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I 



& <s 



Ay 



THE 



AMERICAN ALMANAC 



AND 



REPOSITORY 




OF 



USEFUL KNOWLEDGE, 



FOR THE YEAR 



1842. 



BOSTON: 
PUBLISHED BY DAVID H. WILLIAMS. 

NEW YORK: COLLINS, KEEftE, AND COMPANY. 
PHILADELPHIA: THOMAS, COW PERTH WAIT, AND COMPANY. 
CINCINNATI: M. KUGLER J E^ LUCAS. 
RALEI-GH, N. C.I TURNER AND HUGHES. 
LONDON: WILEY AND PUTNAM. 



IV PREFACE. 

The information relating to the state of education, literary 
seminaries, and schools, is highly interesting; though less dis- 
criminating than could be wished. A summary of the Statistics 
of Education may be seen on the 266th page. If the statements 
here given were the correct results of investigations pursued on a 
well digested and uniform plan, the information would be highly 
interesting. But it is manifest that it cannot be relied on as alto- 
gether correct. In many of the States, common schools are 
supported by a public tax, or by funds provided by the public, for 
the education of all the children within the respective States. All 
the children, therefore, who are educated at these schools, are edu- 
cated, so far as instruction is concerned, " at the public charge." 
In relation to Massachusetts, it is stated, that there are " 160,257 
scholars in common schools," and " 158,351 at public charge; " and 
in relation to New Hampshire, where schools are supported in a 
similar manner, it is stated, that there are " 63,632 scholars in com- 
mon sehools," and only M 7,715 at public charge." 

The Astronomical Department of this volume has been prepared 
by Professor Peirce, from whose reputation as a mathematician and 
astronomer the public will expect it to be done with ability and 
correctness. 

To our correspondents we again express our grateful acknowl- 
edgments for their kindness in forwarding information, and re- 
spectfully solicit a continuance of their favors. 

Cambridge, Massachusetts, 
November 1, 1841. 



CONTENTS. 



-X 



PART I. 



CtLBftDAft AlfO CELESTIAL PHENOMENA FOR THE YEA* 1848. 



Celestial Phenomena, Signs, fcc. 
Chronological Cycles 
Signs of the Zodiac 
Beginning and Length of Seasons 
Movable Festivals of the Church 
Jewish Calendar 
Mahometan Calendar 
Height of Greatest Tides . 
Darkness of the Nights in 1842 
Calendar: — January, &c. 



Page 
. 3 

4 
. 4 

4 
. 5 

5 
. 6 

7 
. 8 
101 



Eclipses in 1849 34 

OcculUtions . . ' . . . 37 
Eclipses of the Satellites of Jupiter . 41 
Venus and Mara, Illuminated btscs of 41 
Saturn's Rings, Position and Magni- 
tude of 42 

Increase of Sidereal Time , . 43 

Latitude and Longitude *f Places . 44 

Dr. Young's Refractions . . 48 

Tablo of the Sun's Parallax in Altitude 48 



PART II. 

United States. 



with Foreign Nations 



1. Election of President and Vice-Pres. 
3. Executive Government 

3. Principal Executive Officers 

4. Congress 

5. Judiciary 

6. Intercourse 

7. Navy List 

8. Army List 

9. Post-Office Establishment 

10. Mint . . . 

11. Revenue and Expenditure in 1841 
19. Expenses of the Florida War, Jfcc. 

13. Revenue, Expenditure, and Debts 

of the several States 

14. Rates of Interest • 



53 
54 

56 
58 
64 
68 
77 
81 
86 
89 
09 
93 

94 
106 



15. Tobacco Trade 

16. Coffee 

17. Commerce . . 

18. Public Lands . 

19. Distilleries . - 

20. Agricultural Statistics 

21. £tate Elections, &c. 
2*3. Governors of States, <fcc. 

23. Theological Schools 

24. Law Schools . • 

25. Colleges 

26. Medical Schools 

27. Religious Denominations 

28. Population, — Six Enumerations 



108 
110 
113 

iai 

133 
123 
125 



137 
126 
133 
134 
137 



Meteorological Information. 



Meteorological Tables for Montreal, Bath, 
Worcester, Trenton, Newtown, Charles- 
ton, Savannah, Augusta, Mobile, New 
Orleans, Natchez, Little Rook, Marietta, 
and Bloomington . . .138-152 



Snow Storms in 1840-41 ; Quantity of 
Snow at Hartford j Flowering of 
Fruit-Tree 153 



Individual States. 



1. Maine . 

2. New Hampshire 

3. Vermont 

4. Massachusetts . 

5. Rhode Island 
0. Connecticut 

7. New York . 

8. New Jersey 

9. Pennsylvania 
10 Delaware 

11. Maryland 

12. Virginia . 

13. North Carolina 

14. South Carolina 
16. Georgia 



155 
160 
166 
169 
176 
178 
181 
191 
194 
198 
200 
202 
209 
212 
214 



16. Alabama . 

17. Mississippi . 

18. Louisiana 

19. Arkansas 

20. Tennessee 

21. Kentucky 

22. Ohio 

23. Michigan 

24. Indiana 

25. Illinois 

26. Missouri . 

27. Florida Territory 

28. Wisconsin Do. 

29. Iowa Do. 

30. District of Columbia 



21ft 
222 
226 
229 
231 
235 
239 
243 
246 
249 
252 
266 
268 
269 
260' 



VI 



CONTENTS. 



United States. 



• Page 
Population Tables .... 261 
Population of the Principal Cities . 261 



Page 
Aggregate, by States, of each descrip- 
tion of Persons .... 262 



American States 

British American Provinces . 



267 I British West India Islands 
267 



Europe, Asia, akd Africa. 



Sovereigns of Europe . . . 269 

European States .... 270 

Population of Asiatic States . . 271 

Population of African States 271 

Population and Extent of the Globe 275 



Sovereigns of Asiatic States . 
Sovereigns of African States 
Great Britain 
France .... 



. 268 



272 
272 
272 
286 



Foreign Obituary 
American Obituary 



287 | Chronicle of Events . 

296 



. 317 



INDEX. 



Page 
African States, Population of . . 271 
Aggregate of each description of per- 
sons in the United States . . 262 
Agricultural Statistics, U. S. . . 123 

Alabama 218 

American Obituary . . . 296 
American States .... 267 
Arkansas .... 229-231 

Army List 81 

Asiatic States, Population of . 271 
Augusta Sophia, Princess . . .291 
Barnes, Thomas .... 294 
Beginning and Length of the Seasons 4 
Beresford, James . . . .291 

Bishops, U. S 134 

Bishops, English .... 285 

Blind, Number of, in U. S. . • 266 
Bolland, Sir William . ... 287 
Bonaparte, Lucien . . . 288 

British North American Provinces . 267 
British West India Islands * . . 268 
Browne, Dr. James .... 294 
Brummell, George . . . 287 

Cabinet, U. S 54, 327 

Calendar; — January, &c. . 10 

Camden, Marquis of ... 291 

Campbell, Miss Harriette . . 294 
Carlisle, Sir Anthony . . .292 
Carr, Bishop .... 294 

Celestial Phenomena ... 3 

Census, Abstract of, U. S. . 262 

Chittv, Joseph .... 294 

Chronicle of Events . . . 317 
Chronological Cycles ... 4 

Colleges 128 

Colleges in U S. 128, 266 

Columbia, District of . . . 260 

Commerce, U. S 113 

Commons, House of . . . 279 
Congress 58 



Page 
Connecticut . . . 178-180 

Cooper, Sir Astley P. 293 

Corrections and Additions . . 227 
D'Arblay, Madame Frances . . 287 
Darkness of the Nights in Year 1842 8 
Dam»ou, Pierre Claude Francois . 288^ 
Deaf and Dumb, Number of in U. S. 266 
Debts of the States . .* . .97 
Delawaro .... 198-199 
Distilleries in the U. S. . . .123 
Durham, Earl of ... 289 

Dyer, George 294 

Eclipses in 1842 .... 34 
Education, Statistics of, U.S. . . 266 
Elections in the several States . 125 
Election of President and V.-President 53 
Employments, Number of Persons en- 
gaged in, I). S 266 

Executive Government ... 54 
Executive Officers, U. S., from 1789 

to 1841 56 

Exports and Imports under several 
Administrations .... 120 

Europe 269 

Festivals of the Church ... 5 

Florida 256-257 

Floweiing of Fruit Trees ... 154 
Foreign Obituary .... 287 

France 286 

Francia, Dr ' 291 

Frend, William 294 

Garrow, Sir William ... 291 

Georgia 214-218 

Governors of the several States . 126 

Government, Executive . . 54 327 
Great Britain .... 273 

Gregory, Olynthus, LL. D. . ' . 293 
Harvey, Sir Thomas . . . 295 
Hazlmline, William .... 292 
Height of the Greatest Spring Tides 7 



I5DEX. 



VU 



Henley. Lord . 
Holland, Lord . 

Horton, Sir Robert J. W. . 
Illinois .... 

Imports and Exports . 
Increase of Sidereal Time . 
Indiana .... 
Intercourse with Foreign Nations 

Iowa 

Jenkinson, Bishop . 

Jewish Calendar 

Judiciary, U. S. . 

Kentucky .... 

Latitude and Longitude of Places 

Law Schools .... 

Legislatures, Meetings of . 

Long-Kiewa .... 

Lords, House of . . 

Louisiana . 

Mahometan Calendar 

Maine 

Marshal, John . 

Maryland .... 

Massachusetts . 

McArthur, John 

Medical Schools . . 

Meteorological Tables . 

Michigan .... 

Militia, U. S. . 

Mint ..... 



Mississippi . . . , 
Missouri .... 
Morison, James . . . 
Movable Festivals of the Church 
Navy List .... 
New Hampshire . 
New Jersey .... 
New York .... 
Niemcewiex, Julien Ursin • 
Nights, Darkness of, in 1842 
North Carolina 
Oecultations in 1842 . 

Ohio 

Otter, Bishop . 
Parliament, British 4 
Pennsylvania 
Phillips, Sir Richard 
Population and Extent of the Globe . 
Population of the Principal Cities in 
U, S 



249 

• 

246 
259 

* 

235 



155 



200 
169 



138 
243 



252 



160 
191 
181 



209 
239 



194 



Page 

293 

291 

295 

-252 

117 

43 

-249 

58 

-260 

289 

5 

64 

-239 

44 

127 

125 

290 

274 

226 

6 

-160 

291 

-202 

-175 

25X) 

133 

-151 

-246 

85 

89 

222 

-256 

287 

5 

77 

-165 

-193 

-190 

294 

8 

-211 

37 

-243 

290 

273 

-198 

2«7 

271 

261 



Page 

Population of Europe . . . 970 

Asia and Africa . . 271 

United Statos . 137,262 

Position and Mag itude of Saturn's 

Rings 42 

Post-Office Establishment ... 86 

Public Lands 121 

Radcliff, Thomas .... 295 
Rates of I merest in the different States 106 
Refractions, Dr. Young's . . 48 

Religious Denominations . . . » 136 
Revenue, Expenditures, and Debts of 

the several States ... 94 
Rhode Island . . . . 176 - 178 
Rickman,John .... 290 
Roberts, Miss Emma .... 291 
Robinson, John, D. D. . 292 
Saturn's Rings, Position and Magni- 
tude of 42 

Schools of different descriptions, U. S. 266 
Sidereal Time, Increase of . .43 
Signs of the Zodiac . . . 4 

Simpson, Thomas .... 289 
Slaves, U. S., six Enumerations . • 137 
Smith, Sir Wm. Sidney . . 288 

Snow~at Hartford, Conn. . .. 154 
Snow Storms in 1840-41 ... 153 
South Carolina . . . 212-214 
Sovereigns of African and Asiatic States 272 
Sovereigns of Europe . . . 269 
Standi*h, Frank Hall . . .292 

State E lections, &c. . . . 125 
States of Europe . . , . 270 



Sun's Parallax in Altitude 
Tennessee . . 

Theological Schools .. 
Thompson, John 
Tobacco Trade 
Tomlyns, Sir Thomas E. 



49 

231 - 234 

127 

. 293 

108 

295 



U. States, Population Tables 137, 261-265 

Vermont 165-169 

Virginia .... 202-208 

West India Islands, British . . 268 
White, Blanco .... 294 

Wilkie, Sir David .... 295 

Willink, Wilhelm .... 293 

Wisconsin ...... 258 

Young's Refractions ... 48 



NOTICE 



RELATING TQ THE ASTRONOMICAL DEPARTMENT. 



The arrangement of the Astronomical Department, by Mr. 
Paine, has appeared to me so judicious and so well adapted to the 
wants of the community, that I have ventured upon no important 
alterations. The mode of calculation has, in almost every case, 
been that, which was proposed by him, and the only changes have 
been to introduce a table exhibiting the darkness of night, as far as 
it depends upon the absence of the moon, and of twilight; to 
omit the ephemeris of the Sun ; and to put into a different form the 
table of occultations. The equation of time, which was intended 
to be retained, was accidentally omitted. But it will be given in 
future volumes. Not thinking it would add to the value of the 
Almanac, I shall not give the sources from which the calcula- 
tions have been derived ; and I can only hope that, from the great 
pains which I have bestowed upon them, they will not fall far short 
of the accuracy for which they have been hitherto distinguished. 
I may also be allowed to take this opportunity to thank my friend 
Lieut. Charles Henry Davis, of the Navy, for his valuable assist- 
ance in calculating those occultations which were not contained 
in the Nautical Almanac, but were derived from the Astronomical 
Society's Catalogue of Stars. 

BENJAMIN PEIRCE. 
Harvard College, October 29, 1841. 



THE 



AMERICAN ALMANAC, 



i 

' FOR 



1842. 



PART I. 



THI 



AMERICAN ALMANAC 

FOR THE TEAR 



1842, 



Being the latter part of the 66th, and the beginning of the 67th, 
year of the Independence of the United States of America ; 

u the 6555th year of the Julian Period ; 

" the latter part of the 5602d, and the beginning of the 
5603d, year since the creation of the world, according to 
the Jews ; 

" the 2595th year (according to Varro) since the foundation 
of Rome ; 

" the 2589th year since the era of Nabonassar, which has 
been assigned to Wednesday the 26th of February of the 
3967th year of the Julian Period, which corresponds, ac«? 
cording to the* chronologists, to the 747th, and, according 
to the astronomers, to the 746th year, before the birth of 
Christ ; 

" the 2618th year of the Olympiads, or the second year of the 
655th Olympiad will begin in July, 1842, if we fix the 
era of the Olympiads at 775J years before Christ, or at 
or about the beginning of July of the year 3938 of the 
Julian Period; 

" the latter part of the 1257th, and the beginning of the 1258th 
year (of twelve lunations) since the Hegira, or Flight of 
Mahomet, which, as is generally supposed, took place on 
the 16th of July in the year 622 of the Christian era. 



I. THE CALENDAR 
AND CELESTIAL PHENOMENA FOR THE YEAR. 

SIGNS OF THE PLANETS, &c. 



g Man. 
g Vesta. 
Juno. 
$ Pallas. 



J Ceres. 

11 Jupiter. 

Yl Saturn. 

1$ Herschel or Uranus. 



© The Sun. 

The Earth. 

• DCH The Moon. 

9 Mercury. 

J Venus. 

£ Conjunction, or haying the same Longitude or Right Ascension. 
□ Quadrature, or differing 90° in " « «« 

# Opposition «■ 180° in " " « 

& The ascending, U the descending node. 



4 CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES, SIGNS OF THE ZODIAC, &C. [1842. 

An asterisk (*) prefixed to the conjunction of the Moon with a star or 
planet, indicates that the star or planet may be eclipsed in some part of 
the inhabited portion of the United States. 

The sign -f- is prefixed to the latitude, or declination, of the Sun, or 
other heavenly body, when north, and the sign — when south ; but the 
former prefixed to the hourly motion of the Moon in latitude, indicates 
that she is approaching, and the latter that she is receding from, the 
north pole of the ecliptic. 

The letters M. A. } m. a., denote Morning and Afternoon. 



CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES. 



Dominical Letter • . B 

Epact 18 

Lunar Cycle, or Golden Number 19 



Solar Cycle 
Roman Indiction 
Julian Period 



3 
. 15 
6555 



SIGNS OF THE ZODIAC. 



Spring 
signs. 

Summer 
signs. 



1. cp Aries. 

2. y Taurus. 

3. 5 Gemini, 

4. c Cancer. 

5. £1 Leo. 

6. flJJ Virgo. 



Autumn 
signs. 

Winter 
signs. 



7 -Or Libra. 
8. HI Scorpio. 
9* / Sagittarius. 

10. yj Capriconrus. 

11. w, Aquarius. 

12. H Pieces. 



BEGINNING AND LENGTH OF THE SEASONS. 



Sun enters ]ff (Winter begins) 1841, Dec. 21st, 
" " cp (Spring " 1842, March 20th, 
" " G (Summer " " June 21st, 

" ■ " r2: (Autumn " " Sept. 22d, 



Vf (Winter 



Dec. 21st, 



d. 



h. in. 0. 




5 47 501 




7 12 14 


M. Time 


4 20 52 


> at 


18 25 2 


Wash'n. 


11 54 13 J 




h. m. i. 





Sun in the Winter Signs . . . . 89 1 24 24 

Spring 92 21 8 38 

Summer 93 14 4 10 

Autumn 89 17 29 11 

" north of Equator (Spring and Summer) 186 11 12 48 
<< south " (Winter and Autumn) 178 18 53 35 



it 
«< 

it 



ii 
U 
ii 



365 6 6 23 



Length of the tropical year, commencing 
at the winter solstice 1841, and termi- 
nating at the winter solstice 1842, x 

Mean or average length of the tropical year, 365 5 48 48 



1842.] 



MOVABLE FESTIVALS. JEWISH CALENDAR. 



MOVABLE FESTIVALS OF THE CHURCH, IN 1842. 



Septuagesima Sunday, 
Qninq. or Shrove do. 
Ash Wed. Lent begins. 
Mid Lent Sunday, 
Palm do. 

Easter do. 

Low do. 



Jan. 23d 

Feb. 6tb 

" 9th 

Mar. 6th 
" 20th 
" 27th 

April 3d 



Rogation Sunday, May 1st 

Ascen. Day or Holy Th. " 5th 
Whitsunday or Pentecost, " 15th 
Trinity Sunday, " 22d 

Advent Sunday, Nov. 27th 



JEWISH CALENDAR. 

[The anniversaries marked with an asterisk (*) are to be strict!? observed.] 

Tear. Names of the Months. 

5602 Thebet begins 

Fast for the Siege of Jerusalem 



t* 

«i 
it 

it 
(I 
it 
tt 

a 
tt 



tt 



10th 

Sebat begins 

Adar begins 

" 11th 

" 14th 

" 15th 

Nisan begins 

« 15th 

" 16th 



Fast of Esther 
•Purim 
Schuscan Purim 



a 
tt 
tt 
tt 
It 
tt 
tt 



« 21st 
u 22 d 

I jar begins 
« 18th 
Sivan begins 
" 6th 
* 7th 
u Thammus begins 
u *i nth 

" Ab begins 
" " 9th 

« Elul begins 

5603 Tisri begins 
«« * 2d 
« « 4th 
" " 10th 



'Beginning of the Passover 
"Second Feast or Morrow of the 

Passover 
•Seventh Feast 
*End of the Passover . 



Lag Beomer 



*Feaat of Weeks or Pentecost 
•Second Feast • • 



Fast for the Taking of the Temple 
Fast for the Burning of the Temple 



it 
u 
tt 



tt 

M 
tt 



15* 
16th 
21st 



•Feast for the New Year 
•Second Feast for the New Tear 
Fast of Gedaljah 

•Fast of the Reconciliation or Atone- 
ment 

•Feast of the Huts or Tabernacles 
•Second Feast of the Huts 
Feast of Palms or Branches 
1* 



Dec. 14, ] 


1841. 


" 23, 


M 


Jan. 12, 1842. 


Feb. 11, 


U 


«• 21, 


tt 


* 24, 


tt 


" 25, 


tt 


March 12, 


tt 


" 26, 


it 


" 27, 


tt 


April 1, 


tt 


" 2, 


tt 


" 11, 


tt 


" 28, 


It 


May 10, 


cc 


" 15, 


<( 


u 16, 


tt 


June 9, 


tt 


i " 25, 


CI 


July 8, 


tt 


le " 16, 


tt 


Aug. 7, 


tt 


Sept 5, 


tt 


« 6, 


tt 


" 8, 


tt 


" 14, 


tt 


* 19, 


it 


« 20, 


tt 


" 25, 


tt 



6 



MAHOMETAN CALENDAR. 



[1843. 



Sept. 26, 1842. 



« 



Year. Names of the Month. 

5603 Tisri 22d *End of the Hut or Congregation 

r east . • . • . 
" 23d "Rejoicing for the Discovery of the 

Law 

Marchesvan begins 

Chisleu begins 

" 25th Consecration of the Temple 

Thebet begins 

" 10th Fast for the Siege of Jerusalem 

Sebat begins • • 

The Jewish year generally contains 354 days, or 12 lunations of the 
Moon, but, in a cycle of 19 years, an intercalary month (Veadar) is 7 
times introduced, for the purpose of rendering the average duration of 
the year quite or nearly correct. 



« 

u 
it 
a 
a 
tt 



27, 
Oct. 5, 
Nov. 3, 

« 27, 
Dec. 3, 

«« 12, 

Jan. 1, 1843. 



« 
tt 
tt 
tt 
u 
tt 





MAHOMETAN CALENDAR. 






Year. Names of the Months. 










3257 Dsu'l-kadah begins 


... 


. 


Dec. 


15, 1841. 


" Dsu'lhejjah 


tt 


. • • 


. 


Jan. 


14, 1842. 


9258 Moharrem 


« 


... 


• 


Feb. 


12, " 


" Saphar 


u 


... 


. 


March 14, " 


« Rabia I. 


tt 


... 


• 


April 


12, " 


" Rabia 11. 


tt 


... 


. 


May 


12, «« 


-" Jomadhi I. 


u 


• • . 


. 


June 


10, « 


" Jomadhi 11. 


tt 


. • • 


. 


July 


10, " 


" Rejeb 


u 


... 


. 


Aug. 


8, ♦< 


« Shaban 


a 


... 


. 


Sept. 


7, « 


" Ramadan 


a 


(Month of Fasting) 


• 


Oct. 


6, " 


<< Schewall 


u 


(Bairam) 


• 


Nov. 


5, " 


« Dsu'l-kadah 


u 


• • • 


• 


Dec. 


4, " 


" Dsu'l-hejjah 


tt 


• • . 


. 


Jan. 


3, 1843. 



The Mahometan Era dates from the Flight of Mahomet to Medina, 
July 16th, A. D. 622. 

The Mahometan year is purely lunar ; it consists of 12 synodical 
.periods of the Moon, or of 354 days, 19 times in a cycle of 30 years, 
-and 11 times of 355 days. The average length of this year is therefore 
-3543Q days, which diners only thirty-three seconds from the truth; a 
•degree of exactness that only could have been attained by a long series 
-of observations. But as no allowance is made for the excess of 11 days 
in the length of a tropical year over the time of 12 revolutions of the 
Moon, it is obvious that in about 33 years, the above months will cor- 
•respond to every season and every part of the Gregorian year. 



1842.] 



HEIGHT OF SPRING TIDES. 



HEIGHT OF THE GREATEST OR SPRING TIDES IN 1842. 

Computed by the formula of Laplace (Mdcanique Cileste, Vol. II. p. 289, 

Paris ed.,and [2858] Bowd. ed.) 



New or 


Fall 






Height of 


New or 


Full 






Heurht of 


Mood 


• 






the 


Tide. 


Mood 


• 




d. 


the 
h. 


Tide. 








d. 


h. 






New Moon, 


, Jan. 


", 


11 M. 


0.76 


Full Moon, 


July 


22, 


6M. 


0.75 


Full 


« 




26. 


1 A. 


1.06 


New 


it 


Aug. 


6, 


10 M. 


1.06 


New 


tt 


Feb. 


10, 


7M. 


0.83 


Full 


tt 




20. 


9 A. 


083 


Fall 


tt 




24. 


11 A. 


1.15 


New 


« 


Sept 


4, 


5 A. 


1.15 


New 


M 


March 12, 


1 M. 


0.88 


Full 


« 




19, 


1 A. 


0.87 


Full 


tt 




26, 


9M. 


1.11 


New 


tt 


Oct 


4, 


1M. 


1.12 


New 


tt 


April 


10, 


5 A. 


0.88 


Full 


tt 




19, 


6M. 


0.84 


Full 


(( 




24, 


6 A. 


0.97 


New 


u 


Nov. 


2, 


11 M. 


1.00 


New 


« 


May 


10, 


6M. 


0.80 


Full 


tt 




17, 


10 A. 


0.82 


Full 


« 




24, 


5M. 


0.83 


New 


u 


Dec. 


1, 


11 A. 


0.87 


New 


« 


June 


8 


5 A. 


0.87 


Full 


tt 




17, 


2 A. 


0.85 


Full 


tt 




22* 


4 A. 


076 


New 


tt 




31, 


2 A. 


0.82 


New 


a 


July 


8, 


2M. 


0.92 















The unit of altitude at any place, is the height at that place of that 
tide which arrives about a day and a half after the time of New or Full 
Moon, when the Sun and Moon at the moment of conjunction or op- 
position are at their mean distance from the Earth and in the plane of 
the celestial equator. 

This unit of altitude, which must be derived from observation for each 
place, multiplied by the quantities in the above table, gives the height 
of the spring tides at that place during the present year. 

By the above table it appears, that the highest tides in 1842 will be 
those of February 26, March 27, September 5, and October 5. 

The actual rise of the tide, however, depends so much upon the 
strength and direction of the wind, that it not unfrequently happens 
that a tide, which would, independently of these, have been small, is 
higher than another, otherwise much greater. But when a tide, which 
arrives when the Sun and Moon are in a favorable position for produ- 
cing a great elevation, is still further increased by a very strong wind, 
the rise of the water will be uncommonly great, sufficient perhaps to 
cause damage. 

The formula, from which these tides were computed, is, however, 
strictly true only for Brest and its vicinity, and must be regarded as a 
very uncertain approximation for the coast of the United States. 

For Tables exhibiting the rise of the tide, and the differences between 
the times of high water at many places on the American coast and at 
Boston, see the American Almanac for 1840, pages 7, 8, and 9. 



F TBI HIQHTfl. [184% 

DARKNESS OF THE NIGHTS DURING THE TEAR 1842, 

For Boittm, JV«o York, Philadelphia, Washington, tyc. 
Ths lumbar of h«n *t Ui« top of llie pig* rfanotM lha an»g« timo for thi mouth 
ftom ths end uf ma in | twilight to ths boglnuinj of morning twilight. 



=5 
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&* 

1 

s 

s 

s 
t 

B 

s 

10 

13 
13 
14 

15 
16 

IB 

20 
SI 
S3 
S3 

25 
36 
37 
38 
29 
30 
31 


13 b. 
■ » 

• 


Fib. 
11 h. 


S 


ch 


April 

lib. 

...■** 

«... 

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7k. 

5 

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• 


■£T 

t- 

• 


f«lj 

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7 1. 


Sept 

8 b. 

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I"'*" 

• 

u 

in 
•> 


Oct. 
3 b. 


Nov. 
lib. 


Dee. 
13 b. 


• 


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ft 


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> 


...©* 

c 

• 


• 

V 


fl. 

• 
....J 


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J 



1842.] 



DARKNESS OF THE NIGHTS. 



9 



DARKNESS OF THE NIGHTS DURING THE YEAR 1842, 

For Charleston, New Orleans, fyc. 



OJB 



1 

s 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

IS 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

90 

21 

23 

S3 

24 

25 

96 

97 

98 

29 

30 

31 



Jan. 
11 h. 



e- 



Feb. 
10 b. 



March April 



9h. 



8 b. 



..]> 



.» 



■O 



G- 



May. 
7h. 



e 



<[... 



<[.... 



• ••• |£ ••• 



(T- 



June. 
7h. 



July 
7h. 



e 



■O 



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••••]> 



Aug. 
8 b. 



G- 



Sept. 
9 b. 



O 



Oct. 
10 h. 



Not. 
lib. 



Dec. 
lib. 



<r* 



V 



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*1 



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G- 



10 January, First Month, begins on Saturday. [1842. 




Twilight begins and ends. Mean time. 




1st day. 


1 7th day. 


13th day. 


| 19th day. 
, Begins. Ends. 


25th day. 


Begins. 


Ends. 


Begins. 


Ends. 


Begins. 


Ends. 


Begiuc. 


Ends. 




h. m. h 


i. m. 


h. m. 


h. ax. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


|h. m. 


h.m. 


h. m. 


h.m. 


Bolton, 


5 48ID. 6 20 a. 


5 48D1. 


6 24 a. 


6 48m. 


6 39 a. 


6 47m. 

i 


6 36 a. 


5 44m. 


6 43 a. 


N. York, 


5 46 639 


6 46 


6 36 


5 46 


6 31 


6 45 


6 87 


5 42 


644 


Wash. 


5 43 6 25 


5 44 


6 29 


5 44 


6 34 


6 43 


6 39 


5 41 


6 46 


Oharlei. 


5 35 6 33 


5 36 


6 37 


5 37 


6 41 


6 36 


6 46 


5 35 


6 61 


N. OrPs. 


5 31 6 37 


5 33 


6 40 


5 34 


6 44 


6 33 


6 49 


5 32 


6 54 


Perigee and Apogee of the Moon, 
Apogee, 13th day, lOh. A. | Perigee, 26th day, 9h. A. 


Last Quarter,' 3d d 
New Moon, 11th 


Phases of the JH 
ay, 4h. 59.9m. A. | Firs 
" 11 6.9 M. |Pull 

> rises and sets, (cor. for r< 


r oon. 

t Quarter, 19th day, 3h. £8.0m» A. 
Moon, 26th <' 41.6 A. 


• 

•5 

a 
• 

s 

© 
& 


• 

c 
© 

o 
II 

cs 
Q 


Sun's upper liint 


ifract.) M. T. 


High water. M. time. 






• 
o 

a 
o 

3 


M 

•a 
O 

*-* 




0* 

a 

2 t 


a 
S 
So 

jS 

o 


■r 

a 

si 

m 

55 


• 

o 

a 
o 

i 


0% 

M 


"3* 






rises. \ sets. 


rises. 


sets. 


rises. 


sets. 


rises.i sets. 
h. m.Jh. m. 


rises. 


sets. 










h. ro.lh. on. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


o. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. no. 


h.m. 


1 
2 


s. 

Su. 


7 30 14 38 


7 25 
7 25 


4 48 
4 44 


7 19 
7 19 


4 49 
4 60 


7 3 5 6 
7 3 6 6 


8 66 
666 


6 12 
6 13 


2 iom 


• • • 


10 64a. 


t 30 


4 39 


2 64m 


34m 


ii 87a. 


3 


M. 


30 


40 


25 


45 


19 


51 


3 


7 


67 


13 


3 37 


l nm 


• . • 


4 


Tu. 


30 


41 


26 


46 


19 


62 


3 


7 


57 


14 


436 


3 6 


36TH 


5 


W. 


30 


42 


25 


47 


19 


62 


3 


8 


67 


15 


6 8 


3 48 


1 6 


6 


Th. 


29 


43 


25 


48 


19 


53 


4 


9 


67 


16 


6 18 


3 63 


3 18 


7 


P. 


29 


44 


25 


49 


19 


64 


4 


10 


67 


16 


7 36 


5 16 


3 86 


8 
9 


S. 
Su. 


29 
7 29 


45 

4 46 


24 

7 24 


60 
4 61 


19 
7 19 


65 
4 66 


4 


11 


67 
6 67 


17 
5 18 


9 


640 


6 


7 4 6 12 


10 4m 


7 44 


6 4tl) 


10 


M. 


29 


47 


24 


62 


19 


67 


4 


13 


67 


19 


10 52 


8 83 


6 69 


11 


Tu. 


29 


48 


24 


63 


19 


68 


8 


13 


67 


19 


11 30 


9 10 


7 SO 


12 


W. 


28 


50 


23 


54 


18 


69 


8 


14 


57 


30 


o 9a. 


9 49 


8 9 


13 


Th. 


28 


61 


23 


55 


18 


5 


3 


15 


67 


31 


41 


10 31 


8 41 


14 


P. 


28 


62 


23 


56 


18 


1 


3 


16 


67 


33 


1 14 


10 64 


9 14 


15 
16 


S. 
Su.- 


27 
7 27 


63 
4 54 


32 
7 23 


57 
4 69 


18 
7 17 


2 
5 3 


3 


17 


67 
6 57 


23 
5 34 


1 45 


11 36 


9 45 


7 3 5 18 


2 na. 


11 67m 


io nm 


17 


M. 


20 


55 


31 6 


17 


6 


2 


19 


67 


35 


2 48 


38a. 


10 48 


18 


Tu. 


26 


56 


21 


1 


16 


6 


2 


30 


66 


35 


3 23 


1 3 


11 23 


19 


W. 


25 


68 


21 


3 


16 


7 


2 


21 


66 


36 


4 


1 40 


o oa. 


20 


Th. 


24 


59 


20 


3 


15 


8 


2 


31 


66 


37 


438 


3 IS 


088 


21 


P. 


24 


6 


19 


4 


16 


9 


1 


22 


66 


38 


6 36 


3 16 


1 36 


22 
23 


S. 
Su. 


23 
7 22 


1 
5 8 


19 
7 18 


6 
6 7 


14 
7 14 


10 
5 11 


1 


23 


66 


39 


6 67 


437 


267 


7 5 34 


6 65 6 80 


8 26a. 


6 68>. 


4 26a. 


24 


M. 


22 


4 


17 


8 


13 


12 





25 


65 


81 


9 39 


7 19 


630 


25 


Tu. 


21 


6 


17 


9 


13 


13 





26 


54 


81 


10 38 


8 18 


6 33 


26 


W. 


20 


6 


16 


10 


12 


15 


6 59 


27 


64 


82 


11 34 


9 14 


7 34 


27 


Th. 


19 


$ 


16 


11 


11 


16 


68 


28 


53 


33 


» • • 


10 1 


8 31 


26 


P. 


18 


9 


14 


18 


10 


17 


58 


29 


53 


34 


o 21m 


10 44 


9 4 


29 
SO 


S. 
Su. 


17 
7 16 


10 


13 


14 
5 15 


9 

7 8 


18 
5 19 


67 


SO 


62 
6 62 


85 
6 36 


1 4 


11 3S 


948 


5 IS 


7 12 


6 57 5 31 


l 48m 


• • • 


10 38a. 


1*1 


M. 1 16 


13 


12 


16 


6 20 


56 1 33 


51 


87 


3 28 


o 8m 


11 9 



1842.] January has Thirty-one Days. 11 


Passage of the Meridian (mean time) and Declination of the Planets. 


| let day. 


7th day. 


13th day. 


1 19th day. 


35th day. 


8sutMs. 


Dee. 


Souths. 


Dec. 


Souths. 


Dee. 


Souths. Dee. 


Souths. 


Dec. 


h. in. 


e 1 


h. m. 


e 1 


h. in. 


• 


, h. to. 


e 1 


h. m. 


a I 


9 u asm - 


—94 80 


11 41m 


— 34 96 


oa. — 38 44 9 19a. 


— S3 3 


1 39a. 


— 19 35 


$10 68 - 


—43 7 


11 7 


—23 84 


11 16m —38 14 11 96m — 33 89 


ii 84m 


—31 89 


$ 3 12&. - 


—13 48 


8 oa. 


— 13 8 


8 oa 


. — 19 18 3 68a. 


— 699 


3 47a. 


— 6 88 


fi 6 63 - 


■[-2 34 


6 83 


+ 8 5 


6 18 


+ 8 53 5 53 


l"f"4 87 


6 85 


+ 5 31 


5 8 68m- 


—10 88 


8 45m 


— 10 46 


8 36m — 10 62 8 7m 


— 10 54 


7 60m 


— 10 56 


$ 4 13a. - 


—10 31 


3 66a. 


— 10 6 


i 8 39a. — 9 64 8 338. 


— 986 


8 7a. 


— 9 19 


i 638 - 


— 1 37 


6 6 


— 87 


646 


+ 14 6 27 


+ 1 7 


6 8 


+ 8 3 


% ii sim - 


—38 17 


11 14m 


— 28 16 


10 66m — 33 12 10 S8IQ 


— 98 9 


1020m 


— 33 5 


h "48 - 


—33 40 


11 S3 


— 23 88 


> 11 3 


— 23 87, ,10 41 
. — 4 9 ! 8 868. 


— 33 36 


110 30 


— 23 83 


$ 4 43a.|- 


— 4 18 


4 20a. 


1 — 4 14 


8 68a 


— 4 8 


1 8 138 


— 3 67 


« | Moon rises or sets. Mean time. 


PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 


a Js * ' 


t? 1 - 


•» at 


Days of Mo 

Moon Sout 
Mean Tin 




I 







e 

s 

5* 


Orleans 


TIONS. 
Sunday* and other RemarkabU 


e 
ffl 


• 
55 


£ 


3 


• 


Days. 




rises. 


rises. 


rues. 


rises. 


rises. 




h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. in. 


h* mi. 




1 3 60m. 


io ssa. 


10 ssa. 


10 3sa. 


10 24a. 


10 26a. 


Earth nearest the Sua. 

2d Sun. aft. Christmas, (j g % . 


S. 4 38m. 


11 840. 


11 84a. 


11 ssa. 


u 29a. 


u 29a. 


3 6 20 

4 814 














46m 


044m 


41m 


33m 


32m 


6 7 3 


1 65 


1 63 


1 49 


1 87 


1 34 




6 763 


8 6 


8 1 


366 


3 41 


388 


Epiphany. 


7 845 


4 13 


4 8 


4 


8 41 


3 37 


□ 5 0- #>*A*ni. 


8 8 37 


6 13 


6 7 

6 im 


6 


4 40 


434 


6 ? U- 

\st Sunday after Epiph. 


& 10 som. 


« 7m 


6 64m 


6 som 


628111 


10 11 23 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


6 U «• 


11 ua. 


4 63a. 


4 688. 


6 6a. 


6 20 a. 


5 29a. 


Sun eclipsed, invis. ia U. S. 


12 67 


A 67 


6 1 


6 6 


6 19 


626 




13 141 


869 


7 3 


7 6 


7 16 


7 21 




14 3 33 


7 69 


6 1 


6 6 


8 10 


8 14 




15 8 8 


9 4 


9 1 


9 3 


9 6 


9 7 


id Sunday after Epiph. d 1£ )> . 


& 8 43a. 


10 oa. 


10 oa. 


10 oa. 


9 49a. 


io oa. 


17 4 33 


11 3 


11 1 


10 89 


19 64 


10 54 


Sup. d 9 0. 16ib,# MH- 


18 6 6 

19 6 61 








11 63 


11 50 




6m 


e sm 


1 


20 6 40 


1 13 


1 9 


1 6 


63m 


048m 


#]>•¥• [e l l8. 


21 7 84 


3 21 


3 18 


3 13 


1 68 


1 51 


3|C >«".*. «• «• •*•/• h. Pieiadum 


22 8 83 


3 83 


837 


830 


8 1 


354 


Sepiuagetima Sund. jfc ]> 139 g . 


S. 9 86a. 


4 41m 


4 83m 


4 som 


4 7m 


8 59m 


24 10 89 


6 41 


6 84 


637 


6 8 


6 




26 1141 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


Cancers, of St. Paul. 


26 8 


6 18a. 


633a. 


6 37a. 


9 40a. 


646a. 


Moon eclipsed, invis. in U. S. 


27 940m. 


. 686 


6 43 


6 45 


654 


668 


26tb, jf^et^G. 


28 18S 


769 


8 


8 3 


6 6 


8 6 




29 338 


9 16 


9 15 


9 16 


9 18 


9 14 

1020a. 


Sexagesima Sunday. 


& s ism 


. 10 8ia. 


10 39a. 


10 soa. 


io soa. 


8ll 4 8 


11 44 


11 41 


11 88 11 37 


11 24 





12 February, Second Month, begins on Tuesday, [1842. 


Twilight begins and ends. Mean time. 




1st day. 


7th day. 


13th day. 


19th day. 


25th day. 


Begins, 
h. m. fa 


Ends. 
. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins, 
i. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Boston, 


6 8801. 8 60 a. 


5 3201. 


6 66 a. 


6 26m. 


7 sa. 1 


1 ism. 


7 io a. 


5 tra. 


7 17 a. 


N. York, 


6 37 6 61 


5 31 


6 67 


6 26 


7 4 1 


1 18 


7 10 


5 10 


7 16 


Wash. 


6 86 6 62 


5 81 


6 68 


6 26 


7 4 J 


5 18 


7 10 


5 10 


7 16 


Oharlei. 


6 31 6 67 


6 27 


7 1 


6 28 


7 6 J 


^ 17 


7 11 


5 10 


7 16 


N. Orl's. 


6 29 669 


6 25 


7 8 


6 21 


7 8 J 


i 16 


7 12 


5 11 


7 16 


Perigee and Apogee of the Moon. 
Apogee, 10th day, lb. M. | Perigee, 24th day, 9h. M. 


Phases of the Moon. 
Last Quarter, 2d day, 5h. 18.3m. M. 1 First Quarter, 18th day, 6h. 32.8m. M. 
New Moon, 10th " 6 46.3 M. | Full Moon, 94th " 11 7.0 A. 


• 

JS 

e 
o 

o 

1 


• 

$ 

e 


Sun's upper limb rim and sets, (cor. for refract.) M. T. 


[ligh water. M. time. 








• 
a* 

a 
$ 

© 


M 

55 


0S 


a 

u 

o 


e 

• 

55 


• 

o 
§ 

s 

tt 


M 


a 
3 

m . 
9 © 


1 


rises . 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


eels. 
h. m. 


rues. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
Ii. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rues. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


h. m* 


h. m. 


h. m* 


1 


Tu. 


7 14 


6 14 


7 11 


5 18 


7 7 


5 21 


6 65 


5 83 


6 61 


5 88 


3 91D 


49m 


11 478U 


2 


W. 


13 


16 


10 


19 


6 


23 


55 


34 


60 


38 


3 47 


1 27 


... 


8 


Th. 


12 


17 


9 


20 


6 


24 


54 


34 


49 


89 


486 


2 15 


86m 


4 


P. 


11 


18 


7 


21 


4 


25 


63 


35 


49 


40 


5 38 


3 13 


1 38 


5 
6 


S. 
Su. 


10 
7 9 


19 
4 21 


6 
7 5 


22 
5 23 


3 
7 2 


26 
5 27 


52 
6 62 


86 
5 37 


48 
6 47 


41 
5 41 


6 57 


4 37 


2 67 
4 27m 


8 2701 


6 7m 


7 


M. 


8 


22 


4 


25 


1 


28 


61 


88 


V7 


42 


9 43 


723 


643 


8 


Tu. 


6 


23 


3 


26 





29 


60 


39 


46 


43 


10 84 


8 14 


6 34 


9 


W. 


. 5 


24 


2 


27 


6 69 


30 


49 


40 


45 


44 


11 15 


8 65 


7 15 


10 


Th. 


4 


25 


1 


28 


58 


82 


43 


41 


44 


45 


11 62 


9 32 


7 52 


11 


P. 


2 


26 





30 


67 


83 


47 


42 


44 


46 


23a. 


10 8 


823 


12 
13 


S. 
Su. 


1 

7 


28 
5 29 


6 68 
6 67 


31 


65 


34 
5 35 


47 
S 46 


43 
6 44 


43 
6 42 


46 
5 47 | 


61 


10 81 


8 61 


5 32 


6 54 


1 na. 


10 67m 


9 nm 


14 


M. 


6 69 


30 


56 


34 


63 


86 


45 


45 


41 


48 , 


1 45 


11 25 


945 


15 


Tu. 


67 


32 


55 


35 


62 


38 


44 


46 


40 


49 


2 15 


11 65 


10 15 


16 


W. 


66 


33 


63 


86 


61 


89 


43 


47 


89 


60 


2 44 


24a. 


10 44 


17 


Th. 


61 


35 


62 


87 


49 


40 


42 


48 


88 


61 


2 21 


1 1 


10 21 


18 


P. 


63 


36 


61 


39 


48 


41 


41 


48 


38 


62 


3 10 


1 50 


11 10 


19 
20 


S. 
Su. 


62 
660 


88 
5 39 


49 
6 48 


40 
5 41 


47 
6 46 


42 
5 44 


40 
6 89 


49 
5 60 


37 
6 86 


62 
5 63 


5 8 


2 43 


i sa. 


-6 26R. 


4 6a. 


2 26a. 


21 


M. 


48 


40 


46 


43 


44 


45 


37 


61 


85 


54 


8 


6 40 


4 


22 


Tu. 


47 


42 


46 


44 


43 


46 


86 


62 


34 


66 : 


9 22 


7 2 


6 22 


23 


W. 


45 


43 


44 


44 


42 


47 


36 


63 


83 


66 


10 27 


8 7 


6 27 


24 


Th. 


44 


46 


42 


46 


40 


48 


34 


64 


32 


*? , 


11 18 


8 68 


7 18 


25 


P. 


42 


46 


41 


48 


38 


49 


83 


65 


81 


57 | 


• • • 


9 41 


6 1 


26 
27 


S. 
Su. 


41 
6 39 


47 
5 49 


39 
6 38 


49 
5 60 


37 
6 36 


61 
5 62 


32 
6 31 


66 
6 57 


30 
6 28 


68 
5 69 | 


o im 


10 23 


8 43 


43m 


u 2a. 


9 22a. 


|28 M. 


83 


60 


37 


61 


34 


68 


30 


66 


27 


6 1 


1 22 


11 42 


10 2 



1842. J February has Twenty-eight Days. 19 


Passage of the Meridian (mean time) and Declination of the Planets. 


9 


1st day. 


7th day. 


13th day. 


19th day. 


25th day. 


b. m. 
69a.- 


Dec. 

e 1 

—15 11 


Soutks. 
h. m. 

1 14a. 


Dec. 

e 1 

— 10 48 


Soutks, 
h. m. 

1 2ia 


Dec. Souths. 
/ h. m. 

. — 6 19 1 15a. 


Dec. 
— 3 56 


Soutks. 
h. m. 

48a. 


Dec. 
e 4 
— 153 


V 


11 43m - 


—19 69 


11 5itn 


— 18 11 


11 67m — 16 


s 2a. 


— 13 41 


8 


-11 2 


<? 


3 39a. - 


— 4 29 


2 82a. 


— 2 84 


3 26a 


. — 40 2 19 




- 1 13 


3 13 


4- 3 J 


a 

6 


6 16 - 

7 3901- 


-|-6 31 
—10 51 


4 67 

7 11m 


+ 724 
— 10 45 


4 41 -|" 8 16 4 2* 
6 63m — 10 35 6 34m 




- 9 10 
-10 22 


4 9 
6 14m 


+10 3 
— 10 6 




2 48a. - 
448 - 

9 69m- 


— 8 49 
-|-3 7 
—22 59 


2 33a. 

4 30 

9 4im 


— 8 23 
+ 4 6 
— 22 53 


2 na. — 7 61 2 sa. 
4 13 -f- 6 1 3 56 
9 33m — 22 47 9 4m 


— 7 29 
-|-6 
— 33 40 


1 478. 
3 40 
8 46m 


— 7 
-J- 6 67 
— 33 34 


h 


9 66 - 


—22 29 


986 


— 22 27 


9 14 


— 22 24 8 53 


— 33 22 


8 31 


— 33 19 


¥ 


3 46a. • 


— 3 49 


3 23a. 


— 3 41 


1 2 ia 


. — 3 35 1 38a. 


— 3 27 


1 16a. 


— 3 30 


• 

5 

a 



s 

* 

• 


• 

i-S 

**• 

a 


Moon rises or sets. Mean time. 


PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 
TIONS. 

Sundays and other Remarkable 
Days. 


• 

V 

a 

3 

e 
ffl 

rises. 
h. m. 


• 

p 

• 


e 


i. 

8 6 

-c 


« 
e 
<* 

• 

55 


1 

2 


h. m. 
4 88m. 
6 49 


rues. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 




65m 


61 m 


47m 


33m 


28m 


3 


6 41 


2 4 


1 69 


1 53 


1 36 


1 80 




4 

5 


7 33 

8 36 


3 7 

4 4 


3 1 
3 67 


2 64 

3 61 


2 35 

3 31 


2 28 

3 24 


Shrove Sund. d <[ h* C3 4 % • 


9 ism. 


4 62m 


4 46m 


4 40m 


4 2im 


4 14m 


7 

8 

9 

10 


10 8 

10 64 

11 39 

o 3ia. 


5 83 

6 7 
sets. 

5 6ia. 


6 38 
6 3 
sets. 
5 54a. 


6 32 
6 67 
sets. 
6 67a. 


6 4 
6 43 
sets. 

6 sa. 


4 68 

6 38 
sets. 

6 sa. 


[b. 1778. 
Ash Wednesday, Gen. Harrison 


11 
12 
£ 


1 2 
1 42 


6 52 

7 62 


6 54 

7 52 


6 66 

7 63 


658 

7 63 

8 4ea. 


7 1 
7 56 


Mahomet Y. 125S begins. 
1st Sunday in Lent. 


2 22a. 


s 53a. 


8 63a. 


8 62a. 


8 49a. 


14 
15 
16 


3 4 
8 47 
434 


9 67 
11 


9 64 

10 68 


9 62 

10 64 

11 69 


9 45 

10 43 

11 45 


9 44 

10 40 

11 40 


9 greatest elong. 


17 


6 35 


8m 


4m 










18 


6 19 


1 17 


1 16 


1 5m 


47m 


4im 




19 

S. 
21 
22 
28 
24 


7 18 


233 


2 17 


3 10 


1 61 


1 43 


2d Sunday in Lent. 

9 stationary. 2|C J iQ. 

Washington b. 1732. # J> to 


8 19a. 

920 

10 20 

11 16 

8 


8 34m 
4 18 
6 8 
rises. 
6 26a. 


3 ism 

4 13 
4 68 

rises. 

6 29a. 


3 11m 

4 7 

4 63 
rises. 

5 32a. 


2 6im 

8 48 
4 87 
rises* 
6 38a. 


2 45m 
8 43 
4 33 
rises. 
6 4ia. 


25 


11m. 


645 


6 47 


6 47 


6 49 


6 61 




26 


1 3 


8 3 


3 4 


8 3 


7 69 


8 




1 66m. 

2 47 


9 2ia. 
10 86 


9 19a. 

10 33 


9 16a. 
10 38 


9 9a. 
10 16 


9 7a. 

10 13 


\Zd Sunday in Lent. 





2 



14 






March 


, Third Month, 


begins on Tuesday. 


[ 


1842. 


Twilight begins and ends. Mean time. 




1st day. 


7th 


day. 


13th day. | 


19th day. 


95tli day. 


Begins, 
h. m. h 


tinds. 
. m. 


Begins. 

h. OB. 


finds, 
h. m. 


Begins. 
n. no. 


Ends, 
h. ra. 


3egios.i Ends, 
i. m. 'h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


tinds. 
h. m. 


Boston, 


5 8m. 7 33a. 


4 63111. 


7 29 8. 


4 48m. 


7 37 a. < 


1 32m. 7 46 a. 


4 3om. 


7 52a. 


N. York, 


6 4 7 33 


4 64 


7 28 


4 44 


7 36 ,- 


184 


7 43 


4 33 


7 49 


Wash. 


6 6 J 31 


4 66 


7 27 


4 46 


7 34 


1 36 


740 


4 26 


7 46 


Charles. 


6 7 7 19 


4 69 


7 24 


4 61 


7 39 < 


1 48 


7 38 


484 


7 38 


N. Orl»s. 


6 7 7 19 


5 


7 23 


4 63 


7 27 4 46 


7 81 


4 37 


7 86 


Apogee and Perigee qf the Moan. 
Apogee, 9th day, 6h. M. | Perigee, 24th day, 6h. A. 


Phases of the Moon. 
Last Quarter, 3d day, 8o. 14.2m. A. 1 First Uaarter, lith day, 5h. 33.6 aa. A. 
New Moon, 13th " 1 20.7 M. | Full Moon, 96th " 8 48.7 M. 


JO 

ti 

o 

S 

<•- 

o 

«D 


• 
M 

s 

o 
■ 

& 


Sun's upper limb rises and sets, (cor. for rofrucl.) M. T. 


High water. M. time. 






• 

J 

M 

o 
ca 






a 

3 

u 

6 


OB 
C 

8* 

• 

55 


i 

a 
2 

1 


4* 

M 

< 

9 

25 




rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. i sets. 
h. m. h. m 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. in. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets, 
h. n>. 


h. m. 


h. sa. 


h. n. 


i 


Tu. 


6 36 


5 61 


8 86 


6 63 


6 38 6 64 


6 28 


6 69 


6 26 


6 1 


3 3m 


... 


10 39a, 


2 


NY. 


36 


63 


84 


63 


33 


66 


37 


69 


36 


1 


3 39 


o torn 


11 31 . 


3 


Th. 


33 


63 


32 


64 


30 


66 


26 


6 


94 


3 


3 31 


i l 


• • • 


4 


P. 


31 


64 


30 


66 


39 


67 


33 





38 


3 


4 7 


1 47 


o 7m 


5 

6 


Su. 


30 


66 


29- 
6 37 


66 
6 67 


27 


67 


23 
6 22 


1 
6 1 


32 
6 21 


3 

6 8 


5 3 


2 43 


1 8 


6 28 5 56 


H 36 6 68 


6 27m 


4 7m 


3 27m, 


7 


VI. 


36 


67 


36 


67 


34 1 69 


31 


3 


20 


8 


7 64 


684 


8 54 


8 


Tu. 


36 


68 


34 


69 


23 6 


20 


3 


19 


4 


9 10 


660 


6 M 


9 


W. 


33 


69 


33 


6 


21 


1 


19 


8 


17 


6 


10 12 


7 62 


6 18 


10 


Tb. 


31 


6 


30 


1 


30 


2 


17 


4 


16 


6 


10 62 


8 33 


6 68 


11 


P. 


30 


3 


19 


3 


18 


8 


16 


6 


16 


6 


11 36 


9 6 


7 36 


12 
13 


S. 
Su. 


18 
6 16 


3 


17 


8 
6 4 


17 


4 


16 

6 13 


6 
6 6 


14 
6 13 


6 

6 7 


11 66 


9 36 


7 66 

8 28m 


6 4 


6 16 


ft 16 6 6 


23a. 


10 sm 


14 


M. 


14 


6 


14 


6 


13 


6 


13 


7 


12 


8 


61 


10 31 


8 61 


15 


Tu. 


13 


6 


13 


7 


13 


7 


11 


S 


10 


8 


1 30 


11 


9 29 


16 


VY. 


11 


7 


11 


8 


10 


8 


10 


9 


9 


9 


1 62 


11 33 


9 53 


17 


Th. 





9 


9 


9 


9 


9 


8 


9 


8 


JO 


3 26 


o 6a. 


10 36 


18 


P. 


7 


10 


7 


10 


7 


10 


7 


10 


7 


10 


3 6 


046 


U 6 


19 
20 


S. 


6 


11 
6 12 


6 


11 


6 
S 4 


11 
6 12 


6 

6 4 


11 
6 12 


6 

8 4 


11 
6 11 


3 62 


1 33 


11 69 


Su. 6 4 


6 4 6 12 


4 60a. 


3 306U 


60*. 


21 


M. 


3 


13 


3 


18 


3 


18 


8 


12 


8 


19 


6 19 


8 69 


2 19 


22 


Tu, 





14 


1 


14 


1 


14 


1 


13 


2 


18 


7 54 


6 34 


8 64 


23 


W.'o 68 


16 


669 


16 


5 69 


16 


5 69 


14 


1 


18 


9 13 


6 62 


6 18 


24 


Th. 67 


17 


68 


16 


68 


16 


68 


14 


6 69 


14 


10 7 I 7 47 


6 1 


25 


F. 


66 


18 


66 


17 


66 


17 


67 


16 


68 


14 


10 64 i 8 34 


6 66 


26 
27 


S. 


63 


19 
6 30 


64 


18 


64 
6 63 


18 

6 19 


66 


16 


67 
5 66 


16 
6 16 


11 37 | 9 *7 


7 37 


Su. 6 63 


6 63 6 19 


6 66 


6 16 


. . . , 9 698. 


8 19ft, 


28 


M. 


60 


31 


61 


30 


61 


19 


64 


17 


66 


16 


19m 10 89 


8 69 


29 


Tu. 48 


33 


49 


31 


60 


30 


63 


18 


63 


17 


69 11 31 


944 


80 


W. 


46 


33 


47 


331 48 


31 


51 


19 


63 


17 


1 41 


... 


10 30 


8l|Th. 


46 


34 


46 


38 1 47 


32 


60 


19 


61 


18 


3 30 o om 


11 1 



1842.] March has Thirty-one Days. 15 


Passage of the Meridian (mean time) and Declination of the Planets. 


1st day. 


7th dav. 


13th day. 


19th day. 


25th day. 


Souths. 
h. in. 

9 3ia»- 


Deb. 
— 3 43 


Souths. 1 Dec. 
h. m. t 

11 36m — 6 64 


Souths. 
h. m. 

11 on 


Dec. Souths. 
, h. m. 
1 — 9 21 10 38m 


Dec. 
— 9 33 


Souths, 
h. m. 

10 27m 


Dec. 

— 9 23 


?0H " 


— 9 13 


Ida. 


— 6 31 


o 19a 


. — 8 22 23a. 


— 20 


27a. 




- 2 42 


<J 9 7 - 
fi 8 88 - 


f-4 17 
\-\% 48 


i y 
9 43 


4-6 6 
-Ml 28 


1 63 

3 28 


-J- 7 64 1 45 
-(-12 21 3 13 


-4-9 37 
-(-13 11 


1 88 

2 69 




-11 16 
-14 1 


2 6 sm- 


— 8 64 


5 4im — 9 84 


6 20IT 


1 — 9 12 4 58m 


— 8 47 


4 36m 


— 8 18 


$ i 87a. - 

} 3 39 - 

5. 8Jtm- 


— « 42 
■f-7 38 
—33 39 


1 33a. 
3 IS 

8 urn 


— 6 12 

-}- 8 27 
— 32 23 


i 7a 

3 68 
7 6411 


. — 6 42 538. 

-]- 9 33 2 42 
\ — 22 16 7 84m 


— 5 12 
-4-10 22 
— 22 9 


89a. 

2 27 
7 14m 


— 4 41 

+11 25 
— 22 3 


h 8 17 - 


-Hi 


7 65 


23 16 


7 84 

1 


— 22 18 7 13 


— 22 11 


6 49 


— 22 9 


# i la. - 


— 3 14 1 


39a. 


— 3 6 


o 16a 


.J — 2 59 11 64 


— 2 48 


11 32 


— 2 40 


[Days of Month. 

Moon Souths. 
Mean Time. 


Moon rises or sets. Mean time. 


PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 
TIONS. 

Sundays and other Remarkable 
Days. 


• 

c 

I 
1 


• 

o 

4 

M 

o 

• 


c 
o 

r 


e 

3 . 
S o 

■5* 

as 
5 


m 

e 

• 

25 


fc. m. 

1 3 99IB. 

2 4 93 

3 637 

4 9 91 

5 7 13 


rises. 
Ii. m. 

ii 49a. 


rises. 
tk. ib. 

ii 45a. 


rises. 
4i. to. 

ii 89a. 


rises. 

Ii. ID. 

11 28a. 


rises. 

\i. m. 

11 na. 


St. David. 

inf. 6 90>*]> m > rt *ni. 

Beginning of 26th Congress. 

Sup. 6 ?©. 

4th Sunday in Lent. 

69*. 


66m 

1 67 
3 49 


49m 

1 60 

3 43 

8 9sm 

4 4 
484 

6 

6 93 


44m 

1 44 
3 36 


26m 

1 24 

2 17 


19m 

1 17 

2 9 


S. 8 41D. 

7 9 64 

8 937 

9 10 30 
10 U 1 


3 33m 

* 8 ] 
438 ' 

6 8 

6 95 


3 21 m 
840 
490 

4 68 
6 31 


s 8m 

8 42 
4 17 
4 48 
6 16 


2 66m 

3 37m 

1 

4 18 
446 

6 14 


11 11 43 

12 03391. 


sets. 
6 478. 


sets. 
6 47a. 


sets. 
6 4«a. 


sets. 
6 44a. 


sets. 
6 44a. 


5th Sunday in hud. 

C5 %I Of 9 stationery. 
Bowdiich d. 1838, aged 65. 
St. Patrick. 


& i ta. 

14 140 

15 3 93 

16 3 31 

17 4 14 

18 6 10 


7 49a. 
9 3 

10 

11 7 


7 47a. 

9 1 

966 

U 3 


7 46a. 
868 
63 
10 66 


7 39a. 

8 46 

9 39 
16 40 
11 41 


7 89a. 
6 46 
988 

10 34 

11 85 


o ism 


o 7m 


oni 


19 6 6 


1 16 


1 8 


1 1 


43m 


36m 


Palm Sunday. Spring begins. 
Newton d. 1727. Goethe, 1832. 


S. 7 7a. 

21 9 6 

22 9 i 


s 9m 

9 67 
3 34 


9 sm 

3 61 
930 


i 66m 

345 
8 37 


1 sem 

3 39 
3 14 


1 sim 

2 23 

3 6 


23 966 

24 10 49 

25 U39 

26 $ 

S. o 3im. 

28 194 

29 3 19 
SO 8 14 
81 4 10 


4 8 
4 87 
rises. 
6 63a. 

, 8 88. 
996 

10 37 

11 48 


4 6 
4 86 
rises. 
6 6ia. 


4 8 

4 84 

rises. 
6 49a. 


9 64 
4 29 
rises. 
6 43a. 


3 60 
428 
rises. 
6 42a 


U >n U- [Year. Good Friday. 
Lady Day. Old beginning of the 


8 7a. 

990 

10 31 

11 86 


8 sa. 

9 15 

10 98 

11 80 


7 63a. 
9 8 

10 9 

11 11 


7 60H. 

8 57 
10 8 

11 4 


Easter Sunday. 
Q greatest elong 


>. * d a 1 m. 



10 April, Fourth Month, begins on Friday. [1842. 


Twilight begins and etuis. Mean time. 




1st day. 




7th day. 


13th day.' | 


19th day. 


25ih day. 


Begins. 

h. m. 1 


Ends. 
1. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins 

\\. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


fcinda. 
h. ro. 


Boston, 


4 7m. e 


> 1 a. 


;8 55m. 


8 9 a. 


3 48m. 


s is a. . 


s mm. 


827a 


3 10m. 


• 37 a. 


N. York, 


4 11 1 


f 57 


3 69 


8 5 


3 48 


8 14 ; 


i 37 


8 22 


3 26 


8 30 


Wash. 


4 16 7 


' 63 


4 4 


8 1 


3 53 


S 9 I 


i 43 


8 17 


3 38 


8 26 


Charles. 4 35 1 


43 


4 16 


7 49 ; 


4 7 


7 5i 3 59 


8 


3 51 


8 6 


N. Orl's. 4 29 1 


' 39 


4 21 


7 44 


4 13 


7 49 I 4 5 


7 63 


3 68 


7 68 


Apogee and Perigee of the Moon. 
Apogee, 5th day, 7h. A. [ Perigee, 21st day, 3h. A. 


Phases of the Moon. 
Last Quarter, 3d day, Ih. 21.8m. A. \ First Quarter, 18th day, lh. 24.1m. M. 
New Moon, 10th " 5 23.0m A. | Full Moon, 24th «• 6 19.4 A. 


• 

§ 

a 



M 


• 
M 

• 
O 

(B 

>» 


Sun's upper limb rises and sets, (cor. for refract.) M. T. 


High water. M. time. 












. 

2 

e 

s 
s 

CD 


to 
O 


a 

a* 


a 
5 

JS 




s 



• 

55 


6 

a* 

§ 

1 


55 


a 


s • 
I* 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 

h. ID. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


seU. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m 


\sets. 
h. m. 


h. ro. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


1 


F. 


43 


6 35 


5 44 


6 24 


5 46 


6 2» 


5 48 


620 


5 60 


6 19 


3 im 


4im 


11 46a. 


2 
3 


S. 


41 


27 
6 28 


42 

5 41 


26 
6 27 


41 
5 42 


24 
6 26 


47 

6 46 


21 
6 21 


46 

5 47 


19 
6 20 


3 46 


1 26 


• • • 


Su. 


5 40 


4 39m 


2 18I7T 


38m 


4 


M. 


38 


29 


39 


28 


41 


26 


45 


22 


46 


20 


6 48 


3 28 


148 


5 


Tu. 


36 


30 


37 


29 


39 


27 


43 


23 


45 


21 


7 16 


466 


3 16 


6 


W. 


85 


31 


3G 


36 


37 


28 


42 


23 


44 


22 


8 33 


6 18 


4 38 


7 


Th. 


33 


32 


34 


81 


36 


29 


41 


24 


43 


22 


9 31 


7 11 


6 81 


8 


P. 


81 


33 


33 


32 


34 


30 


39 


36 


41 


23 


10 19 


7 59 


6 19 


9 
10 


S. 
Su. 


30 
ft 28 


34 
6 36 


31 
5 30 


33 
6 34 


33 
5 31 


31 
6 32 


38 
5 37 


26 
6 26 


40 
6 39 


23 
6 24 


10 49 

11 20111 


829 


6 49 


9 om 7 30m 


11 


M. 


2ft 


37 


28 


36 


36 


39 


36 


27 


38 


26 


M 60 


• 80 


7 60 


12 


Tu. 


26 


38 


26 


86 


28 


34 


34 


2C 


87 


26 


1 21a. 


10 1 


8 21 


13 


W. 


23 


89 


26 


37 


27 


35 


33 


28 


36 


26 


53 


10 33 


8 68 


14 


Th. 


21 


40 


23 


38 


26 


86 


32 


29 


86 


26 


1 32 


11 13 


982 


15 


F. 


20 


41 


22 


39 


24 


37 


31 


80 


84 


27 


3 9 


11 49 


10 9 


16 
17 


S. 
Su. 


18 
6 1ft 


43 

6 43 


30 
5 19 


40 
6 41 


23 
5 21 


38 


30 


31 
6 31 


32 
5 31 


28 
6 28 


3 63 
3 45a. 


• 32a. 

1 2da. 


10 63 


6 39 


5 28 


11 46m 


18 


M. 


16 


45 


17 


42 


26 


40 


27 


32 


30 


29 


4 46 


226 


46a. 


19 


Tu. 


13 


46 


16 


43 


18 


41 


26 


33 


29 


29 


6 13 


3 52 


2 13 


20 


W. 


• 12 


47 


14 


44 


17 


42 


26 


33 


28 


80 


7 83 


6 13 


3 33 


21 


Th. 


10 


48 


13 


45 


16 


42 


34 


34 


27 


31 


8 46 


626 


4 45 


22 


F. 


9 


49 


11 


46 


14 


43 


23 


35 


36 


31 


9 38 


7 18 


6 88 


23 
24 


S. 


7 


60 
6 51 


10 
5 8 


47 
6 48 


13 
5 11 


44 


21 


36 
6 36 


36 

5 24 


39 
6 83 


10 31 


8 11 


6 31 


Sll.b 6 


6 45 


ft 20 


ti iea. 


8 66a J 


7 16a. 


25 


M. 


4 


62 


7 


49 


10 


46 


19 


87 


38 


33 


11 66 


9 36 


7 66 


26 


Tu. 


8 


63 


6 


50 


9 


47 


18 


38 


33 


84 


... 


10 20 


8 40 


27 


W. 


1 


66 


4 


61 


8 


48 


17 


38 


21 


34 


4?m 


11 1 


9 31 


28 


Th. 





56 


8 


52 


6 


49 


16 


39 


3d 


86 


1 31 


11 41 


10 1 


29 


F. 


4 58 


67 


2 


54 


6 


60 


15 


40 19 

41 1 18 


36 


3 1 


... 


10 89 


30 


S. 


57 


58 





65 


4 


51 


14 


36 


3 89 


19ni 11 33 



1842.] April has Thirty Days. 1? 


Passage of the Meiidian (mean time) and Declination of the Planets. 


S 


1st day. 


7th day. 


i 

i 

b 


Kith day. 


19th day. 


25th day. 


Souths. 

D. OB* 

lOfem 


Dec. 

a 

— 746 


Souths. 
h. m. 

10 38m 


Dec. 

e 

— 6 1 


Souths. Dec. 
h. in. 

10 36m — 3 


Souths. 
, h. m. 

6 10 46m 




Dec. 

o < 

- 1 49 


Souths. 
b. m. 

ii om 


Dec. 

e < 

--6 18 


? 


o sia. • 


--6 16 


86a. 


--9 11 


893 


L. 4-11 69 44a. - 


-14 87 


49a. 


--17 1 


4 


1 80 ' 


--13 6 


1 34 


--I4 86 


1 17 


4-16 69 1 10 




-17 18 


1 4 


- -18 31 


a 


2 43 ' 


- -14 67 


3 38 


- -16 41 


3 14 


+W 96 ' 2 1 




-17 7 


1 47 


--17 44 


s 


4 8m 


— 7 46 


8 46m 


— 7 15 


3 30m — 6 48 3 64m — 6 11 


3 28m 


— 6 38 


u 


33a. 
3 10 ■ 
6 47m 


— 46 
-f-12 36 
—31 66 


8a. 

1 66 

6 39m 


— t 38 
-}-n 13 
— 31 51 ' 


1163 — 3 11 11 40 — 3 46 
1 41 a. -f-14 12 j 1 37a. U-H 69 
6 8m — 21 46 6 46m, — 31 43 


11 25 

i isa. • 

6 34m 


— 2 21 
-f-15 46 

— 21 40 


h 


6 14 


—33 8 


6 


— 33 6 


5 37 


— 33 


6 6 14 — 33 6 


4 60 • 


—52 5 


« 


ill 6 1- 


— 3 31! 10 43 


— 3 23 


10 21 


— 2 16 9 68 ' — 3 9 


9 36 


— 2 3 


• 

e 

© 

«D 
1 

2 

s. 

4 


• 

3.6 
s s 

a* 


Moon ri«es or sets. Mean time. 


PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 
TIONS. 

Sundays and other Remarkable 
Days. 


* 

o 

a 
o 
«•» 

s 

K 


■ 

M 

O 

>< 

• 

25 


e 
o 
«•» 

.So 

a 


h 
< 


e 
e 

u 


0. 
« 
e 
aj 
© . 

■ 


h. n. 
i 5U1. 
6 67 


rises. 
h, m. 

o 40m 

1 38 


rises. 
h. m. 

34m 

1 2i 


rises 
h. m. 

27m 

1 16 

i 67m 

3 81 


rises. 
• m. 

) 7m 

) 67 

■ 


rises. 
h. m. 

o om 

60 


2 stationary. 

Lost Sunday, (j ty <t ♦ 


6 47m. 

7 33 


3 8m 

3 39 


3 am 
3 86 


l 40m 

3 18 


i 86m 

3 12 


5 


6 17 


3 6 


3 3 


3 


3 49 


2 46 




6 


6 69 


3 39 


3 37 


3 35 


3 17 


3 16 




7 

8 


39 
10 30 


3 61 

4 11 


3 60 

4 11 


3 49 

4 11 


3 45 

4 11 


846 
4 12 


d # (. 


9 
11 


11 1 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


id Sunday after Easier. 


11 43 m. 
039 a. 


6 43a. 

7 60 


6 40a. 

746 


6 396. 

7 43 


6 30a. 

7 80 


6 38a. 

7 37 


12 


1 18 


868 


864 


849 


8 83 


8 36 


* D • ¥• 


13 


3 10 


10 6 


9 66 


963 


9 35 


9 39 




14 


8 6 


11 6 


11 3 


10 66 


10 37 


10 39 




15 


4 3 






11 63 


11 84 


11 36 




16 

K 
18 
19 
20 
31 


6 1 


6m 


o em 

48tn 

1 38 
3 6 
3S6 
3 3 








3d Sunday after Easier. 

[Amef. Rev. 1775. 
Bat. of Lexington, and begin, of 

Battle St. Jacinto, Texas, 1836. 


6 69 a. 
64 

7 46 
6 38 
938 


64m 

1 83 
3 8 
336 
3 4 


43m 

1 35 
3 1 
3 38 
3 3 


36m 

1 14 
1 61 
3 26 
3 1 


19m 

1 6 

1 47 

2 36 

3 


22 


10 18 


3 30 


8 80 


3 31 


3 83 


8 85 




23 

SL 
23 


11 10 


rises. 


ris$s. 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


St. George, Jj stationary. 
4lh Sunday after Easter, 


8 
o 4m. 


6 69a. 

e is 


6 66B. 
8 9 


6 62a. 

7 64 


6 39a. 

7 48 


6 87a. 
743 


26 
27 


069 
1 66 


9 34 
10 36 


9 16 
10 19 


9 13 
10 14 


8 64 

9 54 


848 
9 47 


%D o etofll et A Ophiuchi. 


28 
29 
80 


8 63 
8 47 
488 


11 J9 

• • • 

o 8m 


11 18 
11 67 


11 6 
11 63 


10 47 1 

11 84 


10 41 , 

11 38 


*M/. [1*89. 
Washington inaug. 1st President, 



2 



18 May, Fifth Month, begins on Sunday. [1842. 


Twilight begins and ends. Moan time. 




1st day. 


7th i 


day. 


13th day. | 


■ 19th day. | 


25th day. 


Begins. Ends. 
h. m. h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


iegins 
i. m. 


. Ends. 1 
h. m. 


Begins. 

h. m. 


Ends. 
h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Boston* 


3 71X1. 8 47 a. 


3 66U1. 


8 67 a. ' 


2 45m 


.9 7a. 


2 36m. 9 17 a. 


2 25m. 


9 28 a. 


N.York, 


3 14 8 40 


3 4 


8 49 


2 64 


868 


3 46 


9 8 


3 36 


9 18 


Wash. 


3 23 8 82 


3 13 


8 40 


3 4 


848 


2 66 


8 67 


3 47 


9 7 


Charles. 


3 43 8 11 


3 86 


8 17 


3 28 


824 


8 23 


6 80 


3 17 


SS7 


N. Orl's. 


3 61 8 


3 


3 46 


8 


8 


3 38 


8 14 


3 83 


8 20 


3 28 


896 


Apogee and Perigee of the Moon. 
Apogoe, 3d day, 9h. A. | P«ri»ee, 15th day, Ah. M. J Apogee, 3 1st day, lOh. M. 


Phases of the Moon. 
Last Quarter, 3d day, 7h. 38.0m. M. 1 First Quarter, 17th day, 7h. 2.1m. M. 
New Moon, 10th " 6 29.9 M. | Pull Moon, 94. h " 4 31.3 M. 


• 

a 
e 

■ 

<*• 

& 


. : 

9 
9 

e 
■ 

CS 

a 

i 

l 


Sun's upper limb rises and sets, (cor. for refract.) M. T. 


High water. M. time. 






§ 

1 


M 

s . 

9 

2 


r 


es 

§ 

** 
■ * 

J5 


s 

26 

6* 

« 


© 

a 
2 

3 


•* 

M 




'ises. i sets. 
\. m..h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises.\ sets. 
h. m. h. in. 


rises A sets. 
h. m. h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


h. m. 


1 
h. m. 


h. m. 


\ 


Su.' 


156 7 


4 59 


6 56 


5 2 


S 63 


6 13 


6 42 


6 17 


6 37 


3 22m 


1 2m • • • 


2 


M. 


64 


1 


68 


57 


1 


53 


12 


43 


16 


38 


4 8 


1 48 


o sm 


8 


Tu. 53 


' 2 


66 


58 





64 


11 


43 


16 


28 


6 13 


2 63 


1 12 


'{ 


w. 


62 


3 


55 


59 


4 69 


65 


10 


44 


16 


89 


6 23 


4 2 


222 


Th. 


50 


4 


64 


7 


68 


66 


9 


46 


14 


40 


7 80 


6 19 


3 38 


6F. 


49 


6 


63 


1 


67 


67 


8 


46 


13 


40 


8 33 


6 13 


438 


; 7 

8 


S. 
Su. 


49 
4 47 


6 
7 7 


62 
4 61 


2 

7 3 


65 
4 64 


68 
6 69 


7 
6 7 


46 
6 47 


13 
5~12 


41 
6 42 


9 26 


7 6 


6 2ft 


10 sm 


7 43m 


6 am 


9 


M. 


46 


8 


49 


4 


63 


7 


6 


47 


11 


42 


10 41 


8 21 


6 41 


10 


Tu. 


44 


9 


48 


6 


63 1 


6 


48 


10 


43 


11 17 


8 67 


7 17 


11 


W. 


43 


10 


47 


6 


61 2 


4 


49 


9 


44 


11 66 


936 


766 


.12 


Th. 


42 


11 


46 


7 


60 


3 


3 


49 


9 


44 


36a. 


10 15 


885 


13 


P. 


"41 


12 


45 


8 


49 


8 


3 


60 


8 


46 


1 17 


10 67 


9 17 


14 
15 


S. 


40 


13 
7 14 


44 
4 43 


9 

7 10 


49 
4 48 


4 

7 5 


2 
5 1 


61 
6 51 


7 

5 7 


46 
6 46 


3 1 


11 41 


10 1 


Su.4 39 


3 46a. 


26a. 10 46IH 


16 


M. 


38 


16 


42 


11 


47 


6 





62 


6 


47 


8 42 


1 23 


11 49 


17 


Tu. 


37 


16 


41 


12 


46 


7 





63 


5 


47 


4 41 


2 31 


418U 


18 


W. 


36 


17 


40 


13 


45 


8 


4 59 


54 


6 


48 


5 61 


3 31 


4 61 


19 


Th. 


35 


18 


89 


14 


44 


9 


58 


64 


4 


48 


7 6 


445 


8 6 


20 


F. 


34 


19 


39 


16 


43 


10 


68 


66 


4 


49 


8 15 


6 65 


4 16 


21 
22 


S. 
Su. 


33 
4 32 


20 
7 21 


38 
4 37 


16 

7 17 


43 

4 42 


10 
7 11 


67 
4 67 


66 
6 56 


8 

5 8 


60 
6 60 


9 12 


6 66 


6 12 


10 6a. 


7 46d. 


6 6a. 


23 


M. 


31 


22 


36 


18 


41 


13 


56 


57 


2 


51 


10 66 


8 36 


666 


•24 


Tu. 


31 


28 


36 


19 


41 


13 


66 


67 


2 


61 


11 42 


9 32 


7 42 


25 


W. 


SO 


24 


36 


30 


40 


14 


66 


68 


1 


53 


• • . 


10 2 


893 


26 


Th. 


29 


25 


34 


20 


39 


14 


65 


69 


1 


63 


22m 


10 43 


9 9 


27 


F. 


29 


25 


34 


21 


39 


15 


64 


7 


1 


68 


1 2 


11 29 


940 


28 
29 


S. 
Su. 


28 
4 27 


26 


33 


33 
7 23 


38 
4 38 


16 


64 



7 1 



6 


64 
6 64 


1 40 


11 67 


10 17 


7 27 


4 32 


7 17 


464 


2 nm 


• • . 


10 69a. 


30 


M. 


27 


28 


33 


23 


87 


17 


63 


1 





66 


959 


39m 


1149 


« 


Tu. 


26 


29 


81 


24 


87 | 18 


63 


2|4 69 


66 


8 49 


1 22 


• • • 



1842. J May has 


• Tkirty-one 


Days. 






19 


Parage of the Meridian (moan time) and Declination of the Planet*. 




1st flay. 


7th day. 


13th day. 


19th day. 


aSth day. 


Seuths., Dee. 


South*. 


Dee. 


Souths. 


Dee. 


Souths. 


Dee. 


Souths. 


Deo. 




h. m. 1 ; 


b. m. 


© i 


h. m. 


• ' 


h. in. 


• i 


h. in. 


e « 


9 


li 19m- 


-11 11 


11 42m 


--16 7 


o ioa. 


- -19 62 40a. • 


--98 18 


l 7a. 


--26 19 


V 


o 55a. - 


-19 10 


l 2a. 


--21 


1 10 


- -23 80 1 17 ■ 


448 88 


196 


--24 91 


$ 


58 - 


-19 37 


61 


--20 89 


4ft 


-4-91 30 89 


--99 16 


83 


--29 66 


a 


1 S4 - 


-18 22 


1 21 


--18 66 


1 8 


--I9 28 66 


--19 66 


49 


--90 94 





2 «m- 


-62 


1 27m 


— 4 82 


. i loin 


— 4 ". 


i 3im 


— 840 


14m 


— 8 19 


$ 


11 12 - 


— 1 68 


10 68 


— 1 83 


10 44 


— 1 18 10 31 


— 10 


10 17 


— 49 


? 


69a. - 


[-16 33 


46a. 


-{-17 18 


81H. 


-{-18 1 


D 18a. 


+18 39 


jo 6a. 


-f-10 18 


u 


5 am- 


-41 39 


4 89m 


— 21 39 


4 151X1 


1 — 21 40 8 61 m 


— 21 41 


8 97m 


— 91 46 


h 


4 27 - 


—22 6 


4 8 


— 22 7 


3 88 


— 22 


B 8 14 


—99 9 


960 


—99 11 


¥ 


9 IS - 


- 1 67 


8 61 


— 1 60 


8 28 


— 1 46 8 6 


— 1 40 


7 49 


— 1 86 


• 

•5 


• 
We 


Moon riso8 or nets. Mean time. 


PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 


a 


-S s 


1 u 


«r i ~ 




o 

as 


3 J 


i- « 


i. i 


a 


TIONS. 


e 


e 

S 3 


s 
e 

m 
© 


© 

• 

S5 


rises. 




* 

as 


Sunday* and other Remarkable 
Days. 




rues. 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 






h. id. 


h m. 


h. m. 


n. on. 


h. m. 


h. in. 




5. 


ft 72m. 


88m 


88m 


28m 


13m 


o 8m 


Rogation Sunday. $ in ft. 


2 


6 12 


1 8 


1 4 


1 


48 


44 




8 


6 54 


1 42 


1 29 


1 27 


1 19 


1 16 




4 


7 8ft 


1 64 


1 62 


1 61 


1 27 


1 44 


[1827. Bonaparte. 1821. 


6 


8 16 


2 14 


2 14 


2 14 


2 12 


2 12 


Ascension Day. La Place died. 


6 


8 57 


1 15 


2 87 


237 


940 


2 41 




7 

5. 


9 39 


2 36 


2 59 


8 1 


8 6 


3 10 


Sunday after Ascension. 


io asm. 


s aim 


8 24m 


3 27U1 


8 36m 


3 40m 


9 


11 11 


StiS. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


■ 


10 


o sa. 


7 68a. 


7 48a. 


7 42a. 


7 26a. 


7 190. 


$ in ft, sup. d 9 ©» U 8talion - 


11 


59 


8 68 


8 62 


8 46 


827 


8 21 




12 


1 67 


10 


9 68 


9 46 


927 


920 




13 


2 66 


10 61 


10 46 


10 40 


10 22 


10 16 


c5 ?fl. 


14 

s. 

16 


S64 


11 33 


11 30 


11 24 


11 9 


11 4 


[1882. 
Whit Sun. Pentecost. Cuvier d. 

* > Sift- 










11 60a. 


11 46a. 


ft 48 


o iom 


om 


2m 


17 


6 34 


89 


038 


85 


28m 


26m 




18 


7 23 


1 17 


1 17 


1 15 


1 11 


1 11 




19 


8 13 


1 38 


1 88 


1 33 


1 83 


1 36 




20 


9 2 


1 68 


2 


2 2 


2 7 


9 9 


Columbus d. 1506. O. S. 


21 


9 63 


226 


2 28 
2 69m 


2 81 


2 41 


2 46 


Trinity Sunday. 


10 47a. 


2 56m 


3 sm 


3 2am 


3 24m 


23 


11 42 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


* D A 1 m . [inten of light 0.821. 


24 


<? 


8 lia. 


8 2a. 


7 68a. 


7 89a. 


7 33a. 


Queen of Eng.b. 1819. £ 0© 


25 


39m. 


9 8 


9 9 


8 56 


8 36 


829 


[* > * /. 


26 


1 8ft 


966 


960 


944 


9 26 


9 20 


Corpus Chris*. Fite Dieu. 


27 


2 28 


10 84 


10 80 


10 2ft 


10 9 


10 8 




28 


S 18 


11 7 


11 8 


10 68 


10 46 


10 41 


1st Sun. after Trinity ^C>oyf. 


4 6m. 


11 33a. 


.11 80a. 


11 278. 


11 na. 


11 148. 


80 


449 


11 66 


11 64 


11 ft2 


11 47 


11 46 




81 


6 81 












• 



30 June, Sixth Month, begins an Wednesday. [1842. 


Twilight begins and ends. Mean time. 




1st day. 


7th day. 


1 13th day. 


19th duy. 


35lh day. 


Begins. finds, 
h. m. h. m. 


Begins. ] 
h. m. h 


Ends. 
• m. 


Begins. 
;h. m. 


Ends. 
h. m. 


Begins. Ends, 
h. m. h.m. 


Begins 
h. m. 


. Ends, 
h. m. 


Bolton, 


9 17m. fl ft. 


3 19m. 9 44 a. 


3 9m* 


9 50 a. 


9 8IB 


.9 54 a. 


3 9m 


.9 66 0. 


N. York, 


999 • «5 


3 96 9 31 


3 98 


9 87 


9 39 


940 


9 98 


9 41 


Wtsh. 


3 41 9 18 


3 87 9 19 


3 86 


9 94 


9 85 


997 


986 


9 38 


Charles. 


3 18 • 41 


3 M> 8 48 


3 1* 


8 50 


8 10 


8*9 


8 11 


8 68 


N . Orl's. 


3 34 ft 80 


8 82 8 34 


3 99 


8 88 


3 93 


840 


|3 9* 


8 41 




Perigee tmd Apogee of the Moon. 
Perigee, 18th day, Oh. noon. | Apogee, 28th day, 3b. M. 


Phases of the Moon. 
Last Quarter, 1st day, lh. 42.9m. M. Full Moon, 32d day, 4h. 13.5m. A. 
New Moon, 8th " 5 6.5 A. Last Quarter, 90th " 6 32.4 A. 
First Quarter, 15th " 11 43.8 M. 


• 

g 

S 


• 

% 

o 

m 


dun's upper limb rises and sets, (cor. for refract.) M. T. 


J High water. M. time. 






i 

a 

a 

i 


M 

© 

• 


! 

JO o 

1* 


ri 
h. 


e 

h 

a 
O 


m 
B 
* . 

• 

7T. 


■ • 

© 

s 

«* 


1 4 

9 


a 

a 

8 o 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises 
h. m 


. sets. 
• h. m. 


90S. 

m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises 
h. m. 


sets. 
b. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


1 


W. 


4 35 


7 80 


4 81 


7 94 


486 


7 19 4 59 


7 3 


4 69 


656 


4 99m 


3 9m 


39m 


2 


Th. 


35 


30 


80 


35 


86 


19 


63 


8 


69 


56 


6 19 


3 59 


1 19 


8 


F. 


36 


81 


80 


36 


36 


90 


59 


4 


59 


67 


6 18 


8 68 


9 J8 


4 
6 


S. 
Su. 


34 
4 34 


83 
7 83 


80 
439 


36 
7 37 


35 
4 S3 


91 
7 31 


63 
4 63 


4 

7 6 


69 
4 68 


57 
6 68 


7 19 


4 69 
6 68m 


3 19 

4 18m 


9 ism 


6 


M. 


34 


83 


39 


38 


35 


93 


61 


6 


58 


68 


9 16 


666 


6 18 


7 


Tu. 


33 


34 


39 


38 


84 


98 


61 


6 


68 


69 


10 6 


7 46 


6 6 


8 


W. 


33 


84 


99 


99 


84 


93 


61 


6 


63 


59 


10*8 


8 33 


6 63 


9 


Th. 


33 


85 


38 


80 


34 


94 


61 


7 


68 


7 


11 40 


9 30 


7 49 


10 


P. 


33 


86 


98 


BO 


84 


94 


61 


7 


58 





34a. 


10 4 


8 94 


11 
12 


S. 
Su. 


33 
4 33 


86 

7 37 


38 

438 


81 


84 


96 


51 


8 
7 8 


68 
4 68 


1 

7 1 


1 8 


10 48 


9 8 


7 31 


4 34 


7 95 


4 61 


3 sa. 


11 4601 


M) 6m 


18 


M. 


33 


87 


98 


33 


84 


98 


61 


8 


68 


1 


3 41 


31ft. 


10 41 


14 


Tu. 


33 


38 


38 


33 


34 


96 


61 


9 


68 


3 


3 81 


1 11 


11 31 


15 


W. 


33 


88 


38 


83 


84 


96 


61 


9 


68 


3 


4 37 


3 7 


27*. 


16 


Th. 


33 


88 


38 


33 


34 


37 


61 


9 


68 


9 


6 19 


9 69 


1 It 


17 


P. 


32 


80 


38 


83 


84 


37 


61 


10 


68 


8 


630 


4 


930 


18 
19 


S. 
Su. 


33 
4 32 


89 
7 39 


38 

438 


38 

7 34 


34 
4 84 


38 
7 98 


61 
4 63 


10 
7 10 


68 
4 69 


8 
7 8 


7 39 


6 9 


839 


8 47R. 


6 37a. 


4 47B. 


20 


M. 


33 


40 


98 


84 


84 


98 


52 


11 


69 


8 


9 63 


7 33 


6 69 


21 


Tu. 


33 


40 


39 


84 


84 


98 


63 


11 


59 


4 


10 46 


8 36 


6 46 


22 


W. 


33 


40 


99 


84 


86 


98 


69 


11 


69 


4 


11 81 


9 11 


7 31 


28 


Th. 


93 


40 


39 


84 


85 


39 


63 


11 


5 


4 


• • • 


9 63 


8 It 


24 


h\ 


S3 


40 


39 


85 


85 


39 


63 


11 





4 


o 19m 


10 80 


8 61 


26 
26 


S. 
Su, 


94 
4 94 


41 
7 41 


39 
480 


35 
7 85 


86 

4 86 


99 


t 


18 

13 


11 

7 13 



6 


4 
7 4 


61 

i 35m 


11 6 


038 


7 39 


4 ( 


11 89a. 


9 69ft, 


27 


M. 


35 


41 


80 


35 


86 


99 


54 


1*3 


1 


4 


1 59 


• . • 


10 33 


28 


Tu. 


35 


40 


81 


86. 


87 


99 


54 


13 


1 


ft 


988 


9 ism 


11 10 


29 


W. 


35 


40, 


81 


85 


87 


99 


54 


13 


1 


5 


8 10 


060 


11 48 


80 


Th. 


96 


40 


81 


85 


87 


99 


55 


13 


3 


6 


848 


1 98 ... 1 



181 










Dn 




1- Ok. I SouUt, 


Dae. 


built. 


ike. 


























1 


I 311. 








-|-s» is i sea. 


4-31 20 


i ids. 


-(-IB 43 


? 










S' 








+11 IT 


J 


30 












2 


+34 IS 


e 


• ar 








-Hi* 




4*1 43 


ii *7in 















iota 








■ 


s 


10 llll 
















— OSS 


s 


11 4B 


2 • 


11 16 


+30*1 




+■ 


11 ID 


+«« 


ID 07 


+31 H 


u 
















l u 


— MM 


h 








— 3i 1 


' 1 30 








— *J« 


V 


T IB 


— in in 


— 1 * 


03* 


— it. i < 


1 34 


n 43 


— 13S 


















PHENOMENA AND OBBESVA- 






L 


\i 


{* 


Svndttt/t and oilier Remarkable 




I 


£ 




Deft. 






































Oil 




o to 


40 












1 6 






1 31 


1 


1 90 


1 US 


1 ID 




J!J m 


lf, m 


a"" 1 


3 43 


■11,1] 


M Sunday after Trinity. 


l «;a. 


bib 


Tasa. 


Vu 


7 10B. 






!* 


B 11 




SIS 




ID 10 


w » 


'0 ' 


a is 


— '_ 


(? grealest elongation. 


10 4M 


io«a. 


10 SSB. 


idsbb. 


o wa. 


3d Sunday after Trinity. 






11 8 




1 a J 






II SI 


I| M 


11 IS 


it as 


130 


dao- 


o am 


o am 


o em 


o am 


onm 


»» 




013 






Bonis of Bunker Hill, 1776. 


o n 


l i 


i « 


1 10 


1 S3 


War with England, 1812. 


1MO 


1 Mm 


l «lm 


1 MIS 


i am 


iih Sunday after Trinity. 












* > am.. 












Summer begiaa. 


7 »6B 


7 44B 


7 asa. 


7 1DB, 


7 13B. 


* » It- 


a is 

a a 


■ n 


an 


4 
■ 41 


1 08 


St. John Baptiit. 9 Hal. * U fl . 


93i 


813 


* M 


>o 


9 '- 1 , 


a J©- 




« MO- 


a mo. 






6th Sun. after Trinity. # (J 1 iff . 




ID 30 


10 is 


10 14 






10 41 


ii a 


10 41 

ii t 


[J« 


41 








11 01 


11 26 


11 IS 


II 34 


1 SI 


a w «. 



1842.] 



July has Thirty-one Days. 



23 



Passage of the Meridian (mean time) and Declination of the Planets. 





1st day. | 


7th duy. 


13th 


day. | 19th 


day. 


35th day. 




Souths. 


Dee. 1 


Soutks. 


Dae 


Souths. 




Dec Souths. 


Dec. 


Souths. 


Dec. 




h. m. 


1 \ 


h. m. 


« 1 


h. m. 


1 j h. id. 


/ 


h. pi. 


. • ' 


9 


o 43a. 


--18 83 


10*. 


■— 


-17 46 


11 3301 




-is 3 n am--*8 6* 


U 46in 


+30 % 


? 


3 13 


--19 30 


3 19 




-17 34 


3 38a. 




-16 813 3«i a . 


- t-13 38 


239a. 


+ 948 


S 


11 6601 


-,-24 * 


11 60m 




-38 60 


11 48m 




-33 38 11 87ip 


--08 


11 pom 


+33 34 


a 


11 35 


1-33 


11 19 




-33 6 


11 




-33 7 10 48 


--33 6 


*0 36 


+33 3 


3 


• 13*. 


-s- 3*8 


8 47a. 


— 8 9 


8 33a. 


— 386' 767a. 


-r 3 47 


! 7 ?sa. 


— 4 9 


$ 


s iota 


— 60 


8 4im 


— 1 3 


8 38Q1 


— 1 96|j 8 14m 


— 1 63 


8 im 


— 3 31 


9 


10 44 


-H?3 14 


10 81 


4"33 36 


10 18 


-f-23 63 10 6 


-f"33 6 


968 


+33 19 


u 


47m 


— 33 31 


20m 


— 33 38 


11 49a. 


— 32 85 | 11 23a. 


— 32 41 


10 66a. 


— 33 48 


h 


IS 


— 33 37 


11 44a. 


— 33 39 


11 18 


— 32 32 10 63 


—33 84 


10 38 


—23 37 


¥ 


I 6 19 


— 1 33 


4 55m 




- 1 33i 


4 32111 




- 1 24 4 8m 


— 1 36 


3 46m 


— 1 38 



S 

e 
© 

2 



1 

% 

& 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
_9 

& 
11 
19 
13 
H 
1* 
16 

& 
18 
10 
20 
21 
22 
23 

& 
25 
26 
27 

28 
29 
SO 



4 

*•> 
9 
o 
09 



s 



a 



s 

55 



h. id. 
6 sira 

6 33 



Moon rises or sets. Mean time. 



4 



& 



7 19 

8 9 



9 

10 

11 



1 



4 
2 

4 

5a. 

4 



3 ia. 

3 64 

*8 45 

4 34 

5 24 

6 14 

7 6 



rises. 

h. «• 

11 46a. 



140) 

48 

1 31 

234 

sets. 

8 ea. 

8 43 



9 15a, 
9 40 

10 6 
10W 

" * 

11 32 



e oa. 

8 65 

9 60 
|0 43 
11 34 

i9m. 



1 6m. 

1 47 
3 38 
8 8 

3 47 

4 39 
6 13 



6 69m. 



8m 

68 

1 44 
3 41 
rises. 

7 38 

8 3 



6 38tt 

8 47 

9 7 
927 
9 49 

10 16 
10 44 



11 33a. 



4 



o 



rises. 
h. so. 

11 60 



sum 

64 

1 30 
3 90 
sets. 

8 ia. 

82(9 



9 lift. 
939 
10 <6 

10 35 

11 4 
JU 36 



O 16m 

69 

1 40 
348 
rises. 

7 34a. 

8 I 



8 3ftL 

8 46 

9 7 
9 39 
9 63 

JO 19 

10 49 

11 38a. 



e 
o 

Is 

on 



rises. 

Q. ID. 

11 53a. 



9 34m 
1 
1 44 
337 

sets. 

7 68a. 

8 36 



9 9fl. 
9 39 
10 8 

10 33 

11 8 
11 43 



e 
o 

9 © 

O 



rises. 
h. m. 



4m 



osim 

1 17 

3 a 

3 63 

sets. 

7 43a. 

8 24 



9 sa 
9 37 
10 10 
10 44 

U 17 
11 56 



a 
* 
as . 

54 



rises. 
h. m. 



8m 



43m 

1 24 
3 13 
3 7 

sets. 

7 38a. 

8 31 



20m 

1 6 

1 67 

2 54 
rises. 

7 30a. 

7 67 

8 32S. 
846 

9 7 
9 31 
956 

10 33 
10 66 



11 84a. 



3am 

1 36 
3 18 
3 14 
rises. 
7 18a. 
7 48 



8 iaa. 

8 48 

9 9 
9 85 

10 4 
10 36 

*1 » 



11 63a. 



9 ia. 
997 

K> 13 

10 47 
XI 23 

. • . 

3m 



46m 

1 86 I 
337 ! 
334 j 
rises. 
7 isa. 

7 45 



8 16a. 
843 

9 11 
989 

IP 8 
10,42 
11 17 



PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA 
TIONS. 

Sundays and other Remarkable 
Pay*. 



:>M t?M- [EM> forth, from Sun. 
bt\ Sutifl. after Trir&y. 8 h©- 
ladep. dec. 1776. 3d, 1$ siatioq. 

[6 $ «. 

Soil eel j peed .invisible in U . S. 
Inf. (j «? O, ? <t- 

1th Bund, after Trimly. # UQ. 



Sth Bund, aft, Trinity. * d a^. 
* C A Ophiucai. 
9 stationary, 

6 U «• 

Moan eclipsed, vis. jo U. S. 
Q stationary, 

9<A frndejl. Trinity. $ { 6 * 



* « 45 H- 

9 greatest elopg. 

? in ft. £et b Pleiad 

lOfft g««rf. oft. Trinity. :|c d t y 



124 



August, Eighth Month, begins on Monday. [1842. 



Twilight begin* and end*. Mean time. 



Boston, 
N.York, 
Wash. 
Charles. 



1st day. 



Begins. Lads, 
h. no. 



b. id. 

9 Mm. 

8 4 
3 8f 



N.Orl's, 348 



17 a. 
9 8 

8 68 
888 
834 



{ 7th day. 
Begins 



h. m. 

3 am. 

;,.< 

3 aa 

S 4ft 
8 64 



Buds, 
h. m. 

9 6a. 

8 66 

8 48 
896 

9 18 



13th day. 



Bcsgtn*. 
h. m. 



Buds, 
h. m. 

8 16m. 8 68 a. 

8 98' 8 46 

8 88 8 88 

3 60 8 18 

8 69 8 9 



19th day. 



Begins, 
h. in. 

8 94D1. 

8 89 

3 88 

3 68 

4 4 



Bnds. 
h. on. 

8 49 a. 

884 

898 

8 10 

8 9 



25th day. 



Beg id*. 
h. m. 

3 34m. 
8 40 

8 48 

4 9 
4 8 



Ends, 
h. m. 

8 30 0. 

8 34 

8 18 

8 S 

7 66 



Perigee and Apogee eftke Moon. 
Perigee, 7th day, 8h. M. | Apogee, 23d day, 9h. A. 



New Moon, 
First Quarter, 



6th day, 
13th * 



Ptuue* of the Moon. 
9h. 37.2m. M. I Full Moon, 
13.6 M. Last Quarter, 



30th day, 9h. 5.8m. A. 
98th " 10 40.9 A. 



Sun's upper limb rises and sets, (cor. for refract.) M. T. 



High water. M. time. 




1842.] August has Thirty-one Days. 35 


Passage of the Meridian (mean time) and Declinatipn of the Planets. 


9 


lit day. 


7th day. 


13th day. 


1 
• 1 
I 

85 


19th day. 


1 25th day. 


Souths. 
h. m. 

10 46T11 


Dee. 
--30 59 


Souths. 
h. m. 

ii im 


Dec. 
+30 « 


South*. 
h. m. 

t 11 34m 


Dec 

e 

--18 


Souths. 
h. m. 

11 49m 


Dec. 
+15 13 


Souths, 
a. m. 

11 a. 


Dec. 
+1141 


? 


3 33a. 


--6 17 


3 34a. 


-- 8 1( 


5 3 85a. 


--0 11 


3 86a. 


— 3 54 


3 38 


— 658 


3 


ii aim 


--31 36 


u um 


--20 41 


> 11 7m 


- -19 66 


10 59m 


-j-18 68 


10 6im 


4-17 55 


a 


10 30 - 


--31 54 


10 10 


- -21 4J 


I 9 55 


- -21 31 


9 43 


+31 16 


930 


+20 59 


3 


7 7a.- 


— 4 43 


6 44a. 


6 1] 


I 6 33a. 


— 6 41 


6 sa. 


— 6 13 


6 49a. 


— 644 




7 45D1 
9 87 • 
10 34a. 


— 3 6 
+23 37 
— 33 65 


7 83m 
9 34 

9 58a. 


— 8 61 
-J-28 & 
— 32 5i 


1 7 ism 
1 9 11 
) 9 32a. 


— 4 43 
-f-33 39 
— 28 8 


7 4m 

866 

9 7a. 


— 5 40 
+98 43 
— 38 6 


6 49m 
8 44 
8 428. 


— 6 43 
+38 43 
— 28 9 


h 


9 59 • 


—23 40| 


9 88 


— 32 4 


1 9 8 


— 22 44 


844 


— 22 45 


8 19 


— 33 47 


tf 


s 16m 


— i si: 


3 53m — 1 31 


J 3 38m 


— 1 89 


9 sm 


— 1 44 


1 89m 


— 1 48 



O 

55 

o 

m 
P> 

m 

1 
2 


•3 S 

I- 9 
g s 


Moon rites or sets. Mean time. 


PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 
TIONS. 

Sundays and other Remarkable 
Day. 


• 

o 

4 

a 
o 

8 
n 


• 



4 

M 

ha 

* 

• 


e 
2 


e* 

!. 

8 & 

•54 

A 
O 


3 

• 


b. n. 

6 com. 

7 46 


roe*, 
fa. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


rises. 
fa. m. 


rises. 
h. m* 


rises. 
h. m. 

im 
53 


■#■ J) c, d, et/ Pleiad, et y y . 


o om 


10 16m 


34m 


43m 


3 

4 


8 45 

9 46 


1 7 
3 15 


1 u 

338 


193 
339 


1 41 
3 48 


1 61 
3 67 


494. 


5 
6 

S. 

8 


10 46 

11 45 


sets. 

7 ioa. 


sets, 

7 7a. 


sets. 
7 sa. 


sets. 
6 67a. 


sett. 
6 66a. 


3 in ft. 

Uth Sunday after Trinity. 


418. 

1 54 


7 40a» 

8 7 


740a. 

8 8 


7 88a. 

8 8 


7 34a. 

8 8 


7 38a. 

8 10 


9 
10 
11 


3 36 

3 17 

4 9 


885 
9 8 
9 34 


8 86 

9 6 
9 89 


888 

9 9 
948 


8 43 

9 17 
9 66 


8 46 

923 

10 8 




12 


6 3 


10 9 


10 15 


10 33 J 


L0 38 


10 45 




IS 

& 
15 
16 
17 


9 56 


10 51 


10 58" 


11 4 1 


11 38 


11 33 


Uth Sunday after Trinity. 


6 6UL 

7 46 
840 
9 SO 


11 408. 


11 46a. 




14m 

1 9 
3 6 


34m 

1 19 
3 16 


86m 

1 86 


43m 

1 41 


49m 

1 47 


18 
19 
20 

S. 
22 
28 
24 


10 18 

11 4 
11 46 


3 88 

rises. 

6 sia. 


9 44 

rites. 
6 39a. 

6 6ia. 

7 13 
7 84 
7 57 


349 
rocs. 
6 37a. 


8 6 

rises. 

osia. 


3 18 

ritet. 
6 19a. 


? in ft. 

\3lh Sund. aft. TVwt. # J & m. 

Sup. <j 9 ©. 


8 

37m. 

1 7 
1 47 


6 6ia. 

7 13 
7 33 
7 66 


6 568. 

7 19 
735 

8 


6 47a. 

7 18 

7 39 

8 7 


6 46a. 

7 14 
749 

8 10 


25 


337 


8 19 


8 38 


836 


8 86 


8 43 




26 


8 9 


8 47 


8 63 


8 66 


9 10 


9 16 




27 

& 
29 
80 


8 55 


9 21 


9 26 


9 33 


9 49 


9 66 


\4th Sunday after Trinity. 


4 43m. 
685 
• 81 


io sa. 

10 53 
11*55 


10 aa. 

11 1 


10 16a. 1 

11 8 1 


84a. 

1 38 


10 48a. 

11 37 


8l| 7 39 


• • . 


2m 9m 


38m 


38m 





26 September, Ninth Month, begins on Thursday. [1842. 



Twilight begins and ends. Mean time. 



Boston, 
N.York, 
Wash. 
Charles. 
N. Orl's. 



1st day. 



Begins, 
b. m. 
3 44D1. 

3 49 
8 64 

4 8 
4 14 



Ends, 
h. m. 

8 16 a. 

8 11 
8 6 
7 A3 
7 46 



7th day. 



Begins, 
h. in. 

3 610). 

3 66 

4 
4 13 
4 17 



Ends, 
h. m. 

8 «a. 

8 
7 66 
7 43 
7 89 



13th day. 



Begins, 
h. m. 

3 69ID. 

i 4 8 

4 » 
4 17 

4 31 



Ends. 
b. m. 

7 63 a. 

7 49 

746 

7 34 

7 81 



19th duy. 



Begins, 
h. m. 

4 7m. 

4 10 
4 14 
4 32 

4 36 



Ends, 
h. m. 

7 40 a. 

7 87 

7 34 

7 36 

7 33 



25th day. 



Begins, 
h. m. 

4 16m. 

4 18 

4 31 

4 38 

4 80 



Ends, 
h. m. 

7 38 a. 

7 36 

7 33 

7 16 

7 14 



Perigee and Apogee of the Moon* 
Perigee, 4th day, 6h. A. | Apogee, 18th day, 4h. M. 



New Moon, 
First Quarter, 



Phases of the Moon. 
4th day, 5h. 7.2m. A. I Full Moon, 19th day, 
11th " 10 503 M. J Last Quarter, 27th " 



lb. 95.7m. A. 
9 56.9 M. 



6 
O 

o 
Q 



1 

2 

J3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 

11 
12 
IS 
14 
15 
16 
17 

18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
28 
24 

25 
26 
27 
28 

29 

ISO 



9 



X 



Th. 
P. 

S. 



Su. 

M. 

Tu. 

W. 

Th. 

P. 

S. 



Su. 

M. 

Tu. 

W. 

Th. 

P. 

Su. 

M. 

Tu. 

W. 

Th. 

P. 

S. 



Su. 

M. 

To. 

W. 

Th. 

P. 



Sun's upper limb rises and sets, (cor. for refract.) M. T. 

, . ■ .. ■■ ^ ■ ■■ ■ > 



$ 
I 



rises. 
h. m. 

6 34 

36 

37 



5 38 
39 
30 
31 
33 
88 
34 



5 35 
86 
87 
88 
89 
40 
41 



5 43 
44 

46 
46 
47 
48 
49 



5 60 
61 
63 
63 
64 
66 



sets. 
h. m 

6 86 
S3 
81 



6 39 
38 
36 
34 
33 
31 
19 



6 17 
16 
14 
13 
10 
8 
7 



6 6 
8 

1 


6 68 
66 
£1 

6 63 
61 
49 

47 
46 
44 



tS 
S5 



4 



rises. 
h. m. 

5 36 
37 
38 



6 39 
30 
31 
33 
33 
84 
86 



5 36 
87 
88 
89 
40 
41 
43 



5 43 
44 
46 
46 
47 
48 
49 



5 60 
61 
63 
63 
64 
66 



sets. 
h. m. 

6 33 
31 
39 



I. 
1* 



fe 



6 38 
36 
35 
S3 
31 
30 
18 



6 16 

15 

13 

11 

9 

8 

6 



6 4 
8 

1 

6 59 
68 
66 
64 



6 63 
61 

60 
48 
46 
44 



rises. 
h. m. 

5 38 

39 

30 



6 31 
33 
38 
34 
35 
86 
36 



5 37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
43 
43 



15 44 

44 
45 
46 
47 

48 
49 



5 60 
51 
63 
63 
64 
66 



sets. 
h. m. 

6 81 
39 

38 






6 

4 



6 36 
36 
33 
31 
30 
18 
17 



6 15 

14 

13 

10 

9 

7 





rises. 
h. m. 

5 84 

86 

86 

5 86 
37 
87 
38 
39 
39 
40 

5 41 
41 
43 
43 
43 
44 
45 



4 
3 
1 

6 59 
68 
66 
64 



6 63 
61 
60 
48 
46 
46 



5 45 
46 
46 
47 
48 
48 
49 



5 60 
60 
61 
63 
53 
63 



sets. 
h. m 

6 36 

34 

33 



6 31 
30 
19 
17 
16 
15 
13 



6 13 
11 
9 

8 
7 
6 

4 



3 

1 



5 68 

67 

66 

64 



6 63 
53 

60 
49 
48 
46 



6« 



rues. 
h. m. 

5 37 

37 

88 



5 38 
89 
89 
40 
40 
41 
41 



5 43 
43 
48 
44 
44 
46 
46 



5 46 
46 
47 
47 
48 
49 
49 



6 60 
60 
61 
61 
53 
63 



sets. 
h. m. 

6 33 

31 

30 



6 19 
18 
17 
15 
14 
13 
13 



6 11 
9 
8 
7 
6 
4 
8 



6 3 
1 

6 69 
68 
67 
66 
64 



6 63 
63 
61 
49 
48 
47 



High water. M. time. 



o 
4 

I 

s 

« 



o . 

© 

85 



c 

o 

an . 
© o 

1« 



h. m. 
7 39m 
869 
10 3 



10 64m 



11 41 


o sia. 


1 


1 41 


3 31 


8 6 


3 63a. 


4 48 


6 10 


7 88 


9 


10 


10 38 


11 16a. 


11 46 


• • • 


o iom 


35 


1 3 


1 83 


3 8m 


9 46 


8 81 


437 


6 44 


7 19 



h. m. 

6 19m 

6 39 

7 43 

8 34m 

9 31 
10 1 

10 40 

11 31 

ia. 

45 



1 ssa. 

338 
3 60 
5 18 
640 
740 
8 18 



b. m. 
8 39Q1 
469 
6 3 



6 64ID 

7 41 

8 31 

9 
9 41 

10 31 

11 6 



8 66a. 

9 36 
9 60 

10 16 

10 43 

11 13 
11 48 



36m 

1 11 

3 7 
8 34 

4 69 



11 63ID 
48 
3 10 
3 38 

5 

6 
638 



7 1603 
746 

8 10 

8 35 

9 3 
9 33 

10 8_ 

10 46m 

11 31 






37a. 

1 44 

3 19 



1842.] September has Thirty Days. 27 


Passage of the Meridian (mean time) and Declination of the Planets. 





1st day. 


7th day. 


13th day. 


19th day. 


25th day. 


Souths. 
h. m. 

39a. - 


Dec. 

■ • ' 
f-620 


Souths. 
h. m. 

46a. 


Dec. 
-J" 1 40 


Souths. 
h. m. 

67a 


Dec. Souths. 
o , «• «n. 
. — 2 52 1 6a. 


Dec. 

e • 
— 7 7 


Souths. 
h. m. 

1 13a. 


Dec. 
o J 
— 11 2 


? 


9 39 - 


— 9 27 


2 40 


— 12 18 


2 41 


— 15 


3 2 42 


— 17 36 


2 44 


— 19 55 


X 


10 4im - 


j-16 37 


o 32m 


-4-15 27 


10 23m -(-u 12 10 14m 


+12 66 


io 5m 


+11 36 


a 


9 14 - 


f-20 37 


9 


-f-20 16 


8 47 


+19 54 8 S3 


+19 32 


8 19 


+19 7 


s 


6 18a. - 


— 7 23 


5 oa. 


— 7 56 


4 4ia 


. — 8 28 4 22a, 


— 9 1 


4 4a. 


— 9 32 




6 32m- 
839 - 
8 13a. - 


— 84 
■f-23 41 
—23 11 


6 17m 

8 16 
7 49a. 


— 9 25 
-f-23 38 
-=-23 12 


6 im — 10 46 5 45m 
8 1 +23 36 7 46 

7 26a. — 23 12 7 3a. 


— 12 15 
+23 81 
— 23 11 


6 28m 

7 31 

3 40a. 


— 13 51 

+21 21 

23 10 


h 


7 51 — 29 48 


7 27 


— 22 49 


7 4 


— 22 60 6 40 


— 22 50 


6 17 


— 22 61 


# 


1 lim' — 1 64 


46m 


— 1 59 


o 22m — 2 


6 11 63 


— 9 11 


11 29 


— 2 17 


« 

e 
o 

at 
a) 

1 


si 


Moon rises or sets. Mean time. 


PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 
TIONS. 

Sundays and other Remarkable 
Days. 


s* 

§ 

CD 

e 


• 

© 

M 

o 
>< 

• 


a 

s 

? • 


e 

8 6 


m 

a 
m 

o • 
•S ° 

6* 

• 


h. m. 
8 6311). 


rises. 
h. m. 

1 em 


rises. 
h. m. 

1 12m 


rises. 
h. m. 

l ism 


rises. 
h. m. 

1 35m 


rises. 
h. m. 

1 44m 


■■ 


2 


9 61 


3 21 


9 27 


2 33 


2 47 


2 63 




3 

5. 
5 
6 


10 47 


8 41 


3 45 


3 49 


3 59 


4 4 


loth Sunday after Trinity. 
Jewish year 5603 begins. (3 9 d • 


11 4im. 

35a. 

1 27 


sets. 

6 33E. 

7 1 


sets. 

6 34a. 

7 4 


sets. 

6 35a. 

7 6 


sets. 

6 37a. 

7 4 


sets. 

6 40a. 

7 17 


T 


2 21 


7 33 


737 


7 38 


7 52 


7 67 




8 


3 16 


8 8 


8 13 


8 18 


8 34 


840 




9 

10 

& 
12 

13 
14 


4 12 
6 8 


849 

935 


8 54 

9 42 


9 1 

9 60 


9 20 
10 9 


9 28 
10 18 


1J. stationary. 

fi in ft- 

16** Sun. after Trinity, ft sta- 

d ft $ • [lionaiy. 
$ in?J. 


6 4a. 

6 67 

7 48 

8 36 


10 29a. 

11 30 


10 36a. 

11 37 


16 44a. 
11 43 


11 53 

o sm 

1 


11 isa. 
o li m 

1 7 


32m 


87m 


43m 


15 
16 


9 20 
10 3 


1 33 

2 35 


1 38 

2 39 


1 43 

2 43 


1 56 

2 53 


2 4 

3 68 


# D7rba. 


17 

19 

20 


10 44 


8 37 


8 39 


3 42 


3 48 


3 63 


llth Sunday after Trinity. 


11 24a. 
8 

o 4m. 


rises. 

5 40 a. 

6 1 


rises. 
6 40a. 
6 3 


rises. 

5 4ia. 

6 6 


rises. 

5 44a. 

6 11 


rises. 

5 46a. 

6 14 


21 
22 
23 
24 

26 


46 

1 28 
9 14 
8 2 


624 
6 60 
793 
8 1 


6 27 

6 66 

7 27 

8 7 


6 80 

6 69 

7 33 

8 13 


6 40 

7 12 

7 50 

8 31 


6 45 

7 18 

7 66 

8 40 


* D 101 H- 
Autumn begins. 

18*fc Sun. aft. Trinity. ^C D *8 


S 64m. 
4 48 


8 47a. 
944 


8 64a. 

9 61 


9 2a. 

9 68 


9 21a. 
10 18 


9 30a. 
10 26 . 


27 
28 
29 


5 44 
41 
7 87 


10 60 


10 64 


11 2 


11 20 


11 30 


St. Michael. 


o om 


o om 


o urn 


26m 


36m 


80| 8 31 


1 16 


1 19 


1 94 


1 36 


142 





28 October, Tenth Month, begins on Saturday. [1842. 


Twilight begins and ends. Mean time. 






1st day. 


7th da 


Snds. 
m. 


13th day. 


19th day. 


95th day. 




Begins, finds, 
h. m. h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


I 
h. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


finds, 
h. m. 


Begins 
ti. m. 


. Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins 
h. in. 


. Ends, 
h. m. 


Boston, 


4 23Q1. 7 17 a. 


4 30m. 


7 6 a. 


4 3701. 


6 65 a. 


4 44m 


. 6 46 a. 


4 60m 


.6 33 a. 


N. Fork, 


4 25 7 16 


4 82 


7 4 


488 


6 64 


4 44 


6 46 


450 


6 88 


Wash. 


4 27 7 13 


488 


7 3 


4 88 


6 54 


4 44 


6 46 


4 50 


6 88 


Charles. 


4 82 


r 6 


4 86 


7 


4 40 


6 62 


4 41 


6 45 


4 49 


6 89 


N. Orl'f . 


434 7 6 


4 87 


6 68 


4 41 


6 61 


1 45 


6 45 


448 


6 40 


Perigee and Apogee of the Moon. 
Perigee, 3d day, 5h. M. 1 Perigee, 31st day, lib. M. 
Apogee. 15th « 1 A. | 


Phases of I 
New Moon, 4th day, lh. 15.7m. M. 
First Quarter, 11th " 1 33.5 M. 


Ike Moon. 
Full Moon, 19th day, 6b. 4.3m. M. 
Last Quarter, 26th " 7 32.5 A. 


• 

e 
o 

S 

o 
• 

m 
Q 


• 

M 

9 
9 

Urn 
O 

►» 

m 


Sun's upper limb rises and sets, (cor. for refract.) M. T. 


High water. M. lime. 






o 

a 
3 

S 

n 


* 

M 

O 

9 

55 


1 * 


a 
o 

9 e> 

a-* 

O 


s 

• 

55 


• 

c 

a 

! 

CD 


0* 

M 

O 

c 

as 


O 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rues. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. \ sets. 
h. m.lh. m. 


rises 
b. m 


. sets. 
. h. m. 


h. m. 


h. ro. 


h.m. 


1 
2 


s. 

Su. 


6 67 

5 as 


5 42 

6 40 


6 66 
5 67 


6 43 
6 41 


6 55 

6 56 


6 43 
6 42 


5 54 .6 45 

6 64 5 44 


6 53 
5 64 


5 46 
5 45 


8 4im 


6 2im 

7 20m 


4 4im 


9 40m 


5 40m 


3 


M. 


69 


39 


58 


39 


67 


40 


65 


42 


64 


43 


10 29 


8 9 


6 29 


4 


Tu. 


6 


87 


69 


38 


68 


39 


66 


41 


55 


42 


11 6 


8 55 


7 5 


5 


W. 


1 


36 


6 


36 


69 


37 


67 


40 


65 


41 


11 54 


9 34 


7 54 


6 


Th. 


2 


S3 


1 


36 


6 


35 


57 


39 


56 


40 


37a. 


10 17 


8 37 


7 


P. 


3 


32 


2 


33 


1 


34 


68 


37 


57 


39 


1 18 


10 58 


9 18 


8 
9 


S. 
Su. 


4 
6 6 


30 


8 


31 
5 30 


2 
6 8 


32 
6 31 


69 
6 


36 
6 35 


67 
5 58 


37 
6 36 


2 


11 40 


10 


628 


6 4 


2 44a. 


24a. 


10 44m 


10 


M. 


7 


27 


-6 


28 


4 


29 





38 


69 


35 


8 30 


1 10 


11 30 


11 


Tu. 


8 


26 


7 


27 


6 


28 


1 


32 


69 


34 


4 20 


2 


o 20a. 


12 


W. 


9 


23 


8 


25 


6 


26 


2 


31 


6 


38 


5 83 


3 13 


1 33 


13 


Th. 


10 


22 


9 


23 


7 


25 


2 


30 





32 


7 4 


4 44 


3 4 


14 


P. 


11 


20 


10 


22 


8 


23 


8 


29 


1 


31 


8 18 


5 68 


4 13 


15 
16 


S. 


13 
6 14 


19 
5 17 


11 
12 


20 
5 19 


9 
6 10 


22 
5 21 


4 


27 


2 
6 2 


30 
6 29 


9 18 


6 68 


6 18 


6 5 6 26 


10 4a. 


7 44a. 


6 4a. 


17 


M. 


16 


15 


13 


17 


11 


19 


6 


25 


3 


27 


10 36 


8 16 


6 35 


18 


Tu. 


16 


14 


14 


16 


12 


18 


6 


24 


4 


26 


11 1 


8 61 


7 1 


19 


W. 


17 


12 


15 


14 


13 


16 


7 


23 


4 


25 


11 39 


9 19 


7 39 


20 


Th. 


18 


11 


16 


13 


14 


15 


8 


22 


6 


24 


• • • 


9 48 


8 8 


21 


P. 


30 


9 


18 


12 


15 


14 


9 


21 


6 


23 


o 8m 


10 18 


8 38 


22 
23 


S. 
Su. 


21 
6 22 


8 
5 6 


19 
6 20 


10 
5 


16 
6 17 


13 
6 11 


9 
6 10 


19 
6 18 


6 

6 7 


22 
6 21 


38 


10 62 


9 12 


l 12m 


11 soa. 


9 60a. 


24 


M. 


23 


6 


21 


7 


19 


10 


11 


17 


8 


20 


1 60 


• • • 


10 82 


25 


Tu. 


24 


8 


22 


6 


20 


9 


12 


16 


9 


19 


2 32 


o 12m 


11 17 


26 


W. 


26 


2 


23 


4 


21 


8 


13 


16 


9 


19 


3 17 


67 


■ 
• • • 


27 


Th. 


27 


1 


24 


8 


22 


6 


13 


14 


10 


13 


4 14 


1 54 


o urn 


28 


F. 


29 


4 69 


26 


2 


23 


6 


14 


13 


11 


17 


5 83 


3 13 


1 83 


29 
30 


S. 
Su. 


29 
6 31 


68 
4 57 


27 
6 28 - 


1 
t 59 


24 

6 25 


4 
6 2 


16 


12 


12 
6 12 


JL 

« 16 . 


6 54 


4 84 


3 64 


6 16 6 11 


8 12m 


6 62m 


4 13ID 


31 


M. 


I 


12 1 


65 


29 


68 


26 


1 


17 1 


10 


18 


M 1 


9 10 


650 


5 10 



1842.1 



October has Thirty-one Days. 



29 



Passage of the Meridian (mean time) and Declination of the Planets. 



9 
? 
$ 

fi 

s 

? 
u 

h 



1st 


day. | 


Souths. 


Dee. 


h. OB* 


e i 


i na. 


— 14 26 


945 


— 31 69 


66m 


-1-10 16 


8 4 


-J-18 44 


3 47a. 


6 1 


6 lira 


— 15 36 


7 16 


-f-38 2* 


6 isa. 


— 23 8 


5 54 


— 22 61 


11 4 


— 223 



7th day. 



Souths. 
h. m. 

1 19a. 

2 47 
9 46m 
760 

3 30a. 

4 63m 
7 1 

6 67a. 
6 32 
10 40 I 



Dec. 

e i 

— 17 14 
— 23 46 
--8 61 
-f-18 17 
— 10 8 J 
— 16 68J 

— 23 6 
-22 61 
— 2 28 



13th day. 



Souths. 
h. m. 

i 16a. 

2 48 

9 87m 
7 86 

3 13a. 

4 36m 
6 46 

6 36a. 
6 9 
10 15 



Dec. 

— 19 11 
— 25 15 

J7 24 
17 63 
— 10 68 
— 19 6 
-f-23 16 
— 23 2 
— 22 60 
— 2 33 



19th day. 



Souths. 
h. m. 

l 2a. 

3 49 

9 27m 
7 19 
2 67a. 

4 4m 

629 
5 16a. 

4 47 
9 61 



Dec. 

o i 
— 19 51 

— 26 26 

+ 6 

-{-17 30 

— 11 24 

— 20 32 

-f-23 16 

— 22 67 

— 22 49 

— 238 



25th day. 



Souths. 
h. m. 

88a. 

3 49 

9 17m 

7 4 

2 40a. 

8 66m 
6 18 

4 66a. 
4 26 

927 



Dec. 



a 



19 28 

—27 H 

4 83 

17 7 
—11 60 
— 22 40 
+23 16 
— 22 62 
— 32 49 
— 2 42 



a 
© 

o 

m 

Q 



s. 

3 
4 
6 
6 

7 
J 

S. 

ia 
n 

12 
13 
14 
16 

& 

17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 

£ 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 

SL 
31 



o Eh 

§ i 



h. m. 
9 25m. 



10 ism. 

U 11 

o 4a. 

1 

1 57 

2 66 

3 53 



4 49a. 

5 42 

6 31 

7 17 

8 1 
8 42 
922 



9 20a. 
10 19 
Jtl 26 



io 2a. 

10 43 

11 26 

8 
o urn. 

69 

1 60 



3 44m. 

8 40 

4 85 

5 80 
633 

7 15 

8 6 

9 67m. 
949 



Moon rises or sets. Mean time. 



© 

a 
o 

« 



rises. 
h. m. 

3 33m 



3 63m 
sets. 

6 2sa. 

6 2 

6 43 

7 28 

8 20 



28m 

1 29 
3 29 



3 som 
rises. 

4 30a. 

4 65 

5 25 

6 3 
6 46 



7 40a. 

8 42 
960 

11 1 



16m 

1 80 



2 44m 
4 1 



M 

5 



rises. 
h. in. 

2 37m 



3 6301 

sets. 
6 81 a. 

6 7 

6 48 

7 36 

8 27 



c 
o 

f ■ 
a 



rises. 
h. m. 

2 39m 



3 64m 

sets. 

5 35a. 

6 11 

6 63 

7 42 

8 34 



9 26a. 
10 27 
1127 



32m 

1 31 

2 31 



3 som 

rises. 

4 32a. 

4 68 

5 80 

6 8 
6 53 



7 47a. 
848 
9 66 
11 5 



17m 

1 82 



2 45m 
4 1 



9 33a. 

10 84 

11 36 



36m 

1 35 
3 32 



3 80D1 
rises. 

4 86a. 

5 3 

6 36 

6 14 

7 



7 64a. 

8 54 

10 1 

11 10 



021m 

1 34 



2 46m 
4 



c 



rises. 
h. m. 

2 43m 



3 66m 

sets. 
43a. 

6 24 

7 9 

8 1 
8 63 



9 62a. 

10 48 

11 49 



47m 

1 42 

2 36 



3 sim 
rises. 

4 43a. 
6 14 

5 60 

6 32 

7 19 



s 



rises. 
h. m. 

2 6im 



4 om 

sets. 

5 48a. 

6 30 

7 18 

8 10 

9 3 



10 ia. 

10 59 

11 69 



63m 

1 46 

2 40 



8 14a. 

9 13 

10 18 

11 23 



sim 

1 89 



2 46m 

3 65 



3 33m 
rises. 

4 47a. 
6 20 

5 67 

6 40 

7 28 



8 22H. 

9 22 

10 25 

11 30 



36m 

1 41 



2 47m 

3 65 



PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 
TIONS. 

Sundays and other Remarkable 
Days. 



\9th Sunday after Trinity. 



6 «?,#*o7ri. [* ]> A Ophi. 
9 et J greatest elongation. 
20th Sun. after Trin. 



# D dm. 

21s* Sund. after Trin. <$ C r£, 



Amer. disc. 1492 N. S. $ stat. 
20ih. >|C J) 47 et t cp. 

22d Sun. after Trin. # ]> B tf . 



[St. Simon and St. Jude. 
23d Sund. after Trin. # J) e &. 
Inf. (5 9©. 



30 November, Eleventh Month, begins on Tuesday. [1842. 


Twilight begins and ends. Mean time. 




1st day. 


7th day. 


13ih day. 


19th day. 


25th day. 


Begins, 
h. no. 


Ends, 
b. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
b. m. 


Begins. 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Boston, 


4 Mm. 


6 30 a. 


6 6m. 


6 23 a. 


6 nm. 


6 iaa. 


6 17m. 


6 u a. 


6 asm. 


6 ii a. 


N.York, 


4 67 


6 31 


6 4 


6 34 


6 10 


6 19 


6 16 


6 16 


6 SI 


6 13 


Wash. 


4 57 


6 31 ' 


6 3 


6 36 


6 8 


6 31 


6 13 


6 18 


6 19 


6 16 


Charles. 


464 


6 34 


469 


6 39 


6 3 


6 35 


6 7 


6 33 


6 19 


6 33 


N. Orl's. | 4 53 


6 36 


4 66 


6 8 


6 1 


6 38 


6 6 


6 26 


5 9 


6 35 




Apogee 


Apogee and Perigee of the Moon. 
, 12th day, 5b. M. | Perigee, 37th day, lib. A. 





Phases of the Moon. 
New Moon, 3d day, lOh. 59.6m. M. 1 Full Moon, 17th day, lOh. 20.9ra. A. 
First Quarter, 9th" 8 6.8 A. | Last Quarter, 25th " 3 51.1 M. 


| Days of Month. 
Days of Week. 


Suu'i upper limb rises and sets, (cor. for refract.) M. T. 


High water. M. time. 








• 
o 

JA 

e 
o 

m 
O 
CD 


M 

O 

o 


a 


a 
3 
S <j 

O 


N. Orleans, 
tec. 


a 
2 

5 

« 


M 

M 


Charleston, 
tec. 


rises. 
i. m. 


sets. 
i. m- 


rises. 

\u m. 


sets. 

h. m. 


rises. \ sets. 
ti. m. h. m. 


rises. 
\i. m. 


sets. 

b. m. 


rises. \ sets. 
b. m. h. m. 


h. nt. 


h. m. 


h. m< 


lTu.« 


3 33 - 


1 64 


6 30 


4 67 


6 27 i 


5 


6 18 


5 9 


6 14 


5 13 


io im 


7 4im 


6 im 


2W. 


34 


53 


31 


66 


28 < 


1 69 


19 


9 


16 


13 


10 60 


8 30 


6 60 


3Th. 


36 


61 


82 


64 


29 


58 


19 


8 


15 


12 


11 36 


9 16 


7 36 


4 p. 


37 


60 


34 


63 


31 


57 


30 


7 


16 


11 


o oa. 


10 


8 


5S. 

QSu. 


38 


49 

4 48 


35 
6 36 


62 

4 61 


6 32 


66 


31 

6 22 


6 
6 5 


17 
6 18 


10 
6 10 


l l 


10 41 


9 1 


6 39 


6 33 


4 55 


l 44a. 


11 34m 


9 44Q1 


7M. 


41 


47 


37 


60 


34 


54 


23 


4 


IS 


9 


2 25 


o 5a. 


10 26 


8Tu. 


43 


45 


38 


49 


35 


53 


24 


4 


19 


8 


3 9 


49 


11 9 


»W. 


43 


44 


40 


48 


86 


52 


26 


3 


3d 


S 


3 57 


1 37 


11 67 


10 Th. 


44 


43 


41 


47 


37 


61 


26 


3 


21 


7 


467 


2 37 


67a. 


HP. 


46 


42 


42 


46 


38 


60 


27 


3 


23 


6 


6 5 


3 45 


3 5 


12 S. 


47 


41 
4 40 


43 
6 44 


45 
4 44 


39 
6 40 


49 


27 


1 


23 


6 
5 6 


7 12 


4 63 


8 12 


13 Su. 6 43 


4 48 


6 23 


5 


623 


8 lsa. 


6 65a. 


4 15a. 


14 M. 


49 


39 


46 


43 


41 


47 


29 





24 


6 


9 10 


6 50 


6 10 


15 Tu. 


61 


39 


47 


43 


43 


47 


30 


4 69 


25 


4 


9 52 


7 32 


5 62 


16 W. 


62 


88 


48 


42 


44 


46 


31 


69 


26 


4 


10 30 


8 10 


6 30 


17 Th. 


63 


37 


49 


41 


45 


45 


32 


68 


27 


8 


11 4 


8 44 


7 4 


18 P. 


64 


36 


60 


40 


46 


44 


38 


68 


37 


3 


11 41 


922 


7 41 


19 S. 

20 Su. 


56 
6 67 


35 


51 


39 
4 89 


47 
S 48 


44 


34 


67 


28 


3 
5 2 


... 


10 


8 
8 58a. 


434 


6 53 


4 43 


6 35 


4 67 


6 29 


o om 


10 33a. 


21 M. 


68 


34 


64 


38 


49 


43 


36 


66 


30 


2 


68 


11 20 


9 40 


22 Tu. 


59 


33 


66 


38 


60 


42 


37 


66 


31 


2 


1 40 


... 


10 23 


23 W. 


7 


32 


66 


37 


61 


42 


37 


66 


32 


1 


2 33 


o sm u 15 


24 Th, 


3 


32 


67 


36 


62 


41 


38 


66 


33 


1 


3 15 


065 


• • • 


25 P. 


8 


31 


58 


36 


64 


40 


39 


66 


33 


1 


4 10 


1 50 


o 10m 


26 S. 


4 


31 


59 


35 
4 35 


65 
6 56 


40 
4 40 


40 
6 41 


55 
4 56 


34 
6 85 


1 
5 1 


5 11 


2 61 


i n_ 

2 2103 


27Su.7 6 


4 30 


7 


6 2im 


4 im 


28 M. 


6 


30 


2 


35 


67 


40 


42 


64 


36 





7 31 


5 11 


3 31 


29 Tu 


. 7 


30 


3 


34 68 


39 


43 


64 


37 





836 


6 16 


4 36 


SOW. 


8 


29 


4 


34 


| 69 


39 


44 


64 


38 





1 9 35 


7 15 


6 35 | 



184 


[2.] November has Thirty Days. 31 


Passage of the Meridian (mean lime; and Declination of the Planets. 




1st day. 


7th day. 


Mh day. 


, 19th day. 


25th day. 


9 


Seuths. 
h. m. 

u 84m- 


Dee. 

e > 

-13 68 


Souths. 

h. m. 

10 63 m 


Dee. 
—10 27 


Souths. 
h. m. 

10 33m 


Dec. 

e i 

— 10 1 


Souths. 
h. m. 

10 32m 


Dee. 

e 1 
— 11 69 


Souths. 
h. in. 

10 3917) 


Dec. 
— 14 64 


? 

fi 

s 


3 46a.- 

9 6m- 

6 45 - 
3 22a. - 


-27 47 
-2 52 
-16 43 
-12 13 


2 4ia.- 

8 65m- 

6 29 ■ 

2 6a. 


—27 66 
-[- 1 34 
"4-16 24 
— 12 36 


2 ssa. 

8 45m 
6 11 
1 61 


— 27 44 

— a 

+16 1 
— 12 54 


k 2 20a. 
\ 8 35m 
f 5 64 
I 1 46a. 


— 27 18 
— 1 29 
-|-15 63 
— 13 7 


2 3a. 

8 34m 
5 36 

1 31a. 


— 26 86 
— 364 
-{-16 43 
— 1132 




s 3im - 

6 62 - 

4 soa.- 


-24 34 

[-23 20 
-22 46 


3 74m 

5 34 

4 12a. 


— 26 15 
-J-23 27 

— 22 38 


2 44 
6 16 

3 63a. 


— 37 64 2 18m 
-f-23 38 4 56 
— 22 30 3 34a. 


— 29 25 
-f"23 52 
— 22 21 


1 53m 
4 86 
3 15a. 


— 30 39 
-(-24 12 
—23 11 


h 


4 0- 


-22 47 


3 38 


— 22 46 


3 17 


— 22 44 


1 2 56 


— 22 41 


3 35 


— 23 39 


¥ 


869 - 


-2 46! 


8 34 


— 2 60 


8 10 | — 2 62 7 47 


— 2 54 


7 33 


— 3 66 


• 
JS 
♦» 

c 

o 

I 

s 

1 

2 


• 
js • 

1.1 
&* 

3* 


Moon rises or sets. Mean time. 


PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 
TIONS. 

Sundays and other Remarkable 
Days. 


• 

o 
4 

s 
o 

8 


* 

M 

S 

• 

as 


0* 

§ 

M 

e • 
.5 c 


I 

IB • 

JS 

u 


§ 

• 

2; 


h. DL 

10 4300. 

11 39 


sets, 
h. m. 

3 668. 

4 33 


sets, 
h. m. 

3 69a. 

4 38 


sets. 
h. m. 

4 4a. 

4 44 


sets. 
h. m. 

4 15a. 
4 58 


sets. 
1. m. 

4 26a. 
6 10 


All Saints. $ in JJ. 
All Souls. <j a $ . 


3 


37 a. 


6 16 


5 23 


5 29 


5 47 


6 65 




4 


1 36 


6 7 


6 14 


6 20 


6 39 


6 49 




5 

7 
8 


3 36 


6 69 


7 11 

8 13a. 

9 17 
10 20 


7 18 


7 38 


7 47 


2<Uh Sun. after Trin. & { ft. 


3 3i a. 

4 33 
6 11 


8 7a. 

9 13 
10 16 


8 20a. 

9 23 
10 25 


8 38a. 

9 39 
10 37 


8 47a 

9 46 
10 44 


9 
10 
11 


6 66 
638 

7 19 


11 19 


11 22 


11 24 


11 34 


11 89 


$ et £ stationary. 


19ID 


o 22m 


24m 


29m 


33m 


12 

a 

14 
15 


7 69 


1 20 


1 21 


1 21 


1 24 . 


1 16 


5|CD x l elx* H- 
25lh Sund. after Tri»sity. J at 

[greatest brill. 


8 40 a. 

9 22 
10 6 


2 20m 

3 20 

4 21 


2 19m 

3 13 

4 16 


2 19m 

3 17 

4 16 


2 nm 

3 12 

4 4 


2 ism 

3 13 

4 6 


16 
17 

18 


10 63 

11 44 

8 


rises, 

4 oa. 

4 42 


rises. 
4 6a. 
4 49 


rises. 

4 12a. 

4 66 


rises. 

4 28a. 

5 14 


rises. 
4 86a. 
6 24 


$ greatest eloog. j|< <[ p, cp. 


19 


88 


6 34 


5 41 


6 48 


6 8 


6 18 


26th Sun. after Trin. j|C J> By . 


S. 
21 
22 
23 


1 3401 
3 30 
3 26 
420 


. 6 36a. 

7 43 

864 

10 6 


, 6 42a. 

7 49 

8 68 
10 9 


6 49a. 

7 64 
9 3 

10 13 


7 8H. 

8 11 

9 17 
10 23 


7 na. 

820 

9 34 

10 39 


24 

26 
26 

s. 

2S 
23 
3C 


6 11 
6 1 

i 6 61 


11 18 


11 29 11 20 


11 29 


11 33 


* T> g l Si- 


30TT 


1 o 22m 


I 33m 


34m 


37m 


7 4im 

1 8 32 
) 9 25 
> 10 21 


• 1 44Q 

3 69 

4 13 
6 29 


1 1 44IT 

3 67 

4 10 

5 34 


i i 44m 

3 55 

4 7 
4 20 


1 41111 

2 49 

3 56 
5. 6 


1 41 

2 47 

3 64 
6 1 


Advent Sunday. 

<j D <J > ? stationary. 

St. Andrew. 





32 December, Twelfth Month, begins on Thursday. [1842. 


Twilight begins and ends. Moan time. 




lit day. 


7th dny. 


13th day. 


19t.li day. 


35th day. 




Begins. Ends, 
h. m. h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. rn. 


Begim 
h. m. 


. Ends. Begins, 
h. m. h. m. 


Ends. 
h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Boston, 


6 39m. 6 


9 a. 


5 36m. 


6 9 a. 


5 40D1 


.6 8 a. 5 43m. 6 io a. 


6 46m. 


6 ua. 


N.York 


» 6 27 6 11 


6 83 


6 11 


5 87 


6 11 6 41 


6 18 


6 44 


6 16 


Wash. 


6 35 6 13 


6 80 


6 14 


6 84 


6 14 6 88 


6 16 


6 41 


6 19 


Chariot. 


6 17 6 31 


6 33 


6 S3 


5 36 


638 6 39 


6 36 


6 83 


638 


N. Orl's 


• 5 13 6 35 


5 18 


6 36 


6 34 


6 11 


5 36 


6 39 


6 38 


683 


Apogee and Perigee of the Moon. 
Apogee, 10th day, lh. M. | Perigee, S3d day, 5h. A. 


Phases of the Moon. 
New Moon, lit day, Uh. 6.5m. A. Last Quarter, 24th day, llh, 37.3m. M. 
Pint Quarter, 9th " 5 16.3 A. New Moon, 31#t " 1 54.1 A. 
Full Moou, 17th « 1 37.9 A. 


• 

§ 
23 

o 
■ 


* 

M 

• 
• 

■ 
& 


Son's upper limb rises and sets, (cor. for refract.) M. T. 


1 H igh water. M . time. 






o 
M 

I 
I 


OS 

M 

h 


a* 


1 *• 

.22 

.3 

o 


c 

a 

• 

85 


a 
S 

5 


M 
© . 

S5 


a 
|. 

JO 

O 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. rn. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
b. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. ; sets. 
h. m. h. m. 


rues. 
h. m, 


sets. 
h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


1 


Th. 


7 10 


4 39 


7 6 


4 34 


7 


4 89 


646 


4 54 


6 38 


5 


9 3im 


7 urn 


6 8im 


2 


P. 


11 


39 


6 


83 


1 


39 


45 


64 


89 





433 


9 8 


7 33 


ss. 

45m. 


13 
7 13 


38 


7 


33 


3 


88 
4 88 


46 


64 


40 
6 41 



6 


6a. 


9 46 


8 6 


4 38 


7 8 


4 83 


7 3 


6 47 4 64 


48a. 


10 38m 6 48m 


5 


M. 


14 


33 


9 


83 


S 


3G 


48 


64 


41 





1 39 


11 9 


939 


6 


Tu. 


16 


38 


10 


83 


4 


88 


49 


64 


43 





3 6 


11 46 


10 6 


7 


W. 


16 


38 


11 


83 


6 


88 


49 


64 


43 





3 46 


36a. 


10 46 


8 


Th. 


17 


38 


13 


83 


6 


88 


50 


64 


44 


1 


3 36 


1 


1136 


9 


P. 


17 


38 


13 


83 


7 


88 


61 


64 


44 


1 


4 16 


1 66 


160. 


10 
11 


S. 
Su. 


18 

7 19 


38 


14 


33 
4 83 


8 
7 9 


38 
4 83 


63 


64 


46 

646 


I 

6 1 


6 


3 40 


1 


4 38 


7 15 


6 53 4 65 


6 63a. 


3 83d. 


1 58a. 


12 


M. 


20 


36 


15 


33 


9 


39 


54 


66 


46 


3 


6 54 


4 34 


364 


13 


Tu. 


31 


33 


16 


83 


10 


89 


64 


65 


47 


9 


766 


5 86 


8 66] 


14 


W. 


33 


38 


16 


33 


11 


89 


56 


65 


48 


3 


8 69 


6 39 


469 


15 


Th. 


33 


39 


17 


33 


13 


39 


66 


66 


48 


9 


956 


7 36 


666 


16 


P. 


S3 


39 


18 


33 


13 


40 


66 


66 


49 


8 


10 40 


830 


6 40 


17 
18 


S. 
Su. 


34 
7 34 


39 
4 39 


18 
7 19 


33 


13 


40 
4 40 


67 
6 53 


66 
4 67 


60 
660 


8 
6 4 


11 36 


9 5 


7 36 

8 7a. 


4 34 


7 14 


• • • 


9 47a. 


19 


M. 


35 


SO 


90 


34 


14 


41 


68 


67 


61 


4 


o 7m 


10 30 


860 


20 


Tu. 


36 


30 


SO 


85 


15 


41 


69 


68 


61 


4 


60 


11 13 


983 


21 


W. 


36 


81 


31 


35 


15 


43 


69 


68 


63 


6 


1 33 


11 65 


10 16 


22 


Th. 


36 


31 


31 


86 


16 


42 


7 


59 


63 


6 


3 16 


... 


10 68 


23 


P. 


37 


33 


33 


36 


16 


43 





69 


68 


6 


968 


38m 


1160 


24 
25 


S. 
Su. 


7 37 
7 38 


33 


33 


87 


17 


43 


1 


6 


63 


7 
5 7 


8 60 


1 89 


. • • 

o 40m 


4 38 


7 33 


4 37 


7 17 


4 44 


7 1 


6 


654 


4 40m 


3 90m 


26 


M. 


38 


34 


33 


88 


17 


44 


1 


1 


54 


8 


6 34 


3 14 


134 


27 


Tu. 


38 


34 


33 


89 


18 


45 


3 


3 


66 


8 


645 


435 


345 


28 


W. 


39 


36 


33 


39 


18 


46 


9 


3 


66 


9 


8 8 


5 48 


4 8 


29 


Th. 


39 


36 


34 


40 


18 


47 


3 


8 


66 


10 


9 91 


7 1 


5 91 


30 F. 


39 


37 34 


41 


19 


47 


3 


4 


66 


10 


10 33 


8 9 


693 


31 la 


30 


37 ■ 31 43 


19 


48 


8 


4 


66 


11 


11 11 


8 61 


7" 

























1842.] December has Thirty~ont Days. 33 


Passage of the Meridian (moan time) and Declination of the Planets. 




J at day. 


7th day. 


13th day. 


19th day. 


25th day. 


Souths. 


Dec. 


Souths. 


Dee. 


Souths 


Dec. 


Souths. 


Deo. 


Souths. 


Dec. 




h. m. 


e ' 


hi in. 


« / 


h. in* 


• 


( h. ra» 


• i 


h. m* 


e « 


?> 


io 6ora- 


—17 64 


ii sm 


— 20 36 


11 19m — 22 44 11 35m 


— 24 13 


u 53m 


— 24 67 


? 


l 38a.- 


—26 30 


l 8a. 


— 24 27 


1 ossa 


. — 23 


11 64 


—21 24 


11 16 


— 19 63 


3 


8 14m- 


— 4 18 


8 4m 


— 6 41 


7 63m — 7 


2 7 43 


— 8 21 


733 


— 987 


a 


6 16 - 


-f-16 39 


4 67 


+15 30 


437 


-}-16 44 4 15 


-|-15 65 


8 68 


-{-16 18 


s 


i ea.- 


—13 82 


o Ma, 


— 13 40 


1 36a 


. — 13 46 29a. 


— 13 48 


7a. 


— 13 47 


$ 


i 36m- 


—31 42 


68m 


— 32 31 


! som — 33 


1 1167 


—83 12 


11 28 


— 33 1 


? 


4 14 - 


■f-24 84 


3 63 


-f-24 68 


3 20 


-f-25 36 3 6m 


-f-26 13 


240m 


4-28 66 


u 


2 56a.- 


—22 


2 88a. 


— 21 48 


2 20a 


. — 21 86 2 2a. 


— 21 21 


1 44a. 


—21 6 


h 


2 14 - 


—22 36 


1 63 


— 22 33 


1 32 


— 22 29 1 11 


— 22 24 


61 


— 22 21 


W 


660 - 


— 2 65 


6 86 


— 2 66 


6 12 


— 2 64 6 49 


— 2 6'2 


5 25 


— 2 60 


• 


& S 


Moon rises or sets. Mean time. 


PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 


c 




. •> 






o 
5 




4 


4 


R 

& 


a 
3 


a 
4 


TIONS. 


O 




a 
. e 

*• 

s 


M 


1 




9 . 

• 


Sundays and other Remarkable 
Days. 


Q 


« 


53 


fc 


O 


55 






sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 






h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h» m. 




1 


11 19m. 


3 63a. 


4 oa. 


4 68. 


4 25a. 


4 84a. 




2 


o 18a. 


4 47 


464 


• 1 


6 21 


6 30 




3 


1 16 


6 49 


6 55 


6 2 


6 21 


630 


d « ?. 

2d Bund, in Advent. 1$ station. 


2 u a. 


6 66a. 


7 oa. 


7 6a. 


7 22a. 


7 sia. 


6 


S 2 


7 69 


8 4 


8 


823 


8 30 


Begin. 1st session of 28ih Cong. 


6 


S 49 


9 5 


8 


9 12 


9 23 


28 




7 


432 


10 7 


10 9 


10 12 


10 10 


10 92 




8 


5 14 


11 8 


11 


11 10 


11 14 


11 16 


r 


9 
10 

S. 


664 

6 36 












5 intf. 
3d Sund. in Advent. $ in A. 


o 7m 


o 7m 


o em 


sm 


sm 


7 16a. 


1 6m 


l om 


i 4m 


1 im 


1 om 


12 


769 


2 8 


2 5 


2 4 


1 67 


1 66 


} stationary. 


13 


8 45 


3 10 


3 7 


3 4 


263 


2 50 




14 


9 34 


4 13 


4 


4 6 


3 61 


8 47 




15 


10 27 


6 18 


5 14 


5 9 


462 


4 47 




16 


11 23 


rises. 


rises. 


fMW. 


rises. 


rises. 


Tea destroyed in Boston, 1773. 


17 


8 


4 23a. 


4 30a. 

5 34a. 


4 368. 


4 66a. 


6 oa. 


[Inten. of light 2.292. 
4th Sunday in Advent. $ $ ©. 


o 21m. 


5 2sa. 


6 4ia. 


6 69a. 


6 8a. 


19 


1 18 


6 41 


6 46 


6 62 


7 7 


7 18 


18th. Inf. 6 ? ©• 


20 


2 14 


7 65 


7 50 


7 67 


8 14 


8 21 


*HC [*>*A- 


21 


3 8 


9 9 


12 


9 14 


9 22 


026 


St. Thomas. Winter begins. 


22 


8 60 


10 23 


10 24 


10 26 


10 28 


10 31 


Landing at Plymouth, 1620. 


23 


4 48 


11 35 


11 34 


U 35 


11 37 


11 34 


* D«tQ- 


24 

& 


638 












Christmas Day. 


6 27m. 


47m 


47m 


45m 


som 


39m 


26 


7 10 


2 1 


1 68 


1 66 


1 46 


1 43 


St. Stephen. 


27 


8 18 


3 15 


3 10 


3 7 


2 63 


2 49 


St. John. 


28 





4 36 


4 21 


4 16 


3 59 


3 64 


Innocents. Sup. d 9 ©> d 9 ©• 


29 


10 6 


6 34 


5 28 


6 22 


5 4 


4 67 




80 


11 8 


6 82 


626 


620 


6 9 6 66 




81 


11 60 


7 24 


7 28 


7 13 


665 1 6 49 


Sun eclipsed, invisible in U. S. 



84 ECLIPSES OF JANUARY llTH AND 26TH, AND JULY 7tH. [1842. 

ECLIPSES IN 1842. 

In the year 1842, there will be five eclipses ; viz. three of the Sun and 
two of the Moon ; of all these eclipses, only one, a very small eclipse 
of the Moon, will be partly visible in the United States; the other 
eclipse of the Moon will be very large ; and two of the solar eclipses 
will be annular and one of them total. They will take place as follows : 

I. Tuesday, January 11th. An annular Eclipse of the Sun, invisible 
in the United States. 

Beginning of the General Eclipse on the Earth at 8h 44m. M. (Mean 

Time at Washington) in Lat. 44° 40' South. Long. 139° 4' West from 

Greenwich. 
Beginning of the Central and Annular Eclipse at lOh. 24m. M. in Lat. 

65° 9' South, and Long. 160° 3' East. 
Sun centrally eclipsed on the meridian of the place at llh. 50m. M. in 

Lat. 88° 41' South, and Long. 57° 28' West. 
End of the Central and Annular Eclipse at Oh. 11m. A. in Lat 44° 2' 

South, and Long. 34° 50' East. 
End of the General Eclipse on the Earth lh. 51m. A. in Lat. 18° 27' 

South, and Long. 5° 4' West. 

This Eclipse will be visible in the Southern Ocean, in the southern 
part of Africa, and in Patagonia. 

II. Wednesday, January 26th. A partial Eclipse of the Moon, in- 
visible in the United States. 

h tn 

The Moon sets at Washington at 6 20 M. 

First contact with Penumbra at 10 8 

Beginning of Eclipse, 11 9 

Greatest obscuration, . . 36 A. ( at Washington. 

End of Eclipse, ... 22 

Last contact with Penumbra, . 3 4 

The Moon rises at Washington at 5 27 

Digits eclipsed 9° 30', on the northern limb. 

III. Thursday and Friday, July 7th and 8th. A total Eclipse of the 
Sun, invisible in the United States. 

Beginning of the General Eclipse on the Earth at 7th day, llh. 24m. A. 

(Mean Time at Washington) in Lat. 27° 55' North,, and Long. 10° 30' 

East of Greenwich. 
Beginning of the Central and Total Eclipse at 8th day, Oh. 25m. M. in 

Lat. 37° 9' North, and Long. 10° 21' West. 
Sun centrally eclipsed on the meridian of the place at lh. 47m. M. in 

Lat. 51° 47' North, and Long. 77° 27' East. 
End of the Central and Total Eclipse at 3h. 30m. M. in Lat. 14° 52' 

North, and Long. 147° 54' East. - 

End of the General Eclipse on the Earth at 4h. 31m. M. urLat. 5° 17 

North, and Long. 128° 31' East. 



Mean Time 



1842.] 



ECLIPSE OF JULY 22d. 



35 



The centre of the shadow passes over the points on the Earth's sur- 
face, whose positions are 

Latitude 37° 7' North. 
42 39 



of Greenwich, 



48 


32 


53 


5 


53 


22 


51 


48 


44 


50 


35 


6 


26 


43 


19 


51 


14 


50 North. 



Longitude 10° 19' West, 

2 49 East, 

19 24 

40 29 

67 39 

77 27 

97 3 

113 13 

125 33 
137 7 

147 47 East, 

that is, through the South of Spain, France, and Germany, through Po- 
land and the Russian Empire to the North Pacific Ocean. 

This Eclipse will be visible throughout the whole of Europe, all of 
Asia but the southern part of Hindostan and Arabia; almost all the 
northern portion of Africa, including Egypt and the whole of the Med- 
iterranean coast, and the Desert of Sahara, and extending almost to the 
Gulf of Guinea ; also in the northwest part of North America, in Green- 
land, Borneo, and part of New Guinea. 

IV. Friday, July 22d. A small Eclipse of the Moon, partly visible 
in the United States, as follows, viz. 





Eclips 


e begins. 


Middle of Eclipse. 


Moon geti. 




h. 


m 


h. m. 


h. 


m. 


Augusta, Ga. 


4 


17.0 M. 


invis. 


5 


9 M. 


St. Augustine, 


4 


28.3 


invis. 


5 


14 


Baltimore, . 


4 


38.1 


invit. 


4 


52 


Buffalo, N. Y. . 


4 


28.9 


invis. 


4 


45 


Charleston, . 


4 


24.8 


invis. 


5 


9 


Cincinnati, • 


4 


6.8 


invis. 


4 


51 


Detroit, 


4 


12.8 


invis. 


4 


46 


Dover, Del. . • . 


4 


42.6 


invis. 


4 


50 


Jefferson, Mo. 


a 


36.1 


4 38.9 M. 


4 


52 


Lexington, Ky. 
Little Rock, Ark. 


4 


7.4 


invis. 


4 


58 


3 


35.8 


4 38.6 


5 


7 


Louisville, Ky. 


4 


2.6 


invis. 


4 


58 


St. Louis, Mo. 


3 


46 2 


4 49.0 


4 


52 


Mobile, .... 


3 


51.9 


4 54.7 


5 


17 


Nashville . . • 


3 


57.3 


5 0.1 


5 


3 


Natchez, .... 


3 


39.6 


4 41.8 


5 


12 


New Orleans, • 


3 


44.2 


4 47.0 


5 


16 


New York, . . 


4 


48.5 


invis. 


4 


50 


Philadelphia, 


4 


43.9 


invis. 


4 


52 


Pittsburg, 


4 


24.5 


invis. 


4 


52 


Richmond, . 


4 


34.8 


invis. 


4 


58 


Savannah, 


4 


20.1 


invis. 


5 


12 


Springfield, 11. 


3 


46.4 


4 49.2 


4 


54 


Washington, D. C. . 


1 4 


36.5 


invis. 


4 


54 



Mean Time of the respective places. 



36 ECLIPSE OP DECEMBER 31 ST. [1842. 

This Eclipse will be wholly invisible in New England and the North- 
eastern part of New York, and the Moon will set eclipsed to the reat of 
the United States. 

First contact with Penumbra, July 22d, 3 3.6 M.^ 

Beginning of Eclipse, " «' 4 36.5 I Mean Time 

Middle of Eclipse, " « 5 39.3 > at 

End of Eclipse, << « 6 42.1 I Washington. 

Last contact with Penumbra, (< a 8 15.0 J 

Digits eclipsed 3° 27' on the Moon's southern limb. 

V. Saturday, December 31st. An Annular Eclipse of the Sun, in- 
visible in the United States. 

Beginning of the General Eclipse on the Earth at 11 h. 1.4m. M. (Mean 

Time at Washington) in Lat. 15° 0' South, and Long. 158° 4' West 

of Greenwich. 
Beginning of the Central and Annular Eclipse at Oh. 5.3m. A. in Lat. 

18° 17' South, and Long. 175° 34' West. 
Sun centrally eclipsed on the meridian of the place at lh. 52.7m. A. in 

Lat. 33° 18' South, and Long. 104° 21' West. 
End of the Central and Annular Eclipse at 3h. 46.9m. A. in Lat. 0° 3' 

North, and Long. 42° 55' West. 
End of the General Eclipse on the Earth at 4h. 50.1m. A. in Lat. 3° 22' 

North, and Long. 60° 17' West. 

The path of the Central Eclipse on the Earth's surface is as follows : 

Longitude 175° 34' 

163 49 

150 4 

135 31 

119 30 

104 21 

88 52 

76 46 

65 30 

53 49 

42 55 

This Eclipse will be visible to the whole of South America and New 
Zealand, and in almost any part of the South Pacific Ocean. 



>■ West of Greenwich. 



Latitude 18° 17' South. 


23 


21 


28 


47 


33 


8 


35 


5 


33 


18 


26 


58 


19 


21 


11 


55 


5 


9 South. 





3 North. 



1842.7 



OCCULT ATI ON 3. 



37 



OCCULTATJONS. 

Elements for facilitating the calculation of Occuliations which may be visible 

in the United States, in 1842. 



°r 


Star's 


• 


9 


Washington 
Mean Time of 
apparent con- 


At the time of Conjunction. 


Li 
Pa 


miting 
rallcls 
twoen 


Apparent 






be 


Name. 


a 


junction io R. 


R. A. of 


Apparent 


Star 


which the 


Month. 




? 


A. of Moon and 


Moon and 


Declination of 


N. or S. 


occult is 






2 

7 


Star. 


Star. 


Star. 


of Moon. 


visible. 


Jan. 2 


1348(Ba.) 


h. in. 1. 

2 23 41 M. 


h. m. a. 
11 19 50.73 


(0 fa &.3 S. 


4& ib s. 


&N. 5 S 


7 


^m 


5 


420 4 


15 41 29 39 


25 15 54.2 


51 10 


65 


12N. 




A'rri 


D 


5 30 11 


44 8.46 


24 50 58 .2 


20 4 


43 


22S. 




A*m 


6 


5 57 44 


45 11.19 


24 46 11.5 


12 43 


36 


30S 


16 


*H 





8 11 49 A. 


23 33 59.81 


54 46.2 N. 


60 6 


90 


19N. 


17 


45 H 


6 


8 15 54 


17 3339 


6 49 10.8 


24 10 


69 


17 8.' 


19 


» SP 


6 


7 14 17 


1 48 44.79 


17 2 47.4 


9 47N 


33 


43 S. 


20 


6 Cjp 


5 


11 33 11 


2 50 12 86 


20 42 27.4 


57 56 S. 


90 


27,N. 


21 


413 (Bai.) 


7 


7 52 17 


3 38 7.49 


23 47 55.9 


28 46 


76 


IN. 




g Pleiad. 


5.6 


6 46 23 


3 35 27 14 


23 47 26.9 


22 7 


66 


5S. 




1 « 


4.5 


48 22 


31.93 


23 36 532 


32 54 


82 


5N. 




e " 


5 


56 4 


50 67 


23 58 11.7 


12 26 


55 


13 S. 




c " 





7 11 24 


36 27.94 


23 52 19.4 


19 58 


64 


7S. 




d " 


*» 
3 


24 17 


59 30 


23 27 15.6 


46 26 


90 


18N 




nti 


3 


52 32 


38 8 09 


23 36 538 


39 50 


90 


12N. 




/Pleiad. 


5 


8 33 40 


39 48 51 


23 34 6.4 


47 


90 


19N. 




h " 


5.6 


52 


.97 


23 39 7 3 


42 


90 


14 N 


23 


139 B 


5.6 


9 58 47 


5 48 13.90 


25 25 45.6 


21 42 


65 


2N. 


24 


w l H 


6 


9 49 33 


6 52 49 45 


•24 26 4 9 


6 39 


49 


20S. 


26 


rf ! 23 


6 


4 41 50 M . 


8 14 21 72 


18 50 0.1 


54 10 


90 


16 N. 




o'O 


6 


8 10 12 A. 


48 27.98 


15 55 19.7 


57 71 


90 


16 N 




o«G 


6 


17 58 


47.36 


16 10 51.6 


40 34 


89 





27 


^ 1 23 


6.7 


19 7 M. 


9 3 40.99 


15 37 41.3 


9 44N. 


34 


45 S. 


28 


a 


6 


6 15 16 


10 14 46.64 


7 20 257 


27 48 


70 


16 S 


29 


5.6 


4 50 41 


11 5 42 41 


47 133 


49 32 


90 


IN 


Feb. 1 


87HT) 


6 


3 13 45 M 


13 38 51 36 


17 4 09 S. 


66 37 S. 


73N.22N. 




89 IJ 


5.6 


4 21 23 


41 19.41 


17 20 310 


69 14 


73 


30 N. 


4 


«n 


1 


2 45 44 


16 19 4473 


26 4 34 9 


21 53 


42 


20S. 


16 


iicp 


6 111 8 3 A. 


2 33 28.44 


19 20 17.9 N. 


66 14 


90 


39 N. 


17 


9 8 


G 1 


'11 17 13 


3 27 42.51 


22 41 14 8 


61 37 


90 


39N. 


20 


»25 8 


*> 


39 47 M. 


5 29 58 38 


25 48 18.0 


34 33 


89 


15jN. 




792 (Bai.) 


7 


5 55 25 A. 


6 15 1.91 


25 7 35.7 


35 47 


87 


11 N. 


21 


«n 


3 


1 15 7 


6 34 15 18 


25 16 56 6 


6 33 N. 


36 


27 Si 
10.S. 


28 


^G 


5.6 


5 15 5 A 


8 22 37.67 


18 37 214 


26 15 S. 


CJ 


25 


35 Sext. 


7 


2 33 M. 


10 35 10.91 


5 34 38.6 


10 29 N. 


34 


51 S. 




1348(Ba.) 


7 


10 13 3 A. 


11 19 5199 


50 5.7 S. 


42 52 S 


89 


6S. 


26 


13tVJ(Ba.) 


7 


2 53 14 M 


11 30 22.20 


1 33 57.3 


10 40 


52 


36 S. 


27 


? np 


5.6 


3 36 1 


12 25 40 23 


8 34 58.1 


30 40 


56 


318. 


28 


FIB) 


5.6 


3 24 3 


13 19 4.24 


15 9 183 


74 57, 


75 


36Nj 


_ 


75 nj 


G 


5 47 30 


24 _27.69 


14 33 4 7 


6 17 


43 


37 s< 



38 



OCCULTATIOH9. 



[1842. 



Day of 


Star's 


• 


Washington 
Mean Time of 
apparent con- 


At the time of Conjunction. 


Limiting 
Parallels 
betweeo 


Apparent 






the 


Ma me. 


'5 


junction in R. 


R. A. of 


Apparent 


Star 


which the 


Month. 




CD 


A. of Moon 


Moon and 


Declination of 


N. or S. 


occult is 






35 
6 


and Star. 


Star. 


Star. 


of Moon. 


visible. 


Mar. 3 


m m 


h. m. s. 

31 31 M 


h. in. •. 
15 58 31 .89 


& 63 #>.9 S. 


tit & s 


&N.2iN. 




a m 


1 


9 35 24 


16 19 45.73 


26 4 37.4 


29 59 


51 


12 S 


8 


v]ff 


5 


4 40 5 


20 31 3 80 


18 41 24 4 


21 34 


55 


21 S 


27 


83 np 


6 


9 21 20 A 


13 36 0.84 


15 23 9.1 


2 23N 


34 


45 S. 


30 


A 1 ^ 


5 


3 26 21 M. 


15 41 11.15 


24 51 6.9 


40 43 S. 


65 


2S. 


• 


A s m 


6 


3 52 20 M 


15 45 13.76 


24 46 32.7 


33 36 


58 


9S. 


April 2 


* / 


6 


4 12 48 M 


18 35 8.71 


25 9 43 2 S. 


19 6S. 


40 N. 24 S. 


12 


e cp 


5 


6 1 0A. 


2 50 11.91 


20 42 22.4 N. 


32 12 


81 


IN. 


14 


*8 


6 


6 12 39 


4 48 29.71 


24 48 7.6 


58 31 


90 


40 N. 


15 


139 8 


5.6 


6 12 7 


5 48 13.29 


25 55 45 4 


9 21 


52 


9S. 


18 


o ! £5 


6 


8 14 23 


8 48 27.51 


15 55 J 0.8 


34 5 


80 


4S. 




o 2 G 


6 


22 13 


46.89 


16 10 42.7 


16 56 


58 


19 S. 


20 


34 Sext 


6 


9 31 27 


10 34 28.98 


4 24 12.1 


51 42 


90 


5N. 


21 


1364(Ba.) 


7 


11 6 25 


11 30 21.31 


1 33 59.6 S. 


4 55 


46 


38 S. 


23 


^"5 


56 


17 18 M. 


12 25 41.52 


8 34 50.7 


38 44 


80 


7N. 


27 




4 


28 47 


16 11 39.17 


25 12 34.6 


15 31 


35 


26 S. 




alTl 


t 


3 48 34 


19 47.27 


26 4 41.1 


54 39 


64 


1CN. 




AOph. 


4 5 


10 41 20 A. 


17 o 41.79 


26 21 55 7 


30 43 


48 


IIS. 


29 


*/ 


4 


5 23 40 M 


18 18 16.33 


25 30 3 7 


24 36 


45 


17 S. 


May 3 


*W 


5.6 


5 42 42 M. 


21 38 12 59 


12 5 18.4 8. 


35 42 S. 


77 N. 7S 


J 6 


22 H 


6 


5 14 44 


23 43 53.52 


2 3 15.4 N. 


69 29 


90 


35 N. 


12 


125 8 


6 


4 52 31 A. 


5 29 55.00 


25 48 15 8 


7 13 N. 


35 


23 S. 


16 


$£l 


5 


7 13 45 


9 23 27.57 


11 59 40.6 


53 39 S. 


90 


12 N 


18 


p 4 cQ 


5.6 


6 18 12 


11 5 42.61 


47 22 1 


31 36 75 


15 S. 


23 


A ! ra 


o 


10 14 


15 44 12 20 


24 51 10.6 S. 


53 4 65 


13N. 




A s ra 


6 


39 50 


45 14.79 


24 46 25.0 


41 15 


65 


2S 


24 


630 May. 


6 


2 13 1 M. 


53 52 21 


25 25 19.4 


65 42 


75 


33 N. 


26 


** 


6 


9 37 55 A. 


18 35 10.38 


25 9 40.9 


44 16 


65 


4N. 


28 


Jupiter 




1 9 9M. 


19 35 59 65 


21 46 18.9 


12 36 


41 


29 S. 


29 


V]ff 


5 


3 52 32 


20 31 6.26 


18 41 14 4 


63 56 


71 


30 N. 


30 


A tst 


6 


2 43 39 


21 15 35.78 


13 33 3.3 


9 3 


46 


33 S. 


Jane 2 


16 H 


6 


3 58 35 M 


23 28 21.72 


1 13 51.2N 


19 18 S 


70 


2N. 


6 


/t cp 


6 


2 24 35 


2 33 29.36 


19 20 20.8 


49 42 


90 


32 N. 


11 


rf^G 


6 


7 27 2 A. 


8 14 10.49 


18 50 2.6 


4 16 ■ 


46 


28 S. 




d*G 


6 


8 34 52 


16 54 08 


17 33 42.8 


68 3 < 


90 


34 N. 


20 a m 


1 


8 22 54 


16 19 48.02 


26 4 43.2$ 


57 21 l 


54 


20 II. 


22 i/ 


4 


10 17 43 


18 18 17.66 


25 30 2.6 


36 1 \ 


B0 


5S. 


24 Jupiter 




4 26 51 M. 


19 25 46.01 


22 12 46.9 


77 39 


35 


34 S. 


26Afr» 


5.6 


10 41 22 A. 


21 38 5.16 


12 5 11.6 


56 7 


78 


16 N 


July 2 tj H 


4 


1 43 42 M. 


1 23 4.59 


14 31 59.3 N. 


6 30 N. 


35 N. 42 S. 


lOUSext. 


6 


8 7 46 A. 


9 49 46.45 


9 3 49.6 


48 49 S. ' 


90 


41*. 


\™Sl 


4.5 


9 2 30 


51 53 42 


8 47 51.5 


51 5 ( 


90 


6N 


14 P rip 


5.6 


7 40 59 


13 19 45 53 


15 9 23 2 S. 


66 26 


75 


24 N- 


75 np 


6 


10 7 16 


24 27.03 


14.33 9.3 


51 N. 


35 


44 S 


17a m 


4 10 55 56 


16 11 39.84 25' 12 37.0 


15 42 S. 


36 


26 S. 



1843.] 



OCCULTATIONS. 



39 



Dtyof 


Star's 


•8 

9 


Washington 
Mean Time of 
apparent con- 


At the time of Conjunction. 


Limiting 
Paraliela 
between 


Apparent 






the 


Name. 


** 


junction in R. 


R. A. of 


Apparent 


Star 


which the 


Month. 




Ml 
05 


A. of Moon 


Moon and 


Declination of 


N. or S. 


occult is 


JolvlH 




45 


and Star, 
h. ra. s. 
9 45 34 A. 


Star. 


Star. 


of Moon. 


visible. 


A Ophi. 


Ii m. s. 
17 5 42.84 


Sfe 21 576 S. 


& & s. 


An. os. 


24 


0t» 


4.5 


10 23 21 


22 8 33 46 


8 33 41.5 


45 54 


81 4N. 


25 


(J ss. 


6 


15 52 M 


11 57.25 


8 36 30.4 


70 57 


81 40 N. 




2669(Ba.) 


7 


2 2 37 


22 16 18.31 


7 59 15 8 


56 51 


82 17N. 


27 


witf 


6 


43 34 


23 38 22 77 


2 27 1.1 N. 


15 50 


47 37 S. 




45 K 


6 


10 33 32 A. 


17 36 22 


6 49 25.7 


39 36 


90 2S. 


31 


8 <P 


5 


3 46 13 M. 


2 50 14.24 20 42 29.4 


36 40 


90 6N. 




# Pleiad. 


5.6 


11 47 40 A. 


3 35 27.80J23 47 21.2 


7 2N. 


35 31 S. 




4.5 


49 51 


32.87 23 36 52.4 


3 40 S. 


45 21 S. 


Aug. 1 


c Pleiad. 


5 


13 54 M 


3 36 28.87 23 52 18.4 N. 


9 25 N. 


32 N. 33 S. 




d -" 


5 


27 22 


37 0.2223 27 14.8 


16 58 S 


60 8S. 




9 8 


3 


56 52 


38 9.00 23 36 53 


10 10 


52 14 S. 




/Pleiad. 


5 


1 39 51 


39 49.40J23 34 5.5 


17 4 


60 8S. 




A " 


5.6 


40 15 


50.35:23 39 6.1 


12 5 


55 12 S. 


13 


630 May. 


6 


8 57 26 A. 


15 53 51.98 25 25 20.3 S. 


65 4 


75 32 N. 


18 


°*W 


6 


8 1 23 


20 20 54 78 


19 5 41.7 


45 2 


71 5N. 


19 


A ■» 


6 


1 16 M. 


21 15 27.49 


13 32 28.0 


3 1 


40 38 S. 


21 


6 ta 


4.5 


4 42 28 


22 8 33.86 


8 33 39.0 


43 20 


81 IN. 


22 


x l h 


5.6 


8 6 48 A. 


23 19 2.81 


24 09N. 


4 26 


46 37 S. 




x* H 


6 


17 59 


22.68 


15 52.5 


14 58 


57 27 S. 


23 


16 h 


6 


1 56 6M. 


29 23.93 


1 13 56.4 


29 3 


75 4S. 




45 X 


6 


4 48 55 


17 36.87 


6 49 30.6 


33 4 


81 8S. 


27 


,u cp 


6 


2 58 6 


2 33 31.01 


10 20 27.3 


44 47 


90 13 N. 


28 


98 


6 


3 55 26 


3 27 44.84 


22 41 19.2 


29 58 


78 3 N. 


Sept.] 


pn 


6 


2 23 13 M. 


7 18 24.03 


21 48 26.8 N. 


34 52 S. 


72N. 2S. 


14 


76 b, 


5.6 


8 42 A. 


20 10 21.57 


19 36 19.4 S. 


34 31 


68 7S. 


15 


$£92(Ba.) 


5 


3a 50 M. 


18 20 82 


18 43 14.5 


17 37 


50 24 S. 


19 


6.7 


6 50 


23 15 29.66 


34 2.4 


34 42 


84 8 8. 






5.6 


2 18 


18 53 52 24 4.4 N. 


51 


42 41 S 




X »H 


6 


12 20 


19 13.39' 15 56.3 


11 23 


53 31 S. 


21 


101 h 


6 


11 49 25 A. 


1 27 23.8213 51 36.6 


40 16 


90 3N. 


25 


^8 


6 


8 56 50 


4 48 32.98 24 48 10.6 


27 6 


74 8N. 


27 


5Q 


7 


3 23 6 M. 


6 1 54.6524 26 54.0 


29 2 


76 7N. 


. 


8n 


7 


5 30 33 


6 43.30 24 57.4 


48 56 


90 26 N. 


Oct. 1 


11 Sext. 


6 


2 52 19 M 


9 49 47.22 


9 3 44.9 N. 


42 43 S. 


90 N. 2 8. 




n Sl 


4.5 


3 46 43 


51 54.15 1 8 47 49.6 


45 11 


90 IN. 


7 


<* m 


4 


7 43 32 A. 


16 11 38.6925 12 34.3 S. 


44 37 


65 3N. 


8 A Ophi. 


4.5 


5 32 40 


17 5 41.6926 21 56.6 


64 54 


64 33N. 


1Q Jupiter 




7 31 39 


19 2 46.6923 3 39.9 


14 10 


39 27 S. 


14 6 i 


4.5 


5 17 16 


22 8 33 75 


8 33 38.6 


55 20 


81 16 N. 


16 m){ 


6 


7 23 38 


23 38 23.82 2 37 9.5 N. 


10 48 


52 30 S. 


U 4S H 


6 


5 44 


17 37.36; 6 49 35.2 


28 10 


73 13 S. 


2047cp 


6 


9 42 29 


2 47 6.84 20 2 21.7 


42 59 


90 13 N. 




S Cp 


5 


10 14 50 


50 16.89 42 39.6 


6 54 


48 22 S. 


2236'u 


67 


3 25 0M. 


3 55 0.15 23 40 14 8 


11 14 


53 12 S. 


»,*B 


6 


2 22 41 


4 48 33.85 24 48 6.5 


13 39 


56 4S. 




IBy 


5 


11 40 21 A. 


5 39 24.3824 30 35.1 


30 59 


79 12 N. 



4U 






OCCULT ATI OKI. 






[mz 


Day of 


Star's 


6 

no 




Washington 
Mean Time Of 
apparent eon- 


At the time of Conjunction. 


' L 
Pi 

be 


uniting 
Mrallels 


Apparent 






'tween 


the 


Name. 


'3 


junction of R. 


R. A. of 


Apparent 


Star 


which the 


Month. 


• 





, A. of Moon 


Moon and 


Declination of 


N. or S. 


occult i« 






7 


and Star. 


Star. 


Star. 


of Mooo. 


V 


hible. 


Oct. 26 


960 (Ba.) 


h. m. s. 
3 21 30 M. 


h. m. i. 
7 42 49.13 


l°9 43 &.7 N. 


46 i\ S. 


SON. i4n. 




%7 (Ba.) 


6.7 


4 55 55 


46 30.35 


20 17 40.3 


1 22 


43 


28 S. 


27 


iSl 


5 


11 19 39 A. 


9 23 28.93 


11 59 35.8 


15 47 


56 


23 S. 


28 


»ft 


4 


3 29 1 M. 


32 46 20 


10 36 16.8 


42 55 


90 


IN. 


30 


'ft 


4.5 


4 59 47 


11 22 17.20 


2 8 9.9 S. 


67 33 


88 


23 N. 


Nov. 7 


Jupiter 




11 6 25M. 


19 18 24.78 


22 38 31.3 S. 


5& 49 S. 


67 N. 12 N. 


9 


A «t 


6 


8 16 10 A. 


21 15 36.71 


13 32 46.1 


37 58 


77 


4 8. 


11 


& m 


4.5 


45 20 M. 


22 8 33.41 


8 33 39.9 


70 28 


81 


40 N 


12 


* l H 


5.6 


3 57 21 A. 


23 18 54.26 


23 59.1 JN. 


18 41 


61 


23 4 S. 




* 2 H 


6 


4 7 54 


19 13.13 


15 54.6 


28 58 


74 


13$. 




16" 


6 


9 15 49 


28 23.96 


1 14 8.3 


35 6 


84 


7.S. 


14 


45" 


6 


21 39 M. 


17 27.26 


6 49 35.2 


35 39 


86 


6l8. 


16 


u cp 


6 


9 26 10 A. 


2 33 32.44 


19 20 35.0 


24 53 


69 


6S. 


17 


47 cp 


6 


4 39 40 M. 


49 7.14 


20 2 23.1 


41 48 


90 


12 N. 




b qp 


5 


5 11 37 


50 16.70 


20 42 41.1 


5 49 


47 


22 8. 




98 


6 


10 3 31 A. 


3 27 46 77 


22 41 22.8 


3 14 


46 


21 S. 


18 


416 (Ba.) 


7 


3 1 15 M. 


39 5.49 


22 56 14.0 


16 30 


59 


8S. 


19 


95 8 


7 


2 21 35 


4 33 45.35 


23 47 57.3 


55 16 


90 


36 N. 


20 


B 8 


5 


5 31 27 


5 39 25 12 


24 30 34.9 


21 56 


66 


3N. 


21 


pn 


6 


10 30 10 A. 


7 18 26 60 


21 48 20.7 


7 ION. 


33 


34 S. 


22 


934 (Ba.) 


7 


2 27 21 M 


27 53.06 


20 30 21.5 


39 59 S. 


90 


37 N. 




d»2S 


6 


11 30 24 A. 


8 16 57.33 


17 33 32.5 


20 27 


62 


14 S. 


24 


&fl 


5 


5 7 19 M. 


9 23 29.79 


11 59 31.2 


1 22 


42 


36 S. 


25 


^fl 


6 


11 40 47 A. 


10 55 34 62 


50 40.2 


63 25 


90 


19 N. 


26 


P 4 & 


5.6 


4 24 42 M. 


11 5 43 66 


47 9.5 


4 5N. 


38 


45 S. 


Dec. 4 


776 May. 


6 


5 21 19 A. 


19 11 12.97 


22 41 19.4 S. 


40 34 S. 


68 N. 


8 


x ** 


6 


8 39 56 


22 29 38.08 


5 1 57.7 


13 5 


54 


28 S. 


12 


101* 


6 


9 42 22 


1 27 24.07 


13 51 38.4 N. 


47 35 


90 


UN. 


17 


5n 


7 


10 23 57 


6 1 56.89 


24 26 58.2 


1 29 


43 


18 S. 


18 


8n 


7 


21 33 M. 


6 45.26 


24 55.6 


21 5 


65 


IS. 




9n 


7 


36 10 


7 25.75 


23 47 15.6 


33 48 


84 


UN. 




nn 


7 


2 31 11 


9 47.54 


23 31 33.6 


42 19 


90 


18 N. 




795 (Ba.) 


7 


4 3 35 


16 1.48 


23 31 19.3 


36 37 


89 


12 N. 


19 


pn 


6 


5 23 26 


7 18 27.34 


21 48 20.8 


3 UN. 


38 


30 S. 


20 


tc 


6 


1 22 


8 3 14.08 


18 6 57.7 


42 17 S. 


90 


7N. 




l004(Ba.) 


7 


51 51 


5 13.61 


18 8 35.4 


32 4 


78 


38. 




d*£5 


6 


5 50 51 


16 58.16 


17 33 28.6 


14 18 


55 


19 S. 


2! 


1 1 Sext. 


6 


10 46 A. 


9 49 49.67 


9 3 30.6 


7 4 


48 


33 S. 




?*& 


45 


11 43 43 


9 51 56.58 


8 47 35.9 


9 24 


50 


30 S. 


23 


^c* 
«& 


6 


I 24 51 M. 


10 47 39.00 


1 34 17.1 


67 24 « 


00 


24 5. 


26 


75ltp 


6 


1 37 21 


13 24 29 08 


14 33 109 S. 


7 47 - 


43 


34 S. 




83 np 


6 


6 43 34 J 36 1.8215 23 19.4 


4 IN. 31 


37 S. 



1842.] 



ECLIPSES OF THE SATELLITES OF JUPITER. 



41 



ECLIPSES OF THE SATELLITES OF JUPITER IN 1842, 

Visible in the United States, in Mean Time at Washington. 

The number of these eclipses visible to us this year will be very 
small ; for the declination of the planet will "not, at any time, be less 
than 20£° south, so that the planet will only rise a few degrees above 
the horizon. 



d. 


b. 


m. 


s. 




Sat 


Jan. 24 


6 


22 


19.4 m. 


Im. 


1 


Feb. 9 


4 


37 


57.5 




1 


" 10 


5 


15 


6.1 




4 


" 16 


6 


31 


30.9 




1 


March 4 


4 


46 


57.7 




1 


" 7 


4 


45 


6.2 




3 


" 8 


3 


50 


19.7 




2 


" 27 


4 


55 


44.9 




1 


April 9 


3 


25 


43.2 




2 


" 12 


3 


11 


11.1 




1 


•« 12 


3 


44 


29.5 


Em. 


3 


" 19 


4 


35 


17.0 


Im. 


3 


May 4 





24 


30.1 




2 


" 5 


1 


30 


10.7 


Em. 


4 


11 5 


3 


20 


24.2 


Im. 


1 


u n 


2 


58 


16 8 




2 


•' 21 


1 


36 


315 




1 


u 25 





28 


3.1 




3 


lt 25 


3 


40 


6.2 


Em. 


3 


Jane 4 


11 


56 


18.8 a. 


Im. 


2 


« 5 


11 


53 


0.7 




1 


" 12 


2 


30 


6 2 m. 




2 


" 13 


1 


47 


12.0 




1 


" 20 


3 


41 


30.3 




1 


" 21 


10 


10 


9.2 a. 




1 


11 29 





4 


36.9 m. 




1 


July 6 


I 


59 


12.2 




1 


" 6 


11 


29 


6 3 a. 




2 


« 7 





23 


11.9 m. 




3 


" 7 


8 


27 


47.5 a. 




1 


" 11 


2 


3 


55.0 m. 




4 





d. 


h. 


m. 


i. 




Bat 


July 


15 





37 


10 


Em. 


1 


«t 


27 


8 


13 


36.0 a. 




4 


tt 


30 


10 


55 


55.1 




1 


« 


31 


11 


17 


34.1 




2 


Aug. 


7 





51 


4.9 m. 




1 


u 


11 


11 


42 


9.0 a. 




3 


it 


15 


9 


15 


5.8 




1 


tt 


22 


11 


10 


25 1 




1 


it 


25 


8 


21 


28.4 




2 


it 


30 


1 


3 


48.0 m. 




1 


Sept 


. 1 


10 


47 


20.7 a. 




2 


n 


7 


9 


30 


8.8 




1 


*t 


14 


11 


25 


36.5 




1 


u 


15 


10 


58 


24.7 


Im. 


4 


n 


16 


7 


47 


58.6 


Em. 


3 


tt 


23 


7 


49 


53.4 




1 


tt 


23 


8 


25 


41.3 


Im. 


3 


<< 


26 


8 


4 


19.4 


Em. 


2 


tt 


30 


9 


45 


21.6 




1 


Oct. 


2 


8 


58 


34 9 




4 


u 


9 


6 


9 


41.5 




1 


tt 


16 


8 


5 


6.7 




I 


a 


28 


7 


50 


555 




2 


tt 


29 


7 


55 


19.6 




3 


Nov. 


1 


6 


24 


33.1 




1 


u 


22 


5 


1 


54.1 




2 


u 


24 


6 


38 


49.6 




1 


Dec. 


8 


5 


29 


8.1 


Im. 


4 


<( 


10 


4 


57 


23.1 


Em. 


1 


a 


24 


4 


52 


26.2 a. 




2 



A Table, showing the illuminated Portion of the Discs of Venus and Mars. 

The numbers in this Table are the versed sines of that portion of the 
Discs, which, to an observer on the Earth will appear to be illuminated, 
the apparent diameter of the planet at the time being considered as 
unity. 

To a spectator on the Earth, Venus appears most brilliant when her 
elongation is about 45°, and she is approaching her inferior conjunction, 
or receding from it; in the former of which positions she will be this 

4* 



42 POSITION AHD MAGNITUDE OF THE RIKG9 OF SATURN. [1842. 



year, on the 12th of November. Mars is most brilliant about the time 
of his opposition to the sun, being then also nearest to the Earth, which 
will not be during this year. 



1842. 
January 
February 
March 
April 
May 
June 



15 
14 
15 
15 
15 
15 



Venus. 


Man. 


0.980 


0.941 


0997 • 


0.960 


0.999 


975 


0.984 


0987 


0.950 


0.996 


0.891 


1.000 



1842. 
July 15 

August 15 
September 15 
October 15 
November 15 
December 15 



Venus. 


Man. 


0.813 


0.999 


716 


0.993 


0.599 


0.982 


0.455 


0.967 


0.240 


0.948 


0.005 


0.928 



Position and Magnitude of the Rings of Saturn, according to Bess el and 
Struve t for every fortieth day in the Year, at 7 hours in the morning* 



7h. M. 



M. T. at Washing 


ton. 


1842. January 


1 


February 


10 


March . 


22 


May 


1 


June 


10 


July 


20 


August 


29 


October 


8 


November 


17 


December 


27 



<( 



31 



a. 


6. 


P» 


L 


3^93 


+ll84 


+» '2.5 


+fe 5oV2 


34.74 


14.76 


17.2 


25 8.7 


36.66 


15.20 


25.2 


24 29 7 


39.14 


16.12 


27 1 


24 19.3 


41.09 


1718 


23.4 


24 43.1 


41.26 


17.68 


15.9 


25 22.3 


39.53 


17 22 


10.0 


25 49.0 


37.05 


16.14 


117 


25 49.1 


35.01 


14.98 


204 


25 19.9 


34.04 


14.07 


30.6 


24 24.6 


34.01 


13.99 


315 


24 17.9 



V. 



4-25 &A 
47.8 
37.8 
27.3 
158 
3.8 
51.0 
37.5 
23.4 
8.6 
7.2 



24 



24 



a denotes the semitrans verse axis of the rings. 



cc 



u 



tt 



<i 



I 



If 



u 



tt 



semiconjugate axis of the rings, positive when their 
northern surface is visible, negative when their south- 
ern. 

inclination of the northern semiconjugate axis of the 
rings to the circle of declination j + when East, 
— when West. 

angle of elevation of the Earth above the plane of the 
rings, as seen from Saturn ; -f" when North, — when 
South. 

elevation of the Sun above the plane of the rings as seen 
from Saturn ; + when North, — when South. 

The .Opposition of Saturn will take place on the 3d of July, and 
there will be no Conjunction during the year. The Right Ascension of 
this Planet will not during the year differ much from 18h., and its decli- 
nation will not be less than 22° south, so that it will not rise to a great 
height even when in the meridian. 

%* Within a few years it has been discovered, that Saturn is not 
placed exactly in the centre of the rings. This singular circumstance 



« 



a 



1843.] 



INCREASE OF SIDEREAL TIME. 



43 



was for some time considered an optical illusion, caused by the shadow 
of the planet on the rings ; but Professor Struve has ascertained with 
the celebrated Dorpat telescope, that the rings are actually eccentric. 
The eccentricity is, however, too small to be perceived by any other 
than the very best and most powerful telesoopes. 

Until very recently it was generally supposed, that this planet was 
surrounded by only two rings, But it has lately been shown by 
M. Encke of Berlin, that it is probable there are three, and M. Dumou- 
chel, of the Roman College at Rome, thinks he has seen several open- 
ings in the ring, and that it is more than quadruple. It is reasonable, 
however, to suppose, that the real number will soon be determined by 
M. Struve, with the magnificent twenty-three feet refractor, recently 
constructed at Munich, for the new observatory at Pulkova, St. Peters- 
burg. 



INCREASE OF SIDEREAL TIME IN MEAN SOLAR HOURS, &c. 





Tncreaie. 


Hours. 


m. sec. 


1 


9.857 


2 


19.713 


3 


29.569 


4 


39.426 


5 


49.262 


6 


59.139 


7 


1 8.995 


8 


18.852 


9 


28.708 


10 


38.565 


11 


48.421 


12 


58.278 


13 


2 8.134 


14 


17.991 


15 


27.847 


16 


37.704 


17 


47.560 


18 


57.417 


19 


3 7.273 


20 


17.130 


21 


26.986 


22 


36.842 


23 


46.699 


24 


56.555 


Daily accelera- 


tion of a star 


in patting the 


meridian 


m. sec. 


352 


1.9095 



Min. 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 



Incr. 




1 lncr. 




— - 


Min. 


[ 


Sec. 


sec. 




sec. 


, 


0.164 


31 


5.093 


1 


329 


32 


257 


2 


493 


33 


421 


8 


657 


34 


585 


4 


821 


35 


750 


5 


986 


36 


914 


6 


1.150 


37 


6.078 


7 


314 


38 


242 


6 


479 


39 


407 


9 


643 


1 40 


571 


10 


807 


; 41 


735 


11 


971 


42 


900 


12 


2.136 


43 


7.064 


13 


300 


44 


228 


14 


464 


45 


392 


15 


628 


46 


557 


16 


793 


47 


721 


17 


957 


48 


685 


18 


3.121 


49 


8.050 


19 


266 


50 


214 


20 


450 


61 


378 


21 


614 


52 


542 


22 


778 


53 


707 


23 


943 


64 


871 


24 


4.107 


55 


9.035 


25 


271 


56 


199 


26 


435 


57 


364 


27 


600 


58 


538 


98 


764 


59 


692 


29 


928 


60 


957 


30 



lncr. 



sec. 

0.003 
006 
008 
011 
014 
016 
019 
022 
025 
027 
030 
033 
036 
038 
041 
044 
047 
019 
052 
055 
058 
060 
063 
066 
069 
071 
074 
•77 
079 
082 





Inor. 


Sec. 




sec. 


31 


0.085 


32 


038 


33 


090 


34 


093 


35 


096 


36 


099 


37 


101 


38 


104 


39 


107 


40 


110 


41 


119 


42 


115 


43 


118 


44 


121 


45 


123 


46 


126 


47 


129 


48 


131 


49 


134 


50 


137 


51 


140 


52 


143 


53 


145 


54 


148 


55 


151 


56 


153 


57 


156 


58 


159 


59 


160 


60 


164 



i 



44 



TABLE OF LATITUDE AWD LONGITUDE. 



[1842. 



LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE OF SOME OF THE PRINCIPAL 
PLACES IN THE UNITED STATES, &c, WITH THEIR 
DISTANCE FROM THE CITY OF WASHINGTON. 

The Longitudes are reckoned from Greenwich. 

The Capitals {Seats of Government) of the Stat's and Territories are 

designated by Italic Letters. 



Albany ( Capitol), . N. Y. 
Alexandria, . . D. C. 
Amherst (Col. Chapel), Mass. 
Annapolis, . • Md. 
Auburn, . . . N. Y. 
Augusta, . . Ga. 

Augusta (State House), Me. 
Baker's Island (Lights), Mass. 
Baltimore (Bat Mon't), Md. 
Bangor (Court House), Me. 
Barnstable (New C. H.), Mass. 
Batavia, . . N. Y. 

Beaufort (Arsenal), . S. C. 
Boston (State House), Mass. 

Do. (Hollis St Ch.), 
Bridgeport (Bapt. Ch.), Conn. 
Bristol (Episcopal Ch.), R. I. 
Brooklyn (Navy Yard), N. Y. 
Brunswick (College), Me. 
Buffalo, . . N. Y. 

Burlington, . . N. J. 

Burlington, . . Vt. 
Cambridge (1st Con. Ch.), Ms. 
Camden, • . S. C. 

Canandaigua, . . N. Y. 
Cape Ann (North Light),Mass. 

Do. (South Light), 
Cape Cod (Light House), Mass. 
Charleston (StMich's Ch.)S.C. 
Charlestown (Navy Y'd), Mass. 
Chicago, . . II. 

Cincinnati (Fort Wash.), Ohio, 
Columbia, . . S. C. 
Columbus y . . . Ohio, 
Concord (State House), N. H. 
Dayton, . . Ohio, 

Dedham (1st Cong. Ch.), Mass. 
Detroit^ . . . Mich. 
Dorchester (Ast Obs.), Mass. 



Latitude 
North. 


Longitud 
in degrees. 


e, West, 
in time. 


Dist. from 
Waeh'ton. 


42 89 3 


* I i. 
73 44 49 


u. m. a. 
4 64 69.8 


mile*. 
876 


38 49 


77 4 


6 8 16 


6 


42 22 13 


72 81 86 


4 60 6.4 


383 


38 68 86 


76 33 


6 6 13 


87 


42 66 


76 28 


6 6 63 


839 ! 


S3 28 


81 64 


6 37 36 


660 


44 18 43 


69 60 


4 89 20 


696 


42 32 11 


70 47 87 


4 43 10.6 


463 


39 17 23 


76 37 30 


6 630 


i*8 


44 47 60 


68 47 


4 36 8 


661 


41 42 7 


70 18 36 


4 41 14.4 


466 


42 59 


78 13 


6 12 62 


370 


32 26 67 


80 41 23 


6 22 46.6 


639 


42 21 22.7 


71 4 9 


4 44 16.6 


433 


42 20 62.8 


71 4 11 


4 44 16.7 




41 10 30 


73 11 46 


4 62 47 


384 


41 40 8 


71 17 19. 


4 46 9.3 


409 


40 41 60 


73 69 80 


4 56 68 


337 


4363 


69 66 1 


4 89 40.1 


668 


42 63 


78 66 


6 15 40 


376 


40 6 10 


74 62 37 


4 69 80.5 


166 


44 27 


78 10 


4 52 40 


440 


42 22 21.3 


71 7 38 


4 44 30.6 


431 


34 17 


80 33 


6 22 12 


467 


42 64 


77 17 


6 9 8 


386 


42 83 18 


70 34 44 


4 42 18.9 


470 


42 38 10 


70 84 44 


4 42 16.9 




42 2 23 


70 4 9 


4 40 16.6' 


607 


32 46 33 


79 67 27 


5 19 49.8 


644 


42 22 


71 3 38 


4 44 14.2 


433 


42 


67 36 


6 60 3 


763 


39 6 64 


84 37 


5 87 48 


497 


33 67 


81 7 


6 24 38 


600 


89 67 


83 8 


5 33 13 


396 


43 12 29 


71 39 


4 46 66 


474 


39 44 


84 U 


6 36 44 




42 14 63 


71 10 49 


4 44 48.8 


433 


43 24 


83 68 


6 31 63 


636 


43 19 10 


71 4 19 


4 44 17.3 


433 



1842L] 



TABLE OF LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE. 



45 



Dover, • . . Del. 

Dover, . . . N. H. 

Easton (Court House), Md. 

Eastport, . • . Me. 

Edenton, . . N. C. 

Exeter, . . . N. H. 

Frankforty . . Ky. 

Fredericksburg, . Va. 

Frederickton, . N. B. 

Frederick, . . Md. 

Georgetown, . . S. C. 

Gloucester (Univ. Ch.), Mass. 
Do. (E. P'ntL't.) 

Do. (Ten P'nd Isl. L't.) 

Greenfield (2d Con. Ch.), Mass. 

Hagerstown, . • Md. 

Halifax, . . N. S. 

Hallowell, . . Me. 

Harrisburg, • . Pa. 

Hartford (State House), Conn. 

Holmes's Hole (Windmill), Ms. 

Hudson, . • N. Y. 

Hudson (Reserve Coll.), Ohio, 

Huntsville, . . Ala. 

Indianapolis, . Ind. 

Ipswich (Eastern Light), Mass. 
Do. (West Light), 

Jackson, . . , M'pi. 

Jefferson, . . M'ri. 

Key West, . . Fa. 

Kingston, . • U. C. 

Knoxville, . . Tenn. 

Lancaster, • • Pa. 

Lexington, . . Ky. 

Little Rock, . . Ark. 

Lock port, . . N. Y. 

Louisville, . . Ky. 

Lowell (St. Ann's Ch.), Mass. 

Lynchburg, . . Va. 

Lynn, . • . Mass. 

Marblehead, . . Mass. 

Marblehead (Light), Mass. 

Middletown (W» Univ.), Conn. 

MiUcdgeville, • . Ga. 

Mobile, . • . Ala. 

Jttontpelier . Vt. 

Monomoy Point Light, Mass. 

Montreal, . . L, C. 

Nantucket (S'th Tower), Mass. 



Latitude 
North. 


LongitiM 
in degrees. 


le, West, 

in time. 


DUt. from 
Wash'ton. 


» / ii 
39 10 


75 30 


h. m. b. 
6 2 6 


miles. 
114 


43 13 


70 54 


4 48 36 


490 


3<t 46 10 


76 8 


6 4 32 


80 


44 54 


66 56 


4 27 44 


778 


39 


77 7 


5 23 28 


284 


43 66 


70 55 


4 43 40 


474 


38 14 


84 40 


6 88 40 


661 


38 34 


77 88 


6 10 82 


60 


46 3 


66 45 


4 27 




39 24 


77 18 


5 9 12 


43 


33 21 


79 17 


5 17 8 


483 


4*36 44 


70 40 19 


4 42 41.3 


463 


42 34 48 


70 40 13 


4 42 40,9 


466 


42 36 -4 


70 40 17 


4 42 41.1 


468 


42 35 141 


72 36 82 


4 60 26.1 


896 


30 37 


77 86 


6 10 20 


68 


44 39 20 


63 36 40 


4 14 26.7 


986 


44 17 


69 50 


4 39 80 


698 


40 16 


76 60 


5 7 20 


110 


41 46 59 


72 40 45 


4 60 48 


386 


41 27 15 


70 86 88 


4 42 26.6 


467 


42 14 


78 46 


4 66 4 


346 


41 14 42 


81 23 45 


6 25 35 




34 36 


86 57 


6 47 48 


726 


39 55 


86 6 


6 44 20 


678 


42 41 2 


70 46 27 


4 48 6.8 


463 


43 41 2 


70 46 84 


4 48 6.8 




32 23 


90 6 


6 83 


1086 


38 36 


92 8 


6 983 


989 


24 3J 30 


81 62 80 


5 27 SO 




44 8 


76 40 


6 6 40 


466 


35 59 


83 64 


6 36 36 


616 


40 2 86 


76 20 33 


6 5 22.2 


109 


28 6 


84 18 


6 87 12 


684 


34 40 


92 13 


6 8 48 


1068 


43 11 


78 46 


6 16 4 


403 


38 8 


85 80 


5 42 


690 


42 38 48 


71 18 67 


4 46 15.8 


419 


37 36 


79 22 


5 17 38 


198 


42 28 


70 67 


4 43 48 


441 


42 30 


70 52 


4 43 28 


460 


42 80 14 


70 60 39 


4 43 32.6 


448 


41 38 8 


72 89 


4 60 86 


836 


83 7 


83 20 


6 83 26 


643 


89 40 


88 11 


5 62 44 


1088 


44 17 


72 36 


4 60 24 


634 


41 33 81 


70 i 


4 40 0.4 


600 


45 81 


78 86 


464 20 


601 


41 16 56 J 


70 6 13 


4 40 24.8 


490 



46 



TABLE OF LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE. 



[1842. 



Latitude 
North. 



Nashville (University), Tenn. 
Natchez (Castle), . M'pi. 
Newark, . . . N. J. 
New Bedford (MarV Ch.)Mass. 
Newbern, . . N. C. 
Newburg, . . N. Y. 

Newbury port (2d Pres. C), Ms. 

Do. (Lights), Mass. 

Newcastle, . . Del. 
New Haven (College), Conn. 
New London, . . Conn. 
New Orleans (City Hall), La. 
Newport (State House), R. I. 
New York (City Hall), N. Y. 
Nobsque Point Light, Mass. 
Norfolk (Farmer's Bank), Va. 
Northampton (1st C. Ch.) Mass. 
Norwich, . . Conn. 
Pensacola, . . Fa 

Petersburg, . . Va. 
Philadelphia (Ind'ce H.), Pa. 

Do. (High Sch. Obs.) 

Pittsburg, . . Pa. 

Pittsfield (1st Con. Ch.), Mass. 
Pittsburgh, . . N. Y. 
Plymouth (Court H.), Mass. 
Portland (Town H.), . Me. 
Portsmouth (Unit. Ch.), N. H. 
Poughkeepsie, . . N. Y. 
Princeton (Nassau Hall), N. J. 
Providence (Univ. Hall), R. I. 
Quebec, (Citadel), • L. C. 
Raleigh, . . N. C. 

Richmond (Capitol), Va. 
Rochester (R'r House), N. Y. 
Sable (Cape), . . Fa. 
Sackett's Harbour, N. Y. 

Saco, . . . Me. 
St. Augustine, . . Fa. 
St Louis, . . M'ri. 
Salem (£. I. M. Hall), Mass. 
Sandwich (1st Con. Ch.), Mass. 
Savannah (Exchange), Ga. 
Schenectady, . N. Y. 

Springfield, . . II. 

Springfield (Court H.), Mass. 
Squam Harbour (Light), Mass. 
Straitsmouth Island (Light), " 
Stratford, . . Conn. 



36 9 83 
31 34 

40 49 

41 38 7 
36 30 
41 31 

43 48 33 
43 48 33 
39 40 
41 17 68 
41 33 

39 67 46 
41 38 30 

40 43 40 

41 31 6 
36 60 60 
43 19 8 
41 33 

30 28 
87 13 64 
39 66 69 

39 67 9 

40 33 

43 36 66 

44 43 

41 67 38 
43 39 36 
48 4 36 
41 41 

40 30 41 

41 49 32 
46 49 13 

36 47 

37 33 17 
43 8 17 
24 60 
43 66 
43 31 

39 48 30 

38 36 
43 81 19 
41 45 81 
83 4 66 
43 48 

39 48 
43 6 1 
43 39 46 
43 39 41 
41 11 7 



Loogituc 
in degrees. 


le, West, 
in time. 


Digt. from 
Wash'ton. 


e i tt 


h. m. i. 


miles. 


86 49 8 


6 47 16.3 


714 


91 34 43 


6 6 38.8 


1146 


74 10 


4 66 40 


315 


70 66 49 


4 43 43.3 


439 


77 6 


fl 8 20 


837 


74 1 


4 66 4 


383 


70 63 47 


4 43 31.1 


466 


70 49 30 


4 43 18.0 


469 


76 33 


6 3 8 


103 


73 67 46 


4 61 61.1 


801 


73 9 


4 48 86 


864 


90 6 49 


6 37.3 


1303 


71 31 14 


4 46 34.9 


403 


74 I 8 


4 66 4.5 


336 


70 40 3 


4 43 40.3 


450 


76 18 47 


6 6 15.1 


317 


73 38 31 


4 60 38.4 


376 


73 7 


448 38 


363 


87 13 


6 48 48 


1050 


77 30 


5 930 


144 


76 9 64 


5 39.6 


136 


76 10 37 


6 43.5 




80 3 


630 8 


333 


73 16 6 


4 63 4.3 


880 


73 36 


4 53 44 


639 


70 40 38 


4 43 41.9 


489 


70 30 30 


4 41 33 


643 


70 46 60 


4 43 3.3 


491 


73 66 


4 66 40 


301 


74 39 30 


4 68 88 


177 


71 34 48 


4 45 39.3 


394 


71 16 


4 45 4 


781 


78 48 


6 15 13 


386 


77 36 38 


5 9 49.9 


133 


77 61 


5 11 34 


861 


81 16 


636 




76 67 


6 8 48 


407 


70 36 


4 41 44 


638 


81 36 


5 36 30 


841 


89 36 


.6 68 34 


866 


70 63 67 


4 43 35.8 


446 


70 30 37 


4 43 1.8 


466 


81 7 9 


5 34 38.6 


663 


73 66 


466 40 


891 


89 38 


5 68 13 


801 


73 36 47 


4 60 33.3 


357 


70 41 8 


4 43 44.5 


466 


70 86 36 


4 43 33.4 


471 


73 8 46 


4 63 36 


887 



1842.] 



TABLE OF LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE. 



47 



Tallahassee, . • Fa. 
Taunton (Trin. Con. Ch.) Mass. 

Toronto or York, . U. C. 

Trenton, . . . N. J. 

Troy, . . . N. Y. 

Tuscaloosa, . . Ala. 

University of Virginia, Va. 

Utica (Dutch Church), N. Y. 

Vaudalia, . • II. 

Vevay, . . . Ind. 

Vincennes, . . Ind. 
Washington (Capitol), D. C. 

Washington, . . M'pi. 

Wheeling, . . Va. 
Williamstown (Con. Ch.) Mass. 

Wilmington, . . Del. 

Wilmington, . . N. C. 

Worcester (Ant. Hall), Mass. 

York, . . . Me. 

York, ... Pa. 



Latitude 
North. 


Longitude, West, 
in degrees, in time. 


Dist. from 
Wash'ton. 


o i n 

80 38 


e i it 

84 36 


h. m. s. 
638 34 


miles. 
896 


41 64 8 


71 6 6 


4 44 34.3 


416 


48 33 


79 20 


5 17 30 


600 


40 14 


74 30 


4 58 36 


166 


42 44 


73 40 


4 54 40 


883 


83 13 


87 43 


660 48 


858 


38 2 3 


78 81 29 


5 14 5.9 


124 


43 6 49 


75 13 


5 53 


383 


38 50 


89 3 


6 56 8 


781 


38 46 


84 69 


5 89 56 


656 


38 43 


67 35 


i 49 40 


693 


88 53 33 


77 1 34 


6 8 5.6 




31 36 


91 20 


6 520 


1146 


40 7 


80 43 


5 33 48 


364 


43 43 51 


78 18 30 


4 63 63.8 


406 


89 41 


75 38 


5 1 63 


108 


34 11 


78 10 


5 13 40 


416 


43 16 13 


71 48 10 


4 47 12.7 


394 


43 10 


70 40 


4 43 40 


600 


39 58 


76 40 


6 6 40 


87 



« Note. — It has been suggested to the Editor that it would add to the 
usefulness of the Almanac to insert the variation of the compass in the 
preceding Table. In order to enable him to act upon this suggestion 
for the next year, observers throughout the country are particularly 
requested to communicate to him any magnetic observations which they 
may have made. Another suggestion with regard to extending this 
Table to some foreign places will also receive, in the next year, the 
attention which it deserves. 



48 



Dr. Young** Refractions, the Barometer being at 30 inches, and the inter- 
nal Thermometer at 50, or the external at 47, degrees; with the corrections 
for + one inch in the barometer, and for — - one degree in the thermowu 
eter of Fahrenheit. From page 19 of Vol, 1st of Pearson's Practical As» 
tronomy. 



• 

< 

i 

< 


2* 


P + 




• 

< 

• 

a. 


K 

cq55 

©J-4 


* • 

s+ 




< 

• 

a 
a, 

< 




5+ 


*d 
«Sfe 

o 1 


d ■ 

< 
i . 

e. 
a 

< 




to'- 

5+ 


«5 | . 


• 4 

0. 


< '/ 
83.61 


< i 
74 




i 
8. 


* II 

14.86 


$4 

80 


II 

3,8 


e • 

8. 


i ti 
6.36 


u 
13,3 


II 

,85 


• * 
14. 


4 II II 

3.49,9 7,70 


Il 

,469 


6 


33.53 


71 


V 


6 


14.19 


29 


3,3 


10 


6.98 


13,1 


r* 


10 


8.47,1 


7,61 


»«* 


10 


81.68 


6T 


V 


10 


14. 4 


99 


W 


90 


6.91 


12,8 


& 


90 


3.44,4 


7,69 


,468 


15 


81. 6 


67 


7,0 


15 


13.60 


38 


V 


80 


6.14 


12,6 


,» 


SO 


8.41,8 7,43 


^» 


90 


80.13 


66 


6,7 


30 


13.85 


98 


V 


40 


6. 7 


12,3 


,79 


40 


3.39,3 


(7,84 


,448 


35 
80 


30.34 
38.37 


63 
61 


6,1 


35 

80 


13.91 
13. 7 


97 
37 


3,0 
3,0 


50 
9. 


6. 
5.64 


Mjl 
11,9 


JH 

,76 


60 
15. 


3.36,7 


1J* >444 
7,18 1,439 


3.34,8 


86 


37.61 


69 


5,9 


86 


12.53 


36 


3,0 


10 


6.47 


11,7 


,74 


SO 


3.37,3 


6,96 


,424 


40 


37. 6 


68 


6,6 


40 


13.41 


36 


1,9 


20 


5.41 


11,6 


,73 


16. 


3.30,6 


6,73 


,411 ' 


4ft 


36.34 


66 


6,4 


45 


12.38 


36 


1,9 


30 


5.36 


11,3 


,73 


30 


3.14,4 


6^1 


^99; 


60 


35.43 


66 


5,1 


60 


13.16 


36 


1,9 


40 


5.30 


11,1 


,71 


17. 


3. 8,5 


6,31 


,386 


6ft 

1. 9 


35. 3 
34.35 


63 
52 


4,» 

4,7 


65 
4. 


13. 3 
11.52 


36 

34,1 


1,70 


50 
10. 


5.35 
5.30 


11,0 
10,6 


_lL° 

,69! 


30 
18. 


3. 3,9 
3.57,6 


6,19 
5,94 


,374 
,362 * 


ft 


33.48 


60 


4,6 


10 


11.80 


33,4 


1,64 


10 


5.15 


10,6 


fit 


19 


2.47,7 


5,61 


,3401 


10 


33.13 


49 


4,6 


30 


11.10 


33,7 


1,58 


30 


5.10 


10,4 


,65 


20 


3.38,7 


6,31 


,893' 


1ft 


33.40 


48 


M 


80 


10.50 


22,0 


1,53 


80 


ft. 6 


10,2 


,« 


21 


3.30,5 


5,04 


I**! 


90 


32, 8 


46 


4,3 


40 


10.32 


21,3 


1,48 


40 


6. 


10,1 


,63 


22 


3.38,3 


4,79 


,290 | 


35 

30 

i 


31.37 
3l7~7 


45 
44 


4,0 
3,9 


60 
5. 


10.15 
9.68 


20,7 
20,1 


1,43 
1,38 


50 
11. 


4.66 
4.51 


9,8 


,62 
,60 


23 
24 


3.16^ 
3^10,1 


4,67 j ,276 ! 
4,351,264 1 


1 * 


30.38 


43 


3,8 


10 


9.42 


19,6 


1,34 


10 


4.47 


9,6 


,59 


25 


2.4,2 


4,16 ,303 | 


4G 


30.10 


43 


3,6 


30 


9.27 


19,1 


1,30 


30 


4.43 


9,5 


,58 


26 


1.68,8 


3,97 


,341 . 


4ft 


1943 


40 


3,5 


30 


9.11 


18,6 


1,26 


30 


4.39 


M 


& 


27 


1.63,8 


3,81 


,230 


60 


19.17 


39 


3,4 


40 


8.5S 


18,1 


1,22 


40 


4.35 


9,3 


,66 


38 


1*49,1 


3,66 


,319. 


55 

3. 


18.52 
18. '29 


39 
38 


3,3 
3,2 


60 


8.46 
8.32 


17,6 
17,2 


1,19 
1,15 


60 
13. 


4.31 
4^28,1 


A 1 
9,00 


,556 


39 
30 


1.44,7 


3,60 
3,36 


,309 


1.40,6 


,301 


5 


19. 5 


37 


3,1 


10 


8.30 


16,8 


1,11 


10 


4.34,4 


8,86 


,648 


31 


1.36,6 


3,33 


,193 1 


10 


17.43 


36 


3,0 


30 


8. 9 


16,4 


1,09 


30 


4.30,8 


8,74 


,641 


S3 


1.33,0 


3,11 


,186 j 


15 


17.21 


36 


2,9 


30 


7.68 


16,0 


1,06 


80 


4.17,3 


8,63 


,633 


33 


1.39,6 


3,99 


,179 


30 


17. 


35 


2,8 


40 


7-47 


16,7 


1,03 


40 


4.13,9 


*,51 


,524 


84 


1.96,1 


2,88 


,178 ( 


35 
30 


16.40 
16.21 


34 
33 


3,8 
2,7 


60 
7. 


7.37 

7.37 


15,3 
15,0 


1,00 
,98 


60 
13. 


4.10,7 


8,41 
8,30 


,617 
,509 


8ft 
36 


1.33,0 


3,76 
3,68 


,137 ( 


4- 7,5 


1.30,0 


,161 


35 


16. 2 


33 


3,7 


10 


7.17 


14,6 


,95 


10 


4. 4,4 


8,20 


,603 


87 


1.17,1 


2,58 


,166 


40 


15.43 


32 


3,6 


30 


7. 8 


14,3 


,93 


SO 


4. 1,4 


8,10 


,496 


88 


1.14,4 


2,49 


,149 


45 15.25 


33 


3,6 


30 


6.59 


14,1 


,91 


80 


3.58,4 


8,00 


,490 


89 


1.11,8 


2,40 


,144 


501 Id. 8 

i 


31 


M 


40 


6.61 


18,8 


,» 


40 


3.56,6 


7,89 


,482 


40 


1. 9,8 


2^2 


,189 


j_66 


14.61 30 


3,3 


60 


6.43 


18,5 1 ,87 1 


60 


8.63,6 


7,79 ,476 


41 


1. 6,9 2,34 


,184 



The Table of Ilrfr actions , ctmtinurd. 



n increase of altitude of one Inch In the barometer, 
or Tor a depression of one degree la the thermometer, is to be added la the 
tabular refraction ; but when the barometer la tower than 'JO inches, or the 
thermometer higher than ii degrees, the correction becomes nibtractive. 

When great accuracy Is required, 0,003 inch should be deducted from the 
observed height of Ihe barometer, for each degree that the thermometer near 
it, Is above 50 degree*, and the same quantity added, for an equal depression. 







A Table 


oftk 




Parallax in Altitude. 






Son'. 

All,,. 


Su 


'■ Horizontal Parallai. 


SSi 


Bun'i Horizontal Fanllu. 




M 


M 


8.0 


8.1 


B.8 




M 


a!s 


fl.B 


u 


B.8 




9.40 


M0 


a. 60 


8.10 


8.30 


m 


1.94 


0.01 


8.08 


0.16 


0.33 




8.37 




SJ7 
















6.00 




o.n 






































4.2S 




4.M 
















at 














■Ml 




1.78 




















1-ffl 




1.4S 




T-M 






2.50 














1.04 






90 












• 1 **4 








B.T4 












L." 


t.M 


B.0] 


0.08 


0.10 


0.M 


80 


0.00 


00 '0.00 


0.00 


0.00 



Logarithm for converting Sidereal into Mean Solar Time -f 9.9968126 
" " " Mean Solar into Sidereal Time + 0.0011874 

A second of time, at (he Equator, contains I5BI feet 



THE 



AMERICAN ALMANAC. 



PART II. 



UNITED STATES. 



I. ELECTION OF PRESIDENT AND VICE-PRESIDENT. 

7%e following Table exhibits the Popular Vote for President, the Number 
of Electors, and also the Number of Electoral Votes given for President 
and Vice-President of the United States, for the 14th Presidential 
Term, commencing on the 4th of March, 1841 . 



Stat ei. 


Populai 


• Vote. 




Electoral Vote. 








Presid'nt. 


Vice-President. 




• 


• 

e 
e 






H 








Harrison 


Van 


t- o 


e 
e 


a 


, 


• 

e 


H . 


• 
jet 






Ticket. 


Buren 






CQ 


£ 


o 
• 


. w. 

well 


o 








Ticket. 




m 


c 

tt 




e 

J3 


Cm 










<5 


SB 


> 


h 


mm % 


J 


»-» 


■ 


JVeto England Slates. 












Maine, «... 


46,613 


46,201 


10 


10 




10 










New Hampshire, . . 


26,434 


32.670 


7 




7 




7 








Vermont, 


32,445 


18i009 


7 


7 




7 










Massachusetts, . . 


72,874 


51,944 


14 


14 




14 










Rhodo Island, . 


5,278 


3,301 


4 


4 




4 










Connecticut, 


31,601 


25,296 


8 
50 


8 
43 


7 


8 
43 


7 








215,244 


177,425 




Middle States. 






















New York, 


225,812 


212,519 


42 


42 




42 










New Jereev. . . 


33,262 


31,034 


8 


8 




8 










Pennsylvania, . 


144,019 


143,676 


30 


30 




30 










Delaware, • . 


5,967 


4,884 


3 
83 


3 

83 





3 

83 











409,160 


392,113 




Southern States. 






















Maryland, 


33,528 


28,752 


10 


10 




10 










Virginia, 


42,501 


43,893 


23 




23 




22 




] 




North Carolina, 


46,676 


34,218 


15 


15 




15 










South Carolina, .. 


(Byl*g 


islature) 


11 




11 






11 






Georgia, . 


40,264 


31,933 


11 


11 




11 










Alabama, • . , 


28,471 


33,991 


7 




7 




7 








Mississippi, ... 


19,518 


16,995 


4 


4 




4 










Louisiana, . . , 


11,297 


7,617 


5 

86 1 


5 
45 


41 


5 
45 


29 








222,255 


197,399 


11 


1 




Western Stales. 






















Tennessee, . . . 


60,391 


48,289 


15 ' 


15 




17 










Kentucky, . . 


58,469 


32,616 


15 


15 




15 










Ohio, .... 


148,157 


124,782 


21 


21 




21 










Michigan, • 


22,907 


21,098 


3 


3 




3 










Indiana, .... 


65,308 


51,695 


9 


9 




9 










Illinois, . . 


45,537 


47,476 


5 




5 




5 








Missouri, . . , 


22,972 


29,760 


4 




4 




4 








Arkansas, . . 
Total, 


4,363 


6,049 


3 

75 
294 


63 
234 


3 
12 
60 


63 
234 


3 
12 

48 


11 


1 


1 


428,124 


361,765 




1,274,783 


1,128,702 


__^^^ Majority, . , 


1,128,702 






60 

|l74 




60 
174 










146,081 




5* 




















# 






54 



UNITED STATES. 



[1842. 



General William Henry Harrison of Ohio, having been elected by a 
majority of 174 of the electoral votes, was, on the 4th of March, 184] , 
inaugurated President of the United States in the city of Washington, 
and died on the 4th of the succeeding April. In consequence of this event 
the duties of the office have devolved on John Tyler of Virginia, who had 
been elected by the same majority Vice-President ; in accordance with 
the provision of the Constitution of the United States, which says : — u In 
case of the removal of the President from office, or of his death, resigna- 
tion, or inability to discharge the powers and duties of said office, the 
same shall devolve on the Vice-President." 



II. EXECUTIVE GOVERNMENT. 

The 14th presidential term of four years, since the establishment of 
the government of the United States under the Constitution, began on 
the 4th of March, 1841 ; and it will expire on the 3d of March, 1845. 

Salary. 
WILLIAM H. HARRISON, of Ohio, President, #25,000 

JOHN TYLER, " Virginia, Vice-President, 5*000 

[President Harrison died April 4th, 1841, in consequence of which 

Vice-President Tyler has become President. See above.] 

The Cabinet. 
The following are the principal officers in the executive department of 
the government, who form the Cabinet, and who hold their offices at 
the will of the President. 



Daniel Webster, 
Thomas Ewing, 
John Bell, 
George E. Badger, 
Francis Granger, 



Massachusetts, Secretary of State, 

Ohio, Secretary of the Treasury, 

Tennessee, Secretary of War, 

North Carolina, Secretary of the Navy, 

New York, Postmaster- General, 

John J. Crittenden, Kentucky, Attorney- General, 

Department of State. . 



Salary. 
$6,000 

6,000 

6,000 

6,000 

6,000 

4,000 



D. F. Webster, Chief Clerk, 

Diplomatic Bureau. 

William S. Derrick, Clerk, 1,600 

William Hunter, Jr. do. 1,500 

Francis Markoe, Jr. do. 1,400 

Consular Bureau. 
Benjamin C. Vail, Clerk, 1,400 
Robert S. Chew, do. 1,400 

Home Bureau. 
Andr. T. McCormick, Clerk, 1,400 



Daniel Webster, Secretary. 

Salary. Salary. 

$2,000 James S. Ringgold, Clerk, 01,400 

Horatio Jones, do. 1,000 

Alex. H. Derrick, do. 900 



Rob. Greenhow, Translator, 1,600 
Edw. Stubbs, Distrib. Agent, 1,400 

Patent Office. 

H. L. Ellsworth, Com. Pat. 3,000 

Jos. H. Hand, Chief Clerk, 1,700 

Charles M. Keller, > Exam- C 1,500 
Th. W. Donovan, liners. \ 1,500 



1842.] 



EXECUTIVE GOVERNMENT. 



55 



Treasury Department. 
Thomas Ewing, Secretary, 



Salary. 
McC. Young, Chief Clerk, $2,000 

Comptrollers. 
Walter Forward, 1st Compt. 3,500 
James Larned, Chief Clerk, 1,700 
Albion E. Parris, 2d Compt. 3,000 
Jonathan Seaver, Chief Clerk, 1,700 

Auditors. 

Jesse Miller, 1st Auditor, 3,000 

Alex. Mahan, Chief Clerk, 1,700 

Wm. B. Lewis, 2d Auditor, 3,000 

James Eakin, Chief Clerk, 1 ,700 

Peter Hagner, 3d Auditor, 3,000 

Jas. Thompson, Chief Clerk, 1,700 
Aaron O. Dayton, 4th Auditor, 3,000 

Th. H. Gillis, Chief Clerks, 1,700 



Salary. 
S. Pleasanton, 5f& Auditor, $3,000 
Thomas Mustin, Chief Clerk, 1,700 

Treasurer' 8 Office. 
William Selden, Treasurer, 3,000 
Wm. B. Randolph, Chief CVk, 1,700 

Register's Office. 
Thomas L. Smith, Register, 3,000 
Mich. Nourse, Chief Clerk, 1,700 

Solicitor's Office. 
Ch. B. Penrose, Solicitor, 3,500 

Land Office. 
E. M. Huntington, Com. Gen. 3,000 
John Williamson, Recorder, 2,000 
Charles Hopkins, Solicitor, 2,000 
John M. Moore, Chief Clerk, 1,800 



War Department. 
John Bell, Secretary. 

Salary. 



Albert M. Lea, Chief Clerk, $ 2,000 

1 Pension Office. 
J. L. Edwards, Commissioner, 3,000 
Geo. W. Crump, Chief Clerk, 1,760 

Adjutant- General's Office. 

Roger Jones, Col. fy Adj. -Gen. 
Samuel Cooper, Assist. Adj.- Gen. 
Lorenzo Thomas, do. 
Robert Anderson, do. 
Edmund SchrWer, do. 
George H. Griffin, do. 
James H. Prentiss, do. 
Brooke Williams, Clerk, 



Salary. 
1,600 



Bounty Lands. 
Wm. Gordon, Principal, 
Indian Affairs. 
Th. H. Crawford, Commiss'r, 3,000 
Daniel Kurtz, Chief Clerk, 1,600 

Paymaster- Generals Office, 
Nathan Towson, Paym'r-Gen. 2,500 
Nathan Frye, Chief Clerk, 1,700 

Purchasing Department. 
C. Irvine, Com.-Gen. Purch. 3,000 
Tim. Banger, Chief Clerk, 1,700 

Surgeon- General's Office. 
Thomas Lawson, Surg.- Gen. 2,500 



1,200 I R. Johnson, Clerk, 

Navy Department. 

George E. Badger, Secretary. 

John D. Simms, Chief Clerk, salary $2,000. 

Navy Commissioners. 
Salary. 



1,150 



Lewis Warrington, 
William M. Crane, 
David Conner* 



$ 3,500 
3,500 
3,500 



Salary. 

C. W. Goldsborough, Sec'y, $ 2,000 
W. G. Ridgely, Chief Clerk, 1,600 



56 



UNITED STATES. 



[1842. 



Survey of the Coast of the United States. 



F. R. Hassler, Principal, 
J, Ferguson, Assistant, 
Edm. Blunt, do. 
C. M. Eakin, do. 
Charles Renard, do. 
Wm. M. Boyce, do. 



Salary. 
$6,000 
4,000 
4,000 
3,000 
3,000 
2,000 



John Farley, Assistant, 
Th. W. Werner, do. 
F. H. Gudes, do. 

H. L Dickins, do. 

J. J. Hassler, do. 

T. P. Dornenburg, do. 



Post-Office Department. 
Francis Granger, Postmaster' General. 



Selah R. Hobbie, 
Philo C. Fuller, 
John S. Skinner, 
John Marron, 
Elisha Whittlesey, 
Peter G. Washington, 



Assist. Postmaster- General 1st Div. 

do. do. do. 2d Div. 

do. do. do. 3d Div. 

Chief Clerk, 

Auditor of the Post- Office, 
Chief Clerk, 



Salary. 
$2,000 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
2,000 
1,000 



Salary. 
#2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,000 
3,000 
2,000 



III. PRINCIPAL EXECUTIVE OFFICERS. 

Th& Principal Executive Officers in the Government of the United States 
from the Year 1789, the Time of its Commencement under the Constitu- 
tion, to the Year 1841." 

Q3» In the American Almanac for 1831, the names of the Principal Executive Officers 
may be seen, exhibited under the several Administrations. 



Presidents. 
1789 — George Washington, Va. 
1797 — John Adams, Mass. 
1801— Thomas Jefferson, Va. 
1809 — James Madison, Va. 
1817 — James Monroe, Va. 
1825— John Quincy, Adams, Mass. 
1829 — Andrew Jackson, Tenn. 
1837— Martin Van Buren, N, Y. 
1841— William H. Harrison, Ohio 
1841— John Tyler, Va. [See p. 64.] 

Vice-Presidents. 
1789 — John Adams, Mass. 
1797 — Thomas Jefferson, Va. 
1801— Aaron Burr, N. York. 
1805— George Clinton, N. Y. 



1813— Elbridge Gerry, Mass. 
J817— Daniel D. Tompkins, N. Y. 
1825— John C. Calhoun, S. C. 
1833— Martin Van Buren, N. Y. 
1837— Richard M. Johnson, Ken. 
1841— John Tyler, Va. [See p. 54.] 

Secretaries of State. 
1789 — Thomas Jefferson, Va. 
1794— Edmund Randolph, Va. 
1795— Timothy Pickering, Mass. 
1800— John Marshall, Va. 
1801 — James Madison, Va. 
1809— Robert Smith, Md. 
1811 — James Monroe, Va. 
1817 — John Quincy Adams, Mass. 
1825— Henry Clay, Ken. 



1842.] 



PRINCIPAL EXECUTIVE OFFICERS. 



57 



1829— Martin Van Buren, N. Y. 
] 831— Edward Livingston, La. 
1833— Louis' McLane, Del. 
1835— John Forsyth, Ga. 
1841— Daniel Webster, Mass. 

Secretaries of the Treasury. 
1789— Alexander Hamilton, N. Y. 
1795— Oliver Wolcott, Ct. 
1801 — Samuel Dexter, Mass. 
1802— Albert Gallatin, Pa. 
1814— George W. Campbell, Tenn. 
1814— Alexander J. Dallas, Pa. 
1817- William H. Crawford, Ga. 
1825— Richard Rush, Pa. 
1829— Samuel D. Ingham, Pa. 
1829— Louis McLane, Del. 
1833— William J. Duane, Pa. 
1833— Roger B. Taney, Md. 
1834— Levi Woodbury, N. H. 
1841— Thomas Ewing, Ohio. 

Secretaries of War. 
1789 — Henry Knox, Mass. 
1795_Timothy Pickering, Pa. 
1796 — James McHenry, Md. 
1800— Samuel Dexter, Mass. 
1801 — Roger Griswold, Ct. 
1801— Henry Dearborn, Mass. 
1S09— William Eustis, Mass. 
1813 — John Armstrong, N. Y. 
1815— William H. Crawford, Ga. 
1817— John C. Calhoun, S. C. 
1825— James Barbour, Ya. 
1828— Peter B. Porter, N. Y. 
1829— John H. Eaton, Tenn. 
1831 — Lewis Cass, Ohio. 
1837— Joel R. Poinsett, S. C. 
1841— John Bell, Tenn. 

Secretaries of the Navy. 
1739 — George Cabot, Mass. 
1798— Benjamin Stoddard, Md. 
1802— Robert Smith, Md. 
1809— Paul Hamilton, S. C. 
1813— William Jones, Pa. 



1814— B. W. Crowninshield, Mass. 
1818— Smith Thompson, N. Y. 
1823— S. L. Southard, N. J. 
1829— John Branch, N. C. 
1831— Levi Woodbury, N. H. 
1834 — Mahlon Dickerson, N. J. 
1838— James K. Paulding, N. Y. 
1841— George E. Badger, N. C. 

Postmasters- General. 
1789— Samuel Osgood, Mass. 
1794 — Timothy Pickering, Mass. 
1795— Joseph Habersham, Ga. 
1802— Gideon Granger, Ct. 
1814 — Return J. Meigs, Jr., Ohio. 
1823— John McLean, Ohio. 
1829— William T. Barry, Ken. 
1835 — Amos Kendall, Ken. 
1840— John M. Kiles, Ct. 
1841— Francis Granger, N. Y. 

Attorneys- General. 
1789— Edmund Randolph, Va. 
1794— William Bra2ford, Pa. 
1795— Charles Lee, Va. 
1801 — Levi Lincoln, Mass. 
1805— Robert Smith, Md. 
1806 — John Brecken ridge, Ken. 
1807— Cassar A. Rodney, Del. 
1811— William Pinkney, Md. 
1814— Richard Rush, Pa. 
1817— William Wirt, Va. 
1829 — J. McPherson Berrien, Ga. 
1831— Roger B. Taney, Md. 
1834— Benjamin B. Butler, N. Y. 
1838— Felix Grundy, Tenn. 
1839— Henry D. Gilpin, Pa. 
1841 — John J. Crittenden, Ken. 

Chief Justices of the Supreme Court. 

1789— John Jay, N. Y. 

1796 — William Cushing, Mass. 

1796— Oliver Elsworth, Ct. 

1800-John Jay, N. Y. 

1801— John Marshall, Va. 

1833— Roger B. Taney, Md. 



58 UNITED STATE!. [1842. 

IV. CONGRESS. 

The Congress of the United States consists of a Senate and House 
of Representatives, and must assemble, at least once every year, on 
the 1st Monday of December, unless it is otherwise provided by law. 

The Senate is composed of two members from each State ; and of 
course the regular number is now 52. They are chosen by the legisla- 
tures of the several States, for the term of six years, one third of them 
being elected biennially. 

The Vice-President of the United States is the President of the Sen- 
ate, in which body he has only a casting vote, which is given in case 
of an equal division of the votes of the Senators. In his absence, a 
President pro tempore is chosen by the Senate. 

The House of Representatives is composed of members from the sev- 
eral States, elected by the people for the term of two years. The 
Representatives are apportioned among the different States according to 
population ; and the 23d, 24th, 25th, 26th, and 27th Congresses have been 
elected in accordance with an act of Congress of 1832, one representa- 
tive being returned for every 47,700 persons, according to the Census 
of 1830, computed according to the rule prescribed by the Constitu- 
tion: (five slaves being computed equivalent to three free persons.) 
The present regular number is 242 representatives, and 3 delegates. 

Since the 4th of March, 1807, the compensation of each member of 
the Senate and House of Representatives, has been 08 a day, during 
the period of his attendance in Congress, without deduction in case of 
sickness; and $8 for every twenty miles' travel, in the usual road, in 
going to and returning from the seat of government. The compensa- 
tion of the President of the Senate, pro tempore, and of the Speaker of 
the House of Representatives, is $16 a day. 

TWENTY-SEVENTH CONGRESS. The Senate. 

Samuel L. Southard, of New Jersey, President pro tempore. 



[The figures denote the expiration of the terms of the Senators.] 

Name. Residence. 

Massachusetts. 

Rufus Choate, Boston, 1845 

Isaac C. Bates, Northampton, 1847 

Rhode Island. 

Nathan F. Dixon, Westerly, 1845 
J. F. Simmons, Providence, 1847 

Connecticut. 

Perry Smith, JVcto Milford, 1843 
Jabez W. H untington, Norwich, 1845 



Name. Residence. 

Maine. 

Reuel Williams, Augusta, 1843 
GeOrge Evans, Gardiner, 1847 

New Hampshire. 

Franklin Pierce, Hillsborough, 1843 
Levi Woodbury, Portsmouth, 1847 

Vermont. 

Samuel Prentiss, Montpelier, 1843 
Samuel S. Phelps, Middtchiry, 1845 



1842.] 

Name. 



Besidence. 
New York. 

Silas Wright, Jr., Canton, 1843 
N. P.Talhnadge, Poughkeepsie,1845 

New Jersey. 

S. L. Southard, Trenton, 1845 
Jacob W. Miller, Morristovm, 1847 

Pennsylvania. 
James Buchanan, Lancaster, 1843 
Daniel Sturgeon, Uniontoum, 1845 

Delaware. 

R. H. Bayard, Wilmington, 1845 
Thomas Clayton, JVcio C<w*/e, 1847 

Maryland. 
John Leeds Kerr, Easton, 1843 
Wm. D. Merrick,.4/.kn'# Fre*A, 1846 

Virginia. 

Wm. C. Rives, Bentivoglio, 1845 
William S. Archer, £& Hill, 1847 

JVortA Carolina. 
W. A. Graham, Hillsborough, 1843 
W. P. Mangun, Tfod Mountain, 1847 

&nrtA Carolina. 

Wm. C. Preston, Columbia, 1843 
John C. Calhoun, .For* ffitf, 1847 

Georgia, 

Alfred Cuthbert, MonHceUo, 1843 
John M. Berrien, Savannah, 1847 

Alabama. 

Clement C. Clay, HuntsviUe, 1843 
Wm. R. King, Sdwia, 1847 



CONGRESS. 

Name. 



59 



Residence. 
Mississippi. 

J. Henderson, Pass Christian, 1845 
R. J. Walker, Madisonville, 1847 

Louisiana. 
Alex. Mouton, Vermillionville, 1843 
Alex. Barrow, Baton-Rouge, 1847 

Arkansas. 
A. H. Sevier, Lake Port, 1845 

Wm. S. Fulton, Little Rock, 1847 

Tennessee. 

A. O. P. Nicholson, Columbia, 1845 
Vacancy. 

Kentucky. 

Henry Clay, Lexington, 
J. T. Morehead, Frankfort, 

Ohio. 

William Allen, ChiUicothe, 

Benjamin Tappan, Steubenvitte, 1845 

Michigan. 

Augustus S. Porter, Detroit, 1845 
William Woodbridge, do. 1847 

Indiana. 

Oliver H. Smith, Indianapolis, 1843 
Albert S. White, Lafayette, 1845 

Illinois. 
Richard M. Young, Quincy, 1843 
Samuel McRoberts, Danvule, 1847 

Missouri. 

Lewis F. Linn, 5*. Genevieve, 1843 
Th. H. Benton, S*. £omw, 1845 



1843 
1847 

1843 



Officers of the Senate. 



Salary* 
Asbury Dickens, Secretary, $3,000 
Lewis H. Machen, Chief CVk, 1,800 
Wm. Hickey, Exec. Clerk, 1,500 
Wm. Carr, 1st Legisl. Clerk, 1,500 
Wm. J. McDonald, 2d Do. 1,500 
J. C. Fitzpatrick, 1st Engr. CI. 1,500 



Salary. 
Win; Patton, 2d Engr. Clerk, $ 1,500 
Edward Dyer, Sergeant at > t Knn 
^mw and Doorkeeper, j 1 > ouu 
Rob. Beale, Ass. Doorkeeper, 1,450 
John L. Chubb, Messenger, 700 



60 



UNITED STATES. 



[1842. 



House of Representatives of the 27th Congress, 
which will expire on the 3d of March, 1843. 

John White, of Kentucky, Speaker. 



Name. Residence. 

Maine. — 8. 

Allen, Elisha H., Bangor. 
Bronson, David, Anson. 

Clifford, Nathan, Newfield. 
Fessenden, Wm. Pitt, Portland. 
Littlefield, Nath'l S. Bridgeton. 
Lowell, Joshua A., Machias. 
Marshall, Alfred, China. 
Randall, Benjamin, Bath. 

JVeto Hampshire. — 5. 
Atherton, Charles G., Nashua. 
Burke, Edmund, Newport. 
Eastman, Ira A., Gilmanton. 
Reding, John R., Haverhill. 
Shaw, Tristram, Exeter. 

Vermont. — 5. 



Everett, Horace, 
Hall, Hiland, 
Mattocks, John, 
Slade, William, 
Young, Augustus, 



Windsor. 

Bennington. 

Peacham. 

Middlebury. 

Johnson. 



Massachusetts. — 12. 

Adams, J. Quincy, Quincy. 

Baker, Osmyn, Amherst. 

Borden, Nath'l B., Fall River. 

Briggs, George N. , Lanesborough. 

Burnell, Barker, Nantucket. 

Calhoun, Wm. B., Springfield. 
Cushing, Caleb, 
Hastings, Wm. S. 
Hudson, Charles, 
Parmenter, Wm., 
Saltonstall, Leverett, Salem. 

Winthrop, R. C, Boston. 

Rhode Island. — 2. 
Cranston, Robert B., Newport. 
TOlinghast, Jos. L., Providence. 



Newbury port. 
Mendon. 
Westminster. 
E. Cambridge. 



Name. Residence. 

Connecticut. — 6. 

Boardman, Wm. W., New Haven. 
Brock way, John H., Ellington. 
Osborne, Tho. B., Fairfield. 
Smith, Truman, Litchfield. 
Trumbull, Joseph, Hartford. 
Williams, Th. W., New London. 

XewYork.— 40. 

Babcock, Alfred, Gaines. 

Barnard, Daniel D., Albany. 

Birdseye, Victory, Pompey. 

Blair, Barnard, Salem. 

Bowne, Samuel S., Cooperstown. 

BrewBter, David P., Oswego. 

Childs, Timothy, Rochester. 

Chittenden, Th. C, Adams. 

Clark, John C, Bainbridge. 

Clarke, Staley N., Eliicottsville. 

Clinton, James G., Newburgh. 

Davis, Richard D. f Poughkeepsie. 

Doig, Andrew W., Lowville. 

Egbert, Joseph, TomkinaviHe. 

Ferris, Charles G., New York. 

Fillmore, Millard, Buffalo. 

Floyd, Charles A., Commack. 

Floyd, John G., Utica. 
Foster, A. Lawrence, Morrisville. 

Gates, Seth M., Leroy. 

Gordon, Samuel, Delhi. 
Greig, John, 
Houck, Jacob, Jr., 

Hunt, Hiram P., 

Linn, Archibald L., Schenectady. 

Maynard, John, Seneca Falls. 

McLellan, Robert, Hudson. 

McKeon, Joffn, New York. 
Morgan, Christoph., Aurora. 

Oliver, Wm. M., Penn Yan. 

I Partridge, Samuel, Elmira. 



Canandaigua. 

Schoharie. 

Troy. 



1842.] 

Name. 
Riggs, Lewis, 
Roosevelt, James I., 
Sanford, John, 
Tomlinson, Th. A., 
Van Baren, John, 
Van Rensselaer, H., 
Ward, Aaron, 
Wood, Fernando, 
Young, John, 



CONGRESS. 



61 



Residence. 
Homer. 
New York. 
Amsterdam. 
Keeseville. 
Kingston. 
Ogdensburg. 
Mt. Pleasant. 
New York. 
Genesee. 



New Jersey, — 6. 

Aycrigg, John B., Pyramus, 
Halsted, William, Trenton. 
Maxwell, John P. B., Belvidere, 
Randolph, Joseph F.,N. Brunswick. 
Stratton, Charles C, Swedesboro'. 
Torke, Thomas J., Salem. 

Pennsylvania. — 38. 

Beeson, Henry W., Uniontown. 

Bidlack, Benj. A., Wilkesbarre. 

Brown, Charles, Philadelphia. 

Brown, Jeremiah, Goshen. 

Cooper, James, Gettysburg. 

Dimock, Davis, Jr., Montrose. 

Edwards, John, Ivy Mills. 

Fornace, Joseph, Norristown. 

Gerry, James, Shrewsbury. 

Gustine, Amos, Mifflintown. 

Henry, Thomas, Beaver. 
Ingersoll, Charles J., Philadelphia. 

Irrin, James, Milesburg. 

Irwin, William W., Pittsburg. 

Jack, William, Brookeville. 

James, Francis, West Chester. 

Keim, George M., Reading. 

Lawrence, Joseph, Washington. 

Marehand, A. G., Greensburg. 

Newhard, Peter, Allentown. 

Plumer, Arnold, Franklin. 

Ramsay, Robert, Hartsville. 

Sergeant, John, Philadelphia. 

Simonton, Wm., Hummelst'n. 

8nyder, John, Selinsgrove. 

6 



Name. Resideaee. 

Tolland, George W., Philadelphia. 
Westbrook, James, Dingman's F. 
One Vacancy. 

Delaware. — 1. 
Rodney, George B., New Castle. 

Maryland. — 8. 
Johnson, Wm. Cost, Jefferson. 
Jones, Isaac D„ Princess Ann. 
Kennedy, John P., Baltimore. 
Mason, John T., Hagerstown. 
Pearce, James A., Chestertown. 
Randall, Alexander, Annapolis. 
Sollers, Augustus R., Pr. Frederick- 
Williams, James W., Churchville. 

Virginia. — 21. 
Banks, Linn, Madison C. H. 

Barton, Richard W., Winchester. 
Botts, John M., Richmond. 
Cary, George B., Bethlehem C R.. 
Coles, Walter, Robertson's St. 

Gilmer, Th. W., Charlotte s?ille.. 
Goggin, Wm. L., Otterbridge. 
Goode, W. O., Boydton. 

Harris, Wm. A., Luray. 
Hays, Samuel L., Stuard's Cr'k. 
Hopkins, Geo. W., Lebanon. 
Hubard, Edm. W., Curdsvilie. 
Hunter, R. M. T., Lloyd's. 
Jones, John W., Petersburg. 
Mallory, Francis, Hampton. 
Powell, Cuthbert, Upperville. 
Steenrod, Lewis, Wheeling. 
Stuart, Alex. H. H., Staunton. 
Summers, Geo. W., Kenhawa. 
Taliaferro, John, Fredericksb'g. 
Wise, Henry A., Accomac C.H. 

North Carolina. — 13. 

Arrington, A. H., Hillardston. 
Caldwell, Green W., Charlotte. 
Daniel, John R. J., Halifax. 
Deberry, Edmund, Lawrenceville.. 



62 



UNITED STATES. 



[1842, 



Name. Residence. 

Graham, James, Rutherford ton. 
McKay, James J., Elizabethtown. 
Rayner, Kenneth, Winton. 
Rencher, Abraham, Pittsborough. 
Saunders, R. M., Raleigh. 
Shepperd, Aug. H., Salem. 
Stanly, Edward, Washington. 
Washington, W. H., Newborn. 
Williams, Lewis, Panther Creek. 

South Carolina. — 9. 
Butler, Samson H., Barnwell C.H. 
Butler, William, Greenville C. H. 
Caldwell, P. C, Newberry C. H. 
Campbell, John, Parnassus. 
Holmes, Isaac E., Charleston. 
Pickens, Francis W., Edgefield C.H. 
Rhett, R. Barnwell, Blue House. 
Rogers, James, Maybinton. 

Sumpter, Tho. D., Statesburg. 

Georgia. — 9. 
Alford, Julius C, Lagrange. 
Dawson, Wm. C, Greensboro'. 
Foster, Thomas F., Columbus. ; 
Gamble, Roger L., Louisville. 
Habersham, R. W., Clarksville. 
King, Th. Butler, Waynesville. 
Meriwether, J. A., Edenton. 
Nisbet, Eugenius A., Macon. 
Warren, Lott, Palmyra. 

Alabama. — 5. 
Chapman, Reu. H., Somerville. 
Houston, Geo. S., 
Lewis, Dixon H., Lowndesboro'. 
Payne, Wm. W., 
Shields, Benj. D., 

Mississippi. — 2. 
[Election 1st Monday in Novem- 
ber, 1841.] 

Louisiana, — 3. 

Dawson, John B., St Francisville. 
Moore, John, Franklin. 

White, Edw. D., Thibadeauxville. 



Name. Residence. 

Arkansas. — 1. 
Cross, Edward, Washington. 

Tennessee. — 13. 



Arnold, Thomas T., 
Brown, Aaron V., 
Brown, Milton, 
Campbell, Th. J., 
Campbell, Wm. B., 
Caruthers, Robert L., 
Gentry, Meredith P., 
Johnson, Cave,' 
McClellan, Abraham, 
Turney, Hopkins L., 
Waterson, HarveyM., 
Williams, Christ. L., 
Williams, Joseph L., 



Greenville. 

Pulaski. 

Jackson. 

Athens. 

Carthage. 

Lebanon. 

Harpeth. 

Clarksville. 

Blountsville. 

Winchester. 

Shelbyville. 

Lexington. 

Knoxville. 



Kentucky. — 13. 

Andrews, L. W., 
Boyd, Linn, 
Butler, William O., 
Davis, Garret, 
Green, Willis, 
Marshall, Th. F., 
Owsley, Bryan Y., 
Pope, John, 
Sprigg, James C, 
Thompson, John B., 
Triplett, Philip, 
Underwood, Joseph, 
White, J., Speaker, 



Flemingsburgr. 

Belle view. 

Carroll ton. 

Paris. 

Green. 

Versailles. 

Jamestown. 

Springfield. 

Shelbyville. 

Harrodsburg. 

Owensboro'. 

BowlingGreen. 

Richmond. 



Ohio. — 19. 



Andrews, S. J., 
Cowen, Benj. S., 
Dean, Ezra, 
Doane, William, 
Giddings, Joshua R, 
Goode, Patrick G., 
Hastings, John, 
Mason, Samson, 
Matthews, James, 
Mathiot, Joshua, 



Cleveland. 
St. Clairsville. 
Wooster. 
Withamsville, 
, Jefferson. 
Sydney. 
Salem. 
Springfield. 
Coshocton. 
Newark. 



1642.] 



CONGRESS. 



63 



Name. fiesidonce. 

Med ill, William, Lancaster. 

Morris, Calvary, Athens. 

Morrow, J., Twenty-Mile Stand. 

Pendleton, N. G., Cincinnati. 

Ridge way, Joseph, Columbus. 

Russell, William, Portsmouth. 

Stokeley, Samuel, Steubenville. 

Sweney, George, Bucyrus. 

Weller, John B., Hamilton. 

Michigan. — 1. 
Howard, Jacob M., Detroit. 

Indiana. — 7. 

Cravens, James H., Marion. 
Kennedy, Andrew, Muncietown. 
Lane, Henry S., Crawfordsville. 
Proffit, George H., Petersburg. 
Thompson, R. W., Bedford. 



Name. Residence. 

Wallace, David, Indianapolis. 

White, Joseph L., Madison. 

Illinois. — 3. 
Casey, Zadock, Mount Vernon. 
Reynolds, John, Belleville. 
Stuart, John T., Springfield. 

Missouri. — S. 

Edwards, John C, Jefferson City. 
Miller, John, Gooch's Mills. 

Territories. 

Florida. — 1 Delegate. 
Levy, David, 

Wisconsin. — 1 Delegate. 
Vacant. 

Iowa. — 1 Delegate. 

Dodge, Augustus C, Burlington. 



Officers of the House of Representatives. 







Salary. 


Matthew St. C. Clarke, Clerk 


of the House y 




$3,000 


S. Burche, ChfCl.x 


In Office 


, 1,800 


John T. Frost, 


Clerk, 


1,500 


Brooke M. Berry, 


do. 


1,500 


Robert N. Johnston, 


do. 


1,500 


Benj. B. French, 


do. 


1,500 


Daniel Gold, 


do. 


1,500 


Horatio N. Orabb, 


do. 


1,500 



Salary. 
Clerk, $1,500 
do. 1,500 
do. 1,500 
do. 1,500 



Noah Fletcher, 

Eliab Kingman, 

Eli Duvall, 

Thomas Patterson, 

E. L. Townsend, Serg. at Ar. 1,500 

Jos. Follansbee, Doorkeeper, 1,500 

John W. Hunter, Ast. Doork. 1,450 

J. W. McCormick, Postmaster, 1,500 



John L. Meehan, Librarian to Congress, 
Edward B. S telle, Assistant Librarian, 
Charles H. W. Meehan, do. 

The National Library contains about 32,000 volumes. 



Salary. 
$1,500 

1,150 



64 



UNITED STATES. 



[1842. 



V. THE JUDICIARY. 
Supreme Court. 



Residence. 




Appointed 


Salary. 


Baltimore, Md. 


Chief Justice, 


1836, 


$5,000 


Cambridge, Mass. 


Associate Justice { 


i 1811, 


4,500 


New York, N. Y. 


do. 


1823, 


4,500 


Cincinnati, Ohio, 


do. 


1829, 


4,500 


Pittsburg, Pa. 


do. 


1830, 


4,500 


Savannah, Ga. 


do. 


1835, 


4,500 


Florence, Ala. 


do. 


1837, 


4,500 


Nashville, Ten. 


do. 


1837, 


4,500 


Richmond, Va. 


do. 


1841, 


4,500 


Washington, D. C. 


Attorney' General, 


4,000 


Philadelphia, 


Reporter, 




1,000 


Washington, 


Clerk, 




1,000 


Do. 


Marshal, 




Fees, &e. 



Roger B. Taney, 
Joseph Story, 
Smith Thompson, 
John McLean, 
Henry Baldwin, 
James M. Wayne, 
John McKinley, 
John Catron, 
Peter Y. Daniel, 
John J. Crittenden, 
Richard Peters, 
William T. Carroll, 
Alexander Hunter, 

The Supreme Court is held in the City of Washington, and has one ses- 
sion annually, commencing on the 2d Monday of January. 

DISTRICT COURTS j — JUDGES, ATTORNEYS, 



Districts, 
Maine, 

N. Hampshire, 
Vermont, 
Massachusetts, 
Rhode Island, 
Connecticut, 
K v I N. Dist. 
N * *' ( S. Dist. 
New Jersey, 
p. t E. Dist. 
ra * j W.Dist. 
Delaware, 
Maryland, 

{ E. Dist. 



Va. 



W.Dist. 



North Carolina, 
South Carolina, 
Georgia, 

< S. Dist. 

'( N. Dist. 
N. Dist. 



Ala. 



Miss. 



La. 



S. Dist. 

E. Dist. 

W.Dist. 

W.Dist. 
Tenn. 7 M. Dist 
( E. Dist. 
Kentucky, 
Ohio, 
Indiana, 
Illinois, 
Missouri, 
Michigan, 
Arkansas, 
D. Columbia, 



Judge 
rWa 



Ashur Ware, 
Matthew Harvey, 
Elijah Paine, 
Peleg Sprague, 
John Pitman, 
And'w T. Judson, 
A. Conkling, 
Samuel A. Betts, 
Ph. Dickeraon, 
Jos. Hopkinson, 
Thomas Irwin, 
Willard Hall, 
Upton S. Heath, 
John Y. Mason, 
[.S.'Penny backer, 
Henry Potter, 
R. B Gilchrist, 
John C. Nicoll, 

Wm. Crawford, 
S. J. Gholson, 
Abner N. Ogden, 

Mr. B. Brown, 

Th. B. Monroe, 
H. A. Leavitt, 
Jesse L. Holman, 
Nathaniel Pope, 
Robert W. Wells, 
Ross Wilkins, 
Benj. Johnson, 
William Cranch, 



Residence, 
Portland, 
Hopkinton, 
Williamstown, 
Boston, 
Providence, 
Canterbury, 
Albany, 
New York, 
Paterson, 
Philadelphia, 
Union town, 
Wilmington, 
Baltimore, 
Cabell C. H. 
Harrisonburg, 
Raleigh, 
Charleston, 
Savannah, 

Mobile, 
Athens, 
New Orleans, 

Nashville, 

Frankfort, 
Lawrenceburg, 
Aurora, 
Vandal ia. 
St. Louis, 
Detroit, 
Port of Ark. 
Washington, 



Salary. 

$1,800 
1,000 
1,200 
2,500 
1,500 
1,500 
2,000 
3,500 
1,500 
2,500 
1,800 
1,500 
2,000 
1,800 
1.600 
2,000 
2»500 
2,500 




1,500 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,200 
1,500 
2,000 
2,700 



Attorneys. 
John Holmes, 
Joel Eastman, 
Charles Davis, 
Franklin Dexter, 
R. W. Greene, 
Charles Chapman, 
J. A. Spencer, 
Ogden Hoffman, 
James S. Greene. 
Wm. M. Meredith, 
Cornelius Darragh, 
James A. Bayard, 
N. Williams, 
R. C. Nicholas, 
W. G. Singleton, 
Wm. H. Haywood, 
Edward McCreary, 
Rob. M. Charlton, 
Geo. W. Gayle, 
Jeremiah Clemens, 
S. F. Butterworth, 
R. M. Gaines, 
Bailie Peyton, 
Henderson Taylor, 
H. W. McCorry, 
Return J. Meigs, 
J. A. McKinney, 
P. S.Loughborough, 
Israel Hamilton, 
Courtland Cushing, 
Justin Butter field, 
Montgomery Blair, 
Geo. C. Bates. 
Absalom Fowler, 
Francis S. Key, 



Pay. 
#200 ft feet. 
900 do. 
900 do 
Fees, fee. 
200 ft fees. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
Fees, fte. 
200 & fees. 
Fees, ftc. 
200 & fees. 
200 do. 
Fees, fte . 
200 ft fees. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
600 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 



1842.] 



JUDICIARY. 



65 



Circuit Courts. 

The United States are divided into the nine following judicial circuits, 
in each of which a Circuit Court is held twice every year, for each State 
within the circuit, by a Justice of the Supreme Court, assigned to the circuit, 
and by the District Judge of the State or District, in which the Court sits. 

Presiding Judge. 
1st Circuit, Maine, N. Hampshire, Mass., and R. I., Mr. Justice Story. 
2d do. Vermont, Connecticut, and New York, Mr. Justice Thompson. 



3d 


do. 


4th 


do. 


5th 


do. 


6th 


do. 


7th 


do. 


8th 


do. 



New Jersey and Pennsylvania, 
Delaware and Maryland, 
Virginia and North Carolina, 
South Carolina and Georgia, 
Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Michigan, 



Mr. Justice Baldwin. 
Mr. Chief Just. Taney, 
Mr. Justice Daniel, 
Mr. Justice Wayne. 
Mr. Justice McLean. 
Mr. Justice Catron. 



9th do. 



Kentucky, Tennessee, and Missouri, 

{ ^ssssMEr D " trict } *"• *— • MoKi »^ 

There is a local Circuit Court held by three Judges in the District of Co- 
lumbia, specially appointed for that purpose. The Chief Justice of that 
Court sits also as District Judge of that District. 

MARSHALS, AND CLERKS. 



Marshals. \ 
John D. Kinsman, 
J. W. Kellej, 
William Barron, 

BSriomoo Lincoln, 
. Hartshorn, 
J. B. Eldridge, 
Clark Robinson, 
Silas M. Stilwell, 
J. 8. Darcy, 
Ittae Otis, 
Henry C. Bossier, 
0. G. Wilson, 
Nicholas Snyder, 
B. Christian, 
lames Points, 
Beverly Daniel, 
Thomas C. Condy. 
Wm. J. Davis, 
R. L. Crawford, 
Bern. Patteson, 
A. K. McClung, 
Anderson Miller, 
M. Marigney, 
C N. Garrett, 
R. J. Chester, 
8. B. Marshall, 
R. M. Woods, 
J. M. McCalla, 
John Patterson, 
Robert Hanna, 
Wm. Prentiss, 
Wm. fl. Russell, 
Joshua Howard, ' 
Th. W.Newton, 
Alexander Hunter, 



Residence. 
Portland, 



Boston, 



New York, 

Newark, 

Philadelphia, 

Wilmington, 

Baltimore, 

Richmond, 

Staunton, 

Raleigh, 

Charleston, 

Milledgcville, 

Mobile, 

Huntsville, 



New Orleans, 

Opelousas, 

Jackson. 

Nashville, 

Greene vi lie, 

Frankfort, 

Stenbenville, 



Washington, 

6* 



Pay. 
$200 & fees. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
Fees, &c. 
900 & fees. 
800 do. 
200 & fees. 
Fees, ice. 
200 & fees. 
Fees, &c. 
200 A fees. 
200 do. 
Fees, &c. 
200 at fees. 
200 do. 
400 do. 
Fees, tic. 
do. 
200 & fees. 
200 do. 



200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



Fees, &c. 



Clerks. 
John Mussey, 

C. W. Cutter, 
Jesse Gove, 
Francis fiassett, 
John T. Pitman, 
C A. Ingersoll, 
R. B. Miller, 
Fred. J. Belts, 
Rob. D. Spencer, 
F. Hopkinson, 
B. J. Roberts, 
W. A. Mendenhal, 
Thomas Spicer, 
Richard Jeffries, 

W. H. Haywood, 
James Jarvey, 
George Glenn, 

D. Files. 
O. R. Clifton, 

William Burns, 

J. Lessassier, 

M. A. McNairy, 
W. C. Mynatt, 
J. H. Hanna, 
William Miner, 
Henry Hurst, 
W. H. Brown, 
Joseph Gamble, 



Wm- Brent, 



Residence, 
Portland, 
Portsmouth, 
Rutland, 
Buston, 
Providence, 
New Haven, 
Utica, 
New York, 
Mt. Holly, 
Philadelphia, 
Pittsbctfg, 
Wilmington, 
Baltimore, 
Richmond, 

Raleigh, 

Charleston, 

Savannah, 

Mobile, 

Huntsville, 

Natchez, 

New Orleans, 

Nashville, 

Knoxville, 

Frankfort, 

Columbus, 

Corydon, 

Vandalia, 

St. Louis, 



Washington, 



Pay. 
Fees, &c. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



1 



66 



UNITED STATES. 



[1842. 



Places and Timks of holding the District and Circuit Courts 

of the United States. 



Maine. 

N. Hampshire. 

Vermont. 

Massachusetts. 

Rhode Island. 

Connecticut. 

New York, 
S. District. 



New York, 
N. District. 



\ 



New Jerset. 

Pennstltania, 
£. District. 

Pennsylvania, 
W. District. 



Delaware. 

Maryland. 

Columbia. 

Virginia, 
£. District. 

Virginia, 
W. District. 

N. Carolina. 
S. Carolina. 



District Courts. 

Wiscasset — Last Tuesday in Feb. and 1st Tues. in 
Sept. ; — Portland — 1st Tues. in June and Dec. 

5 Portsmouth — 3d Tuesday in March and Sept. ; — 
Exeter — 3d Tuesday in June and December. 

Rutland — 6th of Oct. ; — Windsor — 24th of May. 

! Boston — 3d Tuesday in March, 4th Tues. in June, 
2d Tuesday in Sept., and 1st Tuesday in Dec. 

S Newport — 2d Tuesday in May, and 3d in Oct. ; — 
Providence — Jet Tues. in Aug. and February. 

iJVew Haven — 4th Tues. in February and Aug. ; — 
Hartford — 4th Tuesday in May and Noy. 

5 New York — 1st Tuesday of each month. 

C Albany — 3d Tuesday in January ; — Utica — 2d 
Tuesday in July ; — Rochester — 3d Tuesday in 
May j — Buffalo — 2d Tuesday in October. — One 
term annually in the county of St. Lawrence, 
Clinton, or Franklin, at such time and place as 

I the judge may direct. 

C New Brunswick — 2d Tuesday in March and Sept. ; 

< — Burlington — 3d Tuesday in May and Novem- 
£ ber. 

C Philadelphia — 3d Monday in February, May, Au- 
l gust, and November. 

C Pittsburg — 1st Monday in May and 3d Monday in 
I October. 

{Newcastle <$• Dover — alternately, on the 4th Tues. 
in Nov. 1789; and three other sessions progres- 
sively, on the 4th Tuesday of every 3d calendar 
month. 

S Baltimore — on the 1st Tuesday in March, June, 
September, and December. 

Washington — 1st Monday in June and December* 

C Richmond — 12th of May and 12th of November ; — 
I Norfolk — 1st of May and 1st of November. 

1 Staunton — 1st day of May and 1 st day of Oct. ; — 
Wythe Court House — 3d Monday in April and 
Sept. ; — Lewisburg — 4th Monday in April and 
Sept ; — Clarksburg — 4th Mon. in May and Oct. 

i Edenton — 3d Mond. in April and Oct. ; — Newbern 

< — 4th Monday in April and Oct. ; — Wilmington— 
( 1st Monday after the 4th Mond. in April and Oct. 

{Charleston — 3d Monday in March and Sept. ; 1st 
Monday in July and 2d Monday in Dec. ; — Lau- 
rens Court House — the next Tuesday after the 
adjournment of the Circuit Court at Columbia. 



1842.] 



JUDICIARY. 



67 



Georgia. Savannah — 2d Tues. in Feb., May, Aug., and Not. 

Ala., N. District. Huntsville — 2d Monday in April and October. 

Alabama, C Tuscaloosa — 4th Monday in May, and 1st Monday 

M. District. ( after the 4th Monday in Nov. 

Ala., S. District. Mobile — 1st Monday in May and 2d Monday in Dec. 

Mississippi. Jackson — 4th Mond. in Jan. and June. 

La., £. District. New Orleans — 2d Monday in December. 

La., W. District. Opelousas Court House — 2d Monday in June. 

Tennessee, C Knoxville — 3d Monday in April and 3d Monday in 

£. District. \ October. 

S Nashville — 4th Monday in May and November ; — 
Jackson — 3d Monday in September. 

Frankfort — 1st Monday in May and November. 

S Columbus — 3d Monday in July, and 4th Monday 
in December. 

! Detroit — 3d Monday in June, and 1st Monday in 
November. 

Indianapolis — last Monday in May and November. 

Vandalia — 1st Monday in May and December. 

Jefferson City. — 1 st Monday in March and Sept. 

Little Rock — 1st l\londay in October. 



Tennessee, 
W. District. 

Kentucky. ' 
Ohio. 

Michigan. 

Indiana. 
Illinois. 
Missouri. 
Arkansas. 



Maine. 

N. Hampshire. 

Vermont. 

Massachusetts. 

Rhode Island. 

Connecticut. 

New York, 
S. District. 

N. District. 

New Jerset. 

Pennsylvania, 
E. District, 
W. District. 

Delaware. 

Maryland. 

Virginia, 
E. District. 
W. District. 

N. Carolina. 
S. Carolina. 



Circuit Courts, 

Portland — 1st May; — Wiscasset — 1st October. 

Portsmouth — 8th May ; — Exeter — 8th October. 

Windsor — 21st May ; — Rutland — 3d October. 

Boston — 15th May and 15th October. 

Newport — 15th June ; — Providence — 15th Nov. 

C New Haven — last Wednesday in April ; — Hartford 
\ — 17th September. 



(New York — last Monday in Feb., 1st Monday in 
April, last Monday in July and November; — 
Albany — 3d Tuesday in October; — Canandaigua 
— Tuesday next after the 3d Monday in June. 

Trenton — 1st April and 1st October. 



( Philadelphia — 11th April and 11th October. 
( Pittsburg — 3d Monday in May and November. 

{Newcastle — Tuesday following 4th Mond. in May; 
— Dover — Tuesday following 3d Mond. in Oct. 

Baltimore — 1st Monday in November. 



( Richmond — 18th May and 18th November. 
I Lewisburg — 1st Monday in August. 

Raleigh — 12th May and 12th November. 

Charleston — 2d Tuesday in April ; — Columbia — 
4th Monday in November. 



i 



68 



Georgia. 

Alabama, 
S. District. 
N. District. 

Mississippi. 

Louisiana, 
£. District. 

Tennessee. 

Kentucky. 

Ohio. 

Michigan. 

Indiana. 

Illinois. 

Missouri. 

Arkansas. 

District op 
Columbia. 



UNITED STATES. [1842. 

C Savannah — Thursday after the 1st Monday in 
7 May ; — Milledgevule — Thursday after the 1st 
( Monday in November. 

C Mobile — 2d Mond. in March and 4th Mond. in Not. 
I HuntsvMe — 1st Monday in June. 

Jackson — 1st Monday in May and November. 

!JVew Orleans— 1st Monday in April, and 3d Mond. 
in December. 

C Nashville — 1st Monday in March and September; 
7 — Knoxville — 3d Monday in October j — Jack- 
( son — 1st Monday in April. 

Frankfort — 1st Monday in May and November. 

Columbus — 3d Monday in May and December. 

Detroit — 2d Monday in October. 

Indianapolis — 1st Monday in December. 

VandaHa — Last Monday in November. 

St. Louis — 1st Monday in April. 

Little Rock — 4th Monday in March. 

C Washington — 4th Mond. in March and November ; 
\ — Alexandria — 1st Monday in May and October. 



VI. INTERCOURSE WITH FOREIGN NATIONS. — July, 1841. 

The pay of Ministers Plenipotentiary is $9,000 per annum, as salary, 
besides $ 9,000 for outfit. The pay of Charge's d'Affaires is $4,500 per 
annum; of Secretaries of Legation, $2,000. 

The government of the United States is represented by Ministers 
Plenipotentiary at the courts of Great Britain, France, Russia, 
Prussia, Austria, and Mexico, and by Charges d'Affaires at the courts of 
most of the other foreign countries with which this country is much 
connected by commercial intercourse. 

1. Ministers and Diplomatic Agents op the United States in 

Foreign Countries. 



Ministers Plenipotentiary in 1841. 



Andrew Stevenson, 
Lewis Cass, 
C. C. Cambreleng, 
Henry Wheaton, 
C. S. Todd, 
Powhatan Ellis, 



Appointed. Foreign States. 
Great Britain, 
France, 
Russia, 
Prussia, 
Austria, 
Mexico, 



Va. 


1835 


Ohio. 


1836 


N.Y. 


1840 


R. I. 


1837 


Ken. 


1841 


Miss. 


1837 



Capitati. 
London. 
Paris. 

St. Petersburg. 
Berlin. 
Vienna. 
Mexico. 



1842.] 



INTERCOURSE WITH FOREIGN RATIONS. 



69 



Benjamin Rash, 
Henry Ledyard, 



David Porter, 



Secretaries of Legation. 

G. Britain. I John R. Clay, 
France. | Theodore S. Fay, 

Minister Resident. 

Appointed. 
Md. | 1839 | Turkey, 



Austria. 
Prussia. 



Charge's d'affaires in 1841. 



Hermanus Bleecker, N. Y. 
Virgil Maxcy, Md. 

Christopher Hughes, Md. 
Isaac R. Jackson, 
James Semple, 111. 

Allen A. Hall, Tenn. 

William Hunter, R. I. 

John S. Pendleton, Va. 
James C. Pickett, Va. 

Joseph Eve, Ken. 

Enos T. Throop, N. H. 
Aaron Vail, D. C. 

William Baber Ga. 

Washington Barrow, 



1839 
1837 
1830 
1841 
1837 
1841 
1834 
1841 
1838 
1841 
1838 
1840 
1841 
) 1841 



Netherlands, 
Belgium, 
Sweden, 
Denmark, 
New Grenada, 
Venezuela, 
Brazil, 
Chili, 
Peru, 
Texas, 
Two Sicilies, 
Spain, 
Sardinia, 
| Portugal, 



| Constantinople. 



■ Hague. 

Brussels. 
! Stockholm. 
j Copenhagen. 
; Bogota. 

Caraccas. 

Rio Janeiro. 

Santiago. 
: Lima. 
I Austin. 
; Naples. 

Madrid. 
1 Turin. 
| Lisbon. 



List of Consuls and Commercial Agents of the United 
States in Foreign Countries, and of tre Places of their 
Residence ; — Corrected in the Department of State to July Qth, 1841* 

OCT Those marked thos * are Comm&rcial AgtmU* 



Argentine Republic or Buenos 

Atres. 
Amory Edwards, Buenos Ayres. 

Austria. 
J. G. Schwarz, Vienna. 

George Moore, Trieste. 

Frederick W. Rappel, Pesth. 
Albert Dabadie, Venice. 

Barbary States. 

Tho mMN .C, r r ( | T -^. . 

Samuel D. Heap, Tunis, Tunis. 
Dan. S. Macauley, TripoU, Tripoli. 

Bat aria. 
Robert D. Ruedoffer, Munich. 



Belgium. 



Antwerp. 



Brazil. 

Charles B. Allen, Maranham Isl* 

Charles J. Smith, Para. 

Joseph Ray, Pernambuco. 

George W. Slacum, Rio Janeiro. 

George Black, Santos. 

t .i ttt 11 (St. Catharine's 

Lemuel Well., J Igland 

John C. Pedrick, Rio Grande. 

ai n Ti. ( Bahia de San 
Alex. H. Tyler, £ g.,,^. 

Central America. 
Stephen H. Weems, Guatemala. 

Chili. 

Valparaiso. 
P. H. Delano, Acting, Talcahuano. 

Samuel F. Haviland, Coquimbo. 



70 



UNITED STATES. 



[1842. 



China. 
Peter W. Snow, 



Canton. 



DXNMARK. 

Charles F. Ryan, Copenhagen. 
Edmund L. Raynals, Elsineur. 

Egypt, Pasha of 
John Gliddon, Alexandria. 

Equator. 
Seth Sweetser, Guayaquil. 

France. 
Lorenzo Draper, Paris. 

Samuel Allinson, Lyons. 
Reuben G. Beasley, Havre. 
John W. Grigsby, Bordeaux. 
Daniel C. Croxall, Marseilles. 



West Indies. 

Pointe-a 
Pitre, Gua- 
deloupe. 

P.A.DeCreny, {M5L. 



Felix H. Suau, 



JtfHca. 




Francis Lacrouts, 


Algiers. 


Great Britain. 


England. 




Thomas Aspinwall, 


London. 


Albert Davy, 


Hull. 


Philip Schuyler, 


Liverpool. 


Francis B. Ogden, 


Bristol. 


Robert W. Fox, 


Falmouth. 


Thomas Were Fox, 


Plymouth. 


Robert R. Hunter, 


Cowes. 


Scotland, 




Robert Grieve, 


Leith. 


Edward Baxter, 


Dundee. 


Alexander Thomson, 


Glasgow. 



Ireland. 
Thomas Wilson, Dublin, 
Thomas W. Gilpin, Belfast. 
James Corscaden, Londonderry. 



John Murphy, Cork. 

Thomas M. Persse, Galway. 

In and near Europe and Africa. 

Horatio Sprague, Gibraltar. 
Win. W. Andrews, Isl. of Malta. 
"William Carroll, Isl. St. Helena. 
Isaac Chase, Cape-Town. 

•W.H.H. Griffith., | P S 

JVbrth America. 

Thomas Leavitt, St. John's N. B. 

T. B. Livingston, Halifax, N. S. 

James Primrose, Pictou, N. S. 

John I. D'Wolf, Sydney, W. S. 

West Indies. 
Wm. T. Tucker, Bermuda. 

John F. Bacon, \ *? »££> 

John Arthur, Turk's Island. 

Robert M.Harrison, Kingston, Ja. 



C St. Christopher 



and Antigua. 
•John Haly, Barbadoes. 

Wm. Macomb, Trinidad. 

South America, 
Moses Benjamin, j BriShG&M,,. 

jht&ralia. 
James H. Williams, j S | d w^* W 

East Indies. 
Joseph Balestier, Singapore. 

Greece. 
G. A. Perdicaris, Athens. 

Hatti or St. Domingo. 

Francis D. Cummins, Pt. au Prince. 

Aux Cayes. 
Benj. E. Viall, Cape Haytien. 



1842.] INTERCOURSE WITH 

Hanseatic or Free Cities. 

John Cuthbert, Hamburg, 

Marcus Derchkeim, Bremen. 

r. ^ cs u ji f Frankfort on 
Ernest Schwendler, J the Maine . 

HessE, Grand-Duchy of 
Charles Graebe, Cassel. 

Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Grand- 
Duchy of. 

Christian F. Schultz, Rostock. 

Mexican Republic. 
Mexico. 
Chihuahua. 
Santa Fe\ 

{Tampico or 
Santa Anna 
de Tamau- 



FOREIGN NATIONS. 



71 



Manuel Alvarez, 



Daniel W. Smith, 

Marmaduke Bur- 
rough, 



i 



Charles Russell, i 

Peter A. Carnes, 
Jonathan P. Gilliam, 
John Parrott, 
Jose" Maria Castanos, 



Matamoros. 

Vera Cruz & 
Alvarado. 

Tabasco. 
Laguna, 
Carmen Isl. 

Cam peachy. 

Monterey. 

Mazatlan. 

San Bias. 



Muscat, Dominion of the 
Imaum of 

Muscat. 

Isl .Zanzibar, 
Richard P. Waters, I near £. coast 

Africa. 



(Isl 

j, 2nei 

fjof 



The Netherlands or Holland. 

J. W. Vander Broek, Amsterdam. 
John Wambersie, Rotterdam. 

Colonies. 

Thomas Trask, Paramaribo, S. A. 
J. H. D'Meza, Curacao, W. I. 
O. M. Roberts, Batavia, Java. 



New Grenada. 

Ramon L. Sanchez, Carthagena. 
Th. We Robeson, Santa Martha. 
Wm. Nelson, Panama. 

Pacific Islands, Independent, 

S. R. Blackler, Otaheite, Soc. I. 
*P. A. Brinsmade, Woahoo, San. 1. 

J.R.Clendon, {■££*** 

Peru. 

Lima. 
Alex. Ruden, Jr., Paita. 

Portugal. 
Israel P. Hutchinson, Lisbon. 

Wm .H.Ve«e y , ja»' 

Louis Tinelli, Oporto. 

Islands. 

Charles W. Dabney, Fayal, Azores. 
John H. March, Funchal, Mad. 

Ferd. Gardner, {fjgfi^ _ 

Prussia. 

Wm. T. Simons, Elberfeld. 
Frederick Schillow, Stettin. 

Rome or Pontifical States. 
George W. Greene, Rome. 
James £. Freeman, Ancona. 

Russia. 

A. P. Gibson, St. Petersburg. 

Alex. Schwartz, Riga. 

Edmund Brandt, Archangel. 

John Ralli, Odessa. 

Sardinia, Kingdom of. 
John J. Bailey, Genoa. 

Victor A. SaBserno, Nice. 

Saxony. 
John G. Flugel, Leipsic. 



72 



UNITED STATES. 



Spain. 

Maximo de Aguirre, Bilboa. 

Alexander Burton, Cadiz. 

George Read, Malaga. 

J. A. B. Leonard, Barcelona. 

Obadiah Rich, Port Mahon. 



Cuba. 

Nicholas P. Trist, 
George Strobe), 

Hiram P. Hastings, 

Michael Mahon, 
Fitz H. McCready, 



Havana. 

Matanzas. 

\ Trinidad de 
5 Cuba. 

C Santiago de 
I Cuba. 

Baracoa. 



Puerto Rico, 

James C. Gallaher, Ponce. 
Richard J. Offley, Mayaguez. 
William M. Tracy, Guayama. 

Other Spanish Islands. 

Joseph Cullen, Tenerifie, Canary, 
H. P. Sturgis, Manilla, Philipp. 

Sweden and Norway. 

C. D. Arfwedson, Stockholm. 
C. A. Murray, Gottenburg. 

Helmich Janson, Bergen. 



[1842. 

Switzerland. 
Stephen Powers, Basil or Basle. 

Texas. 

Velasco. 
Elisha A. Rhodes, Galveston. 
Young I. Porter, Brazoria. 

Charles S. Wallach, Matagorda. 

Turkey. 

George A. Porter, Constantinople. 
David W. Offley, Smyrna. 

TUSCANY. 

Joseph Binda, Leghorn. 

Two Sicilies. 

Alexander Hammett, Naples. 
John M. Marston, Palermo. 
John L. Pay son, Messina. 

Uruguay or Cisplatine Re- 
public. 

Robert M. Hamilton, Monte Video. 

Venezuela. 

William J. Dubs, Maracaibo. 
Franklin Litchfield, Puerto Cabello. 
Benj. Renshaw, Laguayra. 



3. Foreign Ministers and their Secretaries, 

r 

Accredited to the Government of the United States. 



Foreign State*. Envoys Ex. f Min. Plen. 
Great Britain, Henry S. Fox, 



France, 
« 

Russia, 
« 

Spain, 

u 

Austria, 
« 



M. de Bacourt, 



Secretaries, $c. 

James Hudson. 

R. J. Mackintosh, Attache*. 

Alph. Pageot. 

Count de Montholon, Attache*. 
Alexander Bodisco, George Khremer. 

Mr. de Stoechal, Attache. 
Chevalier D'Argaiz, Sr. Tacon. 

Mr. Liguez y Bardaxi, Attache". 
Baron de Mareschal, Chevalier Hulseman. 

Chev'r Friederichsthal, Attache. 



1842.] 



INTERCOURSE WITH FOREIGN NATIONS. 



73 



FWexgn States. 


Envoys Ex. f Min. Plen. Secretaries, tfc. 


Mexico, 


Vacant 


« 

• 


Angel Cos, Attachi. 


Argentine Rep. 


Carlos Maria de Alvear. 




Ministers Resident. 


Prussia, 


Baron Roenne. 


Portugal, 


J. C. de Figaniere e Morao, 


Brazil, 


Cher. Gasper Josl Lisboa. 




Charges d'affaires. 


Netherlands, 


Chevalier Adr. Martini. 


Belgium, 


M. Charles Serruys, Count de [Baillet 


Sweden, 


Chev. Gustavus de Nardin. 


Denmark, 


M. Steen de Bille*. 


Sardinia, 


Count de Colobiano. 


New Grenada, 


Domingo Acosta. 


Texas, 


Bernard £. Bee. 



4. Foreign Consuls and Vice-Consuls in the United States. 

A list of Foreign Consuls and Vice- Consuls in the United States, for 

whom Exequaturs have been issued from the Department of State. 

Q7 Thoee marked thus * are Constrts-Qeneral i—lbu» f Fice-Oonsuls ; — the rest 
Consuls. 



Austria. 

*Baron de Lederer. 

J. W. Langdon, Boston. 

t Joseph Ganahl, Savannah. 

Baden. 

Johann W. Schmidt, New York. 
Frederick Frey, New Orleans. 

Bavaria. 

G. Heinrich Siemon, New York. 
C Fred. Hagedorn, Philadelphia. 

Belgium. 

Henry G. T. Mali, New York. 

E. A. Homer, Boston. 

Henry Lefebure, Charleston. 

Edward Mallard, New Orleans. 

BraxU. 

*D. de Azevedo Pecanha, Philadel. 
tArchibald Foster, Mass., N. H., 
and Maine, Boston. 

7 



tGeo. 8. Wardwell, Providence. 
tC. Griffin, Connecticut 

tL. F. de Figaniere, New York, 
t John Vaughan, Pa. fc Del., Phil's. 
tGeo. H. Newman, Baltimore, 
t Christopher Neale, Diet, of Col. 
tMyer Myers, Norfolk, and the 

State of Virginia, 
t Jn. P. Calhorda, Wilming'n, N. C. 
tS. Chadwick, S. C, Charleston. 
tJohn W. Anderson, Savannah. 
tJas. VV. Zacharie, Louisiana and 

Alabama. 

Bremen. 
Herman Oelrichs, New York. 
Christopher F Plate, Philadelphia. 
Albert Sobumacker, Baltimore. 
Thomas Searle, Boston, 

Ant'y Ch. Cazenove, Dist. of Co. 
Lewis Trapman, Charleston. 

Eleazer Crabtree, Savannah, Ga, 
Frederick Frey, New Orleans. 



74 



UNITED STATES. 



[1842. 



Chili. 
Franklin H. Delano, New York. 

Denmark. 

tBenj. Aymar, N. York, Con., and 
part of N. J., New York. 

t James W. Andrews, Mass., Me., 
N. H., and R. I., Boston. 

f Christopher Neale, Dist. of Colum- 
bia and the ports on the Potomac. 

t Frederick Myers, Virginia, (ports 
on the Potomac excepted,) to re- 
side at Norfolk. 

tP.K. Dickinson, N. C, Wilroing'n. 

W. Crabtree, Georgia, 

J. F. C. F. Ules, N. Orleans 

France. 

*Durant de St. Andre*, 
De Sieur Dannery, New York. 
M. B. B. de L. D'Hauteuve, Philad. 
Sr. Pillavoine, Baltimore. 

F. L. B. F. Moisson, Richmond. 
tJ. Picket, Boston, 

fj. B. A. M. Deseze, Norfolk. 
De Larne de Villeret, Savannah, 
t Count de la Porte, Tallahassee. 
tB. Martigny, Philadelphia. 

tSr. Cerfberr, N. Orleans. 

tMr. Baudoin, Charleston. 

Frankfort on the Maine. 

Fred. Wysmann, New York. 
Arnold Halbach, Philadelphia. 

Great Britain. 

Th. Colley Grattan, Mass., Boston. 
J. C. Buchanan, New York. 

J. McTavish, Maryland. 

W. Ogilly, N. & S. Car. 

J. Baker, Flor. & Ala. 

C. J. Peshall, Wilmington, N. C. 
A. L. Molyneaux, Georgia, 
J. Crawford, N. Orleans. 



Greece. 
Eugene Dutilh, New York. 

Hamburg. 

tC. Knorre, Boston. 

Johann W. Schmidt, New York. 

Frederich Rodewald, Baltimore. 

Louis Trapmann, Charleston. 

F. W. Schmidt, Louisiana. 

Hanover. 

Theodore Myer, New York. 

tA. W. Hupeden, St. of N. Y. 

H. Van Cooth, Charleston. 

H. Schultze, N. Orleans. 

Elector of Hesse and Grand Duke 
* ofFulda. 

Conrad W. Faber, New York. 

Grand Duke of Hesse. 
Anton Bollermann, New York. 

Lubcck. 
William Kruger, New York. 

Mecklenburg- Schioerin. 
*Leon Herchenrath, Charleston. 

Mexico. 
tDon Juan de la Granja, N. York. 
t George Follen, Philadelphia. 

t Edward Cabot, B6ston. 

f Charles Tiernan, Baltimore. 
D. A. A. Niilalobos, N. Orleans. 
ID. P. J. Marallano, St. Louis, Mo. 
fD. Juan F. Cortes, Natchitoches. 
t Alden A. M. Jackson, Pensacola. 
Lewis Ramirez, St. Louis, Mo. 
t George P. Ward, Florida. 
Ala., Mobile, 
t Richard W. Codgel, Charleston. 

JVcther lands. 
Henry Bohlen, Philadelphia. 

Thomas Dixon, Boston. 



1842.] FOREIGN CONSULS, &C IN THE UNITED STATES. 



75 



tThomas Thaxter, Salem, Mass. 
J. C. Zimmerman, N. T., N. J., and 

Conn. New York. 

tJ. A. Van Cooth, S. C, Charleston 
G. T. Hoogewerff, Maryland and 

Dist. of Col. Baltimore. 

tOliver O. Hara, Kejr West. 

Myer Myers, Norfolk, 

t Godfrey Barnsley, Savannah. 
H. C. Gildemeester, La.,N. Orleans. 
£. de Wolff, Ala. & Flor., Mobile. 
P. J. Lechteitner, Annapolis. 

JVete Grenada. 
•Don Domingo Acosta, 

Oldenburg. 

Otto Heinrich Miesegaes, N. York. 
Chas. F. Lowndes, Charleston, S.C. 

Portugal. 

IP. Noailles Searle, New York. 
*J. C. de Figaniere, Morao. 
tDiego Chalaron, La., N. Orleans, 
f Jose' A. Sintas, N. C, Wilmington. 
Jn. M. L. Smith, Md., Baltimore. 
ID. Antonio G. Vega, Mass., R. I., 

and New Hampshire. 
tJohn Vaughan, Penn. and N. J. 
tElias Reed, Georgia. 

tJule Pescay, W. Flor., Pensacola. 
tWm. H. Allen, St. Augustine, 
i Archibald W. Gordon, Al., Mobile, 
t. P. Calhorda, Wilmington, N. C. 
t Christopher Neale, Dist. of Col. 
t Solomon Marks, Va., Norfolk. 



Prussia. 



Gustav. Gossler, 
J. C. Lang, 
Ludwig Brauns, 
tWilhelm Vogel, 



Boston. 
Philadelphia. 
Maryland. 
N. Orleans. 



/fonts. 

*Giovanni B. Sartori, Trenton. 
Peter Amedee Hargons, Act. Cons. 

Gen. in the absence of G. B. 

Sartori. 
t Martin Mantin, New York. 

tTh. Joseph Bizodard, Baltimore, 
t Samuel Wright, Savannah. 
tWm. D'Azet Senac, Norfolk. 
tCharles Le Carron, Charleston, 
t Henry Perret, N. Orleans. 

tCharles Picot, Philadelphia. 

Russia. 

*Alexis Evstaphieff, New York. 

Peter Kilchen, Boston. 

Edward Johns, N. Orleans. 

tCharles Cramer, New York. 

f C. Jean Cazenove, Dist. of Col. 

Sardinia. 

Luigi Mossi, Consul- Gen., N. York. 
fPietro D'Alessandro, Me , N. H., 

Mass., and R. I. Boston. 
*A. Garibaldi, Acting, Philadelphia, 
f Benj. Douglass, Charleston, S. C. 
f Achille Felix George, Mobile. 
Antonio Michourd. N. Orleans. 

Saxe- Coburg and Gotha. 
Carl Frederick Haussman, for U. S. 

Saxe- Weimar. 

*Fred. Aug. Mensch, New York. 
Aug. W. Hupeden, New York. 

Saxony. 

*Ch. Aug. Davis, New York. 
J. Randolph Mahler, New York. 
J. F. C. Ules, N. Orleans. 

F. Ludwig Brauns, Md., Bait. 
tCharles J. Cazenove, R. I., Mass., 

N. H., and Me. Boston. 
Robert Ralston, Philadelphia. 



76 



TJN1TBD STATES. 



[1943. 



•Don Pablo Chaoen, Philadelphia. 
tF. Moreno, Pensacola. 

tD. Ponce, Savannah. 

tTh. Amory Deblois, Portland. 
iDon Jose* J. Cruzat, Mobile. 
tDon Antonio G. Vega, Boston, 
t Antonio Larrnaga, Charleston. 
Manuel Valdor, 
t Walter de Lacy, 
tjohn Notliss, 



Baltimore. 
Norfolk. 
Key West. 



Sweden and Norway. 

t Ernst Zachrisson, New York. 
tRichard Seldener, Pa., Philadel. 
tF. B. Graf, Baltimore. 

t John H. Brent, Alexandria,, D. C. 
t Duncan Robertson, Norfolk, 
t C. £. Habicht, Me., N. H., & Mass. 
tDiedrich Miesegaes, N. Orleans. 
tFrancis H. Wilman, Savannah, 
t Joseph A. Winthrop, S. Carolina, 
t George Westfield, Mobile. 

John Merle, La. and Miss., New 
Orleans. 

Texas. 

Thomas A. Dexter, Boston. 
Augustus W. Radcliff, New York. 



Cyrus Joy, 
H. Williams, 
Th. L. Hamilton, 
Wm. Smith, 
Joseph B. Browne, 



Philadelphia. 
Baltimore. 
Charleston. 
Mobile. 
Key West. 



Tuscany. 
tW. H. A spin wall, New York. 



TwoSiciUei. 

*D. Rocco Marufoelli, New York. 
"Don Domenico Morelli, Philadel. 
f G. A. Barelli, New Orleans. 

G. A. Trenholm, Charleston, S. C. 
tO. Wolff, Mobile, 

f Geo. H. Newman, Baltimore. 
tGennaro Persico, Norfolk. 
tPietro D'Alessandro, Boston. 
IB. D. Potter, Providence. 

tLuca Palmieri, Philadelphia, 

tlra Clisbe, N. Haven, Ct 

fGofrredo Barnsley, Savannah, 
t Antonio Pomer, Norfolk. 
tA. O. Hammond, Charleston. 
tN. E. Fowls, Dist. of Col. 



Uruguay. 



*Jnan Darby. 
E. I. Tobey, 
tG. F. Darby, 
tE. Dudley Head, 
tC. J. Mansong, 
tG. L. Lowden, 
tJoseph Cabot, 
tThos. Benj. Adair, 



Boston. 

New York. 

N. Orleans. 

Mobile. 

Charleston. 

Philadelphia. 

Baltimore. 



Venezuela. 

Jas. W. Andrews, Boston. 

Juan B. Purroy, New York. 

J. F. Strohm, Baltimore. 

G. Mcllhenny, Philadelphia. 

Wurtemburg. 

John D. Fink, Ala., Mp., La., and 
Fl. New Orleans. 

"Christian Mayer, Baltimore. 



1842,] 



NAVY LUST. 



77 



VII. NAVY LIST. 
1. Vessels of War of the Uhited States Nayt. — July, 1841. 

[The names of officers marked thai * have the rank of Commanders', thai t Lieu* 

tenants} the rest are Captains,'] 



Name and Rate. 



Where and when 
built. 



Sk^so/tke Line.— 11. 
Guns. 

Franktm, 74 

Washington, 74 

Columbus. 74 

Ohio. 80 

North Carolina, 80 

Delaware, 80 

Alabama, 80 

Vermont, 80 

Virginia, 80 

Pennsylvania, 120 

New York, 80 

Frigates, 1st Class, - 15 

Independence, Raiie, 54 

United States, 44 

Constitution, 44 

Guerriere, 44 

Java, 44 

Potomac, 44 

Brandy wine, 44 

Hudson, 44 

Santee, 44 

Cumberland, 44 

Sabine, 44 

Savannah, 44 

Raritan, 44 

Columbia, 44 

St. Lawrence, 44 

Frigates, 2d Class, — 2. 



Philadelphia, 
Portsmouth, 
Washington, 
New York, 
Philadelphia, 
Gosport, Va. 



Commanded by 



1815 

1816 

1819 Joseph Smith, 

1820 E. A. F. Lavallette, 
1820 Fran. H. Gregory, 
1820 Chas. S. McCauley, 



Where employed. 



Constellation, 


36 


Macedonian, 


36 


Sloops of War, 


-21. 


John Adams, 


20 


Boston, 


20 


Lexington, 


20 


Vincennes, 


20 


Warren, 


20 


Natchez. 
Falmouth, 


20 


20 


Fairfield, 


20 


Vandalia, 


20 


St. Louis, 


20 


Concord, 


20 


Cyane, 


20 


Levant, 


20 


Erie, 


18 


Ontario, 


18 


Peacock, 


18 


Marion, 


16 


Decatur, 


16 


Preble, 


16 


Vorktown, 


16 


Dale, 


16 



Boston, 


1814 


Philadelphia, 


1797 


Boston, 


1797 


Philadelphia, 


1814 


Baltimore, 


1814 


Washington, 


1821 


do. 


1825 


Purchased, 


1826 



Washington, 1836 



Baltimore, 1797 

Norfolk, rebuilt, 1836 



Norfolk, rebuilt, 1820 

Boston, 1835 

New York, 1825 

do. 1826 

Boston, 1826 

Norfolk, 1827 

Boston, 1827 

New York. 1828 

Philadelphia, 1828 

Washington, 1828 

Portsmouth, 1828 

Boston, 1837 

New York, 1837 
Norfolk, rebuilt, 1820 

Baltimore, 1813 

New York, 1813 

Boston, 1839 

New York. 1839 

Portsmouth, 1839 

Norfolk, 1339 

Philadelphia, 1839 



Daniel Turner, 



Geo. W. Storer, 
David Geisinger, 



Jesse Wilkinson, 



*John C. Long, 

[Charles Wilkes,' 
♦Win. Jameson, 



♦Josiah Tatnall, 

• • 

♦French Forrest, 
+Wm. Boerum, 
♦James Armstrong, 
♦Joseph Smoot, 
♦Andrew Fitzhugh, 

... 
fWm. L. Hudson, 
♦Wm. J. Belt, 
♦Henry W. Ogden, 
♦Ralph Voorhees, 
♦John H. Aulick, 
♦Charles Gauntt, 



In ordinary, N. York. 

do. do. 

Receiving Ship, Boat. 
Boston. 

Receiving Ship, N. Y. 
Coast of Brazil. 
On stocks, Portsm'th. 

do. Boston. 

do. do. 

In ordinary, Norfolk. 
On stocks, do. 



In ordinary, N. Y. 

do. Norfolk 

Pacific Ocean. FL Sh. 
In ordinary, Norfolk. 

do. do. 

Coast of Brazil, FLSh, 
Mediterranean. 
In ordinary, N. York 
On stocks, Portsm'th. 

do. Boston. 

do. N. York. 

do. do. 

do. Philadelphia. 
In ordinary, Boston. 
On stocks, Norfolk. 



East Indies. 

W. Indies, Flag Ship. 



In ordinary, Boston, 

East Indies. 

In ordinary, Norfolk. 

Explori'g Expedition. 

West Indies. 

In ordinary, N. York. 

do. do. 

Mediterranean. 
In ordinary, Norfolk. 
Pacific Ocean. 
Coast of Brazil. 
Pacific Ocean. 
West Indies. 
In ordinary, Boston. 
In ordinary, N. York. 
Explori'g Expedition. 
Coast of Brazil, 

do. 
Mediterranean. 
Pacific Ocean. 

do. 



78 



UNITED STATES. 



[1843. 



Narao and Rate. 


Where and when 
built. 


Commanded by 


Where employed; 


Brigs. — 4. 












€hma. 










Dolphin, 


10 


New York, 


1836 


... 


Returned from Africa. 


Porpoise, 


10 


Boston, 


1836 


fC. Rinjggold, 
fGeo. N. HoMins, 


Explori'g Expedition. 


Pioneer, 




do. 


1836 


Receiv'g vessel, Ball. 


Contort, 




do. 


J636 


fL. M. Powell, 


Surv. South. Harbors. 


Schooners, — 8. 












Grampus, 


10 


Washington, 


1881 


fJ. S. Paine, 


Coast of Africa. 


Shack, 


10 


do. 


1891 


*A. Bigelow, 
tL.M. Goldsboroogh, 


Pacific Ocean. 


Enterprise, 


10 


New York, 


1831 


Coast of Brazil. 


Boxer, 


10 


Boston, 


1831 


tFrederick Varnum, 


New York. 


Experiment, 


4 


Washington, 


1831 


j Frederick Eagle, 


Receiv'g vessel, PhU. 


Flirt, 

Wave, 

Otsego, 


s 


Transferred from the 
War Department, 


fJ. T. McLaughlin, 

• • • 

f John Rodgers, 


Coast of Florida, 
do. 
do. 


Flying Fish, 




Purchased, 


1828 


. . 


Explori'g Expedition. 


Fulton, Steam Ship, 




New York, 
TransPd War 


1837 


J. T. Newton, 


Atlantic Coast. 


Steamer Poinsett, 




Dep't. 


fW. F. Lynch, 


Norfolk. 


Relief, Store Ship, 




Philadelphia, 


1836 


J. S. Nicholas, 


Pacific Ocean. 


Sea Steamer, 




do. 


1841 


• • 


Equipping. 


Sea Steamer, 




New York, 


1841 


• • t 


do. 



2. Commanders of Stations. 



Charles W. Morgan, 
Charles G. Ridge ly, 
Daniel Turner, 
Jesse Wilkinson, 
Lawrence Kearny, 
Ch arles Wilkes, 



Commodore, 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
Lieutenant, 



Mediterranean. 
Coast of Brazil. 
Pacific Ocean. 
West Indies. 
East Indies. 
Exploring Expedition. 



3. Commanders of Navt Yards. 



John D. Sloat, 
John Dowries, 
Mat. C. Perry, 
Charles Stewart, 
Beverly Kennon, 
Wm. B. Shubrick, 
Alex. J, Dallas, 



Portsmouth. 

Boston. 

New York. 

Philadelphia. 

Washington. 

Norfolk. 

Pensacola. 



Henry E. Ballard, Commanding 
Baltimore Station. 

Edw. R. Shubrick, Charleston, 
S. C. Station. 

James Biddle, Governor of the Na- 
val Asylum, Philadelphia. 



James Barron, 
Charles Stewart, 
Isaac Hull, 
Jacob Jones, 
Charles Morris, 
L. Warrington, 
Wm. M. Crane, 
James Biddle, 
C. G. Ridgely, 
John Downes, 
Jesse D. Elliott, 
Stephen Cassin, 
James Renshaw, 
A. S. Wads worth, 



4. Officers of the Navy. 
Captains. — 54. 



George C. Read, 
H. E. Ballard, 
Sam. Woodhouse, 

E. P. Kennedy, 
Alex. J. Dallas, 
J. B. Nicolson, 
Jesse Wilkinson, 
T. Ap. C. Jones, 
Wm. C. Bolton, 
W. B. Shubrick, 
C. W. Morgan, 
L. Kearny, 

F. A. Parker, 
E. R. McCall, 



Daniel Turner, 
David Conner, 
John Gallagher, 
Wm. M. Hunter, 
John D. Sloat, 
Matth. C. Perry, 
C. W. Skinner, 
John T. Newton, 
Joseph Smith, 
L. Rousseau, 
Geo. W. Storer, 
Beverly Kennon, 
E. R. Shubrick, 



F. H. Gregory, 
John H. Clack, 
P. F. Voorhees, 
Benj. Cooper, 
David Geisinger, 
R. F. Stockton, 
Isaac McKeever, 
J. P. Zantziuger, 
Wm. L. Salter, 
Ch. S. McCtfcfey. 
T. M. Newell. 
E. A. F. Lavallette, 
Wm. A. Spencer. 



1842] 



»A*Y LIST. 



79 



Commanders. — 55. 



Thos. T. Webb, 
John Percival, 
John H. Aulick, 
Wm. V. Taylor, 
Bladen Dulany, 
S. H. Stringham, 
Isaac Mayo, 
W. K. Latimer, 
Win. Mervine, 
Thos. Crabb, 
Thomas Paine, 
Jaa. Armstrong, 
Joseph Smoot, 
S. L. Breese, 



Benj. Page, Jr., 
John Gwinn, 
T. W. Wyman, 
And'w Fitzhugh, 
A. S. Ten Eyck, 
Hiram Paulding, 
J. D. Williamson, 
Uriah P. Levy, 
Chas. Boarman, 
French Forrest, 
Wm. J. Belt, 
Wm. Jameson, 
Wm/ Boerum, 
C. L.jWilliamson, 



Charles Gauntt, 
Wm. Ramsay, 
Ralph Voorbees, 
Henry Henry, 
S. W. Downing, 
Henry W. Ogden, 
£ben. Ridge way, 
Th. A. Conover, 
John C. Long, 
John H. Graham, 
James Mcintosh, 
JosiahTatnall, 
Hugh N« Page, 
William Inman, . 



Steph. Champlin, 
Joel Abbot, 
L. £. Simonds, 
John M. Dal©, 
H. H. Cocke, 
W. J. MoCluney, 
J.B.Montgomery, 
Hor. B. Sawyer, 
C. K. Stribling. 
Joshua R. Sanaa, 
Jno. J. Toung, 
Charles H. Bell, 
Abrah. Bigelow. 



5. Pat of the Navy, per annum. 



Captains, .... 

Senior Captain, in service, * . 

Do. do. on leave, &c. 
Captains of Squadrons, 

Do. do. on other duty, 

Do. do. off duty, 

Commanders, .... 
Commanders, in sea service, 

Do. at navy yards or on other duty 

Do. on leave, &c. . 

Lieutenants, . , 

Lieutenants, commanding,' 
Do. on other duty, 
Do. waiting orders, 

Surgeons, .... 

Surgeons, 1st 5 years in commission, 
Do. do. in navy yards, &c. 

Do. do. in sea service, 

Do. do. of the fleet, 

Do. 2d 5 years, 
Do. do. at navy yards, &c. 

Do. do. in sea service, 

Do. do. of the fleet, 

Do. 3d 5 years, 

Do. do. at navy yards, &c. 

Do. do. in sea service, 

Do. do. of the fleet, 



No. 
54 



286 



55 



59 



Pay. 

$4,500 
3,500 
4,000 
3,500 
2,500 

2,500 
2,100 
1,800 



1,800 
1,500 
1,200 

1,000 
1,200 
1,333 
1,500 
1,200 
1,500 
1,600 
1,800 
1,400 
1,750 
1,866 
2,100 



80 



UNITED STATES. 



' [1842. 



Surgeons, 4th 5 years, 

Do. do. at navy yards, &c. 

Do. do. in sea service, 

Do. do. of the fleet, 

Do. 20 years and upwards, 

Do. do. at navy yards, &o. 

Do. do. in sea service, 

Do. do. of the fleet, 

Passed Assistant Surgeons, 

Assistant Surgeons, 
Assistant Surgeons, waiting orders, 

at sea, 

after passing, &c. 
at sea after passing, 
at navy yards, &c. 

do. after passing, 



Do. 


do. 


Do. 


do. 


Do. 


do. 


Do. 


do. 


Do. 


do. 


Pursers, 




Pursers, 


■ 



No. Pay. 

#1,600 
2,000 
2,133 
2,400 
1,800 
1,250 
2,400 
2,700 

17 

57 

650 
950 
850 

1,200 
950 

1,150 



53 



480 



Chaplains, 
Chaplains, in sea service, 
Do. on leave, &c. . 

Passed Midshipmen, 
Passed Midshipmen, on duty, 

Do. waiting orders, 



13 



195 



1,200 
800 



750 
600 



Midshipmen, 
Midshipmen, in sea service, 
Do. on other duty, 

Do. on leave, <fcc. 



262 



400 
350 
300 



Masters, 
Masters of a ship of the line at sea, 
Do. on other duty, 
Do. on leave, &c. 

Professors of Mathematics, 
Teachers at naval schools, &c. 



28 



1,100 

1,000 

750 

1,200 
480 



1842.] 



WAVT. LIST. 



81 



Boatswains, 
Gunners, 
Carpenters, 
Sailmaxers, 



No. 

29 "l of a ship of the line, 
36 ) of a frigate, 
28 f on other duty, 
27 J on leave, &c. 



Pay. 

$750 
600 
500 
360 



JVote. One ration per day, only, is allowed to all officers when attach- 
ed to vessels for sea service, since the passage of the law of the 3d of 
March, 1835, regulating the pay of the Navy. Pursers are not affected 
by this law, and they have, as formerly, two rations per day. — Teachers 
receive two rations per day, at 20 cents each. 



VIII. ARMY LIST. 



1. Wjnfield Scott, Major- General, General-in-Chief: — Head-Quar- 
ters, Washington City. 

Edmund P. Gaines, Brigadier- General, (Major- General by brevet,) 
Commander of the Western Division ; — Head- Quarters, St. Louis, 
Missouri. 

John E. Wool, Brigadier- General, Commander of the Eastern Divis- 
ion;— Head- Quarters, Elizabethtown, N. J. 



Name. Rank, 

t Roger Jones, Col. Adjutant- Gen. 

, Col. Inspector- Gen. 

George Croghan, Col. Do. 
•Th. S. Jesup, B. Gen. Q'rm'r-Gen. 
Hen. Stanton, Col. Assist. Do. 
Traeman Cross, Col. Do. Do. 
tGeo. Gibson, Col. Com. G. Subsist. 
James H. Hook, Lt.-Col. Assist. Do. 
f Nathan Towson, Paymaster- Gen. 
Thomas Lawson, Surgeon- General. 
Calen. Irvine, Com. Gen. Purchases. 
Jos. G. Totten, Col. Corps of Eng. 
JSylv. Thayer, Lt. Col. Do. 
R. £. De Russy, Do. Do. 

John J. Abert, Col. Corps Top. Eng. 
James Kearney, Lt. Col. Do. 
Geo. Bomford, Col. Ordnance Dep. 
Geo. Talcott, Lt. Col. Do. 
S. W. Kearney, Col. 1st Reg. Drag. 
R. B. Mason, Lt. Col. Do. 

D. E. Twiggs, Col. 2d Reg. Drag. 
W. S. Harney, Lt. Col. fid Reg Drag. 
tAbram Eustis, Col. 1st Reg. Arid. 



Name. Bank. 

}J. B. Walbach, Lt. Col. Do. 
James Bankhead, Col. 2d Reg. ArtU. 
tA. C. W. Fanning, Lt. Col. Do. 
t W.K. Armistead, Col. 3d Reg. ArtU. 
William Gates, Lt. Col. Do. 
t Jn. R. Fenwick, Col. 4th Reg. ArtU. 
J. B. Crane, Lt. Col. Do. 

f Zachary Taylor, Col. 1st Reg. Inf. 
J Win. Davenport, Lt. Col. Do. 
fHugh Brady, Col. 2d Reg. Inf. 
Ben net Riley, Lt. Col. Do. 

James B. Many, Col. 3d Reg. Inf. 
Josiah H. Vose, Lt. Col. Do. 
Alex. Cummings, Col. 4th Reg. Inf. 
John Garland, Lt. Col. Do. 
tGeo. M. Brooke, Co. 5th Reg. Inf. 
J. S. Mcintosh, Lt. Col. Do. 
t Henry Atkinson, Col. 6th Reg. Inf. 
Gustavus Loomis, Lt. Col. Do. 
tMatth. Arbuckle, Col. 7th Reg. Inf. 
W. Whistler, Lt. Col. Do. 

Wm. J. Worth, Col. 8th Reg. Inf. 
New. S. Clarke, Lt. Col. Do. 



* Major-General by brevet. f Brigadier-General by brevet t Colonel by brevet. 



82 



UNITED STATES. 



[1842. 



2. Military Posts and Arsenals. 



Post* 



Eastern Division. 
Fort Winnobago, 
Fort Brady, 
Fort Mackinac, 
Fort Howard, 
Fort Gratiot, 
Fort Niagara, 
Madison Barracks, 
Hancock Barracks, 
Fort Sullivan, 
Fort Preble, 
Fort Constitution, 
Fort Independence, 
Fort Wolcott, 
Fort Trumbull, 
West Point. 
Fort Columbus, 
Fort Hamilton, 
Fort La Fayette 
Fort McHenry, 
Fort Sevorn, 
Fort Washington, 
Fort Monroe, 
Fort Johnston, 
Fort Caswell, 
Fort Macon, 
Fort Moultrie, 
Castle Pinckney, , 
Oglethorpe Barr'ks, 
Fort Marion, 
Key West, 
Fort Brooke, 
Fort Kin 



J 



s» 



Fort Pickens, ) 
Fort McRee, ) 
Fort Morgan, 
New Orleans, 
Fort Pike, 
Fort Wood, 
Baton Rouge, 

Western Division. 
Fort Snelling, 
Fort Crawford, 
Fort Atkinson, 
Fort Leavenworth, 
Jefferson Barracks, 
Fort Gibson, 
Fort Smith, 
Fort Wayne, 
Fort Towson, 
Fort Jesup, 
Fort Jackson, 

Arsenals. 
Kennebec, 
Watertown, 
Champlain, 
Watervleit, 
Rome, 
Allegheny, 
Frankfbrd, 
Pikes vi He, 
Washington, 
Bellona, 
St. Louis, 
Baton Rouge, 
Mount Vernon, 
Augusta, 



State or 
Territory. 



Wisconsin Ter. 
Michigan. 

do. 
Wisconsin Ter. 
Michigan, 
New York, 

do. 
Maine, 

do. 

do. 
N. Hampshire, 
Massachusetts, 
Rhode Island, 
Connecticut, 
New York, 

New York 
Harbor, 

Maryland, 

do. 

do. 
Virginia, 
North Carolina, 

do. 

do. 
Charleston Har- 
bor, S. C. 
Georgia, 
Florida, 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

Alabama, 
Louisiana, 

do. 

do. 

do. 



Iowa Territory, 
Wisconsin Ter. 
Iowa Territory, 
Missouri, 

do. 
Arkansas Ter. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
Louisiana, 

do. 



Maine, 

Massachusetts, 
Vermont, 
New York, 

do. 
Pennsylvania, 

do. 
Maryland, 
D. of Columbia, 
Virginia, 
Missouri, 
Louisiana, 
Alabama, 
Georgia, 



Post-Office. 



Fort Winnebago, 
Sault St. Marie, 
Michillimacinac, 
Green Bay, 
Fort Gratiot, 
Youogstown, 
Sacket's Harbor, 
Houlton, 
Eastport, 
Portland, 
Portsmouth, 
Boston, 
Newport, 
New London, 
West Point, 
New York. 
Fort Hamilton, 

do. 
Baltimore, 
Annapolis, 
Fort Washington, 
Old Pt. Comfort, 
SmithviUe, 

do. 
Beaufort, 

J Charleston, 

Savannah, 
St. Augustine. 
Key West, 
Tampa, 
Seminole Agency, 

Pensacola, 

Mobile, 
New Orleans, 
Petite Coquille, 
New Orleans, 
Baton Rouge, 



Fort Snelling, 
Prairie da Chiea, 

do. 

Ft. Leavenworth, 
Jefferson Barr'ks, 
Fort Gibson, 
Fort Smith, 
Sylvia, 
Fort Towson, 
Fort Jesup, 
Fort Jackson, 



Augusta, 

Watertown, 

Vergennes, 

Watervleit, 

Rome, 

Pittsburg. ■ 

Frankford, 

Fikesville, 

Washington, 

Bellona, 

St. Louis, 

Baton Rouge, 

Mount Vernon, 

Augusta, 



Permanent Com- 
manders. 



Lt. Col. Mcintosh, 
Capt. Johnson, 
Capt. Brown, 
Capt. Merrill, 
Major Belton, 
Capt. Merchant, 
Maj. Pavne, 
Bt. Lt. Col. Pierce, 
Bvt. Maj. Kir by, 
Capt. Porter, 



Major Delafleld, 
Capt. Dimick, 



Capt. Ringgold, 
Bv. Col. Walbach, 



Bv. M. Zantxinger, 



Bv. B. Gen. Taylor, 



Capt. C. C. Sibley, 
Bvt. B. G. Brooke, 
Capt. Lynde, 
Col. Kearny, 
Bt. B. G. Atkinson, 
Bt. B. G. Arbuckle, 
Bt. Mat. Lear, 
Capt. Simonton, 
Capt. G. W. Allen, 
Capt. P. Morrison, 



Major Ripley, 
Major Lomax, 

Major Baker, 

Major Craig, 
Capt. Ramsay, 
Capt. Maynadier, 
Capt. Symington, 

Capt. Bell. 
Lt. Whitefey, 

Capt. Harding, 



Regiment 
and Corps. 



5th infantry. 
5th infantry. 
4ih artillery. 
5th infantry. 
4th artillery. 
3d artillery. 
3d artillery. 
1st artillery. 
1st artillery. 
1st artillery. 



Engineers. 
1st artillery. 



3d artillery. 
1st artillery. 



3d artillery. 



1st infantry. 



5th infantry. 
5th infantry. 
5th infantry. 
1st dragoons. 
6th infantry. 
7th infantry. 
4th infantry. 
1st dragoons. 
4U» infantry. 
4th infantry. 



Ordnancee. 
do. 

do. 

do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 

do. 
do. 

do. 



1842.] 



ARMY LIST. 



83 



The Western Division comprises all Posts, &c. west of a line pro- 
ceeding from the mouth of the Mississippi, up that river to Cassville, in 
Wisconsin Territory, and thence north to the line of demarkation be- 
tween the United States and Canada ; and the Eastern Division com- 
prises all east of such line. 

The Head- Quarters of the Army are at Washington, D. C. 

The Head-Quarters of the Western Division are at St. Louis, Mo. 

The Head-Quarters of the Eastern Division are at Elizabeth town, N.J. 

Two Aids-de-camp are allowed to each of the Generals commanding 
the two divisions, and one Inspector- General is attached as chief of the 
staff, to perform the duties of Adjutant and Inspector- General ; — Col. 

■ is Inspector- General of the Western Division ; and Col. 

George Croghan of the Eastern Division. 

The two Divisions are subdivided into the following seven Depart- 
ments. 

Department 1. All the country embraced within the Western Divis- 
ion above the 37th deg. N. Lat. 

Department 2. All the country within the Western Division below 
the 37th deg. N Lat. 

Department 3. The States of Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, 
Louisiana, Alabama, Georgia, and the Territory of Florida. 

Department 4. South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia. 

Department5. Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and 
New York. 

Department 6. Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New 
Hampshire, Vermont, and Maine. 

Department 7. Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, and Wisconsin 
Territory. 



3. General Return of the Army* as stated by Colonel Roger Jones, 
Adjutant- General, December 3(2, 1840. 



General Staff, 
Medical Department, 
Pay Department, 
Purchasing Department, 
Corps of Engineers, 
Topographical Engineers, 



57 
83 
19 
3 
43 
36 



Ordnance Department, . 322 
Two Regiments of Dragoons, 1,498 
Four Regiments of Artillery, 3,020 
Eight Regiments of Infantry, 7,496 



Total, 



12,537 



84 



UNITED STATES. 



[1842. 



4. Rank and Grade and Pay of the Army. 



/■ ' ■ • '■" 


Number. 


Pay per 

Month. 


15 


ill 

7 


Number of 
tfh. Servant* 
allowed. 


Major-General, 


1 


$200 


Brigadiers. General, 


2 


104 


12 


5 


3 


Adjutant- General, 


1 


90 


6 


5 


2 


Assist. Adj'ts- Gen. (Majors brevet), 
Assist. Adj'ts- Gen. (Captains brevet), 


2 
4 


60 
50 


4 
4 


4 
3 


2 
1 


Inspectors-General, 


2 


90 


6 


5 


2 


Quartermaster- General, . 


1 


104 


12 


5 


3 


Assist. Quartermasters-General, 


2 


90 


6 


5 


2 


Deputy Quartermasters-General, 


2 


75 


5 


4 


2 


Quartermasters, t 


4 


60 


4 


4 


2 


Assistant Quartermasters, 


28 


50 


4 


3 


1 


Commissary- Gen. of Subsistence, 


1 


90 


6 


5 


2 


Assist. Com. -Gen. of Subsistence, 


1 


75 


5 


4 


2 


Commissaries, (Majors), 


2 


60 


4 


4 


2 


Commissaries, (Captains), 


4 


50 


4 


3 


1 


Surgeon-General ($ 2,500 per ann.), 


1 












22 


60 


4 to 8 


4 


2 


Assistant- Surgeons, 


60 


50 


4to8 


3 


1 


Paymaster- General ($ 2,000 per an.), 


1 










Paymasters, . * 


18 


60 


4 


4 


2 


Commissary-Gen. of Purchases, 


1 


($3,000 


p. an) 






Military Storekeepers, 


2 


40 


4 




1 




17 


75 


6 


4 


2 


Lieutenant-Colonels, 


18 


60 


5 


3 


2 




26 


50 


4 


3 


2 


Adjutants, .... 


2 


40 


3 


2 






172 


40 


4 




1 


First Lieutenants, 


208 


30 


4 




1 


Second Lieutenants, . . . 


168 


25 


4 




1 


Sergeant-Majors, 


14 


17 








Quartermaster Sergeants, . 


14 


17 








Sergeants, . 


604 


13 to 16 










560 


9 








Principal Musicians, 


18 


17 








Chief Buglers, .... 


4 


17 










40 


9 










240 


8 








Farriers and Blacksmiths, 


20 


11 










120 


11 








Enlisted men of ordnance, 


250 










Total Commissioned, 


9,920 


7 








735 


Total Non-commissioned Officers, 












Musicians, Artificers, and Privates, 
Total, 


11,804 










12,539 



* Tho pay assigned to Colonels and > then of lower rank, is stated in the table in ro!s- 
tion to those belonging to the Artillery and Infantry. 



1842.] 



ARMY LIST. 



85 



A commanding offioer of a company is entitled to #10 per month for 
responsibility of arms and clothing. 

Commissioned officers below the rank of General are entitled to an 
additional ration for every five years they may have served. 

Officers' subsistence is commuted at 20 cents per ration ; forage at 
$ 8 per month for each horse. 

Officers are entitled to the pay of a private soldier, $ 2*50 per month 
clothing, and one ration per day, for each private servant. 

5. Militia Force of the United States. 

General Abstract of the Militia Force of the United States, according to 
the Returns received at the Office of the Adjutant- General of the Army, 
as stated in the Army Register for 1841. 



States. 


General Offi- 
cers. 


General Staff 
Officers. 


Field Offi- 
cers, dec. 


Company 
Officers. 


Total com. 
missioned 
Officers. 


Non-commis 
aioned jOffi- 
cers, Musi- 
cians, Arti- 
ficers, and 
Privates. 


• 

© 

— 

M> 

e 

P> 

bo 

< 


Maine, 

N. Hampshire, 

Vermont, 

Massachusetts, 

Rhode Island, 

Connecticut! 

New York, 

Newr Jersey, 

Pennsylvania, 

Delaware, 

Maryland, 

Virginia, 

N. Carolina, 

8. Carolina, 

Georgia, 

Alabama, 

Louisiana, 

Mississippi, 

Tennessee, 

Kentucky, 

Ohio, 

Indiana, 

Illinois, 

Missouri, 

Arkansas, 

Michigan, 

Florida Tor. 

Wisconsin do. 

Iowa do. 

D. of Colnrab. 

Total, 


22 

13 

22 

5 

11 

128 

19 

50 

4 
22 
27 
28 
15 
36 
31 
10 
15 
18 
13 
70 
31 

7 
42 

4 

1 

1 


85 

45 

79 
17 
31 

777 
58 

S01 

8 

68 

69 

67 

102 
98 

187 
46 
70 
65 

145 

201 

110 
21 

286 

18 
1 
6 

3 


584 
310 
206 
438 
21 
320 

2,631 
435 

1,305 

71 

544 

1,217 
723 
449 
746 
564 
183 
392 
642 

1,014 

1,889 
566 
216 
636 

70 

9 

36 

24 


1,921 
1,237 

839 
1,207 
81 
1,031 
6,752 
1,476 
7,818 

364 
1,763 
4,311 
2,969 
1,791 
2,208 
1,382 

542 

348 
2,845 
3,084 
4,013 
2,154 

657 
1,200 

193 

33 

126 

68 


2,612 
1,547 
1,103 
1,746 

124 

1,393 

10,288 

1,988 

9,374 

447 
2,397 
5,624 
3,787 
2,357 
3,088 
2,164 

781 

825 
3,570 
4,286 
5,873 
2,861 

901 
2,164 

157 

285 
43 

169 

96 


42,021 
27,215 
25,204 
45,875 

1,253 

38,679 

159,147 

37,183 

247,804 

8,782 
44,467 
99,898 
61,431 
48,755 
54,220 
42,166 
14,027 
36,425 
57,412 
74,099 
140,555 
51 ,052 
26,485 
32,692 

1,872 

5,191 
784 

5,054 

1,153 


45,633 
28,762 
26,307 
47,621 

1,377 

40,073 

169,435 

39,171 

257,178 

9,229 
46,864 
105,522 
65,218 
51,112 
57,308 
44,332 
14,808 
37,250 
60,982 
78,385 
146,428 
53,913 
27,386 
34,856 

2,028 

5,476 
827 

5,223 

1,249 

* 


675 


2,864 


15,941 


52,413 


72,050 


1,431,902 


1,503,952 



8 



9 OtflTBD STATU. [1842. 

IX. FOST-OFTICE ESTABLISHMENT. 
Tahlt of Mail Service for tks Year preceding the 1st of July, 1840, 
as stated by the First Assistant Postmaster- General. 



2. Exlractfro* 

" The number of contractors in the service during Ibe last year w«« 
about 2,100. The number who have been fined, or had deduction! made 
from their pay for delinquencies in the performance of their engage- 
menu, is 633. The fines and deductions, during the year, eicluaiie of 
the remiBoiotiB amount to $ 60,085-60. 

" The number of post-offices on the first da; of Jul;, IS38, was 13,519 i 
the number on the 30th day of Jane, 1839, was 12,730 ; on the same 
day of the present year [1840] the number was 13,463; showing an 
increase, during the year, of 688. There have been established, during 
the year, 059 post-offices ; and 271 discontinued. The number this dsy 
[Dec. 5th, 1840] is 13,638. There have been, during the year, 3,831 
poetmas'.ers appointed, of whom 959 were for new offices." 



1842.] 



POST-OFFICE ESTABLISHMENT. 



87 



The revenue of the department, for the year ending Jane 90th, 1840, 
as appears from the settlement of the accounts of postmasters in the 
Auditor's office, was 

Letter postage ..... 

Newspapers and pamphlets, 

Fines paid to Postmasters for violations of law, 



$ 4,003,776-07 

535,220-61 

260 00 



The expenditures of the department for the same 
period were 

For compensation to Postmasters, $ 1,028,92592 

For wrapping-paper, office furniture, ad- 
vertising, mail-bags, mail locks and 
keys, and stamps, mail depredations 
and special agents, blanks, clerks for 
offices, and miscellaneous, 

For ship, steamboat, and way letters, 

For transportation, 



$4,539,205 C8 



441,77896 

35,410-81 

3,252,99516 



4,759,110-86 

Excess of expenditures, . . . $219,84517 

3. Statement of the Revenue and Expenditure of the Post- Office Depart* 
merit fur the Twelve Years ending the 30th of June, 1840. 



Year ending 


Revenue. 


Expenditure. 


June 30, 1829, 


$l,7o7,4]«42 


$1,782,132 57 


" 1830, 


1,850,58310 


1,932,707 95 


«* 1831, 


1,997,81154 


1,936,12287 


u 1832, 


2,258,57017 


2,266,171-66 


" 1833, 


2,617,011-88 


2,930,414 87 


" 1834, 


2,823,74934 


2,910,605 08 


4t 1835, 


2,993,356 66 


2,757,350 08 


" 1836, 


3,408,323-59 


2,841,766-36 


" 1837, 


4,100,605-43 


3,303,428 03 


" 1838, 


4,235,077-97 


4,621,83716 


" 1839, 


4,477,614 04 


4,654,71842 


" 1840, 


4,539,265-68 


4,759,110-85 



4. Rates of Postage. 

On a Single Letter composed of One Piece of Paper, 

For any distance, not exceeding 
Over 30, and not exceeding 
Over 80, and not exceeding 
Over 150, and not exceeding 
Over 400 miles 



30 miles, 


6 cents. 


80 « 


10 « 


150 *' 


12J « 


400 " 


18| «« 




25 a 



88 UNITED STATES. [1842. 

A Letter composed of two pieces of paper, is charged with double 
these rates ; of three pieces, with triple ; and of four pieces, with quad' 
ruple. " One or more pieces of paper, mailed as a letter, and weighing 
one ounce, shall be charged with quadruple postage ; and at the same 
rate, should the weight be greater." 

Newspaper Postage, 

For each Newspaper, not carried out of the State in which it is pub- 
lished, or, if carried out of the State, not carried oyer 100 miles, 1 cent. 
Oyer 100 miles, and out of the State in which it is published, l£ cents. 

Magazines and Pamphlets, 

If published periodically, diet, not exceeding 100 miles, 1J cents p. sheet. 

Do. do. distance over 100 u 2J " " 

If not pub. periodically, dist. not exceeding 100 u 4 *' ** 

Do. do. distance over 100 " 6 " " 

" Every Printed Pamphlet or Magazine which contains more than 
twenty-four pages, on a royal sheet, or any sheet of less dimensions, 
shall be charged by the sheet; and small pamphlets, printed on a half 
or quarter sheet, of royal or less size, shall be charged with half the 
amount of postage charged on a full sheet." 

The postage on Ship Letters, if delivered at the office where the vea» 
sel arrives, is six cents; if conveyed by post, two cents in addition to 
the ordinary postage, 

5. Privilege of Franking. 

Letters and packets to and from the following officers of the govern- 
ment, are by law received and conveyed by post, free of postage : 

The President and Vice-President of the United States; Secretaries 
of State, Treasury, War, and Navy ; Attorney-General ; Postmasters 
General, and Assistant Postmaster-General; Comptrollers, Auditors, 
Register, and Solicitor of the Treasury ; Treasurer ; Commissioner of 
the General Land Office ; Commissioners of the Navy Board ; Commis- 
sary-General ; Inspectors- General ; Quartermaster-General ; Paymaster 
General; Superintendent of the Patent-Office; Speaker and Clerk of the 
House of Representatives ; President and Secretary of the Senate ; and 
any individual who shall have been, or may hereafter be, President of 
the United States : and each may receive newspapers by post, free of 
postage. 

Each member of the Senate, and each member and delegate of the 
House of Representatives, may send and receive, free of postage, news- 
papers, letters, and packets, weighing not more than two ounces, (in 
case of excess of weight, the excess alone to be paid for,) and all docu- 
ments printed by order of either House, from the period of sixty days 
before he takes his seat in Congress, till the next meeting of the next 
Congress. 



1843.] 



POST-OFFICE ESTJJBIifSHMEKT. 



89 



Postmasters may send and receive, free of postage, letters and pack* 
ets not exceeding half an ounce in weight; and they may receive one 
daily newspaper each, or what is equivalent thereto. 

Printers of Newspapers may send one paper to each and every other 
printer of newspapers within the United States, free of postage, under 
such regulations as the Postmaster- General may provide. 



X. MINT. 

Officers of the Mint at Philadelphia. 
Salary. 



R. M. Patterson, Director, $ 3,500 
Joseph Ritner, Treasurer, 2,000 
Franklin Peale, Chief Coiner, 2,000 
J. R. Eckfeldt, Assayer, 2,000 



Salary. 

J. R. McCHntock. Melter \ AO ^aa 
and Refiner, J* 2 >°° 

Chr. F. Gobrecht, Engraver, 2,000 

, 2d Engraver, 1,500 



Officers of the Branch at New Orleans, La. 
Salary. 



J. M. Kennedy, Supervnten. $ 2,500 
Wm. P. Kort, Assayer, 2,000 

John L. Riddel, MeU.fyRefin., 2,000 



Salary. 



Philos B. Tyler, Coiner, $2,000 
Hor. C. Cammack, Treasurer, 2,000 



Officers of the Branch at Dahlonega, Ga 
Salary. 



Salary. 
David M. Mason, Coiner, $ 1,500 



Paul Rossignol, SuperinU $ 2,000 
J. W. Farnham, Assayer, 1,500 

Officers of the Branch at Charlotte, JV. C. 
Salary. 



Salary. 



B. S. Garther, Superintend. $ 2,000 John R. Bolton, Coiner, $ 1,500 
J. H. Gibbon, Assayer, 1,500 

I. Statement of the Deposits of Gold, for Coinage, at the Mint of the 
United States, at Philadelphia, in the Year 1840. 



The deposits of gold, for ooinage, amounted to . • 
Of which was received from the United States, viz. 
Virginia, . . . $38,995 

North Carolina, . . - 36,804 

South Carolina, . . 5,319 

Georgia, . , .91,113 

Alabama, . . . 4,431 

Tennessee, , . . 104 

$ 176,766 

Coins of the United States, old standard, 1 1 ,256 

Foreign bullion, .... 209,629 

Foreign coins, .... 800,487 

Jewelry, . . . . . 3,860 



#1,201,998 



8 



$1,201,998 



UNITED ST ATM. 



of the Coinage of the Mint of the United State*, 
dclphia, in the Year 1840. 



[1843. 

4 PhUa- 



—— — 


Pietoi. 


Number of 


Value. 


Whole Value. 


Gold. 
Eagle., . . 
Half Eagles, . 
Quarter Eagles, . 

Dollara, .' . 

Half Dollar., 

Quarter Dollars, 

Dimes, 

Half Dimes, . 

Cents, 


47,338 
137,:W2 
18,859 


203,079 

4,386,805 
2,462,700 


$473,38. 
686,911 
47,147 


J 1,207,437 

1,028,603 
24,627 


61,005 

1,435,111)8 

l*3,iar 

1.358.581 

1,344,085 


61,005 
717,504 

47,03a 
135,858 

67,204 




7,053,084 




2.960,667 



3. Statement of the Annual Amounts of Deposit! of Gold, for Coinage, 
at the Mint of the United States and its Branches, from the Mints of 
the United Slates. 



Defined M the Uniiml ft»ui Mint, Philadelphia. 


Yet™. 


"*• 


North 


<£z$U 


— *• 


Ton- 


*ar 


■££. 


Mint. 


1834 
IBM 

in 

1831 

lia-j 
18M 

ibss 

1BW 
ISM 

nui. 


t~'*» 

a oo 

3 00 

to oo 
e oo 
6 oo 
s oo 

3 00 

a uo 

5 00 
3 05 

aja.saa 


siJmo 

134,000 
904,000 
304,000 
458,000 

9K)!S00 
148,100 
110,900 
66,000 
51,500 
36,804 


«3ioo 

96,000 

15.W 
flfl.000 

43^400 

SIMM) 
13,000 

fl.3011 


OjSI^OM 

^■i I- 

3IV.il Ki 
Slit 13 


• l'ooc 

l,O0( 
3>tl 

:«i 
104 


• 


,00 
31 


1 1,000 
1S,'S00 

'200 


8 5,000 

so|ooo 
uu.'ooo 

488,000 
530,000 
678,000 
668,000 
898,000 
608,500 

963,000 
171,700 
138,500 
176,708 


9,738,804 


353,119 1,811,313 


14,3041 4,031 


13,400 5,813,468 


Dopoiiteil at tho Bra nth Mint.. 


Mini and 
Branches 


. Branch. I 

Yaete. CharhMM, 

N. C. 


0™"' ' 


Hew Or loan., 
La. 


Total at 
ranch HinU 


iu u f U.'sT 
OaU. 

9435,100 
3*5,940 

496, IBS 


IBM 

1B40 


U«'b36 
194,738 


UI.UB 


|700 
9,835 


4963,400 
340,740 
940,410 


71 


U! 


3ra,ae9 


370,593 


10,404 


759,559 


6,373,095 



1842.] 



MINT. 



91 



4. Amount of Deposits and Coinage, at the Mint of the United State? and 

its Branches, in the Year 1840. 



Deposit!. 



Mints. 



Philadelphia, 
Charlotte, 
Dahlonega, 
New Orloans, 

Total, 



Gold. 



Q. 8. Gold. 



$ 176,766 

194,796 

191,858 

3,835 



Foreign Gold. 



91,025,932 
169,094 



496,185 I 1,187,396 



Total of 
Gold. 



$ 1,901,998 
194,796 
191,858 
164.999 



1,613,511 



Silver. 



Value. 



$ 1,033,070 

• 

666,676 
1,699,746 



Total. 



Value. 



$8^235,068 
194,726 
121,858 
831,605 



3,313,257 



Coinage. 



Mints. 



Gold. 



Piecea. 



Value. 



Philadelph. 903,579 



Charlotte, 
Dablonnga, 
N. Orleans, 

Total, 



31,*28 
26,4-28 
56,600 



Silver. 



Copper. 



Pieces. 



1,207,437 
127,055 
123,310 
217,500 



3l8,435ljl,675,302 



4,386,805 
3,390,300 



Value. 



Pieces. 



1,028,6032,462,700 
698,100 



Value 



• 
24,627 



7,777,105 1,726,703, 2,469,700 



94,697 



Total. 



Pieces. 



7,053,084 
31,828 
26,4-26 

3,446,900 



10,558,240 



Value. 



2,260,667 
127,055 
123,310 
915,600 



3,496,639 



5. Statement of the Coinage at the Mint of the United States for each 
successive Period of Ten Years, from the Commencement of its Opera- 
tions until December 3Ut, 1840. 



Tears. 


Gol d. 


Silver. 


No. of 
Pieces. 


Value. 


No. of Pieces. 


Value. 


1793 to 1800 
1801 to 1810 
1811 to 1890 
1821 to 1830 
1831 to 1840 

Total, 


134,849 
596,671 
633,302 
393,111 
3,938,409 


% 1,014,290-00 

34250,749-50 

3,166,51000 

1.903,092-50 

17,786,405-00 


1,852,545 

7,663,066 

13,445,962 

39,956,669 

78,664,217 


% 1,440,454-75 

3,569,165*95 

5,970,810-95 

16,781,046-95 

96,344,45400 


5,696,335 


27,191,040-00 


141,582,459 


54,105,931-90 


Tears. 


Copper. 


Total. 


No. of Pieces. 


Value. 


No. of Pieces. 


Value. 


1793 to 1800 
1801 to 1810 
1611 to 1890 
1891 to 1830 
1831 to 1840 

Total, 


8,933,469 
17,416,446 
19,147,497 
15,836,990 
34,639,891 


$ 79,391-89 
151,946-39 
191,158 57 
]51,419*90 
342,322-21 


10,220,849 
95,676,183 
33,226,691 
56,186,000 
117,242,437 


#¥,534,136-57 

6,971,154-14 

9,328,479-52 

18,835,551-65 

44,473,181-21 


95,973,376 


915,531-19 


949,559,160 


82,149,50309 



92 



UNITED STATES. 



[1842. 



6. Recapitulation of the Amount of Coinage at the Mint of the United 
States and its Branches, from the Commencement of Operations to De- 
cember 31rf, 1840. 



Commenced 
Operations. 


Mintf. 


Whole Coinage, in 
Pieeei. 


Whole Coinage, in 
Value. 


1793 
1838 
1838 

1838 


Philadelphia Mint, 
Charlotte Branch Mint, 
Dahlonega Branch Mint, 
N. Orleans Branch Mint, 

Total, 


242,552,170 

94,248 

79,624 

6,250,930 


$82,142,50309 

373,987 50 

355,105 00 

1,183,00300 


248,976,972 


84,054,598-59 



XI. REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE IN 1840. 
[From the Report of the Secretary of the Treasury, December 9th, 1840.] 

RECEIPTS AND MEANS FOR 1840, EXCLUSIVE OF TRUSTS AND THE POST- 
OFFICE. 

The available balance in the Treasury on the 1st of Jan- 
uary, 1840, is computed to have been . . $2,246,74900 

During the first three quarters of the pres- 
ent year the net receipts from customs 
were .... $10,689,88478 

During the same period the receipts from 
lands were . . . 2,630,217.25 

Miscellaneous receipts for the same time, 77,660*98 

Estimated receipts for the fourth quarter, 3,800,000*00 

These make the aggregate of ordinary receipts for the year, 17,197,763*01 

Add the estimated receipts of principal and 
interest in 1840, out of what was due 
from former deposit banks, but not avail- 
able on the 1st of January last, 

Add also the estimated receipts from the 
fourth bond of the United States Bank, 

Do. from the issue of Treasury notes, in- 
stead of others redeemed, 



$850,00000 
2,500,000 00 
5,440,000-00 



Aggregate from these additional sources, 



8,790,000*00 



This will make the total means in 1840, as ascertained 
and estimated, ..... $28,234,512*01 



1842.] REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE. 93 

EXPENDITURES FOR 1840, EXCLUSIVE OF TRUSTS AND THE POST-OFFICE. 

For the Brat three quarters : civil, diplomatic, and miscel- 
laneous, ...... $4,118,24864 

For the same time, military, • . , 8,750,784 52 

For the same time, naval, .... 4,620,316-35 

Estimates by this department (though higher by the 

others) for all expenses during the fourth quarter, 5,000,000*00 

These make the aggregate of current expenses for the 

whole year, .... 22,489,349*51 

Add for funded debt and interest for that of the cities of 
the District of Columbia during the year, ascertained 
and estimated, ..... 100,000-00 

Redempiion of Treasury notes, including principal and 

interest, ascertained during the first three quarters, 3,629,306*61 

Estimate of notes that will be redeemed in the fourth 

quarter, ...... 425,000*00 

This will make the aggregate of payments or expendi- 
tures of all kinds, .... 26,643,656*12 

Leaving an available balance of money in the Treasury 
pn the 31st of December, 1840, computed to be, . 1,590,855-89 

$ 28,234,51201 



XII. EXPENSES OF THE FLORIDA WAR AND INDIAN 

DEPARTMENT. 

A condensed Statement of the Expenditure of the Florida War and 
Indian Department, showing how much each has cost yearly for the last 
Five Years ; taken from the Reports of the Secretary of the Treasury, 
by W. McKnight. 



_™ 5 Florida War, . . . $3,946,443 

llWD \ Indian Department, . . . 1,962,087 

teen $ Florida War, . • . 4,393,693 

***' I Indian Department, . . 3,326,053 

ioqoJ Florida War, . . . 5,124,356 

1000 1 Indian Department, . . 2,382,500 

1ft oq J Florida War, . . . 1,254,357 

lo ™ I Indian Department, . . 2,078,083 



$ 5,908,530 



7,719,746 



7,506,856 



3,282,440 



lAM S Florida Ww, • • • 994,745 

*°* u ) Indian Department, . . 1,332,064 

2,326,809 

Total, . . $26,744,381 



94 


UNITED 


STATES. 




Recapitulation. 


1836, 
1837, . 
1838, 
1839, . 
1840, 


Florida War. 

$3,946,443 

4,393,693 

5,124,356 

1,204,357 

994,745 


Indian Department. 

$1 ,962,087 
3,326,053 
2,382,500 
2,078,083 
1,332,064 




$15,663,594 


$11,080,787 = 



[1842. 



XIII. REVENUE, EXPENDITURES, AND DEBTS OF THE 

SEVERAL STATES. 

[The volumes of the American Almanac for 1840 and 1841 contain 
articles on the Debts and Stocks of the several States prepared by A. C. 
Flagg, Esq., late Comptroller of the State of New York. The following 
Tables on the Revenue, Expenditures, and Debts of the several States 
were prepared by the same gentleman, and were originally published in 
the Albany Argus.] 

1. Revenue and Expesditure* or the Several States. 

The first of the following tables is designed to show the whole amount 
of revenue annually paid into the Treasury of each State, and the total 
sum paid from the Treasury for the support of government. The sums 
paid on account of Internal Improvements, and for public instruction, 
are not included in this statement. In most cases the items have been 
obtained from the official documents presented to the several legisla- 
tures at the close of 1840, or the beginning of 1841. Exactness and 
uniformity in such a comparative statement, is scarcely practicable, 
owing to the different modes of keeping the accounts in the different 
States, and the omission in some cases, of the particulars which are 
necessary in classifying the items of expenditure. 

In some cases, extraordinary expenditures for the particular year 
embraced in the table, may show a greater expenditure to each inhab- 
itant, than a just comparison would warrant. The State of Maine, for in- 
stance, shows an expenditure of more than 63 cents to each inhabitant, - 
this high rate is occasioned by extraordinary expenditures, or those that 
are not usual in other States. The expenditures of Maine for the pay 
of the State officers, the Judiciary, and the Legislature, as given in the 
first three columns of Table No. 2, if added together and divided by the 
population of the State, will show that the cost of sustaining these three 
branches of the government amounts to less than 19 cents to each inhab- 
itant. Louisiana, also, which in the table exhibiting the total expen- 
ditures of the Treasury, stands at the high rate of $ 1-99 to each inhab- 
itant, supports her Judiciary, Legislature, and State Officers by an 



1842.] REVENUE, EXPENDITURES, AND DEBTS OF THE STATES. 05 

expenditure at the rate of only 33 cento to each inhabitant. In these 
expenditures, however, the salaries of the officers only are included ; 
the pay of clerks and the contingent expenses not having been ascer- 
tained. And it may be that the total expenses of the Treasury, as 
given in Table No. 1, may embrace expenditures beyond the ordinary 
annual payments from the Treasury, and that the whole number of in- 
habitants is not embraced in the estimate. 

The Legislature of Tennessee meets biennially, and the sum given 
in Table No. I, is one half of the expenses for two years, as shown in 
the comptroller's report. The expenditures are consequently only 16 
cents and 6 mills annually to each inhabitant. 

In comparing the expenditures of different States it should be borne 
in mind that those having only a quarter of a million of inhabitants, 
must keep in operation all the machinery of a government, and the pro- 
portion of expense to each person will be greater in such case, than 
in a State with a population of two millions, provided both are managed 
with like frugality. 

Table 1. Showing the Population of each State, the Annual Revenue and 
Expenditures of the State Government, and the Proportion of Expendi- 
tures to each Inhabitant. 



States. 


Population in 


Revenue. 


Expendi- 


Proportion of Expen- 




1840. 




tures. 


diture to each Soul. 


Maine, 


501,793 


$52,178 


$318,172 


63 cents 4 mills. 


N. Hampshire, 


284,574 


50,000 


50 000 


17 " 6 " 


Vermont, 


291,948 


90,724 


9u,000 


31 " 1 «« 


Massachusetts, 


737,699 


396,000 


445,745 


60 " 4 " 


Rhode Island, 


108,830 


69,207 


37,707 


34 « 6 « 


Connecticut, 


309,978 


80,000 


80,000 


25 «« 8 «« 


New York, 


2,428,921 
373,306 


451,790 


918,725 


37 " 7 " 


New Jersey, 


80,379 


78,604 


21 " 1 " 


Pennsylvania* 


1,724,033 


702,719 


687,447 


39 " 8 " 


Delaware, 


78,085 








Maryland, 


469,232 


255,678 


259,468 


55 " 5 u 


Virginia, 
N. Carolina, 


1,239,797 


665,057 


580,437 


47 " 1 * 


753,419 


83,757 


107,155 


14 " 2 " 


». Carolina, 


594,398 


299,390 


307,520 


51 " 7 « 


Georgia, 


691,392 


85,000 


186,795 


27 " " 


Alabama, 


590,756 


263,570 


100,000 


16 " 9 " 


Mississippi, 


375,651 


161,161 


215,904 


17 " 5 u 


Louisiana.* 

fM 9 


344,570 


530,000 


688,991 


199 " 9 " 


lennessee, 


829,210 


132,415 


134,496 


16 «« 3 " 


Kentuckv.t 


776,923 


262,716 


256,866 


33 " " 


Ohio, 

f J • 


1,519,467 


231,415 


222,407 


14 " 7 «* 


Indiana. 

Til* 


685,866 


136,748 


127,527 


18 " 7 " 


Illinois, 


476,183 


17u,942 


186,000 


39 «' 2 " 


Missouri, 


383,702 


9 


9 




Michigan, 


212,267 


14,000 


141,485 


66 " 8 u 


^fkansas, 


97,574 


58,507 


51,991 


54 " 4 " 


* Exclusive 


of Lafayette Far 


ish, which is 


estimated at 


7,833. 


t Exclusive 


of Carter Goaatj 


r, estimated i 


it 3,000. 





96 



UNITED STATES. 



[1842. 



[The population of the several States in the preceding Table is given 
as it is stated in a Report of the Secretary of State to the United States 
Senate, dated Jane 23d, 1841 ; and it differs, more or less, with regard 
to each of the States, from the population as originally inserted by Mr. 
Flagg in the Table, which was published May 29th, 1841, before the 
official publication here made use of. — Editor.] 

Table 2. The 1st column embraces the Salaries of the Governor and 
State Officers, and their Clerk Hire and Office Expenses. 2d. Contains 
the Payments to all Judicial Officers whose Salaries and Expenses are 
paid from the State Treasury. 3d. Contains the Sums paid for the Pay 
and Mileage of the Members, the Contingent Expenses, excluding Public 
Printing and the Pay of the Officers of the Legislature. 4th. Shows the 
Sums paid for State Prisons, — in many instances the erection of new 
prisons is included. 5fA. Contains the sums paid for the Insane, the 
Deaf and Dumb, and Blind, and for other benevolent purposes : in some 
cases expenditures for buildings are included. 6th, The Sums paid on 
account of the Militia. 7th. The Amount paid for State Printing. 





1. State 


2. Judici- 


3. Legis- 


4. Bute 


5. Insane, 


6. Mili- 


7. Stats 




States. 


Officers. 


ary. 
$11,200 


lature. 


Prisons. 


fee. 


tia. 


Printing. 




Maine, 


$6,576 


$ 40,687 


7,460 


$ 18,949 


8,325 


$2,000 




N. Hampshire, 


♦3,000 


13,003 


20,183 


• 


8,000 








Vermont, 


♦2,275 


7,335 


21,003 


• 


5,096 








Man. 


16,500 


50,536 


114,071 


• 


20,506 


21,023 


11,944 




Rhode Island, 


♦1,800 


1,750 


5,346 


6,529 


• 


• 


634 




Connecticut, 


♦4,734 


5,650 


11,840 












New York, 


43,3-21 


35,138 


124,026 


27,701 


127,819 


, 18,171 


28,241 




New Jersey, 


7,640 


5,880 


18,869 


12,416 


4,174 


1,005 


8,973 




Pennsylvania, 


39,773 


107,600 


ia5,988 


23,105 


• 


31,7:<8 


60,448 




Maryland, 


14,683 


40,532 


60,633 


35,000 


6,777 


2,801 






Delaware, 


♦2,733 


4,400 


14,580 




i 








X ir *, ioia *. 


19,433 


44,5.50 


95,056 


16,471 


47,544 


59,237 






N. Carolina, 


6,300 


24,834 


49,620 


• 


• 


• 


660 




8. Carolina, 


15,100 


33,000 


43,530 


• 


• 


13,714 


9,129 




Georgia, 


12,000 


21,000 


91,500 






• 






Alabama, 


7,850 


33,775 


46,000 


• 


• 


• 


8,000 




Mississippi, 


10,289 


32,000 


34,552 


51,018 


• 


703 






Louisiana, 


26,000 


59.000 


31,280 












Tennessee, 


8,779 


34,482 


34,i7J 


3,069 


11,250 


• 


4,950 




Kentucky, 


10,150 


34,900 


36,746 


13,843 


19,636 








Ohio, 


18,347 


24,302 


48,830 


11,897 


37,342 


2,838 


20,340 




Indiana, 


3,850 


20,078 


45,053 


19,651 


# 
• 


• 


12,457 




Illinois, 


♦4,550 


13,000 


63,641 


, 


• 


• 


23,245 




Missouri, 


♦H,700 


17,050 


25,300 












Michigan, 


5,100 


7,100 


24,963 


17,799 


• 


a 


10,406 




Arkansas, 


5,200 


13,800 


17,573 


19,596 










* 


Salaries < 


only j — tal 


ken from th 


e " Ameri 


ican Alma 


nac." 







HETEHDE, EXPF.HDITGBE3, i 



DEBTS OF THE STATES. 



2. D» 



f thf Several States, 



Table 3. The 1st column exhibits the Stork Debit of the several Stalls up 
to 1838 :—Thc'M,the total Amount of the Stock Debt of each Stale at 
the dose of 18411 : — The 3d, the Domestic Debt of each State, exclusive 
of tlie Debt created by on Issue of Stock on Bonds : — The 4th, the total 
Amount of the Debts of each State, exclusive of the Debts occasioned by 
the Deposit of the Surplus Moneys of the United States, 



S. Hampshire, 
Vermont, 

Massachusetts, 
Rhode ] eland, 
Connecticut, 

York, 
Sew Jersey, 
Pennsylvania, 
Maryland, 
Delaware, 
Virginia, 
N. Carolina, 
Carolina, 
Georgia, 



Alabam 



sippi, 



Michigan, 

Florida, ' 

D. of Colombia, 



$554,9 

do.' 
4,290,000 



4,129,700 

5,753,770 

10,SOO,000 
7,000,000 

19 f 7H5,0ll(> 
Tr" (•'<* 
3,185,000 
11,101.110(1 
o,4ifc,00<> 
5,479,000 

a.ooo.ruii) 

1,840,000 
3,000,000 



Debts of the States Tor the United States surp 
deposited with them, 


as money J j.yjjjjj 


Debts 
New York, $ 9,663,209 
Boston, 1 ,698,232 
Philadelphia, 1,000,000 
Baltimore, 4,680,870 
Albany, 695.532 
Total of City 


/ Cities. 

Troy, 

Cincinnati, 

New Orleans.: 

Mobile,} 

Charleston,; 
■)ebts. 


¥226,46y,099 

361,000 
8HO,000 
,758,180 
513,000 

— - — 22,372,441 


Total of State and City Debts, 


$248,841,540 


t Bum iu'ual ID bunk, of which * 981,009 i. un.'old. 


t Now York Herald. ' 



OBI TED STATES. [1642. 

Showing the Amount of Stock immett by the teveral Stale/ in 
each Period of Fine Years from 1820 to 1840. 



1843.] REVENUE, EXPENDITURES, AND DEBTS OF THE STATES. 

Maine. — The receipts are for 1840, and include a Bank Tax of 
$40,965, appropriated for schools, and which sum is also embraced in 
the expenditures. The revenues applicable to the ordinary purposes of 
the Treasury amounted only to about $12,000 in 1840. The Treasurer 
estimates the revenue from the State tax, in 1841, at $97,71813, the 
sum of $ 3,357-75 having been received in 1840, showing that the State 
tax would yield over $100,000. In 1840, there was paid from the 
Treasury, for bounty on wheat, school fund, and roll of accounts, 
1838-9, $197,226-42, which sum is not included in the expenditures 
as set forth in Table No. 1. The amount of expenditures includes 
$66,667 78 *' for debt to counties, towns, and individuals " ; the sum of 
$ 19,015 for an extra session of the legislature, is not embraced in 
the item of $40,687 for legislative expenses, as given in Table No. 2. 

In 1835, the Treasury received from the office for the sales of lands, 
$ 133,567-55 ; and in January, 1836, the legislature abolished the State 
tax. The annual average receipts from lands for the last three years has 
been only $ 7,390-70 ; insufficient, says the Treasurer, to defray the 
ordinary expenses of the department. The State has a claim against 
the general government for $ 500,000, which passed both houses of 
Congress at the late session, but was lost in consequence of not being 
returned for the signature of the Speaker before the final adjournment 
of the House. The payment of this recognized claim will reduce the 
State debt to less than $1,200,000. The settlement of the boundary 
question would give the State ample resources for the payment of this 
debt, from the sales of public lands. 

Neic Hampshire. — This State is free from debts of every description 
The Treasurer says, " The ordinary expenditures of the State for execu- 
tive, legislative, and judicial, and all other State appropriations are 
about $ 50,000 annually. Our revenue is derived from taxes levied on 
property and polls according to an appraised value. Our State tax for 
1840, was $40,000, and for 1841, $60,000. In consequence of our 
State legislature holding an adjourned session every fourth year, our 
State tax varies from $40,000 to $60,000." The expenses of the 
judiciary, in the table, are made up of the following items: 

Salaries of the Judges of the Superior Court, . $ 6,200 

Justices of the Court of Common Pleas, . . . 1,972 

Salaries of the Judges of Probate Courts, . . 4,831 

Total, $ 13,003 

It is worthy of remark that this State, notwithstanding its disburse- 
ments from the State treasury are only about $ 50,000 annually, pays 
$1,972 to the Judges of the courts of Common Pleas, and $4,831 to 
Judges of Probate j (answering to Surrogates in New York) : — These 
are expenses which in most other States, are paid either by suitors, 




V 



4 



100 UNITED STATES. [1842. 

from the estates of deceased persons, or from the Treasuries of the 
respective counties. The sum of $ 90,000 is assessed annually on the 
people of New Hampshire for the support of common schools: — in 
addition to this, the districts raise by a local tax the necessary amount 
to build school-houses and keep them in repair. 

The appropriations in 1840, for the deaf, dumb, and blind, printing, 
bounties on wolves, &c, amounted to $112,306*52. The State is prose- 
cuting a geological survey at an expense of $ 2,000 per annum. 

Massachusetts. — In the total amount of expenditures is embraced a 
sum for the support of state paupers, $48,300, — bounty on wheat, 
$ 12,000, — deaf and dumb, and blind, $ 12,500, — lunatic hospital, 
$ 8,000. 

The state revenues are derived from the following sources : 

Bank tax, . . . . . • $ 332,000 

Auction tax, . . . . . 50,000 

Interest on land notes, ..... 10,000 

Miscellaneous, ..... 4,000 

Total, .... $396,000 

The revenues fall short of the expenditures ; but rather than resort to 
a direct tax, the aggregate of these deficits, being about $300,000, has 
been funded and made payable in 1842. The finance committee of the 
house, in 1840, recommended the payment of this debt in 1842, and 
urged the legislature " to avoid, as equally discreditable and ruinous, 
the continual practice of contracting debts for the payment of current 
expenses." And the committee add, that " these results can be effected 
only by taxation or retrenchment." 

The sinking fund provided for the redemption of the scrip issued in 
the currency of Great Britain, and lent to the Western Railroad, 
amounts to $118,817 75. The item of Judiciary expenses in table 
No. 2, is made up as follows : 

Salaries of the Judges of the Supreme Court, and District At- 
torney, Attorneys- General, and Reporter, . . $ 23,500 
Judges of the Common Pleas, ..... 8,750 

Judges of Probate, ...... 6,640 

Reporters, &c. ....... 11,646 

Total, . . . . . $50,536 

Vermont. — The principal part of the revenue for defraying the ex- 
penses of the government, is derived from a direct tax. The Treasurer 
states that the General Assembly, for several years past, has annually 
imposed a tax of three cents on the dollar, on the " Grand List" of the 
citizens of the State, for the support of government, which raises some- 
thing over $ 60,000. Tn consequence of building a new state-house, 



r 



1842.] REVENUE, EXPENDITURES, AND DEBTS OF THE STATES. 101 

and some other extraordinary expenditures, there has been a deficiency 
in the revenue for a few years, which has been supplied mostly by 
loans from the State School Fund. 
Rhode Island, — This State derives from a tax on banks, $24,437*17, 

— from lotteries, $ 9,000, — from interest on public deposits, $ 19,295. 
In addition to. the expenditures given in the table, there is paid from the 
treasury for the support of public schools, $25,125*16. The State owes 
no debt, and the people are exempt from any direct tax. In the table, 
the sums paid to Senators ( #459) and to Representatives ($ 4,847) only 
are put under the head of legislative expenses. In the Treasurer's 
statement for 1840, there is an item of $ 10,562*60, " accounts allowed 
by General Assembly." In the expenses of State and judicial officers, 
the salaries only are embraced. The Treasurer has an item of " or- 
ders of the Supreme Judicial Court paid $ 5,564*02, — and another 
Court of Common Fleas, $ 3,368 53." Whether any portion of these 
orders were given for expenses properly chargeable to the judiciary 
system, there is no means of determining. 

Connecticut, — This State derives $ 35,000 from a direct tax of one 
cent on the dollar of the '< Grand List," — from bank dividends, $ 30,000, 

— and from sales at auction, fines, forfeitures, &c, $ 15,000. The State 
is free from debt and all liabilities; and has a school fund of over 
$ 2,000,000. 

New York. — This State commenced issuing stock, in 1817, for money 
borrowed to construct the Erie and Champlain Canals. The original 
law organized a system of finance, and made such provision for the 
redemption of the debt created, that in nineteen years the redemption 
of the debt was fully provided for, without requiring any subsequent 
legislation, or any additional revenues beyond those set apart by the 
law of 1817. There was derived from the revenues set apart, exclusive 
of canal tolls, the sum of $5,624,761 ; which exceeds by $276,000, the 
whole sum paid for interest on all the money borrowed for the Erie and 
Champlain Canals from 1817 to 1838. The amount received for tolls 
on these two canals from 1821 to September 30, 1840, is $49,142,722*11. 

The debt of New York, as given in table No. 3, ($20,165,254) comes 
down to the close of 1840. Since the 1st January, 1S41, there has been 
issued to railroad corporations $ 700,000, — making the total of the 
State debt, (May 1, 1841,) $20,865,253 92, as stated in the report of 
Mr. Hoffman. An act has also been passed (May 17, 1841) authorizing 
the borrowing on the credit of the State of $ 3,000,000 more. This will 
make the debt, at the close of 1841, $ 23,865,253*92. 



102 UNITED STATES. [1842. 

The revenues derived from the canals for the year ending September 
30, 1840, amounted to the sum of . . . $ 1,011,393-67 

Revenues of general fund, .... 451,790-39 

$2,063,18406 
The expenditures for interest, and for the 

maintenance of all the State canals, was $ 1,186,941 36 
Annual expenses of the Treasury for sup- 
port of government, . . . 918,725*86 

2,105,667-22 

Excess of expenses over income, . . . (42,483*16 

The estimated value of the assessed property of the State is 
$650,000,000. No tax for State purposes has been levied since the 
year 1826. The sum deposited with the State by the government of 
the United States has been invested, and the annual revenue is appro- 
priated to the purposes of education. In addition to this the common 
schools have the annual interest on a capital of $ 2,000,000, and the 
academies on a capital of about a quarter of a million of dollars. 

New Jersey. — This State has a debt of $ 83,072 ; but has not issued 
stock on bonds. The State receives from dividends on stocks, $ 30,000, 
— transit duties $30,276 39; State tax, $20,000. The State pays 
$6,16911 to revolutionary pensioners, and deaf, dumb, and blind. 
There is expended for state prison, $ 12,416-30. 

Pennsylvania. — The amount of expenditures of this State, as shown 
in the table, embraces all the payments from the Treasury, except for 
schools and internal improvements. The revenues are derived from 
dividends on bank stock, $126,522, — auction duties, $96,207, — tax 
on bank dividends, $ 80,465, — town licenses, $ 52,749, — retailers* 
licenses, $70,971, — tax on writs, $ 37,560, — land and land office fees, 
$37,141, and sundry other small items. A tax law has been passed 
which, it is estimated, will bring into the Treasury over a million of 
dollars annually. The item in Table No. 2, under the head of " Judi- 
ciary," embraces, 

The Supreme Court, ..*..$ 18,008 

Presidents of the Court of Common Pleas, . . . 47,463 

Associate Judges, do. . . . . 16,448 

Judges of the District Courts, . . . . 16,283 

Court of Criminal Session, .... 7,148 

Recorder of Mayor's Courts, ..... 2,250 

Total, . $107,600 

The legislative printing, being in German and English, amounts to 
60,488. 



1842.] REVENUE, EXPENDITURES, AND DEBTS OF THE STATES. 103 

Under the act for " the relief of officers and soldiers of the revolu- 
tionary war/' pensions and gratuities are paid annually to the amount 
of $ 51,989-33. The Treasury also pays $ 369,335 43 for schools. 

Maryland, — This State has a revenue from auctions, $ 49,292, — 
dividends on bank stock, $32,289, — licenses granted by clerks of 
courts, $74,090, — dividends on ward stock, $35,110, — from state 
lotteries, $18,117, — state tobacco inspection, $23,380. 

Maryland pays in pensions to officers and soldiers of the Revolution, 
$ 13,921 annually. 

The stock debt of the State amounts to $ 15,109,026 22. A sinking 
fund has been established which already extends to a million of dollars. 
And a direct tax has been authorized by the legislature at its session in 
1841 ; also a loan of $ 500,000 to meet interest now due on State stock. 

Virginia. — This State has an annual revenue from taxes of 
$452,598-22, — from bank dividends, $ 84,715-85, — from clerks of 
courts, $16,706-71. The interest on the stock debt of the State is 
punctually paid in specie, or its equivalent ; the State has productive 
available funds amounting to $ 6,980,000, exceeding the amount of its 
debt. 

The following expenses of a military character are incurred, viz. 

Public guard at Richmond and the penitentiary, . $22,673*31 

Pay of the adjutants, clerks, provost-martial, musicians, 

colors, musical instruments, &c, .... 19,881 
Appropriations for military school, . 11,000 

Repairs of arms, &c., ...... 5,683 



Total, .... $59,237*31 

The State tax is derived from the following sources : 

Lots, ........ $48,837 

Lands, ....... 184,353 

Slaves, ...*.... 72,247 

Horses, ....... 37,439 

Coaches, stages, carryalls, and gigs, .... 25,382 

Merchants, auctioneers, and brokers, . 82,321 
Keepers of houses of private entertainment, ordinary keep- 
ers, venders of lottery tickets, and pedlers, . 34,803 

Total, $485,382 

Sheriff's commissions, insolvents, and 2£ per cent, for prompt pay, 
reduce the sum paid into the Treasury to $252,598. 

North Carolina. — This State has a revenue of $ 83,757*05, derived 
from a general State tax, and a tax on bank stock. 

North Carolina is entirely free from debt ; and this is owing to the 
fact that a tax is annually levied more than sufficient to meet all the 
disbursements of the government 



104 UNITED STATES. [1842. 

South Carolina. — This State, in 1840, derived a revenue of $486,99309 
from a general tax. This tax is principally as follows : 

Tax on negroes, ......$ 185,781 

On goods, ....... 32,907 

On professions! ...... 7,055 

On lots, ..... 45,026 

On lands, ...... 31,074 

Total, . $271,848 

On the 30th of September, 1839, the sinking fund of the State 
amounted to #1,599,48048; out of which $800,000 of State stock, 
issued in 1820, and redeemable in 1840, has been paid. .With the 
increase of 1840, the sinking fund still amounts to $ 819,228. The debt 
above referred to has been paid by the regular operation of the law 
which authorized it to be created, and which simultaneously provided 
a sinking fund for its redemption. 

Georgia, — No direct information has been obtained from this State 
in regard to its debt or the condition of its finances. In Trotter's 
" Finances of the North American States/' published in London, it is 
stated that Georgia had authorized a loan of a million and a half of dol- 
lars to complete the Atlantic Railroad, and that $500,000 of stock bad 
been issued previous to 1840. The salaries of the judicial and State 
officers are taken from the " American Almanac " for 1841, — and the 
expenses of the legislature from the " Tuscaloosa Monitor." 

Alabama. — The Governor states in his Message of November, 1840, 
that under an act of January 29th, 1840, " to recall and cancel the- un- 
sold bonds issued by the State of Alabama/' the directors of the State 
Bank had returned bonds to the amount of $ 334,000, — the branch at 
Huntsville to the amount of $ 500,000, — and the branch at Montgom- 
ery to the amount of $667,000 ; all of which have been cancelled. And 
the Governor states that all the bonds remaining unsold belonging to 
the State Bank are to be recalled and cancelled. This is a portion of 
the seven millions of stock issued for the relief of the State Bank after 
its suspension in 1837. The State having previously issued seven mil- 
lions of stock on which the bank was based, the outstanding stock 
now amounts to $ 10,859,556. 

Mississippi. — This State has an annual revenue from taxes of 
$127,328-34. 

Tennessee, — This State has an annual revenue from taxes of 
$150,000, — interest on United States surplus deposits $36,000. 
The State pays for costs of criminal prosecutions, $22,742. 

In 1838, an act was passed for issuing several millions of dollars of 
State stock, for banking purposes, — but in 1840, this act was repealed, 



1842.] REVENUE, EXPENDITURES, AND DEBTS OF THE STATES. 105 

and a million and a half of dollars in bonds, which had been issued to 
the Union Bank were recalled and cancelled. 

Kentucky. — This State had a revenue from taxation, in 1839, of 
$250,000 on an assessment of ten cents on $ 100; by a law of the last 
session this tax has been increased five cents on the $100. The State 
has also a revenue of over $ 40,000 derived from taxes on law process, 
deeds, seals, &c. 

Kentucky has issued several millions of stock for banking and inter* 
nal improvements ; and has established a sinking fund for the redemp- 
tion of the debts, which now produce a revenue of $ 113,928, and is 
to be increased by five cents on $ 100 ; which will produce annually 
more than $100,000, making the sinking fund revenue over $200,000. 

Ohio. — This State has an annual revenue from taxes of $ 510,939, — 
viz. for canal tax, $283,855 ; for Treasury, $ 227,084. 

Ohio has a stock debt of $ 13,724,755, on which interest is to be paid. 
This State arranged a system of direct taxation when it commenced 
borrowing money ; and this provident course has had a favorable effect 
on the credit of the State. The Ohio Canal which connects Lake Erie 
with the Ohio river, yielded a revenue, in 1840, of $ 425,972*85. 

Indiana. — This State has passed an act for laying a tax of 40 cents 
on each $ 100 of valuation, and 75 cents on each male inhabitant of 21 
years of age. This will produce a revenue of about $ 475,000 ; but, as 
the State has a large sum of Treasury notes in circulation, and as 
these are receivable for taxes, the principal part of these taxes may be 
absorbed in these notes. 

The value of the taxable property in the State, in 1840, was returned at 
$91,756,019, and the number of polls at $100,000. The amount assess- 
ed on property for internal improvements in 1840, was $ 45,878. The 
quantity of land taxed in 1840, was 8,273,120 acres. The auditor 
estimates that 2,235,906 acres were omitted, and that the revenue has 
lost by this neglect $ 23,644, which ought to have been assessed and 
collected in 1840. In 1844, an additional quantity of land which has 
been sold by the government will be taxable, amounting to 5,623,732 
acres, and making a total of over 16,000,000 of acres. 

Illinois. — This State, at the late session of the legislature, increased 
the tax on property from 20 cents to 30 cents, being an increase of one 
third, and the additional 10 cents is pledged for the payment of interests 
on the public debt The Michigan and Illinois Canal, on account of 
which $4,073,048 of stock has been issued, has a large fund in lands 
which were given by the general government to aid this improvement, 
and from wjiicha considerable revenue will be realized. After undertak- 
ing this canal, relying too confidently on the anticipations of speculators 
in regard to the land set apart for its construction, this young State, in 



106 UNITED STATES. [1842. 

1837, passed a law for the immediate construction of 1,300 miles of rail- 
roads. 

As soon as the law of 1837 was passed, the same inconsiderate policy 
which produced it, prompted the commencement of railroads in every 
section of the State ; and the result is, that within three years from the 
passage of the law, the State is involved in a debt of over $ 13,000,000, 
without having a single work completed and in a condition to produce 
revenue to the State. 

Missouri. — This State has issued $2,500,000 for banking purposes; 
but the whole of this sum has not been sold by the bank for the benefit 
of which it was issued. The subject of recalling and cancelling such 
portion of the stock as was yet within the control of the bank, was 
agitated in the legislature last winter, but no definite action was had in 
the matter. 

Michigan, — This State has a debt of about five millions and a half of 
dollars, and, what is peculiarly unfortunate, the State has lost more than 
one third of the proceeds of the stock which has been issued, by the 
infidelity and insolvency of those with whom the loans were nego- 
tiated ; and even the amount received has not been expended in such 
a manner as to yield revenue to any considerable amount. The board 
of internal improvement, in a recent report, say, — " We have expended 
or wasted, three fourths of our five million loan, and what have we to 
show for it? We have finished about forty, — say fifty miles of the 
Central, and about thirty-four of the Southern Railroads, and there will 
soon be completed the portion of the Clinton and Kalamazoo Canal, 
between Rochester and Frederick ; and where are the profits to remu- 
nerate the State for this heavy outlay ? " 

Arkansas. — The taxable property of the State amounts to $ 23,000,000. 
The State tax amounts to $30,000. Bonds have been issued for bank* 
ing to the amount of $3,660,000, of which the sum of $ 984,000 remains 
unsold. 

The land tax in the State is valued at $ 12,541,661, — town lots, 
#1,159,000, — slaves, $5,937,933. The number of persons liable to 
pay a poll tax, is stated at 10,9"3. 



XIV. RATES OF INTEREST. 

[From the " Louisville Advertiser."] 

The following are the Rates of Interest in the States and Territories of 
the Union, together with the punishment of Usury. 

Maine, 6 per cent., — forfeit of the debt or claim. 
New Hampshire, 6 per cent., — forfeit of three times the amount 
unlawfully taken. 



1342.] RATES OF INTEREST. 107 

Vermont, 6 per cent., — recovery in action with costs. 

Massachusetts, 6 per cent., — forfeit of three-fold the usury. 

Rhode Island* 6 per cent., — forfeit of Ihe money and interest on the 
debt. 

Connecticut) 6 per cent., — forfeit of the whole debt. 

New York, 7 per cent., — forfeit of the whole debt. 

New Jersey, 6 per cent., — forfeit of the whole debt. 

Pennsylvania, 6 per cent., — forfeit of the whole debt. 

Delaware, 6 per cent., — forfeit of the whole debt. 

Maryland, 6 per cent., — on tobacco contracts 8 per cent. — Usurious 
contracts void. 

Virginia, 6 per cent., — forfeit double the usury taken. 

North Carolina, 6 per cent. Contracts for usury void, — forfeit double 
the usury. 

South Carolina, 7 per cent. Forfeit of interest and premium taken, 
with costs to debtor. 

Georgia, 8 per cent., — forfeit of three times the usury and contract 
void. 

Alabama, 8 per cent., — forfeit of interest and usury. 

Mississippi, 8 per cent, — by contract as high as 10, — usury recov- 
erable in action of debt. 

Louisiana, 5 per cent., — bank interest 6, — conventional as high as 
10, — beyond contract, void. 

Tennessee, 6 per cent., — usurious contracts void. 

Kentucky, 6 per cent., — usury may be recovered with cost. 

Ohio, 6 per cent., — usurious contracts void. 

Indiana, G per cent., — on written agreement may go as high as 10, 
— penalty of usury, a fine of double the excess. 

Illinois, 6 per cent., — three-fold amount of the whole interest. 

Missouri, 6 per cent., — by agreement, as high as 10, — if beyond, 
forfeit of the whole interest due, and of the usury taken. 

Michigan, 7 per cent., — forfeit of the usury taken and one fourth the 
debt. 

Arkansas, 6 per cent, — by agreement, any rate not higher than 10. 
Amount of usury recoverable, but contracts void. 

Florida, 8 per cent., — forfeit of interest and excess in case of usury. 

Wisconsin, 7 per cent., — by agreement not over 12, — forfeit treble 
the excess. 

On debts and judgments in favor of the United States, interest is 
computed at 6 per cent, a year. 



08 UNITED STATU. [18-12. 

XV. THE TOBACCO TRADE. 

. Statement of the Tobacco, Snuff, and Manufactured Tobacco, Exported 

from the United States annually , from 1821 to 1840, inclusive. 

[From Hawit'i " CommBicJal tod Sullltlcal BcjLilor."] 



. Statement showing to what 



Countries the larger Portion of tie Tobacco 













To nil olhei 




1'on. 


England. 


Francs. 


Holland. 


GwuWIiy. 


Court riea. 


Total. 




Hbdi. 


lilidi. 


Hilda. 




Ilhdi. 


Hbdi. 


1811 


19,685 


3,478 




10^473 


19,997 


66,858 












16,433 


83,169 


If'il 


31.999 


7,861 


30,399 


15, 259 


13,700 


99,099 




19,418 


4,489 


33,159 




18,039 


77,883 


1825 


33,293 




31,998 


13,051 


13,546 


75,984 


l«98 




19,739 


15,465 








INI 


98,91 a 


8,963 


94,553 


19,439 


17,17 






85, ITS 


5,999 










1H-JS 




6,835 


91 593 




15,901 




1830 


19,910 


7,997 


33,576 


15,3 IS 


18,999 


83,810 


941,919 


65,822 


918,679 


139, si: 


153,310 


824,945 




36,373 


1,Bt! 


93,917 




14,993 


86,718 




38,l7f 














1833 


M.779 


4^78 


19,093 






14,169 


83,153 




3(1, Mn 




19,10 






19,834 


87,979 


1833 


97,5iJ3 












94,353 




36,832 


7,o5f 


19,148 










tan 


30,733 










18,797 


100,339 






is,5i: 














30,068 










19.7T 


78,995 


1840 

nm, 


96,355 


15,640 


99,534 


35 


049 


99,490 


119,484 


983,731 


81,019 


305,038 


934 


403 


164,591 


967,755 


534,640 


146,834 


493,707 


373,918 


339,901 


1,799,000 


Vlhia, 


■ 50,)94,466 


(16,361,346 


• 91,907,465 


« 18,734,166 







1842.] TOBACCO TflADE. 109 

The preceding Tables furnish a view of the Tobacco trade, from 1821 

to 1840. ^ . 

It appears that during that period, there were exported 1,792,000 
hogsheads, valued by the Treasury Department at $131,346,514, being 
an annual average of 89,600 hogsheads, or $6,567,325. 

During the years 1821 to 1839, (we have not received the account of 
1840,) there were exported 788,477 pounds of snuff, and 57,196,254 
pounds of manufactured Tobacco ; valued together at $5,556,581. 

For the first 10 years of the series, 1821 to 1830, there were exported 
824,245 hogsheads of Tobacco, valued at $ 56,889,291 ; and during the. 
last 10 years, 1830 to 1840, 967,755 hogsheads, valued at $ 74*457,223, 
being an excess in the last 10 years over the first 10, of hogsheads 
143,510, or $17,567,932. 

The average annual export in the first 10 years was 82,424 hogsheads,. 
or $5,688,929; and during the second 10 years, 96,775 hogsheads, or 
$ 7,445,722. 

The average price during the whole 20 years was $73 21 per hogs- 
head. For the first 10 years, $69-11, and for the second 10 years,. 
$ 76*83, or if 1,200 be taken as the average weight of the hogsheads, 
the price during the 2Q years will be 6 10-100 cents per pound, — first. 
10 years 5| cents, and second 10 years 6 40-100 cents per pound. 

It is to be regretted that an account of the quantities, of Tobacco, the. 
produce of the different States, has not been kept, as the quality of each 
varies, as does also the size of the hogsheads. 

It will be observed that owing to the short crop in 1839, the average, 
price exceeds that of other years very considerably. 

It is remarkable how nearly uniform has been the quantity annually 
exported for the last .20 years, with the exception of 4 or 5 years. 

The second Table presents a view of the exports to those' countries 
which receive from the United States the largest share of our export of 
Tobacco. 

The whole amount sent in the 20 years was 

To England, . . 524,640 hogsheads, $50,194,466 

France, . . . 146,834 " 16,361,346 

Holland, . 423,707 « 21,907,465 

Germany, . . . 373,918 « 18,734,18$ 

all other countries, . 322,901 •« 24,149,051- 

Total, . . 1,792,000 " $131,346,514, 

In the first 10 years there were shipped to England, ~ 241.919 hhds 
In the second 10 years there were shipped to England, 282,721 " 

Being an increase in the* last period of . . 40,802 " 

The average annual export to England, during the 20 years, was* 
26,232 hogsheads, valued at $2,509,723. 

10 



110 UNITED STATES. [1842. 

To France in the 10 years 1821 to 1830, were exported, 65,822 fahds. 

To France in tlje 10 years 1830 to 1840, were exported, 81,012 << 

Being an increase in 10 years of 15,190 " 

The annual average to France is 7,311 hogsheads, or $818,067 

To Holland there were exported from 1821 to 1830, 218,679 hhds. 

«' " " 1830 to 1840, 205,028 " 

Being a decrease in the last 10 years of . 13,651 " 

The average annual export 21,185 hogsheads, or . $1,095,373 

To Germany from 1821 to 1830 were exported, . 139,515 hhds 

" " 1830 to 1840, • '< 234,403 " 



Being an increase of . . . . . 94,888 *' 

The average annual export 18,695 hogsheads, or . $ 936,709 

To all other countries the Exports were in 1821 to 1830, 158,310 hhds. 
" " " 1830 to 1840, 164,591 " 

Being an increase of ..... 6,281 " 

Of other countries, Gibraltar on an average of the three last years 
receives annually 5,130 hogsheads. Sweden and Norway, 1,564 hogs- 
heads. Belgium, 1,255., Italy, 1,660. Cuba, 769. Africa, 1,108. 
Spain, 1,067. Scotland, 854 hogsheads. 

It appears by an article recently published relating to British Com- 
merce, that the duty paid in Great Britain, in 1840, on unmanufactured 
Tobacco was £3,525,956 against £3,431,908 in 1839. The quantities 
imported, in 1840, 35,637,826 pounds against 35,605,223 pounds in 1839 



XVI. COFFEE TRADE. 

[From Hazard's " Commercial and Statistical Register."] 

In reply to an inquiry of a member of Congress relative to the com- 
parative prices of Coffee for a series of years prior to, and since, the 
act of 1833 abolishing the duties, we have prepared the following table, 
— taking the annual reports of the 'Secretary of the Treasury as the 
basis of our calculations. We know of no other mode of arriving at the 
facts, although we are aware, from the circumstance of the different 
qualities of Coffee being all blended together, the average thus obtain- 
ed will not probably correspond with the actual price of any particular 
quality taken separately. But for the general purpose of the present 
inquiry, this mode Of arriving at the desired information may be a suffi- 



184$.] COTTON THAU. Ill 

ciently close approiimation to the truth. The value and prices of the 
imports being obtained from the invoices, roust show correctly the 
cost (it the place of purchase. The value of the exports, -is, we presume, 
B general average of (he prices throughout the year, as obtained at the 
Treasury Department, — and we learn from the Custom-House, is the 
value of the article at the " short price," that is, with the drawback 
taken off. By adding, therefore, 5 cents to tbe priceH of exports from 
1821 to 1833, the average price per pound based on the valuation by tbe 
Secretary may be ascertained. 

Statement shaieing Ike Imports and Exports of Coffee, into and from the 
United States, also the Value, teitk the Quantity left far Consumption 
■ or Exportation,, for each Year from J8S1 to 1839, ending September 
30th, and the Average Prttt, 



Remarks. 
The Importations from 1836 to 1832 both inclusive, were 418,667,6b 1 
Do. from 1834 to 1340, . 655,116,660 

Being an increase of .... . lbs. 236,448,979 

in the 7 years succeeding 1833, over those prior to that year. 



112 UNITED STATES. [1842. 

The Exportation^ frem 1826 to 1832 were . . lbs. 141,836,657 

Do. 1834 to 1840, . . . 96,283,071 

Being a decrease of .... lbs. 45,553,586 

in the 7 years succeeding 1833, as compared with the 7 preceding it. 
The consumption from 1826 to 1832 was . lbs. 276,831,024 

Do. 1834 to 1840, . . 558,833,589 

Being an increase of .... lbs. 282,002,565 

in the consumption of the last 7 years over the former. 

The average price of the importations from 1826 to 1832, was 9 3-10 
cents per lb.; and from 1834 to 1840, was 97-10, being a difference of 
4-10 of a cent per lb. against the latter 7 years. 

The average price of exportation from 1826 to 1832, was 10 5-10 
cents, and from 1834 to 1840, was 11 5- 10, being 1 cent per lb. against 
the latter 7 years. 

It would appear from these statements, that since 1833, the amount of 
coffee imported, has increased 56 47-100 per cent., while that exported 
has diminished 32 12-100 per cent. That the amount consumed has 
increased 101 40-100 per cent. That the cost of the article in the places 
of growth has advanced, as has also the price in the United States. 

The great increase of consumption therefore would seem to have 
been induced by some other cause than the removal of the duties, 
probably the increase of population ; and perhaps the facilities of trans- 
portation enabling it to reach the consumer in the interior at a dimin- 
ished expense, while the demand has sustained the price in the market. 

The increase of population between 1830 and 1840 has been about 
32 9-10 per cent. 

The amount consumed from 1826 to 1832 would furnish to each indi- 
vidual in the United States according to the census of 1830, 37-10 lb. 
per annum ; and the quantity consumed from 1834 to 1840, according 
to the population of 1840, would allow to each individual 4 7-10 lbs., 
being an increase in the latter period of 1 lb. to each, per annum. 

This is independently in both cases of the consumption of 1833, which 
year has been excluded from all the preceding calculations. 



1842.] 



COMMERCE. 



113 



XVII. COMMERCE. 
1. Imports and Exports of each State. 

Imports and Exports of each State and Territory, during the Year ending 

on the 30th of September, 1840. 



> 

States and 
Territories. 


Value of Imports. 


Value of Exports. 


In Ame ri- 
can vessels. 


In Foreign 
vessels. 


Total. 


Domestic 
Produce. 


Foreign 
Produce. 


Total. 


Maine, 

N. Hamp. 

Vermont 

Mass. 

Rhode Island, 

Connecticut, 

New York, 

New Jersey, 

Pennsylvania, 

Delaware, 

Maryland^ 

D. Columbia, 

Virginia, 

N. Carolina, 

S. Carolina, 

Georgia, 

Alabama, 

Mississippi, 

Louisiana, 

Ohio, 

Kentacky, 

Tennessee, 

Michigan, 

Florida, 

Missouri, 

Total, $ 


$ 504,183 

67,411 

404,617 

15 ,813,560 

274,534 

270,411 

52,501,265 

1,680 

7,835,007 

4,357,884 

76,637 

481,634 

236,169 

1,635,432 
357,203 
402,211 

7,274,309 

2,426 

2,241 

28,938 

137,225 

126,775 

10,600 


$ 124,579 
47,236 

700,298 

6,661 

7,939,485 

17,529 

629,875 

802 

552,862 

43,215 

63,451 

16,363 

423,438 

134,225 

172,440 

3,398,881 
2,489 

1,385 
63,953 


$628,762 
114,647 
404,617 

16,513,858 

274,534 

277,072 

60,440,750 

19,209 

8,464,882 
802 

4,910,746 
119,852 
545,685 
252,532 

2,058,870. 
491.428 
574,651 

10,673,190 

4,915 

2,241 

28,938 

138,610 

190,728 

10,600 


$1,009,910 

20,761 

305,150 

6,268,158 

203,006 

518,210 

22,676,609 

14,883 

5,736,456 

37,001 

5,495,020 

751,429 

4,769,937 

387,484 

9,981,016 

6,862,959 

12,854,694 

32,998,059 
991,954 

162,229 
1,850,709 


$8,359 

218 

3,918,103 
3,983 

11,587,471 

1,193 

1,083,689 

273,748 
2,494 
8,283 

55,753 
1,238,877 

8,141 
18,190,312 


$ 1,018,269 

k 20,979 

305,1 iO 

10,186,261 

206,969 

518,210 

34,264,080 

16,076 

6,820,145 

37,001 

5,768,768 

753,923 

4,778^20 

.. 387,484 

10,036,769 

6,862,959 

12,854,694 

34,236,936 
991,954 

162,229 
1,858,850 


92,802,352 


14,339,167 


107,141,519 


113,895,634 


132,085,946 



New Revenue Bill. 

At the recent session of Congress during the summer of 1841, a 
new revenue bill was passed, which received the signature of the Presi- 
dent on the llth of September, by which it is enacted, "That on all 
articles imported into the United States from and after the 30th daj of 
September, 1841, there shall be laid, collected, and paid on all articles 
which are now admitted free of duty, or which are chargeable with a 
duty of less than 20 per centum ad valorem, a duty of 20 per centum ad 
valorem, except on [various] enumerated articles." 

Some of the most important articles enumerated in the bill as exempt 
from duty, are tea, coffee, raw hides, unmanufactured furs, dye woods, 
unmanufactured woods, copper, gold and silver coins, and specie. 

10* 



114 



UNITED STATES. 



[1842. 



2. Value of Different Articles Imported. 

Value of Goods, Wires, and Merchandise, Imported into the United 
States during the Year ending September 20th, 1840. 



Species of Merchandise. 



Frbb or Duty. 

Articles for the use of the U. 
States . • n • 

Articles for Philosophical So- 
cieties, 4Jre. 
Philosophical apparatus 
Books, maps, and charts 
Statuary, busts, casts, &c. 
Painting*, drawings, etch- 
ings, and engravings 

Specimens of botany . 

Anatomical preparations 

Antimony, regulus of 

Spelter, or fcinc . - . 

Buhrstones, unwrought 

Brimstone and sulphur . 

Bark of the cork tree 

Clay, un wrought 

Rags of any kind of cloth . 

Undressed furs . 

Hides and skins, undressed 

Platter of Paris 

Barilla . . . . 

SDye . 
Mahogany, unmanuf. 
and other 
Animals, for breed 

Other 
Old pewter 

' { In plates and sheets 
Brass J llP'S 8 and bars 



(In 
> {Old 

fin pigs, and bars 
In plutes, suited to 
sheathing of ships 
Old, fit only for to> 
manufacture 
Gold . 
Silver 
Gold 
Silver 

India, China, &c. 
Coffee .... 



Copper, 



Bullion, 

Specie, 
Tea from 



Cocoa 



Fruits, 



f 



Spices, < 



Almonds 

Currants . 

Prunes . 

Pigs . 

Raisins, Muscatel 
> Other 

Mace . 

Nutmegs . 

Cinnamon 

Cloves, • 
: Pepper . . 



Value. 



$17,999 



5,846 

42,760 

3,217 

8,520 

5,121 

1,054 

11,379 

85,225 

44,668 

65,751 

9,022 

7,073 

564,689 

422,810 

2,756,214 

135,956 

111,607 

476,310 

307,645 

26,772 

145,511 

168 

300,215 

879,078 

73 

1,602 

1,100,664 

411,567 

70,405 

273,127 

469,434 

2,812,030 

5,328,222 

5,417,589 

8,546,222 

161,389 

199,863 

56,651 

74,59J 

102,333 

787,228 

184,221 

7,576 

122,603 

15,314 

47,518 

189,928 



Species of Merchandise. 



! Pimento 
Cassia . 
Ginger 
Camphor . 

SLace veils, shawls, 
shades, &c. 
Other manufactures of 

Manufactures of silk and 
worsted .... 

Camlets of goat's hair . 

Worsted stuff goods 

Linens, bleached and un- 
bleached . . . 

Ticklenburgs, Oanalmrgs, and 
burlaps 

Sheetings, brown and white 

Bolting cloths 

Wool, not exceeding 8 cts. a lb. 

Quicksilver 

Opium ... 

Crude Saltpetre . • . 

Other articles 

Total, 



MfiKCHAHDISB PAT I WO DU- 
TIES AD VALOREM. 

Manufactures of Wool — 
Cloths and cassimeres 
• Merino shawls 
Blankets not above 75 cts. 

each .... 
Blankets, above 75 eta. each 
Hosiery, gloves, mits, and 

bindings 
Other manufact's of wool 
Woollen yarn . . 
Worsted yarn 
Manufactures of Cotton — 
Dyed, printed, and colored 
White 

Twist, yarn, and thread 
Hosiery, ' gloves, mits, and 

bindings 
Nankeens, direct from China 
Other manufact's of cotton 
From lndia,China,fitc. 
Piece goods 

Si Ilr« J Sawing "Ik • • , 
ohm, ^ 0lher manu f acture8 f > 

Sewing, from other 
places 
Lace, thread, and cotton 
Flaxen Chods — 
Linens, dyed and colored, 
checks, &c. . . | 



Value. 



$ 121,543 

49,033 

5,384 

62,556 

909,858 
7,979,100 

1,729,792 

7,340 

3,387,338 

4,179,130 

339,054 

361,173 
74,534 

675,009 
54,415 
40,874 

366,263 
5,849,116 

$57,196,204 



• 4,696,529 
126,609 

239,757 
330,660 

506,453 

231,885 

807 

103,931 

3,893,694 
917,101 
387,095 

792,078 

1,103 

513,414 

963,441 

23,089 

335 

351,375 
468,435 



113,662 



1843.] 



COMMERCE. 



115 



Species of Merchandise. 



Value. 



Other manufactures of flax 
Hempen Goods — 

flail duck . 

Other manufactures of hemp 
Hate and Bonnets — 

Leghorn, chip, straw, or 
grass flats, 4to. 

Fur, wool, and leather 
Manufactures of Iron and Steel. 

Side-arms 

Fire-arms, not specified 

Drawing-knives . 

Cutting knives 

Hatchets, axes, adzes, &c. 

Socket-chisels 

Steelyards and scalebeams 

Vises .... 

Sickles, or reaping-hooks 

Scythes, 

Spades and shovels • 

Sauares of iron or steel 

Wood-screws, 

Other articles 
Manufactures of— 

Copper 

Brass .... 

Tin .... 

Pewter .... 

Lead ...» 

Wood, cabinet-ware 

" other manufactures of 

Leather .... 

Marble • • » . 

Gold, silver, precious -stones, 
set or otherwise . • ' 

Watches, and parts of 
Glassware — 

Cut and not spocifiod • 

Plain and other 

Other manufactures of . 
Wares — 

China and porcelain 

Earthen and stone . 

Plated, not spocified . 

Gilt .... 

Japanned 
Saddlery — 

Common, tinne.l, japanned 

Plated, brass, polished steel 
Coach ami harness furniture 
Carriages, and parts of 
Slates of all kinds . . 
Prepared quilhv . . . 
Black-lead pencils • 

Paper-hangings . . • 
Hair- cloth and hair-seating 
Brushes of all kinds 
Copper bottoms, cut round* &e. 
Silvered or plated wire 
Raw silk 
Indigo t 

Wool, manufactured, exceed- 
ing 8 cents per lb. 
Articles not enumerM, 5 per ct. 
Do. 10 do. 

Do. 19 do. 

Do. 12* do. 



$321,681 

615,723, 
71.994 



438,000 
7,429 

16,196 

118,589 

6,270 

7,304 

5,915 

9,938 

7,048 

8,420 

5,643 

36,895 

13,673 

3,041 

131,986 

9,204,311 

60,438 
247,679: 

28,774 

24,631' 
901 

86,275 
148,477 
473,091 

19,987 

201,590 
420,959 

63,625 
127,327 
169,895 

187,816 
1,822,415 

103,899 
2J,496 
38,677 

. I 

83,910 

117,090 

4,764 

3,893 

70,744' 

21,417, 

3,799, 

76,521 1 

59,555 

38,762 

8,809 

3,087| 

934,235 

1,191,701] 

171,067 

76,724, 

1,181] 

9,848 

931,460 



Species of Merchandise. 

Articles not enum'd, 15 pr. ct. 

Do. 20 do. 

Do. 95 do. 

Do. 30 do. 

Do. 35 do. 

Do. 40 do. 

Do. 50 do. 

Total, 



MERCHANDISE FAYING SPE- 
CIFIC Duties. 
Flannels . . . 

Bookings and baizes • . 
Carpeting -r- 

BiuMels, Wilton, &c. 

Other ingrained £ Venetian 
Floor-cloth, patent, printed or 

paintod . . 

Oil-cloth furniture 
Cotton bagging • 
Wine — 

Madeira .... 

Sherry .... 

Red, of France 

Other, of France 

French, in bottles, . 

Sicily .... 

Red, of Spain and Austria 

Other, of Spain, Austria, 
and Mediterranean 

Of other countries, in casks 
Do. in bottles 

Spirits from grain 

Do. other materials 
Molasses .... 
Vinegar .... 
Beer, ale, and porter, in casks 
Do. in bottles 

oa — 

Foreign fishing — spermaceti 

Whale, and other fish 

Olive .... 

Castor . . 

Linseed .... 

Rapeseed . 
Teas, from other places than 

China, &c. . . 

Chocolate .... 
Sugar — Brown 

White, clayed, or powdered 

Loaf .... 

Candy 

Other refined . 

Syrup of sugar cane 
Cayenne pepper • • 

Candles — 

Wax and spermaceti • 

Tallow 

"'1166 SO • • e e 

Soap . • . . 

Tallow .... 

Lard 

Beef and pork . . . 
Bacon • . , 

Butter .... 



Value. 



$ 974,391 

'361 

573,516 

34,213 

2,154 

663 

951,644 

* 96,998,981 



$67,690 
51,025 

246,068 
99,433 

19,894 

13,754 

310,211 

351,438 
139,002 
439,799 
114,094 
499,923 
116,129 
37,422 

245,438 

929,262 

36,669 

420,069 

1,172,495 

9,910,791 

14,614 

19,044 

123,441 

13,837 

14,196 

85,919 

9,986 

173,830 

87 

9,421 

1,994 

4,749,492 

838,458 

69 

50 

63 

3 

1 

396 

8,674 

93,299 

13,859 

50,545 

7 

19,439 

14,087 

3,763 



116 



UNITED STATES. 



[1842. 



Specie* of Morotndbe. 


Value. 


Species of Merchandise. 


Value. 


Saltpetre • . 


$94,179 


Alum ; • . . 


9 


Vitriol - Oil of 


747 


Copperas .... 


73 


Balls, Epsom • 


44 


Wheat flour . 


430 


Glauber 


98 




1,015,496 


Tobacco, manufactured — 




Coal . .. . • 


387,938 


Snuff .... 


911 


Wheat .... 


639 


Cigars 

Other than snuff and cigars 


869,434 


Oats .... 


837 


188 


Potatoes .... 


16,690 


Cotton • 


936,177 


Paper— Folioand quarto post 
Foolscap, drawing, and 


15,109 


Gunpowder 


4,521 




Bristles .... 


94,335 


writing 


40,620 


Glue .... 


1,139 


Printing, copperplate, and 




Ochre — Dry , . 


34,410 


stoineis' 


436 


In oil 


3,399 


Sheathing, binders', wrap- 




Lead, red and white . 


41,043 


ping, and box boards 


871 


Whiting and Paris white 


1,017 


All other . . . 


13,933 


Litharge . • 


378 


Books — 




Sugar of load . 


11,385 


Printed previous to 1775 


5,855 


t Pig, bar, and sheet 


13,111 


In other languages than 




«*-. te. . •. •. 


164 


English, Latin, and Greok 


77,155 


44 


In Greek and Latin, bound 


9,394 


f Old and scrap . 


1,136 


Do. unbound 


9,088 


rt^.^„„„ S Cables and tarred 
Cordage, j Untarred ond yarn 


89,504 


All other, bound 


37,592 


13,434 


Do. unbound 


85,750 


Twine, packthread, &c. 


141,973 


Apothecaries' vials, ace. not 




Corks .... 


56,186 


exceeding 6 ovmces each 


559 


r* AnnA * S Roda aod bolts 
Copper, j Nai|> and Sp . ke- 


1,071 


Apothecaries' vials, ace. ex- 




361 


ceeding 6, not above 16 oz. 


366 


"»— * i Rifled .' 


34,900 


Perfumery and fancy vials and 




976 


bottles, not above 4 oz. each 


890 


Wire — cap or bonnet 


9,963 


Perfumery and fancy vials and 




Iron and steel wire, not above 


i 


bottles, above 4, but not 




No. 14 ... 


9,885 


above 16 oz. each 


681 


Iron and steel wire, above 




Demijohns 


95,072 


No. 14 . 


5,811 


Bottles — 




iron — 




Black, not above 1 quart 


116,876 


Tacks, brads, and sprigs, 




Above 1 quart 


' 1,399 


not exceeding 16 oz. per 




Window Glass — 


• 


thousand . 


708 


Not above 8 by 10 inches 


6,711 


Do. above 16 oz. per 1,000 


166 


Above 8 by 10, and not above 
10 by 19 inches 




Nails ... 


69,477 


10,977 


Spikes 


5,032' 


Above 10 by 19 inches 


39,758 


Cables and chains, or parts 


1 


( Dried or smoked . 


19,355 


thereof 


89,643i 


c:.k ) Salmon 

Fuh » ) Mackerel . . 


78,932 


Mill saws • 


1,874 


114,590 


Anchors .... 


8,876 


( All other . 


48,979 


Anvils 


93,903 


Shoes and Slippers — 




Blacksmith's hammers, flic. 


1^993 


Silk .... 


1,858 


Castings, vessels of 


14,673 


Prunella, nankeen, ace. 


968 


Do. All other 


100,834 


Leather, kid, morocco, flic. 


39,377 


Round, as brasiers' rods, of 




Children's 


589 


3-16 to 816 inch diameter 


47,782 


Boots and bootees . 


36,441 


Nail or spike rods . 


94 


Playing cards 


5 


She*- 1 and hoop 


935,809; 


Felts or hat bodies 


969 


Ttflnrl fei*rnll &.A. 


963' 






illlllU, IviUllt H.VI • 

In pigs .... 


VvV 

114,562, 


Value of Merchandise paying 




Old and scrap 


15,749. 


specific duties . 


99,946,334 


Bar, manufactured by rolling 
Do. manufactured other wise 


1,707,649 


Do. do. ad valorem 


96,998,931 


1,689,831 


Do. do, free of duty 


57,196,904 


Steel 


598,716' 
686,777 






WWW .... 

Hemp ... * 


Total, 


$107,141,519 



1842.] 



COMMERCE. 



117 



3. Imports from, and Exports to, Foreign Countries. 

Table exhibiting the Value of Imports from, and Exports to, each Foreign 
Country t during the Year ending on the 30th of September, 1840. 



Countries. 



Russia, 

Prussia, 

Sweden and Norway, 



Swedish West Indies, . 

Denmark, 

Danish West Indies, s , 

Hanse Towns, 

Holland, .... 

Dutch East Indies, • 

Dutch Went Indies, 

Dutch Guiana, 

Belgium, . . 

England, 

Scotland, .... 

Ireland, 
l6|Gibraltar, .... 

Malta, .... 

Mauritius, 

Cape of Good Hope, . 

British East Indies, 

British West Indies, . 
&| British Honduras, 

British Guiana, . . 

British American Colonies, 

Australia , . . . 

France, .... 

French West Indies, . 

French Guiana, 

Hayti, . 

Spain, .... 

Teoeriffe and other Canaries. 

Manilla and Philippine Islands 

Cuba, 

Other Spanish West Indies, 

Portugal 

Madeira, 



6 
7 

81 

9 
10 
11 
13 
13 
14 
15 



17 
18 
19 
20 
91 



33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
30 
3t 
33 
33 
34 
35 

36 

37|Fayal and the other Azores, 

38,Cape de Verd Islands, 

39ltai», . 

40|8ictly, 

41 j Ionian Islands, 

43 Greece, 

43 Trieste, 

44 Turkey, . 

45 Morocco, • 

46 Texas, 

47 Mexico, . • 

48 Venezuela, 

49 New Grenada, 

50 Central America, . 

51 Brazil, . 

53 Argentine Republic, 
53Citplatine Republic, 

54 Chili, 

55 Peru, . 

56 Republic of Escuador, . 

57 South America, generally, . 

58 China, .... 
SOJ Europe, generally, . . 
""" Asia, generally, . 

61 Africa, generally, . . 

63 West Indies, generally, . 

63 South Seas. 

64 Sandwich Islands, . . 

65 North went Coast of America, 

66 Uncertain places, . 

Total, 



Value of 
Imports. 



$ 3,572,427 

59,304 

1,217,913 

57,545 

7,501 

969,177 

3,531,493 

1,074,754 

817,897 

396,479 

37,766 

274,867 

33,1 14,133 

525,217 

98,349 

32,567 

28,471 

32,324 

1,952,461 

1,048,165 

158,353 

10,973 

2,007,767 

122,141 

17,572,876 

335,251 

1,252,824 

1,684,665 

150,522 

450,351 

9,835,477 

1,898,732 

222,884 

309,524 

38,138 

29,348 

1,157,200 

649,525 

43,027 

5,138 

373,365 

563,476 

62,138 

303,847 

4,175,001 

1,355,166 

217,382 

189.021 

4,927,296 

293.562 

494,402 

1,616,859 

438,495 

28,685 

6,640,839 

284,452 
372,537 

13,762 
16,293 

1,525 



Value of Exports. 



Domestic 
Produce. 



* 2*4,856 

43,353 

435,092 

98,710 

76,183 

918,931 

3,367,963 

3,345,264 

132,751 

259,438 

52,118 

1,834,229 

51,951,778 

2,023,636 

217,762 

643,344 

14,610 

8,319 

35,816 

280,404 

2,907,584 

132,095 

118,896 

5,889,315 

84,847 

18,919,327 

483,595 

945,365 

353,419 

11,816 

90,589 

5,331,471 

770,420 
97,341 
93,819 
10,471 
82,611 
1.189,838 

'303,217 



1,590,356 
119,745 

937,072 

969,938 

554,367 

57,923 

130,661 

2,145,863 

980,144 

82,102 

1,372,254 



96,042 
469,186 

63,976 
170.734 
511,215 
376,715 
177,329 

720 



Foreign 
Produce. 



107,141,519 113,895,634 



ft 934,025 

43,115 

115,134 

3,610 

17,868 

180,518 

830,496 

511,046 

202,552 

42,916 

486,426 

5,096,882 

28,304 

257,110 

45,386 

153 

107 

351,791 

58,000 

58,371 

538 

204,035 

6,022 

2,923,227 

80,656 

100 

81,849 

8,874 

11,579 

30,927 

979,044 

29,208 

5,724 

22,858 

5,623 

2,809 

283,347 

33,923 



196,264 
156,873 

281,199 
1,545,403 

229,605 
77,329 
87,285 

360,711 
89,133 
67,638 

356,575 



28,291 
540,780 

138,092 

43,048 

2,514 

65,200 

540 



18,190,312 



Total. 

ft 1,1 by, 481 

'86,468 

550,226 

102,320 

94,051 

1,099,449 

4,198,459 

3,856,310 

2*5,303 

302,354 

52,118 

2,320,655 

57,048,660 

2,050,940 

217,762 

900,454 

59,996 

8,472 

36,013 

632,195 

2,965,564 

19J,466 

119,434 

6,093,250 

90,869 

21,841,554 

514,251 

100 

1,027,214 

362,293 

23,395 

131,516 

6,310,515 

799,628 

103,065 

116,677 

16,094 

85,420 

1,473,185 

337,140 



1,786,620 
276,618 

1,218,271 

2,515,341 
783,872 
135,351 
217,946 

2,506,574 
369,276 
149,730 

1,728,829 



124,333 
1,009,966 
63,976 
308.826 
554,263 
379,229 
242,429 



1,260 



132,065,946 



118 UNITED STATES. [1843. 

4. Extorts of the Produce or the United States. 

Summary Statement of the Value of the Exports of the Growth, Produce, 
and Manufacture of the United States, during the Year ending on the 
ZOth of September , 1840. 



The Sea. 








Fisheries — 








Dried fish, or cod fisheries 


• • 


$541,058 




Pickled fisb, or river fisheries, (her- 








ring, shad, salmon, mackerel) 


• • 


179,106 




Whale and other fish oil 


• • 


1,404,984 






* 


430,490 




Whalebone . . • . 


• • 


310,379 








332,353 


$3,198,370 


The Forest. 






Skins and Furs 


• • 


1,237,789 




Ginseng . . . . . - 


• • 


22,728 




Products of Wood — 








Staves, shingles, boards, hewn tim- 






l 




$1,801,049 






Other lumber . . . • . 


270,933 






Masts and spars 


29,049 


- 




Oak bark, and other dye 


229,510 






All manufactures of wood 


596,305 




. 


Naval Stores — 






i 


Tar, pitch, rosin, and turpentine 


602,529 




i 


Ashes — pot and pearl . 


533,193 


4,062,568 


, 


A'O R T t\ IT W/TTt RIB 




5,323,085 


Avniv ujua I/nut 

Products of Animals — 






Beef, tallow, hides, horned cattle 


623,373 






Butter and cheese 


210,749 




' 


Pork (pickled), bacon, lard, live hogs 


1,894,894 






Horses and mules . 


246,320 








30,698 




• • 


Vegetable Food — 
Wheat 




3,006,034 






1,635,483 






Flour . . . 


10,143,615 






Indian corn .... 


338,333 






Indian meal . . , . 


705,183 






Rye meal 


170,931 






Rye, oats, and other small grain 








and pulse .... 


113,393 






Biscuit, or ship bread 


428,988 






Potatoes ..... 


54,524 






Apples . .... 


55,131 








1,942,076 


15,587,657 












18,593,691 
9,883,957 












• • 


63,870,307 


All other Agricultural Products — 
flaxseed .... 




• 




• . 


120,000 






• 


11,235 




Brown sugar .... 


* . 


45,940 








209 










177,384 


• 





1842.J 



COMMERCE. 



119 



Manufactures. 
Soap and tallow candles 
Leather, boots, and shoes '. 
Household furniture 
Coaches and other carriages 
Hats •„•... 

Saddlery 

Wax .....* 
Spirits from grain, beer, ale and porter 
Snuff and tobacco 

Lead 

Linseed oil and spirits of turpentine 

Cordage 

Iron — Pig, bar, and nails 
Castings . 
AH manufactures of 
Spirits from molasses 
Sugar refined . . 
Chocolate ..... 
Gunpowder .... 
Copper and brass 
Medicinal drugs . 

Cotton, piece goods — 

Printed and colored . 

White 

Nankeens 

Twist, yarn, and thread 

All manufactures of . 
Flax and Hemp — 

Cloth and thread 

Bags, and all manufactures of 
Wearing apparel ... 

Combs and buttons 

Brushes 

Billiard- tables and apparatus 

Umbrellas and parasols 

Leather and Morocco skins not sold pr 

Printing presses and types 

Fire engines and apparatus . 

Musical instruments . 

Books and maps .... 

Paper and stationery 

Paints and varnish 

Vinegar 

Earthen and stone ware 
Manufactures of Glass 

Tin, pewter, lead, marble, and stone 

Gold and silver, and gold leaf 
Gold and silver coin . 
Artificial flowers and jewelry 
Molasses . 

Trunks 

Bricks and lime 
Domestic salt . 

Articles not enumerated — 

Manufactured . . . 

Other articles .... 



Total, 



$ 398,977 

2,925,257 

1,200 

31,445 

192,728 



$451,995 

214,360 

295,844 

74,416 

103,398 

59,517 

59,085 

128,330 

813,671 

39,687 

63,348 

43,510 

147,397 

1 15,664 

841,394 

283,707 

1,214,658 

2,048 

117,347 

86,954 

122,387 



lb. 



3,549,607 

7,114 

1,12H 

152,055 

40,299 

. 12,263 

2,471 

9,654 

19,557 

17,105 

6,317 

12,199 

29,632 

76,957 

34,631 

6,401 

10,959 

56,688 

58,591 

1,965 

2,235,073 

9,479 

9,775 

6,607 

16,949 

42,246 




$ 5,279,317 



6,425,722 



1,143,801 
113,895,634 



120 



UNITED STATES. 



[1843. 



5. Exports and Imports under each of several Presidencies. 

A Tabular View of the Value of Exports and Imports during the Admin- 
istrations of Monroe, Adams, Jackson, and Van Bur en, from 1821. to 
1840, as appended to the Report of the Hon. Levi Woodbury, Secre- 
tary of the Treasury, December 9th t 1840. 



Years. 


Value of Exports. 


Value of 
Imports. 


Excess of 
Imports 
over 
Exports. 


Excess 

of Exports 

over 

Imports. 


Domestic 
Produce. 


Foreign 

Produce, 

&c. 


Total. 


Monroe's 2d. 
1821 - 
1822 
1823 
1824 

Adams's. 

' 1625 

1836 

1827 

1828 

Jackson's 1st. 

1829 

1830 

' 1831 

1832 

Jackson's 2d. 
1833 
1834 
1835 
1836 

Van Buren's. 
1837 
1838 
1839 
1840 


Dolls. 
43,671,894 
49,874,079 
47,155,408 
50,649,500 


Dolls. 
21,302,488 
22,286,202 
27,543,623 
25.337,157 


Dulls. 
64,974,382 
72,160,381 
74,699,030 
75,986,657 


Dolls. 
62,585,724 
83,241,541 
77,579,267 
80,549,007 


Dolls. 

11,081,260 
2,880,237 
4,562,350 


Dolls. 
2,388,658 


191,350,881 

66,944,745 
53,055,710 
58,931,691 
50,669,669 


96,469,469 

33,590,643 
34,539,612 
23,403,136 
21,595,017 


287,820,350 

99,535,388 
77,595,322 

82,324,827 
72,264,686 


303,955,539 

96,340,075 
84,974,477 
79,484,068 
88,509,824 


18,523,847 

7,379,155 
16,245,138 


2,388,658 
3,195,313 
2,840,759 


339,691,815 

55,700,193 
59,462,029 
61,277,0. r >7 
63,137,470 


102,128,408 

16,658,478 
14,387,479 
20,033,526 
24,039,473 


331,720,223 

72,358,671 
73,849,508 
81,310,583 
87,176,943 


349,308,444 

74,492,527 

70.876,920 

103,191,121 

101,029,266 


23,624,293 

2,133,856 

21,880,541 
13,852,323 


6,036,072 
2,972,588 


239,576,794 

70,817,698 

81,024,162 

101,189,082 

106,916,680 


75,118,956 

19,822,735 
23,312,811 
20,504,495 
21,746,360 


314,695,705 

90,140,433 
104,336,973 
121,693,577 
128,663,040 


349,589,837 

108,118,311 
126,521,332 
149,895,743 
189,980,035 


37,866,720 

17,977,878 
22,184,359 
28,202,165 
61,316,995 


2,972,588 


359,447,622 

95,564,414 

96,033,821 

103,533,891 

113,762,617 


85,386,401 

21,854,962 
12,452,795 
17,494,525 
17,809,333 


444,834,023 

117,419,376 
108,486,616 
121,028,416 
131,571,950 


574,515,420 

140,980,177 
113,717,404 
I62,092,i:i2 
104,805,891 


129,681,397 

23,560,801 

5,230,788 

41,0t3,7l6 


26,766,059 


408,894,743 


69,611,615 


478,506,358 


521,595,604 


69,855,305 


26,766,059 



Excess of Imports during Mr. Monroe's 2d term, $ 16,135,189; Mr. 
Adams's term, $17,588,221 ; General Jackson's 1st term, $ 34,894,132; 
General Jackson's 2d term, $ 129,681 ,397 ; Mr. Van Buren's ,term, 
$16,323,187. 



1842.] 



PUBLIC LANDS. 



121 



XVllI. PUBLIC LANDS. 

1. Statement of Public Lands sold; of Cash, Treasurer's Receipts , Treas- 
ury Notes, and Scrip, received therefor; and of Payments into the 
Treasury on account thereof in the Year 1839. 



States or 
Territories. 



Ohio, 

Indiana, 

Illinois, 

Missouri, 

Alabama, 

Mississippi, 

Louisiana, 

Michigan, 

Arkansas, 

Wisconsin, 

Iowa, 

Florida, 

Total 



Lands sold, after deduct- 
ing erroneous entries. 



Acres. 



Purchase 
Money. 



343,444-76 $315,559-53 

618,748-311 773,998 95 

1,133,876-31 1,445,766 91 

1,038,065-83 1,304,718 69 



Amount received 
urer's Receipts, 
Notes. 



in Cash, Trees- 
and Treasury 



Gash. 



131,935-81 
17,787-33 
509,307-11 
134,964-03 
154,8:8-74 
650,733-83 
398,153-31 
56,499*63 

4,976,383-87 



153,738-30 
93,934-68 
833,080-45 
175,008-66 
188,71005 
819,900-90 
373,180-46 
70,660-30 

6,464,556-78 



$ 308,919-79 

764,333-37 

1,390,328-34 

1,300,677-69 

148,216 07 

93,334-68 

757,618-85 

174,316-93 

187,70005 

660,369-48 

350,413-38 

53,161-30 



Treasur- 
er's Re- 
ceipts. 



$ 1,00000 

3,800-00 
40000 



4,10000 

60000 
1,000-00 
4,500-00 



6,118,348*031 14,400-00. 369,106-94 



Treasury 
Notes. 

$039-33 

6,848-47 

12,320-98 

063-97 

58,044 60 

701-74 

50-00 

157,115-49 

14,595-83 

17,49600 



Amount 

paid into the 

Treasury 

during the 

Year. 



$358,380-54 

905,30900 

1,460,525 65 

1,563,541*36 

187,970-97 

55,483-81 

566,145 99 

183,26115 

258,181 00 

803,30109 

643,533 44 

04,61719 



7,076,447-35 



2. Statement of Public Lands sold ; of Cash, Treasurer's Receipts, Treas* 
wry JVbtes, and Scrip, received therefor; and of Payments into the 
Treasury on account thereof, in the 1st, 2d, and 3d quarters of the 
Tear 1840. 



States or 


1 
Lands sold, after deduct- 
ing erroneous entries. 


Amount received in Cash, Treas- 
urer's Receipts, and Treasury 
Notes. 


Amount 
paid into the 
Treasury 
during the 
three Quar- 
ters of the 
Year. 


Territories. 


Acres. 


Purchase 
Money. 

$ 97,146 98 
114,157-94 
387,304*60 
587,15357 

43,443*06 

18,305-84 
189,875-04 

94,340-50 
113,100-61 
197,107 56 
500,708-83 

39,191*85 


Cash. 

$ 26,152 23 
112,870 60 
374,645*14 
586,058 03 

43,763-56 

18,305*84 
183,137-41 

23,98300 
111,109-61 
114,811-37 
583,133-03 

39,033*85 

0,335,183-61 


Treasur- 
er's Re- 
ceipts. 


Treasury 
Notes. 


Ohio, 

Indiana, 

Illinois, 

Missouri, 

Alabama, 

Mississippi, 

Louisiana, 

Michigan, 

Arkansas, 

Wisconsin) 

Iowa, 

Florida, 

Total, 


81,71004 

01,37813 

309,698-05 

468,360 00 

34,721-76 

14,716-38 

140,071-36 

10,473-30 

00,303-67 

101,517-63 

379,374-77 

93,353-55 

1,606,617-49 


• 
• 

$800.00 
66-40 

• 
■ 
e 
e 
• 

703-34 
1,003-00 

e 


$900-40 
6,334 16 

e 
e 

6,337*63 
157-50 

0,875-35 

3,627-30 

15800 


$45,001-35 
105,817-17 
598,883*01 
575,67305 

75,045*95 

10,06709 
411,040.39 

13,683*45 
107,490-97 
159,372-34 
566,830-00 

90,489-49 


2,252,202-07 


9,661-74 


35,000*43 


9,630,917-951 



11 



133 UHITBD BTAT1H. [1843. 

3. Exhibit of the Quantity of Public Land raid, and the Amount paid by 
the PuTchaiera thereof, in each State and Territory, in each Year from 
1633 to the 20th of September, 1340, inclusive . 





1833. 


,». 


1835. 














Aim. 


Dollun, 


Acrei. 


Dalian. 


Ohio, 


551,153-5o| 002,420 09 


478,847-24 


000,59175 


66 1435 69 


836,224 44 
















[11. 










a, (11*1,639 -95 






























1,985. 449 -36 




































T>ii>,:r;o i; 






























ai7,543-9] 




Plor. 




18,30985 








3,856,23? -50 1 4,972,384 84 


■1,658,91671 


6,099,98104 


12.504..478-85 


15,999^114.11 



1,389,991-80 

3,245,344-13 .,_... 

3,109,703.64 4,l"J0,2U4-3ti 
1,655,0"'" »"•■—"" 

■ ' 

H,«S3,V 

879,156-06 
4,!S l J,*»ia 



170,430 79 588,504-30 243,095' 
""' " , - , " ' "" «■*"■ 603,494-_ . 



1,249,617-97 .. , 

l,IH;:,iiWH) 1,J66,11S.3I .„, _ 

063,987-75 83U,09S-I6 510,423-39 

381,773 00 477,319-09 ISO/ 

256,354-10 330,600-04 —• 
930,952.S9 288.699-91 



1114,1.76-1 



a'jl,915-4S' 



^,1)63 -a 



ratal, 



30,074,870 09 35,167^33-061 8,801, 1C 



11 iDoInik 14,33667 ««, - * 20,770-18, iold in WiMomin 1 



1842.] DISTILLERIES IN THE TOUTED STATES. IfiS 

XIX. DISTILLERIES IN THE UNITED STATES. 

Number of Distilleries in each of the States , and of Gallons Distilled, 
according to the Returns of the Sixth Census, 





No. of 






No. of 




States. 


Distille- 


Gallons 


States. 


Distille- 


Gallons 




ries. 


Distilled. 




ries. 


Distilled. 


Maine, 


3 




Alabama, 


185 


127,261 


N. Hampshire, 


5 


31,244 


Mississippi, 


15 


3,150 


Vermont, 


2 


3,500 


Louisiana, 


5 


291,520 


Massachusetts, 


37 


5,177,910 


Tennessee, 


1,381 


1,080,693 


Connecticut, 


71 


215,892 


Arkansas, 


47 


17,215 


Rhode Island, 


4 


855,000 


Kentucky, 


891 


1,700,705 


New York, 


38 


4,008,616 


Missouri, 


215 


328,898 


New Jersey, 


219 


356,417 


Illinois, 


150 


1,429,119 


Pennsylvania, 


707 


8,784,138 


Indiana, 


322 


1,786,964 


Delaware, 


3 


39,500 


Ohio, 


373 


466,357 


Maryland, 


73 


342,813 


Michigan, 


59 


544,066 


Virginia, 
N. Carolina, 


1,450 


882,516 


Iowa, 


2 


4,310 


2,798 


1,038,741 


D. of Columbia, 


I 


6,000 


8 Czn ml inn 


251 


102,288 
528,393 








W. V/«UUUU(k, 

Georgia, 


350 


Total, 


9,657 


36,343,236 



XX. AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS. 

Extract from the Agricultural Statistics, as returned by the Marshals 
under the 13th Section of the Act for taking the Sixth Census. 

I' 



State* and 
Territoru. 



Maine,* 
N. Hanap.* 
Vermont,* 
Mass.* 

Rhode Island, 

Connecticut, 

New York, 

New Jersey,* 

Pennsylvania, 

Delaware, 

Maryland,* 

Virginia, 

N. Carolina,! 

S. Carolina, 

Georgia, 

Ohio, 

Kentucy, 

Tennessee, 

Louisiana, 

Alabama, 

Mississippi, ' 

Missouri, 

Indiana. 

Illinois, 

Michigan,} 

Arkansas, 

PU>tida,$' 

Wisconsin,! 
Iowa, 

0. Columbia, 



Horses 


Neat 




and 


Cattle. 


Sheep. 


Mules. 


, 




59,306 


327,255 


649,264 


39,850 


261,088 


606,891 


60,974 


350,106 


1,393,420 


62,484 


271,760 


378,226 


8,074 


36,700 


90,146 


34,751 


233,969 


406,985 


476,115 


2,642,438 


5,281.225 


69,769 


219,546 


218,555 


333,565 


1,146,418 


3,396,431 


14,421 


54,883 


39,247 


93,954 


240,432 


262,909 


243,173 


1,008,313 


1,280,736 


130,826 


573,840 


232,664 


134,748 


755,060 


254,947 


411,041 


1,196,713 


1,975,100 


327,526 


777,390 


748,459 


99,067 


348,708 


100,056 


128,515 


607,580 


144,372 


109,227 


623,157 


128,376 


157,578 


367,623 


288,235 


243,767 


614,489 


673,952 


195,186 


604,693 


377,963 


39,085 


135,527 


41,877 


10,801 


37,449 


15,354 


2,145 


3,274 


572 



Swine. 



117,386 
120,167 
297,952 
143,021 
29,669 
132,222 

2,116,953 
259,051 

1,450,531 

74,228 

421,520 

1,916,230 

888,513 
1,288,314 
2,103,209 

2,795,630 

344,685 

701,160 

995,739 

1,072,813 

1,580,051 

1,394,286 

393,004 



104,691 
4,673 



Poultry, 
Value of. 



* 123,171 

97,862 

176,437 

540,295 

61,492 

176,659 

2,373,0291 

412,487 

1,033,172 

47,465 

219,159 

752,467 

590,594 
473,158 
734,931 

581,531 
273,314 
829,220 
369,481 
230,283 
393,228 
330,968 

93,549 



17,101 
1,557 



Bushels 


Bushels 


of 


of 


Wheat 


Barley. 


848,166 


355,161 


442,954 


121,400 


652,293 


55,635 


158,923* 


166,419 


3,088 


63,790 


86,980 


33,789 


11,853,507 


2,498,170 


774,023 


12,601 


13,029,756 


178,100 


215,165 


5,260 


3,511,433 


3,594 


10,066,809 


208,152 


705,925 


3,967 


1,732,956 


13,345 


16,292,951 


207,590 


4,547,273 


4,758 


105 




746,106 


6,682 


196,576 


1,544 


946,077 


9,771 


4,154,256 


25,778 


2,740,380 


68,455 


1124200 


85 


154,737 


729 


12,147 


294 



* The returns of the States marked thus (*) have been corrected. The statistics 
vV he rema inder of the States and Territories not yet examined. * 
t The aggregate not yet made. t Statistics not yet received, 

v Aggregate not made. No return from Middle Florida. 



A G HI CUL 


tvrh. Statistics. — (Continued.) 
















Bnabali 




Indian 




Found! Found! 




ofRjo. 


wh«sL 


Com. 


if Wool. 


ofHopa. ofWai. 


Mi 


137,941 


51,543 


950,538 


1,465,551 


36,940 3,733 


N. 


396 ,,» 






243,765 1345 


Vi 




J 58,5011: 1,047.00 




49,714 3,139 


Hi 


541,9.* 


87,010' 1,809,395 




954,7951 1,170 






9,979l 435,893 


I7.t,snr 




Cc 


736,865 


399,470' 1,468,538 


693,1175 


4,573 y&i 


Hi 


a,s84,gi3 


2,SM,:S-H0,]!15,1',; 




363,763 104,031 


Hi 
P. 


i,ra,.v;i 

6,393,447 


886,970 4,311,38 
1,971,938 13,606,619 


Mt,;,5,-: 
:i,n,'ii,vj3 


4,439 10,016 
38,037 18,856 


Di 


33,580 


11,999! 9,099,361 


64,404 


746 1,088 


Hi 


924,333 


74,848 8,470,165 


500,499 


9^68> 3,664 


Vi 
Ni 

Bo 


807,4*1 


1163,13* 34,297,584 


3,686,844 


63,156 39,106 


44,530 




389,303 


93' 15,857 


(h 




B69 : 17[3a9J9: 


363,340 




01 
K, 


801,943 


681 ,at> 33,954,163 


3,650,970 


63,148; 39,095 




S, 187 43,467,349 




840 50,715 


U 








115 1,30! 


Al 


36,635 


5318,680,66: 


173,400 


735 330,057 


H: 






185,839 


154! 6.815 


Hi 


63,185 


16,347 15,591,4* 


463,644 


489 46,690 


ll. 


137,586 


49,631 '38,008,05 




37,749 


30,483 


III 

Ai 
Ft 


95,965 


63,950 


33,116,627 


600,388 


9,561 


35,791 


5,985 


88 


3,931,149 


63,034 




7,911 


W 
Iff 


8,787 


6,917 


1,326,241 


93,031 


84 


9,133 


D. 




39,385 













Tout or 


Pound. 




•Pounda a 


Found) of 




glutei and 


Buaholi 


Tooaof 






Fonoda 


Cotton 






Tariitorioa 


PolaUwi. 


Hay. 


and Fix. 


Tobacco. 


of Rica. 


,*w 


Coco,- 




Maine 


10,393,380 


691053 


38 












N. Ha'nip. 




4961647 




113 










Vennont, 




734,047 


94i 












4,333 




Haaa. 


5,385,05! 


569,495 


33,133 


84,955 










1,741 




R. Maud, 


1»l,773 


63,417 


lb. 383 


307 
















:vi«4,ca; 


436,160 


II. .147,4!! 1 


471,657 










'HH 




Now York, 


{0,00(1,501. 


3,160,916 


763 


6,567 
















!>,I»V4,1I! 


338,490 


33,710 












'm 




Fenn. 




1 ,19« .ft i: 


170,760, 


350,86! 










37B'939 




Doll wire, 






6031 
















1,058,919 


no.bcii 


34 


18,916,019 






6,673 


9,390 




n!c? *' 


9,873,470 


988,740 


99,193 


74,157,841 


9,610 


10,767.451 


3,183 




a. c. 




90,008 




51,518 59,999,671 


148,907,880 


2,310 








9,364 


1,787 


164,551 19.199.413 


134,333,755 


3.30S 




Ohio, 


5,039,784 


1,039,331 


353,530 


6,093,309 






4.S17 




3.373,034 


30,513 


45,053 


36,549,448 


7,739 


198,250,308 


1,163 




LonUw. 




36,108 






3,604,534 


87,640,185 






Alabama, 




13,933 






109,187 


340,379,669 


h % 




MiiiipKlooi 
Mit-ouri, 






16 


83,451 


973,190 


339 ,!!.'«,!' In 






884,491 


44,871 


30,071 


8,450,797 


so 








Indiana, 








1,821,406 






379 




Illinota, 


]]956,'887 


I56,'44I 


50J336 




90,421 








Hie hi (in, 

Ar kail Hal, 
Florida, 
Wiaeomin, 


990,887 


579 


1,039 


143,889 


997 


33,&S7,192 


90 




















Iowa, 


334,083 


17,953 




19,678 






576 




D. Column 




1,331 











1* of Hie Hannah In 



XXL Table, exhibiting the Stats of Government, the Times of Holding 
the Election of Slate Officers, and the Time* of Ike Meeting of the 
Legislatures of the several Slates. 



Gut... 


Seal, of 


Timee of Holding Time, of the Meetinf of the 




Government. 


Election., LegiaUturea. 


Maine, 






N . Hampshire, 




Ill Tueiday in March, lit Wednesday in Juris. 




Montpelier, 


lit Tueeday in Sept. Bd Thunrlay in October. 


MuHcniiHtU 




39 Monday In Hoy. lit Wednaid.y in January. 
Gov. fc Son. in April, 'lit Wed. in Hay end inJuna. 
Rep. in April and Aug. but Wed In Oct. and In Jan. 


Bhnde Iiluid, 


land Newport, 
rl.rt. & H. Hivv 


Coniiiicticut. 


let Monday in April, HI Wedneide. In May. 


New York, 




lit Monday in Nor. let Tneiday in January. 


NewJoraoy, 


Treolon, 


U Toeiday in Oct. 4th Tueiday in October. 


hwlv*tl*, 


Harri.buif, 


3d Tieiday in Oct. lit Tueeday In January. 


Delaware, 


Duver, 


3d Tueiday in Not. lit Tueiday in Jan. ii<»nioJI|r. 


Minion.!, 






Virginia, 


Richmond, 


4i h Thunday in April, lit Monday in Deoanjber. 


M. Colin., 




Commonly in Augun, 2d Monday in Not. tint*. 


"-.Carolina, 




3d Monday In Oct. |4th Monday in November. 


Affi; 


Tu.caToois*' 


lit HoodarinAnf. lit Monday !° Nonmbw! 
Ill Mon. iTuei.IfoT. lit Monday in Jan. W™. 


Mij.ii.ippl, 


JMkBMI, 






lit Mondiy in July, 1st Motiady in January. 
let Mond.ln Oil. 9d Monday in Oct tin*. 


Arkaniai, 


Little Rock, 


Tenneiioe, 




lit Tbonday in Aug. let Monday in Oct. Htm. 


He-lucky, 


Frankfort, 


lit Monil.j in Auiuit, HI Monday in December. 


Ohio, 


fadiaupolii, 


3d Tn»day in Ocl. lit Monday in December. 




In Mondiy in AngnitJl.t Monday in December. 


ttliacu ' 






■ —,.., 




lit Monday in Auguit, lit Monday In Not. Mew. 


Michigan, 


Wioit, 


lit Monday in Oct. Ilit Monday in NoTemboi, _ 



126 



UNITED STATES. 



[1843. 



XXII. GOVERNORS OF THE SEVERAL STATES AND TERRITORIES, 

With their Salaries, Terms of Office, and Expiration of their respective 
Terms ; the Number of Senators and Representatives in the State Le- 
gislatures, with their respective Terms, 









Gov. 


Term 


ex- 


Sena- 


Term 


ihi 


Term 


States. 


Governors. 


Salary. 


Term, 


pires. 


ton. 


Y'n. 


&!► 


Y'n. 








Yean. 






31 


1 


200 


1 


Maine, 


John Fairfield, 


1,500 


1 


Jan. 


1843 


N. H. 


John Page, 
Charles raine, 


1,800 


1 


June 


1842 


12 


1 


250 


1 


Vt. 


750 


1 


Oct. 


1842 


30 


1 


233 


1 


Mass. 


John Davis, 


3,666f 


1 


Jan. 


1842 


40 


1 


350 


1 


R.I. 


Samuel W. King, 


400 


1 


May 


1842 


10 


1 


72 


i 


Conn. 


W. W. Ellsworth, 


1,100 


1 


May 


1842 


21 


1 


208 


1 


N. Y. 


Wm. H. Seward, 


4,000 


2 


Jan. 


1842 


32 


4 


128 


1 


N.J. 


Wm. Pennington, 


2,000 


1 


Oct. 


1841 


14 


1 


50 


1 


Penn. 


David R. Porter, 


4,000 


3 


Jan. 


1842 


33 


3 


100 


1 


Del. 


Wm. B. Cooper, 


1,3334 


3 


Jan. 


1844 


9 


4 


21 


2 


Md. 


William Grason, 


4,200 


3 


Jan. 


1842 21 


5 


79 


1 


Va. 


J. Rutherford, Ac. 


3,333* 


3 


Mar. 


1842, 32 


4 


134 


1 


N. C. 


J. M. Morehead, 


2,000 


2 


Jan. 


1843 50 


2 


120 


2 


s. c. 


J. P.5 Richardson, 


3,500 


2 


Dec. 


1842 45 


4 


124 


2 


Ga. 


Ch. J. McDonald, 


4,000 


2 


Nov. 


1841 93 


1 


207 


1 


Ala. 


Benj. Fitzpatrick, 


3,500 


2 


Dec. 


1843 33 


3 


100 


1 


Mp. 


A. G. McNutt, 


3,000 


2 


Jan. 


1842! 30 


4 


91 


2 


La. 


A. B. Roman, 


7,500 


4 


Jan. 


1843; 17 


4 


50 


2 


Ark. 


Archibald Tell, 


2,000 


4 


Nov. 


1844 17 


4 


54 


2 


Tenn. 


James C. Jones, 


2,000 


2 


Oct. 


1843 25 


2 


75 


2 


Ken. 


Robert P. Letcher, 


2,500 


4 


Sept. 


1844 


38 


4 


100 


1 


Ohio, 


Thomas Corwin, 


1,500 


2 


Dec. 


1841 


36 


2 


72 


1 


Mich. 


J. W. Gordon, Act 


2,000 


2 


Jan. 


1842 17 


2 


52 


1 


Ind. 


Samuel Bigger, 
Thomas Carlin, 


1,500 


3 


Dec. 


1843; 30 


3 


62 


1 


111. 


1,000 


4 


Dec. 


1842 40 


4 


91 


2 


Mo. 


Thomas Reynolds, 


1,500 


4 


Nov. 


1844 18 


4 


49 


2 


Territ. 




















Fl. 


Richard H. Call, 


2,500 


3 


Dec. 


1844 




29 


1 


Wise. 


James D. Doty, 


2,500 


3 


Mar. 


1844 




26 


2 


Iowa, |John Chambers, 


2,500 


3 


July 


1844 




26 1 



In all the States except JVeto Jersey, Virginia, and South Carolina, 
the Governor is voted for by the people j and if no one has a majority 
of all the votes, in the States in which such a majority is required, the 
legislature elects to the office of Governor, one of the candidates voted 
for by the people. 



1842.] 



THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 

XXIII. THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 



137 




Bangor Theol. Seminary, 
Thomaston Theol.lnst. 
Gilmanton Theol. Seminary, 
Theological Seminary, 
Divinity School, Hoi v. Univ. 
Theological Institution, 
Theol. Dep. Yale College, 
Theol. Inst, of Conn. 
Theol. Inst. Epis. Church, 
New York Theol. Sem. 
Theol. Sem. of Auburn, 
Hamilton Lit, and Th. Inst. 
Hartwick Seminary, 
Theol. Sem. As. Kef. Ch. 
Th. Som. Dutch Kef. Cb. 
TheoJ. Sem. Pr. Ch. U. S. 
Sem. Luth. Ch. U. States, 
German Reformed, 
West. Theol. Seminary, 
Theological School, 
Theological Seminary, 
Epis. Theol. School of Va. 
Union Theol. Seminary, 
Virginia Baptist Seminary, 
Southern Theol. Seminary, 
Theological ^Seminary , 
Furman Theol. Seminary , 
Lit. and Theol. Seminary, 
Sooth West. Theol. Sem. 
Lane Seminary, 
Theol. Dep. Ken. College, 
Theol. Dep. Wes. Res. Col. 
Theological School, 
Granville Theol. Dep. 
Oberlin Theol. Dep. 
Indiana Theol. Seminary, 
Alton Theol. Seminary, 
Carlinville Theol. Sem. 
Theol. Dep. Marion Col. 



Place. 



Bangor, Me. 
Thomaston, do. 
Gilmanton, H.H. 
Andover, Mass. 
Cambridge, do. 
Newton, do. 
N. Haven, Ct. 
E. Windsor, do. 
New York, N.Y. 
do. do. 

Auburn, do. 
Hamilton, do. 
Hartwick, do. 
Newburgh, do. 
N. Br'wick, N J. 
Princeton, do. 
Gettysburg, Pa. 
York, do. 

Allegheny T. do. 
Canons burg, do. 
Pittsburg, do. 
Fairfax Co. Va. 
Pr. Ed. Co. do. 
Richmond, do. 
Columbia, S. C. 
Lexington, do. 
High lli lis, do. 
Eaion, Ga. 

Maryville, Ten. 
Cincinnati,Ohio- 
Gambier, do. 
Hudson, do. 
Columbus, do. 
Granville, do* 
Oberlin, do. 

S. Hanover, In. 
Upper Alton, 11. 
Carlinville, do. 
N. Palmyra, Mo. 



Denomina- 


Com. 


o 


a . 




Vols. 


tion. 


opera- 
tion. 


(•V 
o 


•* 00 


6* 


in 
Lib. 


Cong. 


1816 


3 


43 


139 


7,000 


Baptist, 


1837 


2 


23 




500 


Cong. 


1835 


3 


26 


21 


2^00 


Cong. 


1808 


5 


142 


785 


17,500 


Cong. Unit. 


1816 


2 


27 


191 


1,800 


Baptist, 


1825 


3 


33 


137 


4,000 


Cong. 


1822 


3 


61 


245 


200 


Cong. 


1834 


3 


29 


37 


4,000 


Prot. Epis. 


1817 


5 


74 


18b 


7,960 


Presbyt. 


1836 


4 


129 




12,000 


Presbyt. 


1821 


4 


71 


344 


5,000 


Baptist, 


1820 


4 


27 


124 


2,250 


Lutheran, 


1816 


2 


3 




1,000 


Asa. Kef. Ch. 


1836 


3 


11 




4,000 


Dutch Ref. 


1784 


3 


36 


179 




Presbyt. 


1812 


5 


,13 


714 


7,000 


Evang. L. 


1826 


3 


26 


130 


7,000 


U. Ref. Ch. 


1825 


2 


20 






Presbyt. 


1826 


2 


31 


175 


6,000 


Asso. Ch. 




2 


22 


47 


1,600 


Asso. Ref. 


1828 


1 


19 






Prot. Epis. 


1822 


4 


43 


126 


4,000 


Presbyt. 


1824 


3 


20 


, 175 


4,000 


Baptist, 


1832 


3 


67 




1,600 


Presbyt. 


1831 


3 


18 


62 


3,730 


Lutheran, 


1835 


2 


10 


20 


1,800 


Baptist, 




2 


30 


30 


1,000 


Baptist, 


1834 


i 


10 






Presbyt. 


1821 


2 


24 


90 


6,000 


Do. 


1829 


3 


61 


43 


10,300 


Prot. Epis. 


1828 


3 


10 






Presbyt. 




3 


14 


6 




Lutheran, 












Baptist, 


1832 


2 


8 




500 


Presbyt. 


1834 


4 


58 






Presbyt. 




2 


10 






Baptist, 


1835 










Presbyt. 


1838 








700 


Presbyt. 


1 









For a notice of the Roman Catholic Seminaries, see page 134 
XXIV. LAW SCHOOLS. 



Place. 


Name. 


Prof. 

9~" 

2 

3 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

S 

3 


Students. 


Cambridge, Mass. 
New Haven, Conn. 
New York City, 
Carlisle, Pa. 
Williamsburg, Va. 
Charlottesville, Va. 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Mockville, N. C. 
Lexington, Ky. 
Cincinnati, Ohio, 


Harvard University, 

Yale College, 

Law Department, N. Y. Univ. 

Dickinson College, 

William and Mary College, 

University of Virginia, 

Transylvania University, 
Cincinnati College, 


191 
39 

16 
36 
79 
8 
7 
75 
25 



Schools for the study of law are much less frequented than schools 
for the study of the other professions. The first institution of this na- 
ture, of much note, that was established in the United States, was the 
Law School at Litchfield, in Connecticut, which had from 1798 to 1827, 
730 students ; but it is now discontinued. 



T 



198 



UNITED iTATKB. [1842. 

XXV. COLLEGES IN THE 



Name. 



Bowdoin, 

Waterville,* 
3partmouth, 

University of Vermont, 
5}Middlebury, 

6 Norwich University, 

7 Harvard University, 

8 Williams, 

9 Amherst. 

10 Brown University,* 

11 Yale, 
IS Washington,! 
13 Wosleyan University ,J 
14jColumbia,t 

"" Union, 
Hamilton, 

Hamilton Lit. and Theol.* 
Geneva,f 

University of New York, 
College of New Jersey, 
Rutgers ? 

University of Pennsylv. 
Dickinson,^ 
Jefferson, 
Washington, 
Allegheny,^ 
Pennsylvania, 
Lafayette, 
Marshall, 
Newark, 
St. John's, 
St. Mary's,^ 
Mount St. Mary's,$ 



15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
SO 
81 
82 
S3 
94 
85 
86 
97 
88 
89 
30 
31 
38 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
48 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
00 



Georgetown.^ 



Place. 



Brunswick, 

Waterville, 

Hanover, 

Burliugton, 

Middlebury, 

Norwich, 

Cambridge, 

Wiliiamstown, 

Amherst, 

Providence, 

New Haven, 

Hartford, 

Middletown, 

New York, 

Schenectady, 

Clinton, 

Hamilton, 

Geneva, 

New York, 

Princeton, 

New Brunswick, do. 



Presidents. 



Columbian, 1 
William and Mary,t 
Hampden-Sidney, 
Washington, 
University of Virginia, 
Randolph-Macon,^ 
Emory and Henry, J 
Rector,* 

University of N. Carolina, 
Davidson, 
Wake Forest,* 
Charleston, 
South Carolina. 
University of Georgia, 
Oglethorpe, 
Einqry,{ 

Mercer University,* 
University of Alabama, 
La Grange,! 
Spring Hllfo 
Jefferson, 
Oakland, 
Louisiana, 
Jefferson, 
St. Charles,^ 
Baton Rouge, 
61 (Franklin. 
Greenville, 



69 
63 

«j 
65 



Penn. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
Del. 

Md. 

do. 

do. 
D. C. 

do. 
Va. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 



Foun- 
ded. 



Philadelphia, 
Carlisle. 
Canonsburg, 
Washington, 
MeadvilTe, 
Gettysburg, 
Easton, 
Mercersbuig, 
Newark, 
Annapolis, 
Baltimore, 
Emmetsburg, 
Georgetown, 
Washington, 
Williamsburg, 
Prince Ed. Co. 
Lexington, 
Charlottesville, 
Boydton, 
Glade Spring, 
Harrison Co. 
Chapol-Hill, 
Mecklenberg Co. do. 
Wake Forest, do. 
Charleston, S. C. 
Columbia, do. 

Athens, Ga. 

Midway, do. 

Oxford, do. 

Penfield, do. 

Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

La Grange, do. 

Spring Hill, do. 
Washington, Mp. 
Oakland, do. 

Jackson, La. 

Bringiers, do. 

Grand Cotearj, do. 
Baton Rouge, do. 
Opeloosas, do. 

'Greenville, Tenn. 

Washington Co. do. 



Me. Leonard Woods, Jr., D. D. 
do. Eliphaz Fay, A. M. 
N. H. Nathan Lord-, D. D. 
Vt. John Wheeler, D. D. 
do. Benjamin Labaree, A. .M. 
do. Alden Partridge, A. M. 
Mass- Josiah Quincy, LL. D. 
do. Mark Hopkins, D. D. 
do. Heman Humphrey, D. D. 
R. I. Francis Way land, D. D. 
Con. Jeremiah Day, D. D. 
do. Silas Totten, D. D. 
do. Stephen Olin, D. D. 
N. Y. William A. Duer, LL. D. 
do. Elipbalet Nott, D. D. 
do. Simeon North, A. M. 
do. Nathaniel Kendrick.D. D. 
do. Benjamin Hale, D. D. 
do. Th. Frelinghuysen, LL. D. 
N. J. James Carnahan, D. D. 

Abra. A. Hasbrouck, LL.D. 

John Ludlow, D. D. 

John P. Durbin, D. D. 

Matthew Brown, D. O. 

David McConaughy, D. D. 

H. J. Clark, A. M. 

C. P. Krauth, D. D. 

George Junkin, D. D. 

E. W. Gilbert, D. D. 
Hector Humphreys, D. D. 
John J. Chanche, D. D. 
John McCaffrey, A. M. 
James Ryder, D. D. 
Stephen Chapin, D. D. 
Thomas R. Dow, A. M. 
William Maxwell, LL. D. 
Henry Ruffher, D. D. 
H. St. G. Tucker, Chairm. 
L. C. Garland, A. M. 
Charles Collins, A. M. 
Charles Wheeler, A. M. 
N. CI David L. Swain, A. M. 
Samuel Williamson, D. D. 
Samuel Wait, A.M. 
Win. T. Brantly, D. D. 
Robert W. Barnwell, A.M. 
Alonzo Church, D. D. 
J. Brackenridge, D. D. 
Aug. B, Longstreet, A. M. 



Washington, 

University of.Nashville, JNashviire, do. 

East Tennessee, Knoxville, do. 



I I I IWW^. 



HMWWW 



Basil Manly, D. D. 
Robert Paine, A. M. 
John fiazin, 

Jeremiah Chamberlain, D.D. 
Wm. B. Lacy, D. D. 
Alex. H. Everett, LL. D. 
Nicholas Point, 
R. H. Ranny, 
Othon Boadet, 
James McLiq, 

Philip Lindsley, D. D. 
Joseph Estab~ook, A. M. 



1794 

1820 

1770 

1791 

1800 

1834 

1638 

1793 

1881 

1764 

1700 

1884 

1831 

1754 

1795 

1813 

1819 

1883 

1831 

1746 

1770 

1755 

1783 

1803 

1806 

1815 

1833 

1833 

1836 

1833 

1784 

1799 

1830 

1789 

1831 

1693 

1783 

1813 

1819 

1833 

1839 

1839 

1789 

1838 

1838 

1795 

1804 

1785 

1836 

1837 

1888 
1831 
1830 
1803 
1831 
1635 
1831 

1838 
1839 
1794 
1794 
1806 
1867 



1842.] 

UNITED STATES. 





n*l- 


No. of 


No. of 
Hinit- 


I 


















67~ 




3 
5 


a 

7 


145 

'an 


30 
545 

945 




7 
8 


98 
B 


5,564 

gsa 


1,406 
331 
137 




in 




1,380 


474 








4,824 


1,997 




12 


9 


no 


49 

49 




14 




1,170 






15 




9,oafl 


303 




16 






69 




17 










18 


11 


43 


9 




19 




106 








13 


9,183 






91 


14 


900 


77 




93 


8 


650 


(40 
997 




35 


a 








06 




16 






97 










98 




IB 






39 










30 




4 


a 




Bl 





190 






39 


85 


187 






33 




41 






34 


17 


90 








10 


97 






36 


5 








37 










38 


■ 


196 






39 




900 






40 


6 








41 




















43 




674 


TO 








95 






45 














67 






47 


J 


433 






s 


6 


















51 














63 






S3 


6 


so 


9 




54 


15 


















56 


g 










9 








68 










59 


19 








60 


4 




9 




61 










69 










63 




no 






64 










65 5 


39 







130 



UNITED STATES. 



[1842. 



COLLEGES IN THE 



Num. 



66 Jackson, 

67 Transylvania. 
66 'St. Joseph's,$ 

69 Centre, 

70 Augusta,} 

71 Cumberland, 

72 Georgetown,* 

73 Bacon, 

74 St. Mary»s,$ 

75 University of Ohio, 

76 Miami University, 

77 Franklin, 

78 Western Reserve, 

79iKenyon,t 

80 Granville,* 

81 Marietta, 

82 Oberlin Institute, 

83 Cincinnati, 

84 Woodward, 

85 Indiana, 

86 South Hanover. 

87 Wabash, 

88 Tnd. Asbury University,} 

89 Illinois, 

90 Shurtleff,* 

91 McKendree4 
93 McDonough, 

93 University of St Louis,$ 

94 St. Mary's^ 

95 Marion, 

96 Missouri University, 

97 St. Charles^ 
96 Fayette, 

99 Michigan University, 

100 Marshall, 

101 St. Pbilip's,$ 



Place. 



Near Columbia. Ten. 

Lexington, Ken. 

Bardstown, do. 

Danville, do. 

Augusta, do. 

Priocetown, do. 

Georgetown, do. 

Harrodsburg, do. 

Marion Co. do. 

Athens, Ohio, 

Oxford, do. 

New Athens, do. 

Hudson, do. 

Gambier, do. 

Granville, do. 

Marietta, do. 

Oberlin, do. 

Cincinnati, do. 

Cincinnati, do. 

Bloomington, Ind. 
South Hanover, do. 
Crawfordsville, do. 

Jacksonville, 111. 

Upper Alton, do. 

Lebanon, do. 

Macomb, do. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Barrens, do. 

New Palmyra, do. 

Columbia, do. 

St. Charles, do. 

Fayette, do. 

Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Marshall, do. 

Near Detroit, do. 



Presidents. 



Robert Davidson, 
J. M. Lancaster, 
John C. Young, D. D. 
J. Tomlinson, I). D. 
P. R. CossiL D. D. 
Howard Maicom, A. M. 

B. S. Burnet. 
Peter Chazelle, 

Wm. H. McGuffy. LL. D. 
George Jenkins, D. D. 
William Burnett, 
George E. Pierce, D. D. 

C. P. Mcllvaine, D. D. 
Jonathan Going, D. D. 
Joel B. Linsley, D. D. 
Asa Mahan, A. M. 
Thomas J. Biggs, A. M. 
B. P. W. Aydolotte, D. D. 
Andrew Wylie, D. D. 
James Mc Masters, A. M. 
Elihu W. Baldwin, D. D. 
M. Simpson, A. M. 
Edward Beecher, A. M. 

John W. Merrill, A. M. 

Peter J. Verhaagen, 
John Timon, 
Hiram P. Goodrich. D. D. 
John H Lathrop, A M. 
W. Fielding, A. M. 
Archibald Patterson, 

John P. Cleaveland, A. M. 
Charles Baurens, 



Foun- 
ded. 



1830 
1798 
1819 
1893 
1895 
1895 
1899 
1836 
1837 
1831 
1809 
1835 
1896 
1836 
1839 
1839 
1834 
1819 

1897 
1899 
1833 
1839 
1899 
1835 
1834 
1837 
1899 
1830 
1831 
1840 
1839 

1837 

1839 



Remarks. 

The Colleges marked thus (*) are under the direction of the Baptists; thus (f) Epis- 
copalians ; thus (I) Methodists ; thus f$) Qathslics. 

With respect to the Colleges which are unmarked, the prevailing religious influence 
of those that are in the New England States, is Congregationalism ; of the most of 
the others, Presbfterianism, Norwich University, Vt., is an institution recently estab* 
Kshed by the UnwersaUsts. 

By students in the above table, with an exception of a few of the Colleges in the 
Southern and Western States, is meant undergraduates, or members of the four colle- 
giate classes ; not including such as are pursuing professional education, or such as are 
members of a preparatory department. 

The whole number of students on the Catalogue, including those of theology, low, 
and medicine, as well as undergraduates, in Harvard University, in 1840, was 448 \ 
in Yale College, 574. In the University of Pennsylvania, in 1841, in the Collegiate 
Department, 116, in the Academical Department, 316; in the Charity Schools (Eng- 
lish), 153 ; and in the Medical Department, 410 ; — total, 895. 

Some of the Colleges above enumerated, are not in full operation j and scarcely de- 
serve a place in the Table. Several other Colleges have been incorporated, which 
are not yet fully organized. 

The column of Libraries includes the number of volumes in the College Libraries 
and in the Students* Libraries. In some instances, the number of volumes in the ftu* 
dents' libraries exceeds that of the college library. 



1842.] 



COLLE0KS. 



131 



UNITED STATES. (Continued.) 





Inst- 




No. of 










ruct- 


No. of 


Minis. 


Stu- 


Volumes in 


CemuMneeuient* 


66 


ors. 
5 


Alumni. 


tera. 


dents. 


Libraries. 




3 




100 


1,250 




67 


15 


610 


50 


105 


19^49 


Second Thursday in September. 


68 


15 


150 


3 


69 


7,000 


1st August. 


69 


8 






66 


9,000 


Thursday after 3d Wednesday in Sept, 


70 


6 


60 




75 


9,500 


Thursday after 1st Wednesday in Aug. 


71 


4 


89 




49 


1,050 


First Wednesday in December. 


72 


4 


12 




108 


1,200 


Last Thursday in June. 


73 


8 






903 


1,200 


Last Friday in September. 


74 


7 


6 




40 


4,000 


Last week in July. 


75 


6 


145 


34 


165 


2,500 


First Wednesday in August. 


76 


6 


979 


80 


139 


4,359 


Second Thursday in August. 


77 


7 


84 


7 


51 


1,900 


Last Wednesday in September. 


78 


10 


51 


13 


63 


4,200 


Fourth Wednesday in August. 


79 


19 


61 


8 


55 


8,720 


First Wednesday in September. 
Second Wednesday in August. 


80 


5 






12 


3,000 


81 


8 


12 




50 


3,500 


Last Wednesday in July. 


82 


10 






70 






83 


8 






84 




Last Monday in June. 


84 


6 






20 


800 




85 

8G 


6 


59 


1 

4 


59 
120 
100 


1,765 


Last Wednesday in September. 


87 


5 


6 


2,000 


2d Wednesday in July. 


88 


3 






70 






89 


5 


7 




49 


9,000 


Third Wednesday in Septembor. 


90 


4 




4 


9(1 


1,000 


Fourth Thursday in July. 
Second Wednesday in October. 


91 
92 


4 




2 


47 




93 


15 


Id 




60 


7,900 


July 31st. 


94 


12 


8 




104 


6,400 


Near the last of September. 


95 


4 


3 




43 


9,300 


Last Thursday in September. 


96 
97 


J 






85 
75 




(Sot yet in operation.) 


V f 

96 










99 


1 




r 


(247 


in seven bra 


nehee.) 


100 


9 






62 


3,700 




101 


4 






30 


3,000 


First Monday in October. 



College Expenses. 
Annual Expenses at severed of the Colleges in the United States. 



Name 



Dartmouth, 

Univ. Vt. 

Middle bury, 

Harvard, 

Williams, 

Amherst, 

Brown, 

Yale, 

Washington, 

Wesleyan, 

Union, 

Hamilton, 

Hamilton Lit. 

Geneva, 

New Jersey, 

Rutgers, 

Dickinson, 

St. Mary's, Md. 

Univ. Virginia, 

William £ Mary, 

Washington, Va. 

N. Carolina Univ. 

Transylvania, 

Miami Univ. 

Western Reserve, 



Instruction. 



$27 00 
95*00 
9000 
7500 
3000 
3300 

3300 
33 00 
3600 

9600 

9000 
4000 
40 00 
9700 
6000 
7500 
70 00 
30.00 
5000 
40*00 
3000 
9000 



Room-rent 


Total 


and other 


College 


Col. Exp. 


Charges. 


$13-94 


40 24 


550 


30-50 


1500 


3500 


1800 


9300 


900 


3900 


1500 


4800 




6300 


9100 


5400 


1050 


59-50 


1125 


47-95 




5300 


15-50 


41-50 




34 00 


25 00 


45 00 


90 00 


6000 


1000 


3700 


93 00 


98 00 




75 00 


1000 


40 00 


1100 


6100 


19-00 


59-00 


500 


35-00 


7-50 


97-50 




38 weeks, $57*00 



40 
43 
40 
39 
40 
39 
40 
39 
40 
38 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



38 or 39 do. 



40 
40 
41 
36 
43 
46 
44 
36 
43 
40 
40 
39 
49 



do. 
do. 
do* 
do. 
do. 



6500 
65 00 
90-00 
6500 
65-00 
6300 
85-00 
8000 
7000 
55-00 
63-00 
50-00 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



89-00 
80-00 
75-00 

14000 
*195-00 

110-00 
80-00 
90 00 

100-00 
70-00 
59-50 



.i-a-a _;•*. IwmmI 



133 UNITED STATES. [1842. 

The information exhibited in the preceding table hai been derived 
from the official statements contained in the Annual Catalogues of the 
several Colleges, mostly for the College years of 1838- 9, and 1839-40. 
The sums are to be regarded as the average necessary expenses for the 
several objects. The college charges, included in the first three col- 
umns, are subject to comparatively little variation ; but the other ex- 
penses are much more liable to change. With respect to several of the 
colleges, the expenses for washing, wood, and lights, are not mentioned. 
Other necessary expenses, not specified in the table, are such as relate 
to text-books, furniture of rooms, clothing, journeying, and pocket- 
money, all which vary according to circumstances, and the habits of 
individuals. 

Vacations in Colleges. 

Bowdoia. 1. Com., 3 weeks; — 2. Friday after 3d Wed. Dee. 8 wo«k*;— 3. 

Friday after 3d Wed. May, 3 weeks. 
Waterville. 1. Com., 5 weeks ; — 2. 2d Wed. Dec. 8 weeks. 

Dartmouth. 1. Com., 4 weeks; — 9. last Mon. Dec. 6} weeks; — 3. Thursday 

preceding the last Wed. May, 2A weeks. 
Vermont Univ. 1. Com., 4 weeks j — 9. 1st Wed. Jan. 8 weeks. 
Middlebury. 1. Com., 4 weeks ; — 2. last Wed. Nov. 1 week ; 3. 2d Wed. Feb. 

S weeks j — 4. 3d Wed. May, 2 weeks. 
Harvard. 1. ( Two terms of 20 weeks each) from tho end of the first term, 

weeks ; — 2. from the end of the 2d term to Friday after Com- 
mencement (4th Wed. Aug.), 6 weeks. 
Williams. 1. Com., 4 weeks ;— 9. 3d Wed. Dec. 6 weeks ;— 3. 1st Wed. May, 

3 weeks. 
Amherst. 1. Com., 4 weeks ; — 2. from the Wednesday preceding the annual 

State Thanksgiving, 6 weeks; — 3. 3d Wednesday in April, 2 

weeks. 
Brown. 1. Dec. 10, 3 weeks; — 2. April 1, 3 weeks; — 3. July 22, till 

Commencement. 
Yale. 1. Com., 6 weeks;— 9. 1st Wed. Jan. 9 weeks; — 3. last Wed. 

April, 4 weeks. 
Washington. 1. Com., 7 weeks; — 2. Thursday before Christmas, 2 weeks ; — 

3. Thursday before 12th April, 4 weeks. 
Wesley an Univ. 1. Wed. before Christmas, 8 weeks ; — 2. preceding Com., 4 weeks. 
Columbia. 1. From August 1 to the 1st Monday in October. 

Union. 1. Com., 6 weeks ; — 2. in Dec. 4 weeks ; — 3. in April, 4 weeks. 

Hamilton. 1. Com., 7 weeks ; — 2. Dec. 4 weeks from Wed. before Christmas ; 

— a 3d Wed. April, 4 weeks. 
Geneva, 1. Com., 6 weeks ; — 2. from the Wednesday preceding Christmas, 

3 weeks ; — 3. from the next Wed. to the middle of April, 3 

weeks. 
College of N. J. 1. Com., 6 weeks ; — 2. 1st Thurs. after 2d Tues. April, 5 weeks. 
Rutgers. 1. Com. to Sept. 15 ;— 2. Dec. 21 to Jan. 7 ;— 3. April 7 to May 1. 

Penn. University. 1. Com., 6 weeks ; — 2. Dec. 2 weeks ; — 3. April, 2 weeks. 
Dickinson. 1. Com. to the 15th of Sept. — A few days at Christmas, and near 

the 1st of April. 
Jefferson. 1. Month of October ; — 9. Month of April. 

Washington. 1. Month of October ; — 9. Month of May. 

St. John's. 1. Good Friday, 10 days ; — 2. last Wed. in July to the 1st Monday 

in Sept. : — 3. Dec. 23d to 1st Monday in Jan. 
St. Mary's. 1. Com. to the 1st Monday in Sept. 

Mt. St. Mary's. 1. July 1 to August 16. 

Columbian. 1. Com. to 1st Wed. Nov. ; — 2. 1st Wed. May to 1st Wed. July. 

William and Mary. 1. Com. (July 4) to 2d Monday in October. 
Hamp. Sidney. 1. From 4th Wed. Sept. to 1st Nov. j — 2. 4th Thurs. April to 

1st June. 
Washington. 1. Last Thurs. in June to 1st Sept. — A recess of 9 days at Christmas. 

Univ. Virginia. 1. July 4 to September 1st. 

Univ. N. Carolina. 1. Com., 6 weeks ; — 2. 4th Friday in Nov. 6 weeks. 
Coll. S. Carolina. 1. July 1 to the 1st Monday in October. 
Univ. of Georgia. 1. Com., 1 week ; — 2. 1st Nov. to 15th Jan. j — 3. April 1st to 

April 15th. 



1842.] 



COLLEGES. 



133 



Mississippi. 


1. 


Louisiana. 


1. 


Greenevrlle. 


1. 


Nashvjlle. 


1. 


B. Tennessee. 


1. 


Transylvania. 


1. 


Centre. 


1. 



(fair, of Alabama. 1. Jury 15 to Sept. 15. — Recess not exceeding a fortnight about 

Christmas. 
Com., 3 months, vix. July, August, and September. 
Com., 4 weeks j — 2. Dec. 30 to Jan. 10. 
Com., 5 weeks ; — 2. 3d Wed. in March, 5 weeks. 
Com., 5} weeks ; — 9. 1st Wed. April, 5} weeks. 
Com., to 22d October, 12 weeks. 

Months of October and April ; — 2; from Christmas to Jan. 1. 
Com., to Thursday after 3d Wed. Oct. — 2.. after a aession of 

21 weeks, 4 weeks. 
Com., 6 weeks ; — 2. in Feb. 21 weeks from 1st vacation, 4 weeks. 
Com. to the 1st of February. 
The month of August. 

Com. to 3d Monday Oct. ; — 2. 1st Monday March, 6 weeks. 
Com., 6 weeks ; — 2. 21st Dec 2 weeka ; — 3. 1st Wed. AprH, 

4 weeks. 
Com. to 1st Mond. Oct. ; — 2. 10 or 12 days at Christmas ; — 

3. 2d Thurs. March, 3 weeks. 
Com., 5 weeks ; — 2. 2d Wed. Jan., 5 weeks ; — 3. 1st Wed. 

May, 2 weeks. 
Com., 8 weeks"; — 2. after a term of 20 weeks, 4 weeks. 
Com. to 1st Monday in Sept. — Only one vacation. 
Com., 10 weeks ; — 2. ending 2d Wed. March, 2 weeks. 
Month of May ; — 2. Month of October. 
Com., 8 weeks ; — 2. Wed. before 5th April, 6 weeks. 
Com., 6 weeks ; — 2. last Thursday in March, 5 weeks. 

Eiplaw atiow. Vacations of Bowdoin College ; 1st, from Commencement, 3 weeks; — 
2d, from the Friday after the 3d Wednesday in December, 8 toeiks; — 3d, from the Friday, 
efier the 3d Wednesday in May, 2 week*. 



Augusta. 1. 

Cumberland. 1. 

St. Joseph's. 1. 

Georgetown. 1. 

University of Ohio'. 1. 



ni. 1* 

Western Reserve. 1. 



Kenyon.- 


1. 


Ciocionati. 


1. 


Marietta. 


1. 


Indiana. 


1. 


Illinois 


1. 


Marion. 


1. 



XXVI. MEDICAL SCHOOLS. 



Name. 



Maine Medical School, 
N. H. Medical School, 
Vt. Acad, of Medicine, 
Vt. Medical School, 
Med. School Harv. Univ. 
Berkshiro Med. School. 
Med. School Brown Univ. 
Med. Insthut. Yale Coll. 
Coll. Phys. & Surg. N. Y. 
Coll. Physicians & Surg. 
Med. Instil. Geneva Coll. 
Med. Faculty Univ. N.Y. 
Albany Medical College, 
Med. Fac. Columbia Colt. 
Med. Dep. Univ. Penn. 
Jeffetson Med. College, 
Med. Dep. Penn. Coll. 
Med. School Univ. Md. 
Washington Med. Coll. 
Med. School Colum. Coll. 
Med. School Univ. Va. 
Med. Dep. Ham. Sid. Col. 
Med. College of 8. C. 
Med, Coll. State of S.C. 
Med. College of Georgia, 
Med. Coll. of Louisiana, 
Med. Dep. Transyl. Univ. 
uraisvillo Med. Institute, 
Medical College of Ohio, 
^tncinnati Med. Coll. 
WiUoughby Med. Coll. 



Place. 


Foun- 


Prof. 


Stu. 


Grad- 




ded. 




70 


uates. 


Brunswick, 


1820 


4 


464 


Hanover, 


1797 


6 


72 


577 


Castleton, 


1818 


5 


57 


514 


Woodstock, 


1835 


5 


80 


166 


Cambridge, 


1782 


6 


88 


547 


Pittsfield, 


1823 


5 


74 


473 


Providence, 


1821 








Hew Haven, 


1810 


6 


52 


440 


New York, 


1807 


7 


108 


799 


Fairfield, 


1812 






554 


Geneva, 


1835 


6 


81 


53 


New York, 


1837 








Albany, 
New York, 


1839 


8 


68 


13 


1767 








Philadelphia, 


1765 


7 


410 


3,320* 


Do. 


1824 


7 


145 


764 


Do. 


1839 


6 


60 




Baltimore, 


1807 


6 


65 


909 


Do. 


1827 


6 


60 




Washington, 
Charlottesville, 


1825 


6 


40 


81 


1825 


6 


45 




Richmond, 


1838 


6 


50 


14 


Charleston, 


1824 








Do. 


1833 


8 


151 




Augusta, 


1830 


7 


55 


82 


New Orleans, 


1835 


6 


30 




Lexington, 


1818 


7 


254 


1,112 


Louisville, 


1837 


6 


204 


53 


Cincinnati, 


1819 


8 


130 


331 


Do. 


1835' 






95 


Willoughby, 


1834 


5 




1 27 



Lectures 
Commeuce. 



Feb. 10 to 18. 
1st or 2d Thurs. Aug. 
2d Thurs. in March. 
2d Thurs. in March.* 
1st Wed. in Nov. 
1st Thurs. in Sept. 

Discontinued. 
6w'ka3dWed.Aug. 
1st Monday in Nov. 

Discontinued. 
1st Wed. in Oct. 

1st Tuesday in Oct. 

Discontinued, 
1st Monday in Nov. 
1st Monday in Nov. 
1st Monday in Nov. 
1st Monday in Nov. 
1st Monday in Nov. 
1st Monday in Nov. 
1st Monday in Sept. 
1st Monday in Nov; 

Discontinued. 
2d Monday in Nov. 
2d Monday in Nov. 
3d Monday in Nov. 
1st Monday in Nov. 
1st Monday in Nov. 
1st Monday in Nov. 

Discontinued. 
Last Monday in Oct. 



• From 1791 to 1838, inclusive. 
12 



184 



UNITED STATES. 



[1842. 



XXVII. RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS. 
1. Protestant Episcopal Church. 



Dioceses. 



Bishops. 



get Maine, 
o * l N. Hamp. 

35 f R, Island, 
Vermont, 
Connecticut, 
New York. 
Western N. York, 
New Jersey. 
Pennsylvania, 
Delaware, 
Maryland, 

Virginia, 

North Carolina, 

South Carolina, 

Georgia, 

Alabama, 

Mississippi, 

Louisiana, 

Arkansas, 

Tennessee, 

Kentucky, 

Ohio, 

Michigan, 

Illinois, 

Indiana, 

Missouri, 

Florida, 

Wisconsin, 

Iowa, 



Alex. V. Griswold, D. D. 

ohn H. Hopkins, 0. D. 
iTu. C. Browne 1 1, D. D. 
Benj. F. Onderdonk, D. D. 
W. H. De Lancey, D. D. 
George W. Doane, D. D. 
Henry TJ. Onderdonk, D. D. 
Alfred Lee, A, M. 
W. B. Wbittingham, D. D. 

( Richard C. Moore, D. D. 

f W. Meade, D. D., JUtUt. 
Levi S. Ives, D. D. 
Christ. E. Gadsden, D. D. 
Stephen Elliott, D. D. 



Leonidas Polk, D. D. 
James H. Otey, D* D. 
Benj. B. Smith, D. D. 
Cnas. P. Mcltvaine, D. D. 
Samuel A. McCoskry, D. D, 
♦Philander Chase, D. D. 

Jackson Kemper, D. D. 



Cons. 



1811 

1832 A 

1819 3 

1830 

2839 

1833 

1837 

1841 

1840 

1814 i 

1839) 

1881 

1840 

1840 



1838 
1834 
1833 
1833 
1836 
1819 

1835 



Min. 



6 
7 

48 
14 
84 
83 
181 
87 
40 
99 
10 
77 

84 

33 

46 

8 

13 

7 

4 

15 

19 

54 

30 

13 

10 

10 

5 

4 

3 



Meeting of Conventions. 



1st Wednesday in Jane. 
4th Wednesday in June. 
3d Wednesday in June. 
3d Tuesday in June. 
3d Wednesday in Sept. 
3d Tuesday in June. 
1st Thursday in Oct. 
Thurs. aft. 1st Wed. Aug. 
Last Wednesday in May. 
3d Tuesday in May. 
Last Wednesday in May. 
Last Wednesday in May. 

3d Wednesday in May. 

3d Thursday in May. 
1st Wednesday in Feb. 
2d Mon. after Easter Mod. 
1st Friday in May. 
1st Wednesday in May. 
3d Wednesday in Jan. 

3d Wednesday in April. 
2d Thursday in May. 
3d Thursday in Sept. 
1st Thursday in June. 
1st Monday in June. 
Frid. after 4th Mon. May. 

3d Wednesday in Jan. 



* Bishop Chaw was consecrated Bishop of Ohio in 1819; but resigned in 
and, in 1835, he waa chosen Bishop of Illinois. 

2. Roman Catholic Church. 



1831; 



Dioceses. 



Boston, 
New York, 

Philadelphia, 

Baltimore, 

Richmond, 

Charleston, 

Mobile, 

Now Orleans, 

Natchez, 

Bards town, 

Nashville, 

Cincinnati, 

Vincennee, 

St. Louis, 

Detroit, 

Dubuque, 



Comprising 



New England, 

New York and part of New 

Jersey, 
Penn. and part of New Jersey 

and Delaware, 
Maryland and Dist. Columbia, 
Virginia, 

N. C., S. C, and Georgia, 
Alabama and Florida, 
Louisiana, 
Mississippi, 

Kentucky, 

Tennessee. 

Ohio, 

Indiana and part of Illinois, 

Missouri, Arkansas, Sue. 

Michigan and Wisconsin Ter. 

Iowa Territory, 



Bishops. 



Benedict J. Fenwick, D. D. 
{ John Dubois, D. D. 
| John Hughes, D. D.,Coadj. 
j Henry Conwell, D. D. 
j F. P. Kenrick, D. D., Coadj. 

Samuel Eccleston, D. D., Mp 

John England, D. D. 
Michael rortier, D. D. 
Anthony Blanc, D. D. 

j Benedict J. Flaget, D. D. 
| G. J. Cbabrat, 0. D., Coadj. 

Richard P. Miles, D. D 

John B. Purcell. D. D. 

C. de la Hailandiere, D. D. 

Joseph Rosati, D. D. 

Frederick Reze, D. D. 

Matthias Loras, D. D. 



Min. 



31 
66 

59 

69 

7 
30 
19 
50 

8 

51 

6 

36 
30 
73 
18 
8 

545" 



1842.] RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS. 19$ 

Catholics. — The first Catholic Bishop in the United State* (John' 
Carroll, D. D., of Baltimore) was consecrated in 1790. The Catholics 
increase rapidly, almost exclusively by emigration frorfl Europe. They 
have now 16 dioceses, 1 archbishop, 13 bishops, 3 coadjutors: and, 
according to the " Catholic Almanac," for 1841, 512 churches and 
chapels, 394 stations, 545 clergymen, 17 ecclesiastical seminaries, 18 
colleges, 31 female religious institutions, 49 female academies, 72 char* 
itaMe institutions, and 8 periodical publications " devoted to the cause 
of Catholicity." 

Catholic Ecclesiastical Seminaries with the number of students, as 
stated in the " Catholic Almanac " ; — Philadelphia (22) ; Baltimore 
(16) ; Emmitsburg (20) ; Frederick (20) ; Charleston (6) ; Parish of 
Assumption, La. (9); near Bards town, and at St. Rose, in Washington 
County, Ky. ; Cincinnati ; Vincennes (9) ; the Barrens (12,) Mis- 
souri. 

In the Table of Colleges, on pages 128- 131, 10 Catholic Colleges 
are enumerated. In addition to these, 6 or 7 others are enumerated in 
the " Catholic Almanac " ; but they do not appear to be yet properly 
organised as colleges. 

3. Bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Elected. 

Robert R. Roberts, D. D. Bono, Indiana, . • 1816 

Joshua Soule, D. D. Lebanon, Ohio, . • ' 1824 

Elijah Hedding, D. D. Lansingburgh, N. Y. . 1824 

James O. Andrew, D. D. Covington, Geo. . . . 1832 

Beverly Waugh, D. D. Baltimore, Md. . . . 1836 

Thomas A. Morris, D. D. Cincinnati, Ohio, . . . 1836 

The Bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church have no particular 
provinces or districts; but each one is Bishop of the church throughout 
the whole of the United States ; and they spend most of their time in 
visiting the different parts of the country. 



196 



UNITED STATES. 



[1842. 



4. Summary of the Principal Religious Denominations. 



• 


Churches, 


1 


Mombers, 




Denominations. 


or Congre- 


Ministers. 


or Cornmu. 


Population. 




gations. 


4,239 


nicants. 




Baptists, ... 


6,319 


452,000 } 




«« Freewill, 
" Seventh Day, 


753 
49 


612 
46 


33,876! 
4,508 f 


4,300,000 


" Six-Principle, 


16 


10 


2,117J 




Catholics, ... 


512 


545 




800,000 


Christians^ .... 


1,000 


800 


150,000 


300,000 


Congregationalists, 


1,300 


1,150 


160,000 


1,400,000 


Disciples of Christ, (Campbellites,) 










Dutch Reformed, 


197 


192 


22,515 


450,000 


Episcopalians, ... 


950 


849 




600,000 


Friends, .... 


500 






100,000 


German Reformed, 


600 


180 


30,000 




Jews, - . - . 








15,000 


Lutherans, - - - 


750 


267 


62,266 


540,000 


Menonites, 


300 




30,000 




Methodists, ... 
" Protestant, 




3,106 
400 


686,549 ) 
50,000) 


3,000,000 


Moravians or United Brethren, 


34 


33 


5,745 


12,000 


Mormonites, ... 






12,000 


12,000 


New Jerusalem Church, - 


27 


33 




5,000 


Presbyterians, ... 


2,807 


2,225 


274,0841 




" Cumberland, - 


500 


450 


50,000 




" Associate, 


183 


87 


16,000 y 


2,175,000 


" Reformed, 


40 


20 


3,000 




" Associate Reformed, 


214 


116 


12,000 J 




Shakers, - 


15 


45 


6,000 


6,000 


Tunkers, ... 


40 


40 


3,000 


30,000 


Unitarians, ... 


300 


174 




180,000 


Universalists, ... 


653 


317 | 




600,000 



The above statements of the number of churches, ministers, and 
members of the several denominations, have been derived chiefly from 
recent official documents published by the different denominations ; but 
the last column contains rather a vague estimate which was made a few 
years since, and has appeared in various publications, of the total num- 
ber of people who are attached to or show a preference for the several 
different religious persuasions. 



XXVIII. POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES, 

g to the Six Enumerations ; from the Official Revision. 



Sum. 


1790. 


1800. 


1WI0 


1620. 


1830. 


1040. 


Maioa, 


96,540 


151,719 


228,705 


298,335 


399,955 


501,793 


N. Ham p. 


141,899 


183,762 


214,360 


244.1C1 


269,328 


284,574 




85,416 


154,465 


217,713 


235,764 


280,652 


29 1 ,948 


Mua. 


378,717 


423,245 


472,040 


523,287 


610,408 


737,699 


R. Island, 


69,110 


69,122 


77,03 1 


88,069 


97,199 


108,830 




238,141 


251,002 


262,042 


275,202 


297,665 


309,978 


N. York, 


340,130 


586,756 


959,949 


],37M,e?12 


1,918,608 


2,428 921 


N. Jersey, 


184,130 


211,949 


249.55T 


377.575 


320,823 


373,306 


Pi. 


434,373 


602,365 


810,001 


1,049,458 


1,348,233 


] ,724,033 


Delaware, 


59,098 


64,273 


72,674 


72,749 


76,748 


78,086 


Md. 


319,728 


341,548 


380,54b 


407,350 


447,040 


469,232 


Virginia, 
H.C. 


748,308 


880,200 


974,622 


1,065,379 


1,211,405 


i.'.?.'.:t,7in 


393,751 


478,103 


555,50( 


638,829 


737,987 


753,419 


8. C. 


249,073 


345,591 


415,115 


502,74 1 


581,185 


594,39c 




62,548 


163,101 




340.987 


516,823 


691,393 


Alabama, 






20,845 


127,901 


309,527 


590,756 


Mp 




8,850 


40,352 


76,448 


136,621 


" 375,651 


La. 






76,556 


153.407 




352,411 


Arkansas, 








14,273 


30,388 


97,574 


Tenn. 


35,791 


105,602 


261,727 


422,813 


681,904 


829,210 


Ken. 


73,077 


220,955 


406,511 


564,317 


687,917 


779.828 


Ohio, 




45,365 


230,76( 


68 1,434 


937,903 


1,519,467 








4,762 


8,89b 




212,267 






4,875 


24,521 


147,178 


343,031 


685,866 










55,211 


157,455 


476,183 


Muiouri, 






20,845 


66,586 


140,445 


383.7H2 


D.Colura. 




' 14,093 


24,023 


33,039 


39.834 


43,712 


Florida, 










34,730 


54,477 














30,945 


Thiol, 












43,112 


3,929,827 


5,305,925 


7,239,814 


9,638,13 


12,866,93 


17,062,566 



a 



METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION. 



I. METEOROLOGICAL TABLES FOR MONTREAL, 

In Canada, Lot. 45° 30' JV. Long. 73° 22' W.; abstracted from Registers 
kept by J. S. McCord,for Five Years from 1836 to 1840, inclusive. 

1. Mean Monthly Temperature. 



Years. 


Jan. 


Feb. 

11.32 
15.78 
9.00 
20.80 
23.50 

16.08 


March. 


April. 


May. 

53.32 
52.15 
52.80 
52.90 
55.73 

53.38 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 

63.05 
65.15 
65.50 
66.50 
70 87 

66.21 


Sept 

57.46 
58.30 
57.90 
59.60 
59.26 


Oct. 

39-37 
43 20 
46.60 
50.00 
46.35 


Nov. 

32.24 

33.70 
28.80 
34.40 
34.36 


Dec. 

18.09 
20.95 
12.40 
25 00 
17.02 

18.69 




1836* 

1837: 

1838 

1839 

1840 


17.05 

8.70 
21.00 
I2.7U 
10.45 

13.98 


20.90 
25.15 
31.60 
29.30 
30.55 


35.24 
40.40 
34.50 

45.50 
44.46 


65.25 
65.55 
69 90 
62.20 
66.99 


71.90 
65.60 
68.90 
70.00 
71.96 

69.67 




Mean, 


27.50 


40.02 


65.97 


58.50 


45.10 


32.70 


42.316 



Yean. 


S. Awwual Temperature. 


3. Rim. 


4. Weather. 


Metfa 
Temp. 


Max. 
Temp. 


Min. 
Temp. 


Range. 


Inches. 

19.20 
16.90 
18.60 
15.90 
27.55 


Averaging 
per cent. 
Clear days about 44 
Cloudy, 35 
Rain, 11 
Snow, 5 
Showery, 3 
Fog, Hail, &c. 2 


1836 
1837 
1838 
1839 
1840 


40.43 
41.22 

41.68 
44.07 
44.29 


90.00 
90.00 
90.00 
89.00 
91.00 


-19.00 
-18.00 
-13.00 
-18.00 
-14 50 


109.00 
108.00 
103.00 
109.00 
105.50 


Mean, 


42.31 


90.00 


-16.50 


106.90 


19.63 



5. Quantity or Snow. 





Inches. 






Inches. 


Winter of 1830-31 


73.90 


Winter of 1836-37 


65.50 


" 1831-32 


107.60 


« 


1837-38 


49-85 


■• 1832-33 


60.60 


•« 


1838-39 


47.70 


" 1833-34 


51.00 


« 


1839-40 


49.40 


1834-35 


84.95 






■MHMI^* 


" 1835-36 


86.45 


Mean, 




67.695 



1842.] MtTtOROLOeiCAL inPOKHATIOV. 

II. METEOROLOGICAL TABLES FOR BATH, Ha., 



2. Mian Tufehatdhi 



I 


i 


i 


z 


I 


£ 


| 


£ 


1 


J 
B 

1 


j 


1 
g 


S 

J 


|j 


1 = 
J,3 


163-J 


25 1 -23.3 


S3 1 


Is.s 


30.3 


S8-1 


63 666.2 58.7 


50.1 


l','.l. 


24.1 


44 1 


4!UM 


m. : 


24 6 19 


27.9 


43.5 


s<> 


37.13 


(58.8 63.7 57.4 


17.-2 


!5 5 


Iff & 


14 


4 1 .53 


1834 


18428.9 


SSI 


12.4 


-ii.i; 


il.O 


70 5 65.6 62 


!!>' 


Hi -1 


Hi 


44 7 


11. !K) 


J 83:. 


2i.:!20.: 


27 .2 




5-2 S 


il.l 


69.1 64.1 E6.I 


508 


S7 9 


1 b.V 


43 5 


!0.! 16 


183* 


23 i(>.7 


28.4 


{<!.(■ 


51.3 


as 


r>7 862.7 50.8 


43.3 35.3 


US 3 


l-'.-l 


17.55 


1837 


17.3 21.1 


w.r 


41.0 


M.ti 


-,<> - 


665 


id so7.:! 


46.1 


15 3 


25.4 


4'2T 


.13.. 10 


183- 


■>8.7 16.8 


344 


«.',! 


50.1 


65.1 


70.3 


68.0 5y.i 


46.1 


io.e 


80.! 


44 1 


3i jg 


183: 


ttBisa 


32.5 


11 1 


53.1 


iOt 


BS.f 


67.7 61 .5 


5uS 


35 1 


Ai.l) 


40.1 




1841) 


17.0.305 




46 9 


58.4 


.4! 


70.5 


70.8 60.0 


50.1 


37.3 


fcLS 


47.3 




1841 


At.iiaa.usa J 


-10.4 


32.4)55.6 




1 











The amount of Rain for 1838 is for 11 months, December being 
omitted. The Mercury bag continued below Zero through the day 
three times in 10 years, viz. 

Dec. 23d, 1831, temp, at sunrise— 10°, at 2 P. M. — B°, at sunset — 4° 
Jan ,19th, 1833, '■ " —17° " —5° " — 10° 

Dec. 16lh, 1835, •• — 8° " -6" " —10° 

The greatest change of temperature occurring in 24 hours for 10 
Tens, ia 48° from sunrise January 21st to sunrise January 22d, 1836. 



mwteoroj.ooicai. INFORMATION. [1842, 

3. Atehioi Mortice, r Temperatpre, &c. for 9 Yeikb. 





Thenvomsur. 


W«U»r. 


Vtah 


















■Sri 


?~ 
















1 
1 




• 




*s 


*s 


ft 


£■ 




d 






a 


1 
< 


I 


| 

J 


1 


i* 


fl 


1 


1 


s 

a 


■8 
1 

1 


Jan. 


Illn 


IS 


9-7H 


M '. 


IS3 


f, 1 


fifi 


]•)<> 


4(1 


5.9,' 1.4 


fifl 


4.31 




14' 


„,. 




iu: 


IH. 


4> 


h< 


!•':- 


Mi 


5.4 2.1 




3.37 


March, 


?•>'- 


«v 


'HI' 


-in 1 


ai.v 




;>< 


Mil 


Ml 


45 


Kll 


O 


2.88 


April, 


Ml 


m 1 


411 > 


41* 


lit: 


4 1 


H,i 


rlr 


Ml 


44 


« 1 


IX 


2.89 




44; 


11 4 


ll 1 


-->■• :■ 


ui: 


4r 


HI 


tih 


12 1 


M 


71! 


H 


3.59 




>s± 


71 ;■ 


or, 


i>ii< 


vi.< 


4.1 


44 


h7 


I" 1 


4 V 


HI- 


4 


2.55 






7't:- 


;i;i 


RHI 


ItR.l 


It 


3! 


*>(■ 


Uil 


lt.S| 


4 6 


1 V 


2.31 




■ ; ■> 


7HI 


;:c 




h>.i 


i ; 


Hi 


■Sf 


17' 


8.t 


Hr 


H 


307 




• \ I 


[71 


*?■< 


lirlt 


v:t- 


81 


:ih 


KU 


IM 


2.8 4.C 


1 :< 


1.77 




11 J 


>4( 


47; 


17 7 


SI 1 


4h 


i. : 


Hh 


II 1 


4.7' 4.1] 


VII 


335 




■■in i 


41 4 


i->i 


km 


IHJ 


4' 


n.b 


Hf 


»4 


6.(1 3.1 


17 


3.27 


Dec. 


\ti.H 


-W.7 


U4JI 


«4.a 


19.1 


ti.a 


b.7 


13.8 


5JI 


6.3 a.i 


3.0 


3.72 


Menu, 


37. LI 


52.3 


43.5 


-14.3 


J5J.4 


5t).b 


lil .3 


103.1 


id6f 


55.4 61.0 


^4.(1 


37.08 



4 Meteorolog 



1 

I 
s 

Jib. 
Feb. 

£■ 

June, 
Oct." 


| 
9-J 


s 


I! 
IS 


1 
1 




• 


2- 
J 

JO 

42 


31k 


>:i mi 
;~ ■>■ 

U.S. 


i 

Wi 

a 
11 

41 


113 
JS.-1 

a 11 

19.1) 

55.3 

■.:!.!! 

AT 

«3 

15.(1 

«;> 


a 
«i!i 

6:\3 

74.S 

79.1) 
(1 (1 
68.11 

„■; .1 
•;i.a 

31.1 


10.3 

It. 5 
Sl.fi 

H3.fi 

*,(J.7 
49.0 

Ti.l) 


a 


S 

1 

1; 
is 


« 


i 

i 


' 


s 

'. 
1 

i 


1 


1 

11 
1; 

i 


St 

s 


6 

3 


Your, 






33S 


;■ 


4! 


17 


-2( 




n 


114 




54) 


17.2 47.:H 


1 no 


H 


53 


S 


44 


11 


lljfilS 





KKTKOHOLOeiCAL INrOSKA-noiT. 



III. METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOR WORCESTER, Mais. 

Lot. 42° 15* 49* Jf. ; elevation 483 feel ; being an Abstract of the Register 

of &t Wtathtr, kept at the Lunatic Hospital, for ike Year 1840. 





i 

a 


| 


1 


I 


5 


i 




| 

JM.45 
39.4fc 
39.44 

63. MJ 
39 

5 

6 
10 


| 

l 

39.66 
JH.4.1 
39.45 

59. (ii 
i,'. 9; 



13 

1 


i 
| 

B.4I 
99.46 

44.67 

18 


1 

10 

3 
3 


1 

99. X 
34.31 
39 


J 

1 
a 


£ 


Men Sunrise 
Do. 3 P. M 
Do. BuniM 

TkenxaxuUr. 

Do. 2 P. H 

Do. Sun sot 

Cloud* Otewt, 

Rain fell, 
Buow fell, 
Ba lot ol Moon 

Di." "■ 
N. wind, 
N. W. ■■ 
W. « 

a. w. « 

B. » 

a. e. 

E. •' 

N. E. " 


inch 

59.37 

?.9.37 

13.03 
Stilt 

a 

a 

18 

a 
i 




Mil 

39.5L 
29.52 
29.53 

27 .SB 
3D 

3 
13 


10 
1 

1 

9 


59 a 

911.39 

K9.3: 

30.03 
41.11 

9 
11 

s 

3 
5 


J!l ■!) 
7VA' 
J9.« 

41 

-Ml, (II 



9 

5 



39.35 
»3T 
■29.35 

47.87 

93 
8 

9 


!',< 37 
9.39 
39.39 

57.70 
72.??; 

11 

1 


1941 

63.33 

79.fi] 



5 
9 




J9.:i9 
29.39 

'" 

- ■. 

12 

3 
3 


93 

3S 

31 

90 
130 
90 

96 
38 



METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOR TREHTON, N. J., 
For Ott Year 1840; by Dr. F. A. Eieing. 
Observation* at Sunrise, 2 P. M ., sad 10 P. M. 



Mootoi 


Thermometer. 




1 


^ 






i 


1 


1 


1: " _-^P^ 






& 




* s 




"S 




LjkaVfP 




s 


a 


5 £ 




« 


s ^aw-~* J 




Jan. 


44 


-13 


87 90.76 


w 


4 


R ItssT^^ 




Feb. 


■a- 


- ; 


7536.51 




r 






March 


7'' 


tfil 


5035.5* 




1 


4 !■ 




Way,' 


-' 


;*i 


5253.36 




-. 






■ft 


:ih 


445B.3C 




\ 








-ii 


4ii 






* 








July, 


'11 


Hi 


35:68.4i 




t 




T Q§^_!\ 




Aug. H; 


55 


3270.74 












Sept. 


7< 


4(1 


3058.7C 












Oct. 


7< 


UN 


4f 


WH 




i: 




'■5 ^i 




Not. 


ill 


W 


35 


MM 




h 


1 






Deo. 


bl 


14 


37 


atu* 


w. 


01 


7 


Delaware cloae 


,7th. 


Tear, 


90 


-13 


103 


4o.ai 


I., f. w. and ir. w 


19 


Total depth 51 


„che B .| 



Remarks — The coldest day in the year was January 17th ; the mean 
of that day being 1.66°. There were 5 days, the mean temperature of 
which was below 10°. The warmest day in the year was July 16th; 
the mean of that day being 80". There were 47 days, the mean tem- 
perature of which wai 70° or above. 



142 HXTEOOOLOWCAL IKTOUUTIOIT. [1842. 

V. METEOROLOGICAL TABLES FOR NEWTOWN, 

Btrcss Co., Pi.; 

laL 40° 14' 3D". Long. 74° K6' 47" ; being m Mitratt from the Obstr- 



folium of Mr. L. H. Part, 

thi Tear 1840. 



4 WlATBM FK 


M Jiscmr 


1, 


1840, TO Jclt 31 


I 


B4 


I. 




Moulin. 

Awn,' 
A*' 


i 




Mom hi. 




£ 


ll 


£ S Monthi. 

g J 1 1841. 


i 




il 


li 


4 11 3.061 


September, 
NoMiaber, 




7 


44!dOi July,' 


1 

1 


1 

* 


13 
4 

19 
13 

9 

88 


s 



Rtwmrka. — The figure! in Uju no. 
that wtrfl parftcdf dor or entirely c/< 
Tin ml 7 o'clock A.M., 3 i.d 9 P. \ 

Than litre t»er 



The thermometer o\llh5 dl.lell [Jul 4)'beio| 11 0-TS' j KMl°lhZ°i«T™il(Jln.6)tt 
B? ('. On Ihc BSth of March, 1841, lha Ihormomaler wu it 30°, an the SBlh, ll H", 



1842.] MKTeOROLOalCiL IlffOBJUTION. 143 

VI. METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOR CHARLESTON, S. C, 
For the Year 1B40; ty John Syan, City Intptctor. 





Thermo me Mi. 






Hlr 




Me.n Tcmpnetar. 










1 

i 


R 


4 




| 


| 


| 


1 


1 


s 1 I 

1 1 I 




~ 


a 


a 


f 


H 


a 


t- 




a 


U 




v< 


ffi> 


« 


94 


14 


3144 25.31 


M 28.31 48 


m 




February, 
March, 


ft 


n 


il 




1! 


3857 3.2S 


S3 24.29 57 16.29 






71 


74 


* 


41 


54 43.58 29.31 


i>4 5.31 60 30.31 


vn 


Vri 


April, 


74 


< 


7S 


M 


57 5064 13.15 


75 1315 67 2.15 




H 


ft 


M 


7> 


:;;■ 


7T 


34 74 28.31 


31 27.31 79 8.31 








M 


«l 


« 


-'( 


71 


3876 11.15 


32 4.5 78 7.15 


«H 


4 


July, 


M 


K 


i: 


71 


/;■> 


74|77 13.31 


80 10.31 79 17.31 


1 






V 


*H Hi 


,( 


ii 


74 78 18.31 


85 13.31 79 30.31 


fi 


IK 




■r- 


■S-l Ml 


■■;:- 


74 


63:84 8.15 
52|66 14.31 
44 51 19 30 


81 4.15 71 3.15 


1 


11> 




7fi 


i'm '/; 


.4 
3< 


i'. 


75 3.31.70 


Ift 


m 




n> 


14 (i-i 




61 23.30 57 13.30 


H 


ii 


December, 


64 


y; :>" 


;« 


413844 29.31 


52 8.31 49 20.31 


1M 


21) 



VII. METEOROLOGICAL TABLES FOR BAVANNAH, Ga., 
For the Year ending May 2\tt, 1841 ; communicated by Dr. John F. 







Thwmojmrter 


Rain 






■—■■ 


Mo 


alhlr Ham 




4 
























S 


a 


a 




a 


a 




3 






< 






< 






1 






" 


" 


h 


" 


« 


'" 


a 


1840, Jane, 


28 


H2 


m 


77 


in 


fif 


hs 7.s 


74 77 


R8 30 


7'i fff 


3.365 




July, 


2 


HI 


w 


^ 


4 




74 ?:■ 


71 i 4V 


Hli III 


,'<! si 


12.3111 








7! 


* 


W 


:>~, 


7! 


MIIV 


?li74 


«# 


T-nV 


9.741 








7, 


'« 


•v 


I: 




/■H7I 


I'-t 47 


HI .-( 


7Fi Ml 


8.331 






12 




H5 


7t 


-ii 


41 


HUM 


ffllli 


r7.Hr 


/" Il 


4525 






!■ 


i. 


HI 


'ii 


r, 


31 


MfLtf 


4JHM 


KK4I 


,<» * 






December, 


12 


■>l 


71 


fU 


it- 


» 


miUr 


43 HI 


il * 


S4W 


0.8CK 




1841, January, 




il 


7r 


i".' 


;■ 


* 


47 !l: 


>1M 


■W <Ni 


*7i 


3.105 


11 






■W 


VI 


.-( 


If 


IB 


;,i;j.i 


Htsni 


ii't fi7 


,1, 61 


4285 




March, 




V 


Ml 




\Y 


:u 


illil 


ss,<fl 


i'l (K 


i:i 4:- 


6,3S{ 


6 


April, 

mV, 




,:. 




■il 


VA 


M 


;y hi 


il IW 


7a 'i7 


i'lN 


1.60C 


H 




bt) 


9281 1 


55 75 70 


67.45 


HI .06 


74.64 


5.880 


7 
97 


Annual Mean, 


6125 


74 .B0 


68.621 


6*950 



The hottest day waa June 28th, when the thermometer at 2 F. M. 



144 



METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION. 



[1842. 



stood at 98 degrees, being 23 degrees above the annual mean at that 
hour. 

The coldest day was February 16th, when the thermometer at 7 A. M. 
stood at 22 degrees, being 39 degrees below the annual mean at that 
hoar. Difference between the highest and lowest rise of the thermom- 
eter, 76 degrees. 

Baromktkr. 



1 



Month*. 


Highest. 




Lowest. 


Monthly Mean. 


• 

as 


S 


S 


• 

a 


• 

2 


• 


• 

a 


• 

a 


• 

a 




• 

< 


• 

04 


o: 




< 


• 

04 


• 

04 


• 

< 


• 
0M 


04* 




*• 

30.35 


30.31 


30.33 


4 


29.94 


29.87 


I* 

29.89 


30.145 


01 

30.111 


r* 


1840, Jane 23, 


30121 


July 27, 


.28 


.27 


27 


24 


30.04 


.97 


30.01 


.182 


.156 


.164 


Aug. 19, 


.32 


.24 


.23 


13 


.02 


.94 


29.96 


.123 


.097 


.115 


Sept. 13, 


.34 


.33 


.33 


20 


29.96 


.92 


.89 


.164 


.131 


.142 


Oct. 27, 


.36 


.33 


.32 


29 


.83 


.69 


.71 


.148 


.109 


.120 


Nov. 28, 


42 


.37 


.37 


22 


.72 


.66 


.68 


.122 


.076 


.072 


Dec. 7, 


.39 


.36 


.38 


26 


.93 


.70 


.69 


M84 


.123 


.148 


1841, Jan. 19, 


•.49 


.43 


.43 


1 


.81 


.74 


.87 


.149 


.111 


.140 


Feb. 13, 


.32 


.18 


.1022 


.60 


.59 


.67 


073 


t.015 


.031 


Mar. 20 


.34 


.31 


.29 


6 


.56 


.53 


.73 


.08 


.035 


.061 


Apr. 16, 


.45 


.43 


.43 


29 


.83 


.57 


t.47 


.090 


.032 


.038 


May 23, 
Annual Mean, 


.31 


.31 


.29 


11 


.86 


.77 


.83 


.084 
1.287 


.053 
.087 


.053 


.100 



* Highest, 30.49 inches : — t Lowest, 29.47 : — Range, 1.02 : — Ba- 
rometer, 43 feet above half tide. 



ME'l'EOEOLOBICiL 



VIII. METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOB AUGUSTA, G*. 
j*. 2$>28'X.,Long. 81° 54' JV. ; for 1840 ; by Motet Hoibrook, M. D, 





TbarauxMMt. 


Piev»ilin K Wind. 


Win her. 




4 


£ 


& 


























1 
1 


1 
1 


| 


i 
§ 


1 

a 


B 


| 


I 

| 


1 


1 


1 


.3 




g 






s 


< 


■< 


< 


a 


i 


a 


z 


1 


i 


> 


5 


5 


i 


i 


> 


Jan. 35.90 


50.06 


41.48 


42.51 


IS" 


66° 


14 


4 


t 


2 


3 


18 


3 


2 


1 


7 


Feb. 45.8663.10 


sa.7i 


53.91 


24 


72 




5 


9 


10 




9 


4 


2 


1 


1:' 


Mar. 534365.87 


55 97 


5tJ.1T 


32 


76 


7 


: 


10 


d 


2 


9 


4 


13 




5 


Apr. 55.7165.84 


57.-i: 


59 71 


42 


89 


1 




7 


15 




18 




10 






May 60.617923 


66.96 


68.91 


46 


87 


10 


e 


b 


7 


2 


18 


4 






2 


June 66.6387.70 


74.71 


77.01 


58 


96 


2 




u 




2 




2 


11 




a 


July 7129 86.16 


75.42 


77.fr. 


63 


96 




11 




S 


2 


11 




15 




4 


Aug. 72.1384.53 


75.94 


77.54 




90 








19 




3 


3 


25 






Sept. 61.83,7587 


66.57 


68.09 


53 


88 


3 






2 




22 




e 






Oct. 57 527329 


Gl.SS 


64.03 


34 


85 


6 


17 


a 


3 


3 


i>u 




10 






Not. 37.90,57.03 


43.90 


46.28 


23 


71 


10 


5 


9 


4 


2 




2 


5 






Dec. 34.1349.14 








12 


7 


12 






25 


2 


4 






Ann!: 








70 


107 


S4 


-7 


18 


191 


26 


112 


a 


35 


mean. 54.58 69.755 








'18 





















The hottest days were from June 29th to July 3d. Thermometer 96° 
in the shade. 
The coldest days were Jan. 19th, 18 s , and Dec. 20th, 19°. 



MITEOftOLOSICAI. INFORMATION. 



IX. METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOR MOBILE, 

Ut, 30°*VJV.; Lang. 81° 11' W.;fora Year ending March 31, 184! ; by 
Dr. Stephen B. Worth. 




Remarks. — The barometer and thermometer hang in a. cool passage 
with a southern exposure. 

The days reckoned among the cloudy or rainy were bo either wholly or 
in put. Those marked /air, were bo during tha 24 honra. 

The direction of the wind was observed at 9 A. M., noon, and 3 P. M„ 
and occasionally at 9 P. M. The month of January, 1841, waa extremely 
wet, and a greater quantity of rain fell than eier before within the recol- 
lection of the oldest inhabitants, being 14.900 inches. In the spring, sum- 
mer, and autumn, our prevailing winds are southerly, and when they 
predominate, the city is always healthy. We are generally visited by 
frost between the 1st and 7th of November. 



1842.] 



METEOKOLOSICAI. INFOKH AVION. 



147 



X. METEOROLOGICAL TABLES FOR NEW ORLEANS, 

Lot. 29° 57' JV., Long. 90° 7' W. of Greenwich. For Die Year ending on the 
31«( of October, 1840 ; being an abstract of a Journal kept by D. T. Lit. 
lie, Corresponding Member of the Louisiana Society of Natural History 



Moathl. 


TberaoowUr. 


niniiiiiii 








B 


i\ 








B 


fl 






X 


3 


M 


£ 


If 


a 


X 


X 


B 


I 
































« 


n 




*\ U 




<■ 


CO 






« 




SI'. 


685 


SO 5 


HI 5 


if- 43.: 


30*>o 


30.16 


Ml 17 


305029.81 


m 




Ml) 


;e a 51.1 


;i;i 


4ls>5.( 


in If 


J0.13 3ii.lS 


30.44 29 81 






bib 

SO 9 


M.6,65.4 


7(1,1 


30 4U.( 
je|48.( 
i4S7.i. 


HOW 


30 22.30.24 


30.55 29.86 


<w 


Feb. 


32 36Q.f 


7HI 


30J*4 


30 aa 30.22 


taut. 


WW 


m 


M.r. 


W.V 


74 fi 


«<: 


M i 


30.103007 30.07 


10 3V 


-W7h 


M 




14 •.' 


J:<< 


Til;' 


nx 


.1 33. ( 


30.15 30. IE 


io i :> 


nr-i 


10 01 


W 


/KI- 


«h 


79.4 


ffl.5 64 25.5 


30.03.30.04 


tool 


id Vr, 


set a 


4H 




WI 


<4 2 


3S.8 99.070 16.0 
64.J|92.5 ; 60]2.6 


30.14,30.1 i 


W.1S> 


ID 31 


.•0 07 


33 


Julj, 


>i< 1 


*! 


30.1S3O1E 


10 M 


MPVf. 


10 07 




H!,< 




J3.7.93.BT616.5 


miasD.ia 


H).11 


!0 2T> 


WIOC 


W, 




70 h 


Ml 


JO.) 91 516823..= 


30.10 30 0! 


MMfr 


10 22 


■o h; 


26 


Oct. 


nt.li 


ma 


70.4 88.5 SO 38.5 


30.1230.11 


30.11 


80.41 


29 87 


54 


Annual Mean 


70.2 


75.8 


70^|9253656.5 


30.15 30.13 


30.13 


30.55 


29.7b 


77 





1 






Court! of Wlnda. 


is 


J 

"3 




[- 




s 


\ 




t 




1 


1 


1 


■5-5 

11 


1 


1 i 




i 


I 


■8 J 


1 




7 


14 


It 


|i>- ? 


fi 


1 


1 





fi 


28 


7.198 




11 


11 


[ 


« 4 


1 




1 




7 


21 


8 646 




4 


VI 


1 


H 1 


!■ 


V 


'. 


4 


:■ 


1 6 


1.548 




!i 


In 


! 


£< 


J 


4 


'> 


II 


1 


2 


5.578 




V 


11 


> 


7 1 


;■ 




l 


7 


i 


•T-, 


3.399 






sa 


7 


o ;■ 


4 


F.I 


1 




i 


'.Mi 


3.8*41 




r 


it* 


F 


t>i < 


1 


4 


1 


1 


h 


2 3 


4.611 




i 


u 


: 


ii l 


1 


3 


' 


1 




2 


5.434 




' 


ih 


in 


1 


i 


;■ 


1 1 


: 


( 




1 7 


5.870 




B 


n 


! 




V 


i 


7 


I 




ft 


1 7 


3.790 




i 


10 


II 


; 


i 


' 


4 


■ 


1 




XJ, 


2.840 




7 


17 




1 


5 





i a 





2 


2.4 


6.2t>9 




53 


203 


105 7-2 


20 


62 


40 ': 


18 


13 


34 


2.2 


59.047 



Remarks. — Those diy « culled clenr were free from any cloudi what. 



148 METKOB0LOSIC4I. in FORMATION. [1642. 

ever, and ill days on which there iu any rain or clouds, daring any 
pert of Ihem, are placed under the head of eluudy or rainy, in the table. 
The coldeit day in the year waa the 3d of January ; and the warmeat 
day, the 26th of August. 



XI. METEOROLOGICAL TABLE8 FOR NATCHEZ, Hi» 

Lat 31° 34', Long. 91° 25' ; by Dr. Henry Toolty. 
I. Annual Mean of On Thermometer, Barometer, and Weather, for If 



1843.] HETEOEU LOGICAL I 

8. Direction of Ihn Wind during the Tear 1840. 





■5 

i 


I 

■5 
1 


■5 
1 


i 


j 


| 


i 

| 


■ 


January, 
February, 

March, 

w*y.' 

July,' 

August, 

September, 

Ootober, 

November, 

December, 


8 
14 
17 
20 
11 
14 
16 
12 

5 
13 
17 

7 


9 
4 
9 
11 



7 
14 

7 
4 
6 

7 


5 
3 
5 
5 

2 

8 
5 

10 
8 
8 
8 


4 

7 
7 
7 
13 
11 
9 
2 
7 
7 
14 
18 


10 
6 
11 

e 

6 

3 
14 
13 

19 
Jfl 
11 
13 


2 
2 
1 
8 
6 

3 
6 

15 

4 

7 




s 


3 
1 

2 
8 

2 

4 
2 


4 
1 
4 
5 
S 

7 
10 
11 

4 

7 
7 
3 




155 


94 


rs 


lOfi 


137 


48 


23 


68 



Southerly and easterly winds, 423 ; northerly and westerly, 266 ; 
former prevailing over the latter as 100 to G2.8. 



3. Table showing from what Paints of the Compass tltt Wind has blovm 
fir 15 successive Years. 



Id the above abstract it is shown, that in the series of fifteen years therein 
■Uted, the southerly sjul easterly winds prevailed over the northerly and 
westerly winds 1904 times, or in the proportion of 100 to the former and 69.1 
to the latter. The south wind prevailed over the north wind M 100 to 95.8. 
The southwest over the northeast as 100 to 49.8. The southeast over the 
northwest as 100 to 44.8. The east over the west as 100 to 43.7. 
13' 



150 



METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION. 



[1842- 



XII. METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOR LITTLE ROCK, Ark., 
For the Year 1840, by William J. Goulding, M. D. 



1 


Thermom- 
eter. 






Winds. 


Weather. 


Months. 


• 

© 

e 

be 

© 


S 


© 

9 

o 

ex. 


>» 


£ 
































Q 
3 


© 

Q 

** 

■ 


S 

© 

Eh 

a 


99 

Q 

** 

$ 


Q 
© 


• 


S 

X3 


• 

S 

© 
.a 




3 

© 


X3 


m 

© 

* 


** 


a 








* 

o 

B 
71 

1 


.2 

i 




.SP | 
6319 


ed 
« 

40 


o 
K 

6 


••* 
o 

1 


O 

3 


O 

5 


o 

5 


at 
a 
W 

3 


9 
O 
03 

4 


9 
O 
09 


9 
O 
0Q 


© 

7 


© 


'S 
13 


9 

e 

18 


e 

£ 

7 


S 

04 


Jan. 


2 2 


w. 


Cl'dy. 


Feb. 


78 20 


50 


29 


1 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


7 5 


2 


8. 


18 


11 


5 




Fair. 


March, 


8136 


57 


18 


20 


1 


4 


2 


2 


1 


3 


8 


10 


w. 


18 


13 


.6 




do. 


April, 
May, 


84 


47 


64 


24 


11 


1 


1 


4 


5 


2 


8 


6 


3 


s. 


14 


16 


9 




Cl'dy. 


87 


53 


70 


30 


9 


2 


4 


3 


3 


3 


4 


4 


8 


w. 


26 


5 


4 




Fair. 


June, 


93 


58 


78 


29 


7 


2 


1 


3 


2 


1 


7 


6 


8 


w. 


24 


6 


5 




do. 


July, 


92 


64 


79 


17 


4 


3 


2 


6 


10 


2 


1 


4 


3 


E. 


22 


9 


9 


do. 


Aug. 


96 


65 


79 


3 


14 


2 


3 


11 


3 


3 


1 


5 


3 


N. E< 


24 


7 


7 




do. 


Sept. 


88 


51 


71 


7 


19 


2 


410 


3 


5 


1 


4 


1 


N. E. 


20 


10 


6 




do. 


Oct. 


86 


38 


65 


9 


26 


5 


4 5 


3 


3 


4 


5 


2 


N. N. E. 


21 


10 


8 




do. 


Nov. 


73 


22 


50 


7 


25 


4 


3 2 


6 


2 


5 


4 


4 


E. 


20 


10 


4 


2 


do. 


Dec. 


72 


23 


45 
62 


9 


31 


3 
31 


5 1 


5 


4 
33 


9 
4558 


2 
55 


2 
53 


8. 


16 
236 


15 
130 


4 

74 


2 

5 


do. 


1 Year, 


3S 


► 55 


148 


>8. W. 





Remarks. — Highest degree, 96°. Lowest do., 19°. Coldest month, 
January. Hottest month, August. 

The above is an abstract of daily and detailed observations for the 
year, carefully noted by myself, agreeably to the indications on this sub- 
ject given in the " Regulations of the Medical Staff of the U. S. Army." 

As it respects temperature, the year 1840 may be considered an av- 
erage one in this locality ; but in regard to weather, the proportion 
of rainy and cloudy days to fair, has been greater than usual ; the pre- 
vailing vrinds, also, which are usually south and southwest during the 
hot season, have this year been east and northeast, as will appear in the 
table. 



METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION. 



XIII. METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOR MARIETTA, Ohio, 



Lai. 39°85'JV.; Long. 4°'. 



Month.. 


Thermometer. 












B.«™„, 


1 








Is 

J? 










1 


£ 


i 




£ 


Q 








1 


| 






| 






1 




I 




I 




.1 




i 




i 


s 


3 


£ 


£ 


s 




g 




Z 


S 


I 


January, 


as. til 


43 


-4 


47 


11 


20 


2 


j; 


w., (f. w. 


29.80 


28.78 


102 


February, 


41. lil 


74 


-0 


74 


15 


14 


3 


OS 




29.75 


i8.88 


.87 


March, 


48.6C 


78 


U 


tiS 


IS 


M 


3 


21 




29 04 


28.82 






50.57 


88 


a 


H2 


IJ 


13 




25 




89.74 


29. in 


.04 


May, 


fil.Sl 


91 


3: 


58 


21 


10 


E 


i\ 




29.55 


28,92 


.03 




68.01 


8! 


4: 


4b 


19 




4 


25 




29.08 


211.10 


-58 


Jnly, 


7i. as 


92 


51 


41 


23 


8 


9 


17 




29.03 


2:> as 


.38 




?y.4L 


'10 


01 




22 


9 


5 


25 




29.05 


29 20 


,46 


Sept. 


5: 87 


82 


34 


48 


so 


10 


2 


>( 




29.75 


29.12 




Oot. 


58.83 


82 


19 


63 


U 


12 




12 




29 GO 


29.08 


.52 


Nov. 


40.60 


08 


22 




14 


lb 




.IS 




29.70 


98.88 


.83 


Deo. 


3814 


5S 


B 


52 


11 


a 


150 


w., s. w. 


29.75 


s 


.90 


Mean, 


52.35 








204 


\a 


39 OS 


itf.A-.AlA 


iM 



Remarks. — The mean temperature for the year is 52° 35', varying lit' 
tie from that of the preceding year, which waa 52° 54'. The quantity of 
rain and melted enow was 39.09 inches. 



MRTEOROr.OOrUiL lHFOBMiTIOB. 



XIV. METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOR BLOOMINGTON, low*, 

For ike Ytar 1840 ; ly JKV. T. S. Parrw. 



Month, g- 

1 X 


X 


i 

l 

9 


it 


s 

J 
s 

i 


s 


a 
1 
5 


3 


| 


J 4 

II 

° r 


I 


J 


J 


! 

6 


y 


| 
13 


* 
* 

20 


i 


Jan 19.5 




-17 


56 


29.39 


29.71 


29 00 


70 


9 


14 e 




7 


3 


Feb. laa.a 


71 


-as 


Dfl 




.70 


.10 


60 


14 


7| 8 




3 


5 


7 




13 


21 


8 


Mar. 38.3 


63 


12 


51 


.41 


.60 


.21 


.40 


ia 


13 6 




2 


2 


5 


3 


21 


12 19 


April, 52 9 
May, 631 


Sb 


27 


59 


.42 


.80 


.20 


61 


14 6|10 


9 




7 




10 


» 


16 14 


:« 


37 


48 


.41 


.70 


.30 


40 


16 


9 6 


13 




4 


3 




15 


23 


8 


June, 723 


88 


57 


31 


.43 


.70 


.10 


61 


18 


210 


13 




S 


7 


10 


11 


19 


11 


July, 73.9 


"7 


68 


29 


.50 


.80 


.a 


6< 


17 


6 8 


12 






4 


7 


13 


24 


7 


Aug. 70.5 


8b 


54 




.39 


.60 


.20 


40 


20 


3 8 


11 




G 


2 


5 


18 


IS 


12 


Sept. 63 3 


7b 




32 


.49 


.70 


.30 


40 


17 




9 




6 


4 


3 


18 


24 


6 


Oct. 564 


77 




52 


.39 


.80 


.00 


■* 


21 


6 4 








11 2 


24 


1? 


14 


Not. Ul 9 


68 


18 


50 


.45 


.80 


.10 


.70 


21 




2 


2 8 


s] 


14 


21 


9 


Dec. B9.6 


56 


2 


54 


.45 


.90 


X 


70 


2fi 


4 1 




3 8 


i 


19 


24 


7 


Tear, 1^.7 


88-85 


113 


29 42 


29.91 


29.00 


!X 


205 


8ff75 


81 


1761 


6255 


lie 240 


126, 



Warmest day in the year, Judo 12th J mean, 81" SC above 0. 

Coldest, January 24th ; mean, 5° 50' below 0. 

Highest temperature, June 12th, 88° above 0. 

Lowest temperature, February let, 26° below 0. 

Mean temperature Tor the yew 1840, 55° 77' ; for 1839, 64° 2C 

Range of temperature for the year 1840, 113 degreea. 



1842.] 



METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION. 



153 



XV. SNOW STORMS IN THE WINTER OF 1840-41, 
As observed at WaUham, Mass. ; by Mr. Charles Fisk. 



1840, Oct 26, 
Nov. 18- 19, 

22, 

25, 

Dec. 6, 

16, 

20, 

26, 
30, 
31, 

1841, January 1, 

13, 

i 5 ' 

21, 

24, 

29, 

Feb. 1, 

3, 

9, 

16, 

Much 6, 

7, 
10, 
13, 
16, 
April 9, 
13, 



About two inches of moist snow. 

In the night, three inches of snow, much 

drifted. 
A light snow (then rain), half an inch. 
Snowed in the night and covered the ground. 
A furious snow storm, badly drifted. 
In the evening a moist, level snow, then rain 
A flurry of snow of no visible depth. 
Snowed most of the day slightly. 
A tempestuous storm, day and night. 
Snowed a while very fast. 
Snowed most of the forenoon a little. 
Snowed from 3 to 6, then rained. 
Snowed all day lightly. 
A trifling snow. v 

Snowed several hours, then rained. 
In the evening a light snow. 
Snowed from noon till nine. 
A driving snow, afternoon and night, badly 

drifted. 
Violent squalls of snow, no depth. 
In the night, a light snow. 
Snowed moderately till past noon. 
A violent snow storm, afterwards rain. 
A little snow in the night. 
Snowed a little at times, afternoon and night. 
A most violent snow storm, badly drifted. 
Snowed lightly nearly all day. 
Snowed a very little, then rain. 
A driving storm all day, much drifted. 

Total, 
Making 28 snow storms, or rather falls of snow. 



Inches. 



3 
.50 
1 
7 
6 

1 

14 
1 
1 
4 
3 

3 
1 
7 

10 

3 
2 
3 
.75 

5 
1 

8 



87.25 



154 



METEOROLOeiCAL INFORMATION. 



[1842. 



XVI. QUANTITY OF SNOW AT HARTFORD, Con*., FROM 

1817 TO 1841. 

[From the Connecticut Courant.] 





Ft. In. 




Ft. In. 




Ft. In. 1 


1817-18, 


2 2 


1825-26, 


1 9 


1833-34, 


1 3 


1818-19, 


3 2 


1826-27, 


3 10 


1834-35, 


3 2 


1819-20, 


7 1 


1927 - 28, 


1 10 


1835 - 36, 


5 9 


1820-21, 


7 6 


1828-29, 


2 3 


1836-37, 


1 5 


1821-22, 


2 11 


1829-30, 


3 


1837 - 38, 


2 6 


1822-23, 


6 6 


1830-31, 


2 10 


1838-39, 


10 


1823-24, 


2 11 


1831-32, 


5 4 


1839-40, 


4 5 


1824-25, 


2 10 


1832-33, 


2 2 


1840-41, 


6 9 


Total 


in 24 yet 


irs, 84 ft. 2 in. 


Average 


, 3 ft. 6 1-6 in. 





XVII. FLOWERING OF FRUIT-TREES. 



Place. 


Year. 


Peacb. 


Cherry. 


Apple. 


Cambridge, Mass. 


1841 


May 12 


May 12 


May 24 


Perth Amboy, N. J. 


1841 


u 7 




« 17 


Paradise, Lancaster 










Co., Penn. 


1841 


" 1 


" 1 


u 15 


Augusta, Geo. 
Baltimore, Md. 


1841 


Feb. 20 






1841 


April 20 


April 25 
May 5 


« 1 


Nor walk, Ohio, 


1841 




" 12 


Marietta, Ohio, 


[ 1840 


" 6 


April 6 


April 16 



INDIVIDUAL STATES. 



1. MAINE. 



GOYIRHMENT. 



Johh Fairfield, of Saco, Governor ; (term from 1st Wed- 
nesday, Jan. 1842, to 1st Wednesday, Jan. 1843, 



} 



Samuel P. Benson, of Winthrop, 

Sanford Kingsbery, of Kingsbery, 

Isaac Hodsdon, of Corinth, 

Elijah L. Hamlin, of Bangor, > 
(Office at Augusta and Bangor,) \ 

John O'Brien, of Thomaston, 



Secretary of State, 
Treasurer, 
AdjtUanU General, 

Land-Agent, 



Salary. 
$1,500 

900 
900 
700 

1,000 



Warden of State Prison, 700 



Judiciary. 
Supreme Judicial Court. 



Nathan Weston, 
Nicholas Emery, 
Ether Shepley, 
Daniel Goodenow, 
John Shepley, 



Ezekiel Whitman, 
Asa Redington, Jr., 
Frederick H. Allen, 
Anson G. Chandler, 



of Augusta, 
of Portland, 
of Portland, 
of Alfred, 
of Saco, 



Chief Justice, 
Associate Justice, 

do. 
Attorney- General, 
Reporter, 



District Courts. 



of Portland, 
of Augusta, 
of Bangor, 
of Calais, 



West. Dint., 
Mid. do. 
East. do. 
do. do. 



Judge, 
do. 
do. 
do. 



Uther Fitch, 



Municipal Court, Portland. 
of Portland, Judge, 



Salary. 

(1,800 

1,800 

1,800 

1,000 

600 



1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
1,200 



700 



MAIK*!. 

Probate Court*. 



0...,,.. 


Indg«. 


— — 


•d ■— 


Baiidaoea. 


Ba1»- 


r«k, 

Cumberland 

Linroln, 
Hancock, 

W «hii.l;t..Ti. 

OX!!, ■ 

Waldo, 

I'lKBlmu'lii, 
ArOOllOOk, 


Wm. N. Hajen 
Xith'l Grolon,' 
arun'l M. Pond, 
JO. Talbot, 
Wm. Emmons, 
L.man Rawion 
"ballM (ireen, 

Jona. Tbajer, 
The mm Barkd r. 
Kit... W.Snow 
S. B. Tuck, 


Portland, ' 

Ha Unwell! 
aum ford, 

3rono,' 

remington 

S^iii. 


SOOlJohnC. Dodge,' 
300 Joa. S. Kits, 

sbse: 

3S0 J. Goodooow, 
300 ! Wm. Allen, Jr. 

SOol B. P. Field, Jt. 
190 Wm. Dickey, 
135 B. Dor *le j, 
100| Z. P. Wentwotth 


Alfred, 

Pal month, 

No 1,1, .bo TO'. 

En.. ■.-. 

Nor'rW"'* 


S5M 

50(1 

400 
550 
SOU 

150 
IB 
!00 







COBU 


on Sen oo I. s. 






— 


phi 


Iff 

Jig 




it 


mm 




1&39 


i&, 


, B ' 






Mut-r.jHMreH. 






10,30. 


7JM 


1% a; 


357 
















































































































































Tolat, 














SO 1.094 


S55 










93,014 


i>J,B02 


258,1 13' 43 


3,673 


ai-07 8-55 



Statistical Table. 













OflUu*. 




Pulli, 
1841. 


VBtajjl-, 


lSaa. 
Buhob. 


Cooa.jT.-M. 


York, 


14 


$9,114 


$7,702,241 
ll,503,(fl0 


30,856 


Alfred. 




if 




52,29: 


Portland. 




5 


11,151 


9,811,11b 


45,301 


Wiscns!.et. 


H sn cock, 


If. 


5,306 


3,434,512 


24,164 


Ellsworth. 


Washing ton, 


i] 


5,331 


3,183,68i 


42,922 


tfachiiis. 


Kennebec, 




fi,272 


8,638,857 


126,93S 


Parla." 


Oxford, 




6,071) 


4,7211,561 


126,384 


Somerset, 


S 


r>,nay 


4,240,832 


195,454 


SorrtJeew'k. 


Penobscot, 


£ 


8,277 


6,108,315 


153,464 


Bangor. 

Belfast. 


Waldo, 




7,460 


5,;too,uot! 


122,554 


Piscataquis, 


IE 


2,330 


1 ,424,03i] 


83,22!; 


»o*er. 


Franklin, 




3,453 


2,655,68S 


104,312 




Aroostook, 
Total, 


3 Q 


m-i 


491,843 




Hoolton. 


66,544 


69,245,625 


l,10TJl« 



BoONTr OH WmAT AMD COBB. 

died in Maine, in 1837, 1,019,9064 i bounty granted by the 
,31401; in 1838, 1,107,849]; bounty, 987,353-30; Indian 
8, 1,630,9964 buhsb; bounty, $66,328-80. 



1842.] 



MAINE. 



157 



Population of the Towns according to the Census of 1840. 



York County. 

Acton, 1,401 

Alfred, 1,408 

Berwick, 1,698 

Biddeford, 2,574 

Buxton, 2,688 

Cornish, 1,263 

Elliot, 1,889 

Hollis, 2,363 

Eennebunk, 2,323 
Kennebunk Port, 2,768 

Kitterj, 2,435 

Lebanon, 2,273 

Limerick, 1,509 

Limington, 2,210 

Lyman, 1,478 

Newfield, 1,354 

North Berwick, 1,461 

Parsonsfield, 2,442 

Saco, 4,408 

Sanford, 2,233 

Shapleigh, 1,510 

South Berwick, 2,314 

Waterborough, 1,944 

Wells, 2,978 

York, 3,111 



54,034 



Cumberland County. 

Baldwin, 1,134 

Bridgton, 1,987 

Brunswick 4,259 

Cumberland, 1,616 

Danville, 1,294 

Durham, ' 1,836 

Falmouth, 2,071 

Freepoxt, 2,662 

Gorham, 3,001 

Gray, 1,740 

Harpswell, 1,448 

Harrison, 1,243 

Minot, 3,550 

Naples, 758 
North Yarmouth, 2,824 

Otisfield, 1,307 

Poland, 2,360 
Portland, city, 15,218 

Pownal, 1,210 

Raymond, 2,032 

Scarborough, 2,172 

Sebago, 707 

Blandish, 2,198 

Westbrook, 4,116 



Windham, 2,303 

New Gloucester, 1,94b* 
Cape Elizabeth, 1,666 

68,658 

Lincoln County. 
Alna„ 990 

Bath, 5,141 

Bootbbay, 2,631 

Bowdoin, 2,073 

Bowdoinham, 2,402 
Bremen, 837 

Bristol, 2,945 

Cushing, 790 

Dresden, 1 ,647 

Edgecomb, 1,238 

Friendship, 725 

Georgetown, . 1,356 
Jefferson, 2,214 

Lewiston, 1,801 

Lisbon, 1,532 

Newcastle, 1,712 

Nobleborough, 2,210 
Phippsburg, 1 ,657 

Richmond, 1,604 

St. George, 2,094 

Thomaston, 6,227 

Topshara, 1,883 

Union, 1,784 

Waldoborough, 3,661 
Webster, 1,134 

Warren, 2,228 

Washington, 1,600 
West port, 655 

Whitefield, 2,150 

Wiscasset, . 2,314 

Woolwich, 1,416 

Patricktown Plant. 506 
Matinicus Island, 177 
Monhegan Island, 77 
Matinicus Rock, 10 
Matinic Island, 19 
Muscle Ridge Isl. 51 
Ragged Island, 17 

Wooden Ball Island, 9 



63,517 



Hancock County. 
Aurora, 149 

Amherst, 196 

Bluehill, 1,891 

Brooks ville, 1,246 

14 



Bucksport, 3,015 

Castine, 1,188 

Cranberry Isles, 239 
Dedham, 455 

Deer Isle, 2,841 

Eastbrook, 155 

Eden, 1,054 

Ellsworth, 2,263 

Franklin, 502 

Gouldsborough, 1,198 
Greenfield, 223 

Hancock, 760 

Mariaville, 275 

Mount Desert, 1,887 
Orland, 1,381 

Otis, 88 

Penobscot, 1,474 

Sedgwick, 1,922 

Sullivan, 649 

Surry, 857 

Waltham, 23L 

Swan Island, 283 

Township No. 33, 34 
" No. 21, 37 
11 No. 2, 27 
Plantation, No. 1, 88 
Strip North No. 1, 23 
Wetmore Isle, 139 • 
Seaville, 129 

Plantation, No. 7, 61< 
" No. 10, 19 

Trenton, 1,062. 

Bear Island, 11 

Beach Island, 8 

Pickering's Island, 14 
Sprucehead Island, 12 
Little Sprucehead lsl. 6 
Butter Island, 8 

Eagle Island, 18 

Harbor Island, 4 

Marshall's Island, 8 
Duck Island, 6 

Long Island, 114 

Black Island, 30 

Placentia Island, 32: 
Conway's Island, 8 
Calf Island, 18 

John's Island, 4 

Pond Island, 11 

Harbor Island, 9 

Hog Island, 12 

Conway's Island, 10 
Hacketash Island, 18' 
Wooden Ball Island, 7 



158 



MAINS. 



[1843. 



Matinicus Rock. 10 
Matinicus Island, 182 
Hoi brook Island, 3 

28,605 

Washington County. 
Addison, 1,052 

Alexander, 513 

Beddington, 164 

Bailey ville, 329 

Baring, 376 

Calais, 2,934 

Columbia, 843 

Cooper, 657 

Cutler, 657 

Charlotte, 666 

Cherryville, 1,003 

Crawford, 300 

Den ays ville, 378 

Eastport, 2,876 

Edmonds, 259 

Harrington, 1,54*2 

Jonesborough, 392 

Jonesport, 576 

Lubec, 2,307 

Machias, 1,351 

Machias Port, 834 

Marion, 231 

Mechisses, 1,395 

Northfield, 232 

Pembroke, 1,050 

Perry, 1,008 

Princeton, 157 

Robbinston, 822 

Steuben, 884 

Prescolt, 793 

Topsfield, 188 

Wesley, 255 

Whiting, 462 

Plantation No. 23, 122 
East half Township 

No. 6, 2d Range, 73 
Hill's Gore, 4th Ra. 30 
No. 9, 2d Range, 12 
Fowler and Ely, 1st 

Ra. township No. 1,13 
Township No. 9>4th 

Range, 49 

Dan forth half town- 
ship, 4th Range, 45 
Township No. 9, 3d 

Range, 48 

Township No. 2, 2d 

Range, 53 

No. 3, 2d Range, 47 



Hinkley Township % 
No. 3, 1st Range, 9 
Township No. 1, 2d 

Range, 12 

Township No. 21, 

Eastern Di vision , 26 

Annsburg, 23 

Devereaux, 28 

Township No. 14, 153 

" No. 18, 35 

" No. 19, 62 



28,327 



Kennebec County. 

Albion, 1,624 

Augusta, 5,314 

Belgrade, 1,748 

China, 2,675 

Clinton, 2,818 

Dearborn, 168 

Fayette, 1,016 

Greene, 1,406 

Gardiner, 5,042 

Hallowell, 4,654 

Leeds, 1,736 

Litchfield, 2,293 

Monmouth, 1,882 

Mount Vernon, 1,475 

Pittston, 2,460 

Readfield, 2,037 

Rome, 987 

Sidney, 2,190 

Vassalborough, 2,952 

Vienna, 891 

Waterville, 2,971 

Wayne, 1 ,201 

Windsor, 1,789 

Winthrop, 1,915 

Winslow, 1,722 

Clinton Gore, 110 

Wales, 656 

Territory North of 

Albion, 89 



55,823 



Oxford County. 

Albany, 691 

Andover, 551 

Bethel, 1,994 

Brownfield, 1,360 

Buckfield, 1,629 

Byron, 219 

Canton, 919 1 

Denmark, 1,143 



Dixfield, 1,169 

Fryeburg, 1,536 

Greenwood, 836 

Gilead, 313 

Hartford, 1,472 

Hebron, 945 

Hiram, 1,232 

Howard's Gore, 131 
Hamlin's Grant, 80 
Livermore, 2,745 

Lorel, 941 

Mexico, 447 

Newry, 463 

Norway, 1,786 

Oxford, 1,254 

Paris, 2,454 

Peru, 1,002 

Porter, 1,133 

Roxbury, 227 

Rumford, 1,444 

Stoneham, 313 

Stow, 376 

Sumner, 1,269 

Sweden, 670 

Turner, 2,479 

Waterford, 1,381 

Woodstock, 819 

Township B, 111 

No. 5, 1st Range, 49 
No. 5, 2d Range, 42 
Township C, 29 

Andover N. Surplus, 45 
Riley Township, 51 
Letter A, No. 2, 54 
No. 4, 1st Range, 4 
Fryeburg Academy 

Grant, 153 

No. 2, 386 

Batchelder's Grant, 3 

38,357 

Somerset County. 

Anson, 1,941 

Athens, 1,427 

Bingham, 751 

Bloomfield, 1,093 

Brighton, 803 

Canaan, 1,379 

Cambridge, 461 

Concord, 577 

Comville, 1,140 
Chandlerville, 372 

Embden, 983 

Fairfield, 2,198 

Hartland, 1,028 



1642.] 



MAINE. 



150 



Harmony, 

Lexington, 

Madison, 

Maxfield, 

Mercer, 

Moscow, 



1,096 
564 

1,701 
148 

1,432 
502 



New Portland, 1,620 
Norridgewock, 1,865 
Palmyra, 1,500 

Pittefield, 951 

Ripley, 591 

Solon, 1,139 

St. Albans, 1,564 

Storks, 1,559 

8kowhegan, 1 ,584 

SmithBeld, 789 

No. 1. 2d Ran. West 

Kennebec River, 63 
No. 3, 2d Range, 

Pleasant Ridge, 167 
No. 1,3d Ran. West 

Kennebec River, 85 
No. 1, 4th Range, 10 
No. 1, 5th Range, 

Forks Township, 80 
Enchanted Stream, 5 
Parlin Pond, 9 

Holden Plantation, 

Moose River, 65 

Jackman's Town'p , 10 
Canada Road, 6 

Canada Line, No. 5, 

3d Range, 10 

No. 2, 2d Range, 139 
No. 3, 3d Range, 106 
Flag- Staff Town'p, 

No. 4, 4th Range, 64 
Spencer Stream, 6 
Long Pond, 1 

No. 6, 2d Range, 

Canada Road, 1 

No. 1,3d Ran. East 

Kennebec River, 164 
No. 1,4th Ran East 

Kennebec River, 103 



33,912 

Penobscot County. 

Argyle, 527 

Bangor, city, 8,627 

Bradford, - 1,000 

Bradley, 395 

Brewer, 1,736 

Burlington, 350 

Carmel, 520 



Corinna, 1,704 

Corinth, 1,318 

Charleston, 1,269 

Chester, 277 

Dexter, 1,46-4 

Dixmont, 1,498 

Etna, 745 

Eddington, 595 

Edinburg, 52 

Enfield, 346 

Exeter, 2,052 

Garland, 1,065 

Glenburn, 664 

Greenbush, 261 

Hampden, 2,663 

Hermon, 1,042 

Howland, 322 

Kirkland, 351 

Lagrange, 336 

Lee, 724 

Levant, 1,061 

Lincoln, 1,121 

Lowell, 205 

Maxfield, 185 

Mattamiscontis, 97 
Milford, 474 

Newburg, 963 

Newport, 1,138 

Orono, 1,520 

Orrington, 1,580 

Oldtown, 2,342 

Passadumkeag, 394 
Plymouth, 843 

Springfield, 546 

Stetson, 616 

Jarvis's Gore, 185 

Township No. 3, 22 
" No. 4, 41 
Township No. 3, 
Range 8th, 29 

Lower Ind. Town- . 
ship West Penob- 
scot River, 37 
Indian Township, 
No. 2, 6 
Hopkins' Academy 
Grant, . 3 
Letter A, 29 
Unincorpor. Town- 
ship North of Lin- 
coln, 147 
West half of Town- 
ship No. 6, 187 
Township No. 7, 30 

45,705 



Waldo County. 

Appleton, 891 

Belfast, 4,186 

Belmont, 1,378 

Brooks, 910 

Burnham, 602 

Camden, 3,005 

Frankfort, 3,603 

Freedom, 1,153 

Hope, 1,770 

Islesborough, 777 

Jackson, 653 

Knox, 897 

Liberty, 895 

Lincolnville, 2,048 

Monroe, 1,602 

Montville, 2,153 

Northport, 1,207 

Palermo, 1,594 

Prospect, 3,492 

Searamont, 1 ,374 

Swanville, 919 

Thomdike, 897 

Troy, 1,376 

Unity, 1,467 

Vinalhaven, 1,950 
Waldo Plantation, 731 



Piscataquis 
Abbot, 
Atkinson, 
Barnard, 
Bowerbank, 
Blanc hard, 
Brownville, 
Dover, 
EUiotsville, 
Foxcroft, 
Guilford, 
Greenville, 
Kilmarnock, 
Kingsberry, 
Monson, 
Milton, 
Milo, 
Parkman, 
Sangerville, 
Sebec, 
Shirley, 
Wellington, 
Wilson, 
Williamsburg 
Township No 
Range, 



43 £09 

A 

County. 

661 

704 

153 

165 

270 

568 

1,597 

60 

926 

892 

128 

319 

227 

548 

469 

756 

1,206 

1,197 

1,116 

190 

722 

70 

131 

3,3d 

28 



1 



160 

Plantation No. 8, 31 
Letter B, 10th Ran. 5 

13,138 

Franklin County. 

Avon, 827 

Berlin, 442 

Carthage, 522 

Chesterville, 1,0.98 

Farmtngton, 2,613 

Freeman, 838 

Industry, 1,036 

Jay, 1,750 

. Kingfield, 671 

Madrid, 368 

New Sharon, 1,829 

New Vineyard, 927 

Phillips, 1,312 

Salem, 561 

Strong, 1,109 

Temple, 955 

Weld, 1,045 

Wilton, 2,198 

No. 3, 2d Range, 47 

No. 4, 2d Range, 6 

No. 4, 1st Range, 4 

Bigelow Township, 37 

T'najlip Letter E, 77 

'Vffn. 2, 2d Ran. 82 

«<^No. 1,4th Ra. 163 

" No. 1, 3d Ran. 52 

" No. 3, 1st Ran. 7 

" No. 2, 1st Ran. 9 

'< No. 3, 2d Ra. 216 

20,801 



MAINS. 

Aroostook County. » 
Amity, 169™ 

Belfast Academy 
Grant, 141 

Hodgdon, 665 

Houlton, 1,597 

Township No. 5, 3d 

Range, 9 

Township A, No. 6, 
2d Range, 6 

Weston, 249 

Township No. 2, 2d 

Range, 43 

Township No. 1, 4th 

Range, 69 

Township No. 2, 3d 

Range, 14 

Township No, 1, 2d 

Range, 104 

Township No. 1,3d 

Range, 24 

Orient Gore, 68 

Township No. 9, 50 
Township No. 3, 2d 
Range, 20 

Smyrna, 184 

New Limerick, 123 
Letter A, 1st Ran. 177 
Williams College 
Grant, 85 

Bridgewater Acad- 
emy, 51 
Framingham Acad- 
emy Grant, 16 
Westfield Acade- 
my Grant, 3 



[1842. 

Letter A, 5th Ran. 15 
No. 1, 5th Range, 22 
Benedicta, or No. 

2, 5th Range, 222 
No. 3, 5th Range, 100 
No. 4, 5th Range, 294 
No. 6, Cth Range, 43 
Linneus, 311 

Township No. 11, 

1st Range, 66 

Nos. 7 & 9, 5th Ran. 48 
No. 10, 5th Range, 

or Masardis, 140 

No. 11, 5th Range, 45 
No. 13, 3d Range, 66 
Letter G, 2d Range, 58 
Letter K, 2d Range, 96 
Plymouth and Ea- 
ton Grant, 63 
Letters H & J, 1st 

and 2d Ranges, 194 
Plymouth Grant, 200 
Letter G, 27 

Fort Fairfield, or 

letter D, 26 

No. 3, 6th and 7th 

Range, 50 

Madawaska south 

of St. John's R. 1,584 
Madawaska north 

of St. John's R. 1,876 

9,413 



II. NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



Government 
For the Year ending on the 1st Wednesday of June, 1842. 



John Page, of Haverhill, 

Josiah Stevens, Jr., of Concord, 
Zenas Clement, do. 

Charles H. Peaslee, do. 



Governor, 
Secretary of State, 
Treasurer, 
Adjutant' General, 



Salary. 

$1,000 

800 

600 

400 



1843.] MEW HAMPSHIRE. 161 

Executive Council. 

Counties Coancillora. 

m Dbtrict, { B tSSSSS? part } Mo8e8 Norri8 ' of pittefield - 

SM *»■ { ^d°Ca'rfolf naP ' J H.^y B. R».t, « Wolfboroogh. 
* *>• { H ofMe^ h acT, dP " t } J H.Stee,e, "Peterborough. 

4th do. Cheshire and Sullivan, P. Handerson, " Eeene. 

5th do. Grafton and Coos, John H. White, " Lancaster. 

The Governor, Executive Council, Senate, and House of Represent- 
atives, are elected annually on the 2d Tuesday of March ; the official 
year commencing on the first Wednesday in June. The State is divid- 
ed into five Districts for the choice of Councillors ; and again divided 
into twelve Districts for the choice of Senators ; the number composing 
these two bodies being limited by the Constitution, while the number 
of Representatives is unlimited, — every town possessing 150 ratable 
male inhabitants being entitled to one Representative, and one for each 
additional 300. The number of the Representatives, in 1841, was 250. 

Judiciary. 

The Superior Court of Judicature consists of a chief justice and three 
associate justices, who hold one term annually in each of the ten coun- 
ties of the State, for the hearing and determining questions of law, &c. 
This Court is also vested with chancery jurisdiction, for certain pur- 
poses prescribed by the statute. 

The judges of the Superior Court of Judicature are, ex officio, judges 
of the Court of Common Pleas. This Court, before whom all actions 
for the recovery of debts and the enforcement of contracts, and all jury 
trials, are brought, consists of one of the justices of the Superior Court, 
who sits as chief justice of the Court of Common Pleas, and of two 
county judges, generally appointed from among the yeomanry, whose 
principal duty it is to attend to the ordinary business of the county, its 
roads, expenses, &c. Terms of this court are held semi-annually in 
each of the counties. 

Superior Court. 

Appointed. Salary. 

Joel Parker, of Keene, Chief Justice, 1838, $ 1,400 

Andrew S. Woods, "Bath, Associate Justice, 1840, 1,200 

Nathaniel G. Upham, " Concord, do. 1833, 1,200 

John J. Gilchrist, " Chariestown, do. 1840, 1,200 

Charles F. Gove, " Nashua, Attorney- General, 1835, 1,200 

14* 



162 



K1W HAMPSHIRE. 



[1842. 



Justices of the Court of Common Pleas. 



Countiet. 


Justices. 


Residence. 


Salary. 

$150 
150 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
110 
110 
126 
326 
100 
100 
100 
100 
150 
150 
100 
100 


Rockingham, 

Strafford, 

Belknap, 

Carroll, 

Merrimack, 

Hillsborough, 

Cheshire, « 

Sullivan, 

Grafton, 

Coos, 


C Bradbury Bartlett, 

( Dudley Freeze, 

C George L. Whitehouse, 

( Hiram R. Roberts, 

( Thomas Cogswell, 

I Henry Y. Simpson, 

i Nathaniel Rogers, 

( John Crocker, 

( Benjamin Wadleigh, 

I Aaron Whittemore, 

C Jacob Whittemore, 

( Jesse Carr, 

( Horace Chapin, 

I Larkin Baker, 

J Ambrose Cossit, 

( Eieazer Jackson, 

C David Churchill, 

I Walter Blair, 

C Joshua Marshall, 

I Richard Eastman, 


Nottingham, 

Deerfield, 

Farmington, 

Somersworth, 

Gilmanton, 

New Hampton, 

Wolfeborough, 

Eaton, 

Sutton, 

Pembroke, 

Antrim, 

GofFstown, 

Winchester, 

Westmoreland, 

Claremont, 

Cornish, 

Lyme, 

Plymouth, 

Stratford, 

Lancaster, 



Courts of Probate. 



Counties. 


Judges. 


Salary. 


Registers. 


Salary. 
$462 


Rockingham, 


John Sullivan, 


$334 


John Kelly, 


Strafford, 


Benj. W. Jenness, 


167 


Winthrop A. Marston, 


233 


Belknap, 


Warren Lovell, 


142 


Jeremiah Elkins, 


183 


Carroll, 


Jonathan T. Chase, 


142 


Obed Hall, 


183 


Merrimack, 


Horace Chase, 


245 


James Clark, 


345 


Hillsborough, 


Luke Woodbury, 


276 


Stephen Peabody, 


383 


Cheshire, 


Frederick Vose, 


225 


Elijah Sawyer, 


300 


Sullivan, 


John L. Putnam, 


175 


Uriel Dean, 


225 


Grafton, 


Edward Webber, 


275 


David H. Collins, 


380 


Coos, 


Benj. Hunking, 


100 


George A. Cossit, 


125 



Charles T. Jackson, 
Moses B. Williams, 



Geological Survey* 

Appointed. 

Boston, Mass. State Geologist, 1839. 

Assistant do. 1841. 



Lawson Cooledge, 
•Luther C. Pillsbury, 



State Prison. 



Warden, 
Deputy Warden, 



Salary. 
$800 



1842.] 



NSW HAMPSHIRE. 

Counties, County Towns, and Population. 



163 



Counties. 



Rockingham, 

Merrimack, 
Hillsborough, 
Cheshire, 
Sullivan, 

Strafford, 

*Belknap, 
•Carroll, 

Grafton, 

Coos, 



v 



Total, 



Pop. 1820. 


Pop. 1830. 


40,526 


44,452 


32,743 
35,781 
26,753 

18,628 


34,619 
37,762 
27,016 
19,887 


51,415 


58,916 


32,989 


38,691 


5,151 


8,390 


244,161 


269,533 



Pop. 1840. 



( 



45,771 

36,253 

42,494 
26,429 
20,340 

23,166 

17,988 
19,973 

42,311 

9,849 



County Towni. 



I 



284,574 



Portsmouth, 

Exeter, 

Concord, 

Amherst, 

Keene, 

Newport, 

{Dover, 
Rochester, 
Gilford, 
Ossipee, 
( Haverhill, 
( Plymouth, 
Lancaster, 



Pop. 

1840. 



7,887 
2,925 
4,897 
1,565 
2,610 
1,958 
6,458 
2,431 
2,072 
2,170 
2J84 
1,281 
1,316 



Increase of population from 1830 to 1840, 14,848. The increase in 23 
manufacturing towns, viz. Bristol, Claremont, Concord, Dover, Exe- 
ter, Fitz william, Gilford, GofFstown, Hooksett, Keene, Littleton, Man- 
chester, Meredith, Milford, Nashua, New Market, Northfield, Peter- 
borough, Pittsfield, Rochester, Salem, Some rs worth, and Wendell, is 
15,055, being more than the entire increase of the State. The increase 
in 44 agricultural towns, is 7,062 ; — 55 towns present a diminution each 
of over 50 persons. 



Different Classes of Inhabitants. 



Number of White Males, 139,004 

Do. do. Females, 145,032 

r . _ < Males, 248 

Colored persons, J Fema , eB) m 

Males over 100 years of age, 2 

Females do. 7 

Males between 90 and 100, 94 

Females do. 167 

Engaged in 

Agriculture, 67,935 

Commerce, 1,382 

Manufactures and Trades, 1 7,706 

Navigating the Ocean, 497 

Nav. Lakes and Rivers, 209 

Learned Professions, 1,422 



1,422 
179 
154 



Pensioners, 

Deaf and Dumb, 

Blind, 

Insane and Idiots, 

At public charge, 

At private charge, 
Universities and Colleges 2, 

with Students, 
Academies 68, with Scholars, 5,746 
Common Schools, 2,110 

Scholars in Common 

Schools, 81,890 

Persons over 20 years of age, 

unable to read or write, 927 



177 
308 

430 



* The counties of Belknap and Carroll were formed from the county of Strafford, in 

1840. 



104 



NEW HAMPtHIES. 



[1842. 



Population or thb Towns accordimo to thi Cevsus of 1840. 



Rockingham County. 

Atkinson, 557 

Brentwood, 888 

Candia, 1,430 

Chester, 2,173 

Danville, 538 

Deerfield, 1,950 

Derry, 2,034 

East Kingston, 551 

Epping, 1,235 

Exeter, 2,925 

Gosport, 115 

Greenland, 726 

Hampstead, 890 

Hampton, 1,320 

Hampton Falls, 656 

Kensington, 665 

Kingston, 1,032 

Londonderry, 1,556 

New Castle, 742 

Newington, 543 

New Market, 2,730 

Newtown, 541 
North Hampton, 885 

North wood, 1,172 

Nottingham, 1,193 

Plaistow, 626 

Poplin, 429 

Portsmouth, 7,887 

Raymond, 989 

Rye, 1,205 

Salem, 1,408 

Sandown, 625 

Seabrook, 1,392 
South Hampton, 462 

Stratham, 875 

Windham, 926 



Merrimack 
AUenstown, 
Andover, 
Boscawen, 
Bow, 
Bradford, 
Canterbury, 
Chichester, 
Concord, 
Dunbarton, 
Epsom, 
Franklin, 
Henniker, 
Hooksett, 
Hopkinton, 
London, 
Newbury, 
New London 



County. 

455 
1,168 
1,965 
1,001 
1,331 
1,643 
1,028 
4,897 

950 
1,205 
1,280 
1,715 
1,175 
2,455 
1,640 

816 
, 1,019 



Northfield, 

Pembroke, 

Pittsfield, 

Salisbury, 

Sutton, 

Warner, 

Wilmot, 



1,413 
1,336 
1,719 
1,329 
1,362 
2,139 
1,212 



Hillsborough County. 

Amherst, 1,565 

Antrim, 1,225 

Bedford, 1,555 

Brookline, 652 

Deering, 1,124 

Francestown, 1,307 

Goffstown, 2,376 

Greenfield, 834 

Hancock, 1,345 

Hillsborough, 1,807 

Hollis, 1,333 

Hudson, 1,148 

Litchfield, 480 

Lyndeborough, 1,032 

Manchester, « 3,235 

Mason, 1,275 

Merrimack, 1,114 

Milford, 1,455 

Mount Vernon, 720 

Nashua, 6,054 

New Boston, 1,569 

New Ipswich, 1,578 

Pelham, 1,003 

Peterborough, 2,163 

Sharon, 251 

Society Land, 133 

Temple, 676 

Weare, 2,375 

Windsor, 177 

Wilton, 1,033 

Cheshire County. 

Alstead, 1,454 

Chesterfield, 1,765 

Dublin, 1,075 

Fitzwilliam, 1,366 

Gilsum, 656 

Hinsdale, 1,141 

Jaffrey, 1,411 

Keene, 2,610 

Marlborough, 831 

Marlow, 626 

Nelson, 835 

Richmond, 1,165 

Rindge, 1,161 

Rozbury, 286 

Stoddard, 1,006 

Sullivan, 496 



Surry, 481 

Swanzey, 1,755 

Troy, 683 

Walpole, 2,015 

Westmoreland, 1,546 

Winchester, 2,065 

Sullivan County, 

Ac worth, 1,450 

Charles town, 1,722 

Claretnont, 3,217 

Cornish, 1,726 

Croydon, 956 

Goshen, 779 

Grantham, 1,036 

Langdon, 615 

Lempster, 941 

Newport, 1,958 

Plainfield, 1,552 

Springfield, 1,252 

Unity, 1,238 

Washington, 1,103 

Wendell, 795 

Strafford County. 

Barrington, 1,844 

Dover, 6,458 

Durham, 1,498 

Farmington, 1,380 

Lee, 926 

Madbury, 489 

Middleton, 482 

Milton, 1,322 

New Durham, 1,032 

Rochester, 2,431 

Somersworth, 3,283 

Strafford, 2,021 

Belknap County. 

Alton, 2,002 

Barn stead, 1,945 

Centre Harbor, 579 

Gilmanton, 3,485 

Gilford. 2,072 

Meredith, 3,351 

New Hampton, 1,809 

Sanbornton, 2,745 

Carroll County. 

Albany, 406 

Brookfield, 553 

Chatham, 523 

Conway, 1,801 

Eaton, 1,710 

EnWham, 1,195 

Freedom, 906 



1842.] 



NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



165 



Moultonborough 


t, 1,752 


Hill, 


999 


Ossipee, 
Sandwich, 


2,190 


Holderness, 


1,528 


2,625 


Landaff, 


957 


Tarn worth, 


1,717 


Lebanon, 


1,754 


Tufton borough , 


1,281 


Lincoln, 


76 


Wakefield, 


1,396 


Lisbon, 


1,682 


Wolfeborough, 


1,918 


Littleton, 


1,778 






Lyman, 


1,480 


Grafton County. 


Lyme, 


1,785 


Alexandria, 


1,284 


Nash & Sawyer's 


Bath, 


1,595 


Location, 


17 


Bethlehem, 


779 


Orange, 


463 


Bridge water, 


747 


Orford, 


1,707 


Bristol, 


1,153 


Piermont, 


1,057 


Camp ton, 


1,513 


Plymouth, 


1,281 


Canaan, 


1,576 


Rumney, 
State's Land, 


1,110 


Coventry, 


413 


4 


Dame's Gore, 


54 


Thornton, 


1,045 


Danbury, 


800 


Warren, 


938 


Dorchester, 


769 


Waterville, 


63 


Ellsworth, 


300 


Wentworth, 


1,119 


Enfield, 


1,514 


Woodstock, 


472 


Franconia, 


523 






Grafton, 


1,201 


Coos County. 


Groton, 


870 


Bartlett, 


706 


Hanover, 


2,613 


Berlin, 


116 


Haverhill, 


2,784 


Cambridge, 


5 


Hebron, 

» 


508 


Carroll, 


218 



Clarkesville, 88 

Coiebrook, 743 

College Grant, 3 

Columbia, 620 

Crawford's Grant, 9 

Dal ton, 664 

Dummer, 57 

Dixville, 4 

Errol, 104 

Gorham, 156 

Hart's Location, 44 

Hale's Location, 6 

Indian Stream, 315 

Jackson, 584 

Jefferson, 575 

Kilkenny, 19 
Lancaster, 1 ,316 

Milan, 386 

Millsfield, 12 

Northumberland, 399 

Pinkham's Grant, 39 

Randolph, 115 

Shelburne, 350 

Stark, 349 

Stewartstown, 630 

Stratford, 441 

Whitefield, 751 
Wentworth's Locat. 25 



III. VERMONT. 

Government. 

Salary. 
Charles Paine, Governor, (— term ends Oct., 1842, — ) $750 

David M. Camp, of Derby, Lieut.- Gov. $* Pres. Senate. 

Henry F. Janes, of Waterbury, Treasurer, 400 

Chauncey L. Knapp, of Montpelier, Secretary of State, 300 

George B. Manser, do. Sec y Civil fy Military Affairs, 200 

David Pierce, of Woodstock, Auditor, 150 

Secretary of the Senate, 275 

Ferrand M. Merrill, of Montpelier, Clerk of the House of Rep. 275 



Legislature. 

■ 

The Senate, established in 1836, consists of 30 members ; each county 
being entitled to at least one, and the rest being apportioned according 



166 VBRMOCTT. [1843. 

to population ; and the House of Representatives is composed of one 
member from each town. Pay of the members of each House, $ 1*60 
a day, during the session of the legislature , and of the Lieutenant* 
Governor, while presiding in the Senate, (4*00 a day. — Carlos Cool- 
idge, Speaker of the House of Representatives. 





Judiciary. 








Supreme Court. 




* 

Salary. 


Charles E. Williams, 


of Rutland, 


Chief Justice, 


$1,375 


Stephen Royce, 


of Berkshire, 


Associate Judge, 


1,375 


Jacob Collaraer, 


of Woodstock, 


do. 


1,375 


Isaac F. Redfield, 


of Montpelier, 


do. 


1,375 


Milo L. Bennett, 


of Burlington, 


do. 


1,375 


William Weston, 


do. 


Reporter, 


450 



The judiciary powers are vested in a Supreme Court, consisting of 
five judges ; in County Courts or Courts of Common Pleas, comprising 
five circuits, each County Court being composed of one judge of the 
Supreme Court, who is, ex officio, chief justice of the County Courts of 
his circuit," and two assistant judges for each county ; and in justices of 
the peace; — all the judges and justices being chosen annually by the 
legislature. 

The Supreme Court sits once, and the County Courts twice, a year 
in each county. Each judge of the Supreme Court is chancellor of a 
circuit. The Court of Chancery has two stated sessions annually in 
each county. An appeal from the decree of the chancellor lies to the 
Supreme Court 

Common Schools. 

According to a statement in the " Vermont Chronicle/' the number of 
children in the State, between the ages of 4 and 18, is 106,000, and the 
number of District Schools, 2,300. The number of teachers employed is 
5,100. The school tax for the year is $61,803, equal to $22 for each 
district ; the sums raised voluntarily by the towns and districts, amount- 
ed to $81,000. The aggregate expense for schools, including board for 
teachers, books, fuel, &c, is about $ 29*2,730, or $ 112 to each district. 



1842.] 



VERMONT. 

Counties, County Towns, and Population. 



167 



Counties. 


Pop. 1890. 


Pop. 1890. 


Pop. 1840. 


County Towm. 


Pop. 1840. 


Addison, 

Bennington, 

Caledonia, 

Chittenden, 

Essex, 

Franklin, 

Grand Isle, 

Lamoile, 

Orange, 

Orleans, 

Rutland, 

Washington, 

Windham, 

Windsor, 


20,469, 

16,125 

16,669 
16,065 

3,284 
17,192 

3,527 

24,681 
6,976 
29,963 
14,113 
28,659 

38,233 


24,940 

17,470 

20,967 
21,775 

3,981 
24,525 

3,696 

27,285 

13,980 
31,295 
21,394 

28,758 

40,623 


23,583 

16,872 

21,891 
22,977 

4,226 
24,531 

3,883 
10,475 
27,873 
13,634 
30,699 
23,506 
27,442 

40,356 


Middlebury, 
C Bennington, 
( Manchester, 
Danville, 
Burlington, 
Guildhall, 
St. Albans, 
North Hero, 
H yde Park, 
Chelsea, 
Irasburg, 
Rutland, 
Montpelixr, 
Newfane, 
C Windsor, 
I Woodstock, 


3,162 
3,429 
1,594 
2,633 
4,271 

470 
2,702. 

716 
1,080 
1,959 

971 
2,708 
3,725 
1,403 
2,744 
3,315 


Total, 


235,764 


280,679 


291,948 



Different Classes of Inhabitants ; Education. 



Counties. 


No. Person* employed in 










M 

a 
o 

•*• 

3 


1 

§ 


• 

3 

•** 

■0 


• 

4 




• 

S 

J3 






e 


• 

S 


s 

9 


S 


Q 




'O 


•> 
• 




QQ 






3 


** 


•o 


•s 




C 




S 


8 


• 




s 


a 


B 


1 




s 


9 


mi 
*5 









4,671 


a 
& 

100 


1,076 


a) 

o 

116 


9 e 

a ; 55 


a) 

s 

28 


s 

< 
5 


M 
QQ 

134 




177 


JS 



QQ 

6,449 


Addison , 


ioi 6 


Bennington, 


3,097 


83 


945 


84 


3 12 


29 


4 


275 


112 


3,894 


Caledonia, 


6,094 


4 


913 


103 


8 12 


38 


4 


322 


205 


7,398 


Chittenden, 


4,498 


136 


1,027 


107 


9, 10 


38 


3 


256 


144 


5,170 


Essex, 


938 


9 


90 


18 


5' 2 


5 


2 


101 


49 


1,345 


Franklin, 


4,140 


81 


638 


106 


6 


5 


3 


3 


148 


155 


4,361 


Grand Isle, 


783 


16 


84 


19 


2 


2 








26 


1,601 


Lamoile, 


2,986 


68 


369 


49 


4 


8 


14 


1 


100 


105 


3,216 


Orange, 


6,558 


132 


893 


166 


17 


7 


34 


6 


994 


267 


9,622 


Orleans, 


4,265 


83 


384 


51 


2 


4 


18 


2 


111 


122 


3,916 


Rutland, 


6,595 


129 


1,156 


164 


10 


10 


29 


3 


382 


249 


10,330 


Washington, 


7,105 


136 


1,403 


105 


11 


10 


14 


2 


231 


196 


3,323 


Windham, 


10,201 


122 


1,850 


178 


23 


11122 


4 


501 


248 


9,138 


Windsor, 


114219 


204 
1,303 


2,346 
13,174 


297 
1,563 


19 
129 


6| 49 


7 
46 


558 
4,113 


357 
2,402 


13,054 

82,817 


Tatal, 


73,150 


103 


411 



168 VERMONT. [1842. 

Population of the Towns according to the Census of 1840. 



Addison County. 

Addison, 1,232 

Avery's Gore, 78 

Bridport, 1,480 

Bristol, 1/233 

Cornwall, 1,164 

Ferrisburg, 1,765 

Goshen, 621 

Granville, 545 

Hancock, 465 

Leicester, 603 

Lincoln, 770 

Middlebury, 3,162 

Monkton, 1,310 

New Haven, 1,503 

Panton, 670 

Ripton, 357 

Salisbury, '942 

Shorehain, 1,674 

Starksborough, 1 ,263 

Vergennes, city, 1,017 

Waltham, 285 

Weybridge, 797 

Whiting, . 659 

Bennington County. 

Arlington, 1,038 

Bennington, 3,429 

Dorset, 1,426 

Glastenbury, 53 

Landgrove, 344 

Manchester, 1,594 

Peru, 578 

Pownal, 1,613 

Readsborough, 707 

Rupert, 1,086 

Sandgate, 776 

Searsborough, 120 

Shaftsbury, 1,885 

Stamford, 662 

Sunderland, 438 

Winhall, 576 

Woodford, 487 

Caledonia County. 

Barnet, 2,030 

Bradley Vale, 50 

Burke, 997 

Cabot, 1,440 

Danville, 2,633 

Groton, 928 

Goshen Gores, 186 

Hard wick, 1,354 

Harris's Gore, 16 

Kirby, 520 



Lyndon, 


1,753 


Newark, 


360 


Peacham, 


1,443 


Ryegate, 


1,223 


St.Johnsbury, 


1,887 


Sheffield, 


821 


Sutton, 


1,068 


Walden, 


913 


Water ford , 


1,388 


Wheelock, 


881 


Chittenden County. 


Bolton, 


470 


Buel's Gore, 


18 


Burlington, 


4,271 


Charlotte, 


1,620 


Colchester, 


1,739 


Essex, 


1,824 


Hinesburgh, 


1,682 


Huntington, 


914 


Jericho, 


1.685 


Milton,- 


2J134 


Richmond, 


1,054 


St. George, 


121 


Shelburn, 


1,098 


Underbill, 


1,441 


Westford, 


1,352 


Williston, 


1,554 


Essex County. 


Averill, 


11 


Bloomfield, 


179 


Brighton, 


157 


Brunswick, 


130 


Canaan, 


378 


Concord, 


1,024 


East Haven, 


79 


Granby, 


105 


Guildhall, 


470 


Lemington, 


1,130 


Lunenburg 


124 


Maidstone, 


271 


Victory, 


140 


Wen lock, 


28 



Franklin County. 

Avery's Gore, 35 

Bakersfield, 1,258 

Berkshire, 1,818 

Enosburg, 2,022 

Fairfax, 1,918 

Fairfield, 2,448 

Fletcher, 1,014 

Franklin, 1,410 

Georgia, 2,106 



Highgate, 2,292 

Montgomery, 548 

Richford, 914 

Sheldon, 1,734 

St. Alban's 2,702 
Swan ton, 

Grand Isle County. 

Alburgh, 1,344 

Grand Isle, 724 

Isle La Molt, 435 

North Hero, 716 

South Hero, 664 

Lamoile County. 

Belvidere, 207 

Cambridge, 1,790 

Eden, 703 

Elmore, 476 

Hyde Park, 1,080 

Johnson, 1 ,410 

Mansfield, 223 

Morristown, 1,502 

Sterling, 193 

Stowe, 1,371 

Waterville, , 610 

Wolcott, 910 

Orange County. 

Bradford, 1,655 

Braintree, 1,232 

Brookfield, 1,789 

Chelsea, 1,959 

Corinth, 1,970 

Fairlee, 644 

Newbury, 2,578 

Orange, 984 

Randolph, 2,678 

Strafford, 1,762 

Thetford, 2,065 

Topsham, 1,745 

Tunbridge, 1,811 

Vershire, 1,198 

Washington, 1,359 

West Fairlee, 824 

Williamstown, 1,620 

Orleans County. 

Albany, 920 

Barton, 892 

Brownington, 486 

Charleston,. 731 

Coventry, 786 

Coventry Gore, 10 

Craflsbury, 1,151 







VERMONT 


■ 


Derby, 


1,681 


Tinmouth, 


780 


Glover, 


1,119 


Wallingford, 


1,608 


Greensborough, 


883 


Wells, 


720 


Holland, 


605 


Westhaven, 


774 


Irasburg, 


971 






Jay, 


308 


Washington County. 


Lowell, 


431 


Bar re, 


.2,126 


Morgan, 


422 


Berlin, 


1,598 


Newport, 


591 


Calais, 


1,709 


Salem, 


299 


Duxbury, 


820 


Troy, 


856 


Fayston, 


635 


Westfield, 


370 


Marshfield, 


1,156 


Westmore, 


122 


Middlesex 


1,270 






Monroe, - 


1,092 


Rutland County. 


Montpelier, 


3,725 


Benson, 


1,403 


Moretown, 


1,128 


Brandon, 


2,194 


Northfield, 


2,013 


Castleton, 


1,769 


Plainfield, 


880 


Chittenden, 


644 


Roxbury, 


784 


Clarendon, 


1,549 


Waitsfield, 


1,048 


Danby, 


1,379 


Waterbury,, 


1,992 


Fairhaven, 


633 


Warren, 


943 


Hubbardton. 


719 


Worcester, 


587 


Ira, 


431 






Mendon, 


545 


Windham County. 


Middletown, 


1,057 


Acton, 


170 


Mount Holly, 


1,356 


Athens, 


378 


Mount Tabor, 


226 


Brattleborough, 


2,624 


Orwell, 


1,504 


Brookline, 


328 


Pawlet. 
fcttsfield, . 


1,748 


Dover, 


729 


615 


Dummerston, 


1,263 


Pittsford, 


1,927 


Grafton, 


1,326 


Poultney, 


1,878 


Guilford, 


1,525 


Rutland, 


2,708 


Halifax, 


1,399 


Sherburne, 


498 


Jamaica, 


1,586 


Shrewsbury, 


1,218 


Londonderry, 


1,216 


Sudbury, 


796 


Marlborough, 


1,027 



169 

Newfane, 1,403 

Putney, 1,383 

Rockingham, 2,330 

Somerset, 262 

Stratton, 341 

Townshend, 1,345 

Vernon, 705 

Wardsborougii, 1,102 

Westminster, 1,556 

Whittingham, 1 391 

Wilmington, 1,296 

Windham, 757 

» 

Windsor County. 

Andover, 877 

Baltimore, 155 

Barnard, 1,774 

Bethel, 1,886 

Bridge water, 1,363 

Cavendish, 1,427 

Chester, 2,305 

Hartford, ,,2,194 

Hartland, 2,341 

Ludlow, 1,363. 

Norwich, 2,218 

Plymouth, l,4ir 

Pomfret, 1,77* 

Reading, 1,363 

Rochester, 1,396. 

Royalton, 1,917, 

Sharon, 1,371 

Springfield, 2,625 

Stockbridge, 1,418- 

Weathersfield, 2,081 

Weston, 1,032 

Windsor, 2,744 

Woodstock, 3,315. 



IV. MASSACHUSETTS. 



Government 



For the Year ending on the 1st Wednesday in January , 1841. 



John Davis, of Worcester, 

George Hull, of Sandisfield, 

John P. Bigelow, of Boston, 

David "Wilder, of Leominster, 

H. A. S. Dearborn, of Roxbury, 

15 



Salary. 
Governor, $3,666 67* 

Lieut.- Governor , 533*33 

See. of the Commonwealth, 2,000 
Treas. and Receiver- Gen., 2,000 
Adjutant- General, 1 ,500* 



t 

170 MASSACHUSETTS. [1842* 

Salary. 

William Tuftg, 1st Clerk, Secretary of State's Office, 1,200 

Joseph Foster, 1st Clerk, Treasurer's Office, 1,200 

William Learned, 1st Clerk, Adjutant- General's. Office, 1,200 

Horace Mann, of Boston, Sec. of the Board of Education, 1,500 

Waldo Flint, of Leicester, ) ~ . nn/mn C nu „ A * AoTr o . 
Julius Rockwell, of Pittsfield, < * a . w * C<m * 5 4 P ay • 6 a da ^ and 
Whan Shove,' of Danvers, $ ~™""n-\ travelling expenses. 

Charles Calhoun, Clerk of the Senate, 1,170 

Luther S. dishing, Clerk, House of Representatives, 1,170 

Daniel P. King, of Danvers, President of the Senate. 

George H. Ashman, of Springfield, Speaker oftlu House of Rep. 

Judiciary. 

Supreme Court'. 

Salary. 

Lemuel Shaw, of Boston, Chief Justice, $ 3,500 

Samuel Putnam, of Boston, Associate Justice, 3,000 

Samuel S. Wilde, of Boston, do. 3,000 

Charles A. Dewey, of Northampton, do. 3,000 

James T. Austin, of Boston, Attorney- General, 1,200 

Theron Metcalf, of Dedham, Reporter, 1,000 

Asahel Huntington, of Salem, District- Attorney, N. Dist. 1,000 

John H. Clifford, of New Bedford, do. S. do. 1,000 

Pliny Merrick, of Worcester, do. Mid. do. 1,000' 

Daniel Wells, of Greenfield, do. W. do. 1,000 

Samuel D. Parker, of Boston, Attorney, Co. Suffolk, 1,800 

Court of Common Pleas. 

Salary. 

John M. Williams, of Taunton, Chief Justice, (2,100 

Solomon Strong, of Leominster, Associate Justice, 1,800 

David Cummings, of Salem, do. 1,800 

Charles H. Warren, of New Bedford, do. 1,800 

Municipal Court of Boston. 

Salary. 

Peter O. Thacher, Judge, $ 1,250 

Thomas W. Phillips, Clerk; — Samuel D. Parker, Attorney. 

The Municipal Court is held on the 1st Monday in each month. 

. Police Court of Boston, 

William Simmons,) C #1,500 

John Gray Rogers, > Justices, < 1,500 

James C. Merrill, ) ( 1,500 

The Police Court sits every day (Sunday excepted) at 9 o'clock, 

At M., and at 3 P. M., for the trial of criminal causes. 



1842.] 



MA.SSA.CHV8ETT8. 



171 



Probate Court. 



J ■ ■ 

Counties. 


Judges. 


Salary. 

$350 
450 
425 
100 
700 
280 
280 
280 
800 
200 
500 
400 

1,000 
700 


Registers. 


Salary. 


Barnstable, 

Berkshire, 

Bristol, 

Dukes, 

Essex, 

Franklin, 

Hampden, 

Hampshire, 

Middlesex, 

Nantucket, 

Norfolk, 

Plymouth, 

Suffolk, 

Worcester, 


Nymphas Marston, 
Wm. P. Walker, 
Oliver Prescott, 
Theod. G. Mayhew, 
Daniel A. White, 
R. E. Newcomb, 
Oliver B. Morris, 
Ithamar Conkey, 
Samuel P. P. Fay, 
Isaac Coffin, 
Sherman Leland, 
Wilkes Wood, 
Willard Phillips, 
fra M. Barton, 


Timothy Reed, 
fjenry W. Bishop, 
Anselm Bassett, 
B. C. Marchant, 
Nathaniel Lord, Jr., 
Geo. Grennel, Jr., 
Justice Willard, 
Samuel F. Lyman, 
Isaac Fiske, 
George Cobb, 
Jonathan H. Cobb, 
Jacob H. Loud, 
O. W. B. Peabodv, 
Charles G. Prentiss, 


$ 500 
600 
700 
150 

1,500 
460 
460 
460 

1,500 
300 
700 
750 

2,000 

1,400 



Abstract of thi Returns of the Poor for 1640. 





• 

m 

I 

o 
H 

Q 


* 

•B 



e 
2. 


a legal set- 


• 

e 
© 

a 

£ 
s 


te Paapers 
foreigners. 


ions reliev- 
isbouses. 


eekly cost 
Pauper in 
set. 


of Paupers 
made so by 
aoco. 


* tag" 

w.sS 


Countiea. , 


o 

1 

o 


o. of Pan 
the year. 


o. having 
tlement. 


3 

0Q 

o 
6 


o. of Sta 
who are 


o. of Pen 
ed In Aln 


verage to 
of each 
Almshou 


roportion 
probably 
intern per 


et am't * 
of suppe 
relieving 




2 


fc 


1,310 


fc 


fc 


1,433 


< 


0, 

2,309 


S5 


Suffolk, 


3,420 


2,110 


1,606 


*H>1 


$44,19000 


Essex, 


28 


2,721 


2,237 


' 456 


215 


1,363 


85 


1,806 


5320976 


Middlesex, 


46 


2,106 


987 


1,076 


727 


1,393 


93 


1,406 


55,262 83 


Worcester, 


55 


1,487 


1,166 


233 


135 


850 


81 


587 


38,94616 


Hampshire, 


23 


396 


296 


86 


36 


101 


97 


140 


11,64445 


Hampden, 


18 


404 


227 


173 


31 


162 


87 


212 


8,573 17 


Franklin, 


26 


420 


380 


34 


5 


22 


74 


101 


11,111-52 


Berkshire, 


30 


569 


317 


244 


57 


54 


85 


233 


11,344 24 


Norfolk, 


22 


781 


570 


205 


122 


440 


94 


245 


20,882 93 


Bristol, 


19 


1,522 


948 


565 


213 


680 


73 


914 


24,738 37 


Plymouth, 


21 


575 


501 


71 


25 


423 


76 


216 


17,023 32 


Barnstable, 


13 


302 


296 


7 


3 


169 


85 


51 


11,970-79 


Dukes Co., 


3 


29 


29 










2 


2,31900 


Nantucket, 


1 

307 


180 


63 
9,327 


11 
5,271 


3 
3,178 


70 
7,160 


85 


65 

8,287 


9.02500 


Total, 


14,912 


13)11 16 
85 


320,24154 



173 MASSACHUSETTS. 

Abstract of the School Returns for 1839-40. 



[1842. 



i 



No. of Towns which have made Returns, 301 

Population, (May 1, 1837,) 696,197 

Valuation, (1830,) $207,404,35826 

3,072 

124,354 
149,222 

92,698 
111,844 

179,268 

7,844 

11,834 

710 

. 2,378 

3,928 

$33 08 
1 12 75 

$8-92 
#5-85 

$2414 

#6 89 



No. of Public Schools, 

No. of Scholars of all ages in all the Schools, J J° Whiter"' 

Average attendance in the Schools, i Jjj Winter*' 

No. of persons between 4 and 16 years of age, 

No. of persons under 4 years of age, who attend School, 

No. over 16 years of age, who attend School, 

Average length of the Schools in months and days, 

No. of Teachers, (including Summer and C Males, 
Winter terms,) \ Females, 

Average wages paid per month, including C To Males, 
board, \ To Females, 

C Of Males 
Average value of board per month, J Qf Femal ' eg> ' 

Average wages per month, exclusive of C Of Males, 
board, (Of Females, 

Amount of money raised by taxes for the support of Schools, 

including only the wages of TeacheVs, board, and fuel, $477,221*24 

Amount of board and fuel contributed for Public Schools, $ 37,269*74 

No. of Incorporated Academies, . 78 

Aggregate of months kept, ....... 755J 

Average number of Scholars, 3,701 

Aggregate paid for tuition, ....... -$57,458*59 

No. of Unincorporated Academies, Private Schools, and 

Schools kept to prolong Common Schools, • . . 1,308 

Aggregate of months kept, 

Average number of Scholars, .... 

Aggregate paid for tuition, 

Amount of Local Funds, . ' . 

Income from same, 



. 8,324 

. 28,635 

$241,114*20 

$321,079 65 

$"15,270-89 



L 



1842.] 



MASSACHUSETTS. 



173 



Counties, County Towns, and Population. 

7 



Counties. 


Pop. 1820. 


Pop. 1830. 


Pop. 1840. 


County Towns. 


Pop. 1840. 
93,383 


Suffolk, 


43,940 


62,162 


95,773 


Boston, 










C Salem, 


15,082 


Essex, 


74,655 


82,887 


94,987 


< Newburyport, 


7,161 










( Ipswich, 


3,000 


Middlesex, 


61,472 


77,968 


106,611 


J Cambridge, 
( Concord, 


8,409 

1,784 


Worcester, 


73,625 


84,365 


95,313 


Worcester, 


7,497 


Hampshire, 


26,487 


30,216 


30,897 


Northampton, 


3,790 


Hampden, 


28,021 


31,640 


37,366 


Springfield, 


10,985 


Franklin, 


29,268 


29,344 


28,812 


Greenfield, 


1,756 


Berkshire, 


35,720 


37,825 


41,745 


Lenox, 


1 ,313 


Norfolk, 


36,471 


41,901 


53,140 


Dedham, 


3,290 


Bristol, 


40,908 


49,474 


60,164 


C New Bedford, 
( Taunton, 


12,087 
7,645 


Plymouth, 


38,136 


42,993 


47,373 


Plymouth, 


5,281 


Barnstable, 


24,026 


28,525 


32,548 


-Barnstable, 


4,301 


Dukes, 


3,292 


3,518 


3,958 


Edgartown, 


1,736 


Nantucket, 


7,266 


7,202 


9,012 


Nantucket, 


9,012 


Total, 


523,287 


610,014 


737,699 



Different Classes of Inhabitants. 



Free White Males, 


360,679 


" " Females, 


368,351 


Free Colored Males, 


4,654 


u " Females, 


4,015 


No. Persons employed in 




Mining, 


499 


Agriculture, 


87,837 


Commerce, 


8,063 


Manufactures and Trades, 85,176 


Navigating the Ocean, 


27,153 


Nav. Lakes and Rivers, 


372 


Learned Professions, 


3,804 


Deaf and Dumb, Whites, 


273 


Blind, do. 


308 



Insane and Idiots, Whites, 1,071 
Deaf and Dumb, Colored, 17 

Blind, do. 22 

Insane and Idiots, do. 200 

Universities and Colleges (4), 

with Students, 769 

Academies and Grammar 
Schools (251), with Schol- 
ars, 16,746 
Common Schools (3,362), with 

Scholars, 160,257 

White Persons over 20 years 
of age who are unable to 
read and write, 4,448 



15 



174 



MASSACHUSETTS. 



[1842. 



P0PUL4TI0H OF THE ToWNft ACCORDIHG TO THE CENSUS OF 1840. 



Suffolk County. 

Boston, 93,383 

Chelsea, 2,390 

Essex County. 

Amesbury, 2,471 

Andover, 5,207 

Beverly, 4,689 

Boxford, 942 

Bradford, 2,222 

Danvers, 5,020 

Essex, 1,450 

Georgetown, 1,540 

Gloucester, 0,350 

Hamilton, 818 

Haverhill, 4,336 

Ipswich, 3,000 

Lynn, 9,369 

Lynnfield, 707 

Manchester, 1,355 

Marble head, 5,575 

Methuen, 2,251 

Middleton, «57 

Newbury, 3.789 

Newburyport, 7,161 

Rockport, 2,650 

Rowley, 1,203 

Salem, 15,082 

Salisbury, 2,739 

Saugus, 1,098 

Topsfield, 1,059 

Wenham, 689 
West Newbury, 1,560 

Middlesex County. 

Acton, 1,121 

Ashby, 1,246 

Bedford, 929 

Billerica, 1,632 

Boxborough, 426 

Brighton, 1,425 

Burlington, 510 

Cambridge, 8,409 

Carlisle, 556 

Charlestown, 11,484 

Chelmsford, 1,697 

Concord, 1,784 

Dracut, 2,188 

Dunstable, 603 

Framingham, 3,030 

Groton, 2,139 

Holliston, 1,782 

Jiopkinton, 2,245 



Lexington, 

Lincoln, 

Littleton, 

Lowell, 

Maiden, 



1,642 

686 

927 

20,796 

2,514 



Marlborough, 2,101 

Medford, 2,478 

Natick, 1,285 

Newton, 3,351 

Pepperell, 1,571 

Reading, 2,193 

Sherburne, 995 

Shirley, 957 

South Reading, 1 ,517 

Stoneham, 1,017 

Stow, 1,230 

Sudbury, 1 ,422 

Tewksbury, 906 

Townsend, 1,892 

Tyngsborough, 870 

Waltham, 2,504 

Watertown, 1,810 

Wayland, 998 
West Cambridge, 1,363 

Westford, 1,436 

Weston, 1,092 

Wilmington, 859 

Woburn, 2,993 

Worcester County. 

Ashburnham, 1,652 

Athol, 1,591 

Auburn, 649 

Barre, 2,751 
Berlin, 
Bolton, 

Boylston, 797 

Brookfield, 2,472 

Charlton, 2,117 

Dana, 691 

Douglas, 1,617 

Dudley, 1,352 

Fitchburg, 2,604 

Gardner, 1,260 

Grafton, 2,943 

Hard wick, 1,789 

Harvard, 1,571 

Holden, 1,874 

Hubbardston, 1,784 

Lancaster, 2,019 

Leicester, 1 ,707 

Leominster, 2,069 

Lunenburg, 1,272 

Mendon, 3,524 



763 
1,186 



Milford, 1,773 

Millbury, 2,171 

New Braintree, 752 

Northborough, 1,248 

Northbridge, 1,449 

N Brookfield, 1,485 

Oakham, 1,038 

Oxford, ' 1,742 

Paxton, 670 

Petersham, 1,775 

Phillipston, 919 

Princeton, 1,347 

Royals ton, 1,667 

Rutland, 1,260 

Shrewsbury, 1,481 

South borough, 1,145 

Southbridge, 2,031 

Spencer, 1,604 

Sferling, 1,647 

Sturbridge, 2,005 

Sutton, 13,370 

Templeton, 1,776 

Upton, 1,466 

Uxbridge, 2,004 

Warren, 1,290 

Webster, 1,403 

Westborough, . 1,658 

West Boylston, 1,187 

Westminster, 1,645 

Winchendon, 1,754 

Worcester, 7,497 

Hampshire County. 

Amherst, 2,550 

Belchertown, 2,554 

Chesterfield, 1,132 

Cummington, 1,237 

Easthampton, 717 

Enfield, / 976 

Goshen, 556 

Granby, , 971 

Greenwich, 824 

Hadley, 1,814 

Hatfield, 933 

Middlefield, 1,717. 

Northampton, 3,750 

Norwich, 750 

Pelham, 956 

Plainfield, 910 

Prescott, ' • 780 

South Hadley, 1,458 

Southampton, 1,157 

Ware, 1,890 

Westhampton, 759 



1842.] 

Williamsburg, 1,309 

Worthington, 1,197 

Hampden County. 

Blanford, 1,427 

Brimfield, 1,419 

Chester, 1,632 

Granville, 1,414 

Holland, 423 

Longmeadow, 1,270 

Ludlow, t,268 

Monson, 2,151 

Montgomery, 740 

Palmer, 2,139 

Russell, 955 

South wick, 1,214 

Springfield, 10,985 

Tolland, 627 

Wales, 686 

West 6 eld, 3,526 
West Springfield, 3,626 

Wilbraham, 1,864 

Franklin County. 

Asbfield, 1,610 

Bernardston, 992 

Buckland, 1.084 

Charlemont, 1,127 

Coleraine, > 1,971 

Conway, 1,409 

Deerfield, 1,912 

Erving, 309 

Gill, 798 

Greenfield, 1,756 

Hawley, 977 

Heath, 895 

Leverett, 875 

Leyden, 632 

Monroe, 282 

Montague, 1,255 

New Satem, 1,305 

Northfield, 1,673 

Orange, 1,501 

Rowe, 703 

^helburne, 1,022 

Shutesbury, 987 

Sunderland, 719 

Warwick, 1,071 

Wendell, 875 

Whately, 1,072 

Berkshire County. 

Adams, 3,703 

Alford, 481 

Beckett, 1,342 

Boston Corner. 65 



Cheshi 



ire. 



Clarksburg, 



985 
370 



MASSACHUSETTS. 


Dalton, 


1,255 


Egremont, 


1,038 


Florida, 


441 


Gr. Barrington, 


2,704 


Hancock, 


922 


Hinsdale, 


955 


Lanesborough, 


1,140 


Lee, 


2,428 


Lenox, 


1,313 


Mt. Washington, 


, 438 


New Ashford, 


227 


N. Marlborough 


, 1,682 


Otis, 


1,177 


Peru, 


576 


PitUfield, 


3,747 


Richmond, 


1,097 


Sandisfield, 


1,464 


Savoy, 


915 


Sheffield, 


2,322 


Stock bridge, 


1,992 


Tvringham, 


1,477 


Washington, 


991 


W. Stock bridge, 


1,448 


Williamstown, 


6,153 


Windsor, 


897 


NorfoUt County. 


Bellingham, 


1,055 


Braintree, 


2,168 


Brookline, 


1,365 


Canton, - 


1,995 


Co basset, 


1,471 


Dedham, 


3,290 


Dorchester, 


4,875 


Dover, 


520 


Foxborough, 


1,298 


Franklin, 


1,717 


Medfield, 


883 


Med way, 


2,043 


Mil ton, - 


1,822 


Needham, 


1,488 


Quincy, 


3,486 


Randolph, 


3,213 


Roxbury, 


9,089 


Sharon, 


1,076 


Stoughton, 


2,142 


Walpole, 


1,491 


Weymouth, 


3,738 


Wrentham, 


2,915 



Bristol County. 

A ttleborough , 3,585 

Berkley, 886 

Dartmouth, 4,155 

Dighton, 1,378 

Easton, 2,074 

Fairhaven, 8,951 

Fall River, 6,738 



175 

Freetown, 1 ,772 

Mansfield, 1,382 
New Bedford, 12,087 

Norton, 1,545 

Pawtucket, 2,184 

Raynham, 1,329 

Rehoboth, 2,169 

Seekoiik, 1,996 

Somerset, 1,005 

Swanzey, 1,484 

Taunton, 7,645 

Westport, 2,82Q 

Plymouth County. 

Abingion, 3,214 

Bridge water, 2,131 
Carver, 995 

Duxbury, 2,798 

E. Bridge water, 1,950 
Halilax, 734 

Hanover, 1,488 

Hanson, 1,040 

Hingham, 3,564 
Hull, 231 

Kingston, 1,440 

Marsjiiield, 1,761 

Middle borough, 5,085 

N. lindgewater, 2,616 

Pembroke, 1,258 

Plymouth, 5,281 
Plywpton, 834 

Rochester, 3,864 

Scituate, 3,886 

Waieham, 2,o02 

W. Bridge water, 1,201 

Barnstable County. 

Barnstable, 4,301 

Brewster, 1,522 

Chatham, 2,334 

Dennis, 2,942 
Easthaic, 955 

Falmouth, 2,589 

Harwich, 2,930 
Marshpee, 309 

Orleans, 1,974 

Provwcetown, 2,122 

Sandwich, 3,719 

Truro, 1,920 

Wellrieet, 2,377 

Yarmouth, 2,554 

Dukt8 County. 
Chilmark, 702 

Edgartown, 1,736 

Tisbury, 1,520 

Nantucket County. 

Nantucket, 9,019 



176 RHODE ISLAND. [1842. 

V. RHODE ISLAND. 
Government 

For the Year ending on the let Wednesday in May, 1642. 

Salary, 
Samuel W. King, of Johnston, Governor, $400 

Byron Dimon, of Bristol, Lieutenant- Governor, 200 

Henry Bowen, of Providence, Secretary of State, $ 750 & fees. 

Stephen Cahoone, of Newport, Treasurer, 450 

Albert C. Greene, of Providence, Attorney- General, Fees. 

The Senate is composed of the Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, and 
10 Senators. The Governor has no veto power, but is the presiding 
officer of the Senate. 

The House of Representatives is composed of 72 members, elected 
semi-annually, in April and August Of these, Newport sends 6 ; Provi- 
dence, Warwick, and Portsmouth, 4 each ; and every other town, 2. — 
Charles Jackson, of Providence, Speaker, 

The name of the State, in all legislative and legal proceedings, is 
" Rhode Island and Providence Plantations." 

Judiciary. 

The judiciary power is vested in a Supreme Court and a Court of 
Common Pleas for each county. The Supreme Court has equity juris- 
diction in cases of trusts, fraud, partition, partnership, waste, &c. 

Supreme Court. 

Salary. 

Job Durfee, of Tiverton, Chief Justice, $650 

Levi Haile, of Warren, Associate Justice^ 550 

William R. Staples, of Providence, do. 550 

Each of the courts of Common Pleas has five judges,' who have no 
salaries, but are paid by entries. All the judges of all the courts, the 
.clerks, sheriffs, &c, are elected annually by the' General Assembly. 

The government of this State is founded on the provisions of the. 
charter granted to the colony by Charles II., in 1663; and this is the 
only State in the Union which is without a written Constitution. 

The General Assembly, at the session in January, 1,841, called a con- 
vention to meet at Providence, on the first Monday of November, 1841, 
for the purpose of forming a Constitution, to be proposed to the people 
for adoption. 



1843.] 



RHODE ISLAND, 



177 



Public Schools. 

By an act of the General Assembly, passed January 1828, a perma- 
nent school fund was commenced, which is invested in bank stock, and 
now amounts to upwards of $50,000. The sum of $25,000 per annum, 
is paid from the State treasury to the school committees of the several 
towns for the support of public schools. The interest of this' State's 
portion of the deposit of the United States* surplus revenue, and also 
moneys arising from several other sources, are also applied to the sup- 
port of public schools. 

Abstract from the Annual Returns of Public Schools, made to the 
General Assembly in May, 1841. 

Number of School Districts, 352 Number of Schools, 408 

Do. Male Teachers, 339 Do. Female Teachers, 156 

Do. Male Scholars, 11,253 Do. Female Scholars, 9,000 

Average number of Scholars attending, . ' . . . 14,000 

Paid from the State Treasury for Free or Public Schools, $25,272*83 
Paid by the -Towns for the same, . . . 19,943*36 

Expended for tuition, . . . . . . 40,51601 

Expended for fuel, rent, &c • . 6,312*64 

In addition to the above items, the Board of Instruction is generally 
paid for by contribution, and no account made of it. 

Besides the public schools there are a number of incorporated acade- 
mies and private schools, which are well supported. 

Counties, County Towns-,* and Population. 



Counties. 

• 


Pop. 
1820. 

5,637 
10,228 
15,771 
35,786 
15,687 

83,059 


Pop. 
1830. 

5,466 
12,784 
16,534 
47,014 
15,414 


Pop. 

1840. 


County Town*. 

* 


Pop. 

1830. 

3,054 
1,591 
8,010 
16,832 
3,663 


Pop. 
1840. 

3,490 
1,509 
8,333 
23,171 
3,717 


Bristol, 

Kent, 

Newport, 

Providence, 

Washington, 


6,470 
13,08: 
16,874 
58,073 
14,324 


Bristol, 

East Greenwich, 

Newport, 

Providence, 

South Kingston, 


_ Total, 


97,212 


103,830 


D] 

Free White Males 
Do. FemaJ 

Colored persons, 
* Slaves, 


IFFKRXNT CLASS! 

, • 51,357 
eg, 54,236 
(Males, 1,411 
I Females, 1,828 
5 


s of Inhabitants. 

Deaf and Dumb, 

Blind, 

Insane and Idiots, 
At public charge, 
At private charge, 


75 
63 

121 
91 



* The five persons included as slaves in the Census are not strictly such j having been 
wnancipnted by law, but are chargeable for their support upon the ostates of their former 
■•iters. Service cannot be required of them. 



178 



RBODX ISLAM*. 



[1842. 



Employed in 
Mining, 35 

Agriculture, 16,625 

Commerce, 1,340 

Manufactures and Trades, 21,000 
Navigating the Ocean, 1,695 

Nav. Canals, Lakes, & Rivers, 219 
Learned Professions, 461 

Revolutionary and Military 
Pensioners, 601 



Universities and Colleges 2, 

with Students 324 

Academies and Grammar 

Schools, 51 

Students in Academies, &c. 3,500 
Primary & Common Schools, 428 
Scholars in Com. Schools, 17,861 
White persons over 20 years 
of age, unable to read and 
write, 1,600 



Population or the Towns according to the Census of 1840. 



Providence County. 

Burrillville, 1,982 

Cranston, 2,902 

Cumberland, 5,225 

Foster, 2,181 

Gloucester, 2,304 

Johnston, 2,477 

N. Providence, 4,207 

Providence, 23,171 

Scituate, 4,090 

Smithfield, 9,534 

Neioport County. 
Jamestown, 365 



Little Compton, 1,327 

Middletown, 891 

Newport, 8,333 

New Shoreham, 1,069 

Portsmouth, 1,706 

Tiverton, 3,133 

Bristol County. 
Barrington, • 549 

Bristol, 3,490 

Warren, 2,437 

Kent County. 
Coventry, 3,433 



East Greenwich, 1,509 
West Greenwich, 1,415 
Warwick, 6,726 

Washington County. 
Charlestown, 923 

Exeter, 1,776 

Hopkinton, 1,726 

North Kingston, 2,909 
South Kingston, 3,717 
Richmond. 1,361 

Westerly, 1,912 



VI. CONNECTICUT. 

Government 

For tfy Year ending on the 1st Wednesday in May, 1842. 



Wm. W. Ellsworth, of Hartford, Governor, 



Salary. 
$1,100 



Charles Hawley, 
Hiram Rider, 
Royal R. Hinman, 
Henry Kilbourn, 
Seth P. Beers, 



of Stamford, Lieut.- Gov.^ Pres. Senate, 300 
of Hartford, Treasurer, 1,000 

do. Secretary , $ 84 & fees. 

do. Comptroller, 1,000 

Commissioner of the School Fund. 1 ,250 



Judiciary. 
Supreme and Superior Court. 



Thomas S. Williams, 
Samuel Church, 
Henry M. Waite, 
Roger M. Sherman, 
William L». Stows, 
Thomas Day, 



of Hartford, 
of Salisbury, 
of Lyme, 
of Fairfield, 
of Middletown, 
of Hartford, 



Chief Justice, 
Associate Justice, 

do* 

do. 

do. 
Reporter, 



Salary* 

$1,100 

1,050 

1,050 

1,050 

. 1,050 

360 



1842.] CONNECTICUT. 179 

Common Schools. 

School Fund. — The capital of this fund, on the 1st of April, 1840, 
was invested as follows : 

In bonds, contracts, and mortgages, . $1,668,515*42 

Bank stock, 220,700 00 

Cultivated lands and buildings, .... 92,76500 

Wild lands, 50,210 00 

Stock on farms* . . . , . 27500 

Cash, 7,75432 

Total, ..... $2,040,228-74 

The dividend to schools from the revenue of the fund for the year 
ending March, 1841, was $112,599 80. The total amount divided to 
schools in forty-fqur years, is $ 2,609,215*13. 

The number of children in the State between 4 and 16 years of age, 
returned to the Comptroller's office in September last, was 84,148* 
These returns are from 1,633 school districts. The dividend to each 
child the past year has been $1*35; 10 oents more than the year pre- 
vious. 

Counties, County Towns, and Population. 



Counties. 


Pop. 
1880. 


: Pop. 
1830. 

46,950 

51,141 

42,855 
24,845 

43,848 

42,295 

18,700 
27,077 


Pop. 
1840. 


County Towns. 


Pop. 
1830. 


Pop. 
1840. 


Fairfield, 

Hartford, 
Litchfield, 
Middlesex, 
New Haven, 

New London, 

Tolland, 
Windham, 

Total, 


42,739 

47,262 
41,267 
22,405 
39,616 

35,945 

14,330 
25,331 


49,917 

55,629 
40,448 
24,879 
48,619 

44,463 

17,980 
28,080 


C Fairfield, 

( Danbury, 
Hartford, 
Litchfield, 
Middletown, 
New Haven, 

( N. London, 

\ Norwich, 
Tolland, * 
Brooklyn, 


4,226 
4,311 
9,789 
4,456 
6,892 
10,678 
4,356 
4,179 
1,698 
1,451 


3,294 
4,543 

12,793 
4,038 
7,210 

14,390 
5,528 
7,239 
1,562 
1,478 


275,248 


297,711 


301,015 





Population of the Towns according to the Census of 1840. 



Fairfield County. 

Bridgeport, city, 3,294 

Town, except the 

citv. 1,276 

1,255 

4,504 

1,080 

3,654 

3,921 

1,326 



Brookfield, 

Danbury, 

Darien, 

Fairfield, 

Greenwich, 

Huntington, 



Monroe, 1,351 

New Canaan, 2,217 

New Fairfield, 956 

Newtown, 3,189 

Norwalk, 3,863 

Reading, 1,674 

Ridgefield, 2,474 

Sherman, 938 

Stamford, 3,516 

Stratford, 1,808 



Trumbull, 
Weston, 
Westport, 
Wilton, 



1,204 
2,561 
1,803 
2,053 



Hartford County. 
Avon, 1,001 

Berlin, 3,411 

Bloorafield, 98 

Bristol, 2,109 



Granby, 
Hartford, city, 
Town, except 
city, 

Hnrtland, 
Mane heeler, 
Marlborough, 



a Litchfield County. 
Bark ham Blood, i 

Beihlem, ' 

Can a no, 2, 



Coleh ... 

Cornwall, 

Goshen, 

Harrington, 

Kent, 

Litchfield, 

New Hartford, 

New Milford, 

Norfolk, 

Plymouth, 

Roibury, 

Salisbury, 

Sharon, 

Torrington, 

Washington, 
Waterlown, 
Wine beater, 
Woodbury, 1,943 

Middlesex. County. 
Chatham, 3,4 



CONNICTiCOT. 

Cheater, 974 

Clinton, I ,239 

Durham, 1,096 

Eaet Hadham, 2.620 
Hadham, 2,599 

Killing worth, 1,130 
Middlelown,ci(t),3,51l 
Town, except the 






.Veto Haz 



Bradford, 
Cheshire, 
Derby 

Guilford, 
Hamden, 



3,417 



1,5*) 

1,38a 



Middlebury, 71 H 

Milford, 2,455 

N. Haven, ,%, 18,060 
Town, except the 

city, 1,430 
North Braufbrd, 1,016 

North Haven, 1,349 

Orange, 1,329 

Oiford, ieae 

Prospect, 54S 

South bury, 

Wallingfor. 

Waterbury, 

Wolcott, tua 

Woodbridge, 958 

New London County. 

Bozrah, .1,067 

Colchester, 2,101 

East Lyme, 1,412 

Franklin, 1,01)0 

Griswol 2,165 

Groton, 2,963 






2,856 
\,«90 

2,269 
4,200 



Lebanon, 

Li>dyard, 

Lyme"' 

MonUille, 
N. London, city, 
N. Stonington, 
Norwich, city. 
Town, except the 
city, 3,039 

Preaton, 1,737 

Salem, 811 

Slonington, 3,898 

Waterford, 2,329 

Tolland County. 

Bolton, 734 

Columbia, 643 

Coventry, 8,01B 

Ellington, 1,356 

Hebron, 1,7*28 

Mansfield, 2,276 
Somers, 



ford, 
Tolland, 



1,566 



Willington, 1,268 

Windham County. 

Ashford, 2,651 

Brooklyn, 1,488 

Canterbury, 1,791 
Chaplin, 794 

Hampton, 1,106 

Killingly, 3,685 

Plainfield, 2,383 

Pomfret, 1,868 

Sterling, 1,099 

Thompson, 3,535 

Voluntown, 1,185 

Windham, 3,392 

Woodstock, 3,053 



Dm Ian rl Dumb— While ■, 303 
Blind, do. 

limine and tdioti, do 

A^tnro, 



Uni.er.ilie. sad CollatM, 



1842.] NEW TORK. 181 

VII. NEW YORK. 

Government. 

Salary. 

w«. h. siward, { G 2™r,m™ of qBUe e * pires } **> m 

Luther Bradish, S^-G^. and Pres Senate; pay > 
■ *«•««•*, ^ £g a fay during the Session. J 

John A. Collier, Comptroller, 2,500 

Sec. State and Superint. Common Schools, 2,500 

W. W. Tredway, 1st Deputy- Comptroller, 1,500 

Jacob Haight, Treasurer, 1,500 

John Willard, Deputy- Treasurer, 1,300 

Willis Hall, Attorney- General, 1,000 

Orville L. Holley, Surveyor' General, 800 
Samuel B. Ruggles, of New York, Canal Commis. {President.) 
Henry Hamilton, of Schoharie, do. 

Asa Whitney, of Schenectady, Acting Canal Commis. 2,000 

S. Newton Dexter, of Oriskany, do. 2,000' 

David Hudson, of Geneva, do. 2,000 

Geo. H. Broughton, of Lockport, do. 2,000* 

Trumbull Cary, of fiatavia, Bank Commissioner, 2,000 

Chandler Starr, of New York, do. 2,000 

John G-. Forbes, of Syracuse, do. 2,000 

Legislature. 

The Senate consists of 32 members, who are elected for four years, 
8 being chosen annually. Pay, $3 a day. 

The House of Assembly consists of 128 members. Pay, $3 a day. 

Judiciary. 

Court of Chancery. 

Salary. 

Reuben H. Walworth, of Saratoga Springs, Chancellor, $3,000 

John M. Davison, of Albany, Register, 2,500 

[and (2,500 for clerk hire and office expenses. 
Hiram Walworth, of New York, Assist. Reg. 3,000 

[and $ 5,000 for clerk hire and office expenses* 
Alonzo C. Paige, of Schenectady, Reporter, 500 

16 



189 



W1W TOftK. 



[iS4a 



rice- Chancellor's Court, 

Salary. 
Wm. T. McCoun, of N. York, 1st Circuit, JTfce-CAan. fees & $2,000 
Murray Hoffman! do. 1st Circuit, Assistant-Register, 2,500 

F.Whittlesey, of Rochester, 8th Circuit, Vice- Chancellor, 1,600 

[The judges of the other six Circuits are Vice- Chancellors for their 
respective Circuits.] 



Samuel Nelson, 
Greene C. Bronson, 
Esek Cowen, 
John L. Wendell, 



Supreme Court. 

of Cooperstown, Chief Justice, 
of Albany, Associate Justice, 

of Saratoga Springs, do. 

of Albany, Reporter, 

Circuit Courts. 



Salary. 

$3,000 

3,000 

3,000 

500 



There are eight Circuit Courts, with eight judges and the circuits 
correspond, in territory and name, to the eight senate districts. 



Judges. 

Ogden Edwards, 
Charles H. Ruggles, 
John P. Cushman, 
John Willard, 
Philo Gridley, 
Robert Monell, 
Daniel Moseley, 
Nathan Dayton, 



Circuit*, 

1st Circuit, 

2d «< 
u 

u 



3d 

4th 

5th 

6th 

7th 

8th 



c< 



cc 



Residence.' 
New York, 
Poughkeepsie, 

Saratoga Springs, 

Hamilton, 

Greene, 

Onondaga, 

Lockport, 



Salary. 
$1,600 
1,600 
1,600 
1,600 
1,600 
1,600 
1,600 
1,600 



Superior Court of the City of New York. 



Salary. 
(2,500 
2,500 
2,500 



Samuel Jones, Chief Justice, 

Daniel B. Tallmadge, Associate Justice, 

Thomas J. Oakley, do. 

J. P. Hall, Reporter. Charles A. Clinton, Clerk. 

The regular terms of this Court commence on the first Monday of 
each month. 

Court of Common Pleas. 

Courts of Common Pleas are held in each county in the State, con- 
listing of a first or presiding judge, and four assistant justices. 



1842.] 



K*W TOME. 



18S 



Counties, Population, and County Towns. 
Northern District. 



Countiei. 



Albany, 

Alleghany, 

Broome, 

Cattaraugus, 

Cayuga, 

Chatauque, 

Chemung, 

Chenango* 

Clinton, 

Cortland, 

Delaware, 

Erie, 

Essex, 

Franklin, 

Fulton, 

Genesee, 

Hamilton, 

Herkimer, 

Jefferson, 

Lewis, 

Liringston, 

Madison, 

Monroe, 

Montgomery, 

Niagara, 

Oneida, 

Onondaga, 

Ontario, 

Orleans, 

Oswego, 

Otsego, 

Rensselaer, 

Saratoga, 

Schenectady, 

Schoharie, 

Seneca, 

St. Lawrence, 

Steuben, 

Tioga, 

Tompkins, 

Warren, 

Washington, 

Wayne, 
Yates, 

Total, 



Pop. 1830. 


Pop. 1830. 


31,116 
. 9,330 
11,100 
4,090 
38,897 
12,568 


53,560 
26,218 
17,582 
16,726 
47,947 
34,057 


31,215 
12,070 
16,507 
26,587 
15,668 
12,81 1 
4,439 


37,404 
19,344 
23,693 
32,933 
35,710 
19,387 
11,312 


39,835 
1,251 

31,017 

32,952 
9,227 

19,196 


51,992 
1,324 
65,869 
48,515 
14,958 
27,719 


32,208 


39,037 


26,529 

25,569 

7,323 


49,862 
43,595 
18,485 


50,997 


71,326 


41,461 

35,312 

7,625 


58,974 
40,167 
18,485 


12,374 


27,104 


44,856 
40,153 
36,052 
13,081 
23,154 


51,372 
49,472 
36,616 
12,334 
27,910 


17,773 


21,031 


16,037 
21,989 
14,716 
26,178 
9,453 


36,351 
33,975 
27,704 
36,545 
11,795 


38,831 


42,615 


20,319 
11,025 


33,555 
19,019 


944,262 


1,366,467 



Pop. 1840. 



68,593 
40,975 
22,348 
2«,872 
50,338 
47,975 
20,732 
40,785 
28,157 
24,607 
35,396 
62,465 
23,634 
16,518 
18,049 
59,587 
1,907 
37,477 
60,984 
17,830 
35,140 

40,008 

64,902 
35,818 
31,132 

85,310 

67,911 
43,501 
25,127 

43,619 

49,628 
60,295 
40,553 
17,387 
32,358 

24,874 

56,706 
46,138 
20,527 
37,948 
13,422 

41,080 

42,057 
20,444 

1,683,068 



County Towm. 



Albany. 

Angelica. 

Binghampton. 

Ellicottsville. 

Auburn. 

Mayville. 

Elmira. 

Norwich. 

Plattsburg. 

Cortlandville. 

Delhi. 

Buffalo. 

Elizabeth town. 

Malone. 

Johnstown. 

Batavia. 

Herkimer, 

Watertown. 

Marti nsburg. 

Geneseo. 
C Cazenovia. 
( M orris ville. 

Rochester. 

Canajoharie. 

Lockport. 

Utica. 

Rome. 

Whitestown. 

Syracuse. 

danandaigua. 

Albion. 

Oswego. 

Richland. 

Cooperstown. 

Troy. 

Balkton. 

Schenectady. 

Schoharie. 
C Ovid. 
I Waterloo. 

Potsdam. 

Bath. 

Owego. 

Ithaca. 

Caldwell. 

! Salem. 
Sandy Hill. 
Lyons. 
Penn Yan. 



i 



184 



NSW YORK. 



[1842. 



Southern District. 



CooDtiefl. 


Pop. 1890. 
38,330 


Pop. 1830. 


Pop. 1840. 


County Towns. 


Columbia, 


39,952 


43,252 


Hudson. 


Dutchess, 


46,615 


60,926 


52,398 


Poughkeepsie. 


Greene, 


22,996 


29,529 


30,446 


Catskill. 


King's, 


11,187 


20,537 


47,613 


Flatbush. 


New York, 


123,706 


203,007 


312,710 


New York. 


Orange, 


41,213 


45,372 


50,739 


C Goshen. 
( Newburg. 


Putnam, 


11,268 


12,701 


12,825 


Carmel. 


Queen's, 


21,519 


22,276 


30,324 


N. Hempstead. 


Richmond, 


6,135 


7,084 


10,965 


Richmond. 


Rockland, 


8,837 


9,388 


1 1,975 


Clarkstown. 


Suffolk, 


24,272 


26,980 


32,469 


Suffolk C. H. 


Sullivan, 


8,900 


12,372 


15,629 


Monticello. 


Ulster, 


30,934 


36,551 


45,822 


Kingston. 
Bedford. 


Westchester, 
ToUd y 


32,638 


36,456 


48,686 


428,550 


537,041 1 


745,853 



Different Classes of Inhabitants. — Northern District, 



m 



it 



White Persons, Males, 853,929 

Females, 810,276 

6,435 
6,428 



653 
630 



Free colored C Males, 
Persons, \ Females, 

White Persons, 

Deaf and Dumb, 

Blind, 

Insane and Idiots, at public 
charge, 378 

Do. at private charge, 1,114 
n~i~-~,i C Deaf and Dumb, 47 

{KzEi } Biind > « 

rersons, £ Ingane and i diotg> 14l 

Pensioners, revolutionary and 
military, 3,477 

No. employed in 
Agriculture, 362,199 



Commerce, 12,226 

Manufactures and Trades, 96,788 

Navigating the Ocean, 542 

Nav. Canals, Lakes, &c. 5,513 

Learned Professions, 8,871 

Universities and Colleges, 7 

Students in Universities, &c. 819 

Academies and Grammar 

Schools, 25 

Students in Academies, &c. 21,708 
Common Schools, 9,026 

Scholars in Common 

Schools, 414,508 

White Persons over 20 years 
of age, unable to read and 
write, 99,469 



184&1 



NEW YORK. 



185 



Different Classes of Inhabitants. — Southern District. 



White Persons, Males, 353,428 

" «« Females, 355,257 

17,374 
19,790 



Free colored C Males, 
Persons, \ Females, 

White Persons, 

Deaf and Dumb, 

Blind, 

Insane and Idiots at public 

charge, 
Insane and Idiots at private 

charge, 

Colored 5 5;K and Dumb ' 

Persons, > f 1,nd » , T ,. 4 
' ( Insane and Idiots, 

Pensioners, revolutionary and 

military, 
Persons employed in 

Agriculture, 93,755 



386 
245 

305 

349 

21 
36 
54 

612 



Commerce, 16,242 

Manufactures and Trades, 76,405 
Navigating the Ocean, 4,969 
Nav. Canals, Lakes, and 

Rivers, 4,654 

Learned Professions, 5,240 

Universities and Colleges, 5 

Students in Universities and 

Colleges, 466 

Academies and Grammar 

Schools, 254 

Students in Academies, &c. 13,007 
Common Schools, 1,567 

Scholars in Common Sch'ls, 87,859 
No. Whites over 20 years of 
age unable to read and 
write, 14,983 



Population or the Towns according to the Census of 1840. 



Albany County. 
Albany, city, 33,721 
Berne, 3,740 

Bethlehem, 3,238 

Coeymans, 3,107 

Guilderland, 2,790 
Knox, 2,143 

New Scotland, 2,912 
Rensselaerville, 3,705 
Watervliet, 10,141 

Westerlo, 3,096 



Alfred * 

Allen, 

Almond, 

Amity, 

Andover, 

Angelica, 

Belfast, 

Birdsall, 

Bolivar, 

Burns, 

Caneadea, 

Centre ville, 

Clarksville, 

Cuba, 

Eagle, 

Friendship, 

Genesee, 



County. 
1,630 

867 
1,434 
1,354 

848 
1,257 
1,646 

328 

408 

867 
1,633 
1,513 

326 
1,768 
1,187 
1,244 

578 



Granger, 


1,064 


Grove, 


623 


Hume, 


2,303 


Independence, 


1,440 


New Hudson, 


1,502 


Nunda, 


2,637 


Ossian, 


938 


Pike, 


2,176 


Porta ire, 
Rushford, 


4,721 


1,512 


Scio, 


1,156 


West Almond, 


808 


Wirt, 


1,207 


Broome County. 


Baker, 


1,259 


Chenango, 


5,465 


Colesville, 


2,528 


Conklin, 


1,475 


Lisle, 


1,560 


Nanticoke, 


400 


San ford, 


1,173 


Triangle, 


1,692 


Union, 


3,165 


Vestal, 


1,253 


Windsor, 


2,368 



Cattaraugus County. 
Aahford, 1,469 

Burton, 530 

16* 



Cold Spring, 673 

Conewango, 1,317 

Dayton, 946 

Ellicottsville, 1,084 

Formers* ille, 1,294 

Franklin ville, 1,293 

Freedom, 1,831 

Great Valley, 652 

Hinsdale, 1,937 

Humphrey, 444 

Leon, 1,326 

Little Valley, 700 

Lyndon, 628 

Machias, . 1,085 

Mansfield, 942 

Napoli, 1,145 

New Albion, 1,016 

Olean, 638 

Otto, 2,133 

Perysburg, 1,660 

Persia, 892 

Portville, 462 

Randolph, 1,283 

Yorkshire, 1,292 

Cayuga County. 

Auburn, 5,626 

Aurelius, 2,645 

Brutus, 2,044 

Cato, 2,380 



186 



NSW TORK. 



[1842. 



Conquest) 1,911 

Fleming, 1,317 

Genoa, 2,593 

Ira, 2,283 

Ledyard, 2,143 

Locke, 1,654 

Mentz, 4,215 

Moravia, 2,010 

Niles, 2,234 

Owasco, 1,319 

Scipio 2,255 

Sempronius, 1,304 

Sennet, 2,060 

Springport, 1,890 

Sterling, 2,533 

Summerhill, 1,446 

Venice, 2,105 

Victory, 2,371 

Chatauque County. 

Ark wright, 1,418 

fiasti, 1,894 

Carroll, 1,649 

Charlotte, 1,4*28 

Chatauque, 2,980 
Cherry Creek, 1,141 

Clymer, 909 

Ellery, 2,242 

Elliott, 2,571 

Ellington, 1,725 
French Creek, 621 

Gerry, 1,288 

Hanover, 3,998 

Harmony, 3,340 

Mina, 871 

Poland, 1,087 

Pomfret, 4,566 

Portland, 3,136 

Ripley, 2,197 

Sheriden, 1 ,883 

Sherman, 1,099 

Stockton, 2,078 

Villanovia, 1 ,655 

Westfield, 3,199 



Chemung 
Big Flats, 
Catharine's, 
Catlin, 
Caynta, 
Chemung, 
Dix, 
Erin, 
Elmira, 
South port, 
Veteran, 



County. 
1,375 
2,424 
1,119 
835 
2,377 
1,990 
1,441 
4,791 
2,101 
2,279 



Chenango 
Bainbridge, 
Columbus, 
Coventry, 
German, 
Greene, 
Guilford, 
Linckaen, 
McDonough, 
New Berlin, 
Norwich, 
Osteite, 
Oxford, 
Pharsalia, 
Pitcher, 
Plymouth, 
Preston, 
Sherburne, 
Smithville, 
Smyrna, 



Covtnty. 
3,324 
1,561 
1,681 
965 
3,462 
2,827 
1,249 
1,369 
3,086 
4,145 
2,827 
3.179 
1,213 
1,562 
1,625 
1,117 
2,791 
1,762 
2,246 



Clinton County. 

Au Sable, 3,222 

Beekinantown, 2,769 

Black Brook, 1,064 

Champlain, 3,632 

Chazey, 3,584 

Ellenburg, 1,171 

Mooers, 1,703 

Peru, 3,134 

Plattsburg, 6,416 
Saranac, 



1,462 



Columbia County. 

Ancram, 1,770 

Austerlitz, 2,091 

Canaan, 1,957 

Chatham, 3,662 

Clave rack, 3,056 

Clermont, 1,231 

Co pake, 1,505 

Gallatin, 1,644 

Gerraantown, 969 

Ghent, 2,558 

Green port, 1,161 

Hudson, city, 5,672 

Hillsdale, 2,470 

Kinderhook, 3,512 

Livingston, 2,190 

New Lebanon, 2,536 

Stockport, 1,815 

Stuyvesant, 1,779 

Taghkanic, 1,674 

Cortland County. 

Cincinnatus, 1,301 



Cortlandville, 3,799 

Freetown, 950 

Homer, 3,572 

Marathon, 1,063 

Preble, 1,247 

Scott, 1,332 

Solon, 2,311 

Truxton, 3,658 

Virgil, 4,502 

Willett, 872 

Delaware County. 

Andes, 2,176 

Bovina, 1,403 
Colchester, . 1,567 

Davenport, 2,052 

Delhi, 2,554 

Franklin, 3,025 

Hamden, 1,469 

Hancock, 1,026 

Harpersfield, 1,708 

Kortright, 2,441 

Masonville, 1,420 

Meredith, 1,640 

Middletown, 2,608 

Roxbury, 3,013 

Sidney, 1,732 

Stamford, 1,681 

Tompkins, 2,035 

Walton, 1,846 

Dutchess County. 

America, 2,179 

Reek man, 1,400 

Clinton, 1,830 

Dover, 2,000 

Fishkill, 10,437 

Hyde Park, 2,364 

La Grange, 1,851 

Milan, 1,725 

Northeast, 1,385 

Pawling s, 1,571 

Pine Plains, 1,334 
Pleasant Valley, 2,219 
Poughkeepsie, 10,006 

Red Hook, 2,829 

Rhinebeck, 2,659 

Stanford, 2,278 

Union Vale, 1,498 

Washington, 2,833 

Erie County. 

Alden, 1,984 

Amherst, 2,451 

Aurora, 2,909 

Black Rock, 3,625 



1842.] 

Boston, 1,745 

Brandt, 1,088 

Buffalo, city, 18,213 

Checotowaga, 1,137 

Clarence, 2,271 

Cblden, 1,088 

Collins, 4,257 

Concord, 3,021 

Eden, 2,174 

Evans, 1,807 

Hamburg, 3,727 

Holland, 1,242 

Lancaster, 2,083 

Newstead, 2,653 

Sardinia, 1,743 

Tonne wanta, 1,261 

Wales, 1,987 

Essex County. 

Chesterfield, 2,716 

Crown Point, 2,212 

Elizabethtown, 1,061 

Essex, 1,681 

Jay, 2,258 

Keene, 730 

Lewis, 1,505 

Minerva, 455 

Moria, 2,595 

Newcomb, 74 

Schroon, 1,660 

Ticonderoga, 2,169 

Westport, 1,932 

Willsborough, 1,658 

Wilmington, 928 

Franklin County. 

Bangor, 1,289 

Brandon, 531 

Bellmont, 472 

Bombay, 1,446 

Chateaugay, 2,824 

Constable, 1,122 

Dickinson, 1,005 

Dnane, 324 
Fort Covington, 2,094 

Franklin, 192 

Malone, 3,229 

Moira, 962 

Westville, 1 ,028 

Fulton County. 

Bleecher, 346 

Broadalbm, 2,738 

Ephratah, 2,009 

Johnstown, 5,409 

Mayfield, 2,615 



HEW YORK. 

Northampton, 1,526 

Openheim, 2,169 

Perth, 737 

Stratford, 500 

Genesee County 

Alabama, - 1,798 

Alexander, 2,242 
Attica, 

Batavia, 4,219 

Bennington, 2,710 

Bergen, 1,832 

Bethany, 2,286 

Byron, 1,907 

Castile, 2,833 

China, 2,368 

Covington, 2,438 

Darien, 2,406 

Elba, 3,161 

Gainsville, 1,437 

Java, 2,367 

LeRoy, 4,323 

Middlebnry, 2,331 

Orangeville, 2,445 

Pembroke, 1,970 

Perry, 3,082 

Shelden, 2,353 

Stafford, 2,561 

Warsaw, 2,84.1 

Welhersfield, 1,728 

Greene County. 

Athens, '2,387 

Cairo, 2,862 

Catskill, 5,339 

Coxsackie, 3,539 

Durham, 2,813 

Greenville, 2,338 

Hunter, 2,019 

Lexington, 2,813 
New Baltimore, 2,306 

Prattsville, 1,613 

Windham, 2,417 

Herkimer County. 

Columbia, 2,129 

Danube, 1,960 

Fairfield, 1,836 

Frankfort, 3,096 

German Flats, 3,245 

Herkimer, 2,369 

Litchfield, 1,672 

Little Falls, 3,831 

Manheim, 2,095 

Newport, 2,020 

Norway, 1,046 



187 



Ohio, 


692 


Russia, 


2,298 


Salisbury, 


1,859 


Schuyler, 


1,798 


Storks, 


1,766 


Warren, 


2,003 


Wilmurt, 


60 


Winfield, 


1,652 


Jefferson County. 


Adams, 


2,296 


Alexandria, 


3,475 


Antwerp, 


3,109 


Brown ville, 


3,968 


Champion, 


2,206 


Clayton, 


3,990 


Ellsburg, 


5,349 


Henderson, 


2,480 


Hoansfield, 


4,146 


Leray, 


3,721 


Loraine, 


1,699 


Lyme, 


5,472 


Orleans, 


3,001 


Pamelia, 


2,104 


Philadelphia, 


1,888 


Rutland, 


2,090 


Rodman, 


1,702 


Water town, 


5,027 


Wilna, 


2,591 



King's County. 

Brooklyn, city, 36,233 

Bush wick, 1,295 

Flatbush, 2,099 

Flatlands, 810 

Gravesend, 799 

New Utrecht, 1,283 

Williamsburg, 5,094 

Lewis County. 

Denmark, 2,388 

Diana, 883 

Greig, 592 

Harnsburg, 850 

Leyden, 2,438 

Lowville, 2,047 

Marti nsburg, 2,272 

Pinckney, 907 

Turin, 1,704 

West Turin, 2,042 

Watson, 1 ,707 

Livingston County, 

Avon, 2,999 

Caledonia, 1,987 

Conesus, 1,654 



188 



HEW TOM. 



[1842. 



Geneseo, 


2,898 


Root, 


2,970 


Groveland, 


2,000 


St. Johnsville, 


1,923 


Leicester, 


2,415 






Lima, 


2.176 


New York County. 


Livonia, 


2,719 


N. York, city, 


312,710 


Mount Morris, 


4,576 






Sparta, 


5,841 


Niagara County. 


Spring water, 


2,832 


Cambria, 


2,099 


York, 


3,049 


Hartland, 


2,350 






Lewiston, 


2,533 


Madison County. 


Lockport, 
Newfane, 


9,125 


Brook field, 


3,695 


2,372 


Cazenovia, 


4,153 


Niagara, 


1,277 


De Ruyter, 


1,799 


Pendleton, 


1,098 


Eaton, 


3,409 


Porter, 


2,177 


Fenner, 


1,997 


Royal ton, 


3,549 


Georgetown, 
Hamilton, 


1,130 


Somerset, 


1,742 


3,738 


Wheatfield, 


1,057 


Lebanon, 


1,794 


Wilson, 


1,753 


Lenox, 


5,440 






Madison, 


2,344 


Oneida County. 


Nelson, 


2,100 


Annsville, 


1,765 


Smithfield, 


1,699 


Augusta, 


2,175 


Stockbridge, 


2,320 


Boonville 


5,519 


Sullivan, 


4,390 


Bridge water, 


1,418 






Camden, 


2,331 


Monroe County. 


Deerfield, 


3,120 


Brighton, 


2,336 


Florence, 


1,259 


Brock port, 


1,249 


Floyd, 


1,742 


Chili, 


2,174 


Kirkland, 


2,984 


Clarkson, 


3,486 


Lee, 


2,936 


Gates, 


1,728 


Marcy, 
Marshall, 


1,799 


Greece, 


3,669 


2,251 


Henrietta, 


2,085 


New Hartford, 


3,819 


Irondequoit, 


1,252 


Paris, 


2,844 


Mendon, 


3,435 


Remsen, 


1,638 


Ogden, 


2,404 


Rome, 


5,680 


Parma, 


2,652 


Sangersfield, 


2,251 


Penfield, 


2,842 


Steuben, 


1,993 


Perrington, 


2,513 


Trenton, 


3,178 


Pittsford, 


1,983 


Utica, city, 


12,782 


Riga, 


J ,984 


Vernon, 


3,043 


Rochester, city, 


20,191 


Verona, 


4,504 


Rush, 


1,929 


Vienna, 


2,530 


Sweden, 


1,884 


Western, 


3,488 


Wheatland, 


2,871 


Westmoreland, 


3,105 


Webster, 


2,235 


Wbitestown, 


5,156 


Montgomery County. 


Onondaga County 


Amsterdam, 


5,333 


Camillus, 


3,957 


Canaioharie, 
Charlestown, 


5,146 


Cicero, 


2,464 


2,103 


Clay, 


2,852 


Florida, 


5,414 


De Witt, 


2,802 


Glenn, 


3,678 


Elbridge, 


4,647 


Minden, 


3,507 


Fabius, 


2,562 


Mohawk, 


3,112 


Lafayette, 


2,600 


Palatine, 


2,823 


Lysander, 


4,306 



ManJius, 

Marcellus, 

Onondaga, 

Otisco, 

Pompey, 

Salina, 

Skeneateles, 

Spafford, 

Tully, 

Van Buren, 



5,509 
2,726 
5,658 
1,906 
4,371 
11,013 
3,981 
1,873 
1,663 
3,021 



Ontario County. 
Bristol, 1,953 

Canadice, 1,341 

Canandaigua, 5,652 
East Bloomtield, 1,986 
Farmington, 2,122 
Gorham, 2,779 

Hopewell, 1,976 

Manchester, 2,912 
Naples, 2,345 

Phelps, 5,563 

Richmond, 1,937 

Seneca, 7,073 

South Bristol, 1,375 
Victor, 2,393 

West Bloomfield, 2,094 

Orange County. 
Blooming Grove, 2,396 

Crawford, 2,075 

Cornwall, 3,925 

Deerpark, 1,607 

Goshen, 3,889 

Hamptonburg, 1,379 

JVfinisink, 5,093 

Monroe, 3,914 

Montgomery, 4,100 

Mount Hope, 1,565 

Newburg, 8,933 

New Windsor, 2,482 

Walk ill, 4,268 

Warwick, 5,113 



Orleans 
Barre, 
Carlton, 
Clarendon, 
Gaines, 
Kendall, 
Murray, 
Ridgeway, 
Shelby, 
Yates, 



County. 

5539 
2,275 
2,251 
2.268 
1,692 
2,675 
3,554 
2,643 
2*230 



Oswego County. 
Albion, 1,503 

Amboy, 1,070 



1849.] 

Boy Is ton, 481 

Constantia, 1,476 

Granby, 2,385 

Hannibal, 2,269 

Hastings, 1,983 

Mexico, 3,729 

New Haven, 1,738 

Orwell, 808 

Oswego, 4,665 

Palermo, 1,928 

Parish, 1,543 

Keadfield, 507 

Richland, 4,050 

Sandy Creek, 2,420 

Schroepel, 2,098 

Scriba, 4,051 

Volney, 3,155 

West Monroe, 918 

Williamstown, 842 

Otsego County. 

Burlington, 2,154 

Butternuts, 4,057 

Cherry Valley, 3,923 

Decatur, 1,071 

Edmeston, 1,907 

Exeter, 1,423 

Hartwich, 2,490 

Laurens, 2,173 

Maryland, 2,085 

Middleneld, 3,319 

Milford, 2,095 

New Lisbon, 1,909 

Oneonta, 1,936 

Otego, 1,919 

Otsego, 4,120 

Pittafield, 1,395 

Plainfield, 1,450 

Richfield, 1,680 

Springfield, 2,382 

UnadMa, 2,272 

Westford, 1,478 

Worcester, 2,390 



Putnam County. 

Carmel, 2,263 

Kent, 1,830 

Patterson, 1,349 

Phillipstown, 3,814 

Quincy, 1,659 

Southeast, 1,910 



Queen** County. 
Hushing, 4,124 

Hemstead, 7,609 

Jamaica, 3,781 

North Hemstead, 3,891 



NEW TOEK. 

Newtown, 5,054 

Oyster-Bay, 6,865 

Rensselaer County. 

Berlin, 1,794 

Brunswick, 3,051 

Grafton, 2,019 

Greenbush, 3,701 

Hoosick, 3,539 

Lansingburgh, 3,330 

Nassau, 3,236 

Petersburg!!, 1,901 

Pittstuwn, 3,784 

Sand Lake, 4,303 

Schaghticoke, 3,389 

Schodack, 4,125 

Stephentown, 2,753 

Troy, city, 19,334 

Riclttnond County. 

Castleton, 4,275 

Northfield, 2,745 

Southfield, 1,619 

Westfield, 2,326 

Rockland County. 

Clarkstown, 2,533 

Haverstraw, 3,449 

Orangetown, 2,771 

Ramapo, 3,222 

Saratoga County. 

Ballston, 2,044 

Charlton, 1,933 

Clifton Park, 2,719 

Corinth, 1,365 
Day, 942 

Edinburgh, 1,458 

Gal way, 2,412 

Greenfield, 2,803 
Hadley, 865 

Halfmoon, 2,631 

Malta, 1,457 

Milton, 3,166 

Moreau, 1,576 
Northumberland, 1,672 

Providence, 1 ,507 

Saratoga, 2,624 
Saratoga Springs, 3,384 

Stillwater, 2,733 

Waterford, 1,824 

Wilton, 1,438 

Schenectady County. 

Duanesburg, 3,357 

Glenville, 3,068 
Niskayuna, 693 



189 

Princeton, 1,201 

Rotterdam, 2,284 

Schenectady , city, 6,784 



Schoharie 
Blenheim, 
Broome, 
Carlisle, 
Cobleskill, 
Cones ville, 
Fulton, 
Jefferson, 
Middlebury, 
Schoharie, 
Seward, 
Sharon, 
Summit, 



County. 
2,725 

2,404 
1,850 
3,583 
1,621 
2,147 
2,033 
3,843 
5,534 
2,088 
2,520 
2,010 



Seneca County. 

Covert, 1,563 

Fayette, 3,731 

Junius, 1,594 

Lodi, 2,236 

Ovid, 2,721 

Romulus, 2,235 

Seneca Falls, 4,281 

Tyre, 1,506 

Varick, 1,971 

Waterloo, 3,036 



St. Lawrence 
Brasher, 
Canton, 
De Kalb, 
Depeyster, 
Edwards, 
Fowler, 
Gouverneur, 
Hammond, 
Herman, 
Hopkinton, 
Lawrence, 
Louisville, 
Lisbon, 
Madrid, 
Massena, 
Morristown, 
Norfolk, 
Ogdensburg, 
Oswegatchie, 
Parish ville, 
Pierpont, 
Pitkin, 
Potsdam, 
Rossie, 
Russell, 
Stockholm, 



County. 
2,118 
3,465 
1,531 
1,074 

956 
1,752 
2,538 
1,845 
1,271 
1,147 
1,845 
1,693 
3,508 
4,511 
2,726 
2,809 
1,728 
2,526 
3,193 
2,250 
1,430 

396 
4,473 
1,553 
1,373 
2,995 



190 

Steuben County. 

Addison, 1,920 

Bath, 4,915 

Bradford, 1,547 

Cameron, 1,359 

Campbell, 652 

Canisteo, 941 

Caten, 797 

Cohocton, 2,965 

Daneville, 2,725 

Erwin, 785 

Greenwood, 1,136 

Hornby, 1,048 

Hornellsville, 2,121 

Howard, 3,247 

Jasper, 1,187 

Lindley, 638 

Orange, 1,824 

Painted Poat, 1,674 

Prattsburg, 2,455 

Poultney, 1,784 

Reading, 1,541 

Troupsburg, 1,171 

Tyrone, 2,122 

Urbana, 1,884 

Wayne, 1,377 

Wheeler, 1,294 

Woodhall, 827 

Suffolk County. 

Brookhayen, 7,050 

Ea3thampton, 2,076 

Huntington, 6,562 

Iilip, 1,909 

Riyerhead, 2,449 

Shelter Island, 379 

Smithtown, 1,932 

Southampton, 6,205 

Southhold, 3,907 

Sullivan County. 

Bethel, 1,483 

Cochecton, 622 

Fallsburg, 1,782 

Forrestburg, 433 

Liberty, 1,569 

Lumberland, 1,205 

Mamakating, 3,418 

Nevisink, 1,681 

Rockland, 826 

Thompson, 2,610 

Tioga County. 

Barton, 2,324 

Berkshire, 956 

Candor, 3,370 

Newark, 1,616 

Nichols, 1,986 



[1842. 



Owego, 
Richford, 
Spencer, 
Tioga, 

Tompkins 
Caroline, 
Danby, 
Dry den, 
Enfield, 
Groton, 
Hector, 
Ithaca, 
Lansing, 
Newfield, 
Ulysses, 



6,340 

939 

1,532 

2,464 

County 
2,467 
2,570 
5,446 
2,340 
3,618 
5,652 
5,650 
3,672 
3,567 
2,976 



Ulster County. 

Esopus, 1 ,939 

Hurley, 2,201 

Kingston, 5,824 

Marbletown, 3,813 

Marlborough, 2,523 

New Plate, 5,408 

Olive, 2,023 

Plattekill, 2,125 

Rochester, 2,674 

Saugerties, 6,216 

Shandaken, 1,455 

Shawangunk, 3,886 

Wawarsing, 4,014 

Woodstock, 1,691 

Warren County. 

Athol, 1,210 

Bolton, £37 

Caldwell, 693 

Chester, 1,633 

Hague, 610 

Horicon, 659 

Johnsburg, 1,139 

Luzerne, 1 ,284 

Queensbury, 3,789 

Warrensburg, 1 ,468 



Washington 
Argyle, 
Cambridge, 
Dresden, 
Easton, 
Fort Ann, 
Fort Edward, 
Granville, 
-Greenwich, 
Hampton, 
Hartford, 
Hebron, 



County 
3,111 
2.005 

679 
2,986 
3,559 
1,726 
3,846 
3,382 

972 
2,164 
2,498 



Jackson, 


1,730 


Kingsbury, 


2,773 


Putnam, 


784 


Salem, 


2,855 


White Creek, 


2,195 


Whitehall, 


3,813 


Wayne County. 


Arcadia, 


4,980 


Butler, 


2,271 


Galen, 


4,234 


Huron, 


1,943 


Lyons, 
Macedon, 


4,302 


2,396 


Marion, 


1,903 


Ontario, 


1,689 


Palmyra, 


3,549 


Rose, 


2,036 


Savannah, 


1,718 


Sodus, 


4,472 


Walworth, 


1,734 


Williamson, 


2,147 


Woieott, 


2,481 


Westchester County. 


Bedford, 


2,822 


Cortland, 


5,592 


Eastchester, 


1,502 


Greenburg, 


3,361 


Harrison, 


1,139 


Lewisbo rough, 
Mamaroneck, 


1,619 


1,416 


Mount Pleasant, 


7,307 


Newcastle, 


1,529 


New Rochelle, 


1,816 


North Castle, 


2,058 


North Salem, 


1,661 


Pelham, 


789 


Poundridge, 


1,407 


Rye, 


1,803 


Scarsdale, 


255 


Somers, 


2,082 


South Salem, 




Westchester, 


4,154 


White Plains, 


1,087 


Tonkers, 


2,968 


Yorktown, 


2,819 



Yates County. 

Barrington, 1,868 

Benton, 3,911 

Italy, 1,634 

Jerusalem, 2^935 

Middlesex, 1,439 

Milo, 3,986 

Potter, 2,244 

Starkey, 2,426 



1842.] NEW JER8JCT* ]M 

VIII. NEW JERSEY. 

Government. 

Salary* 

William Pennington, of Newark, Governor, and, ex officio, 

Chancellor of State, (term of office expires Oct. 1841,) $2,000 

[and fees as Chancellor. 
Joseph Porter, of Gloucester Co., V.-Pres. of Legislative Council, 

[3-50 a day. 
Chas. G. McChesney, of Trenton, Secretary of State, 50 & fees. 

John Emley , of Burlington Co., Speaker of the House 

of Assembly, 3*50 a day. 

Samuel Prior, ' of Salem, Clerk of do. 3 50 a day. 

Robert E. Horner, of Princeton, Clerk of die Legislative 

Council, 3*50 a day. 

Isaac Southard, of Trenton, Treasurer, (elect, yearly,) 1,000 

Sam'l R. Gummexe, of Trenton, Clerk in Chancery, Fee*. 

Judiciary. 

Court of Appeals and Pardons. 

This Court is composed of the Governor, who is, ex officio, President 
Judge, and 14 Associate Judges, who are elected aaaually. This court 
holds two terms annually at Trenton. 

Court of Chancery. 

The Governor of the State is Chancellor ; and this court holds four 
terms annually at Trenton. 

Supreme Court. 

Terms expire. Salary. 

Joseph C. Hornblower, of Newark, Chief Justice, 1846 $1,500 

Gabriel H. Ford, of Morristown, Associate Justice, 1841 1,400 

John Moore White, of Woodbury, do. 1844 1,400 

Daniel Elmer, ofBridgeton, do. 1848 1,400 

James S. Nevins, of New Brunswick, do. 1845 1,400 

Zachariah Rossell, of Trenton, Clerk, 1842 Fees. 

Josiah Harrison, of Camden, Reporter, 1842 200 

George P. Molleson , of N . Brunswick, Attorney- General, 1846 80 

[and fees. 

The Judges are appointed by the legislature ; those of the Supreme 
Court, for a term of 7 years ; those of the Inferior Courts, for 5 years ; 
both may be reappointed. 

The Supreme Court holds four terms each year at Trenton ; on the 
last Tuesday in February, 2d in May, 1st in September, and 2d in No- 
vember; and the judges of this court hold Circuit Courts and Courts of 



192 HEW JER8KT. [1849. 

Oyer and Terminer font times a jear in each county, except the coun- 
ties of Atlantic and Cape May, in which two terms only are held. In- 
ferior court* of Common Pleas are held four times in a year, in each 
county, by judges appointed by the legislature, who receive no salary, 
and the number of whom is not limited by any law. Courts of Quarter 
Sessions of the Peace are held at the same time for the trial of offenders; 
but crimes of magnitude are reserved for the Oyer and Terminer. 

Finances. 

Receipts into the Treasury during the Tear ending Oct. 15, 1840. 

Temporary loans, #27,000 GO 

Dividends on Railroad and Canal stock, . . . 13,000*00 

Extra do 17,00000 

Transit Duties on Railroads and Canals, • . . 30,276-39 

State Tax, 20,00000 

Incidental receipts 1,063 28 

Total, 108,33967 

Balance on hand Oct. 15, 1839, .... 9,213 18 

Total, $117,552 85 

C Temporary loans and interest, . . 23,269-79 

Payments. J State Expenaeilf 67,334-43 

90,604-22 

Balance, $26,948 38 

New Jersey is one of the few States of the Union that has not in- 
curred a permanent debt; while the improvements in canals and rail- 
roads have been perhaps as great as in any State, in proportion to extent 
and population. The State derives an income of more than $ 40,000 
annually for dividends and transit duties paid by Railroad and Canal 
companies ; which, with a State tax, varying from $ 20,000 to $ 30,000, 
is sufficient to pay all public expenses. 

Public Schools. 

The School Fund, now about $320,000, to the interest on which is 
added about $ 24,000 for bank tax, allows a distribution of as much as 
$ 30,000 to the different counties for the support of public schools. The 
counties have the power to increase the sum received to an amount 
double of their respective quotas, a privilege which being almost univer- 
sally used, increases the fund devoted to this purpose to about $ 90,000. 
Amount of the School Fund, Oct. 15, 1839, $287,287*61 : — Oct 15, 
1840, $ 319,802-63 : — increase during the year, $ 32,515 02. 



1842.] 



NEW JERSEY. 

Counties, Population, and County Towns. 



193 



Counties. 


Pop. 1810. 


Pop. 1890. 


Pop. 1830. 


Pop. 1840. 


County Towns. 


Atlantic, 

Bergen, 

Burlington, 

Cape May, 

Cumberland, 

Essex, 

Gloucester, 

Hudson, 

Hunterdon, 

Mercer, 

Middlesex, 

Monmouth, 

Morris, 

Passaic, 

Salem, 

Somerset, 

Sussex, 

Warren, 


16,603 
24,979 
3,632 
12,670 
25,984 
19,744 

24,553 

20,381 
22,150 
21,828 

12,761 
14,728 

25,549 


18,178 
28,822 
4.265 
12,668 
30,793 
23,039 

28,604 

21 ,470 
25,038 
21,368 

14,022 
16,506 
32,750 


22,414 
31 ,066 
4,945 
14,091 
41,92S 
28,431 

31,066 

23,157 
29,233 
23,580 

14,155 

17,689 
20,349 
18,634 


8,726 
13,223 
32,831 

5,324 
14,374 
44,621 
25,438 

9,483 
24,789 
21 ,502 
21,893 
32,909 
25,844 
16,734 
16,024 
17,455 
21,770 
20,366 


Hackensack. 

Mount Holly. 

Cape May C. H. 

Bridgetown. 

Newark. 

Woodbury. 

Jersey City. 

Flemington. 

Trenton. 

New Brunswick. 

Freehold. 

Morristown. 

Paterson. 

Salem. 

Somerville. 

Newton. 

Belvidere. 


Totals 


245,562 


277,573 


320,779 


373 306 


. 



Population of the Principal Towns. 



In 1830. In 1840. 

Newark, 10,953 17,290 

New Brunswick, 7,831 8,693 

Paterson, 7,331 7,596 



In 1830. 
Trenton, 3,925 

Elizabethtown, 3,451 



Id 1840. 
4,035 
4,184 



Different Classes of Inhabitants. 



White Per— .{ftSk^g 

Free Colored C Males, 10,780 
persons, ( Females, 10,264 



Males, 
Females, 



Slaves, 

White Persons, 

Deaf and Dumb, 

Blind, 

Insane and Idiots, at pub- 
lic charge, 

Do. at private charge, 
Slaves and colored persons, 

Deaf and Dumb, 

Blind, 

Insane and Idiots, 

Revolutionary and military 

Pensioners, 

17 



303 
371 

164 
126 

144 
225 

15 
26 
73 

472 



Number employed in 
Mining, 266 

Agriculture, 56,701 

Commerce, 2,283 

Manufactures & Trades, 27,004 
Navigation of the Ocean, 1,143 
"Canals, Lakes, & Rivers, 1,625 
Learned Professions, 1,627 

Universities and Colleges, 3 

Students in Universities, &c. 443 
Academies & Gram. Schools, 66 
Students in Academies, &c. 3,027" 
Common Schools, 1,207 

Scholars in Com. Schools, 52,583 
White Persons over 20 years, 
of age unable to read and 
write, 0,385". 



184 



PENflSYLVAJUA. 



[1842. 



IX. PENNSYLVANIA. 

Government. 

S»»tiy. 
David R. Porter, Governor, (term of office expires on the 3d 

Tuesday in January, 1845,) $ 4,000 

Francis R. Shunk, Secretary of State and Superintendent of 

Common Schools, . 1,600 

Deputy Secretary of State, 
State Treasurer, 1,600 

Auditor- General, 1 ,600 

Surveyor- General, 1,400 

Deputy -Surveyor General. 
Secretary of the Land Office, 1,400 

Deputy Secretary of the Land Office. 
Adjutant- General. 

State Geologist, 2,000 

Speaker of the Senate. 
Speaker of the House of Representatives. 



Henry Petrikin, 

John Oilmore, 

George R. Espy, 

Jacob Sallada, 

Richard M. Crain, 

John Kleingensmith, 

Daniel Small, 

Adam Diller, 

Henry D. Rogers, 

William T. Rogers, 

William Hopkins, 

Edward B. Hubley, 
William F. Packer, 
Hugh Keys, 



John B. Gibson, 
Molton C. Rogers, 
Charles Huston, 
John Kennedy, 
Thomas Sergeant, 
Ovid F. Johnson, 
F. W. Hindman, 
Abner L. Pentland, 
P. C. Sedge wick, 



Canal Commissioners. 

Judiciary. 
Supreme Court. 

Chief Justice, 
Associate Justice, 

do. 

do. 

do. 
Attorney- General, 



Salary. 
#2,666 67 
2,00000 
2,000-00 
2,00000 
2,00000 
$ 300 and fees. 



Prothonotary for the East District, Fees. 

do. West do. do. 

do. Middle do. do. 

The judges of the Supreme Court receive, in addition to their sala- 
ries, $4*00 a day, " while on the circuits, as a full allowance for trav- 
elling expenses." 

They hold court in bank, once a year, in four several districts ; — 
1st, for the Eastern District, at Philadelphia; 2d, for the Middle Dis- 
trict, at Harrisburg ; 3d, for the Northern District, at Sunbury ; 4th, 
for the Western District, at Pittsburg. 

District Courts. * 

r 

There are three District Courts in the State, which are invested with 
the civil jurisdiction of the Common Pleas, in their respective Districts, 
in all cases exceeding a certain amount. 



1842.] PENNSYLVANIA. 195 

District Court for the City and County of Philadelphia, 

Salary. 
Thomas McEean Pettit, President Judge, $ 2,600 

George M. Stroud, Judge, 2,600 

Joel Jones, do. 2,600 

William V. Pettit, Prothonotary. 

District Court for the City and County of Lancaster. 

Salary. 
Alexander L. Hays, Judge, $ 2,400 

District Court for the County of Allegheny. 

Salary. 
Robert C. Grier, President Judge, $ 2,500» 

■ , Judge. 

Court of Criminal Sessions in Philadelphia, 
George M. Barton, President Judge. 
Robert T. Conrad, and Joseph M. Dor an, Associate Judges. 

Courts of Common Pleas. 

The State is divided into the 19 following Judicial Districts, for the 

sessions of the Court of Common Pleas. The President Judge of the 

District of Philadelphia and the Associate Judges have each a salary of 

$2,000. The President Judge of the f>th Judicial District, composed of 

the county of Allegheny, including the city of Pittsburg, has a salary 

of $2,500. The President Judges, in all the other districts, have- each 

a salary of $2,000, and their Associates, $260. 

District*. Preiident Judges. 

1. Philadelphia, .... Edward King, 

Archibald Randall and John R. Jones, Associate Judges. 

2. Lancaster, .... Benj. Champneys. 

3. Berks, Northampton, and Lehigh, . . John Banks. 

4. Huntingdon, Mifflin, Centre, and Clearfield, -Geo. W. Woodward. 

5. Allegheny, .... Benjamin Patton. 

6. Erie, Crawford, and Venango, . . James Thompson. 

7. Bucks and Montgomery, . • John Fox. 
6. Northumberland, Lycoming, Union, and Co- 
lumbia, ..... Ellis Lewis. 

9. Cumberland, Perry, and Juniata, Samuel Hepburn. 
10. Westmoreland, Indiana, Armstrong, and Cam- 
bria, ..... Thomas White. 
H. Luzerne, Wayne, and Pike, . William Jesup. 

12. Dauphin, Lebanon, and Schuylkill, . James M. Porter. 

13. Susquehanna, Bradford, and Tioga, . J. N. Conyngham. 

14. Washington, Fayette, and Greene, . , . Nathaniel Ewing. 

15. Chester and Delaware, . . . Thomas S. Bell. 

16. Fianklin, Bedford, and Somerset, . . Alex. Thompson. 

17. Beaver, Butler, and Mercer, . . John Bredin. 

18. Porter, McKean, Warren, and Jefferson, Alex. McCalmont. 

19. York and Adams, .... Daniel Durkee. 



PEBNSILViHIi. [1842. 

CoDITItt, COUHTT TOWN*, AND PoPOLATION. 

Eastern District. 



C....i«. 


Pop. 

1890. 


ra. 




0...,^.™. 


Pop, ) M0, 


Adams 


19,371 


21,379 


Gettysburg, 

Reading, 


1,908 


Berks,' 


46,375 


53,357 




8,410 


Bucki, 


37,843 


45,740 




( Doyleetown, 
i Bristol, 


905 
1,438 


Chester, 


44,45 


50,908 




West Chester, 


2,152 


Cumberland, 


23,606 


yj.'^iB 




Carlisle, 


4,351 




21,65: 


25,3113 




ll.BHI9BL.HO, 


5,980 


Delaware, 


14,811 


17,361 




Cheater, 


1,790 


Franklin, 


31,893 


35,103 




Chair her all urg, 


3,239 


Lancaster, 


63,330 


76,558 




Lancaster, 


8,417 




16,98(1 


20.546 




Lebanon, 


1,860 




19,895 


23,266 




Allentown, 


2,493 


Monroe, 








Slroudaburg, 


407 


Montgomery, 


35.793 


39404 






2,937 


Northampton, 


3i,~fi; 


3i),2(i7 




F. 03 ton, 


4,865 


Perry, 


11,34a 


14.257 




Bloo infield, 


412 


Philadelphia, 

Philadelphia, city 


73,295 

63,802 


hh.:-.o:i 
80,458 




Philadelphia, 


205,850 


Pike, 


2,894 


4,843 




Milford, 


648 


Schuylkill, 


11,339 


20,783 




Oris igshurg, 


779 


Wayne, 


4,127 






Bethany, 


299 


York, 

Total, 


38,759 


43,658 


York, 

908,744' 


4,779 


727,1)77 


775,577 




Western District. 




Allegheny, 


34,021 


40.506 


81,235 


Pittsburg, 


21,115 


Armstrong, 


10,344 


17,635 


28,365 


Kittaning, 


1,323 




15,340 


24,206 


29,368 


Beaver, 


551 


Bedford, 


20,24" 


25,536 


29,3:15 


Bedford, 


1,022 


Bradford, 


11,554 


19.609 


33,7rj< 


Towanda, 


912 


Butler, 


10,19:1 




22,378 


Butler, 


861 


Cambria, 


2,287 


7,079 


11,366 


t'bensburg, 


353 


Centre, 


13,796 


18,765 


20,493 


Belkfonle, 


1,031 


Clearfield, 


2,342 


4,803 


7,834 


Clearfield, 




Clinton, 






8.33: 






Columbia, 


17,621 


20,049 


34,367 


Danville, 




Crawford, 


9,39? 


16,005 


31.734 


Meadville, 


1,319 


Erie, 


8,5 -S 


16,906 


31,344 


Erie, 


3,412 


Fayette, 


a7SWr, 


29.237 


33,574 


Onion, 


1,710 




I6£54 


18,028 


19,147 


Waynesbure, 




Huntingdon, 


20,144 


27,159 


35,484 


Huntingdon, 


1,145 


1 ndiana, 


8,882 


14,251 


20,782 


Indiana, 


674 


Jefferson, 


561 


2,225 


7,353 


Brookville, 


276 








11,081 


Mifflinlown, 


420 




30,027 


27,304 


44,00* 


Wilkesbarre, 


1,718 




13,51? 




23,649 


Williamsport, 


1,353 




72= 


1,439 


2,975 


Smelhport, 




Mercer, 


11,681 


19,731 


32,873 


Mercer, 


781 



1842.] 



PENNSYLVANIA. 



187 



Counties. 



Mifflin, 

Northumberland, 

Potter, 

Somerset, 

Susquehanna, 

lioga, 

Union, 

Venango, 

Warren, 

Washington, 

Westmoreland, 

Total, 

\Total of the. State, 



Pop. 1830. 


Pop. 1830. 

• 


16,618 


21,529 


15,424 


18,168 


186 


1,266 


13,974 


17,441 


9,660 


16,777 


4,021 


9,062 


18,619 


20,749 


1,976 


4,706 


40,038 


42 860 


4,915 


9,128 


30,540 


38,400 


321,481 


592,095 


1,049,458 


1,367,672 



Pop. 1840. 



13,092 
20,027 

3,371 
19,650 
2l,195j 
15,498 
22,787 1 
17,900 

9,278 
41,279 
42,699 



815,289 



1 ,724,033 



County Towns. 


Pop. 
1840. 


Lewistown, 
Sunbury, 
Cowdersport, 
Somerset, 


2,058 
638 


Montrose, 


633 


Wellsborough, 
New Berlin, 


679 


Franklin, 


595 


Warren, 


737 


Washington, 
Greensburg, 


2,062 
800 



Population of the Principal Town's. 



Towns. 


1800. 


1810. 


1820. 


1830. 


1840. 


Eastern District, 












Philadelphia, 


70,287 


96,287 


1 19,325 


167,325* 


228,691 


Lancaster, 


4,292 


5,404 


6,663 


7,704 


8,417 


Reading, 


2,385 


3,463 


4,352 


5,859 


8,410 


Harrisburg, 


1,472 


2,289 


2,990 


4,311 


5,980 


Easton, 


1,045 


1,657 


2,370 


3,529 


4,865- 


York, 


2,503 


2,847 


3,545 


4,216 


4,779 


Carlisle, 


2,032 


2,491 


2,908 


3,708 


4,351 


Western District. 






• 






Pittsburg, 


1,565 


4,768 


7,248 


12,542 


21,115 


Alleghany, 








2,801 


10,089 


Erie, 


81 


394 


635 


1,329 3,412 



Population of Philadelphia, City and Suburbs, in 1840, 938,691 ; City Proper, 99,665* 
Classes of Inhabitants. — Eastern District, 



tjr.. „ (Males, 431,578 

White Persons, \ Fema f e8> m % H 

Free colored C Males, 17,638 

Persons, { Females, 20,281 

White Persons, 

Deaf and Dumb, 464 

Blind, 276 

Insane and Idiots, at public 

charge, 312 

Do. at private charge, 755 

17 • 



Colored Persons, 

Deaf and Dumb, 30 

Blind, 70 

Insane and Idiots, at public 

charge, 81 

Insane and Idiots, at private 
charge, 32 

Revolutionary and military 
Pensioners, 439 



198 



PENNSYLVANIA. 



[1842. 



Persons employed in 
Mining, 1,9*22 

Agriculture, 79,88*2 

Commerce, 11,309 

Manufactures and Trades, 68,266 
Navigation of the Ocean, 1,675 
" Canals, Lakes, & Rivers, 2,202 
Learned Professions, 4,068 

Universities or Colleges, 14 



Students in Universities and 

Colleges, 1,342 

Academies and Gram. Schools, 206 
Students in Academies, &c. 12,305 
Common Schools, 1,696 

Scholars in Common Sch'ls, 78,571 
White Persons over 20 years 
of age unable to read and 
write, 16,887 



Classes or Inhabitants. — Western District. 



m;ta P-Fm-1 ( Males, 413,192 
White Persons, J Femal ' eg) 392 ; 13l 

Free colored C Males, 5,114 

.Persons, \ Females, 4,821 

White Persons, 
Deaf and Dumb, 317 

Blind, 264 

Insane and Idiots, at public 

charge, 157 

Do. at private charge, 722 

Colored Persons, 
Deaf and Dumb, 21 

Blind, 26 

Insane and Idiots, at .publie 

charge, 33 

Do. at private charge, 51 

Revolutionary and military 
Pensioners, 812 



Persons employed in 

Mining, 2,681 

Agriculture, 127,651 

Commerce, 4,029 

Manufactures and Trades, 37,617 

Navigation of the Ocean , 1 40 

" Canals, Lakes, & Rivers, 1,749 

Learned Professions, 2,638 

Universities and Colleges, 6 

Students in Universities, &c. 692 

Academies and Gram. Schools, 84 

Students in Academies, &c. 3,665 

Common Schools, 3,072 

Scholars in Com. Schools, 101,418 

White Persons over 20 years 

of age unable to read and 

write, 17,053 



X. DELAWARE. 
Government. 



Salary. 



William B. Cooper, of Laurel, Governor, (term of office 

expires on the 3d Tuesday, in January, 1844,) 
John W. Houston, of Georgetown, Secretary of State, 
Wm. D. Waples, of Millsborough, 
Simon Spearman, of Smyrna, 
Presley Spruance, do. 

^George P. Brinckloe, of Georgetown, 

Pay of the members of the Senate and House of Representatives, 
^$3 00 a day. 



$1,333* 
400 

State Treasurer, 500 

Auditor, 500 

Speaker of the Senate. 
Speaker of the House of Rep, 



1842.] 



DELAWARE. 



199 



Judiciary. 
Superior Court 



James Booth, of New Castle, 

Samuel Harrington, of Dover, 

Caleb S. Layton, of South Milford, 

John J. Milligan, of Wilmington, 



Chief Justice, 
Associate Justice, 

do. 

do. 



Salary. 

$1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
i,200 



[Judge Harrington receives #200 as Reporter of judicial proceedings.] 



Court of Chancery. 

Kensey Johns, Jr., of New Castle, Chancellor, 
Edward W. Gilpin, of Wilmington, Attorney- General, 

Counties, Population, and County Towns. 



Salary. 

$ 1,100 

fees & 300 



Counties. 


Pop. 
1810. 


Pop. 
1830. 


Pop. 
1890. 


Pop. 
1840. 


County Towns. 


Pop. 
1840. 


Kent, 

New Castle, 

Sussex , 


20,495 
24,429 

27,750 


20,793 
27,899 
24,057 


19,911 
29,710 
27,118 

76,739 


19,872 
33,120 
25,093 


Dover, 
( Wilmington, 
( New Castle, 

Georgetown, 


3,790 
8,367 
2,737 


Total, 


72,674 


72,749 


78,085 



Different Classes of Inhabitants. 



White Persons 5 Males > 29 » 259 
nrnite rersons, J Female8i g9,302 

Free colored C Males, 
Persons, ( Females, 

Skvea 5 Males, 

waves, J Females, 

White Persons, 

Deaf and Dumb, 

Blind, 

Insane and Idiots, at public 
charge, 

Do. at private charge, 
Slaves and colored Persons, 

Deaf and Dumb, 

Blind, 

Insane and Idiots, 
Revolutionary and military 

pensioners, - 



8,626 
8,293 

1,371 
1,234 

47 
15 

22 

30 

8 
18 

28 



Persons employed in 
Agriculture, 16,015 

Commerce, 467 

Manufactures and Trades, 4,060 
Navigation of the Ocean, 401 
" Canals, Lakes, & Rivers, 235 
Learned Professions, 199 

College, 1 ; with Students, 23 
Academies and Grammar 

Schools, 20 

Students in Academies, &c. 764 
Common Schools, 152 

Scholars in Common Schools, 6,924 
White Persons over 20 years 
« of age unable to read and 
write, 4,832 



900 



MA&TXAJCD. 



[1843. 



XI. MARYLAND. 

GoVERSMEHT. 

Salary. 

Francis Thomas, of Frederick, Governor, (term of office expires 

on the 1st Monday in January, 1845,) $4,200 



Thomas Wright, 3d, of Annapolis, 
George Mackubbin, do. 

John H. Harris, 
Julius T. Ducatel, of Easton, 
John H. Alexander, of Baltimore, 
Thomas Karney, of Annapolis, 



Secretary of State, 2,000 

Treasurer, Western Shore, 2,500 
'Treasurer, Eastern Share, 450 
Geologist of the State, 2,000 

Engineer of State Survey, 2,000 
Surveyor- General, 800 



Josiah Bayly, of Dorchester Co., Attorney- General, Fees. 

John S. Gittings, of Baltimore, Commissioner of Loans, Fees. 

George G. Brewer, of Annapolis, Register of the Land Office, Fees. 

David Ridgley, do. State Librarian, 1,000 

John N. Watkins, do. Adjutant- General, 500 

Judiciary. 



Court of Chancery. 

Appointed. 

Theodorick Bland, of Annapolis, 1824, Chancellor, 

Louis Gassaway, do. Register. 

Cornelius McLean, do. Auditor, 



John Buchanan, 
John Stephen, 
Stevenson Archer, 
Thomas B. Doreey, 
Ezek. F. Chambers, 
Ara Spence, 
Richard W. Gill, 



Court of Appeals. 

Appointed, 

of Williamsport, 1824, Chief Judge, 

of Bladensburg, 1821, Associate Judge, 

of Bel-Air, 1823, do. 

of Ellicotfs Mills, 1824, do. 

of Chestertown, 1835, do. 

of Snow Hill, do. 



Salary. 
$3,600 

Fees. 



Salary. 
$2,500 
2,200 
3,000 
2,200 
2,200 
2,200 



of Annapolis, 



Clerk and Reporter, Fees. 



Court of the City of Baltimore. 



Nicholas Brice, 

W. G. D. Worthington, 

Alexander Nesbit, 



Chief Judge, 
Associate Judge, 
do. 



Salary. 

$2,400 

1,500 

1,500 



The State is divided into six judicial districts, each comprising two, 
three, or four counties. For each district there are a chief judge and 
two associates, who constitute the County Courts for the respective 



1842.] ni.RjLi.sv. 201 

counties in (he district. These are the common law courts of original 
jurisdiction in the Slate ; and they have jurisdiction of all claims for 00 
dollars and Upwards, appellate jurisdiction from the judgment of jus- 
tices of the peace, and equity jurisdiction within the counties coexten- 
sive with the chancellor. The six chief judges constitute the Court of 
Appeals for the State, which has appellate jurisdiction of cases at law 
and in equity, originating in the County Courts, the Orphans' Courts, 
(of which there is one in each county, composed of three judges for tes- 
tamentary affairs, Etc.,) and the Court of Chancery. 



Counties, Por-tri.i 



O COUHTT ToWJ 









Cen.ui of 1840. 




OowdH. 


v». 






County Towns. 




Fna 








1830. 


Whiles. 


Cofa, 


91BTB1 


TotiU. 




Western Shore 














Alleghany, 


10,602 


14,663 


815 


912 


15,690 


Cumberland. 


Anne Arundel 


■?.-', m 


14,630 


5,ii8: 


'j,m 


29,532 




Baltimore, 


i2o,em 


105,33121,45; 


7,59,' 


1:54,371 


Baltimore. 


Calvert, 


s\8H 


3,585 


1,474 


4:i?i 


9,aa 


Prince Frederick. 


Charles, 


17,666 


6,022 


Bit 


iUoU 


16,023 


Port Tobacco. 


Frederick, 


45,793 


28,975 


2,985 


4,n4r 


36,4oo 


Frederick. 


Harford, 


16,315 




"■36 


2.64:1 


17,19 


Bel-Air 


Montgomery, 


19,810 




>f 


5,135 


14,001 


Bockville. 


Prince Geo. 'a, 


20,373 




i<. 


l»,(!3t 


10,53! 


Upper Marlboro'. 


St. Mary's, 


13.455 




Ht 


6,761 


13,224 


Leonard town. 


Washington, 


25,265 




» 


2,545 


28,850 


Hagerstown. 


Eastern Shore. 














Caroline, 


9,070 




30 


752 


7,806 


Denton. 


Cecil, 


15,432 




'>) 


1,3!>S 


17,231 


Klkton. 


Dorchester, 


18.085 




i- 


4,227 


18.843 


Cambridge. 


Kent, 


]u,5oa 




H 


2,735 


10.84-- 


Chestertown. 




14,336 




11 


3,95(1 


12,03: 


Centreville. 




20,155 




Hi 5,377 


I9,5C8 


Princess Anne. 


Talbot, 


12.947 




10 3,687 


12,1(91 


Easton. 


Worcester, 


I8;271 


3 


1-3 

n 


3,539 


18,377 


Snowhili. 


Total. 


446,913 


19,4115 


Kin .2:12 





i Pbimcifal Town*. 



Baltimore, 
Frederick, 
Hagerstuwn 
. Annapolis, 



80,635 102,313 

4,427 5,188 

3,371 7,197 



202 



MARYLAND. [1842. 

Different Classes of Inhabitants. 



White Persons 
Deaf and Dumb, 178 

Blind, 165 

Insane and Idiots, at public 

charge, 133 

Insane and Idiots, at private 
charge, 254 

Slaves and colored Persons 
Deaf and Dumb, 66 

Blind, 01 

Insane and Idiots, at private 

charge, 99 

Insane and Idiots, at public 
charge, 42 

Revolutionary and military 
Pensioners 94 



Persons employed in 

Agriculture, 69,851 

Commerce, 3,249 

Manufactures & Trades, 21,325 

Navigation of the Ocean, 721 

" Canals, Lakes, & Rivers, 1,519 

Learned Professions, 1,647 

Universities or Colleges, 12 

Students in Colleges, &c. 813 

Academies and Gram. Schools, 127 

Students in Academies, &c. 4,178 

Common Schools, 567 

Scholars in Com. Schools, 16,982 

White Persons over 20 years 

of age unable to read and 

write, 11,695 



XII. VIRGINIA. 



Government. 

Salary. 
John Rutherford, of Richmond, Lieutenant-Governor and Act- 
ing Governor, (term ends March 31st, 1842,) $3,333J 
John M. Patton, of Fredericksburg, Senior Councillor of State, 

(term ends 1843,) 1,000 
John M. Gregory, of Williamsburg, Councillor of State, 

(term ends 1844,) 1,000 
Lawson Burfoot, of Chesterfield Co., Treasurer , 2,000 

James E. Heath, of Richmond, Auditor, 2,000 

James Brown, Jr., do. 2d Auditor and Superin- 

tendent of the Literary Fund, 1,800 

Stafford H. Parker, of Caroline Co., Register of Land Office, 1,500 
Sidney S. Baxter, of Lexington, Attorney- General, Fees & 1,000 
Wm. H. Richardson, of Henrico Co., Secretary of the Common- 
wealth and Librarian, 1,620. 
Thomas Lawson, Clerk of the Council, 1,000 

Adjutant- General, 500 

Charles S. Morgan, of Richmond, Superinten. Penitentiary, 2,000 



1842.] VIRGINIA. 203 

Salary. 
John W. Nash, of Amelia Co., Speaker of the Senate, 1840-41, $6 a day. 
Valentine W. Southall, of Albemarle Co., Speaker of the 

House of Djelegates, $ 8 a day. 

The several officers of the executive government reside at or near 
Richmond, during the term of office. 



Judiciary. 

Court of Appeals. 
* Salary. 

President, $2,750 

Francis T. Brooke, of Spotsylvania Co., Judge, 2,500 

William H. Cabell, of Richmond, do. 2,500 

John Allen, of Botetourt Co., do. 2,500 

Robert Stanard, of Richmond, ' do. 2,500 

The judges are entitled to receive, in addition to their salaries, 25 
cents a mile for necessary travel. The Court of Appeals holds two ses- 
sions annually ; one at Letcisburg, Greenbrier county, for the counties 
lying west of the Blue Ridge, commencing on the 2d Monday in July, 
and continuing 90 days, unless the business shall be sooner despatched ; 
the other at Richmond, for the counties lying east of the Blue Ridge, 
commencing at such times as the court may from time to time appoint, 
and continuing 160 days, unless the business shall be sooner despatched. 

General Court. 

The State is divided into ten Judicial Districts, and each District into 
two Circuits, except the 4th, which comprises three. The third Circuit 
of the 4th District is the 21st District of the State,, containing but a sin- 
gle court, called the " Circuit Superior Court of Law and Chancery for 
the county of Henrico and city of Richmond." In this court there are 
two judges j one on the law side, with a salary of $ 1,800; the other on 
the chancery side, with a salary of $2,000. On the death, resignation, 
or removal of either of the two judges now attached to this court, his 
duties are to devolve on the other, without any increase of salary. In 
all the other circuits, the chancery and common law jurisdictions are 
blended in the same judge, eaci} of whom has a salary of $ 1,500 and 
$ 4 for every 20 miles of necessary travelling. 



904 Virginia. [T84& 



Judges. Residence. 

1. Richard H. Baker, of Nansemond Co. 
9. John Y. Mason, of Southampton Co. 
3. 

4. John D. Christian, of Charles City Co. 

5. John T. Lomax, of Frodericksbnrg. 

6. John Scott, of Fauquier Co. 

7. John B. Clopton, of Richmond. 

8. Daniel A. Wilion, of Cumberland Co. 

9. William Leigh, of Halifax Co. 

10. Fleming Saundors, of Franklin. Co. 

11. Richard H. Field, of Culpeper Co. 



Judges. Residence. 

19. L. P. Thompson, of Amherst Co. 

13. Isaac R. Douglas, of Morgan Co. 

14. Daniel Bmitb, of Rockingham Co. 

15. Benjamin Estell, of Wythe Co. 

16. James E. Brown, of Wythe Co. 
17 

18 Edwin S. Duncan, of Harrison Co. 

19. Lewis Summers, of Kanhawa Co. 

90. Joseph L. Fry, of Wheeling. 

21 | Philip N. Nicholas, of Richmond. 
{ John Robertson, do. 



A Circuit Superior Court of law and chancery is held twice every 
year iri each county and corporation ; the courts sitting until the busi- 
ness is despatched. 

The judges who hold the Circuit Courts, are also required to hold, 
every year, two terms of the General Court in the Capitol at Richmond. 
It is the duty of fifteen of the judges to attend this court, eleven being 
necessary to form a quorum. One term begins on the last Monday in 
June ; the other, on the 15th of December. The judges are required to 
arrange themselves into four classes, of five judges each, one of whom 
is exempt, in rotation, from attending the court. 

The General Court has appellate jurisdiction in the last resort in 
criminal cases ; also original jurisdiction of probates and administrations, 
and some claims of the Commonwealth. Its judges, or a portion of them, 
sit as a Special Court of Appeals, in cases in which the judges of the 
Court of Appeals, proper, are disqualified by interest or otherwise. 

County Courts. 

A County Court sits in each county every month, held by four or more 
Justices of the Peace. TheBe courts, formed of plain farmers or country 
gentlemen, are invested with a jurisdiction wider than that of any other 
court in the State, covering almost the whjle field of cognizance, civil, 
criminal, legal, and equitable. Their civil jurisdiction is over all causes 
in which the value exceeds $ 20. They, exclusively, try slaves for all 
offences ; and they examine free persons charged with felony, previously 
to their trial in the Circuit Court. 



1842.] 



VIRGINIA. 



205 



Couhtiks, Population, and County Towns. 
Eastern District, 



Counties. 



Accomac, 

Albemarle, 

Amelia, 

Amherst, 

Bedford, 

Brunswick, 

Buckingham, 

Campbell, 

Caroline, 

Charles City, 

Charlotte, 

Chesterfield, 

Culpeper, 

Cumberland, 

Dinwiddie, 

Elisabeth City, 

Essex, 

Fairfax, 

Fauquier, 

Fluvanna, 

Fpmklin, 

Gloucester, 

Goochland, 

Greensville, 

Greene, 

Halifax, 

Hanover, 

Henrico, 

Henry, 

Isle of Wight, 

James City, 

King George, 

King William, 

King & Queen, 

Lancaster, 

Loudoun, 

Louisa, 

Lunenburg, 

Madison, 

Mathews, 

Mecklenburg, 

Middlesex, 

Nansemond, 

Nelson, 

New Kent, 

Norfolk, 

Northampton, 

Northum'land, 



Pop. 
1830. 



19,656 
22,618 
11,031 
12,072 
20,253 
15,770 
18,351 
20,330 
17,774 

5,504 
15,252 
18,637 
24,026 
11,689 
21,901 

5,068 
10,531 

9,206 
26,379 

8,221 
14,911 
10,618 
10,358 

7,119 

28,032 

16,253 

28,798 

7,100 

10.517 

3^38 

6,397 

9,812 

11,644 

4,800 

21,93c 

16,151 

11,957 

9,236 

7,668 

20.366 

4,122 

11,784 

11,254 

6,457 

24,814 

8,644 

7,953 



From the Consul of 1840. 



Whites. 



9,518 

10,512 
3,074 
6,426 

11,016 
4,978 
7,323 

10,213 
6,725 
1,771 
5,130 
7,859 
4,933 
3,263 
9,847 
1,954 
3,955 
5,469 

10,501 
4,445 

10,500 
4,412 
3,570 
1,928 
2,447 

11,145 
6,262 

16,900 
4,243 
4,918 
1,325 
2,269 
3,150 
4,426 
1,903 

13,840 

6,<>47 
4,132 
3,729 
3,969 
7,754 
2,041 
4,858 
6,168 
2,472 
15.444 
3,341 
4,034 



Free 
Cold. 



2,848 
603 
223 
373 
323 
563 
449 
772 
774 
670 
307 
587 
491 
355 

2,764 

44 

598 

" 448 
688 
221 
174 
612 
690 

136 

45 

575 

312 

2,939 
240 

1,268 
507 
276 
338 
499 
247 

1,318 
376 
216 
70 
174 
055 
142 

1,407 
152 
373 

2,390 
754 
647 



Slaves. 



1 



4,630 

11,809 
7,023 
5,577 
8,864 
8,805 

10,014 

10,045 
9,314 
2,433 
9,260 
8,7<>2 
6,Ci69 
6,781 
9,947 
1 ,708 
6,756 
3,453 

10,708 
4,146 
5,158 
5,791 
5,500 
4.102 
1,740 

14,216 
8,394 

13,237 
2,852 
3,786 
1,947 
3,382 
5,780 
5,937 
2,478 
5,273 
9.010 
6,707 
4.308 
3,309 

11,915 
2,209 
4,530 
5,967 
3,385 
9,735 
3,620 
3,243 



Total 
Pop. 



17,096 

22,924 

10,320 

12,576 

20.203 

14;346 

18,786 

21,030 

17,813 

4,774 

11,595 

17,148 

11,393 

10,399 

22,558 

3,706 

11,309 

9,370 

21,877 

8,812 

15,832 

10,715 

9,760 

6,366 

4,232 

25,936 

14,968 

33,076 

7,335 

9,972 

3,679 

5,927 

9,258 

10,862 

4,628 

20,431 

15,433 

11,065 

8,107 

7,442 

20,724 

4,392 

10,795 

12,287 

6,230 

27.569 

7,715 

7,924 



County Towns. 



18 



Accomac C. H. 
Charlottesville. 
Amelia C. H. 
Amherst C. H. 
Liberty. 
Lawrenceville. 
Bucking'm C. H. 
Campbell C. H. 
Bowling: Green. 
Cha's City C. H. 
Charlotte C. H. 
Chesterfield C. H. 
Culpeper C. H. 
Cumberl'd C. H. 
Dinwiddie C. H. 
Hampton. 
Tappahannock. 
Fairfax C. H. 
Warrenton. 
Palmyra. 
Rocky Mount. 
Gloucester C. H. 
Goochland C. H. 
Hicksford. 

Halifax C H. 

Hanover C. H. 

Richmond. 

Martinsville. 

Smithfield. 

Williamsburg. 

K'g George C. H. , 

K'g William C.H. 

K'g <fc Q'n C. H. 

Lancaster C. H. 

Leesburg. 

Louisa U. H. 

Lunenburg C. H. 

Madison. 

Mathews C. H. 

Boydton. 

Urbanna. 

Suffolk. 

Livingston. 

New Kent C. H. 

Norfolk. 

Eastville. 

Northum'd C. H. 



906 



VIRGINIA. 



[1842. 







From the Census of 1840. 




Counties. 


Pop. 










County Towns. 




Free 




Toui 




1830. 


Whites. 


Co I'd. 
158 


Slaves. 


Pop. 




Nottoway, 


10,141 


2,490 


7,071 


9,719 


Nottoway C. H. 


Orange, 


14,637 


3,575 


186 


6,364 


9,125 


Orange C. H. 


Patrick, 


7,393 6,0^7 


103 


1,842 


8,o32 


Patrick C. H. 


Pittsylvania, 


26,022, 14,2<tt 


557 


11,558 


26,398 


Pittsylvania C. H. 


Powhatan, 


8,517 2,432 


363 


5,129 


7,924 


Scottsville. 


Princess Anne, 


9,102 3,9!H> 


202 


3,087 


7.2S5 


Pr. Anne C. H. 


Prince Edw'd, 


14,l07i 4,92:1 


570 


8,576 


14,069 


Pr. Edward C. H. 


Prince Geo., 


8,368, 2,692 


469 


4,014 


7,i7r> 


City Point. 


Prince Wm., 


9,330 4,867 


510 


2,767 


8,144 


Brentsville. 


Rappahan'ck, 


5,30/ 


287 


3,663 


9,257 




Richmond, 


5,056 3,092 


510 


2,363 


5,965 


Richmond C. H. 


Southampton, 


16,073 5,171 


1,799 


6,555 


14,525 


Jerusalem. 


Spotsylvania, 


15,227 6,786 


785 


7,590 


15,161 


Fredericksburg. 


Stafford, 


9,362 


4,489 


369 


3,596 


8.454 


Falmouth. 


Surry, 


7,108 


2,557 


1,070 


2,853 


6,4*0 


Surry C. H. 


Sussex, 


12,720 


3,584 


811 


6,834 


11,229 Sussex C. H. 


Warwick, 


1,517 


604 


21 


831 


MSaWarwick C. H. 


Westmoreland, 


8,411 


3,406 


963 


3,590 


8,019|Westm'd C. H. 


York, 


5,354 


1,958 


650 
42.294 


2,112 


4,720.Yorktown. 


Total, 


832.979 


369,39rt 


395,250 


806,942' 1 



Difvxrxht Classes of Inhabitants. — Eastern District. 



«^|a,K 



Free colored J" Males, 
Persons, ( Females, 


20,094 
22,200 


White Persons, 


200,874 
194,376 


Deaf and Dumb, 


202 


Blind, 


265 


Insane and Idiots, at public , 

charge, 167 
Do. at private charge, 337 
Slaves and colored Persons, 


Deaf and Dumb, 


125 


Blind, 


417 


Insane and Idiots, at private 

charge, 267 
Do. at public charge, 39 
Revolutionary and military 
Pensioners, 623 



Persons employed in 
Mining, 1,412 

Agriculture, 222,827 

M an ufactures and Trades, 4,800 
Navigating the Ocean, 574 

Nav. Canals, Lakes, &c. 2,288 
Learned Professions, 
Universities and Colleges, 10 

Students in Universities, &c. 754 
Academies and Grammar 

Schools, 325 

Students in Academies, &c. 8,764 
Common Schools, 976 

Scholars in Common 

Schools, 20,763 

White Persons over 20 years 
of age unable to read and 
write, 29,806 



J 



Western District. 



CoiMliM. 


Pop. 


From tin Uaasus »f IB40. 


Conn. To™. 








Tool 




ia»!. 


Waiter 


Col '4. 


Sla.et. 


Pop. 




Alleghany, 


a,8ie 


2,142 


m 


547 


2,74!i 


Covington. 


Augusta, 
Bath, 


19,112: 


15.D7V 


421 


4,14" 


19.628 


Staunton. 


4, WIS 


3,I7( 


83 


347 


4,306 


Bath 


Berkeley, 


IttflSU 


8,760 


2113 


1,919 


10.97K 


Martin shuts;. 


Bulclnurt, 


16,354 


8,357 


377 


2,925 


11.6711 


Pincaslle. 


Braxton, 




2501 


5 


64 


BJWS 


Bra x ion C. H. 


Brooke, 


7,040 


7,881 


77 


9) 


7,948 


Well.bo.rg. 
Cabell C. H. 


Cabell, 


5,884 


7,574 


22 


567 


8,163 


Clarke, 




2 867 


161 


3,325 


6.353 




Payette, 




3,773 


18 


133 


3,924 




Floyd, 




4.12: 


9 


321 


4,453 


Floyd C. H. 


Frederick, 


26,045 


11,119 


821 


. 2,3n2 


14,242 


Winchester. 


Giles, 


5,aia 


4,684 


49 


574 


5,307 


Giles C H. 




7,675 


8,542 


53 


41)2 


9,087 


Grayson C. H. 


Greenbrier, 


9,015 


7,287 


194 


1,214 


8,605 




Hampshire, 


11,27! 


10,7113 


189 


1,4104 


12.2115 


Itoroney. 


H.ri,, 


6,708 


6,1(10 


31*1 


1.131 


7.622 


VloorGeld. 


Harrison, 


14,677 


16,850 


126 


'693 


17.66b* 


Clarkuburg. 
Jackson C. H. 


Jackson, 




4,803 




87 


4.890 


Jefferson, 


12,027 


9.393 


602 


4.157 


14,082 


Charleston. 


Kanawha, 


9J26I 


1...UI 


97 


2,560 


13,567 


Kanawha C. H. 


Lee, 


6,461 


7,829 


32 


581 


8.441 


loneavilie. 


Levis, 


6,241 


7,989 


38 


124 


8,151 


Weston. 




3,660 


4,159 




150 


4,300 


Logan C. H. 


Mareball, 




6,854 


37 


46 


6,937 


Eliiabethlown. 




6,534 


5,:)y: 


46 


70S 


6,777 


Point Pleasant. 






2,127 


8 


lib 


2.233 




Man miff alia, 


14,05h 


10,'KW 


146 


26 


I7.3&- 


Morgan town. 


Monroe, 


7,798 


7,457 


97 


868 


8,422 


Union. 


Montgomery, 


12,;)04 


5,825 


87 


1,473 


7,405 


Chrisiianabnrg. 


Morgan, 


2,698 


4,1 1.1 




134 


4.253 


Berkeley Springs. 


Nicholas, 


3,340 


2,44fl 


s 


72 


2515 


s----'-- 


Ohio, 


15,590 


I2,84i 


303 


212 


13,357 


V 


P«f«. 




5,1 Sf 


216 


781 


6,194 




Pendleton, 


6,271 


6,445 




462 


6,9411 


Fi 


Pucahontas, 


2,n4l 


2.681 


19 


219 


2,922 


H 




6,099 


6.743 


3D 


91 


6,860 


K 


Pulaski, 




2,768 


17 


954 


3 739 




Randolph, 


5,000 


5,799 


103 


216 


6,208 


B 


Roanoke, 




3,843 


101 


1,55:1 


5.49" 




Rockbridge, 


14,241 


10,448 


326 


3,51(1 


14,284 


L 


Rockingham, 


20,693 


14,044 


501 


1,899 


17,344 


H 


Russell, 


6.717 


7.152 


26 


701 


7,878 


L 


Boott, 


5,7112 


6,011 


48 


344 


7,303 


K 


Shenandoah, 


19,750 


K).:i2i 


S6E 


1,033 


11,618 


M 






B.ii3i 


145 


838 


fi,f>22 


M 


Tazewell, 


4,104 


6.461 


38 


78 


6290 


T 


Tyler, 
Warren, 


5,75li 


6,864 


S 


85 


6,954 


M 




3,851 


342 


1.434 


5,627 




Washington, 


15,614 


11,731 


212 


2,058 


13,001 




Wood, 


6,409 


7.243 


56 


624 


7,923 


Pi 


Wythe, 


12,16; 


7,632 


125 


1,618 


9,375 


H 


Total, 


378^9: 


371,571 


7,548 


53,737 


432,855 




liUt/lUSUK, 


I.SIIjm 


74»,<Wf 


49,848 


448.8B7 


1,939,797 


| 



908 tiroinia. [1842. 

DIFFERENT CLASSES OF INHABITANTS. — WtSUm DistTtU. 



Free colored C Males, 3,720 

Persons, \ Females, 3,820 

Slaves J Male8 ' 27 » 787 

Slaves, (Females, 25,950 

White Persons, 

Deaf and Dumb, 

Blind, 

Insane and Idiots, at public 
charge, 

Do. at private charge, 
Slaves and colored Persons, 

Deaf and Dumb, 

Blind, 

Insane and Idiots, at private 
charge, 

Do. at public charge, 
Revolutionary and military 

Pensioners, 



242 

170 

141 

399 

25 

49 

60 
15 

370 



Persons employed in 
Mining, 688 

Agriculture, 95,944 

Commerce, ,561 

Manufactures and Trades, 16,676 
Navigating the Ocean, 8 

Nav. Canals, Lakes, & Rivers, 664 
Learned Professions, 1,350 

Universities and Colleges, 3 

Students in Universities, &c. 343 

Academies and Grammar 
Schools, 59 

Students in Academies, <fcc. 2,319 

Common Schools, 583 

Scholars in Common 
Schools, 14,568 

White Persons over 20 years 
of age, unable to read and 
write, 28,924 



Population of the Principal Towns. 



Richmond, 

Petersburg, 

Norfolk, 

Wheeling, 

Lynchburg, 

Fredericksburg, 

Winchester, 



1800. 
5,737 
2,521 
6,926 



1810. 

9,785 
5,663 
9,193 



1800. 
12,067 
6,690 
8,478 



2,870 



1830. 
16,060 
8,322 
9,816 
24200 
4,626 
3,307 
3,400 



1840. 

20,153 
11,136 
10,920 
7,885 
6,395 
3,974 
3,454 



1842.] NORTH CAROLINA. ' 209 



XIII. NORTH CAROLINA. 

Government. 

Salary. 
John M. Morehead, Governor, (term of office eipires 

January 1, 1843,) $ 2,000 

[and the use of a valuable furnished house. 

William Hill, of Raleigh, Secretary of State, 800 and fees. 

Charles L. Hinton, of Wake Co., Treasurer, 1,500 

William F. Collins, of Chatham Co., Comptroller, 1,000 

Stephen Birdsall, Clerk of the Treasury Department, 500 

The officers of the executive government are required to reside, during 
their term of office, at Raleigh. 

Andrew Joyner, of Halifax Co., Speaker of the Senate, . 

Robert B. Gillam, of Granville Co., Speaker of the House of Commons. 
• Governor' 's Council. — Johnston Busbee of Wake Co., John A. An- 
derson of Hertford Co., Willie Perry of Franklin Co., Thomas McGehee 
of Person Co., James Leak of Richmond Co., Isaac T. Avery of Burke 
Co., and Allen Goodwin of Chatham Co. 

Judiciary. 

Supreme Court. 

Salary. 

Thomas Ruffin, of Orange Co. Chief Justice, $2,500 

William Gaston, of Newborn, Associate Justice, 2,500 

Joseph J. Daniel, of Halifax, do. 2,500 

Ju~Ifd.ll, of Raleigh, B^Ur, {l^ftj&gfc 

Judges of the Superior or Circuit Courts. — Salary % 1,950 each. 



Thomas Settle, of Rockingham. 

John M. Dick, of Greensboro*. 

Frederick Nash, of Hillsborough 

R. M. Pearson, of Davie Co. 

Hugh McQueen, of Raleigh, Attorney- General. 



John L. Bailey, of Elizabeth City. 
M. £. Manly, of Newbern. 
Wm. H. Battle, of Raleigh. 



Solicitors. 



David Outlaw, of Windsor. 
James W. Bryan, of Newbern. 
Robert Strange, of Fayette villa. 



J. F. Poindexter, of Stokes Co. 
H. C. Jones, of Rowan Co. 
John G. Bynam, of Rutherfordton. 



Salary of each #20 fdr each court which they attend, besides fees for 
conviction. The Attorney-General receives, in addition, % 100 for each 
term of the Supreme Court which he attends. 

18* 



bobth GAkOLiRi. [1842. 

CoClTltS, POPDLATIOIT, AMI CoMTT ToWKl. 





St 












Whim. 


tt t-k.M. 


Total 
Fop. 




Anson, 


11, "31 


9,633 


5,304 


15,077 


WadeBborough. 
Jefferionton. 


A»he, 


6,991 


6,911 


497 


7,467 


Beau fort, 


10,949 


7,050 


4.472 


12,825 


Washington. 




18,276 


5,144 


6,728 


12,175 


Windsor. 


Bladen, 


7,601 


4,317 


3,413 


8.022 


Eliaabethlown. 


Brunswick, 


6,52a 


2,772 


2,119 


5,265 


Smithville. 


Buncombe, 


16,359 


8.798 


1,199 


10,064 


Asbville. 


Burke, 


17,72? 


12,319 


3,216 


15,79! 


Morgantown. 


Cob hi -fas, 


8,796 


6,971 


2,179 


9,251 


Concord. 


Camden, 


6,721 


3.844 


1,661 


5,663 


New Lebanon. 


Carteret, 


6,607 


5,1187 


1,9* 


6,591 


Beanfort. 


Caswell, 


15,lc« 


7,343 


7,024 


14.693 


Caswell C. H. 


Chatham, 
Cherokee, 


15,499 


10,609 


5,31b 

199 


16.242 
3,427 


fittaboroagh. 


Chowan, 


6,668 


■?..»&: 


3.665 


li.tW 


Edenton. 


Columbus, 


4,141 


2.799 


1,086 


3,941 


Whiteiville. 


Craven, 




ejm 


1 5,702 


13.438 




Cumberland, 


14,824 


9,031 


5,392 


15.284 


Fayette ville. 


Currituck, 


7,654 


4,454 


£.101 


6,703|Cn'rntuck. 


Davidson, 


13,421 


11,937 


2,538 


14,606 


Lexington. 






G.594 


1,868 


7,574 




Duplin, 


11,373 


6,244 


4,677 


11,182 


Kenans ville. 


Edgecombe, 


14,933 


7,915 


7,439 


15.708 


Tarborough. 
Luuisburg. 
Gales ville. 


Franklin, 


10,665 


5,227 


5,39 


10,981 


Gates, 


7,866 


4,137 


3,642 


8,161 


Granville, 


19,343 


9,309 


8,707 


18,817 


Oxford. 


Greene, 


6,313 


3,375 


2,971 


6,595 


Snow Hill. 


Guilford, 


18,735 


15,891 


2,647 


19,175 


Greeniborongh. 
Halifax. 


Halifax, 


17,738 


B,623 


1 9,405 


16,865 


Haywood, 


4,693 


4,650 


' 3t)4 


4.975 


Haywood C. H. 


Hendeion, 




4,628 


466 


5,129 




Hertford, 


8,641 


3,384 


3598 


7.484 


Winlon. 


Hyde, 


6,177 


4,009 


2,198 


6,458 


Lake Landing. 
Statesville. 


Iredell, 


15,262 


11,930 


3,716 




Johnston, 


10,938 


6,996 


3,476 


10,599 


Smilhfield. 




5,628 


1 947 


2,818 


4,945 


Trenton. 


Lenoir, 


7,635 


3,687 


3,683 


rm 




Lincoln, 


22,625 


19,656 


6,386 


25,160 


Lincoln ton- 


Macon, 


5,390 


4,446 


368 


4,869 


Franklin. 


Martin, 


8,544 


4,438 


2,816 


7,637 


Williamaton. 


Mecklenburg, 


20,076 


11351 


6,322 


18,273 


Charlotte. 


Montgomery, 


10,918 


8,221 


2,487 


10,780 


Lawrencevills. 


Moore, 


7,753 


6,443 


1,472 


7,988 


Carthage. 
Nashville. 


Nash, 


8,492 


4,941 


3,697 


9,047 


New Hanover, 


10,759 


6,371 


6,376 


13,312 


Wilmington. 
Northampl'n C. H. 
Onslow C. H. i 


Northampton, 


13.103 


5,616 


6,759 


13,369 




7,814 


4,675 


2,739 


7,527 


Orange, 


23.875 


16,771 


6,954 


24,356 


Hillsborough. 


Pasquotank, 


8,616 


4. 65* 


1, 2,788 


8,514 


Elizabeth City. 


Perquimans, 


7,417 


4,096 


2,9431 


7,346 


Hertford. 1 



HO RIB CAROLIHA, 



POPULATION Or TBI PRINCIPAL ToWKi, 



Wilmington, 


1,689 


(Not given 


2,033 • 


(Not given 


Fayetteville, 


1,656 


bj the 


3,532 


by the 


Newbera, 


2,4(i7 


census.) 


3,663 


census.) 


ilaleigh, 


669 




2,674 





240,047 



•""'-•ia,., 

Free colored (Males, 11,237 

(Females, 11,506 

C Males, 133,51 6 

I Females, 133,271 



Slaves, 

White Persona, 
Deaf and Dumb, S 

BUnd, 2 

Insane and Idiots, at public 

Do. at private, charge, 4 

Slaves and colored Persons, 
Deaf and Dumb, 
Blind, 1 

Insane and Idiots, at private 

charge, 1 

Do. at public charge, 



2,244 
i of Inhabitants. 
Revolu. and mil. Pensioners, 609 
Persons employed in 
Mining, 589 

Agriculture, 217,095 

Commerce, 1,731 

Manufactures & Trades, 14,322 
Navigation of the Ocean, 327 
Nav. Cansls, Lakes, &. Rivers, 379 
Learned Professions, 1,086 

Universities and Colleges, 9 

Students in Universities, be. 166 
Academies & Gram. Schools, 141 
Students in Academies, Jtc. 4,398 
Common Schools, 633 

Scholars in Com. Schools, 14,037 
White Persons over 20 yr*. of 
age unable to read St write, 56,609 



313 



SOUTH CAROLINA. 



[1842. 



XIV. SOUTH CAROLINA. 



GOTZRHMXHT. 

John P. Richardiok, Governor, (term of office expires De- 
cember, 1842,) 
William K. Clowning, Lieutenant' Governor. 

Maximilian Laborde, of Edgefield Diet., Secretary of State, 



Wm. E. Hayne, 
William Laval, 
Joseph Black, 
B. H. Saxon, 
William Bailey, 
Robert G. Mills, 
D. C. Webb, 



of Charleston, 

do. 
of Abbeville Dist., 

do. 
of Charleston, 
of Chester Dist., 
of Charleston, 



Salary. 



$3,500 



Fees. 

ComptroUer- General, 2,000 
TreasW; Lower Division, 2,000 

do. Upper Division, 1,600 
Surveyor- General, Fees. 

Attorney- Gen'l, 1 ,100 & Fees. 
Super' t of Public Works, 3,000 
Pres. Bank of the State 

of South Carolina, 



3,000 



A. Patterson, President of the Senate, 

David L. Wardlaw, of Abbeville District, Speaker of the House 
of Representatives. 

Clerk of the Senate, 
Thomas W. Glover of Orangeburg, Clerk of the House of Rep., 



1,000 
1,000 





Judiciary. 








Chancellors in Equity. 










Appointed. 


Salary. 


Job Johnson, 


of Newbury, 


1830, 


$3,000 


William Harper, 


of Fairfield, 


1835, 


3,000 


David Johnson, 


of Columbia, 


1835, 


3.500 


Benj. Faneuil Dunkin, 


of Charleston, 


1837, 


3,000 


Judges of the 


General Sessions and Common Pleas, 








Appointed. 


Salary. 


Robert Gantt, 


of Greenville, . 


1815, 


$3,500 


John S. Richardson, 


of Sumter, 


1818, 


3,500 


Josiah J. Evans, 


of Society Hill, 


1829, 


3,000 


Baylis J. Earle, 


of Greenville, 


1830, 


3,000 


A. Pickens Butler, 


of Edgefield, 


1834, 


3,000 


J. B. O'Neal!, 


of Newberry, 


1835, 


3,000 


William Rice, 


of Charleston, 


State Reporter, 


1,500 



Appeal Courts of Law are held by the Law Judges at Charleston, on 
the 1st Monday in February; and at Columbia, on the 1st Monday in 
May, and the 4th Monday in November. Appeal Courts of Equity are 
held by the Chancellors at the same times and places. 



1842.] 



SOUTH CAROLINA. 



213 



• A Court for the Correction of Errors, composed of all the Judges of 
Law and Equity, is held to consider all questions on which either of the 
Appeal Courts is divided, or on which any two of the judges of either 
Court shall require a further hearing, and all constitutional questions 
arising out of the Constitution of this State or of the United States. 

Districts, Population, and Seats of Justice. 



Districts. 


Pop. 
1890. 


Census of 1840. 


Beats of Justice. 


Whiter 


Free 
Col'd. 

323 

63 

435 

462 

3,201 

136 

166 

428 

93 

294 

73 

188 

43 

27 

250 

107 

101 

25 

88 

102 

238 

264 

93 

407 

58 

373 

97 

32 

109 

8,276 


Slaves. 


Total 
Pop. 


Abbeville, 

Anderson, 

Barnwell, 

Beaufort, 

Charleston, 

Chester, 

Chesterfield, 

Colleton, 

Darlington, 

Edgefield, 

Fairfield, 

Greorgetown, 

Greenville, 

Horry, 

Kershaw, 

Lancaster, 

Laurens, 

Lexington, 

Marion, 

Marlborough, 

Newberry, 

Orangeburg, 

Pickens, 

Richland, 

Spartanburg, 

Sumter, 

Union, 

Williamsburg, 


28,149 
17,169 
19,236 
37,032 
86,338 
17,182 

8,472 
27,256 
13,728 
30,509 
21,546 
19,943 
16,476 

5245 
13,545 
10,361 
20,863 

9,065 
11,208 

8,582 
17,441 
18,453 
14,473 
14,772 
21,150 
28,277 
17,906 

9,018 
17,790 


13,880 

12,747 

10,533 
5,650 

20,921 
9,889 
5,537 
5,874 
7,169 

15,020 
7,587 
2,093 

12,491 
4,154 
3,988 
5,565 

12,572 
7,401 
8,593 
4,188 
8,208 
6,321 

11,548 
5,326 

17,924 
8,644 

10,485 
3,327 

11,449 


15,148 

5,683 

10,503 

29,682 

58,539 

7,722 

2,871 

19,246 

7,560 

17,538 

12,505 

15,993 

5,305 

1,574 

8,043 

4,235 

8,911 

4,685 

5,251 

4,118 

9,9(14 

11,934 

2,715 

10,664 

5,687 

18.875 

8,354 

6,968 

6,825 


29,351 
18,493 
21,471 
35,794 
82,661 
17,747 

8,574 
25,548 
14,822 
32,852 
20,165 
18,274 
17,839 

5,755 
12,281 

9,907 
21,584 
12,111 
13,932 

8,408 
18,350 
18,519 
14,856 
16,397 
23,669 
27,892 
18,936 
10,327 
18,383 


Abbeville. 
Anderson C. H. 
Barnwell C. H. 
Coosa whatchie. 
Charleston. 
Chester C. H. 
Chesterfield C. H. 
Walterborough. 
Darlington C. H. 
Edgefield C. H. 
Winnsborough. 
Georgetown. 
Greenville C. H. 
Conwayborough. 
Camden. 
Lancaster C. H. 
Laurens C. H. 
Lexington C. H. 
Marion C. H. 
Marlboro' C. H. 
Newberry C. H. 
Orangeburg C. H. 
Pickens C.H. , 
Columbia. 
Spartanburg C. H. 
Suraterville. 
Union ville. 
Kingstree. 
Yorkville. 


Total, 


581,185 


259,084 


327,038 


534,398 





Charleston, 
Columbia, 



Population of the Principal Towns. 

1790. 1800. 1810. 1820. 1830. 1840. 

16,359 18,712 24,711 24,780 30,289 29,261 

(1816, 2,06b) 3,310 4,340 



214 



SOUTH CAROLINA. [1849. 

Dipfkrcht Classes of Inhabitants. 



Free colored C Males, 3,864 

Persons, (Females, 4,412 

Slaves 5 Male8 ' 158,078 

Diaves, j Females, 168,360 

White Persons, 
Deaf and Dumb, 140 

Blind, 133 

Insane and Idiots, at public 

charge, 91 

Do. at private charge, 285 

Slaves and colored Persons, 
Deaf and Dumb, 78 

Blind, 156 

Insane and Idiots, at private 

charge, 121 

Do. at public charge, 16 

Revolutionary and military 

Pensioners, 318 



Persons employed in 

Agriculture, 198,361 

Commerce, 1 ,958 

Manufactures and Trades, 10,325 

Navigating the Ocean, 381 

Nav. Canals, Lakes, <&c. 348 

Learned Professions, 1,481 

Universities and Colleges, 1 

Students in Universities, &c. 168 

Academies and Grammar 

Schools, 117 

Students in Academies, &c. 4,326 
Common Schools, 566 

Scholars in Common 

Schools, 12,520 

White Persons over 20 years 
of age, unable to read and 
write, 20,615 



XV. GEORGIA. 



Government. 

Salary. 
Charles J. McDonald, of Muscogee Co. ^Governor, (term 

of office expires November, 1843,) £4,000 

William A. Tennille, of Washington Co., Secretary of State, 2,000 

Thomas Haynes, of Hancock Co., Treasurer, 2,000 

John G. Park, of Gwinnett Co., Comptroller- General, 2,000 

Alfred M. Horton, Surveyor- General, 2,000 

The officers of the executive government are required by law to re- 
side, during their term of office, at Milledgeville. 

Salary. 
Thomas Stocks, of Greene Co., President of the Senate. 

David J. Bailey, of Butts Co., Secretary of the Senate, $500 

Charles J. Jenkins, of Richmond Co., Speaker of House of Rep, 

Cabiness, of Monroe Co., Clerk of House of Rep. 500 



1842;] 6E0B6U. 215 

JsjDlCUBT. 

The Statu is divided into eleven Circuits, wilb a judge for each Circuit 

BaJuy, 
Charles S. Henry, of Chatham Co., Judge o/iAe Eastern Circuit, $2,100 
John Schley, of Louisville, da. Middle do. 2,100 

Garnet Andrews, of Wilkes Co., do. northern do. 8,100 

Th. W. Harris, of Walton Co., da. Western do. 2,100 

Edward Y. Hill, of Jasper Co., do. Ockmulgee do. 2,100 

Carlton B. Cole, of Twiggs Co., do. Southern do. 2,100 

AngusM. D.King, of Monroe Co, do. Flint do. 5,100 

H. J. Welborn, of Muscogee Co., do. Chattahoochee do. 2,100 

Turner H. Trippe, of Hancock Co,, do. Cherokee do. 2,100 

Win. W. Enard, da. Coweta do. 3,100 

William Taylor, of Early, do. South western do. 2,100 

Gardner, of Richmond Co., Attorney- General, $ 250 and perquisites. 

' Levi S. De Lyon, Judge, of the Court of Oyer and Terminer, Savannah. 
John W. Wilde, Judge of the Court of Oyer and Terminer, Augusta. 

Inferior Court. An inferior court is held in each county, composed 
of fife justices, elected by the people every four years. These courts 
possess the powers of Courts of Probate. The justices have no salary. 

Coowtiks, Population, and Coumtt Towns. 



[1841 







C*U<M 


of 1840. 


1 


Couotlsi. 


Fop. 




1 c 




PlM 










ieao. 


V Col'd. 


e ■. 


Pop. 




Uecatur, 


3,854 


8 


» 


~5# 




Oe Kalb, 


10,042 


7 


h 


10,4 1 




Dooly, 


2,131 


8 








Early, 


2,051 


7 


i; 


5,4' 




Effingham, 


2,924 


9 


13 


3,o: 




Elbert, 


12,354 


73 


t> 


11, IS 




Emanuel, 


2,673 


24 


e 


3,15 




Fayette, 


5,504 


30 


14 


6,li 




Floyd, 




E 




4,4' 




Forsyth, 




B 




6,61 




Franklin, 


10,107 


37 


e 


Bfit 




Gilmer, 




! 


■2 


2,5; 






4,567 


2 


19 


6,3l 




Greene, 


ia,sj!! 


25 


!4 


11,6! 




Gwinnett, 


13,-2c!0 


14 




KM 




Habersham, 


10,671 


li 


2 


7,W 




Hall, 


11.748 


3 


19 


7,s; 




Hancock, 


u,m 


47 


5 


9,6.' 




Harris, 


B,loe 




8 


13,93 




Heard, 






7 


5JH 






10.566 


ie 


e 


11, 7J 




Houston, 


7.36B 


6 




9,71 






1.18(1 




K 


2,0; 






9JHM 


15 


a 


Bis 




Jefferaon, 


13,i3i 


35 


16 


11,11 




7,3*1 


35 


12 


7^r 






13,34;-, 


29 


9 


I0.0C 






5,oSti 


G 


12 


5,r,s 




Lee, 


i .es-n 


6 


16 


i JS& 




USft 


7,233 


35 




7%' 




6,115 


29 


!> 


5,8! 




Lowndes, 


2,453 


3 




5,5: 




Lumpkin, 




IS 




5fi- 








3 


K 


6,0* 




Madison, 


4,646 


3 


(2 


4,5] 




Marion, 


1,436 


1 




4,81 




Mcintosh, 


i,m 


102 


( 


6,31 




Meriwether, 


4,422 


16 




14. i: 




Monroe, 


iG.any 


24 


17 


16,2: 




Montgomery, 


1,261 




17 


l,6i 




Morgan, 


ia,MC 


14 


16 


9.1' 




Murray, 






6 






Muscogee, 


3,508 


69 


11 


11,61 




New Ion, 


11,166 


19 


lu- 


11, ft 




Oglethorpe, 


13,618 


31 


ll 


10,8. 




Paulding, 






.4 


~2,.<; 




Pike, 


6,149 


32 


10 


9,v. 




Pulaski, 


4,90fi 


32 


!5 






Putnam, 


13,261 


37 


12 


10.2* 






8,178 






1,91 




Randolph, 


2,191 


11 


9 


8,2; 





DirFEBEHT Classes of Iniiaei 



WW,, p . „,.. 5 M" 1 "- 210,534 
White Person., j f^J^^ I97695 



Slaves, 



Free colored (Mates, 1,374 

Persons, ( Females, 1 ,379 

(Males, 139,335 
I Females, 141,609 
White Persons, 
Deaf and Dumb, 193 

Blind, 13b' 

Insane and Idiot?, at public 

charge, 61 

Do. at private charge, 243 

Slaves and colored Persons, 
Deaf and Dumb, G4 

Blind, 151 

Insane and Idiots, at private 



Do. at public charge, 

Revolutionary and military 



Persons employed it 

Mining, 



574 
0,383 

Commerce, 2,428 

Manufactures and Trades, 7,984 
Navigation of the Ocean, 262 
Nay. Canals, Lakes, &c. 353 
Learned Professions, 1,250 

Universities or Colleges, 11 

Students in Universities, &e. 622 

Academies and Grammar 
Schools, 176 

Students in Academies, &c. 7,873 

Common Schools, 601 

Scholars in Common 
Schools, 15,5(51 

White Persona over SO years 
of age unable to read and 
write, 30.71T 



218 



GEORGIA. 

Population of tub Principal Towns. 



Savannah, 
Augusta, 



1830. 1840. 

7,776 11,214 
4,000 6,403 



Macon, 
Columbus, 



1830. 



1,152 



[1842. 



1840. 

3,927 

3,114 



XVI. ALABAMA. 



Government. 



Benjamin Fitzpatrick, Governor, (term of office expires on 



Salary. 



$3,500 

Fees and 1,000 

do. 1,000 

do. 1,000 

do. 425 



the 1st Monday in December, 1843,)' 
William Garrett, Secretary of State, 

Jefferson C. Vandyke, Comptroller of Public Accounts, 
Samuel G. Frierson, State Treasurer, 
Matthew F. Lindsey, Attorney- General, 

The Governor and other principal executive officers reside at Tusca- 
loosa. The Secretary of State is elected for two years ; and the Comp- 
troller and Treasurer annually ; — all by a joint vote of the two Houses 
of the General Assembly. 

The Senate consists of 30 members, elected for 3 years, one third an- 
nually ; the House of Representatives, of 98 members, elected annually. 
The pay of the members of both Houses, is $ 4 a day each. 



Judiciary. 



Supreme Court. 



Henry W. Collier, 
Henry Goldthwaite, 
John J. Ormond, 



of Tuscaloosa, Chief Justice, 
of Mobile, Associate Justice, 

do. 



Salary. 

$2,250 

2,250 

2,250 



The Judges of the Supreme and Circuit Courts, and also the Chancel- 
lors, are elected by a joint vote of the two Houses of the General As- 
sembly r for 6 years. 

The Supreme Court has appellate jurisdiction only, — and only upon 
points of law, taken up from the Circuit or County Courts, by writ of 
error. This court sits at Tuscaloosa, the seat of government, on the 1st 
Mondays of January and June j and it commonly sits 6 or 8 weeks at 
each term. The opinions of the Court are delivered in writing, and 
published by the Reporter. 



1842] 



ALABAMA. 

Court of Chancery; — established in 1839. 



219 



Salary. 
Southern Chancery Division, Anderson Crenshaw, Chancellor, $ 2,000 

1st District, Mobile, Washington, Clark, Monroe, Baldwin, Conecuh, 

and Covington. 
2d do. Montgomery, Macon, Russell, Barbour, Henry, Dale, Pike, 

and Butler. 
3d do. Sumter, Marengo, Greene, Perry, Dallas, Lowndes, and 

Wilcox. 

Salary. 
Northern Chancery Division, Silas Parsons, Chancellor, g 2,000 

4th District, Jefferson, Shelby, Bibb, Autauga, Coosa, Tallapoosa, Cham- 
bers, Randolph, Talladega, and Benton. 

5th do. Tuscaloosa, Pickens, Marion, Fayette, Walker, Blount, 

St. Clair, Cherokee, and De Ealb. 

6th do. Jackson, Madison, Limestone, Lauderdale, Tranklin, Law- 
rence, Morgan, and Marshall. 

Two sessions are held annually in each District, and the Chancellors 
are required to alternate with each other, so that neither may preside 
twice in succession in either Division. 

Circuit Courts, 



Judges. 


Residence. 


Circuit. 


Salary. 


Attorneyi. 


John D. Phelan, 
Ezekiel Pickens, 
Peter Martin, 
John J. Coleman, 
George W. Lane, 
John P. Booth, 
Samuel Chapman, 
Abraham Martin, 
Eli Shortridge, 
B. F. Porter, 


Selma, 
Tuscaloosa, 
Florence, 
Huntsville, 

Sumter C. H., 

Talladega, 


1st, 
2d, 
•3d, 
4th, 
5th, 
6th, 
7th, 
8th, 
9th, 
10th, 


$2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
1,500 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 


John P. Graham. 
Nathaniel Cook. 
Matth. H. Lindsey. 

William Aiklen. 
F. S. Jackson. 

Fryerson. 

James E. Belsen. 
William B. Martin. 
Walker. 



The Circuit Court has original jurisdiction in all civil and criminal 
causes in the State ; and appellate jurisdiction in all appeals and certio- 
raris brought up from inferior tribunals. 

This State is divided into 10 Circuits, each Circuit comprising about 
6 counties. There are two ridings; one called the Spring, and the other 
the Fall term ; and each term occupies about 8 weeks. Each Circuit 
has a Solicitor, or State's Attorney, who prosecutes throughout the 
Circuit all offenders, and receives for his services $ 250 and fees. 



ALABAMA. 
I, PoWJLATIOfl, ADD CoOMTT ToWNJ, 

Northern District. 









Curiam .if 1840. 




Cocntiw. 


& 






""' ° Wn '' 


Whiui 


pea 


tw 


FoO. 


Benton., 




11,361 


b 


2fm 


14,2611 


Jacksonville, 


Blount, 


4,233 


6,225 




314 


5,57(1 


Blountavilte, 


Cherokee, 




7,652 




1,112 


8,77:! 




De Kalb, 




5,589 




341) 


5,929 




Fayette, 


3,547 


!i,»il 




981 


6.942 


Fayette C. H. 


Franklin, 


II.(>7r 


8:>->.i 


2W 


6,005 


14,8711 


HuWllville. 


Jackson, 


12,701 


i y.Di i; 




1,816 


15,715 


fie Me Funis. Woodtille. 


Uuderdale, 


11.781 


9,447 


Ci 


4,969 


14.485 


¥' 


Lawrence, 


14.904 


7,143 


25 


6,145 


13J! 18 




Limeatone, 


14,807 


7,49a 


36 


6,840 


14.374 


A 


Madison, 


27,991 


12,297 


144 


13,265 


25,70b 


1- 


Marion, 


4,058 


5,094 




753 


5,847 


P 


Marshall, 




6,088 


24 


841 


7,553 




Morgan, 


9,062 


6,58( 


45 


3,21 r 


9,841 




Randolph, 






] 


526 


4,973 




St. Clair, 


5,975 


4,5>.5 


8 


1,125 


5,63H 


A 


Talladega, 




7.663 


2f- 


4,898 


12.687 


1 




120,215 


129,24? 


45! 


56,071) 


185,776 





Southern District. 



ti,2U 


It 


8,109 


14,342 


V 


1,161 


8; 


1,701 


2,95 


h 


li,4(5! 


* 


6.S4E 


12.(12- 


< 


(),*-.{ 


iflZ 


8,2* 


( 


6,1)1! 


2: 


2,471 


8,(i8f 


I. 


Hi,18f 


4 


7,141 


17.33. 


1 


4,2* 


11 


4,395 


8,(541 


1 


4.37d 


4 


3.815 


8,197 


H 




15 


2,125 


(i,0'K 


N 


y.iiiv 


I 


371 


2.43^ 


,v 


<5,ri:if 




5tM 


7,3!n 


1. 


7,U22 


« 


17,20* 


25,19! 


1 


7,55i 


83 


16,431 


34.1 * 


!■ 


4,701 


S 


1.0-4 


5,7ol 




r..4.i( 


E 


1,636 


7,131 


V. 


fi.S)5( 


14 


ViMV. 


19,53! 


1 


5,30! 


23 


5,-51 






0.:e>i 


12 


1 1,901 


!7JJfU 


1. 


1 1 7M 


787 


6,191 


18.741 


V 


5,37' 


If 


Si.2i!J 


10,681 


: 


y.M7: 


IK 


15.486 


24,57.1 




8,721 


2v 


10.343 19,081 


V 


9,:m; 




7,7641 17,llf 


i: 


7,987 


10 


2,1" 


10,108 


F 



DlFFEKERT CLASSES 



( Males, 
I Females, 
Free colored Persons, I j^JJ^ 
C Males, 
) Females, 
("Deaf and Dumb, 



White Persons, 



Slaves, 



.---.. , , "go, 

[ Do. do. at private eharge, 
I Deaf and Dumb, . 

Slaves and col- J Blind, 

ored Persons. 1 Insane 6 Idiots, at private charge, 
I Do. do. at public charge, 



fMin 



•%:.. 



Agriculture, .... 

. Manufactures and Trades, , - 
Navigation of the Ocean, 
Nav. Canals, Lakes, and Rivers, 
I Learned Professions, 
Revolutionary and military Pensioners, . 

<T tnd Colleges, 

Jniveraittes and Colleges, 
Academies and Grammar Schools, 
Students in Academies and Grammar Schools, 

Primary and Common Schools 

Scholars in .Common Schools, 

Scholars at public charge, 

™" ' " ir 20 years of age, unable to read 



1»* 



White Persons o 



N. Dint. 


3. Diltricl. 


G6,:i60 


1 10,333 


62,887 


96,606 


243 


787 


216 


793 


28,000 


99,360 


28.070 


98,102 




91 


45 


68 


23 


16 


86 


107 


SI 


32 


31 


65 


35 


65 


17 


8 


63 


33 


52,656 


124^83 






2,178 


5,017 


10 


246 


65 


693 


379 


1,135 


101 


91 


90 


62 


as 


86 


1,055 


3,953 


368 




7,544 


8,696 


1,993 


1,220 


11,396 


11,196 



222 



MISSISSIPPI. 



[1842. 



Joshua S. Curtis, 
A. B. Saunders, 



3,000 

3,000 
2,000 
3,000 



XVII. MISSISSIPPI. 

Government. 

Salary. 

Alexalder G. McNtjtt, Governor, (term of office from January 

1840, to January, 1842,) 
Thomaa B. Woodward, Secretary of State, (term ending No- 
vember, 1841,) 
Skate Treasurer, 
Auditor of Public Accounts, 

Judiciary. 

High Court of Errors and Appeals. 

Term ends. Salary. 
Wm. L. Sharkey, of Vicksburg, Presiding Judge, Nov. 1841, #3,000 
James F. Trotter, of Columbus, Judge, do. 1842, 3,000 

Edward Turner, of Franklin Co., do. do. 1843, 3,000 

Thomas F. Collins, of Jackson, AW y Gen. do. 1842, 1,000 

Francis F. Hopkins, do. Clerk. 

This Court," which has no jurisdiction except what properly belongs 
to a Court of Errors and Appeals, holds its sessions annually at Jack* 
son, commencing on the 1st Monday in December and January. 

Superior Court of Chancery. 

Term ends. Salary. 

Robert H. Buckner, of Hinds Co., Chancellor, Nov. 1843, $4,000 

R. L. Dixon, of Jackson, Clerk. 

This Court, which has jurisdiction over all matters, pleas, and com- 
plaints whatsoever, belonging to or cognizable in a Court of Equity, 
holds sessions at Jackson, Augusta, and Oxford. 

District or Circuit Courts. 
The Judicial divisions were reorganized in 1840, and formed into 11 
Districts or Circuits. The salary of the Judges is $ 2,000 each. 



Dial. Judges. 



1. George Coalter, 
8: D. O. Shattuck, 

3. C. G. Cage, 

4. Buckner Harris, 

5. Henry Mounger, 

6. H. S. Bennett, 

7. I. R. Nicholson, 

8. F. W. Huling, 

9. Stephen Adams, 

10. M. L. Fitch, 

11. V. T. Crawford, 



District Attorneys. 



Elbridge G. Walker, 
B. F. Caruthers, 

Stanhope Posey, 
& G. Peyton, 

John Watts, 

Henry Gray, 

Isaac N. Mitchell, 
George A. Wilson, 

Charles A. Bradford, 

Robert C. Perry, 
Arthur Smith, 



Counties of the Districts. 



Warren, Claiborne, Washington, and Bolivar. 

Yalabusha, Carroll, Choctaw, and Talla- 
hatchie. 

Adams, Wilkinson, and Jefferson. 

Smith, Copiah, Simpson, Scott, Newton, and 
Neshoba. 

JackBon, Jones, Grenn, Perry, Wayne, Jas- 
per, Clarke, and Lauderdale. 

Noxubee, Lowndes, Kemper, Winston, and 
Octibbeha. 

Hinds, Madison, and Rankin. 

De Soto, Coahoma, Tunica, Ponola, Lafay- 
ette, and Marshall. 

Monroe, Itawamba, TUbamingo, Pontotoc, 
Chickasaw, and Tippah. 

Yazoo, Holmes, Attala, and Leake. 

Lawrence, Covington, Hancock, Marion, 
Pike, Amite, and Franklin. j 



134a] 

A Circuit Court ii holden in each county twice a year. This Court 
hu original jurisdiction, in civil cases, in which the sum in controversy 
eiceedB $ 50. It has chancery jurisdiction in all cases under $ 500 ; and 
baa power to foreclose mortgages without limit as tu sum. 

Judges of the High Court of Errors and Appeals, and the Chancellor 
are chosen by the electors for 6 years ■; the Judges of the Circuit Courts, 
Attorney- Genera], and District Attorneys, as well as all military offi- 
cers, are chosen by the electors for 4 years; all other officers, for 9 

CoUHTlIS, PoFDLlTIOS, Ann CoUKlT ToWHB. 

Jfartim District. 



MISSISSIPPI. 

Southern Dutrict. 



PorcLATioir or thi Prihcipil Towbs. 
Nitehot, in 1820, 2,184 ; in 1840, 4,800. Virtwbnrg, in 1840, 3,104. 



1842.] 



MISSISSIPPI. 



225 



Different Classes of Inhabitants. 



N. Dial. 



< Males, 
I Females, 



White Persons, 

Free colored Person., \ ^J^ •.■.•.' 

01 ( Males, 

Slaves, J Fema&s, 

Deaf and Dumb, 



White Persons, 



Slaves and col- 



Persons em- 
ployed in 



Blind, 

Insane and Idiots , at public charge, 
Do. do. at private charge, 

Deaf and Dumb, . 
Blind, . . 
ored Persons,^ Insane and Idiots, at private charge, 

Do. do. at public charge, 

Mining, 

Agriculture, .... 

Commerce, 

X Manufactures and Trades, 
Navigation of the Ocean, 
Do. Canals, Lakes, and Rivers, 
x L Learned Professions, 

Revolutionary and military Pensioners, 
Universities and Colleges, 
Students in Universities, &c. . 
Academies and Grammar Schools, 
Students in Academies, &c. 
Primary and Common Schools, 
Scholars in Common Schools, ' . 
Scholars at public charge, 
Whites Persons over 20 years of age 
and write, 



unable to read 



45,094 

39,008 

203 

174 

31,480 

30,864 

29 

16 

5 

41 

9 

19 

20 

5 

4 

51,766 

330 

1,454 

33 

. 609 

361 

3 

147 

31 

1,032 

186 

4,109 



2,926 



S. Dist. 



52,162 

42,810 

512 

480 

66,523 

66,344 

35 

27 

9 

61 

19 

50 

46 

11 

10 

87,J>58 

973 

2,697 

33 

67 

897 

27 

4 

307 

40 

1,521 

196 

4,127 

107 

5,434 



396 



LOUISIANA* 



[1843. 



XVIII. LOUISIANA. 



Government. 



Salary. 
Andr£ B. Romaic, of New Orleans, Governor, (from January 

4th, 1839. to January 4th. 1843,) $7,500 

Levi Peirce, of New Orleans, Secretary of State, 2,500 

Francis Gardere, do. Treasurer, 6,000 

Joseph Bernard, of East Baton Rouge, Pres. Board of Pub. Works, 3,000 
P. F. Smith, of New Orleans, Adj. and Inspector- General, 4,000 
Stephen Mazureau, do. Attorney- General, 3,000 

T. W. Chinn, of West Baton Rouge, Pres. Board of Pub. Works, 3,000 

Senate; 17 members, elected for 4 years. 

House of Representatives ; 50 members, elected for 2 years. Pay of 
each, $6 a day. 



Judiciary. 
Supreme Court. 

Francois X. Martin, of New Orleans, Judge, 

Alonzo Morphy, do. do. 

Henry A. Bullard, of Alexandria, do. 

Edward Simon, Western District, do. 

Rice Garland, . do. do. 



A. M. Buchanan, 
Thomas C. Nichols, 
Isaac Johnson, 

■ Diblieuz, 
George R. King, 
H. Boyce, 
E. H. Wilson, 
Jesse R. Jones, 
Frederick H. Davis, 



District Courts. 

of New Orleans, Judge 1st District, 
of Donaldsonville, do. 2d do. 
of St. Franci8ville, do. 



of Plaquemine, do. 

of Opelousas, do. 

of Alexandria, do. 

of Monroe, do. 

or Covington, do. 

of Concordia, do. 



3d 

4th 

5th 

6th 

7th 

8th 

9th 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



Salary. 
$5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 



Salary. 
$4,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 



Commercial Court, New Orleans. 
Charles Watts, Judge, Salary, $ 5,000 



Criminal Court of the City of New Orleans. 
John F. Canonge, Judge, 



4,000 



1843.] LOOIWABA. 

Parish*!, Population, and Skat* c 
Eaatem District. 



938 



LQUISIANIA. 



[1842. 



DIFFERENT ClASSBS OF INHABITANTS. 



White Persons, 



C Males, .... 

\ Females, 

ftee colored Pewoae, j ££f e ,, '.•.•.• 

Slave*. J Female., . . . 

(Deaf and Dumb. 
Insane and' Idiots, at public charge, 
Do. do. at private charge, 

Deaf and Dumb, 
Blind, . . . . 
VJtu * Ck0VUD , Insane and Idiots, at private charge, 

Do. do. at public charge, 

'Mining, 

Agriculture. .... 

Commerce, 

«< Manufactures and Trades, 
Navigation of the Ocean, 

Do. Canals, Lakes, and Rivers, 
Learned Professions, 
Revolutionary and military Pensioners, 
Universities or Colleges, ..... 
Students in Universities or Colleges, 
Academies and Grammar Schools, 

Students in Academies, &c 

Primary and Common Schools, .... 

Scholars in Common Schools, 

Scholars at public charge, 

White Persons over 20 years of age unable to read 
and write, 



B. Dist. 



Persons em- 
ployed in 



W. Dbt. 



64,359 

47,818 

9,891 

12,306 

58,55* 

56,409 

30 

30 

4 

35 

14 

28 

22 

2 



60,965 

8,268 

6,787 

VI 9 

649 

808 

5 

10 

870 

32 

1,308 

113 

2,531 

894 

1,522 



25,388 
20,892 
1,635 
1.670 
27,€71 
25,514 
12 
7 
2 
14 
3 
8 
16 
5 

18,324 
281 
778 
3 

13 

210 

7 

2 

119 

20 

687 

66 

1,042 

296 

3,339 



1842.] 



ARKANSAS. 



239 



XIX. ARKANSAS. 



Government. 



Salary. 
Archibald Yell, of Little Rock, Governor, (term of office 

from November, 1840, to November, 1844,) $2,000 

David B. Green, of Little Rock, Secretary of State, 700 

Elias N. Conway, do. Auditor of Public Accounts, 1,500 

John Hutt, do. Treasurer, 1,000 

The legislature meets on the 1st Monday in October, 1840, and bien- 
nially. — Senators, 17. Mark W. Izard, President. Representatives, 54. 
George Hill, Speaker. 

Judiciary. 



Daniel Ringo, 
Thomas J. Lacy, 
Townsend Dickinson, 
Albert Pike, 



Supreme Court. 

of Little Rock, 
of Arkansas, 
of Batesville, 
of Little Rock, 



Chief Justice, 
Associate Justice, 

do. 
Reporter. 



Salary. 

#1,800 

1,800 

1,800 



The Supreme Court has appellate jurisdiction only, except in partic- 
ular cases pointed out by the constitution. The judges are elected by 
the General Assembly, by a joint vote of both Houses, for a term Of 8 
years. 

Circuit Court. 



Judges. 



Salary. 



1st Circuit, W. K. Sebastian, $ 1 ,200 
2d do. Isaac N. Baker, 1,200 
3d do. Thos. Johnson, 1,200 
4th do. Joseph M. Ho ere, 1,200 



Judges. Salary. 

5th Circuit, J.J. Clendennen, $ 1 ,200 
6th do. Wm. Conway, 1,200 
7th do. R. C. S. Brown, 1,200 



The Circuit Court has original jurisdiction over all criminal cases 
which are not otherwise provided for by law; and exclusive original' 
jurisdiction of all crimes amounting to felony at the common law; and 
original jurisdiction of all civil cases which are not cognizable before 
Justices of the Peace, until otherwise directed by the General Assem- 
bly ; and original jurisdiction in all matters of contract, where the sum 
in controversy is over one hundred dollars. — The judges are elected by 
the General Assembly, for a term of 4 years. 

20 



330 ARKAHail. 

CoCKTIIS, PoPDLiTIOH, *KD CoUBTT ToWBS. 





Poo. 




Pih 




Pup. 




Arkansas 


1,430 


980 


5 


361 


1,340 


Arkansas. 


Benton, 




2,(»K 


JO 


168 


2,22* 


Osage. 


Carroll, 




2,707 




137 


2,844 


Carrollton. 




1.16S 


1,105 


s 


9,698 


3,806 




Clarke, 


],36!> 


1,023 




687 


2,309 


Greemille. 




962 


2,695 


5 


192 


2,893 




Crawford, 


2,441 


8,014 


34 


618 


4,266 


Crawford C. H. 


Crittenden, 


1J17S 


1,096 


11 


454 


1,561 




Desha, 




1,155 


36 


4l(7 


1,598 




Franklin, 




2£57 


8 


400 


2,065 








1,536 




50 


1,58* 




H e in pB lead, 
Hot Spring, 


2,513 


2,923 




),!«' 


4,921 


Hempstead C. H. 


458 


1,655 


3 


249 


1,!>II7 


Hot Spring. 


Independence 
Izard, 


2,031 


3,146 





514 




Batesiille. 


1,266 


9,099 


141 


2,24! 


2,244 


Izard C. H. 


Jackson, 


333 


1,258 


6 


276 


' 1,541 


Litchfield. 


Jefferson, 


773 


. 1,551 


6 


1,010 


2,560 


Pine Bluff. 


Johnson, 




3,839 


8 




3,433 


Johnson C. H. 


Lafayette, 


74S 


555 


1 


1,044 


2,2>H) Lafajette C. H. 


Lawrence, 


2,r306 


2£fi2 


6 


967 


2,835 Jackson. 


Madison, 




2,693 




83 


2,775j 


Marion, 




1,381 


65 


39 


1,325 


Miller, 


356 










Mississippi, 




900 




510 


I,410| 


Monroe, 


401 


786- 


8 


148 


936 Clarendon. 


Pliillipa, 


1,152 


2,625 


17 


905 


3,547 Helena. 


Pike, 




860 




10! 




Poinsett, 




1,253 




67 




Pope, 


1,463 


2,626 


9 


215 




Pulaski, 


3,y<t& 


3,961 


105 


1,284 




Randolph, 




1,973 


7 


216 




St. Francii, 


1,505 


2,132 


a 


365 








1,662 




309 




Soolt, 




1,542 


21 


131 












3 






G-!4 


2,076 


9 


79S 




Union,' 


640 


1,981 


9 


906 


2,889 Cores Fabre. 


Van Bnren, 




1,459 




59 




Clinton 


Washington, 


3,122 


6,246 


19 


883 


7,148 


FayetteTille. 


White, 




841 




88 


929 




Total, 


30,38ft 


17,174 


465 


19,935 


97,574 



1842.] 



ARKANSAS. 



331 



Different Classes of- Inhabitants. 



White Persons, 
Deaf and Dumb, 40 

Blind, 26 

Insane and Idiots, at public 

charge, 9 

Insane and Idiots, at private 

charge, 36 

Slaves and colored Persons, 
Deaf and Dumb, 2 

Blind, 8 

Insane and Idiots, at private - 

charge, 13 

Insane and Idiots, at public 

charge, 8 

Revolutionary and military 
Pensioners, 24 



Persons employed in 

Mining, 41 

Agriculture, 26,355 

Commerce, 215 

Manufactures and Trades, 1,173 

Navigation of the Ocean, 3 

Nav. Canals, Lakes, & Rivers, 39 

Learned Professions, 301 

Academies aDd Gram. Schools, 8 

Students in Academies, &c. 300 

Primary and Common Schools, 113 

Scholars in Com. Schools, 2,614 

White Persons over 20 years 

of age unable to read and 

write, 6,567 



XX. TENNESSEE. 

Government. 

Salary 
James C. Jones, Governor, (term of office expires Oct., 1843,) $2,000 
John S. Toung, Secretary of State, $ 750 and fees. 

Miller Francis, Treasurer of the State, 1,500 

Daniel Graham, Comptroller, 2,000 

Robert P. Currin, Superintendent of Instruction, 1,500 

West H. Humphreys, Attorney- General, 1,000 and fees 

The legislature consists of a Senate of 25 members, and a House of 
Representatives of 75 members ; all elected for two years. The members 
of the present legislature were elected in August, 1841. — Pay of the 
Senators and Representatives, $ 4 per day. 

The Judges of the Supreme Court are elected by a joint vote of the 
two Houses of the General Assembly, for the term of 12 years; and 
those of the inferior courts, in the same manner, for the term of 8 years. 



Judiciary. 
Supreme Court. 

William B. Turley, of Jackson, Judge, Western Division, 
William B. Reese, of Knozville, do. Eastern Division, 
Nathan Greene, of Winchester, do. Middle Division, 



ft&lary. 

#1,800 

1,800 

1,800 



333 TiMitEBBiB. [1843. . 

Court of Chancery. 

Andrew McCaropbell, of Paris, Chancellor, Western Division, (1,500 
Th. L. Williams, of Knoiville, do. Eastern do. 1,500 

Lnnsford M. Brim] sit, of Pulaski, do. Middle do. 1,500 

Bromfield L Ridley, do. Fourth do. 1,500 



The Slate 
uarj, 1836. • 



Cfrmft Court* 
comprises 14 circuits, and the judges h 
- Salary of each judge, $ 1,300. 
•11, or Rofsntil 



e elected in Jan- 



1. William R. Ban 



or A. MiLitio, oFCIarki 
CODHTIES, P.ii 



13. R. M. AnJcraor 

14. B. C.Toltw, 
>W, AMD Count* TOWNS. 

t District. 



of McMiimvillo. 
of Bnntiafdos. 









Osniai 


of 1340. 






Osoathw. 


P„ P . 










Cons., Twna. 








Ton! 




1830. 


Whii™. 


Col' J. 


Shim 


Pup. 




Anderson, 


5,310 


6,2 Id 


15 


425 


0*658 


Clinton. 


Bledsoe, 


4,64f 


5,1110 


128 


538 


5,676 


Pikevills. 


Blount, 


11,028 


10,664 


131 


945 


11,74." 


Uarysville. 


Bradley, 




0,971 


13 


4111 


7,383 




Campbell, 


5,110 


5,831 


54 


264 


CM 1 


Jncksborongh. 


Carter, 


6,414 


4,91(8 


22 


352 


5,372 


Elijabethlown. 




8,470 


8,765 


BE 


624 


9,474 


Tazewell. 




6,017 


6,191 


151 


634 


6r99Si 


Newport. 




10,06b 


9,521 


134 


917 


10,572 


Rulledge. 




14,411 


14,919 


151 


1,006 


16,076 


tireenville. 


Ham it ton, 


2,27b 


7,493 


93 


5S4 


fi,l?. r 


Hamilton C. H. 


Hawkins, 


13,683 


13,401 


128 


1,499 


15,035 


Kngersvilre. 


Jefferson, 


11,901 




132 


1,282 


12,071 


Dan d ridge. 


Johnson, 




2,493 


4 


101 


3,658 






14,498 


l;i,;S7o 


173 


1,1(34 


I5.4& 


Knoxrille. 


Marion, 


5,50c 


5,658 


22 


390 


6.071 


Jasper. 


HcMinn, 


14,460 


11,450 




1,241 


12,719 








4.498 


V. 


284 


4,794 






13,708 


II i : 




804 


12,iii">( 


Madisonville. 


Morgan, 


2,582 


a.i;.!4 


42 


84 


2.0& 


Montgomery. 


Polk, 




3.219 


17 


304 


3,571 




Rhea, 


8,180 


3,580 




377 


3,985 


Washington. 




11,341 


9,59l 


GO 


1,2(!" 


10,948 


Kingston. 




5,717 


6,"48 


40 


354 


i;,4 12 


Sevier C. H, 


iulliran, 


10,073 


9,504 


195 


1,037 


111,731 


Bluunlsville. 


Washington, 


10,995 


10,600 


236 


915 


1-1,751 


Jonesborough. 


Total, 


196,301 


203,371 


2,174 


18,714 


224,25! 





Middle District. 









(> i 


Of 1840. 






1830. 




tol 




Total 


Cosatj Tpwm, 




WhilB.. 




Hates. 






Bedford, 


30,396 


\c,,v:>? 


59 


4,295 


20,546 Shelbyville. 


Cannon, 




6,558 


17 


618 


7,193 




Coffee, 




7,057 


28 


1,105 


8,184 




Davidson, 


88^82 


17,4:.7 


704 


18,34r- 


■30,51)9 NiSH VILLI. 


DeKalb, 




5,3,% 


11 


459 


5,86a 


Dickson, 


7,265 


Biw 


17 


1,687 


7,074 Charlotte. 


Fentress, 


2,748 


3,465 


S 


80 


3,550 Jamestown. 


Franklin, 


15,620 


8,93f 


13 


3,085 12,033;Winchester. 


Giles, 


18,703 


14,48; 


39 


7,030 21 ,491 Pulaski. 


Hickman, 


8,119 


7.281 


19 


1,379 


8,618 Vernon. 


Humphreys, 


6,187 


4,44b 


8 


739 


5,195 | Reynoldsburg. 


Jackson, 

Lawrence, 


5,411 


li/>::6 

(■1,371 


110 
16 


1,826 
735 


1 3,872, G ai n e sbo r ou gh. 


Lincoln, 


22,075 


17,817 


65 


4,221 




Marshall, 




ll,4(jt 


12 


3,1175 






27,665 


17,0;" 


94 


n, imp;. 




Montgomery, 


1-].H4<I 


B.76S 


100 


7,059 




Overton, 


8.242 


8,334 


50 


889 




Robertson, 


ivm 


9,977 


34 


;i,v'Ji 




Rutherford, 


£6,134 


15,(148 


166 


9,072 




Smith, 


19,900 


16,637 


164 


4:m 






ao,r,(ii 


14.SH1 


208 


7,ifc( 




Stewart, 


6,ii6e 


6,317 


1X3 


8,117 






15,21( 


9,:it>( 


88 


1,34; 




Wayne, 
While, 


6/113 


7,15 


85 


529 




9,967 


torn 


174 


933 




Williamson, 


86,638 


15,641 


114 


11,251 




Wilson, 


25,478 


18,803 


869 


5,988 


t: 


Tola}, 


374,749 


31)1,157 


2,8181 07 ,735 




Wt 


tern District. 




Benton, 




4 


8 


247| 4,772| 


Carroll, 


9,897 


If 


3(1 


2,218 12,302 Huntingdon. 


Djer, 


1,904 


3 


i: 


1,042 4,484 Dyersburg. 


Fayttte, 
Gibson, 


8,652 


It 


43 


10,885 21,501 Somerville. 


5.5U1 


It 


108 


2,909 13,689Trenlon. 


Hs-rdiman, 


ii,s.-,r 


i 


39 


5,4:i:J 14,5(13 Bolivar. 


Hardin, 




7,;)b7 


32 


82G 


8,245 Savannah. 


Haywood, 


5,334 


7,575 


38 


6.857 


13,870 Brownsville. 


Henderson, 


8,748 


9,911 


10 


1,954 


11,875 Lexington. 




18,249 


11,214 


15 


3,677 


14,906 Paris. 


Lauderdale, 




2,483 


2 


1,010 


3 4351 


Madison, 


11,594 


111,481 


37 


6,073 


16,530 Jackson. 


McNairy, 




SfiS 


33 


763 


9,365 


Purdy. 




2,099 


4,819 


e 


587 


4,614 


Troy. 


Perry, 


7,094 


6,713 


8 


698 


7,419 


Shannon ■ ville. 


Shelby, 


5,648 


7,605 


73 


7,043 


14,72 


Memphis. 


Tiptnn, 


5,317 


3,6,17 


31 


3,138 


6,600 


Covington. 


Weakley, 


4,797 


8,078 


4 


1,796 


9,871 


Dresden. 


Total, 


110,854 


136,095 


532 


56,61 




Total of Statu, 


6B1.904 


640,62* 


5,524 


183,05 



H 



234 



TENNESSEE. 



Population of JfashvUle, in 1830, 5,565 ; in 1840, 6,929. 
tion of the other towns is not given in the Census. 



[i84a. 

The popula- 



Different Classes or Inhabitants. 



Slaves, 



White Persons, { Females, ' . ' . 

Free Colored Persons, [g^ ' . ' . ' 

C Males, 

I Females, 

Deaf and Dumb, 

Blind, .... 

txtu-4 n AM j ln.sane and Idiots, at public 
White Persons, -j charge • * 

Insane and Idiots, at private 

I charge, .... 
Deaf and Dumb, . 
Blind, 
Insane and Idiots, at private 
vicu |#<;*<> vu «, | charge, 

I Insane and Idiots, at public 
I charge, .... 
"Mining, .... 
Agriculture, 
Commerce, 
< Manufactures and Trades, 
Navigation of the Ocean, 
Nav. Canals, Lakes, & Rivers, 
L Learned Professions, 
Revolutionary and military Pensioners, 
Universities or Colleges, .... 
Students in Universities or Colleges, 
Academies and Grammar Schools, 
Students in Academies and Grammar Schools, 
Primary and Common Schools, . 
Scholars in Common Schools, 
Scholars at public charge, . . 
White Persons over 20 years of age unable to 
read and write, 



Persons em- 
ployed in 



Eastern 


Middle 


District. 


Dbtricl. 


102,352 


152,752 


101,019 


148,407 


1,088 


1,438 


1,086 


1,380 


9,300 


53,889 


9,414 


53,846 


78 


162 


94 


119 


33 


49 


189 


307 


8 


44 


16 


63 


31 


67 


17 


6 


.41 


56 


50,781 


122,380 


583 


977 


4,679 


10,409 


6 


49 


34 


189 


485 


1,032 


372 


412 


5 


3 


260 


232 


24 


81) 


862 


3,156 


262 


448 


5,804 


12,716 


2,719 


3,575 


25,628 


23,454 



Wort- 
em 
Dist. 



70,332 

65,767 

270 

762 

28,288 

28,322 

50 

42 

21 

100 
15 
20 

22 

5 

6 

54,578 

657 

2,727 



79 

525 

111 





48 

1,521 

273 

6,570 

811 

9,449 



1842.] 



KENTUCKY. 



235 



XXI. KENTUCKY. 



Government. 

Robert P. Letcher, of Lancaster, Governor, (term of office 

expires in September, 1844,) 
Manlius V. Thompson, of Georgetown, Lieut.' Governor and 
Speaker of the Senate. Fay, $ G a day while presiding, 
of Frankfort, Secretary of State, 



James Harlan, 

Benjamin Selby, do. 

Thomas S. Page, do. 

James Robertson, do. 

James Davidson, do. 

Thomas S. Theobald, do. 

Peter Dudley, ' do. 

Ambrose W. Dudley, do. 

George A. Robertson, do. 



Salary. 



$2,500 



Audit&r of Public Accounts, 

2d Auditor, 

Register of the Land Office, 

Treasurer, 

Keeper of the Peniten., (J the profits.) 

Adjutant- General, 150 

Quartermaster- General, 150 



1,000 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 



State Librarian, 350 

The Senate consists of 38 members, elected for four years, one fourth 
being elected every year. The House of Representatives consists of 100, 
elected annually on the 1st Monday in August. — Pay, $ 3 a day. 



Judiciary. 



Court of Appeals. 



George Robertson, of Lexington, 

Epbraim N. Ewing, of Rusellville, 

Thomas A. Marshall, of Lexington, 

Jacob Swigert, of Frankfort, 
Owen G. Cates, do. 

James C. Coleman, do. 



Benjamin Monroe, 



do. 



Chief Justice, 
Judge, 

do. 
Clerk, 
Attorney' Gen. 



Salary. 

2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
Fees, 
and fees. 



Sergeant, $ 2 a day while at- 
tending the court, and fees. 
Reporter. 



Louisville Chancery Court. 



George M. Bibb, 


of Louisville, 


Chancellor, 


Charles J. Clarke, 


do. 


Clerk. 


Joseph Mayo, 


do. 


Master, 


William A. Cocke, 


do. 


Marshal, 



Salary. 
3,000 
Fees. 
Fees. 
Fee*. 



336 



UffTUCKT. 



[1842. 



Circuit Courts. 

The State is divided into 18 Circuits or Districts, and the following 
are the Circuit Judges, who have each a salary of $ 1,500. 



District. 
1. Walker Raid, 
S. Henry O. Brown, 

3. Aaron K. Woolley, 

4. James Pryor, 

5. John J. Marshall, 

6. Asher W. Graham, 

7. Benj. Shackfeford, 

8. Christopher Tompkins, 

9. Samuel Lnsk, 



Resident*, 
Washington. 
Cynthiana. 
Lexington. 
Newcastle. 
Louisville. 
Bowling Green. 
Hopkinsville. 
Glasgow. 
Lancaster, 



District, 

10. James Simpson, 

11. Kenaz Farrow, 
19. John L. Bridges, 

13. Armiit. H Churchill, 

14. Alney MeLean, 

15. Tunstall Ouarles, 

16. Wiley P. Fowler, 

17. Mason Brown, 

18. Richard A. Buckner, 



Residence. 
Winchester. 
Mount Srerling. 
Harrodsburg. 
Elizabethtown. 
Greenville. 
Barbourville. 
Salem. 
Frankfort. 
Greensbarg. 



Board of Internal Improve mint. 

Salary. 
Thomas Metcalfe, of Nicholas, President, $1,000 

Austin P. Cox, of Frankfort, Secretary ', 1,000 

Samuel Daviess, Finiss £. McLean, and Peter Dudley, Members. — 
Pay, $ 3 day, and expenses while on duty. 

Engineer Corps. — Sylvester Welsh, Chief Engineer. Salary, 02,500 
— M. R. Stealey, Resident Engineer. Salary, $2,250. — N. B. Buford, 
Resident Engineer. Salary, $ 1,500. — Ch. H. Taylor and Jarius Liv- 
ermore, Assistants. Salary of each, $ 1 ,000. 

Finances. 

The bonds sold by this State for purposes of Internal Improvement 
are as follows : viz. 

1,385,000 5 per cento. —annual interest, . . $69,250 

1,765,500 6 per cents, do. . . 105,930 

600,000 do. (6 years' bonds) . • 36,000 



#3,750,500 $211,180 

If to this be added a temporary loan of $ 40,000 from the banks, the 
total liabilities of the State will be $ 3,790,500, and the annual interest 
including $ 8,420 exchange on interest payable in the East, will be 
$222,000. — TJie State holds 10,709 bank shares, which at par value 
would be worth $1,070,900; and holds of her own bonds, $937,500; 
making upwards of two millions, as an offset to her debt. — Value of tax- 
able property, in 1840, as reported by the Second Auditor, $ 272,250,007. 
— The whole amount of the surplus revenue of the United State* 
received by Kentucky wai $1,433,757-58. Of this $850,000 was set 
apart as a permanent School Fund, and invested in Internal Improve- 
ment bonds. 



1842.] EEHTDCKT. 

CoUKTIM, PofBLATlOlt, 1HD CODHTT ToW»*. 



[1842. 











- 


CountJ Towns. 


3& 




,722 

,079 

77i 4,730 


BarbourvilU, 


224 


Lawrence, 


4,653 


I 


LouiM, 






5,873 


27 


)(J 6,306 






Lincoln, 


6,582 


155 


iO 10,187 Stanford, 


263 


Livingston, 


7,338 




W 9,025iSaleni, 


233 




8,47i» 


310 


» 1 3,6151 RusaelNilie, 


1,196 


Madieon, 


10,860 


82 


13! 16,355 Richmond, 


822 


Marion , 


8.340 


80 


12. 11,032 Lebanon, 


546 


Mason, 
MaCracken, 


11,136 

4,064 


272 
27 


)!> 15,719 Maysville, 
14 4,745 Padncah, 


2,741 




4,366 


5 


19 5,780 Brandenburg, 




Mercer, 


13,061 


373 


*6 18,720'Harrodsburg, 


1 


Monroe, 


5311 


12 


13 


6,52fi ! Tom-pkinsville, 




Montgomery, 


8,409 


188 


<5 


9,3321 Moan t Sterling, 




Morgan, 

Mn lite 11 burg, 


4,53* 


3 




4,603 West Liberty, 




5,765 


13 


•6 


6.964 1 Greenville, 






8,878 


116 


ia 


13,637. Bardslown. 


1 


Nicholas, 


7,310 


182 


a 


8,745 Carlisle, 




Ohio, 


S,747 


22 


13 


6,592 Hertford, , 




Oldham, 


4,853 


145 




7,380 


La Grange, 




Owen, 


6,915 


36 


_,-Jl 


8,232 


New Liberty, 




Pendleton, 


4/H3 


5 


437 


4,455 


Falmouth, 




Perry, 


2,923 


23 


143 


3,089 


Perry C. H. 




Pike, 


3,469 


13 


85 


3,567 


Pikeville, 




Pulaaki, 


8,583 


18 


1,119 


9,620 






Rockcastle, 


3,1133 


S 


377 


3,409 


Mount Vernon, 




Russell, 


3,828 




406 4,238 






Scott, 


8,220 


109 


5,339 13,668 


s'helbyville,' 


1, 


Shelby, 


11,256 


157 


6,355 


17,76* 


1,335 




5,004 


40 


1,493 


6,537 


Franklin, 




Spencer, 


4,1150 


20 


1,911 


6,581 


Tayloraville, 
Elkton, 


398 


Todd, 


6,070 


42 


3,879 


9,991 


470 


Trimble, 


5,614 
3,787 


50 
20 


2,052 
673 


7,716 
4,480 


Cadiz, 
Bedford, 


148 




4,909 


36 


1,728 


6,673 


Morganfield, 
Bowling Green, 
Springfield, 
Monticeilo, 




Warren, 


11,078 


Ifil 


4,207 


15,446 




Washington, 


7,900 




2,05* 


10,596 


598 


Wayne, 
Whitley, 

Woodford, 

Total, 


6,754 


15 


631 


7,399 


142 


4,508 


19 


14f 


4.673 


Whitley O. H. 

Versailles, 




5,816 


172 


5,752 


11,740 


1,044 


590,253 


7,317 


182,25b 


779,828 



Louisville, 
Lexington, 
Maysville, 
Frankfort, 



Population or rue PmncirlL Towns. 

1810. 1890. IS30. 

1,357 4,012 10,359 

4,226 5,279 6,:04 

335 1,130 2,040 



1842.] 



KENTUCKY. 



339 



Different Classes of Inhabitants. 



White Persons, 
Deaf and Dumb, 400 

Blind, 236 

Insane and Idiots, at public 

charge, 305 

Do. at private charge, 490 

Persons employed in 
Mining, 331 

Agriculture, 197,738 

Commerce, 3,448 

Manufactures and Trades, 23,217 
Navigation of the Ocean, 44 
" Canals, Lakes, & Rivers, 968 
Learned Professions, 2,487 

Revolutionary and military 
Pensioners, 886 



Slaves and Colored Persons, 
Deaf and Dumb, 77 

Blind, 141 

Insane and Idiots, at public 

charge, 48 

Do. at private charge, 132 

Universities or Colleges, * 10 

Students in Universities, &c. 1,419 

Academies and Gram. Schools, 116 

Students in Academies, &c. 4,906 

Primary and Common Schools, 954 

Scholars in Com. Schools, 24,641 

White Persons over 20 years 

of age unable to read and 

write, 45,018 



XXII. OHIO. 



Government. 

Thomas Cor win, Governor, (term of office expires on the 
1st Monday in December, 1842,) 



John Sloane, 
John Brougb, 
Joseph Whitehill, 
James B. Thomas, 
William B. Van Hook, 
Jacob Medary, 
Christopher Niswanger, 
Zachariah Mills, 



Secretary of State, 
Auditor of State, 
Treasurer of State, 
Chief Clerk in the Auditor's Office, 
Warden of the State Penitentiary, 
Adjutant- General, 
Quartermaster- General, 
Librarian of the State Library, 



Salary. 

$1,500. 

1,000 

1,200 

1^200 

850 

1,500 

300 

200 

400 



(The above executive officers, for the time being, all reside at Co- 
Iambus.) 



240 ohio. [1842. 

Judiciary. 

Supreme Court. 

Salary. 

Ebenezer Lane, of Nor walk. Chief Judge, reelected 1837, $1,500 

Reuben Wood, of Cleveland, Assoc. Judge, do. 1840, 1,500 

Peter Hitchcock, of burton, do. elected 1835, 1,500 

Fred. Grimke, of Chillicothe, do, do. 1836, 1,500 

The Judges of the Supreme Court, the President and Associate 
Judges of the Courts of Common Pleas, and the Judge of the Superior 
Court of Cincinnati, are elected by the legislature, for seven years. Of 
the Judges of the Supreme Court, the oldest in commission is Chief 
Judge. Two of the four Judges form a quorum, who hold a court in 
each county once every year. 

Superior Court of Cincinnati. 

David K. Est£, of Cincinnati, Judge, Salary, $1,200 

This Court has concurrent jurisdiction, with the Court of Common 
Pleas of the County of Hamilton, of all civil causes at common law and 
in chancery. 

Courts of Common Pleas. 













Salary. 


Wm. L. Helfenstein, 


of Dayton, 


Judgi 


e 1st Circuit, 


#1,200 


Ozias Bowen, 


of Marion, 


do. 


2d 


do. 


1,200 


Van R. Humphrey, 


of Hudson, 


do. 


3d 


do. 


1,200 


Corrington W. Searl, 


of Newark, 


do. 


4th 


do. 


1,200 


George W. Belden, 


of Canton, 


do.. 


bth 


do. 


1,200 


John H. Keith, 


of Somerset, 


do. 


6th 


do. 


1,200 


Benjamin Hinkson, 


of Wilmington, 


do. 


7th 


do. 


1,200 


John A. Hanna, 


of McConnelsville, 


do. 


8th 


do. 


1,200 


Nathaniel C. Reed, 


of Cincinnati, 


do. 


9th 


do. 


1,200 


Fishback T. Owen, 


of Batavia, 


do. 


10th 


do. 


1,200 


Jacob Parker, 


of Mansfield, 


do. 


Uih 


do. 


1,200 


Joseph R. Swan, 


of Columbus, 


do. 


12th 


do. 


1,200 


Emery D. Potter, 


of Toledo, 


do. 


13th 


do. 


1,200 


John W. Willey, 


of Cleveland, 


do. 


Uth 


do.^ 


1,200 


William Kennon, 


of St. Clairsville, 


do. 


Wth 


do. 


1,200 



The several Courts of Common Pleas are held, three times a year, by 
a President Judge and three Associate Judges, in most of the counties; 
but in the counties very recently organized, only twice a year. The 
Associate Judges receive the sum of $2 50 a day, for each day's actual 
attendance upon the courts. 



Statistic! 

Acres of land, 19,693.575 

Value of land, including 
housed, &c. $04,523,048 

VoJ . of town tots, includ- 
ing buildings, fee. $ 20,5(15,772 

Horses, number, 334,112 

Value of horses, 

Cattle, number, 

Value of cattle, 

Merchants' capital, and 
money at -interest, J)8,757,456 

Pleasure carriages, 5,704 

Val. of pleas, carriages, $450,541 



$13,364,400 

546,864 

$4,375^04 



ron 1840. 

Total amount of tm- 

able property, $ 112,037,861 

Stale and Canal Tax, 562,993-61 
County & School Tax, 557,940-53 
Road Tax, 168,623-45 

Township&PoorTax, 161,088-57 
Corporation, Pub. Build- 
ing, and Bridge Tax, 130,493-60 
Physicians' and Law- 



»■ Tax, 



School house Tax, 17,207-38 

Delinquencies, 146,603-98- 

Total am't of Taxes, 1,749,640-31. 



is, Valuation, Population, ihd Coutrrr Towns. 



Counties. 


Ami of Tax- 

able Propsrtj 
1840. 


lSjSl 


Fop. 
1940. 


•**_ 


Pop. 


Adams, 


$016,166 


viMi- 


13,183 


West Union, 




Allen, 


533,843 


578 


9,07! 






Ashtabula, 


1,737,009 


14.584 


23.724 


Jefferson, 


710 


Athens, 


583,650 


6,763 






710 


Belmont, 


1,860,152 




30,901 


SI. Clairsville, 






1.(5*1,4 J i 


i7» ( :y 


'^,71-- 


Georgetown, 
Hamilton, 




Butler, 


2,898,081 


27,044 




1,409 




670,478 




ld."lh 


Carroll too, 


698 


Champaign, 


1,385,279 


12,131 


10,721 


Urbana, 


1,070 


Clark, 


1,716,148 


13,1)74 


16.882 


Springfield, 


2,062 


Clermont, 


2,083,441 


90,460 


23,106 


Butavia, 


2,187 


Clinton, 


1.109.H-HI 


11,892 


18,719 


Wilmington, 




Columbiana, 


27 


35 .iW 


40,378 New I.isWi, 


1,490 


Coshocton, 


62 


11,11.2 


21,590 Coshocton, 




Crawford, 


58 


4,77d 


13 152BucyrB«, 
2li,5d6 Cleveland, 




Cuyahoga, 


., ,.48 


10,36. 


6,071 


Darke, 


588,692 


0,203 


13.282 


Greenville, 


2,006 


Delaware, 


1,388,600 


11,523 


22,1160 


Delaware, 


898 


Erie, 


1,U1I'J,!»S 




12,59! 


Huron, 


1,488 


Fairfield, 


a,5^2,yob 


24,788 


31,924 


Lancaster, 


3,272 


Payette, 


uus.os; 


8,1 8( 


1(1,981 


Washington, 




Franklin, 


3,740,206 


14,766 


2.-1,949 




6,048 


Gallia, 


405,744 


9.733 


13,444 


Gallipot is, 


1,314 




1,041,950 


15,813 


16,297 


Chardon, 


446 


Greene, 


1,837.609 


16,0* 


17,528 Xenia, 






1,152,(110 


18,036 


27,748, Cambridge, 


1,845 


Hamilton, 


9,4H3,365 


5J.3-J1 


80, 145 1 Cincinnati, 


46,333 


Hancock, 


1,608.439 


613 


9,!->s6 Fmdlay, 


469 


Hardin, 


37i(,996 








Harrison, 


1,121,046 


2Q,920 


20,099 Cadiz, 


1,023 



[IBtt 



Count*.. 


KjjjpS 


« 


is'ffi'. 


C™t rT ™. 


^ 


Henry, 
Highland, 


$ 140,69c 


960 


2.50; 


Damascus, 


495 


1,3(8,7 1 


16.347 


22,2ii< 


Hillsborough, 






260,52* 


4,006 


9,74 




436 




820,393 


9,133 


1B,IWE 


Miller-burg, 




Huron, 


l,3!»7.3r.. 


13,345 


23,93: 


Nor walk, 


2.613 




847,8e: 


5,974 


9,744 


Jackson, 


297 


Jefferson, 


1,995,281 


22,469 


25,011 


Steuben villa, 


5,2113 


Knoi, 


1,670*6 


17,124 


29,57! 


Mount Vernon, 


2,:)ia 


Lake, 


1,037 ,650 




9.736 


Pain csv ille, 


2.5BU 


Lawrence, 


335,870 


5,366 


13,71! 


BurTington, 




Licking, 


2,901,73* 


20,864 


35,091 


2,705 




1,114,305 


6,442 


14,1)15 


Belle Fontaine, 




Lorain, 


1,417,813 


5,696 


18,467 


Klyria, 


1,636 




995,574 




9,382 


Toledo, 


1,223 


Madison, 


963,470 


9,190 


9.025 


London, 


SO) 


Marion, 


928.199 


6,558 


14.705 


Marion, 


5711 




1,099,589 


7,560 


18,352 


Med™, 


635 


Mtfya, 


376,975 


6.159 


11.452 


Chester, 


lira 






l,lli 


6,277 


St. Mary's, 


en 


Miami, 


1,B07,468 


12,606 


19,66r 


l"roy, 


1,351 


Monroe, 


505,071 


8,770 


16,521 


Woodsfield, 




Montgomery, 


y,:Wi.!!:>< 


24,252 


31,93- 


Dayton, 


6,067 


Mama, 


745,461! 


11,791 


20,852 


McConneliyille, 




Muskingum, 


2.834,467 


29,325 


36,749 


Zanesville, 


4,766 


Ottawa, 


204,L')9 




2,246 






Paulding, 


52,246 


16t 


1,1*34 






Perry, 


846,402 


14,0 in 


19,344 


Somerset, 


947 




2,334,779 


15,y35 


10,725 


Circle ville, 


a,3s< 


Pike, 


KB, 167 


6,024 


7,626 


Piketon, 




Preble, 


1,427,233 


Ki,a.v 


19.482 


Eaton, 




Portage, 


1,826,681 


16,62; 


22,965 


Ravenna, 


1,541 


Putnam, 


293.949 


231 


5,16: 


Sugar Grove, 




Ricblaud, 


2,453,457 


24,(107 


44,532 


Mansfield, 




Koss, 


3,722,059 


2i,o:i: 


21,46" 


Chilticothe, 


3«7? 


Sanduaky, 


879,1 iy 


2,851 


10,182 


Lower Sandusky, 


1,117 




1,035,334 


6,730 


11,192 


Portsmouth, 






1,142,534 


5,148 


18,126 


Tiffin, 




Shelby, 


485,33b 


3,671 


12,154 


Hardin, 




Stark, 


2,S2l,:iiti 


26,764 


34,603 




3,299 


Summit, 


1 .672,70; 




22,561 






Trumbull, 


2,554.751 


26,154 


38,107 




ijm 


Tuscarawaa, 


1,358.453 


14,29fc 


25.631 


N'ew Philadelphia, 




Union, 


560,007 


3,192 


8,422 


Marysville, 


360 


Van Werl, 


73,510 


49 


1 ,577 


Willahire, 


433 


Warren, 


2,388,844 


21,4iO 


23,141 


Lebanon, 






820,140 


11,731 


20,823 


Marietta. 


1,814 


Wayne, 


2,1112,059 


■z>,;.m 


35,806 


IVfHMMT, 


1.913 


W.lliwnB, 


292,859 


377 


4,465 




<M4 


Wood, 


579,991 


1 ,0f}F) 


5,357 


'errysburg, 


1,066 


Total, 


112,037,861 937,679 


,5)9 407 


1 



1842.] 



OHIO. 



243 



Population or the Principal Towns. 



In 1830. 


In 1840. 


In 1830. 


In 1840. 


Cincinnati, 24,831 


46,338 


Chillicothe, 2,846 


3,977 


Cleveland, 1,076 


6,071 


Lancaster, 1,530 


3,272 


Dayton, ' 2,965 


6,067 


Canton, 1,257 


3,299 


Columbus, 2,437 


6,048 


Newark, 999 


2,705 


Steubenville, 2,937 


5,203 


Mount Vernon, 1,021 


2,362 


Zanesville, 3,094 


4,766 


Circleville, 1,136 


2,329 


Different Classes of Inhabitants. 




White Persons, 




Nav. Canals, Lakes, &c. 


3,323 


Deaf and Dumb, 


559 


Learned Professions, 


5,563 


Blind, 


372 


Revolutionary and military 




Insane and Idiots, at public 


Pensioners, 


875 


charge, 


363 


Universities and Colleges, 


18 


Do. at private charge, 


832 


Students in Universities, &c 


.1,717 


Colored Persons, 




Academies and Grammar 




Deaf and Dumb, 


33 


Schools, 


73 


Blind, 


33 


Students in Academies, &c. 


4,310 


Insane and Idiots, at private 


Primary and Common 




charge, 


103 


Schools, 


5,186 


Do. at public charge, 


62 


Scholars in Common 




Persons employed in 




Schools, * 218,609 


Mining, 


704 


Scholars at public charge, 


51,812 


Agriculture, 


272,579 


White Persons over 20 years 




Commerce, 


9,2ul 


of age, unable to read and 




Manufactures and Trades 


, 66,265 


write, 


35,394 


Navigating the Ocean, 


212 


f 





XXIII. MICHIGAN. 

Government. 

Salary. 
James W. Gordon, of Marshall, Acting Governor, (term ex- 
pires January 2d, 1842,) $ 2,000 
Thomas Rowland, of Detroit, Secretary of State, 1,000 
Robert Stuart, do. Treasurer, 800 
Frank lin Sawyer, of Ann Arbor, Superintend. Public Instruction, 800 
Euroias P. Hastings, of Marshall, Auditor- General, 1,000 
Douglass Houghton, State Geologist. 

The Senate consists of 18 members, elected for 2 years; the House of 
Representatives, of 53 members, elected annually. Pay of each, $ 3 a 



944 * Michigan. [1842. 

day daring the session of the legislature. The seat of government is at 
Detroit, or wherever the legislature shall direct, till 1847, when a per- 
manent seat of government is to be established. 

Judiciary. 
Court of Chancery. 

Elon Farnsworth, of Detroit, Chancellor ;— salary, $ 1,500. 

There are 5 Chancery Circuits. — The terms of the 1st Circuit are 
held annually at the city of Detroit, on the 3d Tuesday in July, and the 
1st Tuesday in February; of the 2d Circuit, at Ann Arbor, on the 2d 
Tuesday in January and July ; of the 3d Circuit, at Kalamazoo, on the 
3d Tuesday in January, and the Thursday next after the 4th Tuesday in 
Jane ; of the 4th Circuit, at Pontiac, on the 1st Tuesday in May, and 
the' Tuesday after the 2d Monday in November ; of the 5th Circuit, at 
Adrian, on the 1st Tuesday in January, and the 3d Tuesday in June. 

Supreme Court. 

Stltrj. 

William A Fletcher, of Ann Arbor, Chief Justice, .$1,600 

George Morell, of Detroit, Associate Justice, 1,500 

Epaphroditus Ransom, of Kalamazoo, do. 1,500 

Charles W. Whipple, of Detroit, do. 1,500 

Z. Piatt, of Jackson, Attorney' General. 

The Judges of the Supreme Court are appointed by the Governor, 
with the advice and consent of the Council, for the period of 7 years. — 
The terms of this court are held at Detroit, on the 1st Tuesday in Jan- 
uary and June; at Ann Arbor, on the 3d Tuesday in January and 
June ; at Kalamazoo, on the 2d Tuesday in September ; and at Pontiac, 
on the 4th Tuesday in June. 

Circuit Courts. 

There are 4 judicial circuits, in each of which one of the Judges of 
the Supreme Court sits as Presiding Judge. 



Presiding Judge. 
1st Circuit, George Morell. 
2d do. Wm. A. Fletcher 



Presiding Judge. 
3d Circuit, Epaphroditus Ransom. 
4th do. Charles W. Whipple. 



Internal Improvement. 

Board of Commissioners. — Shubael Conant, of Detroit, Acting Com- 
missioner ; salary, $ 1 ,000. The Secretary of State and the State Treas- 
urer are, ex officio, members. 

This State, in 1837, authorized the survey and construction of 557 
miles of railroads, 231 of canals, and the improvement of 321 miles of 



1849.] micbioam. ' 245 

river navigation. A loan of $5,000,000 was obtained for these objects, 
of which the whole amount expended up to November 30, 1840, was 
$2,678,202. The eastern portion of the Central Railroad , from Detroit 
to Ann Arbor, a distance of 40 miles, ia completed and in operation. 
The reat of the works are in various stages of progress, for the continua- 
tion of some of which tie Legislature, at its last session, appropriated 
about $ 500,000. 

Common Schools. 

Number of school districts that reported in 1840, 1,506; number of 
scholars, 49,850. Prom the School Fund were distributed on each 
scholar 4" cents. The School Fund consist! of e»erj 16th section of land 
granted by Congress, comprising, as estimated, 1,000,000 acres. The 
n price is reduced to $ 5 per acre. 

CoDHTIIS, POPULATION, AHD CoCHTr ToWNI. 



Pop. in 1810, 4,528; in 1820, 9,048; in 1830, 32,538; in 1834, 87,278; 
in 1837, 175,] (if); in 1840, 212,276. 

Population or tbi Prikcipal Towns, 

Detroit, 9,102 Pontine, 1,904 Monro*, 1,703 

Ypsilanti, 2,410 Marshall, 1,763 



246 MICHIGAN. L184& 


DIFFERENT ClA88£ 


s of Inhabitants. 


White Persons, 




Commerce, 728 


Deaf and Dumb, 


31 


Manufactures & Trades, 6,890 


Blind, 


35 


Navigation of the Ocean, 24 


Insane and Idiots, at public 




Nav. Cansls, Lakes, & Rivers, 166 


charge, 


2 


Learned Professions, 904 


Do. at private charge, 


37 


Universities or Colleges, 5 


Free colored Persons, 




Students in Universities, &c. 158 


Deaf and Dumb, 


2 


Academies and Grammar 


Blind, 


4 


Schools, 12 


Insane and Idiots, at private 




Students in Academies, fee. 485 


charge, 


21 


Primary and Common 


Do. at public charge, 


5 


Schools, 975 


Revolutionary and military 




Scholars in Common 


Pensioners, 


90 


Schools, 29,701 


Persons employed in 




White Persons over 20 years 


Mining, 


40 


of age, unable to read and 


Agriculture, 56,521 


write, 2,173 



XXIV. INDIANA. 



Government. 

Salary. 
Samuel Bigger, of Rushville, Governor, (term of office expires 

in December, 1843,) $1,500 

— Hall, Lieutenant- Governor ; Pay, $ 3 a day during the 

session of the General Assembly. 
William J. Brown, of Rushville, Secretary of State, 600 

[and perquisites. 
Nathan B. Palmer, of Madison, Treasurer of State, 400 

[and perquisites. 
Morris Morris, of.lndianapolis, Auditor of Public Accounts, 400 

[and perquisites. 
Jesse L. Williams, Chief Engineer, 1,000 

Samuel Merrill, President of the State Bank ; appointed by the 

legislature for five years, 1,500 

.Douglass Maguire, Adjutant' General; appointed by the Gover- 
nor during pleasure, 100 



1842.] - INDIANA. 247 

Salary. 
Alexander H. Davidson, Quartermaster- General ; appointed by 

the Governor during pleasure, $50 

Hensley and Patterson, Keepers of the Penitentiary, Profits. 

Samuel H. Peck, Visitor of the Penitentiary, 60 



• 


Judiciary. 








Supreme Court. 






Isaac Blackford, 
Charles Dewey, 
Jeremiah Sullivan, 


of Vine en nes, 
of Charlestown, 
of Madison, 


Chief Judge, 
Judge, 
do. 


Saiary 

$1,500 

1,500 

1,500 


Henry P. Coburn, 


of Indianapolis, 


Clerk, 


Fees. 



The judges are appointed by the Governor and Senate for 7 years, 
and the senior in commission is the Chief Judge. This court holds its 
sessions at Indianapolis, in May and November. It has appellate juris- 
diction only, except that the legislature may give it original jurisdiction 
in capital cases, and cases in chancery in which the President of the . 
Circuit Court may be interested or prejudiced. 

Circuit Courts. 

Ore President Judges. Prosecuting Attorneys. 

1st, Isaac Nay lor, of Crawfordsville. Samuel C. Willson, of Crawfordsville. 

2d, J. H. Thompson, of Salem. John W. Payne, 

3d, Miles C. Eggleston, of South Hanover. John Dumont, 



4th, Elisha Embree, of Princeton, 

5th, James Morrison, of Indianapolis. 

6th, James Perry,! of Liberty. 

7th, 

8th, John W. Wright, of Logansport. 

9th, Samuel C. Sample, of South Bend. 

10th, David McDonald, of Washington. 

11th, David Kilgore, of York town. 



C. D. Edson, 
Wm. I. Peaslee, 
David Macy, 
Del. R. Ecles, 
Lucien P. Ferry, 
Wm. C. Haraaah, 
John S. Watts, 
Jer. Smith, 



of Corydon. 

of Vevay. 

of Mount Vernon. 

of Shelby ville. 

of Cambridge. 

of Greencaslle. 

of Fort Wayne. 

of Laport. 

of Bloomiogton. 

of Winchester. 



e 

The President Judges and the Prosecuting Attorneys are elected by 
the legislature for 7 years ; and the Associate Judges and Clerks of the 
Court are elected by the people for the same period. The President 
Judges receive each a silary of $ 1,000, and Judge Morrison, of the 
5th Circuit, is allowed $ 300 in addition, optional with the County Com- 
missioners of his Circuit ; the Attorneys have each a salary of $ 150 
and perquisites. The Judges hold two terms in each county annually. 
There are two Associate Judges in each county, who receive $3 a day 
during the session. 



IMDIAHA. [1843. 

Couhtiis, Population, a»d Coubtv Town*. 



O...*. 


Pun. 

1H40. 


c™„T.™. 


Conn tie.. 


Pop. 

1*4(1. 


Coanlj Town. 


Adams 


2,204 Decatur. 


Lawrence, 


11.782 


Bedford. 


Allen,' 


5,i'42Fort Wayne. 


Madison, 


8,874 




Blackford, 


l,22tt| 


Marshall, 


1,051 




Bartholomew 


It MMU Columbus, 


Marion, 


10.IM 


INDIA KAPOLrS, 


Boone, 


8,121 Lebanon. 


Martin, 


3,t)75 


Mt. Pleasant. 




2,364] 




3,1)4- 


Peru. 


Carroll, 


7,819 Delphi. 


Monroe, 


111,143 


Muominglon. 
Ciawfordsv'le. 


Casa, 


3,481) Lnganaport. 


Montgomery 




Clark, 


15,595 CharJesLown 


Morgan, 
Nnbfe, 


1U,74I 


Marti naville. 


Clay, 


5,567 Bowling Green. 


2,7(12 


Sparta. 


Clinton, 


7,3(W Frankfort. 


Orange, 


9,002 


Paoii. 


Crawford, 


5,282 Fredonia. 




8,359 


Spencer. 




0,7«) Washington. 


Parke, 




Bockvilie. 


Dearborn, 


19,327 Lawrenceburg. 


Perry, 


4,l>55 


Troy. 


Decatur, 


12,171 (.;r*ensburg. 




4,709 


Petersburg. 


De Kalb,' 


J,!«« 


Porter, 


2,162 




Delaware, 


S,84;i Muncytown. 


Poaey, 


<J.(>;-: 


Mt. Vernon. 


Dubois, 


B,«32 P«ter»»iU«, 


Pulaski, 


561 




Elkhart, 


fi.Wiu Pulaski. 


Putnam, 


lfi,tM3 


fireen Castle. 


Fayette, 


9,d:57 C.mnersville. 


Randolph, 




Winchester. 


Floyd, 


9,454'New Albany. 


Ripley, 


w;.m 


Versailles. 


FountEiin, 


11,21* Covington. 


Rush, 


lf),45rt 


Itushville. 


Franklin, 


13,349 Brooks ilk. 


Scott, 


4,242 


Lexington. 


Fulton, 


1,993| 


Shelby, 


ia,tMS.=. 


Shelby ville. 


Gibson, 


8,377 Princeton. 


Spencer, 


e,;.m 


Itockport. 


Grant, 


4,-75 


St. Jnaeph, 


6,425 


Tarecoopy. 




8,321 Bloomfield. 


Stark, 


149 




Hamilton, 


9,855 


N.iblesville. 


Steuben, 


2,57fi 




Hancock, 


7,538 


Greenfield. 


Sullivan, 


8,315 




Hnrriaon, 


12,45! 


Corydon . 


Switzerland, 


9,9* 


Vevay. 


Hendricks, 


n, at; j 


Danville. 


Tippecanoe, 


1:1,724 


Lafayette. 


Henry, 
Huntington, 


15,12- 


Newcastle. 


Union, 


8,(11 T 




1,57! 


Huntington. 




6,251' 




Jackson, 


ir,96] 


Browne town 




B.27J 


Vewport. 


J KB per. 


1,207 




Vigo, 


12,676 


Terre Haute. 


3a l< 
Jefferson, 


3.B63 




Wabash, 


2,736 




16,614 


Madison. 


Warren, 


5,656 


William sport. 


Jennings, 


bva 


Vernon. 


Warwick, 


«7Si 


Boonville. 


Johnaon, 


9,362 


Franklin. 


Washington, 


ir>.a>:i 


Salem. 


Knox, 


in.t).-.; 


Vincennei. 


Wayne, 


a:i.2!!d 


Centrerille. 



Population or the Principal Towns. 
N.Albany, 4,226 ; Madison, 3,798 ; Indianapolis, 2,692 ; Richmond, 2,670 



1842.J 



INDIANA. 



319 



Different Classes of Inhabitants. 



White Persons, 




Deaf and Dumb, 


297 


Blind, 


135 


Insane and Idiots, at public 




charge, 


110 


Do. at private charge," 


377 


Persons employed in 




Mining, 


233 


Agriculture, 148,806 


Commerce, 


3,076 


Manufactures and Trades, 20,590 


Navigation of the Ocean, 


89 


" Canals, Lakes, & Rivers 


, 627 


Learned Professions, 


2,259 


Revolutionary and military 




Pensioners, 


380 



Colored Persons, 
Deaf and Dumb, 15 

Blind, 19 

Insane and Idiots, at private 

charge, 47 

Insane and Idiots, at public 
charge, 28 

Universities and Colleges, 4 

Students in Universities, &c. 222 
Academies and Gram. Schools, 54 
Students in Academies, &c. 2,946 
Primary and Com. Schools, 1,521 
Scholars in Common Sch'ls, 48,189 
While Persons over 20 years 
of age, unable to read and 
write, 38,100 



XXV. ILLINOIS. 



Government. 

Salary. 
Thomas Carlin, of Quincy, Governor, (term ends 1st Monday 

in December, 1842 ;) $1,000, and $ 500 office rent, &c. $ 1,500 
Stimson H. Anderson, of Mount Vernon, Lieutenant-Governor, 
* $ 7 a day during the session of the legislature. 

Lyman Trumbull, of Springfield, Secretary of State, (including 

clerk hire,) 1,500 

James Shields, of Springfield, Auditor, (including clerk hire,) 2,400 
Milton Carpenter, of Hamilton, Co., Treasurer, (including clerk 

hire,) 1,600 

John D. Whiteside, of Waterloo, Fund Commissioner; )7a 

day and travelling expenses. . 

Canal Commissioners. — Isaac N. Morris, of Quincy, President; Jacob 
Fry, of Lockport, Acting Commissioner ; Newton Cloud, of Morgan Co., 
Treasurer. $5 a day, each, when employed. 



250 Illinois. [1842. 

Judiciary. 

Supreme Court. 

Salarj. 

William Wilson, of Carmi, Chief Justice, $1,500 

Samuel D. Lock wood, of Jacksonville, Associate Justice, 1,500 

Thomas C. Brown, of Galena, do. 1,500 

Theophilus W. Smith, of Chicago, do. 1,500 

Thomas Ford, of Oregon City, do. 1,500 

Sidney Breese, near Carlyle, do. 1,500 

Samuel H. Treat, of Springfield, do. 1,500 

Walter B. Scates, of Mount Vernon, do. 1,500 

Stephen A. Douglass, of Quincy, do. 1,500 

Josiah Lamborn, of Springfield, Attorney- Gen., $700 &, fees. 

J. Young Scammon, of Chicago, Reporter. 

Ebenezer Peck, of Springfield, Clerk, Fees. 

The judges are elected by the legislature, and hold their offices dur- 
ing good behavior. Five constitute a quorum. The judges all perform 
circuit duties, or preside in the Circuit Courts. There are 9 State's 
Attorneys, who are elected by the legislature biennially. Salary, $ 350 
and fees. 

The only other courts now in the State are those held by probate 
justices and justices of the peace. The former have jurisdiction in 
actions of debt or assumpsit by or against administrators, &c., where 
the amount in controversy does not exceed $1,000, and the general 
powers of probate courts. The latter have jurisdiction in actions of 
debt or assumpsit, not exceeding in amount $ 100; and exclusive juris* 
diction in cases of assaults and battery. In trespass to personal property 
and trover, where the damages claimed do not exceed $20, justices of 
the peace have also jurisdiction. 

In all suits for debts, where the damages claimed exceed $ 20, the 
Circuit Courts have jurisdiction, and they are Superior Courts of gen- 
era] jurisdiction, both civil and criminal. 

The Governor and justices of the Supreme Court constitute a Council 
of Revision, which act upon all laws, either approving or disapproving 
them. 

Internal Improvement. 

The construction of all the railroads in the State is suspended, except 
so much of the Northern Cross Railroad as lies between Jacksonville 
and Springfield. The railroad is completed from Meredosia, on Illinois 
river, to Jacksonville. The Illinois and Michigan Canal is in progress. 



ILLINOIS. 
., POPULATION, INIl CoUKl'Y Towns. 



c™„... 


aa 


County Tow... 


c..„... 


« 


C..„T„... 


Adams, 


14,47( 


Quincy. 


Lee, 


2,U3f 




Alexander, 


;t,:iU 


Unity. 


Livingston, 


76b 




Bond, 


5,IJtii 


Greenville. 


Logan, 


2,:i33 






1,70E 




Macon, 


3,039 


Decatur. 




4, lay 




Macoupin, 


7,aao 


Cariinville. 


Bureau, 


;(,mi7 




Madison, 


14,4*3 


tdwardsvUle. 


Calhoun, 


1,741 


Guilford. 


Marion, 


4,742 






i ,uy; 




Marshall, 


i,«4y 




Caas, 


a.itsi 


BeardMown. 


McDonough, 


5,3>ifJ 


Macomb. 


Champaign, 


i ,47; 




MeHenry, 


2,578 




Christian, 


l,»7f 






6^(i5 


Bloom ington. 


Clark, 


7,4.'>: 


Darwin. 


Menard, 


4,431 




Clay, 


a 5&- 


Maysville. 


Mercer, 


saw 


New Boston. 


Clinton, 


3,118 


Carlyle. 


Monroe, 


4,4si 


Waterloo. 


ColeB, 


B,61t 


Charleston. 


Montgomery 


.4,491 


Hillbburo'. 


Cook, 


10,20] 


Palestine . 


Morgan, 


19/J4U 


Jacksonville. 


Crawford, 


4,4« 


Ogle. 


3,47!) 




De Kalb, 


l,6l»7 




Peoria, 


6,153 




De Wilt, 


3.S47 






•Apt* 


Pinckneyv'le. 

i'ltUfifld. 


Du Page, 


3,535 




Pike, 


11,120 


Edgar, 


D,*S 


Pari* 


Pop.. 


4,1)94 


Gulconda. 


Edwards, 


3.U7U 


Albion. 


Putnam, 


2,131 


Hennepin. 


Effingham, 


1,(575 




Randolph, 


7,1144 


Kaska.kia. 


Fayette, 




Vai.dalia. 


Rock Island, 




Sl.-phenaon. 


Franklin, 


y.iitia 


■Yank fort. 


Sangamon, 


14.71(1 


SpRiaGFILO. 


Fulton, 


13.14^ 




Schuyler, 


6,972 


Rushville. 


Gallatin, 


id,-; (J. 


equality. 


Soil, 


6,215 




Greene, 


1 1 ,96 1 


"arrollton. 


Shelby, 


6,U5:i 


Shelby ville. 


Hamilton, 


3,94ii 


HcLeanaboro'. 


a lark, 


1,573 




Hancock, 


9,941 


Jarthage. 




2,B0tJ 




Hardin, 


l ,:57» 




St Clair, 


]3,e:.ti 


Kelleville. 




1 ,-Jiii.i 




Tale well, 


7,221 


Tremont. 


JaTaon' 


1 ,(iS).") 




Union, 


5521 




3,!;W; 


Urownsville. 


Vermillion, 


9,303 


Danville. 


jasper, ' 

Jefferson, 


1,47* 






4,240 


Mt. Carmel. 


5,7(W 


kit. Vernon. 


Warren, 


6.739 


VIonmnuLh. 




■s.cao 






4, din 


Nashville. 




6,1 W 




Wavne, 


r,,i:n 


F airfield. 


Johnson, 


:i,62i. 






7,919 




Kane, 


6,50 1 




Whiteside, 


3,514 




Knox, 


7,0(5i< 


4 no J villa. 


Will, 


10,167 


Juliet. 


Lake, 


2,i;;!4 




Williamson, 


4,457 




La Salte, 


!» 34- 


Ottawa. 


Winnebago, 


4,609 




Lawrence, 


7,oua 


-.awrenceb'rg. 














Total, 


470.183 



3S2 



ILLINOIS. 



[1842. 



Different Classes of Inhabitants. 



White Persons, 
Deaf and Dumb, 155 

Blind, 86 

Insane and Idiots, at public 

charge, 36 

Do. at private charge, 177 

Persons employed in 
Mining, 782 

Agriculture, 105,337 

Commerce, 2,506 

Manufactures and Trades, 13,185 
Navigating the Ocean, 63 

" Canals, Lakes, and Rivers, 310 
Learned Professions, 2,021 

Revolutionary and military 
Pensioners, 195 



Colored Persons, 

Deaf and Dumb, 24 

Blind, 10 
Insane and Idiots, at private 

charge, 65 

Do. at public charge, 14 

Universities or -Colleges, 5 

Students in Universities, &c. 311 
Academies and Grammar 

Schools, 42 

Students in Academies, 1,967 

Primary and Com. Schools, 1,241 
Scholars in Com. Schools, 34,876 
White Persons over 20 years 
of age, unable to read and 
write, 27,502 



XXVI. MISSOURI. 



Government. 

Term ends. Salary. 
Thomas Reynolds, of City of Jefferson, Governor, Nov. 1844, $2,000 
M. M. Marmaduke, Lieutenant-Governor, do. do. 

James L. Minor, of City' of Jefferson, Secretary of 

State, Superintendent of Common Schools, Feb. 1843, 1 300 

[&fees. 
Hiram H. Baber, of City of Jefferson, Auditor Pub. Ac. Feb. 1845, 1,50Q 

[including clerk hire. 
Abraham M. Clelland, do. Treasurer, Dec. 1842, 1,260 

Samuel M. Bay, do. Attorney- Gen% Feb. 1845, 650 

[& fees. 
John Heard, Reg r of Lands, Feb. 1845, 600 

[<& fees. 
James L. Minor, of City of Jefferson, Adjutant- General, 100 

George W. Miller, do. Quartermaster- General, 100 

Wm. Milburn, of St. Louis, Surveyor- General, 1,500 

John Smith, do. President of State Bank. 

Henry Shurlds, do. Cashier do. 2,000 



1842.] 



MISSOURI. 



353 



The Lieutenant-Governor is, ex officio, President of the Senate, and 
receives % 4 50 a day while presiding over the Senate ; and the pay of 
the Speaker of the House of Representatives is the same. The Sen- 
ators are chosen every fourth year, and the Representatives every sec- 
ond year. Their pay is % 3 a day. The legislature meets at the City of 
Jefferson biennially, on the 4th Monday in November. 



Judiciary. 

Supreme Court, 

George Tompkins, of City of Jefferson, .Presiding Judge, 
William B. Nap ton, do. Associate Judge, 

William Scott, do. do. 



Salary. 

#1,100 

1,100 

1,100 



• The State is divided into four Judicial Districts, in each of which the 
Supreme Court sits twice a year. The places of holding the courts are 
Booneville, Palmyra, St. Louis, and PotosK This Court exercises ap- 
pellate jurisdiction from the Circuit Court, and has original jurisdiction 
in cases of habeas corpus, mandamus, &c. The decisions of this Court 
are published at the end of each term in some newspaper printed in the 
District; and they are collected and published in a pamphlet form semU 
annually by the Attorney- General. 







Circuit Courts. 






Judges. 


- 




Salary. Attorneys. 


Salary. 


James W. Morrow, 


1st Circuit, 


$1,000 Samuel M. Bay 


250 & fees, 


John D. Leland, 


2d 


do. 


1,000 James Gordon, 


250 


do. 


Ezra Hunt, 


3d 


do. 


1,000 G. Porter, 


250 


do. 


P. H. McBride, 


4th 


do. 


1,000 Jas. C. Abernathy 


,250 


do. 


John F. Ryland, 


5th 


do. 


1,000 H. Young, 


250 


do. 


A. A. King, 


6th 


do. 


1,000 Peter H. Burnet, 


250 


do. 


F. P. Wright, 


7th 


do. 


1,000 L. Hendricks, 


250 


do. 


Bryan Mullanphy, 


8th 


do. 


2,000 John Bent, 


250 


do. 


David Sterigere, 


9th 


do. 


' 1,000 John S. Brickey, 


250 


do. 


John D. Cook, 


10th 


do. 


1,000 Greer W. Davis, 


250 


do. 


James A. Clark, 


lith 


do. 


1,000 B. F. Stringfellow, 


,250 


do. 


David R. Alctrison, 


12th 


do. 


1,000 






Charles S. Yancey, 


13th 


do. 


1,000 






Charles H. Allen, 


14th 


do. 


1,000 







The jurisdiction of the Circuit Court extends to all matters of tort 
and contracts over 90 dollars, where the demand is liquidated, and 50 
dollars where the agreement is parol. It has exclusive criminal juris-- 

22 



254 



Miiaouii. 



[1843. 



diction, and superintending control over the Count; Courts and Justices 
of the Peace, subject to the correction of tbe Supreme Court. The 
Circuit Court is held in each county. The Judges of the Supreme and 
Circuit Courts ere nominated by the Governor end confirmed by the 
Senate, end they hold their office during good behavior, though not 
beyond 65 years of age. 

Court of Common Pleat of St. Limit. 
P. Hill Engle, of St. Louis, Judge; Salary, $2,000 



Jam en B Bow tin, 



Criminal Court of St. Una*. 
of St. Louis, Judge; 



Salary, $ 1,000 



This is a local tribunal, established for exercising criminal jurisdic- 
tion only in the county of St. Louis. An appeal lies to the Supreme 
Court. The Judge is appointed by the concurrent vote of the two 
Houses of the General Assembly ; and he holds his office during good 
behavior. 

County Courts. 

The jurisdiction' of the County Courts is limited to matters of probate 
and local county affaire, as roads, &c. A County Court site in each 
county, and is composed of three justices, who are elecled by the people, 
and hold their offices for 4 years. An appeal lies to the Circuit Court. 



CoumiS, Population, l 



i Codrtt To was. 







Census of 1840. 






urn 






Count) Towns. 


Whites, t 


Free 


E 


Total 
Pup. 


Audrain, 




1,75*4 


a 


1,949 




Barry, 




4,518 


8 




4,79.5 








3,933 






4.205 


Ren ton C. H. 




8,859 


10,529 


24 




13,561 


Columbia. 


Buchanan, 




6,0114 


( 




(5.237 




Call well, 




l,397l 






1,458 




Callaway, 


6,159 


8,001 1 


22 




11,765 Fulton. 


Ca. Girudeau 


7,445 


6,03(1 


14 




9,359 Jackson. 


Carroll, 




2,155 






2,423 Carrollton. 


Chariton, 


1,780 




an 




4,746 KeytesviUe. 


Clark, 




3,4231 


3 


2,846j " 
8,3-3 Liberty. 

■J,:-U Plaltsbuig. 


Clay, 


5,336 


6,373 


34 


Clinton, 




2,530 


3 


Cole, 


3,023 


8,1173 


34 






8.9(14 


8,31 a] 


15 


10,484 Booneville. 


Crawford, 


1,712 


3,377l 




3,561 Little Piney. 



1949.] 





Pop. 




Fiu 




Total 




1830. 


Whites. 


CoTJ, 


Sis™. 


Pop. 


Dayiess, 




2,i;no 


2 


134 


2736 


Franklin, 


3,484 


6)447 


14 


1,054 


7,5)5 


Gasconade, 


1,545 


4.SW7 




■ 342 


5,330 


Greene, 




4,693 


S 


677 


6,372 


Howard, 


10,854 


O.Srt! 


44 


3,683 


13,108 


Jacks/in, 


2,823 


6.24.1 


« 


1,361 


7,612 


lefferson, 


3,592 


:s;\n 


12 


324 


4,3!Hj 


Johnson, 




3,91] 


4 


556 


4,471 


LafajeltB, 


2^12 


4,798 


26 


1,990 


6,815 


Lewis, 




4,966 


9 


1,065 


6,040 


Lincoln, 


4,059 


6\873 


4 


l,f>7L 


7,449 






9,162 




143 


2,245 


Li >ingat on. 




4,0*2 


3 


241 


4,325 


Macon, 




r.,y.!K 




225 


6,034 


Madison. 


2,371 


a,7ea 


22 


611 


3,3f)f. 


Marion, 


4,83; 


7 231 


43 


2,342 


9.623 


Miller, 




2.171 




111 


2,282 


Monroe, 




7.813 


5 


l,6i*7 


9505 






3,8; 91 


4 


512 


4,407 


Montgomery, 
New Madrid, 


3,902 


3,524 


20 


827 


4,371 


2,3511 


3,74r. J 


6 


801 


4,554 


Newton, 




3,«lb 


5 


169 


3,790 


Perry, 


3,349 


4,!>il8 


14 


778 


5,760 


ptvL 




2.377 


1 


552 


2,930 


Platte, 




8,(14! 


6 


858 


8,913 


Pike, 


6,129 


8,ir>7 


17 


2,472 


10,646 


Polk, 




7,:i/8 


9 


462 


B.449 


Pulaski, 






1 


190 


6,539 


Rolls, 


4,375 


4,451 


11 


1,209 


5,670 


Randolph, 


2,94* 


:>,74<- 


12 


1,437 


7,198 


Ray, 


3,657 


5,714 


6 


834 


6,553 


Ripley, 




2,777 


3 


77 


2,856 


Riyes, 




4,1 I8i 


4 


636 


4,726 


St Charles, 


'4,39i 


6,281' 


2* 


1,597 


7,911 


St. France, 


2,366 


a.fitu 


16 


501 


3 21 ! 


St. Genevieye, 


2.16t 


s^tta 


37 


548 


3,148 




14.12.-. 


3i>,r]iir 


(358 


4,61 fi 


:r,;<i7!! 


Saline, 


2,873 


■JJ»r 


8 


1,615 


5,258 


Scoit, 


2,136 


(i.9>*. 


18 


928 


5,974 


Shelby, 




2,o.-7 




458 


3,050 


Stoddard. 




3 9)81 




71 


3,153 


Tsney, 
Van &'„,«, 




;t,2i a 


12 


40 


3.264 




4,448 


31 


214 




Warren, 




3,555 


2 




4553 


Washington, 


6,784 


(12-18 


42 


W 


7513 


Wayne* 


3,264 


3,9 lii 1 


12 


322 


3,403 


Total, 


140,455 


323,888 


1,574 


58,241 


383,7112 



256 



MISSOURI. 



[18^2. 



Different Classes of Inhabitants. 



White Persons, 




Navigating the Ocean, 


39 


Deaf and Dumb; 


126 


Nav. Canals, Lakes, &c. 


1,885 


Blind, 


82 


Learned Professions, 


1,469 


Insane and Idiots, at public 


Revolutionary and military 




charge, 


42 


Pensioners, 


122 


Do. at private charge, 


160 


Universities or Colleges, 


6 


Slaves and colored Persons, 




Students in Universities, &c 


, 495 


Deaf and Dumb, 


27 


Academies and Grammar 




Blind, 


42 


Schools, 


47 


Insane and Idiots, at private 


Students in Academies, &c. 


1,926 


charge, 


50 


Primary and Common 




Do. at public charge, 


18 


Schools, 


642 


Persons employed in 




Scholars in Common 




Mining, 


742 


Schools, 


16,788 


Agriculture, 


92,408 


White Persons over 20 years 




Commerce, 


2,522 


of age, unable to. read and 




Manufactures and Trades, 


11,100 


write, 


19,457 



XXVII. FLORIDA TERRITORY. 
Government. 



Salary. 
$2,500 
1,500 



Richard K. Call, Govenwr, (appointed March, 1841,) 

Thomas H. Duvall, Secretary, (appointed Sept. 1841,) 

Thomas H. Austin, Treasurer. 

Thomas Brown, Auditor. 

John Graham, Adjutant- General. 

The Legislative Council is composed of a Senate of 11 members, 
elected for two years, and a House of Representatives composed of 29 
members, elected annually, on the 2d Monday in October. The Legisla- 
tive Council meets annually at Tallahassee, the seat of government, and 
residence of the Governor and Secretary, on the 1st Monday in January, 
and its sessions are limited to 75 days. Pay of members, $ 4 a day, and 
$ 4 for every 20 miles' travelling to and from the seat of government. 



Districts. 
Middle, 
Eastern, 
Apalachicola, 
Western, 
Southern, 



Judiciary. 

Judges. 
William H. Brockenbrough, 
Isaac H. Bronson, 
Samuel W. Carmack, 
Dillon Jordan, 
William Marvin, 



Residence. 
Tallahassee, 
St. Augustine, 

Pensacola, 
Key West, 



Salary. 
$1,800 
1,800 
1,800 
1,80 
2,900 



1842L] 



FLORIDA TERRITORY. 



257 



Districts. 


Marshals. 


District Attorneys. 


Middle, 


John W. Camp, 


Charles S. Sibley. 


Eastern, 


J. S. Sanches, 


Thomas Douglas. 


Apalacbicola, 


P. M. Gautier, 


• 


Western, 


Ebenezer Dorr, 


Walker Anderson. 


Southern, 


Joseph B. Brown, 


S. Windsor Smith. 



The Court of Appeals, consisting of the Judges of the several Supe- 
rior Courts, is held annually at Tallahassee, on the 1st Monday in Jan- 
uary. The Territory comprises 20 counties, and the County Courts are 
held semi-annually by the Judges in the respective counties, who have 
a limited civil jurisdiction, and original jurisdiction in all matters relat- 
ing to estates testate and intestate, to executors, administrators, guar- 
dians, wards, and orphans, and their estates. 

Counties, Census of 1840, and County Towns. 



Counties. 


Whites. 


Free 
Col. 


Slaves. 


Total 
Pop. 


County Towns. 


West C Cscambia, 
Florida, { Walton, 

Total, 

f Gadsden, 

Middle J H^ 1110 ^ 

Florida,i ^!" 0n ' 
1 Leon, 

L Madison, 

Total, 

f Alachua, 
I Colambia, 

East 1 r)uvft N> 

Nassau, 
[.St. John's, 

Total, 

South ( Dade, 
Florida, \ Monroe, 


2,330 
1,189 


307 
41 

348 

13 

3 

2 

21 

39 

1 

3 

105 

2 

30 
121 

262 

76 
80 

17 

2(5 

43 

2 


1,356 
231 


3,993 
1,461 


Pensacola. 
Alaqua. 

Quinsy. 

Miccotown. 

Monticello. 

Tallahassee. 

Hickstown. 

Newnansville* 

Jacksonville. 

New Smyrna. 
Fernandina. 
St. Augustine. 

Key West. 

St. Joseph's. 
Mariana. 
Holmes' Valley. 


3,519 

2,637 
1,034 
2 J 62 
3,461 
1,442 


1,587 

3,342 
427 

3 549 
7.231 

1,202 


5,454 

5,992 
1.464 
5.713 

10,713 
2,644 


10,736 

1,719 
1,649 
2250 

437 
73 

954 
1,685 


15,751 

562 

450 

1,801 

13 

908 

888 


26,526 

2,282 
2.102 
4,156 
452 
73 
1,892 
2,694 


8,767 

412 
516 


4,622 

30 
96 


13,651 

446 
688 


Apa- 
lachico- 
la Dis- * 

trict, 


Total, 

'Calhoun, 
Franklin, 
Jackson, 
Washington, 


928 

705 

782 

2,002 

504 


126 

420 

222 

2,636 

353 


1,134 

1,142 

1,030 

4,681 

859 


Total, 


4,093 


88 
~817 


3,631 


7,712 


Tota 


\l of Florida, 


27,943 


25,717 54,477 



Population of the Principal Towns. 
Tallahassee, 1,616 St. Augustine, 2,459 Key West, 088 

22* 



958 



WISCONSIN TERR! TORT. 



[1842. 



XXVIII. WISCONSIN TERRITORY. 

Government. 

Salary. 

James D. Doty, of Madison, Governor and Superintendent of 

Indian Affairs, (term expires March, 1844,) $2,500 

Alexander P. Field, of Madison, Secretary of State, (term expires 

April, 1843,) 1,200 

Mortimer M. Jackson, of Mineral Point, Attorney- General, 200 

George H. Walker, John Hustis, and J. H. Tweedy, Canal Com- 
missioners. Pay, $ 3 a day when in service. 

J. A. Lap ham, of Milwaukee, ■ Chief Engineer. 

C. C. Sholes, of Madison, Auditor. 

R. L. Ream, do. Treasurer. - 

The government was organized in 1836. The Legislative Assembly 
consists of a Council of 13 members, elected for 4 years, and a House 
of Representatives of 26 members, elected for 2 years. Their pay is 
$2 a day, and $ 3 for every 20 miles' travel. The sum of $ 40,000 has 
been appropriated by Congress for the erection of public buildings, and 
of $5,000 for a library. James Maxwell, President of the Council. 
David Newland, Speaker of the House of Representatives. 

Judiciary. 

Salary. 

Charles Dunn, of Elk Grove, 1st District, Chief Justice, $1,800 

David Irvin, of Madison, 2d do. Associate Justice, 1,800 

Andrew G. Miller, of Milwaukee, 3d do. do. 1,800 

T. W. Sutherland, of Madison, U. S. District-Attorney, Fees and 200 

Daniel Huguniu, of Racine, Marshal, Fees and 200 

CpUNTlES AND POPULATION IN 1840. 



Brown, 


2,107 


Calumet, 


275 


Crawford, 


1,502 


Dane, 


3,114 


Dodge, 
Fond du Lac, 


67 


139 


Grant, 


3,926 


Green, 


933 



Iowa, 


3,978 


Jefferson, 


914 


Manitouwoc, 


235 


Marquette, 


18 


Milwaukee, 


5,605 


Portage, 


1,623 


Racine, 


3,475 


Rock,, 


1,701 



St. Croix, 


801 


Sauk, 


102 


Sheboygan, 


133 


.Walworth, 


2,611 


Washington, 


343 


Winnebago, 
Total, 


135 


30,945 



Madison is the seat of government ; but Milwaukie, which contains a 
population of 1,712, is the largest town. 



1842.] IOWA TERRITORY. 259 

XXIX. IOWA TERRITORY. 

Government. 

Salary. 
John Chambers, of Iowa City, Governor and Superintendent 

of Indian Affairs, (term from July, 1841, to July, 1844,) $ 2,500 
Otho H. W. Stull, of Iowa City, Secretary, 1,200 

Jesse Williams, do. Auditor, 100 

Thornton fiayless, do. Treasurer, 100 

Morgan Reno, do. Librarian, 210 

William Reynolds, of Burlington, Superintend. Public Instruction, 250 

Chauncey Swan, of Iowa City, Superintendent of the Capitol, 1,000 
Jesse Williams, do. Territorial Agent, 700 

John Clay pole, of Fort Madison, Director of the Penitentiary, 250 

This country was erected into a territorial government by an act of 
Congress of June, 1838, to take effect on the 4th of July following. 
The legislative power is vested in the Governor and a Legislative As- 
sembly, which meets annually on the 1st Monday of December, at Iowa 
City, the seat of government ; and it consists of 13 members of the 
Council, elected for two years, and of a House of Representatives con- 
sisting of 26 members, elected annually. — Pay of the members $ 3 a 
day, and #3 for every 20 miles' travel. 

The sum of $ 20,000 was appropriated by the government of the 
United States, for the erection of public buildings at the seat of govern- 
ment; $20,000 for the erection of a penitentiary, (at Fort Madison,) 
and $5,000 for a library. These public works are now in progress. 

Judiciary. 

Salary. 

Charles Mason, of Burlington, Chief Justice, #1,800 

Joseph Williams, of Bloomington, Associate Justice, 1,800 

Thomas S. Wilson, of Du Buque, do. 1,800 

Charles Weston, of Davenport, Attorney, Fees and 200 

Thomas B. Johnson, of Bloomirgton, Marshal, Fees and 200 

Wm. J. A. Bradford, of Du Buque, Reporter, 300 

Thornton Bayless, of Iowa City, Clerk, Fees. 

H. T. Reid, of Fort Madison, Attorney, 1st District, Fees. 

R. T. Lowe, of Bloomington, do. 2d do. Fees. 

Wm. J. A. Bradford, of Du Buque, do, 3d do. Fees. 

The Judges are appointed for four years ; and the term of the present 
judges expires July 4th, 1842. The Territory is divided into three 
judicial districts, and the judges perform circuit duties. The Supreme 
Court, composed of all the judges, meets annually in July, at Iowa City, 
the seat of government. * 



260 iowa. territory. [1842. 

Counties and Population according to the Census of 1840. 



Cedar, 

Clayton, 

Clinton, 

Delaware, 

Desmoines, 

Du Buque, 

Henry, 



1,253 
1,101 
821 
168 
5,575 
3,059 
3,772 



Jackson, 

Jefferson, 

Johnson, 

Jones, 

Lee, 

Linn, 

Louisa, 



1,41,1 
2,773 
1,491 
471 
6,093 
1,373 
1,927 



Muscatine, 
Scott, 

Van Buren, 
Washington, 



1,942 
2,140 
6,146 
1,594 



Total, 43,111 



XXX. DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

The District of Columbia is under the immediate government of Con- 
gress. The city of Washington became the seat of the government of 
the United States in 1800 ; and it is the residence of the President and 
the other chief executive officers of the national government. 

The Congress of the United States meets every year at Washington, 
on the 1st Monday in December, unless it is otherwise provided by law; 
and the Supreme Court of the United States meets here annually on 
the 2d Monday in January. 

Judiciary. 



Circuit Court of the District. 



William C ranch, 
Buckner Thruston, 
James S. Morsel, 
Philip R. Fendall, 
Alexander Hunter, 
William Brent, 
EdmUnd I. Lee, 



of Washington, 

do 
" Georgetown, 
Washington, 
do. 



u 



Chief Judge t 
Assistant Judge, 

do. 
Attorney, 
Marshal, 



Salary. 

$2,700 

2,500 

2,500 

L Fees, <fcc. 

do. 



Clerk for Washington County, do. 
Clerk for Alexandria County, do. 



District Court for the District, at Alexandria. 
William Cranch, Judge. Edmund 1. Lee, Clerk. 

Criminal Court for the District. 









Salary. 


James Dunlop, of Georgetown, Judge, 




$2,000 


William Brent, 


Clerk for Washington 


Co., 


Fees. 


Edmund 1. Lee, 


Clerk fur Alexandria Co., 


Fees. 




Orphan's Court. 


m 










Salary. 


Nathaniel P. Causin, 


Washington Co., Judge, 




$1,000 


Edward N. Roach, 


do. Register, 




Fees. 


Christopher Neale, 


Alexandria Co., Judge, 




1,000 


Alexander Moore, 


do. Register, 




Fees. 



1842.] 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

Counties and Population. 



261 



Counties. 


Pop. 
1820. 


Pop. 
.1830. 


Census of 1840. 


County Towns. 


Whites. 


Free 
Cul. 

6,499 
1,862 

8,361 


Slav. 

3,320 
1,374 

4,694 


Total. 

Pop. 


Washington, 
Alexandria, 


23,3tf6 
9,703 


30.250 
9.608 


23.926 
6,731 


33,745 Washington. 
9,967 Alexandria. 


Total, 


3\039 39,859 


30.657 


43.712 


1 



Population of the Principal Towns. 





1800. 


leio. 


1620. 


1830. 


1840. 


Washington, 


3,210 


8,«08 


13,247 


18,827 


23,364 


Alexandria, 


4,196 


7,227 


8,218 


8,263 . 


8,459 


Georgetown, 


- 


4,948 


7,360 


8,441 


7,312 



UNITED STATES. 



POPULATION TABLES. 
I. Population qf the Principal Cities. 





1790. 


1800. 

• 


1810. 


1820. 


1830. 


1840. 


New York, 


33,131 


60,489 


96,373 


123,706 


203,007 


312,710 


Philadelphia, 


42,520 


70,287 


96,664 


108,116" 


167,118 


228,691 


Baltimore, 


13,5u3 


26,614 


46,555 


62,738 


80,625 


102 313 


New Orleans, 






17,242 


27,176 


46,310 


102,193 


Boston, 


18,038 


24,927 


32 250 


43,298 


61,392 


93,383 


Cincinnati, 




750 


2,540 


9,644 


24,831 


46,338 


Brooklyn, 




3,298 


4,402 


7,175 


12,042 


36,233 


Albany, 


3,498 


5,349 


9,356 


12,630 


24,238 


33,721 


Cbaileston, 


16,359 


18,712 


24,711 


24,480 


30,289 


29.261 


Washington, 




3,21(1 


8,208 


13,247 


18,827 


23,364 


Providence, 




7,614 


1«',071 


11,767 


16,832 


23,171 


Louisville, 


w 


* 


1,357 


4.012 


10,352 


21,210 


Pittsburg, 




1,505 


4,768 


7,248 


12.542 


21,115 


Lowell, 










6,474 


20,7H6 


Rochester, 








1,502 


9,269 


20,191 


Richmond, " 




5,537 


9,735 


12,046 


16,060 


20,153 


Troy, 
Buffalo, 






3,885 


5,2<J4 


11,40] 


19,334 






1,508 


2,095 


8,653 


18,213 


Newark, 




• 




6,507 


10,953 


17,290 


St. Louis, 








4,598 


5,852 


16,469 


Portland, 




3,677 


7,169 


8,581 


12,601 


15.218 


Salem, 


7,921 


9,457 


12,613 


12,731 


13,886 


15,082 



263 



UNITED STATED 



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1843.} 



AME&ICAtf STATES, 



267 



AMERrCAN STATES. 
Republics of North America. 



United States, 


■ 

Population. 


Capital*. 


Presidents. 


17,068,666 


Washington, 


John Tyler. 


Mexico, 


7,687,000 


Mexico, 


Anastasio Bustamente. 


Central America, 


2,000,000 


San Salvador, 




Yucatan, 


479,400 


Merida, 


Miguel Barbachano. 


Hayti, 


933,000 Cape Haytien, 


Jean Pierre Boyer. 


Texas, 


150,OO0iAustin, 


Samuel Houston. 


i 


Republics of South America. 


Argentine Repub. 


2,000,000 


Buenos Ayres, 


Don Juan M. de Rosas. 


Peru, 


1,700,000 


Lima, 


General Gamarra. 


New Grenada, 


1 ,687,000 


Bogota, 


Jose Ignacio de Marquez. 


Bolivia, 


1,500,000 


Chuquisaca, 


General Santa Cruz. 


Chili, 


1,500,000 


Santiago, 


Joaquin Prieto. 


Venezuela, 


900,000 


raraccas, 


General Paez. 


Equator, 


600,000 


Quito, 


Vicente Rocafuerte. 


lath's of Panama, 




Panama, 


Thomas Herrara. 


Paraguay, 


300,000 


Assumption, 




Uruguay, 


150,000 


Monte Video, 


Fructuoso Rivera. 


1 


Empire, 

1 


| Emperor, 


Brazil, 1 


5,130,418| Rio Janeiro, 


1 Pedro II. 



The presenUpopulation of most of the above States has not been very 
recently ascertained with any exactness. 



BRITISH AMERICAN PROVINCES. 

Sir Cbarles Baoot, Governor- General, Vice-Admiral, and Captain' 
General of all the British Provinces of North America, 

Bbjtish North America* Provinces. 



Provinces. 


Population in 1834, or 
latest census. 


1 Lieutenant-Governors. 


Lower Canada, 

Upper Canada, 

New Brunswick, 

N. Scotia, with C. Breton, 

Prince Edward's Island, 

Newfoundland, . 

Total, 


549,005 
336,461* 
152,156 
142,548 
32,292 
75,000 


Sir George Arthur. 
SirW.M G.Colebrooke. 
Lord Falkland. 

Sir John Harvey. 


1,287,462 



• Stated in 1840 at 450,000. 



268 



BRITISH WIST INDIA ISLANDS. 



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The condition of the slaves in the British colonies was changed by the 
act of Parliament of 1833, for a time, to that of apprenticed laborers; 
but they are now free. 

Colonial Bishops. — C. Lipscomb, D. D. Jamaica; Win. H. Coleridge, 
D. D., Barbadoes; John Inglis, D. D., Nova Scotia; {Vacant,) Quebec; 
G. J. Mountain, D. O., Montreal ; John Strachan, D. D , Toronto; Au- 
brey Geo. Spencer, D. D., Newfoundland. 



EUROPE. 



REIGNING SOVEREIGNS OF EUROPE. 



• Th. Kint or Binmr it n CuttoKs, ibnnih the ptttot pan of tiii inMacu 

.be King or Belgium la a ProinU.it, ihouih hi. lubjecu arc. m„tl. OuAoJiu , and lbs Klaf 01 
J wa a a t a CaiMta, though rami ul bit ■ubjmu are of ihs Ontk Ckutek. 



270 



STATES OF IJ7ROPK, 



[1842. 



STATES OF EUROPE 

In 1837, with the form of Government, Square Miles, and Population, 
according to the " Penny Cyclopedia." 



States and Titles. 



Andorra, Pyrenees, Republic, 
*Anbalt-Bernburg, Ducky, 
*Anhalt-Cothen, do. 
*Anhalt-Dessau, do. 

* Austria, Empire, 
•Baden, Or. Duchy, 
•Bavaria, Kingdom, 

Belgium, do. 
*Bremen, Free City, 
'Brunswick, Ducky, 

Chareb, States of, Popedom, 

Cracow, Republic, 
t Denmark, Kingdom, 

Franco, So. 

'Frankfort, Free City, 

Great Britain, Ktuifdom, 

Greece, do. 

•Hamburg, Free City, 
•Hanover, Kingdom, 
•Hesse-Ca^sel, Electorate, 
•Hesse-Darmstadt, Or. Duchy t 
•Hesse>Homburg, Landgrav'te, 
*Hohensollera-Hechingen, Pr. 
•Hohenzoll.-Sigmaringen, do. 

Holland, with Luxemburg, 

(onian Islands, Republic, 
•Lichtenstoin, Principality, 
*Lippe-DetmoM, do. 
*Lubec, Free City, 

Lucca, Ducky, 
*Mecklen.-Schwerin, Or. Du. 
•Mecklenburg-Strelitz, do. 

Modena and Mussa, Ducky } 

Monaco, Principality, 

* Nassau, Ducky, 
*Oldenburg, Or. Ducky, 

Parma, Ducky 

Portugal, Kingdom, 
*Prussia, So. 

*Reu*j Principalities of, 
\ Russia, Empire, 

San Marino, Republic, 

Sardinia, Kingdom, 
♦Saxony, do. 

*Saxu*Altenburg, Ducky, - 
*Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, do. 
*Saxe-Meining.-Hildburg.,oV. 
*Saxe-Weimar-Ehienach, do. 
+£chwartzhurg, Principal, of, 
*Scbauenburg-Lippe, Prindp. 

Sicilies, Tbe Two, Kingdom, 

Spain, do. 

Sweden and Norway, do. 

Switzerland, Republic, 
$Turk*y, Empire, 

Tuscan v, Orand Ducky, 
•Waldeck, Principality, 
♦Wurteraberg, Kingdom, 



Form of Government. 



Square 
Miles. 



PopalatNB. 



With two syndics and a council, 
States having limited powers, 
Do. do. 

Do. do. 

Absolute monarchy, except Hungary, ice. 
Limited sovereignty j — two chambers, 
Limited monarchy ; do. 

Do. do. 

Republic ; — senate and convention, 
Limited sovereignty ; — one chamber, 
Absolute elective sovereignty, 
Senate and ehamber of representatives, 
Absolute monarchy j — with prov. stales, 
Limited monarchy ; — two chambers, 
Republic ; — senate and legislative body, 
Limited monarchy ; — lords and commons, 
Limited monarchy, 

Republic ; — senate and common council, 
Limited monarchy ; — two chambers, 
Limited sovereignty j — one chamber, 
Limited sovereignty j — two chambers, 
Absolute sovereignty. 
Limited;— one chamber, 

Do. do. 

Limited monarchy ; — two chambers, 
Under Brit, protec. ; council and chamber, 
Limited monarchy, with one chamber, 

Do. do. 

Republic; — senate and common council, 
Limited sovereignty, with one chamber, 
Limited monarchy, with one chamber, 

Do. do. 

Absolute sovereignty, 

Do. 
Limited sovereignty ; — two chambers, 
Absolute sovereignty, 

Do. 
Limited monarchy ; — one chamber of rep, 
Absolute monarchy ; — provincial states, 
Limited sovereignty ; — one chamber, 
Absolute monarchy, 
Senate and council of ancients, 
Absolute monarchy, 
Limited monarchy ; — two chambers, 
Limited monarchy ; — one chamber, 
Do. do. 

Do. da 

Do. do. 

Do. do. 

Do. do. 

Limited monarchy, with a council, 
Limited monarchy, with a legislature, 
Limited num., with a diet and storthing, 
Confederation of republics j— a diet, 
Absolute monarchy, 
Absolute sovereignty, 
Limited sovereignty j — one chamber, 
Limited monarchy ; — two chambers, 

Total, 



15^00 



3,708,371 



810J 



li 



Ml 



* Member of the Confederation of Germany. . 

t The Continental part, 31,473 sq. miles, 3,040,000 inhabitants : tbe blonds, 38,990 so, ■** 
57,400 inhabitants. 

% Including the governments of Perm, Viatka, Kazan, Simbirsk, Penza, Saratof, Astrsflkjgj 
and pun of Orenburg : — also tbe kingdom of Poland, with 47,070 square miles, and 4,19*^ 
inhabitants. > -* » 

$ Including Wallacbia, Moldavia, and Servia. 



1842.] Asia ; afrtca ; the globe. 271 

Population of the several States and Countries of Asia, 
As stated in the " Weimar Almanac " for 1840. 



Stales and Empires. 



Chinese Empire, . 
Empire of Japan, 
Russia io Asia, 
Turkey in Asia, . 
Persia, . 
Afghanistan, 
Lahore or Etoiks, 
Arabia, . 

Turkestan, 
Empire of Annam, 
Siam, • . 
Sindia or Singhia, 
Birraan Empire, 
Belouchistan, 
Nepaul, . 
Malacca, 



353,866,000 

30,000,000 

12,407,190 

11,064,000 

11,340,000 

10,000,000 

8,000,000 

7,500,000 

6,97«?,000 

5,194,000 

5,000,000 

4,000,000 

3,500,000 

2,700,000 

3,500,000 

600,000 



Total Population* 608,516,019. 



Islands. 

Sumatra, Independent part, 7,000,000 

Borneo, do. . . 4,000,000 

Celebes, do. . 3,000,000 

Philippine Ills., do. . . 1,980,000 

Mindanao, do. . 1,000,000 

Moluccas, do. . . 980,000 

Smaller Sunda Islands, . 1,950,000 

Laccadives and Maldives, . 110,000 

Other Asiatic Islands, . 804,000 

Foreign Possessions. 



British Possessions, 



Dutch 


do. 


^punish 


do. 


Portuguese 


do. 


French 


do. 


Danish 


do. 



112,833,133 

6,741,700 

3, 189,967 

577,600 

130,000 

38,000 



Population of the Different Parts of Africa, 

As stated in the " Weimar Almanac" for 1840. 

Independent States. 



Abyssinia, 
Asbantee, 
Barca, 
Bornoa, 
Dar Fnr, 

Egypti 

Guinea, . 
Morocco, 



British Possessions, 
Danish do. 

Dutch do. 



4.500,000 
3,000,000 

300,000 
3,000,000 

300,000 
3,000,000 
7,000,000 
8,500,000 



Nubia, . • 
Senegambia, . . 
Sennaar, . . 

Soudan, Sahara, &c, 
Fellatahs, . • 

Tiipoli, . . . 
Tunis, 



1,900,000 
10,000 000 
1,500.000 
20,000,000 
3,000,000 
1,500,000 
3,000,000 



Interior and Eastern Africa, 29,000,000 



Foreign Possessions. 

284,000 I French Possessions, 
. 32,670 I Portuguese do. 
15,000 J Spanish do. 

Total Population of Africa, 101,498,411. 



205,233 

682,700 

17,071 



Mote. The correctness of most of the above statements relating to Asia and Africa 
is not to be relied on. 

Population and Extent of the Globe. 





According to Balbi. 


Weimar Almanac. — 1840. 




Pop. 


English 
sq. miles. 


Pop. to 
sq. m. 


Pop. 


English 
sq. miles. 


Pop. 


Europe, • 

Asia, . • • 

Africa, . . . 

America, . . 

Oceanian, (Austra- \ 
Ha,) Polynesia, (In- > 
dian Archipelago,) ) 


297,700,600 

390,000,000 

60,000,000 

39,000,000 

30,300,000 


3.700,000 
16,045,000 
11,354,000 
14,730,000 

4,105,000 


61.5 

24.3 

5.3 

3.6 

4.9 


333,240,043 

608,516,019 

101,496,411 

48,007,150 

1,838,194 


3,807,195 
17,805,146 
11,647,438 
13,543,400 

3,347,840 


61.3 

34.3 

8.6 

3.5 

0.4 


Total, 


737,000.000 


49,834,000 


14.8 


993,108,537 


50,150,009 


19.8 



272 



BOVBfcftftOMS OF AU4TI9 STATSS. 



[1349. 



SOVEREIGNS OF ASIATIC STATES. 



SUtSS. 



ftussia, 

Turkey, 

Bagdad, 

Persia, 
Afghanistan, 
Bolouchistan, 
Bueharia, 
Khiva, 
Yemen, 
Muscat, 
Mecca, 
sSindia, 
Lahore, 
Nepao!, 
China, 
Birraa, 
diam, 

Annara orCochin- 
China, 

Japan, J 

f Bengal, 



British 
India, " 



Madras, 
Bombay, 
I Ceylon, 
French India, 



Danish India, 



Capitals. 



Sovereigns, &c. 



fit. Petersburg^, 

Constantinople, 

Bagdad, 

Teheran, 

Cabul, 

Kolat, 

Bueharia, 

Khiva, 

Sana, 

Muscat, 

Mecca, 

Hyderabad, 

Lahore, 

Catmandn, 

Peking, 

Ava. 

Bankok, 

Hue. 
Jeddo, 
Miaco, 
Calcutta, 

Madras, 
Bombay, 
Colombo, 
Pondicherry, 

Se ram pore, 



Nicholas I. 
Abdul Medjld, 
All Reza, 

Mohammed, 

Shooia, 

Mehrub (killed 1839), 

Batkar, 

Rahhinan-kuli, 

Almuhdi lidin-Allab, 

Seid Said, 

Yahya, 

Dzhankodzi*rao, 

Shere Singh, 

Radzhindra Bikramsah, 

Tao-kwang, 

Ser-a-wa, 

Kroma«mon-tshit, 

Mrag-ming, 

The Kubo, or Secular 
The Dairi, or Eoclesiast 
Lord Auckland, 

Lord Elphinstone. 
Richard Lalor Shiel, 
Sir CoJin Campbell, 
Field Marshal De St. 

Simon, 
Christensen, 



Title*. 



Emperor, 
Sultan, 
Pasha, subj. 
to Turkey, 
Sbah, 
Shah, 
Khan, 
Khan, 
Khan, 
Imam, 
Imam, 
Sherif, 
King, 
Rajah, 
Rajah, 
Emporor, 
Boa or K'g, 
K'g or Em., 

Emperor, 
Emperor, 
ical Emp., 
Gov.- Gen. 
of India, 
Governor. 

Do. 

Do. 
Gov.-Gen. 

Do. 



Ac- 
cos. 



Religion. 



1835 Gr. Ch. 
1839 Mahom. 
Do. 



1834 
1839 

1896 
1828 
1815 
1804 
1813 
18S7 
1840 
1816 



Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Seik. 
Branaan. 



1821; Con fiici. 
Buddhist. 
Do. 

Do. 

{ Sinto. 



1837 
1824 

1819 
1796 
1817 



1841 
1841 



SOVEREIGNS OF SEVERAL STATES OF AFRICA. 

Egypt. — Mehemet Ali, or Mohammed Ali, Pasha, or Viceroy , son 
of Ibrahim Aga, born at Cavala, in Rumelia, in 1769 ; proclaimed Pasha 
of Egypt, May 14, 1805, and confirmed in that office by the Saltan, 
Selim 111., April 1,1606. 

Ibrahim Pasha, son of Mehemet Ali, born in 1789, Generalissimo. 

Morocco. — Muley-Abd-Errahman, Emperor, or Sultan, son of 
Mo ley Hescham, son of Sidi Mohammed, succeeded his uncle Muley 
Suleiman, Nov. 28, 182*2. He is of the Dynasty of Mohammed, who 
claimed to be descended from the Prophet Mahomet, and who obtained 
possession of the throne in 1547. 

Algiers. — The city of Algiers and a part of the seacoast is in the 
military occupation of the French. General Buoeaud Governor* 
General. 

The possession of the territory is strongly contested by Athmet, Bey 
of Constantino, Md-Etkader, Emir of Mascara, and Ben Zamon, Scheik 
of the Kabyles. 

Tunis. — Sidi Achmet, Bey, a Moor, 32 years old, succeeded hit 
father Mustapha, Oct. 10, 1837. 

Tripoli. — Haskar, Pasha. 

Senaar. — Badi VII., Sultan, son of Tabl, the 29th sovereign of the 
race of the Shilluks; reduced, since 1821, to a vassal of the viceroy of 
Egypt. 

BoRNOtf. — SCHUNIM EL KaLMI, SultOH. 

The Fellatahs, capital Sackatoo. — Mohammed Bello, Sultan; 
succeeded, in 1816, his father Hatoian Danfadio, the founder of the 
empire. 

Ashantee. —■ Osay Aguatuh, King, succeeded his brother Sai Tut» 
Quamina, in 1824. 



1842.] 



GREAT BRITAIN. 



273 



GREAT BRITAIN. 

Ministry. — September f 1941. • 



Sir Robert Peel, Bart., 
Lord Lynd hurst, 
Lord Wharncliflfe, 
Duke of Buckingham, 
Sir James Graham, 
Earl of Aberdeen, 
Lord Stanley, 



First Lord of the Treasury, 
Lord High, Chancellor, k 
Lord President of the Council, 
Lord Privy Seal, 
Secretary of State — Home Dep. 
Secretary of State — Foreign Dep. 
Secretary of State — Colonial Dep. 



Rt. Hon. Henry Goulburn, Chancellor of the Exchequer, 



Earl of Haddington, 
Lord Ellenborough, 
Sir Edward Knatchbull, 
Earl of Ripon, 
Sir. Henry HarcKnge, 
Duke of Wellington. 



First Lord of the Admiralty, 
President of Board of Control, 
Paymaster of the Forces, 
President of Board of Trade, 
Secretary at War, 



Salary. 

£5,000 
14,000 
2,000 
2,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
4,500 
3,500 
2,500 
2,000 
2,680 



« « 

* 



Sir George Clerk, 
Sir George Cockburn, 
Lord Ashley, 
Earl of Liverpool, 
Earl of Jersey, 
Earl of Rosslyn, 
Sir Frederick Pollock, 
Sir William Follett, 



Earl De Grey, 
Sir Edward Sugden, 
Lord Eliot, 
Mr. Blackburn, 
Sergeant Jackson, 



The above form the Cabinet, 

Chief Secretary of the Admiralty. 
Lord of the Admiralty. 

Lord Steward of the Household. 
Master of the Horse. 
Master of the Buckhounds. 
Attorney- General* 
Solicitor General, 

Ireland. 

Lord Lieutenant, 
Lord Chancellor, 
Secretary of State, 
Attorney- General, 
Solicitor' General, 

Parliament. 



£20,000 
8,000 



The Parliament of Great Britain consists of a House of Lords and a 
House of Commons. 

House of Lords or Peers. 

The House of Lords consists of Lords Temporal, who are Peers of the 
Realm, and whose honors, immunities, and privileges are hereditary ; 
and Lords Spiritual, consisting of Archbishops and Bishops. 

The House of Lords is composed of all the five orders of nobility of 
England, viz. dukes, marquises, earls, viscounts, and barons, who nave 
attained the age of 21 years, and labor under no disqualification ; of 16 
representative peers from Scotland ; 28 representative peers from Ire- 
land ; 2 English archbishops and 24 bishops ; and 4 representative Irish 
bishops. The number of each, in 1841, was as follows : — 



Dukes, (3 Royal Dukes,) 24 

Marquises, ... 20 

Earls, , . . .117 

Viscounty, . . . 22 

Barons, • . . . 219 



Peers of Scotland, (elected 1841,) 16 
Peers of Ireland, (elected for life,) 28 
English Archbishops and Bishops, 20 
Irish Representative Archbish- 
ops and Bishops, . . 4 



Total, 



476 



Jtlitttf&t Smut of Pttrt, mill lie TitU, Family JVmmt, DaU of 
Cttotim, and Birth of the pr—tmt Pier. 



jml] 



e&SAT BRITAIN, 



875 



Titk. 



Hndwicke 
Barewood 
Harrington 
Harrewby 

Bowe 

Huntingdon 
Jfchestar 



•Yarns. 



Cre- 
ated. 



£»*. 



Jersey 

Uieester 

♦Leven 

Lfchfield 

tUmerick 

Unesey 

Lonsdale 

ieveUce 

tiiveaD 

JUedesfield 

ftUlmesbury 

Mansfield 

sgaoveta 

fMayo 

Jtioto 

"Wley 

tMoumcashel 

Uu Edgocumbe 

Munster 

Nelson 

fO'Neil 

OmJow 

OrJerd 

•Orkney 

Oxford 

Pembroke 

Plymouth 

Pomfret 

Portsmouth 

Poulett 

Pawis 

Radnor 

Ripoo 

aWmqey 

tRosse 

ftasslyn 

St. German* 

Baadwicb 

Scarborough 

•SeafieW 

^Selkirk 

Shaftesbury 

Shrewsbury 

Somen 

Spencer 

Stamford 

Stanhope 

Stradbroke 

Strange 

Sjjffblk fc Berk. 

Talbot 

Taakerville 

Thapet 

Vane 

Verulam 
Waldegrave 
Warwick fe B 
Westmoreland 



Philip Yoike 
H. Lasoelles 
CbarJea Stanhope 
Dudley Ryder 
A. B. 8. T. Hill 

(H. Downsh. lre.1 
R. W. P. C. Howe 
P. T. H. Hastings 
H.S,F.Straogeways 
J. H. I nans K«r 

[D. Roxbinghe] 
Gborge Villiers 
H, Th. Wm. Coko 
David Leslie 
Th. Wm. Anson 
E- Henry Pteryi 
Albemarle Rertie 
G. C, C Jenkinson 
Wm. Lowtht.r 
Peter Kiog 
Richard Bingham 
'••one Parker 
J. E. Hariia 
Wm. Murray 
C. H. Pierrepont 
John Bourke 
G- B. Kyaymound 
Jobn Parker 
G. 8. Douglas 
Stephen Moore . 
R. Gdgecurnbe 
Geo. Fitzclarence 
H. B. Nelson 
C. H. 8t. John 
A. G. Onslow 
Horatio Walpole 
T. J. Fitsmaurice 
Edward HarJey 
R, «. Herbert 
Andrew Windsor 
Th. W. Fermor 
Jn, Q. Wallop 
John Poulett 
Edward CI We 
W. P. Bouvrie 
Fred. J. Robinson 
C. Marsham 
L. Parsons 
J. St. C. Erakine 
William Eliot 
G, J. Montagu 
J. L. Seville 
U A. G. OgllTy 
n. J. Douglas 
C. A. Cooper 
John Talbot 
J. 8. Cooks 
J. C. Speecer 
G, H. Gray 
P. H. Stanhope 
J. E. Rous . 
John Murray 

[D. of Atbol, 8c.] 
Thomas Howard 
C. C. T. Cbetwyod 
G. A. Basnet 
Jieury TuAon 
C. W. Stewart 

[M. Loud'iy, Ire.] 
J. W. Grimsoo 
J.J. WaJdegraTe 

H. R. Greville 
John Fane 



1754 

1812 
174] 
1809 



1757 
1767 
1780 
1769 



17721788 



1731 
1529 
175b 
1637 

1679 

1837 

1041 

I8U1 

1815 

1686 

179(5 

1807 

1838 

17&5 

1791 

1800 

1793 

180b 

1785 

1813 

1815 

145? 

1781 

1786 

1831 

1805 

1831 

1801 

180t> 

1606 

1711 

1551 

1683 

1791 

1743 

1706 

1804 



1796 
1808 
1787 
1816 

1773 

1786 
1795 
1758 

1814 

1784 

1757 

1805 

1764 

1755 

1778 

1777 

1778 

1766 

1789 

1779 

1789 

1799: 

1764 

1791 

1786 

1779 

1777 

1783 

1773 
1791 
1764 
1771 
1767 
1783 
175* 



Titl*, 



IWielrlew 
Wilton 

Winchelsea 
Yarbotough 
Zetland 



JVome. 



Ort- 
ated. 



William Howard 
Th. Edgerton 
G. W. F. Hutton 
Charles Pftlham 
Lawrence Dundas 



VitcoUnts. — 27. 



1765 1779 



1633 
1801 
1806 
1801 
1815 
1660 
1690 
170;) 
1646 
1679 
1449 
1891 
1765 
1698 
1718 
1891 
1766 

1693 
1784 
1714 
1698 



1815 
1799 
1416 
1694 



•Arbuthaott 

Beresford 

Rolingbioke 

Canning 

Canterbury 

Claocarty 

Coraberraere 

De Visci 

fDoneraile 

Bxnoouth 

Gordon 

fGort 

t Ha warden 

Hereford 

Hood 

Hutchinson 

Lake 
Lemster 

fLorton 
Maynard 
Melville 
Ponsonby 
St. Vincent 
Sid mouth 
*Struthallan 
Sydney 
1 orrington 



1799 
1891 

1698 
1837 
1838 



B'n. 



1786 
1799 
1791 
1781 
1769 



John Arhuthnott 
W. C. Beresford 
Henry St. John 
O. J. Canning 
Ch. M. Sutton 
Wm. Th. French 
8. Cotton 
Thomas Vesey 
Hayes Doneraile 
Edward Pel lew 
G. H. Gordon 

[E. A herd., Scot.] 
Ch. Vercker 
M- Ha warden 
H. Devereux 
Henry Hood 
J. H. Hutchinson 

[E. Donough, Ir.] 
F. G. Lake 
A. G. Fitzgerald 

[D. Lionster, ire.] 
R E. Kid* 
Henry Maynard 
R. 8. Dundas 
Jobn Ponsonby 
E. J. Jervis 
Henry Addiogton 
J. Drummond 
J. R. Townshend 
George Byng 



1641 
1893 
1719 
1897 
1835 
IS93 
1896 
1776 
1785 



1777 
1770 
1786 
1819 
1780 

1769 
1771 
1786 



1816 1811 



l7f9 
1777 
1758 
17C9 
1767 
1811 
1757 
1767 
1809 
1768 
1791 
1 760 
1789 
1765 
1781 
1794 
1778 

1776 
1777 
1776 
1775 
1778 

J775 
1785 
1779 
17&J 



Baroiu. — 219. 

Abercromby |G. Abercromby 

Abinjtr Junes Scarlett 

Alvanley William Arden 

Arden C. G. Percival 

Ardroesan A- Moctgomerie 

f E. Eglintoun, Sc] 

Arundel Evereid Arundel 

Aahhurton Alex. Baring 

Audley G. J. Toe net 

Bagot William Bagot 

Bateman W. Bate. Hanbury 

Bayning H. W. Powtott 

Beaumont M. T. Stapletoo 

Beauvaito Fred. J. Lamb 

Belbaven Sea Hamilton 

Berners Henry Wilson 

Berwick Wm. Noel Hill 

Bexiey Met. VansUtart 

Bolton Wm. O. Pewlett 

Boston George Irbv 

Boyle Edwind Beyle 

|[E. Cork & Orr. Ir.] 

Bravbreoke [Richard Griffin 

Brotlrick sGeorge Brodrick 

| ( V. MiddJct., Ire.] 
Brougham fe V, Henry Broughum 

Bvton George A. Byron 

Cahners* G G. Calthorpe 

Camden G. C. Pratt 
Caraoya Thomas Stonor 

Carb* rry Jt»hn FTeke 



1814 

1816 
1793 
1549 
1796 
1891 

1807 
1746 

1806 

1766 

18091 

1839 

1801 

1805 

1686 

1789 

1791 



1784 



1786 
1780 
1777 
1753 
1757 

1773 
1791 

1773 
1786 
177i 
1786 

1757 
1767 
1805 
1819 



1801 

1835) 

1801 

1809 

I8Q6 

1605 
1835 
1996 
1780 
1837 
1797 

1839 

1455 
1784 
1893 
1797 
1761 
1711 

1788 
1796 

183ft 
1643 
11796 
1835 
1377 
1715 



17T0 

1789 
1756 
1819 

1785 
1773 
1817 
1778 

1797 

178S 



1770 
1766 
1789 
1777 
1767 

1788 
1754 

1779 
178t 
1767 

1767 
1766 



UKCAT BRITAIN. [18&. 



Henlaju Sco 
II Moors 
{M.DrDjheda,Ir, 

[M.of Sligo, r, e . 
Krlwnrd F. Lloyd 
1 'r. Rothout 

II. SttffiDClOD 

'. Foimnl, Ire. 
n»s Butler 

h. Stair, B(.] 

rfenrv Pagol 
.William Minis 
!p, C. 8. Snmhti 
[V. Straeiibid, If.] 
W. F. H. Peirs 
Wm. C. Plunks! 
G. IV. Fampljrlde 

: [a Baabnovlra.] 

Alamos re rev 
Thomn K.mi 



rB.RoKts.T.S. 
Georio Bojle 

[E. KW.r.i.Sc 
VV. W. We Hen fi 



ItAfi 18111 



JE. SefU.n. Its.] 
G.A.P.B. Hol.ovd] 
[E. Sheffield, Ire/ 

E. M. PiikEnhuui 

Jf.„If n .'Sl 

K. B Wilunlum -- 
U. J. d« Batch 16 

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if • ««."■' 

Willum. Mlou 

M l,/%™V*2'rt a ' 1 ' 3 ■ 

ii Churla fri»tt 
.n,. II. Trac, 
Edward Hubnd 
1 G. W. Campbell 
in. Argyll, Scot] 
A. 8. Cliicinitu ■' 

\ 8. tune 
H. T. H.Thurl 

'■ 'elil'.BfM 



[M.WellwIe: 

P. W. C. Leotla. : 

J.' Wode'houie 



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'■:"""^:k::,',"'k 






978 



OB&sYT BftlTAUf. 



[1842. 



House of Commohi, 

Elected July, 1841. — Rt. Hon. Charles S. Leferre, Speaker. 

The House of Commons consists of knights, eitiiens, and burgesses, 
respectively chosen by counties, cities, and boroughs, apportioned as 
follows : 

C Counties, . 159 

England and Wales, for < Universities, ... 4 

( Cities and boroughs, . 337 

Scotland, . for {c?tfe?wa boroughs,. 23 } 

C Counties, . . .64 

Ireland, for < University, ... 2 

£ Cities and boroughs, . 39 
Total, 

The union of Ireland was carried into effect January 1st, 1801 ; and 
the Parliament which sat the same month, and which included the mem* 
bers from Ireland, is styled the 1st Imperial Parliament; and the Par- 
liament which assembled January 29, 1833, is styled the Wtk Imperial, 
or the let Reformed Parliament. The following table exhibits the suc- 
cession of Parliaments since the union with Ireland. 



500 



53 



105 

658 



I 



Std Imperial Parliament, 


3d do. 


do. 


4th do. 


do. 


5th do. 


do* 


6th do. 


do. 


7th do. 


do. 


8th do. 


do. 


9th do. 


do. 


10th do. 


do. 



11th Im. or 1st Ref. Par. 
12th do. 2d do. 
13th do. 3d do. 
14th do. 4th do. 



When assembled. 



August 

November 

November 

November 

August 

April 

November 

October 

June 

January 

February 

October 

August 



31, 1809 
25. 1806 
27, 1807 
24, 1819 
4, 1818 
93, 1890 
14, 1896 
96, 1830 

14, 1831 
99, 1833 
19, 1835 

15, 1837 
19, 1841 



When dissolved. 



October 
May 

September 

June 

February 

June 

July 

April 

December 

December 

July 

June 



94, 1806 
97, 1807 
99, 1812 
10, 1818 
99, 1890 

9, 1896 
24, 1830 
99, 1831 

3, 1839 
30, 1834 
17, 1837 
93, 1841 



Existed. 


Y. M. D. 


4 1 95 


6 9 


4 10 2 


5 6 18 


1 6 95 


6 19 


4 1 99 


5 97 


5 90 


9 95 


1 4 96 


4 19 



Table showing the relative state of parties in the House of Commons. 

from 1832 to 1841. 

[From the " Eclectic Review.' 1 ] 





Election of 1839. 


Election of 
Jan. 1835. 


Election of 
July, 1837. 


Election of 
July, 1841. 


e 

£ . 

Is 


• 

e 
1 


• 

■ 
JS 


• 

9 


i 

i 

(2 


i 

•mm 

ft* 


• 

a 

s 


■ 

9 
g 


i 

•c 


s 

9 


f 


m 


9 




25 
144 


101 


42 


O 

a 
i 


« 
04 

69 


E? 
70 


a 

5 


9 

04 
41 


* 


O 


19 


o 


O 

a 


English counties, 


102 1 


195' 


" boroughs, 


327 


949 


76 


9 


183 


196 


18 


181 


145 1 


168 


158 


Welsh counties, 


15 


7 


e 





5 


9 


1 


3 


19 


3 


19 


" boroughs, 


14 


10 


4 





6 


7 


1 


8 


6j 


7 


7, 


Scotch counties, 


30 


92 


8 





15 


12 


3 


11 


19 


10 


90 


" boroughs, 


93 


93 








92 


1 





99 


1 


91 


9 


Irish counties, 


64 


44 


90 





41 


23 


f o 


44 


90 


39 


95 


« boroughs, 


41 


31 


» 


,1 


24 


15 


9 


99 


13, 


93 


16 




■ 






— 












■ «^_ . 


Tol*^ 


658 


487 


167 


\4 


965 


1 963 


30 


339 


3171 9 

«■ 


990 365 



F 



1842.] 



OMJ.T BRITAIN. 



279 



House or Commons — Elected July, 1841. 



England and Walts, 



1 Abingdon 
.8 Albans, St. . 

3 Andover . • 

4 Anglesey 

5 Arundel • 

6 Atbnrton • 
7Ashton-under-Lyne 

8 Aylesbury 

9 Banbury 

10 Barnstaple 

11 Bassetlaw 
IS Bath 

13 Beaumaris . 

14 Bedfordshire 

15 Bedford 

16 Berkshire . 



17 Berwick 

18 Beverley . 

• 

19 Bewdley 

SO Birmingham 

81 Blackburn 

82 Bodmin • 

83 Bolton . 

84 Boston . 

85 Bradford 

86 Breehnoekshire 

87 Brecon 

88 Bridgenorth . 

89 Bridgewttor 

30 Bridport 

31 .Brighton . 

82 Bristol . 

83 Buckinghamshire 

84 Bockiogbam « 

85 Bury . 

86 Bury St. Edmonds 

37 Came 



Afsntderv. 
T. DoffieW 
Lord Listowef 
6. W. Repton 
R. Etwall 
Lord W. Paget 
W. G. Stanley 
Lord Fitzaian 
W. Jardine 
Ci Hindley 
R. Clayton 
Capt. Hamilton 
H: W. Tancred 

F. Hodgson 
M. Goto 
6. H. Vernon 
Hon. Capt. Dancombo 
Lord Daocan 
J. H. Roebuck 
Lt. Col. F. Paget 
Lord ViscountAlford 
W. Astel* 
Captain Polhill 
H. Stuard 
R. Palmer 
Viscount Batrington 
P. Pnsey 

M. Forister 
R. Hodgson 
C. Townley 
J. W. Hogg 
Sir T. Winnington 
J. Scholofield 

G. F. Muntz 
J. Fie Idea 

J. H. Hornby 
Lord Leicester 
Major C. C. Vivian 
P. Ainsworth 
Or. J. Bowriftg 
J. 8. Broworigg 
Sir James Doke 
John Hardy 
E. O. lister 
Col. T. Wood 
C. R. Morgan 
T. C. Whitmore 
R. Pigfct 
H. Broadwood 
T. S. Forman 
H. Warborton 
T. A. Mitchell 
Captain Peehetl 
N. Wigney 
P. Miles 

Hon. F. Berkeley 
Scott Murray 
Sir W. L. Young 
C. G. Du Pre 
Sir T. Freemantle 
Sir J. Cbetwode 
R. Walker 
Earl Jermyn 
LordChas. Pitzroy 
Lord Shelbnrne 



Places. 

38 Cambridgeshire 

39 Cambridge Uni» \ 

versity ( 

40 Cambridge 

41 Canterbury 

42 Cardiff 

43 Cardiganshire • ' 

44 Cardigan • 

45 Carlisle . 

46 Carmarthenshire 

47 Carmarthen . 

48 Carnarvonshire 

49 Carnarvon, fee. 

50 Chatham . 

51 Cheltenham . 

52 Cheshire (North) 

53 Cheshire (South) 

54 Chester 

55 Chichester , 

56 Chippenham . 

57 Chrtstchurch 

58 Cirencester 

59 Clitberoe 

60 Cookermooth . 

61 Colchester . 
63 Cornwall (Bast) 

63 Cornwall (West) 

64 Coventry . • 

65 Cricklade . 

66 Cumberland 
(East) 

67 Cumberland 
(West) 

68 Dartmouth 

69 Denbighshire 

70 Denbigh, fcc. 

71 Derbyshire(North) 

72 Derbyshire(Sobth) 

73 Dei by . 

74 Devize* 

75 Devonport . 



Members. 

Hon. E. Yorke 
R.J. Baton 
J. Pittliz 

Rt. Hon. H. Gouftraro 
Hon. C. E. Law 
Hon. J. H. Sutton 
Sir A. C. Grant 
J. Bradshaw 
Hon. G. S. Smythe 
J. Nicholl 
Col. W. E. Powell 
E. Harford I double 
P. Price } return. 
P. H. Howard 
W. Marshall 
Hon. G. Trevor 
J. Jones . 

D. Morris 

Hon. E. D. Pennant 

W. B. Hughes 

Rt Hon. G. S. fiyng 

Hon. C. F. Berkeley 

W. T. Egerton 

C. Legh 

Sir P. Egerton 

Hon J. Tollemaohe 

Lord R. Grosvenor 

J. Jervis 

Lord A. Jjennox 

J. A. Smith 

J. Neold 

Captain Boldero 

Sir G. H. Rose 

T. W. C. Master 

J. Cripps. Jr. 

M. Wilson 

H. A. Agliooby 

E. Horaman 
R. Sanderson 
Sir J. H. Smith 
Lord Eliot 
W. Rashleigh 
Lord Boscawen 
E. W. Pendarves 
Rt. Hon. E. Ellice 
W. Williams 

J. Neeld 

Hon. Capt. Howard 

Hon. C. A. Howard 

W. James 

E. Stanley 

S. Irton 

Sir J. H. Seale 

Sir W. W. Wynn 

Hon. W. Bagot 

T. Mainwaring 

Hon. G.H.Caveudish 

W. Evans 

C. M. Mundy 

C. R. Colville , 

E. 8trutt 

Hon. J. G. Ponsonby 

T. B. S. 8otheron 

; . H. W. Heneage 

L Tufnell 
Sir G. Grey 



i 



280 



GREAT BRITAIN. 



[1842. 



Placet. 
70 Devonshire 
(North; 

77 Devonshire 

(South) 

78 Dorchester 

79 Dorsetshire 



80 Dover • • 

81 Droit wich 
83 Dudley 

83 Durham (North) 

84 Durham (South) 

85 Durham 

86 Essex (North) . 

87 Essux (South) 

88 Evesham 

89 Exeter 

90 Eye 

91 Fiosbury • 

92 Flintshire . 

93 Flint, fee. 

94 Frorae . 

95 Gateshead 

96 Glamorganshire 

97 Gloucestershire ( 
* (Bast) ( 

98 Gloucestershire i 
(West) j 

99 Gloucester . 

100 Grantham 

101 Great Grimsby 
103 Greenwich . 

103 Guildford 

101 Halifax 

105 Hampshire 

(North) 

106 Hampshire v 

(South) 

107 Harwich 

108 Hasting* • 

109 Haverfordwest 
[110 Helstoo . 

Ill Herefordshire 



1 19 Hereford . 
113 Hertfordshire . 



M0tMtT$, 

Sir T. Actand 

L. W. Buch 

Sir J. Y. Bullor 

Lord Courteaay 

Hon. A. H. Ashley 

Sir J. Graham 

Lord Aobloy 

H. C. Sturt 

G. Banke* . 

Sir J. R. Reid 

E. R. Rice 

J S. Packington 

T. Huwkes 

Hon. H. T. Liddell 

H. Lambton 

L. II. Vane 

J. Bowes 

T. G. Grainger 

Captain Fitzroy 

Sir J. T. Tyre!) 

C. G. Round 

T. W. Braroston 

G. Palmer 

Lord M. Hill 

P. Borthwick 

Sir VV. Follett 

E. Divett 

Sir E. Kerrison 

I\ S. Duncombe 

T. Wakley 

E. Mostyn 

Sir R. B, Bulkeley 

T. Sheppard 

W. Huth 

Lord Adare 

C. R. M. Talbot 

C. W. Codrington 

Hon. F. Charteris 

Hon.G.C.G.Berkeley 

R. B. Hale 

J. Phillpotta 

Capt.M. T. Berkeley 

G. E. Welby 

Hon. F. Tolfemache 

E. Heneage 

Capt. D. Dundas 

E. G. Burnard 

C. B. Wall 

VV. Mangles 

C. Wood 

E. Protheroe 

Rt.Hon.C.S. Lefevre 

Sir W. Heathoote 

J. Flemiag 

H. C. Compton 

J. Attwood 

Major Boresford 

Hon. J. C. Planta 

R. Holland 

Sir R. B. Phillips 

R. R. Vyvyan 

R. Hopkins 

T. R. M. Bakcrville 

J. Baker 

E. B Clive / 

C. Hobhouse 

Lord Grimston 

Hon. D. Ryder 

A. Smith 



Place* 

14 Hertford . 

15 Honitoo • • 

16 Horsham 

17 Huddersfield . 

18 Hull . . 

19 Huntingdonshire 

90 Huntingdon . 

31 Hythe 

33 Ipswich . , 

33 Tves, St. . 
24 Kondal . 

35 Kent (East) 

36 Kent (West) 

37 Kidderminster 

38 King's Lynn 

39 Knaresborough 

30 Lambeth . 

31 Lancashire J 

(North) J 

33 Lancashire j 

(South) f 

33 Lancaster 

34 Launceston 

35 Leeds . • 

36 Leicestershire ( 

(North) } 

37 Leicestershire ( 

(South) j 

38 Leicester . 

39 Leominster , 

40 Lewes . . 

41 Litchfield . 

43 Lincolnshire 
(North) 

43 Lincolnshire 

(South) 

44 Lincoln . 

45 Liskeard . 

46 Liverpool 

47 London , 



48 Ludlow . 

49 Lyme Regis 

50 Lyingtou , 

151 Macclesfield . 



MCMberg, 
Lord Mahon 
Hou. W. Cowper 
Col. H. D. Bailie 

F. McGeachy 
Hon. R. C. Scarlett 
W..R. C. StansfieM 
Sir T. Hamner 

Sir W. James 

E. Fellowea 

G. Thornhill 
Sir F. Pollock 
Col. J. Peel 

J. S. Majori banks 
Rigby Wanon 
G. Rennie, Jr. 
W. T. Praed 
G. W Wood 
J. P. Plumtre 
Sir E. Knaichbull 
Sir Edmund Filmer 
Lord Mar sham 
R. Godaon 
Lord G. Bentinck 
Sir S. Canning 

A. Lawson 
W. B. Ferrand 

B. Hawes [court 
Rt. Hon. C. T. Eyn- 
Lord Stanloy 

J. W. Patten 
Lord F. Egerton 
Hon B.R.YVilbraham 

F. Greene 

G. Mar ton 

Sir H. Hardinge 
J. Becket 
Mr. Aldham 
Lord C. Manners 

C. B. Farnham 
H. Halford 
C. W. Packe 
John Eiuthope 
Wynn El.lia 
C. Greenaway 
J. Wigrum 
Mr. Harford 
Mr. Elphinstone 
Sir G. Anson 
Lord A. H. Paget 
CD. Chtistopher 
Lord Worst ey 
C. Turner 
Sir J. Trollope 
Colonel Sibthorp 
W. R. Collet 
C. Duller 
Lqrd Sandon 
C. Cresswell 
W. Lyall 
J. Maslerman 
Sir M. Wood 
Lord John Russell 
B. Botfield 
J. Ackers 
VV. Pinney 
J. Stewart 
W. A. Mackinnoo 
T. Grimsditch 
J. Brocklehurst 



1842.] OKEAT HITAUfi 



£82 



eftKAt BRITAIN. 



[1842. 



PtftM$. 

331 Sudbary 

332 Suffolk (East) 

333 Suffolk (Woit) 
*)34 Sunderland 
435 Surrey (East) 
336 Surrey (Weil) 
937 Sussex (But) 
338 Sunez (West) 

239 Swansea 

240 Tamworth 

241 Tavistock . 

242 Taunton 
943 Tewkesbury 
244 Thetford 



945 Thirsk . 

246 Tiverton . 

247 Totnei . 

248 Tower Hamlets 

249 Truro . 

250 Tynemouth . 

251 Wakefield . 

252 Wallingford . 

253 WaUall 

254 Wareham 

255 Warrington . 

256 Warwickshire I 
(North) 

257 Warwickshire j 
(South) j 

258 Warwick 

259 Wells . 

260 \Venlook 

261 Westbury . 

262 Westminster . 

263 Westmoreland 

264 Weymouth . 

265 Whitby . 

266 Whitehaven 

267 Wigan 

268 Wight, Isle of 

269 Wilton . . 
970 Wiltebire(North) 

271 WlKshire(South) 



Jfemfters. 

F. Vil tiers 
Dyee Sombre 
Lord Hennikor. 
Col. Sir C. B. Vere 
R. Ru«hbrooke 
H. Waddington 
Alderman Thompson 

D. Barclay 

E. Antrobus 
H. Keroble 
W. J, Denison 
J. Trotter 

6. Darby 

A. E. Fuller 
Earl of March 
Colonel Wyndhana 
J. H. Vivian 

Rt. Hon. Sir R. Peel 
Captain A 'Court 
Lord E. Russell 
J. Rundie Jchere 
Rt. Hon. H. Labou- 
rs. T. Bainbridge 
I. Dowdeswell 
John Martin 
Hon. B. Baring 
Lord Euston ) dou'le 
Sir J. Flower i return 
J. Bell 

Lord Palmerstoo 
J. Heathcoat 
Lord Seymour 
C. B. Baldwin 
W. Clay 
Colonel Fox 
J. E. Vivian 

B. Turner 
H. Metcalfe 
J. Houldsworth 
W. J. Blackstone 
R. Scott 
J. S. Drax 
J. J. Blackburne 
W. S. Do*riale 
Sir E. Wiimot 
Sir J. Mordaunt 
E. Shirley 
W. Collins 
Sir C. Douglas 
R. Blakemore 
W. Hayter 
Hn.G.C.W. Forester 
G. M. Gaskel 

Sir R. Lopes 

Captain Rous 

/. T. Leader 

Viscount Lowther 

Lt. Col. C. Lowther 

Viscount Viiliers 

G. W. Hope 

A. Chapman 

M. At wood 

Mr. Greenal 

Mr. Crosse 

A'Court Holmes 

Lord FitEharris 

Sir F. Burdett 

W.Long 

J. Benelt 

Hon. 8. Herbert 



PUcu. 

272 Winchester . 

273 Windsor 

974 Wolverhampton 

975 Woodstock . 

976 Worcestershire < 

(Bast) { 

977 Worcestershire i 

(West) | 

278 Worcester 

279 Wycombe • 

280 Yarmouth 
381 York . 

282 Yorkshire (East) 

Riding) j 

283 Yorkshire 
(North Riding) 

284 Yorkshire 
(West Riding) 



JMRNTd 

J. B. East 

Mr. Escott 

J. Ramsbottom 

R. Neville 

Hon. C. P. Viiliers 

T. Thornley 

F. Thesiger 

J. Barneby 

J. A. Taylor 

Maj.-Gen. H. Lygos 

F. VV. Knight 

Sir Thomas Wilde 
Joseph Bailey 

G. Dashwood 
R. Bernal 
W. Wilshire 
C. E. Rnmbold 
J. Lowther 

H. R. York 
Lord Hotham 
H. Broadley 
E. S. Cay ley 
Lord Feversbam 
Hon. J. WorUey 
E. B. Denison 



Ireland. 



285 Antrim County 

286 Armagh County 

287 Armagh . 
268 Alhlone 

289 Bandon Bridge 

290 Belfast . 
I 

291 Corlow County 

292 Carlow 

293 Cashel . 

294 Carrickfergns 

295 Cavati County 

296 Glare County 

297 Clonmel 

298 Coleraine . 

299 Cork . 

300 Cork County . 

301 Donegal County 

309 Downpatrick 

303 Downshire . 

304 Drogheda 

305 Dublin 

306 Dublin County 

307 DubUn Univera'y 

308 Dandalk . 

309 Dungaonon . 

310 Dungarvon 

311 Eonis . 

312 Enniskillen . 



N. Alexander 
J. D. Irvine 
Vbcoant Acheson 
Col. W. Verner 
Colonel Rawdon 
Captain Brresford 
Sergeant Jackson 
J. E. Tennent 
J. Johnson 
Colonel Bruen 
H. Bun bury 
Captain Layord 
Dr. Stock 
P. Kirk 
J. Young 
Colonel Clements 
Maj. W. McNamara 

C. O'Brien 

D. R Pigot 

E. Litton 

F. S. Murphy 

D. Callaghan 

E. B. Roche 
D. O'Coonell 
Sir E. S. Hayes 
Col. E. M. Cooolly 

D. Ker 

Earl of Hillsborough 
ViscountCastlereagh 
Sir W. SomerviUe 

E. Grogan 
J. B. West 
J. Hamilton 
Captain Taylor 
Hon. F. Shaw 
Dr. Lefroy . 
T. N. Redingtoo 
Lord Northland 
Rt. Hon. R. L. Shell 
H. Bridgeman 
Hon. A. H.Cole 



1849.] 



GRKAT BRITAIN. 



883 



Places. 

313 Fermanagh. Co. 

314 Galway County 

315 Galway 

310 Kerry County 

317 Kildare County 

318 Kilkenny Co. 

319 Kilkenny 

330 King's County 

321 Kinsale 

322 Leitrim County 

323 Limerick Co, 

324 Limerick 

325 Lisborne 

326 Longford Co. . 

327 Londonderry Co. 

328 Londonderry 

329 Louth County 

330 Mallow . 

331 Mayo County 

332 Meath County 

333 Monaghan Co. 

384 Newry 

335 Mew Robs 

336 Portariington 

337 Queen's County 

338 Roscommon Co. 

339 Bligo County 

340 Bligo 

341 Tralee 

342 Tipperara 

343 Tyrone County 

344 Waterford Co. 

345 Waterford . 

346 Wexford County 

347 Wexford 

348 Westmeatb Co. 



•AfMSMff. 

M. Archdall 

Sir A. B. Brooke 

J. J. Bodkin 

T. B. Martin 

flir V. Blake 

M. J. Blake 

J. O'Conoell 

Hon. W. Brown 

Rt.Hon.M.O'Ferrall 

R. Archbold 

Hon. Col. P. Butler 

Major 6. Bryan 

J. O'Connell 

Colonel Weitenra 

A. Armstrong 
W. H. Watson. 
Lt. Col. S. While 
Lord Vis. Clements 
W. S. O'Brien 

C. Powell 
Sir D. Roche 
I. O'Brien 
Captain II. Maynell 
[L. White 
Colonel H. White 
Sir R. Bateson 
Captain T. Jones 
Sir R. A. Ferguson 
R. M. Betlew 

T. V. Dawson 
Sir 0. J. Noireys 
M. Blake 
R. O. Browne 

D. O'Connell 
H. Grattan 
Hon.H. R. Wcstenra 
G. P. Shirley 

Lord Newry 
Colouel Core 
Hon. G. Darner 
Sir C. H. Coote 
Hon. T. Vesey 
The O'Conor Don 
F. French 
Colonel Perceval 
O. Gore 
J. P. Somers 
M. O'Connell 
R. O. Cave • 
V. Maher 
Lord C. Hamilton 
Hon. H. T. L. Corry 
Hon. S. Carew 
W. V. Stuart 
W. Christmas 
W. M. Reade 
J. Power 
V. Hatton 
T. Esmonde 
M. 11. Tuite 

B. Chapman 



Place*. 
349 Wicklow County 



350 Yougball 



■Msssosr*. 
Sir R. Howard 
Major Acton 
Hon.C. C. Cavondish 



Scotland, 



351 Aberdeenshire 

352 Aberdeen 

353 Andrew's, St. 

354 Argyllshire . 

355 Ayrshire 

356 Ayr, tec. 

357 Banffshire 

358 Berwickshire 

359 Buteshire 

360 Caithnessshire 

361 Clackmannan J 

and Kinross ) 

362 Dumbartonshire 

363 Dumfriesshire 

364 Dumfries, tec. 

365 Dundee 

366 Edinburgshire 

367 Edinburgh 

368 Elgin and Nairn 

369 Elginshire . 

370 Falkirk . 

371 Filestore . 
373 Forfarshire . 

373 Glasgow 

374 Greenock 

{375 Haddingtonshire 

376 Haddington, tec 

377 loveroess-shire 

378 Inverness, tec. 

379 Kilmarnock, tec 

380 Kincardineshire 
,381 Kircaldy, tec. 
382 Kircudbright . 
;383 Lanarkshire 
|384 Leith, tec. . 

385 Linlithgowshire 

386 Montrose, &c. 

387 Orkney (County) 

388 Paisley . 

389 Peeblesshire 

390 Perthshire . 

391 Perth . 

392 Renfrewshire 

393 Ross and Cro- 

martyshire 

394 Roxburghshire 

395 Selkirkshire . 

396 Stirlingshire 

397 Stirling, tec. 

398 Sulheilandshire 

399 Wick, tec. . 

400 Wigton, tec . 

401 Wig ton shire 



Capt. W. Gordbn 
A. Bannerman 

E. Ellice 

A. Campbell 
Viscount Kclburn 
Lord J. Stuart 
J. Duff 

Sir H. P. Campbell 
Rt. Hon. SirW.Rae 
G. Traill 

Col. Abercromby 

A. Smollett 

J. J. H. Johnstone 

W. Ewart 

Mr. Duncan 

J. Ramsey 

Th. B. Macaulay 

W. G. Craig 

Sir A. L. Hay 

Major L. C. Bruce 

W. Baird 

Capt. J. E. Wemyas 

Lord F. Gordon 

J. Dennistouu 

J. Oswald 

R. Wallace 

Sir T. P. Hepburn 

Mr. Balfour 

J. H. Bailie 

J. Morrison 

W. Johnson [not 

Maj -Gen.H.Arbuth- 

Col. R. Ferguson 

A. Murray 

Captain Lockhart 

Rt. Hon. A. Ruther- 

Hon. C. Hope [furd 

P. Chalmers 

F. Dundas 
A. Hastie 

W. F. Mackenzie 
H. H. Drumniond 
Rt. Hon. F. Maule 
P. M. Stewart 

T. Mackenzie 

Hon. T. Scott 
A. Prlngle 
W. Forbes 
Lord Dalmeny 
D. Dundas 
J. Loch 
J. McTaggat 
Captain Dalrymple 



284 •rsat britaut. [184& 

JrUICTART. 

High Court of Chancery. — Lord Lyndhtrrat, Lord High Chancellor ; 
•alary, £ 14,000 i — Lord Langdale, Master of the Rolls, £ 7,000 : — Sir 
Launcelot Shad well, Vict- Chancellor, £6,000. 

Court of the Queen* $ Bench. — Lord Denaan, Lord Chief Justice, 
£ 10,000 : — Sir Joseph Littledale, Sir J. Patteaon, Sir J. Williams, and 
8ir J. T. Coleridge, Judges, £ 5,500 each. 

Court of Common Pleas. Sir N. G. Tindal, Lord Chief Justice, 
£8,400: — Sir John B. Bosanquet, SirTh. Coltman, T. Erskine, and 
Sir W. H. Maule, Judges, £5,500 each. 

Court of Exchequer. — Lord Abinger, Lord Chief Baron, £ 7,000 : — 
Sir John Gtorney, Sir James Parke, Sir £. H.Alderson, Sir R. M. Rolfe, 
Barons, £ 6,600 each. 

Court of Admiralty. — Stephen Lushington* Judge, £ 2,402 : — Sir 
John Dodson, Queen?* Advocate* General : — Dr. J. Fhillimore, Admiralty 
Advocate. 

Scotland. 

Court of Sessions.— 1st Division. Charles Hope 1 , Lord President, 
£4,300: — Adam Gillies, Lord Gillies; J. H. Mackenzie, Lord Mac- 
kenzie.} J. Fuller ton, Lord Fullerton, Judges, £ 2,000 each. 

fid Division, — David Boyle, Lord Justice Clerk, £4,000. — Alexan- 
der Maeonechie, Lord Meadowbank ; J. H. Forbes, Lord Medwyn, Sir 
J. W. Moncrieff, Lord Moncrieff, Judges, £ 2,000 each. — Those of the 
Judges who are also Judges of the Justiciary or Criminal Court, have 
each an additional £600 a year. 

Outer House; Permanent Lords Ordinary, attached equally to both 
Divisions of the Court. Francis Jeffrey, Lord Jeffrey ; H. Cockburn, 
Lord Cockburn ; J. Cttnninghame, Lord Cunninghame ; Sir J. A. Mur- 
ray, Lord Murray ; James Ivory, Lord Ivory. 

Ireland. 

Court of Chancery. — Sir Edward Sugden, Lord Chancellor, £ 8,000 : 
Sir Michael O'Loghlea, Master of the RoUs, £ 4,500. 

Court of the Queen** Bench. — Charles K. Bushe, Lord Chief Justice, 
£5,076. Charles Burton, PhHip C. Crampton, Louis Perrin, Judges, 
£ 3,692 each. 

Court of Common Pleas. — John Doherty , Lord Chief Justice, £ 4,615. 
William Johnson*, Robert Torrent, and Nicholas Ball, Judges, £3,602 
each. 



1842.] 



v GREAT «RlTAUf» 

Archbishops and Bishops of Englahd. 
Province of Canterbury. 



285 





• 




No. 


Gross In- 


Con*. 




Diocesei. 


Bene- 


come. 


1813 


jSrehbishop. 




fices. 




Win. Howley, D. I)., Primate 


Canterbury, 


346H29,946 




Bishops. 








1834 


Charles J. Blomfield, D. D. 


London, 


640 


267,662 


1826 


Charles Sumner, D. D. 


Winchester, 


419 


153,995 


1812 


George Henry Law, D. D. 


Bath and Wells, 


430 


120,310 


1820 


John Kaye, D. D. 


Lincoln, 


1,251 


373,976 


1820 


William Carey, D. D. 


St. Asaph, 


143 


42,592 


1824 


Christopher Be the 11, D. D. 


Bangor, 


123 


35,064 


1827 


George Murray, D. D. 


Rochester, 


94 


44,565 


1828 


Edward Copies ton, O. D. 


Llandaff, 


192 


36,347 


1829 


Richard Bagot, D. D. 


Oxford, 


196 


51,895 


1830 


John Henry Monk, D. D. 


Glouces. & Bristol, 


536 


158,608 


1830 


Henry Phillpotts, D. D. 


Exeter ; 


613 


194,181 


1834 


Joseph Allen, D. D. 


Ely, 


150 


56,495 


1836 


Philip N. Shuttleworth, D. D. 


Chichester, 


267 


82,673 


1837 


Edward Denison, D. D. 


Salisbury, 


397 


134,255 


1837 


Edward. Stanley, D. D. 


Norwich, 


1,026 


331,750 


1837 


Thomas Musgrave, D. O. 


Hereford, 


321 


93,552 


1839 


George Davys, D. D. 


Peterborough, 


293 


98,381 


1839 


James Bowstead, D. D. 


Litchfield and Cot. 


610 


170,104 


1840 


H. Pepys, D. D. 


Worcester, 


223 


73,255 


1841 


Connop Thirlwall, D. D. 1 


St. David's, 


409 


60,653 


Province 


w/ York. 


\ 




Archbishop. 








1791 


Edward Hareourt, D. C. L. 
Bishops. 


York, 


891 


223,220 


1831 


Edward Maltby, D. D. 


Durham, 


192 


74,557 


1827 


Hugh Percy, D. D. 


Carlisle, 


124 


22,487 


1828 


John Bird Sumner, D. D. 


Chester, 


630 


120,310 


1836 


Charles Th. Longley, D. D. 
T. V. Short, D. D. 


Ripon, 






1841 


Sodor and Man, 


23 


3,727 



The Bishops of Durham, London, and Winchester, rank next to the 
Archbishops. The Bishop of Sodor and Man is not a Lord of Parlia- 
ment. 

Archbishops and Bishops of Ireland. 



e 

o 

U 



1806 
1831 



1801 
1802 
1803 
1804 
1804 



jSrehbiskop*. 



Lord J. 6. Beresford, D D. 
Richard Whatelj, D. D. 

Bishops. 



6. la P. Beresford, D. D. 
Charles D. Lindsay, D. D. 
Ld. P. R. Tottenham, D. D. 
Stephen C Sandes, D. D. 



1 

Dioceses. 


s 




o 

1810 


Armagh. 


Dublin. 


1812 




1819 




1820 




1828 


Meath. 


1831 


Kilmorc. 


1831 


*Kildare. 


1839 


•Clogher. 


1839 


Caahel, &c. 





Bishops.. 



Robert Fowler, D. D. 
John Leslie, B. D. 
James Saurin, D. D. 
Richard Mant, D. D. 
Rich'd Ponsooby,D.D. 
Samuel Kyle, D. D. 
Edmund Knox, D. D. 
Thomas Plunket, D.D. 
Ludlow Toason,D. D. 



Dioceses. 



Perns & L. 
♦Elphin. 
*Dromore. 
Downfe Con. 
Derry. 

Limorickyfee 
Tuam & K. 
Killaloe. 



* The bishoprics thus maiked are to be abolished when they become vacant. 



omtAT »kit4i*. 



[1849. 



EffGLISB COLOIUAI. Bmhom. 




John Inglis, D. D. 
Christopher Ltptcorot). I). D. 
Wm. Hart Coleridge, D. D. 
Daniel Wilson, D. D. 
George J. Mountain, D. D. 
Thomas Carr, D. D. 
William Grant Brought©*, D. D. 
G. T. Spencer, D. D. 
Jeba Straehan, D. D. 
Aubrey George Spencer, D. D. 
0. A- Selwin, 



Q.uebeo, 

Nova Scotia, 

Jamaica, 

Barbadoet, 

Calcutta. 

Montreal, 

Bombay, 

Australia, 

Madra*, 

Toronto, 

Newfoundland. 

New Zealand. 



1 




Allowance. 


Clergy. 


£2,400 


4,000 




4,000 




5,000 


37 


1,500 




3,500 


18 


8,000 




8,500 


94 



Ministry. 



Mara hal SooH, 

M. Guizot, 

M. Martin (da Nord), 

Admiral Doperre, 

M. Duchatel, 

M. Gnnin Gridaine, 

M. Teste, 

fet. Villtmaift, (Peer,) 

j&. Humatin, (Peer,) 



FRANCE. > 

- October 29, 1840. 

Pres't of the Council and Min. of War* 
Minister of Foreign Affairs. 
Minister of Justice and Public Worship. 
Minister of Marine and the Colonies. 
Minister of the Interior, 
Minister of Commerce and Agriculture* 
Minister of Public Works. 
Minister of Public Instruction. 
Minister of Finance. 



FOREIGN OBITUARY. 

1840. 

Jan. — At Bath, in England, fn her 88th year, Madame Iterances 
D'Arblay, a distinguished authoress of the last century. She was the 
second daughter of Charles Burney, Mus. D., author of the History of 
Music. She was born in 1752 ; married, in 1793, to A. P. D'Arblay, a 
French emigrant artillery officer, (afterwards General D'Arblay,) who 
died at Bath in 1818. She was entirely self-educated, having never 
been placed in any seminary, or put under any governess or instructor. 
Her first novel, " Evelina,*' which was published in 1772, anonymously, 
was favorably received, and it was highly commended by Johnson and 
Burke. " Cecilia,*' her second novel, was published in 1782 ; " Camilla/* 
in 1796 ; " The Wanderer," in 1814 ; and Ber *« Memoirs of Dr. Bumey, ,, 
irf 1832. 

April 2. — At Brighton, England, in his 73d year, Sir Richard Phillips., 
formerly an eminent bookseller in London, and author and editor of various 
publications. He was a native of London ; his original name is said to 
have been Philip Richards ; and he was self-educated. He spent several 
years in the early part of his life in Leicester, variously employed, in teach- 
ing a school, in trade, and in' conducting a newspaper. In 1796, having 
returned to London, he established the " Monthly Magazine," which at one 
time had a great circulation ; and he carried on, for some years, a very 
extensive business as a publisher, especially of school books, among which 
were the school books written by Dr. Mavor, and some edited by himself. 
In 1807, the Livery of London elected him their she i iff for the ensuing 
year; and, on occasion of going up with an address from the corporation, 
he received the honor of knighthood. 

April 30. — At Caen, in France, aged 62, George Brummett, the cele- 
brated " Beau Brum me 11," and the associate of George IV., when Prince 
of Wales. He had long been in distressed circumstances, and, latterly, 
confined in a madhouse. 

May 3. — At Paris, aged 70, James Moris on, of London, a native of 
Aberdeenshire. He styled himself " The Hygeist," and was the vender 
of the " Vegetable Universal Medicines," commonly known as " Morison's 
Pills." He realized great profits from the sale of his medicines ; and is 
said to have paid the. English government, since 1830, the sum of £60,000 
sterling for medicine stamps. 

May 14. — In London, aged 69, Sir William Bolland, Baron of the 



388 " FOREIGN OBITUARY. [1842 

Exchequer ; a man much respected for bis talent*, learning, and amiable 
and excellent character. 

May 26. — At his residence in Paris, aged 76, Sir William Sidney 
Smith, Admiral of the Red in the Biitish navy, and Lieutenant- General of 
the Royal Marines. He was one of the most celebrated naval officers of 
the last age ; and he distinguished himself on various occasions by his 
talents and courage. In 1S39, a work entitled " Memoirs of Admiral Sir 
Sidney Smith, K. C. B. &c," in 2 vols., by £. Howard, Esq., in which it 
is said : — "In his person, though he has not revived the age of chivalry, 
he has shown what is the real splendor of the chivalric character. All his 
public actions seem to have been less the offspring of mere military calcu- 
lation, and naval science, than of the intuition of the most romantic courage 
and the highest moral feeling, always controlled by prudence and intrepidity, 
that no danger, however sudden, could surprise, and no difficulty, however 
menacing, vanquish. In all the relations of life, he was esteemed just, 
charitable, and more than safely generous. He was not deficient in a cer- 
tain conversational eloquence, and displayed much facility in composition. 
As a friend, or as an enemy, there were few who could excel him." 

June 20. — At Paris, in his 79th year, Pierre Claude Francois Daunou, 
Peer of France, Member of the Institute, and Perpetual Secretary of tbe 
Academy of Inscriptions and Belles Letties, in which office he succeeded 
the illustrious Silvestre de Sacy, in 1838. He was born at Boulogne, in 
1761 ; was Professor of Theology, at Montmorency, at the commencement 
of the Revolution, in 1789 : was elected a member of the National Con- 
veution in 1792; afterwards held various public offices; and was editor of 
the " Journal des Savants," from 1830 to 1838. He was a laborious wri- 
ter, chiefly in periodical works, as the " Journal des Savants/ 7 " Biographic 
Universeile," and " Histoire Litteraire." A memoir of him, in the " Jour- 
nal des Savants," has the following remarks on his character : — " Those 
who know hkn only by his writings, admire his vast learning, his pure and 
elegant style, teeming with the best traditions of the last age, and the just- 
ness of his political and literary opinions ; but few could duly appreciate the 
simplicity of his manners, his rare modesty, his strict disinterestedness, and 
above all, that benevolence which, triumphing by degrees over his natural 
timidity, imparted to bis exquisite politeness all the charms of affability." 

June 29. — At Viterbo, near Rome, in his 66th year, Lueien Bonaparte, 
next brother after Napoleon, and after him, the ablest and most ambitious 
of the family. He was born at Ajacio, in Corsica, in 1775; became, ifl 
1795, a commissary of the French army ; in 1797, a member of the Coun- 
cil of Five Hundred, of which body he was made President ; by bis aid, 
Napoleon was raised to the office of First Consul, and Lueien soon after 
became Minister of the Interior, in the room of the celebrated astronomer, 
Laplace. But the brothers soon quarrelled ; at length Lueien was ordered 
to quit France, and, in 1804, he went to Rome ; and afterwards he retired 
to an estate at Canino, which the Pope raised into a Principality. From 



1843.] FOREIGN OBITUARY. 289 

1810 to 1814, he resided in Shropshire, in England, and here he completed 
his poem entitled " Charlemagne, or, The Church Delivered," which was 
first published in London, in 1814 ; and was translated into English verse 
by Dr. Butler, (late Bishop of Lichfield,) and Mr. Hodgson. 

After the escape of Napoleon from Elba, Lucien hastened to join him at 
Paris, and showed greater devotion to the imperial cause than ever before. 
He afterwards returned to Italy, and devoted the remainder of his days to 
literature and the fine arts. He was twice married, and left one child 
by his first wife, a daughter, Letitia, married, in 1821, to Thomas Wyse, 
M. P. for Waterford, Ireland ; and he left three sons and three daughters by 
his second wife. His oldest son, Charles Lucien, now Prince of Canino, 
married, in 1822, his cousin, Charlotte Zenaide Julie, the oldest daughter, 
and now the only surviving child of Joseph Bonaparte, Count of Survilliers, 
ex-king of Spain. 

June 29. — At Turtle River, N America, aged about 32, by his own 
hand, Thomas Simpson, a native of Dingwall in Scotland, and the compan- 
ion of Mr. Dease in the discovery of the Northwest Passage. The party 
reached Turtle River on or about the 28th of June, and, in a fit of mental 
derangement, Simpson shot two of the company, Messrs. Bird and Legros, 
and in the morning he shot himself. He had been, for four years, actively 
and laboriously engaged in the prosecution of the discoveries which have 
immortalized his name, and for which he is represented to have possessed 
uncommon qualifications. From the beginning of the journey, he is said 
to have manifested occasional symptoms of mental alienation. 

July 7. — At Malvern, in England, in his 59th year, John Banks Jenkin- 
son, D. D. t Bishop of St. David's and Dean of Durham and Brecon, cousin 
to the late Earl of Liverpool, Prime Minister, to whom the Bishop was 
chiefly indebted for his preferment. 

July 28. — At Cowes, England, John George Lambton, Earl of Dur- 
ham, aged 48. He was the eldest son of Wm. Henry Lambton, of Lamb- 
ton Castle, in the county of Durham, and by the death of his father, he 
inherited, at the age of five years, a large estate. On attaining his major- 
ity, he was elected member of parliament for his native county; in 1823, 
he was raised to the peerage ; on the formation of the administration of 
Earl Grey, (his father-in-law,) he became a member of the cabinet, as Lord 
Privy Seal, and had intrusted to him, with Lord John Russell, Sir James 
Graham, and Lord Duncannon, the preparation of the Reform Bill. The 
liberality of this measure is attributed mainly to Lord Durham, who is stat- 
ed to have proposed also the plan of taking votes by ballot, and induced his 
colleagues to adopt it ; but, at the desire of Lord Grey, it was excluded 
from the bill. 

In 1838, Lord Durham went out as Governor-General to Canada, intrust- 
ed with extraordinary powers ; but, finding himself not so well supported 
in his measures as he expected, he returned home the same year, and soon 

25 



■ \ 



990 rOftUMT OBITUARY* [1843. 

afterwards published his Report on Canada, which the " Morning Chron- 
icle" characterizes as " one of the most masterly and statesmanlike surveys 
of a country abounding in all manner of anomalies, that was ever executed." 
Lord Durham was regarded as the leader of the reform movement, and 
his talents and merits-were very differently estimated by different parties. 
" His 6delity to his party and principles/' says the Examiner, " has passed 
through trying ordeals, and passed inviolate. If, as alleged, there was 
much vanity in his nature, with what bruised vanity must he have returned 
from Canada ; but, in the glow of his resentment, he never for an instant 
forgot the interests of his party, and the interests of the people, which he 
believed bound up with them." " No man," says the Morning Chronicle, 
" perhaps, was ever more beloved by all who were in any manner con- 
nected with him. But what gave peculiar value to his high powers, was 
his unbending Integrity and true patriotism. From his first appearance on 
the field of politics to the last, no man ever thought of even doubting his 
rectitude, and his determined adherence to his conscientious convictions.*' 
July 29. — At Hjyfield, England, in his 85th year, John McArt^ur, 
author of the " Life of Lord Nelson," in 2 vols. 4to , *' The Army and 
Navy Gentleman's Companion," and other works. 

August 11. — In London, in his 69th f/ear, John Hickman, JF. JR. &, 
Clerk Assistant at the Table of the House of Commons, since the year 
1814 ; a man distinguished for his various knowledge, more especially on 
statistical subjects. " He was," says Mr. Sharon Turner, " peculiarly a 
man of fact and realities, and well adapted to all things that required close 
attention, investigation, and continued mental labor. — I think his public 
fame will rest mainly and soundly on his labors, efficiency, and arrange- 
ment of our Population Census. His publications on this great subject 
deserve the highest commendations for labor, discrimination, force of mind, 
patience of examination, sound judgment, and varied knowledge, which 
they display. They seem to contain all that is necessary to be known on 
this great and interesting subject." 

Aug. SO. -• In London, in his 72d year, HWiam Otter, D. D., Bishop 
of Chichester, a man highly esteemed for his exemplary, amiable, and 
benevolent character. He was the fellow traveller of Mr. T. R. Malthus 
and Dr. E. D. Clarke, in the north of Europe, and he published the Life 
and Remains of Dr. Clarke; and was the author of some publications in 
vindication of the Bible Society. 

Sept. — At Calcutta, aged 59, Long-Kietva, a native of China, inspector 
of the 'tea plantations established by an English company at Assam. —A 
Calcutta journal, under the date of Sept. 16, 1S40, speaks of him as 
follows: — •' He was a man of immense knowledge. In his youth he 
studied natural history and medicine, and he exercised this art with the 
greatest auccess in his own country; when, in the year 1816, in conse- 
quence of a conspiracy in which one of his family had been implicated, he 



.i 



184&] FOREIGN OBITUARY. 991 

was constrained to exile himself. He took refuge in Bengal, where he 
was converted to Christianity, studied theology, and obtained the degree 
of doctor in that science. M. Long-Kiewa knew all the principal lan- 
guages at present spoken in Asia and Europe, as well as Hebrew, Greek, 
and Latin. He made, for the most part, the Chinese translation of the 
Scriptures, published by Marsh man. Among his papers have been found a 
hundred numbers of a Chinese-Latin- English Dictionary, 4he Chinese trans- 
lation of several fragments of works/ of Xenophon, Thucydides, and Arist 
totle. He bequeathed to the Asiatic Society of Calcutta his library, which 
is composed of about 30,000 volumes, more than 20,000 of which are in 
the Chinese language.'* 

Sept. 17. — At Poonah in India, Miss Emma Roberts, authoress of 
" Memoirs of the Rival Houses of York and Lancaster," and " Oriental 
Scenes, Sketches, and Tales." 

Sept. 20. — In Paraguay, at a very advanced age, Dr. Francia, Dictator 
of Paraguay. The government is said to have devolved on a junta of five 
members. 

Sept, 22. — In London, in her 72d year, Princess Augusta Sophia, the 
second daughter of George HI, of England, characterized as an amiable 
and benevolent woman. 

Sept. 12. — Near Ramsgate, England, in his 81st year, Sir William 
Garrow, a distinguished advocate and lawyer, formerly Attorney-General 
of England, and a Baron of the Court of Exchequer. 

Sept. 29. — At Kibworth, in Leicestershire, England, aged 76, the Rev* 
James JBeresford, author of various publications, the most known of which 
is entitled, " The Miseries of Human Life ; or the Last Groans of Timothy 
Testy and Samuel Sensitive, with a few supplementary Sighs from Mrs. 
Testy," 

Sept. 29. — In London, aged 58, John Marshall, author of various 
works on manufactures, commerce, and statistics. 

Oct. S. — At his seat, the Wilderness, in Kent, England, in his 8 2d 
year, John Jeffreys Pratt, first Marquis of Camden, a distinguished noble- 
man, who had held many important offices, some of which were those of 
Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, in 1795-8; Secretary of State for the Colo- 
nies, in 1804 - 5 ; President of the Council, in 1S05 - 6, and in 1807-12 . 
Chancellor of the University of Cambridge, from 1834 till his decease ; and a 
Teller of the Exchequer, from 17S0 till his death, 60 years. The emolu- 
ment of the two Tellers increased from 1782 to 1808, from £ 2,500 to 
£ 23,000 ; and, during almost half of the time which the Marquis of Cam- 
den held the office, he patriotically resigned this large income. 

Oct. 22, — At Holland House,' Kensington, near London, in his 67th 
year, Henry Richard Vassall, Lord Holland, Chancellor of the Duchy of 
Lancaster, and member of the Cabinet. He was born in 1773, and was 
the only son of Stephen Fox, second Lord Holland, who was the elder 



20tt roREiew obituary* [18421 

brother of the celebrated Charles James Fox. In 1796, Lord Holland 
commenced his parliamentary career, and he has been an able and zealous 
supporter of the same party, and the principles, in the defence of which his 
uncle, Mr. Fox, held so conspicuous a rank. When the Whig party came 
into power, in 1830, Lord Holland became a Cabinet Minister, and Chancel- 
lor of the Duchy of Lancaster, which office he continued to fill till his 
death, except for the short interval during which his party were dismissed 
from office. 

In 1797, he married Elizabeth, daughter and heiress of Richard V assail, 
Esq. (a very opulent planter,) and the divorced wife of Sir Godfrey Web- 
ster, and he assumed, in consequence, the name of Vassal I, though his 
children have taken the family name of Fox. 

Lord Holland was a man of literary accomplishments, and distinguished 
for his knowledge of Spanish literature. He was the author of " An Ac- 
count of the Life and Writings of Lope Felix de Vega Carpio," and of 
•'•Guillem de Castro; " '* Three Comedies from the Spanish," and several 
other publications. 

The following is an extract from a tribute to his memory in the London 
"Examiner:" — "The benignant, the accomplished Lord Holland is no 
more ; the last and best of the Whigs of the old school ; the long tried 
friend of religious and civil liberty ; the champion of toleration, and of the 
oppressed, has closed a life which has been an ornament and a bulwark to 
the liberal cause. He was one of England's worthies, in the pristine sense 
of the word, and a more steady example of the steady statesman, the ur- 
bane gentleman, and the accomplished scholar, never existed. Lord Hol- 
land's was a fine mind, and a fine mind in perpetual exercise of the most 
healthy kind. It was observed of him, that he was never found without a 
good book in his hand. — The charm of his conversation will never be for- 
gotten by those who have enjoyed it. Hie mind was full of anecdote, 
which was always introduced with the most felicitous appositeness, and 
exquisitely narrated. He was a wit without a particle of ill-nature, and a 
man of learning without a taint of pedantry.'' 

Oct. 26. — At Dogpole House, near Shrewsbury, England, in his 77th 
year, William Hazledine, a distinguished civil engineer. 

Oct. 27. — At Duddingston, near Edinburgh, in Scotland, aged 62, Rev. 
John Thomson, a distinguished landscape painter. 

Nov. 2. — In Loudon, Sir Anthony Carlisle, an eminent surgeon, a man 
of high literary and scientific attainments, and formerly President of the 
Royal College of Surgeons. 

Dec. 4. — At Clifton, in Northumberland, England, aged 66, John Rob' 
inson, D. Z)., Rector of Clifton, author of a " Theological Dictionary," 
" Antiquities of Greece," " Ancient and Modern History," and some other 
works. 

Dec. 21. — At Cadiz, in his 42d year, Frank Ball Standish, of Duxbu- 



1842.] FOREI&N OBITUARY. 2d3 

ry Hall in Lancashire, England ; author of «• The Life of Voltaire," '« The 
Shores of the Mediterranean," " Poems," •< Notices on the Northern Capi- 
tals of Europe," and " Seville and its Vicinity." 

Feb. 1. — In London, in his 52d year, Rt. Hon. Robert Henley, 2d Baron 
Henley of Chardstoek, in the peerage of Ireland j a barrister-at-law. He 
was the author of" A Memoir of" [his grandfather] " Robert Henley, Earl 
of Northington, Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain," " A Plan of 
Church Reform," &c. He was greatly respected for his amiable, benevo- 
lent, and religious character. 

Feb. 2. — At Woolwich, England, aged 67, OUnthus Gregory, LL. D., 
late Professor of Mathematics at the Royal Military Academy at Wool- 
wich. He was born at Yaxley, in Huntingdonshire, in 1774 ; was appointed, 
in 1802, Mathematical Master in the Academy ; and afterwards raised to the 
Professorship, which office he filled, with high reputation, till 1838, when, 
on account of ill health, he resigned it. From the year 1917, he had the 
whole of the general superintendence of the Almanacs published by the 
Stationers' Company, which had been for a long period conducted by Dr. 
Hutton. He published various works on mathematical subjects ; also 
" Letters to a Friend on the Evidences, Doctrines, and Duties of the 
Christian Religion," 2 vote , I2mo. ; " Memoirs of the Life, Writings, and 
Character of John Mason Good, M. D. ;" " Memoirs of Robert Hall," &c. 

Feb. 12. — In London, aged 72, Sir Astley Paston Cooper, D. C. L., 
F. R. 9., Sergeant- surgeon to the Queen, a highly distinguished surgeon, 
and one of the first operators of his time. He was the son of the Rev. 
Samuel Cooper, D. D., of Yelverton in Norfolk, received his professional 
education in London and Edinburgh, an 1 early distinguished himself by his 
lectures on anatomy, and his talents as an operator, in one instance he re* 
ceived a fee of one thousand guineas for an operation for the stone. " He 
carried on," says the Gentleman's Magazine, '* a practice, unexampled for 
extent and emolument, in the annals of surgery of this [England] or any 
other country. In 1822, the last year of- his abode in the city, he- realized 
the largest sum ever known by a medical practitioner ; no less, indeed, than 
£ 21,000 ! and, for years after his removal to the west end of the town, 
the same astouishing celebrity, with its consequent wonderful income of 
from £ 18,000, to £ 20,000 per annum, attended hte footsteps. It must, at 
the same time, be recollected that he was ever ready to confer hie gratui- 
tous aid upon the poor and indigent ; and that, during the whole of this 
vast practice, he never omitted to deliver his regular lectures." Some of 
the eminent professional works of Sir A&tley Cooper are hit treatises on 
Hernia and Dislocations. 

Feb. 13. —At Amsterdam, Holland, aged 91, Wilhelm WUHnk, a friend 
of Washington and of the United States. He furnished the government 
of the U. 9. the first loan after the Independence. He held important offi- 
ces in Holland. 

26* 



294 FOREIGN OBITUARY. [1842. 

Feb. 15. — Near Montrieux, in Switzerland, in her 84th year, Miss Har- 
riette Campbell, born at Stirling, in Scotland, in 1807, distinguished for 
her talents, and authoress of " The Only Daughter," <« The Cardinal Vir- 
tues," &c. 

Feb. 17. — In London, aged 65, Joseph Chitty, a very eminent special 
pleader, and author of many laborious and learned works in the profession 
of the law. 

Feb. 21. — In London, in bis 84th x ear > William Frend, author of the 
•' Principles of Algebra," •* Principles of Taxation," «* Evening Amuse- 
ments," and various other publications. 

March 2. — In London, aged 85, George Dyer, author of the " History 
of the University of Cambridge," and of various other works in prose and 
poetry. 

April 15. — At Edinburgh, Scotland, Dr, James Browne,* man distin- 
guished for his learning and research, for several years editor of the Cale- 
donian Mercury, and a writer of valuable articles in the Encyclopaedia BrU 
tannica, particularly on grammar and etymology, history, biography, &c. 

April 24. — At Worcester, England, in his 67th year, Robert James Carr, 
D. D., Bishop of Worcester. 

May — . At Paris, aged 84, Julien Ursin JSIlemcewiez, a celebrated 
Pole, formerly aid-de-camp of Kosciusko. He was taken with Kosciusko, 
long confined in a dungeon at St. Petersburg, and, after his liberation, he 
emigrated with Kosciusko to America, and settled at Elizabethtown, N. J., 
where he married, and resided many years as a cultivator and American 
citizen. In 1807, a new era having commenced for Poland, he hastened to 
Europe, and served his country as Secretary and member of the Senate, 
Member of the Council of Instruction, Member of the Society of the 
Friends of the Sciences, and Minister to England. He was distinguished 
as a scholar, and his works were numerous, in prose and verse. 

May 7. — In London, in his 56th year, Thomas Barnes, the principal 
editor of the Times newspaper. " Mr. Barnes," says the Gentleman's 
Magazine, " succeeded Dr. Stoddard in the editorship of the Times ; and, 
by his extraordinary skill, discrimination, and powers of writing, raised that 
journal to its present power. He was unquestionably the most accom- 
plished and powerful political writer of the day, and particularly excelled in 
the portraiture of public men." 

May 20. — At Liverpool, England, Rev. Joseph Blanco White, B. D. 
and A. M., in his 67th year. Mr. White was a native of Spain, but was 
descended from an Irish family. His grandfather, who was a man of con- 
siderable property, emigrated, on account of his attachment to the Roman 
Catholic religion, trom the county of Waterford, in Ireland, and settled at 
Seville, in Spain. Bianco White was educated at the University of Seville, 
received priest's orders in the Catholic Church, and, at an early age, obtain- 
ed the stall of Magistral, or Preacher, in the chapter of King's chaplains, 



1842.] FOREIGN OBITUARY. 295 

at Seville. According to bis own account, he performed his official ojr re- 
Iigious duties in a zealous and exemplary manner. *' My religious belief/' 
he says, " had been hitherto undisturbed ; but light clouds of doubt began 
now to pass over my mind, which the warmth of devotion soon dissipated ; 
yet they would gather again and again, with an increased darkness, which 
prayer could scarcely dispel. Having to preach to the royal brigade of 
Caribineers, who came to worship the body of St. Ferdinand, preserved in 
the King's Chapel, I chose the subject of Infidelity, on which I delivered 
an elaborate discourse (which was published at Seville, at the expense of 
the brigade). But the fatal crisis was at hand. At the end of the year 
from the preaching of this sermon, — the confession is painful, indeed, but 
it is due to religion itself, — I was bordering on atheism." 

After passing about ten years in a perplexed and unhappy state of mind, 
he sought an asylum in England, where he reexamined the evidences of. 
Christianity, antf, in 1814, he subscribed the articles of the Church of Eng- 
land. He became the author of various works, and distinguished himself 
by the zeal and ability wi h which he opposed the Catholic religion. In 
1835, he deserted the Church of England, and made a profession of Unita- 
rianism. Some of his principal publications are "Letters from Spain, 
under the assumed name of Don Lcucadio Doblado, " Practical and Inter- 
nal Evidences against Catholicism," *' The Poor Man's Preservative against 
Popery," " A Letter to Protestants converted from Romanism/' «* The 
Law of Anti-religious Libel Considered/' and "Observations on Heresy 
and Orthodoxy." 

May 28. — In Bermuda, aged 65, Vice-Admiral Sir Thomas Harvey , 
Commander-in-chief in the West Indies and North America, a distinguished 
officer in the British navy. 

May 31. — At Petersham, England, aged 57, Sir Robert John Wilmot 
Hortoriy author of several political pamphlets, formerly governor of Ceylon, 
and a man much respected for his public services, and private virtues. 

June 1. — At Gibraltar, on his return from Egypt, aged 56, Sir David 
Wilkie t principal painter in ordinary to the Queen, and limner for Scotland, 
author of many celebrated works in his profession. 

June 6. — At Kingston, Canada, aged 47, Thomas Radcliff, a distin- 
guished officer under Wellington in the peninsular war, and (he commander^ 
of the Canadian militia on the western frontier, in the late rebellion. 

July 1. — At York, England, in Rls 80th year, Sir Thomas Edlyne Tom* 
Km, a learned lawyer, author and editor of many professional works, 
among which are " The Law Dictionary," and " Repertorium Juridicum, a 
General Index of all the Cases and Pleadings in Law and Equity." 



AMERICAN OBITUARY. 

The names are arranged alphabetically, under the respective years, 1840 
and 1841, for the sake of convenient reference, and to avoid the necessity 
of inserting thern in the Index to the volume. 

The notices, which are necessarily brief, do not always correspond in 
length to the importance of the persons ; and many names, which it would 
be desirable to have recorded, are omitted for want of requisite information. 

The Editor has again occasion to express his grateful acknowledgments, 
to several of his correspondents, for their kind attention in forwarding 
obituary notices, and particularly to William A. Whitehead, Esq. of New 
York. 

1840. 

Oct. 28.— -At Derby, Vt.,Mrs. Dillia Abbey, in her 103d year. She 
retained her mental faculties to the close of life, with considerable bodily 
vigor and activity. 

Oct. — At New Brunswick, N. J., aged 78, Captain David Abed, an 
officer on board the Alliance frigate, in the revolutionary war. 

Sept. 9. — At Greenfield, Mass., aged 64, Elijah Alvord y formerly clerk 
of the eoucts of Franklin county, a man much respected. 

Dec. 14. — At Wateiford, Conn., Mrs. Sarah Ames, aged 105. 

Oct. 15. — At Crawfordsville, Indiana, in bis 51st year, Elihu W. Said' 
utin, D. D.y President of Wabash College. 

Dec. 25. — At Woolwich, near Swedesborough, N. J., aged 108, John 
Bender % a native of Germany, and a soldier of the Revolution. 

Oct. 8. — At Midilletown, N. J., aged 78, Rev. Benjamin Bentut, a 
Baptist minister, and M. C. from New Jersey in 1815 - 19. 

Oct. — At the University of Virginia, aged about 48, Charles Bonny- 
castle, Professor of Mathematics in the University. He was a native of 
England, and a son of John Bonnycastle, the author of a Treatise on 
Algebra, and several other mathematical works. He was appointed Pro- 
fessor of Natural Philosophy, in 1825, which, about three years afterwasds, 
he exchanged for the chair of Mathematics. He was a. man of profound 
and vigorous mind, of extensive acquirements in science and general lit- 
erature, an able and successful teacher of mathematics, and author of a 
valuable work upon Inductive Geometry, besides other tracts upon various 

topics. 

Sept. 23. — At the University of Virginia, Dr. George W. Boyd, for- 
merly Curator of the Lyceum of Natural History in New York, and lately 
an assistant in the geological survey of Virginia. 



1842.] AMERICAN 0B1T?ART. 897 

Dec. — At Providence, R. I., aged 67, General Samuel TV. Bridgham, 
Mayor of the city of Providence, which office he held from 1832 ; for 
many years Attorney-Gfeneral of the State of Rhode Island, and also long 
Chancellor of Brown University. 

Nov. 10. — At Jamaica, N. Y., very suddenly, in his 48th year, Rev, 
Ettas W. Cane, a much respected minister. 

Aug. 30. — At New Brunswick, N. J., aged 73, Edward Carroll, a man 
much respected. 

Nov.. — At Milledgeville, Ga., George R. Clayton, for 19 years Treas- 
urer of the State of Georgia, and, subsequently, Cashier of the Bank of the 
State. 

Dec. 2. — At Albany, N. Y., Mrs, Rachel Cook, aged 100 years want- 
ing 8 days. 

Nov. 19. — At Boston, Mass., aged 67, Joseph Coolidge,* man much 
respected for his public spirit and usefulness. ' 

Nov. 27. — At Stockbridge, Mass., aged 86, James Davidson, who held 
the office of Major in the American revolutionary army. 

Nov. 14. — At the University of Virginia, of a pistol shot discharged by 
a disguised student, aged 39, John A, G. Davis, Professor of Law in the 
University, an office which he had held for 10 years ; and he bad been, for 
several years, the presiding officer of the institution. He was a man of a 
high order of intellect, of untiring industry, of amiable and philanthropic 
character, and he was an exemplary member of the Episcopal church. 
" There was no man of his age in the State who had so noiselessly and 
calmly done, or was proceeding to do, so large an amount of good; less by 
his cooperation in professed enterprises of philanthropy, than by the good 
principles and good influences which, in every step of his walk through 
life, he was careful to diffuse abroad in society. As a successful instructor, 
he could hardly be surpassed ; and it is thought since graduates of his law 
school have taken their places at the bar, the profession, in Virginia, has 
breathed a more enlarged spirit, and displayed a wider and a higher tone. 
The most rigid disciplinarian of all the professors in the University, he was 
yet perhaps the most beloved and esteemed by the students ; for it was to 
him that every one looked, in the hour of sickness or trouble, for parental 
kindness, sympathy, and help. He published, in 1838, a valuable law-book, 
a " Treatise on Criminal Law, and a Guide to Justices of the Peace." 

Sept. 23. — At Franklin, Mass., in his 96th year, Nathaniel Emmons, 
D. D., long distinguished as one of the most eminent divines in New Eng- 
land. He was born at East Haddam, Connecticut, May 1, 1745, graduated 
at Yale College, in 1767, and was, for some time previous to his death, the 
senior graduate of that college. He was licensed as a candidate for the 
ministry, in 1779, and ordained pastor of the Congregational church and 
society in Franklin, in 1773, where be continued to perform the duties of 



296 AMERICA* OBITUARY. . [1849. 

pastor til) 1827, 54 years. Dr. Emmons belonged to the Hopkinsian school 
of divines, and long held among 1 them the first rank. He was greatly 
respected for his talents as a preacher and theologiln, and as an exemplary 
and devoted pastor. He was, for many years, an eminent private instructor 
of students in theology. His publications are numerous, consisting chiefly 
of two volumes of sermons, and many miscellaneous and occasional dis- 
courses. 

Mr. Williams, in the discourse preached at the funeral of Dr. Emmons, 
says, " By a natural and pathetic delivery of hi 9 sermons, he early secured 
the attention and affection of his people. Nor has any man, in ancient or 
modern times, in any department of eloquence, produced greater and bet- 
ter effects on the same hearers, for so long a time, by the power of speech, 
than were produced by Dr. Emmons. — In the instruction of students in 
theology, of whom he bad a large number, he excelled every teacher of 
whom 1 ever had any knowledge, in any department of education, whether 
literary, scientific, or professional." 

Oct. 16. — At Chester, N. H., aged 72, Daniel French, an able lawyer, 
and formerly Attorney-General of New Hampshire. 

Dec. — At Nashville, Tenn., Felix Grundy, a member of the United 
States Senate, distinguished for his talents, and for a long career in different 
stations of pubiie life. He commenced his public career more than 40 
years ago, at the age of 21 or 22, as a member of the convention for revis- 
ing the constitution of Kentucky ; was afterwards, for six or seven years, 
a member of the legislature of that State ; in 1806, was elected one of the 
judges of the Supreme Court of Kentucky, and soon after was appointed 
the Chief Justice. In the winter of 1807 - 8, he removed to Tennessee, 
and, for several years, devoted himself wholly to the practice of the law, 
and held the first rank in his profession. In 1811, he was elected a mem* 
ber of the* House of Representatives in Congress, and in 1812, 1818, and 
1814, he was one of the leading members of that body. He was after- 
wards, during several years, a distinguished member of the legislature of 
Tennessee ; and, in 1829, he was elected a member of the United States 
Senate ; in 1838, he was appointed Attorney- General of the United States, 
and, in 1840, he was again elected a member of the Senate. 

Nov. 5. — At German Flats, N. Y., George JR. T. Hewes, one of the 
persons who assisted in throwing the tea overboard in Boston harbor, in 
the Revolution. His age was stated at 106, but supposed not to be so great 
by 5 or 6 years. 

Aug. 23, 1840 — In Jefferson Co., Mp., aged about 60, General Tho- 
mas Hinds, a distinguished officer in the battle of New Orleans, and M. C. 
from Mississippi in 1828-31. 

Aug 28, 1840. — At Port Gibson, Mp., Dr. Thomas T. Hogg, a young 
physician much esteemed. 

Dec. — At Newton, Mass., aged 89, Zibeon Hooker , a patriot of the 



1842L] AMERICAN OBITUAET* 209 

Revolution. He entered the army at the age of 17, was at the battle ef 
Bunker Hill, was afterwards raised to the rank of Lieutenant, and contin- 
ued in the army till the close of the war, in 1783. 

Dec. — At Hightstown, N. J., Rev. Sylvester Hutchinson, who was for 
about 55 years a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Dec. 26. — At Springfield, Mass., aged 71, John Ingersoll, Clerk of the 
Courts of the county of Hampden, a man much esteemed. 

Oct. 3. — At Washington, D. C, in his 69th year, Elias Kane, Navy 
Agent, formerly a distinguished merchant of New York. 

Dec. 27. — At Brook field, N. H., aged 110, Jenny Kennison, reported, 
in the census of 1840, as the oldest person in N. H. 

Nov. 14. — At Brooklyn, N. Y., Zachariah Lewis, in bis 68th year. 
He graduated at Yale College in 1794 ; was educated for the ministry j 
was editor of the Commercial Advertiser and' New York Spectator 17 
years, from 1803 to 1820 ; and was senior Vice-President of the American 
Bible Society. He was a good scholar, a sound thinker, and close rea- 
soner ; and was greatly respected for his exemplary character and Christian 
virtues. 

Dec. 27. — At Burlington, Conn., aged 80, Zachariah Marks, a respect- 
able fanner, who left an estate to Washington College, in Hartford, valued 
at upwards of $3,000. 

Dec. 26. — At Richmond, Ya., while on a tour, in his 22d year, Eben* 
izer P. Mason, a graduate of Yale College, in 1839, and author of " An 
Introduction to Practical Astronomy." "Young Mason," says Professor 
Olmsted, " was truly a man of genius ; and short as was his career as aa 
astronomer, he accomplished enough to inspire in his scientific fiiends the 
highest expectations of his future eminence in the exalted study to which 
he had devoted himself." 

Nov. or Dec. — At Edgartown, Mass., aged 92, William May hew, a 
member of the Convention in 1789, and one of the last survivors of those 
who signed the Constitution of the United States. 

Nov. 18. — At Embden, Me., Mr. McFadden, in his 101st year. 

Dec. 31. — At Portland, Me., in his 77th year, Prentiss Mellen, LL. D., 
late Chief Justice of Maine. He was the son of the Rev. John Mellen, of 
Sterling, Mass., at which place he was born, Oct. 11, 1764. He, graduated 
at Cambridge, in 1784 ; commenced the practice of law in Sterling, in 17SS ; 
soon after he moved to South Bridgewater ; in 1792, he removed to Bidde- 
ford, in Maine, and, in 1806, to Portland. He practised with eminent sue* 
cess in the courts of all the counties in the State, and rose to the head of 
the bar in Maine. He was a learned and accurate lawyer, and an able, 
and, at times, a very eloquent advocate. 

In 1817, he was chosen a Senator in Congress from Massachusetts, and 
at the separation of Maine, in 1820, he resigned his seat in the Senate, and 
was elected the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Maine. " This 



900 AMERICAN OBITUARY. [1642. 

office he continued to occupy, witb distinguished ability, till Oct. 11, 1834, 
when, at the age of 70, he became legally disqualified by the constitution. 
The manner in which he discharged the duties of that elevated station, is 
partly disclosed in the first eleven volumes of the Maine Reports, which 
will remain a monument of his legal discrimination, great familiarity with 
practice, and high sense of justice." 

" But above all his other qualifications, and as the crowning attribute of 
his character, he was a man of sterling integrity and firm religious princi- 
ple. His whole life was clear and transparent ; for it was regulated by 
motives drawn from a pure and permanent source, and directed by general 
benevolence and a high sense of moral obligation." 

Nov. 7. — At Coventry, Pa., aged 88, Colonel Caleb North* first a cap- 
tain, and afterwards a lieutenant-colonel till the close of the war, in the 
revolutionary army ; many years a respectable merchant in Philadelphia ; at 
one time, High Sheriff of the city and county of Philadelphia ; and, at the 
time of his death, President of the Pennsylvania Society of Cincinnati. 

Oct. 22. — At Pittsfield, Mass., David Palmer, M. />., of Woodstock, 
Yt, President of the Vermont Medical College in that town, and a man 
highly respected for his talents, acquirements, and character. " His great 
scientific attainments and professional skill, bis readiness of access, and 
affability in discourse, especially in matters of science and religion, and his 
kind and gentle demeanor, gained him many friends." 

Nov. — In Virginia, aged about 63, Rickard £. Parker, in early life a 
member oi the House of Delegates ;. for many years, a Judge of the Gen- 
eral and Circuit courts of Virginia ; for a short period, a Senator in Con- 
gress ; and, for the last two years, a Judge of the Supreme Court of Appeals. 

Oct. 10. — At Boston, Mass., aged 96, William Pearee, who was one 
of the " tea party" in the Revolution. 

Nov. — At his residence on the shore of East River, opposite to Hurl- 
gate, N. Y., JVathanicl Prime, an eminent merchant, and one of the found- 
ers of the house of Prime, Ward, King, & Co. 

Sept. 18. —At Philadelphia, Pa., C. 5. Rafinesque, P. J)., (formerly 
known by the name of C. 5. Rqfinesque Schmaltz,) for several years Pro- 
fessor of Botany and Natural History, in Transylvania University, and author 
of several works on these sciences. 

Oct. 17. — At Baltimore, Md., by shooting himself with a pistol, WUHam 
S. Ramsay, of Carlisle, Pa., aged 23. He was a member of the 26th 
Congress, and had recently been elected a member of the 27th Congress. 

Oct. 20. — At Baltimore, Md., in his 89th year, Rev. Nelson Reed, re- 
puted the oldest Methodist minister in the United States. 

Sept. 16. — At Whitehall, N. Y., aged 100, Jonathan Reynolds, who 
served in the Revolution, and was for many years a pensioner as a lieuten- 
ant in the U. S. army. 



IMS.] AMERICAN OBITUART. 901 

Aug. — At Springfield, Ala , Col. Thomas Middle, member elect of the 
State Senate. 

Oct. 12. — At Waterford, Gloucester Co., N. J., Joseph Rogers, a. Judge 
of the County Ceart 

Dec. — At Eastport, Me., aged 86, Captain John Shackford, a soldfer 
of the Revolution. 

Oct. 16. — At Hartford, Conn., aged 81, Isaac Spencer, an officer of the 
Revolution, and, from 1818 to 1835, Treasurer of the State of Connecticut 

Aug. SI. — At Harvard, Mass., aged 83, Captain John Stacy, who served 
seven years in the revolutionary war. 

Dec. 3. — At New Brunswick, N. J., murdered just as he was about 
to go to church, on Thanksgiving day, Abraham Swjdam, President of 
the Farmers and Mechanics Bank, a man much respected. 

Aug. 19. — At New Brunswick, N. J., aged 69, Dr. Augustus R. Tay- 
lor, a member of the Legislative Council, and an eminent physician. 

Dec. 7. — In Harford Co., Md., in his 90ih year, Col. Andrew Turner, 
a patriot of the Revolution, who belonged to the staff of that part of the 
revolutionary army that was under the command of Gen. Lafayette. 

N 0V . _ i n Wake Co., N. C, Arthur Wall; age stated at " 130, or there- 
abouts." 

Dec. — At Southampton, N. Y., aged 91, Jkr. Henry White, a surgeon 
in the revolutionary army, and long a practising physician at Southampton 

Nov. 12. — In Pitt Co., N. C, in his 83d year, Dr. Robert Williams y 
a surgeon in the revolutionary army, a man highly respected for public and 
private virtues and usefulness. He was a member of the Convention which 
met at Hillsborough to adopt the constitution of the United States, also of 
the Convention called, in 1835, for remodelling the constitution of North 
Carolina ; and he was repeatedly a member of the state legislature. 

Aug. 7. — At Puerto Cabello, J. G. A. Williamson, Charge d'Afiaires of 
the United States at Caraccas. 

Oct. 2. — At Watertown, N. Y., in his 93d year, Elijah Woodward, the 
last of a family of seven brothers and two sisters, — remarkable for lon- 
gevity, — their average ages being 85 years. 

Dec. 24. — At Dunstable, Mass., in his I02d year, Jonathan Woodward, 
a revolutionary pensioner. 

Oct. — At Castleton, Yt., Theodore Woodward, M. D., Professor or 
Surgery, &c, in the Yermont Academy of Medicine. 

Dec. 16. — At Huron, Ohio, suddenly, by falling into the lake, in his 
61st year, Jabcz Wright, an early settler of the county, formerly a mem- 
ber of the State Senate, and an Associate Judge of the county 3 a maa 
much respected. 

26 



30ft AUftlCAJf OBITOAAT* [1842. 

1841. 

Jane 26. — At Philadelphia, in his 84<h year, Jemee Mereremkie, D. />., 
the oldest Episcopal clergyman in that city, and, for many years, one of the 
associated pastors of Christ Chorch, St. Peter's, and St. James's. " This 
aged and venerable divine/' says the U. S. Gazette, *' baa for a long time 
been unable to discharge the public duties of his sacred office. In addition 
to the veneration and respect doe to Dr. Abercrombie as a clergyman of 
piety, learning, and great eloquence, he will long be remembered as a 
faithful and eminently successful teacher of youth." 

July 90. — At St. Joseph's, Florida, Richard C. Men, Judge of the 
United States Court for the District of Apalachlcola. 

Feb. 10. — In Wilkinson Co., Mp., aged 8*, JhUhony Armutead, a 
soldier of the Revolution. 

May 16. — At Goshen, N. Y., in his 84th year, Copt. Daniel Bailey, a 
soldier of the Revolution. 

Feb. 25. — At Washington, D< C, suddenly, of ossification of the heart, 
aged about 60, PhiHp P. Barbour, of Gordonsrille, Vs., an Associate 
Judge of the Supreme Coort of the United States. Judge Barbour was 
distinguished for his talents and eloquence, and for his success in profes- 
sional and political life. He was a member of Congress from 1814 to 1825 ; 
in 1821, he was elected Speaker of the House of Representatives; in 
1825, he was appointed a Judge of the Virginia court ; in 1827, he became 
again a member of Congress, and served three sessions. In 1836, he was 
appointed by General Jackson an Associate Judge of the Supreme Court 
of the United Stales. 

Aug. 28. — At Halifax, Nova Scotia, aged 61, John Barnes, a come- 
dian, well known throughout the United States as *' Old Jack Barnes." 

Feb. 8 —At Newhuryport, Mass., aged 93, WiUiam Barthtt, long 
known as an eminent and wealthy merchant- of Newburyport, and a very 
munificent benefactor to the Theological Seminary at Andover. 

April 24. — In Virginia, aged 77, George Baxter, D. D., Professor of 
Theology in the Union Theological Seminary in Prince Edward Co., for- 
merly President of Washington College at Lexington, and one of the most 
eminent and respected Presbyterian clergymen in Virginia. 

May 23.— At Springfield, N. Y., in his 86th year, Captain Jedediah 
Beach, a soldier of the Revolution, and a man much respected. 

Oct. 6. — At Boston, aged 78, George Blake, for many years U. 8. At- 
torney for the District of Massachusetts. . 

Sept. 12. — Jn New York city, aged 70, General Robert Bogardui, for 

nearly 50 years a member of the New York bar ; formerly a member of the 

State Senate ; and for many years an active officer in the New York militia. 

Sept — At Providence, R. I., in his 89th year, Col. Ephraim Bowen, an 

offices of the Revolution. 



1843.] AMtaiCAir obituary* 308 

Jan. 17.— At New Orleans, La., aged 48, Rezin P. Bowie, "well 
known in the southwest by his many deeds of valor in its early history, 
among the Mexicans and savages." 

Aug. 4. — In Kentucky, John Breekenridge, D. D., for several years 
President of the Young Men's Colonisation Society ; formerly a Professor 
of Pastoral Theology in the Theological Seminary at Princeton, N. J., and 
subsequently settled in the ministry <at New Orleans. He was a man of 
distinguished intellectual powers, of great benevolence, and of superior 
pulpit talents; and was greatly respected and beloved as a man and a 
Christian minister. 

Jan. SI. — At Paris, France, in his 68th year, Daniel Brent, U. S. Con- 
sul in Paris, and Agent for American claims. 

Feb. 20. — At Albany, N. Y., Jarnts (?. Brooks, known in early life as 
a poet, and for the last 15 years as editor of different newspapers. 
Sept. 27.— -At Providence, R. I., aged 73, JWcholas Brawn, a wealthy 
merchant, and a man highly respected for the excellence of his character, 
hk benevolence, and munificence. He was graduated, in 17S6, at the 
" College of Rhode Island," of which institution he afterwards became the 
most munificent benefactor, in consequence of which its name was changed, 
in 1804, to u Brown University." 

Jan. 13.— At Chicago, Illinois, aged 26, Caleb A, Buckingham, an 
attorney at law, of Geneva, in Illinois, late of Cambridge, Mass. ; a man 
much esteemed. 

Feb. 26. — At Newport, R. I., aged 86, Captain Samuel Buffum, who 
was an officer on board the armed ship Protector in the revolutionary war. 

Oct. 26.— At Philadelphia, Pa., aged 61, Major- General Thomas Cad- 
walader, a lawyer by profession, and a Brigadier-General in the last war 
with Great Britain; a man distinguished for his military talents, and greatly 
respected for his private virtues and public usefulness. 

May 16.— At Greece, Monroe Co., N. Y., aged 86, Philip Caldwell, a 
soldier of the Revolution, and a man much respected. 

April 7. — At Philadelphia, Pa., Samuel Calhoun, M. D., Professor of 
Materia Medica in the Pennsylvania Medical College. 

June. — At Harwiugton, Conn., David Candee, one of nine brothers, 
the average age of whom was about 81 years. 

April. — At Pleasant Garden, Burke Co., N. C, in his 89th year, Col. 
John Carson, father of the late Samuel P. Carson, M. C. Col. Carsoo, who 
was a native of Ireland, emigrated to this country and settled at Pleasant 
Garden, before the Revolution, at a period when the Blue Ridge was the 
western boundary of the Cherokees. He served with distinction, under 
General Rutherford, in the memorable campaign which preceded the sub- 
mission of this formidable tribe. He was, for some time, a member of the 
General Assembly, and, throughout life, exercised the influence which 
wealth, indomitable courage, and extraordinary mental and physical vigor 
naturally secure. 



904 AMERICA* OBITfTABT. [1842, 

Sept. 25. — At Augusta, Me., General John Chandler, aged 81. 

May. — At Hamilton, N. Y., Jeremiah Chaplin, D. D., a much respect- 
ed Baptist clergyman, and formerly President of Waterville College in 
Maine. 

Sept. 5. — At Williston, Vt., Martin Chittenden, M. C. from Vermont 
in 1803 - 13, and Governor of the State in 1813- 14. 

June.— At Philadelphia, Pa., aged 32, With* Gaylord Clark, editor of 
the Philadelphia Gazette, a man much esteemed for bis fine poetical and 
literary talents, for his productions both in poetry and prose, and for his 
amiable and excellent character. 

June 17. — At Burlington, Vt., aged 62, Jktgustine Clarke, late Treas- 
urer of the State. 

* 

May 19. — At Charleston, S. C, Jesse F. Cleaveland, formerly M. C. 
from Georgia, but for the last three years a merchant of Charleston. 

July 21. — At Charlottesville, Va., Col. Isaac J&, Coles, member elect 
of the Virginia legislature. 

May 30.— At Buffalo, N. Y, Bates Cooke, late Comptroller 'of the 
State of New York, a man much respected. 

Sept. 27. — At Milford, Pa., aged 48, Lewis Cornelius, whose body 
weighed after his decease, 645J pounds. 

Jan. 9. — Near Princeton, N. J., aged about 53, William Cruser, late 
Judge of the Court of Common Pleas. 

May 23. — In Lauderdale Co., Mp., General Samuel Dale, an eminent 
pioneer in the settlement of the southwest ; a man remarkable for his cour- 
age and bodily strength, and distinguished for bis contests with the Indians, 
and as a partisan officer in the last war with England. " His story," says 
J. F. H. Claiborne, " is studded over with spirit-stirring incidents, unsur- 
passed by any thing in legend or history. His celebrated canoe fight, where, 
unaided, in the middle of the Alabama, then in its spring flood, he fought 
seven warriors with clubbed rifles, killed them all, and rowed to the shore, 
with the corpse of the last antagonist under his feet, would be thought fab- 
ulous, if it had not been witnessed by twenty soldiers standing near the 
bank, who, not having a boat, could render him no assistance." 

April 7. — At Pittsburg, Pa., Trevanion B. Dallas, an eminent lawyer, 
and one of the Judges of the District Court for the county of Alleghany. 

May 22. — At Utica, N. Y., aged 63, James Dean, formerly Judge of 
the County Court, a man respected for his talents, learning, and character. 

Jan. 24. — At Springfield, N. J., aged 91, Matthias Denman, in early 
life an enterprising man, and one of the first owners of the land on which 
Cincinnati, Ohio, is built. 

May 18. — At Philadelphia, Pa., in his 75th year, William P. Dewees, 
M. D., formerly Professor of Obstetrics, &c, in the University of Penn- 
sylvania ; an eminent practitioner, and well known as a writer on the sub* 
jects of his professorship. 



18451] JJTXEICAIT OBITUARY. 305 

Jan. 28. — At Troy, N. Y., aged 74, John D. Dickinson, M. C. from 
New York in 1819 - 28, and in 1827 -31. 

March. — At fifiddlebury, Vt., aged 68, Joel Doolittle, a native of Rus- 
sell, Mass., a graduate, in 1799, of Yale College, and, for a number of 
years, one of the Judges of the Supreme Court of Vermont ; a man much 
respected for hii character and public usefulness. 

April 21. *— At Roxbury, Maw., aged 64, David Dudley, late President 
•f the Traders' Bank, in Boston, a man much esteemed. 
. March 26.— At New Orleans, La., J. A*. Duman, formerly a Judge of 
the City Court. 

July. — At Washington, D. C , aged 52, Hippolete Dumas, a native of 
France, and formerly a .Captain of the U. S. Engineers. 

July 20.— At New Bedford, Mass., aged 54, Captain Joseph Dunbar, a 
highly respected and useful citizen. 

April 29. — At Dover, N. H., aged 71, Daniel M. DureU t formerly a 
Judge of the Inferior Court. 

Jan. 13. — At Geneva, Ohio, Deacon Joseph Fitch, in his 100th year. 

Oct. 22. — At Washington, D. C, of bilious fever, aged 61, John For- 
syth, of Georgia, a man of talents and eloquence, who has been long distin- 
guished in public life, and has held many important offices. He was born 
at Fredericksburg, Ya , in 1781 ; was graduated at New Jersey College, in 
1799 ; was M. C. from Georgia in 1813 - 18, and in 1827 -.29 ; United States 
Senator in 1813 - 19, and in 1829 - 35 ; Governor of Georgia in 1827 - 29 ; 
Minister to Spain in 1819-22; and was appointed Secretary of State by 
General Jackson, in 1835, which office be held till the end of Mr. Van Bu- 
ren's administration. " The high offices which, during a great portion of his 
life, he successfully filled, both in his own particular State and in the Na- 
tional Government, attest at once the superiority of his abilities and the pub- 
lic estimation of them. To the high advantage of superior talents he added, 
also, that of elegance and dignity of manners, which shed a grace on the ex- 
alted stations which he filled. His death, sundering many ties of devoted 
affection, has plunged in the deepest distress a large and most interesting 
family circle." 

Aug. 24. — At Raleigh, N. C, in his 81st year, Joseph Gales, father of 
the senior editor of the National Intelligencer, and a man much respected 
for his virtues and usefulness. He was born in Derbyshire, England, and 
commenced business as a printer and bookseller at Sheffield, wnere he es- 
tablished, in 1787, the " Sheffield Register." In 1794, he emigrated to the 
United States, and, in 1795, commenced business as a printer at Philadel- 
phia, where he published, for one year, the " Independent Gazeteer." In 
1799, be removed to Raleigh, N. C, where he established the " Raleigh 
Register," which be published for forty years. " During his long life of 
useful labor, he maintained an enviable reputation for the roost blameless 
purity in private life, for devotion to public duties, for enlarged benevolence, 
and exemplary piety." 

26 • 



906 AMERICAN OBfTUAET* [1843. 

March 3. — At Auburn, N. Y., Nathaniel Garrow, Marshal of the 
Northern District of New York. 

July. — At Hudson, N. Y., aged 86, Exekiel Gilbert, formerly distin- 
guished as a practising lawyer, and a man of learning and eloquence. He 
was born atMiddletown, Conn., graduated at Yale College, in 1778; was 
a M. C.,in 1793 - 7. The commencement of his active life was brilliant 
and full of promise ; but, in the midst of his career, he was seized with a 
paralysis of his lower extremities ; and for more than 30 years, the disease 
gradually increased upon him, and rendered him physically helpless. He 
bore his affliction with calm philosophy. 

March. — At Belleville, Ohio, aged r04, William Gillespie, a native of 
Ireland. He was a colonel in the rebel army in Ireland, in 1768-9; in 
1770, he emigrated to the United States, and entered the American service 
as a volunteer, in 1775. 

May 9. — At Decatur, De Kalb Co., Georgia, General Thomas Glascock, 
formerly M. C. from Georgia ; a man respected for his talents and char- 
acter. 

Jan. 12. — At Merrimack, N. H., aged 79, Dr. Mel Goodrich, a physi- 
cian, for many years, of extensive practice. 

May 27. — At Newbury port, Mass., aged 90, Captain Benjamin Gould, 
an officer of the revolutionary army. He was in the battles of Bunker 
Hill and Stillwater ; and was an officer of the guard at West Point, on the 
night when the treachery of Arnold was discovered. 

Aug. 29. — f n New York city, John A. Graham, LL. D. j aged 78. 

Feb. 1. — At Philadelphia, Pa., Jacob Green, M. D., Professor of 
Chemistry in the medical department of Jefferson College, and anthor of a 
t( Monograph of the Tiibolites." 

April 16. — At Stillwater, N. Y., aged about 78, Rev. Caleb Green, a 
respected Baptist minister. 

Feb. 9. — At Baltimore, Md , in his 65th year, Samuel Harden, a much 
respected citizen. 

April 4. — At Washington, D. C, in Iris 69th year, William Henry Har- 
rison, President of the United States. He was born in Charles City coun- 
ty, Virginia, on the 9th of February, 1773, and was the third son of 
-Benjamin Harrison, a distinguished patriot of the Revolution, one of the 
signers of the Declaration of Independence, and Governor of Virginia, in 
1781 - 3. Young Harrison was educated at Hampden Sidney College, and 
turned his attention to the study of medicine. The hostilities of the In- 
dians on the northwestern border having begun to excite general attention, 
the young student resolved to relinquish his professional pursuits, and join 
the army destined to the defence of the Ohio frontier. In 1791, soon after 
the death of his father, who died in April of the same year, he received 
from President Washington, when only in his 19th year, the commission of 
Ensign ; in 1792, he was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant ; and he fought 



1842.] 'AMERICAN 0B1TUAET. 307 

under General Wayne, i?fao spoke of his gallant conduct in a very flatter- 
ing manner. After the desperate battle at the Miami Rapids, he was pro* 
moted to the rank of Captain, and was placed in the command of Fort 
Washington. Io 1797, he resigned his commission in the army, and was 
immediately appointed Secretary of the Northwest Territory. In 1799, at 
the age of 26, he was elected a delegate from this Territory to Congress, 
and in this office he performed very important services for his constituents. 
On the erection of Indiana into a territorial government, he was appointed 
its first Governor, and he held this office by reappointment till 1813. In 
addition to the duties in the civil and military government of the Territory, 
he was Commissioner and Superintendent of Indian Affairs; and in the 
course of his administration, he concluded thirteen important treaties with 
the different tribes* On the 7th of November, 1811, he gained over the 
Indians the celebrated battle of Tippecanoe, the news of which was 
received throughout the country with a burst of enthusiasm. During the 
last war with Great Britain, he was made commander of the Northwestern 
Army of the United States, and he bore a conspicuous part in the leading 
events in the campaign of 1812 - 13, the defence of Fort Meigs, and the 
victory of the Thames. In 1814, he was appointed, in conjunction with 
his companions in arms, Governor Shelby and General Cass, to treat with 
the Indians in the northwest, at Greenville ; and in the following year, he 
was placed at the head of a commission to treat with various other impor- 
tant tribes. 

In 1816, General Harrison was elected a member of Congress from Ohio ; 
and in 1828, he was sent Minister Plenipotentiary to the republic of Colum- 
bia. On his return, he took up his residence at North Bend, on the Ohio, 
16 miles below Cincinnati, where he lived upon his farm, in comparative 
retirement, till he was called by the people of the United States to preside 
over the country, as its chief magistrate. His election was a triumphant v 
one; of 294 votes for President, he received 234; and his progress from 
his residence, tbe Log Cabin, to the White House, was marked by the 
roost gratifying demonstrations of popular affection and confidence. His 
inaugural address, though not marked by any uncommon ability, as a literary 
performance, yet was of such a tone and character as to strengthen his 
hold upon the affections of the American people. From the time when he 
was first nominated for the office of President of the United States till his 
death, he had been rising in public esteem and confidence ; be entered 
upon the duties of his office with an uncommon degree of popularity, and 
a high expectation was cherished that his administration would be honora- 
ble to himself, and advantageous to the country. His death, which took 
place just a month after his inauguration, caused a deep sensation through- 
out the country, and was regarded as a most calamitous event. He was 
the first President of the United States that has died in office. The mem- 
bers of his cabinet, in their official notification of the event, say : — a " The 



906 JJfB&ICAlf OBITUARY* [1842. 



people of the United State*, overwhelmed, like ourselves, by an event eo 
unexpected and to melancholy, will derive consolation from knowing that 
hie death waa calm and resigned, as hfe life bad been patriotic, useful, and 
dletingeished ; and that the latt utterance of hi» lips expressed a fervent 
desire for the perpetuity of the constitution, and the preservation of ite 
true principles. In death, as in life, the happiness of his country wee up- 
permost in bis thoughts." 

June 10. — At Washington, D. C, in bis 92d year, Bkhard Harru 
won, late Auditor of the Treasury, and a man highly respected. He 
acted as Consul at Cadiz, for five years, during the Revolution. At the 
organization of the government under the constitution, he received the> 
appointment of Auditor of the U. S. Treasury from Washington, the duties 
of which he performed, with great ability and integrity, for 46 years. 

March. — At Newport, R. I., aged 69, Benjamin Hazard, an eminent 
lawyer, upwards of 80 years in succession a member of the legislature of 
Rhode Island, and for several years Speaker of the House of Representa- 
tives. 

May 9. — At Natchez, Mp., aged 86, John Henderson, a native of Scot- 
land, the oldest man in Natchez, and formerly the Treasurer of the county 
of Adams. He emigrated to America, in 1770, settled at Baton Rouge, in 
1776, and at Natchez, in 1787. He was distinguished as an upright mer- 
chant, and was highly esteemed for his many Christian virtues. 

Jan. 6. — At New Haven, Conn., aged 51, James Abraham Hittkouu, 
one of the most eminent of the American poets. He was the son ef the 
late Hon. James Hfkmouse, who was for many years a distinguished Sen- 
ator in Congress ; was graduated at Yale College, in 1808 ; and was distin- 
guished for his literary acquirements, correct taste, and excellent character. 
Some of his principal poems are *' Percy's Masque," first published in 
1820; •« Hadad, M and " The Judgment." His Nterary productions were 
collected by himself and published, m 1839, in two vols. 12mo., under the 
title of " Dramas, Discourses, and other Pieces." 

Aug. 1. — At Barnstable, Miss., aged 84, Deacon Sylvanus Hinckley, 
a revolutionary patriot and pensioner, and a worthy man. 

Jan. 28. — At Brownsville, Pa., in his 86th year, WUHam Hogg, leaving 
to collateral heirs an estate said to amount to $1,000,000. More than 60 
years ago, he crossed the Alleghany mountains with a small pack of goods, 
ail he possessed, which he bore on his own back, established himself at 
Brownsville, where he soon after opened a small store, the first in that 
region of country. He was distinguished for his enterprise, sagacity, and 
thrift in the management of his business, and be became the greatest mer- 
chant and wealthiest man, in Western Pennsylvania. 

May 9. — At Sooth Kingston, R. I., suddenly, in the pulpit, in his 7Sd 
year, Rtv. Henry Clarke Hubbard, a Baptist minister. 

May 24. — At Philadelphia, Pa., in his 82d year; Joiiah Hunt, a patriot 
of the Revolution, and a respected citizen. 



1842.] AMERICAN OBITUART. 309 

Oct. 9.— At Philadelphia, Pa., aged 67, Genera! Callender Irvine, 
Commissary-General of Purchases of the ^United States. 

April 11. — At New Orleans, La., the Abbe Jean Jean; for the last 22 
years a resident of New Orleans, where for 6 years he exercised the func- 
tions 'of Vicar- General. 

Aug. 8. — At Pittsborough, Chatham Co., N. C, aged 84, Col. Edward 
Jones, who for the last 15 years has been withdrawn from business and 
society, but who was, for about 30 years, Attorney- General of North Caro- 
lina, and a leading and popular character in the literary and polite circles of 
the State. Col. Jones was a native of Lisburn, in Ireland, and a brother of 
William Todd Jones, a distinguished Irish patriot. He was bred a mer- 
chant ; in early life, he emigrated to America, and carried on trade for a time 
at Philadelphia ; about the year 1786, he removed to Wilmington, N. C, 
where he soon failed. He then turned his attention to the study of the 
law, rapidly rose to distinction in the profession, and was soon elected 
Attorney-General, as the successor of Alfred Moore, Senior. In executing 
the duties of this office, be became thoroughly conversant with criminal 
jurisprudence, and was distinguished at the bar both in criminal and civil 
cases. The Chatham Bar, in a tribute of respect paid to him on his death, 
say, " That although this distinguished gentleman has been long withdrawn 
from the active duties of his profession, we are yet unwilling that this 
event should pass unmarked by an expression of our sympathy. His uni- 
form kindness to the junior members of the profession, and the scrupulous 
courtesy of his professional intercourse, were felt and acknowledged by all 
who had the happiness to know him. Most of those who were the asso- 
ciates of his earlier professional labors, are now no more, yet there are 
many living, who bear witness to his ability as a lawyer, in conflict with the 
brightest ornaments of the bar ; but his highest claims to distinction were 
found in his extensive literary attainments, his accurate taste as a scholar, 
and in the brilliancy of his wit. To those of us, who were associated with 
him in his latter years, the recollection of his many virtues, and that ele- 
gant urbanity which made his house the temple of hospitality, will long 
continue to be a source of unmingled pleasure." 

Feb. 23. — In Gloucester Co., N. J., aged 67, Joseph Kaighn, a respect- 
ed member of the Society of Friends, and for several years a member of 
the Legislature of N. J. 

April 9. — At Portsmouth, N. H., aged 63, William Ladd, an eminent 
philanthropist, and late President of the American Peace Society. He 
was born at Exeter, in 1778, and was graduated at Harvard University, in 
1797. He took a very active part in forming the American Peace Society, 
which was founded in 1828 ; was, for a considerable time, almost the only 
efficient and responsible agent in conducting its operations ; and was, for 
some time, the editor of the " Harbinger of Peace/' which succeeded the 
" Friend of Peace," a work projected, and sustained for several years, by 



310 AMERICA* OBITUARY. [1849. 

Dr. Noah Worcester. He was distinguished for his disinterested and zeal- 
ous labors in the cause of peace, and for the benevolence and excellence 
of his character. 

Aug. 7. — At Norwich, Conn., James Lawman, aged 72." He was grad- 
uated at Yale College, in 1788 ; was a Senator in Congress from Connecti- 
cut In 1819 - 25, and afterwards a Judge of the Superior, Court of that 
State. 

July 12. — In New York city, aged 74, hade Lawrence, a highly re- 
spected citizen, and late President of the branch of the U. S. Bank in that 
city. 

May 19. — At New Orleans, Philip K. Lawrence, Judge of the United 
States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana. 

Aug. 21.— At Geneva, N. Y., in his 64th year, Gideon Lee, lately an em- 
inent and respected citizen of the city of New York. He was born at Am- 
herst, Mass. ; in early life, he removed to the city of New York, became an 
extensive dealer in leather, and amassed a large fortune. He was greatly 
respected for his talents, intelligence, and for the purity and excellence of 
his character. He was elected Mayor of the city of New York, a member 
of Congress, and Elector of President and Vice President. " Few men have 
earned so enviable a reputation for integrity, talents, and philanthropy ; and 
a still less number have engrafted on an originally circumscribed education 
the graces which adorn a cultivated mind, and the facility of clothing its 
aspirations in language at once energetic and refined." 

Jan. — In Cheshire, Mass., aged 85, Rev. John Leland, who accompa- 
nied to Washington " the great Cheshire Cheese," which was presented 
to President Jefferson. 

March 18. — In New York city, aged 84, Herman Le Roy, long known 
as a respected and prosperous merchant. 

July.— In Warren Co., N. J. aged 108, John [Ann, a native of Maryland. 

April. — At New London, Conn., aged 105, Jane Loudon,* colored 
woman, and a native of Africa. 

April 4. — At South Hero, Grand Isle Co., Vt., Rev. Ma Lyon, aged 
79. He was graduated at Dartmouth College, in 1790 ; entered the ministry 
more than 50 years since ; removed from Massachusetts to Grand Isle coun- 
ty, Vt., about 40 years since, and was M. C. from Vermont, in 1815-1817. 

June 25. — At Washington, D. C, Major- General Alexander Macomb, 
Commander-in-chief of the army of the United States. He was born at 
Detroit, in 1782, entered the service of the United States, in 1799, as a 
cornet of dragoons, and was in the military family of General Alexander 
Hamilton. *.He was raised to the rank of a Brigadier- General in January, 
1614, commanded at the successful battle of Pittsburgh in the same 
year, reeeived a gold medal from Congress for his gallantly, and was ap- 
pointed by President John Q. Adams, Commander-in-chief of the army of 



1842.] * AMERICAN OBITUABT. 311 

the United State§, immediately alter tho decease of General Browo, which 
took place in 1828. 

Oct — At Westborougb, aged 86, Henry Marble, a Lieutenant of tho 5th 
Massachusetts regiment in the revolutionary army. 

Jan. 27. — At Boston, Mass., Colonel Joseph May, aged 81. He was 
upwards of 40 years the secretary of an insurance company ; and was a 
man greatly esteemed for his amiable and benevolent character, and for his 
virtuous and useful life. 

April 6. — At Grand Gulf, Mp., George McAlpine, in his 94th year. 
He was a native of Glasgow, in Scotland, emigrated to America before the 
Revolution, was in the American revolutionary army, and at the close of the 
war he removed to Mississippi. 

April 27. — At Washington, D. C, aged about 80," Rev. Andrew T. 
MeCornish, a respected clergyman, for 23 years minister of the first Epis- 
copal Church formed in Washington. 

March 3. — In Hardin Co., Ohio, in his 102d year, Rev. Alexander 
McDougal, a Baptist minister, and a soldier of the Revolution. 

Feb. 18. — At Warren, Ohio, aged 83, John McElroy, a native of Ire- 
land, and a soldier of the American Revolution, who was in 16 engagements. 

Sept 2. — At Cumberland, Md., aged 81, William McMahon, a man 
much respected. 

July 12. — In New York city, in his 79th year, Dr. Wm. Jamee Me- 
JYeven, a distinguished Irish patriot, and companion of Thomas A. Emmett. 

Sept. 5. — In New York city, in his 41st year, Grenville Mellen, eldest 
son of the late Prentiss Mellen, of Portland, Chief Justice of Maine. He 
graduated at Harvard University, in 1818 ; be afterwards entered into the 
profession of the law, which after a few years he relinquished, and de- 
voted himself to poetry and literature. He was the author of a volume of 
poetry, published in 1833, entitled " The Minstrel and Other Poems." 

Feb. 21. — At Frankfort, Ken., Richard H. Menefee, member of the 25th 
Congress from Kentucky. 

March 13. — At Wilkesbarre, Pa., aged" about 63, Asher Miner, a man 
much respected. 

April 23. — At Worcester, Mass., in bis 64th year, Thomas Miner, 
M. D., of Middletown, Conn., a graduate, in 1796, of Yale College, and 
an eminent physician, several years President of the Connecticut Medical 
Society, of extensive literary attainments, and greatly esteemed for his 
integrity and benevolence. He was one of the most active founders and 
supporters of the Medical Institution of Yale College, and of the Connect- 
icut Retreat for the Insane. 

June. — At Washington, D. C, George Washington Montgomery, a 
clerk in the department of State, born in Valencia in Spain, of a distin- 
guished Irish family, and a man of superior talents and education. He 
came, in early life, to this country, and was long employed in the depart- 



312 AMERICAN OBITUARY. [1842. 

ment of State. " Hi* exquisite historical novel of the 8th century, ' Ber- 
nardo del Carpio,' and the translation of Washington Irving's ' Conquest of 
Granada/ " says the "National Intelligencer," " have been most known 
to the public. In English, many contributions to the Southern Literary 
Messenger and other periodicals of our country, his narrative of a journey 
to Guatemala, give evidence of his talent at description, glowing imagina- 
tion, cultivated taste, vigor and acuteness of intellect. — He is gone in the 
prime of life, with every endowment which could render him useful to the 
country of his adoption, and an honor to the human race; — leaving many 
endearing ties, cherished and regretted by all who knew him, and who 
could appreciate his distinguished merit.'* 

Sept. 21. — In Clark Co., Ala., in his 66th year, John Murphy, Gover- 
nor of Alabama in 1825-9, and M. C. in 1833-35. 

March 3. — At Wilton, Conn., in his 101st year, Francis Newell. Ac- 
cording to his own account, he was born in France, July 11, 1740. 

Jan. 19. — At Woodbridge, Conn., aged 81, Lieut. Isaac JVbrthrop, a 
revolutionary pensioner, and one of the nine last surviving officers of the 
Connecticut line. 

Sept. 1. — Near Georgetown, D. C, in his 89th year, Joseph JVottrse, 
Register of the United States Treasury from 1789 to 1829, one of the Vice 
Presidents of the American Bible Society, and a man much respected. He 
was born in London, in 1754 ; emigrated with his family to Virginia, in 
1769 ; entered the revolutionary army, in 1776 j and served in different de- 
partments connected with it till the close of the war. 

April 26. — At Eeene, N. H., of a cancer, aged 97, Benjamin Nurse; 
and on the 28th, bis wife, aged 91 ; having lived' together 69 years. 

May 10. — At Somerset, Pa., General Charles Ogle, M. C. from Penn- 
sylvania. 

Oct. — At Pittsborough, N. C, John Owen, who was Governor of North 
Carolina in 1830-31. He was a man greatly respected for his talents and 
integrity, his private worth, and public usefulness. 

Oct. — At Painesville, Ohio, aged 96, General Edward Paine, one of 
the earliest settlers in the northern part of Ohio, and an officer of the Rev- 
olution. He led on "the first company that broke ground at Dorchester 
Heights in Massachusetts. 

June 22. — At Philadelphia, Pa., Joseph Parker, late President of the 
Bank of Philadelphia. 

May 22. — At Deer field, N. H., Mrs. Abigail Philbrkk, aged 103. 

Jan. 24. — At Baltimore, Md., in her 108th ye~ar, Mrs. Susannah Pipher, 
a uative of Germany. 

June. — At Pomeroy, Meigs Co., Ohio, in his 78th year, Samuel JVyUis 
Pomeroy, formerly a respected citizen of Brighton, Mass. 

April 23. — At Hadley, Mass., aged 76, Samuel Porter, formerly a State 



1843.] AMERICAN ORIT0ART. 313 

Senator and Councillor, end a Judge of the Court of Sessions, a respected 
and useful citizen. 

Aug. 21. —At Philadelphia, Pa., in her 104th year, Mre. Merey Potter, a 
native of New Jersey. 

April 10. — At Goshen, Conn., in his 57th year, Rett. Grant Powers, 
pastor of the Congregational church in that town, and a man much es- 
teemed for his talent* and virtues. He was horn at Hollis, N. H., in 1784, 
graduated at Dartmouth College, in 1810, and was several years settled io 
the ministry, at Haverhill, N. H. He was the author of a small volume 
entitled an u Essay upon the Influence of the Imagination on the Nervous 
System, contributing to a False Hope in Religion," and some other publi- 
cations. 

May 2. — At Mercersburg, Pa., Rev. F, A. Ranch, P. D., President of 
Marshall College. ■ 

April 27.— At Tallahassee, Florida, in his 32d year, General Leigh 
Read, Marshal for the Middle District of Florida.' He was a native of 
Sumner Co., Tennessee, and in 1832 he removed to Florida, and settled at 
Tallahassee in the practice of the law. When the Seminole war broke 
out, he was appointed aid-de-camp to General Call, was wounded in the 
first battle of the Withlacoochee, and was in many subsequent engage- 
ments. In June, 1836, he led the forlorn hope that relieved the Black- 
house on the Withlacoochee. In 1637, he was appointed by General 
Jackson a Brigadier-General of the Florida mjlitia, 

July 1.— Near Tallahassee, Florida, in his 52d year, Robert R. Reid, late 
Governor of Florida. He was a native of South Carolina, but removed in 
early life to Georgia, was a representative to Congress from that State, and 
a Judge of the Superior Court. He was, in 1882, appointed Judge of the 
Superior Court for the Eastern District of Florida, by Mr. Adams, and, in 
1839, Governor of Florida, by Mr. Van Buren. While he held the office 
of Judge, he was elected a member of the convention for forming a con- 
stitution for Florida, and he presided over that body in such a manner as to 
gain great respect and esteem. He was respected for his gentlemanly and 
courteous manners, kindly temper, and for his talents and acquirements as 
a scholar and a jurist. 

Aug. 13. — On SL Mary'* river, near Fort Wayne, Indiana, aged about 
80, J, B. Riehianritte, principal chief of the Miami nation. He is said to 
have left $200,000 in specie, besides immenee quantities of very valuable 
iea§ estate. 

Sept. 21. — At Concord, Mass., in his dlat year, Evra Ripley, D. D., 
senior pastor of the first church in Concord, the oldest clergyman in 
Massachusetts, and a man. much respected. He was born at Woodstock, 
Conn., May 1, 1751 ; graduated at Harvard University in 1176 5 and was 
ordained pastor of the church in Concord, Nov. 7, 1778. He preached for 
the last time on the 1st of May, 1841, it being his 90th birthday. 

27 



* 

314 AMEBJCU? OBITUAET. [1843. 

Sept. 16. — At Whitehall, N. Y., aged 100, Joseph Reynolds, a Lieu- 
tenant in the United States revolutionary army. 

May 27. — In New York city, in his 70th year, Alexander Robertson, 
the oldest artist in the city, and formerly Secretary ef the Academy of 
Fine Arts. 

March 31. — At Philadelphia, aged 73, James Ronaidson, a native of 
Scotland, but long a respected citizen of Philadelphia, and a distinguished 
type founder. " He will long be remembered as an active participant in 
the principal enterprises for the improvement of the city, — as the friend 
and counsellor of his emigrant countrymen, — as the Philadelphia type 
founder for a long period, — the indefatigable horticulturist, — and more es- 
pecially as the founder of the celebrated and most beautiful cemetery bear- 
ing his name, — bat last and not least, as a most upright, frugal, and honest 
man." 

Sept. 2. — At Sachem's Head, Conn., Robert Sedgwick, long a distin- 
guished member of the bar of New York city, and a son of the late Theo- 
dore Sedgwick, of Stockbridge, Mass., a Judge of the Supreme Court of 
Massachusetts. 

Aug. 10. — At Boston, Mass., aged 29, WiUiam H. Simmons, a graduate, 
in 1831, at Harvard University, a gentleman respected tor his talents, learn- 
ing, and character. 

Feb. 8. — At Waterford, N. Y., Cyrus Stebbins, D. D., in his 69th year. 

Jan. 21. — At Washington, D. C, aged 47, Captain Thomas Holdup 
Stevens, commander of the Navy Yard at Washington, a distinguished 
officer of the navy, and much esteemed as a man. 

May. — In Clearfield Co., Pa , Mrs. Stevens, aged 108, leaving some pos- 
terity of the 6th generation. 

Jan. 24. — In Calhoun Co., Fl^l^a, aged 77, Colonel Henry D. Stone, 
a patriot, of the Revolution, for a time, President of the Legislative Council 
of Florida. 

March 8. — At Bath, Me., aged 72, Peleg Tattman,s. wealthy merchant, 
and M. C. from Maine in 18ll - 13. He was born at Tiverton, R. I., in 
1764; in 1778, at the age of 14, he entered into the privateering service or 
employment ; in 1780, he had his left arm shot off; and, in 1781, be was taken 
prisoner, and was confined in Ireland and England till the peace in 1783. 
He soon afterwards became commander of a merchant vessel, and after fol- 
lowing a seafaring life for many years, he devoted himself to the business 
of a merchant, and acquired a large fortune. He was distinguished for his 
talents, industry, perseverance, and energy. 

Aug. 81. — At Havre de Grace, Md., A. J. Thomas, a highly respected 
citizen. 

March. — R. I., aged 72, Stephen TilKnghast, for many years President 
of the American Insurance Company. 



1843.] AMEEICA9 OBITUARY. 315 

• 

April 11. — Near Youngstown, Warren Co., Ohio, in bis 68th year, 
George Tod, a native of Suffield, Conn., aud a graduate, in 1795, of Yale 
College, a man much respected for his integrity and usefulness. In 
1801, he removed to Ohio, was elected a member of the State Senate in 
1804, and soon after a Judge of the Supreme Court. On the declaration 
of war against England, in 1812, he accepted the office of Lieutenant 
Colonel in the army of the United States, and continued in active service 
till the return of peace. He discharged the duties of Presiding Judge of 
the third Judicial Circuit of Ohio, for fourteen years ; and several years 
afterwards, he was Prosecuting Attorney for the county of Warren. 

April. — In Anson Co., N. C, Alexander Troy, a highly respectable 
lawyer, and for many years Solicitor of the 5th Judicial Circuit of N . C. 

May. — At Harwich, Mass., aged 89, Rev. Nathan Underwood, a pa- 
triot of the Revolution, who was in the battles of Lexington, Bunker Hill, 
White Plains, and Trenton. He afterwards graduated at Harvard College, 
in 1788, and was a preacher upwards of 40 years. 

Jan. 23. — In Madison Co., Ala., Samuel Walker, late Speaker of the 
House of Representatives of the State of Alabama. 

April 9. — At Philadelphia, Pa., aged 57, Joseph Watson, President of 
the Lehigh Company, and formerly Mayor of Philadelphia. 

Aug. 31. — At Paris, France, in his 64th year, Samuel Welles, a native 
of Boston, 'Massachusetts, and the head of an eminent banking house at 
Paris, which he established in 1815. He was distinguished for his ability 
and integrity in his profession, for his friendly disposition, and for his gen- 
erous hospitality to his countrymen. 

March 2. — At Trenton, N. J., aged 66, James D. Wesieott, who has 
filled several important offices in the State of N. J., and for the last ten 
years, that of Secretary of the State. 

April 21. —At Goshen, N. Y., aged 72, Col, David M. Westeott. 

Aug 10. — At New York, aged 54, Stephen White^ formerly a distin- 
guished merchant of Salem. 

Jan. 16. — At Boston, Mass., aged 81, Samuel WuHams, who formerly 
resided in London about 30 years, and was well known to the commercial 
world as a distinguished merchant and banker. 

Sept. 14. — At Washington, D. C, aged 66, John A. Wilson, formerly 
U. S. Marshal for the District of Columbia, and a respected citizen. 

Jan. 19. — At Danvers, Mass., in his 101st year, Lemuel Winchester, 
a revolutionary pensioner. 

Feb. 22. —At Boston, Mass., aged 81 , Thomas Lindall Winthrop, LL. D., 
President of the Massachusetts Historical Society and of the American 
Antiquarian Society, and late Lieut.- Governor of Massachusetts. At a 
meeting of the Historical Society, on the 28th of February, the following 
tribute of respect was paid to his memory : " Voted, that this Society deep- 
ly laments the death of the late Honorable Thomas Lindall Winthrop, who 
has for many years presided over its deliberations with an urbanity and 



810 'AMKRIOAIf OBITVAftT. [1841 

earnest devotion to itf interests not 1ms exemplar/ add honorable than use- 
ful ; who, descending in a direct line from the first Governor of Massachu- 
setts, baa manifested, through a long life, the virtues which distinguished 
his illustrious ancestor ; filled to general approbation for several years the 
office of Lieutenant-Governor of the Commonwealth; and exemplified the 
true uses and fulfilled the obligations of wealth by the liberality of his pri- 
vate charities, and by his patronage of the several important institutions 
over which he presided, and others with which he was connected, evinced, 
as respects the Historical Society* by frequent and valuable benefactions." 

May 24. — At Portland, Me , aged 38, Henry JiUun Worcester t minis- 
ter of the New Jerusalem Society in that city. He graduated at Yale 
College, in 1828 ; was the author of a small volume of sermons ; and was a 
man highly esteemed. 

April. — In Louisa Co., Va«, aged 100, Mrs. Mary Yancey, leaving a 
numerous and highly respectable offspring. 



CHRONICLE OF EVENTS 

From July, 1840, to October, 1841. 



JULY, 1840. 

2. A blockade of the river and port of Canton, in China, by the Eng- 
lish, in accordance with a public notice given on the 22d of June pre- 
ceding, by Commodore Sir John Gordon Bremer, commander of the 
expedition, is enforced. 

25. Lieutenant J. A. Underwood and Midshipman Wilkes Henry, 
officers in the U. S. Exploring Expedition, having gone on shore at 
Malolo, one of the Feejee Islands, are treacherously murdered by the 
Dative 8. Lieutenant Wilkes immediately attacked the town and fort ; 
70, or upwards, of the natives were killed, the fort and town burnt, the 
plantations destroyed, and the island laid waste. 

AUGUST, 1840. 

1. Dionysius Lardner, LL. D., editor of the Cabinet Cyclopaedia, 
tried at the Lewes Assizes, England, on an action brought by Captain 
Heaviside for criminal conversation with his wife. The jury returned 
a verdict for the plaintiff; — damages £ 8,000. 

5. The city and island of Chusan, belonging to China, are captured 
after a slight resistance, by the English forces under Brigadier- General 
Burrell. The Chinese had about 25 killed ; the English none. Gen- 
eral Burrell was appointed governor of the island. 

6. Prince Louis Napoleon, son of Louis Bonaparte, late King of Hol- 
land, makes an attempt to effect a hostile descent upon the coast of 
France. He embarked front London in the Edinburgh Castle steamer, 
accompanied by about 60 men, including General Montholon, Colonel 
Voison, Laborde, Montauban, and Parquin, and some other officers of in- 
ferior rank. The party landed at Wimereux, about two leagues from Bou- 
logne, directed their march to that town, and were soon taken prisoners. 
The Prince was soon after placed in the Castle of Ham. 

14. The Britannia Steam-packet arrives at Liverpool, after a passage of 
10 days from Halifax, the shortest ever made between the North 
American continent and England. 

SEPTEMBER, 1840. 

8. A convention assembles at Wheeling, on the Ohio, computed at 
dOjOOO in number, for the purpose of promoting the election of Gen- 
eral Win. H. Harrison as President of the United States. 

10. A numerous assemblage of the political party styled Whigs, from 

27* . 



318 CHRONICLE OF EVENTS, 1840. [1842. 

every county in Massachusetts, and most of the States in the Union, 
called the Bunker Hill Convention, meets at Boston, for tfie purpose of 
promoting the election of General William Henry Harrison to the presi- 
dency of the United States. A procession was formed on the Boston 
common, and proceeded, eight abreast, by a circuitous route more than 
four miles in length, to Bunker Hill, the van of the procession reaching 
Bunker Hill before the rear had left the common. The number in the 
procession was computed at about 20,000, about 1,500 being on horse- 
back. A declaration of principles was read at Bunker Hill by Daniel 
Webster, the President of the Convention. 

11. The town'of Beyrout, in Syria, fired upon, reduced to a mass of 
ruins, and taken, by the English and Austrian fleets. 

28. A fire occurs at Plymouth dockyard, in England, by which the 72 
gun ship, Talavera, and the Imogene, a frigate of 28 guns, are destroyed. 

OCTOBER, 1840. 

7. William I., King of the Netherlands, publishes a proclamation an- 
nouncing his voluntary abdication of the throne, and is succeeded by 
his son William 11. — He is said to have retired with a private fortune 
of 168 millions of francs, and he abdicated in consequence of his deter- 
mination to marry the Countess d'Oultremont, a lady of the Roman 
Catholic faith. 

10. The army under Ibrahim Pacha and Soliman Pacha defeated, near 
Beyrout, in Syria, by the Turkish or Allied troops, under the command 
of Selim Pacha, General Jockmus, Commodore Napier, and Col. Hodges, 
with a loss of 7,000, killed, wounded, and prisoners. 

12. The Queen Mother Christina, Regent of Spain, resigns or abdi- 
cates, and retires to France. 

15. A musket is fired at Louis Philippe, King of the French, while 
passing along the quay of the Tuileries, by an assassin named Manila 
Edmund Darmes. The king was not hurt 

17. The Steam-ship Acadia arrives at Boston, after a passage of 12 
days and 12 hours from Liverpool ; the shortest passage ever made from 
a port in Europe to the United States. 

18. The ceremony of the exhumation of the body of Napoleon Bona- 
parte is performed at St. Helena, with great parade, in order to be con- 
veyed to Paris. He died, May 5, 1821. The body was embalmed by 
French physicians, and was found in a state of complete preservation. 
The ceremony of interment took place at Paris, Dec. 15. See page 319. 

21. The French ministry, Thiers at the head, resign.— An arrange- 
ment was concluded and a new ministry formed and sworn into office, 
on the 30th, with Marshal Soult and M. Guizot at the head. 

30. A tremendous earthquake demolishes 240 houses in the town of 
Zante, and injures nearly all the rest. The villages and country houses 
of the island were destroyed, or greatly injured. The total amount of 
damages was estimated at 2,500,000 dollars. 



1842.] CHRONICLE OF STOUTS, 1840. 819 

NOVEMBER, 1840. 

3. The strong fortress of St. Jean d'Acre, the principal stronghold of 
Mehemet Ali in Syria, taken by storm by the Allied fleet of the English, 
Turks, and Austrians. A magazine containing 500 barrels of powder 
was blown up, over which about 2,000 soldiers were stationed, who were 
nearly all buried in the ruins. Upwards of 2,000 were killed, more 
than 3,000 taken prisoners, and many wounded. Materials found in the 
fort were estimated in value at little short of £1,000,000. The loss on 
board the Allied fleet was 23 killed, and 50 wounded. 

14. A commercial treaty between Great Britain and the republic of 
Texas is signed in London. 

15. The steamboat Express explodes on the Tombeckbee, 5 miles 
below St. Stephens, killing and wounding 14 persons. 

r 17. A fire at Canajoharie, N. Y., destroys 40 buildings, mostly dwel- 
ling houses. Loss estimated at upwards of % 100,000. 

24. The remains of General Hugh Mercer, who died at Philadelphia 
in consequence of wounds received in the battle of Princeton, Jan. 3, 
1777, are disinterred, and relnterred at the Laurel Hill Cemetery, near 
Philadelphia, attended by a great concourse of people. An address 
was delivered by Wm. JB. Reed, Esq. 

DECEMBER, 1840. 

1. An action takes place at Kotrfeth, in Seindee, between 4,000 Be- 
loochees, posted among the hills, and commanded by Nusseer Khan, and 
900 Sepoys, with 2 field-pieces, commanded by Lieut. Col. Marshall. 
500 of the former were slain, and 6 chiefs and 132 followers taken pris- 
oners. 

4. A great snow-storm commences in the Middle and some of the 
Southern States, accompanied with violent wind. In Massachusetts, it 
commenced about mid-day, on the 6th. In the Middle States, it was one 
of the greatest snow storms that had occurred for many years; the snow 
being on an average, at Washington, about 1£ feet deep, and very much 
drilled. Travelling was very greatly obstructed, and in consequence a 
quorum of both houses of Congress was not formed till Wednesday the 
9th, instead of Monday the 7th. In Massachusetts, the depth of snow 
was only from 4 to 6 inches. 

5. General Lavalle is routed by the government forces of Buenos 
Ayres, and a large body of his infantry surrenders. 

15. The remains of Bonaparte are remqved. from Cherbourg (where 
they were landed on the 30th of November) to the Church of the In- 
valides in Paris. The funeral procession was splendid, the coffin ' being 
conveyed on a car, and the number assembled very great, computed 
at 500,000. The king and royal family were present at the ceremony, 
and 60,000 national guards were in attendance. 



MO CttBowrcuc •f'kvhtb, 1641. [18©. 

7 JANUARY, 1841. 

6. A great and midden change of temperature, from extreme cold to 
warm, takes place) followed, on the 6th and 7th, by a great fall of rain. 
The inow was rapidly dissolved; the Hudson, Passaic, Delaware, 
Schuylkill, and other riven and streams of water, in the Northern, Mid- 
dle, and some of the Southern States, rose to an unusual height, numer- 
ous bridges were carried off in different parts of the country, roads 
Tendered impassable, and a great amount of property destroyed. 

20. A circular is addressed by Captain Elliot to the subjects of the 
Queen of England, in China, announcing that arrangements have been 
made with the government of China to the following effect : ~" 1. The 
cession of the island and harbor of Hong Kong to the British crown. 
All just charges and duties to the empire, upon the commerce carried on 
there, to be paid as if the trade were to be conducted at Whampoa. 
2. An indemnity to the British government of 6,000,000 dollars, 1 ,006,000 
dollars payable at once, and the remainder in equal annual instalments, 
ending in 1646. 3. Direct official intercourse between the two coun- 
tries upon an equal footing. 4. .The trade of the port of Canton to be 
opened within ten days after the Chinese new. year, and to be carried 
on at Whampoa, till further arrangements are practicable at the new 
settlement." 

25. A shock of an earthquake is felt in the city of New York and 
vicinity, to such a degree as to excite considerable alarm. 

27. Alexander McLeod, of Upper Canada, under arrest on a charge 
of being engaged in burning the steamboat Caroline, at Fort Schlosser, 
during the military occupation of Navy Island in 1827, is admitted to 
bail in the amount of $ 5,000. When this fact became known, the in- 
dignation of the people of Lockport was so much excited, that they as- 
sembled in great numbers, and prevailed on the bondsmen to withdraw 
the bail which they had given, so that McLeod was continued in con- 
finement to await bis trial. 

30. The town of Mayaguez, Porto, Rico, consisting of about 600 build- 
ings, is consumed by fire. Loss stated from $2,000,000 to $4,000,000. 

FEBRUARY, 1841. 

B. The Pennsylvania Bank of the United States, after having, from 
the time of the general resumption of specie payments on the. 16th of 
January, a period of 80 days, " paid out an amount little, if at all, short 
of six millions of dollars, in com or specie funds," suspends apeote pay- 
ments. This event produced a great excitement, and was followed by 
an exhibition of its affairs, which were so unfavorable as to causa great 
surprise. The suspension wan soon followed by the other banks id 
Philadelphia, the batiks of Baltimore, Ac. ; but the banks of New York 
and New England continued to pay specie* 

9. The marriage of the Ootfnt of Nassau (ex- King of the Netherlands) 
to the Countess d'Oultremont, is celebrated at Berlin. 



1849.] CHRONICLE OF EVENTS, 184L 391 

10. The Union of Upper and Lower Canada* — Lord Sydenham, 
Governor General of British North America, takes the oath of office as 
Governor of Canada, under the Act for the anion of Upper and Lower 
Canada into one Province. 

21. The emigrant ship called the Governor Fenner, bound from 
Liverpool to New York, having a crew of 18, including the captain, and 
106 steerage passengers or emigrants, about 2 o'clock in the morning, 
12 hours after sailing from Liverpool, comes in collision with the Not- 
tingham steamer from Dublin, the night being excessively dark, is sud- 
denly sunk, and all on board perish, with the exception of the captain, 
S. £-. Andrews, and the first mate, J. C. Carter. 

22. A land-slide in the commune of Gragnano, in Italy, occurs, by 
which 113 persons lose their lives. 

22. The town of Reggio, in Calabria, the southern province of Italy, 
is nearly, destroyed by an earthquake. 

25. The Bogue Forts and the city of Canton captured by the English. 
The number of prisoners taken at Chuen-pee, was stated at 1,000, and 
the killed and wounded on the side of the Chinese were said to be very 
numerous. Canton was almost deserted by its inhabitants. 

26. The Irish Registration of Voters' Bill, at the end of a debate of 
four days, passes in the British House of Commons by a vote of 299 
to 294. 

MARCH, 1841. 

4. The inauguration of General William Henry Harrison, as Presi- 
dent of the United States, takes place at Washington in presence of a 
concourse of spectators, variously estimated from 30,000 to 60,000. — 
The Inaugural Address was despatched from Washington to New York, 
by railroad, in 11 hours. v 

11. The English Steam-packet President sails from New York for 
Liverpool, having a crew of 81 persons and 28 passengers j in all 109 
souls. — Nothing has been heard of her since. The President is said to 
have been the largest steam vessel ever built ; — burden 2,360 tons ; — 
loss about $384,000 j — insurance $288,000. 

15. The rivers and streams of water in North Carolina, South Caroli- 
na, Georgia, and Alabama, rise to an extraordinary height, in consequence 
of great rains. The rains commenced in the upper country, on the 9th 
of March, and the waters in the lower country began to rise about the 
12th or 13th, and by the 15th or 16th, the roads in many parts were 
under water. Much damage was done to towns, villages, and to property 
on the rivers, also to railroads and other roads Some of the rivers, as 
the Ogeechee, Oconee, and Ockmulgee, in Georgia, are said to have 
risen higher than they did in the great Yazoo freshet in 1796, or at any 
time since. 

17. President Harrison issues a proclamation calling an extra session 
of Congress, to be convened on the 31 st of May, to consider " sundry 



898 CHRONICLE OF e v*irrs, 184L. [1842. 

weighty and important matters, chiefly growing out of the state of the 
revenue and finances of the country ." 

26. Captain Elliot, the chief superintendent of the British commerce 
in China, says in his proclamation, " A suspension of hostilities at 
Canton and in the province, has been this day agreed upon between 
the imperial Commissioner Yang and the undersigned. — It has further 
been publicly proclaimed, under the seals of the Commissioner and 
the acting Governor of the province, that the trade of the port of 
Canton is open, and that British and other foreign merchants, who 
may see fit to proceed there for the purpose of lawful commerce, shall 
be duly protected." 

27. A tremendous storm occurs at St. Louis and vicinity, lasting about 
15 minutes, and completely, covering the ground with hail. 

APRIL, 1841. 

4. William Henry Harrison, President of the United States, dies at 
Washington. On the 7th, the funeral obsequies were performed, and an 
immense concourse assembled to pay their testimony of respect, not only of 
the citizens of Washington and the vicinity, but from all parts of the Union, 
with pall -bearers representing each of the several States and Territories. 

5. Nearly one quarter of the town of Antigua, in the island of Antigua, 
West Indies, destroyed by fire. Loss estimated at about $300,000. 

12. A great snow-storm in Pennsylvania, New York, &c. The snow 
falls to the depth of a foot, in the city of New York. The storm was 
widely extended in Massachusetts, snowing in the night of the 12th, and 
through most of the day of the 13th, to the depth of 6 or 8 inches. 

19. The ship William Brown, of Philadelphia, on her passage from 
Europe, lost at sea, having a crew of 17, and 63 passengers; — 11 only 
saved. 

23. A treaty between the United States and Portugal, concluded August 
26, 1840, ratified. 

MAY, 1841. 

13. The American Bible Society celebrates its 25th anniversary, at New 
York. The whole amount of receipts, during the preceding year, was 
stated at $118,860*41; the number of Bibles and Testaments published 
and circulated through the efforts of the Society, since its organization, is 
nearly 3,000,000. 

14. This day is observed, in accordance with the recommendation of 
President Tyler, as a day of Fasting aud Prayer, in the United States, on 
account of the death of William Henry Harrison, President of the United 
States. 

16. A constitution of the republic of Yucatan, is decreed by the Legisla- 
ture, and published at Merida, the capital of the State. Yucatan having 
declared its absolute independence of the republic of Mexico. 



1843.] chrokicle of events, 1841. . 333 

17. A large portion of the rock, (about 260 feet of the cliff,) on which 
the defences of the city of Quebec is built, falls away, causing the ruin of 
several houses and buildings, and the death of about 30 persons. 

21. The foreign trade of Canton is suspended, and hostilities are re- 
newed between the Chinese and English. The principal batteries for the 
defence of Canton, were suppressed on the 24th ; the British troops landed 
and took .possession of the heights in the rear of the city, after a severe ac- 
tion, on the 25th ; and, on the 27th, a capitulation took place, by which the 
Chinese agreed to pay $ 6,000,000 in one week, as a ransom for the city ; 
also that the Chinese troops, except those of the province, should be with- 
drawn within six days, 60 miles into the interior, and that all losses sus- 
tained from the partial destruction of the factories, should be paid. The 
sum of $6,000,000 was actually paid as stipulated. 

28. A great flood of waters in Georgia and South Carolina. The river 
Savannah is said not to have risen so high for a century. Boats passed 
through all the streets of the city of Augusta: Many wooden houses were 
carried off, the foundations of many others undermined or injured ; many 
cattle, horses, &c, were floated off, and much other damage was done. 

29. The New York National Theatre burnt by incendiaries. Cost of the: 
Theatre about $ 50,000. 

31. An extra session of Congress, being the first session of the 27th 
Congress, in pursuance of President Harrison's proclamation, commences. 

JUNE, 1841. 

4. The resolution moved by Sir Robert Peel, c « That Her Majesty's min- 
isters do not sufficiently possess the confidence of the House of Commons 
to enable them to carry through the House measures which they deem of 
essential importance to the public welfare," passes the House of Commons 
by a vote of 312 to 311. 

15. The town of Praia, in the island of Terceira, is completely destroyed 
by an earthquake. Much damage was done to other places in the island 
by a series of earthquakes. 

16. The steam-packet Columbia arrives at Boston, after a passage from 
Liverpool, of 12 days and 8 hours, being the shortest passage, by 4 hours, 
yet made from England to the United States. 

18. The new Constitution of the newly constituted " State of the Isth- 
mus of Panama," publicly sworn to, and Dr. Thomas Herrara elected Pres- 
ident. 

22. The British Parliament is prorogued by the Queen. On the next 
day, the proclamation of the Queen, dissolving the Parliament and calling 
another on the 19th of August, was published in the Royal Gazette. 

26. The remains of President Harrison are removed from Washington^ 



CHftOKICLE 07 EVENTS, 1841. [1842. 

with appropriate ceremonies, in order to be deposited at bis late residence 
at Nortb Bend, Ohio. 

27. The bill for the establishment of the Fiscal Bank of the United 
States, passes in the Senate by a vote of 26 to 23. 

JULY, 1841. 

6. The bill to distribute (he proceeds of the sales of the public lands 
among the several States, and grant preemption rights, passes the United 
States House of Representatives by a vote of 116 to 108. 

12. The opinion of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, in 
the case of Alexander McLeod, is delivered at Utica, by Mr. Justice 
Cowen. The Court denied the application for the discharge of the pris- 
oner, and ordered that he be remanded to take his trial according to the 
ordinary forms of law. 

13. A treaty for the settlement of the affairs of the East between the 
Sultan of Turkey and the Pacha of Egypt, is signed at London by the 
representatives of Austria, France, 'Great Britain, Prussia, and Russia. 
1. The hereditary possession of Egypt is confirmed to Mehemef AH and 
his descendants, in a direct line. 2. Mehemet AH will be allowed to nom- 
inate his own officers up to the rank of a colonel. The Viceroy can confer 
the title of Pacha only with the consent of the Sultan. 3. The annual 
contribution is fixed at 80,000 purses, or 40,000,000 piastres, or £400,000. 
4. The Viceroy will not be allowed to build a ship of war without the 
permission of the Sultan. 5. The laws and regulations of the empire are 
to be observed in Egypt, with such changes as the peculiarity of the 
Egyptian people may render necessary, but which changes must receive 
the sanction of the Porte. 

13. Serious disturbances take place at Toulouse, in France, in conse- 
quence of which M. Mahul, the Prefect, by the advice of the National 
Guard, resigns his office. 

28. The British Association for the Advancement of Science meets at 
Plymouth; and continues its session till the 4th of August. 

AUGUST, 1841. 

& The bill for the establishment of the Fiscal Bank of the United States, 
passes in the House of Representatives, in concurrence with the Senate, 
by a vote of 128 to 91. 

9. The Sub-Treasury, or Independent Treasury Law, which was passed 
by the House of Representatives of the 26th Congress, June 30, 1840, by 
a vote of 124 to 105, is repealed by the House of the 27th Congress, by a 
vote of 134 to 87. 

9. The steamboat Erie, having sailed from fiufalo for Chicago, a little 
after 4 o'clock, P. M., with upwards of 200 persons on beard, consisting of 
30 or 40 cabin passengers, about 140 steerage passengers, mostly Swiss 
and German emigrants, and the crew, when about 33 miles from Buffalo, 
at about 8 o'clock, takes fire by means of a vessel filled with varnish, and 



1842.] CHRONICLE OF EVENTS, 1841. 895 

is totally destroyed) together with all on board except 28, who were picked 
up by the steamboat De Witt Clinton, three or four hours afterwards. The 
loss of property was great. The boat was estimated at $ 75,000 ; mer- 
chandise, $ 20,000 ; specie belonging to the emigrants, $ 180,000. 

12. The boile*r of the steamboat Sarah Bladen, on the Mississippi, 15 
miles above Bayou Sara, bursts, and several lives are lost. 

16. President Tyler returns the Bill passed by both Houses of Congress, 
to. establish a Fiscal Bank of the United States, with his veto. 
' 18. A bill for the establishment of a uniform system of bankruptcy 
throughout the United States, to go into operation February 1, 1642, passes 
in the House of Representatives* in concurrence with the Senate, by a 
vote of 111 to 106. 

19. The British Parliament meets, and the Rt. Hon. Charles Shaw 
Lefevre is reelected Speaker without opposition. 

20. A fire breaks out in the evening at Syracuse, N. Y., in a carpenter's 
and joiner's shop, in which 27 or 23 kegs of gunpowder (640 pounds) were 
deposited. The explosion of the powder was tremendous, causing the 
death of 25 or more persons, and wounding many others. The sound was 
heard from 20 to 30 miles distant. The coroner's jury stated, " That in the 
belief of the jury, the shop was set on fire by some person or persons to 
the jurors unknown, and that the powder was secretly stored in the shop, 
contrary to the ordinances of the village of Syracuse." 

23. The bill for the distribution of the proceeds of the sales of the pub- 
lic lands among the several States, in proportion to population, passes the 
United States Senate, in concurrence with the House of Representatives, 
by a vote of 28 to 2*2. 

29. An amendment to an address to the Queen of Great Britain, censur- 
ing certain measures of the government, and expressing a want of confi- 
dence in the ministry, passes the House of Commons by a majority of 91. 
The same amendment was passed in the House of Lords, on the 24th, by 
a majority of 72. On the 30th, Lord Melbourne gave notice in the House 
of Lords, that he and his colleagues had tendered the resignation of their 
offices, which had been accepted. A new ministry was soon after formed, 
Sir Robert Peel being first Lord of the Treasury. 

— . A trial is made with an experimental steam-coach or steam-carriage, 
carrying 16 persons, on the road from Regent's Park, London, to the Ma- 
nor-House, Tottenham. The distance traversed is between 8 and 9 miles, 
and it was performed in rather less than half an hour. 

SEPTEMBER, 1841. 

3. A bill for establishing a * ( Fiscal Corporation of the United States," 
passes in the Senate, in concurrence with the House of Representatives, 
by a vote of 27 to 22. 

4. The city of Cincinnati is, for 24 hours, in a state of complete anarchy, 
controlled mostly by a lawless and vindictive mob, trampling all law and 



Washington, 


March 5, 1792 


Jackson, 


Do. 


March 1, 1797 


Do. 


Madison, 


Feb. 21, 1811 


Do. 


Do. 


Feb. 28, 1811 


Do. 


Do. 


Nov. 6, 1812 


Do. 


Do. 


Jan. 20, 1815 


Tyler, 


Monroe, 


May 4, 1822 


Do. 



326 CHRONICLE OF EVENTS, 1841. [1842. 

authority under foot The number of persons engaged in the riots was 
stated at from 200 to 1,500, composed of Irishmen, persons employed on 
the river, and other disorderly people. Their violence was directed chiefly 
against the negroes and abolitionists. Several were killed, and 20 or 30 
wounded. 

9. The bill passed by both Houses of Congress, for establishing a " Fis- 
cal Corporation of the United States," is returned to the House of Repre- 
sentatives, by President Tyler, with his objections. The veto power has 
been exercised fourteen times, since the adoption of the Constitution, by 
several of the Presidents, as follows : — 

May 31 , 1831 
Dec. 7, 1831 
July 10, 1832 
Dec. 6, 1832 
Dec. 8, 1834 
Aug. 16, 1841 
Sept. 9, 1841 

10. Thomas Ewing, Secretary of the Treasury, John Bell, Secretary of 
War, George E. Badger, Secretary of the Navy, and John J. Crittenden, 
Attorney -General, chosen by President Harrison for their respective of- 
fices, and retained by his successor, President Tyler, send in their resigna- 
tions, to take effect on the 12th. 

13. The 27th Congress adjourns, having held an extra session from the 
31st of May. Several important bills were passed during the session/some 
of which were an act authorizing a loan of $ 12,000,000 ; an act repealing 
the Sub-Treasury, or Independent Treasury ; an act to establish a uniform 
system of bankruptcy throughout the United States ; an act to appropriate 
the proceeds of the pales of the public lands, and to grant preemption 
rights ; and an act making appropriations for various fortifications, for ord- 
nance, and for preventing and suppressing Indian hostilities. An act es- 
tablishing a " Fiscal Bank," and another establishing a "Fiscal Corpora- 
tion," were passed by the two Houses of Congress, both of which received 
the veto of the President. 

OCTOBER, 1841. 

4. A great storm, on the 4th and 5th, of rain, snow, and wind. Much, 
damage was done on the coast of Massachusetts, and in some harbors to 
shipping and other property. At Pigeon Cove, Rockport, Mass., out of 16 
small fishing vessels, 14 were destroyed. The snow fell in some parts of 
Massachusetts to the depth of a foot. 

12. The jury by which Alexander MeLeod was tried, after an absence 
.of 30 minutes, return into the Court with a verdict of not guilty. 

18. A destructive fire occurs at Georgetown, S. C, destroying the 
.prominent business part of the town. 



CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS. 

United States Cabinet. See page 54. 

In September last, just before the adjournment of Congress, the members 
of the United States Cabinet, with the exception of the Secretary of State, 
resigned their respective offices. The following persons now constitute 
the Cabinet : 

Salary. 
Daniel Webster, of Massachusetts, Secretary of State, $ 6,000 

Walter Forward, of Pennsylvania, Secretary of the Treasury, 6,000 
John C. Spencer, of New York, Secretary of War, 6,000 

Abel P. Upshur, of Virginia, Secretary of the JVavy, 6,000 

Charles A. Wickliffe, of Kentucky, Postmaster- General, 6,000 

Hugh S. Legare*, of South Carolina, Attorney- General, 4,000 

Page 55. James JV. Barker, 1st Comptroller, vice Walter Forward, 
promoted. /. W. Tyson, Commissary -General of Purchases, vice Calen- 
der Irvine, deceased. 

Page 62 Messrs. Alford and Nisbit, members of Congress from Geor- 
gia, have resigned their seats. 

Page 63. Henry Dodge has been elected Delegate to Congress from 
Wisconsin Territory. 

Page 64. Bennet A. Crawford has been appointed U. S. Judge for the 
District of Louisiana, in place of Theodore H. McCaleb, deceased, who 
succeeded P. K. Lawrence, who died May 19, 1841. Z. Collins Lee, U. 
S. Attorney for Maryland, vice J\T. Williams. 

Page 65. 12. B. Pottinger, Marshal for Maryland, vice JYtcholas Sny- 
der; Thomas Claiborne, for Middle Tennessee, vice S. B. Marshall; 
and James F. O wings, Clerk for Illinois, vice W. H. Brown. 

Page 68. Edward Everett, Minister Plenipotentiary to Great Britain, 
vice Andrew Stevenson; Waddy Thompson, Minister Plenipotentiary 
to Mexico, vice Powhatan Ellis; and William Hunter, late Charge 
d % Affaires, now Minister Plenipotentiary \ to Brazil. 

Page 69. William Boulware, Charge d' Affaires to the Two Sicilies, 
vice Enos T. Throop ; Samuel D. Heap, late Consul at Tunis, now Dra- 
goman to the Legation to Turkey. 

Page 71 . J. H. Peebles, Consul at Campeachy, vice Peter A. Carnes ; 
and JF. L. Casletnau, Consul at Lima. 

Page 73. John D. Bates, Belgian Consul at Boston, vice E. A. Ho- 
mer; Auguste Branda, Belgian Consul at Norfolk ; John M. Wright, 
Brazilian Consul for Pennsylvania, vice John Vaughan, 



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CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS. 



Page 76. Antonio A. VUlalobos, Spanish Consul at New Orleans. 

Pages 76 and 79. Early in September, and since the article of the 
Navy List was printed, numerous naval promotions and appointments have 
been made, in consequence of which the following names are to be added 
to the lists of Captains and Commanders, inserted in pages 78 and 79. 

Commanders to be Captains, from the 8th September, 1841. 



1 John Percival, 

2 John H. Aulirk, 

8 William V. Taylor, 

4 Bladen Dulany, 

5 Silas H. Stringhani, 



6 Isaac Mayo, 

7 William Mervine, 

8 Thomas Crabb, 

9 Thomas Paine, 
10 James Armstrong, 



11 Joseph Smoot, 

12 Samuel L. Breese, 
18 Benjamin Page. 



^Lieutenants to be Commanders. 

Frederick Vamum, from the 8th March, 1841. 

From the 8th September, 1841. 



1 Joseph R. Jar vis, 

2 Thomas W. Frelon, 
8 Sam'l W.Lecompte, 

4 Charles T Piatt, 

5 Wm. M. Armstrong, 

6 Wm. F. Shields, 

7 G. P. Pendergrast, 

8 Wm. C. Nicholson, 

9 James B. Cooper, 

10 E. W. Carpender, 

11 John L. Saunders, 

12 Joseph B. Hull, 

13 John Stone Paine, 

14 Joseph Moo re head, 

15 Thomas Petigru, 

16 John S. Chauncey, 

17 Irvine Shubrick, 

18 John Kelley, 

19 Edmund Byrne, 



20 Edward S. Johnson, 

21 Wm. H. Gardner, 

22 David G. Farragut, 

23 Stephen B. Wilson, 

24 E. C. Rut ledge, 

25 Wm. S. Harris, 

26 Thos. A. Domin, 

27 R. B. Cunningham, 

28 James Glynn, 

29 Joseph Myers, 
ISO Wm. C. Wetmore, 

31 Thos. R. Gedney, 

32 John Rubier, 

33 Victor M.Randolph, 

34 J. Crowninshield, 

35 Frederick Engle, 

36 Alex. J. Dallas, 

37 John Rudd, 

38 Robert Ritchie, 



39 Wm. W. McKean, 

40 Franklin Buchanan, 

41 Samuel Mercer, 

42 Charles Lowndes, 

43 L.M.Goldsborough, 

44 George N. Hollis, 

45 D. N. In graham, 

46 John Mars ton ; Jr., 

47 Henry Bruce, 

48 Win. D. Newman, 

49 Henry A. Adams, 

50 Alex. B. Pinkham, 

51 James D. Knight, 

52 Joseph Mattison, 

53 Wm. S. Walker, 

54 Alex. S. Mackenzie, 

55 George F. Pearson, 



Page 81. The head quarters of the Eastern Division of the American 
Army, have been removed from Elizabethtown, N. J., to Troy, N. Y. 

Pages 81 and 83. Col. Sylvester Churchill has been appointed Inspec- 
tor General. 

Page 89. Isaac Roach, Treasurer of the Mint, vice Joseph RUner. 

Page 182. WUliam Kent, Judge of the 1st Circuit of New York, vice 
Ogden Edwards. 

Page 204. John Y. Mason, late Judge of the General Court of Virginia, 
has been appointed Judge of the U. S. Court of Virginia. 



THE IND. 



V