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Entered aceordingp to Act of Congress, in the year 1837, 

By Charlxs Bow£if, 

in the Clerk's office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts. 



261941 



CAMBRIDGE: 
FOLSOM, WELLS, AND THORSTON, 

Prinlen to th« UoiTcnity. 



PREFACE. 



^ In presentiDg the ninth volume of the American Almanac to the 
public, we again avail ourselves of the opportunity which the 
occasion affords, of expressing our grateful acknowledgments to 
onr correspondents, who have kindly forwarded information for the 
improvement of the work ; and we respectfully solicit a continu- 
ance of their favors. 

This volume will be found to contain the usual quantity and 
variety of matter ; and, as such explanations and remarks, as were 
deemed useful, in relation to the various subjects treated of, are 
given in different parts of the work, it is unnecessary to speak 
particularly of them here. For information relating to the Astro- 
nomical Department, the reader is again referred to the Pre- 
liminary Observations of Mr. Paine. 

All intelligent and judicious legislation must be founded, in a 
great measure, on statistical knowledge. If the statistics of all 
the United States, collected and digested on a judicious and uni- 
form plan, — embracing, among other matters, a view of the 
Population, with the different classes and divisions, — Commerce, 
Manufactures, and Agriculture, with their various branches, — 
works of Internal Improvement, as Canals, Railroads, &c., — Crime 
and Pauperism, — Education and^ Religion, with their condition, 
means of support, and the institutions connected with them, — 
were, at regular periods, laid before the public, a mass of in- 
formation would be presented, which would be of immense ad- 
vantage to the national government and to the government of 
the several states ; and the wide diffusion of such information 
among the citizens at large would be attended with the most salu- 
tary consequences. *' Knowledge is power'* ; and such knowle4ge 



IV PREFACE. 

OS this would greatly increase the ability of the national and state 
governments, as well as of societies and individuals, to promote 
the interest, anf advance the moral civilization and improvement, * 
of the people. 

The volumes of the American Almanac contain a good deal of 
statistical information, which has been collected with much labor 
and expense. In conducting the work, we have frequently 
found it impossible to procure the information wanted. The sta- 
tistics of the whole country can never be collected by one indi- 
vidual, nor by a society formed for the purpose. If the work 
is ever accomplished in a suitable manner, it must be done under 
the direction of the government of the United States, And, if the 
national government should connect this object with the taking of 
the next Census, the design would certainly commend itself to 
every man of enlightened views ; and it would redound to the 
lasting honor of the administration that should first introduce the 
system. 

Cambridge^ Ma8$ackaattt$^ 
S^ttmbtr 11, 1837. 



CONTENTS, 



PART I. 



CAl.Bin>AB AffO CbLXSTIAL PHfilfOMBIfA FOB THB YbAB 1837. 



PBfO. 

C«le«lial Pbcooineaa ; Si^c, &e. 3 

Chronological Cycles ... 4 

Sigtta of tJ>« Zodiac .... 4 

Bogianing and Length of the Season i 4 

MoviJito PestiTuls ; Jewish Calendar 5 

Mahometan Calendar .... 6 

Height of the Greatest Tides 6 

Tide Table 8 

CALENDAR:— January, &c. 10 

Bciipiies of the Son and Moon . . 34 

Aoottai Eclipse of the Sun . . 35 
Oecoltatiooa in 1838. . . . .47 

Eelipeea of the Satollitea of Jupiter 48 



Pag*. 
Position and Magnitude of the Eings 

of Bntnrn 48 

Mean Time of the Greatest Libratioo 

of the Moon's Apparent Disc . 50 

Illuminated Portions of the Discs of 

Venus snd Mars . . . . M 
Latitude and Longitude of Places, U. S. 51 
Increase of i^idereal Time, &e. 54 

Epbemerts of the iSun . . .55 

Apparent Places of 30 Fixed Stars 61 
Dr. Young's Refractions ... 67 
Table of the Sun's Parallax in Aliitoda 68 
Elements of Eclipses .... 69 



PART II. 



MlSCBLLAITBOCS DBrARTMBRT. 



1. Progooatiea of the Weather 79 

9. Aurora Borealis, Janoarr 25, 1837, 80 

3. Meteors of November 13, 1836, . 83 

4. Aliens, — in the United States 85 
5t. London Periodical Press . . 92 

6. Publication of Books in England 96 

7. International Copyright . 97 



8. 



9. 



Products of the Press in Oeraany, 
France, and England . 99 

Prices of 14 Articles for 40 Years 101 
10. Prices of Flour . . .108 

U. Age and Size of Trees . 109 

12. Disease among Shell- fish 109 

13. Select Scraps .... 109 



UjriTBO Statbs. 



1. Election of ^reiideataad Vice- Pros. 114 



9. Commorce 


113 


31 Tobacco Trade 


. 190 


4. Banks .... 


127 


5. Finances .... 


. 131 


& Surplus Revenue 


133 


7. Imports and Exports of Gold 


and 


Silver .... 


. 133 


8. Lead Mines 


134 


9. Mint 


. 134 


10. Post-Office EeUblishment 


137 


11. Public Lands 


. 140 


IS. Indian Tribes . 


143 


13^ Executive Government 


. 14C 


14. Judiciary 


148 



15. Intercourse with Foreign Nations ISB 

16. Navy List .... 158 

17. Army List 160 

18. Emigrants and Foreign Paupers 161 

19. Population of the United Suies 163 

20. Slaves in the United States . 163 
31. Governors of States and Territories 164 



22. State Elections, &.C. 

23. Lhw Schools 

24. Colleges in the United States 

25. Medical Schools . 

26. Theological Schools 

27. Benevolent Societies . 

28. Religious Denominations 



MbTSOBOLOOICAI. IirrOBMATIOff. 



1. Meteorological Table for Dover, 

N. H 177 

9. Table for Concord, N. H. 177 i 

3. Table for Dartmoath College . 178 | 

4. Time of Opening of Erie Canal 179 { 

5. Opening and Closing of the Hudson 180 
& Flowenag of Fruit IVeea 181 



7. Tables of N. Y. Academiei 
& Recession of the Mississippi 
9. Table for Savannah . 
la Tables for Now Orleans . 
11. Tables for Key West . 
19. Table for Marietta . 
13. Tables for Su Looii . 



165 
165 
166 
170 
171 
171 
179 



188 
189 
183 
184 
166 
187 
188 



VI 



CONTKATS. 



IlfDITIDOAL StATBS. 



Praliminary Obaervatioiu 
1. Maine 

S. Mew Hamptbire 
3* Vermont . 

4. Manachuaetts 

5. Rhode Island 

6. Coonecticut . 

7. Now York 

8. New Jeney . 

9. Ptonmjlvnnia 

10. Delaware 

11. Maryland . 

12. Virginia 

13. North Carolina 

14. South Carolina 



Page. 

. id9 

190 
. 19-2 

194 
. 195 

203 
. 803 

904 
. S08 

911 
. 917 

918 
. 919 

993 
. 933 



15. Goorfia 

16. Alabama . 

17. Misniariippi . 

18. Louisiana . 

19. TcnocMee . 

90. Kentucky . 

91. Ohio . . ^ 

93. Indiana 
23. lllinoii . 

94. MiMOuri 

95. Michigan . . 

96. Arkanaaa . 

97. DiAtriet of Columbia 

98. Florida Territory 

99. Wisconsin Territory 



936 



941 
244 
245 
246 
2SO 
251 
254 
255 



259 
960 
961 



American Sutes, N. and S. America 969 I British N. A. Provincea 
Texas 963 | British West Indies 

EtjBors. 



966 
266 



Reigning Sovereigns of Europe . 967 

European States, — Pop. and Religion 968 

Population of Cities ... 969 

Population of the Globe . . . 970 

Population of Asiatic States . . 970 

German Unirersitiet .... 970 

Sweden and Norway . 971 

Russia 971 

Denmark 279 

Belgium 973 

Holland or Netherlands . . 973 

Great Orluin 974 

France 983 

Prussia 988 

UaooTer 989 



Saxony 

Wurtemberg 290 

Bavaria 290 

Austria ...... 290 

Spain 291 

Portugal 292 

Sardinia 299 

Two Sicilies 293 

Greece 993 

Turkey 293 

Foreij^n Obituary .... 294 

Amoriean Obituary .... 306 

Chronicle of Events 992 

ArrcvDix. 
Twenty-lifUi Coogreasi U. B. . .333 



INDEX. 



Paee. 

Afkelios, Prof. J 305 

Age and Sixe of Trees . 109 

Alabama — Government ; Judiciary ; 
Pauperism ; Internal Improvement : 
Cotton Crop: Bank 936-5237 

Aliens in the IJnited States . 85 

American Obituary . . 306 

American Sutea .... $263 

Aocillon, M 305 

Arkansas — Government ; Judiciary ; 

258 > 259 

Army List 160 

Aurora Borsalis, Jan. 12, 1837 80 

Ausuia 290 

Banks, Deposit 127 

Banks in the U. S. 199 

Bannister, John .... 300 

Baniine, Dr. Wn. ... 296 

Batburst, Bp 305 

Bavaria 990 

Begiuning and Length of the Seasons 4 

Belginm 973 

Bonevolant Societies ... 171 



Bishops, Methodist, U; S. 
** Protestant Episcopal 
** Roman Catholic 

Bolivia . , . 

Bolton, John .... 

Books, Publication of in England 

Booihroyd, Ur. Benj. . . 

British American Provinces, 

Buenos Ayres .... 

Burgess, Bp. . 

Calendar — January, &c. 

Calendar, Jewish . 

Calendar, Mahometan 

Celestial Phenomena 

Central America 

Cervotto, James 

Charles X. 

Chili 

Chronicle of Events 

Chronological Cycles 

Circuit Courts, U. S. 

Cities of the Globe — Population 

Colleges in U. 8. 



Page. 
174 
176 
176 
269 
304 
96 
297 
268 
262 
304 
10 
5 
6 
3 
962 
300 
300 



323 

4 
149 
969 
166 



IKOKX. 



Vl| 



Pige. 

Cohaan. G«or|e .... iao 

Colau^a — Ihitrict of — Jadiciary 259 

Comnwice, U. 8 113 

CoagKM, ^SOi, (J. S. . . 333>335 
Connecticoc — Goverament } Judiciary ; 

Paapemia 203 

Coiwab, (J.S 153 

Qopjrifbt, loteniatiooal ... 97 
Davidwa, Joba .... 301 

Davie*, Mrs C S95 

Day, Charles 299 

Delawaie -— GovemmaDt ; Judiciary ; 

Canals and Railroads 917 

Denmark 272 

Deposit Banks .... 127 

Discs of Venus and Mars 50 

Disea«e among Sbell-fisli 109 

District CouiU, U.S. . .148 

Dooovan, Bdward .... 303 
Drake, Dr. Nathaa .... 294 
Dubois, Baron .... 305 

Eclipses of the Son and Mooo 34 

Eclipse of the Sun, September 18 35 

Eclipses or tbe Satellites ot Jupiter 48 
Eclipies, £lomenis of ... 69 
Elections io tbe different States 165 

Election of Pres. and V. Pres., U.S. Ill 
Emij^raots and Foreign Paupers . 161 
Ephemsris of the Son ... 55 

Ei^oalor 262 

Erie Canal, Time of opening of . 179 
Eoropean Sutes — Population,- &c. 968 
Executive GoTernmeut .144 

Exporu, U.S. . . 113, 114, 116 
ExpoTU of Gold and BilTer . 133 

Parish, Prof. Wm. ... 302 

F^weett, John 303 

Pea, Abate 294 

Festivals of tbe Church ... 5 
Fitzfaerbeft, Mrs. Maria A. . 305 

Fixml Stan, Apparent Places of . 61 
Florida — Government ; Jadiciary ; 

Railroads and Canals . 260-261 

Floor, Prices of . . . .10-2 
Flowering of Fruit Trees . 18 L 

Fonbianqne, J. de O. . ,302 

Foreign Mstioos, lutereourM with 152 
Foreign Paupers .... 161 

Franco 282 

Georgia — Government ; Judiciary ; 

^uperism ; Internal Improvement 

234-335 
Gerard, Francois .... 3f»-2 
German iiniversities . . 270 

Gold and Silver, Imports and Exports of 133 

GoTemment, if. S 144 

Governors of tbe Sutes . 164 

Great Britain 271 

Greece 293 

Grey, Bp. 305 

Gnstavus Adolphus 303 

Hanover 289 

Bayti 262 

Height of tbe greatest Tides . . 6 
Henry, Dr. William ... 996 
BolUnd or Netherlands . . . 2r3 
Hudson River, Openiog and Closing of 180 

Hufeland, Ur 29(i 

Hulse, Sir Samuel .... 3()9 

Hunter, Rev. Dr. J 303 

lUinuis — Goveinmant ; Judiciary } 

Pauperism ; Internal Improvement 

351.254 



Page. 

ImporU, U. 8. . . . 113, 116, 117 
Indiana — Government ; Judiciary ; 

Iniernal Improvement . 250, 351 

Indiun Tribes . . . ., . 143 
liiteicourao with Foreign NatioiM 15fi 
International Copyright . . 97 

JukoHiooe, Dr. J 304 

Judiciary 148 

Kentucky — Government ; Judiciary ; 
Pttuperism .... M5, 246 

lA i'Uta 963 

Lands, Public 140 

Luibam, Dr. John .... 304 

Latitude and Longitude of Pluces . 51 

l^aw relating to Aliens, U. 8. . 86 

I Law Schools in U. 8. . . .165 

. Lax, Rev. Wm 300 

I Lead Mines 134 

I Libraiiou of th« Moon's Disc . 50 

Luion, Sir Robert .... 99& 

' Literary Jouruala in London . 99 

Loniiuu Periodical Press ... 89 

Louisiana — Government j Judiciary } 

Internal Improvement . 241-944 

Magazines, &.C., in Loudon . 95 

Mail, Transportation of . . 137 

Muine — Government ; Judiciary } Pao<> 

perism ; Internal Improvement 190-193 
MaliUran de Beriot, Madame . 996 

Marsden, Wm 299 

Maryland — Government } Judiciary : 

218,919 
Massachusetts — Government; Judici- 
ary j Population and Representation : 
Census ; Beturus of the Poor } School 
Returns ^ Finances j Bounty lor Nox- 
ious Animals; Slate Prison; Rail. 

roads 195-909 

McAdam, J. L 301 

McMshou, Sir Wm. . . .309 

Medical Schools .... 170 

Meteorological Table for Concord . 177 

»* " Dover . 177 

** ** Dart. College 178 

Key West 186 

Marietta 187 

" " New Urieans 184 

'* M.V. Academies 

191 
" St. Louis 188 

" ** Savannah 189 

Meteors of November 13, 1836 . 83 

Muxico 269 

Michigan — Government ; Judiciary ; 
Population; Primary Schools; Uni- 
versity ; Inloinal Improvements 256-258 

Mill, James 294 

Miuii, General .... 302 

Ministers, (J. S. . . . .152 

Ministers and Consuls, Foreign . 154 

Mint^ LT. 8 134 

Minsipsippi — Government ; Judicisry ; 

Pauperism; Railroads; Census 938 -SMl 
MissiMippi River, Recession of . 189 
Midsouri — Government ; Judiciary ; 

Pauperism .... 254, 255 
Montrose, Doke of . . . 309 

Navy List 158 

Nuvy, Officers of .... 150 

Netherlands 273 

New Grenada 968 

New Hampabira — Government ; Judi- 
ciary ; Panpaiism 198, 198 



u 



IC 



II 



(I 
il 



Vlll 



IIIDBX. 



Page. 
New Jertoy — Governmeot i Jodieiary : 
Pauperism } Popalation in ItSSm ana 
1745 , Railroad* ; Canals . 906-311 
Newspapers in JLoadon . . 92 

Newspapers In Parts . . . 100 

New York — Governmeot ; Judieiarr ; 
Common Schools ; Pauperism ; Ca- 
nals : Railroads . 204-S08 
North Carolina ; History ; Goveroors ; 
Chronology ; Settlements ; Popola- 
tion at early periods : Government ; 
Judiciary j Banks ; Liteiary Fund ; 
Internal I mprovemont j State-House ; 
Cotton Manufactures . 223 - 331 
Occultations in 1838 ... 47 
Ohio — Government ; Judiciary ; Pau- 
perism j Canal Tolls ; Internal im- 
provement .... 346-249 
0*Meary. Barry E. . .294 

Otlley,Wra. Y 294 

Paper and Specie in Circulation 131 

Paraguay 2(j3 

Parallax in Altitude of the Sun . 68 

Pennsylvania — Governmeot ; Judicia- 
ry } Finances ; Education ; Internal 
Improvement . . . 311-216 
Periodical Press in London 93 

Peru ...'.. 362 

Pond, John 396 

Ponsooby, Sir F 303 

Population, V. SUtei ... 163 
" Europe ... 368 
" Globe .... 370 

Portugal 392 

Post-Office Establishment . . .137 
Postage, Rates of . 138 

Pradt, M. do 304 

Fiess in London .... 92 
Press, Pioductions of in Germany, lie. 99 
Prtdv of 40 Articles for 40 Years 101 

Prices of Flour .... 102 
Prognostics of the Weather . 72 

Prussia 308 

Publication of Books in England . 96 

Public Lend 140 

Ratea^of Postage .138 
Rayneval, M. de . . . . 395 
Raynounrd, F. J. M. . . 399 
Refraction, Dr. Young's . 67 
Religious Denominations . . .17 
Reviews in London . . • 94 
Rhode Island — GovernmoDt ; Judi- 
ciary 302, 203 

Rings of Saturn .... 49 

Rippon, Dr. J 302 

RoHvlyn, blarl of .... 303 
Rowley, Dr. George 899 

Russia, 371 

Babine, Joseph, .... 308 

Sardinia 393 

Baumares, Lord de ... 299 
Saxony 290 



Page. 

Select Scraps 109 

Senate, U. 8 334 

Sessions of the State Legislatures 165 
Shell-Fbh. Disease among . 109 

Sidereal lime. Increase of • . 54 

Signs of tho Zodiac .... 4 
Simeon, Rev. Charles 900 

Slaves in the U. S 163 

Smedley, Rev. Edward . 996 

Soano, Sir J 903 

South Carolina — Government ; Judi- 
ciary } Internal Improvement ; Pau- 
perism . . 333-934 
Sovoreigni of Europe . 967 

s^pain 991 

Specie and Paper in Circulation . 131 
Specie Payments, Suspension of . 131 
Stewart, Bishop .... 306 

Sun, Ecli/»se or ... . 36 

Sun, Ephemcris of . . .55 

Sun's Parallax in Altitude . 68 

Sweden and Norway . . . 971 

Tennessee — Government : Judiciary 

344,945 
Texas — Government ; History and 

Outlines of the Constitution 963 - 965 
Theological Schools .... 171 
Thornton, Dr. R. J. ... 303 

TiarkiuJ. L 994 

Tide Tabl 8 

Tides, Height of .... 6 
Tobacco Trade .... 190 
Tonnage, U.S. . . . .119 

Transportation of the Mail . 137 

Trees, Ago and Bixe of . . 109 

Turkey 993 

Turner, Dr. Edward ... 304 

Two Sicilies 993 

ITroguay 968 

Vacations in ColSegei . 169 

Vance, George 905 

Venezuela 969 

Vermont — Government ; Judiciary ; 
Pauperism ; Internal Improvement 

194 195 
Vessels built in the U. S. . . * 113 

Vessels of War, U. S. . 158 

Virginia — Government ; Judiciary } 
Pauperism : Internal Improvement 

919-229 
Votes in the Presidential Election 119 
Weather, Prognostics . . . ^79 

Weld, Cardinal .... 905 

Westall, K 901 

West Indies, British ... 966 

WiflTen, J. H 994 

Wisconsin — Government ; Judiciary ; 
Newspaperi ; Railroads . 961, 909 

Wurtembeqr ^90 

Wyld, James 999 

Young's Refraetions ... 07 



SCr As the names in the Amgnem Ohitmanf (see page 906) are placed in alphabetical 
order for the sake of convenient reference, they are not ioaerted in ih* Index. 



PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS ON THE ASTRONOMICAL 

DEPARTMENT. 



All the calcolalions in this Almanac have been adapted to Meaiv solar 
time. — On account of the eccentricity of the Earth's orbit, and the inclK 
nation of the Ecliptic to the Equator, the motion of the Earth in Right 
Ascension ia not uniform, and, consequently, the solar days are not equal, 
but about half are a little more, and about as many a little less than 24 
hours. A clock, therefore, regulated to apparent solar time must be 
frequently adjusted. To avoid tbis inconvenience the fiction of mean time 
has been invented, and, having already come into very general use. will 
probably soon entirely supersede the other. Its name is derived from 
the circumstance, that the length of a mean solar day, hour, &c., is the 
nuan or average length of all the apparent solar days, hours, &c., in a 
tropical year. 

The greatest difference between Mean and Apparent time occurs on 
the 3d of November, viz. 16m. 16 sec; and, the equation then being 
subtractive from Apparent time, the instant the Sun's centre is on the 
meridian, or bears exactly south, a clock legulated to Mean time should 
indicate lib. 43m. 44 sec. ; on the 11th February is the greatest additive 
equation, when the time of noon bv the clock is 14m. 34 sec. after 12. 

But Mean time is easily reduced to Apparent by applying the eqna- 
tion (pages 55 to 6(t) on the day in question, in a manner directly the 
reverse of that therein indicated. 

The arrangement of the Calendar pages remains as in the Almanac 
for 1837, without alteration. 

The time of twilight is computed on the supposition (hat it begins and 
ends when the distance of the Sun from the zenith is 108° ; the quantity 
osually assumed, but which is probably too great by two or three degrees. 

The time of the Phases of the Moon is computed for the meridian of 
Washington, but may be easily reduced to that for any other meridian 
by adding or sabtractinv the difference of Longitude, according as the 
same is east or west of uiat city. 

In the computation of the rising and setting of the Sun, for this 
Almanac, two corrections have been recently introduced. These correc- 
tions are, 1st, ibr the effect of refraction in causing him to appear above 
the sensible horizon, sooner in the morning and later in the aflernoon 
than he actually is ; and, 2dly, for the interval between the rising or 
setting of his centre, and of his highest point ; the instant of the ap- 
pearance or disappearance of this pomt, and not (as heretofore) of bis 
centre, being considered the time of his rising or setting. So that at 
the time indicated in the Calendar pages, as that of sunrise or sunset, 
bis centre is 90^ 50' from the zenith > his semidiameter being about 
16^ and the horizontal refraction 34'. 

The amount of these corrections varies at every place with the decli- 
nation of the Sun, and on the same day is different m different latitudes. 
At Boston, when greatest, they lengthen the interval between sunrise 
and sunset about 12 minutes ; at New Orleans, nearly 9. 

The aetting of the >k>on only, is given from the new to the full ; and 
the rvnng only, from the full to the new moon. The letters M. A. m. a. 
found in these columns, and in other parts of the Almanac, are used to 
denote Morning and Jfftemoon. The time of the beginning and end of 
twilight, and of the rising and setting of the Sun and Moon being given, 
in the Calendar pages, for five of our principal cities, situate in very dif- 
ferent latitudes, the Almanac is in fact computed for nearly oYerj place 
within the United States. 

The planets are placed iu the order of their mean distances from the Sun, 
and their decUnations are computed for the moment of their passage over the 



PRELIMIIfART OBSERVATIONS* 



meridian of Washington. The places of ihe four new planets, Vesta, Juno, 
Pallas, and Ceres, are given onJy when they pass the meridian within fire 
hours of midnight ; their distance from the Earth at other times being so 
great, as to render them invisible. 

The time of High Water is corrected for the difference of the Right 
Ascension of the Sun and Moon, for the Moon*s declination and her dis- 
tance from the Earth. The time of the tide immediately preceding her 
southing only having been given, it should be corrected by the addition of 
half the difference when the time of the other tide is required. 

It may be. proper to remark, that, notwithstanding the three corrections 
above mentioned, the o(>served time of high water, frequently, in calm 
weather, diflfers considerably, perhaps half an hour, from the computed. 
Indeed, until recently, astronomers seem to have been contented with 
the knowledge, that the flow and ebb of the sea wore caused by the at- 
traction of the Sun and Moon, and to have taken little pains to increase 
their acquaintance with these curious and interesting phenomena. But, 
as within a short time much attention has been turned to the subject, and 
many competent persons in Europe have undertaken to make careful 
observations for a series of years, on every tide, we are induced to hope 
that the causes of some of the anomalies, not only in the time of high 
water, but also in the rise of the tide, may be discovered, and their effects 
predicted. 

On the 18th of September there will be an eclipse of the Sun visible 
throughout North America and annular throughout or in some part of 
thirteen States (See page 46. ). — This eclipse is the last of that remarkable 
series of five large obscurations of the Sim visible to us in the short term of 
seven years ; and it will be the last central eclipse viMble to us for nearly 
sixteen years, or until May 26th, 1854. The phases of this eclipse for 15 
places in the United States, as deduced from a rigorous computation, will 
be found on pages 39 to 44 ; also on the 45th, the phases at 28 other places, 
the times of which, though estimated from the preceding, will not, it is 
supposed, be erroneous by more than a minute. In these computations the 
semidiameter of the Sun and Moon were reduced 5'' the quantity indicated 
by all the observations on the eclipses of Feb. 1831, July 1832, Nov. 1834, 
and May 1836. 

By referring to the account of this glorious eclipse (pages 85 to 46), it will 
be seen that the width of the ring will exceed 400 miles, and that the 
eclipse will be seen annular by nearly one half of the inhabitants of the 
United States. 

Much diminution of the light during the continuance of the eclipse is 
not to be expected. It is possible that the planet Venus may be per- 
ceived without a telescope, during the greatest obscuration^ as she wiU 
then be about 21^ N. W. t>f the Sun ; but her great distance from the earth 
at the time renders thi^ improbable ; Mercury, Jupiter, and Saturn will 
also be above the horizon, but too near the Sun to be seen. 

On the 47th page will be found a list of those conjunctions of the Moon 
with the planets and stars of not less than the sixth magnitude, which may 
prove to be occultations in some part of our country. Whilst in the Calea- 
dar pages those conjunctions of the Moon with stars, which may be occul- ' 
tations in some part of the United States, are noted with an asterisk, in- 
stead of the usual symbol of conjunction. 

The moment of the Immersion or Einerj^ion of any star, however small, 
behind or from the dark side of the Moon, cdn be determined with pre- 
cision ; but, if the star is not very bright, great difficulty is experienced in 
satisfactorily ascertaining it, when the phenomenon takes place on the side 
that is enlightened. 

The CaUlogue of the eclipses of the satellites of Jupiter (pages 43 and 



PRKI.IMIHART OBSERTATIORS. Xl 

49) conltlns only those visible in some fMirt of the United States. The 
eclipses uotil the planet comes into opposition with the Sun, on the 4th of 
Match, will happen on the west side, then, until the conjunction on the 
22d of September, on the east side, and afterwards again on the west, until 
the opposition in April, 1S39. From conjunction to opposition, the im- 
meisions of the first and second satellites are, generally, only visible, and 
from the opposition to conjunction, the emersions, only ; but both the 
phenomena of the third and fourth satellites can sometimes be seen. 

In the table of Latitude and Longitude of some of the principal places 
in the United States (page 51, &c.) will be found the latitude of a large 
number, as determined by the editor, by recent observations made by 
himself; also the longitude of a few, deduced by him from observations 
made by others on the annular eclipse of February, 1831, or as ascer- 
tained by comparison of the place in question, by chronometers, with 
the Capitol 9t Washington, the University of Virginia. Philadelphia, or 
Boston, the clistance ol which from the meridian of Greenwich is sup- 
posed to be conectiy known. The longitude of the Capitol is the mean of 
the results, deduced from the observations on the annular eclipses of 
1791, ISII, and 1831, and has recently been confirmed by the editor, by 
comparing it by chronometers with the University of Virginia and the city 
of Philadelphia. The unfortunate adoption, in the construction of several 
maps of this country, of the longitude of the Capitol (5h. T 42^0* reported 
by an individual actmg under the authority of a Resolve of Cougress, 
has caused an error of 6| minutes of a degree therein. 

It will be noticed, that the positions of Charleston, Beaufort, S. C, 
and Savannah, dififer very considerably from those hitherto assigned to 
those places. They were determined by the editor with great care in the 
autumn of 18^, at the time of a journey to the south, undertaken for the 
purpose of observing at Beaufort the total and central eclipse of the 30th of 
November of that year. The diflerence between the Longitude of St. 
Michaers church in Charleston, and of the State-House in Boston, was 
determined by eight chronometers. From the longitude of this church, that 
of the Exchange In Savannah, and that of the Arsenal in Beaufort, were 
deduced, by using four. So that it may be hop6d, that the Longitudes of 
these places, as laid down in this table, are much nearer the truth than 
those usoalJy assigned in the maps and charts of our coast. 

The use of the Longitudes of these places, formerly supposed correct, 
produced great inconvenience, by causing an apparent change, of several 
seconds, in the daily rates of all chronometers on board vessels arriving at, 
or from, Charleston, &c., aAer voyages of a few days' duration. 

As the error was about ten miles, or forty seconds of time, one of these 
instruments received in Boston, New York, kc, in five days from Charles- 
ton or Savannah, would have apparently changed its rate of going, eight 
seconds ; and four seconds, if the length of the voyage was ten davs. 
But since the ailoption of the Longitude published in this Table, this 
apparent change has not been discovered. 

The most important light-house on the coast of New England is that 
in Truro, Massachusetts, generally known as the Highland or Cape Cod 
light ; as from it vessels from Boston, Salem, &c., usually take their de- 
parture, and as it is generally first seen by them, on their return. It would 
seem, therefore, that its accurate position would have been long since 
ascertained ; but by a large number of observations of northern and southern 
stars, made bv the editor in the autumn of 1835, its Latitude was found to 
be 42*» 2' 22" nearly, or about three miles less, than has hitherto been sup- 
posed. The possible consequences of such errors may be easily imagined. 

The Ephemeris of the Sun (pages 55 to 60) is wholly taken from the 
English Nautical Almanac, and not from the Berlin Ephemeris as heretofore. 



Zll 



PftELIMIIfA&T OB8ERVATIOM8. 



It contains the Sun's Semidiameter, Horizontal Parallax and Declination ; 
the Time {mean, which by the addition of 0-19 sec. will be converted 
into sidereal) occupied by the Semidiameter in culminating or passing the 
meridian, the Equation or reduction of apparent to mean time, to be ap- 
plied to apparent time in the manner indicated at the head of the column, 
the Sidereal Time, and the Obliquity of the Ecliptic. The epoch of all is 
Ob. Om., mean time, of the meridian of Greenwich. 

The apparent places of 30 of the principal fixed stars (pages 61 to 66) 
will be found %'ery useful for determining the time, or latitude ; for which 
purpose they are much to be preferred to the Sun. 

Reduction of Meridional Altitudes. 

A Table has been publis^hed for several years, in the English Naatical 
Almanac, for facilitating the reduction of the Latitude of a place, from 
•bservations made on the Pole star, at any time during its revolution 
around the Pole ', which Table, when great accuracy is not wanted, or a 
good table of Logarithms is not at hand, will be found convenient. But 
as exactness is sometimes required, it was thought the insertion of a cor* 
rect and general rule for the reduction of the Latitude, from altitudes of 
any star, might be useful and acceptable. 

Rule. To the log. co-sine of the star's distance from the meridian in 
degrees, add the log. cotangent of its declination ; the sum (rejecting 10 
in the index) will be the log. tangent of an arc (A) less than 90^. From 
the sum of the log. co-sine of A and the log. sine of the corrected altitude, 
subtract the log. sine of the star's declination, the remainder will be the 
log. sine of an arc (B). Then the Latitude is the sum or difference of B 
and A, according as the distance of the i<tar from the meridian is greater or 
less than six hours; but, when the declination of the star is of the same 
name with, and is less than, the Latitude of the place, the supplement of 
their sum, and not their difference, is the Latitude. 

Examples. 
On the 23d of July, 1836, when the distance of the star a Ursac Minoria 
from the meridian was 6h.7m. 27.93ec. (9P 51' 48''), its corrected altitude, 
at the church in Harris Street, Newburyport, was 42° 44' 13.93", and its 
declinaUon 88° 35' 53.54". What is the Latitude by this observation .' 



COB. 91° 51' 48" 
cot. 88 2d 63.64 

tang. A 3 a64 



8.5120914 
8.4374596 

6.9495510 



COS. A0° y 3.64" 
sine 42 44 13.93 

sine 88 26 63.64 



9.9999998 
9.8316374 

19.8316372 
9 9998372 



sine B 42 45 26.31 9.8318U00 

then B -|- A (the star being more than six hours from the meridian)^ 42° 
48' 28.95", the Latitude. 

On the same evening, at the same place, when the star a Aquilos was 
10m. 7fsec (2*^ 31' 55") fiom the meridian, its corrected altitude was 
65<» 33' 37.72", and its declination 8° 26' 27.13" north. 

log. COS. 2° 81' 65" -I- log. CO tang. declination=log. tang. A 81° 83' 8.60" 
log. COS. A+log. sin. 66« 33' 37".72— log. sin. dec.=log. sin.B 55° 38' 25.56" 

Now, as the declination of the star is of the same name with, and is less 
than the Latitude, the supplement of the sum of A and B, ATP 48' 30.84", 
b the Latitude. 

When, as is frequently the case, several altitudes of the same star have 
been obtained within a few minutes of each other, their reduction by this 
method is very simple, as two of the logarithms (the cotangent and sine of 
the declination) undergo no change. 

BoMUnif August 26<^, 1887. 



THX 



AMERICAN ALMANAC 



FOR 



1838. 



PART I. 



THX 



AMERICAN ALMANAC 

TOR THE TSAR 



1838, 



Being the latter part of the 63d, and the beginning of the 63d, year 
of the Independence of the United States of America ; 

•* the 6551st year of the Julian Period ; 

^ the latter part of the 5598th, and the beginning of the 
5599th, year since the creation of the world, according to 
the Jews ; 

** the 259l8t year (according to Varro) since the foundation 
of Rome ; 

' the 2585th year since the era of Nabonassar, which has 
been assigned to Wednesday the 26th of February of the 
d967th year of the Julian Period, which corresponds, ac- 
cording to the chronologists, to the 747th, and, according 
to the astronomers, to the 746th year, before the birth of 
Christ; 

** the 2614th year of the Olympiads, or the second year of the 
654th Olympiad will begin in July, 1838, if we fix the 
era of the Olympiads at 775i years before Christ, or 
at or about the beginning of July of the year 3938 of the 
Julian Period ; 

** the latter part of the 1253d, and the beginning of the 1254th 
(lunar) year since the Hegira, or Flight of Mahomet, 
which IS supposed to have taken place on the 16th. of 
July of the year 622 of the Christian era. 



I. THE CALENDAR 
AND CELESTIAL PHENOMENA FOR THE YEAR. 

SIGNS OF THE PLANETS, ^c. 



STha Sun. 
The Earth. 
# > O C The Moon. 
9 Mercury. 
§ Venus. 



^ Mara. 

Q Vesta. 

S Jano. 

$ Pallaa. 



^ Ceres. 

1|. Jupiter. 
f^ Saturn. 
J^ Herscbel or Ur^nua. 



(5 Conjunction, or having the aame Longitude or Right Aacansion. 
a Quadrai nre, or differing 9(F in " " '« 

S Oppoailion «« ]80« in " " " 

[I Tna aaeending, XJ the deacanding node. 



4 CHROirOLOeiCAL CYCLE 8, 810218 OF THE ZODIAC, &C. [1838. 

An aiterisk (*) prefixed to the conjunction of the Moon with a itar or 
planet, indicate! that the star or planet may be eclipsed in some part of 
the inhabited portion of the United States. 

The sign -f- i* prefixed to the latitude, or declination, of the Sun, or 
other heayenlj body, when north, and the sign — when aovih ; but th« 
former prefixed to the hourly motion of the Moon in latitude, indicates 
that she is approaching, and the latter that she is receding from, the 
north pole of the ecliptic. 

The letters M* Jl., m. a., denote Morning and Afternoon. 



CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES. 



Dominical Letter . G 

Epact 4 

Lunar Cycle, or Golden Number 15 



Solar Cycle ... 27 
Roman Indiction . . .11 
Julian Period . 6551 



"fif"- ?3. n Gemini. 



SIGNS OF THE ZODIAC. 

Autumn 



Summer 
signs. 



7. ^ Libra. 
a.r»«M 1 8' ni Scorpio. 
"^ i 9. / Sa^ltarius. 



<2. 8 

(3. n 

C 4. S Cancer. -wri^*^. C lO.I/f Capricomus 

5 5. a Leo. ^."J**' 5 11. m AqSarius. 

<6. flj Virgo. I "ff°»- ?12.H Piices. 



BEGINNING AND LENGTH OF THE SEASONS. 



h. m. ■. 



Sun enters Vf (Winter begins) 1637, Dec. 21st, 6 37 1 ^ 
« " cp ^Spring «• 1838, March 20th, 8 ()59|M.Time 
*« " £S (Summer «« " June 21 it, 5 2 11 V at 

i€ u ^ (Autumn " « Sept. 22d, 18 51 2 1 Wash'n. 

« « Vf (Winter <• " Dec. 21st, 12 17 50 J 

d. h. m. f. 
Sun in the Winter Signs . . 89 1 23 58 

•« « Spring 92 21 1 12 

" «* Summer 93 13 48 51 

•« " Autumn 89 17 26 48 

«< north of Equator (Spring and Summer) 186 10 50 3 
•< south " (Winter and Autumn) 178 18 50 46 

Length of the tropical year, commencing ) 
at the winter solstice 1837, and term£> 365 5 40 49 
nating at the winter solstice 1838, ) 

Mean or arerage length of the tropical year 865 5 48 48 



1838.] 



UOYABLM FS8TITAX.8. JXWlSH CALXRDAE. 



MOVABLE FESTIVALS OF THE CHURCH IN 1838. 



SeptoAgmiina Sandaj Feb. 11th 
Qoinq. or Shroye <' *< 25th 

Aflh. Wed. lit day in Lent " 28th 
Mid Lent Sunday March 25th 

Palm Sunday April 6th 



BagUr Sitmday 
Low Sunday 



It 

u 



15th 
22d 



Rogration Sunday May 20th 

Aeeen. Day, or Holy Th. •* 24th 
Whit8unday,or Pentecoft June 3d 
Trinity Sunday « 10th 

Corpus Chrieti day '* 14th 

Adyent Sunday Dec. 2d 



JEWISH CALENDAR. 

[TIm umiTamriei mark«d with an tfUriik (*) are itrlctlj obeerred.] 
rear. Namei of the MontlM. 

5598 Thebetbegini .... Dec. 29^1837. 

« « lOth Fast for the Sie^ of Jeniaalam . Jan.7, 183& 

" Sebatbagina . . « . 27, " 

- Adar begins Feb. 26, « 

u u 11th Fast of Esther . March 8, *« 

•• «« 14th •Purim .... 11, " 

«« •^ 15th Schuscan Pniim . . 12, << 

■* Nisan begins • • . 27, '^ 

« « 15th ^Beginning of the Passoyer . April 10, " 
tt u lath ^Second Feast or Morrow of the 

Paasoyer • . 11» '' 

« ** Slat •Seyenth Feast . • • 16, « 

M ** 22d ^EndofthePassoyer . 17, « 

<* Ijar begins • • • • . 96, << 

** *' 18th Lagbeomer . May 18, « 

** Siyan begins • . 25, *< 

u It 6th *Feastof WeeksorPenteooat 30, « 

** ** 7th ^Second Feast . . 31, « 

<« Thammtis begins . . • . . June 24, ** 

u a i7t|| Fast for the Taking of the Temple July 10, '< 

** Ab begins . . • . 23, « 

u «i 9th •Fast for the Boming of the Temple 31, « 

*< Elol begins . . • • • Ang. 22, ** 

5699 Tisri begins *Feast for the New Tear Sept 20, « 

«< <« 2d ^Second Feast for the New Tear 21, « 

«< c< 4th Fast of Oedaljah . . 23, « ' 
M <• lOth *Fast of the ReconcUiatioB or 

Atonement • 29, << 

M M 15th •Feast ofthe Hats or Tsberaaeles Oct 4, « 

M « 16th "Second Feast • . .5^(1 

M << 21st Feast of Palms or Branohea 10, " 



6 MAHOMETAN CALENDAK. HEIOBT OF BFRUfO TIDES. [1838L 



T«ar. NamM of the Months. 

6599 Tiflri 22d ' *£nd of the Hat or Congregation 

Feast 
" 23d ^Rejoicing for the Diecorerj of 
the Law 
Marcheeyan begins .... 
** Chisleu begins . • . . • 

« « 25th Consecration of the Temple 

" Thebet begins .... 

« «< 10th Fast for the Siege of Jerusalem 
'* Sebat begins ..... 



« 



« 



Oct. 11, 1838. 

. 12, «• 

20, « 

Nov. 18, •« 

Dec. 12, « 

18, " 

. 27, « 

Jan. 16, 1839. 



MAHOMETAN CALENDAR. 
Year. Namet of the Moothi. 
1253 Schewall begins 



« 


Dsa'l-kadah " 


« 


D8U*l-hejjah <* 


1254 


Moharrem " 


it 


Saphar « 
Rabia I. ** 


•< 


<( 


Rabia II. << 


<( 


Jomadhi I. " 


u 


Jomadhi II. << 


« 


Rejeb " 


l( 


Shaban «< 


«( 


Ramadan '^ 


t< 


Schewall " 


tl 


Dsu'l-kadah « 



a . • • 

. ' (Month of Fasting 





Dec. 


29, 1837. 


Jan. 


27, 


1838. 


Feb. 


26, 


u 


March 27, 


. u 


Aoril 
May 


26. 
25, 


It 
u 


June 


24, 


It. 


July 


23, 


u 


Aug. 


S«, 


« 


Sept. 


20. 


It 


Oct. 


20, 


ti 


Noy. 


18, 


(( 


Dec. 


18, 


«* 


Jan. 


16, 


1839. 



The Mahometan Tear contains 354 days, or 12 reyolutions of the 
Moon. In the course, therefore, of about 33 yearn, the months corre- 
spond to every part of the Gregorian Tear, and to every season. 



HEIGHT OF THE GREATEST OR SPRING TIDES IN 1838, 
Chmputed by the formula of Laplace {Mecanique Cdleste, Vol. II. p. 289.) 



New or full 






Heisht of 
the Tide. 


New or fuU 






1 Hei<htor 
theTid*. 


Moon. 






Moon. 


— 


d. 






d. 


h. 


h. 


Full Moon, 


Jan. 


10, 


2 A 0.74 


New Moon, 


July 


21. 


9M 0.76 


New " 




25, 


9 A 0.99 


Full 


C( 


Aug. 


5, 


5 A 0.97 


Full " 


Feb. 


9, 


9M 0.80 


New 


u 




19, 


11 A 0.82 


New " 




24 


7M 1.12 


Full 


u 


Sept. 


4, 


1 M 1.12 


Full " 


March 11. 


4M 0.86 


New 


it 




18. 


4 A 0J86 


New ** 




25, 


5 A 1.15 


Full 


« 


Oct. 


3, 


10 M 1.16 


Full " 


April 


9, 


9 A 0.87 


New 


« 




18. 


9M 0.85 


New " 




24 


2M 1.04 


Full 


«< 


Noy. 


1, 


7 A 1.05 


Full " 


May 


9 


OA 0.82 


New 


M 




17, 


3M 0.79 


New •' 




23 


11 M 037 


Full 


« 


Dec. 


1, 


7M 0.89 


Full ** 


June 


7, 


11 A 0.79 


New 


l< 




16, 


7 A 0.77 


New *' 




21. 


10 A 0.76 


FttU 


u 




30 


7 A 0.81 


Full " 


July 


7. 


9M 0.84 













183a] 



U»IT OF AZtTITUBK OF SSYXaAL POKT0. 



Hie nnit of altitude at any place, ii the rise at that place of that tide 
wKueh amyei about a day and a half after the time of New or Fall 
Moon, the San and Moon at the moment of conjunction or oppceition 
haTing* been at their mean distance from the Earth and in the plane of 
the celestial equator. 

Hie unit of altitude (which can be ascertained by observation only) 
at any place, multiplied by the quantities in the above table, will give 
the height of the spring tides at that place during the present year. 

It will be seen that the tides of February 25th, March 27th, April 25th, 
September 5th, October 4th, and November 2d, will be the greatest of 
all, in 1838. 

The actual rise of the tide, however, depend^ so much on the strength 
an^ direction of the wind, that it not unfrequently happens that a tide, 
which would, independently of these, have been small, is higher than 
another, otherwise much greater. But when a tide, which arrives when 
the Sun and Moon are in a favorable position for producing a great 
elevation, is still further increased by a very strong wind, the rise of 
the water will be uncommonly great, sufficient perhaps to cause damage. 

The following Table contains the Unit of Altitude of several ports 
and places on the coast of America, according to the best authorities. 

The unit of altitude of the several places in the Bay of Fundy was 
ascertained by recent observations. 



feat. 




ftsL 


Advocate Harbour (Bay of > >;^ 
Fundy) 5 ^ 


Cape Cod Light House . 


Gi 


" •' Harbour . 


11 


Andrews, St ... 25 


** D»Or (Bay of Fundy) 


50 


Annapolis (N. 8.) . .30 


'* Henlopen 


6 


Apple Riwer ... 50 


« Henry . 


4 


Augustine, St. ... 5 


*« .Lookout . 


9 


Basin of Mines (Bay of Fundy) 60 


"May . 


. 6 


Baj,Bristed ... 8 


" St. Mary . 


14 


" Broad .... 9 


" Sable . 


. 9 


** Buzxard's ... 5 


*• Split (Bay of Fundy) 


55 


" Casco .... 9 


Charleston (S. C.) 


6 


'* Chignecto (north part of ) rwv 
the Bay of Fundy) ] ^ 


Cumberland (Basin Fort), head 


^71 


ofthe Bay of Fundy 


" St. Mary's . 16 


Digby(N. S.) . . 


. 30 


'• Vert .... 7 


Eastport . 


25 


Beaver Harbour 7 


Elizabeth Isles 


5 


Bell Island Straits . . .30 


" Town Point 


5 


Block Island ... 6 


Florida Keys 


'6 


BOSTOV ... 11;| 


Gay Head (Vineyard) 


5 


Cape Ann ... 11 


George's River 


9 


« Blomidom (Bay of Fundy) 60 


Georgetown Bar * • 


4 


" Chat • . . 13 


Gonldsborough 


. 19 



8 



TIDE TABLX* 



[183& 



fteL 

Green Islands ... 16 

Out of Annftpolii ... 30 

Gut of Canflor ... 8 

Halifax • ... 8 

Hampton RoadB • 5 

Hillsboroagli Inlet • . 6 

Holmee'i Hole . • 4 

John*!, St (N. B.) . . 30 

« St (N.F.) . . 7 

Kennebec ... 9 

Kennebunk ... 9 

Long laland Sound • 5 

Louiaburg (C. B.) . . 5i 

Macbiaa ... 12 

Marblehead . • . 11 

Mary'i, St, Bar . 7 

Monomoy Point . . 6 

Moose Riyer (Bay of Fondy) 30 

<« Island (Me.) . . 25 

Mount Deiert ... 12 

Mouths of the Mississippi Ijl 

Nantucket (Shoal and Town) 5 

Nassau (N. P.) ... 7 

New Bedford ... 5 

Newburyport ... 10 

New Hayen . ... 8 

Newport ... 5 

Nbw Touc • . • 5 

Norfolk .... 6 



«( 



<i 



a 



Partridge Island (Bay of Fnady) 55 

Passamaqaoddy Eiyer 

Penobscot Riyer 

Plymouth • • • 

Portland • 

Port Homer 

Hood • 

Jackson • 

Roseway 
Portsmouth (N. H.) 
Prince Edward's Island 
Proyidence 

Rhode Island Harbour • 
Richmond 

Salem (Mass.) • 

Sandwich Bay . • 
Sandy Hook 
Seyen Isles H^bour 
Sheepscut Biyer 



10 

11* 
9 

8 

6 

6 

8 
10 

6 

5 

5 

4 
11 

8 

5 
31 

9 



Shubenacadie Riyer <B. of Fun.) 70 
Simon's, St, Bar 

<• « Sound . 

Townsend Harbour . 
Truro (Bay of Fundy) . 
Vineyard Sound 
Windsor (Bay of Fundy) 
Wood's Hole 
Yarmouth (N. 8.) 



6 

9 
70 

6 
GO 

6 
12 



TIDE TABLE. 



The following Table contains the difference between the time of high 
water at Boston, and at a large number of places on the American coast, 
by which the time at any of them may oe easily ascertained, by sub' 
traeUn^ the difference at tne place in Question from the time at Boston, 
when the sign — is prefixed to it ; and by adding it, when the sign is -f-* 

The time of high water, in the calendar pages, is of that ti£ which 
immediately precedes the southing of the Moon. 



Albany 
Andrews, St 
Annapolis (N. 8.) 
Annapolis (Md.) 
Augustine, St. 
Bay, Bristed 
<• Broad . 



h. in. 



+ 4 


— 

— 4 

— 3 45 

— 45 



12 



30 

18 





Bay, Casco 
<* Chebucto 

Geneyieye,and) 
St. Barbe 3 

Buzzard's 
Narragaaset 
Pistofit 



<t 

«i 



h. n. 

— 045 

— 4 



— 350 

— 853 

— 445 



i83aj 



TIDE TABLE. 



9 



<c 

44 

U 

14 

c« 

U 

M 

a 
it 
*t 
« 

u 



Bay, St. Maz7*B 

" Sandwich (N. S.) 
** Scbecatiea 
Bermuda InJet • 

Cape Ann. 

Cansor . . 
Charles 
Chat 
Churehill 
Cod 
Fear 
Hatteras 
Henlopen 
Henry 
Lookout 
St. Maij . 
May . 
Romain (S. C.) 
Sable (N. S.) 
Split 
Charleston 
Cumberland (Basin Fort) 
Eastport 

Elizabeth Town Point 
Florida Key 
Fort St. John 
Fryin^pan Shoals 
Gay Head 
Georgetown Bar 
Gooldsborongh 
Gat of Annapolis 
Gat of Cansor 
Halifax 

Hampton Roads 
Harboar, Amelia 
'* Beaver . 
<* Nantucket . 
*< Rhode Island 
'* Seven Isles 
" Townsend 
Hillsboroucrh Inlet 
Holmes's Hole 
Ice Cove 

Island, Anticosti. W. end 
Bell, Straits of 
Block 
Button 
Elizabeth 
Fox 
Green 
Moose 

Prinee Edward 
Rhode 
Sable 
Sea 
Janeiro, Bio . 



« 

IC 

U 

u 
•c 
** 
u 
it 
u 



h. 

— 2 

— 2 

— 

— 4 


— 3 

— 3 

±S 



— 3 
^2 

— 2 

— 3 

— 3 

— 2 

— 2 

— 3 

— 3 

— 

— 4 

+ 


— 2 

— 2 

— 2 

— 6 

— 3 

— 4 

— 

— 1 

— 3 

— 4 

— 3 

— 3 

— 2 
+ 

— 4 

— 

— 

— 4 

— 1 
+ 4 

— 2 

— 3 

— 4 

— 2 

— 

— 2 

— 

— 1 
-4 
• 3 

— 2 
+ 6 



m. 


30 
30 
30 




45 
30 
10 


30 
30 
45 
50 
50 
80 
45 
30 
30 
15 
00 
30 


36 
40 
30 


53 
30 
30 
30 
30 


30 



John's, St. (N. B.) 
'• St. (N. F.) 
Kennebec 
Kennebunk 

Louisburg * . . 

Machias 
Marblehead 

Martha's Vineyard (W. P't 
Mary *B, St, Bar 
Monomoy Point • • 
Mount Desert 
Nantucket (town^ 
(shoal) 
Nassau (N. P.) . 
New Bedford 
Newburyport 
New Haven . 
New London 
Newport 
New Tors 
Nootka Sound 
Norfolk 

CX?racock Inlet 
Old Point Comfort 
Philadelphia 
Plymouth . . . 
Portland 

Portsmouth (N. H.) 
Port Campbell 
Hood 
Howe 
Jackson 
Roseway 
Royal 
Providence 
Quebec 
Race Point 
Richmond 
River, Apple « 
St. Croix 

Delaware, entrance 
George's . . , 
Penobscot • 
Sheepscut 
Salem, Mass. 
53' Salvador, St. 
40| Sandy Hook ... 
50, Savannah 




45 
30 
45 
30 
45 


20 
80 


15 



II 
II 
If 
II 
II 



K 
If 
U 
tt 



•c 



45 



50 





St. Simon's Bar 



(I 



(C 



Offing 
Soand 
_ Sunbury 
45, Tarpaulin Cove . 
Oi Vineyard Sound . 
45|Wind8or 
O.Wood's Hole 



b. ID. 
+ 30 

— 5 

— 45 

— 15 

— 4 15 

— 30 


.) — 3 53 

— 4 


— 30 
H- 30 
+ 44 

— 4 

— 3 30 

— 15 

— 14 

— 2 36 

— 3 50 

— 2 20 
+ 50 

— 3 

— 2 30 

— 5 25 
+ 2 57 



— 45 

— 15 

— 2 30 

— 4 

— 3 

— 3 

— 3 15. 

— 4 14 

— 3 5 

— 5 30 

— 16 
+ 4 20 

— 00 


— 2 30 

— 45 

— 45 

— 45 

— 
+ 4 15 

— 438 

— 3 15 

— 4 

— 4 5 

— 2 30 

— 2 

— 238 

— 030 
+ 030 

— 260 







30 



10 January ^ First Month, begins on Monday, [1838. 


Twilight begini and endi. Mean time. 




lit daj. 


7th day. , 


13th day. 


1 19tb duy.. 1 


25tb day. 




Begins. En<is. 
h. in. h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Eodfl. 1 
h. m. 


Begini 
h. m. 


1. Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins, 
lb. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins.! 
h. m. 


Ends. 

b. m. 


Bolton, 


5 48m. 6 90 a. 


5 48m. 


6 34 a. 


5 48m.|6.39a.'5 47m. 


6 85 a. 


5 44m. 6 49 a. 


N. York, 


5 46 6 33 


,5 46 


6 36 


5 46 


6 81 


5 45 


6 87 


549 644 


Waah. 


6 48 635 


544 


6 39 


5 44 


634 >5 48 


6 89 


5 41 6 46 


Cbarlee. 


5 86 688 


5 86 


6 87 


5 87 


6 41 


5 86 


6 46 


5 85 6 61 


N.Orl'i. 


5 81 6 87 


5 83 


6 40 


5 34 


6 44 


5 83 6 49 


'5 83 16 64 


Jipogee and Perigee ef the Moon. 
Apogee, 14th, 3b. A. | Perigee, 96th, 9h. A. 


Pkttsee qf the Moon. 
Firtt auarter, 3d daj, Ih. 34.9nii. M. Lait Quarter, 18th day, 7h. S6.7in. A. 
Fall Moon, 10th " 9 11.9 A. New Moon, 95th " 8 43.4 A. 


• 

•2 

a 
• 

•o 

1 


• 
M 

% 

•o 

m 


£$un'B npper limb riiofl and setii, (cor. lor retract.) M. T. 


High water. M. time. 




^ ".•\ 


g 


M 


8 

1' 





m 

U 

• 


• 

s 

1 


9* 


a' 

h 

m 
ja 


ritee. 
h. m. 


eeU. 

h. in. 


rises., $tU. 
h. m.'h. n. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets, 'rises. 
h. m. h. m. 


sUs. 

b. m. 


rUes.\ sets. 
h. m.'h. m. 


h. D. 


h. m. 


b. Oim 


1 


M. 


7 80 


4 38 


7 35 443 


7 19 


4 49 > 8 1 


5 5 


6 57 '5 11 


8 6a. 


046a. 


11 6m 


2 


Tu. 


80 


89 


35 


44 


19 


50 


8 


6 


57 


13 


8 58 


1 38 


11 56 


S 


W. 


80 


40 


35 


45 


19 


51 


8 


7 


57 


13 


4 45 


3 95 


45a. 


4 


Th. 


80 


40 


35 


45 


19 


51 


8 


7 


58 


13 


5 33 


8 13 


1 39 


5 


F. 


80 


41 


35 


46 


19 


53 


8 


9 


58 


14 


6 85 


4 15 


9 35 


6 
7 


S. 
Su. 


80 
7 80 


43 
443 


35 

7 35 


47 
4 48 


19 
7 19 


53 


8 


9 
5 10 


58 


14 


7 56 


586 


8 56 


4 54 :7 8 


6 58 5 15 


9 iia. 


6 5ia. 


5 IIR. 


8 


M. 


80 


44 


35 


49 


19 


55 


8 


11 


58 


16 


10 18 


7 53 


6 13 


9 


Tu. 


80 


45 


35 


50 


19 


56 


8 


13 


58 


17 


11 3 


8 43 


7 9 


10 


W. 


80 


46 


35 


51 


19 


67 


8 


18 


58 


18 


11 44 


9 34 


7 44 


11 


Th. 


99 


47 


34 


53 


18 


58 


3 


14 


58 


18 


• • • 


10 1 


8 91 


12 


F. 


39 


48 


34 


53 


18 


59 


3 


14 


58 


19 


3im 


10 86 


8 56 


13 
14 


S. 
Su. 


39 

7 38 


49 
4 60 


34 


54 


18 
7 17 


5 
5 1 


3 
7 3 


15 
5 16 


58 


30 


056 


11 9 


9 99 


7 93 455 


6 68 5 31 


1 39m 


11 44a. 


10 4a. 


15 


M. 


38 


51 


38 


56 


17 


3 


3 


17 


57 


33 


9 4 


• • • 


10 40 


16 


Tu. 


97 


53 


33 


56 


17 


8 


3 


18 


57 


38 


940 


3om 


11 14 


17 


W. 


36 


54 


31 4 59 


16 


4 


3 


18 


57 


38 


8 14 


054 


11 47 


18 


Th. 


36 


55 


31 '5 

1 


16 


5 


3 


19 


57 


34 


3 47 


1 97 


• ■ • 


19 


F. 


35 


57 


30 


3 


15 


7 


1 


30 


57 


35 


438 


9 8 


98m 


20 
21 


Su. 


34 
7 38 


58 
4 59 


19 


8 


7 U 


8 
6 9 


1 
7 1 


90 
5 31 


56 
6 56 


35 
5 36 


5 3 


949 


1 9 


7 19 5 4 


6 im 


3 4im 


9 im 


22 


M. 


38 


5 


18 


5 


18 


10 


1 


33 


56 


37 


7 30 


5 


8 30 


23 


Tu. 


33 


9 


17 


6 


19 


11 





33 


55 


98 


8 48 


633 


443 


24 


W. 


31 


8 


17 


7 


13 


19 





34 


56 


39 


953 


738 


5 58 


25 


Th. 


30 


4 


16 


8 


11 


13 





95 


55 


80 


1&49 


899 


649 


26 


F. 


fO 


5 


15 


9 


10 


14 


659 


36 


64 


81 


11 43 


9 99 


749 


27 
28 


8. 
Su 


19 

7 18 


6 
5 8 


14 


10 


10 
7 9 


15 
5 16 


59 
6 58 


37 
5 38 


54 


83 


80a. 


10 10 


8 80 


7 14 


5 19 


6 58 '5 88 


1 17a. 


10 57m 


9 nm 


29 


M. 


17 


9 


18 


18 


8 


17 


58 


39 


53 


84 


9 8 


11 a 


ID S 


80 


Tu. 


16 


10 


13 


14 


8 


18 


57 


80 


53 


85 


945 


95a. 


10 46 


31 


W. 


16 


13 


11 


16 


7 


30 


57 


81 


53 


86 


8 34 


1 4 


11 24 



1838.] January has Thirty-one Days. 11 


r^aaa^ of the Meridian (mean time) and Oeclinaiion of the Plaoeu. 




Ut day. j 


7th da/. 


13th day. 


1 19lh day. ( 


3&th day. 




SeiOte. 1 Dee. ; 


Sanilu, 


Dee. 


SsHlAtf. 


Dee. 


^SoMtka, 


Dee. 


8satAs. 


Dee. 




h. m. 1 •, ' 


b. m. 


• 4 


h. m. 


• 


, h. n. 


« < 1 


h. m. 


• 1 


9 1 Via. —^ 94' 


1 94a. 


-^18 87 


68a 


. — 17 16 88. 


— 17 11 


11 16m 


— 18 11 


$ 3 18 —U 06 


8 14 


— 10 34 


8 


— 740 8 1 


— 6 16 


9498. 


— 9 61 


^ OCT - 

fi 


-93 83! 


088 


— 9141 


048 


—90 41 46 


—10 33 


41 


— 18 17 


2 


10 oa.- 


-99 AO 


033a. 


4-48 IS 


9 68.-1^93 38 8 408. 


4-93 43. 

1 


8 168. 


4-93 8i 


U 


4 ssm - - ft 86 


4 Mm -^-bn 


8 61II 


1 -f- 6 41 8 96m 


--649, 


8 im 


--6 88 


h 


8 81 — 17 8! 


8 30 — 17 16 


8 8 


— 17 93 7 47 


—17 98 

1 


7 98 


—17 33 


9' s 4sa.' — 10 ii! 


3 34a. — 10 6'il 8 la 


. — 9 60 1 9 888. 


-0 631 


9 168. 


— 941 


^ ^ . 1 Mood rises or sets. Mean time. || 




% 




• 

1 


• 

1 




1^ 




PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 
TIONS. 

SundayB md other RemarkabU 




<S 


3 


• 


Dayt, 






sets. 


A0Ctfe 


9tU. 


sets. 


siCs. 






h. n. 


It. IB. 


b. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 




1 

2 
3 


4ft6a. 
848 

630 


lOftsa. 


10 678. 


10 678. 


lOftOa. 


U 18. 


Earth ocarett the Sun. 


Bm 


sm 


7m 


4m 


6m 


9 at greatest E. elong. 19^ IS'. 


4 


7 17 


190 


1 19 


1 16 


1 9 


1 7 


1|. statiooarj. 


6 


8 6 


9 81 3 98 


394 


9 19 


3 


*^ac)p. 


6 


Bb» 


849 i9» 


3 89 


8 17 


8 13 


EpiphOMy^ 


5. 


8 Ma. 


4 5sm 


4 48in 


4 4im 


4 93m 


4 16m 


\tt Sunday after ESpiphany. 


8 


10 46 


6 9 


6 86 


640 


638 


690 


D*©. *DC8. 


9 


11 40 


m 


rtsM. 


riu$. 


liMti ri§u. 


9 itatiooary. )|C]^47n* 


10 


8 


4 978. 


43fta. 


4 43a. 


6 la. 6 iia. 


(5?^. JPS'N. 


11 


S8II1.I ft 33 


ft40 


6 46 


6 3 ! 6 11 


Venus most briliiant as eyen- 


12 


189 


687 


648 


648 


7 9 


7 8 


[log star. 


13 


9 


7 41 


746 


740 


769 8 4 


14th. *D«ril. c5^^. 


& 


tftim. 


8 4sa. 


6468. 


8 488. 


8 66a. 8 688. 


2d Sunday after Epiphany. 


15 


8 81 


944 


046 


946 


60 


9 61 




16 


4 11 


10 46 


10 47 


10 48 


10 46 


10 46 


15th. d]>U* 


IT 


480 


1148 


1148 


1146 


1140 


1140 




18 


8 80 
6 19 














19 


oaom 


Oftim 


47m 


ossm 


86m 


Inf. d90. 


20 


688 


9 


lft7 


1 63 


130 


1 86 


2l8t. dJh- 


s; 


7 80ni. 


8 iim 


8 6aa 


8 im 


344m 


3 39m 


3d Sunday after Epiphany. 


22 


848 


4 93 


4 17 


4 11 


3 61 


344 


• 


23 


94S 


884 


898 


690 


460 


4fi0 




24 


lots 


686 


630 


693 


6 1 


6 88 


6^9. 


25 


U B6 


Mta. 


Mb. 


Site. 


ssfs. 


ssls. 


ConoerHcn of St. Paul. 


26 


878. 


ftftsa. 


ftftoa. 


6 38. 


6 168. 


6 938. 


6^S' 


27 


Ifti 


7 18 


799 


796 


784 


788 


6^^' 


s: 


9 478. 


8 388. 


8 40a. 


Q 41a. 


8468. 


8 488. 


4tfi Sunday after Epiphany. 


29 


887 


884 


960 


964 


8 63 


868 


28th. d]> ¥' 


SO 


498 


11 8 11 7 


" • 


10 60 


10 06 


9 stationary. 


^1 


8 U 


1... 


• ■ . 


• . • 





12 February, 


Sea 

Twili 


OTU 

gbt 

7tb 


i Month, begins on Thursday, [1838. 


■ 


begins and ends. Mean time. 


• 


1st day. 


1 


da 


y- 

:nds. 
m. 


13tb day. || 


19tb day. 


1 25th da J. 


Begins, 
h. m. ti 


Ends. 
1. m. 


Begins, 
b. m. 


£ 
b. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, i 
h. m. 


begins 

li. m. 


. Ends, 
h.m. 


Begine 

b. m. 


. Bode. 
h.ni. 


Boeton, 


6 88m. 8 60 a. 


6 83m. 


8 66 8. 


6 98m. 


7 8 a. 6 16m. 


.7 10 a. 


|6 9m. 


.7 17 a. 


N. ITork, 


6 87 8 61 


6 81 


8 67 


636 


7 4 6 18 


7 10 


6 10 


7 16 


Wftih. 


6 88 8 63 


6 81 


8 68 


6 36 


7 4 6 18 


7 10 


6 10 


7 16 


Charles. 


5 81 8 67 


637 


7 1 


6 33 


7 8 6 17 


7 11 


6 10 


7 18 


N.OrPi. 


639 869 


636 


7 8 


6 31 


rr 8 6 18 


7 13 


j6 11 7 Iff 1 


JS»oge» and PtrigM qf the Moan, 
Apogee, llth. 9h. M. . | Pericee. 94th. 8b. M. 


„ Phates (^ tAc Movh, 

First aaarter, 1st day, Oh. 95.9in. A. Last auartor, 17th day, Oh. 31.2m. A. 

Full Mood, 9th *> 8 44JS M. New Moon, 94th " 6 59.9 M. 


• 

B 
O 

S 

o 
« 

1 


i \ 


Sun's HfftT limb rises and seU, (oor. for refract.) H. T. 


'lligh water. M. tuae. i 


i 




't 


• 

1 
1 


ek 

•a 

e 
Si? 


•• 

1* 




a 

h 

• 

s? 


i 

1 

1 


M 
O 

r 








li. m. 


h. m. 


ritta. 
b. m. 


sett. 
b. ID. 


b. Di. 


aett. 

b'. m. 


ntes. 
b. m. 


sett, lists, 
a, m. b. m. 


sets, 

h. m. 


b. n. 


h. m. 


h.m. 


1 Th.'7 14 


5 14 


7 10 


6 18 


7 8 


6 S3 


8 68 


6 83 8 61 


6 37 


4 4a. 


1 43a. 


4a. 


2F. 1 IS 


16 


9 


19 


6 


38 


66 


38 


60 


88 


460 


380 


060 


8S. 11 

4 Su. 7 10 


18 
5 18 


8 

7 7 


30 

6 sT 


4 
7 8 


34 
6 36 


64 

864 


84 
5 36 


49 
8 49 


89 

640 


6 61 


8 81 


161 


7 16a. 


4 668. 


8 1«U 


6M. 9 


19 


8 


93 


9 


88 


63 


88 


48 


41 


848 


838 


448 


6Tu. 


8 


30 


6 


98 


1 


97 


69 


87 


47 


43 


10 1 


7 41 


6 1 


7W. 


7 


S3 


4 


36 


7 


38 


61 


88 


48 


48 


10 60 


880 


680 


8 Th. 


8 


38 


8 


98 


869 


99 


60 


89 


46 


48 


1199 


9 9 


799 


9F. 1 6 


36 


9 


97 


68 


80 


49 


40 


44 


44 


... 


948 


8 6 


10 S. 


4 


38 
6 37 


7 1 

8 69 


99 
6 80 


67 
868 


81 
6 83 


46 
8 47 


41 


48 


46 

648 


6m 


10 19 


880 


11 iSu. 7 3 


643 


8 43 


39m 


10 49a. 


9 oa. 


12 M. 


1 


38 


68 


81 


66 


83 


48 


43 


43 


47 


1 9 


11 17 


987 


13 Tu. 





80 


67 


83 


64 


• 

86 


46 


44 


41 


47 


187 


U 47 


10 7 


UW. 


6 68 


81 


66 


84 


68 


88 


44 


46 


^. 


48 


9 7 


. • • 


10 34 


16 Th. 


67 


33 


64 


86 


63 


87 


43 


48 


89 


49 


984 


14m 11 9 1 


16 F. 


66 


83 


63 


88 


60 


88 


43 


48 


88 


49 


1 8 9 


43 


1189 


17 S. 


64 


34 
S 86 


61 
860 


87 
6 88 


49 
8 48 


89 
6 40 


41 
8 40 


47 
6 48 


87 
888 


60 
6 61 


839 

4 93m 


1 19 


• • • 


18 iSu. 6 63 


3 sm 


39m 


19 M. 


61 


87 


49 


89 


47 


41 


89 


49 


88 


69 


6 18 


3 68 


1 16 


20Tu.l 60 


88 


48 


40 


48 


43 


88 


60 


86 


63 


840 


4 30 


9 40 


2lW.i 48 


40 


46 


43 


44 


43 


87 


60 


84 


68 


8 16 


6 66 


4 18 


22 Th. 47 


41 


46 


43 


43 


44 


88 


61 


83 


64 


9 87 


7 17 


687 


23 F. 46 


43 


44 


44 


43 


46 


86 


63 


83 


66 


10 88 


8 18 


838 


24 S. 


44 


44 
6 46 


43 
8 41 


46 

6 48 


41 
8 40 


48 


84 


63 
6 68 


81 
8 80 


66 

6 68 


n 31 


9 11 


7 31 


25 Su, 8 43 


6 47 8 83 


ua. 


9 64m 8 14m 


26 M. 40 


48 


89 


47 


88 


48 83 


64 


80 


68 


67 


10 87 


887 


27 Tu. M 


48 


87 


49 


88 


60 80 


66 


98 


66 


1 88 


11 16 


988 


28 W. « 


49 


88 


60 


84 


61 39 


68 


37 


66 


3 18 


U 68 


10 18 



n 



1838.1 February has Twenty^gkt Days, 13 


Pms«^ of th« Meridiaa (mean time) and Deelioatioa of Um Plaoata. 


1st <Uj. 


7th day. 


13th daj. 


19ih day. ) 


9Sth day. 


^SamtkM. 


Dee. 


&ma«. 


Dee. 


SnifJU. 


Dee. 


iSvuCJU. 


Dee. 


V «• 




h. m. 


• 1 


h. n. 


• 


, ,h. m. 


« 


b. Da 


O 1 


9 \lO 40fD - 


—19 SO 


10 90m 


—90 11 


10 99m|-HW lft||l0 3ftm 


— 19 36 10 44m 


— 18 19 


? 


S S9L; — n| 


9 isa. 


+ 1S0 


1 408 


. -|- 9 47 1 loa. 


-^-894 


! 4fta. 


+ 3 16 


S 

fi 


0« - 


-16 39 


30 


— ^16 8 


098 


— 13 33 19 


—11 68 


14 


—10 8 


T4M.- 


H*17 


798a. 


-1^94 84 


7 fta 


.-1-94 09 6 4fta. 


-Hwii 


6960. 


+96 80 


u 


s asm.-}- IS 


9 om 


--697 


1 40m|-f- 6 43 1 14m 


--7 0) 40m 


--7 18 


h 


» — 17 38 


637 


— 17 41 


, 6 14 


— 17 44 6 ftl 


—17 46 ft 98 
— 16 9ia. 


—17 40 


V 


1 doa.' — » S9| 1 ssa. 


— 030 


: 1 fta. — 9 93| 438. 


— 9 


a 


Hoon rtM« or aota. Moao timo. || 






• 


g" . : " li 


PHENOMBNA AND OBSERVA- 


j 


4 




s . 


S , 


TIONS. 




* e 

jj 


1 
1 


• 

as 


JA o 

r 


8 ^ 

r 


• 


Sundaifi and other Remartablt 
Dayt, 




Mt», 


»4U, 


•«to. 


ui», hU. I 






h. a. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


o. fl^ h. n. 'h. on. 


- 


1 


SB. 


ssm 


lom 


loin. 6m 9m | 


3«ci>a<f. 


8 


6M 


1 37 


1 39 


1 98 1 13 


' • 


CandlemoM. c$ Tf PMadef. 


3 


1 47 


950 


344 


918 990 


9 13 1 


5lh SimdMf o/Ur Epiphany, 


& 


S4M. 


8 aem 


I 8 4900 


8 43m 3 9iraj 3 13m j 


5 


• M 


436 448 


441 


4 19 


4 11 




6 


loss 


8 48 6 41 


684 


ft 19 


6 8 


*>cn. 


7 


11 18 


TIMS. 


rtfM. 


Tint, 


rJMf. 


ria9». 


[18S5. 


8 


s 


4 S8&. 


4 318. 


4 878. 


4 ftoa. 


4 608. 


Sovere cold in Soulbcm Slatao, 


9 


ftm. 


6 31 


ftSft 


ft 80 


ftftl 


ft A6 


$ staUooarj. 9|e>87^. 


10 


• 48 


6 S3 


630 


630 


6 46 


6 ftl 


Septuagetima Smrutay, 


1 99ID. 


7 348. 


7 368. 


7368. 


7 408. 7 43a. i 


12 


t 9 


8 36 1 6 36 


888 


836 


637 


¥r^m' ^>U. [K^lO*. 


18 


940 


038 


937 


930 


039 


31 


12tb. ^at greaieft W. tiong. 


14 


897 


10 41 


10 30 


10 88 


10 99 


10 97 




16 


4 8 


1146 


11 49 


11 38 


11 96 


1194 




16 


4M 


■ • • 


■ • • 


■ . ■ 


• • • 


. . . ■ 


nih. p|c> Aotaref. 


17 


8 30 


54Xn 


49m 


043m 


99m 


94m 


DOh- <5^h- 

Sesageiima Stmdtuf, 


S. 


8 sam. 


S 609 


3 om 


1 ft4m 


1 36m 


1 98m 


19 


T3Q 


8 1ft 


3 8 


3 1 


940 


339 




20 


8 31 


4 19 


4 11 


4 4 


8l9 


886 




21 


• 84 


6 1ft 


6 8 


6 1 


440 


433 


S2d. d > 9 • 


22 


MSO 


• 


ft 64 


648 


6 31 


ft Oft 


Washington born, 1739, N. S. 


23 


II 8ft 


Mta, 


•0U» 


Mto. 


•««. 


HU. 


«4ib. 6Qg' 


24 


318. 


6 7a. 


6 loa. 


6 19a. 


6 loa. 


6 9ia. 


St, MaWtSoM, d > V- 
Shrove Bmnday. 


1 338. 


7 -ira. 


7 98a. 


7 908. 


7308. 


7 39a. 


26 


8 14 


840 


8 46 


846 


8 41 


840 


27lh. dOW- 


27 


8 4 


to 4 


10 9 


980 


9 61 


9 40 


akrove Tu€$daif, 


b» t^ 


11 91 111 18 


11 U 


11 


10 60 


Ash Wednetday. \ 



9 



14 Marck, Third Month, beglm on Thursday. f 1838.1 




BoMni, 
N.Y«k, 
Wuti. 

Chula. 
N.Orl'i. 


Mt.r- 1 T.i.«,. 1 lJO.d.,. ,1 IWhUu,. ;| lS.I.,l.y. 1 


1 tm.^ 31 a. 4 

: : 5" 1: 
t;i;;:ii: 


um. } » a. 4 tiin 

« 7« J4 4« 
H 7 3* 4 al 
I) T 33 I4 U 


) M .4 w 


£»!.. |B.iiu., Ka... 
J 43 I4 M ,1 4t 

7 40 U aa ,7 w 

T >* 4 M -I M 

1 11 4 37 7 U 




l-tattfriluM-c,. 
PlrllOuutil, U <l>f, lb.3e.4iD. M. |L<ulUuin«. ISlb dlf, Ih. n.lln. N. 
KullMoon, ' Itlh"" 3 SiJI M. 1 N,. Moon. ' SErih "' 4 X.i A. 


-' - ' ^••■■•'—t 


IlLu;, rlHi 1.1111 HU,(Dui.U.ir<>Iiul.| M. T.l 


H«h..L,r. ai.l—.| 








1 

•^ 


i' 


1' 


h 


1 


1^ 


1' 




9a 


T 3S 

: n 

1 30 


M 

as 

30 




^ 


i'i: 
I 

n 
so 

14 

e 

g T 

* 
a 1 

>N 

Bia 
a« 

aa 


u 


10 38 

11 M 

41 
110 

S»7 

aia 

• 34 

10 30 

130 

1 ao 
in 


b.n. 
41> 

334 

10 31 

11 u 

330 

a« 

ViSTn 

11 CO 
oai 


DMm 

34S 

as* 

S IM. 
• *7 

lim. 

iia 
aw 

_»30 

IM 
8(3 

• II 

»ao 
ia3t 


ISI 


z\i 


u 
u 

81 ) 

1 

t» I 


a 13 

> > B 
8 

U I 1 

a >» 
a M 

30 H 

n 1 «s 


a n 

rr 

a 1 

>M 

sas 

M 

a* 


■I 

n 



1838.J Marck has ThirtyM^tu Days 


■ 




15 


Pu«HS« erth« Meridian (iihuid time)' and Declination 


of the Planata. 


1 


lai lUy. 


7tb Oay. 


I'Jib day. 


iifih daf 1 


'Jinh 


day. 


' 


»•■»>». ' Dm. 


SmUkt. 


D9C. 


Souths. 


Dao. 


Somtkt. 


Uao. 


Souths. 


DmT 


h.m. . ,• 


b. m. 


m 


n. OB. 


• ' 


1 h. n. 


• 1 


b. n. 


• 1 


9 


10 Mm! — 16 4S| 


11 8m 


— ^14 6 


11 19m| — 10 36 11 36m 


— 693 


11 63m 


— 1 98 


9 


oioa.- 


f-3 43 


11 a 


-f- 1 21 


11 8 


— 99 10 88 


— 9 4 


10 13 


— 8 37 


a 
n 


10 - 


-840 


40. 


— 7 6 


11 60 


— 6 16 11 61 


— 393 


11 a 

1 


— 1 90 


^ 
? 
n 


owm- 


f-7 81 


4m 


+ 7 4fl 


11 890 


. 4- 10 11 6a. 


+ 9?!' 10 40a. 


+ •48 


f} • IS 1 17 46 


1 4 80 


— 17 46 i 4 96mj — 17 44 4 9m — 17 49' | 3 38m 


—17 40 


9 6a.' — 9 9 


11 48 


— 8 A& 'l 1 31 — 8 47 10 60 — 8 40* 10 86 


— 889 


j£ 1 .' ( Mo«>n riM* or aata. Mean time. | 




it -^ * ' 




C ^ 1 . 1 


m 


PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 


*1 
S 


if 


o 

1 

i 


M 

■ 


1. 

•= S 
•fi4l 

1 


o 
o 


3 

• 

S5 


TIONS. 

Smdayw and other RemvkahU 
Day«. 






nu. 


sets. 


sUt. 


teU. 


sets. 




h. m. 


b m. 


h. B. 


h. D. 


fa. in. 


h. m. 




li 4 «7a. 

2 541 












St. David. 
3d. d^?. 


861X1 


8im 


36m 


am 


8m 


si 

1 


• 37 


1 49 


1 41 


1 84 


1 14 


1 7 


4th. 25ib CongrreM began, 18S7. 
Ut tiunday in Lent. ^ UQ- 


SJ 


7 tia. 


3 bllQ 


9 44m 


3 37m 


3 ifim 


9 7m 


6 


OSS 


la 


8 SB 


8 31 


3 9 


8 1 


Boston massacre, 1770. 


^ 


Itf 


4 SI 


4 39 


4 16 


3 68 


3 61 


6ih. Inf. d?©. *>il& 


II 


10 s 


6 7 


5 3 


466 


4 39 


4 38 


D©?. d?^. 


s 


10 47 


ft 84 


630 


696 


6 11 


6 7 


f^ sUtionary. 


9' 11 2B 

1 


Ti»€9. 


ritm. 


riMe$. 


rues. 


ruw. 




10 

5. 


8 


A 38a. 


6 aia. 


6 338. 


6 ssa. 


6 4ia. 


2d Sunday in Lent. 


9in. 


• 38a. 


6 39a. 


6 30a. 


6 818. 


6 338. 


12 


048 


7 39 


799 


738 


796 


7 36 


d?9. 


IS 137 


889 


8 31 


8 39 


8 93 


8 91 


d9W- 


14 


9 e 


987 


9 34 


9 81 


31 


18 




16 


950 


10 44 


10 40 


10 36 


10 33 


10 18 


16ih. 5|CD«37ni. dJh- 


16 


836 


11 »4 


11 40 


11 43 


11 36 


11 31 


I7th. dU/<0- 


17 

5- 


496 


• « • 


• • • 


... 


... 


• • • 


St. Patrick. Kritisli left Boston, 
a<f Sunday in Lent. [1776. 


6 9im. 


1 8m 


67ro 


0Om 


30m 


33m 


19 


6 19 


9 7 


3 


1 63 


1 81 


1 33 


^1>//. - 


20. 7 19 


8 8 


3 67 


960 


3 38 


930 


Spring begine. 


21) B19 


8 83 


3 46 


340 


8 91 


8 14 


Dfi© 


22 


9 18 


4 31 


437 


4 91 


4 6 


4 1 


Newton died, 1727. 


23 


10 14 


6 8 


6 1 


4 67 


4 46 


443 


dJ?. 69i' 


24 


11 B 


830 


6 99 
Mtr. 


637 


6 30 


6 19 


9 stationary. ^ ]> 9* 

Lady Day. Mid Lent Sunday, 


S. 


^ 11 flSm. 


•eta. 


»eU. 


sttt. 


»eU. 


26', Ma. 1 7 Ma. 


7 36a. 


7 3sa 


7 978. 


7 968 


25ib. 6 }> ^- ® eclipsed invis. 


27 


1 43 1 866 


8 68 


B 60 


888 


836 


Mahometan year 1264 begine. 


29 


386 


10 14 


10 10 


10 6 


9 49 


944 


*1>CT- 


29 


880 


11 80 


11 94 


11 17 


10 68 10 69 


Sup. d 9 ©. 


90' A OA 








11 66 

... 




31 


8 SS 


....... 

88m' 83in 


96m 4m 











16 April, 


Fourth Month, i 


begins on Sunday, 


[1838.1 




Twilight begini and endi. Mean time. 






lat day. 


1 7th day. | 


13tb day. || 


19th day. i 


fi5th daj. 


Begina. 
h. m. fa 


End*, 
.m. 


Begina. 
h. m. 


Enda. 
h. m. 


Begina. 
h. m. 


Enda. 
h.m. 1 


Segiaa. 
1. m. 


Etida. ' 
h.m. 


Begina. £ada. 
h. m. h. m* 


Boston, 


4 7in.6 


1 a. 


8 AAin. 


8 9 a. 


3 48m. 


8 18 a. 8 8im. 


8 37 a. 


8 19m. 8 rv a. 


N. fork, 


4 11 7 67 


8 69 


8 6 


3 48 


8 14 8 87 


893 


8 96 


880 


Wub. 


4 16 7 63 


4 4 


8 J 


3 68 


8 9 843 


8 17 


3 88 


898 


CharlM. 


4 96 746 


4 16 


7 49 


4 7 


7 66 : 


i A9 


8 


3 61 


8 • 


N. Orl»f. 


499 769 


4 91 


7 44 


4 13 


7 49 4 6 


7 63 


3 68 


7 68 


Jip9ge» mud Perigu t^ the Mown. 
Apofea, 6th, Oh. A. | PerigM, S9d, 3h. M. 


Phages fif the Moon, 
Fint OMiter, '^ lit dtr, Ah, 9«.5iii. A. Last aaartor, 17th day, lOh. 91.6iii. BC 
Fail Moon, 9th " 8 58.3 A. New Moon, 94th " 1 59^ M. 


• 

1 

S 

1 


• 
M 

1 


Bun's «pp«r limb riiei and seta, (oor. for refract.) M. T. 


High water. M. Uao. 






i 


1 


r 


1 

Su- 
JB 


h 

• 

as 


i 


M 
O 


3 


neee. 

Urn ID. 


eeU. 

h. n. 


rieea. 
h. m. 


etU. 

h. n. 


rife*. 
h.m. 


»et§, 

h. m. 


rues. 
ha m. 


*eU. 

h. m. 


rieee. 
n. m. 


§eu. 

h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


k.ni. 


1 


Su, 


6 46 


6 96 


646 


6 94 


6 46 


6 99 ,6 49 


6 90 


6 60 


6 19 


8 A8a. 


1 88a. 


1168m 


2 


M. 


49 


97 


46 


96 


46 


98 


48 


91 


49 


90 


4 66 


988 


86a. 


8 


Tu. 


40 


98 


41 


96 


46 


94 


46 


91 


47 


90 


696 


4 6 


998 


4 


W. 


68 


99 


69 


97 


41 


94 


46 


99 


46 


91 


768 


633 


861 


6 


Th. 


66 


60 


87 


98 


40 


96 


44 


98 


46 


91 


9 8 


648 


6 8 


6 


P. 


64 


61 


66 


99 


68 


96 


49 


93 


44 


99 


10 4 


744 


8 4 


7 
6 


S. 

Su. 


63 
6 61 


89 
6 66 


88 


60 


66 

6 86 


6 98 


41 
A 39 


94 
6 96 


48 

6 41 


93 

6 36 


10 41 


8 91 


8 41 


A 69 


6 61 


11 14a. 


6 64a. 


7 14a. 


9 


M. 


99 


64 


60 


83 


86 


99 


88 


36 


40 


96 


11 4t 


933 


741 


10 


Tu. 


97 


66 


98 


86 


81 


60 


87 


96 


89 


94 


• • • 


949 


6 9 


11 


W. 


96 


66 


97 


84 


80 


81 


66 


97 


88 


94 


om 


10 16 


888 


12 


Th. 


94 


67 


96 


66 


98 


83 


84 


97 


87 


96 


86 


10 46 


9 8 


18 


P. 


96 


68 


94 


66 


9T 


88 


88 


98 


66 


36 


1 6 


11 19 


968 


14 
16 


S. 
Su. 


91 
6*19 


69 

6 40 


96 

A 91 


67 
6 88 


96 
A 94 


84 

6 66 


89 
6 81 


99 
6 80 


86 
A 84 


96 

637 


1 89 


11 66 


10 U 


3 16111 


... 


lOffra. 


16 


M. 


18 


41 


90 


89 


98 


86 


80 


60 


68 


37 


9 67 


87m 


U 47 


17 


Tu. 


16 


49 


18 


40 


99 


87 


99 


61 


69 


38 


8 47 


137 


• • • 


18 


W. 


14 


48 


16 


41 


90 


88 


98 


89 


31 


39 


4 AA 


3 86 


66m 


19 


Th. 


18 


44 


16 


43 


19 


39 


97 


83 


80 


39 


6 99 


4 3 


939 


20 


P. 


11 


46 


18 


48 


17 


40 


96 


88 


99 


60 


7 A3 


A 33 


866 


21 
22 


S. 


10 


47 
6 48 


19 
S 10 


46 

6 46 


16 
6 14 


41 
6 49 


94 
6 38 


84 

6 86 


98 
A 37 


30 
6 81 


9 1 

1 9 A7m 


6 41 


6 1 


^ 


6 6 


7 37m 


6 67m 


28 


M. 


6 


49 


9 


47 


16 


48 


93 


66 


96 


81 


JO 49 


823 


649 


24 


Tu. 


6 


60 


8 


48 


19 


44 


91 


86 


96 


83 


11 96 


9 A 


796 


26 


W. 


6 


69 


6 


49 


10 


46 


90 


87 


94 


88 


7a. 


47 


8 7 


26 


Th. 


9 


68 


6 


60 


9 


46 


19 


87 


38 


88 


46 


10 36 


848 


27 


P. 


6 1 


64 


4 


61 


8 


47 


18 


88 


99 


84 


I 97 11 7 1 


997 


28 
29 


S. 
Su. 


460 
468 


66 

6 67 


3 
A 1 


69 6 

6 63 A 6 

64 1 8 


48 
6 49 


16 
6 lA 


89 
6 89 


96 
A' 19 


86 

636 


9 9 


11 49 
888. 


10 


9 A8a. 


10 66m 


SOlM. 


66 


68 





60 


14 


40 


18 


36 


8 89 


1 19 


1188 



18:^.] April has Thirty Days. 171 


PMMg« oTUe Meridian (owiio itwe) and t>«eliiuUioa ofth* Plsii«u. | 


1 


lA dmj, 1 


7th ilHjr. 


13th dajr. 


1 19th day. , 


asth daj. 1 




JSm.**.! 


Dm. 


SMrfAtf. il«e. 


SmUkM 


. Dae. 


l8v«lA«. 


llM. 


SniJkB. 


Dm. 


1 h.DU 


. . ' 


h. m. 


h. m. 


• 


. ih. n. 


• • 


h. m. 


• t 


9 ) lM.I-1- d H! t6a.:-f-IO 99 


6ea. -|-18 48 1 iia. 


+!•« 


1 18a. 


+9147 


!? 


• MIB( — 4 90 • Mm. — 4 49 


1 9 98m — 4 41 , 9 nm 


— 47 


9 11111 


— 8 10 


a 


1117 +0 44: 


1180 


+ «M 


11 98 


4* 4 f 11 n 


+ 8 16 


11 10 


+ 8 8 


499 - 


1 
— 9 9 


8 11 


— 8 41 


449 


— 8 13 497 


— 744 


4 8 


— 7 18 




10 lOft. - 


f88^ 


9 449* 


+ 9 10 


9 198 


. -|- 9 19 9 840. 


-f-936 


8 898. 


+ 980 


1 f| a lom - 


-17 lO 


9 48m — 17 81 


9 3om — 17 37; 1 86m 


— 17 33^ 


1 30m 


—17 18 


!¥:wM - 


— 8 94*' 9 48 ' — 8 18 


9 9ft 


1 — 8 11 1 9 1 I — 8 6: 


840 


— 8 


i ^i 


Mooo riMM or «»ii. Mean tioie. f 


PHENOMENA AND OBBEEVA- 


. 


6 


* 


^ 


M 


o 


jl 


J 


- 

• 


1 

r-- 

r 


3. *> 

r 


h 

m 

as 


TIONS. 
amdtOfB md otUr JtemarkabU 


5. 

2 


h. m. 

6 ua. 

7 11 


h. m. 

1 imi 

998 


MU 

h.m. 
1 39m 
999 


stU, 

h. n. 

1 38m 
3 16 


Mb. 

h> n. 

1 4m 

1 64 


«ete. 

B. IB. 

67m 

1 48 


5lh Bmtday m Leni, 
lil. *>47n. 


S 


9 Is 8 


8 8 


967 


918 


9 81 




4 


841 t 8S8 


818 


880 


1 14 


8 9 




5 998 


4 8 '40 


868 


144 


8 41 




6 10 § 


4 38 4 91 


4 18 


4 10 


4 9 


d>U. *l>tffl. 


7 10 47 


4 49 


4 49ra 


440 


4 16 


434 


Palm Sunday, 

}f oclipsed, viflble ia U. Sialef . 


9 


11 96a. 
8 


ri0t$. 
8 96a. 


risef, 
8 388. 


rigu. 
8 918. 


8 loa. 


riats. 

8 isa. 


10 


Tin. 


7 99 


797 


738 


7 14 


7 19 




11 


049 


8 18 888 


899 


8 16 


8 11 


i2ih: 5|c>/^. *>A'ni. 


12 


1 84 


945 


9 41 


916 


9 18 


9 IS 


13th. c5 $C 8 » 1^ aear approach. 


18 


931 


10 54 


10 48 


10 41 


10 93 


10 16 


Good Friday, d > h- CJ?W- 


14 


8 18 


* • • 


11 68 


1148 


11 34 


11 17 


EdiUr Sunday. 

17th. Franklin died, 1790. 


16 


4 18m. 
8 19 


om 

1 










6im 


46m 


33m 


18m 


17 


8 a 


1 60 


1 44 


1 17 


1 17 


1 10 


Battle of Lexington and begin. 


18 


7 8 


9 11 


337 


9 31 


? * 


1 60 


[of American Revolution , 1776. 


19 


8 8 


8 4 


1 1 


3 67 


348 


339 


19th. Byron died, 1824, a. 86. 


20 


8 8S 


810 


1 30 


836 


3 17 


8 14 


dDW. 23d. c5>?. 


;2i 


9 4» 


3 84 


1 64 


3 63 


8 40 


3 48 


Battle of St. Jacinto, 1836. 
Low Sunday. 6 ^ S' 


's. 


10 8810. 


4 i7in 


4 18m 4 lom 


4 3om 4 33m 


2S 


n 98 


«Cf#. 


teU. 


Ht$, 


««(«. 


MtM, 


St. George. VeDos most brilliant 


M 


loa. 


7 48a. 


7 43a. 


7 198. 


7 368. 


7 3ia. 


[as moniiiig atar. 


.25 

1 


1 u 


9 7 


9 3 


868 


8 89 


6 38 


9 at greatest E. elong. 20*^ 20'. 


20 


3 11 


10 30 


10 14 


10 7 


47 


40 


tsih. :4c ^ 9 . 


27 


8 9 


11 38 


11 18 


11 11 


10 49 


10 41 


*DC8. 


28 


4 1 








11 46 


11 17 


d ]> ?. Chaucer died, 1434. 
[President of the U. S., 1789, 








8 38. 


3im 


14m 


7m 


• • . 


• • • 


SO 


883 


1 8 


060 


069 


33m 


36m 


Washington inaugurated as first 



8' 



18 May, Fifth Month, begins on Tuesday, [183^. 


Twilifht begiiu aod eod*. Moaq tinM. 




lat day. 


7l 

Begii 
h. m. 


b day. | 


13th day. | 


19th day. | 


95th day. | 




Begins, 
h. m. 


Eodi. ! 
h. m. 


IS. 


Enda. Begins. Ends, t Begins, 
h. m. h. as. h. n. , h. m. 


^da. 
h. m. 


Begins, 
h.m. 


finds, 
h.m. 


BostOBi 


a 7m. 


8 47 8. 


3 8603. 


sera. 


3 46m.9 7 a. |3 8603. 


9 17 a. 


S9&m. 


938 0. 


N.York, 


S M 


8 40 


8 4 


8 49 


3 64 


866 34i 


9 8 


9 86 


9 18 


Waah. 


393 


8 33 


|3 13 


8 40 


3 4 


848 966 


6n 


9 47 


9 7 


Chatlet. s 48 - 


8 11 


i8 86 


8 17 


3 98 8 94 3 99 


830 


8 17 


837 


N.OrlVi, S51 


8 8 i|8 46 


8 8 


3 88 8 14 S 33 


890 


3 38 'a 36 1 


■Jhntgtt a»d Ptrif$ of the Moon, 
Apofee, 4th, 2b. M. Apogee, 31it, 7h. A. 
Perigee, ]9tb, 7 A. 


Phaaos ^ the Moon. 
Pint Oaaitoff, 1st dajr, lOh. 56.7m. M. New Moon, 93d daj, llh. 14.9a. M. 
Fall Moon, 9th *^ 11 49.4 M. Firat auuter, 31«t " S 27.3 M. 
Lastauarter. 16th " 4 33.8 A. 




• 

8 

St 
& 


SuD*B tipp^ limb nsM and aeU, (cor. for refract.) M. T. i 


High water. M. tima. 


e 






■ 

i 


6 

e 

s 

1 


r. 


o 


m 

§ 

1^ 


1. 


m 

s 

• 

2 


o 

1 
1 


9 

as 


§ 






riMOs. »eta 


riau. 


aeU. 


rues.laeU. 


risea.' seta. 


rtaea. 


aeU. 


1 


' 








h. n. b. 00. 1 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. SB. h. m. 


h. m..l). m. 


b. m. 


h. m.| h. m. 


h n. b. BB. 


1 


Tu. 


4 64 


6 60 


4 69 


6 66 


6 3 6 63 


5 13 


6 41 


5 17 


6 37 1 4 33a. 


3 i:;a. a3a. 


2 


W. 


63 


7 


68 


66 


1 


63 


13 


43 


16 


38 


646 


896 1 1 46 


8 


Th. 


63 


1 


67 


. 67 


5 


64 


11 


43 


15 


39 


7 8 


448 i 8 8 


4 


F. 


60 


3 


66 


68 


4 69 


66 


10 


44 


15 


40 


8 16 


6 56 , 4 16 


5 


S. 
Su. 


49 
4 48 


8 

7 4 


65 
4 64 


6 69 

7 


68 
4 67 


65 
6 66 


10 
6 9 


46 

6 44 


14 
5 13 


40 
6 41 


9 13 


6 69 5 13 


6 


9 66a. 


7 368. 6 66aH. 


7 


M. 


47 


6 


63 


1 


66 


67 


8 


46 


13 


43 


10 33 


8 13 6 33 


8 


Tu. 


46 


6 


63 


9 


65 


68 


7 


46 


12 


43 


11 9 


843 , 7 3 


9 


W. 


46 


7 


61 


8 


64 


6 69 


6 


47 


11 


43 


1134 


9 14 7 34 


10 


Th. 


44 


8 


60 


4 


63 


7 


6 


48 


11 


44 


. • . 


948 , 8 8 


11 


P. 


48 


9 


49 


6 


62 


1 


6 


48 


10 


44 


80)10 93 ! 8 43 1 


12 
18 


S. 
Su, 


43 
1 41 


10 
7 11 


48 
4 47 


6 

r~7 


61 
4 60 


3 
7 3 


4 
6 3 


49 
6 60 


9 
6 9 


45 
6 46 


043 


11 9 

11 45a 


9 99 


1 39m 


10 68. 


14 


M. 


40 


13 


46 


8 


49 


4 


3 


60 


8 


46 


9 6 


... 1061 


15 


Tu. 


38 


13 


44 


9 


48 


6 


9 


61 




46| 


3 61 


Sim 11 46 


16 


W. 


38 


14 


43 


10 


47 


6 


1 62 




47 


346 


1 96 ... 


It 


Tb. 


37 


16 


43 


11 


46 


« 


6-2 




48' 


4 61 


9 31 6im 


IH 


P. 


36 


16 


41 


19 


45 7 


5 ! 63 




48 


6 10 


3 60 9 10 


19 
20 


S. 


36 


17 

7 18 


40 
4 89 


13 
7 14 


45 
4 44 


8 
7 9 


4 69 64 
4 69 ,6 64 


5 5 


49 

6 49 1 


796 


6 6 


396 


5U. 4 85 


8 83m 


6 13m 


4 3Sm 


21 


.\I. 


34 


19 


88 


14 


43 


9 


68 


65 




60 ' 


936 17 6 596 | 


22 


Tu. 33 


90 


87 


16 


43 


10 


67 ' 66 




60 


10 16 


766 


6 16 


23 


W. »« 


31 


86 


16 


43 


11 


67 


66 


3 


61 


11 3 


843 


7 3 


24 


Th. 81 


33 


36 


17 


41 


13 


68 


66 


8 


"l 


11 48 


9 98 


748 


26 


p. 


SO 


33 


86 


18 


41 


18 


66 


67 


3 


«=*, 


3ia. 10 11 


8 81 


26 


s. 


39 


34 


34 


19 


40 


13 


66 


67 


9 


63 


1 13 10 63 


9 IS 


27 


Su. 


4 38 


7 90 


4 34 


7 30 


4 39 


7 14 


4 66 666 


5 1 


6 63 I 


1 638. 11 88m 


96am 


28 


M. 


38 


36 


33 


31 


38 


15 


64 1 68 


1 


m; 


984 


I4H. 


10 34 


29 


Tu. 


37 


97 


S3 


33 


38 


16 


64 69 





63 


8 18 


068 


11 18 


80 


W. 


36 


37 ^ 83 


33 


87 


16 


63 6 69 





64 


4 9 


1 49 


98. 


81 


Th. 


96 


38 81 


33 1 87 


17 


68 7 





64 


6 3 


948 


1 3 



183S.J Hay has Tkiriy-one Days. 19| 




Punfe of the MeridiAO (mean time) and Declination of the Plaoete. ] 




i«t day. 1 


7th day. 


1 13th day. ,| 19th day. | 


SSth day. | 




SevOe.! 


IVe. ' 


SraOe. 


Dee. 


tertAe 


. Uee. 


StuUU. 


Deo. 


Ssmtke. 


l>ee. 


1 !».«. 


• 1 


h. ra. 


, • * 


h. m. 


• 


, b. n. 


• ) 


h.m. 


A 1 


9 1 IM. 


4^81 


06oa. 


4-«i« 


908 


.-}-19 66i;il 46m 


--I7 80 


11 iim 


--16 91 


$ • TOB- 


— 1 50 


4m 


— 09a 


1 am + 1 9si o o 


-•318 


9 


--6 91 


^ 11 » - 

fi 


-(-04fti 

( 


10 Mf 


+11 94 


i 10 60 


4-19 69 10 44 


-j-uso 


10 87 


-1-15 68 


1 

— 040: 


8 16 


— 099 


1 349 


— 060 998 


— 834 


166 


— 6 14 




1 

e 68.- 


+-0 82, 


7 49a. 


+ 983 


1 7 198. + 9 38 6 668. 


-f-998 


6 848. 


-f-9 16 


h 


1 6m- 


—17 10 


40m 


—17 4 


; 14m — 16 66 ill 45 


— 10 53 


11 19 


-16 43 


9 


e 17 


— 7 5* 


7 64 


— 75C 


) 7 31 


— 7 47 1 7 8m 


— 743 


6 46m — 7 4l| 


^ t . \ Moon riam or wU. Mean time. i 




1 -«5 


• 


«k 




*k 


PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 


1 


e» 

1 

• 

2S 


1^ 


34 


1 


TIONS. 
8tmdaif§ and other RemarkahU 


5 


Ja 


1 




• 

2: 


DaifM. 






jet*. 


jeu. 


nU, 


Ufa, 


MU, 






h. n. 


D« TDu 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 




1 


e40a. 


1 som 


1 36m 


1 39m 


1 13m 


1 7m 


2d. *>87il. 


2 


794 


9 


9 9 


1 56 


1 44 


1 40 


St. Phiiip and James, 


Z 


8 B 


999 


395 


933 


3 18 


9 10 


as©. c5}^ii» 


4 


645 


943 


940 


946 


330 


988 


*)/9np. [d.l827. 


6 


994 


8 5 


a 6 


3 5 


8 8 


8 8 


Bonaparte d. 1821. La Place 
Sd Sunday after Eaeter. 


« 


10 4&. 


899m 


89Sm 


8 34m 


8 36m 


8 97m 


7 


10 46 


8 41 


348 


8 46 


3 61 


8 64 


9 and )l staiicnaiy. 


8 


11 80 


me*. 


nf«». 


riau. 


«^<#. 


T%$ta» 




« 


8 


7 848. 


7 80a. 


7 948. 


7 98. 


7 48. 




10 


ism. 


946 


988 


838 


8 14 


8 8 


^ ^ h* ^> Antaret. 


11 


1 11 


969 


946 


089 


17 


9 


[46P Sy. 


12 


S 7 |lOM 


10 47 


10 40 


10 17 


10 9 


ISib. $ at greateil W. along. 
itfi Sunday after Easter. 


8 0ffl. 


11 48a. 


11 49a. 


11 S5a. 


11 188. 


11 68. 


16 


4 4 
8 










11 56 

• • . 


ISih. Virginia »eUled, 1607, 0. S. 


osim 


96m 


9om 


3m 


1« 


• 86 


1 


1 1 


67 


43 


88m 


<90h- 15th. C. Cod dif. 1602. 


17 


050 


1 88 


1 80 


1 98 


1 17 


1 14 


d ^i^Orionif. Inf. (5 90* 


18 


780 


1 67 


1 56 


154 


1 49 


1 48 


15ih. Cuvier died, 1882. 


19 


897 


990 


9 91 


9 90 


3 90 


990 


Dark day in N. England, 1780. 
d ]> $ • RcgaHon Sunday, 


S. 


lom. 


943m 


9 44m 


9 46m 


3 50m 


9 6im 


21 


10 7 


8 


3 10 


8 18 


8 31 


895 


SOth. Lafayette d. 1834, a. 77. 


22 


11 


8 33 


888 


3 43 


3 66 


4 9 


6^3' d$« Ononis, d ) 9 


23 


11 50 


Mte. 


Mf9. 


«et9. 


9$U, 


*at$. 


20tb. Colombns d. 1606, 0. 8. 


24 


580. 


70. 


9 la. 


8 648. 


8 338. 


8 348. 


^Q^. AseensUmDay. 


25 


1 09 


10 8 


10 1 


054 


983 


094 


241 b. CopemicQS d. 1543. 


20 
5. 


940 


10 67 


10 61 


10 44 


10 98 


10 16 


Sunday after Ascension. 


8 43a. 


11 80a. 


11 sia. 


11 368. 


11 7a. 


11 18. 


28 


488 


. • « 


• • ■ 


11 66 


11 49 


11 87 




2f>l 


IS 


om 


9m 








9 ftationary. 

Pope d. 1744. Voltaire d. 1778. 


80 


1 


81 


090 


096m 


19m 


om 


81 


41 


61 


50 


47 


40 


88 


dDU. DUO- 



120 



/iune, Sixth Month, brains on Friday, 



[i8aa> 



i'wilijjht btsgiiic aiKl villi*. 



Muiin titiie. 



Boiton, 
N. York, 

WMh. 
CharlM. 



Begiai. 
h> m. 

3 nm. 
3 » 
S41 
S IS 



l«t duy . 1 1 7th dit y. 
Bndi. ' Begins. Biid<. 



N. Orl*i. s 34 



b. m. 
9 S7a. 
35 
9 18 
8 41 
890 



h..ni. 


h. 111. 


3 i3in. 


9 44 a. 


3 39 


9 31 


3 37 


9 19 


3 10 


8 46 


3 33 


8 3« 



I3ih day. 



BegiiDi. 
h. in. 

3 9m. 

3 33 
3 36 
3 10 

13 33 



Ead*. 
(i. m. 

9 00 a. 

9 87 
934 
d 50 
^ 38 



19th day. 



Begiu*.; Bads, 
b. Ri. 



3 8in. 

3 33 
3 35 
J 10 
3 33 



h. IB. 
9 54 a. 
9 40 
937 
853 
840 



aSihday. 



BegiM. 
ii. in. 

I 9in. 

I 38 
I 36 
3 11 
3 33 



0561 
9 41 
998 
858 
8 41 



Perigte and JSpogM of the Moon. 
Perif«e, 14lh day, Bh. M. | Apogee, aSth day, lb. A. 



Full Moon, 
1a*\ Quarter, 



Pka$u of the Moo*. 
7lh day, lib. 43..'>m. A. I Now Moon, S2lst daj, 

14ib »» 9 92.5 A. | Pir«t aurtrter, 99th «^ 



9h. 2S.6m. A. 
8 4.9 A. 



riigb water. fiTUmel 



• 

1 


• 

JM 

1 


U. 


<M 


o 


o 


■ 


■ 


>% 


>t 


OB 


« 


Q 


O 



8ua'« ^p'per limb riao« and aetii, (cor. for refiact.) M. 1*. 



o 

a 

a, 
I 



i,P. 

S^u. 
4M. 

6Tu. 
6'W. 

7 Th. 

8 P. 

_^?!_ 
10|£^u.;4 33 

11 M. I 33 

I2TuJ 33 

13! W.' 33 

14 Th. 33 

15,F. 33 

16 S. 33 



ris9i. 
h. in. 

4 35 
34 

4 34 
93 
33 
33 
33 
33 
3^ 



17|Su.4 33 

ISM. 32 

19 Til. 33 

20, W 33 

21 Th. 33 

22 F. 33 

23;S^ 33 
24!5m; 



25 
26 
27 
2S 
29 
30 



l! 



M. 

Til. 

W. 

Th. 

P. 

S. 



4 34 
31 
34 
35 
35 
35 
35 



40tt. 

h. m. 
7 39 
39 



7 80 
31 
S3 
88 
S3 
34 
85 



hm 
O 



rued. 
h. m. 

4 31 

SO 



4 £0 
39 
39 
39 
38 
33 
38 



7 85 
86 

87 
87 
38 
38 
38 



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39 
89 
89 
89 
89 
40 



4 26 
39 
38 
28 
38 
39 
29 

4 3i> 
28 
39 
39 
39 
39 
39 



7 40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 



4 30 
83 
30 
30 
81 
31 
31 



8CU 

h. m, 
7 34 
34 



7 35 
36 
36 
37 
39 
28 
39 



7 39 
30 
80 
81 
31 
32 
S3 



7 33 
33 
34 
34 
34 
34 
.«6 

7 35 
35 
35 
35 
35 
85 
85 






not*. 
h. in. 

4 36 

36 



4 35 
85 
85 
34 
34 
34 
34 



4 84 
84 
34 
34 
34 
33 
33 



4 38 

83 
34 
34 

34 

84 
34 



4 35 
35 
35 
36 
86 
36 
36 



otto. 
h. m 

7 19 

19 



a 
o 






rue*. 
h. in. 

1 53 

53 



7 19 
30 
30 
91 
31 
33 
33 



4 53 
53 

53 
53 
53 
53 
53 



seta. 
h. m. 

7 1 

1 



s 
-Si 

a 

55 



ruea. 
h. m. 

5 
4 69 



7 3 
3 

8 
8 

4 
4 
5 



7 38 
34 
25 
35 
36 
37 
37 



7 37 
38 
28 
38 
28 
39 
39 



4 53 
53 
53 

. 53 
52 
53 
53 



4 53 
53 
69 
53 
53 
53 
53 



7 5 
6 
6 
7 
7 
8 
8 



7 9 
9 
10 
10 
10 
11 
11 



4 59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
69 



4 59 
69 
59 
59 
59 
60 
59 



4 59 
59 
59 
69 
59 
69 

4 59 



7 39 


4 53 


7 11 


39 


53 




39 


53 




99 


53 




39 


54 




39 


54 




39 


54 





5 



1 
1 
1 



hOU. 
h. in. 

6 55 

55 



6 56 
56 
57 
57 
66 
58 
59 

6 59 

7 

1 
1 
3 
3 



7 8 
8 
8 

4 
4 
4 

4 



4 



I 



e 






b. m. 


h. m. 


6 la. 


8 4la. 


7 4 


4 44 


8 sa. 


5 43a. 


8 67 


37 


048 


733 


10 25 


8 5 


U 7 


8 47 


11 50 


930 ' 


. • . 


10 13 



82DI 

1 14 
150 

3 49 
344 

4 41 

5 39 



7 4 

4 
4 
4 
5 
5 
5 



6 4100 

7 47 
856 
9 66 

10 50 

11 87 
30a 




10 54a. 9 14a. 

11 39 I 9 60 
. . . 10 49 

29m 11 44 

1 34 



3 31 
3 19 



41m 

1 39 



4 3im 3 4im 



1 oa. 

1 88 

3 16 

3 54 

385 

4 17 
4 59 



5 37 


8 47 


6 36 


456 


786 


5 56 


8 30 


6 50 


9 17 


7 37 


10 


830 


10 4011) 


9 om 


11 18 


938 


11 66 


10 16 


34» 


10 54 


1 15 


11 35 


1 57 


na. 


339 


59 



183&] 




June has Thirty Daifs. 






211 


Pmm(« of the MeridHm (idmo time) and i>«elioatioa of the FIan«u. | 


1 l«t dmy. 


7ih day. 


1 13ih day. 


lOth day. 


35th dHy. 1 


Samtks. 


iHc 


SaulMt. 


Dm. 


SnUJu. Doe. 


S»uthM. 


Dec. 


^ h-n,. ... 


h. m. 


• • 


h. B. 


• 


. h.m. , . 


t h. m. 


• 1 


Y 10 4im- 


-14 98 


10 99m 


--W 19 


I0 9«n] 


I--16 37 10 90m;+18 61 


10 48m 


--91 1ft 


9 


• |> 


-7481 


8 1 


--0 »» 


9 


--19 1 


I 9 4 


--14 9 


9 7 


--1ft ftft 


<S 


MM - 


-17 98 


10 94 


--18 8ft 


10 18 


--10 80ill0 19 


--90 37 


10 6 


--91 91 


fi 










^ 















J at - 


— «•• 


Oftft 


— 4 41 


098 


— 4 88 11 84a. 


— 490 


,11 988. 


— 439 


2 


f aa.- 


f • « 


ft 488. 


-|-8ft0 


8 9fta 


.-|-83ft ft 3a. 


-{-8 19 


■ 4 43a. 


+ 8 1 


fi 


10 10 — M M 


10 94 


— 18 34 


980 


— 16 90 9 34 


— 16 96 


9 


— 16 99 


V 


1809 — 7381 


ft ftsm 


— 7 37|1 ft 8imi~ 7 3711 ft Om' — 7 87 


4 44m — 7 37 


jB ^ . ) Mooo riaet or Mta. Mean timo. | 




g 5 s ■ . 


• 


m 

r 


. 1 


PHENOMENA AND OB8BRVA- 


o 


1! 


i 4 
Mb. 


1 

• 


ItS 

r 


i 


TION8. 

fihoMlffy* and other RtmarkaJbU 
Dayt, 




MC*. 


Stti. 


ut§. 


nt». 






h. ■. 1 h. B. 


h. m. 


ha m. 


h* n. 


h, n. 




1 


7 loa. , 1 urn 


1 lom 


1 om 


1 60h 


1 ftm 


Severe frost in U. 8. 1836. 


2 


8 1 98 


1 90 


130 


130 


1 31 


3d. D0¥- 

PentteotL WhU Svnday, 


8 4im. ; 1 4RD 


1 48m 


1 ftom 


1 ftom 


1 86ro 


4 


• 94 1% ft 


9 9 


9 11 


9 


998 • 


[io'chief, 1776. 


6 


10 11 9 n 9 as 


988 


9 48 


983 


7th. WaftbtDgtOD appoint. Com.- 


« 


n I Km*. fiMi. 


riMM. 


fi$m. 


Hm«. I 


dJh- *>»'ni. 


7 


11 88 1 7 898. 


7388. 


7 980. 


7 6a. 


6808. 


*l>ara. 


8 


^ 


848 


8 38 


8 81 


8 


8 1 


*Jy*/- 


9 


onn. 


048 


087 


080 


9 8 


1 1 


TVMfy fihoMlay. 


1 46111. 


10 988. 


i0 9«a. 


10 188. 


Oftoa. 


083a. > 


11 


987 


11 7 


11 8 


10 88 


10 49 


10 88 




12 


884 


11 18 


11 88 


11 80 


11 18 


11 1ft 1 


9 at greatest W. eloog. 23^^ 20'. 


IS 


447 


• • • 


• • • 


11 86 


11 81 


11 40 


14ih. (5^1^. 


14 
15 


888 
89ft 


im 

94 


oro 

094 








Corptu CkritH, FiU Dieu, 
d fi 9 . fi 62' South of 9 . 


94m 


99m 


93m 


16 

& 


7 19 


48 


048 


048 
1 14m 


89 


03 


17ib. Bat. of Bunker Hill» 1775. 
^ tlaliooaiy. Ut S, aft. Trm, 


8 om. 


1 om 


1 19m 


1 9im 


1 9ftm 


18 


8ftl 


1 88 


1 88 


1 49 


1 54 


1 80 


^OQ* iDiensity of Ifght 0.402. 


19 


94» 


9 9 


9 8 


9 14 


930 


986 


I8ih. d5?. d5 J. 


20l 10 41 


9ao 


947 


963 


3 19 


390 


dl> «. 


21 


11 S8 


Mtt. 


uU. 


«ete. 


MCt. 


MCt. [ 


Surnmtr begint. 


22 


8 978. 


8 488. 


843a. 


8 888. 


8 148. 


8 78. 


28d. JcJj. ^fij. 


23 

s 


1 89 
994a. 


083 


9 98 


9 90 


9 1 


8A4 


24tb. 6%ZSI' _ 
A. John Baptist, fid 8. aft. TV. 


10 88. 


10 9a. 


9 868. 


408. 


osfta. 


25 


8 19 


10 88 


10 SO 


10 98 


10 13 


10 




26 


8 48 


10 84 


10 ftS 


lOftO 


10 40 


10 88 




27 


487 


11 14 


U 14 


11 n 


U 6 


11 ft 


*>u. 


28 


ft 18 


11 88 


1188 


11 39 


11 89 


11 31 


Battle of Monmouth, 1778. 


29 6 fi6 


11 80 


11 ft9 


11 ft9 


U 86 


1107 


S8th. Madison died, 1886. 


80 ' M 




1 








/ fiaK ^^ Snirn. 




~ ~ 


• ••,...,.......,..., 


H«*0 





22 



July^ Seventh Month, begins on Sunday, 



[I838.i 



Twiliglit b«|fiiia hihI uikJu. iMean time. 





l«t day. i 


7th day. | 




Begins. 


Ciidi. 


Bagiut. 


Eada. 




h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. in. 


Boaton, 


3 ram 


9 Ma. 


2 1901. 


9 49 a. 


N. York, 


a 98 


9 40 


2 sa 


9 86 


Wash. 


a 39 


9 97 


-2 44 


9 94 


Cbarlei. 


3 18 


8 63 


3 17 


8 61 


N. Orl't. 


3 9» 


8 41 


\t 99 


8 89 



13ih liny. 



Begios.i Cud*, 
h. in. jh. m. 

2 981]]. |9 44 a 
9 39 19 81 



9 61 
3 99 
3 83 



9 19 

8 48 
8 37 



19th day. 



Bafiai.j fclodi. 
h. in. ju. ID. 

2 8ftm.9 87 a. 



95th daj. 

1 6egiiM 
h. m. 



2 48 

2 68 

3 97 
3 87 



9 96 
9 14 
8 46 

884 



Boda. 



h. BB. 

9 44m.|9 38 a. 
9 64 9 18 
8 6 9 7 
8 89 8 40 

8 49 8 80 



Perigee and Jipogee of the Moon. 
Pariye e, lOth day, Ih. A. | Apogoe, ;l8th day, 8h. 



A. 



Phaseu of' the Moon. 
10.6m. M. I iNew Moon, Slat day, 

1 1.6 .M. I Firn Quarter, fi9tb '* 



Full Moon, 
Lact Quarter, 



7ih da?, 9h. 
14th " 2 



9h. 14.1m. M. 
46.6 M. 



o 



1 
2 
8 
4 
6 
6 

8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 

15 
16 
17 

18 
19 
20 
21 

22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 

29 
80 
81 






>» 
• 



Sun*t upper limb rtaea and aets, (coi. for reiruci.) M. T. High w 



Su, 

M. 

Til. 

W. 

Th. 

F. 

Su, 

M. 

Tu. 

W. 

Th. 

P. 

Su. 

\T. 

Tu. 

W. 

Th. 

P. 

Sn, 
M. 

Tu. 

.V. 
Th. 
P. 
S. 



Su, 

M. 

Tu. 



o 



I 






ruea. 
h. m. 

4 96 

96 

97 

97 

98 

99 

30 



4 80 
31 
89 
83 
83 
84 
83 



4 36 
87 
88 
39 
89 
40 
41 



4 49 
48 
44 

46 
46 

47 
48 



4 49 
60 
61 



aeta. ,riaM 
h. m. h. m. 



7 40 
40 
40 
89 
89 
39 
89 

7 88 
88 
88 
87 
87 
86 
36 



7 36 
84 
84 
88 

89 
89 

81 



7 80 
99 
98 
97 
96 
96 
94 



7 93 
99 
91 



4 31 
89 
89 
83 
33 
84 
36 



4 36 

36 
87 
88 
39 
39 
40 



4 41 
49 
43 
44 
44 
46 
46 

4 47 
46 
49 
49 
60 
61 
62 



4 6J 
64 

66 



■leut. 
.1. m 

7 36 

36 

36 

84 

34 

84 

34 



7 33 
83 
33 
39 
39 
31 
31 



7 80 
99 
99 
98 
97 
9? 
96 



7 96 
94 
93 
99 
99 
91 
90 



7 19 
18 
17 



a 
o 

r 

JB 
at 

m 

_^ 

ruta. 
h. m. 

4 37 

87 

88 

38 

39 

4f» 

40 



4 41 
42 
49 
43 
44 
46 
46 

4 46 
47. 
48 
49 
60 
60 
61 



4 6-2 
63 
63 
64 
66 
66 
66 



4 67 
68 
69 



u 
4 



atts. 
h. m, 

7 99 

99 

99 

98 

98 

98 

98 



7 97 
97 
97 
96 
96 
95 
96 



7 94 
94 
93 
93 
99 
91 
91 



c 
o 

So 

m 

JS 

O 



riaea. 
h. m. 

4 66 

65 

66 

66 

67 
67 
68 



4 68 
4 69 
6 

1 
1 
9 



3 
3 
4 

4 
6 
6 
6 



7 90 


6 7 


19 


7 


18 


8 


17 


8 


17 


9 


16 


10 


16 


11 



7 14 
14 
13 



6 11 
19 
13 



seta. 
h. in 

7 11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

7 10 

10 

10 

10 

9 

9 

9 



7 8 
8 
8 
7 
7 
6 
6 



7 6 
6 
4 
8 
8 
9 
1 



7 
7 
6 60 



a 

CI * 



T. 



tae» 
I. m 

> 1 

I 

1 

9 

9 

8 

4 



i 4 
6 
6 
6 
6 
7 
8 



5 6 
9 
10 
10 
II 
11 
19 



5 19 
13 
13 
14 
14 
16 
16 

5 16 
17 
18 



Ii. m. 
7 6 



8 
3 
8 
9 
9 
9 



9 
1 
1 
1 

7 
6 69 



6 69 
68 
67 
67 
66 
66 
65 



(f 54 
64 
68 



ater. M. time. 



4 



2 



h. in. 
6 43a. 

6 87 

7 46 

8 66 
964 

10 49 

11 88 



93m 

1 7 
1 69 
9 40 

3 98 

4 14 

4 67m 

6 69 

7 8 

8 88 

9 46 

10 46 

11 31 

9a. 

046 

1 90 
1 64 
9 98 
8 I 
8 84 

4 7a. 

4 48 
6 86 



fi 



b. m. 
8 93a. 
4 17 

6 96 
686 

7 84 

8 99 

9 18 






10 3a. 

10 47 

11 39 

• • • 

90m 

1 8 
I 64 



9 37m 

3 39 

4 48 

6 13 

7 93 

8 96 

9 11 



9 49m 

10 96 

11 
11 84 

8a. 

41 

1 14 



h. n. 

1 48a. 

9 87 
8 46 
4 66 

6 64 

6 49 

7 38 



8 93a. 

9 7 
9 69 

10 40 

11 98 

. • • 

um 



67m 

1 69 

3 8 

4 83 
6 46 

6 46 

7 31 



8 9m 

8 46 

9 90 
9 64 

10 S8 

11 1 
II 84 



1 47a, 
9 98 
8 15 



7a. 

48 

1 86 





183a j July has Thirty^ofu Days. 23 




PaM««8 of Uio Mnridimi (mftin li ••«*) and Declinntiun nfthe Ptan«>t«. 




A 


Ut day. 


7Ui duy. 


\\ i3ih diiy. 


t 19th 


day. ' 


9.Hh diij. 




SMtk*. I Dtrc 1 


Ssaiks. 


Hoc 


\Sumths. 1 Doe. 


Ssulhs. 


Dec. ' 


Ssutks. Dec 




? 11 6ai|4-4l 19 


b. m. 


• < 


h. m. 1 . 


, h. Bi. 


• > ' 


n. in. ^ 1 




11 S7m 


--94 9 


loa 


.>-|-93 16 1 408., 


--3I 


1 sa. 


- -17 41 


j V 1 « 11 -f"" ^ 


9 15 


--19 fi 


»' 9 aomj-f-'M 95|', 9 98 


--9I 93 


9 88m 


--99 9 


<J 10 - 

ft 1 


f-i3 11 

I 


9 55 


4-^4fl 


1 9 49 


-Ha 14 9 43 


--9S 85 


987 


--9S 48 


( 
1 


5 


loiaa. - 


t 
— 489 


10 978. 


— 4 51 


1 

,10 oa. — 5 


7 9S98. 


j 

— 6 90 

1 


9 88. 


— 6 49 




? 
U 


4Sta. - 


1 
f-7 41 


4 9a. 


-|-7 H 


1 ' 3 438 


. -{- 6 57. 8 998. 


+ «83 


3 98. 


+ • T 




h 


84ft - 


—10 10 


890 


— 16 17 ; 7 58 — 18 17 7 39 1 


— 18 18 


7 8 


—18 17 


1 
( 


9 4«Kn! — 7 39 


8 5801 — 7 4l'l 3 89ni| — 7 44 8 8inl 


— 7 47 


9 44m 


— 7 60 


^1 


ii 


Uuon riaet or mti. Moan timo | 


PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 
TIONS. 


S 

as 


■ 

o 

m 

B 

e 


• 

s 

M 

• 


1 
Id 




1 

S 1 

0-* 1 


1 J 


i 


i 


ja 


• 

2s 


Day*. 






sets. 1 


seU, 


sets. sets. 


sets. 








h. m. 


h. n. 


h. n. 


b> m. ' b. m. 


h. in. 






S. 


7 16&. 


7m 


iim 


19m' 19m 


98m 


Bd Sunday after Trinity. 




2 


8 1 


097 


89 


35 45 


50 1 


1st. Eanb farthest from ibe Sun. 




3 


8 ftl 


1 089 


58 


1 9 


I 17 


1 93 

1 


6 }> h-^I>A'ni-4tb.s|ci>ani. 




4 


9 U 1 193 


130 


1 38 


1 54 


9 1 


liidepeixJeoce declared. 1776. 




5 


10 49 


9 9 


9 10 


9 17 


9 37 


9 48 


4ib. Adams and Jeflenon died. 




6 

r 


11 44 


rises. 


nsa. 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


[1826. MoDroe died, 1S31. ' 




9 


8»a 

- - 


8 188. 

9 OO. 


8 pa. 


7 608. 


7 438. 


4th Sunday a/ler Trinity. 




& 


4501. 


9 48. 


8 54a. 


6 87a. 


8 398. 




9 


1 45 


9S8 


935 


9 31 


18 


9 14 


Braddock defeated, 1755. 




10 


9 41 


10 6 


10 3 


10 1 . 


9 63 


9 6Q 






11 S33 


10 39 


10 99 


10 98 


10 95 


10 35 


dl>^?. 




12 4 33 


10 59 


10 58 


10 54 


10 65 


10 67 


Sup. d 9 O- Hamilton d. 1804. 




13 5 JO 


11 15 


11 18 


11 90 


11 30 


11 99 


12lb. Bat. of Boyiie, 1690, N. H. 




14 


6 ae 

6 4801. 


11 38 


11 43 


11 48 


11 67 


• . . 


dQ?. 8 20 4' South. 

5th Sumi. ajier Trim. S|C> C T* 










ini 




16 

1 


7 40 


5ID 


iim 


15m 


30m 


038 


17 


8S5 


38 


045 


51 


1 9 


I 17 




18 


9 31 


1 SO 


1 98 


1 35 


158 


3 6 


di^O- c5>?. d>^. 


19 


10 38 


i 11 


990 


997 


949 


969 




20 


11 94 


seU. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 




21 


na. 


8 58. 


8 oa 


7 54H 


7 378. 


7 818. 


m Sund. a/ler Trm. d ) 9 • 


S. 


1 oa. 


8 33a. 


8 998. 


8 368. 8 lia. 


8 7H 


•29 


1 51 


8 57 


854 


8 51 8 41 


888 






24 


9SS 


9 17 


9 18 


9 14 9 7 


9 6 


*l>rft. 




26 


8 !3 


938 


9 88 


934 


31 


9 39 


*>u. 




2C 


853 


953 


9 63 


9 64 


955 


9 67 






21 


^ 4 31 


10 11 


10 18 


10 15 


10 10 10 93 


6 9 i' ?P46'S. hfiat. 




2« 
51 


\ 6 11 
8 648. 


10 !0 
10 59a. 


10 81 


10 37 


10 48 10 60 


Kevoliitioti in Fiance, 1830. 
1th Sunday afltr Triiiiy. 




10 578. 


11 la. 


11 148.11 908. 




80 6 40 


11 19 11 95 


11 31 


11 47 ,11 64 


d^h. 




ai 7 31 


11IV4 . . . 1 . . . 


...'... 





24 Avgusl, Eighth Month, begins on fVtdntsda^. [I838.| 




N.Yark, 


t.l d.r. 


1 




i3.bd.r. 


IMd... 


iiWd.,. I 


)um.* Ill 

lis SM 


'l UD. 

|t u 

SH 
141 


948 


»M 416 IW IM 

::: h b ti 


iMH) 


BIOK. 
IM 

I 44 


p..ii.., 7U. d>,T, lA. M. r Apor». ud dtr, m>. a. 


Pull Hood, Sth d>j, Sti. t7.4iii. A, 1 N>w Maoa, IMi itf, I>k. IBAu. A. 
Lui Qu.n.r, ISIh " 8 M.l H. I Fim Oauur, MOM » 3 KM U. 


i 

•s 

1 

1 

2 
S 
4 
ft 
6 
7 
8 

e 

10 

II 

n 

IS 
14 
IB 
16 
IT 
18 
19 
10 
11 

n 
n 

M 
IS 

M 
« 
18 
19 

■0 
«1 


1 

1 

w. 

Th 
P. 

S. 

&;. 

M. 
Tn 
W. 
Tti 
P. 
S. 

H. 

Tu 
W. 
Th 
P. 
S. 
Su. 
M. 
Tu. 
W. 
Th. 
F. 

a. 
si;. 

^: 


-^ . 


Hi,b.,i«. M.u™. 1 






4 
H 

1 ID 


^^5 

;; 


1^ 


I' 


'- 


i 
1 

IN 
11 UB 

4 Mm 

414 

4 41 
SM 
■ « 

10(4 

11 itim 

11 M 
134 

il 

1 u 
111 

TH 


S4 
* 

iM 

II H 

in 

>M 

10 M 

11 4 
11 » 

141 
3M 

■ w 


1 

a*iB- 
1 w 

«ia 

1* 

• 47 
II M 

OMin 

414 
4U 

144 
410 
4M 

■ M 

■ 11 
OM 
OtSUI 
IM 

• *« 
141 


■>. m, b, m! 

Eli 


u 


1 


lo 


t la 


4M 

«3 
19 

M 

44 

41 
44 
41 

41 

4 40 
H 
M 
<T 
•4 

u 

w 


K. n 
M 

H 

n 

34 

44 

4 11 

U 

M 

« 
N 
18 
*S« 
14 
W 
W 

M 

111 

H 

■4 
H 

•4 


10 
8 41 
44 

48 

44 

8«" 

41 

10 
M 
14 

M 
41 

M 

aw" 
» 

18 

ar 

14 


Its 

H 

M 
<d« 




11 

I* 


I 8 

W 

» 

if 
4S 
44 
4* 


i 16 
IS 

K 

n 

M 
•4 

sc 

34 




U 
4T 
40 

M 

W 




s 


M 


H 
M 

u 

n 


n 
n 

14 



1838.] August has ThiHy^ne Days 


• 




251 


FMsaf« of the Meridian (mean tima) and Daelination of the Planata. | 




iatday. 


7th daj. 1 13th day. 


19th day. 


35th day. \ 




SmUU., Dae 


Scmtkt, Dae. SraUU. 


Dee. 


\StMiha. Dae. 


Sffutka. 


Dee.' 


b. m. 1 . / 


o. in. ^ h. Ol. 


. • ' 


jh. m. , 


h* ni. 


• 


9 1 1 »a.'+ll 19 


I S4a. - - 9 6 


1 40a.--6 < 


1 1 498.-1- I 18:1 1 S9a. 


— 1 66 


? 


9 4iai-Hi M 


9 48ID - -99 IS 


' 9 56m- -^1 43 ,10 9m|-|-90 60 10 om 


--19 86 


3 


930 ' 


f-«« 


9 94 


-|-98 90 


17 

1 


-HM 40 9 11 

1 


-f-4S94 9 4 


-}-38 1 


8»58.- 


-•« 


sua. 


— 64fl 


1 

) 7 47a. — 7 91 7 93a. 


1 
— 7 63 . 7 la. 


— 896 


^ 
3 








1 














9 90a. 


+ 6 » 


» 9 la. -1- 4 41 1 4ia. 


+ 4 19 


' 1 99a. 

1 1 


+ 349 


h • 6 41 \ !• » 


6 17 


— 16 9S 


t 664 


— 16 96 6 89 


— 16 80;; 6 9 


—16 86 


9 J 9 16Cn 7 M 1 1 63nii ^ 8 Q 


f 1 97m — 6 


6| 1 8m 


— 6 10' 88m 


— 6 16 


js 1 Moon ri««« or mu. Bleao time. | 




«' -5 i 


^ 


•» 


m. 


«k 


PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 


^' o .2 


• 

1 

J 


i 

• 

as 


f 






TIONS. 

Sundaya tmd other RamtrkabU 
Datft. 


1 b. ou 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. n. 


a$U. 

k. m. 


aaia. 
h. m. 


[America dit. 1498, 0. 8. 


1, Sana. 


• • • 


9m 


8m 


97m 


86m 


LammoM Day, Continent of 


2. 996 


4im 


049 


060 


1 18 


1 96 


1st. 6 9aA* 


3 10% 


144 


1 U 


S 


9 99 


989 




< 


11 tt I H«e«. 1 riat9. 


riaea. 


ruaa. 


riaaa. 


8^ 8umiay after Trmity. 


S.\ 


a 


7 SMul 7 tia. 


7 97a. 


7 19a. 


7 7a. 


S\ 37I1I< 


8 4)61 


768 


7 46 


746 


. 


7 ,« 


660 


690 


8 97 


699 


8 91 


dJW- *>Z«- 


8 su 


66S 


664 


864 


864 


666 


d>?. 


9! 8 4 


9 17 


9 19 


9 91 


96 


9 98 




10' I §4 


9 41 


946 


948 


067 


10 1 




n 


4 44 


10 7 


10 16 


10 17 


10 31 


10 86 


[a/ier TrinUy, 
S|C> / Pleiadiim. 9th Sunday 


5. 


ft Mm. 


10 698. 


10 46a. 


10 6aa. 


11 oa. 


11 laa. 


13 


a JO 


11 16 


U 96 


1188 


11 63 


• • • 




14 


v a« 










9m 

064 


^DCy. Peon b. 1709. 
aOh' Scott b. 1771. Napo- 


15 9tt 


om 


]«m 


99m 


44m 


16 9 10 


1 9 


1 11 


1 18 


140 


1 60 


(5 1> S' Battle of Bennington^ 


17 


10 13 


9 6 


9 18 


990 


940 


3 49 


d J ?. [l777,ofCarob. 1780. 


18 


11 9 


3 13 


3 90 


896 


343 


3 61 


Delambre d. 1822. 

d 9 U- lOtA Swid. afttr ZVw. 


11 4801. 


BUM. 


aete. 


Mb. 


uta. 


aata. 


20 


tia. 


7 98a. 


7 9ia. 


7 19a. 


7 ua. 


7 9a. 




21 


1 11 


7 49 


749 


741 


7 87 


736 


William IV. born, 1766. 


22 


l« 


7fl0 


8 


6 


8 


6 1 


c5]^U- c5>9- 


23 s» 


8 16 


6 16 


8 19 


898 


696 


9 at greaieit E. along. S7^ 20'- 


24 a 8 


684 


637 


689 


6 47 


8 61 


8t, Bartholomew. ^I^ Spica. 


26! 


SM 


664 


860 


9 9 


9 14 


9 19 


8t. Jame*. 

nth Sunday after TrmUy. 


s' 


4S4a. 


9 16a. 


994a. 


9 99a. 


9 44a. 


963a. 


27 


699 


049 


966 


10 9 


10 91 


10 99 


dJh- *J^ni- 


28 


• U 


10 98 


10 86 


10 43 


11 6 


11 14 


27th. Battle on L. Island, 1776* 


29 


7 10 


11 18 


1197 


1134 


1167 


... 


^1>//. 


to « fA 




« - . 






om 

1 9 


29th. Battle oa Rhode Island. 


ai 


9 10 


99iiil 30in rrm' 


60m 








[1778. 



26 Srpteinber, Ninth Month, begins on Saturday. [1838. 



^ Jlftgu ilf Uu Mmn 



PoTI Mood, «b diT, Ih. <>-4n. K. 1 N 
I«.(aa»l». IIKI. ■' 5 1.0 M. |Fi 


« Q 


"nar 


.O.Kd.,.:..«.7«.A. 
M.h '?'4 4SJ a: 


^|^|«„..^U.bn»..„d. «.,(«- 


,fi«r.rf«».) M. T. 




^ 


1' 


!. 


1. 


i 

1 

10 Its. 

4 1 
014 

IB itm 
10 *e 

4a. 

ew 
ou 


1^ 


T 

i 


1 

M 
10 
(I 

n 


in 
u 

« 

u 
I I 


t M 
11 

w 
u 

M 


1 w 

» 

34 


t 16 
t M 


« 


an 

u 

w 

40 

e 

« 

>41 

44 
40 
40 

47 


17 
11 
It 

10 

s 


b. B. 
OMft. 

■ M 

4 It 
7»MI1 

10 10 
10 M 


s 17a. 1 

• lOB. 
SM 

10 w 

11 IMU 
4M 


M 

n 
tt 

M 
U 


t 90 
17 

11 


940 
40 

4t 
40 

47 
«7 




u 

M 

47 


I4t 
41 

u 

47 


) » 

\ 

B 1 


Tit ; 

III 


u 

H 
ZBtf- 1 H 1 4« 1 H 

IftS. 1 m| «T « 


u 

H 


t 43 
4* 

SI 


H 

n 


41 


S 


M 
•0 


>67 
U 

u 

u 

4» 


I4aa. 
lis 

717 


II M 

ONa. 
1 u 

1 14 
■ 4J 


naw 

10 It 

10 t4 

11 IS 

oita. 


■0 5;r.'> H 't w It u ii «» 


)U 


«4« >U 


S47 


Ism 


48 


■ H« 


•».' 4 iM.; 



183a] September has Thirty Days. 27 


FUMffs oftlM Meriiliaa (nwan Uiim) and Deeliaaiioa of iIm Pluiou. 


Ut dmj. II 


7ih day. 


lath day. 


lOtbday. 


SSib day. | 




SMdM. Dm. 


ggmtkt 


Dae. 


80«U«. 


Deo. 


Sntks. Oao. 


SaiitAa. 


Dee. 


h.». 


k.B. 


• • 


b. n. 


• 


b. m. - , 


b. BB. 


• ' 


9 


19fB. — 44S 


I 4a. 


— 6te 


sia. 


— 4 19 11 47m| — S4| 


11 am 


--94S 


9 
S 

fi 
6 


10 um- 

8« - 


-17 46 

-ttfr 


10 9SD1 
843 


- -16 61 
--91 61 


10 dm] 

840 

• 


I--18 40 10 89 
- -91 n 8 89 


- -11 19 
--00 96 


10 80 

j 6 98 

1 


--886 

-|-19 87 




1 M.- 


f-t 6 


413. 


+ «•• 


98a, 


.+ « ^ 


1 4a. 


+ IU 


11 46m 


+ 1 * 


h 


44a - 


-18 48 


4 91 


— 18 49 


860 


— 10 67 1 8 37 


—17 6 


! 3 18a. 


— 17 18 


V 


• )om! — e SI 


11 41 


— 898 


11 17 1—8 S8!ll0 68 


— 688 


10 98 — 6 a| 


^1 


. . Mooo riMa or MtB. Moan Urao. Ii 




|\ -3 8 ■ ^ 


• 


m 


a "' •' 


PHENOMENA AND OBSEEVA- 


a' 

o 




4 


M 

1 

m 

Z 


.5 6 

r 


lo 

r 


h 

• 


TIONB. 

SHiMbyt mid iftiwr RmafktbU 
Day*, 




, rwcf . 


rue»» 


ru«$. 


naea. 


rises. 






h. a. 1 b. m. 


h. m« 


h. a. 


b. ni* 


B* in. 




1 

& 


1» Be. 1 « »a. 


6 968. 


6 198. 


6 9a. 


4 67a. 


\2th Sunday ajter Trinity, 


11 «u , « ta. 


8 oa. 


6 688. 


6 43a. 


6 408. 


3 


^ •M 


899 


090 


6 19 


• 17 


<90W- dJW- *>70m. 


4 


Om. 564 


864 


063 


660 


61 


:^:^nH' [PhUadelpbia, 1774. 


6 


Si 1 7 17 


7 19 


790 


7 91 


793 


9 stationary. Ist Con^. mot at 


6 


i 4M ' 7 41 


744 


7 47 


763 


7 67 


[1833, a. 88. 


7 


SSS |8 7 


8 19 


8 16 


898 


838 


^ > VT* Hannah More died, 


8 


S98 SSS 


844 
9 33a. 


860 


9 6 


9 18 


^ ]^ ^, e, c, d,/ Pleindum &. i| ^ . 
13IA awiday a/Ur TrinUy, 


4 am. 9 16a. 


29a. 


9 48a. 


968a. 


10 


6 90 (10 1 


10 9 


10 17 


10 38 


10 48 


Battle on Lake Erie, 1813. 


11 


• 18 


10 65 


11 4 


11 11 


1184 


U 44 


Bat. on Lake Champlain, 1814. 


12 
13 


7 14 
S 9 


11 68 

• ■ • 










^ ^ vd* Bat. near Belt., 1814. 
d D ^. Bat. of Quebec, 1759. 


om 


13m 


84m 


44m 


14 


9 


1 6ID 


1 12 


I 18 


137 


1 45 


DOS- c^9««- 


!15 


947 


9 n 


2 18 


9 29 


9 88 


2 45 


CJ ^ U« N. York surren., 1776. 
<5 1> 9 . Uih Sun, aji, Trin, 


& 


losom. 


a iTm 


S 221X1 


3 95m 


3 37m 


3 43m 


17 


11 11 


490 


493 


420 438 


487 


[ibU in the U. StattM, 


18 


U 60 


Mia. 


teU, 


Mto. 


§«tM, 


sets. 


Anmdar Ediptt of the Sun vii- 


19 


os9a. 


6 99a. 


948. 


6 96a. 


6 28a. 


29a. 


Inf. d 90- 20ib. )|C> Spica. 


20 


1 9 


640 


8 48 


046 


6 61 


064 


Jewish Year 6599 begins. 


21 


148 


6 69 


7 4 


7 7 


7 16 


7 21 


Scoit died, 1832, a. 62. 


22 


S81 


7 21 


7 98 


7 89 


746 


7 51 


> UO- 23d. d 5 h- 
Autumn begins, 16th Sun. after 


8 na« 


7 49a. 


7 668. 


8 9a. 


8 198. 


8 20a. 


24 


4 7 


894 


8 89 


889 


869 


9 7 


ITHmty, 


25 


6 1 


9 9 


9 16 


9 96 


9 47 


9 67 


Arnold deserted, 1780. 


26 


667 


10 8 


10 16 


10 93 


10 44 


10 64 


Philadelphia surrendered, 1777. 


27 


868 


11 U 


11 99 


U 99 


1148 


11 58 


Raromohun Roy died, 1833. 


28 


764 












9 stationary. 












29 


8S0 


90n 


1 son 


1 49m 


6Bm 


1 7m 


;|C D a Vf • ^* 'A'*^ Am/. 


s. 


0448. 


1 490 


) 1 64II1 


1 1 osm' 9 iim' 9 nm 


ll6<A Sunday after Trinity. 



28 


October , Tenth Month, begins on Monday, [1838^1 


Twilight begins and ends. Mean tioM. | 




1st day. 


• 1 
Begi 
h. m 


th day. || 


13tb day. | 


19th day. 1 


99Uiday. 


h. n. ll 


Ends, 
i.m. 


ns. 

• 


Eode. 
h. Dk. 


tiegini 
h. m. 


1. Bnds. Begins, 
h. m. hi m. 


Ends. 

b. n. 


Begins. £ode. 
h. m. h. n>. 


BestoD, 


4 9sm. 7 17 a* 


4 80in. 


7 6a. 


4 87m. 6 66 a. 4 44m.l6 46 a.| 


4 6omu6 38 a. 


N.York, 


4 3ft 7 IS ' 


489 


7 4 


4 88 


664 4U 


6 46 


4 60 6 88 


Wash. 


4 97 7 13 


488 


7 3 


4 88 


664 |4 44 


6 46 


4 60 i6 38 


Oharlea. 


489 1 


' 6 


486 


7 


4 40 !6 63 4 46 | 


6 46 


449 


6 39 


N.Orl's, !4 84 ll 


f 6 


487 


6 66 


4 41 '6 61 i 


146 


6 46 


448 1 


6 40 


Ptrigte and ^tpegM of the Mo9%, 
Ferifee, 3d. 5h. M. Perigee, 31st, Sh. A. 
Apogee, 16th, 7 M. 


l*Aeses sf lAs JNeoM* 
Fnll Moon, 3d day, 9h. 38.3ib. M. New Moon, 18tb day, 9fa. 16.9m. H. 
LastOoarter, 10th <* 5 16.6 M. First aaarter, S6th *• 3 50.2 M. 


1 

1 


• 

1 


Son's ivper limb rises and seU, (cor. for refract.) M. T. 


High water. M. time. 






•s 

1 


i 

0k 




!• 


•• 


1 i 

• 




!. 

^ 


1' 


riUB. 
h. m. 


h. ni. 


rista. mU. 
h. vdt h. Dk. 


h. n. 


MtU, 

h. n. 


riMS. 
h* n. 


h. in. 


rista. 
h. D. 


h.m.! 


he nie 


h m. i h. BB. 


1 


M. 


ft 66 


6 48 


6 66 


6 48 


6 66 


6 48 


664 


6 46 


6 63 


6 46 j 


9 66a.| 7 36a. 1 5 m^\ 


2 


Tu. 


67 


49 


67 


49 


67 


43 


66 


44 


64 


46 


10 46 


8S6 640 


8 


W. M 


40 


68 


41 


68 


40 


6ft 


41 


64 


44 


11 99 


9 9 ' 799 


4 


Th. 


ft fl9 


88 


6 68 


89 


6 69 


89 


ft6 


49 


66 


48l 


• • • 


9 46 


8 a 


6 


F. 


6 I 


88 


6 


88 


6 


88 


66 


41 


66 


49 


6m 10 93 1 8 43 1 


6 

7 


S. 

Su. 


3 
6 8 


86 
6 34 


1 
6 9 


87 
6 86 


1 
6 3 


87 
6 86 


67 
668 


40 
6 88 


66 
6 67 


41 ; 

6 39 


048 


,11 4 
11 46a. 


' 994 


1 94m 


10 sa. 


8 


M. 


4 


88 


8 


34 


8 


84 


58 


87 


68 


38 


9 9 i . . . 10 M 1 


9 


Tu. 


6 


31 


4 


89 


4 


33 


669 


86 


68 


37 i 


964 


a4m 11 40 


10 


W. 


6 


99 


6 


81 


6 


81 


6 


36 


6 69 


86 


840 


1 90 ... 


11 


Th. 


8 


98 


6 


99 


6 


80 





84 


6 


86 


440 


9 90 40m 


12 


F. 


9 


96 


7 


98 


7 


99 


1 


88 





84 


6 8 


8 48 ' 3 8 


18 
14 


S. 
*t*. 


10 
6 11 


94 

ft 99 


8 
6 9 


96 
6 96 


8 


97 


3 


39 


1 


33 
6 39 


7 87 


6 17 

6 S5m 


837 


6 9 |6 86 


6 2 


6 80 


6 9 


8 66m 


4 66m 


16 


M. 


19 


90 


10 


S8 


10 


34 


8 


99 


9 


81 


9 47 , 7 37 6 47 1 


16 


Tu. 


IS 


19 


11 


93 


11 


93 


4 


98 


8 


90 


10 39 


8 10 ' 6 80 


17 


W. 


14 


17 


19 


90 


19 


90 


6 


96 


4 


38 


11 9 


643 ' 7 9 


18 


Th. 


16 


16 


18 


18 


13 


19 


6 


96 


4 


97 


U 80 


9 10 ; 7 SO 


19 


F. 


17 


14 


14 


17 


14 


17 


6 


34 


6 


96 


11 66 


986 


766 


20 
21 


a 

Su. 


18 
6 19 


13 
6 11 


16 
6 16 


16 


16 


16 

6 15 


7 


38 ' 6 


95 

6 94 


30a. 


10 


890 


6 14 6 16 


5 99 


6 6 


478. 


10 97m 


. 8 47m 


22 


M. 


91 


10 


18 


19 17 


14 


8 


9) 


7 


. 93 


190 


11 


930 


28 


Tu. 


99 


8 


19 


11 


18 


18 


9 


90 


8 


99 


166 


11 36 


966 


24 


W. 


93 


7 


90 


10 


19 


19 


10 


19 


8 


31 


9 36 


168. 10 86 


26 


Th. 


94 


ft 


31 


8 


90 


10 


11 


18 


9 


30 


393 


18 11 93 


26 F. 


96 


4 


39 


7 91 1 


9 


11 


17 


10 


19 


494 


3 4 


94a. 


27 

28 


S. 
Su. 


97 


9 


94 


5 «■' 


99 
6 98 


7 
6 6 


19 
6 18 


16 
5 16 


10 
6 11 


18 
5 17 


6 46 


826 
4 668. 


1 46 


« 38 6 1 6 96 


7 16a. 


8 ifta. 


29 


M. 


90 6 96 


8 


34 


4 


14 


14 


19 


16 


880 


6 10 


480 


SO Tu. 81 4 58 ' 97 


1 


36 


8 


14 


13 


19 


16 


9 97 


7 7 


697 


31 W. 82 67 39 





36 


9 


16 


19 


18 1 16 ;iO 14 


764 


6 14 



ItiSS.] October kas Thirly-one Days. S8| 


F^,^ of Iho H..Mi.a (m.t. ti.«.; .»! I>,»:l!n.l.on of lb. I^Lu.u. | 




l«*.T. 


ro.*.,. \< .3.hd.,. HUhd.,. !r XMbd.T. 1 




S«U.. 


!)«. 




Ua |,«nU. 


., b^. |B«U.. 


Uh. .^hU..! !>«. 1 


H ••■-- 




h. B. 


• -r-" 


. . h. .. 






9 »Mt> 


-f-;»i 




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IS 11 sm 




11 tuu 




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4-. .8 


l*4t 




10 48 




t 10 H 




10 M 


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h. m. 


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k. n. 


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[dcpotiiei rr. Buk D. S.. ISSS. 


1 




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4SM. 


4 4»a. 4 44&. 


d JW- *B^»- b™o«1o( 




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4 17 


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17 11 I 








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flat 


Amerim diicovertd, 1491, N. S. 
dJh' lOil' S»nd. aftir THa. 


S a «. 










23 ,6, 




TIT 


TW jl44 . 




Balile af Red Buk, ITTT. 


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aO' November, Eleventh Month, begins on Thursday. [1838. 


Twilight begiu and eodi. Meen time. 




lit day. 


1 7tb day. | 


13rh diy. | 


19th day. 


3Sih daj. 1 


Begini. Enda. 
h. n. b. n. 


1 Begin*, 
'h. m. 


Eodi. 
h. Ri. 


Begioi 
b. m. 


. Ends. Begitti. 
h. ni. b. n. 


Ends, 
b. m. 


Begioe. 
h. m. 


Ends. 1 
h.m. 1 


Boftoo, 


4 6801. e io a. ;6 6ai. 


6 38 9. 


6 iim 


. 6 18 a. 5 i7in. 


6 14 a. 


5 3800. 6 11 a.| 


N.York 


:> 4 67 6 81 


!6 4 


6 94 


6 10 


6 19 • 6 16 


6 16 


9 31 


6 18 


Wub. 


4 67 6U 


6 8 


6 36 


6 6 


6 91 6 IS 


6 18 


6 19 


6 16 


Charlea. 14 54 a S4 


469 


6 39 


6 8 


696 I 


i 7 


6 38 


5 19 


6 39 


N. Orl'i. 4 5» s 86 


466 


6 31 


6 1 


638 i 


i 6 


098 


5 9 


«39 


Aporn and Ferig€4 qf Uu Moon, « 
Apogee, 19th day, 5h. A. | Perigee, 98th day, 6h. A. 


PkoMtt of the Moon. 
Fall Moon, lit day, 7h. 16.8in. A. New Moon, 17th day, 9h. S3.9m. M. 
Lett Qoaiter, 8th « 9 40.6 A. Pint auarter, 94th *<^ 1 94.9 A. 


• 

1 


• 

1 


Bun'i t^fir limb riaet and lett, (cor. for refract.) M. T. 


High water. M. tine. 








• 




• 

S 

I 


i 




1^ 




• 


i 

m 


1- 


1. 








r%$$$. 
D. in. 


Mte. riMOo. 
h. ni. h. n. 


h. ra. 


h. in. b. n.'ha n. b. ni» 


ritu. $tU. 
h. n. h. n. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


1 


Th. 


6 8S 


4 66 


6 99 


4 50 


6 37 


5 1 16 16 1 

1 


» U 


6 14 


5 14 


10 67a. 


8S7a. 


6 67a. 


2 


F. 


84 


64 


80 


68 


98 


5 of 


17 


10 


15 


13 


1140 * 


930 


T 40 


8 
4 


S. 


86 


63 


81 
033 


67 
4 66 


98 
6 80 


4 69 

4 66 


18 
6 19 


9 
5 6 


16 
6 17 


13 
5 11 


• • ■ 


10 3 

10 47a. 


998 


8 86 


4 61 


38in 


9 7a. 


6 


M. 


88 


60 


84 


64 


81 


67 


90 


8 


17 


11 


1 7 


11 81 


9 61 


6 


TU. 89 1 


49 


86 


63 


83 


66 


31 


7 


18 


10 


1 61 


... 


10 86 


7 


W. 


40 


48 


86 


61 


88 


66 


93 


6 


19 




386 


16m 11 94 1 


8 


Th. 


43 


46 


88 


60 


86 


64 


98 


6 


30 




894 


1 4 


• • . 


9 


F. 


43 


46 


89 


49 


86 


63 


34 


4 


30 




4 17 


1 67 


iim 


10 
11 


S. 


44 

6 46 


44 
143 


40 
6 42 


48 

4 47 


87 
6 89 


63 
4 61 


35 
696 


8 
6 8 


91 
6 92 


5 7 


630 


8 10 


I so 

9^01 


6 49m 


439m 


i% 


M. 


47 


43 


48 


46 


40 


60 


97 


9 


38 




8 6 


646 


4 6 


18 


Tu. 


48 


41 


U 


45 


41 


49 


38 


1 


34 




866 


6 36 


466 


14 


W. 


60 


40 


46 


44 


43 


48 


99 


1 


35 




940 


790 


6 40 


16 


Th. 


61 


89 


47 


43 


48 


47 


80 


6 


96 




10 IS 


766 


6 16 


16 


F. 


63 


88 


48 


43 


44 


48 


81 


4 50 


96 




10 48 


898 


648 


17 
18 


S. 
5u. 


63 

A 64 


87 
4 86 


49 
6 60 


41 
4 40 


46 

6 46 


40 
4 45 


S3 
683 


69 
4 68 


37 
6 38 




n 90 


9 


790 


5 9 


11 63m 


9 88m 


7 63in 


19 


M. 


66 


85 


61 


89 


47 


44 


84 


67 


» 




38a.'l0 8 


898 


20 


Tu. 67 


36 


68 


89 


48 


44 


86 


67 


39 




1 6 


10 45 


9 6 


21 


W. 66 


34 


64 


88 


49 


48 


86 


66 


80 




1 46 


1196 


945 


22 


Th.0 69 


S3 


66 


37 


60 


43 


87 


66 


81 




398 


89. 


10 98 


28 


F. 


7 


S3 


66 


36 


61 


49 


88 


66 


S3 





3 19 


069 


11 19 


24 
25 


S. 
Su. 


S 

7 3 


S3 
4 81 


67 
6 68 


86 

4 36 


69 

668 


41 
4 41 


88 
680 


65 

4 56 


83 

684 



5 


4 19 


166 


18a. 


5 38a.| 8 8a. 


1 38a. 


26 


M. 


4 


80 


6 69 


84 


64 


41 


40 


66 


84 





6 41 


4 31 


9 41 


27 


Til. 


6 


80 


7 


84 


66 


41 


41 


65 


86 





748 


598 


348 


2S 


sc- 





99 


I 


83 


66 


40 


43 


65 


86 





8 47 


697 


4 47 


2« 


>Th. 8 


39 


8 


83 


67 40 


43 


69 


87 


943 


7 93 


643 


801 F. 1 B 


39 


4 


83 


66 40 


44 


66 


88 


.10 86 


8 15 


686 



183a] November has Thirty Days, 






311 




PaaHg* <if ibe MeiidMo (idmb ume) and DeelioaUoa of the FUoeta. I 


lA «toy. j 


7th daj. 


13th dftjr. 


1 19th day. 1 


3Sth dmy. | 




&mlA«.| 


Dm. 


Sntks. , i)M. 


1 SmM«. 


Dec. 


Smttks. 


Dm. 


AraO*. 


Dee. 


^ *»-»■ I 


• • 


h. m. 


• < 


' h.m. 


• 


h. n. 


• 


h. n. 




^ 


11 ztmr 


—1194 


11 oim 


— tl7 8 


7 oa. —90 7'l 9ia. 


— 93 8» 


oaoa. 


—94 90 


? 


11 1 — OlTj 


U 


—19 9 


11 19m — 14 80'! Ill ism 


— 10 60 


11 96m 


— 10 


^ 


T9B - 


-1S87| 
-10 87 


T19 


--19 84 
+M41 


7 


- -11 Zi' 48 
4-M 40 1 3 19 


-j-10 30 
+19 60 


030 


4-090 
-j-OOM 


a 

9 


4a - 


4 


8)0 


940 


• 48m- 


— 1 10 


098m 


-998 


om — 9 69 60m 


— 8 18 


8 80m 


— 841 


h 


1 ia.- 


— IBIOJ 


400. — 18 18 


940 


.— 18 98J oa., 


— 18 87 


1141 


—18 40 


V TW 1- 


— • 4'' 7 30 ! — 8 t 


7 11 


— 9 


Oil 048 1 


— 


94a. 


— 8 


51 |. 


Mooa nam or Mia. M«ao tim«. | 




• 

i 


i 


M 

1 


m 




PHENOMSMA AND OBSfiSVA. 
TIONB. 


1 






1 

• 


£ 

r 


V 


Awioyf and other ReBurtabit 
JDoyt. 




^^t99m 


riMf. 


fiM9». 


ruet. 


riteg. 






k. ■. 


h.B. 


h.m. 


h. n. 


h. m. 


h. m. 




1 


11 6ia. 


4801. 


488a. 


4 88a. 


4 oia. 


4 68a. 


9|C>V'Cp. AttSamtt, 


2 


8 


8 9 


8 8 


6 14 


6 80 


887 


*>9&i,B&^ e,d,/PI«ad. 


S 


otfmJftM 


889 


810 


18 


097 


Sup. d 9 0* <1^ Stm. aft. TV. 


S. 


1 M 


3ia. 


64UU 


ooia. 


7 130. 


79Sa. 


ft 


S ftl 


788 748 


740 


11 


691 




« 


S»I. 


888 840 


888 


U 


099. 


c5$onSdiftaiice0'. 9|C>cn. 


7 


447 |040 


• 84 


10 


10 17 


10 90 




8 


ftS8 


10 80 


11 


U 6 


1190 


1190 




A 


41 M 












lOih. Sparzheim d. 1882, a. 66. 
d > ^. ^ccllpwd. 
9|C>jrA* 22d Sm. after Trim. 


10 
5. 


7 8 


3m 


om 


om 


lom 


094m 


7 4fln[L 


1 8m 


1 om 


1 om 


1 lom 


1 lom 


IS 


897 


9 


9 


9 


9 10 


919 


d>/jnp. 


IS 





8 7 


8 7 


8 7 


8 


8 


d>H. 


14 


• 40 


4 • 


4 


4 


4 


360 


9|C>Spica. C»m>n died, 1882, 


IS 


10 97 


8U 


8 10 


8 7 


407 


464 


[8.96. 


16 


11 19 


17 


14 


10 


860 


6 69 


dp?, dffh. 


17 
5. 


oa. 


Ml*. 


Mte 


8990. 


Mto. 


Mto. 


Igi slatiooafy. 23d 8und. after 


OMa. 


8 7a. 


loa. 


8 43a. 


669a. 


19 


147 


800 


4 


U 


038 


048 


[Trimi^. 


20 


944 


080 


7 8 


7 10 


7 83 


741 


Tarlelon defeated, 1780. 


21 


840 


8 4 


8 19 


816 


887 


840 


Cape Good Hope first doobledJ 


22 


434 


17 


098 


890 


844 


068 


*>S88V:p. [1497, 0.S. 


2S 


097 


10 81 


10 80 


10 40 


10 63 


10 60 


dhO- 


24 


17 


11 47 


11 60 


n 68 


... 


... 


6^1i^' Tieatjr at Ghent, 1814. 
24th Sunday ^ TVmify. 
26ib. N. York evacuated, 1788. 


7 68 








om 


4II1 


26 


744 


1 sm 


1 om 


1 om 


1 6 


1 10 


27 


04S 


990 


990 


9 10 


9 17 


9 17 




28 


• 86 


887 


380 


338 


398 


390 


Earthquake ID N. England, 1814. 


20 10 » 


480 


468 


440 


487 


434 


dJh- *PCSP- 


80 11 30 1 n 


18 


7 


660 


646 


D90- ^' Andrtm. 





[^A Month, begins on Saturday. [\9tSA. 


«b.,in.,.d„d.. «.«.,«. 


i,d.I. 


Bi^ 


l.d.T. ,, 






1... EDdj. 






















Bon«, 


i9Mn.w •■ 


turn. 


■ 8, 






140111. 




N.York, 


in Uii 




II 












Wuli. 


.» Uu 


aw 




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.1. i 


M 1 I« 




810 




*n ^31 


.aa n 


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su !•» 




X 


a 14 




U 8« 


830 


88S 


Aponn, IDthilaj,'^ A. 1 Pe'rioi, B5(h d>T, Tb. A. 








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048 811 



i8saj 




December has Thirty-one Days^ 33| 


?■■■(• of Um Maridims (meui Ubm) ud DcelinUMn oTtlM FIumIi. | 




litdfty. II 7tbday. | 


13th day. ') 19th day. | 


85tb day. | 


■ 


&mtiU.( 


Dee. 1 SraO*. i 


Dee. 


Somlkt. 


Dee. amIiU.I 


Dm. 


8omtkt.\ 


Dee. 


"k... 1 


• '1 


k. m. 


• i 


h. m. 


• 1 


1 h. m: 1 


• / 


h.ni. 


. • • 


9 


Mft.- 


-9ii9i 


1 6a. • 


—96 46 


190a. 


^-98 6! 1 96a. 


— 98 41 


1 19a. 


—9166 


? 


11 am- 


-90 47 


11 4001 • 


-H»ll 


11 4609 


—98 11 


11 69m 


—98 46 


8 


— 98 64 


fl 



693 - 
9S0 - 


-90 96 


6 --786 
1 69 4^^ 


666 

1 98 


--643 

-(-91 a 


640 
I 064 


--664 

+9126 


69im 

94 


--6 10 

+91 47 


7 asm- 


-888 


719m 


— 649 


6 67m 


— 869 


1 6 48m 


— 660 


6 99m — 8 41 


8 lom- 


-4 4 


760m 


— 436 


78Qm 


444 


I 7 om 


— 6 1 


6 46m — 6 17 


h 


11 99 — IB »! 


11 1 — ^18 8 


10 40 


— 19 11 


I 10 90 — 19 19 


960 


— 19 96 


m 


6 la. — 9 4' 


6 87a. — 1 


6 14a. 


— 8 60 i 4 4ia.l — 8 66 


499a. 


— 8 61 


^1 _, 1 Mooo riM« or Mte. Uema tf dm. |) 






^l ^ S ,1 




• 


«• 


•% 
^ 


PHENOMENA AND OBbxAVA- 


1 

o 
>* 

s 


S 3 


1 
1 


4 

• 


V 


b 




h 

• 


TION0. 

Bimdayi and oiher RemarkabU 
Days. 






rittB. 


v^vVvB 


run. 


rwM. 


rue$. 






lum. 


h. m. 


h* ID* 


h. m. 


h. m. 


b. iD> 




1 


^ 


4 178. 


4 96a. 


4 89a. 


4 68a. 


6 9a. 


Adnejd aundatf. 


Sim. 4 ita. 4 93a. 


6 99a. 


6 6ia. 


6 la. 


3 


ISI 619 698 


686 


666 


7 6 


9|C P 47 n* 2d SeM. 26th Con- 


4 


S8S 180 ,117 


743 


6 9 


6 10 


[grass begbt. 


5 


897 640 


846 


660 


9 6 8 18 


Presideiityan Btiren bora, 1782. 


6 


4 17 9 47 


969 


66 


10 7 10 19 




7 


4 9 


10 69 


10 64 


10 68 


11 6 


11 9 


dflCn. * 4' North. 


8 
10 


444 


11 A4 


11 67 


11 68 


* . • 


• . • 




6 94m. 

7 1 








im 

066 


8m 

066 


oenm 


67m 


66m 


11 


749 


1 66 


1 66 


1 66 


1 63 


1 61 


CJ^U. 


12 


691 


8 


9 60 


966 


9 48 


346 




1S| 


9 6 


4 4 


4 9 


467 


946 


8 41 


16th. Gnat fire in N. ¥., 1686. 


14 


968 


6 10 


6 6 


6 


4 U 


489 


WashtngrtoB d. 1709, a. 68. 


1ft 


10 44 


6 16 


6 19 


6 6 


6 47 


6 41 


d ^ $ . Zd Sunday in Jidvent, 


11 aoiii< 


. S0U. 


fit*. 


MU, 


aeU. 


MU, 


17 


86a. 


447a. 


4 66a. 


6 sa. 


6 366. 


6 868. 


9 at greatest £. elong. 20^ 14'. 


18 


1 84 


664 


6 8 


6 


639 


688 


Sup. cJ?©. (5P^. 


1« 


930 


7 7 


7 18 


7 19 


786 


743 




20 


894 


6 39 


897 


8 81 


844 


860 


dU?. 


21 


4 14 


989 


949 


945 


9 63 


9 66 


WvUer begins, 8t, Thomas. 


22 

s. 

24 


6 4 


]q64 


10 66 


10 67 


11 1 


11 8 


d 1> 1^. Landing at Plymouth, 
4th Sunday in Advent. [1620. 


4 6ia. 

688 










• • • 


7ni 


8m 


7m 


7m 


7m 


2fi 


7 99 


1 99 


1 31 


1 19 


1 14 


1 18 


9 stationary. Christmas Day, 


2€ 


890 Igss 


3 86 


3 83 


9 33 


330 


St. Stephen. [Pleiadum. 


21 


r 9 16 


866 


868 . 


848 


8 88 


830 


>|Cj9&j^y&*,e,c, d./Sch 


2fi 


10 M 


6 14 


6 


6 3 


444 


487 


hmoeenis. 27th. St. John. 


29 


11 16 


691 


6 31 


6 14 


663 


646 


^ fiO- Intensity of light 0.656. 
>|C 1> C 8 . 1st S. aft. Christmas. 


^ 


7 8811 


1 7 26n] 


1 7 19m 6 66m 


649m 


81 


1610 


U 936 


8 19 


8 13 7 61 I 7 U 


Earth nearest the Sun. 



34 



SCLIP8E8 OF MARCH 25t1I AND APRIL dxH. [18^8. 



ECLIPSES OF THE SUN AND MOON. 



In the year 1838, there will be four eelipeei, two of the San sad 
two of the Moon. Of the four, two will be wholly vieible, and two 
wholly inviaible, throughout the inhabited part of the United Statea. 

I. Sunday, March 2$th. A total eclipae of the Sun, wholly inTinbl* 
in the United States. 
Beginning of the General EclijMe at 2b. 25.7m. A. (Mean Time at 

Washington) in Lat. 58^ 20f South. Long. 16P 14' East. 
The total and central Eclipse begins, or the centre of the Moon's shadow 

touches the Earth, at 3h. 36.1m. A., in Lat. 7T* 4Q> South. Long. 149° 

2(KEaBt 
The Sun centrally eclipsed at noon, at 4h. 1.0m. A., in Lat 57^ Sd'' 

South. Long. 74«> ir West. 
The centre of the Moon's shadow leaves the Earth, or the total mod 

central Eclipse ends, at 5h. 52.0m. A., in Lat. 19** 55' South. Ijong. 

74® 10* West. 
The Penumbra of the Moon leaves the Earth, or the whole Eclipeo 

ends, at 7h. 2.4m. A., in Lat. 0^ 20' South. Long. 91° 1' West; 

This Eclipse will be partially visible in South America and New 
Zealand, and wholly visible in the great Sbuthern Ocean, to a rtrj 
considerable portion of which it will also be total. 



II. Monday, April 9th. 
United States as follows : 



Albany, . 
Augusta, Oa. 
Augusta, Me. 
St. Augustine, 
Baltimore, 
Bangor, 
Boston, . 
Brattleborough, . 
Buffalo, . 
Charleston, . 
Cincinnati, 
Columbia, S. C. . 
Concord, N. H. 
Detroit, 
Dover, Del. 
Easton, Md. 
Frankfort, Ky. 
Halifax, N. S. . 
Harrisburgh, . 
Hartford, l:t. 
Lexington, Ky. 



The Moon eclipsed, visible throughout tha 









Beginning. 


Greatest ObeenrA- 


Sod. 






tion. 






h. m. 


h. m. 


b. in. 


• • 


7 37.1 A. 


9 3.6 A. 


10 30.1 A 






7 4.5 


8 31.0 


9 57.5 






7 52.8 


9 19.3 


10 45.8 






7 5.8 


8 32 3 


9 58.8 








7 25.6 


8 52.1 


10 18.6 








7 57.0 


9 23.5 


10 50.0 








7 47.8 


9 14.3 


10 40.8 








7 41.7 


9 82 


10 34.7 






7 16.5 


6 43.0 


10 9.5 








7 12.3 


8 38.8 


10 5.3 








6 54.3 


8 20.8 


9 47.3 






7 7.6 1 


8 34.L 


10 0.6 








7 46.2 


9 12.7 


10 39.2 








7 0.2 


8 26.7 


9 53.2 








7 30.1 


8 56.6 


10 23.1 








7 27.6 


8 54.1 


10 20.6 








6 53.5 


8 20.0 


9 46.5 








8 17.6 


9 44.1 


11 10.6 








7 24.8 


8 51.3 


10 17.8 








7 40.8 


9 7.3 


10 33.8 








6 54.9 


8 21.4 


9 47.9 



183a] 



■CLIPSSB or APaiL 9th and sxpt. 18th. 



35 





BefiDDiof. 


OreatMt ObMaia- 
tiM. 


Ssd. 




li. m. 


b. n^ 


b. m. 


*LdUla Rocky . 


6 23.3 A. 


7 49.8 A. 


9 16.3 A. 


Xjowell, 


• 




7 46.8 


8 13.3 


10 39.8 


*St l^nit. 








6 33.7 


8 0.2 


9 26.7 


Mobile, 








6 39.4 


8 5.9 


9 39.4 


Montreal, 


. 






7 37.8 


9 4.3 


10 30.8 


Ifaatncket, . 








7 61.6 


9 18.1 


10 44.6 


NwhTiUe, 








6448 


8 11.3 


9 37.8 


*Natches, . 








6 26.5 


7 63.0 


9 19.5 


New Haven, . 








7 40.2 


9 6.V 


10 33.2 


Newport, 








7 46.7 


9 13.2 


10 39 7 


New Bedford, 








7 4d.4 


9 14.9 


10 41.4 


'New Orleans, 








6 31.6 


7 58.1 


9 24.6 


New York, 








7 36.0 


9 2.6 


10 29.0 


Norfolk, 








7 26.8 


8 63 3 


10 19.8 


Northampton, Mass. 








7 41.4 


9 7.9 


10 34.4 


Philadelphia. 








7 31.4 


8 57.9 


10 244 


Pittsfanrgh, 








7 11.6 


8 38.1 


10 4.6 


PijmoDtb, Mass. 








7 49.4 


9 15.9 


10 42.4 


Portland, Me. 








7 607 


9 17.2 


10 43.7 


PorUmonth, N. H. 








7 49.1 


9 16.6 


10 42.1 


ProTidence, 








7 46.4 


9 12.9 


10 39.4 


Qaebcc, 








7 47.0 


9 13.6 


10 40.0 


Raleigh, 








7 16.9 


8 43.4 


10 9.9 


Richmond, Va. 








7 22.3 


8 48.8 


10 15.3 


Rochester, 








7 20.7 


8 47.2 


10 137 


Salem, Msss. 








7 48.4 


9 14 9 


10 41.4 


Savannafa, . ** . 








7 7.2 


8 33.7 


10 0.2 


Springfield, Msss. 








7 41.7 


9 82 


10 34.7 


Trenton, N. J. 








7 33.5 


9 0.0 


10 26.5 


Utica, N. Y. 








7 31.2 


8 67.7 


10 24.2 


•Vandalia, 








6 36.0 


8 2.6 


9 29.0 


Washington, D.C. 








7 24.0 


8 50.6 


10 17.0 


Worcester, Mass. . 








7 44.9 


9 11.4 


10 37.9 



Mean time of the respective places. 

Digits eclipsed 7° 13^ on the northern side of the Moon. 

III. Tuesday, September 18th. An annalar Eclipse of the Son, 
▼isible throQghoat the United States. 

Phases of the General Eclipse. 

At lb. 13.6m. A. (Mean Time at Washington) the Moon's Pennmbra 
will touch the Earth, or the General Eclipae will begin, in Kamtscbatkat 
in Lat 63<> 39^ North. Long. 169» 25/ East. 

At 6h. 20.6m. A., the Moon's Penumbra will leave the Earth, or the 
General Eclipse will end, in the Pacific Ocean, near the Colombiaa 
Coast, in Lat. 6° 25/ North. Long. 83° 32' West. 

Hence the duration of the entire eclipse for the whole Earth will be 
6h. 7.1m. 



* ^t tboM of the above plaeee marked with an aiteriak the edipae will begia st, 
or a very few miootea after, raniet. 



96 



ECLIPSE OF SEPTEMBER 16tH. 



[183a 



Path qfthe Central EeUptt 

For entry mxtadB, fr^in the time of its toaching the Earth at sunset,* 
at a point sitaated in the unknown regions, near the North Pole, to the 
time of its leaving the Earth, also at sunset, at a point in the North 
Atlantic Ocean, or during the whole time of its continuance on the 
Earth. 

Unknown Regions near the North Pole. 





Mean time 


Mean time 


Latitude 


Longitnde 




at 


at 


of 


of 




fWashington. 

h. m. 1. 
3 53 521 A. 


the place. 


tli6 plaee. 


the place. 


Bon Mti c«nt. eelip. at 


h. m> ■• 
8 41 91 A. 


^ i5.4 N. 


&4b.9E. 


** eentriilly •clipied at 


53 99 


5 38 1 


t 87 59.8 


35 53.8 W. 


if li 


53 53 


396 56 


87 11.1 


68 46.9 


« <( 


54 53' 


9 937 


84 58.0 


90 5.7 


U If 


55 53" 


1 43 3 


83 14.7 


95 \\S 


« i( 


56 53 


. 1 35 34 


81 46.1 


97 91.6 


«l u 


67 53 


33 93 


80 99.8 


96 94.3 


H »C 


56 53 


30 59 


79 90.6 


99 QSt 


C. CI 


59 53 


31 7 


78 17.9 


nst 


" " 


3* 53 


31 46 


77 19.3 


18.6 


<( « 


1 53 


33 38 


t 76 94.3 


« 90.5 


•c « 


953 


33 46 


75 31.7 


18.5 


« C( 


3 53 


35 7 


74 41.5 


13.3 


tl if 


4 53 


36 39 


73 53.8 


5.3 


if if 


5 53 


38 19 


8.6 


98 55.3 


i< f* 


6 53 


40 5 


79 95.8 


43.8 


« «I 


7 53 


41 49 


71 44.1 


39.8 


If fC 


8 53 


43 34 


3.4 


91.4 


CC if 


9 53 


45 91 


70 93.6 


9.7 


Cf fi 


10 53 


47 10 


60 44.7 


97 57.6 


If <i 


11 53 


48 59 


6.7 


45.9 


f( ft 


19 53 


50 49 


68 99.9 


33.8 


Cf CC 


13 53 


58 38 


67 54.0 


90.4 



* In thi« Eelipee tliii eingnlar ooennenee will take place, tIs. the Central Eelipee will 
not begin nntll after the conjnnetion in Right Aseeneioo. The Central Eelipee will 
not, therefore, as it oeool, begin at iunriee at the place where it towh«i the Earth, 
hot at ■ooeet, the Son will not be centrally oelipeed on the Meridian, and the Path of 
the Centre, for some minotee, will be towards the West, and not toworde the EeeV 
Indeed it appears ttom the above, that in the short interval of Im. SBs. of slealiiff 
time, the Central Path changes its Longitude towards the West 100*, or from W* East 
to 90* West. 

In the " ConnoisMMs dss TVsu,** (the French Nontiool Almanac,) the Longitude of 
the point where the Central Eclipse will begin is laid down erroneously, by nenrlj 
100 degrees, probably through an error of the press. 

t The oorrssponding times at any other place can be easily ascertained by adding to, 
or subtracting from, the times in this column, the Longitude of the place from Waah- 
ingfoo, according as the plaee is East or West of that city. For Greenwich aid 
Sh. 8m. 7s. 'y for Boston add S3m. 51s. ; for New York aUL 19m. Ss. ; for Philadelphia 
aid 7m. 93s. ; for Baltimore aii Im. 36s. ; for Charleston snACrtict 11m. 43b. j for CiB> 
dnnati mhtna 99m. 41s. ; for New Orleans miJbtnet 5Shn. 90s. 

X The greatest North Latitude of the Path of the Centre. 

% The gnnteot West Longitude of the Path of the Centre. 



183&] 



xcLiPsi or sxvTKMBxm 18th. 



37 



Brituh Possessiona in JCorth Jtmeriea. 



OMAraUy 

M 



edipMd at 

M 



« 

U 
M 
C« 
M 
U 
M 
<( 
U 

u 

cc 
u 
u 
cc 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

« 

M 

(« 

U 

Ct 

<i 

U 

(( 

M 

M 

M 

C« 

t( 

(( 

CC 

l( 
l( 
« 
(( 

(C 

u 

Cf 



M 
M 
C< 
<( 
M 
« 
U 
U 
M 
(( 
M 
«« 
«• 
IC 
• i 
tl 
(C 

<l 
It 

IC 

c< 
<c 

IC 
4C 
CC 

cc 

CI 

l( 
« 

CI 

II 

M 
IC 
II 
CC 
fC 
CI 
CI 
CC 

cc 
CC 
CI 



Sao eaatnl] r eeBpMd at 

<« IC 



CC 

u 

CC < 

«l 



II 
*c 

CC 
CC 



Mean time 

at 
WaahiDgton. 



3 14 53 A. 

15 53 

16 53 

17 53 

18 53 

19 53 

90 53 

91 53 
99 53 

93 53 

94 53 

95 53 

96 53 

97 53 

98 53 

99 53 

30 53 

31 53 

39 53 
33 53 
34-53 
35 53 
3fi 53 

37 53 

38 53 
S9 53 

40 53 

41 53 

42 53 

43 53 

44 53 

45 53 

46 53 

47 53 

48 53 

49 53 

50 53 

51 53 
59 53 

53 53 

54 53 

55 53 

56 53 

57 53 



Mean tima 
at 

tlw place. 



h* OB* ■• 

1 54 98 A. 

56 19 

56 10 

9 1 

1 59 

844 

5 34 

795 

9 14 

11 4 

19 54 

14 43 

16 33 

18 94 

90 15 

99 6 

93 56 

95 46 

97 37 

99 96 

31 18 

33 9 

35 

36 51 
38 49 
40 33 
49 25 
44 17 



4C 
48 



9 
9 



49 54 
51 48 
53 49 
55 36 
67 31 
59 97 



1 
3 
5 

7 



23 
20 
17 
15 



9 14 
U 14 
13 14 
15 IS 



Lafltude 


of 


tha place. 


^ 18.9 N. 


66 44.5 


11.0 


65 38.1 


5.8 


64 34.1 


3.0 


63 39.4 


9.1 


68 39.9 


9.8 


61 33.8 


5.3 


60 37.3 


9.7 


59 494 


15.3 


58 48.6 


99.0 


57 55.7 


99.8 


4.3 


56 39.1 


14.0 


55 49.0 


94.3 


54 59.8 


35.5 


11.5 


53 47.7 


24.1 


0.8 


59 37.7 


14.6 


51 51.6 


98.7 


6.0 


50 43.4 


91.1 


49 59.0 


37.0 


15.9 


48 53.6 


39.0 



Lake Superior. 
3 



58 53 A. 

59 53 

53 

1 fa 

9 53 
353 



17 18 A. 
19 21 
21 25 
23 30 
95 36 
97 43 



g 



10.5 N. 
49.1 
97.8 
6.6 
46 45.6 
94.7 



Sao aeatnJIy ediiMed at 

CC CC 



UnUed States — • Wisconsin Territory. 

4 



4 5.1 A. 

5 53 



3 99 51 A. 
39 



I 



46 3.9 N. 
45 43i) 



Northern part of the State of Michigan. 



Sao eeatnUr eelipied at 

M CC 



u 

M 
CC 
U 
tt 

M 



CI 
CC 

CC 

u 

CC 
CC 



6 53 A. 

7 .53 
B53 
9 53 

10 53 

11 53 
19 53 

13 sa 



3 34 19 A. 
36 95 

38 40 
40 56 
43 14 
45 34 
47 56 
SO 19 



45 99.6 N. 

H 
44 41.7 

21.3 

1.1 

43 40.9 

90.8 

' 0.8 



Lonfitoda 

of 
the plaee. 



96 



95 



7.9 W. 
S&S 
49.5 
99.7 
16.9 

4.1 
51.4 

a&8 

96.4 

14.0 

1.6 

94 49.9 

36.7 

94.0 

11.3 
93 58.6 

46.0 

33.4 

20.7 

8.1 

99.55.4 

42.7 

30.0 

17.3 
4.5 

51.7 

38.8 

25.8 

12.8 

59.6 

46.4 

33.1 

19.6 
6.0 

59.9 

38.3 

24.9 

10.0 

55:7 

419 

96.5 

11.6 
87 56.5 

41.9 



87 95.6 W. 

9.8 

86 53.8 

37.6 

91.0 

4.3 



85 47.3 W. 
99.9 



91 



-90 



89 



88 



85 

84 



83 



89 



194) W. 

53.8 
35.1 
16.0 
56.5 
36.6 
16.1 
55.9 



38 



ECLIPSE OF 8EPTEMBEB 18tE. 



[1838. 



Southern extremity of Upper Canada, 



Sao centrallr eclipted tt 

u cc 



Mean time 

at 
Waabiofton. 



fa. lO. s. 
4 14 53 A. 
15 53 



Mean time 

at 
the place. 



b» m. ■• 
3 58 40 A. 
55 14 



Latitude 

of 
tlie place. 



4140.9N. 
91.1 



Lon^tnde 
the plaee. 



11^ 



Lake Erier 

San centrally oelipMd at | 4 10 53 A. | 3 57 45 A. | 43 1 J N. t 81 4B.7 W. 

JVortheaetem part of the State of Ohio, 



Sun centrallT oelipeed at 



i< 



(( 



4 17 S3 A. 

18 53 

19 53 



4 19 A. 
950 
530 



41 41.0 N. 
91.9 
9.9 



Southwestern part of Pennsylvama. 



San eontrally eclipted at | 4 90 53 A. 



fi 



(C 

c< 



91 53 
39 53 



4 8 19 A. 
11 
13 50 



40 49.0 N. 
93.1 
3.0 



81 9S.SW. 
l.l 

80 30.1 



80 10.9 W 
79 43.5 
10.1 



Western part of Maryland. 
Sun centfally eclipeed at | 4 93 53 A. | 4 10 50 A. | 39 44.1 N. I 78 47.6 W. 

JCorthem part of Virginia, 



Sun centrally eclipeed at 



if 



« 



4 94 53 A. 

95 53 
90 53 



4 19 48 A. 
99 53 
90 9 



30 94.7 N. 

5.3 
38 45.9 



Southern part of Maryland, 



Sun centrally eclipied at 

i( c< 



4 97 53 A. 
98 53 



4 99 18 A. 
39 40 



38 90.0 N. 
7.3 



78 17.9 W. 
77 40.8 
14.4 



70 40.6 W, 
5.1 



Eastern shore of Virginia^ 
SuD centfally eclipMd at | 4 99 53 A. i 4 30 10 A. i 37 48.0 K. | 75 97^ W. 



Ban centfally eelipted at 

(I M 



f« 


(t 


(C 


C( 


M 


CI 


l< 


K 


«l 


(1 


l< 


(( 


U 


. (t 



11 



l( 



•I «( 

8nn eeti etnt. eelipeed at 



4 30 53A 


31 53 


39.'» 


33 53 


34 53 


35 53 


30 53 


37 53 


38 53 


39 53 


40 53 


41 99 



Atlantic Ocean. 



38 .50 A. 
43 40 
47 44 
51 58 
56 98 

1 18 

43 
19 39 
19 97 
97 41 

39 13 
58 28 



37 98.7 N. 

9.3 
30 49.9 

30.4 

10.9 
35 51.3 

31.5 

11.0 
34 51.3 

30.3 

7.9 

33 65.0 



74 47.5 W. 
74 5.0 
73 18.9 
79 30.5 
7138.4 
70 40.4 
00 34.3 

08 90.3 
00 53.3 
00 4.8 

09 96.8 
57 40.9 



Dnratioa of the Central Eclipie oa the Earth Ih. 48m. 20^ 



Metn TiiiiA «t 
Baltimore. 



183B.] BGI.IP8V OF sxpTSiiBXft 18th. aO 

PhBtea of the Edijtte at some of tke prindpal Cities m the United SUUee, 
The Eartk^s eUiptieity being considered one three-hundredth, and the 
semi-diometers* of the Sun and Moon reduced ^ for irradiation and 
infLmmi^ aeeording to the theory of De Sdjour. 

At the Cit9 of Ba^ltimorv, tn the State of Man^and, in Lat 39° 17' 13'', 
Long. 76» 37' 50'', the EeUpse wUl he annular ^ asfoUaios, 

Beftnning of the EcUpM 3 6 35.9 A.* 

Formation tf the Ring . 4 24 45.1 

Nearest approach of the Centrea and > 27 39.1 
Apparent ^ in the Ecliptic 27 47.1 

I&qfture of the Ring .... 3033.3 

End of the Eclipae . 5 39 51J2 j 

Duration of the Ring 5 48.2 

" •< whole Eclipse . 2 33 15.3 

Digits eclipsed W &. The Eclipse will begin at a point in the rightf 
side of the Son 96° 58' &om the vertex. 

At the nearest approach C Distance of the North Limbs 87.13'' 

of the Centres of the { *< " Centrei . 15.51 

Son and Moon .( ** ** South Limbs 56.11 

7%e Otjf of BosTov, in the State of Massachusetts, 
Lat 4aP 21' 23". Long. 71 » 4' 9". 

Beginning of the Eclipse 3*27* 32.2 A. . 

Greatest Obscuration . 4 45 50.8 f Mean Time at 
Apparent ^ in the Ecliptic 46 39.3 ( Boston. 

End of the Eclipse . 5 56 15.8 ^ 

Duration of the Eclipse . 2 28 43.6 

Point first touched . . 100° 28' from the vertex to the right. 
Point hist touched . . 77 6 " «< left. 

Digits eclipsed 10° 49' on Sun's South limb. 

At the greatest C Oifibrence of corrected semi-diameters 72.53" 

Obscuration I Distance of the Centres Q and > . . 115.96 



* 8«a remariu on tbii fielipte in the Preliminary Obtorvaiions. 

t An EelipM ofth* Bon nlmott 9^w^J9 begini on liii ri^ht aide and anda on liis left 
m4o ; bat if an aatoonomieal of Inrorting toleacopo be OMd, the appearaneo will be 
•nelly the eoolnf y* 



40 SCLIPSB OF SXPTEMBER 18tB. [1838. 

At the City of Buffalo, in the Stale of Jfew York, t» Lai. 42<> 53', 
Long. 78° 55', the Eclipse toill be annular. 

Beginning of the Eclipse 2* 46 57.8 A..^ 

J^rmuUion of the Rinff . 4 7 4.5 I 

Nearest approach of 3ie Centres Q and ^ 9 17.6 f Mean Time at 

Apparent ^ in the.Ecliptic ... 9 42.7 f Buffalo. 

Buvture of the Bing .... 11 30.4 

End of the Eclipse .... 52319.6 J 

Duration of the Ring • 4 25.9 

«« « Eclipse . . 2 36 21.8 

Point first touched 91^ 26' from the vertex to the right. 
Digits eclipsed ll"" 6i|'. 

At the nearest approach C Dutance of the North Limbs . 119J90" 
of the Centres of the < " '< Centres 48.15 

Sun and Moon C *' " South Limbs 22.90 

7%e CUy o/ Charlbstoh, tn the State of South CaroUna. 
Lat. 32° 46' 33". Long. 79» 67' 27". 



h. DO. 1. 

Beginning of the Eclipse • 3 4 36.5 A. % 

Apparent I in the Ecliptic . 4 25 16.1 r Mean Time at 
Greatest Obscuration ... 26 35.6 i Charleston. 

End of the Eclipse . . . 5 39 5.8 ' 

Duration of the Eclipse . . 2 34 29.3 

Point first touched 97° 36' from the vertez to the right. 

Digits eclipsed lO"* 36' on Sun*s North limb. 

At the greatest C Difference of corrected semi-diametars 71.29" 

Obscuration ( Distance of the Centres © and J^ . 151.47 

The City of Ci5cinhatI| tn the State of Ohiot 
Lat. 39° 5' 54' . Long. 84° 27' W. 

h« m. 1. 
Beginning of the Eclipse 2 26 42.0 A. .^ 

Apparent I in the Ecliptic . 3 50 59.5 f Mean Time at 

Greatest Obscuration ... 61 51.6 \ Cincinnati. 

End of the Eclipse . . 5 7 54.8 ^ 

Duration of the Eclipse . , . 2 41 12.8 

Point first touched 86° 37' from the vertex to the right. 

Digits eclipsed 11° 2' on Sun*s North limb. 

At the greatest ( Difference of corrected semi-diameters 70.09" 

Obscuration \ Distonce of the Centres and ]^ . . 83J21 



183&] SCKIP8E OP 8KPTBMBXB ]8tH. 41 

A CJU dt^ of l>rrRoiT, in ikt State nf JiiOdgan^ in Lat 49^ M', 
Long. BSIPS&ftk€ EdipM wiU he omnifar. 



B«giiimiigofthe£cIipM 2*27 5.4 A. ^ 

Formation of the Ring . 3 48 25.9 

Apparent ^ in the Ecliptic 51 22 



Metn Time at 



IVearest approach of Centres 51 28 1 \ Detroit. 

Rt^ture of the Xing 54 30.0 | 

End of the Eelipee .57 19.2 J 

Duration of the Ring ... 6 4.1 

" «< Eclipse . . 2 40 13.8 

Point first touched dS^ 17' flrom the yertez to the right 

Digito eetipsed ll^ 7'. 

At the nearest approach ^ Distance of the North Limhs 60.69" 

of the Centres of the > *< " Centres 9.62 

Son and Moon ) " " South Limbs 79.93 

The City of New Hayxn, in the State of ConnectiaU. 
Lat. 41° 17' 58''. Long. 72° 57' 46''. 

n. n. i. 
Beginning of the Eclipse • 3 20 32 A. ^ 

Greatest Ohscuration ' . . 4 39 49 / Mean Time at 

Apparent d io the Ecliptic 40 22 & New Haven. 

End of the Eclipse . 5 50 49 ^ 

Duration of the Eclipse 2 30 17 

P<nnt first touched 99^ 22' from the vertex to the right. 
Di|pts eclipsed 11*> 3' on Sun's South Limb. 

At the greatest ) Difference of corrected semi diameters 72iM" 

Obscuration > Distance of the Centres of the and J^ • 82.70 



Jfie City of New Orlxahs, m the State of Louisiana, 
Lat. 29° 57' 45". Long. 90« 6' 49''. 

.jinning of the Eclipse 219* 1.5 A. .. 

Apparent c5 in the Rcliptie . 3 40 54.0 f Mean Time at 

Greatest Obscuration • 3 45 21 5 i New Orleans. 

End of the Eclipse . .51 16.6 ^ 

Duration of the Eclipse . . 2 42 15.1 

Point first touched 84^ 43' from the vertex to the right 

Digits eclipsed 9^ 17' on Sun's North limb. 

At the Greatest ( Difference of c'oirrected semi -diameters 1' 9.21" 

Obscuration { DisUnce of the Centres of the © and > 6 1.99 

4* 



43 



XGLIP8I or 8XPTEIIBUL 18tB. 



JUth^Gty^ New York, w Cfce SUUe qf Aeio Ym-k, m Ut. 40^ 42" 4<y% 
Long. 74<» 1' 8", t&« Ec^pM wOl be amnd^* 



Beginning of the Eclipse 
Formation of the Ring 
lieareBt approach of the Centres 
Appaient I in the Ecliptic 
Rupture of the Ring 
End of the Eclipse 

Duration of the Ring 
" " Eclipse 

Point first toacbed 98® 45' from the vertex to the right 
Digits ecUpsed 110 6'. 

At the nearest approsch C Distance of the North Limbs 
of the Centres of the < " *< Centres 
Sun and Moon f " " *South Limbs 



h. m. •. 

3 16 34.7 A.I 

4 35 1.5 
36 18.8 
36 48.2 

. 37 36.6 

5 47 47 7 


Mean Tinoe at 
* NewYock. 


2 35.1 




2 31 13.0 





136 87" 

64.80 

7.27 



At the City of Philadxlphia, tn the State of Pennsylvania, in Lai. 
39<^ 56^ 59^', Long. 75^ 10' 59", the EcUpse wiU be anntdar. 



Beginning of tlie Eclipse 
FomuUion of the Ring 
Nearest approach of the .Centres 
Apparent ^ in the Ecliptic 
I&tpture of the Ring 
End of the Eclipse 

Duration of the Ring 
« •* Eclipse 



b. n. ■• 

3 12 25.6 A. 

4 3U 19J2 

32 45.1 

33 4.0 
. 35 10.8 

5 44 38.2 



Mean Time at 
Philadelphia. 



4 51.6 
. 2 32 12.6 

Point first touched 98® ^ from the vertex to the right. 
Digits eclipsed 11^6'. 

At the nearest approach C Distance of the North Limbs 
of the Centres of the 2 " " Centres 
Sun and Moon C « ' « South Limbs 



113.17" 
41J» 
30.61 



* It will be remembered, tbat tlthoofh the table* of the Moon gonerally five her 
plaee with « very great degree of preciiioo, email dieerepanoiee between bei tme and 
oaleniated poeition are lometimoa found. It b higblf probable tbat this Eclipee will be 
annalai in the Citjr of New Torli ; hot thould the Latitude of the JUooa aa giren by 
the tablee, be too great by 8", it will not be; but will be to in Raleigh, and very 
nearly eo in Cincinnati. Should it, on the other hand, be too imall by the lame quan* 
tity, the Colipee will be annular at New Haren, and the duration of the Ring at 
New York will be much more eooiiderable. The gveateat dillbrmea between the 
inie and ubular latitude ia about 15 lecondat bat thii is af Ttij fare ocQuneuGt^ 



18881] BCUMK OF BXFTBMBBK IStB. 48 



jfr tks Cktf €f FmnvtM, t» tke SUUb ef Pmuuylmmis, in Lftt. 40^ 3r« 
Long. SOP 2^, ike EeUpm will be mmidar and almoM exaetltf central. 



Mean Time at 
PitUborg. 



ling of the Eclipae 
lion of tke Any 
Appannt ^ in the Ecliptic 



fbrmaiion of tke Rh^ 
Appannt ^ in the Eel 
Nearest approach of the Centres 



Fhtptttre of tke Ring 
End of the Eclipse 

Duration of the Ring 

" " Eclipse 

Point first toached 91° 46^. Digito ecUpi«d ll*" 6i'. 

At the nearest approach C Distance of the North Limbs 69.87" 

of the Centres of the ^ *< <« Centres . .1.03 

8un and Moon / ** <« South Limbs . 71.1 



h. m. ■. 


2 46 25.0 A. 


4 6 18.3 


9 194 


9 19.8 


12 217 


5 23 34.2 


6 3.4 


2 37 9.2 



Tke City of Portlaitd, m Uke State of Maine. 
Lat. 4S» 39* 26^'. Long. 70° 20^ 30". 

Beginning of the Eclipse 3* 28 20 9 A. ^ 

Greatest Obscaration . . 4 46 15 2 / Mean Time at 

Apparent I in the Ecliptic . 47 12.2 ( Portland. 

End of the Eclipse . . . 5 56 31.2 ^ 

Duration of the Eclipse 2 28 10.3 

Point first touched 100* 9' from the vertex to the right. 

Digits eclipsed 10^ 40' on Sun's South limb. 

At the greatest C Difference of corrected semi-diameters 72.63^ 

Obscaration I Distance of the Centres Q and > • . 140.47 

T%e City of Raleigh, in the State of Korik Carolina, 

Lat.350 47'. Long 78° 48^. 

0. n. ■■ 
Beginning of the Eclipse 3 3 310 A. ^ 

Apparent ^ in the Eclipse . 4 24 47.1 / Meao Time at 

Greatest Obscuration 25 24 9 1 Raleigh. 

End of the Eclipse » 5 38 9.2 ^ 

Dnration of the Eclipse 2 34 38 2 

Point first toached Oe^' 55'. Digits eel. l]o 5^' on Sun's North limb. 

At the greatest ( Difierenoe of corrected semi diameters 71.42" 

Obscuration \ Distance of the Centres Q ^^^ ^ • • 73.76 

Hence it appears that the Eolips^ will be very nearly annular.* 



* Eftletieh was lituAted very ■imilarly, with r««peet to th« aonalar l^lipts of 
FetKmiy Mih, 1631. At that time, the diflfi'renee of ihe corrected wmiHlmmetefli 
wsa 90.50'', and the leaat dii^ianea of tbo Ontrea 33 86". Tho aboTO Eelipte will be 
aaaalar, \f the Moon 'a tahmUr Uatitods eboald be too yreat by (ArM Mconda only. 



44 ECLIPSE OF 8EPTEIIBSE 18tH. [1838. 

At the CUy cf Richmond » in the State of Virginia, in Lat. ST^ SS' 17", 
Long. TT^ 2& 28^ ^ *the Edipse toUl be annular. 

Beginning of the Eclipse . . 3 6*20^2 A.' 

F^ormation of the Ring . 4 24 54 8 

Apparent in the Ecliptic .27 30.1 ( Mean Time at 

Nearest approach of the Centres • 27 43.0 [ Richmond. 

Rupture (^ the Ring .... 3030.9 I 

End of the Eclipse .... 54012.6 J 

Daration of the Ring . . . 5 36.1 

« " Eclipse . . . 2 33 52.3 

PoiDt first touched 97^ 15' from the vertex to the right. 

Digits eclipsed IF 6'. 

At the nearest approach C Distance of the North Limbs 46 56^' 

of the Centres of the 2 << " Centres . . 24 96 

Son and Moon i " " South Limbs 96.52 

J3t the City of Washington, m the Distriet of Columbia, m Lat. 38<* 52' 
54", Long. 77^ 1' 48'% the Edipse toill be annular and very nearly 
central. 

Beginning of the Eclipse . . 3 5 28.8 A. "^ 

Formation of the Ring . 4 23 45.3 | 

Nearest approach of the Centres 26 44.0 1 Mean Time at 

Apparent d in the Ecliptic . 26 45.8 f Washington. 

Rupture of the Ring .... 2942.6 

End of the Eclipse . . . . 5 39 17.2 j 

Duration of the Ring .... 557.3 
" " Eclipse . 2 33 48.3 

Point first touched 96^ 46^ from the vertex to the right. 
Digits eclipsed 11^ 6^. 

At the nearest approach C Distance of the North Limbs . 76.10" 
of the Centres of the 2 " •* Centres . , 4.54 

Sun and Moon ( " «« South Limbs 67.02 



The Phases of the Eclipse at the following places were not stricUy 
computed (which was considered unnecessary), but were estimated 
from the preceding. It is, however, believed that the times in the 
following table will be found by observation to be near approximations 
to the true. Should greater accuracy be required, the time of the Be- 
ginning can be recompated by the Elements on the 69th page. 



1838.] 



A11MS7, N. T. 

AOgOMAy ll«. . 

BmtMoroagh, Yt. 

ColsabM, S. C. . 

Cbocord, N. B. . 
•CbMoo, Md. . 

Fruklbrt, Kjr.l , 
*Ilan-i*borc, Fano. 

fiwiford^Ct. 

"Lowll, Man. 
^tbrMtta, Ohio, . 

Mobil*, Ala. . 

MiOedfOTilla, da. 

Maahviila, Taa. 

Natchez, 

N«w Mfoni, Maaa. 
«Mocfolk»Va. . 

PortMUMmth, N. H. 
^Prineetoa, N. J. 

Proridaoca, R. I. 
^CfaivaiHty of Virginia, 



SaJooB 

SpriDgiBeld. Mi 
^ranloa, N. J. 
*Wheeltof , Va. . 
•Wlhaingtoii, DaL 

WoKOMtar, M 



XGI.IP8I 


OF 8K] 


nrsMBi 


■•fi*- 


Ofaataal 


EmI. 


DlaC 


Obwor. 




b. m. 


h. n. 


b. IB. 


3 MA. 


4 S3 A. 


5 45 A. 


ssa 


4 16 


599 


3S9 


4 47 


5 57 


3 19 


438 


549 


956 


4 18 


539 


395 


443 


.153 


3 10 


4 31 


543 


997 


359 


5 8 


3 4 


M98 


538 


3 91 


440 


5 51 


396 


444 


555 


949 


4 6 


590 


996 


3 53 


5 


9 57 


4 10 


534 


999 


348 


5 4 


9 10 


336 


499 


396 


447 


5 57 


3 19 


439 


545 


396 


446 


5 56 


3 14* 


•4 34* 


546* . 


396 


445 


5 55 


3 


499 


535 


398 


446 


5 57 


3 91 


4 40 


5 51 


3 14 


*4 35 


5 46 


943 


4 7 


5 91 


3 U 


«4 39 


544 


394 


443 


554 



IStb. 



45 



D«m- 

tioo. 



9 31 

93U 

996 

930 
936 
998 
933 
9 41 
934 
930 
999 
938 
9 41 
9 37* 
9 41* 
9 49 
9 99 
9 33 
9 38* 
9 39 
9S9* 
9 35 
9 98* 
9 30 
9 39 
9 36 
9 39* 
9 994 



DifHa jPainI lat 
aeltpaad. toucfaad. 



{ 



ll 'O 
10 33 
10 34 
10 51 
10 49 
«10 45 
«11 6 
tlO 59 
•11 6 
10 57 

10 48 

11 7 
t 933 
tl0 91 
tl0 96 
t 949 
«10 54 
•11 6' 

10 44 

11 6 

10 55 

11 6 
$10 48 
MO 55 
•11 6 
•11 6 
•11 6 
(lOSfi 



9d 

94 

100 

99 

95 

100 

08 

66 

96 

100 

100 

90 

87 

95 

86 

85 

100 

97 

100 

98 

100 

96 

100 

100 

93 

91 

98 

100 



^ 
•? 



>a 

H 



§ 



Tha abova ara azpraaMd in Maan Tima of tbe mpaetiva placas. 
The Path of the Central EcUpie first touches the Earth at a point 
aitaatad in the unknown regions near the North Pole, and a little East 
of the meridian of Greenwich ; in a few seconds afterwards, it attains its 
grea^st North Latitude (88^), whilst for the first eight minutes it rapidly 
adTancca towards the West, until it is 99° West of that meridian. The 
Central Path then passes, in a South by East direction, over the whole 
extent of the continent lying North of the United States ; its course 
lies a little to the West of Hudson's Bay, over the territory of the 
Hudson's Bay Company, the western part of Upper Canada, and Lake 
Superior. It then enters the United States and passes over the north- 
east part of Wisconsin Territory and of the State of MicBittAir, then 
orer tbe London District of Upper Canada, and, crossing Lake Erie, 
again enters tbe United States ; thence across the northeast extremity 
of the Counties of Cuyahoga and Columbiana, and across the Counties 
of Geauga and Trumbull, in the northeastern part of the State oi 
Ohio ; thence across the southwest part of the Counties of Mercer, 
Butler, and Bedford, and across the Counties of Beayer, Allegany, 
Westmoreland, and Somerset, in the southwest part of the State of 
PxussTLTAiiiA ; thcnec across the eastern part of the County of Alle- 
gany, in the western part of the State of Maryland ; thence across 
the Counties of Morgan, Berkeley, Jefferson, Loudon, and Fairfax, in 
the northeastern part of the State of Viroivia ; thence across the 
Counties of Prince George, Charles, and St. Mary, in the southwestern 



• AoDotoff. t Oa tba North Limb of the Boa,. ^ On tha 8oaUi lAmb. 



'46 ECLIPSE OF SKPTEMBEB 18tH. [1838. 

part of the State of Maryland ; thence across the Cberapeake Baj 
and the Coanty of Accouiac, on the Eastern Shore of Virgiitia, to the 
Atlantic Ocean ; and in ten minutes afterwards, it will leave the Earth 
at a point situated in Latitude 34° N., Longitude 58^ W., (very nearly), 
after having described a circuit on the Earth of 5000 English miles. 

This Eclipse will be annular in the Territory of Wisconsin, in the 
District of Columbia, and throughout or in some part of, thirteen 
States, viz. throughout Michigan, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Dela- 
ware, and Maryland ; throughout Ohio and Virginia, with the excep- 
tion of the southwest part of each ; throughout the western and 
southern parts of New York ; in the northeastern part of Illinois, In- 
diana, Kentucky, and North Carolina, and in the County of Fairfield, 
in the southwest part of Connecticut. The width of the ring Yariee as 
usual in different parts of the Earth, but it will everywhere be very 
great. The width of the ring in the United States, on February 12tfa, 
1831, was 70 English miles ; but on this occasion it will be six times 
as great, or no less than 420 miles, extending from Fairfield County, in 
Connecticut, to Raleigh in North Carolina. The Moon at the time of 
the Eclipse will be at her greatest possible distance from the Earth. 
The Penumbra of the Moon first touches the Earth in the Province of 
Ochotsk, in the northeast of Asia ; with this exception the Eclipse 
will be wholly invisible to every continent but America. As the path 
of the southern contact of the limbs passes over the North Pacific 
Ocean far to the West of our continent, and thence across the northern 
part of South America to the Atlantic Ocean, it is evident thai the 
Eclipse will be visible throughout North America. This will be the 
last central Eclipse of the Sun visible in the United States until that of 
May 26th, 1854 ; which Eclipse will probably be annular in Boston, and 
in some parts of New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, 
and Maine. The next total Eclipse of the Sun in the United States will 
happen August 7th, 1869. See jSmtrican Almanac, for 1831, p. 72, &c. 

IV. Wednesday, October 3d, the Moon partially eclipsed, invisible 
throughout the United States. The Phases of this Eclipse, in mean 
time of the meridian of Washington, will be as follows, viz. 

fa. in. 
fiegintiing of the Eclipse . 8 2.1 M. 

Greatest Obscuration 9 33.1 

End of the Eclipse 11 4.0 

Digits eclipsed 11^ 8' on her Northern side. 

At Jeffisrson, Missouri, (the most westerly city of the United States,) 
the Eclipse will begin about an hour ailer the rising of the Sun, and 
of coarse after the setting of the Moon. 

The whole of this Eclipse will be visible in Asia and Australia; the 
beginning will be visible in the western part of North America, and the 
end in the eastern part of Europe. 



1B3&] 



0GCUI.TAT101I8. 



47 



0CCULTAT10N8 IN 18SS. 

The foUowiDf table contains a list of those conjunctions of the Moon 
with planets and stars of not less than the sixth magnitude, which 
'may profe.to be occultations in 90me part of the United States, also 
the mean time (at Washington) of the conjunctions in Right Ascension, 
reckoned, according to the manner of astronomers, from noon to noon, 
mod the difference of the declinations of the Moon and star, ai the mo- 
ment of conjunction. The number of interesting occoltations in 1838 
wal] be Tery large, as there will be four occoltations of Spica, three of 
Antares, one of |9 Tauri, two of Mercury, one of Jupiter, one of Mars, 
and four of part, or of the whole, of the Pleiades. It is to be hoped 
they will be carefully observed throughout the United States. 



%* TboM 4natk«l with ko sstoriak will ftlao bo Ti>ibl« in lome part of finrope. 



iCoojo. 

in 

A. R. 



Star's 
Nanus. 



Jan. 



Feb. 



•51 
•8 
•9 
14 
1 
•4 



April 



h. m.' 

6 i5acp 

4 7,C8 
13 22i47 n 
18 Snfl 
11 56ac|) 

9 52C 8 

•ttlio Ocn 

•<J\13 4 37fl 
•in 6 53 1 ft 
11 17 39/9iq7 
1716 43 a m 
March *6 8 3JJ<i s 
•10 7 Oafl 
•1«I2 1237ni 
lb 14 27jy' / 
24 21 9 Merc. 
2b 6 14,C c|3 
•J 7 58,47 n 
613 24*0^ 
•12 7 15/ £2: 
12|13 KilA' m 
•5£)i 2 37 Merc. 
27 8 19 C 8 
8 42 37 SI 
13 21/911$ 
U 5,ani 

16 5i«Vf 

7 382:i7 m 

8 51 V / 

II 10 a in; 

12 22 A' m 
3 4i;ani 
15 j6,C «|> 
24 11 15/ fl 
24,21 ld|U 
Aug. 5,14 ll«Vf 
5 16 19 « Vf 
•7i 9 20!/ -a 
•12111 54/Hei. 
14ll4 56C 8 
24 2 loans 
Ti^ 7 53> m 



9Ur*ti 
Maff. 



May 



Judo 



July 



•2 
4 

10 
15 

n\ 
*t 

3 

4 

15 



+46 & 

-1-28 50 

4-35 56 

+56 3H 

-1-62 27 

--3819 

--38 10 

--53 30 

--16 51 

--67 50 

--24 29 

--40 8 

--44 50 

4-65 40 

,+60 34 

--28 43 

--17 49 

1+55 3 

1+46 22 

+ 32 31 

1+69 16 

+50 5 

;+5l 3C) 

1+53 55 

--63 1 

- -19 2r. 

+48 51 

'-f-6tf 25 

1+71 19 

+61 23 

+63 53 

+14 36 

+33 32 

+47 45 

+35 10 

+76 58 

4-73 5H 

+70 33 

+13 3b 

+56 y 

+33 3? 

1-1-68 25 



4 

4.5 

6 

4 

4 

4.5 

6 

6 

6 

34 

1 

6 

4 

6 

5 

5 

6 

4 

5.6 

5 



Conju. Star's 
in Nanw. 
A. R. 



ti 



Aug. 29 12 44 yi / 
Sept.*3 7 670« 

*4i 9 26nH 
7i 9 47ti/ cjp 

8 16 46iFlei. 
8|17 9c 
817 22 d 
8|l7 51, 8 
8, 18 32/Plci. 

2i), 8 25an;; 
II o.vy 

7 2850 i» 

6 401/ « 

17 19||* 8 

6 59 n H 



29 

•30 

Oct. •] 

7 

•29 

Nov. '1 

•2 

2 

•2 

2 

2 

4 

•6 
9 



Star*! 



•10-13 
11 15 




6 50> en 

9 19 9 8 
12 236 Hlei. 

12 58 d •< 

13 24 >; 8 

14 4yplei. 
13 20C8 

18 17:Mars 



+U^ 
+24 3 
+26 18 
+19 41 
+ 2 19 
— 91 
+17 57 
+12 59 
+22 34 
+30 15 
+7:^ 12 
+25 45 
+72 53 
-14 12 
+28 65 




13 35/ 8 
5 55147 n 
13 4rjH^ 
56'» H 



8 
4 

7 

7 

8 
8 



28.9 8 
2S\b Plei. 
46>e 
1 



c 
d 



u 
u 



13 
8 41 
•27, 9 22/ Plei. 
•27 9 22'A " 
•29, 9 22 C 8 



+19 4 
+22 25 

— 
+15 29 
+10 30 
+20 2 
+58 39 
+31 47 
+55 31 
+34 53 
+ 4 41 
+28 36 
+29 20 
4^55 
4-32 57 
1+32 59 

4-42 51 
+20 52 
4-28 59 

+ 5'^ 
—14 

— 6 
+20 58 
+15 5I» 
4-25 11 
4-20 111 
+50 2»l 



32 
32 
II 



6 

6 

5.6 

6 

4.5 

5 

6 

3 

5 

1 

5 

6 

5.6 

2 

5.6 

6 

6 

4.5 

5 

3 

5 

4.5 

6 

4.5 
3.4 
1 
6 
5 
6 
6 
6 
4 
6 

4.5 
5 
5 
6 
3 
5 

5.6 
I 4.5 



48 



SCI.IV8K8 OF THX SATELLITES OF JUPITER. 



[183& 



ECLIPSES OF THE SATELLITES OP JUPITER IN 1838, 

VisiUe throughout or m some part of the UnUed Siatee^ in Mean Time 
for the Meridian of Oreenwich, reckoned, according to the manner of 
astronomers, from noon to noon* 





<1. 


h. 


m. 


•. 


Sat. 




d. 


h. 


m. 


fl. 




Sat 


Jan. 


1 


20 


59 


46 Im. 


1 


Mar. 


27 


21 


56 


11 


Em. 


1 


14 


3 


15 


28 


3 


1 


44 


29 


15 


20 


47 




2 


44 


6 


18 


44 


27 


2 


«4 


29 


16 


24 


42 




1 


cc 


7 


19 


17 


31 


3 


April 3 


22 


10 


18 




3 


(t 


7 


22 


39 


42 Em. 


3 


it 


5 


17 


57 


39 




a 


(1 


8 


22 


53 


1 Im. 


1 


4< 


5 


18 


18 


53 




1 


« 


10 


17. 


21 


18 


1 


44 


7 


12 


47 


28 




1 


« 


13 


21 


19 


13 


2 


c< 


10 


22 


53 


27 


Im. 


3 


« 


14 


23 


15 


13 


3 


(4 


12 


20 


13 


10 


Em. 


1 


« 


17 


19 


14 


34 


1 


44 


12 


20 


34 


37 




2 


« 


19 


13 


42 


55 


1 


44 


14 


14 


41 


46 




1 


44 


20 


23 


54 


10 


2 


44 


19 


22 


7 


33 




1 


44 


24 


13 


11 


22 


2 


44 


21 


16 


36 


9 




1 


it 


24 


21 


7 


54 


1 


44 


21 


18 


11 


54 


Im. 


4 


« 


26 


15 


36 


15 


1 


(4 


21 


21 


52 


5 


Em. 


4 


C( 


31 


15 


46 


39 


2 


44 


28 


18 


30 


36 




1 


C4 


31 


23 


1 


16 


1 


44 


SO 


12 


59 


15 




1 


Feb. 


2 


17 


29 


39 


1 


.4 


30 


15 


7 


54 




2 


44 


4 


11 


57 


57 


1 


May 


2 


14 


4 


9 




3 


44 


5 


U 


8 


34 


3 


II 


5 


20 


25 


9 




1 


44 


7 


18 


22 


9 


2 


44 


7 


14 


53 


48 




1 


44 


9 


19 


23 


7 


1 


4/C 


7 


17 


45 


2 




2 


44 


11 


13 


51 


28 


1 


44 


8 


15 


47 


19 




4 


44 


12 


15 


6 


11 


3 


i4 


9 


14 


50 


12 


Im. 


3 


fi 


13 


18 


9 


48 


4 


44 


9 


18 


2 


25 


Em. 


3 


t( 


13 


22 


12 


47 Em. 


4 


ct 


14 


16 


48 


24 




1 


44 


14 


20 


67 


55 Im. 


2 


44 


14 


20 


22 


7 




2 


44 


10 


21 


16 


40 


1 


i* 


16 


18 


49 


4 


Im. 


3 


44 


\6 


10 


16 


19 


2 


it 


21 


18 


43 


2 


Em. 


1 


44 


18 


15 


45 


3 


1 


<4 


23 


13 


11 


40 




1 


44 


19 


19 


4 


2 


3 


k4 


25 


12 


17 


11 




2 


44 


20 


10 


13 


29 


1 


cc 


30 


15 


6 


21 




1 


4( 


21 


23 


33 


54 


2 


June 


1 


14 


54 


9 




2 


44 


23 


23 


10 


20 


1 


4l 


6 


17 


1 


2 




I 


44 


25 


12 


52 


28 


2 


44 


8 


17 


31 







2 


Ci 


25 


17 


38 


44 


1 


44 


14 


13 


54 


48 




3 


il 


2() 


23 


2 


35 


3 


(4 


15 


13 


24 


27 




1 


44 


27 


12 


7 


12 


1 


44 


21 


14 


45 


26 


Im. 


3 


Mar. 


2 


12 


9 


5 


4 


<( 


22 


15 


19 


10 


Em. 


1 


(4 


4 


S U and O 




44 


29 


17 


13 


53 




1 


44 


4 


18 


13 


25 Em. 


2 


July 


3 


14 


39 


10 




2 


44 


(5 


16 


14 


22 


1 


i4 

1 


8 


13 


37 


14 




1 


14 


11 


20 


49 


43 


2 


' 44 


14 


12 


24 


24 


Im. 


4 


C( 


13 


18 


8 


12 


1 


44 


14 


15 


27 


36 


Em. 


4 


4( 


15 


12 


36 


40 


1 


44 


15 


15 


31 


56 




1 


44 


20 


14 


14 


43 


3 


CC 


27 


13 


45 


18 




3 


44 


20 


2«» 


2 


9 


1 


cc 


31 


13 


49 


53 




1 


C4 


22 


12 


44 


1 


2 


Aug. 


4 


14 


19 


51 




2 


44 


2-2 


14 


30 


38 


1 


c* 


23 


14 


2 


3 




1 


44 


27 


18 


12 


24 


3 


Sept. 23 d U 


and 


©. 







1S3RJ POSITION AND MAGNITUDE OF THE RINaS OF 8ATUEN. 49 



d. D. B* S» 

Oct. 23 37 32 Im. 

'< 27 23 26 16 

Not. 4 21 10 44 

<< 11 23 43 55 

" 12 21 42 20 

« 19 23 36 3 

'^ 28 19 66 8 

D«e. 5 21 51 42 

'< 6 20 39 30 

« 12 23 45 14 



9ftt. 




d 


h. 


m. 


1. 




8i 


4 


Doc. 


13 


23 


12 


25 




2 


1 


4< 


14 


18 


13 


34 




1 


2 


U 


17 


18 


6 


66 




3 


2 


U 


17 


20 


66 


16 


Em. 


3 


1 


i< 


21 


20 


7 


1 


Im. 


1 


1 


« 


24 


22 


5 


9 




3 


1 


i( 


25 





53 


40 


Em. 


3 


1 


« 


28 


22 





26 


Im. 


1 


1 


(( 


31 


17 


34 


51 




2 


1 

















PositUm and Magnitude qf the Rings of Saiumy according to BesaeL and 

StruTe,for every fortieth day in the year. 



eh. A. 



M . T. mt Watbingtoii. 

1S37. January 1 

Febraarj 10 

March 22 

May 1 

Jane 10 

Jaly 20 

Aagaat 29 

October 8 

November 17 

December 27 



a. 


h. 


P' 


L 


35 38 


+1^.37 


+5 31.9 


+25 5V.9 


37.46 


15.47 


2 55.3 


24 23.4 


40.00 


16.49 


2 58 7 


24 20.7 


41.74 


16.93 


2 42.5 


23 55.7 


41.49 


16.49 


2 19.1 


23 24.9 


39.47 


15.56 


2 6.0 


23 13.0 


36.95 


14.77 


2 12.9 


23 33.8 


35.01 


14.41 


2 38.1 


24 18.6 


34.17 


14.6] 3 14.2 


25 8.0 


34.61 


15.03! 


3 51.3 


25 44.61 



24 23.5 
24 20.6 
23 55.6 
23 24.7 
23 13.0 

23 33.7 

24 18.7 

25 8.0 
25 44.7 



c< 



a denotea the semi trans vene axis of the rings. 

h " ** semiconjugate axis of the rings, positive when their 

northern surface is visible, negative when their south- 
ern, 
inclination of the northern semiconjugate axis of the 
rings to the circle of declination ; + when £ast| 
— when West 
angle of elevation of the Earth above the plane of the 
rings, as seen from Saturn ; -|- when North, — when 
South, 
elevation of the Sun above the plane of the rings as 
seen from Saturn ; -f- when North, — when South* 



P " 



I •* 



V •* 



« 



« 



• • 



It has been recently discovered, that Saturn is not placed exactly 
in the centre of the rings. This singular circumstance was for some 
time considered an optical illusion, caused by the shadow of the planet 
on the rings; but Professor Struve has ascertained, with the celebrated 
Dorpat telescope, that the rings are actually eccentric. The eccentri- 
city is, however, too small to be perceived by any other than the very 
beet and most powerful telescopes. 

5 



50 



LIBRATION OF THE MOOM'S DISC. 



[1838. 



A Table, showing the Mean Time (at Washington) of the greatest Libra- 

tion of the Moon's apparent Disc, 



1838. 


d. 


h. 


m. 


1838. 


d. 


h. 


m. 


1838. 


d. 


h. 


n. 


Jan. 


5 


5 


59 SW. 


May 


11 


4 


50 SE. 


Sept. 


10 


10 


15 SW 




20 


13 


9 SE. 




25 


4 


47 NW. 




26 


11 


36 NE. 


Feb. 


1 


18 


27 SW. 


Jane 


6 


17 


47 NW. 


Oct. 


8 


14 


56 NW 




17 


20 


24 SE. 




21 


8 


42 SW. 




24 


13 


52 NE 


Mar. 


1 


22 


39 SW. 


July 


4 


3 


14 SE. 


Nov. 


5 


21 


23 NW 




]8 





34 SE. 




17 


17 


2 SW. 




20 


21 


41 NE 




30 


5 


42 SW. 


Aug. 


1 


1 


1 SE. 


Deo. 


4 





8NW 


April 


14 


16 


2 SE. 




13 


14 


27 SW. 




17 





25 NK 


■ 


27 


9 


29 SW. 




29 


5 


17 SE. 




31 


15 


39 NW 



" The Moon's Libraiion is here supposed to take place in the plane 
of her orbit ; and by the time of the greatest Libration of her apparent 
Disc is to be understood the Instant at which, to an observer at the 
centre of the Earth, the Tariation of the Disc from its mean state has 
attained its maximum. The right-hand column indicates the quadrant 
of the Moon's Disc in which the. Libration takes place, and in which 
the greatest change of the Moon's surface will become yisihle." 



A Tablet showing the illuminated Portion of the Discs of Venus and Mars. 

The numbers in this table are the yersed sines of that portion of the 
Discs, which, to an observer on the Eaith, will appear to be illuminated ; 
the apparent diameter of the planets at the time being considered 1.0. 

To a spectator on the Earth, Mars appears most brilliant when 
nearest the Earth, that is, when in opposition to the Sun ; but Venus 
when her elongation is about 45° and she is approaching or receding 
from, her inferior conjunction. She will, therefore, this year appear 
most brilliant, in the morning about the 23d of April, about which 
time she may be seen without much difficulty, amidst the brightest 
sunshine. 

Mars will be very distant from the Earth during the whole year, but 
much nearer at the end than the beginning, and rapidly approaching. 
The last opposition of this planet took place on the 5th of February, 
1837, and he will be again in that position in March, 1839. 

1838. 

January 15 

Febmaiy 14 

March 15 

April 15 

May 15 

June 15 



Venui. 


Mart. 1 


0.369 


0.997 


0.109 


1.000 


0.037 


0.999 


0.307 


0.996 


0.501 


0.989 


0.644 


0.977 



1838. 




Venus. 


Mara. 


July 


15 


0.753 


0-9t57 


August 


15 


0.845 


0.951 


September 


15 


0.915 


0.934 


October 


15 


963 


0.917 


November 


15 


0.991 


0.904 


December 


15 


1.000 


0.903 



1838.] 



TABLE OF LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE. 



51 



•LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE OF SOME OF THE PRINCIPAL 
PLACES IN THE UNITED STATES, Ac, WITH THEIR 
DISTANCE FROM THE CITY OF WASHINGTON. 

The LongUkdes are reckoned from Greenwich. 

The CtqnUUe {SeaU of GovemmeiU) of the States and Territories are 

designated by Italic Letters. 

The Latitude of those places, which are marked with a *, has heen 
determined bj the Editor, from actual observations, recently made by 
himself, and may be relied on within a few seconds. The Latitude of 
the places marked with a f has recently been ascertained by others, 
and communicated for pablication. 

The Longitude of the places marked with a * was computed by the 
Editor liom the observations on the Annular Eclipse of the Sun in 
February, 1831, after correction for the errors of the Moon's place, as 
giren by the tables of Damoiseau. The Longitude of those marked 
with a t was determined by the Editor, by chronometers, by comparing 
the place in question with Washington, the University of Virginia, 
Philadelphia, or Boston ; the position of which is supposed to be cor- 
rectly ascertained. 

The Latitude and Longitude of very many of the places in the fol- 
lowing table, where no recent observations hav&been made, are to be 
considered only as rough approximations. 



Albany (Capitol), . N. Y. 
Alexandria, . . D. C. 
Amherst (Col. Chapel), Mass. 
Annapolis^ Md. 

Auburn, . . N. Y. 

Augusta, . Ga. 

Augusta (State House), Me. 
Baltimore ( Bat Mon't], Md, 
Bangor (Court House), Me. 
Barnstable (New C. H.), Mass. 
Batavia, N. Y. 

Beaufort (Arsenal), . S. C. 
Boston (State House), Mass. 
Bridgeport, (Bupt. Ch.) Conn. 
Bristol (Hotel), . R. L 
Brooklyn (Navy Yard), N. Y. 
Brunswick (College), Me. 
Buffalo, . . N. Y. 

Cambridge (1st Con. Ch.), Ms. 
Camden, . . S. C. 

Canandaigua, . N. Y. 

Cape Cod (Light House), Mass. 



* 8«e tk« TttitttTkt on tbi« tftblo in tho Preliminftry Obien-ations. 



LatUada 
North. 


Longitoda, Wost, | 

in d«grees. in Um*. j 


Dlst. (rosi 
Wub'n. 


*43 89 3 


• 1 i< 
78 4t 49 


h. m. ■• 
4 64 69.8 


milva. 
876 


88 49 


77 4 


6 8 16 


6 


#43 sa 13 


t79 80 46 


t460 8 


888 


39 


76 43 


6 6 63 


87 


4aM 


70 38 


6 6 63 


839 


83 98 ' 


61 64 


6 37 86 


680 


*44 18 48 


69 60 J 4 89 30 


696 


•39 17 13 


t76 87 60;t« 6 81.3 


88 


*44 47 50 


68 47 


436 8 


661 


^41 43 9 


t70 19 


t4 41 16 


466 


49 69 


78 13 


6 13 63 


870 


*82 36 67 


f 60 41 33 


t6 33 46.6 


639 


*43 31 33 


71 4 9 


4 44 16 6 


433 


41 10 80 


73 11 46 4 63 47 


384 


*41 89 68 


71 19 4 46 36 


409 


40 41 60 


•78 69 80 ]*4 56 68 


237 


43 63 


09 65 1 1 4 89 40.1 


668 


43 63 


78 66 6 16 40 


376 


•43 33 23 


1 71 7 36 \AAi^1 


431 


84 17 


80 33 6 33 13 


467 


43 64 


77 17 6 9 6 


.336 


•43 3 33 


{70 4 33 1 4 40 17.6 


607 



52 



TABLE OF LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE. 



[1838. 



Latitadfl 
North. 



Charleston (StMich's Ch.) S.C. *33 46 ss 
Charle8town(Navy Vd), Mass. 49 33 
Chicago, • . 11. 43 

CincinDati, (Fort Wash.) Ohio, ts9 6 64 
Columbia, • . S. C. ss 67 
Columbus, . . • Ohio, 89 47 
Concord (State House), N. H.*48 is 39 
Dedham (1st Cong. Ch.)* Mass. *43 u 60 
Detroit, . . . Mich. 43 34 
Dorchester (Ast Obs.), Mass. f 43 19 i6 
Dover, . . Del. 

Dover, . . . N. H. 
Easton (Court House), Md. 
Eastport, . . . Me. 
Edenton, . . N. C. 

Exeter, . . . N. H. 
Frankfort, . . Ky. 
Fredericksburg, . Va. 

IVederickton, . N. B. 

FrederickstowD, . . Md. 
Georgetown, . . S. C. 
Gloucester (Hotel), Mass. 
Greenfield (2d Con. Ch.), Mass. 
Hagerstown, . * . Md. 
Halifax, . . N. S. 

Hallowell, . . Me. 

HarriabuT^, . . Pa. 
Hartford, . . . Conn. 
Holmes's Hole (Hotel), Mass. 



Longitade, Wect, 
io def root, in time. 



Hudson, 

Huntsville, 

Indianapolis, 

Jackson, 

Jefferson, 

Key West, 

Kingston, 

Knoxville, 

Lancaster, 

Lexington, 

LitUe Rock, 

Lockport, 

Louisville, 



N. Y. 

Ala. 

Ind. 

M'pi. 

M'ri. 

Fa 

U. C. 

Tenn. 

Pa. 

Ky. 

Ark. 

N.Y. 



Lowell (St. Ann's Ch.), Mass. 

Lynchburg, . . Va. 

Lynn, . . . Mass. 

Marblehead, . . Mass. 

Middletown, . . .Conn. 

MittedgevUle, . . Ga. 

Mobile, . . . Ala. 

J^fontpelier, , Vl 

Monomoy Point light, Mass. 



S9 10 

43 13 
^8 46 10 

44 64 
86 

43 68 
88 14 

88 84 
46 3 

89 34 

88 31 
*43 86 80 
*43 86 18 

89 87 
t44 39 30 

44 17 
40 16 

*4146 60 
•41 37 19 

43 14 
84 86 
89 66 
83 33 

39 36 
f34 83 36 

44 8 
86 69 

40 3 36 
88 6 
34 40 
43 11 
88 8 

*43 88 49 
37 86 
43 98 

43 30 

41 34 
33 7 
30 40 ■ 

44 17 
*4] S3 30 



t79 67 97 f 
71 8 83 

87 86 
84 37 
81 7 

88 8 
71 99 

f 71 10 46 ,\ 

83 68 I 
*71 4 99 * 

76 30 
70 64 

76 8 
66 66 

77 7 
70 66 

84 40 
77 38 
66 46 
77 18 
79 17 

t70 40 t 
{73 86 f 

77 86 
*6S 86 40 

09 60 

76 60 
tT3 40 t 
{70 86 80 t 

73 40 

86 67 

86 6 

90 8 

93 8 

83 63 30 

76 40 

83 64 
76 30 83 

84 18 
93 13 

78 46 
86 30 

f71 18 46 t 

79 33 
70 67 
70 63 
73 89 
83 30 
88 11 
73 36 



•70 81 



m. ■. 
19 49.8 
44 14.3 
60 3 
87 48 
94 98 
)t9 13 

46 66 
44 43 
31 63 
44 17.6 

9 

43 36 

4 83 

37 44 

38 38 
43 40 
38 40 
10 83 
97 

9 13 
17 8 
43 40 
60 34 
10 30 
14 96«7 
89 80 

730 
60 40 

43 96 
66 4 

47 48 

44 90 
83 
833 

31 30 

640 
86 86 

6 33.9 

37 13 
8 48 

16 4 
43 
46 16 

17 38 
43 48 
43 98 
60 36 

38 SO 
63 44 
60 34 



Dist. ft 01 

WMh'P. 

mile*. 
644 
439 
763 
407 
600 



*4 40 3.1 



474 
439 
696 
489 
114 
490 
80 
778 
384 
474 
661 



49 

.483 

403 

896 

«S 

936 



110 
936 

467 
346 
796 
673 
1036 
980 

460 

616 
109 
634 

1066 
403 
800 
439 
198 
441 
460 
336 
643 

1033 
634 
600 



183&] 



tABtiK OF LATITUDE AND LOffOITCDB. 



53 



Montreal, • L. C. 

Nantucket (S'th Tower), Mass. 
JVashvilU (University), Tenn. 
Natchez (Castle), . M'pi. 
Newark, • . N. J. 

New BedfoTd(MarV Ch.)Ma9s. 
Newborn, . . N. C. 
Newburg, . N. Y. 

Newburyport,(2dPreB. C), Ms. 
Newcastle, . . Del. 
A'tw Haven (College), Conn. 
New London, . . Conn. 
Aew Orleans (Citv Hall), La. 
Aewporf, (State House), R. L 
New York (City Hall), N. Y. 
Norfolk, (Farmer's Bank), Va. 
Northampton (Ist C. Ch.) Mass. 
Norwich, . Conn. 

Pensacola, . . Fa. 

Petersburg, . Va. 

Philadelphia (Ind'ee H.), Pa. 
Pittsburgh, . . Pa. 
Plttsfield (1st Con. Ch.), Mass. 
PJattsbargh, . N. Y. 

Plynioath (Court H.), Mass. 
Portland (Town H.), . Me. 
Portsmouth (Mansion H.),N. H. 
Ponghkeepsie, . . N. Y. 
Princeton, • . N. J. 
Providence (Univ. Hall), R. I. 
Qaebec, (Citadel), . L. C. 
RfOtigh, . N. C. 

Richmond^ (Capitol), Va. 
Rochester (R'r House), N. Y. 
Sable (Cape), . . Fa. 
Sackett's Harbour, N. Y. 

Saco, . . Me. 

St. AuguBtine, . . Fa. 
St. Louis, . . MVi. 
Salem, (B. L M. Hall), Mass. 
Savannah (Exchange), Go. 
Schenectady,* . N. Y. 



Sprin^fiddj 
Sprinfffietd 



II. 



pringfietd (Court H.), Mass. 

Stratnird, . . Conn. 

TaUahas9t, . . Fa. 

Taunton (Court H.), Mass. 

Toronto or York, . U. C. 

TVenioTif . . N. J. 

Troy, . . . N. Y. 



Lfttitnd* 
North. 


Loofitai 
in d«f rees. 


lo, WmI, 
in time. 


Dist. from 
Wuh'n. 


• < I. 
4A 81 


• t 1. 
78 86 


h. IS. 1. 
464 30 


mileg. 
601 


*41 16 66 


f*70 6 6 


t*4 40S4.4 


490 


tS6 9U 


*86 49 8 


♦i 47 16.9 


714 


81 84 


'^1 34 43 


6 6 88.8 


1146 


40 46 


74 10 


466 40 


916 


•41 88 7 


f 70 66 46 


t4 48 48 


439 


86 30 


77 6 


6 8 91) 


387 


41 31 


74 1 


466 4 


389 


*4a 48 » 


t70 69 


t4 48 38 


466 


89 40 


76 88 


6 9 8 


103 


f 41 17 68 


73 67 46 


4 61 61.1 


801 


41 33 


73 9 


448 86 


864 


tS0 67 46 


*90 6 49 


•6 37.8 


1903 


{41 38 30 


71 31 14 


4 46 34.9 


403 


40 43 40 


*74 1 8 


*4 66 4.6 


996 


*86 60 50 


t76 18 47 


t6 6 W.1 


317 


*43 10 5 


\,12 87 46 


t4 60 81 


376 


41 88 


73 7 


4 48 38 


863 


80 38 


87 13 


6 48 48 


1060 


87 18 64 


77 30 


6 990 


144 


*89 66 69 


*76 10 60 


*6 48.6 


* 136 


40 83 


80 3 


1 690 8 


933 


*43 36 60 


f 78 16 45 


f4 68 8 


860 


44 43 


78 36 


468 44 


639 


*41 67 80 


t70 40 45 


f4 49 43 


439 


^43 89 36 


70 30 80 


4 41 99 


643 


*43 4 64 


t70 46 


t4 48 


491 


41 41 


78 66 


4 66 40 


301 


40 93 


74 86 


468 90 


177 


*41 49 83 


t71 34 45 


t440 89 


894 


f40 49 13 


71 16 


4 46 4 


781 


86 47 


78 46 


6 16 13 


986 


•37 83 17 


tT7 38 38 


t6 9 49.9 


193 


•43 8 17 


77 61 


6 11 34 


861 


34 60 


81 16 


6 36 




48 66 


76 67 


6 848 


407 


• 43 81 


70 36 


4 41 44 


698 


39 48 80 


81 86 


636 90 


841 


38 86 


89 86 


6 68 94 


866 


*43 81 19 


f ♦to 64 


1^4 48 86 


446 


*33 4 66 


fSl 7 9 


f 6 94 98.6 


663 


43 48 


78 66 


4 66 40 


8^1 


89 48 


88 88 


6 68 19 


801 


*43 6 68 


t73 86 


f460 90 


867 


t41 11 7 


73 6 46 


4 69 86 


987 


30 38 


84 86 


688 34 


896 


*41 64 9 


t71 60 


f4 44 30 


416 


48 38 


79 30 


6 17 30 


600 


46 14 


74 89 


4 68 86 


166 


43 44 


78 40 


464 40 


883 



54 



TABLE OF LATITUDE AND LONOITODE. 



I Latttade 
North. 



Loncituda, Wott, 
in d«fro«f. in time. 



Tusealoosaf Ala. 

University of Virginia, Va. 
Utica (Dutch Cliurch), N. Y. 
Vaiidalia, • . <1L 
Vevay, . . . Ind. 
Vincennes, . . Ind. 
Washington, (Capitol,) D. C. 
Washington, . . M'pi. 
Wheeling, . . Va. 
Williamstown (Con. Ch.) Mass. 
Wilmington, . . Del. 
Wilmington, . . N. C. 
Worcester (Ant Hall), Mass. 
York, . . . Mok 

York, . . Pa. 



• < i« 

83 13 
fSS 3 S 
•43 6 49 

86 60 

88 46 
38 43 

*38 63 04 

81 86 

40 7 
*43 43 44 

80 41 

84 11 
*43 16 13 

43 10 

89 66 



a « <i 

97 43 

*78 81 90 

76 18 

80 3 

84 60 ' 

67 36 
*77 1 48 

01 90 

60 43 
t73 18 

76 38 

78 10 
t71 48 

70 40 

76 40 



h. ID. ■« 
6 60 48 

*6 14 6.9 
6 63 
6 66 8 
6 89 66 
6 49 40 
i 8 7.3 
6 6 30 
6 93 48 

t4 63 63 
6 1 63 
6 13 40 

t4 47 13 
443 40 
6 640 



[1838< 

Dift. ftom 
Wa> h»a. 

milM. 

068 

134 



781 
666 



1146 
964 
408 
108 
416 
884 
600 
87 



INCREASE OF 

' Increaio. 



SIDEREAL 

loer. 



Hoon. 
1 

9 
8 
4 
6 
6 
7 
8 

10 

11 

19 
18 
14 
16 
16 
17 
18 
19 
90 
91 



94 



HI* nc. 

9.867 
19.718 
39.660 
80.436 
40.383 
60.180 

1 8.906 
18.863 
98.7116 
88.666 
48.431 
66.9r78 

3 8.184 
17.901 
97.847 
87.704 
47.660 

8 7.978 
17.180 
96.966 
86.849 

46.600 



Dailj accelera- 
tion of m itar 
In paninf tb* 
BMridian. 

m. Me. 

3 S6.9005 



Min. 

I 

1 
3 
8 
4 

6 

6 

7 

6 



10 

11 

13 

13 

14 

16 

16 

17 

18 

19 

30 

31 



94 



•ee. 

0.164 
890 
488 
667 
891 



TIME IN MEAN 
1 locr. 



1.160 
814 
479 
648 
807 
071 

9.186 
800 
464 



703 

067 

8.131 



97 



460 
614 
778 
048 
4.107 
371 
486 
600 
764 



I 



Min. 

81 

83 

83 

84 

86 

86 

87 

88 

80 

40 

41 

43 

43 

44 

46 

46 

47 

48 

40 

60 

61 

63 

63 

64 

66 

66 

67 

68 

60 

60 



6.008 
367 
431 
666 
760 
014 

6.078 
349 
407 
671 
786 
000 

7.064 

998 

803 

667 

.731 



SOLAR 

, iDcr. I 



HOURS, Ac, 

Incr. 



SMO 
314 
878 
649 
707 
671 

0.086 
199 
864 
698 



6V7 



Bee. 

1 
9 
8 

4 
6 

6 
7 
8 

10 
11 
19 
18 
14 
16 
16 
17 
18 
10 
30 
31 
33 
38 
34 
36 
36 
37 
98 
30 
80 



0.008 
006 
006 

Oil 

014 

016 

010 

099 

036 

097 

000 

088 

086 

088 

041 

OM 

047 

040 

069 

066 

066 

060 

068 

066 

060 

071 

074 

077 

070 



Be*. 

81 
S3 

83 
84 

86 

86 

87 

88 

88 

40 

41 

43 

48 

44 

46 

46 

47 

46 

40 

60 

61 

69 

68 

64 

66 

66 

67 

68 

69 

60 



0.088 



000 

088 



101 

104 

197 

110 

119 

118 

118 

131 

198 

198 

198 

181 

184 

187 

140 

149 

148 

148 

161 

168 

168 

168 

189 

184 



1838.] 



KPHEMBEI9 OF TBS SUN. 

At wtMH noon at Chreomwiek, 



55 



JANt/ARY. 1 




FEBRUARY. 




l>.|a«mi Unn. 


d. 1>. calm. 


** • * 


D.|Sttim Dtam.) H. D. culm. \ 




1 ( H 


m. Mc 


ii "^ 




t '* 


ID. MO. 




T 16 lU 


1 10.80 


2 


16 14.7 1 740 




3 17.S 


10.70 1 


- TS" 


4 


144 7.66 


• 
* 


5 17.8 


10.50 


i « 


6< 144 ! 7.43 


.5 .• 


71 njt 

9 17.1 
11 17.0 
13i 16.0 


10.47 
10.88 
10.17 
10.00 




8 18.7 1 7.90 
10| 13.3 648 
12 13.9 6.76 \ 
lil4 13.5 1 645 


15 16.0 


9.m 


rS«3~:'lC; W.I 1 9M 


> 17 16.6 
19, 16.4 
21 > 16.3 

23l 164) 

25: 18.7 


9.68 
0.48 
9.39 
9UI9 


©•^ J* B- 


48 
20 
|22 
24 


11.7 
11.3 
10.8 
10.8 


6.15 
545 
5.T7 
540 




8.80 




9.8 


5.43 


1 


27 iM 


8.58 


0.4 


5.96 


29 16.9 


8.85 


\ • 30 6.9 1 


5.11 




31 uu> 


8.13 


2 ^ i 1 1 




1 


Bqiwt. of T. 
to he added to 








Eouat. of T. 
to he added to 




D. DccUofttioo 


Siderral 


D. 


Declination 


Bidoraal 


Boath. 


Jifpar, Time. 


TioM. 




SoQth. 


Apper, Time. 


Time. 


e < <i 


in. MC. 


h. m. ■. 




• 1 41 


m. too. 


h. m. MC. 


1 


38 1404 


8 5046 


18 43 4546 


1 


17 8 904 


13 5541 


90 44 5844 


2 


93 56 40.8 


4 18.76 


46 43.11 


2 


16 51 74 


14 9.78 


48 5548 


8 


39 51 4^ 


4 46.68 


50 8847 


3 


16 33 38.3 


14 049 


53 51.06 


4 


3345 OA 


5 14.10 


64 85.39 


4 


16 15 514 


14 1548 


56 48.61 


5 33 88 99.8 


5 41.96 


58 31.78 


5 


15 57 474 


14 3043 


91 45.08 


6 33 81 89^ 


6 7.88 


10 3 98.34 


6 


15 30 384 


14 3448 


4 41.64 


7l 33 94 8.1 


6 84.03 


6 94.90 


7 


15 90 634 


14 38.03 


88840 


8! 33 16 17.6 


6 60.64 


10 91.46 


8 


15 3 1.1 


14 80.61 


13 84.76 


9' 23 8 0.9 


7 34.73 


14 18.08 


9 


14 49 644 


14 3341 


16 3141 ' 


10 


31 4018.8 


7 49.35 


18 1440 


10 


14 33 33.8 


14 38.43 


90 3746 


11 


31 50 10.1 


8 18.30 


10 33 11.15 


11 


14 8 584 


14 83.63 


91 34 9443 


12 31 40 36.« 


8 86JW 


96 7.71 


12 ; 18 44 04 

1 O 1 


14 3840 


98 90.97 


13 


31 80 87.7 


8 50.81 


30 437 


1<^ 1 13 34 64 

4 4 1 


14 81.70 


83 1743 


14 


31 90 14.1 


3143 


84 0.88 


14 13 3 50.6 


14 99.76 


86 14.07 


15 


31 9 35.9 


9 43.80 


37 5748 


15 


19 43 91.8 


14 9741 


40 1049 


16 


90 58 18^ 


10 8.71 


41 53.08 


16 


19 99 40.7 


14 33.54 


44 7.17 


17 


90 46 86.7 


10 38.84 


45 5049 


17 


19 1 47.7 


14 10.87 


48 3.73 


,1» 


90 84 86.4 


10 48.90 


49 47.04 


18 


11 40 48.1 


14 1443 


53 0.90 


119 

1 


30 33 13.7 


11 3.08 


53 4340 


19 


11 10 n.4 


U 8.90 


55 56.85 


20 


30 35.0 


11 30.05 


57 40.15 


20 


10 68 0.9 


14 9.80 


50 58.41 


1 

21', 19 86 16.8 


11 37.88 


90 1 86.71 


21 


10 36 94.9 


13 55.96 


n 8 4947 


122', 19 49 44.4 


11 68.87 


5 33.97 


22 


10 14 37.6 


18 48.49 


7 4648 


23< 19 36 fiO.5 

1 


13 0.68 


9 9944 


23 


59 41.6 


13 4048 


11 4348 


24 19 14 S5U> 


13 34.69 


13 96.40 


24 


80 36.6 


13 31.66 


15 89.63 


25 18 M 58.8 


19 88.89 


17 39.96 


25 


8 98.0 


18 99.84 


10 36.18 


26 18 48 0.7 


13 53.31 


31 19.53 


26 


8 46 14 


18 13.48 


98 89.78 


27| 18 99 49.7 


18 4.78 


35 1648 


27 

28 


8 38 814 


18 145 


97 39.98 


2S 


d 18 14 4A 


\ 18 16.54 


30 1948 


8 55.1 


13 5041 


81 9548 


2S 

M 


17 56 6.f 
\ 17 41 aoJi 


» U3746 
) 18 3745 


88 9.18 
87 5.78 


29 


7 88 114 


13 8043 


85 89.88 


tl 


L 17 96 14^ 


1 18 46.81 


41 9.9811 1 


1 



56 



EPHEMEaiS OF TBE SUIT. 



[1838. 



At mam noon ai Cfreentoieh. 



MARCH. 


! APRIL. 1 


D.,Semi Diara 


B. D. culm. 


• 


, Semi Diam 


S. D. calm. 


• 




4 '< 


m. >ec. 


1 


D, 


1 II 


m. aec. 


a 


s 


t 16 8^ 


1 6.11 


1 


16 0.8 


1 4.36 


3 


4 


r 8J 


4.97 


S 


0.8 


4.39 


• 


e 


» 7.8 


4.86 


,9 s 


5 


16 69.7 


44^ 




€ 


i 7.4 


4.73 


.2 '•* *' 


7 


69.3 


4.89 


, CO 

1 .2.- .^ 


IC 
IS 


> 6^ 
S 6.4 


4.63 
4.63 


a^ -a ... 


9 
11 


69.7 
68.1 


4.46 
4.64 




14 


6.8 


4.46 




13 


67.6 


4.63 


|5 34 


IC 


» 6.8 


4.38 


15 


67.0 


4.73 


le 
2C 


1 4.7 
1 4.3 


4.33 

4.38 


qoity 1 
60"; 

»rizonl 
13th, 


17 
19 


66.6 
66.0 


4.83 

4.94 


2^- IS 

is ir. 


2S 


6.6 


4.34 


3^ wr 


21 


66a 


6U)7 


3^ a: 


24 


3.0 


4.33 


< 1 


23 


M 


6.30 


®4 1 


26 


» 3.6 


4.31 


et 'a 


25 


64.4 


6.38 


& i 


2t 


la) 


1 4.31 


27 


63.9 


6.48 




ao 


) 1.4 


i 4.33 


29 


63.6 


6.63 


32 

D. 


0.8 


4.36 

Eqaat. of T. 
to be added to 
Appar. Time. 


a 


31 


634) 


6.78 


m 


DecUaation 
Sooth. 


Sidereal 
Time. 


'd. 

1 


Declination 
North. 


1 Eqaat. of T. 

add to.9vp. 

till letli. 


8idor»ftl 
Timo. 




• i It 


ID. >ec. 


h. m. aet*. 




O 1 |< 


m. aec. 


b. in. eoo. 


1 


7 38 11.4 


13 39.83 


33 36 33.86 


1 


4 38 66.7 


4 1.61 


37 86.67 


2 


7 16 31.8 


13 37.19 


39 18.94 i 


2 4 63 3.4 


8 43.39 


41 83.13 


3 


6 63 36.1 


13 14.66 


43 16.60 


3 6 16 3.8 

1 


8 36.16 


46 98.68 


4 


6 39 38.3 


13 1.44 


47 13.06 


4 6 87 69.6 


8 7.16 


49 95.34 


5 


6 6 16.9 


11 47.86 


61 8.63 


5 6 49.3 


3 49.81 


68 91.79 


6 


6 43 4.8 


11 83.79 


66 6.18 


6 6 33 83.6 


3 81.63 


67 18.34 


7 


6 19 47.9 


11 19.31 


69 1.73 


7' 6 46 9.3 

1 


3 14.18 


1 1 14.89 


8 


4 66 37U 


11 4.4} 


33 3 68.39 1 


8, 7 8 88.9 


1 66.84 


6 11.44 


9 


4 88 8.3 


10 49.14 


6 64.81 


9 . 7 81 1.4 


1 89.78 


9 7J9 


10 


4 9 86.6 


10 38.49 


10 61.89 


10 7 63 16.3 


1 33.97 


13 AM 


11 


8 46 6U) 


10 17.60 


1 

33 14 47.94 


1 
1 1 8 15.33.1 


1 6.44 


1 17 IM 


12 


8 33 81.6 


10 1.19 


18 44.49 \ 


12 8 37 31.9 


60.19 


90 67.66 1 


13 


3 63 66.9 


9 41.59 


32 41.04 ' 


13 9 69 13.1 


84 36 


94 64.30 i 


14 


3 35 16.1 


9 27.73 


36 87.59 14 9 30 63.6 


18 66 


98 60.70 


15 


3 11 89.7 


9 10.60 


SO 34.14 15 9 43 36.9 


-^0 3.41 


83 47.89 


16 


1 47 63.0 


8 63.37 


34 30.69 


16 10 3 48.7 


— 11.47 


86 43.88 


17 


1 34 16.3 


8 86.73 


38 37.35 17 10 35 1.7 


36.97 


40 40.44 


18 


1 83.S 


f 18.01 


43 33.61 , 


18 10 46 4.6 


40.07 


44 87010 


19 


36 61.3 


8 0.13 


46 30.37 ; 


19 11 6 67.0 


63.70 


48 83.66 


20 


13 8.6 


7 43.10 


60 16.93 , 


20 11 97 38.6 


1 7.04 


63 80.11 




North. 


• 




21 \\ 48 8.8 


1 19 86 


66 36-65 1 


21 


10 33.4 


7 33.97 


38 54 13.48 \ 


t 






22 


34 14.6 


7 6.73 


68 10.04 ! 


22 13 8 37.6 


1 33.34 


3 93.90 


23 


67 64.6 


6 47*40 


3 6.69 , 


23 13 38 34.4 


1 44.17 


4 19.78 


24 


1 31 83.9 


6 39.01 


6 8.14 


24 18 48 39.0 


166.64 


8 16.80 


25 


] 46 9.3 


6 10.67 


9 69.69 


25 


13 8 11.0 


9 6.63 


13 13.88 


26 


3 8 43.3 


6 63.10 


13 66.33 , ' 


26 


13 37 40.1 


9 17.14 


16 9.49 


27 


3 83 14.3 


6 83.61 


17 63.76 


27 


13 46 66.9 


9 37.17 


90 5.80 


28 


3 66 43.4 


6 16.13 


31 49.34 ' 


28 


14 6 68.0 


9 86.70 


94 3.84 


29 


6 19 6.9 


4 66.66 


36 46.89 ! 


29 


14 34 46.1 


9 46.74 


97 60.10 


30 


8 43 87.6 


4 88.31 


3948.46 1 


30 


14 a 90^0 


9 64.37 


8166J0 


31 


4 6 43a) 


4 19.83 


88 39U)1 [ 


31 


15 1 89.3 


8 9.39 


86 63Jn 



183a] 



XFHBMEEI8 OT TtUt SUV. 



57 



Jit mean noon at Greenwiek. 



MAt. ( 


JUNE. 1 


D. SvniDaa. 


8. D. eolin. .*" .• | 


D. 


SemiDiam. 


8. D. culm. 


• 
* 


1 s ». 


m. MC 


8 9 




1 It 


n. MO. 


SB 

• 


1 Uftt.0 


1 5.78 


^ .' 


2 


15 47.1 


1 8.16 


9 


8, «S.6 


5.94 


•r « 


4 


46.8 


8.38 


• 

1 i 


6| tf.1 


6.10 


5 « 


6 


46.6 


8.88 


7j fli.7 


6.96 


."" ... 


8 


463 


8.46 


.M „ 


9' 513 


6.48 


Ik 9«r 


10 


46.9 


638 


P i^ 


11, ws 


6.60 


fi^- 1" 


12 


46.0 


830 


&9 tr 


IS 80.4 


6.76 




14 


453 


8.64 


I5 «» 


15 M.0 


6.98 


16 


453 


8.68 


;s |- . 


17 49^ 
19 tf.9 

2ii 4&9 


7418 
7.94 
7.40 


%^<n goo 

|d W5 


18 
20 
22 


453 
463 

46.8 


830. 

8.70 

8.60 


5^ I" 

s2 % 


23'. 4ai 


7.55 


0^ t-" 

J8 


24 


453 


8.66 


25, 48.a 
27! ^^ 

29, 47.6 


7.60 
7.89 
7.95 


6 I 


26 
28 
30 


46.1 
45.1 
45.1 


835 

8.60 
835 


1 


31 4T.S aOT 


i - 






Eonat. of T. 

fitot. /v'.3vp. 

UlflGUi. 


D. OMlination 


Ennat. of T7 


SldatMl 


D. 


DeeliofttioD 


Sideiml 


North. 


Jfyfor. Tiwu, 


Time. 




Nortb. 


Tin*. 


\ • • «« 


ID. MC. 


h. m. MO. 




• < II 


n. MC. 


b. m. aeo. 


A 


15 ltO.3 a 9.39 


9 85 59.93 


1 


99 9 99.9 


3 85.75 


4 88 538 


2 


14 19 43.5 8 9.78 


89 48.77 


2 


99 10 833 


9 96.77 


49 9.08 


3 


15 87 82.4 8 16.75 


48 4538 


8 


93 18 193 


9 17.49 


46 66.00 


4 


15 55 4.S 


8 33.19 


47 41.88 


4 


23 95 383 


9 7.70 


49 55.14 


5 


16 12 98^ 


8 99j08 


51 8838 


5 


33 89 913 


107.65 


58 51.70 


6 


16 89 94.7 


8 8448 


86 8436 1 


6 


33 88 60.6 


14737 


57 4836 


7 


16 46 9.6 


889.98 


59 8138 


7 


33 44 66.3 


1 86.57 


5 1 4439 


9 


17 9 87a) 


8 48.47 


8 8 9&09 8 


23 00 87.9 


19537 


5 41.88 


9 


17 18 40.1 


8 47.18 


7 94.64 ; 9; 99 55 55.7 


1 1431 


87.85 


10 


17 84 48.1 


8 80.98 


11 9130 


}^ 


38 0493 


1 9.T7 


18 8431 


11 


17 50 1941 


8 89.78 


8 15 17.76 


11 


98 5 18.9 


5037 


5 17 8137 


12 


18 5 88^ 


8 54.65 


19 1439 


1I2 


38 934.1 


86.05 


9197.68 


IS 


18 90 88.9 


8 56.00 


98 10.88 


113 


38 18 4.9 


36.78 


95 94.19 


14 


18 85 31.1 


8 66.74 


97 7.45 


'14 


38 16 31.3 


1431 


.99 90.76 


15 


19 49 44.7 


8 56.89 


81 4.01 15 
85 037 I 16 


38 19 183 


— 1.79 


88 17.80 


16 


19 8 49.5 


8 5646 


38 91 40.1 


-|-0 11.03 


87 1835 


17 


19 17 85U) 


85548 


88 57.13 17 


98 98 493 


09838 


41 1031 


16 


19 81 0.9 


8 5339 


43 5337 


18 


98 95 90.0 


36.86 


45 6.96 


lift 


19 44 7.1 


8 61.68 


46 5033 


19 


98 96 893 


49.88 


49 839 


,20 

1 


19 56 88.9 


84839 


50 46.78 


20 


98 97 303 


1 337 


58 036 


1 

.21 90 9 19.0 


8 4037 


8 54 4838 


21 


33 97 48.9 


1 16.07 


6 66 66.60 


|22 90 31 S4.d 


8 41.70 


56 89.89 


22 


33 37 43.3 


130.17 


6 58.91 


2S 


90 38 8.6 


8 87.39 


4 9 86.45 


|28 


33 37 15.7 


1 4939 


4 40.76 


24 


90 44 81.8 


8 89.86 


6 88.01 


|24 


38 36 343 


165.31 


6 4634 


25| 90 45 8S.7 


8 96.91 


10 99.57 


26 


38 38 8.1 


3 8.10 


19 4930 


26 


91 6 14.0 


8 90.96 


14 36.18 


26 


38 38 37.3 


9 90.86 


16 8036 


l27 


91 16 83.4 


8 1434 


18 93.70 


27 i 38 31 31.6 


9 8838 


90 3031 


'28 


91 96 96.7 


8 7.65 


99 10.36 


;28 


1 38 18 513 


9 4539 


34 8337 


29 


9186 9.8 


8 031 


36 15.83 ; 2S 


1 33 15 66.5 


9 56.17 


38 90.19 


SO 


91 40 14.4 


9 6838 


80 1337 


3C 


1 38 13 87.3 


8 10.19 


83 96.67 
86 9333 


;3i 


91 54 8.9 1 9 44.85 


84 8.98 


8II 38 8 533 


8 9137 



58 



EPHEBIERI8 OF THE BVK. 



[1838. 



At mean noon at Grtenwieh. 



JULY. 


b. 




AUOtJST. 




D. 


Semi Diana. 


B. D. culm. 


• 


Semi Diam. 


B. D. cnlm. 


• 


2 


t* 
15tf.l 


m. lec. 
I 8.48 


Si - 


1 


15 47.1 


m. MC. 
1 641 


1 


4 


45.1 


8.41 


i '^ 


8 


47.3 


6.34 




6 


tf.l 


8.32 


ff 


47.6 


6.07 




8 


45.9 


8.99 


^.'* 4 


7 


47.0 


5.91 1 


10 


4ffJ 


8.10 


9 


48.9 


5.74 . 


|5- s| 


12 


4M 


7J» 


11 i" 


11 


ASA 


5.58 1 


pSSI 1-- 


14 


4A4 


7.85 


2€£^. 


13 


484» 


5.49 


II '^^ 


16 


4A3 


7.71 




Iff 


49.3 


5.96 j 


18 


45.6 


7.66 




17 


49.6 


5.10 1 


i-" IS 


20 
22 
24 


45.8 

45.9 j 
40.1 


7.41 
7.95 
7.09 


^ to ••0* 


19 
21 
23 


50.0 
50.4 
50.8 


4.96 ' 

4.83 

4.66 


^ ffA 


26 


46.3 


64»9 


6 4 


25 


51.9 


AM 


6 * 


28 


46.6 


6.75 


h s 


27 


51.6 


4.46 


30 


46.8 


6.66 


4 


29 


59.1 


4.34 




t2 


47.1 


6.41 




31 


59.6 


4.94 


D. 


Declination 
North. 


Eauat. of T. 
to M added to 
AppQT, Time. 


Sidereal 
Time. 


D. 


Declination 
North. 


Equat. of T. 
to M added to 
Appar. T^iiM. 


Sidereal 
Time. 




• 1 i» 


m. MC. 


h. m. lee. 




o t n 


n. lec. 


h. m. aee. 


1 


33 8 68.5 


8 91.07 


6 36 99.93 


1 


18 5 63.9 


6 1.14 


8S8 85.6S 


2 


33 4 45.5 


3 38.48 


46 18.79 


2 


17 50 41.8 


6 6748 


49 89J09 


3 


98 13.4 


3 44.79 


44 15.34 


3 


17 35 13.4 


6 63.90 


46 98^06 


4 


99 66 113 


8 66.65 


48 11.90 


4 


17 19 36.3 


6 48.39 


50 36.91 


5 


9140 67.3 


4 6.35 


59 8.47 


5 


17 3 33.4 


6 49.83 


64 91.77 


6 


93 U 13.5 


4 16.63 


•6 6.0B 


6 


16 47 4.0 


5 36.76 


68 18.SS 


7 


99 88 6.1 


4 96.U 


7 1.60 


7 


16 80 38.3 


6 30.08 


9 9 14.88 


8 


99 31 35.3 


4 36.00 


3 68.16 


8 


16 13 S6.6 


6 99.89 


6 114S 


9 


99 94 41.0 


4 45.18 


7 64.79 


9 


15 56 39.9 


5 14.99 


10 7.98 


10 


99 n 93.6 


4 53.07 


11 51.38 


10 


15 39 6.3 


5 6.60 


14 4.54 


U 


9B 43.1 


6 9.36 


7 16 47.83 


11 


15 91 98.3 


4 57.64 


9 18 1.09 


12 


99 1 39.8 


5 104» 


10 44.38 


12 


16 3 35.8 


4 48.15 


91 57.84 


13 


91 53 13.7 


5 17.85 


93 40.04 


13 


14 45 97 7 


4 38.11 


95 54.90 


14 


91 44 95.1 


5 94.93 


97 87.40 


14 


14 37 5.9 


4 97.55 


90 60.711 


15 


91 35 14.0 


5 31.56 


31 34.06 


15 


14 8 30.3 


4 1646 


83 47.S9 . 


16 


91 95 40.0 


6 37.71 


35 30.60 


16 


13 49 40.8 


4 4.85 


87 43.88 


17 


91 16 45.8 


6 43.37 


30 97.16 


17 


13 80 38.1 


' 8 59.74 


41 4644 


18 


91 5 98.9 


5 48.53 


43 93.73 


18 


13 11 33.4 


3 40.19 


45 37410 


19 


90 54 50.6 


5 53.18 


47 90.90 


19 


13 51 54.0 


3 97.01 


49 33.66 


90 


90 43 51.0 


5 67.98 


61 16.85 


20 


19 89 18.4 


8 13.43 


•3 30.11 


21 


90 89 30.4 


0.84 


; 7 66 18.43 


21 


19 U 90.8 


9 60.35 


9 57 96.88 


as 


90 90 40.0 


6 3.86 


1 60 0.97 


22 


11 59 ItA 


9 44.83 


10 193.91 


23 


90 6 47.1 


6 6.31 


6 3 6.63 


23 


11 33 0.9 


9 99.83 


5 19.78 


24 


19 56 96.0 


9 8.16 


7 3.60 


•24 


11 11 34.4 


9 14.37 


9 16.81 


25 


10 43 49.0 


6 0.43 


10 69.64 


!25 


10 50 57.4 


1 6848 


IS 19.88 


26 


10 30 41.1 


6 10.00 


14 56.10 


26 


10 30 10.1 


1 43.16 


17 949 1 


27 


10 17 90.0 


6 10.18 


18 59.75 


27 


10 9 19.8 


195.44 


91 5.97 


28 


10 8 39.7 


6 0.67 


99 48 JO 


28 


48 5.0 


1 8.3] 


95 9.68 


29 


18 49 40.5 


6 8.40 


96 45.85 


29 


96 40.8 


50.79 


98 69.00 


30 


18 35 90.8 


6 6.60 


80 49.41 


:«) 


5 94.7 


89.99 


89 85.86 


31 


18 90 46.8 


6 4.18 


34 88.97 


31 


8 43 514) 


14.71 


36 89.91 



1838.] 



EPHKHBaia OF THE SUN* 



59 



^t mean noon at Greenwich. 



SEPT£MISfiR. 




UCTOBER. 1 


D.-8«nn IKam. 8. D. colm. 1 


. 


d: 


tSemi UiaiD. 


ti, 1>. culm. 


^ • 


J • " 


B. tec. 


• 




1 It 


m. Mc. 




2 ]A53i> 

4j A3J 


I 4.16 
4.08 


S . 1 •* 

. : 4 


16 0.9 
1.4 


I 4.17 

447 


61 6U> 


441 


1 i 6 


3.0 


4.39 


1 1 


8l 64.5 


3.95 


s~ s 


3.6 


440 


^'^ IS 

3^ «?. 


10 6ft.O 
12 66^ 


3.90 1 
8.87 


lis II 


lO! 34 
12; 34 


4.63 
, 4.T7 


14. MU) 


344 




4.1 


493 


16! 66.5 

18' A7.0 
20 67.6 
22 66.1 


3.83 
843 
344 
346 ' 


i2 ti ,|16 

Ir U ;18 

•|« sa ho 

s^ a: 22 


4.7 
6.3 
5.7 
64 


6.08 
5.35 
5.43 
6.63 


24 66.6 


840 


Oji a 24 


6.8 


5.83 


0^ S5 


26 

28 


60.3 
69.7 


8.96 
4.01 


J S ,28 


74 

74 


6.08 
6.35 


00 


do 16 0.3 


4.09 


et 


30 


8.3 


6.46 






00 


l32! 84 


6.60 


•s 

CD 




Eqnat. of T. 




t 


Eooat. ofT. 
(0 bt tubtr./r. 




D. DMUoation 


tQb€ tmbtr. 


Sidiiroal 1 


D. Daelination 


Sidaraal 


ftoflb. 


fr.Ap. Timt, 


Time. | 


I Sooth. 


Avpar, Timt, 


Time. 


- • • '• 


VOm MC. 


h. in. >«o. , 

1 


1 , , ,, 1 ID. tee. 


h. m. lee. 


1 


8 33 9jO 


845 


10 40 48.77 ; 


1 j 3 7 8.8 1 10 14.40 


13 89 648 


2 


9 19J0 


39.71 


44 4543 1 


2 8 30 974 10 83.44 


48 1.93 


3 


7 38 31.4 


4146 


48 41.88 1 


3 1 3 63 434 10 53.18 


46 5848 


4 


7 16 16.4 


1 147 


53 88.a 


4 


4 16 674 


11 10.69 


.60 6543 


5 


6 64 4.3 


1 30.94 


66 34.96 


5 


4 40 7.8 


11 38.65 


54 6148 


6 


6 31 46.3 


14043 


11 31.63 1 


65 3 144 

1 


11 46.34 


68 48.18 


71 6 9 19.7 


3 0.91 


4 38.07 


7 I 5 36 18.4 


13 3.63 


13 3 44.69 


8 


6 46 48.0 


3 31.19 


8 3448 


8 6 49 174 


13 30 60 


6 4146 


^ 


6 34 lOJ 


3 41.63 


13 37.18 


9 1 6 13 134 > 


13 3644 


10 3741 


10 


» I an A 


8 3.30 


16 17.74 


10 


6 35 3.0 


12 63.93 


14 84.CT 


u 


4 38 38.4 


8 33 90 


11 30 14.80 


11 


6 57 48.1 


13 8.40 


13 18 80.93 


12 


4 16 443 


8 43.69 


34 10.86 


12 7 30 37.7 


13 3349 


33 3749 


13. Z 63 46^6 


4 447 


38 7.43 


13 I 7 43 1.4 


13 37.86 


36 94.08 


14| S 39 44.1 


4 9541 


83 8.97 


14 1 8 6 384 


13 61.79 


80 3048 


15 8 6S7.7 


4 46.61 


86 0.53 


15' 8 37 49.4 


14 6.18 


84 17.14 


16 S4S37.6 


5 7 53 


80 07.08 


IC' 8 60 3.0 


14 17.90 


38 13.68 


17 S 30 14J 


6 28.55 


48 08.63 


17' 9 13 94 


14 30.31 


43 1048 


18{ 166 66.3 


5 4947 


47 60.18 


18 1 9 84 7.3 


14 41.84 


46 6.78 


19 188S9.6 


6 10.67 


61 46.73 


19 9 66 574 


14 63.88 


60 844 


20 1 10 1&«. 


6 31.53 


56 48.88 


20 10 17 874 


16 8.37 


53 69.80 


21 46 6641 


6 53.44 


69 3943 


1 

1 






*22 


033 394) 


7 13.37 


13 8 3648 


21 10 39 9.8 


16 13.03 


13 57 6646 


23 


6.9 


7 34.01 


7 33.93 


22 11 0.33.1 


15 33.18 


14 153.00 




booth. 






23 11 31 44.4 


16 80.68 


5 4946 


24 


38 IfU 


7 54.66 


13 11 39.49 


'24 11 43 46.3 


10 38.37 


9 46.13 


25 


046 464 


8 16.16 


16 36.05 


25 13 3 37.8 


15 45.46 


13 43.60 


26 


1 10 11.1 


8 36.61 


19 33.60 


26 13 34 17.1 


15 6184 


17 89.94 


27 


1 38 864 


6 66.71 


38 19.16 


27 13 44 46.3 


15 67.63 


31 85.80 


28 


1 67 14 


16.73 


97 16.79 


28 13 5 1.4 


16 3.49 


35 33.85 


29 


S 30 35.7 


3543 


31 13.38 


^ 13 35 6.1 


16 6.71 


39 38.90 


30 


fl 48 49.1 1 66.09 


85 888 


30 13 44 66.0 


16 10.18 


88 2646 


3lU 7 64 I 10 14.40 


89 5.88 


I3I 14 4 33.9 


16 13.69 


37 39.00 



eo 



EPHEHtRIS OP TAB 8tTK. 



[1838. 



Jii mean noon at Oreonwieh. 





.N< 


>VEMB£K. 
8. D. culm. 


1 

• 


Ub^CBMBfiR. 


i 


b. 


Semi Diam. 


D. 


Semi Diam. 


S. D. culm. 






( // 


ID. aec. 


p» ^ 




< It 


m. aec. 


1 %' 


1 


16 8.8 


1 6.60 


1 


16 164) 


1 lOOl 


;i 


9.4 


6.91 


3 


163 


10.18 


5 


9.9 


7.14 


.i ^ 


5 


16.6 


10.88 


1 1 


7 


10.8 


7.87 


.. •» 
•3- '^ 

5.B «2s 


7 


16.8 


10.47 


6 •• 


9 
11 
13 


10.8 
11.3 
11.6 


7.61 
7.89 
8J09 


9 
11 
13 


16.0 
16.9 
16.4 


10.60 
10.71 
10.80 


-Is -^ 


15 


13.0 


8.89 




15 


16.6 


10.88 


17 
19 


13.6 
13.9 


8.66 
8.78 


£z Sri 1 

u ' ' ..» 1 


,17 
119 


16.7 
16.8 


10.04 
10.96 


F- 1*. 


21 


13.3 


9.00 




21 


17.0 


\\M 


39 a-s 


^ 


18.0 


9.99 


23 


17.1 


114)1 


o« & 


25 U.0 


9.43 


• 


25 


17.3 


11.09 


"s r 


27! U.8 


9.64 




27 


17.8 


10.06 


vi QD 


29 


14.7 


9.88 


w" 

* 


29 


17.3 


10.09 


4 A 


31 


15.0 


10.01 


^ ! 


31 


17.3 


10.85 


: - - 


D. Declination 


£auat. of T. 
tobesubtr.fr. 


Sidereal 


' D. 


Declination 


Bauat. of T. 
»wt. fr. Jipm. 


Sidereal 


Boutb. 


Appar. Tm». 


Time. 




South. 


till 95th. 


Time. 1 


{ 


• f II 


m. nc. 


h. m. tec. 




• 1 ti 


m. aec. 


h. m. aee. 


1 


U 33 56.0 


16 14.79 


14 41 18.65 


1 


31 49 28.8 


10 47.13 


16 80 86.97 


2 U 43 8.3 


16 16.93 


46 16.11 


2 


31 67 87.4 


10 94.34 


43 31.88 


3', 15 3 4.3 


16 16.93 


49 11.67 


3 


33 6 33.8 


10 0.04 


47 98.10 


4 15 M 46.6 


16 16.73 


63 8.93 


4 


33 14 43.5 


36.04 


61 94.90 : 


6 15 80 11.9 


16 14.40 


67 4.79 


5 


33 39 86.6 


19.86 


66 91.59 

1 


6' 15 67 22.7 


16 19.94 


16 1 1.85 


6 


99 80 4.4 


8 47.90 


60 18.00 1 


7 16 15 17.6 


16 9.93 


4 57.91 


7 


99 87 6.0 


8 91.60 


17 3 14.04 ' 


8; 16 89 66.3 


16 6.36 


8 64.47 


8 


-99 48 41.0 


7 66.98 


7 11.10 


9 


16 60 18.9 


16 0.68 ' 


19 514)3 


9 


99 40 404) 


798.60 


11 7.70 


10 


17 7 93 J 


16 66.03 


16 47.68 


10 


99 66 30.6 


7 1.49 


16 4.00 


11 


17 34 10.6 


15 48.66 


15 90 44.13 


11 


93 44.7 


68S39 


17 10 0.00 


12* 17 40 89.9 


15 41.38 


94 40.68 


1I2 


98 6 81.6 


6 6.81 


99 67.41 


13 


17 66 614) 


16 83.04 


^37.94 


13 


98 9 60.7 


6 37.44 


96 68.0T 


14 


18 13 48.4 


15 93.98 


89 83.79 


14 


93 18 49.9 


6 8.78 


80 60.00 


15 


18 38 16.6 


15 144)6 


86 80.34 


15 


98 17 6.9 


4 30.78 


84 474>0 


16 


18 43 30.1 


16 8.29 


40 96.90 


16 


93 90 1.7 


4 10.46 


88 4S.08 


17 


18 68 33.7 


14 51.68 


44 93.46 


17 


93 99 29.4 


8 40.08 


49 40.93 


18 


10 13 674) 


14 89.93 


48 90.03 


18 


93 94 994) 


8 11.80 


46 36.70 


19 


19 97 0.5 


14 96.95 


63 16.68 


19 


98 96 0.4 


9 41.48 


60 88.00 


20 


19 41 0.8 


14 11.86 


66 18.14 


20 


93 97 8.6 


9 11.66 . 


64 90.01 


21 


19 64 80.6 


18 66.98 


16 0.70 


21 


98 97 88.8 


1 41.66 


17 60 96.47 


22 


90 7 38.4 


13 41.39 


4 6.97 


22 


98 97 44.8 


1 llJBl 


18 9 38Xn 


23' 30 30 944) 


13 34.88 


8 9.83 


23 


33 97 99.9 


41.47 


6 10.07 


24 


30 33 46.0 


IS 7.67 


11 50.38 


li 


93 96 83.7 


^0 11.48 


10 16.13 


25 


30 44 46.9 


13 49.73 


15 65.04 


25 


98 35 14.3 


-)-0 18U4 


14 19.60 


26< 90 66 98.6 

1 


13 31.08 


10 69.40 ; 


26 


33 98 97.6 


48.96 


18 9.94 


27 31 7 36.6 


13 11.63 


93 40.04 1 


27 


98 91 19.6 


1 17.08 


99 6.00 


28| 91 16 96.8 


11 61.43 


97 46.60 


28 


98 18 90.6 


147.46 


96 9«00 


29 


31 38 60.7 


11 80.78 


81 49.15 


29 


98 16 18.6 


9 16.70 


90 60.99 


30 


91 88 61.1 


11 9.96 


86 38.71 


30 


98 11 89.7 


9 46.66 


88 OftUO 


31 


91 48 96.8 


10 47.13 


80 86.37 


31 


98 7 83.1 


8 14.68 


87M.06 



61 

TVmc ^S^pwrmU Plaee$ tf 30 of ike Principal Fixed Stare^ far epery 

tenth day iifthe year. 

Epoch. — The Upper Cahniiiation at Greenwich. 






fan. 1«! 8i.eB 

21,1 6mb| 

31,; MJ8 

P'eb. 10, 61.14>96 

20. 
Iflar. 2, ^ i».TO 

12, 3fc79 

22^1 ttA6 

ipril 1,1 ti.%i 

11,! aa.M| 

2 J, I M.97| 

Hay I,' M^J 

11,1 a.i7i 



i9C«U. 



4 



9 




27,,' 43.7C 
37, 26.01 



311 



aAxi»ti$. 






a C«ti. 



1 66 

3.11 
3.08 
3.84 
%10 
3.67 
3.46 
3UI6 
3.39 
3.36 
3.38 
. 3.34 
^ 3.46 
3.63 
3.84 
8.09 
8.38 
3.69 
4.03 
4.36 
4.70 
8.04 
6.37 
6.88 
6.06 
8.32 
8.44 
8.84 
8.90 
893 
703 
7.10 
7.13 
7.13 
711 
7.08 
8.S8 
0.88 



93 

I 4i 

41 48.3 
46.0 
44.8 j 
434)1 
43.3' 
43.4 1 
41U»| 
40.7 1 
39.8; 
89.1 1 
38.8 
38.3 
38.0 
38.3 
88.8 
39 Jl 
40.3 
41.4 
4S.9 
44.6 
48.3 
48.1 
49.0 
61.8 
63.7 
66.6 
67.1 
68.7 
80.1 
81.3 
83.3 
88.2 
84.0 
84.6 
84.8 
85.0 
86.0 
84.7 



I 

I 



b. m. 
3 68 

tee. 

49.63 

49.44 

49JI3 

49.30 

49.07 

48 93 

48.70 

48.68 

48.86 

48.49 

48.44 

48.46 

^48.80 

48.81 

48 76 

48.94 

49.16 

49.43 

49.70 

6U00 

60.31 

60.83 

60.94 

61.34t 

61.63 

61.80 

63.06 

69.38 

63.48 

63.85 

63.80 

63.01 

UJOO 

68.06 

63.07 

63.08 

68.03 

63.96 



37 



4.7 
4.1 
3.6 
3.0 
3.6 
3.1 
3.0 
9.0 
3.1 
3.4 
3.9 
iJi 
4.6 
6.1 
7.0 
8.6 
10.3 
11.9 
13.7 
16 6 
17.3 
19.0 
90.8 
33.0 
38.3 
34.3 
94.9 
36.4 
38.8 
36.8 
36.3 
34.9 
34.4 
33.7 
33.0 
33.8 
31.8 
S04» 



a Taari. 



I 



h. n. 
4 38 



88.71 
38.88 
88.83 
38.63 
38.39 
38.94 
38.06 
87.93 
37.77 
37.88 
87.83 
87.48 
87.43 
37.48 
j 37.49 
37.81 
87.77 
87.07 
38.30 
88.48 
88.16 
39.06 
39.38 
89.68 
40.00 
40.83 
40.83 
40.99 
41.90 
41.48 
41.70 
41.93 
43.11 
4338 
43.38 
49.48 
43.60 
43 60 



o 

18 

• It 
10 



49.1 
48.9 
48.7 



48.3 

48.0 
47.8 
47.8 
47.4 
47.8 
47.8 
474 
47.8 
47.9 
48.4 



.49.8 

608 

61.8 

63.8 

83.8 

84.7 

66.7 

68.8 

67.4 

68.1 

88.7 

69.1 

69.4 

698 

60.8 

60.4 

69.8 

60.1 

66.9 

66.7 

66.6 



G 



62 

TVtie ,9pparetd Places of 90 of the Principal Fixed SUurs^ fir every 

tenth day qf the year, (Continued.) 

Epoch. —The Upper Cnlmination at Greenwich. 



1 


a Aorig*. ! 


§ Ononis. 


I^I^uri. 


aOrioDis. 


^Caak BUjor 




• 

8 

< 


• 


1 


.i 


4 


• 


• 

1 


1 


• 

^ 1 




•• 
04 


• 

i 


*< 

M 

.9 


m 

1 


.9 
P4 


• 

1 


2 
S 


• 

1 


04 fi 




fa. m. 


1 

9 


fa. na. 


• 


h> m. 


• 


b. n. 


e 


h. n. 


« 


1888. 


6 4 


45 


5 6 . 


8 


5 16 


93 


5 46 


7 


6 88 


16 




AM. 


1 i< 


•ae. 


1 •< 


■oe. 


1 <i 


sec. 


1 ti 


MC 


( It 


Jan. 1, 


45.06 


49 45.6 


46.84 


28 88.7 


4.43 


97 60.4 


95.34 


33 91.9 


1.00 99 49. 


11, 


4ft.06 


47.0 


46.88 


85.3 


4.44 


60.R 


35.39 


31.1 


1.87 U^ 

1 


21, 


45.09 


48.3 


46.38 


86.5 


4.41 


61.8 


35.39 


90.4 


1 1.6^ 53U 


31, 


44.00; 


49.3 


46.30 


87.6 


4.88 


61.6 


35.38 


19.8 


1.86' 55.^ 


Feb. 10, 


44.78 


50.0 


46 08 


88.4 


4.33 


61.9 


35.14 


19.4 


! 1.66 574 


ao, 


44.53 


50.6 


45.93 


89.0 


4.07 


09.1 


35.03 


19.1 


1 1.47 56J 


Mar. 2, 


44.80 


50.8 


45.77 


89.4 


8.90 


63.9 


34.87 


18.8 


i 1.83 m 


12, 
22, 


« 4400 
48.68 


50.7 
50.8 


45.69 
1 46.43 


89.6 
89.4 


8.71 
8.63 


63.1 1 
61.9 


34.71 
34.56 


18.7 
28.7 


1.16 60.( 
0.071 60.J 


April 1. 


tt.61 


49.6 


45.36 


89.0 


8.86 


61.6 


34.89 


18.8 


0.79 6Jft 


11, 


48.43 


49.7 


49.18 


38.3 


8.33 


6I.9I 


34.34 


19.0 


0.81 60.1 


21, 


48.33 


47.7 


45.03 


87.4 


8.10 


60.8 


34.13 


19.8 


0.46; 59J 


May 1, 


48.19 


46.4 


44.94 


86.3 


3.08 


60.4 


34.08 


19.7 


0.81 56i 


11, 


«.1S 

1 


45.1 


44.91 


85.0 


3.00 


59.9 


38.98 


90.3 


0J90l 67.^ 


21, 


48.18' 


43.8 


44.91 


88.4 


8.01 


59.6 


33.97 


90.9 


0.19 564 


31, 


.48.97 
^«.43 

1 


43.6 


^44.96 
45.07 


81.7 


8.06 


59.1 


34.00 


91.6 


0jO9' 64-' 


June 10, 


41.9 


29.7 


- 3.30 
^ 8.88 


58.8 


34.07 
34.19 


33.5 


OJO9' 59.( 


20, 


48.66 


40.0 


45.31 


37.8 


68.7 


38.6, 


- 0-18" 60.1 
" 0.91 481 


30, 


48.01 


88.1 


46.38 


36.8 


8.50 


58.6 


94.85 


34.6| 


July 10, 


44.32 


88.9 


45.69 


33.8 


8.84 


68.6 


94.54 


96.61 


0.84 46.] 


20, 


44.56 


87.7 


45.83 


31.9 


4.11 


68 9 


94.76 


96.7 


0.50J 444 


30, 


44.04 


87.3 


46.08 


30.3 


4.41 


50.0 


95.P0 


97.7 


ObOS' 434 


Aug. 9. 


45.84 


87.3 


46.36 


18.6 


4.73 


50.3 


35.96 


98.7 


0.09 404 


]S> 


45.711 


87.3 


46.66 


17.3 


6.06 


59.7 


35.54 


99.5 


I.isl 35.1 


^' 


46.18 


87.4 


46.94 


16.3 


6.41 


60.1 


35.83 


80.1 


1.89 S7i 


Sept. 8, 


46.61 


87.8 


47.34 


15.6 


5.76 


60.6 


3618 


80.6' 


1.66 374 


18, 


47U>8 


88.3 


47.54 


15.3 


6.10 


6'».9 


36.43 


80.9 


1.06 364 


28, 


47.45 


89.0 


47.83 


15.3 


6.44 


61.3 


36.74 


80.9 


2.95 3«.« 


Oct 8, 


47.85 


89.9 


48.11 


16.7 


6.77 


61.7 


37.04 


80.7, 


9.55[ 374 
9.83'' 37.1 


18, 


48.34 


40.9 


46.87 


16.4 


7.00 


69.1 


37 83 


80.8 


28, 


49.60 


43.0 


49.63 


17.5 


7.89 


696 


97.61 


S9.7 


8.14 39. 


Nov. 7, 


48.98 


48.3 


> 48.85 


18.8 


7.67 


63.8 


97.88 


90.0 


S.43; 40.' 


17. 


40.33 


44.6 


49.0A 


30.4 


7.93 


^63.3 


38.18 


98.11 


8.70 42- 


27, 


49.49 


46.1 


49.33 


33.1 


8.16 


63.6 


98.85 


37.1: 


8.99 44.1 


Dec. 7, 


49.70 


47.6 


49.36 


38.8 


834 


64.0 


98.54 


96.1 


4.17 47J 


17 


, 49.88 


49.1 


49.46 


36.6 


8.48 


64.4 


98.69 


35.1 


4.39 49; 


27 


, 49.09 


60.6 


49.A9 


97.3 


8.56 


64.8 


38.80 


34.1 


4 40 99-1 


37 


, 40.M 


\ 53.0 


49.54 


39.9 


8.68 


66.8 


38.87 


38.8 


4.98 641 



63 



TViie ,/S^^partnt Places of 90 of (he Principed Fixed Stars, for every 

ienUi day of the year. ( Continued. ) 

Epoch. — The Upper Calmination at Greenwich. 



1 


aOuiallinMia. 


|9 Oenuuorun. 


aUjdxm. 


aLMDis. 


/t Ltooii. 


1 


• 

1 


1 ■ 


1 


1 


1 


i 


i 


1 


i 

< 


1 


1 


OS 


« 

1 


s 


1 


OS 


1 


.a 


• 

1 




• 

1 




h. m. 


• 


b. in. 


• 


h. in. 


• I 


h. n. 





h. ID. 


1 • 


1838. 


7 30 


9 


7 94 


98 


8 10 


7 


9 69 


13 


! 11 40 


16 




MC 


> 1' 


MC. 


1 II 


MC. 


1 It , 


■eo. 


1 ti 


1 MO. 


1 n 


Jan. 1. 


M.99 


98 13.7 


34.97 


94 46.4 


38.30 


67 97 9, 

i 


46.30 


46 36.3 


47.80 


38 86.9 


lU 


50^ 


11.4 


99.14 


49.6 


88.63 


90.61 


46.47 


33.8 


48.13 


36 Jl 


21. 


tOM 


10.3 


99.34 


46.9 


88.61 


814i| 


46.71 


33.7 


48.44 


33.7 


31. 


60.M 


0.4 


94.91 


47.4 


38.04 


33.0 


46.00 


31.8 


48.71 


89.6 


Feb. 10, 


60^ 


8.7 


99.91 


480 


304)3 


36.4 


464)4 


31.3 


48.86 


91.9 


20, 


fiOL49 


8.1 


99.96 


48.6 


80 07 


36.0 


46.13 


30.8 


, 40.14 


31.6 


Mar. 2, 


M.40 


7.7 


39.10 


49b9 


804)7 


88.3 


46.18 


90.7 


40.30 


- 31.9 


12. 


MUB 


7.4 


99.03 


49.9 


30.03 


80.3 


46.18 


36.8 


40.30 


91.9 


22, 


•0.U 


7.4 


94.87 


60.4 


38.84 


88.01 


46.14 


31.0 


40.44 


99.0 


April 1, 


«».96 


7.4 


94.70 


40.0 


86.83 


40.6| 


46.07 


31.4 


40.46 


99:6 


11. 


4B.83 


7U», 


94.63 


41.3 


86.71 


40.8 


46.97 


31.0 


40.46 


334 


2J, 


49.«7 


7.9 1 


94.99 


61.4 


88.68 


40.8 


46.86 


33.6 


49.41 


34.3 


M.y 1. 


49M 


"1 


94.31 


61.6 


38.46 


40.7 


46.74 


33.0 


49J6 


36.1 


11. 


4SM 


9.7I 


94.08 


61.4 


38.33 


40.4 


46413 


38.6 


49.37 


86.0 


21. 


4SM 


0.3, 


93.90 


91.9 


88.30 


80.8 


49.61 


34.1 


48.18 


36.9 


31, 


49J0 


0.8; 


3SJU 


40.0 


88.10 


88.1 


46.40 


34.6 


49.09 


97.7 


Jane 1(^ 


40.98 


10.4 


94.03 


40.6 


384)3 


38.3 


46.31 


36.0 


48.99 


98.4 


^. 


4Si90 


11.3 


33.04 


40.3 


87.06 


87U 


46.36 


96.3 


48.89 


38.9 


n 


49.36 


11.0 


34.00 


40.7 


37.03 


36.3 


46.90 


96.6 


48.80 


899 


Jul7 10, 


^4M6 
49.96 


13.7 


^14.10 


401 


37.00 


86.3 


46.17 


96.8 


48.71 


89.9 


20, 


19.4 1 


34.96 


48 6 


87^ 


84.0 


49.16 


36.9 


48.64 


99.6 


30. 


48^78 


14.3 


34.43 


47.9 


37.97 


83.0 


46.18 


36.8 


48.66 


994 


Aog. 9, 


4M1 


14.8 




47.3 


^884)4 
88.14 


91.8 


46.33 


36.7 


46.68 


89.9 


19. 


40.19 


19.3 


94.87 


46.6 


80.7 


46.20 
^46.40 


36.4 


48.60 


86.7 


29, 


«Ui 


14.6 


99.13 


49.0 


38.97 


90.0 


34.0 


48.48 


884) 


Sept. 8, 


40.90 


14.7 


99.41 


49.1 


8843 


30.3 


48.63 


34.31 


,48J3 
^48.68 


87.1 


18. 


M.97 


14.6 


1 99.73 


44.3 


88.63 


30.0 


49.69 


33.4 


86.9 


28, 


61.U 


19.9 


964)4 


43.9 


86.84 


904) 


49.86 


33.8 


48 67 


34.6 


Oct. 8, 


41.44 


14.7 


96J8 


49.6 


88416 


90.3 1 


46.11 


31.0 


48.80 


83.9 


18, 


41.74 


13.9 


99.73 


41.7 


89.96 


804) 


46.96 


10.6 j 


48.06 


31.1 


2«, 


094rr 


19.8 


974)6 


40.0 


89.69 


31.1 


46.66 


18.0 1 


49.17 


39.1 


Nov. 7, 


49.96 


11.6 


97.44 


40.1 


90.06 


89.4 


46.96 


16.3 


4043 


96.9 


17. 


93.69 


10.3 


97.79 


39.3 


40.90, 


84.1 


47.98 


14.3 1 


49.70 


94.7 


.. *'• 


4S.96 


8.7 


98.18 


38.7 


40.61 


86.1 


47.63 


19.4, 


60.01 


994 


Dec. 7, 


49.94 


7jI 


96.44 


89.3 


40.03 


38.9 


47.96 


10.6 


60.94 


904) 


17, 


49.48 


9.7 


98.73 


37.9 


41.34 


40.6 


48.90 


0.6 


oaoo 


17.9 


27, 


99.70 


4.9 


98.99 


37.6 


41.43 


43.8 1 


49.63 


6.0 


914M 


16.8' 


1 37, 


49.69 


9.0 


99.16 


87.8 


41.78 


49.11 


48.93 


6.4 


61.96 


18.9 



64 

True Apparent Places of ^ of the Principal Fixed Stars, for every 

tenth day of the year, (Continued.) 

Epoch. — The Upper Culmination at Greeirwioh. 





a Virginis. 


aBooii*. 


a* Libra. 


^ Ur^B MiDorii. 


filA\nm<. 




• 

4 


• 


< 


m 

1 


• 

4 


• 


• 

1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


■ 

1 


t 


' 1 

1 


6 

A 

• 




1 


«* 


• 

1 


h. in. 


# 


h. m, ' 


• 


h. m. 


h. m. 


# 


b. m. 


^ 


1838. 


18 16 


10 


14 8 


90 


14 41 


16 


14 61 


74 . 


16 8 


8 




tec. 


< <l 1 


■ec. , 


< «i 


■ec. 


i 1 • 


■ec. 


. .. ' 


wc« 


• «« 


Jan. ], 


S0.46 IB 4ft.4 ; 


16.88 


1 34.8 


' 64.70 


91 48.6 


13.98 


48 49.4 

1 


16.81 


46 61.7 


11, 


S9.81 


47.6 


16.91 


89.5 


65.04 


60.9 


14.76 


40.1 


17.18 


68.6 


21, 


40.14 


49.6! 


16.65 


80.5 


66.88 


61.9 


16 61 


88.8' 


17.46 


65.9 


31, 


40.46 


61.6 


16.80 


98.8 


66.79 

1 


63.6 


16.61 


* 87.9! 


17.79 


66.8 


Feb. JO, 


40.7S 


68Ui 


17.91 


37.6 


56.06 


65.8 


17.41 


86.7 


18.11 


68^ 


•20, 


41.01 


66.8 


17J0 


S6.8 


. 66.37 


56.9 


18.99 


86.9 


18.48 


69.8 


Mar. % 


41.94 


66.8; 


17.77 


96.5 


1 66.66 


68.3 


19.11 


87.8 


18.79 


61.0 


12, 


41.44 


mV 


18.01 


96.5 


66.99 


69.6 


19.85 


89.8 


19.00 


69.0 


22, 


41.50 


69.9 


18.91 


97.0 


' 67.16 


60.7 


30.49 


41.8 


19.35 


63.7 


April 1, 


41.71 


60.1 


, 18.38 


97.8 


67.87 


61.7 


31J)1 


43.8 


19.48 


6a.9 


11, 


41.80 


00.7 


18.61 


'98.9 


67U(6 


09.4 


91.39 


40.6 


19.67 


63.6 


21, 


41.86 


61.1 


18.61 


80.9 


67.70 


68.0 


31.68 


49.6 


19.84 


68.6 


May 1, 


41.80 


61.4 


18.07 


81.7 


67.89 


68.4 


31.78 


63.7 


19.98 


69.6 


11, 


41.80 


61.6 


18.71 


88.9 


67.91 


63.7 


91.08 


66.7 


30.10 


6S^ 


21, 


41.89 


61.4 


18.71 


84.8 


67.98 


68.8 


31.49 


68.7 


30.18 


68.1 


31, 


41.8S 


61J 


18.69 


86.8 


68.01 


63.9 


91.18 


61.6 


30.94 


638 


June 10, 


41.80 


' 61.0 ' 

j 


19.65 


87,6 


68.09 


68.8 


90.76 


68.9 


30.97 


69.4 


20, 


41.7S 


60 7 


18.68 


88.9 


68.00 


68.7 


30.99 


66.9 


90.97 


61.9 


90, 


41.60 


60.9 


18U9 


89.9 


67.96 


0.6 


19.00 


67.5 


90.94 


61.6 


July 10, 


41.M 


69.7 


18.89 


40.7 


! 67.89 


63.8 


18.91 


68.7 


30.18 


61.0 


20, 


41.46 


69.9 


18<^ 


41.3 


67.80 


68.0 


18.17 


69.4 


30.10 


60.6 


30, 


41.86 


66.6 


18.14 


41.6 


', 67.69 


69.6 


17.89 


60.5 


30.00 


60.9 


Aug. 9, 


41.96 


68 


18.01 


41.6 


1 67.66 


63.1 1 


16.69 


60.1 


19 88 


66.6 


19, 


41.16 


67.4 


17.87 


41.4 


67.48 


61.7 i 


16.79 


68.9 


' 19.75 


69.4 


29, 


41.07 


66.9 


17.74 


40.9 


1 

• 67.80 


61.9 


16.01 


66.7 


19.61 


60.1 


Sept 8, 


41.01 


66.6 

1 


17.69 


40.0 


67.18 


60.71 


14.97 


64.8 


19.48 


66.8 


18, 


40.97 


66.9 1 


17.59 


88.8 


i 67.07 


60.8 > 


18.60 


694 


19.86 


68.7 


28, 


40 JW 


66.0 ' 


17.46 


87.4 


66.99 


60.9! 


19.99 


69.7 


19.96 


6S.6 


Oct 8, 


.40.99 
«^414>7 


66.0 


17.49 


86.7 


66.04 


69.7 > 


19.48 


56.5 


1 19.19 


68.7 


18, 


66.3 


^17.49 
17.48 


88.7 


66.98 


69.6 


19.08 


63.0 


j 19.15 


68.0 


28. 


41.19 


66.9 


81.9 


^66.96 
' 67.06 


69.7 


^11.89 
11.69 


49.4 


1 19.16 


69.6 


Nov. 7, 


41.86 


67.7 


17.68 


98.7 


604) 


46.1 


^19.91 
19.69 


60.0 


17, 


41.68 


68.8 


17.78 


96.1 


1 67.90 


60.6 


11.78 


41.3 


60^ 


27, 


41.83 


60.1 


17.03 


33.3 


1 67.89 


61.3 


11.99 


87.4 


19.49 


C9.0 


Dec. 7, 


a.i9 


61.8 


18.17 


90.6 


< 67.09 


09.3 


13.97 


88.7 


19.70 


68^ 


17, 


49.44 


68.6 


18.45 


17.7 


67.90 


68.6, 


13.76 


80.8 


19.96 


64^ 


27, 


49 78 


66.6 


18.76 


16.1 


68.91 


66.0 


18.88 


379 


< 90.98 


66.4 


37, 


a.i9 


6.76 


IM9 


13.6 


68.68 


66.6 


14.11 


94.6 


90.68 


68.1 



65 



TrM€ Affparttd 



PlaetM ^if 90 of ike Prmmdl Fixed Starts fur eMry 
<efi<4 itoy of ike ytar. (Cfoiitiaue<L) 



£poeli. — The Upper Colmiiuitioii at Greenwich. 





aConam 


fi^ BoorpiMitt. ' 


a Seorpiooia. 


a Ljm. 


a Aqoil*. 




Boraaltf. 

• 




1 








^ 








4 


1 


1 


1 


* 

1 


1 


• 

1 


1 


i 


1 




a 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


• 

1 




b. m. 


• 


h. m. 


• 


b. m. 


1 


n Ilk 

1 


• 


h. m. 


• 


1838. 


M 97 


*» 1 


16 68 


10 


18 10 


98 


18 31 


88 


, 10 43 


8 




Me. 


1 


Me. 


1 It 


Me. 


1 ' " 


MC. 


> <i 


1 MC. 


« <« 


Jan. 1, 


48.75 


16 38.7 


0.91 


9191.3 


97.40 


, 8 694) 


96.10 


87 81 J 


61.14 


18 334 


llj 


4Mft 


88.0 


0.66 


< 39.4 


97.80 


1 60.8 


96.31 


67.0 


61.91 


394 


ai, 


«J9 


38.7, 


0.88 


93.8 


98.13 


80.8 


96.48 


64^ 


61.34 


304 


31j 


«.71 


81^ 


1.99 


i *"> 


98.47 


t\a 


96.70 


63.0 


6140 


90.0 


Feb. 10^ 


MjO» 


30.3, 


1.68 


90.0 


98.89 


83.1 


96.98 


40.6 


61.81 


97.8 


ao, 


MJ8 


98,3 


IM 


, 97.9 


98.18 


* 88.1 

1 


98.94 


47.6 


61.81 


98.6 


Mar. a, 


W.70 


9&8. 


fLsa 


! 98.3 


99.63 


' 844) 

1 


98.66 


46.0 


63.11 


96.8 


12. 


M.S» 


980) 


9.63 


90.3 


90.86 


, 84.9 


98.88 


444 


63.38 


96.1 


22. 


»1.96 


90.8 


9.83 


30.1 


30.18 


' 86.8 


97.99 


44.6 


6943 


96.0 


April 1, 


»1^1 


9M 


8.10 


30.0 


30.48 


88.8 


97.68 


444 


69.03 


96.9 


11, 


*l«7i 


99J0J 


346 


31.6 


30.78 


87.4 


97.90 


48.4 


63.99 


96.6 


21, 


6I.M 


33.7, 


3.68 


39.0 


31.03 


88.1 


1 38.38 


48.7 


634)9 


98.7 


May 1, 


MLM 


38.7 


3.77 


89.4 


' 81.36 


68.7 


1 38.61 


484 


6348 


98.0 


n. 


A3.15J 


37.8 


3.04 


39.7 


31.46 


80.3 


9888 


60.7, 


64.13 


904 


81, 


8S.9S 


40.0 


4.08 


39.8 


31.89 


80-8 


994)0 


63.3 


6449 


314 


31, 


0S.i7 


49.1 


4.10 


38.1 


81.76 


70.8 


■ 38.39 


684) 


64.60 


33.9 


June 10; 


09.37 


44.91 


4.97 


33.9 


81.87 


70.7 


' 39.61 


604) 


6444 


38.9 


ao, 


*U» 


48.1 


4.31 


38.9 


81.8S 


71.1 


1 38.86 


83.1, 


66.18 


374 


30. 


fi9.10 


47.8 


4.39 


33.9 


31.88 


71.4 


; 90.74 


86.1 


66.86 


30.4 


iJoly 10. 


i9.l0 


48.4 


4.99 


33.9 


31.86 


71.7 


90.70 


68.1 


6640 


414 


1 ao, 


B1.M 


60.8! 


4.98 


33.J 


31.80 


71.9 


90.78 


70.0 


66.81 

1 


43.9 


• 30. 


•i.as 


81.8 


4.14 


39.8 


81.83 


79.1 


98.79 


784 


66.87 


444 


lAag. 9, 
19. 


»l.fiO 


40.0 


4.09 


39.7 


81.71 


73.1 


90.89 


76.8 


66.00 


404 


»!.« 


43.9 


3.80 


89.6 


81.67 


79.0 


99.47 


77.7 


68.87 


47.8 


ao. 


U.M 


89.1 


3.76 


39.3 


81.41 


71.8 


99.90 


704 


6641 


484 


flept 8, 


»1.17 


61.8 


3.60 


81.9 


81.36 


71.6 


90.08 


80.6 


6641 


404 


18, 


91J» 


S0.7 


3.44 


S1.6 


Sl«08 


71.9 


98.84 


81.4 


6648 


604 


^ 


ao.8ft 


40.4 


3.31 


31.9 


30418 


70.7 


99.69 


81.7 


6644 


604 


Oct 8, 


sa.7s 


47.8 


3.90 


30.6 


80.80 


70.9 


98.88 


814 


6646 


614 


18, 


M.04 


48.8 


3.19 


30.6 


80.70 


80.7 


98.00 


81.0 


64.99 


60.0 


28, 


«MD 


43.8 


3.08 


30.4 


1 30.84 


80.9 


97.87 


704 


64.76 


604 


Nov. 7, 


M.«6 


41.0 


3.10 


80l8 


30.89 


80.7 


97.ff7 


76.6 


64.89 


•04 


17, 


38.0 


. 3.17 
^3.30 


30.4 


1^30.68 
80.70 


88.4 


97.61 


78.6 


64 60 


404 


87, 


M.79 


36.1 


3du7 


88.3 


97.40 


74.3 


8441 


484 


Dec. 7, 


M3t 


39J> 


3»47 


81.9 


30.04 


80.1 


97.34 


714 


6448 


484 


17, 


M.M 


984) 


3.80 


31.8 


31.16 


88.8 


97.39 


88.7 


6444 


464 


87, 


•Ml 


98.1 


3.86 


39.7 


31.41 


88.8 


.97.81 

* 97.47 


864 


6448 


U4 


37J 


»l.^0 


98.3 


4.34 


33.7 


31.70 


80.1 


89.3 


6441 


49.4 



0* 



66 



Ihte Appareid Plaeti of SO of the PrirMped Fired StarWf ffr 

tenth day of ike fear. (Cfontinoed.) 

£poch. — The Upper Culmination at Greenwich. 



a Cygni. 



8 

< 



a Aqaarii. 



P4 



I 



1838. 
Jan. 1, 

II, 

21, 
31, 

Feb. 10, 
20, 

Mar. 2, 
12, 
22, 

April I, 

11, 

21, 

Bfay 1, 

11, 
21. 

81, 

June 10, 
20, 
30, 

Jalv 10, 
20, 
30, 

Aug. 9, 
19, 
29, 

Sept 8, 
18, 
28, 

Oet. 8, 
18, 
28, 

Nov. 7, 

17. 
27. 

Dee. 7, 

17. 

87, 

I 37, 



b* HI* 


• 


It. m. 


90 S5 


44 


31 67 


MC- 


. .' 


MC. 


63 SI 


41 74.4 


36.60 


62 47 


71.7, 


96.66 


^63.64 


68.7,' 


90Jk5 


. o»-4; 


36.68 


63.65 


69.6 


.26.63 
,^'26.71 


6S^I 


600 


61.02 


67.61 


26.83 


61.97 


66.7 


36.08 


69.56 


64.91 


37.16 


61.68 


53.3 1 


37.36 


64.33 


61.0 


37.60 


64.60 


611 


37. 7 


64.07 


64.31 


38.16 


66.36 


656 { 


38.46 


66.7*2 


67.6 j 


' 38.77 


66.06 


60.8 


1 38.00 


60.18 


63.6 


30.41 


66.07 


606i 


30.79 


66.01 


68.7 


10.01 


6711 


730 


90.97 


67.96 


76.4 


10.M 


67.11 


78 7 


30.60 


67.16 


89.0 


10.84 


57.M 


»J0 


10.0d 


67.34 


87.8 


lli>i 


67.11 


00.4 


31.04 


66.04 


03.6 


11.09 


66.71 


04.4 


10.07 


66.40 


06.7 


10.80 


66.01 


86-6 


10.70 


66.03 


07.1 


10.67 


68.71 


07.0 


10.65 


66.48 


064 


10«41 


6).t!e 


06.1 


30.11 


664n 


088 


10.30 


64.09 


01.8 


10.11 


64.80 


80.6 


MUM 


64.71 


064 


SOjOO 



1 

6 80.9 
80.0 
81.6 
89.3 
89.S 
6S.I 
83.8 
83.9 
83.0 
89.3 
81.3 
80.3 
78.8 
77.3 
76.4 
78.6 
71.6 
60.6 
67.6 
66.6 
610 
63.4 
614) 
60.8 
68.S 
68.1 
67.6 
67.3 
679 
67.9 
67.4 
67 8 
68.9 
66.8 
60.4 
60.1 
60.6 
614 



a PlwU Am- 
trails. 



& 



h. m. 
39 48 

MC. 

40.11 
40.93 
40.17 
40.14 
40.14 
40.17 
40.94 
^40JI6| 
40.60) 
40.60 
40.01 
41.17 
41.46 
41.76 
43.13 
49.47 
49.83 
41.10 
41.66 
4186 
44.18 
44.46 
44.68 
44.86 
44.00 
46.07 
46.10 
46.00 
46.04 
44.06 
44.85 
44.73 
44.67 
44«4S 
44.98 
U.I6 
44.06 
41.06 



10 



o Pocui. 



-& 

... 



s. 



h. DB. 

39 66 



98 6710 
67.4 

66.7 I » 
66.7 
64.4 
69.0 ' 
bl9'| 
40.1'' 
47.0 1 1 
44.8'! 
A'lS 
40.9 
370 
96.6 
11.6 
31.6 
30.6 
38.0 
26.8; 

36.8 i 
969| 
34.0' 
34.0 > 
36 3! 
36.0! 
36.9 
38.0 
303 
10.6 
13.0 
81.3 
14.4 
16.4 
16.31' 
86.7 
160 
86.0 
86.6 



40.77 
40.60 
40.69 
40 68 
40.66 
40.68 
, 40.68 
40.71 
40.63 
40.00 
41.10 
41.43 
41.68: 
41.07' 
49.98 
43.60 
49.08 
41.96; 
43.66 
41.06 
44.18 
44.17 
44 67 
41.71 
44.94 
44.01 
44.06 
44M 
44.09 



44.77 
44.67 
44 66 



44.99 
44.19 



14 

19 67.1 
66.9 

66.0 

69.8 

69.6 

61.6 

60.6 

60.6 

60.1 

66.0 

60.1 

60.6 

604 

61.6 

68.1 

64.8 

66.8 

60.0' 

71.1! 

71.7 

76.0 

78.1 

80.6 

09.7 

84.6 

86.8 

af7.7 

80jO 

OOjO 

00.7 

01.9 

01.4 

01.4 

01.9 

00.7 

064) 

80.1 

80.1 



ot Androai«da 



8 

M 



•) ; 


• 
S8 


0.73 11 61.: 


000 


69.J 


0.48 


51.1 


0.37 


49.'; 


C.98 


4S.S 


C.99 


46.C 


C.19 


46.1 



1.10 


40.4 


1.60 


41.1 


1.83 


49.9 


3.17 


41.7 


9.69 


45.5 


387 


47.6 


3.91 


.w.» 



0-90 

0.95 

O.i'4 

0.60 

0^> 

0.0:' 

1.11 

l.M 

1.8a 

3.11 
3.M 
381 
3.31 
1.6S 
8.83 
4J» 
4.13 
4.61 
4 66 
4 76 
401 
4.86 
4.86 
4 81 
4.76 
4.66 
AM 



4.33 
4.10 



43.e 

43.8 
41.1 



40j(^ 
40U» 
40.4 
41.1 
49J 
41.1 
45J 
17.6 
t9.» 
6^.3 
64.9 
6T.4 
60.0 
69.5 
64.9 
67.9 
60.9 
71.l] 
79.7 
74.1; 
76.1 < 
76.9| 
76.4| 
76 6 
764 
764 
7»jO 



Or. Ytmtg't K^rmOiiMM, tU Baromltr btiag U 30 imekM, 
aal noisoaHtar mt60,ttr llu cilemil at4T, digrtiM ; milk i 
Jar -(- mc inek n (i< iahntMl«r, mtdfor — «u dtgret a 
mtrtf FrnkrakB^ Fr9»pagt\2 af Vol. littf PtarnnCt PnutUalJlf 



i\% 


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¥ 


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? 


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1 + 


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uii 


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M 


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IV 


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V 


10 1.M 


11,1 


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■.41,17,81 


,484 


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V 








V 




IS^ 


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w 


1.44^7,15 


,488 






7,0 








»>l 


IO«.U 


[i,ii 


,80 




M1,b!7,18 


,418 






«,! 




ijj* 


W 




40B. 1 


IJ,! 


,19 




.J»,a!T,14 


,ua 




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M 








Ml 


tola. 




jn 




1J«,7,1,M 


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~»*{«^ 


ft 


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as 


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10 1.41 


11,1 


.14 


■0 


lJ1,lllJW 


AM 






M 


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11,1 


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1J0,1 8,71 


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11,0 




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1. i.P«,lS 


,114 


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"i* 


18. a 


».»i,a|.jw 




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,Mi 




H 


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." 




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90 9.10 


10,4 


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80 






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to 




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ao>. 1 


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int. 


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4.70 


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V) 


w 


IO.lt 


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I.U 


Mt.M 


*,» 


J« 


n 


1.18,1 


4jrai,il8l 


Mil. 1 


u 


M 


B. 


B.W 


»,. 


■".M 


ilToui 


0.8 


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M 


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^6 


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,341 1 


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111,8 




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■ IS. a 




1.1 




a.«i]i«.s 






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1.11 


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I.M 




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ijn 






»6 


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IV 


\fit 






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1.01,1 


g,Bp 




M 16.10 




u 




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1^ 


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^ 


1J1,0 


i,n 




MIO.)! 


n" 


V 


To 


1.31 


;;;;. 


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1.88 


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1.1*.* 


0,40 




«.».il 




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fO 




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VO 




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3.* 






13.8 


.» 








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1 HU.l 


» 


«.» 


u 


«.4» 


IM 


,87 




.19 


.4 1. O.O'l.U 


,1H 



Tk* TMt of R^firttioiu, ctnUinuti. 



• 


i 


i^ 


i^ii 


' 


<» 


i^ 


S-^ST 


« 


w 


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J» 




■ 




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; 


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if 


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fiOt 


; 


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mi 



The correction for ui iacrcMe oC aliiiude of one loch In the buoBwter, 
or for > dcprauion of one drgrce ia (he Ihermomeler, ii to be addti to thr 
tabular rer«ction ; but when Ihe barameter is loner Ihan 30 inchu, Or the 
flionnometer higher than 47 degrees, the carrecllon be came) nitrutiM- 

Vben peat lecuncy ii re qiiiied, 0,003 Inch ihouli! be deducted from Ihe 
obtetred height of the barometer, for each degree lh>t (ha thermometer near 
It, taabOTeGOdegrcM, and the »me quaintly added, for an equal ilepreiriOQ. 



Jl Tabit ofikr. Stm't ParaUar in JllHtnie. 



AllH. 


Son 


■iHor 


""•' 


p«i, 




A°UI* 


»it 


'■Uo 


™ul 


Par,, 




; 


*^ 


aM 


a"S 


'J. 


B.aa 


u 


— 


— 


t.aa 


!:i. 






UtI 










M 


».M 


a4« 
















B^ 


s.n 




4M 


^.m 


4.n 


iM 














s^ 


00 












M 






8<M 










I.Mt 




ti.tn 




M 






T.TO 






TO 


s.n 




9.M 


1.96 


a- 


■0 


1.M 


■IM 


1^ 












9.1S 






M 






IM 




Ml 


w 






1^ 






40 






«.M 


«M 




H 


o.n 




O.T» 


O.T« 




u 


tM 


Mi 


s.n 


•.I* 




N 


OJM 




d.KI 


t-M 


t* 



anvertblc Sidereal into Mean Solar Tlmo -f 9.9968106 
" Mean Solar Into Sidereal Time -j- 0.0011074 
a, at flm Equator contaiiu 1621 feel. 



183&] 



XLUfKNTfl OF TBI ECLIPSES. 



69 



EUwMmtB€ftk» 



afOU Sun of September IQih, 1838. Mean Time 
at Greenwiek, 



8okr EtopMDtt, conpaUd for ersry boar. 



7 

8 

9 

10 

II 

19 



6 il^S 

9 ' 
i 
0! 



w 



9|iiiido. 


Lathodo. 


» II 


10 


90 36.49 


+ 0.44 


93 3.90 


.43 


95 99.99 


.43 


97 56.63 


.49 


30 93.35 


.49 


39 50.06 


.41 


35 16.81 


.41 



Rifiit Aic 

1^5 h 37'.49 
45 59.13 
48 6.85 
50 91.57 
S9 36J» 
54 51.00 
57 5.79 



DeoUnaUon. 



+ 


f 51 %JB 




60 10.5 




49 19.9 




48 14.0 




47 15.7 




46 17.4 




45 19.1 



Biderod Tine, 
b. IB. see. 
11 48 49.39 
50.17 



49 



0.03 
18.89 
98.74 
38.60 
48.46 



Bomi Diam. 

i!5^.04 
.06 
.06 
.07 
.06 
.00 
.11 



Soo'B BorinoUl Pferallaz 8.54". Obliquity of Um EcUpUe 93* 97' 46.86." 

Loottr ElooMoU, for everj balf boar. 





iMgitiido. 


Latftodo. 


RifbtAae. 


DeeUmtioo. 


Eqoat. Par. 


Somi Dial 


6 


1?4 6 29.66 


+ 55^1.59 


1^4 il ^.6 


• 1 II 
+ 3 1^ 94.6 


5&M.04 


14 41JW 


90 


91 7.01 


54 0.99 


175 10 95.4 


4 19.8 


53.97 


M 


7 


35 51.39 


59 40.97 


93 96.1 


9 57 14.9 


53.91 


JO 


3D 


50 35.58 


51 19.56 


36 96.6 


50 9.8 


53 85 


Jtl 


8 t 


175 5 19.60 


40 58.79 


49 96.8 


43 4J5 


53.79 


M 


30 


90 3.98 


48 37.98 


176 9 96.9 


35 59.3 


53.79 


.18 


9 


34 48.11 


47 17.11 


IS 96.8 


98 53.0 


53.66 


.17 


30 


49 39.90 


45 56.19 


98 96.6 


91 48.3 


53.60 


.16 


10 


176 4 16.96 


44 35.99 


41 96.9 


14 49.6 


S3JA 


.15 


30 19 0.97 


43 14M 


54 95.7 


7 36.9 


53.48 


.13 


11 33 44.95 


41 53.15 


177 7 95.0 


31.0 


53.49 


.19 


30 48 98.10 


40 39.05 


90 94.9 


153 95.0 


53.36 


.11 


19 


177 3 19.10 


SO 10.90 


33 93Ji 


46 19.0 


53S3.X 


.10 



6 in LoogHoda at 8b. 44' 46.5". 6 in Rlgbt Ate. at 7b. 56^ SB.!". 



rftkB Ediptts of March 25cA, Apnl 9eA, and October 3d, 1838. 
Mean Time at Greenwich. 



Loagitoda of th« Boa 
Hoarly aiolioo in Loofitado 
Boo'a Hoiixootal Ptralbx 
Boa'a 8«iDldiain«t«r 
Mooo'a Longitude 
Hoorlv notioa boar preeading 

•' •« foUowiog 

Mooo't Latifodo 
Hoorlj BMtioa boar praeading 

" ** foilowiog 

Mooo*t Equatorial Parallax . 
HoorW TariatioD in Equat. Par. 
Mooa'i Horixontal Somi Diam. 
Uoorlj variation io Sami Diam. 



Harcb 95th, 


April 9tb, 


OciobarSd, 


9h. 44' 99.9". 


14b. 6' 99.9". 


9b. 46' 95.7". 


\4iik.6 


iS 4& 99'.9 


ite 56 ihJi 


9 48.4 


9 97.0 


9 97.8 


8.6 


8.6 


8.6 


16 9.7 


15 58.5 


16 1.1 


4 48 96.8 


199 45 99.9 


9 56 18.3 


37 41.5 
37 40.1 


30 15.0 


38 9.9 


— 46 9.9 


-36 95.1 


+ 39 0.1 


+ 3 96.6 
4- 3 97.3 


— 9 46.9 


+ 3 30.5 


61 6.0 


54 34.7 


01 99.8 


— 0.7 


•f 0.8 


— . OJt 


16 39 


I4 5Q.3 


16 43.5 


— 0J3 


+ 0.9 


— 0.1 


0. m. wo. 






11 35.70 







flidaiaal xSma 

Tbo BJgB + praflzad to tbo boorlj oMtioa of tba Hooo in Latituda, iodicatai iha if 
appioacbiag, and tba aign — tbat tba is recading ftom tba nortb pola of tba Beliptie. 



TBE 



AMERICAN ALMANAC 



PART 11. 



MISCELLANEOUS DEPARTMENT. 



I. PROaNOSTICS OF THE WEATHER. 

[la tiM AaMriean Alamnmo for 1831 thert b a tfeatiM on the *< NatamI HiMaty 
of thm Womtter,*' to wtaieh wo woold roibr Ibr tho oxpUnation of lomo tormi appliod 
to diflbioot Undo of eloadi, whieh aro fooiMt io tliu article.] 

[From " The Saloxday Magaxioe.'V] 

What is commonly called the power offoreteUing the weather, is 
only Che result of repeated observations on the comparative frequency 
with which certain effects accompany one another. If a certain final 
effect is most commonly found to be preceded by several separate, pre- 
Tioos, and subordinate ones, the comparative certainty with which we 
may anticipate that final effect, depends on the number of the precursory 
ones that may be observed. We know but little of the proximate causes 
of atmospheric phenomena ; and, whatever these causes may be, they 
act without our being able to recognize their existence at the" time, 
except by means of some other subordinate or secondary efiTecti wrought 
by them ; and he will be best able to predict the final one who has 
observed with the greatest attention, or in the greatest number of 
instances, these forerunners. It is obvious, that persons who pass 
much of their time in the open air, and whose pursuits and occupations 
are much influenced by states of the weather, are likely to observe 
with most attention all those minor effects we have alluded to ; several 
of which would not attract that of one who, for the most part, was en- 
gaged in-doors. 

Hence it is, that agriculturists, shepherds, gardeners, coachmen, but 
above all, fishermen and sailors, are so much more weather-wise than 
the mechanic or citizen; and, from the constant necessity they are 
under of studying the minutest indications, or secondary effects, of 
meteorological changes, they arrive at the power otforeteiUng future 

7 



74 PROONOSTICS OP THE WEATHER. [1838. 

ohang;efy far exceeding the landBoian's comprehension. If these per- 
sons could always explain clearly and simply the indications to which 
they trust, there is little doubt but they would be found consistent with 
the soundest philosophy, — that is, they would be found to be the 
results of repeated and unbiased observation : but a tincture of super- 
stition, and the universal passion of wishing to excite surprise by the 
manifestation of superior potoer, whether mental or bodily, a passion 
most strong in proportion to the absence of general cultivation, induces 
this class of persons either to withhold their information, or deters 
them from telling candidly and simply what it is founded on. Never- 
theless, we should not. reject rashly those precepts which at first may 
teem trivial, or even absurd, merely because they come from a suspi- 
cious source ; many old-women's prtjvAUes^ as they were conteny>ta- 
ously designated by philosophers, in the plenitude of superficial knowl- 
edge, have been since proved to be founded on the more recondite 
properties of natural sgents which had formerly escaped our oBserva- 
tion. Drawing out the fire of a scald, or burn, by holding the injured 
part to the fire, was, in the medical school of palUative treatment, stig- 
matized as especially aniie and dangerous ; the komaopaikie physician 
acknowledges the soundness of the principle, and the efficacy of its 
application. That the tvn does something more to put out thefire^ than 
merely by the liveliness of his beams withdrawing our attention from the 
grate, is now proved by chemistry, as well as the experience of ages, 
to the discomfiture of those who used to laugh at the idea. With'these, 
and numerous other instances we could mention, before our minds, 
we may listen with ske^Aicism, if we please, bat not with ridicule or 
contempt, to the signs which the fisherman or sailor points out, as 
prognoftticating conformable weather. 

In the absence of that tact, that quick prescience of atmospheric 
changes, possessed by the class of persons we have above enumerated, 
and which can only be acquired by a similar course of discipline, the 
common observer must have a barometer to aid him in forming a guess, 
whetlier he should take an umbrella or a great coat out with him, or 
whether he had not better stay at home if he is not compelled to go 
abroad, or the reverse. Undoubtedly the best and most delicate moun- 
tain barometer ought to be preferred, but, in default of the best, a good 
ordinary instrament will answer every purpose ; we most strenuously, 
however* caption any one about to purchase a new one, to eschew that 
thing called a wheel'tarometer^ which, not to be utterly worthless, must 
be belter made than we ever yet saw one made. A small column of 
mercury is acted on by every Quctuatioo in an elastic, gaseous medium ; 
and can we suppose this delicate action can take place, if we load the 
mercury with the additional task of working a clumsy piere of mech- 
anism, consUntly getting deranged, and, when in iu best trim, requir- 



183B.] -FEOoifosTics or the weatbba. 75 

in^ a force of atimospberic pressure, perhaps, nearly equivalent to the 
tenth of an inch to overcome the inertia ? 

A thermometer is less absolately necessary than the barometer; bnt 
the " curious in the weather " bad better be provided with one, for 
reasone that he may glean from many parts of this paper. The ther- 
mometer should be hung out of doors in a northern aspect, protected 
from the aun^ and as exposed to the free air as possible ; but it should 
be sheltered from the direct influence of the sky above it. 

The observer should accurately know the aspect of his dwelling, and, 
indeed, should be able, at all times and places, to recognise the quarters 
of the compass, that he may observe the directions of the wind by 
means of smoke or the clouds, and he then need not care about having 
a vane in his garden, or even in his neighborhood* 

Baromttrieal Indications of Changes in the fFeather. 

1. After a continuance of dry weather, if the barometer begins XofmU 
dawly and tUadily, rain will certainly ensue ; but if Xhe fine weather 
has been of long duration, the mercury may fall for two or three days 
before any ptraptibU change takes place, and the longer time elapses 
before the rain comes, the longer the wet weather is likely tu last. 

2. Conversely, if ailer a great deal of wet weather, with the barom- 
eter below iis mean height, the mercury begins to rise steadily and 
sUneiy, fine weather will come, though two or three wet days may first 
elapse ; and the fine weather will be the more perrAanent, in propor- 
tion to the length of time that passes before the perceptible change takes 
place. 

3. On either of the two foregoing suppositions, if the change imme- 
diately ensues on the motion of the mercury, the change will not be 
permanent. 

4. The mercury will oflen rise or fall as has been just mentioned, for 
some time before the fair or wet weather, which it prognosticates, be- 
gins ; and it will then fall or rise during the continuance of this : tliat 
is, the mercury will often appear at variance with the existing state 
of the atmosphere. Under such circumstances, the principle before 
alluded to must be borne in mind ; that the barometer only indicates 
the occurrence of some unknown change in the air, that has taken 
place, but the effect of which may, or may not, promptly follow its 
cause, owing to some modifying power that we know nothing of. 
Nevertheless, the instrument is a sure guide, when iU fluctuations are 
not very rapid and very sudden, to those who choose to interpret it 
rationally and consistently. If the barometer rise slowly and steadily 
for two days together, or more, fine weather will come, though for 
those two days it may rain incessantly, and the reverse ; but if the 



76 PEOOlfOSTICS OF THB WBATHZIU [1838. 

barometer riee for two days or more daring rain, and then on the ap- 
pearance of fine weather it begins to fall again, that fine weather will 
be very transient; and the same observation applies oonversely to wet 
weather. 

5. A sudden fall of the barometer in the Spring or Aatamn, indicates 
vnnd; in the Summer, during very hot weather, a thunder-storm may 
be expected ; in Winter, a sudden fall after frost of some continuance, 
indicates a change of wind, with a thaw and rain. But, in a continued 
frost, a rite of the mercury indicates approaching snow. 

6. When a violent gale has followed Sr sudden fall of the mercury, 
this frequently, and indeed, most commonly, begins to rise again very 
rapidly, especially about the seasons of the equinoxes ; in this case the 
gale will not last long, but the ascent of the mercury is not to be taken 
as indicative of fine weather; on the contrary, a great deal of rain may 
ensue, and the barometer will quickly begin to sink again. 

7. No rapid fluctuations of the barometer are to be interpreted as 
indicating either dry or wet weather of any continuance ; it is only the 
sZoio, steady, and continued rise or fall that is to be attended to in thie 
respect. 

8. A rise of mercury late in the Autumn, after a long continuance of 
wet and windy weather, generally indicates a change of wind to the 
■ortbern quarters, and the approach of frost. 

On Fndieations funusked by Clouds^ t/€. 

The present state of the sky and air, as regards its dryness or mois- 
ture, indicated by the kind and quantity of clouds, mists, dews, &c., 
must, of course, be taken into account when we wish to draw any con- 
clusions as to immediate changes in the weather. Our information on 
this subject is hardly less vague than on others connected with that of 
metereology generally ; the following are the principal conclusions at 
which accurate observers have arrived, but they are liable to too many 
exceptions and modifications to be taken as any thing more than gen- 
eral guides. 

1. If the sky be assumed as perfectly clear, after a continuance of 
dry weather, light streaks of cirrus appearing in it are the first indica- 
tions of approaching change. These cirri increase by the lateral addi- 
tion of others ; they descend to a .lower region, and become succes- 
sively drrO'Stratus and cumtdus, till that modification takes place which 
converts them into nimbit and rain commences. 

2. Cirrus in the sky generally results from a change of wind in those 
upper regions, and th^ direction of the filaments, of course, indicates 
that of the new current; therefore, if the cirri are directed from the 
southern or western quarters, after the wind has been in the others, the 



183B.] paoeicosTics or the wkathkh. 77 

nin may be more eertunlj anticipated, and the barometer will be 
found to be falling. 

3. It is the praTalence of dTro-straius towards the horizon, that 
canses the son to appear as if setting in a fog, n^ith that streaky effect 
which has always been thooght to indicate rain before the morning; 
and the red and crimson streaks produced in sharper, well-defined 
lines of color in the mass of such clouds at sunset, are considered 
indieative of wind and rain, or of stormy weather. 

4. In hot summer weather, the sky, during the finest days, is often 
loaded with masses of enmuhUf of clear, sharp, rounded outline, and 
brilliantly edged with light ; with such a sky no immediate change 
need be apprehended ; and towards evening these clouds disperse, 
breaking up into that intermediate modification called eirro-€umuhUy 
the smaller detached masses of which are edged with crimson and pur- 
ple tints, which, in all times, have been hailed as ominous of continued 
fine weather, and have given rise to the well-known doggrel : 

** Ad eveoing red and rooruing gny, 
WiJI Mt the tratreller on his way ; 
Bat an eveoiag gray and a moruing red, 
WiJl poor down rain on a trawJIer'a head." 

5. If, aHer such a sky as we have just described, the cumuli towards 
erening, instead of dispersing, congregate towards the horizon, and 
rise upwards with sharp outlines, and an unusual stillness and close- 
neaa is felt in the air, it is a sure sign of an approaching thunder-storm, 
and this sign will be corroborated by the barometer and electrometer. 

6. In addition to the gray evening, a greenish tinge in the sky, 
towards the horizon, is usaally a precursor of wet, and, like the dis- 
tinctness with which distant objects can be seen, arises from the modi- 
fication in the clearness and refractive powers of the air, occasioned by 
an excess of moisture. 

7. But, whatever may be their form or character, an increase of the 
clouds, particularly towards evening, may be generally taken as indi- 
oating approaching rain, because accumulated moisture in the air must 
•Tentoally return to the earth as rain. 

8. The dappled, or mottled sky, produced by the prevalence of cirro- 
cumiuhiSf when the small masees of cloud nearly melt into one another, 
is at all seasons and times of the day a sign of fine weather ; but in 
the morning, after the sun has risen, may be safely relied on as such j 
it is this sky at that time of the day which is gray in color. If the 
obaerver see such a sky; and observe the smoke to rise from the chim- 
ney straight upwards, and to a considerable height, he need hardly 
consult his barometer for a confirmation of such satisfactory prognostics. 

9. Whenever drro-slratus prevails, it forebodes rain, snow, or hail, 
according to the season ; and especially when towards evening an ez- 



78 FRoeifosTics op tbe wkather. [1838. 

tonsiTe even sheet of this cloud is spread over the greater part of the 
sky, a fall of steady rain is usually the consequence. 

10. At all seasons amo-evnitc/icj is seen in the intervals between 
showers ; its prevalence is a tolerably constant precursor of inerestaingr 
temperature ; it is a modification of this cloud which presents itaelf 
before thunder-storms, with sharp, rounded outlines, lis surface broken 
into smaller cumuli, and often of a lurid color. 

11. In wet weather, when the air is damp, cirri which appear in the 
intervals of rain are undefined in outline ; and whenever this cloud 
loses its distinct, filamentous character, and becomes feathery and aofl, 
wet may be expected. 

13. Halos round the moon are considered a tolerably certain sigm of 
rain, even when there is no apparent cloud intervening to form them. 

Indications of the Change of Weather fumi$hed by Animals, ^h:. 

• 

The peculiar feelings of uneasiness experienced by invalids, and 
indeed by many persons in perfect health, during certain states of the 
atmosphere, may fairly lead us to suppose, that animals must be also " 
influenced in a similar manner; and the regularity with which the 
functions fulfil their purpose, being in this case uncontrolled by intel- 
lectual agency, animals manifest the results of any variation in that 
regularity, by a corresponding deviation from their usual habits. Now, 
though we know nothing df the connection between atmospheric 
changes and their effects on organized bodies, we may safely and 
wisely trust to such deviations from the regular hebits of animals, as 
indicating such a cause, and as well deserving of attention, provided 
we do not suffer our judgment to be biased by any irrelevant associa- 
tions of any kind. The following few observations on the influence 
of changes in the weather on man and certain animals, have been made 
in all ages, and, therefore, may be safely taken as generally correct, 
and as illustrating this subject. 

An unusual bustle is observed among ants, bees, and wasps at their 
nests ; spiders come out of their recesses, and are seen crawling about 
at night ; flies of all kinds are more active, and sling or bile, before 
rain. When gnats fly in compact bodies in the beams of the setting 
sun, it indicates fine weather ; but if they retire under the shade of 
trees at evening, rain may be expected. Snails and slugs appear in 
greater numbers during damp weather, and, therefore, before as well 
as after rain ; and frogs are more lively and clamorous in the ponds 
and marshes at the same times. 

The habits of insectivorous birds and beasts will be modified by 
changes in the weather, according os those changes influence the 
insects which are their prey; thus swallows fly low before rain, be- 



1838.] paoeifosTics of tbb weathbr. 79 

eaoae the inteeU which they chase and capture on the wing, approach 
nearer the earth at that time. For a similar reason, bats* being obseryed 
to flit long and late in the twilight, is considered a sign of a fair day 
on the morrow, and they do so, beoanse in calm and settled weather, 
gnale, dorfoeetlee, and other insects, remain long on the wing in the 
evening. On the contrary, bats' retiring early to their haunts, shows 
that their food is not to be met with, on accoont of approaching wet ; 
and, aince thb privation excites painfal feelings in the quadruped, the 
cries of the bats, under these circumstances, have, probably, been 
regarded as a just prognostic of rain. 

It hen been observed that fish are eager in biting at flies at the sur- 
ftce of the water, and are more active, before rain, for a similar reason. 

Rooks return to their nests sooner than usual, when the grubs in the 
corn-fields bury themselves deeper in the esrth against a change : but 
why those birds' circling in the air and descending to the earth succes- 
sively in flocks, is considered as ominous of wet we know not, nor do 
we proiess to vouch for the fact 

But, besides being influenced by the abundance or scarcity of their 
fol^, modifications in the state of the air acton the lower animals, and 
induce them to titter cries, or express their pleasure or pain, in an 
unwonted manner. Asses are observed to bray more and to be mote 
irritable before wet. 

The oneasiness of pigs before a storm has been a theme of amuse- 
ment in rural life, quite long enough to attest the truth of the obser- 
vation ; and sailors expect one when porpoises and dolphins gambol at 
the surface of the sea. 

Peacocks and guinea-fowls, and many other birds, are particularly 
clamorous before rain, and the domestic cock manifests uneasiness by 
frequent crowing. 

Cattle leave off feeding, and chase one another in their paatores at 
such times. 

The vegetable kingdom furnishes abundant information on hygro- 
metrical changes in the atmosphere^ though but few facts are recorded, 
or obeervations on the subject made. The closing of the flowers of the 
Anmgmllia mrvensig on dull days, has conferred on it the name of the 
Poor Man's Weatker-glast ; and many other plants merit (he same 
title, as the Caltndula arvemsU, Tragopogon, dro. But these eflects are, 
in this case also, due to several cau^s, aoting simultaneously ; and 
since, from our limited knowledge, we cannot separate these causes so 
as lo attribute the result to the more influential one, the information 
derived from plants, like that from animals, must always be uncertain, 
and comparatively useless, though interesting, and well deserving of 
attention. 



80 AURORA BOREALIS OF JANUARY 25tH, 1837. [1836. 

IC. AURORA BOREALIS OF JANUARY 25th, 1837. 

In the American Almanac for 1837, may be seen notices [pp. 186 
and 317] of remarkable displays of the Aurora Borealis on the 17th of 
November, 1835, and the 22d of April, 1836; hot the evening of the 
25th of January, 1837, was rendered memorable for a still more mag- 
nificent exhibition of this interesting but mysterious phenomenon, it 
occurred between the hours of 6 and 12, and attracted great attention 
in various parts of the United States, and in the British Provinces of 
America. The atmosphere, in this region, was clear and still; the 
temperature very cold ; and the ground was covered with snow. The 
color was a deep red, and there was a brilliant reflection upon the 
snow, resembling the light of a distant conflagration. The corona 
which was formed near the aenith, by the converging of the stream- 
ers from all directions, doubtless surpassed in splendor any ezhibi- 
tion of the kind that has been witnessed in this country during the 
present age. The following particulars are extracted froi^ the '* Ob- 
servations " of Professor Olmsted of Yale College, publiahed in ** The 
American Journal of Science.*' 

" The 17ih of November, 1835, the 22d of April, 1836, and Uie 
25th of January, 1837, have severally been rendered memorable for the 
occurrences of the Aurora Borealis in forms and colors more magnifi- 
cent and splendid, than any other witnessed by the present generation. 
That of the 25th of January was the most magnificent of all. It re- 
sembled that of the 17th of November, 4835, in many particulars, but 
its colors were brighter and more diversified, and its oolumna arranged 
with more symmetry around the magnetic pole, supporting a canopy 
of unrivalled grandeur. 

"It cannot be doubted, that we are passing through one of those 
interesting periods when the Aurora Borealis, after haying been scarce- 
ly visible for many years, returns in unusual frequency and splendor. 
A number of such epochs are distinctly marked in history ; a full and 
learned account of which, as far down as the year 1731, may be seen 
in the celebrated work of Mairan, on the Aurora Borealis, which con- 
stitutes a separate volume of the Memoirs of the Royal Academy of 
Sciences at Paris. 

** My attention was first attracted to the Aurora as early as 6 o'clock, 
before the twilight was over. At this time, the northern sky exhibited 
a blush not unlike that of the fairest dawn. This was skirted on the 
east and west by ill-defined columns of crimson light, which moved 
slowly from north to south. At 7 o'clock these began to send up 
streamers, all of which tended, as usual, to a common focus situated 
a few degrees south and east of the. zenith. At ten mmutes past 
7 o'clock the corona was distinctly formed, embracing the Pleiades, 



183B.] AURORA BORSALI8 OF JANUARY 25tH, 1837. 81 

wliich were nearly its centre, and seemed for a €»w moments to eon- 
tiol its mysterious moTementa. By the diurnal motion, however, Uiose 
staiB soon moved to the westward ; but the common focus, or point of 
concoaxse, of all the streamers, held a filed position in the mag^netie 
meridian, and at or near the pole of the dipping needle, as was the 
ease in the similar exhibition of NoTember, 1835. At three different 
times daring the evening, the corona was dispersed, and as often 
re-formed ; but the position of its centre remsined nearly invariable 
with respect to the magnetic meridian. Meanwhile the twilight of the 
northero aky had moved slowly southward, its boundary spanning the 
firmameiit from west to east in a well-defined zone, until it left only 
a segment of the southern hemisphere, about 30 degrees in altitude. 
Thia portion of the heavens, thrown as it was into striking contrast 
with Che illuminated parts of the sky, appeared of a dark slate color, 
and exhibited the interesting spectacle of stars seeming to shine brightly 
throngh a stratum of black clouds. 

" These phenomena played off various interesting evolutions, until 
15 minutes after 10 o'clock, when suddenly the meteor rallied all its 
forces. Innumerable spindles of silvery lustre darted from the crimson 
folds oC light that hung round the sky, and all pointed towards the 
common focus; and sheets of a thin vapor, of mingled white and red, 
flowed over these, and wreathed themselves around the same point in 
wsvy folds, A nniversal stillness reigned ; and the ground itself, now 
eoTered with snow, which exhibited a delicate rosy tint, contributed to 
enhance the beauty of the scene. It will be obvious, also, to one that 
reflects upon the position of the principal constellalions, at that time, 
that a large portion of all the brightest of the fixed stars were assem- 
bled on the spoL 

" So delicate was the auroral covering, tliat the light of the stars was 
bat little obscnred by it The cluster of small stars in the head of 
Orion, when most enveloped, was still distinctly visible; and the two 
planets [Jupiter and Mars] appeared through a dense mass of red vapor, 
with seemingly augmented splendor. Mars, especially, seemed pecu- 
liarly in his element. In these various attributes of grandeur and 
beauty, the present greatly exceeded all former exhibitions of tlie au- 
rora ; but there were wanting the auroral waves, or Merry Dancers, 
which made so conspicuous a figure in the great display of November, 
1835. 

" Although the Moon [it rose about 9 o'clock] was shining in the 
east, and but little past the full, yet the distinctness of the auroral 
light seemed scarcely impaired by it. This is remarkable ; perhaps 
there is not more than one instance on record, when so splendid an 
exhibition of the aurora was witnessed in the presence of so full a 
moon. The magnetic needle was observed to undergo extraordinary 



82 AURORA BOREALIS OF JANUARY 25tH, 1837. [1838. 

flactnations. Early in the eyening the thermometer was at 20^, bat 
sunk rapidly, and at 10 o'clock was only 4® above zero, and before 
morning it fell quite to zero. The zodiacal light was at that time very 
conspicuous in the southwest, and has continued to the present time 
(March 7th| 1837,) considerably brighter than in ordinary years. 

" 1 can add nothing respecting the origin of the Aurora BoreaUs, 
except to declare my conyiction that it is not satisfactorily aeeoonted 
for by any existing theory, lo assigning it so hastily to electricity, a. 
quietus was given to all fartlier attempts at explanation, while yet even 
the presence of this agent, in any extraordinary degree, has never been 
proved Magnetism has done more : the auroral vapor is proved to 
have magnetic properties ; but still this fact gives no information 
respecting its origin. This, 1 believe, is to be sought for in a source 
extrinsic to the earth." 

The appearance of the Aurora Borealis at numerous other placee 
seems to have been very similar to its exhibition at^ew Haven, as 
above described. In Philadelphia it is stated to have '^ exceeded in 
brilliancy, distinctness, and duration, every exhibition of the kind of 
which we have any account in this latitude." The first impression 
was that the brilliant light was caused by fire. The editors of the 
'' Vermont Chronicle," at Windsor, remark, ** When our attention was 
first called, the pure mantle of snow everywhere was bright red, so 
strong was the reflection ; and we could with difficulty dispel the 
illusion that a neighbor's house was on fire.'* The following notice 
of its appearance at Dartmouth College is extracted from the " Ver- 
mont Chronicle." 

** The Aurora of the 25th was strikingly similar to that of November 
17th, 1835. On both occasions, the atmosphere was remarkably clear ; 
the air almost perfectly still, and the mercury rspidly sinking in the 
thermometer. On both evenings the display commenced with the 
appearance of crimson columns in the noithwest and east, which grad- 
ually extended to the zenith, and were succeeded by streamers of vari- 
ous hues rising from every point of the compass and forming a mag- 
nificent dome, whose centre was some 15 or 16° south of the zenith. 
On both occasions, this first scene gradually faded away, leaving but 
a faint auroral illumination above the southern horizon, and was after- 
wards succeeded by a second exhibition more active and more highly 
colored than the first. 

" On the la6t occasion, however, the sky was more deeply tinged 
with crimson than on the former, and the efiect was greatly heightened 
by the reflection of the snow, and the singular display of the moon, the 
planeU, and the most brilliant of the constellations, shining through 
an apparently dense mass of colored vapor with almost undiininished 
lustre. 



1838.] AUEORA BOftEALIB OP JANUARY 25tH, 1837. 83 

^ Oo the eveniDg of the 25tb, the indications of the Aurora were first 
Botieed aboat 15 minotes past 6, when a smalt column of deep crimson 
appeared in the northwest, accompanied hy a faint auroral light along 
the nortbern horizon. Soon another colamn appeared in the east, and 
m a lew minutes these two extended over the sky and formed a mag- 
nificent arch of colored light. At 15 minutes before 7, streamers of 
Tarioas hnes, bat mostly of a silvery, golden, or crimson tint, were 
Aootin^ ap from every point of the compass, forming a brilliant corona, 
whwe centre, at 7 o'clock, was about 3 degrees north of the Pleiades ; 
that is, on the meridian about 16 degrees south of the zenith. At 16 
minates past 7, the scene was remarkably magnificent, — a crimson and 
goMen dome, resting upon a base of burnished silver, — the reflection 
from the snow producing a most brilliant efiect. At 30 minutes past 7, 
the whole sky still illuminated^ but with diminished splendor. 

** At 8, the sky still covered with faint auroral beams, mostly white 
and slate-colored, alternatiqg. At 9, no signs of auroral action except 
a faint light over an app.irently slate-colored ground, above the south- 
ern horizon. At 10, a sudden renewal of the auroral action, — crimson 
streamers from the east, southwest, and north. 

<* At 15 minutes past 10, the scene was tlie most magnificent which 
the evening afforded. The whole sky was resplendent with the most 
brilliant colors, all rushing up and uniting in a splendid corona, whose 
centre was, at 46 minutes past 10, near the star Pollux. 

^* At II, the auroral action had nearly ceased. During the whole of 
this wonderful exhibition, there was none of that waving appearance in 
the aororal beams which distinguished the Aurora of November, lti35. 
Nor was there on the succeeding evening any renewal of the exhibi- 
tion, as on the former occasion. 

** At 15 minutes past 7, the thermometer was at 10° below zero; at 
9, 16^ below; and at 11, 19^ below zero." .At Windsor, as stated by 
the editors of the " Vermont Chronicle," the thermometer at 7 o'clock, 
on the following morning (26th of January) '* stood at 36^* below 
zero. 



III. THE METEORS OF NOVEMBER 13th, 1836. 

Thc American Almanac for 1835 contains an account of the very 
remarkable Meteoric Phenomenon which was observed throughout the 
United States on the morning of the 13th of November, 183:), by Pro- 
fessor Olmsted, whose attention has been much attracted to the subject. 
The following notice of a similar, though much less extraordinary 
*' Meteoric Shower," which occuired on the morning of the J3ih of 



84 THE METEORS OF NOVEMBKR 13tH, 1836. [1S33^ 



November, 1636, is eztraoted from a communication from Profei 
Olmsted to " The American Journal of Science." 

<* For six years in saccession» there has been observed, on or altout 
the 13th of November of each year, a remarkable exhibition of shooting 
stars, which has received the name of the <* Metearie Shower" 

** In 1831, the phenomenon was observed in the State of Ohio, and in 
the Mediterranean. In 1832, the shower appeared in a more imposing 
form, and was seen at Mocha in Arabia ; in the middle of the Atlantic 
Ocean ; near Orenburg in Russia ; and at Pernambuco in BraxiK The 
magnificent Meteoric Shower of 1833, is too well known to require the 
recital of any particulars Of the recurrence of the phenomenon at 
the corresponding period in 1834% and in 1835, evidence has been pre> 
Bented to the public in this journal [* The Journal of Science.'] 

*< I now feel authorized to assert, that the Meteoric Shower reap- 
peared on the morning of the 13th of November, 1836. Having been 
much in the habit of observing phenomena of this kind, I can truly say 
that those exhibitions of shooting stars, which have for several yeani, 
occurred on the 13th or 14th of November, are characterized by several 
peculiarities which clearly distinguish them from ordinary shootingr 
stars. Such peculiarities ^re the following : 

*' 1. The number of meteors , though exceedingly variable, is moch 
greater than usual, especially of the larger^and brighter kinds. 
** 2. An uncommonly large proportion leave luminous trains. 
" 3. The meteors, with few exceptions, all appear to proceed from a 
eammon cenire, the position of which has been in nearly the same point 
in the heavens, viz. in some part of the constellation Leo. 

" 4 The principal exhibition has, at all times and at all places^ 
occurred between midnight and sunrise, and th^ maximum fivm three 
to four o*elock, ' 

'* In all these particulars, the meteoric showers of 1834, 5, and 6, 
have resembled that of 1833; while no person, so far as I have heard, 
has observed the same combination of circumstances, on any other 
occasion within the same period. I have not supposed it necessary, in 
order to establish the identity of these later meteoric showers with that 
of 1833, that they should be of the same magnitude with that. A small 
eclipse I have considered a phenomenon of the same kind with a larger 
one ; and, conforHiably to this analogs , I have regarded an eclipse of 
the sun, first exhibiting itself as a slight indentation of the solar limb, 
but increasing in magnitude at every recurrence, until it becomes total, 
and aflerwards at each return, but partially covering the solar disk, 
until the moon pnsoes quite clear of the sun, — as affording no bad 
illustration of what probably takes place in regard to these meteoric 
showers. The fact, that the Aurora Borealis appears unusually fre- 
quent and magnificf nt for a few successive years, and then for a long 



]8Sk] THS METKORll OF IfOTKMBER IStB, 1836. 85 



is aearoely 86«n at all, wai proved by Mairan a hundred jean 
ifo* "Usere is much reaaon to tospeet a like periodic character in the 
^non in qaestion, which first arretted attention in 1831, became 
remarkable in 1832, arrived at its maztmum in 1833, and has 
MBce ^Town leas and less at each annual return. Some seem to lup- 
pose, thmt we are warranted in expecting a eimilar exhibition of meteore 
on the morning of every future anniversary ; but thie, I think, is not 
to be expected. It is perhaps more probable that its recurrence, unless 
in « mneh diminished degree, will scarcely be witnessed again by the 
present generation. The shower, however, at its late return, was more 
striking than I had anticipated ', and it must be acknowledged to be 
adv^eninroos to enter the region of prediction respecting the future 
exbibttions of a phenomenon, both whose origin and whose laws we 
so imperfectly understand.*' 

P f o fe esor Olmsted proceeds to give an account of the observations 
of the meteors which were made at Springvale, Me., Cambridge, Mass., 
YsJe College, New York, Newark, N. J., Randolph-Macon College, 
Va.y and in Newbury District, S. C. At Springvale, 253 meteors were 
coQnted; at' New York, 300; at Randolph- Macon College, 500 were 
■aid to be seen, and in Newbury District, ** an immense number." 
'* From the iccounts compared, we are led to conclude, that the meteoric 
shower increased in intensity from north to south, that of South Car- 
olina haring been the most considerable of all, so far as accounts have 
reached us." 



IV. ALIENS. 
The Law rblatino to Aliens in trc Unitxo States. 

£Tbe Ibllowiof paper containiog an abitract of tbe Law relating to Aliens, ae it 
rasardi their right of holding and ecnvefing prt^ertg in the different States of the 
Unioo, has been furnished by Mr. P. W. Chandler.] 

The Preliminary Remarks in this paper have been condensed chiefly 
from Chancellor Kent's << Commentaries on American Law." With 
respect to the statements in relation to some of the states, there is a 
possibility of error, owing to the difficulty which has been experienced 
in procuring complete sets of the Laws of all the states. It is believed, 
however, that the stotemente may be relied on as generally correct 

Prbliminart Remarks. — An alien is a person born without the 
jurisdiction of the United Stetes. There are some exceptions, however, 
to this rule, both by the English law, and by statute regulations in our 
own country. By the English law, the issue of public ministers 
abroad, and children bom abroad, of English fathers, are considered as 
natives ; but it is essential, in the latter case, that the father should go 

8 



86 ALIENS. [1838. 

and continae abroad in the character of an EngliBhman. By an act of 
Congress, it is declared, that children of parents daly naturalized under 
the laws of the United States being under the age of twenty-on* years* 
shall, if dwelling in the United States, be considered as citiaens ', and. 
by subsequent statutes, it would seem to be sufficient for the father to 
be naturalized. In regard to children of citizens of the United States 
born without the limits of this country, there is a statute, passed in 
18()3, but it refers to those only, whose parents were citizens at that 
time ; consequently the provision narrows rapidly by the lapse of time, 
and the period will soon arrive when there will be no statute regulation 
for the benefit of children born abroad, of American parents, and they 
will be obliged to resort for aid to the dormant and doubtful principles 
of the Common Law. 

An alien cannot acquire a title to real property by descent, or by any 
right created by other mere operation of law ; but he may purchase 
land or take it by devise, though he is exposed to the danger of bein^ 
devested of the fee, and of having his lands forfeited to the state, and 
if he dies, the inheritance escheats of course. He may sell land to a 
citizen, and the conveyance is good as against himself, but the pur- 
chaser takes it subject to the right of the government to seize the land. 

The better opinion is, that aliens may take a lease for years, and 
they are capable of acquirjng, holding, and transmitting movable 
property, in like manner as our own citizens, and they can bring aoits 
for the recovery and protection of that property. Even alien enemieSy 
lawfully resident in the country, may sue and be sued as in times of 
peace. An alien may take a mortgage upon real estate by way of 
security of a debt, but it is doubtful whether he may become a valid 
purchaser of the mortgaged premises sold at his instance. 

During the residence of aliens in this countryj they owe a local alle- 
giance and are equally bound with natives to obey all general laws for 
the maintenance of peace, and the preservation of order, and which do 
not relate specially to our own citizens. If they are guilty of any 
illegal act, or involved in disputes with our citizens or with each other, 
tiiey are answerable to the ordinary tribunals of the country. 

If an alien dies before he has taken any steps under the act of 
naturalization, his personal estate goes according to his will, or if he 
dies intestate, then according to the law of distribution of the state 
of his domicile at the time of his death. 

If aliens come here, with an intention to make this country their per- 
manent residence, they will have many inducements to become citizens. 
The terms upon which any alien, being a free white person, can be nat- 
uralized, are prescribed by several acts of Congress. It is required, that 
he declare on oath, before a state court, being a court of record with a 
seal and clerk, and having common law jurisdiction, or before a circuit 
or district court of the United States, or before a clerk of either of the 



L] ALISN8* 87 



aid eoarte, two yean ftt leait, before hie admiiuon, hit intention to 
m citisen, mnd to renounce his allegiance to his own soTeretgn. 
deelnrmtion need not be made, if the alien be a minor under 
twenty-on« jears of age, and shall have resided in the United States 
tbre« jvara next preceding his arrival to majority. It is sufficient to 
be iBade at the Ume of such minor's admission, and that be then de- 
eJaie on oath, and proTO to the satisfaction of the court, that for three 
veara next preceding, it was his bond fide intention to become a citizen, 
and then five years' residence, including the three years of his mi- 
BOffity, irill entitle him to admission as a citizen, on complying with the 
ot2ier requisites of the law. At the time of an alien's admission, his 
country must be at peace with the United States, and he must, before one 
of these courts, take an oath to support the Constitution of the United 
Statesy and likewise, on oath, renounce and abjure his native allegiance. 
He muaty at the time of his admission, satisfy the coutt by other proof 
than his own <lath, that he has resided five years, at least, within the 
United States, and one year, at least, within the state where the court 
is held; and if he shall have arrived after the 16th of June, 1812, his 
rendenee must have been continued for five years next preceding his 
admission, without beinnr at any time during the five years out of the 
territory of the United States. He must satisfy the court, that* during 
that time, he has behaved as a man of good moral character, is attach- 
ed to the principles of the Constitution of the United States, and well 
disposed to the good order and happiness of the same. He must, at the 
same time, renounce any title or order of nobility, if any he hath. 
The law further provides, that if any alien shall die after his declara- 
tion, and before actual admission as a citizen, his widow and children 
shall be deemed citizens. 

A person thus duly naturalized, becomes entitled to all the privileges 
and immunities of natural-born subjects, except that a residence of 
seven years is requisite to enable him to hold a seat in Congress ; and 
no person, except a natoral>born citizen, is eligible to the office of gov- 
ernor in some of the states, or to the office of President of the United 
SUtes. 

Laws op the different States. — After having given this gen- 
eral outline of the common law and of the statutes of the Federal 
goyemment affecting aliens, it will be proper to show in what re- 
spects the former is modified or controlled by the local statute regula- 
tions of the several states ; and for this purpose a brief abstract of the 
statutes of those states that have legislated on this subject will be 
given. It should be borne in mind, however, that all privileges grant* 
ed to aliens by a state, are strictly local, and they are not entitled in 
any other state, to any privileges other than those secured to them by 
the laws of that state. 



88 ALIENS. [1838. 

Maine. — Any person who has purchased real estate during aliena^fe 
and afterwards become naturalized, is entitled to hold and dispose of 
the same, in the same manner, as if he were a natural-born citizen ; 
and any alien, who files in any court of record, a declaration of his 
intention to become a citizen of the United States, and afterwards, 
before the expiration of three years, dies, not having been naturalized , 
if such alien during the three years becomes seized of any real estate, 
it descends to his heirs, or may be disposed of by will, in the same man- 
ner as if he were a citizen. 

Alienage in the widow of a citizen is no objection to her receiyin^ 
dower, nor is it any impediment to any person claiming a distributive 
share of personal estate, as issue, widow, or otherwise. 

Vermont. — By the Constitution of this state, it is proyided, that 
every person of good character who comes into the state, and setties, 
and takes an oath of allegiance to the same, may thereupon purchase, 
and by other just means acquire, hold, and transfer land, and after 
one year*s residence, become entitled to all the privileges of a natural* 
born citizen, except that he is not capable of being elected governor, 
lieutenant-governor, treasurer, councillor, or representative in assembly, 
until after two years' residence. 

Massachusetts. — The alienage of a woman does not bar her right 
of dower, excepting as to land conveyed by her husband, or taken from 
him by execution previous to February, 1813. With respect to aliens 
claiming a distributive share of personal estate, the law is the same as 
in Maine. 

On the death of an alien, administration of the estate, if there be no 
widow or next of kin in this state, is granted, of right, to the consul 
or vice-consul of the nation to which he belonged, if there be any in 
this state. 

When any person is disabled to prosecute an action in the courts 
of this commonwealth, by reason of his being an alien, subject, or citi- 
zen of any country at war with the United States, the time of the 
continuance of such war is deemed no part of the respective periods, 
limited by statute for the commencement of suits at law. 

Connecticut. — The Superior Court, on the petition of any foreigner, 
who has resided in the state at least six months, may empower such 
person to receive and hold land for all purposes, and in the same man- 
ner as if he were a natural-born citizen. 

No person who is not an inhabitant of this state, or of any of the 
United States, who comes to reside in any town in the state, gains a 
settlement in such town, unless admitted by the vote of the inhabit- 
ants, or by consent of the civil authority and selectmen of such town, 
or unless such person is appointed to, and executes, some public office. 

JV*ei0 York. — Aliens are enabled to take and hold lands in fee, and 
to sell, mortgage, and devise, but not demise or lease the same, equally, 



Aiiixns. 89 

as if the J were native citiiens ; provided that the partj liad previously 
taken an oatb, that he was a resident of, and intends always to reside ini 
the United States, and to become a citizen thereof as soon as he coald 
be naturalized, and that he had taken the incipient measures required 
by law ibr that porpose. The power to sell, assign, mortgage, and 
devise real estate, is to continue for six years from the time of taking 
the oath ; but the alien is not capable of taking or holding any lands, 
descended, devised, or conveyed to him previously to his becoming 
•och resident, and taking the oath above mentioned ; and if he dies 
within the six years, his heirs, being inhabitants of the United States, 
take by descent, equally as if he bad been a citizen. 

If an alien sells and disposes of any real estate, which he is entitled 
by law to hold and dispose of, he may take a mortgage for the purchase 
moneyy and may become a repurchaser on a sale made to enforce 
payment. 

Aliens holding real estate by virtue of these provisions, are subject 
to duties, assessments, taxes, and burdens, as if they were citizens ; 
bnt are incapable of voting at any election, or of serving on any jury 
or of holding any civil office. 

Alienage of an ancestor does not affect the inheritance ; nor is it any 
impediment to a widow's receiving dower, if she be a resident of the 
state at the time of the death of the alien. 

Eyerj devise of any interest in real property to a person, who, at the 
time of the death of the testator is an alien, not authorized by statute 
to hold real estate, is void. 

An alien who has not taken the preliminary measures to entitle him 
to naturalization, is not competent to serve as an executor. 

The limitation act, so far as it affecte alien enemies, is not in force 
during the continuance of war with their country. 

jV«i7 Jersey, — In many respects the restrainta upon aliens' holding 
real estate are entirely removed in this state. 

Pennsylvania. — Alien friends may purchase lands, tenementa, and 
hereditaments within this commonwealth, not exceeding five thousand 
acres, and may have and hold the same as fully to all intenU and pur- 
poses, as any natural-born citizen may do. They may also acquire, 
take, hold, and dispose of real estate by descent or devise, in as full 
and ample a manner, as the citizens of the state. 

Delaware, — Aliens resident in this state, having made a declaration 
according to law, of their intention to become residenta of the United 
States, are capable of holding and aliening lands ; and, on the death of 
such aliens, their lands descend and pass in the same manner, as if they 
were citizens. The kindred of such aliens, if residing in the state, 
although aliens, may take lands by the intestate law equally with citi- 
zens, but those who do not thus reside are passed by, and the efieot 
is the same as if they were dead. 

8" 



90 ALIEII6. [1838. 

On the death of an alien, his personal estate is distributed like that 
of a citizen, and it is no impediment to the kindred of an alien or other 
intestate that they are aliens. 

Marifiand. — Aliens actually residing in the state may take, hold, 
and dispose of real property as if they were citizens, provided that 
every male alien, who thus has an interest in real estate, shall, within 
one year after the acquisition of such real estate, make a declaration 
according to the laws of the United States, of his intention of becoming 
a citizen thereof, and shall, within twelve months after his being capable 
of becoming a citizen, naturalize himself. 

If such alien die within the time required for his making the declara- 
tion of becoming a citizen or of being naturalized, then his lands 
descend in the same manner as if he were a citizen ; but if it falls 
to a male descendant, he takes them on the same conditions as the 
original holder. 

The heirs of any alien holding real property, may have and hold the 
same in like manner as citizens ; but they must, if male, take it on the 
same conditions as the original holder. 

If an alien, holding lands, neglects to make the declaration or to be- 
come naturalized, all conveyances made by him are as good as if he had 
complied with the law ; and where naturalization is not obtained by 
fraud, if there be any defect in the proceedings, such defect does not 
invalidate any conveyances which the alien may have made. 

Virginia. — Alien friends who come into the state and make a decla- 
ration before some court of record, that they intend to reside therein, 
are capable of faking, holding, and disposing of lands in the same 
manner as if they were natural-born citizens ; and in case of the death 
of such aliens, their lands descend to their heirs, whether aliens or citi- 
zens, fiat the persons to whom such land is aliened or devised, or 
shall have descended, must come to reside in the state, and make 
declaration of their intention so to do within five years after such alien- 
ation, devise, or descent. 

SotOk Carolina. — In this state there are statute provisions in favor 
of aliens similar to those in New York.* 

Creorgia. — Alien friends who enroll their names in the ofiice of the 
clerk of the Superior Court of the county where they propose to reside, 
may hold, sell, and devise all kinds of personal property, and rent 
houses or lands from year to year, and have the right of suing for all 
debts, demands, or damages other than for real estate. 

When a citizen dies possessed of real estate, and leaves no heirs but 
aliens, the executor or administrator sells the property and pays over 
the proceeds to the legal representatives. 

No alien may be appointed executor or adminbtrator. 



K«nt»i CommentariM, Vol. II. p. 70. 



1838.] ALixm. 91 

Tennessee, — When any person dies intestate, without issue, and 
poseeMed of any estate, real or personal, it descends to such persons as 
are next of kin to such deceased person, and resident within the 
United States, to the perpetual exclusion of aliens, who may be re- 
lated in a nearer degfree. 

Kentuidty. — Allen friends who reside in the commonwealth two 
years, nuy, after that period, during the continuance of their residence, 
receive, hold, and para real estate' in the same manner as citizens 
may do. 

indtana. — Alien friends may hold lands, the same as citizens, by 
making a declaration, according to the laws of the United States, of 
their bond fide intention of becoming citizens thereof. 

Missouri. — Aliens residing in the United States who make a decla- 
ration of their intention to become citizens thereof, by taking the oath 
required by law, and aliens residing in tlie state, are capable of acquir- 
ing real estate by descent or purchase, and of aliening the same^ and 
are to incur like duties and liabilities thereto, as if they were citizens 
of the United Sutes. 

In OMOf lUinoiSf Miehigafif and Louisiana^ the disability of aliens to 
take, hold, and transmit real property, seems to be entirely removed. 
Bui aliens not domiciliated in any part of the United States are subject 
to pay to the last-mentioned state ten per cent, on all sums which 
may be due to them as heirs, legatees, or donees by any succession 
which may be opened in the state. 

In JVeto Yvrkf Jfew Jtrsey, Mart/land, South Carolina^ and Georgia , 
aliens may take mortgages of real estate ; and in JVew York, Virginia, 
Kenbuky, and Michigan, there are statute provisions, that, in making 
title by descent, it shall be no bar to a demandant, that any ancestor, 
through whom he derives his descent from the intestate, is or hath 
been an alien. 



In regard to marriages, aliens stand upon the same general foot- 
ing as citizens do, in all the United States. In all the states, mar- 
riage is treated by the law as a civil contract, and not as one to 
be regulated by any religious establishment or religious ceremonies. 
All religious sects, in the United States, enjoy a perfect equality, 
without i^iy distinction or priority or privilege of one over another. 
In some of the states there are legislative provisions respecting the 
mode of the celebration of marriage. But these provisions are of a 
liberal cast, and allow the ceremony to be performed by a magistrate, 
or by a minister of the religious sect or denomination to which the 
parties belong, according to their own choice. And it may be generally 
stated, that marriages contracted before a magistrate or before such a 
minister, are valid ^to all intents and purposes, whether the parties 
are citizens or aliens, without any other formalities or ceremonies than 
they themselves voluntarily choose to adopt. 



93 



THB LONDOir PSEIODICAL PRESS. 



[1638. 



V. THE LONDON PERIODICAL PRESS. 



The following information relating to the London Periodical Press, 
is derived mostly from ** The Great Metropolis," a work (bj Mr. Grant) 
published in London in October, 1836. The London Newspapers do not 
depend so much for their circulation upon regular subscribers, by the 
year, as the American Newspapers do; but they are sold chiefly by 
newsmen or newsvenders ; and the number disposed of, of the several 
papers here noticed, has been very different at different times. The 
numbers sold daily, of the daily papers, and weekly, of those which 
are published but once a week, are here stated according to the latest 
information. In August, 1836, the stamp duty on English newspapers 
was reduced from S^i. to Id, ; and there has been a corresponding re- 
duction in the price of the London daily papers, from 7d, to ^. The 
journals to which a star is prefixed, maintain Tory or conservative 
principles ; the others, Whig, liberal, or radical principles. Besides the 
principal editor, all the most considerable papers have several assistants 
or regular contributors. 

1. MoBNiNo Daily Newspapkbs. 



Name. 


Began. 


No. lold. 


Editor. 


*Tbo Times, 

*Tbe Morniog Herald, . 

Tbe Moraiiig Chronicle, • 
*Tbe Morning Post, 

The Morning Advertiier, 

The Constitutional, 


1788 
1789 
1769 
1771 
1794 
1836 


J 0,000 
7,000 
5,500 
3,000 
5,000 


Mr. Barnes. 
Mr. White. 
Mr. Black. 
Mr. Biddleston. 
Mr. Andenon. 



« The Times " has been styled " the leading journal of Europe.*' 
It is conducted with great ability and at great expense ; and it directly 
employs, one way or anotlier, nearly one hundred individuals. The 
paper is a very valuable property, estimated to be worth £250,000; its 
annual profits, for some years past, are supposed to have been between 
£20,000 and £ 30,000. It has several times changed iU political 
principles. During the ministry of Earl Grey, it was a strenuous 
advocate for the Parliamentary Reform Bill; but since 1834, it has 
maintained Tory or conservative principles. 

** The Morning Herald " supported reform during Lord Grey's ad- 
ministration ; but it is now conservative. 

*' The Morning Chronicle '* has, since Lord Melbourne last came 
into office, been the leading ministerial morning paper. 

*' The Pablic Ledger," was established in 1758, and discontinued in 
1836, and <« Tbe Ck>nsUtuUonal " was snbsUtuted in iU stead. 



1838.] 



THB LONDON PXEIODICAL PRB8I. 



93 



2. Etkivivo Daily Papxrs. 



Name. 


Began. No. iold. 

1 


Editor. 


The Globe, 

The Courier, .... 

The Son, 

•l*he SUDdard, .... 
The True Sua, .... 


18S7 
1839 


3,000 
3,000 
1,000 


Mr. Wilson. 
Mr. Hodgkina. 
Mr. Young. 
Ur. Oifford. 
Rev. Mr. Fox. 



" The Globe " has been, daring the Grey and Melbourne adminia* 
trationsy the leading ministerial evening paper. 

'* The Coarier," like the Times, has repeatedly changed its princi< 
plea. From the year 1800 to the commencement of Mr. Canning's 
ministry, it was ultra Tory in its principles; but it vindicated Mr. 
Canning against the ultra Tories ; after the death of Mr. Canning, it 
again became ultra Tory ; but since the commencement of Earl 6rey*s 
ministry, it has maintained liberal principles. It was for several years 
the acknowledged organ of the government, was much patronized by 
the clergy of the established church, and its circulation, for a consider- 
able period, averaged 10,000 copies daily ; but its circulation began to 
decline afler the peace, and it is now surpassed by the Globe and the 
Sun. 

3. WlKKLT OR SoifDAT NxWSPAI^XRf. 



Name. 


Began. 


No. aold. 


Editor. 


The Examiner, • 

The SpeeUtor, .... 

The Ailaa, • . . . 

The Obeenrer, . ... 

BelPi Life in Loodon, . 
, The Week Iv Ditpalch, 
1 •Bell'a Weeklv MeMeofer, . 

BAll*a New Weekly Meiaenger, 
1 The Sandaj Timee, 
. rrbe John Boll, .... 

•The Agn, .... 
; The Batiriat, 

1 The Neura, 

: Tho Weekly Tme Bon, 

The County Chronicle, . 
^Tlie London Weekly Journal, 

The Mark Lane Expreia, 
•The Agricalturist, 
•The Weekly Poit, 

The Patriot, .... 

The Christian Advocate, 
•The Watchman, .... 

The Court Journal, 

Tho Naval and Militarv Gazette, . 
1 *The (Jnited Service Gasette, 




1808 
1897 
1895 

1899 

1839 
1899 
1890 
1819 
1831 
1805 
1833 

1836 
1836 
1833 

1834 
1839 
1833 
1333 


3,400 
9,500 
9,500 

90,000 

31,000 

13,000 

5,000 

5,000 

4,500 

4,500 
9,500 
9,000 

1,800 
700 
1,800 
9,500 
1,500 
9,000 


Albany Fonhlaoque. 
Mr. Rmtoul. 
Robert Bell. 

Vincent DowUng . 

Mr. Smith. 

Theodore Hook. 
Mr. Weatmacott. 

1 
Mr. Lane. 

Joaiah Condor. i 
Mr. Stepheoi. 

Leman Blanehard. 
Robert M. Martin. 
Alarie A. WatU. 



" The Patriot," *• The Christian Advocate *' and " The Watchman '* 
are religions papers ; the Brst two of liberal politics ; the last, conser- 



94 



THE LONDON PERIODICAL PRE88. 



[1838. 



yative. ''The Patriot" is the organ of the Evangelical Dissenters. 
'* The Christian Advocate " was started a few years since, as the organ 
of the Wesleyan Methodists, but its politics were too liberal for them, — 
(as a body they favor Tory principles) ; and " The Watchman '* was 
set ap by them in opposition to " The Advocate." ** The County 
Chronicle," *' The Court Journal," and « The Naval and Military Ga- 
zette," take no decided part in politics. " The John Bull " once had 
a circulation of about 10,000. Its ** readers are chiefly among the 
clergy." The aggregate circulation of the daily papers is stated at 
about 40,000 ; that of the weekly 120,000 ; and in addition to these 
stamped newspapers, the circulation of unstamped papers is said to 
have amounted, for some time, to 200,000 copies weekly. 

4. Quarterly Reviews. 



Name. 


Began. 


No. aold. 


Editor. 


*UDan«rIy Review, . . . : 
liondon and WeBlraintter Review, 
Foreifn Qoarterly Review, 
British and foreign Review, . 
Dablin Review, .... 


1809 
1894 
1827 
1835 
1836 


9,000 
1,500 
1,300 


John G. Lockhart. 
Tbomae Faleoaer. 

John Kemble. 
O'Connell, Wiaemao, 
and M*Quin. 



' " The Quarterly Review," which has been successively edited by 
William Giffbrd, J. T. Coleridge, and J. G. Lockhart, has, since its 
first establishment, been the leading Tory journal of Great Britain. It 
has no fixed rate of remuneration for contributions ; but the average 
compensation is said to be the same that is paid by the " Edinburgh 
Review," viz. 20 guineas for a sheet, or 16 pages 8vo. 

** The Westminster Review,^* was begun in 1824, bj^ a number of 
gentlemen of Radical politics, who styled themselves Utilitarians, and 
it was edited by Dr. Bo wring. '* The London Review '* was started, 
in 1835, by Sir William Molesworth, M. P., as proprietor, and Mr. 
Thomas Falconer, as editor. In 1836, the two Reviews were united, 
under Mr. Falconer, as editor. The usual rate of compensation for 
contributions is stated at 16 guineas a sheet. 

The editors of " The Foreign Quarterly Review " have heretofore 
been Messrs. Gillies, Fraser, and Cochrane. It confines itself chiefly 
to foreign publications. Its principles are liberal, but moderate. 

" The British and Foreign Review " was esUblished by T. W. Beau- 
mont, M. P., as proprietor. Its principles are liberal and independent. 

« The Dublin Review " advocates the Roman Catholic Religion, and 
the political principles of Mr. Daniel 0*ConnelI. 

** The British Critic and Theological Review," a quarterly journal of 
long established reputation, is not noticed in " The Great Metropolis." 



<c 



.J THX LORD OH PEBIODICAL PRE 80. , 95 

5. MOVTHLT LiTBRART JoURHALB. 

The following are the Monthly Periodicals noticed by the author of 
The Great Metropolis *': — << Hu GemtUman^s MagMxmt " ; began in 
1733; now circulates upwards of 1,200 copies; the ^itor from its 
commencement styled << Sjlvanus Urban " : — " Tht Monthly Revitw ** ; 
established in 1749, by Mr. Griffith, and conducted by him and his 
son 76 years ; — "its circulation now limited, but select : " — <* The 
MmUhty Magazine " ; began in 1786 ; was nearly thirty years conduct- 
ed by Sir Richard Phillips, and its circulation exceeded 1,200 copies, 
now diminished: — *' Tke Eclectic Review'*; began in 1805; edited 
for many years, till the close of 1636, by Josiah Conder ; a religious and 
literary publication, supported by Dissenters ; in religion, evangelical ; 
in politics, liberal : — " The Jfew Monthly Magazine'* ; began in 1814; 
formerly edited by Thomas Campbell, now by Theodore Hook ; formerly 
had a circulation of upwards of 6,000, now much less ; but still larger 
than any other monthly : — ** Fraser's Magazine " ; began in 1830 ; 
edited by James Fraser ; circulation little short of 1,500 copies ; of ultra 
Tory principles: — ** The Metropolitan Magazine*'; began in 1831; 
edited by Captain Marryatt; circulation upwards of 1,500: — ** The 
Monthly Repository " ; began in 1806 ; was for many yeais the religious 
organ of the Unitarians ; " some years ago it came into the hands of the 
ReT. W. J. Fox, who divested it entirely of its theological character, 
and made it a purely literary and political journal " ; politics ultra-liberal ; 
now edited by Mr. Kearne ; circulation about 800 copies : — " TA« 
Lady's Magazine" ; began in 1755; circulation not large: — '* The 
Court Magazine** ; began in 1632; conducted, till near the close of 
1834, by Mrs. Norton ; circulation never more than 1,500, now less : — 
" The jSsiatie Journal** ; began in 1816; circulation about 800 copies: 
— *' 7%e United Service Journal**; began in 1829; circulation nearly 
2,500 copies ; of conservative politics : — " Alexander's East India Mag- 
axnu " ; began six or seven years since ; circulation less than 500 ; of 
(ib«nl politics. 

6. WXXKLY LiTKRARY JOURNALS. 

** The Literary OazetU ** ; began in 1816 ; edited from its commence- 
ment by Mr. Jerdan ; circulation for many years upwards of 5,000 
copies, and still large : — •* The Jithenaum** ; established 5 or 6 years 
ago by Mr. Buckingham, since purchased by Mr. Dilke ; circulation 
5,060 or 6,000 copies ; — " The Mirror " ; began 15 or 16 years ago by 
Mr. Limbird, the conductor ; circulation formerly 15,000 copies ; now 
very considerable : — ** The Penny Magazine ** ; began under the aus- 
pices of the « Society for Diffusing Useful Knowledge " ; but it is the 
property of Charles Knight, the editor; circulation heretofore nearly 



96 



THE LONDON PERIODICAL PRESS. 



[1838. 



200,000; now nearly 140,000 j rate of pay for contributions £1 \5s. 
for each page, '* perhaps the highest in periodical literature ** : — *< Tke 
Saturday Magazine " ; began in 1832, under the direction of the *' So- 
ciety for Promoting Christian Knowledge "; circulation about 60,000 ; 
rate of pay for contributions, a guinea a page. ' 



VI. PUBLICATION OF BOOKS IN ENGLAND. 

An estimate of the cost of publishing an edition of 750 copies of an 
8vo. volume of 500 pages, printed on respectable paper, to be sold by 
retail for 128. a copy ; showing what part of the cost consists of taxes ; 
as stated in the " Edinburgh Review," for June, 1831. 



Coit. 



Datj. 



Printing and Correctionfl, 
Paper^ .... 
Boardinfr, 
AdTortUiug, 



11 copies to public libraries, 

14 do. fsay) to the autbo 
795 do. for sale at 8*. 5d. 

Deduct cost, . 
Profit to author and publiiher, commia- ) 



£ «. d. 

95 6 

57 15 

15 

50 



£ ». 
905 3 
318 1 



£918 1 

d. 
5 




£ 


«. 


d. 


19 


19 


4 


4 


15 


7 


95 









£49 14 II 



flion, iiitereit on capital, dec, vken > £ 87 1 5 
all are sold, 7 



** It results from this statement that the duties amount to about one 
5th, or 20 per cent, of the cost ; and the daties may be said invariably 
to exceed all the remuneration the author can reasonably expect for 
his labor. But it is essential to bear in mind, that the preceding state- 
ment shows only how the duties affect books when the entire impres- 
sion is sold off at the full publication price. In truth and reality, 
however, this is a contingency that but seldom happens. Excluding 
pamphlets, it may, we believe, be truly affirmed, that, at an average, 
the original impression of half the books printed is hardly ever sold off, 
except at a ruinous reduction of price. It mriy be established by un- 
questionable evidence, that one book in every 4, and 49 pamphlets in 
every 50, do not pay their expenses." 

** On a late investigation into the affairs of an extensive publishing 
concern in the metropolis, it was found that of 130 works published by 
it, in a given time, 50 Had not paid their expenses. Of the 80 that did 
pay, 13 only had arrived at a second edition ; but in most instances, 
these second editions had not been profitable. In general, it may be 
estimated, that, of the books published, one-fourth do not pay their 



1838L] PUBLICATION OF BOOKS IN BNGLAND. 97 

expenses ; and that only one in 8 or 10 can be reprinted with advan- 
tm^e. As. it respects pamphlets, we know we are within the mark when 
we affirm that neC one m 50 pajs the expense of publication." 

Remark, Since the time when the above statement was published, 
the taxes on literatare in England have been reduced. On the 28th of 
June, 1833, the duty for every advertisement in a newspaper or periodi* 
cml publication, was reduced from 2s. Gd. to Is. 6^.; on the 13th of 
August, 1836, the duty on printing paper was reduced from '3d. to Hd. 
per lb. ; and on the 20th of August, 1836, so much of an Act of the 
64 GeQ. III., respecting copyrights as requires the delivery of a copy 
of every book published to the libraries of Sion College, the four Uni- 
versities of Scotland, and of the King's Inns in Dublin, was repealed. 
The libraries still entitled to a copy are those of the British Museum, 
the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, the Advocates* Library, 
Edinburgh^ and that of Trinity College, Dublin. 



VIC. INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT. 

Efforts have been recently made in France, England, and the 
North of Germany, to obtain an international copyright law, by means 
of which the authors of the several countries may have the exclusive 
right to their respective writings secured to them. 

The popular productions of English literature are published very 
extensively in the United States, and are sold here at very much lower 
prices than those at which they are sold in England. The works of 
French authors are reprinted in Belgium ; and not only that country, 
but Germany, England, and various other countries are supplied at a 
much lower rate than they can be from Paris, greatly to the injury 
of the authors. The effect of this system has been so great, according 
to M. de Balzac, that, " books which under the Restoration sold 4,000 
copies do not sell more than . 1,000 ; and of those that heretofore sold 
1,000, not more than 300 can be disposed of." It is said, " that the 
trade is so profitable, and carried on so extensively that the Belgian 
government would not dare to becon^e a party to the treaty." 

In France a Commission has been appointed consisting of Villemain 
(President,) Arago, Victor Hugo, Letronne, Rossi, Lenormand, Th^- 
nard, Dubois, Dumont, A. Didot, Gosselin, Hackette, Royer-^Collard, 
and Cav^, who have made a ** Report on the question relative to for- 
eign contrefa^OHf or spurious editions of French works," from which 
the following extracts are made. 

" A numerous committee of English writers has met with a similar 
intention and has drawn up a request to the American Congress to 
obtain a reciprocal guarantee of literary property in the two countries. 

9 



96 I.XTERNATIONAX COPrRI«HT. [1838. 

The abuse of ^uriooi editioiM, which militate against English au- 
Uiors in America, is more actively employed in £urope to the detri- 
ment of French writers. Every thing has tended to render the spoUa- 
tion as easy as it is lucrative. Establishments for producing spurious 
editions have been made beyond the frontier. The low price rendered 
possible.by their having to pay merely the expense of the materials of 
printing, has allowed them to supply all the markets of Europe; andy 
by means of the transit law, these Belgian editions traverse our territory 
to reach their markets. 

'* The Commission is of opinion that it should be enacted, that all 
wqrks foreign or French, published abroad for the first time, should not 
be allowed to be reprinted during the lifetime of the author, or a term 
regulated by law, without his consent, or that of the person to whom 
be has ceded his rightsi" 

On the 1st of February, 1637, Mr. Clay presented to the Senate of the 
United States an Address signed by 56 distinguished authors of Great 
Britain, in which they say, *' that they have long been exposed to injury, 
in their reputation and property, from the want of a law by which the 
exclusive right to their respective writings may be secured to them in 
the United States ; that, for the want of such law, deep and extensive 
injuries have of late been inflicted on their reputation and property, and 
on the interests of literature and science, which ought to constitute a 
bond of union and friendship between the United States and Great 
Britain ; — and that, deeply impressed with the conviction that the 
only firm ground of friendship between nations is a strict regard to 
«imple justice, they earnestly request the Senate of the United States 
in Congress assembled, speedily to use, in behalf of the authors of 
Oreat Britain, their power of securing to the authors the exclusive 
light of their respective writings." 

• They state that their property is injured by the fact that the profits 
arising from the sale of their works, which are reprinted in the United 
fiKates, are wholly appropriated by American booksellers, not only with- 
out the consent of the authors, but even contrary to their express 
desire ; -^ and that their reputation is liable to be injured by the mutila- 
tion or alteration of their works, while their names are retained, and 
tfaey are made responsible for works which they no longer recognize 
as their own ; — grievances under which they have, at present, no 
redress. 

They maintain that the want of such protection as they ask, is inju- 
rious to American authors, by preventing their obtaining a fair remu- 
neration for their labors ; and also to the American public, by being 
furnished with mutilated or imperfect editions, instead of the complete 
productions of the several authors. 



1838.] IRTXRHATIOIIAX. COVTRIGBT. 99 

The meiDoria] wu referred to a coinmUtee, eeneieting of Menrt. 
CUj, Preston, Buchanan, Webeter, and Ewingr of Ohio. An addreav 
firom American aoihora recommending the paaeing of rach a law has 
alio been presented. 

Literary labor generally receives bat a very moderate compensation. 
Aothori are rarely wealthy , and they have as fair a claim to hare their 
property protected as other classes of the community ; and it is for the 
iaCerest of literature and science, that they should be thus protected. 
There can be little doabt, that, if an international copyright law, jodK 
eioasly framed, were enacted and in operation, alike in Great Britain 
and the United States, securing to British authors the exclusive righf 
to their writings in the United States, and to American authors the 
ezclusive right to their writings in Great Britain, it would not only be 
in accordance with justice, but would promote the interests of litera- 
ture and science. But perhaps reviews^ journals, and ammymou$ peri" 
odieal Uteraimre generally should form an exception, and not be pro- 
tected like other literary publications. 



Vm. PRODUCTS OF THE PRESS IN GERMANY, FRANCE, 

AND ENGLAND. 

Germany. — Germany still stands preeminent in the extent of its 
book-trade. The annual value sold is estimated at £860,000 sterling; 
thirty yean ago the trade was in the hands of only 300 booksellers, of 
publishers. At present there are not less than 1,094, including ^ 
commercial houses of Switzerland, Hungary, Prussia, and its Polish 
provinces. Through the Germanic Confederation there is one book- 
shop to 93,000 souls, while in Austria there is only one to 122,222. 
The progression, as regards intelligence, is still more striking in Prus- 
sia, where there is a book-shop to every 33,899 persons : in 1830, 
there were 200, which, in 1833, had increased to 293. At least 5^ 
new book-shops have been established in different parts of Germany 
between Easter, 1832, and Easter; 1833. The number of works pub- 
lished in that country has increased in the following proportion : ill 
1827, 5,000; in 1828, 5,600; 1832, (in which year many pamphlets wefS 
published,) 6,122; in 1833, 4,635 (?) Of these, Austria furnished 290, 
Prussia, 1,058; Saxony, 1,810. Leipsic is the centre of this immense 
commerce. 

France. — If we compare the total number of works published in 
Germany from 1814 to 1820, which were 50,393, and the number pub* 
lisbed in France during the same period, which was only 16,528, it 
would not at first be imagined that the proportional increase of literary 



100 



PBODUCTfl OF THE FRKSfl. 



[1838. 



works has been much greater in the latter than the former eonntrj, but 
so it is i the aggregate amount of works was barely doubled in Ger- 
many, while in France, in 1826, the number published was 4,347, or 
four times as great as in 1814. In 1828, the French publications were 
7,6 16| a number never reached in the catalogue of the celebrated an- 
nual Leipsie fair. The fluctuations in the labors of the French press 
are to be attributed to political events. In 1811, 45 millions, and in 
1836, 144 millions of sheets were printed in France, the former number 
giving 1}, the latter 4^ sheets for each individual. 

England. — In England, including pamphlets, reprints, newspa- 
pers, magazines, &c., the value of printed works in 1833 amounted to 
£ 2,420,900 sterling. This trade is almost entirely in the hands of the 
London booksellers, of whom there are 832, nearly as many as there 
are in Germany. The division of trade in this central mart of book- 
trading is remarkable : there are booksellers who entirely devote them- 
selves to the sale of religious works, others to that of elementary works 
for instruction, and so on. Exclusive of pamphlets, reprints, and 
newspapers, the number of volumes published in England rose from 
1,105 in 1828, to 1,507 in 1833, between which periods there was an 
annual increase of about 92 or 93 volumes, caused by the rapid progress 
of ** cheap literature," which has effected a reduction in the mean 
price per work from 12ff. to 10^. 7d. — Mag. Popular Science, 

France, — The year 1835 gave birth to 177 new novels in France^ 
by 144 authors, of whom 40 were debutants and 27 females ; the most 
celebrated names^ ^Ifred de Vigny, Balzac, and George Sand : — 299 
poetical works ; most celebrated poet, Victor Hugo : — 151 dramatic 
pieces ; Eugene Scribe the most prolific writer in this department. 

It has been calculated that no less than 5,000,000 francs have been 
lost in Paris since 1830, by unsuccessful attempts to establish periodical 
works. — For. Qu. Rev, 

During the year 1836, there were printed in Paris 6,632 works,' written 
in French, English, German, Greek, Latin, Italian, Spanish, Polish, 
&c. ; besides 1,154 works of engravings and lithographs. — Gent. Mag. 

Paris J^Tewspapers. — The sale of Newspapers at Paris, is stated in 
the " Foreign Quarterly Review '* for October, 1836, as follows : — 

EttaAtte, 3,100 

. 9,fi00 

9,100 
. J,90 

1,500 
. 1,400 

1,400 



OuetU de Frmnoe, . 


9,800 


Jooraahdefl IMbaU, 


. 9,400 


CoDBtilutionnel, 


8,S00 


Courrier Frao<;ais, 


. C,300 


Tempc, 


6/JtO 



Qnotidieone 4,600 

National, 4^300 

Boo Sens, a;HW 



Journal d« Parb, . 

E!cho, •*.... 

Monitear, .... 

Imparlial 

Meaaager, 

Joaraal do Commerae, 

Fraoeo, 1,100 



IX. PRICES or U ARTICLES FOR 40 TEARS. 
[Eiuuud IhM ■ T*U* br Hr. Jaha HtjwiRl.] 



"-\M^ 


i 


i 


it 


k 


*2 


lb. 


fi 


'i 


lb. 


1 


a 


'b).i.'ii»,..ii». 


bn. 




»l. 1 lb. 


iTss la.uo'i.ou i.j« 




70( 


13 00 


18.ml' .»7 9L 






*«>'■ 


I»6 IJS.M'I.S3|l.9a 






II.OO 


18.00 '• .00 las 












i!o( 


IJ.OO 


le.floi; -00, se 


1.50 


igIoo 




1798 1 7 


'so 








1.49 






1799 10 






8.00 


7^00 : '50! 30 




IB^OO 




IMO Jtt. 






7,00 : .00 fls 








I«I 13 






K.OO ! .50 US 










i.9S.<.!31ll,U0 




iIm 




36 


1603 , 7 










49 


1B0« ' 7. 


M a.SO| 13.00 








M 




,00 6.M 10,00 










IMM ^ T 






i!9a 


19.00 






Boisias'iiioo 












90 a.a'i iD.oo 




















39 


ISIO 6 












161 1 itf. 


93 3..3a 10.00 










' iei9 .ID 










as 






10.00 










1 ills |'» 


M ' 3 M 




Kf SJiS 


°T5 


IflioO 


89 


! 18IS ' i 


:os 1:75 


11.50 


39.00 [3 00 B< 








< M(I7 H. 










i4.*5a 






'as ( 6;75 


I3.S0 


Sflisol^ 00,^ 
























'67 3-SO 














50 3.33 




ll!50 














7:7s 


13-00 


3 mi 


90 




39 






8,95 


13.00 








IB 




60 3.75 7.00 


19.00 










«tt 




SO 3.7S 


7J0 


U.O0 






1.0s 




96 






SO 3.50 


6.00 








1.0s 






m? 




























laioo 


a 5 






9Jl5 




i§» 




6i 3.93 


9.M 


H.00 


2 50 












?■ 








1 00 


18 


es 


B50 


^ 






7^ \i.ei 






t so 




so 


b!w 


ST 










isiso 




13 




10.08 


39 
















TO 




M 


*'•'"' 


i: 


84 UsT 


0!^ 


16.99 


3 


" 


"5" 


776 


Sm 


44( 


lot 


he iboTB Uble tha 


p,i 


e. u 


•Hi 


«D for B»l° 




•t> 


Udin 


tb« 



« BoaloD Commeiciil Guetis ") knd the;' iro the bighesl whalcula 
price* qaoled, and the irticlei of Ihe beat quality. 

Th* aeries of yetn embraced id Ihii Uble ue remarkable for gmt 
CMnmcrcial and polilieal chaugei. 



1C2 



PRICES OP PLOUB. 



[1838. 



X. PRICES OF FLOUR 

JH Philaddphiafar three Months of the Year^from 1796 to 1837, 

indMsine. 

[From ** The PeDosylTaDian.'*] 



Fean. 


January. 


1796 . 


#19.00 


1797 


10.00 


1798 . 


8.50 


1799 


9.50 


1800 
1801 


11.50 


1809 . 


7.00 


1803 . 


6.50 


1804 . 


7.50 


1805 


11.00 


1806 . 


7.50 


1807 


7.50 


1808 (Emb.) 


600 


1809 do. 


5.50 


1810* . 


7.75 


1811 . 


11.00 


1813 (War) 


1S.50 


18J3 do. 


11.00 


1814 do. 


9.95 


1815 do. 


8.00 


1816 


9.00 



Febroary. 



13.50 

1000 

8.50 

9.50 

11.95 

7.00 

6.50 

7.50 

13.95 

7.50 

7.50 

5.75 

7.00 

8.00 

10.50 

10.l9i 

10.00 

8.35 

8.00 

9.00 



1 
March. 


Years. 


Janoary. 


Febroary. 


March. 


$15.00 


1817 . 


• 13.50 


$ 13.75 


#14.35 


10 00 


1818 


10.00 


10.75 


10.50 


8.50 


1819 . 


900 


8.75 


6.35 


9.96 


1830 


6.00 


5.50 


5.00 


11.50 


1891 . 


4.00 


4.00 


3.75 


1899 . 


6.35 


6.35 


635 


7.00 


1893 . 


7.00 


6.75 


7.00 


6.50 


1894 


6.00 


6.00 


6.13 


7.00. 


1835 . 


4.87 


5.13 


5.13 


13.00 


1836 . 


4.75 


4.63 


4.50 


7.00 


1837 . 


5-75 


6.00 


5.75 


7.50 


18S8 


5.00 


4.87 


4.75 


5.50 


1899 . 


8.50 


8.35 


8.0O 


7.00 


1830 


463 


4.50 


4.50 


8.95 


1831 . 


6.13 


6.3S 


7.00 


10.50 


1839 


5.50 


5.50 


5.50 


9.75 


1833 . 


5.75 


5.00 


5.50 


9.50 


1834 


5.35 


5.00 


5.87 


8.00 


1835 . 


4.87 


5.00 


5.00 


7.75 


1836 


6.50 


6.63 


6.75 


8.00 


1837 . 


1100 


11. 00 





This table is said to have been carefully prepared from authentic 
data. It indicates great and sodden changes in the market, and shows, 
that notwithstanding the price of flour was unusually high in 1637, yet 
it had repeatedly been still higher within the period embraced in the 
table. 



Xf. AGE AND SIZE OF TI^EES. 

Therc is a great difference in the age that may be attained by dif- 
ferent kinds of trees. Some continue to flourish through a long series 
of ages ; nor can any definite time be assigned to them as the natural 
period of their existence. There are individual trees whose age, as 
computed by some naturalists, would carry back the commencement 
of their existence to a period anterior to the deluge ; and though we 
have no very satisfactory evidence that there are any trees now exist- 
ing of so great an age ; yet there is no physical impossibility that such 
may be the fact. 

The age of many kinds of trees may be ascertained, with some de- 
gree of accuracy, by felling them and counting the number of the con- 



• In Joly aod Aofuet, la 1810, the pf lee of floor was from $ 11.00 to % lfij)0. 



AOK AirO BIZS OF TRKKt. 103 

eentrie eireles or rings of their ttcm or trunk. Tb« ago of trees is slso 
efltimaied, while they sre standing, hy their size, appearance, and a 
Iraowledge of the laws by which their growth is regulated ; and there 
■re some old and celebrated trees, . the age of whioh is known, with 
■ame decree of accuracy, by historical documents. There are, howerer, 
b«t rery lew of the most remarkable veterans of the forest or the field, 
of which the ages can be ascertained with any precision. 

We can notice briefly only a few of the most remarkable trees. For 
&rtlier information, we would refer to the writings of Michauz and De 
CindoUe, the volume on Timber Trees in ** The Library of Entertain- 
mg Coowledge," «' The Penny Cyclopedia," and " The Gentleman's 
Magazine^" for June, 1836. The facts in this paper have been derived 
from these sources and from other works to which reference is made. 

1. ** The daks are among the patriarchs of Europe." In America 
there are no less than 29 varieties of the oak enumerated by Michaux. 
The white oak of the American forests is a much taller tree than the 
British oak ; though its timber is not so hard nor so durable. '* It is," 
says Michaux, " 70 or 80 feet high, and 6 or 7 feet in diameter ; but 
its proportions vary with the soil and climate." 

The Wallace Oak, at Ellerslie, in Scotland, 3 miles from Paisley, 
was a remarkable object at the beginning of the 14th century, and 
must be at least 700 years old. Its branches are said to have covered 
a Scotch acre of ground. Many cases of oaks of extreme old age are 
recorded, some of which have been estimated at 1,500 or 1,G00 years. 
The largest oak known in England, was called Damory's, in Dorset- 
shire, and was 68 feet in circumference. It was destroyed in 1755. 
The largest oaks now growing in England are two near Cranborne 
Lodge, Windsor ; one 38, the other 36 feet round. 

There has recently been published in the newspapers a notice of an 
oak at Ashton, England, said to be the finest in the country, which had 
been lately sold for 60 guineas, and was expected to be cut down when 
the barking season for the year (1837) should arrive. The circumfer- 
ence of Its trunk, 6 feet above tlie ground, is stated at 20 feet ; the 
length 72; the circumference at this height being 2 feet. About 30 
years since it was sold for iC 100; but a chancery suit then arose, which 
saved it from the axe. 

In Samagitia, Poland, 30 miles from Kowno, there was a famous 
oak, which was cut down in 1812. It was 38j^ French feet in circum- 
ference, and 14 in diameter. " When sawed through, iu age was 
clearly discernible, and found to be almost 600 years." — Bib, Univ, 

Aag, 1831. 

Mr. Welles, in a communication in«*Tbe New England Farmer," 
sUtes that in a lot in I>orchester, [Mass.,] given by Governor dtuugh- 
ton for the benefit of college education to I>orcheBler scholars, he meas* 



104 AGS AND 8IZB OF TftCCt. [1836. 

nred several oaks which were from 18 to 20 feet in circumlerenoe ; 
and in one of them he counted 200 rings, indicating as many yean. 

The writer of an article on ** American Forest Trees/' in " The North 
American Review/* for April, 181)7, says; — '* The largest oak, and 
indeed the largest tree which we have seen in this country, is a while 
oak, on the estate of James Wadsworth, Esq., of Geneseo, N. Y. The 
tree is from 24 to 27 feet in circumference at the smallest part of the 
trunk. Its age cannot be less than 500 years, and it must therefore have 
been a majestic tree at the time when Columbus discovered the western 
world. It appears to be still in a healthy and vigorous condition, and 
bears in its exterior no marks whatever of decay. It is by no means 
improbable that this tree exceeds in size, many both in Europe and 
elsewhere, which are recorded as of greater diameter. For, in the 
measurement of large trees, it is of great importance to ascertain at 
what part of the trunk the measurement was taken. Every one muat 
have remarked the difference between the bulk of such trees at the 
surface of the ground, and at a few feet above.*' 

2. The Feio attains a great age. The famous Anktrwyfu Fet0, near 
Staines, in England, is ulder tlian the meeting of the English barons at 
Runnymede, when they compelled King John to grant Magna Charta. 
It is 94 feet in diameter. The yews at Fountain's Abbey, in Yorkshire, 
are estimated at more than 1,200 years old ; and some at Fotheringay, 
in Scotland, have been computed at 2,500 or 2,600 years. One at 
Fortingal, in Perthshire, is said to be 56^ in circumference ; one at 
Brabourn in Kent, nearly 20 feet in. diameter ; and one at Hedsor, in 
Bucks, 27 feet in diameter. 

•3. The Umt is said to acquire a larger diameter, in a given time, 
any other European tree. There is one at Friburg, in Switzerland, 
which was planted in 1476, on the occasion of the battle of Morat ; 
aad it now has a diameter of 13 feet and % inches. 

A lime at Trons, in the Grisons, which was a celebrated plant in 
1424, existed in 1798, when it measured 51 feet in circumference. Its 
age is computed by De Candolle at 583 years. 

4. The FAm^ both of Europe and America, is a large tree, and has a 
rapid growth ', but the American elm has a more majestic appearance 
than that of Europe. The former is represented by Michaux as much 
inferior to the latter for useful purposes; yet he characterizes the 
American elm as '' the most magnificent vegetable of the temperate 
zone." One which grew at Morges, in Pays de Vaud, is mentioned 
by De Candolle, which he estimated at 335 years old ) and its trunk 
was 17 feet 7 inches in diameter, — (the foot of Pays de Vaud.) Mr. 
Btmtt mentions an elm of 30 feet in circumference, planted in the 
reign <9r Stephen ; and one near Fowick Bridge, Worcestershire, is 25 
feet round. The largest elm of Scotch growth, now nearly destroyed, 
in Teviotdale, near Roxburghe, measured, in 1796, 30 feet in girth. 



]83d.] Aes AHD 8ISI OP TrnKis. 105 

Ths Elm on Boston common is very conspicQOiM, both on aecoant 

:£ iia sitoation and size ; and it is a very beaotiful and well proportion* 

cd object. According to the statement of Mr. Welles, in " The New 

Lof land Farmer '* ; — ** it measures near the ground 23 feet, and about 

3 feet above, 20 feet in circumference." Mr. Welles mentions, that 

^ a> publication states the measurement of an elm at Hatfield, Mass., as 

34 fe^ in circumference at 2 feet from the ground, and 24 feet 8 inches 

adore, with a supposition that it is the largest tree in New England. 

Bfit 'The Gazette' of Northampton states that there are several elms 

v^eh would compete with it in that place, measuring 2t, 22, and 

rten 25 feet, and that one is said to measure 28 feet at some distance 

Som the ground/' — JV. E. Farmer. 

5. Some Cedars on Lebanon measured in 1660 by Maundrell and 
Pococke, were found to be 36^ feet in circumference ; and were com- 
pated to be then 609 years old, and about 600 years old in 1787, when 
■een by M. Labellordiere. 

6. In the Garden of Olives at Jerusalem, there are now existing 
eight OliceMf which can be proved by historical documents to have ex- 
isted anterior to the taking of Jerusalem by the Turks ; and conse- 
quently most be at least 800 years old. 

7. ^' In the island of Tenerifie there is a Dragonier f or Dracama iraeOy 
which is reputed to have lived a thousand years, and is called the 
Great Dragon, In 1402, when the island was conquered by B^than- 
eourt, it was as large and as hollow as it now is. Humboldt measured 
it in 1799, and found it to be 45 French feet in circumference a little 
above its root. This tree is called dragon's-blood, because there flows 
from its trunk, during the dog-days, a liquor of a deep red, like blood, 
which is soon condensed, and becomes dry and brittle. It is the true 
dragon's blood of the shops." — Xfouv. Diet, d'Hist, Jfat, This famous 
tree, which has been frequently visited by travellers, was destroyed by 
a storm in 1822. 

8. The Banian or Burr Tree (the Fieus Indiea) is one of the most 
curious and beautiful productions of nature. Each tree is in itself a 
grove, being composed of numerous stems or trunks which are connect- 
ed together ; some of the stems being of the size of a large tree. A cele- 
brated Banian, called the Cubbeer Burr, stands on an island in the 
Nerbuddah, near Baroach in Hindostan. It is said by the natives to be 
3.000 years old It is described by Milton in his *' Paradise Lost; " and 

*it is supposed by some to be the same that was visited by Nearchus, 
an officer of Alexander. The large trunks of this tree amount to 350 ; 
and the smaller ones exceed 3,000 ; and each of these is constantly 
Bending forth branches and hanging roots to form other trunks. The 
circumference of the whole is nearly 2,000 feet. — Clarke^ Penny Mag, 



106 ABE AlfD SIZE OP TREES. [1838. 

9. There are three celebrated Sweet- Chestnuts^ on the side of Mount 
Etna, called de* Cento CavaUi, 180 feet in circninference at the bottom 
of the trunk ; di Sania Jgatha, 70 feet; and della A'ave, 64 feet in cir- 
cumference. They must be of higrh antiquity ; but nothingr precise is 
known on this point ; &nd it is almost certain that the first mentioned 
has been, in reality, formed of five or six trunks grown together. Ac- 
cording to Brydone and Glover, this chestnut is 204 feet in circum- 
ference. 

The Tortworth Chestnut belonging to Lord Ducie, in Gloucester- 
shire, England, has been computed to be 900 years old. It measures 
50 feet in circumference 5 feet from the ground ; and the height of the 
main stem is 70 feet. 

10. The Baobab of Africa, considered by Humboldt, " the oldest 
organic monument of our planet,** is estimated by Adanson at the 
extraordinary age of 5,150 years ) and, if this is not an over-estimate* 
it must have been a tree of considerable age at the time of the deluge I 
The method adopted by Adanson for ascertaining the age of the 
baobab, was by making a deep cut in the aide of the trunk and count- 
ing the concentric rings ; and thereby ascertaining the proportion 
between the number and the part of the diameter examined and the 
whole diameter. But this method cannot insure an accurate compu- 
tation. The enormous dimensions of its trunk bear a striking dispro- 
portion to the other parts. It is not uncommon to find a trunk not 
more than 12 or 15 feet from the root to the branches, with a circum- 
ference of 75 or 78 feet. Humboldt mentions baobabs having a diame- 
ter of 30 feet. The size of the flowers is said to be in proportion to the 
size of the tree. 

11. Some Cypresses that were celebrated even in the time of the 
Moorish kings, existed in the palace- garden of Granada in 1776, and 
were supposed to be at least 800 or 900 years old. In America, accord- 
ing to Michaux, the largest stocks of the cypress are 120 feet in 
height, and from 25 to 40 feet in circumference, above the conical base, 
which, at the surface of the earth, is always three or four times as large 
as the continued diameter of the trunk. Strabo mentions a cypress in 
Persia, in girth as much as five men could span ; and he believed it to 
be as much as 2,500 years old. At Atlexo there is a cypress 76 feet in 
circumference; and one at St. Maria del Tuli, 118 feet round. The 
deciduous Cypress of Chapultepec in Mexico, said to be 117 feet 10 
inches in circumference, the younger De Candolle considers even 
older than the boabab tree above noticed. 

12. The PUuu Tree (the Piatanns Orientalis of the eastern continent, 
and the Platanus OeeidenUUit of America) commonly known in the 
Eastern States by the name of the Button-wood^ and in the Western 
States by that of the Sycamore, is celebrated in both continents for size 



k 



ld38Lj Aex AND 81 ZB or trxbs. 107 

ud majestic appearance ; bat the American species is said to possess 
1 licher foliage, and afford a deeper shade than the Asiatic. 

There is now growing in the valley of Bujukdere, near Constanti- 
sople, an immense oriental plane, 150 feet in circumference, with an 
atemal cavity of 80 feet. Pliny mentions a plane tree in Lycia, which 
^ a hollow trunk, that afforded a retreat for the night to the Roman 
BMtsQl Licinius Mutianos, with Id persons of his retinue. This inte- 
tior grotto was 75 feet in circomferenoe, and the summit of the tree 
RKmhled a small forest 

** The Sycamore {Platatau OcddetUalis)" says Mr. Flint, in his 
^ Geography of the Mississippi Valley," ** is the king of the western 
finests. It flourishes alike in eyery part of the valley that we have 
seen. It is the largest tree of onr woods, and rises in the most grace- 
iol formsy with vast spreading lateral branches, covered with bark of 
a brilliant white. A tree of this kind near Marietta, (Ohio,) measured 
15| fiset in diameter. We have seen one on the Big Miami, which we 
tfaooght still larger. Judge Tucker, of Missouri, cut off a section of a 
hollow trunk of a sycamore, and applied a roof to it, and fitted it up 
for a study. It was regularly cylindrical, and when fitted up with a 
stove and other arrange ments, made an ample and convenient apart- 
mentJ' 

A hoUow trunk of an enormous sycamore was fitted up with the 
requisite appendages and made use of at Utica, N. T., as a retail shop ; 
and it was afterwards carried to the city of New York for a show. 
The following notice of such an object, which was exhibited in the 
saloon of the American Miueum, and supposed the same that was used 
at Utica, is extracted from the New York Traveller. " A sycamore 
tree of most singular and extraordinary size has been brought to this 
city from the western part of this state. The interior is hollowed out, 
and will comfortably accommodate some 40 or 50 persons. It is splen- 
didljr furnished as a sitting-room, and contains every article of elegance 
and usefulness. It has a handsome piano, sofas, glasses, and mirrors, 
of fit and becoming style ; and is decorated with pictures and fancy 
articles/' 

13. Of the Pines of North America, Michanx describes 14 species, 
some of which grow to a great size, surpassing in height all other trees 
of the forest, and are very valuable for timber. He measured near 
Norridgewoek on the Kennebec, the trunk of a white pine felled for 
a canoe, which was 154 feet long, and 54 inches in diameter. The 
greatest height attained in tliat region, by the pine, he states at about 
180 feet. 

Mr. Douglas, a botanist, who was sent out from London, in 1825, 
to explore the northwest coast of America, mentions two species of 
pines which grow to an enormous size. One of these species, called 



108 AGS AMD SIZE OP TREES. [1838. 

the Pimts Doughusii, found on the banks of the Colambia, grows, as 
he states, to the height of 230 feet, and is upwards of 50 feet in circum- 
ference at the base. The other species, called the Pinus Lambertiana, 
was found in Northern California. * '' One specimen, which ih conse- 
quence of its having been blown down, Mr. Douglas was enabled to 
measure, was 215 feet in length, 57 feet 9 inches in circumference at 
three feet from the root, and 17 feet 5 inches at 134 feet. It is prob- 
ably the largest single mass of timber thai was ever measured by man ; 
though some of the growing specimens of the same pine were evidently 
of greater elevation.*' — Timber Trees. 

Lewis and Clark in their " Expedition,*' mention six species of firs 
or pines in the country watered by the Columbia, the largest of which 
is doubtless the same as that called Pinus Douglassi. " This species 
grows to an immense size, and is very commonly 27 feet in circum- 
ference, 6 feet above the earth's surface. They rise to the height of 
230 feet, and 120 of that height without a limb. ,We have often found 
them 36 feet in circumference. One of our party measured one and 
found it to be 42 feet in circumference, at a point beyond the reach 
of an ordinary man. This trunk for the distance of 200 feet was desti- 
tute of limbs. This tree was perfectly sound, and at a moderate calcu- 
lation, its size [height] may be estimated at 300 feet." 

14. The Mahogany^ a tree found in the West Indies and the central 
parts of America, is highly valued for its timber. It is a tree of rapid 
growth, but supposed tu be not less than 200 years in arriving at matu- 
rity ; its trunk has ofXen a diameter of 4 feet ; and the timber of a sin- 
gle tree sometimes produces ^4,000 or $5,000. The mahogany, or 
" Swietenia mahogardy is perhaps the most majestic of trees ; for 
though some rise to a great height, this tree, like the oak and the 
cedar, inspires the spectator with the strongest feelings of its firmness 
and duration. It expands into so giant a trunk, divides into so many 
massy armi<, and throws the shade of its shining green leaves, spotted 
with tufXs of pearly flowers over so vast an extent of surface, that it is 
difficult to imagine a vegetable production, combining in such a de- 
gree, the qualities of elegance and strength, of beauty and sublimity. 
A single log, imported into Liverpool, weighed nearly 7 tons ; was, in 
the first insUnce sold for £378; resold for £525; and would, had the 
dealers been certain of its quality, have been worth £ 1,000." — Timber 
Trees. 

15. The ^ppU Tree though not to be compared, especially in height, 
to the large forest trees above mentioned, sometimes grows to a con- 
siderable size. Mr. E. Hall, of Raynham, Mass., states, that there are 
two apple trees standing near his house, the circumferenee of one of 
which is 13 feet 5 inches 5 feet from the ground, and 12 feet 2 inches 
3 feet from the ground ; of the other, 12 feet 2 inches one foot from tlie 



1838.] AGE AND SIZE Or TREES. 109 

ground, and 11 feet 6 inches 3 feet from the ground ', and the reputed 
&f e 130 years. Mr. J. Ives statefl, that in Wallingford, Vt., there ia an 
3:pplB. trtty whoee circamference is 8 feet 4 inches one foot from the 
gronnd ; and about 50 yards distant from it, there is a BvUitmyX tree, 
the circamference of which is 9 feet S inches 18 inches from the 
ground ; and that the branches extend over a tract of land 5 rods in 
diameter. — JV. E. Farmer. 



XII. DISEASE AMONG THE SHELL-FISH. 

•^ OsB of the most curious phenomena of the year (1836) has been 
the fataJ effect of an epidemic disease among the moJluscoas animals 
or sbell-fiah of the Muskingum rirer, (Ohio.) It commenced in April 
and eontinued until JanCi destroying millions of that quiet, retiring 
race, which people the beds of streams. As the animal died, the valves 
of the shell opened, and, decomposition commencing, the muscular 
adheatons gave way, and the fleshy portion rose to the surface of the 
water, leaving the shell in the bed of the stream. As these dead bodies 
floated down the current, the heads of islands, masses of fixed drift- 
wood, and the shores in many places, were covered with them, taint- 
ing* the air in the vicinity with putrid effluvia. The cause of the dis- 
ease amongst the shelly race remains as much a mystery as that of 
the Asiatic cholera amongst the human family." — Dr, S. P. HUdrUh, 
Jaurmal of Sdmu. 



XIII. SELECT SCRAPS. 

1. Tht English J Scotch, and Irish, — It has been well said, I know not 
by whom, that an Englishman is never happy but when he is miserable ; 
that a Scotchman is never at home, but when he is abroad ; that an 
Irishman is never at peace but when he is at war. — The Original. 

2. Jlfon and Woman. — Man is strong ; woman is beautiful. Man is 
daring and confident; woman is diffident and unassuming. Man is 
great in action ', woman in suffering. Man shines abroad ; woman at 
home. Man talks to convince ; woman to persuade and please. Man 
has a rugged heart; woman a soft and tender one. Man prevents 
misery; woman relieves it. Man has science ; woman taste. Man has 
judgment ; woman sensibility. Man is a being of justice ; woman of 
mercy. — Sat. Mag, 

3. Source of Falsehood. — It is more from carelessness about truth, 
than from intentional lying, that there is so much falsehood in the 
world. — Dr, Johnson. 

10 



110 SELECT SCRAPS. [1838. 

4. Conversation. ~ Conversation should be pleasant without scur- 
rility, witty without affectation, free without indecency, learned with- 
out conceitedness, novel without falsehood. — Shakspeare. 

5. Education of Children. — The education of a child is principally 
derived from its own observation of the actions, the words, the voice, 
the looks, of those with whom it lives. — Bp. Jebb, 

6. Contorts of the Poor. — The poor man has his wife and children 
about him ; and what has the rich man more P He has the same enjoy- 
ment of their society, the same solicitude for their welfare, the same 
pleasure in their good qualities, improvement, and success : their con- 
nection with him is as strict and intimate, their attachment as strong, 
their gratitude as warm. I have no propensity to envy any one, least 
of all the rich and great ; but if I were disposed to this weakness, the 
subject of my envy would be a healthy young man, in full possession 
of his strengrth an4 faculties, going forth in a morning to work for his 
wife and children, or bringing them home his wages at night. — Paley. 

7. Time. — There is no saying shocks me so much, as that which I 
hear very often, that a man does not know how (o pass his time. It 
would have been but ill spoken by Methusalem in the nine hundred 
and sixty-ninth year of his life. — Cowley. 

8. Source of Cheerfulness. — No man's spirits were ever hurt by 
doing his duty. On the contrary, one good action, one temptation 
resisted and overcome, one sacrifice of desire or interest, purely for 
conscience' sake, will prove a cordial for weak and low spirits beyond 
what either indulgence, or diversion, or company can do for them. — 
Paley. 

9. The HumUe-mmded. — They who are truly humble-minded have 
no quarrels, give no ofience, contend with no one in wrath and bitter- 
ness ; still more impossible is it for them to insvU any man, under any 
circumstances. — PaUy. 



UNITED STATES. 



I. ELECTION OF PRESIDENT AND VICE-PRESIDENT. 

1. VoUm for President and VUe-Presidtnt of the United States^ for the 
13ih Presidential Term^ commencing on the ^ of March, 1837. 



1 






'S 


Votes for President. 


For Vice-President. 














1 


Sutes. 


Whole Number 
Electors. 


M. Van Burea 
W. H. Harrison. 


• 

1 

1 


• 

J! 

e 


i 

s 

s 

• 


• 

§ 

a 

1 


t 

•9 

1 


• 

1 


• 

-a 

a 

OQ 

e 

1 


MaJiM, 


10 


10 








10 








JVe«r Bantpebire, . 




7 


7, 








7 








Vermont. 






7 


7 










7 






SfaMBcbusetti, 






14 


1 




14 






14 






Rhode Island, . 






4 


4* 








4 








CoonecticQt, 






8 


8| 








8 








New York, . 






49 


49 








49 








New Jersey, 






8 


6 










8 






FeDDejIvania, . 






90 


30 








30 








Delaware, 






3 


3 










3 






Maryland, 






10 


10 












10 




Virginia, 






S3 


sa 














83 


North CareUna, 






15 


]5 








15 








Booth Carolina, . 






11 


( 






11 






11 




Georgia, . 






11 




11 










11 




Alabama, 






7 


7 








7 








Miaaiiaippi, 






4 


4 








4 








Loaisiana, 






5 


5 








5 








Tennessee, 






15 


1 


15 










15 




Kentncky, 






15 


15 










15 






Ohio, 






91 


i 91 










91 






Indiana, 






9 


' 9 










9 






Illinois, . 






5 


5; 








5 








Missouri, 






4 


4 








4 








Arkansaa, 




3 


3; 

ICTi 73 

1 


96 


14 


11 


3 








TataH, 


S91 


144 


T7 


47 


93 


Mlehifan (if counted). 


3 


3, 




14 


11 


3 








T^te/, . 


t 




294 


170! 73 


96 


147 


77 


47 * 93 1 



Michigan was not formally admitted into the Union as a State, at the 
time when the electors were chosen. Afler the votes for President 
and Vice-President were counted, by the tellers of the Senate and 



112 r.T,TED STATES. (1838. 

HoQM of RepreieDUtirei, the Froiilent of the Senala declared Hartin 
Van Buren elected Preiident of the United Statei ; and that do peraon 
had been elected Vice-Piesldenl. Tbe Senate iben proceeded to elect 
a ViceTreaideDl, and made choice of Richard M. JoIidkid, be having 
33 vatea ; aod Francia GraogeT 16. 



3. AVmter of Vota gitcn in Vit stetriU Slata in Jfovtmbtr, 1636, for 
Electors to eUa a President and VKe-PraidaU of the linked Stattt, to 
ttnefrom Oie Ath iff March, \S3,T,toAeAth of MaTch,\BAy. 





H. Van Olbara. 




H. Van 


OUien. 


Btaw. 


^^ 




Sut» 






Maine, 


15JJ3!I 


S. Carolina, No 


votobj 


people. 




ie,72al 6;a2d 


Georgia, 


28,130 


24,930 


Vermont. ' 


14,037; 20,i»91 


Alabama, 


19,l)Ce 


16,637 




33,50! 


41.09311 Miuuaippi, 


9,979 


9,fi6S 


Rhode Uland, 


2,0W 




3.G53 


3,3«3 


Conaeetieul, 


19,234 


18.466! Tenneaaee, 


26,120 




Ne«r York, 


IGC.ei5 


138,643 


Kenlncky, 


33,435 


3 


New Jeraay, 


26,347 


2(1,892 


Ohio, 


96,948 


IC 


PenniflTania, 


91,4751 67,111 


Indiana, 


32,4t:M 


4 


Delaware, 
Maryland, 


4,155 4,738 


Dliooii, 


18,097 


1 


aa,I6; 25,B52 


Missouri, 


J0,996 




Vir^nia, 


30,aei, 23,368 


Arkanaaa, 


B,400 




Nonh Carolina, 


26,9101 23,1126 


Michigan, 


7,360 




Votei for lb 


e Electora of Martin Van Bnren, 


762,H9 


Vote, for t 


w Electora of other Candidatea, 


736,736 




Majorily, . 


25,413 



Three different modea of chooaing the electora of Freaident and Vlce- 
Preiident in the different Statea, an aulfaoriied bj the Conetitntion, 
vii, b; the people by diitricta, by tha people by ft general ticket, and by 
the itate legialatuiei. The aame 6tatea bare not all aniformly adhered 
to the aame mode ; and the mode may be varied at tbe pleaaure of the 
atate legiilatnrei. At the laat election all tbe Statsa cboae their electora 
by ft general ticket, except South Carolina, in which they were choaen 
by the Legial&tnre. 

The Elector! most be ehoaen within 34 daja of the 1st Wcdoeaday 
in December, on which day they meet in Ibeir reapective Statea to 
give their votes from President and Vice-Fteaident. 

A (talement of the voles in tbe twelve preceding elections of Freai- 
denl and Vice- President of the United Stales, msy be aeen in the 
American Almanac for 1834, pp. 126, 127. 



COMMK&CX. 



113 



II. COMMERCE. 

1. Imports ahd Exports of sacb Statk. 

StaietnaU of tke Commerce of each Siate and Territory, commencing on 
the \st of October^ 1835, tmd ending on the 30fA of September, 1836. 





Valoe of tmpoi 


rts. 


Value of Export*. | 


States and 




1 








Tenitoriae. 


In Ameri- 


J In Foreign 


Total. 


Domettic 


Foreign 


Total. 




can vetaelfl. 


Tostela. 

1 




Prod nee. 


Produce. 




Maiae, 


• 760,946 


' $169,840 


$930,086 


• 836,074 


• 14,919 


• 850,986 


S. Hamp. 


63,919 


449 


64.354 


15,015 


505 


15,690 




456,846 


* 


456,846 


188,165 




188,165 


JUes. 


94,619,665 


1,061,797 


35,681,463 


5,113,196 


5,967,150 


10,380,346 


R. Island, 


559,514 


1 9,685 


555,199 


919,307 


16,193 


938,430 


Connecueat, 


458,298 


9,935 


468,163 


431,176 


7^083 


438499 


.V York, 


107,644,170 


' 10,609,946 


118,953,416 


I9,816,5d0 


9,104,118 


98,930,638 


X. Jersey, 


18,384 


5,979 


94,963 


38,769 


94,040 


69,809 


jPeoDsyWanu, 


14,179,453 


895,780 


15,068,333 


9,697,651 


1,343,904 


3,971,555 


'Delaware, 


57,739 


49,394 


107,063 


74,981 




74,981 


Maryland, 


6,190,949 


940,918 


7,131,867 


3,096,916 


646,559 


3,675,475. 


D. ofColom. 


110,575 


644 


111,419 


333,699 


3,189 


396,874 


, Virginia, 
!N. CaroUoa, 


940,806 


166,006 


1,106,814 


6,044,096 


148,019 


6,199,040 


169,964 


37,158 


197,116 


498,415 


1,436 


439,851 


S. Carolina, 


1,715,819 


1,085,549 


9,801,361 


13,489,757 


901,619 


13,684,376 


iGeorsi^ 


300,391 


979,831 


573,299 


10,791,700 


500 


10,733,9()0 


jAlalMina, 


490,994 


931,394 


651,618 


11,183,788 


378 


11,164,166 


fMisaiasippi, 


5,650 




5,650 








i Tenoeuee, 


36,015 




36,015 








I^QfUuiana, 


19,399,430 


9,718,919 


15,117,649 


39,996,565 


4,953,363 


'''^I'SS 


Ohio, 


9,969 


8,691 


10,960 


3,718 




3,718 


Florida Tor. 


55,968 


66,477 


191,745 


69,076 


9,586 


71,668 


Mich. Ter. 


501,735 


559 


502,987 


57,181 


4,050 


61,931 


MiMeoim, 


3,937 




3,997 








' T^Ud, i 


171,656,449 


18,393,593 


189,980,035 


106,916,680 


91,746,360 


196,663,040 



2. Number and Close of Vessels Built, and the 7\mnage thereof, in each 
State and Territory of the United States, for the Year ending on the 
ZOth of September, 1836. 



Bute.. 


Claai of Veeeelfl. 


I No. of 
VoMeb. 


Total 
Tonnage. 




Shipe. 


Brigi. ! Sch'n. 


Sloopa. 


Bteamb*u. 


Torn. 95thi. 


Ifaioe. . . 
New Hampehlre, 
1 Maetaehiuetta, 
' Rhode Island, 
I Connecticut, 

New York, . 

New Jeney. 

Pennsyhraaia, 

Delaware, 

Maryland. . 

D. of Colombia, 

Virginia, . 

North Carolina, 

South Carolina, 

Georgia, 

Florida, 

Miniiiippi, 

Alabama, 

Looiiiaoa, 

Keotoeky, 

Tenoeuee, 

Ohio, . . 

Miehigaii, . 

7Wa<, 


'30 

5 

34 

9 

1 
14 

9 

4 
1 


36 

10 
9 

3 

3 

9 

1 
1 


91 

9 

109 

9 

15 

54 

95 

6 

6 

95 

1 

14 

5 

1 

6 

5 

7 


5 

11 

1 

41 

47 

38 

3 

5 

9 

6 

1 

3 

1 


1 
9 

'I 

60 

1 
1 

? 

9 
9 

1 

9 

99 

1 


168 

7 

174 

8 

58 

135 

66 

74 

19 

111 

1 

83 

7 

4 

9 

10 
9 

99 
6 
9 


37,031 78 

3,730 58 

99,973 06 

1,804 16 

4,508 99 

19,993 75 

4,659 91 

10,914 86 

934 81 

9,690 49 

59 11 

1,480 84 

554 33 

480 08 

379 40 

648 46 

1,714 00 

3,196 60 

450 88 

OSS 31 


93 


65 


444 


164 


194 


890 


113,697 49 



10 



114 



UNITXD STATES. 



[1838. 



3. Exports of the Produce of tbe United States. 

Summary Statemtnt of the Value of the Exports of the Growth, Produce^ 
and Manufacture of the United States, during the Year ending on the 
20th day of September, 1836. 



The Sea. 
Fisheries — 
Dried fish, or cod fisheries 
Pickled fish, or river fisheries, (her 

rinff, shad, salmon, mackerel) 
Whale and other fish oil 
Spermaceti oil . 
Whalebone .... 
Spermaceti candles 



The Forest. 
Skins and Furs . 

Ginseng 

Products of Wood — 

Staves, shingles, boards, &c. 

Other lumber .... 

Masts and spars 

Oak bark, and other dye 

All manufactures of wood 
JVaval Stores — 

Tar, pitch, rosin, and turpentine 
Ashes — pot and pearl . 

Agriculture. 
Products of Animals — 
Beef, tallow, hides, horned cattle 
Butter and cheese 
Pork (pickl'd), bacon, lard, live hogs 
Horses and mules . 
Sheep 

Vegetable food — 

Wheat 

Flour 

Indian corn .... 
Indian meal .... 

Rye meal .... 

Rye, oats, and other small grain 
Biscuit, or ship bread 
Potatoes 

Apples 

Rice 



iTobacco .... 

Cotton 

AU other agricultural products — 

Flaxseed .... 

Hops 

Brown sugar 

Indigo 



$2,153,623 

195,188 
22.106 
68,758 

421,016 

912,376 
723,606 



699,116 

114,033 

1,383,344 

346,689 

18,548 



2,062 

3,572,599 

103,702 

621,560 

173,976 

80,492 

244,760 

43,630 

39,668 

2,548,750 



0746,464 

221,426 
1,049,466 
119,787 
187,008 
341,907 



653,662 
211,405 



4,496,673 



2,561,730 



7,431,199 



250,182 

25,886 

12,342 

1,020 



$2,666,058 



5,361,740 



9,902,929 
10.058,640 
71 ,284,925 



289,430 



183a] 



COMMERCE. 



11 



Mahdfacturbs. 
Soap and tallow candles • 

Leather, boots, and shoes . 
Household furnitnre 
Coaches and other carriages 

Hata 

Saddlery 

Wax 

Spirits from ffratn, beer, ale, A porter 
Snuff and tobacco .... 

Lead 

Linseed oil and spirits of turpentine 

Cordage 

Irtm — pig, bar, and nails . 

Castings ..... 

All manufactures of 
Spirits, from molasses . 
; Sugar, refined .... 

.'Chocolate 

Gunpowder .... 

Copper and brass .... 
Medicinal drugs 
Cotton, piece goods — 

Printed and colored 

White 

I Nankeens . . 

Twist, yam, and thread 
All other manufactures of . 



Woollens .... 
Flax and Hemp — 

Cloth and thread 

Ba^, and all manufactures of 
Wearmg apparel 
Combs ana Duttons 
Brushes, billiard tables and apparatus 
Umbrellas and parasols 
Leather and morocco skins not per lb. 
Printing presses and type 
'Fire-engines and apparatus . 
Musioalinstruments . 
Books and maps 
Paper and other stationery 
Paints and varnish 
Vinegar . . • , 
Earthen and stone ware 
Manitfaetures of GUus 

Tin, pewter, lead, marble, and stone 

Gold and silver, and gola leaf 
Gold and silver coin 
Artificial flowers and jewelry 
Molasses .... 

Trunks .... 
Brick and lime 
Domestic salt 
Articlts not enumerated — 

Manufactured 

Other articles 



Totalj 



$256,625 

1,950,795 

637 

32.765 

14,B12{ 



$478,310 
133,471 
314,046 
103,652 
244,012 

64.699 

91,676 

117,032 

435/164 

2,218 

51,910 
8,502 

78.533 

85,599 
141,873 

34,721 

165,648 

3,396 

154,928 

72,991 
112,493 



2,255,734 
1,699 

6,720 

7,385 

86,297 

75,972 

4,685 

17.345 

21,367 

12,654 

2,661 

7.174 

38,597 

44,857 

17,493 

3.634 

13,391 

46,877 

14,795 

10,907 

345,738 

16,407 

851 

6,481 

6.629 

31,943 

642,171 
807,920 

"> i 



$2,813,601 



3,097,49; 



1,350,09 
106,916,68< 



116 



UNITED STATES. 



[1838. 



4. Imports from and Exports to Forxioiv Countries. 

Tahht exhibiting the value of Imports from, and Exports to, each Foreign 
Country f during the Year ending on the 30th of Sept. 1836. 



I 
9 
3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
16 
19 
90 
91 
22 
23 
94 
95 
96 
27 
28 
99 
30 
31 



Coontriet. 



Ruuift} 

Prunia, . 

Sweden and Norway, 

Swedish West Indiu, 

DoDmark, 

Danish VVeit Indiei, 

Notherlandi, 

Dutch East Indies, 

Dutch West ladies, 

Dutch Guiana, 

Belgium, . 



England, 

Scotland, 

Ireland, . 

Gibraltar, 

Malu, 

British East Indies, 

British West Indies, 

British Guiana, . 

Honduras, 

Cape of Good Hope, 

British American Colonies, 

Other British Colonies, 

Guernsey, Jersey, &.c. . 

Hanse Towns, 

France on the Atlnntic, 

France on the Mediterranean 

French West Indies, 

French Guiana, 

Hajrti, . • 

Spain on the Atlantic, . 

32 Spain on the Mediterranean, 

33 Teneriffe, and other Canaries, 
Manilla and Philippine Islands, 

Cuba, 

Porto Rico, 

Porto^l, 

Madeira, 

Fayal and other Axores, 

Cape de Verd Islands, 

Italy, . 

Sicily, . . . , 

Trieste, 

Turkey, 

Mocha, Aden, 4tc. 

Greece, .... 

Morocco, &e. 

Mexico, . . • , 

Central Ropublie of America, 

Colombia, 

Brazil, 

Argentine Republic, 

Peru. .... 
South America, generally. 
China, .... 
Europe, generally, 
Asia, generally, 
Africa, genornlly. 
West Indies, generally, 
South Seas, 

North West Coast of America, 
63 Uncertain places. 

Total, 



34 

35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
59 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 



Value of 
Importa. 

$9,778,554 

81,301 

1,943,189 

56,414 

48,971 

1,895,369 

1,898,931 

1,477,906 

591,906 

33,471 

480,009 

75,761,713; 

9,375,899 

508,356 

945,978 

34,390 

9,954,476 

lJ285ii87 

99,019 

215,392 

98,755 

9,497,571 

93,079 

4,994,890 

34,648,281 

1,967,136 

417,335 

3,483 

1,898,019 

793,708 

1.600,781 

'903,953 

803,330 

19,734,875 

3,909,043 

975,273 

366,910 

17,374 

13,813 

1,970,946 

649,090 

1,090,099 

975,371 

39,981 

39,921 

5,615,819 

195,304 

1,696,650 

7,910,190 

1,053,503 

811,497 

155,831 

7,394,816 

945,948 

669,339 

4,460 

1,196 

17,975 

1,899 



Value of Exports. 



189,960,095 



Domestic 
Produce. 



• 326,983 

66,410 

598,983 

80,{^ 

314,268 

1,326,392 

9,498,096 

179,691 

406,458 

59,315 

1,586,995 

53,309,483 

9,349,550 

343,845 

635,198 

38,817 

989,315 

1,748,855 

105,075 

1(19,823 

86,218 

9,456,415 

9,077 

3,159,418 

17,656,692 

1,951,742 

471,997 

1,054,974 

604,999 

378,528 

91,687 

7,361 

4,601,717 

594,559 

38,335 

38,945 

7,181 

67,910 

139,473 

146,183 

1,138,431 

99,085 



1,500,639 

86,349 

393,687 

1,739,741 
969,818 
588,866 

8,538 

341,563 

949,999 

41,997 

985,408 

404,945 

T!,96&' 

38,838 



Foreign 
Produce. 



106,916,680 



$584,730 

89,558 

1,690 

971,717 

910,092 

686,479 

906^31 

67,427 

9,360 

697,135 

1,874,737 

744 

3,854 

925,177 

139,892 

435,461 

97,631 

36,015 

4,517 

194,851 



1,911,464 

604,675 

795,991 

30,173 

185,065 
46,980 

4,964 

59,679 

1,803,772 

65,899 

13,947 

17,393 

450 

8,946 

594,586 

49,714 

829,674 

534,949 

91,000 



4,540,996 
103,169 
435,.568 

1,362,195 

115,115 

355,051 

918 

853,701 

305,600 

911,390 

109,051 

59,303 

35,531 



31,746,360 



Total. 



• 911,013 

66,410 

618,541 

81,845 

585,985 

1,536,484 

3,184,575 

1,079,022 

473,885 

61,675 

3,284,060 

65,177,920 

8,350,294 

347,699 

860,375 

178,709 

794,776 

1,846,486 

105,075 

145,838 

90,735 

3,651,966 

9,077 

4,363,893 

18,961,367 

9,677,733 

509,100 

1,940,039 
651,909 
978,588 
95,951 
60,033 
6,405,469 1 
660,458' 
51,589 
56,338, 
7,631' 
75,456 
664,059 
195,897 ; 
1,968,105 
634,034 
91,000 



6,041,635 
189,516 
899,955 

3,094,996 

384,933 

037,917 

918 

8,538 

1,194,964 
949,999 
347,537 
406,798 
513,906 
136,571 
64,369 



196,663,040 



?838.] 



COMUSRCS. 



117 



5. Valve of divferkitt Articles Imported. 

Value of different Articles of Merchandise Imported into the United States 
during the Year ending September 20th, 1836. 



S|wci«i of Merehaodiio. 



FasB or Dvrr. 
Articles imported for the bse of 

the United States 
jSrticUs spedaUy impwted for tn- 
eorporated Pml. Societus^ ^c, 
PfailoBophieal apparatai| &c. 
Books, maps, and charts 
fitatoarj, busts, casts, aod spe- 
cimens of scalpture 
Paintings, drawing, etchings, 
aod enj^vinfs . 
Cabinets oiinedals and eoUeetions 

ofaotiqnitT 
Specimens or botany 
Models aod invent, of machinery 
Anatomical preparations 
Antimony, regalus of . 
Lapis calaminaris, Uxtenegue, 

spelter or zinc 
Bnrr stones, un wrought 
Brimstone and salphar 
Bark, of the cork-tree 
Clay, nnwTOU|;ht 
Rafs of any kmd of cloth 
Undressed fars of all kinds 
Hide* aod skins, raw 
Plaster of Paris 

BariIJa 

;Wood, dje .... 
Uamanunetured mahogany 
Animals for breed \ 

All other 
Old pewter .... 
Tin in piss and bars » 

Plates and sheeta 
Brass in pigs and bars 

Old ... . 
Coj^r in pigs and bars 

in plates for sheathing ships 
for the use of the mint 
Old, fit for re-man ofaeture 
Bnliion, Gold 
Silver 
Specie, Gold . . 

Silver .... 
Teas from jndia, China, Ace. 

Cofiee 

Cocoa 



FraiU, 



Spices, 



' Almonds 

Currants 
. Prunes 
' Fip . 

Raisins in jars 8b boxes 
, Raisins, all other 
' Mace ... 

Nutmegs 

Cinnamon 

Cloves 

BlaelK pepper . 

Pimento 

Cassia, 

Ginger 



Valae. 



• a,389 



3,596 
33,990 

859 

6,987 

244 

16,033 

654 

144 

38,875 

303,532 

31,403 

130,017 

8,850 

8,825 

707,011 

646,623 

3,511,463 

129,114 

144,349 

309,890 

591,106 

41,438 

151,228 

9,463 

319,255 

1,403,553 

3,023 

3,910 

735,988 

1,016,132 

13,405 

139,103 

1,913,137 

318,350 

5,318,725 

5,850,669 

5,341,506 

9,653,053 

943,216 

414,641 

91,096 

63,124 

1.35,072 

680,039 

468,974 

29,964 

279,960 

17,064 

22,180 

217,347 

314,976 

109,203 

97,345 



Species of Merchandise. 

Camphor ', i ', 7' 

Silks, other than India, vis. 
Lace veils, shawls, shades, 8te. 
Other manufactures of 
Manufactures of silk and worsted 
Oamlots of goat's or camePs hair, 

as cashmere of Thibet 
Worsted stuff goods . . 
Linens, bleached and unbleached 
Ticklenburgs, Osnaburgs, and 

burlaps .... 
^'^lioeting, brown and white 
Bolting cloth 

Wool, not exceeding 8 ets. per lb. 
Quicksilver .... 

Opium 

Crude saltpetre 
All other articles 

Total, 

MSMCHAITDIIB PATIRO DUTISS 
A.D VALOKXM. 

Manttfiutures qf Wool — 

Cloths and eassimerea « 

Merino shawls 

Blankets not above 75 eta. each 
abovp 75 cents each 

Hosiery, gloves, mitts, bindings 

Other manufactures of wool 

Woollen yarn . 

Worsted yam 
ManvfaetMTU of Ootten— 

Dyed, printed, or colored « 

White ... 

Hosiery, gloves, mitts, bindings 

Twist, yam, or throaa 

Nankeens .... 

Other mannfltetnres of eotton 
SUkaJrom htd&a, CSUna, ^c. 

Piece goods .... 

Sewing silk 
Do. fhim other places 
Laee — thread and cotton 
Fiaxen goods -^ 

Dyed and colored linen, checks 

Other manufactures of 
Hempen goods •— 

Sail duck ^ . 

Other manufkctores of 
HlUa and bonnet* — 

Leghorn, chip, straw, or grass 
nats, &c. . . • 

Pkir, wool, and leather 
MoKuPe ofiron,or iron and *Ud — 

Side-arms, 

Fire-arms, not specified 

Drawing-knives . • 

Cutting-knives . . 

Hatchets, axes, and adzes 

Socket-chisels 

Steelyards and sealebearos 



Valne. 



$55,369 

974,857 

10,357,039 

3,171,093 

386,450 
6,669,319 
8;371,813 

399,194 
555,141 
80,598 
806,370 
140,554 
469,696 
516j605 
8,257,809 



192,056,481 



•8,096,382 

19,127 

963,832 

1,413,990 

700,630 

713,757 

812 

911,804 

12,199,900 

2,766,787 

1,358,606 

595,290 

98,348 

974,074 

1,747,106 

83,549 

699,633 

1,457,449 

539,143 
503,537 

662,658 
54,459 



609,019 
24,229 

35,156 
623,150 
92,406 
7,431 
16,837 
29,179 
42,082 



118 



UNITED STATES. 



[183^ 



Spedei of MercbandiM. 



Warai, < 



Vieei 

Sickle* or reaping-hooki 
Scfthei 

Spadei and shoTola 
Souaret of iroa 
Wood icrewi 
Other artielei . 
MamifaetMrtt t^f— 
Copper 

Braat .... 
Tin .... 
Powter 
Lead 

Wood ~- cabinet ware 
Other article! 
Leather 
Marble 
Gold and siWer, prociooe stonef, 

tet or otbernrite 
Watchei and parti of watches 
r Cut, and not ipecified 
GlaM- ) Plain and other 
ware, j Other articles of, paying 
( a daty of 20 per cent, 
f China and porcelain 
Earthen and stone 
Plated not specified 
Gilt . 
Japanned 
Sodffisry — 
Common, tinned and japanned 
Plated, brass, and polished 
Coseh and harness farnitnre 
Carriages and parts of carriages 
Slates of all kinds 
Q,uills, prepared 
Black-lead pencils 
Paper hangings . • 

Rair-clotb and hair^eating 
Brashes of all kinds 
Copper bottoms 
Sheet ajid rolled brass 
Silver or plated ware . 
Raw silk .... 
Indigo .... 
Wool, unmanufactured, exceed- 
ing 8 cents per pound . 
Articles not enumerated, 5 per et. 
Do. 10 do. 

Do. 12 

Do. 12^ 

Do. 15 

Do. 90 

Do. S5 

Do. 30 

Do. 35 

Do. 40 

Do. 60 



Value. 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



7Vta2, 



Mbkchardise FATiiro BPECiric 
DuTias. 

Flannels 

Bockings and baizes 
CorpttxHSB — 

BruMeis, Wilton, h. treble ingr. 

Other ingrained and Venetian 



% 49,946 
.9,709 
95,871 
24,367 
13,361 
161,769 
5,870,240 

159,705 

608,392 

49,483 

64,333 

4,313 

112,395 

Sa5,520 

1,046,060 

37,541 

539,075 

1,239,568 

65,953 

155,617 

I 

396,537 

284,673, 

2,424,514 

555,424 

194,254 

80,601 

191,566 

408,561 

26,433 

5,564 

149,462 

13,009 

6,755 

113,516 

67,895 

61,105 

17,046 

1,394 

7,051 

37,507 

1,113,577 

463,756 

65,705 

11,263 

10,536 

332,215 

1,723,164 

53,013 

1,600,461 

94,363 

4,213 

1,463 

384,243 



Species of Merchandise. 



Valoe. 



$59,343,388 



$306,952 
168,760 

614,712 
449,943 



Floor cloth, patent, printed, or 
painted .... 

Oil cloth, other than patent floor 
cloth .... 

Cotton bagging 

FftMSf — 

Madeira, in casks and bottles 
Sherry, do. do. 

Sicily, do. do. 

Red, of France, in casks 
Other of France, do. 
Of France, in bottles and cases 
Red, of Spain snd Austria, in 

casks .... 

Other of Spain, Austria, Ger- 
many, and the Mediterranean 
in casks .... 
Of other countries, in casks 
Do. in bottles 

S^inla — From grain 
From other materials 

Mulasies 

Vinegar .... 

Beer, ule, and porter in casks 
Do. in bottles 

oa — 

Foreign fishing, Spermaceti 
Whale and other fish 

Olive, in casks 

Castor .... 

Linseed .... 

Rapcsoed .... 
Teas from other places than Chins 

and ladia .... 
Chocolate .... 
Sajror — Brown 

White, clayed, or powdered 

Loaf . . ; . 

Candy .... 

Other refined 

Syrup of sugar-cane 
Cayenne pepper 
Candies — Wax, and Spermaceti 

Tallow .... 

Cheese .... 

Soap 

Tallow .... 

Urd 

Beef and pork 

Bacon 

Butter 

Saltpetre .... 

Vitrei, oil of 
SaUa — Epsom 

Glauber .... 
TobaecOf mon^/actered — 

Snufl!' . . . 

Cigars .... 

Other than snuff and etgara 

Cotton 

Gunpowder .... 
Bristles . • . . . 

Gloe 

Oekre — Dry .... 

In oil .... 

Red and white lead 
VVhtting and Paris white 
Litharge ..... 



$96,03^ 

19,80-' 
l,701,4oJ 

436,94] 
435,805 
S07,64tJ 
436,46S 
300,234 
1,191,077 

44,356 



739,104 
440,781 
49,.'>8.3 
378,611 
1,538,770 
4,077,312' 
21,131 I 
2,105 
176,477, 



93 
588 

173,416 
730 

535,036 
181 

1,305 
765 
11,693,699 
890,805 
47 
96 
49 
92 
95 
1,186 
5,425 
93,796 
43,071 
8,634 
27,631 
4,326 
16,344 
90,670 
83, 
43| 
86 
103 



4,980 

1,058,857 

275 

255,312 

21,088 

216,034, 

591 

94,816* 

773. 

62,237! 

1,0451 

131' 



:338.] 



COMMXECI. 



119 



of MerehaadiM; 



-^u of Ixmd . • * 

L^ — Pigy b«r, and sheet . 

Sbot 

OU and senip . 
C^dage — Cables and tarred 

Ustarred and jam 
Twiae, packthread, ke. 
C«rlu ..... 

Cffper — Roda and bolta 

S'&ib . . . . • 
Fre-grms — Muiketa . 

Eiiea 

Wiie, cap or bouoet . 

Ina and steel wire, not above 

No. 14 • . . • 
De. abore No. 14 

Tadta^ trad», and migt — 

Xoc exceeding 16 oz. per thoua. 

Exeeedios 16 ox. per tboasand 
t9n — Nails 

Spikea .... 

Cables and chains, or parta of 

Mill-sews .... 

Aocbors .... 

Anvils .... 

Blacksmiths' hammers, &g. 
> Castings, vessels of 
' CastioipB, all other 

Roond iron, as braziers' rods of 
^16 to 8-16 diameter 

Nail or spike rods, or nail plates, 
slit, rolled, or bammenMl 

Bend iron, scroll iron, or case* 
ment rods, slit or hammered 
! Sheet and hoop 

I R«» 

Old and scrap . 
I Bar, maonfaetored by rolling 

Bar, muHiiactnred otherwise 
pteel ... 

Hemp . . . • 
Aiam ■ . • 

Copperas 
Wheat flour 
Salt . . > • 



Coal 

Wheat . 
Osu 
Potatoes 



Valae. 



35,283 

635 

1,603 

83,561 

5,964 

168,739 

67,670 

944 

806 

53,617 

1,410 

1,394 

31,582 
31,272 

2,216 

698 

106,283 

15,804 

139,731 

13,936 

13,007 

99,283 

9,282 

33,414 

44,211 

91,764 

1,301 

5 

325,676 

272,978 

28,224 

8,131,828 

1,891,214 

686,141 

615,558 

1,877 

189 

62,341 

724,597 

244,995 

493,159 

63,346 

31,614 



Bpeeias of Merchandise. 



Paper — Folio and quarto post 

Foolscap, drawing, and writing 

Printing, copper-plate, dte. 

Bheathing, binders', wrapping, 
and box boards 

All other .... 
Bo9k» — printed previoos to 1775 

la other languages than Eng 
lish, Latin, and Greek 

In Greek and Latin, bound 
Do. unbound 

All other, bound 
Do. unbound 
Apothecaries' vials and bottles, 

not exceeding 6 oz. each 
Apothecaries' vials, exceeding 6, 

and not exceeding 16 os. each 
Perfumery and fancy visli and 

bottles, not exceeding 4 os. each 
Perfumery and fancy visis and 

bottles, above 4 and not above 

16 oz. each 
Demijohns .... 

Glaa* BoUUs — 

Black, not above 1 quart 

Exceeding 1 qoart 
Window QUua — 

Not exceeding 8 by 10 inches 

Exceeding 8 by 10, and not ex- 
ceeding 10 by 12 inches 

Exceeding 10 by 12 inches 
Flah — Dried and smoked . 

Salmon .... 

Mackerel .... 

All other .... 
Shoes and Sippert — silk 

Prnnelk), nankeens, lie. 

Leather, kid, and morocco, Ac 

Children's .... 
Boots and bootees 
Playing cards .... 
Fells, or hat bodies, wholly or 

partly of wool . 



Value. 



Total vabu, papng meeifie dnHu 
Do, " autioa ad vol. 

Do, fru of duijf 



Total vabu 



• 31,793 

104,935 
539 

1,588 
33,856 
11,741 

99,310 

5,838 

4,756 

58,095 

93,747 

1,105 

191 

1,854 



58 

93,298 

859,554 
580 

15,433 

17,933 

155,394 

12,178 

35,884 

36,470 

30,774 

7,049 

804 

45,996 

1,995 

9,866 

68 

406 

38,580,166 
59,:M3,388 
92,056,481 

189,980,035 



New York, 
Boston, 
Philadelphia^ 
New Orleans, 
New Bedford, 
BalUmorei 



6. TOKIIAOB OF THE PuillCIPAL DISTRICTS, 

September 30tA, 1836. 



Tonnage. 
404^4 
226,779 
91,905 
81,710 
81,252 
62,365 



Tonnage. 
Portland, 57.366 

Penobscot, 53,207 
New London, 39,147 
Bath, 42,296 

Waldoboroogh, 38,546 
Salem, 33,025 



Barnstable, 

Nantucket, 

Belfast, 

Plymouth, 

Newburyport, 

Portsmouth, 



Tonnage. 
30,278 
30,010 
29,893 
23,922 
22,264 
20,791 



120 UNITED 8TATC9. [1838. 

III. TOBACCO TRADE. 

* 

[From the " National GazeOe,*' Octolrar 6tb, 1836.] 

It was desired by several of our friends who are largely interested in 
the trade of Tobacco, that we should endeavor to obtain and forward to 
them a statement of the exports of that article, and of its various kinds, 
viz. Ohio, Kentucky, Maryland, and Virginia, for a series of 15 or 20 
years, to enable them to form some opinion as to the probable increase 
or falling off of the consumption of Tobacco, and of the particular de- 
scription increased or diminished in consumption in particular coun- 
tries. Such a statement would not only be highly useful to dealers, 
but also to planters ; but there are no data from which it can be com- 
piled, as the records of exports seldom or never designate the descrip- 
tion of tobacco exported. In the course of our efforts to obtain the 
desired information, we became possessed of all the facts relating to 
the growth and exportation of tobacco which are to be obtained from 
the records of our own country and the published documents of others, 
so far as they were accessible. 

A letter of the Governor and ([Council of Virginia, dated James* City, 
January 20th,* 1622, says, ** that there was not above G0,000 pounds 
made in the colony; " but in 1639, only 17 years afler wards, the Grand 
Assembly passed a law which recites, that, " Whereas, the excessive 
quantity of tobacco of late years planted in the colony has debased the 
quality," and enacts, " that all the tobacco planted this present year, 
and the two succeeding years, in the colony of Virginia, be absolutely 
destroyed and burned, excepting and reserving so much in equal pro- 
portion to each planter, as shall make in the whole just the quantity 
of 120,000 lbs. of tobacco, stripped and smoothed, &c. In consideration 
whereof, the creditors of the planters were compelled to ** accept and 
receive 40 lbs. of tobacco so stripped and smoothed, in full satisfaction 
of every 100 lbs. now due them." It is not important to ascertain 
whether this law was reenacted at the end of the 3 years named in it ; 
for we find in an official report to the commissioners, that the yearly 
exports of tobacco for ten years ending in 1709, were 28,858,666 lbs., 
of which 11,260,659 lbs. were annually consumed in Great Britain, and 
17,598,007 lbs. in other countries of Europe. In 1744 — 1776, the 
average annual exportation was 40,000,000 lbs., of which 7,000,000 lbs. 
were consumed in Great Britain, and 33/)00,000 lbs. in other European 
countries. The vuiual average exportation from 1768 to 1770, both 
inclusive, was 67,780 hbds. of about 100 lbs. each, or 67,780,000 lbs. 
As we have now approached the period when the exportation of to- 
bacco arrived at a point from which it has vibrated, (sometimes a little 
above or below it,) we subjoin a statement of the exportation for the 



183a] 



TOBACCO TmADI. 



131 



yemrs 1772 - 1775, incliiaiye, which will fomish the remtrkable ftet 
that (compared with anj sncceeding four jean since that period) the 
annual eiportation of tobacco just before the Revolution, was about 
the same that it has been at any time since, in our most prosperous 
period*. For although 1790 - 1792 were three years of very heavy ex- 
portations, they fell off in 1793 nearly one half, making the annual 
average exportation not materially different from 1778- 1775. 

StaiemnnU showing the QuaniUy qf Tobacco Exporttd from the UniUi 

Colonies from 1772 to 1775, indusive. 



Tesn. 


Poonda Exported. 


Poaodi comtuiied or 

lamaining on haod in 

Great Britain. 


Poaadfl conaaoMd or 
remainiof on haod in 
other eooatriea of 
Europe. 


1772 
1773 
1774 
1775 


97,799,263 
100,473,007 

97,397,252 
101,828,617 

897,497,139 


97,791,805 

8,695,564 

18,698,337 

27,623,451 

147,809,157 


7,458 
96,776,443 
78,676,915 
74,205,166 

849,665,982 



Total exportation for the 4 years, 397,497,139 lbs., or an annual aver- 
age of 99,374,785 lbs. This brings np to the period of the Revolution. 
The fisUowing will exhibit the exportation of the article during that 
period : 

SUUment shaming the QnaatUy tf Tokteco Exported from lAe 

Colonies from 1776 to 1782, inclusive. 



Yean. 


Poonda Exported. 


Poonda eonraned or 

on band in Great 

Britain. 


Ponnda eootomed or 

on band in other 
eouotriea of Europe. 


1776 
1777 
1778 
1779 
1780 
1181 
1788 

Total, 


14,498,500 
8,441,214 
11,961,533 
17,155,907 
17,424,267 
13,339,168 
9,828,244 

86,649,533 


• 
t 

7,520,550 

10,982,899 

11,474 791 

7,600,296 

6,364,813 

43,943,349 


14,498,500 
2,441,214 
4,440,783 
6,173,008 
6,950,176 
5,738,878 
3,463,431 

42,705,964 



Total exportation for the 7 years, 86,649,533 lbs. or an annual aver- 
age of 12,378,504 lbs. Of the total 7 years* exporUtion, 33,974,949 lbs. 
were captured by the British during the war. 

The following table exhibits the exports of Tobacco from the United 
States, for the yean 1787, 1788, 1789, immediately preceding the adop- 
tion of the present constitution. 

« TUi year Great Britain exported to the continent nearly 96,000,000 Ibi. of old 



t Great Britain exported thii year to the continent 8,000,000 Iba. of former itook. 

11 



UHIVKV ITATM. 



ilmtuig lilt Qiuaaity of To&ocOT Etportii from ti« Vniltd 
Stattt from 178T to 1789, ttuJiuira. 



Ttm. 


PhWi EiiMrud. 




Eu^p,. 


1787 
1788 
1789 

Toui, 


90,041,000 
88,595,000 
88,675,000 

867,311,000 


45,379,795 
39,600,404 
48^1 ,238 

133,81 M31 


44,661,805 
48,995,186 
39^:768 

133,500,159 



Total eiporUtion for (he Zjttn, 267,311^000 Itw. oi an anaiul ■*«- 
■ge of 89,103,666 Ibi. 

Tha following italemeDt furDiihei at ODe riew the exporta of leaf 
«nd maDofactiired Tobaaco and Sanff, from 1790 to 1835, iacluuTC. 

StatomaU exkibitiitg tkt Jfumla- of HogoheadM qf Tobaeeo Exported from 
U< United StMtM from 1790 to 1835, inrituiv*, and iitt Setragt Price 
ptr pound, and gron ViUue from 1802 to 1835, ituituvBt. Alto llu 
JfUmier if Poyndt of Manufactured Tataceo and Snuff Ezporttdfrom 
1791 to 1835, iruinnvl. and grou Valtufrom 1817 to 1835, indiuive. 















V.iu or 




No. bhdi. 


Antt* 








UlDDftc- 


Yna. 


l»fT(*«oo 


.hTK, 


r«.iTii«. 


°ib.. 


"""■ 




■1790 


118,460 


s 


J 








1791 


101.272 


g 


81,1221 






IWi 


113,438 


£ 




117,874 


1 




1793 


59,947 


Zni 




l;l7,7«4 




1794 


72,958 


1 


s 


19,370 


[ 5 




1795 


61,050 




20,263 




1796 


6«pl8 


s 

-a 


29,181 


1 




1797 


68.167 


P 


ia,ao5 


1 


1798 


68,567 


142,269 


1799 


96,070 


■ 9 


406,076 


^ 


1800 


78,686 


£ 




457,713 


1 ■« 


3 


laiii 


103,758 


< 




472,282 




lara 


77,7til 


6Jc 




233 591 


.- 


1M03 


86,991 


6 




152,416 


jeo4 


83,341 


5 




298,139 




S 


1805 


71^1 


7 




438.460 


I 


1806 


83,186 


6 




381,733 






tl807 


62,236 


7 




274,952 


i ^ 




11808 


9,676 


7 




36,332 






1809 




5 


3,774;000 


350,835 


i § 




81810 


84,134 


5 


5,048,000 


539,285 


1 « 




1811 


35^28 


S 


8,150,000 


753,553 






II 1813 


X^ 


6 


1,514,000 


588,618 


i 





• Pnack bnloUin. 





No. or iiitdt 


Anne 




Munhelui'd 


aooff 


ValHoT 


Ytmim. 


i..fr«b«». 


poc.;. 


TtwIVihi.. 


Jk*. 


'ta.' 


Haanhe- 


•IB13 


6^14 


5e 


sTgiooo 


283,512 






•1814 


3,125 


H 


232,000 


79,377 






UdlS 


85,337 


8 


8J£15,000 


1,034,045 






1816 


69,341 


151 


1" IXI 


576,246 






1817 


68,365 


l4 


00 


1.115,874 


6,080 


$281,509 


1818 


84,337 


10 


I 41 


1,486,240 


6,513 


373,876 


1419 


69,427 


104 


67 


926,833 


13,710 


237,192 


isia 


83.940 


8 


1 B8 593,^ 


4,99e 


I49.5S9 


isai 


66,859 


71 


1 45 1,332,949 


44,552 


149.083 


laa 


83,169 


6i 


< W l,4U,«M 


44,602 


157,182 


1823 


99,000 


5| 


1 27 1587,507 


36,6<rt 


154,955 


1834 


77,883 


H 


1 bS 2,477,990 


45,174 


208,789 


laK 


75,984 


6 


1 K 1,871,368 


53,920 


172,353 


1326 


64.098 


; 08 2,179,774 


61,801 


210,134 


1837 


ioo,oas 


^ 


1 16 2,730,»55 


45,t<l2 


239.<i24 


1828 


96,278 


4 


L 97 2,637,411 


85,665 


210,747 


1829 


77,131 


5 


5.185,370 2,619,399 


19,509 


202,396 


. 1830 


63,810 


6 


5,833.112 3.199,151 


29.425 


246,747 


; 1831 


86,718 


41 


4,892,188 3,039,856 


27,967 


292,475 


1 1832 


106306 


41 


5,909,769 3,456,071 


31,175 


295.771 


j 1833 


83,153 


51 


5,755,968 3,790,310 


13.453 


288.973 


18M 


87,979 


?} 


6,595,305 ,3,956,579 


57,826 


328,409 


1 1835 


94,353 


8,250,577 13,817,854 


36,471 


X7,61] 



It nta/ b» propar to remark, that the weight of a hogibaad af labacco 
u moeh freitar dow Uud foronrl;. Originally, tobacco boiog laa 
compactly preaaed, the bogaheadi sveraged odIj 600 lb*., bat thej ^rad- 
oallj incraaacd, and in 1770, tBacb«d 1,000 lbs. aTarage. At thia tima 
Keotackf averagaa aboat 1,300 Ibc. per hogabead, and Iba aTerafe of 
all kinda (Kcntncky , Virginia, Harjlaod, and Ohio) we have eatimated 
at 1200 Iba. par hogahead, which we believe to be very neiirlj right. 
The annnal average eipartation for the laat 21 jeara, from 1815 to 1835, 
incliMire, is within * fraction of 62,760 hogaheada. Taking onr cati- 
mate of 1,200 Iba. per hogahead lo ba the true weight, we ahall thaa 
hare 99,313,000 Iba. as the annnal average for the laat 21 yean; and 
we baie aeen tlut the annnal average exportation for the 4 yeara end- 
ing in and including 1775, waa 90,374,765 Ibi., which eatabliihei the 
remarkable fact, that the exportation of leaf tobacco has remained ita- 
(icnary for a period of 60 yean. 

On a careful examination of the foregoing alatemeaU, it appeara, that 
wbea oui expoiti of leaf tobacco, for two or three anoceaaive yean, 
mnch exceed one hundred miltiona of ponnda; for some auccaeding 
yeara they are proportionably redoced below thai atandard. It ii alao 
erident that the Rerolntionary war gave a check to the exportation of 
leaf icbacco from which it boa never recovated ; for until that period, 

• Wat Willi Qnat Bilula. I Fhh. 



lU 



UJIITBD tTATM. 



[1838L 



ai mty be Men by reference to the preceding etatenients, (he annual 
ayerage exportation increased regularly and steadily. It was 37,760,000 
Ibe. greater for the years 1763 to 1770, than for the years 1744 to 1746; 
and for the years 1772 to 1775, it was 31,594,785 lbs. more than the 
annual average for the years 1763 to 1770. In other words, for the 31 
yeara immediately preceding the Revolation, our exports of leaf to- 
bacco annually increased very nearly 2,328,000 lbs., and for the 60 
years since that period, it has remained stationary, except when inter- 
rupted by wars or other commercial embarrassments. The reason is 
apparent Before the Revolution, all Europe depended on us for sup- 
plies of the article ; but, being cut off from the supplies, by the war, 
Europeans turned their attention to growing it for themselves, and 
have continued to cultivate it all over the continent. 

It will be observed that the exportation of manufactured tobacco and 
snuff has increased more than forty -four fold since 1791, and more than 
three fold since 1817 ; but the gross value has not proporttonably in- 
creased, at least since 1817. 

From a review of the subject, as above detailed, it will be-perceived, 
that, if it were in our power to furnish a precise statement of the 
exports of each description of tobacco, and the countries to which it 
was exported, (although very desirable on many accounts,) it wodid 
not furnish satisfactory evidence that the conBumption of tobacco gen- 
erally, or of any particular description, had increased or diminished in 
Europe, without knowing what they groto, as well as what we export. 
We have devoted much labor and attention to this part of the subject ; 
but, although we can learn generally that the production of it in Europe 
keeps pace with the increased consumption, yet oar researches have 
not enabled us to lay before you any useful statement, either as to the 
quantity or the qualities grown, except for three years in France, as 
ibllows : — 

Statement shewing the Quantity of Tobaeeo Grown in France for the 

Years 1818 - 1820. 



Yean 


KilofnuBDMi. 


Pooodi. 


No. of hhda., Mtiinated 
at 1,900 llM. per bhd. 


1818 
1619 
1620 


, 7,418,000 
10,360,000 
13,155,000 


18,545,000 
25,900,000 
32,887,500 


15,454 
21,583 
27,406 



This shows an increafed production of nearly double in the 3 years. 

It will strike you with surprise, as it did us, that the consumption of 
tobacco has increased so much in our own country, as to carry off the 
very large surplus grown beyond the foreign demand. Formerly, when 
all the tobacco was grown in Virginia and Maryland, we exported as 
much as we do now ; and now, in addition to those States, which pro- 



1838.] TMACCO niADB. 135 

docs aeirljp, or quite u mtich u they did than, Oliio, Kantooky, and 
TeuMiaBce, togetbet with Coanaoticat, PeuiuflrBDia, Indiana, and Hin- 
■ouri, prodace ai nmah mora. Wa oiut, tharsfart 
Uie qomntit/ icqairad for eiportalian. 



TnaiBij DupaitiaaDl, XtfiMar^ OOsa, lalj 4i 



'126 VHITBO BTATBt. [1838. 

Remturkg, — If the praoeding ■tatements may be relied on u oorreet, 
it appears that there has been a yery surprising increase of the use of 
tobacco in this country, and that the annual consumption now amounts 
to upwards of 100,000,000 pounds : — giving about 7 pounds to eyery 
man, woman, and child. The sum annually paid by the consumers of 
this quantity of tobacco in its manufactured state, has been computed, 
by a writer in <* The Portsmouth Journal,'* at $20,000,000. 

The following passage is extracted from Dr. Mnsaey's ** Essay on the 
lofluence of Tobacco on Life and Health." — *' Eighty thousand dol- 
lars' worth of cigars, it was estimated, were consumed in the city of 
New York in 1810 ; at that rate, the present annual consumption would 
amount to more than $ 200,000. The statement of Dr. Abbot, in his 
* Letters from Cuba,' in 1828, is, that the consumption of tobacco in 
that island is immense. The Rey. Mr. Ingersoll, who passed the win- 
ter of 1832-3, in Havana, expresses his belief that this is not an 
overstatement. He says, < Call the population 120,000 ; say half are 
smokers ; this, at a bit (i. e. 12} cents) a day, would make between 
$ 7,000 and $ 8,000. But this u too low an estimate, since not men 
only, but women and children smoke, and many at a large expense.' 
He says, that * the free negro of Cuba appropriates a bit (i. e. 12} 
cents) of his daily wages, to increase the cloud of smoke that rises 
from the city and country.' This, in 30 years, would amount to 
$ 7,058.72, a respectable estate for a negro, or even for a white man. 

" The Rev. O. Fowler, from considerable attention to the statislies 
of tobacco consumption in the United States, estimates the annual 
cost at f 10,000,000 ; time lost by the use of it, at $12,000,000 ', pauper 
tax which it occasions, at #3,000,000. 

*' This estimate, I believe to be considerably below the truth. It has 
been estimated, that the consumption of tobacco in this country is e^gftf 
times as great as in France, and three timet as great as in England| in 
proportion to the population.*' 

According to an estimate given by the editor of the '* New York 
Commercial Advertiser," in a late number of that journal, the cost of 
the tobacco smoked in the city of New York, is much greater than is 
stated by Dr. Mussey ; but his estimate will probably be thought, by 
most readers, a great exaggeration. According to the ** Commercial 
Adyertiser," 100,000 persons in the city, (about one third of the whole 
population) are supposed to be smokers ; and the average eost to each 
smoker is computed to be 10 cents a day ; — total daily cost # 10,000 ; 
and the annual cost $ 3,650,000. The annual cost of bread for the 
inhabitants of the city, allowing 13 ounces of bread for each person, 
and computing flour at f 10 per barrel would amount to $ 3,493,060. 
" Thus a little attention to the subject discloses the painful and disgust- 
ing facti, that in the clear-headed, sharp- sighted, money-making city of 
New York, the inhabitants pay more for tobacco than they do for bread.'* 



IV. BANKS. 

i. CoRDtTiav or tdi Dirocrr Baiu, 

JcMrrfny la RcteriM racticBd ol tA< TVconry Diportnuiit, tfa or war d« 
IXD/jVarcA, IS37. 



VMITBD ITATH. [1838. 

DiroiiT BiKKi. (CoDtiDiwd.) 



BMapitulaHan of Dtpotii Btmkt. 





»I71.«7,0M.S« 


Deixxiu br TV-u-r, II. 


. •auxWJIM.M 


SMk., . . . 


. S^I,T3BJ3 


[top«iu br Public OSdri, S,35<^tM.ll 


&•■■ Ei.uu. 


. 3.IH,JMJ» 


OihT D<t«ili>n, . 


. 9>,<B1,4».a 




. M.3i3,an.M 


Du. lo B.Bh., . . 


. 88,508,418.07 




3(H,!1TS.M 


Oihii Utblliiin, 


, H,>lll,«6J7 


Ihi. tmn Buki, . 


as,ns,i»e.ee 


C>p[u1, . 


. m,937,se.(a 


NWafMteiBub, 




. VUS.9M.T5 


BJHI., . . . 
ClHIlkliOD, . . 




ProlL ud L_, ke. 


. T,a»,474.»* 





T: 


Ko-oT 










aiuH 


2£ 


Bru- Dm. 


SpKii. 


li^. 


IXpoiU. 


Cpll^ 


Mu.^ 


. i«p.4,i83e, - - 


iTi^ 


t 1,768,040 


«83«,Bi» 


• 3.93S.ttX 


n.u. 


a 


. M.ja, iBsa, - . 




i,H6,ii 


818.569 




Vu 




- !.»»; 1. isa*, - - 


itfioa 


3,oes,8n 


848,875 


Si»;S 




10 




1,138,444 


8,430.3ST 


6,499.966 


30^410^011(1 


E.I. 


t 


566.416 


1.(144.989 


1.699.389 


e^7so,.'fli 


Cann. 


a 




3,874,ai9 


lUesSn 


3^1^ 




es 




8,9M,646 


91.197,897 


99.539,616 




Phb. 


44 


3,8?6,esB 


10.931/H3 


13.347,977 






9 


- Ocl. 1S35, M D»c. less, 
^ F.h. lo iJo... 183a, ,- 

a D.C. is35,u>biic. lax. 


336.134 


1,7SS.S99 


1.139.897 




Dal. 




161,860 


80S,tKi 


4I0.8S4 




Md. 


I 


1.300 968 


3^.IS 


4.379,945 


8,90S>75 






. JMU.r, 1, 1838. - 




081, 7»8 


l.3BS,Sa 


9.339>:« 






16 Imn..,, J, IKS, - 


i,5sa.a» 


8,169,76; 


3,548,414 


8,511,300 






314,8S« 


a,oso,sia 


6M.3I 




a.c. 




9 !-<•«, 1° Oct., IB3S, 


a,s«o.4sn 


7,488,797 


4,o»i,aio 


7;^^8 


Q>. 


I 


ii April, isas. ^ -^^- 


S,«W,59S 


7,9?r,5e7 


3,S9SS30 


8909967 


Pi. 


. 


4 aI>l°lS^ lo"(I:'l. 18&, 


39,037 
1,589,494 


714.369 
8.172,107 


449,4.'. 

3,159.04 


l'^^ 


Lk 


M 


31 April ,o Oc..*.r. 1^ 
B D.e. 1B3S. w Not. 1834, 


S,1W7,56T 


7,IM,546 




34,005,984 


MIM. 






4,490 J3I 


cVoiisii 


8,764 J50 


T.I11U 




4 M., ic Ooob... 183a. 


9I1.B76 


431«,5«8 


1,514,065 


4,S4fi,S85 


«-■ 




w !!«:J«5i,'<',iiV, 1B3B, 


'371,598 
979,870 
669,839 


3,819,480 




6:115400 




~a 


10 


D.cll&5,'u, the. 1836, 


653,861 
1,981650 


l,673;Bir 


47ajao 

1,979,857 


Ohi'a, 






B,994,906 


9.6;SM- 


6,196,914 


8,369,744 


Mich. 


— 


~i«~ 


Ocu 183S, U No>, IKia, 


178,071 




a! 114,943 


909;77S 


3»,a69,no?i 


ta43M,474 


10,049.916 


9I6,H75,S9« 


B. U. B. 






F.bra«, 1.1839, - 


T,6au,S99 


16,444,564 


5,0«a,lS4 


3^000,000 

95i.ws,«a 


"mt 


I4S 


40.019,594 


140,301.038 


115.104.440 


:S'.'« 
















t;s. 














13,195.000 


SSt 


KH 




D«i*-b.r, 18», - 








w.rnfiM 


«*/"/■ 












304,940^ 


BpKia Fund.. 




Bp.ci> Knwl.. 1 


N. B>lIlp•lli^^ •535,980 


Plerid.. 


. . .t!J61,3W. 


VHEDdot, . aai.sui 




. 41,6 






R 


Sew Voik, . . i,sT;,s8fl 

Nonh Ciraliu, lll^Qf 




fp-'v-u, iiMom 1 



183a] 



riNAlfCEt. 

5. Papxr and SrxciK. 



131 



jfa EackibU, m nmnd mrnhmrSf of tks amotmt of Paper and SpecU m 
aetioe cireulationf and qf Specie in Banks in the United Statety pre- 
pared partly from actual retumsy and partly from estimates; as given 
in the Report of the Secretary of the Treasury, dated Dec. eth, 1836. 



' Paper in aetiTe 
i CireuUtioo. 



NearOoi. 1833, 

lot Jan. 1834, 

lat Jan. 1836, 

1st Jan. 1836, 

l8t Dec. 1836, 



$80,000,000 

76,000,000 

82,000,000 

108,000,000 

120,000,000 



Specie in aetiTe ' 
Ciienlation. 



Specie in 
Banlu. 



$4,000,000 $25,000,000 
12,000,000; 27,000,000 



18,000,000 
23,000,000 
28,000,000 



43,000,000 
40,000,000 
45,000,000 



Toul Specie io 
the U. 0utea. 



$29,000,000 
39,000,000 
61,000,000 
63,000,000 
73,000,000 



6. SuflrxHSioH or Srxcii Patmsitt bt tbx Banks. 

The Spring of 1837 was rendered memorable for an almost unpre* 
eedented series of mercantile embarrassments and difficulties, which 
were first eitensiyely lelt in the cities of New York and New Orleans, 
bat soon extended to all the commercial towns in the United States, 
causing very heavy and numerous failures. A similar embarrassment 
in trade was also experienced in foreign countries. 

On the 10th of May, 1837, all the Banks in the city of New York, 
by common consent, suspended specie payment; and nearly all the 
banks in all the states of the Union, immediately after hearing of 
this measure of the Banks in the city of New York, adopted the same 
course. The Legislature of the State of New York, being then in ses- 
sion, passed an act, on the 16th of May, authorizing the suspension of 
specie payments by the banks in that State, for one year. 



V. FINANCES. 
[Fram the Report of tlio Beeretify of the Tretnry, Dec. 0ib, 1836.] 



Balance in the Treasury on the 1st of Jan. 1835, 
The Receipts from all sources during the year 1836, 
Vix. 

Fh>m customs, $19,391,310.59 

From lands 14,757,600.75 

From dividends and sales of bank stock, 569,280.82 

From incidental items, .... 195,561.98 
From the NeapoliUn indemnity, 516,332.96 



$8,89^,856.48 
35,430,087.10 



These, with the aboye balance, make an aggregate of $44,322,945,591 
The Expenditures on all objects during the year 1835, 17,573,141.56 



138 UNITED STATES. [^838. 

Vii. 
Oa civil list, foreign intercoane, and mifcel- 

Iftneous object!, 3,7914161.60 

liMpoliUn twerdfl, 506,436.03 

Military service, including fortifications, dte. 9,430,313.69 
Naval service, including gradual improvement, 3,664,939 06 

Public debt, 58,191.28 

The balance lefl in the Treasnrj on the 1st of January, 

1836, was, therefore 926,749,803 96 

The receipts into the Treasury during 1636, as ascer- 

Uined and estimated about Jl7,691 ,098.00 

Of these, the receipts during the first three quarters are 

ascertained to have been 38,141,898.04 

Vix. 

From customs, 9 17,523,151.79 

From lands, 20,048,929.88 

Dividends and sales of U. S. Bank stock, . 292,676.67 
Incidental items, including excess of repay- 
ments on account of public debt, as here- 
after stated 947,139.70 

[This does not embrace the receipts in trust on account of the Chick- 
asaw Indians; nor the receipts on account of the Post-Office and 
Patent-Office, of which, as well as the expenditures on the same 
accounts, separate statements are kept, in conformity to the laws ; nor 
what has been received in trust the present year for the clsimants 
under the French, Neapolitan, and Spanish treaties.] 

Receipts during the fourth quarter of the present year, 

computed at about f 9,550,000.00 

These, with the balance on the 1st of January, 1836, 

form an aggregate of 74,441,702.00 

The expenditures during the year 1836, ascertained and 

esUmatedtobe 31,435,032.00 

Of these, the amount during the first three quarters is 

ascertained to have been 20,791,372.16 

Vis. 
On civil list, foreign intercourse, and miscellaneous, 3,850,101.66 

Military service, including fortifications, Ac 13,010,061.59 

Naval service, &e 8,931^209.69 

The expenditures for the fourth quarter, as computed by the proper 
Departments, will be f 10,643,660 ; but, it is thought, they will prob- 
ably fall short of that amount. This will leave on hand, the Ist of 
January, 1837, an estimated balance of f 43,005,669. From this, if the 
diminished sum of $ 1,080,000 for unavailable funds be deducted, tiM 
available balance of money on the 1st of January, 1837, would b* 
941,925,669. 



183a] 



riFARcn. 



133 



VI. SURPLUS REVENUE. 

Apportionment of the Sarplaa Revenue of the United States, remain- 
ing in the Treasury, January Ist, 1837, (reserving $5,000|O00,) among 
the several States, agreeably to the nnmber of electoral votes for Presi- 
dent, according to the act of Congress, of June 23d, 1636 : — the de- 
posits to be made in four equal parts, on the let of January, 1st of 
April, Ist of July, and Ist of October, 1837. ' 





electo- 






Lleeto- 




StatM. 


ral 


Amount to 


SUtae. 


ral 


Amoont to 




Vote*. 


be depotitod. 




Votofl. 


be deposited. 


Maioe, 


10 


$1,274,451.09 


Georgia, 


11 


$ 1,401,896.13 


New HanfMhire, 


7 


89-2,115.71 


Alabama, 


.7 


899,115.71 


MassftdtUMtU, 


4 


1,784,331.43 


Miaaiasippi, 


4 


509,760.41 


Rbodo Iiland, 


14 


509,780.41 


Louisiana, 


5 


637,225.51 


Vermont, 


7 


899,115.71 


MUsouri, 


4 


509,780.43 


Conneeticat, 


8 


1,109,560.81 


Keolueky, 


15 


1,911,676.53 


New York, . 


49 


5,352,694.28 


Tennessee, . 


15 


1,911,676.53 


New Jeraey, 


8 


1,019,560.61 


Ohio, . 


21 


2,676,347.14 


Penntjlvania, 


30 


3,82:i,35:J.0B 


Indiana, 


9 


1,147,005.92 


Delaware, . 


3 


389,335.31 


1 filinoii, 


5 


637,225.51 


Marvfaind. 


10 


1,274,451.02 


, Arkansaa, . 


3 


389,335.31 


Virginia, . 
North Carolina, 
Soalh C:\rolinB, 


S3 
15 
11 


9,931,237.34 
1,911,676.53 
1,101,896.12 


Michig&D, 


3 


382,335.31 


Totals 


294 


$ 37,466,859.97 



VII. IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF GOLD AND SILVER. 

[From the Washington «* Globe."] 

Table of Import and Export of Gold and Silver Coin and Bullion to 
and from ths United States, from 18'21 to 1836. 



Second term 
of President 
Monroe, 



Term of Pres- 
ident Adams, 



First Term of 

President 

Jackson, 



Second term 
of Ptesident 
Jackson, 



Yean. 



1821 
1822 
1823 
1824 

^ 1825 
1826 
1827 
1828 

1829 
la'U) 
1831 
1832 

1833 
1834 
1835 
1836 



Imported. 



$8,064,890 
3,369,846 
5,067,896 
8,379,835 

6,150,765 
6,880,960 
8,151,130 
7,489,741 

7,403,612 
8,155,964 
7,305,945 
5,907,504 

7,070.368 
17,911,632 
13,131,447 
12,166,373 



Eipotted. 



910,748,059 

10.810,180 

6,372,987 

7,014,552 

8,797,055 
4,704,523 
8,014,880 
8,243,476 

4,924,020 
2,178,773 
9,014,931 
5,656,340 

2,614,962 
1,676,258 
5,748,174 
4,435,815 



12 



134 



UNITED STATES. 



[1838. 



VIII. LEAD MINES. 

Statement of the Lead made annually at the United States Lead MineSf 
from the Year 1821, (when their Superinttndence was transferred from 
the Treasury to the War Department f) to September 20th ^ 1835. 



Foriod*. 


Fever River. 


MiMonri. 


Total. 

1 








lb«. 


Ibfl. 


Ibp.- 


Lead made from the 


year 








1821, to 


30th Sept 


. 1823 


335,130 


• 


a35,130 


Lead made 


in the year end- 








ing Sept 


. 3()th, 


1824 


175,220 


■ 


175,220 


Do. 


do. 


IS^') 


WW ,530 


386,590 


1,051,120 , 


Do. 


do. 


1826 


958,842 


1,374,962 


2,333,804 


Do. 


do. 


1827 


5,182.180 


910,380 


0,092,5G0 


Do. 


do. 


1828 


ll,10r..8lO 


1,205,920 


12,31 1 ,730 


Do. 


do. 


1829 


13,343,1.'>0 


1,198,160 


14.541,310 


Do. 


do. 


1830 


8.323.098 


8,060 


8,332,r)58 


Do. 


do. 


1831 


G,a81,900 


67,180 


6,449.080 


Do. 


do. 


1H32 


4,281,876 


• 


4,281,876 


Do. 


do. 


1833 


7.941,792 


■ 


7,941,792 


Do. 


do. 


1834 


7,971,579 


a 


7,971.579 


Do. 


do. 
Total, 


1835 

• 


3,754,290 


• 


3,754.290 


70.420.357 


5,151,2:i2 


75.571,609 



IX. MINT. 

Officers of the Mikt. 

Salary. Salary. 

R. M. Patterson, Director, f 2,000 J. R. Eckfeldt, ^^a^^er, $1,500 



Wm. Findlay, Treasurer, 1,200 
Adam Eckfeldt, Chief Coiner, 1,500 



J. Cloud, Mtlter and Refiner, 1,500 
William KneasK, Engraver, 1,200 



1. Statement of the Annual Amounts of Deposits of Gold, for Coinage^ 

from the Mines of Vie United States. 



a 

e 


Virginia. 


North 


1 
Sooth Georgia. 


Tonnei- Alabama. Not as- i 


Total. 


18-21 




Carolina 


Carolina.' 


■ee. 


1 


cortttiacd. 


$ .■>,otio 




$5,000 


1 
• 1 • 


• 




• 


1825 




17, OIK) 


• • 


« 






• 


17,000 


1826 


• 


90,000 


1 


( 






• 


20,000 


18-37 




2I,0(H> 


• • 


1 






• 


21, (KM) 


1828 




46,000 


* 


1 






• 


46,000 


18:29 


$9,.'i00 


rJ4,0(MI 


• a.-wii . 


1 






■ 


140,0lK) 


18:M) 


34,01)0 


2»4,00li 


2G,000'$ 212,000 








« 


46ti,000 


laii 


26,00(1 


294,000 


22,(MMi 176,000 


$ 


1,000 $1,000 


520,()(»0 


ih:v2 


.34,00(1 


4.^,0 )(! 


45,«>0il i40,U)(J 




I,(MW 


• 


(iT^,(|()0 


i«:v.j 


104,000 


475,(K) » 


6f),(»(M 216,000 


7,(H)0 


• 




8r.h,000 


1831 


fri^ood 


3^0.(M«l 


3f<,0(Mi' 415,000 


3,000 


« 


• 


8%, 000 


18:ij 


m,nw 


2(y,o0f) 


42,^IM) a 19 DIM) 


100 


• 


$ 12,000 


(•)'>,.')'>0 


16M 


62,000 


14«,I0(' 


K^,'2m 


291,400 


300 


1 

e • 


467,001) 




374,90t» 


2.465,60. 


99S,I(K> 1.680.:<00 


J2.400 


1,000 12,900 


4,84 l.-'iOO 



1838.] THE HINT. 135 

2. Siatement of the Coinage of 1836, at the Mint of the United Statee. 



1 D«nomtnatioDi. 

1 


Piecas. 


Valna. 


67o/<2. — Half Ragles, .... 
Qaarter Eagles, . 


553,147 

547,ft:^ 


$2,765,735 
1,369,965 




1,101,133 


4,135,700 


Silver, — Dollars, .... 
Half Dollars, 
Qaarter Dollars, 
Dimes, . . • . 
Half Dimes, .... 


1,000 

6,5464»0 

472,000 

1,190,000 

1,900,000 


1.000 

3,273,100 

118,000 

119,000 

95,000 


1 


10.109,200 


3,606,100 


Copper. — Cents, .... 
' Half Cents, 


2,111,000 
398,000 


21,110 
1,990 


1 


2.509.000 


23,100 


Whole JVitmber of PieceSt 


13,719,333 


7,764,900 



3. Statement of Gold Deposits at the Mint in 1836. 

The deposits of gold for coinage amount to . . . $ 4,084,000 
Of which was received from the United States, vix. 

Virginia, $62,000 

North Carolina, .... 148,100 

South Carolina, .... 55,200 

Georgia, 201,400 

Tennessee, 300 

$467,000 



Coins of the United States of old standard. 
Coins and bullion from England, 



Do. do. 

Do. do. 

Do. do. 

Bullion from Africa, 
Jewellers' base gold, 



France, 

other European States, 

Mexico and S. America, 



6,000 

230,000 

3,160.000 

75,400 

124,700 

. 8,700 

13.200 



$4,084,000 

All the coinage embraced in this statemeiH has been performed at the 
U. States Mint in Philadelphia ; but branch mints have recently been 
established at New Orleans. La., Charlotte, N. C, and Dahlonega, (ia. 

'* The last year," says the Director in his Report, dated January 23d, 
1837, ** has been marked by the introduction of important improyementB 
in every department of the Mint. 

'* Changes have been made in the arrangements for assaying, which 
place this part of our establishment upon a footing with the most per- 
fect in Europe.'* 



4. TatuloT Statement qf Ike JtmattM ^ Cmagt at liU Mint, in tfc« leceral 
Denomnatima of Coin from tht Commaicement oj tit Operaluna vntil 
Hit 3Ul of Dtctmber, 1836, incliuivt. 



The nusibei oi' F^gla coined fiom 179!) Id IBW, inctuiivi, wu 13a,Sl«. No auin 
bail ba«i> coiwrl iidcd ]«>4. ^^ ^ 

Summary of the ahnia Comagt. 
Gold, — Whole No. of pieM.coin*d, 4,7I«,323 — viloe *2a,loa,OS500 
Silver, do. do. 115,«1,763 " «,73!).I8a.!» 

Copper, do. do. 77,752,905 " 740;WI.6iy 

Tal^, 197,891,503 1 09^1,540.481 



183&] 



POST-OrPICK ESTABLISHMENT. 



137 



[From the Pottmuter-GoDoral'a Report.] 

X. POST-OFFICE ESTABLISHMENT. 

1. Transportation of the Mail. 

The Length {in miles) of Poet Routes^ and the Annual Dransportatum of 
the Mail in each State and Territory ^ on the let of July, 1836. 









Annual Tranaportatioa. 




Btatet and 


Length 
of I lie 


















Territories. 


Route. 


On Horse 




*In eteam- 








and io 


In Stagoa. 


boata and un 


Total. 






Sulkioi. 




Railroads. 




JV E. Section, 












Maine, 


3,999 


244,192 


630,448 


96,406 


971,048 


N. Hampshire, 


2,7ir,| 


72,540 


648,414 


. 


720,954 


Vermont, 


2,4995 


87,152 


573,794 


• • 


660,946 


Massachusetts, 


3,71 Oi 


107,5:U) 


1,270,542 


111.956 


1,490,034 


Rhode Island, 


490^ 


10,712 


127,036 


48,256 


186,004 


Connecticut, 


2,02Si 


91,936 


554,5()2 


26,728 


673,166 


New York, 


13,0b2 


841,256 


3,116,984 


315,328 


4,273,568 


Middle Section, 












New Jersey, 


1,853 


73,840 


401,518 


43,472 


518,830 


Pennsylvania! 


11,335 


785,382 


1,890,!M)2 


175,604 


2,851,888 


Delaware, 


59U 


20,800 


117.702 


14 976' 


153,478 


Maryland, 


2,385 


153,712 


429,338 


137,384 


720,434 


Ohio, 


7,749? 


594,542 


1,327,196 


31,304 


1,953,042 


Michi^aOy 


2,2ti2| 


161,616 


189,124 


• • 


• 350,740 


Southern Section. 












Virginia, 


9,089 


793,624 


913,328 


146,224 


1,853.176 


N. Carolina, 


6,318 


421,408 


794.:J52 


20,384 


1,236,144 


S. Carolina, 


4,250 


299,7-^8 


669,(i56 


87,000 


1,056,384 


Georgia, 


5,025 


344.968 


666,744 


■ • 


1,011,712 


Florida, 


1.845 


78,312 


84,864 


44,720 


207,896 


5. W. Section. 












Kentucky, 


5,968 


453,336 


591,136 


210,808 


1,255,280 


Indiana, 


4,3J)8 


391,456 


437,528 


12,376 


841,360 


Illinois, 


4,337 


246,064 


515,320 


• • 


761 ,384 


Wisconsin, 


5(>4 


60,752 


15,808 


• • 


66,560 


Missouri, 


2,79b 


275,496 


97,5r)2 


• 


373,048 


Arkansas, 


2,351 


272,896 


31,200 


44.928 


349,024 


Tennessee, 6,704 


537,680 


573,456 


56,680 


1,167,816 


Alabama,! | 4,612 


388,544 


531 ,85() 


32,760 


953,160 


Mississippi, 3,427 


306,904 


140,504 


117,104 


5()4,512 


JLooisiana, 
Total, 


1,858 


185,120 


68,016 


103,896 


357,032 


118,264 


8,291 ,504 


117.408,820 


1,878,296 


27,578,620 



* A amall amount or packet acrriee is ioeluded with the steamboat mails, 
f Baa beoD ainee transferred to the Southern Section. 



138 UHITED 8TATM. [1838. 

On the let of July, 1835, the length of the mail routes in operation 
in the United States was 112,774 miles, and the annual transporUtion 
on them 25,869,486 miles. 

The number of rost-OflSces in the United States on the Ist of July, 
1835, was 10,770; on the Ist of July, 1636, 11,091; on the 1st of 
July, 1837, 11,767. 

2. Rxviirux AND Expenditure of the Post-Office. 

The Revenue accruing from the Post-Office Department for the year 

ending on the 30th of June, 1636, according to statements from the 

Auditor's office, was as follows : — 

From Letter Postages, . $3,010,249.43 

" Newspapers and Pamphlets, . 376y217.l3 

" Fines, 3,054.63 

Estimated for deficient returna, 8,934.00 

Toial, . $3,396,455.19 

Expenditure for Transportation of Mails, $1,638,051.76 

*' Compensation to Postmasters, . 812,802.67 

<' Clerks for offices, 122,933.35 

<< Miscellaneous, 181,835.98 

TaUd, . $2.7.>5,623.76 

Ezcesa of Revenue over Expenditure, .... $642,831.43 

3. Rates of Postage. 

On a Single LUter eompoMed of One Piece of Paper. 

For any distance not exceeding 30 miles, 6 cents. 

Over 30, and not exceeding 80 << 10 " 

Over 80, and not exceeding 150 '* 12} " 

Over 150, and not exceeding 400 '* 16| ** 

Over 400 miles 25 ** 

A Letter composed of two pieces of paper, is charged with double 
these rates; of three pieces, with triple; and of four pieces, with 
quadruple. " One or more pieces of paper, mailed as a letter, and 
weighing one ounce^ shall be charged with quadruple postage ; and at 
the same rate, should the weight be greater." 

Newspaper Postage, 

For each JfewspapcTf not carried out of the State in which it is pub- 
lished, or, if carriffd out of the State, not carried over 100 miles, 1 cent. 
Over 100 miles, and out of the SUte in which it is published, 1^ cents. 



1638.] posT-ofriCB estabxishmbnt. 138 

Magazines and Pamphlets. 

* 
If published periodically, diet, not exceedingr 100 miles, 1) cts. per sheet 

Ditto do. distance over 100 " 2& <* ** 

\fnoi pub. periodically, dist. not exceeding 100 " 4 '' " 

Ditto do. disUnce over 100 <* 6 ** " 

*' Every Printed Pamphlet or Magazine which contains more than 
twenty-four pages, on a rayai sheet, or any sheet of less dimensions, 
shall be charged by the sheet ; and small pamphlets, printed on a half 
or quarter sheet, of royal or less size, shall be charged with half the 
amount of postage charged on a full sheet." 

The postage on Skip Letters^ if delivered at the office where the 
vessel arrives, is six cents ; if conveyed by post, two cents in addition 
to the ordinary postage. 

Privilege of Franking. 

Letters and packets to and from the following officers of the govern- 
ment, are by law received and conveyed by post, free of postage. 

The President and Vice-President of the United States, Secretaries 
of State, Treasury, War, and Navy; Attorney • General ; Postmaster- 
General, and Assistant Postmasters- General; Comptrollers, Auditors, 
Register, and Solicitor of the Treasury ; Treasurer ; Commissioner of 
the Genera] Land Office ; Commissioners of the Navy Board ; Commis- 
sary-General ; Inspectors- General; Quartermaster-General; Paymaster- 
General ; Superintendent of Patent-Of^ce ; Speaker and Clerk of the 
House of Representatives; President and Secretary of the Senate ; and 
any individual who shall have been, or may hereaAer be. President of 
the United States ; and each may receive newspapers by post, free of 
postage. 

Each member of the Senate, and each member and delegate of the 
House of Representatives, may send and receive, free of postage, news- 
papers, letters, and packets, weighing not more than two ounces (in 
case of excess of weight, excess alone to be paid for,) and all documents 
printed by order of either House, from the period of sixty days before 
he takes his seat in Congress, till the next meeting of the next Con- 
gress. 

Postmasters may send and receive, free of postage, letters and pack- 
ets not exceeding half an ounce in weight ; and they may receive one 
daily newspaper, each, or what is equivalent thereto. 

Printers of newspapers may send one paper to each and every other 
printer of newspapers within the United States, free of postage, under 
such regulations as the Postmaster- General may provide. 



140 



UNITED STATES. 



[1838. 



XI. PUBLIC LANDS. 

1. Exhibit of the net Quantity of Public Lands sold^ Amount paid by PuT' 
dtastrSy and Payments nuuLs into tJie Treasury on Account thsreofjfrom 
the Earliest Period of Sales toMie 6lst of December, 1834. 



Years. 



1787 
17U2 
171M) 
1797 
1798 
IbOO 
1801 
1802 
1803 
1804 
1805 
1806 
■ 1807 
1808 
1809 
1810 
1811 
1812 
1813 
1814 
1815 
1816 
1817 
1818 
1819 
To June 30, 1820 

From July 1 , 
1820 
1821 
1822 
1823 
1824 
1825 
1826 
1827 
1828 
1829 
1630 
1831 
1832 
1833 
1834 



Quantity sold. 



lAlltUUlltOl puicUu«u 



AcTta. 1UU£A. 
72,974 00 
1,165,440 00 
43,446 til 



398,646 45 

340,009 77 

181,068 43 

373,611 54 

619.266 13 

473,211 63 

359,011 79 

213,472 12 

231,044 98 

235,879 41 

288,930 31 

530 537 40 

270.241 43 

864,536 53 

l,120.2:i3 64 

1,622,830 06 

2,159,372 43 

2,401,844 60 

5,475,648 17 

518,500 80 



nioiicv. 



Aniuuat paid into ih« 
Trcunury. 



j^ 117,108.24 
832,549.66 
100,427.53 



' 834,887.11 

680,019.54 

398,161.28 

772,851.95 

1,235,955.22 

1,001,358.02 

738,273.29 

459,230.34 

55<»,655.03 

51)2,382.13 

614,324.58 

1,149,536.46 

621,199.44 

1,784,560.95 

2,340,188.91 

3,567,273.88 

5,022.409.84 

7,209,997.42 

17,681,794.37 

1 ,465,283.94 



ly,y65,75823*,$49,6dU,427.13' 



13,049,641 lUI 

303,404 09 

781,213 32 

801,226 18 

653,319 52 

749,323 04 

893,461 69 

848,082 26 

926,727 76 

965,600 36 

1,244,860 01 

1,929,733 79 

2,777,856 88 

2,462.342 16 

3,856,227 56 

4,658,218 71 

^7,501,238 43 



$4,836.13 

83,540.60 

11,963.11 

443.75 

167,726.06 

188,628.02 

165,675.69 

487,526,79 

54( ►,193.80 

765,245.73 

466.163.27 

647,939.06 

442,252.33 

61)6,548.82 

1,040,237.53 

710,427.78 

835,(555.14 

1,1^5,971.09 

1,287,959.28 

1,717,985.03 

1,991,226.06 

2,60(5,564.77 

3274,422.78 



$ 19,269,132 62 



] 



:;i7, 663,964.601 

424 962 26 
1,169,224.98 
1,023,267.83 

850,136.26 

953,799.(j3 
1,205,068.37 
1,128,617.27 
1,318,105.36 
1 ,221 .357.99 
1,572,863.54 
2,^33,432.94 
3,557,023.76 
3,115,376.09 
4,972,284.84 
6,0iK),98L04 

$58>09,4()(rUi§ ''^i^^A^y^Jy^r^ 



1,635,871.61 1 

1,212,966.46 
1,803,581-54 
916.523.10 
984,41815 
1,216,090.56 
1 ,393,785.09 
1 ,495.845.26 
1,018,308.75 
1.517,175.13 
2;329,356.14 
3,210.815.48 
2,623,381.03 
3.967,682.55 
4.a'S7,000.69 



{Statement lor the year 1835 ; and lor the Idt, 2d, and 3d Quarters of 

the year 1836. 
la^5 I 12,564,478 85 | 15,999,804.11 I 14,757,600.75 

iaJ6 I 15.934,430 36 | 20,063,454.58 | 20,648,929.88 



The total amount of moneys received for the year 1836, according 
to the Treasurer's Report of January 27th, 1837, was $ 23,983,192.18 ; 
but the returns were not complete. 

(•rUrU; li) Sm M-uUt, nut pag$. 



1838.] 



rUBIilC IiANDS. 



141 



^otes an the preceding Table. 

* This 18 the grross amount of acres and purchase money, including 
the special sales prior to the opening of the land offices, and, of course, 
all the lands as they were sold from year to year, without regard to 
their subsequent reyersion to the United States, or their subsequent 
relinquishment by purchasers under the reKef laws commencing in the 
year 182]. 

t This is the net amount of sales and atnount paid by purchasers , after 
deducting all reversions and relinquishments of land sold under the 
credit system, ending on the 30th of June, 1820. 

t This is the amount paid into the Treasury, in 1820, for the sales of 
land under the credit and cash systems. 

§ These aggregates include the special sales made prior to the orgam- 
zation of the land districts^ — also the amount of forfeited land stock, 
Mississippi stock, and military land scrip^ received in payment for the 
public lands. 

In making estimates or comparisons between the sums receivable, 
and the quantities of land sold at different times, it is important to 
remember that the minimum price per acre was two dollars before 
1820, and since only one dollar and twenty-five cents. Besides the 
above sales by the United States, they have made donations of lands, 
most of which have come into the market during the last forty-six 
yearsi of over 16,000,000 of acres. 



2. Exhibit of the Quantity of Land granted as Bounties during the lata 
War, and to each of the States and Territories^ far Colleges, Roads 
and Canals, Seats of Government, Saline Reservations, and Common 
Schools. 



State* and 
Tetritoricd. 



Ohio, 
; Indiana, 
I Illinois, 
^ Missouri, 
' Mississippi, 

Alabama, 
I JLfOuisiana, 

Michigan, 

Arkansas, 

Florida, 

t Total, 



Boantiex 

during tbo 

lat« war. 



Acres. 



Collei^ei, Boadi and 



Acade- 
mies, &c. 



Canals. 



Acres. 

69,120 

67,960 46,080 

2,878,720; 46,(»80 

468.960! 46,08(» 

46,080 

46,5(50 

46,080 

46,080 

46,080 

46,080 



+1 



,037,120 



4,452,76l> 



Acres. 

830,137 

580,800 
480,000 



480,000 



484,320 



Seats of 
Govorn- 
rnent. 



Saline 
ReserTaltons. 



Acres. 

2,560 
2,560. 
2,449 
1,280 
1,620 

10,000 
7,400 
1,120 



2,290,937 28,989 



Acr. lOOths. 

23,680 00 

23,040 00 

121,629 08 

46,080 00 

23,040 00 



237,469 68 



Common 

Schools 

l-36ih part. 



Acres. 
684,743 
626,868 
1,034,897 
1,230,639 
834,364 
889,030 
873,973 
543,893 
950,258 
877,484 



8,546,149 



nniTCv aTATE*. 



6f 






1 Unr,^ 
1 BSJrI 


ii 




||||||ipM 


s 

1 


SI 




i 


n • • 


■ga 








H'-- 


1 


i i 


s=ss«ss555SS|i: 


^■s 


: 1 


gsjp.pjjlH 


s ■ ■ ■ 


1' 


1 li 


lllllllpsS 1 


1 ■ ■ 


■2-3 




3 \ ■ . 


y 


^ji 




1 |. 




ii 


Ul 


SiSSSSSESa^SE 


i 1 ■ 




1=8 


jiss§i;?p.i;i 




iv 


Jl;} 


IPllliJplSI 


^5 


l-s"J 


2 — ""— » |3 


Ijif ■ 


^1 
III 




i 


Lis' " .3 


IJI 
^11 


"■^l^'* 


HmmMmiMM 


4t 


=S5sas»2'5-p 


^:| 






ri^t-ll 






O » =-!„ i ■ -O 


111 


, 


■■■■,■ kttim 


1 


i 


i iffliffl 


3 

1 


,\ ^...si'.'-IJi.. 


lis 


i 


iljjjfljjjj ilfii 



1838.] 



PUBLIC liANDB. 



143 



4. Statetnent of Public Land sold and Payments into the Treasury on 
Account thereof, in the Year 1835, and the Ist, 2df and 3d quarters of 
the Year 1836. 



State* and Territoriei. 


1835. 


Ist, 2d, and 3d auartera, 1836, 




Acrns. 


Acres. 




Ohio, 


66I,4:J5 59 $731,778.83 


966,404 66 


$1,136,185.13 


Indiana, 


15,86.904 e.-i l,799,63-2.3<? 


2,.590,2I4 04 


3,259,618.46 


Illinois, 


2,096,(i29 29 2,4 i 1, 125.03 


2,556,594 65 


3,06;i,:W2.54 


MiMOttri, . 


«ti2,l80 47 7.52,763.95 


1.280,139 18 


1,49-1,454.54 


A lalmmo. 


1,587,007 87 2,154,-2«4 81 


1,181,043 47 


J,755,04.'i.23 


Mi^siasippi, 


2,931,181 15 3,377,r.:«).77 


l,t>8U,792 03 


2,8^*6,497.68 


Louisiana, 


325,955 85 347,171.44 


762,027 '\:> 


671,464.09 


Arkansaa, 


630,0-27 75 654, 271. 5<- 


819,099 52 


1,003,69.'>.77 


Michigan, 


1,817,247 81 : 2,l40,.'i07.9<l 


3,495,429 47 


4,051,777 56 


Wi aeons in, 


2I7,.543 91 1 301,217.70 


549,614 91 


542,785.62 


Floiida, . 


48,364 31 1 37,336.32 


43,770 98 


48,:2.<.26 


Received bjr Troas. U. S. 


1 


• • 


131,350.00 


JUaly . 


12,564,478 85 814,757,600.75 


15.934,430 30 


$20,048,929.88 ' 



XII. INDIAN TRIBES. 

Statement showing the JVkimber of Indians note East of the Mississippi ; 
of those who have emigrated from the East to the West of that River ; 
and of these with in striking Distance of the Western Frontier, 

[From the Report of C. A. Harris, Commissiooer of Indian Affairs, Dec. 1st, 1836.] 

1. J^Tame and Number of the Tribes now East of the Mississippi. 



1st. Under Treaty StipulatwnM 




% 




to rtmove to the West qf the 




2d. J^ot under Treaty Stipula- 




Missiosiprn. 
" Ottawas of Ohio, 




timtg to remove. 




230 


Now York Indians, 


4,176 


Potawatamies oflndiona. 


3,000 


VVyandnts, 


575 


CbipfiAwafl, Ottawas, and Po- 




Mianiies, .... 


1,100 


taw<itamiefl, . 


6,288 


Ottawas and Chippewa* of 




Wiiinpbaj^oes, 


4,500 


the Lakes, 


2,564 


Cherokoes, 

(Jrvoks, .... 


16,000 
4,000 










(Jhickasaws, . 


5,4(H) 






Seminolns, 


2,600 


Bnmgktoverf 




Appalachicolas, 


400 






Ottavraa li. Chippowas, in the 




Totals . 




poninSMla of Michigan, 


6,500 






4^,918 





8,415: 



48,918 



57,433! 



2. Jf umber of Indians who have emigrated from the East to the West Side 

of the Mississippi. 



Chippewas, Otuwoa, and PoU- 


' 


Shawnees, .... 


1,272 


watumies, .... 


1,712 


Oilawos, .... 


SOO 


Choctaws, .... 


15,000 


Weas, 


2^ 


Qu/ip:IWS, .... 


476 


Piankeshaws, 


162 


Creeks, .... 


17,894 


Pftorins and Kaskaskias, 


J3> 


8eiTiinolos, .... 


407 , 


S«;necas, .... 


251 


Appalachicolas, . 


265 


Senecua aod Shawnees, 


211 


Cherukcos. .... 


6,072 






Kickapoos, .... 


588 


Total, 


45,090 


Dnlitwnrcs, .... 


826 







144 



UlfIT£D STAT IS. 



[1838. 



3. Jfumber of ihe indigenous Tribes toithin striking Distance of the 

Western Frontier, 



Sioux, . 
lowaya, . 
naca, • • • 
Foxes, 

SacB of the MiMOuri, 
*Oaagei, . . 

Omiihas, 

Oloes and Minoariaa* 

Pawneen, 

Cainonchei, 

Kiowaya, . 

Handans, 




daapawi, 

Minatareos, 

Assinaboini, 

Creoii, . 

GroK Ventres, 

Crowg, 

Caddooi, 

Poncaa, 

Arickareei, 

Cbeyennes, . 

Ulackfeet, 



Totals 



450 

15,000 

8,000 

3,000 

3,000 

4,S00 

9,000 

800 

3,000 

8,000 

30,000 

i]50,34l 



Recapitulation. 



Number of rndiana now Eait of the Minisaippi, 

Number of Indiana who have oroigraled from Eait to Weil aide, 

Number of ihe indigeoous Tribes, ...... 

^Aggrtgatty 



57,433 

45,690 

150,341 

253,464 



4. Extract from the Report of C. A. Harris ^ Commissioner of Indian 
Affairs f dated December \st, 1336. The details, the results of which 
are here mentioned^ may be seen in the Table on the following page, 

** The general result is, that within the last eight years, 93,401,637 
acres have been ceded bj the Indians, for which the United States have 
stipulated to give them $ 26,982,068 and 32,38 1 ,000 acres of land, valaed 
at $40,476,250, making the whole consideration $67,458,318. The obvi- 
ous reflection suggested by these facts is, the increased liberality and 
kindness of the United States in its intercourse with the aboriginal 
people. In 17B9, General Knox, in a communication addressed to the 
President of the United States, remarked, that, as the settlements shall 
approach near to the Indian boundaries established by treaties, ' they 
will be willing to sell further tracts for small considerations.* An ex- 
amination of the earlier treaties will show how little proportion the 
sums paid bore to the quantity and value of the land acquired. Ten, 
twenty, or thirty cents per acre were seldom exceeded. The average 
sum, paid in the period embraced in the annexed statement is seventy- 
two cents per acre. In the late treaties with the Chickasaws and aome 
other tribes, the provisions have been even munificent, the Uiiited 
States having given to them the whole net proceeds of their laade.' 



»» 



1838.] 



INDIAIf TRIBES. 



145 



Stalement showing the Quantity of Land ceded by Indian Tribes to the 
United States^ and the amourU stipvlated to be paid to thtm therefor, 
since the 4th of March, 1829. 



Name of Tribes. 



and Pota- 



I Winnabagoot. . 

S^Chippewai, Ottawa*, 
I walamiea .... 

3. Delaware!, .... 

4 Saca, Foxes, Sioux, and otheri, 

5,Choclawii, .... 

6,Senac«t, .... 

7 CrecKi, ..... 

SSeneeai and Shawaneai, 

9,dhawaneei, .... 
10,OtUwaa, .... 
UlWyaodota, .... 

1*2 McDomonies, 

13 Potawatamioi of the Prairie, . 

14 Potawatamioi of the Wabash, 

15 PotawatamiM of lodiaoa, 

16 Shawaneea and Dolawnios, 

17 Kaskaakiaf and Peorias, 
ISjKickapooa, .... 
ll9'i\ppalachico1a«, . • 

20 Pinnkesbawa and Weasj . 
3tjWinoeba£o«s, 

23 Saca and Foxes, 

t23 Chiekasaws, .... 

24 Chiekasaws, .... 

25 0ttawas, .... 
36!Cherokoes west, 
'27!Creeks west, 

|28'Seniinolos, .... 

|2U Quapaws, .... 
3o|Otoes and Mlssoorlas, 

31 Pawnees, .... 
32,Chippewas, Ottawas, and Pota- 
I watamies^ .... 
33, Potawatamies, 
34[ Band of Pota watamies, . 

35 Do. do. . 

36 Do. do. . . * . 

37 Caddoes, .... 

38 Cherokees, 

39 Chlppewas of Swan Creek 
I Black River, 

40 Wyandots, 
4 1, Four bands of Potawatamies, 

42 Two bands of do. 

43 Do. do. do. . 

44 Ottawas and Chippewas, 

45 Band of Potawatamies, 
46| Do. do. 



and 



I 



Total, . 



Date of 
Treaty. 



duantity 

of land 

coded tn 

U. States. 



Auf. 1, 1839' 



July 29, 
Aug. 3, 
July, 15, 
Sept. 97, 
Fob. 28, 
Mar. 24, 
July 20, 
Kvig. 8, 
Aug. 30, 
Jan. 19, 
Fob. 8, 
Oct. 20, 
Oct. 2f>, 
Oct. 27, 
Oct. 2t>, 
Oct. 27, 
Oct. 24, 
Oct. 11, 
Oct. 29, 
Sept. 15, 
5»ept.21, 
Oct. 21), 
May 24, 
Feb. 18, 
Fob. 14, 
Feb. 14, 
May 9, 
May 13, 
Sept. 21, 
Oct. 9, 

Sept. 26, 
Dec. 16, 
Dec. 17, 
July 31, 
Dec. 10, 
July 1, 
Doc. 29, 

May 9, 
April 23, 
April 22, 
April 23, 
April II, 
Mar. 28, 
Mar. 26, 
)lar. 29, 



1829- 

1829 

1830 

1830 

1831 

1832 

1831 

1831, 

18311 

1833 

laii 

1832 
18;{i' 
18>2 

i8:ja 
lai-i 
I8:i2| 
i8;ft?' 

18.J2| 
li'32 
18:12 
18.'« 
18*34 
1833 

I8:w 

1833 
18:« 
1833 
1833 
1833 

1833 
1834 
1834 
18351 

i8:w' 

1835 
1835 

1836 
1836 
18:)6 
183f) 
18.36 
1836 
1836 
1836 



Acres. 
2,530,000 

.4,160,000 

5,760 

16,256,000 

7,796,000 

40,000 

5,ia?,ooo 

39,680 

92,800 

49,917 

16,000 

3,00.»,000 

1,.')36,(K)0 

2,626,560 

737,000 

199,tW) 

1,920 

2,048,000 

5,120 

160,000 

2,816,000 

5,760,000 

6,422,400 

32^000 



4,032,640 
96,000 



5,104,960 
1,380 
2,560 
1,280 
3,843 
1,000,000 
7,882,940 

8,390 

39,900 

6,400 

1,920 

93,040 

13,734,000 

2,560 

9,560 



93,401,637 



Claantity 
of land as- 
signed to 
Indians as 
part of the 
considera- 
tion. 



Acres. 



15,000,000 
67,000 

9,000,000 

60,000 

100,000 

34,000 



96,000 
768,000 

* 160,000 
2,000,000 



96,000 



5,000,000 



32,381,000 



Amount 
paid to 
Indians 
in land, 
money, ftc. 



$ 746,862 

390,601 

3,000 

317,732 

92,938,529 

163,400 

15,809,080 

111,600 

162,500 

47,500 

24,400 

285,687 

460,346 

658,419 

406,121 

50,950 

155,780 

1,1.'»,100 

13,000 

214,069 

9,945,482 

r36,924 

* 3,000,000 

t 46,000 

32,640 

109,400 

59,036 

295,500 

254,076 

40,150 

112,220 

7,624,280 

1,600 

2,560 

600 

3,400 

86,800 

5,677,919 



I 



ii 



6,.S59 
2,079 
23,040 ; 
2,309,451 I 
2,719' 
2,719 



^(17,458,318, 



RxcAnTULATioiT. — - Whole number of acres acquired. 

Whole number of acres assigned, 
Cost of treaties, 



93,401,637 
. 99,:WI,000 
$ 67,458,318 



* Estimated net proceeds, tbe whole of which they will receive. 

F< 
»t defined in such manner as wifl 
b«inv ascertained. 



t Annuity. t For adjustment of boundaries. 

^ Boundories not defined in such manner as will admit of the area of the cession 



II Net proceeds to be paid to the Indians. No estimate of amount can now be made. 

13 



146 



UlflTBD STATES. 

XIII. EXECUTIVE GOVERNMENT. 



[1838. 



The 13th presidential term of four years, since the establishment of 
the ^y eminent of the United States under the Constitution, began on 
the 4th of March, 1837 ; and it will expire on the 3d of March, 1841. 

Salary. 
MARTIN VAN BUREN, New York, President, $25,000 

Richard M. JouRsoir, Kentucky, Viee-Presidmtf 5,000 

Thk CJabirxt. 

The following are the principal oificers in the ezeaUive department of 

the government, who form the Cabinet, and who hold their offices at 

the will of the President. 

Salary. 

John Forsyth, Georgia, Secretary of State, $6,000 

Levi Woodbury, New Hampshire, Secretary of the Treasury , 6,000 

Joel R. Poinsett, South Carolina, Secretary of War, 6,000 

Mahlon Dickerson, New Jersey, Secretary of the Jfavy, 6,000 

Amos Kendall, Kentucky, Postmagter'Oeneral, 6,000 

Benj. F. Butler, New York, Attorney- General, 4,000 

Department of State. 
John Forsyth, Secretary. 



Salary. 
A. O. Dayton, Chirf Clerk, $2,000 
W. S. Derrick, (Dip. Bureau,)! , GOO 
F. Markoe, {Cons. Bureau,) 1,400 
A.T. McCormick, (Home Bu.) 1,400 



Salary. 

Patent Office, 

H. L. Ellsworth, Com. Pat. $3»000 

Thomas Johns, Chitf Clerk, 1,700 

Robert Mills, Exam, Clerk, 1,500 



McC. Young, Chitf Clerk, $2,0iX) 

Comptrollers. 
George V^olf, \st Compirol. 3,500 
John Laub, Chief Clerk, 1,700 

Albion K.Parris,2<2 Comptrol. 3,000 
John N. Moulder Chief CVk. 1,700 

Auditors. 
Jesse Miller, IjC Auditor, 3,000 
Wm. Parker, Chi^ Clerk, 1,700 

Wm. B. Lewis, 2d Auditor, 3,000 
J. Eakin, Chief Clerk, 1,700 

Peter Hagner, 3d Auditor, 3,00<> 
J.Thompson, Chirf Clerk, 1,7()0 

J. C. Pickett, Ath Auditor, 3,000 
T. H. Gillis, Ckirf Clerk, 1,700 



Treasury Department. 

Leyi Woodbury, Secretary. 
Sabry. 



Ball 



Baiarr. 
S. Pleasonton, 6th Auditor, $3,000 
T. MusUn, Chief Clerk, 1,700 

Treasurer's Office. 
John Campbell, Treasurer, 3,000 
Wm.B. Randolph, Chief a' k,l, 700 

Register's Office. 
Thomas L. Smith. Register, 3,000 
M. Neurse, Chitf Clerk, 1,700 

Solicitar*s Office. 
Henry D. Gilpin, Soluitor, 3,500 

f^nd Office. 
J. S. Whitcomb, Com. Gen. 3,000 
J. M. Moore, Ut CVk. Surveys, 1 ,800 
S. D. King, Principal Clerk, 1,800 
M. Fitzhugh, Pr. CVk. Claims,l,900 
Matthew Burchard, Solicitor, 2,000 



^ 



1838.J 



EXECVTIVB 0OTSRNMSIVT. 



147 



War Dspartmbnt. 
Joel R. PoinMtty Suretary, 



Salary. 
J, A. Cochran, Chief Clerk, $2,0o0 
L. L. Van Kleeck, Clerk, 1,600 

Bounty Lands, 
Wm Gordon, Principal, 1,400 

Indian AffairM. 

Gary A. Harris, Commissar, 3,000 
Daniel Kurte, Chief aerk, 1,000 

Pension Ofiee. 

J. L. Edwards, Commissar, Sf,500 
Geo. W. Crump, Chief Clerk, 1,600 

JidjtUant- General* $ Office, 

Roger Jones, Col, i^ Adj. Oen, 
Lorenzo Thomas, 1st Lt, 4th b\f, 
E. Schriver, 2d Lt. 4th Art. 
Brooke WilUams, 1,150 

Paymaster- GeneraTs Office. 

Nathan Towson, PaymW Gen. 2,500 
N. Frje, Jun., Chi^ Clerk, 1,700 

Topographical Bureau. 

J. J. Abert, Lt. Col. ^ Top. Eng. 
Aug. Canfield, Capt. fyAs$ist. do. 



Salary. 
E. B. White, Lt. 4- Assist, do. 
Robert Fowler, Clerk, $800 

Purchasing Department. 
C. Irvine, Com. Gen. Purch. 3,000 
Tim. Banger, Chief Clerk, 1,500 

Clothing Department. 
John Garland, Brevet Major. 

Svhsistenee Department. 
Geo. Gibson, Brig. Gen., Gen. Com. 
J. H. Hook, Maj. fy Com. Siihsi^. 
C. G. Wilcox, Clerk, 1^0 

Surgeon- GeneraTs Office. 
Thomas Lawson, Surg. Gen. 2,500 
R. Johnson, Clerk, 1.150 

quartermaster-GeneraVs Office. 

Maj. T. Cross, Acting Q. M. O. 
T. F. Hunt, Major 5th Inf. Assist. 
Wm. A Gordon, Clerk, 1,150 

Engineer Department, 
Gen. Charles Gratiot, ChirfEng. 



NaYT DpPARTMBRT. 

Mahlon Dickerson, Secretary. 
John Boyle, Chief Clerk, salary $2,000. 
A*ai72^ Commissioners, 

Salarr salary. 

C. W. Goldsborough, Sec'y, 2,000 
W. G. Ridgeley, Chief Clerk, 1,600 



Balarv. 
Isaac Channcey, Presidenl^^ 3,500 
Charles Morris, 3,500 

A. S. Wadsworth, 3,500 



Salary. 



GXNKBAL PoST-OfFICR. 

Amos Kendall, Postmaster- General. 

Charles K. Gardner, Auditor of the Post* Office, 

Sclah R. Hobbie, Assist. Postmaster- General, 1st Div. 

Robert Johnston, do. do. do, 2d Div. 

Datiiel Coleman, do. do. do, 3d Div. 

Peter G. Wa$hington, Chief Clerk. 



Salary. 
$3,000 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,000 



148 



UNITED 8TATK8. 



[1838. 



XIV. THE JUDICIARY. 



Supreme Court. 

*,* For an account of Ihe jurisdiction of the Supreme Court, the Circuit 
Courts and the District Courts, see the American Almanac for 1831. 

Roger B. Taney, 
Joseph Story, 
Smith Thompson, 
John McLean, 
Henry Baldwin, 
James M Wayne, 
Philip P. Barbour, 
John McKinley, 
John Catron, 
Beuj. F. Butler, 
Richard Peters, 
WUliam T. CarroU, 

The Supreme Court is held in the City of Washington, and has one Ks- 
sion, annually, commencing on the secpnd Monday of January. 

DISTRICT COt/RTdt — JUDGES, ATTORNEYS, 



Roaidence. 




Appointed 


Salary. 


Baltimore, Md. 


Chief Justice. 


1836, 


$5,000 


Cambridge, Mass. 


Associate Justice^ 


. 1811, 


4,500 


New York, N. Y. 


do. 


1823, 


4,500 


Cincinnati, Ohio, 


d4>. 


1829, 


4,500 


Pittsburg, Pa. 


do. 


1830, 


4,500 


Savannah, Ga. 


do. 


1835, 


4,500 


Gordonsville, Va. 


do. 


1836, 


4,500 


Florence, Ala. 


do. 


1837, 


4,500 


Nashville, Ten. 


' do. 


1837, 


4,500 


Washington, D. C 


. Mtomey- General^ 


4,000 


Philadelphia, 


Reporter^ 




1,000 


Washington, 


Clerk, 




Fees, &^. 



Districts. 
Maine, 

N. Hampkhire, 
Vermont, 
Maauebuietts, 
Rhode Island, 
Connecticut, 
V V S^- Dint. 
"• '• f a. Di«t. 
New Jeraoy, 
p. S E. Dist. 
"• t W.Diit. 
Delaware, 
Maryland, 
V, J E. Dist. 
^*- jW.Diit. 
North Uaroliaa, 
South Carolioa, 
Georgia, 
... J S. Dist. 
^'■- i N. Disi. 
Misiisiippi, 
T . « E. Dist. 
^- ( W.Dist. 
E. Dist. 
f W.Dist. 
Kentucky, 
Ohio, 
Indiana, • 
Illinois, 
Missouri, 
Michigan, 
Arkansas, 



JutLres. 
Ashur Ware, 
Matthew Harvey, 
Elijah Paine, 
John Davis, 
John Pitman, 
And'wT. Judson, 
A. Conkling, 
;^. R. Belts, 
William Rossel, 
Jos. Hopkinsot], 
Thomas Irwin, 
WiUard Hall, 
Upton S. Heath, 
PHtor V. Daniol, 
Alex. Caldwell, 
f1. Potter, 
Thomas Lee, 
Jer. Cuylor, 

Wm. Crawibrd, 

(George Adams, 



Residence, \ Salary. 
Portland, ! $1,800 

HopkintOD, | 1,000 
WilliamstoVn,; 1,300 



Ten. 



M. W. Brown, 

Th. B. Monroe, 
H. A. Leavitt, 
Josso L. Holman, 
Nathaniel Pope, 
Robert W.Wolls, 
Ross Wilkins, 
Beoj. Johnson, 



D. Columbia, iWUIiam Cranch, 



Boston, 

Providence, 

Canterbury, 

Albany, 

New York, 

Mt. Holly, 

Philadelphia, 

Pituborg, 

Belmont, 

Richmond, 

(Marksburg, 

Raleigh, 

Charleston, 

Savannah, 

Mobile, 

Natchez, 

New Orleans, 

Nashville, 

Frankfort, 
Steubonville, 
Lawrenceburg, 
Vandaiia, 



2,500 
1,500 
1,500 
2,000 
3,500 
1,500 
2,500 
1,800 
1,500 
2,000 
1,^^00 
1,600 
2,000 
2,500 
2,500 

2,500 

2,000 

3,000 I 

1,500 [ 

1,500 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,200 
2,000 
1,500 



Washington, I 2,700 



Jittomeys. 
Joseph Howard, 
J. P. Hale, 
David Kellogg, 
John Mills, 
R. W. Greene, 
Wm. S. Hohibird, 
Nat. B. Benton, 
Wm. M. Price, 
James S. Greene, 
Jobn M. Reed, 
Bonj. Patton, Jun. 
James A. Bayard, 
N. Williams, 
R. C. Nicholas, 
N. G. Singleton, 
T. P. Devereaux, 
R. B. Gilchrist, 
Wm. H. Btiles, 
John Forsyth, 
John D. Pholan, 
R. M. Gaines, 
Henry Carleton, 
P. K. Lawrence, 
J. A. McKinney, 
James P. Grundy, 
Lewis Sanders, 
N. H. Swayne, 
T. A. Howard, 
David J. Baker, 
A. L. Mogennis, 
Daniel G(M>dwin, 
Samuel C. Hall, 

'Francis Key, 



Pom. 
$300 at fees. 
200 do. 
200 do. 

200 h. fees. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
SOO do. 
200 do. 
Foes, &c. 
200 & fees. 
200 do. 
Fees, &e. 
200&reea. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
Foes. &e. 
200 & fee*. 
200 do. \ 
200 do. I 
200 do. 
600 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 
200 do. 

200 do. 



1838.] 



JUDICIAaT. 



149 



Circuit Courts. 



The United States are divided into the nine following judicial oircaits, 
in each of which a Circuit Court is held twice every year, for each State, 
within the circuit, by a Justice of the Supreme Court, assigned to the circuit, 
and by the District Judge of the State or District, in which the Court site. 

Prttiiliiif Jadft. 
1st Circuit, Maine, N. Hampshire, Mass., and R. I., Mr. Justice Story. 
2d do. Vermont, Connecticut, and New York, Mr. Justice Thompson. 



New Jersey and Pennsylvania, 
Delaware and Maryland, 
Virginia and North Carolina, 
South Carolina and Georgia, 
Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Michigan, 
Kentucky, Tennessee, and Missouri, 

There is a local Circuit Court held by three Judges in the District of Co- 
lumbia, specially appointed for that purpose. The Chief Justice of that 
Court sits also as District Judge of that District 



3d 


do. 


4th 


do. 


5th 


do. 


6th 


do. 


7th 


do. 


8th 


do. 



Mr. Justice Baldwin. 
Mr. Chief Justice Taney. 
Mr. Justice Barbour. 
Mr. Justice Wayne. 
Mr. Justice McLean. 
Mr. Justice Catron. 



MA8SBAUS, AND CLERKS. 



Albert Smith, 
Charles Luia, 
Heman Lowri*, 
Jooa* Ij. Sibley, 
' Borrioff. Anthony, 
N. IVflcoz, 
NathaDiel Oarrow, 
W. C.H.Waddell, 
J. 8. Darey, 
B. 8. Boniafl, 
I John M. Davb, 
I D. C. Wileon, 
! Nichola* Snyder, 
I B. Chruliao, 
• James Points^ 
< Bererly Daniel, 
I Thomas C. Coody, 
Peter Solomon, 
&. Ij. Crawford, 
B. Patterson, 
W. N. Gwinn, 
J H. Holland, 



i William Lyon, 
. 8. B. Marshall, 
J. M. MeCalla, 
Joho Patterson, 
O. Taylor, 
Uonry IViltoo. 
Jamas H. Belfe, 
Coorsd Ten Eyek, 
Eliaa lUetor, 

AJazaador Hnnter, 



Portland, 



Boston, 

Provid^ce, 

Berlin, 

Utiea. 

New York, 

Newark, 

Philadelphia, 

Pitubaiy, 

WilfDington, 

Baltimore, 

Richmond, 

WheeUog, 

Raleigh, 

Charleston, 

Mobile, 
HnntsTille, 
Natches, 
New Orleans, 

Kooxrille, 

Marfreesboro*, 

Lexineton, 

Colaimms, 

Brownston, 

Garlyle, 



Looii, 



Pay. 

Fees, Ate. 
$S004fees 

300 do. 

Fees, ^. 
do. 
do. 
900 at fees. 
Fees, Ate. 

do. 

do. 

S00 4tAes. 
900 do. 
Fees. 4to. 

do. 
900atAes. 
Feei, dec. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

900 k, fees. 
900 do. 

Fees, ttc. 
900 ^ fbei. 
900 do. 



900 
900 
900 
900 
900 
900 
900 



do* 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



Clerk*. 
John Mmsey, 
C. W. Cutter, 
Jesse GoYe, 
Frsaeii Bassett, 
John T. Pitmsn, 

C. A. IngersoU, 
R. B. Miller, 
Fred. J. Betu, 
W. Pennington, 
F. Hopkinson, 
E. J. Roberts, 
W.A.Mend'nhall 
Thomas Bpieer, 
Riehaid Jeffries, 

W.H.Haywood, 
James Jarvey, 
George Gleno, 

D. Flies, 
C. R. Clifton, 
William Bnms, 



Wsshington, | Few, Bcc. 



J. Lessasiier, 
W. C. Mynatt, 
N. A. McNairy, 
J. H. Haona, 
William Miner, 
Henry Harst, 
W. H. Brown, 
Joseph Gamble, 



B. J. Lee, 



I JUndraes. 

Portland, 

Portsmouth, 

Rutland, 

Boston, 

Providenoe, 

New Haven, 

Utiea. 

New York, 

Newark, 

Philadelphia, 

Pittsburg, 

Baltimore, 
Richmond, 

Raleigh, 

Charleston, 

Savannah, 

Mobile, 

BunUTille, 

Nstohes, 

New Orleans, 



KnozTille, 

NashTille, 

Frankfort, 

Colombos, 

Cory don, 

Vandalia, 

SU Louis, 



Pay. 
Fees, fcc. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 

do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 

do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



Alexandria, ( do. 



150 



UNITED 8TATK8. 



[1838. 



Places and Times of holding the District and Circuit Courts 

OF THE United States. 



Maine. 

N. Hampshire. 
Vermont. 



! 



District Courts. 

Wiscassti — Last Tuesday in Feb. and Ist Tues. in 
Sept. ; — Portland — Ist Tues. in June and Dec. 

Portsmouth — 3d Tuesday in March and Sept. ; — 
Exeter — 3d Tuesday in June and December. 

Rutland — 6th of Oct ; — Windsor— 'M\h of May. 



MAMAcnnflVTTs f ^ort<m— 3d Tuesday in March, 4th Tues. in June, 
jmassachusetts. ^ 2j Tuesday in Sept , and 1st Tuesday in Dec. 

iJ^Tetoport — iM Tuesday in May, and 3d in Oct. ; — 
Providence — 1st Tues. in Aug and February. 

iJVew Haven — 4th Tues. in February and Aug. ; — 
Hartford — 4th Tuesday in May and Nov. 

} JVeio York — 1st Tuesday of each month. 

C Albany — 3d Tuesday in January ; — UUca — Last 
( Tuesday in August. 

C Jfew Brunswick — 2d Tuesday in March and Sept. ; 

< — Burlington — 3d Tuesday in May and Novem- 
C ber. 

! Philadelphia — 8d Monday in February, May, Au- 
gust, and November. 

C Pittsburg — 1st Monday in May and 3d Monday in 
I Octol^r. 

'Jfevxastle 4* Dover — alternately, on the 4th Tiles, 
in Nov. 1789 ; and thiee other sessions progres- 
sively, on the 4th Tuesday of every 3d calendar 

^ month. 

i Baltimore — on the 1st Tuesday in March, June, 
\ September, and December. 

Washington — 1st Monday in June and December. 

C Richmond — 15th of May and 15th of November ; — 
\ Jiorfolk — 1st of May and 1st of November, 

i Staunton — 1st day of May and 1st day of Oct. ; — 
Wythe Court House — 3d Monday in April and 
Sept. ; — Lewisburg — 4th Monday in April and 
Sept ; — Clarksburg — 4th Mon. in May and Oct. 

( Edenton — 3d Mond. in April and Oct. ; — JS''ewbem 

< — 4th Monday in April and Oct. ; — Wilmington — 
( 1st Monday after the 4th Mond. in April and Oct. 

Charleston — 3d Monday in March and Sept ; 1st 
Monday in July and 2d Monday in Dec ; — Lau' 
reus Court House — the next Tuesday after the 
adjournment of the Circuit Court at Columbia. 

Savannah — 2d Tues. in Feb., May, Aug., and Nov. 

Ala., N. District. HunisvUle — 2d Monday in April and October. 

Ala., S. District. Mobile — 1st Monday in May, and 2d Mond. in Dec. 



Rhode Island. 

Connecticut. 

New Tore, 
S. District. 

New York, 
N. District. 

New Jersey. 

Pennsylvania, 
£. District. 

Pennsylvania, 
W. District. 



Delaware. 



Maryland. 

Columbia. 

Virginia, 
E. District. 

Virginia, 
W. District. 



N. Carolina. 



S. Carolina. 



Georgia. 



1838.] 



JUOICIART. 



151 



Mississippi. 

La., £. District. 

La., W. District. 

txrhessee, 
E. District. 

Tehiiessex, 
W. District. 

KE5TVCKT. 



Ohio. 

IVDIANA. 

iLLiirois. 
Missouri. 



I 



'Jackson ^^4\h Mond. in Jan. fc Jane. 

Jfew Orleans — 2d Monday in December. 

Opelousas Court House «~ 2d Monday in Jane. 

KnozmUe — 3d Monday in April and 2d Monday in 
October. 

Nashville — 4th Monday in May and November. 

Frankfort — Ist Monday in May and November. 

Columbus — 3d Monday in July, and 4th Monday 
in DeceiAber. 

Indianapolis — last Monday in May and November. 

Vandalia — 1st Monday in May and December. 

Jefferson — let Monday in March and September. 



Circuit Courts. 



Maihs. 

N. Hampshire . 

Vermoitt. 

Massachusetts. 

Rhode Island. 

CoNlfXCTICUT. 

New Tors, 

S. District. 
N. District. 

New Jersey. 

Pehnstlvaitia, 
£. District. 
W. District. 

Delaware. 

Martlahd. 

VlROIIilA, 

£. District. 
W. District. 

N. Carolina. 
S. Carolina. 

Georgia. 

Alabama, 
S. District. 
N. District. 

Mississippi. 

Louisiana, 
£. District. 



Portland — 1st May ; — Wiscasset — Ist October. 

Portsmouth — 8th May ; — Exeter — 8th October. 

Windsor — 2l8t May ; — Rutland — 3d October. 

Boston — I5th May and 15th October. 

Jfewport — 15th June ; — Providence — I5th Nov. 

C JVeto Haven — last Wednesday in April ; Hartford 
\ — 17th September. 

C JVVto York — last Mondav in Feb., 1st Monday in 

< April, last Monday in July and October. 

( Albany — 2d Tuesday in lune ; 3d Tues. in Oct. 

Trenton — 1st April and 1st October. 

S Philadelphia — Uih April and 11th October. 
Pittsburgh — 3d Monday in May and November. 

iJVetocastle — Tuesday following 4th Mond. in May ; 
— Dover — Tuesday following 3d Monday in Oct 

Baltimore — 1st Mond. in April and October. 

C Richmond — 22d May and 22d November. 
( Lewisburg — 1st Monday in August. 

Raleigh — 12th May and 12th November. 

C Charleston — 2d Tuesday in April ; — Columbia — 
( 4th Monday in November. 

Savannah — Thursday aAer the Ist Monday in 
May ; — Milledgeville — Thursday after the 1st 
Monday in November. 

( Mobile — 2d Monday in April and October. 
I HuntsvUle — 1st Monday in June. 

Jackson — 1st Monday in May and November. 

iJVew Orleans— 3d Monday in May and Novem- 
ber. 



153 



ViriTED 8TATC8. 



[1838. 



Tekkissek. 

Kkvtuckt. 

Ohio. 

Michigan. 

ivdiaiia. 

Illikois. 

M188OUK1. 

Arxaitsas. 

D. OP Columbia. 



C JVVwA«t((«— Ist Monday in March and Sept.; — 
\ KnoxvUU — 2d Monday in October. 

Frmn/^ort — let Monday in May aiid NoTember. 

ColumhuM — 3d Monday in May and December. 

Detroit — 4th Monday in Jane. 

Indianapolis — let Monday in December. 

VandaUa — Laat Monday in November. 

St. Louis — let Monday in April. 

Little Rock — 4th Monday in March. 

i Washington — 4th Mond. in March and November ; 
— Alexandria — Ist Mond. in May and October. 



XV. INTERCOURSE WITH FOREIGN NATIONS. 

The pay of Ministers Plenipotentiary is $9,000 per annum, as 
salary, besides $9,000 for outfit. The pay of Charges d* Affaires is 
$ 4,500 per annum ; of Secretaries of Legation, f 2,000. 

The government of the United States is represented by Ministers 
Plenipotentiary at the courts of Great Britain, France, Russia, Spain, 
Prussia, and Mexico, and by Charges d'Affaires at the courts of most of 
the other foreign countries with w^ich this country is much connected 
by commercial intercourse. 

MinitUTs Plenipotentiary in 1837. 
Appointed. Foreifn Statei. 



Andrew Stevenson, 
Lewis Cass, 
John H. Eaton, 
George M. Dallas, 
Henry Wheaton, 
Powhatan Ellis, 



Edward Kavanagh, 
Auguste Davezac, 
Virgil Mazcy, 
Christopher Hughes, 
J. F. Woodside, 
David Porter, 
R. B, McAfee, 
J. G. A. Williamson, 
William Hunter, 
Charles G. De Witt, 
Richard Pollard, 
James B. Thornton, 
Alcee La Branche, 



Benjamin Rush, 
Charles E. Anderson, 
Arthur Middleton, 



Va. 

Ohio, 

Tenn. 

Pa. 

R. L 

Miss. 



1836 
1836 
1836 
1837 
1837 
1837 



Great Britain, 

France, 

Spain, 

Russia, 

Prussia, 

Mexico, 



Chargds d'Affaires in 1837. 



Me. 
La. 

Md. 

Md. 

Ohio, 

Md. 

Ken. 

N. C. 

R.I. 

N. y. 

N. H. 
La. 



1835 
1831 
1837 
1830 
1835 



1834 

1834 
1836 
1837 



Portugal, 

Holland, 

Belgium, 

Sweden, 

Denmark, 

Turkey, 

New uranada, 

Venezuela, 

Brazil, 

Central America, 

Chili, 

Peru, 

Texas, 



CftpiuU. 

London* 

Paris. 

Madrid. 

St. Petersb'gh. 

Berlin. 

Mexico. 



Lisbon. 

Hague. 

Brussels. 

Stockholm. 

Copenhagen. 

Constantin'ple 

Bogota. 

Caracas. 

Rio Janeiro. 

Guatemala 

Santiago. 

Lima. 



Secretaries of Legation, 

G. Britain. 

France. 

Spain. 



Wm. W. Chew, 
Theodore S. Fay, 
Charles Ellis, 



Russia. 

Prussia. 
Mexico. 



1838.] 



CONSULS IN rORBIGH COUNTRIES. 



153 



COHSULS OF TBS UfflTID BtATKS IN FoREIOlT COUMTRISS. 



Aoitria, 

it 

»( 

Baibarj, 

u 

Bcraria, 

Dvlgiuoa, 

i( 

txtl, 

(( 
u 
l( 
(( 

i( 

It 

Su'o* Ayr'i, 

America, 

Chili. 
t( 

(( 

('bina, 

Deomark 4c 
DepoD- 
deoeiet, 

Egypt, Pa- 
sha of, 
•( 

t< 

(( 

Equator, 

Franco aod 

Depen- 

deoeiei, 
(I 

i< 
ct 
«( 

iC 

(i 
u 
(I 
({ 

G. Britaio 

4c DepoD- 

dencioa, 
It 

(< 

II 

*t 

(I 

« • 

Ci 

tc 
u 

(i 
(( 

'* 

t( 

(( 

<( 

<i 

I 

(i 



Vienna, 

Trieilo, 
Venice, 

Tanie, 

Tripoli, 

Tangier, 

Manich, 

Antwerp, 

Oitend, 

Kio Janeiro, 

San Salvador, 

Pemambuco, 

Para- 
la. Maranliaro, 

Rio Grande, 

Saotoi, 

I. St. Cath'ne, 

Boe'oi Ayrot, 

Guatemala, 

Truxillo^ 

Valparaiio, 

Coqaimbo, 

Talcabuana, 

Canton, 

Copenhagen, 

St. Tbomai, 

St. Croix, 

Elsinear, 

Aleppo, 

BeiroQt, 4bC. 

Alexandria, 

Candia, 

Canea, 

Ouaywiail, 

Pat is, 

BordMQx, 

Maneillee, 

Nantei, 

Harre da Gr., 

Lyona, 
Cette, 

La Rocbelle, 

Bay(H)na, 

Gnadaloupe, 

Martinique, 

Algiera, 

London, 

LiTerpool, 

Brutol, 

Falmouth, 

Plymouth, 

Hull, 

Cowea, 

Olaamw, 

Leith, 

Dundee, 

Dublin, 

Cork, 

Belfut, 

Londonderry, 

Galway, 

Gibraltar, 

Cape-town, 

I.of France, 

Turk*! laland, 

Bermuda, 

Nawau, N. P. 



J. G. Scbwarx 


Q. Britain 


George Moore 


k. Depen- 


Albert Dabadie 


dencies, 


Samuel D. Heap 


t( ' 


D. S. McCauJey 


u 


James R. Leib 


it 


R. de Reudorifer 


(( 


Th. II. Barker 


(i 


Louia Mark 


(( 


George Blocum 


1 " 


Wm. Odiin 


Greece, 


Jocoph Ray 


(( 


Cb. J. Smith 


Hanaaatic 


Charles B. Allen 


Towns, 


Uaac A. Haves , " ' 


George Black 


HayU, 


Lemuel Wells 


(t 


'J'h. Lumpkin 


CI 


Charles Savage 


H. Caasel, 


6. Courtault 


Holland and 


Geo. G. Ilobton 


Dependen- 


Th. T. Smith 


cies, 


Edw. Byerback 
P. W. Snow 


it 


U 


C. J. Hambro 


u 


Nathan Levy 


lUlian 


David Rogers 


Statea, 


Rd. L. Rainals 


u 


Chev. Durighello 


Mecklenb'g, 


J. Chattoaud 


Mexican 


John Gliddon 


Sutes, 


Vincent Roaa 


t< 


D. Boonal 


tt 


Seth SweeUer 


i( 


Daniel Brent | 


t< 


George Strobel ' 


ii 


D. C. Croxall ; 


i< 


P. C. Fenwick 


<i 


R. G. Beanley 
Th. W. Oldfieldi 


II 


(C 


Theodore Privat 


u 


Jss. J. Debessi 


«( 


Dominic Lynch 


CI 


P. Suao 


CI 


Robert F. Chase Muscat, j 


Charles Garavini 


N. Grenada, 


Th. Aspinwall 


ti 


F. B. Ogden 


CI 


Th. Dennison 


Peru, 


Robert VV. Fox 


cc 


Thomas W. Fox 


IC 


Albert Davy 


Portugal k. 


R. R. Hunter 


Dependen- 


Alex. Thomson 


cies, 


Robert Grieve 


CI 


Edward Baxter 


CI 


Thomas Wilson 


IC 


Reuben Harvey 


Prussia, 


Th. W. Gilpin 


CC 


J. Corscadpn 


Roman St'a, 


Th. M. Perse 


Russia, > 


Horatio Spragne 


CC 


Isaac Chase 


II 


Paul Froberville 


CI 


John Arthur 


Sandwich T. , 


W. T. Tucker 


Sardinia, | 


George Huyler 


Saxony, 



Antigua k, St. 
Christopher, 

Kingston, Ja. 

Barbadoes, 

MalU, 

St. Helena, 

Demarara, 

Halifax, N. B. 

St. John's, 

Sydney, N. B. 

Athens, 

Svra. IsJ. 

Hamburg, 

Bremen, 

Frankfort. 

P*t an Prince, 

Auz Cayea, 

Cape Haytien, 

Cassel, 

Amsterdam, 

Rotterdam, 

Surinam, 

Isle Cura^o, 

Batavia, 

Since pore, 

Rome, 

Leghorn, 

Genoa, 

Rostock, 

Mexico, 

Tampico, 

Aguatnlco, 

Acapulco, 

Monterey, 
8. Blaa Jt Max. 

Vera Crux, 

Matamoros, 

Chihuahua, 

Santa Fe, 

Saltillo, 

Campeohe, 

Goayamas, i 

Tabasco, { 

Lagnna, 

Zanxibwr, 

Carthagena. 

Santa Martha, 

Panama, 

Arequipa, Stc. 

Lima, 

Paita, 

Liabon, 

St. Ubei, 

Oporto, 

Madeira, 

Fayal, 

C. Verde IsIs. 

Elberfeld, 

Stettin, 

Rome, 

SL Peterab*f , 

RiM, 

Odessa, 
Archangel, 
S. Islands, 
Genoa, 
Dresden, 



R. Higinbotkam 
R. M. Uarriaon 
John Haly 
W. W. Andrewa 
Wm. Canoll 
Moaes Benjamin 
John Morrow 
Th. Leavitt 
W.J.H.WilPma 
G. E. Perdicaria 
James Wilkioa 
John Cuthbort 
Joshua Dodge 

E. Schwendler 

F. M. Dimond 
William Milea 
Samuel Israel 
Charles Graefa 
J. W. Parker 
J. Wambersia 
Thomas Traak 
Louis Paimba»of 
Owen Roberta 
Joseph Balestiar 
Geo. W. Greene 
Th. Appleton 
Charles Bamat 

C. P. Choltz 
Wm. D. Jonea 
John 6. McC^] 
Thomaa Reily 
Harvey Gregg 
Wm. K Gilliam 
JoaeM.Caataoot 
M. Burroogh 

D. W. Smith 
J. 8. Lanffham 
Ceran Su vrain 
J. W. McGoffln 
Payton Gay 
Cb. W. Davis 
H B.Coleman 
J. W. Langdoo 
R. P. Watara 

J. M.Maophenon 
Alex. Danouille 
J. B. Feraod 
W. F. Taylor 
A. Worthington 
James Girdon 
I. P. Hutchinson 
Wm. H. Vasoy 
C. Brown 
John H. Mareh 
C. W. Dabney 
Ferd. Gardiner 
Wm. T. Simons 
Fred. Schillow 
Geo. W. Greene 
A. P. Gibson 
Alex. Schwartz 
John Ralli 
Edmund Brandt 
J. C. Jones, Jr. 
Charlea Bamet 
Edw. F. Rivinus 



154 



UNITED 8TATS8. 



[1838. 



Saxony, 

BoeietT III. 

Spain «. Do- 

p«adeQ- 

ciei, 
ii 

it 

(( 

<i 

(I 

t( 

i( 

i« 

(t 

(i 

»i 

t« 

(i 

(f 

Sweden, 
t( 



{Leiptie, 

louheite, 

Cadiz. 

Barcelona, 

Malaga, 

Alicaot, 

Bilboa, 

Manilla, 

Tonerine, 

Port Mabon, 

HaTana, 

Trinidad, Cn. 

St. Jago, 

Matanzai. 

Puerto del P. 

Ponce P. R. 

Guayama, do, 

Mayazuez, do. 

St. Johu'i, do. 

Stoekbolm, 

Oottenburf, 



Frederick Lut 
S. R. Blacker, 
Alex. Burton 
Joseph Borrai 
Geo. G. Barren 

M. de Afulrra 
A. H.P. Edwards 
iofeph Cullen 
ObaJiah Rich 
N. P. Triit 
E. C. Watmongh 
Michael Mahon 
L. Shoemaker 
John Owen 
Jai. C. Galleaher 
W. H. Tracy 
George Latimer 
G. W. Montgotliery 
G. D. Arfwedson 
C. A. Murray 



it 

Switxerl'nd, 

Texas, 
ct 

ii 

Tuikey, 
ii 

it 

it 

ii 

it 

ti 

Tiucany, 
Two Sici- 
lies, 
it 

Uragnay, 
Venezuela, 

it 
It 

tt 



BergM, Ny. 

Banl, 

Brazoria, 

Galveston, 

Goliad, 

Constanti'ple, 

Smyrna, 

Salooica, 

Stancbo, 

Cyprus, 

Broasa, 

Tenedos, 

Leghorn, 

Naples, 

Palermo, 

Messina, 

Montevideo, 

Maracaybo, 

Puer. Cabello, 

Lag nay ra, 

Angostura, 



Helmich Janaon 
E.H. Thomson 
John A. Parker 
F. Slaoi^hUr 
John Striker 
Geo. A. Porter 
David Oflley 
W. B. Llewellen 
D. Davenant 
N. de Mattey 
N. L. Periek 
B. Samariisa 
Th. Appletoa 
Alex. Hammel 
Benj. Gardner 
J. L. Payson 
John Patrick 
W. J. Dubbe 
,F. Litchfield 
I Benj. Renshaw 
|Tb. B. Nalle 



MiNiSTJEBS, CojrsuLs, &c. or Foreign Powers im the United States. 



JSustria, 
Baron de Lederer, CofiMutr- Oen. 
Jos. Ganahl, K. Canndf Sayannah. 

Baden, 

C. F. Hoyer, Consul^ New York. 

Bavaria. 
George Heinrich, Consulf R. York. 

Belgium, 
Baron D. Behr, MxnuUr Resident, 
E. A. Homer, Consulf Boston. 
Henry G. T. Mali, do. N. York. 
Henry Lefebare, do. Charleston. 

Brazil, 

D. Cavalcanti d'Albnqnerque, 
Charg6 d'affaires. 

S. de Soaza Telles, Consul' Gen- 
eralf Philadelphia. 

Archibald Forte, Cons., Massachu- 
setts, N. Hampshire, &> Maine. 

C. Griffin, do. New London. 

Samuel Snow, do. Providence. 

Herman Bruen, do. New York. 

J. Vaughan, V. Con., Philadelphia. 

G. H. Newman, do, Baltimore. 

Chrlstoph. Neale, do. Alexandria. 

Myer Myers, do. Norfolk. 



John P. Calhorda, do. Wilmington. 
Sam'l. Chadwick, do, Charleston. 
J. 'W. Anderson, do. Savannah. 
Jas. W. Zacharie, do, N. Orleans. 

Bremen. 

Eleazer Crabtree, Cons., Savannah. 

John Jacob Werner, Vice- Consul^ 

ad interim^ Philadelphia. 

Caspar Meier, do. New York. 

ChiU. 
Manuel Carvallo, Ch*g6 d'4faires, 

Denmark. 

, Ckarg6 d^J^ahres. 

W. Ritchie, Viee- Consul, Boston. 
Benj. Aymar, do. New York. 
John Buhlen, do. Philadelphia. 
H. G. Jacobson, do. Baltimore. 
Christ. Neale, do. Alexandria. 
Fred. Myers, Consul, Norfolk. 
P. K. Dickinson, do. Wilmington. 
James H. Ladson, do. Charleston. 
W. Crabtree, Jr. do. Savannah. 
Peter £. Sorbe, do. N. Orleans. 

Frariee. 
M. Edouard Pontois, Envoy Extra- 
ordinary if Min. Plenipotenitary. 
M. Saligny, Secretary of Legation, 



1838.] FORKION MINISTERS, CONSULS, d^C, IN THE U. STATES. 155 



Adel Charles LAcathon de la For- 
est, Ckmsul^Generalf Mew York. 

llichael E. Henaut, Cona., PhU'a. 

M. Henri, Com. AgeiU^ Baltimore. 

Connt Choiseul, F. C, Charle8t4m. 

M. Dee^ze, do. Norfolk. 

Delame de Villeret, do. Sayannah. 

M. Batre, Com. ^gent, Mobile. 

Count de la Porte, V. Consul, Tal- 
lahassee. 

Martin Francois Armand Saillard, 
Consul, New Orleans. 

Frahkfori. 
A. Halbach, Consul, Philadelphia. 
Fred. Wjsmann, do. New York. 

Great Britain. 
Henry S. Fox, Envoy Exlraor. and 

Min. Plenipotentiary. 
Cnarles Bankhead, See. of Legation, 
Andrew Buchanan, Attaeki. 
J. T. Sherwood, Consul, Portland. 
Donald Mcintosh, do. Portsmouth. 
George Manners, do. Boston. 
James Buchanan, do. New York. 

, do. Philadel'a. 

John McTavish, do. Baltimore. 
William Gray, do. Norfolk. 
Henry Newman, do. Charleston. 
Edm. Molyneaux, do. Savannah. 
James Baker, do. Mobile. 

John Crawford, * do, N.Orleans. 
Albert G. Lano, V. C, Eastport 
J. B. S wanton, do. Bath. 

Greorge Jaffray, do. Portsmouth. 
R. C. Manners, do. Boston. 
J. C. Buehanan, do. New York. 
P. T. Dawson, do. Baltimore. 
Robert Leslie, do. Petersburg. 
Wm. Mackenzie, do. Richmond. 
Anthony Mislan, do. Wilmington. 
James Moodie, do. Charleston. 
William Cooke, do. Darien. 

John Innerarity, do. Pensacola. 



OUver O'Hara, F. C, Key West. 
Robert Higgin, do. Mobile. 

,Homhurg. 
C. N. Buck, C. Gen., Philadelphia. 
J. W. Schmidt, V. Cons., N. York. 
F. Christ Graf, do. Baltimore. 
A. C. Cazenoye, do. Alexandria. 
Jacob Wulff, do. Charleston. 

Charles Knorre, do. Boston. 

F. W. Schmidt, Cons., N. Orleans. 

Hanover. 
A. W. Hopeden, V. C, N. York. 
John Lowden, Cons., Charleston. 

Hanseatie Toums. 
Lewis Trapman, Cons., Charleston. 
Casper Meier, do. New York. 

H. F. Von Lenyerke, do. Philad*a. 
Thomas Searle, do. Boston. 
A. C. Cazenoye, do. Alexandria. 
Fred. Frey, do. N. Orleans. 

Hesse CasseL. 
Conrad W. Faber, Cons., N. York. 

Holland or Jfetkerlands. 
Chey. A. Martini, Ch'gi d'^fiUres. 
J. C. Zimmermann, Cons., N. York. 
J. J. Hagewerft, do. Baltimore. 
A. C. Cazenoye, do. Alexandria. 
Henry Bohlen, do. Philad'phia. 
Thomas Dixon, do. Boston. 
P. G. Leichleitner, do. Annapolis. 
Myer Myers, do. Norfolk. 

G. Barnsley, do. ad. int., Sayannah. 
Thomas Taxter, V. Cons., Salem. 
H. C. Gildmeester, Cons., N. Or*ls. 

Mecklenburg' Schwerin, 
Leon Herchenrath, Con., Charrton. 

Mextco. 

Don Francisco Pizarro Martinez, 

Envoy Ex. and Min. Plen. 
Estanislao Cuesta, Secretary. 



156 



UNITED STATES. 



[1838. 



Manuel Bassave, AUaM, 

, New Orleans 

£dward Cabot, F. Consul, Boston. 
P. Gonzalez jr Aquila, do. N. York. 
A. M. Cos, ad int., do, Philadelphia. 
Luke Tiernan, do, Baltimore. 
R. W. Cogdell, Cons., Charleston. 
Henrj Dagget, Consul^ Mobile. 
G. J. Marallano, do, St. Louis. 
Juan Francisco Cortes, V. Consul, 

Natchitoches. 

J{«w Grenada. 
Don Domingo Acosta, €h*ge d^Af' 

/aires and Consul- Gen, 
James Andrews, V. Cons,, Boston. 
P. Gillineau, do. Conn. & R. L 
Mortimer Livingston, do. N. York. 
Telesforo Ores, do. Philadelphia. 
Richard W. Gill, do, Baltimore. 
Thos. Middleton, </o. Charleston. 
John Myers, do. Norfolk. 

Robert Goodwin, do. Savannah. 
W. H. Robertson, do. Mobile. 

Sam. P. Morgan, do, N. Orleans. 

Oldenburg. 
Otto Heinrich Miessegaes, Consul, 

New York. 
Leon Herchenrath, do. Charleston. 

Portugal, 

D. Joaquim Cesar de Figaniere e 

Morao, Chargi d'Affaires and 

Consul' General. 

M. Januario Cardoso e Freitas, 
AUaehi. 

D. Antonio G. Vega, V. Consul, 

Boston. 
Paulo J. Figuera, do. New York. 
John Vaughan, do. Philadelphia. 
D. M. Valdor, Consul, Baltimore. 
C. Neal, do, Alexandria, D. C. 
Walter D. Lacy, do. Norfolk. 
J. P. Calhorda, do. Wilmington, 
N. C. 



Ren^ Goddard, V. Cons. Charls'n. 
Elias Reed, do. Savannah. 

Diego Chalaron, do, N. Orleans. 
A. Willis Gordon, do. Mobile. 
Jule Pescay, do. Pensacola. 

Wm. H. Allen, do. St. Augustine. 

Prussia, 
Baron de Ro^nne, Minist. Resident. 
Gustav. Gossler, Consul, Boston. 
J. W. Schmidt, do. New York. 
Arnold Halbach, do. Philadelphia. 
Louis Trapman, do. Charleston. 
F. W. Schmidt, do. N. Orleans. 

Rome. 
Giovanni Sartori, Consul- General, 

Trenton. 
T. J. Bizouard, V. Cons., Baltimore. 
Henry Perret, do. N. Orleans. 

Russia. 

Baron de Maltitz, Envoy Extraord. 

and Minister Plenipotentiary, 
George Krehmer, First Sec'y Leg. 
Alexander Chvostoff, Second do, 
Jean Smirnoff, Attach6. 
A. Eustaphieve, C- Gen. N. York. 
Peter Eilchen, Consult Boston. 

E. Jones, do. New Orleans. 
J. Prince, Agent, Salem. 
£. Mayo, do. Portland. 
J. G. Bogart, V. C^ns., New York. 
T. H. Deas, Agent, Charleston. 

F. Whittle, do. Norfolk. 

Sardinia, 

A. Garibaldi, Con,- Gen., Philad'a. 
Louis Albert Cazenove, F. Consul. 

Boston. 
S. y. Rouland, Consul, New York. 
C. Yaldor, do. Baltimore. 

Y. F. Brette, do. Norfolk. 

Y. Auze, do. Savannah. 

Th. Roger, V. Consul, Charleston. 



1838,] FOREIOIY HIIfI8TSR9, CONSULS, ^tC, IN THE U. STATES. 157 



A. F. George, V. Conntly Mobile. 
Antoine Michaud, cfo. N. Orleans. 

Soxe- Weimar* 
Aug. W. Hupeden, Co7i#.,N. York. 

Saxony. 
Charles Aug. Davis , Con.- General. 
Robert Ralston, . do. Philadelphia. 
F. Ludwig Brauns, do, Baltimore. 
Andreas A. Melly, Cont.f N. York. 

Spain. 

Don Angel Calderon de la B^rca, 
Envoy Extra, and Min. Plenip. 

Don Miguel Tacon, See. Legation. 

Don Louis Potestad, Ist Attaehi. 

Don Francisco V9.mpi\\Of^ Attachi. 

Don Pablo Chacon, Consul- Gen. , 

Philadelphia. 

Thomas Amory Deblois, Vice-Con* 
8tUt Portland. 

Don Antonio G. Vega, Vice Constd 

Boston. 

Fran. Stoughton, Consul, N. York. 

Manual Valdor, Vice Cons,, Balti- 
more. 

Antonio Pomar, do. Norfolk. 

Antonio Larragua, do, Charleston. 

Antonio Argote Villalobus, Cons., 

New Orleans. 

Pedro de Alba, V, C, Pensacola. 

Don Jofl^ Ygnacio Cruzat, Vice 
Constd, Mobile. 

Sweden and Jiorway. 
Chevalier S. Lorich, Charg6 d*^- 

f aires and Constd- General. 
J. Vaughan, V, Cons., Philadelphia. 
C. £. Habicht, do. Boston. 

John James Boyd, do. New York. 
S. Lawion, do. Baltimore. 

J. H. Brent, V. Cons,, Alexandria. 



Joseph Winthrop, do, Charleston. 
Fran. H. Wilman, do. Savannah. 
Diedrich Miesegaes, do. N. Orleans. 
W. P. Vincent, do, Norfolk. 

Switzerland, 
Theodore Nicolet, Con., N. Orl'ns. 

Texas. 

W. W. Wharton, ) jun^.^, 
Memacum Hunt, 5 •«»«»''«•'• 

John Howard, Consul, Boston. 

Townsend, do, N. Orleans. 

Woodward, do, N. York. 

The Two Sicilies, 
Chev. Domenico Morelli, Consul- 
General, Philadelphia. 

Pietro D'Alessandro, Vice Consul, 

Boston. 
Benj. Dyer Potter, do. Providence. 
John Clisbe, Consul, New Haven. 
Martin Mantin, ,do. New York. 
A. O. Hammand, do. Charleston. 
Wm. Read, V. Cons,, Philadelphia, 
Emmanuel Valdor, do, Baltimore. 
Luca Palmieri, do, Philadelphia* 
Antonio Pommar, do. Norfolk. 
Hippolite Gaily, do. N. Orleans. 
Goffre Barnsley, do. Savannah. 

Tuscany. 
W. H. Aspinwall, V, Cons., N. Y. 

Uras^ay, 
Juan Darby, Consul- General, 
T. B, Avdier, F. Cons., Baltimore. 
Carlos D. Head, do. New Orleans. 

Venezuela, 
N. D. C. MoUer, Consul, N. York. 

Wurtemberg, 
Christian Mver, Cons.- Gen., Bait. 



14 



158 



UNITED STATES. 



[1838. 



XVI. NAVY LIST. 



1. Vessels of War or the United States Navy. — February, 1837. 



Name and Rate. 
Ships of the Line, 

GufM. 

Franklin, 74 

VVushington, 74 

Columbus, 74| 

Ohio, 74 
North Carolina, 74 

Delaware, 74 

Pennsylvania, 74 

Alabama, 74 

Vermont, 74 

Virginia, 74 

New York, 74 

Fris^atesj Ut Class. 

In£pendence, 64 

United States, 44 

Constitution, 44| 

Guerriere, 44 

Java, 44 

Potomac, 44 

Brandy wine, 44 

Hudson, 44 

Columbia, 44 

Santee, 44 

Cumberland, 44 

Sabine, 44 

Savannah, 44 

Raritan, 44 

St. Lawrence, 44 

Frigates^ 2d Class. 
Constellation, 3(5 
Macedonian, 36 



Where and when built. 



Philadelphia, 
Portsmouth, n. 
Washington, 
New York, 
Philadelphia, 
Gosport, Va. 
Philadelphia, 



1815 

H.J816 

1819 

1820 

18-20 
1820 
1837 



Where employed. 



Boston, 

Philadelphia, 

Boston, 

Philadelphia, 

Baltimore, 

Washington, 

Washington, 

Purchased, 

Washington, 



In ordinary, at New York. 

do. at New York. 

do. at Boston. 

do. at New York. 

In commission, Pacific. 
In ordinary, at Norfolk. 

do. at Philadelphia. 

On stocks, at Portsm'th, N. H. 

do. at Boston. 

do. at Boston. I 

do. at Norfolk. ! 



On the coast of 'Brazil, 
in commission, Mediterranean 
do. do. 



1814 

1797 

17U7 

1814' In ordinary, at Norfolk. 
1814 

1821 
1825 
1826 
1836 



SIoQps of War 
John Adams, 
Cyane, 
Erie, 
Ontario, 
Peacock, 
Boston, 
Lexington, 
Vincennei, 
Warren, 
Natchez, 
Falmouth, 
Fairfield, 
Vandalia, 
iSt. Louis, 
I Concord, 



24 
24 

18 



Baltimore, 
Captured, 



Charleston, S. 

Captured, 

Baltimore, 



18 Baltimore, 
18 New York, 
IS Boston, 
18 New York, 
18; New York, 
18, Boston, 
18 Norfolk, 
18| Boston, 
18 New York, 
18 Philadelphia, 
18 Wasliington, 
18 Portsmouth, 



Receiving Ship, Norfolk. 
In commission, Mediterranean 
In ordinary, Norfolk. 
Receiving vessel, at N. York. 
In ordinary, at Washington. 
On stocks, at Portsm'th, N. H. 

do. at Boston. 

do. at New York. 

do. at New York. 

do. at Philadelphia. 

do. at Norfolk. 



17D7 In commission, West Indies. 
1812 On the stocks, at Norfolk. 



C. 1799Jn commission, Mediterranean 
1815 Condemned, Philadelphia. 
1813 On the coast of Brazil. 
1813 In ordinary, at New York. 
1813 In commission, East Indies. 
1825 In commission, West Indies. 

1825 Inordinary, Portsmouth, N. H. 

1826 In the Pacific. 

1826 In ordinary, at Norfolk. 
1827, In commission, West Indies. 

1827 In ordinary, at Norfolk. 

1828 On the coast of Brazil. 
1828, In commission. West Indies. 
1828 do. do. 
1828 do. . do. 



f 



1838.] 



NAVT LIST. 

J>l'ames of Vesseh of War, (Continued.) 



159 



Name and D^te. 



VVliere and when bailt. 



Schooners, 4^. 

, Guns. 

'Dolphin, 12l 

|Gram|Mi8, 12' 

Shark,. 12 

'Enterprise, J 2, 

Boxer, 12 

Experiment, 12; 

Porpoise, | 

Foi, 



Philadelphia, 

Washington, 

Washington, 

New York, 

Boston, 

Washington, 



Where employed. 



3 



Purchased, 
Sea Gull, (galliot) i Purchased, 



1821 On the coast of Brazil. 
18211 In commission, West Indies. 
1821: In the Mediterranean. 
1831 In commission. East Indies. 
1831 In the Pacific. 
1831 !ln ordinary, at New York. 

{Atlantic coast. 

1823 Receiving ship, at Baltimore. 
]823i do. at Phila*phia. 



2, Officers im the Navy. 
Captains — 50. 



John Rodgers, 
James Barron, 
Charles Stewart, 
Isaac Hull, 
Isaac Chauncey, 
Jacob Jones, 
Charles Morris, 
L. Warrington, 
Wm. M. Crane, 
James Biddle, 

C. G. Ridgely, 

D. T. Paterson, 
M. T. Woolsey, 



F. H. Gregory, 
John H. Clack, 
P. F. Voorhees, 
Benj. Cooper, 
David Geisinger, 
R. F. Stockton, 
Isaac McKeever, 
J. P. Zantzinger, 
Wm. L. Sailer, 
C. S. McCauIey, 
T. M. Newell, 
E. A. F. Valette, 



J. O. Creighton, 
John Downes, 
Jesse D. Elliot, 
Stephen Cassin, 
James Renshaw, 
A.S. Wadsworth, 
George C. Reed, 
H. £. Ballard, 
David Deacon, 
S.L. Woodhouse , 
J. J. Nicholson, 
E. P. Kennedy, 
Alex. J. Dallas, 



J. B. Nicholson, 
J. Wilkinson, 
T. Ap C. Jones, 
W. C. Bolton, 
W. B. Shubrick, 
Alex. Claxton, 
C. W. Morgan, 
L. Kearney, 
F. A. Parker, 
E. R. McCall, 
Daniel Turner, 
David Connor, 



John Gallagher, 
Thos. H. Stevens, 
Wm. M. Hunter, 
JohnD. Sloat, 
Math. C. Perry, 
C. W. Skinner, 
John T. Newton, 
Joseph Smith, 
L. Rosseau, 
Geo. W. Storer, 
Beverly Kennon. 
£. R. Shubrick. 



Masters Commandant — 48. 



W. A. Spencer, ! 
Thos. T. Webb, ! 
John Percival, 
John H. Aulick,' 
Wm. V. Taylor, 
Mervine P. Mix, 
Bladen Dulany, 
S. H. Slringham, 
Isaac Mayo, 
W. K. Latimer, 
Wm. Mervine, 
Thos. Crabb, 



E. B. Babbitt, 
Jas. Armstrong, 
Joseph Smoot, 
S. L. Breese, 
Benj. Page, Jun. 
John Gwinn, 
T. W. Wyman, 
And*w Fitzhugh 
A. S. Ten Eyck, 
John White, 
Hiram Paulding, 
J. D. Williamson, 



Lieutenants, 

Surgeons, 

Passed Assistant Surgeons, 

Assistant Surgeons, 

Pursers, . . . . 

Chaplains, 

Passed Midshipmen, . 



296 Midshipmen, 

50 Sailing Masters, 

14 Boatswains, 

43 Gunners, 

41 Carpenters, 
9 ' Sailmakers, 

198 



Uriah P. Levy, 
Chas. Boarman, 
French Forrest, 
W. E. McKenney, 
W. J. Belt, 
Wm. Jameson, 
Wm. Boerum, 
C. L. Williamson, 
Chas. Ganntt, 
William Ramsay, 
Ralph Voorhees, 
Henry Henry. 

256 
. 27 

19 
. 20 

19 
. 19 



160 UNITBD STATES. [1838. 

XVII. ARMY LIST. 

Alexander Macoub, Major- Generalf General-in-Chief: — Head-Qnar- 
ten, Washington City. 

On the 19th of May, 1837, an alteration was made in the line mark- 
ing the limits of the two great military diyisions. This line now com- 
mences at the mouth of the Mississippi, thence proceeding up that 
river to Cassville, in the Territory of Wisconsin ; and thence north to 
the line of demarkation between the United States and Canada. AH 
west of that line forms the Western Division; and all east, the Eastern 
Division. ^ 

Edmund P. Gaines, Brigadier' General, (Major- General by brevet,) 
Commander of the Western Division ; — Head -Quarters Jefferson 
Barracks, Missouri. 

Winiield Scott, Brigadier- General, (Major-General by brevet,) Com- 
mander of the Eastern Division ; — Head-Quarters, Elizabeth- 
town, N. J. 

Two aids-de-camp are allowed to each of the generals commanding 
the two divisions, and one Inspector- General is attached as chief of the 
staff to perform the duties of Adjutant and Inspector General. — Col. 
John E. Wool is Inspector-General of the Western Division ; and Col. 
Greorge Croghan of the Eastern Division. 

The two Divisions are subdivided into the following seven Depart- 
ments. 

Department 1. All the country embraced within the Western Divis- 
ion above the 37th deg. N. Lat. 

Department 2. All the country within the Western Division below 
the 37th deg. N. Lat. 

Department 3. The States of Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, 
Louisiana, Alabama, Georgia, and the Territory of Florida. 

Department 4. South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia. 

Department 5. Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, 
and New York. 

Department 6. Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New 
Hampshire, Vermont, and Maine. 

Department 7. Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, and that part of 
the Wisconsin Territory embraced within the Eastern Division. 

Organization of the Army, as staled by Colonel Roger Jones, Jidjutani- 

GenercU, November 30/A, 183C. 
General Staff, . 14 Ordnance Department, . 308 



Medical Department, . 76 

Pay Department, 18 

Purchasinff Department, 3 

Corps of Engineers, 22 

Topographical Department, . 10 



Two Regiments of Dragoons, 1,498 
Four Regiments of Artulery, 2,180 
Seven Regiments of Infantry, 3,829 

TotcA, 7,968 



1838.] 



▲ RUT LIST. 



161 



Major- Genera], 


1 


Majors, .... 


23 


Brigadier- Generals, 


2 


Adjutants, 


. 2 


Adjatant-General, 


1 


Captains, .... 


146 


Inspectors- General, . 


2 


First Lieutenants, 


168 


Quartermasters, 


4 , 

1 


Second Lieutenants, 


168 


Quartermasters- General, . 


1 


Sergeant-Majors, . 


. 13 


Commissary- Gen. Subsistence, 


4 


Quartermaster* Sergeants, 


13 


Commissaries, 


-2 


Sergeants, 


478 


Surgeon-General, 


1 


Corporals, 


504 


Surgeons, .... 


15 


Principal Musicians, 


16 


Assistant- Surgeons, . 


GO 


Chief Buglers, . 


4 


Paymaster-General, 


1 


Buglers, 


. 40 


Commissary - Gen. Purchases, 


1 


Musicians, 


212 


Paymasters, 


17 


Farriers and Blacksmiths, 


20 


Military Storekeepers, . 


2 


Artificers, 


. 108 


Colonels 


15 


Enlisted men for Ordnance, 


250 


Lieutenant-Colonels, 


15 


Privates, 


5,625 



Total commissioned, 648. — Total non-commissioned officers, musi- 
cians, artificers, and privates, 7,310. -7- Grand Total, 7,958. 

Total number of the Militia in the United States, as stated by Col- 
onel George Bumford, Colonel of Ordnance, Nov. 22d, 1836, 1,326,821. 



XVIIl. EMIGRANTS AND FOREIGN PAUPERS. 

The " New York Times" furnishes the following statement of Emi- 
grants who have arrived at N. York and Quebec during the last 8 years. 



Yean. 


At aoebec 


At New York. 


1829 


13,356 


15,064 


1830 . 


24,391 


30,224 


1831 


49,250 


31,739 


1832 . 


51,422 


48,589 


ie33 


22,0(i2 


41,702 


1834 . 


30.217 


48,110 


1835 


11,580 


35,303 


1836 . 


27,515 


6(),541 



The number of Passengers who arrived at New York, in 1837, from 
January Ist to July 27th, was 34,554. 

Number of Passengers who arrived in the United States during the 
year 1836, as stated in th^ New York *' Commercial Advertiser," 
80,952; — males 51,942 \ females 29,010. — Of these passengers 4,013 
were born in the United States : — 47,792 in Great Britain and Ireland ; 
2,681 in the British American Colonies ; 20,142 in Germany ; 4,443 in 

14* 




•sc 
.J* 



g2 UNITED STATES- I*" 

Rfifl in PrusBia ; 445 in Swiuerlar^a ; 414 in Denmark j 
^,ance j 668 in PrusBia , « Texas"-, 5>16 in Cuba ; 2,152 in 

Holland ; 797 in Mexico ; 698 in ^^^^ ' ^J , 
^ountrieB - Of the above there were laxia^d, 
sountneB. v^i Passaraaquodd v 

imui «• ■' . _ _ ;„ ,ua AltusliouseB in Boston and 1 1>. • .n 

The number of Paupers in the AiniBnou»» ^ 

pUa in 1836 wa» «• follow. : ^„ ..,,•• - 

Boston, American,. 5W ; Foreigner., CT3 ; - total , -• .. 

Philadelphia, do. 1^15-, do. «^j- «>- ~ " ^, - 

The Report of the Board of Aldermei. of the city of New }-^^- ' ^ , 
June 12th! mr, states, that there were then m the Alnishou.- . . 

June X* , . J ir„,.«a 2 453 Tjersons, of whom 8/1 \\t • 

pital, and Long Island ^"^'^^^^ J . ^ 2^1 . 199 foreigners i 

dren, chiefly Americans; in the nospiuw , e ^ 

whoe number under charge of the eommissioners of the Ah .-. 
^074 of whom three fourth, were foreigners ; - that dunng i ■ 
lei there Td arrived at that porl 66,541 passengers ; and u.. 
1836, there had arrivea ^ ^ weekly :— that out of « ^ ' 

year the arrivals would average ^j^rK, j 

' , ..... «u^ AimalioYXse at Bellevue, 982 were a 

persons admitted into the Aimsnovia , , _, .^ 

, , /. .1- J „« TTOfir the expenses of the Almshouse 

and that for the preceding year, i-ne ^ v 

$205,506.63. ... , ,. ^ «« 1 

The Mayor of New York, in a communication to the Common i • 
cil, states, that - Nearly 2,000 [emigrants] arrive each week, an. 
nollikely many months will elapse before the number per week w» 

«/././. Vw A ^ «ii*.a w^ith the wandering crowds ol A\ 

3,000. — Our streets are fillea w^*"* , ,. . 

, . . .,* oitv unaccustomed to our climate ; w . 

passenffers, clustering in our cii-y » . , ^ . , « 

out money; without employment ; without fnends; many not «,.• .. 
ingour l«.guagej and without any dependence for food, or ra.m. . . 
or fireside. WhaJ is to become of them? .. a quesUon of senous .... 
port. Our whole Almshouse department .. so full that no more can .. 
received there without manifest hazard to the health of every .niual. 
PeUUon. signed by hundreds, aaking for work, are preiented in var 
Private associations for relief are almost wholly without funds. Tli.. . 
sands must therefore wander to and fro, filling every part of our on 
happy land wilb squalid poverty and profligacy." 



.LKUJK8. 



XVN7 



,1.) 



. inl Vols, in 
■■->' , Slud'ts' 
iix.' Liberies. 



Commenc«in«nt. 



>i I 
III 
n) 
■'■I 
1.) 
•I) 
'||J 



II') 



••) 
-I) 



1,000 

2,500 

7jO 

300 



400 



500 



Wed. allcr 3d Tueiday in S#pt. 
La«t Wediieoday in fi«epton)b&r. 
Last Wediiesiiiay in Seplembor. 
Fourth Wednesday in August. 
jFirat Wednesday in August. 
Second Wednesday in Auguat. 
Lait Wodneiday in July. 



Laft Wednesday in September. 



3tl Wednesday in September. 
Third Wednesday in July. 



July Slat. 

Near the Uiat of September. 



IN THE United States. 

Friilay after 3d Wed. Doc, 8 weeks ; — 3. 
■. Mav, 2 weeks. 
•i I Wed. Dec, 8 weeks. 
I,i-t Mond. Dec, 6^ weeks; — 3. Thursday 

' il. May, 2^ weeks, 

i-t Wod. Jan., 8 weeks. 

i^t Wed. Jan. 7 weeks ; ~ 3. 3d W6d. May, 

l)<>c, 2 weeks;— 2. 1st Wed. in April, 9 
' Commencement, G weeks. 
W'A. aaorSd Wed. Dec, 6 weeks ; — 3. 1st 

: Wod. Jan., 3 weeks ; — 3. 1st Wed. May 

ixi Friday in Dec, 3 weeks;— 3. 3d Fri- 

1st Wed. Jan., 9 wooki ; — 3. last Wed. 

Mirsday before Christmas, S^ weeks ; — 3. 
xii'il, 3 weeks. 

'. wt>ekfl ; — 2. preceding com., 5 weoks. 
' Monday in October. 
< )'>c. 4 weeks ; — 3. in April, 4 weeks. 
-. 4 weeks from Wed. before Christmas; 

•vccks. 

hristmas and New Year, 2 weeks ;— 3. 

Fhurs. after 9d Tues. in April, 5 weeks, 
i It. 21 to Jan. 7 ;->3. April 7 to May 1. 

i weeks ; ~3. April, 3 woeka. 
I >iitli of May. 
'otith of May. 

L.I lit Wed. in Jalj to Um lit Monday 
' t Mond. Jan. 
■^opt. 



162 i7NIT£D STATES. [1838. 

France ; 668 in Prussia ; 445 in Switzerland ; 414 in Denmark ; 298 in 
Holland ; 797 in Mexico ; 698 in Texas'; 516 in Cuba ; 2,152 in other 
countries. — Of the aboye there were landed, 



At New York, 56,578 
Baltimore, 6,058 

New Orleans, 4,966 



Boston, 2,690 I Passamaquoddy, 1,471 

Philadelphia, 2,147 All other ports, 1,403 
Portland, 1,621 



The number of Emigrants from Cork in Ireland to North America 
from January to August, inclusiYe, 1836, was 4,993. 

The number of Paupers in the Almshouses in Boston and Philadel- 
phia in 1836 wa» as follows : 

Boston, Americans, 597; Foreigners, 673; — total, 1,270 

Philadelphia, do. 1,515; do. 1,266;— do. 2,781 

The Report of the Board of Aldermen of the city of New York, dated 
June 12th, 1837, states, that there were then in the Almshouse, Hos- 
pital, and Long Island Farms, 2,453 persons, of whom 871 were chil- 
dren, chiefly Americans ; in the Hospital 281 ; 199 foreigners : — the 
whole number under charge of the commissioners of the Almshouse 
3,074, of whom three fourths were foreigners ; — that during the year 
1836, there had arrived at that port 66,541 passengers ; and that this 
year the arrivals would average 2,000 weekly: — that out of 1,209 
persons admitted into the Almshouse at Bellevue, 982 were aliens; 
and that for the preceding year, the expenses of the Almshouse were 
$ 205,506.63. 

The Mayor of New York, in a communication to the Common Coun- 
cil, states, that *' Nearly 2,000 [emigrants] arrive each week, and it is 
not likely many months will elapse before the number per week will be 
3^000. — Our streets are filled with the wandering crowds of these 
passengers, clustering in our city, unaccustomed to our climate ; with- 
out money ; without employment ; without friends ; many not speak- 
ing our language ; and without any dependence for food, or raiment, 
or fireside. What is to become of them ^ is a question of serious im- 
port. Our whole Almshouse department is so full that no more can be 
received there without manifest hazard to the health of every inmate. 
Petitions signed by hundreds, asking for work, are presented in vain. 
Private associations for relief are almost wholly without funds. Thou- 
sands must therefore wander to and fro, filling every part of our once 
happy land with squalid poverty and profligacy." 



XIX. POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES, 
Jltiording to til Fitt Enumeraiions ; from lAe Officiat ItitiUuni. 



.„,». 


1790. 


IBOO. 


1810. 


1820. 


1830. 


Maine, 


!Hi,f)4U 




228,705 


298.335 


399,!I55 


N«<r Hampahin, 


]4J,«'.K 


IS3,7(i; 


214,.10( 




269,3aS 


Vermont, 


85,410 


154,461 




235,7W 


2«0,C5!i 




ZTi,71' 


423,245 








Rhode Wand, 




GIM* 








Connecticut, 


asri.ui 


SSLwi-i 


1! 


275,20! 


297,005 


New Vork, 


340,ia 


5Sli.75C 


1! 


I,372,H1! 


1.9m,008 


NewJefaey, 


184,13! 


SII.M! 




277,57; 


320,823 




434,37: 


(J02,3(i! 


II 


1^9,45( 


1,34(<,233 




59.09t 


64.27: 


■1 




76,74a 


Maryland, 




34t,54( 









Vir/iaia. 


748,3(if 


800.!i0( 


u 


|.065,37S 


1,211,405 


North Cnrolins, 




478,1 o: 


K 






Sodlh CarolioA, 


a4l',07v 


34,'i,&^l 


5 






Georgia, 




lt>^,IOI 


i; 


340,UW 


510.tt23 


Alabima, 






■f 












■i 


75.44t 


136,1)21 








.0 


153,40: 




Tennemee, 


35,701 


105,002 


n 




681.904 




73,075 


2a0,i)55 


1 


















Indiana, 




4,875 








lEIinais, 








55.211 


157,45E 


Missouri, 










140,44; 


























Dial, of Colombia, 




14,09: 


:; 




3i(,«34 


Florida Territoij, 
TMal, 






7, 4 


■ 


34,730 


3,9aa,ea7 


5k3ii5,D25 


9,038,131 


12,806,920 



II 



"i" 




1 


"-=*5||qjljiiiiB.|p . 


i 


""""iPiiiip- i 1 


t 


'^'"^iHsilll 11 1 







164 UNITKD STATES. [1838. 

XXI. GOTERMORS OF THE BEVKRAL StATES AMD TERRITORIES, 

With their Salaries, Term of Ojfice, Expiration of their respective Terms; 
the number of Senators and Representatives in the StiUe Legislatures, 
with thtir respective Terms, 









Gov. 


1 
Term ex- Sena- 


Term g i «* 


Term 


States. 


Goveroon. 


Salary. 


Term, 


piiefl 


' tors. 1 


V*"- ll-l 


Y»rs. 


- 




1,500 


Years. 






25 


k8- 
1 , ltt7 


1 


Maine, Robert P. Dunlap, 


1 


Jan. ] 


838 


N, H. 


Isaac Hill, 


1,200 


1 


June ] 


[8;i8 12 


1 234 


1 


Vt. 


Samuel Jenison, 


750 


1 


Oct. 1 


i837i 30 


2;i3 


1 


MasB.* 


tidward Everett, 


3,(5Gt;i 


1 


Jan. ] 


[d;W 40 


1 508 


1 


R. 1. 


John B. Francis, 


400 


1 


May 1 


i83fl 10 


1 


72 


k 


Conn. 


11. W. Edwards, 


1,100 


1 


May ] 


1838 21 


1 


208 


1 


N. Y. 


VVm. L. Marcy, 


4,000 


2 


Jan. J 


1831) 32 


4 128 


1 


N.J. 


Phil. Dickerson, 


2,000 


1 


Oct. ] 


1837 14 


1 50 


1 


Feno. iJoseph Kilner, 


4,000 


3 


Dec. ] 


1838 33 


4 100 


1 


Del. 


C. P. Comegys, 


l,333i 


3 


Jan. 


1841, y 


4 21 


2 


Md. 


Th. W. Veaaey, 


2,(»6(>5 


1 


Jan. 


1838 15 


5 


80 


1 


Va. 


David Campbell, 


3,3334 


3 


Mar. : 


1840' 32 


4 


i:i4 


1 


N. C. 


Ed. B. Dudley, 


2.0(K) 


2 


Jan. 


1839 50 


2 120 


2 


s. c. 


Pierce M. Butler, 


3,5<»0 


2 


Dec. ] 


1838 45 


4 


124 


2 


Ga. 


William Scblev, 


3,000 


2 


Nov. ] 


1837 90 


1 


lc5 


1 


Ala. 


Arthur P. Bagby, 


3,500 


2 


.Nov. ] 


1839 3i» 


3 


91 


1 


Miss. 


Charles Lynch, 
Ed. D. While, 


ii,500 


2 


Jan. 1 


1838 


30 


4 


91 


2 


La. 


7,500 


4 


Jan. 


1839 


17 


4 


50 


2 


Tenn. 


Newton Cannon, 


ti.OOO 


2 


Oct. ] 


1839 


25 


2 


75 


2 


Ken. 


James Clark, 


2,500 


4 


Sept. : 


1840 


38 


4 


100 


1 


Ohio, 


Joseph Vance, 


1,000 


2 


Dec. . 


iaT8 


30 


2 


72 


, 1 


Ind. 


David Wallace, 


1,500 


3 


jDec. ] 


1840 


30 


3 


(>2 


' 1 


111. 


Joseph Duncan, 


1,000 


4 


iDec. 


1838 


40 


4 


93 


2 


Miss. 


L. W. Boggs, 


1,500 


4 


,Nov. : 


1840 


18 


4 


49 


2 


xMicb. 


Stevens T. Mason, 


2,000 


2 


Jan. J 


1838 


Hi 


2 


50 


1 


Ark. 


James S. Conway, 


2,000 


4 


Nov. 


1840 


17 


4 


54 


2 


Territ. 




















Fl. 


Richard K. Call, 


2,500 


3 


April \ 


L839 






27 


1 


Wise. 


Henry Dodge, 


2,500 


3 


"May 


1839 




i 20 


2 



In all the Slates except JSTew Jersey^ Maryland^ Virginia, and South 
Carolina, the Governor is voted for by the people ; and, if no one has 
a majority of all the voles, in the States in which such a majority la 
required, the legislature elects to the office of Governor, one of the 
candidates voted for by the people. In the State of Louisiana, the 
people give their votes, and the legislature elects one of the two candi- 
dates who have the greatest number of votes. 

The Governors of the Territories are appointed by the President of 
the United SUtes, with the consent of the Senate, for the term of three 
years. 

* According to the CoDsUtqtion or Massachusetti ea now amended, the authorised 
average oamber of RnpreeentatiTet fox the next rooeoediog 10 yean, is SOS and 9 
lOthi. 



1838.] 



ELECTI05S AITD MEETlHeS OF LBGI8LATURE8. 



165 



XXII. T^bte, exhibiting the Seats of Oovemment, the Times of Holding 
the Election of State Officers, and the Times of the Meeting of the Legis- 
latures of the several States. 



StaUs. 



BeaU of Oovera- 
ment. 



Maioo, 
'N. Hampshire, 

Vermont, 
'M«MachosetU, 

Rhode Islandi 

,C6nn{>cttcat, 
I New York, 
New Jersey, 
'Pennsylvania, 
Delaware, 
Maryland, 
, Virginia, 
•Nonh Carolina, 
Sooth Carolina, 
.Georgia, 
Alabama, 
Misaissippi, 
LoQisiona, 
Teoneaiee, 
i Kentucky, 
Ohio, 
Indiana, 
Illinois, 
Misaouri, 
Michigan, 
Arkansaa, 



Augusta, 

Concord^ 

Mont poller, 

Boston^ 
I Providence, 
) aad Newport, 

Hart. Ac N. Uav, 

, Albany, 

'Trenton, 

liairisborg, 

Dover, 

■Annapolis, 

Richmond, 

Raleigh, 

Columbia, 

Milledgevtlle, 
; Tuscaloosa, 

Jackson, 
jNew Orleans, 
iNashvilln, 
, Frankfort, 

Columbus, 

Indianapolis, 

Vandalta, 

Jefferson City, 

Detroit, 

Little Rook, 



Times of Holding 
Elections. 



Times of the Meeting of the 
Legislatures. 



2d Monday in Sept. ;lst Wednesday in January. 
2il Tuesday in March, |lst Wednesday in June. 
1st Tuesdny in Sept. Sd Thursday in October. 
2d Monday in Nov. Ist Wednesday in Janunry. 
Gov. & Ben. in April, 1st Wed. May and in June. 
jRep. in April and Aog.'last Wed.in Oct. & in Jannary. 



1st Wednesday in May. 

Ist Tuesdoy in January. 

4th Tuesday in October. 

1st Tuesday in December. 

1st Tuesday in Jan. UeKniaUy. 
<... tf.viiuaj III v/bk. [last Monday in December. 
In the month of April, rlst Monday in December. 
Commonly in August, 2d Monday in Nor. biemn, 
2d Monday in Oct. |4ih Monday in November. 
Ist Monday in Oct. ,1st Monday in November. 
Ist Monday in August,, 4th Monday in November. 



Ist Monday in April, 
Ut Monday in Nov. 
2d Tuesday in Oct. 
2d Tuesday in Oct. 
2d Tuesday in Nov. 
Ist Monday in Oct. 



1st Monday iu Nov. 
Ist Monday in July, 
Ist Thursday in Aug. 
Ist Monday in August, 



1st Monday in Jan. bienn, 

Isi Monday in January. 

Ist Monday in Oct. bienn. 

1st Monday in December. 
2d Tuesday in October,! 1st Monday in December. 
Ist Monday in August,! Ist Monday in December. 
1st Monday in August,' 1st Monday in Dec. bienn, 
Ist Monday in August,] 1st Monday in Nov. biemn, 
1st Monday in Oct, 1st Monday in January. 
1st Monday in Oot. (Sd Monday in Nov. frtsnii. 



Cambridge, Mass. 
New HaTen, Conn. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Carlisle, Pa. 
Williamsburg, Va. 
Charlottesville, do. 
Leiington, Ken. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 



XXIII. LAW SCHOOLS. 

Harvard Univeraity, 
Tale College, 

'Carlisle, College, 
William and Mary College, 
University of Virginia, 
Transylvania University, 
Cincinnati College, 



Prof. 
2 


Stodents 
50» 


2 


31 


1 


9 


1 


6 


1 


50 


2 


56 


3 


25 



Schools for the study of law are much less frequented than schools 
for the study of the other professions. The first institution of this 
nature, of much note, that was established iu the United States, waa 
the Law School at Litchfield, in Connecticut, which had, from 1798 to 
1827, 730 students; but it is now discontinued. 



* The average number throughout the year. 



166 



UNITED STATES. 



[1838. 



XXIV. COLLEGES IN THE 



Name. 



Place. 



Bowdoin, 
Watervilie,* 
3; Darlmouth, • 

4 University of Vermont| 

5 Middleburr, 
\orwich Cniver»ity, 
Harvard Uaivorsity, 
Williania, 
Amherst, 

Brown Univergity,* 
Yttlo, 

Waahington,t 
Woflloyan Univenity,| 
Colambia^f 
Union, 

Htimilton, , 

Haniitton Lit. and Theol.* Ilamiltoo, 



6 

7 

fct 

9 
10 
11 
191 
13 
14 
l.*) 
IK 
17 

18 Goneva,t 

19 University of New York, 
S20 College of Mow Jersey, 

21 Rut^rsj 

22 Univoriity of Poonsyl. 

23 Cariisle,^ 

24 JufTerson, 

25 Washington, 
;2t) Allegrhony,t 

|27 Western Univeriity, 
28 Pennsylvania, 
29| Lafayette, 

30 Haddington,* 

31 Marshall, 

33 Newark, 
•M St. John's, 

34 St. Mary*s,$ 

35 Mount St. Mary's,^ 
36| Mount Hope, 

37 Georgetown,^ 

38 Columbian,* 

3if William and Mary,f 

40 Hampden-Sidney, 

41 Washing too, 

12 University of Virginia, 

43 Raiidoiph-Macon^ 

44 University of N.CaroliDa, 

45 Davidson. 

4t> Coik'ge of S. Carolina, 
47 University of Georgia, 
4S University of Alabama, 
49 Lagrange,! 
SOSpiing Uill,$ 
51 JclFisrsoa, 
j'i Oakland, 
5^j Mississippi, 

54 Louisiana, 

55 Julibrson, 
55 Fianklin, 
57,GrcvnoviIle, 
J.58 VViinhinjfion, 

[59 University of .Nashville, 

6<» Ea«t Tennessee, 

'61 Jackson, 

tV2 'rrannjrlvania, 

6;< St. JuKpph's,^ 

64 t 'en Ire, 

65 Au^'usta,^ 

66 Cumberland, 

67 Bacon,* 

68 tit. Miiry*s,$ 



Brunswick, 
Watervilie, 
Hanover, 
j Burlington, 
MiddJebury, 
I Norwich, 
Cambridge, 
Williaroatowo, 
Amherst, 
Providence, 
New H'iveo, 
Hartford, 
Middletown, 
'New York, 
:^clienoctady, 
Clinton, 



Geneva, 
New York, 
Princeton, 
New Brunswick 
Philadelphia, 

'Carlisle, 

^Canonsburg, 
Washin^tog, 
MeadvilTe, 
Pittsburg, 

iGetiysburg, 
Guaton, 
Haddington, 
Mercer rtburg, 
Newark. 
Annapolis, 
Baltimore, 
Emraitsburg, 
Near Baltimore, 
Goorxotuwn, 
Washington, 
Williamshorg, 
Prince Ed. Co, 
Lexington, 

Charlottesville, 
Bovdton, 

Chap«|-Hin, 

Mucklenberg Co 

Columbia, 

Athens, 

Tuscalooea, 

Lagrange. 

Soring UiII, 

Wnshinston, 

Ouklaml, 

Clinton, 

Jackson, 

St. James, 

St. Landry, 

Grecne^ilie, 

Waiihini>lon Co. 

Nanhville, 

Knoxvilln, 

Near Colombia, 

Lexington, 

Burdstnwn, 

Danville, 

Augusta, 

Princeton, 

Georgetown, 

Marion Co. 



Bfe. 

do. 
N. H 
Vt. 

do. 

do. 
Mass 

do. 

do. 

R. I. 
Con. 

do. 

do. 
N. Y 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
N.J. 
, do. 
Penn. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

Del. 

Md. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
D. C. 

1I0. 

Va. 

. do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

N. C. 

. do. 

B.C. 

Geo. 

Ala. 

do. 

do. 

Mi. 

do. 

do. 

La. 

de. 

do. 

Tenn. 
do. . 
do. 
do. 
do. 
Ken. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



Presidents. 



William Allen, D. D. 

Robert £. Pattison, 

Nathan Lord, D. D. 

John Wheeler, D. D. 

Joshua Bales, D. D. 

Alden Partridge, A. M. 

Jnsiah Q.uincy, LL. D. 

Mark Hopkins, D. D. 

Hainan Humphrey, D. D. 

Francis Way land, D. D. 

Jeremiah Day, D. D. 

Silas Totton, A. M. 

Wilbur Fisk, D. D. 

William A. Duer, LL. D. 

Eliphalot Nott, D. D. 

Joseph Penney, D. D. 
jNath'l Kendrick, D. D. 

Benjamin Hale, D. D. 

J M. Matthews, D. D. 

James Carnahan, D. D. 

Philip Miliedoler, D. D. 

John Ludlow, D. D. 

John P. Durbin, A. M. 

Matthew Bfown, D. D. 

David McConaughy, D. D. 

Martin Rutor, D. D. 

Gilbert Morgan. A. M. 

C. P. Krauth, A. M. 

George Judkio, O. D. 

John L. Dagg, 

F. A. Raoch, P. D. 

Richord S. Mason, D. D. 

Hector Humphrey, D. D. 

John J. Chanche, 

Thomas R. Butler, 

Frederick Hall, M. D. 

Thomas F. MuUedy, D.D. 

Stephen Chapio, D. D. 

Thomas R. Dew, 

Oaniol Carroll, D.D. 

Gesner Harrison, 

Henry Ruirnnr,CAainiMii. 

Stephen Olin, D. D. I 

David L. Swain, 
|R. H. Morrison, | 

Rol>ert W. Barnwell, < 
' A ionzo Church, D. D. ' 

Alva Woods, D. D. 
.R. Puvne^ 

John Ilazin, 1 

C. L. DubuisBon, A. M. 
Jeremiah Ciiamberlin,D.D. 
IB. N. Klliott, A. M. I 

!jttino4 Shannon, 
■Th. U. Ingalls, 

Henry Hoss, Eaq. 
James Maclra, 
Philip Lindsley, D. D, | 
JoHcph Esta brook, A. M. 
B4>njamin Laberoe, A. M. • 
'Thomas W. foit, D. D. j 
Goorgo A. M. Elder, 
iJohn C. Youri^, A. M. 
'•CO. C. Tomlinsoa, A. M. 
jF. R. Cossit, 
Woltor Sc»)lt, 
Peter Chazolle, 



Foun- 
ded. 



1794 

1820 

1770 

1791 

1800 

lrt34 

1638 

1793 

1821 

1764 

1700 

1824 

1»3I 

1754 

1795 

1812 

ldl9 

1823 

1831 

1746 

1770 

1755 

1833 

1802 

1806 

1633 

1819 

1832 

1832 

18L'6 

18:16 

1833 

1784 

1799 

1830 

1832 

1789 

1821 

1693 

1783 

1812 

1819 

18:^2 

1791 

1837 

1804 

17a5 

1828 

1831 

1830 

1802 

1831 

1830 

1825 



1794 
1794 
1806 
1807 
laTO 
1798 
I8I9 
1822 
1825 
1825 
1830 
1822 



1B38.J 

UNITED STATES. 



|tn.I- 




Na.»r 




VobVla 


Vol.. Id 




JIUM- 


NLof 


Hioii- 


Bind 


L-dIIdio 


Stttd'U' 




1^ 


Aliinini. 


Mn. 


aau 


Lib'iiu 


Lib'ri*. 










lai 


B.«W 


5,300 












*,SO0 


1,500 


Ftiil WadotldiT in AufUU. 


4 1 '? 


1,858 


239 


Vol 


6,0l>0 
6900 

9,aao 


8^ 
9,700 
3,100 


I*.Wod,.»d.,'lDjui?. 
Fiiit WndaDHliy ia Aufuit. 

Wed. btto<B 3d'7taun.1fl'Au|. 
















S^BI 


1,344 




44,000 


tMo 






Ml 




85* 


3.000 
4300 


3,900 
01950 




'h.'i 


i^ 


4S0 
1,907 


4U 


C^uoo 
10,500 


]5|«00 








42 




9,000 


9>) 


Finl Thundiy in Aufuit. 










,000 




B««d lV.d«|.«lv ia Au(«,t 




1,700 








e|oao 


>•/ mltBT 1» UonaiT in Ucl. 










;330 


slwo 


FauHhWedH.d>TiDju]f. 


16 7 




69 




,500 


3,700 










S3 


,600 




KSs:;';';-/*?- 


18 1 19 




■9 


38 


,900 


1^ 














lJi Thu,.d.r i/jui,. ^ 


90 ' 12 


a.^ 






7;ooo 


4.600 












3,000 


3.500 




9U 










". 














3;ow 


5,500 




95 




SI I 
M6 




KO 


'« 


I;^ 


9;400 




36 












8,000 


'. 




37 
38 


J 


■" 






104 


1,000 




Lm Thoiidnj in July. 


» 
















Lut TneiittT in S«pi. 




* 
















39 


3 


, 




9 


ao 


■900 


600 


Uil Wedneirtaj in Auguit. 
P-UHh W,dne.&., in a,pl. 














2,700 








95 


lar 








12,000 




TM,d*T™L"vin°K'lT. ' 
Lul wMk in Jons. 


36 


^ 








'45 


7,000 


3>0 














19,000 




.VnnitlHlulDfiurr. 


X 












4.000 






M 












3,600 




)uJi4ih. 


tt 












&.ooa 


3,900 








390 








1,500 




Li.tTh«r.d.riniiiD>. 


«l 










?^ 


10,500 


350 


Juir «i>- 


4li 




3» 






m 


10,000 


3,000 


U.I Tbn..d.r In June. 
Fi-l Hond.; in DecemlHT. 


47 
48 




333 




^ ■ 


158 


l^ 


» 




SI 










'm 


3,'ooo 
















lOU 








54 








a 


60 


■'s 


900 


K.iss;i'";.... 


» 


















M 

S7 




110 






« 


00 




Third W«iIn<idiT la 9<ip[. 


S 










35 




'. 




s 










I9S 




3,500 


Pint W-EJne.d.j in Oclob... 


60 










90 




"w 


CinlTbniidaj In Ucubei. 


89 




3 










3,Mi> 












3 












9 














Thnndijr iHa, 3d W>d. in Bept. 


«S 


6 


«0 

9e 






» 


00 

00 


500 


Tb«,^t,^a,,l.yW^i.mA^. 












115 








«8 


^ 















Lul weak in Julj. 



168 



UNITED STATES. 



[1838. 



COLLEGES IN THE 





Name. 


Place. 


Presidents. 


Foun- 
ded. 

1831 
1834 
1835 
1826 
1808 
1832 
1832 
1834 

1834 
1827 
1829 
1833 
1830 
1835 
1834 
1837 
1837 
1829 
1830 
1831 
1835 

1837 


69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
64 
85 
86 
87 
68 
89 
90 
91 
92 
93 
94 
95 


University of Ohio, 

Miami University, 

Franklin, 

W^ostorn Reserve, 

Kenyontt 

Granvillo,* 

Marietta, 

Oborlin Inst., 

Cincinnati. 

Woodwara, 

Willougbby Univ., 

Indiana, 

South Hanover, 

Wabash, 

Illinois, 

Shurtleff,* 

McKendrean,} 

Canton, 

McDonough, 

University of St. Loais,^ 

St. Mury'<,$ 

Marion, 

Columbia, 

St. Charles,^ 

Fayette, 

Michigan University, 

Marshall, 


Athens, Ohio, 
Oxford, do. 
New Athens, do. 
Hudson, do. 
Gambier, ' do. 
Granville, do. 
Marietta, do. 
New Elyria, do. 
Cincinnait, do. 
Cincinnati, do. 
Chagrin, " do. 
Bloomington, Ind. 
South Hanover, do. 
Crawfordsville, do. 
Jacksonville, IJ. 
Up. Alton, do. 
Lebanon, do. 
Canton, ' do. 
Macomb, do. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Barrens, do. 
New Palmyra, do. 
Columbia, do. 
St. Charles, do. 
Fayette, do. 
Ann Arbor, Mich, 
do. 


Robert G. Wilson, D. D. 

R. H. Bishop, D. D. 

Joseph Smith, 

Georgo B. Pierce, A. M. 

C. P. Mcllvaine, 1). D. 

John Pratt. 

Jool H. Lmsley, A. M. 

Asa Maban, 

Wm. H. ^cGulfy, 

B. P. W. Aydelotte, 

Nehemiah Allen.Esq. 

Andrew Wylie, D. D. 

James BIythe, D. D. 

Elihu W. Baldwin. A. M. 

Edward Boecher, A. M. 

John Dew, 

G. B. Perry, D. D. 

P. J. Verhaegen, 
John H. Odin, 
Wm. S. PotU, 

W. FieldinjK, 
Archibald Patterson, 

John P. Cleaveland, 



Remark*, 



The Colleges marked thus (*} are under the direction of the BapUtUi thus (f) Efis- 
ei^aliant ; thus ({} Methoduts ; thus ($) Catholiet, 

With' respect to the Colleges which are tntmar&Mf, the prevailing religious iofluence 
of those that are in the New England States, b CongregatUnudum ; of the most of 
the others, Preabyttrianism, Norwich University, Vt., is an institution recently estab- 
lished by the Uidver»aUst*. 

By ttudenU in the above table, with respect to the New England Colleges and many 
of the others, is nseant umdergraduaUSf or members of the four collegiate clasies ; not 
including such as are pursuing professional education, or such aa are members of a 
preparatory department : but the greater part of the students in the Catholic Colleges, 
and also in many of the other Southern and Western Colleges, belong to the preparatory 
department ; and in some of the new colleges in the Western States, (as McKendrean, 
3hurtleflr, and Canton Colleges, in Illinois, and St. Charles dnd Fayette Colleges in 
Missouri) all the students enumerated, belong to the preparatory depaitment. 

The whole number of students, on the Catalogue, including those of theology, law, 
and medicine, as well as undergraduates, in Harvard Univenity in 1837, was 423 ; in 
Yale College, 570. In the University of Pennsylvania, in the Collegiate Department, 
100, in the Academical Department, 139 ; and in the Medical Department, 401 ; — 
toUl, 640. 

Some of the CoUegea above enumerated, are not in full operation ; and acaroely 
deserve a place in the Table. Several other Colleges have been incorporated, which 
are not yet fully organized. 



1838.] 



COLLEeSfl. 



169 



UNITED STATES. (Continued.) 



Inat- 




No. of 




VoIj. in 


Vols, in 




ruct- 


No. of 


Minis- 


Stud- 


College 


StudUs* 


CommeDceantnt. 


( or«. 

1 


Alumni. 


ters. 


ents. 


Lib*ries. 


Lib'ries. 
1,000 




69 1 5 


79 


26 


45 


1,00U 


Wed. aaor 3d Tuesday in Sept. 


70 


1 6 


170 


17 


196 


a,9oo 


9,500 


Last Wednesday in September. 


71 


6 


90 


7 


51 


300 


750 


I.ast Wednesday in September. 


72 ; 9 


95 


• 


82 


1,600 


300 


Fourth Wednesday in August. 


73 14 








5fi 


2,300 




First Wednesday in August. 


74 6 








80 


3,000 




Second Wednesday in August. 


75 9 








908 


9,500 




Last Wednesday in JuJy. 


76 4 




1 




■ 


• 






77 8 








• 


• 






78 


8 








100 


• 






79 


5 








140 


■ 






80 


5 


* 10 


1 


77 


600 


400 


Laai Wednesday in September. 


81 


9 




4 


30 


• 






89 


4 




• 


60 


• 






83 


5 


7 




64 


1,500 


500 


3d Wednesday in September. 


84 


3 




9 


60 


1,000 




Third Wednesday in July. 


85 


9 




9 


50 


• 






86 


3 






70 


• 






87 












• 






88 


15 


9 






900 


7,500 




July 31st. 


89 


15 


5 






124 


6,000 




Neur the last of September. 


9U 


5 


/ 






80 


• 






91 


3 










• 






99 ; 3 








70 


■ 


, 




93 ' S 








75 


• 






94 ! 




1 






• 






961 










■ 







Vacations in Colleges in the United States. 



Bowdoin. 

Waterville. 
Dartmouth. 

Vermont Univ. 
Middlebary. 

Harvard. 

Williams. 

Amherst. 

Brown. 

Tale. 

Washington. 

Weslevan Univ. 
Columbia. 
Union. 
Hamilton. 

Geneva. 

College of N.J. 

Rutgers. 

Penn. University. 

Jefiersoo. 

Washington. 

fit. John's. 

St. Mary'fl. 



1. Com., 3 weeks ; — 9. Friday after 3d Wed. Doc, 8 weeks; — 3. 

Friday after 3d Wed. Mav, 2 weeks. 
1. Com., 5 weeks ; — 2. 2d Wed. Dec, 8 weeks. 
1. Com., 4 weeks; — 2. Last Mood. Dec, 6^ weeks; — 3. Thursday 

preceding the last Wed. May, 2| weeks. 
1. Com., 4 weeks; — 2. 1st Wed. Jun., 8 weeks. 
1. Com., 4 weeks ; — 2. 1st Wed. Jan. 7 weeks ; — 3. 3d Wed. May, 

2 weeks. 
1. Wed. preceding 25th Dec, 2 weeks;— 2. 1st Wed. in April, 9 

weeks ; — 3. preceding Commencement, 6 weeks. 
1 Com., 4 weeks ; — 2. Wed. after 3d Wed. Dec, 6 weeks ; — 3. 1st 

Wed. May, 3 weeks. 
1. Com., 6 weeks ; — 2. 2d Wed. Jan., 2 weeks ; — 3. 1st Wed. May 

4 weeks. 
1. Com., 4 weeks; — 9. last Friday in Dec, 2 weeks;— 3. 9d Fri- 
day in May, 3 weeks. 
1. Com.^ 6 weeks; — 9. 1st Wed. Jan., 9 weeks ; — 3. last Wed. 

April, 4 weeks. 
1. Com., 7 weeks ;— 9. Thursday before Christmas, !^ weeks; — 3. 

Thursday before 12th April, 3 weeks. 
1. Wed. before Christmas. 7 weeks ; — 9. preceding com., 5 weeks. 
1. From August 1, to the 1st Monday in October. 
1. Com., 6 «reeks ; — 9. in Doe. 4 weeks ; — 3. in April, 4 weeks. 
1. Com., 7 weeks ; — 2. Dec. 4 weeks from Wed. before Chrbtmas ; 

— 3. 3d Wed. April, 4 weeks. 
I. Com. 6 weeks ; — 2. at Christmas and New Tear, 2 weeks ;— 3. 

In April, 3 weeks. 
1. Com., 6 weeks ; — 9. 1st Thurs. after 9d Toes, in April, 5 weeks. 
1. Com., to Sept. 15 ; — 9. Dec. 91 lo Jan. 7 ; — 3. April 7 to May L 
1. Com., 6 weeks ; — 9. Deo. 2 weeks ; —3. April, 9 weeka. 
1. Month of October; — 9. Month of May. 
1. Month of October; — 9. Month of May. 
1. Good Friday, 10 days;— 9. Last Wed. in July to the lit Monday 

Sept. •, — 3. Dee. 93d to 1st Mood. Jan. 
1. Com. to the 1st Monday in Sept. 

15 



170 



UNITED STATES. 



[1638. 



Mt. Bt. Mary*i. 1. 

CoJnmbian. 1. 
William and Mary. 1 . 

Bamp. Sydney. 1. 

Washington. 1. 

Uoiv. VirginiB. I. 
Univ. N Carolina. 1. 

Coll. S. Carultna. 1. 

Unir. Georgia. 1. 

Univ. Alabama. 1. 

Mississippi. 1. 

Louisiana. 1. 

Orceneville. I. 

fiashvilto. 1. 

E. Tennessee. 1. 

Transylvania. ). 

Centre. 1. 

Augusta. 1. 

Cumberland. 1. 

Bt. Joseph's. 1. 

Georgetowrn. 1. 

University of Ohio. 1. 

Miami. 1. 

Western Reserve. 1. 

KenyoD. L 

Indiana. 1. 

lUmois. 1. 



July i to Auflust 16. 

Com. tu 1st Wed. Nov. ; — 9. 1st Wed. May to 1st Wed. in July. 
Com. to tho lust Monday in October. 

From 4th Wed. Sept. to 1st Nov. ; — 3. 4th Thurs. Ap'l to 1st June. 
Last Thurs. in June to Ist Sept. — A recess of 9 days at Christmas. 
July 30 to September 10. 
Com., 6 weeks ; -r-S. Doe. 1.5, 4 weeks. 
July 1 to the 1st Monday in. October. 
Com., 1 week ; — 3. 1st Nov. to 15th Jan. ; — 3. April 1st to April 

15th. 
Com. to tho 1st Mond. in Dee. ; — 9. Ist July to 1st Moad. Aug. 
Com., three months, viz. July, August, and September. 
Cora., 4 weeks ; — ii. Doc. SO to Jan. 10. 
Com., 5 week« ; — 3. 3d Wed. in March, 5 weeks. 
Com., 5^ weeks ; — 3. 1st Wed. April, 5i weeks. 
Com., 4 weeks ; — 3. 1st Thursday April, 4 weeks. 
Com. to Ist Moodav Nov. ;— 3. 3d Blond. March, 6 weeks. 
Com. to Thurs. alter 3d Wed. Oct. ;— 3. After a session of 91 

weeks, 4 weeks. 
Com., 6 weeks ; — 8. in Feb. 31 weeks from Ist vacation, 4 weeks. 
Com. to the 1st February. 
Tho month of August. 

Com. to 3d Monday Oct. ; — 3. 1st Monday March, 6 weeks. 
Com., 6 weeks ; — 3. Wed. after 3d Tuesday Apri^ 4 weeks. 
Com. to 1st Mond. Nov. ; — 3. hist Wed. March to 1st Mond. May. 
Com., 5 weeks ;— 3. 3d Wed. Jan., 3 weeks ; — 3. 1st Wed. Hay, 

3 weeks. 
Com., 13 weeks ; — only one vacation. 
Month of May ;— 3. Month of October. 
Com., 8 weeks ; — 3. Wed. before 5th April, 6 weekf . 



Ekflaivatioit. Vacations of Bowdoin College. Ist, from Commencement^d week* i — 
Sdf from tke Friday aftrr the 3d Wednesday in December ^ 8 veekt } — 3^ frvM the Frv- 
day i^Ur the dd Wedmoeday in May, 9 weeks. 



XXV. MEDICAL SCHOOLS. 



Name. 



Place. 



Lectures com. 



Maine Medical rtchool, 
New Hampshire Medical School, 
Vermont Medical School, Univ. Vt. 
Vermont Academv of Medicine, 
Mass. Medical School, Harv. Univ. 
Berkshire Med. irnit., Williams Col. 
Medical School, Yale Collece, 
Coll. Phys. and Surgeons, N. V. 
Coll. Phvs. and Sure , West. Dist. 
Geneva Medical College, 
Medical Depr Univ. Pennsvlvania, 
Medical Dep. Jefferson College, 
Medical Dep. Univ. Maryland, 
Washington Medical College, 
Medical Dep. Univ. Virginia, . 
Medical Cullnge of (he Suto of 8. C. 
Medical College of S. Carolina, 
South. School of Proc. Med. 
Medical College of Georgia, 
Medical College of Trans. Univ. 
Louisville Medical College, . 
Medical College of Ohio, 
Ref. Medical Col. Ohio, 
Louisville Medical School, 
Med. Col. of Louisiana, . 

Willottghby Med. Col. 



Brunswick, 

Hanover, 

Burfington, 

Castloton, 

Boston, 

Pittsfield, 

Now Haven, 

New York, 

Tairfioid, 

Geneva, 

Philadelphia, 

do. 
Baltimore, 

do. 
Chariottesvillo, 
CharlfMton, 

do. 

do. 
Auguftta, 
Lexington, 
Ix>ui!(vilie. 
Cincinnati, 
Worthington, 
Ltiuisville, 
New Orleans, 
Willoughbv, 



I Fob. lOth to 18. 
1st or 9drh. Aug. 

3d Thnrs. in Aug. 

1st Wed. in Nov. 

Ist Thurs. in Sept. 
I Last week in Oct. 
1 1st Mond. Nov. 
,1st Tuos. in Oct. 

1st Mond. in Nov. 
1 1st Mond. in Nov. 
jinst Mond. in Oct. 
last Mond. in Oct. 
September. 
2d Mond. in Nov. 
3d Mond. in Nov. 
3d Mond. in April, 
3d Mond. in Oct. 
1st Mond. in Nov. 

1st Mond. in Nov. 
Ist'Mond. in Oct. 

Last Mond. in Nov. 
Ist Mond. in Nov. 



Prof. 



Stud. 



4 

3 
3 

6 
6 
5 
5 

7 
6 
6 
7 
7 
6 
6 
3 
7 
7 
6 
7 
6 
6 
7 
4 

7 
4 



78 
86 

63 
118 
100 

50 
106 
164 

68 
401 
317 
143 

15 

46 
127 
110 

46 
949 

180 



30 



1838.] 



THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 



171 



XXVI. THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 



Name. 




Bangor Theol. Seminary, 
Gilmanton Theol. 8om. 
Theolofical Seminary, 
Divinity School, 
Theological Institation, 
Theol. Dep. Yalo Collbge, 
Theol. [n»t. of Conn. 
Theol. Ins. Epis. Church, 
New York Thcolog. Sem. 
Theol. Sem. of Auburn, 
Hamilton Lit. fc Th. Inst. 
Ilarlwick Seminary, 
Theol. Sem. As. Ref. Ch. 
Tb. Sem. Dutch Ri'f. Ch. 
Theol. Sem. Pr. Ch. U. S. 
Sera. Luth. Ch. U. S. 
German Reformed, 
West. Theol. Seminary, 
Theological School, 
Theolojsiical Seminary, 
Epii. Theol. School of Va. 
Union Theol. Seminary, 
Virginia Baptist Seminary, 
Southern Theol. Sem. 
Theological Seminary, 
Furman Theol. Seminary, 
South West. Theol. Sem. 
Lane Seminary, 
Theol. Dep. Ken. College, 
Theol. Dep. W. Res. Col. 
Theolo2icnl School, 
Granville I'beolog. Dep. 
Indiana Theol. Seminary, 
Alton Theol. Seminary, 
I'beol. Dep. Marion Col. 



Denomiaa- 
tion. 




Bangor, Me. 

Gilmanton, N. H. 
Andover. Mass. 
Cambridge, do. 
Newton, do. 
N. Haven, Ct. 
E. Windsor, do. 
Now York, N. Y. 

do. do. 

Auburn, do. 
Hamiltoni do. 
Hartwick, do. 
Newburgh, do. 
N.Br'wick,N.J. 
Princeton, do. 
Gcttyfburg, Pa. 
York, do. 

Allegheny T. do. 
Cnnon^burg, do. 
Pitti«burg, do. 
Fairfax Co. Va. 
Pr. Ed. Co. do. 
Richmond, do. 
Columbia, S. C. 
Lexington, do. 
ni;;h Hills, do. 
Maryville, Ten. 
Cincinnati, Ohio, 
Gambier, do. 
Hudson, do. 
Columbus, do. 
Granville, do. 
S. Hanover, In. 
Upper Alton, 11. 
N. Palmyra, Mo. 



Cong. 
Cong. 

(xOllg. 

Cong. Unit. 
Baptist, 
Cong. 
Cong. 
Prot. Epis. 

Presbyt. 
Baptist, 
Lutheran, 
Ass. Ref. Ch. 
Dutch Ref. 
Presbyt. 
Evang. L. 
c; Rof. Ch. 
Presbyt. 
Amo. Ch. 
Asjto. Ref. 
Prot. Epis. 
Presbyt. 
Buptisi, 
Presbyt. 
Lutheran, 
Baptist, 
Presbyt. 
Do. 

Prot. Epii. 
Pre»byt. 
Lutheran, 
Baptist, 
Pre«byt. 
Baptiiit, 
Presbyt. 



1816 
1835 
1WJ8 
1824 

1825 

1834 
1819 

1821 
1820 
l8iG 
183G 
1784 
1813 
1K26 
182.5 
1828 

1828 
1822 
1824 
IS.'S 
1829 
1832 

1821 
1829 
1828 



o 
d 

3 

2 

5 

3 

3 

3 

3 

4 

2 

4 

4 

2 

3 

3 

5 

2 

2 

3 

I 

1 

3 

3 

1 

3 

2 

2 

2 

3 



or* 

'Ota 

*'C0 



49 

10 

133 

21 

40 

76 

96 

90 

3 

51 

9 

9 

94 

130 
25 
20 
33 

19 
29 
35 
60 
22 
1 

29 

42 

11 

3 

30 

10 

1835 I 2, 25 

1' 



1832 1 






72 

672 

100 

40 

113 

300 

220 
124 



714 



90 
76 



14 
30 
62 



Vols. 

in 
Lib. 



4,000 

1,600 

13,000 

1,800 
2,000 
3,000 
4,000 

4,500 
2,250 
1,000 



7,000 
7,000 

4,000 



3,000 
3,200 

1,800 
1,200 
1,000 
5,000 
1,000 



500 

7001 



For a notice of the Roman Catholic Seminaries, see page 173. 

XXVIL BENEVOLENT SOCIETIES. 

Receipts of same of the principal Benevolent Institutions during One 

Year, ending in 1836, or 1837. 



American Board of Com. for Foreign Missions, 

American Tract Society, 

American Bible Society, 

American Home Missionary Society, . • « 
American Sunday School Union, 
American Education Society, .... 
Methodist Missionary Society, .... 
Baptifit Genernl Convention for Foreign Missions, 
American Colonisation Societv, 

Pr....,„t Epi.copa. Church.] Suc^Mfri, 
American Anli-Slavery Society, .... 



Formed. Receipts. 



1810 


$176,232.15 


1814 


130,991.28 


1816 


90,.'i78.89 


1826 


86,803.61 


1824 


72,,'«4.10 


1816 


65,574.69 


1819 


61,3:^7.81 


1814 


60,000.00 


1819 


61,66^.95 


1820 


48,9n.l7 




32,740.35 


1833 


36,567.92 



172 



UNITED STITXS. 



[1838. 



XXVIII. RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS. 

1. SUMMART or THE PRINCIPAL RkLIGIOUS DElfOMIFATIONS. 



Denominationf. 



Churches 
I or Coii- 
gregftt'M. 



Miniflteia. 



Baptitta, ..... 
** Freewill, . . , . 
•* SeTontb-uay, . . 

'* Six-Principle, 

Catholics, 

Christians, . .* . 

Congrogationalists, 

Disci plas or Christ, (Campbellites,) 

Dutch Reformed, 

Episcopaliaas, 

Friends, 

(jeriaan Reformed, . 

Jews, 

Lutherans, .... 
Mennonites, . . . | 

Methodists, .... 

" Protectant, 

Moravians or United Brethren, 
Mormonites, .... 

New Jerusalem Church, 
Preshyterians, .... 

" Cumberland, 

** Associate, • 

** Reformed, 

« Associate Reformed, 

Shakers, 

Tunkers, . ... 

Unitarians, . . , • 
Universalists, .... 



6,319 

753 

49 

16 

443 

1,000 

1,300 

197 

830 

500 

. 600 

750 
SMX) 



94 

97 

9,807 

500 

183 

40 

914 

15 

40 

900 

653 



4.339 

613 

46 

10 

389 

800 

1,150 

199 
849 

180 

967 

9,764 

400 

33 

33 
9,995 

450 
87 
90 

116 
45 
40 

174 

317 



Members 

or Com- 

mttnie'ots. 



453,000^ 
33,876 
4,503 f 
2,117, 

150,000 
160,000 

99,515 



30,000 

69,366 
30,000 
650,103 { 
50,000 
5,745 
12,000 

274,084 

50,000 

16,000 

3,000 

13,000 

6,000 

3,000 



Popalatiuo. 



4,300,000 

800,000 

300,000 

1,400,000 

450,000 
600,000 
100,000 

15,000 
M0,000 

3,000,000 

13,000 

13,000 

5,000 



3,175,000 



6,000 

30,000 

180,000 

600,000 



The above statementB of the numbers of churches, miaisters, and 
members of the several denominations) have been derived chiefly from 
recent official documents published by the different denominations ; but 
the last column contains a rather vague estimate, which has appeared 
in various publications, of the total number of people who are attached 
to or show a preference for the several different religious persuasions. 

Baptists. — The statement in the table, taken from Mr. Allen's 
^* Triennial Baptist Register,'* for 1836, is too small, as returns from 
many churches and associations had not been received. The Baptists 
increase very rapidly ; they are making vigorous efforts to promote 
education ; and they have under their influence 6 or 7 theological sem- 
inaries, 7 or 8 colleges, various other literary institutions, and about 30 
periodical publications. 

The Freewill Baptists have 24 yearly meetings, and 55 quarterly 
meetings. They differ from Baptists by being anti-calvinistic, and 
some of them are Unitarians. 

The Seventh' Day Baptists have one general conference, formed in 
1808, which meets annually. 



1838.] EELieiOUB DENOHINATIOlfS. 173 

The MennanUts and Twiikers agree with the Baptistt on the subject 
of baptism. 

CatkolUs. — The first Catholic bishop in the United States (John 
Carroll, D. D., of Baltimore,) was consecrated in 1790. The Catholics 
increase rapidly, almost exclusively by emigration from Europe. They 
have now 12 dioceses, L archbishop, 13 bishops; and according to the 
«* Catholic Almanac" for 1837, 300 churches, 143 stations, 389 clergy- 
men, 12 ecclesiastical seminaries, 13 colleges, 23 female religioift insti- 
tutions, 37 female academies, 37 charitable institutions, and 7 periodical 
publications " devoted to the cause of Catholicity." 

Catholic Ecdesiaatieal Seminaries with the number of students, as 
stated in the ** Catholic Almanac " : — Boston ; Philadelphia (8^ ; Balti- 
more (17) ; Emmitsburg (26) ; Frederick (19) ; Charleston (7) ; near 
Bardstown, and at St. Rose, in Washington County, Ken. ; Cincin- 
nati (7), and Perry County, Ohio; the Barrens, and St. Stanislaus, 
Missouri. 

In the table of Colleges, on pages 166- 9, 8 Catholic Colleges are enu- 
merated. In addition to these, the following are mentioned in the Cath- 
olic Almanac, viz. Mount St. James's Seminary at Worcester, Mass. ; 
Nyack College on the Hudson, about 30 miles north of New York ; St. 
James's Literary Institution, Frederick, Md. ; Cincinnati Athenseum ; 
and St. Philip's College near Detroit; but these institutions do not 
appear to be yet properly organized as colleges. 

Christians, often called Christ-ians. They agree with the Baptists on 
the subject of baptism ; but are generally anti-trinitarians. They have 
a literary institution at Beverly, Mass. 

CongregaticnaUsts. — This denomination, often called ^* Orthodox 
Congregationalists,'* are descended chiefly from the English Puritans, 
who founded the settlements of New England, and are found chiefly in 
New England. They are an intelligent and powerful body of Chris- 
tians, have 4 theological seminaries, and 7 of the New England colleges 
are chiefly under their influence ; and they have a number of periodi- 
cal publications. 

Disciples of Christ, — This is a new denomination, founded by the 
Rev. Alexander Campbell of Bethany, Va. 

Duleh Reformed Church. — This denomination of Christians is found 
chiefly in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. They have 1 
general synod, 2 particular synods, 18 classes, and a college and theo- 
logical institution at New Brunswick, N. J. 

Episcopalians or Protestant Episcopal Church, — The first Protestant 
Bishop in the United States (Samuel Seabury, D. D., of Coniiectiout,) 
was consecrated in 1784. This denomination has now 22 dioceses, 18 
bishops, 4 theological institutions, 5 colleges, and several periodical 
publications. 

15*^ 



174 UKITXD STATES. [1838. 

Friends or Quakers. — The Friends haye meeting ia 18 of the 
States, bat are most numerous in Pennsylvania ; and they have 8 yearly 
meetings and many more quarterly and monthly meetings. A dlTiaion 
took place in this respectable and peaceable denomination in the years 
1827 and 1628 ; and the two divisions are knowa by the names of Or- 
thodox and Hicksites. The former division is supposed to comprise 
about two thirds. 

German Reformed Church ; most numerous in Pennsylvania ; — have 
a theological institution at York, Pa. 

LvHierans; 1 general synod ; 9 district synods ; — 4 theological sem* 
inaries, at Hartwick, N. Y., Gettysburg, Pa., Lexington, S. C, and 
Columbus, Ohio. 

Methodists. — The Methodists have 1 general conference, which 
meets once in 4 years, 25 annual conferences, 3,039 travelling preach- 
ers, and many local preachers ; and the number of their congregations 
is supposed to be twice as great as the number of their travelling 
preachers. They have 6 bishops, who are employed most of the time 
in travelling and visiting the different conferences. The names of the 
bishops with the residences of their families are as follows : — 

Elected. 

Elijah Bedding, D. D. Lynn, Mass 1824 

Beverly Waugh, D. D. New York. N. Y 1836 

James O. Andrew, D. D. Augusta, Geo 1832 

Thomas A. Morris, D. D. Cincinnati, Ohio, .... 1836 

Robert Soule, D. D. Lebanon, Ohio, . . . ' 1824 

Robert R. Roberts, D. D. Bona, Indiana, .... 1616 

The Methodists have had a rapid increase, and have lately made 
laudable efforts to promote education. They have 7 colleges, all of 
recent origin, 21 academies, and 3 periodical publications under their 
direction. The Methodist '* Book Concern " is an extensive establish- 
ment in the city of New York for printing and circulating Bibles, 
Tracts, and Sunday School Books at the lowest prices. 

A schism took place in this denomination in 1830. The party that 
separated style themselves Protestant Methodists, and differ from the 
main body chiefly by discarding the exclusive sway of the clergy in 
ecclesiastical government, and admitting the laity to have a share. 
They have 1 general conference, and 13 annual conferences, com- 
posed of an equal number of ministers and laymen, or elected dele- 
gates. 

Mormonites.'—ThiB sect was founded in 1630^ in the county of On- 
tario, N. Y., by Joseph Smith, Jun., the publisher of the " Book of 
Mormon,*' a duodecimo volume of 588 pages, comprising 15 books, 
purporting to have been written at different times. 



1838L] RBLIOIOUB DEHOMIHATlOlfS. 175 

Moravians. — The Morarians, otf as thej are asually style themselyes, 
the " United Brethren," are foond in several of the States, but are most 
numerous in Pennsylvania. They have several schools or seminaries 
of good reputation. 

Presbyterians. — The Presbyterians have 1 general assembly, 24 
synods, 128 presbyteries, 2,807 churches, and 2,225 ministers, including 
licentiates. They are a numerous, powerful, and intelligent denomi- 
nation, in the Middle, Southern, and Western States ; and they have 
about one third of the colleges in the United States under their influ- 
ence, and 8 or 9 theological institutions. They are now nearly equally 
divided between what are called the Old and the New Schools. At the 
last meeting of the General Assembly at Philadelphia in May and 
June, 1837, the Synods of the Western Reserve, Ohio, and of Utica, 
Geneva, and Genesee, N. Y., comprising upwards of 500 ministers, 
mostly of the ** New School," were declared to be no longer con- 
nected with the Presbyterian Church of the United States. The 
American Home Missionary Society and the American Education So- 
ciety were discountenanced by a vote, of 124 to 86. 

The Cumberland Presbyterians were first organized as a distinct body 
in 1810, and a«re found chiefly in Tennessee, Kentucky, Alabama, Mis- 
sissippi, Indiana, and Missouri. They have a college at Princeton, 
Kentucky. 

The Associate Presbyterians have 1 synod and 9 presbyteries. 

The Reformed Presbyterians have 1 general synod, 2 subordinate 
synods, and 4 presbyteries. 

The 'Associate Reformed Presbyterians have 3 synods and 13 presbyt- 
eries. They have theological seminaries at Newburgb, N. Y., and 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

The Unitarians (Congregational Unitarians) have societies in 14 or 
15 States, but a majority of them are found in Massachusetts. The 
first Unitarian minister (James Freeman, D. D., of Boston) that was 
ordained as such in America, was ordained in 1787. The Unitarians 
have much wealth and learning. They have a theological school at 
Cambridge, Mass., and the university there is under their control. 

The Universalists formed their general convention at Oxford, Mass., 
in 17B5. It meets annually. In 1831 a part of the Universalists seced- 
ed, and formed a separate denomination, entitled Universal Restora- 
tionistM. 



176 



UIHTED STATES. 



[1838. 



2. Protestant Episcopal Church. 



Dioceses. 



c ■ 
£ S 



«5 



< 



^ Maine, 
N.Hainpflbire, 
MauucliusetU, 
,R. Island, 

Vermont, 

Coonocticut, 

New York, 

New Jerse/i 

FeniiKylvaoia, 

Delaware, 

Maryland, 

Virgiaia, 

North Carolina, 
jSouth Curollna, 

Georgia, 

Alabama, 

Miuisiippi, 

Louisiana, 

Tonnesaee, 

Kentucky, 
•Ohio, 
jlliinois, 
llndiana, 

Miisouri, 

Michigan, 
Fioiida, 
Wisconsin, 



Bishops. 



Cons. 



Alez.V.GriswoM,D.D. 1811 < 

ohn H. Hopkins, D. D. 1839 
Til. C. Bruwnell, D. D. 1819 
Benj. F. Onderdonk, D. D. 1^30 
George W. Duane, D. D. Ib3*2 
tlunry H. Oudordoiik, D. D. 16^7 

Wm. M. Stone, U. D. 1 1830 
( Richard C. Moore, D. D. 1814 ) 
} VVm.ML>ado,l).U..«MUt.lin29 { 
Levi a. Ives, D. D. i6;<l 

Nathaniel Bowon, D. D. 1 1818 



James H. Otoy, D. D. 1834 

Benj. B. Smith, D. D. 1«32 

Chus. P, Mcllvaino; D. D. 1832 
* Philander Ubaao, D. D. 1619 

I Jackson Kemper, D. D. >1835 { 

Sam. A. McCoskry, D. D. 1836 



MIn. 



73 

20 

46 

6 

7 

3 

4 

10 

20 

47 

7 

10 

10 

10 

4 

1 



Meeting of ConventionM. 



Ut Wednesday in Sept. 
Last Wedncsduy in June. 
M Wednesday in June. 
'^ Tuesday in June. 
iU Wednesday in Sept. 
-id Tuesday in Juno. 
First Thursday hi Oct. 
Lust Wednesday in May. 
Third Tuesday m Muy. 
Ist Saturday in June, 
[^ast Wednesday in May. 

3d Wndneaday in May. 

Last Thursday in May. 
1st Wednesday in May. 
-2(i Mun. aA. Easter Mon. 
*iit Saturday in June. 
Ist Wednesday in May. 
LastThuis. in April. 
Isl Sat. II r. Sd Wed. Oct. 
-2(1 Thursday in May. 
'id Th. af. Ut Wed. Sept. 
3d Wednesday in May. 



2d Friday in June. 



* Bishop Chase was consecrated Bishop of Ohio in 1819 } but resigned in 1831 ; and 
in 1835, he was chosen Bishop of lUinou. 



3. Roman Catholic Church. 



Dioceses. 



Boston, 
New York, 

Philadelphia, 

Baltimore, 
Charleston, 
Mobile, 
New Oilcans, 

Bardstown, 

Cincinnati, 
Vincnnnes, 
St. Louis, 
Detroit, 



Comprising. 



Now England, 

N. Vork and part of N. Jersey, 

Ponn. and part of N. Jersey, 

and Delaware, 
Md., Va., fc Dist. Columbia, 
N. C, S. C, and Georgia, 
Alabama and Floiida, 
Louisiana and Mississippi, 

Kentucky and Tennessee, 

Ohio, 

Indiana and part of Illinois, 
Missouri, Arkansas, &.c. 
Michigan and Wisconsin Ter. 



Bishops. 



Bcned't. J. Fenwick, D. D. 

John Dubois, D. D. 

Henry Conwcll, D. D. } 

F. P. Keiirick, D.D., Coadj. \ 

Samuel Kcclf Kton, D. D., jibp. 

John England, D. D. 

Michael Poriior, D. D. 

Anthony Blanc, D. D. 
^ Bonedict J. Flaget, D. D. 
( G. J. Chabrat, U. D., Coadj. 

John B. Purcell, D. D. 

Simon G. Brut6, D. D. 

Jo«eph Rosati, D. D. 

Frederick a«x6, D. D. 



Min. 



S4 

43 

40 

75 
98 
10 
31 

41 

91 
15 
47 
S3 

389 



METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION. 



I. METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOR DOVER, N. 1 
For 1830. Bt A. A. Tb1\i, E*q. 



D»T a). Heu of thna obian 



Tbg liiebHl Uaipellliirs, J11I7 Stli, SG 
Ruif« of Ibe j«u 115 degriHp Mntn 

Fiir daji. Cloiidf. Faal 



n. TABLE FOR CONCORD, N, H. 

Mean Ttntptratare ^ tatk MoTUh in 1836, atearding to Iht Journal 
of JoAn Former, E»j. 



lltPOHMATIOH. 












a ^-"js 









■'■""'™l3!i=i3IJlsSa!|| 






li 



iisijfihsrlf 



.tf„,H I SiSsasssEi^sia i ss i £ ^a 



B3Jggi3SaK3 ■ 


ws 






nil 


S3 


|s5|8 


'it'i 

aii 


1 


-1 


« 



1838.] 



MXTEOROLOOICAL IllFOJlMATIOfr. 



179 



Remarks extracted from the ** Vermont Chronicle" — The weather 
during the latter part of the month of November [1835], was extremely 
cold ; and the succeeding month of December was remarkable also for 
the extraordinary severity of the weather, during the first 18 days. 
The mean temperature during this period was 6.3° ; being at sunrise 0^. 

The month of February [1836] was probably the coldest known since 
the settlement of the country. The mean temperature was nearly 5J^^ 
lower than the remarkably cold February of the preceding winter. The 
average temperature of the 14 mornings on which the mercury was 
below zero, was nearly — 16. On the morning of the 2d of the month, 
the mercury is said to have congealed in the bulb of a thermometer 
at Franconia. 

The aurora borealis has been observed but once during the winter, 
while during the previous winter it was observed 1 2 times. ' 

The whole number of observations from November [1835] to the lat- 
ter part of March, [1836] at which time the mercury was below zero, 
was 67 ; — the preceding year 52. The average temperature of these 
67 observations was about — 8^^, 

The whole depth of snow which has fallen since the 20th of Novem- 
ber [1835] is 9 feet 1 inch. The sleighing has been uninterrupted 
since the 23d of November, that is, almost 19 weeks. In the open 
fields the average depth of snow is still [April 1, 1836,] more than 18 
inches. 

The mean temperature oTthe month of January, 1837, at Dartmouth 
College was 10.57°, nearly one third of a degree lower than that of the 
preceding February, which is said to have been the coldest month 
then on record at that place. 



IV. TIME OF THE OPENING OF THE ERIE CANAL AND 

LAKE ERIE. 

[From the Report of the Regents of the Univenity of New York.] 





Canal opened at 
Baffdlo. 


Canal opened at 


Lake Erie open 


Tear. 


Albany. 


at Bufittlo. 


1827 


April 21 


April 21 


April 21 


1828 


« I 


" 1 


'• 1 


1829 


*« 25 


" 29 


May 10 


1630 


«• 15 


«* 20 


April 6 


1831 


«« 16 


" 16 


May 8 


1832 


«« 18 


« 25 


April 27 


1833 


« 28 


«* 22 


*» 23 


1834 


•* 16 


(( 17 


" 6 


18:i5 


«* 15 


« 15 


May 8 



180 MBTBOROLOOICAL INFO&MATIOIT. [1838- 

V. TIME OF THET OPENING AND CLOSING OF THE 

HUDSON RIVER 

At Albany, so far as the same can he novo ascertained. 
[Prom the Report of tho Regents of the University of New York.] 



Wintar*. 



17d9— 90 

1790—91 

179i— 92 

179-2—93 

1793—94 

1794—95 

1795—96 

1796—97 

1797—98 

1796-99 

1799—1800 

180U— 01 

1801—02 

1802—03 

1803—04 

1804^05 

1805—06 

1806—07 

1807—08 

1808-.09 

1809—10 

1810—11 

1811—13 

1819-13 

1813—14 

1814—15 

1815— IC 

1816-17 

tl817— 18 
1818—19 
1819—20 

tl«W_2l 
1821-22 
1B22_23 

$l{)-23— 24 
1824—25 
1625_-26 
182« 27 

1)1827—28 

1829—30 

iri«:w>— 31 

IKJl- 32 
«*18;^>-33 

18:0— 34 
tt 183 1—35 

1835—36 

16:^—37 



River eloeed or obtti acted 
bj lee. 



February 3, 1790 

December 8, 1790 

December 8, 1791 

lAooomher 12, 1792 

December 36, 1793 

Jttouary 12, 1795 

January 23, 1796 

November 28, 1796 

November 26, 1797 

November 23, 1798 

January 6, 1800 

January 3, 1801 

February 3, 1802 

December 16, 1802 

January 13, 1804 

December 13, 1804 

January 9, 1806 

December 11, 1806 

January 4, 1808 

December 9, 1KU8 

January 19, 1810 

December 14, 1810 

December 20, 1811 

December 31, 1812 

December 92, 1813 

Docember JO, J8I4 

December 2, 1815 

Dt^cember 18, 1816 

December 7, 1817 

December 14, 1818 

December 13, 1819 

November 13, J 820 

December 13, 1821 

Deromber 34, 1822 

Docemtwr 16, 1823 

Junuiiry 5, 1825 

December 13, 1825 

December 34, 1826 

'November 25, 1827 

'December S3, 1828 

'January 11, 1830 

•December 33, I8:J0 

'Docember 6, lau 

'December 91, 1832 

•December 13, 1833 

'December 15, 1834 

'November 30, 18'« 

♦December 7, 1836 



River open or frae of loe. 



•Maroli 33, 1786 



♦March 17, 1794 



Febraary 93, 1806 



'March 13, 1813 



March 

April 

March 

March 

March 

March 

March 

March 

'February 96^ 
'March 90, 
'February 8, 
'April 1, 

'March 
'March 
'March 
'March 

•February 94, 
•March 93, 
•April 4, 



85, 

15, 



15, 
15, 
23, 
21, 



1818 
1819 
1890 
1821 
1822 
1823 
1824 
1825 
1826 
18-27 
1828 
1829 
1830 
1831 
1832 
1833 
\«H 
1835 
1836 



No. dayi clowd. 



81 dayi. 



45 daya. 



83 dayi. 


108 days. 


no days. 


109 daya. 


123 days. 


92 days. 


90 days. 


78 daya. 


60 daya. 


75 days. 


86 days. 


About SO dayi. 


100 days. 


63 days. 


82 dayi. 


11 [ diyi. 


t3 dayi. 


73 dayi. 


100 dayi. 


125 dayi. 



' All those marked thui ' are derived from autbontie records or perional observation. 

t Tliia winter wai Ion; and inleniely cold. On the 3d of March, 1818, tho ice 
moved in a body downwards for »ome distttnee, and there remained itatiooary. The 
river was not clear until March 95lh. 

X Tho river closed on tho 13th, opened on the 90th, and finally closed Deoember 1. 
This was one of the four wintnri during a century, in which the Hudson between 
Powlen Huok and New York wai eroned on the ice. The other three beiog 1740-41, 
1764-65, and 1779-80. 

j& January U, 1894. The river was clear of ioe, and remained so for sereral days. 

|{ The river opened aod closed repeatedly during thii winter. December SI, it eloeed 
a aeeoadttime. 

If Opened in consequence of heavy raini^ and cloied again on the 10th of Jan., 1631. 

•' Opened again Janunry 3; closed again January 11 

ft March 17tb ; River opened opposite to tho city. March 18th ; Steamboat John 
Jay came to Van Wie*i Point, ice at the Overslaugh. T. R. B. 



1838.] 



rj.ows&ure of fruit-trbbs. 



181 



VI. FLOWERING OF FRUIT-TREES. 

1. Time ofHowering of the Ptaeh^ Cherry^ and Apple Trees ^ at several 

Places, 



Placa. 


VMieh. 


Chdrry. 


Apple. 


Brunswick, Me. 




May 28 


June 5 


BurlingteDi Vt. 




" 24-28 


May 30, June 3 


Feacham, do. 






do. 12, full. 


Cambridge, Mass. 


May 17-22 


May 12-21 


May 23-31 do. 


Wilmington, Del. 


•< 2 


•' 2 


19 do. 


Baltimore, Md. 


April 25 




" 5 


Charleston, S. C. 


Feb. 9-26 




April 1 


Norwalk, Ohio, 


May 4 


May 6 


May 10 



The winter of 1836-7, in the Northeastern States, was long «nd 
severe, though not quite so much so as the winter immediately preced- 
ing ; and the Spring of 1637 was uncommonly backward. A great part 
of the peach trees, in this part of the country, were entirely killed, or 
rery much injured, as also were some other kinds of trees. But few 
peach trees produced any blossoms ; and such as did flower, were so 
much chilled with the cold, that they were, contrary to what is the gen- 
eral rule, later in flowering than the cherry trees. 



2. Time qf Flowering of Fruit-Trees ^ at several Places in the State of 

Jfew York, in 1836. 



Place. 


FMoh. 


Cherrj. 


Apple. 


Auburn, 


May 7 


May 3 




BeUeviUe, 




" 25 


May 20 


Cambridge, 




" 13 


*• 17 


Canajoharie, 




" 15 


« 17 


Canandaigua, 


May 4 




" 13 


Cortland, 




" 12 


it 20 


East Hampton, 


« 18 


" 21 


.* 17 


Flatbush, 


" 10 


" 6 


•« 16 


Fredonia, 


" 10 


*' 3 


« 13 


Lewiston, 


« 12 


« 10 


« 17 


New burgh, 


« 4 


" 3 


« 8 


Oxford, 




" 16 


« 19 


Pompey, 




" 16 


*• 27 



16 



182 



METEOROLOGICAL IITFOaMATION. [1838» 

VII. METEOROLOGICAL TABLES OF 



Abstract of the Returns of Meteorological Observations made to the JRe- 
gents of the University by sundry Academies in the State of New 
York for the Year 1836. 

1. Me AH Tempxrature or each Mohth. 



ACADKMIBS. 



Albany, 

Aubarn, 

Camb. Was. 

Cuoandaigua 

Cherry-Val. 

Clinton, 

Cortland, 

Dutchess, 

Erasmus H. 

Fuirfield. 

Fredonia, 

(jranville, 

Uanailton, 

Hartwick, 

Ithaca, 

Johnstown, 

Kinderhook, 

Kingston, 

Lansingb'gh, 

Lewiston, 

Monroo, 

Montgom'ry, 

Newburgh, 

Oneida Inat. 

Onondaga, 

Oxford, 

Pomrtey. 

RedhoOK, 

Rochester, 

St. Lawrence 

Scheuect'dy, 

Union, 

Union-Hall, 

Uiica, 



Jan. 



23.16 
20.21 
21.92 



Fob. 



16.33 
19.17 
13.63 
22.68' 19.24 
19.74 12.4-2 



;K).01 
21.52 
25.11 

28.16 



22.61 
14.80 
19.34 
22.05 



21.07i 17.00 
26.57 20.59 



22.26 
21.44 



13.74 
i:).95 



2-2.l2ii0.51 
25.15' 18.09 
20.94 l.i.UJ 
21.90 16.64 
24.43 18.57 
25.55 18.90 
24.06 22.24 
25.18 19.6.') 



Mar. 



Apr. 



May. June, July 



27.04,42.71 
28.74 1 4 1.77 
2(^.03 40.3*4 
i7 ..VI 51.44 
2:1.21 40.72 
34.09 42.83 



23.41 
30.rj 
32.51 



40.45 
46.60 
46.21 



25.53,41. b9 
28.45 44.7() 



29.17 

•24.87 
'39.62 



42.04 
38,9.-, 
45.:J8 



22.14 
25.41 



17.76 
18.85 



21.141 14.9.'i 



26.15 
21.01 
20.75 
24.38 
24.71 
19.21 
23.86 
22.51 
27.01 
22.61 



19.7i' 
15.3^ 
15.6b 
18.01 
18.42 

16.81 
17.63 
21.99 
13.67 



•27.00 42.75 
•22.01 3H.b2 
•26.62142.37 
•29.52 44.17 
3).17|41.4U 
•28.85 40.20 
•27.80 43.18 
26.09,41.74 
•29.17i45.2(i 
•22.58140 41 
•28.39 42.81 



•25.74 
24.87 
•28.72 
•29 00 



41.41 
39.21 
46.28 
42.92 



•24.92 40.01 
27.12 42-66 
•27.82 38.70 
31.93 45.07 
22.63,37.81 



59.62 
58.46 
5»).84 
.57.59 
58.55 
53.04 
61.77 
63.19 
58.17 
61.71 
56.33 
60.08 
r.2.32 
ti2.74 
57.86 
57.26 
58.6.1 
61.72 
Si.55 
54.74 
.'>7.78 
tK).93 
61.00 
.-|8.24 
59.30 
,58.28 
54.11 
'61.34 
54.22 
.S4.86 
55.47 
.57.a5 
.S6.63 
54.75 



65.12 72. 
65.69,70. 
65.11 69, 
63.1864, 
61.97167. 
59.59' 68 
66 
73., 
72 



;61.68 
66.03 
'63.18 
,62.13 67 
,63.84 66 
71.9;{|75. 
61.93 66 
65..'K) 70 
»i5.75 69 
(W.88 70 
63.88 70. 
65.19 71 
69.27 75. 
61.50 67. 
65.14 68 
64.29 68. 
64.23 68. 
64.80 71 
65.13,70 
63 69 69. 
59.tt7|64. 
65.97 69. 
66.87 70. 
63.43 68 
64.16 71 
63.79 67 
61.78 70 
61.41.65. 



49 

4(> 

60 

M> 

60 

8< 

9fe 

59 

14 

64 

80 

77 
6! 
95 



Aug. 



Sept. Oct. Nov. 



»)4.55,60. 
62.71 JOI. 
•>0.97 58. 



Dec. 



51 12.32 36.66 
02 40.7133.94 
44,. i9.77 34.86 
t>3.40 .57.87 42.42 .'i4.02 
i>0.79 57.(>0l37.9J 32.16 
65.71 65.15 48.89 40.10 
60.08 57.31» 38.43 33.35 
<>6.93 ri3.6:i', 45.24 38.48 
66.92 &1.23 47.28,40.38 
1)1 22,59.81.37.5:131.85 



. e 
B o 
c • 



»S.3I 

«i5.24 

60.15 

t)2 34 

62.49 

64|63.:V* 

5:}'«>:}.29 

9^66.16 

94 ^yS.SO 
09 62.-.i5 

95 6:i 02 
75 64.60 
13-65.28 
66l«;2.5H 
27k>3.4b 
54 
77 
16 
15 
.%3 
87 

5:< 

2(i 



62.44 

.^8.02 
M.41 
6:1.28 
62 5(1 
64 .0;^ 

(j0.7:< 

«VI80 
78 .58.61 



.•>9. 

60. 

56, 

61. 

.'i9. 

59. 

00. 

61. 

64. 

61 

61, 

63, 

61, 

«)8, 

(*0 

.58, 

.53 

62, 

•>9, 

55, 

61, 

60 

ta, 

57. 



:« n.54'35.78 

60 48.09 37 .S2 

07 ;j5.y8 ;W.22 

69.<9.66a'«.14 

29 

•Xi 

,65 

75 

97 

89 

,17 

,02 

;J9 

,89 



40.2135.07 
40.76 :M.07 
40..39!:J5.37 
43.58 :?7 33 
46.73 39.46 
40.27 33.54 
40.84 .36.23 
:«.3 .35.25 
14.35 35.69 
10.I6:«.35 
29 41.60 36.54 
80p9.85:i3.10 
78.^6.1131.60 
5(.' 44.65 39.77 
04 41.36 36.49 
29, ;tf).88 33.05 



68 
:)7 

4y 
10 



43.27 
10.51 
15.47 
.19.34 



37 58 

a5.oo 

:19.3H 
33.72 



2ii.20 44.73 
28.2144.75 
24.57 142.68 
21.56:43.78 
22.4i;41.25 

32.12 46.92 
24.73 42.04 
29.02 47.32 
31.66 47.73 
•22.16 42.48 
•2816 44.64 
25.10 45.t58 
22.77 40.45 
25.9944.92 
27.89 44.28 
23.92 452 31 
25.51 43.81 

26.97 45.94 
29.09 47.82 
26.61 43.64 
27.43 44 69 

25.13 44.25 
29 85 45.73 

22.98 44.31 

38.23 45.16 
24.37 42.80 
23.40 40,18 
28.05 46.11 

28.24 44.01 
19.59 40.78 
27 41 44.66 
2.5.72 43.11 

:m.(>o 46.5a 

23.27.40.89 



Via. RECESSION OF THE MISSISSIPPL 

Average Monthly Recession of the Mississippi from High- Water Mark, 
at JVew Orleans;— for the Years 1833-4-5-6. 



Janaarji 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 



Inchea. 




Inches. 


7.90 


July, 


5.82 


513 


August, 


7.97 


4.27 


September, 


13.10 


294 


October, 


1333 


4.63 


November, 


12M 


4.72 


December, 


8.84 



1838.] MiTxoKOLOaiCAL itfroBJUTtof. 

HEW YORK ACADEMtES. 

2. EzTBEitis or TehpibjltvrKi &e. 

Tbe Un two eoluixni •ibilut Iba Mem Jli 
Q^ntilr tf Rt'*, hi II j«t> (1836 la IBM] 



.......... 


It 


n 
1 i 


i 


.2 


N 


s 

li 

e 






1 

i 

41. « 

41.97 

:i7.ei 

1 

91. IS 
:«.9J 




;iwiij-\?ii.V, 

CortlinSl, 

F.irlWd, 
Prt4on», 
l!«n.,lle, 

lihicZr ' 

LaoiiUa, 
Mod™., 

Ne-bl.,,, ''' 
0»>dl Kttllou. 

Oiroijl**' 

SB, 

BochMiet, 
(JniDD-'Hill, 


m 

X 
BO 

M 

M 

«l 
97 

9:1 
W 

91 
83 
86 


_ 18 

- li 

I 11 

- i 

ni 

- a 


80 

77 

19 
66 

M 
7( 

6a 

69 


Feb. 5 

;; B 
J.I.. » 

1; ^ 


i:; 5 
'.■:l.,i 

Jul} 8 
JutJ S 

i:s,t 

Jutj « 

li 

li 


■•»■ 'S-KiS 

a«pl. 6 Bfpt. K 46.7 

Ant. aiMcpi. sdiM- 

Oct. 3Ul>ee. 9U*a.l9 
Oel. 5 44.19 
Oel. |9KI.» 

Srpt. 9 Sopl. SS'4^1 

Ant. 91 ^pi. a7u:i 

Se^. 5'lcl. i]».3 

(itl. 1941.1 

Oct. OOel. I9|4>i.9i 

s^pt. !»o«. ia,4B.« 

3.pt. 60.I. I9'48.S 
S.pL 9u]l)el. 19; 49. 4 

Sfft. 6's^ge48!4 

^^ G.Se^S8t4.» 
Sept. i'.lfn*. 98 43.C 

A^l^. locL 19 u!^ 
Uel. I9 46.9< 
Oel. nOct. 3 45.31 
Pepl. 3ttNo». 16498- 
Sepl. 6|Sept. !»45.:r 





IX. METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOR SAVANNAH, GEO. 

MttraeUd from Mr. A. O. Otmlir's Tabia far 1 1 JfoMA*, from Augtut 

1836, to Jwa JB37. 







So'cloekA M 


6 o'clock PM 








Momhe. 










i 


S 


.!^ 


.|| 


.1 S 1 . 


i 


JiNI 


X 


z 


s 




= !s 






i =:. 1= J 


















i ^.-h, 










































sassiii 






























J^ 


s 


67 




39 


13 60 i3 


SiliSSi'sa 






4!fifl 


J 













































































































184 

X. METEOROLOGICAL TABLES FOR NEW ORLEANS. 

[ComiBiuiialti] I17 Pint. E. H. Butn, H. D.] 

1. MoiuMg JliilTact from Dr. Bartim'a Meleerdogieai Journal for 183G 









«™. 






B^IQX 


™^ 
























Hid. 


m™. 


■U... 




Min. 


"*"■ 


R.iW». 


J«nuar7, 


70 


34 


55. 


36 


30.46 


2!>7S 


3016 


.70 


Febrasry, 




33 


55.50 


36 


30.45 


29 BO 


30.12 


.65 




75 




56.75 


87 


30.38 


at 75 


30.13 


.63 


^"!' 


7!) 


.W 


69.25 


21 


30,27 


i».7H 


30.04 


.49 


63 


tM 


73. 


in 


30.17 


3!>70 


29.97 


.47 




83 


m 


78-53 


VO 


30.33 


20.83 


30.04 


.40 


July, 


89 


71 


80.08 


IM 


3ii.a] 


29.92 


30 05 


.28 




87 


72 


73.72 


ir. 


3(115 




30 05 


.22 


September, 


86 


65 


77-12 


Vl 


30.17 


■29,94 


30 05 


.23 




81 


43 


65.11 


;iH 


3025 


29,85 


30-09 


.40 


NoTember, 


73 


34 


53 81 


3!t 


30-40 


39.70 


30.13 


.70 


ATerafe, 


74 


^ 


50.19 


4D 


30.55 


29.98 


30.23 


.57 






66. 


29 









































W. 


""■ 






If. 










■s 
















5 




,- 




t. 
















w 


























£ 


i 


1 


3 


i» 


.N. 


NE. 


E. 


SE. 


S. 


sw. 


W. NW. 


Hi 


Jan. 


35 38 


15 


6.14 


?1 






17 


6 


10 


3 


12 


6 ft. 


Feb. 


37| 37 


' 


3.07' 12 


8 




7 


3 


8 


5 


1.S 


6.3 


Mar. 


42 45 


i 


1.60 24 


10 


3 


6 




b 




8 


4. 


April, 


40; 21 


11 


d.86l 3 


4 


1(1 


26 


IM 


9 






2. 




57 20 


1.' 


5.121 8 


7 


H 


15 


8 


17 




12 
















10 




19 


14 


13 








n 


7.27 4 


H 


1 




10 










A,.; 






3.83, S 


t 


5 






18 






9.7^ 


s..;i. 


; 3( 


v; 


6.31 ! 16 


IfV 


M 
















( IG 




1.05 19 


27 












II 


S,8 




1 a 


1- 


2-90 54 




a 


8 


ft 






7 


10 M 


Dec. 


( 19 


6 


3.30 37 


" 


33 








' 




7.8 


No. Ob 


5i 


28 


139!52.Ki|204 


113 


81 


198 


131 


117 


73 ;ii9 





The Winds and Weattur were noted tbt«e titnea a day. 



1838.] 



MBTBOROLOeiCAL IITFOBMATION. 



185 



2. Table tf Temperatures of Jifew Orleans by Seasons, 



Atbkaob. 



AverMa of 1833, ; 
1834, 1835, 1836. 



Winter, 
Spring, 
Summer, 
Autumn, 



Sunrbe. 



Mid- 
day. 



In the 
Sun. 



Sun- 

Nt. 



47.57 ,58.4C, 54.98 

62.10 70 52' 68.23 

76.72 183.27 104.96 80.76 



64J29 72 89 



70.63 



10 at 
nifht. 



1.69 
C>3 41 

7d.2J» 
67.13 



High- 
est. 



72.66 

m. 

89. 
83.66 



Low- 1 Goo. Raoio. 
est. ATor. 



28.66'53.17 
46. 66.0() 



72. 
34. 



79.76 



41.66 
27.47 
16.56 



,68 73 32.61 
66 93l 



3. Table showing the relative and progressive Frequency of the various 
Winds at JS'ew Orleans^ during the MonUis of ^prilf May^ June, July, 
August^ and September j of the Four Years preceding 1837. JVotices of 
the Winds being usually taken thriee a day. 



April. May. 


Juno. 


July. 


Aaguflt. 


September. 


8. 18.25 jsw. 22.25 


8w. 23.25 


SR. 16.25 


sw. 19.75 


RE. 18.50 


8K. 17.75 SE. 11. 


8S. 18. 


9W. 13. 


SE 


. 10.50 


SE. 13.25 


8w. 10.75 HE. 10.75 


8. 8.25 


B. 9.75 


8. 


9.25 


B. 12.25 


B. 8. E. 6.50 


E. 7. 


KW. 9.33 


Nl 


•7. 


5. 10.50 


jTW. 7.75 


5W. 6. 


HW. 7. 


9. 9.25 


WW. 9. 


RW. 10.33 


5E. 7.00 


w. 5,50 


w. 5.25 


RE. 7.66 


R. 


8.66 


8. 7. 


w. 5.75 


w. 4.50 NE. 5. 


w. 7.33 


W 


8 50 


8w. 5.66 


V. 5.25 


N. 4. In. 4.75 


». 7. 


K. 


5.25 


w. 4.33 


The foUawing Table shows the Winds according to their successive 


PrevaUncy during the above Six wartn Months, 


8W. 15.78 HE. 9 69 


X. 8.12 


8E. 14.46 Kw. 8.23 


K. 6.69 




w. 5.94 



4. Monthly Fall of Rain on an Average of the last Four Years. 





Inehea. 




lochoi. 


January, 


4.69 




23.33 


February, 


2.08 


July, 


663 


March, 


2.64 


August, 


5.24 


April, 


5.31 


September, 


6.79 


May, 


2.44 


October, 


1.29 


June, 


6.17 


November, 


3.10 






December, 


2.97 




23.33 










Total, 


47.35 



16» 



186 



MSTEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION. 



[1838. 



XI. METEOROLOGICAL TABLES FOR KEY WEST. 

[Bj W. A. Whitehead, Eeq., Collaetor of Cuitome.] 

1. TahU of Mean Temperatures from Observations at Key Westf Florida ^ 
the most southern Town in the U, States, (Lat. 24° 33' 30" N. Long. 
81° 52' 30" W.) 



MonUie. 


1830. 


1831. 

67.12 

68.50 
7466 
76.16 
78.10 
80 40 
81.66 
81.66 
81.00 
78.40 
76.00 
70.00 


1832. 


1834. 


1835. 


1836. 


Mean*. 


January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

Jane, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 

Mean of Years, 


71.10 
73 00 
74.50 
75.50 
80.00 
82.00 
82.66 
83.13 
81.33 
79.33 
75.50 
72.50 


68.44 
74.44 
72.44 
74.55 
80.19 
80.63 
83.76 
82.13 
82.70 


73.83 
74.31 
75,69 
75.80 
79.11 
83.88 
82.64 
84.72 
80.77 
74.30 
73.89 
69.79 

77.394 


68.88 
65.36 
71.16 
76.49 
79.78 
80.98 
82.49 
82.16 
80.72 
76.20 
76.57 
70.31 


68.98 
67.40 
71.02 
76.78 

71.44 


69.725 
70.502 
73.245 

75.880 
79.43(i 
81.578 
«2.642 
82.760 
81.304 
77.057 
74.680 
70.650 


77.548 


76.138 




75.924 




76.622 



Remarks. — The means of 1830, 1831 , 1832, are from three daily 
observations ; those of 1834, 1835, 1836, from maximum and minimum 
observations by a self-registering thermometer. It will be seen from 
the above results, that at Key West, January is usually the coldest 
month of the year, and August the warmest ; and that the mean tem- 
perature of both April and October approaches very near to that of the 
whole year; the temperature of the latter month varying the least, as 
has been observed by Humboldt and other meteorologists, to be gen- 
erally the case. The thermometer hung within doors, but in a free 
circulation of air, night and day. 

2. Cfreatsst Heat and Cold at Key West. 



iQOfiS Gn9,ieBi heat, August 15th, 
^°^ I Least heat, January 29th, 



max, 89^' 
max. 63| 



80O 
min, 44 



%* For previous years, see the American Almanac for 1837. 

The night of the 28th and 29th of January, 1836, was the coldest 
ever known, the mercury, in a thermometer under cover, falling to 
44°, one degree lower than on the 8th of February, 1835. 

The highest observed temperature in any one year has been 90^, 
making the greatest range ever known only 46^. 



iKPoaMATion. 



I. -Cimdeiutd SbaanaU <^ (Aa Faa iff Rain at Kty Wat in tt 
during tmtnd Yttn, in Intke*. 



M-h.. 


1832. 


1833. 


1934, 


1835. 


1836. 


M«™. 






2.200 


0.325 


2,400 


2.350 


1.819 


Febrairj, 




1.500 






1.175 


1.3.37 
















April,' 




0.850 


1.750 


I.ISO 


0600 


1,087 






3.350 


11.4S& 


3.610 


6,950 


6.341 


Jqm'. 




1.900 


0.100 


3.150 


4,400 


2,3>^ 






4.300 


2,700 


3.iK5 


1.100 


2,839 






3,100 


3,460 


5.U30 


0700 


3.297 


Sept. ^ 




4.450 


3,600 


5.900 


3.250 


4.350 


Octobei, 


4.700 


l-lrSB 


B.850 


0425 


1,650 


3.330 


Not. 


1.750 


2.075 


l,e75 


1.430 


0.525 


1.491 


Dec. 


0.300 


2.300 


0,010 


2,773 


0.250 


1.127 


Tolal, 


6.750 


27.550 


36,oyo 


30.075 


24.400 


31.389 



XU. METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOR MARIETTA, OHIO, 
For At Year 1836, ty Dr. S. P. BUdretk. 



188 XBTEOnO LOGICAL INFORMATION. [1838. 

XIII. METEOROLOGICAL TABLES FOR ST. LOUIS, 

For 1836, prepared by the Meteorologieal Department of the St. Louis 
Association ofJVatural Sciences; tht Obseroations being made three times 
a da Iff viz, at Sunrise, U P. M., and 9 P. M, 

1. Table showing the Temperature in 1836, compared with the ^^verage 

Mean Temperature of Seven Years. 



Moothi. 


1836. 


Maximum. 


Minimam. 


Range. 


1 Average mean 
Mean, temperature of 
■even joara. 


January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 

Whole year. 


50.0 
68.0 
70.2 
89.4 
97.2 
99.5 
98.4 
93.9 
92.7 
87.1 
70 2 
53.2 


0.5 

8.5 

7.2 

28.6 

47.7 

5(>.7 

61.2 

52.2 

45.5 

24.1 

16.2 

1.7 

8.5 


49.5 
76.5 
63.0 
60.8 
49.5 
4'.>.8 
37.2 
41.7 
47.2 
63.0 
54.0 
54.0 


30.9 
32.5 
38.3 
58.5 
68.9 
74.5 
78.6 
73.6 
67.8 
48.4 
40.8 
29.9 


29.5 
34.5 
42.7 
58.6 
65.2 
73.1 
78.1 
74.6 
66.9 
55.8 
49.2 
33.7 


99.5 


108.0 


53.5 


55.2 



2. 



Table shotoing the State of the Weather and prevailing Winds in 
1836, compared with an Average of Four Years, 



Monthi. 


Dry Day 


9, 


Wet Daji. 




• 
9 

a 

MM 


• 
g 

5 

■ 


Winds. 














:i 


• 

s 


• 

a 


c 


• 


e 

■s 

e 


s 

9 
■ 


i 

9 






• 

9 


CD 

ja 
O 

9 


o 
O 

4 


7 


QQ 

2 


9 

01 

19 


1 

12 


s 




January, 


9E* TTs ?l tT* 


February, 


5 


11 


1 


6 


6 


23 


6 


1 


NW. SB. 8W. 


March, 


15 


8 


1 


5 


2 


27 


4 


2 


NW. 8E. 


April, 


9 


11 


1 


9 




28 


2 


10 


HE. BE. 


May, 


10 


11 




10 




28 


3 


7 


8K. 


June, 


3 


18 




9 




29 


1 


2 


SB. nw. 


July, 


7 


17 




7 




30 


1 


7 


SK. HW. 


August, 


5 


14 




12 




28 


3 


5 


NW. SB. 


September, 


10 


8 




12 




27 


3 


6 


NW. SB. 


October, 


12 


10 




9 




27 


4 


3 


NE. NW. 


November, 


14 


6 


1 


7 


2 


24 


6 


1 


8£. 8W. 


December, 


14 
113 


7 
130 


8 


6 

99 


4 
16 


25 
315 

314 


6 
51 

51 


2 

46 

53 


SB. 8W. NW. 


Whole year. 


8B. NW. 


Aver, of 4 years. 


251 


116 


138 1019 


|13 


92 1 13 




260 


105 





INDIVIDUAL STATES. 



PRBLIMIlfART ObSXRYATIOITS. 



In this Yolume of the Almanac, an attempt has been made to present 
information on the subject of pauperism in relation to the different 
States. But, with respect to the greater part of the States, it is impos- 
sible to obtain full or satisfactory information on this subject, inas- 
much as, in regard to the most of them, no official returns are made 
from which the number of paupers or the expense of supporting them 
can be ascertained. 

Paupers in all the States are few, compared with the number found 
in most European countries ; but, in the oldest and most densely 
peopled States, they are more numerous than in the others ; and in the 
States in which they are most numerous, and especially in populous 
cities, a large portion of them are foreigners. In the slave-holding 
States, in which manual labor is chiefly performed by slaves, paupers 
supported at public expense are few, as such of this class of persons, 
as are unable to labor, are maintained by their owners. 

In the Almanac for 1837, the subject of Internal Improvement in 
the several States, particularly in relation to Canals and Railroads, 
was treated of as fully as the limits of the work and the means 
of procuring information would admit. In this volume considerable 
additional information of this sort is given ; but, owing to the recent 
commercial embarrassments in relation to money, few new works of 
this kind, during the past season, have been commenced ; many which 
were previously commenced, have been prosecuted with diminbhed 
vigor ; and some have been, for the present, suspended. 

In remarking upon the increased facilities of interoourse and travel- 
ling in the United States, in the Preliminary Observations, in the 
Almanac for 1837, page 190, it was stated; — <<The first stagecoach 
drawn by four horses in Massachusetts, of which we have any knowl- 
edge, was established in 1774, running between Boston, Salem, and 
Newbury port." 



190 INDIVIDUAL STATES. [1838. 

In Adams'i '< Annals of Portsmouth/' N. H., it is stated ; — " April 
20thy 1761, Mr. John Stayers commenced running a stage from this 
town to Boston. It was a curricle, drawn by two horses, sufficiently 
wide to carry three passengers. — It is supposed that this was the first 
stage that was ever run in America." Instead of this curricle drawn 
by two horses, a stagecoach drawn by four horses was established on 
the same route in 1774. See Felt's ** History of Ipswich.*' 

But we have been informed by the Hon. David Daggett, late Chief 
Justice of Connecticut, who, at the time referred to, resided at Attle- 
borough, in Massachusetts, that a stagecoach, drawn by four horses, 
was established between Boston and Providence earlier than the year 
1774. Mr. Daggett says ; — *' One Dexter. Brown, who resided near 
Providence, set up a stagecoach, drawn by four horses, between Provi- 
dence and Boston, I am quite confident, as early as 1772, and I believe 
earlier. It used to leave Providence on Monday noon, arrive in Boston 
on Tuesday night; leave Boston on Thursday noon, and arrive in 
Providence on Friday night. It was set up to accommodate strangers 
who resorted to Newport for their health, and who could go to Provi- 
dence by water, but were without a conveyance to Boston. I have a 
very clear recollection of the wonder excited throuo;h the country 
by this vehicle, equal to that lately excited by the railroad-cars, and 
not exceeded by that produced by the passage of a balloon at this day." 



I. MAIN£. 
Government 



For the Year ending an the Ut Wednesday in January, 1838. 

Salary. 
Robert P. Dunlap, of Brunswick, Governor, $ 1,500 

Asaph R. Nichols, of AugusU, Secretary of State, . 900 

Asa Redington, Jr. do. Treasurer, . . 900 

Abner B. Thompson, of Brunswick, Mjuiant- General, . 700 
John Hodgdon, of Bangor, Land'^gent, . 1,000 

Isaac S. Small, do. Surveyor- General, . 1,000 

John O'Brien, of Thomaston, Warden of StaU Prison, 700 

Counsellors : Henry Hobbs, William Dunn, Josiah Merrow, 
Joseph Johnson, Samuel Small, Samuel Veazie, and David 
W. Lothrop. 
The Senate consists of 25 members ; John C. Talbot, President, 
House of Representatwes 187 members; Hannibal Hamlin, Speaker, 





JnDiciimr. 






S>.pr,mcJwiieialCoun. 










■aJanr. 


Nathan Weiton, 


of AafUiU, 


CluifJtutut, 


»1,800 


Nicholas Emerj, 


of Portland, 


.auteiau Juttit*, 


1,800 


Ether Shepley. 


of Sacs, 


ia. 


1,800 


Hath«. Clifford, 


ofMowBeld, 


AUonuyGaUTiU, 


1,000 


John ShepUy, 


ofSaoo, 


Reporttr, - 


600 




Court of Common Pleat. 




EMkiol WbitHUU), 


orPorUand, 


ChitfJHSlia,, 


i;»o 


DaTid Perham, 


ofBaogor, 




1,200 


Sama«1 E. Smith, 


of Auguata, 


io. 


1,200 


PoPDLATlOK 0» 


MilKB IB 1830, i» 


D ON lit or Much 


1837. 



CaaoliH. I 1830. 1 IW. 


Undir 






1637° 


York, in 
CDmberland, 13 

l.lDColD, )l 

Kennebec, '1 
Oxford, 17 
Waldo, W 
Someraet, Ss 
Penolwcot, M) 
Hancock, 17 
Waahinglon, 95 

Foitirnera Dot included 
in Uiia ceniui, at least. 


53,7dl 
07.019 
(iO,07l 
6aa77 

40,(537 
3.i,8n 
43,903 
51,694 
87.!>7! 
aB.213 

3,300 

10,000 


6,104 
7,690 
7,508 
7,619 
5,219 
5.060 
5,909 

g1 

4,156 


9 
It 
'i 


3.071 

7,506 
2,8.00 
9,e8(> 

B,4ao 

7,027 
7,175 
20,104 
3,632 

C,918 


60,507 


lU7,7Ha 


ai3,86a 


72,689 


485,451 



PlUPtKllH. 

Total namber of panpan in tbe Slate, according to the Report made 
to the LegisUtuie in 1835, 2,480. ToUl amount of the annual eipensa 
f68,188. 

Tbe larger towna generall; have poor- houae* for the accommodalioD 
of tbe poor, in aonie inatancca witb farma annexed to them. Town* 
not proiided with poor-bouaea adopt Tarioua melhoda for aupporting 
their poor; Bome contract with IndiridDala for anpporling parlieulat 
ftmiSiea; othera for the nipport of their poor for a nogle year, for a 
nnmber of jeara, oi for life. Freqaentlj the; ue di«po«ed of bj atia- 
tioD to the loweat biddai. 



id2 



UAlNfi. 



[1838. 



INTERNAL IHPBOVEMENT. 



The Cumberland and Oxford Canal j 20^ miles long ; and the Bangor 
and Orono Railroad, 10 miles long, are the only canal and railroad 
completed or commenced in Maine ; though several other impoitant 
works of the kind have been incorporated or projected. For a notice 
of a projected railroad from the coast of Maine to ^tebec, see the Ameri- 
can Almanac for 1837. 

The Portlandf Saco, and PortsmouUi Railroad; incorporated in 1837 ; 
48 miles long ; cost for grading, masonry, and bridging for a double 
track, aa estimated by Mr. James Hall, Engineer, $761,507.72; cost 
per mile $ 16,281.61. — To the above cost add for land damages and 
fencing $30,000. 

The Portland and Bangor Railroad; projected ; — 132 miles long , — 
cost, as estimated by Colonel S. H. Long : — 

For road-formation, inclusive of small bridges, &c. 
Extra allowance of bridges and high embankments, 
For railing, inclusive of turns-out, &c. 



$1,230,000 
265,000 
080,000 



7\fUU, 



92,475,000 



II. NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Government 

For the Year ending on the 1st Wednesday in June, 1838. 



Isaac Hill, 
Ralph Metcalf, 
Zenas Clement, 
Joseph Low, 
Robert Davis, 



Tristam Shaw, 
Samuel Tilton, 
Benjamin Evans, 
Leonard Biscoe, 
Samuel Burns, 

Samuel Clark, 
C. G. Atherton, 



of Concord, 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



Oovemor, 
Secretary of Statef 
Treasurer^ 
Mjutant- General^ 
Qttartermaster' General, 



Salary. 
#1,200 
600 
600 
200 
200 



Executive Councils 



of Exeter, 
of Saubomton, 
of Warner, 
of Walpole, 
of Rumney, 

of Franklin, 
of Donstable, 



Conaty. 
Rockingham. 
Strafford. 
Hillsborough. 
Cheshire. 
Graflon. 

President of the Senate, 
Speaker of the Howe 4if Bsp, 



1838.] 



ZrSW HAMP8HIRK. 



193 



Judiciary. 

Superior Court. 

Appoiotsd. Salary. 

Wm. M. Richardson, Cheater, Chief Justice, 1816, #1,400 

Samael Green, Hopklnton, AssociaU JusUce, 1819, 1,200 

Joel Parker, Keene, do, 1833, 1,200 

Nathaniel G. Upham, Concord, do. 1833, 1,200 

Charles F. Goye, Goffiitown, Momey-Gonoral, 1635, i;200 

CourtB of Common Pleas. 

By an act of the state legislature of December, 1832, the former Court 
of Common Pleas was disoontinaed, and new courts were established, 
consisting of two justices for each county, and the judges of the Supe- 
rior Court, who are, ex officio^ judges of the Court of Common Pleas, 
one or more of them being required to attend the seyeral terms ; and 
they rank as senior or presiding justices of the seyeral county courts. 



CoaatiM. 

Rockingham, 

Straflbrd, 

Merrimack, 

Hillsborough, 

Cheshire, 

Sulliyan, 

Grafton, 

Coos, 



Justices of the Court of Common Pleas. 



C Bradbury Bartlett, 
( Dudley Freese, 

i Henry T. Simpson, 
Henry B. Rust, 

{Benjamin Wadleigh, 
Aaron Whittemore, 

C Simon P. Colby, 
( Jesse Carr, 

! Horace Chapin, 
Larkin Baker, 

C Ambrose Cossif , 
\ Eleazer Jackson, 

C Dayid C. ChurehiU, 
} Walter Blair, 

C Joshua Marshall, 
\ John Pendezter, 



Nottingham, 
Deerfield, 


Salary. 

$150 
150 


New Hampton, 
Wolfeborough, 

Sutton, 
Pembroke, 


150 
150 

110 
110 


Weare, 

Goffatown, 


126 
126 


Winchester, 
Westmoreland, 


too 

100 


Claremont, 
Cornish, 


100 
100 


Lyme, 
Plymouth, 

Stratford, 
Bartlett, 


150 
150 

100 
100 



The number of jSttomeys in the State, according to the New Hamp- 
shire Register for 1837, is 204. 

Paupxrism. 

The poor in this State, as in the other Northeastern States, are sup- 
ported b^ a direct tax by the towns to which they seyerally belong. 
The larger towns generally baye poor-houses, to some of which a farm 
is annexed, where the poor are collected and supported ; and in other 
places they are supported by priyate contract or disposed of to the 
lowest bidder. 

17 



194 VERMONT. [1838. 

III. VERMONT. 

GOYERNMKIfT 

For tJu Year ending on the 2d Thursday in October, 1837. 

Balsry. 

Silas H. Jbkison, ofShoreham, Governor, $750 

David M. Camp, of Derby, Lieut.- Gov. 4* P^^* Senate. 

Augustine Clarke, of Montpelier, Treasurer , 400 

Chauncey L. Knapp, do. Secretary of State, 300 

George B. Mansar, of Williston, Sec'y CivU ^ Military JSffairs, 200 

David Pierce, of Woodstock, Auditor, 

Norman Williams, do. Secretary of the Senate, 5tTh 

A. L. Miner, of Manchester, Clerk of the House of Rep. 275 

Leqislature. 

The Senate, established in 1836, consists of 30 members, each coonty 
being entitled to at least one, and the rest apportioned according to 
population \ and the House of Representatives is composed of one 
member from each town. Pay of the members of each house, $1.50 a 
day, during the session of the legislature ; and of the Lieutenant-GoT- 
ernor while presiding in the Senate $ 4.00 a day. — Carlos Coolidge of 
Windsor, Speaker of the House of Representatives. 

Judiciary. 

The judiciary powers are vested in a Supreme Court, consisting 
of five judges, chosen every year by the legislature ; in a County Court 
for each county, consisting of tliree judges, chosen in the same man« 
ner (one of the judges of the Supreme Court being chief justice), 
who hold courts twice a year in their respective counties ; and in jus- 
tices of the peace, also appointed in the same manner. 





Supreme Court. 




Balsfy. 


Charles K. Williams, 


of Rutland, 


Chief Justice, 


»1,300 


Stephen Royce, 


of Berkshire, 


Associate Justice, 


1,300 


Samuel S. Phelps, 


of Middlebury, 


do. 


1,300 


Jacob Collamer, 


of Woodstock, 


do. 


1,300 


Isaac F. Redfield, 


of Montpelier, 

Pauperism. 


do. 


1,300 



Paupers in this State are supported by the 'towns or townships to 
which they severally belong, by a direct tax. They are disposed of by 
auction to the lowest bidder > or by private contract As each town 



183a] 



▼KRMOMT. 



Ids 



acts independently in this matter, making no, report to a common head, 
there are no meana of ascertaining correctly the namberof paupers in 
the State, or the expense of supporting them. A correspondent esti- 
mates the total annual expense of pauperism in the State at about 
1^100,000. 

INTEKNAL IMPROVEMENT. 

No railroads have yet been commenced in this State. For a notice 
of seyeral which haye been projected, see the American Almanao for 
1837. To those may be added Tke JVonoieh and Hartford Forwarding 
BaUroad ; incorporated in 1836 \ — to extend from the falls in Con- 
necticut River below Hanover Bridge, to Lyman's Bridge ; — capital 
$300,000. 



IV. MASSACHUSETTS. 

GoVERHMEIfT 

For tSu Year ending on tke 1st Wednesday in Jamtaryf 1838. 



Edward Etxrxtt, of Boston, 
George Hull, of Sandisfield, 

John P. Bigelow, 
Hezekiah Barnard, 
H. A. S. Dearborn, 

William Tufts, 
Joseph Foster, 
Fitch Hall, 



of Boston, 
of Boston, 
of Boston, 



aalarf 
Governor, $3,666.67 

LietU,' Governor f 633.33 

Sec, of die Commonwealth, 2,000 
Treas. and Reeeher-Gen. 2,000 

1,500 



Charles Calhoun, 
Luther S. Cushing, 

Horace Mann, 
Julius Rockwell, 



Adjutant' General, 

1st Clerk f Secretary of State's Qgiee, 1,200 

1st CUrk, Treasurer's Office, 1,200 

1st Clerk f Adjutant-General's Office, 1,200 

Clerk of tke Senate, pay in 1837, 1,130 

Clerk House of Rep. do. 1,130 

President of tke Senate. 

Speaker of tke House of R^esentatives. 





Judiciary. 






Supreme 


Court. 


Salary. 


Lemuel Shaw, 


of Boston, 


Ckirf Justice, 


♦3,500 


Samuel Putnam, 


of Boston, 


Associate Justiu, 


3,000 


Samuel S. Wilde, 


of Boston, 


do. 


3,000 


Marcus Morton, 


of Taunton, 


do. 


3,000 


Charles A. Dewey, 




3,000 



196 



MA88ACBU8XTT8. 



[1838. 



James T. Austin, 
Octayius Pickering, 
Asahel Huntington, 
Charles H. Warren, 
Pliny Merrick, 



of Boston, 
of Boston, 
of Salem, 
of New Bedford, 
of Worcester, 



Sslaiy. 

jSttorney- General, 1^300 

Reporter, 1,000 

IHstriet Momey, N. Dist 1,000 
do. S. do. 1,000 

do. Mid. do. 1 ,000 

do. W. do. 1,000 



Artemas Ward, 
Solomon Strong, 
John M. Williams, 
Dayid Cummings, 



Court of Common Pleae, 

of Boston , Chief Justtce, 

of Leominster, Associate Justice, 
of Taunton, do. 

of Salem, do. 

Municipal Court if Boston. 



$2,100 
1,800 
1,800 
1,800 



Peter O. Thacher, Judge, 1,250 

Thomas W. Phillips, Clerk / — Samuel D. Parker, Attorney. 
The Municipal Court is held on the first Monday in each month. 



PoUce Court of Boston. 



William Simmons, 
John Gray Rogers, 
James C. Merrill, 



> Justices, 



(«1, 

C 1,^ 



600 
500 
500 



The Police Court sits every day (Sunday excepted) at 9 o'clock, 
A. M., and at 3 P. M., for the trial of criminal causes. 



ProbaU Court 



Coaotiei. 


Jodgei. 


Salary. 

300 
450 
425 
60 
700 
280 
280 
280 
800 
120 
500 
40() 
1,000 
700 


Rsfittan. 


Salary. 


Barnstable, 

Berkshire, 

Bristol, 

Dukes, 

Essex, 

Franklin, 

Hampden, 

Hampshire, 

Middlesex, 

Nantucket, 

Norfolk, 

Plymouth, 

Suffolk, 

Worcester, 


Nymphas Marston, 
Wm. P. Walker, 
Olivef Prescott, 
George Athearn, 
Daniel A. White, 
R. E. Newcomb, 
Oliyer B. Morris, 
Ithamar Conkey, 
Samuel P. P. Fay, 
Isaac Coffin, 
Sherman Leland, 
Wilkes Wood, 
John Heard, 

Ira Barton, 

_ 


Timothy Reed, 
HeniT W. Bishop, 
Anselm Bassett, 
Cornelius Marchant, 
Nathaniel Lord, Jr. 
Elijah Alvord, 
Justice VVillard, 
Samuel F. Lyman, 
Isaac Fiske, 
Timothy Hussey. 
Jonathan H. Cobb, 
Jacob H. Loud, 
O. W. B. Peabody, 
Charles 6. Prentiss, 


500 
600 
700 
100 

1,500 
460 
460 
460 

1,500 
150 
700 
750 

2,000 

1,400 



k 



>Ilt8ACH(T»TTI. 



Population according to tht Ccnni (often an (A* lit of May, 1637, logedur 
■DtiA rAc tiumio- of Rtpraenuuiva to vihick each Toien it mtidtd ftr 
iA« Ktzt 10 Ytart, accardijig U> ike Cii>u(ilii[ion, lu note amatdtd. 



MAa&iCBtllBTTI. 



Monlu^n, 



mljoMrr, I 

^prlnilttU) I 
ToltanJ, 

WllH. 

■•■..ifiuld, 
.8p,in.fi.ld 



Eli.nbun 
Kebob«l< 






I'll 



TitEorr, ' 



J 8,203 

II K,IM 

8,(B7' 
9,099 

890 



! 3,765 

9fiie 



JViiu The 9d calDDn of Dfur*! in Iks tbnoe libl>, duJimI TViiUi, il 

Al BoRDn, lor gumpla, nij Hud M RcptiiidUIItm tnt; fnu, (Dd 37, nil 
Ma. For ( notloi at Um .laun^uil ^ Uu Onflitiituii, IH Um Amariou Aln 

1837, M* aoo. 

Tl>« Aol* nufflbai of lowni lir Ui* Bum m^ «Dd SIS RtprwiiUtl'H <» 

of 10 nua of 133 iiul S-IOilii i Bukiu tlm (nru* niiBlni of KipraieiuIlT 
Hit l0r«n. HMV-IOUn. 



1836.] MAiucBuiiTTa. 198 

Ciiriui or TBI Stiti, 

ExhiUtiag iht Populatimt iff tit ttverid CoimtUt in IBOD, 1830, and 

183T ; mUo lA* JVimbtr of PoUm and VaiiuUion w 1800 mi 1630. 





leoo. 


1830. 1 1837. 


F.p, 1 PBlh. 


"■^^ 


p.p. If.]].. 




B«Ub>n, 

Nocfclk, 
7W, 


19» sj 
33,88 i: 

96,06 B! 

II ii 
« s 

11 i 


« 89.91) .79 
HI 0,937 .79 

l61,5liB.II 

i40,aio.w 

IS4,B07.7B 
484,707.38 

lOj^iiniTa 

Bll,940.ia 
£41,131.^ 


ae.595 
3;,ias 

40,4V1 

«9,a44 
31,640 

au.aii 

41,90 


6,8(8 

■B 
i| 

lo.itn 

10,406 

11 lew 


W,33i,'935JTi g^ 

ll|&lli,349.90 33,«i 
S,603,a».ST 30,413 

SolMlioOl.aS 81,964 
91,100,040.68 96,asi 


«■,.«: ffl^ 


• 4,BIS,L37,«6 010,014 


1S0,5«L »9C8^60,4D7.MTUI,33l| 



AaiTRicT or Tui Retdrki or THK Poor roR 1H36; 
From Uie Surelary <f Slate'i Qffitt, Mar A 8th, 1837. 



or the 305 lowM in'lhe Stale, 204 only made relurm; leaving 101 
towDi lh>t made no retuini. Of the 5,680 paupen, 1,467 were (up- 
ported oo oonlracl. attn nvengt eipanie of J 1.00 a w*ek.- Tem- 
perate 8,560; not temperate, l,ere; not allied, 1.148.— InMne, 286.— 
Idiote, 173.— It ii stated by Mr. Artemai Simondi, " tbst Uie psaper 
expenditure of tfaii State U tvice ai grext in proportion to popuIa^oD, 
u JD New York." — Of the 5,580 paupera, 3,720 were bom in HiMf 
chDMtU, 633 in other Sutas, and J ,192 in foteisn conntiiei. 



200 MASSACHUSETTS. [1638. 

Abstract of thb School Rktdrrs fob 1836. 

Number of Cities and Towns from which returns were re- 

ceiyed (no returns from 16 Towns), 289 

<< School Districts, 2,517 

<* Children between 4 and 16 years of age, 166,912 

<* Male Children attending school, from 4 to 16 years 75,552 

" Female Children attending school, from 4 to. 16 

years, 70,987 

*< Instructors, (Male 2,154; Female 2,816,) 4,970 

Average Number of Scholars at Academies and Private Schools, 28,752 

Towns having Local School Funds, . . • . 87 

Towns not having Local School Funds (no answer from 2 

Towns), 200 

Amount raised by tax for the support of Common Schools 
(of which ^ 336,694.94 were for paying wages of Instruct- 
ors solely), $391,993.96 

Amount raised by voluntary contribution for Common 
Schools, 47,593.44 

Estimated amount paid for tuition in Private Schools and 
Academies, 326,642.53 

Totaly (in 289 cities and towns,) $ 766,229.93 

Sum apportioned, January 1st, 1837, among the towns that 
made returns according to law, being the income of the 
School Fund, $19,002*24 

FllTAHCES. 

^9numnt of the ExptnstM of the State for each Year since 1825. 



1825 $198,021.23 

1826 252,297.16 

1827 293,633.71 

1828 307,769.03 



1829 $293,942.45 

1830 330,440.28 

1831 381 ,481 .68 

1832 304,613.19 



1833 $367,353.92 

1834 362,380.41 

1835 494.438.37 

1836 422,700.56 



Of the Expendi- 
ture for 1836,"^ 



^The salaries of Executive and Judicial 

Officers amounted to . , . $68,881.28 

Pay of Councillors ($3,804); Sena- 
tors ($8,499); and RepresenUtives, 

($116,699,) 129,002.00 

^Expense for state Paupers, 41,200.74 

Of the ReeeipU C On account of Bank Tax, . 317,546.98 

for 1836, I On account of the Auction Tax, 57|845.G2 



18380 



MABSACBUSXTTS. 



901 



BamUy fof^ Jfaxiout JtnimaU, 

Bounty paid for the destruction of Noxious Animals in the State, 
from the date of the act of April 4th, 1835, to January 27th, 1837. 



Number of Bean, 1 

" Wildcato, 14 

" Foxes, 3,270 



f 5.00 each, 

5.00 do. 

50 do. 



Totalf 

MAttACHQSKTTS StATX PrIIOH. 



$5.00 

70.00 

1.635.00 

91, 710.00 



Number of convicts received from December 12th, 1805, when 

the prison was first opened, to September 30th, 1836, 2,968 

Number discharged by expiration of sentence, order of court, 

or who have escaped, ..... 2,072 

Number discharged by pardon or remission of sentence, 458 
Number deceased, ...... 160 

Remaining in prison September 30th, 1836, 278 

Total, 2,968 

TdbU showing the operaiiatu of th€ Prison from Septombtr 30cik, 1820, to 

September '30th, 1836. 





No. in 




Di*eharg«d 


« 






aOthSapt. 


PriMO. 


ReceiTed. 


or Efecaped. 


Pardoned. 


Died. 


RaeoBmiUed. 


1820 


308 


71 


72 


25 


6 


16 


1821 


282 


87 


76 


32 


5 


16 


1822 


279 


91 


70 


14 


10 


21 


1823 


308 


107 


66 


6 


6 


20 


1824 


298 


86 


80 


10 


6 


13 


1825 


314 


96 


66 


13 


1 


27 


1826 


313 


81 


61 


14 


6 


24 


1827 


285 


80 


78 


27 


1 


14 


1828 


290 


104 


83 


14 


4 


13 


1829 


262 


79 


82 


19 


6 


15 


1830 


290 


115 


• 75 


7 


5 


19 


1831 


256 


71 


86 


12 


7 


14 


1832 


227 


76 


84 


10 


11 


15 


1833 


250 


119 


83 


7 


6 


15 


1834 


277 


119 


71 


17 


4 


16 


1835 


279 


116 


99 


13 


3 


13 


ia% 


278 


97 


87 


7 


4 


7 



Income for the year ending September 30th, 1836, 
Disbursements, do. do. 

Balance, being profits for the year, 



$ 47,182.25 
33,754.00 

$13,428.25 



203 



MASSAC HU0ETT8. 



[1838. 



Railroads complxtxd. 



Name. 


Opemd, 


Leittth, 
Milea. 


Com. 


Qaincj, 

Boston and Lowell, 
Andoyer and Hayerhill, . 
Boston and Froyidence, 

Dedham Branch, 

Taunton Branch, 
Boston and Worcester, 


1827 
1835 
1837 
1835 
1835 
1836 
1835 


3 
26 
I5j^ 
41 

I?* 

44 


$1, 505,645 J23 

1,650,000.00 

198.600 00 
1,577,546 J23 



Railroads Commxhcxd. 

The Etutem Railroad; — the part between Boston and Salem, 15 
miles, began July 22d, 1836, and expected to be completed in 1838. 

The Norwich and Worcester Railroad ; — from Worcester to Norwich, 
Conn., 59 miles; begun in 1835, and expected to be completed in 18%. 

The Wetiem Railroad: — from Worcester to Springfield, 54| miles ; 
— thence to the State line between Massachusetts and New Tork» 
6S^ -r- total, 117 miles. Here it will unite with roads now in progreos 
or incorporated, one leading to Albany, one to Troy, and another to 
Hudson. 



V. RHODE ISLAND. 

GoyXRXMKIVT 

For the Year ending on the 1st Wednesday in May, 1838. 



Salary. 
Oovemor, $400 

Lieutenant- Governor f SOO 

Secretary of StdUe, 750 &> fees. 



Trecuurer, 
AUomey- General, 



450 
Fees. 



John Browh Frakcis, of Warwick, 
Benjamin Thurston, of Hopkinton, 
Henry Bowen, of Proyidence, 

John Sterne, of Newport, 

Albert C. Greene, of Proyidence, 

The Senate is composed of the Goyemor, Lieutenant-Goyernor, and 
10 Senators. 

The House of Representatives is composed of 72 members, ^elected 
semi-annually, in April and August Samuel Y. Atwell, Speaker, 

Judiciary. 

The judiciary power is yested in a Supreme Ck)urt, and a Court of 
Common Pleas for each of the fiye counties. All the judges are ap- 
pointed annually by the Greneral Assembly. 



^ 



1838.] RHODE ISLAND. 203 

5t^eiiM Ccurt, 

Salary. 
JobDarfee, of Tiverton, ChirfJ^MUt, f650 

Levi Haile, of Warren, JlMSOciale Justice ^ 550 

Wm. R. Staples, of Providence, do, 550 

Each of the coarta of Common Pleafl compriaes 5 judges, who have 
no salaries, but are paid by entries. 



VI. CONNECTICUT. 

GOTERHMXKT 

For the Year ending on the 1st Wednesday of May ^ 1838. 

Salary. 
HcNRr W. Edwards, of New Haven, Governor, 91,100 

Ebenexer Stoddard, of Woodstock, Lieut-Gov* if Pres. Sen. 300 
Jeremiah Brown, of Hartford, TreasureTf 1,000 

Royal R. Hinman, do. Secretary ^ $84 & fees. 

William Field, do. Comptroller, 1,000 

Seth P. Beers, Commissioner of the School Fund, 1,250 

Stillman H. Wlghtman, Speaker of the House of Representatives. 





JUOICIARY. 






Supreme and Superior Court. 










Salary. 


Thomas S. Williams, 


of Hartford, 


Chief JusUcSf 


♦ 1,100 


Clark Bissell, 


of Fairfield, 


jSssodate Justice, 


1,050 


Samuel Church, 


of Salisbury, 


do. 


1,050 


Jabez W. Huntington, 


of Norwich, 


do. 


1,050 


Henry M. Waite, 


of Lyme, 


do. 


1,050 


Thomas Day, 


of Hartford, 
Pauperism. 


RepoT^r, 


350 



Paupers in this State are supported by the towns of which they are 
legal inhabitants. A few, who belong legally to no town, are supported 
by the State. One very common mode of supporting them is to collect 
them together into a house, called the poor-house, where they are fur- 
nished with little more than the bare necessaries of life. But no gen- 
eral returns have been made, from which the number of paupers, or the 
expense of supporting them, can be correctly ascertained. 



204 



MBW YORK. 



[183& 



VII. NEW YORK. 

GoTXRNIfXNT. 



William L. Marct, 

John Traeji 

Azariah C. Flagg, 
Philip Phelps, 
George W. Newell, 
Abraham Keyier, 
Peter Keyaer, 
John A. Dix, 
Archibald Campbell, 
Samuel Beardslej, 
William Campbell^ 
S. Van Rensselaer, 
Samuel Young, 
William C. Bouck, 
Jonas Earll, Jun. 
John Bowman, 
William Baker, 
Charles Stebbins, 
George R. Davis, 
Lewis Eaton, 






] 



Bolarj. 
t4,000 



Governor; term of qfiee expires 
Jan, 1, 1839. 

Lieut.' OoB. and Pres. Senate; pay > 
1^6 a day during the Sesiion. > 

ComptroUeTf 2,500 

1st Deputy- ComptrcUer, 1 ,500 

^ do, 1,500 

Treasurer, 1,500 

Deputy- Treasurer, 1 ,300 

Sec, State and Superint, Com, Schools^ 1,750 

Dep. Sec. ^ Clerk of Com. of Land Qficej 1,500 

.Attorney- Qeneral, 1 ,000 

Surveyor- General, 800 

of Albany, Canal-Corn,, {President.) 

of Ballston-Spa, do. 

of Fultonham, Acting Canal-Commis. 2,000 

do. 2,000 

do, 2,000 

do. 2,000 

JBank- Commissioner f 2,000 

do. 2,000 

do. 2,000 



of Onondaga, 
of Rochester, 
of Springfield, 
of Cazenovia, 
of Troy, 
of Lockport, 



Legislature. 

The Senate consists of 32 members, who are elected for four years, 
8 being chosen annually. Pay $3 a day. John Tracy, President. 

The House of Representatives consists of 128 members. Pay, 93 a 
day. Edward Liyingston, Speaker. 



JODlCIARr. 

Court of Chancery. 

Reuben Hyde Walworth, of Albany, Chanedlor, 

James Porter, do. Register, 

John Walworth, of New York, Assist. Reg. 

Alonio C. Paige, of Schenectady, Reporter, 

Vice-Chancellor's Court. 

W. T. McCoun, of New York, 1st Circuit, Vice-Chan., ^f 2,000 & fees. 
The other seven circuit judges are yice-chancellors for their respec- 
tive circuits. 



Salary. 

9^,500 

Fees. 

do. 

50O 



1838.] 



NXW YORK. 



205 



Supreme Court. 

Samael NelBon, of Cooperatown, Chief Justtee, 
Greene C. BroDBon, of Albany, Associate Justice^ 

Esek Cowen, of Saratoga Springs, do. 

John L. Wendell, of Albany, R^^orter^ 

Circuit Courts. 



Salary. 

$2,500 

2,500 

2,500 

500 



There are eight Circuit Courts, with 
correspond, in territory and name, to the 



eight Judges, and the circuits 
eight senate districts. 



JadfM. 


OireuiU, 


1 




Reiidenoea. 


Salary. 


Ogden Edwards, 


1st Circuit 




New York, 


#1,600 


Cl^arles H. Ruggles, 


2d *« 






Poughkeepsie, 


1,600 


James Vanderpoel, 


3d " 






Albany, 


1,600 


John WUlard, 


4th " 






dalem, 


1,600 


Hiram Denio, 


5th " 






UUca, 


1,600 


Robert Monell, 


6th ** 






Greene, 


1.600 


Daniel Moseley, 


7th " 






Onondaga, 


1,600 


Addison Gardner, 


8th " 






Rochester, 


1,600 


Superior Court 


:o/ 


the City of New York. 














Salary. 


Samuel Jones, 




Chief Justice 


} 


$2,500 


Daniel B. Tallmadge 


9 


Associate Justice, 


2,500 


Thomas J. Oakley, 






do. 




2,1500 



J. p. Hall, Reporter, Charles A. Clinton, Clerk. 

The regular terms of this court are on the first Monday of each 
month. 

Court of Common Pleas. 

Courts of Common Pleas are held in each county in the State, con- 
sisting of a first judge and four assistant justices. 

JAimber of Professional Men in the State, according to WiUiams's ** JV*«io 

York J9nnual Register.'* 

AttomeysandCounsellorsin 1820, 1,248; in 1830, 1,688 ; in 1837, 2,161 
Practising Physicians and Surgeons, ** 2,876 

Clergy of difierent denominations in 1819, 761 ; " 2,192 

Attorneys and Counsellors in the city of New York 

in 1820, 303; " 607 

Id 



906 



niW TORK. 



CoMMoir Schools. 



[1838, 



Amount of the Common School Fund, Sept. 30, 1836, jl,917,494.17 
Number of School Districts in 853 towns in the State, 10,207 

Number of School Districts that made returns in 1836, 9,696 

Number of Children taught in Districts returned, 532,167 

Number of Children between 5 and 15 or 16, in those Districts, 538,396 

Expenses of the Common School System in 1836. 

Public Mono J distributed among the Towns, g 313,376.91 

Amount paid for Teachers* wages, besides Public Money, 425,643.61 



Paid for Teachers' wages, g 739,020.52 

Interest at 6 per cent, on 52,183,200, invested in school-houses, 130,992.00 
Annual expense for books, 532,167 scholars, at 50 cents each, 266,083.50 
Fuel for 9,916 school-houses, at $ 10 each, 99,160.00 



Total, 51,235,256.02 



Pauperism. 



Paupers, in this State, are supported by a tax on the inhabitants of 
the counUes to which they respectively belong, and are under the 
care of the Superintendents of the Poor of the different counties ; and 
the several counties are provided with poor-houses, to which a farm U 
attached, and in which the paupers are collected. 

7%e foUauring statement exhibits the number supported or relieved, the 
total annual expense, and the average annual expense of supporting 
each pauper in the poor-houses, for several years. 





Supported or relieved. 


Annual expenae of 
Ettcb. 


Total Expense. 


1830 
1831 
ia33 
1834 
1835 
1836 


15,506 
15,564 
35,777 
32,798 
38,362 
37,959 


^37.03 
83.28 
32.21 
30.78 
3273 
32 53 


g 246,752 90 
245,433 21 
295.239.13 
3(^,913.21 
32:1.741.12 
396.100.05 



The following facts are derived from the Annual Report of the Sec- 
retary of State, dated March 29, 1837. 

The whole number of paupers relieved, or supported, during the 
year ending December 1, 1836, was 37,959, of whom 20,554 belonged 
to the city of New York. The whole amount expended for their relief 
was $ 396,100.05. The value of the labor of paupers was |t 39,124.47 • 
the average expense of supporting each pauper at the poor-houaes, 
$ 32.53 per annum, or about 62 cents and 6-lOths a week. 



1838.] 



BXW TOftX. 



907 



There are attached to the poor-houseg 6,21 7i| acrea of land ; the ag- 
gregate value of the poor-house establishments is stated at f 1,433,775.^3; 
the number of paupers receired into the poor-hooaes, during the year, 
12,922; bom in the poor-houses, during the same period, 312; died, 
1,505; bound out, 639; discharged, 8,355; abscouded, 971. Paupen 
in the poor-bouses on the 1st December, 1836, 7,038; males, 3,714; 
females, 3,294. Of the number supported, or relieved, during the year, 
there were foreigners, 6,874 ; lunatics, 786 ; idiots, 271 ; and mutes, 77. 

New Tork State Caicals^ — Firisbed. 
[Fioffl tba Report of tha Canal Board, datad Febraaiy SO, 1837.] 



I Kama. 


Lonirth. 
Mile*. 

3G3> 

«5 
64> 

12 > 

3) 
38 

21) 

25 

23> 
16 5 
8 
97 


Loeka. 
84 

38 

14 
11 

53 

27 

116 


Lockage. 
Feel. 


Coit. 


Tolli in 1836. 


- Erie, 

Jfav. Feeders, , 
Champlain, 

GUn 9 Falls Feeder, 

River Jiatigation, 
Oswego, 
Cayuga and Seneca, 

Feeder, 
Chemung, 

Feeder, 
Crooked Lake, 
Chenango, 

I Total, 


689 

339<| 

123 

80 

516 

269 
1,021 


$7443,768.86 

1,257,604.26 

565,437.35 
236,804.74 

331,693.57 

156,776.90 
2,270,605.22 


$1,440,539.87 

115,425.24 

30,469.83 
20,523.43 

5/)66w90 
2,311.86 


655 


343 


3,037i 


$11,962,711.90 $1,614,336,431 



New York Statb Canals, — Uhfimished. 



Nama. 


Length. 


Loeka. 


Loekaga. 
Faat. 


Eatimatad Coat. 


Black River, 
Feeders, 
' Genesee Valley, 
j Feeders, 


Si 

107) 
15 J 


135 
132 


1,083 
1,057 


$1,068,437.20 

2,002,285.92 


Total, 


168 


267 


2,140 


$3,070,723.12 



Cahals by Incorporated Companies. 

Several companies have been incorporated in this State for con- 
structing canals. The Delattare and Hudson Canal is much the most 
considerable work of the kind completed by an incorporated company. 
It extends from the Hudson river to the coal mines in Luzerne county, 
Pa. Length of the canal, 109 miles ; of the railroad, coonecUd with it, 
16 imlee ; — total 125 mile*. ToUl ooet, $2,231,820. 



208 



IfVW YORK. 



[1838. 



Railroads. 

From the year 1826 to 1636, incluBive, there have been 91 railroad 
companies incorporated in this State, with a total capital of $45,912,000. 



Naanas. 



Brooklyn and Jamaica, 

Bufiklo and Black Rock, 

Bufialo and Niagara Falls, 

Harlaem, 

Ithaca and Oswego, 

Lockport and Niagara Falls, 

Mohawk and Hudson, 

Rensselaer and Saratoga, 

Rochester, 

Saratoga and Schenectady, 

Utica and Schenectady, 



Hailroads completed. 



From 



Brooklyn 

Buffalo 

Buffalo 

Bowery, N.Y.city 

Ithaca 

Lockport 

Albany 

Troy 

Rochester 

Saratoga Springs 

Schenectady 



To 



Jamaica 

Black Rock 

Niagara Falls 

Yorkville 

Oswego 

Niagara Falls 

Schenectady 

Ballston Spa 

Carthage 

Schenectady 

Utica 

Total, 



Com- Length, 
pleted I Mile*. . 
in 



j. 



1836 12 



1835) 
1836 
1834 



3 

23 

4 



1834! 29 

1836 20 

1832i 15 

1835! 24^ 



1833 
1832 
1836 



3 

78 



233 



Several other important railroads are expected to be completed, and 
in fiill operation, before the end of the year 1837. Portions of seyeral 
other roads have already been some time in operation. 



VIII. NEW JERSEY. 

GoVXRNlIEIfT. 

Salary. 
Philemon Dxckxrhoh, of Paterson, Oavemor, and, ez officio. 

Chancellor of StaU ; (term of office expires Oct. 1837). $2,000 

[and fees as Chancellor. 
Jeptha B. Munn, of Morris Co. Viet-Pres. Legislative Council, 

[3.50 a day. 
James D. Westcott, of Trenton, Secretary of State, 50 and fees. 

Thomas G. Haight, of Monmouth Co. Speaker of the House 

of Assembly, 3.50 a day. 

Joseph C. Potts, of Trenton, Clerk of do. 3.50 a day. 

Jacob Kline, of Somerset Co. Treasurer, 1 ,000 

Stacy G. Potts, of Trenton, Clerk in Chancery, Fees. 

Judiciary. 
Court of Appeals and Pardons. 

This court is composed of the Governor, who is, ex officio, President 
Judge, and 14 Associate Judges, who are elected annually. This court 
holds two terms annually at Trenton. 



183a] HKW JERSBT. 909 

Court of Chancery, 

The Governor of the State is Chancellor; and this court holda four 
terms annually at Trenton. 

Supreme Court. 

Tenn •ipirei. Salary. 

Joseph C. Homblower, of Newark, Chief Justice, 1839 $1,500 

Thomas C. Rjrerson, of Newton, Associate Justice, IBil 1,400 

Gabriel H. Ford, of Morristown, do. 1641 1,400 

Zachariah Rossell, of Trenton, Clerk, 1837 Fees. 

James S. Green, of Princeton, Reporter, 1837 200 

John M. White, of Trenton, Attorney- General 1636 80 8c fees. 

The Supreme Court holds four terms each year at Trenton ; on the 
last Tuesday in February, 2d Tuesday in May, let in September, ^d 
2d in November; and the judges of this court hold Circuit Courts and 
Courts of Oyer and Terminer twice a year in each county, except Cape 
May, where one only is held. Inferior courts of Common Pleas are 
held four times in a year, in each county, by judges appointed by the 
legislature, who receive no salary, and the number of whom is not limited 
by any law. Courts of Quarter Sessions of the Peace are held at the 
same time for the trial of ofienders ; but crimes of magnitude are re- 
served for the Oyer and Terminer. 

The number of Counsellors and Attorneys in the State, in 1636, ac- 
cording to the New Jersey Register, was 186. 

FiirAivcES AND School Fund. 

The receipts into the Treasury during the year ending in 
. October, 1836, including a balance of $8,866.76, pre- 
viously in the Treasury, $88,533.42 
Disbursements during the year, 78,227.34 
Total amount of the School Fund in 1836, $254^75.66 

Pauperism. 

Paupers, in this State, were formerly supported by the townships in 
which they resided. In 1798, the counties were authorized to build 
poor-houses, in which the poor in the several counties might be main- 
tained ; and some of the counties have availed themselves of this per- 
mission. If a county refuses to build a county poor-house, any town- 
ship in such county may purchase or build a poor-house for the use of 
the township, and not be liable to be called upon to pay for a county 
poor-house. In counties in which there are no county poor-houses, a 
number of the towns have purchased houses with farms, where the poor 
are maintained. No official returns have been made from which the 
namber of paupers in the State, or the expense of supporting them, 
can be ascertained. 

18* 



FopDLjiTioa or Niw Jimit ir 1737 ikd 1745. 
xamml ftom l•bic^lI tliii <■ [«i>>tedwIUuHitnriUiaii,iiuliHinduioD[UHiiiini 
•eripUorDr. Fiuklin, ud wu coiniDiiBlMltd tij Hi. Jand Sjiirki.] 

JWmkr of Pmpli in JVne J<r««j, lalttn in 1737-S. 



TAe J\^mi«r of PeopU in ikt Western Divtfum t>/' tAe Prcvtnu o^ Jfttc 
Jertty, lakta by order nf kit Exctilcncy IakIj Morrii, in Ikt year 1745. 



ConnliH. 


- 


^ 


F.m.l.. 


Fsmilei 




au 


T.,. 


Wbola 
Numb.. 


, — ! 


«.>.., 


FamalH 


1737-8.1 






11% 














8,080, 


















































































3UU 


«M 








3D 






m 


8,139 


7,7 lel 7,351 


r,3« 1 6.079 1 5JS 


M9 


3I,B3I 


.!.» 1 



The A^mier ^ the People in lAe Eastern Division of Mid Provinr 
Jfea Jerity, taken by order aforesaid. 



Caonllat- 


Mil« 


Uiikx 

under 


Fenuld 
■bait 
16. 


'T 


allien. 


81 


Fe».l« 




Birpn, 


1 


ll 


590 
l.MB 


;.| 


35 

■•11 


371 

483 
513 
l»4 


337 

Ml 

386 


7812 9,848 
e,.]9) 8,541 
3,839 1 


G.SM 


6fiSl 


8,353 


fl,<46 


3^7 


1,8I3| 


1,360 


99,479 1 


[Nnnm, 


i.'p.oee 


l*,S53! 13.7M 


13,7M 


9,838 


'^ 


9,018 


81,403 [ 



1838.J 



KKW JSRSXT. 



311 



Railroads. 



I 



Naina. 



j Camden and Amboy, 
West Jersey, 
ipaterson and Hnd. River, 
jPaterson Junction, 
I Elizabeth & Somerville, 
tPaterson and Fort Lee, 
'New Jersey, 
N.Jersey, Hud., & Del., 
Delaware and Atlantic, 
Brid^eton &. Centreville, 
Morns and Essex, 
Belvidere A Port Colden, 
Medford, 
Belleville, 
Bergen County, 
Burlington & Mt. Holly, 
Monmouth A Middlesex, 
Camden and Woodbury » 
Belvidere and Delaware, 
Mt. Holly and Camden, 
Woodstown & Bridgeton, 
Camden Sl Egg Harbor, 



loe. 



1830 
1830 
1831 
1831 
1831 
1832 
1832 
1832 
1833 
1834 
1836 
1836 
1836 
1836 
1836 
1836 
1836 
1836 
1836 
1836 
1836 
1836 



Cspiul. 



$1,500,000 

1,000,000 

500,000 

40,000 

1,700,000 

200,000 

1,500,000 

1,500,000 

300,000 

30,000 

300,000 

100,000 

75,000 

150,000 

600,000 

50,000 

250,000 

100,000 

500,000 

150,000 

60,000 

200,000 



Rtmarkf. 



Completed 1832. 61 m. long.' 

Not begun ; the charter void.l 

Completed 1834. 16im.long. 

Not commenced. 

|n progress. 

Not begun ; the charter void. 

Completed 1836. 31 m. long. 

Survey made. 45 miles long. 

Not completed. 

Not commenced. 

Part of it in operation. 

Not commenced. 

Not commenced. 

Not commenced. 

A survey has been made. 

The stock subscribed. 

Part of the stock subscribed. 

The work has been begun. 

The stock subscribed. 

Not commenced. 

Not commenced. 

Not commenced. 



Caitals. 



Name. 


Inc. 

1824 
1830 
1833 
1834 
1835 


Capital. 


Hamaxlu. 


Morris, 

Delaware and Raritan, 

Manasquan& Barnegat Bay. 

Bottlehill and Montville, 

Wading River, 

Salem Creek, 


$4,100,000 

1,500,000 

5,000 

100,000 

200,000 


Compl'd 1836. 101 m. long. 
Compl'd 1834. 42 m. long. 
Not begun ; charter void. 
Not commenced. 
Not commenced. 
Completed ; 4 miles long. 



IX. PENNSYLVANIA. 

GoVERirUBKT. 

JosBPH RiTNKR, CrovemoT, (term of office expires on the 3d 

Tuesday in December, 1838,) 
Thomas H. Burrowes, Steretary, 

Joseph Lawrence, State Treaswrtr, 

Nathaniel P. Hobart, Auditor- Qeneral^ 

John Taylor, Survttfor-Oentrai, 



Salary. 

$4,000 
1,600 
1,400 
1,400 
1,400 



*^rd 


PKMN8TLTAFIA. 


[IKH. 


John Gebbart, 


Secretary of the Land Qfice, 1,400 


James Todd, 


Attorney' General, 


300 and feee. 


'William Piper, 


Adjutant' General, 




Th. S. Cunningham, 


Speaker of the Senate, 




Lewis Dewart, 


Speaker of the House if Rq^reaeniatiett. 




Judiciary. 


• 
• 




Supretne Court, 


Sahfy. 


John B. Gibsoa, 


Chief Justice, 


$ 2,666.67 


Molten C. Rogers, 


Associate Justice^ 


2,000.00 


Charles Hoaston, 


* do. 


2,000.00 


John Kennedy, 


do. 


2,000.00 


Thomas Sergeant, 


do. 


2,000.00 


Henry Witmer, 


Prothonotary for East District^ 


Fees. 



The judges of the Supreme Court receive, in addition to their salaries, 
$4 a day '< while on the circuits, as a full allowance for travelling ex- 
penses." 

They hold court in bank, once a year, in four several districts ; — 
1st, for the Eastern District, in Philadelphia; 2d, for the Middle Dis- 
trict, at Harrisburg; 3d, for the Northern District, at Sunbury ; 41h, for 
the Western District, at Pittsburg. 

District Courts, 

There are three District Courts in the State, which are invested with 
the civil jurisdiction of the Common Pleas, in their respective Diatricti, 
in all cases ejCbeeding a certain amount. 

District Court for the City and County of Philadelphia. 

Salary. 
Thomas McKean Pettit, President Judge, $2,000 

George M. Stroud, Judge, 2,000 

Joel Jones, do, 2,000 

Franklin Comly, Prothonotary. 

District Court for the City and County of Lancaster, 

Balarf. 
Alexander L. Hayes, Judge, ( 2,000 

^ District Court for the County of JiUegheny, 

BmUwy. 
Robert C.Grier, Judge, $2,000 

Courts of Common Pleas. 

The State is divided into the 19 following Judicial Districts, for tiie 
sessions of the Court of Common Pleas. The President Judge of the 



183a] 



VEKtiBlLVAmA. 



313 



District of Philadelphia and an Aaaociate Law Judge have each a lalary 
of $2,000; and two other Anociate Judges 1^400 each. The Presi- 
dent Judge of the 5th Judicial District, composed of the county of 
Allegheny, including the city of Pitlsburg, has a salary of $2,000. 
The President Judges in all the other districts have salaries of $1,600, 
and their associates, $ 20O. 

Districts. President Judges. 

1. Philadelphia, Edward King. 

Associate Law Judge, .... Archibald Randall. 

2. Lancaster, Orestus Collins. 

3. Berks, Northampton, and Lehigh, John Banks. 

4. Huntingdon,Mifflin, Centre, and Clearfield, . Thos. Burnside. 

5. Allegheny, Trevanian B. Dallas. 

6. Erie, Crawford, and Venaogo, Henry Shippen. 



7. Bucks and Montgomery, . 

8. Northumberland, Lycoming, Union 

9. Cumberland, Perry, and Juniata, 

10. Westmoreland, Indiana, Armstrong 

11. Luzerne, Wayne, and Pike, . 

12. Dauphin, Lebanon, and Schuylkill 
.13. Susquehanna, Bradford, and Tioga 

14. Washington, Fayette, and Greene, 

15. Chester and Delaware, . . 

16. Franklin, Bedford, and Somerset, 

17. Beayer, Butler, and Mercer, . 

18. Porter, McKean, Warren, and Jefibrson, 



John Fox. 
& Columbia, Ellis Lewis. 

John Reed. 
,& Cambria, John Young. 
. Dayid Scott. 

Calvin Blythe. 
. Edward Herrick. 

Thos. H. Baird. 
. Isaac Darlington. 

Alex. Thompson. 
. John Bredin. 

Nath*l B. Eldred. 



19. York and Adams, Daniel Durkee. 



Finances. 



ReceipU for the year 1836, 
Payments, do. 



54,000,437.64 
3,675,638.11 



Public Debt. 

Loans not pertaining to Canals and Railroads, . $ 1,780,000.00 

Loan to Eastern Penitentiary, per act of 2lBt March, 1631 , 120,000.00 

Loan to Union Canal Company, 1st March, 1833, . 200,000.00 
Debts due by appropriations, &c., to miscellaneous ob- 

jecU, 641,758.84 

Debts pertaining to public improvements, by Canal and 

Railroads, ........ 22,229,003.32 



$ 24,970,762.16 



214 PENNSTLVAiriA. [1838. 

Public Property. 

Bank Block, 2,108,700.00 

Turnpike and Bridge stock 2,597,09&50 

Canal and Navigation Block, 410,000.00 

The public works, Canals and Railroads and Bridges, con- 
nected therewith, 22,991,003.32 

To which may be added moneys due on lands, say . 1,000,000.00 



529,106,801.^ 
Education. 

The following facta are derived from the Report of the Secretary of 
Slate, made to the legislature at its last session : — 

By the new school-laws of the State, each county is left to determine 
by its votes whether it will entitle itself to the aid of the public fund by 
assuming a certain proportion of the expense. The result stated by the 
Secretary is, that the counties supposed to contain the most intelligent 
inhabitants are the most opposed to the system, whilst the recent and 
less populous districts cordially accept it. 

The whole number of districts is 987 

The number which have accepted, 745 

The number of Common Schools, 3,349 

Male Teachers, 2,428 

Female Teachers, 966 

3,394 

Male Scholars, 74,253 

Female Scholars, 65,351 

Philadelphia SchooUi, 11,234 

150,838 

The average time during which schools were kept open during the 
year was four months and three days. Average cost of teaching each 
pupil, one dollar per quarter. Average number in each school, 41. 
. The whole number of children in the State, between the ages of 5 
and 15, is about 320,000. 

Of the sum of $200,000 appropriated to the schools for the year, near- 
ly 132,000 have been paid. The remainder will be due to certain dis- 
tricts that have not yet complied with the conditions of the law. 

Fifty-two counties have voted to raise by taxes the aggregate sum of 
$ 340,000. 

Twenty-two of the academies that have received aid from the State, 
report 1,111 students. These academies possess land estimated at 
$ 68,000, investments at j 29,000, an4 buildings at $ 57,000. But one 
reports a library. 



1838.] PZN5STLVANIA. 315 

Eight of the CollegeB th|it have received aid from the State, report 
841 students ; 116 graduates in 1836. Average expense to each pupil, 
$ 135. Funds estimated at $ 333,000, of which sum the property of 
the University of Pennsylvania alone makes g 186,000. Volumes in 
three libraries, 11,200. 

Pennsylvania has made grants of money and land at different times 
to colleges and academies, the gross amount of which is estimated to 
be $485,000. 

Fublic ScJtoela of PhiUidelpkia. '^The city and county of Philadelphia 
constitute a school district, uuder special regulations, and are not in- 
cluded in the above statements. From the 19th annual report of the 
Board of Controllers, it appears that the monitorial and infant schools 
have been attended by 7,127 pupils; the primary schools by 2,500; other 
schools by 1,500, making a total of 11,127 children taught at the ex- 
pense of the county. The expenses of the year were $ 75,000, in- 
cluding 23,000 for building school-houses. 

INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT. 

The following statement is extracted from the Report of the Canal 
Commissioners, read in the Senate, December 8, 1836. 

Pennsylvania has in operation of canals^ 600 miles ; railroads, 120 ; — 
In the course of construction ; — 



North Branch extension, eanalf 90 
£rie extension, do. 112. 



Tangascootack extension, canal, 71^ 
Gettysburg extension, railway, 41| 



Total in operation, 720 miles; in the course of construction, 252|. 

The Tangascootack extension is nearly completed. A portion of 
each of the others has been placed under contract during the past sea- 
son, and when completed, the whole extent will make an aggregate of 
Pennsylvania canal of 809^ miles, and railway, 161| miles. 

There have been constructed within the borders of the State, by 
the enterprise of incorporated companies, the following canals and 
railways. 



Canals. , Mile*. 

Union, 80 

Schuylkill, .... 108 

Lehigh, .... 46^ 

Total, 286i miles of canal. 



Canali. Miles. 

Delaware and Hudson, 25 

Conestoga navigation, .16 

Codorus navigation, 11 



Railways. Miles, j Railways. Miles. 

West Chester, ... 9 ILittle Schuvlkill, . 2H 

Mauch Chunk, ... 9 Schuylkill Valley, . 10 

Boom Run, . . . 5^ Mill Creek, ... 4 

Phil.. Germant., & Norristown, 21 Pine Grove, .... 4 



Mine-hill & SchuylkUl Haven, 20 
Mount Carbon, ... 7 
Lyken's Valley, IH 

Total, 196^ miUs qf raihoay. 



Carbondale, . 16| 

Philadelphia and Trenton, . 261 
Beaver Meadow, 26] 



316 



PEKIfSYLTAiriA. 



[1838. 



Ganali. 



Mauch Chunk and Wright*B 
Creek, 



Mil«s. 



26 



In the coone of construction and under contract, by incorporated 
companies. 

Canali. Milei. 

Columbia and Tide, . 45 

Bald Eagle navigation, . . 25 

Total, 96 mUes of emuU, 

Railways. Miles. 

Reading and Fort Clinton, 20 

Philadelphia and Reading, 54 
Philadelphia and Wilmington, 17 

Catawissa and Tamaqua, 38j| 

Sunbury and Pottsyille, 51 { 

Williamsport and Elmira, 7^ 

Total f 368i miles of railroad. 



Hallways. Mila». 

Lancaster and Harrisburg, 36 
Harrisburg and Chambersburg, 50 
Downingtown and Norristown, 20 
Marietta and Columbia, 3 

Strasburg, 5 



State Canals in operation. 
Do. Railways do. • 

Do. Canal extension, commenced, 
Do. Railway extension, do. 

Canals by incorporated companies in 

Railways do. 

Canals do. 

Railways do. 



operation, 

do. 
commenced, 

do. . 



Total, 



Milei. 
GOO 
120 
2091 

4li 
2d6i 
186 

96 
3081 

1 ,9184 



Amount of Tolls rusivtd on the State Works during the Year ending 

October 31, 1836. 

Canal and Railway tolls, $ 670,760.79 

Motive Power tolls, 165,171.04 



Total receipts. 
Expenses for the year. 



5835,931.83 
606,859.(32 



Balance, 



f 229.072.21 



1B38.] DELAWAEB. 217 

X. DELAWARE. 

CrOTEKHMSIIT. 

Sftlary. 
CoRKSLius p. CoMKOTS, of Kent Co., Oovernor ; (term of office 

expires on the 3d Tuesday in January, 1841,) $ 1,333| 

Charles Marion, of Kent Co., Surttary of Stattf 400 

George S. Adkins, of Milton, Auditor, 500 

Peter S.- Parker, do. . State Treasurer, 600 

Presley Spruance, Jr., of Smyrna, Speaker of the Senate. 
William D. Waples, of Millsbcrough, Speaker of the House of jRepre- 
sentatives. 
Pay of the members of the Senate and House of Representatives, 
; 3,00 a day. 

JUDICIART. 

Superior Court. 

BmUrj. 
John M. Clayton, of Dover, €M^ Justice ^ jg( 1,200 

James R. Black, of New Castle, Jjssoeiate Justice, 1,000 

Samnel M. Hafiington, of Dover, do. 1,000 

Caleb 8. Layton, of Georgetown, do. 1,000 

Court of Chancery, 

Kensey Johns, Jun., of New Castle, ChaneeUoTf 1,100 

James Rogers, do. Attomeif'Qeneral, g 350 d& fees. 

Canal ANn Railroads. 

Chesapeake and Delatoare Canal ; from Delaware City, on Delaware 
River, to Back Creek, a stream emptying into the river Elk above the 
entrance of the latter into Chesapeake Bay; — 13.63 miles long; — 
completed in 1829 ; — cost $ 2,250,000. 

J^ew Castle and .Frenchtoum Railroad; from New Castle to French- 
town ; — 16 miles long ; — completed in 1832 ; — cost g 490,000. 

Wilmington and Susquehanna Railroad ; from Wilmington to Susque- 
hanna (opposite to Havre de Grace, where it is connected with the 
Baltimore and Port Deposit Railroad) ; — 33 miles long ; — completed in. 
1837 ; — cost 5 1 ,200,000. 

19 



218 MARTLAITD. [1838. 

XI. MARYLAND. 

GOTERNMBKT. 

Salary. 
Tbomas W. Veazey, of Cecil Co., Governor; (term of office 

expires in Jaouary, 1838,) $2,666i 

r Nathaniel F. WilliaidB, Baltimore; Wm. FA 
EzeciOivej Johnson, Baltimore Co.; Gwynn ^^''^"> leach 500 

CouncUA Charles Co. ; John McRenney, Queen | 
I Anne Co. ; Wm. L. Jones, Somerset Co. J 

Thomas Culbreth, Annapolis, Clerk of the Executive Council,! J500 

George Mackabin, do. TVeasurerj Western Shore, 2,000 

Wm. K. Lambdin, Treasurer, Eastern Shore, 2,000 

Julius T. Ducatel, Baltimore, Geologist of the State, 2,000 

John H. Alexander, do. Engineer of the State Survey, 2,000 

Thomas Karney, Annapolis, Surveyor- General, 800 

Josioh Bayly, DotcheBX^T Co., Attorney- General, Fees. 

Hugh W. Evans, Baltimore, Commissioner of Loans, Fees. 

George 6. Brewer, Annapolis, Register of the Land Office, Fees. 

David Ridgely, do. State Librarian, 1,000 

[The State Library is kept in the State-House at Annapolis, and con- 
tains 10,000 volumes.] 

The Senate is composed of 15 members, elected for 5 years ; 9 from 
the Western Shore, and 6 from the Eastern Shore. 

The Bouse of Delegates is composed of 80 members, elected annually; 
4 irom each of the 19 counties, and 2 from each of the cities of Annap- 
olis and Baltimore. — B. L. Gantt, Speaker. 

JnOIClART. 

Court of Chancery. 

Appointod. Salary. 

Theodorick Bland, Annapolis, 18^, Chancellor, $ 3,600 

Ramsay Waters, do. Register, 

Alexander Randall, do. Auditor, Fees. 

Cottrt of Appeals, 

Appointed. Salary. 

John Buchanan, Williamsport, 1824, Chief Judge, $2,500 

John Stephen, Bladensburg, 1821, Associate Judge, 2,200 

Stephenson Archer, Bel-Air, 1823, do. 3,000 

Thomas B. Dorsey, Ellicott's Mills, 1824, do. 2,200 

Ezek. F. Chambers, Chestertown, 1835, do. 2,200 

Ara Spence, Snow Hill, do^ 2,200 

Richard W. Gill, Annapolis, Clerk and Reporter. 



283a] MAETLAND. 219 

Court of the City of Baltimore. 







SftUry. 


Nicholas Brice, 


Chirf Judge, 


$2,400 


W. G. D. Worlhiiglon, 


jSssodate Judge, 


1,500 


Alexander Nesbit, 


do. 


1,500 



The State is divided ioto six judicial diBtricts, each comprising two, 
three, or foar counties. For each district there are a chief judge and 
two associates, who constitute the County Courts for the respective 
counties in the district. These are the common law courts of original 
jurisdiction in the State ; and they have jurisdiction of all claims for 
$50 and upwards, appellate jurisdiction from the judgments of justices 
of the peace, and equity jurisdiction within the counties coextensive 
with the chancellor. The six chief judges constitute the Court of 
Appeals for the State, which has appellate jurisdiction of cases at law 
and in equity, originating in the County Courts, the Orphans' Courts 
(of which there is one in each county, composed of three judges for 
testamentary a£5urs. &c.), and the Court of Chancery. 



XII. VIRGINIA. 

OOVXRNMXIIT. 



Salary. 
David Campbcll, of Washington Co., Governor; (term ex- 
pires March 31st, 1840,) $3,333.33 

William H. McFarland, of Richmond, IdeutenarU- Governor 

and Counsellor of State, 1,000 

Henry L. Hopkins, of PowhaUn Co., Counsellor of State, 1,000 
John Rutherford, do. do. 1,000 

Lawson Burfoot, of Richmond, Treasurer, 2,000 

James E. Heath, do. Auditor, 2,000 

James Brown, do. Second Auditor, 1,800 

William Seldcn, do. Regis, of Land Office, 1,500 

Sidney S. Baxter, of Xiexington, Attorney- General. 

Wm. H. Richardson, Secretary of the Commonwealth. 
John B. Richardson, Assistant Secretary. 
Thomas Lawson, Clerk of the Council. 
Bernard Peyton, Adjutant- General. 
Stsfibrd H. Parker, Speaker of the SenaU. 
Linn Banks, Speaker of the House of Delegates. 



220 TiRfliNiA. [1838. 

JuDiciAar. 

Court of Appeals, 

Salary. 

Henry St. George Tacker, of Richmond, President, $ 2,720 

Francis T. Brooke, of SpotsyWanta Co., Judge, 2,500 

William H. Cabell, of Richmond, do, 2,^00 

Richard E. Parker, of Frederick Co., do. 2,500 

William Brockenbrough, of Richmond, do. 2,500 

The judges are entitled to receive, in addition to their salaries, 25 
cents a mile for necessary travel. The Court of Appeals holds two 
sessions annually ; one at Lewishurg, Greenbrier county, for the coun- 
ties lying west of the Blue Ridge, commencing on the 2d Monday in 
July, and continuing 90 days, unless the business shall be sooner 
despatched ; the other at Riekmondy for the counties lying east of the 
Blue Ridge, commencing at such times as the court may, from time to 
time appoint, and continuing 160 days, unless the business shall b» 
sooner despatched. 

Oeneral Court, 

There are 21 judges, having each a salary of $1,500, except the 
judge of the 7th circuit, whose salary is $ 1,800; and their names, with 
the number of their respective circuits, and places of residence, are as 
follows : 

1. Riehard H, Baker, of Naniomond Co. 
9. John Y. MaaoQ, " Boulhamptoo Co. 

3. Abel P. Upihur,' " Northampton Co. 

4. John B. Chrittiao, " Charles City Co. 
5b John T. Lomax, ** Frederiekebarf. 
$, John Scott, " Fauquier Co. 

7. John B. Cloptoa, " Richmond. 

8. William Daniel, " Campbell Co. 

9. William lioigh, " Halifax Co. 

10. Fleming Saondere, ** Fraoklin Co. 

11. Biobard H. Field, " Cnlpepper Co. i 

The State is divided into 10 districts, and each district into two eir* 
cults, and a Circuit Superior Court of law and chancery is held twice 
every year in each county and corporation ; the courts sitting until the 
business is despatched. 

The judges, who hold the Circuit Courts are also required to hold, 
every year, two terms of (he General Court in the Capitol at Richmond. 
It is the duty of fiHeen of the judges to attend this court, eleven being 
necessary to form a quorum. One term begins on the last Monday in 
June ; the other on the 15th of December. The judges are required to 
arrange themselves into four classes, of five judges each, one of whom 
is exempt, in rotation, from attending the court. 



19. L. P. Thompfon, of Amhent Co. 

13. Isaac BT. Donglai, " Morgan Co. 

14. Daniel Smith, " Rockingham Co. 

15. Benjamin EeUU, « WythtfCo. 

16. Jamei E. Brown. 

17. John J. Alien, " Harriaoo Co. 

18. EUlwin S. Duncan. 

19. Lewia Summeri, " Konhawa Co. 
SM. Joaoph L. Frye. 

91. Philip N. Mieholae, ** Richmond. 



1898.] VIRGINIA. 231 

The General Court has appellate jurisdiction in the last resort in 
criminal cases; also original jurisdiction of probates and administra- 
tions, and some claims of the Commonwealth. Its judges, or a portion 
of them, sit as a Special Court of Appeals, in case's in which the judges 
of the Court of Appeals, proper, are disqualified by interest or other- 
wise. 

County Courts. 

A County Court sits in each county every month, held by four or 
more Justices of the Peace. These courts, formed of plain farmers or 
country gentlemen, are invested with a jurisdiction wider than that of 
any other court in the State, covering almost the whole field of cogni- 
zance, civil, criminal, legal, and equitable. Their civil jurisdiction is 
over all causes in which the value does not exceed $20. They, ex- 
clusively, try slaves for all offences ; and they examine free persons 
charged with felony, previously to their trial in the Circuit Court. 

Paupxrisii. 

The number of Paupers in this State is computed at about 2,500 ; 
and the annual expense of supporting them at $ 90,000 or $ 100,000. 
They are supported by a tax levied annually by the Overseers of the 
Poor, in each county, upon all males above 16 yean of age, and all 
fenuUe slaves above 16, — who are called titkables. The two modes of 
applying the funds thus raised, which prevail, are as follow : — 

Ist. In the greater part of the counties, the poor are boarded out in 
private families, commonly among their kindred, at a rate agreed on 
between the Overseer of that hundred and the housekeepers who fur- 
nish the board ; or the pauper receives his yearly allowance aAd 
makes his own bargain for subsistence. The annual cost for each 
pauper in this mode, is from $ 40 to $ 100. 

2d. In other counties (not more than one fourth of the whole) a poor- 
house is erected, with the consent and approbation of the County Court. 
To this house a farm is attached, on which such of the paupers, as are 
able, are made to work ; and here all who receive relief are obliged to 
live. The annual cost for each pauper, in this mode, is from $30 to 
$40 a year. Many who would be disposed to receive assistance in the 
former mode, are induced to decline it in this, on account of being 
required to be separated from their friends, and compelled to work, if 
able ; and from a wounded pride at being set apart as receivers of pub- 
lic charity. Hence the poor-house system, though much the more 
comfortable, is also much the more economical. Counties which for- 
merly had, under the other system, 75 or 100 paupers, have now, under 
this, only from 25 to 30, at $30 or $40 each; reducing the yearly 
county expenditure from $ 3,500 or upwards, to $ 1,200 or $ 1,500. 

19» 



393 YiRGWiA. [1838. 

Iktsrital Improfbmbht. 

In the Almanac for 1837| an account may be seen of varioiu works of 
internal improyement in this State. At the recent aesaion of the legi»> 
Uture, the sum of about f 4,500,000 was appropriated for yariova im- 
proYementa, of which the following are some of the moat important. 

Richmond and Petersburg Railroad Co., .... $200,000 

Louisa Railroad Co., 120,000 

Portsmouth and Roanoke Railroad Co., .... 50,000 

Northwestern Turnpike, 65,000 

Roanoke, Danville, and Junction Railroad, 320,000 

Dismal Swamp Canal, 126,000 

Falmouth and Alexandria Railroad, 400,000 

Lynchburg and Tennessee Railroad, 200,000 

City Point Railroad, 60,000 

New Shenandoa Co., 46,666 

Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, 302,100 

James River and Kanawha Co., . . • ■ . 1,990,800 



XIIL NORTH CAROLINA. 

[For the following notice of the history and fUtMtica of North Carolina, the Ed- 
itor ia indebted to the politeneaa of the Floo. David L. Swain, formerly GoTornor of 
the State, and now President of the University of North Carolina.] 

The first permanent settlement in North Carolina ia believed to have 
been formed immediately subsequent to the expulsion of the Quakers 
from Virginia, in 1662. (See Bancroft's Hi$t. U, StaUs, Vol. II. Ch. 
Carolina.) 

In that year Cistacaneu, king 'of the Yeopim Indians, granted to 
George Durant the neck of land which separates Little and Perquim. 
mons Rivers, at their entrance into Albemarle Sound ; and on the lat 
of April, 1663, Sir William Berkeley, Governor of Virginia, granted a 
portion of the same tract to George Cathmaid, under the following- 
description, *^ 3,350 acres lying and being on the north side of Roan- 
oke (now Albemarle) abutting southerly on the said Sound, easterly on 
Katotin (now Little) River, westerly on Perquimmons, which issueth 
out of the said Sound, and northerly on the Owasoke Creek, which 
issueth out of Perquimmons River and the woods ; the same being due 
unto the said Cathmaid per traruporUUionem qf tixty-tevm persont,'* 
These are the oldest land titles, and JDurant's Jfeek in Perquimmons 
county, probably the earliest settlement in Carolina. 



1838.] MO&TB CAROLINA. 383 

On the 24th of Much, 1663, King Charlai the Second granted to 
Edward Earl i>f Clarendon, George Duke of Albemarle, William Earl 
of Craven, John Lord Berkeley, Anthony Lord Ashley, Sir George Car- 
terett, Sir John Colleton, and Sir William Berkeley, all the country from 
the Atlantic to the Paci6o Ocean, included between the 3l8tand 36th 
parallels of north latitude. The territory was erected into a proTince 
by the name of Carolina, of which the grantees were Lords Proprietors. 

On the 8th of September, 1663, Sir William Berkeley, Governor of 
Virginia, one of the proprietors, was instructed to visit the settlement 
on Albemarle and organize a regular government. Oeorge Drumnumd 
was appointed governor, assisted by a council of six persons, and the 
infant colony was from that period known as the CaurUy of JHhtmarU^ 
in Ike jrromnee of Carolina, 

On the 30th of June, 1665, the second charter of Charles the Sec- 
ond was obtained, enlarging the powers of the grantees, and extending 
the boundaries of the province from the southern boundary of Virginia 
(36<' 300 to Florida (29o.) 

The area of Carolina, under this charter, was s million of square 
miles, quite equal to one half the territory of the United States, accord- 
ing to their present limits. It included a large part of Mexico, all 
Texas, all our territory south of 36° 30' and west of Arkansas, and all 
the cotton-growing States of the Union, vis. North and South Carolina, 
Georgia, Tennessee, Arkansas, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana. 

The first legislative body known to the history of Carolina convened, 
according to Chalmers {Hist Col. of S. Carolina, Vol. II. p. 284), in 
1666, and petitioned ihe Lords Proprietors to permit the people of 
Albemarle, to hold their lands upon the same terms that the people 
of Virginia held theirs. Governor Drummood was succeeded by Ssyn- 
nel Stevens, in October, 1667. He was instructed to act with the 
concurrence of a council of twelve, six of whom were to be appointed 
by himself, and the other six to be phosen by the delegates of the 
freeholders. The governor, the council, and twelve delegates chosen 
by the freeholders, constituted " The Grand Assembly of Albemarle.^' 

On the 29th May, 1664, (" Brief Description. of Carolina,*' printed by 
Robert Home, 1666,) Sir John Yeamans, a^ the head of 800 colonists 
from Barbadoes made the second * settlement that was attempted on the 
Cape Fear River. It was organized into Me second govenunent estab- 
lished in Carolina, and received the name of the County of Clarendon, 
The first Charltstoton in Carolina was projected by Governor Teamans, 
and is supposed to have been situated at the confluence of Oldtown 
Creek with the Cape Fear, in the county of Brunswick, on the plaota- 



« A few indWiduali ftom NSw Bsglaod Mtll«d oo the Cap« Fatr, then ealM 
Clarandoo River, in 1650, and left tiM country in 1663. — See Marthi*f BiaL A*. Ckr- 
9Um, Vol. I. pp. 196-137. 



224 IfORTH CAROLIKA. 



[1838. 



tion now owned by Thomaa Cowan, Esq. At this period the Cotmty 
oj Albemarle included the country between Virginia and the Cape Fear, 
and the County of Clarendon waa spread OTer the region between 
Cape Fear and Florida. 

In 1670, Governor Sayle landed at Port Royal and hud the founda- 
tion of a third government in Carolina. He fell an early Tictim to the 
diseases of the climate, and, in August of the following year, the au- 
thority of Governor Yeamans of Clarendon, was extended over this 
colony. €rovernor Yeamans removed immediately to the latter settle- 
ment, and in the first year of his administration founded Old CharlesUm 
on the banks of Ashley River, which continued to be the metropolis of 
the colony until 1680, when the present city of Charleston was built 
upon the neck of land between Ashley and Cooper Rivera. The colo- 
nists who accompanied Governor Yeamans from Barbadoes to Cape 
Fear, are believed to have followed him with great unanimity on his 
migration southward, in the year 1690, no settler remained, and with 
his administration the history of Clarendon as an independent govern- 
ment ceases. 

The Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina, drawn up by the cele- 
brated author of the ** Essay on the Human Understanding," bear 
date on the 1st of March, 1669. Governor Stevens and Governor 
Sayle were required to organize their respective governments under 
them in the following year, at which time Grahame (Bist. U, States^ 
Vol. 11. p. 107) states, that 3ohn Locke was created a landgrave, and 
was one of the three hereditary nobles of Carolina, of the first order. 

Between the years 1671 and 1665, the part of the province south of 
the County of Clarendon, was divided into the counties of Craven, 
Berkeley, Colleton, and CartereU, 

Craven extended from the Santee to the Sewee ', Berkeley, from the 
Sewee to the Stono, Colleton, from the Stono to some point beyond 
Edisto ; and CartereU, stretching firom thence to Florida, was uninhab- 
ited. 

In 1697, the portion of the province north of the Santee River (the 
county of Albemarle and the uninhabited County of Clarendon) ac- 
quired the distinctive appelUtion of AbrfA, and the four southern coun- 
ties that of South Carolina. — (See Oldmixon's Carolina, {Hist. Col. of 
a. C. Vol. II. pp. 444, 445) ; Chalroer's Political Annals, (idem., 327) ; 
Williamson's Hist. JV. Carolina, Vol. I. p. 162; Archdale's Carolina, 
published in 1707. 

Having traced thus briefly the history of the several settlements in 
Candina from their origin until the period at which they were all 
merged into North and South Carolina, no reference will henceforth 
be made except incidentally to the southern government. 



1838.J ifOftTH CAEOLi:rA. 235 

GOTSIUIORS or THB CoU^TT OF AlBBMARLS. 

George Drvmmond, ofpowiti in the antomn of 1663 

Samael SteTeni, do, October, 1667 

(Died early in 1674.) 

T Cartwright, President of the Council, 1674 

(Resigned and returned to England early in 1676.) 

* Miller, appointed President of the Council, July, 1677 

John Culpepper, usurped the government, Dec. 1677 

\ John Harvey, appointed President of the Council, 1680 

John Jenkins, do. Governor, June, 1680 

(Died December 1681.) 

Henry Wilkinson, appointed Governor, Feb. 1681 

X Seth Sothel, do. Governor, 1683 

(Impeached and expelled by Parliament, 1688.) 

Philip Ludwell, appointed Governor, 1689 

(Appointed Governor of Carolina, 1693.) 

Alexander Lillington, appointed Deputy Governor, 1693 

Thomas Harvey, do. do. 1695 

The Fundamental Constitutions were abrogated in Carolina in the 
month of April, 1693. At the same time the authority of Governor 
Ludwell was extended over the four southern counties. He assumed 
the title of Governor of Carolina, and fixed his residence at Charleston. 
From the accession of Governor Ludwell to* the government of Caro- 
Una, (April, 1693,) until the 24th of January, 1712, the northern part of 
the province (Albemarle) was ruled either by deputy-governors, ap- 
pointed by the Governor of Carolina at Charleston, or by a President 
of the Council, elected by the deputies of the Lords Proprietors. In 
all other respects the two governments, North and South Carolina, 
were entirely independent of ^ach other, and were even separated by 
a wide wilderness, and a well-defined boundary, the Santee River. 



* In Norember, 1676, GoTernor Eaitehuroh wu lent out from Eogland to Albo- 
marlo. He itopped in the Weit Indiet, and hnvinf been detained by ** an agreeable 
oDgagenent," did not arriTe ontil lome time after Cnljpepper'e rebellion in December, 
1677. He died in tlw midit of nnsoceenful efforts, aided by tbe (Sorernor of Virginia, 
to eoppreef tbe intorrection, and thne, baring won tbe lady, loet bit goTemment and 
hie lift. 

t In the begionittg of tbe year 1680, tbe Proprietors sent oat Beth Botbel, as Got- 
ernor, who was taken by tbe Algerines on his voyage thither. In Febmary, 1681, 
Henry Wilkinson was appointed " Oavernor qf that portion nf Carolina gtrtUhing from 
FirginiM. te the River Pamlieo, and Jiv miUg beyond tl." — Cbalmer*s PoL Jinnali, 
(Hist. Col. of 8. C. Vol. II. p. 309.) 

X After Socbel's expulsion f^om Albemarle, be went to Charleston, was eleeted 
gofrernor of that part of the provioee in 1600, and was inpeaehed and ezpened there- 
ftom two years afterwards. 



2Si6 NORTH CAROLINA. ^ [1838. 

60VKRVOR8 or Carolina rROM April, 1693 to January, 1712. 



James Moore, ' appointed 1700 

Sir N. Johnston, do, 1703 

Edward Tynte, do. 1706 

Robert Gibbes, do. 1710 



Philip Ludwell, appointed 1693 

Thomas Smith, do. 1693 

Joseph Blake, do. 1694 

John Archdale, do. ' 1695 

Joseph Blake, do. 1696 

OoTBRlfORS OF NoRTH CAROLINA UNDER THE ProPIUKTARY 

Government. 

Henderson Walker, President of the Couneilj 1699 

(Died the 14th of April, 1704.) 

Robert Daniel, appointed Deputy- Goverrtm't ^'^ 

Thomas Carey, do. do. , 1705 

William Glover, President of the Council^ t^RJy ^'^ 

Edward Hyde, do. do. Aug-ust, 1710 

Edward Hyde, appointed Governor, Jan. 24th, 1713 

Thomas Pollock, President of the Council, Sept. 12th, 1715 

Charles Eden, took the oath of office as Governor , May, 28th 1714 

(Died 26th March, 1722.) 
Thomas Pollock, President of the Council, Mar. 30th, 17^ 

(Died August 30th, 1722.) 
William Reed, President of the Council, Sept. 7th, 17^ 

George Burrington, Goremor, (took oaths of office,) Jan. 15th, 1724 
Sir Richard Everard, dp. do. July, 17th, 1735 

In 1729 all the Lords Proprietors except John Lord Carterett sold 
their shares of Carolina, and surrendered the government to the crown. 
Thus ended the Proprietary government, sizty-siz years ailer the 
charter by which it was established. 

Governors under the Royal Government. 

George Bnrrington, Governor, (took oaths of office,) Feb. 25th, 173^ 

(Pled to South Carolina, April, 1734.) , 

Nathaniel Rice, President 0/ ^^0 CouneU^ April 17th, 1734 

Gabriel Johnston, Governor, (took oaths of office,) Nov. Sd, 1734 

(Died, 1752.) 

Nathaniel Rice, President of the Council, 1752 

(Died the 28th of January, 1753.) 

Matthew Rowan, President of the Council, Feb. 1, 1753 

Arthur Dobbs, Governor, (took oaths of office,) Nov. 1st, 1754 

(Resigned, Oct. 27th, 1764.) 

William Try on, Gorcrmw, (took oaths of office,) Oct. 27th, 1764 

(June, 1771, appointed Governor of New York.) 

James Hasell, President of the Council, July 1, 1771 

Josiah Martin, Governor, (took oaths of office,) August. 1771 

(Abdicated and took refuge on board the Cruizer sloop of war in 
Cape Fear River, August, 1775.) 



J 



i8daj 



IfOKTH CAROLIlTjk. 



237 



GOVEBVORS UNDER TBE CONSTITUTION. 



Richard Caswell, 
Abner Nash, 
Thomas Burke, 
Alexander Martin, 
Richard Caswell, 
Samuel Johnston, 
Alexander Martin, * 
Richard D. Spaight, 
Samuel Ashe, 
William R. Davie, 
Benjamin Williams, 
James Turner, 
Nathaniel Alexander, 
Benjamin Williams, 



Elected. 

Dec. 1776 

do. 1779 

do. 1781 

do. 1782 

do. 1784 

do. 1^87 

do. 1789 

do. 1792 

do. 1795 

do. 1798 

do. 1799 

do. 1802 

do. 1805 

do. 1807 



David Stone, 
Benjamin Smith, 
William Hawkins, 
William Miller, 
John Branch, 
Jesse Franklin, 
Gabriel Holmes, 
Hutchins G. Burton, 
James Iredell, 
John Owen, 
Montfort Stokes, 
David L. Swain, 
Richard D. Spaight, 
Edward B. Dudley, 



Eleeted. 

Dec. 1808 

do. 1810 

do. 1811 

do. 1814 

do. 1817 

do. 1820 

do. 1821 

do. 1824 

do. 1827 

do. 1828 

do. 1830 

do. 1832 

do. 1835 

Jan. 1, 1837 



Chronological TobU of Events from the First Settlement qf the Country to 

the Period qf the Revolution. 

First settlement in Carolina (by Quakers), .... 1662 

Goremment of the County of Albemarle organized, . 1663 

First Session of the Grand Assembly of Albemarle (October), . 1666 
George Fox, the founder of the Quakers, visits the Colony, and 

organizes the first religious association in September, . 1672 
Culpepper's rebellion (see Johnson's *< Life of Greene," Ch. 7; 

Bancroft's U. States, Vol. II. Chap. Carolina), 1677 

Impeachment and banishment of Governor Sothel, 1688 

Fundamental Constitulions abrogated 1693 

First Episcopal Missionary arrives, 1700 

Church of England established by law, 1704 

Carey usurps the government, 1707 

Palatines settle on Neuse and Trent Rivers (December), 1710 
Great massacre of the whites by the Indians on the Rivers Ro- 
anoke, Tar, Neuse, and Trent, 1711 

First emission of paper-money (bills of credit), . 1713 
First revision of the statute law (12 manuscript copies promul- 
gated), 1715 

The pirate Teach killed, and his vessels captured by Lieutenant 

Maynard in Pamlico Sound, 1716 

Court-Houses first erected, 1723 

Earliest permanent settlement on the Cape Fear, aboat . 1724 

Boundary line between Virginia and North Carolina run, . . 1727 

Road constructed from Newbern to Bath, .... 1728 



228 KOSTH CAEOI.IRA. [1838. 

^Proprietary GoTernment dissoWed and Royal Government estab- 
lished, 1729 

Boundary line between North and Sovth Curolina run and marked, 1735 

John Lord Carterett*8 eighth part of Carolina assigned to him in 
severalty, by metes and bounds, 1744 

First post route established (from Suffolk, Va., to Wilmington, 
once every two weeks, at an expense to the Province of £ }33 
6s. per annum), 1745 

First printing-office introduced (by James Davis of Newbern), 1749 

First book printed (Swan's Revisal of the Laws), • . 1756 

First newspaper published, " North Carolina Magazine or Uni- 
versal Intelligencer," by James Davis, at Newbern, 1764 

Battle of the AUemance (between Governor Tryon and the Reg- 
ulators), 16th of May, 1771 

Abdication of Governor Martin and termination of the Royal 
government in North Carolina, 1775 

Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence, 20th of ^fay, 1775 

Pr^greBsive extentWR of Settlement from East to West^ as mdieaied ^y 

the establishment of Towns. 

Bath, 1706 ; Newbern, 1710 ; Queen Anne's Creek, 1716, name 
changed to Edenton, 1722 ; Newton, incorporated and name changed 
to Wilmington, 1739; Childsburg, 1759, name changed to Hillsborough, 
1766; Caropbelton, 1762, name changed to Fayetteville, 1784; Salis- 
bury, 1756; Salem, the principal settlement of the Unitas Fratrum, 
1766; Charlotte, 1768; Wake Court-House, 1770, name changed to 
. the City of Raleigh, 1792, became the seat of government, 171)5; 
Tryon Court-House (now Lincolnton), 1770; Morganton, 1778 ; Mor- 
ristown (now Asheville), 1794; Waynesville, 1807; Fran)clin (Macon 
Co.), 1820 ; Murphey, 1837. 

The University of North Carolina was incorporated in 1789; located 
at Cbapel Hill, 1791 ; opened for the reception of students, 12th of 
February, 1795. 

Population at severaj:^ karlt Periods. 

In 1()67, 1,400 tithables, comprehending all persons, without distinc- 
tion of age or sex, between sixteen and sixty years of age. In 1701^ 
5,000 ; 1729, 10,000 ; 1749, 45,000 ; 1763, 95,000 whites. 

* At the cIoM of the Proprietary gOTeromeot, North Carolioe wai divided into the 
countiei of Albemarle, Bath, and Clarendon. Albemarle wai tubdiTided into aix pre- 
eioeti, Currituck, Paiqnotank, Perqnimmoni, Chowan, Bertie, nod Tyrrell ; Bath into 
finr ; Beaufort, Hyde, GrsTen, and Carterett ; and Clarendoa eontaiiMd one only, Nsw 
Banever. lo 1798 the priaiary diTiaion was aboliabed, aad the eleven preetneu woie 
ityled Coaotiea. Edenton, Bath, Nowberoi and Beaufort were the only towns eeUb- 
lif bed by law prior to 17S9. 



1838.] NOKTH CAROLINA 999 

GOVBKVHXIVT. 

fliltry. 
Edward B. Dodlst, of Wilmingtoii, Gattmor; tenn fiom > «a/mia 
Jan. 1, 1837, to Jan. 1, 18393 \ ^' 

l^ilUam HiU, of Raleigh, Secretary of State, 800 and fees. 

Daniel D. Courts, of Surry Co., Treasurer, 1,600 

W^iUiam F. Collins, of Chatham Co., Comptroller, (from Jan. 1, ) , g^ux 
1837, to Jan. 1, 1839,) ] ^^^^ 

The officers of the executive goyemment are required to reside, dur- 
ing their term of office, at Raleigh. 

Hugh D. Waddell, of Orange Co., Speaker of the Senate. 

William H. Hajwood, Jun., of Wake Co., Speaker of the House ef 
Commons, 

JUDICIART. 

Supreme Court* 

StJarf. 

Thomas Ruffin, of Orange Co., Chief Justiee, $2,600 

William Gaston, of Newborn, Associate Justice^ 2,600 

Joseph J. Daniel, of Halifax, do. 2,500 

Th. P. Devereux, of Raleigh, > p,..^*^. C $ 300 with the copy- 

Wm. H. BatUe, of Loubburg, ] '^'fp^^ters, j ^.^j^^ ^^ the .Reports. 

Judges of the Superior or Circuit Courts. 



Frederick Nash, of Hillsborough. 
R. M. Pearson, « MocksTiUe. 
John L. Bailey, « Elizabeth City. 



Thomas Settle, of Rockingham. 
R. M. Saunders, « Raleigh. 
John M. Dick, ** Greensborough. 
John D. Toomer, << Fayetteville. 

John R. J. Daniel, of Raleigh, Attorney' General. 

John F. Poindexter, of Stokes Co., SoUeitor- General 

David Outlaw, Alexander Troy, James R. Dodge, and James W. 
Gwynn, SoUators. 

StITX or TBX BAHXt. 

Capital. Cireolatioii. Bpeeie. 

Suu Buk, Jaly 9S, 1837, $ 1,500,000 $ 1,S91,&50 $509,477.63 

C«p«FMrBuik, JoM 1, do. 1,155,500 800,981 167,946.00 

M«iebtiiU* Buk, May 31, do. 985,000 18i»,476 98,194.11 

Pavpbribii. 

Paupers in this State are supported by the eounties in which they are 
settled, by a distinct tax,ealled the poor or parish- tax, which is imposed 
on the inhabitante by the county court. This tax varies in the diflbrent 
counties ; but in all the counties it is moderate. The paupers are under 
the care and direction of the " Wardens of the Poor,"who are seven in 
ilumber in each county, and are elected by the freemen every three 

20 



390 NORTH CAROLINA. [1896. 

yean. All appliealioni for relief muet be made to the wardens, who 
receive and disbarae the poor>taz. The poor were formerly lei oui 
by the wardens every year to eoeh persona aa would oodertake to pro- 
vide for them at the lowest price. At present, however, in the greater 
part of the counties poor-houses are provided, where the poor of the 
several counties are placed and maintained ; but in counties not pro- 
vided with poor-houses, they are let out td the lowest bidder. 

Literary Fund. 

This State has a Literary Fund pledged to the support of common 
schools, consisting of swamp lands, estimated at 1,500,000 acres, bank 
stock and cash amounting to something more than a million of doUais. 
The management of this fund is committed to a *' Board of Literatare," 
composed of the Governor, Charles Manly, David W. Stone, and Wil* 
liam A. Blount. 

Intxrnal Improvxmknt. 

The Internal Improvement Fund of this State amounts to mboat 
1^1,000,000, principally invested in stocks and in money lent upon 
bond. The Board of Internal Improvement consists of Governor Dud- 
ley, Cadwallader Jones, and William D. Mosely. 

A considerable number of charters for railroads have been granted 
by the legislature of this State ; but two only which lie wholly within 
the State, have yet been commenced. 

The Raleigh and Gaston Railroad ; incorporated in December, 1835 ; — 
extending from Raleigh to Gaston on the Roanoke, where it unites 
with the Petersburg Railroad ; -^ 86 miles long ; — estimated cost, 
at from $800,000 to $1,000,000.— The work was begun at the Roa- 
noke ; one half of it is expected to be completed before the end of the 
year 1837; and the remainder in 1838. 

The Wilmington and Raleigh Railroad ; — incorporated in December, 
1835; — extending from Weldon, on the. Roanoke, where it unites 
witli the Portsmouth and Roanoke Railroad, to Wilmington; — itq 
miles long; — estimated cost, including cars, locomotive engines 
wharves, &c., also steamboats between Wilmington and Charleston, 
$1,600,000. — One half of the work is expected to be completed before 
the end of the year 1837, and the remainder in 1838. 

The LouisviUe, Cineinnatij and CharlesUm RaUroadt as projected 
intersects the Western part of this State. 

The Fayetteville and Western Railroad Company has been incorpo- 
rated, with a design of constructing a railroad from Fayetteville to the 
Tadkin, near the Narrows ; with one branch to be extended from that 
point to the Louisville, Cincinnati, and Charleston Railroad, and an- 
other to be constructed up the valley of the Tadkin to Wilkesborough. 
Surveys of these roads are now making. 



1838.] irOKTB CAROLIITA. 881 

The PtttT^mrg and RooMoke^ and the PorUmoutk and Roanoke JlotZ- 
roadsy extending from the towns of Petenborg and Portsmouth, in 
Virginia, to the Roanoke in N. C, are completed; — 12 miles of the 
former, and 17 of the latter are in this State. 

Appropriation of the portion of the Surplus Revenue belonging to 
this State by the legislature, at its last session, as stated by the " Fay- 
etteville Observer " : 

'* The leading measures of the session have been, the reception of 
our share of the surplus money ; the appropriation of $ 400,000 of it 
to the Fayetteville and Western Railroad ; $ 500,000 to the Wilming- 
ton and Raleigh Railroad ; and 2-5ths of the estimated cost of a road 
from Beaufort to Fayetteville (' provided individuals be found willing 
to invest the remaining 3-5thB ') \ |^200,000 to draining the Swamp 
Lands ; $ 300,000 to an increase of the capital of the Bank of Cape 
Fear, with the privilege of increasing the amount of individual stock 
^400,000 more ; the perfecting of a complete Digest of the whole 
Statute Law of the State; and last, but not least, the devotion of 
$1,000,000 to the Literary Fund, together with all future dividends 
firom works of Internal Improvement." 

Tax Statb-Hovsk. 

The State-House now building at Raleigh, of hewn granite, is ex- 
pected to be completed in about two years, and will be one of the best 
edifices of the kind in the country. The walls are finished ; and the 
sum already expended on the edifice is about $ 325,000 ; and the entire 
cost of the building and furniture, when completed, will probably ex- 
ceed 1^500,000. Its length is 160 feet ; ita width, including the porti- 
ooffy 140 ; the height from the floor of the rotunda to the top of the 
staff 101, from the basement floor to the granite balnstrade wluoh 
■urmounts the dome, 100, and of the exterior walls 60 feet The eol- 
nmns are 5 feet 2^ inches in diameter, standing on a basement 16 feet 
high. The proportions and entablature are copied from the ParthenoA. 

COTTOV MAVUrACTVBXS. 

Cotton factories are rapidly springing up in this State ; but, with two 
or three exceptions, are confined to the spinning of cotton yam. The 
two oldest cotton factories are, one at the falls of Tar River, in Edge- 
combe county, established in 1818, and another near Lfncolnton, in 
1822. Factories have since been established at Mocksville, Greensbor- 
oogh, Fayetteville, Lexington, Salem, Milton, and in the counties of 
Orange and Randolph. Arrangements are in progress for establishing 
similar works in various other places. 



239 SOUTH CAROLINA. [1838. 

XIV. SOUTH CAROLINA. 

GOYKRimXHT. 

Salary. 
PiXRCK M. BuTLXR, Govcmor ; (term of office expires 

December, 1838,) $3,500 

William Daboee, Lieut,- Governor. 

B.H. Saxon, of Abbeville Dial. Secretary of StaU, Fees. 

John T. Seiblea, of Lexington Dist. Surveyor- General, Fees. 

R. Barnwell Smith, of Charleston, Attorney- General, 900 

William Laval, « Comptroller- General, 2,000 

George Walker, of Edgefield, Superint, Public Works, 1,200 

W. £. Hayne, of Charleston, Treasurer, 2,000 

Joseph Black, of Columbia, do, ... 1,600 

Charles J. Colcock, of Charleston, Pres, Bank of State of S, C, 3,000 

Patrick Noble, of Abbeville, President of the Senate, 

David L. Wardlaw, ** Speaker of the House of RepresetUaUces. 





Judiciary. 








GuaueUors in Equity 


• 








Appointed. 


Salai7. 


Heniy W. Desanssure, 


of Columbia, 


1808, 


•3,500 


Job Johnson, 


of Newberry, 


1830, 


3.000 


William Harper, 


of Fairfield, 


1835, 


3.000 


David Johnson, 


of Columbia, 


1835, 


3,600 


Judges of ths General Sessions and Common Pleas, 








Anwintod. 


Salsrr. 


Rlihn U. Bay, 


of Charleston, 


1791, 


$2,572 


Robert Gantt, 


of Greenville, 


' 1815, 


3,600 


John S. Richardson, 


of Sumter, 


1818, 


3,500 


Josiah J. Evans, 


of Society Hill, 


1829, 


2,500 


Baylis J. Earle, 


of Greenville, 


1830, 


2,500 


A. Pickens Butler, 


of Edgefield, 


1834, 


2,500 


J. B. O'Neall, 


of Newberry, 


1835, 


3,000 


W. R. Hill, 


of Columbia, Reporter, 


1,500 



In December, 1835, a change was made in the judiciary of this 
State, though the judges remain the same. The old Court of Appeals, 
composed of three judges, was abolished, and two of the judges were 
made chancellors in equity, and the other, one of the common law 
judges, or a judge of the Sessions and Common Pleas. 

Appeal Courts of Law are held by the Law Judges at Charleston, on 
the 1st Monday in February ; and at Columbia on the first Monday in 



183a] 



SOUTH CAROLUIA. 



233 



May, and the fourth Monday in Noyember. Appeal Conrti of Equity 
are held by the Chancellora at the same times and phicea. 

A Court for the Correction of Errors, composed of all the Judges of 
JLaw and Equity, is held to consider all questions on which either of 
the Appeal Courts is divided. 

Ihtbrital Improykment. 

In the Almanac for 1837, a particular notice may be seen of various 
canals and railroads which have been completed or projected in this 
SUte. 

Louumlle^ Cincinnati, and Charleston Railroad. 

The stockholders of this great proposed work met at Knozville, Jan- 
uary 9th, 1837, and the following persons were chosen Directors of the 
Company : — Edward D. Mansfield, William Green, Joseph Bonsall, 
Ohio; Robert Wickliffe, William H. Richardson, James Taylor, John 
W. Tibbatts, Israel L. Ludlow, John fi. Casey, Ken,; John Williams, 
J. G. M. Ramsay, Alexander E. Smith, T^enn,; Jas. F. E. Hardy, 
Thomas J. Forney, Peregrine Roberts, JV. C. ; Robert T. Hayne, James 
Hamilton, Charles Edmondston, Mitchell King, Benjamin T. Elmore, 
A. Blanding, John C. Calhoun, John W. Simpson, Robert G. Mills, 
S. a. — Robert T. Hayne, President, Major W. G. McNeU, Chief En- 
ginser. Captain W, G. Williams, Associate Engineer. 

A resolution was passed authorizing and directing the Directors to 
cause surreys of several routes to be made, and be ready to report on 
the final location of the road at the next meeting of the Company. 

According to the Report of the committee on Finance the number of 
shares subscribed for, and the money paid in on the Ist of January, 1837, 
were as follows : — 



1 

1 


Sharei. 


Amooat. 


Paid in. 


Subscribed in South Carolina, 
« Tennessee, 
<* Kentucky, 
" North Carolina, 
" Cincinnati, 

Total, , 


35,251 

3,613 

2,882 

1,284 

302 


$3,625,100 

361,300 

288,200 

128,400 

30,200 


$176,256 

18,065 

14,410 

6,420 

1,510 


43,332 


$4,333,200 


$216,660 



Padpxrism. 

Paupers in this State are supported at the expense of the inhabitants 
of the several districts to which they belong; but there are no returns 
from the different districts, from which the number of paupers or the 
expense of supporting them can be ascertained. 

20* 



234 SOUTH CAROLINA. [1838. 

The number of persons supported in the poor-house in the cifj of 
Charleston, during the year ending August Slst, 1836, was 373, of 
whom 171 were foreigners ; and the number of outdoor pennonen 
to whom rations were granted during the same period, was 18D, of 
whom 90 were foreigners. 



XV. GEORGIA. 

GOVXRNIIXNT. 



William Scblbt, of Augusta, Governor; (term of office > ^^ ^^^ 
expires November, 1837,) 5 9^^^ 

William A. Tenille, of Washington Co., Seerttary of SUUe, 2,000 

Thomas Haynes, of Hancock Co. Treasurer, 2,000 

John G. Park, of Gwinette Co. Comptroller- (hnerdl, 2,000 

John Brewster, of Houston Co. Surveyor- OonereU, 2,000 

The officers of the ezecutiye goyernment are required by law to 
reside, during their term of office, at MilledgeTille. 



Robert M. Echols, Walton Co. President of the Senate. 

Arthur A. Morgan, Houston Co. Secretary of the Senate, ^ 500 

Joseph Day, Jones Co. Speaker of House of Rep. 

Joseph Sturgis, Talbotton, Clerk cf House of Mep. 500 

JUDICIABT. 

The Steto is diyided into ten Circuits, with a judge for each Circuit. 

Salary. 
Vacant, Judge of the Eastern Circuit, $2,100 

John Schley, of Louisville, do. Middle Circuit, 2,100 

G. W. Andrews, Washington, do. Northern Circuit, 2,100 

Th. W. Harris, Walton Co. do. Western Circuit, 2,100 

John G. Polhill, Milledgeville, do. Oakmulgee Circuit, 2,100 

Arthur A. Morgan, Houston Co. do. Southern Circuit, 2,100 

Angus M. D. King, Forsyth, do. Flint Circuit, 2,100 

Alfred Iverson, Columbus, do. Chattehoochee Cir. 2,100 

Owen H. Kenan, Coweta Co. do. Cherokee Circuit, 2,100 

Hiram Warner, Talbotton, do, Cowete Circuit, 2,100 

Ebenezer Stearns, Auguste, Attorney- General, $ 250 and perquisites. 

Charles S. Henry, Judge of the Court of Oyer and Terminer, Savannah. 
John W. Wilde, Judge if the Court of Oyer and Terminer, Augusta. 



1838.] exoBOiA. 935 

hrferior CourL An inferior eonrt ii held in eaeh eovntj, composed 
of fiye joatices, elected by the people cTery foor yesn. These courts 
possess the powers of Courts of Probate. The justices have no salary. 

GaOLOOICAL SURVXT. 

A geological surrey of this State is now in progress hy Professor J. 
R. Cotting, who has been appointed State Geologist. 

Pauperism. 

Paupers in this State are supported by the seyeral counties in which 
they reside, and a tax, called the ** poor-tax," is levied on the inhabit- 
ants for this purpose ; but no returns have been published, by which 
the number of paupers or the expense of supporting them can be ascer- 
tained. 

IlTTXRlTAL ImPROTXHBHT. 

Seyeral railroads, in progress or projected, were noticed in the 
American Almanac for 1837. 

The Central Railroad o/XSeorgia, about 200 miles in length, is design- 
ed to connect the cities of Savannah and Macon, passing in its route 
in the vicinity of the towns of Louisville, Sandersville, Irwioton, and 
Milledgeville ; to accommodate a rich cotton-growing country, through 
which Jt is to pass; and to unite with the "Western and Atlantic 
Railroad'* about to be begun by the State, leading from Tennessee 
state line to the Chattahoochee River, effecting thus a communication 
between the Southwestern States and the Atlantic. 

A charter was granted, in 1834, with a capital of ( 2,000,000 ; and in 
1835 it was amended, granting to the corporation banking privileges, 
and increasing the capital to $ 3,000,000. The work was commenced 
in November, 1836, with a force of about 1,000 men. In July, 1837, 
the grading of 21 miles was completed ; the rails were laid on 12 miles ; 
and on the 4th of July, the passenger-car for the first time carried pas- 
sengers over the distance of 7 miles. 

It has been ascertained that the whole distance is practicable without 
exceeding an inclination of 21 feet in a mile. It is now to be graded 
for a single track, with sidelings and turns-out at proper distances. An 
additional distance of 30 or 40 miles was designed to be put under conn^ 
tract in September ; and 70 miles are expected to be completed early 
in the season of 1838. 

The greater part of the stock of this railroad is owned by the citizens 
of Savannah and its vicinity, being mostly held in Yery small sums. 
The number of stockholders, according to the Report, dated April 10th, 
1837, was 655. 



296 ALABAMA. [1838. 

XVI. ALABAMA. 

GOVERIVMEKT. 

Salarr. 
Arthur P. Bagbt, of Monroe, Governor, (term of office expires ) ^^ ^wy. 

1 8t Monday in Nov. 1839,) j 9^»^^ 

Thomas B. Tunstall, Secretary of State , 1,000 and leea. 

Jefferson C. Vandyke^ Comptroller of Public Jeeountt, 1,000 

William Hawn, State Treasurer, 1,000 

John D. Phelan, JSttorney-Generalf 425 and perqataites. 

The Governor and other principal executive officers reside at Tuska- 
loosa. The Secretary of State is elected for two years ; and the Comp- 
trollers and Treasurer, annually ; — all by a joint vote of tha two 
Houses of the General Assembly. 

The Senate consists of 30 members, elected for three years ; the 
House of Representatives of 91 members, elected annually. The pay of 
the members of both Houses is $4 a day each. 

JUDICIART. 

Supreme Court, 

Salary. 
Henry W. Collier, of Tuskaloosa, Chief Justice , $2,250 

Henry Goldthwaite, of Mobile, Jissodate JustiUj 2,250 

John J. Ormond, do. 2,^0 

Circuit Courts, 

SUary. 

Ptolemy T. Harris, of St. Stephens, Judge of the 1st Circuit, $2,000 

Ezekiel Pickens, of Selma, 

Peter Martin, of Tuskaloosa, 

John J. Coleman, of Florence, 

George W. Lane, of Huntsville, 

Anderson Cranshaw, of Butler C. H. 

Samuel Chapman, of Sumter C. H. 

Wm. D. Pickett, of Montgomery, 

Eli Shortridge, of Talladega, 

The judges of the Supreme and Circuit Courts are elected by a joint 
vote of the two Houses of the General Assembly, for 7 or 6 years. — The 
Supreme Court has appellate jurisdiction only, — and only upon points 
of law, taken up from the Circuit or County Courts by writ of error. 
This court sits at Tuskaloosa, the seat of government, on the Ist Mon- 
days of January and June ; and it commonly sits 6 or 8 weeks at each 
term. The opinions of the Court are delivered in writing, and publish- 
ed by the reporter. 



do. 


2d 


do. 


2,000 


do. 


3d 


do. 


2,000 


do. 


4th 


do. 


2,000 


do. 


5th 


do. 


1,500 


do. 


6th 


do. 


2,000 


do. 


7th 


do. 


2,000 


do. 


8th 


do. 


2,000 


do. 


9th 


do. 


2,000 



1838.] 



ALABAMA. 



837 



The Cireoit Coort ham origiDftl jurisdiction in all ciTil and oriminal 
causes in the State; and appellate jurisdiction in all appeals and 
certiororis brought up from inferior tribunals. This Court has also full 
chancery powers, the Circuit Judge being indeed the Chancellor. 

This State is divided into 9 circuits, each circuit comprising about 6 
counties. There are two ridiugs ; one called the springi and the other 
the bU term ; and each tei^ occupies about 8 weeks. Each circuit has 
a solicitor or State's attorney, who prosecutes throughout the circuit all 
offenders, and recelTes for his services ( 250 and fees. 

Pauperism. 

There are but few paupers in this State. They are supported at the 
expense of the counties in which they severally reside ; and the judge 
and commiisioners annually set apart a portion of the county tax for a 
poor-fund. 

Intbrval Improvkmxmt. 

A correspondent states, that under this head, '* Nothing new is to be 
added to what is contained in the Almanac for 1837, except that, with 
regard to the Manigomery and Chattahoochee RaUroadf 76 miles long, the 
work is still in progress, most of it under contract, and about 15 miles 
completed." 

CoTTov Cbop or Alabama ih 1836. 

EsUmated amount in North Alabama, 80,000 bales \ all sold and ship- 
ped at New Orleans ; — in South Alabama, 250,000 bales, each weigh- 
ing about 450 pounds; all sent to Mobile, and mostly sold there by 
factors. 

State aho Cobditiob or tbb several Banks or thb State, 

June, 1837. 



Bankfl and Branches. 


Cap. Stock. 


Specie io 
Vault. 


Notes in 
Circulation. 


Prof, since 
JNov. 1836. 


Bajik of th« State of Alabama, 

Branch at Mobile, 

Branch at Montgomery, 

Branch at Decatur, . 

Branch at HQatsTille, . 

Bank of Mobile, .... 

Plaoure & Merchants* Bk. of Mobile, 


1,207,886 
8,300,000 
683,000 
1,500,000 
1,000,000 
1,500,000 

i,75i,pao 


S89,499 
79,794 
96,950 
10,777 
75,356 
159,913 
100,185 


780,094 
1,684,763 
833,000 
751,885 
538,010 
691,909 
300,365 


85,889 
318,867 
149,000 
106,820 

68,063 
904,7SS 

50,909 


$10,141,806 


$751,772 


$5,569,096 


$965,600 



238 uusissiFPi. [189& 

XVII. MISSISSIPPI. 

GoTERMMEirT. 

Salary. 
Cbarles Ltkch, Governor; — (term of office from Jannanr, \^o euv\ 

1836, to January, 1838,) J v-**^**" 

Barry W. Benton, Secretary of StaU, 1,200 

Charlet C. May ton, State Treasurer, l^Q 

John H. Mallory, Auditor of PtMic AceounU, i;aOO 

The regular meeting of the Legislature is on the 1st Monday of Jan- 
uary biennially. — The Governor holds his office for two years from the 
time of his election, the 1st Monday in November and the day follow- 
ing ; but he does not enter upon his duties till the meeting of the Legis- 
lature, on the 1st Monday in January ; and from November to Janoarj 
the duties of governor devolve upon the President of the Senate. 

JUDICIART. 

High Court of Errors and Appeals. 

Salary. 
William L. Sharkey, ofVicksburg, Presiding Judge, (2,000 

Cotesworth P. Smith, of Woodville, Judge, 2,000 

Daniel W. Wright, of Columbus, do. 2,000 

Matthew D. Patton, of Jackson, AUomey-Oeneral, 1,000 

This court, which has no jurisdiction, except what properly belongs 
to a Court of Errors and Appeals, holds its sessions annually at Jackson, 
commencing on the Ist Monday in December and January. 

Superior Court of Chancery, 

Salary. 
Edward Turner, of Franklin Co. Chancellor, 2,000 

T. B. J. Hadley, of Jackson, Clerk. 

This court, which has jurisdiction over all matters, pleas, aqd com- 
plaints whatsoever, belonging to or cognizable in a Court of Equity, 
holds two sessions annually, beginning on the 1st Monday in Januaij 
and July. 





CircwX 


Court. 






* 








Salary. 


William S. Bodley, 


Ist District) 


Judge, 


$2,000 


John M. Maury, 


2d do. 




do. 


2,000 


James Walker, 


3d do. 




do. 


2,000 


Thomas A. Willis, 


4th do. 




do. 


2,000 


Thomas S. Sterling, 


5th do. 




do. 


2,000 


James F. Trotter, 


6th do. 




do. 


2,000 


Hulling, 


7th do. 




do. 


2,000 



183a] 



MISSISSIPPI, 



Tbe State is divided into 7 circuits or districts, and one judge and a 
diBtrict attorney are chosen every four years by the electors of each 
district > and a circuit court is holden in each county twice eveiy year. 
This court has original jurisdiction in civil cases, in which the sum in 
controversy exceeds $50, 

Criminal Court, establi^ud in 1836. 

John I. Guion, Judge, Salary, #2,000 

This court has jurisdiction in the five southwestern counties, which 
border on the Mississippi, viz. Warren, Claiborne, Jefferson, Adams, 
and Wilkinson. This is the only criminal court in the State ; in the 
other counties the circuit courts have criminal jurisdiction. 

Paupesism. 

Paupers in this State are supported by the counties in which they 
respectively reside ; and for this purpose the board of police of each 
county makes an annual appropriation ; but, as no returns are made, 
neither the number of paupers, nor the expense of supporting them, can 
be ascertained. The number, however, is very small. 

Railroads, — in progress. 



Name. 



Miniwippi, 
Vickabaif, 
JacksoD and 

Brmtukni, 
W. Feliciana, 
Grand Gnlf fc 

PortGibion, 



Inc. 



1836 
1636 

1836 
1836 

1636 



From 



Natchnx 
Vickabarg 

Jaekion 
Woodville 

Grand OuU 



To 



Canton 
Clinton 

Brandon 

St. Franciaville 

PortGibwn 



Length. 
Miloa. 



1 50 
54 

14 
38 



Estimated 
Cott. 



Bemarka. 



$3,000,000 r)0 m under contract. 
|A11 under contract. 
I [1838. 

950,000 To be finiahed in 
All under contract. 



Railroads, 


— im 


wrporaied. 






Name. 


Inc. 

1836 
1836 
1837 
1837 


From 


To 


Length. 
Mile*. 


Mississippi and Alabama, 
Lake Washington & Deer Creek, 
Columbus and Aberdeen, 
1 Manchester and Benton, 


Brandon 
Princeton 
Columbus 
Manchester 


Mobile 
Deer Creek 
Aberbeen 
Benton 


20 
14 



The JVIn0 Orleans and yashviUe Railroad, extending from New Or- 
leans to Nashville, 564 miles, will, when completed, pass through 
Mississippi from north to south ; and it was incorporated by this State 
in 1837. 

The JVoicAez and WoodviUe Railroad, a branch of the Mississippi Rail- 
Toad, extending from Natchez to Woodville, 41 miles, has been pro- 
jected. 

A branch from Monticello to the Mississippi Railroad has been also 
projected. 



240 



MI98I88IPn. 



[183& 



OrriciAL Rkturn or thk Ckhsos or Mississippi, ik 1837. 
TtUcm inpursuanee of an AU of the LegishUuref approfoed Janwary 20, 1837. 



Namei 
ofCoontiee. 


Male 
Slaves. 


Female 
Slaves. 


Free white 
inhabit- 
ants. 


Acres of 
land cul- 
tivated in 
1836. 


Bales of 
ootUM pro- 
duced in 
1836. 


CooBt J He«t» 


Adaou, 


6,566 


6,669 


S'S? 


70,913 


34,964 


Natches. 


Amite, 


9,500 


9,476 


3,390 


34,585 


8,7M 


Liberty. 


Attala. 


374 


334 


1,713 


4,137 


195 


Attakk C. H. 


Bolivar, 


399 


305 


945 


3,960 


935 




Garroll, 


9,986 


9,977 


4,070 


97,360 


6,961 


CarroIhoB. 


Cbickaiaw, 


118 


113 


699 


1,196 






Chocuw, 


474 


485 


9,484 


6,901 


589 


Greensboroogk. 


Claiborne, 


4,433 


4,439 


3,196 


56,049 


25,183 


PortGibMO. 


Clarke, 


965 


938 


1,330 


3,564 


326 


Clarke C. H. 


Copiah, 


1,655 


1,733 


4,647 


99,370 


7,499 


Gallatin. 


CotiagtoB, 


371 


495 


1,850 


9,184 


1,133 


WilliamslNiig. 


DeSoto, 




*889 


1,942 


3,640 


101 




Franklin, 


l<a54 


1,993 


2,066 


19,969 


6,049 


Meadvillo. 


Ckeene, 
HaneocK, 


179 


918 


1,046 


3,578 


109 


LeakeviUe. 


357 


363 


1,755 


9,374 


167 


Hancock C. H. , 


Hinds, 


7,059 


6,870 


7,501 


65,519 


96,496 


Raymond. 


Holmei. 
ItawamiM, 


9,583 


9,478 


9,959 


30,6a5 


9,591 


LezinftoB. 


99 


91 


1,470 


1,848 


53 




Jackson, 


199 


194 


1,319 


9,382 


4 


Jackson C. H. 


i"p«'» 

Jefferson, 


365 


410 


1,570 


6,347 


876 


Jasper C. H. 


4,183 


4,107 


9,960 


50,097 


99,031 


Payette. 


Jones, 


49 


59 


1,017 


1,976 


193 


Elliflvillo. 


Kemper, 
Koanoma, 


1,003 


1,130 


3,380 


10,513 


1,769 


DeKalb. 


159 


145 


564 


1,551 


119 




Lafitvette, 
Lauderdale, 


751 


700 


3,498 


4,879 


405 




949 


995 


1,899 


34>5 


198 


LanderdaloCH. 


Lawrence, 


1,156 


1,066 


5,919 


90,855 


3,855 


Montieello. 


Leake, 


336 


915 


1,136 


3,114 


13 


Leake C. H. 


Lowndes, 


3,767 


3,595 


5,495 


37,907 


5,797 


C^olombne. 


Madison, 


5,448 


5,790 


3,695 


87,746 


30,873 


Canton. 


Marion, 
Marshail, 


775 


779 


1,940 


13,894 


9,037 


Columbia. 


9,663 


9,561 


8,974 


24,696 


1,5S6 


Athens. 


Monroe, 


1,173 


1,155 


4,165 


91,485 


9,589 




Neshoba, 


154 


159 


638 


1,639 


66 


Neshoba C. H. 


Newton, 


917 


909 


1,506 


9,706 


76 




Noxubee, 


9,9H9 


9,76 


3,189 


&S729 


6,876 


Maeon. 


Oetibbeha, 


767 


719 


1,393 


7,009 


483 


Starkville. 


Perry, 


908 


994 


1,368 


5,405 


2r> 


Augusta. 


Pike. 
Pottola, 


1,055 


1,110 


3,745 


93,829 


3,638 


Homesvill*. 


590 


419 


1,996 


4,41 4* 


365 




Pontotoc, 


593 


568 


1,571 


5,518 






Rankin, 


993 


963 


3,955 


15,043 


9,997 


Brandon. 


Scott, 


116 


194 


818 


2.910 


154 


Srotl C. H. 


Simpson, 


41B 


473 


9,329 


11,214 


1,519 


Weitville. 


Smith, 


135 


167 


1,085 


2,554 


137 


Smith C. H. 


TallahtteUe, 


7R^ 


749 


1,393 


11,780 


9,529 


Coffeeville. 


Tipoah, 
Tishaminfo, 


595 


669 


3,993 


4,820 


413 




89 


99 


9,468 


2,'01 




1 


Tunica, 














Warren, 


4,841 


4,845 


5,965 


49,718 


25,132 


Vicksbnrg. 


Washington, 


9.9K0 


9,H99 


775 


96,130 


13,605 


Princeton. i 


Wayne, 
WiDdnson, 


413 


434 


993 


6,224 


640 


Winchester. 


4,706 


4,888 


3,972 


67,979 


30,579 


Woodville. 


Winston, 


84 


475 


9,392 


6,591 


139 


Louisville. 1 


Talabndia, 


9,081 


9,131 


4,355 


25,409 


4,486 


YalabnshaC.H.' 


Taaoo, 


4,9.14 


4,947 


3,433 


63,095 


23,453 


Benton. 


81, :i8 


82,555 


144,351 


1,048,5:10 


317,783 



• All the Slaves. 



1838.J MISSISSIPPI. 241 

Free white inhabitonts, ^. 144,351 

Slaves, , 164^ 

Total 308,744 

^White Males over the age of 45, 6,103 

White Males between 21 and 45, . 30,594 

While Males betweenlS and 21, . '. 4,541 

White Males under 18 years of age, 36,181 

White Females over 16 years of age, 27,834 

White Females under 16 years of age, .... 82,461 

JVble. — ^TheL above numbers are given as they are stated in the " offi- 
cial return "; though there is a want of agreement between the number 
oftohUe inhabitants f and the sum of the several divisions of them. 

The number of slaves in the several counties is stated <* as returned " ; 
bat the Secretary of State gives **by calculation " a different number 
w^ith respect to 25 of the counties. 



XVIII. LOUISIANA. 

Government. 

Salary. 
Edward D. Wbite, Oovemar; (from Jan. 1835 to Jan. 1839,) ^7,500 
M. Blache, Secretary of State, .... 2,500 

F. Gardere, Treasurer ; 4 per cent, on all moneys received. 

Louis Bringier, Surveyor- General, 800 

Claudius Crozet, Civil Engineer, 5,000 

P. F. Smith, Adjutant and Inspector- General, . 2,000 
, Attorney- General f .... 3,000 

Senate; 17 members, elected for two years. C. Derbigny, President. 

House of Representatives ; 50 members, elected for two years. 

Judiciary. 

Judges ef the Supreme Court. Francis X. Martin, Henry A. Bullard, 
and H. Carleton. Salary of each, ^ 5,000. Thomas Curry, Reporter. 

Judge of the Criminal Court of the City of New Orleans. John F. 
Canonge. 

Judges of the District Courts. — Salary of each, $3,000. 

£ Mazeureau, 1st District. Seth Lewis, 5th District. 



J. C. Nichols, 2d do. 

J. Gibbs Morgan, 3d do. 



H. Boyce, 6th do. 

E. K. Wilson, 7th do. 



Cooley, 4th do. | Jesse R. Jones, 8th do. 

21 



24^ LouiBiAiTA. L183a ' 

PROTISIOIf FOR TBI PoOR. 

There are no poor-houses or almshouses in this State, and yery few 
poor. In the citj of New Orleans, the sick-poor are supplied with 
every thing necessary at tlie large Charity Hospital, which provides 
annually for as many as about 8,000 or 9,000 in-door and out-door 
patients. 

The three Orphan Asylums support and educate, and then bind out. 
the orphans of the poor. Two of these institutions are well endowed 
by public and private charity. 

INTEttNAL IMPROVEMENT. 

Canals. 

1. Orleans Bank Canal ; — length, 4| miles ; — cost, $952,433. It 
connects New Orleans with Lake Pontchar train. It commenced ia 
1837, with an income of ^ 300 per week. 

2. Canal Carondclct; — length, 2 miles ; — original cost, $ 200,000 ; 
four times that amount since expended ; — income during six months, 
in 1836, S 36,055. — It connects New Orleans with Lake Pontcbar- 
train through the Bayou St. John, which is 4 miles long. 

3. Canal Barataria ; — length, 22 miles ; — cost of Part 1st, $200,000 ; 
— It connects the Mississippi, 6 miles above New Orleans, with the 
Lafourche ; thence through the Lakes to Berwick's Bay ; thence to 
the sea by Barataria. It consists of four parts, 22 miles in all ; one 
part, 2^ miles long, finished. 

. Railroads — coMPi.ETfiD. 

1 . Pontehartrain Railroad ; — 4^ miles long ; — original cost, $ 200,000 ; 
income spent on improvements, «&c., now valued at $ 500,000. Semi- 
annual dividend in 1836, on this sum, 4 per cent. 

2. CarroUton Railroad and City Branches ; — length, 11 1 miles; — 
cost, $293,147; revenue, about 14 per cent. It connects Kew Orleans 
with CarroUton, GJ| miles distant ; with Lafayette, 2 miles distant ; and 
suburbs. 

3. Orleans-Street Railroad ; — length, IJ miles ; — cost, $ 12,000. It 
connects New Orleans through Orleans Street, with the Bayou St. John. 

Railroads — in Progress. 

1. St. FrandsviUe and Woodville Railroad; — length, 27 miles; — 
capital, $ 500,000. It connects St. Francisville with Woodville, Mis. ; 
and is connected with a Bank. 

2. Jfew Orleans and JVashviUe Railroad ; — length, 564 miles ; — 
capiUl, $10,000,000. To extend from New Orleans to Nashville, Ten. 



i 



1S38.] i^ouisiANA. 243 

It was in 1896 surveyed throaghoat ; laid out to the state line, 80 miles ; 
and 20 miles under contract. 

3. JYeto Orleans and Lake Borgne RaHroad ; — length, 20 miles; 

capital, $ 200,000. This is an extension of the Fontchartrain Railroad. 

4. Atdtafalaya Rai/roarf ; — length, 30 miles ; — capital, $500,000. 
It connects Point Couple with Opelousas; proposed to he extended to 
the Sabine, 150 miles, and to have a branch to Cheney ville. 

5. Alexandria and CheneyvilU Railroad ; — length, 30 miles ;"— capi- 
tal, $500,000. To extend from Cheney ville to Afexandria on Red 
River. 

6. Port Hudson, Jackson^ and Clinton Railroad ; — length, 28 miles ; 
— capital, $400,000. To connect Port Hudson, on the Mississippi, 
livith Jackson, Clinton, &c. 

7. Baton Rouge and Clinton Railroad ; — length, 20 miles; capital, 
9 250,000. To connect Baton Rouge with Clinton, &c. 

Railroads — projected. 

1. JVew Orleans and Bayou Sara Railroad ; — length, 101 miles ; — 
capiUl,$ 1,400,000. 

2. JVew Orleans and English Turn Railroad ; — length, A^ miles ; — 
capiUl, $60,000. 

3. Springfield and Uherty Railroad; — length, 30 miles; capital, 
^200,000. To extend from Springfield to Liberty. 

4. Lake Borgne Railroad ; — length, 22 miles ; — capital, $ 176,000. 
To connect New Orleans with Lake Borgne. 

5. Livingston Railroad. 

6. Lake Providence Railroad ; — length, 100 miles ; — capital, 
$800,000. To extend from Providence, on the Mississippi, to the 
great raft on Red River, and Rigolet Bon Dieu. 

7. Iberville Railroad. To extend from the town of Plaquemtne, on 
the Mississippi, to the head waters of the Bayou Plaquemine. 

Other Public Works. 

1. Commercial Bank Water- Works ; — length of pipe, about 12 miles ; 
— cost, when finished, $455,000. These works belong to the Commer- 
cial Bank Charter. They are for the use of the inhabitants, and for 
watering the streets of the city. The water is drawn from the river 
by a steam-engine to a reservoir on a mound 20 or 30 feet high, above 
the city ; — thence conveyed by pipes through the city. 

2. City JFater- Works ; — length of pipe, 1 mile; — cost, $110,000 : 
used exclusively to keep water running through the gutters in hot 
weather. The water is pumped by a steam-engine from the river. 

3. Draining Company; — two steam-engines; — capital $640,000. 
The object is to drain the swamps between the city and Lake Fontchar- 



244 



LOUISIANA. 



[183& 



train, containing an extent of about 35 eqaare miles, on the same plan 
that is adopted in Holland, by hydraulic machines. The profits are 
derived from the increased value of the lands drained. These lands, 
which are reclaimed from an inundation of several feet of water, are 
very valuable, and are under excellent cultivation with cane. 

There are many other important public works in successful operation 
in the State, as the removal of obstructions to navigation in the rivers 
Atchafalaya, Amite, Plaquemine, &c. 



XIX. TENNESSEE. 



GOVERNHKRT. 

Governor ; (term of office expires ) ^ q /wi 

October, 1839,) J • "^'^^ 

Secretary of State, . #750 and fees. 

Treasurer of the State. 

The legislature consists of a Senate of 25 members, and a House of 
Repreaentatives of 75 members ; all elected for two years. The mem- 
bers of the present legislature were elected in August, 1837. — Pay of 
the Senators and Representatives, $ 4 a day. 



Newtov Cahnok, 

Luke Lea, Jun., 
Miller Francis, 



JUDICIART. 

The Judges of the Supreme Court are elected by a joint vote of the 
two Houses of the General Assembly for the term of 12 years ', and 
those of the inferior courts, in the same manner, for the term of 8 yean. 



William B. Turley, 
William B. Reese, 
Nathan Green, 



Supreme Court. 

Salary, 
of Bolivar, Judge, Western Dimsion, f 1,600 

ofKnoxville, do. Eastern Division , 1,800 
of Winchester, do. Middle Division, 1,800 



Court of Chancery, 

Pleasant M. Miller, of Jackson, Chancellor, Western Division, 1,500 

Th. L. Williams, ofKnoxville, do. Eastern do, 1,500 

L. M. Bramlett, of Pulaski, do. Middle do. 1,500 



L 



1838.] 



tenhesske. 



245 



Circuit CouTtM. 

The State comprises 11 circuits, and the judges were elected in Jan- 
uary, 1836. ~ Salary of each judge, $ 1,300. 



I. Samoel Powell, of Ro(enviIl«. 

a. Edward Scott, of Knoxville. 

3. Charin F. Keith, of Athene. 

4. Abnhem Carothera, of Carthage. 

& Samoel AodeiaoQ, of Morf^eeeboro*. 
6. Wm. T. BrowD, of Naahville. 



7. Mortimer A. Martio. 

8. Edmund Dillahuntj, 

9. John W. Cooke, 

10. John Read. 

11. Aoalia Miller. 



of Columbia. 
of Parte. 



XX. KENTUCKY. 

GOTIRNMIRT. 



Salary. 



James Clark, of Winchester, Ctottmor^ (term of office expire* > ^o raa 
in September, 1840,) J V-^fSW 



Charles A. Wicklifie, of Bardstown, Lieut.- OovemoTy ^ Speaker ) 
of the Senate : — 06 a day while presiding over the Senate. 5 

James M. Bullock, of Shelby ville. Secretary of State ^ 

Benjamin Selby, Frankfort, Editor of Public Recounts , 



John M. Foster, do. 

James Davidson, do. 

Thomas S. Theobald, do. 

Peter Dudley, do. 

John Woods, do. 

George A. Robertson, do. 



1,000 
1,500 
1,600 
1,500 



Register of the Land- Office, 
Treasurer f 
Keeper of the Peniten. (^ the profits.) 
Adjutant- General^ 150 

Quartermaster- General j 150 



State Lihrarian, 250 

The Senate consists of 38 members, elected for four years, one fourth 
being elected every year. The House of RepresetUativea consists of 
100, elected annually on the 1st Monday in August. Pay $ 3.00 a day. 



JUDICIART. 



Court of Appeals. 



George Robertson, of Lexington, 

Ephraim M. Ewing, of Ruseellville, 

Thomas A. Marshall, of Lexington, 

Jacob Swigert, of Frankfort, 
Charles S. Morehead, do. 

James C. Coleman, do. 



James G. Dana, 



do. 



Chief Justice, 
Judge^ 
do. 

Clerk, 
Attorney- Gen, 



Salary. 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
Fees 
400 & ftes. 



Sergeanty $ 2 a day while at^ 
tending the court, and fees. 
Reporter, 



21 



'^40 


KENTCCKT. 


[icise. 




LouisviUe Chancery Court. 










Sadary. 


George M. Bibb, 


of Louisville 


, ChanctUory 


93,000 


Albert T. Burnley, 


do. 


Clerk, 


Fees. 


Charles J. Clarke, 


do. 


Master, 


Fees. 


William A. Cocke, 


do. 


Marshal, 


Fees. 




Circuit Courts. 


- 


The State is divided into 16 Circuits or Districts, and the following 


are the Circuit Jud| 


;es, who have each a salary of |^1|500. 


Dietria. 


Residence. 


DietrusL 


JZasitfmca. 


1. Walker Beid, 


Waabington. 


9. John Green, 


DaoTille. 


8. Henry O. Brown, 


Cynthiania. 


10. James Simpson, 


Wincbeater. 


3. Daniel Majet. 


Lexington. 


11. Kanax Farrow, 


Monnt Sterling. 


4. James Prjor, 


Newcaatle. 


IS. John L. Bridges, 


Harrodsbatf. 


5. John J. Harthall, 


Lonisville. 


13. Armist. H. Charehill, 


Elixabethtown. 


6. Asber W. Graham, 


Bowling Groen. 


14. Alney McLean, 


GreenTille. 


7. Benj. Shackleford, 


Hopkinavilla, 


15. Joseph Eve, 


Barbourrille. 


8. Cbriatophor Tompkioi 


, Glasgow. 


16. Resin Davidge, 


Moaeow. 




Pa0P] 


BRISM. 





There are but few paupers in this State. An intelligent correspond- 
ent estimates the number at about 1,000, and the annual expense of 
supporting them at about $ 40 each. They are supported by the sev- 
eral counties by a tax on the people ; and some of the counties have 
poor-houses. 

Ikterval Improvkmxrt. 

Notices may be seen in the Almanac for 1837, of various works of 
internal improvement which have been commenced in this State. 
Their progress has been somewhat retarded of late. 



XXI. OHIO. 

GOVXRHMSNT. 

[The following ExecatiTe Officers all reside at Colnmbos.] 

JossPH Vance, Governor; (term of office expires on the > 
Ist Monday in December, 1838,) > 

Carter B. Harlan, Secretary qf State, 

John A. Bryan, Auditor of State, 

Joseph Whitehill, Treasurer of State, 

Timothy Griffith, Chitf derk in the Auditor's Office, 

Nathaniel Me^bury, Warden of the Staie Penitentiary. 

William Doherty, Adjutant- General. 



SaJary. 
91,000 

800 

1,000 

80O 

60O 



1838.] 



OHIO. 



247 



Christopher Niswanger, Quartermasier- General, 
Rufus Hodges, Paymaster' General. 

JZachariah Mills, Librarian to the State Library. 

[The State Library was established in 1817, and contains 5,000 
volames.] 

Judiciary. 

Supreme Court. 

AppoinUd. Salary. 

ofNorwalk, Chirf Judge, 1828, $1,200 

Cleveland, .Associate Judgey 1831, 1,200 

do. ia32, i;200 

Frederick Grimk^, ChUIicotbe, do. 1835, 1,200 

The Judges are elected bj the legislature, for seven years, and the 

oldest in commission is Chief Judge. Two of the four Judges form a 

quorum, who hold a court in each county once every year. 



Ebenezer Lane, 
Reuben Wood, 
Peter Hitchcock, 



Courts of Common Pleas. 



Wm. L. Helfenstein, 
David Higgins, 
Van R. Humphrey, 
Alexander Harper, 
George W. Belden, 
John H. Keith, 
Benjamin Hinkson, 
Thomas Irvin, 
David K. Este, 
John W. Price, 
Ezra Dean, 
Joseph R. Swan, 



of Dayton, 
Nor walk, 
Ravenna, 
Zanesville, 
Canton, 
Somerset, 
Wilmington, 
Gallipolis, 
Cincinnati, 
Hillsborough, 
Wooster, 
Columbus, 



Judge let 
do. 2d 
do. 3d 
do., 4th 
do. 5tA 

do. eth 

do. 7^ 
do. Sth 
do. 9th 
do. iOth 
do. nth 
do. mil 



Circuity 
do. 
do. 
do. 

do. 

do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



Salary. 
91,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



The Judges of the Courts of Common Pleas are elected by the legis- 
lature for seven years. The several Courts of Common Pleas are held, 
three times a year, by a President Judge and three Associate Judges in 
most of the counties ; but in the counties very recently organized, only 
twice a year. The Associate Judges are elected by the legislature for 
seven years, and receive the sum of 02.50 a day, for each day's actual 
attendance upon the Courts. 

PAUPKRISM. 

Paupers in this State are not numerous ; but, as no returns are made 
to the legislature, there are no means of ascertaining the number of 
paupers or the expense of supporting them. They are provided for 
either at the expense of the county or the township in which they have 



248 OHIO. [leai 

a legal settlement. The Commissionera of each county are aathoraed. 
in their diacretion, to levy a tax for the erection of a poor-house for tbe 
use of the county; and, when completed, they are required to appoint 
annually a Board of three Directors to manage its affairs. These poof- 
houses are open to all the paupers who have obtained a legml settle- 
ment within the respectiye counties. It is made the duty of the Direc- 
tors to take the general direclion of the poor-house, to prescribe rul«s 
for its management and good government, to visit it as often as once a 
month, to report its condition annually to the Commissioners, and ta 
appoint a superintendent, who is required to take the immediate charge 
of its concerns. 

In many of the older counties, the poor are provided for in this man- 
ner. In the counties in which no poor-houses have been erected, paii> 
pers are supported at the expense of the respective townships in which 
they reside, under the supervision of overseers of the poor elected bj 
the people. It is made the duty of the overseers to administer tempo- 
rary relief to persons who are in circumstances to require it, whether 
they have obtained a legal residence or not ; and, when in the opinioo 
of tbe overseers it is necessary, they are authorized to make contracts 
for the maintenance of such paupers at the expense of the to^vnships 
for a term not exceeding one year. 

Canal Tolls. 

^maufU of ToiU received on the Ohio and Miami Canals for the Years 

ending December 1st, 1835, and 1836. 

1835. 1836. 

The Ohio Canal, . $180,977.41 $206,864.91 

The Miami Canal, . .'51,917.00 51,110.uS 



ntal, $232,894.41 $257,975.43 

Ohio PxifiTKNTiARr. 

Total earnings of the Prisoners during the year ending 

November 30th, 1836 $38;905.12| 

Total expenditure for the same period, .... 30,17B.3S 

Net Profits, $3,726,801 
Number of Prisoners, December 1st, 1836, 314. 

INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT. 

In the American Almanac for 1837, a notice may be seen of several 
canals in this State, completed, in progress, or projected, and also a 
large number of railroad companies, which have been incorporated ; but 
little has been since done on these public improvements on account of 
the pecuniary embarrassments of the times. 



183a] OHIO. . 249 

The Miami Canal is now completed from Dayton to Piqna, 30 
milea ; — total length from Cincinnati to Piqua, 95 milea. It is ex- 
pected that the distance from Ptqua to SL Blarj's will be completed in 
the antnmn of 1837. 

That portion of the Wabash and Erie Canal which is in the State of 
Ol^io and not completed, was put under contract about the 1st of July, 
1837. 

No railroads in this State are yet completed ; bat Sandusky City 
and Monroeville Railroad, also Mad River and Lake £rie Railroad, 
aa far as Tiffin, 30 miles, are graded, ready for laying the rails; and are 
expected to be put in operation in the autumn of 1837. 

Railroads Incorporated early in the Year 1837. 

BelUfoniaine and Perryeburg; — from Bellefontaine in Logan Co., to 
Perry shurg in Wood Co. — Capital, $400,000. 

Charleston^ Oberlin, and Ashland; — from the mouth of Black River 
in Lorrain Co., to Ashland in Richland Co. — Capital, $ 300,000. 

Charleston and Elyria ; — from the mouth of Black River to Elyria. — 
CspiUl, $30,000. 

Carrdllton and Lodi; — from Carrollton in Carroll Co., to Lodi. — 
CapiUl, #100,000. 

Lima, Auglaize^ and ShanesviUe ; — from Lima to Auglaize, and 
thence to Shanesyille. — Capital, $ 100,000. 

MassiUon and Ohio ; — • from Massillon to Ohio River. — Capital, 
01,200,000. 

Maunue and Indiana ; — from Maumee in Lucas Co., to the San- 
dusky City and Toledo Raikoad. — Capital, $100,000. 

Ohioy Pennst^vaniaj Indiana; — from the Ohio River, in Columbiana 
Co., to the Indiana state line, in the county of Paulding, Vanwert, or 
Williams. 

Veniee and Margaretta ; — from Venice in Huron Co., to Belleyue. — 
Capital, $25,000. 

VemUUian and Ashland ; ^ from the mouth of Vermillion River in 
Huron Co., to Ashland in Richland Co. — CapiUl, $300,000. 

WellsvUlef Steubenville, and Bridgeport ; — from Wellsville to Steu- 
benville and Bridgeport. — Capital, $500,000. 

Canal Companies Incorporated in 1837. 

Cincinnati and Whitewater ; — from Cincinnati, along the valleys of 
the Ohio, Great Miami, and Whitewater Rivera, to interaect the White- 
water and Indiana Canal at Harrison. — Capital, $ 45p,000. 

Franklin and Delaware; — from Columbus to Delaware. -^ Capital, 
$300,000. 

Carrel Canal Co. ; — from the mouih of Chagrin River in Cuyahoga 
Co. to Holmes's Mill. — Capital, $ 300,000. 



250 



INDIANA. 



[1838. 



XXII. INDIANA. 
Goterhmeitt. 

Salary. 
David Wallace, of Covington, Governor ; (term of office ) ^^ ci,a 

expires in December, 1839,) J « *»5>w 

— ^— Hillis, Lieut.- Governor ; — Pay, $ 2 a day 

during^ the session of the Gen. Assembly. 

William J. Brown, of Indianapolis, Secretary of State ; elected 

by the Gen. Assembly for 4 years ending ^ 
January, 1841, $600 and perquisites. 

Nath. B. Palmer, of Indianapolis, Treasurer of State; elected 

for 3 years ending Feb., 1838, f 400 and perquisites. 

Morris Morris, of Indianapolis, .Auditor of Public Accounts ; 

term expires Jan., 1838, 400 and perquisites. 

Douglass Maguire, Attorney- General ; appointed by the Gover- 
nor during pleasure, 100 

Daniel D. Pratt, Quartermaster- General; appointed by the 

Governor during pleasure, 100 

James Keigwin, Keeper of the Penitentiary , Profits. 



JUDICIART. 

Supreme Court. 



Isaac Blackford, 
Charles Decoy, 
Jeremiah Sullivan, 
Henry P. Coburn, 



Chirf Judgef 
Judge, 
do. 



Salary. 
#1^500 
1.500 
1^500 



of Indianapolis, 

of Charlestown, 

of Madison, 

of Indianapolis, 

The judges are appointed by the Governor and Senate for 7 years. 
This court holds its sessions at Indianapolis in May and November. It 
has appellate jurisdiction only, except that the legislature may ^ive it 
original jurisdiction in capital cases, and cases in chancery in which the 
President of the Circuit Court may be interested or prejudiced. 

Circuit Courts. 

BaUry. 

John R. Porter, Vermillion Co., 1st Circuit, President Judge, $1,000 

J. U. Thompson, Charlestown, 

M. C. Eggleston, Brookville, 

William W. Wick, Indianapolis, 
Samuel Bigger, Rushville, 
E. M. Huntington, Terre Haut, 
Charles W. Ewing, Fort Wayne, 
Samuel Sample, South Bend, 

These judges are elected by the legislature for 7 years. They hold 
two terms annually. The Associate Judges have J[ 2 a day. 



2d 


do. 


do. 


l,uou 


3d 


do. 


do. 


1,000 


4th 


do. 


do. 


1,000 


5th 


do. 


do. 


1,000 


6th 


do. 


do. 


1,000 


7th 


do. 


do. 


1,000 


8th 


do. 


do. 


1,000 


9th 


do. 


do. 


1,000 



183&] IlfDIANA. 351 

IlfTKRITAL ImpROYKMSITT. 

In the Almanac for 1837, a notice may be seen of various important 
works of interna] improvementi commenced or projected. 

The fVabask and Erie Canalf a state work, is completed from Fort 
Wayne to Logansport. 

The White Water Canal y a state work, to extend from Lawrenceburg 
to the National Road in Wayne Co., 76 miles long. The part from 
Lawrenceburg to Brookville, 34 miles, is under contract. 

Ldtwrencehurg and Indianapolis; incorporated in 1832; — part under 
contract; — cost estimated at 01,000,000. 

The Madison and Lafayette Railroad; commenced in 1636; — 22 
miles under contract. 

The JeffetsonmUe and CrawfordsviUe Railroad ; 20 miles under con- 
tract. 

The Central Canal and New Albany and Vineennea Turnpike^ in pro- 
gress. 



XXIII. ILLINOIS. 

GOTKRIfHENT. 

Salary. 
Joseph Duhcan, of Jacksonville, Governor; (term of office 

from 1st Blonday, Dec, 1834, to 1st Monday, Dec, 1838,) $ 1,000 
William H. Davidson, of Carmi, Lieut,' Governor ; 06 a day dur- 
ing the session of the legislature. 
Alexander P. Field, of Vandalia, Secretary of State, 1 ,000 

Levi Davis, do. Auditor of Public AeeountSf 

(including clerk hire 1 ,800) 

John D. Whiteside, do. Treasurer, 800 

Usher P. Linder, do. Attorney' General, 350 & fees. 

Senate, 40 members. House of Representatives, 93 members. Pay of 

emch 04 a day. 

Judiciary. 

Supreme Court, 

Salary. 

William Wilson, of Carmi, Chief Justice, $ 1 ,200 

Samuel D. Lockwood, of Jacksonville, Associate Justice^ 1 ,200 

Thomas C. Browne, of Springdeld, do. 1,200 

Theophiliis W. Smith, of Chicago, do, 1,200 

This court holds its terms at the seat of government on the 2d Mon- 
day in December, and the 1st Monday in June. 



252 ILLINOIS. [1836. 

Circuit Courts. 



Jesse B. Thomas, 1st Circuit. 
Sidney Breese, 2d do. 
Walter B. Scates, 3d do. 
Justin Harlan, 4th do. 
The salary of the several Circuit Judges is ^ IjOOO. 



James H. Ralston, 5th Circuit. 
Daniel Stone, 6th do. 

John Pierson, 7th do. 



Municipal Courts of Chicago and AUtm. 

Thomas Ford, Chicago, Jwlge, $lyOOJ 

William Martin, Alton, do. 1,09C< 

Pauperism. 

Paupers are very few in this State ', and the expense of maintaining 
them is trifling. They are supported by each county under the direc- 
tion of the court of the County Commissioners, except in the city ai 
Chicago, Alton, and a few other incorporated towns. 

INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT. 

During the session of the Legislature, in the early part of the year 
1837, an act, which was approved by the governor on the 28th of Feb- 
ruary, 1837, was passed to establish and maintain a general system ol 
internal improvement. This act requires that two boards shall be elect- 
ed, biennially, by the joint vote of the General Assembly ; one entitled a 
Board of Fund Commissioners, consisting of three members ; the other, 
a Board of Commissioners of Public Works, consisting of seven mem- 
bers. The latter " Board are authorized to locate, superintend, direct, 
and construct, on the part of this State, all works of internal improve- 
ments which have been or shall be authorized to be undertaken, prose- 
cuted, and constructed by the State, either in whole or in part, except- 
ing the * Illinois and Michigan Canal.' " 

Fund Commissioners. Col. Thomas Mather of Springfield, Charles 
Oakley of Tremont, and Gen. M. M. Rawlings of Shawneetown. 

Commissioners of Public Works. William Kinney of St Clair Goantj, 
President; E. Willard of Jonesborough, Murray McConnel of Jackson- 
ville, M. K. Alexander of Paris, Joel Wright of Canton, J. W. Stephen- 
son of Galena, and £. Peck of Chicago. — G. W. Caruthers of Vandalia, 
Secretary. 

The State is divided into four districts ; and four companies, each 
having an experienced engineer, are engaged in making surveys. 

The Board of Fund Commissioners are authorized to contract for a 
loan, or loans, from time to time, in all not exceeding g 8,000,000, at 
a rate of interest not exceeding 8 per cent, payable semi-annually, for 
carrying into effect the provisions of the Act. The following 15 appro- 



1838.] iLLiNoig. 253 

priations are made for the aeTenil works specified in the Act ; — total 
amount, 59,600,000. 

For the improvement of the navigation of rivers the following; appro- 
priations have heen made ; — viz. Ist. The Great Wabash, $ 100,000 ; 
2d. The Illinois, $100,000; 3d. Rock River, $100,000; 4th. The 
Kaskaskia, $50,000 ; 5th. The Little Wabash, $50,000. 

6th. For the great Western Mail Rout, leading from Vincennes to 
St. Loois, $250,000. 

^appropriations for Railroads. 7th. A Railroad from the city of Cairo, 
at or near the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, to some 
point at or near the southern termination of the Illinois and Michigan 
Canal, via Vandalia, Shelbyville, Decatur, and BloomingtOD, and from 
thence via Savannah to Galena; — $3,500,000. 

6th. A southern cross Railroad from Alton to Mount Carroel, via £d- 
wardsville, Carljle, Salem, Fairfield, and Albion ; and also a Railroad 
from Alton to Shawneetown to diverge from the aforesaid southern 
cross railroad at or near Ed wards ville, and thence from- said diverging 
point, via Lebanon in St. Clair county, Nashville in Washington county, 
l*inkney ville in Perry county, Frankfort in Franklin county, and Equal- 
ity in Gallatin county ; — $1,600,000. 

9th. The northern cross Railroad from Quincy on the Mississippi 
river, via Columbus and Clayton in Adams county, Mount Sterling in 
Schuyler county, Meradosia and Jacksonville in Morgan county, Spring- 
field in Sangamon county, Decatur in Macon county, Sydney in Cham- 
paign county, and Danville in Vermillion county, and thence to the 
State line, in the direction of Lafayette, Indiana ; which railroad shall 
cross the Sangamon river at some eligible point below the north and 
south forks thereof; — $ 1,850,000. 

lOth. A branch of the Central Railroad, to commence at some eligible 
point on said road where a direct line from Hillsborough to Shelbyville 
would intersect the same, or within one mile of the said point of inter- 
section, and to run from thence, via Shelbyville in Shelby county, 
Charleston in Coles county, Paris in Edgar county, and thence to the 
State line in a general direction for Terre Haute, Indiana ; — $ 650,000. 

1 1th. A Railroad from Peoria in Peoria county, via Canton in Fulton 
county, Macomb in McDonough county, Carthage in Hancock county, 
to Warsaw on the Mississippi river ; — $ 700,000. 

12th. A Railroad from Lower Alton, via Upper Alton and HilUiborough, 
to the Central Railroad, so as to intersect the Railroad from Terre 
Haute to the same ; — $ 600,000. 

13th. A Railroad from Belleville, via Lebanon, to intersect the Rail- 
road from Alton to Mount Carmel, at the nearest and most eligible point 
on said road ; — $ 150,000. 
14th. A Railroad from Bloomington in McLean county, to Mackinaw 

22 



254 iLLiHois. [1886. 

town ia Taiewell eountj, to diverge a fork at said Mackinaw town ; 
one branch or fork of said Railroad to run to the IllinoiB river and con- 
nect with the Peoria and Warsaw Railroad, at Peoria; and the other 
branch to run through Tremont to Pekin ; — $350,000. 

15th. There ii appropriated the sum of $ 200,000 of the first 
moneys that maj be obtained under the provisions of the Act, to be 
drawn, in a ratable proportion to the census last made, by the several 
counties, through which no Railroad or Canal is provided to be made at 
the expense or cost of the State of Illinois ; which said money is to be 
expended in the improvement of roads, constructing bridges, and other 
public works. 

Remarks. — Some of the above Railroads occupy the same rentes as 
those contemplated by private companies, chartered at a previous see- 
sion of the Legislature. It is expected that State works will super- 
sede those projected by private companies, and that the charters wiU be 
surrendered. 

This system of public works does not include the ** Illinois and Mich- 
igan Canal.'* 

About 55 miles of the Quincy and Danville Railroad, (No. 9,) are now 
under contract at f 8,000 a mile, — from Meradosia to Springfield. 

The IlUnois and AHekigan Canal, extending from Chicago on Liake 
Michigan, to Peru on Illinois river, about 100 miles in length, was 
commenced in 1836, as a State work, under the direction of a separate 
Board of Commissioners, consisting of W. F.Thornton, J. A. McCler- 
nand, and Jacob Fry. 

RaUroads undertaken by private Companies, 

A Railroad from the Ferry, at St. Louis, to the coal mines at Bluffi ; 
6 miles ; expected to be completed in December, 1837. 

A Railroad from Jacksonville to Augusta; 22 miles ; in progress. 

A Railroad from Chicago to Des Plains ; 12 miles ; in progress. 

A Railroad from Naples to Jacksonville ; 22 miles ; incorporated in 
1837. Several others are projected. 



Sakiy. 



XXIV. MISSOURL 

GOVKRRBCEHT. 

LsLBUiui W. Booos, Oeremor; (term, from 3d Monday in > ^ . ,_^ 
November, 1836, to 3d Monday in November, 1840,) $ ▼ ^^"^ 

F, Cannon, Lieui,' Governor and President of the Senate. 

Peter G. Glover, City of Jefferson, Secretary of State^ 730 and fees. 

John Walker, do. 7rsa«i«rer, 730 and fees. 

Hiram H. Baber, do. JhtdU, of PtikKc Jiee's, 730 and ftea. 

Daniel Dunklin, SwrveyoT'Oenend. 

William B. Napton, Momaf- General. 



183a] 



MIMOUAI. 



8S5 



Matthias McGirk, 
George TompkiDs, 
John C. Edwards, 



JODICIART. 

Presiding Jndg^f 

A$aociaU Judge, 

do. 



Salaiy. 
#1,100 

1400 

1,100 



Circuit CourtM. 

iwlfst. Salary.i Jodfei. Baltry. 

William Scott, 1st Circuit, 91,000| J. F. Ryland, 6thCireiiit,$ 1,000 

Th. Reynolds, 2d do. 1,000 C. H. Allen, 7th do. 1,000 

Ezra Hunt, 3d do. 1,000 L. E. Lawless, 8th do. 1,000 



P. H. McBride, 4th do. l,000l Jones, 9th 


do. 


1,000 


A. A. King, 


5th do. 1,000| John D. Cook, 10th 

PoPULATIOlf OF MlBBOURI. 


do. 


1,000 




WhitM. SlftVM. Frae Colorad. 




Total. 


IdSCi 


202,757- 40,540 911 




244,208 


1830 


1 14,796 25,081 567 




140,445 



Increase, 87,962 



15,459 



344 



103,663 



Pavpbuim. 

Paupers are few in number In this State. Thej are iupported at the 
expense of the different counties in which thej reside, under the direc- 
tion of the County Commissioners* 

Railroad. 

In addition t» the railroads mentioned in the Almanac for 1837, 
another is projected from the town of Louisiana on the Mississippi, to 
Colombiay and thence to Rocheport on the Missouri 



XXV. MICHIGAN. 



GOTERNMENT. 

Stxtbhs T. Masoh, of Detroit, Qavemor ; — term ezpirei ) 



Edward Munday, 

Kintzing Pritchette, 
John D. Pierce, 
Henry Howard, 
Robert Abbott, 
Peter Morey, 
Calvin Jackson, 
Edward N. Bridges, 



Salary. 
$2,000 



January 1, 1838, > 

of Ann Arbor, lieui.'Qov. — $6 a day ) 
during the session of the Legislature. ) 

of Detroit, Secretary of State, 1,000 

Superintendent of Pub. Instruct., 1 ,500 



of Marshall, 
of Detroit, 

do. 

do. 

do. 



Treasurer, 500 

Auditor- General, 400 

Attorney- General, 400 

Priv. See. to the Governor, 500 

Bank Commissioner, 1,000 



256 MicHieAN. [1838. 

Judiciary. 

Suftreme Court. 

Bakrj. 

William A. Fletcher, of Ann Arbor, Chief Justice^ ^1 ,600 

George Morell, of Detroit, Assodaie JuMiUy 1,500 

Epaphroditus Ran lom, of Kalamazoo, do, 1,500 

£lon Farns worth, of Detroit, Chancellor , 1,500 

The Judges of the Supreme Court are appointed by the Governor, 
with the advice and content of the Council, for the term of 7 years. 

Proorkss of Population. 

The population of Michigan has increased with great rapidity within 
a few years past. The population, in 1830, was 31 ,639 ; in 1834, 85,856 ; 
and in 1837, computed at 200,000. 

Michigan was admitted into the Union, upon an equal footing with 
the other States, on the 26th of January, 1837, by Act of Congress, ap- 
proved by the President of the United States. 

Prihart Schools. 

The Legislature of this State, on the 20th of March, 1837, passed <* an 
Act to provide for the organization and support of Primary Schools,'* for 
which the State possesses very valuable funds, as will be seen by the 
following extract from the ** Report of the Superintendent of Public 
Instruction ; " which was made to the Legislature, January 5th, 1837. 

" The primary school lands reserved from sale, and given to the State 
by the ordinance of Congress, consist of sections number sixteen, in all 
the surveyed townships; and by the constitution of the State, as already 
intimated, the proceeds of all these lands are to go into one general 
fund for the support of schools throaghout the State. Were it not so, 
one township might derive from its lands an enormous yearly income, 
while its neighbor with more inhabitants might be almost entirely des- 
titute, owing to the unfortunate location of its sixteenth section. The 
peninsular portion of the State of Michigan contains very nearly 40,000 
square miles. One thirty-sixth of which belongs to the common school 
fund. In 40,000 square miles, there are 1,111 townships of 36 sqaare 
miles each. But dropping 11 entire townships for the deficiency 
already suggested, there will remain 1,100 townships, which is a fraction 
less than the true number. 

'* One square mile, section number sixteen in each township, amount- 
ing in all to 1,100 square miles, is devoted to the cause of primary edu- 
cation. In 1,100 square miles, there are 704,000 acres, which at ($ 5 per 
acre, the minimum price, would realize to the State $3,520,000. It is 
to be presumed, however, that a due proportion of this amount is waste 
land, and consequently of no value. But if a portion is waste land, an 



] 6-38. J MicHieAN. 357 

equal portion miMt bo regarded as of the fini quality. Throwing one 
fbarth entirely out of the question, the remaining three fourths will pro- 
duce the following results, at the priees estimated for each separate 
fourth; — 

The first quarter, at $10 per acre, would amount to $1, 760,000 
The second do. 7 do. do. 1,232,000 

The third do. 4 do. do. 704,000 

Total, $ 3,696,000 
Another estimate will show a similar result. 
50,000 acres, at $ 15 per acre, would amount to f 750,000 

150,000 do. 10 do. do. 1,500,000 

200,000 do. 6 do. do. 1,000,000 

200,000 do. 3 do. do. 600,000 

104,000 do. do. do. 000,000 

Total, $3,850,000' 

** These estimates may seem to be extravagant ; but it is oonfidently 
believed, that the result, in the issue of things, will exceed, rather than 
iall short of the highest computation." 

UirivXRSiTT or Michtojiii. 

On th^ 18th of March, 1837, an Act was passed " to provide for the or- 
ganization and government of the University of Michigan," an institution 
which is to be established at Ann Arbor ; the government of it to be 
invested in a Board of Regents consisting of 12 members; the Governor, 
Lieutenant-Governor, Judges of the Supreme Court, and Chancellor of 
the State, to be, ex officio , members. — The University is to consist of 3 
departments ; — 1st, the department of literature, science, and the 
arts ; — 2d, law; — 3d, medicine ; — and lo have 26 professorships. The 
funds of the University consist in lands, estimated by the Superintend- 
ent of Public Instruction at the value of $021,600. 

Gbolooicail Svrtbv. 

On the 23d of February, 1837, an Act wa« passed to provide for a Geo- 
logical survey of the State ; and sums for the years 1637, 1838, 1839, and 
1840, the whole not exceeding $ 29,(K)0, were appropriated fbr the pur- 
pose. Dr. Houghton' has been appointed Geologist*. 

ImTXRHAL iMPROVXMXlfT. 

In March, 1837, an Act was passed for establishing a system of Inter- 
nal Improvement, under the direction of a ** Board of Commissioners of 
Intenial Improvements,'' consisting of 7 members, the Governor being, 
ex qfioio, one of thftt nuaaber^ and the President of the Board ; and the 

2» 



256 MicBiexif. [1838. 

loan of a siim not exceeding $ 5,000,000 was authorized, at a rate of m- 
terest not exceeding (>J^ per cent. 

The fioard of CoinmiBsioners were authorized and directed to cause 
surveys to be made for the three following railroads across the peninsa- 
la of Michigan ; — 

1. The Central Railroad; — extending from Detroit to the mouth of 
St. Joseph's river. — Appropriation, $400,000. 

3. The Southern Railroad; — extending from the navigable waters of 
the river Raisin, passing bj the village of Monroe, to New Bufialo. 
Appropriation, $100,(00. 

3. The Jforthem Railroad; — extending from Palma, or from or near 
the mouth of Black River, to the navigable waters of Grand River, or to 
Lake Michigan, in the county of Ottawa. Appropriation, $50,000. 

Appropriations were made for the survey of a canal, or for a canal and 
railroad, from Mount Clemens to or near to the mouth of the Kalanoazoo 
river ; and a canal to unite the waters of the Saginaw river, with the 
navigable waters of the Maple or Grand rivers; — also to survey the 
St. Joseph's, Kalamazoo, and Grand rivers, with a view to the improve- 
ment of their navigation. 

Incorporated Railroad Companies. 

Four railroads to be constructed by incorporated companies were 
noticed in the Almanac for 1837. Companies were incorporated in 
March, 1837, for constructing the two following railroads. 

The Detroit and Shiawassee Railroad; from Detroit to Shiawassee. 
CapiUl, 5500,000. 

The Gibraltar and ClinUm Railroad ; from Gibraltar to Clinton. Cap- 
itol, $ 400,000. 



XXVi. ARKANSAS. 

GoVXBirMXNT. 



Balaiy. 

James Cohwat, of Little Rock, Governor; — term of office > ^o ^^m 

ex pires November, 1 840, 5 * '*»"^ 

Robert A. Watkins, of Little Rock, Secretary of State ; — term ) ,,,^ 

ot office from 1836 to 1840, ] '"' 

The Legislature meets biennially, at Little Rock, on the first Monday 

in November. — Senators, 17. Samuel C. Roane, President. Repre- 

■entotives, 54. John Wilson, Speaker, 

JUDICIARV. 



Suprcne Court. 






Salvy. 


Daniel Ringo, of UtUe Rock, ChirfJksties, 


^1,800 


Th. I. lALcej, AssodaU Justice^ 


1^800 


Townson Dickenson, ilo. 


1,800 



k 



1838.] 



▲BKAirSAS. 



359 



The Supreme Court has appellate jurisdiction only, except in particu- 
lar cases pointed out by the Constitution. The judges are elected by the 
General Assembly, by a joint vote of both Houses, for a term of 8 years. 

Circuit Court, 

Judges. — Charles Caldwell, Lewis B. Tully, John C. P. ToUieson, 
Handy, James Hoge, De Lafayette Royseton. — Salary of each 



4^1,200. 

The Circuit Court has original jurisdiction over all criminal cases 
which are not otherwise provided for by law ; and exclusive original 
jurisdiction of all crimes amounting to felony at the common law; and 
original jurisdiction of all civil cases which shall not be cognizable before 
Justices of the Peace, until otherwise directed by the General Assem- 
bly ; and original jurisdiction in all matters of contract, where the sum 
in controversy is over one hundred dollars. — The judges are elected by 
the General Assembly for a term of 4 years. 



XXVH. DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

The District of Columbia is under the immediate government of 
Congress. The city of Washington became the seat of the govern- 
ment of the United States in 1800 ; and it is the residence of the Pres- 
ident and the other chief executive officers of the national government. 

The Congress of the United States meets every year at Washington, 
on the first Monday in December, unless it is otherwise provided by 
law ; and the Supreme Court of the United States meets here annually 
on the 2d Monday in January. 





JUOICIART, 


» 






Circuit Court. 




William Cranch, 
Buckner Thurston, 
James S. Morsel, 
Francis S. Key, 
Alexander Hunter, 


Resideoce. 
Washington, 

do. 
Georgetown, 
Washington, 

do. 


Chirf Judge, 
Assistant Judge, 

do. 
Attorney, 
Marshal, 


Salary. 

$2,700 

2,500 

2,500 

Fees, dec 

do. 


William Brent, 
Edmund I. Lee, 


Clerk for 
CUrk for 


Washington County, 
Alexandria County, 


do. 
do. 


S. Chase, 
Edward N. Roach, 


Orphans* Court. 

Washington, Judge, 
do. do. 


Balaij. 

$1,000 

800 


H. C. Neale, 


do. 


Register. 




Alexander Moore, 


Alexandria, 


do. 





260 



FLORIDA TBRRITORT. 



[183a 



XXVIII. FLORIDA TERRITORY. 

GOTERITMKNT. 

Richard K. Call, Oovemor; (appointed in 1836; term of> ^ocum 

office ezpixes in April, 1339,) J * "^^^^^ 

John P. Duval, Secretary ^ 1,500 

The Legialature, or Legislative Council, is composed of 27 memben, 
who are elected annually by the people on the 2d Monday in October. 
It meets annually at Tallahassee, the seat of government and resi* 
dence of the Governor, on the Ist Monday in January, and its sessions 
are limited to 6 weeks. 





■r 

Judges. 


JUaidamee. 


SaUary. 


JStitmeft. 


Wattern Diiiricti 


J. A. Cameroo, 


Pensacola, 


$1,800 


Ctooi^e Walker 


Middle do. 


Th. Raodall, 


Tallahassee, 


1,8C0 


Ch. 8. Sibtoy. 


Eastern do. 


Robert R. Reid, 


St. Augastine, 


1,800 


Th. Doaglaas. 


Bouthorn do. 


James Webb, 


Key West, 


9,900 


William Marria 



Marshals, — J. W. Exum, T. £. Randolph, Samuel Blair, and Ch. M. 
Wells. 

The Western District comprises the counties of Escambia, Walton, 
Washington, Franklin, and Jackson ; and the Superior Courts are held 
at Pensacola and Mariana. 

The Middle District comprises the counties of Leon, Gadsden, Ham* 
ilton, Jefferson, and Madison ; and the courts are held at Tallahassee 
and San Pedro. 

The Eastern District comprises the counties of Nassau, St. Johns, 
Duval, Columbia, Alachua, Hillsborough, and part of Mosquito ; and 
the courts are held at St. Augustine, Newmansville, and Jacksonville. 

The Southern District comprises the counties of Monroe, Dade, and 
part of Mosquito ; and the courts are held at I^ey West. 

The Court of appeals, consisting of the Judges of the several Superior 
Courts, is held annually at Tallahassee on the 1st Monday in January. 

The territory comprises 20 counties ; and the County Courts are held 
semi-annually by the judges in the respective counties, who have a 
limited civil jurisdiction, and original jurisdiction in all matters relating 
to estates, testate and intestate, and to guardians, wards, and orphans, 
and their estates. 

Railroads and Casals. 

The Ldike Wimico and St. Joseph's Canal and Railroad ; ^ Srom SU 
Joseph's to Lake Wimico; 12 miles long. Incorporated in lb35 and 
1836 } — completed in 1 836. 



1838.] 



FLORIDA. 



261 



The Eatt Florida Railroad ; ^ from Jackiooville to St Marks; 160 
miles ; — estimated cost, $ 1,233,000 j — preparatory survey made ; must 
be completed in 5 years. 

Canals and Railroads Incorporated. 



Ntme. 



Ptaoteri and Citizens' Canal Co. 

TallahaiisM Rail Road Co. . 

Ploridaf Alabama Sl Georgia R. R. Co. 
■ Flor. Peninsula &. Jacksonville R.R.Co. 
'.St. Andrew! and Cbipola Canal Co. 

Penaacola and Pcrdido R. R. & C. Co. 

L.\Vimico&St. Joseph'i R.R. k. C.Co. 

St. Aoguntlne and Picolata R. R. Co. 
;Eait and South Florida Canal, 
Brooa wieJt (Ueo.) aod Florida R. R. Co. 




1831 

I KM 
1434 
1835 
183:) 
I8:J3 

ie3«; 

18;j7, 
1837 



Matanzaa Rlrer Haliraz River, E.F. 
rallahaMee ISt. Mark>i 



Colombua, Goo. 
JackaoQTille 



Penaacola Baj 
St. Juaepli'i 

^t. Augustine 
St. Augustine 



Pensacola Baj 
Tallahaatee 



Mobile Bay 
Tallahassee by the 
way ofL.Wimico 
Picolata 
Cape Florida 
Braoswicli,6oo. Apalachicola or 8t. 
I George's Sound, 
I via Tallahassee ' 



XXIX. WISCONSIN TERRITORY. 

GOTSRITMSNT. 

Salary* 
HxifRT DoDOB, Governor and Svperinlendent of Indian Affairs; \ ^^ enn 

term from 1836 to 1639, 5 9*^^^W 

Wm. B, SUughton, Secretary ; term from 1837 to 1839, 1,200 

The Legislative JJssembly consists of a Council of 13 members elected 

for 4 years, and a House of Representatives of 26 members elected for 2 

years. Their pay is $3 a day, and $ 3 for every 20 miles* travel. The 

government was organized in 1836, and the first session of the Assembly 

commenced on the 25th of October, 1836, at Belmont, Iowa co. The 

second session is to commence on the first Monday of November, 1837, 

at Burlington, Des Moines co. By an Act of the Assembly, Madison^ 

on the Four Lakes, is to be the seat of government afler the 4th of 

March, 1839. — Population, in 1837, estimated at 25,000; and rapidly 

increasing. 

JUDICIJIRT. 

Salary. 

of Elk Grove, Ist District, Chief Justice^ $ 1 ,800 

ofDuBuque, 2d do. /issoeiate Justice, I fiOO 

WiUiamC. Frazier ofMilwaukie, 3d do. do. 1,800 

W. W. Chapman, Jlttomey. Francis Gehon, Marshal, 



Charles Dunn, 
David Irvin, 



WiscoRSiN Univrrsitt. 

In December, 1836, by an Act passed by the Legislature, an institu- 
tion was incorporated, entitled '* The Wisconsin University," to be 



963 



WIBCOITBIN TERRITORY. 



[1838. 



eitablished at Belmont, and to be under the direction of 21 tmatees, ap- 
pointed by ihe Legislature, the Governor to be, ez qjEdo, one of the 
number. No measures hare yet been taken to cariy the Act into 
effect 

Newspapers. 
Title. Place. 

Wisconsin Pioneer, ) Milwaukie 
Milwaukie Advertiser, $ MUwaukie. 

Miners* Free Press, Mineral Point. 



Title. Plaea. 

Wisconsin Democrat, Green Bay. 
Iowa News, Du Baqne. 
Gazette, Burlington. 



Railroads Incorporated, December, 1836. 

The Lafontain^ or Portage Railroad ; — to extend from Lafontaine on 
Foe River to Winebago Lake. 

The BdnunU and Du Buque Railroad; — to extend from Belmont to Do 
Buque, 30 miles ] — with power to extend it to Mineral Point, and tbenee 
to Dodgeville. 



AMERICAN STATES. 





Me/nMici of Korth America, 








Population. 


Capitals. 


Population. 


Presidents. 




United States^ . 

Mexico, . . 

Texas. 

Central Anariea, . 

Uayti, 


19,866,000 

7,847,299 

63,000 

1,800,000 

935,336 


Washington, 
Mexico, 
Houston. 
Gnalimala, 
Cape Haytien, 


18,897 
170,000 

45,000 
15,000 


MaiUn Van Bono. 

Gen. Bustamente. ! 
Samnel Houston. ! 
Gen. Moraaan. i 
J. P. Boyer. . 




Mt^hUes i 


9f South Ann 


srtea. 


United Prov. La Plata, 

Pern, 

Bolivia, . 

Chili, 

New Grenada, 

Venezuela, 

Paraguay, 

Equator, . 

Uraguay, 


9,379,888 

1,700,000 

1,300,000 

1,500,000 

1,927,680 

659,638 

600,000 

481,966 

175,000 


Buenoe Ayres,' 

Lima, 

Chu(|uiiaea, 

Santiago, 

Bogota, 

Caraccas. 

Assumpuon, 

Cluito, 

Monte- Video, 


80,000 
70,000) 
12,000 i 
65,675 

eo,uoo 

40,000 

9,000 

60,000 

10,000 


0«n. Rosas. 

Gen. Santa Cnu. 

Gen. Prieto. 
Senor Marqoas. 
Dr. Vargas. 
Dr. Frsncia, X>»ct. 
Gen. Flores. 
Gen. Oribe. 


1 






Empire. 




Bnitil, 


5,130,458 


Rio Janeiro, 


i Emperor. 
160,000 (Pedro II. 





The population of the above, with the exception of that of the United 
States and 7Vza«, is given according to the Weimar Almanac for 1835. 



183a] TBZAi. 263 

TEXAS. 

Go?XRllMEIIT. 

Salary. 

Samusl HouSTOiTy President, $10,000 

Mirabeau B. Lamar, Viee-PruidefU, 3,600 

^Secretary of SUUe, 3|500 

B. B. Bee, SeerOary of War, 3,500 

Henry Smith, Secretary of the Treasury ^ 3^600 

S. Rhodes Fisher, Secretary of the Ifavy, 3,500 

R. Barr, Postmaster- General, 3,500 

P. W. Orayaon, Attorney- General, 3,500 

W. H. P&tton, ^juartermaster-GeH. 



A. Sidney Thuraton, Commis.-Gen. 



J. W. Moody, Auditor of Accounts. 
J. Snively, Paymaster- General. 
E. Moorehouae, ^<//«ta?it-Ge?i«ra/. 

The election of President, Vice-President, Senators, and Represen- 
tatives, took place on the lat of September, 1836; General S. Houston 
received 3,385 votes for President, and Mirabeau B. Lamar 2,738 for 
Vice-President. The Congress met on the 1st of October, 1636. The 
seat of government is Houston. 

The following notice of the formation of an independent government 
in Texas, and the outlines of the Constitution, are extracted from a 
letter of Henry M. Morat, to John Forsyth, (U. S.) Secretary of State, 
dated Velasco, August 22d, 1836. 

" A Convention held at San Felipe, in November, 1835, composed 
of 56 representatives from all the municipalities, in which they de- 
clared, that, as Santa Anna and other military chieftains had by force 
of arms overthrown the federal institutions of Mexico, and dissolved 
the social compact which existed between Texas and the other mem- 
bers of the confederacy, they had taken up arms against the encroach- 
ments of military despots, and in defence of the Constitution. 

*« This was considered as an absolute separation from Mexico, and on 
the 2d of March, 1836, delegates of the people from all the disUicU 
declared Texas a **free, sowreign, and independent State,** 

** A Provisional Government had already been formed under the 
Convention of November, 1835, which continued until a general Con- 
grees met at Washington, on the Rio Bra2os, on the day previous to 
the declaration of independence. This convention took place by writs 
of election issued by the Provisional Government, and it is said that all 
parts of Texas were represented in it, from the extreme western settle- 
ment at San Patricio, on the Nueces, to the Sabine and Red Rivers. 

*< On the 17th of March, 1836, that convention unanimously adopted 
the present Constitution, which, in the greater part, very nearly resem- 

• J. Plokney HaDdanoo, lata Beoratory of Bute, bu boaa racaotly appointad Min- 
iftar to Enfland. 



264 TEXAS. [1838. 

blei that of the United States, and seems to have receired the general 
approbatiou of the citizens. 

** The powers of the government under that instrument are divided 
into legislative, executive, and judicial departments ; the Representa- 
tives to be chosen annually, untiL Congress shall otherwise provide bj 
law, and the Senators for the term of three years. The House of Rep- 
resentatives to consist of not less than twenty-foar nor more than forty 
membersj until the population shall amount to one hundred thoosaiid 
souls ; afler which, the whole number shall not be less than forty, nor 
more than one hundred. The Senate to be never less than one-third, 
nor more than one-halC the number of Representatives. 

*' The executive authority is vested in a chief magistrate, styled the 
President of the Republic of Texas. The first to hold his office for two 
years, and all succeeding presidenls to be elected for three years, and 
be ineligible during the following term. 

*^ The judicial powers are confided to one superior and such other 
courts as Congress may establish ; the judges to hold their offices for 
four years, and be reeligible. 

** Some of the peculiarities of this constitution are, 

'* That ministers of the Gospel shall not be elected to the execative 
office, nor to a seat in either branch of Congress. 

<* That no holder of public money or collector thereof shall be enti- 
tled to a seat in the legislature, until he shall have acquitted himself of 
all responsibility. 

<* That the Supreme Court shall have appellate jurisdiction only, and 
no judge shall sit in a cause in the Supreme Court which shall have 
been tried by him in a court below. 

'* That the judges are to be elected, by joint ballot of both Houses of 
Congress, for four years. 

** That the Executive shall not command the army or navy in person, 
without the authority of a resolution of Congress. 

*^ That all officers shall remain in office during the term of the Presi- 
dent, unless sooner removed with the advice and consent of the Senate. 

" That Congress shall not have the power to emancipate slaves ; nor 
shall any slaveholder be allowed to manumit, without the consent of 
the legislature, unless he shall send the slave without the limits of the 
republic. 

** That no free person of African descent, either in whole or in part, 
shall be permitted to reside permanently in the republic, without the 
consent of Congress. 

" That the admission of negroes, except from the United States, is 
for ever prohibited, and the importation of ihem declared to be piracy. 

** That no alien shall hold land, except by title direct from the gov- 
ernment, though their heirs may take by descent. 



1838.] TIXA8. 265 

*' That perpetoittM or monopolies are contrary to the j^enias of a fVee 
govern ment, and shall not be allowed. 

** That no appropriation shall be made for private or local purposes, 
unless two-thirds of each House shall concur. 

'< That the President shall not re-nominate the same indiyidnal to 
office after rejection by the Senate. 

*' It also protects the public domain from donations made by the 
legislature of Coahuila and Texas, to persons not citizens of the repub- 
lic, and declares such grants to be fraudulent'' 

Mr. Morfit estimates Texas, according to its present limits, to be 
nearly four times as large^ in extent of surface, as the State of Virginia, 
and its population to amount to about 65,000 inhabitants ; the army, 
in September, 1836, at 2,500 ; ~ the public debt at $1,250,000. 

** The products of Texas," says Mr. Morfit, " are principally cotton 
and corn ; the former is the most cultivated, on account of its superior 
value : this year there will be less than 10,000 bales ; but, if tlie country 
had been quiet, there would have been 50,000. Abundance of fine cat- 
tle is raised with very little difficulty, and the climate and soil are 
adapted to the usual grain of our own country. 

'* It is said that the sugar-cane would thrive well here, but I should 
donbt it; though I believe, from personal observation, that the soil 
woold yield abundant crops of indigo, and with little trouble. 

" The tonnage of Texas, as might be expected for a country so new, 
is very small. Heretofore, part of the trade was carried on in Mexican 
shipping, and then the amount was much greater ; at present, they 
have not more than a doien commercial vessels, including two or three 
steamboats." 



23 



366 



BRITISH ▲MERICAN PROVIffCEB. 



[1838. 



BRITISH AMERICAN PROVINCES. 



North American Provinces: 



Ifower Canada, 
Upper Canada, 
Nova Scotia, 
New Branswick, 
Prince Eklw. III. 
Newfoundland, 
Cape Breloo, 

ToUi, 



Year. 



1831 
1833 
18-27 
1834 
ia33 
1838 
e«um. 



Pop. 



539,83-2 Earl or Gotford, Oavemor-Oeneroi. 

29t>,544 Major Gen. Sir Francia U. Head, Lieut. -Oavtmor, 

123,848 MaJorGun. Sir C. Campbell, do, 

119,116 Majnr-Gen. Sir John llurvry, do, 

38,9-251 Churlei AugUAtinu Fitzruy, do. 

58,088' Captain Preicolt, Qnemer. 

30,0001 



1,196,3431 



British West Indus: — Late Slave Colonies, 
With the Governors J Population^ Slaves f 4^., in 1833. 



Antigua, 

Bahama, 

Barbsdoea, 

Borbioe, > 

Demarara, ) 

Bermuda, 

Dominica, 

Grenada, 

lionduraa, 

Jamaica, 

Montserrat, 

Novia, 

St. Chrintopber, 

St. Lucia, 

St. Vincent, 

Tobago, 

Tortola, 

Trinidad, 



Hennr Light, lMtU.'Ouv. 

Lt. Col. W. Colebrooke, do. 
Sir £. J. M. Macgregor, Oao. 

Sir Jm. Carmlehael Smith, do. 

Maj.-Gen. Sir R. Chapman, LL.'0. 
Henry Light, do. 

Lt.-Cul. C. J. Doylo, Oav. 

Col. Fr. Cockburn, 
Major-Gen. Sir L. Smith, Oov. 

Henry Light, lAeiU,-Oov. 

Do. do. 

Lieot.-Cul. H. G. Macleod, do. 
Col. Sir Dudley Hill, Oov. 

('apt. George TylHr, Lieut.-Oov. 
Major.Gen. H. C. Darling, Oov. 



Sir G. F. Hill, 



LLtuL-Oov. 



Totmly 



Whites 



77,460 



Free I Slaves. ' TotaJ. | 
colored. i 



3,000 
3,000 
5,000 
1,150 
6,400 
740 
3,fiOO 
'2,8iK) 
2,;JiiO 

5j,0I)0 
800 
9,000 
3,«K>J 
3.700 
2,800 
1,300 
1,300 

I6,0'J0 



113 890 



30,000 

9,300 

8-2,000 

2I,;<00 

70,00(» 

4, GOO 

15,400 

24,000 

2, 10 J 

303,000 

6,200 

6,600 

19,200 

I3,(i00 

23,500 

12,500 

5,400 

24,000 



I 35,000 

' 16,9iJO 

103,100 

' 79.400 

9,240 

I9,ec|0 

»7,600 

4,tv=>0 

415,000 

7,3*) 

9,:ti)0 

2:i,>00 

27,600 

14,090 

7,180 

44,900 



692,700 1884,050 



Colonial Bishops. 



Binhop of Quebec ; George J 



Mountain, D. D., Bishop of Montreal ; John Inglis, D. D., Biiihop of 
Nova Scotia ; Christopher Lipscomb, D. D., Bishup of Jamaica ; Wm. 
H. Coleridge, D. D., Bishop of Barbadoes and the Leeward Islands. 



EUROPE, 



REIGNING SOVEREIGNS OF EUROPE. 



JWUM. 



T^tU. 



IJharleii XIV. 
Nicholu I. 
Frederick VI. 
Victoria 
William I. 
Leopold 

_ Fred. VVm. IH. 
I Frederick 
I Em. Aaj^ufituSf 
'Paul Ffcdorick 
JGeorgo V. 
I Auguiitua 
William 
William 
Ch. Frftdorick 
Ernest 
Bernard 
Joseph 
Leopold 
Al«xi« 
Henry 

Fred. Oanther 
Gunther II. 
flenrj XIX. 
Henry LXU. 
Leopold 

Georfe William 
George 
Looie 

Ch. I^opold Fr. 
William U. 
,Loui» n. 
iCharlM 
Frwlertck 
John Joseph 
William 

IjOUIS 

Ferdinand 

Louts Philip 

Isabella U. 

Maria If. 

Charles Albert 

I.ieopold 11. 

Maria Ijoutsa 

Franct* CV. 

Cbarie4 Loniii 

Gregory XV I, 
(Ferdiiiaad IL 
lOllio 
iMahmood 11. 



Kiug 
I Lmperor 
(King 
jviueea 
.King 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
Gr. Dukf 

do. 

do. 
Duke 

do. 
Gr. Duke 
Duke 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
Prince 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
Landg're 
Gr. I)uk(> 
Elector 
Gr. Uukt 
Prince 

do. 

do. 
King 

do. 
Emperor 
King 
QuecD 

do. 
Kin* 
Gr. Duke 
Duchess 
Duke 

do. 
Pope 
King 

do. 
S^uttan 



1 



SUUB. 



"^wuden 6l Morway 
R.u8!<ia 
Denmark 
liroat Rritiiin 
Holland or Netherlands 
Kelgium 
Pruaitia 
'^nxony 
H.inoTer 

Mecklenburg-Schwcr. 
■ Mccklenburg-Strelitz 
lOldcnburg 
Rrunsdwick 
' NHSsaq 
Sttxe-Weimar 
Sajie-< 'oburg-Gotha 
Sttxo-Meiningea 
Saxo- A It4* n bu|g 
Aiihult-Dnisau 
Anhnlt-Bornburg 
Anliali-Cothen 
<^chwartz*il RudoUtH 
Schwartz'g Sondcr'n 
Reuss, Elder Line 
ReuB<<, Younger Line 
Lippe-Dctmold 
Lippe-Schauenburg 
VValdeck 
(iesso-Hombarg 
Raden 

llesiHA-CasMl 
Hexse-Darmitadt 
nohonzuPn Sis^mar'n 
lluhenzol'n Ilechio'n 
Liclitonstcin 
VVurtemberg 
Buvaria 
Austria 
Prance 
Spiin 
Portagal 
:^ardinia 
Tu«cany 
Pnrroa 
Mudeoa 
(jQcca 

States of the Choreh 
Two Sicilies 
Greece 
Turkey 



Dat$ ^ Birth. 



Jan. 

July 

Jan. 

May 

Aug. 

Dec. 

Aug. 

May 

June 

Sf'pl. 

Aug. 

July 

April 

June 

Feb. 

Jan. 

Dec. 

Aug. 

Oct. 

June 

July 

Nov. 

s^ept. 

Mar. 

May 

Not. 

Dee. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

July 

Dec. 

Feb. 

July 

Juno 

Sept. 

Aug. 

April 

Oct. 

Oct. 

April 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Dec. 

Oct. 

Dec. 

i^opt. 

Jan. 

June 

July 



6, 
98, 
84, 



3; 



1764 
179» 
1768 
1819 
34, 1772 
16, 179() 
" I77U 
1797 
5, 1771 
15, 18iJ() 
la, 1771) 
13, 17«:) 
2:1, l8o< 



14, 

a, 
2, 

17, 

"I: 

30, 
6, 



17U.2 
1783 
1784 
1800 
1789 
1794 
1767 
177e 
1793 



34, lt»l 
1, 1790 
31, 178:) 
6, 1796 
20, 1784 
20, 1789 
39, 1770 
29, 179<) 
1777 
1777 



28, 

2t;. 



I>ate 

.tfccMste*. 



5, 
1, 



Keb. 
Dec. 
Mar. 13, 
July 20, 
Mar. 16, 
July 21, 
Nov. 16, 
June 6, 
July iO, 
Feb. 1, 
\ov. 6, 
May 21, 
April 25, 
Jan. U, 
June 14, 
Dec. 9, 
Dec. 34, 
s«ept. 29, 
Aug. 9, 
April 9, 
Aug. 23, 
April98, 
April 23, 
Jan. 29, 
April 17, 
April 4, 
Feb. 13, 
Sept. 9, 
April 3, 
Mar. 30, 
Feb. 27, 
April 6, 
Oct. 17, 
Not. 2, 
I7(;o;Mar. 34, 
1781 Oct. 30, 
178r.Oct. 13, 



6, 


1773 


10, 


itoo 


4, 


1819 


2, 


1798 


3, 


1797 


13, 


1791 


6, 


1779 


23, 


1799 


18, 


171.5 


12. 


1 8 15 


I, 


1815 


20, 


1785 



30, 1785 

22, I77fi 

26, 

27, 

25, 

19, 17^t|Mar. 2, 
Aug. , 9, 
Sept. 29, 
May 2, 
April 27, 
June 18, 
May 30, 
June 8, 
Mar. 13, 
Feb. 2, 
Not. 8, 
Jan. 2.5, 
July 28, 



181t 
182.. 
IbOt 
1837 
1815 

\s:n 

1797 

1834. 

18:J7 

18:J7 

18U< 

1829 

1831 

18 It) 

lh2r 

I8O1 

1803 

1834 

1817 

1796 

18:i0 

1807 

1837 

1817 

18IH 

1802 

1787 

1813 

1829 

I8;)0 

1821 

1830 

1831 

1810 

1805 

18ir 

182,'> 

1830 
18:« 
162b 
1831 
1824 
1814 
1815 
1824 
1831 
1830 
18:J3 
1808 




54 

29 
40 
18 
41 
40 
27 
39 
66 
27 
.17 
46 
25 
2:1 
45 
23 
3 
45 
23 
28 
53 
13 
36 
28 
32 
5 
3 
34 
59 
40 
44 
Si 
33 
34 
44 
3f 
39 
43 
57 
3 
7 
31 
20 
22 
35 
24 
65 
31 
18 
33 



RsUgitn. 



Lutheran 

Gr. Ch. 

Lutheraa 

Pr. Ep. 

Reformed 

Luth*n* 

Evang'l 

CBth.» 

Prot. 

Lutheran 

do. 

do. 

do. 
ETangM 
Lutheran 

do. 

do. 

do. 
EvaogM 

do. 
ReforaiM 
Lotheran 

do. 

do. 

do. 
Reform*d 

do. 
ETang'l 
Reform 'd 
Evang'l 
Reform*d 
Lutheran 
Cath. 

do. 

do. 
Lutheran 
Cath. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do.* 
Mahom^n 



* The King of Saxony is a Catholic, though the greater part of his tttbjeets are ProUstanltf 
the King of Belgium is a Protestant^ though his subjects are mo«tly Catholiet ; and the Kinf 
of Greooo ia a CoiAe/ie, though most of his subjeou tra of the Orttk CkMrek, 



268 



BUROPEAir STATES. 



[183a 



EUROPEAN STATES, 

With the Population and the Jiumber of the different Religions ^ belonging' 

to each. 
, [From the Weimar Almanac for 1837.] 



States. 



1. Anhalt-Bernburg, 

2. Anhalt-Cothcn, 

3. Antialt-Dea««i, . 
A, Au«tria,* . 

5. Baden. • . 

6. Bavaria, . 

7. Belgium, 
6. Breroeiii • . , 
9. Brunswick, 

10. Cracow, . 

11. Denmark, . 
19. Franco, . 

13. Frankfort, . 

14. Great Britain, 

15. Greece, 

16. Hamburg, 

17. Hanover, 

18. Hesae-Caisel, 

19. Hesse Darmstadt, 

90. Hesse Homburg, 

91. HoiiensoI'n-HechinfeD 
99. Hohenz. Sigmaringen, 

93. fonian fslands, . 

94. LieebtORdtein, 

95. Lippe-Detmold, . 
98. Lippe-Schauenbnrg, 

97. Lubeck, 

98. Lucca, 

99. Moeklenbur<;-8chwerin 

30. Mecklenborg-Strelilz, 

31. Hodena, 
39. Naaaaa, 

33. Nethcrlandfl, . 

34. Oldenburg, 

35. Parmn, 

36. Portugal, 

37. PruBRia, . 

38. ReuH-Elder Lino, 

39. Reus-Younger Line, 

40. Russia,* 

41. St. Marino, 
49. Sardinia, 

43. Saxe-Allenburg, 

44. Saxe-Coburg, . 

45. Saxe-Meiningon, 

46. Saxe- Weimar, 

47. Saxonj, 

48. Schwarlz-Rudolstadt, 

49. Scbwartz-Sondersh'n, 

50. Spain, 

51. States of the Church, 
59. Sweden and Norway, 

53. Switzerland, 

54. Turkey,* . 

55. Tuscany, 

56. Two Sicilies, . 

57. Waldeck, . 

58. Wurierabarg, . 

Totals 



Catholic*. 



Protest'U. Greek Cb. 



1,03<) 

37,000,000 

810,3.10 

9,8^0,383 

4,000,000 

1,550 

9,GO0i 

llf»,7:J0, 

2,0001 

31,00(),000; 

6,000l 

6,600,000 i 

3,080' 

910,000 1 

110,000 

177,888 

3.050 

91,000 

42,75» 

35,;200 

5,850 

1,600 

100^ 

400 

145,000 

642 

388,500 

167,800 

980,000 

71,580 

440,000 

3,.530,000 

4,930,000 



7,000,000 

7,000 

4,418,000 

161 

2,000 

470 

9,950 

97,519 

150 

300 

13,944,959 

2,455,557 

4,000 

800,000 

310,0(KI 

1,319,070 

7,740,187 

800 

469,035 



43,165 
35,800 
55,9J55 
9,800,000 
378,944} 
1,094,633! 
90,000 
56,350 
344,000 
1,500. 
2,040 ,l«7l 
l,IOO,OOOi 
. 49,800' 
18,67G,687J 

140,000 

1,440,300' 
559,549, 
516,687' 
90,000 



9,900,000 



611,165 



148,017 



78,400 
25,900 
45,703 

4(3,681 

48,609 

196,571 
9,100,000! 
173,027} 



8,000,000 

30,04 1 1 

68,854 : 
3,800,000 36,531,437 



117,761 
138,861 
144,a>4 
329,546 
1,. 58 1, 861 39 

63,793 

53,880 



4,023,200 
1,300,000, 

3,000 1 2,830,000 



54,700 
1,087,413 



80,000 



121,743,3571 53,340,433 43,300,668 



Jews. 



Total. 



160 

9001 

1,6401 

470,000 

19,423 

67,6741 

781' 

I,40o' 
19,350 

6,000 
60,000 

6,200 
13,500 

7,550' 
13,300 

8,300 
23,174 

1,050 

100 
5,500 



400 

3,117 

655 

1,500 

6,003 

50,000 

960 



167,600 

300 

900,000 

30,000 

1,000 

1,070 

1,410 

KiO 

167 



16,000 

845 

1,900 

250,000 

930 

3,ooo; 

500 
10,760 



43,335 

36,000, 
57,639 1 
35,400,000: 
1,S0?<,71T! 
4,187,390; 
4,149,1571 
57,d00 
946,4100 
128,480 
2,048,657, 
39,560,934, 
54,000: 
35,440,787 
811,185 
152,000 
l,6t>Q,500; 
677,81 1 . 
760,694 
34,tu0 
21,000 
42,820 
188,717 
5,850 ; 
80,000' 
96,000: 
46,503 
145,OCO 
466,540 
85,257 
390,000 
370,374 
2,806,278 
950,507 ■ 
440,000 
3,530,000 
13,566,897 
30,041 
68,854 
47,592,427 
7,000 
4,470,000 
117,921 
131,861 
146,394 
241,046 
1,558,153 
4(>,239 
54,080 
13,944,259 
9,471 ,.557 ■ 
4,028,045 
2,116,215 
12,180,000 
1,350,000 
7,840,187 
56,000, 
1,587,448, 



1,753,101,239,200,649 



* Turkey in Europe has 7,150,000 MakofUtanM, Russia 900,000, and AnstriA 500 : 
— total, 8,050,500. 

JtaU. — The sereral numbers and the sums toUl are given in this Ubie as they an 
found in tbe Weimar Almooac ; hot they are not all eonsistent with each other. 



1838.] 



POPULATION OP CITIES. 



269 



Population of Cities. 

Population of suck Cities in the different Quarters of the Globe as contain 
100,000 Inhabitants and upioards ; from M. Balbi. 

t 

EuROPK. 



1 

Ciiiet. 


Coaotriet. 


Pop. 

1 


Cities. 


(Joantriet. 


Pop. 


London, 


England, 


1,024,000 


Rome, 


Italy, 


154,000 


Parifl, 


France, 


890,000 


Milan, 


Ausi. Italy, 


151,000 


Constantinople, 


Turkey, 


600,000 


Birmingham, 


Bi.gland, 


147,000 


trt. Pelersburgb, 


KUMIU, 


449,000 


Maiseilles, 


France, 


145,000 


Naples, 


Two Sicilies, 


364,000 


Warsaw, 


Poland, 


: 140,000 


Vienna, 


Austria, 


3J3,000 


Leeds, 


England, 


123,000 


Ltislion, 


Portugal, 


960,000 


Turin, 


Sardinia, 


192,000 


Moscow, 


Russia, 


350,000 


Hamburg, 


(jerroaoy. 


122,000 


Berlin, 


Prussia, 


240,000 


Barcelona, 


Spain, 


190,000 


Dublin, 


Ireland, 


204,000 


Prague, 


Bohemia, 


120,000 


Glasgow, 


Scotland, 


202,000 


Copenhafoo, 


Denmark, 


' 115,000 


Anijttfrdam, 


Holland, 


201,000 


Venice, 


Austrian Italy, 


114,000 


Madrid, 


Spain, 


901,000 


Bordeaux, 


France, 


; 109,000 


Manchester, 


England, 


187,000 


Cork, 


Ireland, 


1 107,000 


L*irerpool, 


England, 


185,000 


Bristol. 


England, 
Belgium, 

Tarliey. 


, 104,000 


Pbiermo, 


Sicily, 


173,000 


Brussels, 


! 100,000 


Lyons, 


France, 


lt>5,000 


Adrianople, 


100,000 


Bdinburgta, 


Seotland, 


169,000 






1 






Asia. 






Pekin, 


China, 


1,300,000 Cacbemiie, 


Beiks, 


1 150,000 


Jeddo, 


Japan, 


1,300,000 Manilla, 


Philippine, 


140,000 


Hangtefaeou, 


China, 


600,000 Damascus, 


Turkey, 


140,000 


Calcutta, 


Hindostan, 


600,060; Teheran, 


Persia, 


140,000 


Benares, 


Do. 


600,000 Smyrna, 


Turkey, 


130,000 


Meaeo, 


Japan, 


500,000 Paunab, 


Hindosun, 


119,000 


Canton, 


China, 


- 500,000 Nagpour, 


Do. 


115,000 


Nankin, 


Do? 


500,000 BariMla, 


Do. 


100,000 


Rinstschio, 

Madras, 


Do. 


500,000 ; Lahore, 


Seiks, 


100,000 


Hindostan, 


4(»,000 Candahar, 


Cabul, 


, 100,000 


Patna, 


Do. 


312,000 Herat, 


Chorassan, 


100,000 


Lacknow, 


Do. 


300,000 Balfroneb, 


Persia, 


100,000 


Delhi, 


Do. 


950,000 Tauris, 


Do. 


100,000 




Do. 


900,000 Ashmedabad, 


Hindostan, 


100,000 


Ispahan, 
Aleppo, 


Persia, 


900,000 Ougein, 


Do. 


100,000 


Tarkey, 


900,000 Hue, 


Cochin-China, 


100,000 


Mtrzapoar, 


Hindostan, 


200,000 Saigon, 


Cambodia, 


100,000 


Dacca, 


Do. 


200,000 Tocat, 


Turkey, 


100,000 


Moorsbedabad, 


Do. 


165,000 Bursa, 


Do. 


100,000 


Bombay, 


IH). 


162,000 nngdad, 


Do. 


100,000 


Surat, 


Do. 


160,000 Erzerom, 


Do. 


100,000 


Oasacea, 


Japan, 
Do. 


150,000 Jisagounggar, 


Thibet, 


100,000 


Nara, 


150,000,1 










America. 






New York, 1 


[Jnited SUtet , 
Mexico, 


270,000 


Rio Janeiro, 


Braxil, 


140,000 


Mexico, 


180,000 


Baliia, 


Do. 


120.000 


Philadelphia, 1 


[Jnited States, 


168,000 


Havana, 


Cube, 


119,000 






Avrica. 


• 




Cairo, 1 


Egypt, 1 


333,000||Tanb, j' 


ronli, 1 


100,000 



23* 



370 POPDI^TIOIt ASD IZTBHT OF TBB OLOBE. [1808. 

PoFDLATioR aud Eitiht or the Gloik. 









B.]bl. Wflliur AlDinic ~ 1837. 


Pop. 


.fSii^r^ ''■ 


,<,. u.il». 1 






ai.im.am 

M.1W0,(W0 
20^^ 


1I^>1,"0(», 5.3 1 I01,3I3,17B 
M,730,1KH» 9.6 *3,9W.,I2« 

«,10S,D(M 4.3 1 l,4T3,aU 


n,23S^ 3:.3 
li;7ii;0O0 is 


)3!,OCO,000 


49,BM,0UU 14.B |l,(»3,398,M 


19,963,436' W-^ 



PoroLlTlUN or THE 9ETIK1L StaTII ADD CoDHTnilB 

J* ilnCeil in lit Wtimat Mmanac far 1837. 



Stater and Empira. 




/*£a)uf<. 
























E.^™^Ap.«.. 




















S'™1no..fi.„H.,- .■ .iH^-S."! 
































HinJi. or Uinfliii, 






Fbragn Poutsaumt. 


fi™^r-. ■ 




St 












goj^^adi.,, . 


S 


PoT^BBwD^'. . . HJ.'wm 






Tumi 


P^f.., 


., 0M,R»,«9. 






C, Ciihoiic ; P. Piouiunt i H. Hiiod, ibat li, ixnlr CiUhIb, uail panir Fi 



3838.] SWEDEN AlfD NORWAT. 271 

I. SWEDEN AND NORWAY. 
Kino avo Royal Family. 

CHARLES XlV.y King of Sweden and Norway ; b. at Pan, in 
France, Jan. 26, 1764 ; aucceeded to the throne Feb. 5, 1818 ; m. Aug. 
16, 1798, EuoKHix Bermardhins dk Clary, b.Nov. 6, 1781 : — Isaoe : 

Jos^k Francis Oscar, Prince Royal, Duke of Sudermania; b. 
July 4, 1799 ;.ni. June 19, 1823, the Princess Josephine, daughter of the 
late Prince Eugene de Beauharnais, Duke of Leuchtenberg, b. March 
14, 1807 : — Issue : — 

1. Charles Lewis Eugene, (Hereditary Prince,) Duke of Scania; b. 
May 3, 1826. 

2. Francis Gustavus Oscar, Duke of Upland ; b. June 18, 1827. 

3. Oscar Frederick, Duke of East Gothland ; b. Jan. 21, 1829. 

4. Charlotte Eugenie Augusta Jimelia Albertine; b. April 24, 1830 

5. CharUs Augustus fTicholas, Duke of Dalecarlia ; b. Aug. 24, 1831. 

GoYERlfMBllT. 

Sweden and Norway have different constitutions, though under the 
goyemment of one and the same king, who is, of all the constitutional 
monarchs of Europe, one of the most limited. The legislative body of 
Sweden, styled the Diet or States General, consists of four orders, 
the nobles, the clergy, the burgesses, and the peasantry. In Nor- 
way nobility is abolished, and the legislative body, styled the Storthing, 
consists of two houses. 

POPOLATIOH. 

Sweden, 1831, 2,888,196. Stockholm, city, 77,273. 

Norway, 1832, 1,139,849. Christiania, do. 18,305. 

St. Bartholomew's, W. India, Swedish Colony, 18,000. 



n. RUSSIA. 
Emperor and Imperial Family. 
NICHOLAS, Emperor of all the Russias, and King of Poland ; b. 
July 6, 1796; m. July 13, 1817, Alexandra (formerly Charlotte), 
daughter of the King of Prussia, b. July 13, 1798; — succeeded his 
hrtfiher Alexander, Dec. 1, 1825 (his elder brother ConstarUine, b. May 
8, 1779, having renounced his right to the throne, — died 1831): — 
Issue : — 

1. Alexander, Grand Duke, Herediiary Prince ; b. AprU 29, 1818. 

2. Mary, Grand Duchess; b. Aug. 18, 1819. 

3. Olga, Grand Duchess; b. Sept. 11, 1822. 

4. Alexandra, Grand Duchess ; b. June 84, 1825. 

5. ConsUmtime, Grand Duke ; b. Sept. 21, 1827. 

6. /fickolas, Grand Duke ; b. Aug. 8, 1831. 

7. Michael, Grand Duke ; b. Oct 25, 1832. 



272 RUSSIA. [183a 

Princes of the Blood. 

Maria, Princesii of Saze- Weimar ; b. Feb. 16, 1786. 

Jinne, PrinceBs of Orange ', b. Jan. 18, 1795. 

Michael, Grand Duke; b. Feb. 9, 1798; in. Feb. 20, 1894, Pauiinm^ 
niece of the King of Wurtemberg, b. Jan. 9, 1807 : — Issue ; Mttria 
(b. Ib25), Elizabeth (b. 1826), Catherine (b. 1827), and Mne (b. 1834). 

G(\V£RKMEKT. 

The government of Russia is an absolute hereditary monarchy ; and 
it is conducted by a Council of the Empire, the Ministry, and a Senate ; 
the last of which is a body partly deliberative and partly executive ; 
but there is no representative body. The established religion ia the 
Greek church, but all others are tolerated. 

Population of the Russian Territories. 
Russia in Europe, 44,563,600. 

The kingdom of Poland, subject to Russia, 4,0S3,O0O. 

Russia in Asia, 12,407,190. 

Russian Possessions in America, 50,000. 

Total, 61,123,790. 



111. DENMARK. 
Kino and Royal Family. 
FREDERICK VI., King of Denmark, Duke of Pomerania ; b. Jan. 28, 
1768 ; declared co-regent with his Father, Christian Vll., April 14, 1784, 
succeeded to the throne March 13, 1808; m. July 31, 1790, Maria 
Sophia F&ederica, Princess of Uesse-Cassel, b. October 28, 1767 : 
Issue : — 

1. Caroline^ Princess Royal; b. Oct. 28, 1793; m. to Prince Freder- 
ick Ferdinand, Aug. 1, 1829. 

2. WUhelmina; b. Jan. 17, 1808; m. to Prince Frederick Chailee 
Christian, Nov. 1, 1828. 

Christian Frederick, cousin to the King; Crown Prince; b. 
Sept. 18, 1786; m. (i.) Feb. 18, 1806, Charlotte, Princes of Meck- 
lenburg-Schwerin : — Issue : Frederick Citarles Christian, b. Oct. tJ, 
1808; (11.) May 22, 1815, Caroline Amelia, daughter of Duke Frederick 
Christian of Holstein, b. June 28, 1796. 

The Government of Denmark is an absolute hereditary monarchy. 

Population of the Kingdom and Colonies, 1828. 
Denmark Proper, 1,521,278 Santa Cruz, St. Thomas, 

Uolstein and Lauenburg, 410,385 and St. Jobn*s, W. In- 
Iceland, 49,126 dies, 46,290 

Faroe Islands and Green- Tranquebar in Asia, and 

land, 6,630 Guinea in Africa, ^,000 



Total, (in Europe,) 1,987,419 



Total, (Foreign Colonies,) 74,290 



1838.] 



BBLGIUM. 



273 



IV. BELGIUM. 

KiKO AND ROTAL FaMILT. 

LEOPOLD, King of the Belgians, formerly Prince Leopold of Saze- 
Oobarg, brother of the present Duke of Saxe-Cobarg-Gotha ; b. Dec. 
16, 1790; m. (i.) May 2, 1816, the daughter of George IV. of England, 
who died Nov. 6, 1S17; elected King of the Belgians, June 4, 1831; 
took the oath (o the constitution, July 21, 1831 ; m. (ii.) Aug. 9, 1832, 
Louise, daughter of Louis Philippe, King of France, b. April 3, 1812: 
— Issue : — 1. Leopold Louis Philip Maria Victor, Prince Royal; b. April 
9, 1835.-2. PhUip Ferdinand Eugene George, b. March 24, 1827. 

GOVEIINMENT. 

The government is a constitutional hereditary monarchy. The 
legislature is composed of a Senate and Chamber of Representatives 
or Deputies. The number of deputies is apportioned to the popula- 
tion, and cannot exceed the proportion of 1 deputy to 45,000 inhabit- 
ants ; and the number of senators is equal to half the number of 
deputies. The deputies are elected for four years, and the senators for 
eight years, by citizens paying a direct tax determined by the electoral 
law ; the requisite sum cannot exceed 100 florins, nor be less than 20 
florins. The Chambers assemble by their own right, every year, on 
the 2d Tuesday in November, unless convoked earlier by the king. 

Statistical Tablb of Belgium — including the Grand'duchy of 

Luzemburg. 







Doaf 






lohabitanu | | 


Prortneofl. 


Pop. I'd 1835. 


ond 


Blind. 




to 


Capitals. 






Dumb. 


3a3 


Birtbi, 
32 


Deaths, 
46 


Uarria^eB. 
149 




Antwerp, 


353,936 


102 


Antwerp. 


Brabant, 


566,809 


240 


514 


29 


41 


137 


Brussels. 


W. Flanders, 


615.JK)4 


281 


544 


30 


39 


169 


Bruges. 


E. Flanders, 


747,569 


312 


814' 


30 


43 


173 


Ghent. 


' Hainault, 


626,942 331 


715 


30 


^ 48" 


140 


Mons. 


j Liege, 


380,189 


194 


403 


31 


47 


155 


Liege. 


Li m burg, 


326,737 


173 


32f 


32 


44 


139 


Maestricht. 


NaiDur, 


220,332; 140 


219. 


33 


56 


154 'Namur. 


Luxemburg, 
Totals Mean, 


316,504 


127 


197 


28 
30 


43 
43 


128 


Luxemburg. 


4,154,922 


1,900 


4,117 


144 


t 

1 

















V. HOLLAND OR NETHERLANDS. 

Kino and Royal Family. 

WILLIAM, King of Holland (Netherlands), Prince of Orange- 
Nassau; b. Aug. 24, 1772; succeeded his father in his hereditary pos- 
sessions in Germany, April 9, 1806; declared Sovereign Prince of the 
Netherlands, December 3, 1813 ; assumed the crown, March 16, 1815; 
m. October 1, 1791, Wilhelmiva, sister of the King of Prussia, b. No- 
vember 18, 1774 ; — Issue : — 



274 



HOLLAND OR NETHCRLANDS. 



[1838. 



1. William, Prince Royal and Prince of Orange, Field- Marshal; 
b. Dec. 6, 1792; m. Feb. 21, 1816, j^nne, sister of the Emperor of Rns- 
oia, b. Jan. 18, 1795 : — Issue ; William^ b. Feb. 19, 1817 ; Mexander, 
b. Aug. 2, 1818 ; Frederick, b. June 13, 1820; Sophia, b. April 8, 1884. 

2. Frederick, b. Feb. 28, 1797; m. May 21, 1825, Louisa, 3d daugrhter 
of the king of Prussia : — Issue ; WUhelmina, b. Aug. 5, 1828 ; Freder- 
erick, b. July 6, 1833. 

3. Marienne; b. May 9, 1810 ; m. Sept. 14, 1830, to Albert of Pnusia. 

Government. 

The government is a constitutional, hereditary monarchy. The legis- 
lative power is vested in the King and the States General, a body con- 
sisting of two Chambers, which meet annually. The first Chamber is 
composed of not less tha.n 40 nor more than 60 members, of 40 years of 
age and upwards, nominated by the king for life. The second Cham- 
ber contains 110 members elected by the people every three years 

Population of Holland in 1835. 

North Holland, 420,345 Guelderland, 323,167 Friesland, 217,8® 

South Holland, 492,918 Overyssel, 186.062 North Brabant, 355,l.^iO 

Zealand, 140,342 Drenthe, 67,230 Luxemburg, ^ ono *:«^ 

Utrecht, 134,364 Groningen, 166,164 Gr.duchy, 1831, 5 •^'«»*^^ 

Total, 2,806,278. 

Population or the Dutch Colonies. 
In Asia, — Batavia, Amboyna, Banda, Ternate, Maoaasar, 

Sumatra, and Timor, 6,561,700 

In America, — Surinam, St. Eustatia, and Curasao, . 9(>,0<K) 



ToUU, 



6,651,700 



VI. GREAT BRITAIN. 

Population and Extent op the Possessions op the British Cmpiiib, 
AS stated in the Edinburgh Almanac for 1837. 



1 

PopulatioD. 

1 


Square milev. 


Popala. to 
>q. mile. 


Great Britain and Ireland, 
Gibraltar, Malta, and Gozo, 
British India and Dependencies, 
Ceylon and Mauritius, 
Cape Colony, 

Sierra Leone, St. Helena, &c.. 
West Indies and Guiana, 
•North American Provinces, 
'Australian Colonies, 


24,306,710 

140.11^ 

123,300,000 

1,050,000 

150,000 

44,450 

903,640 

1,350,876 

129,600 


118,209 

164 

1,180,000 

25,340 

200,000 

115,000 
410,000 
oUo,ouU 


205.t> 

854 4 

104.5 

41.4 

07 1 

7.8 1 
3.3 1 

0.4 


Total, 


150,375,407 


2,357,213 



• Britiih North America aod AuatralU ar« estimatod at 3,000,000 sqaara milea 



183&] GREAT BBITAlir. 275 

GOTERNHXNT. 

The governmenl of Great Britain is a constitutiona] bereditary mon- 
archy. In the descent of the crown the constitutional rule recognises 
the right of primogeniture among the males, and of the males in prefer- 
ence to the females ; but, upon failure of the male line, the crown de- 
scends to the eldest of the female issue. The descent is limited to such 
heirs only as are Protestant members of the church of England, and are 
married to none but Protestants. 

** By statute 12 George III. ch. l), no descendants of George II. (ex- 
cept the issue of princesses married into foreign families) can contract 
matrimony without the previous consent of the King, unless, being of 
the age of 25, tbey give a twelvemonth's notice of such intention to the 
privy council, and, before the expiration of that period, no disapproba- 
tion is expressed by Parliament" 

In the government of Great Britain the power of the sovereign is con- 
trolled by the influence of the aristocracy in the House of Peers, and by 
that of the democracy in the House of Commons. The executive 
authority is vested in the Sovereign, the legislative in the Sovereign 
and Parliament. The Sovereign has the power of appointing all the 
great officers of state ; and all the executive acts of the government are 
performed in his or her name ; but the ministers only are responsible 
for them. 

QOKER AND ROTAL FaMILY. 

VICTORIA, Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and 
Ireland, (daughter of the late Dvke of Kentf — b. Nov. 2, 1767 ; died Jan. 
23, 1820, — by Victoria Maria Louisa, sister of the Duke of Saxe-Coburg 
and of Leopold, King of the Belgians); — b. May 24, 1819; succeeded 
heruncle VVilUum IV., June 20, 1837. 

Queen Dowager. 
Melaide, consott of William IV., late King of England ; sister of the 
Duke of Saxe-Meiningen, b. Aug. 13, 1792. 

Uncles and Aunts of the Q}teen. 

1. Augusta Sophia; b. Nov. 8, 1768; — unmarried. 

2. Eliidbeth; b. May 22, 1770 ; m. April 7, 1818, to Frederick Joseph 
Liewis, Landgrave of Hesse-Homburg, who died April 2, 1829. 

3. Ernest Augustus, King of Hanover (late Duke of Cumberland) ; b. 
Jane 5, 1771 ; m. May 29, 1815, Frederica Sophia Carolina^ sister of the 
Dake of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, b. March 20, 1778 ; — Issue ; George 
Frederuk, b. May 27, 1819. 

4. Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex ; b. Jan. 27, 1773 ; — m. at 
Rome April 4, and at London Dec. 5^ 1793, Lady Augusta Murray, 
daughter of the Earl of Dumnore, who died 1830. — This marriage, 
being contrary to the 12 Geo. HI., was declared void, in 1794, 



276 fiREAT BBITAIF. [1836. 

5. jjdolphus Frederick, Duke of Cambridge; b. Feb. 24, 1774; e 
May 7, 1818, Augusta WUhdnUna Lomaay nieoe of the LaDdgra^e of 
Hetse, b. July 5, 1797 ; — Issue ; 1. Gttnrgt WiUiam, b. March 26, 1819: 
2. Augusta CaroUne, b. July 19, 1822; 3. Mary Addaide; b. Nov. 27 
1833. 

6. Mary^ Duchess of Gloucester; b. April 25, ]776; — m. July 21 
1816, to her cousin, William Frederick^ Duke of Gloucester, who died 
Nov. 30, 1834. 

7. Sophia; b. Nov. 3, 1777 ; — unmarried. 

Ministry. 

The Ministry under Earl Grey went out of office in Jnly, 1834 ; anc 
a new ministry was formed with Lord Melbourne at its head. This lat- 
ter was dissolved in November, 1834, and another was formed with Sir 
Robert Fed at its head. In April, 1835, Sir Robert Peel and his col- 
leagues resigned, and Lord Mdboume was reinstated in o^ce. For a 
view of the succession of the several ministries for the preceding 37 
years, see the American Almanac for 1834, page 294. 



Viscount Melbourne, First Lord of the Treasury^ £5,000 

Lord Cottenham, Lord- Chancellor , 14,000 

Marquis of Lansdowne, I^nrd President of the Coundi^ 2,000 

Viscount Duncannon, Lord Privy Seal ; Commissioner 

of Woods and Forests, 2,000 

Rt. Hon. Th. Spring Rice, Chancellor of the Exchequer, 5,000 

Lord John Russell, Sec. State for the Home Dep.^ 5,000 

Viscount Palmerston, Sec. State for Foreign Affairs, 5,000 

Lord Glenelg, V See. State for Colonial Affairs, 5,000 

Earl of Minto, First Lord of the Admiralty, 4,500 

Rt. Hon. Sir J. C. Hobhouse, Prts. of the Board of Control, 3,500 
Rt. Hon. Sir Ch. Poulett Thompson,Pre«. of the Board of JYade, 2,000 

Viscount Howick, Secretary at War, 2,580 

Lord Holland, Chan, of Duchy of Lancaster, 4,000 

The above form the Cabinet. 



m » 



Rt. Hon. Sir Henry Pamell, Paym,'Gen,and Treas.qf Jfapy, 3,000 

Sir R. Hussey Vivian, Master-Gen, of the Ordinance, 3,500 

Earl of Lichfield, Postmaster^ General, 2,500 

H. Labouchere, Master of the Mint, ^., 2,000 

R. Cutlar Ferguson, Judge-Advocate- General, 

John A. Murray, Lord- Advocate f&r Sootlandm 

John Cunninghame, SoUeitor- General for SeotUmd. 

Sir John Campbell, Attorney* General, 

Bir R. M. Rolfe, SeHieitor-Generml. 



1838.] GREAT BRITAIfT. 277 





Ireland. 


Smtary. 


£arl Malgrave, 


Lord-JUeutenani, 


£20,000 


Lord Plunket, 


Lord- Chancellory 


8,000 


Viscount Morpeth, 


Secretary of SUUe, 


5,S00 


Stephen Woulfe, 


Attorney' General. 
Solicitor* Oeneral. 

Parmameivt. 





The Parliament of Great Britain consista of a House of Lords and a 
House of Commons. 

House of Lords or Peers. 

The House of Lords consists of Lords Temporal, who are Peers of the 
Realm, and whose honors, immunities, and privileges are hereditary ; 
and Lords Spiritual, consisting of Archbishops and Bishops. 

The House of Lords is composed of all the five orders of nobility of 
England, viz dukes, marquises, earls, viscounts, and barons, who have 
attained the age of 21 years, and labor under no disqualification ; of 16 
representative peers from Scotland ; 28 representative peers from Ire- 
land ; 2 English archbishops and 24 bishops ; and 4 representative Irish 
bishops. The number of each, in 1837, was as follows : — 



Dukes, (3 Royal Dukes,) . 24 
Marquises, .... 10 
Earls, ... .107 
Viscounts, . 16 

Barons, 192 



Peers of Scotland, (elected,) 16 
Peers of Ireland, (elected for life,) 28 
English Archbishops and Bishops, 26 
Irish Representative Archbishops 
and Bishops, ... 4 



Total, 432 

House of Comioirs. 

The House of Commons consists of knights, citizens, and burgesses, 
respectively chosen by counties, cities, and boroughs. Important 
changes were made in relation to the House of Commons by the Act of 
Parliamentary Reform of 1832, an account of which may be seen in the 
American Almanac for 1833. 

The Septennial Act of 1715 extended the duration of Parliament to 7 
years, unless dissolved by the King ; but it seldom happens that a Parlia- 
ment sits out this period. The union of Ireland was carried into effect 
January 1, 1801 ; and the Parliament which sat the same month, and 
which included tlie members from Ireland, is styled the 1st Imperial 
Parliament; and the Parliament which assembled January 29, 1833, is 
styled the Uth Imperial, or the 1^ Reformed Parliament. The 12th 
Imperial, or Sd Reformed Parliament| was dissolved on the 17th of July, 

2# 



S78 



GREAT BRITAIN. 



[1838. 



1837 ; and a new Parliament haa recently been elected. The followin? 
table exhibits the succession ot Parliaments since the union with Ireland. 



« 




VVhon asfombled. 


Wlion diMolrcd. 


Exut<w!. 


... 
( 




Y. M. 0. 


2d Imperial Parliament, 


August 31, 180-2 October 
Nov. 25, IttOG May 


24, 1806 


4 1 25 


3d do. 


. do. 


27, 1807 


6 2 


4th do. 


do. 


Nov. 27, l807,Sept 


29, 1812 


4 10 2 


5th do. 


do. 


Nov. 24, 181-2'june 


10, 1818 


5 6 16 


6th do. 


do. 


August 4, 18 lb, February 


29, 1820 


1 6 2ii 


7th do. 


do. 


April 23, ]d*<>o:.lune 


2, 182(; 6 I L^ 


»8th do. 


do. 


Nov. 14, 182t>;july 


24, 183(»> 4 1 22 


9th do. 


do. 


Oct. 2(5, 1830 April 


22,1831 


5 27 


10th do. 


do. 


June 14, 1831 Dec. 


3,1832 


5 2C« 


llth Im. or 


1st Ref. Par. 


Jan. 29, 183:^ Dec. 


30,1834 


2 25 


12th do. 


2d do. 


Feb. 15>, 18;i5July 


17, 18:i7 


1 4 26 



DisUributian of the Members of the House of Commons. 

Ehglamd. 

Klectan. 

144 344^ 



S6 Counties, 4 each j; 7, 3 each ; 6, 2 each ; York- > 



Wales. 

3 (yoanties, 2 each ; and 9 Counties, 1 each, 
14 Districts of Boroughs, I each. 



15 
14 



Total for Wales^ . 



Scotland. 



33 Counties, 

76 Cities and Boroughs, 



30 
23 



Total for ScoUand, 53 



I&EtAITD. 

32 Counties, 2 each, 

6 Cities, 2 each ; 27 Boroughs, 1 each ; ) 
University of Dublin, 2, 5 

Total for Irelandf . . . . 

Total for the ^ehoU United Kingdom, 



64 
41 

105 
658 



shire, 6; Isle of Wight, 1 ; total 40 Counties 

133 Cities and Boroughs, 2 each, . .266"^ 

53 Boroughs, 1 each, .... 53 

City of London, 4 

Universities, Oxford Sl Cambridge, 2 each, 4^ 

Total for England, 471 619,213 



k 327 274,649 



25,815 
11,309 



29 37,124 



33, ns 

31,332 
64,447 



60,607 
31,545 

92,152 



I 



183a] 



BRBAT BRITAIN. 



379 



England, 
WaJes, 
Scotland, 
Ireland y 



Sq. mile*. 



50,210 

29,7o7 
31, 20-2 



Toud, 119,324 
Armjy Navy, Ac., 

Toto/, 



Populatioo ID 



I3,0t59,:i:w 

H(»5,23() 
2,3<)5,8<»7 
7,7ri4,rj36 



24,044,917 
277,017 



Rpj^ittered 
Eltfctor*. 



619,213 

37,124 
64,447 
92,152 

812.936 





Uott 


M. P. 


Elector 




to Pop. 


471 


21 


29 


24 


53 


38 


105 


84 


658 


29 



Om M. p. 

to Po|i. 



27,790 
27,042 
44,634 
74,138 



36,648 



24,321,934 



JUDICIART. 

High Court of Chancery, — Lord Cottenham, Lord High ChaneeUor ; 
Lord Langdale, Master of the Rolls ; Sir Launcelot Shadwell, F»m- 
Chanetllor. 

Court qf the King*s Bench. — Lord Denman, Lord Chief Justice ; — 
Sir Joieph Littledale, Sir J. Patteaoo, Sir J. Williama, and Sir J. T. 
Coleridge, Judges, 

Court of Common Pleas. — Sir N.^ C. Tindal, Lord Chirf Justice; — 
Sir James Allen Park, Sir Stephen Gaaelee, Sir John B. Boaanqnel, 
and Sir John Vaughan, Judges, 

Court of Exchequer, — Lord Abinger, Lord Chief Baron ; — Sir W. 
Holland, Sir J. Gurney, Sir J. Parke, and Sir E. Alderson, Barons, 

Court of Admiralty. — Sir John NichoU, Judge; — Sir John Dodfon, 
King^s Advocate General; — Dr. Philliinore, Admiralty-Advocate. 

Scotland. 

Court of Session, — 1st Division. Charles Hope, Lord President; 
D. R. W. Ewart, Lord Balgray; Adam Gillies, Lord Gillies; J. H. 
Mackenzie, Lord Mackenzie. 

2d Division. — David Boyle, Lard Justice Clerk; Sir Wm. Miller, 
Lord Glenlee ; Alexander McConnochie, Lord Meadowbank ; J. H. 
Forbes, Lord Medwyn. 

Ireland. 

Court of Chancery. — Lord Plunket, Lord Chancellor. Sir William 
McMahon, Master of the Rolls, 

Court of the King's Bench. — Charles K. Bushe, Chief Justice, Charles 
Burton, P. C Crampton, Louis Perrin, Judges, 

Court of Common Pleas. — John Doherty, Chief Justice. Arthur 
Moore. William Johnson, and Robert Torrens, Judges, 



280 



great britain. 

Archbishops and Bishops of Enolard. 

Ptovince of Canterbury. 



[1838. 



a 
o 



1813 

J824 
ltJ36 
1812 
1816 
1820 
1820 
1834 
1824 
1825 
1827 
1838 
1829 
1830 
1830 
1834 
1836 
1836 
1837 
1837 



Archbishop. 



Wm. HoNvle^, D. D., PrimaU. 

Bubopi. 
Chariot J. Blomfiald, D. D. 
Charles Sumnor, D. D. 
George Henry Law, D. D. 
Herbert Marsh, D. D. 
John Kaye, D. D. 
William Carey, D. D. 
Robert Jamex Carr. D. D. 
Christopher Beihell, D. D. 
J. Banks JeokinsoD, D. D. 
George Marray, D. 0. 
Bdward Copleston, D. D. 
Richard Bagot, D. D. 
John Henry Monk, D. D. 
Hoary Phillpotts, D. D. 
Joseph Allen, D. D. 
Samuel Bailer, D. O. 
William Otter, D. D. 
Edward Denisoa, D. D. 
Edward Stanley, O. D. 



Dioceees. 



Canterbary, 

London, 

Winchester, 

Bath and Wells, 

Peterboroagh, 

Lincoln, 

St. Asaph, 

Worcester, 

Bangor, 

St. David's, 

Rochester, 

Llandaff, 

Oxford, 

Glouces. & Bristol, 

Bxeter, 

Ely, 

Lichfield Sc Gov. 

Chichester, 

Salisbury, 

Norwich, 

Hereford, 



Net 
Income. 



£19,162 

13,939 
11,151 
5,94r> 
3,103 
4,542 
6,301 
6,569 
4,464 
1,897 
1,459 
924 
9,648 
4,633 

A1,105 
3,923 
4,229 
3,939 
5,395 
3,576 



Propoeed 
Income. 



£15,000 

10,000 
7,000 
5,000 



5,000 



5,500 



No. 
Beoe- 

6ce«. 

346 

640 
419 
430 
SS3 

1,951 
143 
333 
133 
409 
94 
192 
196 
536 
613 
150 
610 
967 
397 

1,096 
321 



G-ron 
looome. 

£L29,S4i: 

967.685 
153,985 

37:«,--C6 

73,3;:.! 

6O,f350 

44,5© 

36i,MT 

5l,b96 

156,60P 

194,Iri 

56,4i«5 

170,M« 

82,5:3 

134,25» 

331.750 

90^' 



Province of York. 



1 Archbishop. 












1791 Edward Harcourt, D. C. L. 


York, 


19,699 


10,000 


891 


933^ 


Bishops. 












1831 Edward Multby, D. D. 


Durham, 


19,066 


6,000 


199 


74^7 


1697 Hugh Percy, D. D. 


Carlisle, 


9,913 




194 


92,4-71 


1828 John Bird Sumner. D. D. 
1636 Charles Tb. Lougley, 


Chester, 


3,961 




630 


190.310 


Ripon, 










1 o ^» 


Manchester, 










1837 William Ward, D. D. 


Sodor & Man, < 






S3 


3,727' 



The Bishops of Durham, London, and Winchester rank next to the 
Archbishops. The Bishop of Sodor and Man is not a Lord of Parlia- 
ment. 

The Ecclesiastical Commissioners, in their Reports, recommended 
that two new sees should be formed in the province of York, viz. Ripon 
and Manchestet ; that Gloucester and Bristol should be united ; also, 
St. Asaph and Bangor ; that Sodor and Man should be annexed to Car- 
lisle ; that the income of some of the sees should be reduced, and that 
of others increased : but that the income should not be reduced unless 
it exceed 5,500(.; nor increased, where it amounts to 4,500Z. 

The total gross income of the several Sees is stated by the Report of 
the Commissioners, at £181, €31 ; net income £161 , 292 ; — the number 
of Benefices 10,540, gross income, £3,197,145 ; net income, £3,004,639 ; 
— number of Curates, 5,232 \ — average annual net income of each per- 
son, £285 ; average annual stipend of the curates, £81 . 



1838.J 



«REAT BRITAIN, 



281 



Arcbbishops and BiSHOPi of Irelawd. 



o 



Archbishops. 



Sees. 



!8Uo hoTtiT7ii. BerostbidtD.D. Armngh. 
16:ri|Kichard Whaiely, D. D. Dublin. 
ISiti Richard Laurence,D.C.L. Caihul. 
18US P. Le Poer Trench, D. D.|Taain. 

Bishops. 

laOl N. Alexander, I>. D, Meath. 

]603{Ch. D. Lind«ey, D. D. ^Kildare. 
180-2 G. la P. Bcrostbrd, D. D. Kilmore. 
19!}<t-:^iephea C. Sandos, D. D. KilUloe^ CI. 
18041 Ld. R.P. TotteDhum,D.D. I^tjfogher. 

i*Killolafc A. 



c 
o 



Bishops. 



181-i|John Loslio, D. D. 
Id] 3, Robert Fowler, D. I). 
IdI9'James Saurin, D. O. 
1830, Richard Mant, O. D. 



1822| Edmund Knox, D. D 

1828 R. Ponsonby, D. D. 
1830 Siuouol Kyfo, D. O. 



Seoi. 

I^Elphin. ~ 
]*OMorj. 
,*Dioraore. 
IDowd & Coo. 
Leig.&. Ferns. 
Limerick. 
Clojne. 
Derry. 
*Corli A; Boat. 
*Raphoe. 
^Cionfert fcK. 
*Walerf.abL. 



According to the act of Parliament of 1833, entitled " An Act to alter 
and amend the Laws relating to the Temporalitiei of the Chorch of 
Ireland,'* the archbishoprics of Cashel and Thiam are to be annexed to 
Armagh and Dablin, and are to be suppressed as archbishoprics^ and 
reduced to bishoprics ; and the ten bishoprics to which an asterisk ia 
prefixed are to be abolished, and their duties transferred to other sees. 
This change is to take effect whenever tlie sees become vacant by the 
decease of the present incambents. 

English Bishops m India. 



Coos. 



Bishops. 



1832 Daniel Wilson, D. D. 

1835 

1830 Thomas Carr, D. D. 

1836 William Grant Broughton, D. D. 



Dioeeses. 



Calcutta, 
Madras, 
Bombavi 
Australia, 



Alloirance. 



£5,000 
2.500 
2,500 
2,000' 



Clergy. 



37 
24 
12 



Number or Congregations of Dissenters in Eivolano, as stated 
IN THK Evangelical Almaicac for 1837. 



Congregationalists, 1,840 

Baptists, . . 1,317 

Orthodox Presbyterians, 60 

Wesleyan Methodists. . 2,818 



Calvinistic Methodists, 
Other Methodists, 
Unitarians, . 
Quakers, 



607 
666 
197 
396 



7,901 

453 

8,354 



ToUdj 

Home Missionary and other stations, .... 
Total 

Universities. 
Oxford; founded according to some in 872; according to others in 
1172 ; — Doke of Wellington, Chancellor ;~- 19 Colleges and 5 Halls ;^ 
32 Professors and Lecturers ; — Members of convocation, in 1836, 2,567 ; 
Members on the Books, 5,154. 

24" 



282 GREAT BRITAIN. [18S8 

Cambridgk ; founded in 1257 ; — Marquis of Camden, Chancellor ;— 
13 Colleges and 4 Halls ; — 30 Professors and Lecturers ; — Members of 
the Senate, in 1836, 2,552 ; Members on the Boards, 5,457. 

London ; founded in 1826, incorporated in 1837 ; — Earl of Bnrliof- 
ton. Chancellor ; — 26 Professors ; — Students, in 1836, 574 ; 150 d* 
them in arts and law. 

Durham ; founded in 1832; — 14 Professors, Lecturers, and Headers 

King* 3 College^ London ) founded in 1829 ; — Rev. Hugh James Rose, 
Principal ; — 26 Professors and Masters ; — Students, in 1836, 759 ; — 
180 of them in medicine. 

St. Andrews, founded in 1410, consisting of the United College of 
St. Salvator, and St. Leonard, ( , Principal^) and the 

College of St. Mary, (Robert Haldane, D. D., Principal ; ) 11 Professors : 
Students in the United College, in 1836, 111; in St. Mary's, in 1826, 99 

Glasgow; founded in 1451; — Sir Robert Peel, Rector ; — Duncaa 
Macfa(lan, D. D., Principal; 21 Professors and Lecturers; Students, in 
1836, 542. 

Aberdeen ; composed of King's College, founded in 1495, (Williim 
Jack, D. D., Principal,) and of Marischal College, founded in 15^, 
(Daniel Dewar, D. D., Pnncipal;) — 27 Professors and Lecturers; — 
Students, in 1836,615. 

Edinburgh ; founded in 1582 ; — Geo. H. Baird, D. D., Principal ; — 
33 Professors; — Students, in 1825, 2,236 ; in 1832, 2,020. 

Dublin ; founded in 1591 ; — Duke of Cumberland, Chancellor ; — 
19 Professors; — Students, in 1828, 1,254. 

Ro%fal College of St. Patrick, Maynooth ; a Catholic Seminary, insti- 
tuted in 1795; VV. Montague, D. D., President; 13 Professors. 



VII. FRANCE. 

Kino and Rotal Family. 

LOUIS PHILIPPE, King of the French; — of the branch of Or- 
leans, and descended from a brother of Louis XIV; b. Oct. 6, 1773 ; — 
King of the French, Aug. 9, 1830, (on the deposition of Charles X.) ; — 
m. Not. 25, 1809, Maria Amelia, daughter of Ferdinand L, late 
King of the Two Sicilies; b. April 26, 1782: — Issue : — . 

1. Ferdinand, Duke of Orleans, Prince Royal, b. at Palermo, Sept 
3, 1810; m. May 30, 1837, Helena, Princess of Mecklenburg, sister of 
the Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, b. Jan. 24, 1814. 

2. Louise; b. April 3, 1812; m. Aug. 9, 1832, Leopold, King of the 
Belgians. 

3. Maria; h. April 12, 1813. 



1838.J FRANCE. 283 

4. Lams CharUsy Duke of Nemoan ; b. Oct. 85, 1614. 

5. Clementina ; b. June 3, 1817. 

6. Francis, Prince of Joinville ; b. Oct. 14, 1818. 

7. Henry, Duke of Aumale ; b. Jan. 16, 1822. 

8. Anthony, Duke of Montpenaier ; b. July 31, 1824. 

Sister of the King. 
Eugenie Adelaide Louise, Princeas of Orleana ; b. Aug. 23, 1777. 

Government. 

The government of France comprisea three powera or braAchea, the 
King, the Chamber of Peera, and the Chamber of DepuUea ; and their 
three-fold aanction ia neoesaary in order to give validity to every law 
of the country ; but in other reapecta their functiona are diatinct and 
determinate. 

The King. 

The executive power ia veated in the King. Participating with the 
other branchea the right of proposing lawa, he alone ia authorized to 
promulgate them. He ia the aupreme chief of the itate, commanda the 
forcea both of land and aea, declares war, makes treaties of peace, 
alliance, and commerce, appoints to all oifioea of government, and 
makes the nilea and ordinances necessary for executing the laws, with- 
out having power either to suspend the laws themselves, or dispense 
with their execution. 

The person of the King is inviolable and aacred ; but his ministers 
are responsible. 

Chamber of Peers. 

The rights of the Peers were formerly hereditary ; but in 1831, their 
hereditary rights were aboliahed ; and they are now nominated for life 
by the King, who can aelect them only from among thoae men who have 
held, for a cer^n time, high public officea, auch aa those of ministers, 
generals, counsellors of state, prefects, mayors of cities of 30,000 inhab- 
itants or more, presidents of royal courta, membera of the Institute, 
members of general councils, or of councils of commerce, &c. 

The Chamber of Peers participates the legislative power with that 
of the Deputiea and with the King. It is convoked at the aame time 
as the Chamber of Deputies, and it can hold no session, at any time 
when the Chamber of Deputies is not also in session. Nevertheless, aa 
it haa cognizance of the Crimea of high treaaon and of outragea against 
the safety of the atate, it may, in this case only and for the exercise 
exclusively of its judicial functions, form itself into a court of justice, 
even at a time when the Chamber of Deputies is not in session. — The 
Chamber of Peera occupies the Palace of the Luxembourg, which has 
been succeasively the residence of Maria de Medicis, of t^e family of 



284 FRANCE. [1838. 

Orleans^ of the Directorji of the Fimt Conaai Bonftp^rte, of the Con- 
Bervatory Senate, &.c. Its Bessions are public. 

Chamber of Deputies, 

This body is composed of Deputies elected, every five years, bj 459 
colleges, distributed among the departments in proportion to their pop- 
ulation ; and to these colleges all Frenchmen who perform certain con- 
diliona specified by one of the fundamental laws, are summoned. In 
order to be eligible as a deputy a Frenchman must be ^ years of age 
and pay a direct tax of 500 francs ; and in order to be an elector, he 
must pay a direct tax of 200 francs. To the King pertains the right of 
Convoking the Chamber of Deputies ; he may also prorogue or diadolve 
it; but in this last case he must convoke a new one within three 
months. — The Chamber of Deputies meets at Paris in the palace 
which formerly belonged to the family of Bourbon- Cond^. Its sessions 
are public. 

Ail the power of the Chamber of Deputies consists in deliberating 
and voting zespecting laws, which must also obtain the assent of the 
other two branches ; but, with respect to the execution of them, it takes 
no part. Taking no part either in the nomination or the dismission of 
functionaries of any class, it exercises, in relation to the government 
of the country, only an oversight and control. Every year, the law 
relating to the finances or budget, which gives authority fur collecting 
the taxes, and for disposing, under certain restrictions, of the revenue 
which they afford, is submitted to its vole, before it undergoes an ex- 
amination in the otlier Chamber. It is then by giving its assent, or 
rather its refusal, that it can make knou n to the country whether it ap- 
proves or disapproves of the proceedings of the executive power. 

The present Chamber of Deputies was elected in 1834. — Number, 
459. — Charles Dapin, Speaker. The number of members of the 
Chamber of Peers is about 200. — Baron Pasquier, Speaker. 

The names of the Peers and Deputies may be seen in the American 
A]:nanac for 1836. 

Council of Ministers. — April, 1837. 

The general direction of all the affairs of the State is divided into 
eight divisions or branches, with a Minister at the head of each. 
Count Mule, Pres. Council ; Minister of Foreign ^Jfairs. 

M. Barthe, Keeper of tfie Seals ; Min. Justice ^ Worship. 

General Bernard, Minister of War, ' 

Admiral Rosssmel, Minister of Marine. 

Count Montalivet, Minister of the Interior. 

M. Martin du Nord, • Minister of Commerce. 
M. Salvandyj Minister of Public Jnstruetum. 

M. Lacave Laplange, Minister of Finance, 



1838.] 



FRANCE. 



285 



Classes or thb Populatior of Fraitci. — 1831. 



Unmarried Males, 
Married Men, . 
Widowers, 
Army and Navy, 



8,864;200 

6,946,000 

722,400 

303,000 



Unmarried Females, 9,068,100 

Married Women, 6,054,400 

Widows, . 1,501,900 

Total, 16,624,400 



Totaly 15,936,500 
Total population in 1820, 30,451,187; in 1831, 32,560,934. 

MovemerU of the PopvUUion in 1834. 



« 



u 



L<efiitraate C.ittdren — Male, 

*« « Female, 

Ellegitimata " Male, 

Fenale, 

Total BiHht, 



EzeeHofBirtba, 



470,958 

441,973 

37,760 

35^799 

966,490 
917,898 

68,6(3 



Deceased, Malei, 
" Femalet, 



469,158 
455,670 



ToUd DeaUu, 917,898 

Of the penona deceased 145 were 100 
yearf of age and upwaidti 

Marriages, 971,999 



Average Annual Movement of the Population from 1817 to 1834 — 

18 Years, 



Ltegitimate Births, 
Illegitimate ** 



Totaly 



Male Children, 
Female '* 



Excess of Males, 



899,419 
68,736 

968,155 
499,097 
469,058 

30,039 



Marriages, 241,233 

Deceased, Males, . 404,257 

" Females, 397,560 

Total, 801,817 
Excess of births over 

deaths, or average an- ^ 166,338 
nual increase. 



PoFULATioir OF THE Frinch Coloriks. — According to M. Benoiston 

de Chateauneuf. 



In America. 



Goadaloupe, 
Martinique, 
Marie-Galante, 
Les Saintes, 
Desirade, 



92,500 

98,000 

12,000 

1,200 

1,300 



St. Martin (Guiana), 4,000 

St. Pierre and Micquelon, 500 
Guiana, . 18,000 



Total in America, 228,000 



In Africa. 



Algiers and its territory, 1,500,000 
Senegal, St. Louis, &c., 20,000 
IsleofGoree, 



Isle of Bourbon, . 88,400 

St. Marie, near the coast } ^^ 



of Madagascar, 



i 



Total in Africa, 1 ,609,000 



286 PRANCE. [1836. 

In Jlsia. 

Pondicberry, &c., Hindostan ; Cbandernag or, in Bengal ; CoasI ol 
Malabar, Mahe and its territory ; Galfof Caint>ay, Surat; Factories at 
Mocha in Arabia, 179,000. — Total of the Colonies, 2,016,000. 

Catholic Clerot. 

Cardinals, ... 4 ! Vicars, .... 6,14^ 

Parish Priests, Chap- > oa •>«■ 
l.ins,&c. ^ j30^' 



Archbishops, . '. .14 

Bishops, .... 66 



Vicars-General, . 174 

Canons, .... 660 



Pupils in Seminaries and r m (wj 
Schools, ^ *"^*^ 



Cur^s, .... 3,301 

Protestant and Jkwish Clkrgt. 



]l0,i 
Total, 52;s»2 



Lutheran Ministers, 388 ; — Reforihed, 345 ; — Jewish Priests or 
Ecclesiastics, 94. 

Education. 

The University of France comprises the whole system of national 
education, embracing all the institutions for imparting education, which 
are spread over the whole kingdom, from the lowest schools up to tiM 
royal colleges. The University is under the direction of a coancil com- 
posed of six members, called the " Royal Council of Public Instruction," 
of which body the Minister of Public Instruction, is, tz officio^ Presi- 
dent. The University is composed of 26 Academies, each of which 
comprises two, three, or more of the departments into which the terri- 
tory of France is divided. These academies are severally governed bj 
a rector, and comprehend one or more royal colleges, and have tlie 
superintendence of all the communal colleges, instituiiAms, and pensions 
(or boarding-schools), normal schools, (or schools for the education of 
teachers,) and the primary schools in their respective districts. 

The Communal Colleges are supported principally by the communef 
in which they are situated. Some of them have endowments ; bet 
most of them depend chiefly for their support upon the fees paid bj 
students. The professors or teachers receive but small salaries, gen- 
erally from 1,000 to 3,000 francs. 

The Royal Colleges are supported chiefly by the government ; aoc 
the professors' salaries, which are generally very moderate, from 2,1<M) 
to 4,000 francs, are paid from the budget of the minister of public in- 
struction. — The students are styled in French internes and extemtJ. 
that is, boarders and daij'Scholars . 

The following Tabular View of the Institutions comprised in the Uni- 
versity of France, has been compiled from an account of the Univer- 
sity communicated by the Rev. Robert Baird, of Paris, to the *' Ameri- 
can Quarterly Register,'* for August, 1836. 



1838.) riAKcB. 287 

TiAular Viae efdu liutUulioi%3 cvmpritei in lAs IMiternty of Franet. 





t 




Inltr- 


ElKl- 


is 


^ 




.1 




■;& 








= ? 




Fuilooi. 


iiPrlnirf 




H 




dlod'lfc 


fliwl'u. 


ii 


= g 




1 Scl««l.. 




Sj 


^ 








i-3 




l£, 






"^ 


^ 






e 1 i,oai 








ifl 












a 9uu; 


B^"" ■ 






12 










17 


9] lill9 




















l,»7l 


Bo-la's^', . 








no 










9I l>) 


Bo»|<.'i, 




I 












HI 


1 1 5M 


C»n' 




I 












SS 


3I r^ 


C.bor., . . 






94 


90 


160 






« 




Cl...««.^ . 










MS 






311 




D.>™, ^. . 








ea 












I>«..i, 




















CrooU, 








133 








05 




l.i.n.«™, . 




1 
















te' : 




B 1 


^ 


iw 


ae* 


^ 


" 


M 


9 ' 


.,„„.., . 




3 1 


M 


110 


sw 


15 




'95 


3 ' ■ 


N>«>i<. . . 










226 










0'j»i>;, . 




















p..i., . . 








l.Kffl 


'3,394 








i 1 


p..,' . . 




i i 


15 




aoi 


14 




39 
31 


1 






a 3 


33 


3W 












a''^' . . 




a 1 












en 


s 1 i,7ii 






9 1 














9 , 1.513 


Touloini; 
















91 iSp 


7VW, 


seTT 


Mfi" 


5.779 


■s'^ 


^ 


iir 


I.IM 


M i 49.318 



There are 6 riealliea oT Catholic Theology, ni Aii, Bordeaux, Lyons, 
Vniia, Rouen, aad Taulauge ; and 3 of ProUttanl Thtology, one (Ln- 
tberan or Augaburg CoDfrasiaD] nt Strasbiirg ; th« olhet (CBlvinUt or 
Helvetic Confeuion) at Monlaubnn, under the Acad, my of Toulouse. 

The facultiea of Law *ie 9, at Ail, Caen, DijoD, Grenoble, Paris, 
Foilieri, Reanes, Slraaburg, and Toulouse. 

There are 3 foeuhiea of Medicine, at Grenoble, Paris, and Moot- 
pettier i also 17 aecondar; acboola of medicine. 

Tb« facollies of Science are 8 in number, at Paris, Slraaburg, Caen, 
Toulouae,MontpelUer, Dijon, Lyona, and Grenoble; — thoaa ol ieiierj, 
6, at Paris, Straiburg, Toulouse, Caen, Dijon, and Besanijon. 

Id order to become a student in the facull; oriheulogj oroftav, 
a person must bo pusaessed of a degree of bachelor of letteri ; and a 
course of three years in either faculty ia requisite (o obtain the degree 
of bachelor ; — for the degree of doctor, four years ; and lo obtain the 
degree of doctor in thmlogy, the candidate must defend a final snd 
general thesis. Candidates for a degree of doctor in medicine must 



288 FRANCE. [183i 

have a. diploma of bachelor of letten, aqd also of sciences, and nasi 
go through a course of four years. 

The faculties of Law and Medicine at Paris are greatly distingnish- 
ed; the former has 16 professors, and had, in 1836, upwards of 3,(Kt> 
students ; the latter 27 professors, and in 1836, about 4,000 students. 

Statistics of EduaUion in Franetf according to M. Benoiston de C&ojms- 

. ntftff , for some years previous to 1834. 

Students in Law, 4,640 of whom 2,800 at Paris. 

<< in Theology, 500 '" 140 Protestants. 

« in Medicine, 1,950 '< 1,100 at Paris. 

'* in the Sciences, 2,135 << 1,200 *' 

" in Literature, 1,900 << 1,500 '« 

Thtal, 11,109 

Pspik 
Primary Schools (for boys, 31,420, for girls, 10,672), 1,907,0^ 

Institutions and Pensions, 2O,50l< 

Communal Colleges, 29,7lXi 

Royal Colleges, 11, 00^') 

1,968,200 
Students in Theology in the Seminaries, .... ]3,(iOv 

Total, 1,961,2110 

Mr. Baird says, '<The number of pupils in the Normal Schools b 

about 2,000. — It is probable the number of children and youth who 

attend the primary schools, during some portion of the year, is Dct 

much less, if any, than 4,000,000." 



VIII. PRUSSIA. 

Kino ahd Rotal Family. 

FREDERICK WILLIAM III., King of Prussia; b. Aug. 3, 1770, 
succeeded his father Frederick fVilliam 11.^ Nov. 16, 1797; — m. Dec 
24, 1793, Louisa Augusta, Princess of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, who died 
July 19, 1810; — [m. (II.), by private marriage, or marriage morgana- 
tique, Nov. 9, 1824, Augusta, Princess of Liegnitz] : — Issue by the first 
marriage ; — 

1. Fredxrick William, Prirue Royal; b. Oct 15, 1795 ; — m. Nov. 
29, 1823, Elizabeth Louisa, daughter of the King of Bavaria; b. Sox 
13,1801. 

2. fVUliam Louis, b. March 22, 1797 ; — m. June 11, 1829, Augusta, 
daughter of Charles Frederick, Duke of Saxe- Weimar ; b. Sept. 90. 
1811 : — issue; Frederick William Mcholas Charles; b. Oct 18, 1831. 



18da] PRUSSIA. 2S9 

3. Charlotte, Empress of Russia; b. July 13, 1796. 

4. CharUs; b. June 29, 1801 ; — m. May 26, 1827, Maria Louisa 
Mejuatdrina, daug}iter of Charles Frederick, Duke of Saxe-Weimar : 
-> lasue : — 1. Frederick CharUs, b. March 20, 1828; — 2. Maria Loui- 
sa Anne, b. March 1, 1829. 

5. Mexandrina; b. Feb. 23, 1803; — m. May 25, 1822, Prince Freder- 
ick, of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. 

6. Louisa ; b. Feb. 1, 1808 ; — m. May 21 , 1825, Frederick of Orange. 

7. Albert; b. Oct. 4, 1809; — m. Sept. 14, 1830, Marianne, daughter 
of William, King of the Netherlands. 

The kingdom of Prussia contains eight pronnces, seven of them 
lying in the northeast of Germany, and the other two, entirely separated 
from the rest, toward the northwest of Germany. The government is 
an absolute hereditary monarchy; and it is one of the best educated 
kingdoms in the world. 

IX. HANOVER. 

Hanover has, since the accession of the House of Brunswick to the 
British crown, been under the government of the Kings of Great 
Britain ; and George I. of England was the second Elector of Hanover. 
In 1814, Hanover was erected into a kingdom, and the King of Great 
Britain has since been also King of Hanover. But it is now separated 
from the British crown, inasmuch as the Salic law, which excludes 
females from the throne, is in force in Hanover ; and on the deatli of 
William IV., the crown of Hanover passed to his eldest brother, the 
first male heir. 

The present King, on the 12th of July, 1837, issued a procU" 
mation, in which he expressed his diesatufaction with the new con- 
stitution of Hanover, which had been acted upon by George IV. 
and William IV., declaring that he regarded it, << neither in form or 
substance binding upon him." This proclamation has caused much 
dtfleatiafaction in Hanover, and a strong sensation in Germany. 

KiRo AND Family. 
ERNEST AUGUSTUS, (late Duke of Cumberland, and fourth son 
of George HI. late King of England,) King of Hanover; b. June 5, 
1771 ; m. May 29, 1815, Frederica Sophia Carolina, Princess Dowager of 
Solms, sister of the Duke of Mecklenburg- Strelitz, b. March 20, 1778 : — 
iMUe : — 

Qeorge Frederick, Prince Royal ; b. May 27, 1819. 



X. SAXONY. 

KllfO AHD ROTAL FaMILY. 

FREDERICK AUGUSTUS, King of Saxony ; b. May 18, 1797 ; 
succeeded his ancle AnJtit4my^ June 6, 1836; (having been appointed 

25 



890 BAXONT. [1838. 



eo-regeta Sept. 13, 1830 ; his father, Prince Maximilian, the late Kiof • 
brother, having renounced his claim in his favor ;) — m. (I.) Oct. 7, 1819, 
Caroline, daaghter of Francis.!, of Austria, who die4 May 15, 1832;— 
m. (II.) April 24, 1833, Maria- Anna- lAopoUthta^ daughter of Maximihas 
Joeeph', late King of Bavaria. 

Saxony is the smallest and one of the best educated kingdomi in 
Europe. 

XI. WURT£MBERG. 

Kino and Rotal Fahilt. 

WILLIAM, King of Wurteroberg ; born Sept. 27, 1781 ; — succeeded 
hifl father FreifmcA, the first king of Wurtemberg, Oct. 30, 1816;- 
m. (I.) Jan. 24, I8l6, Catherine^ sister of the Emperor of Russia aad 
widow of the Duke of Oldenburg, b. May 21, 1788, d. Jan. 9, 1819;- 
m. (II.) April 15, 1820, Pauliha, daughter of his uncle Alexander, 
Duke of Wurtemberg, b. Sept. 4, 1800 : — Issue, (by the first marriage^' 
1. Maria, b. Oct. 30, 1816;— 2. Sophia, b. June 17, 1818 —(By the 
8d marriage,) — 3. Catherine, b. Aug. 21, 1821; — 4. Crarlks, Prnei 
Royal, b. March 6, 1823 ; — 5. Attgugta, b. Oct. 4, 1826. 



XII. BAVARIA. 
Kiso AND Royal Fa milt. 

LOUIS, King of Bavaria ; b. Aug. 25, 1786 ; — succeeded his ftther 
MaaamUBm Joseph, Del. 13, 1825 ; — m. Oct. 12, 1810, Thkrksa, daugh- 
ter of Frederick, the late Duke of Saxe-Altenburg, b. July 8, 1798:^ 
Issue : — 

1. Maximilias, Primeo Royal, b. Not. 28, 1811. — 2. MoHlda, b. Aug. 
30, 1818, ^* spouse of the hereditary Prince of Hesse- Darmstadt. — S. 
Orifo, King of €keeoe, b. June 1, 1815. — 4. Leopold, b. March 12, 
188L— 5. Adeline^ b. March 19, 1823.— 6. HUdegarde, b. Jsne 10, 
1825. — 7. AUxandrmay b. Aug. 26, 1826. — 8. Alkeri, b. iolj 19, 
1828. • 

XIII. AUSTRIA. 
Emperor and Imperial Family'. 

FERDINAND I., Emperor of Austria, King of Hungary and Bohs- 
mia ; — b. April 19, 1793 ; — succeeded his father Francie, the first Em* 
peror of Austria, March 2, 1835; — m. Feb. 12, 1831, Mama Asss 
Caroline, daughter of Victor Emanuel, late King of Sardinia ; — b. 
Sept. 19, 1803. 

Brothers and Sisters of tht Emperor, 

1. Maria Louisa ; b. Dec. 12, 1791 ; — m. April 2, 1810, to J^apoUsn 
BofMparto, Emperor of France ; — created Duchess of Parma, Mslj 30, 
1814.-* 2. Maria OUmentina; b. March 1, 1798; — m. July S8, 1816, 



1838.] AUBTEIA. 991 

LMftM, Prince Salerno. — a Frtmaa Chtuties JMepk, Archduke ; b. 
Oec. 7, 1802 ; — m. Not. 4, 1824, Frederica Sophia, nsier of the King of 
Bavaria: — Iteue I — /Vbimm. b. Aug. 18, 1830; F^srdhuuid, b. Jnly 
6, 1832 ; Charles, b. July 30, 1833 — 4. Maria Anns Fronds, b. June «, 
1804. 

SUp^moHhtr of the Emperor, 

CarUtM Augtuta, daughter of Maximilian Joseph, late King of Bara- 
ria ; b. Feb. 8, 1792. 

UneUs of the Emperor, 
1. Charles, Archduke, b. Sept. 5, 1771: — Issue, 6 children. — 2. 
Joseph, Archduke, Palatine of Hungary, b. March 9, 1776 : — Issue, 5 
children. —3. John, Archduke, b. Jan. 20, 1782. —4. Renter, Arch- 
duke, b. Sept 30, 1783: — Issue, 8 children. — 5. Louis, Archduke, 
b. Dec. 13, 1784. 

XIV. SPAIN. 

QuxsN ANn RoTAL Family. 

ISABELLA II. {Maria Louisa), Queen of Spain ; b. at Madrid, Oct. 
10, 1830; succeeded her father Fordinand VIL Sept. 29, 1833. 

Mother of the Qaeen, and Queen-Regent during her rnxnority. 

Maria Christina de Bourbon, daughter of Francis, late King of the 
Two Sicilies, b. AprU 27, 1806. 

Sister of the Quasn. 
Maria Louisa Ferdinanda, Infanta of Spain, b. Jan. 30, 1832. 

Undes of the Queen. 

Charles, or Don Carlos, Infant of Spain ; b. March 29, 1788 ; — m. 
Sept. 29, 1816, Frances, Infanta of Portugal : — Issne, 3 sons. 

Francis de Paul, Infant of Spain ; b. March 10, 1794 ; — m. June 12, 
1819, Louisa CharlotU, Princess of the Two Sicilies : — Issue, 8 chil- 
dren. 

Since the death of Ferdinand VII., in 1833, Spain has been harassed 
by a ciyil war carried on in the name of Donna Isabella 11., Queen of 
Spain, the daughter of Ferdinand, by her mother Donna Maria Chria- 
tina de Bourbon, Regent of the empire, on one part, and by Don Carlos, 
the Pretender, brother of Ferdinand, on the other part; and the con- 
test is yet undecided. 

On the I6tb of June, 1837, a Constitution was proclaimed at Madrid 
in the name of the Queen, and signed by the Queen Regent, the min- 
isters, and deputies. This constitution is similar, in many respects, to 
the present constitution of France, and guaranties the liberty of the 
press, and other fundamental principles of freedom. 

By this constitution the nation is obliged to maintain the public wor-> 
■hip and ministers of the Catholic religion professed by Spaniards. 



293 SFAiir. [183& 

The power of enacting laws resides in the Cortes in conjonction with 
the King. 

The Cortes are composed of two co-legislatiye bodies, of equal 
powers, the Senate and Congress of Deputies. 

The Deputies are appointed for three years, and each pronnce is 
entitled to one deputy, at least, for every 60,000 inhabitants. 

The number of Senators is equal to three fiHhs of the number of 
Deputies ; but each province is entitled to at least one Senator. They 
are appointed by the King from a triple list proposed by the electors of 
each province who elect the deputies. 

At every time when there is a general election of Deputies, whether 
in consequence of their term of office having expired, or of a dissolution 
of the Congress, a third part of the Senate is to be renewed, thoee 
going out being reeligible. 

The Cortes are to assemble every year on the first of December. It 
is the right of the King to convoke the Cortes, to saspend and close 
their meetings, and dissolve them ; but under the obligation, in the 
latter case, of convoking and reassembling another Cortes within a 
period of three months. 

MlNISTST. 

M. Calatrava, Pres, Council^ and Min, Foreign Jijfain. 

M. Mendizabal, Minister of Finance. 

M. Armendariz, Minister of the Interior. 

M. Gil de la Quadra, Minister ^Marine. 

M. Lopez, Minister of Grace and Justice, 

Marquis de Rodil, Minister of War. 



XV. PORTUGAL. 

QuBBH AMD Royal Family. 

MARIA 11. DA GLORIA, Queen of Portugal and the Algarves ; b. 
April 4, 1819; — declared Queen of Portugal in consequence of the 'ab- 
dication of her father, Don Pedro, late Emperor of Brazil, May 2, 1826 ; 
m. (I.) Jan. 30, 1835, ^Augustus, Duke of Leuchtenbergj who died March 
28, 1835, — (11.) April 9, 1836, Ferdinand Augustus, Duke of Saxe- 
Coburg, nephew of Leopold, King of the Belgians, b. Oct 29, 1816. 

Unde and Aunts of the Q^een. 
1. Maria Theresa ; b. April 29, 1793 ; widow of Peter Charles of Spain. 
2. Isabella Maria, b. June 4, 1801. — 3. Dow Miguel, b. Oct. 26, 1802, 
~ assumed the absolute sovereignty of Portugal in 1828, — quitted and 
formally relinquished the kingdom in 1834. — 4. Anne de Jesus Maria j 
b. Deo. 23, 18U6. 



183dJ Sardiitia. 293 

XVI. SARDINIA. 

KlMG AHD ROTAL FaMILT. 

CHARLES ALBERT, King of Sardiuia ; b. Oct. 2, 1798 ; succeeded 
his ancle Chariots Felix, April 27, 1831 ; — m. Sept 30, 1817, Thkrsba, 
daughter of Ferdinand III., late Grand Dake of Tuscany :— Issue : ~ 

I. Victor Emanukl, Prince Boyaly Duke of Savoy, b. March 14, 
1820. —2. Ferdinand, Duke of Genoa, b. Not. 15, 1822. 



XVII. THE TWO SICILIES. 

Kino aho Rotal Familt. 
FERDINAND II., King of the Two Sicilies; b. Jan. 12, 1810; suc- 
ceeded his father FraneiSy Not. 8, 1830 ;<-m. Not. 21, 189fi, Mmrim 
Christina^ daughter of Victor Emanuel of Sardinia, b. Not. 14, 1810. 
Issue : — Francis, Prince Royals b. Jan. 16, 1836. 

Brothers and Sister$ of the King. 
1. Maria Caroline, b. Not. 5, 1796 ; m. Feb. 14, 1816, Duke of Bern. 

— 2. LotUea Charlotte ; b. Oct 24, 1804 ; m. June 12, 1819, Don Francis 
of Spain. — 3. Maria Christina^ Queen-mother of Spain, b. April 27, 
1806.— 4. Charles, Prince of Capua, b. Dec. 10, 1811. — 5. Leopold, 
Count of Syracuse, b. May 22, 1313. — 6. Maria Jlntoinette, b. Dec. 
19, 1814. — 7. AiUonio, Count of Lecce, b. Sept. 23, 1816. — 8. Maria 
Amelia, b. Feb. 25, 1818. — 9. Caroline, b. Feb. 29,1820.-10. There- 
sa, b. March 14, 1822. — U. Louis, Count of Aquila, b. July 19, 1824. 

— 12. Francis, Count of Trapani, b. Aug. 13, 1827. 



XVIII. GREECE. 

King. 

OTHO I., King of Greece, second son of the King of BaTaria, b- 
June 1, 1815, elected King of Greece Jan. 25, 1833; — m. Not. 22, 
1836, the Princess of Oldenburg. 



XIX. TURKEY. 
Sultan and his Family. 
MAHMOUD II., Grand Seignior and Sultan of the Ottoman Empire ; 
b. July 20, 1785; succeeded his brother the Sultan Mustapha, July 28, 
l^i6: — Children: — 

1. Salyha, Sultaness; b. June 16, 1811;— m. 1834, Khabil RufV 
Paehay Grand Master of Artillery. — 2. Abdul-Mxdjid, Sultan, Prince 
Imperial, b. April 20, 1823. — 3. Hadidja, Sultaness, b. Sept. 5, 1625. 
— 4. Jldila, SulUness, b. May 21, 1826.— 5. Mdul-jSziz, Sultan, b. 
Feb. 8, 1630. — 6. KhairUe, Sultaness, b. Jan. 23, 1831. . 

25* 



FOREIGN OBITUARY. 



1836. 

March 18. (1836.) — At Rome, aged 88, the Jlbatt JPea, a celebrated 
archeologist, author of various works, aud well known as the translator 
and commentator oLWInckelmann. 

May 1. — At Jever, in Oldenburg, his native place, in his 48th year. Dr. 
John Lewit TiarlUf F. R. S., British Astronomer to the American Boun- 
dary Line Company. # 

May 2. — At Wobum Abbey, England, aged 44, Jeremiah Holme WlffeUy 
nbrarian to the Duke of Bedford, and a celebrated Quaker poet He was 
bom of a respectable family of the Society of Friends, and was brought up 
to the profession of a schoolmaster, in which he was for some years actively 
engaged. He published a variety of miscellaneous poem^i, a translatioo of 
the Spanish poet Garcilasso de la Vega, and also a translation of Tasso. 
The last was his greatest work, and tlie first edition of it appeared in two 
splendid royal octavo volumes. 

May 26. — In London, in his 65th year, William Young Ottley, F. R. S. 
and S. A., Keeper of the Prints in the British Museum. He was for nearly 
half a century actively devoted to his favorite pursuit of the fine arts, and 
is honorably known as an artist, a collector, and an author. 

June 3. — Near London, Barry Edward CMeara, formerly sui^eon to 
the ex-emperor Napoleon, and author of *' A Voice from St. Helena, or. 
Napoleon in Exile," and several other publications. 

June 7. — At Hadleigb, in SuflTolk, England, J^Tathan Drake, M. D.,aged 
70. He graduated at Edinburgh in 1789, and settled as a physician at 
Hadleigb in 1792, where he practised 44 years, greatly respected and es- 
teemed for his professional merit and private virtues. 

In the walks of literature Dr. Drake was a highly respectable and volu- 
minous author. Some of his principal works are " Literary Hours*' (1st 
edition, 1796, 1 vol. Bvo ; 4th edition, 1820, 3 vols. 8vo.) ; « Essays illus- 
trative of the Tatler, Spectator, and Guardian,'* 3 vols. 8vo.; '* Essays illus- 
trative of the Rambler, Adventurer, and other Periodical Papers, to the 
year 1819,'* 2 vols. 8vo ; <* The Gleaner, a Series of Periodical Essays, 
selected from Authors not included in the Briiish Essayists," 4 vols. 8vo ; 
*< Bhakspeare and his Times," 2 vols. 4(o; <« Winter Nights," 2 vols. 8vo ; 
" Evenings in Autumn," 2 vols. 8vo ; *' Noontide Leisure," 2 vols. 8vo ; 
and " Mornings in Spring," 2 vols. H^o- 

June 28. — At Kensington, England, JamtB Mill, in his 63d year. He 
was a native of Kincardineshire, was educated at Edinburgh, and licensed 



»> 



1838.] ro&xiflR OBITUARY, 1836. 295 

as a preacher Id the Scotch church ; but Boon after went to London and 
devoted himself to literary and philosophical pursuits. 

In 1818, he published his greatest worlc, the '* History of British India, 
io 3 vols. 410. (6 vols. 8vo, \&20.) His « ElemeoU of Political Economy, 
published in 1821, and his ** Prison and Prison Discipline, Coloniea, Laws 
of Nation:), and Education," placed him in a high rank as a political econo- 
mist and philosopher. He was an able contributor to the " Encycloposdia 
Britannica," to the Edinburgh, Westminster, and London Reviews. 

June 29. — At Dulwich, England, aged 47, Mev, Edward SmedUy, Preb- 
endary of Lincoln, author of several poems, and a ** History of the Re- 
formed Religion in France,'* and the Editor of the ** Encyclopedia 
Metropolitana." 

July 15. — At Edinburgh, in his 94th year, Sir Robert U$ton, the first 
minister from Great Britain to the United States after the acknowledgment 
of independence, and late British ambasdador at Constantinople. He re- 
tired from public life a little more than ten years before his death. ** The 
last years of a life so distinguished and so protracted, were in every respect 
worthy of its brightest periods. With an entire freedom from ostentation, 
and in the enjoyment of universal esteem, Sir Robert was distinguished by 
the uniform urbanity of his deportment, by activity in the promotion of 
every good work, and by an enlightened regard to the interests of the poor 
in his neighborhood, who will long deplore his loss. Sir Robert had the 
misfortune to lose Lady Listen about six years ago, and has left no issue." 
— Gent. Mag. * 

July. — In London, aged 94, Mr$. Cecilia Daviea, formerly a celebrated 
songstress on the English stage ; and also on the principal Italian and German 
stages, she became Prima Doaoa. She wai a great favorite of M atia The- 
resa, and at Vienna had operas written expressly for her by Metastasio, and 
composed by Hassee. Her last years were spent in poverty. 

Aug. 8. — At Hildburghausen, aged 68, Dr, f)riedrich Carl Ludwig Sick" 
ler, an eminent archxologist, and author of various learned works on 
archeology, antiquities, and philology. 

Aug. 17. — At St. lldefonso, Spain, M. de Rayneved, the French ambas- 
sador at the court of Spain ; an eminent diplomatist, who was employed in 
important missions under Bonaparte, and after the restoration had a still 
more distinguished career in diplomacy. 

Aug. 17. — At the castle of Louisenluud, Denmark, in his 92d year, the 
Landgrave Charles of Hesse- Cassel, a Danish Field-Marshal, and Gov- 
ernor of the Duchies of Sleswick and Holstein ; uncle to the reigning 
Elector of Hesse-Cassel ; grandson of George II. king of Great Britain, 
and father-in-law of Frederick VI. king of Denmark. He was the oldest 
prince in Europe, having been bom Dec. 19, 1744. Mr. Rae Wilson in his 
Travels in Norway, thus speaks of him : — "I dined and spent many happy 
hours with the Prince, who conversed in English fluently, though he never 
waa in Great Britain. He was a most devout and humble Christian, of a 



396 roRXiGff OBiTUABTi 1836. [1838. 

lughly cultivated miod, held id great estimatioD, and was truly a blessing lo, 
and the praise of all around. His knowledge of hieroglypbtcs was remarkable.'* 

Aug. 26. — At Berlin, Prusaia, in his 75th year, Dr, CkriBtian WUHam 
HvftUmdy a very eminent physician and medical writer. He was iKMm at 
Langenialza in 1762; began to practise physic at Weimar in 1793; after- 
wards became physician to the Duke of Weimar (a situation previously 
held by his &ther) and a professor at Jena ; in 1801, was appointed phys- 
dan to the king of Prussia and director of the MedicO'Chirurgical College. 
He was a popular lecturer, and attracted a' large auditory ; and was dbtia- 
guished for his profound and extensive learning, and his ingenious applica- 
tion of his theory to practice. His most celebrated works are his *' Practial 
Medicine *' and his *< Art of Prolonging Life." 

Aug. 30. ^- At Pendlebury, near Manchester, England, aged 61, Wiiliam 
Henry y M. D., a manufacturing chemist of Manchester, and a scientific 
chemist of great reputation. He finished his education at the university 
of Edinburgh, where he attended the lectures of the eminent chemist Dr. 
Black, and was the associate and friend of Mackintosh, Brougham, and 
Jeffrey. He was intended for the medical profession ; but, on account of 
very delicate health, he was induced to relinquish it, and to connect himself 
with his father in the business of a manufacturing chemist. Soon after the 
termination of his collegiate education, he delivered at Manchester a couisa 
of lectures ; and the notes of these lectures led to the publication, in 1799, 
of a small volume on the science. This work, which was subsequently 
enlarged, has passed through numerous editions, and has been highly 
esteemed and much used, both in England and America. Dr. Henry was 
an elegant writer, and his characters of Priestley, WoUaston, and Davy, 
have been much admired as compositions. In private life. Dr. Henry poe- 
sessed qualities calculated to excite and rivet esteem and admiration. He 
was distinguished for hospitality ; his manners were modest and engaging, 
and his conversation peculiarly attractive and insinuating. 

Sept. 6. — In London, aged 81, WWiam BantirUj LL. D., F. R. S., 
Chancellor of the Diocese of Lincoln, formerly the King's Advocate- General 
in the High Court of Admiralty, &c. He was an eminent civilian, dis- 
tinguished for his knowledge of ecclesiaatical law, and for great mental 
acquirements. 

Sept. 7. — At Greenwich, England, John Pond, F. R. S., corresponding 
member of the French Institute, member of the principal astronomical aocie- 
ties in Europe, and, for nearly twenty-five years, Astronomer Royal of Eng- 
land. Dr. Maskelyne, a few months before his death, which took place in 
1811, mentioned Mr. Pond to the Council of the Royal Society as the fittest 
man to succeed him in the office of Astronomer Royal ; and, on the recom- 
mendation of Sir Joseph Banks, the appointment was made. Mr. Pond 
continued to fill the office with great honor to himself and benefit to the 
public, till the autumn of 1835, when, on account of ill health he retired, 
and was succeeded by Mr. Airy. 



1838.] FORKION OBITUARY, 1896. 297 

Mr. Pond contributed the ** Introduction to Astronomy,*' prefixed to Pink- 
erton'sXxeography, and many scientific articles to Rees's *' Cyclopedia"; and 
his communications to the Royal Society were numerous and important. 

'* As a practical astronomer, Mr. Pond liad no superior; few if any equals. 
His perception of the capabilities of instruments generally, and of the mode 
of so using them as to render all their strong points available and their 
weak ones unprejudicial, formed a very striking feature in his professional 
character. The numerous folio volumes of his observations, so highly 
appreciated by scientific men in every part of the gIol>e, are alone sufficient 
to show the extent and utility of the work performed at Greenwich, during 
the time that the establishment was under his diraciion. The accuracy of 
a portion of those observations is to be attributed to improvements in the 
mural circle, suggested by Mr. Pond, which converted it into the most 
perfect instrument used in the Observatory ; but the correctness of the 
chief part must be ascribed to a mode of observing of which he was the 
sole inventor. ^Thla consisted in the union of the two circles, and the ob- 
serving with one by direct vision, with the other simultaneously by reflec- 
tion ; thus correcting those errors which are incidental to observations 
made by a single instrument. A result, and perhaps the most important, of 
the application of the mural circle, has been the formation of a catalogue 
of the fixed stars more perfect than any before or since produced. Here 
it may also be stated, the vast superiority of the Greenwich transit obser- 
vations made by Mr. Pond, has been publicly recognized by several con- 
temporary astronomers of the first rank. To his earnest and reiterated 
solicitations our national observatory is indebted for many of the new in- 
struments which have confessedly rendered it so preeminent and complete. 
His skill In the use of these was very remarkable ; his talent for observing 
quite unique. MM. Arago, Biot, and Delambre, as well as MM. Bessel 
and Schumacher, the great French and German astronomers, have home 
testimony to the decided merit and originality of his method." — Oent, 
Mag, 

Sept. 8. — At Huddersfield, England, aged 68^ Benjamin Bootkroyd, 
D. D., pastor of the independent church at Highfield Chapel, Huddersfield. 
He was bom of parents in very humble condition, from whom he received 
no advantages of education except being sent to school from the age of 
four to his sixth year. He was then employed in spinning worsted, and 
aftf^rwards in learning his father's trade of a shoemaker. He is represented 
as having been m early life '* one of the worst of characters, and, when 
in ill-humor, quite a dread to the neighborhood in which he lived ; " but at 
length he became an entirely reformed and religious young roan, and, having 
a strong understanding, he was encouraged to prepare himself for the min- 
istry, at a Dissenting college. After having entered upon the ministry at 
Pontefract, he applied himself to the study of Hebrew without the aid of 
an instructor, and, '* by dint of great exertion and perseverance, he acquired 
a thorough knowledge of the language, and published a new Hebrew edi- 



208 FOBBIGN OBITVABT, 1836. [1838. 

tkm of the Old Tealament, workini; frequently with hts own hands mt the 
prees six hoars a day, besides compiling the manuscript, and examining and 
correeiing the proof sheets, in whicb his compositor only Imew the letters." 

Sept. 23. — At Manchester, En^and, aged 28, Madame Maiibran de 
Beriot, a celebrated vocal actress. Maria Felicitas, the eldest daughter of 
Seiior Manuel Garcia, an eminent tenor singer in the Italian Opere, was 
bon in Paris in 1808. At the age of eight years she accompanied her 
parents to London, where she spent a number of years in unceasing study. 
lo 1826, at the age of 16, she made her first appearance on the stage as one 
of the chorus of the Italian Opera ; and in 18*26, she accompanied her familj 
to America to assist in the novel attempt to establish the performance of 
Italian operas in this country. At New York, she was married to M. Maii- 
bran, an^elderly French merchant, who soon after failed, and was cast into 
prison ; and Madame Maiibran, believing she had been deceived, ▼olunta- 
rily gave into the hands of his creditors her marriage settlement, left her 
husband, and returned to England to seek support from the ezerdse of her 
vocal and dramatic talents. 

Her performances In London and Paris excited the most enthusiastie 
applause. Her reputation soon occupied the attention of the musical soci- 
ety throaghout Europe ; and she traversed extraordinary dutanees to fulfil 
numerous engagements in different citiiss on the continent. Her last en* 
gagement at Naples was for 80,000 francs and two benefits and a half^ for 
40 nights ; and that upon which she entered at Milan, with Duke Visconti, 
(the director of La Seakiy) was, exclusively of other profitable stipulations, 
460,000 francs for 186 performances. Her generosity was so unbounded, 
that, after a few years of her career, during which she had gained immense 
Slims, she had ^expended so much upon her relatives and to oblige her 
friends, that she had little or nothing left 

Her short and singular history was closed at Manchester, where she bad 
been engaged to attend the grand musical festival which was celebntted in 
that town from the 18th to the 17th of September, 1886. She arrived afier 
a rapid journey from Parb, on the 11th of September, was taken ill on the 
13th, the day of the commencement of the public performances, yet die 
sung on that day, and also on the 14th, with enthusiastic applause, but was 
too ill to sing more ; and she expired on the 23d. 

** A remarkable combination of fine qualities rendered her the wonder ol 
all who saw or heard her. Her mental conceptions were of the highest 
order ; while in the demonstrative and executive parts of her art, in the 
exercise of &cuUies of the most rare and exciting nature, she has never 
been aurpaased. She has been heard to sing, in one evening, in six differ- 
ent langtiages, and with unqualified admiration in all.*' 

In March, 18S6, Madame Maiibran, being then in Paris, and freed by the 
French courts from her union with M. Maiibran, was married to M. de 
Beriot, a Belgian, whose talents as a violinist had placed him in the highest 
rank in his profeasion. During her last illness she mentioned that she bad 



183&] pouieir obituary, 1886. 999 

known M. do Beriot nine yetrt, and had been seven yean married to him^ 
but that she had not been able to make their marriage known until within 
the last two years. — Qeni. Mag, 

Oct. 5.-* At Oxford, England, aged 54, George Rouiley^ D.D., F. R. 8., 
Master of Univenity College, and Vice-chancellor of the UniTersity of 
Oxford. 

Oct. 6.— At Edge Grove, Hertfordshire, Eng., in hit 82d year, WHUam 
Maraden^ D. C. L., F. R. S., a leaned orientalist, author of the" History of 
Sumatra," a ** Dictionary and Grammar of the Malayan Language," an edi* 
tion of '< The Travels of Marco Polo," with Notes, ^. 

Oct 9. — At Saumarez, his seat in the island of Guernsey, in his 80th 
year, the JU. Han. Jmmee SaumareM, Lord de SaumareZf Admiral of tho 
Ked, and General of the Royal Maiine Forces of England, a veiy eminent 
naval officer, and greatly distinguished in the naval history of England* 
He was no less characterized by virtues in private life, than by his public 
services, and was one of the Vice-Presidents of the British and Foreign 
Bible Society, and of the Naval and Military Bible Society. 

Oct. 14. — In England, aged 46, Jamee Wyld, Geographer to the King, 
distinguished for his knowledge of geography, and author of a ** Scripture 
Atlas," « Thompson's Edinbuigh Atias," an ''AUas of the Worid," foUo, a 
amaUer Atlas, with Statistical Tables, and numerous maps and charts. 

Oct. 17. — lo France, aged 76, M. Frmragois /. M, Baynouard, an eminent 
French philologist; for many years Perpetual Secretary of the Academy of 
Inscriptions and Belles-lettres, one of the conductors of the " Journal dot 
Savans," distinguished as a scholar, poet, historian, philologist, and aiche- 
ologist ; and author, besides, of other works, of the *' Glossaire compart de la 
Langue des Troubadours." Of this work only the first volume has been 
published ; but the necessary materials for the completion of it are left in 
an advanced state of preparation. 

Oct. 26. — In Loadon, aged 74, George ColmaHf *< the Younger," noted 
as a dramatic writer, a wit, and a man of convivial habits. He always styled 
himself*' the Younger," and was the son of George Colman, " the Elder,'* 
the translator of ** Terence," a writer ia ** The Connoisseur," and the author 
of " The Clandestine Bfarriage." Both the father and son were mucl^ 
connected with the theatre. The younger Colman was the author of 
numerous comedies, more distinguished for their wit, than for strictness of 
morals. Many of his last years were spent in great poverty. 

Oct 2& — In London, CharUe Day, the wealthy blaeking-manufactiyer, 
of the firm of Day & Martin, who had been totally blind for many years 
bofore his death. He left a large estate, stated at X460,000, which he 
bequeathed chiefly to his family and relatives; and he directed X 160,000 
to be devoted to the establishment of a charity, to be called " The Poor 
Blind Man's Friend " ; the interest of which, after allowing for the salary 
o£ a dark and other expenses, is to be applied, under the direction of bis 



300 FOREIGN OBITUA&T, 1836. [1838. 

executors, to the gnnting of annuities of from X 10 to £20 each, to poor 
blind men and women. 

Oct. 29. — At St. Ibb8,near Hitchin, in Hertfordsliire, Eng.,agcd 75, the 
Sev, WUiiam Laxt F, M, &, Lowndes Professor of Astronomy and Geom- 
etry in the university of Cambridge. He was a distinguished mathemaii- 
ciau and astronomer, and author of several worlcs connected with these 
sciences ; the most elaborate of which were the tables to be used with 
the Nautical Aimaaac, which were published by the Board of Longitude in 
1821. 

I(fov. 4. — At Goritz, in Illyria, in his 80th year, Charlet X, late king of 
France. Chartes Philippe de Bourbon, Count of Artois, was bom Oct. 9, 
1757 ; was the younger brother of Louis XVI. and Louis XVIIL, the latter 
of whom he succeeded as king of France, Sept. 16, 1824 ; and in July, 
1830, he lost his crown in consequence of issuing two latal ordinances, 
one abolishing the freedom of the press, and the other changing the mode 
of election. 

The Count of Artois married, in 1773, Maria Theresa, daughter of Victor 
Amadous UL, king of Sardinia, who died in 1805, and by whom he had 
two sons, the Duke of AngoulSme and the Duke of Bern. His private 
character was exceedingly dissolute till after the middle period of life ; his 
talents were very moderate ; nor were his manners or disposition naiich 
calculated to gain popularity. On succeeding his brother Louis XVIIL, 
he cherished the arbitrary principles of the old regime; and be lost a 
throne which common prudence might have enabled him to retain. 

** Latteriy, in bis retirement, Charles X. appeared as an amiable, warm* 
hearted, well-disposed old man. Having led a very dissipated life when 
young, his latter years were passed in acts of superstitious mortifieatioo, 
under the direction of his confessors. He constantly wore sackcloth or 
haircloth next to his skin ; he fasted much, and prayed several times in the 
course of the day ; and he frequently imposed upon himself, as a penance 
for some hasty expression, the remaining several hours without uttering a 
word." 

Nov. 8. — In London, aged 76, John BannUtcTf an eminent aetor, distin- 
guished particularly as a comedian. He commenced his professional career 
at an early age, and, after a course of 87 years, having accumulated a 
handsome fortune, he was induced, in 1815, in consequence of being much 
afflicted with the gout, to take leave of the stage. «< The loss of Mrs. Sid- 
doy to the stage was scarcely more regretted than (hat of Jack Bannister. 
He was the pet of all who knew and all who 9aw him. His name was 
* honest Jack,' a term as familiar to us, as ever could have been * rare Ben 
Jonson ' to our ancestors." — Oeni. Mag. 

Nov. 13. — At Cambridge, England, in his 78th year, itsv. Chariei 
Simeon, Semor Fellow of King's College, and Rector of Trinity Church in 
that town. He ministered to this church more than S3 years, and was 
never married. He was one of the most able, zealous, and successftil 



1838.] FOREIGN OBITVART, 1836. 301 

members of that class of divines ia the English established church that are 
styled evangelical; and he labored with untiriDg efforts to propagate his 
principles both in the pulpit and through the press. His numerous works 
which were published at different times, were, in 1882, collected and pub- 
lished in 21 large and closely compressed 8vo. volumes, under the direc- 
tion of the Rev. Th. Hartwell Home, and they comprise 2,586 sermons 
and skeletons of sermons, which form a commentary upon every book of 
the Old and New Testament. 

Mr. Simeon's funeral took place at the chapel of King's College on the 
19th of November, and was very numerously attended ; his whole congre- 
gation being admitted by tickets, and also about 700 members of the uni- 
versity were supposed to be present. The funeral procession consisted of 
upwards of 1300 persons, all in the deepest mourning. The whole town 
throughout the day partook of the mournful solemnity ; the shops were 
closed, and a silent awe pervaded the streets, indicative of the general sor- 
row for the loss of one so much respected. After the ceremony, a sermon 
was preached by Dr. Kaye, Bishop of Lincoln ; and the following day (Sun- 
day) four other occasional sermons were preached in the town, by Dr. 
Dealtry, Archdeacon Hodgson, Prof. Scholefield, and the Rev. W. Mandell, 
all of which have been published. 

Nov. 26. — At Moffat, Dumfriesshire, Scotland, aged 80, John Loudon 
MeAdoMt the celebrated introducer of the system of road-making known 
by his name. He was the son of James McAdam of Waterhead in Scot- 
land, but passed a part of his early life with au uncle by whom he was 
adopted, in America, where he remained till the close of the revolutionary 
war. It was in his 60th year that he commenced his public career as a 
reformer of roads, by means of which he became a great public benefactor, 
and he has made his name as familiar as a household word. He received 
from the British government, in two iustalments, £10,000, as a reward of 
the improvements which he originated. He resided for some time at Bris- 
tol, where he was highly respected. 

Dec. 4. — In England, aged 71, Richard Westallj of the Royal Academy, 
an eminent artist, author of a great number of works and designs, and well 
known for his numerous beautiful illustrations of elegant literature. By 
his professional exertions he acquired a handsome competence, which was 
lost in unsuccessful speculations ; and in his latter years he was reduced 
to indigence, or very straitened circumstances. 

Dec. 12 or 13. — Near the southern confines of the district of Egueda in 
Africa, murdered by the £1 Hareb tribe, John Davidson, while on his 
travek towards the city of Tombuctoo, from which he was about 25 days' 
journey distant AAer having obtained a good classical education, he was 
bred to the business of a chemist and druggist in London, and he became 
a member of the firm of Savory and Moore in 1819 ; but, from his great desire 
to travel and other reasons, he quitted it in 1826, and, from that time up to 

26 



dOQ F0BEI65 OBITUAET, 1836. [1838. 

tbe time of his death, he travelled over various parts of the globe, having 
visited North and South America, India, Egypt as far as the second Cataract, 
Syria, Palestine, Turkey, Greece, Italy, France, and Germany, before be 
undertook his expedition to Tombuctoo. He delivered a course of lectuies, 
at the Royal Institution in London, on Egypt and the Holy Land, whi^ 
excited great interest. He was conversant with the different languages of 
the East ; he possessed extraordinary enterprise and great accomplishmeots 
as a traveller ; and his death caused much disappointment and regret. 

Dec. 24. — At Narbonne, aged 65, Don Franeiaeo Etpoz y Mina, the 
distinguished Spanish constitutional general. 

Dec. 24. — In London, aged 86, John Bippon, D. D., pastor of the Bap- 
tist church in New Park street 54 years, having succeeded John Gill, D. D.; 
the two having and sustained the office of pastor of tbe church 117 y^rs. 

Dec. 80. — In London, in his 82d year, Jame§ Graham, Sd Dukt ef 
Montrose, Lord Justice General of Scotland. He held successively Tarioos 
important political o.iices, and was a man of talents and highly estimabk 
character in private life. 

1837. 

Jan. 1. — At Chelsea Hospital, aged 90, Field-MarsJial Sir Samuel 
Huhe, Governor of Chelsea Hospital from 1820 till his death. He bad 
been upwards of three quarters of a century in the military service of hi? 
country, having entered the Ist foot guards as an Ensign in Dec. 1761. 
He was raised to the rank of a Major-general in 1793, of Lieutenant-general 
in 1798, of General in 1803, and of Field-Marshal in 1830. 

Jan. 4. — In London, aged 77, John de Grenier Fonblanque, senior 
king's counsel, an eminent equity lawyer, and author of '' A Treatise on 
Equity " in two vols. 8vo. He was descended from an ancient family in 
Languedoc, and was the father of John S. Martin Fonblanque, a commis- 
sioner of bankrupts, and of Anthony Fonblanque, editor of the Examiner, 
and author of ** England under Seven Administrations." 

Jan. 11. Near Basingstoke, England, aged 53, Sir Frederick Ponaonbff 
a Major-General in the army. He was highly respected and esteemed as a 
man, and greatly distinguished as an officer, having acted a conspicuom 
part in military operations in Spain and at Waterloo. 

Jan. 11. — At Paris, aged 66, Francois Gerard, one of the most distin- 
guished painters of the French school. 

Jan. 12. — At Little Stonebam, Suffolk, England, aged 79, Rev, H^iOiam 
Fariah, B. D., Professor of Natural Philosophy in the Univereity of Cam- 
bridge. 

Jan. 13. — At Dublin, aged 60, Sir Win. McMahon, Master of the Rolls 
in Ireland. 

Jan. 18. — At Dysart House, in Fifeshire, Scotland, aged 75, Jamet St. 
Clair Erthine, 2d Earl of Roatlyn. He was 23 years a member of tbe 
House of Commons, before his accession to the peerage in 1805 ; was a 



1838.] poREien obituary. 1837. 303 

coospicuous member of both tlouaes of Parliament ; and was Lord Presi- 
deat of the Council in Sir Robert Peel's late brief administration. 

Jan. 18. — At St. Andrews, aged 90, Rev. John Hunter, L L. D., 
F. R. S., Principal of the United College of St. Salvator and St. Leoo9d in 
the University of St. Andrews ; emineot for his learning, and well known 
for his editions of Virgil, LIvy, Horace, &c. 

Jan. 20. — In London, aged 84, Sir John Soane, R. A., F. R. S. and 
S. A., Professor of Architecture In the Royal Academy, an eminent archi- 
tect, and author of meny works on architecture. 

Jan. 21. — In London, Robert John Thornton, M. D., a celebrated 
botanist. He was the younger sod of Bonnel Thornton, one of the editors 
of the *' Connoisseur," who died in 1768. He was educated as a physician, 
succeeded Sir James Edw. Smith as Lecturer at Guy's Hospital on medical 
botany ; and for many years was an Indefatigable and roluraioous author. 
His ** Temple of Flora, or Garden of the Botanist, Poet, Painter, and Phi- 
losopher, with picturesque plates, in illustration of the sexual system of 
Linnsus," folio, is a splendid work ; and ^* the pencils of Opie, Reinagle, 
Russell, Miss Bumey, &.C., were employed for its embellishment, and the 
muses of Seward, Maurice, Dr. Shaw, G. Dyer, &c., were invoked to swell 
its triumph." But the returns from the .sale of this very expensive work did 
not answer the author's expectation ; and, th'Sugh he obtained an act of 
Parliament to legalize a lottery to relieve him from his embarrassment, yet 
the enterprise proved ruinous to his fortunes. 

Jan. 24. — In London, aged 67, Joseph Scdrine, F. R. S., honorary secre* 
tary of the Horticultural Society (of which he was regarded as the founder) ; 
Treasurer and Vice-President of the Zoological Society. 

Jan. SO. — At Upsal, Sweden, aged 86, Professor Adam AxeUuSt said to 
be the last remaining pupil of Linnsus, celebrated for his travels in Asia 
and Africa. 

Feb. 1. — Near London, Edward Donovan, F. L. S., author of several 
works on natural history. 

Feb. 5. — In London, aged 90, James Cervetto, ** the younger," former- 
ly a celebrated violoncellist. He was the son of the elder James Cervetto, 
who was bom in Italy in 1682, came in 1736 to London, where he died in 
1783, at the age of 101. The younger Cervetto, 6r8t brought the violon- 
cello into favor in England, and was leader of the Drury Lane orchestra 
in the time of Garrick. He excelled his father in his profession, and 
was a member of the Royal Society of Musicians 72 years. 

Feb. 7. — At St. Gall, in Switzerland, aged 58, Gustavus Adolphus IV, 
ex-king of Sweden. He was born Nov. 1, 1778, and was the only son of 
Gustavus HI. He became king of Sweden in his I4th year, by the assas- 
sination of his father in 1792, his uncle the Duke of Sudermania being re- 
gent ; and in 1798, at the ago of 18, he ascended the throne ; but, in 1809, 
on account of his impolitic and violent conduct, he was deposed, and his 
heirs were excluded from the throne by an act of the Diet. He after- 



904 70REIGK OBIT€ART, 1837. [1838. 

wards travelled in several countries of Europe under different names, and 
resided at several places. His latter years were spent not only in exile, 
but in poverty. He was badly clotbed and fed, and possessed only a mnall 
annuity of JS96. He married a princess of Baden , sister of the late em- 
press of Russia, wife of tbe emperor Alexander ; and by her had foor 
children who still survive, — one son, Prince Gustavus Vasa, dow a general 
in the Austrian service, and three daughters. 

Feb. 11. — At Winchester, in England, in his 97th year, John LdUham, 
M. D., F. R. S., one of the founders of the Linncan Society in 1788; an 
eminent naturalist and ornithologist. Some of his principal works are« 
'' A General Synopsis of Birds," in 6 vols. 4to., with 2 supplementary voU. 
1781 - 1801 ; — " Index Ornithologicus," 2 vols. 4to. 1790} — «* General 
History of Birds/' 10 vols. 4to. This indefatigable naturalist commenced 
the publication of the last work when in his 82d year. 

Feb. 12. — At Hampstead, aged 40, Edward Turner, M. D., F. R. S., 
Professor of Chemistry in University College, London, and author of the 
** Elements of Chemistry," a work in high estimation. He was an emi- 
nent chemist, a popular and much esteemed professor, and a man of a very 
exemplary and benevolent character. 

Feb. 19. — At Southampton, England, aged 80, Thonuu Burgess, 
D. D., F. R. S., F. S. A., Y. P. R. S. L., &c.. Bishop of Salisbory . He 
was the son of a grocer at Odiham, in Hampshire, and was gmdoated 
A. B. in 1778, at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, of which he was elected 
felkiw in 1787. He was appointed Bishop of St. David's in 1803, and was 
translated to the see of Salisbury in 1825. Bishop Buigess was mainly 
instrumental in founding the Royal Society of Literature, of which he be* 
came, in 1821, the first Vice-President. He was a man of various and 
extensive learning, and a voluminous author. His publications, whfch are 
numerous, relate to various subjects of classical learning, critical and doc- 
trinal theology, and practical religion. He was a devout, exemplary, and 
zealous prelate ; and St. David's College at Lampeter, founded by him fior 
the education of ministers for the Welsh church, is an endoring monument 
of his benevolence. To this institution he bequeathed the whole of his 
valuable library, consisting of many thousand volumes. 

Feb. 19. — At Birminghdro, in England, aged 68, John Johnstone , 
M. D., an eminent physician and scholar, author of several pubhcations con- 
nected with his profession ; but his principal literary work is the life of his 
friend, Dr. Samuel Parr. 

Feb. 24. — At Liverpool, England, aged 80, John Bolton^ an eminent 
merchant, and a highly respected and benevolent man. 

March 12. — At Paris, In his 78th year, of apoplexy, M, de Pradi^ for- 
merly Archbishop of Malines. He was a member of the Legion of Honor, 
bore a conspicuous part in the political history of France, was employed 
in many important missions, and was the author of many political publi- 
cations. 



1838.] FOREIGN OBITUART, 1837. 305 

March 18. — Near Botley, Hants, in England, aged 68, John Fawcett, an 
eminent comic actor, who took leave of the stage in London in 1830. 

March 27. — At Brightonj England, Mr$. Maria ^nne FUxkerbert, aged 
80. Mary Anne Srnythe was first married to Edward Weld, in 1775, who 
died without issue the same year ; and she was afterwards married to 
Thomas Fitzherhert, who died also without issue in 1781. Shortly after 
her beauty and fascinating manners attracted the admiration of the Prince 
of Wales, to whom she was united in marriage according to the forms of 
the Catholic church, to which she belonged. Her character is represent- 
ed as amiable and benevolent, and she waj highly esteemed by the royal 
family. 

March 28. — In London, aged 67, George Vante^ an eminent surgeon. 

April 1. — In London, John ConstabUf R. A., an eminent portrait and 
landscape painter. 

April 5. — In London, in his 93d year, Henry Baihur$ty D. C. L., Bish- 
op of Norwich. He was born at Brackley, Northamptonshire, Oct. 16, 
1744, and was the seventh son of Benjamin Bathurst, who was the young- 
er brother of Allen first Earl Bathurst, and had 36 children, 22 by his first 
wife, and 14 by his second. — Dr. Bathurst was educated at Winchester, 
and graiduated at New College, Oxford, B. C. L., in 1768, and was conse- 
crated Bishop of Norwich in 1808. He published several sermons and 
charges, and a letter to Mr. Wilberforce. '^ He was distinguished through 
the whole course of his long life for the liberality of his principles ; and 
during many years he was regarded as * the only liberal bishop in the House 
of Lords.* In the exercise of his high duties he was exemplary ; and he 
is said to have distributed his patronage in a disinterested and generous 
manner.* ' — Qent, Mag, 

April 10. — At Rome, Thomas Weld, Cardinal of the Church of Rome. 
He was bom in England in 1772, and was the son of Thomas Weld of 
Lulworth Castle, in Dorsetshire, who was the founder of the Roman 
Catholic College at Stoneyhurst in Lancashire. After the death of his 
wife in 1815, he took holy orders in the Church of Rome ; some years after 
be was made coadjutor Bishop of Canada, and in 1829 was elevated to the 
rank of a cardinal. He devoted a large share of his fortune to objects of 
piety and charity. 

April 19. — At Berlin, aged 70, M. AneiUonf the Prussian Minister of 
Foreign Affairs, eminent as a statesman, philosopher, and publicist. 

April. — In Paris, in his 81st year, Baron Dubois, one of the most emi- 
nent surgeons of Europe, long a professor of surgery. 

May 29. — At Upsal, Sweden, aged 84, Prof. John ^^zeliuif an eminent 
chemist. 

July 19. — In London, aged 63, CharUi J. Stewart ^ D. D., Bishop of 
Quebec. 

July d4. — In England, Edward Grey, D. D., Bishop of Hereford, and 
brother of Eari Grey, late Prime Minister of Great Britain. 



AMERICAN OBITUARY. 



The names are alphabetieoUly arranged under the respective years, 1896, 
and 1837, for the sake of convenient reference. 

The notices, which are all necessarily brief, do not always correspond in 
length to the importance of the persons ; and many names, which it would 
be desirable to have recorded, are omitted on account of the difficulty of 
procuring the requisite information. 

For many of the notices here given, the editor is indebted to the atten- 
tion of his correspondents ; and for favors of this sort his particular ac- 
knowledgments are due to the Hon. James Parker, M. C. for the last four 
years from New Jersey. 



1836. 



Nov. 5. — At West Point, N. Y., aged 88, Major Roger JUdmip ao offi- 
cer of the revolutionary army. 

Oct. 6. — In Lower Canada, aged 101, 5afniM/ Anderton, foroieriy ao 
Associate Judge of the King's Bench. At the time of the revolt of the 
American colonies, he joined the British standard, and was Captain of the 
Kiog*s Royal Regiment of New York ; and after the war he settled in 
Canada, near Cornwall. 

Dec. 7. — In New York city, Jo§eph Bayleyt M. D., aged 61. 

Dec. 31. — In Philadelphia, aged 49, Charlei Btdd/e,late Commissioner 
from the U. S. Government for examining a proposed route for fonnlng a 
communication between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. 

Nov. 30. — At Baltimore, Md., aged 77, Dr. Solomon Muthard^vk emi- 
nent physician. 

Aug. 1. — At Hardwick, yt.,aged 37, Jfathamel Blanchardf a native of 
Peacham, Vt., and a respectable lawyer and worthy citizen of Fayetteville, 
Georgia. 

Aug. 28. — In Oneida Co., N. Y., aged 73, Mev. PubUui V. Bogue^ an 
eminent Presbyterian minister. 

Nov. 5. — In Virginia, aged 67, Danid Briggi, an eminent attoney 
formerly Mayor of Fredericksburg, and a Counsellor of State. 

Dec. 19. — Killed, in consequence of the bursting of the boiler of the 
steam-packet Dolphin, at St. John's Bar, Florida, Lieut, Col Alexander S. 
Brooki, of the U. S. Army, son of the late Governor Brooks of liiassa* 
chusetU. aged about 54. He entered the army, in 1808, with the rank of 
first Lieutenant, and was much esteei^ed as an officer. 



1838.] AMERICAN OBITUARY, 1836. 307 

Nov. 20. — At his father's reridence in Bedford Co., Ya., John Tkompion 
Brown J of Petersburg, Va., aged 36.^ He was for seveml years a very 
distinguished member of the Virginia Legislatore, was rising rapidly at the 
bar, and was regarded as one of the most eminent men of his age in the 
SUte. 

Sept. 6. — At Providence, R. I., Moses Brown, in his 98th year. He 
was bom at Providence, Sept., 1738, and was the youngest of four 
brothers, Nicholas, Joseph, John, and Moses, who were all remarlrable 
men, largely endowed with practical sagacity and a spirit of enterprise ; and 
they have left honorable men^orials of their public spirit and philanthropy. 
lliese brothers were among the founders of Rhode Island College, since 
named Brown University, in honor of the eldest, who was its most munifi- 
cent benefactor. — Moses Brown, at the early age of 13, left school, (his 
father being dead,) and passed his early years in the family of his uncle, 
Obadiah Brown, an eminent and wealthy merchant of Providence, whose 
daughter he married in 1764, and a portion of whose estate he inherited by 
will. In 1768, he engaged in commercial pursuits in connection with his 
three brothers ; and, after about ten years, he withdrew from the bustle of 
trade to that retirement to which his feeble health invited, and which was 
more congenial to his early formed taste for intellectual pursuits. He was 
three times married, but his last wife was taken from him many years be- 
fore bis death. By his first wife he hod two daughters, (one of whom died 
in infancy, and the other in 1794,) and one son, Obadiah Brown, of honor- 
ed memory, who died in 1822. These bereavements ** took from the 
aged pilgrim his staff and the companions of his journey, but they taught 
him to lean, with more confidence, upon an Almighty arm, and to look 
forward, with a more sustaining hope, to a communion with the society of 
heaven." ' 

Mr. Brown was a Baptist till 1773, when, at the age of 85, he became a 
Friend ; and from that time to the dose of his long life, he was a firm ad- 
herent to the primitive doctrines of the Society ; exerted a strong influence 
in all its concerns, both secular and religious ; sustained many of its 
most important offices with dignity and usefulness ; was long regarded as 
the patriarch of the Society ; and was greatly respected and beloved for his 
many Christian virtues, not only by his own brethren, but by other denom- 
inations. 

This venerable philauthVopist was a munificent patron of the Yearly- 
Meeting Boarding- School in Providence, a well endowed institution. He 
was, in accordance with the principles of the religious denomination to 
which he belonged, a friend of peace, and opposed slavery in all its forms. 
He manumitted his slaves in 1773 ; was one of the founders, and, for many 
years, an efficient member of the Abolition Society of Rhode Island, and 
was also an active member and liberal supporter of the Rhode Island Peace 
and Bible Societies. Though his constitution was originally feeble, yet he 



308 AMBRICAN OBITUARY, 1836. [1838. 

nearly completed his 98th year ; retainiog, till his last illoess, in a remariu- 
ble degree, the use of liis faculties of "^dy and mind. He spent oiucfa of 
his time in reading and writing, maintained an extensive correspoadence. 
and rarely made use of a clerk or an amanuensis. He made Itia will at the 
age of Sti, a long instrument, exemplifying, in an interesting manner, his at* 
tachment to his lriendS| and his desire to promote the cause of education. 
philanthropy, and religion. 

Sept. 14. — On Staten Island, N. Y., in his Slat year, ,iaron Burr, thii4 
Vice-President of the United States. He was born at Newark, M. J., Feb. 
6, 1756, and was the son of the Rev. Aaron Burr, the second President of 
New Jersey College at Princeton, whose father was a native of Ger- 
many, and resided| after emigrating to this country, at Fairdeld, Coon. 
The mother of Aaron, Burr was the daughter of the celebrated Rev. JoiLk> 
than ^dwards, the third President of New Jersey College. His father died 
in 1757, and his mother in 1758, leaving two children, Aaron and hta aster 
Sarah, who afterwards became the wife of Judge Tapping Reeve, of Litch- 
field, Conn. He was graduated at New Jersey College, in 1772, at tbe 
age of 16 ; in 1775, in his 20th year, he joined the American army under 
Washington, at Cambridge ; accompanied Gen. Arnold as a private soldier ia 
his expedition against Quebec; after his arrival there, he acted as an aid-de- 
camp to Gen. Montgomery ; and on his return, in 177t>, Gen. Washiogtoa 
invited him to join his family at head-quarters. Some circumstance soon 
took place, which has not been fully explained, by which Burr for erer lost 
tbe coijfidence of Washington 3 and the hostility of the former to the latter, 
from that time, was undisguised and unmitigated. In 1777, Burr was ap- 
pointed Lieutenant-Colonel, and distinguished himself as an able and brave 
officer *, but in March, 1779, he was, 00 account of the state of bis health, 
compelled to resign his office, and retire from military life. 

He then devoted himself to the study of law ; commenced practice at 
Albany, in 1782, but soon removed to the city of New York ; he l>ecame 
distinguished in his profession ; was appointed Attorney-General of New 
York in 1789 ; from 1791 to 1797, he was a member of tbe U. S. Senate, 
and bore a conspicuous part as a leader of the democratic or republican par- 
ty. At the election of President of the United States, for the 4th Presi- 
dential term, Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr had each 73 votes^and the 
choice was decided by Congress, on the 36th ballot, in favor of JefferKm 
for President, and Burr for Vice-President. On the 12th of July, 18U4, Col. 
Burr gave Alexander Hamilton, long his professional rival and political op- 
ponent, a mortal wound in a duel. He soon after conceived the project of 
his mad, and not very well explained, enterprise in the western country of 
the United States $ for which he was at length apprehended and brought to 
Richmond, in August, 1807, on a charge of treason ; and after a long trial, 
he was acquitted. He afterwards returned to the city of New York, prac- 



18^.] AMKRICAK OBITUARY, 1896. 309 

tised Iftw to some extent, but passed the remainder of Ids life In oompara- 
tive obscurity and neglect. 

Colonel Burr was of small stature, only about 5 feet 6 inches high, yet 
he had a lofty mein, a military air, a remarkably brilliant eye, and a striking 
appearance. He possessed very distinguished talents and many accom- 
plishments ; but he manifested a lamentable want of principle, bodi in pub- 
lic and private life. His biographer, Mr. DaTis, says ; << That he was far 
more tenacious of his military, than of his professional, political, or moral 
character. — In his intercourse with females he was an unprincipled flatter- 
er, ever prepared to take advantage of their weakness, their credulity, or 
their confidence. She that confided in him was lost. His Intrigues were 
without number. His conduct most licentious. The sacred bonds of 
friendship were unhesitatingly violated when they operated as barriers to 
the indulgence of his passions." 

April 17. — In New York, in his 89th year, Dr, Oeorge Maeartney 
Buthe, a distinguished surgeon. 

Oct. 20. — At St. Augustine, Florida, George L F, Clarke a native of 
Florida, and for many years Lieutenant-Governor and Surveyor-General of 
the province of East Florida, under the Spanish Government. 

Nov. 11. — At Windham, Conn., aged 83, Jabez Clark, late Chief Jus- 
tice of the County Court ; long a distinguished member of the bar, and 
highly esteemed as a very excellent and useful citizen, and an exemplary 
Christian. He served through the revolutionary war, in the department of 
the Quartermaster-general. 

Sept. 25. — In Telfair county, Georgia, Gensroi John Coffee^ M. C. 
from Georgia. 

Aug. 6. — At Adolphus, Upper Canada, aged 105, Daniel Cole^ a native 
of Long Island, N. Y. 

Aug. 21. — At Tappan, N. Y., aged 84, Charlee JHekmeon, a soldier of 
the revolution, and for many years an alderman of New York city. 

Sept. 11.-^ At New Haven, Conn., CoL Joeeph Drolce, in his lOOih 
year. 

Se|>t. 11. — At Brooklyn, N. Y., aged 46, Col. John M. Ckunble, of the 
U. S. Marine Corps. 

Oct. 16. — At Milton, Mass., of apoplexy. In his 67th year, Samuel Oile, 
D. D., a highly respectable Congregational minister in that place. 

Oct. 5. — Near Easton, Md., Robert H, OoldBborough, U. S. Senator 
from Maryland. 

Not. 12. — In Lincoln Co.,N. C, Gen, Joseph Oraham^ aged 77. He 
was born in the county of Chester, Pa., in 1759 ; emigrated in 1766 or 1766 
to N. C. ; at the age of 18, joined the army of the revolution ; and in the vari- 
ous ranks of sergeant, adjutant, captain, and msjor, he continued in the ser- 
vice, with short Intervals, till the close of the war, and gained the reputation 
of an aUe and brave officer. After the close of the war, he was for several 



^10 AMERICAN OBITUARY, 1836. [1838. 

* 

years Sheriff of MeckleDbcrg, and frequently repretented that coimty in 
the State Senate. During the last war with Great Britain, he held the of- 
fice of Brigadier- Greneral of Militia ; and was subsequently promoted ta 
the rank of Major-General of Militia. 

** Gen. Graham united the frankness of the soldier with the courtesy ef 
the gentleman. He was frugal without parsimony, and liberal without os- 
tentation. His death was accompanied with many circumstances of coc- 
solation to his relatives for (heir bereavement. He had served his country, 
long, faithfully, and efficiently, lived to see his children rateed up to char- 
acter and usefulness, and died with an assurance, strengthened by more 
than forty years' connection with the Presbyterian Church, of a happy im- 
mortality beyond the grave." 

Oct. 7. — At Yorktown, Va., aged 64, Major Thonuu Griffin, eecond ic 
command at the battle of Hampton, and M. C. in 1803-5. 

Nov. — Near Rah way, N. J., aged 8*7, Richard Hartshorn^ a respected 
member of the Society of Friends. 

Dec. 8. — At Rome, N. Y., aged 75, Joshua Hathaway, Judge of the 
Court of Common Pleas in the county of Oneida. 

Dec. 25. — At Hingham, Mass., aged 97, Eheh Hersey^ the oldest inhab- 
itant of the place. \ 

Nov. 30. — At Bellegrove, Va., aged 80, Major Isaac HUe, an officer in 
the revolutionary war. 

Sept. 17. — At Port Gibson, Mississippi, aged about 45, George Irish, 
Judge of the first judicial district in that State. 

Oct. 3. — At Weathersfield, Vt., William C. Jarvis, of Charlestown, 
Mass., formerly Speaker of the House of Representatives of Massachusetts. 

Oct. 24. — At Rutland, Yt., in consequence of her clothes taking Bie, 
Mrs, Sarah Johnson^ aged 101 years. 

Dec. 3. — At Brooklyn, N. Y., aged 56, EUsha W, SUngt lately a con- 
spicuous member of the New York bar. 

Sept. I. — At New Lebanon, N. Y., aged 68, John Kingf M. C. io 
1831-3, from New York. 

Nov. 26. — At Cincinnati, Ohio, George L. JEtnnard, of IndiaDapolis, 
and M. C. from Indiana. He was scalded in consequence of an explosion 
of the steamboat Flora, on the Ohio, 30 miles below Cincinnati, on the 
16th of November, and he died in consequence of the injury on the 26th. 

Nov. — At Rochester, Mass., the Rev, Lemuel Le Baron, in the 90th 
year of his age and the 65th of his ministry. 

Oct. 29. — At Worcester, Mass., aged 28, Dr. 7%omas G. Lee, Physi- 
cian and Superintendent of the McLean Asylum at Charlestown ; a man 
highly esteemed for his personal worth and professional talents and use- 
fulness. 

Oct. 17. — At Washington, D. C, Joseph Lovell, M. D., Surgeon- 
General of the United States army. He entered the army, in 1812, as 



1838.] AMERICAII OBITUARY, 1836. 311 

Surgeon of the 9tli regiment of infimtry ; and in 1818 he was appointed to 
the important station of Surgeon-Generalof the [Jnited States armyya post 
which his talents, medical skill, and great experience eminently qualified 
him to fill with honor and great advantage to the public service. He was 
much esteemed for his private virtues, as well as great public usefulness. 

Nov. 10. — At Baltimore, Md., aged 80, Jatnei H. McCuUoch, Collector 
of the port of Baltimore, having sustained the office 30 years ; — a patriotic 
and highly respected citizen. 

Sept. 29. — At Bloomfield, Me., aged 74, Bryce MeLellan, formerly a 
judge ; a man distinguished for his benevolence and liberality to charitable 
objects. 

Jan. 20. — At Columbia, S. C, Rev, Robert Mean§f a Presbyterian min- 
ister of Fairfield District, S. C. He published several sermons, and an 
able '* Essay on the Pentateuch,'* in answer to a pamphlet of Dr. Thomas 
Cooper. Mr. Preston, U. S. Senator from South Carolina, said of him, 
** 1 have not known a man who united in so eminent a degree the highest 
qualities of a gentleman and a Christian." 

Oct. 11. — At Providence, R. I., in his 68th year, ^bg MesBCr^ D. D., 
LL. D., formerly President or Brown University. He was graduated at 
Brown University in 1790, and was President of the institution from 1802 
to 1826. He was a man of considerable literary and scientific attainments, 
and conducted the affairs of the University in a manner creditable to his 
talents and learning. ** In his domestic relations he was a most affection- 
ate husband and father ; as a friend, warm-hearted and constant ; and in his 
intercourse with his fellow-citizens, kind, cheerful, and of scrupulous in- 
tegrity. He died as he had lived, a firm, consistent, and unpretending 
Christian." — Providence Courier, 

Oct. 8. — At Springfield, La., Larrey H. Moore j for several years a dis- 
tinguished member of the Senate of Louisiana* 

Nov. 8. — At Norton, Mass., aged 79, Samuel Morey, M. D., a distin- 
guished physician, who was a surgeon in the revolutionary army, for two 
years, at West Point. 

Dec. 3. — In the city of New York, suddenly fell dead, General Jacob 
Morion, 9l venenbXe and estimable citizen, for twenty years previous to his 
death Clerk of the Common Council, having performed duty as an officer 
of the New York Artillery every year since the adoption of the Federal 
Constitution. He was assistant-marshal under Morgan Lewis, at the grand 
reception of General Washington as first President of the United States. 
He held many civil offices, and discharged them all with intelligence and 
ability, and was much respected and esteemed for his public services, and 
Ills virtues in private life. 

Aug. 22. — At Richmond, Ya., aged 82, Samuel Myers, a respected 
citizen. 

Sept. 7. — At Bellefield, Prince George's Co., Md., aged 74, Benjamin 
Oden, a much respected citizen. 



318 Amcricaic obituart, 1836, [163^. 

Oct. 21. — In Northampton Co., Va., General Severn E. Parker^ «■ 
eminent lawyer^ formerly a distinguished member of the State Legialatfae, 
andaM. C. in 1819 — 21. 

Nov. 9. —At hit residence in Goochland Co., Va., aged 67, Jama 
Pleaeante^ M. C. from 1811 to 1819, United States Senator frona 1819 ic 
1822, Governor of Virginia from 1822 to 1825, and a member of the Con- 
vention of 1829-30, for amending the State ConstitutioD. He mu 
twice appointed to the bench, but declined, from a distnist of his €m% 
qualifications. He was a man of rare modesty, greatly respected and es- 
teemed for public and private virtues. • 

Oct. 10. — In Albemarle Co., Va., aged upwards of 70, .Afrs. M&rtht, 
Bandolph, widow of the late Governor Thomas M. Randolph, and the \a^ 
surviving daughter of Thomas Jefferson, a lady of distinguished talents 
and virtues. 

Sept. 3.— At New Cwitle. Delaware, aged 71, George Read, son d 
George Read who signed the Declaration of Independence of the United 
States ; an able lawyer, and District Attorney for Delaware from the time 
of Washington's administration to that of Madison. 

Oct. 2. — At Mount Holly, N. J., aged 65^ Samuel J. Beade, a reepected 
citizen. 

Oct. 25. — In Edgefield District, S. C, Bev, Luiher jRiee, an etniBaii 
Baptist minister of Virginia. He was born at Northborough, Mass., gradu- 
ated at WiUiam*s College, in 1810, and in 1812 he sailed as one of the 
first missionaries sent to India by the American Board of Foreign Mis- 
sions. After his acrival in India, he became a Baptist ; soon returned ts 
this country, and was actively employed in promoting domestic and foreign 
missions. Columbian College in the District of Columbia was fcHmded 
chiefly by his exertions. 

Nov. 11. — At Windham, Conn.^ aged 88, Hezekiah Ripley, late Judge 
of Probate for the county, and a highly useful citizen. 

Oct. —At Philadelphia, aged 76, XJHWert Robertson, British Coneul for 
that port. 

Dec. 27. — In New York city, aged 73, William Sampson, counsellor at 
law, and a native of Ireland. 

Aug. 14. — At Constantia, Oswego Co., N. Y., aged 84, Creorge Sar^Oy 
a native of Germany, formerly an eminent merchant of New York, and for 
30 years an inhabitant of the county in which he died, and the original 
patentee of a large part of that flourishing district of the State. 

Nov. 6. — In Davis Co., Indiana, aged 79, Dr. John A, Seudder, a na- 
tive of New Jersey. 

Aug. 80. — At Palmyra, Missouri, aged about 49, Oeorge Shannon^ foi^ 
merly a Circuit Judge in Kentucky, and U. S. District Attorney for Mis- 
souri. He was a native of Pennsylvania ; accompanied Lewis and Clark, at 
the age of 16, in their expedition to the Pacific ocean, in 1803; aflerwardj 



1838.] ' AWEBICAK OBITUART, 1836. 313 

read law in Philadelphia ; removed to Kentucky and commenced practice ; 
ihence iemoTed» In 1R28, to St. Louis. His eatfy education was much neg- 
lected ; but he possessed original talents and a vigorous mind. 

Oct. 13. — In Washington, Gloucester Co., N. J., aged nearly 100 years, 
Jacob Spencer^ a revolutionsry pensioner. He had had seven wives, and 
left but one child living. 

Aug. 24. — Near Kingston, Tenn., Col. Jamei Standtfer, M. C. from 
Tennessee. 

Nov. 29. — At Princeton, N. J., aged 85, Samud W. Stockton, a Lieu- 
tenant in the U. S. Navy. 

Oct. — At Easton, Mass., David TKompBOfif a pensioner of 80 years* 
standing. He enlisted in the French war at the age of 16 ; waa one of the 
ill-fated garrison that defended Fort William Henry in 1757, where he lost 
faia left arm, for which he received a pension till the time of his death, and 
was the last surviving pensioner that took part in that war. His age Is not 
accurately ascertained, but it was from 98 to 102. 

Sept. 8.— At Warren, R. I., aged 61, John Trott, Chief Justice of the 
Court of Common Pleas. 

Dec. 30. — At New Scotland, N. Y.,John Warden, in his lOlst year. 

Sept. 3. — In New York city, aged 87, John Watts, M. C. in 1798 - 5. 

Aug. 19. —In New York city, in her lOOth year, Mrs. White, relict of 
the Hon. Henry White, and daughter of Governor Yan Courtlandt. 

"Sov, — At Bangor, Me., aged 82, Captain Luke Wilder, an officer of 
the revolutionary army, a native of Lancaster, Mass., from which place he 
marched with a company of volunteers to join Gen. Stark at Bennington. 

Oct. 97. — At West Farms, Westchester Co., N. Y., aged 73, Martin S. 
Wilkins, long a respected member of the New York bar. 

Oct 24. — At Louisville, Ken., Horatio Oatei fVin$tonf an eminent 
lawyer of Yirginia, and lately a leading member of the state legislature. 

Dec. 24. — At Boscawen, N. H., Samuel Wood, D. D„ aged 85. He 
was bom at Mansfield, Conn., May 11, 1752; graduated at Dartmouth 
College in 1779 ; was ordained pastor of the Congregational church In 
Boscawen in 1781, which office he sustained till his death. This excellent 
man was a zealous promoter of learning, and he fitted more students for 
college than any other clergyman In the State. About 100 of his pupils 
entered college, about 50 became ministers of the Gospel, a considerable 
oumber were assisted by him in defraying the expenses of their education ; 
and by his pupils, generally, he was regarded with much affection and 
respect. 

Oct. 14. — At Leominster, Mass , Mn. Lois Wood, aged 100 years and 

six raontlis. 

Oct 21.— At Feacham, Vt., aged 29, Rev, EvartM Worcester, ordained 
pastor of the Congregational church in Littleton, N. H., March 17, 1836 ; 
formeriy a tutor In Dartmouth College ; a young minister of much promise. 

27 



314 AMEBICAU OBITUARY, 1896.' [183B. 

Nov. 24. — At LiUletoD, Mass., Benjamin Worcester ^ aged 99. 
Sept. 10. — At Geoigetovrn, D. C, aged 77, Dr. George tVorthiagtm 
a man much respected. 



1837. 



April. — At Uxbridge, Mass., Benjamin Adams, M. C. from Massac&a* 
setts from 1816 to 1821. 

April 10. — At Gretna Green, N. C, WUUs Mston, M. C. from N.C 
from 1803 to 1815, and from 1825 to 1831. 

May 11. — In Hunterdon Co., N J., aged 84, Jacob JlnderMon^ aa ofi- 
cer of the militia in the revolutionary war. 

April 17. — At Washington, D. C, aged 80, Joseph Anderson, late Fkfi 
Comptroller of the Treasury, an office which he honorably Blled for nissj 
years He was a native of Pennsylvania, and served in the Sew Jersej 
line throughout the whole revolutionary war. He afterwards removed ti 
Tennessee and was a U. S. Senator from that State from 1797 to 1S15. He 
was a man highly respected for both his public and private character. 

March 17. — At Sharon, Vt., aged 61, Rev. Samuel Barron, a respected 
Congregational minister in that town. 

July 17. — At Dover, N. H., aged 44, Jameg Bartlett, formerly ft mea- 
ber of the Senate of N. H., and Register of Probate. 

Feb. 28. — In Davidson County, Tenn., Col Adam Binkley, aged 13S. 
He served throughout the revolutionary war, at which time he haul a wilt 
and eleven children. — S. W. Chtiatian Advocate. 

July 4. — At Spring6eld, Laurens Co., Georgia, aged 74, Generd 
David Blaekshear, distinguished for his patriotic services, both civfl 
and military. He was a native of North Carolina ; and at the a^e of 
16 he entered the army of the United States, and remained in it tOI 
the establishment of independence. In 1790, he removed to Georgia; 
was for several years much engaged in Indian warfare; and afterward! 
devoted himself to agriculture, sustaining with usefulness, from time lo 
time, honorable stations in public life. When the sea-coast of Georgia 
was threatened with invasion, in 1814. he was intmsted with the coauuand 
of a brigade, in which station he acquitted himself with reputation. 

June SO. — At Nacodoches, Texas, Jesse Bledsoe, formerly a distin- 
guished advocate and jurist of Kentucky, a U. S. Senator from that Sute 
from 1813 to 1815, Professor of Law in the University of Transylvania, and 
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Kentucky. There was a time 
when no man in the State stood higher than he did in respect to eloquence, 
talents, and influence ; but by habits of intemperance he became a misera* 
ble outcast and wanderer. 

April 11. — At Lowell, Mass., aged 46, Kirk Boott, a highly respected 
citizen, whose name has been identified with the prosperity of the new 
and flourishing city of Lowell, since the fiist establishment of manufac* 



1838.] AMERICAN OBITUART, 1837. 315 

tures at that place. He was a native of Boston ; received his eariy edaca- 
tioo in an excellent school in England ; spent one or two years at Harvard 
University ; then went to Spain, and joined the army as an officer under 
the Duke of Wellington ; afterwards spent ahout two years at the military 
school at Woolwich in England ; where he acquired eminent skill as a 
draftsman and engineer: about 1817, he returned to Boston, where he en- 
gaged in mercantile pursuits ; and a few years aAerwards, he was called to 
superintend the erection of the new manufacturing establishments at Low- 
ell. In this new career, his enterprise, energy, and ektraordloary taleoCe 
for business rendered his services invaluable ; while his urbanity, generosity t 
and disinterestedness gained for him the public respect, and endeared 
him to his friends. 

May 30.— At Philadelphia, aged 107, Christopher Bouyn^, a sokUer of 
the revolution. 

Aug. 26. — At Hartford, Conn., aged 83, Jonathan Brace, a, respected 
citizen. He was M. C. in 1798-1800; formerly Chief Judge of the 
County Court, and Jud^e of Probate. 

April 4. — At Newmarket, N. H., aged 58, Daniel Braeketj a man much 
respected. A short time before his death his weight was 560 pounds. 

Jan. — At Duxbury, Mass., sged 91, jSndrew Bradford, ti descendant of 
Governor Wm. Bradford, and a Quarter-master in the army of the revolu- 
tion. He was a twin brother of Peter Bradford, who died only two years 
before. 

July 18. — In Chester Co., Pa., Col. Thomas BuU, aged 94, a soldier of 
the revolution. 

May, — At Carlisle, Pa., Profe»»or Merritt CaldweUf aged 30. 
Jan. 8. — At his seat in Culpepper Co., Va., aged 63, Dabney Carr, a 
judge of the Virginia Court of Appeals ; a man much respected and esteem- 
ed for bis amiable character, his talents, leaming,industry,solidity of mind, 
and uncommonly fine colloquial powers. 

May 19. — At Clarksville, N. J., aged 78, Dr, Israel Clark, an eminent 
physician. 

Feb. 26. — At Topsfield, Mas4., aged 76, Dr. ^eftemiah Cleavelandf 
53 years a practising physician at that place, for many years a magistrate, 
and for some time a member of the i!«tate Senate ; much esteemed for his 
public and private virtues, and his religious character. 

July 17. — At Rochester, N. Y., Dr. Jinson Colman, a gentleman much 
respected. 

Feb. — At Detroit, Michigan, General Ezra Comis, member of the 
Michigan House of Representatives from the county of Calhoun ; he was ' 
abo a mem bet of the Convention that formed the State Constitution, and 
Speaker of the first House of Representatives under that Constitution *, 
and much esteemed as a Christian, and as a man of talents and integrity. 

Aug. 12. — At Plymouth, aged 79, Rosseier Cotton^ Register of Deeds 
for the county of Plymouth ; having discharged the duties of the office 48 



316 AMBRICAIf OBITTJABT, 1887. [1838. 

yean. His father held the same office 88 years, and his grand&ther 43, — 
the three, 124 years hi successton. 

May «. — In Morris Co., N. J., aged 48, Oeorge K, Draksj lately a 
jadge of the Supreme Court of that State. 

March 6.'— At Mason, N. H., in Ms 103d year, OHver EUiot, a soldier 
of the French war of 1756, and of the revolutionary war. 

Jan 25. ~ At Boston, aged 74, OUver FUke, M. D., of Worceeter, Mats. 
He was the son of the Rev. Dr. N. Fiske, of Broolcfiekl ; was graduated at 
Harvard CoHege in 1787 ; was long a practising physician at Worcester ; 
and filled with honor many public offices in the State. 

May 4. — In New Yoric, John Fleming, late President of the Me- 
chanics' Bank. He was found dead in his bed in the morning ; and ac- 
cording to the verdict of the coroner's jury, his death was earned hy 
*' mental excitement." 

Aug. 16. — At the Sweet Springs, Va., ^Hn Fhyd, who was M. C. 
from 1817 to 1829, and Governor of Virginia from 1829 to 1834. 

Feb. — At Sharon, Conn., Benjamin Gannett , aged 80. He was (he 
husband of Deborah Sampeon, who served three years as a soldier in ^ the 
American revolutionary war; and a bill was before Congress at the time of 
his death, granting him a pension In consideration of the militaiy servicer 
of bis deceased wife. 

April 18. — At Marion, Ohio, of apoplexy, James B. Ganftner, editor -of 
the Ohio Free Inquirer. 

April 12. — At Natick, Mass., Mrs. lAfdia Gay, nged 108. Her hair, 
which had been white with age, was turning to its original color, black. 

March 7. — Near Woodville, Mississippi, aged about 40, Wifkam HaiU, 
a man of good talents, and M. C. from Mississippi in 1826-8. 

Jan. 14. — At Westhampton, Mass., aged 8S, Re9. Enoch Hale, who had 
been 56 years pastor of the church in that place. 

Feb. 8. — In New York city, aged 72, fViUiam Hamereley, M. D., 
senior consulting physician in the New York Hospital, and formerly Pro- 
fessor of the Theory and Practice of Physic in the College of Physicians 
«aiid Surgeons. 

June 28. — Near Paris, Fiance, in his 36th year, ChaHet CarroU Harper, 
of Baltimore, son of the late Robert Goodloe Harper, and late secretary of 
the American legation at Paris ; a man of fine talent^. 

March 18. — At Frankford, Pa., aged 88, Francis J. Harper, M. C, 
(elect) from Pennsylvanili. 

Jan. — At Hopkinton,N. H., Mrs. Rachel Herrick^ aged 103. 

Feb. 13. — At Tarn worth, N. H., aged 77, Rev. Samuel Hidden^ first 
minister of the Congregational Church in that town. 

Jan. 84. —At New York city, Josiah Ogden Hoffman, an associate 
judge of the Superior Court of that city. 

June 4. — At Cambridge, Mass., In his 74th year, ^hiH HokneOj D. D., 



1838.] AMERICAlf OBITDART, 1837. 317 

late paMtor of the Pirpt Congregatlona) Church in that town. He wis 
bora at Woodstock, Conn., Dec, 1763 ; graduated at Ya1« College in 1788; 
from Nov., 1786, to June, 1791, was pastor of a church at Midway in 
Georgia; and in 1792 he became pastor of the First Church in Cambridge. 
Dr. Holmes was higtUjr respected for his talents, learning, and charscter; 
and his influence was extensively felt in yarious benevolent and literary 
societies of which he was a member. His most considerable literary pro- 
duction, entitled ** The Annals of America,*' in two volumes, 8vo, is one of 
the most valuable historical publications that has been written in this coun- 
try ; and it has the high reputation of an accurate, judicious, and elaborate 
work. It was first published in 1805 ; in 1818, an edition was printed in 
England ; and in 1829, a new and much improved edition was published at 
Cambridge. His Life of President Stiles was published in 1798. — His 
other publications, consisting of sermons and historical disquisitions, are 
nearly thirty in number. 

The following just remarks on the character of Or. Holmes, are e&traeted 
from a sermon preached at Cambridge, by the Rev. Dr. Jenks, on the next 
Sunday after hb funeral. — ** The important character of pastor, leader, and 
guide. Dr. Holmes sustained with high respectability, much consistency, 
uniformity, and meekness. He was a ruler in the church of Christ, * not 
as lording it over 6od*s heritage,' with arbitrary power, but governing by 
persuasive influence and evangelical gentleness, combined with the con- 
straining dignity of a firm adherence to principle. Few pastors, or men, 
have, in my judgment, combined these two characters more successfully 
together. Studiously polite to all with whom he conversed, and scrupu- 
lously attentive to every demand of propriety, both in private and public 
life, he could use consistently, what no bigot or zealot can, the memorable 
language of the Apostle, — * We were gentle among you as a nurse cherish- 
eth her children ; ' and with equal justice could say, in regard to any sup* 
posable demand interfering with his sense of sacred duty, from any quarter, 
* To whom we gave place by subjection no not for an hour, that the Gospel 
might continue with you.' 

" This blending of moderation and modesty, with firmness and decision 
of character, where decbion and firmness are needed, constitutes, if I mis- 
take not, an enviable, or rather a desirable distinction. Especially in these 
days of denunciation, estrangement, and obloquy, of superficial attain- 
ments and loud professions, of headlong rashness in enterprise, and bold- 
ness and confidence in assertion, we can hardly praise too highly the peace- 
ful, laborious, faithful, and humble follower and minister of Jestu Christ, 
who is learned without vanity or dogmatism, pious without cant or fitful- 
ness, and charitable without ostentation. And such, if I mistake nott was 
our beloved and lamented friend. Never in extremes, or chargeable with 
extravagance, his deportment and character united, in no common degree, 
the gentleman, the scholar, and the Christian." 

5J7* 



318 AMERICAIV OBTTUA&T, 1637. [1838. 

Feb. 15. — At HopkiDton, Mum., Bged 72, Rev. Jfaihamel ff«tBe,laie 
pMtor of the CoDfi^regatioDal Church in that town, much respected for his 
taleDtfl and virtues. 

May 16. >- At Philadelphia, aged 67, Michael Hurley, D. D., an eoaiiievt 
Catholic clergyman, much respected and esteemed for his charity and phi- 
lanthropy. 

Jan. 24. — At Boston, Mr9. Eleanor Jefereofif in her 10 1st year. 

May 9. — At Andover, Mass., in bis 84th year, Osgood Jokfuon, hte 
Principal of Phillips Academy in that town. He graduated at DartiDoulh 
Ootlege in 1828, and in 1882, became Principal of Phillips Academy, a sta- 
tion for which he was eminently quali6ed by his talents, learning, Utecafy 
taste, and his manly and Christian virtues. 

Aug. — About 20 miles from his residence at RockviUe, Md., kitted 
by being tlirown from his carriage, Charles J, JRlgeur, Judge of the 
County Court in Montgomery Co., Md. 

Julyl. — At Franklin, l^Iissouri, aged 82, Ctflonei Joel JRngBbmry,* 
lative of Connecticut, and an officer in the service of the United Stales 
far 42 years. 

Jan. 20. — In New Toric city, aged 70, Isaac L, Mip, for many yeais 
assistant Register of the Court of Chancery in the State of New York. 

April 12. — Near Freedom, in Beaver Co., Pa., General Ahner Laeoek, 
m his 67th year. He was a native of Virginia, and in his youth reoMived 
with his father to Pennsylvania. Without the advantages of much ctfly 
education, by his own exertions | by the force of his natural talents, and his 
moml wovth, he raised himself from humble Ufe, to eminence as a legislator, 
statesman, and civiMan. He filled various public stations, for a period 
of nearly forty years, with unirapeaohed integrity and ability. He was a 
memlier of Congress iroro 1811 to 1818, and a United Stales Senator from 
1818 to 1819. 

July. — In New Yotk city, aged 88, Bobert V, iMng, senior editor of tlw 
New York Gazette, a man of good talents and estimable character. 

Jan. 29. — At Har(ford, Vt., aged 46, Lewis Lyman, an enterpilsiiig, ap- 
light, and successful merchant 

, June 29. — At his residence in Warren County, N. C, aged 79, JfaAan- 
ial Maeon, long a distinguished member of Congress from North Carolina. 
He was elected a member of the 2d Congress in 1791, and continued a 
member of the House till 1816, when be was transferred to tlie Senate, of 
iriiich he continued a member till 1828, when he resigned and retltod to 
private life; having been 37 yean a member of tfie House or Senate, a 
hmger period than any other man ; and for several yean what is callod the 
Father of the House. He was Speaker of the House of Reptesentatives 
in the 7lh, Sth, and 9lh Congresaes. ** During the long term, and thioogh aH 
the oxciiing periods, of to pubHt life," says the «< Warranton Rayortor,' 
'* though always a conspicuous party man, no one of any farly ovnr <|Qes> 



1838L] AKEftlCAJI OBITVART, 1887. 319 

tkmed hia integrity or the parity of his motiven ; tod be hts descended to 
the grave full of yeei9 and with univereal rotpect." He was the boson 
friend of Jeflerson and Madison ; and no one was more devoted to Mn 
fhan John Randolph. Mr. Randolph in the last paper which he i%rote for 
bis wtU, (written in 1832, but recently set aside by the Virginia Court of 
Appeals,) after enumerating several bequests to liis friend, he cliaracteriiM 
faiin as ** the iMst, and parest, and wisest man that I ever Imew.*' 

Nov. 14. — At Talladega, Ab., aged about M, Smmud W, Mardk, M. C. 
from Alabama from 1881 to 1835 ; a man respected both in public and private 
life. 

Fob. — At Clear Creek, Warren Co., Ohio, aged 91, F^gU9 MeLeaUt , 
father of John McLean, Judge of the United Sutes Sopfeme CourL He 
was one of the pioneers of the settlement of the Miami Valley, having re- 
moved, in 1797, to (ho place where be died. 

March 19. — At Washington, D. C, aged 70, Jeremiah MeLene, of 
Columbus, Ohio, M. C. in 1833 - 7, and 21 years Secretary of State for 
Ohio ; a highly respectable man. 

April 22. — At MUledgeville, Geo., aged 71, Generoi Damd Bwady 
Mitchell, Governor of the State of Georgia from 1809 to 1813. 

July 25. — In Orange Co., N. C, Jtlfred Moore f in bis 56ih year. He 
was the son of Alfred Moore, late U. S. District Judge for the District of 
N. C. ; and be was for many years a distinguished member of tlie State 
Legislature, and several years Speaker of ihe House of Commons. He 
was distinguished for liis ability, eloquence, and spotless integrity. In all 
the relations of life, he was exemplary and amiable ; and, as a companion, 
remarkably iateresUng and iustructlve. 

July 28. — At Canterbury, N. H., aged 58, EMekiel Morrill, a member of 
the State Council in 1836. 

March 5. — In Philadelphia, aged 77, jindrew PettU, a highly respected 
merckiant. 

May 28. — At Cambridge, Mass., Israel Porter^ aged 93. 

June 20. — At .Marblehead, aged 93, Joshua PrentisSt the oldest inhabi- 
tant of that town, and an officer of the revolution. 

Feb. 16. — At Marblehead, Mass., very suddenly, while attending the meet- 
ing of the Sunday-school children, aged 60, fVilliam Reed, an eminent mer- 
chant* and a man much esteemed for. bis benevolent and religious character. 
He wasM. C. from Massachusetts from 131 1 to 1816 ; was President of the 
Sabbath- School Union of Massachusetts, and of the Araeiican Tract So- 
ciety, Vice-President of the American Education Society, a member of the 
Board of Visitors of the Theological Seminary at Andover, and of the 
Board of Trustees of Dartmouth College. Besides liberal bequests to heire 
wad relatives, he left $68,000 to benevolent objects, of which f 17,000 were 
to Dartmouth College, 1 10,000 to Amherst College, $10,000 to the Board 
of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, 9 9,000 to the First Church and 



330 AXBRICAN OaiTUABT, 1837. [ld3B. 



Society in Marblehead, ^ 7,000 to the Second Confrregfttional Church 
Society in Marblebead, and 1^6,000 to the library of the Theological Semi- 
naiy at Andover. 

Peb. 6. — At Chambenburg, Pa., in his 8Sd year, Jamti RiddU, formerty 
a judge in the High Court of Errors and Appeals, an eminent counsellor and 
lawyer, respected for his talents, learning, and worth. 

May 8. — At Waytand, Mass., aged 58, M. M, Muiter, for more than 10 
years a member of one or other branch of the Legiblature of Massachn- 
setts, and a man much esteemed. 

Feb. 25. — At Salem, Mass., aged 52, Mits Sarah Savage, authorees ef 
'* The Factory Girl," and several other works much esteemed; a lady of 
rare intellectual endowments and amiable and excellent character. 

Aug. 26. — At Uiica, N. Y., Henry Seymour, formerly acting Canal 
Commissioner, a man of talents and respectability. 

Aug. 16. — At St Louis, Missouri, John Shachford, Sergeant-at-anna of 
the U. S. Senate. 

July 27. — At New Orleans, of apoplexy, JameB L, Shepherd, Preadent 
of Union Bank, and a man much esteemed. 

April 13. — At Schenectady, N. Y., of apoplexy, Peter Smiih, formerly 
first Judge of Madison County, an enterprising and wealthy citizen. 

March. — At Goiham, Me., Mrs. Jane SnoWj aged 102. 

July 29. — At New Haven, Conn., suddenly, of angina pectoris, Hemry 
R. Storrst of the city of New York, in his 5Uth year. He was bom jo 
Middleton, Conn., graduated at Yale College in 1804; practised law some 
years at Utica, N. Y., and during his residence there was a distinguished 
M. C. in 1819-21, and in 1323-31. He afterwards established himself 
in the city of New York, where he soon became a very eminent practitioo- 
er in his profession. He was possessed of extensive and various acquiie* 
ments, uncommon powers of discrimination, great logical exactness, and a 
ready and powerful elocuiion ; and as a debater in Congress, he stood con* 
spicuous in the first rank. 

March 5. — At Windsor, Vt, Dr. M'ahum Trashy aged 76. 

Jan. 6. — At Albany, N. Y., aged 76, Abraham Van Vechten, a highly 
respected man, an eminent lawyer, and one of the fathers of the New 
York bar. 

April 17. — Near Woodville, Mississippi, of the small pox, Hetury Vase^ 
aged about 36. He was a native of Massachusetts, and was educated al 
West Point, N. Y., where he was distinguished as a proficient in mathemati- 
cal studies; but left the institution in 1822, without graduating. He waa 
connected at different times with the press in Mississippi, to which he coo* 
tributed extensively in geography, statistics, and history. He was a man of 
very sanguine temperament, ardent in the pursuit of knowledge, of very 
retentive memory, but deficient in qualities which insure success id the 
common pursuits of life. 



1838.] AMEHICAN 0BITI7ART, 1837. 321 

Aug. 28. — At Charlestown, Masa., aged 73, Timothy Walker, a weal* 
thy merchant, and formerly a State Senator. 

Aug. 21. — At Warwick, R. i.,Jdhn Wmtemum, aged 78. He was a 
soldier in the revolutionary war ; and subsequently Chief Justice of the 
Court of Commeo Pleas in Rhode Islaod. 

March 27. — At Hampton, N. H., aged 65, Rev, Jonah Webster , pastor 
of the Congregational church in that town. 

Jan. 10.— AtPitUburg, Pa., aged 64, William Whitehead, formierly ol 
New York, and subsequently cashier of the "Nenark Banking and Insur- 
ance Co.,*' and the " Commercial Bank at Perth Amboy," both institutions 
having commenced business under his charge. 

Aug. 12. — At Bristol, R. I., Henry Wighty D. D.,in his 86th year. 
He graduated at Harvard University in 1782. 

Aug. 7. — At Knoxville, Tenn., John WUliamOf a U. S. Senator from. 
Tennessee from 1815 to 1823, a man highly respected for his talonts and 
character. 

Aug. 29. — At Philadelphia, in his 34tb year, John FT. Williams, a mem- 
bur of the Philadelphia bar. Mr. Williams was a native of Connecticut, 
a graduate of Yale College in 1822, and a man of superior talents and 
acquirements. He distinguished himself as a writer in the '^ American 
Quarterly Review,'* of which he was, for some time, the editor ; and for 
about seven months previous to April last, when he was sealed by his &tal 
malady, he was editor of the ** National Gazette," which he conducted witb 
much ability. At a meeting of the Philadelphia bar, on the SOth of AiH 
gust, it was resolved, ** That this bar has heard with feelings of deep regiet 
of the death of their late fellow-member, John W. WiUiams» Esq., whose 
pleasing manners and amiable disposition endeared him to his associate!, 
while his high talents and various accomplishments made him an omameni 
to society." 

May 28. — At Litchfield, CUmn., Frederick Wokott, in his 70th year. 
He was a native of Litchfield, a brother of Oliver Wolcott, late Governor 
of Connecticut, and son of Oliver Wolcott, wlio died 1797, and grandson 
of Roger Wolcott, both Governors of Connecticut. He was graduated at 
Yale College in 1786 ; was a man of talents and excellent character ; was 
for many years a member of the Council and Senate of Connecticut, and is 
remarkable for having held important public offices for 45 years, during all 
the fluctuations of party. 

March 19. — At Schenectady, N. Y., Joseph C, Fates, forroeriy a judge 
of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, and afterwards (1822- 6) 
Govvmor of the Btsite. 



CHRONICLE OF EVENTS 

From August 1836 to September 1837. 
[The figure! on the left deeignate the day of the month.] 



AUGUST, 1836. 

4. The famous bell at Moscow, the largest in the world, (21 feef in 
height, 23 in diameter and weighing 432,0001b8. £nglish weight,) rais- 
ed from the ground where it had long lain. 

13. The English Newspaper Stamp Duties Bill passed, reducing the 
duty on newspapers from 2d. to Id, 

13. The Queen Regent of Spain is compelled by a military insarrec- 
' tion at St. Ildefonso, to accept the Constitution of 1812, wlilch is pro- 
claimed at Madrid, and an ultra liberal ministry is officially announced, 
with M. Calatrava, President of the Council. 

22. The British Parliament is prorogued by the King in person. 

22. The siith annual meeting of the ** British Association for the 
Advancement of Science,'* composed of 1,289 members, commences at 
Bristol, and continues a week. 

25. The French Ministry, — Thiers at the head, — resign in conse- 
quence of a difference between them and the King, respecting the 
affairs of Spain. 

25. An official return made to the French government, states, that 
there are more than 50,000 British residents in France. 

30. A calamitous fire, in South wark, London, destroys buildings and 
merchandise, estimated in value from £300,000 to £500,000. This is 
said to have been the greatest* fire in London since the year 1794. 

SEPTEMBER, 1836. 

4. The Turkish Sultan releases all the inmates of his Seraglio from 
the perpetual imprisonment within the precincts of his palace, to which 
they had considered themselves to be condemned for life. 

7. A new French Ministry, with Count MoU at the head, after delay 
and difficulty, organised, a id published in the Moniteur. 

7. The coronation of Ferdinand, Emperor of Austria, takes place at 
Prague. 

9. A revolution breaks out at Lisbon, and the Queen of Portugal, 
after some delay, and a vain attempt to put it down, takes the oath to 
the ConstitttUon of 1820. 

9. Mr. Green ascends from the Vauxhall Gardens near London, in 



183a] CHROMCLS OF S VERTS, 1836. 333 

a balloon, carrying 9 persons ; stUins the eleTstion of about 2^ miles > 
and the party descend near Gravesend, upwards of 20 miles from the 
starting point, without any accident. On the 2l8ty another ascent was 
made with the same balloon, and with 11 persons. 

13- 17. A grand masical festival takes place in the Collegiate Church 
at Manchester, England, attended by about 2,600 personsi including 
many of the most eminent musicians and singers of the day. — " The 
festival continued for four successive days, and on the 17th, it termi- 
nated witli a fancy*dress ball upon a scale of unexampled splendor." 

16. A treaty between Ibenu Kesham, £mperor of Morocco, and the 
government of the Onited States, concluded. It was proclaimed by 
the President of the United States on the 30th of January, m37; and 
is to continue in force 50 years. 

21. The Carlist army, consisting of 14,000 men, under General Go- 
mez, defeated at Villarrobledo, on the Manzanares, by the army of the 
Queen of Spain, under General Alaix, with the loss of a number killed, 
and 1,274 prisoners. 

22. The New York Bowery Theatre, one of the largest buildings in 
the city, burnt. The loss of property was estimated at ^ 75,000. 

22. The session of the Provincial Parliament of Lower Canada open- 
ed by Lord Gosford, Governor-in-chief. He soon after dissolved it, 
owing to the spirited opposition manifested by the members. 

26. In consequence of disputes between the French and Swiss gov- 
ernments, relative to the expulsion of refugees from Switzerland, the 
French government publishes an order suspending all intercourse 
between the two countries. — In the following month (October 17) 
the Extraordinary Diet of Switzerland, assembled at Berne, adopted 
conciliatory measures ; and the intercourse between the two countries 
was renewed. 

OCTOBER, 1836. 

1 . An attempt is made by the Carlists on the lines of the British 
legions under General Evans at St. Sebastian, which was repulsed 
with considerable loss on both sides. 

Z Sl4. Violent gales on Lake Michigan ; several vessels and much 
property destroyed. 

5. A great and, for the season, unparalleled snow-storm in different 
parts of the United States. — In the vicinity of Auburn, N. Y., the 
quantity of snow was stated at 24 or 2H inches in depth, melting as it 
fell ; and the next morning it measured 13 or 14 inches in depth. It 
did much damage to fruit and forest-trees. In Pennsylvania, between 
HoUidaysbnrg and Johnstown, it was 20 inches deep. 

17. The King of the French issues an order for the release of Messrs, 
Peyronnet and Chantelauze, ex-ministers of Charles X., from the castle 
of Ham, af\er an imprisonment of nearly six years. — Prince PoUgnac 
and M. G. de Ranville were set at liberty about a month afUrwards. 



3S4 CHROfflCLE OF STENTS, 1836. [1838. 

21. The Dew theatre at Cineinn«ti bamt. 

24. General Gomes, the Carlist f eneral, poaeeaeee himself of the 
town of Almaden, in La Mancfaa, althoogh the place waa defended bj 
a garrison of 1,500 or 2,000 men. 

25. The Luzor obelisk erected at Paris in the Place Louie XV., in 
the presence of the royal family and about 250,000 spectatoca. 

25. The steamboat Royal Tar, of St. Johns, New firniMwiek, de- 
stroyed by fire in Penobscot Bay, and 32 liTes lost. 

28 A destroctive fire at Newark, N. J., by which about 60 boose* 
axe burnt ; — loss of property estimated ▼arioiialy from |^ 200,000 to 
$500,000. 

29. A ^h attempt is made at Straaborg, France, by Louie Napoieae 
Bonaparte, son of Louis, the late King of Holland, to effect a reToln- 
tion in layor of himself. It was promptly and effectaally defeated by 
General Voirol, the commander of the military division, and Lawc Na- 
poleon, with seven of his fellow conspirators, was aneated. 

NOVEMBER, 1836. 

4. An attempt is made at Lisbon, by the Queen of Portugal, to effect 
a revolution by discarding the Constitution of 1820, to which she had 
recently sworn, and reestablishing that of Don Pedro. — As soon aa tfan 
attempt was known, the city was in a state of violent agitatioii ; the 
national guards flew to arras and invaded the palace, and the Queen 
was soon compelled to restore the Constitution and r^inatate the Ban- 
deira constitutional ministry. 

7. A great balloon journey from the Vauzhall Gardens, near LiOndoB, 
to Weilburg in Nassau, about 30 miles from Coblentz, performed by 
Messrs. Green, Mason, and Holland. The balloon was let loose at half 
past 1 o'clock, P. M., passed over Canterbury, Dover, Calais, Waterloo, 
Brussels, Namur, and Coblentz, and descended, at 74 Q*clock A. Bf. on 
the 8th, having traversed the distance of nearly 600 mika in 18 hows. 
It carried upwarda of a ton weight of ballaat, besides a quantity of wise 
and other stores. Its greatest elevation waa 2 miles. 

20. The Oneida Bank, ol Utica, N. Y., robbed of $108,600. 

20. The ship Bristol, on its passage from Liverpool to New Teiic, 
wrecked near Rockaway, Long laland, and of 82 ateerage paasengexB, 
between GO and 70 perished ; also 7 cabin paasengera, and 4 of the etew. 
Meat of the cargo waa loat. 

22. The French army of 7,000 men, under Marabal Clanael, in an 
expeditioa againat Constautine, oomroence an attack upon tiie Iowb, 
but on the 24th begin a retreat, and sustain the loaa of abo«l one half ^ 
the troops. 

93. A decree i« pnUtshed at Canton ftir the ezpakuon of the Brilkdi 
and other •• barbarian *' merckanta within half a booo, fbimdad on a 
charge of the practice of smuggling. 



IC^3^.] CDRONICLK OF EVENTS, 1836. 3^5 

25. A calamitous fire in the village of Johnstown, N. Y., by which 
property estimated to amoant to $30,000 is destroyed. 

26. General Santa Anna, the President of Mexico, who was defeated 
and taken prisoner on the 21 st of April, 1836, by the Tezans, under 
General Samuel Houston, is set at liberty by General Houston, who 
had become President of Texas. 

29. A violent gale in London and throughout England, accqmpanied 
by heavy falls of rain. Much injury done in London and other places; 
and many vessels are wreck.ed on the coast. — This is said to have been 
a severer gale than had happened in England fur fifty years 

DECEMBER, 1836. 

1. A charter granted by the King of England to the London Univer- 
sity, and the Earl of Burlington appointed Chancellor. 

4. The independence of the Republics in America, which were for- 
merly Spanish Provinces, acknowledged by Spain. 

5. The Congress of the United States meets at Washington ; — on 
the 6th, at 12 o*cIock,rthe President's Message is delivered ; and on the 
7th, at 20 minutes before 10 o'clock, P. M., it is received in Boston. 

10. A decree of the Queen of Portugal, abolishing the slave-trade in 
the Portuguese dominions, published. 

15. The United Sutes General Post-Office, the Patent-Office, and the 
Washington City Post-Office, together with the entire contents of the 
last two buildings, and the greater part of the contents of the first are 
burnt ; together with 7,000 models of patents, out of 10,000 patents 
which have been granted by Congress ; 163 large folio volumes of 
records ; 26 large portfolios, containing 9,000 drawings, many of them 
beautifully executed and very valuable ; 10,000 original descriptions of 
inventions, and many other documents. The committee of the U. 8. 
Senate suppose, that about 3,000 of the most important of the models 
may be replaced, at an average expense of 033 each, or $ 100,000 for 
the whole. 

15. An influenza attended by inflammation of the throat and lungs, 
with violent spasms, sickness, and headache, and fatal in numerous 
instances, rages in London, and throughout Great Britain, and likewise 
on the continent of Europe. 

23&24. A battle fought before Bilboa between the allied Christine 
and British force, on the one side, and the Carlists on the other ; termi- 
nating in favor of the former, who enter Bilboa on the 25th. — The allies 
acknowledged the loss of 800 men. The Carlists lost about 200 prison- 
en, and a few killed. 

24. A great fall of snow commences in Great Britain, and also in the 
north of France. — It continued several days and blocked up the roads 
in most parts of England so completely, that on the 27th, at 8 o'clock 
P. M., all the London mails were due. It caused great damage and 

28 



326 CHRONICLE OF EVENTS, 1896. [1838. 

loss of life in some places. At Lewes an avalanche from a cliff destroy- 
ed a nunober of houses, and buried the iohabitants in the rains } and 
by Chatham Lines, the snow was from 30 to 40 feet deep. The eold 
was not severe, the thermometer descending^ but a few degrees below 
freezing. This is said to have been the most violent snow-storm that 
has occurred in England since 1814. " Never before," says a Loodoo 
paper, " within our recollection, was the London mail stopped for a 
whole night at a few miles from London ', and never before hare «e 
seen the intercourse between the southern shires of England and the 
metropolis interrupted for t^o whole days.*' 

27. An attempt is made on the life of the French King, while be is 
on his way to the legislative chambers, by Meunier and two otlier 
assassins armed with pistols. — The King was not injured, and the 
assassins were arrested. The meeting of the Chambers opened by a 
speech from tlie King. 

30. The plague continues to rage at Constantinople. — It is said to 
have carried off, during the summer and autumn, no less than 100,000 
of the inhabitants of the city. 

JANUARY, 1837. 

3. The ship Mexico, measuring 288 tons, which sailed from Liver- 
pool on the 23d of October, with a crew of 12 persons and 104 passen- 
gers, is wrecked on Hampstead Beach on Long Island, about 25 miles 
from New York, and 108 lives lost, 103 of the passengers, and 5 of the 
erew, including Captain Wilson, the master of the vessel. — The ship 
Bristol was wrecked, with (he loss of about 70 lives, on the 520th of the 
preceding November, at no great distance from the same place. In re- 
lation to these melancholy occurrences, Mr. Buchanan, the British con- 
sul says, '* The facts are appalling beyond description ; and the more to 
be deplored, as both wrecks have mainly arisen from the defective sys- 
tem governing the pilots of New York. — Let the pilots and those who 
sustain the present system by which such calamitous occurrences arise, 
reflect upon their awful accountability ! '* 

15. A great fire at St. John's, New Brunswick*, destroys about 115 
buildings. Loss of property estimated at about $ 1,000,000. 

16. The Senate of the U. S. pass a resolution by a vote of 24 to 19 to 
expunge from ihe records (by drawing black lines round it) the resolo* 
Uon passed on the 2dih of March, 1834 ; viz. ** That the President, in the 
late executive proceedings, in relation to the public revenue, has a»- 
sumed upon himself authority and power not conferred by the Consti- 
tution and Laws, but in derogation of both." — Fecw, Benton, BnMm, 
Buchanan, Dana, Ewing (of Illinois), Fulton, Grundy. Hubbard, King 
(of Alabama), Linn, Morris, Nicholan, Niles, Page, Rives, Robinson, 
Ruggles, Sevier, Strange, Tallmadge, Tipton, Walker, Wall, Wright — 
JVaifM, Bayard, Blaok, Calhoun, Clay, Crittenden, Davis, Ewing (of 






I838.J cBKomciiB of events, 1837. ;)S7 

Ohio), HeDdrieks, Kent, Knight, Moore, PrentiM, Preston, Robbins, 
SoQtiiard, Swift, Tomlinson, Webster, White. 

16. Sir Robert Peel inaugurated Lord Rector of the Universitj of Glai- 
gow. — On the 20th a public dinner was given to him in honor of hia 
political principles, which was attended by about 3,600 persons. 

S5. A bill which had been passed by the Senate of the United States 
for the admission of Michigan into the Union as a State, passes the 
House of Representatives by a vote of 132 to 43; and on tho 26th it re- 
ceives the sanction of the President of the United States. 

25. An extraordinary aurora borealis in the evening is seen in various 
parts of the United States. — See page 80 of this volume. 

SO. The magazine of the French garrison, conUining 12,000 lbs. of 
powder and 1,000,000 musket cartridges, at Bona, in Africa, explodes, 
the commanding officer with 108 men are killed, and 102 wounded. 

— . The town of Jaffa, in Palestine, destroyed by an earthquake, and, 
of 15,000 inhabitants, 13,000 are buried in the ruins. 

FEBRUARY, 1837. 

1. A memorial presented to the Senate of the United Stales by Mx. 
Clay, signed by 56 authors of Great Britain, praying Congress to secure 
to them -the exclusive right to their respective writings in the United 
SUtes. 

7. The royal palace at Naples takes fire, and is partially destroyed ; 
the library and the magnificent collection of paintings belonging to the 
kiDg, bo^nt. 

9. The Mexican government issue an order declaring a blockade of all 
the porbs of Texas, to take effect from and after the 30th day from 
thie date. 

12. Marshal Clansel, who commanded the French expedition against 
Constantine, in Africa, superseded in the government of Algiers by 
J^t. Gen. Count de Damremont. 

13. A mob or riotous meeting in the city of New York, destroy or 
dtiroage several hundred barrels of flour, and several hundred bushels of 
wheat. — Of the rioters, 27 were arrested and committed for trial. 

16. A fire at Bath, Maine, destroys a number of dwelling-houses, 
stores, and shops. — Loss estimated at about g 50,000. 

17. Gomez, the most eminent Carlist Spani'^h General, sbot by 
order of Don Carlos, in pursuance to the decree of a military tribunal 
held the preceding day. 

22. The Irish Municipal Corporations Bill passed by the British 
House of Commons by a vote of 322 to 242. — It was lost in the House 
of Lords, on the 9th of June, by a vote of 205 to 119. 

— . The English ship Jane and Margaret, bound from Liverpool to 
New York, wrecked near the Isle of Man, and all its passengers, con- . 
sisting of 189 persons, and its whole crew, consisting of 17 persons, lost. 



3^ CHROmCLE OP STENTS, 1837. [183&. 

MARCH, 1S37. 

I. A resolation is passed by the Senate of the United Statee, by & rote 
of 23 to 19, " That it is expedient and proper, that the independent 
political existence of Texas be acknowledged by the government of the 
United States.'* 

4. Martin Van Buren is inaugurated President of the United State*. 
— The inaugural address was delivered by the President in the eastern 
portico of the Capitol at Washington, and the oath of office was admin- 
istered by Chief Justice Taney in the presence of the Senate, the Heads 
of the Departments, Foreign Ministers, a great number of officers of 
government, and a vast concourse of people. 

6. A treaty is concluded between the United States army, under 
Gen. Jesup, and the Indians, signed by Jumper and other chiefs. By 
this treaty, it is stipulated, that all hostilities shall cease, and that by 
the 10th of April all the Indiana shall be at Tampa with their families to 
take transports for the West. — The conditions of this treaty were not 
complied with on the part of the Indians generally ; and the war was 
not terminated. 

7. Mr. Grote brings forward a motion in the British Parliament for 
the introduction of the vote by ballot in the election of members of Par- 
liament, which is lost by a vote of 153 to 265. ^ 

15. Resolutions in favor of the commutation of church-rates passed in 
the British House of Commons by a vote of 273 to 250. 

15. The English and Spanish troops, under Gen. Evans, receive a 
severe check from the Carlists, and are compelled to retreat to St. 
Sebastian with a loss in killed and wounded, stated at 1 ,000 men. 

31. The President ad interim o( Mexico '* protests in the roost solemii 
manner, before all civilized nations, against the acknowledgment of the 
pretended republic of Texas made by the United States." 

31. The navigation of the Hudson opened so that a steamboat passes 
up from New York to Albany,— the river having been closed 115 days. 

31. A fire at Utica, N. T., destroys s large range of buildings, includ- 
ing many stores and tenements. Loss estimated at $ 80,000 or 100,000. 

APRIL, 1837. 

3. A great snow-stnrm at St. Louis, Missouri, the snow falling to the 
depth of 17 inches, — stated to have " had no parallel in the memory of 
the oldest citizens at any season of the year." 

8. A great fire at New Orleans destroys 107 houses. 

8. Snow falls at Havre, Rouen, and many other places in France, and 
the fields in many parts still covered with snow. 

II. Snow in considerable quantity falls in London. It is 'remarked 
by the London ** Morning Herald '*; — ** Considering the qaantitj [of 
snow] that fell in October, we may now be said to have had seven 
months of winter. In fact there has not been any genial weather since 
the middle of August." 



1638.] CHROniGLC OF KV£MT8, 1837. U29 

17. The United StJites sloop of war Natchez captares a Mexican brig 
of war, after having made, off the Brassoa St. Jago, a formal demand. 
upon the Mexican authorities to deliver up and release six American 
▼easels which had been illegally captured hy the Mexicans. 

26. The trial of Meunier for an attempt on the life of the King of the 
French terminates in his conviction. — His sentence was commuted to 
perpetual banishment ; and, soon after, Louis Philippe granted an am- 
nesty to political oflenders imprisoned in France, said to amount to 
169, an act well received in Paris and throughout the kingdom. 

27. About 70 buildings and much other property destroyed by fire at 
the city of Detroit. 

228. " In the province of Koeslin, in Prussia, on the shores of the Baltic, 
a hill more than 100 feet high and covered with furze, is suddenly sunk 
with a noise resembling thunder -, and a movement of the ground in the 
neighborhood takes place, by which adjoining hills are raised 20 or 30 
feet'* — Gent. Mag. 

MAY, 1837. 

1. During the preceding two months unprecedented embarrassments 
and difficulties were experienced among the mercantile classes, and 
were felt in all the commercial towns in the United States, and espe- 
cially in New York and New Orleans. '* The number of heavy suspen- 
sions that have taken place [in New York] since the day on which the 
Josephs failed, is now 260, to say nothing of countless smaller ones, 
which in the crash of millions are not taken into the account." — JV. Y. 
Com. Adv. May 3. *' In two days, houses in New Orleans stopped pay- 
ment, owing an aggregate of more than j[ 27,000,000. Among them 
were three whose liabilities are stated at $ 1,000,000 each, one at 
52,500,000, one at f 3,000,000, and one at $ 15,000,000 \'' ^JiT. Y. Jimr. 
of Commerct. 

The number of failures in Boston from Nov. 1, 1836, to May 12, 1837 ; 
the larger establishments, 78; retailers, 60 ', shops, 30 ', — total, 168. 

1. From an official return to this date, it appears that there are about 
70,000 English residents in France ; — 24,000 or 25,000 in Paris. 

2. A Convention meets at Harrisburg fox the purpose of amending the 
Constitution of Pennsylvania. 

8. A Committee appointed by a numerous meeting of tl\e citizens of 
New York, to proceed to Washington, and request the President of the 
United States to rescind the Specie Circular, to defer commencing suits 
upon unpaid bonds, and to call an extra session of Congress, have nh in- 
terview with the President; and in their address they state; — « Under 
a deep impression of the propriety of confining our declarations within 
moderate limits, we affirm, that the value of our real estate, has within 
the last six months, depreciated more than $40,000,000 ; that within 

28* 



330 CHROIflCLE OF K VENTS, J837. [1838. 



the last two months, there have been more than 250 fail ares of hou! 
engaged in extensive business; that within the same period, a decline 
of 1^20,000,000 has occurred in our local stocks,- including those Rail- 
road and Canal Incorporations, which, though chartered in other States, 
depend chiefly upon New York for their sale ; that the immense amooat 
of merchandise in our ware-houses has within the same period fallen in 
vahi'? at least 30 per cent.; that within a few weeks not less than 20,0 N> 
individualsi depending upon their daily labor for their daily bread, have 
been discharged by their employers because the means of retaining tbem 
were exhausted ; — and that a complete blight has fallen upon a com- 
munity heretofore so active, enterprising, and prosperous ; — the error of 
our rulers has produced a wider desolation than the pestilence whieh 
depopulated our Utreets, or the conflagration which laid them in ashes *' 
9. The steamboat Ben Sherrod, (Captain (^astleman,) on her passage 
from New Orleans to Louisville, when about 30 miles below Natchea, 
takrs fire, and is burnt. — Out of 235 persons on board, only €0 were 
saved ; of these more than half belonged to the boat ; of 60 or 70 cafatn 
passengers, 10 or 12 only were saved. At the time the boat took fire, 
she was engaged in a race with the steamboat Prairie. A committee of 
the citizens of Natchez, appointed to investigate the circumstances of 
this disastrous event, reported ; — that the Ben Sherrod and the Prairie 
steamboats had been racing from the time of their leaving New Orleans 
till the time when the boat took fire ; that the hands on duty were at the 
time in a state of intoxication ; that the boat had been on fire some time 
before alarm was given to the cabin passengers ; that the captain i^as 
guilty of great indiscretion and neglect of duty ; -that the steamboat 
Alton, (Captain Dougherty,) passed the distressing scene, running orer 
many, and afibrding no assistance ! 

10. All the banks in the city of New York, without exception, by 
common consent, stop payments in specie ; and each agrees to receive 
in payment of debts, and on deposit, the notes of all the banks in the 
city. — On the following day (llth) a meeting of delegates from the 
banks of Boston, Salem, Lowell, &c., was held at Boston, and it was 
voted, << that, in consequence of the painful intelligence of the suspen- 
sion of specie payments of all the banks iu the city of New York, 
the banks in this city and vicinity do suspend specie payments for 
the present." The banks of Providence, Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
Albany, and others in every quarter, on learning that the banks 
of pew York |^had suspended specie payments, adopted the same 
course. On the 16th, the legislature of New York passed an act author* 
ixing the suspension of specie payments by the banks of that State for 
one year. 

15. President Van Buren issues a proclamation for the convening 
of the Congress of the United Sutes on the Isi Monday in September, 



1836.} CHRONICLE OP CVSNTS, 1837. 331 

on account of '< great and weighty matters claiming their considera- 
tion." 

17. Iran and Hemani taken from the Carlists bj the united Spanish 
and English forces under Generals £spartero and Evans ; and on the 
18th Fontar&bia also capitulated to the same. 

19. War is declared by the Republio of Buenos Ajres, or the Argen- 
tine Confederation, against Peru, being now under the protection of 
General Santa Cruz, who is also President of Bolivia. Chili having 
some time previous declared war against Peru, — Chili and Buenos 
Ayres, and Peru and Bolivia are now at war, — two against two. 

JUNE, 1837. 

3. A sanguinary battle under the walls of Barbastro, in Spain, between 
the Christines, under Gen. Oraa, and the Carlists, in which the former 
were worsted. — General Evans with the greater part of the other Eng- 
lish officers, about this time, abandoned Spain and returned to England. 

3. A destructive tornado extending from the Hudson through Dutch- 
ess county, N. T., into the State of Connecticut, makes great ravages. 

10. The plague commits great ravages in Smyrna and its vicinity. — 
For some time about 300 are said to have died daily in the city. 

11. A disgraceful riot in Boston, which commenced about 4 o'clock, 
P. M., (Sunday,) by a contest between some members of a fire-engine 
company, just returned from Rozbury, and some Irishmen who had 
met in Broad-street, with many others of their countrymen, to form a 
funeral procession. — Afler the contest had raged with great violence 
for some time between the members of the fire department and the 
Irish, the latter were driven into their houses, and many disorderly 
persons, a great part of them very young, made an attack upon the 
dwellings of the Irish in Broad-street, and destroyed their property to 
the amount (as estimated) of $ 3,000. 

15. Great and disastrous inundation at Baltimore.— In consequence of 
heavy showers of rain which commenced about 10 o'clock in the even- 
ing of the 14th, (he waters of Jones's Falls were suddenly swelled, and, 
in three or four hours, rose 20 feet abov« the usual level, said to be 
higher than ever known before ; and great ravages were committed on 
the property and lives of persons who resided near the stream. About 
50 dwelling-houses and 200 stores were destioyed or damaged ; a great 
amount of goods and property ruined ; and between 20 and 30 lives 
were lost. 

16. A new Constitution is proclaimed at Madrid, having been adopted 
hy the Cortes, and signed by all the members, and by the Queen. 

20. William IV., King of England, dies about 3 o'clock, A. M. — On 
the 2Ist, at 10 o'clock, A. M., the proclamation of Victoria, as Queen of 
England, was made at St. James's Palace, at Charing Cross, at Temple 
Bar, and at the corner of Chancery Lane, at each place in the presence 
of an immense concourse of people. 



332 cBUoificj^K or kvents, 1837. [1838. 

JULY, 1837. 

4. The cholera prevails at Naples, having within the preceding s«vea 
days carried off 2,795 persons ; and since April, from 12,0CM) to 14,000- 
Also very fatal at Palermo. 

6. The funeral of William IV. celebrated; almost all the Bh<^ u 
London being closed, and business generally suspended. 

17. The British Parliament prorogued by the Queen in person ; aad 
a proclamation is issued dissolving it, and directing new writs of elec- 
tion to be issued, returnable on the 11th of September. 

19. The Railroad from Baltimore to Wilmington, Delaware^ by way 
of Havre de Grace, formally opened to the public. 

20. A political commotion in Mexico, in consequence of Preaideat 
Buatamente having dehianded a loan of 1 5,000,000 of the clergy. 

31. A fire at Albany does considerable damage. 

AUGUST. 1837. 

2-4. Hurricanes do great damage at St. Thomas, St. Bartholomew's, 
and other West India Islands. 

7. A scaffolding and part of a suspension bridge erecting over the 
river St. John's, about two miles above the city of St. John's, in New 
Brunswick, fall, and ten or fif\een men are killed. 

11. A train of passenger cars having about 200 passengers, and a train 
of burden cars run against each other, on the I'ortsmouth and Roanoke 
Railroad. — Three persons were killed, and 15 or 20 more injured, some 
of them dangerously. 

14. A fire at Washington, Georgia, destroys about 30 buildings. 

15. By an explosion of the steamboat Du Buque on the Mississippi, 
near Bloomington, about 300 miles above St. Louis, the lives of 26 per- 
sons are destroyed. 

21. The office of the " Observer," an abolition newspaper, published 
at Alton, Illinois, destroyed by a mob. , 

SEPTEMBER, 18S7. 

4. The 25th Congress of the United States assemble at Washington in 
compliance with the proclamation of the President, for an eztraordi&aiy 
session. — The message of the President was delivered on the 5th, 
at 12 o^cIock. It reached Philadelphia in 6 hours, (conveyed by the 
government express and by railroad,) at 6 o'clock, P. M.,and New York, 
at 11 o'clock; — New Haven, (by steamboat,) at half past 5 o'cloek, 
A. M., on Tuesday; — thence it was conveyed on horseback to Wor- 
cester in 6 hours and 3 minutes ; — thence by the railroad to Boston, 44 
miles, in 1 hour and 19 minutes; — arriving at Boston 38 minates 
past 12 o*clock on Tuesday. 



APPENDIX 



CONGRESS. 



Tax Congress of the United States consists of a Senate and HoaM 
of Representatives, and roust assemble, at least, once every year, on 
the first Monday of Oecemberi unless it is otherwise provided by law. 

The Senate is composed of two members from each Slate ; and ef 
course the regular number is 52. They are chosen by the legislatures 
of the several States, for the term of six years, one third of them being 
elected biennially. 

The Vice-President of the United States is the President of the Sen- 
ate, in which body he has only a casting vote, which is given in caae 
of an equal division of the votes of the Senators. In his absence, a 
President pro tempore, is chosen by the Senate. 

The House of Representatives is composed of members from the 
several States, elected by the people for the term of two years. The 
representatives are apportioned among the different States according to 
population ; and the 23d, 24th, and 25th Congresses have been elected 
in accordance vrith an act of Congress of 1332, one representative 
being returned for every 47,700 persons, computed according to the rule 
prescribed by the Constitution. The present regular number is 242 
representatives, and 2 delegates. 

Since the 4th of March, 1807, the compensation of each member of 
the Senate and House of Representatives, has been $8 a day, during 
the period of his attendance in Congress, without deduction in case of 
sickness ; and $8 for ^^ery twenty miles' travel, in the usual road, in 
going to and returning from the seat of Government. The compensa- 
tion of the President of the Senate, pro tempore, and of the Speaker of 
the Home of Representatives, is f 16 a day. 



334 



TW£RTT-riFTH CONGRESS. 



fl836. 



ThB SeHATE. — TwBNTT-FlFTH CoRGRCSS. 

Richard M. Johrsoit, of Kentucky, f^ce- President of the United SUUi 
and President of the Senate. 
Asbary Dickens, Secretary. — Salary, $ 3,000. 

[The fi^ares donote the expiration -or the termi of the Benatora.] 
Name. Roaidenee. 



Maine. 

John Rn^sles, Thomaston^ 
Reuel WiUiamfl, Augusta^ 

Jfew Hampshire. 

Henry Hubbard, Charlestown, 
Franklin Pierce, HiUsboroughy 

Vermont. 

Benjamin Swifl, SL Albans, 
Samuel Prentiss, Montpelier, 

Massachusetts. 

Daniel Webster, Boston, 
John Davis, Worcester, 

Bhode Island. 

Asher Robbins, J^etcport, 
Nehe. R. Knight, Providence^ 

Connecticut, 

John M. Niies, Hartford, 
Perry Smith, Jiew Milford, 

Jfew York. 

N. P. Tallmadge, Poughkeq^sie, 
Silas Wright, Canton, 

J^cw Jersey. 

S. it. Southard, TVentonf 
Garrett D. Wall, Trenton, 

Pennsylvania. 

Samuel McKean, Burlington, 
James Buchanan, Lancaster, 

Delaware. 
Richard H. Bayard, 
Thomas Clayton, jYeto Castle, 

Marjfiand, 

Joseph Kent, Bladenshutg, 
John S. Spence, Worcester Co., 

Virginia. 

Wm. C. Rives, Lindsay*s Store, 
Wm. H. Roane, Richmond, 

Jforth Carolina. 

B. Brown, Brown's Store, 
Robert Strange, FayettevUle, 



841 

843 

841 
843 



939 
843 



639 
841 



839 

841 



839 
843 



839 
843 



839 



Name. Reeidenee. 

South Carolina. 

J. C. Calhoun, Fort HiU, 1841 

Wm. C. Preston, ColumHa, l&C 

Georgia. 

John P. King, Augusta, 1841 

Alfred Cuthbert, MonUceUo, IS^i 

Alabama. 

Wm. R. King. Selma, lail 

Clement C. Clay, 1843 

Mississipfi. 

John Black, Monroe, 1839 

R. J. Walker, MadisonvilU, 1841 

Louisiana, 

R. C. Nicholas, Dowdds^rnxnlU, 1841 
Alexander Mouton^ 1843 

Tennessee, 
Felix Grundy, NaskoHU, 



1839 
1841 



Hugh L. White, KntmnUe, 

Kenltudcy. 

John J. Crittenden, Frankfort, 1841 
Henry Clay, Lexington, 

Ohio. 

Thomas Morris, Bethel^ 
841 1 William Allen, Coluntbus, 

Indiana, 
John Tiptoa, Logansport, 



1843 



1839 

1843 



839 

843 Oliver H. Smith; 

Illinois, 
J. M. Robinson, Carmi, 



1839 
1843 



1841 

1843 



839 

841 1 R. M. Young, 

Missouri, 

839 1 Th. H. Benton, St. Louis, 1839 
843 1 Lewis F. Linn, St. Genevieve, 1843 

Michigan. 

Lucius Lyon, Branson. 
841 1 John Norvell, Detroit, 

Arkansas, 

William S. Fulton, Little Rock. 
Ambrose H. Beyier, Lake Port, 



839 



841 
843 



J83a] 



TWENTY- FIFTH CONflEKflS. 



335 



House of Represkvtativxs of tbx 25th Cohqeess, 
Which wiU expire ontheZd of March, 1839. 

Jambs K. Pole, of Tennessee, Speaker, 



Maine. — b. 
Anderson, Huffh J. 
Carter, TimotEy J. 
Davee, Thomas 
Evans, George 
Fairfield, John 
Gillej, Jonathan 
Noyes, Joseph C. 
Smith, Fr. 6. J. 

JVeio Hampshire. — 5. 
Atberton, Ch. G. 
Cushman, Samuel 
Farrington, James 
Weeks, Joseph 
Williams, Jared W. 

VertnofU. — S. 
Allen, Heman 
Everett, Horace 
Fletcher, Isaae 
Hall, Hiland 
Slade, William 

Massaohtisetta. — 12. 
Adams, John Q. 
Borden, Nathaniel B. 
Brings, George N. 
Calhoun, Wra. B. 
Cashing, Caleb 
Fletcher, Richard 
Grennell, George 
Hastings, Wm. S. 
Lincoln, Levi 
Parmenter, Wra. 
Phillips, Stephen C. 
Reed, John 

Rhode Island, — 9. 
Cranston, Robert B. 
Tillinghast, Joseph L. 

Connectieut. — 6. 
Haley, Elisha 
Holt, Orrin 
Ingham, Samuel 
Phelps, Launcelot 
Toucey, Isaae 
Whittlesey, Th. T. 

A «o York, — 40. 
Andrews, John T. 



Bicknell, Bttuoett 
Birdsall, Samuel 
Broadhead, John C. 
Bronson, Isaac H. 
Bruyn, Andr. D. W. 
Cambreling, C. C. 
Childs, Timothy 
Clark, John C. 
Curtis, Edward 
Oe Graff, John I. 
Edwards, John 
Filmore, Millard 
Foster, Henry A. 
Gallup, Albert 
Grant, Abraham P. 
Gray, Hiram 
Hoffman, Ogden 
Jackson, Th. B. 
Jones, Nathaniel 
Kemble, Gouvernenr 
Loomis, Arphazad 
Marvin, Richard P. 
McCIellan, Robert 
Mitchell, Charles F. 
Moore, Ely 
Noble, Wm. H. 
Palmer, John 
Parker, Aroasa S, 
Patterson, Wm. 
Peck, Luther C. 
Pratt, Zadoc 
Prentiss, John H. 
Russell, David 
Sibley, Mark H. 
Spencer, James B. 
Taylor, William 
I'itus, Obadiah 
Vail, Henry 
Vanderveer, Abraham 

JVsio Jersey, — 6. 
Ayerigg, John B. 
Halstead, Wm. 
Maxwell, J. P. B. 
Randolph, Jas. F. 
Stratton, Charles G. 
Yorke, Th. Jones 

Pennsylvania, — 28. 
Beatty, William 
Biddle, Richard 
Buchanan, Andrew 



Darlington, Edward 
Davies, Edward 
Fry, Jacob 

Hammond, Robert H. 
Henry, Thomas 
Hubley, Edward B. 
KiiDgensmith, John 
Logan, Henry 
McClure, Charles 
McKennon, T. M. T. 
Morris, Matthias 
Morris, Samuel W. 
Muhleoburg, H. A. 
Nay lor, Charles 
Ogle, Charles 
Painter, Lemuel 
Petriken, David 
Plunnner, Arnold 
Potter, Wm. W. 
PotU, David 
Reily, Luther 
Sergeant, John 
Sheffer, Dan 
Tolland, George W. 
Wagener, David W. 

Delaware, — 1. 
Milligan, John J. 

Maryland. — 8. 
Dennis, John H. 
Howard, Benj. C. 
Jenifer, Daniel 
Johnson, Wm. C. 
McKim, Isaac 
Pearce, James A. 
Thomas, Erancis 
Worlhington, J. Y. H. 

Virginia. — 21. 
Beime, Andrew 
Bouldin, James W. 
Coles, Walter 
Craig, Robert 
Drorogoole, Geo. C. 
Garland, James 
Hopkins, Geo. W.' 
Hunter, R. T. M. 
Johnson, Joseph 
Jones, John W. 
Mallory, Francis 
Mason, James M. 



336 



TWENTT-riFTH C0ire&£S8. 



[\^ 



Mereer, Charles F. I 
Morgan, Wia. S. 
PattoD, Joho M. 
Pennyhacker, Isaac S. 
Rives, Francis E. 
Robertson, John 
Stewart, Archibald 
Taliaferro, John 
Wise, Henry A. 

JVorcA Carolina. — 13. 
Bynum, Jesse A. 
Connor, Henry 
Deberry, Edmund 
Graham, James 
Hawkins, M. T. 
McKay, James 
Montgomery, Wm. 
Rancher, Abraham 
Sawyer, S. T. 
Shepard; Charles 
Shepperd, Aug. H. 
SUnly, Edward D. 
Williams, Lewis 

South Carolina, — 9. 
Campbell, John 
Clowney, W. K. 
Elmore, F. H. 
Griffin, John K. 
Legare, Hugh S. 
Pickens, Francis \V. 
Richardson, John P. 
Smith, R. B. 
Thompson, Waddy 

Georgia. — 9. 
Cleaveland, J. F. 
Dawson, W. C. 
Glascock , Thomas 
Grantland, Seaton 
Haynes, Charles £. 
Holsey, Hopkins 
Jackson, Jabez 
Owens, George W. 
Townes, Geo. W. B. 

Alabama. — 5. 
Chapman, Reuben 



Lawler, Joab 
Lewis, Dixon H. 
Lyon, Francis S. 
Martin, Joshua L. 

Mississippi. — 2. 
Claiborne, J. F. U. 
Gholson, S. H. 

Louisiana. — 3. 
Garland, Rice 
Johnson, Henry 
Ripley, Eleazer W. 

Tennessee. — 13. 
Bell, John 
Campbell, Wm. B. 
Carter, Wm. B. 
Cheatham, Richard 
Crockett, John W. 
Maury, A.* P. 
McClellan, A. A. 
Polk, James K. 
Shields, Eben. J. 
Turney, H. L. 
Williams, C. H. 
Williams, Joseph 



ITentucky. — 13. 
Calhoun, John 
Campbell, John 
Chambers, John 
Graves, Wm. J. 
Harlan, James 
Hawes, Richard 
Menefee, R. A. 
Pope, John 
Rumsay, Edward 
Southgate, Wm. W. 
Underwood, J. R. 
White, John 
Williams, Sherrod 

Ohio. — 19. 
Alexander, J., Jr. 
Allen, John W. 
Bond, Wm. K. 
Chaney, John 



Corwin, Tbomu 
Duncan, Alexander 
Goode, Patrick G. 
Hamer, Th. L. 
Harper, Aleiander 
Hunter, Wm. H. 
Kilgore, Daniel 
Leadbetter, D. P. 
Loomis, A. W. 
Mason, Samson 
Morris, Cairaiy 
Ridge way, J. 
Shepler, Matthias 
Webster, Taylor 
WhitUesey, Elisha 

Indiana. — 7. 
Boon, Ratliff 
Dunn, George H. 
Ewing, John 
Graham, Williain 
Herod. William 
Rariden, James 
White, Albert S. 

iOmms.—Z- 
Casey, Zadoc 
May, William L. 
Snyder, A. W. 

Missouri. — 2. 
Harrison, Albert G. 
Miller, John 

Michigan. — 1. 
Crary, Isaac C. 

Arkansas. — 1- 
Yell, Archibald 



TCRRITORIXS. 

Florida. — I Ddt^t 
Downing, 

Wisconsin. — 1 Ddti. 
Jones, Georg« W. 



THX XHO. 



THS 



AMERICAN ALMANAC 



AffD 



REPOSITORY 



OF 



USEFUL KNOWLEDGE, 



FOR THE TEAR 



1839. 



BOSTON: 
PUBLISHED BY CHARLES BOWEN. 



Entered aoeordinf to Aet of Congrotf, in the year 1838, 

B7 Chaklb* Bowbr, 

ia the Clerk*! offloe of the Dii trict Court of the DUtrict of AUencliaeclta. 



CAMBRIDGE: 

FOLaOM, WKLL8, AHD THURSTOIT, 
PrinUn lo ika UaiTtnitjr. 



PREFACE. 



Thb first Tolome of the American Almanac was publkhed ten 
years since, for the year 1830; and the one now offered to the 
public is the 10th in the series. The work was commenced as a 
doubtful experiment; and, although it has received a good share of 
the public favor, yet, when the labor and expense of preparing and 
publishing it are taken into consideration, its success, in a pecu- 
niary point of view, has not been great. But if our labors have 
been less lucrative than we could reasonably wish, we have, never- 
theless, been gratified by the approbation that has been manifested 
in relation to them ; and we trust we may be permitted to cherish 
the feeling that they have been, in some measure, conducive to the 
public advantage. 

As a large part of the contents of the volumes is of permanent 
value, it has been thought advisable to add to the 10th a Gmeral 
Index for the whole of this series, of such matters as are not 
common to all or most of the volumes ; and those purchasers who 
have been careful to preserve their copies wUl, we doubt not, find 
the Index a convenient appendage. Should the work be continued 
for many years to come, it may probably be found expedient to add 
a similar Index to every tenth volume. 

The opinion, we believe, prevails pretty extensively, that the 
American Almanac, or some similar work, is needed ; and it is to 
be hoped that the public patronage will be so far extended to it, 
as to prevent its discontinuance. Should it be published for 
a long course of years, and be conducted with sufficient care, 
judgment, and ability, the series of volumes will form a ** Repos- 
itory of Useful Knowledge," of permanent value for constant 



IT PRBFACE. 



reference, with respect to contemporary history and statistics, aad 
will furnish a fund of information relating to the movements ud 
progress of society, and on a great variety of interesting toptes. 

The importance pf statistical knowledge is now extensively fch 
in all civilized countries, and by all enlightened governments. In 
our own country much less has been done to advance it, whether 
by the National Government or by the State Governments, thss 
might reasonably have been expected; and, till more is ^ ffi » Ij 
them in relation to it, it must necessarily continue among ns in a 
backward state. We cannot but hope, that, before long, it wiD 
receive, from those who have the management of public aflhin, an 
attention more in accordance with its importance. 

We again avail ourselves of the opportunity of ezpiessing ow 
grateful acknowledgments to our correspondents for their kindncsi 
in forwarding information, and respectfully solicit a continaance cf 
their favors. 

Cambridge, MassackmttU, 
^eptemfter 8IA, 1838. 



CONTENTS. 



PART I. 



Calshbab AiiD Obuutiai. PHavomiiA rom Tm Ymui 1839L 



C«]Mtial PhtnqmMi, Bignii Ibe. . 
CThroBoMeal CyelM 
8iga« of the Zodiac 
BofiniiiiifaiKl Leo^ of tbo Boimmm 
MoTftblo FostiTtli I Jewiali Calendar 
Mahoroatan CalaiMhr • 

Hoigbt of tha Graatart Tidet 

TldeT^Ma 

CALENDAR, JanuaTy, dtc . 
EelipMB of tba Sua .... 
OeeahatioBS ia 1839 
Belqpaaa of tiha Satallitai of JojkitOT . 



Faf« 

. 3 

4 
. .4 

4 
. & 

6 
. 6 

8 

. 10 

34 

. 35 

37 



EphaoMrii of Oamhart'i Comat • 
PotiUoo aad Mafaitada of Satani'i Riagi 39 
Tabla of tba Mooo'a Apparant Diaa . 49 
Table ■howinf tba lUamiDatad Portion 

of tba Inset of Venae and Mare . 49 
Latitode and Lon«itode of Placaa, U. B. 41 
laereaM of Sidereal Time, Ike. 44 

Bpbemerl* of tbe Bon • . • . 4S 
Trne Apparent Plaeae of as Fixed Sttn 51 
Dr. Tooof '■ Refraotiona ... 56 
Table of tbe Boo'a Parallax in Altatoda 59 
TabUofBami-diomalAreeiaCJ.B. . 09 



PART II. 

MiioBi.i.Airsou* DsrAXTMBirT. 



1. The Calendar.— Julian aad Oieforiaa 
Tear. Old and New Btyle. Time 
of Commeocinf tbe Tear . . 63 

t. Expectation of Ulb, or Lawa of 

Mortality . . . . 65 



3. Pablioatioe of Booka 

4. Temperance, and tbe 

Blasaaebuaetta 

5. Select Scrape • 



74 
77 



UiriTBD Statbs. 



1. ExaeatiTe OoTemment . . 79 14. 

SI. CoQgfaaa 81 15. 

a. TbeJodieiary « . . . 86 16, 

4. louroonrae witb Foreign Nationa 90 17. 

5. Army Liat 96 18. 

6. MiTitia 97 19. 

7. Navy Liat 96 SO. 

8. Hint 100,21. 

9. Public liandi 101 99. 

10. Annoal Expenditure . . . 102 93. 

11. Poet Office EaUbliabment . . 103 24. 

IS. Obainerce 105 96. 

13. Indian Tribes . . .113 



Statistics of Sbeep and Wool • 113 

Bank Hi 

CarrenoT and Exebanga • • 117 
State Elections, ^e. •191 

GoTeraors of Sutes and Territofiee UB 
Population of tbe United Butes • 198 
Slaves in tbe United Butea 193 

Collegea 194 

Medical Schoola ... 198 
Theological Bcboola , . . 199 
LawBcboobi .... 199 
Religiona Denominations . 139 



Mbtbobolooioal Irfobmatioh. 



1. Motaoiolofical Table IbrBmnswick 133 

9. Tablo for Concord . • • 133 

TaUa for Dartmoatb College . . 134 

Tables for Dorer .... 134 

TaUa relating to BeTaanab . . 136 

Tables for Key Weat ... 137 



X 
4. 
5. 

6. 



7. Table for Indiaa Key . 

8. Table for Banu Crux 

9. Table for CbarlotteeTille 

10. Annoal Quantity of Rain 

11. Flowering of Fruit Ti 



188 
138 
139 
139 
149 



▼1 



COKTEIITS. 



IllOITISOAI* STAUk 



1. Maiatt . 

t. New H >m|whif 

3. Vermoot 

4. UamiclinMtta 

5. Rhode laland 

6. Cooneeticat 

7. New YoTk . 

8. NewJeriey 

9. PeaMjInuua 

10. Delaware . 

11. Maryland 
19. Virginia . 

13. North Carolina 

14. South Oaieliaa 

15. Oeorgia . 



Paga 

141 Iff. 

14817. 

144,18. 

145 <9. 

150 90. 

15181. 

15S99. 

157,93. 

150,34. 

165,25. 

165*96. 

J68 97. 
, 17398. 

173,99. 
. 175 30. 



Alabama 

Miieiitippi 

Looiaiaoa 

Teao'tteee 

Kentoeky 

Ohio . 

Indiana . 

llliaoia 

Mittoari 

Miehifaa . 

Arlcaneaa 

Diatriot of Colombia 

Florida Terrttoij . 

Wiaoonain Temtoij 

Iowa Territofj • 



m 

US 



m 



m 

m 



Britiili North Aaericaa ProTinoet 

Texae 

Mexico 

Central Ameriea 
BritiahWettlndiei . 



903 
905 

906 
907 
908 



Haytl sn 

Spantth Weet lodiea . . . . tS 
French Wett Indiea ... IS 
Doteh, Daniab, and Swndiah Wait In* 

iO 



BovTif Ambbica. 



1. NewGfenada 914 

9. Venezoela 916 

3. Equator 916 

4. Pern 916 

5. Bolivia j 917 



6. Chili 

7. La Plau, or Boenoe Ayrco 

8. Uruguay • . . . 

9. Paraguay 

10. BraaQ • . . . 



at 

391 



Eqbofb. 



Beignlng BoTcrelgni of Enrope . 
States of Eorope. OoTemment, (ke. 
Population and Extent of the Globe . 
Pf^iation of Aaiatie Statee . . 
Population of diiferent parte of Africa 
Sweden and Norway .... 

RuMia 

Deamark 

Belgium 

Hofland, or Netherlandi 

Great Britain 

Fhinee 

Prueiia 

Hanover 

Saxony 



924 
995 
996 
996 
996 
S97 
»8 

as9 

990 
331 
933 
2S9 
256 
960 
961 



Wnrtembeif 

Bavaria 

Austria . 

Switxerland . 

Spain . . 

Portqgal 

Sardinia . 

Two Sieiliee 

Oreeee • 

Turkey 

Foreign Obituary 

Araericail Obituary 

Chronicle ef Evente 

AdditioDB and Correctioiie 

General Index 



271 
979 

sn 



3P 

315 



INDEX. 



Page 

A.fric» SS6 

A#«B of perMNH buried in Englaad 67 

A^0* of peraoM who died inPraMia 68 
AJmbama g oTenunent ; JndlclMT ) 

Mintia • 177-179 

379 

• 383 

103 

. 381 

330 

. 198 

96 

. 336 

381 

. 363 

379 

. J15 

363 

. 330 

131-3 

. 351 

380 

. 317 

379 

. 69 

377 



Albert, Baron .... 
American Obituary . , 

Animal ezpeodltare, U. 8. 
Antomarcbl, Dr. . . 

Argentine BepabUo 
Arkansas GoTemment ; Judiciary 
Arm J List .... 
Aaia, Countiiei of . . . 

AttwoodyTIi 

Aoatria 

Bablngton, in. 

Banfca. U. & 

Havana ..... 

Belir^om 

Biahopa, V. 8. ... 

Bialftops, England 

Bland, Mrs. .... 

BoUTla 

Bond, J. L 

Booka, Pobllcation of . 
Borowlaakl 



Bocta, Charlea 377 

Braxil 333 

Bridgea, 01rE 378 

Briiiall Provinces . . - . 303 

Britisb West Indies .... 308 

Boenos Ayres 330 

Calendar, Old and New Style, ice • 63 

CAI^ENOAR, Jaaoary, 4ec. . 10 

Calendar, Jewish .... 6 

Calendar, Maliometan ... 6 

Canada 308 

Celeatlal Ptienomena . . • 3 

Central America .... 307 

CUli 319 

Cbronlcls of Events .... 303 

Cliroaological Cycles ... 4 

ColMgea, *.•... 134 

Colombia, District of— Judiciary . 199 

Ccmunerce, U. S. .... 105 

Connectlcnt — GoTernment } Judi- 
ciary *, Militia . . .151-153 

Congreas, U. 81 

Coasuls, Foreign 

ConanlsIU. S. . . . . 

Coorta, v. S. Times of holding . 

Currency and Exdiaage . 

Bamremont, Count, 

Daniel, Wm. 377 .Life, Expectation of . 

Delaware — CloTemment } Jndici. jLIoyd, B. . . . 

ary $ Militia 165 Louis, Baron 

Denmark 338|Louitiana— GoTemmentj 

Dofliaa, Conal 379 

Datch West Indies 313 

Eclipses of Juplter*k Batemtes . 37 

EcJipsea of tto Soi ... 34 

Bldon,Barl 380 



Psga 

Election^ Time of . . .131 

Epiiemerii of Gambart's Comet 37 

Ephemeris of the Boa ... 45 

Equator 316 

Europe ...... 334 

Exchange 117 

Executive GoTemment, U. S. . 79 

Expecifttlon of Lifb ... 65 
Expenditure, U. 8. Goremment . 102 
Exports, U.S. . 106-106 

Festivals of the Church ... 5 
Fixed Slant, True Apparent Places of 51 
Florida — Government} Judiciary . 300 
Flowering of Fruit Treea . 140 

Foreign Obituary .... 876 

France 358 

French West Indies . . .313 

Gambart^s Comet, Ephemeris of . 87 
Georgia — Government $ Judicia- 
ry; Militia} Internal Improve 

ment 175-177 

Globe, Population and Extent of . 336 
Governors of Btatei .... 133 
Gregorian Year .... 63 

Great Britain 383 

Greece 374 

Hanover ...... 360 

Hayti ...... 311 

Hlrt, H. A 377 

Hollaud 831 

Hummel, John 379 

Illinois ~ Government } Judiciary } 

Militia 195,196 

Imports, U. 8 108, 109 

Increase of Sidereal Time . 44 

Indiana — Government ; Judiciary \ 
Internal Improvement} Bank; 

Militia 193,195 

Indian Tribes 113 

Intereoone with'Foreign Nations . 90 
Iowa — Government ; Judiciary } 
Census .... 301,303 

Jewish Calendar 5 

Judiciary, U. 8. . . . .86 

Julian Year 69 

Kentucky — Government } Judiciary ; 
I Militia} Internal Improvement 183-187 
La Plata ...... 330 

Latitude and Longitude of Places, U. 8. 41 

Law Schools 139 

Lawless, John .... 877 

Legislatures, Meetings of . . .131 



93 

91 
88 

in 

379 ; License Law of Masaachusetu . 74 

. . 65 
319 
. 377 
Judiciary} 
Penitentiary . . 181,188 
Maine — Government } Judiciary } Mi- 
litia 141,148 

Marrisga ..... 78 
MarBhmaa,J 379 



VIU 



IITDEX. 



MvyluMl— 'GoTHiuiMBt: Jodldarys 
▲niMMlineBta of the Conatltattoii ; 
MUitla 165-168 

Miwchnmttt — Oartramantj Jad|d> 
mrj i ProdoeU of Mrtaln BranchM 
or ladotCiT} MiUtia) flckool Re- 
larnfl ltf-150 

BbYOTf Wm. • . . . 

Medical Schools .... 

Meteorological Table for Bramwlck 

Concord 



i< 



It 



U 
u 



u 
tt 
u 



194 
136 



Mexico 



Part. College 
Dover 
SaTannah 
KeT West 
Indian'Key 
Santa Crux 
CharlottearillelSS 
206 



Michigan — Goremment: Jndictary} 

Militia; School Fond . 197,198 
BUiiiia, n.& 97 



MIniatera Plenipotentiary, . 

Mint, n. S 

Miaaiiaippi— GoTemment ; Jodidary ; 

Militia; Banka; Newapapen 180-181 
Miaaonri — Gorernment ; Judiciary 196 

Bfbhler, Dr 281 

Moll, Dr. 280 

Mortality, Law of ... . 65 

Morton, Th 281 

Naples 273 

Nary List, V.B. .... 98 

Navy, Officers of, 99 

Netherlands ..... 331 

New Braaswick 204 

Newfoandland .... 204 
New Grenada . * . . , 215 
New HampiOilre -* GoTemment ; Jadi- 

ciarv ; Militia . . 142*144 

New Jersey — Goremment ; Judicia- 
ry i Finances j Militia , 157, 158 
New York — OoTemment ; Judiciary ; 
Common Schools; New York Ca- 
nals } Militia ... 152, 156 

North Carolina — Government; Jodl- 
ciary; Hilitia . . . 172,179 

NoTa Scotia 204 

Obituary 276 

Occultations, 35 

Ohio — GoTemment ; Judiciary ; Mi- 
litia; Penitentiary; Common Schools ; 
Literary Institutions . 187-192 

Paradise Lost 78 

Pnraguay 221 

PennsylTsnia — GoTemment ; Judici- 
ary ; Public Debt; Public Property ; 
Canals and Railroads; Education j 
Militia; Outlines of the Amended 
^Co nstitution . . .159-164 

Peru .••... 216 

Petrol^ Signer 280 

Places orS5 Fixed Stars. • 51 

PoIewhele,R. . S8i 

Fdllta, C. H. L. ... * 281 



Post Offloe EetabllahoMBt • 
Prince Edward^ lalaad . 
Prussia .... 
PablicaUon of Books 
Pnbllo Lands 
Rain, Annual QaaaUcy of 
Ratea of Poatage 
279 Reere, J, ... 

128 Refhacliona, Dr. Toaai^ . 

133 1 Religiooa DenomtnatioiM, U. I 

133 , RepreaeDtatiTes In Coograaa 

134 Rhode laland — GoTeraoMBt : 
ry ; MlUtln ... 
Riea,P. ..... 

137, Ritchie, Wm. . 

138 Rnaala si 

138 1 Sacy De ssi 

Sandibrd, Sir D. K. . . . . 2S 

Saxony as 

Schopenhauer 2£ 

Seasons, Beginning and Lengtk of . < 
Select Scrape 



IR 

an 

2Sf 
6 

IC. 

19 
Hi 



» 

S 



s 
. n 



90 Senate, U. fl. 

100 Sheep and Wool, BtattitieB of 
Sicilies, Two, . 
Signs of the Planets 
BignaoftheZodiae . 
Slave CompensaUon 



IIS 

27S 

} 

4 

fll 

SIsTes, U. S. is 

3'eep ....a » m ^ 

Solitude n 

South America . . • .214 

South Carolina — Gorenuneiii ; 

Judiciary ; Militia . . ITS, 174 
Spain _ 

2!2 

US 

27S 

63 



Spanish West Indies 
Statistics of Sheep and Wool . 
St. Leu, Dneheas of 
Style, Old and New . 
Sweden and Norway 
Switserland . . * . 
Talleyrand . . • . 
Teraperanoe . ■ • 
Tenneaaee — OoTeroment ; Jadfc^ 

Texaa 

Theological Schools . 
Tide Table .... 

Turkey 

Unwins, D. 

Uruguay £1 

Vacations in Colleges, , • .12? 

Venexuela tii 

Vermont— GoTomment; Jndid- 



. 237 

. Ti 

112,191 

. 2U 

. 129 

I 

. 273 
37i 



ary ; Militia 



14*. 



145 



Population, U. S. 123) Wurtemberg 

Portugal 281 ' TonAg*s Refractions 



Vessels of War, U. & 

Virginia — Gorernment; Jadicia- 

ry ; Miiiaa; Public Debt . 16S, ITS 

Ward, Bp asi 

Wesley, S. S7! 

West Indies so! 

William IV. S7C 

Wisconsin — GoTemment ; Judletary ? 

Militia SA 

Wool and Sheep il) 



Postage, Rates of 



104! 



54 



93r As the namss in tbs .^NMriean 0»iiaery (see pagejna) are phwed In 
order for the sake of eoBTsnient rslhrsnee, they sn not inserted in lUs Index^ 



i 



RELIMINART OBSERVATIONS ON THE ASTRONOMICAL 

DEPARTMENT. 



All the calculations in this Almanac have been adapted to msah solar 
ime. — On accoont of the eccentricity of the Earth's orbit, and the incli- 
lalion of the Ecliptic to the Equator, the motion of the Earth in Right 
\.scension is not uniform, and, consequently, the solar days are not equal, 
>ut about half are a little more, and about as many, a little less than 24 
lOUia. A clock, therefore, regulated to apparkmt solar time must be 
frequently adjusted. To ayoid this inconyenience the fiction of mean time 
lias been invented, and, haying already come into yery general use, will 
probably soon entirely supersede the other. Its name is derived from 
the circumstance, that the length of a mean solar day, hour, &c., is the 
mean or average length of all the apparent solar days, hours, &c., in a 
tropical year. 

The greatest difference between Mean and Apparent time occurs on 
the 3d of November, viz. 16m. 17 sec. ; and, the equation then being 
aubtractive from Apparent time, the instant the Sun's centre is on the 
meridian, or bears exactly south, a clock regulated to Mean time should 
indicate llh. 43m. 43 sec. ; on the 11th February is the greatest additive 
equation, when the time of noon by the clock is 14m. 83 sec. after 12. 

But Mean time is easily reducea to Apparent by applying the equa- 
tion (pages 45 to 50) on the day in question, in a manner directly the 
reverse of that therein indicated. 

The arrangement of the Calendar pages remains as in the Almanac 
for 1838, without alteration. 

The time of twilight is computed on the supposition that it begins and 
ends when the distance of the Sun from the zenith is 1Q8® ; the ouantity 
usually assumed, but which is probably too great by two or three aeffrees. 
The time of the Phases of the Moon is computed for the mericuan of 
Washington, but may be easily reduced to that for any other meridian 
by adding or subtracting the difierence of Longitude, according as the 
same is east or west of tnat city. 

In the computation of the rising and setting of the Sun, for this 
Almanac, two corrections have been recently intr<Mluced. These correc- 
tions are, 1st, for the effect of refraction in causing him to appear above 
the sensible horizon, sooner in the morning and later in the afternoon 
than he actually is ; and, 2dly, for the interval between the rising or 
setting of his centre, and of'^his highest point ; the instant of the ap- 
pearance or disappearance of this pomt, and net (as heretofore) of his 
centre, being considered the time of his rising or setting. So that at 
the time inaicated in the Calendar pages, as that of sunrise or sunset, 
bis centre is 90^ 50' from the zenith ; his semidiameter being about 
16^ and the horizontal refraction 34'. 

The amount of these corrections varies at every place with the decli- 
nation of the Sim, and on the same day is different m different latitudes. 
At Boston, when greatest, they lengtnen the interval between sunrise 
and sunset abont 12 minutes ; at New Orleans, nearly 9. 

The setting of the Moon only, is given from the new to the fall ; and 
uie ritmg only, from the full to the new moon. The letters M. A. m. a. 
foond in these columns, and in other parts of the Almanac, are used to 
denote Morning and ^fiemoon. The time of the bennning and end of 
twilight, and of the rising and setting of the Sun and Moon being given, 
>o the Calendar pages, for five of our principal cities, situate in very dif- 
leient latitudes, the Almanac is in fact computed for nearly every plaee 
wiUun the United Stotes. 
The planetB are placed in the order of their mean dis tances from the Sun 



X PRELIMflfART OB8ERTATI02(8. 

and their declinations are computed for the moment of their paasa^ vwer ^ 
meridian of Washington. The places of the four new planet*, Ve^a, Joae, 
Pallas, and Ceres, are given only when they pass the meridian withia five 
hours of midnight ; their distance from the Earth at other times beia; ac> 
great, as to render them invisible. 

The time of High Water is corrected for the difference of the Ri^ 
Ascension of the Sun and Moon, for the Moon*s declination and her As* 
tance from the Earth. The time of the tide immediately preceding her 
southing only having been given, it should be corrected by the additioa af 
half the difference v(hen the time of the other tide is required. 

It may be proper to remark, that, notwithstanding the three conecSooi 
ahove mentioned, the observed time of high water, frequently, it csfai 
weather, differs considerably, perhaps half an hour, from the compeled. 
Indeed, until recently, astronomers seem to have been contented mi± 
the knowledge, that the flow and ebb of the sea were caused by the al> 
traction of the Sun and Moon, and to have taken little pains to increase 
their acquaintance with these curious and interesting phenomena. But, 
as within a short time much attention has been turned to the subject, aad 
many competent persons in Europe have undertaken to make carefiri 
observations for a series of years, on every tide, there is reason to hope 
that the causes of some of the anomalies, not only in the time of 1ms> 
water, but also in the rise of the tide, may be discovered, and their e&cis 
predicted. 

On the 35th and 36th pages will be found a list of those conjunctxmB af 
the Moon with the planets and stars of not less than the sixth maKnxtede, 
which may prove to be occultatioos in some part of our country ; wbQst ^a 
the Calendar pages those coojimctions of the Moon with stars, which a»y 
be occultations in some part of the United States, are noted with aa as- 
terisk, instead of the usual symbol of coiijundion. 

The moment of the Immersion or Emersion of any star, howerer araalU 
behind or from the dark side of the Moon, can be determined with pre- 
cision ; but, if the star is not very bright, great difficulty is experieoced in 
satisfactorily ascertaining it, when the phenomenon takes place on the side 
that is enlightened. 

The Catalogue of the eclipses of the satellites of Jupiter (page ST) 
contains only those visible in some part of tho United States. The 
eclipses until the planet comes into opposition with the Sun, on the 3d of 
April, will happen on the west side, then, until the conjunction on the 
22d of October, on the east side, and afterwards again on the west, until the 
opposition on the 4th of May, 1S40. From conjunction to opposition, the 
immersions of the first and second satellites are, generally, only visable, and 
from the opposition to conjunction, the emersions, only ; but both the 
phenomena of the third and fourth satellites can someUmes be seen. 

In the table of Latitude and Longitude of some of the principal places 
in the United States (page 41, &c.; will be found the latitude of a large 
number, as determined by the editor, by recent observations made by him- 
self; also the longitude of about forty, deduced by him from obsemtioos 
made by others on the annular eclipses of Feb. 1831 and May, 1836, and on 
the total eclipse of Nov. 1834, or as ascertained by comparison of the place 
in question, by chronometers, with the Capitol at Washington, the Unrrer- 
iity of Virginia, Philadelphia, or Boston, the distance of which from Uie 
meridian oi Greenwich is supposed to be correctly known. The longi- 
tude of the Capitol is the mean of the results, deduced from the observa- 
tions on the annular eclipses of 1791, 1811, and 1831, and has recently 
been confirmed by the editor, by comparing it by chronometers with the 
University of Virginia and the city of Philadelphia. The unfortunate adop- 
tion, in the construction of several maps of this country, of the longitude 



PESLIMINART OBSIRVATIORS. XL 

9f the Capitol (5h. V 42")i reported by an individual acting under the 
authority of a Resolve of Cougreaa, has caused an error of 6^ minutes of a 
ieeree therein. 

ft will be noticed, that the positions of Charleston, Beaufort, S. C, 
kod Savannah, differ very considerably from those hitherto assigned to 
tbofl« places. They were determined by the editor with great care in the 
aatamn of 1834, at the time of a journey to the south, undertaken for the 
purpose of observing at Beaufort the total and central eclipse of the 30tb of 
N'ovemt>er of that year. The difference between the Longitude of St. 
Michael's church in Charleston, and of the State- House in Boston, was 
determined by eight chronometers. From the longitude of this church, that 
of the Exchange in Savannah, and that of the Arsenal in Beaufort, were 
deduced, by usine four. So that it may be hoped, that the Longitudes of 
these places, as laid down in this table, are much nearer the truth than 
those usually assigned in the maps and charts of our coast. 

The use of the Longitudes of these places, formerly supposed correct, 
produced great inconvenience, by causing an apparent change, of several 
seconds, in the daily rates of all chronometers on board vessels arriving at^ 
er from, Charleston, &c., after voyages of a few days* duration. 

As the error was about ten miles, or forty seconds of time, one of these 
iastniments received in Boston, New York, &c., in five days from Charles- 
ton or Savannah, would have apparently changed its rate of going, eight 
seconds ; and four seconds, if the length of the voyttge was ten davs. 
But since the adoption of the Longitude published in this Table, this 
apparent change has not been discovered. 

The most important light-house on the coast of New England is that 
in Truro, Massachusetts, generally known as the Highland or Cape Cod 
light ; as from it vessels from Boston, Salem, &c., usually take their de- 
parture, and as it is generally first seen by them, on their return. It would 
seem, therefore, that its accurate position would have been long since 
ascertaioed ; but by a large number of observations of northern and southern 
stars, made by the editor in the autumn of 1835, its Latitude was found to 
be 429 2f 22^' nearly, or about three miles less, than has hitherto been sup- 
posed. The possible consequences of such errors may be easily imagined. 
The Ephemeris of the Sun (pafos 45 to 50} is wholly taken from the 
Englisb Nautical Almanac, and not trom the Berlin Ephemeris as heretofore. 
It contains the Sun's Semidiameter, Horizontal PanJlaz and Declination ; 
the Time {meant which by the addition of 0*19 sec. will be converted 
into sidereal) occupied by the Semidiameter in culminating or passing the 
meridiaDy the Equation or reduction of apparent to mean time, to be ap- 
plied to apparent time in the manner indicated at the head of the column, 
the Sidereal Time, and the Obliquity of the Ecliptic. The epoch of all is 
Oh. Om., mean time, of the meridian of Oreenwich. 

The apparent places of 35 of the principal fiied stars (pages 51 to 57) 
will be found ve^ useful for determining the time, or latitude ; for which 
purpose they are much to be preferred to the Sun. 

The table of semidiurnal arcs, (p. 60) contains the intervals, in the United 
States, between the southing and the rising or setting of any celestial body, 
whose declination (north) does not exceed 30 degrees. By the aid of this 
table, therefore, we can readily ascertain, with a very considerable degree 
of accuracy, the time of the rising or setting of the sun, star, planet, &c., 
provided we know the time of its southing and its declination ; but if the 
latter is south, the semidiurnal arc is the difference between the quantity in 
the table and 12 hours. 

EZAMPI.XS. At what time will the planets Vesta and Saturn rise and set 
at Washington, (lat. 88.9^) on the 26th of February ; the former will south 
that day at 7h, 89m. A., with a north declination of 24i<* ; the latter at 6h. 



zu 



PmiLIMINART OBSKETATIOKS. 



ISm. M.y with a gooth decliDation of 20jr^. By the table it appe», that 
the semidiurnal area at Washington for the above degrees of decliDatkm, arv 
7h. 27in. and 12h. — 7h. Qm. or4h. 51m. ; hence Vesta will rise at Ob. 1^ 
A.| on the 25th, and will set at 3h. 6m. M., on tlie 26(h. Saturn wUi iis« 
on the 25tb, at Ih. 34m. M., and will set at llh. 6m. M. 

RBdmetwn of Maridional AUitude$. 

A Table has been published for several years, in the English Nantica! 
Almanac, for facilitating the reduction of the Latitude of a place, hem 
observations made on the Pole star, at any time during its rerolotica 
around the Pole ; which Table, when great accuracy is not ^^nted, or a 
good table of Logarithms is not at hand, will be found convenieoC Be: 
as exactness is sometimes required, it was thought the insertion of a cor> 
rect and general rule fur the reduction of the Latitude, from altitudes d 
any star, might be useful and acceptable. 

Rule. To the log. co-sine of the star's distance from the meridiaa it 
degrees, add the lor. cotangent of its declination ; the sum (rejecting I* 
in the index) will be the log. tangent of an arc (A) less than 90^. Thi 
sum of the arithmetical compliment of the log. sine of the declinatioci, the 
log. co-sine of A and of the log. sine of the corrected altitude, rejectinc 1* 
in the index, will be the log. sine of another arc B. Then the tlatitoae a 
the sum or difference of B and A, according as the distance of the stsr 
from the meridian is greater or less than six hours; but, when the declioa- 
tion of the star is of the same name with, and is less than, the LAtitade 
of the place, the supplement of their sum, and not their difference, is the 
Latitude. 

EXAMPLCS. 



On the 28d of July, 1836, when the distance of the atar a Ufsa 

from the meridian was 6h.7m. 27.2sec. (91^ 51' 48"), its corrected aldtode. 
at the church in Harris Street, Newburyport, waa 42^ 44' l3.93'^ and ib 
declination 88<> 85^ 53.54''. What is the LaUtude by this obeenrstion ? 



cos. »1«51'48" 
cot. 88 25 63.64 

tang. A S a64 



8.6120914 
8.4374596 

6.9495510 



sine A. C. 88 2^ 58.54 0001C2S 
COS. A. 3 3.64 9.999999B 
sine alt 42 44 18.9S 9.8316374 



sine B 42 45 25.31 9.8318000 

then B + A (the atar being more than six hours from the meridlsD)e 42* 
48' 28.95", the Latitude. 

On the aame evening, at the same place, when the atar a Aqoike was 
10m. 7|8ec (2® 81' 55") from the meridian, its corrected altitude ww 
66<»38'37.72",andits decUnaUon 8<> 26' 27.13" north. 

log. COS. 2^ 81' 55" + log. co-tang, declinations^log. tang. A B19 88' a.60* 
log. COS. A-f log. sin. 55^ 88' 87".724-Arithmetical compliment of lor. sin. 
decUnaUon=Jog. sin. B 55<' 88' S5.56" 

Now, as the declination of the star is of the same name with, and is less 
than the Latitude, the supplement of tlie sum of A and B, 42° 48^ 90.84*, 
is the Latitude. The latitude of this church, deduced from 802 altitudes 
of northern and southern stars, is 42^ 48' 32.1". 

When, as is frequently the case, several altitudes of the same star have 
been obtained within a few minutes of each other, their reduction by thb 
method is very simple, as two of the logarithms (the cotangent and aine of 
the declination) undergo no change. 

Bottanj JhtguMt ISA, 1888. 



AMERICAN ALMANAC 



roK 



1839. 



PART I. 



TBS 



AMERICAN ALMANAC 

FOE THE TKAK 



1839, 



Being the latter part of the G3d, and the beginDiog of the 64th, year 
of the Independence of the United States of America ; 

« the 6552d year of the Julian Period ; 

** the latter part of the 5599th| and the beginning of the 
5600th, year since the creation of the world, according to 
the Jews ; 

** the 2592d year (according to Varro) since the foundation 
of Rome ; 

** the 2586th year since the era of Nabonas^ar, which has 
been assigned to Wednesday the 26th of February of the 
3967th year of the Julian Period, which corresponds, ac- 
cording to the chronologists, to the 747th, and, according 
to the astronomers, to the 746th year, before the birth of 
Christ ; 

** the 2615th year of the Olympiads, or the third year of the 
654th Olympiad will begin in July, 1839, if we fix the 
era of the Olympiads at 7751 years before Christ, or 
at or about the beginning of July of the year 3938 of the 
Julian Period ; 

** the latter part of the 1254th, and the beginning of the 1255th 
(lunar) year since tlie Hegira, or Flight of Mahomet, 
which is supposed to have taken place on the 16th of 
July of the year 622 of the Christian era. 



I. THE CALENDAR 
AND CELESTIAL PHENOMENA FOR THE YEAR. 

SIGNS OF THE PLANETS, &c. 



O The Sun. 

The Earth. 

• 1»0<( The Moon. 

9 Mercury. 

2 Venus. 



^ Mars, 
fi Vesto. 
12 Juno. 
$ Palla^. 



$ Ceres. 

1|. Jupiter. 
Yl Saturn. 
1^ Herschel or Uranus. 



I Conjunction, or haying the same Longitude or Right Ascension* 

□ Quadrature, or differing 90® in « « ** 

P Oppoeition «• ISO® in " " " 

^ The aacending, XJ the descending node. 



4 CHROirOLOeiCAL CTCLB8, SIONS OF THE ZODIAC, &C. [1639. 

An asterisk (*) prefixed to the conjunction of the Moon with a star or 
planet, indicates that the star or planet may be eclipsed in aoma part ef 
the inhabited portion of the United States. 

The sign -f- is prefixed to the latitude, or declination, of the Su^ci 
other heayenlj body, when north, and the sign — when south ; hnl ths 
former prefixed to the hourly motion of the Moon in latitude, indieatet 
that she is approaching, and the latter that she is recedin|^ from, the 
norih pole of the ecliptio. 

The letters i^. wf ., m. •., denote Morning and Afttmoon* 



CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES. 



Dominical Letter . F 

Epact 15 

Lunar Cycle, or Golden Number 16 



Solar Cycle 
Roman Indiction 
Julian Period 



88 

. 12 
^6i 



SIGNS OF THE ZODIAC. 



Spring 
signs. 

Summer 
signs. 



^3. n 



Aries. 

Taurus. 

Gemini. 

Canoer. 

Leo. 

Virgo. 



Autumn ^ ^ /^ sio^io. 

"«°»- I 9. / SagiUariuJ. 
w:«.»«.* tlO.vyCaiprioocnnB. 
^-n^ hl.^Aqliariu.. 

"«''■• ?12,KFisceB. 



BKGINNING AND LENGTH OF THE SEASONS. 



•. 



h. m. 

Sun enters \ff (Winter begins) 1838, Dec. Slst, 12 17 50 
«< « cp (Spring «« 1839, March 20th, 13 62 ~ 

G (Summer " << June 21 st, 10 52 

tt « ^ (Autumn " «* Sept. 23d, 49 

«« " Vy (Winter ** " Dec. 21st, 18 14 6 



i( 






50^ 

45 

42V 



d* D. D. B* 

Sun in the Winter Signs . 89 1 34 55 

*• " Spring 92 20 69 67 

<< « Summer 9S 13 8 7 

" " Autumn 89 18 13 17 

" north of Equator (Spring and Summer) 186 10 8 4 
« south « (Winter and Autumn) 178 19 48 12 



Length of the tropical year, commencing ) 
at the winter solstice 1838, and termi- > 965 5 66 18 
nating at the winter solstice 1830, ) 

Mean or average length of the tropical year 365 5 48 48 



M 



Time 
at 
Wasfa*a. 



1.839.] MOTABLK rE8TITAI.8. JEWISH CAI.ENDAR. 

MOVABLE FESTIVALS OF THE CHURCH IN 1839. 



Seplnagesima Sunday Jan. 27th 

Quina. or Sbrove " Feb. 10th 
Ash. Wed. Ist day in Lent ** 13th 

Alid Lent Sunday March 10th 

Palm Sunday » ** 24th 

Master Sunday ** 3Ut 

I.1OW Sunday April 7th 



Rogation Sunday May 5th 

Ascen. Day, or Holy Th. ** 9th 
WhiUunday, or Pentecost " 19th 
Trinity Sunday " 26th 

Corpus Christi day, ) ^ oa«i. 

FeteDieu $ 

Advent Sunday Dec. Ist 



JEWISH CALENDAR. 

[Tba anniTenariM marked with an stteruk {*) nn itrictlj obaerred.] 

Year. Nanm of the MoDtha. 

5599 Tnebet begins Dee. 18, 1838. 

<« •• 10th Fast for the Siege of Jerusalem << 27, *' 

*' Sebat begins Jan. 16, 1839. 

** Adar begins Feb. 15, " 

it a 11th Fast of Esther .... •* 25, «« 

" « 14lh •Purim •* 28, " 

« « 15th Schuscan Purim . . March 1, « 

" Nisan begins « 16, " 

«< « 15th •Beginning of the Passover . . *< 30, ■< 
« « 16th * Second Feast or Morrow of the 

Passover 31, " 

*• ** 21st •Seventh Feast .... April 5, «• 

i< .« 22d •End of the Passover . . "6, " 

« Ijar begins «« 15, " 

« « ibth Lag beomer .... May 2, " 

" Sivan begins '* 14, " 

«« « 6th •Feast of Weeks or Pentecost . . " 19, *« 

•« «« 7th •Second Feast . . " 20, «* 

** Thammus begins June 13, ** 

<* *< 17th Fast for the Taking of the Temple <' 29, « 

« Ab begins July 12, «« 

«« •« 9th •Fast for the Burning of the Temple « 20, *• 

« Elul begins Aug. 11, " 

5600 Tieri begins •Feast for the New Year . Sept. 9, " 
«i « 2d •Second Feast for the New Year " 10, " 
« •' 4th Fast of Gedaljah . . . " 12, •* 
" ■• 10th "Fast of the Reconciliation or Atone- 
ment « 18, " 

«« «* loth •Feast of the HuU or Tabernacles ** 23, " 

«« •« I6lh •Second Feast . . "24, «« 

*< *« 21st Feast of Palms or Branches . , *< 29, " 



6 MAHOMETAN CALENDAR. HEreHT 0» SPmnfO TIDES. [188ft. 

Year. Nanm of the Mootbf. 

5600 Tisri 22d *£nd of the Hut or Congregation 

Feast 8e^ ae,18»L 

(f i( 23(1 "Rejoicing for the Discoyery of 

the Law Oct- 1, •« 

" MarchesTan begins ** 9, " 

** Chialeu begins Nor. 7, " 

" " 25th Dec. I, *« 

" Thebet begins « 7, •* 

" " 10th " 16, « 

" Sebat begins Jan. 5,1810. 



MAHOMETAN CALENDAR. 



Year. Namea of the Mootha. 

1253 Schewall begins 
*< Dsu 1-kadah " . 
** Dsu'l-hejjah 

1254 Moharrem 
Saphar 
Rabia L 
Rabia II. 
Jomadbi I. 
Jomadhi II. 
Rejeb 
Shaban 
Ramadan 
Schewall 
Dsu'l-kadah 



<« 
« 

u 

u 
(( 
l( 
u 
it 



u 
«« 

c< 

II 
fl 
(I 
u 
fl 
11 
II 
11 



• 9 

(Month of Fasting) 



18,]83& 

Jan. 16, 1439. 

Feb. 15, 

March 17, 

April 16, 

Maj 15, 

June 14, 

July 13, 

Aug. 12, 

Sept. 10, 

Oct. 10, 

Nov. 8, 

Dec. 8, 

Jan. 6, 1840. 

The Mahometan Tear contains 354 days, or 12 reyolntions of the 
Moon. In the course, therefore, of about 33 yean, the months com- 
spend to every part of the Gregorian Year, and to every season. 



u 
u 
f 
u 
u 
u 
c« 
M 

u 
cc 

a 



HEIGHT OF THE GREATEST OR SPRING TIDES IN 1839, 

Computed by the formula of Laplace (Meeanique CiUttef Vol. II. p. 289.) 



New or 


full 




Helxht of 1 


New or 


fall 






Height </ 
theTMa. 


Moon. 






the 


Tide. 


Moon. 






d. 






d. 


h. 




h. 


New Moon, 


Jan. 15, 


10 M 


0.86 


New Moon, 


July 


10. 


6 A 0.84 


Full 


II ' 


29, 


11 M 


0.84 


Full 


II 




26. 


6M 084 


New 


it 


Feb. 13, 


lOA 


1.03 


New 


II 


Aug. 


9» 


4M 0.87 


Full 


K 


28, 


3M 


088 


Full 


(1 




24, 


4A 1.01 


New 


l( 


March 15, 


9M 


1.15 


New 


fl 


Sept 


7, 


5A OJO 


Full 


l< 


29, 


9A 


0.87 


Full 


fl 




23, 


2M 1.12 


New 


it 


April 13, 


6A 


1.12 


iNew 


If 


Oct. 


7, 


9M 87 


Full 


K 


28, 


2A 


0.79 


Full 


II 




22. IIM 1.10 


New 


If 


May 13. 


2M 


0.98 


New 


ft 


Nov. 


6, 


3M 0.78 


Full 


If 


28, 


6M 


0.73 


Full 


ft 




20. 


9 A 0.99 


New 


ti 


June 11, 


9M 


0.87 


New» 


<4 


Dec. 


5, 


10 A 0.72 


Full 


it 


26. 


7A 


0.73 


Full 


If 




2o: 


8M 0.91 



1839.] 



UNIT OF ALTITVUX OF SCYERAL PORTS. 



The unit of altitude at anj place, is the riae at that place of that tide 
which arriyes about a day and a half after the time of New or Full 
Moon, the Sun and Moon at the moment of conjanction or opposition 
having been at their mean distance from the Earth and in the plane of 
the celestial eqaator. 

The nnit of altitude (which can be ascertained bj obsenration only) 
at any place, multiplied by the quantities in the above table, will give 
the height of the spring tides at that place during the present year. 

It will be seen that the tides of February 14th, March 16th, April 
14th, August S&th, September 24th, and October 23d, will be the great- 
est of all in 1839. 

The actual rise of the tide, however, depends so much on the strength 
and direction of the wind, that it not unfrequently happens that a tide, 
which would, independently of these, have been small, is higher than 
another, otherwise much greater. But when a tide, which arrives when 
the Sun and Moon are in a favorable position for producing a great ele- 
vation, is still further increased by a very strong wind, the rise of the 
water will be uncommonly great, sufficient perhaps to cause damage. 

The following Table contains the Unit of Altitude of several ports 
and places on the coast of America, according to the best authorities. 

The unit of altitude of the several places in the Bay of Fundy was 
ascertained by recent observations. 





Feet. 




rest. 


Advocate Harbour (Bay of) 
Fundy) J 


50 


Cape Cod Light House 


H 


" " Harbour 


11 


Andrews, St. ... 


25 


*' D'Or (Bay of Fundy) 


50 


Annapolis (N. S.) 


30 


<' Henlopen 


5 


Apple River .... 


50 


" Henry 


4« 


Augustine, St. . 


5 


" Lookout 


9 


Basin of Mines (Bay of Fundy) 


60 


«« May 


6 


Bay, Bristed 


8 


«• St. Mary 


14 


•« Broad 


9 


« Sable 


9 


*' Buzzard's 


5 


'« Split (Bay of Fundy) 


55 


" Casco 


9 


Charleston (3. C.) 


6 


" Cignecto (north part of > 
the Bay of Fundy) \ 


60 


Cumberland (Hasin Fort), head 


!" 


of the Bay of Fundy 


*< St. Mary's 


16 


Digby (N. S.) . . . 


30 


* Vert . .- . . 


7 


Eastport .... 


85 


Beaver Harbour 


7 


Elizabeth Isles 


B 


Bell Island StraiU 


30 


«* Town Pomt 


5 


Block leland 


6 


Florida Keys 


5 


BosTOir .... 


lU 


Gay Head (Vineyard) 


5 


Cape Ann .... 


11 


George's River 




«' Blomidom (Bay of Fundy] 


)60 


Georgetown Bar 


4 


« Chat .... 


13 


Gouldsborough 


13 



8 



TIDE TABI.B. 



[1839L 



Feet. 

Green Islands .^ 16 
Gut of Annapolis .30 

Gut of Cansor ... 8 

Halifax .... 8 

Hampton Roads . 5 

Hillsborough Inlet 5 

Holmes's Hole ... 4 

John's St. (N.B.) ... 30 

** St. (N. F.) . 7 

Kennebec .... 9 

Kennebunk ... 9 

Long Island Soand . 5 

Louisburg (C. B.) . . GJ 

Machias .... 12 
Marblehead .11 

Mark's St., Bar . . . 7 

Monomoj Point ... 6 

Moose River (Bay of Fundy) 30 

** Island (Me.) . . 25 

Mount Desert ... 12 

Mouths of the Mississippi IJ 

Nantucket (Shoal and Town) 5 

Nassau (N. P.) ... 7 

New Bedford ... 5 

Newburyport ... 10 

New Haven ... 8 

Newport .... 5 

New York ... 6 

Norfolk .... 5 



u 



t< 



<i 



Partridge Island (Bay of Fundy) 55 

Passamaquoddy River 

Penobscot River 

Plymouth 

Portland 

Port Homer . 

Hood 

Jackson 

Roseway . 
Portsmouth (N. H.) 
Prince £dward*s island 
Providence 

Rhode Island Harbour 
Richmond 
Salem (Mass.) . 
Sandwich Bay 
Sandy Hook 
Seven Isles Harbour 
Sheepscut River 
Shubenacadie River (B. 
Simon's, St, Bar . 

«* ** Sound . 

Townsend Harbour 
Truro (Bay of Fundy) 
Vineyard Sound . 
Windsor (Bay of Fundy) 
Wood's Hole 
Yarmouth (N. S.) 



. 25 
10 

. Hi 

9 
. 8 

6 
. 8 

6 
. 10 

6 

5 
. 4 

11 

. 8 

5 

. 31 

9 

of Fun.) 70 

. 6 

6 

9 

70 

. 5 

60 

. ft 

12 



TIDE TABLE. 

The following Table contains the difference between the time of high 
water at Boston, and at a large number of places on the .American eoast, 
by which the time at any of them may be easily ascertained, by jm^ 
tracting the difference at the place in Question from the lime at Bovtoa, 
^tJ" ^^P "^" "■ " profij«*d to it ; and by adding it, when the sign is -|-. 

The time of high water, in the calendar pages, is of that tide whicii 
immediately ^tfceiiM the southing of the Moon. 

h. 



Albany 
Andrews, St. 
Annapohs (N. 8) 
Annapolis (Md.) 
Augustine, St. . 
Bay, Bristed . 
^ Broad 



+ 4 


— 

— 4 

— 4 

— 3 

— 



m. 
12 


30 
18 


45 
46 



Bay, Casco 
« Chebucto 

Genevieve, and 

St. Barbe 
Buzzard's 
Narragantet 
Pistolet 



i( 






i 



— -0 

— 4 



— 3 

— 3 

— 4 



45 




GO 
53 
45 



1839.] 



TIDE TABLE. 



9 



*t 
*t 

€t 
«« 
U 
U 
«« 
«« 
€t 
€t 
c< 

CC 



Bay, St. Mary's 

«< SaDdwich (N. 8.) 
'* Sehccatica 
Bermuda Inlet 
Cape Ann 

Cansor 

Charles . 

Chat . . 

Churchill 

Cod 

Fear 

Halteraa 

Henlopen 

Henry 

Lookont 

St. Mar J . 

May 

Romain (S. C.) . 

Sable (N. S.) 

Split . . « 

CSAKIiESTOir 

Cumberland (Baain Fort) 
£aatport 

Elisabeth Town Point 
Florida Key 
Fort St. John 
Fryinrpan Shoals 
Gay Head 
Georgetown Bar 
Gouldsborough . 
Gut of Annapolis 
Gut of Cansor 
Ualifajc 

Hampton Roads 
Harbour, Amelia 
•* Beayer . 
" Nantucket . 
" Rhode Island 
'* Seven Isles 
*' Townsend . 
Hillsboronf h Inlet 
Holmes's Hole 
Ice CoTC 
Island, Anticostl, W. end 

Bell, StraiU of 

Block 

Button . 

Elisabeth . 

Fox 

Green 

Moos^ 

Prince Bdward 

Rhode 

Sable 

Seal 
Janeiro, Rio 



h* IB* 



u 

M 
<• 
M 

a 

«l 

u 
a 




3t) 



— 2 

— 2 

— 30 
•-430 



— 3 








— 3 45 



±1 



— 3 

— 2 



30 
10 

30 
30 



— 2 45 



— 3 

— 3 

— 2 



50 
50 
30 



— 2 45 



— 3 

— 3 

— 

— 4 

+ 


— 2 36 

— 2 40 

— 2 30 

— 5 

— 3 53 



30 
30 
15 
OO 
80 




_4 

— 

— I 



30 
30 
30 



^3 30 





30- 




— 4 

— 3 

— 3 

— 2 45 

+ 30 

— 4 
-0 



45 
30 



— 45 



— 4 

— 1 

— 1 

+ 4 





20 
30 





— 2 15 



53 

40 



— 3 

— 4 

— 250 

— 45 

— 2 

— 

— I 

— 4 45 

— 3 

— 2 45 
+ 5 



50 





John's, St. (N. B.) 
St. (N. F.) 



it 



p't)— 



. + 

+ 



Kennebeo 
Kennebonk . 
Louisburg . 
Machias • 

Marble head 
Martha's Vineyard (W 
Mary*s, St, Bar . 
Monomoy Point 
Mount Desert 
Nantucket (town) 
" (shoal) 

Nassau (N. P.) 
New Bedford 
Newburyport 
New Haven 
New London . 
Newport 
New Tore 
Nootka Sound 
Norfolk . 
Ocracook Inlet 
OJd Point Comfort 
Philadelphia 
Plymouth 
Portland 

Portsmouth (N. H.) 
Port Campbell 

" Hood 

« Howe 

*' Jackson 

" Rose way 

" Royal . 
Providence 
Quebec . 
Race Point . 
Richmond . 
River, Apple 

" St. Croix. . 

*< Delaware, entrance -^ 

" Georffe's . — 

" Penobscot 

" Sheepscut 
Salem (Mass.) 
Salvador, St. 
Sandy Hook . 
Savannah . 
St. Simon's Bar 

** Offing 
«< Sound 
Sunbury 
Tarpaulin Cove 
Vineyard Sound 
Windsor 
Wood's Hole 



+ 



5 



4 


3 

4 





4 
3 


2 
3 



. + 



— 5 

+ 



2 
4 

3 
3 
3 
4 
3 
6 

4 



+ 



. + 



a» n. 
30 


45 
15 
15 
30 


53 




30 
30 
44 


3D 
15 
14 
36 
50 

2 20 
50 

3 
2 30 

25 
2 67 

45 
15 
30 



3a 
15 
14 
5 
30 
15 
20 
30 

30 
46 
45 
45 

15 
38 
15 

5 
2 30 
2 
S 38 
30 
30 
2 60 




2 




4 
4 
3 
4 
4 



ITT Jaauarg, First Month, begins on Tuciday. \^^ \ 



l9lhil»T- I *^'" 



Apngw, 7th Aij, gh^ M. 



1p«g« "^ '''?'•• ■"" "■ 



»., i9ihJ.r. lib- «. _ 



.rMHin, 




Slh 


B 


4S. 


M 


\v. 


1M« 


", 


a»ik "' 10 3L 


» 


J aun'. itn^ hob !.»> .nd .eu, (c 


•■— "" •"■ 


""^"-^^ 


1 - 




!. 


|i 


li 


h 


1 


i^J 1 -, 




-=<r 




ft 






1 


£ 1 




;"^- 


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h'.'«: 


a^m 


IX' 




™m'u"^'. 


b.^l.. 




4W 








I4S 








sn 


««.'•- 




W 


» 












ai 1 » 


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4* 
















1 M 






40 


u 


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441 


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4 as 


rJ 


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aal u 


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4 41 


I IS 


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ewiiiw- 




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tu 


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n 






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ai 


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onm 


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i39.J 



January has Thirty-^ne Days, 



PMsafe of the Meridian (mean time) and Declination of the Planets. 


Ist day. 


7tb day. 


I3th day. 


' 19th day. | 

SinJtiu. Dec t 

b. m. , , 

10 80m — 31 9 


S5th day. 


'SmOAtf. 
b. m. 

, 23a« 


Dec. 

— acTb 


SMtfA*. 
h. m. 

Ill 3rm 


Dee. 

—19 67| 


Soutkt, Dee. 
b. m. . , 

10 48m — 30 SO 


b. m. 
10 37m 


Doc. 

• < 
—31 6 


19 


—38 91 


' oasa. 


— 33 43 


888. — 31 39 


44a. — 19 63 


618. 


—17 6 


6 7ID 


+ 485 


1 4 48m-- 8 63 


4 80m--8 39 


4 lOm -f- 3 18 


8 4001 


-- 3 


11 44a -f^ 1^ 


,11 l4a.-|-23*7 


10 44a. - -33 fl7 

1 


10 16a. 


+«i6: 


9 478. 


-|-33 8 


« sm — 8M 


ff flam — t 58 

1 


6 86m 


1 
— t34 


6 18m 


— 6 41' 

1 


4 60m 


— 6 4 


« ssm — ft SI 


1 

6 3m — » 42 


6 40m 


— 6 61 


1 

6 nm — 6 66 


4fl6m 


— 6 


9 S4 i — W 83 


9 18 

1 


— 19 89 8 A3 


—19 44 


8 81 —19 49 


8 9 


— 19 6 


4 3a. 


1 — 8 46 


1 3 898. 


— 8 40' 


8 168. 


— 8 861 


3 648. 


— 8 39| 


3 818. 


— 8 3 



ll 



Moon rite* or leta. Mean time. 



i 
3 

1 

5 

). 

7 

8 
9 

1 
2 

5j 

4 

5 
6 

7 
.8 
% 

s. 

w 
u 

1% 

s. 

28 

29 
SO 
81 



h. n* 
1 13111. 
3 6 

3 63 
837 

4 18 



I 

s 

pa 



4 67m. 
686 

6 16 
668 
743 
8 81 
034 



10 3im. 

11 SO 

198. 
116 

3 9 
369 
8 47 

4 368. 
634 

6 14 

7 8 

8 4 
4 

10 8 



II IB. 
11 6S 

8 
46m. 

ISO 



h. n. 

6 19a. 

7 31 

888 

9 41 

10 48 



11 



46m 

1 49 
964 
4 1 

6 8 



6 13m 



4 498. 

6 7 

7 34 
S40 
066 



11 118. 



97m 

1 44 

8 
4 14 
6 30 



6 16m 

6 13a. 
6 31 
796 



4t 






h. m. 

6 348. 

7 86 
S 41 
9 43 

10 48 



11 438. 



44m 

1 46 
348 
8 66 

6 1 



6 4m 

Mtc. 

4 668. 

6 13 

7 97 
6 41 
9 66 



II 108. 



S4m 

1 40 
364 
4 7 
6 13 



6 oro 

ri»99. 
6 188. 
6 36 
738 



a 
O 



rtset, 
b. m. 

6 308. 

7 39 
844 
9 44 

10 44 



11 43a. 



43ro 

1 43 
346 
849 

464 



6 67m 



6 18. 
6 16 
780 

8 44 

9 66 



11 88. 



31m 

1 86 

3 48 
860 
6 6 



6 3m 

me«. 
6 338. 
638 
780 



I 

a* 

M 



a 
m 
o . 



ruM, 
h. m. 

6 478. 

7 63 

8 68 

9 48 

10 44 

11 808. 



86m 

1 81 

3 80 
8 31 

4 34 



ru«d. 
h. n. 

6 648. 

7 68 

8 67 
963 

10 46 



11 388. 



03Sm 
1 38 
336 
8 36 
4 36 



6 36m 

MtU, 

6 198. 

6 81 

7 40 

8 49 
966 



II 38. 



13m 

1 31 

3 81 
839 

4 43 



6 40m 

rises, 
6 378. 
6 89 

7 an 



6 aom 

sets. 
6388. 

6 38 

7 46 
863 
9 66 



11 8a. 



lom 

1 18 
3 36 

3 33 

4 36_ 

6 83m 

rises, 

6 46a. 
646 

7 43 



PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA 
TIONS. 

Sundaif* ttnd other Remarkahl 
Dayt. 



Earth ocarest the Sun. d 9 $ 
Inf. c5 90* 

Epiphany, 

DO$. ^JU, DO?. 
DOU- (J]>Spica. 

dPh- *j«ia. 

(S^ 9. Itt atmi. after Epiph 
9 staiionaiy. 

dfi^n. *28'S. 
*D88Vf. 

2d Sunday after Epiphany, 

:|c:]) 4,c,rf,Plciad. 3|C>9,ija 

d ]> /* 8 • Concertion of 8t, 

dfi'/n. d80- *D13« 8 
Septtta, 8und. ^l>cn. [cAur 
2f)ih. ^grcat. W.elon. 24°fi(y 



12 rebruary 


,* 


wnrf Jtfm/A, bfgiiiS on /Vidtfy. [1^09 




T«,l«bl b.(id. 




K. York, 6 17 

W4rf>. |,M 
N.OlI>>. tjg ; 


Ma. 


1 711, d.j. II i31h d.». 1 
D«(illt., EDdi. 'Bopai-i Iln'iU. 

;t'^lii.la'M'L.t'MiB.y Ta.| 


.m. >..«. Ih.-. Km. 
iain.,iiOB.!,s «n.7i7*. 


ApogM, 4lh itj. &. H. 1 P.rii«. ISlt. H.j, llh. A. 


Un Omnti, eOk d<j>, Ih. SJoi. A. i Pint Qnintr, mli lUj, &. 4l.(b. A. 


1 

t 


i 

i 




H[«b«Uf. ILU.-. 


i 




^ 


1' 


J 

H 


88 




4 

1 

141 
8 40 

lU 

180 
1140 


m 






b. n 
t H 


I 10 


s le 




)» 


h. IB 
4 41 
40 


88 
680 
40 

4) 
48 

r» 

47 
40 

84 
BU 

u 

4< 

88 


,vr.l:;, 

II 81 10 It 




18 
10 

as 
n 
w 

9S 

H 

n* 

ti 

M 
« 

M 
4> 


T S 


6 90 

» 

M 


BM 

M 
■ M 

U 
M 

w 

BU 

4a 

: 

4* 

«a 

»u 

M 
SB 

w 

M 


» 

n 

M 
N 

*0 

u 
u 

M 

tt 

«0 
19 

«a 

4* 

t <« 

«T 


u 

M 
41 


M 
81 

40 


14« 
41 
48 
47 
4» 

B4> 

41 
41 
40 

w 


wm 

048 

110 

14* 
848 

lis 

8 441 






f 1 

■ H 

H 

M 
I El 


» 

M 

M 
W 


948 

47 

4S 

40 
M 

M 

u 

184 

w 


43 
48 

40 

48 


111 ' 


t 


48 
40 

40 
•0 

M 

88 

16 

88 


■ 87 
IB 

•« 

88 

n 


>4*<J 

10 84 I 

11 1 

a4MJ 

I'l i 

740 ' 



1839] 



February has Twenty^ght Days, 



Fuaago of the Meridian (mean time) and Declination of tbe Planeta, 



lat day. 



9 
? 

s 

a 

s 

h 



n« IDs 

10 Min 
58a. 
8 3sm 
18a. 

4 40m 
4 68 
438 
7 U 

Q 6a. 



Dee. 
• 
— 99 11 

— 16 14 
4-8 6 
-f-38 61 

— 496 

-|-S86 

— 6 1 
— 19 68 

— 8 14 



7lh day. 



h. m. 

10 44in 
1 4a. 
a 6901 
8 49a. 

4 iTxn 

4 88 
4 4 

799 
1 48a. 



Dee« 

— 91 43 
— 19 40 



-u 


6 


— 8 


ft 


-[-848 


8 69| 


—90 


1 


— 8 


8 



13th day. 
Dec. 



h. ni« 
10 67m 

1 9a. 
9 8sm 

8 948. 

8 6610 
4 14 
840 
7 
1 90a. 



— 9 

— 1 

+ « 

— 6 



— 7 



80 
64 

47 
18 

^ 

84 
1 

64 
4 

69 



19tb day. 



h. n. 
11 HID 

1 13a. 
9 6m 
8 la. 

8 88m 
8 61 
3 16 
6 39 
0688 



Dec 



— 18 80 



3&lh day. 



h. m. 

11 97m 

— 7 ojj I na. 

4- 4 90 ' 1 86m 



-94 80 



-1-0 8 
-|-490 
— 6 47 
-90 6 
.' — 7 61 



7 898. 



8 loro 

3 98 

9 60 
8 16 

88a. 



Dec. 
a 
—16 4 

— 8 t 

-|-944 

— 6 % 



— 74 



Moon rise* or seta. Mean time. 




PHENOMENA AND OBSERVE 
TIONS. 

Sundays and other Remarkabi 
Datft. 



3d. ^ ]> 60n]^. $ stnttoDary. 
TallejTand b. 1755. d ]> ^. 
Stxagenma Sunday. 1|. stat. 
Hostilities against (^reat Britaii 
4tb. d D U- [ceased, 1783 
5tb. GalvaDi died, 1799. 
8tb. d D h* [18S5 

Severe cold in Southern States 

Slur&ve Sunday, 

Shrove Tuesday, d ^ ^ • 
Ath Wednesday. Jjcnt begins, 
d D $ » ^- St. VaUniwe. 

g siatiooarjr. [1664 

\st Sunday in Lent. Angelo d. 
Wirt died, 1834, a. 62. Luthei 
d 9 g . [died, 1646 

^ stationary, d D ;ir B • 
22d. Washington b. 1732, N. S. 

[ingtoo, 1888. 
^ D 47 n. 24th. Duel at Wash> 
td Sun, in Lent. St. Matthias, 
$ stationary. 
Senefelder died, 1884, a. 68. 

Dh0. 



14 March, Third Month, begins on Friday. 



[I8a« 



Tuilighl bjgiiii ind en 



B«,iii.. Eodi. 'BoflDi 



'««« |TU I'lM |7«a !'« s 

J4M i» .«> ^M |:.» 

,I«M It« 1'4« Im U » 



I Piiti|M. lEUi, Eh. M. I 



1^1 OauteT, ath di 
Naw Moon, ISUi " 


, a 


.la-G-.M" 


Ifl:- 


^ 


™,. 


»h'^'" 


i*-5 


4lK. 












1^ 


1^ 


^j 


8 


4 

1 
eioD 


l'!f 




'i 


li- 


^ 




TI 


,... 


MS 


losia. auL 

u 1 B 11 




»i 

w 

M 
U 

n 
n 
» 


H 
M 

M 

H 


S90 
M 
38 

as 

31 
IB 


H 


B 1 


a 4 


33 

1* 
IS 

la 
t 1 

lU 

w 

H 

w 


T 

n 

nr 

la 
u 

» 

IB 
B IB 


SM 

low 

11 » 

*B. 
OttB 
IM 

til 

43a 
B47 
H4«. 
SM 

10 M 

tl4B 


I IT«- 

II «r 

a 19 
• u 

II • 
11 «• 

ana. 

13T 


M 1 
11 41 

■ 4* 

1 3* 




< 


I 1 


a4sn 

M47 




M 
M 


SI 
M 


SN 

»7 
M 

M 

M 

M 


B 1* 

1< 

n 


H 

» 

w 

M 


I* 


» 4>. ISM- 
Alt 4Ba 
TBI »•! 

a» •*• 

Bti t u 

B » 14* 


,. J 


• 41 


sn 


10 Ua. 


a»«- 



1839.] 



March has Thiriy^one Days. 



li 





Paasa^ of tb« Moridian (niMui time) and Deelination of the Planeta. 




1 


let day. 


7th day. 


13th day. 


1 19th day. 
'8outks.\ Dee. 


1 95th day. 


Saudu, Dee. 


Ssutks. Dee. 


SsmOu. 


Dee. 


Souths. \ 


Dec. 


h« in. ^ / 


b. m. 


, h.m. 


, ; h. III. ^ f ' h. m. 


• 1 


9 11 3810 — IS n 


11 ttm — 9 la 


188 


. — 4 19 898.-I- ] lit 808. 


--66! 


? 1 i»aJ— 1 u 


1 938. + 1 " 


196 


+ 4 17, 1 80 


--790 1 88 


- -10 1' 


ft 


1 1601' 


f»« 


044m 


-}-89a 


i Iim4-T94 11 84 


4*8 11 


11 9 


-|-8 61 




9 Mm - 


-8 91 
-6 I 


9 99ro 


-|-» 3C 


» 1 9 sm 4- 7 40 ! 1 87m 


+ 968 


1 9m 


--19 ! 


5 8 11 - 


*946 


--6 99l| 990 


4-6 69!> 1 64 '{'BiO 


186 


-- 7 i 


1^ 314 - 


— 680 


9 8 


— 6 17 , 1 49 


— A 91 16 — 4 46060 


— 4« 


h , • • - 


—90 8 


887 


— 90 9 ' 6 14 


— 90 9 4 61 —90 , 4 97 


—90 1 


^ 1 sia. — 7 se 


'11 69 


— 7 80'lll 88 


— 7 99 11 14 — 7 14 !l0 69 


— 7 • 


^' > ^ ^ 1 MoAD ris«t or mu. Mean tiiiM. | 




■ 
Q 


II 

|1 


m 


a 

8 


• 

41 

M 

• 

2S 


r 


m c 

r 


9k 

m 

rises. 


PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA 
nONS. 

SumUttfS and other RemarkabU 
Days, 




rifM. 


risss. 


rtsts. 


rises. 




Ik. n. 


h. m. 


h. Ok 


h.m. 


h. ID* 


h« n. 




I torn. 


7 918. 


7 918. 


7 918. 


7 918. 


7 988. 


81. David, 6^S* 


2 

5. 


1 80 


8 91 


8 90 


8 19 


8 16 


6 16 


3ci. diy©. dllU- 


9 801. 


9988. 


9 908. 


9 188. 


9 108. 


9 98. 


3d Sunday in Lnd, 


4I S4t 


10 98 


10 93 


10 18 


10 8 


10 4 


26th CoDgresfl begins. 


5, 8 80 


11 81 


U 98 


11 90 


11 8 


11 1 


Boston massacre, 1770. 


6- 4 li 












9|e])mnt. 5ib. yoUadied,1827. 


Ti . « 


87m 


oiim 


96m 


8m 


om 


8 ••• 


141 


184 


1 97 


1 8 


060 


*Jy'/- 


il 


649 


940 


988 


990 


9 4 


1 66 




7 4oni. 


8 84m 


3 9rrro 


8 19m 


9 68m 


9 6im 


ilhatmdayinUnt. ^>60/. 


11 848 


4 19 


4 19 


4 8 


8 47 


8 41 


8SQ' . . 


12 9 88 


4 66 


460 


444 


498 


494 


18th. Sop. d <?©• [«c- »"V'*. 


13: 10 19 


699 


6 91 


6 17 


6 6 


6 8 


Champollioo d. 1832, a. 42 


14 11 94 


Mii. 


MCf. 


sats. 


sets. 


sets. 


3|Cj70m. [gins. 


15 OlM. 


6 998. 


8 998. 


6 998. 


6 998. 


8 808. 


17tb. MahomHom ytar 1255 be- 


16 


1 6 


749 


7 47 
9 78. 


7 46 


740 


740 


Bowditcb d. at Host., 1838, a. 65. 


1 69a. 


9 118. 


9 48. 


8648. 


8 698. 


bih 8. Lent. St. Pair. IGlb. ^ $ . 


13 9 M 


10 88 


10 97 


10 98 


10 8 


10 4 


I7lh. Brttisli fioaHy left Boston, 


19 8 91 


1168 


11 48 


11 40 


11 91 


11 16 


18lh. *J47, tcp. [1776. 


20 4 M 












Spring begins, Yl stationary. 
19ih. d > Pleiades. 


21 iM 


1 7m 


1 om 


68m 


oaim 


094m 


22 6 61 


9 19 


9 4 


1 67 


1 84 


198 


Newton d. 1727. Goethe, 1832. 


23 


7 46 


8 9 


9 66 


9 48 


997 


990 
8 6m 


22d. :*Cj47n. 


6 878. 


8 4im 


a 36m 


8 90m 


8 iim 


Palm Sunday. Lady Day. 


25 9 94 


4 19 


4 7 


4 9 


847 


aa 


Dfi©. 


26 10 8 


487 


488 


480 


4 18 


4 16 




n 1049 


468 


468 


468 


446 


446 


*D27JJ. dDj. 


!S 11 98 


rises. 


TtStSm 


me*. 


rises. 


risss. 




S9 ^ 


6 198. 


6 118. 


108. 


6 78. 


6 98. 


Good Friday, Swedenbonrg d. 


10 


Tin. 


7 16 


7 18 


7 11 


7 4 


7 4 


dJU- *]>«8'"5- C^^2. 


047m. 


8 178. 


8 188. 


8 108. 


8 08. 


7 688. 


EasUr 8und. 9|C ^ 1617 Baily. 



16 






Aprils Fourth Month, begins on Monday, [1899. 


Twilight begiD* and eods. tfran time. 




lat daj. 1 


7th day. | 


13th day. i| 19th day. 


«5lfcdsf. 
;^egae..Ea£a. 

;s i«n.|8r8. 


Begin*. 
h« n. 


£nd«. 
h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begin*, finds, i Begins. Euda. 
h. m. h. m. ,|h. m. h.in. 


Boitoo, 


4 7ID. 


8 la. 


8 55m. 


8 oa. 


3 430] 


1.8 i6a.i>8 8im. 


897 a. 


N. Fork, 


4 11 


7 57 


8 59 


8 6 


3 48 


8 14 js 87 
8 9 «43 


8S9 


PS M 'sai 


Wash. 


4 16 


7 53 


4 4 


S 1 


3 58 


8 17 :b SS 8 31 


CharlM. 


435 


7 48 


4 18 


7 49 


4 7 


755 860 

7 49 k A 


8 


13 ftl 8 1 


N. Orl'f. 


14 39 


7 89 


14 31 


7 44 


4 13 


7 83 


> 8B |7 « 


Jipogf mid Perigf ^ tk» Momu 
Perigee, 13th, lOh. A. | Apogee, Z7tb, 10b. M. 


Phases qf tks Moon. 
Lait Uaartor, 6tti dar, llh. 25.0m. A. First anarter, SOth day, Ilh. 4S.7k. H. 
New Moon, 13ib " 6 9.7 A. Full Moon, 98Ui *^ 9 1&4 A. 


■ 

a 
e 

S 

<k. 
o 

m 


• 

e 

i 


■ 

& 


Suti't upper liiub rieei and leu, (cur. for refract.) M. T. 


lii^ wM«r. M. UK. 


' 




• 

1 


• 


r 


1 

6 


s 

h 

« 

2: 


5 


»4l 


L 






rues. 
Ii. tn. 


«etjr. 

Ii. m. 


rues. 
h. n. 


sets. 
h. m. 


nfss. 
h. n. 


sets. Arises, sets, 
h. m.,b. m. h. n. 


rises. 
h. in. 


h.in.| 


h. m. 


l>.m. 


1 

h.a.. 


1 


M. 


5 43 


8 38 


5 45 


6 34 


5 48 


8 33 


5 49 6 90 


5 50 


6 19| 


088in 


10 4M. 


9 U. 


2 


Tu. 


43 


37 


48 


35 


45 


93 


48 


91 


49 


9o; 


1 5 


11 14 


934 1 


8 


W. 


40 


38 


41 


30 


48 


94 


48 


91 


47 


30 


1 84 


11 4* .18 5 ! 


4 


Th. 


88 


39 


39 


97 


41 


34 


45 


93 


48 


91 


3 5 


• • • 


^m \ 


6 


P. 


M 


80 


87 


38 


40 


35 


44 


38 


45 


91 


9 40 


aom 


1191 ' 


6 
7 


S. 
Su. 


84 
5 33 


81 
6 83 


85 

5 88 


39 

8 80 


88 
5 88 


38 
8 97 


43 

5 41 


33 
6 34 


44 
5 48 


33 
6 33 


8 31 


1 1 


• • • 


4 9m 


1 49111 


9Cl! 


8 


M. 


81 


S3 


83 


81 


80 


9S 


39 


35 


41 


38 


5 91 


9 1 


1 91 


9 


To. 


39 


84 


80 


83 


88 


39 


89 


35 


40 


98 


6 47 


4 27 


an 


10 


W. 


37 


85 


38 


88 


81 


80 


87 


38 


89 


34 


8 14 


5 M 


4 14 , 


11 


Th. 


36 


88 


37 


84 


80 


81 


85 


37 


88 


34 


999 


7 


«36 


12 


P. 


34 


87 


35 


85 


38 


83 


84 


97 


87 


35 


10 13 


78(t 


•B 1 


13 
14 


a 

Su. 


33 
5*31 


88 
8 89 


34 
5 38 


88 

8 87 


37 
5 38 


88 

8 84 


88 

5 83 


38 

6 39 


86 
5 85 


35 

1 

8 36 1 


10 55 

11 87m 


8 8ft 


• » 1 

- 1 


ITin 


7 rm 


15 


M. 


19 


40 


31 


88 


24 


85 


81 


80 


84 


37 


188. 


989 


8 » 


16 


Tu. 


18 


41 


30 


89 


38 


88 


80 


90 


88 


37 


1 I 


10 41 


9 1 


17 


W. 


16 


43 


18 


40 


S3 


87 


99 


81 


83 


38 


1 49 


11 2» 


949 


18 


Th. 


14 


43 


18 


41 


30 


86 


38 


83 


31 


39 1 


3 81 


iia. 19 SI 


19 


P. 


18 


44 


15 


43 




89 


97 


83 


80 


39< 


8 33 


1 a 


U t9 1 


20 
21 


S. 
Su. 


11 
5 10 


45 
8 47 


13 
5 13 


43 
8 45 


5 18 


40 


35 


88 

84 


39 
598 


80 
880 


4 n 


1 n 


ITS. 


6 41 5 34 


5 36a. 8 8a.{ 


I 38a. 


22 


M. 


8 


48 


10 


48 




43 38 


85 


37 


81 


655 


436 


985 


23 


Tu. 


6 


49 


9 


47 




48 


93 


85 


36 


81 


8 15 


5 68 


4 U 


'24 


W. 


5 


50 


6 


48 




44 


31 


86 


95 


83 


9 18 


6 08 


5 IS 


25 


Th. 


« 


53 


8 


49 


10 


45 


90 


87 


34 


88 


10 5 


745 


6 8 1 


26 


P. 


3 


53 


5 


50 


• 


48 


19 


87 


38 


88 


10 88 


8 IS 


6 88 


27 


S. 
Su, 


5 1 

4 50 


54 

855 


4 
5 3 


51 ! 8 
8 53 |5 6 


47 
6 48 


18 
5 18 


88 

8 89 


93 

5 3G 


34 
685 


11 10 


880 


7 18 

1 


28 


11 40a. 


9 90a. 


T4ea. 


29 


M. 


58 


57 


1 


53 


5 


49 


15 


89 


19 


85 


... 


946 


8 • 1 


80!Tu. 


56 


88 





54 


8 


50 


14 


40 


18 


86 


8m 


10 18 


888 * 



is:i9.] 






April has Thirtj^ Days. 17 


Pa«Bag«orthe MMidian (mean time) and DeelinaUon of the PlaneU. 


1 1st day. 
*S0UtM». Dec 


7th day. 


IJth day. 


J 9th day. 


9dih day. | 


Sumiks, 1 Dee. 


StrntMs 


Dee. 


astaks. ; Dee. 


Ssmtks. 


Dec. 


h. m. , .[1 h. m. ... 


1 h. in. 


• 


. >>. m. 1 . / 


b. IDa 


• 1 


9 1 7a.- 


-19 491 1 19a.-f-]6 M 


1 48 


..--17 631 49a.|-|-17 88 


loa. 


--16 44 


? 


1 as - 


-13 83< 


1 43 !- -J6 1 


1 1 49 


- -18 97 1 64 


--99 80 


9 1 


--99 18 


^ 


10 90 - 


-O34I 


9 67 1- - 9 41 


. 9 80 


- - 9 48 9 4 


--oa 


840 


--998 


a 












1 








s 






1 






< 








^ ; «in;+M 3ft 


8m - -16 n 


11 879 


. - -18 10 '11 9a. 


--19 89 


10 4ia. 


--90 88 


? 


AS +1 it 


094 --764 


11 61 


- - 8 14 11 99 


--894 


10 64 


--896 


u 


O 10 ; — 4 a\ 


U 48a. — 8 00 


11 39 


— 8 83. 10 66 


— 8 16 


10 80 


— 8 1 


hi 


S M <— 90 0' 


3 a6m — 90 4 


3 110 


1 — 30 


9!| 9 46m 


— 19 69 


9 Sim 


— 19 66 


W 


10 9B 1—0 oei 


JO 8 ' — 6 61 


9 40 


— 6 46i| 9 18 1 — 6 Ssi 


806 


— 6 83 


JS / 


-• . 1 


Mood rifea or mis. Mean time. n 




c ^ ss 


• 


-^ 1 


■» 


9^ 


PHENOMBNA AND OBSESYA* 


o 


§3 


a 

3 

i 


41 

1 

• 


r 


1^ 




h 

as 


TIONS. 

Sundoffs and other RemarkabU 
Dayt. 






ritu. 


rius. 


ri$m. 


rises. 


rife*. 






h. m^ 


h. m» h. m. 


h. m. 


h. ID. 


h.n. 




I 


1 som. 


9 3ia.i 9 lea. 


13a. 


8 679. 


8 64a. 




2 


9 19 


10 36 


10 30 


8 14 


067 


989 


*>i,2,Hni. 


3 


9 60 


11 80 


11 38 


11 10 


10 66 


10 48 


>AntBref. ]) f^. 


4 


« jtt 








1164 
• • • 


11 47 

• • . 


^UO 


5 4 41 


Sim 


9Sm 


16m 


6 

5:. 


6 36 


1 97 


t 19 


1 13 


ooom 


43m 


^ $ . Intensity of li^hi 1 ,381 . 
Low Swidtty. 


6 siin. 


3 1401 


3 7m 


3 om 


1 40m 


1 88m 


8 7 96 


363 


3 47 


3 41 


994 


3 18 


9 al great. E. elong. 19° 14'. 


9 


19 


8 3ft 


330 


8 16 


8 3 


3 66 


9|CD90m. 


lO 


9 10 


3 61 


846 


346 


8 86 


884 




11 


10 


4 16 


4 14 


4 13 


4 7 


4 7 


c5)«. 


12l 10 61 


436 


438 


436 


486 


4 40 




13 


11 43 


Mte. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


Zd Sutid. after EaiUr. (^ ^ ^ . 


sra. 


8 sa. 


7 60a. 


7 06a. 


7 438 


7 89a. 


15; 1 S6 


996 


9 99 


16 


8 59 


664 


d>?. 


le' 


987 


10 48 


10 41 


10 84 


10 13 ] 


10 7 




IT 


• so 


11 66 


11 fiO 


11 43 j 


11 31 1 


11 14 


19ih. ^I^cfT. 9 staiionnry. 


18 
19 


4 41 












19ih. Byron died, 1824, a. S6. 
Battle of Lexington and begin. 


640 


67in 


40m 


49m 


90m 


18m 


20 


6 93 


1 41 


1 84 


1 98 


1 


1 8 


[of American Revolution, 1776. 
Zd Sunday afUr Easter. [1836. 


S. 


799a. 


3 160) 


3 lom 


3 4m 


1 48ro 


1 44m 


22 


6 7 


9 49 


3 88 


384 


9 91 


3 19 


21 St. Bat. of Si. Jacinto, Texas, 


23 


6 49 


3 4 


3 1 


3 60 


360 


940 


Si. Gtorg9. 26ih. :|C p y C 


24 


998 


338 


8 99 


890 


3 16 


8 16 


23d. i^g. ^slat 


25; 10 7 


3 41 


8 41 


8 40 


340 


8 41 


^ ^f'ti an appulae. 


26 


10 47 


rises. 


ruM. 


riiu. 


rises. 


rues. 


*j5oriB. 6 5U. «"». 


27 


Jl 97 


,6 9a. 


6 6a. 


6 3a. 


6 649. 


6 638. 


9 in Inf. d • 


5. 


a 


7 14a. 


7 loa. 


7 6a. 


6 69a. 


0498. 


4/A Sunday afier EattUr. 


29 


loni. 


8 19 


8 U 


8 7 


7 61 


746 


[President of the U. S., 1789. 


SO 


60 1 099 1 9 16 


9 9 


860 844 


Washington inaugurated as ilrst| 



3» 



18 May, Fifth Month, begins on Wtdntsday, [1839. 


Twilight bttgin* aoil ead«. Moan lime. 




1 lat day. || 


7th day. ) 

Begins. Eiida. 1 

ba n. h. in. jli 


13th day. || 19tb day. | 


1 9Si^(la?. 




Begins, 
h. m. 


Rnds. 
b. m. 


logins. 

k. m. 


. £nds. Begins, 
h. m. b. m. 


Boda. 
b. m. 


jtteStM. Coda. 

|b.B. >h.M. . 


BoviOQ, j8 Tin. 


6 47 a. 


3 6601 


.8 67 8. 9 46nL 


.9 7 a. 3 85in. 1 


) 17 a. 


9 95m.99ir 


N.York, 'a 14 


8 40 


6 4 


848 964 


n58 946 


» 8 


9 33 913 


Woh. 8 33 


8 68 


6 16 


840 i6 4 


»48 956 


B67 


9 47 19 7 

3 n {8 87 


ClMrlM. 's 4S 


8 U 


6 66 


6 17 6 98 |8 94 6 99 

8 8 ;6 68 '8 14 k 66 


BSO 


N.Orl*t, s 51 


8 6 


6 46 


6 30 


» 93 4 91 


Pengu and Jifg— 9/ the Jlimn. 
F«rifeo, 18th, 4h. M. \ Apogoo, S4tb, 5b. A. 


Pkatea 4ff tke Moom, 
Last aanrter, 6th daj, lOh. 3l.6ai. M. Fint Oaartor, 90th day, lb. I&Al M. 
New Moon, 13th *^ S S.3 M. Pull Moon, 96lh » 5 37 Jl M. 


• 

1 


1 


3un*« upp0r limb rises and seU, (oor. fur refract.) M. T. \ 1 


Higb water. JiL tiiK. 




<$ 

4 




& 

1 


as 


a 

1^ 




§ 

». 

o 

• 

as 




1. 


1 i 


riaet. 
h. m. 1 


seU. 1 

ti. m. 


rises. 
h. on. 


Mis. 1 

h. m. 1 


). m. 1 


reu. 
Ii. m. 


h. m. 


sets. 

h. m. 


h. HI. 


ss(s. 

h. m. 


h.iD. 


b M. 


1 


w. 


4 64 


S 50 ^ 


1 50 


5 65 : 


i 9 ( 


169 


5 13 


B41 


B 17 


687 


088in 


10 3ia., 3 111. 


2 


Th. 


63 


7 


68 


66 


1 


68 


19 


49 


16 


68 


1 11 


11 93 6 46 


8 


P. 


69 


1 


67 


67 1 


I 


64 


11 


48 


15 


69 


148 


... 9S 


4 
5 


S. 


50 
4 49 


9 
7 6 


66 
4 66 


68 

6 69 


4 60 

i 68 


66 

6 65 


10 


44 


16 
5 14 


40 

640 1 


998 


3in 


13 7 

10 »n. 


5 10 


6 46 


8 Tm «7in 


6 


M. 


48 


4 


64 


7 


67 


56 




46 


13 


41 


8 67 1 37 , . . . 


7 


Tu. 


47 


6 


63 


1 


66 


67 




46 


IS 


49 


6 8 9 «8 1 8m 


8 


W. 


46 


6 


69 


9 


65 


68 




46 


19 


43 


698 4 1 96 


9 


Th. 


45 


7 


61 


6 


64 


6 60 




47 


11 


48 


7 41 6 91 9 41 


10 


P. 


44 


8 


60 


4 


66 


7 




48 


11 


44 


844 6 94 3 U 


U 
12 


S. 


46 
4 43 



7 10 


49 
4 48 


6 
7 6 


63 
4 61 


1 
7 9 




48 


10 
6 9 


44 


984 


7 14 ' 4 84 

8 9m 63sa 


6 4 649 


645 


10 93in 


18 


M. 


41 


11 


47 


7 


60 


8 




60 


9 


46 


11 11 ' 8 31 O 11 


14 


Tu. 


40 


19 


46 


8 


40 


4 




60 


8 


46 


Oa. 9 40 7 


16 


W. 


69 


16 


44 


9 


48 


6 




61 


7 


46 


47 10 9T 7 47 


16 


Th. 


68 


14 


43 


10 


47 


6 




63 


7 


47* 


1 87 '11 17 ' 87 


17 


P. 


67 


16 


49 


11 


46 


6 




63 


6 


48 


9 93 99.' 9 99 


18 
19 


S. 


66 

466 


16 
7 17 


41 
4 40 


19 
7 13 


45 
445 


7 
7 8 


5 1 63 
469 6 64 


6 
5 6 


48 

6 49 


8 8 


! 48 MO 

1 3oa. 10 aofo 


3 503. 


20 


M. 


66 


18 


80 14 


44 





60 1 64 j 6 


49 ' 6 ; 9 40 ' 68. 


21 


Tu. 


64 


19 


68 14 


43 


9 


68 , 65 




60 6 10 6 80 1 10 


22 


W. 


66 


10 


67 


16 


46 


10 


67 i 65 




60 


7 19 • 4 60 


9 19 


23 


Th. 39 


91 


66 


16 


49 


11 


57 66 




61 


8 91 6 1 


3 91 


24 


P. 61 


99 


66 


17 


41 


19 


6a ' 66 




61 


16 6 63 


4 16 


26;s. 


60 


93 
794 


66 

464 


18 


41 


18 

7 13 


66 1 67 
4 65 67 


6 9 


58 
669 


964 1 7 8« 


464 


26 


SU.*4 99 


7 19 |4 40 


10 80a. 8 loa. 


6 aoa. 


27 


M. 98 


96 


64 


90 


80 


14 


56 1 68 




63 


11 8 ; 8 48 


6 9 


28 Tu. S8 


96 


66 


91 


69 


15 


64 


68 




68 


11 43 


098 


648 


29W.I fn 


97 


69 


99 


88 


16 


64 


1 «» 




68 


• • • 


60 


713 i 


noThJ 96 


97 


69 


99 


37 


16 


63 '6 59 




64 


19m 10 34 


744 1 


•l|P. 1 96 


98 1 61 


96 


67 


17 


63 7 




64 


64 11 14 


834 



S39.] 



May has Thirty-one Days, 



19 



Pasi«|0 of the Meridian (moan time) and Declioaltoa of the Planeta. 



1 



If 

u 



l*t daj. 



Souika. 
b« n. 

11 ssm 
s sa. 
e 18 



10 16a. 

10 20 
10 4 

1 66in 

8 33 • 



uoc« 
-13 60 



4-9 4 



+21 a^ 

+ 8 31 

— 946 

— 19 63 

— 697 



7lh day. 



I'Jlh day. 



II im 
9 16a. 

7 67 



48a. 
9 68 
988 

1 81m 
8 9 



i>ee. 



+94 861 
+ 8 89, 



Stmtkt. 
b. m* 

10 89rn 

3 33a. 
787 



1^: 



8 
9 

— 3 33| 
— 19 49 

— 6 99 



Dee. I 



Dee. Somtk». 

9 IS 10 96m + 9 88 
6 lo' 9 8ia.+96 ]9| 



+ 7 69 



9 8ia. 

7 19 



994a. +43 99 
9 89 + 7 80| 
9 18 — 9 96* 
1 Ora — 19 46 
47 — 8 18 



9 8a.+99 89 

9 7 4"'"^ 
8 48 — 9 18 

40m — 19 41 

7 94 I — 6 14 



asth day. 



Smttk*. 
h« in* 

i0 90m 

9 86a. 
7 9 



8 37a. 
849 
894 
1601 
7 



Dec. 

-j-ll 83 
+96 8 
+ 8 14 



+99 40 

+ «w 

— 9 18 
— 19 87 

— Oil 



^ i 

as* 



Moon riaei or aeti. Mean time* 



1 
2 

8 
4 

;i 

8 
9 
10 
11 



1 46m. 

987 

3 81 
496 



4t 



I 



ruM. 

ii. Bi* 

10 368. 
1133 



IS 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 



6 19m. 

8 11 
T I 
760 
888 
938 
10 30 



S. 
20 
21 



23 
24 

25 

5. 

27 
28 
29 
80 
81 



11 lom. 
loa. 

1 19 
994 
836 

494 
6 10 



8 88. 
047 
797 
8 8 
846 
996 
10 8 



19ra 



59m 

1 96 
1 69 
9 16 
937 
8 
8 36 



99tM. 

8 19a 

9 37 

10 48 

11 84 



41 



tS 



ruts, 
h« oi. 

10 188. 

11 14 



6m 



48m 

1 90 
1 48 
9 13 
988 
3 
8 97 



urn 



18 68a. 
11 41 

8 
ot3m. 

1 98 
9 91 



44m 

1 8 
1 98 
1 48 
9 8 
9 91 
rUtt, 



8 19a. 

930 

10 86 

11 97 



8m 



8 9a. 

7 14 

8 17 

9 18 
10 8 
10 61 



40m 

1 8 
1 98 
1 46 
9 4 
9 93 



I 






h. ID. 

10 iia. 
u 7 

11 68 



I 



riMf, 
h. m. 

9 49a. 

10 46 

11 87 



40m 

1 16 
1 46 
9 11 
3 88 
3 3 
8 80 



8 8a. 

9 93 

10 38 

11 90 



sm 



3om 

1 9 
1 94 

1 46 
3 4 
3 36 



9im 

69 

1 88 
9 4 
9 84 

8 6 
387 

7 478. 

9 1 

10 6 

11 
11 46 



5-4 



nses. 
h. B. 

49R. 

10 88 

11 80 



PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 
TIONS. 

SundatfM and other Remarkoblt 
Daya, 



18m 

068 
131 
9 8 
9 36 
3 7 
8 43 



aetM, 

7 438. 

8 64 
969 

10 6i 

11 40 



n»t9. 


flMt. 


6 4a. 


6 698. 


7 8 


7. 3 


8 10 


8 3 


9 8 


9 I 


10 1 


964 


10 44 


10 88 



33m 

69 

1 19 
1 43 
9 6 
9 81 
rJMt. 



6 43H. 
843 
749 
889 
989 
10 19 



18m 
060 

1 19 
1 44 
9 9 
936 
riM», 
6 408. 
888 
788 
889 
996 

10 19 



St, Philip and JcmtM, 

[Place, 1827. 
5ih. Bonaparte died, 1821. La 
RogaHon Sund. ijfi ^ / VvVf • 



Aseetuion Day, ^ stationary. 

Sunday after Atcaaion, 
Virgioia sealed, 1607, O. S. 

Cape Cod disc., 1602. d D ?• 
15th. Severe frost in U. S. 1834. 
dS^H- [Cuvierd. 1882. 

Pentecott. Whit Sunday. 
I9th. Dark day in N. E. 1780. 
20th. Lafayelte d. 1834, a. 77. 
21st. ^stationary, d > Si^Sl' 

dJU- dj5onp. 

Queen of England bom, 1S19. 

9 at great. W. elon^. 24<' 47'. 

Trinity Sunday. 

9|e D 638 Mayer, mUl. 

$ stationary, d D h* ^hO- 

^ D y / . 80th. Pope d. 1744. 

C$ ]^ r / . Corjna Chritti, FiU 



20 June, Sixth Month, begins on Saturday. [1839. 


Tvriiiglit begio* and ends. Mmd time. 




l«t day. 


7th day. | 


ISrbday. \\ 


19tii day. 


S5alidey. 


Begins, 
h. m. I 


Bndi. 
1. m. 


iBegina. 

'h. m. 


£nda. 
h. m. 


Begina. 
h. ID. 


finds. 1 
h.ni. 


legioB. 
1. n. 


. finds. 


h. m. h.B. 1 


Bofftoo, 


2 17m. 8 


»s7a. 


H3 13m. 


944 a. 


2 9m. 


950a. i 


1 8m. 


.954 a. 


3 Sin. 9 66 a.1 


N.York, 


2 29 S 


^26 


325 


9 81 


,9 98 


9 87 


2 23 


940 


3 3S 


041 < 


Wash. 


2 41 8 


1 18 


287 


9 19 


3 86 


924 


185 


921 


236 


92B 


ChftTlea. 


8 IS e 


41 


8 10 


8 46 


3 10 


860 


1 10 


862 


3 11 


063 


N 


.Orl*a.'8 34 k 


80 


323 




8 84 


333 


838 3 » 


8 40 ;'3 3» 


b4i 




Porigee, 9th 


Perigee and Jipefee ef the Moem, 
day, 9h. M. | Apogee, Slat day, 7h. M. 


1 


Pha»u of tka Moan, 
Lait Quarter, 4th day, 6h. SI8.7m. A. Firtt aaarter, 18lh dar, 41i. 53.1m. A. 
New Hood, Uth " 9 33.9 M. Full Moon, SOth *^ 6 SU9 A. 


• 

1 

O 

1 


• 
M 


tiun's upper limb rifes and aeta, (cor. for rofraot.) M. T. 


High wmter. M. cuaa. 


1 

e 

1 




M 




o 

1 

1 


•B 


9k 


1 


i 


9k 

I 

• 


6 


1. 


' 1.' 

c 

JS 






\ruea. 
'h. m. 


sets. 
h. ni. 


rises. 
b. m. 


sels. 

h. Dk. 


rises. 
ha n. 


seu. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. n. 


sets, 

h. n. 


fiaaa. 
h. m. 


seu, 
h. m. 


h. m. 


h. IB. 


1 

2 




14 36 

p 


729 
7 39 


4 81 
480 


7 24 
7 24 


496 


7 18 


158 

4 58 


7 1 

7 1 


5 

460 


666 

655 


1 84m 


11 ftsa. 10 I3a. 
. . - 'iosia.| 


4 34 


4 86 


7 19 


2 ism 


8 


M. 


34 


80 


80 


25 


86 


19 


53 


2 


69 


56 


2 57 


STDl 11 63 ( 


4 


Tu. 


1 33 


81 


39 


36 


85 


90 


58 


3 


99 


66 


8 68 


1 3S ' . . . 


6 


WJ 93 


33 


29 


26 


85 


20 


59 


8 


99 


67 


446 


2 26 46m: 


6 


Th. 


93 


83 


29 


97 


84 


21 


59 


3 


59 


57 


6 51 


3 81 1 51 ' 


7 


P. 


23 


83 


28 


29 


84 


21 


59 


4 


59 


66 


658 


4 38 960 1 


8 
9 


S. 


33 
433 


34 
7 35 


29 
4 28 


28 
7 29 


84 


29 


59 
4 59 


4 
7 5 


09 
409 


68 
669 


8 8 


5 48 4 8 I 


434 


7 23 


9 3m 


6 4»X1 6 2m 


10 


M. 23 


86 


38 


99 


84 


28 


53 


5 


59 


69 


10 


7 40 ! 6 9 


11 


Tu. 29 


36 


39 


80 


84 


24 


59 


6 


69 


7 


10 68 


838 1 «56 


12 


w. 


33 


37 


38 


80 


34 


25 


69 


6 


69 




11 68 


933 


758 


IS 


Th. 


33 


37 


38 


81 


84 


25 


59 


7 


09 




040a. 


10 99 


840 


14 


F. 


23 


36 


38 


81 


84 


26 


52 


7 


69 




194 


11 4 


09i 


15 
16 


a 


33 


86 

7 38 


28 
429 


82 
7 82 


83 

4 33 


97 
7 97 


52 
4 69 


8 
7 8 


60 




3 7 


11 47 


10 7 


SuJa 99 


4 60 


7 2 


3 55a. 


36a. 


10 tan 


17 


M. 


33 


38 


28 


38 


88 


97 


53 


9 


69 




380 


1 19 11 30 


18 


Tu. 


23 


89 


38 


83 


88 


98 


63 


9 


59 




497 


2 7 027a.. 


19 


W. 33 


89 


39 


84 


84 


38 


62 


10 


50 




6 13 


268 


III ' 


20 


Th. 23 


89 


29 


84 


34 


38 


09 


10 


66 




6 6 


846 


9 


21 


F. 


28 


89 


29 


84 


34 


29 


62 


10 


69 




7 8 


4 48 


a 


22 
23 


S. 


28 
4 23 


89 

7 40 


29 

4 39 


84 
7 35 


84 
4 84 


90 59 
7 99 462 


11 

7 11 


60 
4 69 


7 4 


8 8 


643 


4 8 


9 7a. 


6 47a. 


Ta. 


24 


M. 


34 


40 


80 


85 


35 


29 


58 


11 


5 




989 


789 


060 


25 


Til. 


34 


40 


80 


85 


85 


29 


53 


11 







10 44 


834 


044 


26 


W. 


34 


40 


80 


85 


85 


29 


68 


11 







11 26 


9 5 


796 


27 


Th. 


30 


40 


80 


35 


86 


29 


53 


11 







... 


946 


8 5 I 


28 


P. 


25 


40 


81 


86 


96 


29 


54 


I] 


1 




5m 


10 23 


849 


29 


S. 


25 


40 
7 40 


81 
4 31 


86 
7 86 


86 


29 


54 


11 


1 




43 


11 4 


24 


180 


Su. 


4 ' 


15 1 


4 86 


7 29 


4 54 


7 


111 


5 1 


7 5 


1 34ro 


11 46a. 


10 6a. 



1839.] 



June has Thirty Days. 



21 



5 



lit day. 



PatMgeoflhe Myf idian (moan tiuia) aod UaclioatioD of tha PUdou. 



h. n. 
10 34m 
:i 46a. 
6 43 



Dee. 

4-14 6 
4-34 1ft 
+ 6 6 



8 
8 

7 66 
11 41 
6 34ro 



lia. -4-93 80 

16 |-|-« 8 
! — 3 10 

1— 10 31 
1 — « a 



7ih day. | 


1 13th day. || 


Soutkt, 

0. ID. 

10 8601 


Deo. 
• 
--17 8 


SauUu. 

h. n. 

10 64m 


Dec. 
--30 16 


3 63a. 


--23 6 


3 67a. 


--31 87 


638 


"T* ■ 


6 IS 


4-9M 


7 49a. 
7 63 
7 33 


-j-23 13 
-|- 6 36 
— 3 11 


738a. 
780 
7 8 


4-3148 
-}-4 41 
— 3 14 


11 16 


—19 38 


10 60 


—19 34, 


lom 


— 6 6 


6 47m 


-6 6l 



19th day. 



Dec. 



SorniMs. 
h. n. 

11 90m 4-93 67 

8 la. '•4-10 49 

669 



7 81 
7 9 
046 

10 36 



-|- 1*4 



- 4-21 18 
-|- 8 63 
I — 3 30 
— 19 31 



6 38m — 6 6 



aSih day. 



Somtka. 
■• n. 

U 63m 

8 4a. 

6 46 



6 48a. 
648 
633 
10 

6 oro 



Dec. 



84 

17 46 

-f-039 



— 339 
— 19 18 

— 6 6 



^ 



^-1 



Si 

ij 



HooQ riaea or aeti. Mnan time. 



o 

§ 

e 
K 



3 

4 
6 
6 

7 
8 

5. 
10 
11 
12 
13 
1-1 
15 

ib'. 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

^. 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 



8 


16m. 


mea. 

ha ID. 

11 26a. 



4 lOL 11 66a 
4 67 

6 44 
« 83 

7 90 

8 9 

9 1 



9 S8m. 
10 60 

3a 

1 7 

2 9 

3 6 

8 66 



19m 
043 

1 4 
1 36 
1 60 



9 Sim 

aeCt. 

8 32a. 

9 33 

10 8 
i0 43 

11 9 



4 4ia. 


6 33 


« 8 
648 


738 


8 4 


848 


9 86a. 


10 20 


11 30 

a 

1 16m. 


, 1 10 


3 4 


3 64m* 



11 3ia. 

11 60 



9m 

38 

41 

1 8 

1 3im 

rise*. 

7 9a. 

8 4 
860 

9 38 
9 69 



10 38a. 






o 



rutt. 
h« in. 

11 3ia. 



11 618. 



16m 

41 

1 4 
1 38 
1 64 



3 36m 
Mte. 

8 14a. 

9 16 
10 9 

10 88 

11 6 



11 39a. 
11 49 



om 

039 
060 

1 13 



1 86m 

risu. 

7 la 
766 

8 43 
933 
964 



10 300. 



B 

e 



ruu. 
h. in. 

11 16a 



11 47a. 



um 

40 

1 6 
1 80 
1 67 



3 8im 

Mto. 

8 7a. 

9 8 
9 66 

10 88 

11 3 



11 36a. 
11 48 



10 17a. 



e 
e 

I" 



naea. 
h. m. 

10 69a. 



11 34a. 



6m 

36 

1 6 
1 86 
3 7 



3 46m 

set*. 

7 46a. 

8 47 

9 87 
10 18 
10 60 



s 

• • 

Si 



ruis. 
h. ID. 

10 66R 



11 ssa. 



4m 

086 
1 8 
1 89 
3 18 



11 19a. 

11 46 



lom 

86 

1 
1 27 



3 63m 

»eU. 

7 38a. 

840 

983 
10 14 
10 48 



11 168. 
11 46 



^ 13m 
I 40 

1 6 

1 34 



1 67m 
rwM. 

6 83a. 

7 97 

8 17 

9 
9 80 



2 6m 

rwM. 
6 26a. 
720 
8 10 

8 66 

9 33 



10 8a. 10 oa 



PHENOMENA AND 
TIONS. 



OB8EBVA 



Sundays and other RtmarkabU 
Dayt, 



^ p 2449 Baily. 

\tt Sunday a/Ur TViiitfy. 

Last transit of $ 1769. 



IJ. statlooary. 



Severe frost ia 
[U. S. 1816. 



2d Sunday ajter Trinity. 

dD9. 

;d?a. 

|3cf Sunday after Trimiy. 
D J©. Bat. BuDlcer Hill, 1776. 
(5^S. Bat. of Waterloo, 1816. 
^])28nC. ^ DU- [<!• 1838. 
9|C])68ni^. (jj^aiq;. Wm. IV. 
Summer begins. ^ ]) 1617 Baily. 

}^ stationary. 

4/^ S.aft. TViw. ^]»l,^7Kni. 

' (j ^ o Hi . St. John Baptist. 

24ili. 6^h' 

I [mouth, 1778. 

Sup. d {?0« Battle of Mon- 

a$0- Madison died, 1886. 

6<A Sund, after Trin. 3|C D 45'» . 



July, Sivenlh Month, br^ns on Monday. [1839.' 



1(14 

11 



P«i|*l, 7H dli|r , <l h. M. r Ap"***. 'ttfc ^ y. Ik- ' 



iMrtsr, 4lh d»j. Oh. 6.I111. iS. 1 FirH Qauur, ISlh d«7, 


Hi. S3.7«. M. 

6 i7.e K. 












1' 


f' 


Jj 




i 
i 

h-o. 


i 

Ii.ni. 

OtBDl 
1 U 

*4S 


1* 




b. B 


h. m 

M 

M 


•1 
IS 

sa 

M 

40 


19S 
*• 
» 
M 
S8 


M 


h. in 




I 


II M 




u 

u 

w 

M 

« 

u 

t«" 

48 
4S 
4« 
M 

W 


n 
n 
n 

n 


4* 
4t 
4) 

41 


M 

M 
» 
7» 
114 
U 

ai 
n 

M 
» 

It 


4W 
> 

t 1 


rr 


» 

u 


I 4 

rr 

SB 

M 

M 

H 


ion 
11 «f 

0>M. 

aio 

140 

otim 

140 

aw 


(M 

7M 

BW 

10 u 

H. 
04a 

lao 

1 H 

IM 
■ 4R 

1 n 


IS" 




III 
w 
a» 

39 

M 
31 

JL 

t4 

D 

M 

f*0 


t4S 

41 
4» 
*» 
M 

H 

»4 

4M 

H 


low 

11 «o 

• in. 

• M 
14* 

3 4M. 

4 U 

■ M . 

■ n ' 

T ■ 

TM . 




8W 


10 

n 


if 



1839.] 




July hm 


( Tkirty-ont Days. 2G 


Passage of tba Mendiao (mean time) and Declination of the Planet*. 




1 let day. 


7th day. 
Simtk*, Dec. 


1 i3th day. 


.. 19th day. i 
" SonUs, Dec. ' 


S5th day. 




l&mUb. 1 Deo. 


Stmtka, 1 Dec. 


Samtka. Dec. 


' b.m. 1 , . ,1 


h. m. , 


h.». 


, j h. na. . . / 1 


h. m. 


• 1 


tf . jna.,- 


-34 30 


, 690. -|-3S 40 


1 190. -f-10 69j 1 360.|-f-19 93 


1 490. 


--13 64 


? 


S 7 - 


-19 38 


9 8 


"1-13 93 


3 7 


-|-10 14 8 6 


4-799, 


8 4 


--4 41 


8 


6 sa - 


— 048 


1 930 


— 3 7 


|6 8 


— 380 496 


— 4 64' 


446 


— 6 19 


« 4m- 


^9fia 


948m 

1 


-|- 8 M 


6 99mj-|- 6 86 6 &9m 


-}-949 


4 60m 


+ 6 67 




la.- 


— 3 40 


1 

! 6 890. 


— 398 


, 6 170. — 8 


8 4960. 


— 836 


4860. 


— 843 


h 


9U j— 19 16 


. 9 10 


— 19 13 


! 846 


— 19lij 8 91 


— 19 10 


7 67 


— 19 fl 


^ , 4 Mm) — 6 6", 4 wmi — « e 


t 8 48m — 6 10| 8 34m| — 6 ISJ 


3 om 


— 6 16 


^ 


* 


Moon riies or aeta. Mean time. 




e 


II 




• 


m 




ah 


PHENOMENA AND 0B8EJIVA- 


o 
S 

*o 

1 


i 

9 

1 
,1 


i 

• 


r 


3 


3 

• 

as 


TIONB. 

Sundays and other Remarkable 
Da^. 




riacf. 


ri§u. 


rtMM. 


flMf. 


rises. 






h. in. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. OB. 


D. no. 


Urn OB. 




1 


943m. 


10 47a. 


10 400. 


10 448. 


10 88O. 


10 990. 


^>7,90»r^])Ureou8. 


2 


490 


11 8 


11 6 


11 8 


11 7 11-9 


DOli. 


8 


9 17 


11 39 


11 31 


11 83 


11 36 11 89 


Earth farthest (h>m the Suo. 


4 


9 4 


11 63 


11 69 


11 60 


... 


... 


Independeoce dec. 1776. [1880. 


5 


9 54 








7m 


13m 


□ OO- CJ?fffi. AJgierttak. 


• 


748 


3im 

69m 


39m 


80n) 


43 


1 

060 


8 46m. 


1 im 


1 7m 


1 94m 1 93m 


6th 8. after Trin, [Pleiadum. 


8 


9 47 


1 87 


144 


1 61 


3 11 


3 31 


*pi86y. n$G). 


9 


10 90 


3 31 


3 89 


349 


8 8 


3 19 


Braddock defeated, 1776. 


10 


1163 


MU. 


Mtf. 


MtC. 


«0te. 


Sits, 




11 


60a. 


8 878. 


8 830. 


8960. 


8 90. 


8 40. 


^)9. 


It 


1 44 


9 8 


9 4 


9 


8 47 


848 


fiat, of BojToe, 1690, N. 8. 


IS 


283 


9 33 


939 


996 


9 17 


9 16 


14th. Hamilton d. 1804. 


& 


3 178. 


9 638. 


9 610. 


9 498. 


9 468. 


9 460. 


7ih 8undMf after Trimty, 


lb\ SM 


10 13 


10 19 


10 11 


10 11 10 13 


14th. *j69fl. Oc.of ?. 


16 


489 


10 90 


10 81 


10 33 


10 96 


10 88 




17 


9 19 


10 48 


10 91 


10 63 


11 


11 


^I^Spica. 6^gf n^ 


IS 


960 


11 9 


11 18 


11 19 


1137 


11 88 




19 


9 43 


11 39 


1187 


11 43 


11 66 


... 


6g%. ^lo27'S. 


20 

5. 


738 


... 


... 


... 


... 


8m 




8 170. 


om 


9m 


13m 


99m 


88m 


6 P «ni, h- 6** ^- ^fi^ ^*»- 


22 


9 10 


89 


049 


060 


1 


1 19 


S3d. Gambart's Comet in Peri- 


23 


10 4 


1 31 


1 39 


1 36 


166 


3 9 


Gibraltar taken, 1704. [helion. 


24 


11 


ITMf. 


ri««». 


run. 


ri»9M. 


risu. 




26 


11 96 ! 7 398. 


7 198. 


7 13a. 


6 640. 


6 490. 


a6th. Coleridge d. 1884. 


26 


B 


9 


799 


760 


796 


7 99 


*D27Vf. d^ail. 


2T 
51 


4om. 


838 


634 


8 31 


8 10 


8 8 


3|CI^4«,45m. 


1 39m 


8 63a. 


8 60O. 


8 488. 


8 490* 


8 410. 


9th Btmday after Trimty. 


29 


337 


9 14 


9 19 


9 13 


9 11 


9 13 


$gr.E.eloo.46<»4£'. d ]l 9- 


80 


9 19 


939 


989 


987 


9 40 


943 


^ ]^ 60H • 1st Masonic Lodge 


81 


4 3 


9 67 


989 


10 3 


10 9 10 14 


[estaUisbed in U. S. 1788. 



24 August, Eighth Month, begins on Thursday. [1839 


-1 


Twilight bogini and ends. Mean time. 




lat day. 


7th day. | 


13ih day. | 


19th day. SSdi daj. 




Begini. J 
h. m. h 


Bads. 
. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m« 


Begins. 1 finds. 

b. m. jh. m. 


Sogins. £ads. 
1. m. ih. m. 


Bosio«>* F Tilts 


Boiton, 


3 65m. 9 


17 a. 


3 6in. 


9 5a. 


3 16in. 


8 63 a. 1 


1 34m- 8 43 a.i Is S4in.! s se a. 


N.York 


1 S 4 9 


8 


3 14 


8 66 


3 38 


8 46 ; 


1 83 8 84 


8 40 |8^ 


Wash. 


8 14 8 58 


3 33 


8 48 


3 30 


8 38 i 


B 88 838 


,8 46 


8 U 


Charlet. 


8 89 888 


8 46 


8 36 


860 


a 18 ] 


1 66 8 10 1 4 3 


8 t 


N. Orl*s. 1 8 48 8 34 


3 64 


8 16 


3 69 8 9 \U 


1 4 's 3 4 a 


786 


1 
- 1 

1 

i 


Perigee and Jfyogee ef ike Moo*. 
Perifoe, lit day, 7h. M. Perigee, 97th day, 7h. A. 
Apogee, 15th " 9 A. 


Last Q 
NevrM 
FiratQ 


Phaeee 
aarter, Sd day, 4h. 40.8ai. M 
oon, 9th " 4 10.5 M 
luarter, 17th ** 3 29.5 M 


of the Moen. 

. Full Moon, 94th dar, 4b, 99Xm. A. 

. Last Quarter, 31st *«' 9 30.7 M. 

• 


1 
1 


• 

1 

e 
o 

1 


• 

M 
• 
• 

O 
■ 

1 


Ban's upper limb rises and sets, (cor. for refroct.) M. T. 


High water, it. tina 






■> 


o 
41 


hi 


a 
e 


• 

a 

2 

■ 

.2 
o 

risee. 
h. m. 


• 

o 

4 


a 

s • 


i 

1 

i 


J-* 


1 

ii 

js 


rieee. 
h. m. 


set*. 

h. ro. 


riaea. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rites. 
h. m. 


eete. 

h. m. 


8eU.\nse* 
h. m. h. m 


. eeis. 
. h. m. 


h. m. 


h. IB. 


b. M. 


1 


Th. 


453 


730 


466 


7 16 


5 


7 13 


5 18 


6 68 16 19 


663 


8 7m 


47mtU 488. 


2 


F. 


S3 


19 


67 


15 


1 


11 


14 


67 


19 


63 


3 48 


I 38 


• • . 1 


8 

4 


S. 
ISu. 


64 
4 65 


18 
7 16 


68 
469 


14 
7 13 


1 
6 3 


10 
7 9 


14 
6 15 


66 


30 


61 

660 


484 


9 14 


6 240 


si 


6 66 6 30 


6 89m 


8 1901 


1 880 


5 


M. 


66 


16 


5 


13 


8 


8 


16 


64 


31 


49 


7 6 


4 46 


8 ff 


6 


Tu. 


67 


14 


1 


11 


4 


7 


16 


68 


31 


48 


8 40 


6 90 


449 


7 


W. 


68 


18 


3 


10 


6 


6 


17 


63 


93 


48 


965 


786 


»» , 


8 


Th, 


4 69 


11 


8 


8 


6 


4 


18 


61 


33 


47 


10 63 


889 


6 m 




9 


F. 


6 


10 


4 


7 


7 


3 


18 


60 


38 


46 


11 89 


9 19 


786 


10 
11 


S. 
Su. 


1 
6 3 


9 
7 8 


6 
6 6 


6 
7 6 


8 
6 9 


3 
7 


19 
5 90 


49 
648 


34 

5 24 


45 

644 


30a. 


10 


8 36 


1 

»] 


66a. 


10 36(11 


8 66a 


12 


M. 


8 


7| ^ 


3 


10 


6 59 


30 


47 


36 


43 


I 28 


11 6 


9 96 


18 


Tu. 


4 


6 


S 


3 


11 


58 


21 


46 


25 


43 


1 69 


11 89 


9 86 


14 


W. 


6 


4 


9 


7 


13 


67 


22 


46 


36 


43 


927 


7a. 


10 97 ' 


16 


Th. 


6 


3 


10 


6 69 


13 


55 


33 


44 


37 


41 


2 66 


035 


10 66 


16 


F. 


7 


7 1 


11 


68 


14 


51 


38 


48 


27 


40 


336 


1 


11 96 


17 
18 


S. 
Si*. 


8 

6 9 


6 69 

6 68 


13 
6 13 


67 
6 66 


16 
5 16 


63 

6 53 


34 
5 34 


43 
6 41 


38 
5 38 


89 
688 


4 8 


1 48 aa. 


i 


4 64a. 


9 34a. 


54a. 


19 


M. 


10 


66 


14 


64 


17 


60 


25 


40 


39 


87 


6 


346 


9 6 i 


20 


Tu. 


11 


65 


16 


63 


18 


49 


36 


89 


99 


86 


785 


6 16 


3 U 


21 


W. 


U 


64 


16 


61 


19 


48 


27 


88 


80 


86 


868 


638 


466 


I 


22 


Th. 


14 


63 


17 


60 


30 


46 


37 


87 


80 


84 


969 


789 


6 66 




28 


P. 


16 


61 


18 


49 


31 


45 


38 


86 


81 


88 


10 48 


898 


649 




24 
25 


S. 
Su. 


16 
6 17 


49 
6 48 


19 
5 30 


47 
6 45 


31 
6 33 


48 

6 43 


39 
5 99 


86 

6 84 


83 
6 83 


83 
6 81 


11 83 


9 19 


783 




... 


9 646. 


8 14a. 




26 


M. 


18 


46 


31 


48 


33 


41 


80 


38 


83 


80 


14m 


10 80 


866 




27 


Tu. 


19 


44 


33 


41 


34 


89 


81 


83 


84 


39 


060 


11 6 


6 96 




28 


W. 


30 


43 


33 


40 


35 


88 


83 


31 


84 


38 


1 35 


11 43 1 


10 9 




29 


Th. 


91 


41 


34 


38 


96 


86 


83 


39 


85 


37 


3 3 


. . . 1 


36 




80 


F. 


99 


89 


36 


86 


97 


84 


88 


38 


86 


«» 


389 


19m 1 


1 94 




81 


S. 


98 


87 


96 84 1 


98 83 1 


84 




»\ 


86 34| 


894 


' * 


• . . 





iS39.j August has Thirty^mu Days. 

pM—f of the Mwidimn <iiwn tiiag) mmI P«ctiii>tton of U» Plaiwto. 



^ 





lit da/. 1 


Tth daj. 


I3th day. 


19tb daj. 1 


SStbday. 




Sm<A«. 


Dm. 


SraOa. 


Oae. 


SraUa. Dae. 


SMlAa. 


Doo. 


Stmlke. 


Dee. 




h. m. 


• f 


h. m. 


• < 


b... , 


n. B. 


1 


b. n. 


• 1 


9 


1 MML- 


--841 


1 478. 


+ 991 


1 978.+ 9 47{ 1 198. 


+ 1 16 


0498. 


+ 19 


9 


9 80 - 


--1 9i 


9M 


— 1 91 


9a 


— 4 


4| SW 


— 080 


999 


— 9 


s 


4» • 


-^749 


439 


— 991 


^ 4 19 


— lOOOf 4 9 


— 19 14 


994 


— 19 8 


fi 






















Q 


4S0in- 


■{-on 


4 30m 


-(-94i 


4 9m +0 99 9 am 


+ 7 


993m 


+ •* 


5? 
11- 


4 118.' 


— 4 7 


9 618. 


— 431 


> 9 918. — 4 63 9 118. 


— 6 10 


9 618. 


— 64 


Yt 


799 • 


—10 93 


7 9 


— 19 M 


\ 41 


—19 91 19 


— 19 80 


6M 


— 19 4 


V 


t 9 Will- 


~0 91 


9 9m 


— 36 j 1 44ml — 9ll 1 1901 


— 090i 


099m 


— 04 


^ 




Moon riaos or tets. Moan tune. || 




c 


^ 


a -r 1 


«k 


J* 


PHBNOMXNA AND OB8ERVA 


e 


i 


i 

m 


i. 




i 


TIONS. 


e 


11 


1 

18 




JB 

r 


li 


U 

ti 


S»mday» and other Rtmarkahl 
Doyt. 






flMt. 




rwM. 


ri»t$. 


nMf. 






h. 19. 


b.BI. 


b. n. 


b. m. 


b.ai. 


b. n. 




1 




10 388. 


10 378. 


10 918. 


10 498. 


10 488. 


LammoM Dvf, Contiflent of An 


2 


94S 


10 69 


11 


11 


11 93 


11 80 


i^^W' [diKOT. 1498, 0. S 


8 


• 99 


11 19 


1141 


1148 


• . • 


• • * 


*>M8. d<y«ni ^1«»46'N 


M 


1 98inu 

999 








7m 

060 


nm 
1 10 


\Wi Sunday afUr Trimhf, 


5 


98IS 


0900) 


9811) 


^^cAurigv. 


6 


940 


1 9t 


1 80 


197 


1 60 


9 10 


6ih. 9 at gieat. E. elon. 27^ SC 


7 


10 99 


993 


399 


340 


9 


8 10 


6^l^\i' ai«l7'N. 


8 


11 94 


mu. 


MU, 


Mto. 


««to. 


ttt$. 


1^ •utioBwry. 


9 


94a. 


7 948. 


7 909. 


7 978. 


7 178. 


7 168. 




lO 


1 10 


7 97 


766 


798 


7a 


7a 




&'. 


1 99a. 


9 108. 


9 168. 


9 148. 


8 138. 


8 198. 


im Stm, ^fUr Triiu d > 9 


12 


9 94 


994 


094 


896 


899 


989 


d>?. 


IS 


9 U 


9 99 


964 


960 


9 1 


9 6 


*^40Iip. d^U- 


14 


9 94 


9 11 


9 11 


17 


997 


989 


djSpica. c5><y. 


16 


490 


989 


987 


9 41 


966 


10 1 


Scott b. 1771. Napoleoo, 1769 


16 


9 91 


9 00 


10 4 


10 10 


10 97 


10 H 


Bau BenDing.'77. Carodeo,'80. 


17 


6 9 


10 91 


10 89 


10 44 


11 4 


11 14 


^ ^ f^. 18tb. 9 sutionary. 


5:. 


• •oa. 


11 118. 


11 198. 


11 968. 


11 478. 


11 688. 


\2ik 8. ttfttr Trin, ^ > a nt- 


19 


T 99 

8 40 












18tb. Delambre died» 1822. 


20 


im 


9ID 


lOlD 


98m 


49m 




21 


949 


1 9 


1 9 


I 10 


187 


1 a 


*>M/. 


22 


10 97 


riM$, 


fwaf. 


rites. 


met. 


riM». 


23d. ^8*H. *>^Vf- 


23 


11 99 


988. 


9 348. 


308. 


7a. 


48. 


24ih.:|c»58«». i^^ffm. 


24 


8 


099 

7 108. 


960 


48 


oa 


080 


at. Bar, S6U1. i ^ 1^.^ D 96m 


s. 


1901. 


7 )49. 


7 148. 


" 118 


7 118. 


IfUh Smf, after TV. 8t, James 


26 


1 9 


789 


789 


7 80 


7 41 


7a 


26tb. Henchel 4. 1822. 


27 


1 99 


8 1 


9 9 


8 6 


11 


19 


DOh* B«i.OBL.Iilaod,1776 


2S 


9 47 


890 


980 


898 


844 


960 


[Islapd, 1778 


29 


9 89 


8M 


9 I 


9 9 


31 


09? 


^ ^ 47, • cp. Baitjtf on Rhode 


30 


484 


999 


999 


949 


10 4 


10 18 


Venna moat brilltaot aa evemiii 


31 


9 89 


10 18 


10 99 


10 93 


10 64 


11 6 


[star 



26 September, Ninth Months begins on Sunday. [l^HI. 


Twilight begioi aud eoda. M«an time. 




lit day. 


I Tlhday. || 


13ihday. || 


19th day. i 


aSdiiiay. 




1 Begins. Ends, 
h* in. b. nia 


Begins. 
|h. m. 


Rnds. J 
b. m. 


Segins 
1. m. 


. Ends. Begins, 
b. m. b. m. 


Ends, 
b. m. 


Begtoa. KsMla. 
h. m. h. D. 


Boston, 


8 44m. 8 16 a. 


8 6im. 


8 4 a. 9 


S 69in 


.7 68a. 4 


7in. 


7 40 a. 


4 16IIl|7 98 a. 


N. York's 40 8 11 


'3 66 


8 < 


1 8 


749 4 


10 


7 87 


4 18 7 Si 
4 91 7 33 


Wuh. 's 54 8 


• 


4 


7 66 


i 7 


7 46 4 14 


7 84 


Charlea. '4 q 76a 


4 13 


7 48 


4 17 


7 84 433 


7 36 


4 38 7 16 

4 90 k 14 1 


N. Orl»a. 4 14 7 4^ 4 n 




7 89 4 31 


7 81 4 36 


793 


Apogee and Pmrigtt nf (A« Mooiiu 
Apogee, 13th dajr, 3h A. | Perigee, 34th day, 5h. A. , 


New Moon, 7th day, 5h. 13.0m. A. Full Moon, 33d day, Sh. l.Tna. M. 
Firat auarter, 15th ^< 8 51.4 A. Lett anarter, 39th •< 4 35^ A. 


M ^ 


8nn*s uppa 


- limb rises and sets, (cor. Tor refract.) M. T. 


High water. M. taoM. 


§ 



• 


« /■ 






M 






• 

>• 


• 



1 

3 

n 


M 


>*» 

• 
2: 


L 


1 


■T 

1 

• 

as 


• 

u 


M 

• 
2 


1 

h. B. 


!l 


Hses. 
1. m. 


sels. 

\i. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sUs. 

b. m. 


rites, sets. 'rises.\ 
b. m. h. in.|h. m.j 


sets. 
\i. m. 


rises.\sets. 
h. m.jh. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


1 SuM 34 ( 


9 36 


6 37 


6 83 


6 39 


8 81 


6 86 ( 


S35 


6 87 


638 


4 16IZ1 


1 68111 1603, 


2M. 36 


36 


38 


83 


30 


80 


36 


34 


87 


39 


6 30 


3 10 ' 1 38 * 


3Tu. 37 


38 


39 


80 


81 


38 


86 


33 


38 


31 


7 6 


446 


3 6 


4 W.I 38 


81 


80 


39 


83 


37 


87 


31 


88 


19 


840 


690 


4 40 


sTh.i 39 


SO 


81 


37 


83 


36 


37 


30 


89 


18 


949 


739 


5 49 


6F. ! 80 


38 


83 


36 


84 


94 


38 


19 


89 


17 


10 43 


838 


648 


7 


S. 31 


36 
6 26 


83 
684 


34 
6 38 


86 


38 


38 
6*39 


18 
6 16 


40 


16 


11 36 9 6 


7 38 > 


8 <S>1i. ft 83 


6 36 G 31 


ft 40 15 


3a. 


9 43m 


8 smj 


9 


M. 83 


33 


86 


31 


86 


SO 


40 


16 


41 18 


31 


10 11 


8 81 


10 


Tu. 34 


31 


86 


19 


87 


18 


40 


14 


43 


13 


67 


10 87 


8 97 


11 


W. 36 


19 


87 


18 


38 


17 


41 


13 


43 


11 


1 33 


11 3 9 29 1 


12 


Th, 86 


17 


88 


16 


39 


16 


43 


11 


43 


10 


1 48 


11 38 9 48 


IS 


F. ' 87 


16 


89 


14 


40 


IS 


43 


9 


48 


8 


3 17 


11 67 10 17 ' 


14 S. 1 38 

15 SU. 6 39 


14 
6 13 


40 
6 41 


13 
6 10 


41 
6 41 


13 


43 


8 
6 7 


44 
5 44 


7 
6 6 


3 61 


3ia. 10 M 


10 6 48 


3 31 a. 


1 iia.'ii Sim 


16;M. 40 


11 


43 


8 


43 


9 1 44 


6 


46 


6 


4 17 


1 67 


8 178., 


17 


Tu.l 41 


9 


43 


7 


48 


7 46 


6 


46 


4 


637 


3 7 


1" 


18 


W.' 43 


7 


43 


6 


44 


6 


45 


4 


46 


8 


669 


4 38 


366 


19JTh. 43 


6 


44 


4 


44 


4 


46 


8 


46 


3 


8 33 


6 3 


4«3 


20lP. 44 


4 


46 


3 


4ft 3 


47 


1 


47 


1 


980 


7 10 


• SO 


21 
22 


S. i 46 
Su.6 46 


3 
6 


46 
6 47 


6 1 
6 69 


46 6 1 


47 6 


47 
6 48 


6 
5 69 


10 31 


8 1 


8 31 


6 47 


6 69 


6 48 


ft 80 


11 8a. 


8 488. 


7 8a. 


23 


M. 47 


666 


48 


67 


48 


67 


48 


67 


48 


67 


1144 


934 


744 


24 


Tu.l 48 


66 


49 


66 


49 


66 


49 


66 


49 


66 


• • • 


10 


830 


26 


W.i 49 

1 


61 


60 


63 


60 


63 


60 


64 


60 


64 


osom 


10 87 


8 67 


26 


;Th.| 60 


63 


61 


63 


61 


69 


60 


63 


60 


68 


067 


11 16 


• 36 


27 


F. 


61 


iO 


68 


60 


63 


61 


61 


61 


61 


61 


1 1 86 


. . • 


10 29 


2C 

2S 


IS; 


68 

6 64 


49 


68 


49 

6 47 


68 
6 64 


49 
6 47 


63 
6 63 


60 


61 


60 
6 49 


! 3 33 


Sin 


11 10 

■ 1 


6 47 !6 64 


6 48 6 63 


3 loin 


60in 


• • • 


8( 


)M. 


66 


46 j 66 46 


66 * 46 


68 


47 63 


48 4 6 


1 46 


sm 



;i839.] 



September has Thirty Days. 



27 



PaMuge of the Moridian (meaa time) and Declioalion of the Pla.neta. 



\ 



9 

a 

U 



2 
3 
4 

5 
6 

_7 

5. 
9 
10 
11 

12 

|13 
14 

16 
17 
18 
19 

'20 

'•S, 

!23 
,24 
•25 

t27| 

Iso! 



lit day. 



h. m. 
<MU 
^ 13 
3 44 

a 67ro 



\l 

el 



Dm. 



a 



— 11 96 
— 15 19 

+ 448 



7th day. 



3 28a. 
699 
3610 



t 



6 19 

19 93 

47 



Souths. 


Um». 


h. in. 


6 i 


11 90in 


+ 7 99 


1 56a. 


— 13 7 


8 80 


— 16 99 


3 aom 


-|-860 


3 9a. 


— 6 88 


5 6 


-—19 26 


sm 


— 6 69 



13th day. 



SoutJu. 
h. in. 

10 asm 
1 86a. 

8 98 

3 iim 



1 60a. 

4 44 
11 38 



T55Sr 

+ • ' 
9 89 

— 14 19 

— 17 48 

•4-346 



— 7 6 
— 19 80 

— 6 58i 



19th day. 



'SoutJka, I Dec. 
b. m. I „ . 

10 4901,4' 9 9i 
1 Sa. — 14 61 



8 91 



— 16 54 



1 47m + 1 85 



1 3ia.' — 7 84 



433 
11 9 



— 19 36 

— 7 8 



aSth day. 



Souths. 
h. n. 

!i0 5ein 

87a. 

i 8 14 

1 39m 



1 19a. 

4 
10 44 



D«G. 

+ 6 64 
— 14 84 




4-0 18 



— 8 9 
— 10 41 

— 7 9 



a d 



b. m. 
6 ssm. 

784 

8 83 

938 

10 19 

11 5 
11 48 

30a. 

1 10 
1 61 

9 83 

3 15 

4 1 
450 

5 43a. 

6 86 

7 80 
834 
9 10 

10 7 
10 57 



Mood riaes or sets. Mean time. 



o 

I 



nMw. 
h. n. 

11 16a. 



33m 

1 88 

3 47 

8 57 

sett. 



o 



sS 



Tvea. 
h. m. 

11 98a. 



6 80a. 

6 57 

7 10 

7 86 

8 

8 39 

9 5 



9 6ia. 

10 46 

11 48 



1 im 

3 15 
risu. 



11 46a. 

S 

87m. 

1 30 

3 36 
8 34 

4 96 

5 38m. 

6 98 



5 40a. 


6 8 


697 


6 55 


780 


e 15 


9 



10 14a. 

11 94 



99m 

1 39 
959 
4 1 

sets. 



a 

s 
a* 



ruu. 

h. m. 

11 30a. 



p 
S 

is 



h. m. 

11 53a 









ns69. 
h. m. 



6 89a. 

6 58 

7 18 

7 40 
6 5 

8 36 

9 13 



9 69a. 

10 53 

11 50 



1 6m 

9 19 
rises. 



5 40a. 

6 4 
6 80 

6 69 

7 80 
899 
9 17 



36m 

1 46 

9 66 

4 4 

sets. 



6 89a. 

6 59 

7 91 

7 44 

8 10 

8 41 

9 19 



57m 
9 8 
3 11 

1 14 
sets. 



10 
11 



6a. 





8m 

1 13 
3 93 
rises. 



5 89a. 
5 
683 
7 4 

7 49 

8 39 

9 94 



6 39a. 

7 3 
7 99 

7 56 

8 35 

8 59 

9 40 



10 98a. 

11 23 





1 

3 13 
8 17 
490 

sets. 



8m 
8 



PHENOMENA AND 
TION8. 



OBSERVA 



Sundays and other Remarkable 
Day*. 



6 4ia. 

7 7 
784 

8 9 

8 33 

9 9 
9 50 



29m 

1 28 
9 36 
rises. 



6 soa. 

6 9 

6 41 

7 17 
7 59 
849 
9 46 



10 3ia.|io 28a.,io 60a. 

11 81 111 87 ill 56 



10 388. 

11 39 



11 la. 



I4th Sund. after Trin. d g©. 
Inf. CJ??©. *D47n. 

[at Philadelphia! 1774. 
1st Congress (52 members) met 

©eel. invisible in U. S. ^^. 
15^ Sunday after Trimly. 
Jewuh y. 5600 begins. ^ p SSTQ^. 

(j ]^Spica. 6T> 2' £ ]> U- 
f} stationary. Q stationary. 

*J>lrri. ? stationary. 

*l>Tin. ^l>ani- c5Dh- 

I6th Sunday after Trinity. 



9 at great. W. elong. 17° 61'. 
2l8t. Scott died, 1832, a. 62. 
:jC])33, 42, 46«i. 
5JCD 81,82,90,96 a», Uranus. 
nth 8. a/. T. 6 hV^P^' **s. 
^])60, 62, 63 H- Autumn 

[ begins. 
*D/',47,.cf. 
*1>^,*,«,c/f,Ple.*Dij,9«. 

:jci>i368. 29th. d 9fi- 

18/^ S. after Tr. St. Michael. 
29th. i^ 1> 47n . 



2d October, Tetilk Month, begins on Tuesday. [1899. 


Twilif ht iMgilM and ««!•. Mmw llm*. 




lat day. 


7th day. || 


13th day. 


lOtb day. 


1 Saliday. 

hTtrib.*. 


Bagioa. KDds. 
h« D. o. n. 


B«gin«. 
h. m. 


Bnda. 

h. m. 


BagiBi 
h. m. 


. £ada. 
h. in. 


|B«giiia.t Eoda. 

|h.-. ^.». 

|4 44m. 6 46 a. 


Boitoa, 


4 38m. 7 17 a. 


4 80m. 


7 6 a. 


4 87in 


.6 55 a. 


4 snmL. 


#«&. 


N.Twk, 


4« 7 15 


4 89 


T 4 


4 88 


654 


444 640 


14 60 


4 38 


WMk. 


497 7 IS 


4 88 


7 8 


4 88 


654 


4 44 16 60 


UiO 


418 


ChulM. 


4 83 7 8 


4 36 


7 


4 40 


669 


4 45 W 4ft 


-4 40 ;6SI 


N.Orl'a. 


4 84 7 6 


487 


6 66 


4 41 


6 51 


t4 46 |6 4ft 


i4 48 )4« 


Jipogw and Ptrigee ^f tke JMmh. 
Apofse, 10th daj, 5b. M. f Parifee, 90d daj, Sh. If. 


Naw Moon, 7th day, Oh. 5.3iii. M. FuH Mooa, SBd ter, lU. a3.te. «. 
Pint auartar, 15th ** 1 16.6 A. liatt auattar, Kth •• » SSLl M. 


• 

§ 

as 

e 

1 


% : 

o 


t$aa*i upper limb riaaa and aeta, (cor. for rorraet.) M. T. 


Hi8livat«r. ILaaa. 






i 


•a 

1^ 


1^ 


1 


h 

• 

as 


s 
1 




1 
I* 


1 
1 


Ii. m. 1 


Mta. 

Ii. m. 


ritta. 
h. m. 


B. m. 


riM«. 
h. m. 


$0U. 

Ii. na 


ruM. acta, 
b. an. h. m. 


rtaea. 
h. m. 


aaca. 

h. n. 


• b. m. 


h.m. 


h.». 


1 


Tu.J 


S M ( 


\ 43 


ft 66 643 


6 66 


ft 48 


6 54 1 


1 45 


6 58 


6 46 


5 99[D 


8 am 


1 9sm 


2 


W. 


67 


43 


67 43 


67 


43 


66 


44 


54 


45 


655 


4 80 


966 


STh. 


08 


40 


66 


41 


66 


40 


56 


48 


54 


44 


896 


6 8 


491 


4 P. 


5 60 


80 


4 50 


80 


6 60 


80 


56 


49 


56 


49 


086 


7 18 


681 


6 
6 


s. 

iSu. 


6 1 
6 3 


88 

6 86 


6 
6 1 


88 
6 37 


6 
6 1 


86 

6 87 


56 


41 


66 


43 
6 41 


10 31 


8 1 


691 


6 67 


6 40 


6 66 


11 sm 


8 4SIII 


1 sm 


7 


M. 


8 


84 


3 


86 


9 


85 


66 


86 


57 


80 


11 39 


8 18 


739 


8 


Tn. 


4 


88 


8 


84 


• 


34 


66 


87 


59 


38 


11 60 


888 


768 


9 


W. 


6 


81 


4 


89 4| 


89 


6 60 


86 


68 


87 


098a. 


Id a 


893 


10 


Th. 


6 


90 


5 


81 


5 


81 


6 


86 


6 60 


86 


846 


18 88 


S« 


11 


P. 


A 


98 


6 


90 


6 


80 





84 


6 


85 


I 17 


10 87 


9 17 


12 
13 


S. 
5u. 



8 10 


96 
5 34 


7 
6 8 


98 

6 96 


7 
6 8 


90 

6 97 


1 
6 9 


88 

6 3-i 




6 1 


84 

6 33 


1 60 


11 88 


090 


9 93a. 


8 sa. 


I0 9BB 


14 


M. 


11 


39 





96 





96 


3 


80 


9 


33 


8 6 


48 


11 4 


16 


Tu. 


13 


30 


10 


98 


10 


94 


8 


90 


3 


81 


3 51 


1 ai 


II II 


16 


W. 


13 




11 


99 


11 


93 


4 


98 


8 


90 


454 


984 


esta 


17 


Th. 


14 




13 


90 


19 


90 


6 


96 


4 


99 


639 


4 a 


999 


18 


P. 


16 




18 


18 


18 


10 


6 


95 


4 


97 


7 61 


5 ai 


S51 


19 

20 


S. 


17 
« 18 


6 18 


14 
6 16 


17 
6 16 


14 
6 16 


17 
6 16 


6 
6 7 


94 
6 38 


6 
6 8 


98 
6 96 


865 


6 38 


486 


4sa. 


7 868. 


5 4A- 


21 


M. 


10 




16 


14 


16 


16 


8 


93 


6 


94 


10 31 


8 11 


• n 


22 


Tu. 


31 




18 


13 


17 


14 


8 


91 


7 


93 


11 14 


684 


7 M 


2S 


w. 


33 




10 


11 


18 


18 





90 


6 


99 


11 54 


084 


7 64 


24 


Th. 


33 




90 


10 


10 


19 


10 


10 





91 


... 


10 18 


888 


25 


P. 


34 




31 




90 


10 


11 


18 





90 


086m 


11 4 


094 


26 
27 


S. 

ST. 


96 

097 


6 3 


99 

694 


5 6 


91 
692 



6 7 


11 
6 19 


17 
6 16 


10 
6 10 


6 18 


1 94 


11 88 


18 16 


! 9 lom 


• • * 


iT 86. 


2S 


Vf. 


98 




96 




98 


6 


13 


16 


11 




'8 


04OII1 


11 66 


2S 


Tn. 


30 


6 


96 




94 


4 


14 


14 


13 




855 


180 


• • • 


SO 


W. 


81 4 69 


97 




96 


8 


14 


13 19 




' 6 9 


9 48 


I Wl 


31 


Th. 


83 67 


98 




96 


9 


16 


19 IS 




• 696 U 8 1 


9 98 



1^39.] 



October has Thirttf-one Days, 



29 



PaaMfe of the Meridiao (mean tirae) and Declination of the Planets. 



Ut day. 



9 

In 



ba m. 
II VKD 

ta. 

S 8 

6«m 



, OfiUU 
8 38 

10 90 



o 



4l 
5 



Bee. 

+ 8 3 
— 13 35 
1 

1 4 



— 880 
— 10 47 

— 7 14 



7th day. 



13th day. 



19th day. 



35lh day. 



SoMtks, 
h. n. 

11 arm 

II 35 
3 



28m 



34a. 
3 17 
050 



Dec. 

o 

— I 37 
— 11 83 
— 21 50 

— 237 



— 860 
-18 53 

— 7 10. 



8o%Uh$, 
h. n. 

11 43m 

10 53 
3 57a. 

2m 



16a. 

3 55 

31 



Dee. 

— • 1 

— 17 

44 



Souths, I Dee. 

, b. m. . , 

11 55m — 10 20 



10 21 
3 S3a. 



— 8 48,11 



— 37 11 57m 



— 10 50 
— 7 38 



9 84a. 
7 



— 7 



7 
34 



— 5 10 



— 055 
-90 6 

— 736 



iSautks. 
h. m. 

8a. 

56m 
348a. 

11 8a. 



II 88m 

3 ISO. 
8 43 



Dee. 
• 
— 14 18 

— 530 

57 



— 039 



— 10 23 
—30 13 

-7 39 



^ i 
§1 



b. n. 

7 34m. 

8 10 
8 

47 
10 28 



I 

1 7 
. 8 

* 

9; 
10 
11 
12' 

■5.1 

!^^' 

il5 

lie; 

il7 

;18. 

!l9' 

\S/ 
!21| 
|22 
23 

'24| 
'25{ 

,!?' 

5.1 

28 

29 

1»0 

.31! 



11 8m. 
11 49 
30a. 

I 13 
I 67 
9 45 
3 35 



437a. 

5 90 

6 18 

7 4 
7 54 
843 
81 



Moon ritei or aeta. Mean time. 



■ 

3 

a 
o 

I 



rvea. 
h. n. 



86ro 

147 
955 
3 59 



5 3m 



5 41a. 
4 

6 31 

7 4 
7 46 



o 

4 



e 



b. n. 



4im 

1 50 

3 57 

4 



a 

s 

Bo 



rtMe§, 
b. n. 



10 318. 
U 13 

om. 

1 8 

3 10 
8 15 

4 lom. 

5 10 

6 13 

7 3 
7 46 



8 37a. 
86 

10 43 

11 83 



1 5m 
3 20 



3 86m 

rises. 

452a. 

5 25 
6 
650 

6 3 



13a. 

10 27 

11 88 



047m 



5 3ro 

sets. 

5 45a. 

6 
637 

7 11 
7 53 



045a. 
43 

10 48 

11 57 



47m 

1 55 

3 

4 1 



o 

a 



nsts. 

h. m. 



5 om 

seU. 

5 48a. 

6 13 
643 

7 17 

8 1 



1 
3 
3 
4 



8m 
7 

8 
5 



S 

•So 



5 om 

sets. 
5 58a. 
627 
7 
7 37 
822 



1 om 

333 



8 36m 



4 56a. 

5 30 

6 13 

7 6 

8 9 



9 30a. 

10 33 

11 43 



40m 



8 52a. 
050 
10 54 



14a. 

10 11 

11 12 



nses, 
h. n. 

5m 

1 10 

2 13 

3 13 

4 8 



5 om 

sets. 

6 4a. 

634 
7 8 

7 47 I 

8 33 I 



35a. 

10 23 

11 33 



sm. 



1 13 
3 24 



nm 

1 33 

380 



34m 

1 29 

2 34 ' 



8 87m 
rises. 

4 50a. 

5 SO 

6 19 

7 18 

8 17 



3 88mi 8 4im 



9 26a. 

10 37 

11 46 



nses. 


nses. 


5 iia. 


5 17a. 


5 51 


5 50 


688 


648 


735 


7 46 


830 


8 40 


40a. 


56a. 



53m 



10 54 

11 60 



1 3m 



11 3 




1 



om 
7 



PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 
TIONS. 

Stmdatft and other Remarkabie 
Days. 



Removal of the public depositet 
[from Bank U. States, 1S83. 

Batde of Germantown, 1777. 

Inf. d ?0- 

\9th 8. after Tr. cJ D 9 , J 

Battle before Savaonah, 1779. 

dDarR. dD^. d 1> h- 

<9 O B • Tntensity of light 4.053. 
20</iS.a. r. *])y'/. dg}^. 
^Dt/. ISih.Canovad. 1822. 

Sup. d 9 ©• 

sKD^Vf. Bargoyne Mr. 1777. 

d D 9. ComwalHs sur. 1781. 
2lst 8und. after Tnn. d 9 U- 
20th. America discovered , 1492, 

d UO- [N. S. 

*>64, ^cp. 
^Dir8- ? stationary, 
d D i9 8 • Pbiladelpbia settled, 

[1682 
22<i Sunday after Trinity. 



6^a{l. 8t. 



and St. 
[Jude. 



30 



November^ Eleventh Month, begins on Fri day . ]ySR 

Twilljbt tMglni Slid ends. Mean tiae^ 

"wurasyi 



Boston, 

N. York, 
Wuh. 
Churlos. 
N. OrlV 



1st 


d«y. 


Bofini. 
k, m. 

4 Mm. 


End«. 
h.m. 

30 a. 


40T 


OSl 


407 


• 81 


4M 


84 


408 


80 



7th day. 



Begins, 
h. n. 

om. 

4 
8 
4 00 
4 00 



Ends. 

98 a. 

OM 

090 

oao 

81 



13th day. 



Begins, 
h. m. 

iim. 

6 10 

5 8 

1 



Ends. 

h. tSkm 

18 a. 

19 
91 
090 

098 



Begins. 

h. SB. 

5 

18 

7 





I 



tegins. Ends. jiBefisk Ui. 
.SB. lum. :k.B. *.!!. < 

U 10 V 91 H U 



i 



18 
90 



019 iCU 
19 «B 
9 10 



Apogoe, 0th day, lOh. M. | Perigee, SOth day, Sh. A. 



New Mood, 
First Oanrtor, 



PA«ss« ^ (As JMben. 

6to day, 3h. 3.3m. M. i Foil Moon, 
14th " 4 4.7 M. Last Ouarter, 



90th dny, 
«7th 'f 



Sh. 11*. V 

5 ni 1 



I 



1 

8 
4 
6 
6 
7 
8 

10 
11 
12 
18 
14 
16 
16 

17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
28 

24 
26 
26 
27 
28 



88 



M 

9 

e 



sSttM*s nffer limb rises and seu, (eur. fi>r reftmot.) M. T.; High 



P. 

Su. 

M. 

Til. 

W. 

Th. 

P. 

S.^ 

Su. 

M. 

Tu. 

W. 

Th. 

P. 

S. 



nsss. 
h. m. 

083 
84 



sets. 
h. n. 

4 00 

04 



Sui 
M. 
Tu. 
W. 

Th. 

P. 

S. 



Su. 
M. 

Tq. 

W. 

Th. 

P. 

S. 



080 



89 
40 
49 
43 



14 08 
01 
00 
40 
48 
40 
40 



44 
40 
47 
46 
00 
01 
09 



08 
04 
00 

07 
M 

000 
7 



7 9 
8 

4 




8 




nsss. 
b. n. 

)0 90 

80 



4 41 

A^ 

49 
41 
40 
80 
86 



487 
80 
80 
80 
84 
88 
89 



4 89 
81 
80 
80 
90 



o 



81 
89 
84 
80 
80 
86 
30 

40 
49 
48 
44 

40 
47 
48 



049 
00 
01 
08 
04 
00 
M 



iO 57 
M 
M 
7 
1 
8 
4 



h. ni< 
400 
06 



riMs. 
h. n. 

6 97 

98 



4 07 
00 
04 
08 

01 
00 
40 



99 
80 
81 
89 
88 
80 
80 



4 46 
47 
40 
40 
44 
48 
49 



14 41 
40 



88 

87 
80 



^ 



h. SB. 

1 




87 
88 
40 

41 
49 
48 

44 



40 
40 
47 
48 
49 
00 
01 



KM 
80 
84 
84 



88 



6 63 
08 
04 
M 

06 
07 
M 



4 M 
M 
67 
M 
00 
04 
03 



4 09 
01 
M 
40 
48 
47 
40 

440 

40 
44 
44 
48 
49 
49 



b. SB. 
16 
17 



18 
10 
90 
91 
99 
98 
94 



10 

8 
6 
7 
6 

4 



90 

90 
97 



80 
81 

089 
83 
84 
U 
80 
87 



4 41 
41 
41 
41 
40 
40 
40 



6 M 
M 

40 
41 
49 
48 
44 



««Cs. 

h. B. 
U 
10 



8 

8 
9 
1 
1 
5 
4 09 



460 
M 
07 
07 
M 
M 
M 



400 
00 
00 
00 
00 
M 
00 



U 



ruts. 

n. n. 

14 
10 



10 
17 
17 
16 
10 
90 
90 



91 
99 
98 
94 
90 
90 
90 



6 97 
98 
90 

90 
80 
81 
39 



638 
84 
84 
U 
M 
87 
M 













14 I 
18 > 

IT' 

11 1 
11 1 
10 1 

1 
1 

±\ 

8 
7 
6 
6 

4 
_4 

8 
9 
1 
1 
1 
1 




8 



9«a. 10 4 

06 



MED 7«D,I*S 



94in 



sa9,] 




November has Thirty Days 


■ 




31 


PBm(« oTUm HAudiM (mean tim*) and Oeclinalion of the Planets. 




lei daj. , 


/ih flay. 


lauiday. II 19Uiday. | 


35ib day. 
OmOa. 1 Dae. 




SraiAe. 


Dm. ! 


&MiMa. 


iiec 


8Mtta. 


. Deo. SMlAa. 


Dae. 


a 


h. ia» 


• •! 


h. m. 


o « 


h. m. 


o 


.11 h. m. 




h. m. 




0«a.- 


— 18 9l' 


088a. 


— 81 14 


808 


-— «80l 1 8a. 


— 96 S 


1 168. 


—96 40 


• asm- 


— 46 


8 I8m 


— 843 


8 7D 


i — 8 64: 8 68m 


— 4 86 


68m 


— 880 


9 43a.- 


^94 98 


988a. 


— 94 87 


9888 


. — 94 40 9 818. 


—•4 84 


9 988. 


—94 10 


S It sia. - 

o 


— 796 


10 oa. 


— 8 6 


9408 


u — 88 8 lOa. 


— 8 46 


8 688. 


— 847 
























U 


11 Mm- 


—10 66 


10 6om; — 11 99 


10 800 


B — ^1148'I]0 90m 


— 19 14 


10 9m 


—18 88 


hi 1 1 l«.|— 90 »{ 


1 98a. — 90 97 


1 7a 


. — 90 89 488. 


— 90 40 


96a. 


—90 40 


•? 


1 8 19 < — 7 83! 


7 61 — 7 34 


787 


— 786! 7 4 


— 780 


640 


— 786 


^ . 


Mooo riaee or eeta. Mean time. i\ 


PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 




m 

o 


i e 1 


m 


.k 


Diyt of M 




4 

1 


4 

•> 

1 

• 

as 


r 


r 


L 

• 


TIONS. 
Smda^ md other Remarkablt 






riMW. 




risu. 


riat$. 


rUea. 






h. a. 


h. m. 


k.m. 


h. n. 


h. n. 


b. ffl. 




1 


8 sum. 


169m 


1 63m 


1 6om 


9 om 


9 4m 


AU8mnt9, 


2 


8 


9 60 


960 


967 


9 67 


3 


dD?. 

23d atrnday a/Ur DrmiUf. 


S. 


• 48II1. 


8 69m 


8 66m 


8 67m 


8 6sro 


8 66m 


4 


10 98 


6 


468 


460 


448 


448 




5 


11 10 


• » 


660 


668 


644 


649 


d>U. 


6 


1164 


Mia. 


Mia. 


Mi», 


aefa. 


MtM, 




7 


4ia. 


8 oa. 


6 18a. 


6 180. 


6 888. 


6 478. 


d>9* c5>ani. 


8 


1 81 


844 


8 61 


868 


18 


680 


d>h- [1832,8.66. 


9 


2» 


8 81 
798a. 


888 


648 


7 8 


7 19 


6 1>S- 10th. Sporzbeim died, 
S4lA Sunday after Trimly, 


8 IMi. 


7868. 


7 49H. 


8 3a. 


8 14a. 


11 


4 7 


8 31 


888 


8 44 


9 3 


9 19 


Venus niott brilliant as moraiDg 


12 


4S7 


838 


844 


9 48 


10 6 


10 13 


3|c>17Vf. [star. 


13 


648 


10 48 


10 69 


10 68 


11 8 


11 16 


[ag«d96. 


14 


8S4 












:|C » 42, 57 ta. Carroll d. 1882, 
:|C]>81,82«. ^> Uranus. 


15 


7« 


8 om 


9m 


6m 


ism 


18m 


16 


8 8 


1 13 


1 14 


1 16 
9 97m 


1 19 


1 99 


6 9h' 
25iA &m. a/Ur TV. ^>60, 62, 


8 678. 


9 98m 


9 98m 


9 98m 


9 97m 


18 


• 48 


844 


8 49 


840 


8 84 


834 


VH- 


19 


JO 40 


ris99. 


ru$t. 


riaea. 


riiet. 


^V0BVa 


:|C ^ ^, 47, « cp. staliouarjr. 


20 


1148 


8 668. 


4 18. 


4 78. 


4 948. 


4 88a. 


*>9,'78i*>^<,c,rf,/,^, 


21 


a 


4 49 


4 48 


460 


6 16 


698 


[Pleiadua. 


22 


64m. 


8 41 


648 


6 60 


18 


698 


:|C»136B. 1^ atationaiy. 


23 


8 


063 


7 1 


7 7 


7 98 


788 


2d(b. N. York evacuated, 1783. 
26lA Sun, after TVmi. ^ <JQ. 


8 4in. 


8 88. 


8 16a. 


8 318 


8 888. 


8 488. 


25 


4 8 


894 


998 


833 


848 


9 66 


:)C»83G. 


26 


468 


10 88 


10 40 


10 48 


10 68 


10 88 


3|C D Regulus. 


27 


643 


11 48 


1140 


11 48 


U 68 


11 67 


*DWi2, 


28 
29 


897 
7 7 












SOtb. Si. Andrew, 


848m 


048m 


48m 


6im 


68m 


30 


7 47 


1 61 


160 


1 60 


1 47 1 48 


9 al greatest E. eloog. 21^ 16^. 



32 December, Twelfth Month, begins on Sunday. [1^9. 

Twillgbt begins aod enda. Mean time. 



Boston, 
N.Tork, 

Wash. 
Cb&rles. 
N. OrPi. 



lit day. 



Be^Dt. 

6 39m. 
6 37 
6 36 

5 17 

6 18 



Ends, 
h. m* 

6 9 a. 

6 11 
6 18 
6 31 
6 36 



7th day. 

Ends, 
h. m. 

6 9a. 

6 11 
6 14 
6 33 
636 



Begins, 
h. m. 

6 86m. 

5 88 

6 80 
6 33 
6 18 



13tb day. 



Begins. Ends, 
h. m. 

6 8a. 



h. D. 
6 40m. 
6 87 
6 84 
6 36 
6 33 



6 11 
6 14 
6 33 
6 27 



Idth day. 



95«k ftLj. 



Begins. Ends. I'Begiaa^ Faik 



h. D* lb. in« 

6 4sm.'6 10 a. 



6 41 
S 88 

5 99 

6 36 



6 18 
6 16 
636 
699 



1 



h.111. 

|6 4601.1 6 U e. 
3 44 6 16 



6 41 

5 83 

6 98 



6 » 
6 39 



Apogee and Perigee ^f the Mocn. 
Apogae, 3d day, Ih. A. | Apogee, 3Ist day, 3h. M. 

Perigee, Idth " M. 



Naw Moon, 
First Quarter, 



5th day. Oh. 
13th ** 4 



Phases qf tMe Moon. 



59.6m. A. 
40.3 A. 



Fall Mooo, 
Last Quarter, 



90th day, 7h, 

271 h *' U 37^ 



M. 



New Moon, January, 1840, 4th day, 4ii. 19.1 m. A. 



• 


M 


Son's upper limb rises and sets, (cor. for refract.) M. T. 


a 


9 

O 

m 




o 
o 

1 


4 


£ 


r 


c 
o 


0k 

§ 

• 




rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
b. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
b. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


seU. 
h. m. 


I 


Su. 


7 10 


439 


7 6 


484 


69 


4 40 


644 


466 


638 


5 


2 


M. 


11 


99 


6 


34 


7 


39 


46 


65 


89 





8 


Tu. 


13 


39 


7 


84 


1 


39 


46 


66 


40 





4 


W. 


13 


39 


8 


33 


3 


89 


46 


65 


41 





5 


Th. 


14 


38 





33 


8 


88 


47 


66 


41 





6 


P. 


16 


98 


10 


83 


4 


38 


48 


65 


43 





7 


S. 


16 


38 


11 


33 


6 


38 


48 


65 


43 





8 


Su. 


7 17 


438 


7 13 


4 33 


7 6 


4 38 


6 49 


4 66 


644 


6 


9JM. 


IS 


98 


13 


33 


7 


88 


60 


66 


46 


1 


lOlTu. 


10 


38 


14 


33 


8 


38 


61 


66 


46 


1 


11 W. 


30 


38 


15 


83 


9 


88 


63 


66 


47 


1 


12 Th. 


31 


38 


16 


33 


10 


89 


63 


66 


47 


1 


13 


P. 


31 


38 


16 


33 


10 


39 


63 


66 


48 


9 


14 


S. 


33 


38 


J7 


34 


11 


39 


64 


66 


49 


9 


16 


5m, 


7 33 


4 38 


7 17 


4 34 


7 13 


4 39 


664 


4 66 


6 49 


6 9 


16 


M. 


34 


38 


18 


34 


13 


39 


66 


67 


60 


3 


17 


Tu. 


94 


39 


18 


34 


13 


40 


66 


67 


60 




18 


W. 


36 


39 


19 


35 


IS 


40 


66 


67 


61 




19 Th. 


39 


39 


19 


86 


14 


40 


66 


68 


61 




20 P. 


36 


80 


30 


86 


14 


40 


67 


68 


69 




21 


S. 


36 


30 


30 


86 


14 


41 


67 


68 


63 




22 


Su. 


7 37 


4 31 


7 31 


4 87 


7 16 


4 41 


6 68 


4 69 


6 63 


6 4 


23 


M. 


37 


31 


91 


37 


16 


43 


68 


4 60 


63 




24 


Tu. 


38 


33 


33 


88 


16 


43 


69 


6 


64 




25 


W. 


38 


83 


93 


88 


16 


43 


6 69 





64 




26 


Th. 


39 


88 


33 


39 


17 


44 


7 


1 


66 


6 


27 


P. 


30 


84 


83 


89 


17 


46 





9 


66 


7 


28 


a 

Su. 


39 

7 30 


84 
4 86 


34 
7 34 


40 


19 
7 18 


46 
4 46 


1 
7 1 


9 66 1 


8 
5 9 


29 


4 40 


5 3 


B 66 


SO 
81 


M. 
Tu. 


SO 
80 


86 
87 


96 
36 


41 
43 


10 
>9 


47 
48 


3 
3 


4 
6 


67 
67 


10 
10 



High watar. M. tuae. 



o 
M 

s 
o 

s 



h. m. 

7 64m 

8 60 

9 84 
10 16 

10 66 

11 33 
9a. 



j2« 



43a. 

1 18 
1 65 

3 86 
8 3S 

4 16 
6 9 



h. m. 
6 84in 

6 30 

7 14 

7 96 

8 86 
• 19 

9 49 



JS 



6 iia. 

7 14 
834 
9 39 

10 89 

11 36 



18m 

1 6 
1 61 
3 87 

3 IB 

4 4 
4 46 



10 93ni 

10 66 

11 S6 

16a. 

1 8 
1 M 
9 49 

3 6ia. 

4 64 

6 4 

7 9 

8 19 
6 

9 66 



h.B. ' 

Sftcm. 

469 
• K 

6I« 
666 ' 

783 I 
8 9 



8 4an! 

9 IS • 

9» ' 

10 86 

11 « I 

16a. 

1 9 



9 118. 


8 14 


494 


6 39 


689 


7 96 


8 18 



10 46a. 9 68. 


11 31 9 61 


• • . 


10 87 


17IX] 


11 18 


66 


1 
. . . ' 
1 



6 3im 

6 99 

7 38 



1 44 
9 36 



8 iim 

4 9 
6 18 



4in 

46 



1 Sim 
399 
8 S6 



639.J December has TMrty-one Days, 83 


PlunifB of Ihe Meridian (mean time) and Declination of the Planets. 


lalday. || 


7th day. | 


1 13th day. 


19lh day. | 


95th day. j 


8o»Uu, 


Dee. > 


SnrfA*. 


Dec 


'8ouh , 


D«o. 


Souths. 


Dee. 


Souths. 


^Duc 


h. a. 


■ 1 


h. m. 


o < 


J b. m. 


o 1 


h. n. 


• 1 


h. m. 


• 


9 1 3ia. - 


-90 38 


1 ifta. 


—94 41 


, 448. 


— 98 4 


I 11 60m 


— 31. 8 


11 om 


— 10 60 


$ 8 49m- 


-7 1 


8 40m 


— 880 


8 4001 


1 — 10 30 oa 


—13 7 


840 


—18 04 


g aata.- 

Q 8S0a. - 


-9S9S 


3 918. 


— ^ 17 


13 178. 


— 99 83 9 188. 


— 91 88 


9 98. 


— 90 86 


-8S« 


9 98. 


— 8 1ft 


7 498. 


. — 740 7 808. 


— 7 


7 198. 


— 093 


il 9 4am- 


-13 3 


9 34m 


— 18 90 


9 on 


1—19^ 8 40m 


—14 7 


8 96m 


—14 90 


>ilo «.- 


-90 09 


1144 


— 90 to 


1134 


-nil 1 


1 11 8 


—91 


10 49 


—91 18 


1^ 9 17 - 


-794 


ft 088. — 7 88 


808. 


. — 7 80 78. 


— 7 90 i 4 448. 


— 739 


• 

i If 


Moon riMi or aets. Mean time. || 


PHENOMENA AND OBBERVA. 


A u 1 a 1 


m 


« 


i 


4 

1 


3o 
m4 


Jo 


h 

m 


TIONB. 
Sundays and other RemarkahU 


• 


y 


J* 


Days, 


n 


SB 


^ 


o 


^ 




• 


nass. 


r%»ts. 


rust. 


russ. 


rises. 




h. m* 


h. B. 


h.B. 


h. m. 


b. in. 


h. n. 




<S. 8 97m. 


9 9Sm 


9 aim 


3 49m 


3 48m 


9 48m 


C5 ^ $ . Adoeta Sunday. 


2 9 9 


9 00 


8 03 


8 40 


880 


8 89 


d ?©. d D U- Bcjpinning of 


S 999 


409 


404 


400 


487 


4 34 


[Ist Session of 26(b Congresi. 


4 19 19 


8 009 1 


009 


090 


080 


Stfa. Pros. Van Bareo b. 1782. 


5 1197 


MCf. 


aete. 


MU. 


saia. 


Mte. 


a¥©- dh©- 


6 oiaa. 


4399. 


4 878. 


4448. 


08. 


108. 




7 1 11 


098 


080 


087 


OfiO 


10 


d><?. 

d>^. td Bmiday In AicefU. 


<Si. 3 sa. 


0348. 


808. 


878. 


6008. 


7 08. 


9 9ftt 


780 


780 


7 41 


708 


8 


9 stationary. 


10 9 49 


890 


948 


8 47 1 


9 8 




11 4 90 


949 


9 09 


60 10 4 


10 


*De,88«. 


12 ft 10 


10 89 


11 1 


11 8 


11 7 


11 11 


^])73,78ta.. ISth. I ^Jf. 


13 6 1 

14 47 








... - - - 1 


16th. Severe cold in Botlon, '36. 
Washington died, 1799, a. 68. 
3d iiuiulay in Advent. 


lom 


lom 


iim 


nm 


18m 

1 lom 


5. 7 8oa. 


1 33m 1 3im 


1 30m 


1 lom 


16 8 90 


980 985 


989 


998 


999 


$ at great. W. elong. 46<> MK. 


17 9 37 


8 09 


3 AO 


8 01 


887 


984 


16tb. Tea dest. in Boston, 1773. 


18 10 90 




viass. 


riM*. 


fisss. 


risss. 


Inf. d 9 • 16th. Great fire in N. 


19, 11 SO 


8 19& 


, 3 908. 


8 888. 


9 068. 


4 68. 


*1>I868. d?U.[York,'86. 


20 ^ 


430 


483 


489 


6 1 


6 19 


17ib. Bolivar died, 1830. 


21 49m 


. ft 89 


40 


6 09 


19 


31 


3|e]»xn> Winter begins. St. 
4th Sun. i« Adi>ent. [Thomas. 


S. 1 44m 


. fioa. 


. 7 48. 


7 98. 


7 368. 


7 338. 


28; 9 49 


9 10 


830 


834 


886 


843 


22d. Landing at Plymouth, 1620. 


24: S34 

25; 4 30 


937 
10 80 


080 
10 80 


9 83 
10 87 


040 
10 40 


044 
10 48 


Christmas Day, [1776. 


26 ft 8 


1189 


11 88 


11 88 


11 88 


1189 


St. Stephen. Battle of Trenton, 


27 ft44 

28 094 












.)(. D t/; nj;. St. John. 

Innocents. 

1st Sunday after Christmas, 


49ir 


1 41tn 
1 1 43II] 


8om 

1 1 80m 


34m 


34m 


5.' 7 om 


. 1 4ftn 


1 80m 


1 9om 


80 7 49 


948 


944 


340 


337 


334 


d>U. 


31! 8S4 


8 64 


1 8 49 


8 48 


897 


1 3 38 


^ ) $ . Earth nearest the Sun. 



34 ECLIPSES OF UARCH 15th akd 8cpt£mber 7tr. [1839. 

ECLIPSES OF THE SUN. 

In the year 1839, there will be but two Eclipsei, both of which wQLj 
of coarse, be of the Sun. Neither of them will be yiiible in the Umtid 
States. 

I. Friday March 15th. The Sun totally eclipsed. 

Beginning of the General Eclipse, or the Moon's Penumbra fint 

touches the Earth at 6h. 26.2m. M. (Mean Time at Washington), ii 

Lat. 3l«> 17' South. Long. 82° 38' West. 
The Total and Central Eclipse begins, or the shadow of the Mooa 

first touches the Earth at 7h. 22.0m. M., in Lat 32° 25^ Soath. 

Long. 96° 37' West. 
The Sun centrally and totally eclipsed, or the meridian at 9h. 1.9in. M., 

in Lat. 5<> 59' South. Long. SO^* IS' West. 
End of the Central Eclipse, or the shadow of the Moon leaves tke 

Earth at lOh. 46.4m. M., in Lat. 25'> 55' North. Long. 239 & f^A. 
The Penumbra of the Moon leaves the Earth, or the General EctipK 

ends at lib. 44.1m. M., in Lat. 27° 3' North. Long. 18<> 5' East 

This Eclipse will be visible to the greater part of South America u^ 
Africa, to a large part of Europe, and of the Pacific and Atlastic 
Oceans. The line of the total Eclipse passes over the centre of Sooth 
America and of Africa, and the narrowest part of the Atlantic Ocean. 

II. Saturday, Sept. 7th. The Sun annularly eclipsed. 

The Moon's Penumbra first touches the Earth, or the General Eclipse 

begins at 2h. 16.0m A. (Mean Time at Washington), in Lat 2af* l^ 

North. Long. 164« 29' East, 
The centre of the Moon's Penumbra first touches the Earth, or tte 

Central Eclipse begins, at 3h. 20.8m. A., in 26^ 58' North. Lonj^- 

138<> 11' East. 
The Sun centrally eclipsed on the Meridian, at 5h. 6.3m. A., in Lit 

14° 49' North, Long. 154° 8' West. 
The centre of the Penumbra leaves the Earth, or the central eclipse 

ends, at 7h. 8.2m. A., in Lat 20* 50' South, and Long. 96P 65' Weii 
The Moon*s Penumbra last touches the Earth, or the General Eclip^ 

ends, at 8h. 13.1m. A., in Lat 23^ 34' South. Long. 113^ 29' West 

This Eclipse will be yisible throughout the North, and in a Urgf 
part of the South, Pacific Ocean, in the eastern part of Russian Asia, in 
the Islands of Japan, and in the extreme western part of North Amer- 
ica. The line of the annular Eclipse begins on the Island of Niphon, 
and thence passes nearly across the Pacific Ocean, so that the Eclipse 
will not be annular in either continent of Asia or America. 



1839.] 



0CCULTATI0H8. 



35 



OCCULTATIONS IN 1839. 

The following table contains a list of those conjunctions of the Moon 
y^iih planets and stars of not less than the sixth magnitude, which may 
proTe to be Occnltations in some part of the United States, also the 
mean time (at Washington) of the true conjunctions in longitude, reck- 
oned according to the manner of astronomers from noon to noon, and 
the difference of the latitudes of the Moon and stars at the time of con- 
junction. 

The most interesting Occultations during the year, in the United 
States, will be those of Venus, July 13th ; of Uranus, July 1st, Sep- 
tember 21 St, and November I5th ; of Regulus, November 25th, and 
of the Pleiades, January 23d, July 6th, September 2Gth, and No- 
vember 20th. It is hoped they will be carefully observed. 

%* TboM narkad wilh an uurbk will abo be Oeeoltatiou in mmd* part of Europe. 





Coojo. 




in 




LoDf. 




h. m. 


Jan. 1 


6 53 


•10 


15 38 




16 26 




16 51 




19 3 


18 


6 11 


21 


5 57 


•22 


6 4 


23 


10 18 




13 43 




13 45 




13 59 




14 11 




14 13 




14 42 


•24 


4 50 


25 


16 39 


•26 


9 9 


27 


13 16 


28 


15 25 


•30 


10 4 


Feb. ^3 


13 39 


20 


10 13 


22 


14 56 


•23 


5 47 


24 


11 16 


26 


17 20 


28 


14 20 


Match 6 


15 58 


8 


18 23 


10 


16 54 



43rS 

2A»lTl 
3A«ni 
67r m 
83 Vm 

102 ttH 
27i^cp 

9 H 

b Pleiad. 



Star*! 
Name. 



It 



i« 
«« 



g 
e 

c 

d 

59 ^b 

49eAuri 

76cn 
43y<3 

50 n( 

69/8 
49cAuri. 

47 n 
I9;is 

89HSI 

mm 
y'/ 

60a/ 



Star 
N. or 

8. 



-So 

-61 
—26 
— 1« 
—64 
—25 
—32 
—43 
—39 
—17 

— 7 
+ 2 

— 6 
-32 
—25 
—46 
—55 
—14 
—12 
—46 
—21 
—44 
—55 
—22 
—30 

±^ 

— 6 
—23 
—51 

—50 



Sur't 
Mag. 



5 

5 

5 

6 

3.4 

6 

6 

6 

6 

4.5 

5.6 

5 

5 

5 

3 

6 

4.5 

6 

6 

5 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

5 

5.6 



Mar. 



April 



13 
16 

18 



23 
27 
30 
31 
1 
2 



Conjo. 

in 
Lonf. 

b* m. 

17 36 

6 27 

7 30 

8 16 
22111 21 

8 7 

17 56 

13 14 
15 27 
12 2o 

14 41 

15 39 

18 23 
9115 43 

8 38 

7 

9 



May 



15 
19 

2() 

•26 

5 



38 

50 



June 



11 
27 

29 
30 
31 
1 
8 
16 
19 



9 39 

14 43 

15 27 
17 50 
17 27 

8 17 
10 32 
13 21 
15 27 
12 10 



11 
14 



20 
19 



Star*! 
Name. 



8 16 
7 58 



70 « 

71. H 
47 cp 

48icp 

47 n 

2o>'G 

68in|; 

]617Bai 
1690Bai. 

i&m 
2A'in 

50 tit. 

98 
76c n 
43yG 
50 nD 

25/vy 
27/»vy 

271^ en 
GSOMay 

win. 

y'/ 

40t/ 
58cu > 
2449fiai 
47 cp 



Star 
N. or 

S. 



w 



—68 
—45 
—30 

+ 1 
—37 

+ 9 

—64 

—52 

—55 

—11 

—44 

— 9 

—39 

—40 

h-50 

—14 

—46 

—39 

—62 

—33 

—63 

—64 

—20 

-32 

—69 

—24 

—68 

—69 

—30 

—73 

—56 



Star*! 
Mas. 

6 

4 

6 

5 

6 

6 

4 

5 

6 

6 

5 

5 

3.4 

6 

6 

6 

5 

6 

5.6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

5 

4 

6 

6 

6 

4 

6 



38 



OCCUXiTATIOJrS. 



Jane 20 
21 
23 



•30 
Jaly n 



Aug. 



8 

13 

•14 

26 

27 



28 
30 

3 
5 

13 
21 

23 
•24 

•25 

•29 



Sept. ^2 

9 

13 

14 

•20 



»21 



23 
•25 



Cooja. 

in 
Long. 

n* m. 

8 40 

10 53 

9 45 

13 23 

15 It) 

11 5 

14 11 

16 46 
16 50 



13 
16 
16 
17 
17 
17 
17 
17 
17 
21 
9 
12 
17 



31 

r.i: 



54 

7 

19 
20 
41 
10 

4 
32 
50 
15 





68»nD 
1617 Bail. 

ura 

6 7r m 
630 May. 
42 D tit. 
90 ipm 
UroHMS, 
96 ta 
9 8 
b Pleiad. 

8 



17.33 
14 22 



17 
17 
13 
16 

7 



10 
52 
34 
25 
13 



10 51 

11 54 



8Ur>a 

Name. 



M 



<( 
If 



c 
d 

25iy8 
136 C 8 

Venus. 

33(ta 
42 « 
450« 

81 « 

60H 

62H 

59;r8 
49 c Aur. 

40v/n5 

58ai / 

49avy 

58« 
96m 
47 cp 
48« cp 

47 n 

28nc 
um 

33i« 



8 25 

6 33 

9 9 

10 6 
12 35 

7 45 
9 38 
6 23 
6 54 

11 33142 

12 545 Dm 

8 2481 

9 9 82 m 
12 18lC7raiiitf. 
14 29O9W 
16 30 96ta 

9 060 H 
9 40G2H 

10 63 an 

10 28 34/(cp 



Bur 


Sur't 


N. or 


Mft(. 


S. 

-i4 




5 


-44 


6 


-47 


6 


^42 


34 


—15 


6 


—57 


6 


— 44 


5 


—37 




—32 


6 


—57 


6 


—34 


4.5 


—24 


6.6 


—15 


6 


—23 


5 


-48 


6 


—41 


3 


—60 


4^ 


-€l 


4 


— 8 




—62 


6 


—18 


4.6 


—26 


6 


—64 


6 


— IH 


6 


—38 


6 


—15 


6 


—64 


6 


— 5 


6 


-66 


6.6 


—73 


6 


-24 


3.4 


—25 


6 


—44 


6 


— 5« 


6 


—26 


5 


—17 


6 


—30 


6 


—25 


6 


—61 


3.4 


-18 


4.6 


—28 


6 


—66 


6 


—20 


6 


— 1 


6 


-38 




—68 


6 


-45 


6 


—44 


6 


—22 


6 


— 7 


6 


—20 


6 



CoDJa. 

in 
Long. 



Sept. 26 
26 



Oct. 



Dec. 



28 



2917 6947 n 



Nov. 



13 
14 
17 
23 
24 
28 
12j 
14 

•16 
17 



»19 



20 



•22 
25 
26 
27 
11 
12 

19 
•21 

24 

« 

27 



ha ID. 

16 30 

17 15 



3^ 
17 < 



74898 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 




29e 



30 
56 
42 



8Ur4 

Name. 



47 cp 
48fi <p 




A Pleiad. 



it 
it 



d 

136 C 8 



4 45|x' / 
7 4040 T/ 

7 5349avy 
13 2264^cp 

10 1259 jT 8 
15 043yS 

11 14l7Vf 
6 25 42 

13 25579 
4 24 81 
6 1082 
6 6 Uranus* 

6 47 60H 

7 28G2H 

7 49 63 an 

8 0134 u en 

13 60|47cp 

14 34148 acp 
829 



37 

39^ 

51 « 

2c 

A\d 

5| 



?, 



leiad. 
<( 

it 



a 

ti 



» 



leiad. 



<« 



4 

7 
7 
7 
8 
8 
8 
9 

6 37i 136 C 8 
15 10|83s 

15 17| Regains 
18 10 59ci) 

7 37|33tm 

7 13|73;isar 

8 1978 fl» 

16 50|].36C8 

9 41(77 j»n 

12 547eil 

13 2949 if 
16 4740^19 



—2915 
—36 5 
-« » 
-56 3 



-5 




1839.] 



SCLIPSS8 OF mX SAT£LLITBS OF JUPITER. 



37. 



£CUPS£S OF THE SATELLITES OF JUPITER IN 1839, 

Visibi