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L^ 



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C-..ir 




AY 



f 



It 



THE 



AMERICAN ALMANAC 



Ain> 



REPOSITORY 




or 



USXFUIi XKOWtlDGB, 



FOR THE TEAR 



1847. 



BOSTON: 

PUBLISHED BT JAMES MUNROE k Go 



1846. 






Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1846, 

By Fbancis Bowen, 
in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts. 



BOBTOK : 
PBUmED BT B. N. DICKINSON & CO. 
WASHINerON BTREKT. 



PREFACE. 



The American Almanac has now been published for eighteen years, and 
great pains have been taken to cause the work to deserve its reputation as a 
trustworthy manual for reference, and a full repository of information re- 
specting the finances, statistics, legislation, public institutions, and internal 
improYements of the United States. The editors have endeavored to make 
it a full contemporaneous record of the government and the progress of the 
country, condensing into the smallest space the information afforded by offi- 
cial documents and by numerous correspondents in all the States of the 
Union. 

The astronomical calculations have been made, as usual, by Professor 
Peirce, who has also added to the work a chronological and systematic cata- 
logue of all the comets of which the orbits have ever been computed, refer- 
ring the longitudes to the mean equinox of January 1, 1850. This catalogue 
is unique, and will be found to be of great use to astronomical observers and 
computers. An interesting account of the Observatory of Paris, recently 
published by M. Ajago, has been translated for this work, as it affords valu- 
able hints for the conduct of the new American observatories, and gives an 
eloquent and striking sketch of the results that may be expected from the 
use of improved instruments in these establishments. 

In another part of the volume will be found the new tariffs of duties es- 
tablished in 1846, both in England and the United States, digested and al- 
phabetically arranged, followed by an abstract of the law establishing a 
warehousing system in this country. The general abstract of all the public 
laws passed by Congress is continued, as in former years ; the outlines of the 
sub-treasury system and of the law creating the Smithsonian Institution are 
contained in this article. A tabular view is given of all the raUroads in this 
country and in England, which contains more information on this subject 
than has ever been brought together before. A comparative view of the 
debts, property, and general financial condition of all the States has been 
made out with great care from the latest returns. As a census has been 
taken, and manufacturing and agricultural statistics have been collected, 
during the past year in several of the States, a good deal of novel and inter- 
eslang information of this character has been gathered and inserted in this 



IV PREPACB. 

Toltixne. An article on the comparative cost of government in England and 
in this conntry affords results which will probably be new to most of our 
readers. The obituary record, the lists of officers under the National and 
State governments, the register of colleges and of the theological, law, and 
medical schools, and the other ordinary articles of the work, will be found as 
full and accurate as in former years. 

The thanks of the editor are particularly due to the Hon. A. C. Flagg, 
Hon. E. R. Potter, Hon. David G. Burnett, Digby V. Bell, Esq., Joseph T. 
Thomas, Esq., Thomas H. Dewitt, Esq., Edward T. Tayloe,Esq., and many 
other contributors and correspondents, to whom the work is indebted for a 
great part of its value. A continuance of their favors is respectfully solicit- 
ed. A work embracing such a multitude of facts must necessarily contain 
some errors ; persons who detect any are earnestly requested to communi- 
cate them to the editor. It is a matter of some public interest that a period- 
ical which circulates so widely both in Europe and America, and which is so 
iiniversally trusted as a manual for reference, should be rendered as accurate 
as possible ; and this end can be obtained only by the cooperation of many 
individuals. Communications may be addressed to the ** i^tor of tho 
American Almanac Boston.'* 

Boston, Mdss.^ 

Octo6er 1,1846, 



CONTENTS. 



PART I. 



CiLorsAK Ain> OmjHnuj, Vbmsouxka. fob vm Tjulb 1847. 



Oekflttal Phenomena, Signs, &«., 8 

Chronologieal Cjdes, 4 

Signs of the Zodiac, 4 

Beginning and length of the Seasons, 4 

Movable Festirals of the Choreh, *"6 

Jewish Calendar, 5 

Mahometan Calendar, < • '6 

Height of the greatest Tides, 7 

Darkness of the Nights in 1847, 8 

CALXirnAii ; — Jannarr, &c., 10 

Xelipses in 1847, 84 

Oocultations, 86 

Eclipses of Jupiter's Satellites, 88 

Discs of Yenos and Mars, 89 

BingsofSatom, 40 

Latttade and Longitude of Places, 41 



Page 

Latitude and Long, of 'ObeerTSleries, 44 

Ephemerls of the Sun, 45 

Apparent Places of the Pole Star, 61 

Places of the principal fixed Stars,* > 68 

Dr. Young's Befractions, '•••61 

Sun's Parallax in Altitude, 62 

The Obserratory of Paris,* •• 66 

MmosoLoaiaAi. IirroaxATnm : — Tables 
for Saco, Cambridge, Mendon, Worces- 
ter, Rochester, Trenton, Lambertrille, 
Chapel Hill, Sayannah, Natehea, 8l«a- 
benyUle, Bloomington, Plowenng of 

Pruit Trees, 71-81 

Chronolt^cal Catalogue of Comets, 82 

Systematic CatidQgue of Comets, 88 



PART II. 



Unmi) Statu. 



1. 



2. 



8. 



6. 



6. 

7. 



BxecuflTe OoTemment, 99 

Ofllcers in the Departments, •••99 

Collectors of Customs, 102 

Postmasters in the Chief Cities, 103 

Congress, 105 

Senate, 105 

House of Representatiyes, 107 

Alphabetical List of BepresentatiTes, • 110 

Judiciary, 112 

Supreme Court, 112 

Circuit Courts, 113 

District Courts , 115 

Intercourse wiUx Foreign Nations, • '116 

Consuls in Foreign Countries, 117 

Foreign Ministers, • 121 

Foreign Consuls in the United States,121 

Nayy List, 125 

Naval Forces of other Powers, 129 

Commercial Importance of other 

Powers, 181 

Army List, 181 

Post Offloe Establishment, 184 



8 Mint. 140 

9. Public Lands, 143 

10. Reyenue and Expenditure,* • • 146 

Debt of the United States, 148 

United States Reyenue for 66 years, -149 

U. S. Expenditure for 56 years, 150 

Imports, Exports, &g., for 56 years, '151 

11. Cost of Goyeniment, 162 

12. Railroads in the United States, 160 

Do. . in Massachusetts, 160 

Do. in New York, 161 

Do. at the South and West,* • • .162 
Do. in Great Britain, 168 

18. Tariff of Duties in 1846, 164 

Warehousing System, 170 

14. Commerce, 171 

Foreign Ooods imported, 171 

Yalue of Exports, 174 

15. Finances and Debts of the States,- • -178 

16. CoUeses, 180 

17. Theological Schools, 184 

18. Law Schools, 184 



Tl 



CONTBNTB. 



19. Medical Schooli, 1 

20. Population of the Cities, 185 

21. Religious Denominations, 186 

22. State Elections, &c., 186 

23. Goyernora of States, &c., 187 

2i. Statistics of Massachusetts and New- 
York, 188 

New York State Census in 184&, 191 

Churches in New York, 192 



26. 

26. 



27. 
28. 
29. 



PMfe 

Academies, Schools, &o., in N. York,198 

New York City Census in 1845, 198 

Census of Boston in 1846, 193 

Abstracts of PubUc Laws,< 199 

Independent Treasury Bill, 207 

Smitlisonian Institution, 212 

The Oregon Convention, 214 

Population of the United States,* • • '216 
glares in the United States, 216 



Individual States. 



1. Maine, 21617. 

2. New Hampshire, 218 18. 

8. Vermont, 22019. 

4. Massachusetts, 223 20. 

6. Rhode Island, 22721. 

6. Connecticut, 280 22. 

7. New York, 23323. 

8. New Jersey, 24024. 

9. Pennsylvania, 24326. 

10. Delaware, 25126. 

11. Maryland, 25227. 

12. Virginia, 25428. 

la North Carolina, 26929. 

U. South Carolina, 260^30. 

16. Qeoi^ia,. • . » 262^31. 

16. irioiida, 2641 



Alabama, 266 

Mississippi, 269 

Louisiana, 272 

Texas, 276 

Arkansas, 281 

Tennessee, 282 

Kentucky, 286 

Ohio, 288 

Michigan, 291 

Indiana, 298 

Illinois, 301 

Missouri. 304 

Wisconsin, 306 

Iowa, 307 

Distcist of Columbia, 810 



American States,* 



-Sll\Britidi American Provinces,. 



811 



EUBOPB. 



Sovereigns of Europe, 812 

European States, 313 

Great Britain, 814 



British Tariff of 1846, 318 

Com Laws of 1846, 318 

France, 322 



American Obituary,* • 
Chronicle of Events,* 



'823 
846 



Corrections and Additions,* 



862 



INDEX. 



Abstracts of Ihiblic laws, 199 

Alabama, 285 

Amerioaa Obituary, 323 

American States. 811 

Appropriations m 1846, 199 

Arkansas, 281 

Armj List, 131 

Articles imported in 1^, 171 

Articles exported in 1845, ••••<• 174 

Boston, Census of, in 1845, 193 

British American Proyinoes, 311 

Cabinet, Officers in the, 99 

Calendax ; Januarj, &c., 10 

Catalogue of Comets, 82 

Census of New York, 191, 193 

Census of Boston, 193 

Chronicle of Events, 846 

Chronological Cycles, 4 

Church Festinds, 6 

Churches in New York, 192 

Circuit Courts. 113 

Cities, Population of, 185 

Collectors of Customs, 102 

Colleges, —180 

Comets, Catalogue of, 82 

Commerce, 171 

Commercial importance of other Powers, • 181 

Congress, 105 

Connecticut, 230 

Consuls, Foreign, In United States, 121 

Consuls in Foreign Countries,* • • • • 117 

Com Laws, British, in 1846, 818 

Corrections and Auditions, 852 

Cost of (Joremment, 152 

Countries whence goods are brou£^t,> • • •176 

Darkness of the Nights, 8 

Debt of the United States, 148, 151 

Debts of the States, 178 

251 



Delaware, 

Departments, Officers In the, 99 

Dii^ of Tenus and Mars, 89;MedicaI Schools, 

District Courts, • 115 Meteorological Inlbrmation, 



District of Columbia. 810 

Duties, Tariff o£ in 1846, 164 

Eclipses in 1847, 34 

Elections, State, 186 

Ephemeris of the Sun, 45 

European States, 813 

Executive Government, 99 



' Page 

Exports, value of, in 1845, • 174 

Exports for 66 years, 151 

Festivals of the Church, 6 

Finances of the States^" 178 

Fixed Stars, Apparent JPlaces of,» • • 58 

Florida,... !...r. 264 

Flowering of Fruit Trees, 81 

Foreign Qoods imported, 171 

Foreign Ministers, •. 121 

France, 822 

France, Naval Force of; 129 

Georgia, 262 

Government. Cost of, 152 

Governors of States, 187 

Great Britain, 814 

Great Britahi, Naval Force of, 129 

Great Britain, Railroads in. 163 

Great Britain, Tariff of, in 1846, 818 

Holland, Naval Force of, 130 

niinois, 801 

Import, Articles of, in 1845, 171 

Imports for 56 years, 151 

Independent Treasury Bill, 207 

Indiana, 298 

Intercourse with Foreign Nations, 116 

Iowa, • 806 

Jewish Calendar, 5 

Judiciary, United States, 112 

Jupiter's Satellites, Eclipses of^ 88 

Kentucky, 285 

Latitude and Loi^tude of Places, 41 

Law Schools, 184 

Laws, Abstracts of, 199 

Louifdana, .• 272 

Mahometan Calendar, • 6 

Maine, 216 

Maryland, 262 

Massachusetts, • 228 

Massachusetts, Railroads of, 160 

Massachusetts, Statistics of, 188, 190 

185 

71 



Expenditures, U. S., for 66 years,. 



Mexico, Naval Force of, 180 

Michigan, 291 

Mhit, 140 

Mississippi, 269 

Missouri, 804 

Naval Forces of other Powers, 129 

125 



Navy List, 



160iNew Hampshire,- 



218 



• •• 

VIU 



XND£X. 



Paffej Pag6 

New J«nej, • 240 Seasonf, Beginning and Length of, 4 

New York, 2881 Senate of Che United States, 106 

New York, State Census of, 191 Signs of the Planets, 8 

New York, Citj Census of, 198 Slaves In the United States, 216 

New York, Rallroadsin, 161 1 Smithsonian Institution,- • 212 

New York, Statistics oi; ISSSouth Carolina, 260 

Nights, Darkness of the, 8, Southern Bailroads, 162 

North Carolina, • • . 259 Soyereigns of Europe, 812 

Obserratoriee, tat. and Long, of, 44 

Obserratory of Paris, 63 

Ocoultations, 86 

Ohio, 288 

Oregon ConTmtion, 214 

Parallax in Altitude of the Sun, 62 

Paris Observatory, 68 Supreme Court,* • 112 

Pennsylvania, • 243 Systematic Catalogue of Comets, 98 

Pole Star, Places of the, 61,Tariff of the United States in 1846, 164 

Population of the United States, 215 Tariff of Great Britain in 1846, 818 

Population of Cities, 185| Tennessee, 282 

Postmasters, lOSiTexas, 276 

Post-Office Establishment, 134' Theological Schools, 184 

Public Lands, 143 Tides, Height of ONatest, 7 

Bailroads in the United States, 160 Tonnage of the United States, 151, 177 

Bidlroads in Qreat Britain, 163 Treasury, Independent, 207 



Stars, Ilzed, Apparent Places of, 68 

State Elections, &o., 186 

State Finances, Debts, &c., 178 

Statistics of Mass. and N. Y., 188 

Sun, Ephemeris of the, 45 

Sun's Parallax in Altitude, 62 



Befiractions, Dr. Young's, 61 

Keligious Denominations, 186 



Bepresentatives, House of,* 

Bevenue and Expenditure, 

Bevenue, U. S., for 66 years,* • • • 

Bhode Island, 

Russia, Naval Force of, 

Satellites of Jupiter, Eclipses of,« 
Saturn's Bings, 



107 
145 
149 
227 
129 

:^ 



Tonus and Mars, Discs of,* 

Vermont, 

Virginia, 

Warehousing System, 

Western Bailroads, 

Wisconsin, 

Young's Beflractions, 

Zodiac, Signs of the, 



89 
220 
254 
170 
162 
806 

61 



THE 



AMERICAN ALMANAC, 



FOE 



1847. 



PART I. 



/\ 



1 



X 



THB 



AMERICAN ALMANAC, 

FOB THB TEAB 

1847, 

Being, the latter part of the 71st, and the beginning of the 72d year 
of the Independence of the United States of America ; 

" the 6560th year of the Julian Period ; 

^< the latter part of the 5607th, and the beginning of the 5608th 
year since the creation of the world, according to the Jews ; 

" the 2600th year (according to Varro) since the foundation of 
Eome; 

** the 2594th year since the era of Nabonassar, which has been 
assigned to Wednesday, the 26th of February of the 3967th 
year of the Julian Period, which corresponds, according to 
the chronologists, to the 747th, and, according to the astron- 
omers, to the 746th year, before the birth of Christ ; 

" the 2623d year of the Olympiads, or the third year of the 
656th Olympiad, beginning in July, 1847, if we fix the era 
of the Olympiads at 7 76 J years before Christ, or at or 
about the beginning of July of the year 3938 of the Julian 
Period; 

<< the latter part of the 1263d, and the beginning of the 1264th 
year (of twelve lunations) since the Hegira, or flight of 
Mahomet, which, as is generally supposed took place on 
the 16th of July, in the year 622 of the Christian era. 



I. CALENDAR 
AND CELESTIAL PHENOMENA FOR THE YEAR. 

SIGNS OF THE PLANETS, &c. 



The Sun. 

® The Earth. 

• ^0<[ The Moon. 

$ Mercury. 

9 Venus. 



^ Mars. 
Q Vesta. 
S Juno. 
$ Pallas. 



5 Ceres. 

1|. Jupiter. 

1^ Saturn. 

^ Herschel or Uranus. 

:|c A fixed star. 



i Conjunction, or having the same Longitude or Bight Ascension. 
D Quadrature, or differing 90* in « " '* 

S Opposition, or differing 1 SO* in " " ** 

^ 'I'ne ascending, tJ the descending node. 



I 



4 GHBONOLOQICAL CYCLES, BIONS OF THB ZODIAC, BTC, [1847. 

The sign -f* is prefixed to the latitude, or declination, c^ the San, or other 
heavenly body, when norf A, and the sippi — when south ; but the former pre- 
fixed to the hourly motion of the Moon in latitude, indicates that she is 
approaching, and the latter that she is receding from, the north pole of the 
ecliptic. 

The letters M. A.^ m. a^ denote Morning and AfUmocn, 



CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES. 



Dominical Lettor, C 

Epact, 14 

Lunar Cycle, or Golden Number, 5 



Solar Cycle, 8 

Roman Indiction, 5 

Julian Period, G560 



SIGNS OF THE Z0DL4lC. 



Spring 
signs. 

Summer 
signs. 



! 
{ 



1. <lp Aries. 

2. 8 Taurus. 

3. n Gremini. 

4. 23 Cancer. 

5. ^ Leo. 

6. np Virgo. 



Autumn 
signs. 

Winter 
signs. 



( 7. =2= Libra, 
j 8. ffl Scorpio. 
' 9. / Sagittarius. 

(10. vy ' 
<11. •» 

W2. H 



\ff Capricomus. 
Aquarius. 
Pisces. 



BEGINNING AND LENGTH OP THE SEASONS. 



Sun enters yjf (Winter begins) 1846, Dec. 21st, 
" ** SP (Spring " ) 1847, March 21st, 
." " G (Summer " ) « June 21st, 
zCh (Autumn « ) " Sept. 23d, 
Vf (Winter " ) « Dec. 21st, 









h. m. 8. 

11 4 30A.1 

25 6 M. 

9 10 9 A. 
11 14 19 M. 

4 5 46 M. 



M. Time 

at 
Wash'ton. 



u 



a 



(( 



u 



(( 



<( 



d. h. m. 8. 
89 1 20 36 

92 20 45 3 

93 14 4 10 
Autumn " 89 17 42 27 

13 
3 



Sun in the Winter Signs* 
Spring " 
Summer 



north of Equator, (Spring and Summer)' 



(Wi 



" south of " (Winter and Autumn) 



186 10,49 
17$ 19 3 



Length of the l3Y>pical year, commencing at \ 
the winter solstice, 1846, and terminating at \ 365 5 52 16 
the winter solstice, 1847, ) 

Mean, or average length of the tn^ical year, 365 5 48 48 



1847.] MOVABLB FESTIVALS, JEWISH CALBNDAB. 5 

MOVABLE FESTIVALS OF THE CHURCH, IN 1847. 



Septaagesima Sunday, Jan. Slst 
Qoinq. or Shroye Sunday, Feb. 14£h 

Ash Wed., Lent begins, Feb. I7th 

Mid Lent Snndaj, Mar. 14th 

Palm Snndaj, Mar. 2Sth 

Easter Sundca/y Apr. 4tli 

Low Sunday, Apr. 11th 



Eogation Sunday, May 9th 

Ascen. Day, or Holy Th. May 13th 
Whitsnnday or Pentecost, May 23d 
Trinity Sunday, May 30th 

Corpus Chiisti Day, ) , 
FSteDieu, |Jnne3d. 

Advent Sunday, Nov. 28th 



JEWISH CALENDAR 

[The anxdyenarieB marked -vrith an asterisk (*) axe to be strictly obsenred.] 

Year. Names of the Months. 

5606 Thcbet begins, Dec. 20, 1846. 

« " 10th, Fast for the Siege of Jerusalem, Dec. 29, " 

« Sebat b^ins, Jan. 18, 1847. 

« Adarbegins, Feb. 17, " 

" " 13th, Fast of Esther, Mar. 1, " 

" " 14th, *Purini, Mar. 2, " 

« " 15th, Schuscan Purim, Mar. 3, " 

« Ifisan begins, • Mar. 18, " 

** " 15th, *Beginning of the Passover, • Apr. 1 , " 

" " 16th, ♦Second Feast, or Morrow of the Passorer, Apr. 2, " 

♦* « 21st, *SeTenth Feast, Apr. 7, " 

« " 22d, *End of the Passover, Apr. 8, " 

« Ijar begins, Apr. 17, " 

" " 18th, Lag Beomer, May 4, " 

" Sivanbegms May 16, " 

** " 6th, *Feast of Weeks or Pentecost, May 21, " 

« " 7tih, *Second Feast, May 22, " 

" Thammus begins, Jun. 15, " 

« " 17th, Fast for the taking of the Temple, • • • July 1, " 

« Abbegins, July 14, " 

** ** 9th, *Fast for the burning of the Temple, July 22, " 

« " Elulbegins, Aug. 13, " 

5608 Tisri be^s, *Feast for the New Year, Sept 11, " 

« « 2d, *Second Feast for the New Year, Sept 12, " 

« " 3d, Fast of Gedaljah, Sept 18, " 

^ ** 10th, *Fast of the Kecondliation or Atonement, Sept 20, *' 

" " 15th, *Feast of the Huts or Tabemades, Sept 25, " 

1* 



6 MABOXSTAM CALBNDAS. [1847. 

Tear. Namef Oi ttie Momttui. 

5608 Tisri, 16th, *Second Feast of the Huts, Sept. 26, 1847. 

« ♦* 2l8t, Feadt of Palms or Branches, Oct. 1, " 

" « 22d,«^Endof tibie Hut or Congregation Feast,* •• Oct 2, " 

" " 23d, *Eejoicing for the Discovery of the Law, • • Oct 3, " 

" Marchesvan begins, Oct 11, " 

« Ohisleu begins, » Nov.», ** 

" " 25th, Consecration of the Tomple, Dec. 3, " 

" Thebet begins, Dec. 8, " 

** " 10th, Fast for the Siege of Jerusalem, Dec. 1 7, " 

The Jewish year generally contains 354 days, or 12 lunations of the Moon, 
but in a cycle of 19 years, an intercalary month, (Yeader) is 7 times intro- 
duced, for the purpose of rendering the average duration of the year nearly 
or quite correct 



MAHOMETAN CALENDAR. 

Year. Karnes of the Months. 

1263 Muharrem begins, Dec. 20, 1846. 

" Saphar " Jan. 19, 1847. 

" RabiaL " Feb. 17, " 

« RabiaH. " Mar. 19, « 

" JomadhiL ** April 17, « 

« Jomadhin. " May 17, " 

" Redjeb " June 15, " 

« Chaban " July 15, " 

« Ramadan " (Month of Fasting) Aug. 13, " 

" Schewall " (Bairam) Sept 12, " 

" Dsul-kadah " Oct 11, " 

" Dsu'l-hejjah " Nov. 10, " 

1264 Muharrem " Dec. 9, " 

The Mahometan Era dates from the flight of Mahomet to Medina, July 
16th, A. D. 622. 

The Mahometan year is purely lunar; it consists of 12 synodical periods 
of the Moon, or of 354 days, 19 times in a cycle of 30 years, and 11 times 
of 355 days. The average leagdi of this year is therefore 354^ days, which 
differs only ^irty -three seconds from the truth; a degree of exactness that 
only could have been attained by a long series of observations. But as no 
allowance is made for the excess of 11 days in the length of a tropical year 
over the time of 12 revolutions of the Moon, it is obvious tiiat in about 33 
years, the above months will c(Nrresp<Mid to every season and every part of 
the Gregorian year. 



1847.] 



HBIOHT QV SPBUra TIDXS. 



HEIGHT OF THE GBEATEST OR SPRING TIDES IN 1847. 

Computed by the Formula of LapUux^ (Mfcanique Celeste, Vol. 11. pp. 289, 

Pon> erf., and [2858] Bowd. ed.) 



New or Full 


Height of 


Newer 


Full 


Height of 


Moon. 




tbe Tide. 


Moon. 


the Tide. 






d. h. 








d. h. 




Fun Moon, 


Jan. 1, 10 M. 


0.83 


New Moon 


July 12, 6M. 


0.84 


New 


Cl 


16, 7 A. 


1.03 


Full 


(C 


27, 6 A. 


1.00 


Full 


(( 


31, 3M. 


0.84 


New 


(( 


Aug. 10, 7A. 


0.84 


New 


C( 


Feb. 15, 6M. 


1.13 


Full 


(( 


26, IM. 


i.n 


Fall 


u 


Mar. 1, 10 A. 


0.87 


New 


u 


Sept 9, UM. 


0.86 


New 


u 


16, 4 A. 


1.17 


Full 


» 


24, 9 M. 


1.16 


Full 


u 


31, 4 A. 


0.87 


New 


(( 


Oct. 9, 4M. 


0.86 


New 


u 


April 15, 1 M 


1.10 


Full 


u 


23, 6 A. 


1.12 


Full 


u 


30, 8M. 


0.86 


New 


tt 


Nov. 7, 10 A. 


0.84 


New 


u 


May 14, 10 M. 


0.99 


FuU 


(( 


22, 5M. 


1.02 


FuU 


tt 


29, 10 A. 


0.85 


New 


(( 


Dec 7, 3 A. 


0.84 


New 


(( 


June 12, 8 A. 


0.89 


FuU 


(( 


21, 5 A. 


0.94 


FuU 


u 


28, 9 M. 


0.90 






• 





The unit of altitude at any place is the height at that place of that tide 
which arrives about a day and a half after the time of New or FuU Moon, 
when the Sun and Moon, at the moment of conjunction or opposition, are at 
their mean distance &om the Earth, and in the plane of the celestial equator. 

This unit of altitude, which must he derived from observation for each 
place, mnltipUed by tiie quantities in tiie above table, gives tiie height of tiie 
spring tides at Uiat place during the present year. 

By the above table it appears, that the highest tides of 1847 wiU be those 
of January 18, February 16, March 18, April 17, August 27, September 25, 
and October 25. 

The actual rise of ^e tide, however, depends so much on the strong^ 
and direction of the wind, that it not un&equenUy happens that a tide, 
which would, independentiy of these, have been smaU, is higher than anoth- 
er, otherwise much greater. But when a tide, which arrives when the Sun 
and Moon are in a favorable position for producing a great elevation, is stiU 
further increased by a very strong wind, the rise of the water wUl be un- 
commonly great, sufficient, perhaps, to cause damage. 

The formula, from which these tides were computed, is, however, strictiy 
true only for Brest and its vicinity, and must be regarded as a very uncer- 
tain approximation for the coast of the United States. 



IUSKSBI8 O' THS KIQHM. 



DARKNESS OF THE NIGHTS DUEING THE TEAS 1847. 

fbr Btstm, Netc York, F/iUaddphia, WiahingUm, 4x. 
bs nuinlHT of hoiin at Uie top of the page dsnotfa Ibe mnee tim* Ibr the monUi firm 
md of tiu erenliw hrlllght to ttu tjcgbmlug of the morning IwUl^iL 
tM dott In thi tibis denoto Uu houn of anlln duknen, whu tlH» b ndltuff nm, 
ID, DOT EiriHghl ; uid thdc dispixlljoii denotes ttae boun belbn or iftH mldDl^. 



Iho. 


.^ 


11 h7 


"^rlr If. 


pDe 


a 


sr 


W; 


OM. 


Norm' 


Droi'i 
13 h. 


to 

13 
IB 
U 
18 
M 
17 
U 
19 
» 
31 
93 

sa 

24 
16 
36 
IT 
29 
3B 
80 
81 


...a'"" 
« 

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s 


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B 



1847.] 



DABKNBB8 OF THB VIGHTS. 



Far Charlesttm^ New Ori&ans^ ^c. 





Day 

of 

Mo. 


Janiuary 


Feb'ry 


Miarch 


April 


Hay 


Jane 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct 


Not. 


Deo. 




11 h. 


10 h. 


9h. 


8h. 


7h. 


7h. 


7h. 


8h. 


9h. 


10 h. 


11 h. 

• 


11 h. 




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• • 



10 January y First Months begins on Friday ^ [ 


•1847.1 


Twilight begins and ends. Mean Time. | 




Istday. 


7th day. | 


13th day. | 


19th day. 


26th day. | 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


B^ns. Ends, 
h. m. h. m. 


Begins 
h. m. 


. Ends. 

h. m. 


Boston, 


5 4dm 


620& 


I 548m 


6 24a 


5 48m 


629a 


5 47m 6 35a 


5 44m 6 42a 


N. York, 


546 


622 


546 


6 26 


546 


6 31 


545 


637 


542 


644 


Wash'n, 


543 


625 


544 


6 29 


544 


634 


543 


639 


5 41 


645 


Charles., 


536 


6:« 


536 


6 37 


537 


641 


5 36 


646 


535 


6 51 


N. Orl's, 


5 31 


637 


533 


6 40 


534 


644 


5:« 


6 49 


532 


654 


APOGEE AND PKBIGEK OP THS MOON. 

Apogee, 6th day, Ih. A. | Perigee, 18th day, lOh. M. 


PHASB9 

Full Moon, Ifltday, 9h. 84.1m. M. 
Last Quarter, 9th " 1 82.8 A. 
New Moon, 16th « 7 86.6 A. 


OP THI MOON. 

First Quarter, 23d day, Uh. 9.6m. IL 
FttU Moon, 3l8t " 8 20.6 M. 


1 


i 

1 


Sun's Vfper limb rises and sets, (corr 


.for refract.) M. Time. 


[High Water. M. Tline. 


• 


9* 

1 


f^ 


a 

l4 


• 


<5 

9k 


9* 


e 

6 


rues. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rues. 
h. m. 


sas. 

ti. m. 


nses. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


nses. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


nses. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


1 


F. 


7 30 


4 38 


7 24 


4 42 


7 19 


4 49 


7 3 


5 5 


6 96 


5 12 


1126a 


9 6a 


7 26a 


2 
8 


S. 
Su. 


30 
7 30 


39 

4 40 


24 
7 24 


43 


19 


50 
4 50 


3 
7 3 


6 
5 7 


56 
6 67 


12 
5 13 


« • • 


9 47 


8 7 


4 44 


7 19 


7m 


10 26a 


8 46a 


4 


M. 


30 


41 


25 


45 


19 


51 


3 


7 


57 


14 


46 


10 50 


9 19 


5 


Tu. 


30 


42 


25 


46 


19 


62 


3 


8 


67 


15 


119 


11 36 


9 56 


6 


W. 


29 


43 


25 


48 


19 


53 


3 


9 


57 


15 


1 56 


• t • 


10 29 


7 


Th. 


29 


44 


25 


48 


19 


54 


4 


10 


57 


16 


229 


9m 


11 3 


8 


F. 


29 


45 


24 


49 


19 


55 


4 


11 


57 


17 


3 3 


043 


11 40 


9 

10 


S. 
Su, 


29 
7 29 


46 


24 


50 
4 51 


19 
7 19 


56 


4 


11 


57 


18 
5 19 


340 


1 20 


. . . 


4 47 


724 


4 57 


7 3 


5 12 


6 57 


4 19m 


1 59m 


19m 


11 


M. 


2B 


48 


24 


52 


19 


58 


3 


13 


57 


19 


5 4 


244 


1 4 


12 


Tu. 


28 


49 


24 


53 


13 


59 


3 


14 


57 


20 


6 10 


350 


2 10 


18 


W. 


28 


50 


23 


54 


18 


5 


3 


15 


57 


21 


7 18 


458 


3 18 


14 


Th. 


28 


51 


23 


55 


18 


1 


3 


16 


57 


22 


8 33 


6 13 


433 


16 


F. 


87 


53 


23 


56 


18 


2 


3 


17 


57 


23 


938 


7 18 


5.38 


16 
17 


S. 
Su. 


.27 
7 26 


54 


22 


57 


17 


3 


3 


18 


57 


24 
5 24 


10 31 


8 11 


6 31 


4 55 


7 22 


4 58 


7 17 


5 4 


7 2 


5 18 


6 67 


11 19m 


8 59m 


7 19m 


18 


M. 


26 


56 


21 


59 


16 


5 


2 


19 


56 


25 


6a 


9 46 


8 6 


19 


Tu. 


25 


57 


21 


5 1 


16 


6 


2 


20 


56 


26 


51 


10 31 


8 51 


20 


W. 


24 


58 


20 


2 


15 


8 


2 


21 


56 


27 


1 35 


11 15 


935 


21 


Th. 


24 


5 


20 


3 


15 


9 


1 


22 


56 


28 


2 20 


oa 


10 20 


22 


F. 


23 


1 


19 


4 


14 


10 


1 


23 


55 


29 


3 5 


045 


11 6 


28 
24 


S. 
Su. 


22 
722 


2 


18 


5 


14 


11 
512 



7 


24 
5 25 


55 
6 55 


30 
5 30 


3 53 


1 33 


11 53 


5 4 


7 17 


5 7 


7 13 


4 42a 


2 22a 


42a 


26 


M. 


21 


5 


17 


8 


13 


13 





26 


54 


31 


543 


323 


143 


26 


Tu. 


20 


6 


16 


9 


12 


14 


6 59 


27 


64 


32 


6 67 


437 


2 57 


27 


W. 


19 


7 


15 


10 


11 


16 


59 


28 


53 


33 


8 18 


5 58 


4 18 


28 


Th. 


18 


9 


14 


11 


10 


17 


58 


29 


53 


34 


932 


7 12 


532 


29 


F. 


17 


10 


13 


13 


9 


18 


57 


30 


52 


35 


10 27 


8 7 


6 27 


30 
31 


S. 
Su. 


16 


11 


13 


14 


9 


19 


57 


31 


68 


36 
536 


1114 


8 54 


7 14 


71 


5 


5 13 


7 12 


5 16 


7 8 520 1 


6 56 


5 32 16 51 


11 52a 


9 32a 


7 52a 



1847.] 



January has Tkirty-one Days* 



11 



PaMage of the Meridian (mean time) and Declination of the Planets. 



1st day. 



Souths, 
h.. m. 

10 26in 

2ia 
9 18m 

6 12 
10 44 
5 46a 
83Q 
9 41 
3 17 
5 56 



Dec. 

— 81 10 
— 23 28 
— 20 25 
-|-1 S2 
— ^13 3 
— ^17 19 
-[-14 27 
-|-21 1 
— ^13 46 
-|-330 



7th day. 



Souths. 
h. m. 

10 32m 

30a 
9 12m 

5 54 
10 30 
5 2da 

8 8 

9 15 
2 56 
5 32 



Dec. 

— 1^28 
—22 37 
— 21 14 
-|-1 32 
— 13 5 
— ^16 49 
14 60 
57 
— ^13 32 
-}-333 



-1-14 
-[-20 



13th day. 



Souths. 
h. m. 

10 
38a 

9 6m 

6 37 
10 14 

5 loa 

744 
8 50 
235 
5 9 



Dec. 

43m| — 1^22 
— 21 21 
— 21 59 
-[-1 17 
■13 4 
— ^16 16 
-[-15 16 
-f«) 54 
— ^13 19 
+ 3 35 



19th day. 



Souths. 
h. m. 

10 67m 

47a 

9 om 

520 
10 
4 53a 
722 
8 25 

3 14 

4 46 



o I 

— 23 38 

— ^19 42 
— 22 34 
-|-1 8 

12 69 
I — ^15 40 

15 44 
53 
— ^13 6 
+ 339 






fi(Du<&s. Dec. 
h. m. 

11 13m| — S3 8 



25th day. 



64a 
8 54m 
5 1 
944 
4 37a 

7 

8 1 
153 
4 23 



— ^17 43 

— 23 3 

-|-1 4 

— ^12 62 
— ^15 

-[-16 14 

-|h20 S2 

— 12 61 

+ 3 43 



I 



ii 



1 

4 
5 

6 

7 
8 

S. 
11 
12 
IS 
14 
16 
16 

5. 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 

S, 
26 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 

S. 



h. m. 

g 
32m 



1 2om 

2 6 

2 51 

3 33 

4 15 

4 68 
6 40 



6a4m 

7 12 

8 1 
8 55 
950 

10 48 

11 47 



046a 
143 
2 39 
333 

4 26 

5 18 
10 



7 2a 

7 64 

8 46 
937 

10 27 
U15 

g 



Moon rises or sets. Mean Time. 



o 

I 
I 



rises, 
h. m. 

6 9a 

6 6 



7 4a 

8 2 

9 
967 

10 53 

11 50 



49m 

1 49 

2 50 

3 51 

4 50 
648 

sets. 



6 9a 
723 
837 
948 
10 60 



8m 






rises. 
h. m. 

5 14a 

6 10 



7 8a 

8 4 

9 2 
958 

10 53 
1160 



47m 
148 

2 47 

3 47 
446 
544 

sets. 



6 13a 

725 

838 

948 

10 88 






nses. 
h. m. 

6 18a 

6 14 



7 1la 

8 7 

9 4 
988 

10 54 

11 49 



045m 

146 

244 

343 

443 

639 

sets. 



6m 



1 14m 

2 18 

3 18 

4 14 
6 3 
6 47 
626 



2m| 7 im 



1 iim 

2 15 

3 14 

4 9 
469 
543 
633 



6 16a 
728 
839 
948 
10 88 



o 

dd 



nses, 
h. m. 

532a 

625 



7 21a 

8 14 

9 8 
10 1 

10 53 

11 45 



4am 

136 
233 
3 31 
429 
6 26 

sets. 



4m 



6 5em 



iiom 

2 11 

3 10 

4 6 
4 55 
639 
620 



26a 
735 
842 
9 49 
10 54 
1168 



o 
« 



8 



rtaes, 
h. m. 

539a 

632 



7 26a 

8 18 

9 11 
10 2 

10 63 

11 45 



PHENOMENA AND OBSERYA- 
TIONS. 

Sundays and Holidays. 



Washington Mean Time, 
d. h. m. ^ , 

Circumcision, © nearest 
2 6 iim<J ^vTit :|c 1 29 N. 
2d Sunday after Christmas. 

2 3 48a n ft O 
6 10 lim<J (fV'Ophi. *1 27 N. 
684a^§$ 5J917S. 

6 8 40a ^ ^^OpM. ^1 55 S 
9 3 27m^ ^«OphL5|c0 20N. 
10 11 4om ^ stationary. 



38m lEpipJiany. 



134 
2 31 
328 
425 
5 23 

sets. 



6 32a 
739 
8 46 
950 

10 54 

11 57 



6 66m 



1 
3 
2 63 
362 
442 
6 27 
9 



im 





648m 



68m 

1 67 
265 
3 49 
439 
523 
6 6 



6 46m 



12 4 12m (5^9 19 69 S. 

13 36a 9 in Aphelion. 

13 168a ^ ^C ^8 87 S. 

13 8 44a ^ m {3 

i5i0 24m<Jg<E g4 59S. 

1st Sunday after Epiphany. 



17 11 44m (5 9 C 
19 3 45m^ fid 
19 11 14m ^ in Q 
21 6ia 6W<L 



9 6 20 S. 
>i 5 46 S. 

9 1 46 S. 



24 27m ^ in Aphelion. 

2d Sunday after Epiphany, 

Conversion of St, Patd. 

26 728a i (Ji^Ophi. 5tC 1 45 S. 

25 10 52a 6^€ J5if2 68N. 
28 10 64a 6 ^e^Opiji,^ Q 33 g 

31 43a J2^ stationary. 
Septuagesima Sunday. 



12 February^ Second Month, begins on Monday. [1847. 


TwiUgfat begins and ends. Mean Time. 




Ist day. 


1 7th day. 


13th day. |i 


19th day. 


25th day. | 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins. Ends, 
h. m. h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins 
h. m. 


. Ends. 
h. m. 


Begins 
h. m. 


.L&ldB. 

h. m. 


Boston, 


5 38m 


650a 


I 5 33m 


6 56a 


5 26m 


7 3a 


5 18m 7 loa 


5 9m 7 17a 


N. York, 


5 37 


6 51 


531 


6 57 


525 


7 4 


5 18 


7 10 


5 10 


7 16 


Wash'n, 


536 


653 


531 


6 58 


5 35 


7 4 


5 18 


7 10 


5 10 


7 16 


Charles., 


531 


6 07 


527 


7 1 


533 


7 6 


5 17 


7 11 


5 10 


7 1« 


N. Orl's, 


539 


6 59 


525 


7 3 


5 21 


7 8 


5 16 


7 13 


5 11 


7 16 


APOGEK AND PK&IAEX OF TBB MOON. 

ApogM, 8d day, 4h. M. | Perigee, 15th day, 8b. A. 


PBAUB OF THE MOON. 

Last Qnarter, 8th day, 7h. a0.5m. M. Vint Quarto*. Sktday, lOh. 6lJ0m. A. 
New Moon, 15th « 6 17.8 M. 


• 

1 

i 


1 

1 

_ _ 


filings vpper limb ziaas and sets, {oorr. for refract.) M. Time. 


High Water. M. Time. 




1 


So 

r 


g 


S (3 


• 




1 

a 
1 


nses. 
h. m. 


HtS. 

h. m. 


rises. 
h.m. 


sets. 


nses. 
h.m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h.m 


nses. 
h.m. 


sets. 
h.m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


1 


M. 


7 14 


5 14 


7 11 


5 18 


7 7 


521 


6 55 


5 33 


6 51 


5 38 


• • • 


10 9a 


8 29a 


2 


Tu. 


13 


15 


10 


19 


6 


»i 


55 


34 


50 


38 


39m 


10 41 


9 1 


S 


W. 


IS 


17 


9 


20 


5 


34 


54 


34 


49 


39 


1 1 


1113 


932 


4 


Tk 


11 


18 


7 


31 


4 


35 


53 


«> 


49 


40 


1 33 


11 45 


19 5 


5 


F. 


10 


19 


Q 


23 


3 


36 


sa 


36 


46 


41 


3 5 


. • • 


10 34 


6 

7 


a 




7 8 


31 


5 


83 


3 


27 


53 


37 


47 


41 


334 


14m 


11 6 


5 22 


7 4 


5 35 


7 1 


5 28 


6 51 


5 38 


8 47 


5 43 


3 6m 


46m 


11 42a 


8 


M. 


6 


23 


3 


36 





39 


50 


39 


46 


43 


3 43 


1 82 


• • . 


9 


Tu. 


5 


34 


3 


37 


6 59 


30 


49 


40 


45 


44 


4 31 


3 1 


021m 


10 


W. 


4 


35 


1 


36 


68 


33 


48 


41 


44 


45 


5 13 


3 58 


1 12 


11 


Th. 


S 


26 





30 


57 


33 


47 


42 


44 


46 


625 


4 5 


3 25 


12 


F. 


1 


' 28 


6 58 


31 


55 


34 


47 


43 


43 


46 


7 45 


586 


345 


13 
14 


S. 
.9w. 



6 5» 


39 


57 


33 
5 34 


54 
6 53 


35 


46 


44 


43 


47 
5 48 


9 8 


648 


5 8 


5 30 


6 56 . 


536 


6 45 


5 45 


6 41 


10 9m 


7 49m 


6 9m 


15 


M. 


57 


33 


55 


35 


53 


t^H 


44 


46 


40 


49 


11 1 


8 41 


7 1 


16 


Tu. 


06 


33 


53 


36 


51 


39 


43 


47 


39 


50 


11 47 


937 


7 47 


17 


W. 


54 


35 


53 


37 


49 


40 


42 


48 


38 


51 


33a 


10 13 


833 


18 


Th. 


53 


36 


51 


39 


48 


42 


41 


48 


38 


52 


1 17 


10 57 


9 17 


19 


F. 


53 


38 


49 


40 


47 


40 


49 


37 


53 


8 1 


11 41 


10 1 


20 
21 




50 

6 48 


39 


48 


41 
>43 


46 
6 44 


44 


39 


50 


36 


53 
554 


3 44 


34a 


10 44 


5 40 


6 46 


5 45 


6 37 


5 51 


535 


3 29a 


1 9a 


11 S9m 


22 


M. 


47 


43 


45 


44 


43 


46 


36 


53 


34 


55 


4 16 


156 


16a 


23 


Tu. 


45 


43 


44 


45 


43 


47 


35 


53 


33 


56 


5 9 


3 49 


1 9 


24 


W. 


44 


46 


43 


46 


40 


48 


34 


54 


33 


57 


623 


4 3 


323 


25 


Th. 


43 


46 


41 


48 


38 


49 


33 


55 


31 


57 


7 48 


538 


3 48 


26 


F. 


41 


47 


39 


49 


, 37 


51 


33 


56 


30 


58 


9 9 


6 49 


5 9 


27 

28 


S. 
Su, 


39 


49 


38 


50 
5 51 


36 


53 


31 


57! 38 


59 
6 


10 10 


760 


6 10 


6 3i 


3 


5 50 


5 37 1 


6 34 


553 


P 30 


5 58 |6 37 


10 55a 


8 35a 6 55a 



1847.] 



February has Twenty-eight Days. 



13 



Paenage of the Meridian (mean time) and Declination of the Planets. 



2601 day. 



lat day. 



Souths. 
h. m. 

11 33m 
1 la 
8 43in 

439 

025 

4 19a 

636 
733 
1 28 
3 56 



Dec. 

—81 33 
— 15 1 
— 83 28 
+ 1 9 
— ^12 43 
— ^14 13 

tl6 53 
20 54 
— ^18 34 
+ 3 49 



7th day. 



Souths, 
h. m. 

1149m 
1 6a 

843m 
4 18 
9 10 

4 2a 

6 16 

7 10 
1 8 
3 43 



Bee. 

— 19 16 
— 12 20 
—83 41 
-|-1 18 
— ^12 29 
— ^13 30 
28 
56 
— 12 19 
-|-3 54 



j-n 

4-20 



13fch day. 



Sowtha, Deo. 
h. m. 

8a I — ^16 7 

1 11 — 9 40 
8 87m| — 83 46 
356 
8 64 
3 47a 

5 57 

6 47 
47 
3 11 



-|-134 
— ^12 14 
— 12 47 
4-18 3 
4-80 59 
— ^12 3 
-f-4 



19th day. 



Souths. 
h. m. 

87a 

1 15 

83em 

334 

838 
332a 
538 
6 85 
086 
8 48 



I 



t 



1 
2 
3 

4 
5 
6 



5. 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 

S. 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 

^ 
S. 

22 

28 

24 

25 

26 

27 



5. 



I 
I' 



h. m. 
47m 
130 

2 13 
8 55 

3 37 
480 



5 5m 
588 
642 
734 
830 
98S 
10 86 



Moon rises or sets. Mean Time. 



Dec. 

6 I 

-^18 8 
— 644 
— 83 43 
+ 1 56 
— ^11 59 
— ^18 2 

t 18 301 
21 4 
— ^11 48 
+ 4 6 



SoiOhs. Deo. 
h. m. 

45a I — 7 18 



1 19 



3 48 



8 87m — 83 33 
3 11 -f- 8 86 
8 81 — ^13 39 
3 17a I — ^11 15 
580 
6 3 
5 
8 86 



- -19 16 

-81 9 

—11 38 

"1-413 



nses. 
h. m. 

650a 
748 
844 
9 41 

10 37 

11 37 



11 85m 
022a 
1 19 
8 14 

3 9 

4 3 
456 



550a 
^48 
734 
834 
913 
10 
10 45 



U28a 



35m 

133 

234 

331 

485 

5 14 



sets. 
6ioa 

726 

8 40 

958 

11 1 



9m 
1 11 

8 8 
3 

3 45 

4 85 

5 8 



535m 



M 



nses. 
h. m. 

6 58a 

7 49 
844 
940 

10 37 

11 35 



33m 

1 31 
830 

3 27 

4 21 

5 11 



sets. 
6 12a 

726 

8 39 

51 

10 50 




1 

2 4 
8 56 

3 41 

4 82 
4 59 



6m 

8 



5 38m 
2 



i 



o 

^ 



nses. 
h. m. 

6 55a 

760 

845 

9 40 

10 35 

1133 



03Qm 

1 27 

2 26 

3 23 

4 17 

5 8 



sets. 
6 14a 

727 

839 

950 

10 68 




1 
2 

2 68 

3 37 

4 19 
4 67 



3m 

4 



5 30m 



nses. 
h. m. 

7 oa 

753 

8 45 

9 37 

10 30 

11 26 



o 
« 

^ 

■> 



2om 

1 15 
8 13 

3 10 

4 4 

4 57 



sets. 
6 19a 

789 
838 
9 45 

10 50 

11 53 



52m 

1 47 
8 39 

3 85 

4 8 
4 48 



5 84m 



nses. 
h. m. 

7 3a 

7 65 
S 46 
9 37 

10 30 

11 83 



17m 

1 18 
8 10 

3 6 

4 1 
454 



sets, 

6 88a 

7 31 
833 
9 45 

10 47 

11 60 



49m 

144 

836 

3 81 

4 5 
4 45 



5S8m 



PHENOMENA AND 
TIONS. 



OBSBBTA- 



Sundays and Holidays. 

Vaahlngtoti Mean Timie^ 
d. h. m. ^ . 

8 7 qm 5 gr. Hel. Lat N. 
Purif. of B. V, Mary. 
5 7 54m; gr. Hel. Lat S. 

7 5 85m^ ^it 5|C0 7 S. 
77 55a^9li 901 S. 

11 13a i id ^ 6 6 S. 

Sexagesima Sunday. 

13 10 59m ^ gr. Hel. Lat. S. 

13 4 iia n ? O 

15 8 36m ii<L ^ 6 26 S. 

16 7 83a ihd T^ 6 80 S. 
16 8 8m^ ^Xf ^ 145 S. 
16 8 50m ^ m sup. i Q. 

Quinquagesima or Shrove Sun. 
16 10 38m i9<L 9 4 48 S. 
IS 7 47m^9C 9 1 26 S. 
Ash Wednesday. 
19 9 9m i^lri 

88 3 5m ^ ^ ^ 
88 5 67mi^C 

1st Sunday in Lent 

83 8 5m($ 12© Wash. b. 1782. 
88 4 87a fl[ stationary. 

St. Matthias. 

84 8 48a ($ $v^ t # 38N. 

86 5 86a UllQ 

88 %9tmi$ot 3|C126N. 

2d Sunday in Lent. 



^ 20 S. 

S 11 49 S. 

:5?8 2lN. 



14 March, Third Months begins hn Monday. [1847. 


Twilight begins and ends. Mean Time. 




1st day. 


1 7th day. 


13th day. | 


19th day. 


26th day. | 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


'Begins. £nds. 
h. m. h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins 
h. m. 


. Ends. 
h. m. 


B^ns. 
h. m. 


i'inds. 
h. m. 


BoBton, 


5 3m 


7235 


L 4 53m 


7 29a 


4 43m 


7 37a 


4 33m 7 45a 


4 20n] 


L 789a 


N. York, 


5 4 


722 


454 


7 28 


4 44 


736 


434 


742 


433 


7 49 


Wash'n, 


5 5 


721 


455 


7 27 


4 46 


734 


436 


740 


436 


746 


Charies., 


6 7 


7 19 


4 59 


7 24 


4 51 


739 


4 43 


733 


434 


738 


N. Orl's, 


6 7 


7 19 


5 


7 23 


4 53 


727 


4 46 


731 


4 37 


735 


APOOEK A^D PEaiGKE OF THB MOON. 

Apogee, 2d day, 9h. M. | Perigee, 16th day, 7h. M. | Apogee, 29th day, Ih. A. 


PHABKS < 

Full Moon, 1st day, lOh. 0.4m. A. 
Last Qnarter, 9th " 11 30.6 A. 
New Moon, 16th « 4 2 7 A. 


)F TH£ MOON. 

First Quarter, 23d day, Oh. 82.6m. A. 
Full Moon, 8l9t '^ 4 8.7 A. 


• 


1 


Sun's y^er Ihnb rises and sets, (con*, for refract.) M. Time. 


High Water. M. Time. 


1 

IB 

1 


• 

1 


9* 

•B 

1 


1 


1 O 


h 

• 


• 

1 


h 
1 


g 

1*^ 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 

h. m. ] 


uts. 

1. m. 


rises. 
h m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


ris'.s. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


1 


M. 


6 37 


5 SO 


«35 


5 51 


fi:«l 


5 52 


6 29 


5 57 


6 26 


5 59 


11 34a 


9 14a 


734a 


2 


Tu. 


35 


61 


33 


52 


32 


53 


27 


58 


25 


6 


• • • 


946 


8 6 


3 


W. 


33 


52 


32 


53 


30 


53 


26 


59 


24 





6m 


10 18 


838 


4 


Th. 


31 


63 


30 


54 


29 


56 


25 


59 


23 


1 


038 


10 46 


9 6^ 


5 


F. 


30 


54 


29 


55 


28 


57 


34 


6 


22 


2 


1 6 


11 17 


9 37 


6 

7 


S. 
Su. 


6 27 


56 


27 


57 


26 


58 


22 


1 
6 2 


21 
3 20 


2 
6 3 


1 37 


1146 


10 6 


5 57 


6 26 


5 58 


6 25 


5 59 


6 21 


2 6m 


• • • 


10 36a 


8 


M. 


25 


58 


24 


59 


23 


6 


20 


3 


19 


4 


2 36 


16m 


11 10 


9 


Tu. 


23 


59 


23 


6 


22 


1 


19 


3 


18 


4 


3 10 


50 


11 50 


10 


W. 


32 


6 


21 


1 


20 


2 


18 


4 


17 


5 


3 50 


1 60 


• • • 


11 


Th. 


20 


1 


19 


2 


19 


3 


16 


5 


16 


6 


4 38 


2 18 


0S8m 


12 


F. 


16 


3 


18 


3 


17 


4 


15 


5 


15 


6 


5 46 


326 


1 46 


13 
14 


S. 
Su, 


17 
6 IS- 


4 


16 


4 


16 


5 
6 6 


14 
6 12 


6 


14 


7 
6 8 


7 12 


452 


3 12 


6 5 


6 14 


6 5 


6 14 


6 7 


6 12 


8 38m 


6 18m 


4 38m 


16 


M. 


IS 


6 


13 


5 


12 


7 


11 


8 


11 


8 


946 


726 


5 46 


16 


Tu. 


12 


7 


11 


7 


11 


8 


10 


8 


10 


9 


10 39 


8 19 


6 39 


17 


W. 


10 


8 


9 


8 


9 


9 


8 


9 


8 


9 


11 28 


9 8 


723 


18 


Th. 


8 


9 


8 


10 


8 


10 


7 


10 


7 


10 


oua 


951 


8 11 


19 


F. 


6 


11 


6 


11 


6 


11 


6 


11 





11 


55 


10 36 


8 55 


20 
21 


S. 
Su, 


5 
6 3 


12 
6 13 


4 
6 3 


12 


4 


12 


4 


11 


5 


11 
612 


1 39 


11 19 


939 


6 13 


6 3 


6 13 


6 3 


6 12 


6 3 


2 2la 


la 


10 2im 


22 


M. 


1 


14 


1 


14 


1 


14 


2 


13 


2 


12 


3 5 


46 


11 5 


23 


Tu. 


5 50 


15 


5 59 


15 





14 


1 


13 


1 


13 


3 50 


130 


1150 


24 


W. 


58 


16 


53 


16 


5 59 


15 


5 59 


14 





14 


442 


322 


042a 


25 


Th. 


56 


17 


56 


17 


57 


16 


5B 


15 


6 59 


14 


5 49 


329 


149 


26 


F. 


55 


18 


55 


18 


55 


17 


57 


16 


67 


16 


7 13 


453 


3 13 


27 

28 


S. 

Su, 


53 
5 51 


20 


53 


19 


63 


18 
6 10 


56 
5 54 


16 
6 17 


56 
6 55 


16 
6 16 


836 


6 16 


436 


6 21 


5 51 


6 20 


5 51 


9 43a 


7 22a 


5 42a 


29 


M. 


49 


22 


50 


21 


50 


20 


53 


18 


64 


16 


10 27 


8 7 


627 


30 


Tu. 


47 


23 


48 


22 49 


21 


52 


18 


53 


17 


11 4 


844 


7 4 


31 


W. 


46 


24 


46 


23 47 


22 


51 


19 


51 


18 


11 36 


9 15 


735 



1847.] March has Thirty-one Days. 15 


PasBage of the Meridian (mean time) and DecUnatiou of the Planets. 




Irt day. 


7th day. 


13th day. 


19th day. 


26th day. 


iScmtAs. 


l>ec. 


Souths 


Dec. 


Souths. 


Dec. 


Souths. 


Deo. 


Souths. 


Dec. 




h. m. 


e t 


h. m. 


O 1 


h. m. 


O i 


h. m. 


1 


h. m. 


1 


5 
9 


56a 

1 21^ 


— 3 40 

— 138 


1 9a 
1 25 


-- I 29 
-- 1 23 


1 14a 

1 28 


--6 5 
--4 341 


1 4a 

1 32 


--8 45 
-- 7 37 


38a 

1 35 


--856 

--10 33 


^ 


S 24m 


— 23 2C 


» 3 19n 


1 — 22 56 


8 14m 


— 22 24 


8 8m 


— 21 45 


3 3m 


—SO 88 


s 


2 54 


-|-2 47 


' 2 29 


"1-3 25 


2 3 


^-4 6i 


1 36 


-}-4 49 


1 9 


+ 632 


5 


8 10 


— ^11 25 


. 7 53 


— 11 3 


7 36 


— ^10 39; 


7 18 


—10 14 


7 


— 9 46 


3 


3 7a 


— 10 44 


\ 2 53a 


— 9 58 


2 39a 


— 9 12, 


2 25a 


— 8 27 


2 12a 


— 7 42 


Tl. 


5 9 
5 49 


4-19 3£ 
--21 15 


) 458 

\ 528 


-|^0 16 4 36 
- -21 20 6 7 


-|h20 52| 

--81 28' 

1 


420 
4 47 


-|-ai 28 

--21 36 


4 5 

4.27 


--22 2 

--21 44 


h 


U 51in 


— ^11 2S 


» 11 son 


a — ^11 6 11 9m 


— ^10 51{ 


10 49m 


— ^10 36 


10 28m 


— 10 21 


¥ 


2 iia 


-}-4 IS 


) 1 48a 


, -f-4 25 


1 26a 


+ 4a3; 


1 4a 


-|-4 41i 


4oa 


-f-4 49 


i 




Moon rises or sets. Mean Tuue. 




S| 




o 


• 


• 


• 


TJUJiiNOMlfiiNA AJMD UJBSISUVA' 


1 




dd 


^ 


^ 


4 


TIONS. 


•s 

1 


il 


§ 


1 

• 


i 


0^ 

1 

an 
.4 


S 

• 


Sundays and Holidays. 


^ 


m 


55 


^ 


s 


^ 






rues. 


rWM. 


n><#. 


nses. 


rises. 


Washington Mean Time. 




h« m. 


u. m. 


H. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


n. m. 


{ d. h. m. , , 


1 


s 


540a 


5 42a 


5 44a 


6 47a 


6 50a 


St. David. 


2 


lun 


630 


639 


6 39 


6 41 


6 42 


4 i0 30m$ in Q. 


3 

4 


53 

1 36 


735 
8 31 


734 
8 31 


735 
8 29 


733 

825 


733 
8 24 


6 7 om5 in 0. 

9 5m g in rerihelion. 


5 


2 19 


929 


927 


9 25 


920 


9 18 


10 4 7a (5 ?AAy * 1 6N. 


6 


3 3 


10 27 ] 


L0 25 


L0 23 


10 14 


10 11 


1210 6m 3 d(C ^ 6 8 S. 
Sd Sunday in Lent. 


3 49m 


1125a ] 


LI 22a . 


LI 19a 


11 8a 


11 4a 


8 


436 


• • • 


• • • 


• • a 


• • • 


« • • 


13 34m 6 9 9 ; 14 S. 


9 


627 


023m 


19m 


oism 


3m 


om 


14 6 9m ^ SX' elong. 18 18 E. 


10 


6 19 


1 19 


115 


111 


053 


56 


15 11 69m 2 ^(C 1^ 5 20 S. 


11 


7 14 


2 12 


2 8 


2 4 


1 51 


1 48 


17 8 4a (5 W(C S 2 29N. 


12 


8 10 


3 3 


259 


2 65 


243 


2 41 


•17 8 36a ilj^€ 9 1 12 S. 


13 


9 6 


348 


346 


342 


333 


329 


17 10 24a 61lr^ * 1 6N. 
Uth Sunday in Lent. 


10 3m 


4 3im 


4 29m 


4 26m 


4 20m 


4 18m 


15 


11 


5 11 


5 9 


5 9 


6 4 


6 4 


18 6 im (5 9 (C 9039 s. 


16 


1156 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


18 864a ^ ^9 . ^ 3 54N. 


17 


52a 


7 27a 


726a 


7 25a 


7 22a 


7 22a 


15^. Patrick. 


18 


1 48 


8 40 


839 


8 37 


830 


829 


19 7 5om 5 gr. HeL Lat. N. 


19 


2 44 


51 


9 49 


943 


937 


934 


21 25mO ent *f* Spring beg. 


20 


339 


10 67 


L0 54 


10 51 


10 39 


10 37 


21 1 26a $ stationary. 
5th Sunday in Lent. 


4 34a 


11 69a 


11 65a 


11 5ia 


11 39a 


1135a 


22 


629 


• ■ • 


• • • 


• • • 


• • • 


• « • 


21 7 oa <5^(C j^3 46N. 


23 


6 19 


64m 


06om 


46m 


033m 


30m 


23 10 7m^ $9 $ 4 23N. 


24 


7 9 


1 43 


139 


134 


1 22 


1 18 




25 


7 57 


225 


222 


2 Id 


2 7 


2 3 


Lady Day. 


26 


643 


3 2 


3> 


2-57 


2 47 


2 44 


26 4 28a *(5 ?viy *0 20N. 


27 


9 27 


336 


334 


33S4 


325 


3 22 


27 10 4m^^7r'V5 3|C168N. 

Palm Sunday. 


10 lom 


4 8m 


4 6m 


4 4m 


3 69m 


3 58m 


29 


10 92 


436 


4'd6 


435 


432 


432 


31 2 44a Inf. (5 5 O- 


80 


1134 


6 4 


6 4 


5 4 


5 4 


6 6 


31 4 16a (5 ^vVy * 1 21 N. 


31 


g 


532 


634 


536 


538 


6 40 


Lunar eclipse, iftyis. in U. S. 



16 April, Fourth Month, begins on Thursday. [1847. 


Twilight begins and ends. Mean Time. 




1st day. 


7th day. 


13th day. 


19th day. 


26th day. | 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Bnds. 
h. m. 


Begins. Ends, 
h. m. h- m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


1 nds. 
h. m. 


Begins 
h. m. 


. Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m 


Boston, 


4 7m 


8 IS 


I 365m 


8 oa 


3 43m 


8 Ida 


3 3im 8 27a 


3 19m 8 37a 


N. York, 


4 11 


7 57 


350 


8 6 


3 48 


8 14 


3 37 


822 


326 


830 


Wasli'n, 


4 16 


763 


4 4 


8 1 


353 


8 9 


343 


8 17 


333 


826 


Charles., 


4 25 


743 


4 16 


7 49 


4 7 


755 


359 


8 


3 61 


8 5 


N. Orl's, 


429 


730 


421 


7 44 


4 13 


7 49 


4 6 


753 


358 


768 


APOGUE AMD PX&IGn OV THK MOON. 

Perigee, 13th day, 6h. A. | Apogee, 26th daj, Ih. BL 


PHASaS OP THX MOON. 

Last Quarter, 8th day, lOh. 18.0m. M. First Quarter, 22d day, 4h. 0.4m. M. 
New Moon, 15th " 1 18.6 M. Full Moon, 80th " 8 17.7 M. 


• 

1 


• 

t 


Sun^s %i^pper limb rises and sets, (oorr. for refract.) M. 


Time. 

• 

4 


High Water. M. Time. 


• 


r 


wo 

r 




• 


• 

o 


1 


|4 


nses. 
\i. m. 


sets. 

h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 

li. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises, 

h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


nses. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


he in. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


1 


Th. 


5 44 


6 25 


5 45 


3 24 


5 46 


623 


5 49 


620 


5 50 


6 18 


* • • 


9 47a 


8 7a 


2 


F. 


42 


26 


43 


25 


44 


24 


48 


20 


49 


19 


7m 


10 19 


839 


3 

4 


S. 


40 

53B 


27 


41 


8 27 


42 

5 41 


25 


46 


21 
6 22 


48 


19 


39 


10 48 


9 8 


629 


5 40 


626 


5 45 


5 47 


620 


1 cm 


IL 19a 


9 39a 


5 


M. 


37 


30 


38 


28 


39 


27 


43 


23 


45 


21 


1 39 


11 51 


10 11 


6 


Tu. 


35 


31 


36 


29 


38 


28 


42 


23 


44 


21 


2 11 


• a • 


10 48 


7 


W. 


33 


32 


35 


JH 


36 


29 


41 


24 


43 


22 


248 


28m 


11 29 


8 


Th. 


32 


33 


33 


32 


35 


30 


40 


25 


42 


23 


3 29 


1 9 


. . • 


9 


F. 


3U 


34 


32 


33 


t» 


31 


39 


26 


41 


23 


4 19 


1 59 


19m 


10 
11 


S. 


26 
6 27 


35 

6 3> 


30 
5 28 


34 
8 35 


32 
5 30 


32 


37 


26 
6 27 


Ji9 
5 38 


24 
6 24 


525 


3 5 


1 25 


6 33 


5 36 


6 50m 


4 30m 


2 5Qm 


12 


M. 


25 


38 


27 


3ft 


29 


34 


36 


28 


37 


25 


8 11 


5 51 


4 11 


13 


Tu. 


23 


39 


25 


37 


27 


£5 


34 


28 


36 


26 


920 


7 


5 20 


14 


W. 


22 


40 


24 


'JH 


26 


36 


3:2 


29 


35 


26 


10 15 


766 


6 15 


16 


Th. 


20 


41 


22 


39 


24 


37 


31 


30 


34 


27 


11 2 


842 


7 2 


16 


F. 


18 


42 


21 


40 


23 


;« 


30 


30 


33 


28 


U 47 


927 


7 47 


17 

18 


S. 


17 
5 15 


43 
6 44 


19 
5 18 


41 
9 42 


21 
5 20 


38 
639 


29 
5 27 


31 
6 32 


32 
5 31 


28 
6 29 


034a 


10 14 


8 34 


1 16a 


10 56m 


9 16m 


19 


M. 


14 


45 


16 


43 


19 


40 


26 


33 


29 


29 


1 69 


11 39 


9 59 


20 


Tu, 


12 


47 


15 


44 


17 


41 


25 


33 


28 


30 


242 


22a 


10 42 


21 


W. 


11 


48 


13 


45 


16 


42 


24 


34 


27 


31 


326 


1 6 


11 26 


22 


Th. 


9 


49 


12 


46 


14 


43 


23 


a> 


26 


31 


4 17 


157 


17a 


23 


F. 


8 


50 


10 


47 


13 


44 


22 


36 


25 


32 


5 18 


2 58 


1 18 


24 
25 


S. 
Su, 


6 
5 5 


51 


9 


48 


12 


45 


21 


36 


24 


32 
633 


634 


414 


2 34 


6 52 


5 8 


S49 


5 10 


646 


5 20 


6 37 


5 23 


7 46a 


526a 


3 46a 


26 


M. 


3 


S3 


7 


50 


9 


47 


19 


38 


22 


34 


8 55 


635 


4 56 


27 


Tu. 


2 


54 


6 


51 


8 


48 


17 


38 


21 


•36 


9 47 


7 27 


6 47 


28 


W. 





56 


3 


62 


7 


49 


16 


39 


20 


a-) 


10 27 


8 7 


627 


29 


Th. 


499 


57 


2 


53 


5 


50 


15 


40 


19 


36 


11 3 


843 


7 3 


30 

— 


F. 


58 


58 


1 


54 


4 


61 


14 


40 


18 


36 


11 36 9 16 


736 



1847.] April has Thirty Days. 17 


Passage of the Meridian (mean time) and Declination of the Planets. 




l8t daj. 


7th day. 


1 13th day. 


19th day. 


25th day. | 


Souths. 


Deo. 


Souths 


Dec. 


Souths. 


Deo. 


Souths. 


Deo. 


Souths. 


Deo. 




h. m. 


e t 


h. m. 


e 1 


h. m. 


1 


h. m. 


1 


h. m. 


1 


!? 


11 54n] 


I - - 6 « 


J 11 17n 


a - - 3 13 


10 4dm 


--0 59 
--18 40 


i0 3im 


--0 14 


110 32m 


--066 
--«2 94 


9 


1 4oa 


- -13 4: 


r 1 45a 


- -16 21 


1 soa 


1 57a 


--20 41 3 3a 


^ 


7 561X1 


— ^19 & 


> 7 50n 


1 — 18 55 


i 7 44m 


— 17 48 


7 38m 


— ^16 36,; 7 3lm 


— 15 19 


5 


035 


-|-6 2( 


) 6 


4-656 


11 32a 


-f-7 31 


11 3a 


-f- 7 52 10 35a 


+ S 4 


5 


638 


— 9 14 


I 6 19 


— 8 45 


6 om 


— 8 16 


5 4om 


— 7 46i 

1 


5 19m 


— 7 16 


6 


1 57a 


— 6 « 


i 1 44a 


— 6 10 


1 3ia 


— 5 30 


1 19a 


— 4 51 


1 6a 


— 4 14 


n 


348 
4 4 


--22 31 
--21 54 


) 333 
I 345 


--23 11 
--22 3 


3 19 
328 


- H23 40| 

- -22 12' 


3 5 
3 7 


--24 8 
--28 90 


2 52 
2 49 


--24 34 
--39 88 


h 


10 3m 


— 10 t 


i 94211 


1 — 9 51 


1 9 2im 


— 939! 8 59m 


— 9 27 


8 37m 


— 9 15 


9 


15a 


-|-4 56 


1 in 53 


-}-5 6 


|1130 


4- 5 14 |ll 8 


-f-622 


L0 46 


-t-589 


4 




Moon rises or sets. Mean Time. 








• 


• 


• • 


rUJSJNUMJfi^A AJ!*D OBSjfiKVA- 


1 


l.l 




dd 


dd 


d8 d8 


TIONS. 


o 
m 

1 


is 

33 




1 

• 


1 


1 




1 Sundays and Holidays. 




h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


rises, 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


rises, 
h. m. 


d. 


Washington jSdfian TiniA. i 


h. m. 




1 


17m 


7 23a 


7 22a 


7 20a 


7 14a 


7 14a 1 


2 2 33a 9 in Q. 


2 


1 1 


8 21 


8 19 


8 17 


3 9 


3 7 /Good Friday. '" 


3 

S. 


147 


9 19 


9 17 


9 14 


9 4 


9 1 


3 11 19m 5> go 'IJg?'' 1.823. 


2 34m 


10 18a 


to i4a 


LO loa 


9 59a 


9 55a 


Easter Sunday. 


5 


323 


11 13 


LI 9 1 


LI 5 


10 52 


10 49 


4 ioiim<5^0. 


6 


4 14 


• • • 


• • • 


LI 59 


11 40 


11 42 


5 7 omft ffi\ Hel. Lat N. 

6 8 28m^^ry 5[C0 25S. 


7 


5 7 


7m 


3m 


• • • 


• • • 


• t • 


8 


6 1 


67 


53 


49m 


37m 


34m 


7 2 62m 69 ^ 9 22 28 N. 


9 


65S 


1 42 


1 40 


1 36 


1 25 


1 21 


10 6 29m^ ^C ^ 6 18 S. 


10 

S. 


750 


226 


2 23 


2 21 


2 12 

2 55m 


2 10 


11 9 48mn 5©. 
Low Sunday. 


8 44m 


3 4m 


3 3m 


3 im 


2 54m 


12 


930 


3 42 


3 42 


3 41 


338 


338 


11 8 oa S in ?!. 


13 


10 34 


4 18 


4 18 


4 19 


420 


422 Il2 2 66m^>i(C T^ 5 13 S. 


14 


1130 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. Solar Eclipse, invis. in U. S. 


15 


26a 


6 26a 


6 24a 


6 22a 


6 15a 


6 12a 


12 1 8a <5 l2^«P H^ 1 17N. 


16 


123 . 


836 


8 33 


8 30 


8 20 


8 16 


'13 36m 5 stationary. 


17 


2 19 


9 49 


9 39 


9 35 


923 


920 


13 4 22a ($ ^ C 9 1 58 S. 
2d Sunday after Easter. 


3 16a 


10 43a 1 


L0 33a 1 


L0 33a 


10 2la 


10 17a 


19 


4 10 


11 36 1 


11 31 1 


11 27 


11 14 


11 11 


'i4lo 2m ^mC n 1 8 S. 


20 


5 2 


• • • 


• • • 


• • ■ 


• • • 


11 50 16 9 22a <5 ^ty stC 54 S. 


21 


552 


022m 


18m 


15m 


3m 


• • • 


17 2 54m 6 9 C 9 3 56 N. 


22 


639 


1 1 


59 


055 


45 


42m 


18 47a (5 2/f C 214: 6 N. 


28 


724 


1 37 


1 34 


133 


1 24 


1 22 


21 7 64m<5 ^yVJ * 1 9 S. 


24 
S. 


8 7 
8 40a 


2 9 


2 7 


2 5 


2 


158 


21 5 3ia ^ $ ^ $ 1 66 N. 
3d Sund. aft. Easter. St. Mark. 


2 38m 


2 3Sm 


2 36m 


2 32m 


232m 


26 


932 


3 7 


3 7 


3 7 


3 6 


3 6 


21 11 43a $ in Aphelion. 

25 8 47a 6 9v^0 * 1 S. 


27 


1014 


335 


3 35 


336 


338 


339 


28 


10 58 


4 3 


4 4 


4 6 


4 10 


4 13 


25 10 7a 6 ^/*Vy JJC 65N. 


29 


1143 


433 


435 


437 


445 


448 


28 11a g gr. elong. 26 49W. 


SO 


s 


5 6 


5 9 


5 13 


522 


596 


28 1133a 2 9ry * 38 S. 



2* 



18 



I- I -T I !■ I M ^^^M I I — --~- - I 1 ' 

May^ Fifth Month, begins on ScUurday. 



m^ 



Twilight begina and enda. Mean Time. 



Boston, 
N. York, 
Wash'n, 
Charles., 
N. Orl's, 



Istdfty. 



Begins, 
h. m> 

8 7m 

3 14 
328 
343 
361 



Snds. 
b. m. 

8 47a 

840 

838 

8 11 

8 3 



7th day. 



Begins, 
h. m. 

866m 
3 4 

8 13 
336 
345 



Ends, 
h. m. 

8 67a 
8 49 
840 
8 17 

8 8 



18th day. 



Begins, 
h. m. 

a 45m 

8 54 
3 4 

328 
338 



Ends, 
h. m. 

9 7a 

8 58 
8 48 

8 84 
8 14 



19th day. 



Begins, 
h. ni* 

8 3sm 

846 
8 56 

388 
3 33 



Lnds. 
h. m. 

9 17a 

9 8 
8 57 
8 30 
890 



26th day. 



Begins. iBnds. 
h. m. h. m. 



8 8&m 
8 36 
8 47 
3 17 
3 88 



9 28a 
9 18 
9 7 
8 37 
S 28 



PIBIGU AND APOQU OV THJE MOON. 

Perigee, Uth day, 7h. A. j Apogee, 28d day, 4h. A. 



Last Qoarter, 7th day, 
New Moon, 14th '^ 



PHASB8 or THS MOON. 

6h. 41.2m. A. I Fiist Quarter, 2l8t day, 8h. 60.0m. A. 
10 15.8 M. VuU Moon, 29th '< 9 87.4 A. 



I 
I 



J. 

2 
3 

4 
5 
6 

7 
8 



I 



s. 



Son's tvper limb rises and sets, (corr. for refract.) M. Time. 



rises. 
h. m. 
4 56 



Su. 

M. 

Tu. 

W. 

Th. 

F. 

S. 



4 55 
53 

S2 
51 
49 
48 
47 



9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 

16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 



Su. 

M. 

Tu. 

W. 

Th. 

F. 

Su, 

M. 

Tu. 

W. 

Th. 

F. 

S. 



23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 

30 
81 



Su. 

M. 

Tu. 

W. 

Th. 

F. 

Su. 
M. 



sets. 
h. m. 

6 59 



4 46 
44 
43 
48 
41 
40 
30 

4^" 
37 
36 
35 
34 
33 
32^ 

438 
31 
30 
89 
89 
88 
27 

4^ 
26 




1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
7 



8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 



7 15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
80 
21 






6 



rtses. 
h. m. 
450 



sets 
h. m. 

6 55 



458 
56 
55 
54 
52 
51 
50 



6 56 
58 
59 

7 
1 
2 
3 



4 49 
48 
47 
46 
45 
44 
43 

r^ 

41 
40 
39 
39 
3d 
37 



7 23 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 

r» 

30 



4 37 
36 
35 
35 
34 
33 
33 

4^ 
32 



rises. 

h. m. 

5 3 



15 1 

4 59 

58 
56 
55 
54 



7 4 
5 
6 

7 

8 

9 

10 



7 10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 



7 17 
18 
19 
19 
20 
21 
22 



I' 



sets. 
h. m. 
6 52 



6 53 
54 

55 
56 

67 
58 
59 



4 53 
58 

51 
50 
49 

48 
48 



7 23 438 



23 



4 47 
46 
45 
44 
44 
43 
42 

^4 42 
41 
41 
40 
39 
39 
38 



6 50 

7 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 



6 
7 

8 

8 

9 

10 

11 



37 



7 12 
13 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 

7"i7 
18 



|4 



rtses. 
h. m. 

5 13 



5 12 
11 
10 
9 

8 
7 
6 



5 5 
5 
4 
3 
2 
2 
1 







459 

59 

*58 

67 

57 



4 56 
56 
56 
55 
55 
54 
64 

4^ 
53 



sets. 
h. m. 

6 41 



6 42 
43 
43 
44 
45 
46 
46 



6 47 
48 
48 
49 
50 
51 
51 



652 
53 
53 
54 
55 
55 
56 



6 57 
57 
58 
59 
59 

7 
1 

7~X 
2 



rises. 
. m. 

18 



sets. 
h. m. 

6 37 



17 
16 
15 
14 
13 
12 
11 



6 37 
38 
39 
39 
40 
41 
41 



|5 11 

10 
9 

8 
8 
7 
7 



15 6 

6 
5 
5 
4 
4 
3 



P 3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 


l5~0 




6 42 
43 
43 
44 
45 
45 
46 



6 46 
47 
48 
48 
49 
50 
50 



6 51 
51 
52 
53 
53 
54 
54 

665 
56 



High Water. M. Time. 



o 

^ 



h. m. 



9m 
044 

1 17 

1 51 

2 31 

3 15 

4 9 



5 12m 

638 

743 

8 53 

9 50 
10 41 
1129 



15a 

59 

1 40 

2 22 

3 5 
353 
443 



5 43a 

6 58 
753 
8 54 
945 

10 25 

11 6 

11 44a 



1^ 
I 



dd 



h. 
9 



m. 
49a 



10 
10 
11 





1 

2 
4 

5 
6 

7 
8 
9 

9 

10 

11 





1 

o 



24a 

57 
31 

• • 

iim 

55 
49 



52m 

12 
23 
33 
30 
21 
9 



55m 

39. 

20 

2a 

45 
33 
23 



3 
4 

5 
6 
7 

8 
8 

9 
10 



23a 
32 
33 
34 
25 
5 
46 

84a 

8 



I 



J^ 



h. m. 
8 9a 



8 44a 

9 17 
9 51 

10 31 

11 15 

• • • 

9m 



1 12m 

2 32 
343 

4 53 

5 40 

6 41 
729 



8 15m 

850 

940 

10 22 

11 5 
11 53 

43a 



1 43a 

2 52 

3 53 
454 

5 45 

6 25 

7 6 

7 44a 

828 



1847.] May has Thirty-one Days. 19 


Passage of the Meridiaji (mean time) and Declination of the Planets. 




Isftday. 


7th day. 


13th day. 


19th day. 


26th day. 


5imM«. 


Dec. 


Soutfa, 


Dec. 


Souths, 


Dec. 


Souths, 


Dec. 


Souths. 


Deo. 




h. m. 


e t 


h. m. 


1 


h. m. 


e 1 


h. m. 


1 


h. m. 


1 


$ 


to 2smi 


L--24« 
--23 2^ 


) 10 24m 


--536 
--«4 41 


10 33m 


--9 6 
-^25 13 


10 47m 


--13 3 


11 8m 


- -17 11 


9 


2 loa 


1 2 18a 


2 25a 


2 33a 


--25 20 


2 40a 


-H26 2 




7 25n] 


I — ^13 65 


) 7 18m 


— ^12 34 


7 iim 


—11 6 


7 3m 


— 936 


6 56m 


— 8 5 


S 


10 8a 


+ 8 ( 


> 9 4la 


4-769 


9 16a 


-t-743 


8 5la 


4-720 


8 28a 


-|-648 


5 


4 QSm 


L — 6 4t 


J 4 36m 


— 6 20 


4 13m 


— 5 64 


3 19m 


— 530 


3 26m 


— 5 8 


5 


54a 


— 3 41 


L 42a 


— 3 11 


3ia 


— 2 41 


19a 


— 2 15 


8a 


— 1 52 


5 


238 


--«4 Si 
--22 3e 


r 2 25 


--25 17 
--22 43 


2 12 


--25 34 


2 


--26 48 


147 


--26 
--23 2 


u 


2 30 


\ 2 12 


1 54 


--22 60 


1 36 


--22 56 


1 18 


h 


8 lezn 


L — 9 t 


> 7 54m 


— 866 


7 32m 


— 8 47 


7 lom 


— 8 40 


6 47m 


— 834 


« 


10 23 


-t-5 3'3 


r|lO 1 


-f-5 44 


9 39 


-t-5 61 


9 16 


4-557 


8 63 


+ 6 3 


• 

1 




Moon rises or sets. Mean Time. | 




s J 




• 


9 


• 


e 


PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 




^ 

•« 


<Jd 


fH 


^ 

•« 


TIONS. 


^ 
J 


(^1 


g 


1 

• 


1 


1 


1 

• 


• 

Sundays and Holidays. 




a 


m 


isi 


^ 


55 






ns s. 


ises. 


rues. 


ns s. 


rises. 


Washington Mean Time. 




li. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


n. m. 


n. m. 


d. h. m. ^ 


1 


3im 


8 iia 


8 8a 


'8 4a 


7 63a 


7 40a 


St, Philip and St, James. 
Sd Sunday after Easter, 


1 20JI1 


9 9a 


9 5a 


9 la 


8 48a 


8 45a 


3 


2 11 


10 4 


10 


956 


9 43 


9 40 


2 3 3om ^ ^ 9 ^ 2 32 S. 


4 


3 4 


10 55 


L0 51 


10 47 


10 34 


10 31 


5 s 923. ^ m Perihelion. 


5 


3 57 


11 41 


1138 


1135 


11 24 


1120 


6 6 om(5 9^ 9 149N. 


6 


4 51 


• • * 


• « • 


• • • 


• • • 


• • • 


9 34m^ JC ^ 5 47 S. 


7 


5 44 


24m 


2im 


19m 


9m 


6m 


9 8 46m^ ^(TiS? sjc 87N. 


8 


6 38 


1 4 


1 2 


1 


53 


052 


9 2 3ia <J I2 C li 6 4 S. 
Rogation Sunday, 


7 30m 


1 4om 


1 39m 


1 38m 


1 34m 


1 34m 


10 


823 


2 15 


2 16 


2 15 


2 15 


2 15 


9 3 37a (5 ^eK 3|C 56 S. 


11 


9 16 


251 


2 51 


253 


2 65 


2 67 


9 9 oa <5 9 ? 9 27 S. 


12 


10 11 


3 27 


330 


3 31 


3 37 


340 


11 735a (5 9By H^ 36 S. 


13 


11 7 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


Ascension Day, 


14 


3a 


722a 


7 19a 


7 15a 


7 4a 


7 la 


11 9 46a il^k, 9 53 S. 


15 


1 


8 26 


822 


8 18 


8 5 


8 2 


12 10 14m 5 gr. Hel. Lat. S. 
Sunday after Ascension, 


1 56a 


9 24a 


9 19a 


9 15a 


9 2a 


8 59a 


17 


2 50 


10 13 ] 


LO 9 


10 5 


9 53 


9 60 


12 7 34a <5 g C g 1 46 S. 


18 


3 42 


10 56 1 


LO 54 


10 50 


10 39 


10 36 


15 9 33m^ $Bg 5|C 1 7 S. 


19 


4 31 


11 34 1 


11 30 


11 29 


11 20 


11 17 


16 7 om$ stationary. 


20 


5 18 


• • • 


• • > 


• • • 


11 59 


11 57 


16 9 2m<J^C V421N. 

17 5 lom ^ 9 (C 9 6 52 N. 


21 


6 3 


9m 


7m 


5m 


• • • 


• • • 


22 

5. 


646 


41 


39 


37 


033m 


33m 


18 11 im<J ^;i«r H^ 141N. 
Whit Sunday. Pentecost, 


7 23a 


1 9m 


1 8m 


1 8m 


1 6m 


1 6m 


24 


8 10 


1 37 


1 37 


1 37 


138 


1 30 


21 1 36a <5 $ O- 


26 


864 


2 5 


2 6 


2 7 


2 10 


2 13 


21 7 9a ^ ^ l2 <y 21 S. 


26 


938 


234 


236 


2 38 


2 43 


2 46 


22 8 64m ^ 9 err sjc 2N. 


27 


10 25 


3 5 


3 8 


3 11 


3 19 


323 


22 11 40m2 stationary. 


28 


11 13 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


rtses. 


26 2 7a <5^0«r * 1 8N. 


29 

S, 


8 


7 la 


6 67a 


6 53a 


6 4ia 


6 38a 


28 2 27m 9 gr. Hel. Lat K 
Trinity Sunday, 


sm 


766a 


7 64a 


7 50a 


7 37a 


7 34a 


31 


063 


852 


8 48 


8 43 


8 31 


8 27 


31 9 46m$ in Q, 



20 


June^ Sixth Months begins on Tuesdatf. [1847. 


Twiligbt begins and ends. Mean Time. | 




lat day. 


7th day. 

Begins. Ends, 
h. m. h. m. 


18th day. || 


19th day. 


26th day. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins. 
' h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins 
h. m. 


Ends. 
h. m. 


Begins. 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Boflton, 


8 17m 


378 


I 2 12m 


9 44a 


2 om 


960a 


2 sm 54a 


8 om 066a 


N. York, 


829 


025 


2 25 


31 


2 23 


37 


2 28 


040 


883 


41 


Wash'n, 


8 41 


13 


8 37 


9 10 


836 


024 


8 35 


87 


8 30 


928 


Charles., 


3 13 


8 41 


3 10 


8 46 


3 10 


8 50 


3 10 


8 62 


3 11 


853 


N. OrPs, 


3 24 


8 30 


3 22 


8 34 


322 


8 38 


322 


8 40 


3 23 


8 41 


PERIQXK AND APOQKB Of THE MOON. 

Perigee, 7th day, 8h. A. | Apogee, 20th day, llh. M. 


PHASES OF THE MOON. 

Last Qoartar, fith day, lOh. 68 2m. A. ¥iret Quarter, 20l!h day, 2h. 24.1m. A. 
New Moon, 12t|i " 7 44.8 A. Full Moon, 28th " 8 14.5 M. 


1 

1 


• 

1 

1 


Sun's upper limb rises and sets, (corr. for refract.) M. lime. 


High Water. M. Time. 


• 


h 




1^ 


S5 


• 


0t 

h 


l4 


Ttses 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises.] 
h.m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises, sets. 
\x. m. h. m. 


rues. sets. 
h. m.'h. m. 


rises 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


1 


Tu. 


4 20 


7 30 


4 31 


7 24 


4 36 


7 19 


4 53 


7 2 


4 59 


6 56 


22m 


10 39a 


8 59a 


2 


W. 


25 


30 


31 


25 


36 


19 


52 


3 


59 


55 


59 


11 19 


9 39 


8 


Th. 


25 


31 


30 


26 


30 


20 


52 i 4 


59 


57 


1 39 


11 59 


10 19 


4 


F. 


24 


32 


30 


26 


'35 


21 


52 


4 


59 


57 


2 19 


. • . 


11 7 


5 
6 


S. 
Su. 


24 


32 

7 33 


29 
4 29 


27 


35 


21 
7 22 


52 


5 
7 5 


59 

4 58 


68 

6 58 


3 7 


47m 


11 59 


4 24 


7 28 


4 35 


4 52 


3 59m 


1 39m 


• • • 


7 


M. 


23 


34 


29 


28 


35 


23 


51 


6 


58 


59 


4 58 


2 38 


58m 


8 


Ta. 


23 


34 


29 


29 


34 


23 


51 


6 


58 


59 


6 8 


3 48 


2 8 


9 


w. 


23 


35 


28 


29 


34 


24 


51 


7 


58 


7 


7 17 


4 57 


3 17 


10 


Th. 


23 


36 


28 


30 


34 


•21 


51 


7 


58 





8 23 


6 3 


423 


11 


F. 


22 


30 


23 


31 


34 


25 


51 


8 


58 


1 


9 27 


7 7 


5 27 


12 
13 


S. 
Su. 


22 


37 
7 37 


28 


31 
7 31 


34 
4 34 


25 
7 26 


51 
4 61 


8 
7 8 


58 
4 63 


1 
7 1 


10 23 


8 3 


6 23 


4 22 


428 


11 13m 


S 53m 


7 13m 


14 


M. 


22 


37 


28 


32 


34 


26 


51 





58 


2 


2a 


42 


3 2 


15 


Tu. 


22 


38 


28 


32 


34 


26 


51 


9 


56 


2 


46 


10 26 


8 46 


16 


W. 


22 


3d 


28 


33 


34 


27 


51 


9 


68 


2 


1 25 


11 5 


9 25 


17 


Th. 


22 


39 


28 


33 


34 


27 


51 


10 


58 


3 


2 4 


11 44 


10 4 


18 


F. 


22 


39 


28 


83 


34 


27 


51 


10 


59 


3 


2 43 


023a 


10 43 


19 
20 


S. 
Su. 


22 

4 23 


39 


23 


34 
7 34 


34 
4 34 


28 
7 28 


62 
4 52 


10 


59 


3 

7 3 


3 24 


1 4 


11 24 


7 40 


4 28 


7 11 


4 59 


4 8a 


1 48a 


8a 


21 


M. 


23 


40 


28 


34 


34 


28 


•52 


11 


59 




4 53 


233 


53 


22 


Tu. 


23 


40 


29 


34 


35 


28 


52 


11 


59 




5 50 


330 


1 50 


23 


W. 


23 


40 


29 


35 


35 


29 


53 


11 


59 




655 


435 


2 55 


24 


Th. 


23 


40 


29 


35 


35 


29 


53 


11 


5 




755 


535 


3 55 


25 


F. 


24 


40 


29 


35 


35 


29 


53 


11 







8 57 


6 37 


4 67 


26 
27 


S. 
Su. 


24 
4 24 


40 
7 40 


30 


35 
1 35 


36 
4 36 


29 
7 29 


53 
4 53 


12 
7 12 



5 1 


7 4 


950 


730 


550 


4 30 ' 


10 35a 


8 15a 


6 85a 


28 


M. 


25 


40 


31 


35 


36 


29 


54 


12 


1 


5 


11 19 


8 59 


7 19 


29 


Tu. 


86 


40 


31 


35 


37 


29 


54 


12 


1 


5 


• • • 


043 


8 3 


30 


W. 


26 


40 


31 


36 


37 


29 


55 


12 


8 


6 


3m 


10 86 


8 40 



1847.] 



JwM hcts Thirty Da/ys. 



21 



Passage of the Meridian (mean time) aod DecUnAtion of fee Planets. 



t day. 



Souths. 
h. m. 

11 40m 

2 4da 

6 46m 

8 la 

2 56m 
11 55 

1 33a 

57 

6 2im 

8 27 



Deo. 

-4-21 36 

-f^ » 

— 6 17 
+ 6 3 

— 4 47 
— 1 31 
^26 10 
^ 23 7 

— 829 
1-6 



7th day. 



Souths, 
h. m. 

12a 
2 54 

6 38m 

7 40a 

2 30m 
11 44 

1 20a 

40 
5 58m 

3 4 



Dec. 

-di 12 
-4-23 

— 4 44 
-|- 5 18 

-433 

— 1 16 
4-96 16 
-j-^O 10 

— 8 26 
+ 6 15 



13th day. 



Souths. 
h.m- 

45a 
2 50 

6 3Qm 

7 20a 
2 3m 

11 33 

1 8a 

22 
5 35m 
7 41 



I>ec. 
h. m. 

•4-25 13 
4-21 29 

— 3 11 
4-4 28 

— 423 
-13 

-[-26 18 
+23 13 

— 8 24 
+ 6 19 



1 1 h uay. 



Souths. 
h. m. 

1 13a 

3 3 

6 22m 

7 oa 
1 36m 

11 22 
056a 
4 

5 12m 

7 19 



Deo. 

-1-24 41 
-|-1»39 

— 1 39 
-|-334 

— 4 19 

— 56 
16 

23 15 

— 8 24 
-[-623 



25th day. 



SovMa. 
h. m. 

1 34a 

3 6 

6 13m 

6 4ia 
1 8m 
11 11 

045a 
11 47111 

4 48 
656 



Dto. 
h. m. 

— 22 56 
+17 34 

— 9 
+ 236 

— 4 19 

— 63 

^12 
16 

— 8 26 
+ 626 



I 



I 



1 
2 
3 
4 
_5 

S. 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



S. 
14 
16 
16 
17 
18 
19 

S. 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

S, 
28 
29 
30 



I 



r4 



11 



h.m. 
1 S2m 
246 
3 41 
434 
527 



6 18m 

7 10 

8 3 

8 56 

9 50 

10 46 

11 41 



37a 

1 30 

2 22 

3 10 

3 67 

4 42 

5 23 



6 6a 

6 48 

7 32 

8 17 

9 4 
954 

10 47 



11 42a 

S 
038 

134 



Moon rises or sets. Mean Time. 






Txses. 
h. m. 

9 42a 

10 25 

11 6 
11 42 



18m 

62 
127 
2 3 

2 43 

3 28 
8'tS, 



8 4a 

8 51 
992 
10 9 
10 41 
1110 
1139 



7m 
035 

1 5 
139 

2 15 
2 58 



rises. 
736a 

822 
9 6 



dd 

I 



n-es. 
h. m. 

933a 

10 23 
U 3 

11 40 



17m 
052 

1 29 

2 5 
246 
331 
S3t8. 



8 oa 

8 43 

929 

10 6 

10 39 

11 10 
1139 



8m 
037 

1 8 
141 

2 19 

3 2 



rises, 
7 3la 

820 
9 3 



I 



nse . 
h. m. 

934a 

10 19 

11 1 
11 39 



16m 
063 

1 30 

2 8 
2 49 
336 

sets. 



755a 
844 
926 
10 4 

10 37 

11 9 
11 39 



8m 
039 

1 10 
145 
223 
3 7 



I 

@ 



rises. 
h. m. 

922a 

10 9 

10 54 

1134 



15m 
054 

1 35 

2 16 

3 
348 

sets. 



7 43a 

8 32 

9 16 
9 56 

10 31 

11 6 
11 33 



iim 

043 

1 13 

1 55 

2 34 
320 






5 



rises. 
h. m. 

9 19a 

10 6 

10 52 

11 34 



15m 

56 

1 37 

2 20 

3 5 
3 S3 
sets. 



739a 

828 
913 
9 54 

10 31 

11 5 
11 30 



t2m 
046 

1 21 

1 59 

2 41 
326 



rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


7 27a 


7 15a 


7 12a 


8 16 


8 5 


8 2 


9 1 


8 S3 


8 49 



PHENOMENA AND OBSSRYA- 
TIONS. • 

Sundays and Holidays. 



^ 4 37 S. 
9 38 S. 

S 144N. 



Washington Mean Time, 
d. h. m. Q ^ 

3 7 50m <J 9 KlI * 54 N. 

3 52a ^ 5 $ {J 24 3 N. 

Corpus Christi. Fete Dieu. 

3 3 3oa D^Q. 

4 6 38a Sup <J g ©. 

\st Sunday after Trinity. 

4 11 2ia ^ in Perihelion. 

5 10 32a i >2C >l 4 53 S. 

6 4 2a <5 (JC 
8 6 4om (i 9 C 

Su Barnabas. 

10 4 27a i^Jll 
2d Sunday afier Trinity. 

11 4 17a 6 9;)3€ * 048 S. 

12 10 ua i ^qyi 5Jc 36 S. 

13 5 39m3^C jy4 34N. 
13 4 18a ^ 9 C Sf 6 43 N. 
16 7 4m § gr. Hel. Lat N. 

15 3 35a 2 9 ySS 5|C 1 7 N. 
3d Sunday after Trinity, 

16 66m ^ 9(C 97 ON. 
16 11 14a ($ ^ $ ^1 13 S. 

20 1 7a 6 210* 

Sl John Baptists [begins. 

21 9 11a O enters Zo, Summer 

23 735a ^ ^KJJ ^ 114N. 

4tth Sunday after Trinity. 

24 10 7a 1^ stationary. 
St. Peter. 

25 3 52m i gr. Hel. Lat S. 



22 July, Seventh MorUh, begins on Thursday. [1847. 


Twilight begins and ends. Mean Time. 




1st day. II 7th day. 


13th day. | 


19th day. 


26tiiday. | 


begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins. Ends, 
h. m. h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h.m. 


Begins. Ends, 
h. m. h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h m. 


Boston, 


2 ism 


9 64a 


I 3 i9in 


9 49a 


2 26m 


9 44a 


3 35m 9 37a 


344X1] 


L 928a 


N. York, 


326 


940 


2 32 


9 36 


2 39 


9 31 


3 46 


935 


354 


9 18 


Wash'n, 


3 39 


9 27 


3 44 


9 24 


2 51 


9 19 


3 68 


9 14 


3 5 


9 7 


Charles , 


313 


8 53 


3 17 


8 51 


322 


8 48 


3 27 


845 


332 


8 40 


N. OrPs, 


326 


8 41 


339 


8 39 


333 


8 37 


3 37 > 8 34 


3 43 


8 SO 


PXaiQKK AND APOUU OP THB VOON. 

Perigee, 2d day, 8h. A . | Apogee, 18fch day, 5h. M. | Perigee, aoth day, 4h M. 


PHA8SS OF THE MOON. 

Last Quarter, 5th day, 8h. 84.2m. M. First Quarter, 2(yth day, 7h. 44.8m. M. 
New Moon, 12th " 6 29.6 M. Full Moon, 27th «' 5 0.1 A. 


• 

1 
1 


• 

1 

1 


Son^s iqiper limb rifles and sets, (oon 


. for refract.) M. Time. 


High Water. M. Time. 


• 


1 


1 




• 

5Z5 


• 




0% 

a 
1^ 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
\i. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h m. 


rues. 
h. m 


sets. 
h.m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h.m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


1 


Th. 


4 26 


7 40 


433 


7 85 


4 38 


7 29 


4 55 


7 12 


S 2 


7 5 


46m 


11 6a 


926a 


2 


F. 


27 


40 


33 


85 


38 


29 


55 


13 


2 


5 


136 


11 51 


10 11 


3 

4 


S. 


27 
4 28 


40 


:«{ 


34 
7 34 


39 
4 39 


29 
7 28 


56 
4 56 


12 
7U 


3 
5 3 


5 
7 5 


3 11 


• • • 

t 


10 56 


7 40 


433 


2 58m 


38m 


11 47a 


6 


M. 


28 


89 


34 


34 


40 


28 


57 


11 


4 




3 47 


137 


• • • 


6 


Tu. 


29 


39 


85 


34 


40 


28 


67 


11 


4 




4 41 


221 


4iin 


7 


W. 


SO 


89 


35 


38 


41 


28 


58 


U 


4 




542 


322 


1 43 


8 


Th. 


80 


88 


36 


33 


42 


27 


58 


11 


5 




6 51 


4 31 


2 51 


9 


F. 


31 


38 


36 


33 


42 


27 


59 


11 


5 




8 1 


541 


4 1 


10 
11 


S. 


32 
4 38 


38 


37 


33 
7 33 


43 
4 43 


27 
7 27 


59 
5 


10 


6 


7 4 


9 10 


6 50 


5 10 


7 37 


438 


7 10 


5 6 


10 lom 


76am 


oiom 


12 


M. 


33 


37 


39 


31 


4* 


26 





10 


7 


3 


11 3 


843 


7 3 


13 


Tu. 


34 


36 


39 


31 


45 


26 


1 


9 


8 


3 


1148 


928 


748 


14 


W. 


a? 


86 


40 


80 


45 


25 


1 


9 


8 


3 


030a 


10 10 


830 


15 


Th. 


86 


85 


41 


30 


46 


25 


2 


9 


9 


2 


1 7 


10 47 


9 7 


16 


F. 


86 


34 


42 


39 


47 


24 


3 


8 


9 


2 


143 


11 23 


9 43 


17 

18 


Su. 


37 

4 88 


34 
7;fi< 


43 
443 


39 
7 28 


48 

4 48 


23 


3 


8 
7 8 


10 
$ 10 


2 
7 1 


2 18 


11 58 


10 18 


7 23 


5 4 


3 54a 


34a 


10 54m 


19 


M. 


39 


32 


44 


87 


"49 


22 


4 


7 


11 


1 


330 


110 


11 30 


20 


Tu. 


40 


32 


45 


27 


50 


22 


5 


7 


11 





4 10 


150 


loa 


21 


W. 


41 


31 


46 


26 


51 


21' 


6 


6 


12 





454 


234 


54 


22 


Th. 


43 


80 


47 


25 


52 


20 


6 


5 


12 


659 


550 


330 


1 SO 


23 


F. 


43 


29 


47 


34 


53 


19 


7 


5 


13 


59 


659 


439 


2 59 


24 
25 


S. 
Su. 


44 
4 45 


28 


48 


33 


58 


19 

7 18 


8 
5 8 


4 


14 


58 
6 58 


8 7 


5 47 


4 7 


7 27 


4 49 


7 23 


454 


7 4 


5 14 


9 15a 


655a 


5 15a 


26 


M. 


46 


26 


50 


32 


55 


17 


9 


3 


15 


57 


10 10 


750 


6 10 


27 


Tu, 


47 


25 


51 


21 


55 


16 


10 


2 


15 


57 


U 


8 40 


7 


28 


W. 


.48 


24 


52 


20 


50 


15 


10 


2 


16 


56 


11 45 


9 25 


745 


29 


Th. 


49 


23 


53 


19 


57 


14 


11 


1 


17 


55 


• • • 


10 9 


6 29 


30 


F. 


50 


22 


54 


18 


58 


13 


12 





17 


55 


029m 


10 53 


9 13 


31 


S. 


51 


21 


55 


17 


59 


12 


13 


16 59 


18 


54 


1 13 


11 34 


9 54 



1847.] 



July has Thirty-one Days. 



23 



Paasage of the Heridian (mean time) aod Declination of the Pianete. 



25th day. 



1st day. 



Souths. 
h. m. 

148a 

3 8 

6 4m 

623a 
039in 

11 
033a 

11 2910 

4 25 
632 



AJ6C* 

--20 28 

— -15 14 
--1 19 
-|- 1 36 

— 4 25 
-0 54 

4-26 
4-2317 

— 8 27 
-{-6 29 



7th day. 



Somhs. 
h. m. 

1 54a 

3 8 

5 54m 

6 6a 

oiom 

10 50 

2ia 
11 iim 

4 1 
6 9 



Dec. 

— -17 39 
--12 44 

-8 44 
-f-0 32 

— 4 36 
-- 59 

t25 53 
23 16 

— 8 30 
-f-6 31 



13th day. 



Souths. 
h. m. 

1 S2a 

3 8 

5 45m 

5 48a 
11 37 
10 39m 

9a 

10 53m 
3 37 

6 46 



o i 

»14 51 



— ^10 

— 034 

— 4 56 

— 1 8 
4-55 39 
-[-23 14 

— 8 35 
-|-6 3:3 



19th day. 
Souths. 



h. m. 

1 42a 

3 6 
5 3Sm 
5 32a 
11 8 

10 2^11 

11 56 
10 36 

3 13 
5 22 



— -12 25 
-- 7 22 
--5 24 

— 1 41 

— 5 19 

— 1 22 
--25 22 
-|-23 12 
-r-8 42 
-|-« 33 



Souths. 
h. m. 

1 2la 

3 3 

5 24m 

6 16a 
10 39 

10 18m 

11 44 
10 18 

2 48 

4 59 



Deo. 

e I 

-10 47 
-435 

— 638 

— 2 49 

— 546 

— 1 38 
4-25 3 
-f-23 9 

— 8 49 
-|-6 33 



• 

1 

1 


Hoon Souths, 
Mean Time. 


Moon rises or sets. Mean Time. | 


• 


• 

0% 

1 

• 


c5 

a 

i 


• 
Si 

1 


• 

i 

• 
55 


h. m. 


rises, 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


1 


2 29m 


9 44a 


9 43a 


9 4ia 


9 35a 


9 3la 


2 


323 


10 21 


10 20 


10 19 


10 16 


10 16 


3 


4 16 


10 65 


10 56 


10 55 


10 56 


10 57 


S. 
5 


5 8m 


11 30a 


11 3la 


11 32a 


1135a 


11 38a 


6 












6 


6S2 


5m 


8m 


oiom 


16m 


19m 


7 


7 45 


42 


046 


050 


063 


1 3 


8 


839 


1 24 


127 


1 33 


1 43 


1 50 


9 


934 


2 11 


2 15 


220 


2 33 


2 39 


10 


10 28 

1122m 


3 


3 5 


3 10 


3 24 


330 


3 55m 


3 59m 


4 sm 


4 19m 


4 25m 


12 


13a 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


IS 


1 3 


8 7a 


8 4a 


8 2a 


753a 


7 50a 


14 


161 


8 42 


340 


837 


8 31 


8 29 


15 


236 


9 13 


9 11 


9 10 


9 5 


9 4 


16 


3 19 


9 41 


9 40 


9 40 


938 


933 


17 
S. 


4 1 


10 10 


10 10 


10 10 


10 11 


10 12 


4 44a 


10 37a 


10 39a 


10 40a 


10 42a 


10 46a 


19 


527 


11 7 


11 8 


1111 


11 16 


11 19 


20 
21 


6 10 
656 


1138 


1141 


11 43 


11 52 


11 56 












22 


744 


12m 


16m 


19m 


029m 


35m 


28 


835 


51 


056 


069 


1 12 


119 


24 

S. 


929 


1 37 


141 


1 46 


2 


2 6 


10 25a 


2 28m 


2 33m 


2 38m 


2 S2m 


2 63m 


26 


1131 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


27 


8 


659a 


666a 


6 64a 


6 44 


6 4ia 


28 


18m 


74d 


740 


737 


7 30 


728 


29 


114 


821 


820 


8 19 


8 15 


8 16 


80 


2 9 


867 


867 


887 


8 66 


8 67 


81 


3 3 


033 


033 


934 


996 


039 



PHENOMBNA AND OBSERVA- 
TIONS. 

Sundays and Holidays. 

Washington Mean Time, 
d. h. m. , 

3 4 15m<5 l2(r >i4 45 S. 
3 6 14mn ^O' 

4 5 3imO in Apogee. 

5th Sunday after Trinity. 

5 4 40m(5 $<£ ^ 3 6 S. 
5 10 45m ^ 9 aSt iic 57 S. 
5 1 loa iM<C 9 21 S. 

7 4 7a n§0' 

8 7 17a 5J m ?S' 

9 11 8a j'SO'^SSS^* 0.584 

Qth Sunday after Trinity. 

10 11 24a nig^O- 

11 59m 5 gr. elong. 26 29 E. 
11 113m<$ j^C :5i?446N. 

13 1 37a ^ ^ 9 ^ 2 22 S. 

14 2 12m <$ ¥ O 
U 2 190. id ^ 5 8 5N. 

7th Sunday after Trinity. 

16 8 24m(5 9(r ^ 9 8 37N. 

18 6a ^ in Perihelion. 

18 11 oa {^ in Aphelion. 

19 5 54a 2 <J/i3C 3(c 9 S. 

22 7 om d gr. Hel. Lat S. 

23 3 68m9 in 8« 

Sth Sun, aft. Trinity. St. James. 

24 4 54m 5 stationary. 

24 1 32a 9 stationary. 

25 11 52m <5 ^JH $ 24 47 S. 

26 1 32a 9 gr« elong. 45 40 E. 

27 4 om^ §T^ 



30 9 4im<JT2(r 



* 10 S. 
l2 4 44 S. 



24 



August, Mffhth Month, begins on Sunday, [1847» 



Twilight begins and ends. Mean Time. 



Boston, 
N. York, 
Wash'n, 
Charles., 
N. Orl's, 



Iflt day. 



Begins, 
h. m* 

3 65m 
3 4 

3 14 
339 
348 



End^. 
h. m. 

9 17a 

9 8 

8 £8 

8 33 

8 34 



7th day. 



Begins, 
ht m. 
3 6m 
3 14 
323 
346 
3 54 



Ends, 
h. m. 

9 6a 

8 66 
8 48 
835 
8 16 



18th day. 



Begins, 
h. m. 

3 15m 
333 
330 
350 
3 59 



Ends. 
h. m. 

8 S3a 

8 45 

8 38 
8 18 
8 9 



19th d^. 



Begins, 
h. m. 

3 84m 

3 33 
338 
356 

4 4 



Ends, 
h. m. 

8 42ai 
834 
838 
8 10 
8 3 



26th day. 



B^ns 
h. m. 

3 34m 
340 
346 

4 3 
4 8 



Ends, 
h. m. 

830a 
8 34 
8 18 
8 3 
766 



APOOKK AND PUUGSl OW TfU MOON. 

Apogee, 14th day, lOh. A. | Perigee, 27th day, 7h. M. 


PHASKS OP THl MOON. 

Last Quarter, 8d day, 8h. 51.Sm. M. First Qoaiter, ISCh day, llh. 58.2m. A. 
• New Moon, 10th «.♦ 7 30.8 A. FuU Moon, 28th " 1 1J3 M. 


• 

1 

1 

1 


1 

Su. 


Son's tapper limb rises and sets, (oorr. for reiJraot.) M. Time. 


1 High Water. M. Time. 


6 




5)o 

r. 


0^ 

Q 

r 


S o 

• 


• 

9^ 


1^ 


1^ 


h. m. 
4 53 


sets.. 
h. m. 

7 30 


riSfs 
h. m. 
456 


sets. 
h. m. 

7 16 


nsts. 
h. m. 

5 


sets. 

h. m. 

7 12 


nses. 
h. m. 

5 13 


h. m. 
6 59 


rises, 
h. m. 

5 IS 


sets. 
h. m. 

6 S3 


h. m. 
1 54m 


h. m. 

. » . 


h. m.. 

i0 4ia 


2 


M. 


53 


Id 


57 


14 


1 


10 


14 


58 


19 


52 


3 41 


3im 


11 29 


3 


Tu. 


54 


17 


58 


13 


3 


9 


15 


53 


20 


52 


329 


1 9 


• • • 


4 


W. 


55 


16 


59 


13 


3 


8 


16 


57 


31 


51 


4 18 


1 58 


18m 


6 


Th. 


56 


15 


5 


11 


4 


7 


16 


56 


31 


50 


5 13 


2 53 


1 13 


6 


F. 


57 


14 


1 


10 


6 


6 


17 


65 


22 


50 


6 34 


4 4 


3 34 


7 
8 


S. 


5R 
4 59 


13 
7 11 


3 

5 3 


9 

7 7 


6 

5 7 


5 


18 


54 


22 
523 


49 

6 48 


7 40 


530 


3 40 


7 4 


5 18 


6 53 


8 59m 


39m 


4 59m 


9 


M. 


5 


10 


4 


6 


7 


2 


19 


52 


23 


47 


10 1 


7 41 


6 1 


10 


Tu. 


1 


9 


5 


5 


8 


1 


20 


61 


24 


46 


10 S 


832 


652 


11 


W. 


3 


7 


6 


4 


9 





20 


60 


24 


45 


11 36 


9 16 


736 


12 


Th. 


3 


6 


7 


3 


10 


6 69 


21 


49 


25 


44 


13a 


9 53 


8 13 


IS 


F. 


4 


5 


8 


1 


11 


58 


22 


48 


36 


43 


47 


10 37 


8 47 


14 
16 


S. 
Su. 


5 
5 6 


4 


9 



6 59 


12 
5 13 


56 
6 64 


22 
5 23 


47 
6 45 


37 
5 37 


42 

6 41 


1 18 


10 58 


9 18 


7 3 


5 10 


1 5ia 


11 3im 


9 5lm 


16 


M. 


7 


1 


a 


68 


14 


53 


24 


44 


28 


40 


3 32 


3a 


10 23 


17 


Tu. 


8 


6 69 


13 


56 


15 


53 


24 


43 


29 


39 


254 


034 


10 54 


18 


W. 


10 


67 


13 


56, 


16 


61 


25 


42 


30 


38 


329 


1 9 


U 39 


19 


Th. 


11 


55 


14 


54 


17 


50 


26 


41 


30 


37 


4 9 


149 


9a 


20 


F. 


12 


64 


15 


52 


18 


48 


26 


40 


31 


36 


458 


333 


058 


21 
22 


S. 
Su. 


13 
5 14 


53 


16 


51 


18 


47 
6 45 


27 

5 28 


38 


31 


a-j 

6 34 


6 6 


346 


3 6 


6 51 


5 17 


6 49 


5 19 


6 37 


5 32 


7 26a 


5 6a 


3 36a 


23 


M. 


15 


49 


18 


48 


20 


44 


28 


36 


32 


33 


8 43 


633 


443 


24 


Tu. 


16 


48 


18 


46 


21 


43 


29 


35 


a< 


32 


946 


736 


646 


25 


W. 


17 


46 


19 


45 


22 


41 


30 


34 


33 


31 


10 38 


8 18 


638 


26 


Th. 


18 


44 


30 


43 


23 


40 


31 


32 


34 


30 


11 34 


9 4 


7 24 


27 


F. 


19 


43 


3r 


43 


24 


38 


31 


31 


34 


38 


• • • 


9 49 


8 9 


28 
29 


S. 
Su. 


20 
5 21 


41 


22 


40 


25 


37 


32 


30 


a*) 


37 


9m 


10 33 


863 


6 39 


5 23 


6 38 


5 26 


6 a*) 


5 a') 


6 29 


5a'> 


6 36 


53m 


11 17a 


9 37a 


SO 


M. 


23 


38 


24 


37 


27 


34 


33 


28 


36 


35 


1 37 


• • • 


10 20 


81 


Tu. 


33 


36 


25 


a*) 


27 


32 


34 


27 


36 


34 


830 


omiii 6 



1847.] August hat ITtirttf-one Days. 25 




Passage of the Meridian (mean time) and Declination of the Planets. | 




1st daj. 


7th day. | 


18th day. 


19th day. | 


aSth day. | 


Souths. 


Dee. 


South. 


s. Dec. 


Souths. 


Dec. 


Souths. 


Dec. 


Souths. 


Dec. 




h. m. 


t 


h. m. 


• 1 


h. m. 


e 1 


h. m. 


1 


h. m. 


< 


^ 


44a 


--loae 


> 3a 


. -|-11 39 


11 24m 


4-13 43 


11 58m 


4-16 35 


ia50m 


4-16 19 


9 


268 


--1 2( 


) 2 53 


— 1 25 


3 45a 


— 4 4 


2 36a 


— 636 


2 25a 


— 8 58 




Slim 


.--7« 


) 4 SOL 


a-f-o 1 


4 47m 


-t-969 


434m 


4-10 61 


4 19m 


4-1137 


2 


458a 


— 4 i 


) 4438 


i — 6 17 


429a 


— 028 


4 14a 


— 738 


4 oa 


— 8 47 





10 7 


— 62S 


I 030 


-t-657 


9 13 


— 732 


8 47 


— 8 9 


822 


— 8 47 


6 


10 sm 


— 2 -! 


\ 9 5411 


a — 230 


9 44m 


— 259 


933m 


— 333 


9 22m 


— 4 8 


^ 


1133 
957 


--24 3^ 
--23 i 


r 11 19 

i 938 


--24 12 
--23 1 


11 7 
920 


--23 44 
--52 56 


10 55 
9 2 


4-93 14 
--92 61 


10 43 
843 


4-29 48 
--22 46 


h 


2 19 


— 8 SS 


) 1 54 


— 9 8 


129 


— 9 17 


1 4 


— 928 


039 


— 938 


¥ 


431 


-f-6X 


\ 4 7 


4-6 31 


343 


4-629 


3 19 


4-6 27 


255 4-624 


• 




Moon rises or sets. Mean lime. 




■9 s 




o 


• 


• 




PHENOMENA AND OBSERYA- 




dd 


^ 


< 


^ 


TIONS. 


i 




w% 


1 


1 


1 


• 


Sundays and Holidays. 


nus. 


rises. 


nsts. 


rises. 


rtses. 






h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


d. h. m. , 


,s*. 


354m 


10 ea 


loioa 


10 12a 


10 17a 


10 20a 


dth Sunday after Trinity. 


2 


450 


10 46 


10 48 


10 51 


10 59 


11 4 


1 6 56a ($9C 9 6 S. 


3 

4 


543 

637 
730 


1125 

• • • 


1130 

• • • 


1133 
• • • 


11 43 

. • • 


1148 

• • • 


8 1 42a <J <yc ^ 1 86 S. 


5 


lom 


13m 


18m 


3im 


36m 




6 


834 


67 


1 1 


1 6 


1 20 


1 26 


7 6 69a i2lC jy4 69N. 


7 


9 17 


1 50 


1 64 


2 


2 13 


2 20 


7 10 58a Inf*. <J S ©• 
lOth Sunday after Trinity. 


10 em 


2 45m 


2 50m 


254m 


3 8m 


3 15m 


9 


10 58 


342 


3 47 


3 61 


4 3 


4 9 


8 9 33m ^ gr. Hel. Lat S. 


10 


1145 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


9 11 34m 3 ^fiCeta.5ic 1 16 S. 


11 


3ia 


7 14a 


7 12a 


7ioa 


7 5a 


7 4a 


10 10 17m 4 § (C goes. 


12 


115 


7 44 


744 


7 43 


739 


739 


14 4 36a <5 9 C ? 2 18 S. 


n 


158 


8 12 


8 11 


8 12 


8 11 


8 12 




14 

& 


2 41 
323a 


8 41 


8 42 


8 42 


8 46 


8 47 


nth Sunday after Trinity. 


9 8a 


9 loa 


9 12a 


9 16a 


9 20a 


16 


4 6 


93d 


941 


943 


9 61 


54 


17 9 4m S stationaiy. 


17 


450 


10 11 J 


L0 14 


L0 18 


10 28 


10 32 




18 


537 


to 48 : 


L0 62 : 


10 66 


11 7 


11 13 




19 


625 


1128 : 


LI 33 


1138 


11 61 


11 56 


19 6 22a ^ fiicTix; H^ 1 55 S. 
24 6 22a ^^Cn * 158 S. 


20 


7 17 


• • • 


. • • 


• • • 


• • . 


• • • 


21 


8 10 


16m 


2im 


26m 


4om 


46m 


26 4 23a g gr. elong. 18 17W. 
12^ Sunday after Trinity* 


9 5a 


1 lom 


1 15m 


1 2om 


1 34m 


1 4om 


23 


10 1 


2 10 


2 15 


220 


233^ 


239 


26 6 2im7 in Aphelion. 


24 


10 58 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


St. Bartholomew. 


25 


1154 


6 14a 


6 13a 


6iia 


6 5a 


6 4a 


26 4 15a <J V^C >l 4 52 S. 


26 


i 


653 


082 


652 


6 49 


6 49 


27 9 2m$ in S2 


27 


05om 


730 


730 


731 


7 31 


733 


27 8 9a 9 at gr. brilliancy. 
29 i48m^9<L ¥ IN, 
ISth Sunday after Trinity. 


28 
S, 


146 

2 4iin 


8 6 


8 8 


8 9 


8 13 


8 17 


8 44a 


846a 


849a 


d56a 


9 oa 


30 


336 


9 24 


926 


9 31 


9 41 


9 46 


30433a<J^(r ^0 25S. 
31 10 37a S m Perihelion. 


31 


431 


10 8 1 


10 12 


L0 16 


10 38 


10 36 



3 



26 September y Ninth Month, begins an Wednesday, [1847. 


Twilight begins and ends. Mean Time. 




Ist day. 


7th day. 


13th day. 


19th day. 


25th day. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Knds. 
h. m. 


Begins. Ends, 
h. m. h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins 
h. m. 


. Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Boston, 


3 44m 


8 16£ 


L 3 5im 


8 4a 


3 59m 


7 52a 


4 7m 7 40a 


4 16m 7 2da 


N. York, 


3 49 


8 11 


3 56 


8 


4 3 


7 49 


4 10 


7 37 


4 18 


726 


Wash'n, 


364 


8 6 


4 


7 66 


4 7 


746 


4 14 


7 34 


4 21 


7 83 


Charles., 


4 8 


7 62 


4 12 


7 43 


4 17 


734 


422 


725 


428 


7 16 


N. Orl's, 


4 14 


7 46 


4 17 


7 39 


4 21 


7 31 


4 25 


722 


430 


7 14 


APOGKE AND PERIQKE OV THE MOON. 

Apogee, Utb day, 8h. M. | Perigee, 24th day, 4h. A. 


PHA»Sg OF THK ICOON. 

Lut Quarter, Ist day, 4h. 6.1in. A. First Quarter, 17th day, 2h. 12.im. A. 
New Moon, 9th " 10 89.0 M. Full Moon, 24th " 9 17.2 M. 


• 

1 

m 

1 


i 
1 


Sun's ^qiper limb rises and sets, (corr. for refract.) M. Time. , 


High Water. M. Time. 


• 

q 


1 


1 


r 


1 «* 

• 


• 

o 


h 


h 

1 
1 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 

h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


set4. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


1 


W. 


0.24 


6 35 


5 26 


6 34 


528 


6.31 


5 34 


6 25 


536 


623 


3 6m 


46m 


1168a 


2 


Th. 


26 


34 


27 


J« 


29 


30 


35 


24 


37 


22 


3 52 


1 32 


... 


3 


F. 


27 


33 


28 


30 


30 


28 


36 


22 


38 


21 


448 


2 28 


46m 


4 


S. 


28 
6 20 


31 


29 


29 

6 27 


31 
5 32 


27 
6 25 


37 
5 37 


21 
6 20 


38 
5 39 


19 
6 18 


5 57 


337 


1 67 


5 


Su. 


6 30 


5 30 


7 2im 


5 im 


3 2im 


6 


M. 


30 


28 


31 


26 


83 


24 


38 


19 


39 


17 


8 42 


622 


4 42 


7 


Tu. 


31 


26 


32 


24 


34 


23 


38 


18 


40 


16 


944 


7 24 


544 


8 


W. 


32 


25 


33 


23 


35 


21 


39 


16 


40 


15 


10 35 


8 15 


635 


9 


Th. 


33 


23 


34 


21 


36 


20 


39 


15 


41 


13 


11 15 


8 55 


7 15 


10 


F. 


34 


21 


35 


19 


37 


18 


40 


14 


42 


12 


11 49 


9 29 


7 49 


11 
12 


S. 
Su, 


35 
5 36 


19 
6 17 


36 
5 37 


18 


38 


17 
6 15 


41 
5 42 


12 


42 


11 
6 10 


20a 


10 


6 20 


6 16 


5 39 


6 11 


5 43 


5ia 


10 31m 


8 6im 


13 


M. 


37 


16 


39 


14 


40 


13 


42 


9 


43 


8 


1 22 


11 2 


922 


14 


Tu. 


38 


14 


39 


12 


41 


12 


43 


8 


44 


7 


1 60 


11 30 


9 50 


15 


W. 


39 


12 


40 


10 


41 


10 


43 


7 


44 


6 


2 22 


2a 


10 22 


16 


Th. 


40 


11 


41 


8 


42 


9 


44 


6 


45 


5 


254 


034 


10 54 


17 


F. 


41 


9 


42 


7 


43 


7 


45 


5 


45 


4 


334 


1 14 


11 34 


18 
19 


S. 
Su. 


42 
5 43 


7 


43 


5 


44 


5 
6 4 


45 
5 46 


4 


46 


3 
6 2 


4 20 


2 


20a 


6 5 


5 44 ( 


S 4 


5 44 


6 3 


5 46 


5 25a 


3 5a 


125a 


20 


M 


44 


4 


45 


2 


45 


2 


47 


1 


47 


1 


6 50 


4 30 


2 50 


21 


Tu. 


45 


2 


46 


1 


46 


1 


47 





47 





8 13 


6 53 


4 13 


22 


W. 


46 





47 . 


5 59 


47 


5 59 


48 


5 59 


48 


5 58 


922 


7 2 


622 


23 


Th. 


47 


5 63 


48 


67 


48 


57 


48 


57 


48 


57 


10 14 


764 


6 14 


24 


F. 


48 


66 


49 


65 


49 


55 


49 


55 


49 


55 


11 1 


8 41 


7 1 


25 

26 


S. 
Su. 


49 
5 50 


64 


50 


53 


50 


63 
552 


60 
5 50 


54 
6 53 


50 
5 60 


54 
553 


11 46 


926 


746 


5 52 


5 51 . 


5 52 


5 51 


• • • 


loioa 


8 30a 


27 


M. 


61 


50 


52 


50 


52 


51 


61 


51 


51 


51 


3om 


10 63 


9 13 


28 


Tu. 


63 


49 


53 


49 


53 


49 


62 


50 


61 


50 


1 13 


1137 


967 


29 


W. 


64 


47 


54 


47 


54 


47 


62 


43 


62 


49 


167 


• e • 


10 42 


SO 


Th. 


65 


45. 


65 


45 


55 


45 


53 


47 1 62 


48 


2 42 


82m 


1129 

1 



1847.] September has Thirty Days. 27 


PasBftge of the Meridian (mean time) and Declination of the PlaoetB. 




Ist day. 


7th day. 


13th day. 


19th day. 


26th day. | 


iS9uM5. 


Dee. 


Sottths 


AJcC* 


Souths. 


Dec. 


Souths. 


Dec. 


Souths. 


Dec. 




h. m. 


C 1 


h. m. 


O 1 


h. m. 


e i 


h. m. 


O 4 


h. m. 


e 1 


$ 


11 om 


-|-14 58 


11 isn 


1-|-11 55 


11 38m 


-t-7 45 


11 55m 


-^-3 9 


10a 


— 1 38 


9 


2 8a 


— 11 11 


1 49a 


— 12 42 


1 25a 


— 13 41 


57a 


— 13 57 


24 


— 13 22 




4 im 


+12 22 


3 44n 


1 -|-13 55 


3 25m 


4-13 20 


3 4m 


-[-13 39 


2 4im 


-^-13 51 


S 


3 44a 


— 10 7 


3 32a 


—11 14 


3 19a 


— 12 19 


3 7a 


— 13 24 


2 54a 


— 14 26 


8 


764 


— 9 31 


7 31 


— 10 8 


7 9 


— ^10 43 


6 43 


— ^11 17 


6 26 


— 11 49 





8m 


— 4 fiS 


8'57n 


1 — 5 36 


8 45m 


— 6 20 


8 34m 


— 7 8 


8 22m 


— 7 67 


5 


10 28 


-|H22 4 


10 15 


- -21 23 


10 3 


--20 52 


950 


--20 15 


937 


- -19 37 


:!f 


8 21 


-[-22 38 


8 1 


--22 32 


7 42 


--22 26 


7 22 


--22 20 


7 2 


--22 15 


^ 


9 


— 9 51 


11 40a 


—10 3 


11 14a 


— 10 14 


10 49a 


— 10 23 


10 24a 


— 10 32 


¥ 


2 27 


+ 6 Ifl 


2 3n 


l4-6 15 


1 39m 


-f-6 11 


1 14m,-f- 6 6 


50m 


4-6 


1 




Moon rises or sets. Mean Time. 




11 




• 
(9 




(> 


• 


FHKUSUiMKNA AJND OiSiJJ&lCyA- 


1 




^ 


4 


'H 


'H 


TIONS. 


^ 


i S 




t 


.fl 


1 


J9 




1 


ll 




^ 


1 


<5 


Sundays and Holidays. 


S 


PQ 


% 


^ 


S5* 








n««j. 


TIMS. 


nses. 


nses. 


nses. 1 


Washington Mean Time. 




h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. , 


d. h. m. ^ 


1 


5 26m 


10 56a 


11 oa 


11 5a 


11 19a 


11 25a 


1 7 om$ Stationary. 


2 
3 


620 


11 47 


11 51 


11 50 


• • • 


• • • 


2 10 45m ^ ^2 O- 

4i0 40m<jiC jysiON. 


7 13 








lom 


16m. 


4 

S. 


8 5 


4Qm 


44m 


5om 


1 3 


1 9 


lAih Sunday after Trinity. 


865m 


1 37m 


1 42m 


1 46m 


1 5dm 


2 6m 


6 


943 


2 35 


2 39 


2 43 


2 54 


2 59 


8 4 26a <JgC g 4 65N. 


7 


10 29 


333 


3 36 


3 39 


348 


3 52 




8 


1113 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


10 8 17a 9 stationary. 


9 


1156 


6 14a 


6 14a 


6 13a 


6 13a 


6 13a 


10 18 17a 5 gr. Hel. Lat. N. 


10 


035a 


6 44 


644 


6 44 


646 


6 47 


11 7 68a 6 9 (C 9 8 9 S. 


11 


121 


7 11 


7 13 


7 14 


7 18 


721 


12 9 43m<5 »2;i«j' 5i^l48N. 
16th Sunday after Trinity. 


& 2 6a 


7 4ia 


7 43a 


7 46a 


7 5ia 


7 54a 


13 


248 


8 12 


8 15 


8 18 


8 26 


8 31 


14 2 5em<Jft^'2£i: 5|C137N. 


U 


333 


8 47 


8 51 


8 55 


9 5 


9 10 


16 9 24a ^ 2^n * 8 S. 


15 


4 19 


9 25 


930 


9 33 


9 46 


952 




16 


6 8 


10 9 


10 13 


10 18 


10 32 


10 38 


18 3om 9 gr. Hel. Lat. S. 


17 


559 ^ 


10 56 


11 3 


U 8 


11 22 


1128 


19 9 23a Sup. <5 g ©. 

23 2m i rid J25 3S. 

16th Sunday after Trinity. 


18 

S. 


6 52 
746a 


11 56 


• • • 


• • • 


• • • 


• • • 
1 
1 


• • « 


om 


5m 


18a 


24m! 


20 


8 41 


57m 


1 1 


1 5 


1 17 


124 


23 11 I4m0 enters:^ Autumn 


21 


9 37 


2 3 


2 7 


2 11 


2 20 


226 


St. Matthew. [begins. 


22 


10 32 


3 15 


3 17 


320 


326 


331 


24 5 35a (J stationary. 


23 


1128 


nses. 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


nses. 


25 i0 3om^9(E 9 2 S. 


24 


S 


553a 


6 oa 


6 la 


6 3a 


6 6a 


Moon eclipsed, invis. in U. S. 
27 6i2m<J 5f 9 g 10 2N. 
1 lih Sunday after Trinity. 


25 
5. 


2sm 
Tiim 


638 


640 


6 43 


648 


651 


7 19a 


7 22a 


7 25a 


7 33a 


739a 


27 


2 19 


8 3 


8 6 


8 10 


821 


827 


27 8 1om<J ^i <J 26N. 


2li 


I 316 


8 49 


853 


8 68 


9 11 


9 17 


29 11 6m 3 ^v£i JJC 140 S. 


2!i 


> 4 12 


943 


9 45 


9 51 


10 4 


10 10 


Michaelmas Day, 


81 


U 7 


10 36 


10 40 


10 45 


10 50 


11 5 


30 7 om§ in Perihelion. 



28 October, Tenth Month, begins on Friday. [1847. 


Twilight begins and ends. Mean Time. 




1st day. 


7th day. 


18th day. | 


19th day. 


25Uiday. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


B^ns. Ends, 
h. m. h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m 


Begins 
h. m. 


. lEnds. 
h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Boston, 


4 23m 


7 17a 


L 4 30ni 


7 oa 


4 37m 


6 55a 


4 44m 6 46a 


4 50m 6 3da 


N. York, 


4 25 


7 15 


432 


7 4 


43d 


6 54 


4 44 


646 


4 50 


638 


WasVn, 


4 27 


7 13 


433 


7 3 


438 


6 54 


4 44 


6 46 


4 50 


638 


Charles., 


432 


7 8 


436 


7 


4 40 


6 62 


4 46 


6 45 


4 49 


6 39 


N. Oil's, 


434 


7 6 


437 


6 68 


4 41 


6 51 


4 46 


6 45 


4 48 


6 40 


APOGEE AMD PERIGEE OF THE MOON. 

Apogee, 8th day, Oh. M. | Perigee, 28d day, 8h. M. 


PHASES OF 

LastQnarter, let day, 2h. 27.9m. M. 
New Moon, 9th " 8 58.6 M. 
First Quarter, 17th " 2 32.8 M. 


THE MOON. 

FuU Moon, 23d day, 6h. 27.8m. A. 
LastQnarter, 80th " 4 47.9 A. 


• 

1 

•s 

«0 

1 


t 

1 


Sun's tfpper Itanb rises and sets, (corr. for refract.) M. Time. 


High Water. M. Time. 


1 


ii 

i 


ii 

1 


1^ 


• 


• 

o 


I. 
1 


g 

|a3 


rtses. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h m. 


sets. 
1. m. 


nses. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


nses 
h. m. 


sets 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


uts. 
h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


li* m. 


1 


F. 


5 56 


5 43 


566 


5 43 


5 50 


5 43 


5 64 


6 45 


5 53 


546 


3 2911^ 


1 9m 


• • • 


2 
3 


S. 
Su. 


57 
5 53 


42 
6 40 


67 

5 58 


42 
5 41 


57 
5 58 


42 
5 41 


55 
6 56 


44 
6 43 


54 
5 54 


46 

5 44 


4 24 


24 


24m 


5 32m 


3 12m 


1 32m 


4 


M. 


59 


39 


59 


39 


59 


39 


56 


42 


55 


43 


6 55 


435 


255 


5 


Tu. 


6 1 


38 


6 


JIH 


6 


38 


66 


41 


66 


42 


8 15 


6 65 


4 16 


6 


W. 


2 


36 


1 


37 


1 


37 


57 


40 


56 


41 


923 


7 3 


623 


7 


Th. 


3 


34 


2 


36 


2 


35 


68 


38 


57 


39 


10 9 


7 49 


6 9 


8 


F. 


4 


»< 


3 


34 


3 


34 


68 


37 


58 


38 


10 47 


827 


6 47 


9 
10 


S. 
Su. 


5 
6 6 


31 


4 


32 


4 


32 
5 31 


69 
6 


36 


58 


37 
6 36 


11 19 


8 69 


7 19 


5 29 


6 5 


5 31 


6 5 


5 35 


5 59 


11 53m 


9 33a 


7 63m 


11 


M. 


8 


28 


6 


29 


6 


30 





34 


6 


36 


22a 


10 2 


822 


12 


Tu. 





26 


7 


28 


7 


29 


1 


32 





34 


063 


10 33 


8 63 


13 


W. 


10 


24 


8 


26 


8 


27 


2 


30 


1 


33 


1 23 


11 3 


923 


14 


Th. 


ir 


22 


9 


25 


9 


25 


2 


29 


2 


32 


1 64 


1134 


964 


15 


F. 


12 


20 


10 


23 


10 


24 


3 


2d 


2 


31 


223 


8 


10 28 


16 
17 


S. 
5m. 


13 

6 14 


19 
6 17 


11 
6 12 


22 
5 20 


11 
8 12 


22 

520 


4 
6 5 


27 

5 26 


3 
6 4 


29 
6 28 


3 8 


048 


11 8 


3 67a 


1 37a 


11 67m 


18 


M. 


15 


16 


13 


18 


13 


19 


6 


25 


4 


27 


4 57 


2 37 


67a 


19 


Tu. 


17 


14 


14 


17 


14 


17 


6 


24 


5 


26 


620 


4 


2 20 


20 


W. 


18 


13 


15 


15 


15 


16 


7 


23 


6 


25 


743 


523 


343 


21 


Th. 


19 


11 


16 


14 


16 


15 


8 


22 


6 


24 


8 56 


635 


4 65 


22 


F. 


21 


10 


13 


12 


17 


14 


8 


21 


7 


23 


9 49 


729 


649 


23 

?4 


S. 
Su. 


22 

6 23 


8 
5 7 


19 
6 20 


11 
5 10 


18 
6 19 


13 
5 12 


9 
6 10 


20 


8 


22 

5 21 


10 36 


8 16 


636 


5 19 


6 8 


112ia 


9 la 


7 21a 


25 


M. 


24 


5 


21 


8 


20 


10 


11 


18 


9 


20 


• • * 


9 49 


8 9 


26 


Tu. 


25 


4 


22 


7 


21 


9 


11 


17 


10 


19 


9m 


10 33 


863 


27 


W. 


27 


2 


24 


6 


22 


7 


12 


16 


10 


18 


063 


11 19 


9 39 


28 


Th. 


28 


1 


25 


4 


23 


5 


13 


15 


11 


17 


1 39 


• • ■ 


10 21 


29 


F. 


29 





26 


3 


24 


4 


14 


14 


12 


16 


2 21 


im 


11 7 


80 
31 


S. 


31 


4 58 


27 


1 


25 


3 


14 


13 


12 
6 13 


16 
5 16 


3 7 


47 


11 69 


Su. 


6 32 


4 57 


6 28 


5 


16 26 


6 2 


6 16 


5 12 


3 59m 


139m 


• • • 



^ 



1847.] October has ThiHy-one Bays. 29 


Pasaage of the Meridian (mean time) and Declination of the Planets. 




l8t day. 


7th day. 


13th day. 


19th day. 


26th day. 


Sovihs. 


Dec. 


SmUhs 


Dec. 


Souths. 


Dec. 


Souths. 


Deo. 


Sottths. 


Dec. 




h. m. 


e 1 


h. m. 


O I 


h. m. 


O 1 


h. m. 


a < 


h. m. 


e 1 


5 


022a 


— 6 IS 


\ 34a 


, — 10 27 


45a 


— ^14 20 


55a 


— ^17 44 


1 4a 


— 20 36 


? 


11 48II: 


I — 11 6- 


r 11 1211 


tt — 954 


10 80m 


— 7 39 


loiim 


— 5 38 


47m 


— 4 8 


^ 


2 17 


-|-13 5' 


r 1 60 


-[-13 55 


121 


+13 47 


50 


4-J13 33 


18 


-)-13 16 


5 


2 42a 


— ^15 2^ 


I 2 30a 


, — 16 21 


2 19a 


— ^17 15 


2 da 


— 18 6 


1 57a 


— ^18 53 


5 


6 7 


— ^12 1£ 


) 5 48 


— 12 44 


530 


— ^13 7 


513 


— ^13 27 


455 


— ^13 44 


5 


aioir 


I — 8 4e 


) 7 58E 


a — 9 38 


7 45m 


— 10 30 


7 32m 


— 1122 


7 19m 


— 12 14 


^ 


9 24 
6 41 


--18 a 

--22 1( 


) 9 10 
) 6 20 


--13 20 
--22 5 


8 57 
5 59 


-[-17 42 
--22 1 


8 43 
5 37 


-j-17 4 
--21 58 


829 
5 15 


4-16 27 
--21 66 


h 


9 59a 


— ^10 41 


L 9 34a 


t —10 48 


9 9a 


— 10 54 


8 45a 


— 10 58 


8 2la 


— 11 2 


V 


025ir 


1 4-5 51 


. r Im 


]+C2] 


11 32 


-f- 6 43 


11 8 


-|- 637 


10 44 


-[-632 


• 

1 


II 


Moon rises or sets. Mean Time. 


PHENOMENA AND OBSBRYA- 




• 


• 


<i 




1 


V 

<« 


<« 


<Jd 


^ 


<S 


TIONS. 


"8 
1 


is 


1 


1 

• 

S5 


1 


1 


i 

55 


Sundays and Holidays, 


h. m. 


li. m* 


rists. 
h., m. 


mes. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


d. 


Washington M«»'n iHm«. 


h. m. 




1 


6 im 


11 3ia ] 


LI 36a 


11 4oa 


11 53a 


• • • 


2 oiom<$J/C J/5 15N. 


2 


6 52 


• • • 


• • • 


> < • 


• • • 


om 


3 11 i2mlnf. <5 9 O- 
18fA Sunday after Trinity. 


7 4im 


3om 


34m 


038m 


49m 


55m 


4 


827 


1 27 


131 


134 


1 43 


1 47 


4 4 28m<5g}di 9|C133N. 


5 


9 11 


2 26 


2 27 


2 31 


2 37 


2 40 


4 6 33a 5 in Q. 


6 


9 55 


322 


3 24 


3 26 


3 30 


333 


6 8 24mn 50- 


7 


10 37 


4 19 


4 20 


420 


4 23 


4 24 


8 4 36m <J 9 C 9 7 33 S. 


8 


1120 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


Sun annu. eel. invis. in U. S. 


9 


2a 


5 44a 


5 46a 


5 48a 


5 63a 


5 56a 


8 10 18m <5 gj?£ij 5|C 1 17 N. 
19^A Sunday after Trinity. 


46a 


6 15a 


6 18a 


6 20a 


6 29a 


6 32a 


11 


1 31 


6 49 


652 


656 


7 6 


7 10 


9 11 65a SWO- 


12 


2 17 


724 


729 


732 


7 44 


7 51 


10 9 9m (5 § d 5 2 38 S. 


13 


3 4 


8 7 


8 12 


3 16 


829 


8 36 


13 3 27mggt9:0: 5|C0 54N. 


14 


3 54 


854 


8 53 


9 3 


9 17 


9 23 


13 6 43mn^O. 


15 


4 45 


946 


9 50 


956 


10 9 


10 15 


13 12a iJ^eyi H^ 53 S. 


16 


6 37 


10 45 J 


LO 48 


10 53 


U 6 


11 13 


14 10 14a ^ in Aphelion. 
20^^ Sunday after Trinity^ 


6 30a 


1146a 1 


Lisoa 


11 54a 


• • • 


• • t 


18 


7 23 


• V • 


• • • 


• • • 


4m 


lom 


St. Luke. 


19 


8 17 


54m 


66m 


1 om 


1 7 


1 13 


18 8 14m J/ in Q. 


20 


9 11 


2 3 


2 6 


2 7 


2 13 


2 16 


18 2 62a <$ g/3iTH ^ 1 25 S. 


21 


10 6 


3 11 


3 12 


3 14 


3 16 


3 19 


20 8 6m<5 ^C li 5 8 S. 


22 


11 2 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


uses. 


rises. 


21 6 18a <5 gvTtt st^ 41 S. 


23 


S 


5 7a 


5ioa 


5 13a 


5 19a 


5 24a 


22 1 17m 9 stationary. 
21st Sunday after Trinity. 


om 


5 6ia 


5 64a 


558a 


6 8a 


6 13a 


25 


58 


637 


6 41 


6 46 


668 


7 3 


22 8 6a ($9C 9 8 S. 


26 


1 57 


729 


7 84 


7 39 


752 


758 


24 9 22m<5 ^C ^ 1 9N. 
29 11 22m ^^(C ^6 13N. 


27 


255 


8 23 


8 28 


833 


8 47 


8 53 


28 


3 51 


922 


9 27 


9 31 


944 


950 


St. Simon and St. Jude. 


29 


445 


10 20 ] 


.0 24 1 


L0 28 


10 40 


10 47 


31 4 Qmg (J©. 


30 


535 


1120 ] 


123 1 


LI 27 


1137 


11 42 


31 7 50a ^ 5<JTn. * 042N. 


5. 


623m 


• • • 





• • • 


• • • 


22rf Sunday after 


■ Trinity. 



3* 



80 






November, Eleventh Month, begins on , 


Monday. 


[1847.1 


Twilight begins and ends. M«aa Tbne. | 




let day. | 


7th day. 


18th day. 


19th day. 


25th day. 1 


Beghis. 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins. Ends, 
h. m. h. m. 


Beghis. 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins 
h. m. 


. iBnds. 
h. m. 


Boston, 


4 56in 


630at 


5 sm 


623a 


5 iim 


6 18a 


5 17m 


6 14a 5 33m 6 ua 


N. York, 


467 


631 


5 4 


684 


6 10 


6 19 


6 15 


6 16 


531 


6 13 


Wash'n, 


467 


631 


5 3 


625 


5 8 


6 21 


5 13 


6 18 


5 10 


6 15 


Charles., 


464 


634 


450 


630 


6 3 ( 


B26 


5 7 


633 


518 


623 


N.Orl's, 4 63 


635 


456 


6 31 


5 1 ( 


3 26 


5 6 


636 


5 


6 35 


APOGIS AND PIEien or THK MOON. 

Apogee, 4tii daj, 6h. A. | Perigee, 20tti day, Oh. A. 


PHA818 OF THI MOON. 

New Moon, 7th d»r, lOh. 2.6m. A. FuU Moon, 22d day, 4h. 56.2in. H. 
Firat Quarter, 15th « 1 6.6 A. Last Quarter, 29th <^ 11 18.6 H. 


• 

1 

1 


1 


Son^s i^aper limb rises and sets, (corr. for refiraet.) M. Time. 


High Water. M. Time. 


• 




9% 

h 

r 




• 


• 






rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


h> m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


1 


M. 


6 38 


4 55 


6 29 


4 59 


8 27 


5 1 


ft 16 


5 11 


S 14 


5 14 


5 om 


2 40m 


1 om 


2 


Tu. 


34 


54 


30 


58 


2S 


•0 


17 


10 


15 


13 


6 17 


3 57 


2 17 


3 


W. 


35 


53 


31 


57 


89 


4 59 


IS 


9 


16 


12 


7 31 


5 11 


3 34 


4 


Th. 


36 


51 


32 


Od 


30 


68 


19 


8 


17 


11 


8 41 


6 21 


4 41 


5 


F. 


38 


50 


34 


54 


31 


57 


20 


8 


17 


11 


034 


7 14 


534 


6 

7 


S. 


39 
6 40 


40 

4 48 


35 
6 36 


53 


32 
6 33 


56 
4 55 


21 

6 22 


7 
5 6 


18 
6 19 


10 
5 9 


10 15 


755 


6 15 


4 51 


10 5im 


8 3im 


6 5lm 


8 


M. 


42 


46 


38 


50 


35 


54 


23 


5 


20 


9 


11 24 


9 4 


7 34 


9 


Tu. 


43 


45 


39 


49 


36 


53 


24 


4 


20 


8 


11 55 


935 


7 55 


10 


W. 


44 


44 


40 


48 


37 


62 


25 


3 


21 


8 


028a 


10 8 


838 


11 


Th. 


46 


43 


42 


47 


39 


51 


26 


3 


22 


7 


1 1 


10 41 


9 1 


12 


F. 


47 


42 


43 


46 


40 


50 


27 


2 


23 


6 


133 


11 13 


933 


13 
U 


S. 


48 
6 50 


41 
4 40 


44 
6 46 


45 


41 


49 


28 


1 
5 1 


24 
625 


6 
5 5 


2 10 


11 50 


10 10 


4 44 


42 


4 48 


6 39 


2 52a 


32a 


10 63m 


15 


M. 


61 


39 


47 


43 


43 


47 


30 





26 


4 


340 


120 


1140 


16 


Tu. 


58 


38 


48 


43 


44 


46 


31 


4 59 


27 


4 


438 


2 18 


038a 


17 


W. 


53 


37 


40 


41 


45 


46 


32 


58 


27 


3 


553 


333 


153 


18 


Th. 


54 


36 


50 


40 


46 


45 


33 


58 


28 


2 


7 9 


4 49 


3 9 


19 


F. 


55 


35 


51 


39 


47 


44 


34 


57 


29 


1 


821 


6 1 


421 


20 
21 


S. 
Su. 


57 

6 5R 


35 
4 34 


53 
6 54 


39 


48 


44 


35 


57 


29 


1 
5 1 


9 21 


7 1 


5 21 


4 3R 


6 49 


4 43 


6 36 


4 56 


6 30 


10 15a 


765a 


6 15a 


22 


M. 


58 


33 


55 


37 


60 


42 


37 


56 


31 


1 


11 5 


845 


7 5 


23 


Tu. 


7 


33 


56 


36 


61 


42 


38 


56 


33 





1160 


930 


760 


24 


W. 


3 


33 


57 


36 


52 


41 


38 


55 


33 





• • • 


10 17 


8 37 


25 


Th. 


3 


31 


5R 


35 


53 


41 


m 


55 


34 





37m 


11 1 


9 21 


26 


F. 


4 


30 


50 


34 


64 


41 


40 


66 


34 





121 


11 44 


10 4 


27 
28 


S. 
Su, 


6 

7,6 


30 
4 29 


7 
7 1 


34 


55 
6 56 


41 
4 40 


41 


65 


.'» 



$ 


2 4 


• • • 


10 48 


4:» 


8 42 


4 55 


636 


8 4sm 


028m 


U34a 


29 


M. 


8 


29 


3 


33 


57 


40 


43 


56 


37 





334 


1 14 


. • • 


30 


Tu. 


9 29 


4 


33 


68 


40 44 


561 38 





433 


2 3 ossm 



November has Thirty Days, 

Paaaage <rf the Meridian (mean tfane) and Peclinatton of the Planets. 




81 



Idth day. 



19th day. 



Souih$, 
h. m. 

44a 

8 56m 

10 sa 

114 
350 

oaom 

727 
337 
642a 

9 2 



See. 

e 4 

— ^23 16 

— 4 14 
+12 8 
— 81 27 
— 14 19 
— ^15 34 
4-14 12 
4-21 59 
— -11 1 
-j-5 13 



26th day. 



h* in. 

11 54m 

8 51 

9 38a 

1 4 

2 35 

6 4m 

7 11 

3 13 
6 19a 

8 38 



Dec. 



16 
— 596 
+12 8 
— «1 63 
— ^14 18 
16 16 
-j-13 46 
+82 2 
— ^10 53 
1+5 10 



PHBNOMSNA AND OBSERTA- 
TIONS. 

Sundays and Holidays. 



Washixurton Mean Tkoe. 
d. h.m. • • 

AU Saints. 
4 8 49m ^ gr. Hel. Lat S. 

4 10 7m 5 9 C 9 1 6 S. 

5 4 27m^ ^<mi 9[c 1 16 S. 
5 11 om ^ gr. elong. 23 4 £. 
7 3 24m^ 0aTH ^ 149 S. 

23d Sunday after Trinity. 
7 8 150. Jll stationary. 

1 4oa 9 <^^ g^* brilliancy. 
7 om ^ in Ferihelion. 
7 47a <J a C g 7 13 S. 

2 4oa "^ stationary. 
7 4om9 in Q. 

24ith Sunday after Trinity. 

15 11 33a ^ stationary. 

16 3 28a ^ l^C Jl . »2 4 57 S. 

19 AismifH 9 9 S. 

19 1 48a''^ m Q. 

20 657m^ ^C i 2 7N. 
25th Sunday after Trinity. 
23 8l8m5 in Q. 
23 11 67a 2 9 ^^ 3|c 24 N. 

25 7 6ia 6 2tl> 31 5 SN. 

26 2 4m^9eX ^154N. 

26 2 I7mlnf. i^Q. 

27 7 52a ^ in Ferihelion. 

1^^ Sunday in Advent* 

29 2 9imn>iO. 

St. Andrew. 



132 



December, Twelfth Month, begins on Wednesday, [^^^7. 

Twilij^t begina and ends. Mean Time! ~ 



Boston, 
N. York, 
Wash'n, 

Charles., 
N. Orl's, 



Ist day. 



Begins 
b. m. 

5 29m 
5 27 
595 
5 17 
5 13 



Ends, 
h. m 

d oa 
11 
6 13 
6 21 
625 



7th day. 



Begins, 
h. m. 

5 35m 

533 

530 

522 

5 18 



Ends, 
h. m. 

6 9a 
6 11 
6 14 
622 
6 26 



Idth day. 



Begins, 
h. m. 

5 40m 

6 37 
5 34 
529 
534 



Ends, 
h. m. 

6 18a 

6 11 
6 14 
623 
6 27 



19th day. 



h. m. 
5 43m 
5 41 
533 
5 29 
5 25 



Ends. 
h. m. 

6 loa 

6 13 
6 16 
6 25 
629 



25th day. 



Begins, 
h. m. 

5 46m 

5 44 

5 41 
532 

5 28 



£nds. 
h. m. 

6 14a 

6 10 

6 19 

623 

6 32 



APOQBK AND PERIOKB OW THB MOON. 

Apogee, 2d day, 9h. M. | Perigee, 18th day, 8h. M. | Apogee, 30th day, 5h. M. 



New Moon, 7th day, 3h. 
First Quarter, 14th " 10 



PHASES or THE MOON. 

22.4m. A. I Full Moon, 
17.9 A. I Lest Quarter, 



21st day, 
29th " 



5h. 
8 



O.Qm. A. 
401 M. 



1 


• 


§ 


J 


s 


^ 


^ 


•s 


9B 


I 


& 


i 


1 


w. 


2 


Th. 


8 


F. 


4 


S. 


5 


Su. 


6 


M. 


7 


Tu. 


8 


W. 


9 


Th. 


10 


F. 


11 


S. 



12 
13 
14 
16 
16 
17 
18 

19 
20 
21 
22 
28 
24 
25 



2« 
27 

28 

29 

{80 

81 



Sun's iQ^wr limb rises and sets, (corr. for refract.) M. Time. 



e 
dd 



rises. 
h. m. 

7 10 
11 
12 
13 



Su. 

M. 

Tu. 

W. 

Th. 

F. 

S. 



Su. 

M. 

Tu. 

W. 

Th. 

F. 

S. 



Su. 

M. 

Tu. 

W. 

Th. 

F. 



7 14 
15 
16 
17 

18 
19 
20 



7 21 
21 
22 
23 
24 
24 
25 



7S5 
26 
26 
27 
27 
28 
28 



786 
29 
29 
29 
30 
30 



sets. 
h. m. 

4 29 
29 
29 

28 



4 28 

28 
28 
28 
28 
23 
28 



4 28 
28 
28 
28 
28 
29 
29 



4 29 
30 
30 
31 
31 
32 
32 



4 33 
34 
34 
35 
36 
37 



I 



rises. 
h. m. 

7 5 
6 

7 
9 



7 9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 



f7 16 
16 
17 
17 

18 
18 
19 



7 19 
20 
20 
21 
21 
22 
22 

7^ 
23 
24 
24 
26 
25 



sets. 
h. m 

4 34 
34 
34 
33 



rises. 
h. m. 

6 59 

7 
1 
2 



4 33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 



4 33 
33 
34 
34 
34 
34 
35 



4 35 
36 
36 
37 
37 
38 
38 



4 39 
39 
40 
40 
41 
42 



d 



^ 



sets. 
h. m. 

4 40 
39 
39 
39 



3 
4 

5 
6 

7 
8 
9 



7 10 
10 
11 
12 
12 
13 
13 



7 14 
14 
14 
15 
15 
16 
16 



7 17 
17 
18 
18 
19 
19 



4 38 
38 
38 
38 

38 
38 
39 



4 39 
39 
39 
39 
39 
40 
40 



4 40 
40 
41 
41 
42 
43 
43 



I. 



rises. 
h. m. 

6 44 
45 
45 
46 



|6 47 

48 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 



16 52 
53 
54 
54 
55 
55 
56 



sets. 
h. m 

4 55 

55 

55 

55 



rises. 
h. m 

6 38 

39 

40 

41 



4 55 
65 
55 
55 
55 
55 
56 



16 56 
57 
57 
58 
58 
59 
69 



4 44 
45 
45 
46 

47 
48 





1 
1 
2 
2 



4 56 
56 
56 
56 
57 
57 
57 



5 



d8 



6 41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46' 

iL 
16 47" 

48 

49 

49 

50 

50 

51 



4 57 
58 
58 
59 
59 
59 

5 



1 
2 
2 
3 
4 
5 



^ 51 
52 
52 
53 
53 
54 
54 



sets. 

h. m. 

5 






5 



1 
1 
1 



5 1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
3 
3 



6 55 
55 
56 
56 
57 
57 



5 3 
4 
4 
4 
5 
5 
6 



5 6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

10 



High Water. M. Time. 



I 



h. m. 
5 22m 
634 

7 40 

8 44 



9 35m 
10 17 

10 56 

11 32 
lOa 

46 

1 21 



2 oa 

2 44 
328 

4 21 

5 25 

6 36 

7 48 



f 
&- 



I 



<« 



I 



dd 



8 57a 
955 
10 48 
1139 



• • • 


25m 


1 8 


1 49m 


228 


3 9 


3 51 


432 


525 



h. 
3 
4 
5 
6 

7 
7 
8 
9 
9 
10 
11 

11 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 



m. 

2m 
14 
20 
24 



15m 
57 
36 
12 
50 
26 
1 



4om 
24a 

8 

1 

5 
16 
23 



6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

10 

11 



37a 

35 

28 
19 
5 
48 
29 



8m 

49 

31 

12 

5 



h. 
1 
2 
3 

£ 

5 
6 
6 
7 

8 
8 
9 

10^ 

10 

11 



1 

2 

3 



m. 
22in 
34 
40 

44 



35111 

17 

56 

32 

10 

46 

21 



om 

44 
28 

2ia 

25 
36 
43 



4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
9 

10 
11 
11 

• 


1 



57a 

55 
48 
39 
25 

8 
49 



28a 

9 
51 

• • 

32m 

25 



1847.] December has Thirty one Days. 83 


Passage of the Meriiian (mean time) and Declination of the PUnetB. 




Ist day. 


7th day. 


18th da '. j 


19th dfty* 


25th day. | 


Souths, 


Deo. 


SouthSi^ Deo. 


S<mths. 


Dee. 


Souths. 


Dec. 


Souths. 


Dee. 




h. m. 


t 


h^m. 


h. m. 


e < 


h. m. 


e 1 


h. m. 


o • 


5 


11 sm 


L — ^17 M 


i 10 34m — ^16 36 


10 26m 


— 17 49 


i0 3om 


— ^19 49 


10 39m 


—2144 


9 


8 47 


— 651 


i 846 


— 833 


3 45 


— 10 20 


8 45 


— 12 10 


8 47 


— 14 




9 Ida 


4-12 1( 


i 8 50a 


. -}-12 32 


8 23a 


4-12 55 


8 8a 


4-13 25 


750a 


4-14 


S 


054 


-^2ir 


\ 044 


— 22 31 


034 


—22 41 


25 


—22 48 


15 


— ^22 51 


O 


3 21 


— 14 IS 


I 3 7 


—14 4 


2 53 


—13 51 


2 39 


—13 35 


225 


—13 14 


O 


5 ism 


L — 16 5i 


) 5 321 


a — 17 26 


5 14m 


—17 53 


456m 


—18 13 


438m 


— ^18 23 


^ 


655 
2 47 


- -13 2^ 
--22 : 


\ 639 
f 222 


--13 5 
--22 12 


622 
1 55 


--12 51 
-H22 18 


6 5 
1 29 


--12 41 
--22 24 


5 47 
1 2 


4-12 36 
4-22 31 


h 


556a 


— 10 5S 


{ 533a 


i — 10 46 


5 1ia 


— 10 38 


4 48a 


—10 29 


4a6a 


—10 19 


9 


8 14 


-1-5 : 


r 7 50 


-|-5 6 


7 26 


+ 5 a\ 


7 2 4-5 3 


639 


4-5 3 


• 


, 


Moon xises or sets. Mean Time. 




P 


• 

d8 


d8 


• 


• 


• 

d8 


ifUJillNOJlllSMA AND OBSERVA- • 
TIONS. 


1 




a 


1 

• 


1 


e 


• 


Sundays and Holidays. 




h.m. 


rues. 


rises. 
h.m. 


nses. 
n. to.. 


nses. 
h. m. 


nses. 
h. m. 


Washington Mean Time, 
d. h.m. 


1 


7 14in 


1 im 


1 2m 


1 2m 


1 3m 


1 5m 


3 03ia ($9(C 9 046N. 


2 


7 56 


157 


1 56 


1 57 


1 55 


1 55 


3 8 loa ^ stationary. 


3 


8 40 


2 54 


254 


252 


2 48 


2 47 


5 2 14a 9 stationary. 


4 


923 


3 £0 


3 49 


3 47 


3 41 


339 


6 1 2im^ 9 (c 9 1 3 a 

2d Sunday in Advent 
7 7 om $ in Perihelion. 


& 


LO 9m 


4 48m 


4 45m 


4 43m 


434m 


4 3lm 


6 


10 57 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


7 


11 46 


4 47a 


4 5ia 


456a 


5 9a 


5 16a 


8 5 4im 5 gr. Hel. Lat N. 


8 


«37a 


537 


542 


5 46 


6 6 


6 9 


10 a 3oa D ©. 


9 


1 20 


631 


635 


6 41 


654 


7 


11 3 5oa ($ 9«iiK :(c 016N. 


10 


2 23 


7 31 


736 


740 


7ffl 


768 


13 10 38a 6h€ h ^3^8. 


11 


8 14 


834 


839 


8 42 


8 51 


857 


14 2 33m 9 gr. elong. 46 50W. 
Bd Sunday in Advent 


S, 


4 6a 


9 30a 


9 4ia 


945a 


9 53a 


9 57a 


13 


4 57 


10 47 


L0 49 


10 51 


10 56 


10 53 


14 10 54m 5 gr. elong. 21 15W. 
14 11 24a D ? ©. 


14 


5 48 


11 55 J 


1157 


11 57 


U58 


• • • 


15 


6 39 


• • • 


• • • 


• • • 


. . . 


im 


15 10 24a <5 gfvnt S|C 24 S. 


16 


7a2 


1 4m 


1 3m 


1 3m 


1 2m 


1 2 


16 11 ism^9<C 9 3N. 


17 


8 26 


«14 


2 12 


2 12 


2 7 


2 7 


16 3 fiea 9 ^^ Perihelion. 


18 

5. 


9 21 


324 


3 22 


3 19 


3 13 


3 11 


17 3 14a i g<£ ^ 3 22N. 

4^ Sunday in Advent. 


10 18a 


4 34m 


432m 


4 29m 


4 19m 


4 16m 


20 


11 16 


rises. 1 


nses. 


rises. 


nses. 


nses. 


22 4 57mO enters \St Winter 


21 


g 


4 46a 


452a 


455a 


6 9a 


5 17a 


St. Thomas. [begins. 


22 


14m 


5 46 


550 


555 


6 8 


6 14 


23 iiom<5JJ((C 21^ 6N. 


23 


1 10 


6 47 


652 


6 56 


7 8 


7 14 


24 7 30m9 stationary. 


24 


2 3 


749 


75S 


766 


8 6 


812 


31 5 9mO in Perigee. 


25 


2 53 


850 


8 54 


8 56 


9 4 


9 6 


Christmas Day. 

Ist Sun. of. Christmas. St Ste- 


3 4im 


9 5ia 


54a 


9 55a 


10 oa 


10 3a 


27 


426 


10 49 1 


L0 50 


L0 51 


10 54 


10 55 


St John. [jiJien. 


28 


5 9 


LI 46 1 


LI 46 


LI 46 


1146 


1147 


Innocents. 


29 


553 


• • • 


• • • 


• • • 


• • • 


• • • 


31 9 8m(5JJ((Jn 5|C0 22S. 


80 


634 


042m 


42m 


4im 


38m 


38m 


31 9i8m^9>^ :(cl80N. 


31 


718 


140 


133 


136 


131 


131 


31 5 47a ^ in {3* 



34 



XCLIF8BS OF XAECH 31, AND IPBIL U. 



[1847. 



ECLIPSES IN 1847. 

la the year 1847, there will be four eclipses ; two of the Sun, and two of 
the Moon, neither of which will be visible in the United States. 

I. Wednesday, March 3l8t. A partial eclipse of the Moon, invisible in 
the United States. 

Beginning of the eclipse, 2 55.9 A. ^ 

Middle of the eclipse, 3 58.0 A. r Mean time at Washington. 

End of the eclipse, 5 1.1 A.} 

Digits eclipsed, 3° 26' on the northern limb. 

Angle of the first point of contact from the Moon's north point, 50' E. 

Angle of the last point of contact from the north point, 15 W. 

This eclipse will be visible in Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia and South 
America. 

n. Wednesday, April 14, and Thursday, April 15. A total Eclipse of 
the Sun, invisible in the United States. 

Beginning of the general eclipse at April 14th, lOh. 38.4m. A. [Mean 
Time at Washington] in latitude 35' 55' S., and longitude 40' 23' E. of 
Greenwich. 

Beginning of the total eclipse at April 14th, llh. 40.4m. A. in latitude 
47° 39' S. and longitude 28' 29' East of Greenwich. 

Central eclipse at Noon, at April 15th, Oh. 52.2m. in latitude 24' 30' S. 
and longitude 89° 58' East of Greenwich. 

End of the total eclipse at April 15th, 2h. 35.8m. in latitude 16' 17' S.and 
longitude 151° 14' East of Greenwich. 

End of the general eclipse at April 15th, 3h. 37.8m. in latitude 4' 3l' S- 
and longitude 137* 49' East of Greenwich. 

This eclipse will be visible in the south of Africa, throughout Madagas- 
car, the Indian Ocean, Australia, Borneo, and the neighboring islands, and 
in the south-eastern comer of Asia. 

The total eclipse will traverse the Indian Ocean and the north of Austra- 
lia, and the central line will pass over the following points on the earth's 
surface : 



Latitude. 

• 


Lon^tade East frum 
Greenwich. 


Latitude. 


Longitude East trom. 
Greenwich. 


o / 

47 39 S. 
45 2 
40 8 
33 36 
26 3 
24 30 


e > 

28 29 
41 14 
57 41 
73 7 
87 32 
89 58 


o » 

18 19 
14 51 

14 6 

15 4 

16 27 


e 1 

102 52 
115 59 
129 7 
141 56 
151 14 



1847.] 



ECLIF8EB OF 8EPTEMBBB 24, Ain> OCTOBEB 9. 



95 



in. Friday, September 24th. A partial eclipse of the Moon, inyisible. 
in the United States. 

Beginning of the eclipse, 8 18.8 M."^ 

Middle of the eclipse, 9 25.3 M. >• Mean Time at Washington. 

End of the eclipse, 10 31.8 M.) 

Digits eclipsed, 5° 2' on the south point. 

Angle of the first point of contact from the Moon's north point, 128" E. 

Angle of the last point of contact from the north point, 159 W. 

This eclipse will be yisible in Asia, Australia, the east of Africa and Ea- 
rope, and the West of South America. 

IV. Saturday, October 9th. An annular eclipse of the Son, inyisible 
in the United States. 

Begins on the Earth generally at Oh. 58. Im. M. [Mean Time at Wash- 
ington] in latitude 38» 30* N. and longitude 0° 9* E. of Greenwich. 

Central eclipse begins on the Earth at 2h. 14.9m. M. in latitude 52* & N. 
and longitude 16** 3' West of Greenwich. 

Central eclipse at Noon, at 3h. d0.6m. M. in latitude 31* 22' N. and longi- 
tude 47° 11' E. of Greenwich. 

Central eclipse ends on the Earth at 5h. 28<3m. M. in latitude 18* 9', 
and longitude 105° 44' E. of Greenwich. 

Ends on the Earth generally at 6h. 45.0m. M. in latitude 4* 40' N. and 
longitude 88° 4' E. of Greemvich. 

This eclipse will be visible throughout Europe, the northern half of Africa 
and the greater part of Asia. 

The central eclipse trayerses the south of Ireland and Great Britain, 
Prance, Switzerland, Germany, Hungary, Turkey in Europe, Asia Minor, 
the north of Arabia, the Ked Sea, Hindostan, the Bay of Bengal and the 
Bnrmah Empire, and the central line passes over the following points on 
the earth's surface : 



North Ladtode. 


Long. ft. Oxteenwich. 


North Ladtttde. 


Txmg. fir. OreflQwleh. 


52 9 


o 1 

16 3 W. 


O f 

24 34 


* 1 

58 48 E. 


49 42 


22 E. 


20 28 


68 35 


47 28 


10 14 


18 18 


78 IS 


43 18 


23 31 


17 53 


88 


87 53 


35 46 


17 38 


94 49 


81 34 


46 53 


IS 29 


105 44 


81 22 


47 11 







35 



OCOULTATIOMg. 



[1847. 



OCCULTATIONS 

MemenUjbrJaeUitainiff the ctdculcction of Occtdtationt which may he visihle in the 

United States^ in 1847. 



Month. 


Star's 
Name. 


1 


Waahingtonf 

Mean Time of 

apparmt oon- 

Jnnotion in R. 

A. of Moon 


At the tima of Conjonction. 


limiting 
Parallela 
between 
which the 
ooeult. is 


Apparent 

R. A. of 

Moon and 


Apparent 
BecUnatiiMi of 


Star 
N. orS. 
of Mofm 






^ 


and Star. 


Star. 


DUkT. 


v& ixiA^Ma* 


TiMble. 






h. m. B. 


h. m. B. 


e ' U 


1 /( 


• ° 


Jan. 1 


*n 


4.5 


8 54 24 A. 


7 9 19.68 


16 48 32.1 N. 


41 58 S. 


90N.20N. 


2 


kn 


5 


4 9 21M. 


7 24 54.15 


16 8 53.3 


49 44 


90 28 


8 


C'C 


6 


8 5 6A. 


8 47 35.57 


12 12 14.4 


42 31 


90 14 


3 


o«C 


5 


9 21 24 


8 50 8.44 


12 26 37.3 


18 46 


56 10 S. 


4 


K S 


5.6 


2 2 20M. 


8 59 28.87 


11 16 39.3 


53 29 


90 27 N. 


25 


dls 


4 


8 26 31 A. 


4 14 8.43 


17 10 40.2 


35 29 


82 13 


25 


t^ 


4.5 


8 57 25 


4 15 18.21 


17 6 0.8 


43 2 


90 21 


25 


<J38 


5 


9 33 28 


4 16 39.96 


17 34 19.4 


15 54 


52 6 S. 


29 


An 


4.5 


3 35 15 M. 


7 9 19.86 


16 48 31.1 


39 34 


90 18 N. 


SO 


A»C 


6 


10 34 30 A. 


8 38 34.08 


12 39 55.6 


50 41 


90 25 


31 


a«C 


5 


4 20 43 M. 


8 50 8.84 


12 26 34.9 


23 1 


62 6 S. 


Feb. 2 




5.6 


11 21 52 A. 


10 59 7.80 


2 46 59.4 N. 


28 24 S. 


69 N. 5 S. 


7 


4 


3 59 33M. 


14 10 51.78 


12 39 49.5 S. 


45 26 


77 13 N. 


22 


^'H 


4 


2 12 12 


4 14 8.00 


17 10 39.2 N. 


21 5 


58 1 S. 




«P8 


4.5 


2 42 45 


4 15 17,79 


17 4 59.9 


28 39 


69 6N. 




m B 


5 


9 41 52 A. 


4 58 26.16 


18 25 55.5 


6N. 


34 18 S. 


28 


16 Sext. 


6 


11 1 


10 1 15.23 


6 54 55.8 


60 42 S. 


90 36 N. 


Mar. 2 


vgl 


4.5 


9 39 20 A. 


11 29 9,14 


1 0.4N. 


47 31 S. 


90K16N. 


12 


pi / 


5 


1 47 30 M. 


19 12 48.37 


18 7 37.2 S. 


59 56 


72 28 


13 


iS'Vf 


8.4 


2 18 5 


20 12 24.78 


15 15 28.3 


30 35 


58 6S. 


15 


A. 


4.5 


2 12 


22 8 45.04 


8 32 30.8 


73 18 


81 42 N. 


24 


in 


5 


10 50 58 A. 


7 24 53.79 


16 8 52.5 N. 


32 49 


77 10 


.26 


X G 


5.6 


9 15 3 


8 59 29.11 


11 16 36.1 


49 54 


90 24 


30 


«fl 


4.5 


3 51 11 M 


11 29 9.23 


59.2 


46 37 


90 15 


Apr. 9 


5^, / 


6 


34 2M. 


19 49 17.40 


15 53 11.2 S. 


8 51 S. 


33N.26S. 


17 


6' 8 


4 


7 40 55 A. 


4 14 7.16 


17 10 37.5 N. 


10 41 


45 11 




cJ«8 


4.5 


8 9 43 


4 15 10.95 


17 4 58.1 


18 15 


54 4 


20 


51 n 


5 


8 59 57 


7 4 35.80 


16 24 39.2 


54 16 


90 85 N. 


20 


An 


4J5 


11 9 11 


7 9 18.74 


16 48 31.9 


22 16 


60 


22 


A«G 


6 


5 38 26 


8 38 33,35 


12 39 56.5 


40 7 


90 13 


22 


a«G 


5 


11 23 51 


8 50 8.18 


12 26 35.8 


13 27 


49 15 S. 


25 


f# 


5.6 


6 29 33 


10 59 7.95 


2 46 56.7 


30 27 


72 3 


29 


4 


10 25 49 


14 10 53.28 


12 39 57.0 S. 


58 52 


77 31 K 




»fl 


4.5 


5 51 14 A. 


11 29 8.82 


1 0.9 N. 


53 34S. 


90N.23N. 


28 


f*:£r 


6 


4 58 2 


15 24 20.23 


16 19 47.2 S 


42 29 


74 9 


June 2 


^•w 


8.4 


9 43 14 A. 


20 12 27.13 


15 15 19.7 S. 


20 26 S. 


47N.15 S. 


5 


i>m 


4.5 


20 28 M. 


22 8 47.09 


8 32 19.4 


60 11 


81 26 N. 


8 


Hbbsch. 




6 40 7 


1 5 18.47 


6 15 28.0N. 


38 12 


81 3 


14 


in 


4.5 


5 5 37 


7 9 18.30 


16 48 32.9 


36 8 


83 14 


17 


'd 


4.5 


10 39 58 


9 52 8.58 


8 46 22.9 


6 39 


41 25 S. 



1847.] 



OOOULTATIOKS. 



37 



Jiajot 


Star's 


.1 

1 


Washington, 
Mean Time of 
apparent con- 


At thA time of GoqjimotioiL. 


limiting 
Parallels 
between 


Apparent 


Apparent 

Declination of 

Star. 


Rtnr 


the 
HonOi. 


Name. 


1 


junction in R. 

A. of Moon 

and Star. 


R. A. of 

Moon and 

Star. 


Ovac 

N.orS. 
of Moon. 


which the 

occult, is 

Tisible. 




h. m. 8. 


h. m. 8. 


O < II 


/ u 




J'ne26JrOphi.. 


5 


1 46 OM. 


16 18 13.13 


18 6 9.6 S. 


38 2S. 


68 4N. 


29 


pi / 


5 


3 43 14 


19 12 51.29 


18 7 29.7 


46 36 


72 12 


30 


^]ffd 


3.4 


4 19 8 


20 12 27.78 


15 15 16.9 


11 54 


38N.23S. 




«»t* 


6 


8 54 24 A. 


20 51 33.74 


13 38 8.5 


39 14 


78 3N. 


July 2 


&rx 


4.5 


5 59 30 M. 


22 8 47.87 


8 32 14.7 S. 


46 53 S. 


81N.10N. 


6 


oH 


5 


2 9 14 


1 37 20.77 


8 23 15.1 N. 


40 50N. 


88 7 


Aug. 5 


s»'h 


4.5 


3 45 24 M. 


4 15 18.55 


17 5 4.0 N. 


2 29S. 


37N.19 S. 


12 


dil 


5 


9 1 8 A. 


10 52 40.49 


4 26 9.0 


6 44 


41 27 


19 


X Ophi. 


5 


6 24 24 


16 18 12.65 


18 6 8.4 S. 


60 39 


72 34 N. 


22 


P'/ 


5 


11 1 36 


19 12 5146 


18 7 28.8 


54 7 


72 21 


23 


3«Vf 


3.4 


11 35 7 


20 12 28.22 


15 15 14.6 


13 2 


38 22 S. 


25 


^m 


4.5 


11 24 37 


22 8 48.80 


8 32 9.1 


35 7 


70 2 


28 


e H 


5 


11 14 32 


1 33.01 


4 50 42.4 N. 


61 28 


90 26 N. 


29 


Hbrsoh. 




1 48 10 M. 


1 6 37.66 


6 21 18.5 


51N. 


33 34 S. 


Sep. 26 


H 


5 


29 8M. 


1 37 22.80 


8 23 26.9 N. 


11 14 S. 


45N.21 S. 


28 


«« 


1 


9 50 11 A. 


4 27 12.26 


16 11 50.9 


59 16 


90 38 N. 


Oct 2 


kn 


5 


2 25 56 M. 


7 24 54.72 


16 8 54.2 N. 


36 20 S. 


84N.14N. 


5 


^n 


4.5 


1 55 11 


9 52 9.16 


8 46 22.6 


20 5 


57 11 S. 


12 


&-^ 


4.5 


4 53 55 A. 


15 45 9.07 


16 16 28.4 S. 


27 12 


55 6 


19 


«»t» 


4.5 


8 19 56 


22 8 48.53 


8 32 9.7 


36 28 


73 


22 


Hbrbgh. 




8 5 51 


59 8.91 


5 34 49.2 N. 


8 6 


42 26 


22 


eH 


5 


8 40 39 


1 33.58 


4 50 45.4 


58 45 


90 23 N. 


29 


51 n 


5 


50 33 M. 


7 4 38.25 


16 24 39.0 


57 34 


90 39 


29 


in 


4.5 


2 54 34 


7 9 21.15 


16 48 31.3 


26 35 


65 4 


31 


a«23 


5 


1 22 49 


8 50 9.45 


12 26 34.0 


39 9 


90 11 


Nov. 3 


^il 


5.6 


33 46M. 


11 9 26.93 


2 50 54.4 N. 


23 53 S. 


62N.10S. 




76 sr 


6 


1 26 22 


11 11 5.95 


2 29 8.0 


37 36 


87 5N. 


12 


P'V 


5 


9 35 20 A. 


19 12 50.16 


18 7 303 S. 


52 31 


72 21 


14 


^Vf 


3.4 


4 33M. 


20 12 27.06 


15 15 17.1 


9 19 


35 25 S. 


19 


K 


5 


10 15 A. 


1 37 23.08 


8 23 27.6 N. 


8 56 


43 24 


22 


y 


1 


6 31 17 


4 27 13.41 


16 11 51.2 


65 29 


90 45 N. 


23 


N8 


6 


8 53 31 


5 38 35.38 


17 39 57.5 


43 36 


90 26 


24 


wn 


5.6 


9 18 32 


6 33 34.02 


17 47 13.8 


19 41 


56 


25 


fcn 


5 


7 3 27 


7 24 56.36 


16 8 49.3 


49 35 


90 27 


28 


^ft 


6 


1 40 47M. 


9 23 47.59 


10 22 58.1 


53 24 


90 26 


28 


oft 


4 


6 12 40 


9 33 2.23 


10 34 49.0 


5 26 


40 25 S. 


29 


dd 


5 


10 46 59 A. 


10 52 42.25 


4 25 59.3 


21 20 


58 12 


Dec.10 


p' / 


5 


3 13 23 M. 


19 12 49.98 


18 7 30.8 S. 


42 47 S. 


72N. 9N. 


19 


63 y 


6 


11 29 34 A. 


4 14 43.01 


16 25 4.7 N. 


28 35 


67 4 


20 


« 8 


1 


4 31 37 M. 


4 27 13.63 


16 11 50.5 


64 16 


90 44 


20 


111 8 


6 


11 .55 59 A. 


5 15 33.80 


17 14 6.2 


60 33 


90 43 


22 


An 


4.5 


10 31 16 


7 9 22.58 


16 48 26.7 


44 15 


90 22 


23 


^n 


5 


5 7 45M. 


7 24 57.01 


16 8 46.9 


58 38 


90 38 


24 


a' 23 


5 


6 55 8 A. 


8 50 11.10 


12 26 25.9 


63 51 


90 42 


25 


11 Sext 


6 


11 24 51 


9 50 4.62 


9 2 7.4 


43 57 


90 13 


26 


'Tft 


4.5 


27 4M. 


9 52 11.52 


8 46 9.5 


51 5 


90 22 



38 



XCLIP8K9 ov nns savbi^litsb or jupitsb. 



[1647. 



ECLIPSES OF THE SATELLITES OF JUPITER IN 1847. 
Visible in the United StcOm, in Mean IHnu at WmdwugUm, 



JMb, 


MMuTiine. 


Phase. 


Snt. 


Date. 


MeanTlme. 


PfaMie. 


Sat. 


4. 


h. m. •. 


d. 


h. m. •. 


Jan'y 1 


9 12 294) A. 


Em. 


1 


March 26 


1 52 7.8 M. 


Em. 


1 


8 


3 41 21^ 




1 


26 


10 38 32.0 A. 




2 


4 


4 44 6dJS M. 




2 


27 


8 21 2.5 




1 


7 


4 39 1.1 




1 










7 


6 3 12.1 A. 




2 


Aprils 


1 14 0.0 M. 


Em. 


2 


8 


11 7 49^ 




1 


3 


10 16 48.6 A. 




1 


10 


5 36 42.9 




1 


11 


12 31.1 M. 




I 


14 


6 34 26.6 M. 




1 


12 


6 41 29.8 A. 




1 


14 


8 39 33.0 A. 




2 


13 


7 10 4.5 




3 


17 


4 20 29.9 


Tm. 


3 


19 


8 37 7.7 




1 


17 


6 47 6.6 


Em. 


3 


20 


7 42 25.6 




2 


17 


7 32 11.8 




1 


20 


8 32 25.9 


Tm. 


3 


SI 


11 15 49.4 




2 


20 


11 11 48.1 


Em. 


3 


S3 


2 58 50.7 M. 




1 


26 


10 32 40.8 




1 


S4 


8 20 58.9 A. 


Im. 


3 


27 


10 17 43.6 




2 


S4 


9 27 47.4 


Em. 


1 










S4 


10 48 32.3 




3 


May 5 


6 56 56 2 A. 


Em. 


1 


S9 


1 52 1.3 M. 




2 


12 


8 52 17.6 




1 


30 


4 6 30.0 




1 


19 


10 47 33.1 




I 


31 


11 23 27.8 A. 




1 


22 


7 21 13.4 


■ 


2 


FeVy 1 


21 34.6 M. 


Tm. 


3 


July 22 


2 38 37.5 M. 


Tm. 


2 


1 


2 50 5.0 


Em. 


3 


23 


31 43.0 




3 


2 


5 52 19.8 A. 




1 


26 


2 44 57 JS 




1 


5 


4 28 7.9 M. 




2 


29 


5 14 3.4 




2 


8 


1 19 12.4 




1 


30 


4 30 44.9 




3 


8 


4 22 39.6 


Im. 


3 










8 


5 46 9.1 A. 


Em. 


2 


Angast 2 


4 38 57.3 M. 


Tm. 


1 


9 


7 48 5.1 




1 


11 


1 1 23.3 




1 


15 


3 15 a3 M. 




1 


14 


5 56.9 




4 


15 


8 22 8.8 A. 




2 


14 


5 36 5.7 


Em. 


4 


16 


9 43 53.5 




1 


15 


11 42 40.2 A. 


Tm. 


2 


S2 


10 58 3.0 




2 


18 


2 55 9.4 M. 




1 


23 


11 39 44.0 




1 


23 


2 18 20.9 




2 


25 


6 8 45.5 




1 


25 

26 


4 48 49.5 
11 17 12.2 A. 




1 
1 


Match 1 


6 58 39.6 A. 


Em. 


3 


27 


11 22 11.0 


Em. 


3 


2 


1 33 51.5 M. 




2 


30 


4 54 7.6 M. 


Im. 


2 


3 


1 35 35.4 




1 


31 


30.3 


Em. 


4 


4 


8 4 37.2 A. 




1 










8 


8 27 13.0 


Im. 


3 


Sept. 3 


1 10 45.6 M. 


Im. 


1 


8 


11 35.3 


Em. 


3 


4 


24 144 




3 


11 


10 28.5 




1 


4 


3 21 45.1 


Em. 


3 


12 


5 27 243 




2 


10 


3 4 13.9 


Im. 


1 


16 


0. 27 50.7 M. 


Im. 


3 


11 


4 23 18.0 




3 


18 


11 56 19.1 A. 


Em. 


I 


16 


11 24 22.9 A. 




2 


19 


8 3 0.0 


2 


17 


4 57 37.5 M. 




1 


20 


6 25 14.0 


1 


18 


11 25 57.0 A. 




1 



1847.] 



SOUFftS^ OV THS SATSUJTXS Of JCPITEX. 



39 



Bate. 


MeanTtne. 


PhAW. 


Sat. 


Bate. 


SfieanlSmo. 


PhMto. 


Sat. 


d. 


h. ID* 8« 


d. 


h. m. 8. 


Sept 24 


2 25.3 M, 


Im. 


2 


Nov'r 19 


9 56 45.1 A. 


Im. 


1 


24 


6 50 57.1 




1 


19 


10 51 33.1 




2 


26 


1 19 16.6 




1 


21 


8 5 21.5 




3 




• 






21 


U 12 23.6 


Ebi. 


3 


Octo. 1 


4 36 38.2 M. 


Im. 


2 


22 


7 8 39.9 




4 


3 


3 12 32.0 




1 


25 


5 21 44.4 M. 


Im. 


1 


4 


9 40 49.3 A. 




1 


26 


11 50 6.3 A. 




1 


9 


11 17 42.2 


TTm. 


3 


27 


1 28 11.2 M. 




2 


10 


5 5 45.4 M. 


]JB. 


1 


28 


6 18 26l7 a. 




1 


U 


8 30 28.5 A. 




2 


29 


3 29.9 M. 




3 


11 


H 34 2.5 




1 


29 


3 11 20.2 


Em. 


3 


17 


14 16.6 M. 


■ 


3 










17 


3 17 5.2 


Em. 


3 


Dec'r2 


7 15 9.6 M. 


Im. 


1 


18 


11 6 47.9 A. 


Im. 


2 


4 


1 43 33.1 




1 


19 


1 27 13.7 M. 




1 


4 


4 4 52.5 




2 


20 


4 35 59.8 




4 


5 


8 11 54.7 A. 




1 


20 


6 45 31.3 


Em. 


4 


6 


4 2 16.1 M. 




3 


24 


4 12 32.6 


Im. 


3 


7 


5 22 42.3 A. 




2 


24 


7 16 12.7 


Em. 


3 


11 


3 37 6.0 M. 




1 


26 


1 43 10.7 


Im. 


2 


11 


6 4L 35.8 




2 


26 


3 20 24.6 




1 


12 


10 5 29.0 A 




1 


27 


9 48 43.5 A. 




1 


13 


8 52.9 M. 




3 










14 


4 33 53.7 A. 




1 


NofV 2 


4 19 37.5 M. 


Im. 


1 


14 


7 59 27.7 




2 


2 


5 13 35.2 




1 


18 


5 30 45.0 M. 


- 


1 


. 3 


11 41 54.9 A. 




1 


19 


12 59 10.9 A. 




1 


5 


10 33 38.S 




4 


21 


6 27 37.7 




1 


6 


57 8.4 M. 


Em. 


4 


21 


10 36 16.4 




2 


9 


6 56 8.3 


Tm. 


2 


25 


7 24 33.9 M. 




1 


9 


7 6 49.3 




1 


26 


4 31 33.7 




4 


11 


1 35 8.3 




1 


27 


1 53 0.7 




1 


12 


8 3 27.9 A. 




1 


27 


3 58 42.6 A. 




3 


12 


8 14 58.1 




2 


28 


8 21 29.7 




1 


14 


7 13 37.2 


Em. 


3 


29 


1 13 6.5 I!C 




2 


18 


3 28 24.4 M. 


Im. 


1 


30 


2 49 58.0 A. 




1 



A Tabic shtwinff the lUurmnaUd Pordom of the Diaa of Venus and Mars, 

llie numbers in this table are the versed sines of that portionof the Discs, 
which, to an t>b6eryer on the Earth, will appear to be illuminated, the ap- 
parent diameter of the planet at the time being considered as unity. 

To a spectator on the Earth, Venus appears nK>st brilliant when her 
elongation is about 45°, and she is approaching her inferior ooigunction, or 



40 



DI8C8 OV YBNUS AND MASS J BIXOS OF 8AT0BN. 



[1847. 



receding from it -, in which positions she will be this year on the 27th of 
August, and the 8th of November. Mars is most brilliant about the lime 
of his opposition to the Son, being then also nearest to the Earth, in which 
position he will be this year on the Slst of October. 



January 

Februa^ 

March 

April 

Miiy 

June 



15 
14 
15 
15 
15 
15 



Yenas. 


Mars. 


0.993 


0.951 


0.970 


0.928 


0.932 


0.904 


0.871 


0.879 


0.787 


0.858 


0.676 


0.843 



July 15 

August 15 
September 15 
October 15 
November 15 
December 15 



Yeniu. 


Mara. 


0.543 


0.839 


0.360 


0.858 


0.099 


0.911 


0.047 


0.984 


0.318 


0.987 


1.508 


0.931 



Positim and Magnitude oftht Rings of Saturn, according to Bessd and Struve 
for every fortieth day in the year^ at 7 hours in the morning. 



Mean Time at Wash^ton. 


a 


b 


J». 


;. 


P. 


Th.M. 




It 


II 


o 1 


» 1 


o » 


1847 January 


1 


36.00 


+ 6.64 


+6 37.1 


+18 38.1 


+8 47.9 


February 


10 


34.95 


5.24 


20.0 


8 37.1 


8 14.9 


March 


22 


35.22 


3.95 


5 59.9 


6 26.3 


7 41.6 


May 


1 


36.74 


2.99 


42.1 


4 39.9 


7 8.1 


June 


10 


39.20 


2.60 


32.2 


3^48.0 


6 34.3 


July 


20 


41.79 


3.01 


33.8 


47.8 


6 0.2 


August 


29 


43.11 


406 


45.3 


5 24.3 


5 25.9 


October 


8 


42.22 


4.92 


5.76 


6 41.6 


4 51.5 


November 


17 


39.76 


4.86 


6 lA 


71.0 


4 16.8 


December 


27 


37.22 


3.94 


5 53.4 


64.6 


3 42.0 


u 


31 


37.00 


3.82 


52.0 


5 55.2 


3 38.5 



a denotes the semi-transverse axis of the rings. 

b " " semi-conjugate axis of the rings, positive when their northern 
surface is visible, negative when their southern. 

mdination of the northern semi-conjugate axis of the rings to 
the circle of declination ; +when East,— when West 

angle of elevation of the Earth above the plane of the rings, 
as seen from Saturn j + when North, — when South. 

angle of elevation of the Sun above the plane of the rings, as 
seen from Saturn ; -f when North,— when Soutii. 
The Opposition will take place on the 2nd of September. 



(( 



« 



(( 



C( 



(( 



(C 



mi'] 



TABUI OV LAViTVAB AV9 LOVaiTDPB. 



41 



LATITUDE AKD LONGITUDE OF THE PRINCIPAL PLACES 
IN THE United States, etc., with theis Distances fbom 

Washington. 

The Longitudes an reckoned Jrom Greenwich, 

The Capiiah (Seats of Gwermnent) of the States and Territories, are daigfiated 

hy Italic Letters, 



Albany ( Capitol), N. Y . 

Ai6Z8xuiri&i ••••••••••••••• *\j. C* 

Amherst (College Chapel),* • 'Mass. 

' mapohs, • Md. 

AuDiim, • •••••••••••••••••'JN. Jt • 

Angnsta,* • • • • Ga. 

AvQusta (State House), Me. 

Baker^s Island (Lights), Mass. 

Baltimore (Battle Mion't),* • • 'Md. 

Bangor (Court House), Me. 

Barnstable (New C. H.), Mass. 

ij&tavia, • ••.•.•••••••.•••••^. X • 

Beaufort (Arsenal), • S. C. 

Boston (State House),* • Mass. 

Do. (Light), 

Bridgeport (Baptist Ch.),****ConB. 

Bristol (Episcopal Ch.^ R- 1* 

Brooklyn (Navy Yard), N. Y. 

BrunsYHlck (College), Me. 

ASoffslo. * •••••••••••••••••* *p^. Y. 

Bnnington, •• • ^N. J. 

Burlington, • Vt 

Cambridge (Observatory),* • • 'Mass. 
v/auden. •••••« ••..••••••••o. C/. 

dtn^nfjftlgim^ •.....« ^. "Y. 

Cape Ann (North Light),* • • *Mass. 

Do. (South Light , 

Cape Cod (Light House),* • • -Mass. 

Castine, Me. 

Charleston (St Mich's Ch.),* 'S. C. 
Charlestown (Navy Yard),** 'Mass. 

Chicago, 111. 

Cincinnati (Fort Wa8h'n),***Ohio. 
v€>t(nioMi, ••••'**•.•••••••*• e5. O. 

Cobtmbusy Ohio. 

Concord (State House), N. H. 

Dayton, Ohio. 

I>«dham (Ist Cong. Ch.),****Ma8s. 

Detrwt, Miiph. 

Dorchester ( Ast Obsery.), » * * ♦ Mass. 

4* 



Latitiide, 
Korth. 



42 89 
38 49 
42 22 

38 58 
42 55 

33 28 
44 IS 
42 32 

39 17 
44 47 

41 42 

42 59 
32 25 
42 21 

42 19 
41 10 

41 40 

40 41 

43 53 

42 53 
40 5 

44 27 
42 22 

34 17 
42 54 
42 38 
42 38 
42 2 
44 22 

32 46 
42 22 

42 
39 5 

33 57 
39 57 

43 12 
r39 44 
42 14 

42 19 



15.6 
35 



43 
12 



LoDgltode, W«0t, 



Wsk.tr. 
Wakh. 



50 
6 

57 
22.7 
41.1 
30 

3 
50 



10 
48.6 



21 
13 
23 
30 
33 



54 



29 



57 



73 
77 
72 
76 
76 
81 
69 
70 



44 49 4 

4 5 
31 28 4 



33 

28 
54 
50 

47 28 



23 76 37 30 



10 



68 

70 
78 
80 
71 
70 
73 
71 
73 
69 
78 
74 
73 
71 
80 
77 
70 
70 
70 
68 
79 
71 
87 
84 
81 
83 
71 
84 
71 
82 
71 



47 

18 34 
13 

41 23 

4 9|4 

53 43,4 

11 46'4 



17 19 
59 30 
55 1 
55 

52 37 
10 

8 
33 
17 

34 48 
34 46:4 

3 55 4 
45 4 
57 27 5 

3 334 



35 
27 
7 
3 
29 
11 



10 59 4 

58 |5 
4 194 



. m. 8. 

54 59^ 

8 16 
50 6 

6 12 

5 52 

27 36 

39 20 

43 10 
630 

35 8 

41 14.8 
12 52 
22 45.6 

44 16.6 

43 33.9 
52 47 

45 9.3i 

55 68 

39 40.1 
15 40 
59 3a5 
52 40 

44 32 
22 12 

9 8 

42 19.2 
42 19.2 

40 16 
35 

19 49.8 

44 14.2 
50 2 
37 48 
24 28 
32 12 

45 56 

36 44 
44 44 
31 52 
44 17.3 



mUee. 

376 

6 

383 

87 
339 
580 
595 
452 

3S 
661 
466 
370 
629 
432 

284 
409 
227 
568 
376 
156 
440 
431 
467 
836 
470 

507 

544 
433 
763 
497 
500 
396 
474 

422 

526 
432 



42 



TABUB OF Z«A.T1TU1>B AMD LO1I0ITUDB. 



[1847. 



Dovety • Del. 

Doyer, N.H. 

Easton ( Court House), Md. 

Eastport, Me. 

Edenton, N. C. 

Exeter, ••.. jj, H. 

Fravkfarty • Ky. 

Fredericksburg, • "Va. 

Ftedtinckton^ Jjf. B. 

Frederick, Md. 

Georgetown, S. C. 

Gloucester (Uniy. Ch.), Mass. 

Bo. (E. Fnt. Light,) 

Do. (Ten Fnd Lt. Isl.^ 

Greenfield (2d Con. Ch.),* • • -Mass. 

Hagerstown, .Md. 

Haliftix, • N. S. 

Hallowell, .Me. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

Hartford (State House), ...... Conn. 

Holmes's Hole (Windmill),' -Mass. 

Hudson, N. Y. 

Hudson (Reserve Coll.), Ohio. 

Huhtsyille, Ala. 

Indianapolis^ Ind. 

Ipswich (Eastern Lie^ht), Mass. 

Do. (Western Light), 

Jackson^ Miss. 

Jefferson, Mo. 

Key West (S. W. Pt.), Fa. 

Kingston, •.•». u. Q, 

Knoxville, Tenn. 

Lancaster, Pa. 

Lexington, Ky. 

Little Bock, Ark. 

Lockport, N. Y. 

Louisville, Ky. 

Lowell (St. Ann's Ch.), Mass. 

Lynchburg, Va. 

Lynn Church, Mass. 

Machias Bay, Me. 

Marblehead, Mass. 

Marblehead (Light), Mass. 

Middletown ( W. Univ.), Conn. 

MiUedgemUe, Ga. 

Mobile, Ala. 

Montpelier, Vt. 

Monomoy Point Light,. .... -Mbss. 

Montreal, L. C. 

Nantucket (South Toi?<rer),. . . dMass. 
Nashville (University), Tenn. 



lalitade. 
North. 



• u 
39 10 

43 13 

38 46 

44 54 

39 
42 58 
38 14 

38 34 
46 3 

39 24 

33 21 
42 36 
42 34 
42 36 
42 35 

39 37 
44 39 
44 17 

40 16 

41 45 

41 27 

42 14 

41 14 

34 36 

39 55 

42 41 

42 41 

32 23 
38 36 

34 32 
44 8 

35 59 

40 2 
38 6 
34 40 

43 11 
38 3 
42 38 
37 36 
42 27 

44 33 
42 30 
42 30 

41 33 

33 7 
30 41 

44 17 
41 33 

45 31 
41 16 

36 9 



10 



Loogftode, West, 

in deg^«e8. In time. 



44 
49.6 
4 
16 

20 



59 
15 

42 



8 
8 



36 



46 

51 

24 

14 

8 

20 

48 

35 

56 
33 



75 30 

70 54 

76 8 
66 56 

77 7 
70 55 
84 40 
77 38 

66 45 
77 18 
79 17 
70 40 
70 40 
70 40 
72 36 

77 35 
63 36 

69 50 
76 50 

72 40 

70 36 

73 46 
81 24 
86 57 

86 5 
70 46 

70 46 
90 8 
92 8 
81 47 
76 40 

83 54 
76 20 

84 18 
92 12 

78 46 

85 30 

71 19 

79 22 
70 57 

67 22 
70 51 
70 50 

72 89 
83 19 

87 59 

72 36 

69 59 

73 35 

70 6 

86 49 



19 
11 
17 
32 

40 



45 
38 

54 



17 
34 



30 



33 



2 

25 

24 
39 

45 

56 

12 
3 



Di0t.fr. 
WaBh. 



h. m. 
5 2 
43 

4 
27 
28 
43 
38 
10 
27 

9 
17 
42 
42 
42 
50 
10 
14 
39 

7 
50 
42 
55 
25 
47 
44 
43 
43 



8 
27 

6 
35 

5 
37 

8 
15 

5 42 
4 45 

6 17 
43 
29 
43 
43 
50 
33 
51 
50 
40 
54 
40 
47 



4 
5 
4 
5 
4 
5 
5 
[4 
5 
5 
4 
4 
4 
4 
5 
4 
4 
5 
4 
4 
4 
5 
5 
5 
4 
4 
6 
6 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
6 
5 



4 
4 

4 
4 
4 
5 
5 
4 
4 
4 
4 
5 



8. 


36 
32 
44 
28 
40 
40 
32 


12 

8 
41.3 
40.8 
41.1 
26.1 
20 
26.7 
30 
20 
43 
26.5 

4 
39.6 
48 
20 

5 

6.3 
32 
32 
10 
40 
36 
22.2 
12 
48 

4 


16 
28 
50 
28 
25,6 
22.6 
36 
19.0 
56 
24 


20 
24.8 
16.2 



miles. 
114 
490 

80 
778 
284 
474 
551 

56 

43 
482 
462 
466 
463 
396 

68 
936 
593 
110 
335 
457 
345 

726 
573 
462 

1035 
980 

456 
516 
109 
534 
1068 
403 
590 
439 
198 
441 

450 
448 
325 
642 
1033 
524 
500 
601 
490 
714 



1847.] 



TABLE OF LATITUDE AHD LONGITUDE; 



43 



Natchez (Fort Panmnre], Miss. 

Newark, • N. J. 

New Bedford (Mariner's Ch.),- Mass. 

Newbem, •. • • N. C 

Newburg, N. Y. 

Newbnryport ( 2d Presb. Ch.), • Mass. 

Do. (Ligbts) 

Newcastle, Del. 

New Haven (College), Conn. 

New London, Conn. 

New Orleans (City Hall), La. 

Newport (Court Honse), R. L 

New York (City Hall), N. Y. 

Nobsqne Point Idgbt, Mass. 

Norfolk (Fanner's Bank),* • • • Va. 
Northampton (1st Con. Ch.)* 'Mass. 

Norwich, 'Conn. 

Fensacola, Pa. 

Petersburg, • Va. 

Philadelphia (Ind'ce HaU,) • * -Pa. 
Do. (High School Obs.) * * * 

Httsburg, Pa. 

Pittsfield, (1st Cong. Ch.), Mass. 

Plattsburgh, • N. Y. 

Plymouth (Court House),* • • -Mass. 

Portland (Mount Joy), Me. 

Do. (Light), 

Portsmouth TUnit'n Ch.), N. H. 

Do. (Light), 

Ponghkeepsie, N. Y. 

Princeton (Nassau Hall), N. J. 

Providence (Univ'y Hall),* * * 'R. L 

Quebec (Citadel^, L. C. 

MuUeiohj ••••■• »»..,».. jj. (^. 

Richmond (Capitol), Va. 

Rochester (R'r House), N. Y. 

Sable (Cape), Fa. 

Sackett's Harbor, N. Y. 

Saco, Me. 

St. Augustine, Fa. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Salem (E. L M. Hall,) Mass. 

Sandwich (1st Cong. Ch.),***Mas8. 

Savannah (Exchange), Gra. 

Schenectady, N. Y. 

Springfield^ 111. 

Springfield (Court House),* • *Mass. 

Squam Harbor (Light), Mass. 

Straitsmouth Island (Light), • • Mass. 

Stratford, Conn. 

TaUahassee, Fa. 



Latitade, 


Loo^tade, Weet, 


Dtetfr. 


North. 


indegzees. 


in tune. 


Waah. 
miles. 


• 1 u 


• 1 n 


h. m. 8. 


SI 34 


91 24 42 


6 5 38.8 


1146 


40 45 


74 10 


4 56 40. 


215 


41 38 7 


70 55 49 


4 43 43.3 


429 


35 20 


77 5 


5 8 20 


337 


41 31 


74 1 


4 56 4 


282 


42 48 32 


70 52 47 


4 43 31.1 


466 


42 48 30 


70 49 6 


4 42 18.0 


469 


39 40 


75 33 


5 2 8 


103 


41 18 30 


72 56 45 


4 51 47 


301 


41 22 


72 9 


4 48 36 


3.54 


29 57 30 


90 


6 


1203 


41 ^9 


71 19 12 


4 45 16.8 


403 


40 42 40 


74 1 8 


4 56 4.5 


226 


41 30 57 


70 39 37 


4 42 38.5 


450 


36 50 50 


76 18 47 


5 5 15.1 


217 


42 19 9 


72 38 15 


4 50 33.2 


376 


41 33 


72 7 


4 48 28 


362 


30 24 


87 10 12 


5 48 40.8 


1050 


37 13 54 


77 20 


5 9 20 


144 


39 56 59 


75 9 54 


5 39.6 


136 


39 57 9 


75 10 37 


5 42.5 




40 32 


80 2 


5 20 8 


223 


42 26 55 


73 15 36 


4 53 2.3 


380 


44 42 


73 26 


4 53 44 


539 


41 57 26 


70 40 19 


4 42 41.3 


439 


43 39 52 


70 13 34 


4 40 54.2 


542 


43 36 


70 12 12 


4 40 49 




43 4 35 


70 45 50 


4 43 3.3 


491 


43 3 30 


70 43 


4 42 52 




41 41 


73 55 


4 55 40 


301 


40 20 41 


74 39 30 


4 58 38 


177 


41 49 22 


71 24 48 


4 45 39.2 


394 


46 49 12 


71 16 


4 45 4 


781 


35 47 


78 48 


5 15 12 


286 


37 32 17 


77 27 28 


5 9 49.9 


122 


43 8 17 


77 51 


5 11 24 


361 


24 50 


81 15 


5 25 




43 55 


75 57 


5 3 48 


407 


43 31 


70 26 


4 41 44 


528 


29 48 30 


81 35 


5 26 20 


841 


38 37 28 


90 15 16 


6 1 0.7 


856 


42 31 18 


70 53 53 


4 43 35.5 


446 


41 45 31 


70 30 13 


4 42 0.8 


456 


32 4 56 


81 8 18 


5 24 33.2 


662 


42 48 


73 55 


4 55 40 


391 


39 48 


89 33 


5 58 12 


801 


42 6 4 


72 35 45 


4 50 23 


357 


42 39 46 


70 41 8 


4 42 44.5 


466 


42 39 41 


70 35 36 


4 42 22.4 


471 


41 11 7 


73 8 45 


4 52 35 


287 


30 28 


84 36 


5 38 24 


896 



44 



TABUB 09 LATITUAK AND JLOHOXX(U>B. 



[1847. 



Taunton (Trin. Cod^. Ch.),*'Ma88. 
Toronto or York (Ooaerv.),- -U. C. 
1 T6ni/on^ ....#........»•..•.. J4 « J. 

\_ ro v> •••••••••••••••••••••• S\ . X • 

IjuBccdoosa^ Ala. 

Udiversity of Virginia, Va. 

Utica (Dutch Church), N. Y. 

Vandalia, HI. 

Vevay, • •Ind. 

Vincennes, Ind. 

Washington, (Capitol), • • • -D. C. 

Washington, Miss. 

Wheeling, Va. 

Wiliiamstown (Cong. Ch.,)* • 'Mass. 

Wilmington, Del. 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Worcester (Ant? Hall), Mass. 

York,. Me. 

York, -..Pa. 

Yorktown, • • • Va. 



North. 



3 
49 



41 54 11 
48 39 35 
40 14 ^ 

42 44 

33 12 
38 2 

43 6 
38 50 
38 46 
38 43 

38 53 34 
31 36 
40 7 
42 42 49 

39 41 

34 11 

42 16 17 

43 10 
39 58 
37 13 







Longitade, West, 
Indq^teei.i in time. 



71 5 

79 21 

74 30 
73 40 
87 42 
78 31 

75 13 
89 2 
84 59 
87 25 

77 1 
91 20 

80 42 
73 13 

75 28 

78 10 
71 48 
70 40 

76 40 
76 34 



" h. m. s. 
55 4 44 23.6 
30 5 17 26 
4 58 36 

4 54 40 

5 50 48 
29 5 14 5.9 

52 
56 8 
39 56 
49 40 
dO[5 8 6 
5 20 
5 22 48 
10 4 52 52.6 
5 1 52 
5 12 40 
13 4 47 13.3 

4 42 40 

5 6 40 
5 6 16 



Diatte, 
Wash. 



miles. 
415 
500 
166 
383 
858 
124 
383 
781 
556 
693 

1146 
264 
406 
108 
416 
394 
500 
87 



LATITUDE AND LONGITUD:^ OF THE PRINCIPAL FOREIGN 

OBSERVATORIES. 

[The Longitades are ftom Gieenmch.] 



Observatories. 



Altona, 

Armagh, 

Berlin, 

Brussels," •• 

Cambridge, 

Cape of Good Hope, 

Dorpat, 

Dublin, 

Edinburgh,* • • 

Gottingen, 

Greenwich, 

Konigsberg, 

Munich, 

Paris, 

Petersburg, 

Rome, 

Turin, 

Vienna, 



Latitude. 



53 32 45 N. 

54 21 12.7 N. 
52 31 13.5 N. 

50 51 10.7 N. 

52 12 51.8 N. 
33 56 3 S. 

58 22 47 N. 

53 23 13 N. 

55 57 23.2 N. 

51 31 48 N. 
51 28 39.0 N. 

54 42 50 N. 
48 8 45 N. 
48 50 13 N. 

59 56 81 N. 
41 53 52 N. 
45 4 6 N. 
48 12 35 N. 



Loni^tade la time. 



h. m. 
39 
26 
53 
O 17 




1 
1 



13 
46 



25 
12 



s. 

46.6 E. 
35.5 W. 
35.5 E. 
29.0 
23.5 
55.0 
55 
22 



E. 
E. 
E. 
E. 
W. 





1 



39 



22 



46 
9 
2 1 

49 
030 

1 5 



43.6 W. 
46.5 E. 

0.0 

a5 
26.5 
21.5 
15.8 
54.7 
48.4 
81.9 



E. 
E. 
E. 
E. 
E. 
E. 
E. 



M Apparent Noon at GrttmouA. 









dtstbse; 


B.D.eulm. 


;- ^.\\^ 


BiEf^^: 


8. D, coliT^ 
















1 ism 


l"ll-(B 


% I 








8 17^ 


10-91 


i i 




7-88 


i 






HI 


7-89 


7 17-a 
9 in 


10 89 
10-SS 
10^ 


i ^ 


13-7. 
13-3 


7-42 


¥P 




m 




S-B7 


;il 


IS Wi. 






8-79 


15 18-8 




u-i 


8-6S 


is a-- 


17 169 
19 16-4 


fl-e« 


pr^ 


117 


8-34 


ill 


21 18-! 




s Sa 




8-96 


23 lao 


9-24 


1 =. 


10-4 


S-18 


»!l s 


25 lS-8 


902 


10-0 




t 


27 16-8 




1 i 


8 




S-45 


29 lS-3 












31 161 


8-34 




















mtatmi 


D. DccUiAtkm 


l^b.uM^U. 






DwUDUioii 




nmeU 


Bonth. 


Atpoj. Tm-- 






Sogtb. 


Ap^. ^Twit. 


















1 33 b 91-9 




18 49 3-76 


1 


17 U 'i-9 


1361-26 


90 44 18-90 


2 EB 57 179 


4 11-39 


18 49 0-31 


2 


IB S3 56-8 


13»-83 


20 48 13-56 


8 sa SI 4e'7 


43B1M 




3 


18 38 30-7 


11 6-flB 


20 63 1010 


4 32 43 48-3 


5 874 






Ifl 19 4711 




SO 68 8-05 


G 29 39 29-7 


6 33-84 










St 3-31 






IB 148-54 




16 42 29-8 




31 3 59-79 


7 » 25 10-9 


a 28-73 


10 S43-W 




15 23 68-7 


14 94-90 


21 7 66-39 


8 « 17 2S-0 


8M-40 


19 30-85 




16 S 7-9 






9 32 e 19 9 




1913 36-21 






14 99T7 


31 16 40-43 


10 at M-7 


7 49-47 


10 17 3277 


10 


14 28 44-7 


14 31 08 


911014-99 


11 21 51 30-7 


8 8-86 


[0 9139-32 




14 7 11-3 


1131-67 


11 33 42-93 


IS n 42 11 


8 3028 






13 47 S3-7 




S127 39T» 


IS 21 32 0-3 




10 99 99-41 




13 97 29-6 


14 3ff31 


913136-84 


U « SI 44-5 




10 33 18-89 




13 7 8-3 


14M-67 


21 36 39-10 


15 21 U 2-0 


ojrsa 








14 98-09 


91 30 99-75 


IS SO £9 S3-3 


9SB-16 








14 saw 


2143 36-30 


17 20 48 90-4 








12 5 10-9 


14 18-M 


2147 21-8* 


18 SO 3fl 83-B 


10 38-60 


19 49 529 


LJ 


U44 8-3 


14 14-37 


il 51 I8-11 


19 SO S4 3-0 


iosr44 


19 53 1-77 




11 99 64-8 


14 8-» 




M SO II 211 


11 15-59 


19 S8 66-33 


20 


U 1 90-6 


14 3-86 


il 50 11-61 


21 19 6aiB-S 


1133-04 


M 54-89 


21 


10 39 68-2 


13 6619 


99 3 8-07 


22 19 44 47-8 


114983 


ao 4 5114 


22 




13 49-71 




23 IB 30 ST-e 


12 6-63 






g 68 is-7 


13 40-69 




24 19 le 48-8 






24 






22 11 57-73 


25 M 3 141 




■0 IB 41-11 ,25 




13 22-66 


99 18 61-28 


26 IS 47 SO-9 


IS 48-10 


K 20 37-00 


96 


fl 49 48-3 


13 12-74 




27 18 32 7-1 


13 0-77 


20 24 34-22 


27 




13 3114 


22 2e«-39 


2S IB IS 33-S 


13 12-23 


WSS 30-77 


28 




19 61-18 


29 30 43-04 


2S 18 39-0 


13X9-39 


30 32 27-33 


29 


7 49 4-1 


19 3B-6e 


B 34 40-40 


80 17 44aTl 


■ 13 33-34 


a0 38S3-8a 











46 



BFHBKICBIB OF THB SDH. 



[1847, 



At Apparent Noon at Greenvnck. 



MARCH. 1 






APitn«. 




D. 


06fln~9lM&« 


S. D. culm. 


• 


D. 


Semi-Biam. 




• 




* n 


m. sec. 


1 

0,^ • 




1 II 


m* sec. 


8 


2 


16 0-0 


1 5-30 


1 


16 1-0 


1 4-41 


^•^ 

^ 


4 


8-6 


5*16 


3 


0-4 


4*45 




6 


8*0 


5*03 


1 b 


5 


15 50-9 


4*50 


1 ^ 


8 
10 


7-5 
6-9 


4-99 
4*81 




7 
9 


59*3 

«*8 


4*56 
4*63 




12 


6*4 


4*72 


1^1 - 


11 


58*3 


4*70 


^ss*^ 1 - 


14 


5-9 


4*63 


H ih 


13 


67*7 


4*79 


Is &^ 


16 


5-3 


4*56 


X^ 3°1 


15 


m-x 


4*89 


*^l^- 


18 


4-8 


4*49 


a _rf^ 


17 


56*6 


5*00 


r i^ 


20 
22 


4*9 
3*7 


4-44 
4*41 




19 
21 


66*1 
55*6 


6*11 
6*34 


9g 1'^ 

UK 


24 


3*3 


4-39 


*1 § 


23 


55*1 


5-37 


*l i 


26 


2-6 


4*38 


k S 


25 


54-6 


5*51 

• 




28 


21 


4*33 


•• 


27 


64-1 


. 5*65 


l9 


30 


1-5 


4*39 


29 


53*6 


5*80 


82 


1-6 


4*41 


S 


31 


631 


5-95 


3 






Bk|im.ofTime 


PI8 J 1 






Bqna. ofTfane 


DlCroPCAt, 


D. 


Declination 


to be added to 


Time at 


D. 


Declination 


to be added to 


Time at 




SouOi. 


Appear. Time. 


mean noon. 




North. 


tiU15th. 


mean noon. 




O 1 II 


m. 8. 


h. m. see. 




O 1 II 


m. 8. 


h. m. see. 


1 


7 42 4*1 


13 39*50 


33 34 40*49 


1 


4 24 43*8 


4 4*01 


36 53*60 


2 


7 19 16-3 


13 27*47 


32 33 3704 


2 


4 47 50-5 


3 45-71 


40 50*15 


3 


6 56 23*2 


12 14*86 


22 42 33*50 


3 


5 10 53-1 


3 27 54 


44 46-70 


4 


6 33 23*2 


12 1-78 


22 46 30*14 


4 


5 33 48-3 


3 9*53 


43 43-35 


5 


6 10 16 7 


11 48*26 


22 50 26*70 


5 


5 56 38*3 


2 51*69 


52 39*80 


6 


6 47 6*1 


11 34*39 


22 54 23-25 


6 


6 19 23*3 


2 34*05 


56 36*36 


7 


5 23 50*9 


11 19*92 


22 58 19-80 


7 


6 43 1*2 


2 16*63 


1 32*91 


8 


5 31*1 


11 517 


23 2 16*35 


8 


7 4 32*4 


1 59*41 


1 4 39-46 


9 


4 37 7*3 


10 50-06 


23 6 12*90 


9 


7 26 56-6 


1 42*46 


1 8 26*01 


10 


4 13 39*9 


10 34-60 


23 10 9-46 


10 


7 49 13*3 


125*77 


1 13 32-56 


11 


3 50 9*3 


10 18-83 


23 14 6*01 


11 


8 11 33-1 


1 9*36 


1 16 19^18 


12 


3 26 35*9 


10 2*74 


23 18 2*56 


12 


8 33 38*8 


53*35 


1 30 15*67 


13 


3 3 0*0 


9 46*36 


23 2t 59*11 


13 


8 55 15-1 


37-46 


1 34 13-23 


14 


2 39 32*1 


9 29*71 


23 25 56*66 


14 


9 16 58*4 


31*98 


1 38 8*73 


15 


3 15 43*5 


9 12-81 


33 39 52*32 


15 


9 38 33*6 


4-0 6*83 


1 33 5*33 


16 


3 62 1-6 


8 55*69 


33 33 48-77 


16 


9 59 57*3 


— 7-96 


1 36 1*8S 


17 


1 39 19*7 


8 38*34 


33 37 45*33 


17 


10 21 12-0 


22*39 


1 39 58*43 


18 


1 4 37-4 


8 30-78 


23 41 41*87 


18 


10 43 16-5 


36*45 


1 43 54*99 


19 


40 54*9 


8 3*04 


23 45 3B*42 


19 


11 3 10*4 


5013 


1 47 51-54 


20 


17 13-7 


7 4513 


23 49 34*93 


20 


11 23 53*3 


1 3*43 


1 51 43*00 


21 


6 39*0 


7 37-07 


23 53 31*53 


21 


11 44 34*9 


1 16*33 


1 55 44*65 


22 


30 9-6 


7 8*88 


23 57 28-08 


22 


13 4 45*0 


138-81 


1 59 41*30 


23 


53 43-9 


6 50-56 


I 24-63 


23 


12 24 53-1 


1 40*86 


3 3 37*75 


24 


1 17 36-5 


6 3315 


6 21*13 


24 


12 44 49*0 


1 53*46 


3 7 3431 


25 


1 41 3-0 


6 13*67 


9 17*73 


25 


13 4 32*3 


3 3-63 


3 11 30*86 


26 


3 4 35-0 


5 5514 


13 14-28 


26 


13 24 2-7 


2 14-32 


2 15 27-41 


27 


3 28 5*4 


•5 36*57 


17 10*84 


27 


13 43 19-8 


8 34*54 


2 19 23-97 


28 


3 5132*6 


5 17*99 


21 7*39 


28 


14 2 33-4 


3 34*37 


3 33 30*58 


29 


3 14 56*4 


4 59*43 


25 3*94 


29 


14 21 13*3 


3 43*50 


3 27 17*07 


^0 


3 38 16*4 


4 40*88 


29 0*49 


30 


14 39 48*9 


3 53*21 


3 31 13*63 


)1 


4 1 83*3 


4 23*41 


32 57*04 


31 


14 58 10*1 


3 0*39 


2 35 10*18 







■ Al Apparent Na 


m at GrmiBich. 






MAT. 








lUHS. 




D 


S<!Di-I^^ 


a ■a.taim. 




S«il-bUm. 


^.b.cotm. 




1 


lim 


I G-OS 


a 1 




1 . 


3 
6 


(B-T 


6-H 


8-W 


i i 


7 
9 


M-3 


S-fiO 




S'tt 


M 


11 


BO-g 


6-7B 


B-78 


13 


BO'4 


8-93 


m h 


8'S3 


«l 


IS 




T-00 


sSS a". in 


8-87 


17 
IS 


4B'3 


7-a» 


rilji «:; 


8-80 


61^ 


21 




T-SB 




as 


4S-S 


TTl 


°| a s 


8^ 


25 


48-a 




1 J - 


8-85 


i 


87 
29 


49-0 


B-00 
813 


8-81 


31 


4r4 










tqiu.oTTlme 


eumti 






Bqiu.ofnme 


ffidet«l 






Wtan.il.,j». 


TUneri 




D«Uiiili«. 


-ifi£" 


nii«.t 




Nortli. 


ia«r. Tim. 






Norlh. 






















14 m io-i 






1 


1^ 43-3 


3 3S-01 


4 37 33-30 


2 


15 18 16'S 




J 30 fl-73 


2 


33 B4BTi 




4 41 lB-9* 


3 


16 34 7'9 




8 43 3-Sfl 




38 18 330 




4 45 18-51 


4 




3 81 -82 


8 46 W-B4 


4 


S8 33S3-6 




4 49 13-08 


5 


IS s 4'4 




3 M sa-K 




aS30S0-8 


187-86 




6 


16 SO 8-a 


3 33-M 


8 54ea-95 


6 


S8 37 84'4 






7 


18 42 68-S 




8 sa 40-51 


7 


38 43 34-3 






S 


IS SB la-s 


3 41-03 


3 8 4808 


8 


83 40 SOT 


1 35-84 


6 45BT» 


9 


IT IS 43-1 






9 


sa 61 48-0 




5 8 65-85 


10 


17 31 40-6 


3 49-88 


3 10 3017 


10 


33 60 39-8 


1 9-97 


6 13 «-40 


11 


IT « !o-e 


380 00 


3 14 3S-73 


11 


33 4 13-4 


OSO-M 


5 18 48-06 


12 


la 9 43-8 


aw-aa 




12 




38-40 


(30 4S'6a 


IS 


18 IT te-9 




3 33 39-34 


13 


33 13 7-9 


3814 


6 84 43-OT 


14 


i8asa»-8 






14 




13-81 


9 38 3863 


16 






3 SO 31-05 


15 


33 19 33-3 




6 33 35-19 


16 


10 1 7'7 


3 51-38 


3 34 18-50| 


16 


33 30S4-8 


-4-nri5 


5 36 31-74 


17 




3 83-31 


3 38U-De 


17 


33 S3 ro 




6 40 39-30 


18 


10 38 £6-8 


a«-ra 


3 43 11-81 


18 


83 84 43-T 






19 


19 41 38-3 


3 40-98 




19 


33 3S60-S 


050T3 


5 48 31-49 


20 


ISMM-e 


3 48-01 


3 M 4-73 


20 


33 3BM-7 


1 3-74 


8 68 17-97 


21 


80 flB3-8 


343-n 


3 M 0-38 


21 


33 37 100 


118-79 


S 56 14BS 


22 




3 30-00 


asTsrss 


82 


S3B7 80-S 


1 30T^ 




23 


1(130 49-8 


3 38-78 


4 1S4-39 


2S 


33 38 00^ 


148-06 


S 4 7-84 


24 


SO 43 101 


3 31-01 


4 8 50-06 


24 


33 36 13'! 


1S5-S0 


8 8 4-80 


25 


a0 53W-3 


3S8-77 




25 


83 35 8-8 






26 


a 1 1-8 


sao-os 


4 13 44-00 


26 


33 8313-8 






2 


SI 14 88-7 






27 


S3 31 ^-3 




6 19fiS-97 


28 


S1S4S6-8 




4 31 37-17 


28 


83 18 88-4 


S 45-70 




2S 


a3( 1-3 




4 88 33-73 


29 


33 16 5-0 




6 3T48-B9 


3 


MOIM 


3ES-43 


430 3«-se 


30 


83U50-S 


3 0-89 


6 3143-94 


3 1 n a la^ 


8 44-30 


433 3t-e4 


SI 


33 911-4 


aai-M 


8 36 4010 



48 



SFHEXXBIS or THB SUV. 



[1847 







At Apparent Noon < 


it Greenwich, 




JULY. 1 


AUGUST. 1 


^ 


Semi-Diam. 


S. D. cuim. 


• 


D. 


Semi-Diam. 


8. D. culm. 


• 




« II 


m. see. 


5S 




1 II 


m. see. 




2 


16 461 


1 6*69 


ss 


1 


16 47*0 . 


1 6*61' 


S 


4 


461 


8*61 


9S ■• 

1 ^ 

a» go 


3 


47-3 


6-44 


d '* 


6 


45-1 


8*62 


6 


47*6 


6*27 


i '^ 


8 


45-1 


8*49 


jg«J SCO 


7 


47-8 


6*09 




10 


46-3 


6*30 


9 


48*1 


6*92 


12 


46-3 


8-18 


aa ir 


11 


4a*4 


6*76 


i8s f- 


14 


46*4 


8*05 


Hh 


18 


48-8 


6*60 


.««. •* rA ^ 


Iti 


46-6 


7-91 




15 


49-1 


6*44 


«T-|J 


18 


46-6 


777 




17 


49-6 


6*28 


'P? 1^ 


20 


45-8 


7*68 




19 


49*9 


5-14 


22 
24 


46*0 
46-1 


7*46 
7*30 


21 
23 


60*3 
60-7 


5*00 

4*87 




26 


46-3 


7*13 


i; i 


25 


61*1 


4*74 


^ 1 


28 


46*6 


6*96 


J, s 

i 


27 


51-6 


4-62 


80 


46*8 


6*79 


29 


62*0 


4*51 


32 


46*7 


6*61 


31 


62*4 


4-41 


1 






Eqna. of Time 


Siderml 




• 


Equa. of Time 


Sideraal 


D. 


Declination 


to be added to 


Time at 


D. 


Declination 


to be added to 


Time at 




North. 


Appar. Time. 


mean noon. 




Nortli. 


Appar. Time. 


mean noon. 




• 1 II 


m. B. 


li. m. sec. 




e 1 II 


m. B. 


h. m. aeo. 


1 


23 9 11*4 


3 21-61 


6 35 40*10 


1 


18 8 7-2 


6 2*99 


8 37 53-34 


2 


23 6 7*7 


3 3314 


39 36*66 


2 


17 52 68*8 


5 59*44 


8 41 49*99 


3 


23 39*7 


3 44*42 


6 43 3321 


3 


17 37 32*8 


5 56-30 


8 45 46-45 


4 


22 65 47*6 


3 55*45 


6 47 29-77 


4 


17 21 49*5 


5 60*58 


3 49 43-00 


6 


22 50 31*4 


4 6*19 


6 51 26-33 


5 


17 5 49*2 


6 45*28 


8 53 39-55 


6 


22 44 51*4 


4 16*62 


6 55 22*88 


6 


16 49 32*2 


• 6 30-40 


8 57 36*11 


7 


22 38 47-7 


4 26*72 


6 59 19-44 


7 


16 32 58*8 


6 32*95 


9 132-66 


8 


22 32 20*3 


4 36*49 


7 3 1600 


8 


16 16 9*3 


6 25*92 


9 5 29*22 


9 


22 25 29*6 


4 45-89 


7 7 12*56 


9 


15 59 4't 


5 18*31 


9 9 26*77 


10 


22 18 16*5 


4 54*90 


7 11 9*11 


10 


15 41 43*5 


5 10*14 


9 13 22*33 


11 


22 10 38*4 


6 3*50 


7 15 5*66 


11 


15 24 7*7 


6 .1*40 


9 17 18*88 


12 


22 2 38*4 


6 11*68 


7 19 2*22 


12 


15 6 17-1 


4 62*08 


9 21 15*43 


13 


21 54 15*7 


6 19*41 


7 22 58*78 


13 


14 48 12-1 


4 42-20 


9 25 11-99 


14 


21 45 30*5 


6 26*67 


7 26 65-33 


14 


14 29 3*0 


4 31-76 


9 29 8*54 


15 


21 36 23*0 


5 33*45 


7 30 51*89 


15 


14 11 20-0 


4 20-78 


9 '33 5-10 


16 


21 26 63*4 


6 39*73 


7 34 43-45 


16 


13 52 33-5 


4 9-26 


9 37 1*65 


17 


21 17 1-9 


5 45-47 


7 38 4500 


;i7 


13 33 33-8 


3 57-17 


9 40 58-20 


18 


21 6 48*8 


5 60*69 


7 42 41-56 


18 


13 14 21*3 


3 44*56 


9 44 64*76 


19 


20 56 14'3 


6 55*36 


7 46 38-11 


19 


12 54 56*2 


3 31-43 


9 48 51*31 


20 


20 45 18*6 


5 60*47 


7 60 34*67 


20 


12 36 19*0 


3 17*78 


9 62 47*86 


21 


20 34 2*0 


6 3*01 


7 54 31*23 


21 


12 15 29*8 


3 3*65 


9 66 44*42 


22 


20 22 24*7 


6 6*97 


7 58 27-78 


22 


11 56 29*0 


2 49*03 


10 40*97 


23 


20 10 26*9 


6 8*34 


8^ 2 24-34 


,23 


11 35 16*8 


2 33-95 


10 4 37*52 


24 


19 68 8-8 


6 10*13 


s" 6 20*89 


24 


11 14 63*7 


2 18*42 


10 8 34-08 


25 


19 45 308 


6 11*32 


8 10 17-45 


25 


10 64 20*0 


2 2-46 


10 12 30-63 


26 


19 32 331 


6 11*91 


8 14 14-00 


26 


10 33 35*8 


146*06 


10 16 27*18 


27 


19 19 16*0 


6 11*91 


8 18 10*66 


27 


10 12 41*5 


129*28 


10 20 23*74 


28 


19 5 39*6 


6 11-31 


8 22 7*12 


'28 


9 61 37-6 


•1 12-12 


10 24 20*29 


29 


18 51 44-3 


10-12 


8 26 3-67 


29 


9 30 84-0 


64*60 


10 28 16*84 


80 


18 37 30-3 


6 8*34 


8 30 0*23 


30 


9 9 1-3 


36*74 


10 32 13-39 


31 


18 22 67*8 


6 5*90 


8 33 66-78 


!81 


8 47 89^ 


18-66 


10 36 9*96 



At Af^xireta Nom at OrtatmA. 



SEPTEUBBR. 


II 0CT08BR. 




B 




S.D.c»Im. 


1 D.] Saol-DUm. 


B, D. culLi. 










U " '. „ . 




s 


2 


U S0^ 


1 lat 


3 19 0-7 


l' 4-33 


4 


53-3 




a " 


4-43 


i'i 


6 


OS'S 


4'17 




8 


M-3 




^-■" Z- 2-3 






10 




409 


Is ^1 


4-TO 


hjl 


12 




4'CO 






sal- 


14 


SS-9 


_ 4W 


S-07 


m 


16 






«= 3- " 


5-S3 


18 
20 
22 


ee-o 

S7-4 


403 


rill ;:;- 


s 


iM^ 

s^% 


24 




1-OT 


°l ? 


6-86 


'1 i 


26 
28 
30 


ss-i 

6B-B 
19 0-1 


411 


t* ii 


0-10 
6-40 










i' --. a-7 


8-64 


i 


^ 


DMiitua™ 


Eqai.ofTIBe 


SidCRlU 


^ 


DMlimUon 




ILmeU 




North. 


me^ awm. 


' 


South. 














m. a. 




1 


lisia 




-\- u' 007 






3 a «-o 


10 11-14 


12 38 33-09 


2 










2 


3 39 3-9 


10 30-18 


12 43 19-81 


3 






37-73 


L0 47 69-80 


s 




10 48-91 


18 46 la-lB 


4 


















6 


6SJ60 






10 55 62-71 


5 




1135-33 


12 54 9-36 


6 








ID3S49-2<! 


6 


4S8®-0 


11 42-»r 




7 












S 21 68-1 


12 0-33 


13 a 3-37 


8 






3 19-34 




8 




13 17-08 


13 5 58-82 


9 








11 U 38-92 


9 




12 33-49 


13 9 65-47 


10 


5 S 19'8 


S 87-11 


11 16 38-47 


10 


9 30 43-7 


13 40-47 




11 


A 4a 31 'B 


3 17-Ti 


11 19 32-03 


11 


8 63 23-3 


13 4-99 


13 17 48-58 


12 








12 




13 20-04 


13 214513 


13 


3 86 48-8 


3 6027 




13 


7 35 43-3 


13 34-60 


13 as 41-68 


14 




4ao-ai 


11 31 ai-98 


14 






13 29 35-33 


IS 


3 10 37-3 


4 41-22 


11 38 18-a) 


15 


8 23 30-3 






16 


3 4Jlt9-l 






16 








17 






11 43 11-33 


17 




14 27-81 


13 41 27-88 


18 




D 






18 


9 20 48-0 


1139-S3 


13 45 24-44 


19 


1 3T« 








19 




14 60-93 


13 4B ai-oo 


20 


114 28 


9 


e 26-83 


11 55 O-90 


20 


10 13 20-0 


16 1-61 


13 53 17-66 


21 


51 § 


i 


9 47-00 


LI se S7-M 


21 


10 34 62-2 


19 11-57 


13 67 14-10 


22 


0-^46 








22 


10 59 14-9 






23 


No 4 S3 






13 9 80-94 


23 




IS ao-76 




24 


Sow 








24 




16 37«) 




25 


049 64 




8 11-33 


12 14 43-75 


25 




16 45-10 


14 13 0-31 


26 


1 B4S 




8 31-83 


12 19 40-30 


26 


12 30 3-6 




14 16 58-87 


27 


1»14 







12 22 36-85 


27 


13 40 331 




14 ao 63-48 


26 


1 G2 38 







la 36 33-40 


28 


13 61-0 






29 






3210 


12X20-26 


29 




18 r3a 




80 


S3»S3'3 


OSl-70 


13 34 39-61 


30 


13 40 60-1 




14 32 43-09 


81 


3 a43-e 


10 11-14 


Ifi 38 23-09 


31 


14 30-3 


16 13-75 


14 38 3B-03 



60 



xFHBUSis ov ma suir. 



[1847. 



/ 




At Appcertrd Noon at Greenwich. 




NOVEMBER. 


DBCEBiBKR. | 


D. 


Bemi-Diam. 


S. D. eulm. 


^ • 


D. 


Seml-Diam. 


S. D. culm. 


• 




« n 


m. Bee. 


1 




« $t 


m. sec. 




1 


19 8-7 


1 6*84 


1 


16 14-9 


1 10*19 


8 
5 


9^ 

9-7 


707 
r30 


a 


8 
5 


15*1 
15*4 


10*37 
10*53 


S to 


7 


10-2 


7*64 


.2. A 


7 


15*7 


10*67 




9 


10 6 


7*78 


U.d 


9 


15*9 


10*80 


-■6: M 


11 


111 


8*08 


iS8 ? - 


11 


16'2 


10-91 




IS 


11-6 


8*26 


Hh 


13 


16*4 

• 


11*01 


isfii 


15 


12-0 


8*60 




15 


16*6 


1109 


^^a 3^- 


17 


12*4 


873 


III" 

paw ^^ A^ 


17 


16*7 


1115 


P IS 


19 


128 


8*96 


19 


16-9 


11-19 


21 


13-2 


919 


21 


170 


11*22 


sa w« 


23 


13-6 


9*41 


• CO 


23 


17*1 


11*83 


'1 r- 


25 


14*0 


9.62 




25 


17*2 


11*21 




27 


14*3 


0.83 


27 


17'3 


1118 


r Pi 

St- 


29 


•14-8 


10.01 


29 


17*3 


11*13 




31 


14-9 


10.19 


f 1 


81 


17*3 


11*07 


t ^ 






EquA. of Time 


Sidereal 






Equa. of Time 


Sidereal 


D. 


Declination 


to be subtr. fr. 


Time at 


D. 


Declination 


9ub. fr. Appear. 


Time at 




South. 


Appar. Time. 


mean noon. 




South. 


tiU 25th. 


mean noon. 




1 II 


m. 8. 


h. m. sec. 




e 1 II 


m. s. 


h.m. sec. 


1 


14 19 67-2 


16 15*77 


14 40 36*19 


1 


21 46 15-8 


10 88*47 


16 38 52*84 


2 


14 39 10-4 


16 16*97 


14 44 32*74 


2 


21 65 31-5 


10 30*70 


16 43 49*40 


8 


14 68 9-4 


16 17*34 


14 48 29*30 


8 


22 4 220 


10 7*28 


16 46 45*95 


4 


15 16 63-8 


16 16-83 


14 52 25*85 


4 


22 12 46*9 


9 43*24 


16 50 42.51 


6 


15 35 23-2 


16 15*59 


14 56 22*40 


5 


28 20 45*9 


9 13*61 


16 54 39*07 


6 


15 63 37-2 


16 13*47 


15 18-96 


6 


22 28 18*9 


8 53*40 


16 58 36*62 


7 


16 11 35-3 


16 10*50 


15 4 16*51 


7 


22 35 25*6 


8 27-66 


17 2 32*18 


8 


16 29 17-1 


16 6*69 


15 8 12*07 


8 


22 42 5-8 


8 1*42 


17 6 28*74 


9 


16 46 42*3 


16 2*04 


15 12 8*62 


9 


22 48 19-2 


7 34*70 


17 10 25*29 


10 


17 3 60-3 


16 66*56 


15 16 617 


10 


22 54 5*6 


7 7*55 


17 14 21*85 


11 


17 20 40-9 


15 50*23 


15 20 1*73 


11 


22 59 24*8 


6 39*99 


17 18 16*41 


12 


17 37 13-6 


15 4307 


15 23 58*28 


12 


23 4 16*7 


6 12 05 


17 22 14[*S7 


IS 


17 53 27-7 


15 35*07 


15 27 54*84 


13 


23 8 41*1 


6 43*73 


17 26 11*52 


14 


18 9 23*2 


16 26*25 


15 31 51-39 


14 


23 12 37-8 


5 16*19 


17 30 8-08 


15 


18 24 59 6 


15 16*60 


15 36 47*95 


15 


23 16 6-8 


4 46*32 


17 34 4*64 


16 


18 40 16*5 


15 6*12 


15 39 44*50 


16 


23 19 7*9 


4 17*22 


17 38 1-19 


17 


18 56 13*4 


14 54*82 


15 43 41*06 


17 


23 21 410 


3 47*92 


17 41 57-76 


18 


19 9 600 


14 42 70 


15 47 37-61 


18 


23 23 45*9 


3 18*43 


17 45 64*31 


19 


19 24 5-9 


14 29*77 


15 51 34*17 


19 


23 25 22*6 


8 48*79 


17 49 50*86 


20 


19 38 0*8 


14 1603 


15 65 30*73 


20 


23 26 31-2 


8 19*04 


17 63 47*48 


21 


19 51 34-3 


14 1*48 


15 69 27*28 


21 


23 27 11*4 


1 49*20 


17 67 43*96 


22 


20 4 46-0 


13 4613 


16 3 23*84 


22 


23 27 23-3 


1 19*31 


18 1 40*63 


23 


20 17 35*0 


13 29-99 


16 7 20*39 


23 


23 27 70 


49*39 


18 6 37*00 


24 


20 30 2*7 


13 13*06 


16 11 16*96 


24 


23 26 22*2 


19*47 


IS 9 33*65 


25 


20 42 7-0 


12 65*37 


16 16 13*50 


25 


23 25 9*2 


-j- 10*42 


19 13 30*21 


26 


20 53 48*1 


12 36*90 


16 19 10*06 


26 


23 23 27*9 


40*84 


18 17 86-78 


27 


21 6 5*8 


12 17*66 


16 23 6*62 


27 


23 21 18*3 


1 9*96 


18 81 83*38 


28 


21 15 69*8 


11 57*68 


16 27 3*17 


28 


23 18 40*5 


1 39*55 


18 85 19*88 


29 


21 26 89*7 


113608 


16 30 69*73 


29 


23 16 34*6 


S 8*99 


16 80 16-43 


^0 


21 36 35*1 


11 15*57 


16 34 66*28 


30 


23 IS 0*7 


8 38*84 


18 33 18*09 


I 


21 46 15*8 


10 53*47 


16 33 68*84 


81 


23 7 68*9 


3 7*86 


18 37 0*06 



1847.1 



VIXEJP BTABg. 



51 



Ihie Apparmt Places of iht Pole Star for ewry daif of the }fear. 
Epoch.— The Upper Culmination at Greenwich. 





JAXVAST. 


RBBVAKT. 


MABOH. 


APKIL. 


ILLT. 




aUzBtt Minoiifl. 
(Pofarw.) 


oUran Minoiii. 
(Polaris.) 


(Jt\}n» MinoiiB. 
{PolarU ) 


aUrsce Minoiia. 
{Polaru.) 


aUrssB Minoris. 
{Polaris.) 


Day 
of the 
M<»ktili. 

1847 


• 

1 

••a 

1 


• 

1 

• 

1 


• 

i 


1 

1 


• 

1 


• 
• 

1 


m 


1 

■ 

1 


< 

<*a 


• 

1 

• 

1 


1 


i» 


h. 
1 


88 


h. 
1 


e 

88 


h. 
1 


8*8 


h. 
1 


e 

88 




JO. sec. 


t It 


m. sec. 


1 II 


m. sec. 


1 II 


m. sec. 


1 II 


m. sec. 


1 II 


1 


4 39*49 


29 57-8 


3 74-62 


29 57*3 


3 56*63 


20 51*9 


3 48-20 


29 42*8 


3 54-31 


29 33*5 


2 


38-67 


67*8 


73*86 


57*2 


56-15 


61*7 


48-18 


42-5 


54-73 


33*2 


3 


37*86 


57*9 


73-09 


57-0 


55-68 


61-4 


48-19 


42*2 


65*17 


33*0 


4 


37*06 


58*0 


72*36 


66-9 


65-22 


51*1 


48*20 


41*8 


65*62 


32*7 


5 


36*34 


580 


71*82 


56*8 


64*76 


60*9 


48*21 


41-5 


56*06 


32*4 


6 


35*43 


56*1 


70W 


66*7 


64*33 


60-6 


48*23 


41*2 


66*56 


32*1 


7 


34*68 


63*2 


70^8 


56*6 


53-91 


60-3 


DI3] 


[£S] 


57*05 


31*9 


8 


33*81 


58*3 


60-47 


56-4 


53*61 


50*0 


48-41 


40*3 


67-56 


31*7 


9 


33*00 


68-3 


68*76 


66-2 


53*14 


49-7 


48*50 


40*0 


58-06 


31-5 


10 


32*19 


66-3 


68*06 


661 


52*78 


49-5 


48-61 


39*7 


68*60 


31-3 


11 


31*37 


58-3 


67*35 


55-9 


52*43 


49-2 


48*73 


39-4 


60*12 


31*0 


12 


30*66 


88*3 


66-66 


65*7 


^•08 


48-9 


48-37 


39-0 


50*66 


30*8 


13 


29*74 


68*3 


65*99 


55-6 


51*73 


48*6 


4904 


38-7 


60*20 


30*6 


14 


28*02 


58*3 


65*33 


55*4 


51*38 


48*3 


49*22 


38*4 


60*76 


30*4 


15 


28*10 


58*3 


64*67 


65-2 


51*05 


48*0 


49*41 


381 


61*34 


30*1 


16 


27*29 


58*3 


64*03 


550 


50*75 


47*7 


49*60 


37*8 


61-93 


29*9 


17 


26-48 


58*2 


63*40 


54-7 


50-49 


47-4 


49*82 


37-5 


62*53 


29*7 


18 


25*67 


58*2 


62-79 


54*5 


50*24 


47*1 


50-05 


37*2 


63-14 


29*5 


19 


24*87 


66-2 


62*18 


54-3 


50*00 


46*8 


50-29 


36*9 


63*76 


29*3 


20 


24*06 


581 


61*57 


64*1 


49*77 


46-5 


50-54 


36*6 


64*39 


291 


21 


23*26 


58*1 


60*96 


53*9 


49-56 


46-2 


60-81 


36*3 


65-02 


28*9 


22 


22*46 


581 


60*37 


53*7 


49*36 


45*9 


61-00 


36-0 


65*66 


28*8 


23 


21*64 


58*0 


89-79 


63*5 


49*17 


46*6 


61-39 


35*7 


66*31 


28*6 


24 


20-84 


58*0 


69-24 


53*2 


49*00 


45-3 


51-71 


36*4 


66*97 


28*5 


25 


20*04 


57-9 


68*70 


82*9 


48*85 


44*9 


82*04 


35*1 


67*64 


28*3 


26 


19*26 


57*9 


8316 


52*6 


48*72 


44*6 


52*39 


34*8 


68*32 


28*2 


27 


18*46 


67*8 


67-64 


62-4 


48*60 


44*3 


52-75 


34*6 


69*01 


28*0 


28 


17*68 


57-7 


5713 


52*2 


48*49 


43*0 


53*12 


34*3 


69-71 


27*9 


29 


16*91 


57*6 


56-63 


61*9 


48*38 


43*6 


53*50 


34*0 


70*41 


27*7 


30 


16*16 


B7'5 






48-30 


43*3 


53*90 


33*7 


71*12 


27*6 


31 


15*39 


57*4 






48-24 


43-0 


64-31 


33*6 


71*84 
72*67 


27*4 


32 


14*62 


57'3 






48-20 


42-8 






27*3 



52 



VIXBD BTAB8. [1847. 

« 

True Apparent Placet of the Pole Star for every day of the year» 
Epoch. — The Upper Cnhnination at Greenwich. 





JUNE. 


JULT. 


▲nousT. 




OOTOIMBK. 




aUrsflB MlnoriB 
[Polaris.) 


ajjTBse Mlnoris. 
{Polaris.) 


(Jtiintd Mlnoris. 
(Polaris.) 


1 

aUrssB Mlnoris. 
{Polaris.) 


(i\iT8a Mlnoris. 
(Polaris.) 


Day 

otVbB 
Month. 

1847 


• 

1 


• 

1 

1 


• 

1 


• 

1 

• 

1 


• • 

1 


• 

1 


1 


• 

1 

• 

1 


1 


• 

1 
1 


h. 
1 


88 


h. 
1 


e 

88 


h. 
1 


88 


h. 
1 


88 


h. 
1 


o 

88 


1 


m. sec. 
4 12*57 


29 27-3 


m. sec. 
4 36-45 


29 85-8 


m. sec. 
5 1*37 


1 It 

29 29-5 


m. sec. 
6 21-14 


29af7"6 


m. sec. 
5 31-60 


29 48*1 


2 


13-30 


27-2 


37-28 


25-9 


2*11 


29-7 


21-64 


37-9 


31-77 


48*4 


8 


14*04 


27*1 


38-12 


25-9 


2*84 


29-9 


22-23 


33-2 


31-93 


48*8 


4 


14-78 


27*0 


38-95 


25-9 


3-57 


30-1 


226^ 


88*5 


32-09 


49*2 


5 


15'S8 


26-9 


39-78 


26*0 


4-29 


30-3 


23-09 


38-8 


32*23 


49-5 


6 


16-27 


26*7 


40-62 


26*1 


5-01 


30-5 


23*54 


39-2 


32-34 


49*9 


7 


17-03 


96-6 


41-45 


26-1 


5-73 


30-8 


23*99 


39*5 


32*44 


60*3 


8 


17-80 


26-5 


42-28 


26-2 


6*45 


31-0 


24*43 


39-8 


32-64 


60*6 


9 


18-57 


26-4 


43-11 


26-3 


716 


31-3 


24-96 


40-2 


32-64 


51*0 


10 


19-36 


26-3 


43*93 


26-4 


7-86 


31-6 


26-28 


40-5 


32-73 


61*4 


11 


20-13 


26*3 


44-75 


26-6 


8-54 


31*7 


25*69 


40-8 


32-79 


61*8 


12 


20-92 


26-2 


45-57 


26-6 


9-23 


38-0 


26-09 


41*2 


32-82 


62*2 


13 


21-72 


26*1 


46-40 


26-7 


9-91 


32-2 


26-49 


41*6 


32*83 


62*6 


14 


22*52 


26-0 


47-22 


26-8 


10-58 


32-4 


26-87 


41-8 


32*84 


62*9 


15 


23-33 


26-0 


48-04 


96-9 


11-24 


32-7 


27-25 


42-2 


32*85 


63*3 


16 


24-13 


25-9 


48-86 


270 


11-89 


33-0 


27*62 


42-6 


32-86 


63*7 


17 


24-93 


25-9 


49-67 


27-1 


12-53 


33-2 


27-97 


42-9 


32-86 


540 


18 


25-73 


26-9 


50*48 


27-2 


13-16 


33-5 


23-30 


43-3 


32*84 


64*4 


19 


26-54 


25-8 


51*29 


27-3 


13-79 


33-8 


28-62 


43-7 


32*79 


54'8 


20 


27-36 


25-8 


S2-09 


27*5 


14-42 


34-0 


28-93 


44-0 


32*73 


65*2 


21 


29*18 


25-8 


52-89 


27*6 


1503 


34-2 


29*23 


44-3 


32*65 


65'5 


22 


29*00 


25-7 


53-68 


27-7 


15-64 


34-5 


29*52 


44-7 


32*56 


66-9 


28 


29-82 


25-7 


54*47 


27*9 


16-24 


34-8 


29*30 


45*0 


32-47 


66-3 


24 


30-65 


25-7 


55-25 


281 


16*83 


35*1 


30-07 


45*4 


32*37 


66*7 


25 


31*47 


25-7 


5603 


28*2 


17-41 


35*4 


30-33 


45-8 


32-26 


67*1 


26 


32-30 


25-7 


66*80 


28*4 


17-98 


35-7 


30-57 


46-2 


32*13 


57-4 


27 


33-12 


25-7 


57-57 


28*6 


18-53 


36*0 


30*80 


46-6 


31*98 


57*8 


28 


33-05 


25-8 


68*34 


28*8 


19-06 


36*3 


3102 


46-9 


31-82 


68*2 


29 


34-79 


25*8 


69-11 


29*0 


19*56 


36-6 


31-22 


47-3 


31*64 


88*6 


30 


35-62 


25*8 


69-88 


29*1 


20-10 


36-9 


31-41 


47-7 


31-44 


89*0 


81 


36-46 


25-8 


60-63 


29*3 


20-62 


37-3 


31-60 


481 


31*24 


59-3 


82 






61-37 


29*5 


2114 


37-6 






31*03 


69-7 



18i7.] 



V%XBD BXABS. 



53 



True Apparent Places of the Pole Star for every day^/md of TMrtyseven of the 
Principal Fixed Stars /or every tenth day^ of the year. 

Epoch.— The Upper Cnlminatiqn at Greenwich. 















(^UranMinoris. 


a AndromedaB. 




XrOVIMBIft. 


DSCSMBSS. 


. 


3 




1 
















1- 

■♦a 


• 

1 


1 

■*» 


1 












t^UrsfB MinorlB. 


aUrssB MiBoiis. 




•a 


1 


•§► 


1 


Yv 


{Polatis.) 


{Polaris.) 

m 




f 


S 


Day 

of fehe 


1 

43 


1 


i 

49 


1 


1847 


h. 
18 


e 

86 


h. 



28 


Month. 


'3, 


1 


i. 


1 


^p ^ 


m. seo. 


f 1 1 


m. 860. 


1 II 






S 


Jan. 1 
11 


21 16-44 
16*88 


35 51*9 

48*4 


29*86 
29*72 


14 56-7 

Pf ait 




h. 




h. 




656 


1847 


1 


88 


1 


88 


21 


17*79 


45'3 


29'58 


54*3 




m. 860. 


t It 


m. sec. 


( II 


31 


19*40 


43*2 


29*45 


S2-8 


1 


5 31*08 


29 59-7 


4 78-M 


30 91 


Feb. 10 


21-59 


39*6 


29*35 


51*2 


2 


30-82 


60-0 


78-40 


9«4 


20 


24*35 


37*4 


29*27 


49-5 


3 


30*60 


60-3 


77-83 


9-6 


Mar. 2 


27-52 


35*8 


29*22 


47*9 


4 


30-35 


60-6 


77-22 


9*8 


12 


30-99 


34*7 


29*21 


46-3 


5 


3009 


61-0 


76-61 


101 


22 


34-60 


34*2 


.29*25 
"89*34 


44*9 


6 


29*81 


61*4 


75-98 


10-3 


Aprill 


38*22 


34-4 


43*6 


7 


29*52 


61-7 


75-35 


lO'O 


11 


41*71 


35-2 


29-46 


42*7 


8 


29-23 


621 


74-72 


10-8 


. 21 


44*97 


36-6 


29*64 


42*2 


9 


28-90; 


62-4 


74-08 


11-0 


May 1 


47*87 


38-6 


29-36 


42*0 


10 


28-61 


62*7 


73-42 


11-2 


11 


50*31 


40-7 


30*10 


42-3 












21 


52-24 


43-5 


30-39 


42*9 


11 


28-26 


631 


72-75 


11*6 


31 


63*58 


46-4 


30*70 


43-9 


12 


27-89 


63-4 


72-06 


11-7 


Jun. 10 


54*31 


49-6 


31*03 


45-2 


13 


27-52 


C3-7 


71-40 


11*9 


20 


54*40 


82-8 


31*36 


46-9 


14 


2715 


64*0 


70-71 


120 


30 


53*86 


66-0 


31-70 


48*9 


15 


26-78 


64-4 


70-01 


12*2 


July 10 


52*69 


69-2 


32*02 


61-0 


16 


26-39 


64-7 


69*30 


12-4 


20 


50*96 


62*2 


32*32 


53*3 


17 


25-97 


65*0 


68-58 


12-6 


30 


48*65 


64*9 


32*60 


55-7 


18 


25-53 


65*4 


67-85 


12*8 


Aug. 9 


45*88 


30 7*4 


32*85 


58*2 


19 


25'09 


65-7 


67-12 


13*0 


19 


42*64 


9*5 


33-06 


60-6 


20 


24-64 


66-0 


66-38 


13*2 


29 


39*08 


11*2 


33*22 


63*0 












Sept. 8 


35*22 


12-5 


33 35 


65*3 


21 


24-19 


66-3 


65-64 


13*3 


18 


3115 


13*3 


33*44 


67*4 


22 


23-72 


66-6 


64-89 


13-5 


28 


26-98 


13*8 


33-49 


69*4 


23 


23-24 


66-9 


6414 


1316 


Oct. 8 


22*77 


13*5 


33*50 


71*1 


24 


22-76 


67-2 


63-38 


13*7 


18 


18*65 


12*9 


33*48 


72-6 


25 


22-25 


67-5 


62-61 


13*8 


28 


14-67 


11*9 


33*42 


73*8 


, 26 


21-73 


67-8 


61*84 


13-9 


Nov. 7 


11*02 


10*2 


33*34 


74-8 


27 


21-20 


63-0 


61*06 


14-1 


17 


20 7-69 


8*1 


33*24 


75-4 


28 


20*66 


68-3 


60-28 


14*2 


27 


4*86 


5*6 


33*11 


75*7 


29 


20-11 


63-6 


59-50 


14-3 


Dec. 7 


62*55 


35 62*8 


32*93 


76-8 


30 


19-55 


68-8 


58*70 


14-4 


17 


60*90 


59*7 


32^ 


76-6 


31 


18-96 


69-1 


57-91 


14*5 


27 


50*88 


66*0 


33*60 


74-8 


32 






57-11 


14*8 


87 






32-54 


73-9 



5* 



54 



FIXED 8TAB8. 



11847. 



True Apparent Places of Thirty-seven of the Principal Fixed Stars fir every 

tenOi day of the year. 

ISpocih. — The Upper Culmination at Greenwich. 





/?Cetl. 
2.8 


a Arietta. 
8 


aCett. 
2.8 


a Tauri. 
{Aldtbaran.) 


a AnrigK. 
{OipeUa.) 


1847 


• 

S 

1 


• 

1 


1 
1 


• 

1 

1 


• 

i 


1 

• 


f 


• 

1 




L ^ 

1 
1 


h. 



1*8 


h. 
1 


o 

22 


h. 
2 


8 


h. 
4 


e 

16 


h. 
6 


o 

45 




m. sec. 


1 II 


m. sec. 


1 >> 


m. 80C. 


1 1 1 


m. Bee. 


1 II 


m. sec. 


1 1 1 


Jan. 1 


35 54-57 


49 45-6 


58 34-78 


44 16-5 


5418-46 


29 5-7 


27 10-60 


1143*9 


5 26-33 


49 68-1 


11 


54-44 


461 


34-63 


16-1 


18-35 


5-0 


10-56 


43-6 


26-30 


60-4 


21 


54-30 


46-3 


34*49 


14-5 


13-23 


4-3 


10-18 


43-3 


26-21 


70*0 


31 


64-18 


46-3 


34*33 


13-8 


18-09 


3-6 


10*36 


43-0 


26*07 


71*5 


Feb. 10 


54-07 


46-0 


34-17 


12-9 


17-93 


31 


10-21 


42-6 


25-88 


72*2 


20 


53-98 


45-5 


34 02 


12-0 


17*77 


2-6 


10-05 


42-3 


25-65 


7*2*7 


Mar. 2 


53-91 


44-7 


33-88 


11*0 


17-62 


2-3 


9-96 


42-0 


25-40 


72*8 


12 


63-87 


43-6 


33-76 


10-0 


17-47 


2-2 


9-68 


41-7 


2514 


72-6 


22 


.53-86 
"53-90 


42*2 


33-68 


91 


17-35 


2-2 


9*51 


41*4 


24-87 


72*2 


April 1 


40-6 


33-63 


8-2 


17*26 


2-3 


9*36 


41-1 


24-63 


71*5 


11 


63-93 


38-7 


33-63 


7-5 


17-20 


2*7 


9-22 


40-9 


24-42 


70*5 


21 


54-10 


36-7 


.33-69 
"33-78 


7*0 


17-19 


3-2 


9-12 


40-8 


24-25 


69-4 


May 1 


54-20 


34-5 


6*7 


.17-22 
^17-30 


4-0 


9*07 


40-7 


24-13 


68*1 


11 


54-46 


32-3 


33-92 


6*7 


6*1 


9-07 


40-8 


24-07 


66*7 


21 


54-70 


30-0 


34-11 


7-0 


17-42 


6*3 


. 911 
" 9*20 


41*1 


24-07 


65*3 


31 


64-96 


27-7 


34-34 


7'6 


17-59 


7*7 


41*5 


. 24-14 
^24-26 


63-9 


Jun. 10 


55-25 


25-4 


34*61 


8-4 


17-79 


9*2 


9-34 


420 


62*5 


20 


65-66 


23-2 


34-90 


9-4 


1803 


10-8 


9-62 


42-7 


24-46 


61*3 


80 


65-88 


21-2 


35*21 


10-7 


18-29 


12*5 


9-73 


43-5 


2468 


60*3 


July 10 


56-19 


19-5 


35-53 


12-2 


18-57 


14-2 


9-97 


44-4 


24-96 


60*4 


20 


56-49 


18-0 


35-86 


lJ-8 


18-86 


15-9 


10-23 


45-3 


25-28 


68*8 


30 


56-78 


16-8 


36-18 


15-5 


19-16 


17-5 


10-51 


46-3 


25-63 


58*4 


Aug. 9 


57-05 


15-9 


36-48 


17-3 


19-45 


19-0 


10-80 


47-2 


26-00 


58-1 


19 


57-28 


16-4 


36-77 


19-1 


19-74 


20-3 


11-10 


48-2 


26-39 


58*0 


29 


57-48 


15-3 


3703 


20-8 


20-01 


21-4 


11-40 


49 


26-79 


58-2 


Sept. 8 


57-64 


15-5 


37*27 


22-6 


20-26 


22-3 


11-70 


49-8 


27-19 


58*6 


18 


57-76 


16-0 


37-47 


24-0 


20-49 


22*9 


11-98 


50-4 


27-59 


59-0 


28 


57-84 


16-8 


37-65 


25-4 


20-70 


23-2 


12-26 


60*9 


27*98 


69*7 


Oct. 8 


57-89 


17-8 


37-79 


26-7 


20-88 


23-3 


12-52 


61-2 


28*36 


60*5 


18 


67-90 


19-1 


37-90 


27 8 


21-04 


23-2 


12-76 


61-4 


28-72 


61*5 


28 


57-87 


20-4 


37*98 


23-8 


2116 


22-9 


1296 


61-6 


29*05 


62*6 


Nov. 7 


67-82 


21-9 


38*02 


29-6 


2125 


22-4 


13-17 


61-4 


2936 


63*7 


17 


67-75 


23-3 


38-04 


30-2 


21-32 


21-7 


13-34 


61-3 


29*63 


65*0 


27 


57-65 


24*6 


38-02 


30-6 


21.35 


210 


13-47 


61-1 


29-86 


66*4 


Dee. 7 


57-64 


26-8 


37-98 


30-8 


21-35 


20-2 


13-67 


60-9 


30-04 


67*9 


17 


67*41 


26-9 


37-91 


30-8 


21-33 


19-4 


13-63 


60-6 


30-17 


60*4 


27 


57-28 


27-8 


37-81 


30-7 


21-27 


18-5 


13-66 


50*3 


30*23 


70*8 


37 


67-14 


28-4 


37-69 


30-4 


21-18 


17-7 


13-63 


600 


30-24 


72*2 



1847.] 



VIXBD STARS. 



55 



Jhte Apparent Places of Thirty-eeven of the Principal Fixed Stasv for every 

terik day of the year. 





Epoch. 


— The Upper 


Cuhninatioxi at Greenwich. 








jdOrionto. 


/^Tanri. 


(^Orionis. 


a Orionis. 


OCanisHi^ru. 


1 


(Biga.) 


2 




2 




1 




(aurUa.) 




■♦2 


• 

1 

4a 


1 


• 


* 


• 


• 

1 


• 


'i 

« 




pi 


1 


^ 


1 


1. 


1 


1' 


i 


1 


1 


h. 


^ 


h. 


o 


h. 


e 


h. 


o 


h. 


e 


1847 


5 


8 


5 


28 


5 





5 


7 


6 


16 




m. eec. 


> < 1 


m. sec. 


/ It 


m. sec. 


/ It 


m. sec. 


« It 


m. sec. 


1 II 


Jan. 1 


7 12-94 


22 09-5 


16 30-53 


2815-1 


22 13-23 


24 71-7 


46 55-27 


2213 7 


38 26-38 


30 48^ 


11 


12-92 


71-1 


39-53 


16-5 


13*23 


73-0 


56-29 


12-9 


26-44 


50-6 


21 


12-86 


726 


39-48 


15-8 


13-19 


74-1 


65-27 


12-1 


26-44 


62-7 


31 


12-75 


73-7 


39-38 


16-1 


13-10 


75-0 


66-20 


11-5 


26*39 


64-7 


Feb. 10 


12-61 


74-6 


39*24 


16-3 


12-98 


75*8 


65*09 


11-0 


26*30 


66*3 


20 


12-45 


75-3 


39-07 


16-4 


12*83 


76-4 


54-05 


10-6 


26-17 


67-7 


Mar. 2 


1227 


75-7, 


33-88 


16-4 


12*66 


76*8 


54*79 


10-3 


26-01 


68-7 


12 


12-08 


75-9 


38-68 


16-3 


12*48 


770 


64-61 


10-1 


25*83 


60-4 


22 


11-89 


75-8 


38-47 


16-1 


12-29 


77-0 


64-42 


10-0 


25-63 


69-8 


April 1 


11-72 


75-5 


33-28, 


16-7 


12-12 


76-9 


64-24 


10-1 


25*43 


60*9 


11 


11-56 


74-9 


38-11 


15-3 


11-96 


76*6 


54-03 


10-2 


25-24 


69-6 


21 


11-43 


74-1 


37-97 


14-8 


11-83 


76-1 


6304 


10-4 


2506 


69-1 


May 1 


11-34 


73-1 


37-87 


14-2 


11-73 


76*4 


53*63 


10-8 


24-90 


69^ 


11 


11-29 


71-8 


37-82 


13-7 


11-67 


74*5 


53*75 


11-3 


24-78 


67-1 


21 


11-27 


70-3 


37-81 


13-2 


11-65 


73-5 


63*72 


11-9 


24-69 


65-7 


31 


. 11-31 
"11-39 


68-7 


37-86 


12-8 


11-67 


72*3 


53*73 


12-6 


24-63 


64-1 


Jtin.lO 


66-8 


-37-95 
<^ 38-11 


12-5 


.11-74 
^11-88 


71*0 


.53-78 
"53*88 


13-4 


24-62 


S2-3 


20 


11-51 


64*9 


12-2 


69'6 


14-4 


24-64 


60-4 


30 


11-87 


63-0 


38-29 


12-1 


1201 


68-0 


64-02 


15-4 


.24-71 
<^ 24*82 


48-4 


July 10 


11-86 


61-1 


38-51 


12-1 


12-18 


66-5 


64-19 


16-4 


46*1 


20 


12-08 


59-3 


38-76 


12-2 


12-39 


66-1 


64-39 


17-4 


24-96 


44-1 


30 


12-32 


57-6 


3904 


12-4 


12-63 


63-7 


54*60 


18-4 


25-13 


42-2 


Aug. 9 


12-57 


56-1 ' 


39-34 


12-6 


12-98 


62-4 


64*85 


19-3 


25-32 


40*4 


19 


12-84 


54-8 


39-65 


12-9 


13-14 


61-3 


65*11 


20*1 


25-64 


38-0 


29 


1312 


53-8 


39-97 


13-3 


13-41 


60-5 


55*38 


20-7 


26-78 


37-7 


Septs 

18 


13-40 


63-2 


40-29 


13-6 


13-69 


69-9 


65*66 


211 


2604 


36*8 


13-68 


52-9 


40*61 


14-0 


13-97 


50-6 


66*94 


21-4 


26-31 


36-3 


28 


13-95 


53-0 


40-93 


14-4 


14-25 


69*6 


66-22 


21-4 


26-50 


36-3 


Oct 8 


14-21 


63-4 


41-24 


14-7 


14-52 


59-9 


66*60 


21-2 


26-87 


36-7 


18 


14-46 


54-2 


41-83 


15*0 


14-78 


60-6 


56-78 


20-8 


27-16 


37-6 


28 


14-69 


65-3 


41-81 


15*4 


15-02 


61-3 


57-04 


201 


27-44 


38*8 


Nov. 7 


14-90 


56-7' 


42-07 


16-7 


15-25 


62-3 


57-28 


19-4 


27-71 


40*4 


17 


1509 


68-3 


42*30 


16*0 


15*45 


63-5 


57-61 


18-5 


27*96 


42*4 


27 


15-24 


60-0 


42-60 


16-3 


15*62 


64-9 


67-71 


17-6 


28*19 


44'6 


Dec. 7 


15-36 


61-8' 


42-67 


16*7 


15*76 


66*3 


57-68 


16-4 


28-39 


47*0 


17 


15-44 


63-6 


42-79 


171 


16*87 


67-7 


58*01 


16-4 


28-56 


49-4 


27 


16-48 


65*3 


42-86 


17*5 


15*98 


69-1 


68-10 


14*5 


28-68 


61-9 


37 


15*48 


670l 


42-86 


17-9 


15*95 


70-3 


^8-16 


13-6 


28*76 


64-2 



_. I 



H 



VUUP 8TAB0. [1847. 

TmeAfparaU Places of TkiHv-swm of th€ Priwnpal Fixed Stan fw every 

tern, day of the year. 





Epoch. 


—The 


Ui^r Cuhaimation at Greenwich. 


t 






a' Geminonun. 


aOaniB Minoris. 


P Geminomm. 


1 

aHydm. 


aLeonJB. 




( Cattor.) 

ft 
1 1 


{Procvon.) 

t 1 


(PoUux.) 

i'i 

t i 


a 

• 

1 


• 

1 


{Regutus.) 
1 ^ 

i i 


h. 


O 


h. 


e 


h. 


e 


h. 


A 


h. 




1847 


7 


82 


7 


5 


7 


28 


9 


8 


10 


12 


Jan. 1 


m. 8eo. 


1 II 


m. Bee. 


i 
1 II 


m. sec. 


f ' i 


m. see. 


1 it 


m. sec. 




34 51*95 


13 58*8 


31 19*18 


36 34-7 


36 58*78 


2312-8 


20 6*69 


2*3 


014*56 


433-4 


11 


53-09 


53*2 


19*30 


33*4 


58-92 


12-9 


5*91 


4-5 


14-82 


32*1 


21 


62-17 


63-8 


19*37 


32*3 


69*01 


13*3 


6-03 


6-6 


1504 


31*0 


31 


52*20 


54-6 


19-39 


31*4 


59-05 


13-7 


6-20 


8-5 


15-21 


30*2 


Feb. 10 


5217 


65-3 


19-37 


30*7 


59-03 


14-3 


6*27 


10-3 


15-33 


29-7 


20 


52-06 


66-1 


19*29 


.30-1 


58*95 


14-9 


6*29 


11*7 


15*40 


29*4 


Mar. 2 


51-95 


56*8 


19*18 


29*7 


58*84 


16*6 


0*27 


13*0 


15*43 


29-4 


12 


51*78 


57*5 


1904 


29*5 


68*68 


16-2 


6*21 


139 


15-41 


29-5 


22 


61*59 


68-1 


18-88 


29*4 


58*50 


16*8 


6*11 


14*6 


15-35 


29*9 


April 1 


51*38 


58-6 


18*70 


29*4 


56*31 


17-2 


5-99 


15*1 


15-26 


30-3 


11 


51*18 


58^8 


18*63 


29-6 


68-11 


17*5 


5*85 


15*4 


15*14 


30-9 


21 

^ iff* •« 


50-98 


58-0 


18*30 


29-9 


67*.92 


17*7 


5*70 


15-4 


1501 


31-5 


May 1 


50*80 


68*9 


18-20 


30*2 


57*74 


17*8 


6-55 


15*2 


14*87 


33*2 


11 


60-65 


58*7 


18-07 


30*7 


67-59 


17*8 


6-40 


14*8 


14*73 


32-8 


21 


50-54 


58-4 


17*97 


31-2 


67-43 


17-6 


5*27 


14-2 


14-60 


33*4 


31 


50*46 


67*9 


17*90 


31*8 


67-40 


17*4 


5*15 


13*4 


14*48 


34*0 


Jan. 10 


60-43 


57*4 


17-86 


32*6 


57*35 


17*0 


505 


12*5 


14*37 


34*5 


20 


60*44 


56*7 


17*86 


33-2 


57-35 


16*6 


4*97 


11*5 


14*28 


34*9 


30 


50-49 


56*0 


17-90 


34-0 


57*39 


16*1 


4-91 


10*4 


14*21 


35*3 


July 10 


.50*58 
^60*73 


55 3 


J 17-97 
^1808 


34-8 


/ 57-47 
"67-60 


15*6 


4*88 


9*2 


14*16 


35*6 


20 

4% /\ 


64-5 


35-6 


15*0 


4-88 


7*9 


1413 


35*7 


30 
Aug. 9 


50*90 


63*6 


18*21 


36*3 


57*75 


14*4 


4-90 


6*7 


14*13 


35*8 


61*10 


63*0 


18-37 


37-0 


57-93 


13*8 


/ 4-95 
^ 6 05 


5-5 


14*15 


35-7 


19 


61*33 


52*2 


18*56 


37-6 


58*14 


13-2 


4*4 


^14*20 
"14-28 


35-5 


29 
Septs 


51*58 


61*4 


18*76 


37-8 


58-37 


12-5 


5*16 


3-5 


35-1 


51*86 


60*6 


18*99 


380 


58-63 


11-8 


5-29 


2*8 


14*39 


34*6 


18 


52*16 


49-8 


19-24 


37-9 


58-91 


11*0 


6'.36 


2*4 


14*53 


33-8 


28 
Oct 8 


62-48 


490 


19*50 


37-6 


59-21 


10-2 


5-66 


2*3 


14*70 


38-9 


62*81 


48*3 


19-78 


37*0 


59-52 


9-3 


6-89 


2*6 


14-91 


31*7 


18 


63-16 


47*5 


20*07 


36*2 


69*85 


8*5 


6-16 


3*2 


1614 


30-3 


28 
Nov. 7 


63*49 


46*8 


20-36 


36-2 


60*18 


7*7 


6*42 


4*1 


15*40 


28-8 


63*33 


46*2 


20*65 


340 


60-51 


6-9 


6*71 


6*4 


15-69 


an 


17 


54*17 


45-8 


20*94 


32*6 


60*84 


6*2 


7-Oi 


7*0 


16*00 


25-4 


27 

irx mm 


54*49 


45*4 


21-21 


31-2 


61*16 


6*6 


7-32 


818 


16-32 


23*6 


Dec. 7 


64-79 


45-3 


21*46 


29*7 


61*44 


5*2 


7*63 


10*9 


16*64 


31*8 


17 


65*04 


46*3 


21*69 


28-2 


61-70 


4*9 


7*92 


13*1 


16*96 


20*0 


27 


65*26 


45-5 


21'87 


26-9 


61*92 


4*8 


8-18 


15*3 


17-26 


18*4 


87 


55-43 


46*9 


.22-Ge 


26"5 


62*09 


4*9 


9*43 


17*6 


17*53 


17-0 



1847.] 



riZBD STABS. 



57 



Ihie Appareni Places of TTuriv-aeven of the Principal FixedStanJar every 

tenth day cf ^ year, 

Spoch.— The Upper CalmmatiQii at Greenwich. 





aUnnMidatfs. 
1.2 


^Leonis. 
2.8 


aVizglxiis. 


asootis. 
{Areiums.) 


a*libnB. 
8 


1847 


i 

< 

t 


1 

• 

1 


• 

4 


• 

1 

m 

1 


m a 

1 
l 

ft 


1 


• 

4 


1 

• 

1 


• 

1 

••9 

i> 

ft 


• 
• 

1 


h. 
10 


6*2 


h. 
11 


o 

15 


h. ' 
13 


10 


h. 
14 


19 


h. 
14 


1°6 




m. S6c< 


t It 


m. sec. 


1 II 


m. sec. 


f 1 1 


in. 86C* 


1 II 


m. Mc. 


1 ii 


Jan. 1 


5415*34 


33 70*2 


41 15-81 


26 27*5 


17 8-77 


2137*7 


8 40-82 


88 47*3 


42 25*38{24 2*a| 


11 


15-87 


70-7 


16*12 


25-9 


9-09 


30*7 


41-14 


45*1 


25-70 


3*7 


21 


16-35 


71*7 


16-41 


24-6 


9-41 


41-6 


41*46 


43*2 


96*02 


6-3 


31 


16-75 


73-2 


16-67 


23*6 


9-71 


43*5 


41*78 


41-7 


26*34 


6*9 


Feb. 10 


1706 


75-1 


16*83 


22-9 


9-98 


46-3 


42*06 


40-6 


26 65 


8*4 


20 


17-23 


77'4 


17*06 


22-6 


10-23 


46-9 


42*36 


39-9 


26*95 


9-9 


Mar. 2 


17*41 


79-9 


17*18 


22-6 


10*44 


48-3 


42*61 


39-7 


27*22 


11*2 


12 


17-44 


82-6 


17-26 


22*9 


10*61 


49-6 


43*33 


39*9 


27*47 


12*3 


22 


17*38 


85-2 


17*30 


23*4 


10*76 


60-4 


43-01 


40-5 


27*69 


13*3 


April 1 


17*24 


87*8 


17*31 


24*2 


10*86 


51-1 


43*16 


41*4 


27*88 


14*1 


11 


17-02 


90-3 


17-27 


25-1 


10-93 


51*7 


43*28 


42-7 


28*04 


14*7 


21 


16-75 


a2-4 


17-21 


26-1 


10-97 


62-0 


43*36 


44-9 


2817 


16*2 


May 1 


16-43 


94-2 


17-13 


271 


10*98 


62*1 


43*40 


45-7 


23*27 


15*6 


11 


16-09 


«5-6 


1703 


28-1 


10-97 


621 


43*42 


47*4 


28*34 


15*7 


21 


15*73 


96*6 


16-92 


29-1 


10-94 


61*9 


43*41 


49*0 


28*39 


15-7 


31 


16-37 


970 


16-81 


300 


10-89 


61*6 


43-37 


60*7 


28*40 


15-6 


Jan. 10 


1502 


97*0 


16-60 


30-8 


10-82 


61*2 


43*31 


62*2 


28*39 


15*5 


20 


14-70 


96*5 


16-58 


31-6 


10-73 


60*7 


43*22 


63-6 


28*35 


15*2 


30 


14-40 


05-5 


16-46 


32-0 


10-63 


60*2 


43*12 


64-7 


26*29 


14*9 


July 10 


14-14 


94*2 


16*36 


32-3 


10-52 


49-6 


4300 


55*6 


26*20 


14*6 


20 


13-92 


92-4 


16-26 


32*5 


10-40 


48*9 


42*86 


56-3 


28*09 


14*1 


30 


13*75 


90-2 


16*18 


32*6 


10-27 


48*2 


42*71 


66-7 


27*96 


13*6 


Aug. 9 


13-63 


87-7 


16-11 


32-4 


1015 


47*6 


42*56 


669 


27*82 


13*1 


19 


13-58 


85*0 


16*06 


32-0 


10*04 


46-8 


42*41 


56-7 


27*67 


12*6 


29 


^13-68 
"13-66 


82-0 


16*04 


31*6 


•9*93 


46-1 


42*26 


66-3 


27*82 


11*9 


Septs 


78-8 


. 16*04 
"16-08 


30-7 


9*85 


46-6 


42*12 


556 


27*37 


U*3 


18 


13-80 


76-4 


29-6 


9-79 


451 


4201 


54-6 


• 27*24 


10-8 


28 


14-00 


72-1 


16-16 


28-3 


9-76 


44-8 


41*92 


63*3 


27*14 


10-3 


Oct. 8 


14*28 


63*9 


1625 


26-8 


# 9-77 
^ 9-33 


44-7 


41*86 


61*7 


27*07 


9*9 


18 


14-62 


65*8 


16-40 


261 


44-9 


.41*86 
"41*88 


49-8 


27*04 


9*7 


28 


1502 


62-8 


16*60 


23-3 


9-93 


45-d 


47-4 


.27*05 
"27-12 


9-7 


Nov. 7 


15-49 


601 


16-82 


21-3 


10-08 


46-0 


41*96 


46-1 


9*9 


17 


1601 


67*8 


1708 


191 


10-27 


46-9 


42*10 


42*6 


27*24 


10*3 


27 


16-56 


55*8 


17-37 


170 


10-61 


431 


42*28 


39-9 


27*41 


11*0 


Dec. 7 


17*15 


64*4 


17-68 


14-8 


10-73 


49-6 


42*60 


37*2 


27*62 


11*9 


17 


17-74 


53*4 


18*01 


12*7 


11-08 


51*3 


42*76 


34*5 


97*88 


13-1 


27 


18-32 


53-0 


13-34 


10-7 


11-30 


63'2 


43*06 


32*0 


96*16 


14-4 


37 


18*87 


53*1 


13 66 


90 


11.72 


55-1 


43 30 


29*6 


28*47 


15*9 



5a 



nxSD MAUk 



[1847. 



2Viw Afpamd Plaem (^ Thirty-mom of tkt Prmdptd Fixtd Stan far ofen/ 

ieiuk dojf ^ the ywr* 

Epoch.— The Upper Cwlmination at Greenwid^ 



1847 

Jan. 1 
11 
21 
31 

Feb. 10 
20 

Mar. 2 
12 
22 

Aprill 
11 
21 

May 1 
11 
21 
31 

Jim. 10 
20 
30 

July 10 
20 
30 

Aug. 9 
19 
29 

Sept 8 
18 
28 

Oct 8 
18 
28 

Nov. 
17 
27 

Dec. 7 
17 
27 
87 



/'Unw BCinoris. 
8 


• 

1 


1 


1 


• 

1 


14 


74 


m. 860. 


t II 


51 8*50 


46 37*7 


9-27 


35'5 


10-12 


338 


11-00 


32*8 


1100 


32*5 


12*77 


32*8 


13'S6 


33-8 


14*32 


35*4 


14*05 


37*6 


15*47 


40*1 


15*84 


430 


16*06 


461 


1617 


49*4 


16*12 


52*6 


15-93 


65-7 


15-01 


58-5 


15-17 


61*1 


14*63 


63*3 


14*02 


650 


13*33 


66*3 


12-58 


671 


11*80 


67*3 


1100 


670 


10*20 


66*2 


9*42 


649 


8*67 


631 


7*99 


60*9 


7*38 


68*2 


6*87 


65*1 


6*47 


61*8 


* 6*20 


48-2 


441 


6*1(^ 


40*3 


6*29| 


36-6 


6*63 


33*0 


7*12 


29*6 


7-74 


26*6 


8*47 


24*1 



2.3 



I 



I 



h. 
16 
m. sec. 
8 46-57 
•46*86 
47*17 
47*49 
47*79 
48*09 
48*37 
48*63 
48*86 
49*06 
49*24 
49-39 
49*52 
49*61 
49*68 
49*71 
49*72 
49*70 
49*66 
49*58 
49-48 
49*36 
49-22 
49*07 
48*91 
48*76 
48*62 
48'50i 
48*41 
48 35 
48*34 
.48*38 
^48-47 
48*60 
48-79 
49*02 
49*28 
49-561 



^0 

8 

48 46*8 
48-4 
50-0 
51-5 
520 
54-2 
55*3 
56-1 
56-7 
671 
57-3 
57-3 
57-2 
56*9 
56-5 
66-1 
66*6 
550 
54*5 
53*9 
53*3 
52*8 
52-3 
51-8 
51*4 
510 
50-7 
50*6 
50-6 
50-7 
61-0 
51*6 
52*4 
53*4 
54-6 
56-0 
67-5 
691 



aCoxoiueBoTO- 

aUs. 



I 



h. 
15 

.m. sec. 

28 U-81 
12*10 
12*40 
12-72 
13*04 
13-36 
13*66 
13-04 
14*19 
14*42 
14*62 
14*78 
14*91 
15*00 
15*06 
1509 
1508 
1504 
14*96 
14-86 
14*73 
14-57 
14*40 
14-21 
14-02 
13*83 
13-64 
13-48 
13*34 
13*23 
13-17 
. 13*16 
'13*20 
13*30 
13*45 
13*66 
13*89 
1416 



27 

1056*5 
630 
50-8 
49-0 
47*6 
46-d 
46-4 
46-6 
47-3 
48*4 
49-9 
51-7 
53-8 
66*0 
68-3 
60-6 
62*8 
64-8 
66-7 
66-3 
69-6 
70-6 
71-3 
71-6 
71-5 
711 
70*3 
60-1 
67-6 
65*8 
63*6 
61*2 
68-2 
55*4 
52*5 
49-5 
46*7 
44*0 



aSerpentSs. 
2.3 



• 

I 



I 



6 



h. 

15 
m. seo. 
36 43-49154 40*2 



43*77 
44-06 
44-36 
44-66 
44*95 
45-24 
45-50 
45*75 
45*97 
46*16 
46-33 
46-47 
46*58 
46*66 
46*72 
46-74 
46-73 
46-69 
46-62 
46*53 
46*41 
46*27 
46*12 
45*95 
45-79 
46*63 
45*49 
45*37 
45*28 
45*23 
45*23 
45-28 
45*38 
45-53 
45-73 
45*9^ 
46-291 



^-2 

36-3 

34*6 

33*2 

32-1 

31*4 

31*0 

310 

31-3 

31*9 

32-8 

33*9 

35*2 

36-5 

87*9 

39-3 

40-6 

41*8 

42*9 

43-9 

44-7 

45-4 

45-8 

49-1 

46*1 

45*9' 

45*5 

44*9 

43-9 

42-6 

41-4 

39-6 

37-8 

35-8 

33*7 

31-6 

205 



P^ SeorpfoniB. 
2 



I 
I 



I 



h. 

15 

m. sec 

56 32-45 

32-73 

33-04 

33-36 

33-68 

33-99 

34-30 

34-50 

34-87 

35*12 

35-35 

35*55 

35-73 

35-68 

36-00 

36-09 

36-16 

3617 

36-16 

3611 

3603 

35-92 

35-78 

35-63 

35-46 

35*23 

3511 

34*96 

34*82 

34*T2j 

34*67 

34*66 

34*70 

,34-81 

^34-96 

35-16 

35-39 

35-66 



19 

22 45*4 
46*4 
47-4 
48-5 
49-6 
60*7 
61-7 
62*6 
63*4 
64*0 
64*5 
54*9 
65*2 
65*4 
55*5 
66-6 
55-6 
55*5 
65-4 
66-3 
55-1 
64-9 
64-6 
54*3 
53*9 
63*5 
53*1 
52*6 
62*2 
51*8 
61*6 
51-4 
51*4 
61*7 
62*1 
52-6 
53*4 
54*3 



1847.1 



nXEt> BTABS. 



59 



Ihte AppecrerU Pla(X8 ef l%iriy'8even of the Primnpal FHxed Slan fir mmy 

tenth day tj the year, 

Spoch. — The Upper Cidminatioii at Greenwicli. 





a Soorpionis. 
(Afitares.) 


a Ophinehl. 
2 


aLyrae. 




. 1 
1 


■ 


• 

1 

43 


• 

1 




1 




1 


1 




• 

1 


t 


i 


h. 


o 


h. 


o 


h. 


e 


1847 


16 


26 


17 


12 


18 


38 




in. sec. 


4 II 


m. sec. 


1 II 


m. sec. 


1 II 


Jon. 1 


20 veo 


5 S'5 


2149*09 


40 39*8 


3144-06 


38 46*6 


11 


1-88 


3-0 


49*28 


37*6 


4416 


42-6 


21 


2-19 


3-6 


49*50 


35*6 


44-32 


39-5 


31 


2-51 


4*4 


49*75 


33*7 


44-53 


36-7 


Feb. 10 


2-84 


6-2 


60-01 


32*1 


44-77 


34*2 


20 


3-17 


6*0 


50-29 


30-9 


45-04 


32-2 


Mar. 2 


3-50 


6-9 


60*57 


30-0 


45*34 


30*6 


12 


3-81 


7-7 


50'86 


29*6 


45-66 


29-6 


22 


4-11 


8-5 


61*14 


29*5 


45-98 


29*2 


April 1 


4*39 


9-2 


51*42 


29*9 


46-31 


29*4 


11 


4-66 


9-9 


51-68 


30*7 


46*64 


30-2 


21 


4-89 


10-4 


51*93 


31-8 


46*96 


31-5 


May 1 


6*10 


11-0 


82*16 


33*2 


47*26 


33-3 


11 


6*28 


11-6 


52-37 


34-9 


47*64 


36*6 


21 


6-43 


11-9 


52*56 


36*7 


47*79 


38-2 


31 


6-55 


12-3 


62*70 


38*7 


48-00 


41*0 


Jun. 10 


5-63 


12-6 


82*82 


40-6 


48-18 


43*9 


20 


6*68 


12-9 


52-90 


42-6 


43.31 


47-0 


30 


6-68 


13-2 


52-04 


44*5 


48*39 


50-1 


July 10 


6-65 


13*4 


52-95 


46*2 


48-42 


531 


20 


6-58 


13-5 


52*92 


47*8 


48*41 


55-9 


30 


6-4S 


13*6 


62*85 


49*2 


48*34 


63-5 


Aug. 9 


6-34 


13-6 


52-74 


60-4 


48-22 


60-8 


19 


6-18 


13*4 


52*60 


61*4 


48-06 


62-8 


29 


5*00 


13-1 


82*44 


62*1 


47*87 


64*5 


Sept 8 


4*82 


12-8 


52*26 


fl2'6 


47-64 


65-7 


18 


4-03 


12*3 


62-07 


82*6 


47-39 


66-5 


28 


4-45 


11*8 


51-88 


52-5 


47-13 


66*8 


Oct 8 


4-30 


11-2 


51-70 


82*1 


46*37 


66-7 


18 


4-18 


10*6 


51*53 


51*3 


46-61 


66*1 


28 


4*10 


10*0 


51*39 


60*3 


46*37 


651 


Nov. 7 


4-06 


9*6 


61*29 


49*1 


46*16 


63*6 


17 


, 4-08 
^ 4-16 


9-1 


61*23 


47*5 


45*99 


61-7 


27 


8*8 


51*21 


45*8 


45.86 


59*4 


Dec. 7 


4-30 


8*7 


. 51-24 
^51*33 


43*8 


46-79 


56*7 


17 


4*48 


8*8 


41*4 


45-76 


53*8 


27 


4-71 


9-1 


61*46 


39*2 


,45-79 
<^ 45-89 


60-8 


37 


4*96 


9*5 


1 61*63 


37*0 


4?*3 



S Aqui1«. 
8.4 


1 


• 

1 


it 


1 


h 
19 


2 


m. sec. 


1 II 


17 46-03 


48 56*5 


<5 46*13 


67*0 


46*25 


65*6 


46-41 


64-3 


46-00 


63-2 


46*81 


52*4 


4704 


61*7 


47-29 


61*4 


47*56 


61*4 


47*83 


51*7 


48*12 


82*3 


43-40 


63*2 


43*68 


64*4 


48 95 


65-3 


49*21 


67*4 


49-46 


69*1 


49*67 


60*8 


49-86 


02*6 


5001 


64*2 


50*12 


66*8 


60-19 


67*3 


60-22 


68-7 


60*21 


69-8 


60*15 


70*8 


50-06 


71-6 


49-92 


• 72*2 


49-77 


72*6 


49*60 


72*7 


49*42 


72-7 


49*24 


72-5 


49-^7 


72*0 


48*92 


71*4 


48-80 


70*6 


49*71 


69*6 


48*65 


68*6 


•48*64 


67*3 


48*66 


65-9 


48*73 


64*6 



m. 
43 



a Aqnilae. 
lAitair,) 
. 12 ^ 

1 1 

2 I 



I 



19 

18*22 
18*28 
18-38 
18-51 
13-68 
18-37 
1908 
19*32 
19-57 
19-84 
20-12 
20-41 
20-70 
20-98 
21-26 
21*51 
21*74 
21*95 
22*12 
•22*25 
22-34 
22-39 
22-39 
22-35 
22-27 
22-16 
22-02 
21-86 
21-67 
21-49 
21*32 
21-16 
21*02 
20*91 
20-84 
20-80 
20*80 
20*84 



8 

28 11*8 

10*2 

8*4 

6-9 

5*6 

4*4 

3*6 

3*2 

2-9 

3*1 

3*7 

4*6 

6*8 

7*3 

9*1 

110 

18*0 

15*0 

17*0 

19*0 

20*9 

22*6 

24*1 

25*4 

26-5 

S7-4 

28*0 

28*4 

28*5 

23*4 

29*0 

27*4 

26*6 

25-4 

94*2 

22*7 

211 

19*5 



60 



FIXSD 8TAB8. 



11847. 



Drue Apparmt Places of 7?lt»fv-«eran of the Principal Fixed Stars for every 

Unm day of the year. 

Epoch. — The Upper Culmination at Greenwich. 





aCygni. 


a Cephel. 


aAquAili. 


oPiaeJliutanJis. 
{EonuUhata.) 

^ ' i 

•♦3 ^ 

1 1 


aPegasi. 

{Markab.) 


1847 


• 

•*> 


1 

i 


• 

S 

1 


• 

1 
1 


• 

S 


• 

i 


. 7 


1 
1 


h. 
20 


o 

44 


h. 
21 


e 

61 


h. 
21 


o 

1 


h. 
22 


e 

30 


h. 
22 


o 

14 


Jan. 1 


m. 0ec. 
36 12-07 


1 «« 
44 24*9 


m. Bee. 
14 64-18 


1 II 

56 36*5 


m. sec. 
57 54*99 


1 II 

3 340 


m. sec. 
49 10-28 


1 II 
26 67-9 


m. Bee. 

57 8-56 


f II 
22 67-9 


11 


12-02 


22*1 


63-97 


36-7 


64-94 


34«S 


10-18 


675 


6*46 


66*7 


21 


/ 12-01 
"12-07 


19*2 


53-84 


32*7 


64-92 


35-6 


10-10 


66-9 


8*36 


66*4 


81 


16-9 


,63-77 
"53-80 


29*5 


64*92 


36-3 


10*05 


56-0 


8*32 


64*1 


Feb. 10 


12*17 


130 


- 25-0 


.64*95 
^55*02 


36-9 


10-03 


54-8 


8*29 


62-8 


20 


12-38 


10-3 


63-91 


22-8 


37-4 


10-04 


63*4 


8*28 


61*6 


Afar. 2 


12-61 


7*9 


54-10 


• 19-b 


65-12 


37*6 


.10-06 
^ 1018 


61*8 


, 8*31 
O 8*38 


60-5 


.12 


12-76 


5-9 


64*37 


17*2 


55*24 


37-6 


49*9 


59-0 


22 


13-08 


4*4 


54-70 


15*0 


66*40 


37*3 


10*30 


47-9 


9*49 


68-9 


April 1 


13-34 


3*5 


6609 


13*3 


65-59 


36-8 


10*4C 


46*8 


6*63 


SR*6 


11 


13-68 


3*2 


65-54 


121 


66*81 


36*0 


10-66 


43*6 


8*80 


58*6 


21 


14*04 


34 


66*02 


11-6 


56-06 


34*9 


10*90 


41*4 


9*01 


59*0 


May 1 


14*40 


4*2 


66*53 


11*7 


56*32 


33-6 


11-16 


30*2 


9*26 


59*8 


11 


14*77 


6*5 


67*04 


12*4 


56*61 


32*1 


11*46 


37*0 


9-63 


60-8 


21 


15-13 


7*4 


57*65 


13*7 


66*01 


30*4 


11-78 


34*9 


9-82 


es*2 


81 


16-46 


9*7 


66-04 


16*6 


67-21 


23-5 


12-11 


33-0 


10*13 


63-9 


Jun. 10 


16-77 


12*3 


66*50 


17-9 


67-51 


26*6 


12-45 


31-3 


10*44 


65*8 


20 


16-06 


16*3 


68*91 


20*6 


57*79 


24-7 


12*79 


29-8 


10*74 


67*8 


80 


16-23 


19-4 


69*28 


23-7 


6806 


22-9 


1312 


28-6 


11*04 


70*0 


July 10 


16-46 


21-7 


69*55 


27*0 


58-31 


21*1 


13*43 


27-8 


11-32 


72*2 


20 


16-59 


25-0 


59-76 


30-5 


58-52 


19*4 


13*71 


27*3 


11-57 


74.6 


80 


16-67 


28-3 


50-90 


34-1 


88-69 


lS-0 


13*96 


27-1 


11*79 


76-7 


Aug. 9 


16-68 


31-6 


69*96 


37*7 


58*83 


16-7 


14-17 


27-2 


11*07 


78-8 


19 


16-64 


34*6 


69*93 


41-2 


58*92 


15-6 


14*33 


27-7 


12*11 


80*8 


29 


16-55 


37*2 


69-83 


44*6 


66*96 


14-7 


14*44 


28-6 


12*21 


82*6 


Sept 8 


16-41 


39-7 


59-65 


47-8 


68*96 


14-1 


14*50 


29-5 


12*27 


84*2 


18 


16-22 


41*8 


69-41 


60-6 


58*93 


13-7 


14*51 


30-8 


12*29 


85*5 


28 


1600 


43-6 


69-11 


63-2 


68-86 


13-4 


14*48 


32-1 


12-27 


86*6 


Oct 8 


16-76 


44*9 


63-76 


56-3 


58-76 


13-4 


14*41 


33*6 


12*22 


87*5 


18 


15-49 


45*7 


68-37 


67*0 


68-64 


13*6 


14*30 


35-0 


1214 


881 


28 


15-22 


46-1 


67-96 


68-2 


68-60 


13-9 


1417 


36-4 


12*04 


88*5 


Nov. 7 


14-96 


460 


67-53 


68*8 


68-36 


14*3 


1402 


37-7 


11*92 


88*7 


17 


14-69 


46*3 


67*10 


68*9 


6822 


14-9 


13*86 


38*8 


11-79 


88*5 


27 


14-46 


44*2 


56*69 


68*4 


68-08 


15-5 


13*69 


30*7 


11-65 


88*2 


Dec. 7 


14*20 


42*6 


56-30 


67-3 


67*96 


16-2 


13*63 


40-4 


11*52 


87-6 


17 


14*00 


40*6 


65-95 


65-7 


67*86 


17-0 


13*38 


40-7 


11*39 


86*8 


27 


13*96 


38-1 


66*65 


63-6 


1 67*76 


17-9 


13*25 


40-8 


11*27 


85*8 


87 


13^ 


35*4 


66*40 


61*0 


67-69 


18*7 


13*13 


40*6 


11*10 


84*7 



Dr. Toun^t Refmctiona, the BaromOer beiag at 30 india, and the intemal 
ThermoBUler ai 50, or the eiternal at 47, degrees ; with tht corrections Jot + 
one inc* in (Ae haromOtr, and fir — one degree in the tlannometer of Fahren- 
lieit. Fhm page 19 of Vol. U ofPearsoaS Practical ^ifionomy. 



BUKR PABAIXUC IK ALTirOSB. 
l}aiUo/Iitfi-aetiimi,ec 





« 


; 


fc 




s 


+ 


t. 




- 


+ 


=. 




S 


f 




a 


""s 


§ 


i 


i 




& 


s 


^ 


•s 


M 


s 


9 


«a 


§ 




1 


^. 


goi 


^' 


1 


1^ 


i- 


s' 


1 


S^ 


r 


s« 


1 


1^ 


g« 




13 


I. 4,« 


Jb 


130 


u 


40,8 


1,M 


oat 


07 


81,7 


,M 


,M0 


79 


11^ 


,38 




«t 


1. s,. 


it,tw 


m 


M 


3e,a 


1,31 


im 


<B 


VW 


,79 


,WI 




10,1! 


■w 






1, 0,M 


;!,» 


lai 




37,9 


1,IW 


m 


es 


!«,4 


,7a 


,M4 




9,9 


,31 






6fl.! 




116 




38,4 


i,aa 


m 


TO 


ei,i 




,M3 


(a 


e,! 


,*7 




1« 




1,88 




60 










10,1 






Kl 








47 


M,2 




ice 


BO 


33,0 


1,1! 




» 


18,8 


_^,038 


84 


6,1 


,« 1 


49 


BB,S 




104 


61 


38:3 




OBS 


73 


17,7 


,60,0* 


81 








49 


60,5 


1,69 


101 




31,0 


1,04 


WK 




16,1 


,» 


,m 


W 




t1* 




MJ 




l,B3 




ai 




,WI 










,m 






,lfl 




81 






001 


86 


a8,4 
87,! 


,05 


057 


" 


14,4 


1*8 


MI 


B* 


«,' 


,07 










43,t 




038 


M 


^^B 


^7 


OKI 






." 


« 




0,1 


,00 




M 


4«,«l 




USi 


BV 


M,7 


,« 


«M» 


■« 


11,9 ,381,0831 











II increase ofattitade of one inch in Ihe barometer, or 
tor a depresBion of one degree in the tbennometer, ia to be added to the tab- 
ular refraction ; bnt when the barometer is lower than 30 inches, or the 
thermometer higher than 47 de^ees, the correction becomes siJAradive.. 

When great accuracy is required, 0,003 inch should be deducted from the 
observed height of Ihe barometer, for each degree that the thermometer near 
it is above 50 degrees, and the same quantity added for .an eqaal depression- 







ATabU 


oflAe 


am' 


ParaSax 


.'» Ahit«di. 










um. 


Sim's HortKnilalParallai. 


8nn'. 






8.4 


8.6 


8!^ 


e'Jf 


8.8 




SA 


e!5 


8!6 


s!7 


s 


S 




fi.m 


H.!<B 


8.no 


S.JO 


^.80 


45 


5.94 


6.01 


6.08 


6.15 


e 


32 










H,fi7 


fl.77 


50 






K.SI 




' 


tn 






M7 




fl-.-n 




















an 












VX 


i3S 




4.35 


4 


n 






7.99 






8,!7 






3.59 






i 




as 




7.70 


7.70 




7.WH 


70 




S.fll 




8.98 


■4 






7,l» 


7J» 


7.13 


7.63 


T.« 


75 


a.17 


SJ» 


9.13 


a,ss 


8.86 


3S 




O.BB 


7.04 


7.m 


7.111 




I.4B 


1.4H 


1.4B 


t-sr 




40 


fl.44 




6.fi0 






85 












AS 


6.94 


0.01 


6.08 


6.1S 


6.88 


W 


0.00 


0.00 


0,00 


0.00 


OM 



verting Sidereal into Mean Solar Time + 9.9988126. 

" Mean Solar into Sidereal Time + 0JW1IB74. 
aX the Equator, contains 15S1 feet. 



1847.] THJB OBBBBVATOKT OIT PABIS. 63 



THE OBSERVATORY OF PARIS. 

[The fbllowing liyely and intereeting article I hare translated, "with some abridgment, 
fW>m a report nutde by M. Arago to the Chamber of Deputies, and aftenrards published in 
the Asmuaite du Bureau des Longitudes fi» 1844. Those who hare taiken so much interest 
in the ertohWshmwit of A«i*a-ii>^iT^ ohservatovies at Cambridge, Washington, and Clneln- 
natt, will learn with pleasure ficom this eketdi, that nQW seal Ibr the progress of astronom- 
ical disooyeiy seems now to be animating the goyenunents and learned societies of Europe. 
The history of the Paris Obsenratory affords yaluable hints for the conduct of our own 
establishments ; and the eloquent yiew of the results to be expected from the use of im- 
proyed instruments will show our astronomers t^ what objects their attention must be 
dfnected, and irtutt lliey may hope to accompUsh in an atmosphere that is Jhr less fre- 
quently obtteueted with ekrads and mists, than that of £Dgland and France.] 

Whsn Louis XIV. resolved, at the request of Colbert, soon after the 
foundation of the Academy of Sciences, to create the Observatory of Fans, 
tiiere was no national establishment of the kind in all Europe. The as- 
tronomers of different countries, left; to their own resources, were obliged to 
ufle inferior instruments, and to place them in inconvenient positions, usu- 
ally without firm supports; they could not undertake any regular and 
systematic labor. The plan lor establishing the national observatory was 
drawn up as early as 1667. l^e mason-work was commenced in 1668, 
and the edifice was completed on the 14th of September, 1671. It had 
cost over $400,000. 

After this enormous expense had been incurred, who would not believe that 
iFrance was provided with an observatory worthy of the country and of the 
science to which it was dedicated ? But it was not so. The architect had 
drawn up the plan of the building without having sufficiently consulted the 
observers ; they pcotested against it, but thdr complaints came too late, or 
were not heeded. Claude Perrault, though he had not yet built the colon- 
nade of the Louvre, found hims^ alone more powerful than all the French 
astronomers united. He obstinately and haughtily rejected arrangements 
which Colbert himself had acknowledged to be useful; he resisted the great 
minister, in order, as he said, not to break the architectural lines, or to in- 
jure the harmony and regularity of the masses. These idle, sesthetical 
considerations unluckily triumphed over the foresight and the well-founded 
remarks of men eminent in science. The same thing, we are told, some- 
times happens now-a-days. 

But it should be mentioned in excuse of the architect, that the art of ob- 
serving was then nndeigoing an actual revolution ; that astronomers were not 
yet all of the same opinion respecting the uncertainty of the measurements 
of altitudes obtained by means of gnomons-; that an opinion from a source 
already of high authority in Italy had been procured in favor of these in- 
slmments, and even recommending the erection in the interior of a colossal 
■on-dial ; lo liiat the great halls which are now useless in the observatory, 



64 XfiS OBSBRVATORT OF PARIS. [1847. 

and the heaviness, so mach censured, of the northern facade, are not to be 
imputed to the architect alone. 

The eastern tower, left uncovered, and the vast room o^Uled the HaU of 
the Meridian^ served for setting up or sheltering telescopes, not achromatic, 
from 50 to 60 feet in length, such as observers used at the end of the seven- 
teenth century, when they wished to study the physical constitution of tho 
planets an^d their satellites. Excited by the remarkable discoveries with 
which the science was enriched by means of these great instruments, astron- 
omers and opticians attempted to manufacture them of a still larger size ; 
and they soon succeeded. One of these telescopes had a focal distance of 
over three hundred feet As the new edifice could no longer contain or 
support them, it became necessary to erect miwts of a prodigious height in 
the open air, and even to transport into the garden a colossal tower of wood, 
used a short time before for the water-works of Versailles. The object- 
glasses were fixed at the summit of these masts or of the immense tower, 
while the observer held the eye-glass in his hand ; the telescope, confined to 
these two extreme pieces, had no tubes Difficulties that might have been 
foreseen caused the failure of these efibrts, the most gigantic that are en- 
rolled in the annals of science. It was evident, a priori, that the observer 
could not with sufficient precision adjust the centres of two lenses thus iso- 
lated in space, and not connected by the intervention of any rigid body. 
With such instruments, also, the impossibility of observing, except for a few 
minutes before and after the passage of stars over the meridian, was enough 
to prevent any continuous wid prolonged labor. 

But the inherent defects of Perrault*s edifice became most glaring, when 
the necessity was perceived of applying instruments in the plane of the 
meridian, to the observation of stars. Thus, in 1732, no place could be 
found in the great building for establishing a mural quadrant of six feet 
radius ; in an enclosure covered by roofs entirely closed, and resting upon 
walls of great thickness and considerable height, no continuous opening 
could be made in the line of the meridian, through which all the stars, from 
the horizon to the zenith, might be seen at the moment of their culmina- 
tion. Thus compelled to give up the great edifice, the Academy caused an 
ou^house to be built, attached to the eastern tower. On a similar occasion, 
in 1 742, a second little building was erected by the side of the former one. 
About 1760, a little tower with a revolving roof was constructed to the 
south of the two former buildings, to facilitate the observation of equal alti- 
tudes, and thus determine the exact time of the phenomena. These three 
little out-buildings, erected at a trifling cost and likely to endure but a short 
time, formed for many years the true, the only royal observatory of Paris. 
The sumptuous edifice of Perrault, towered majestically over them j but, to 
use an expression of that day, it was only a parade observatory. 

Besides, this great building, like the other monuments of the capital, felt 
the effects of i^<^ carelessness and indolence which characterized the later 



1847i] THB OBSSBTATOBT OF PASiS* 6S 

yean (^ the leign of Lonk XV. In 1 770, it was fkUing into min. It was 
no longer safe to enter 1^ laige haUs, especiall j dnring a thaw ; the walls 
and Tsahed ceilings, undermined by the rains, were dropping piece by 
piece. The incessant petitions of Cassini, strengthened by reports from the 
Academy, were at last jieeded by the minister; and it was decided that the 
lepaks of the edifice should be immediately commenced. As the -vicious 
arrangements of the interior had giyen much trouble to astronomers, Cas- 
sini proposed tiiat Ihe whole upper part of the building should be taken 
down. But Louis XVI. was unwilling to destroy an edifice erected by his 
grandfather, the imposing size and severe style of which placed it among 
•the chief ardiitectoral ornaments of the metropolis. Its demolition might 
also hare been opposed by the recollection of the brilliant sdentific achiere- 
ments of which it had been the theatre. 

It was here, for example, that Picard, giving up the old sight vanes, 
applied telescopes furnished with micrometers to the graduated instruments, 
and thus laid a foundation for the exactness of modem observations. Here, 
also, was doubled, if we may so speak, the duration of an astronomer*s life, 
by tJie. discovery that the stars might be observed in the day-time. In this 
bmlding, too, Picard and Auzout, using the hair micrometer of their inven- 
tion, determined the angular diameters of the heavenly bodies, and thus 
overcame the difficulties with which the genius of Archimedes had striven 
m vain. Within these walls, now threatened with destruction, were made 
the trials, the minute preparations that were necessaiy before undertaking, 
with any chance of success, the celebrated measurements executed in France, 
in Peru, and in Lapland, to determine the dimensions and shape of the 
earth. Richer watched Hie vibrations of his pendulum here both before and 
after his voyage to Cayenne, and by these comparisons established the cap- 
ital fact, that the weight of terrestrial bodies is diminished as they approach 
Ae equator. Under this roof, also, Cassini established the laws of the 11- 
faration of the moon, discovered four of the satellites of Saturn, the rotary 
movement of these new bodies, and those of the satellites of Jupiter, and the 
zodiacal light Finally, in these vast halls, science began to suspect that the 
transmission of light was not instantaneous; and it was by observing, 
through the large windows of the Paris observatory, the eclipses of the 
satellites of Jupiter, that Roemer first determined by approximation the 
quickness of a ray of light; after a century and a half of further in- 
quiry, the rate has been definitively fixed at 191,000 miles in a second. 

In every country where the love of science exists at all, such recollec- 
tions would have sufficed to save the most defective edifice from destruction. 
]bi France they had their full weight ; and, though great repairs and im- 
provements in the observatoxy were made during the last quarter of the last 
century, the main building preserved all its chief architectural features. 
Li 1831, the Chamber of Deputies, wishing that our national observatory 
diould be made equal to the most celebrated observatories in Europe, voted 

6* 



66 THE OBSBBVATOBT OP PABIS. 11847. 

an appropriation for it twice as great as the minister asked for, and thus 
provided not only for the necessary repairs, bat for the entire re-constmction 
of the smaller buildings used by the obsenrers. The Deputies soon after- 
wards famished tiie establishment with its vast, oonyenient,and richly deco- 
rated amphitheatre, which an expert architect has happUy united with the 
other portions of the edifice, and into which a taste for astronomy constant- 
ly draws a numerous audience. The new structures destined for meridian 
observations happily unite convenience and utility witibi elegance, and leave 
absolutely nothing to be desired. 

In former days, besides the dilapidation of the principal structure, another 
thing grieved the French visiter. The instruments in use were almost ex- 
clusively of foreign origin. The telescopes, for instance, bore the names of 
Campani, Borelli, Hartzoecker, Huyghens, Dollond, and Short*, the mural 
and transit instruments, and the great repeating circles, were the productions 
of Sisson, Bird, Ramsden, and Reichenbach. The astronomical clocks alone 
came from the workshops of our own artists. But now, all the instruments in 
the Paris observatory are of French manufacture. We have not sacrificed 
scientific exactness to national pride, which would have been an act of great 
folly, but we still find upon the walls and the massive piers the magnificent 
graduated circles, the transit instruments and equatorials, of Fortin and 
Gambey ) and in the vast halls of the old building, the great achroma^c tel- 
escx>pes manufactured by the skilful hands of Lerebours and Cauchoix. 
And how was this great change effected ? The answer is a very simple one. 
The French artists were told to pay no heed to the almost universal opinion 
respecting an innate superiority which the English and German workmen 
possessed over them. This advice was followed, and the success of the 
trial surpassed all our hopes. In France, to venture is almost the same 
thing as to succeed. 

For some years, all the governments of Europe' seem to have acted in 
concert in improving their old observatories and creating new ones. In 
England, Greenwich, already so justly celebrated, has been much enlarged ; 
and the observatories of Edinburgh, Cambridge, Oxford, Dublin, and Ar- 
magh vie with that which Flamstead, Halley, Bradley, Maskelyne, and Pond 
have made, illustrious, and which is still happily in very good hands. Simi- 
lar establishments have been erected, on a great scale, at the Cape of Good 
Hope, at Sydney in New Holland, and at Madras. The Sicilian govern- 
ment, besides its renowned edifice at Palermo, to which Piazzi, at the begin- 
ning of this century, gave so much fame, has lately constructed a fine obser- 
vatory near Naples, at Capo di Monte ; and another, for observations in 
meteorology and physical science, is rising on the fianks of Vesuvius. The 
observatories of Florence, Milan, Padua, Turin, and Vienna might perhaps 
be criticised if viewed only as buildings ; but the number and beauty of the 
instruments in them deserve all praise. All the world knows of the fine 
observatories, most of them new, at Brussels, Geneva, Altona, Munich, Got- 



1847.] TH£ OfiSEBYATORr OF FAJU8. 67 

tingen, and Hambnrg. In Prussia, the course of the stars is studied, under 
government auspices, at Bonn, Breslau, and Eonigsberg; and in this 
general rivalij in favor of the most magnificent of all sciences, Bossia has 
placed herself in the first rank. Not content with very useful observatories 
at Borpat, Abo, Eieff, Kazan, and Nicolaiefi^ on the Black Sea, she has just 
erected near Petersburg, on the hill of Pulkova, a model establishmeat. 
This central observatory of Russia has cost more than 2,000,000 of roubles ; 
among its fine instruments is a telescope purchased at Munich for 80,000 
roubles. 

If some narrow minds concave that so many observatories are useless, 
we can undeceive them by showing that the field of science has enlarged 
itself yet more rapidly than the means of investigation. Confining our- 
selves at first to those stars which are always visible, we find that more than 
190,000 of them, formerly called fixed stars, are subject to movements which 
need to be continually measured with great exactness. Millions of stars, 
also, hitherto despised on account of their excessive smallness, now drikw 
-the attention of astronomers, and promise to unveil the most hidden won- 
ders of the firmament. As for the comets, visible for so brief a period that 
we must almost steal a sight of them, protection is needed in Europe against 
the continuously misty atmosphere, which, at a given place, often renders 
any observation impossible for weeks together. Besides, is it not natural, 
that, in the nineteenth century, every nation should have the noble ambition to 
take a direct part in those astronomical victories of which men have most 
reason to be proud, on account of their certainty, their magnificence, and 
their usefulness ? 

Again, the vast improvements which are making in the construction of 
telescopes, achromatic glasses, and large graduated instruments, have con- 
tributed even more than the progress of astronomy or the simbitious eager- 
ness of all European governments towards causing new observatories to be 
built, and the form and aiiangement of old ones to be modified. The first 
>py-giasses of the poor optician of Middlebourg, who invented these won- 
derful instruments, had a focal distance of only one foot and a half. Those 
with which Galileo discovered the satellites of Jupiter, and the phases of 
Venus, multiplied the object hardly seven times. Huyghens and Cassini 
^ telescopes which, with a focal distance of 24 feet, multiplied the olject a 
hundred times. Afterwards, Auzout made an object-glass that had a mul- 
tiidying power of 600, the focal distance being 300 (French) feet ; but as we 
have already said, the use of an instrument as- lofty as the dome of the 
Hotel of the Invalids, in spite of a thousand ingenious artifices, is obstructed 
by mnumerable difficulties. The discouraged opticians, following the ex- 
AQiple of Newton, turned their attention to reflecting telescopes. 

A.t length, in 1758, the son of a French refugee in England, John Pol- 
lond,achieved that which Newton had declared to be impossible, and produced 
telescopes which gave the images of heavenly bodies without those colored 



66 TBS OBSXHYAIOBT OJT PABM. [1647. 

borders wUdi aU timple object-glasses had created. Achromatic glasses of 
small dimensions, which had as great a multiplying power as the instru- 
ments 200 or SOO feet long, of Campani, Boretti, and Anzout, at once mo- 
nopoUaed the attention of men of science. As the English alone could 
mt^e flint glass without striae, they were able to make achromatic glasses 
for the whole world. Bat they could not fiibricate such lenses of more than, 
six inches opening. The images thus created not having light enough to 
snpport the requisite multiplying power, recourse was again had to reflect- 
ing telescopes, and those colossal machines were made which have immor- 
talized Herschel. A Swiss workman, in a glass manufactory near Munich, 
succeeded in making flint glass without strise, and science then tmrned again 
to refracting telescopes. Incited by the skiU with which Frauenhofer had 
used this glass, the English goTemment endeavored, but in vain, to regain 
possession of a branch of industry n^ich had fallen out of its hands. The 
most powerful instruments now in use, even in the English observatories, 
came from the workshops of Paris and Munich. The greatest known 
object-glass has 15 inches opening. It seems as if the power of such an in- 
strument ought to be equalled, if not surpassed, by reflecting telescopes of 
attainable magnitude. In truth, a wealthy Irish nobleman, Lord Bosse, has 
i^pUed, with infinite zeal and remarkable skill, enormous sums in attempts 
to construct such telescopes of greater dimensions than any yet known. 

Things were in this state, when two ^ass-makers, Gninand and Bon- 
temps, presented to the Academy of Sciences masses of crown and flint 
glass 22 inches in diameter, which appeared free from bubbles and 
striae. The same artists engaged to furnish similar masses even fluree feet 
in diameter. Opticians have, also, generously offered to sdentiflc societies 
the necessary met^nical means to shape, temper, and polish these gigantic 
glasses. Finally, the most eminent artist of our country has offered to di- 
rect this labor. In a very short tame, if the Chamber adopts the proposition 
now made to it by the ministry, French astronomers will perhaps turn to- 
wards the skies telescopes superior to everything of the kind which now 
exists, superior even to what the most glowing imaginations would have 
dared to hope for, a year ago. Meanwhile, the parallactic mounting and the 
revolving roof of the eastern tower will enable us to make good use of sev- 
eral telescopes, which the difficulty of managing has hitherto rendered 
useless. 

Are the discoveries foreshadowed by such grand instruments important 
enough to justify so much zeal and expense. Let us cite a few facts, and 
the Chamber may then answer this question for itself. 

Till very lately, we had not succeeded in determining the actual distance 
of a smgle star. All that astronomers could establish was a Umit tekhm lohidi 
not one of these stars could be situated, Now^ thanks to the great telescopes of 
which we shall soon have the use, the true distance of ovte star is known. The 
little star called 61 Cygni is so far from the earth, that it requues ten years 
for its light to reach us ; so that, if the star were suddenly annihilated, it 



I817.X ^^^ OBSEEVATOBY OF PAKIS. 69 

would still be seen for ten years after the catastrophe. Remember that 
light travels 191,000 miles in a second, that there are 86,400 seconds in a 
day, and 365 1-4 days in a year. The product of these three numbers, 
multiplied by ten, gives us the distance in miles which separates us in a 
straight line from 61 Cygni. Astronomers may well boast of such a result, 
and desire to apply their magnificent measuring operations to other stars. 

Large telescopes, of parallactic mounting and high magnifying power, 
will serve to perfect the observations upon the double stars. It is now 
known that the stars of nearly all these binary groups are dependent upon 
each other ; they form systems composed of suns, usually colored, and tum- 
iBg around their common centre of gravity. The exact measurement of 
these movements of rotation, combined with the determination of the actual 
distance of the two stars, will lead mathematically to a knowledge of the 
sum of the two masses. When mathematicians and astronomers were ena- 
bled to prove with absolute certainty, that the mass of the sun is 355,000 
times as great as that of the earth, every one was struck with astonish- 
ment. But the result was by no means so wonderful or so difficult of at- 
tainment as the one now proposed. TAen, the problem was to ascertain the 
bulk of a heavenly body which appears even to the naked eye as a vast 
globe, around which the earth revolves, and which governs by its attraction, 
— that is, by an action dependent on its mass, — all the planetary move- 
ments. Every one can here dimly perceive a priori connections and rela- 
tions which ought to lead to the desired result. Now^ the object is to ascer- 
tain the bulk of suns belonging to other systems ; of suns placed at such 
distances as to confound the imagination; of suns which appear, even 
through the telescope, of no appreciable diameter ; of suns which the mere 
thickness of a spider's thread veils from the eye of the observer. Here the 
force of science will appear in all its majesty. 

With such a telescope as we now speak of, astronomy will find a field of 
research, as yet almost untouched, in the vast and variously shaped nebuia^ 
which are scattered all over the heavens. It will observe the gradual con- 
centration of the phosphorescent matter ; it will mark the epochs when it 
assumes a circular shape, when the luminous central nucleus first appeal's, 
when this nucleus, having become very bright, will remain surrounded only 
by a slight nebulous halo, and when tMs halo also will be condensed. 
Then, the observer will have followed through all its phases tJie birth of a 
new star. Another quarter of the heavens will show us how the same stars 
gradually grow faint, and at last entirely disappeai*.* 

Within the limits of our own system, also, a great telescope promises 
discoveries of another kind, and of no inferior interest. We yet know but 
little of the atmosphere of Venus, or of the lofty mountains withjwhich this 

* The truth of the ndndnr hypothesis is here taken for granted ; hut if the recenfrfao- 
eoonts of diBcoyerieB made through Lord Rosse's telescops are correct, this hypotbedl? if 
only a splendid dream. 



70 THE OBSERYATOBY OF PAB18, ^847. 

globe, nearly as large as the earth, appears to be corered. The snowy spots 
which periodically appear, increase, diminish, and disappear, first at one, 
and then at the other pole of rotation of Mars, according as the snn is in 
tliis or that hemisphere of the red planet, have not been sufficiently studied. 
Though Jupiter has not yet been carefully examined with powerful tele- 
scopes, we know that in the equinoctial regions of this planet there are 
winds like our trade-winds ; that the atmosphere there undergoes enormous 
perturbations; and that clouds there are sometimes borne along at the 
speed of 250 miles an hour. If these curious results have been obtained 
with our present imperfect means of observation, what may we not expect 
from diligence imited with power ? The mysterious ring of Saturn, — that 
continuous bridge without piles, 30,000 miles broad, 250 miles thick, and 
everywhere distant 20,000 miles from the planet which it surrounds, — cer- 
tainly reserves capital discoveries for one who can examine it continuously 
with a high magnifying power. The continued observation of the brilliant 
satellites of Jupiter has so enriched science, that we may reasonably expect 
much from an uninterrupted examination of the satellites of Saturn and 
Uranus. A study of the continual changes of form which comets undergo 
ought to enlighten us respecting the physical constitution of celestial space. 
If these inquiries as yet have made but little progress, the fault must be im- 
puted to the feebleness of our telesc(^es. 

Let us now take a rapid view of what may reasonably be expected from 
the application of much improved instruments to the observation of the Moon. 
1,093 mountains upon its surface have been exactly measured. One of 
these lunar mountains, Doerfd^ is 25,000 feet high ; another, Newton, is 24,000 
feet ; a third, Casatus, is 22,500 feet. The crater-like formation of most of 
the moon^s surface, also, has been carefully observed; the depth of each 
crater and the altitude of the central peak are now exactly known ; and as- 
tronomers have obtained these results with a multiplying power not exceed- 
ing 200. May we not have great hopes, then, of a telescope the illumina- 
tion of which will permit us to use a multiplying power of 6,000, and through 
which we can observe a lunar mountain as fully as we now can see Mont 
Blanc from Geneva? In 1843, Dr. Kobinson examined the moon with a 
reflecting telescope, three feet in diameter, belonging to Lord Hosse j its illu- 
mination was only one fourth as great of a refractor of three feet opening, 
and the multiplying power was but moderate. Yet this astronomer has 
already pressingly invited the naturalists to go to Parsontown in Ireland, in 
order to study the physical constitution of the moon, assuring them, that 
they would gain entirely new information respecting the action, upon our 
globe, of the forces which govern the formation of volcanic regions. 

If, after this long exposition of the uses of great telescopes, the Chamber 
will also remember that, in such a case, the unexpected discoveries are always 
the most numerous, most fruitful, and most brilliant, it will see why its 
Committee unanimously recommends, that an appropriation of $19,000 
should be made for completing the Observatory of Paris. 



II. METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION. 



I. METEOROLOGICAL TABLES FOR SAGO, ME. 
Lot. 43" 31 ' N., Lcmg. IQT 26' W. By John M. Batchdder. 



1845. 



July, . 

Augost, . 
September, 
October, , 
NoTcmber, 
December. 
1846. 
January, 
February, 
March, 
April, 
May, 
June, 



Mean, 



Monthly Means of 
Barometer. 



Monthly Means of Monthly Means of 






29.834 

30. 

29.965 

30178 

29.860 

30j 



03630 



29.985 
30 059 
29.955 
30.158 
29.979 
29.980 



30.003 



04 



29.831 
04330.042 
29.918 
30.170 
29.814 
.026 



29. 
30 
29 
30 
29 
29 



958 
026 
969 
,109 
986 
,976 






29.845 
30 047 



Attached Therm. 






29 837 67.7 73.1 



1^ 
Pi 



pi 



,30.044 68.0 
29.97929.95458.8 
30.152!30.167;56.0 



29.882 
30.005 



29.85256.1 
30.022,60 1 



30, 
30 
29 
30, 
29 
29, 



,00829 
.051130 
.964129 
.05630 



996 
967 



29 
29 



,984 58.4 
.04551.4 
963 60.7 
.108 62.8 
.987 60.0 
.974 63.0 



73 
74.2 
61.5 
609 
62.9 

62.8 
68.6 
66.1 
67.7 
62.8 
66.5 



29.985 



29.996'29.995'60.3 



S 



External Thenn. 






715 
70.5 
62.6 
59.6 
603 
601 

62.^ 
62.7 
62.8 
64.8 
62.0 
65.6 






70.8 68.2 
70.6 65.9 

61.9 56.3 
59.0 42.8 
59.136.4 
61.016.5 

61.217.0 
59.210.2 
63.2 90.0 
66.1,42.3 
61.6 51.6 
65.0,61.8 



77.7 
76.6 
66.2 
57.9 
47.0 
26.4 

29.7 
26.8 
43.7 
57.3 
59.7 
711 



pi 



65.4163.7 63.1 41.6 



69.3 
67.4 
57.3 
47.4 
41.1 
20.4 

21.8 
16.8 
35.0 
46.5 
52.4 
66.4 



S 



53.3 



71.7 
70.0 
59.9 
49.4 
41.6 
21,1 

22.8 
17.8 
36.2 
48.4 
54.6 
66.1 



4.49 



46.6 



Winds and Clouds. 



1845. 



July, . 
August, . 
September, 
October, . 
November, 
December, 
1846. 
January, 
f ebmary, . 
March, . 
April, 
May, 
June, 

Mean, 
Total, 



Monthly Means of Force of 
Wind. 






1.5 
1.2 
1.7 
1.8 
2.0 
1.6 

1.1 

2.0 
2.0 
2.0 
1.9 
1.5 

1.7 



IS, 

pi 

09 



2.5 
2.2 
21 
2.3 
2.6 
1.9 

2.0 
2.9 
2.5 
3.2 
2.9 
2.5 

2.5 



pi 



1.5 
1.3 
1.9 
1.8 
1.6 
1.8 

2.0 
2.2 
1.9 
2.2 
2.1 
1.7 

1.8 



S 



1.8 
1.6 
1.9 
2.0 
21 
1.8 

1.9 
2.3 
21 
2.5 
2.3 
1.9 

2.0 



Monthly Meajis of 
Clouds. 






4.6 
4.6 
4.8 
4.3 
5.6 
4.6 

5.2 
4.0 
6.5 
4.6 
6.9 
6.4 

4.9 



Pi 

09 



6.3 
6.4 
6.2 
6.0 
6.1 
6.4 

5.7 
4.0 
6.2 
41 
6.3 
4.6 

6.2 



Pi 



61 
6.3 
6.2 
4.6 
4.8 
6.3 

6.0 
4.8 
62 
4.6 
6.9 
6.0 

1.6 



6.0 
61 
6.1 
4.6 
6.6 
6.1 

6.8 
4.1 
6.8 
4.4 
6.4 
4.9 

6.1 



5,280 
7,140 

2,844 

13^304 
6,208 

2,928 
3,000 
6,036 
1,248 
4,176 
1,632 

66,680 



71 MBTBOBOLOOICAL INrOEIUTIOV. [1847. 

Maximnm heat, Aag. 8, sr + ) jj^„ jog„_ 

Mjnimnm heat, Dec 12, U' — j 

Saco river closed bj ice, Dec. 11. 

" " opened, March 25. 
Number of &ills of mow, tvrcDly-foBr. 

n. METEOROLOGICAL TABLES FOB CAMBRIDGE, Mass. 
Smnmary of lite Meleorologieal Oi/senitlioni made at tie Oiaervaton/ of Har- 
vard CoOeffe. By W. OoncJ Bond. North Lai. 42- 22'. Lm. West <f 
Gre^wich, 71° 07'. From May \d, 1844, to May ls(, 1846. 



1647.] 



mntOBOLOOICAX* nrVOBMATXOK. 



73 



2. WiwDS AND Clouds. 



Months. 


PoTce of the Wind, 0—6. 


Quantity of Cloads, 0—10. 


Snn- 


9 


8 


9 


M'th- 


Son- 


9 


8 


9 


M'th-' ^^^ 
w of rain 




riM. 


A. M 


P. M.P. M.I 


riae. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


*y 


in 












mean. 










mean. 


inches. 


1844. 




May, 


1.5 


1.3 


1.7 


1.2 


1.4 


5.5 


5.6 


5.6 


6.5 


5.8 


1.958 


June, 


1.4 


1.2 


1.7 


1.2 


1.4 


4.7 


4.9 


4.4 


4.1 


4.5 


1.767 


July, 


1.^ 


1.2 


1.6 


1.3 


1.3 


5.0 


5.4 


5.6 


5.6 


5.4 


2.897 


Auj^fust, 


1.3 


1.5 


1.7 


0.8 


1.3 


5.4 


,6.2 


6.2 


6.2 


60 


3.3.')4 


September, 


1.1 


1.2 


1.4 


1.0 


1.2 


4.1 


1.7 


1.9 


2.6 


2.6 


4.503 


October, 


1.8 


1.3 


1.3 


1.4 


1.5 


69 


5.0 


5.7 


5.0 


6.4 


3.268 


November, 


1.2 


1.2 


1.3 


1.2 


1.2 


4.7 


64 


6.2 


5.6 


5.7 


1.501 


December. 


0.9 


0.8 


1.3 


1.0 


1.0 


5.1 


6.5 


6.6 


3.9 


5.5 




1845. 
























January, 


0.8 


0.7 


0.9 


10 


0.9 


6.0 


6.4 


5.6 


5.0 


5.7 


# 


Febraary, 


1.1 


08 


0.7 


0.8 


09 


5.1 


4.7 


4.0 


5.1 


4.7 


8.930 


March, 


1.2 


0.9 


1.2 


0.9 


1.0 


5.6 


5.4 


4.6 


4.0 


4.9 


3667 


April, 


1.2 
1.2 


1.5 
1.1 


1.9 
1.4 


0.9 
1.1 


1.3 
1.2 


6.0 
5.3 


6.7 
5.7 


5.1 
5.1 


45 

4.8 


5.6 


1.482 


An'l mean, 


5.2 ,33.327 


1845. 






















Mav, 


1.2 


1.1 


1.7 


1.3 


13 


4.8 


4.1 


4.6 


4.9 


4.6 


2.631 


'June, 


1.0 


1.3 


1.6 


1.4 


1.3 


5.9 


4.9 


4.6 


5.0 


5.1 


3.1.54 


Julv, 


1.0 


1.2 


1.1 


1.3 


1.2 


40 


4.1 


5.4 


4.6 


4.5 


4.066 


August, 


0.6 


06 


1.1 


0.7 


0.8 


5.9 


5.0 


5.1 


.4.6 


5.1 


2.527 


September, 


0.8 


0.9 


1.5 


0.9 


1.0 


4.3 


40 


4.9 


5.1 


4.6 


2.584 


October, 


1.0 


0.9 


0.9 


0.7 


0.9 


54 


.5.0 


52 


4.7 


51 


4.218 


November, 


1.2 


0.9 


1.1 


0.9 


10 


5.2 


5.2 


5.9 


5.4 


5.4 


10.432 


December. 


1.4 


1.1 


1.1 


1.1 


1.2 


5.1 


4.8 


53 


6.0 


5.3 


8.037 


1S46. 
























1 January, 


1.0 


0. 7 


lA 


1.1 


1.1 


5.6 


5.7 


5.0 


5.7 


5.5 


2.597 


' February, 


0.9 


0. 8 


1.1 


0.8 


0.9 


5.8 


4.^ 


4.1 


51 


50 


2.000 


March, 


1.5 


1. 9 


1.4 


1.0 


1.3 


4.4 


4.9 


57 


.5.6 


5.1 


1.059 


April, 


09 
1.0 


1. 5i 1.4 


1.0 


1.1 
1.1 


4.0 
5.0 


37 

4.7 


3.8 


3.8 


3.8 
4.9 


1..501 
44.806 


An'l mean, 


1.0 


j 1.3 


1.0 


5.0 


5.0 



* Melted snow since November. 

Barometer was highest, 1844, October 22, 90.622 in. Lowest, Febraary 6th, 1845, 28.882. 
Bange, 1.740. Mean for the year, 29 907. 

Thermometer highest, 1844, August 17th, 4-90'. Lowest Feb'y 2d, 7.9. Range, 97.9. 
Mean temi^rature for the year, 47.2'. 

Maximum of Thermometer, 1845, July 12, + 100"* Minimum of Thermometer, 1846, 
February 27th, — 8. Range, 108 Mean for the year, 29.920 in. 

Barometer was highest, 1846, November 29th, 30.680. Lowest. February 20, 1846, 29.080. 
Range, 1 600. Mean temperature of the year at the hours, 48.9 . 

The hours of observation adopted in these tables, are those generally used by observ- 
ers in England. The mode of notation for the winds and clouds also deserves notice. In 
the former case, denotes a perfect calm, and 6 the greatest violence of the wind. In the 
latter case, denotes a sky without any clouds, and 10 a sky completely overcast. As 
tmiformity in these tables is very desirable, it is to be wished that this method should be 
adopted by observers throughout the countiy. 



UXTBOHOLOeiCU. IKVOKHATIOr. 



in. METEOROLOGICAL TABLES FOB MENDON, Misi. 

Lat.o/ipirtof Unilarian Church, i2' 06' 13" N., Long. 11° SS- 35" W.Jriim 
Ghwnwici. By John Gto. MOadf, M. D. For the years 1843 unJ 1844. 



IBIS. 
IMontlu, 


0^,rttt«*^^ 


*^X^^^^«™<^'^^-| 


i 


a 
< 


iii 


i!i 


s 




II 

im B 


1 


li 

V 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




























































a? 








































































































te'i., 














































































































a.7 


7.1 


B.6 '6« 


.8 ; 






i. 


















1 








71 



a. Winds xsd Clodds. 



IV. METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOR ■WORCESTER, MiM. 
Lata' Ifi' n" N.; deixttvm *6S fat; fur the year 1845. 



76 



XBTSOXOLOOIOAL tSWOWMATlOtt. 



[1847. 



V. METEOROLOGICAI, TABLE FOR ROCHESTER, N. Y. 
Lot, 43- 8' 17", Long. IT 51/ Collegiate Institute. ByL. Witherell. 



1845. 



Barometer. 
Gruatest h't, 
Least height, 

Mean, 

Thermometer. 

M^thly mean, 
Highest deg., 
Lowest degree, 
Range, 

AVarmest day, 
Coldest day, 
Fair days. 
Cloudy days, 
Kain fell. 
Snow fell, 
Rain & Snow, 
Solar halos, 
Lunar halos, 
Aur. Borealis, 
Inch. of rain & 
melted snow, 
Days of 

N. wind, 
N E. 

E. 
S. £. 

S. 
8. W. 

W. 
N. W. 



inch, inch 
30.06 29.95 
29.00 28.78 
29.5029.46 



28.0628.05 



51 

51 
28 
81 



u 

u 
(( 
(( 



7 
24 
2 
15 
5 

1 
1 



I 3 
54 
25 

!ls 

20.5 

5 
17 



1 

: 3 

I 



3.51 2.00 



4 

3.5 

1 

8 

3.5 

3 

65 

5.6 



2 

1 

1 

3.5 

2 

2.5 

8 

7.5 






t 



^ 



inch. inch. inch. inch. inch. inch. 
29.80 29.85 29.88 29.80 29.73 29,82 
28.80 29.08 29.25 29 28 29.10 29.30 
28.48 29.52 29.60 29.56 29 53 29.60 



38*41 46!42 53°78 64?66 



76 
12 
64 
30 
15 
11.5 
19.5 
5 
12 
2 
1 
1 




76 
,20 
56 
30 
8 

95 
20.5 

9 

5 

1 

1 







87 

33 

54 

12 

29 

18 

13 

11 

1 

2 

: 

I 




2.62 2.49 2.66 



15 
2 I 
5 
1.5 
2 I 
6.5 
6 I 
11 I 



2 

1.6 


3.5 
.5 


7.6 
15 



3 

1.5 

1 
1 
4 

7.5 
13 



88 
46 
43 

8 
80 

18 5 

11.5 

13 



; 

, 


4.48 

35 
1.5 

'1.5 


1.5 
8.5 
6.5 

13 



69 58 69.35 
102 93 



48 
54 
13 
31 
21.5 

9.5 
10 











2.76 

2.6 
2 




8 
4 
196 



i 






I 



u 



i 



inch inch, inch 
29.90 30.10 80 13 
29 0829.0029 06 
29.6229.6929.52 



68!80 49*01 



53 
40 
17 
81 
24 

7 
11 











2.77 

.6 



26 
1.5 
46 
1 
21 



86 
38 
47 
29 
21 , 

18.5 
20 











4.32 

2.5 
1.5 

25 
2.5 
6.6 
6 
11 



76 

23 

63 

4 

21 

16.6 

14.6 

11 

1 

8 

2 





2.84 

8 
1.6 
.6 
1.6 
3 
11 
6.6 
4 



39.41 
64 
10 
54 
1 
28 

6 
25 

7 

6 

2 



1 



268 



I 

a 



I 



1^ 



Inch.i 
30 06 30.13 
2917 28.78 
29.67 29.55 



237847-44 



39 
5 
34 
14 
19 
4 
27 
1 

17 
2 


1 



,102 
I 
i 64 



1546 

2105 

106 

74 

2 

6 

6 

2 



15 


1.6 


2 


2 


1 





6 


2 


1 


2 


6 


2 


7.6 


8.5 


12 


18 



1.42 34 44 



27 5 
19.5 
6 
21 
20.5 
605 
73.5 
146 5 



VI. METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOR TRENTON, N. J. 
For the Year 1845 ; by Dr. F. A. Ewing. 



MonthB. 



January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 



Thermometer. 



Year, 



65 
62 
76 
79 
84 
93 
96 
88 
82 
78 
70 
48 



I 



18 
12 
25 
28 
42 
47 
61 
69 
45 
31 
20 
12 



I- 



96 12 84 



S) 



37 
50 
51 
51 
42 
46 
35 
29 
37 
47 
60 
36 



i 



^ 






=3 



I 



33 36 

34 35 
44 38 
51.46 
6012 
7014 
74 59 
73 37 
63.45 
55.02 
48 81 
29^34 

63.24 



V. w. 

N. W. 
N. W. 
V. E. — X. W. 
8. W. 
8. W. 
B. W. 
8. W. 
K. W. 
8. W. 
N. W. 
8. W. 



8. W. 



•a 



o 



6 
6 
7 
4 
9 

10 
9 

17 
9 
6 
9 
4 



94 



o 
a 

QQ 



O 



6 
8 
8 
1 



REMARKS. 

Obeerrations at SunxiBe, 2 
P.M. and 10 P.M. 



1 
_6 

20" 



Coldest day, 6th, 18.6^. 
Maple, 2d ; Blackbiids, SOx. 



Hottest day, 18th ; 84% 



Ice,22d. 

1st Snow, 29th. 

Coldest d ayj^21gt, 18^. 



Total depth Snow, 8H inchM. 



There ww» right dajf tti* meanB of whieh wvn abOf« 80". 



1U7.] unOBOxAWKUir 

TIL MBTBOBOLOGICAL TABLES »0R LAMBEBTTIIiLE, N. J. 

LaLVf^- N-,Ltmg.l*-t,i- W. ; l^ L. H. Panau. 

1. ScKiUBT roK Tss Yeak bhdeno Jem 30, 1846. 



■ JolJ. t FebruBij. 

2. Wbatheb for Yeas e 



TT: 


1 


1 


n 


il 


Mmttu. 
18«-«. 


1 


1 


il 

T 

16 


II 
11 

1.88a 


BtpUmber, 


1 


8 


10 
IB 

la 

i 


4.ssa 


M" 


1 


G 


Y^T, 


48 


41 


132 


44.2£1 



Auhcal Mbam, j 



EXTBBITB TcMPEKlTimB. 



1 


1^ 


s 


18 


1 

a 


i 


i 


i 


i 




4T.CQ 




































































RH 


St 








6 


St 










































1 




















































4S.8S 




47.40 











78 



XSTSOBOLOOIOAL IKTOSICATZOV. 



[1847. 



Vm. BfETEOROLOGICAL TABI4ES FOR THE UOTVEESITT 

OF NORTH CAROLINA, AT CHAPEL HILL. 

Lot. 35« 54' 21 " N. Long. 79' 17 30" JT. 

By James Phillips^ Prof. Mathematics and Nat. Philosophy. 





Barometer. 




Thennometor attached. 


1 


• 


• 


• 


1 


• 


• 


• 


MonfihB. 


g 


-< 


^ 


A4 





< 


CM 


P4 




DQ 


oa 


CO 

* 


29.781 


oS 


o» 


eo 


ca 


June, 1846, 


'29.736 29.750,29.734 


70.8 


78 8 


93.3 


78.4 


July, 


.628 .652 


.642 


.688 


71.8 


795 


92.5 


80.7 


August, 


.689| .706 


.693 


.697 


71. 


76.1 


86.9 


76 2 


September, . 


.690, .718 


.702 


.698 


68.6 


71.6 


80.4 


70.4 


October, . 


.8181 .846 


.834 


.770 


61.8 


68. 


68.8 


57 8 


November, 


.625 .655 


.633 


.626 


42 7 


49.6 


69.4 


49. 


December, 


.720 


.742 


.718 


.n7 


30.7 


86 4 


44. 


858 


January, 1846, 


.677 .709 


.648 


.669 


' 86.9 


43.1 


62. 


421 


February, 


.644 .686 


.668 


.665 


; 35.1 


41.7 


48.8 


404 1 


March, . 


.6271 .663 


.648 


.633 


' 43.5 


63.4 


61.4 


622 > 


April, . . . 


.781 .806 


.764 


.764 


; 61.8 


60.1 


70 4 


60.1 


May, 


.574, .603 


.fias 


.693 
29 681 


' 62.8 
1 52.6 


69.3 


79.9 
69.7 


69. 


Annual Mean, 


29 684 


29.711 


29.689 


69.8 


69.8 





Thermometer detached. 


i 


Cleamefls from 
OtolO. 


• 


• 
IB 














►> 

i 




t 


t 
^ 


• 
DD 

1 


1 


S 


^ 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


Month!. 


* 


• 


pj - 


• 


1 


a 


• 


P^ 


• 

CM 


a 


§ 


1 




OQ 

70.4 


03 

81.5 


CO 


o> 


6.9 


5.5 


00 
47 


7.1 


« 


^ 





June, 1846, 


93. 


^8. 


80.7583 


5 30 


July, 


71.6 


81.8 


91.4 


79.9 ;81.1976 


4.7 


4.5 


42 


4.9 


9,31 




August, 
September, 


71. 


78.4 


85. 


76.1 '77.6572 


2.9^ 


8.5 


8.8 


4.6 


8 31 




68.2 


72.8 


801 


70.1 ,71.6792 


68 


6.1 


4.9 


76 


729 


1 


October, 


60.9 


69 


67.6 


57 4 68.7460 


5.3 


6.5 


5.6 


72 


828 


3 


NoTember, 


42.3 


50.2 


684 


48.5 149 9500 


5.7 


6.7 


6.2 


5.8 


4 29 


1 


December, 


29.7 


34.8 


41.2 


34.4 136.0282 


4. 


8.9 


6.2 


4.8 


10128 


9 


January, . 


83.4 


41.9 


60.1 


41.6 41.7822 


5.6 


5.6 


4.9 


6.1 


5*26 


6 


February, 


88.1 


42.1 


47 9 


40.6 40 9196 


3.3 


2.9 


3.8 


48 


7128 




March, 


41.7 


58.7 


61.4 


50.9 52 4177 


4.4 


4.9 


8.3 


0.7 


8' 30 


1 


April, . 


60.7 


61.9 


70.9 


60.2 


60 9883 


44 


4.7 


8.9 


62 


10|27 


8 


May, . 


62.8 
61.7 


71. 

60.7 


79.2 
68.8^ 


68.9 


70.4839 


4.1 

47 


4.1 

47 


8.8 
45 


5.8 
6.7 


11 29 


2 


Annual mean, . 


68.8 


60.1211 


92 


>846 


19 



Hottest day, July 22d, — 

Barometer at Sunrise, 29,688 ; at 9 A. M. 29^688 ; at 8 P. M. 2965 ; at 9 P. M. 29.66. 

Attached Therm. " 78 " 87 « 104 " 90.5 

Detached Therm. " 78 »* 89 ' " 104 " 91 

Thermometer, mean, 90.6 ; Barometer, mean, 29.669. 
Ck>ldest*day, December 21st, — 

Barometer at Sunrise, 29,762 ; at 9 A. M. 29.8 ; at 8 P . M. 29.8 ; at 9 P. M. 29.8. 

Attached Therm. « 10 « 19 « 29 " 21 

Detached Therm. ** 7 « 13 « 28 « 18 

Thermometer, mean, 16.25 ; Barometer, mean, 29.785. 

Annual Barometrical mean, 29.69176 inches. 

First froet, Oct. 18. First snow, Dec. S. Frogs singtaig, Jan. 81. Peach blossomed 
March 17. 



METBOBOLOGICAL TABLE FOB NATCHEZ, Mim. 

Lai. B\° 34'. Lang. 31' 24' 4a"; 6y Henry TooU^, Sr. 



. Lomit, JumuTeUt—Se.Mla. 



METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOB STEUBENVILLE, Ohio. 
Lot. 40° 26' N., Long. 89" 41' 24 " (F. B^i Rosic'eM Afcrtt 




METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOE BIX)0MINQTON, lowi. 

For Iht gmr 1845 ; by A6: T. S. Parvin. 



WtnaMDViivly3a-'S*'. ColdMt, Sh. 19 3-. HlgbeiitTgiDp. JhIt 20-«8'. Ln- 

•rt,Dec.l»--12°. Meiui,W.e7- Ruige.llO'. UlsdsaipplopeiwlFsb.lB; cl««l,I>ei>.l. 

Xn, METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOR SAVANNAH, Ga. 
/V (iHJ yeoTi enditvj Mag 21, 1946. By Dr. JiAn F. Posey. 





mjiBM. 


.™«. 


HbmlMyUmB. 






a 1 s 


S 






a 


S 


a 


S 


sa 


Months. 


i 


-i c^ 




i_ 








<j 




ei 






















.IUI.6,lB44, 


n 


S009 30 


3 


ai.M 


21 29 


97 


29.92 


a».94 


80.06 


8006 


'»^ 


July, 


28 


lis 




.12 


11 


90 


.88 


.90 








iyi, 


20 


.IB 


5 




W 




.79 




29!e9 










B 












80.02 


aoioi 


ao'm 


October, 




!2S 






28 


)9 


.'54 


!68 


.06 




.03 




26 


.Z! 


i 


.30 




» 


.79 


.82 








Ju., ISii, 




.83 


!6 




22 


j9 




t .48 










.37 












.70 


.11 


'08 




09 


Febrnwj, 






10 




4 


13 


'.&) 


.6* 


.00 


.04 




07 




27 


•.11 


IS 




17 


rs 


.68 










08 


April, 


B 






!2H 








!e2 










•l&f, 


















!04 




.08 


1^ 


1» 


.34 


M 




28 


» 


:82 


J4 


.11 


.09 


.08 


July, 


7 


.22 


19 






<a 




.82 






29.96 


August 




.17 










'.ao 


.89 


soios 




30.08 




-IS 








» 


.75 


.70 


.08 


!02 




October. ' 


16 


.81 


80 


.80 


n 


to 


■ .71 


.66 










No.a»l^, 


25 


.86 


84 


.33 


2 










ioo 




12 


J«., 184^ 




.44 


42 


.40 










.09 


.00 




10 


23 


t .45 








18 






.07 








Fsb^u," 


27 


.82 


« 


isi 


19 










MiM 


29 




Muoh, ' 




.29 


17 


.28 




19 






29!98 






94 


April, 




.42 












:60 


80.07 


aoioe 


80 


15 


M„,' 


^ 


.IT 




.IB 8 1 


!L 


-S7 


.60 


29.92 29,92 1 29 





1845. •Hlihwt,HBnh2TUi,a 



llDcha. 1844. ' 

a. i LowMt, Uwdi lit, 29,i 



t, D«. m, 29.48 ii 
,80 in. BugB] 1. 



1847.] 



METEOBOLOGICAL INFOBMATION. 



81 









2. 


Thermometeb 


• 














Highest. 


Lowest. 


Monthly 
Mean. 


• 


1 
























1841. 




!^ 


^ 


s 




» 


1^ 


i^ 


• 


• 


• 

1^ 


Si 




Months. . 


i 

7 


• 

76 


C4 




12 


• 

61 


76 


73 


• 

74 


86 


• 

79 


Bain 
Incl 


a 
1 

7 


June, 


94 80 


5.646 


July, . 


27 


82 


*98 


86 


12 


81 


80 


73 


78 


90 


82 


12.975 


13 


August, . . 


8 


81 


95 


86 


29 


61 


83 


75 


74 


88 


81 


3.830 


6 


September, . 


8 


74 


96 


76 


29 


50 


66 


60 


69 


82 


75 


6.970 


6 


October, . 


18 


72 


85 


76 


30 


36 


66 


46 


68 


72 


66 


.395 


8 


NoTember, . 


13 


66 


79 


73 


26 


41 


67 


60 


52 


67 


60 


2.605 


6 


December, 


6 


64 


70 63 


17 


123 


39 


34 


44 


67 


61 


2.716 


6 


1845. 


























January, 


17 


61 


72 66 


31 


32 


66 


61 


46 


61 


47 


2.625 


6 


February, 


22 


61 


77 68 


6 


28 


51 


48 


46 


64 


66 


.260 


2 


March, 


9 


66 


81 68 


21 


37 


68 


61 


62 


67 


69 


1.845 


8 


April, 


19 


71 


89 , 76 


9 


42 


60 


63 


64 


81 


70 


.050 


1 


May, . 


5 


74 


88 77 


17 


64 


74 


68 


68 


82 


73 


5.330 


6 


June, 


24 


82 


102| 89 


1 


68 


78 


70 


70 


76 


82 


2.330 


8 


July, . 


22 


81 


100 I 90 


2 


74 


89 


81 


81 


79 


83 


3.010 


8 


August. 
Septemoer, . 


15 


78 


96 ! 84 


6 


67 


83 


78 


78 


76 


81 


9.775 


9 


9 


79 


96 1 85 


26 


64 


75 


66 


66 


71 


77 


2.045 


6 


October, . 


10 


76 


86 77 


22 


45 


66 


65 


66 


61 


67 


6.210 


6 


NoTember, •. 


1 


63 


78 , 70 


28 


28 


40 


34 


34 


49 


66 


.380 


2 


December, - 


9 


69 


71 , 69 


21 


§15 


29 


27 


27 


38 


44 


4.690 


10 


1846. 


























1 January, 


SI 


60 


71 67 


11 


27 


60 


43 


43 


43 


62 


6.980 


7 


1 February, 


24 


47 


69 61 


10 , 


33 


66 


61 


61 


46 


53 


5.255 


6 


1 March, 


20 


69 


88 72 


4 


37 


68 


60 


50 


54 


60 


6.136 


8 


1 ^pril. 


26 


70' 


86 76 


3 


47 


62 


66 66 


61 


65 


2.455 


6 


May, . 


28 

• 


78 97 > 89 


18 

• 


64 

• 


76 76 ' 75 1 


70 


77 


1.385 


2 

146 


Total, 


• 


• 


• 


. 




« 




9 


92.835 



1844. *ffighe8t, July 27th, 98'. f Lowest, December 17th, 23^ 

1846. t Highest, June 24th, 102° § Lowest, December 21st, 16°. Range, 87" 

Xin. FLOWERING OF FRUIT TREES IN 1846. 



' Places. 


Peach. 


Cherry. 


Apple. 


Saco, Me., 


Plum, 


May 5 


May 13 


Cambridge, Mass., 


April 28 


May 2 


May 6 


New Haven, Conn., 


April 30 


April 30 


May 10 


Perth Amboy, N. J., 


April 19 


April 21 


April 30 


Lambertville, N. J., 


April 19 


Aprill9 


April 24 


Philadelphia, Penn., 


Aprils 


April 14 


April 19 


Baltimore, Md., 


April 12 


April 15 


April 25 


King George C. H., Va., 


April 6-11 


Aprils 


April 11-20 


Charleston, S. C, 


Feb. 12 






Madison, Wise. Ter., 


May 2 


May 2 


Mays 


Natchez, Miss., 


Feb. 16 


Plum, Feb. 7 


March 24 



8S 



OATAIjOOUB qv comsts. 



[1847. 



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eooor^oooookOiAco 



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i-i <N O 
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a> 



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(M CO 



«0 00 -^ i-<i 03 <0 O 

o o» eo «o o c» CO 

fm CO ^^ CO CT i-< 



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ti <^ 



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o 

00 
CO 
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o 

^ 00 



<0 9^ O) 
^ <N 00 
He* 
<0 C» <N (O O <0 O 
r« t» r-H ^ 91 o» -^ 

ixi F-4 CO •>• (M 01 






CO 



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CO 
01 o 






• 


j^ ^ IN. ^ Oi 01 

^ r>. CO CO <0 1-^ 


ft O o> »o 00 -«!!< r- o> «o 

.Tf<co<o «ot>-coao<o 

^ oi iO kO in ko 00 o) o 

^ FM 


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<or^«040'-ioieO'* 

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to 

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lA >^ 00 0> t^ 

00 t<« O <» to 

CO <<^ F-4 «-< 00 ''^i CO 

t^ o» "^ CO eo «o o» 

• •••«•• 

o o o o o o o 



« eo 

00 »>- »ft »>. 

lA 00 eo 0> VA IN 
lA t« *0 r« 91 00 -^ 

-^ ^ Oi t^ eo *n id 

o o o o o o o 



eo C9 to 

O) <M 00 O) 
*A O) O) to 00 
»A »^ r-i 91 to 
r* w lA 00 "^ 

• • « • • 

O O O O O 



3 



O lA »A h« ^ 

eo (M >A kA 
eo to o oo o eo ei 

t>. CO to 00 r-l "^ 



o 

kA I. «0 O 

•-< g »A <N 



r|i (N 
kA 00 '^^ >A 
kA t<« CO <^ kA 
to t» 00 ^ o» 

lA kA rH 1^ >A 
G O ^ <6 6 

o 

kA 



^ 



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eo r-i 



91 

F-i 0> (N Oi r-^ 

i>H ^ 00 kA 



r-ioi«ofititor«kAkAt^e4ooo9«oco'^in'^ 
cieo iAt»i-i <»i-ieoc4eoeo<^t^t^<o 



III 

•^1 



O 00 O 



00 



kA 



^ r* eo 

(N 0> O 



o «e Op 

91 00 o 



O '^ "* 00 

kA kA G4 f-4 

0« 00 kA ^ 00 eOI> O 00 "* 
COii i>h9104 ^COkA 

OOtOCOOOtotOkA^'^aOCOi^G^tOkAQ 
eO»-4'^tOOOCOkAOC4<^00> kAkAd> 
,_I^Ct|,^C4i~iF^ C^r-H 0)91 



3 




s 



91 







eo 



to 



eo -"t 



9> -^ kA CO 
00 f-i lA 




3C0 o o <^ 
kA i-i eo kA 

SOt««Ot0^tOOOOOtOOeOkAtO94e4^COeOO4<M 
oikAr«e>teo<ootoOkAi-io^e>ioor«eoeoco^ 
.-leoco <NPi i-igico >-HCOi-<c>io<o<co^^fH 

■rf< »-H 

« eo 



o 

00 



00 



O 06 o 



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kfl 



00 ««^ -^ Q to 
1-4 (N « 1^ to ^ 



to 

kA 
(N 



•^ C9 kA to 

«< 1-H l^ I— I 
C^ (N (M r-l 



«A"«*'4"^eO'*^ kA 

'^t^ooo>i-4eoo)Otoo)ao9i 
kAooto-^osot^ooeoeioic^ 

<M <N CO I— I t-H CO 



« <M 00 O* 
r* O ^'J •"• fl> 

c^55<Ncoaj 

°" CO CO "-I CO s « 






bo«4 



TO 

*^ 
<N 



-4 00 

kA e«i 00 



Oi kA 
to Ck ^ CO 
01 r-i o» 0> OS 



O 

O 09 to 

0«C0C0tOFMkA<Nr>»00 
OicoooOOooooifr^ 
t^eoQoooookAr^cfikA 



mcHCv v^i-'wawas^ r» c^ v#^ ww uu «« •— w •« 
tOi-iWeOtOkAOOOO-^kAOO-^i-fi-iOtOOOO 



i^lfS^^'^ 










© . 



^tS 









o 



OO^t^^t^-i\0^< -^O^ 



c;»>-'^"^0>'-«f-4»*'-«<N tO»AC0tO(Ni-ii-i(NC0tO 00t»Q 
'^0>C0tO0>QPC0kAtO tOQ0e0»At>»O>eOC0C0kA kA<»OD 
JOC^(N©ICOeOCOCOeO eOCO^-^"*-^«AkAkAkA kAiAkA 



o 



ko to t^ 00 o» Q F-^ CI eo "^ »ft to M »* 00 »t1 SJ S I?*' •-< ?3 $2 

_< ^ ^ ^ oi S^ 04 09 en 04 04 €4 ffi 04 01 n 94 00 f-i CO CO 00 



S4 



OATALOGUB OT COUBZI. 



[1847. 



s 



tbSb 

a d 






nonowia P5B5 OOMOrtrtrtQQeiQMOiOtfQQOPOQQ 






o -«* 



in 
I— I 
iq 

kCd CO 



lO F-l 


CO 


1^ t^ 


00 


la r-i 


Ift 




-^ 




1-4 


*^ «o 


00 


O (O 


o> 


rH 00 


GO 


OS b- 


Oi 


o> o» 


o> 


O Oi 


o> 


a> OS 


o> 



1 

g 



H 
O 

o 

H 

O 
>A 
A 
H 

•< 




«0 lO 

o o> 
o o 

CO «o 

O 00 

• • 

o o 



00 

00 ^ 
00 Oi 
O CO 
t^ b- 

(O «o 
OS o» 

• • 

o o 



o o 



Perihelion 
I>istance. 


0.225695 
0.040066 


Oi o O »ft o r- o> , 

t^O -* -"t (N>rtO OOiftift-^OOiCOi 
t^in»-i^ t<»r^00'«!f<O<N»A05O>0S<NCTt^«D(M<NC0 

t^o«o»-it>«o>ooi»ft»ftr-»^'*eo>oOi-i-^ioa>0(N 

'»ti-(«D0>»ftr^tf5<N04t^C«lirS«0t^O00«O«O«0ir5«O«> 
«000l^00«00000i-ia0-^'*CMO0500C0OOOOOO 
©OiftOiOOiOiftCOOO-^Oi-itOtNWOOOOOO 

.-•^OOOOOOOOOfmOOOfmOOOOOO 


1 
1 


» »» 

61 27 50 
59 29 5 


ooioo t'-o i-io»noooinoooooo»f5i^ 

Tl< r^ CO O-^ i-irH<M Tj<»OC^»OC0 

<^tooooao(MOaoi-ioooaoxoc(|e9'^cocoo»0(Noo 

'i*»ftO»r<»oit«-t^i-it<»o>ooi-i«DcooscoOrHQOp-.— o 
e>iQOtni^r-i(Neot^oo<Mi>*aot<« «o«o»o<o«o«o 


Angle betw. 
Perihelion 
and Node. 


O t 11 

345 44 10 
293 15 50 


0500 OOO -^OOOOOOJO Oift040«^<0 
OCN»-i I-I ^ -^ coco CO<NC0 »0"^ 

0^0»«0'^f"iOWift«^00<N«t^04C«Of-<Nt<»OW0i 
-^OCO I-I '^VOC^I CTW «!-« CO-^(M»«'«*«00 

CTrHOO(N»-it^«OTj*t»OeOO«00>d»<0000 — oo 

coGOOrHcoooc<<oooooi-iiAOaitomkAtnmmkn 

cococo i-H^ c»ico cOf-^f" ^cocoeococoeo 


Longitude 

of 
Perihelion. 


O ' II 

249 7 23 
285 10 58 


(NCOO OO t>.O00»nOOC0 b-.CT»ftt^r-<0 
cHi-H CO C«<(N»-« (MCOO -^^ pH<NeO 

*^(N(N'^«Oi-it^iOCi'*H<t»0400i-lO»-"«0OJ»OOli-H 
C0C0C0»O»O (NCOi-i »OfmC^C^ i-i tH »-^ 

"^C0O0S»O»O-^r-l<0^t<»C0"^0iOO»ftlO»ft?Dlft»ft 

1-4 ri « t<» t^ O O <N CO »-• CO ** -^ "* CO to <0 <D «0 «0 «0 

CNt-iOICOCOCO F-ii-H i-ieO(N(M(Ne^OI04 


Longitude 
of Ascend- 
ing Node. 


o ' r> 

234 51 33 

218 26 48 


COCOO OOO «0OO»ftOO00 t<»t<»<Dt^OO 
i-MlOrH "^ i-l-^r-»C0»ftC0lO i-ii-l<Mi-ieO>ft 

H«(NaoOi-Hco(MOaO)AC«ia)coodOD-^'^^i-iknoi>-i 
loeo iOi-4 i-i-^tninco-^eoini-* ciC4C>ii-if-4co 

,MF-40»t^Oi(M^«0000'^COOO»as-«f'^-^kATf4-Tti^ 

ttf<-^tococooooir«OiaoQOcoaieo«ot»r«r«r^r^f>. 

rHi-iCO <M <N<N(S5.-i(N(N<M<N(N(N 


Green-wich 
M. 8. T. of Peri- 
helion Passage. 


0.8. 
May 6.667 
7.346 


rt<P-4 in— <N O «0 (NCOb-OOOQO 
«OQ0 OO «0 OOO) (M OiOi-^C^1t^'«f 
(M<N«00iC00»«Ot<»OC0i-iifte0o«0«0C0»0O«0OC0 
05«0»0<0^00(Mi«»OOOOSCO«rt<N<NO«0«00>OOi 
OOiF-i»0«Or»0>i-lCOOOOTf<OOcoO»000400C500» 

anaot<«aOQOCococot<«aoc4cO'«t4<«ti^co«oaob.r«t<«QOt^ 
O S4 C <j|2;Jz;4fi<iS!i-<0 


• 


A.D. 
1582 


in o CO CO ro 00 00 oi i-i -^ in (N ro 00 o 
00 o>oio>o r-i — incococot<«(N>t>-oo 
in inminco tocotocococococococo 

1-4 ^HpHi-Hi— I P-ir-li— li— li-li— lr-«^^l~4^^ 


• 


s 


in <o r« 00 OS m Q ^ 9< ^9 "^ ^ <o t^ oo 
CO CO CO CO CO W ^ >* <* tH "* tP "* "^J« "* 



I l|i|ll|ll'51l still 1111^ III 



__OMMM qrtanjtfe! M CC PMBiMQOaQtfMMQ 



1 




III 

III 


350 39 36 
109 13 
109 3 25 
86 46 33 

330 37 

86 25 50 

73 2 
210 
356 53 
109 14 29 
165 
309 47 34 

59 25 2 

27 7 40 
6 15 34 

331 23§ 

11 41 39 

9 53 22 

138 43 56 
104 46 34 
328 1 1 
323 42 44 
6 26 6 


l|i 
hi 


274 31 46 265 11 22 
53 9 303 57 

53 27 46,304 34 21 
175 37 34' 88 51 1 
270 34 241 H 
352 52 50 79 18 40 
346 35 273 33 
218 68 

269 51i 272 58* 
323 51 58214 37"29 
300 46 135 46 
191 3 2|l40 50 26 

15 11 54: '4 36 56 

54 50 lo: 81 57 50 
129 45 58,123 30 24 

16 2i 1 44 38S 
15 56 19' 44 2! 29 

312 16 31,323 58 10 
312 19 16 322 12 38 
337 57 |327 30 
125 28 18264 11 14 
208 58 10 104 11 36 
187 5 9 219 4 8 
191 2 31,332 19 47 
88 24 31 94 49 10 


il 


lYhMmmTfTfAm 




1680 
1683 

1683 

16* 
1686 
1689 
1695 
1698 
1699 
1701 
1702 
1706 
1707 
I7IB 
1723 

1729 

173T 
1737 
1789 
1742 
1743 
1748 


£ 


S« SSSS33SSEggSS S SSSSSS 



GATAUKIUS OF OOXSM. 



11847. 



1 




•UOROOJla 1 


OQQC«P5QQQQrtQtfQqQrttfQfiPfiPPO« 


Period 

of 

ReTolntioa. 


76.615 

7334 
1128 

5.013 
482 
1232 
2090 

5.6070 
5.5995 


Eccentric- 
ity. 


0.9675439 

0.99868 
0.9954268 

0.8640 
0.9980036 
0.998932 
0.9992490 

0.7862730 
0.7861193 


Perihelion 
Instance. 


O P O »ft l> ©1 P -^l* p p 00 p Tj* CO O P -^ « CO (N r^ O 

i«*coCToo«o»0'*«»ot^<»0"«*cf>p«-fcoooo>'^»or-co't*«'^ 
»oociaD<oeo»ocoeoioeoo»pMoo<Ncooscot^r>-<N»0'^cs 

(N04C<«9»<<^(N00C0<-t00P(Op0>a)u;)OO>C4(N94(Nt^r^C>« 
»OOI(M(NOO«OCOeQOI»0000»OTj*'*^»0»Oe0^i-4rii-4COCOiO 

OOOWOOOOOOOOfmOOOOOOOOOOOO 


1 

i 


> i-iCOCOiOr-OOOt^ (N00«C0<MO»-fO eO<NO<0"<*»^»0 

00 00OCOCOe0Pt-rO>t^cOr-i00f-l'^e0Oi-<O)CO^t<«C0<<4«kO 

. »O^-ls.^.xft^.CT0»00t<»0S'c)*tf5e«(Ni(NO00OOOOi-it-*i^ 
•"^Tf<^*^oo«Oi-iFMCOi-it^ Qor^t»in'^ tH-^"^-^ co 


Angle betw. 
Perihelion 
and Node. 


. C»kA<N(O(0f-iO00 O00OtA-^0»i-i»nT-ii-ia)O<NOkO(0 

»^t<«tnc^i.Haokno)aooTf(cooo^GDO)>0(NOO)»^r«Tfi»^o» 
i-<r-»i-<cor*»r>oooocoo««-iiooooO"*p»^040>o»t*eo'*0 

^tA4n(Ni-^'^C&(OCO^t^O>-HOOQOOOC»<MlNlNCIQ<l94CO 


Longifcade 

of 
Perihelion. 


^ ceQO.-iTj*coeo<N.-f i-HosinQooi^^"* Oi-it^or^co« 
eo'-ipi~i^c4tf>'^^coootfdr-«ookn eo eo co o) o> oo >a o» 

'^'*C0(Np-ii-«tf5»O(MiO'«J»i-irii-«CM(N<N<N0<i-i»-*e0 « 

oooooOf-icoO'^cooo-^-^o»kncococo-^c4tokaknkneoe<9a) 
• '*o»osooi-ioo(N<Ncoo«eooooooi-i'«j<»n'<i«'«*«'«t'^«eoo 


Longltade 
of Ascend- 
ing Node. 


. o>eoo400i<NWco rH.-iiri«'Tf<o6oio> OiWr^-gpt-oooo 

'ift"^'^'"^*^coo»nt*«oiftcocecoo<0'^i-'C<icor-ii-iweoo» 

cot<«c»oo-^«4(Ok004»np'^ot^r^f-4Udmcocococot»t»o> 
F-i(M G»«(N i-i eoeoeo»-i(N rti-irHi— coeoi-< 


Greenwich 
M. 8. T. of Peri- 
helion Passage. 


C0C0«Di-<OC»l00 C0r-<C0"-Hr-»O'-H«Oe0C00i0CiOt^'^f^ 

i-iC»l«C0»O«O-^ G^00»OiO-^>OOvO00cO.-i00»OC»<00i-i 

t>.»O00O>O4t<»O>'^r-C0i-^t<»'^'-«'-«i— •«-iQ0T|<Tj*p'^COf^lO 

00>^(N00OQ0(NQ0C000pt^C0«O»^t^<O00-^»A0|«t>«00C0 

oocoeo-^ooooeoeortiAOoocoooaooooocococoift-Tj*"^©! 

OQOOOOOOOOOQOf-ii-lriO«t>ceOOi-li^Olt^«Ot>t'.t^t^OOeOCT 


> • 


^ CO ^ f^QDQOt^ 00 O) 0) 0> (N cq|» ^ CO CO 0» P O 

W-if"^ -^"^"^O lftiO»OiOCOCO COCOCOCO t>. I> 

i t>. *^ r* r* !>• r- r* t>. i>. r«- 1>. r* r* r- t^ t>. r- i>. 




cot>. t>-t^t<»t^ t>- W t> t^ t>. r- 00 00 00 00 eo « 



1647.] 



OATALOeUB OF COKSTB. 



87 



•8 

I 

I 

i 

o 

8 



H 



• 

1 


• 

1 g-§ i i 1 i ll-g ^^1:^1 1| HM ill i 


*iio$i)a0j)(I 


GqqpQqQQGQQQtf«P«QCQP5P«qp« 


Period 

of 

ReTolntion. 


y. 

34.58 
4.586 

75314 

5.613 
20.026 

3.123 


Eccentric- 
ity. 


1.00944 

1.0093698 
0.903148 

0.67692 

1.0282955 
0.9999460 

0.5395345 
0.6784 

0.84836 


Perihelion 
IMstanoe. 


1^ <N Tf 

O 00 CO O O to Ot^CO ^« 00 00*^ 

f»>ntoc>^ia> 0)0 coooooO(00»oo(N>noi<x>(OOi-« 
eoO'^i-'knaoaoaook QOrHeo<MQOO)eoT44eaaocokAaOf-40» 
eo(Neoooeor-«i-i<0'^t»c>ieototntno*n'^kn<»e<5r«cooao 

OOOC4>-iO)rHC4^kAeOi-iO)rHr<.tO(OkAO)OH*04G4i-i^ 
04040>00000>i-ii-i'^'^t>.0»At>-0>»ft-^'^*>.i-i-sJieO-^CO 

OOOi-<»-«OOi-iOf-<^00000«-i«-ti-«Oi-<0000 






^OOOOtOOO f^kA tOOCNOtO-'ttO'iiOtNCN OOi-i 

oi ^ eo i-H oi eo >^ 00 C4 e^ ^ i^ oi «o 

<OkA>ni^t^aoo>«<toop^eoeoeoc49>eoeoa»<«t^tO'^ia 

- ..H r^ .-H tA •-( Ol CO f^ 00 C) ^ di ^r^ lA ^ •-• CO lA 1-4 
i.HF^.-iOOOOPr^i-iCOCOOOa^'*Wi-«t^OO"H'l>»"-'0»*00000 

• p.4i.Hi.Hi.Hi^04i^coaoaoaoeo»Ar«aoc4iA^'^kOt«aOp^>A'^ 


Angle betw. 
Perihelion 
and Node. 


^»^co^(oco ooto toeOi^ r«aotoQOiAr«>-i toto 

^O«C0O| kA 0<^ «4<'« r)4'<d*iA'^kA«AT|i aA04 

<N 1^ F^ o '^ oot^ »A «w eo o» ■^ o> o o> O** 04 -^ o> o O « t^ 

^ ,.H ^ fM tA eo -* -^ ^ ^ ^ ^ rm CO >^ CO 

O(0t0f^C00>C0^C00)t0C>ie0'^t0i-ii-i«4<^t0iAI^0«iA0) 
* r«r«t^i-iixQOO>i>iCO»ACOtOC|tA4A(OlAtAkAOOOC*iaOOIO» 

(MO<>-4>-Hco>-Hr-irH f-4C^i>i cocoeoooo4i-^>-4eo 


Longitude 

of 
Perihelion. 


.C^O'*00<N »A»-i l^tO"^ i^OOi-'OOOOi.-f r-""^ 
GS| i^ 1^ Ol «4< >^ tA i^ tA kA ri eo C«1 i-i O 

^ 0)'^0)i^O<N(OkOkAeoF->ooeo>^0)000»aoa)to^<NO>« 
i-i o< o< oi i-H oi (N 00 F^ eo *A pi »A o« eo ^ 01 eo 1^ 00 

. lAlA»A»^i-<i-IOOtOOO'^aOOOt^t^Pt^tOOO.-fOOOt^OaO 
• 000»^i-"0»0>*^f-^'>*i-iOO'«*''^^fM'T*t»A»AQOi-<0>»AtO 
i-lrH»-l(-li-l COCOOO <N<N<N rHO|»-<i-t 




.•A-^eOOlOk t>.tA i-iCOOO ^<-itAkAkAtOO ^Q 
> 00 C^ f-i i.H tA Ol r-4 09 f-r 09 «4< tA 04 00-^ •-• C4 

too«<x>iMtA-^o»0)eotoaoeoo»oaooo>^ao-^too»0)to-^ 

'»A »AeO i^OI JAOO*^ Ol iA©« -^ '^ CO «-•"* 

. ooo>ooeo»AC<i'^oii-ii^pmO'^o»eoa)»Atotot^»o»o»2»ot;^ 

• 0|C^O|tAiAtOtOO»0000000«(N'*00^-»A»A»A»AtOtOeOO>0 


Oreenirloh 
M.S.T. of Peri- 
helion Passage. 


t^tAOia)(Noooioit^c<iO'^o O0f-ii-ieoo>i-io_ «-•« 

(NO>I>-«AeOO"^-^f^"^i-iQOOOi-<00«MO>tO^<OiAO«r»CO^ 

o>i>o<oooiiA»Aoo«AOeo»^»ftooeoooeooio>»A«©o»A 
Ot^i-«oio>oeoO'<tooeoo>tOTj*aoo«ooo»too>oit^iA'-<« 
oii-ioir-ii-H&iotO'^kAaooaoaOi.HiAOi'^tAneo'^ooo^ao 

nQa)0>c»oa)o>aotAtnt>-tA^oaot^o»tAo>o>f-^t»ooo*^o 
,^f.Hi-i(Ni-i ,-ir-ii-i 00 C4 oii-»i-ii-io«o« eo •-• 

<1 Ph QQ<J t^Ul^}^^^ t^^^^^^ 


• 


d^ « eo r|i o> o o i-< .-< eo :* »S S iS *^ t: 

•H|^ r. t^ »» t^ 00 00 00 oo 00 oo oo oo oo oo oo 

5t>- r» *>•*«-. i> r* r* r» i>- i>- t>» «>• t^ r- t<» »>. 


i 


kA to t^OO OkO^G^eO-^ lAtOt^r^OOO) 
00 00 00 OD 00 0» 0» O) O) 0> Ok 0» 0» W 0» 0» 



88 



ojltaioqvm of oombtb. 



[1847. 



I 

J 

1 

s 

i 






• 

1 


4J «i 

'P 'P 

a a a ^ q « J 3i^ 
gSaJ^SSPuiajaspqwOOOONOpqoOwOrtpqn 


•uoBoaiia 


tfGtfQ««««qqp««qp5«««Pfifi«p5PQ 


Period 

of 

Revolution. 


y. 

12.126 
3.2942 

3.2922 
6.737 

1494 


Eccentric- 
ity. 


0.7347635 

0.8488828 

0.8461753 
0.745784 

0.9950347 


Perihelion 
IMatanoe. 


(N-<t^<DOCOO> «00 00 00 i-ii-i O 
^ f-> Oi CO ^ Oi CH tOC^*AtOf-4kOO>»0 »^r^(MOC0<N«0 
00»0(MO)OaO^«4<0*Af-4<Or<-t>>i-H'^t«<-ir-4^000«OOS 

eo<Dcocor^co«ocOTi<0"*oo«0'^"»tOTi<i-i-^F-HO«Oi-'0»oo 
«0(Otn«oo)0)^oooeor«04aot»-^c*i«oo>c»'^Ooo-<^-^ 

O«^t<»Ol>-<N0»rJi»0'^C0»0»0'<i«r^00<0<NOOC00i©«0«0 
^00^0^00»-HF-tO«-iOOOOOO^i-<OOi— lOO 


1 

"g 

A 


. O<N»f5C0»>'OC0 ^DOOCO-^^J^Ot^ t^OOO»Or»00 
-(MCOf-Hi-^OIvOr-H "<* eOCOCO^vOCO-* "^'Tf'CO-^ »o©i 

QOC|r)400e«1<0»^i^tOk09I^OOI'^t^OOOOOeOQO^O>*<4< 

'(NkOkOOtO'^ c»imoO'^vo^in<-ikn 9< 9ieooo 1-4 

^ ©i-^i^«ocoo>osO'-*r»eO'*Oco«Ot^rH*^«ecoeo»ococo 
* i-icoeoo<oeO'<t(OkO'^i-'<Otn-^Tj4>or«<N)A>Or-ii-ieo«o«o 


Angle betw. 
Perihelion 
and Node. 


. FMt>.-^Oiftcoo ;Doooeoc3»ot^Oit>» »ococoooao<N<o 
-•^ 1-4 coeo lOi^io (N »o (N <NiOrH »a ^ 

©iot^«ot^<DOO*0'«*'i^aooO'«*'oo(N04eo<o*^t^'^Tt«o> 
eoHnco<Nr-i(M«4<-^>o i-i'^iOkn-Ti«i-icok009<r-4i-icoc4 

^ oo.-f»ft'«j«04'«!f<r^o>oo<o«H<o>c^»o»«<oOf-i^c»ioooO'*i<'^ 

** «OC0t-iOi-i»ATJ4C0t<»Q0Q000r^rf<i-i0iC0<MC»<C000r-i(?l 
^(Nr-l^^^ ,-Hi-HC»lCO<N r-lCN CO'-^"-H(M 


Longitude 

of 
Perihelion. 


. Olt>.»OOO»rt00 COO(N»nO«-<«Oi-HF-i iOCM-^COO^OOO 
-(Ni-i-^iOTfr-H C0"^CT<NC0e0C0»O»O rH(NCM (N»0 

"* «* Tfi CO 00 .-1 (N «o r* 04 •-• c^ 00 .-• "^ 04 CO 1^ i-< »o <N 

COCOr-l'<*CO»n'^<N(NrH<itf-lC^^CO'^WTl<»-l'i*CO"^ 

„ O'*'^«Tl<t<»<D0>^<0t^e0O«'^'^O'*W0><DO'*'-*^ 
"* OC<<0i-il^C0C0<N00Q0»OO«rtOC0 O>00C0'^«O'-«OJ«>-t^ 

,^ l-H(M l-H(N l-Hr-l (—1 l-Hl-HCOr-''*^'— • (N<N 


III 
1^1 


. coooiooooi^ t^O'itaooif-fcoooo oa»F-4iftoococ^ 

-C0i-H»O»ftFM-^-H COC0«(N»r5COCO »-f iO(N«-ivO<N »« 

<N^i-iooi-H"^cot^»-fC»<»or»o>©i6oot^o»ift<DO(N»ai-i©i 

CO *a CO "-Hf-KiftCN-i^iOiftr-Hi-iG^ k09IG4iOO f-i 

oooi*^t-Tj*i-i'^oscoo>«o*^o«oo«o'»oor*Tf<FM(N»-r^ 
• »ftiot^«>coo>ooo ioeo.-fOic^«o<N'«tOr^co»oc»««o?o 

i-iCOf-"<M -^C^i-H coco C0r-i(Np-<CO CO«-ieO(MCOC^©« 


Greenirich 
M.S.T. of Peri- 
helion Passage. 


cou^^or'Oot^ coi-too-r^QOuri-^O"""* «0r-too»r50>«ot>. 
t>.o<Nr^oooocor*o>ooo>"^oiooooo>i-<«oocoTt'iot>.ioo 

iOOOC>100»0"^i-'000>OCO'^<NCO'-^t^^*'-lQ0040— i-TjiO 
r-ir*r-ii-4-^«0(N-^<NO>Tf<WO«Oi-HCO«*ft04000;OFMOC^ 

eoco(Nco<Niftcooot^»n'^oOr-i-^o>oir*»fto>»f5-^»rto>oooo 
nQOOtnaOr-4Cor««4<ooaOi-iC40i'^r-i^knQOoco^oiaoooao 


i 


qOOqoooowc^coco kO«or»aooocso>i-icn'«t»««o«ot^ 

^^0000a)0>0)0)0>0)0> 0>0>OkO)0>0)AOOOOOOO 
i r>. r* t^ t^ r* t^ b- b- t>. t^ r- t^ r- »^ t^ t^ oo oo oo oo oo oo oo 


m 


Q»-iWC0"^»ft«Ot^Q0 -^0>-OFMC^C0"«*»O«t^rj«*^«00O> 



1847.] 



CATALOGUB OV COMETS. 



89 



d 
o 

O 



O 

o 

o 

t3 






:3 



3 



©a 03 03 03 Vi _:»s Sijas « 



O^ a^ • • • • • •w^ • • 




■oopowia QtfQp«tfQQQ«tffifiPOOfiPQp5PPqpP 



|4 



I 



S 



. 00 
1^ 



eo o 

03 CO 



o 
in o 

00 



eo o> «^ -^ 

• • • • 

t>. Ol "^ "^ 
*^ *>. t>. t^ 



OO CO 

00 a* 
to o 

• • 

CO CO 



«0 00 

CO «o 
ci id 



e^ 



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00 

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00 

a 

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■^ "^ «> ^ 
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eo o »-• »-i 

CO CO CO CO 
Oft O) O) c^ 

d d d d 



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t>. 
CO 
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00 

d 



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00 

00 

o 
o» 

00 



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CO ^ 

in fm 

CO lO 

o m 

CO t<« 

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CO 
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CO CO CO 

• • • 

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CO 00 

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CO 
t^ o 

O '^ CO 
r-t i-H CO 
(N t^ OS 

00 r* 05 
m r^ <o 



O ^ o» "^ 
OOirft^OiOS'Tf'COCO 
f-iCOCNl-HrJiOOiOOt^. 
cocoor^cocow^t^ 
i-<C0C0C0>~'i~<'^^^OS 



I-* 1— ^ i-H O O «-* •— ' ^^ f M t-4 .-<>» <.-< r-( 

^ V*r;^co~co 00 o~co~o co »o <n ift~bo" 

(M^,^ COG*!"— "FM<*^"^f«-^iO»0-^ 

O O O A CO 




OC0Q0CO&l<NO)r«t^C0lN0«IC09lOOOAC0OC4Q0C0C094 

pht|<f-h-^ (Ni-iiafh m^meocoiNOi'tt'^-^co-^f-i^ 

"^"^"^"^^Oic^eocoo^-"© 

•^■^■^^•^OOCOi— lr-»00i-ii-l 



eO»ftO><M00C0'-i'-«C0^-^"^-^ 

tD"<tcocot^r»cocot>iWoO"*Tj* 



"SB'S "2 



00»iOCOi-iOt^lOFMCO"*t^ 
COCOCO C^— <r- C0"^fm*Oi-i 

<>.mt<«coeO'^coiot^c4cooo 
Tf<e<ii-io«CMco(MrH»ftmr- 

•^eooO'*»rtiO"^^oiO"^"<* 

m9<i-Hcocor-'>-HC)mOco 
(N(Mr-i coco»-^co^ 



o» 00 r» 00 (N 04 F-4 t5~o CO CO i-i in 

"«j«"*W Ci|OI-H -^COiO 

(Mcoe4cococoo>r«coc^oaoo 
ini-tcocococo"-" incNco co 

'^^inin>nin9<eo'-<G4cocOi-i 
cocococococoi-i9>aoo0r-4t^co 



cococO'ttosp-^mO'-HOftao 
i>N i_4 I— I I— I in ^ 

00(Ni-ir.4C^t^O^0»CO<0 

oicocoeO'Hff^ttcoco 

o>o>0)0»cof^cot^<*<-i-Hin 
Tf-^-^-^oomminooOftt'* 

i- M i»( I— I rH 1 1 CO I— I i-M <N g| W 

~b3 00 -ot IN Qolo in Ti« in 00 CO 
CO inminrH coWf-"-^ 






(MCOOiOftOOCOOSCOCOCO-^COCOO 

"<t ineo'^rH CO -^mf-i 

OOOeOCTCOCOOlOOt^'^CqiO^ 

eo-TttrHTfcoeo inCTi-<co co 

^o>cocom>naoao(NOao»^oor« 
t<» CO in " — ~ .. . — 



C4 



C4 



COt^t-^-^-^Wt^Oi-^-rf*^ 




. 94in^coo)coG4iieq9iooo>^04 
- i-i"^<Nco c«incoinc<icoco«i-H 



eoco«ocot^*^oO'^c«l04i-*-*<Nr» _^ 

c»ico^c»iinin©leocor-»i-ir-»rHi-iinin»ninincO 



»ntpr:-r^(N-^^0)aor«cp 



CO 
C4 CO 



S-* Ci O p 
« O '"t Tf< 



CO 1-^ i-< 



OOCOCOp^COCOCOOO 

Oioamco-^aooooo 

(N 



S 



5S 

00 



00 CO 
00 00 



o o ^ 

t^ 0> CO 
CO 



m CO 
in ■* 'I* eo 

CO *^ ^* "I 

CO ©I i-i i-i 





00 n CO F-4 
CO i-i <N CO 
r« (N in r^ 
fO oi '^ ta 

i-i 00 <N (N 



aQOoeoo^iocsio^FHOin 



0)0»C0O^Oi-*Q0 

FM-^comoftr^'^co 
QOOoo«OQoeoo<><- 
oo)i-i(N(Nf-iinin 

l-lO»C0in"*rH"^FM 
■ ••••••• 

rHom'^oiininin 



i-H (N C^ 



CO r« 
04 O 

00 ^ 

o» o 
in in 

01 (N 



00 00 

fm oi 

00 CI 
Oi Oft 

Oft Oft 

in 

<N 



s 



O O 00 
Oft CO C4 
X o ^ 

m Oft o 
Oft o X 

• • • 

m -^ r- 

<M 91 






'"« PH 










SCO m i-< 
Oft fh 91 

m Oft Oft o 

^ 00 00 o 
CT t>i •-• o» 

• • • • 

t^ r«- •-• 00 

<N (N 00 n 

4^1 



O* t>- OD 00 O 1-^ «-) eq 00 00 lO 
000<~<^H H ^ r-* r-t r^ 

jsooSoooooo 00 oooooox 



00 00 Oft Oft 0% 

fH rH I— < F-1 »1 

00 00 00 00 00 



£ 



Oft o 1-4 eq 00 

p^ 94 (N C4 04 


<* 


lA «Ot<« 


C4 


04 01 Ol 


>M fM Fl 11 PH 


l>i 


i-M i-H i-M 



SiSi^ 



■-♦ 04 

CO CO 



W 



90 



OATAIOGUB OV OOJCBTS. 



[1847. 



1 



• 

1 


Encke. 

Rumcker. 

Rosenbei^r. 

Encke. 

Encke. 

Heiligenstein. 

Encke. 

Rumcker. 

Nicolai. 

Rumcker. 

Encke. 

Rumcker. 

Clausen. 

Hansen. 

Rumcker. 

Gambert 

Nicolai. 

NicolaL 

Cluver. 

Argelander. 

Cluver. 

Heiligenstein. 

Heiligenstein. 

Cluver. [Mayer. 

Haedenkampf and 


•noRoajqa 


1 q(2;p^p$Qp<p?p^p?p^cp;Qp$p^QQqp?q;k;p^pi^p^Q 


• 

^ 1 


y- 

4.810 

3.318 

1550 
1817 

4386 
152 
6-737 

2611 


1^ 


0.6867458 

0.8445479 

0.9914768 
0.9823022 

0.9953690 
0.9562464 
0.7470093 
1.0089597 

0.9992730 

1 


1 

• I* 


Oixco«oco cii-i»r5CO»«ooi-io»t^OTf<c>i;D p-i -^coia 

»O00!MC0O><NO>O5'^;OC0r-it>.Tf<e0'C0C4© — — OiCNia-^-^* 
iOS^00t>»t^^C0Or-(Ma0O"^Q000-^Q0OF-t0000iOi-H00-^ 
C^(N'-<(M»O«OC0«O«O'-^'3>5»iC0O»f>OI<N<>.a0e<l;D<©aCt>.i-i 
04C>0iO'*'<*'T|«''t(N04-^OQ0"«*|'<*OQOa0»fl<NOOC0©1 
00OOOe000^F-<<NkOO0i00WO0>©Or-'00O»ftSf.HS 

000000-"^00r-iC0^^0<N(N00000OC> 

.. «oor*<Oift-^t>..-4<oa»(Nxr-a»co»ft'^?o©<QOO»noGS|ob' 

-»-i COG^ •^ ■-•CO'O'^CO fm(?<C>| '-HtOCO^^CSI 

i-4OC000(NC00>O<M'^Om^^e«li-MC0C»OC»b«t>>m00^CO 
(N CO ^ (N 1^ CO '"t »-! CO eo CO ^ CO CO CO O --^ O CO CO CO S 

. 0>COCOCOCOt^<N(N«0"^"^000>COCOC0040»rt»r50t^CO^i-i 

• r>.t>.*o^cooot^»oo»r5oococO'-^co^ G«io)i>.-^inoi 


Angle hetw. 
Perihelion 
and Node. 


. ^»0.-<T«I>-ift»f5>ftOr-<Mt>.«0C0'^C0»ftC0O«0OC0O0S«D 
•lOWCO'^OCOCO (MC0(M»OphC0 ^lOO OiCCO-^tiftr-* 

'^«-i'«*.-r^f>.«0OCN»O(N00«0«0»OO«i-«p-C0r^00^CO 
i-iCOOiOr-H CO i-4«-«»-i»OFM©|^C*"<*'rf<(NiOC0"*C^ 

„ ©0»C»COG^t^>-i»-«00'<txO<>»t^<Or^OOO>0>"<tCO©0000»0 
* IO«0<Oi*QDOOOOOO(7<lCOOOOt^iOvf5pHb-|N.,-i«Sc«»0 


Longitude 

of 
Perihelion. 


-Tf^'ft'^^ifSr-icN'^t o^ (MO F-4!Mco»oeo(?if^Hc5»n^ 
•^©co«0'^t>.eoc»»ot>.co»fto<ocii-i»-i05t<»t>.eoo>©«oi-< 

_ t>.©o»cot*'©i-H^Tj<©-Ti*co©Ciao©t>.t>-«ooo»ftcot^i-tG«4 


Longitude 
of Ascend- 
ing Node. 


w a 1 II 

Nov. '20.24484 77 39 54 
Mar. 21.21198; 49 8 35 
Mar. 21.53656 49 5 13 
May 5.26588177 1 31 
May 23.94619 334 42 59 
July 16,02522 98 14 50 
Oct 23.99639| 93 10 58 

23.80102i 93 5 50 
Dec. 9.43750303 25 25 
July 11.511 134 40 29 
Sept 29.06645 279 37 53 
May 30.353 20 38 4 
Aug. 18 71105193 17 5 
Dec. 10.68187216 3 23 

10.77845 216 5 6 
May 18.96231,251 46 6 
Apr. 21.97761,197 50 25 

21.91801 197 56 40 
Apr. 29.03904; 40 48 51 
Oct 8.95224 44 25 42 
Nov. 18.41206 235 27 10 
Feb. 4.92144 184 46 47 
June 7.84112318 29 10 
Sept 11.69286 149 57 56 
April 9.30062 206 38 28 


1 . 

p.i 


• 


*S2 2222 222222 IS SslllP 


• 

& 


^rt ,-, ^ f^ _ ,-, ^ _ ^ ,«, ^ ^ i-i ,5 fS 12, IS J3 



1847.] 



CATAIX>6UB or OOMETS. 



91 



-6 

■s 

6 



OB 

H 

o 

o 

o 

H 






1 

1 


•r> -St: 


'uofpajqa 


rt«QPQ«««Atf««A««PPfiQC;:;Q;::;qq 


? 1 


^ «o <N ^c«i<Ncocow^T*| 

<o «o o -^ t>. *^ t<» *>« *• o »n 

^- eo <o hn o 

©I CO 0> (N 
"^ 00 »o 

^ <M r-H 00 


1 


0.7514480 

0.9674023 

0.9932341 
0.9706716 
0.9998308 

0.9998202 
0.5500864 
0.5499640 
0.5541125 
0.5526020 
0.5485724 
0.6171573 
0.6158599 


Perihelion 
J)istanoe. 


-^ "<t a ri* o»a'^cot>. oiftoot>. 

t<»C0«O 00e00aC»<OC0>-H<NG^-^«0»f3OC0r'<N<N0iI>. 

QOOoor^<00>o<oo»oOco«D-^oo<0(?icocoi-'r'OOcoTi»oo 
00500t>-'*"^COCO'^;DiOCOCi'rf<»n^OOCO-^<MCO-^<N(NOO 

mcoo>OiOi>-H.-t«oQOFM-^oooo»nt^»o«0(NC»iO'icoo«o»n 

(N00t^''f^»n'*00«-f<NO'^00»OO^^^0iC»(3>O»CJ0000 
r-«t-H00'^*AOO^C0a>4(Nt»T^>-4O;0(0^«0OC0;0CD^-i4 

O— ^OOOfl^tMOO"— •'-•Oi— "OOi— ii-Hi— ii-ti-<»-t^^f— ii— it-< 


• 

1 

5 


^ OC0'-'t^(»(N04»n.-^r-i;0(M(M"<t'<**r^^«0O<N««0«0<0r>. 

-CO coi-i'^'^coco'^cocotfiiO rH»o Tj<'«t'Tf<W'<tO'^c« 

iO00C0«D04G<|r»vO»O"^<Ni-<*>-"<tOO"*"^Q000FMO«DTf<"^ 
Tfie0C01^»OO>O>t^C0O>O>O5»^C0»ft<MW(N.-f.-<i-ii-i,-iWO| 


Angle betw. 
Perihelion 
and Node. 


. oo«ot>»ocMcoo-^co»^»-«t^ooioo<o«^ao(N»-<oco-^<o»n 

-"^ ■^COCOiOCNfM^COr-l »0 eOtf5-^CNCO»OC^Tj»p-ii-i 
e0»-«»OO«C0<00iTj*C500O<0r-««0O<MTj»(M00«0C0a0C»li-i 

* »oco-^rf<c>iT^cocO'-<(Ncoincoco-^Wi-H»-H»o»r5,-Hco>r5-^"^ 

«0"^«-iQ0O(MOO<N«0«>0>e0O.-f'^f"'^'itOO©QQQ0Q0 

• C^O«»O»n'-«<-'i-'t^»«»O<NC0'*a0CS|C^(NOOOOOt^t^ 


Longitude 

of 
Perihelion. 


. '<tr-iOQOcor*cor*oooor»o»i>«oo<NC»ittoooo^ooicoo«o«o 

- r-»"<t-^C0^iOC0<-^C0-*>-H"<tC0'«t3^"^i-i i-HO©<rJ«i-irJ* 

»0OTj*OO'-^»nC<IOe0OO0iC0'-^OC0»0«0t^0S'*00»ftt^ 

- ,^rHriC0'*<NOTj<(M'<*0l(NC0(N'*fi"^C0C0i-><-^'^ i-iCOeO 

f-<ooO'^«D«or^"<tG^oO"^G*^^»ooFMf-^p^ooo40o<^^c>^ 

• r-i(M.-<(Mt>,OOOOt>-00<N(N<Nt^0000a0»r5»ft'^ti»0O'<t-^ 
COC<I»-H<N<M<M<NCO^ CO CO<M<n(M«N COCO 


Lon^tndo 
of Amend- 
ing Node. 


, Clt^eOQOr-<OCO'-<iO»f5QO«>04COQO«Ot>.0«DOOS0040»-H 
T^eO»ft'Tf<CO(N'*rHT^'^f" (N-^tN riCTrJ^-^t O CO 

Oii-iCfiOi-^ooMi-^^oeooOFMCo^oi^OOOcoeoeoooosco^o 

Tj* (M Tf r-H CO <N ri O i-H *0 (N (N (N (N (N (N CO 91 p-i o O 
000100(M<004QO»00«0«0«00>t^Or^t^t^O»C»Cig>0»COCO 
CO ^C0« ,-M(Nc5^(N<N r-i.~iF^(N(N(N(M(M 


Green^ch 
M.S.T. of Peri- 
helion Passage. 


or* oo>— co(N ooT*c»it>coc^ci(MT>«»fti-HOi<o»rt©i 
tj*»£5oo co»ft'ft'-^'-^o>'^<N©*^'-*(i^t>.oooo»eoooi<o 

O.— <D"^'-it>.<Oi-iFM-^«n»O^r^i-<«OC0Q0-^»Ot*«Ct^»ft^ 
«0(N'-iCMa<IOOt>.Tli|>.>00>0>«0>«©t>-©<f-04'Nl'-t<»COt<»0 

«o©pH©oq^c>>AO»"«*o»i-j'^«oo»'<*FMq©(Ncq'«!f|oqTj»Tj»»o 
a5r-l«o«odc»id<^»rt"^<?^c6o4c6ot>^d5D«fi5ado6t>It>^od©«c4 


• 


A. D. 

1830 
1832 
1832 
1833 
1834 
1835 

1835 

1840 
1840 

1840 

1840 

1842 

1843* 

1843 

1843 
1844 


i 


inkOfifikAioxo n o tn lA <5 «o <o (0 «o «o 



* 7or other orbits of this ronarkable Comet, see Am. Almaniic of 1844, p. 97. 



ci.iAi.oe UK <w coKaTS. 



h 



lH'=^|i?|||||.Hiii|SSiil 

i5 (S K K a o S ts 1^ ^ ^ M (£| S fl tS uc d a (£; £ p 



Siil 13 



l5sss§^sSil 






SS=?^?22sa""**S§^B""-"»S 



B — — 4 n S n ■» ■- -T .n .n R — « m ui » ■* M 



II ll j jl II j 



i 

X 

i 



1847.] 



CATALOGVB OF COMETS. 



93 



CATALOGUE OF THE OBBITS OF COMETS. 
Past n. Systematic Abraxgement. 



Ascending Node in Aries, or between 
350' and 40°. 



TncU- 
nation 


Bate of 
Perihe- 
lion 


Peri- 
helion 
•dis- 


Lon- 
gitude 


Angle 
from 
Node 


between 


Passage. 


tance. 


Q. 


to 
Perih. 


e 




1686.71 


0.32 


a53 


o 

86 


and 


1743.72 


0.62 


7 


241 


50 


1808.53 


0.61 


25 


228 




1770.61 


0.67 


357 


24 




1779 01 


on 


26 


62 




1771.30 


0.90 


29 


76 




123108 


0.95 


22 


121 




1793.88 


1.42 



15 


85 




1706.08 


0.43 


59 


40 


1763.82 


0.50 


358 


89 


and 


1743.72 


0.62 


7 


241 


95 


1580.91 


0.60 


^ 


90 




1748.46 


0.63 


f5 


246 




1788.88 


0.79 


a53 


32 




1793 88 


1.42 
018 





85 




1577 iW 


30 


257 


85 


1790 89 


0.80 


34 


119 


and 


1844.79 


0.86 


32 


211 


140 


1825.41 


0.90 


21 


107 




1723 73 


1.00 


16 


332 




179625 


1.58 


18 


184 


130 to 


184316 


0.01 





82 


180 


1844.79 


0.86 


1 32 


211 



In-^ 
cU- 
na- 
tion. 



31 
46 
39 

2 
32 
11 

6 
_48 

65 
73 
46 
65 
67 
65 
48 



105 
116 
131 
121 
130 
115 



144 
131 



Ascending Node in Taurus, or between 
20" and 70°. 





and 

50 



40 

and 

95 



85 
and 
140 



174418 


0.22 


47 


1808.53 


0.61 


25 


1779.01 


0.71 


26 


1826.77 


0.85 


44 


1771.30 


0.90 


29 


1231.08 


0.95 


22 


158610 


1.06 


42 


1844.67 


1.19 


64 


1783.88 


1.60 


56 


1744.18 


0.22 


47 


1785.26 


0.43 


65 


1680.91 


060 


23 


1748.46 


0.63 


85 


1707.96 


0.86 


65 


1783.88 


1.60 


56 


182122 


0.09 


4d 


1577.82 


0.18 


30 


1785.26 


0.43 


65 


1784.05 


0.71 


58 


1790.39 


080 


34 


1707 94 


0.86 


55 


1844 79 


0.86 


82 


1825.41 


0.90 


21 


11813.88 


1.22 


43 



161 

228 

62 

14 

76 

121 

333 

279 

354 

151 
127 

90 
246 

27 
354 



47 

39 

32 

26 

11 

6 

6 

3 

49 



47 
93 
66 
67 
89 
49 



169 
267 
127 
336 
119 
27 
211 
107 
204 



107 
105 

93 
129 
116 

89 
131 
121 

99 



Ascending Node in Taurus, continued. 



TncU- 
nation 
between 


Date of 
Perihe- 
lion 
Passage. 


Peri- 
helion 
dis- 
tance. 


Lon- 
gitude 

CI' 


Angle 
from 
Node 

to 
Perih. 


o 

130 
and 
180 


1^32 
180160 
Halley'a 
1813.17 
1844.79 
1835.33 


0.19 
0.26 
0.69 
0.70 
86 
2 06 


p 

41 
45 
55 
61 
32 
69 


e 

5 

221 
111 
351 
211 

[ 211 



In- 

cli- 

na- 

tion. 



176 
169 
162 
159 
131 
171 



Ascending Node in Gemini, or between 
50" and 100°. 





and 
50 



40 

and 

95 



85 
and 
140 



130 
and 
180 



539.80 


0.34 


76 


1618.85 


0.39 


79 


1766.32 


040 


75 


1661 07 


0.44 


85 


1632 80 


0.52 


92 


1743.02 


0.86 


88 


1819 88 


0.89 


78 


1844.67 


1.19 


64 


1815.31 


122 


84 


1783 88 


1.60 


66 


1811.86 


1.58 


94 


1785.26 


0-43 


65 


1846.17 


066 


78 


1781.51 


078 


84 


1652.86 


0.85 


91 


1707.94 


0.86 


55 


1816 31 


1.22 


84 


1783.88 
1785.26 


160 
0.43 


56 


66 


1784.05 


0.71 


58 


1818.92 


085 


91 


1707.94 


0.86 


65 


1822.81 


1.16 


93 


1832.31 


1.18 


73 


989.70 


0.67 


96 


Halley's 


0.69 


65 


1337 41 


065 


74 


1813.17 


0.70 


61 


1822.64 


0.85 


98 


1781.91 


0.96 


78 


1759.96 


0.97 


81 


1664.92 


1.03 


84 


1832.31 


1.18 


73 


1835 23 


2.05 


59 



255 

287 

177 

33 

24 

6 

350 

279 

66 

364 

314 



127 
13 

156 

300 
27 
66 

354 



10 

37 

8 

38 

83 

2 

9 

3 

44 

49 

31 

93 

85 
81 
79 
89 
44 
49 



127 
336 
93 
27 
181 
205 



180 
HI 

46 
361 
238 

61 
301 
310 
205 
211 



93 
129 
117 

89 
127 
137 

~1^ 
162 
148 
169 
142 
163 
176 
159 
137 
171 



Ascending Node in Cancer, or between 
80° and 130». 





and 
50 



1844.95 
1661.07 
1798.20 



0.24 
0.44 
049 



119 

86 

123 



175 

88 

848 



46 
88 

44 



94 



OATALOOUX OV GOVBTflb 



(1847. 



Ascending Node in Cancer — Continued. 



IncU- 
natkm 
between 


Date of 
Perihe- 
lion 
Passage. 


Perihe- 
lion 
dis- 
tance. 


Lon- 
gitude 


Angle 
from 
Node 

to 
Perih. 


e 




1^.16 


0.66 




108 


e 

14 


and 


1819.66 


0.76 


114 


165 


50 


1743.02 


086 


88 


6 




1737.43 


87 


228 


188 




1815.81 


1.22 


84 


66 




1846.06 


1.48 


111 


838 




1811.86 


1.58 


94 
119 


314 
175 




1844.95 


0.24 


40 


1798 26 


049 


123 


843 


and 


1840.01 


0.62 


120 


72 


96 


1781.51 


0.78 


84 


156 




1662.86 


085 


91 


300 




1778.68 


113 


122 


814 




181815 


1.20 


71 


112 




1815 31 


1.22 


84 


66 




1846.06 


1.48 
0.10 


111 
124 


338 




1780.74 


123 


86 


1299.24 


032 


116 


104 


and 


1433 84 


0.33 


116 


208 


140 


1787.86 


0.35 


108 


99 




1793.84 


0.40 


109 


240 




1764.12 


0.66 


121 


105 




1799.68 


0.84 


100 


196 




1818.92 


0.85 


91 


93 




1337.47 


0.94 


106 


109 




l;fi2.81 


1.16 


98 


181 




1818.15 


1.20 


71 


112 




1787.36 


0.36 


108 


99 


180 


989.70 


0.37 


96 


180 


and 


1770.89 


053 


110 


260 


180 


1822.54 


0.85 


98 


288 




1337.47 


0.94 


106 


109 




1769.96 


0.97 


81 


801 




1664.92 


1.03 


84 


810 




1718.04 


1.03 


130 


I 6 



In- 
cli- 
na- 
ti<m. 



81 

11 

2 

39 

44 

48 

_31 

45 
44 
63 
81 
79 
61 
90 
44 
_48 

126 
HI 
104 
132 
120 
127 
129 
117 
137 
127 
_90 

132 
163 
149 
142 
137 
175 
169 
148 



Amending Node in Leo, or between 
110" and 





and 

60 



40 

and 

96 



85 
and 
140 



1844.95 


0.24 


119 


175 


1798.26 


0.48 


128 


843 


181956 


0.75 


114 


166 


1787.48 


0.87 


228 


138 


1846.06 


1.48 


HI 


888 
175 


1844 96 


0.24 


119 


1798.26 


048 


128 


848 


1780.91 


0.52 


142 


264 


1840.01 


0.62 


120 


72 


1759.90 


0.80 


141 


274 


1773.68 


113 


122 


814 


1846.06 


1.48 


111 


888 


1843.34 


1.62 

0.10 


157 


124 
123 


1780.74 


124 


1827.70 


0.14 


150 


269 


1299.24 


0.32 


115 


104 


1483 84 


0.33 


116 


208 



46 
44 
11 
89 

48 



45 
44 
72 
63 
79 
61 
48 
63 

126 
126 
111 
104 



Ascending Node in Leo — Continued. 



IncU- 
nation 
between 



85 
and 
140 



180 
and 
180 



Date of 
Terifae- 

lion 
Pa8B^;e. 



1764.12 
1824.53 
1811.70 
1747.16 



Perihe- 
lion 
dis- 
tance. 



. 



1690.10 
1801.81 
1718.04 
1788.86 



0.66" 
0.68 
1.04 
229 



0.58 
064 
1.08 
1.06 



Lon- 
gitude 



121 
186 
141 
146 



149 
146 
180 
168 



Angle 
finm 
Node 

to 
Perih. 



105 

234 

65 

227 



809 

186 

6 

58 



In- 
cU- 
na- 
tiond 



127 

126 
107 
102 



160 
167 
148 
168 



Ascending Node in Tirgo, or between 
140" and 190.^ 





and 

60 



40 

and 

96 



85 
and 
140 



180 
and 

180 



1769 77 


0.12 


176 


829 


1264.68 


0.41 


187 


97 


1666.30 
159364 


0.57 


181 


91 


0.09 


168 


12 


1769.77 


0.12 


176 


829 


3786.51 


0.41 


196 


826 


1780.91 


0.62 


142 


254 


176G.90 


0.80 


141 


274 


1804.12 


1.07 


177 


832 


1678.66 


1.24 


164 


166 


1774.62 


1.45 


184 


160 


1848.84 


1.62 


157 


124 


1598.64 


0.09 


168 


laf 


1827.70 


0.14 


160 


259 


1822.34 


0.60 


177 


843 


1827.09 


0.61 


185 


161 


1683.52 


a56 


176 


87 


1840.26 


0.75 


186 


229 


174210 


0.76 


189 


828 


566.62 


0.77 


177 


75 


1811.30 


1.04 


141 


66 


1678 66 


1.24 


164 


166 


1747.16 


2.29 


148 


227 


1690.10 


0.58 


149 


dod 


1301.81 


0.64 


146 


186 


1790 04 


0.75 


177 


116 


178886 


1.06 


168 


58 


1792.03 


1.29 


192 


164 



41 
61 
72 
79 
66 
94 
88 
68 

126 
126 

102 
96 
100 
116 
120 
107 
94 
102 

160 
167 
148 
168 
140 



Ascending Node in libra, or between 
170»aud220'. 





and 

60 



1757.80 


0.84 


215 


269 


240.86 


0.87 


211 


82 


126468 


041 


187 


97 


1566.80 


0.57 


181 


91 


170219 


0.65 


191 


810 


1695.88 


084 


218 


210 


1880.27 


0.92 


207 


6 


1848.79 


1.69 


216 


100 


1826.80 


2.00 


198 


280 



18 
44 
80 
86 
4 
22 
21 
11 
40 



1847.] 



CATALOOUB Or COVBTS. 



95 



Asoendiog Node !n libra — Continued. 



IncU- 
Datkm 
between 



40 

and 

06 



85 
and 
140 



180 
and 

180 



Date of 

Perihe- 

Uon 


Ptorfbe- 
lion 
dia- 


Lon- 
gitude 


Angle 
from 
Node 


Paflsage. 


tance. 

• 


Q- 


to 
Perth. 


i-Zeo-T? 


0.12 


• 

176 


o 

829 


240.86 


0.87 


all 


82 


1786.51 


0.41 


195 


825 


1097.75 


0.74 


218 


125 


1826 63 


088 


193 


177 


180412 


1.07 


177 


882 


1774.62 


1.46 


184 


160 
^1 


1842.96 


0.15 


1822.84 


0.50 


177 


848 


1827.09 


0.51 


184 


151 


1688.62 


0.55 


176 


87 


1789.46 


068 


209 


105 


1840.25 


0.75 


186 


230 


1742.10 


0.76 


189 


828 


565.52 


0.77 


177 


75 


1826.68 


0.88 


198 


177 


17d0.64 


75 


irt 


116 


1825.94 


1.25 


216 


257 


1792.08 


1.29 


192 


154 



In- 

cU- 

na- 

tion. 



41 
44 
61 
73 
90 
66 
83 



106 
126 
102 
96 
124 

loo! 

116 

120 

90 

148 
146 
140 



Afloending Node in Scorpio, or b^ween 
aOO'and260.<* 





and 

60 



1737.08 
1757.80i 
1884.25 
1695.88 
Biela's' 
1880271 
57.26 
(187 B.C. 
1848.79 



40 

and 
95 



85 
and 
140 



180 
and 
180 



1826.88) 

1758.44 

1097.75 

574.26 

1M0^B7| 

1826.88!" 

1665.30 

1582.34 

1842.96 

1677.84 

1066.41 

1766.13 

1789.46 

1747.82 

1840.19 



1862.17 

1766.13 

876.16 

1826.94 



0.22 
0.34 
0.51 
0.84 
0.86 
0.92 
0.96 
1. 1 
1.69 

0.08 
0.22 
0.74 
0.96 
1.48 

0.08 
0.11 
0.13 
0.15 
0.28 
0.84 
0.51 
0.68 
0.84 
1.22 



0.46 
0.51 
0.58 
1.25 



228 


100 


215 


269 


226 


50 


218 


210 


246 


228 


207 


6 


146 


15 


220 


10 


210 


100 


285 


80 


232 


87 


218 


125 


146 


15 


249 


184 


285 


to 


281 


156 


226 


820 


208 


241 


289 


99 


240 


110 


245 


100 


209 


105 


284 


18 


286 


156 


250 


20 


246 


100 


220 


277 


216 


267 



Ascending Node in Sagittarius, or between 
280* and 280". 



Incli- 
nation 
between 


Date of 
Perihe- 

Uon 
Passage. 


Perihe- 
lion 
dis- 
tance. 


Lon- 
gitude 


Angle 
frt)m 
Node 

to 
Perih. 


e 



and 
60 


y. 

83.80 
Biela's 
1772.12 


0.84 
0.86 
100 


• 

256 
246 
269 

^ 
285 
233 
274 
267 
264 
271 
280 
268 
265 
249 


e 

75 
228 
200 


40 

and 

95 


1680.96 
1826.88 
1768.44 
1819.49 
1807.71 
1812.70 
1684.48 
1824.74 
1790.07 
1785.07 
1840.87 

1826.^ 
1665.30 
1677.34 
176613 
1799.00 
1748.32 
184019 


001 
0.08 
022 
0.84 
065 
0.78 
0.96 
1.05 
1.06 
1.16 
1.48 


851 

80 

87 

14 

4 

199 

881 

86 

206 

205 

184 


85 
and 
140 


0.03 
0.11 
0.28 
0.51 
0.78 
0.84 
1.22 


235 
231 
289 
215 
260 
234 
286 


80 
156 

99 
101 
216 

18 
156 


180 
and 
180 


1362.17 
1766.13 
1846.42 
1698.79 
1799.00 


0.46 
0.51 
0.66 
0.69 
0.78 


260 
245 
262 

270 
250 


101 
100 
867 
216 



In- 
eli- 
na- 
tioa. 



10 
18 
19 



61 
91 
68 
81 
68 
74 
56 
55 
67 
70 
58 



91 
104 
101 
189 
188 

96 
121 

184 
189 
151 
168 
188 



Ainending Node In Oaprioomus, or between 
2e0'and810°. 



Oand 
50 



40 

and 

95 



85 
and 
140 



180 

and 

180 



1588^ 
1618.62 



1680.96 
1819.49 
1787.71 
167216 
1684.43 
1810.76 
1824.74 
1790.07 
1802.69 
1786.07 



0.88 
0.61 



OOT 

0.84 

0.65 

0.70 

0.96 

0.97 

1.05 

1.06 

1.09 

114 



1^:51 
1701.79 
1885.79 
1792 99 

465 B.C. 
1472.16 
1701.79 
1846.42 
169879 
1792.99 



059 
0.77 
0.97 

054 
0.69 
0.64 
0.69 
0.97 



804 


278 


297 


25 


265 


d6l 


274 


14 


267 


4 


800 


109 


271 


881 


809 


114 


280 


85 


268 


205 


801 


22 


265 
808 


205 


29 


801 


165 


276 


167 


284 


147 


^ 


66 
286 


801 


165 


262 


100 


270 


867 


284 


147 



281 

61 
81 



88 
66 
68 
56 
57 
67 
70 



104 
188 
128 
181 



IBS 
178 
188 

168 
181 



96 



CATALOOUB Of 0OMST8. 



[1847 



ABcending Node in Aqnarias, or betweRn 
290° and 840^ 


Ascending Node in Pisces, or betiroen 
820* and 10°. 


IncU- 

nation 

between 


Date of 
Perihe- 
lion 
Passage. 


Perihe- 
Uon 
dis- 
tance. 


Lon- 
gitude 

Q. 

804 
823 
297 
812 
339 


Angle 
from 
Node 

to 
Perih. 


In- 

cU- 

na- 

tion. 

o 

28 
7 

21 
4 

47 

83 
47 
63 
57 

77 

135 
104 
105 
124 
131 
129 
1281 
106 
138 
103 
111 

150 
135 
131 
1381 
146! 
1451 


IncU- 
nation 
between 


1 
Date of Perihe- 
Perihe- lion 
lion I dis- 

Passage. tance. 

1 
1 


Lon- 
gitude 


Angle 
from 
Node 

to 
Perili. 


In- 
cli- 
na- 

tiOD. 

e 

81 

7 
46 

2 
47 

48 

73 
46 
65 
47 
86 
66 
48 

185 
131 
129 
128 
106 
103 
111 
86 

150 
144 
135 
131 
145 


e 



and 

60 


1^.45 
1833 69 
1618.62 
668.65 
184502 


0.33 
0.46 
0.61 
0.89 
0.91 


o 

278 

169 

26 

22 

115 

109 

115 

114 

22 

30 

27 

29 
110 
253 

76 
280 

77 

3 

166 

136 

109 


e 


and 

60 


7. • 

1686.71 0.32 
1833.69 0.46 

1743.72 0.62 
1770 61 0.67 
1845.02 0.91 
1793.88 1.42 




353 
823 

7 
857 
337 



858 
7 
853 
337 
360 
347 
•' 

m 

839 
880 
819 
837 
326 
324 
850 


a 

86 
159 
241 

24 
115 

86 


40 

and 

96 


1672.16 
1846.02 
1810.76 
1802.19 
1729.45 

1830 99 
1823.94 
1066.41 
1808 36 
1845.42 
1797.52 
1596.60 
1558.60 
1704.79 
1799.98 
1699.03 


0.70 
91 
0.97 
1.09 
4.06 

0.13 
0.23 
0.34 
0.39 
0.40 
0.58 
0.55 
0.58 
0.69 
062 
0.74 


800 
837 
809 
801 
812 

838 
803 
240 
824 
889 
830 
319 
337 
301 
826 
324 


40 

and 

96 


1763.82 50 
1743 72 0.62 
1788.88 0.77 
1845 02 91 
1762.40 1.01 
1845 30 1.25 
1793.88 1.42 


89 
241 

32 
115 
116 
205 

85 

27 
76 
280 
.77 
3 
136 
109 
116 


86 
and 
140 


86' 
and 
140 


1830.99 0.13 
1845.42 0.40 
1797.52 53 
1696.60 0.55 
1658.60 0.58 
1799.96 0.62 
1699 08 0.74 
1762.40 1.01 


130 
and 

180 


465 B.C. 

1830.99 
1845 42 
1704.79 
1827.43 
1806.99 


0.13 
0.40 
0.59 
81 
1.08 


338 
839 
301 
318 
323 


90 
27 
76 

166, 
21 

228 


180 
and ' 

180 


168991 0.01 
1843.16 0.01 
1830.99 0.13 
1846.42 0.40 
1806.99 1.08 


847 

838 
339 
323 


78 
82 
27 
76 
228 



This systematic arrangement has been made with the intention of fkdlitatlng, as &r as 
possible, the comparison of the orbits, and particularly that of any new orbit with those 
previously computed. For this purpose, the lines of division of the successive tables haye 
been made to encroach upon each other so far, that the search for an orbit resembling the 
new one may always be limited to a single table and even to one of the subdivisions of theU 
table; for two orbits, which approach to similarity, will certainly be found together in 
that subdivision to which either of them properly belongs. To effect this object, all those 
orbits are placed in the same fable whose ascending nodes are in the same sign, and cdl 
those orbits, moreover, are grouped with them which have their ascending node within 
ten degrees of that sign. The same method of lapping over is adopted in the subdivision 
in ]^erence to inclination, while the orbits are arranged in the subdivisions in the order 
of their perihelion distances. Many of the orbits are thus found repeated, and some of 
them three or four times ; and no orbit can fail to be exhibited in connexion with those 
orbits with which it is allied. In each subdivision, in short, all those orbits are given 
which properly belong to it, and also those which have, or may have, any resemblance to 
them ; so that in order to compare a new orbit with the old ones, it is only necessary to inspect 
that subdivision to tohich the new orbit would properly belong; that is^ to look into that 
taibiU which has the same name as t/ie sign of the ascending node of the new orbit, and into 
the first, second, third or fourth subdivision of the tetble as the incHncUion may be in the 
first, second, third or fourth octant. 



TRB 



AMERICAN ALMANAC, 



FOR 



1847. 



PAKT II. 



UNITED STATES. 




L EXECUTIVE GOVEBNMENT. 

The 15th Presidential term of four }^ars, since the establisbmeiit of the 
government of the United States under the Constitution, began on the 4th of 
March, 1845 ; and it will expire on the 3d of March, 1849. 



JAMES K. POLK, of Tennessee, President, 
Geobge M. Dallas, of Fennsylvania, Vtce-Prendent^ 

The Cabinet. 



Salary. 

$25,000 

5,000 



The following are the principal officers in the executive ekpartmaU of fh^ 
government, who form the Cabinet, and who hold their offices at the will 6i 
the President 









Sabit* 


James Buchanan, 


Pennsylvania, 


Secretary of State^ 


$6,000 


Bobert J. Walker, 


Mississippi, 


Secretary of Uie Treamay^ 


6,000 


William L. Marcy, 


New York, 


Secretary of War, 


6,000 


George Bancroft, 


Massachusetts, 


Secretary of the Navy, 


6,000 


Cave Johnson, 


Tennessee, 


Postmaster- General, 


6,000 


John T. Mason, 


Vii^ginia, 


Attorn^- General, 


4,000 



Department of State. 
James Buchanan, Secretary. 



Salary. 
Nicholas P. Trist, Chief Clerk, $2,000 



Diplomatic Bureau. 

William S. Derrick, Clerk, 
WiUam Hunter, Jr. do, 
Erands Markoe, do. 

A. H. Derrick, do. 

W. C. Zantzinger, do. 



1,600 

1,500 

1,400 

900 



Consular Bureau, 

Bobert S. Chew, Clerk, 

Sam.L. Gouvemeur, do. 

Domestic Bureau. 
Edwin W. Hutter, Clerk, 
Lund Washington, Jr., do, 
SOOiWm. C. Beddall, do. 



flalaiy. 

1,400 
1,400 

1,400 
1,400 
1,000 



100 



VKITISD STATES. 



11847- 



Salary.! Salary. 

Edward Stubbs, Di^ur, Agent, $1,450 H. H. Sylvester, Chief Clerk, $1,700 

Bobert Greenhow;j»j/^af»toor, 1,600, Charles G. Fage, \ Exam- < 1,500 

\ and Clerk | W. P. N. Fitzgerald, > iners, \ 1,500 

imiisionsy 1,400 Henry Stone, } Assist. < 1,250 

Thomas G. Clinton, > Eram. \ 1,250 



George Hill,Zt 



Edmund 




Office. 



A. L. Mclntire, Draughtsman, 1,200 



Com, Pat. 3,000i Hazard Knowles, Machinist, 1,250 



Tbeasubt Bepartmbnt. 



Bobert 
McC. Young, Chief Clerk, 

Comptrollers. 

James W. McCulloh, 1st Comp. 
James Lamed, Chief Clerk, 
Albion K. Parris, 2d Comp. 
J. M. Brodhead, Chief Clerk, 

Auditors. 

Wm. Collins, Ist Auditor, 
John Underwood, Chief Clerk, 
J. M. McCalla, 2d Auditor, 
J. F. Polk, Chief Clerk, 
Peter Hagner, 3d Auditor, 
Ja's Thompson, Chief Clerk,, 
Aaron O. Dayton, 4th Auditor, 
Th. H. Gillis, Chief Clerk, 
S. Pleasanton, bth Auditor, 
Thomas Mustin, Klhief Clerk, 



3,500 
1,700 



J. Walker, Secretary. 

$2,000 Treasurer's Offi,ce. 

William Seltlen, Treasurer, $3,000 
W. B. Bandolph, Chief Clerk, 1,700 

Register's Office. 

3,000| Ransom H. Gillet, BjegisJijer, 
l>700|Mich.Nourse, Chi^f Clerk, 

Solicitor's Office. 
Seth Barton, Solicitor, 

Land Office. 

James Shields, Com. Gen. 
3,000 S. H. Langhlin, Recorder, 
l,70o' James H. Piper, Chief Clerk, 
3,000 Jos. S. Wilson, Chief Clak of 
l,70ol Private Land Claims, 1,800 

3,000 John Wilson, Chief Clerk of 



3,000 
1,700 
3,000 
1,700 



3,000 
1,700 



3,500 



3,000 
2,000 
1,800 



1,700 



Surveys, 



1,800 



Was Defastment. 



William L. Marcy, Secretary. 



Arch. Campbell, Jr. Ch. Clerk, $2,000 

Bureau of Indian Affairs. 

William Medill, Commissioner, 3,000 
S. Humes Porter, Chief Clerk, 1,600, 



Pension Bureau. 

Ja*s L. Edwards, Commissioner, $2,500 
Geo. W. Crump, Chief Clerk, 1,600 



1847.] 



BXECUTITS GOVBXVaENT. 



101 



Quartermaster' i Bureau. 

T. S.Jesap,Br,MaJ,Gen.^Q.M. Gea. 
A. B. Hetzcl, Capt. and Assist. Q. M. 
Wm- A. Gordon, Prin. Clerk, $1,600 

Pay Bureau, 

N. Towson, Breif. Br. Gen. 4r 

Paymaster General. 
Nathaniel Frye, Chkf Clerk, 



1,700 



Subsistenoe Bureau. 



G. Gibson, Brev. Brig. Gen. ^ 
Com. Gen. of Subsistence. 
John C. Casey, Capt. ^ Assist. Com. 
Richard Gott, CMef Clerk, 1,600 

Afedical ff Surguxd Bureau. 



H. L. Heiskell, Surgeon. 
B. Johnson, Chief Oerk^ 



$1,150 



Engineer Bureau. 

J. G. Totten, Col.j- Chief Engineer. 
G. L. Welcker, Capt. ^ Assist. Eng. 
F. N. Barbarin, Chief Clerk, 1.200 

Topographical Bureau. 

John J. Abert, Cd. ^ Chief Top. Eng. 
W. H. Swift, Capt. ^ Assist, Eng, 
Geo. Thompson, Chief Clerk, 1,400 

Ordnance Bureau. 

Geo. Talcott, Lt. CoL in charge of Bur. 
W. Maynadier, Capt. ^ Assist. 
Thomas Lawson, Surg. Gen. 2,500, Geo. Bender, Chief Clerk. 1,200 



Navy Department. 

George Bancroft, Secretary. 

John Appleton, Chief Clerk, salary $2,000. 

Joseph Smith, Chief of the Bureau of Docks and Navy Yards, $.3,500 

Lewis Wanington, db. do. Ordnance and Hydrograph/, 3, .500 

Charles Morris, do. do. Construct. Repairs 4r ^g^P- 3,000 

Gideon Welles, do. do. Pi-ovisions and Clothing, 8,000 

Thomas Harris, do.. do. Med. and Surg. Instruments, 2,500 

Alex. D. Bache, Superintendent of the Coast Survey, 6,000 



Post Office Department. 

Cave Johnson, Postmaster General. 

Selah B. Hobble, \st Assistant Postmaster Gen., Contract Office, $2,500 

Wm. J. Brown, 2d do. do. do. Appointment Office, 2,500 

John Marron, Chief Clerk, Post Office Department, 2,000 

Peter G. Washington, Auditor of the Treasury for the Post Offiee, 8,000 

E. G. Eastman, Quef Clerk of the Auditor, 2,000 



9* 



lOS 



UXITBO BTATHa. 



11847. 



C0LLBCTOB8 OF Customs in the Prinoipal Posts. 
[Corrected in the IVmtwy Department^ June 26fA, 1846.] 



Ports. 
Eastport, Me. 
Machias. Me. 

* 

Castine, Me. 
Belfast, Me. 
Waldoboro', Me. 
Wiscasset, Me. 
Bath, Me. 
Portland, Me. 
Portsmouth, N. H. 
Newburyport, Ms. 
Gloacester, Ms. 
Salem, Ms. 
Marblehead, Ms. 
Boston, Ms. 
Fall River, Ms. 
Barnstable, Ms. 
New Bedford, Ms. 
Edgartown, Ms. 
Nantucket, Ms. 
Providence, R.I. 
Bristol, R. I. 
Newport, R. I. 
Alburgh, Vt. 
New London, Ct. 
New Haven, Ct. 
Middletown, Ct. 
Pairfield, Ct. 
Plattsburgh, N. Y. 
Ogdensburgh, N.Y, 
Sackett's H'r. N. Y. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Oswego, N. Y. 
Lewiston, N. Y. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Sag Harbor, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Perth Amboy, N J. 
Bargaintown, N. J. 
Tackerton, N. J. 



CoUecton. 
Bion Bradbury. 
"Wm. Brown. 
R. H. Bridghara. 
Alfred Marshall. 
Edmund Wilson. 
James Taylor. 
J*n C. Humphreys. 
John Anderson. 
Aug. Jenkins. 
Wm. Nichols. 
Eli F. Stacy. 
James Miller. 
Peter Dixey. 
Marcus Morton. 
Phin. W. Leland. 
Josiah Hinckley. 
Jos. T. Adams. 
Jos. T. Pease. 
Charles W. Rand. 
H. Willard. 
Wm. J. Miller. 
Edwin Wilbur. 
R. G. Hopkinson. 
Tho's Mussey. 
Norris Wilcox. 
Philip Sage. 
Wm. S. Pomeroy. 
Wm. F. Haile. 
David C. Judson. 
Otis N. Cole. 
Joseph Sibley. 
G. H. McWhorter. 
R. H. Boughton. 
H. W. Rogers. 
A. Huntington. 
C. W. Lawrence. 
Jas. A Nichols. 
Robert B. Risley. 
Sam. S. Downs. 



Portf. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Erie, Pa, 

Wilmington, Del. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Annapolis, Md. 
Vienna, Md. 
Georgetown, D. C. 
Alexandria, D. C. 
Tappahann'k, Va. 
Petersburgh, Pa. 
Richmond, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Ocracoke, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
EUza'h City, N. C. 
Plymouth, N. C. 
Washington, N. C. 
Newbern, N. C. 
Beaufort, N. C. 
Charleston, S. C. 
Georgetown, S. C. 
Savannah, Greo. 
St. Mary's, Geo. 
Mobile, Ala. 
N. Orleans, La. 
Franklin, La. 
Cleveland, Ohio, 
Maumee, Ohio, 
Sandusky, Ohio, 
Detroit, Mich. 
Michil'ck, Mich. 
Fensacola, Fa. 
Jacksonville, Fa. 
Apalachicola, Fa. 
St. Augustine, Fa. 
Port Leon, Fa. 
Key West, Fa. ^ 
Galveston, Texas, 



CoUeotora. 
James Page. 
Murray Whallon. 
Henry Hicks. 
Wm. H.Marriott- 
Richard Sands. 

B. H. Crockett. 
Robert White. 
Edward Green. 
John A. Parker. 
J. T. Rosser. 
Thomas Nelson. 
Conway Whittle. 
Thos. J. Pastaer. 
Murphy V.Jones. 
W. D. Pritchard. 
Joseph Ramsay. 
Jas. K. Hutton. 
T. S. Singleton. 
J. E. Gibble. 
Wm. J. Grayson. 
Thomas L. Shaw. 
Wm. B. Bullock. 
Archibald Clark. 
Jas. E. Saunders. 
Denis Prieur. 

Smith Inglehart 
J. H. Forsyth. 
Wm. Patterson. 

C. G. Hammond. 
S. E. Haring. 
Dillon Jordan. 
James Dell. 
Sam. W. Spencer. 
Greoi^e Center. 
Wm. H. Ware. 
Steph. R. Mallory. 
Hiram J. Runneb. 



1847.] 



P08TMAST£ltfl. 



103 



POSTMASTBBS IN THE ChIEF T0WN8 AND CITIE8. 

[Corrected in the Post Office Department^ Juhf^ 1846.] 



atieii. 
Angasta, Me. 
Bangor, Me. 
Bath, Me. 
Brunswick, Me. 
Calais, Me. 
Hallowell, Me. 
Portland, Me. 
Robbinsto'wn, Me. 
Soco, Me. 
Concord, N. H. 
Dover, N. H. 
Hanover, N. H. 
Keene, N. H. 
Nashua, N. H. 
Portsmouth. N. H. 
Brattleboro', Vt. 
Burlington, Vt. 
Middlebury, Vt. 
Montpelier, Vt. 
Andover, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
CharlestowTi, Ms. 
Lowell, Mass. 
Lynn, Mass. 
Nantucket, Mass. 
N. Bedford, Mass. 
Newburyport, Ms. 
Northampton, Ms. 
Siilcm, Mass. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Taunton, Mass. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Newport, K. L 
Pawiuckct, R. L 
Providence, R. I. 
Bridgeport, Conn. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Middletown, Conn. 
New Haven, Conn. 
N. London, Conn. 



Postnuusters. 
A. R. Nichols. 
C. K. Miller. 
Thomas Eaton. 
T. S. McLellan. 
J. C. Washburn. 
David H, Goodno. 
N. L. Woodbury. 
Jas. W. Balkam. 
Bowen C. Greene. 
Jos. Robinson. 
Thos. Stackpole. 
Alfred Morse. 
Wm. L. !Poster. 
Ch's P. Danforth. 
Neh. Moses. 
F. N. Palmer. 
William Noble. 
Edw. D. Barber. 
Geo. W. Read. 
Samuel Phillips. 
Nath'l Greene. 
Wm. Sawyer. 
Stephen S. Seavy. 
Benj. Mudge. 
Geo. F. Worth. 
Edw. W. Greene. 
Stephen Rsley. 
Thos. Shepherd. 
Benj. F. Browne. 
Harvey Chapin. 
Ch. R. Vickery. 
M. L. Fisher. 
Jos. Joslen. 
F. A. Sumner. 
W. B. Sayles. 
Philo F. Bamum. 
Joseph Pratt. 
. Allen May. 
Ed. A. Mitchell. 
Stanlv G. Trott. 



Cities. 
Norwich, Conn. 
Albany, N. Y. 
Auburn, N. Y. 
Batavia, N. Y. 



Postmasters. 
W. L'Hommedieu. 
Jas. D. Wasson. 
Amos S. Rathbun. 
F. Follett. 



Bingh'pton, N. Y. Tracy Robinson. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. Henry C. Conklin. 
Buffalo, N. Y. P. Dorsheimer. 
Canandaigua, N.Y. Thos. B. Hahn. 
Catskill, N. Y. W. W. Van Loan. 
Cooperst'n, N. Y. Robert Davis. 
Elmyra, N. Y. Levi J. Cooley. 



Geneva, N. Y. 
Hudson, N. Y. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 
Lockport, N. Y. 



Greo. M. Horton. 
Paul D. Carrique. 
J. M. McCormick. 
H. W. Scovel. 



Newburgh, N. Y. James Belknap. 
New York, N. Y. Robert H. Morris. 
Ogdensb'gh, N. Y. Joseph M. Doty. 
Oswego, N. Y. D. P. Brewster. 
Owego, N. Y. S. B. Leonard. 

Po'keepsie, N. Y. J.VanBenthuysen. 
Rochester, N. Y. Henry Campbell. 
Rome, N. Y. J. Hathaway. 

Saratoga Sp. N. Y. Thos. J. Marvin. 
Schenectady, N. Y. James M. Bouck. 
Syracuse, N. Y. Wm. W. Tcall. 
Troy, N. Y. George R. Davis. 

Utica, N. Y. A. G. Dauby. 

West Point, N. Y. C Berard. 
Whitehall, N. Y. Atherton Hall. 
Newark, N. J. Wilson Knott. 
N. Brunswick, N J. John Simpson. 
Paterson, N. J. Wm. D. Quin. 
Princeton, N. J. W. R. Murphy. 
Trenton, N. J. Joseph Justice. 
Carlisle, Pa. Geo. Sanderson. 

Chambersb'gh, Pa. John McClintock. 
Easton, Pa. Abraham Coryell. 

Erie, Pa. Robert Cochran. 

Harrisburgh, Pa. James Peacock, 



104 



UNITBD 6TATB8. 



[1847. 



Cities. 
Holidaysburgh, Pa. 
Lancaster, Pa. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Pottsville, Pa. 
Reading, Pa. 
Wilkesbarre, Pa. 
Wilmington, Del. 
Baltimore, Md, 
Cumberland, Md. 
Frederick, Md. 
Hagerstown, Md. 
Alexandria, D. C. 
Greorgetown,D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Abingdon, Va. 
Charlottesv*e, Va. 
Fred'burg, Va. 
Ljrnchburg, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Petersburg, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Wheeling, Va. 
Winchester, Va. 
Fayetteville, N. C. 
Greensboro' N. C. 
Newbern, N. C. 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Camden, S. C. 
Charleston, S. C. 
Columbia, S. C. 
Georgetown, S. C. 
Yorkville, S. C. 
Athens, Ga. 
Augusta, Ga. 
Columbus, Ga. 
Darien, Ga. 
Macon, Ga. 
Milledgeville, Ga. 
Savannah, Ga. 
Apalachicola, Fa. 
Pensacola, Fa. 
Tallahassee, Fa. 



Postmasters. 
John Gorley. 
Mary Dickson. 
Geo. F. Lehman. 
Cham. McKibbin. 
M. Cochran. 
John K. Wright. 

E. B. Collins. 
Wm. R. Sellars. 
Jas. M. Buchanan. 
Jacob Fetchtig. 
John Rigney. 

F. Humrichouse. 
Daniel Bryan. 
H. W. Tilley. 
C. K. Gardner. 
J. K. Gibson. 

T. Wayt. 
R. T. Thom. 
Robert Cawthon. 
Alexander Gait. 
Wm. N. Friend. 
Thos. B. Bigger. 
Alex. Newman. 
Henry F. Baker. 
John McRae. 
Wm. S. Hill. 
W. G. Bryan. 
Wm. White. 
W. C. Bettencourt. 
J. N. Gamewell. 
Alfred Huger. 
Benj. F. Rawls. 
Wm. McNulty. 
Samuel Melton. 
John Crawford. 
E. B. Glascock. 
John Forsyth. 
Charies O'Neal. 
Wm. G. Smith. 
E. Daggett. 

G. Schley. 
Joseph H. May. 
H. Kelly. 
Miles Nash. 



Cides. 
Florence, Ala. 
Greensboro*, Ala. 
Huntsville, Ala. 
Mobile, Ala. 
Montgomery, Ala. 
Tuscaloosa, Ala. 
Jackson, Miss. 
Natchez, Miss. 
Vicksburgh, Miss. 
N. Orleans, La. 
Little Rock, Ark. 
Columbia, Tenn. 
Knoxville, Tenn. 
Memphis, Tenn. 
Nashville, Tenn. 
Frankfort, Ky. 
Lexington, Ky. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Maysville, Ky. 
Chillicothe, Ohio, 
Cincinnati, Oliio, 
Cleveland, Ohio, 
Columbus, Ohio, 
Dayton, Ohio, 
Newark, Ohio, 
Steubenv'lle, Ohio, 
Toledo, Ohio, 
Zanesville, Ohio, 
Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Evansville, Ind. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Lafayette, Ind. 
Madison, Ind. 
New Albany, Ind. 
Terre Haute, Ind. 
Vincennes, Ind. 
Alton, m. 
Chicago, 111. 
Galena, El. 
Jacksonville, 111. 
Shawneetown, 111. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Milwaukie, W; T. 



Posbnastera. 
Geo. W. Sneed. 
Cha's J. Wheeler. 
Daniel B. Turner. 
J. W. Townsend. 
Neil Blue. 
Wm. D. Marrest. 
C. R. Dickson. 
Woodson Wren. 
N. D. Coleman. 
Alex. G. Penn. 
W. E; Woodruflf. 
Jeremiah Cherry. 
Sam. W. Bell, Jr. 
M. B. Winchester. 
L. P. Cheatham. 
Benj. F.Johnson. 
Joseph Ficklin. 
Thomas J. Read. 
Rich. H. Stanton. 
J. R. Anderson. 
Geo. Crawford. 
T. P. Spencer. 
Jacob Medary. 
J. W. McCorkle. 
Levi J. Houghey. 
W. O'Neal. 
Tru. C. Evarts. 
Israel Hoge. 
George DanforUi. 
John S. Bagg. 
B. F. Dupuy. 
Livings'n Dunlap. 
Wm. L. Embree. 
Andrew Collins. 
Calvin W. Ruter. 
Stcph. G. Dodge. 
Elihu Stout. 
Peter Merrill. 
Hart L. Stewart. 
J. L. Slaymaker. 
Wm. M. Happy. 
Pleasant L. Ward. 
John M. Wimer. 
Josiah A. Noonan. 



1847.] 



CONGBJSSB. 



105 



n. CONGRESS. 

The Congress of the United States consists of a Senate and Honse of 
Representatives, and mast assemble at least once every year, on the 1st 
Monday of December, unless it is otherwise provided by law. 

The Senate is composed of two members from each State ; and of course, 
the regular number is now 56. They are chosen by the legislatures of the 
several States, for the term of six years, one third of them being elected 
biennially. 

The Vice President of the United States is the President of the Senate, 
in which body he has only a casting vote, which is given in case of an equal 
division of the votes of the Senators. In his absence a President pro tem- 
pore is chosfen by the Senate. 

The House of Representatives is composed of members from the several 
States, elected by the people, for the term of two" years. The Representa- 
tives are apportioned among the different States, according to population. 
The 29th Congress is chosen according to the act of Congress of 1842, the 
ratio being " one Representative for every 70,680 persons in each State, and 
one additional Representative for each State having a firaction greater than 
one moiety of the said ratio, computed according to the rule prescribed by 
the Constitution of the United States." The law of 1842 also requires, that 
the Representatives of each State " shall be elected by districts composed of 
a contiguous territory equal in number to the number of Representatives 
to which said State may be entitled, no one district electing more thai\ one 
Representative." The present number is 226 Representatives, and 2 
Delegates. 

Since the 4th of March, 1817, the compensation of each member of the 
Senate and House of Representatives has been $8 a day, during the period 
of his attendance in Congress, without deduction in case of sickness ; and 
$8 for every twenty miles' travel, in the usual road, in going to and return- 
ing from the seat of government. The compensation of the President of 
the Senate pro tempore^ and the Speaker of the House of Representatives, is 
$16 a day. 

TWEKTY-NINTH CONGRESS. ThE SbNATE. 

George M. Dallas, Pennsylvania, President. 
[The figareB denote the expiration of the terms of the Senatora.] 



Maine. 

John Fairfield, Saco, 1851 

George Evans, Gcardiner^ 1847 

New Hampshire. 

Ch's G. Atherton, Nashua^ 1849 

Joseph Cilley, Nottingham, 1847 



Vermont. 

William Upham, Montpelier, 1849 

Samuel S. Phelps, Middldmry, 1851 

Massadmsetts. 

Daniel Webster, Marshfidd, 1851 

John Davis, Worcester, 1847 



106 



UmTSD BTATB8. 



[1847. 



Bhodtldand* 
Albert C. Greene, Prooidence, 
J. F. SimmonB, Providence, 

Cbnnecticut, 
John M. Mes, Hartford, 
J. W. Huntington, Nonoich, 

New York, 
John A. Bix, Albany, 

Dan. S. Dickinson, Binghampton, 

New Jersey, 
Wm. L. Dayton, Trenton, 
Jacob W. Miller, Morristoum, 

Pennsylvania. 
Simon C-imeron, Middletown, 
Daniel Sturgeon, Uniontown, 

Delaware, 
John M. Clayton, Newcastle, 
Thomas Clayton, Newcastle, 

Maryland. 
Bererdy Johnson, Baltimore, 
James A. Pearce, Chestertown, 

Vtrginia. 
Wm. S. Archer, Lodore, 
I. S. Pennybacker, Newmarket, 

North Carolina. 
Vacancy. 
W. P. Mangum, Red Mountain, 

South Carolina. 
George M'Duffie, Cherry HUl, 
John C. Calhoun, Pendleton, 

Georgia. 
Walter T. Colquitt, Columbus, 
John McP. Berrien, Savannah, 

Alabama. 
Arthur P. Bagby, Tuscaloosa, 
Dixon H. Lewis, Lowndeshoro\ 





Mississippi 




1851 Jesse Speight, Plymouth, 


1851 


1847 Job. W. Chalmers, HoUy Spring, 


1847 




Lomsiana. 


V 


1849' Henry Johnson, New River, 


1849 


1851 Alex. Barrow, , Baton Rouge, 


1847 




Arkansas. 




1849 


A. H. Sevier, Lake Port, 


1849 


1851 


Chester Ashley, Little Rock, 
Tennessee, 


1847 


1851 


Spencer Jamigan, Athens, 


1847 


1847 


Hopk. L. Tumey, Winchester, 
Kentucky. 


1851 


1849 


John J. Crittenden, Frankfort, 


1849 


1851 


J. T. Morehead, Covington, 
Ohio. 


1847 


1851 


W illiam Allen, ChiUicothe, 


1849 


1847 


Thomas Corwin, Lebanon, 
J^ftchigan. 


1851 


1851 


Lewis Cass, Detroit, 


1851 


1849 


Wm. Woodbridge, Detroit, 
Indiana, 


1847 


1847 


E. A. Hannegan, Covington, 


1849 


1851 


Jesse D. Bright, Madison, 
Illinois. 


1851 


1849 


Sidney Breese, Carlyle, 


1849 


1847 


James Semple, Alton, 


1847 




Missouri, 




1849 


David R. Atchison, P//iftc City, 


1849 


1847 


Tho*s H. Benton, St. Louis, 
Florida. 


1851 


1849 


David Levy Yulee, St. Augustine, 


1851 


1847 


J. D. Westcott, Jr., Tallahassee, 
Texas. 


1849 


1849 


Samuel Houston, 


1847 


1847 


Thomas J. Rusk, 


1851 



Officers of the Senate. 



Asbury Dickens, Secretary. 
Edward Dyer, Serjeant-ai-Arms. 



Robert Beall, Doorkeeper. 
Septimus Tuston, Chaplain. 



1847.] 



C0VO&B88. 



107 



House of Hepbesentatiybs of the 29th Cokgbbss, 
which will expire on the Sd of March, 1847. 

Jomr W. Davis, of Indiana, Speakek. 



[The numbers attached to the names show 
members were chosen. When no numbers 

Maine. — 7. 

2. Dunlap, Rob. P., Brunswick. 

6. Hamlin, HanM, Hampden. 

4. McCrate, J. D., Wiscasset. 

5. Sawtelle, CuUen, Norridgeioock. 

1. Scammon, J. F., Saco. 

3. Severance, L., Augusta. 

7. Williams, Hez'h, Castine. 

New Hampshire. — 4. 

Johnson, Ja's H., Baih. 
Monlton, Mace, Manchester. 
Norris, Moses, Jr., Pittsfidd. 
One Vacancy. 

Vermont. — 4. 

2. Collamer, Jacob, Woodstock. 

4. Dillingham, P Jr., Waterhury, 
1. Foot, Solomon, Rutland. 

3. Marsh, Geo. P., BurUngton. 

Massachusetts. — 10. 



3. Abbott, Amos, 
8. Adams, John Q., 

6. Ashman, George, 
10. Grinnell, Joseph, 

5. Hadson, Cha^s, 
2. King, Daniel P., 

7, Rockwell, Julius, 

4. Thompson, Benj., 

1. Winthrop,R. C, 

One Vacancy. 

jRhode Island,-^ 2, 

2. Arnold, Lem. H., Wakefidd. 
1 . Cranston, H. Y., Newport. 

Qrnnecticvt-:—^' 

1 . Dixon, James, Hartford, 

2. Hubbard, S. D., Middletoum. 



Andover. 
Quincy. 
Springfield. 
New Bedford. 
Westminster. 
South Danvers. 
Pittsfeld. 
Charlestoum, 
Boston. 



the Districts in each State from whieh tbt 
are ^ven, they were chosen by general ticket.] 

3. Rockwell, John A., Norwich. 

4. Smith, Truman, Litchfeld. 

New York, — 34. 

7. Anderson, J. H^ White Plqin^. 

17. Benton, C. S., Mohawk. 
6. Campbell, Wm.W., New York, 

29. Carroll, C. H., GrooeVnd Cen. 

11. Collins, John F., Hillsdale. 

14. Culver, Eras. D., Greenwich. 

26. Ellsworth, Sam. S., Penn Yon. 

21. Goodyear, Charles, SchoJiarie. 
10. Gordon, Samuel, Delhi. 

30. Grover, Martin, Angelica. 

12. Herrick, Rich. P., Greenbush. 
28. Holmes, Elias B., Brockport. 

23. Hough, Wm. J., Cazenovia, 

19. Hungerford, O., Watertown. 
34. Hunt, Washington, Lockport. 

20. Jenkins, Timothy, Oneida Ca^. 

18. King, Preston, Ogdensburgh. 

1. Lawrence, John W., Flushing. 

31. liewis, Abner, Panama. 

4. Maclay, Wm. B., New York. 
3. Miller, William S., New York. 

32. Moseley, W. A., Buffalo. 

27. Mott, John De, 
9. Niven, Arch. C, 

25. Rathbun, George, 

15. Russell, Joseph, 

2. Seaman, Henry J., Richmond. 

33. Smith, Albert, Batavia. 

22. Strong, Stephen, Oswego. 

24. Wheaton, Horace, Pompey. 

16. White, Hugh, Cohoei. 

13. Wood, Bradford "R., Albany. 

5. Woodruff, Thos.M.,iVretr York. 

8. Woodworth, W. W.,fl^ Park 



Lodi. 
MonticeBa. 
Auburn, 
Warrensburgh. 



108 



UNITBD STATES. 



[1847. 



Neim Jersey. — 5. 

4. Edsal, Joseph E., Hamburg, 

1. Hampton, James G.,£ndf;9«<on. 
3. Runk, John, Kingwood. 
6. Wright, William, Newark. 

2. Sykes, George, Mount HcUy. 

Pennsylvania. — 24. 

16. Black, James, Newport. 

17. Blanchard, John, Bdlefont. 

10. Brodhead, R. Jr., Boston. 
24. Buffington, Joseph, Kittanning. 

3. Campbell, J. H., Philadelphia. 

21. Darragh, Comers, Pittsburgh. 

6. Erdman, Jacob, Coopersburg. 
20. Ewing, John H., Washington. 
19. Foster, Henry D., Greensburg. 

22. Garvin, William S., Mercer. 

4. Ingersoll, Cha's J., Philadelphia. 

2. Ingersoll, Joseph "R.^ Philadelphia. 

11. Leib, Owen D., Catawissa. 
1. Levin, Lewis C, Philadelphia. 

7. McIlvaiTie, A..R., Brandy wine. 
15. McLean, Moses, Gettysburgh. 

13. Pollock, James, Milton. 

14. Ramsey, Alex'der, Harrisburg. 
9. Ritter, John, Reading. 

18. Stewart, Andrew, Unidntown. 

8. Strohm, John, iV[ Providence 

23. Thompson, James, ^m. 

12. Wilmot, David, TWzTuib. 

5. Yost, Jacob S., Pottstorm. 

Delatvare. — 1. 
Houston, John W., Georgetoum. 

Maryland. — 6. 

1. Chapman, John G., Port Tobacco. 

5. Constable, Albert, PerryoiUe. 
4. Giles, William F., Baltimore. 

3. Ligon, Thomas W., EUicatCs MiUs. 

6. Long, Edward, Princess Ann. 

2. Perry, Thomas, Ckmberkmd. 



Virginia. — 15. 

1. Atkinson, Arch., Smithfidd. 

7. Bayly, Thomas H., Accomac C.H. 

10. Bedinger, Henry, Charlestoum, 
15. Brown, William G., Kingwood. 

12. Chapman, Ang. A., Union. 

2. Dromgoole, G. C, Summit, N. C. 

13. Hopkins, Geo. W-, Abingdon. 

4. Hubard, Edm. W, Curdsville, 

8. Hunter, R. M. T., Lloyd's. 

14. Johnson, Joseph, Bridgeport, 

5. Leake, Shelton P., Charlottesville. 

11. McDowell, James, 

9. Pendleton, John S., CulpepperCH. 

6. Seddon, James A., Bichraond. 

3. Treadway, Wm. M., Danville, 



North Carolina. 

2. Barringer, D. M., 
9. Biggs, Asa, 

8 Clarke, Henry S., 
7. Daniel, J. R. J., 

5. Dobbin, James C, 
4. Dockery, Alfred, 
1. Graham, James, 

6. M*Kay, James J., 

3. Reid, David S., 



— 9. 

Concord. 

Williamston, 

Washington. 

Halifax. 

Fayettenille. 

Dockenfs Sfe. 

Rutherjordton, 

Elizabethtown. 

Reidsuille. 



South Carolina. — 7. 

1. Black, James A., Cheroh. Works. 

5. Burt, Armistead, Willington. 

6. Holmes, Isaac B., Charleston. 

7. Rhett, R. B., Ashepoo. 

2. Simpson, R. F., Pendleton. 

4. Sims, A. D., Darling. C. H. 

3. Woodward. J. A., Winnsboro^. 

Georgia. — 8. 

6. Cobb, Howell, Athens. 

4. Haralson, H. A., La Grange, 
2. Jones, Seaborn, Columbus. 
1. King, Thomas B., Fredrica. 

5. Lumpkin, J. H., Rome. 

7. Stephens, A. H., OrawfordsviUe. 



1847.1 



COmOKMM, 



109 



8. Toombs, Bobert, Wasbinglon. 
3. Towns, Geo. W. B., 



6. 
1. 
2. 
5. 

7. 
4. 
3. 



3. 
1. 
4. 
2. 



11. 

9. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

8. 

7. 

1. 

6. 

6. 
10. 



4. 
1. 
8. 
3. 
6. 



Alabcana, — 7. 

Chapman, Benben, Warrenton. 
Dargan, Edm. S., Mobile. 
Hilliard, Henry "W., Montgomery, 
Houston, Geo. S., Athens. 
McConnell, F. G., TcUtadega. 
Paine, William W., Gainesville. 
Yancey, Wm. L., Wetumpha. 

Mississippi. — 4. 

Adams, Stephen, Aberdeen* 
Davis, Jefferson, Warrenton. 
Roberts, Robert W., HtUsboro*. 
Thompson, Jacob, Oxford. 

liouisiana. — 4. 

Harmanson, J. H., AvoydUs. 
La Sere, Emile, New Orleans. 
Morse, Isaac E., St. Martinsv'e 
Thibodeaux, B. G., Tkibodeaux. 

Arkansas. — 1. 

Yell, Archibald, FayettemUe. 

Tennessee. — 11. 

Brown, Milton, Jackson. 
Chase, L. B., ClarksviUe. 

Cocke, William M., Rutledge. 
Crozier, John H., KnoxviUe. 
Cullom, Alyan, ZAvingston. 
Ewing, Edwin H., Nashville, 
Gentry, M. P., FranUin. 
J'ohnson, Andrew, Greenville. 
Jones, George W., FayettemUe, 
Martin, Barclay, Columbia, 
Stanton, Fred'k P., Memphis, 

Kentucky. — 10. 

Bell, Joshua !F., DanviUe, 
Boyd, Lynn, 
Davis, Garrett, 
Grider, Henry, 
Martin, John P., 
10 



Cadiz. 
Paris. 
^Bowling Gn, 
Prettovihurg. 



Woodsjield, 
Parishes MxUs, 
Li^gpqlis. 
Norwalk. 



2. McHenry, John 3BL, Eartford, 
7. Thomasson, W* P*, LcndsmlkL 

10. Tibbatts, J. W., N^eipport, 

9. T>rambo, Andrew, OwinysviUe. 
5. Young, Bryan B., Mizabethtotpn. 

Ohio, — 21. 

1 1 . Brinckerhoff, J., MansJiM 

16. Cummings, J. D., N. PhiladePa, 

2. Cunningham, F. A., Eaton, 

10. Delano, Columbus, Mt. Vernon. 

1. Faran, James J., Cincinnati, 

1 7. Fries, George, EanoixrUm, 

20. Giddings, J. B., Jefferson. 

14. Harper, Alexander, ZanesvUU, 

7. MJcDowell, J. J., Hillsborough. 

15. Morris, Joseph, 
13. Parish, Isaac, 

9. Perrill, Aug^. L., 

21. Boot, Joseph M, 

5. Sawyer, William, St. Mary's. 

3. Schenck, B. C, Dayton. 

6. St John, Henry, McCutchenv's. 

18. Starkweather, D.A, Canton. 

8. Thnrman, Allen G., ChiUicothe. 

19. Tilden, D. B., Bavenna, 

4. Vance, Joseph, Urbana. 

12. Vinton, S. F., Gallipdlis, 

Michigan, — 3. 

3. Chipman, John S., CentrevtUe, 

2. Humt, James B., PontuW' 

1. McClelland, B., Monroe, 

Indiana, '-' 10, 

9. Cathcart, Cha*s W. Jjaporte. 

6. Davis, John W., Carlisle, 

2. Henley, T. J., N, WasUn^n. 
10. Kennedy, A., Muncietoum. 

7. McGaughey,E. W., Greencastle, 

I, Owen, Bob. D., New Harmony, 

8. Pettit, John, La Fayette. 

4. Smith, Caleb B., ConnorsviUe, 

3. Smith, ThomM) VersaUiea, 

6, Wick, William W., IndianapoUt. 



110 



UNIXBB STATES. 



[1847. 



Illinois, — 7. 

7. Baker, Edward D., Springfield. 

5. Douglass, S. A., Quiticy, 

3. Ficklin, O. B., Charleston. 

6. Hoge, Joseph P., Galena, 

2. McCIemand, J. A., Shawneetovm. 
1. Smith, Robert, Alton. 

4. Wentworth, John, Chicago. 

Missouri. — 5. 

BowHn, James B., StXouis, 

Phelps, John S., Springfield. 

Price, Sterling, Kei/tesville. 

Belfe, James H., Caledonia. 



Sims, Leonard H., Springfidd. 

Florida. — 1. 
BrockenbronghjW.H., Tallahassee. 

Texas. — 2. 

1. Kaufman, David S., 

2. Pilsbury, Timothy, 

Terbitobies. 

Wisconsin. "^1 Delegate. 

Martin, Morgan L., Green Bay. 

Iowa. — 1 Delegate. 
Dodge, Aug. C, Burlington. 



Officers of the House. 



B. B. French, Clerh. 

Newton Lane, Serjeant-at-Arms. 

Cha*s S. Whitney, Door-Keeper. 



Simon Brown, Librarian. 
J. M. Johnson, Postmaster. 
Ritchie & Heiss, Printers. 



Alfhabbtical List of the Repbesektatives. 



Abbott, Amos, Ms. 

Adams, John Q. Ms. 
Adams, Stephen, Miss. 
Anderson, Jos. H., N. Y. 
Arnold, Lem'l H., R. I. 
Ashmnn, Greorge, Ms 
Atkinson, Arch., Ya. 
Baker, Edward D., HI. 
Barringer, Dan. M., N. C. 
Bayly, Tho's H., Va 
Bedinger, Henry, Va. 
Bell, Joshua F., Ky. 

Benton, Cha's S., N, Y. 
Biggs, Asa, N. C. 

Black, James, Pa. 

Black, James A., S. C. 
Blanchard, James, Pa. 
Bowlin, James B., Mo. 
Bojd, Lynn, Ky. 

Bnnckerhoff, Jacob, O. 
Brockenbr'gh,W.H., Fl. 
Brodhead,Rich.Jr., Pa. 



Brown, Milton, Ten. 
Brown, Wm. G., Va. 
Buffington, Joseph, Pa. 
Burt, Armistead, S. C 
Campbell, John H., Pa. 
Campbell, W. W., N. Y. 
Carroll, Cha's H., N.Y. 
Cathcart, C. W., Ind. 
Chapman, Aug. A., Va. 
Chapman, John G., Md. 
Chapman, Reuben, Ala. 
Chase, L. B., Ten. 

Chipman, J. S., Mich. 
Clarke, Henry S., N. C. 
Cobb, Howell, Ga. 

Cocke, Wm. M., Ten. 
CoUamer, Jacob, Vt, 
CoUins, John F,, N. Y. 
Constable, Albert, Md. 
Cranston, H. Y., R. I. 
Crozier, John H., Ten. 
CuUom, Alvan, Ten. 



Culver, Erast. D., N.Y. 
Cummings, John D., O. 
Ctmningham, F. A., O. 
Daniel, John R. G., N. C. 
Dargan, Edw. S., Ala. 
Darragh, Cornelius, Pa. 
Davis, Gfarrett, Ky. 

Davis, Jefferson, Miss. 
Davis, J. W., Speak.^ Ind. 
Delano, Columous, O. 
DeMott, John, N. Y. 
DiUingham, P. Jr., Vt. 
Dixon, James, Ct. 

Dobbin, James C, N. C 
Dockery, Alfred, N. C. 
Dodge, A. C, Dd.^ Iowa. 
Douglass, Steph. A., IlL 
Dromgoole, Geo. C, Va. 
Dunlap, Robert P., Me. 
Edsal, Jose/ph E., N. Y. 
Ellsworth, Sam. S., N. Y. 
Erdman, Jacob, Pa. 



1847.] 



00N6BB8S. 



Ill 



Ewing, Edwin H., Ten. 
Ewing, John H., Pa. 
Faran, James J., O. 

EickUn, Orlando B., 111. 
Foot, Solomon, Vt. 

Foster, Henry D., Pa. 
Fries, Greorge, O. 

Garvin, Wm. S., Pa. 
Gentry, Mere. P., Ten. 
Giddings, Joshua R., O. 
Giles, WilHam F., Md. 
Goodyear, Charles, N. Y. 
Gordon, Samuel, N. Y. 
Graham, James, N. C. 
Glider, Henry, i^. 

Grinnell, Joseph, Ms. 
Grover, Martin, N. Y. 
Hamiin, Hannibal, Me. 
Hampton, Ja's G., N. J. 
Hkralson, Hugh A., Ga. 
Harmanson, J. H., La. 
Harper, Alexander, O. 
Henley Tho's J., Ind. 
Herrick, Rich'd P., N. Y. 
Hilliard, Hen. W., Ala. 
Hoge, Joseph P., III. 
Holmes, Elias B., N. Y. 
Holmes, Isaac E., S. C. 
Hopkins, Greo. W., Va. 
Hough, Wm. J., N. Y. 
Houston, Geo. S., Ala. 
Houston, John W., Del 
Hubard, Edm. W. Va. 
Hubbard, SamT D., Ct. 
Hudson, Charles, Ms. 
Hungerford, Orv., N. Y. 
Hunt, James B., Mich. 
Hunt, Washington, N. Y. 
Hunter, R. M. T., Va. 
IngersoU, Charles J., Pa. 
IngersoU, Joseph R., Pa. 
Jenkins, Timothy, N. Y. 
Johnson, Andrew, Ten. 
Johnson, James H.,N. H. 
Johnson, Joseph, Va. 
Jones, Geo. W., Ten. 
Jones, Seaborn, Ga. 

Kaufman, D. F., Texas. 
Kennedy, Andrew, Ind. 
King, Daniel P., Ms. 
King, Preston, N. Y. 
King, Thomas B., Ga. 
La Sere, Emile, La. 



Lawrence, J. W., N. Y. 
Leake, Shelton F., Va. 
Leib, Owen D., Pa. 

Levin, Lewis C, Pa. 
Lewis, Abner, N. Y. 

Ligon, Th. W., Md. 

Long, Edward, Md. 

Lumpkin, J. H., Ga. 

Maclay, Wm. B., N. Y. 
Marsh, Geo. P., Vt. 

Martin, Barclay, Ten 
Martin, John P., Ky. 
Martin, M. L., 7)cZ., Wis. 
McClelland, R., Mich. 
McClemand, J. A., 111. 
McConnell, F. G., Ala. 
McCrate, John D., Me. 
McDowell, James, Va. 
McDowell, Jos. J., O. 
McGaughey, E. W., Ind. 
McHenry, John H., Ky. 
McHvaine, A. R., Pa. 
McKay, James J., N. C. 
McLean, Mos.es, Pa. 

MiUer, Wm. S., N. Y. 
Morris, Joseph, O. 

Morse, Isaac E., La. 
Moseley, Wm. A., N. Y. 
Moulton, Mace, N. H. 
Niven, Arch. C, N. Y. 
Norris, Moses Jr., N. H. 
Owen, Rob. D., Ind. 
Parish, Isaac, O. 

Payne, Wm. W., Ala. 
Pendleton, John S., Va. 
Perrill, Augustus L., O. 
Perry, Thomas, Md. 
Pettit, John, Ind. 

Phelps, John S., Mo. 
Pollock, James, Pa. 

Price, Sterling, Mo. 

Ramsey, Alex., Pa. 

Rathbun, George, N. Y. 
Reid, David S., N. C. 
Relfe, James S., Mo. 
Rhett, R. B., S. C. 

Ritter, John, Pa. 

Roberts, Rob't W., Miss. 
Rockwell, John A., Ct. 
Rockwell, Julius, Ms. 
Root, Joseph M., O. 

Runk, John, N. Y. 

Russell, Joseph, N. Y. 



Sawtelle, Cnllen, Me. 
Sawyer, William, O. 
Scammon, John F., Me. 
Schenck, Rob. C, O. 
Seaman, Henry J., N. Y. 
Seddon, James A., Va. 
Severance, Luther, Me. 
Simpson, Rich. F., S. C. 
Sims, A. D., S. C. 

Sims, Leonard H., Mo. 
Smith, Albert, N. Y. 
Smith, Caleb B., Ind. 
Smith, Robert, HI. 

Smith, Thomas, Ind. 
Smith, Truman, Ct. 

Stanton, Fred. P., Ten. 
Starkweather, D. A., O. 
Stephens, Alex. H., Ga. 
Stewart, Andrew, Pa. 
St. John, Henry, O. 

Strohm, John, Pa. 

Strong, Stephen, N. Y. 
Sykes, Geo., N.J. 

Thibodeaux, B. G., La. 
Thomasson, W.P., Ky. 
Thompson, Benj., Ms, 
Thompson, Jacob, Miss. 
Thompson, James, Pa. 
Thurman, Allen G., O. 
Tibbatts, John W., Ky. 
Tilden, Daniel R., O. 
Toombs, Robert, Ga. 
Towns, Greo. W., Ga. 
Treadway, Wm. M., Va. 
Trumbo, Andrew, Ky. 
Vance, Joseph, O. 

Vinton, Samuel F., O. 
Wentworth, JohUj HI. 
Wheaton, Horace, N. Y. 
White, Hugh, N. Y. 
Wick, Win. W., Ind. 
Williams, Hez'h, Me. 
Wilmot, David, Pa. 

Winthrop, Rob. C, Ms. 
Wood, Brad. R., N. Y. 
WoodruflF, T. M., N. Y. 
Woodward, Jos. A., S. C. 
Woodworth, W. W., N. Y. 
Wright, WilUam, N. J. 
Yancey, Wm. W., Ala. 
Yell, Archibald, Ark. 
Young, Bryan R., Ky. 



IIS 



VNITBO tr^THS. 



11847. 





m. THE JTJDICaULRY. 




\ 




SuPBEHx Cotmc. 








BeBidenoe. 


Appointed 


Salaxy. 


Roger B. Taney, 


Baltunore, Md., Chie/ Justice, 


1836, 


$5,000 


John McLean, 


Cincinnati, Ohio, Associate Justice, 


1829, 


4,500 


James M. Wayiie, 


Savannah, 6a., do. 


1835, 


4,500 


John McKinley, 


Florence, AUu, do. 


1837, 


4,500 


John Catron, 


Nashville, Tenn., do. 


1837, 


4,500 


Peter V. Daniel, 


Richmond, Va., do. 


1841, 


4,500 


Samnel Nelson, 


Cooperstown, N. Y., th. 


1845, 


4,500 


Levi Woodhurjr, 


Fortsmonth, N. H., do. 


1845, 


4,500 


Robert C. Grier, 


Fittsburg, Ftt., do. 


1846, 


4,500 


John "t. Mason, 


Washington, D. C, Attorney Oenend^ 


, 1845, 


4fiO0 


Benj. C. Howard, 


Baltimore, Md., Bqporter, 


1843, 


1,000 



sibn annually, comillienciDg on the Ist Monday of December. 



•DISTRICTP COURTS :--JTJDGES, ATTORNEYS, 



I 

2 

3 

4' 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

18 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

^ 
28 

124 
25 
26 

ZI 

28 
[29 
■80 



Maine, 

N. Hampshire, 

Vermont, 

Massachusetts, 

Rhode Island, 

Connecticut, 



Districts. 



N.Y. 



(N.i)i8, 
\S. Dis. 



New Jers^, 
p^ (E.Dist. 
*^* i W. Dist. 
Delaware, 
Maryland, 
v» ( E. Dist. 
^*- {w.Djst. 
North Carolina, 
South Carolina, 
Georgia, 
Florida, 

S. Dist. 
Dist. 



Ala. 



{n. 



Judges. 



Ashur Ware, 
MatOiew Harvey, 
Samuel Prentiss, 
Peleg Sprague, 
John Pitman, 
A. T. Judson, 
A. Conkling, 
Samuel R. B^tts, 
Ph. Dickerson, 
John K. Kane, 
Thomas Irwin, 
WillardHall, 
Upton S. Heath, 
J. D. Hallyburton, 
.f.W.Brockenbrough, 
Henry Potter, 
E. B. Gilchrist, 
John C. Nicoll, 
Isaac H. Bionson, 

William Crawlbrd, 



Residence. 



Salary. 



Miss. { N; ^t- 



Dist. 
Louisiana, 
Texas, 

(W.Dist. 
Tenn. {M.Dist. 
( E. Dist. 
Kentucky, 
Ohio, 
'31|Indiana, 
32imnpis, 

83 Missouri, 

84 Michigan, 
85 1 Arkansas, 



S. J. Gholson, 

T, H. McCaleb, 
John C. Watrous, 

M. B. Brown, 

Th. B. Monroe, 
iL H. Leavitt, 
E. M. Huntington, 
Nathaniel Pope, 
Robert W. Wells, 
RossWilkins, 
Benjamin Johnson, 



Portland, 

Hopkinton, 

Montpelier, 

Boston, 

ProTidene^, 

Canterbury, 

Auburn, 

New York, 

Paterson, 

Philadelphia, 

Pittsburg, 

Wilmington, 

Baltimore, 

Lexington, 
Raleigh, 
Charleston, 
Savannah, 
St. August'e, 

Mobile, 

Athens, 

N. Orleans, 
Galveston, 

NaihTille, 

Frankfort, 
Steubenviile, 
Terre Haute, 

Jeff'son City, 
Detroit, 
Little Rock, 



$1,800 
1,000 
1,200 
2,600 
1,600 
1,600 
2,000 
3,500 
1,500 
2,500 
1,800 
1,500 
2,000 
1,800 
1,600 
2,000 
2,500 
2,500 
2,000 

2,500} 

2,000} 

3,000 
2,000 

1,500 1 

1,600 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
2,000 



Attorneys. 



Aug. Haines, 
Franklin Peirce, 
Charles Linsley, 
Robert Rantoul, 
Walter S. Bui^ss, 
Jonathan Stoddard, 
W. F. Allen, 
Benj. F. Butler, 
James S. Greene, 
Thomas M. Pettit, 
Jcbn L. Dawson, 
Wm. H. Rogttrs, 
W. L. MarshaU, 
R. C. Nicholas, 
George H. Lee, 
Duncan R. McRae, 
Edward McCrady, 
Henry R. Jackson, 
Chandler C. Yonge, 
Alex. B. Meek, 
J. A. S. Acklin, 
Oscar F. Bledsoe, 
R. M. Gaines, 
Thomas J. Durant, 
George W. Brown, 
H. W. McCorry, 
Thomas D. Mosely, 
Thomas C. Lyon, 
P.S.Loughborough, 
Thos. W. Bartley, 
Daniel Mace, 
David L. Gr^^, . 
Thomas J. Gantt, 
John Norvell, 
S. H. Hempstead, 



Pay. 



$200t 
200t 
200t 
t 
200t 
200t 
200t 

t 
200t 

200t 

aoot 

200t 

aoot 
aoot 
aoot 
aoot 
aoot 
aoot 
aoot 
aoot 
aoot 
aoot 
aoot 
aoot 
aoot 
aoot 
aoot 
aoot 
aoot 
aoot 
aoot 
aoot 
aoot 



• Corrected at the Deptftmient of State, July 20, 1846. t And Fees. t Fees, &o. 



1847.] 



JUDICIABT. 



118 



Circuit Coubts. 

The United States are divided into the following nine dTudicial Circuits, in 
each of which a Circuit Court is held twice every year, for each State within 
the Circuit, by a Justice of the Supreme Court, assigned to the Circuit, and 
by the District Judge of the State or District in which the Court sits. 



1st Circuit, 

2d do. 

3d do. 

4th do. 

5th do. 

6th do. 

7th do. 

8th do. 

9th do. 



Maine, N. Hampshire, Mass., and K. I., 
Vermont, Connecticut, and New York, 
New Jersey and Pennsylvania, 
Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia, 
Alabama and Louisiana, 
N. Carolina, S. Carolina, and Greorgia, 
Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Michigan, 
Kentucky, Tennessee, and Missouri, 
Mississippi and Arkansas, 



Pfesiding Judge. 

Mr. Justice Woodbury. 
Mr. Justice Nelson. 
Mr. Justice Grier. 
Mr. Chief Just. Taney. 
Mr. Justice Daniels. 
Mr. Justice Wayne. 
Mr. Justice McLean. 
Mr. Justice Catron. 
Mr. Justice McKinley. 



There is a local Circuit Court held by three Judges in the District of Co- 
lumbia, specially appointed for that purpose. The Chief Justice of that 
Court sits also as District Justice of that District. 



BIARSHALS, AND CLERKS. 



1 


Marshals. 


Residence. 


Pay. 


Clerks. 


Residence. 


Pay. 

Fees. 


Virgil D. Parris, 


Paris, 


f200t 


John Mussey, 


Portland, 


2 


Cyras Barton, 


Concord, 


200t 


John L. Hayes, 


Portsmouth, 


do. 


8 


Jacob Kent, 


Wells River, 


200t 


B. H. Prentiss, 


Montpelier, 


do. 


4 


Isaac 0. Barnes, 
Burrington Anmony, 


Boston, 


t 


Seth E. Sprague, 


Boston, 


do. 


6 


ProTidence, 


200t 


John T. Pitman, 


Providence, 


do. 


6 


Benning Mann, 


Hartford, 


200t 


C. A. Ingersoll, 


New Haven, 


do. 


7 


Jacob Gould, 


Rochester, 


200t 


RyB. Miller. 


Utica, 
New York, 


do. 


8 


Eli Moore, 


New York, 


t 


Frederick J. Betts, 


do. 


9 


Samuel McClung, 


Trenton, 


200t 


Robert D. Spencer, 


Mt. HoUy, 


do. 


10 


George M. Keim, 


Philadelphia, 


JL 


F. Uopkinson, 


Philadelphia, 


do. 


11 


Samuel TTays, 


Pittsburg, 


200t 


£. J. Roberts, 


Pittsburg, 


do. 


12 


Alexander Porter, 


Wilmington, 


200t 


W. A. Mendenhal, 


Wilmington, 


do. 


13 


Moreau Forrest, 


Baltimore, 


t 


Thomas Spioer, 


Baltimore, 


do. 


14 


E. Christian, 


Richmond, 


200t 


Philip Mayo, 


Richmond, 


do. 


15 


James Points, 


Stannton, 


200t 


R. W Moore, 


Clarksburg, 


do. 


16 


Wesley Jones, 


Raleigh, 


400t 


W. H. Haywood, 


Raleigh, 


do. 


17 


Thomas D. Condy, 


Charleston, 


t 


James Jarrey, 


Charleston, 


do. 


18 


Hend. Willingham, 


Athens, 


JL 


C^rge Glenn, 


Savannah, 


do. 


19 


Joseph B. Browne, 


Key West, 


200t 






do. 


20 


James G. Lyon, 


Mobile, 


200t 


John Fits, 


Mobile, 


do. 


21 


Benjamin Patteson, 


Huntsville, 


200t 


B. T. Moore, 


Huntsville, 


do. 


22 


Andrew A. Kincannon, 


Columbus, 


2oat 


G. M. Ragsdale, 




do. 


23 Thomas Fletch6r, 


Jackson, 


200t 


William Bums, 


Jackson, 


do. 


24'\Villi»m F.Wagner, 


New Orleans, 


200t 


N. R. Jennings, 


New Orleans, 


do. 


26, John M. Allen, 


Oalreston, 


aoot 


Thomas Bates, 


Galveston, 


do. 


26 


R. J. Chester, 


Jackson, 


200t 


Caleb Green, 




do. 


27 


Jesse B. Clements, 


Nashville, 


20Ot 


N. A. McNairy, 


NashviUe, 


do. 


28 Arthur R. Crozier, 




200t 


W. C. Mynatt, 


Knoxville, 


do. 


29' John TAne, 


Shclbyrille, 


200t 


J. H. Hanna, 


Frankfort, 


do. 


30! Daniel A. KobertBon, 


Lancaster, 


200t 


William Miner, 


Columbus, 


do. 


31 Abel C. Pepper, 


Indianapolis, 


200t 


Horace Bassett, 


Corydon, 


do. 


32|S. H. Anderson, 


Mt. Vernon, 


200t 


William Pope. 
Joseph Gamble, 


Springfield, 


do. 


33' Robert C. Ewing, 


Richmond, 


20Ot 


St. Louis, 


do. 


84 A. E. Wins:, 


Mnnroe, 


200t 


John Winder, 


Detroit, 


do. 


85 


lElias Rector, 


Van Buren, 


aoot 


WilUam Field, 


Little Rock, 


do. 



t And Fees. 
10* 



X Fees, &c. 



114 VVlTt1> flfATSi. [1M7. 

PULCES AND TiMSfl OV BOLBIira THB ClBOUIT COUBTS. 

Maiwb, • • Porttonrf— 1st May and 1st October. 

New Hjlmpshikb,* • • 'PortsmotOh — 8th May; — Exdet — 8th October. 

Vermont, Windsor — ^2l8t May ; — RtOland—^^ October. 

Massachusetts, Boston — 15th May and 15th October. 

Rhode Island, Newport — 15th June ; — Providence — 15th November. 

Connecticut, New JJaucn— 4th Tuesday in April ; — Hartford-^ 

Tuesday in September. 

N. York, S. Disi,* • • -New York — ^lasi Mon. in Pebmary, 1st Mon. in April, 

and 3d Mon. in October. 

N. York, N. Bist,* • • 'Albany— ^^ Tues. in Oct, and 3d Tues. in May ; — 

Canandatgua — Tues. next after third Mon. in June. 

New Jbeset, t • Trenton — 1st April and 1st October. 

Pbnn., E.Di8t, Philadelphia — 11th April and 11th October. 

Penn., W. Dist, Pittsburg — 3d Mond. in May and Nov. ; — WiUiamt- 

port — 3d Monday in June and September. 

Delawabb, Newcastle — Tuesday following 4th Mond. in May ; — 

Dover — ^Tuesday following 3d Monday in Oct. 

Maryland, Baltimore — 1st Monday in November. 

YiBOiNiA, E. Dist, • • •Richmond — ]|^t Mon. in May and 4th Mon. in Nov. 

ViRGiNLi, W. Dist., • 'Lewisburg — 1st Monday in August 

North Carolina,* • • Raleigh — 1st Mon. in June, and 1st Monday in Dec. 

South Carolina,"* Charleston — Wednesday preceding the 4th Monday 

in March ; — Cb2uin5ta— 4th Monday in November. 

Gboboia, Savannah — 2d Monday in A^ril ; — MiUedgeviUe — 

Thursday after 1st Monday m November. 

Alabama, S. Dist • • 'Mobile — 2d Mon. in April, and 4th Mon. in Dec. 

Alabama, N. Dist., • 'Huntsville — 1st Monday in June. 

Mississippi, Jackson — 1st Monday in May an^ November. 

Louisiana, New Orleans— ^tk Mon. in April and 3d Mon. in Dec. 

Texas, Galveston — Ist Monday in February. 

Tennbssee, Nashville — 1st Monday in March and September; — 

KnoxviUe — 3d Mon. in April and October j — Jaeh- 
son — 2d Monday in October and April. 

Kentucky, Frankfort — 1st Mon. in May, and 2d Mon. in Nov. 

Ohio, Columbus — 3d Mon. in July and 2d Mon. in Nov. 

Michigan, Detroit — 3d Mon. in June and 2d Mon. in Oct 

Indiana, Indianapolis — Ist Monday in December. 

Illinois, Springfield — last Monday in November. 

Missouri, St. -Louis — 1st Monday in April. 

Arkansas, Little Roch^2d Monday in April. 

DiBT. Columbia, • • • • Washington--^^ Monday in March and Sd Monday 

in October; — Alexandria — 1st Monday in May 
and October. 



1.847.] ^UBICIART. 115 

Plaoes and TiMBfl olr hoIdirg the District Courts. 

Maine, • • Wiscasset — Ist Tnesday in September ; — Portland — 

Ist Tuesday in February and December; — Bam- 
ffor—4th. Tuesday in June. 

New Hampshire, * • ^Portsmmuh — 3d Tuesday in March and Septembto ; — 

Exeter — 3d Tuesday in June and December. 

Vermont, Rutland— 6ih of Oct. ; — Windsor — 24th of May. 

Massachusetts, Boston — 3d Tuesday in March, 4th Tuesday in June, 

2d Tnesday in Sept., and 1st Tuesday in Dec. 

Bhqdb ISLAiTD, Newport — 2d Tuesday in May and 3d in October; — 

Providence — 1st Tuesday in August and February. 

Connecticut, New Haven— 4i!h Tuesday in February and Aug. ; — 

Hartford— 4th. Tuesday in May and November. 

N. York, S. Dist.,* • • 'New York — 1st Tuesday of each month. 

N. York, N. Dist,* • • * Albany — 3d Tuesday in January j— Utica — 2d Tues- 
day in July ; — Rxhester — 3a Tilesday in May ; — 
Avibwm — 3d Tues. in Aug. ; — Buffalo — 2d Tues. 
in Nov. ; — one term anniully in the county of St 
Lawrence, Clinton, or Franklin, at such time and 
place as the Judge may direct. 

New Jersey, Trenton — 2d Tuesday in March and September, and 

3d Tuesday in May and November. 

PSKH., E. Dist, Philadelphia — 3d Mond. in February, May, August, 

and November. 

PbhKt W. Dist., Pittsburg — Ist Monday in May and 1st Monday in 

Octolier; — WiUiamsport — 1st Monday in October. 

Delaware, Newcasde — 3d Tuesday in June, and 2d Tuesday in 

December ; — i>tw«^— Tuesday next following the 
3d Monday of March, and the Tuesday next fol- 
lowing the 4th Monday of September. 

Martland, Baltimore — 1st Tuesday in March, June, September, 

and November. 

Dist. Columbia, • • • • Washington — 1st Monday in June and December. 

Virginia, E. Dist,'" /JicAinonrf — 12th of May and 12th of November; — 

Norfolk — 30th of May, and 1st of November. 

Virginia, W. Dist..* * Staunton — 1st day of May and 1st day of October; — 

Wytheville—Wed. after 3d Mon. in April and Sep- 
tember ; — Charleston — Wed. after 2d Mon. in April 
and September ; — Clarhhvarg — ^last Mon. in March 
and August ; — Wheeling — Wed. after the 1st Mon. 
in April and September. 

North Carolina, •• 'jEcfeirfon — 3d Mon. in April and October ;---iV^ig- 

hum— 41^ Mon. in April and October ; — WUming- 
ton-rlst Mon. after 4th Mon. in April and October. 

South Carolina, • • • Charleston — dd Monday in March ojid September, Ist 

Mondayin July and 2d Monday in Dec. : — Laurens 
Court House — ^the next Tuesday after the adjoom- 
ment of the Circuit Court at Columbia. 

Georgia, Savannah— T/Sl Tues. in Feb., May, Aug., and Not. 



116 UNITED STATES. [1847. 

Flobida., TaUahassea — iBt Mon. in JaoHj ; — St. Augustine — 1st 

Mon. in April ; — Key West — 1st Mon. in August. 

Alabama, N. Dist,* • -HuntsviUe — 2d Monday in April and October. 

Alabama, M. Dist, • • TWo/ootO'-ith Monday in May and 1st Monday 

after the 4th Monday in November. 

Alabama, S. Dist.,* • 'Mobile — 1st Monday in May and 2d Monday in Dec. 

Mississippi, • * Jackson— ^ih Monday in January and June. 

Louisiana, New Orleans — 2d Monday in December, and 1st 

Monday in January. 

Texas, Galveston — Ist Monday in February. 

Tennessee, E. Dist.,- 'KnoxviUe — 3d Monday in April and October. 

Tennessee, W. Dist.,* AVMAy///e— 4th Monday in May and November j — 

Jackson — 2d Monday in October and April. 

Kentucky, Frankfort — 1st Mon. in May and 2d Mon. in Nov. 

Ohio, Columbus — 3d Mon. in July and 2d Mon. in Nov. 

Michigan, Detroit — 3d Mon. in June and 2d Mon. in October. 

Indiana, Indianapolis — ^last Monday in May and November. 

Illinois, Vandcdia — Ist Monday in May and December. 

MissouBi, Jefferson City — 1st Mon. in March and September. 

Abkansas, Little Rock — 1st Monday in October. 



IV. INTERCOURSE WITH FOREIGN NATIONS.— Aug. 1846. 

The pay of Ministers Plenipotentiary is $9,000 per annum, as salary, 
besides $9,000 for outfit. The pay of Charges d'Aifaires is $4,500 per an- 
num ; of Secretaries of Legation, $2,000 ; of Ministers Resident, $6,000. 

The United States are represented by Ministers Plenipotentiary at the 
Courts of Great Britain, France, Russia, Prussia, Spain, and Brazil ; and 
by Charges d' Affaires at the Courts of most of the other foreign countries 
with which this country is much connected by commercial intercourse. 

1. MiNISTEBS AND DIPLOMATIC AqBNTS OP THE UnITED StaTES IN 

FOBEIGN COUNTBIES. 



Ministers Plenipotentiary in 1846. 



Louis McLane, Md. 

WiUiam R. King, Ala. 

Henry A. Wise, Va. 

Andrew J. Donelson, Tenn. 
Romulus M. Saunders, N. C. 
Ralph I. Ingersoll, Conn. 



Appointed. 


Foreign States. 


184$, 


Great Britain, 


1844, 


France, 


1846, 


Brazil, 


1844, 


Prussia, 


1846, 


Spain, 


1846, 


Russia, 



Capitals. 
London. 
Paris. 

Rio Janeiro. 
Berlin. 
Madrid. 
St. Petersbui^. 



IM7.} 



INTXBCOUBSE WITH FOSEIGN NATIONS. 



117 



Alex. H. Everett, 
Anthony Ten Eyek, 



Commissioners. 

Appointed. FoTeign Stafces. 
Mass. 1845 China, 
Mich. 1845 Sandwich Isles, 

Secretaries of LegatUm, 



Salary 

$5,000 

3,000 



James McH. Boyd, Great Britain. 
J. L. Martin, France. 

Charles B. Ingersoll, Bnssia. 
Theodore S. Fay, Prussia. 



Thomas C. Beynolds, Spain. 
Bohert M. Walsh, Brazil. 

Peter Parker, China,$2,500 



Minister Besident, 

Appointed. Foreign States. Capital. 

Dabney S. Carr, Md. | 1843 | Turkey, | Constantinople. 

John P. Brown, Dragoman to the Legation. Salary, $2,500. 



Charge d^ Affaires in 1846. 



A. Darezac, 
Thomas G. Clemson, 
Henry W. Ellsworth, 
Williajn W. Irwin, 
Benjamin A. Bidlack, 
Benjamin G. Shields, 
William Crump, 
A. G. Jewett, 
WilUam H. Polk, 
William A. Harris, 
Robert Wickliffe, Jr. 
Abraham Bencher, 
William H. StUes, 



N. Y. 
Pa. 

Ind. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Ala. 
Va. 
Me. 
Tenn. 
Va. 

Ga. 



Appointed 
1845 
1844 
1845 
1843 
1845 
1845 
1844 
1845 
1845 
1846 
1843 
1843 
1845 



Foreign States. 
Netherlands, 
Belgium, 
Sweden, 
Denmark, 
New Grenada, 
Venezuela, 
ChiU, 
Peru, 

Two Sicilies, 
Argentine Republic, 
Sardinia, 
Portugal, 
Austria, 



Oapitals. 
Hague. 
Brussels. 
Stockholm. 
Copenhagen. 
Bogota 
Caraccas. 
Santiago. 
Lima. 
Naples. 
Buenos Ayres. 
Turin. 
Lisbon. 
Vienna. 



2. List of Consuls and Commebcial Agents of the United 
States in Fobeign Countbies, and of the Places of theib 
Residence ; — Corrected in the Department of State^ July Srf, 1846. 

B:;?* Those marked thiiB ( * ) are Commercial Agents. 

Babbaby States. 



Abgentine Republic, ob Buenos 
Aybes. 

James H. Tate, Buenos Ayres. 
Jefferson Adams, Rio Negro. 

AUSTBIA. 

J. G. Schwarti!, Vienna. 
Edward Warrens, Trieste. 
Wm. A. Sparks, Venice. 

Baden. 
Geo. F. Gerding, Mannheim. 



Thomas N. Carr, Tangier, Morocco. 
Samuel D. Heap, Tunis, Tunis. 
D. S. Macauley, Tripoli, Tripoli. 

Batabia. 

Chas. Obenneyer, Augsburg. 
Philip Geisse, Nuremberg. 

Belgium. 
Francis J. Grund, Antwerp. 



118 



Brazil. 

Charles B. Allen, Maranham Island. 
Charles J. Smith, Para. 
G. P. Manouvrier, Pemambuco. 
Gorham Parks, Rio Janeiro. 
George Black, Santos. 
Lemuel Wells, St, Catherine's Isl. 
Thomas McGuire, Rio Grande. 
Alex. H. Tyler, Bahia. 

Central America. 

Steph. H. Weems, Guatemala. 

A. FoUin, Truxillo, (Hond.) 

Fran. V. aark, { ^^'^ ^^ N^^" 

Chili. 

Eben. R. Dorr, Valparaiso. 
William Crosby, Talcahuano. 
Sam'l F. Haviland, Coquimbo. 

China. 

Paul S. Forbes, Canton. 
Bob. L. Mcintosh, Fouchowfou. 

Denmark. 

Charles F. Ryan, Copenhagen. 
£dm. L. Rainals, Elsineur. 

Danish Islands. 

David Rogers, Santa Cruz. 
*David Naar, St. Thomas. 

Egypt, Pasha of 
H. B. Humphrey, Alexandria. 
Narino de Mattey, Isle of Cyprus. 

Equator. 
Seth Sweetser, Guayaquil. 

France. 
Robert Walsh, Paris. 
Ren. G. Beasley, Havre. 
John W. Grigsby, Bordeaux. 
Daniel C. Croxall, Marseilles. 
M. Hollander, Sedan. 

E. R. Livingston, Nantes. ' 

F. M. Auboynean, La Rochelle. 



UNITED STATES. [1847. 

West India. 



John W. Fisher, i Poi?te-a-Pitre, 
' ( Guadeloupe. 

Gab. G. Fleurot, j St Pierre, Mar- 
' I timque. 

South America. 
Jos. W. Fabens, Cayenne. 

Africa. 
Francis Lacrouts, Algiers. 

Great Britain. 

England. 

Thos. Aspinwall, London. 
Rob't Armstrong, Liverpool. 
Francis B. Ogden, Bristol. 
James Flora, Manchester. 

Robert W. Fox, Falmouth. 
Thos. Were Fox, Plymouth. 
Jos. R. Croskey, Cowes. 
Albert Davy, Leeds. 

Scotland. 

Robert Grieve, Leith. 
Stewart Steel, Dundee. 
Joseph Cowdin, Glasgow. 

Ireland. 

Thomas Wilson, Dublin. 
Thos. W. Gilpin, Belfast. 
Rob. L. Longhead, Londonderry. 
John Murphy, Cork. 
Michael Kennedy, Galway. 

In and near Europe and Africa. 

Horatio Sprague, Gibraltar. 

Wm. Winthrop, Island of Malta. 

Wm. Carroll, Isl. of France. 

Isaa<; Chase, Cape-Town. 

North America. 

Israel D.Andrews, St. John's, N. B. 
T. B. Livingston, Halifax, N. S. 
Luther Brackett, Pictou, N. S. 



1847. 



IKTESCOUBBB WITH FOBEION NATIOHS. 



119 



West Indies. 
IVed*k B. Wells, Bermuda. 
John F. Bacon, Nassau, Bahama I. 
John T. Pickett, Turk's Island. 
Rob. M. Harrison, Kingston, Jam. 

*R.S.Higmbothom, \ ^^ Christopher 
° ' I and Antigua. 

Wm. R. Hayes, Barbadoes. 

Edw. B. Marache, Trinidad. 

South America. 
Samuel J. Masters, Demerara. 

Australia, 

Jas. H. Williams, Sydney. 

E. Hathaway, Jr., HobartTown. 

East Indies. 

Joseph Balestier, Singapore. 
George W. Ellis, Bombay. 
Jas. B. Higginson; Calcutta. 
Fredlt T. Bush, Hong Kong. 

Gbeece. 
John W. Mulligan, Athens. 

Hanseatic, OB Free Cities. 
John Cuthbert, Hamburg. 
W. H. Robertson, Bremen. 
Ernest Schwendler, Frankfort. 

Hanover, Hesse Cassel, &c. 
Charles Graebe, Cassel. 

Hatti, or St. Domingo. 

Joseph e. Luther, Port au Prince. 
Richmond Loring, Aux Cayes. 
John L. Wilson, Cape Haytien. 

Mexican Republic. 
John Black, Mexico. 

^Manuel Alvarez, Santa F^. 
Franklin Chase, Tampico. 
J. F. Schatzell, Matamoras. 

P.M.Din.ond. { ^^^^--^ 

*Edw. J. Glasgow, Chihuahua. 



Edward Porter, Tabasco. 
Eneas McFaul, Jr., Laguna. 
Thos. O. Larkin, Monterey. 
John Parrott, Mazatlan. \ 

J 084 Mar. Castanos, San Bias. 
John A. Robinson, Guaymas. 
P. de Regil y Estrada, Merida. 

Muscat, Dominion of the Imaum of 
Charles Ward, Island Zanzibar. 

The Netherlands, ob HollaItd. 
Charles Nichols, Amsterdam. 
W. S. Campbell, Rotterdam. 

Francis W. Cragin, Paramaribo. 

W. H. Freeman, Cura^oa. 

0. M. Roberts, Batavia, Java. 

New Grenada. 

Ramon L. Sanchez, Carthagena. 
Southy Grinalds, Santa Martha. 
William Nelson, Panama. 

Pacimc Islands, Independent. 
Joel Turrill, Oahu, Sand. Isl. 

John B. Williams, Auckland Islands. 
*John C. Williams, Navigators' Isl. 

Peru. 

Stanhope Prevost, Lima. 
Alex. Ruden, Jr., Paita. 

Portugal. "'" 

Wm. H. Vesey, Lisbon. 
Louis Tinelli, Oporto. 

Islands. 

John H March, Funshal, Madeira. 
Ferd. Gardner, St. Jago, C. Verd. 

Prussia. 
Fred'kSchillow, Stettin. 



120 



UNITED 0TATB8. 



IW7. 



Boms, or Pontifical States. 

Nicholas Brown, Borne. 
Jas. E. Freeman, Ancona. 
Henry J. Brent, Bayenna. 

BussiA. 

A. P. Gibson,. St. Fetersborg. 

Alex. Schwartz, Biga. 

£dmnnd Brandt, Archangel. 

John Balli, Odessa. 

Sardinia. 

O. Edwards Lester, Genoa. 
Victor A. Sassemo, Nice. 

Saxont. 

John G. Fljigel, Leipsic. 
George Mohr, Dresden. 

Spain. 

Max. de Agoirre, Bilbao. 
Alexander Barton, Cadiz.' 
George Beed, Malaga. 

P. Pou, Barcelona. 

Nicholas B. Boyle, Port Mahon. 

Ouba, 

Bob. B. Campbell, Hayana. 
Sim. M. Johnson, Matanzas. 
Samnel McLcmi, Trinidad de Cnba. 
John W. Holding, Santiago de Cuba. 

Puerto Bico, 

James C. Gallaher, Ponce. 
Thos. B. Abrams, Mayagnez. 
Wm. H. Tracy, Guayama. 
Henry G. Hubbard, St John's. 

Other Spanish Islands, 

Joseph Cnllen, Teneriffe, Canary. 
H. P. Sturgis, ManiUa, PhiUip'e. 



Sweden and Nobwat. . 

C. I). Azfwedson, Stockholm. 

C. A. Mnnay, Gothenburg. 

Helmich Jansen, Bergen. 

Jozgen A. Flood, Porsgnmd. 

Switzerland. 
Geo. H Gonndie, Basil or Basle. 

TtTRKBT. 

George A. Porter, Constantinople. 
David W. Offley, Smyrna. 
Jasper Chasseaud, Beiroat 

TUBOANT. 

Joseph A. Binda, Leghorn. 
J. Ambrosi, Act, Florence. 

Two Sicilies. 

Alex. Hammett, Naples. 
John M. Marston, Palermo. 
Charles Sherwood, Messina. 

Uruguat, or Cibplatine Be- 

FUBLIC. 

Bob. M. Hamilton, Monte Video. 

Venezuela. 

Wm. P. Chandler, Puerto CabeUo. 
John P. Adams, Laguayra. 
Bobert Hutton, Maracaibo. 

WURTEHBURO. 

Frederiok Idst, Stuttgard. 



The only consuls who receive salaries are those for London, $^2,000, Tan- 
gier, $2,000, Tunis, $2,000, Tripoli, $2,000, and Beirout, $500. 



1847. 



FOBEIGN CONSULS, ETC 



121 



• 3. !FoREiGN Ministers and theib Sboretabibs, 

Accredited to ike Government of tlie United States. 

Foreign States. Envoys Ex. and Min. Plen. Secretaries, &c. 

Russia, Alexander Bodisco, Edw. de Stoeckl, Ist Sec, 

Argentine Rep., Brig. Gen. D. Carlos de Alvear, Min. Plen. and Extraor. 

" D. Emilio de Alvear, Sec. of Le^. 

France, M. Alph. Pageot, ad interim^ M. Geo. Serrurier. 

Great Britain, Richard Pakenham, J. F. Crampton. 

Spain, M. Calderon de la Barca, Mr. F. Bourman. 

Brazil, Chev. Gaspar Jos^ de Lisboa. 

Chili, Don Manuel Carvallo, Don Fran. S. Astaburuaga. 



Portugal, 
Prussia, 

Denmark, 

Belgium, 

Austria, 

Sardinia, 

Netherlands, 

Sweden, 



Ministers Resident. 
J. C. de Figaniere, 
Sr. de Gerolt. 



F. de Menezes de Brito do Rio. 



Chmg^s d'AffoJres. 
M. Steen de BilM, M. Torben Bill^. 

M. Beaulieu, A. Dumon. 

Chevalier Hulsemann, ad interim. 
Count Albert Lupi de Montalto. 
Chevalier F. M. W. Testa. 
Chevalier Adam de Lovenskiold. 



4. FoBEiGN Consuls and Vicb-Consuls in the United States.* 

A List of Foreign Consuls and Vice- Consuls in the United States, 
Those marked thus ( * ) are Connih- Gtnertd; thus ( t ) Tue- Con&uls ; the rest axe Consuls. 

Argentine BepubUcj or Buenos Ayres. 
Fitzhenry Homer, Boston. 

Austria. 
*Auguste Bebaont, New York. 



J. W. Langdon, Boston. 
tJoseph Ganahl, Savannah. 
C.C.Holtenburgher,New Orieans. 

Baden. 
*J. "W. Schmidt, New York. 



Frederidc Frey, New Orleans. 
tJacob H. Eimer, New Orleans. 



Bavaria. 

G. Heinrich Siemon, New York. 
C. Fred. Hagedom, Philadelphia. 



Belgium. 

tS. F. Rawson, Eastport. 
Thos. A.Deblois, Portland. 
John D. Bates, Boston. 



* This list is necessaiUj imperfect in some d^pree, as no official record of the Foreign 
Consuls in the United States is kept at any of tibe public offices. Erory exertion is made 
to render it as correct as possible. Those who notice errors in the list are respectftdly 
requested to communioate ttnam to the e<Btor, fbr correction in tti* saliiM<}Qeiit volume . 



11 



122 



UNITED BTATBS. 



[1847. 



♦Aug'e Moxhfet, 
tHippolyte Mali, 
Adolphe E. Bone, 
Sam'l D. Walker, 
A. W. NolUng, 
tAuguste Branda, 
Geo. A. Hopley, 
W. E. O'Driscoll, 
tWilliam Porter, 
tTh. A. Pinkney, 
Charles Auz^, 
James B. Behr, 



New York. 

New York. 

Philadelphia. 

Baltimore. 

Bichmond. 

Norfolk. 

Charleston. 

Savannah. 

Apalachicola. 

^ey West. 

Mobile. 

New Orleans. 



Brazil, 

♦L. H. F. d'Aguira, New York. 
tArchibald Foster, Mass., N. H., and 

Maine, Boston. 
tL.r.deFiganiere, New York. 
tEdw. S. Say res, PhUadelphia. 
tGeo. H. Newman, Baltimore. 
1 Clement Smith, Dist. Columbia. 
tHerman Baldwin, Richmond. 
tMyer Myres, Norfolk. 
tH. G. Chadwick, Charleston. 
tPeter Beynand, New Orleans. 

Bremen. 

Herman Oelrfchs, New York. 
Christo. F. Plate, Philadelphia. 
*Alb. Schumacker, Baltimore. 
Ant Ch. Cazenoye, Dist Columbia. 
Lewis Trapman, Charleston. 
Eleazer Crabtree, Sayannah. 
Fred'k Eodewald, New Orleans. 

Bruixswick, 
J. D. Kleudgen, New York. 

cmi 

Frank. H. Delano, New York. 

Denmark. 

Geo. M. Thatcher, Mass., Me., N. H., 

and B. I., Boston. 
Edward Beck, N. Y., Conn., and part 
of N. J., New York. 



t John Bohlen, Philadelphia. * 
tHen. G. Jacobsen, Baltimore. 
tP. K. Dickinson, Wilmington. 
tJamcs H. Ladson, Charleston. 
tW. Crabtree, Sayannah. 

J. F. C. Ules, New Orleans. 

Ecuador. 

Seth Bryant, Boston. 

James H. Causten, Washington. 
Samuel Sweetser, Philadelphia, 
Murat Willis, Norfolk. 

France, 

*MX. De la Forest, New York. 
tLouis Borg, New York. 

Max Isnard, Boston. 

tFauyel Gouraud, Newport, 
M. B. B. de L. D'Hautrieye, Philadel. 
tGeo. C. Morton, Baltimore. 
Ct de Montholon, Richmond. 
tPascal Sehisaua, Norfolk. 
Count de Choiseul, Charleston. 
tR. de Leaumont, Charleston. 
L. Barre, Sayannah. 

Jean J. Aversenc, Mobile. 



tH. de St Cyr, 
Aimb Roger, 
tH. Germain, 



Mobile. 
New Orleans. 
New Orleans. 



Frankfort on the Maine. 

Fred. Wysmann, New York. 
Arnold Halbach, Philadelphia. 

Great Britain, 



Jos. J. Sherwood, 
T. CoUey Grattan, 
tE. A. Grattan, 
Anthony Barclay, 
J. McTayish, 
Francis Waring, 

Chas. D.Wake, | 
Robert Grigg, < 



Portland. 

Mass., Boston. 

Boston. 

New York. 

Baltimore. 

Norfolk. 

N. C. and S. C, 
Charleston. 

Florida and Ala., 
Mobile. 



1847.] 



FOBBION OONSULS, ETC. 



123 



A. li. Mol3aieax, Georgia. 
William Mure, New Orleans. 

Greece, 

Henrj G. Andrews, Boston. 
Eugene Dutilh, New York. 

Guatemala. 
*Antonio de Aycenena. 

Hamburg, 

C. H. F. Moring, Boston. 
Theodore des Arts, New York. 
*Alb. Schnmacker, Baltimore. 
Henry Ludlam, Richmond. 
Louis Trapmann, Charleston. 
Edward R. Bell, Mobile. 
William Vogel, New Orleans. 

Hanover, 

L. H. Meyer, New York. 

fA. W. Hupeden, New York. 

John Leppien, Philadelphia. 

Edward Uhrlaub, Baltimore. 

H. W. Kuhtman, Charleston. 

J. B. Bher, New Orleans. 

Adolph Meier, St. Louis. 

Elector of Hesse 
Conrad W. Faber, New York. 

Grand Dvke of Hesse, 
Antoin BoUerman, New York. 

Lvbeck, 
William Kruger, New York. 

Mecldenberg'Schwerin. 
*Leon Herckenrath, Charleston. 

Mexico. 

*Juan de la Graoga, New York. 
tEdward Cabot, Boston. 
tFelix Merino, 3Philadelphia. 



tCharles Tieman, Baltimore. 
tRobert Adger, Charleston, 
to. L. Dabelsteen, New Orleans. 
tJuan Herbst, Pittsburg. 

tD. Juan F. Cortes, Natchitoches. 
tA. A. M. Jackson, Pensacola. 
Lewis Ramirez, St. Louis. 
Antonio Niel, • Independence, Mo. 
tGeorge P. Ward, Florida. 
tCarlos Lebaron, Mobile. 

Netherlands, 

Thomas Dixon, Mass., Me., N. H., 

and R. I., Boston. 
tB. Homer Dixon, Boston. 
J. C. Zimmerman, N. Y., N. J., and 

Conn., New York. 
Henry Bohlen, Philadelphia. 
Frederic B. Graff, Baltimore. 
Leon Herckenrath, Charleston. 
tOliver O'Hara, Key West. 
Myer Myres, Norfolk. 

tGodfrey Bamsley, Savannah. 
Stevenson Forbes, Mobile. 
F. Marion Ward, New Orleans. 

'New Grenada, 

*Don Domingo Acosta. 
Greg. Dominguez, New York. 

Oldenburg. 

E. Pavenstedt, New York. 
Chas. T. Lowndes, Charleston. 

Peru, 

Greo. F. Guild, Boston. 
Thomas Galway, New York. 

Portugal. 

tD. Anton. G. Vega, Mass., R. L, and 

N. H., Boston. 
tP. Noailles Searle, New York. 
Jn. M L. Smith, Baltimore. 
tDan. J. Desmond, Philadelphia. 
tChristoph. Neale, Dist. Colombia. 
tWalter Delacy, Norfolk. 



124 



UNITSD STATES. 



[1847. 



tJ. G. Boon, - Savanaah. 
Carlos Le Banna, Mobile. 
tAnt. J. Goavea, New Orleans. 

Prussia, 
George Hussey, New Bedford. 



New York. 

Philadelphia. 

Maryland. 



*J. W. Schmidt, 

J. C. Lang, 

Lndwig Branns, 

tWilhelm Vogel, New Orleans. 

E. C. Angebrodt, St. Louis. 

Borne, 



tNicholas Beggio, 
♦Peter A. Hargous, 
tMartin Mantin, 
tCharles Picot, 
t J. P. Scott, 
tW.D'AzetSenac, 
tSamuel Wright, 
fThomas Barrett, 



Boston. 
New York. 
New York. 
Philadelphia. 
Baltimore. 
Norfolk. 
Sayannah. 
New Orleans. 



Russia, 

*Alex.Ev8taphieflr,New York. 
Geo. E. Runhardt, New York, 
t A. W. Thaxter, Jr. Boston. 
tJohn R. Wilder, Savannah. 
tJosephE.Morrell, Mobile. 
Edward Johns, New Orleans, 

Sardinia. 

*Luigi Mossi, New York. 
tNicholas Reggio, Me., N. H., Mass. 

and R. I., Boston. 
Daniel J. Desmond, for Penn., N. J. 

and Del., Philadelphia. 
tE. L. Trenholm, Charleston. 
tC. A. Williamson, Baltimore. 
tE. B. de Mednx, Mobile. 
Antonio Michoud, New Orleans. 

Saxe Cciburg and Gatha, 
Carl Frederick Haussman, for XT. S. 

Saxe- Weimar, 

♦Er. Ang. Mensch, New York. 
Edward Slacken, New York. 



Saxony, 

*J. W. Schmidt, New York. 
J. Rand'ph Mahler, New York- 
Robert Ralston, Philadelphia. 

E. Lndwig Branns, Baltimore. 

J. F. C. XJles, New Orleans. 

SpaitL 

tTh. Am. Deblois, Portland. 
tWm. B. Parker, Portsmooth. 
Don. Ant G. Vega, Boston. 

F. Stoughton, New York. 

t Jorge Chacon, Philadelphia. 
tJ. Anto.Lanranga, Charleston. 
tJ. Anto. Pizarro, Baltimore. 
tWalter De Lacy, Norfolk. 
Fred. B. Lord, Wilmington. 
fF. Moreno, Pensacola. 

tF. A. Browne, Key West 
R. A. D. Lorrel, 
tJos^ I. Cmzat, 



Savannah. 
Mobile. 



J. G. Mnnoz y Funes, New Orleans. 

Siveden and Norway. 

tCharles J. Hunt, Mass., N. H., and 

Maine, Boston. 
tClaud.B. Habicht,New York. 
tRichard Seldener, Philadelphia. 
tF. B. Graf, Baltimore. 

tJohn H. Brent, Alexandria. 
tDunc'n Robertson, Norfolk. 
tFran. H. Wilman, Savannah. 
tJos. A. Winthrop, Charleston. 
tGeorge Westfield, Mobile. 
tDiedr. Miesegaes, New Orleans. 

Suntzerland^ 

Louis P. De Luge, New England and 

New York, New York. 
J. G. Syze, Penn., New Jersey, and 

Delaware, Philadelphia. 
Nicholas Easier, for Ky., Ind.; HI., 0., 
Mich., and Wise. Ter., Louisville. 



1847.1 



NAVr LIST. 



185 



Abra. Zipcy-Oglu, Boston. 

Tuscany, 

W. H. Aspinwall, New York. 
Carlo Gavenni, Mobile. 
Carlo G. Mansoni, New Orleans. 

Two Sicilies, 

*D. Rocco Mamscelli, New York. 
♦Don Domenico Morelli, Fhiladera. 
tNicholas Keggio, Boston. 
tB. D. Potter, Providence, 

tlra CUsbe, New Haven. 

tLuca Palmieri, Philadelphia. 
jGreo. H. Newman, Baltimore. 
|N. E. Fowls, Dist. Columbia. 

tAntonio Pomer, Norfolk. 
tG. A. Trenholm, Charleston, S. C. 
tGoffredo Bamsley, Savannah, 
to. Wolff, Mobile. 

tG. A. Barelli, New Orleans; 



Uraguay. 

E. S. Tobey, Boston. 

tG. P. Darby, New York. 

tBenj. W. Frazier, Philadelphia. 

tT. B. Garf, Baltimore. ' 

tG. L. Lowden, Charleston. 

tC. J. Mansong, Mobile. 

tE. Dudley Head, New Orleans. 

Venezuela. 

Silas G. Whitney, Boston. 
tJohn P. Bigelow, Boston. 
Juan B. Pun'oy, New York. 
W. McBhenny, 
J. F. Strohm, 
Aaron Milhado, 
Geo. B. Dieter, 



Philadelphia. 
Baltimore. 
Norfolk. 
New Orleans. 



Wurtemburg. 

♦Ferd. L. Brauns, Baltimore. 
Frederick Klett, Philadelphia. 
John D. Fink, Ala., Miss., La., and 
Florida, New Orleans. 



David Conner, 
Lawrence Bousseau, 
William B. Shubrick, 
James Biddle, 
George C. Bead, 



V. NAVY LIST. 

1. COMMANDEBS OF SQUADRONS. 

Ckmmodore. 



do, 
do. 
do, 
do. 



Home Squadron. 
Coast of Brazil. 
Pacific Oce^. 
East Indies. 
Coast of Africa. 



2. CoMMANDEBS OP NaVT YaRDS. 



George W. Storer, 
Foxhall A. Parker, 
S. H. Stringham, 
Charles Stewart, 



Charles W. Morgan, 



Portsmouth. 
Boston. 
New York. 
Philadelphia. 



Jesse Wilkinson, 
Wm. K. Latimer, 



3. Naval Asylum. 
GiJvernoT^ 



Washington. 

Norfolk. 

Pensacola. 



Philadelphia. 



11* 



126 



UMITED BTAT£S. 



[1847. 



4. OFFICERS OF THB NaTT. 



Captains. — 65. 



Jamei Barron, 
Charles Stewart, 
Jacob Jones, 
Charles Morris, 
L. Warrington, 
James Biddle, 
C. G. Kidgely, 
John Downes, 
Stephen Ca^sin, 
A. S. Wadsworth, 
George G. Read, 
H. E. Ballard, 
J. B. Nicolson, 
Jesse Wilkinson, 
T. Ap C. Jones, 
WiUiam C. Bolton, 
W. B. Shubrick, 



Charles Gauntt, 
William Ramsay, 
Henry Henry, 
Samuel W. Downing, 
Henry W. Ogden, 
Thomas A. Gonover, 
John C. Long, 
John H. Graham, 
James M. Mcintosh, 
Josiah Tattnall, 
Hugh N. Page, 
William Inman, 
Stephen Ghamplin, 
Joel Abbott, 
Lewis £. Simonds, 
John M. Dale, 
Harrison H. Cocke, 
William J. McCluney, 
John B. Montgomery, 
Horace B. Sawyer, 
Cornel. K. Stribling, 
Joshua R. Sands, 
John J. Young, 
Charles H. Bell, 



C. W. Morgan, 
L. Kearny, 
F. A. Parker, 

E. R. McCall, 
Daniel Turner, 
David Conner, 
William M. Hunter, 
John D. Sloat, 
Matthew C. Perry, 
C. W. Skinner, 
John T. Newton, 
Joseph Smidi, 

L. Rousseau, 
George W. Storer, 

F. H. Gregory, 
P. F. Voorhees, 



Benjamin Cooper, 
David Geisinger, 
R. F. Stockton, 
Isaac McKeever, 
J. P. Zantdnger, 
Wm. D Salter, 
Ch. S. McCauley, 
T. M. NeweU, 
E. A. F. Lavellette, 
JT. T. Webb, 
John Percival, 
John H. Aulick, 
W. V. Taylor, 
Bladen Dulany, 
S. H.Stringham, 
Isaac Mayo, 



Commanders. — 96. 



Abraham Bigelow, 
Frederick Tamum, 
Joseph R. Jarvis, 
Thomas W. Freelon, 
Sam'l W. LeCompte, 
Charles T. Piatt, 
Wm. M. Armstrong, 
William F. Shields, 
G. J. Pendei^rast, 
William G. Nicholson, 
James B. Cooper, 
Ed. W. Carpenter, 
John L. Saunders, 
Joseph B. Hull, 
John Stone Paine, 
Joseph Moorehead, 
Thomas Petigru, 
John S. Chauncey, 
Irvine Shubrick, 
John Kelly, 
Edmund Byrne, 
Willlkm H. Gardiner, 
David G. Farragut, 
Richard S. Pinckney, 



(WiUiam Mervine, 
Thomas Crabb, 
Thomas Pafaie, 
James Armstrong, 
Joseph Smoot, 
.Samuel L. Bveeae, 
I Benjamin Page, 
'John Gwinn, 
iThomuB W. Wyman, 
'Andrew Fitzhugh, 
W. K. Latimer, 
Hiram Paulding, 
Uriah P. Levy, 
Charles Boarman, 
French Forrest, 
Wm. Jamesson. 



Stephen B. WUson, 
Edward C. Rutledge, 
William S. Harris, 
T. Aloysius Domin, 
Rob, B. Cunningham, 
James Glynn, 
Joseph Myers, 
Thomas R. Gedney, 
John Bubier, 
Victor M. Randolph, 
Jacob Crowninshield, 
Frederick Engle, 
John Rudd, 
Robert Ritehie, 
William W. McKean, 
Franklin Buchanan, 
Samuel Mercer, 
Charles Lowndes, 
L. M. Goldsborough, 
George N. Hollins, 
Duncan N. Ingraham, 
John Marston, 
Henry Bruce, 
Henry A . Adams, 



James D. Knight, 
Joseph Mattison, 
William S. Walker, 
Alex. S. MackenjsBB, 
George F. Peaison, 
James T. Gerry, 
John S. Nicholas, 
Samuel F. Du Pont, 
William L. Hudson, 
James P. Wilson, 
George A. Magmder, 
John Poi)e, 
Levin M. Powdl, 
Charles Wilkes, 
Elisha Peck, 
Thomas J. Manning, 
William Pearson, 
William L. Howard, 
William P. Piercy, 
Richard A. Jones, 
Thomas J. Leib, 
Thomas 0. Selfridge, 
Henry Eagle, 
Andrew K. Long. 



5. Pat of the Navt, />er annum. 



Captains, 66 Senior, in service, 
Do. do. on leave, 

Captains of Squadrons, 
Do. do. on other duty. 

Do. do. off duty, 

CoMMANDSits, 96, in sea service. 
Do. at navy yards, or on 

other duty. 
Do. on leave, &c., 

liisuTXNAKTB, 326, commanding. 
Do. on other duty, 

Do. waiting orders, 



Pay. 






Pay. 


54,500 Surgeons, 69, 1st 6 years in com., 


$1,000 


3,600 


Do. 


in navy yards, &c., 


1,260 


4,000 


Do. 


in sea service, 


1,888 


8,500 


Do. 


of the fleet. 


1,600 


2,600 


Do. 


2d 6 years, 


1,200 


2,600 


Do. 


at navy yards, &c. 


1,500 




Do. 


in sea service. 


1,600 


2,100 


Do. 


of the fleet, 


1,800 


1,800 


Do. 


3d 6 years. 


1,400 


1,800 


Do. 


at navy yards, &c. 


1,750 


1,500 


Do. 


in sea service. 


1,866 


1,200 


Do. 


of the fleet, 


2,100 



1847.] 



NATT U8T. 



1S7 



BctcnoKS, 4kh 6 years, 
Do. at nayy yarcLs, &o., 

Do. in Bea servioe, 

Do. of the fleet, 

Do. 20 years and upwards, 

Do. at navy yards, &o., 

Do. in sea-service, 

Do. of the fleet, 

pABSBB Assistant Snaaxoirs, 29. 
Assistant Subgxons, 96, waiting 
orders, 
at sea, 

after passing, &c., 
at sea alter passing, 
at navy yards, 
do. after passing, 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

PUBSERS, 64. 



Pay.] 
$1,600 CHAPLAms, 22, in Sea service, 



2,000 



Do. 



on leave, &c., 



2,183 PASSU) MiDsmPHXN, 181, on dnty, 



2,400 



Pay. 

♦1,200 

800 

760 



Do. 



vraiting orders, 600 



1,800 MiDSHiPiaiN, 264, in sea service. 



2,250 

2,400 
2,700 



660 
660 



Do. 
Do. 

Mastxks, 28, 



on other duty, 
on leave, &c.. 



400 
860 
300 



of ship of the line at sea, 1,100 



Do. on other duty. 

Do. on leave, &c.. 

Professors of Mathematics, 22, 



860 Trachbrs at naval schools, &c., 8, 



1,200,Boatswains, 31 ' 
860 Gunners, 42 
1,160 Carpenters, 86 

SAIUfAEERS, 34 , 

Note. One ration per day, only, is allowed to all officers when attached to veesehi for 
s^vioe, since the passage of the law of the 8d of March, 1836, regulating the pay of the 
navy. TecuJurs receive two rations per day, at 20 cents each. 



of a ship of the line, 
ofafligate, 
on other duty, 
on leave, &c.. 



1,000 
760 

1,200 
480 
760 
600 
600 
860 



6. Vessels op War op the United States NAVT.-^JM/y, 1846. 

[The names of officers marked thus * have the rank of Chmnumders ; thus t LieutenaMis ; 

the rest are Captains, 



Name and Bate. 



Ships of the Line. — 10. 
Guns. 
Franklin, 74 

Columbus, 74 

Ohio, 74 

North Carolina, 74 

Delaware, 74 

Alabama, 74 

Yeriaont, 74 

Yirginia, 74 

Pennsylvania, 120 

New York, 74 

Frigates, Isb CUus.^lS. 



Independence, 

United States, 

Constitatjon, 

Potomac, 

Brandywine, 

Santee, 

Cumberland, 

Sabine, 

Savanxiah, 

Raritan. 

Columma, 

St. Lawrence, 

Congress, 



Razee, 64 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 



Where and when 
built. 



Philadelphia, 1816 

Washington, 1819 

New York, 1820 

Philadelphia, 1820 

Gosport, Va,, Ji820 



Philadelphia, 1837 



Boston, 1814 

Philadelphia, 1797 

Boston, 1797 

Washington, 1821 

Do. 1826 



Boston, 



Commanded by 



T. W. Wymauj 
*J. Growninshield, 
*H. W. Ogden, 



*C. K. Stribling, 



E. A. V. Lavellette, 



J. Percival, 
John H. Aulic, 



1842 French Forrest, 



Frigates, %i Class. 

Constellation, 
Blaoedonian, 



—2. 

86 
36 



New York, 

Philadelphia, 

Washington, 



1848 
1836 



1842 James Armstrong, 



F. H. Gregory, 
*B. Bitchie, 



Portsmouth, 1841 



Baltimore, 1797 
Norfolk, rebuUt, 1886 



Where employed. 



Boston. 

East Indies. 

Rec'g ship, Boston. 

Bec'g ship, N. York. 

Norfolk. 

On stocks, Ports'ih. 

do. Boston. 

do. do. 

Rec'g ship, Norfolk. 
On stocks, do. 



Pacific Ocean. 

Boston. 

East Indies. 

Home squadron. 

Norfolk. 

On stocks, Ports'th. 

Home squadron. 

On stocks, N. York. 

Pacific Ocean. 

Home squadnAi. 

Norfolk. 

On stocks, Norfolk. 

Pacific Oceant 



Norfolk. 
New York. 



128 



UMITBI> 8TATBS. 



[1847. 



Name and Bate. 



Sloops of War. ~ 



John Adams, 

Boston, 

Yincennes, 

Waxren, 

Falmouth, 

Fairfield, 

Vandalla, 

St. Louis, 

Gyane, 

Levant, 

Saratoga, 

Ontario, 

Marion, 

Decatnr, 

Preble, 

Yorktown, 

Dale, 

Portsmouth, 

Plymouth, 

Albany, 

Germantown, 

St. Idary's, 

Jamestown, 

Brigs. ^S. 

Boxer, 

Dolphin, 

Porpoise, 

Bainbridge, 

Perry, 

Somers, 

Truxton, 

Lawrence, 



28. 

Guns 

20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
18 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 



10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 



Schooners — 9. 

Shark. 10 

Experiment, 4 

Flirt, 

Ware, 

Phenix, 

On-ka-hy-e, 

Bonito, 1 

Reefer, 1 

Petrel, 

Steamers. '— 11. 

Fulton, 4 

Mississippi, *10 

Union, 

Princeton, 

Michigan, 

Alleghany, 

Spitfire, 8 

Yixen, 3 

Gen. Taylor, j 

Water Witch, 

Engineer, 

Store Ships. — 4. 

BeUef; 6 

Erie, 8 

Lexington, 8 

Southampton, 



Where and when 
built. 



Norfolk, relfuiU, 
Boston, 
New York, 
Boston, 

Do. 
New York, 
Philadelphia, 
Washington, 
Boston, 
New York, 
Portsmouth, 
Baltimore, 
Boston, 
New York, 
PortsmouUi, 
Norfolk, 
Philadelphia, 
Portsmouth, 
Boston, 
New York, 
Philadelphia, 
Washington, 
Norfolk, 



Oommanded by 



1820 *W. J. 

1826 

1826 
1826 



McCluney, 



*H. Paulding, 
*J. B. Hull, 



Boston, 
New York, 
Boston, 
Boston, 
Norfolk, 
New York, 
Norfolk, 
Baltimore, 



1881 

1836 
1836 
1842 
1843 
1842 
1843 
1843 



Washington, 1821 
Washington, 1831 

Transferred lh>m 
W^ar Department. 



Purchased, 
Do. 
Da 
Do. 



1843 
1846 
1846 
1846 



New York, 1837 

Philadelphia, 1841 

Norfolk, • 1842 

Philadelphia, 1843 

Erie, Pa., 1844 

On the stocks. 

Purchased, 1846 

Do. 1846 

Transferred from 

War Department. 

Washington, 1846 

Purchased, 1845 



Philadelphia, 1886 

Balthnore, 1818 

New York, 1825 

Norfolk, 1846 



W. Mervine, 
*Hugh N. Page, 
^Irvine Shubrick, 
tWm. M. Glendy, 
*Lewis E. Simonds, 



1827 *J. R. 

1828' 

1828 
1828 
1837 
1837 
1842 
1813 
1839 
1839 
1839 
1839 
1839 
1843 
1843 
1846 
1846 
1844 
1844 



Jarvis, 



Wm. F. Shields. 



*W. W. McKean, 
*J. B. Montgomery, 
♦Henry Henry, 



*J L. Saunders, 
*R. B. Cunningham, 



tJohn E. Bispham, 
♦John Pope, 
tW. E. Hunt, 
tL. Pennington, 
tGeo. S. Blake, 
*D. N Ingraham, 
*E. W. Carpenter, 
*Samuel Mercer, 



tN. M. Howison, 
t James L . Lardner, 
tA. Sinclair, 



IT. G. Renham, 

t J. S.. Sterrett, 
tT. D. Shaw, 



A. Fitzhugh, 



*F. Engle, 
♦Steph. ChampUn, 



*J. TattnaU, 
•J. R. Sands, 



tOscar Bullus, 
to. C. Turner, 
tTho's Bailey, 
tH. W. Morris, 



Where employed. 



Home squadron. 
New York. 
East Indies. 
Pacific Ocean. 
Home squadron. 
Norfolk. 

do. 

do. 
Pacific Ocean. 

do. do. 

do. do. 
Rec'g ship, Baltim'e. 
Coast of Africa. 
Norfolk. 

Boston. 
Pacific Ocean. 

do. do. 
Braidl. 
New York. 
Philadelphia. 
Home squadron. 
Coast of AfUca. 



Coast of AAica. 

do. do. 
Home squadron. 
Coast of Brazil. 
Home squadron. 

do. do. 

do. do. 

do. do 



Pacific Ocean. 
Rec'g yessel, Philad. 
Home squadron. 
Coast Survey, 
do. do. 
Gulf of Mexico. 
Home squadron. 

do. do. 

do. do. 



New Yoric. 
Home squadron. 
Washington. 
Home squadron. 
Lake Erie. 
Pittsburg. 
Gulf of Mexico, 
do. do. 



Water-tank, Norfolk. 
Tug, Norfolk. 



Home squadron. 
Pacific Ocean. 

do. do. 
Coast of Africa. 



* Paixhan. 



1847] 



NAYT LIST. 



139 



7. Naval Forces op other Powers. 
Naval Force of Great Britain,* 



GlasBee of (thips. 


Tn csnirnnifurinTi, 


Building. 


In ordinary. 


Total 
ships. 




No. Guns. 


No. 


Guns. 


No. 


Guns. 

6,258 

8,066 

521 

18 

40 

80 

• • 

• • 

• • 


Ships of the line, 
Frigates, . 

Sloops, brigs, and bombs, 
Schooners, cutters, and ketches, 
Steam frigates, 
Steam sloops, 
Steam packets, 
Other steamers. 
Transports and troop ships, 
BeoeiTing-ships, coast-guards, and 
other non-effectlTe tmscIs, 

Total, 


17 

82 

71 

88 

.6 

54 

21 

9 

5 

84 


1,570 

1,146 

, 856 

66 

60 

270 

42 

18 

70 

H86 


23 
15 
21 

• • 

12 

20 

8 

6 

• • 

• • 


2,124 

498 
805 

• ■ • 

120 

100 

6 

12 

• • • 
■ ■ • 


75 

73 

40 

6 

4 

6 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 


115 

120 

182 

89 

22 

80 

24 

16 

5 

84 


[ 882 


4,588 


100 


8,166 


204 


9,988 


686 



« Nominal annament. The oflScial list numbers 671 reesels, but names only 686. 

Number of ressels in the British nary, 636 ; mounting, when aimed, 17,681 guns. Num- 
ber of men and boys employed, 40,000. 

Navtl Force of Francej\ 



Classes of yessels. 


Tn Ri>}irvnJ{v<inn, 


Building. 


Inordinary. 








Total 
ships. 


No. 


Guns. 


No. 


Guns. 


No. 


Guns. 


Ships of the line, 

Frigates, 

Correttes and sloopi^ 

Brigs, . . 

Schooners, and small Tessels, 

Transports, &c. 

Steam frigates, . 

Steam corretfees, . 

Smaller steamers, 

Total, 


17 
28 
17 
34 
37 
83 
6 
8 
41 


1,598 

1,184 

444 

464 

122 

182 

78 

62 

209 


25 
16 
8 
2 
2 
10 
2 
9 
8 


2,442 
810 
90 
40 
12 
40 
12 
54 
15 


4 
6 
6 

21 
8 

14 

« • 

• • 

• • 


840 
810 
124 
270 
20 
56 

• ■ 

• ■ 

• • 


46 
45 
26 

67 

47 

67 

7 

17 
44 


1 215 


4,298 


72 


3,515 59 


1,120 


846 



Total number of ressels of all classes in ttie French nayy, 846. Total number of guna, 
when all are armed, 8,928. Number of men and boys in the naval service, in 1845, 27,664 

Nacal Force of Russia^ 



Gtoases of ships. 


Inc( 


immifurinn 


, buildiTiff, and ordinary. 






Yessels. 


Guns. 


No. of guns of each Teasel. 


Ships of the Ime in the Baltic, 

Frigates in the Baltic, . 

Sloops, brigs, and gunboats, in the Baltic, 

Steamers, . ' . 

Ships of the line in the Black Sea, 

Frigates in the Black Sea. 

Sloops and brigs in the Black Sea, . 

Smaller yessels in the Black Sea, 

Steamers, 

Total, 


80 
20 
40 
26 
17 
10 
12 
18 
6 


2,400 
840 
820 
104 

1,860 

610 

168 

158 

86 


Estimated at 80 goiu each. 
Estimated at 42 guns each. 
Estimated at 8 guns each. 
Estimated at 4 guns each. 

5 of 60 guns, and 5 of ^ gpaXB. 
Estimated at 14 guns each. 

Estimated at 6 guns each. 


179 


6,896 


Besides the Caspian fleet. 



Number of men in the Baltic and Black Sea fleets, 69,000. 



• From the Navy list for Jaanarr, 1846. 
X From MeOiegor's OonmneU SMIsttei. 



t Ffou *^ Annilea MMtimee," Jone, 1846. 



130 



UNITED STATES. 

Naval Force of HoUand,* 



[1847. 



Claases of ships. 


In 
commission. 


Building. 


Inordinary. 


No. 


Guns. 


No. 

8 
6 

1 

• 


Guns. 


No. 


Guns. 


Ships of the line, 
Frigates, . 
Steamers of war, 
Gunboats, . 

Aggregate, . 


• * 

6 

8 

40 


210 
12 
80 


222 
240 

4 

• 


5 
8 

64 


390 
860 

• • 

128 


48 


902 


9 


466 


77 


878 



Number of yessels, besides sloops and brigs of war, 134 ; mounting 1,646 guns. 

Naval Force of Mexico.\ 

The nayal force of Mexico recently in commission consisted of 8 brigs, 2 steamers, and 18 
smaller yessels ; mounting in all 42 guns. Commercial tonnage unknown. 



Comparative View of the Naval Forces of the Powers of Europe and America. 



Relatiye nayal 
power of each na- 
tion. 



In commission. 



Great Britain, 

France, 

Russia, 

Turkey, 

United States, 

^Egypt, . 

Holland, . 

Sweden, 

Denmark, 

Austria,* 

Bnuil, 

Sardinia, 

Spain, 

Two Sicilies,* 

Portugal,* 

Mexico, 



Yessels. 



832 

215 

179 

62 

47 

85 

48 

t330 

74 
31 
11 
21 
17 
59 
23 



Guns. 



4,583 

4,293 

5,896 

2,636 

1,165 

1,448 

302 

660 

344 

686 

450 

226 

348 

388 

42 



Building, orcUna- 
ry, &c. • 



Vessels. 



304 
131 

• ■ 

4 

80 
8 
86 
50 
12 

• • 

11 
4 



Guns. 



Total. 



18,098 
.4,636 

• • 

24 
1,190 

312 
1,344 
1,196 

782 

825 
220 



Yessels. 



(686 

846 

T179 

66 

**77 

88 

184 

380 

108 

74 

42 

15 

21 

17 

23 



Guns. 



4' 



17,681 

8,928 

"896 

660 

2,345 

1,760 

1,646 

1,856 

1,076 

686 

775 

446 

848 

888 

42 



i 

o 

« 

o 



40,000 
27,554 
59,000 
26,820 

8,724 






141 
68 
32 
9 
5 
1 
4 
2 



* Although the whole nayal force of these nations has been placed in the coliunn of " In 
coBunission " it is probable that a portion of it is in " ordinary," but it is not known what 
^frSo* ®^ nations haye a few war steamers, but the number is not known. 

t «3 of this number are gun-boats. J 86 are men-of-war cutters and gun-boata. 

Tl Exclusiye of the Caspian fleet. 



f Ebrolusiye 

Of sailing vessels in the Indian nayy, 

Of steamers in the Indian nayy, 

Of mail steamers, under control of goyemment in 1848, 

Of reyenue yessels, 



Yessels. Guns. 



Total, 



••Exclusiye of U. States reye- 
nue vessels, consisting of 




No. of yessels. Tot. tonnage. No. of guns. Offi'rs & men. 



13 sailing, 
8 steam, 



1,443 
8,110 



61 



769 



* From the United Service Journal, Ibr 1846. 
t From recent information by Amerioan offloers. 



1847.] 



ARMT LIST. 



131 



Comparative View of the Commercial Importance of different Nations, 



Nationfl, !n the order of their 
commercial importance. 


No. of yessels in 

commerce and 

fisheries. 


Tonnage. 


No. of guns to 
each 100,000 
tons of com- 
merce. 


United Kingdom of Great Britain, 


23,898 


8,007,581 


588 


United States, . 


19,666 


2,416,990 


97 


France, . 


13,782 


839,608 


1,063 


Sweden and Norway, 


5,450 


471,772 


224 


Holland, . 


1,528 


241,676 


683 


Russia, 


Not known. 


239,000 


2,466 


Two Sicilies, 


9,174 


213,198 


158 


Austria, 


6,199 


208,661 


321 


Turkey, . 


2,220 


182,000 


1,461 


Sardinia, . . . • 


3,602 


167,860 


266 


Denmark, 


3,036 


163,408 


709 


Portugal, 


798 


80,625 


• • 


Spain, 


2,700 


80,000 


■ • 


Brazil, 


Unknown. 


Unknown. 


■ • 


Mexico, 


Unknown. 


Unknown. 


• • 



VI. ARMY LIST. 



1. WiNFiELD Scott, Major General^ (commissioned July 25, 1814,) Gen- 
eral-in-Chief — Head Quarters, Waahington City. 



Edmund P. Gaines, 
Thomas S. Jesup, 
Zachary Taylor, 
William O. Butler, 
Robert Patterson, 



Commissioned. 
Major General, Aug. 15, 1814. 

do. do. May 8, 1828. 

do. do. May, 1846. 

do. do. . of Volunteers, June, 1846. 
do. do. do. Jnly* 1846. 



Brigadier Cf&ierals. 



Hugh Brady, 
George M. Brooke, 
John E. Wooi, 
George Gibson, 
Matthew Arbuckle, 
Roger Jones, 
N. Towson, 
Will. J. Worth, 



Commissioned. 
July 6, 1822. 
Sept. 17, 1824. 
AprU 29, 1826. 
April 29, 1826. 
March 16, 1830. 
June 7, 1832. 
June 80,1884. 
March 1, 1842. 



David E. Twigp, 
Stephen W. Kearney, 
Thomas L. Hamer, 
Joseph Lane, 
James Shields, 
Thomas Marshall, 
Gideon J. Pillow, 
John A. Quitman, 



Commissioned. 
June, 1846. 
June, 1846. 



► of Yolunteers. 



IS3 



imiTBS STATES. 



[1847. 



Roger Jones, Brevet Brigadier General, and Adjutant General. 

L. Thomas, Major, and Assistant AdjtOant General, 

"W. G. Freeman, Captain, and Assistant Adjutant General, 

Col. George Croghan, Inspector General of the Army. 

Col. S. Churchill, do, do. do, 

2. Field Oppicers op Regiments. 



First Dragoons. 
Col. Rich. B. Mason, 
lieut. Col. Clifton Wharton, 
Miyor Eustace Trenor. 

Second Dragoons. 
Col. Wm. S. Hamey, 
Lient. Col. T. T. Fatintleroy, 
Major Edwin V. Snmner. 

First Artillery. 
Col. I. B. Crane, 
Lieut. Col. B. K. Pierce, 
Major L. Whiting. 

Second Artillery. 
Col. James Bankhead, 
jLient Col. A. C. W. Fanning, 
Major John Erving. 

Third Artillery. 
Col. William Gates, 
lieut. Col. F. S. Belton, 
Major W. L. McClintock. 

Fourth Artillery. 
Col. J. B. Walbach, 
|Lieut. Col. M. M. Payne, 
Major John L. Gardner. 

First In/antry. 
Col. W.,Davenport, 
lieut. CoL H. Wilson, 
Major John B. Clark. 

Second In/antry. 
tCol. Hugh Brady, 



Lieut. Col. B. Riley, 
Major J. Plympton 

Third In/antry. 
tCol. J. B. Many, 
Lieut. Col. E. A. Hitchcock, 
Major W. W. Lear. 

Fourth In/antry, 
Col. WiUiam Whistler, 
Lieut Col. John Garland, 
Major W. V. Cobbs. 

Fifih In/antry. 
tCol. G. M. Brooke, 
^ieut. Col. J. S. Mcintosh, 
Major Martin Scott. 

Sixth In/arttry. 
Col. Newman S. Clarke, 
Lieut Col. G. Loomis, \ 

Major B. L. E. Bonneville. 

Seventh In/antry, 
tCol. M. Arbuckle, 
Lieut Col. Greenleaf Deaihom, 
Major Thomas Noel. 

Eighth In/antry. 
tCol. W. J. Worth, 
Lieut Col. Tho's Stamford, 
iMajor W. G. Belknap. 

Mounted Btflemen, 
Col. Persifor F. Smith, 
Lieut Col. John C. Fremont, 
Major Geo. S. Burbridge.' 



t Brig. General by brevet. {Colonel by brevet. 



Aurr LIST. 
3. liXLM o» Pi* OB Ajoir Ovncuw. 



SiteMUer-Omioral, ^ " ""' 


104 00 


12 


72 


J 


24 


■V 


'koBo" 


2*66 




20 (M 






1 








28S 




so 00 








24 




8300 




±S.'iJj.S::rSi, 


WK 


4 


£4 

24 


f 


24 




is 


986 


Sfi=.tS.r'^St"i.., 


eoo( 






3 


24 






1830 


1HD( 


12 






24 






1465 


AidjtuC Qoii. Qfln. — Colonel, 










24 








DBpntj Qnar. Gm. — U, Colonel, 


75 01 


6 










83 00 






60 0( 














1410 












S 








Commi»ary G™. of talBtet'silci: 










24 




33 00 




AMiaOmt Com, Gen.— U. Col. 


76 00 




90 


8 








162 




so 00 








24 






1410 


CommlsV of SabaiBlenc* — Cl,il. 


GO 00 


i 








1 


10 60 




ABEbUnt Com. Urideg par of Lt. 


2000 














200 


PiynuiBlet, .... 
















203f 
126C 




i 






8 


2' 




Burgeon Oonorsl, SiSOO per aim., 
Burgeons of 10 ysu*' HrvlFe. 
















149 


"eb'ffl 




■49 










BnrgoonB of less thwi lOy. Bervloe, 
















126 00 


Aamt. Surg, of 10 jsara' Berrica, 










8 


1 


16 60 


132 60 


Aulst. Surg, of 5 loan' aurlce, 




4 


24 










98 60 




S3 38 




24 








16 60 


8188 






































ColODil, . .* . '■. 


90 00 




86 




24 


2 


33 00 


183 00 




7600 












83 00 




sa,-. ■.'.•. •. 


eoo( 




24 




24 












24 




8 


1 


16 60 


9S60 




83 8! 




24 








16 60 


8188 




38 S3 


* 






8 


^ 




3188 






e 


80 




24 




33 00 


183 00 




7B0( 




30 






2 


83 00 


16200 


tf^r, ..'... 


60 00 




24 








83 00 


14100 




60 00 


4 


24 




16 


1 


16 60 


109 60 




88 88 




24 








16 60 


8»8I 




33 8S 




24 




16 




16 60 


89 39 


Aitjniut, ]Mtia« pij or Ueut. 

ASIILLIHI ~ IHrUITET. 


10 00 
































75 0( 








24 


2 


8100 


106 00 










3 


24 




SI 00 


146 00 


s&, .■.■.-.■. 






24 


8 


24 


3 


8100 


129 OC 






24 
24 
24 








16 50 
1G6D 
1550 














|u 












!0 0( 




"i' 


"s 


... 


IB 00 







134 



UNITED 8TATBB. 



[1847. 



4. Militia Fobcs ov this Unitsd Statss. 
Abstract of the United Statu Militia^ from, the Army Register Jor 1846. 



States and 
TenitoxleB. 



Maine, 

New Hampshire, 

Massachusetts, 

Yermont, 

Rhode IslaQd, 

Connecticut, 

New York, . 

New Jersey, 

Pennsylvania, 

Delaware, 

Maryland, . 

Virginia, 

North Carolina, 

South Carolina' 

Georgia, 

Florida, . 

Alahii.nf>ii^ . 

Louisiana, 

Mississippi, . 

Tennessee, 

Kentucky, 

Ohio, 

Indiana, 

Illinois, . 

Missouri, 

Arkansas, 

Michigan, 

Wisconsin Territory, 

Iowa Territory, . 

District of Columbia, 



I 



1844 
1845 
1845 
1843 
1845 
1845 
1845 
1829 
1845 
1827 
1838 
1845 
1841 
1844 
1839 
1845 
1844 
1829 
1838 
1840 
1845 
1841 
1832 
1841 
1844 
1843 
1845 
1841 



1832 



26 
12 

9 
12 

7 

11 

122 

19 

56 

4 
22 
28 
28 
20 
86 

8 
82 
10 
15 
25 
43 



SI 

• • • 

45 
8 

28 
1 



654 









95 
40 
86 
51 
80 
41 

769 
58 

164 

8 

68 

57 

67 

138 
98 
14 

102 
46 
70 
79 

172 



UO 
• • • • 

94 

29 

148 

6 



8 



2,593 



540 
828 
121 
224 
86 
817 

2,253 
435 

1,523 

n 

544 

1,859 

728 

467 

746 

95 

671 

183 

392 

859 

1,104 



566 

• • • • 

790 

810 

882 

36 



24 



15,144 



I, 



1,659 

1,264 

408 

801 

27 

1,062 

5,866 

1,476 

6,054 

364 

1,768 

5,036 

2,969 

1,960 

2,212 

508 

2,173 

542 

848 

2,644 

8,665 



2,154 

• • • • » 

2,990 
762 

2,116 
126 



68 



50,511 



2,820 
1,689 

569 
1,088 

150 
1,431 
8,509 
1,988 
7,797 

447 
2,897 
6,480 
8,787 
2,585 
3,092 

620 
2,978 

781 

825 
3,607 
4,984 



2,861 

• • • • • 

3,919 

1,109 

2,674 

169 




96 



68,902 



42,845 
26,758 
90,238 
22,827 
13,659 
45,392 

153,918 
37,183 

263,890 

8,782 

44,467 

115,173 
62,524 
50,341 
54,220 
11,502 
58,858 
14,027 
85,259 
67,645 
82,806 



61,062 

• •■••• 

67,081 

16,028 

58,212 

6,054 



1,163 



44,665 
28,897 
90,807 
23,915 
13,809 
46,823 

162,427 
39,171 

271,687 

9,229 

46,864 

121,653 
66,311 
52,926 
57,312 
12,122 
61,836 
14,808 
36,084 
71,252 
87,790 

180,258 
53,918 
83,234 
61,000 
17,137 
60,886 
5,223 



1,489,894 11,822,288 



1,249 



Vn. POSTOFFICE ESTABLISHMENT, 

1. Post-Office Statistics for the year ending June 30, 1845, 

' Number of Post-Offices supplied, . , 14,183 

Increase of Mail Transpoi-tation over last year, . 224,645 

Beceipts for the year, ' . . , $4,289,841 80 

Expenditures for the year, . . 4,820,731 99 
The net revenue, deducting the commissions of Fostmasteis 

and incidental expenses, was . . 2,942,217 27 

The pay of Postmasters for the yewr was 1,409,875 18 



1847.] 



posi-onrics establishmbnt. 



135 



The Magnetic Telegraph between Baltimore and Washington has cost, 
between the 1st of April and the 1st of October, 1845, $3,244 99, and the 
receipts have been $413 44. 

Of 67 railroad ^ntracts in New England and New York, only 35 haye 
been adjudged in consequence of exorbitant demands. The railroad sendee 
performed is one tenth part of the whole ; the pay they receiye one fifth 
part. 

In 1838, the weight of the mails for one week in the cities of New York, 
Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, and Richmond, was tested, and the 
whole weight amounted to . . . . 55,641 pounds. 

The newspapers weighed . 44,868 

The periodicals weighed, . . 8,857 

The letters, free and taxable, weighed . 1,916 

At present, it is believed, the printed matter is nine tenths of the weight 
conreyed, and it pays only one tenth of the expense. 

2. TaUe of Mail Service for the year preceding the Ist of July, 1845. 



{( 



{( 



{{ 



Q^A^^a mkw^A 




Length 

of 
Routes. 


Annual Transportation. 


Total 
Transpor- 
tation. 


Total Cost. 


(States ana 
Territories. 


On 
Horse. 


In 
Coaches. 


Railroad 

and 
St'mboat. 


Maine, 

New Hampshire, 

Vermont, 

Massachusetts, 

Rhode Island, 

Connecticut, . 

New York, . 

New Jersey, . 

PennsylTuiia, 

Delaware, 

Maryland, 

Virginia, . . 

North Carolina, 

South Carolina, . 

Georgia, . 

Florida, 

Ohio, 

Michigan, 

Indiana, 

Illinois, 

Wisconsin, 

Iowa, . . • 

Missouri, 

Kentucky, . 

Tennessee, 

Alabama, 

Mississippi, 

Arkansas, 

Louisiana, 




Miles. 
4,037 
2,371 
2,401 
8,297 
884 
1,943 

12,867 
1,954 

10,203 
594 
2,258 
9,859 
7,283 
4,566 
6,457 
2,920 

11,047 
8,803 
6,854 
7,046 
1,976 
687 
8,657 
7,489 

> 6,674 
6,650 
4,414 
8,522 
2,228 


Miles. 

298,479 

125,149 

126,628 

258,718 

30,732 
130,938 
883,973 

93,372 
905,108 

56,264 
210,704 
1,032,056 
553,248 
314,614 
484,472 

96,680 
827,006 
812,458 
675,924 
374,294 
140,040 

92,925 
627,848 
624,081 
631,410 
666,644 
656,518 
369,012 
228,436 


Miles. 
706,124 
476,808 
684,178 
874,208 
74,266 
418,458 

2,842,169 
406,096 

1,666,436 
88,088 
307,736 
884,266 
653,228 
483,010 
698,814 
163,894 

1,721,036 
316,472 
697,896 

1,036,964 

83,834 

64,288 

604,674 

694,614 

669,848 

676,762 

332,072 

112,944 

7,488 


Miles. 
86,400 
73,632 
2,304 

618,556 
29,952 

217,338 
1,104,884 

211,462 

816,368 

' 893,848 
636,694 
347,272 
222,040 
306,604 
75,400 
571,480 
177,276 

"35,776 

'485,096 
686,212 

1*8,848 
88,072 
31,200 
82,888 


Miles. 

1,041,008 

675,689 

713,110 

1,646,477 

134,940 

766,734 

4,831,026 

709,920 

2,787,912 

144,352 

912,288 

2,452,006 

1,553,748 

1,019,564 

1,388,890 

835,974 

3,119,622 

806,206 

1,173,820 

1,447,034 

228,874 

147,218 

1,467,618 

1,803,807 

1,190,758 

1,888,264 

920,662 

618,156 

818,812 


$69,664 
46,638- 
46,939 

128,646 
10,616 
56,308 

360,666 
58,194 

152,917 
7,931 

131,730 

198,162 

174,617 

116,945 

149,761 
42,854 

162,800 
46,363 
68,711 

120,523 

13,382 

7,381 

69,182 

126,561 
89,629 

228,266 
95,312 
62,950 
89,666 


Total, 




143,940 


11,226,631 


17,924,046 


6,484,692 


85,684,269 


$2,867,991* 


Cost, . 




$548,482 


$1,476,079 


$843,480 







* Also, ezpenBes of Mail Agendes, $87,618 ; mAklog in all $2,906,604. 



186 



UNITBD STAXM. 



[1847. 



3. Number of Pat-Officeg, Exknt of Pcit*Boad$^ w»d Beiftnm and Expen- 
ditures of the Post-Office Department; with the Amount paid to Poetmasters 
and for Transportation of the MaU, 



Year. 


No. of 

Post 

Offices. 


Szteatof 

Post 

Boads. 


Beyenue 

of the 

Department. 


BzpencUtavBS 

of the 
Departmoit. 


Amount paid for 


Compen. of 
Postmasters. 


Transporta'n 
of the Mail. 






MileR. 


BoUara. 


Dollars. 


Dollara. 


Dollars. 


1790 


75 


1,875 


37,935 


32,140 


8,198 


22,031 


1795 


453 


13,207 


160,620 


117,893 


30,272 


75,359 


1800 


903 


20,817 


280,804 


213,994 


69,243 


128,644 


1805 


1;SS8 


31,076 


421,373 


377,367 


111,552 


239,635 


1810 
1815 


2,300 

3;000 


36,406 
43,748 


551,684 
1,043,065 


495,960 
748,121 


149,433 
241,901 


327,966 
487,779 


1816 


3,260 


48,673 


961,782 


804,422 


265,944 


521,970 


1817 
1818 


3,459 
3,618 


52,069 
59,473 


1,002,973 
1,130,235 


916,515 
1,035,832 


303,916 
346,429 


639,199 
664,611 


1819 


4,000 


67,566 


1,204,737 


1,117,861 


375,828 


717,881 


1820 


4,500 


72,492 


1,111,927 


1,160,926 


352,295 


782,425 


1821 


4,650 


78,808 


1,050^067 


1,184,283 


387,599 


815,631 


1822 
1823 
1824 
1826 


4,799 
4,043 
5,182 
5,677 


82^763 
84,860 
84,860 
94,052 


1,117,490 
1,130,115 
1,197,758 
1,306,525 


1,167,572 
1;156,995 
1,188,019 
1,229,043 


355,299 
360,462 
383,804 
411,183 


788,613 
767,464 
763,939 
785,646 


1826 


6,150 


94,052 


1,447,703 


1,366,712 


447,727 


885,100 


1827 
•1828 
1820 
1830 
1831 


7,003 
7,530 
8,004 
8,450 
8,686 


105,336 
105,336 
115,000 
115,176 
115,486 


1,524,633 
1,659,915 
1,707,418 
1,850,583 
1,997,811 


1,408,959 
1,689,945 
1,782,132 
1,982,708 
1,936,122 


486,411 
548,049 
559,237 
695,234 
635,028 


942,345 
1,036,313 
1,153,646 
1,274,009 
l,2fl2,226 


1832 


9,205 


104,466 


2,258,570 


2,266,171 


715,481 


1,482,507 


1833 


10,127 


119,916 


2,617,011 


2,930,414 


826,283 


1,894,638 


1834 


10,603 


119,916 


2,823,749 


2,910,605 


897,317 


1,925,544 


1835 
1836 


10,770 
11,001 


112,774 
118,264 


2,993,356 
3,406,323 


2,757,350 
2,841,766 


945,418 
812,803 


1,719,007 
1,638,052 


1837 


11,787 


141,242 


4,100,605 


3,308,428 


891,352 


1,996,727 


1838 
1839 
1840 
1841 
1842 
. 1843 
1844 


12,519 
12,780 
13,468 
13,778 
13,733 
13,814 
14,103 


134,818 
lo3,990 
155,739 
155,026 
149,732 
142,295 
144,687 


4,235,078 
4,477,614 
4,539,265 
4,379,296 
4,546,246 
4,295,925 
4,237,285 


4,621,833 
4,654,718 
4,759,110 
4,443,768 
4,235,052 
4,374,713 
4,297,867 


933,948 
980,000 
1,028,925 
1,013,645 
1,147,256 
1,426,394 
1,358,316 


3,131,308 
3,285,622 
3,298,876 
3,159,375 
3,087,796 
2,947,319 
2,988,551 


1845 


14,183 


143,940 


4,289,842 


4,320,732 


1,409,875 


2,905,504 



The preceding statistics all relate to the Post-Office operations under the 
old law; the new law went into operation Jnly Ist, 1845. 



4. Decrtate of Biaxavt wxier Oa Nev! Zov. 

The following is an exact statement, as ascertained at the department, of 

tbe revenne deriyefl from 926 of the larger ofBcee in tlie United Stales for 

the qaarter ending the SOth of Scptcmlier, 1845, compared nitb the qiuuiec 

ending the doth of September, 1 B44 -. 

Reveane for the qnarter ending the 30th of Sept 1844, •464,481 

The same for the quarter ending Sept. 30th, 1845, 371,473 

Deficiene;, abont 41^ per cent., . . S193,008 

Out of 935 post-offices, which, nnder the old law, paid SlOO net and np- 

warda per qnaiier, 10 onlj exhibit an increase. These show an ^gregale 

increase of SI 19. These 10 arc in compoiatiTcly small towns, which have 

of late rapidlj increased in popuhition. 

The preceding stalemenC relates to Ihe Jirst three months under the new 
law ; what follows is an ofBcial statement respecting the opera^on of the 
new law during the tecond three months, viz: ^m October 1, 1S45, to 
January 1, 184G. 

The Revenue injtjiu of the large PoU-Offices for thejourth quarter of 1845, 
compared with t&jt which aarued m the tame Offices ibtring tie JburtA 
■ judrto- of 1844, 



Fifty Post-Offices show a deficit of 858,484, being a fraction less than 40^ 



138 UKXVBD STATBt. [1S47. 

Betnms made from each post-office, of the number of letterg received in 
the month of October, 1845. 1,953 offices, paying about one seventh of the 
revenue of the Department, failed to comply with the order. The following 
is the result from the offices making returns : 

Letters reduced to single rates, taxed and free, at 5 cents, 3,139,208 

Letters reduced to single rates, taxed and free, at 10 cents, 771,669 

Ship letters for delivery, at 2 cents, . . . 15,348 

Dropped letters at 2 cents, . . . 50,842 

There were 2,139,203 five cent rates, and 771,669 ten cent rates — not so 
many separate letters. 

The gross revenue, including the postages paid by the Executive Depart- 
ments, for the half year ending 31st December, 1845, was, $1,646,638 

The expenditures and liabilities same period, . 2,063,168 

Defideney for half year, .... $416,580 
or at the rate of about $833,060 a year. 

5. Bates of Fostaob. 

For a letter, not exceeding half an ounce in weight, (avoirdupois,) 
sent not exceeding 300 miles, ... 5 cts. 

Sent over 300 miles, . . . . 10 ^ 

For every half ounce, and any excess over every half ounce, the sam« 
rates of postage; and when advertised, two cents on each letter; 
or four cents, if the advertising cost so much, additional. 

For drop letters, (not to be mailed) each . . 2 *^ 

For any printed circular, handbill, or advertisement, on quarto post, 
single cap, or paper not larger than single cap, unsealed, sent any 
distance, . . . . . 2 " 

For any pamphlet, magazine, periodical, or other matter of every 
kind, that is transmittable by mail, and has no written oomnranica- 
tion on it, of one ounce or less, or for a newspaper exceeding 1,900 
square inches of surface, . . . . 2^ ** 

For each additional ounce, or an excess greater than a half ounce, 1 " 

Newspapers of 1,900 square inches or less, sent by Editors or Pub- 
lishers, from their offices of publication, any distance not exceed- 
ing 30 miles, ..... Free. 

For any other newspaper, sent over 30, and not more than 100 miles, 
or any distance within the same State, . . 1 cent 

Sent over such distance, . . . 1^ " 

Where the circular is on a sheet larger than single cap, it is to be rated as 
a pamphlet. As the postage on these articles is chargeable on each copy, 



X 



1^7.] POBT-Ofl^ICB ESTABLISHM£I7T. 139 

pofltmasters will carefbH^ examine til pabkets, and rate' the pofltage accord- 
ingly. When the article to be mailed is sL circttlar, pamphlet, or newspaper, 
it should be so enveloped, or folded, that it can be distinctly seen at the ofSce 
to be such, and also that it contain no writing, marks, or signs, to serve the 
purpose of written comiminicatiolis. if not done up so as to open at the 
6nd, it is to be charged as a letter, by weight. 

No packet can be mailed which weighs more than three potinds. Bomid 
books of any size are not inclnded in the term " mailable matter," except 
books sent by Governors of States. 

The establishment of private expresses for the conveyaiKje of any letters, 
packets, or packages of letters, or other matter transraittabte in the United 
States mail, (ncfwspapers, pamphlets, magazine^, and periodicab except- 
ed,) from one city, town, or other place, to any other dty, town, or place in 
the United States, between which the United States mail is regolaily trans- 
ported, is prohibited. 

6. Pbivilegd of FsANKINa. 

1. The President, ex-Presidents, and Mrs. Madison, and Mrs. Harrison, 
retain the franking privilege, as regulated by former laws. 

2. The Vice-President, members of Congress, alid del^ates from Ter- 
ritories 

May transmit pu&^tc documents free during their official terms; 

May send and rec^ve free, newspapers^ letters^ or packets^ weighing under 
two ounces, during the session of Congress, and for thirty days before the 
commencement and thirty days after the close of any session ; 

May receive letters free, not weighing over two ounces, during the recess. 
This does not include the interval from the close of one Congress to the 
commencement of the next ; 

May transmit free written letters from themselves the whcU year — that i^, 
from sixty days before the commencement of any session, until the meeting 
of the next Congress. 

3. The Secretary of Hie Senate and the Clerk of the House of Repre- 
sentatives 

May send free public document* during their Official terms ; 

May send and recdve free letters, newspapers, and pju^ges, not weighing 
over two ounces, during the session of Congress, and for thirty days before 
and after; 

May send free Utters written hy themselves during their official terms. 

4. The governors of States may send free the laws, records, and docu- 
ments of the legislature, to the governors of other States. 

5. The three assistant postmasters general 
MaysenJ/reeletters, packages, or other matters, relating exclusively to 

their official duties, or the business of the Post-Office Department j 



140 



UNITED 0TATS8. 



[1847. 



May receive all such letters and documents as reli^ to their own dnties, 
or that of the department, and have the postages remitted at the city post- 
office. 

6. Deputy postmasters may send free all such letters and packages as 
may relate exclusively to the business of their respective offices, and may 
have allowed all postages paid or charged to them in the settlement of 
their accounts. 

7. Exchange newspapers between editors pass free. 

8. Editors or publishers of newspapers may send their papers firee within 
thirty miles of the place of publication. 

9. Communications addressed to the officers of the government, hereto- 
fore having the franking privilege, touching the business of their respective 
offices, are to be paid for out of the contingent fund provided for their offi- 
ces, or out of the treasury. 



VUI. MINT. 

It is lawful for any person or persons to bring to the Mint gold and silver 
bullion to be coined ; and the bullion so brought is there assayed and coined, 
as speedily as may be after the receipt thereof; and if of the standard of 
the United States, free of expense to the person or persons by whom it shall 
have been brought. But the Treasurer of the Mint is not obliged to re- 
ceive, for the purpose of refining and coining, any deposit of less value 
than one hundred dollars, nor any bullion so base as to be unsuitable for 
minting. And there must be retained from every deposit of bullion below 
the standard, such sum as shall be equivalent to the expense incurred in 
refining, toughening, and alloying the same ; an accurate account of which 
expense, on every deposit, is kept, and of the sums retained on account of 
the same, which are accounted for by the Treasurer of the Mint with .the 
Treasurer of the United States. 



Officers of the 'MirA at PhUaddphia. 



B. M. Patterson, Director, 
Isaac Boach, Treasurer, 
Franklin Peale, Chief Coiner, 
J. Eckfeldt, Assayer, 



Salary. 

$3,600 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



Salary. 
Richard J. McCulloh, Mdter 

and Eefiner, $2,000 

Jas. B. Longacre, Engraver, 2,000 
W. C. Dubois, AssH Assayer, 1,300 



1847.1 



lciir«r. 



141 



CfflxxTS cf the Branch at New Orleans, La. 



Salary. 
J. M. Kennedy, Superintendent, $2,500 
Wm. P. Hort, Assayer, 2,000 

John L. Riddell, Melt. ^ Refin., 2,000 



Salaiy. 
Phil. B. Tyler, Coiner, $2,000 

John R. Macmordo, Dreasurer, 2,000 



Officers of the Branch at Dcddonega, Ga, 

Daniel H. Mason, Coiner, 



J. F. Cooper, Superintendent, $2,000 
Isaac L. Todd, Assayer, 1,500 



$1,500 



Officers of Branch at Charlotte, N. C. 



G. W. Caldwell, Superintend, $2,000 
J. H. Gibbon, Assayer, 1,500 



John B. Bolton, Comer, 



$1,500 



1. Statement of the Deposits for Coinage, at the Mint of the United States 

and its Branches, in the y€ar 1845. 



GiM, 

From Mines in the United States, . 
Coins of the U. States, old staiidard, . 
Foreign Coins, .... 
Forelen Bullion, .... 
Total of Gold, 

SUver. 

Bullion from the United States, 
Foreign Bullion, .... 
Foreign Coins, . ... 

Tof^i of Silver, .... 

Total, .... 


$1,008,327 

29,773 

2,554,018 

131,988 


$3,724,106 
1,873,486 


4j769 

89,135 

1,779,582 




5,597,592 



2. Statement of the Coinage of the Mint bf the United States and Branches, 

in the year 1845. 



DenOToiiiAtioiiB. 


Pieces. 


Talue. 


Denomitiatloiis. 


Pieces. 


Value. 


Gold. 

Eagles, 
Half Eagles, 
Quar. Eagles, 

Copper, 
Cents, 


73,653 
548,728 
110,511 


$3,756,447.60 
38,948.04 


Stiver, 

Dollars, 
Half Dollars, 
Quar. Doll's, 
Dimes, 
Half Dimes, 

Total, 


24,500 

2,683,000 

922,000 

1,985,000 

1,564,000 

« 


$1,873,200 


3,894,804 


5,668,595.54 



UNltBD BIAIBB. 



Coinagt of On MtiU of the Dmbd SuOa, fimi IT99, induding Oie omiage 
of the BraaiJi Mints from Ihe comiat^ceiBent of their (^fxrationii, in 1 B3S. 



198^ 


871,485 CO 


»S7O,fl8SB0 


»11,378 00 


1,834.420 


8463,64190 


799 


■ 102,727 60 


79,un 60 


1 ,824 40 


1,219,370 


192,128 40 


797 


103,422 60 






1,095,166 


126.524 29- 




206,810 00 






1369^1 


646,898 00 




213,286 <XI 


423J116 00 


9,108 68 


1,3«6,681 


646,906 68 


ttoo 


ai7,7UO 00 


224,296 00 


29.279 40 


8,337,972 


67I.3SB 40 


8U1 


422,670 00 


74,758 00 


1 ,028 37 


1,671390 


610 966 37 


<m 


423,810 1)0 


68,^3 00 


84 422 88 


8,616.989 


616,076 88 




258,3n60 


87418 00 


26,203 03 


2,780,830 


870,608 68 




2^8,042 60 


100,340 60 


12,844 94 


2/^6,839 


3n,827 9* 




170,387 60 


149^188 60 


I ,483 48 


2,260,361 




S£ 


334,605 00 




6560 00 


1,816,409 


eoi^oM 00 


mi 


437,496 00 


687;448 75 


.662 21 


2,731,346 


1,044,695 98 




284,666 00 


684,300 00 


13,090 00 


2,936 888 


982,056 00 




109,375 00 


707,378 00 


8,00163 


2,861834 


884,753 63 


810 


Wl,436 00 


638,773 60 


16^660 00 


3,056,418 


1.156,868 60 




497,008 00 


ra,3iooo 


2,406 95 


1,649,570 


1,108,740 96 




290,436 00 


814,020 50 


10,766 00 


2,761,646 


1,116,219 60 




477.140 00 




4,190 00 


1,766»31 


1402,27160 


8W 


77,270 00 


681^087 50 


8,578 80 


1^3^ 


642,635 80 




8,176 00 


17,308 00 




69,967 


20,483 00 






28,675 75 




2^88,136 


66.786 67 






607,783 60 


89,4*100 


6,183,997 


647.26:60 


81S 


"sk'woo 


1,070,164 60 


S1.H70 00 


6;6^;o»4 


1.345.064 60 


819 


,^'^^ 


1,140,000 00 


26,710 00 




1»26 00 




l.M9,030 00 


601,080 70 


44,076 50 




1,864.786 20 




189,325 00 


826.762 45 


8,800 00 




1,018,97! 46 




88,980 00 


805.806 60 


20,723 89 


3,813,798 


915^89 




72,425 00 


695,560 00 




^66^4% 


987,976 CO 




93,200 00 


1,752,477 00 


" 12,620 00 


4178^894 


1,8B8;297 00 




166,385 00 


1,664,588 00 


14,928 00 


6,178,760 






.^■^f^SS 


2,002J>90 00 


18,344 26 


^774^484 


2)110,679 26 




131,566 00 


2,889,200 00 


23^77 82 


»fl97,846 


3,024,8*2 83 


tw 


140,146 00 


1,675,600 00 


25,636 24 


8,198,963 


1,741,381 21 


m 


295,717 60 


1^ 678 00 


16:580 00 


7,674,601 


2,306,876 60 


830 


643,106 00 


a,49S*M00 


17,115 00 


8,367191 


8,165,620 00 




714,270 00 


8,175,600 00 




U^^ 


3,923,473 W> 




798,435 00 


2,579 WO 00 




9,128,387 


3,401.066 OO 


^. 




2,768,000 00 


28)160 00 


J0>)7;790 


lC766.710 00 


K34 




3,115,002 00 


19,161 00 


11.637,843 


7,3^,423 00 






3,443J)03 00 


39,480 00 




6S^667 00 




4,135,700 00 


8,606,100 00 


23,100 00 


13,719,333 


7,764,900 00 




1,148,306 00 


2,09aJ>10 00 




^010721 


s'Mm 00 




1,609,696 00 


2,883,248 00 




16.780,811 


4.206,640 0» 




l*i6,BB6 00 


2,189,296 00 




11,811,694 


8,576,467 81 




1,675,302 60 


1,726,708 00 


24,627 00 


10,658,240 


3^42^632 60 


^J 


1,091,597 60 


1,132,760 00 


16,073 67 


8,811,988 


2,240,32117 


sta 


1,834,170 60 


2,332,760 00 


23,833 90 


11,743,163 






8,109,797 50 


8,834.760 00 


24,283 20 


14,640.682 


1i)967)b30 70 


844 


6,428.230 00 


2,235,650 00 


£3,987 62 


9,061^ 


7,687,767 63 


346 


3,768,447 60 


1373,200 00 


_88,!«8 04 


l06406,10l 


6,688.695 5* 




48,310^ 60 


60,493,434 99 


1,M2,668 62 


116,846.856 92 



1847.] 



PUBLIC LANDS. 



143 



IX. PUBLIC LAOT)S. 

[From ihe Land CommiasioiierB' Eeport for 1845.] 

1. Exhibit of the Quantiiy of Public Land remaining unsold^ and in market^ 

June 30, 1845. 



States and TenitoriM. 



Ohio, 

Indiana, 

Illinois, 

Missouri, 

Alabama, 

Mississippi, 

Louisiana, 

Michigan, 

Arkansas, 

Florida, 

Iowa, 

Wisconsin, 



Total, 



a 






if 



Acres. 

154,218 

315,956 

2,966,118 

3,478,270 

1,361,625 

1,018,114 

1,733,603 

6,379,137 

8,060,722 

375,165 

957,416 

275,429 



27,075,773 



s| 
Is 

5 






il.a 



dm 



S 



III 



Acres. 



1,446,075 
2,869,700 
5,075,221 
419,383 
451,390 
5,985,392 
5,707,637 
2,042,725 
2,650,295 
1,600,836 
5,023,854 



33,272,508 



Acres. 
1,776 

365,466 
1,793,037 
2,798,677 
4,792,473 
2,974,097 
1,576,167 
1,873,797 
3,204,188 
3,618,476 



437,802 



23,435,956 



I 



S 
§1.9 



Acres. 
2,722 
71,338 

991,140 

505,203 
1,431,252 

924,131 
1,547,796 

238,003 
1,313,066 
3,508,416 



10,533,067 



States and Territories. 



Ohio, 

Indiana, 

Illinois, . 

Missouri, 

Alabama, 

Mississippi, 

Louisiana, 

Michigan, 

Arkansas, 

Florida, 

Iowa, 

Wisconsin, 



Total, 



ell 



I 



Acres. 

306,722 

245,929 

3,245,249 

6,633,493 

4,455,299 

894,424 

427,466 

385,524 

4,425,888 

165,602 



21,185,596 




Acres. 

151 
585,536 
3,894,267 
2,307,225 
4,298,443 
2,924,172 
1,141,605 
27,426 






43 



la 



Acres. 
420,178 
699,559 
70,837 



212,452 
1,222,706 



15,178,825 



2,625,732 



•a g »*s 

Pis- 






Acres. 

885,767 

3,729,859 

15,830,348 

20,798,089 

16,970,927 

10,409,034 

12,412,029 

14,611,524 

19,046,589 

10,317,954 

2,558,252 

5,737,085 



188,307,457 



144 UVITEP VTATSf. [1847. 

2. Statement of PuHtc Lands 5oZd, and of Ferments into the IVeasury, on 

account thereof ^ in the year 1844. 



States and Ter- 
ritorififl. 


Lands sold, after de- 
ducting erroneous 
entries. 


Amount receired In Cash, Treas- 
urer's Receipts, and Treas- 
ury Notes. 


Amount p'd 
into the 
Treasury 

during the 
Year. 


Acres. 


Purchase 
Money. 


Cash. 


Treasu- 
rer's 
Receipts. 


Treasury 

N0t4^H. 


Ohio, 
Indiana, 
Illinois, . 
Missouri, 
Alabamal, . 
Mississippi, . 
Louisiana, 
Michigan, 
Arkansas, . 
Florida, 
Iowa, 
Wisconsbi, . 


83,064 35 

107,278.24 

489,410.91 

449,743.43 

84,764.28 

80,486.31 

96,048.81 

22,328.40 

56,663.03 

14,714.14 

110,990.38 

260,440.85 


$;42,459.92 

134,106.24 

612,533.61 

563,377.32 

106,955.82 

88,046.68 

122,395.24 

28,734.67 

70,253.97 

18,640.13 

138,782.40 

832,392 24 

2,207,678.04 


636,788.17 

133,170.67 

594,663.00 

557,369.08 

104,592.32 

38,046.68 

110,985 31 

28,734.57 

69,631.07 

18,640.13 

138,782.40 

331,066.79 






982,258.48 

116,754.39 

577,026.21 

680,494.87 

87,720 67 

36,175.13 

122,886.83 

27,056.60 

/ 46,538.60 

6,11598 

129,721.98 

908,070.72 






$1,000.00 


$2,877.80 

8,508.24 

200.00 






1,200.00 


9,509.93 




522.90 










586.45 




Total, . 


1,754,763.13 


2,162,309.09 


2,200.00 


17,205,32 2,019,813.46 



3. 



Statement of Public Lands sold, and of Payments into the Treasury, on 
account thereof in the first and second quarters of the year 1845. 



States and Ter- 
ritories. 


Lands sold, after de- 
ducting erroneous 
entries. 


Amount receired in Cash, Treas- 
ure's Receipts, and Treas- 
ury Notes. 


Amount p'd 

intoTreas'y 

during the 

1st and 2d 

quarters of 

the Year. 


Acres. 


Purchase 
Money. 


Cash. 


Treasu- 
rer's 
Receipts. 


Treasury 
Notes. 


Ohio, 
Indiana, 
Illinois, . 
]!Ais8ouri, 
Alabama, . 
Mississippi, . 
Louisiana, 
Michigan, 
Arkansas, . 
Florida, 
Iowa, 
Wisconsin, . 


27,895.80 

44,251.98 

199,686.23 

142,519.54 

81,646.72 

12,693.28 

45,359.99 

8,297.43 

9,699.73 

7,999.96 

106,824.48 

143,603.65 


654,716.07 

56,329.60 

249,633.32 

178,434.97 

89,567.39 

16,866.67 

57,880.51 

10,815.84 

12,125.90 

9,999.94 

133,607.34 

181,116.91 


$53,251.88 

64,762.42 

248,490.82 

172,464.71 

39,607.39 

16,766.67 

56,780.51 

10,815.84 

12,020.90 

7,449.94 

183,607.34 

180,954.03 






$50,418.11 

61,243.94 

208,396.24 

206,271.81 

62,066.32 

15,665.7a 

68,622.94 

6.566.70 

34,281 .5q 

12,336.8S 

125,914.4fl 

165,832.09^ 








$60.00 

5,970.26 

50iX) 


















106.00 
2,550,00 








162.88 




Total, 


780,377,68 


990,084.36 


986,872.46 




8,888.14, 1,017,616.1^ 



4. 



Statement of Public Lands sold, and of Payments into the Treasury, on 
account thereof in the third quarter of the year 1845. 



atatea and Ter- 
ritories. 


Lands sold, after de- 
ducting erroneous 
entries. 


Amount received in Cash, Treas- 
urer's Receipts, and Treas- 
ury Notes. 


Amount p'd 
intoTreas'y 

during the 
tbdrd quart 

ter of the 
Year. 


Acres. 


Purchase 

Money. 


Cash. 


Treasu- 
rer's 
Receipts. 


Treasury 

Notes. 


Ohio, 
Indiana, 
niinpis, 
Missouri, 
Alabama, . 
Missisdppi, . 
Louisiana, 
BlOchigan, 
Arkansas, . 
Florida, 
Iowa, 
Wisconsin, . 


41,467.06 
11,770.02 
132,480.80 
56,64152 
13,988.35 

7,877.94 
24.265.64 

5,085.61 
16,986.72 

8,648.82 

44,167.83 

128,416.58 


6128,609.53 

14,712.53 

166,986.10 

70;916.58 

17,479.87 

9,222.88 

82,961.80 

7,622.05 

21231.88 

4;661.00 

55,461.89 

168,691.94 


$128,411 .53 

18,810.03 

164,6iai0 

70,616.63 

17,197.74 

9,222.88 

82,749.80 

7,622.06 

21,181.88 

4,661.00 

55,461.89 

162,757.80 






$9,328.21 

12482.99 

161,790.47 

56,384 48 

17,976.82 

2,153.89 

26,758 20 

6,250.98 

1,461.87 

3,606.62 

46,467.81 

149,722.61 






......... 


















$211.50 






60.00 








$184.14 




Total, . 


486,290.89 


092,905.60 


688,002.781 


I84.I4I 


3S1.60 


484,269.85 



1847.] 



SETBirUE XSTD BXFBNBITUBB. 



145 



5. QmrOity of Public Land sold, and the Amount paid Jbr it in each year, 

from 1833 to the third quarter of 1845. 



Yean. 


Aciea. 


DoUuB. 


1 Tears. 


Acres. 


Dollan. 


1833 
1834 
1835 
1836 
1837 
1838 
1839 


3,856,227.56| 4,972,284.84 
4,658,218.71 6,099.981.04 
12,564,478.85 15,999,804.11 
20,074,870 92 25,167,833.06 
5,601,103.12 7,007,523.04 
3,414,907.42 4,305,564.64 
4,976,382.87 6,464.556.79 


1840 
1841 
1842 
1 1843 
1 1844 
1845* 


2,236,889.74 
1,164,796.11 
1,129,217.58 
1,605,264.06 
1,754,763.13 
1,266,668.57 


2.789,637.53 
1,463,364.06 
1,417,972.06 
2,016,044.30 
2,207,678.04 
1,691,389.86 

81,603,633.37 


' Total,t 


64,303,788.64 



* Embraeing only thxee quarters of the year, t Total £>r 12 years and three quarters. 



1. 



X. BEVENUE AND EXPENDITURE. 
[From a Beport of the Secretary of Hie Treasoiy, December 3, 1846.] 

Statement of duties, revenues, and public expenditures during the fiscal yean 
ending June 30, 1844, and June 30, 1845. 



The receipts into the treasury were aa fol 

lows: 
From customs, viz : * 

During the first quarter, 

During the second quarter, 

During the third quarter, 

During the fourth quarter, 

Total customs, • 

IVom sales of public lands, 

From miscellaneous sources, 

Total receipts, exclusive of loans, &c.,* • 

Treasury notes under act of March 3, 1843,* • 
Avails of loan of liiarch 3, 1843, 

Total from notes and loans, 

Total Qieans, 

Balance in the Treasury, July 1, 1843 and '44, 
Grand total, 

The expenditures, exclusive of trust funds, 
were as follows : 

CivU List. 



Legislature, • 

Executive, • 

Judiciary, • 

Governments in the Territories, 

Surveyors and their clerks, 

Officers of the Mint and branches, 

Commissioner of the Public Buildings, < 
Secretary to sign patents, 

Total civil list, • • « 



Year ending 
June 80, 1844. 



$6,132,272 09 
3,881,993 47 
7,675,366 40 
8,493,938 98 



26,183,570 94 

2,059,939 80 

261,007 94 



28,504,518 68 



1,806,950 00 
70,231 35 



1,877,181 35 



30,381,700 03 



10,434,507 55 



40,816,207 58 



856,874 84 

840,752 92 

550,477 18 

101,736 04 

51,451 28 

47,100 00 

2,000 00 

1,500 00 



2,451,892 26 



Year ending 
June 80, 1846. 



10,878,718 04 
4,067,445 15 
6,385,558 83 
6,201,390 68 



27,528,112 70 

2,077,022 30 

163,998 56 



29,769,133 56 



7,857,379 64 



87,626,513 20 



713,594 16 

847,342 28 

628,012 17 

93,206 60 

58,738 68 

42,766 66 

2,000 00 

1,762 50 

2,887,423 051 



13 



146 



UKITED STATES. 



[1847: 



Foreign Intercourse. 

Salaries of ministers,- - 

Salaries of secretaries of legation, < 

Salaries of charg^ des aflFaires, - 

Salarj of minister resident to Turkey, « 

Outfits of ministers and charges des affaires, • 
Salary of dragoman to Turkey and contin 

gencies, 

Contingent expenses of all the missions abroad, 
Expenses incurred by the legation to Mexico, 

in relation to prisoners, 

Contingent expenses of foreign intercourse,* 
Expenses of forwarding the mails, &c., between 

Chagres and Panama, 

Salary of the consul at London, 

Relief and protection of American seamen,* • 
Clerk-hire, office-rent, &c., to American con- 
sul, London, 

Intercourse with Barbary powers, 

French seamen killed or wounded at Toulon, 
Interpreters, guards, &c., at the consulates in 

Turkish dominions, 

Payments under the 9th article of treaty with 

Spain, y r • • 

Compensation for certain diplomatic services. 
To commissioner to Sandwich Islands, 

Total foreign intercourse, 

Miscellaneous, 

Surveys of public lands, 

Support and maintenance of light-houses, &c., 

Manne Hospital, &c., 

Building Marine Hospitals, 

Public Buildings, &c., in Washington, 

Eumiture of the President's house, 

Support of the Penitentiary, 

Sixth census, ; 

Patent fund, 

Distribution of the sales of public lands, 

Payment to Maine and Massachusetts for ex- 
penses incurred in protecting the heretofore 
disputed territory, • • 

Buil<Ung custom-houses, &c., 

Survey of the coast of tJie United States,* • • 

Mint establishment,* 

Relief of simdry individuals, 

Miscellaneous claims unprovided for, 

Survey of the northeastern boundary line,* 

Removal of the statue of Washington, 

Auxiliary watch in the city of Washington,* 

Expenses incidental to the issue of treasury 
notes, 

Expenses incidental to the loans,* • * * 



Year ending 
June 30, 1844. 

$69,566 06 

13,246 00 

46,813 36 

3,000 00 

9,000 00 

1,850 00 
26,327 72 



26,064 67 

250 00 

2,000 00 

81,853 74 

2,800 00 
6,394 24 
1,000 00 

3,000 00 

1,273 00 

850 00 



Year ending 
June 80, 18^. 



$295,288 79 



$122,388 62 

302,487 25 

65,741 72 

46,146 03 
549 63 

12,500 00 

923 49 

' 39,353 28 

15,301 09 



206,934 79 

96,395 66 

95,000 00 

78,875 00 

138,704 67 

5,358 46 

28,500 00 

2,500 00 

6,490 74 

2,000 00 
2,300 00 



$82,535 51 

16,814 40 

69,593 93 

7,300 00 

00 



61,191 



2,400 00 

13,421 69 

33 13 

30,879 89 

500 00 

2,000 00 

60,352 80 

2,800 00 

6,266 79 

600 00 



25,300 00 

14,879 40 

2,800 00 



$399,668 54 



$95,922 01 

438,357 77 

168,016 20 

35,800 00 

28,916 15 

7,652 84 

• 39,798 07 
19,716 23 



10,792 95 
288,933 39 

85,110 16 
100,087 00 
126,067 97 

17,680 47 

7,318 23 

4,000 00 
8,299 63 



1847.] 



KETfiMUE JLSD £XPfiNi>ITDR£. 



147 



Support of lunatics of the District of Colombia, 
Three and five per cents, to certain States, • • • 

Two per cent, fund to Alabama, • • • 

Two per cent, fund to Mississippi, • 

Relief of the cities of the District of Columbia, 

Debentures and other charges, • • 

Additional compensation to collectors, &c., • • 

Payment of horses, &c., lost, 

Duties refunded under protest, • • • • 

Repayment for lands erroneously sold, 

Refunding purchase money for land sold in 

the Greensburg district, Louisiana, 

Testing the electro-magnetic telegraphs, • • • • 
Results and acc't of the exploring expedition. 
Preserving the botanical and norticultural 

specimens brought home by the exploring 

expedition, 

Preparing indices to the manuscript papers of 

Washington, 

Information respecting foreign commerce, • • • 

Registers for ships and vessels, 

Clerk to commissioners to remit duties on 

goods destroyed by fire in New York, 

Payment of books ordered by Congress, 

Conveying to the seat of government the votes 

for President and Vice President of U. S.,« 

Completing State House, Florida, 

Indemnity for slaves on board the Comet and 

Encomium, 

Expenses in relation to insolvent debtors of 

the United States, » 

Manual for custom houses in relation to sugar. 
All other items of a miscellaneous nature, • • • 

Total miscellaneous, 

Under the direction of the War Department. 

Army proper, 

Military academy, • • 

Fortifications, and other works of defence, • • • 
Armories, arsenals, and munitions of war, • • • 

Harbors, roads, rivers, &c., 

Surveys, 

Pensions, 

Indian Department, 

Claims of me State of Virginia, 

Arming and equipping the militia, 

Payments to militia and volunteers, ........ 

Relief of sundry individuals, 

Total under direction of the WarDep't,* • 



Year ending 
June 80, 1844. 



$38,021 04 

103,884 77 

710 65 

124,260 92 

277,327 04 

17,779 58 

11,315 22 

452,898 18 

18,358 82 

98,746 86 
17,500 00 
30,000 00 



1,200 00 

1,108 00 
3,000 00 
2,000 00 

7,005 99 
5,444 76 



5,553 21 



2,484,565 47 



3,053,294 53 

123,195 27 

705,980 44 

610,827 43 

263,629 51 

55,210 56 

2,013,072 63 

1,021,500 18 

18,404 78 

176,941 37 

174,819 62 

14,440 91 

8,231,317 23 



Tear ending 
June 30, 1845. 



$9,000 00 
25,886 10 

340 00 
124,575 12 
283,500 00 
168,380 79 

19,811 75 
398,730 30 

41,532 75 

38,239 87 

4,881 00 

35,000 00 



2,200 00 

1,252 00 
7,000 00 



2,000 00 
136,328 78 

10,586<00 
20,000 00 

6,962 17 

2,500 00 
2,334 06 
7,706 01 



2,831,115 77 



3,155,027 30 

142,874 85 

591,722 26 

786,155 04 

507,279 24 

72,810 57 

2,364,601 90 

1,383,916 78 

33,861 47 

176,383 08 

274,442 62 

44,127 80 



9,533,202 91 



148 



UNZTBD STATES. 



[1847. 



Under the direction of the Navy Department. 

Pay and subsistence, including medicines, &c., 
Increase, repairs, armament and equipment,* 

Contingent expenses,- • • '» 

Navy yards, 

Navy hospitals and asylum,^ 

Magazines, 

Relief of sundry individuals, 

Marine corps, 

Pensions to invalids, widows, &c.,« • • • • 

Total under direction of the Navy Dep^t, 



Tear ending 
Jnue 80, 1844. 



Public Debt. 

Paying the old public debt, 

Interest on the loans of 1841, 1842, and 1843, 

Redemption of the loan of 1841, 

Redemption of the loan of 1843, 

Redemption of Treasury Notes, 

Interest on Treasury Notes, 

Premium on the purchase of stocjs^ of the loan 

of 1841, 

Premium and commission on the purchase of 

stock of the loan of 1843, 

Total public debt, 

Total expenditures, » . 

Balance in the Treasury, July 1, 1844-5» 



$4,145,087 

1,315,727 

540,326 

141.010 

15,212 

780 

18,512 

303,499 

16,834 

6,496,990 



Tear ending 
June aO, 1845. 



35 $3,380,564 06 

54 1,405,946 44 

76 549,129 83 

75 321,680 99 

00 11,106 54 

01 249 78 
00 73,830 03 
81 352,542 26 
43 183,589 16 

65 6,22"8,639~09- 



$46,077 75 
M22,857 03 



11,118,828 42 
611,010 34 



$35,756 33 
996,256 76 

5,623,894 71 
400,000 OO 

1,470,243 13 
43,775 26 

3,268 93 

14,962 50 



12^998,77354 8,588,157 62 
32,958,827 94 29,968,206 98 



7,857,379 64i 7,658,306 22 



2: Statement of the Debt of the United SlateSy July 1, 1845» 

1. Of the (old) funded debt, being unclaimed principal and 

interest, returned from the late loan offices, . . $120,418 18 

2. Outstanding certificates, and interest to 31st December, 
1798, of the (old) unfunded debt, payable on presentation, 

3. Treasury notes issued during the late war, payable on pre- 
sentation, ..... 

4. Certificates of Mississippi stock, payable on presentation, 
6. Debts of the corporate cities of the District of Columbia, 

assumed by the United States, viz. : 

Of the city of Washington, $840,000 00 

Alexandria, 210,000 00 

Georgetown, 210,000 00 



22,003 56 

4,317 44 
4,320 Qd 



6. Loans, 
Tiz : Under the act of 15th April, 1842, redeemable 1st 
January, 1863, .... 
Under the act of 3d March, 1843, redeemable 1st 
July, 1853, 
LOini 



1,260,000 oa 



7. Outstanding treasury notes, 
Total debt, 



8^343,886 03 

6,604,231 35 
442,470 04 

$16,801,646 6d 



3. Saiement of ilu RectipU inlo the NatiomS Tre(aiiry,Jroai Ovtloma, Inter- 
nal Sanatue and Direct Taxea, and talei of Public Lands, Jradiont of a 
dollar being exdaded. 



Yam. 




SS^ 


SaktoTlmda 
and 


Aggr^SSte of Itecripls. 1 


la each yea. 


ftraijMPS. 


"&" 


•4,399,473 
3,M3,on 

14^667,698 
15,»4S,e22 
16,363,eU) 
7,29flJ)31 
8,&BS,3«» 

?s 

86,^;8re 

26,283.348 

iai 

l-;878,336 

ao,a98,ni 

23,681,886 
7,046,844 

RK3 


8208,943 
83T,708 

iS 
as 

779,136 
1,643,620 
1,583,377 

237,069 

43,631 
76^ 
27;870 

!B 

9,982 
6,762 
8,E«1 

4,612.288 
1,219,613 
313,244 
137,947 

44430 
40,966 

i^ 

19:«71 
26,888 

\^ 


$4336 
83,511 

ssi 
11 

442,262 
1,» 

iSS 

1,717,986 
1,991,223 

984,418 
1,216,090 
1,393,796 
1,496,946 
1.018,309 
1^17,176 
2,3:9,366 

IfS 

J» 

7'a8i;n8 

8,494,858 
1,470,296 

i'o5b"^ 
S;mi!o2i 


»4^,4T3 
4,693,012 

SjS 

7,M8,U4 

13,165)328 
10,932,163 
11,087,231 
13,620.312 

sgs 

17,0^,869 

8^78^832 

43]b1t90 
9,491,931 

"SSS 

24!24a,6M 

21,280:998 
27^697 
81407,0*0 

18,032,846 
16,993358 

sss 




ii 


22,642,497 


!a 


33,986,847 


im 


48,676,6»4 


s 


82,427,449 


H 


41,087,063 




87,900,902 


i 




1822 

S 


73,750,893 


1 




lew 

5 


107,095,«04 


leaa 

11 


136,681,972 


IS 

mo 


81,798,781 


leJ'^^-ia 




1 ^. 


i,« 


'a^nj&i 



* for ths jeu endtsg Jans 30. 



St,d,m>nl of at Krpe«ditHru of tht Unlltd 
« accawri oflht Fablic DeU, aadfim, Tnal I 



T«»ri. 


CivOUsl, 


MiUtMT-u*- 
Uibment. 


HanltMib. 






3r" 


1789-91. 
1793 
1T96 
1797 

law 

i 

i 

813 

Is 

i 

B 

1835 

S 

1829 

ffi 

a 

i8aa 

II 

1841 
.1846 


SS 

i;iii;o38 

i>3;^i8 

1,114,768 
I,4IS,9Z9 

IK 

1,897.997 
1,423,388 

\m'^ 

i» 
1,729,435 
a,2U8,(«!» 

2;989.Jia 
8,S1S,987 

2mfxa 
2,m.m 

;iH 

2,748,544 
2,800,178 
2314,777 
2,888,062 

80«i;849 
4,674,841 
S,061,789 
4,399.779 

Sil 

4.994,663 
6,681 J7B 
8,4110,881 
8^776,^ 
S8ffr^ 
6il«l,7*7 
6,806^ 


«835,618 
1,2lB,694 
1,237,620 
3,733,640 
2,573,069 
1,474,881 

2:i30;»37 
2,682,093 
2,626,041 
1,756,477 

'991436 
1.640,431 

!K 

3,771.109 
2,556,693 

12,187;046 

64Blim 
6,636^187 
6,268,296 
6370,255 

JSSJ 

6,87^ 
6,701,203 
6,260,530 
6,762,889 
6,943,239 
7,982,877 
18,096,152 
16,061.428 
9,420,813 
18,466,110 
19,417.274 

I8,es8,3ia 

14,268,981 
11,621,488 
13,704,882 
0,ue469 
4,158,884 
8:281,317 
9^^ 


61,409 
3^632 

2;85b;o^ 

8,448,716 

1,189,833 

1,649,641 
1,7^2,064 
1,884,068 

l^x 

7^K 
8,680,000 
8,908,278 

3,319,243 
2,224.469 
2,603,766 
2,904,683 

4:218;9n2 
4,263.8-8 
3,918,786 
8,808,746 

ias 

iSS 

5,eoo;78a 
e^;oo3 

6,124,466 
6,001,077 
8,397,243 
8,672,718 
8:4S6i91 
6,228,639 


S» 

lis 

ifi;83o;i46 

13:062:816 
12;2g4S7 
12,606,041 
12,661,489 
18,220,534 
13,863,768 
16,614,088 
22.049,298 
18,420,487 
17,006,419 
29366Ji44 
31,793,537 

28,337,772 
26,198,840 
m:B81:337 
10.698,891 
19,980,066 
21,^1,049 


e3,J97.49S 
13,088^ 
ai,8B8J61 
17,174,438 
23,927,3*4 
36,147^7 
108M7,088 
68,eBefl8T 
«,98t,421 

66,2*8,879 
87,180.438 
112,1M,<»1 
81,216,8X3 



D XXFBHSIIDBB. 



Ej^oOa, andiha T<aal Attnage,fiim ITdl to 1849. 



• ObI; Blu moBlbi of 1H8. Ilvillastu a 



152 UNITSD STATS8. [1847. 

XL HOW MUCH DOES THE GOVERNMENT COST 
in the United States and in Great Britain f 

A Republican govemment will always be noted for the economical ad- 
ministration of its affairs. When the people tax themselves, they will take 
good care to make the burden as light as possible. In the case of war, 
indeed, the excitement of passion and patriotism may lead to a lavish ex- 
penditure, and much money will probably be wasted, because the power 
and responsibility must be divided among many persons, who have com- 
paratively but little experience on account of frequent changes in office ; 
while in a monarchy, the reins are all held in one hand, and a permanent 
ministry is more able to avoid the enormous expense that is usually caused 
by frequent changes of plan and much vacillation of purpose. But in 
peace, the merit of different administrations will be estimated almost exdu- 
sively by their relative cheapness ; he who lessens the amount of taxation is 
always sure of the gratitude of the people. There is danger, indeed, that 
frugality will be carried to excess, and some of the higher interests of the 
people be sacrificed to their inconsiderate and ill*timed parsimony. That 
is false economy which dries up some of the distant sources of wealth in the 
attempt to save a few drops to the broad stream which rolls by our doors. 

The govemment of this country is supposed to be the cheapest in the 
civilized world. Probably it is so ; but exaggerated statements upon the sub- 
ject are often made by those who are not conversant enough with our insti- 
tutions to know where the greatest expense is incurred, nor in what quarters 
prodigality and wastefulness may exist without punishment or detection. 
The small salaries of persons in office are usually taken as a decisive proof 
of economy ; but the saving thus made is often more than balanced by the 
unnecessary multiplication of such offices, and by carelessness or pecula- 
tion in the administration of public works and in the performance of jobs by 
contract. The higher class of officers of the custom-house are not so well 
paid here as in Great Britain ; but the aggregate expense of collection bears 
a higher ratio to the amount collected than it does in England. A similar 
remark is applicable also to the post-office. The British minister at Wash- 
ington, we believe, has a higher salary than the President of the United 
States ; the British minister to France certainly receives more than twice 
as much. The Lord Chief Justice of England has a larger salary than aU 
the nine judges of our Supreme Court united. An English consul often has 
higher pay than an American ambassador ; and it is a striking proof of the 
inequality of our system, that the same remark may be made of more than one 
American consul. "The cost of building a ship-of-war at one of our navy 
yards is about twice as great as it would be if fUmished by private contract 

But the expenses of our govemment are most frequently underestimated 



1847.] COST OF GOTBBViOBKT. 163 

from losing sight of the division of labor and cost among the national, state, 
and city or town authorities. The whole cost of the state institutions is 
interpolated, as it were, between the national and civic expenditures, which 
'create the whole burden of taxation in most European countries. Owing 
to the inclination of the people in this country, especially in New England, 
to keep as much of the administration of public aifairs in their own hands 
as possible, the town or city taxes are often larger than all those of the state 
and the national government united. There is very little centralization of 
power ; much of the tax is voted, and many of the appropriations are made, 
directly by the people, in their primary assemblies. 

It becomes a problem of much interest and considerable difficulty, then, 
to determine the aggregate cost of government in this country, and thus to 
compare the burden of taxation in the United l^tates with what it is in Eng- 
land. We can obtain only an approximate solution. The weight of taxa- 
tion can be properly estimated only by its relation to the wealth of the 
country ; the same burden becomes light or heavy in proportion to the 
ability of the people to bear it. But the aggregate of national wealth escapes 
all calculation or probable estimate. There are no data on which to found 
even a plausible conjecture on this point. Valuations of all the real and 
personal estate within certain towns and states are often formed, it is true, 
and for the very purpose of taxation ; but these give only a rude approxi- 
mation to the relative wealth of individuals, towns, and counties ; or they may 
enable us to compare one year with another, so as to show the progress of 
wealth in the community. No one supposes that they give the true amount 
of absolute wealth. Many kinds of property are excluded from them alto- 
gether ; others are admitted at a rate known to be far below their real value. 
In diiferent states, also, they are formed on wholly different principles, so 
they do not enable us to compare one state with another. 

The corrected aggregate valuation of all real and personal property in the 
state of New York, in 1845, was but $605,646,095 ; the dty of New York 
alone probably contains as much wealth as this. The aggregate of state, 
city, and town taxes in the same year was $4,170,527 95, which is a rate of 
6 mills and 888 thousandths of a mill on a dollar of this assumed valuation. 
The actual rate of taxation for these purposes cannot have been more than 
one mill on the dollar, or one thousandth part of the whole property. 

The valuation of all wealth in Massachusetts, in 1840, was nearly 300 
millions, — about half as great as New York, — while the population h little 
more than one fourth as large. The valuation of Boston in 1845 was about 
136 millions ; its actual wealth greatly exceeds this sum. No returns are 
made in Massachusetts to show the aggregate amoimt of town and city taxes 
throughout the commonwealth. 

The valuation of the state of Ohio in 1845 professes to give the aggre- 
gate only of that property which is taxable by law; the amount is 



154 



UKiTBD 8TAT£8. 



11847. 



$144,160,469. The aggregate of state, county, and town taxes in the same 
year was $2,409,171 07, which is a rate of 16 7-10 mills on a dollar. 

We shall prohably come much nearer a correct result by comparing the 
whole taxation, or total expenditure, with the whole population, so as toT 
ascertain what would be the amount for each individual if the whole people 
were taxed per capita^ without regard to their property. To apply this 
method first to the taxation by the National Goyemment, I have taken the 
aggregate of the national expenditures each year for a series of years, ex^ 
eluding payments on account of the public debt and from trust funds. The 
object is to ascertain the ordinary rate of expenditure in a time of peace ; a 
national debt exists in this country only as a temporary thing, the effect 
either of a war or of some extraordinary experiments in legislation. I hare 
selected those years in which a national census was taken, so as not to be 
obliged to take the population by estimate, except in 1800; 1802 was pre- 
ferred, because in the two years preceding 1800 the preparations for a war 
with France occasioned considerable increase of expenditure. The popula- 
tion of this country in 1800 was 5,305,925 ; in 1810, it was 7;239,814; at this 
rate of increase, in 1802 it must have been about 5,677,340. In a similar 
manner, I have calculated the population in 1845 to be 19,914,362. We 
have, then, the following table : 

United States, 



Years. 


Total population. 


Total Expenditure. 


Expense per head. 


1802 
1810 
1820 
1830 
1840 
1845 


5,677,340 

7,239.814 

9,638,131 

12.866,920 

17,063,353 

19,914,362 


$,3,737,080 
5,311,082 
13,134,530 
13,220,534 
23,327,772 
21,380,049 


$0.66 
0.73 
1.36 
1.03 
1.37 
1.07 



Average rate, $0.97. 



The expense of the National Grovemment, then, is less than one dollar a 
year for each inhabitant of the United States. Let us now look at the cost 
of the State governments. 

The population of Massachusetts in 1840 was 737,699; the rate of in- 
crease between 1830 and 1840 was 20 per cent. On this ratio I have calcu- 
lated the population for the following years. For the reason already given, 
from the aggregate of expenditures for each year I have deducted the amount 
for interest on debt and for debt paid off. 



1847.1 



COST OF GOYBBXMENT. 



155 



Massachuset^. 



Yean. 


Population. 


Gross 

Expenditures. 


Interest and 

debt paid off. 


Net expenses. 


Bate per « 
head. 


1841 
1842 
1843 

1844 
1845 


752,453 
767,207 
781,961 
796,715 
811,469 


S399,929 
351,551 
370,365 
461,098 
511,193 


S37,069 

44,156 

55,679 

116,051 

154,086 


$362,860 
307,395 
314,686 
345,047 
357,107 


$0.48 
0.40 
0.40 
0.43 
0.44 



Average rate, $0.43. 

The population of the state of New York in 1840 was 2,428,921 ; in 1845, 
according to the state census taken in that year, it was 2,604,495, being an 
increase of 7 1-5 per cent, in five years. The total of ^state expenditures in 
1845, excluding interest and debt paid off, was ^$793,576 38; which is an 
average of only 30 1-2 cents for each inhabitant. The estimated net expen- 
diture for 1*846 is but $743,014. 

The population of Ohio in 1840 was 1,519,467 ; if it increased from 
1840 to 1845 in the same ratio in which it increased from 1830 to 1840, the 
population in 1845 must have been 1,990,502. The whole expenses of the 
state government, including the legislature, salaries, support of asylums, 
printing, claims, &c., but excluding interest on debt and support of common 
schools, were but $201,471 97, which is only ten cents a head. Adding to 
this the money paid for common schools, the aggregate of state expenses 
was $484,432.03, which is 24 cents for each inhabitant. The interest paid 
on the public debt in 1845 was $1,077,864.97 ; the income from the public 
works (to build which the debt was contracted) exceeded the expenditure 
on these works by $203,704.42 ; subtracting this balance from the amount 
of interest paid, we have $874,160.50 as the annual burden of interest borne 
by the state. Adding this amount of interest to the former aggregate, we 
have $1,358,592.58 as the whole amount of state expenses of every kind j 
and this is but 68 cents for each inhabitant. 

The population of Rhode Island in 1840 was 108,830; in 1845, according 
to the rate of increase in the ten years preceding 1840, it should have been 
about 115,000. The aggregate of state expenditures for the year ending 
April 30, 1845, including $25,589 paid for common schools, was $89,879, 
which is equal to 78 cents a head for the whole population. But the interest 
on the Deposit and School Funds, owned by the State, was $14,059 ; and 



* Whole amount paid out of the treasury. 

But the temporary payments to be received again, were 

Interest and debt paid off, . . . 

Net ezpeiiMi u above, 
See Con^troUer^t Report for 1846, pp, 89^. 



$1,808,735.03 



$746,626.47 
268,688.18 



1,016,168.66 
$798,676.88 



156 



UHITBD STATBS. 



[1847. 



this subtracted from the aggregate of expense leaves but $75,820, which is an 
arerage of not qnite 66 cents for each inhabitant 

« From these data, we may safely estimate the average cost of the state 
goYernments throughout the United States at 50 cents a head for the whole 
population. We come now to the town or city expenditures, including those 
which are known as county expenses. Here we find that the average cost 
for each inhabitant is very much greater in the large cities than in the 
smaller towns and villages. This might be expected, as taxatiqn and ex- 
penditure are meant to be in proportion, not to the numbers, but to the 
wealth of the community ; and wealth is accumulated in the great cities. 

I take the city of Boston for the first example. According to the nation- 
al census, its population in 1840 was 93,383; but as we have shown else- 
where, (see page 194, this volume J this is grossly erroneous, the true number 
at that period being only about 85,000. The city census, taken with great 
care in 1845, shows that the population in that year was 114,366, which is an 
increase of about 34 1-2 per cent in five years. On this basis I have calcu- 
lated the population for the years contained in the following table, which 
shows abo the gross expenditure for each year, the amount of interest on 
debt and of debt paid off during the same periods, the net expenditure after 
this last amount is deducted from the former one, and the average of this 
net expenditure for each inhabitant I add one other column as a matter 
of interest, though not strictly connected with our present subject ; it shows 
how large a portion (about one third^ of this net expenditure is fbr the sup- 
port of common schools. 



Yean. 


Population. 


Grosa 
Expendi- 
ture. 


Tnterest and 
debt paid off. 


NetEzpen- 
ditura. 


ATerage 
per hethd. 


Amount paid 
for schools. 


1842 
1843 
1844 
1845 


96,746 
102,619 
108,492 
114,366 


$651,126 
642,354 
718,138 
948,937 


$147,702 
153,619 
164,460 
350,359 


$503,424 
488,735 
554,678 
598,578 


$5.20 
4.76 
5.11 
5.23 


$150,426 
136,219 
201,256 
205,278 



Avei*age rate, $5.07 1-2. 



The population of the city of New Tork in 1840 was 312,710 ; in 1845, 
according to the state census, it was 371,102, showing an increase of 18 6-10 
per cent, in five years. The estimate of city expenditures, excluding in- 
terest on debt, for 1846, which of course was based on the actual expendi- 
tures of 1845, is $1,563,130, or $4.21 for each inhabitant 

The population of Baltimore aYy, in 1840, was 102,313, its increase since 
1830 having been nearly 27 per cent. ; on this ratio, its population in 1845 
was 116,125. The total expenditure of the city in 1845 was $659,032.36; 
of this sum, $312,913.88 was for interest on city debt, leaving $846,118.48 



1847.] COST OP GOTERNMBNT. 157 

as the balance for ordinary expenditure, which amounts to $2.98 for each 
citizen. 

The population of Providence, R. I., in 1845, estimated in a similar man- 
ner, was about 28,000 ; the city tax voted for this year was $81,186, no por- 
tion of which, I believe, was appropriated for debt or interest. The expen- 
diture, then, is $2 89 for each citizen. 

The materials for estimating the expenses of the smaller towns and vil- 
lages arie diflScult to be obtained ; but I have succeeded in bringing together 
enough to found a probable conjecture upon. According to returns made 
to the Comptroller of the state of New York, and published in his report, 
the aggregate of town taxes assessed in 1845, excluding the city of New 
York, was $949,271.80; of county taxes for the same time, still excluding 
the city and the state tax proper, was $800,000 ; the whole highway tax, 
assessed in days, and estimated at 58. a day, was $901,186.25. The aggre- 
gate of these three sums is $2,650,458.05 j and as the population of the state, 
excluding that of the «'('/? according to the census of 1845, was 2,233,393, 
this amount is an average of $1.18 2-3 for each inhabitant. This is evi- 
dently somewhat too gi-eat to be a fair estimate ftJr the smaller places only, 
as I have only excluded the c\t^ of New York, and have retained, (because 
the materials could not be found for applying the calculation to them sepa- 
rately,) the cities of Albany, Troy, ButFalo, Rochester, Brooklyn, Newburgh, 
Poughkeepsie, Syracuse, and Utica. If these also were taken out of the 
account, the average for the remainder of the state would probably be as 
low as one dollar. 

From a return printed in this volume under the head of Rhode Island, we 
find that the aggregate of town taxes voted in that state for 1844-5, exclud- 
ing the city of Providence tax, was but $49,096. The estimated population 
of the state at that time, again excluding this city, was 86,500, so that the 
cost for each inhabitant of the towns was only 56 cents. 

The probable population of Ohio in 1845, it has been already shown, was 
1,990,502. The Auditor's report shows, that the total amount of taxes 
levied in that state in 1845, (excluding the state tai proper, which has been 
already considered,) was $1,403,169.83, which is 70 1-2 cents for each in- 
habitant. As there is but one large city in Ohio, and this one, Cincinnati, 
probably does not contain more than one thirtieth of the whole population 
of the state, this average is probably very near the truth. Comparing it 
with the averages in New York and Rhode Island, it appears safe to assume 
75 eents a head as the total of town expenses, excluding the lai^ge cities 
from the estimate, throughout the United States. But assuming the present 
population of this country to be 20 millions, not more than one million and 
a half of them live in cities which contain more than 15,000 inhabitants eadi. 
The facts already given show that $3.00 a head would be a large estimate 
for the civic expenditures of these cities, as only five of them number over 
100,000 inhabitants each. Taking the amount for the cities, then, at $3.00, 

14 



158 UNITED STATES. [1847. 

and for the towns at 75 cents, the general average of town or city expenses 
for the whole population is a little less than 92 cents. The general result of 
our calculation, therefore, is as follows : 

Aggregate of the National Expenditures, $0.97 for each inhabitant. 
Do. State do. 0.50 « *' " 

Do. town or city do. 0.92 " 



(( (( 



Total cost of government in the U. States, $2.39 " 



(C u 



or $47,800,000, if the population of the country be twenty millions.* 

The population of the United Kingdom of England, Scotland, and Ire- 
land, in 1841, was 26,711,059. The ordinary expenses of the British gov- 
ernment in the same year were £24,887,729 ; the interest and other charges 
connected with the national debt made up a further sum of £28,556,324, so 
that the aggregate expenditure was £53,444,053. The materials for estimat- 
ing the municipal expenses are very imperfect; but returns made in March, 
1839, show that the annual cost of keeping up the highways in England 
alone was £1,267,848 ; the expense of supporting the English paupers, under 
the new poor law, in 1840, was £3,850,040. Adding these two items to the 
former amount, we have £58,561,941 as the total expenditure, which is £2 
3s. lOd., or $9.60, for each inhabitant, — four times as much as in the Uni- 
ted States. Yet this sum does not include the ordinary civic expenses, 
which, in 1835, amounted to £2,000,000 for the metropolis alone ; if five and 
a half millions be assumed on this account for the whole kingdom, which is 
a very low estimate, 4s. 6d. or $1.09, must be added to the average, making 
it $10.69 ; and still the cost of the highways and the poor in Scotland and 
Ireland is left out Again, the support of the National church in England 
is compulsory, so that the tithes must be added to the preceding aggregate. 
"With this addition, McCuUoch, the highest authority on this subject, says 
the ordinary annual expenditure amounts to £68,000,000, and the average 
rises to $12.33 per head. It should further be obsei'ved, that the estimate 



* Mr. liyingston, XT. S. Secretary of State, attempted in 1832 to ascertain the total coet 
of goTemment in the United States, and addressed circulars for that purpose to the seye- 
ral States and Territories. The returns were quite imperfect, but the calculation which 
he founded upon them, embracing the same items wliich are considered in this article, 
gaye $2.15 as the average for each indiyidual. Adding the cost of the clergy and militia, 
the earn, is increased to $2.55. But through a great portion of this country, there is no 
eongmlsory assessment for either of these two purposes, and I have therefore excluded them 
finom the account, except when a sum for the support of the militia enters into the aggre- 
gate of State expenditures. In 1838, Mr. H. C. Carey, of Philadelphia, made another cal- 
culation, which gaye $2.19 as the ayerage. These two results, allowing for the diflFerence 
created by the lapse of years, agree so nearly with my own calculation as to afford a strong 
presumption of its oorrectness. T did not fioe thpm till the fbregoing estimate was com- 
pleted. 



1847.] C08T OF aOYEBNMENT. 159' 

for the United States inclades the expense of an excellent and costly system 
of free schools, while in Great Britain little or nothing is appropriated for the 
great cause of public education.* 

The charge of the public debt in Great Britain I have included in the . 
aggregate of annual expenditures, while both the National and State debts 
are left out of the account for the United States. The propriety of making 
this distinction is obvious. The object is to ascertain the sum of the (rrdi- 
nary and permanent expenditures. The normal condition of Great Britain is 
one of indebtedness ; that of the United States is freedom from debt. Debts 
are never incurred by our government except on exti-aordinary emergencies, 
and then they continue but for a short time, the natural resources of the 
country being sufficient not only to, discharge the interest, but rapidly to 
extinguish die principal. But the English national debt is a permanent 
charge entailed on all fature generations, and no one expects that it will 
ever be cancelled. It was incurred for unproductive expenditure^ — the cost 
of wars, — and not for reproductive investment^ as in the case of the debts con- 
tracted by the individual states of our Union. Not one of these states has 
ever obtained considerable loans merely to meet the excess of ordinary ex- 
penditures over its income. They have borrowed money only for the pur- 
pose of constructing railroads, canals, and other productive public woriss, or 
of famishing capital for banking objects. In many cases, the direct income 
from these works or banks more than pays the interest on the debt, so that 
the state is really not in debt at all, but receives an income independent of 
taxation. And even if this direct income be insufficient, the indirect gain to 
the community from the existence of these works still makes the investment 
a profitable one for the people. The value of the land and its annual pro- 
ducts is so much increased, that the state could well afford to sink the whole 
capital invested in the public works. This is the present condition of Ohio 
and Pennsylvania. Their railroads and canals do not pay to the state the 
interest on their cost ; but they have already repaid to the people more than 
the whole capital expended on them. It should be remembered, also, that, 
twenty years ago, not one of the states was in debt except for a very 
trifling sum. 



* A calculation made by M. Chevalier, in 1883, shows that the annual cost of govern- 
ment in France was then about 1,250 milUons of ftancs, which amounted to 40 ftuucs, or 
$7.50 for each inhabitant, — more than three times as much as in this country. Tho 
taxes levied in France for all purposes in 1842 exceeded 1,160 millions of franca. 



Xn. RAILROADS IN THE UNITED STATES, 
and in Great Briain. 

' lie foUowirg liet of Railroads in Massachuectis and (he iidja<:eDt 
States, and in New York, ia very complete and accurate, being compiled 
from official retnms. But llie remainder ie quite imperfect, thongh more 
full than anything wbich has been given before. We insert it in the hope, 
that, by the kindness of our correspoadenta in the sevi^ral States, and of (he 
officers of the Railroad companies, we may obtain materials for a far n 
perfect enumeration in our next volume. 




The Fitf hburg Bsllroul Companj bought up the ChsrlM- 



„ .hBonly. ■ 

dm Brancb, Sept. 1, 1845, ft 
I This li s unkm oT the NanhaiDplon tiod SpringlleLd, isd Uw Oreenfleld und Tiwlh- 
"■""""'"■"' " ' ig; thft whole ro»d is now opeu, tfaonghoolf 



m Hidlrauli. ThelUtfTii 



tt Ttiii In 



Albany Hod W«t Stockbridge road, which la pnperlj pluedamong 



iH York Railnudj. 

The Providence and Worcester Railroad company a chartered with a 
capital of $1,100,000; length about 44 miles. The Vermont and Massa- 
chusetts, and the Worcester and Nashua Bsilroads are also in progress. 

The Wobnin Branch, 3 miles long, belongs to the Lowell road ; the Sax- 



onrillo Branch, 6 miles, to the Worcester ; tbe Harblehead Branch, 4 miles, 
and Gloucester Branch, IS miles, to the Eastern, Including these, the total 
length of what may be called the Massacbuaetta roads is 753^ miles. 

a. Otser Railboads in Kew ENai.ut-D. 



BU«. 


Name. 


LeDglh. 


c«t. 


CoBDMlicUt, 


Bangor nod ITppeT SllUirater, 
Portland and torBmouth, 

ProTl^ "f add°8toningk.n, 
HirHbrd ud N«w Havoo, 
lUitford and Sprinirfleld, 
BridirepoM and W SlorkhridEC.l 


36 

19* 

90 

m 


2,600,000 
1,100,000 





A portion of thin road is la 



lengtb of Btdlroails li: 



6, aH^r nuhtrnctin^ th« Albany an 



"trhb.^™ »W to Arcli-a Hrfnljie bvUi« CompWllor fot 84,600. It w. 
dsIIt coii«Cmcl«l b; tli« Kbara and Osnego Ridlnnd Compui;. 
i rnm pioQlo of 1»43 and 1814. 



d beloDga to ttia W«flt«ni Itoilroad 
r.phaTcalrcadjbociipvcn Inthoa 



swichiuetta, and lis ci 



lea 



VNITEB fiTATTO. 



[1847. 



4. Othxb Rjlilboads IK THE Unitbd Statbs. 



state. 



Sew Jersey, 






C( 

(( 
l( 
({ 
(( 



PennsylTUiift, 

u 
u 
t( 

(C 

ii 
(( 
c; 
i( 
ti 
(( 
(( 
u 
u 

H 

i( 
<( 

(( 

u 

Delaware, 

Maryland, 

(( 

(( 
(( 

Vilginia, 

ii 

a 
u 
(( 
(( 
i( 

North Carolina, 



(( 



IC 



South Carolina, 

n u 

Georgia, 

ik 

(( 
(( 

Florida, 
(i 

(( 

Alabama, 
Mississippi, 

(( 

(C 

Kentucky, 

Ohio, 

(( 

u 

In^ana, 

Michigan, 

u 

(C 



Names. 



Miles in 
length. 



Camden and Amboy, 
New BrunsDi'iok Branch, . 
Trenton Branch, 
Elizabethtown and Somerrille, 
Morris and Essex, 
New Jersey, . 

Patterson, . . 

Beayer Meadow, 
Blossbnrg and Coming, . 
Columbi^ (State work,) 
Portage. " " 
Cnmberland Valley, . 
Harrisbnrg and Luicaster, 
Hazleton Branch, 
Little Schuylkill, 
Lackawana, . . 

Mauch Chunk, 

MinehiU and Schuylkill Ilaven. 
Lehigh and Susquehanna, 
Norristown, . . 

Philadelphia and Trenton, 
Philadelphia and Baltimore, 
Pottsrille and Danrille, 
Reading, 

Schuylkill VaUey, 
Lykens' Valley, 
Williamsport and Elmira, 
Frenchtown and Newcastle, 
Baltimore and Ohio, 
Baltimore and Susquehanna, 
Baltimore and Washington, 
Annapolis Branch, 
GreensTille and Roanoke, 
Pittsburg, . . 

Louisa, . . . 

Portsmouth and Roanoke, 
Richmond, Fred'rg and Potomac, 
Richmond and Petersburg, 
Winchester and Potomac, 
Raleigh and Gaston, 
Wilmington and Raleigh, 
South Carolina, . 
Columbia Branch, 
Central, (Savannui to Macon,) 
Georgia, (Augusta to Atlanta,) 
Monroe, 

Montgomery and West Point, . 
Pensacola and Montgomery, 
St. Joseph's, 

Tallahassee and St. Marks, • 
Tuscrmibia and Decatur, . 
Vicksburg and Jackson, 
Jackson and Brandon, . 
Grand Gulf, 

St. Francisville and WoodTille, 
Lexington and Ohio, , 

Little Miami, 

Mad RiTer and Lake Erie, 
Sandusky and MonroeTille, 
Huron and Norwalk, 
Madison and IndlanopoUs, 
Central, (Detroit to Kalamaaoo,) 
Southern (Munroe to Hillsdale,) 
Detroit and Poutiac , . 



61 
26 
8 
26 
20 
84 
16 
26 
40 
82 
86 
46 
86 
10 
23 
16 
9 

19i 
20 
20 
80 
97 
291 
94 
25 
16 
25 
16 
188 
58 
88 
20 
18 
63 
58 
78* 
76 
224 
32 
87 
161 
136) 
66/ 
190 
172 
25 
89 

• • 

12 
22 
46 
45 
14 
7 
28 
29 
40 
65 
16 
12 
66 
144 
78» 
_25_ 

3,125 



Cost. 



Total out of N E ngP d & N. York, 
Grand total in" United States, 1 4,864f 



88,300,000 

500,000 

400,000 

2,000,000 

500,000 

150,000 

600,000 

4,204,969 

1,788,000 

1,250,000 

860,000 

120,000 

326,500 

503,580 

100,000 

396,117 

1,260,000 

800,000 

500,000 

4,400,000 

1,500,000 

9,467,570 

300,000 

170,000 

400,000 

600,000 

7,623,600 

3,000,000 

1,650,000 

200,000 

284,433 

969,880 

650,000 

1,454,171 

800,000 

700.000 

500,000 

1,600,000 

1,800,000 

5,671,462 

2,581,723 

8,000,000 
300,000 
600,000 

i()o,iK)o 

180,000 
460,000 
450,000 
100,000 
50,000 
168,000 
400,000 
400,000 

1,000,000 
160,000 
100,000 
212,000 

1,842,308 
986,295 
800,000 



^'^^^ Expensee 



$788,608 
162,825 
208,814 



868,450 



$368,841 
180,240 
113,719 



186,886 



202,747 
62,786 



104,118 
15,886 



* Including Tecumaeh Branch, 10 miles long. 



5. Bailboads in Gebat Bbitaih. 







L'glbin 


Total 


COM per 






miles. 


ee«. 


mil.. 


J 


Arbo™ih«.dBorfu, 


15 


1 


^,218 


8 


*ffi'"^' ' 








7 




as 




Bristol ud OlouceiUr, 












22^700 




Bristol >u>d EieUr, 








78 




^676 


e 










16 




84.188 


7 


Dundee mod Aibmitti, 








161 




8^70 
















I<^ 





EdlDburgh BDd ijlugrxr, 
OlMFOw,P»i.lei, mdAyr, 








H 
48 

to 




20,607 


12 


Ola^oir, I'nldej, md Grwnodi, 








22 




85,016 


3 


Grand Junction, 

OiuHUr ud Crewe Branch, 










; 


22,293 




UtctjooI md MBDcheslH, 










1 


60^ 


5 


Bollon, Kenjon, tnd Leigh, , 
Ol«l Norm of Kngland, . 








4S 


it 


as,866 


18 


Branch to Oslbr-l, 








■SI 


7,466,689 


66,372 




HnilMdSslby, 








a 


48,000 


20,192 














2S,2» 


ao 


Liverpool and M«nche«ter, '{Bee No. 
London and Binninghani, 


IS,) 






IS 

11 


140'009 

a,6i4,ei«i 
ia».ooci 


1700 
52^ 




London ud BlukwuU, . 








8 


1,1 


288.177 


24 


London and Oleenwich, 








b} 


h' 


266,822 


is 


London and BrigtaloD, 








mi 


H 


66,B91 




SESS^'^^Ongh™, - 












80.400 


ZT 








81 




61624 


28 










60 




46,998 




H«icb«Ur, Boilon, ud BuiT, 












87,000 


81 


Hirvport onl Ctrllele, 








28 
1E8 


6J 


85,402 


33 


Newcaslie and Cerllsle, 








H 


i; 




34 


Ne<rcutle Ml North lliieMa, . 








23 


1 


20;009 
44 238 


85 


North Union, . 
Boilon (UidPHHton, . 








23 
14j 


H 


27,886 
26.000 


38 


PreBtonind Wjro, '. 








1 


\ 


81.266 


8» 




























17,000 


41 


Bonth Eaatem, 








ve 


3, 


44415 


4a 


South Weetera, 








7«1 


all 


27374 




BBwkloa uid Darlinglon, . 








25 




18,009 












24) 


m'fioo 


26,000 


a 


Weet Lmdonl . ' . ' 








4 


1111,026 


20162 




Yinnoulh and Norwloh, 








20| 


aw,o88 


11^78 


47 










23' 


1.107,146 


60,000 


Total miles, ' ' . 




SM. 



6. JU-II-aOADB IK IREI.AIJD. 



KameofBailroad. 


Lenetb. 


Coat. 


Cost 
per mile. 


Dnblin and Dregheda, 

Branch loDalkay, ' . . . 
Ulster, .... 


24 


iS79,253 
859,000 
868,858 


il6,63S 
16,662 
18,941 









164 



TAfilPF OF DtJTiKS. 



[1847. 



Xin. TARIFF OF DUTIES IN 1846, 
And the Wabehousinq System op that Year, 

Digested and AlphaheticaUy Arranged from the Official Copy, 

The letters n. o. p. signify not othemnse provided for. 

On all articles not here enumerated, a duty of 20 per cent, ad valorem; the duties on 
the enumerated articles are so muchp«r cent, ad valorem^ after December, 1, 1846. 



Absynthe, . .100 

Acetic, or acetous acid, . 20 
Acids, chemical, medicinal, or manufiMi- 

turing, n. o. p. . .20 

Adhesive felt for sheathing, . Free 

Alabaster ornaments, . . 40 

Alabatta, . . 80 

Alcomoque, . . .5 

Ale, ... 30 

Almonds, . . .40 

Aloes, ... 20 

Alum, . .20 

Ambergris, . . 20 

Amber, . .20 
American fisheries, Produets of 

Ammonia, . . .10 

Anchovies, . . 40 
Angora goats' hair, unmanufactured, 20 

Animal carbon, . . 20 

Animals for breed, . Free 

Annatto, rancon or Orleans, . 10 

Anise seed, . . .20 

Antimony, crude and regulus of 20 

Antiquities, cabinets of . . Free 

Apples, . . . 20 

Arabic, gum, . . .10 

Argentine, . . 30 

Algol, . . . 5 

Arms, side or fire, . . 30 

Arrack, . . .100 

Arrow root, . . 20 

Arsenic, . . " . 15 

Assafoetida, . 20 

Asses' skins, . . .30 

Bacon, . . « 20 

Baizes, n. o. p. . . .25 

Balsams, ... 30 

Bananas, . . .20 

Barbary, gum, . . 10 

Barilla, . . . .10 

Barks, n. o. p. . . 20 

Bark, Peruvian, or Quilla, . 15 

Barley, ... 20 

Barley, pearl or hulled, 20 
Barytes, sulphate of, crude or refined, 20 

Baskets, ... 30 

Baskets, osier or willow for . 20 

Bay rum, ... 30 

Beads, all . . .30 
BedSj hair and vegetable substances for 20 

Bedsides, (of carpeting,) . 30 

Beer, .... 30 

Beef, . . .20 

Beeswax, . . 20 

Bells, old, and bell metal, . 5 

Benzoates, 30 

Benzoic acid, . . .20 

Benzoin, gum, . 30 

Berries, dye, umuanu&cturcd, 5 



Berries, n. o. p. . 20 
Bichromate of potash, . . 20 
Bismuth, ... 20 
Bitter apples, . . .20 
Bituminous substances, crude, n. o. p. 20 
Black, bone or ivory, . . 20 
Black, Frankfort, . . 20 
Blank books, bound, or unbound, 20 
Blankets, ... 20 
Bleaching powders, . . 10 
Blue vitriol 20 
Boards, . . .20 
Bookings, n. o. p. . . 26 
Bologna sausages, . . 30 
Free' Bone, manufeMitures of . 30 
10] Bone and bone tips, unmanufactured, 6 
Bone or ivory black, . . 20 
Bonnets, • • . 30 
Bonnets, flats, braids, &c. for . 30 
Books in the course of printing and re- 
publication in the United States, 20 
Books printed, magazines, &c. 10 
Boots, lastings, mohair, silk twist, &c. for, 5 
Boracicacid, . . 20 
Borax or tinctal, . . 26 
Botany, specimens of . Fi^e 
Boucho leaves, , . .20 
Boxes, paper or fimcy, . 30 
Bracelets, hair, ' . .30 
Braces, India rubber, . 80 
Braids, hair, braids for bonnets, . 30 
Brandy, ... 100 
Brass, manufactures of . .30 
Brass, in pigs or bars, and old brass, 5 
Braziers' copper, . . 20 
Brazil paste, . . 15 
Brazil wood, in sticks, . , 5 
Breccia, ... 20 
Bricks, paving, or roofing, . 20 
Brimstone, crude, . . 16 
Brimstone, roU, . . 20 
Bristles, ... 5 
Bronze liquor or powder, . 20 
Bronze metal, in leaf, . 20 
Brooms, . . .30 
Brushes, ... 30 
Building stones, . . 10 
Bullion and coins, . . Free 
Burgundy pitch, . , 26 
Burgundy wine, . . 40 
Burnt starch, . . .10 
Burr stones, wrought or not, . 10 
Butter, . . .20 
Buttons and button moulds, . 26 
Cabinets of coins, medals, antiquities, Free 
Cables, tarred or untarred, . 26 
Cadmium, ... 20 
Calamine, . . .20 
Calomel, ... 26 



1847.] 



TABIFV OF DUTIES. 



165 



lOj 
80 

26 

40 



Cameos, real or imitation, not set, 

Cameos, real or imitation, set in metal, 

Camphor, crude. 

Camphor, refined, 

Candles, spermaceti, wax, tallow or 
stearine, 

Canes, 

Cantharides, 

Capers, n. o. p.. 

Caps, wholly of cotton, made ou frames, 

Caps, woven, or of for, 

Carbon, animal. 

Carbonates of soda. 

Card cases,' . 

Carpets, carpeting, all, 

Carriages, and parts of carriages, 

Cassia, 

Cassia buds. 

Castings of iron, 

Castor oil, 

Castorum, 

Catechu, or terra japonica, 

Catgut and strings for musical instru'ts, 

Cayenne pepper, 

Cedar wood, manufactures of. 

Cedar wood, uumanufitctured, . 

Cement, Roman, . 

Chalk, n. o. p., . 

Chalk, French, . 

Chalk pencils, red. 

Chalk, red, 

Champaigue wine, 

Charts and maps. 

Cheese, 

China ware, 

Chinese matting. 

Chloride of lime, 

Chocolate, . 

Chromate of lead or potaah, 

Chromic acid, 

Chronometers, box or ship, and parts of, 

Cigars, 

Cinnamon, . . 

Citric add. 

Claret, 

Clay, unwrought. 

Clocks, parts of clocks, 

Cloth, grass and hair, 

Clothing, ready made. 

Cloves, 

Coach famitnre, 

Coal, . 

Cobalt, 

Cochineal, 

Cocoa, and cocoa shells, 

Cocoa nut oil, 

Cocoa nuts, 

Coculus Indicus, 

Codilla, or tow of hemp and flax, 15 

Coffee, imported direct in American ves- 
sels, or in foreign vessels exempted by 
reciprocity treaties, or grown in the 
possessions of the Netherlands, and 
imported from the Netherlands in like 
manner, . . Ihree 

Coins, cabinets of, . . Freej 

Coins, gold, silver, and copper. Free, 

Coir, unmanufikctured, . 26 

Coke, and culm of,(oai, . . SO 

Colors, water, . . 30 

Combs, . . .80 

Comfits ... 40 



Composition tops fbr tables, frc, . 40 
Confectionary, n. o. p., . 80 

Copper, manufiictures of; . 80 

Copper for U. S. Mint, . Free 

Copper in pigs and bars, and old copper, 6 
Copper in sheets, plates, or other, n. o. p., 20 
Copper ore, . . . Free 

Copper rods, bolts, nails, spikes and bot- 
toms, . . . 20 
Copper, sheathing, in sheets 48 inches 
long, 14 wide, and weighing from 14 to 
84 oz. per square foot, . Free 
Copper, sulphate of, , .20 
Copperas, ... 20 
Coral, cut or manu&ctnred, . SO 
Coral, marine, unmanufactured, 20 
Cordage, tarred or untarred, . 25 
Cordials, . . . IQO 
Cords, cotton, . . .80 
Corks, and manufactures of cork, 80 
Cork tree bark, unmanufltctured, . 15 
Com, Indian, and corn meal, . 20 
Cosmetics, . . .80 
Cotton, . . . Free 
Cotton caps, gloves, leggings, mits, socks, 
stockings, wove shirts and drawers, 
I made on frames, composed wholly of 
cotton, worn by men, women or chil 



dren. 



20 
80 
80 
25 



Cotton cords, gimps, galloons, 
Cotton embroidered or tamboured, 
Cotton laces, insertings, braids, 
Cotton, manu&ctures of, wholly of cot 

ton, n. o. p. . . . 25 

Cotton plush for hats, , 20 

Court plaster, . . ,80 

Crayons, ... 80 

Cream of tartar, . . .20 

Cubebs, ... 20 

Cudbear, . . .10 

CuraQoa, . • . 100 

Curls, hidr, • . .80 

Currants, ... 40 

Cutlery, . . .80 
Dates, . . .40 

Diamonds and imitations, not set, . 10 

Diamonds, glazierti', set or not set, 16 

Diamonds, set in metal, . 80 

Dolls, . . . .80 

Down, ... 26 

Dragon's blood, . . .16 

Drawers, woven, . 80 
Drawers, wove, wholly of cotton, made 

onfirames, . .20 

Dutch metal in leaf, . . 20 

Dying articles, not crude, n. o. p. . 20 

Dyewoods, extracts of; n. o. p. . 20 

Dyewoods, in sticks, . . 6 

Earthen ware, . . 80 

East India, gum, . . 10 

Ebony, unmanufkctured, . 20 

Ebony, manufjaxitures of, . .40 
Embroidered articles, (witii gold, silver, 

&c.) . • • • 80 

Emery, ... 20 

Engravings, . . .10 

Envelopes, paper, . . 80 

Epaulets, of gold or metal, . 80 

Epsom salts, . 20 

Essences, . . .80 

£ther, ... 20 

Extracts. . • .80 



166 



TJLBUTF Of* DUTIES. 



[1847. 



Extracts of Dyewoodfl or madder, n. o. p. 20| 
Fancj boxes, . . 80] 
Fans, . . . . SOi 
Feathers, artificial or ornamental, 80 
Feather beds and feathers for beds, 25 
Felspar. . . .20 
Felt, adne^iye, ibr sheathing, . Free 
Fig blue, . . .20 
•Figs, ... 40: 
Fire arms, . . .80; 
Fire crackers, . . 80 
Fire screens, . . .80 
Firewood, ... 30 
Fisheries, American, oil and other pro- 
ducts of . . Free 
Fish, foreign, n. o. p. . . 20 
Fish glue, or isinglass, . 20 
Fish, preserved in oil, . . 40 
Fish skins, . . 20 
Flannels, u. o. p. . . 25; 
Flats, braids, &c., for bonnets, 80; 
Flax, manu&ustures of, n. o. p. . 20; 
Flaxseed, . . • 20 1 
Flax, tow of . . . 15 
Flax, unmanufactured, . 15j 
Flints, ... 5 
Floorcloths, n. o. p. . 25 
Floor matting, . .25 
Floss silks, . . 25; 
Flour of sulphur, . .20 
Flowers, n.o. p. . . 20 
Flowers, artificial or ornamental, . 80' 
Frankfort black, . . 20; 
French chalk, . . .201 
Fruit, green or ripe, n. o. p. . 201 
Fruits preserved in sugar or brandy, 40, 
Fullers' eart^, . . 10: 
Fulminates, or fulminating powders, 201 
Fur, all manufactures of . 80 
Fur caps, bonnets, &c. . . SOj 
Furs dressed on the skin, . 20; 
Furs, hatters', not on the skin, . 10 
Furs, undressed, on the skin, 10 
Furniture, . . .80 
Galloons, cotton, . . 80 
Galloons, metal, . . 80 
Gamboge, . , 20 
Game, prepared in cases, . 40 
Gelatine, ... 80 
Gems and imitations, not set, . 10 
Gems, set in metal, . . 80 
German silver, manu&ctured or not, 80 
Gilt ware, . . 30 
Gimps, cotton, . . 80 
Ginger, ground, . . .80 
Ginger root, dried or green, . 40 
Glass, colored or painted, porcelain, 80 
Glass, compositions of, not set, • 10 
Glass, compositions of, when set, 80 
Glass, cut, . . 40 
Glasses for watches, spectacles, &c. 80 
Glass, manufactures of, n. o. p. 30 
Glass, paintings on . .80 
Glass tumblers, not cut or printed, 30 
Glass, window, broad, crown, or cylinder, 20 



Glauber salts. 

Glaziers' diamonds, set or not set, 



20 

15 

Gloves, wholly of cotton, made on frames, 20 

30 
20 

25 
20' 



Gloves woven. 

Glue, 

Goats' hair, manufactures of, n. o. 

Goats' hair, unmanufiictared, 



Goldbeaters' skin, . . 10 

Gold, and gold coins, . Free 

Gold leaf, ... 15 

Gold, manufactures of . . % 

Goods of United States growth or manu- 
feu;ture, exported and brought back, 
on which no bounty or drawback lias 
been paid, . . ' . Free 

Granadilla, manufactures of . 40 

Granadilla, unmanufactured, . 20 

Grapes, ... 30 

Grass cloth, . . .26 

Grass, manufactures of . 80 

Grease, . .10 

Green turtle, . . 20 

Green vitriol, . . .20 

Grindstones, . . 6 

Guano, . . . Free 

Gum Arabic, Senegal, Tragacanth, Bar- 

bary. East India, Jedda, substitute, 10 
Gum benzoin, or benjamin, . 30 

Gunny cloth, . . . .20 

Gunpowder, . . 20 

Hair bracelets, chains, curls, &c., 30 

Hair cloth and seating, . . 26 

Hair, curled, . . 20 

Hair, goats', unmanufsMstured, . 20 

Hair, human, prepared for use, 30 

Hair, manu&ctures of, n. o. p. . 26 

Hair pencils, . . SO 

Hair, uncleaned and unmanufactured, 10 
Hams, ... 20 

Harness fomiture, . . 30 

Hat bodies, cotton, . 30 

Hats, all or chiefly of wool, . 20 

Hats, n. o. p. . . 30 

Hatters' plush, chiefly of cotton, . 20 
Hearth rugs, . . 30 

Hemp, manu&ctuies of, n. o. p. . 20 
Hempseed, . ,10 

Hempseed oil, . . . ' 20 

Hemp, tow of . . 16 

Hemp, unmanufiactured, . 30 

Hides, raw, dried, salt, or pickled, n. o. p. 6 
Honey, . . .80 

Horn, manu&ctures of . 80 

Horns and homtips, unmanufiictured, 6 
Household effects, old and in use abroad 

of those bringing them, . Free 

Hydriodate of potash, . 20 

Implements- and tools of trade of ^ per- 
sons arriving here, except machinery 
and tools fbr use in manufactories, Free 
Indian com and com meal, . 20 

India rubber fabrics, ^ . 30 

India rubber, in bottles, &c., unmanuf 'd, 10 
India rubber shoes, . . 30 

Indigo, ... 10 

Indigo, extract of . .20 

Ink, and ink powder, . 30 

Inventions, models of, if unfitted for use, Free 
Ipecacuanha, . . 20 

Iridium, . . .20 

Iris, or orris root, . . 20 

Iron, castings, old or scrap, vessels of cast, 80 
Iron in bars, blooms, bolts, loops, jdgs, 

rods, slabs, n. o. p, . . 30 

Iron liquor, . . 20 

Iron, manufactures of . .30 

Isinglass, . . 20 

Ivory or bone black, . > 20 



1847.] 



TABIFF OF DUTIES. 



167 



Ivory, nmnaniiflicfcared, iyory nute, or 

vegetable ivory, 
Ivory, and vegetable ivory, mannfac- 

turesof . . .80 

Jalap, ... 20 

Japanned ware, n. o. j). , . dO 

Jedda, gum, . . 10 

Jellies, . . .80 
Jet, and manu&ctures or imitationa of 30 

Jewelry, real or fitlse, . . 80 

Juniper betries, . . 20 

Junk old, . . . Free 

Jute, unmanufactured, 25 

Kelp, . .10 

Kermes, ... 5 

Kermes, mineral, . 16 

Kirschenwasser, . . 100 

Knots, metal, • . .30 

Lac dye and spirits, . 6 

Laoes, metal, . . .80 

Lac spirits, . . 20 

Lac sulphur, . ■ .20 

Lamp black, . . 20 

Lard, . .20 

Lastings, for shoes, &c., exclusively, 5 

Laths, . . .20 

Lead, chromate of . . 20 

Lead, tu pigs, bars, and sheets, . 20 

Lead, manufactures of . 80 

Lead, nitrate of . . 20 

Lead pencils, . • 80 

Leaden pipes and shot, . . 20 

Lead, white and red, . 20 

Leather, manu&ctures of, 80 
Leather, tanned, bend, sole or upper, 20 

'Leeches, . . .20 
Leggings, wholly of cotton, made on 

finames, . . .20 

Legging, woven, . . 80 

Lemon juice, . . .10 

Lemons, and lemon peel, . 20 

Lime, . . .10 

Lime, chloride of . . 10 

Lime juice, . • .10 

Limes, ... 20 

Linen, embroidered or tamboured, 80 

Linens of all kinds, . . 20 

Linseed, . . .10 

Linseed oil, . 20 

Liquorice paste, juice, or root, • 20 

Liqueurs, . . . 100 

Listings, woollen, . . 20 

Litha^, ... 20 

Logwood, extract of, . .20 

Maocaroni, . . 80 

Mace, ... .40 

Madder, extract of . . 20 

Madder, ground and root, . 5 

Madeira wine, 40 

Magazines, printed books, &o., . 10 

Mahogany, manu&ctures of . 40 

Mahogany, unmanu&ctnred, 20 

Malt, ... 20 

Manganese, . .20 

Manna, , . . 20 

Maps and charts, . 10 

Maraschino, . . 100 

Bfarble, in rough slabs or blocks, . 20 
Marble, manu&etures of, except mere 

slabs^and blocks, 80 

Marrow, ... 10 

Mats, of flags, jute or grass. 26' 



Matting, Chinese, and other floor, 25 

Mattresses, vegetable substances for 20 

Meats prepared in cases, . 40 

Medals, cabinets of • • Free 

Medicines, n. o. p. . ^ . 80 

Medicinal drugs, roots, and leaves, crude, 

n. o. p. . . . 20 

Merchandize of United, States growth or 
manufacturcj exported and brought 
back, on which no bounty or draw- 
back has been paid, . Free 
Mercurial preparations, . . 25 
Metallic Pens, . . 80 
Metals, unmanufactured, n. o. p. 20 
Mineral kermes, . . 15 
Mineralogy, specimens of . Free 
Mineral substances, crude, n. o. p. 20 
Mineral waters, . . 80 
Mits, wholly of cotton, madd on frames, 20 
Mits, woven, . . .80 
Models of inventions, if unfitted for use. Free 
Mohair, manufactures of, n. o. p. 26 
Mohair, manufactures of, for making 

shoes,. &c f . . .5 

Mohair, unmanufactured, . 20 

Molasses, . . .80 

Mordant, paj^nt. . . 20 

Mosaics, real or imitation, if set in metal, 30 
Mosaics, real and imitation, not set 10 

Moss for beds or mattresses, . 20 

Muffs, fur, . . . 30 

Muriatic acid, . . .20 

Musical instruments, and strings for, 20 
Music and music i>aper, . . 10 

Muskets, ... 80 

Natron, . , ,10 

Natural History, specimens of. Free 

Needles, sewing, darning, &c. . 20 

Newspapers, illustrated, n. o. p. 10 

Nickel, . . .6 

Nitrate of lead, . . 20 

Nitrate of soda, crude, . . 5 

Nitrate of soda, refined, . 10 

Nitric acid, . . .20 

Nut galls, ... 5 

Nutmegs, . . .40 

Nuts, dye, unmanufaxitured, . 6 

Nuts, n. op. . . .80 

Nux vomica, . . 10 

Oakum, 

Oats and oatmeal, . . 20 

Ochres and ochry earths, dry or ground, 80 
Oilcloth, ... 80 

Oil, foreign, spermaceti, whale, or other 

fish, ... 20 

Oil, hcmpseed, linseed, &c., for painting, 20 
Oil, ueatsfoot and other animal, 20 

Oil, of American fisheries, . Free 

Oil of vitriol,. . . 10 

Oil, olive, or salad, . . 80 

Oil, palm and cocoanut, . 10 

Oils, volatile or essential, n. o. p. . 80 
Olive oil, . . 30 

Olives, . . .80 

Opium, . . ^ . 20 

Oranges and orange peel, . 20 

Orpiment, . 10 

Orris root, . . .20 

Osier for baskets, . . 20 

Osier, manufactures of . .80 

Packthread, 80 

Paddy. . . .20 



168 



TARIVI* 07 017TIBS. 



[1847. 



'•) 



Paintings, not mercliandifle, 

Paintings on glass, 

Paints, dry or ground, n. o. 

Palmleaf, manu&ctures of 

Palm oil, 

Palmleaf, unmaimfactgred, 

Pamphlets and periodicals, 

Paper boxes, envelopes, . 

Paper hangings, 

Paper, manufactures of 

Paper, n. o. p. 

Paper screens or fireboards, 

Paper, sheathing. 

Papier mach^, manuflbctures of 

Parasols and frames for 

Parchment, 

Paris white, 

Parterre for bonnets, . 

Paste, compositions of, not set, 

Paste, compositions of, when set, 

Pastel, 

Pastes, 

Patent mordant, 

Paving stones, tiles, and bricks, 

Paving tiles, marble, 

Pearls and imitations, not set, 

Pearl barley. 

Pearl, manufactures of 

Pearl, mother of 

Pearls, set in metal, . 

Pencils, lead, 

Pencils, red chalk, 

Pencils, slate. 

Pens, metallic, . 

Pepper, 

Perfumes, 

Periodicals and bo<^, 

Periodicals and other works, in course 

of printing or republication here 
Personal effects of Americans dying 

abroad, 
Peruvian bark. 
Pewter, manufactures of 
Pewter, old, , , 

Pickles, n. o. p. 
Pimento, 
Pineapples, 

Pipes, leaden, . 

Picch, 

Plaits for bonnets, 
Planks, 
Plantains, 

Plants, roots, &c., n. o. p., 
Plaster of Paris, ground, 
Plaster of Paris, unground, 
Plated ware, 

Platina, manu&otures of . 
Platina, unmanufactured, 
Pla3'ing cards, 
PlumlMigo, 
Plums, 

Plush for hatters, chiefly of cotton. 
Pocket books. 
Polishing stones, 
Porcelain glass, 
Pork, 

Porter, . , 

Port wine. 
Potash, chromate, bichromate, hydrio 

date, or prussiate of 
Potash, nitrate of, crude, 
Potash, nitrate of, refined, 



Free 

ao 

20 
80 
30 
10 
10 
80 
20 
30 
80 
20 
20 
80 
30 
30 
20 
30 
10 
30 
10 
80 
20 
20 
30 
10 
20 
80 
5 
80 
80 
80 
20 
80 
80 
80 
10 

20 

Free 
15 
80 
5 
30 
40 
20 
20 
20 
80 
20 
20 

Free 
20 

Free 
30 
80 

Free 
30 
20 
80 
20 
80 
10 
80 
20 
80 
40 

20 

5 

10 



Pota«ium, . . .20 

Potatoes, . . 80 

Poultry, prepared, in cases, 40 

Precious stones and imitations, not set, 10 

Precious stones, real or fiEOse, if set, 80 
Professional books, not men^iandiae, in 

use of persons arriving here, Fr«e 

Prunes, . , .40 

Prussian blue, . , 20 

Prussiate of potash, . . 20 
Pulp, dried, . .20 

Pumice and pumice stone, . 10 

Pumpkins, . . 20 

Putty, . . .20 

Pyroligneous acid, . . 20 

Quicksilver, . . • . 20 

Quillabark, . . 16 

Quills, . . .20 

Quinine, sulphate of . 20 

R*gs, . . .6 

Raisins, ... 40 

Rapeseed, , » .10 

Rapeseed oil, . . 20 

Ratifia, . . . lOQ 

Rattans, unmanufiuitured, . 10 

Red chalk, . . .20 

Red chalk and pencils, . 80 

Red lead, . . .20 

Reeds, unmanu&ctured, . 10 

Rhubarb, . . .20 

Rice, . . . . 20 

Rifles, , . ,80 

Rochelle salts, . . 20 

Roman cement, . , 20 

Roman vitriol, , , 20 

Roofing slates, . , 26 

Roofing tiles and bricks, . 20 

Roots, plants, &c. n. o. p., , Free 

Rosewood, manufactures of . 40 

Rosewood, unmanufactured, , 20 

Rotten stone. . . 10 

Rubies, and unitations, not set, . 10 

Rubies set in metal, . 80 

Rye and rye flour, . . 20 
Saddlery, ccmmon, tinned, or japanned, 20 

Saddlery, n. o. p., . .80 

Safllower, . , 6 

Saffron and saffron cake, . 20 

Sago, ... 20 

Salad oil, . . .80 

Sal ammonia, . . lo 

Salmon, preserved, . . gQ 

Sal soda, • • . 20 

Salt, , . .20 

Saltpetre, crude, . . 5 

Saltpetre, refinea, . . 10 

Salts, Epsom, glauber, Rochelle, and 

other, n. o. p., . .20 

Sardines. . . 40 

Sarsapanlla, . . .20 

Satinwood, manufiietures o^ . 40 

Satinwood, unmanufactured, . 20 

Sauces, n. o. p., . . 80 

Scagliola tops, . , 40 

Scantling, . . 20 

Scrap iron, . . .30 

Sealing wax, . go 

Seaweed for beds or mattresses, . 20 

Seedlac, ... 5 

Seeds, garden and other, n. o. p. Free 

Segars, paper or tobacco, . 40 

Senegal, gum, . , .10 



1847.] 



TAmUlf OF DUTIES'. 



169 



Seppia, ... 20 

Sewing silk, . . .80 

Shaddocks, . . ;%) 

Sheathing ccfpper, in ^eets 48^ inches 

long, 14 wide, and weighing from 14 

to 34 oz. per square Ibot, . Free 

Stheathing m6tal, . . Free 

Sheathing paper, . . 20 

Shellac, ... 6 

Shell hoxes, . . .30 

Shell, manufactures of . * 80 

Shells, t6rtoise and other, lUimaniiftc'd, 6 
Sherry wine, . . .40 

Shirts, woTen, . . 80 

flirts, wore, wholly of cotton, made on 

frames, ... 20 

Shoddy, or waste, , . 5 

Shoes, india rabber, . 80 

Shoes, lastings, mohair, silk twist &c., fbr 6 
Shot, lead, . . .20 

Shrubs, plants, kb., n. o. p., . I'ree 

Side arms, . . .80 

Silk, embroidered or tamboured, 80 

Silk, manufSactitres of, n. o. p., . 25 
Silk, rawj singles, tram and thrown, or 

organzme, , , .16 

^Ik, sewing, . . 80 

Silks, floss, . . .25 

Silk twist, . . 80 

SUk twist, for shoes, boots, &c., . 5 

S&Ter, and silVer coins, . Free 

SUyerleaf, . . .15 

SilTer, manufactures of . 80 

Sihrer plated metal, . . 80 

Sisal grass, unmanufkctured. 25 

Skins, raw, dried, salt, or pieUed, n. o. p., 5 
Skins, tanned, dressed, and other, n. o. p., 20 
Slate pencils, . . .20 

Slates, roofing, or other, . 25 

Smalts, . . .20 

SnufF, ... 40 

Soap, aU, . . .80 

Soap stocks and stii£b, . 10 

Socks, woven, . . .80 

Socks, wholly of cotton, made on frames, 20 
-- " • • - 20 

10 
5 

10 
80 
40 
20 
80 

Free 
80 
15 
6 
20 
100 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
10 
80 

Free 
20 
20 
15. 



Soda, all carb<mates <tf, n. o. p. 

Soda ash, 

Soda, nitrate of, crude. 

Soda, nitrate of, reflbaed, . 

SouTenin, 

Spar omamcaits, 

Spars, 

Spatteere fbr bonnets, 

Speokaens of natural history, 

l^tectacle glasses, 

^Iter In sheets. 

Spelter, unmanu&etored, n. o. p., 

Spermaoeti candles and tapem. 

Spirits, distilled. 

Spirits of turpentine, 

Spontfes, 4 

Spunk, 

aquills, 

StMfch, 

Starch, burnt, 

Stars, metal, . . ' . 

Statimry, not iMiehaadiae, 

Staves, 

Stearine candles and tapers, 

Steel in bars, ea8t,^shear, or Gmaan, 

Steel,^n. o. p., 

15 



Stereotype plates, . . 20 

Still bottoms, . . 2a 

Stockings, wholly of cotton, made on 

frames, . . .20 

Stockings, woren, . . 80 

Stocks, woven, , . 30 

Stones, building or burr, . 10 

Stones, paving, . . 20 

Stones, polislung, . . 10 

Stones, precious, and imitations, not set, 10 
Stone ware, . . 80 

Straw, manulSstctores of . .80 

Strings for musical instruments, 20 

Substitute, gtim, or burnt starch, . 10 
Sugar and syrup of sugar, 80 

Sulphate of barytes, crude, or refined, 20 
Sulphate of copper, . 20 

Sulphate of iron, . . 20 

Sulphate of quinine, . 20 

Sulphate of sdnc, . . 20 

Sulphur, flour of, . . 20 

Sulphuric acid, . . 10 

Sumac, ... 5 

Sunshades and frames for, . 80 

Suspenders, hidia rubber, ^ 80 

Sweetmeats, . ' . .40 

Syrup of sugar, • . 80 

TaUow, . . ' . 10 

Tallow candles, . . 20 

Tanning articles, not crude, n. o. p., 20 

Tapers, spermaceti, wax, or stearine, 20 

Tapioca, . . .20 

Tar, . . . 20 

Tartar, crude, . . .5 

Tartanoacid, . . 20 

Tassels, metal, . .80 

Tea, imported direct in ikmerican vessels, 
or in foreign vessels tempted by reci- 
procity treaties, . . Free 
Teeth, unmannfactnied, . 5 
Terne tin plates, . . 15 
Teutenegue, in sheets, . 15 
Teutenegue, unmanu&ctured, n. o. p., 5 
Terra japonica, or catechu, . 10 
Thibet goats' hair^ unmanufactured, 20 
Thread laces and inserting, , 20 
Tiles, paving or roofing, . 20 
Timber, hewn and sawed, ox for wharves, 20 
Tin, in pigs, bars, blocks, . 5 
Tin, manufactures of . .80 
Tin in plates or sheets, tin plates galvan- 
ized, n, o. p., . . 15 
Tin plates, terne, tin foil, . 15 
Tinctal, ... 25 
Tinctures, . . .80 
Tippets, fUr, . .89 
Tobacco, raannfiujtnres of, . 40 
Tobacco, unmanufactured, . 80 
Tools of trade of persons arriving here, 
except machinery and tools Ibx use in 
manu&ototies, . Free 
Tortoise shell, unmanufitctuzed, 6 
Tow of hemp or flax, . 15 
Toys, ... 80 
Tragaeantb, gam, • 10 
Trees, shrubs, plants, &o., n. o. p.. Free 
Tresses, metal, . 80 
Tumblers, glass, noi cut, or printed, SO 
Turmerie, . . 6 
Turpentine, spirits of, 20 
"^ ■ . .20 



2(^rurtie, green, 



170 



TARIFF OF DUTISS. 



[1847 



Twine, 

Twist made of silk or silk and mohair, 

Typea, new or old, and type metal, 

Umbrellas and firames for 

Tanilla beans, 

Tegetables, dye, xmmamilkcfcared, 

Tegetables prepared in cases, 

Vegetables, n. o. p., 

y^;etable substances, nnmannfkctnred, 

n. o. p., . 
Vellum, 

Velvet, wholly or chiefly of cotton, 
Verdigris, 
Vermicelli, . 

Vermilion, . . , 

Vinegar, 

Vitriol, blue, or Boman, 
Vitriol, green, 
Vitriol, oil of. 

Vitriol, white, . ^ 

Wafers, 

Walking sticks, 

Ware, earthen or mineral, n, o. p.. 
Waste or shoddy, 

Watches, parts and materials of watches, 
Watch glasses. 
Water colors, 
Wax candles and tapers. 
Wearing apparel, not merchandise, in 

use of persons arriving here, Free 

Wearing apimrel, ready made, . dO 

Webbing, india rubber, . 80 

Weld, ... 6 



80, Whalebooe, manuflMstares of. 80 

80, Wlialebone, of foreign fisheries, . 20 

20 Wheat and wheat flour, 20 

80 Whipgut and strings for musical instru- 

20| ments, ... 20 

6, White and yeUow acid, . 20 

40 White lead, . . 20 

20 White vitriol, . .20 

Whiting. ... 20 

WiUow for baskets, . . 20 

Willow, manu&ctures of, . 80 

Willow squares for bonnets, 80 

Window glass, broad, crown, or cylinder, 20 

Wines, aU, . . .40 

Wings, metal, . . 80 

Woad, . .10 

Wood, cedar, ebony, &c. unmanufihctnred, 20 

Wood, fire, or unmanufitctured, n. o. p., 80 



26 
80 
20 
20 
80 
20 
80 
20 
20 
10 
20 
80 
80 
30 
6 

10 
30 
30 
20 



Wood, manufactures of, n. o. p, . 80 

Wool, embroidered, or tamboured, 80 

Woollen listings, . . 20 

WooUen yam, . 25 

Wool hats, . . .20 

Wool, manufactures of, n. o. p. SO 

Wool, unmanufactured, . 80 

Worsted, embroidered or tamboured, SO 

Worsted, manufiictures of^ n. o. p., 26 

Worsted yam, . . 25 

Yams, . . . .20 

YaTOj woollen or worsted, . 25 

Zinc m sheets, . . .15 

Zinc, sulphate of, . . 20 

Quo, unmanu&otured, n. o. p. . 5 



Gtoods shall be weighed, measured, &o., at the owners' expense. In lieu of the bounty 
on pickled fish, a drawback shall be paid on its exportation equal to the duty paid on tha 
salt, and no more. Goods imported now, and placed in the public stores till December 2, 
1846, shall pay only the duties levied by this law. The owner may raise the inyoice value 
of bis goods to what he believes their true value to be in the markets of the country whence 
they are imported, adding thereto the costs and charges, which, under existing laws, would 
form part of their true value when entered ; and on ttiis true value the duties shall be as- 
sessed. The collector shall cause an appraisement or estimate of imported goods to be made 
according to existing laws ; and if this exceeds, by 10 per cent., the yalue as declared on 
entry, then, besides the duties now imposed, 20 per cent, duty shall be paid on such ap- 
praised value. But the duty shall never be ass^sed on less than the invoice value. The 
deputies and clerics of collectors, naval officers, &c., shall be sworn or affirmed by the 
collector to use their best endearors to detect and prevent frauds. No officer in the navy 
shall import, in any yessel of the United States, goods subject to duty. All acts and parts 
of acts repugnant to tliis law are repealed. 

Warehousing Stbtem. Duties are to be paid in cash. If they are not paid within the 
time allowed by law, or if the goods are entered for warehousing, the goods may then be 
deposited in the public stores, or in stores agreed upon by the collector and importer, tbo 
stores to be secured as required by the act of April 20, 1818 ; — to lie there at the owner's 
risk, and 8ul\ject at all times to his order, on the payment of duties and expenses, and to 
be secured by bond with surety for double the amount of duties. The goods shall not be 
withdrawn in less quantity than an entire package, cask, bale, or box, or if in bulk, not 
less tlian one ton. They may be re-shipped without payment of duties, if good security, 
as now required in the case of drawback, be given that they shall be landed out of tb» 
United States. Goods remaining in store more than one year shall be appraised and sold 
at public auction, and the proceeds, after deducting duties, expenses, &o., shall be paid to 
the owner, or placed in the Treasury, subject to his order. Goods of a perishable nature, 
gunpowder, fire crackere, and explosive substances, shall not be warehoused. Ware- 
housed goods may be withdrawn and sent to anotner port of entry, due security being 
given, under the restrictions in the act of March 2, 1799 ; but the original term of one 
year allowed for warehousing goods shall in no way be extended. If any such goods are 
fraudulentiy concealed or remoyed from the warehouses, they sliaU be forfeited to the 
United States, and persons guilty of the act shall be punished as for smumling ; if thA 
owner fhiudulently gain access to them, except in presence of the proper ofiteer, he shall 
be fined $1,000 ; any one altering the marks on the goods shall be fined $600. The ool- 
lectors shall make quarterly returns of the kind and amount of goods warehoused, whieh 
Um Secretary of the Treasury shall publish fe#lhe Washinf^n papers. 



1847.] 



COHMXBCE. 



171 



XIV. COMMERCE. 

1. Value of Different Abticles Imported. 

Value of Goods, Wares, nnd Merchandise, imported into the United States, 

dtaring the year ending June 30th, 1845. 



Species of Merchandise. 


Value. 


Fam OF DuTT. 




BuUion-' 




Qold, 


$66,103 


Silver, 


41,275 


Specie — 




Gold, 


752,747 


Silver, 


8,210,117 


Teas, 


5,730,614 


Coffee, 


6,221,271 


Copper — 




In plates and sheets, 


738,936 


In pigs, bars, and old, 


1,225,301 


Brass, in pigs, bars, and old, 


13,702 


Dye wood, in sticks, 


603,408 


Barilla, 


22,917 


Burr stones, nnwronght, 


82,624 


Crude brimstone, 


108,619 


All other articles, 
Total, 


3,380,306 


22,147,840 


MiSCHANDISX PATINa DUTIES 




AS YALORKK. 




Manujiuaures of Wool — 




Cloths and cassimeres. 
Merino shawls of wool. 
Blankets, not above 75 cents 


6,411,850 


226,317 




each, 


804,677 


Blankets, above 75 cents each. 


694,237 


Worsted stuffs, 


1,988,109 


Hoatery, gloves, mits, &c., 


741,242 


Woollen and worsted yam, 


187,976 


Otiier articles. 


658,468 


ManufoLctures of Cotton — 




Dyed, printed or colored, 


8,672,546 


VVliite or uncolored, 


1,828,461 


Velvets, cords, &c., 


671,291 


Twist, yarn, or thread. 
Hosiery, gloves, mits, &c., 


566,769 


1,326,631 


Other manufactures, 


906,594 


Silk and worsted goods, 


1,510,810 


Camlets, and mohair goods, « 


228,888 


Silks, floss, &c., 


1,^,541 


Lace — 




Thread and cotton. 


1,122,997 


Gold and silver, &c , 


28,434 


Flax-^ 




Linens, bleached and other, 


4,298,224 


Other articles, 


624,886 


Hempen Goods — 




Sheetings, brown and white, 


106,730 


Ticklenburgs, oenAbnrgs, and 




burlaps, 


196,471 


Other articles, 


206,782 



Species of Merchandise. 



Clothing — 

Beady made, 

Other articles of wear, 
Grass— 

Cloth and carpeting, not spe- 
cified. 

Matting and mats, 
Wire, brass, copper and plated, 
Arms, fire and side, 
Manufactures of-^ 

Iron and steel. 

Copper, 

Brass, 

Tin, 

Other metals. 
Saddlery, 
Mantifactttres of— 

Leather, not specified, 

Wood, 
Glass— 

Above 22 by 14 inches, 

Silvered, framed, and other, 
Hats, Bonnets, tfc. — 

Leghorn, straw, chip, &c., 

Palm leaf, 
Wares — 

China and porcelain, 

Earthen and stone, 

Plated and gilt. 

Japanned, 
Furs — 

Undressed, on the skin, 

Hats, caps, and mufEa, 

Hatters' and other, 
Hair cloth and seating. 
Brushes, of all kinds. 
Paper hanging. 
Slates of all kinds, 
Black lead pencils, 
Copper bottoms, cut round, &c. 
Zinc, in plates. 
Chronometers and clocks. 
Watches and parts of watches. 
Gold and silver, manufactures of 
Jewelry, 
Quicksilvw, 

Buttons, metal and oC&er, 
Teas, imported from places oth- 
er than those of their growth 

and production. 
Coffee, so imported, 
Corks, 
Quills, 
Wood, unmamtfaetwedr-^ 

Mahogany and rose, 



Value. 



$67,282 
1,105,796 



50,069 
126,190 

18,266 
146,165 

4X)23,590 

107,756 

120,088 

13,131 

26,517 

268,247 

109,668 
176,092 

80,263 
871,375 

712,923 
52,108 

262,256 

2,187,269 

169,227 

59,896 

256,686 
16,646 

465,789 
90,643 
67,426 
46,285 

121,768 
11,798 
8,456 
73,909 
80,806 
1,108,648 
89,380 

139,539 
54,993 

109,230 



81,274 

22,261 

90,862 

9,887 

299,082 



BtriTU) stjuis. 



1847.] 



OOMMXBCB. 



173 



Spedes of Merchandiae. 


Talue. 


SpeciM of Merchandise. 


Talue. 






j&-onr— 




Do.. 8 OK. or under, 
Plain tomblen, 


$2,385 


Nail or spike rods, slit, rolled. 




790 


or hammered. 


6929 


Cylinder, 


14,679 


Sheet and hoop iron. 


489,528 


Crown, 


18,211 


Casement rods, band, scroll. 




Polished plate, 


21,292 


&c.. 


7,671 


Apothecaries' vials, 


1,662 


In pigs. 

Old and scrap. 


606,291 


Bottles, 


44,835' 


119,740 


Demijohns, 


6,408| 


Bar, manufiictuved by rolling. 


1,691,748 


Patent sheathing metal. 


6,874 




872,157 


Pins— 
Solid-headed, in packs of 6,000 


' 1 


Steel. 
Leather — 


776,675 


each. 


26,828 


Sole and upper. 


1,164 


Ponnd pins, 


19,250 


Gloves, 


699,882 


Muskets and rifles, 


16,185 


Boots and shoes, 


42,269 


Wire- 




Skins— 




Iron & steel, cap and bonnet. 


10,969 


Tanned and dressed. 


114,497 


All other. 


14,692 


Tanned and not dressM, 


12,626 


Mdnu/aetures of Iron^ . 
Tacks, brads, and sprigs, 




Paper — 




1,678 


Writing, 


7,926 


Wood screws. 


17,133 


All other, 


43,798 


Nails, cut and wrought, 


68,456 


Books— 




Spikes, 


626 


Printed 40 years before im- 




Chain cables. 


57,193 


portation. 
Printed in Latin and Greek, 


19,967 


Chains, other than cables, 
Wrougnt iron, for ships, loco- 


10,718 


9,886 




In Hebrew, 


18,462 


motives, &c.. 


5,618 


In English, 


118,949 


Malleable iron, 
Manufaetures of Iron ^ Steele 


327 


In other languages. 


59,192 




In pamphlets and sheets, 


^'JS 


Mill, cross-cut, and pit saws, 


6,996 


Lexicons and all other. 


4,968 


Steam gas pipes, 


408 


Coal, 


228,919 


Anchors, 


2,871 


Salt, 


896,668 


Anvils, 


67,397 


Potatoes, 


58,949 


Blacksmiths' hammem and 




Fish— 




sledges, 


5,637 


Dried or smoked. 


9,646 


Castings — 




Pickled, 


280,619 


Tessels of. 

All other. 

Glazed or tinned hollow waie. 

Sad irons, hatters' and tailors' 

irons. 
Cast iron butt hinges, 
Axletrees, or parts thereof, 


18,236 

4,792 

88,917 

612 

80,607': 
1,992 


Articles not enumerated. 


86,801 


Value of Merchandise pajfing 

speeiJU, dvtieSf 
Do. do. ad valoremy 


84,914,862 
60,191,862 


Do. do. free of duty. 


22,147,840 


Totals 


117,264,664 


B'on — 








Braziers' rods, from 8-16th to 




\ 




10-16th hich diameter. 


26,8141 


\ 





Year ending June 30, 1844. 

Merchandise at specific duties, 
do. ad valorem, 
do. firee of duty. 

Total, 


$81,862,863 
62,816,291 

24,766,881 

108,435,035 


Year ending fVj^t. 80, 1842. 

Merchandise at specific duties, 
do. ad valorem, 
do. free of duty. 

Total, 


$20,326,516 
49,209,085 
80,627,486 


100,162,087 


Nine months ending June 80, 
1843. 

Merchandise at specific duties, 
do. ad valorem, 
do. free of duty, 

Total, 


$12,494,840 

16,684,876 
86,674,684 


Year ending Sept. 30, 1841. 

Merchandise at specific duties, 
do. . ad valorem, 
do. free of duty, 

Total, 


$27,816,804 
84,610,642 
66,019,781 


64,768,799 


127,946,177 



15* 



174 



Uiri9«I> SXATXS. 



[1847. 



2. Exports of thb Fboducb or the Ukited Statsb. 

Value of the Exports of the Growth^ Produce^ and Manufacture of the United 
StaieSf during the two years ending June 30tA, 1845. 



Tear ending 
June 80, 1846. 



Thb Sba. 
Fisheries'^ 
Dried fish, or cod fisheries, 
Pkkled fi^h, or river fisheries, (hening, shad, 

salmon, mackerel,) 
Whale and other fish oil, . 
Spermaceti oil, 
Whalebone, 
Spermaceti candles, 

Thb Fobbst. 

Skins and furs, 

Ginseng, 

Products of Wood — 

Staves, shingles, boards, hewn timber, 

Other lumber, 

Masts and spars, 

Oak bark and other dye» 

All manufactures of wood 

Naval stores, tar pitch, rosin and turpentine, 

Ashes, pot and pearl, 

AOBICULTUBB. 

Products of Animals — 

Beef, tallow, hides, homed cattle. 

Butter and cheese, 
- Pork, (pickled,) bacon, lard, live hogs. 

Horses and mules, 

Sheep, 
VeqetcMe Food-^ 

Wheat, 

Flour, 

Indian com, 

Indian meal, 

Rye meal, 

Bye, oats, and other small grain and pobe, 

Biscuit, or ship bread. 

Potatoes, 

Apples, 

Bice, 
Tobacco, 
Cotton, 
All other Agricultural Products — 

Flaxseedf, 

Hops, 

Brown sugar, 

Indigo, 

MAimFACTURES. 

Soap and tallow Candles, 
Leather, boots and shoes. 
Household furniture, 
Coaches and other carriages, 
Hats, 



Year ending 
Jane 90, 1844 



$699,886 

197,179 
1,464,968 
344,930 
463,096 
180,492 

742,196 
95,008 

1,672,279 

326,945 

23,274 

70,370 

919,100 

818,692 

1,140,848 



1,810,551 
758,829 

3,236,479 

315,696 

27,824 

600,400 

6,759,488 

404,008 

641,029 

104,391 

133,477 

388,603 

74,108 

51,465 

2,182,468 

8,397,255 

54,063^601 

23,749 

51,560 

12,363 

1,176 

619,544 

204,000 

327,938 

63,931 

75,649 



$803,353 

208,654 
1,520,363 
975,195 
762,642 
236,917 

1,248,355 
177,146 

1,953,222 

369,305 

28,692 

70,616 

677,420 

814,969 

1,210,496 



1,926,809 
878,865 

2,991,284 

385,488 

23,948 

336,779 

6,398,593 

411,741 

641,552 

112,908 

177,953 

366,294 

122,926 

81,306 

2,160,456 

7,469,819 

51,739,643 

81,978 

90,341 

11,107 

70 

623,946 
828,091 

277,488 
65,821 
70,597 



1847,.] 



OOlMfB^S- 



175 



Saddlery, . * 


JuSesSrisS 


Year, ending 
June 30, 1846. 


$34,552 


$20,847 


W cLJL* - • • • • 


278,039 


234,794 


Spirits from grain, 


59,312 


75,108 


Beer, ale, porter and cider, 


56,697 


69,582 


Snnff and tobacco, 


536,600 


538,498 


Linseed oil and spirits of turpentiae, 


68,476 


92,614 


Cordage, 


49,242 


55,016 


Zrwi — 






Fig, bar, and nails, . 


183,522 


77,669 


Castings, . • • 


54,598 


118,248 


All manofactnres of, 


528,212 


649,100 


Spirits from molasses, 


241,604 


216,118 


Sugar, refined. 


128,594 


164,662 


Chocolate, 


2,150 


1,461 


Gunpowder, 


130,923 


122,599 


Copper and brass. 


91,446 


94,736 


Medicinal drugs. 
Cotton Piece Uoods — 


166,805 


212,837 






Printed and colored, 


385,403 


516,243 


White, 


2,398,800 


2,343,104 


Nankeen, 




1,174,038 


Twist, yam, and thread. 


44,421 


14,379 


All otJier manufactures of. 


170,156 


280,164 


Flax and hemp— bags and all manufactures of, 


311 


14,762 


Wearing apparel, 
Combs and buttons. 


117,570 


69,653 


30,778 


23,794 


Brushes, > • . • 


5,962 


2,206 


Billiard tables and apparatus, 


2,534 


1,551 


Umbrellas and parasols, 


6,514 


2,583 


Leather and Morocco skins not sold per pound, 


39,197 


16,363 


Fire engines and apparatus, . 




12,660 


Printing presses and type, 
Musical Instruments, 


36,243 


26,774 


17,050 


18,309 


Books and maps, . . 


42,432 


43,298 


Paper and stationery. 


83,108 


106,190 


Paints and varnish, 


44,060 


50,165 


Vinegar, 


8,315 


14,375 


Earthen and stone ware, 


4,884 


7,393 


Manufactures of— 






Glass, .... 


77,860 


98,760 


Tin, 


6,421 


10,114 


Pewter and lead, 


10,018 


14,404 


Marble and stone, 


19,135 


17,626 


Gold and silver, and gold leaf. 


2,638 


3,229 


Gold and silver coin. 


183,405 


844,446 


Artificial flowers and jewelry, 


6,761 


10,435 


Molasses, 


3,922 


20,771 


Trunks, . * • 


7,481 


3,336 


Brick and lime, 


12,833 


8,701 


Domestic ssJt, 


47,755 


45,151 


Xicad, . . • • 


595,238 


342,646 


Articles not enumerated — ' 






Manufactured, 


1,600,090 


1,269,338 


Other arti^es, 
Total, 


854^427 


1,315,578 


I 99,715,179 


99,299,776 



176 



UNITED STATBS. 



[1847. 



3. IvpObts fbom akd Exports to Foiusion Countries, 
During tite yectr ending June SOth, 1845. 



1 


Countries. 


Value of 
Imports. 


Talue of Exports. 


Domestic 
Produce. 


Foreign 
Produce. 


Total. 


Rnada, 


$1,492,262 


536,846 


«100,4d2 


$727,387 


2 


Pnusia, 


31,082 


602,007 


65^114 


567,121 


8 


Sweden and Norway, 


627,938 


250,567 


22,761 


273,328 


4 


Swedish West Indies, 


12,119 


88,886 


1,458 


90,388 


6 


Denmaxlr. 

Danisli West IndLes, 


22,429 


124,666 


20,501 


145,167 


6 


760,809 


83^,503 


160,926 


994,429 


7 


Hanse Towns, 


2,912,537 


4,106,927 


838,093 


4,946,020 


8 


Holland. 

Dutch East Indies, 


954,344 


2,753,780 


268,267 


8,022,047 


9 


538,608 


129,151 


72,007 


201,158 


10 


Dutch West Indies, 


863.324 


804,980 


83,708 


887,788 


11 


Dutch Qulana, 


41,347 


47,737 


1,872 


49,609 


12 


Belgium, 


709,562 


1,495,764 


855,819 


1,851,078 


18 


England, 


44,687,859 


41,618.934 


^''^^'^'^ 


46,286,178 


14 


Scotland, 


708,187 


2,611,874 


64,986 


2,666,810 


16 


Ireland, 


104,857 


103,471 




108,471 


16 


Gibraltar, 


92,118 


426,107 


168,664 


589,671 


17 


Malta, 

British East Indies, 


22.311 


12,909 




12,909 


18 


1,276,534 


297,331 


184,067 


431,398 


19 


Australia, 

Cape of Cfood Hope, 




69,521 


790 


70,311 


20 


26,489 


83,743 




83,748 


21 


Mauritius, 




12,935 




12,935 


22 


Honduras, 


204,818 


188,494 


»,421 


239,916 


23 


British Guiana, 


7,957 


416,867 


1,881 


418,748 


24 


British West Indies. 

British North American Colonies, 


752,580 


4,087,500 


86,720 


4,124,220 


25 


2,020,066 


4,844,966 


14209,260 


6,064,226 


26 


France on the Atlantic, 


20,181,260 


11,860,432 


2'SS,26a 


14,822,686 


27 


France on the Mediterranean, 


1,414,176 


979,789 


197,980 


1,177,719' 


28 


French West Indies, 


415,188 


642,456 


21,648 


664,103 


29 


French Guiana, 


59,806 


67,052 


444 


67,496 


80 


French Aftican Ports, 




6,508 




6,608 


81 


Bourbon, 




16,483 




16,488 


32 


Spain on the Atlantic, 


117,158 


271,233 


560 


271,783 


83 


Spain on the Mediterranean, 


954,628 


65,700 


28,806 


84,598 


84 




55,082 


6,896 




6,886 


85 


Manilla and Philippine Isles, 


683,059 


119,268 


85,815 


164,678 


86 


Cuba, 


6,804,414 


6,208,808 


860,946 


6,664,764 


87 


Other Spanish West Indies, 


2'2?$'S§ 


688,149 


20,776 


708,924 


88 


Portugal, 


296,908 


124,350 


6,419 


129,789 


89 


Biadeira, 


168,674 


69,812 


1,784 


61,006 


40 


Fayal and other Asores, 


28,573 


2,831 


61 


2,882 


41 




7,579 


60,599 


«J'^ 


68,488 


42 


Italy, 


1,801,577 


687,669 


280,352 


817,921 


43 


Sicily, 


629,498 


70,626 


884,667 


406,292 


44 


Sardinia, 


19,859 


162,827 


82,970 


195,797 


45 




821,650 


1,438,103 


868,776 


1,801,878 


46 


Turkey, LeTant, and Egypt, 


781,617 


116,668 


S'S^ 


166,089 


47 


Hayti, 


1,386,867 


1,827,891 


77,849 


1,406,740 


48 


China, 


7,286,914 


2,079,841 


196,664 


2,276,996 


49 


Texas, 


765,324 


210,786 


168,056 


868,792 


50'Me3dcb, 


1,702,986 


784,164 


868,177 


1,152,881 


61 


Central America, 


66,269 


41648 


26,101 


67,649 


62 


New Grenada, 


171,921 


4S,717 


80,260 


78,977 


58 


Tenezuela, 


1,268,276 


686,646 


189,686 


1,725,180 


54 


Bradl, 


6,084,699 


2,418,667 


424,888 


2,887,960 


65 


Argentine Bepublio, 


1,750,698 


842,676 


160,481 


??'922 


66 


Cisplatlne Bepublic, 


20,578 


140,986 


16,150 


157,186 


67 


Chili, 


1,128,690 


1,247,860 


800,881 


1,548,191 


68jPeru; 


886,112 


88,424 




88,424 


59,South America generally, 




76,32U 


9,910 


^•^ 


60 


Asia generally. 


196,110 


i7i,doa 


140,945 


812,748 


61 


Africa generally. 


672,126 


626,66S 


79,648 


606,106 


62 


. Europe generally. 




21,678 




21,678 


as 


t West Indies generaUy, 




182,596 


878 


182,976 


64 


\ South Seas ancf Padfle Ocean, 


186,810 


416,026 


67,064 


473,089 


6C 


Total, . 


1,666 








11^,264,664 


^M,m 


l6,fi46,SM 


ll4,d4^dM 



D EXBOBTS or BACH StATE, 
w ending Jane SQth, 1845. 



ComARA.TiTB View op thb Tohkaqb of- tbh Usiteb SniEg 
From 1815 to 1845 indwtije, Vn <<>nj aad 95tht. 



178 



UKITED STATES. 



[1847. 



XV. COMPARATIVE VIEW OF 











Annual 


8t&tAB. 


Abioliite 


Contingent 


Total 


Interest on 


K7WMl«0« 


Debt. 


Debt. 


Debt. 


Absolute 
Debt. 


Maine, 


$1,274,285 




$1,274,285 


$76,457 


New Hampflhire, 


None. 




None. 




Vermont, 


279,960 




279,960 


16,798 


Massachusetts, 


1,039,215 


$5,049,556 


6,088,771 


59,336 


Khode Island, 


152,719 




152,719 


9,163 


Connecticat, 


None. 




None. 




New York, 


25,576,570 


1,713,000 


27,288,570 


1,391,992 


New Jersey, 


None. 




None. 




Pennsylvania, 


40,986,393 




40,986,393 


2,048,320 


Delaware, 


None. 




None. 




Maryland!, 


11,986,785 


*1, 376,891 


13,363,676 


655,421 


Virginia, 


7,384,794 


1,476,295 


8,861,089 


641,746 


North Carolina, 


None. 




None. 




South Carolina, 


3,234,502 


2,000,000 


5,234,502 


170,798 


Geoi^a, 


1,727,760 




1,727,760 


109,296 


Florida, 


3,900,000 


950,000 


4,850,000 


294,000 


Alabama, 


9,207,556 


4,438,522 


13,646,078 


557,746 


Mississippi, 


2,271,707 


5,000,000 


7,271,707 


128,000 


Louisiana, 


1,380,566 


14,857,565 


16,238,131 


78,914 


Arkansas, 


2,676,000 


1,044,570 


3,720,570 


160,250 


Tennessee, 


3,254,417 




3,254,417 


173,349 


Kentucky, 


4,409,456 




4,409,456 


258,354 


Ohio, 


19,251,180 




19,251,180 


1,140,707 


Michigan, 


4,394,510 




4,394,510 


266,000 


Indiana, 


15,072,080t 


1,390,000 


16,462,080 


607,772 


Illinois, 


14,633,969 




14,633,969 


712,533 


Missouri, 


684,997 




684,997 


73,100 


Texas, 


4,856,601 


5,092,406 


9,949,007 


300,000 


TcJtal, 


179,635,022 


44,388.805 


224,023,827 


9,930,052 



These tables are believed to be very accurate, being compiled almost 
exclusively from official reports made by the Treasurers and Auditors to 
the Legislatures of the several States, near the 1st of January, 1846. The 
account of the State debts, in particular, is full, and may be depended 
upon ; that of the several kinds of property owned by the States, of course 
is more defective ; for the State archives seldom afford complete materials 
for accurate accounts of this sort, and the property is sometimes estimated 
at a nominal valuation, which is much above its market value. The editor 



* Arrears of interest due Dec. 1, 1846. 

t Including $2,777,820 arrears of interest up to Jan. 1, 1846, and $1,204,760 of domestle 
debt, for which treasury notes bearing interest are now outstanding. 



1847.] 



FINANCBS or THE 8TJLTB8. 



179 



THE FINANCES OF THE STATES. 



states. 


Amount 

of 

School Fund. 


Other 
prodnctiTO 
Property. 


Other property 

not now 

produetiye. 


Ordinary an- 
nual Expendi- 
ture, ezdufiiTe 
of Debts 

and Schools. 


Maine, 

New Hampshire, 

Vermont, 

Massachusetts, 

Bhode Island, 

Connecticut, 

New York, 

New Jersey, 

Pennsylvania, 

Delaware, 

Maryland, 

Virginia, 

Nortb Carolina, 

South Carolina, 

Georgia, 

Florida, 

Alabama, 

Mississippi, 

Louisiana, 

Arkansas, 

Tennessee, 

Kentucky, 

Ohio, 

Michigan, 

Indiana, 

Illinois, 

Missouri, 

Texas, 


$100,000 

234,900 
810,494 
433,635 
2,070,055 
6,374,144 
380,000 

175,750 

541,200 

263,000 
927,850 

884,043 

1,221,819 

1,455,124 

457,042 

279,663 


$369,104 

716,137 
1,711,647 

400,400 

30,723,336 

224,089 

30,848,761 

521,529 

3,215,919 

6,054,643 

363,000 

4,371,255 

6,300,000 

2,625,369 

17,605,933 

4,204,430 

141,000 


$5,000,000 
4,747,827 

2,000,000 
2,416,938 

3,000,000 
1,068,450 

5,000,000 


$154,681 
140,000 

95,503 
357,107 

43,316 

98,105 
793,576 
111,380 
437,437 

17,129 

188,653 

"554,996 

63,458 
215,287 
113,986 

127,386 

155,000 

515,207 

33,830 

165,000 

262,000 

201,472 

95,000 

71,122 

158,000 

136,555 

150,000 


Total, 


16,608,719 


110,396,552 


23,232,715 


5,455,186 



of the American Almanac respectfully invites his correspondents in the 
several States to communicate such eirors as they may detect in these 
tables, and they will be republished in the volume for 1848 in a revised and 
perfect condition. The object here is to give only a summary of the facts, 
so as to afford the means of comparing the States with each other. Their 
financial condition is shown at much greater length under the head of " In- ' 
dividual States." Official returns published in this work for 1843, (page' 
135) showed that tiie total of the debts of the States in 1842 was $198,818,736* 
It is apparent, then, tiiat tiiere has been no great reduction of these debts. 



UKIIBD BTATX8. l^^f- 

xrr. cOLLBGfis m the 



1847.] 



COLLEGES. 



181 



UNITED STATES. 



1 
2 
8 

i 

5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
16 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
80 
81 
82 
88 
84 
86 
86 

88 
89 
40 
41 
42 
48 
44 
46 
46 
47 
48 
49 
60 
61 
62 
68 
64 
66 
66 
67 
68 
69 
60 
61 
62 
68 
64 
66 



Inst- 
mct- 
en. 



8 
7 

16 
7 
7 
7 

80 
8 

12 

9 

83 

8 

8 

13 

13 

9 

9 

8 

11 

13 

9 

7 

8 

8 

6 

6 

4 

7 

4 

6 

7 

6 

16 

12 

10 

16 

10 

4 

6 

6 

9 

8 

4 

6 
10 
8 
8 
4 
7 
9 
6 
6 

4 
8 
8 
3 
6 
6 
9 
4 
4 
2 



No. of 
Alumni. 


No. of 
Minis- 
ters. 


Sto- 
dents. 


749 


121 


182 


210 


70 


70 


2,228 


646 


831 


277 




125 


771 


245 


97 


88 




104 


6,942 


1,588 


276 


967 


831 


167 


662 


137 


118 


1,496 


474 


140 


6,644 


1,430 


424 


257 


117 


80 


249 


104 


119 


1,170 




114 


2,125 


808 


282 


487 


69 


139 


140 




138 
81 


167 




131 


2,747 


628 


244 


488 


77 


82 


613 




118 


661 


140 


101 


683 


227 


170 


248 




191 


16 




100 


69 




76 


28 




130 


6 




49 


11 




64 
112 


124 


6 


27 


187 




160 


41 




180 
78 


90 




140 


104 




25 
98 


8 




65 


126 




136 


1,286 




170 


77 




73 

46 
60 


16 




128 


829 


70 


150 


81 




44 


11 


6 


24 


67 




40 




8 


160 


628 


60 


116 


26 


1 


65 


11 




70 
85 


74 


2 


80 


60 




106 
70 


61 




105 


18 




170 
65 
46 
70 


no 




41 



Yolumes in 
Libraries. 

24,860 
7,000 

16,600 
9,200 
7,064 

74,000 

■ 7,600 

15,000 

23,000 

44,000 

7,949 

12,000 

14,000 

13,000 

10,000 

4,600 

6,400 

14,600 
9,000 
6,000 

12,000 
4,500 
3,800 
8,000 
2,270 
6,000 



8,600 

4,000 

12,000 

8,500 

3,000 

25,000 

4,200 

5,000 

8,000 

2,700 

16,000 

2,800 



10,000 
1,160 
4,700 
8,000 
15,000 
13,000 
2,000 



6,000 
2,200 
4,000 
4,000 
1,850 

800 

8,000 



Commencement. 



First Wednesday in September. 

Second Wednesday in August. 
Last Thursday in July. 
First Wednesday in August. 
Third Wednesday in August. 
Third Thursday in August. 
Fourth Wednesday in August. 
Third Wednesday In August. 
Fourth Thursday in July. 
September 15. 

First Wednesday in September. 
Third Thursday in August. 
First Thursday in August. 
First Wednesday in August. 
Day after first Monday in October. 
Fourth Wednesday in July. 
Fourth Wednesday in July. 
Third Wednesday in August. 
First Wednesday in August. 
Wednesday preceding 4th of July. 
Last Wednesday in June. 
Fourth Wednesday in July. 
The 15th, 16th, or 17th of July. 
Second Thursday in July. 
Last Thursday in September, 
Last Wednesday in September. 

SecoQd Wednesday in September. 

Last Wednesday in^ August. 

Early in July. 

Fourth Wednesday in September. 

The 22d of February. 

Third Tuesday in July. 

Last week in June. 

Thursday bef. 1st Mon. in August. 

Near the last of July. 

First Wednesday in October. 

July 4th. 

Fourth Wednesday in September. 

Last Thursday in June. 

July 4th. 

Second Wednesday In June. 

Last Wednesday in June. 

4th of July. 

First Thursday in June. 

Last Thursday in June. 

Third Thursdav in June. 

Tuesday after 4th Monday In Sbroh. 

First Monday in December. 

First Wednesday in August. 

Wednesday after 2d Monday in Not. 



Wednesday after 2d Monday In Dee, 
Early in June. 

First Thursday in April. 
First Wednesday in June. 

December. 

First of NoTember. 

Third Wednesday in September. 



16 



182 



UNITED STATES. 



[1847. 



COLLEGES IN THE 



Name. 



Plac«. 



66 

67 

68 

69 

70 

71 

72 

73 

74 

75 

76 

77 

78 

79 

80 

81 

82 

83 

84 

85 

86 

87 

88 

89 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

95 

96 

97 

98 

99 

100 

101 

102 

103 

104 

105 

106 

107 

108 



WaahingtoitJ 

Unireraity of NashTille, 

Franklin, 

EajBt Tennessee, 

Cumberland Unlrersity, 

Jackson, 

TransyWania, 

St Josei^'s,} 

Centre, 

Augusta,^ 

Georgetown,* 

Bacon, 

St. Mary'Sjf 

UnlTersity of Ohio, 

Miami University, 

Franklin, 

Western Kesenre, 

Kenyon,t 

Granville,* 

Marietta, 

Oberlin Institute, 

Cincinnati, 

St. XaTier,§ 

Woodward, 

Ohio Wesleyan Uniy'ty,* 

Indiana State Uniyendtyj 

Madison Uniyersi^y, 

Wabash, 

Ind. AsDury UniTersity,t 

St. Gabriel^8,$ 

Illinois, 

Shurtleff,* 

McEendiee^ 

Knox Manual Labor, 

Uniyersity of St. Louis, § 

Kemper College,! 

St. Mary's,§ 

Masonic, 

Missouri Uniyersity) 

St. Charles,^ 

Fayette, 

Michigan Uniyersity, 

St. Phfllp'sj 



Presidents. 



Wash'n co., Tenn. 

Nashville, do. 
Near Nashville, do. 

Knoxville, do. 

Lebanon, do. 

Columbia, do. 

Islington, Ky. 

Bardstown, do. 

Danville, do. 

Augusta, do. 

Georgetown, do. 

Harrodsburg, do. 

Marion co., do. 

Athens, Ohio, 

Oxford, do. 

New Athens, do. 

Hudson, do. 

Gambler, do. 

Granville, do. 

Marietta, do. 

Oberlin, do. 

Cincinnati, do. 

Cincinnati, do. 

Cincinnati, do. 

Delaware, do 

Dloomington, Ind. 
South Hanoyer, do. 
Crawfordsville, do. 

Greencastle, do. 

Tincennes, do 

Jacksonville, HI. 

Upper Alton, do. 

Lebanon, do. 

Galesbui^, do. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

St. Louis, do. 
Cape GirardeaUjdo. 

Mulon CO., do. 

Colimibia, do. 

St. Charles, do. 

Fayette, do. 

Ann Arbor. Mich 

Near Detrpit, do. 



Philip lindsley, D. D. 
Tolbert Fanning, A. M. 
Joseph Estabrook, A. M. 
T. G. Anderson, A. M. 
WiUiam Mack, A. M. 
H. B. Bascom, D. D. 
J. M. Lancaster, 
John C. Young, D. D. 
J. Tomlinson, D. D. 
Howard Malcom, M. D. 
E. S. Burnet, 
W. S. Murphy, S. J. 
T. McGill, LL. D. 
E. D. Macmaster, D. D. 
William Burnett, 
George £. Pierce, D. D. 
D. B. Douglass, LL. D. 

Joel H. Linsley , D. D. 
Asa Blahan, A. M. 

J. A. Elet, S. J. 
Thomas J. Biggs, A. M. 
Edward Thompson, M. D. 
Andrew Wylie, D. fa. 

Scovel, D. D. 

Charles White, D. D. 
Matt Simpson, D. D. 
J. P. Bellier, 
J. M. Sturtevant, 
Adiel Sherwood, D. D. 

Finly, D. D. 

Hiram H. Kellogg, 
J. Tan de Yelde, 

Hector Figari, 0. M. 
J. Worthington Smith, 
John H. Lathrop, A. M. 

Archibald Patterson, 
Andrew Ten Brook, A. M. 
[Mr. Bowens, 



Foun- 
ded. 



1794 

3806 
1844 
1807 
1844 
1880 
1798 
1819 
1819 
1825 
1830 
1836 
1837 
1821 
1809 
1825 
1826 
1826 
1832 
1832 
1834 
1819 
1840 

1844 
1827 
1829 
1833 
1839 
1848 
1829 
1835 
1834 
1837 
1832 
1840 
1830 
1831 
1840 
1839 

1887 
1839 



Remarks, 

The CoUeges marked (*) are under the direction of the Baptists ; thus (t ) Episcopalians ; 
thus (t) Methodists ; thus (§) CatAolies. With respect to the Colleges which are unmark- 
edy the prevailing religious influence of those that are in the New England States is Con- 
gregationdKsm ; of most of the others, Presbyterianism. 

Bj students in the aboye table*, except a few of the Colleges in the Southern and Western 
States, is meant undergradiuttes^ or members of the fbur collegiate classes ; not including 
such as are pursuing professional education, or such as are members of a preparatory 
department. Some of the Colleges aboye enumerated are not in full operadon; and 
Bcaxcelj deserve a place in the table. 

The column of Ubrarits includes tlie number of yolumes in the College Libraries and in 
fbe 8lu4ents^ JUbraries. 



1847] 



COLL£61£8. 



188 



UNITED STATES. (CoDtinued.) 



66 


Inst- 

rucfc- 
ers. 

2 


No. of 
Alonmi. 

110 


No. of 
Minis- 
ters. 


Stu- 
dents. 


Volumes In 
Libraries. 


Commencement 




42 


1,000 




67 


6 


836 




80 


10,000 


First Wednesday in October. 


68 


7 






140 


1,000 




69 


6 


40 




120 


3,620 


First Wednesday in August. 


70 


8 


82 




66 


1,000 


Tiast Thursday in July. 


71 


3 


8 


60 


76 


1,500 




72 


6 


610 


8 


100 


4,500 


Third Wednesday in July. 


73 


11 


150 




69 


7,000 


First August. 


74 


5 


143 




140 


4,000 


Thursday after 3d Wednes. in Sept. 


76 


4 


60 




61 


2,500 


Thursday after 1st Wednes. in Aug. 


76 


6 


20 


14 


123 


3,100 


Last Thursday in June. 


77 


4 






66 


1,200 


Last Friday in September. 


78 


7 


21 




61 


5,000 


Last week in July. 


79 


8 


149 


80 


166 


2,500 


First Wednesday in August. 


80 


6 


809 


7 


105 


4,352 


Second Thursday in August. 


81 


7 


84 




61 


1,900 


Last Wednesday in September. 


82 


8 


116 


86 


64 


6,247 


Second Wednesday in August. 


83 


8 


116 


22 


67 


8,750 


First Wednesday in August. 


84 


5 






12 


3,000 


Second Wednesday in August 


85 


8 


21 




50 


3,500 


Last Wednesday in July. 


86 


10 


8 




70 






87 


8 






84 




Last Monday in June. 


88 


5 






60 






89 


6 




1 


20 


800 




90 


6 






42 




First Thursday in July. 


91 


6 


231 




160 


1,765 


iMUt Wednesday in September. 


92 


3 






120 




Last Wednesday in July. 


93 


5 


12 




73 


8,500 


Fourth Wednesday in July. 


94 


5 






112 






95 


7 






60 






96 


5 


43 


4 


64 


2,000 


Last Wednesday in June. 


97 


6 


8 


2 


48 


1,000 


Fourth Thursday in July. 


98 


4 






47 




Second Wednesday in October. 


99 


4 






24 




Third Wednesday m September. 
Third Tuesday in August. 


100 


13 


10 




146 


7,900 


101 


6 


8 


8 


19 


6,400 


Last ThTirsday in July. 


102 


5 








2,500 


Last Thursday in August. 


103 
104 
105 


6 


13 




46 




Last Thursday in September. 


5 






85 




Last week in August 


106 


2 






76 






107 


7 






70 


4,000 


Second week in August 


108 


4 






30 


3,000 


First Monday in October. 



Annual College Expenses. 



Nam<^. 


Instruc- 
tion. 


Room-rent 
and other 

Coll. Exps. 


Total 
Collie 
charges. 


Board. 


Wood, 

Lights, and 

Washing. 


Bowdoin, 

Dartmouth, 

Harvard, 

Williams, 

Amherst, 

Brown, 

Yale, 

Wcsl^an, 

Hamilton, 

Now Jersey, 

Dickinson, 

University Virginia, 

N. Carolina Unlv'ty, 

Transylvania, 

Western Reserve, 


$24.00 
27.00 
76.00 
80.00 
88.00 
40.00 
88.00 
86.00 
26.00 
40.00 
83.00 
76.00 
50.00 
40.00 
80.00 


$22.00 
HJH 
15.00 
9.00 
16.00 
23.00 
21.00 
11.26 
14.00 
20.00 
14.00 
28.00 
11.00 
12.00 
* 11.00 


{$46.00 
40.24 
90.00 
89.00 
48.00 
68.00 
64.00 
47.25 
40.00 
60.00 
47.00 
98.00 
61.00 
62.00 
4100 


89 weeks, $68.50 

88 do. 67.00 
40 do.70to90.00 

89 do. 66.00 
40 do. 60.00 
89 do. 60.00 

40 do.60to90.00 
89 do. 68.60 
88or89 do. 68.00 

41 do. 82.00 

43 do. 76.26 

44 do. 110.00 
40 do. 90.00 
40 do. 100.00 

42 do. 60.00 


$35.00 
9.00 

17.00 

20.00 
20.00 

25.00 
22.76 
20.00 
20.00 
26.00 
12.00 



XVIL THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 









1 


•1 




1 








1 "^ 


1 


.9 

S 






i 


i\ 


] 


1 


Bufor Tbfol. Sundoirj, 


Bugot. Ho. 


Cone. 


1818 


8dl3» 


7,000 




Ollnunlon, N. H. 


>3ni. 


isas 


3 29 


!& 


4^ 


TbwIoglMl aemiW. 


Andorer, M™ 




180 


6 86;986 ir,wt» 


DiTlnllySebMl, Hut, Univ., 


lunbridgo, do. 


:ong! Unit. 


^1 


2 sgm im 






Beptiet, 




i 38181 4^ 


ThML Dep. Tale College, 


4ew Hn'ren, Ct. 


Cong. 


lis 


4 «478 


Th«i.IiuitofConn«Micnl, 


EmI Windsor, do. 


Cong. 


IBS 


S 2» n 4,000 


Th«rf. InK. B^. Chunb, 
Union Theol. Seminarr, 


Prol,Bpi«op.l, 




a 70196 7,360 


<e-Yopk; do. 


PreebTteriui, 


m 


6^11213812,000 


rh«l.Sem.ofAttbum, 






182 


1 71SS9 S.000 


Hunllbm HI. «id Tb. Inet., 




Baptist, 




r 


2.250 


H»rtwlck Semlnaij 
rheol, Scm. Ab. Re/.Ch., 




Lnlte™, 




1,000 




A».R«r.'Ch. 


1838 


4;ooa 


Th. Ban. Dutah Ref. Ch., 




Dutoh Her. 


17M 


86179 
4 146 763 
3 26 ISO 




Theol. Sem. Fnibyt. Ch^ 








7,000 


Sem. LDtltenui Cburch, 




Enng. L. 


1826 


7;ooo 




Eork, do 


0. Ref. Ch. 


1826 


2 30 




WeMern Theol. Semtawr, 


AllegiienjT., do. 




1828 


8 B4ia 


6,000 


Theologieal SebDol, 


Canombnrg, do 


Amo. Ch. 






1,600 


Tlualogial BemlDirr, 


ntttburg, do 


Ab8o Rer. 




1 IB 




E^.Th«ri.Brii«>lo/V., 


F^rbi CO., Tk 


Plot. BpKtop*l, 




4 3S206 


4,0OlJ 


Union Tbeol. Semharr, 


PttorsKd. CO., do. Prtabyterian, 


182^ 


f 20176 4,00* 


Smuheni Theol. Semtau^, 


BlchmODd, dcBapttst, 








FRBbyWrlui, 








Lcrington, do. 




I83B 




1,800 


mmun Th«l. Stmbais, 


faitfleld m., do. 


BspliJt, 




ia.s 


1000 


SonOiweat Theol. Semluuy, 


Maryiille Ttmn 
CJmlnuUj, Ohio 


Presbjtoriin, 




6,000 


lUMSaninu;, 


Prot. iipiecopnl, 




a, 64266 


10,600 


Tbeol.I>.p.Kea.ColUge 
TheoLD«.W".Re».C(il., 
SnnTlUeTniHd. t>ep., 


a™bler, do. 


1828 






ssa., t 


Pr«.bjlettaB, 
Bnptlal, 


1832 


-,'J 


600 


SSKSw, 


Obprtln, do. 




18M 


* E» 




S. Hanoter, Ind. 






Z U^ 




Alton Thool, Sflniln.rj, 


Dpper Alton, lU-'Baptbil, 




1 " 1 



XVin. LAW SCHOOLS. 



PlBO. 


N^e. 


,SL. 


...... 


OBrtl>le,p«., 
dndniuti', Ohio, 


Harvud Untnnrity, 

Wiiu™ and MMy College, 

TTMiiylTuda UnivmHtj, 
CindnnaU College, 
iDdiBDH StUe CniTcndtr, 




82 
73 

13 



• Knmber of etndonto from tie obi 



hUibmeiit of the Kbool to IME, 1,100. 



XIX. MEDICAL SCHOOLS. 



»™. 


PlKt. 


'^ 


P„, 


Sin. 


GIiMI- 

IUl«> 






Bmnawick, 








60 


4ft 


FebruMj 16ai. 


N. U. Medical School, 










8< 




lBtor2dTb. Ang. 


('AstlelonMod. CoUcBB, 


Caeaeton, 


1818 










Mb Tbun. In Aug. 


VtMBUHlCtOkgc, 


Wood»l«i, 








a 


361 




M«I.Soh«>lHm.W.., 


CMnbrWge, 








16 


«■ 


let Wed. in Not. 


Beduhire Hed. ScbDol, 


Piiafleld, ' 


1B28 






10 




let Thim. In Sept. 


Mea. ludt. VdsCoU., 


NewH..;ii, 


1810 






£ 




6w-Bft.&lTb.Aug. 


Coll. Ptya, 4Sui^. N.r., 


Ne-Yorit, 










8b: 


Isl Mondsj lu Not. 


Med. IniUe. a<ni«nCaU., 


Jeneva, 








17 




1« Toe., in Oct. 


Med.PMnltyUnl..N.Y., 
Mbmy Hedksl CoU^b, 
















Albmy, ' 








llj 




LBtru^"faOot.' 


Med. Dcp. UdIt. Penu., 




1785 






M2 


4,eii 


let m™. In Not. 


j6feomiM«l.CDU«ge, 










460 






M«i. Dep, Pmn. CoU.,' 


Do. 








60 




let Mm! Si Not.' 


EnuikUn Medksl Coll., 


Do. 


lue 












Ued. Sobool DnlT. Hd., 


Balelmue, 














WiBhlngt™ Med. CoU ' 
Med. School Columb. ftill , 


Do. 


1827 






% 




letMon. blNoT. 




182S 










letMon.liNOT. 


Ued. SchiHlCDiF. Vl, 




1825 






46 




letMon. inOct. 


Richmona Med. Coll.^, 


UchmODd, 








76 




1st Mon. In \ot. 


HlnehMl«M«tlcil Coll., 














IjltMoD.inOct. 


Med.Coll.8f«taofa.C.,' 




1883 












Moa. College of Geotgli,' 


Aaguat*,^ 














Med. Coll. irtOHwJ*/ 


NeSo^ui, 


1835 






a) 




3d Mon,' in Not! 


Manphl. Med. Coll., 


M«nphi>,Ten. 








1 




M«l.Dep.TrBii»yl. OnlT., 


LeHnglon, 








214 1^1 


St Mon. In Not. 


;«ukTilleMed.In>W., 


LoaiartUe, 










58 


etMoD.luNOT. 




Cle.dMid, 0. 


18M 








4; 




Bedli^IjColleS^ofOliio, ■' 
Med. Dtp. of Kemp. Coll., 


Ondnnia 
At. Lonis, W. 












let Mon.' in Hoi.' 














Med. CoU. St. Lonia Univ., 


^7 


1888 








14 


etM^inNoT.' 


Willo«ghbTM«l.Col.., 


Wlllouihbj, 












Laat Mon. in Oct. 



XX. POPULATION OF THE PRINCIPAL CITIES. 



186 



WITKD BTATK8. 



[1847. 



XXI. BELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS. 

According to returns made in 1844-6, and by estimate. 



Names. 



Roman Catholics, 

Protestant Episoopalianf, 

Presbyterians, Old School, 

Presbytoxians, New School, 

Cumberland Presbyterians, 

Other classes of Pxesbytorlans, 

Dutch Reformed, 

German Reformed, 

Srangelical Lutherans, 

MoraTians, . • • 

Methodist Episcopal, 

Methodist Protestant Church, 

Reformed Methodists, 

Wesleyan Methodists, 

German Methodists, (United Brethren,) 

AUbright Methodists, (Evangel. Associa'n,) 

Mennonites. 

Orthodox Congr^;ationa]istB, 

Unitaiian Congregationalists, 

UniTersalists, 

Swedenborgians, * 

Reg^ular Baptists, 

Six Principle Baptists, 

Serenth Day Baptists, 

Free WUTBaptlsts, 

Church of God Baptists, 

Reformed Baptists, (Campbellites,) 

Christian Baptists, (Unitarians,) 



Churches. 


Ministers. 


Cammunicaati 


676 


709 




1,282 


1,286 


72.099 


2,274 


1,648 


174,020 


1,494 


1,268 


120,645 


670 


800 


60,000 


680 


298 


46,500 


279 


271 


81,214 


750 


191 


75,000 


1,232 


601 


146,800 


22 


24 


6,000 




12,446 


1,167,249 


\ 


1,800 


60,000 




76 


8,000 




600 


20,000 


1,800 


600 


16,000 


1 600 


260 


15,000 


400 


260 


68,000 


1,420 


1,275 


202,260 


dOO 


260 


80,000 


1,094 


700 


60,000 


42 


80 


6,000 


9,479 


6,297 


n9,978 


17 


22 


8,056 


60 


62 


6,000 


1,165 


771 


61,872 


125 


88 


10,000 


2,600 


1,760 


200,000 


650 


782 


85,600 



XXIL Table exhibiting the Seats of Government, the Times of the Election of 
State officers^ and the Meeting of the Legislatures of the several States, 



States. 



Maine, 

N. Hampshire, 

Yermont, 

Massachusetts, 

Rhode Island, 

Connecticut, 

New York, 

New Jersey, 

Pennsylramis, 

Delaware. 

Maryland, 

Yindnia. 

N. Carolina, 

8. Carolina, 

Georgia, 

Horida, 

Alabama, 

Mississippi, 

Louisiana, 

Texas, 

Arkansas, 

Tennessee, 

Kentucky, 

Ohio, 

Indiana, 

Illinois, 

Missouri, 

Michigan, 



Seats of 
Goyemment. 



Augusta, 
Concord, 
Montpelier, 
Boston. 

I ProTldence. 

( Newport, 
Hartf 'd k N. Hay. 
Albany, 
Trenton, 
Harrisburg, 
Doyer, 
Annapolis, 



Times of Holding 

Elections. 



Times of the Meeting of 
the Legislatures. 



Richmond, 

Raleigh. 

Columbia, 

Milledgeyille, 

Tallahassee, 

Tuscaloosa, 

Jackson, 

New Orleans, 

Austin, 

Little Rock, 

Nashyille, 

Frankfort, 

Columbus, 

Indianapolis, 

Springfield. 

Jefferson City, 

Detroit, 



2d Wednesday in June. 

Ist Wednesday in June. 

2d Thursday in October. 

Ist Wednesday in Jantiary. 

1st Tuesday in May. 

Last Monday in October. 

1st Wednesday in May. 

1st Tuesday in January. 

4th Tuesday in January. 

1st Tuesday in January. 

Ist Tues. in Jan. hienniaUy. 

Last Monday in December. 

1st Monday in December. 

2dJtfonday in Noy., bienn, 

4th Monday in Noyember. 

1st Monday in Noy. bitmn. 

1st Monday in Noyember. 

1st Monday in Dec. bienn. 

1st Monday in Jan. bienn, 

1st Monday in Noyember, 3d Monday in Jan. Henn. 
1st Monday in Noyember, I January, bienn. 



2d Monday in Sept., 
2d Tuesday in March, 
Ist Tuesday in Sept. 
2d Monday in Noyember, 

1st Wednesday in April, 

Ist Monday in April, 
1st Monday in Noyember, 
Tues. af. 1st Mon. in Noyl 
2d Tuesday in October, 
2d Tuesday in Noyember, 
1st Wednesday in Oct. 
4th Thursday in April, 
Commonly in August, 
2d Monday in October, 
1st Monday in October, 
Ist Monday in October, 
1st Monday in August, 
1st Mon. and Tue. in Noy. 



Ist Monday in August, 
1st Thursday in August, 
1st Monday in August, 
2d Tuesday in October, 
1st Monday in August, 
1st Monday in August, 
1st Monday in August, 



1st Monday in Noiy. bienn, 
Ist Monday in Oct. bienn, 
Ist Monday in December. 
1st Monday in December. 
1st Monday in December. 
1st Monday in Dec. bienn. 
1st Monday in Nor. bienn. 



1st Tuesday in Noyember, 1st Monday in Jaauaiy 



1847.] 



GOTXlUrOBS, XTC. 



187 



XXm. GOVEBNOKS OF THE SEVERAL STATES AND 

TERRITORIES, 

___ * 

With their Salaries^ Terms of Office, cmd expiration of their respective Terms ; 

the Number ^f Senators and Representatives in the State Legislatures^ with 

their respective Terms. 



States. 



Maine, 

N. Hamp'e, 

Vennont, 

Massach'ttB, 

R. Island, 

Connecti*t, 

New York, 

New Jersey, 

Pennsylv*a, 

Delaware, 

Maryland, 

Vireinia, 

N. Carolina, 

S. Carolina, 

Georgia, 

Florida, 

Alabama, 

^fississippi, 

Louisiana, 

Texas, 

Arkansas, 

Tennessee, 

Kentucky, 

Ohio, 

Michigan, 

Indiana, 

Illinois, 

Missouri, 

Wiscon. T., 

Iowa T.,* 



Goyemors. 



Hugh J. Anderson, 
Anfliony Colby, 
Horace Eaton, 
George N. Briggs, 
Byron Diman, 
Isaac Toucey, 
Silas Wright, 
Charles C. Stratton, 
Francis R. Shunk, 
Wm. Temple, Act. 
Thomas G. Pratt, 
William Smith, 
William A. Graham, 
William Aiken, 
Geoi^ W. Crawford, 
Willmm D. Moseley, 
Joshua L. Martin, 
Albert G. Brown, 
Isaac Johnson, 
J. P. Henderson, 
Thomas S. Drew, 
Aaron V. Broivn, 
William Owsley, 
Mordecai Bartley, 
Alpheus Felch, 
James Whitcomb, 
Augustus C. French, 
John C. Edwards, 
Henry Dodge, 
James Clarke, 



1,500 
1,000 

750 
2,500 

400 
1,100 
4,000 
2,000 
3,000 
l,333i 
4,200 
3,333i 
2,000 
3,500 
3,500 
2,500 
3,500 
3,000 
6,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,000 
1,500 
2,500 
2,500 



I 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
2 
4 
2 
2 
4 
2 
4 
2 
4 
2 
2 
3 
4 
4 
3 
3 



Term 
ezpirefl. 



Jane 

June 

Oct 

Jan. 

May 

May 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Dec. 

Nov. 

July 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Dec. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Nov. 

Mar. 

July 



1847 
1847 
1847 
1847 
1847 
1847 
1847 
1848 
1848 
1848 
1848 
1849 
1849 
1846 
1847' 
1849 
1847 
1848 
1850 
1847 
1848 
1847 
1848 
1846 
1848 
1849 
1850 
1848 
1848 
1848 



31 
12 
30 
40 
31 
21 
32 
18 
33 
9 
21 
32 
50 
45 
47 
17 
33 
32 
32 
21 
25 
25 
38 
36 
18 
50 
40 
18 
13 



I 



I 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
3 
3 
4 
6 
4 
2 
4 
1 
2 
3 
4 
4 
4 
4 
2 
4 
2 
2 
3 
4 
4 
2 



151 

250 

230 

356 

69 

215 

128 

58 

100 

21 

82 

134 

120 

124 

130 

41 

100 

92 

98 

66 

75 

75 

100 

72 

53 

100 

91 

49 

26 

26 



I 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 



In all the States, except Virginia and South Carolina^ the Governor is voted 
for by the people ; and if no one has a majority of all the votes, in the 
States in which such a majority is required, the Legislature elects to the 
office of Governor one of the candidates voted for by the people. 

The seat of government of Louisiana, after 1848, is to be at Baton 
Rouge ; of Alabama, after 1847, at Montgomery. 

* lom is now a State, the people haTing accepted a State oonstitation in August, 1846* 
But the J9tate Oovenment wm not oiganiaed when this sheet wm pat to press. 



I8S DKi 


1.D si*r 


L» 




ltS47. 


XXIV. STATISTICS OF MASSACHUSETTS AMD NEW YORK. 


Agric^ 


and Slatiiti 


i. 1S4 


5. 


Indisn com, bnsheb of. 






1,985,215 


14,622,100 


Wheat, 




47.986 


13,391,757 


Rye. " ■ 




M6,92S 


2,938,412 


Barley, " 




121,931 


3,108,794 


Oats, " . 




1,238,159 


26,323,045 


Buekvrheat, " 

Total of cereal graiiu, . 




32,274 


3.622,763 


3,872,490 


64,006,871 


Potatoes, bnahels of, 




4 767 115 


"'23;554;oia 


OUwir escnlenl vegetables, bushels of, 




1,604,789 




Peaa, beans and mmips, " 






3,273,997 


Hay, tons of, . 




603,482 




Flax, poandfl of. 




5,896 


3,837,052 


Neat eattle, number of, 






27B,549 


1,995,412 


Horses, ■• 






65,181 


505,255 


Swine, 






104,740 


1,581,344 


Sheep, 

Wool, pounds of. 






354,943 


6,413,904 






1,016,230 


13,764,813 


Butter, " ' 






7,688,556 


79,501,732 


Cheese, " . 






7,262,637 


36,744,976 


Silk, raw, " 






19* 


1,438 


Jfcna/k 


iurins&a 


lUtia. 




CbBon, number of mills, 






302 


118 


Tarda of cotton cloth, . 






175,682,919 


31,234,633 


IVc»ifcn,nnnibcr of mills. 








345 


Tarda of ffooUen eloth made, 






13,175,819 


4,916,997 


Glass fiicMries, number of; 






10 




Valneofriass ware made. 






8758,300 


. «38,100 


Paper factonei, number of, 
Value of paper made, . 














•1,750,273 


$720,935 


Tanneries, nimiber<rf, 






473 


1,416 


Value of articles manufactured, . 


•3,836,657 


•6,588,132 



Statistics of New York, ib 18- 
eotOaimng the items vat embraced in tht pteaeding ct 









Itaw muiiiiHiued, 


»4,210,*01 






11,767.256 MsnH&anrMin, 


7,677,060 


lAndmini 


i^lbbwl.!, " 


'302,484 :aiM.«.: No. o^ 


87 




:& ". 


118,020 


Raw mit«ti] UHd, 


•l,8fflj)74 




16,211 


HuDfrctaruIn, 


l,e»t,e26 




" buekwlt, " 


— 478 


EUJ..>rHiU<:No.'Dr 


740 




» tornlpe, « 






»l,]a6,636 


"• ", 


»sr^: 


i 




«» 




" ""^ ;; 




IUi.^».t«i.ln.;d, 


»l,4ia,020 








aiunfaactia : lio. of 


1,679,815 






078 


lie 






m 


lUwpotsrisliuHl, 


jtl,lS2,W7 




' Kb, 






^mm 




OJ] 


W<»Bn.;S«l«v.,No.or 


846 


Uriil mil 


No. or 


9S4 


fiaw nuUiial ami. 


»2,774,8Ca 




Artida ahich arrived i 



190 



UKITJBB STATM. 



[1847. 



Statmticb ov Massachusetts, in 1845. 



Cotton. Spindles : No. oj; 817,483 

Cotton consumed, lbs. 66,901,954 
Value of cotton cloth, $11,164,212 
Cotton yam not made Into 

cloth, lbs. 1,360,026 

Value of cotton yam, $284,061 

Cotton batting, lbs. 2[,506,665 

Value of cotton batting, $158,0141 
Capital in cotton inaai:Sactaie, $17,789,000 

Males employed, 6,303 , 

Females employed, 14,4071 

Calico manuilBCtories : No. of, 14, 
Calico printed, yda. 40,855,810, 
Value of caUco, $4,779,817 
Value of the goods bleach- 
ed and colored, 92,000 
Capital invested, $1,401,500 
Males employed, 1,887 
Females employed, 166 
Goods bleached or col'd, yds. 22,291,008 
Hands employed, 211 

Woollen : 

Sets of woollen machinery, 514 

Wool consumed, lbs. 16,387,448 

Broadcloth, yds. 1,022,359 

Caasimere, " 2,451,458 

Satinet. " 3,558,720 

Kentucky jeans, " 1,652,345 

Flannel or blanketing, <^ 4,490,937 
Woollen yam, not made 

into cloth, lbs. 256,205 

Capital invested, $5,604,002 

Males employed, 3,901 

Females employed, 3,471 

Carpeting mills : No. of, 17 

Carpeting, yds. 1,158,958 

Capital invested, $488,000 

Males employed, 715 

Females employed, 319 

Worsted goods &ctories : No. of 10 

Worsted goods, yds. 2,321,338 

Value of such goods, $382,858 

Capital invested, $514,000 

Males employed, 298 

Females employed, 548 

Hosiery manu&ctories : No. of, 17 

Value of Hosiery, $62,492 

Capital invested, $42,500 

Msdes employed, 53 

Females employed, 185 

Linen manufactories : No. of, 3 

Capital invested, $79,000 

Silk manu&ctcnrles : No. ot^ 8 

Sewing sUk, lbs. 22,509 

Capital invested, $88,000 

JioUtngy Slitting, and Nail mills : No. of; 32 

Iron not made into nails, tons 14,942 

Nails, lbs. 37,102,400 

Capital invested, $1,906,400 

Hands eitfployed, 1,729 

Forges : No. of, 152 

Articles of wrought iron, tons 5,218 

Capital invested, $377,685 

Hands employed, 422 
Hollow ware, l^maces for : No. of, 91 
Hollow ware and castings, tons 20,002 

Value of do., $1,280,141 

Capital invested, $713,270 



Hands employed , 1 ,267 

Machinery manufactories : No. of, 114 

Vatae of machinery, $;2,022,648 

Capital Invested, $1,103,850 

Hands employed, 2,421 

S^A« maauikctorios : No. of, 20 

No. of sythes, 170,328 

Capital invested, $69,590 

Hands employed, 171 

Axe manufactories : No. oi; 35 

Axes, and other edge tools, 65,537 

Capital invested, ^^8^225 

Ha^ds employed, 94 

Cutlery manufactories : No. of, 14 

Value of cutlery, $148,175 

Hands employed, 197 

Tack and Brad manufactories : No. of, 26 
Tacks and brads, lbs. 3,058,175 

Capital invested. $128,225 

Hands employed, 269 

Plough mauufiictories : 78 

Capital invested, $58,575 

Hands employed, 158 

Copper manufactories : No. of, 19 

Copper, lbs. 2,480,000 

Value of copper, $610,950 

Hands employed, 197 

Brass foundries : No. of, 26 

Value of articles manufactured, $831,890 
Capital invested, $167,600 

Hands employed, 145 

Paper manu&ctories : No of, 89 

Paper stock consumed, tons 12,886 

Quantity of paper, reams 607,175 

Capital invested. $1,144,537 

Hands employed, 1,369 

Saddle^ Harness and Thmk mana- 
fiietories : No. of, 299 

Value of goods made, $422,7d4 

Hands employed, 648 

Upholstery manufh.ctories : No. of; 58 

Value of Upholstery, $854,261 

Hands employed, 275 

Hat and Cap manu&ctories * No. of, 143 
Value of hats and caps, $734,942 

No. of hats and caps, 677,347 

Hands employed, 1,003 

Cordage manufactories : No. of, 49 

Cordage, lbs. 9,898,783 

Value of cordage, $906,321 

Hands employed, 647 

Salt manufactories : No. of, 662 

Salt, bushels 880112 

Value of salt, $79,980 

Hands employed, 584 

Vehicle manufactories : No. of, 663 

Value of vehicles, $1,348,576 

Hands employed, 1,881 

Oil and Sperm .Candle manufacto- 
ries : No. ofl 60 
OU, galls. 3,748,828 
Value of oil, $2,945,498 
Sperm Candles, lbs. 2,241,192 
Value of sperm candles, $668,308 
Hands employed, 806 

Soap and taUow candle manuflusto- 
ries : No. of, 109 

Soft soap, bbis, 18,949 









iploj8 



Hiinda toiploy^f 

Haiids ppiplnyM^ 

Shl'i, Ho. of p*iT^ 
VBlnaofboMaMidEl 



UHDdA emplOTedf 
Hands emplDjed, 



Huidi pmplojed, 

Capiat iDTeiM. 
Lmnbttj thoiuuicli otf 
Many of the mino 



lS,SSa,;CO| TUue of Im^m', 



lis 

Whale ol 



Foreign bitoEDltioiuoailT 
Value of all oilier AmerkA] 



WhsiifiihtTy, veiselB I 



CaplfatlDTWted, 
Hands Qinplajod, 



. 321,366 



1. e,7M,!ia 

I. 9Ji72,Seo 
9 OPT paw* 



491,06* 

|l,S3S,e40 

7^8 



Iba. E73,H8 
1 the preceding 



New Tobk SiiTB Cessds, i 



Total popnlatioii, 

FemnleB, 

Males sntgecl to military da^, 

Aliens not lutiiralized, - 

Coloi«d persons not taxed, 
Do- taxed, 

Do. 



19fl 



UHITSD VtAVMBB 



(1847. 



Unnumied females between 16 and 45, 

Do. do. under 16, . 
No. of marriages year preceding, . 
Males bom do. da 

Females bom do. do. 
Males died do. do. 

Females died do. do. 
Persons bom in this State, 

Do. New England, 

Do. Other States, 

Do. Mexico or Spanish America, 

Do. Great Britain and dependances. 

Do. France, 

Do. Grermany, 

Da Other European countries, 

Total of foreigners, 
Children between 5 and 16, 
Do. attending common schools. 
Do. do. private da 

Do. do. academies. 

Do. do. colleges. 

Deaf and Dumb, under 12, 

between 12 and 25, 
of alleges, 1,064. 
Blmd, under 8 years, 

between 8 and 25, 
of all ages, 877. 
Idiots, under 21, 

over 21, 

whole number, 1,620. 
under 21, 
over 21, 



157 males 
290 " 



Lunatics, 
Indians, 



33 

148 

373 
539 

65 
946 
743 



It 
u 

tt 
tt 

« 
u 



977 

277,890 

10,619 

49,558 

8,222 



161,334 

490,709 
27,783 
46,817 
42,938 
18,722 
1 7,562 
1,894,278 

228,881 
83,642 



347,266 

664,520 

493,539 

58,320 

13,679 

11,301 

109 females 

283 



41 
110 

315 

388 

49 

1,085 

683 



u 

(( 

u 

(( 
(( 

u 
(( 

(C 



Churches nr t^ State of New Yobk. 





Cost of 


Ofim- 


Of real 




buildings. 


pToyementi. 


estate. 


782 Baptist, 


$1,903,782 


$158,354 


$378,923 


268 Episcopal, . 


1,830,080 


187,302 


. 534,649 


669 Presbyterian, 


2y421,790 


250,065 


* 619,922 


271 Congregational, 


648,332 


49,826 


115,685 


1123Methomst, 


1,905,442 


157,802 


419,706 


104 Roman Catholic, 


655,140 


75,233 


248,896 


260 Dutch Reformed, 


1,292,688 


119,463 


366,798 


112 Universalist, 


288,608 


17,126 


49,044 


65 Unitarian, 


166,069 


14,904 


59,054 


15 Jews, 


89,450 


9,000 


18,085 


153 Quakers, 


156,383 


19,214 


84,317 



1847.] 



eSKBUB OF BOSTON. 



198 



Academies, Schoolb, ftc, in New York. 





Cost of 


Ofim- 


Of real 




bnildings. 


proTement. 


estate. 


10 colleges, 


$505,000 


$119,350 


$781,500 


163 academies, . 


743,104 


110,040 


137,814 


55 female seminaries, . 


205,601 


14,753 


64,840 


22 other institations of learning, 


420,800 


22,455 


191,720 


2 normal schools. 


2,000 


2,000 


10,000 


10,708 common schools. 


2,997,155 


135,362 


606,605 


(Pupils on list, 463,069; average at- 








tendance, 291,495.) 


1 






1,569 priyate schools. 


312,137 


43,206 


191,759 


(Pupils attending, 4,473.) 
Clergymen in me State, 4,399. 




\ . 






\j 





Census op the City op New York. 



Total popnladoxt. 
Males. 

Females, . • 

Subject to militaiy duty, 
Yoters, 
Aliens, . 
Paapers, 

Colored persons, . 
Of theee, not taxed, 

" taxed, . 

" Toters, 
Married females under 45. 
Unmarried do. between l6 

do. do. under 16, 
Marriages in 1844, 
Births in 1844, nudes, . 



. 8n,102 
180,365 
. 190,737 
85,419 
. 64,283 
61,961 
. 1,863 
11,939 
. 11,576 
255 
108 
64,297 
and 46, 51,666 
. 62,029 
2,665 
. 7,519 



Births in 1844, ftmales, . 6,495 

Deaths in 1844, males, . 8,471 

do. do. females, . 2,819 

Bom in New York, . . 196,876 

do. New England, . 16,086 

do. other States, . . 25,677 

do. foreign countries, . 146,202 

Children between 6 and 16. . 70,061 

do. at common schools, 89,066 

do. priyate schools, . 17,426 

do. academies, . 1,270 

do. colleges, . . 262 

Deaf uid dumb, . . 240 

Blind, ... 68 

Idiots, . . . . 81 

' Lunatics, . . . 658 



XXV. CENSUS OV BOSTON, IN 1845. 



This census was taken under the direction of the City Goyemment, hy 
licmuel Shattuck, Esq., who has published the results in an octavo volume 
of 275 pages, "embracing collateral facts and statistical researches, illustrat- 
ing the history and condition of the population, and their means of progress 
and prosperity." This is one of the most thorough and well-digested statis- 
tical works that have been published in the United States, and it may be re- 
commended to the attention of the National and several State governments, 
as a good model of the proper mode <^ taking a census, and collecting and 
publishing statisticSi when they have occasion to order the preparation of 

17 



194 



UNITED STATES. 



I I 847. 



motorials for these parposes. An exposure of one of the most striking of 
the numberless blunders in the United States Census of 1840 is one of the 
most interesting features of Mr. Shattuck's work. In the former volumes of 
the American Almanac we hare exposed a great number of errors in this 
census, which must be pronounced, on the whole, to be a disgrace to the 
country and utterly untrustworthy. 

The United States census, token in June, 1840, declared the population of 
Boston to be 93,383 *, the State census, taken only one month earlier, gave 
84,401 . It is very evident that both could not be correct. By careful inquiry 
and research Mr. Shattuck ascertained, that the difference consisted almost 
wholly in the number of male persons in two of the wards ; and the blunder 
was finally traced home to the erroneous enumeration of the inmates of a 
very few sailor boarding-houses. The persons who took the U. States census 
of 1840 enumerated all those who made such houses their stopping places 
while in port as inhabitants of Boston, though some of them had no( been in 
the city for three years. They might just as well have included all the 
visiters at the hotels during an equal period. . Correcting this blunder, the 
population of Boston, in June, 1840, was probably about 85,000. The num- 
ber in 1845, according to this city census, was 114,366, being an increase of 
35 per cent 

This great increase has produced a corresponding growth in the adjoining 
towns, and in places connected with Boston by railroads ; as is shown in the 
following table : 





Census of 1840. 


Population. 


Increase. 


Towns adjoining Boston. 


State. 


National. 


1845. 


Number. 


Per ct. 


Dorchester,* 


4,458 


4,875 


5,483 


1,025 


23 


Roxbury, 


8,310 


9,089 


13,929 


5,619 


67 


Brookline, 


1,123 


1,365 


1,682 


569 


50 


Cambridge, 


8,147 


8,409 


12,490 


4,363 


33 


Somervifle,* 


1,200 


1,200 


2,250 


1,050 


87 


Charlestown,* . 


9,672 


10,284 


12,500 


2,500 


25 


Chelsea, . 


2,182 


2,390 


5,000 


2,182 


128 


Towns on Railroads. 












Lowell, 


20,981 


20,796 


28,841 


7,860 


38 


Worcester, 


7,060 


7,497 


11,514 


4,000 


56 


Springfield, 


11,013 


10,985 


14,703 


4,000 


33 


New Bedford,* 


12,585 


12,087 


16,000 


3,500 


27 


Fall River, 


6,451 


6,783 


10,290 


3,839 


59 



* The population of towns, in 1846, with this mark, is estimated. An enumeration waa 
made in others. In the State Census, of 1840, paupers and some others were not enume- 
rated. This wiU pardally account for the discrepancies between the State and National 
Oensus. 



We make such farther extracts from Mr. Shattuck's work as our limits 
will permit. 



0^.,^. 


^^^. 


In each 100 tben were 


Under 1 Oier 


agM. 

a 

B5 


l:| 


"a!' 


ae«. 

If 
11 

eras 
aa,6i 


Eom In BoaWn, of American pirento, 
Born in Bmlon, of Poreiga pannU, 
BoiD tK U. Suat, but nde i£ Boito^i, 
N«lborniiiUieCnil«l31*(«, 
Total (Bra in Boatoo, 
loUl not bora In Boston, 

ForeiKneri and Iheir ohliawn' 


2»;9ii 


1) 


g 

46 

1 



These ^le are very remarkable, and show that 3S.93 per cent., a little 
over one third of our population, are natire bom; and of (hese, S6.16 
per cent, are nndec 20 years of age, and 9.76 per cent only oyer W 1 the te- 
matadcr being emigronta from other places in the United Stales, or from 
foreign coantries. Th« foretgnera and their children are 37,289, or 33.61 
percent, of the whole popaladonl The ffcireigners under BO were 16,370, 
being 35.£9 per cant of the population of that age. 

Claiset of the Population at Afferent periodt. 



Tear. 




berofPerMDi. 


ToeachlOOpenonatlHie I 


Total. 


Wlitee. 


Colwel. 


WUtos 


Griorea. 




16,382 


15,006 


1,374 




1765 




14,672 




94.54 


bA6 




18,320 


17,554 




95.82 


4.18 


1600 




.23,763 


1,174 


95.30 


4.70 




33,787 


32,319 


1,4B8 


95.66 


4 34 


ISSO 


43,398 


41,558 


1,740 


95.98 


4.02 


leas 


58,381 


56,364 


1,917 


96,71 




1830 


61,393 


59,517 


1,875 


96.95 


3J>5 


183S 


78,603 


76,846 


■ 1,757 


97.76 


2.24 


1840 


85,000 


83,01 a 


1,988 


97.66 




1845 


114.366 


112,524 


1,843 


98.34 


1.61 



From this gtatemeui; it appears^tliaC the propoition of the colored popula- 
tion has been gradually diminishing. It has beea reduced from 4.70 per 
cent in 1800, to 1.61 in 1845, or 3,06 per cent. 

The ixilored children educated at public expense, are as follows : 



In the Smith School, 



43 



1840 
136 



116 



In the Primary School for colored children in 1845, there were 51 bojB 
and 48 girla, or 99 in all. The colored Tolen^rere 249 in 1838, and 357 in 
1845. This indicates that their condition has improved. 



196 



ITXITBD «TATE8. 



Proportion of the Seoces. 



[1847< 



Tears. 


Number of Penoos. 


To each 100 persons 
there were 


ToeaofalOO 
males, the fe- 
males were 


TotaL Males. 


females. 


Males. 


Females. 


1835 
1840 
1840 
1845 


78,603 

84,401 

85,000 

114,366 


38,610 
40,715 
40,860 
56,890 


39,993 
43,686 
44,140 
57,476 


49.12 
48.24 
48.07 
49.74 


50.88 
51.76 
51.93 
50.26 


103.58 
107.29 
108.02 
101.03 



Ages of the Population, 



Tears. 


Number of Persons. 


In each 100 there were 


All ages. 


Under 16. 


16 to 45. 


Over 45. 


Under 16. 


16 to 46. 


Oyer 46. 


1825 
1835 
1845 


56,360 

76,846 

114,366 


19,192 
25,434 

37,268 


31,404 
43,613 
64,889 


5,764 

7,799 

12,209 


34.05 
33.10 
32.58 


65.72 
56.86 
56.74 


10.23 

10.04. 

10.68 



The number of bouses, and the average number of families to each house, 
at the different periods, were as follows : 



In 1790, bouses, 2,300 ; families, 1.46 to each ; 
In 1845, « 10,812 ; " 1.77 to each ; 

In 1790, families, 3,358; persons, 5.39 to each; 
In 1845, " 19,175; •* 5.09 to each; 



JbbU showing the proporUon of married and unmarried persons^ widows and 

widowers in different places* 



Places. 


Population. 


To each 100 of the whole population there were 


Males. 


Pemales. 


Unmar- 
ried. 


Mar- 
ried. 


Widow- 
ers. 


Unmar- 
ried. 


Mar- 
ried. 


Widow- 
ers. 


Boston, 1845, 
Dublin, 1841, 
Ireland, 1841, 
Paris, 1841, 
France, 1841, 


114,663 

232,726 

7,039,659 

1,194,503 

34,230,178 


32.97 
28.46 
34.46 
29.92 

28.28 


16.33 
14.69 
13.92 
20.46 
18.95 


.45 
1.82 
1.34 
1.83 
2.18 


30.67 
32.51 
34.47 
22.09 
27.03 


16.25 
12.57 
14.30 
20.18 

18.87 


3.33 
6.95 
3.51 
5.52 
4.69 



Number of Children in the Public Schools. 



Glasses of Schools. 


In 1820. 


^X*' 


NoTem. Februa- 
1829. ry, 1836. 


Februa- 
ry, 1841. 


^ST' 


Primary Schools, 
Grammar Schools, 
English High School, 
Latin School, 

Total, 


1,381 
2,456 

207 


2,661 

3,239 

145 

175 


3,513 

3,380 

134 

141 


4,323 

4,092 

133 

115 


5,620 

5,985 

130 

123 


7,892 

8,115 

139 

142 


4,044 


6,220 


7,168 8,663 


11,858 


16,288 



1847.] 



OfiNBUS OF BOSTON. 



197 



The Private Sdbods, 



Teun. 


Number of 
Schools. 


Nnnil)er of 
Schcdars. 


Ezpenditores. 


Eibch Scholar. 


Scholars to each 
lOOofpopuladon. 


1829 
1839 
1841 
1843 
1845 


155 
114 
118 
108 
115 


4,018 
3,392 
3,567 
3,103 
3,224 


$107,702 

108,739 

103,111 

91,316 

105,410 


$26.78 
32.05 
28.90 
29.42 
32.69 


6.69 
4.13 
4.00 
2.95 
2.81 



The Manufacturing Industry of a people is a means of wealth which has 
been considered as deserving of particular notice. Facts on this subject 
were collected by authority of the United States in 1840, and by that of the 
State in 1837 and 1845. 



In Mannfiictares. 


In 1837. 


In 1840. 


In 1845. 


Capital invested. 


$5,830,572 


$2,442,309 


$4,330,600 


Males employed. 


6,320 


2,289 


5,260 


Females employed, 


4,450 




970 


Value of the product, 


$11,070,576 


$4,016,573 


$10,648,153 



Provident Institution fm- Savings, 



V Year. 


No. of Dep. 


Amount of Deposits. 


Amount of Divi- 
dends. 


Expenses. 


Oct., 1842, 
Aug., 1843, 
July, 1844, 
Nov., 1845, 

Oct., 1842, 
Aug., 1843, 
July, 1844, 
Nov., 1845, 


15,025 
15,328 
17,716 
19,007 

1,524 
1,663 
2,070 
2,707 


$2,360,212.41 
2,389,356.61 
2,735,598.09 
3,023,742.03 

Suffolk Savings j 

274,651.89 
302,120.96 
415,118.25 
545,327.19 


$87,125.04 
85,658.24 
92,770.88 

103,948.42 

Bank. 

9,556.72 

9,823.87 

11,361.35 

17,207.74 


$8,154.01 
7,827.02 
7,847.63 
8,122.34 

2,573.44 
2,645.27 
2,531.78 
2,849.26 



State Receipts and Expenditures as shared between Boston and all the other 

towns in the State. ' 



YeaxB. 


Of all the receipts from the towns. 


Of all the expenditures to the 
towns, 

• 


Boston paid 


All other towns 
paid 


Boston received. 


All other towns 
received 


1840 
1841 
1842 
1843 
1844 
1845 


56.82 
58.77 
59.15 
59.65 
55.62 
58.42 


43.18 
41.23 
40.85 
40.35 
44.38 
41.58 


28.73 
26.97 
28.35 
27.57 
24.29 
26.94 


71.27 
73.03 
71.65 
72.43 
75.71 
73.06 



This statement shows that Boston, for the last si^ years, ha.«i, on the ave- 
rage, annually paid into the treasury 58.07 per cent, of the whole State 

17* 



198 



mriTBD STATSB. 



[1847. 



reyenne ; and all ihe other towns only 41.93 per cent. ; that Boston has re- 
ceiyed only 27.14 per cent ; and all the other towns 72.86 per cent. 



Year. 


Number of Paupers. 


How suppoxted. 


Unable to 
labor. 


Xnaaue 

and 
idiotic. 


Out-door. 


In-door. 


Total. 


State. 


City. 


1841 
1842 
1843 
1844 
1845 


1,816 
1,899 
2,284 
2,274 
2,109 


1,269 
1,452 
1,436 
1,369 
1,484 


3,085 
3,351 
3,720 
3,643 
3,593 


1,832 
2,883 
2,405 
2,541 
2,465 


1,253 
968 
1,315 
1,102 
1,128 


920 
1,100 
1,110 
1,090 
1,200 


156 

42 

33 

39 

" 44 


Total, 
Average, 


10,382 
2,076 


7,010 
1,402 


17,392 
3,478 


12,126 
2,425 


5,766 
1,153 


5,420 
1,084 


314 
62 



Classification of Pauperism. 



Tear. 


Bom of Amexicaa 
parents. 


Bom of 

foreign 

parents. 


Bom in 
Ireland. 

304 
415 
359 
326 
382 


Bom in 
other for- 
eign places. 


Unknown. 


Total 
admitted. 


Boston. 


Other 
places. 


1841 
1842 
1843 
1844 
1845 


117 
99 
142 
108 
154 


194 
231 
230 
172 
226 


131 
190 
115 
203 
133 


87 
120 
118 

91 
108 


24 

28 

26 

8 

^ 13 


857 

1083 

990 

908 

1016 



Cost of Pauperism, 



Years end- 
ing May 1. 



1841 
1842 
1843 
1844 
1845 



Cost of Psupexism. 



House of In- 
dustry, &c. 



48,516.88 
48.351.48 
44,902.50 
44,799.08 
41,310.69 



Oyerseers of Total Ex 



the Poor. 



12,000.00 
13,000.00 
15,000.00 
15,000.00 
15,000.00 



pense. 



60,516.88 
61,351.48 
59,902.50 
59,799.08 
56,310.69 



How this cost was paid. 



Income fm 
labor, &c. 



7,342.89 
6,126.31 
6,328.38 
4,512.51 
5,471.52 



Paid by the 

State. 



11,481.29 
20,722.92 
25,610.27 
29,496.20 
26,894.77 



Net expense 
to the city. 



41,692.70 
34,502.25 
27,963.85 
25,790.37 
23,944.40 



Church Accommodation, 



Denominations. 



Baptist, 

Catholic, 

Episcopalian, 

Methodist. 

Orthodox, 

Unitarian, 

Universalist, 

Others, 

Total, 



Socie- 
ties. 



12 
7 

10 
10 
14 
21 
8 
17 



99 



Church- 
es. 



10 
7 
6 
9 

11 

18 
6 

11 



78 



Cost of 
Churches. 



$393,000 
400,000 
287,000 
152,500 
685,500 
823,500 
130,000 
375,000 



3,246,500 



Seats. 


Halls. 


Seats. 


Total ao- 
com'tions. 


10,500 
8,400 
4,950 
6,300 

11,549 

15,975 
4,720 

11,600 


2 

4 
1 
3 
3 
2 
6 

21 


630 

1,150 
1,000 
1,600 
2,000 
800 
3,000 


11,130 
8,400 
6,100 
7,300 

13,149 

17,975 
5,520 

14,600 


73,994 


10,180 


84,174 



1847.] 



TITLES AND ABST&ICTS OF THE PUBLIC LAWS. 



199 



Expenses of Public Worship. The following table shows the number of 
clergymen, the amount of their salaries, what is paid for music, &c. 



Denomination. 


No. of 
Clergy 'n. 


Salaries. 


Mutio. 


Contingent.^ 


Total. 


Baptist, 

Episcopalian, 

Methodist, 

Orthodox, 

Unitarian, 

Unlversalist, 


11 
9 
10 
14 
22 
9 


$13,500 
14,400 

7,731 
22,600 
35,720 

8,300 


$2,850 
3,335 
1,667 
6,100, 

10,262 
1,760 


$4,875 

5,020 

5,477 

10,825 

12,452 

3,952 


$21,225 
22,755 
14,875 
39,525 
58,434 
14,012 


Total, 


75 


102,251 


25,974 


42,601 


170,826 



XXVI. TITLES AND ABSTRACTS OF THE PUBLIC LAWS, 
Passed at the Pi&st Session of the 29th Cokoress. 



Civil and Diplomatic Expenses. Por the year 

Congress — pay of members, 

" incidental expenses, . 

President and Vice-President of the United States, 
Department of State, 
Treasury Department, 
War Department, 
Navy Department, 
Post-Office Department, 
Surveyors and their Clerks, 
United States Mint and Branches, 
Grovemments of the Territories, 
Judiciary, .... 
Miscellaneous, 

Two instalments of the Mexican indemnities. 
Light House establishment. 
Surveys of Public Lands, 
Intercourse with Foreign Nations, 

Army appropriation bill, 

Navy apprc^riation bill. 

Military Academy, 

Bevolutionary and Navy pensioners, . 

Volunteers and other troops in the Mexican war, 



ending June 30, 1847. 

$371,816.00 
376,560.50 

30,000.00 

47,545.00 
360,461.00 
119,615.00 

82,320.00 
173,070.00 

68,960.00 
125,300.00 

46,650.00 
572,900.00 
356,036.09 
320,000.00 
446,532.04 
202,547.00 
352,800.00 



$4,053,112.63 

6,873,082.67 

7,449,703.35 

123,976.00 

1,744,535.40 

11,957,359.00 



200 UKITED STATES. [1847 

Members of Congress and wild Ihdians, 239,548.00 

Post- Office Department, .... 4,078,540.75 

Repairing and building fortifications, (Nos. 15 and 51,) 1,610,000.00 

Beficiendes in appropriations for 1846, . .' 1,700,914.99 

War with Mexico, .... 10,000,000.00 

Appropriations for the Indian Department, . 1,106,698.50 

Smithsonian Institation, . . . 242,129.00 

Sandry appropriations in different bills, . 429,138.89 

Total, . . $51,608,739.18 

No. 1. An Act to extend the lawt of the United States over the State of Tex- 
as^ and for other purposes. All the laws of the United States shall have effect 
within and over the State of Texas. The State shall form one judicial 
district, and the court established therein shall have the powers and jurisdic- 
tion both of a district and circuit court. See pp. 112-116. Dec. 29, 1845. 

No. 2. An Act to establish a collection district in the State of Texas, and for 
other purposes, Galveston is the only port of entry \ Sabine, Yelasco, Mata- 
gorda, Cavallo, La Vaca, and Corpus Chriati are ports of delivery only. 
The collector shall receive $2,000 a year, including fees, and the excess of 
fees shall be paid into the treasury. Surveyors for the several ports of de- 
livery shall receive $1,000 a year, including fees. Dec 31, 1845. 

No. 3. An Act to repeal the Act which abolished the office of one of the In' 
spectors General of the army, and to revive and estahUsk said office. The 4th 
section of the act of Aug. 23, 1842, is repealed. Jan. 12, 1846. 

No. 4. An Act to continue the office of the Commissioner of Pensions, This 
office is continued till March 4, 1849. Jan. 14, 1846. 

No. 5. An Act establishing certain post-routes in Texas. See No. 19. Feb. 
6, 1846. 

No. 6. An Act relative to Collectors and other officers of the customs. If they 
serve for a less period than a year, they shall not be paid for the whole year, 
but only pro rata of the maximum pay for the time of actual service. Their 
accounts for salary, &c. shall be rendered quarterly. The additional duties 
provided by the 17th section of the act of Aug. 30, 1842, shall not be deemed 
fines, penalties, or forfeitures. Feb. 11, 1846. 

No. 7. An Act to enlarge the powers of the several Orphans^ Courts held in 
and for the District of Columbia, They may appoint guardians to infant or- 
phans who have no testamentary guardian. If an infimt whose father is 
living becomes entitled to property, separate from the father, the father as 
natural guardian may be compelled to give bond and security, or a special 
guardian may be appointed. Guardians may be compelled to give new or 
additional security, on the order of the court, after having had ten days' 
notice. If the security given become insufficient, the executor or adminis- 
trator may be compelled to give further security after receiving ten days' 
notice. These powers may be exercised either ex officio, or on application 
of a party interested. Feb. 20, 1846. 



1847.] TITLES AND AB8TBACT8 OV THE PUBLIC LAWB. 201 

No. 8. An Act to repeal the Act requiring one of ihfi Judges of the Circuit 
Court for the District of Cokanbia hereafter to reside in Alexandria, March 
24, 1846. 

No. 9. An Act to authorize the Secretary of the Navy to contract for the pur- 
chase of American water-rotted hemp for the use of the Navy, A contract may 
be made for a period not exceeding three years. March 30, 1846. 

No. .10. Pensioners' appropriation bill. Seepage 199. May 7, 1846. 

No. 11. Appropriation bill to supply deficiencies in appropriations. See 
page 200. May 8, 1846. 

No. 12. An Act to repeal a part of the Act entitled an Act supplementary to 
the several laws for the sale of the public landSj approved April 5, 1832, and far 
other purposes. The second proviso in said act is repealed. May 8, 1846. 

No. 13. An Act providing for the pr<^ecution of the existing uxir between the 
United States and the Republic of Jdexico, ^ Whereas, by the Act of the Re- 
public of Mexico, a state of war exists between that Government and the 
United States," the President may employ the militia, naval and military 
forces of the United States, and may call for 50,000 volunteers, to serve for 
12 months, or during the war, unless sooner discharged; and $10,000,000 
are appropriated for this object. The militia, when called out, may be com- 
pelled to serve for not more than 6 months. The volunteers must furnish 
their own clothes, and, if cavalry, their own horses and horse equipments, 
but shall be armed by the United States. The volunteers are subjected to 
the roles and articles of war, and are placed on the same footing, except as 
to clothing and pay, with the United States army. Por clothing, they re- 
ceive a sum equal to the cost of clothing a private in the army. The offi- 
<^rs of companies, battalions, squadrons, and regiments shall be appointed 
according to the laws of their respective States or Territories. The Presi- 
dent may organize the companies, &c., into brigades and divisions, and shall, 
if necessaiy, apportion the staff, field, and general officers among the respec- 
tive States as he may deem proper. Wounded or disabled volunteers shall 
be entitled to all the benefits of wounded or disabled soldiers. All the pub- 
lic armed vessels now authorized by law may be completed, and merchant 
vessels or steamboats may be purchased, chartered, armed, manned and 
equipped, as the President may deem proper. The militia or volunteers, 
when called out, shall be organized and paid like the army of the United 
States, and mounted privates, &c., shall receive 40 cents a day for the use 
and risk of their horses. May 13, 1846. 

No. 14. An Act to autJiorize an increase of the rank and file of the army of 
the United States. Each company may be increased to 100, and again re- 
duced to 64, when the present exigency shall cease. The enlistments shall 
be for five years only. May 13, 1846. 

No. 15. Appropriations for fortifications. See page 200. May 15, 1846. 

No. 16. An Act for the organization of a company of sappers^ miners^ and 
ponloniers. Such a company, amounting in all to 100 ^men, shall be added 



202 UKITBD STATES. [1847. 

to the corps of engineers. The pay shall be like that of the workmen in the ord- 
nance department The officers shall be taken from the corps of engineers ; 
the men shall aid in giving practical instruction at the MiUtary Academy, 
shall aid and oversee the workmen employed on the public works, and act 
as fort-keepers, under the orders of the Chief Engineer. $25,000 are appro- 
priated fbr this object for the ensuing year. May 15, 1846. 

No. 1 7. An Act to provide for raising a regiment of mounted riflemen^ and for 
establishing military stations on the rotOe to Oregon. The regiment shall consist 
often companies, each having 64 privates ; the pay shall be like that of the 
dragoons. The regiment in all other respects is put on the same footing 
with the rest of the army. When on fatigue duty, as in making* fortifi- 
cations, surveys, roads, &c., 15 cents a day of extra pay and a commutation 
for the spirit ration shall be allowed them. $76,500 are appropriated for 
this object, $3,000 more for each military station that may be established on 
the route to Oregon, and $2,000 more in each case, to pay the Indians for 
the ground. 

Ko. 18. An Act to establish the value of certain foreign coins and moneys of 
account^ and to amend existing laws. The specie dollar of Sweden and Nor- 
way shall be estimated at 106 cents ; of Denmark, 105 cents; the thaler of 
IPrussia, 69 cents ; the florin of South Germany, 40 cents ; the florin of Aus- 
tria, 48 1-2 cents ; the lira of Lombardy and Tuscany, 16 cents ; the franc 
of France and Belgium, and the lira of Sardinia, 18.6 cents ; the ducat of 
Naples, 80 cents ; the ounce of Sldly, 240 cents ; the pound of the British 
North American provinces, 400 cents. May 22, 1846. 

No. 19. An Act establishing certain post-routes (in Texas), and for other 
purposes. Certain routes are established, and the continuance of a part of 
the present mail service in Texas is authorized, but not beyond June 30, 
i 850. Contracts for mail service there may be made with or without adrer- 
tisement, as deemed expedient, if the prices be not beyond the average for 
like service in other parts of the United States. Accounts with contractors 
and postmasters are to commence Feb. 16, 1846. The former act (No. 5, see 
page 200), is repealed. May 29, 1846. 

No. 20. An Act in rdation to the July term of the circuit and district courts 
in the district of Ohio. See pp. 114 and 116. May 29, 1846. 

No. 21. An Act supplemental to the Act entitled " an Act providing for the 
prosecution of the existing war between the United States and the Republic of 
Murico^ and for other purposes. One major-general and two brigadier-gen- 
erals maybe appointed in addition to the present number ; but, at the end of 
the war, the whole number shall be reduced to one major and two brigadier- 
generals, the President selecting those who are to be retained without regard 
to the date of their commissions. General officers of the militia may be 
called into service. Any volunteer company may have from 64 to 100 pri- 
vates, and an additional second lieutenant. The President may appoint 
additional officers in the quartermaster, commissary, and medical depart- 



1847.] TITLES AND ABSTRACTS OF THE PUBLIC LAWS. 203 

ments, to oontinae in 06^ as bng as the volunteers ; also, four new assist- 
ant adjutant-generals. Majors in the quartermasters' department must be 
taken from the army captains. Appointments in the line and staff, of equal 
rank, shall not be held by the same officer at the same time. Aids-de-camp 
of the major-general commanding may be taken from the line without re- 
gard to rank ; of the other generals, from the captains or subalterns. The 
general commanding in the field may appoint a military secretary. The 
allowance for clothing to volunteers shall be $3.50 h month ; and 50 cents 
for subsistence, and 25 cents for forage, for every 20 miles by the most direct 
route from their homes to the general rendezvous. Master armorers, black- 
smiths, &c., may be enlisted in the ordnance department as the service may 
require. June 18, 1846. 

No. 22. An Act making alterations in the pay department of the army. Three 
additional paymasters may be appointed. June 17, 1846. 

No. 23. An Act to authorize the justices of the county court of Bates county^ 
in the State of Missouri^ to eater a certain quarter section of land for a couady 
seat. June 19, 1846. 

No. 24. Post-office appropriation bill. See page 200. June 19, 1846. 

No. 25. An Act to provide for the organization of the volunteer forces^ brought 
into the aeroice of the United States, into brigades and divisions, and for the ap- 
pointment of the necessary number of general officers to command the same. The 
general officers thus appointed shall be discharged at the close of the war* 
£ach brigade shall have at least three regiments, and each division at least 
two brigades. June 26, 1846. 

No. 26. Indian department appropriation bill. See page 200. June 
27, 1S46. 

No. 27. An Act to retrocede the county of Alexandria, in the District of Co- 
IttmbiOf to the State of Virginia. Virginia having signified her willingness to 
take back this county, it is hereby forever relinquished to her, if the people 
of the county assent to the retrocession. Every free white male who has 
resided six months in the county may vote viva voce on this question, insane 
persons and paupers excepted. Five commissioners appointed by the Presi- 
dent shall superintend this voting, and a majority of the votes shall deter- 
mine. The right of property in the custom-house and post-office is not 
ceded, nor in the soil so as to affect the rights of individuals. Till Virginia 
provides for the extension of her own judicial system over the territory, the 
legal jurisdiction of the United States is retained. The two public half 
squares are ceded for the use of the county. Congress will not assume or 
pay any debt of the city of Alexandria. July 9, 1 846. 

No. 28. An Act to authorize the President of the United States to sdl the re- 
served mineral lands in the States of Illinois and Arkansas, and Territories of 
Wisconsin and Iowa, supposed to contain lead ore. Six months' notice of such 
sales shall be given, and the lands shall not be subject to preemption rights 
till they have been offered at public sale. If the lands contain mines actu- 



204 mriTBD STATES. [1847. 

ally discovered and being worked, they shall be sold in sndi snbdiTislons as 
shall include these mines at not less than $2.50 an acre ; but if not sold pab> 
licly at such price, they may be entered within 12 months thereafter at 
private sale like other lands. Outstanding leases must expire before die 
sale. July 11, 1846. 

. No. 29. An Act to legalize certain land sales made at Chocchuma and Cdumr 
bus, in the State of Mississippi, and to indemnify the Qdckaaaws therefor. July 
15, 1846. 

No. 30. An Act to change the time ofhoidvng the Federal Court in North Caro- 
lina. See page 114. July 15, 1846. 

No. 31. An Act toestahUsh the 'coHection district of Chicago, Jnly 16, 1846. 

No. 32. An Act to exempt canal-boats from the payment of foes and has- 
pital money. Persons employed in these boats without masts or steam power, 
shall not pay any marine hospital tax, or receive any benefttHom the marine 
hospital fund ; nor shall the boats be libelled in any of the United States 
courts for the payment of wages. July 20, 1846. 

No. 33. Appropriation bUl for the support of volunteers. See page 199. 
July 20, 1846. 

No. 34. An Act to authorize an issue of Treasury Notes and a Loan, ^ Trea- 
sury notes may be issued and re>issued, as necessity may require, so as not to 
exceed $10,000,000 outstanding at any one time, according to the act of Oct 
12, 1837 ; except that the authority here given shall expire at the end of one 
year. The President, if he sees fit, may borrow the money and issue the 
stock therefor, according to the act of April 15,1842*, but the sum iims 
borrowed, together with the treasury notes, shall not exceed ten millions in 
the whole. The interest shall not be over six per cent., and the stock shall 
not be sold at less than par. No compensation shall be made for preparing 
these notes, nor shall any additional clerks be allowed except as provided by 
the act above mentioned. $50,000 are appropriated to pay bona fide holders 
of certain treasury notes fraudulently re-issued. July 22, 1846. 

No. 35. Appropriation bill for members of Congress and wild Indians. 
See page 200. July 23, 1846. 

No. 36. An Act in relation to the payment of claims. When a claim is al- 
lowed by a resolution or act of Congress, the money shall not be paid except 
to the claimants, their executors or administrators, or to a person producing 
a warrant of attorney from them, attested by two witnesses and duly ac- 
knowledged, and specifying the resolution or act, and the amount allowed 
thereby. July 29, 1846. 

No. 37. An Act further to extend the time for locating Virginia military kmd 
vxirrants, and returning surveys thereon to the General Land Office. The time 
is prolonged to Jan. 1, 1S48. July 29, 1846. 

No. 38. An Act giving the assent of Congress to a change of the compact en- 
tered into between the United States and State of Avkan&ae on her admission into 
the Union, Seventy-two sections of the land formeriy appropriated for 



1847.] TITLES AND AB8TBACTS OF THE PUBLIC LAWS. S05 

a seminary of learmng in Arkansas may be deTotod to tlio benefit of com- 
mon schools. July 29, 1846. 

No. 39. An Act reducing the duty on imports^ amdfor oUier pwrpo9e$. The 
new tariff; see page 164. July 30, 1846. 

No. 40. An Ad to exempt coffee imported from the Netheriandt Jiram. duty 
in certain cases, and for other purposes. If grown or piodaced in (he depen- 
dences of the Netherlands, and imported direct from the Netherlands in 
Dutch or American yessels, the coffee shall be free ^ duty, and duties col- 
lected upon such coffee from Aug. 30, 1842, to Sept 1 Ub, 1845, shall be 
refunded. No discriminating tonnage duties shall be levied on Spanish 
vessels coming from foreign countries, except from Cuba or Porto Bico, and 
all such duties collected under the act of July 30, 1832, shall be refunded. 
August 3, 1846. 

No. 41. An Act in nidation to the time of holding the Circuit and Distrid 
Cowls of the United States for the district of Ohio, See pages 114, 116. Aug. 
3, 1846. 

No. 42. An Act to grant the right of preemption to aduai settlers an the land 
acquired by treaty from the Miand Indians in Indiana. Aug. 3, 1846. 

No. 43. An Act providing for the adjustment of aU tiuspended preginption 
land claims in the several States and Territories. The commissioner of the 
general land office may determine, any time within two yean from this date, 
all cases of suspended entries now existing in his office, upon the principles 
of courts of equity, and in accordance with general equitable rules to be set- 
tled by the Secretary of the Treasury, the Attomey-General, and the Sfdd com- 
missioner conjointly. But these shall vacate only the United States title, 
without affecting the rights of conflicting claimants. The power herein given 
jBhall cease at the end of two years, and a list of the cases, with the principles 
on which they were determined, shall then be reported to Congress. The 
list shaU comprise two classes, the one of titles confirmed, the other of claims 
rejected. Lands coming under the second of these classes shall be offend at 
public sale. Aug. 3, 1846. 

No. 44. An Act to define the boundaries of the State of Iowa, and to repeal so 
much of the Act of March 3, 1845, as rdates to the boundaries of Iowa. The 
boundaries of Iowa shall be as follows : — From the mouth of the Des Moines 
river, up the main channel of that river, to the northern boundary line of 
Missouri as established in the Missouri State constitution of 1820 ; thence 
west along sud boundary line to the Missouri river ; thence up the Missouri 
river to the month of the Big Sioux river, according to Nicollet^ map; 
thence up the Big Sioux river to the parallel of 43* SO' north latitude; 
thence east along said parallel to the Mississippi river ; thence down the 
Mississippi to the place of beginning. The controveny respecting the 
boundary between Iowa and Missouri is refeired to the Supreme Court of 
tiie United States for decision. Until the vt&xx census, Iowa shall have two 
Representatives in Congress. Ang. 4, 1846. 

18 



206 VKItED flTATSfl. [1847. 

No. 45. An Act to establish a warehonsiog system, &c. See page 170. 
Aug. 6, 1846. 

No. 46. An Act to repecd an Act entitled an Act Jbr the rdiefof the Stock- 
bridge tribe of Indiana in the territory of Wisconsin^ approved March 3, 1843, and 
for other purposes. The act is repealed, and the tribe is restored to their an- 
cient form of government. The Indian sub-agent at Qreen Bay and the 
Governor of Wisconsin shall enrol the names of such individuals in the 
tribe as desire to remain citizens of the United States, and three months 
shall be given for any one who wishes to enrol his name. At the end of this 
time, the sub-agent shall divide the land of this tribe on the Winnebago 
lake into two districts, to be known as the Indian district and the citizen 
district, " according to the strength and numbers of their respective parties, 
and the laws and usages in said tribe." The lands in the Indian district are 
to be held in common ; those in the citizen district shall be divided, and each 
citizen shall receive his ratable proportion thereof. Those Indians who be- 
come citizens forfeit their right to any part of the annuity due from the gov- 
ernment to the Stockbridges. $5,000 shall be paid to this tribe of Indians 
in liquidation of all then- claims. This act shall not prejudice the claim of 
the tribe upon the Delaware nation for a share of the lands assigned them 
west of the Missouri river. Aug. 6, 1846. 

No. 47. An Act to enable the people of Wisconsin Territory to form a constt- 
twtion and State government^ and for the admission of such State into the Union, 
The following are to be the boundaries : — Beginning at the northeast cor- 
ner of Illinois, thence running along the boundary of Michigan through 
lake Michigan, Green Bay, to the mouth of the Menomonie river ; thence 
up said river to BmM river, and up this river to lake Bruld ; thence along 
the south shore of this lake to the centre of the channel between Middle and 
South islands in the lake of the Desert ; thence to the head-waters of the 
Montreal river as marked in Capt. Cramm's survey ; thence down the Mon- 
treal river to the middle of lake Superior ; thence to the mouth of the St 
Louis river, and up said river to the jfirst rapids in it, above the Indian vil- 
lage, as marked in Nicollet's map ; thence due south to the main branch of 
the river St Croix, and down the main channel of this river to the Missis- 
sippi ; thence down this river to the northwest comer of Illinois ; thence 
due east, along the northern boundary of Illinois to the place of beginning. 
As to the islands in the BruM and Menomonie rivers, the line shall be so 
run as to give to Michigan all the islands down to and inclusive of Quinne- 
see FaUs, and all the islands from these falls to the junction of the river with 
Green Bay to Wisconsin. Provided^ that this boundary shall not be bind- 
ing unless ratified by the State of Michigan on or before June 1, 1848. The 
State of Wisconsin shall have concurrent jurisdiction on the Mississippi and 
all other rivers forming its boundaries with any other State bounded by the 
same *, and all these rivers and navigable waters shall be common highways, 
free to all citizens of the United States without impost or toll. The laws of 



1847.] TITLES AND ABSTBACTS Olf THB PUBLIC LAWS. 207 

the United States not locally inapplicable shall have force in Wisconsin as 
well as elsewhere in the United States. The State shall form one judicial 
district, and a district judge shall be appointed thereto, with a salary of $1,500 
a year, who shall hold at the seat of government two sessions annually on 
the first Mondays in January and July. A district attorney and a marshal 
shall also be appointed, each with a salary of $200 and fees. Until another 
census is taken, Wisconsin shall have two representatives in Congress. The 
following propositions are submitted to the constitutional convention of 
Wisconsin for acceptance or rejection ; if accepted and ratified by an article 
in the constitution, they shall be binding on the United States : 1st Section 
16 in every township, lOr other lands equivalent thereto and as contiguous as 
may be, are granted to the State for the use of schools. 2d. 72 sections, or 
two entire townships, set apart by an act of June 12, 1838, are hereby grant- 
ed to the State for the use and support of a university. 3d. Ten entire 
sections are granted for erecting or completing the public buildings of the 
State. 4th. All salt-springs in the State, not exceeding 12 in number, with 
six sections of contiguous land, are granted to the State, without prejudice to 
the right of any individuals to such a spring. 5th. !Five per cent, of the net 
proceeds of the sales of the public lands within the State shall be paid to it 
for the purpose of making roads and canals. These propositions are made 
provided, that an article in the constitution of the State concedes to die United 
States the primary disposal of the soil within the same, and provides that 
the United States lands shall not be taxed, and that non-resident proprietors 
shall be taxed no higher than residents. Aug. 6, 1846. 

Ko. 48. Sdb-Tkeasuky Bill. An Act to provide for the better organiza- 
tion of the Treasury, and for the collection, safe-keeping, transfer, and di^ursetmnt 
of the public revenue. The rooms prepared in the new treasury building at 
Washington, with the fire-proof vaults and safes erected in the same, and 
such other apartments as are herein provided for, are hereby constituted the 
treasury of the United States. The mint at Philadelphia and the branch 
mint at New Orleans shall be places of deposit for the public moneys at these 
points respectively ; and the treasurers of these institutions shall be assistant 
treasurers under this act. The rooms provided in the custom-houses in New 
York and Bostoni under the act of July 4, 1840, shall also be for the use of 
the assistant treasurers, as well as the offices provided under said act at 
Charleston, S. C, and at St Louis, Missouri. Four assistant treasurers of 
the United States shall be appointed, each for four years, who shall give 
bonds with sureties, and shall be stationed respectively at Boston, New 
To^, Charleston, and St Louis. All collectors, and receivers of public 
money, of whatever character, are required safely to keep the same without 
loaning, using, depositing in banks, or exchanging it '^ for oth^ funds than 
as allowed by this act," till ordered to transfer or pay out the same ; and to 
perform all other duties as fiscal agents of the government which arc com- 
patible with llieir other duties. Bonds and sureties must be given by all, 



208 UmTBD 8TATS8. [1847. 

and the amount of the said bonds may be increased from time to time as 
deemed necessary. At least as often as once a week, all collectors and re- 
oeivers of public money of whatever character, in the District of Columbia, 
in BostoQi New York, Philadelphia, Charleston, New Orleans, and St Louis, 
shall pay over the moneys in their hands to the public treasurers in their 
respectiye cities. The Secretary of the Treasury may transfer the public 
moneys to any of the depositaries herein constituted, and the Postmaster- 
General may transfer the postoffice portion thereof, as often ais either shall 
see tit Special agents may be appointed, to be paid not more than $6 a 
day and travelling expenses, to examine the books, accounts, and money on 
hand in the several depositaries. Other officers, such as the land registers, 
collectors, superintendents of the mint, &c., as a farther check on the sub- 
treasurers, shall examine their books, accounts, and money on hand, once a 
quarter, and as much oftener as need be. Necessary additional expenses 
may be allowed for clerks, fire-proof vaults and diests, &c. ; but the number 
of clerks shall not exceed ten, their aggregate compensation shall not be more 
than 16 [8] thousand dollars, nor shall any one clerk receive over $800 per 
annum. Balances in the present depositaries may be transferred to any 
other of the'present depositaries, but not to the depositaries constituted un- 
der this act till Jan. 1, 1847. Marshals, district attorneys and patentees, 
wishing to pay money to the United States, may pay any of the assistant 
treasurers as directed by the Secretary of the Treasury. Any officer charged 
with the safe keeping of the public moneys who shall loan, use, deposit in 
bank, or exchange any portion of them, shall be deemed guilty of felony, be 
imprisoned not less than 6 months nor more than 10 years,-and be fined an 
amount equal to the sum thus embezzled. Any failure to pay over the 
money required shall be deemodi psima facie evidence of such embezzlement 
Until the rooms and offices herein directed can be prepared for use, the Sec- 
retary of the Treasury may procure, and contract for the use of, suitable 
rooms and safes. On and after Jan. 1, 1847, all duties, taxes, sales of pub- 
lic lands, debts, postages, and sums of money becoming due to the United 
States, shall be paid only in gold and sUver coin and United States treasury 
notes. Monthly accounts oi the specie on hand and the treasury notes is- 
sued shall be published in two of the newspapers at Washington. On and 
after April 1, 1847, all payments by the United States shall be made in gold 
and silver coin, or in treasury notes, if the creditor agrees to receive such 
notes. No exchange of funds shall be made by the disbursing officers, ex- 
cept ton gold and silver ; and when they have drafts to collect, they shall 
pay out the fhnds rec^ved for said drafts, unless they can exchange such 
fimds for gold and silver at par. The Treasury shall publish regulations to 
enforce the speedy presentataon of government drafts, and to guard against 
those drafts being thrown into circulation as a medium of exchange or paper 
currency. No officer shall sell for a premium any treasury note, draft, or 
warrant, not his private property, without making return of the premium 



1847.] TITLES AND ABSTRACTS OV THB PUBLIC LAWS. 209 

and charging it to the credit of the United States. The assistant treasurers 
shall he paid as follows : — the one at New Yoiic, $4,000 a year ; at Boston, 
Charleston, and St Lonis, $2,500 a year each ; the treasnrers of the mints 
at Philadelphia and New Orleans, in addition to their present salaries, $500 
a year each ; and if they make any farther chaise for any official service 
whatever, they shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor. $5,000 are ap- 
propriated for incidental expenses under this adt Aug. 6, 1846. 

No. 49. An Act to provide for the confirmation of certain settlement clams in 
the Greensbwrg land district, Louisiana, Aug. 6, 1846. 

No. 50. An Act to surrender to the State of Tennessee aU title the United 
States have to lands in Tennessee south and west of the line commonly called the 
Oongressionod reservation line, and to release to said State the proceeds of such 
of said lands as may have been sold by the State of Tennessee as the agent of the 
United States. This surrender and transfer is made on condition that the 
State applies $40,000, if the proceeds of the londs amount to so mudi, for 
the support of a college at Jackson, Madison county, Tennessee. Provided 
also, that this release shall satisfy all claims of the State for services ren- 
dered and expenses incurred under the act of Congress of Feb. 18, 1841. 
Aag. 7, 1846. 

No. 51. Appropriation for defensive works. See page 200. Aug. 8, 1846. 

No. 52. Army appropriation bill. See page 199. Aug. 8^ 1846. 

No. 53. Military Academy appropriation Inll. See page 199. Aug. 
6, 1846. 

No. 54. An Act supplementary to the Act of Feb, 20, 1846, entided an Act 
to enlarge the powers of the seoeral Orphans^ Courts in the District of Columbia.. 
Orphans at any age between 14 and 21 may choose guardiansfor them- 
selves, but these guardians must be approved by the court and give security; 
the court may also remove such a guardian, and cite the orphan to make a 
new choice. If any surety of a guardian petitions to bo set free from the 
liability, the court mny Require the guardian to give counter security, or to 
deliver up the ward's estate. Aug. 8, 1846. 

No. 55. An Act to regulate the proceedings in the circuit and district courts of 
the United SlateSj and for other purposes. The circuit court may remit to the 
next term of the district court in the same district any pending indictment 
cognizable by said district court*, and the district court may do likewise to 
the circuit court The grand juries empanelled for the district eonrt may 
take cognizance of all crimes within the jurisdiction of either the circuit or 
district court ; and an indictment for a capital offence, or one involving im- 
portant questions of law, may be remitted, to the circuit court. Hereafter, no 
grand jury shall be summoned for either of these courts, •xcept the judge 
at his discretion order a venire for the same ; provided, that persons accused 
of crime be still liable to imprisonment before indictment Any one admit- 
ted to bail may be arrested by his bail, held in custody, and the bail exone- 
rated. Any officer or mariner of a ressel who feloniously runs away with 

18* 



^ 



310 UNITED STATES. [1847. 

it or with goods In it worth S50, shall be deemed gwlty of felony, and fined 
not orer $10,000, or imprisoned not over ten yean, or both. The jndge may 
require a penon under bail to giro farther or better security, or be commit* 
ted. Witnesses may be compelled to recognize, with or withoat sureties, 
to appear at a trial. So much of the Uw of July 7, 1838, as distributes 
trials between tiie circuit court at Canandaigua snd that at Albany accord* 
ing to the locality of the cause of action, is repealed. The court may order 
witnesses to be subpoenaed for a defendant, and the costs and fees to be dis- 
charged as if ihey were witnesses for the United States, if it thinks proper. 
See also pp. 114, 115. Aug. 8, 1846. 

No. 56. AnActtoattcbch totheFart Wayne land distrkt eertmn tracts of 
lohdM lying within the Umits of that district which are not now attached t&asnf dis- 
trict. Aug. 8, 1846. 

No. 57. An Act to provide for the distribuiim of the edition of the buos and 
treaties of the United States, published by Little and Brown, under the resoltOion 
of March 3, 1845. The copies distributed to public officers shall be held for 
the use of their offices, and as the property of the United States. This edi- 
tion is dedared to be competent evidence in all the tribunals and public 
offices in the United States and of the several States, without further proof 
or authentication. Aug. 8, 1846. 

No. 58. An- Act to protnde for the more effectual publication of the laws of 
the United States, Aug. 8, 1846. 

No. 59. An Act for the aUouxmce qfdrawbadc on foreign merchandise im- 
ported into certain districts of the United States from the British North Ameri- 
can Provinces, and exported to foreign countries. The drawback is allowed, 
subject to esjsting laws and regulations, if the exportation be made within 
one year from the date of importation. Aug. 8, 1846. 

^No. 60. An Act granting certain lands to the Territory of Iowa to aid in the 
improvement of the navigation of the Des Moines river in said Territory. One 
equal moiety, in alternate sections, of the lands remaining unsold in a strip 
five miles wide on each side of said river is granted for this puipose. These 
lands shall be sold only as the improvements make progress ; that is, not 
more than $30,000 worth shall be sold till half of that sum is e^cpended on 
the improvement; and then the residue may be sold to replace the amount 
expended, and so on. The river shall remain a public highway, and the 
lands shall not be disposed of at less than $1 25 per acre. Aug. 8, 1846. 

No. 61. An Act to regulate writs of error and appeals from the district courts 
of the United States for the middle district of Alabama, They shall be taken 
directly to the Supreme Court of the United States, and not to the circuit 
court of Alabamiv Aug. 8, 1646. 

No. 62. An Act more effectually to provide f>r the enjbrcement of certain pro- 
visionsin the treaties of the United States, As some of these treaties provide 
that the consuls, vice-consuls, and commercial agents may act as judges and 
arixitrators between the captains and crews of vessels belonging to their re- 



1847.] TITLES AND ABSTSJLCTS OV THS PUBLIC LA.W8. Sll 

spectire natioiifl, witlioat inteifereiuse from ihe local autiiaritief, except die 
case djstmbs tihe tranqnilUty of the country, or their interference be reqnett* 
ed by the consuls, authority is hereby given to the courts and magistrates of 
the United Stat^ to aid in canying into effect any award or decree of the 
consuls made under these circumstances. Recusant persons may be kn* 
prisoned or discharged by the written consent of the consul, provided the 
foreign government pay the expenses of imprisonment and the costs. Aug. 
8, 1846. 

No. 63. An Act to equalize the compensation of the iwrveyon generaiofthe 
pubiie lands of the United States^ and for other purposes. Aug. 8, 1846. 

No. 64. An Act jnaJang copies of papers certified by the Secretary of the 
Senateor Clerk of die House ofBepresentatives, legal evidence, Extracts from the 
journals thus certified shall be legal evidence. Aug. 8, 1846. 

No. 65. An Act to carry into effectthe convention between the United States 
andtheReputHc of Peru^ concluded at Idma, Mxrch 17, 1841. The attorney* 
general of the United States is authorized to adjudicate the claims arising 
under this convention, and the necessary documents in the Department of 
State shall be delivered to him for this purpose. He shall report to the 
Secretary of State a list of the awards made by him, which shall be trans- 
mitted to the Secretary of the Treasury, who shall pay out, in ratable pro- 
portion to the sucoessfhl claimants, the money that may be received horn 
Pern under this convention. For their services, the attorney-general shaU 
be paid $2,000, and his derk, $1,000, out of tihe first funds received firom 
Peru. Aug. 8, 1846. 

No. 66. An Act to establish an additional land district m Iowa. Aag* 
8, 1846. 

No.67. AnActtoamendtheActqfApril2,lSUyentiaedanActdireetiHff 
the disposition of certain unredaimed goods^ wares, and merchandise seiiudfar 
being iOegaUy imported into the United ^ates. The act shall apply to property 
appraised at $100 or less. Aug. 8, 1846. 

No. 68. An Act to enakiUlM Secretary of the Navy to puri^iaee the f^ 

using Mia^s patent manger stopper, $3,000 appropriated for this pupese. 

Aug. 8, 1846. 
No. 69. An Act to grant a certain quantity ofland to aid in the improvement qf 

iheFoxand Wisconsin riverSfOndto connect thesamebyacanalf in the Territory 

of Wiseonsin, Land equal to one half of three sections in width, on each 

side of Fox river from its mouth to the entrance of the canal, and on each 

«de of the canal, reserving the alternate sections to the United States, is 

granted for this purpose. The sections reserved shall not be sold at less 

than $3 50 an acre, nor Shall any preemptive right to them be admitted ; 

and the lands granted shall not be sdd for less than $1 26 an acre. The 

money received for the lands must be expended in due season on the work ; 

the sales shall never be mora than $10,000 in advance of the esqpeDditnie. 

The improvement must be commenoed within tfuee yean, and com- 



212 UNITED BTATX8. [1847. 

pleted within twenty yean from the time ttiat Wificonsin becomes a State. 
Ang. 8, 1846. 

No. 70. An Act to authorize the constituted authorities of the county of Polk in 
the Territory of Iowa to enter a quarter section of land for a seat of justice. Aug. 
8, 1846. 

No. 71. An Act authorizing the inhabitants of township oiie^ of range thirteen 
eastj Seneca county y Ohio, to rdinquish certain lands selected for schools, and to ob' 
tain others in lieu of them. Ang. 8, 1846. 

No. 72. An Act to authorize the Trustees of Tymochtee township, Wyandott 
county, to select lands for schools within the Wyandott cession. Aug. 8, 1846. 

No. 73. An Act to refund to certain persons an excess of duty, exacted on the 
importation of foreign merchandise. The Secretary of the Treasury is author- 
ized to refund what has been illegally exacted by collectors since March 3, 
1833, when satisfied by decisions of the United States courts that the duties 
were illegally exacted. Ang. 8, 1846. 

No. 74. Ciyil and diplomatic appropriation bill. See page 199. Ang. 
10, 1846. 

No. 75. Navy appropriation bill. See page 199. Aug. 10, 1846. 

No. 76. An Act to establish the Smithsonian institution, for the increase and 
diffusion of knowledge among m/en. The President and Vice-President of the 
United States, the Secretary of State, the Se<a*etary of the Tieasnry, the 
Secretary of War, the Secretary of the Navy, the Postmaster-Oeneral, the 
Attorney-General, the Chief-Justice, and the Commissioner of the Patent 
Office of the United States, and the Mayor of the city of Washington, during 
the time for which they shall bold their respective o^ces, and such other per- 
sons as they may elect honorary members, are hereby constituted an "estab- 
lishment,'' by the name of the " Smithsonian Institute,'' for the increase and 
diffusion of knowledge among men ; and by that name shall be known and 
have perpetual succession. From the interest already accrued on the fund, 
$242,129 are appropriated for the erection of a suitable building. All future 
appropriations for the institute are to be made exclusively from the interest 
accruing, at 6 per cent on the fund, which amounts to $515,169, this interest 
being now devoted to this object forever. The institution is to be conducted 
by a board of regents, composed of the Vice-President and the Chief-Justice 
of the United States, and the Mayor of Washington, during their terms of 
office, of the three Senators appointed by the President of the Senate, three 
Representatives appointed by the Speaker of the House, and six other per- 
sons not members of Congress, two of whom must be members of the Na- 
tional Institute, and residents in Washington, appointed by joint resolution 
of the Senate and House. The term of service for these last six members- 
shall be six years, two of them going out biennially. Hie regents shall meet 
at Washington, Sept. 7, 1846, and organize by choosing one of their own 
number as chancellor, and a suitable person as secretary, of the institution, 
who shall also be secretary of the board of regents. They shall choose three 



1847.] TITIiBS JLNX> ABSZHACTft OF THIS PUBLIC ULWS. 2213 

of their number as an executive committee, and fix the times for their fhtaro 
meetings ; ^ve shall be a qaorom. The sendees of the regents shall be 
gratuitous, but they shall be paid their travelling and other actual expenses. 
A suitable site for the building may be taken from any of the public grounds 
in Washington. A suitable edifice shall be erected ^^ of plain and durable 
materials, and structure, without unnecessary ornament, and of sufficienf; sizei 
and with suitable rooms or halls for the reception and arrangement, upon a 
liberal scale, of objects of natural history, including a geological and mine- 
ralogical cabinet; also, a chemical laboratory, a library, a gallery of art, 
and the necessary lecture rooms." " All objects of art and of foreign and 
curions research, and all objects of natural history, plants, and geological 
and mineralogical specimens, belonging or hereafter to belong to the Uni- 
ted States, shall be delivered to such persons as may be authorized by the 
board of regents to receive them, and shall be arranged so as to facilitate 
the examination and study of them, in the building erected for the institu- 
tion ; and the regents shall afterwards, as new specimens in natural history, 
geology, or mineralogy may be obtained by exchanges of duplicate speci- 
mens belonging to the institution, (.which they are hereby authorized to 
make,) or by donation, which they may receive, or otherwise, cause such 
new specimens to be also appropriately dassed and arranged. And the 
minerals, books, manuscripts, and other property of James Smithson shall be' 
removed to said institution, and shall be preserved separate from the other 
property." The secretary of the regents shall have charge of the buildings 
and property, shall keep a record of proceedings, shall be librarian and 
keeper of the museum, and may with the consent of the regents appoint as- 
sistants ; and the said officers shall be paid for their services, salaries to be 
established by the regents, and be removable by the regents. Appropriations 
from the fund shall be made by the regents, not exceeding an annual ave- 
rage of $25,000, for the gradual formation of a library " composed of valua- 
ble works pertaining to all departments of human knowledge." Of any por- 
tion of the interest of the fund not herein appropriated, tlie managers may 
make such disposal as they shall deem best suited to promote the purposes of 
the testator. Persons taking out copyrights, within three months after the 
publication of the work copyrighted, shall give one copy of it to the Smith- 
sonian institution, and one to the library of Congress.'!*^ Ang. 10, 1846. 

No. 77. Navy pensions appropriation bill. See page 199. Aug. 10, 
1846. 



* Regents of the Smitksonian I1^stittaion. 
GxoBGE M. Dauas, ChaneeUor. 



Roger B. Taney, 
lYilliiun W. S^Kton, 
QeoTgeEvaiu, 
EKdnej Breese, 
J. S. Peimybacker, 
William J. Hough, 
Bichard D. Otren, 



Henry W. miliard, 
RoAis Choato, 
Biehard Rvah, 
William 0. PreBton, 
Qideon Hawley, 
Alexander D. BafObe, 
J. G. Totten. 



214 U«1TBD BTATB8. [1847. 

No. 78. An Act authorizing the payment of certain claims of the State of Ala- 
bama, $13,455 32 are appropriated to pay for certain expenses incurred 
dnring the Indian wars. Aug. 10, 1846. 

No. 79. An Act to provide for the payment of the evidences of public dfefif in 
certain cases. Innocent holders of treasury notes once paid, but afterwards 
purloined, altered, and put in circulation again, may obtain their value from 
the government, on furnishing sufficient proof of good faith. Aug. 10, 1846. 



XXVn. AETICLES OF THE OREGON CONVENTION 

between Great Britain and the United States^ signed by the Plenijxftcntian'es 

at Washington, June 15, 1846. 

Article 1. From the point on the 49th parallel of north latitude, where the boimdaiy 
laid down in existing treaties and conventions between Great Britain and the United States 
terminates, the line of boundary between the territories of her Britannic Majesty and 
those of the United States shall be continued westward along the 49th parallel of north 
latitude to the middle of the channel which separates the continent ftom VancouTcr** 
Island ; and thence mmtfaerly through the middle of the said channel, and of Ihica Straits, 
to the Padflo Ocean ; provided, however, that the navigation of the said channel and 
straits, south of the 49th parallel of north latitude, remain free and open to both parties. 

Article 2. From the point at which the 40th parallel of north latitude shall be found 
to intersect the great northern branch 6t the Colimibia river, the navigation of the said 
branch shall be free and open to the Hudson's Bay Company, and to all British subjects 
trading with the tsame, to the point where Hie said branch meets the main stream of the 
Columbia, and thence down the said main stream to the ocean, with free access into and 
tiirough the said river or rivers, it being understood that all the usual portages along the 
line thus described, shall in like manner be free and open. In navigating the said river or 
rivers, British subjects, with their goods and produce, shall be treated on the same footing 
as citizens of the United States ; it being, however, always understood that nothing in this 
artlole shall be construed as preventing, or intended to prevent, the Qovemment of tha 
United States from making any regulations respecting the navigation of the said river or 
rivers, not inconsistent with the present treaty. 

Article 3. In the future appropriations of the territory south of the 49th parallel of north 
latitude, as provided in the first article of this treaty, the possessory rights of the Hudson's 
Bay Company, and of all British subjects who may be already in the occupation of land or 
other property lawfully acquired within the said territory shall be respected. 

Article 4. The &rms, lands, and other property of every description, belonging to the 
Pnget's Sound Agricultural Company, on the north side of the Columbia river, shall be 
confirmed to the said Company. In case, however, the situation of those feums and lands 
should be considered by the United States to be of public and political importance, and the 
United States Oovemment should signify a desire to obteun possession of the whole or of 
any part thereof, the property so required shall be transferred to the said Government at 
a proper valuation to be agreed upon between the parties. 

Article 5. The present treaty shall be ratified by the President of the United States, by 
and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof, and by her Britannic Majesty ; and 
the ratifications shall be exchanged at London at the expiration of six months from the 
date hereof, or sooner if possible. 



XXVm. POPXJLATION OF THE UNITED STATES. 



XXIS: SLAVES IN TEE UNITED STATES. 



Steto. 


1790 1 1800 1 leio 


1B20 


isao 1 1S40 


Vsmrnit," 

New Tork, 
Delkwm, 

St., 

SoDth GuoUna, 

a«rgla, 

AlBbama, 

Ke-tudLr; 

Mkhlgan, 

HlHonrl, 
IHiC. ColnmUs, 


161 

95: 

a,709 
2i;32: 

If 

^^ 
100.673 
107,094 
29.284 


8 ( 

^^ 168.^ 
146,161' 106.SU5 
58,404! 106.218 


1 
S 

lO.OfiB 

'.g 

4309 

P 

269,476 
149.060 
41,879 
82.814 

11 


8 
1 

J 

s 

217.631 
117.649 
06,66 

,», 

3 
T4 

IS 

li^oi 


•i 

443,967 

Is 

1^268 

4 






84.660 






3,41T 

iilsso 


4o;m^ wi^ 






.? 






136 


6,377 




l;SS 








.fi'iii 






























T«ti, 




868.0411 1,191,864 


1,638,064 


2,00»,0B1 


a,487W 



INDIVIDUAL STATES. 



I. MAINE. 

GOTESNMXirT. 



Huoa J. AiTDBKSOK, of Beliast, Gwerwfr^ (tenn expires <« the 
second Wednesday in June, 1847,) 



Ezra B. F^rench, 
James White, 
Alfred Bedington, 
Iievi Bradley, 
Benjamin Gair, 
James Bates^ 
I^athaniel Mitcbell, 
Alpheas Lyon, 
Ebenezer Enowlton, 
Samuel Belcher, 
Stephen H. Chase, 
Daniel T. Pike, 



of Nobleboro', Secrtktry tf State, 

of Belfast, TVeomirer, 

of Augusta, Adjvtemi Gerund, 

of Charleston, Land Agent, 

of Palermo, Warden of State Prison, 

of Augusta, SupH of Insane JBbepitai, 

of Portland, 7 

of Watervffle, J ^^ Co-mmxmen. 

of Montville, Speaker of the House. 

of FarmingtMi, Clerk of the House, 

of Eryebmg, President of the Senate, 

of Augusta, CMc of do, 

JUDICIAST. 



Supreme Judicial' Court. 

Bzekiel Whitman, of Portland, Chief Justice, 

JBther Shepley, of Portland, Justice, 

John S. Tenney, of Norridgewock, do. 

Wyman B. S. Moor, of WaterviUe, Attorney- Gmeral, 

Joim Shepley, of Saco, Reporter, 

District Courts, 

Daniel Goodenow, of Alfred, WestDist. 

Asa Bedington, Jr^ of Augusta, Mid. do. 
IVederick H. Allen, of Bangor, East. do. 

Mumcipal and Police Courts. 

Lather iltdi, of Portland, 

Ebenezer Clap, of Bath, 

Gnstayus G. Cushman, of Bangor, 



$1,500 
900 
900 
700 
1,000 
700 
800 



ral. 


$1,800 
1,800 
1,800 
1,000 




1,000 


Judge, 
do. 


1,200 
1,200 


do. 


1,200 


Judge, 
do. 


700 


do. 


500 



1847.] 



MAINS. 



217 



Probate Courts. 



OonntleM. 



York, 

Cumberland, 

Lineoln, 

do. E. Bist 
Hancock, 
Waahington 
Kennebec, 
Oxford, 
Somerset, 
Penobscot, 
Waldo, 
Fxanklin, 
Piscataquis, 
Aroosto^ 



Judges. 



Wm. A. Hayes, 
Barrett Potter, 
Nathaniel Qioton, 
Joel Miller, 
Samuel M. Pond, 
J. G. Taibot, 
Win. Emmons, 
Lyman Rawson, 
Charles Greene, 
Samuel Cony. 
Jona. Thayer, 
Mos. Sherburne, 
Eph. Packard, 
S. G. Tuck, 



Residence. 



S. Berwick, 

Portland, 

Bath, 

Thomaston, 

Bucksport, 

E. Machiafl, 

HalloweU, 

Rumford, 

Athens, 

Orono, 

Camden, 

Phillips, 

Blanchard, 

Haynesrille, 



Sal- 
ary. 



$300 
400 
800 
100 
290 
250 
800 
200 
150 
275 
150 
100 
75 
100 



Registers. 



Wm. Hammond, 
Chris. C. Tobie, 
Arnold Blaney, 
Beder Fales, 
I J. D. Richards, 
.Albert G- Lane, 
Fran. Davis, Jr., 
Geo. F. Emery, 
Tho's C. Jones, 
John Williams, 
Charles Palmer, 
SewallCram, 
Eben. S. Greely, 
Theodore Cary, 



Residence. 


Sal- 




ary. 
$650 


EUot, 


Westbrook, 


900 


Bristol, 


600 


Th'maston, 


160 


Ellsworth, 


300 


Machias, 


400 


Augusta, 


660 


Paris, 


860 


Norridge'k, 


800 


Bangor, 


660 


Belftst, 


aoo 


N. Sharon, 


160 


Dover, 


126 


IHoulUm, 


126 



Fll^ANCES. 

[Extracted ftom the Report of the State Treasurer, April 80, 1846.] 

Total amount received from Jan- 1, 1845, to April 30, 1846, $610,891 46 
Balance in the Treasury, January 1, 1845, 392,422 24 

$1,003,313 70 
634,210 16 

$369,103 54 



Expended from Jan. 1, 1845, to April 30, 1846, 
Balance in the Treasury, April 30, 1846, 



Principal items of Expenditure. 

Salaries, 

Pay of Legislature, 

Expenses of Executive, 

Criminal prosecutions, 

Schools, 

Roll of accounts, 

Printing, binding, &c.. 

Deaf, dumb, and blind, 

Militia pensions, 

Indian tribes, 

State Prison officers, 

Clerks, 

Insane Hospital, 

County taxes, 

Agricultural Sodeties, 

Public debt paid off. 

Interest on debt, 



$28,607 30 


39,797 20 


6,006 51 


18,612 83 


25,176 17 


8,438 57 


5,152 73 


4,688 31 


3,112 00 


7,308 55 


4,446 00 


3,043 60 


557 00 


11,725 36 


1,498 07 


316,646 22 


137,707 62 



Ckief sources of Income, 



Direct taxes, 

Land office, 

School fund. No. 13, 

do. do. No. 14, 
Permanent school fund, 
County taxes, 
Bank dividends, 
Bank stock, 
Interest on deposits. 
Duties on commissions, 
Miscellaneous, 
Distributing proceeds of 

public lands, 
North-eastern boundary 

indemnity, 



$220,150 95 

135,782 33 

26,090 00 

13,045 00 

21,088 70 

13,681 68 

900 00 

3,375 00 

6,510 14 

2,523 00 

5,646 00 

19,716 23 

142,882 44 



Whole amount of Public Debt, 
Annual interest on this debt, about 



$1,274,285 
76,000 



19 



218 



HEW HAMPSHIKE. 



[1847. 



n. "^NEW HAMPSHIRE. 





Government 


} 




For the year 


ending an the Jirst Wednesday of June, 1847. 










Salary. 


Akthont Colby, 


of New London, 


Governor, 


$1,000 


George G. Fogg, 


of Concord, 


Secretary of State, 


800 


Ramuel F. Wetmore, 


of Concord, 


Deputy Sec. of State, 


Fees. 


James Peverly, Jr., 


of Concord, 


Treasurer, 


600 


Charles H. Peaslee, 


of Concord, 


Adjutant General, 


400 


James W. Parker, 


of Merrimac, 


President of the Senate.. 




John P. Hale, 


of Dover, 


Speaker of the Mouse. 




John A. Richardson, 


of Durham, 


Clerk of the Senate. 




Thomas J. HaiTis, 


of Claremont, 


Clerk of the House. 






Executive Council. 







Counties. 


Councillors. 





l8t District, 


2d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


4th 


do. 


5th 


do. 



{ '•^"c^"""'*" }johnC.YonBg,«fOssipee. 

Cheshire and Sallivan, Jared Perkins, of Unity. 
Grafton and Coos, Enos Ferrin, of Hebron. 

The Governor, Executive Council, Senate, and House of Representatives 
are elected annually on the 2d Tuesday of March, .the official year com- 
mencing on the 1st Wednesday in June. The State is divided into Jive 
Districts for the choice of Councillors ; and again divided into twelve Dis- 
tricts for the choice of Senators j the number composing these two bodies 
being limited by the Constitution, while the number of Representatives is 
unlimited, — every town possessing 150 ratable male inhabitants being en- 
titled to one Representative, and one for each additional 300. 

Judiciary. 

The Superior Court of Judicature consists of a chief justice and two asso- 
ciate justices, who hold one term annually in each of the ten counties of the 
State, for the hearing and determining of questions of law, &c This Court 
is also vested with Chancery jurisdiction for certain purposes. 

The judges of the Superior Court of Judicature are, ex o^ao, judges of the 
Court of Common Pleas. This Court, before whom all actions for the re- 
covery of debts and the enforcement of contracts, and all jury trials are 
brought, consists of one of the justices of the Superior Court, who sits as 



1847.] 



N£W HAMFSHIBB. 



219 



chief justice of the Court of Common Pleas, and of two county judges, gen- 
erally appointed from among the yeomanry, whose principal duty it is to 
attend to the ordinary business of the county, its roads, expenses, &c. 
Teiins are held semi-annually, in each of the counties. 

Superior Court. 

Appointed. Salary. 

Joel Parker, ofKeene, Chief JusHcey 1838 $1,200 

Andrew S. Woods, of Bath, Associate Justice^ 1840 



John J. Gilchrist, of Charlestown, do. 

Circuit Court. 

Charles P. Gove, of Nashville, 

Ira A. Eastman, of Gilmanton, 

Lyman B. Walker, of Concord, Attorney General^ 

Judges of ike Court of Comm/on Pleas. 



Courts of Probate. 



1,200 



1840 


1,200 


1843 


$1,200 


1844 


1,200 


1843 


1,200 



Counties. 


Justices. 


Residence. 


Salary. 


Rockingham, 

Strafford, 

Belknap, 

Carroll, 

Merrimack, 

Hillsborough, 

Cheshire, 

Sullivan, 

Grafton, 

Coos, 


j Bradbury Bartlett, 
1 James Pickering, 
j George L. Whitehouse, 
1 Hiram R. Roberts, 
( Thomas Cogswell, 
\ Henry Y. Simpson, 
( Nathaniel Rogers, 
\ Thomas P. Drake, 
( Benjamin Wadleigh, 
■) Jacob A. Potter, 
\ Jacob Whittemore, 
\ Jesse Carr, 
( Horace Chapin, 
] Nathan G. Babbitt, 
( Ambrose Cossit, 
\ Eleazer Jackson, 
i David C. Churchill, - 
\ Nathaniel S. Berry, 
( Joshua Marshall, 
( Richard Eastman, 


Nottingham, 

Newirtgton, 

Farmington, 

Somersworth, 

Gilmanton, 

New Hampton, 

Wolfeborough, 

Effingham, 

Sutton, 

Concord, 

Antrim, 

Goffstown, 

Winchester, 

Westmoreland, 

Claremont, 

Cornish, 

Lyme, 

Hebron, 

Stratford, 

Lancaster, 


$3 per day during attendance at Court, and 
10 cents per mUe for travel. 



Counties. 


Judges. 


Salary. 


Registers. 


Salary. 


Rockingham, 


John Sullivan, 


$334 


David A. Gregg, 


$462 


Strafford, 


Ch's W. Woodman, 


167 


Enoch Berry, 


233 


Belknap, 


Warren Lovell, 


142 


Jeremiah Elkins, 


183 


Carroll, 


Jonathan T. Chase, 


142 


Obed Hall, 


183 


Merrimack, 


Horace Chase, 


245 


Calvin Ainsworth, 


345 


Hillsborough, 


Luke Woodbury, 


276 


Samuel N. Pattee, 


383 


Cheshire, 


Larkin Baker, 


225 


Elijah Sawyer, 


300 


Sullivan, 


John L. Putnam, 


175 


Ralph Metcalf, 


225 


Grafton, 


Walter Blair, 


275 


Samuel Swasey, 


380 


Coos, 


Benj. Hunking, 


100 


George A. Cossit, 


125 



220 



TSAMONT. 



[1847. 



* 

Statb Pbibon. 

Samuel G. Berry, Warden ; William Berry, Deputy Warden ; Rev. Elca- 
zar Smith, Chaplain ; Thomas Chadboum, M. D., Physician, 



1st District, 
2d do. 
3d do. 
4th do. 



CONGBESSIONAL DISTRICTS. 

Coontiee. 
Kockingham, Strafford, 
Merrimack, Belknap, Carroll, 
Hillsborough, Cheshire, 
SuUivan, Grafton, Coos^ 



Population. 
68,920 
74,231 
68,923 
72,368 



III. VERMONT. 



Government. 



Horace Eatok, 
Leonard Sargeant, 
Elisha P. Jewett, 
James McM. Shafter, 
Greo. H. Beaman, 
Silas H. Hodges, 
DeWitt C. Clarke, 
Ebenezer N. Briggs, 
Ferrand F. Merrill, 
Gostav. H. Loomis, 
Hiram Harlow, 
F. W. Hopkins, 
C. B. Adams, 
Thomas Kidder, 
Daniel Kellogg, 



of Enosburg, 
of Manchester, 
of Montpelier, 
of Burlington, 
of Rutland, 
of Rutland, 
of Burlington, 
of Brandon, 
of Montpelier, 
of Montpelier, 
of Windsor, 
of Rutland, 
of Middlebury, 
of Windsor, 
of Rockingham, 



Salary. 
Goyemor, (term ends Oct '47,) $750* 
Lieut.' Crov. and Pres, Sen.y $4 a day. 
Treasurer, 50O 

Secretary of State, 275 

Sec'y Civil and Military Affairs, 20O 
Avditor of Accounts, 150 

Secretary of the Senate, 250 

Speaker of the House, 
Clerk of the House, 400 

State Librarian, 100 

Superintendent of State Prison, 50O 
Adjutant and Inspector Gtneral, 1 50 
State Geologist, 

Chaplain of State Prison, 400 

Commissioner of the Insane, 



The Senate, established in 1836, consists of 30 members, each county 
being entitled to at least one, and the rest being apportioned according to 
population ; and the House of Representatives is composed of about 230 
members, one member from each town. Pay of the members of each Housie, 
$1.50 a day, during the session of the legislature. 



* And ^ as Commissioner for the Deaf, Blind, Insane, &c. 



1847.] VERMONT.^ 221 

JVDICIABT. 

Supreme Court. 

Salary. 

Charles K. Williams, of Eutland, Chief Justice, $1,376 

Stephen Royce, of Berkshire, Associate Judge, 1,375 

Isaac F. Bedfield, of Montpelier, cb, 1,375 

Milo L. Bennett, of Burlington, do. 1,375 

Daniel Kellogg, oi Rockingham, do. 1,375 

Peter T. Washburn, of Woodstock, Reporter^ 450 

The judiciary powers are vested in a Supreme Court, consisting of five 
judges ; in County Courts, or Courts of Common Fleas, comprising five 
Circuits, each County Court being composed of one Judge of the Supreme 
Court, who is, ex officio^ Chief Justice of the County Courts of his Circuit, and 
two Assistant Judges for each county ; and in Justices of the Peace ; all the 
Judges and Justices being chosen annually hy the Legislature. 

The Supreme Court sits once, and the County Courts twice, a year, in each 
county. Each judge of the Supreme Court is Chancellor of a Circuit. The 
Court of Chancery has two stated sessions annually in each county. An 
appeal from the decree of the Chancellor lies to the Supreme Court. 

Common Schools. — The School Fund has been abolished, having previ- 
ously been borrowed by the State. 

By an Act of the Legislature, passed Nov. 5, 1845, provision is made for 
the supervision and regulation of Common Schools, by the appointment of a 
State Superintendent to be elected by joint vote of the assembly. County Su- 
perintendents to be appointed by the Judges of the County Court, and Town 
Superintendents to be elected by the inhabitants of each town, at their annual 
town-meetings. To these Superintendents are committed the regulation of 
Schools so far as concerns the examination of teachers, course of instruction, 
government, discipline, and the selection of books. Each town is divided 
into a suitable number of school districts, the prudential concerns of which 
are under the management of a District Committee. 

Vermont Asylum for the Insane^ Bratdd)oro\ — William H. Rockwell, M. D., 
Superintendent. Since the opening of the Asylum there have been admit- 
ted, to September, 1845, 835 patients; 572 have been discharged, and 263 
remain in the institution. Of the 835 patients thus admitted, 340 recovered, 
equal to 40.71 per cent ; 59 have died, equal to 7.06 per cent Of recent 
cases discharged last year, 89.58 per cent recovered; Of all chronic cases 
discharged last year, 31.37 per cent recovered. 

Terms of Admission, For first six months, two dollars per week, and one 
dollar and fifty cents afterwards. When the insanity is connected with 

19* 



222 



VKBMOMT. 



11847. 



epilepsy or paralysis, $2.50 per week. No patient received for a less term 
than three months, unless he recover before that time. 

State Prison. — Average nomber of convicts, in 1845, 68; expenditure, 
$7,803.65 ; income, $5,914.59. ' ~ 



Finances. 

Received from Sept. 10, 1844, to Sept. 13, 1845, 
Expended from Sept 10, 1844, to Sept. 13, 1845, 



$113;921.d9 
95,503.42 



Principal items of Expenditure. 

General Assembly, $ 1 1 ,536 

Salaries of judges, 6,542 

Oilier salaries, 4,725 

Auditor's orders, 15,003 

Amer*n Asylum, (Hartford,) 1,960 
Insane Hosp'l, (Brattleboro',) 1,332 
Blind Asylum, (Boston,) 1,120 
Court expenses, 28,389 

Silk and cocoon premiums, 1,776 
Destruction of bears, &c., 804 

Vermont Asylnm, 6,000 

Interest to banks, 1,757 



Principal sources of Bevenue. 



70 Taxes, 

75j State's Attorney, 

00 Safety fund oontribations, 



01 
91 
20 
00 
31 
45 
75 
00 
09 



do. notes, 
School fund notes, 
State bank collections, 
Pedlers' licenses. 
Bank dividend taxes, 
Clerks of courts. 



$72,106 11 
4,204 80 
2,100 00 

484 00 
7,034 16 

405 31 
2,398 08 
3,254 29 
2,007 59 



Common School Statistics fob 1845. 



Counties. 



BeDnington, 

Windham, 

Windsor, 

Rutland, 

Addison, 

Oiange, 

Chittenden, 

Washington, 

Caledonia, 

Franklin, 

Orleans, 

Lamoille, 

Essex, 

Grand Tsle, 



o 
d 



BOO 

53 



9'^ 

> 9 
o 

• g 

o -S 



9 985 2,411 1,859 

19! 2,991 7,101 6,278 

19 8,618 9,496 7,946 

17 2,482 6 279 4,618 

16 1.963 5,186 4.121 

10 2;090 5,607 4^511 
9 2,106 5,348 8,395 

16 2,859 7,416' 5,793 

11 1,609 4,092 2;866 
7 1,426 3,917 2,526 

10 1,169 3,226 2,427 

5 504 1.202 962 

2 48 130 123 

_4_320 932 485 

15424,105 62,432 47,910 3,772 



IS 

■sa 
s^ 

. 60 
O 3 

~197 
470 
687 
432 
339 
383 
242 
424 
243 
183 
167 

57 
6 

43 



■43 

-a 

Is 



<s 



a 






279 
823 
989 
740 
699 
516 
518 
722 
415 
3(i3 
820 
184 
21 
n 



6,566 




$2,861.22 

6,782.41 

7,578.21 

.6,054.69 

4,105.35 

4,216.02 

8,110.93 

4,934.15 

3,768.60 

1,941.44 

1,988.74 

614.75 

42.00 

504.60 

45,992 91 




$1,474.65 

4,588.75 
4,925.67 
8,81949 
8,142.70 
2,160.48 
3,684.20 
8,484 28 
2,980.68 
1,416.78 
1,416.94 

797.77 
70.67 

268.25 



83,660.16 



IS 

$2,548.48 
6,878.40 
9,827.86 
6,371.88 
6,189.72 
6,42608 
4,175.03 
6,818 28 
8,270.8$ 
2,372.86 
2,441.87 
1,021.75 
126.06 
667.49 



66,124.491 



1847.] 



MASSACHUSETTS. 



223 



IV. MASSACHUSETTS. 

GrOYEBNMEKT 

For the year ending on the 1st Wednesday in January ^ 1847. 



George N. BEiGGs,^of Pittsfield, 
John Reed, of Yarmouth, 



John G. Palfrey, 
Joseph Barrett, 
Henry K. Oliver, 

William Tnfts, 
Joseph Foster, 
Horace Mann, 



GoveiiMr^ 

Lieutenant- Governor ^ 
Sec. of the Commonvoeal^ 
Treasurer anil Receiver Oen., 
Adjutant General and Keeper 
of Military Stores^ 

1st Clerk, Sec. of Staters Office, 

1st Clerk, Treasuj^ei^s Office, 



of Cambridge, 
of Concord, 
of Salem, 



Salary. 
$2,500 
$4 a day. 
1,600 
1,600 



1,500 
1,200 
1,000 



of Boston, 



William B. Calhonn, of Worcester, 
Samnel H. Walley, of Boxbury, 
Charles Calhonn, of Boston, 
Charles W. Storey, Jr., of Boston, 



Sec. of the Board of Education, 1 ,500 
President of the Senate. 
Speaker of the House of Bep. 
Clerk of the Senate, $8 per day. 

Clerk of the House, $8 per day. 





Judiciary. 










Supreme Judicial Court. 








Liemnel Shaw, 


of Boston, 


Chief Justice, 






$3,500 


Samnel S. Wilde, 


of Boston, 


Justice, 






3,000 


Charles A. Dewey, 


of Northampton, 


do. 






3,000 


Samnel Hnbbard, 


of Boston, 


do. 






3,000 


Theron Metcalf, 


of Dedham, 


jReporter, 






300 


Albert H. Nelson, 


of Wobnm, 


District Attorney, 


N. 


Dist 


, 1,000 


John H. Clifford, 


of New Bedford, 


do. 


S. 


do. 


1,000 


Ezra Wilkinson, 


of Dedham, - 


do» 


Mid. 


do. 


800 


William Porter, Jr., 


of Lee, 


do. 


W. 


do. 


800 


Samnel D. Parker, 


of Boston, 


Attorney, Co. of Suffolk, 


2,900 



Court of Common Pleas* 



Daniel Wells, 


of Greenfield, 


Chief Justice, 


$2,100 


Pliny Merrick, 


of Worcester, 


Associate Justice, 


1,800 


Emery Washbnm, 


of Worcester, 


do. " 


1,800 


Joshna H. Ward, 


of Salem, 


do. 


1,800 


Lnther S. Cushing, 


of Boston, 


do. 


1,800 


U. G. 0. Colby. 


of New Bedford, 


do. 


1,800 



224 



HASBACHUSJeXTS. 



[1847. 



Probate Courts. 



Counties. 


Judges. 

Nymphas Marston, 
Wm. P. Walker, 


Salary. 


Regiaters. 


Salary. 


Barnstable, 


$400 


Timothy Reed, 


$500 


Berkshire, 


375 


Henry W. Bishop, 


500 


Bristol, 


Oliver Prescott, 


400 


Anselm Bassett, 


500 


Dukes, 


Theod. G. Mayhew, 


100 


B. C. Marchant, 


150 


Essex, 


Daniel A. White, 


600 


Nathaniel Lord, Jr., 


1,200 


Franklin, 


R. E. Newcomb, 


240 


Greo. Grennel, Jr., 


400 


Hampden, 


Oliver B. Morris, 


240 


Justice Willard, 


400 


Hampshire, 


Ithamar Conkcy, 


240 


Samuel F. Lyman, 


400 


Middlesex, 


Samuel P. P. Fay, 


700 


Isaac Fiske, 


1,200 


Nantucket, 


Samuel Mitchell, 


200 


Gebrge Cobb, 


300 


Norfolk, 


Sherman Leland, 


400 


Jonadian H. Cobb, 


-600 


Plymouth, 


Aaron Hobart, 


350 


Jacob H. Loud, 


600 


Suffolk, 


Willard Phillips, 


800 


H. M. Willis, 


2,000 


Worcester, 


Benj. F. Thomas, 


.600 


Charles G. Prentiss, 


1,200 



Police Court of Boston. 
Abel Cashing, Ja's C. Merrill, John G. Rogers, Justices^ salary, $1,500 each. 



Finances. 

Balance in the Treasury, January 1, 1845, 
The ordinary receipts in 1845, exclusive of money borrowed, 
were, — from the Bank tax, . . $30,720.83 

Auction Tax, . . . 49,295.17 

State Tax, .... 70,717.75 

Attorney for Suffolk County, . . 9,447.90 

Proceeds of Lands in Maine, . . 2,567.80 

Dividends on Western Railroad stock, . 60,000.00 

Miscellaneous, . . . . 1,877.80 

Alien passengers, . . . ' 6,920.24 

Total of ordinary receipts. 
The expenditures in 1845 for ordinary purposes were. 

Cash on hand for ordinary purposes, January 1, 1846, 

Indebtedness of tlue Commonwealth^ January 1, 1846. 

. $37,140.00 

7,075.00 

. 995,000.00 



$10,677.59 



516,225.08 
511,193.02 

$5,032.06 



Five per cent, stock, due 1 846, 

Npte to Phoenix Bank, and interest on it, 

Western Railroad assessments. 

Total for all pui-poses, 
Credit of the State loaned to railroads, 

Total liabilities of the State, 



Principal Expenditures in 1845. 

Pay of the Council, Senate, and Representatives, 
Salaries established by law, 



$1,039,215.00 
5,049,555.56 

6,088.770.56 



$61,808.00 
64,766.25 



1847.] 



MASSACHUSETTS. 



225 



Balances to Qounty Treasurers, 

Militia services, ..... 
Support of paupers, military and other accounts, . 
Interest on State Stock, and temporary loans, 
Interest on Western Railroad Stock loan, 
Miscellaneous, $12,378.26 : State Printing, $14 180.23, . 
Scrip of 1842 pwd off, . . . 

Asylum for Blind, $7,777.55 ; for Deaf and Dumb, $5,209.22, 
Agricult Societies, $5,964.60 ; Normal Schools, $7,665.00, 



$51,202.87 
28,757.00 
76,831.30 
9,585 83 
49,750.00 
26,558.49 
46,550.00 
12,986.77 
13,629.60 



Stocks and various Funds belonging to the Commonwealih, 

10,000 shares Western Railroad Stock, . . $1,000,000.00 

Notes, Stocks, $31,456.17 ; School Fund for Indians, 2,500.00, 33,956.17 

Massachusetts School Fund, 

Charles River and Warren Bridge Fund, 

Western Railroad Loan Sinking Fund, (in trust,) 



Western Railroad Stock Sinking Fund, 
Total, 



810,493.60 

27,939.35 

290,610.61 

359,141.25 



$2,522,140.98 



Statistics of Ckime. 
TcMe showing the number of prosecutions^ convictions, ^c, in the year 1845, in 
Massachusetts. The population, in 1840, was 737,699. 



Offences. 


i 

20 
175 

45 

440 

1,599 

2,279 


i 

1 

• 

o 

11 

78 

18 

249 

682 

1,038 


1 

• 


13 

7 

33 
56 


.<« 

l\ 

Pi a 
d 

84 

21 

154 

848 


Proportion, of 
prosecutions to 
population. 


Proportion of 
convictions to 
population. 


Against the person, feloniously,* 
Against the person, not felonioiiBly,t 
Against property, with violence,1: 
Against property, without violence ,|| 
Other offences,^ 


1 to 36,886 
1 to 4,215 
1 to 16,393 
1 to 1,676 
1 to 461 


1 to 67.064 
1 to 9,458 
1 to 40,982 
1 to 2,950 
1 to 1,082 


Total, 


1 109 


1,111 


1 to 324 


1 to 711 



* Murder, rape, assault with knife cgr gun, and felonious assault, 
t Assault and battery. i % Riot, burglary, highway robbery and arson. 

II Larceny, cheating, counterfeiting, forgery, &c. 

^ Breaches of license and Sunday laws, keeping brothels, conspiracy, pei^jury, adultery, 
lewdness, gambling, &c. 

Of those convicted, 12 were sentenced to the Common Jail, 261 to Ijie 
House of Correction, and 79 to the State Prison. The remainder were fined. 



Staie Prison. — According to the report of the Warden, there were 287 
prisoners in the Massachusetts State Prison on the 30th September, 1845 ; 
96 having been received and 85 discharged during the year previous. Of 
these 223 were committed for offences against property, including burglary, 
larceny, counterfeiting, &c. ; 13 for arson and malicious burning ; and 37 for 
crimes against life and the person, including assaults of various kinds. 
There are 14 confined for life \ 1 for 35 years ; 1 for 20 years; and only 27 



226 



UASSACUU SETTS. 



[1847. 



for terms under 2 years. Of the whole number, 66 are foreigners, and 103 
natives of Massachusetts. There are 29 second comers and r4 third comers, 
and 1 each committed for the 4th, 5th and 6th time. There are 14 negroes 
and 17 mulattoes. The receipts — for labor and fees of admittance — were 
$31,801 ; and the expenses, $30,994, leaving a balance of income of $800. 



$1,085,200 
54,260 



Debt of Boston. — The total amount is 

The interest to be provided for is 

The rents of buildings, for which in part this debt was cre- 
ated, amount to . . . $53,869 

Intereston bonds for land sold, 6 per cent, on $378,143, 22,688 

76,557 

Making the income to exceed the interest, . 22,297 

The provisions for meeting the debt at maturity are equally satisfactory. 

The whole amount of the debt i^ . . . $1,085,200.00 

Cash to the credit of the Committee on the reduction of 

the Debt, . . . $120,894.68 

Bonds and mortgages for lands sold, . 378,143.79 

499,038.47 



Leaving a balance of . 

The principal part of the debt falls due in 1 854. 
In 1852, one item of the property for which the debt was created 

— the City wharf — with the stores upon it, reverts to the 

city ; its estimated value is 
or more than sufficient, if sold, to pay the balance. 



$586,161.53 



$600,000.00 



Abstract of the Returns of the Banks in Massachusetts for 1845. 



Due from the Banks. 



Capital stock paid in, 
Bills in circulation of $5 and upwards, 
Bills in circulation less than $5, 
Net profits on hand. 
Balances due to other banks. 
Cash deposited, 

Ca£h deposited bearing interest. 
Total due from the banks, 

Resoitrees of the Banks. 

Specie, 

Ileal estate, . 

Bills of other banks in this State, 

Bills of other banks elsewhere. 

Balances due from other banks, 

Debts due, including notes, bills of ex- 
change, and all stocks, . 
Total of the resources, . 

Amount of the dividends for the j^ear. 

Amount of reserved profits, 



24 Banks in 
Boston. 



80 Banks out 
of Boston. 



$18,030,000 
5,252,634 

668,614 
1,201,134 
4,865,678 
8,809,626 

922,641 



Total,104 Banks 



00 
00 
69 
18 
54 
34 

39,750,228 75 



2,773,930 10 
697,616 11 

2,883,003 66 
346,309 00 

2,603,482 91 

_30,946,886_97 

39,750,228 75 

1,059,860 00 

923,610 06 



00, $12,940,000 00 $30,970,000 00 

^"^ ' 7,045,245 75 12,297,879 76 

1,373.192 25 2,041,806 25 

709;331 05 1,910,465 74 

180,442 67 5,046,120 85 

2,a58.607 37 11,668,133 91 

160;577 22 1,083.218 66 



25,267,396 31 



583,974 25 

400,353 19 

229,958 08 

50,848 34 

2,299,424 74 

21,702,842^1 

26,267,396 31 
770,690 00 
595,663 75 



65,017,625 06 



3,357,904 35 

1,097,969 30 

2,612,961 74 

397,152 34 

4,902,907 66 

62,648,729 68 



65,017,625 06 
1,830,540 00 
1,619,063 81 



Aggregate Dividends of Banks in Boston for the year, a fraction over 6 4-100 per cent. 
" " " " in Oct., 1846, " " 3 21-100" « 

" " « out of " for the year, " « 5 95-100" « 

" " " " « Oct., 1845, " " 8 9-100" " 



1847.] 



RHODE ISLAITD. 



227 



IxrLUENCE OF Occupation on Longevity. 

[From the Registration of Deaths in Massachusetts from 1842 to 1845.] 



Occupations. 



Professional men, 

Merchants, 

Agriculturists, 

Public officers, 

Mechanics, 

Laborers, 

teamen, 

Paupers, 

Females^ 



Total and averages, 



1842. 



I 



54 

78 
660 

41 
452 
195 
192 

15 



1,687 



1843. 



I 



75 
d3 

706 
29 
484 
179 
207 
32 



1,805 



.o 



82 

75 

663 

25 

452 

182 

162 

35 

19 



1,695 



1844. 



-S 






9 



9> 



^ 



3,549, 
4,056 

42,447 
1,017 

20,629 

9,346 

6,500 

2,482l 

729. 



43.28 
54.08 
64.02 
40.68 
45.63 
5118 
4012 
70.91 
38 36 



90,725 1 53.54 



»4 

.a 



62 

90 

645 

35 

477 

219 

145 

5 

264 



1845. 



I 



2,724 

4,403 
39,869 

1,544 
22,398 
10,690 

6,206 

408 

12,215 



1,942 100,457 



11 



43.93 
48.92 
61.81 
44.11 
46.96 
48.81 
42.80 
81.60 
46.32 



51.72 



V. RHODE ISLAND. 

Government 
For the year ending the Ist Tuesday in Mciy^ 1847. 



Byron Diman, 
Elisha Harris, 
Henry Bowen, 
Stephen Cahoone, 
Joseph M. Blake, 
Henry Barnard, 



of Bristol, 
of Coventry, 
of Providence, 
of Newport, 
of Bristol, 
of Providence, 



Salary. 
Governor^ $400 

Lieutenant Governor^ 200 

Secretary of State, $750 and fees. 
General Treasurer, 500 

Attorney- General, Fees. 

ConCr of Public Schools, 1,500 



These ofScers, and the Senators and Bepresentatlves, are elected annu- 
ally, on the 1st "Wednesday of April, for the year commencing 1st Tuesday 
of May. The Commissioner of Schools is appointed by the Governor. The 
Senate consists of the Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, and one Senator from 
each of ilie thirty-one towns in the State. The House of Representatives 
consists of 69 members. 

Judiciary. 



Supreme Court. 



Job Durfee, 
Levi Haile, 
William R. Staples, 
George A. Brayton, 



of Tiverton, 
of Warren, 
of Providence, 
of Warwick, 



Chief Justice, 
Associate Justice, 

do. 

do. 



Salary. 

Entries and $650 

do. 550 

do. 550 

do. 550 



228 



BHODE ISLAKD. 



[1847. 



The Judges of the Supreme Court hold their offices until ihey are re- 
moved by a resolution passed by both Houses of the Assembly, and voted 
for by a majority of the members elected to each House. The Court of 
Common Pleas in each of the five counties consists of a Justice of the Su- 
preme Court, who sits as Chief Justice, and two Associate Justices, who are 
elected for each county. 



Finances, 
For the year ending April 30, 1846. 



Receipts. 

Balance in April, 1845, 
Withdrawn from fund, 
Fines, Courts, &c.. 
Militia tax and pedlers. 
Bank tax, 

Interest on Deposit Fun^, 
Int. on School Fund stock, 
Pawtucket turnpike. 
Miscellaneous, 
Tax on insurance. 
Increased capital of banks, 
Money hired. 



$12,419 

10,000j 

3,089 

5,848 

25,492 

12,367 

2,986 

2,500 

2,830 

1,765 

2,808 

25,000 



$107,104 



Expenditures. 

Salaries, $3,950 
Senators and Representatives, 4,219 

Courts of law, 11,080 

Militia, 1,685 

Accounts allowed, 11,850 

Paid money hired, 25,000 

Miscellaneous, 3,441 
Commissioner of schools, ' 1,500 

Public schools, 25,000 

State Prison, 5,585 

Balance in May, 1846, 13,794 

$107,104 



Militia Tax. — By law a commutation tax of fifty cents is assessed upon 
every person liable to do military duty who does not choose to equip him- 
self and perform the duty required. The avails of this tax are divided 
among those who volunteer to perform the duty. 

Bank Tax. Every bank is required to pay a tax of 25 cents on every 
$100 of capital paid in, and two per cent, on the amount of any increase of 
its capital. 

Deposit Fundj or TJ. S. Surplus Revenue. From Report of May, 1846. 

$229,567.84 

48.18 



Invested in bank and other security, 
In hands of commissioners. 
Borrowed by State, Jan. 7, 1840, to pay balance 6f 

State Prison debt, 

June, 1842, for State purposes, 

Oct. 1842, 

Jan. 1843, 

June, 1843, 

May, 1845, 



ft 


ic 


C( 


u 


(( 


ct 


(C 


(( 


f( 


C( 



(f 
u 
u 
f( 



(( 
a 

C( 



$29,526.49 
50,000.00 
28,192.72 
25,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 



152,719.21 



Whole amount of fund, 



$382,.335.23 



1847.] 



RHODE ISLAND. 



229 



2bble showing the amount paid hy the several toums for the support of 
schools, and their total expenses for aU town purposes whatsoever. 
Prepared hy Henry Barnard, Esq, 



TOWOB. 


For publie schools. 


For 
high- 
ways. 

$1,200 
800 
600 
1,000 
700 
102 
126 

4,527 

700 
450 
300 


For Poor. 


1844-6. 


1843-4. 


From 

State. 


From 
town 
tax. 


Registry 

tax 

1844. 


Money 
besides 
farm or 
fund. 


Cost of 
farm. 

$9,000 
4,000 

4,100 
4,000 

21,100 

6,000 
6,000 

11,000 

80,000 
3,600 
7,000 
8,000 

3,700 
102,800 

8,000 


Am'tof 

tax 

voted. 


Am't of 

town 

exposes. 


Newport Co, 

Newport, 

Portsmouth, 

Bfiddletown, 

Tiverton, 

little Compton, 

New Shoreham, 


$1,766 59 
374 12 
198 89 
808 72 
323 21 
66 33 
281 17 

8,818 68 

818 67 

467 89 

126 66 

1,403 02 

6,057 42 
982 82 
1,168 09 
2,176 28 
469 06 
661 18 
641 45 
963 10 
689 95 
681 26 


$1,000 
600 


$231 
66 
40 
124 
15 
16 
13 


$2,400 
200 
376 
139 
400 
300 
250 


$9,500 
'500 
500 
1,600 
500 
307 
660 


$14,821 
1,000 
476 
1,000 
600 
425 
700 

18,922 

3,600 

8,500 

781 


Total, 

Bristol Co, 
Bristol, 
Warren, 
Barrington, 


1,600 

860 
860 
100 


605 

8 

46 
15 


4,065 

200 
280 
350 


13,357 

3,500 

3,100 

450 


Total, 

Providence Co, 

Providence, 

N. Providence, 

Cnmberland, 

Smithlleld, 

Buirillville, 

Glocester, 

Foster, 

Scitoate, 

Johnston, 

Cranston, 


1,300 

17,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

300 

400 

800 

400 
500 

21,900 
600 


64 

920 
164 
483 
708 
124 
73 
64 
200 
127 
177 


1,460 

13,000 

900 

2,000 

3,000 

1,000 

850 

1,000 

1,000 

800 

1,200 


830 

4,736 
1,052 
1,217 

850 
389 
705 
672 
1,600 
517 
900 


7,050 

81,186 
3,500 
3,500 
3,000 
800 
1,460 
1,000 
2,100 
1,600 
2,6D0 


7,781 

74,173 
3,600 
6,001 
3,000 
1,800 
1,031 
1,080 
2,100 
3,092 
2,750 

97,527 

8,295 
664 

600 
2,400 

6,849 

776 
646 

1,200 
885 
626 
578 

1,200 


Total, 

Jient Co. 
Warwick, 
£. Gieenwicta, 
W. Greenwich, 
Coventry, 


13,179 56 

1,556 86 
830 44 
836 35 
817 91 


3,040 

184 

48 
40 
86 


24,760 

1,000 

1,000 
1,018 
1,000 


12,688 

600 
501 
810 

700 


100,636 

2,000 
800 
890 

1,500 


Total, 

Washington Co. 
Westerly, 
Charlestown, 
S. Kingstown, 
N. Kingstown, 
Richmond, 
Exeter, 
Hopkinton, 


3,04106 

468 95 
250 94 
964 82 
666 81 
850 81 
446 73 
422 42 

3,666 98 
24,996 16 


600 
800 


857 

58 
89 
100 
206 
68 
60 
69 

589 
4,565 


4,018 

795 

600 
1,633 
1,349 
600 
300 
627 

5,704 
40,449 


2,011 

413 

397 
600 
500 
802 
203 
669 


8,000 


4,690 

700 

500 
1,300 
549 
600 
400 
600 

4,649 
130,282 


Total, 

Aggregate fbr 
State, 


300 
26,600 


2,984 

• 

22,628 


187,400 


5,760 
136,839 



PttWic Schools. -^ The State has a school fund, invested in bank stock, of 
$51,300. By an act passed 1 836, the interest of this State*s part of the Uni- 
ted States snrplos revenne, (commonly called the Deposit Fund,) was set 
apart for public schools. $25,000 is annually paid from the State treasury 

for schools, and each town has this vear, (1846,) according to the reqnisi- 

20 



230 



CONNECTICUT. 



[1847. 



tioDS of the revised school law, TOted to raise by tax one third as mach as 
they receive from the State, and many of the towns raise a much larger 
sum. The amount expended for schools in 1844, (exclusive of academies 
and private schools,) was over $54,000. The amount this year will he 
larger by several thousand dollars. H. Barnard, Esq., late superintend- 
ent of the public schools of Connecticut, is now the Rhode Island com- 
missioner of public schools. For several years past great exertions have 
been made in improving the schools, and a very large sum has been expend- 
ed in erecting district school houses and repairing old ones. 

State Prison. — The number of convicts in the State Prison in October, 
1845, was 17, of whom only 10 were natives of Rhode Island j 9 were re- 
ceived, 6 discharged, 3 were set free by the General Assembly, and 1 died. 
Profits of the labor of the convicts during the year, $2,525.15, being about 
$1,500 less than in the former year. 



Banks in Rhode Island in May^ 1846. 



Dr, 



ImbUities, 



Capital stock, $10,548,690 50 

Bills in circulation, 2,907,490 96 

Deposits on interest, 269,948 12 

Deposits not on interest, 1,078,913 88 
Debts due from banks, 757,058 14 
Dividends unpaid, 26,005 72 

Net profits on hand, 510,144 48 



Total liabilities, $16,098,251 80 



Suspended paper, $169,917 58 

Reserved profits, 297,552 07 

Loaned on pledged stock, 352,276 04 
Debts due and not paid, 197,854 00 



Resources, 



Cn 



Debts due from directors, $712,614 23 
Other stockholders, 563,387 60 

From all others, 12,846,970 53 



Total discounts. 
Specie, 

Bills of other banks. 
Deposits in other banks, 
Stock in the banks. 
Bank and other stocks, 
Real estate, 
Furniture, &c., 



14,122,972 36 
280,470 67 
460,753 11 
694,039 18 
48,485 83 
202,048 92 
259,704 80 
29,776 93 



$16,098,251 80 



VI. COKNECTICUT. 



Government 
For the year ending on the \st Wednesday in May^ 1847. 



Isaac Toitcet, 
Noyes Billings, 
Alonzo "W. Birge, 
Charles W. Bradley, 
Mason Cleveland, 



Salaiy. 
of Hartford, Governor^ $1,100 

of New London, Lieut Gov. and Pres, Senate^ 300 
of Coventry, Treasurer ^ 1,000 

of New Haven, Secretary, $84 and fees, 

of Hampton, Oymptrdler^ 1,000 



1847.] 



CONNECTICUT. 



231 



Seth P. Beers, of Litchfield, Conmissioner of the School Fund^ and 

SupH of Schools, $1,250 and expenses. 

Samuel Ingham, President pro tern, of the Senate, 

Cyrus H. Beardsley, Speaker of the House, 
Chajles R. IngersoU, Cleric of the House. 
Alfred A. Bumham, Clerk of the Senate, 





Judiciary. 








Supreme and Superior 


■ Court. 


Salary 


Thomas S. Williams, 


of Hartford, 


Chief Justice, 


$1,300 


Samuel Church, 


of Salisbury, 


Associate Justice, 


1,250 


Henry M. Waite, 


of Lyme, 


do. 


1,250 


William L. Storrs, 


of Middletown, 


do. 


1,250 


Joel Hinman, 


of Waterbury, 


do. 


1,250 


Thomas Day, 


of Hartford, 


Reporter, 


350 



A term of the Superior Court is held by one judge twice annually, in 
each county of the State, and the Supreme Court, constituted of the five 
judges, meets annually in each county. The judges of this Court hold their 
offices until seventy years of age. 

County Court. — A County Court is held by one Judge three times each 
year, in the several counties. The Judges of this Court are appointed an- 
nually by the Legislature. 

The Superior and County Courts have civil, criminal, and equity juris- 
diction, and, to a large extent, concurrent and original jurisdiction. In all 
civil actions where the damages, or matter in dispute, exceed $35, the 
County Court has jurisdiction, and the Superior in all cases where the dam- 
ages, or matter in dispute, exceed $70. The County Court has exclusive 
jurisdiction of breaches of the peace, not cognizable by Justices, and concur- 
rent jurisdiction with the Superior Court in all other criminal cases, except 
where the punishment is death, or imprisonment for life, in which latter 
cases, the Superior Court has exclusive jurisdiction. In civil cases, appeals 
lie in all cases fi^m the County to the Superior Court, where the matter in 
dispute exceeds the sum of $70. 



Finances fob 1845-*46. 



Principal Receipts. 

On hand, April 1, 1845, $25,300.89 
State tax, 44,397.52 

Dividend on bank stock, 32,721 .50 
Forfeited bonds and costs, 3,562.71 
State Prison, 7,000.00 

Miscellaneous, 818.48 



Principal Expenditures, 



General Assembly, 

Salaries of officers. 

Contingent expenses, 

Deaf and dumb, insane, 

Judicial expenses. 

Paupers and Quartermaster, 3,224.51 

Miscellaneous, 8,318.14 

On hand, April 1, 1846, 14,704.73 



$18,451.01 

11,934.00 

10,249.49 

9,816.85 

33,911.22 



232 



CONNSCTICUT. 



[1847. 



View of the different Branches of the School Fund^ in 1825, 1831, and 1846. 



In lx)nds and mortgages, 
Bank stock, 

Cnltivated lands and buildings. 
Wild lands, 

Stock in MaRsaclmsetts, 
Cash in the Treasury, 
Total, 


In 1825. 


InlSSl. 


In 1846. 


$1,432,299.40 

77,600.00 

167,020.19 

18,199.33 

2,159.59 

22,155.77 


$1,423,716.42 

99,950.00 

196,595.90 

164,144.60 

1,320.00 

17,230.95 


$1,642,083.22 

254,700.00 

74,590.00 

66,932.71 

31,579.08 


1,719,434.33 


1,902,957.87 


2,069,885.01 



The number of children between 4 and 16 is 85,275, being 1,200 more 
than were returned last year. The amount of dividends to the schools this 
•year is $119,385, and has exceeded that of any former year by about $1,650. 
The number of school societies in the State is 215; school districts, 1,644. 

Statistics of Connecticut for the year etiding October ^ 1845. 





Talue. 


Hands 

empl'd. 

6,362 


■% 


Talue. 


Hands 

empl'd. 


Cotton goods. 


$8,028,826 


Combs, 


248,688 


262 


Woollen goods, 


8,280,575 


2,149 


Whale fishery, 


1,804,818 


8,608 


Paper, 


1,186,302 


659 


Cod, shad, &o. fishery, 


461,773 


1,707 


Sewing silk, 


178,382 


272 


Hats, caps, &c., 


921,806 


1,461 


Leather manu&ctured, 


735,827 


518 


Iron castings, 


476,460 


686 


Carpets, 


597,028 


946 


Hooks and eyes. 


111,600 


208 


Clocks, 


771,116 


656 


Pig iron, 


272,000 


862 


Coaches and wagons, 


1,222,091 


1,606 


Jewelry, 


206,770 


175 


Machinery, 


868,860 


436 


MisoeUaneons manufiko's, 


4,472,800 


7,490 


Brass articles, 


1,126,494 


608 


Saddles, trunks, &c., 


547,990 


580 


Axes, hatchets, &c., 


268,656 


302 


Tinware, 


487,810 


414 


Boots and shoes, 


1,741,920 14,918 


Mechanics' tools. 


154,980 


287 


Bricks, 


113,060 


310 


Vessels btdlt, 


888,67S 


466 


Buttons, 


428,762 


687 


Firewood, 


569,284 


1,488 


Chairs and famitnre, 


818,201 


478 









The value of agrictiltural productions and live stock during the same year 
are given as follows: Of butter made, $918,839; of cheese, $334,451; of 
hay raised, $4,212,725; of Indian com, $1,183,159 ; of potatoes, $1,115,377; 
of rye, $495,080; of wheat, $38,633 ; of tobacco, $243,805 ; of buckwheat, 
$88,566 ; of oats, $571,434 ; of neat cattle, $2,808,352 ; of horses, $1,249,521 ; 
of sheep, $315,004; of swme, $1,144,756. 



1847.] NBW TO&K. 233 

Vn. NEW YORK. 
Government. 

Salary. 
Silas Weight, Governor, fterm expires Jan 1, 1847,) $4,000 

Addison Gaidner, i ^^- ^' "^F^' ^^'' W. »6 ) 

( a day and mileage. ) 

Azariah C. Flagg, GompiroUer, 2,500 

Nath'l S. Benton, Sec. State and Superint. Common Schools, 2,500 

Philip Phelps, Deputy ComptroUer, 1,500 

Thomas Farrington, Treasurer, 1,500 

John F. Bacon, Deputy Treasurer, 1,300 

John Van Buren, Attorney General^ 1,000 

Hugh Halsey, Surveyor General, 1,000 

Henry Storms, Commissary General. 

Jonas Earll, Jr. of Syracuse, Act. Canal Commis. (Prest,) 1 ,600 

Daniel P. Bissell, of Utica, do. do. 1,600 

Stephen Clark, of Moscow, do. do. 1,600 

Nathaniel Jones, of Newburgh, Non-act. do. do. 

Legislature. — The Senate consists of 32 members, who are elected for 4 
years, 8 being chosen annually. Pay, $3 a day, and $3 for every 20 miles 
of travel. There are eight Senatorial Districts, each electing four Senators 
for a term of four years, one being chosen every year. 

The House of Assembly consists of 128 .members. Pay, the same as in 
the Senate. 

JUDICIAET. 

1. Court for the Trial of Impeachments and the Correction of Errors. 

This is a Court of dernier resort upon appeals from the Chancellor and 
Writs of Error from the higher court ; it has no original jurisdiction ex- 
cept in cases of Impeachment. It is composed of the Lieut.-Governor, 
(who is President of the Court,) the Senators, the Chancellor, and the 
Justices of the Supreme Court. Nineteen members form a quorum for 
the hearing of arguments, and a majority of that number (ten) may de- 
cide a case, although a quorum d<r not vote. 'Three terms may be held 
each year, one of wliich must Jk; at Albany j the others are usually Jbeld 
at the city of New York, and some western town. The compensation is 
the same as for members of the Legislature, mileage being allowed for 
each term of the Court. The Chancellor and Justices of the Supreme 
Court are not permitted to vote in the reviewal of the decisions of their 
respective Courts. The Court is at present (1846) constituted as follows 

20* 



1 



34 NEW YORK. 

Addison Gardiner, JUeutenamt Governor and President, 
let District, 



[1847. 



John A. Lett, 
David R. F. Jones, 
George Folsom, 
Edward Sanford. 



2d District. 

Abraham Deyo, 
Joshua B. Smith, 
Robert Denniston, 
Saxton Smith. 

Sd District. 

John C. Wright, 
Steph. C. Johnson, 
John F. Beekman, 
Wm. H. Van Schoonhoven. 

Isaac R. Elwood, Clerk. 



4th District. 

m 

Tho*s B. Mitchell, 
Orville Clark, 
Augastos C. Hand, 
Samuel Young. 

5th District. 

Carlos P. Scovil, 
Thomas Barlow, 
Enoch B. Talcott, 
Joshua A. Spencer. 

M District. 



C. T. Chamberlain, 
Clark Bumham, 
Geo. D. Beers, 
Tho's J. Wheeler. 



7th District, 

John Porter, 
Albert Lester, 
H. J. Sedgwick, 
Ridi. H. Williams. 

Sth District 

Han-ey Putnam, 
Fred. F. Backus, 
Carlos Emmons, 
Gideon Hard. 

Chancellor. 

R. H. Walworth. 

Justices S. Court. 



Greene C. Bronson 
Samuel Beardsley, 
Freeborn G. Jewett 

Charles Bryan, Sergeant at Arms. 



2. Court of CJiancery. 

Salary. 

Reuben H. Walworth, of Saratoga Springs, Chancellor, $3,000 

John M. Davison, of Albany, Register, 2,500 

[and $2,500 for clerk hire and office expenses 
Hiram Walworth, of New York, Assistant Register, 3,000 

[and $5,000 for clerk hire and office expenses. 
Alonzo C. Paige, of Schenectady, Reporter, 500 

Lewis H. Sanford, of N. York, 1st Circuit, Vice- Chan. Fees and $2,000 
Anthony L. Robertson, do. 1st Circuit, -4s«stan/ Vice- CAan. 2,500 

F. Whittlesey, of Rochester, 8ih Circuit, Vtce-Chancdlor, 1,600 

[The Circuit Judges in the other Circuits are Vice-Chancellors for their 
respective Circuits.] 

3. Supreme Court. 

Greene C. Bronson, of Albany, 

Samuel Beardsley, of Utica, ^ 

Freeborn G. Jewett, of Skeneateles, 

Hiram Denio, of Utica, 

Four law terms are held each year. Except in extraordinaiy cases, (as 
in the trial of McLeod, the GtaitLda, patriot,) this Court holds no nisi prius 
terms for jury trials. These are held by the Circuit Judges for the trial 
of questions of fact arising in the Supreme Court. 





Salary. 


Chief Justice, 


$3,000 


Associate Justice^ 


3,000 


do. 


3,000 


Reporter, 


500 



1847.] 



N£W TOBK. 



235 



4. Grctdt Ckfurts, which are also Courts of Oyer and Terminer^ and Geti- 
eral Gaol Ddioery, — There are eight Circuit Courts, and the circuits 
correspond, in territory and name, to the eight senate districts. There 
are two tienns annually for each County, exc^ in New York and Kings 
County, where the terms are more numerous. 



Residence. 
New York, 
Poughkeepsie, 
Delhi, 

Saratoga Springs, 
Hamilton, 
Elmira, 
Geneva, 
Lockport, 



5. Superior Couii of the City of New York. 



Judges. 


Circuits. 


John W.Kdmonds, 


1st Circuit, 


Seward Barcnio, 


2d « 


Amasa J. Parker, 


3d '' 


John Willard, 


4th " 


Philo Gridley. 
Hiram Gray, 


5th « 


6th " 


Bowen Whit-ing, 


7th « 


Nathan Dayton, 


8th « 



Salary. 

$1,600 
1,600 
1,600 
1,600 
1,600 
1,600 
1,600 
1,600 



Balarj. 

$2,500 
2,500 
2,500 



Samuel Jones, Chief Justice, 

Thomas J. Oakley, Associate Justice, 
Aaron Yanderpoel, do, 

Jesse Oakley, Clerk. 

6. Courts of Common Pleas. — Courts of Common Pleas are held in 
each county, consisting of five judges. The court for the city of New 
York has a first judge, and two assistant judges. 

7. Surrogates^ Courts, (or Courts of Probate,) of which there is one in 
each County. Charles McVean, Surrogate for New York Co, 



FINANCES. 

Debt of the State, •— The total Canal Debt, on the 30th of September, 
1845, was $19,690,020.77; and the annual interest on this debt was 
$1,066,693.30. $14,449,737.23 of this debt is at 5 ;>£r c^it. interest; 
$1,481,782.00 at 6;>er cent.; and $3,647,136.00 at 7 pei^ cent. 

There is also the General Fund Debt, amounting to $585,549.24, on 
which the annual interest is 325,298.34. The State is liable also for 
$1,713,000.00 of stock issued on the faith of the State, and loaned to rail- 
road corporations. The aggregate debt, then, is $27,288,570.10. 
The whole sum charged for the support of government dur- 
ing the year ending Sept 30th, 1845, is . . . $1,306,208.43 
Receipts in this year, including the mill tax, and excluding 
temporary loans, were 1,055,166.87 

Deficit in ordinaiy receipts to pay expenses, $251,041.56 

The mill tax amounts to $548,504.09. There has been paid, during the 

fiscal year, for aid to the sherifis in enforcing the laws in the counties of 



236 



NSW TOKX. 



[1847. 



Colombia, Delaware, Schc^arie, Ulster and Cattaraugiu, a total sum of 
$64,391.19; to the several State prisoiis, $89,203.84 ; bounty on coal, &c. 
*77,000 ; on salt, $99,379.77. 

The amount of capital and annual reyenue of the several funds appro- 
priated to the purposes of education, are as follows, viz : 



Common School Fund, 
United States Deposit Fund, 
Literature Fund, 



Capital. 
$2,090,632 41 
4,014,520 71 
268 ,990 57 

6,374,143 69 



Bevenne. 
$113,458 87 
280,272 55 
19,164 87 

412,896 29 

$279,364 02 

55,876 38 

10,000 00 

19,000 00 

2,000 00 

. 2,300 00 

2,800 00 

14,089 78 

$385,430 18 



This annual revenue is appropriated as follows, viz : 
Common schools, .... 

Academies, .... 

Normal School, ..... 
University of New York, Geneva and Hamilton Colleges, 
Albany Medical College, and New York Eye Infirmary, 
Genesee Wesleyan Seminary, . 

District School Journal, .... 
Deputy superintendents of common schools, 

There has also been paid directly from the Treasury the 
following sunis, viz : 

For the support and instruction of deaf and 

dumb, .... $21,930 69 

For the support and instruction of blind, 16,132 04 

' 38,062 73 

Paid in 1845, for purposes of education, . . $423,492 91 

The annual interest on the cost of the canals ($30,723,335 94) at 5J 
per cent., the average paid on the present debt, is . $1,689,783 47 

The net revenue from all the State canals, after deducting 
the expenses of collection and superintendence, is . 1,673,295 36 

Statement of all the Chartered Banks of New York for the last four years. 





January 1, 1843. 
85 HmkB, 


Nov. 1, 1843. 

86 Banks and 

2 branches. 


Nov. 1, 1844. 
88 BankR and 
2 branches. 


Nov. 1, 1846. 

81 Banks and 

2 branches. 


Capital, 
Circulation, 
Canal Fund, 
Deposits, 
Due Banks, 

Loans and disc. 
Stocks, 
Specie, 
Bank notes. 
Cash items. 
Due from banks, 


$32,901,280 

9,734,465 

1,464,496 

15,109,164 

10,736,602 

44,276,546 
4,843,320 
6,738,389 
3,890,677 
2,248,202 
3,726,370 


$32,391,460 

13,850,334 

1,111,357 

22,407,761 

12,203,614 

51,711,666 
6,055,938 
9,953,270 
3,537,600 
2,526,158 
8,477,399 


$31,391,460 

15,114,686 

1,214,790 

21,979,071 

11,210,760 

57,285,160 
4,170,935 
6,978,055 
1,971,208 
4,511,316 
7,173.523 


$30,491,460 

15,831,058 

1,244,524 

23,104,678 

10,048,355 

57,734,989 
4,227,191 
6,856,718 
1,807,991 
4,469,853 
7,927,610 



1847.] 



MfiW YORK. 



237 



Statement of tixty-seven Free Banks on thejirst day of November, 1845. 



Resources, 




Iioans and discounts, . 


$17,442,022 


Real estate, 


482,844 


Bonds and mortgages, . 


2,072,003 


Stocks and notes, 


6,735,631 


Loss and expense, 


120,266 


OverdraftB, 


26,586 


Specie, 


2,027,827 


Cash items. 


1,477,532 


Bills of solvent banks. 


464,695 


Bills of suspended banks, 


658 


Due banks, 


1,606,556 




32,456,620 



Liabilities. 




Capital, 


$12,353,968 


Profits, . 


1,148,896 


Circulation, . 


5,544,311 


Due State Treasurer, 


141,592 


Due Canal Fund, 


336,806 


Due depositors. 


8,669,313 


Due individuals, 


316,504 


Due banks. 


2,781,499 


Due U. States Treasurer, 


907,792 


Other amounts, 


255,939 




32,456,620 



Chartered and Freo Banks. 

• 


Feb. 1, 1846. 


May 1, 1846. 


Aug. 1846. 


Loans and discounts, 


$71,897,570 


$72,591,431 


$68,652,486 


Stocks, 


11,050,464 


10,989,417 


10,608,162 


Specie, . 


8,361,383 


8,171,624 


8,673,309 


Cash items, . 


6,370,302 


5,839,700 


4,941,221 


Bank notes. 


2,580,711 


2.851,351 


2,348,061 


Due from banks, 


10,181,277 


8,850,126 


8,196,869 


Capital, 


42,956,489 


42,829,014 


42,160,458 


Circulation, . 


21,159,987 


20,816,492 


17,885,486 


Deposits, 


29,654,401 


30,868,377 


28,110,553 


Due to banks. 


14,843,359 


11,823,794 


13,463,962 


Due Canal Fund, . 


896,848 


354,364 


433,751 


Due U. S. Treasury, . 


2,580,711 


3,493,622 


2,115,640 



It will be seen that, since the last quarterly statement, the loans and dis- 
counts hare decreased nearly four millions of dollars (3,938,945 ;) that the 
specie has increased $501,685; the cash items decreased $898,479, the 
amount due from banks $653,257, circulation nearly three millions 
(2,931,006,) the individual deposits $2,758,824, and the United States 
government deposits (1,377,982. 

General Fund in 1846. 



Chief Items of "Receipt, 



Auction duty. 
Salt duty. 

Register and Clerk fees, 
State tax, . 7 

Premium on bonds. 
Arrears of taxes, 
Bedemption of lands, 
Free banks, for expenses. 
Interest on deposits, 
Interest on arrears. 
Foreign insurance. 



$176,198.62 

132 024.84 

33,571.90 

548,504.09 

10,753.50 

36,312.90 

71,768.79 

17,650.18 

5,842.29 

5,184.58 

2,675.38 



Of Expenditure, 

Salaries, . . $104,480.28 

Legislature, & conting't ex., 96,657.32 
Court of Errors, . 26,193.90 

Transporting convicts, 13,545.07 

Interest on debt, . 268,633.18 

State Printing, . 51,763.74 

Deaf, dumb, and blind, 28,062.73 

Commissary's dep't, . 14,733.37 
Hospital, and foreign poor, 32,500.00 
Bounty on coal, 73,525.41 

Expense of salt springs, 31,527.56 



CDonHga. 


Pop.lStt 


Pop 


1845. 


^, 


Fmula. 


,«.. 


SS^S" 


Fupan. 


AlbMJ-, 


6e,6e3 


77,268 


88,886 


82 


78 


'•SS 


821 


Allegsnj, 


40.976 


40.08* 


20,316 




64 


879 




BrcKrae,' 


ZiSS« 




908 


13,180 




14 




70 




28,872 




169 


16,477 










Cn,^"*™' 


6n,s3e 


4 


6B8 
54S 
689 


26,131 

is 


196 


59 


776 


16 
88 




£;t^ 


187 


CheDU^; 


40,785 


8 


900 


19,798 


'l2 




221 




CltolonT' 






,278 


16,075 


»3 


06 


*'768 


41 


Col^m4^ 


4S!262 




ll76 


20,908 












24,ti07 


2 


081 


12,682 


49 




140 






86,398 


8 


990 


18,829 


.61 


90 




«6 


DnKhMB, 


62^ 




124 


27,447 


"7 




1^7 


249 


Er«, 






635 


41,209 






8,874 








i 


102 




w 




1^1 


66 


FnitUii, 


18,618 




692 




109 




2,064 


40 


FnUon, 


18,049 




679 


9,160 






208 






69,687 


2 




16^ 






627 




0^^ 


804ie 


S 






ffiS 


84 


695 


133 




• 1^ 






ll034 




28 




15 




37377 


8 




19,098 








103 


Jslfe™™,' 


80,984 






83;324 


i76 




2,049 


147 


SS; 


47,618 






38,035 






13,998 


291 


17,830 




213 


10,442 






1,011 






86.140 




198 


16,783 






ns 




Ulditon, 


10,008 




987 


20.748 




16 




122 




64^ 






86477 


32 






379 


srs;" 


.&i 


t 


i 


41 


.1 


27 




1,957 


NlagsfB, 


ai,is2 


,660 


17,82; 










OMidE, 


85,810 


,778 


42,661 










Ononis 


87,911 


0,175 


35,830 


146 


12 




JS 


Ontario, 


48,601 


42^ 


21,620 








132 


Oruge, 


60,788 




25,924 










Orleam, 


26,m 


,816 


18,106 


89 




™i 


48 


O.»ego; 


48,619 


441 


24,897 






^^ 




Ot«go, 


49,B2S 


,609 


26,221 






475 




FntDun, 


12,826 


3,258 


6.768 


00 


09 




76 


Queens, 


80,324 


,849 


M,241 


m 




1,866 


547 














2;608 




S^' 


10,906 


;678 


6,088 


"6;e86 


08 




68 


Bodklmd, 


11^6 






6,406 


72 


1,039 


7 


8«S^ 


40,668 


4i;477 


20j^ 






'860 




achenacWj, 


17,887 








86 


443 


80 


Scbohwle, 


32^ 








...48 




65 


Sen™, 


24374 




12.6S3 


12|419 




464 


60 


9t.Li>b«i«, 


66,706 


,364 


81,781 


30,673 


u'm 


8,482 


261 




46^188 


^ 


26,742 


24,93; 


11)212 


664 


68 


iuffoUl,' 


82 469 


^79 


17,760 


16329 




740 






16629 


8,'727 


9,783 


8,M4 


ms 


620 




STL, 


30^7 


,468 


11^ 


10,986 


4,933 


148 


99 


87^ 


168 


19,121 




8669 


384 


63 


Ulil^,^ 


46S2a 


;907 


2^'0*4 


2S>3 


10,646 


1,529 




Wmen, 


13^422 


,908 


7,642 


7,266 


8,372 


168 


6 


WuhingtoB, 


0,080 


Sm 


30 446 


aoSM 


9,203 


''2S 


137 




42JB7 


,616 


21,865 


20,660 


9,848 


1,028 


68 


WM^«tar, 


48,686 


,678 


24,280 


33,348 


9,968 


2,491 


208 


Wjomiag, ' 




206 


18737 


13,468 


6767 


806 


69 


T^wT*' 


20.444 


;777 


10;447 


io;sao 

1593.153" 


4,922 
5Sr379 


163,717 


-.«1- 


3.428,867 


1«04,496 


1,3]1,342 



c„^ 


a™ or 

bmil 
Uisd. 


Ssr 


'^sr^ 


Amount of 


Total tua- 


taattonoti 
SlnluU'D 


iib«7.n 


806,eiS 


»16,60B,16 


•74,073 19 


8108^0140 


»in,a7S69 




Altaguij, 


760,977 


1,337,766 


14,92121 


16,783 73 


81,654 94 


7.8 


Broome,' 


121JB5 


2,087,167 


11,867 66 


6,954 26 


17,72182 






801,231 


3,036,316 


13,326 05 


15,826 36 


^'}^.i 




Cajugi, 


409,724 


9,760,06( 


25,04154 


11,924 01 


36,966 55 


SS 




846,20 


4,686,982 


18,018 66 


14,903 77 


82,822 33 


7.2 






2,484,634 


8,000 00 


6,071 76 


14,071 76 






Mo;iOI 


4183^266 


W0« 


10,92188 


26,992 28 


H 


Clinton, 


608,066 


I,6««,14 


3,654 o: 


10,982 64 


24,636 06 


14.8 


Columbia 


877 300 






14,46146 


46,584 82 




CoRUtnd? 


286^ 


2,174*018 


10^435 2: 


6^887 77 


16,333 0* 


7.6 




(874^ 


8,478,012 


5 274 5; 


8>J21 


28,876 79 




DulthuM,' 


484,79' 


18,784,944 


40,67104 


19,689 79 


69,260 83 




Erlt, ' 




11881969 


46 6S2 64 


18,260 92 


63,938 66 


54 


Franklin, 


l,OI7;6i»i 


1684 790 


^ii: 


8,610 66 


1?,02182 


10,1 


EB^iT^ 


^845,671 


1,483,136 


,988 78 


10,988 97 


20,977 75 




Fnllon, 


^080 


1^308.724 


,477 33 


10,183 88 


17,66116 


18.6 




28«,61W 


6,873,386 


15,896 23 


11,319 99 


27^16 22 






882 >3 


2,968,67; 


20,170 Ot 


8,235 76 


28,406 84 




HunllUn, 


816,077 


339,228 




9,600 87 


11,350 87 


88.1 




TTS^li* 


6,612,423 


!6'u72 7: 


12,698 07 


^&t 


6.7 


f^^,'" 


7SS,674 


6,586,66 


24,014 89 




48,21827 




^X 


(21,768 


80,760,472 


44,00000 


133,436 66 






960676 


676000 


39962 


8 406 36 


18:806 88 


83 




817,930 


BJi72;868 


30000 


16,413 04 


29,61301 


3.1 




890,171 


,490,38 


,038 6' 


11,72533 






Hooroa,' 


392,346 


1 351 488 


46 042 80 


20,912 82 




4.8 


Uoa«o^«T 


242,969 


8,690,27 


9,054 86 


14j065 99 




8.1 


N««YDtk, 


111,774 


239,996,61 


2,096,181 18 




2,098,19118 




Hli««., 


ka26 


^099 


^20^31 


^^S 


30,607 S 


63 


0»dd», 


730,61 


1 ,307389 


40,314 98 


103 21 


66/1819 






466,000 


16,640,164 


7 074 IB 


173 81 


46,36301) 




Ontario, 


388,668 


12^438 


23,34667 


534 3! 


36,18104 


2,8 


Orang., 


489,621 


1 ,819,430 


44:083 9. 




6^676 98 




Oclaoi, 


288,632 


761,064 


4,83306 


187 8; 


28,020 9! 




Osnio 


6B3,24I 


382 085 


20,20608 


>S«45 


42,172 4* 




CH«S, 


697 670 


408 040 


19^7847 


127 96 


83,407 42 


3.2 


PaOuun, 


138^79 


,929,368 


6,367 90 


157 60 


9,926 40 




Qneetn, 


I7«,3n 


r,668^ 


13,09007 


t0314 


^^?i 


H 




400,673 


12,624,268 


36,814 47 




60,692 22 


4.S 


Rkhm™d,tt 


21262 


,373,278 


. 6,60900 


186 91 


8,898 97 






102,640 


2^^ 


2^8 72 




6,134 90 


2.5 




1,738^ 


8^45^ 


23,486 OT 




48,366 39 


133 




'mW 


^MSill 


22,920 64 


16264 


86,483 28 






110,830 


2,739,421 


12 634 66 


SS 






Schobule, 


363,800 


,8Mie5 


9,410 44 


21,744 53 






B,n™, 


197 JOO 


674031 


14,43721 


ma 


21,004 65 






Suffolk, 


382,633 


,962,618 


13,62003 


146 41 


21,966 44 








899,000 


,172,41^ 


17 392 14 


199 87 


38,89161 


B 




Sum™', 


682,662 




9,736 80 




17,128 60 


11 




Tiogm 


306,670 




12,69137 


ai74 








ToSilkto., 


366,016 




9 760 0( 


182 74 




6 




DlMcr, 






31,667 92 


117 98 












'976;433 


7,670 76 


IB9I8 


11,829 88 






WuhUfton, 




6,901,847 


17^6 8. 


no 66 


31387 00 


Si 


W.JM. 


366,574 


6,818,633 


13,691 11 


186 36 




as 




280,192 


10,086,317 


22,740 41 


184 81 






Wjomfng.tt 


318,080 


3,662,732 




..,,120 29 




8.6 


Yitto, 


208,681 


4,207,986 












ir7,f265l9 


i«16,64«,0B6 


ta;ffil,256"16 


B94937180 


»4:i-7o-,^r95 


-SS9 — 



240 



KBW JJSBBBT. 



[1847. 



<( 



ti 



(( 



ft 



u 



i( 



(C 



Census Statistics reUxttng to Common Schools. 

Children between 5 and 16 years old in the State, 
attending common schools, 

private unincorporated schools, 
academies, high schools, &c., 
colleges and universities, 
Number of common schools, 
Cost of common school buildings, 
** " other improvements, 
" " real estate. 
No. of pupils on teachers' lists. 
Average daily attendance, 
No. of private and select schools. 
No. of pupils attending these schools, 
No. of volumes in district libraries,* 
Money paid for teachers' wages,* 

** " for libraries,* . 
No. of pupils attending less than 2 months,* 
" more than 2, and less than 4 months,* 
" more than 4, and less than 6 months,* 
Whole number attending less than 6 months,* 



tt 



ti 



664,520 
493.539 

« 

58,320 

13,679 

11,301 

10,70> 

$2,997,156 

$135,362 

$606,605 

463,069 

291,595 

1,569 

41,783 

1,145,250 

$572,677 

$95,573 

216,380 

197,255 

147,121 

560,766 



* From the School Superintendent's Report 



Vni. NEW JERSEY. 



GOYEBNMENT. 



Salary. 
Charles C. Stsatton, of Gloucester Co., Governor, (term of 

office expires, Jan. 1848,) $1,600 

Ch. G. McChesney, of Trenton, Secretary of State, Fees. 

Stacy A. Paxson, of Trenton, Treasurer, 1,000 

John C. Smallwood, of Glouc'r Co. President of the Senate, $4.00 a day. 

Lewis Howell, of Cumberl'd Co. Speaker of the Assembly, 4.00 a day. 

Daniel Dodd, Jr., of Essex Co. Clerk of the Senate, 3.50 a day. 

Adams C. Davis, of Hunterd'n Co. Clerk of the Assembly, 3.50 a day. 



JUDICIABT. 

Court of Errors and Appeals. — This Court is composed of the Chan- 



1847.7 ^^^ JEKSET. 241 

cellor, the judges of the Supreme Court, and six oUier judges, appointed 
by the Governor, with the consent of the SSnate, who hold office for six 
years, one judge vacating his seat each year, in rotation. The Court holds 
stated terms at Trenton on the third Tuesdays of January, April, July, and 
October. "^ 









Tenn expires 


Joseph Porter, 


of Gloucester Co., 


Judge* 


1852 


Jame& Speer, 


of Passaic Co., 


do. 


1851 


Aaron Hohertson, 


of Warren Co., 


do. 


1850 


Andrew Sinnickson, 


of Cumberland Co., 


do. 


1849 


Jonathan J. Spencer, 


of Burlington Co., 


do. 


1848 


Ferdinand S. Schenck, 


of Somerset Co., 


do. 


1847 



• Court of Chancery. — The Chancellor is appointed by the Governor, with 
the consent of the Senate, and holds his office for seven years. This Court 
holds four terms annually at Trenton, on the 3d Tuesdays in March, June, 
September, and December. 

Term expires. Salary. 

Oliver S. Halsted, of Newark, Chancellor, 1852 $1,800 & fees. 

Samuel R. Gummere, of Trenton, Clerk, 1850 Fees. 

Supreme Court, 

Term expires. Salary. 

Henry W. Greene, of Trenton, Chief Justice. 1 853 $1,500 & f. 

Ira C. Whitehead, of Morristown, ^ssocicrfe Jusftce, 1848 1.400 &f. 

James S. Nevius, of N. Brunswick, do. 1852 1,400 &f. 

Jos. F. Randolph, do. do. 1852 1,400 & f 

Tho's P. Carpenter, of Woodbury, do. 1852 1,400 & f. 

Abraham Browning, of Camden, Attorney Genercd, 1850 Fees & 80 

James Wilson, of Trenton, Clerk, 1847 Fees. 

Robert E. Spencer, of Mount Holly, importer, 1847 200 

Saml R. Gummere, of Trenton, Clhk in Chancery, 1850 Fees. 

The Judges are appointed by the Governor, with the consent of the 
Senate, and hold office for seven years. 

The Supreme Court holds four terms each year at Trenton, on the first 
Tuesdays in January, April, July, and October 5 and the judges of this 
court hold Circuit Courts and Courts of Oyer and Terminer four times 
a year in each county, except the counties of Atlantic and Cape May, in 
which two terms only are held. Inferior Courts of Common Pleas are 
held four times in a year in each county, by judges appointed by the 
liCgislature, for five years, who receive fees, but no salary, and the number 
of whom is limited to five in each county. The compensation of a judge 
ia not to be dimim'shed during his term. 

21 



242 KKW JBS8ST. [1847. 

COHMON SCHOOL6. 

Amount of the School Fund, January, 1846, . . $380,683 20 

Number of Districts returned, about . . . 1,000 

Number of children in the returned Districts, . . 74,915 

Of these, 41,752 have attended school during the year. 

There are 161 townships in the State, and about 1,630 Districts. 

From the returns it is estimated that there are 120,000 children in the 
state between 5 and 16 years old, and that nearly two thirds of these are 
sent to the public schools for some part of the year j but what portion of 
the remaining third are taught in private schools, and how many are left to 
grow up in ignorance, cannot be estimated. The schools in the reported 
districts have been kept open on an average about nine months of the 
year ; and the price of tuition averaged about $2 per quarter. The sum of 
$45,632 30 has been distributed to these districts, and by this it appears 
that about $90,000 are annually expended in the public schools ; one third 
of it being appropriated from the school fund, and the remainder being 
raised by tax, under the direfition of the people, at their town meetings. 

According to the township reports an average of $1.31 has been paid for 
each child sent to the public schools, and as the price of tuition averages 
$2 per quarter, it is estimated that though the schools have been kept open 
nine months of the year, the children have attended them on an average of 
only eight iveeks. 

Finances. 

Whole amount received in 1845, . . . $132,492 50 

Whole amount expended, . . . 127,213 52 



Chief itemB of Expenditure, 

Salaries, $13,645 95 

Legislature, 23,149 04 

Additions to State House, 22,585 95 
Lunatic Asylum, 13,278 34 

Debt paid to School Fund, 15,833 64 
Incidental expenses, 38,720 60 



Total, 127,213 52 



Chief sources of Income, 

On hand, $6,099 04. 
Dividends on Stocks, and 

Transit duties, &c., 63,861 12 

Temporary loans, 20,000 00 

State Tax, 32,535 50 

Sale of Governor's house, 4,626 66 

Bond of I. Southard, 5,370 18 



New Jersey Ijunatic Asylum, — The commissioners have selected a farm 
in Ewing, about two miles and a half from Trenton, as the site for the 
Lunatic Asylum about to be erected. The property purchased contains 
111 acres. The extreme length of the building will be four hundred and 
eighty feet, the width of the central part eighty-four feet, and of the wings 
thirty-nine feet. The central part is to be four stories high, and the wings 
three stories ; the foundation and external walls are to be of stone, and the 
whole covered with slate. The estimated cost is seventy-five thousand 
dollars. The building is calculated for the accommodation of two hundred 
patients. 



1847.] 



PENNSTLYANIA. 



243 



IX. PENNSYLVANIA. 



GOYEIIKICBNT. 



Francis B. Shunk, Govemor^term of office expires on the 3d 

Tuesday in Januaiy, 1848 J 
Jesse Miller, of Perry Co., Sec, of State^ and Superintendent 

of Common J^JijooUj 



Henry Petriken, of Centre Co., 
Ja's R. Snowden, of Venango Co., 
J. N. Purviance, of Butler Co., 
John Laporte, of Bradford Co., 
Thomas J. Rehrer, 
George W. Bowman, 
William S. Ross, of Luzerne Co., 
Findley Patterson, of Armstrong Co., 
James Bums, of Miflin Co., 

William B. Foster, Jr., of Bradford Co., 
Joshua Hartshome, of Chester Co., 



Deputy Secretary of State, 
State Treasurer^ 
Auditor General, 
Surveyor General, 
Deputy Surveyor General, 
Adjutant General, 
Speaker of the Senate. 
Speaker of the House. 

Canal Commissioners. 



Salary. 

$3,000 

1,700 
1,000 
1,400 
1,400 
1,200 
1,000 
300 



Judiciary. 
Supreme Cotitrt. 



Chief Justice, 
Associate Justice, 

do. 

do. 



Falary. 
$3,666.67 
2,400.00 
2,400.00 
1,600 00 



$300 and fees. 
Fees 
do. 
do. 



John B. Gibson, of Carlisle, 

Molton C. Rogers, of Lancaster, 

Thomas Sergeant, of Philadelphia, 

Thomas Bumside, of Centre Co., 

One Vacancy. 

John M. Read, of Philadelphia, Attorney Chneral, 
Joseph S. Cohen, Prothonotary for the East District, 

Abner L Pentland, do. West do. 

P. C. Sedgewick, do. Middle do. 

The Judges of the Supreme Court receive, in addition to their salaries, 
$4.00 a day, "while on the circuits, as a full allowance for travelling 
expenses." By a law passed in 1843, the salaries of those who succeed the 
present incumbents will be as follows: Chief Justice, $1,800, Associate 
Justices, $1,600 ; and, in addition, $3 a day while on the circuits. 

They hold court in bank, once a year, in four several districts ; — 1st, 
for the Eastern District, at Philadelphia; 2d, for the Middle District, at 
Harrisburg ; 3d, for the Northern District, at Sunbnry ; 4th, for the Western 
District, at Pittsburg. 

District Courts. — There are four District Courts, which are invested 
with the civil jurisdiction of the Common Pleas, in their respective Districts, 
in all cases exceeding a certain amount 



244 



rKNN8Yl.VAMIA. 



[1847, 



« Salary: 

Joel Jones, President Judye^for the City and Co. of Philaddphiay $2,000 



John K. Findlaj, 
George Sharswood, 
Alexander'Hayes, 
Hopewell Hepburn, 



Judgey do. do. do. 

do. do, do. do. 

Judge for the City and €b. of Lancaster^ 
President Judge for the Co. of Alleghany ^ 



2,000 
2,000 
1,600 
2,000 



Vacancy. 
James Thompson, Judge for Erie, Crawford, Venango, Warren, Mercer^ 2,000 
D. C. Skerrett, Prothonotary fir Philaddphia. 

Courts of Common Plects. — The State is divided into 21 Districts, for the 
sessions of the Court of Common Pleas. The President Judge of the 
District of Philadelphia and the Associate Judges have each a salary of 
$2,600. The President Judges, in all the other districts, have each a salary 
of $2,000, and their Associates $120. 

Districts. President Jadges. 

1. Philadelphia, .... Edward King. 
Judges, James Campbell, John B. Jones, Anson V. Parsons. 



2. Lancaster, 

3. Berks, Northampton, and Lehigh, . 

4. Centre, Clinton, and Clearfield, 

5. Alleghany, 

6. Erie, Crawford, Venango, and Wan-en, 

7. Bucks and Montgomery, . 

8. Northumberland, Lycoming, and Columbia, 

9. Cumberland, Perry, and Juniata, 



Ellis Lewis. 
John Banks. 
Geo. W. Woodward. 
Benjamin Patton. 
Gaylord Church. 
David Krause. 
Joseph B. Anthony. 
Samuel Hepburn. 



10. Westmoreland, Indiana, Armstrong, and Cambria, Thomas White. 



11. Susquehanna, Wyoming, Wayne, and Pike, 

12. Dauphin, and Lebanon, 

13. Luzerne, Bradford, and Tioga, 

14. Washington, Fayette, and Greene, 

15. Chester and Delaware, 

16. Franklin, Bedford, and Somerset, 

17. Beaver, Butler, and Mercer, 

18. Porter, McKean, Warren, Jefferson, and Elk, 

19. York and Adams, 

20. Huntingdon, MifHin, and Union. 

21. Munroe, Carbon, and Schuylkill, 

FlNAHCKS. 

Total amount received in 184.5, 
Total amount expended in 1845, 
Whole amount of State Debt, 
Annual Interest on thb Debt, 



William Jessup. 
Nat. B. Eldred. 
J. N. Conyngham. 
Nathaniel Ewing. 
Thomas S Bell. 
Jeremiah S. Black. 
John Bredin. 
Alex. McCalmont. 
William N. Irvine. 
Abraham S. Wilson 
Luther Kidder. 



$3,010,062.34 
3,289,028.13 

40,986,393.22 
2,048,319.66 



1847.] PENNSTLYANIA. 245 

Property of the Commonivealth. 

Stock in sundry corporations, (par value) . . $2,045,476.79 

Public Works, (cost of construction) . , 28,043,316.77 

Public buildings and grounds at Harrisbnrg, (estimated) 250,000.00 

Money due on l^nds un-patented, (estimated) . 190,000.00 

State arsenals, powder magazine, &c., (estimated) . 100,000.00 



Principal Items of Expenditure. 

Public Improvements, $661,340.66 
Expenses of Government, 239,304.20 
Militia Expenses, 18,831.92 

Pensions and Gratuities, 41,858.29 
Charitable Institutions, 14,643.35 
Common Schools, 234,331.88 

3Loans, 26,033.01 

Interest on Debt, 1,789,990.30 

Guaranty of Interest, 20,125.42 

Cancelled relief Notes, 85,000.00 

Damages on the public w'ks, 26,303.40 
Penitentiaries, 13,972.00 

Pliiladelphia Riots, 45,252.32 

City of Pittsburg, 30,000.00 



$31,228,793.56 
Chief Sources of Income. 

Lands, $12,457.66 

Auction Commissions, 18,900.00 

Auction Duties, 71,248.03 

Tax on Bank Dividends, 86,675.88 
Tax on Corporation Stocks, 80,147.50 
Tax on Real & Per. Est 1,318,332.02 
Town Licenses, 36,112.65 

Retailers' Licenses, 1 2,908.1 7 

Militia Fines, 7,838.18 

Tax on Writs, 30,820.1 6 

Collateral Inherit. Tax, 33,650.80 
Canal & Rail Road Tolls, 1,154,591.55 
Tax on Loans, 55,788.50 

Canal Fines, &c., 5,639.46 



Abatement of State Tax, l7,685.89|Refnnded Cash, 8,577.34 

Miscellaneous, 16,225.47 Miscellaneous, 1,458.95 

The School System op Pennstltania. 

Communicated by J. S. Hart, Esq., Principal of the High School^ PMladelphia. 

The earliest l^islative proTision in Pennsylvania for the education of the yoimg at the 
public expense, was that contained in the Act of 1809. By this Act, it was proTided that 
the township assessors should annually report to the County Commissioners the names of 
all the children in their several districts whose parents were unable to pay for their 
schooling. The children thus reported were then sent to the nearest private school, and 
the school bills were paid by the county. Such children were called "county scholars." 
There are no printed documents which show the amount of money expended, or the num- 
ber of scholars educated, in the State, under the Act of 1809. It was, however, an imi>or- 
tant measure and continued in operation with occasional modifications for a quarter of a 
century, viz., from 1809 to 1884. In the single county of Philadelphia, whose records 
have been specially examined for the purpose of the present article, it appears that dur- 
ing the first nine years, namely from 1809 to 1818, the sum of $141,114.07 was expended 
under tjiis Act. During the years 1815, 1816, and 1817, the annual expenditure in Phila- 
delphia was a little over $20,000, and the annual number of " county scholars " about 1900, 

The Act of 1809, and, indeed, all the early legislation on this subject in Pennsylvania, 
contemplated only the education of the poor. The idea of " common schools," that is, of 
providing for the education of all, at the common expense, is of very recent date in this 
State. The first legislative provision was in express terms for the " indigent." It was 
regarded, not like the administration of justice or the establishment of highways, an in- 
stitution at the common expense and for the common good, but as a scheme of eharityj 
for the benefit of the poor at the expense of the rich. This created in the schools an 
invidious distinetfon between the children of the rich and the children of the poor, be- 
tween the pay soholars and the pauper scholars. So strong was the feeling on this sub- 

21* 




COKUOH SCUOOLB. 

Comparatii-e Vieio of the School Si/slf^n since its ritabtwhrneat I'n 1835. 





inHCM. 


a«HOO«. 


T„„™. 




^1 


i 
1 


1 


j. 


if 

It 


i 


ill 


It 


1686, 




638 

740 




156 


"762 
3,884 


3m. LM. 


%^H 






asT 


m 


818 m" 


siVse'" 






•m 






4089 


fl nj 


4,841 


18 89i 


iraj 


1888, 


;os3 


881 


s» 


628 


3J13» 


S 38 


5,034 


18 B5 




1839, 






867 


083 


3,162 ; S 


,6M 


19 ail) 


laoa 


1840, 


,060 




8tiT 


<>8a 


8 162 8 




19 391 


13 03 




;ra 


B02 


88,1 


784 


6,179 i 7 


;086 


18 B2' 


146 


18*2', 




906 


m. 


881 


6,lla 1 9 


,494 


18 68 


118 


1848,' 




846 






8,156 1 14J 


^ 






1844, 


, Ja 


939 


[139 


846 


5,993 16 


7,686 


lit, 




i8«; 


1,IB» 


}fi^ 


1.018 




0,690 


8,031 


9 4S1-5 



The fcnec^e Mbks, for jp«Ul Muoni, do not lochulB any pocUon of tbt linpoitui4 
gtMLgUu nliting to ibe Khools of Philulslphti, empdng U» Bute upproptiiliDii. Phil, 
■delphla nosiral ftnm ths Stale daring 1846 the nun of £81,667.98, vbiob li iDclndud In 
Uk 8191,157.10 ^T« Id the tbneclng tsble. All tike sUxr Hanu rupeoUnglhe FUUdel- 
phla 8cliciat> ihuDld be added Co ttioH In the table la mal 



1847.] PJiNNSYLVANlA. 247 

The city and county of Philadelphia, though in some respectB under the general schocl 
law, and forming the First School District of the State, has yet a special and distinct or> 
ganization of its own. Its origin and history are briefly as follows. 

About thirty years ago, some bencTolent indiTiduaJs, belonging chiefly to the society of 
Friends, associated in various ways for the promotion of education among the poor, and 
were led by the reputjation of the Lancasterian Schools which were then greatly in vogue 
in England, to invite th&x proprietor, Joseph Lancaster, to visit this country for the • 
purpose of establishing the system here. Mr. Lancaster visited Philadelphia in conse- 
quence and introduced his system. l!he schools established and organized under his 
auspices attracted much attention, and led, in 1818, to the passage of % law erecting the 
city and county of Philadelphia into a school District, for the purpose of trying the sys- 
tem on a large scale. This law was the origin of the School System of Philadelphia. 

The official organization established by the law of 1818 is somewhat peculiar, and re- 
msdns without material change to the present time. The District is divided geographically 
into 11 Sections, each section having a board of School Directors. These Directors liave 
the care of all the schools within their limits, appointing the teachers, directing the disci- 
pline and instniction, and attending generally to the local interests of the system, subject 
to the supervision of another Central Board. This Central Board, called the Board of Con- 
trol, is a representative body, the members being chosen by and from the several sectional 
boards. The members of the Board of Control are therefore at the same time Controllers 
and Directors. The number of Controllers is 21, the number of Directors 186. The 
powers of the Board of Control are important. The Controllers determine the amount 
of money needed for school purposes, amounting now to nearly a quarter of a milUon of 
dollars annually. They determine upon the organization of new schools and the erection 
of new school houses, the salaries of teachers, and the selection of school books. They also 
purchase the books and other suppUes for the schools, amounting to about $30,000 per 
annum. They also pay all bUls. They are incorporated, and hold about $650,000 worth 
of real estate, consisting of lots purchased, and school houses built by tiiem. They 
have also under their immediate supervision and control the Central High School. 

While the official organization created by the law of 1818 remains witiiout material 
change, the system of schools established under this organization haa undergone an 
almost total revolution. The schools contemplated by that law, and origbially established 
under it, had three leading features, every one of which has been since abandoned. 
1, They were monUorial or Lancasterian schools, the first school having been organized 
by Mr. Lancaster himself. 2, They were unelassijied, that ii?, without any distinction into 
higher and lower schools. 8, They were powpw schools. They were hence necessarily 
inefficient, Incapable of improvement, and odious. Notwithstanding ttie ample powers 
conferred upon tiie Controllers, and great liberality of expenditure, and tiie afttive ex- 
ertions of tiie most hifluential men in the city, the schools did not flourish, nor ttie sys- 
tem grow to any considerable extent, until every distinctive feature of the original plan 
was abandoned. About ttie time that tiie law was passed establishing a general system 
throughout the State, supplementary legislation was procured for the Phihidelphia 
schools authorizing the Confa^llers to substitute paid assistant female teachers instead 
of unpslid, irresponsible monitors ; to open tiieir schools to children of all classes, rich 
and poor ; and lastly, to chissify the schools, by the establishment of Primary Schools, 
and a mgh School. The Primary Schools were introduced in 1838, the High School and 
the Assistant Teachers in 1837. From the date of these changes, which were all eflFecfced 
iu tiie years 1886 and 1837, the schools incrcai«d with unparaUeled rapidity, until they 
have now become more numerous by &r than those of any city in the Union. The grad- 
ual growth of tiie system in various important particulars during the last twenty-seven 
Tears, is exhibited in ttie following teble, which ha* been compiled from tiie Annual 
Beporti and Minutes of ttie Controllers, and from the Ledgers and Day-books of ttie 
County Coiiimittionen. 





1S18. 








T.I»of 




8™ei- 


To«»l 




iamat ei- 




School prop- 




^nded for 






pe„J«l br 


^X^i 


en J Kaniig- 






rhlT^Kble 




the Coimtj 








toevh year 




tOrScboal 


taXA«baat 


Counij M 




Ee»IB»Wto 


u pec Ml 




puipoM. 


futnltun. 


the end of 
each jenr. 


^. 


Z^'^] 




~ 


(23,708 HI 


»17,9(I7 10 


$17,967 10 


S893 36 


m»n 


M 




sajmtn 


22,418 29 


*),338 89 


2,019 17 






«348 6T 


10,745 28 


61,128 87 


2,556 43 


14,103 39 


59 »2 




19,421 7a 


6 IIK 61 




23tW91 


14,372 25 






16,444 29 


13^88 


ctIIio W 


2,876 5* 




57 16 




16,786 08 


288 24 




2At7 8lJ 


18ie9 74 






26,699 39 


B,3«.as 


66;i40 4H 


3,307 33 


17aW01 






23,018 33 




71,UC« 47 


3,6.''pO 17 




11 61 




30 89918 


352 47 


71,366 94 


3:mm 


2o;346 69 






29,616 11 


6,742 17 




3,864 90 


28,772 84 






80^73 86 


8 641 61 




4,18198 


23,032 44 


14 38 




83,766 78 


9,110 85 




4.637 52 


24.&t6a3 






82,100 76 


6;374 43 




*,i<Oii24 


26.726 32 






27^16 




98;437 00 


4iei86 


27,283 06 


490 




63/J«10 


S3,min 


121,627 07 


6.07K 36 


29.fti2 03 






74,170 41 




162,446 68 


8,122 28 


33,26190 






66,7(8 46 


12>7 44 


174,768 02 




43,476 01 


12 68 




48,908 81 


IJ1137 


176,314 2» 


8;h15 7U 


45,346 54 






76fll7 16 


23,787 42 


20040171 


mm 15 08 








191^40 21 




314!oll 82 


16,700 56 


77^730 30 


!0 88 




188,741 91 


82.762 70 


89e;764 82 


19,838 20 


106,989 21 






147,7« 44 


27,487 22 


424,26164 


21,212 68 


120,262 22 


I H 80 




174,297 53 


41,707 04 


466,049 68 


23,302 43 


132,490 39 


1 1282 




216,380 60 


08,922 72 


(32,97180 


26,148 68 


169,467 78 


1 3634 


it 


373,981 as 


84,669 16 




30,-')82 02 


299,212 53 






219,786 66 






31,307 70 


aol&2S6 




_ 


227,206 42 


SUOS 67 1 047,259 73 


_^a^ 




1 53. 



Ye«. 




si 




of pu- 










VaoKot 


Finding 


p£^to 




iT.Ei»™-~:'»~ 


"^ 




5430- 


mafi^- 
nimre 

■grsr 


-m- 


-mr- 


Count J 


&"ito- h "far- 


8,082 


-sm 


SB"2r eelo'-Sw 


U19, 


3JJ53 




8 18 


m 




7,866 


5 26 . 4 28 j an 




5,689 


2»t 






1 ^, 






^' 


8,289 




439 




836 


9,346 


6 89 4 85 S17 


1822, 




640 




196 


836^ 


11127 






828, 


8,108 


620 








17000 




911 




3,618 








938,' 


18794 


6 70 6^ 


n 




4,147 






234 


939 


21,968 








i'S^ 


509 


4 33 




840, 


23;i92 


6 71 6 70 


75 




4,803 








841, 




6 67 6 73 


S2 


SS- 


5,057 


660 


4 67 


262 


842 & 8, 


33^180 






m' 


S'SS 


6 76 






944, 


S3>9» 


693 604 


63 


Wl! 


6.371 


sn 


495 


2i>y 


m. 


36,065 






tv 


ULuiestn 


t™iufnl 




lligbSc 


lool and A, 


uiiiiunt 


e«li«.in(miu 


^ 



1847.] PKNNSYLVANIA. 249 

If the aboTetafoular history of the Philadelphia schools be divided into tvro periods^ the 
year 1836 may be oonsidered as marking the termiiiatioii of the Lancastrian system, and 
the year 1837 the commencement of the new system. For the purposes of comparison, the 
year 1836 should be thrown out of the account, as the schools were then in a transition 
state. Adopting this dlTision as the basis of a comparison, we find the following results. 
During the Lancasterian period, the average number of pupils to each teacher was 286 \ 
and the average annual cost of tuition, including all expenses, $5j68. During the latter 
period, the corresponding items are, number of pupils to a teacher, 74 ; average cost, $6.48. 
It thus appears, that the whole additional cost of introducing the High and Primary Schools 
and the assistant teachers, and of reducing the number of pupils to each teacher from 296 
to 74, has been only the average of 86 cents per annum, or less than 22 cents per quarter. 

The schools of Philadelphia, as now organized, are divided into four dustinct classes. 
These are as follows : I. The Cmtral High School. This contains 419 pupils, arranged in 
8 divisions, whose average age on admission was 14 years and 6 months, and who have a four 
years' course of study, equal and in some respects similar to that pursued in American 
colleges. Pupils can gain admittance to the High School only by having been at least one 
year in the lower schools. The average time of their connection with the lower schools 
previous to their admission to the High School is 3 years and 7 months. The privilege of 
admission to this institution operates as a powerfttl stimulus both to the teachers and pu- 
pils of the lower schools. Its influence, in &ct, pervades the whole system, n. The Oram" 
mar Schools. These rank next in order after the High School, and are 48 in number. In 
these schools are taught English Grammar, Geography and Arithmetic, Beading and Writ- 
ing. They are all in large commodious buildings erected and furnished for the purpose. 
A Graujmar School usually contains 250 pupils, seated in one common room for study, with 
class rooms adjoining for recitation. The pupils are classed into 6 divisions, having 1 
Principal and 4 Assistant Teachers. In the boys' schools, the Prindpad is a male, but the 
assistants are females. In the girls' schools, all the teachers are females. III. The Sec- 
ondary Schools. These teach Reading, Spelling, and the first four rules of Arithmetic. A 
Secondary School contains usually 250 cliildren, arranged in 4 divisions, with 1 Principal 
and 8 Assistant Teachers, all females. lY. The Primary Schools. In these, the children 
commence with the alphabet, and learn the elements of reading and spelling, and the arith- 
metical tables. A Primary School consists usually of about 200 children, arranged in 8 
divisions, with 1 Principal and 2 Assistant Teachers, all females. 

These four classes of schools are intended to be, fmd to so|Qe extent are, concentric. The 
secondary school is the centre of a cluster of primaries, the grammar school of a number 
of secondaries, and the high school the centre of all the grammar schools. A boy at 4 
years of age may enter the lowest division of the primary to learn his alphabet and be 
promoted according to his prepress in successive years through 3 regularly ascending di- 
visions in the primary, 4 in the secondary, 5 in the grammar, and 8 in the high school. 
These schools, being all under one common and controlling Board, are minutely fitted into 
each other and dovetailed together, and present an instructive instance of the efficiency 
and economy resultmg from a proper classiflcation and division erf labor. Nearly /orty 
thousand children ate now enjoying the benefits of a system which takes a child from the 
alphabet and carries him through the differential calculus ; and yet the average expense, 
including not only tuition and the ordinary incidental expenses, but hooks and stationery^ 
(which are fiimished gratuitously,) includinjf also the interest on all the money expended 
from the commencement on real estate and school furniture, is only $6.60 per annum, or 
$162^ per quarter. 

The expenditures for the public schools of Philadelphia for the year ending July 1, 1845, 
were $227,205.42. Of this sum, $33,214.30 was received from the State ; the rest was raised 
by taxation. The ^OAving tables show with some minuteness the manner in which this 
money was expended, and a general summary of the other important statistics of the 
schools for 1845- 



250 



PSNNSTLYANIA. 



[1847. 



L Expenditures for cuxtmnt of the Public Schools of PkUaddphiayJrom July 
Ist^ 1844, to June SOth, 1845, inclusive^ abstracted from Controller's Ledger. 



Schools and Sections. 


Real Estate. 


School 
Furniture. 


School Exp's 
and Salaries. 

$12,592 78 


Total. 


High School, 


$1,021 69 


$108 75 


$13,723 07 


Model, " 


92 91 


80 36 


3,919 98 


4,093 25 


First Section, 


1,446 84 


339 20 


47,886 66 


49,672 70 


Second " 


925 64 


48 81 


18.573 02 


19,647 47 


Thlid " 


879 89 


337 56 


15,902 18 


17,119 62 


Fourth " 


900 76 


12 00 


1^122 02 


16,034 77 


Fifth " 


907 43 


41 10 


9,956 53 


10,905 06 


Sixth " 


8,845 19 


470 62 


11,040 18 


20,355 99 


Serenth " 




93 60 


5,978 80 


6,072 90 


Eighth « 


2,028 25 




1,536 21 


3,564 46 


Ninth « 


922 95 


140 96 


9,606 37 


10,670 28 


Tenth " 


313 32 


196 79 


13,543 36 


14,053 47 


EleT«nth '< 


886 77 


64 50 


7,695 49 
173,353 63 

• • 


8,646 76 




19,171 63 
Fuel, 


1,934 14 

• 


194,459 20 
4,306 69 






General expet 


ises, (books, stationeij, advertis- 






ing, &c.,) 


• • 


• 


28,439 63 




Total, 


• 


• ■ 


$227,205 42 



n. 



Summary of Schools^ Scholars^ Teachers, Controllers and Directors of the 
PhiladdpTda Public Schools for ike year 1845. 





• 


Schools. 




Teachers. 


Scholars. 


• 

1 


1 


• 

1 

1 


i 




• 

1 


• 

1 


1 




3 

o 
H 


• 

1 


• 


1 


• 


• 

1 


• 


Under the 














Controllers, 


1 


2 


1 






4 


12 


10 


22 


754 364 


1^18 71 


54 


1st Section, 




14 


5 


28 




47 


7 


151 


158 


4,917 5,034 


9,961 


7 


64 


2d « 




4 


4 


11 


1 


20 


4 


65 


69 


2,230 2,250 


4,480 


3 


24 


3d " 




4 


4 


15 




23 


7 


46 


53 


1,699 1,847 


3,646 


2 


9 


4th « 




10 


1 


10 




21 


3 


52 


56 


2,153 1,943 


4,096 


2 


16 


5th " 




2 


1 




23 


26 


13 


20 


33 


1,166 1,032 


2,188 


1 


18 


6th « 




4 




2 


21 


27 


12 


27 


39 


1,345 1,338 


2,683' 1 


15 


7th " 




2 


1 




12 


15 


7 


12 


19 


809; 727 


'^\^ 


12 


8th " 










4 


4 


3 


2 


5 


220 221 


6 


9th « 




2 


3 


9 


2 


16 


2 


27 


29 


1,272 979 


2,261 1 


12 


10th " 




4 


1 


11 




16 


3 


50 


63 


1,951' 1,914 


3,865 2 


12 


nth « 


1 




I 21 


I 86 


15 


15 


9 
i 82 


10 
472 


19 

1564 


728 


782 
18,431 


1,510 1 


9 
186 


Totals, 


1 


i8 


1 


78; 231 


19,234 


'37,666 


21I 



Peninsylvania Hb^ntalfar the Insane. — This is is a private charitable institution, re- 
ceiving no assistance from the city or State, and expending all its income for the benevo- 
lent objects of its foundation. It was founded- in 1752, and up to 1841 received insane as 
well as other sick patients in the buildings in the city of Philadelphia. In 1841, the insane 
were removed to a country location, two miles west of the city, and this new establishment 
was then styled the " Pennsylvania Hospital for the Insane." Up to the period just re- 
ferred to, nearly 40,000 patients had been admitted into the Hospital in the city, and of 
these, 4,336 were insane. Patients were received into the Hospital for the Insane, without 
reference to the residence of the applicant, the duration of the disease, Ints curability. No 
patient is received for less than 8 months ; but by paying board for that period, a patienfc 



1847.] DELAW^^E. 251 

can be remOTed at any time. Incurable cases, supported by their friends, may remain in- 
definitely in the Hospital. A fixed number of recent indigent cases axe maintained on the 
funds of the house for a limited period ; but these, if not improving or likely to improve 
at the end of six months, are discharged to make room for others. Oases of mama a potu 
are not received into this Hospital. 

At the close of the ye» 1845, there were 169 patients under care. The highest number 
in the house at one time was 174. The average nxunber for the whole year has been 162 ; 
being more than at any previous period in the history of the institution. Of those dis- 
charged in 1846, 80 were cured, 5 much improved, 24 improved, 30 stationary, 20 died ; 
total, 159. !From the opening of this institution in 1841, up to the end of 1845, there have 
been 769 admissions, of which 447 were males, and 322 females. Discharged, or died, 600 ; 
861 males, and 239 females ; and there remain 86 males and 83 females, total 169. Of these 
numbers, there were 269 single males, and 136 single females ; total number of single, 405. 
Married, males 152, females 139 ; total married, 291. Widows, 47 ; widowers, 26. Of the 
000 discharges since the openingia 1841, 313 have left " cured," 60 " much improved," 79 
« improved," 88 " stationary," and 76 " have died." 

Of the 769 patients, 373 were cases of mania, 208 males, and 166 females ; 143 were cases 
of melancholia, 82 males and 61 females *, 128 were cases of monomania, 76 males and 52 
ibmales ; 119 were cases of dementia, 76 males and 43 females ; 6 were cases of delirium, 
5 males and 1 female. In proportion to the number of admissions, the ratio of recoveries 
has been larger in the cases of mania than in either of the other forms of insanity. In mel- 
ancholia and monomania, they have been nearly equal; m dementia, there have been 
very few ; and of those registered as entering with delirium, none. 



X. DEI^WARE. 

GOVBENMENT. 



Salary. 
William Temple, of Smyrna, Acting Governor, (tenn of 

office expires on the 3d Tuesday in Jannary, 1847,) $1,833 1-3 

George P. Fisher, of Dover, Secretary of State, Fees and 400 

James S. Buckmaster, of Frederica, State Treasurer, 500 

Abraham Staats, of Fieldsboro', Auditor, 500 

JUDIOIABT. 

Superior Court, 
James Booth, of New Casde, Chief Justice, $1,200 

Samuel M. Harrington, of Dover, Associate Justice, 1,200 

John J. MiUigan, of Wilmington, do, 1,000 

David Hazzard, of Milton, do, 1,000 

Edward W. Gilpin, of Wilmington, Attorney General, Fees and 500 

Court of Chancery, 
Kensey Johns, Jr., of New Castle, aancdlor, 1,100 



852 



MASTLAITD. 



[184 



Orphan^ Court, The Chaacellor and one Judge of the Superior Court 

Joshua E. Driyer, of New Castle, Register of WiUs^ Fees. 

Charles Polk, of Dover, do, do. Fees. 

William Dunning, of Georgetown, do, do. Fees. 



XI. MABYLAND. 

GOTSBKMBNT. 



Thomib 6. Pkatt, 
the 1st Mon. in 
Wm. T. Wootten, 
Dennis Claude, 
Thomas Kamey, 
6. R Bichardson, 
John S. Gittlngs, 
George G. Brewer, 
Bichard Swan, 
James Swan, 
John N. Watkins, 
William Williams, 
WilUam S. Waters, 



of Pr. George's 

Jan. 1848,) 
of P. Geo. Co. 
of Annapolis, 
of Annapolis, 
of Baltimore, 
of Baltimore, 
of Annapolis, 
of Annapolis, 
of Baltimore, 
of Baltimore, 
of Somerset, 



Sslaiy. 
Co., Cfovemor, (term expires 

Use of a house and $4,200 

Secretary ofState^ 2,000 

Treasurer^ 2.500 

Examiner General^ 800 

Attorney' General^ "Feea. 

Conmdmoner ofLoans^ Fees. 

Eegister of the Land Office, Fees. 

State librarian, 1,000 

Commissioner o/StampSy 750 

Adjutant- General^ 500 

President of the Senate, 

Speaker of the House, 



JXTDICIART. 



Court of Chancery. 

Appointed. 
Theodorick Bland, of Annapolis, 1824, Chancellor, 
Louis Gassaway, Register. Cornelius McLean, Auditor. 



Stevenson Archer, 
Thomas B. Dorsej, 
£zek. F. Chambers, 
Axa Spence, 
Bobert N. Martin, 
A. C. Magmder, 
Bichard W. GUI, 



Court of Appeals, 
of Bel- Air, 1 823, Chief Judge, 



of EUicoU's Mills, 1824, 
of Chestertown, 1835, 
of Snowhill, 1835, 

of Cumberland, 1845, 
of P. George's Co., 1845, 
of Annapolis, 



Salary. 
$3,600 



Associate Judge, 

do. 

do, 

do, 

do. 
Clerk and Reporter, 



Nicholas Brice, Chief Judge, Baltimore City Court, 

W. G. D. Worthington, Associate Judge, 
Alexander Nisbet, do. 



$2,500 
2,200 
2,200 
2,200 
2,200 
2,200 
Fees. 

$2,400 
1,500 
1,500 



1847.] ^ MARYLAND. 253 

The State is divided into six jndicial districts, each comprising two, three, 
or four counties. For each district there are a chief judge and two associates, 
who constitute the County Courts for the respective counties in the district. 
These are the common law courts of original jurisdiction in the State ; and 
they hare jurisdiction of all claims for fifty dollars and upwards, appellate 
jurisdiction from the judgment of justices of the peace, and equity jurisdic- 
tion within the counties coextensive with the chancellor. The six chief 
judges constitute the Court of Appeals for the State, which has appellate 
jurisdiction of cases at law and in equity, originating in the County Courts, 
the Orphans' Courts, (of which there is one in each county,) and the Court 
of Chancery. 

Finances. 

Total amount received in 1845, . . $966,589.00 

Total amount expended in 1844, . . 948,488.84 

Chief Sources of Income. 



Dividends on stocks, $79,781.33 

Direct taxes, 507,781.04 

Other taxes, 38,329.68 

Auction duties, 18,058.23 

Baltimore & Ohio R. R. Co., 38,699.43 
Canal companies, 74,800.00 

Licenses hy county courts, 103,518.75 
Tobacco inspection, 33,973.61 

iBalt. & Susq. R. R. Co., 20,000.00 



Principal Items of Expenditure. 

Salaries of civil officers, $1 1 ,847.1 9 
Salaries of the Judiciary, 40,767.74 
Expenses of Legislature, 5 1 ,460.45 
Interest on the State deht,' 710,784.51 
State colonization, 1 1 ,370.00 

Common schools, 34,069.36 

Charitable Establishments, 6,392.00 
Miscellaneous, 11,712.97 

Colleges and academies, 18,899.96 

Whole amount of State debt, . . $11,986,784.98 

Annual interest on this debt, . . 655,421.16 

The interest in arrear on State debt, Dec. 1, 1845, was 1,376,891.20 

The sinking fund, Dec. 1, 1845, amounted to 1,404,030.00 

The productive capital of the State consists of 

Bank stock, . . . $510,966.66 

Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and other stocks, 1,075,000.00 

Debts due the State, . . 1,629,952.74 

Total, . . $3,215,919.40 

Besides this productive stock, the State holds $15,523,649.95 of capital 
and credits, at present unproductive, but which must, at some future time, 
become of considerable value. 

Estimated present value of this unproductive stock, $,5,000,000.00 

Baltimobe and Ohio Bailboad. 

Cost of the railroad to Cumberland, . . $7,623,626 

Length of the railroad, . . 177 miles. 

Average cost, per mile, . . $47,077 

22 



254 



MASTLAND. 



[1847. 



Summary of Receipts. 



Year. 


No. of 
pafisengerfi. 


From 
passengers. 


No. of tons. 


From tonna^. 


Aggregated 


1836 


157,102 


$128,126 30 


66,703 


5153,186 23 $281,312 53 


1837 


140,699 


145,625 29 


74,597 


155,676 09 301,301 38 


1838 


150,516^ 


166,693 53 


77,526 


198,530 79 


365,224 32 


1839 


152.501 


173,860 44 


100,451 


233,487 06 


407,347 50 


1840 


152,418 


177,035 75 


88,374 


255,847 95 


432,883 70 


1841 


17l,629j 


179,615 80 


65,498 


211,451 07 


391,069 87 


1842 


154,568 


181,177 35 


67,844 


245,315 31 


426,492 66 


1843 


149,533 


274,617 27 


82,715 


300,617 81 


575,235 08 


1844 


173,821 


336,876 32 


103,111 


321,743 66 


658,619 98 


1845 


202,458j 


369,882 30 


141,407 


368,720 88 


738,603 18 




il,605,246i 


2,133,510 35 


868,226 2,444,576 85[4,578,O90 20, 



Gross receipts in 1845, 
Gross expenses, 

Net receipts, 



$738,603.18 
363,841.44 

$374,761.74 



William Smith, 
John M. Patton, 
Raleigh T, Daniel, 
John F. Wiley, 
Fabins M. Lawson, 
James E. Heath, 
James Brown, Jr., 

StaflfbrdH. Parker, 
Sidney S. Baxter, 
W. H. Richardson, 

Thomas F. Lawsoo, 
Charles S. Morgan, 
Edward P. Scott, 
William O, Goode, 



Xn. VIRGINIA. 

Government. 

Term enda. Salaiy. 

ofFaaquier Co., Governor, Jan. 1,1849, $3,333 

' of Richmond, Councillor of State, Mar. 31, '47, 1,000 
of Richmond , Councillor of State, Mar. 3 1 , '48, 1 ,000 
of Amelia Co., Councillor of State, Max. 31,^49, 1,000 
of Richmond, Treasurer, 2,000 

of Richmond, Auditor, 2,000 

of Richmond, 2c? Auditor, and Supa'intendent 

of the Literary Fund, 2,000 

of Richmond, Register of the Land Office, 2,000 

of Richmond, Attorney General, Fees & 1,000 

of Henrico Co., Secretary of the CommonvxaJth, 

Adjutant Geri. and Librarian, 1,720 
of Richmond, Clerk of the Council, 1,000 

of Richmond, Superintendent of Penitentiary, 2,000 
of Greenville, Speaker of the Senate, $6 a day* 

of Mecklenberg Co., Speaker of the Home, $8 a day. 



The Gpyernpr, Treasurer, Auditor, 2d Auditor, and Register of the Land 
Office are, ex officio, members of the Board of Public Works, Literary Fund, 
and Northwestern Turnpike. They do not receive compensation for this 
Be^^^ce. 



1847.] 



TI&GINIA. 



255 



WUliam H. Cabell, 
Francis T. Brooke, 
John J. Allen, 
Briscoe G. Baldwin, 
One Vacancy. 
Joseph Allen, 
John A. North, 



JUDIGIAST. 

Court of Appeals. 

of Richmond, President^ 

of Spottsylvania Co., Judge^ 
of Botetourt Co., do. 



of Staunton, 



do. 



Elected in 


Salary. 


1830, 


$2,750 


1830, 


2,500 


1840, 


2,600 


1842, 


2,500 



Clerk of the Eastern Circuity 1,000 
Clerk of the Western Circuity 1,000 



of Richmond, 
of Lewisburg, 

The judges are entitled to receive, in addition to their salaries, 25 cents a 
mile for necessary travel. The Court of Appeals holds two sessions annu- 
ally ; one at Lewisburg^ Grccnhriar county, for the counties lying west of the 
Blue Ridge, commencing on the 2d Monday in July, and continuing 90 
days, unless the business shall be sooner despatched; the other at Richmond^ 
for the counties lying east of the Blue Ridge, commencing at such times as 
the Court may from time to time appoint. 

General Court. — The State is divided into ten Judicial Districts, and each 
District into two Circuits, except the 4th, which comprises three. The third 
Circuit of the 4th District is the 21st District of the State, containing 
but a single Court, called the " Circuit Superior Court of Law and Chancery 
for the county of Henrico and city of Richmond." In this Court, there are 
two judges; one on the law side, with a salary of $1,800; the pther on the 
chancery side, with a salary of $2,000. On the death, resignation, or remo- 
val of either of the two judges now attached to this court, his duties are to 
devolve on the other, without any increase of salary. In all the other cir- 
cuits, the chancery and common law jurisdictions are blended in the same 
judges, each of whom has a salary of $1,500, and $4 for every 20 miles of 
necessary travelling. 



Judges. 

1. Kichard U. Baker, 

2. James H. Ghobipn, 

8. Geo. P. Scarburg, 

4. J. B. ChriBtiaii, 

5. John T. Lomax, 

6. John Soott, 

7- John B. Clopton, 
8 Daniel A. Wilson, 

9. William Leigh, 

10. N. M. Taliaferro, 

11. Richard U. meld. 



Residence. 
of Nanaemond Oo. 
of PeterBburg. 
of Accomac. 
of Charles City Co. 
of Fredericksburg. 
of Fauquier Co. 
of Richmond, 
of Cumberland Co. 
of Hali&x Co. 
of Franklin Co. 
of Culpepper Co. 



Judges. Residence. 

12. L. P. Thompson, of Staunton. 
18. Isaac R. Douglass, of Morgan Co. 

14. Daniel Smith, of Rockingham Co. 

15. Benjamin Estellj of Wjthe Co. 

16. James E. Brown, of Wythe Co. 

17. Edward Johnston, of Botetourt Co. 

18. Edwin S. Duncan, of Ilarrison Co. 

19. D. W. McComaa, of Wythe Co. 

20. Joseph L. Fry. of Wheeling. 

m ( Philip N. Nicholas, of Richmond. 
1 John Robertson, do. 



A Circuit Superior Court of Law and Chancery is held twice every year 
in each county and in some corporations. The judges who hold the Circuit 



256 VIBGINIJL. [1847. 

Courts are also reqaired to hold, every year, two teims of the General Court 
in the Capitol at Eichmond. It is the duty of fifteen of the judges to attend 
this Court, eleven being necessary to form a quorum. One term begins on 
the last Monday in June j the other, on the 1st Monday of December. The 
judges are required to arrange themselves into four classes, of five judges 
each, one of which is exempt, in rotation, from attending the court 

The General Court has appellate jurisdiction in the last resort in criminal 
cases ', also, original jurisdiction of probates and administrations, and some 
claims of the Commonwealth. Its judges, or a portion of them, sit as a 
special Court of Appeals, in cases in which the judges of the Court of Ap- 
peals proper are disqualified by interest or otherwise. 

County Courts, — A Court sits in each county every month, held by four 
or more Justices of the Peace. These Courts, formed by plain fanners or 
country gentlemen, are invested with a jurisdiction wider than that of any 
other Court in the State, covering almost the whole field of cognizance, civil, 
criminal, legal, and equitable. Any one Justice can hold a Court with 
jurisdiction over all causes in which the value does not exceed $20. At the 
monthly and quarterly sessions, which are held by four or more Justices, 
deeds and wills may be proved, and chancery matters and suits at common 
law be heard and determined, with a right of appeal to a Supei^or Court. 
These Courts, exclusively, try slaves for all offences j and they examine free 
persons charged with felony, previously to their trial in the Circuit Court. 
Free Negroes and Indians are on the same footing with slaves. 

Productive Property of the State. 

Bank stocks, .... $4,217,700 00 

Old James River Company stock, . 243,000 00 

Stocks in railroad companies, . . 1,172,100 00 

Do. in navigation companies, . 361,173 03 

Do. in turnpike companies, . . 98,202 00 

Loans to corporations, . . 369,128 96 

Do. to colleges, &c., . . . 50,500 00 

Certificates of debt of city of Richmond, . 13,000 00 

Railroad companies for dividends due, . 71,040 00 

$6,595,843 99 

Funds and Resources of the Commonwealth, Sept. 30, 1845* 

1. Productive stocks and funds, . . $6,595,843 99 

2. Funds unproductive, but available, . 350,000 00 

3. Stocks in improvements not completed, and unproductive, 3,357,568 44 

4. Stocks in improvements completed, but unproductive, and 

other unproductive funds, — about 5-12ths of these 

may become productive, . . 1,039,758 18 

$11,343,170 61 



1847.] 



VlltOINIA. 



257 



Finances. 

Whole amount of State Debt, . . $7,384,793.87 

Annual interest on this debt, . 451,746.07 

$1,406,021.51 of this debt is owned by the State itself. 

Chief Sources of Income, 



\ 


Common- 


Board of 


Literary 


Totals, 




wealth. 


P. Works. 


Fund. 


Revenue taxes, 


$647,713 04 


■ • • • 


• • • • 


$647,713 04 


Militia fines, 


12,462 08 


• • • • 


• • • • 


12,462 08 


Dividends on bank stocks, 


154,103 50 


$65,042 30 


$17,701 00 


236,846 80 


Dividends from joint stock compos, 


■ • • • 


51,244 77 


• • • • 


51,244 77 


Bonus on bank capital, 


• • • • 


49,858 48 


• • • • 


49,858 48 


Taxes on law processes, . 


29,690 52 


• • • 


• • • • 


29,690 52 


Tax on dividends, 


7,647 47 


• • • • 


• ■ • » 


7,647 47 


Temporary loans, 


80,000 00 


• • • • 


• • • • 


30,000 00 


Interest on loans, & c, 


8,771 98 


41,419 56 


65,121 00 


115,313 53 


Loans for joint stock companies, . 




23,861 63 


• • • • 


23,861 63 


Deficiency for int. on public debt, 




190,000 00 


• • • • 


190,000 CO 


James river and Kanawha co., 




30,500 00 


• • • • 


30,500 00 


Fines, forfeitures, &c., 




■ • ■ ■ 


14,974 01 


14,974 01 


Dawson fund, . . 




• • • • 


9,440 68 


9,440 68 


Arrearages of 1844, . 




...J 


21,830 43 


2i;830 43 


Invested capital, (loans reAinded,) 




■ • • • 


11,000 00 


11,000 00 


Miscellaneous receipts, 


42,878*93 
$933,267 52 


820 67 


5,820 20 


49,519 80 




$452,247 41 


$145,887 32 $1,531,403 241 


Totals — Receipts as above, $1,531, 


408 24 


Tot 


al Disbursen 


lents, 


$1,443,387 84 


Sinking Fund, 6, 


991 70 




Sinking F 


und. 


5,98163 


N. W. T. Road, 


aoooo 




N. W. T. Road, 


225 00 


$1,537, 


694 94 


$1,449,593 47 


Chief 1 


Tteiris of E 


Tpeiiditure, 








Common- 


Board of 


literary 


Totals. 




wealth. 


P. Worfas. 


Fund. 


Expenses of General Assembly, 


$75,213 10 


• • ■ ■ 


• • • • 


$75,213 16 


Officers of Government, 


83,395 91 


$1,882 77 


$1,864 47 


87,143 15 


Criminal charges. 


31,952 28 


• • • • 


• • • • 


31,952 28 


Penitentiary expenses. 


16,393 03 


• • • • 


• • * • 


16,393 03 


Contingent expenses of courts, 


32,574 41 


» • • • 


^. • • • • 


32,574 41 


MUitia, 


19,510 78 


• • • • 


• • • • 


19,510 78 


Military school at Lexington, 


6,000 00 


• ■ • • 


1,500 00 


7,600 00 


Public guard at Richmond, . 


28.710 80 


• • • • 


• • • • 


23.710 80 


llepairsofarms, 


3;826 72 


• • • ■ 


• • • • 


3,826 72 


Commissioners of revenue. 


31,772 13 


• • • • 


.... 


31,772 13 


Lunatics and lunatic asylums. 


49,056 25 


• • • • 


• • • • 


49,056 25 


Deaf, dumb, and blind asylum, 


13,868 52 


• • • • 


298 14 


14,166 66 


Interest on public debt. 


66,256 89 


886,489 18 


• • • • 


451,746 07 


Contingent fund of executive, 


7,938 75 


• ■ • • 


• • • • 


7,938 75 


Temporary loan of 1844, 


110,000 00 


• • • • 


• • • ■ 


110,000 00' 


Deficiency in fund for int. improvem't, 


190,000 00 


• • • • 


• • • • 


190,000 00 


James river and Kanawha Co., 


78,000 00 


• • • • 


• ■ • • 


78,000 00 


Internal improvements. 


278 50 


16,427 34 


• • • • 


16,705 84j 


Divid'ds to Old J. R. C. stockholders. 




84,095 00 


• • • • 


84,095 001 


Investments, 




1,707 50 


29,420 00 


31,127 50 


School quotas, 




• • • • 


n,423 59 


71,423 59 


Annuity to University, . 




• • • • 


15,000 00 


15,000 00 


Dawson Amd, 




• • • • 


6,159 26 


6,169 26 


General appropriations, . 


9,li"80 


• • • • 


• * ■ fl 


9,132 80 


Miscellaneous, 

Totals, 


25,317 97 


1,867 74 
$442,469'58 


2,053 96 
$127:719 4i 


29,239 66 


«873,1 


98 90 


$1,443 887 84 



22* 



258 



VIRGINIA. 



[1847. 



Town lots, $49,488 34 
Lands, 189,581 84 

$239,070 18 

251,297 slaves, at 32c. 80,415 04 

325,231 horses, &c., at 10c., 32,523 00 
8,341 gold watches, at $1, 8,341 00 
3,991 silver patent lever 

Lepine watches, at 50c., 1,995 50 
13,804 silver watches, 25c., 3,450 00 
18,589 metallic clocks, 25c., 4,647 25 
36,238 other clocks, 12ic., 4,529 75 
10,944 coaches, Ij p. c, 19,851 73 



Tares for 1845. 
Bridges, 



Ferries, 
Newspapers, 
Collateral inheritances, 



$160 11 
189 13 
294 00 
595 86 

$431,844 93 



Licenses to 
Merchants, 
Pedlers, 

Ordinary keepers, 
Houses of private entert'nt, 3,439 74 
Venders of lottery tickets, 15,000 00 



80 stages, do. 


271 97 


2,217 carryalls, do. 


1,532 63 


4,594 gigs, do. 


2,549 72 


3,002 pianos, 


5,186 00 


Gold or silver plate, 


2,356 19 


Interest on money lent. 


11,566 35 


Income over $400, 


4,803 76 


Money, 


255 76 


Attorneys, 


3,395 00 


Physicians, 


3,700 00 


Dentists, 


165 00 



$97,304 62 

3,328 00 

18,910 11 



Exhibiters of shows, 
Agents of insurance. 
Owners of stallions, 
Dentists, additional. 



Total for taxes. 
Various deductions, 



Net taxes. 



180 00 

2,513 86 

5,417 00 

40 00 

$146,133 33 

577,979 26 
44,923 94 

$533,055 32 



Common Schools. 

Number of schools in 122 counties and towns. 
Number of poor children in 121 counties and towns. 
Sent to school in 120 counties, 
Sent to Lancasterian and other schools in 4 towns, 
Sent to 45 district schools in 4 counties. 

Total number of poor children educated in 124 coun- 
ties and towns, . . . 

Exp. for tuition at the common and Lancasterian schools, $66,826 49 
Amount at district scliools, . . . 1,313 56 

Total expenditure for tuition and expenses, 



3,677 
53,909 



27,212 
584 
498 



27,796 



$68,140 05 



Average attendance of each poor child at common schools, 58 1-4 days, 
equal to 11 1-2 weeks. 

Average amount paid for the tuition of each poor child at common 
schools, $2 39. 

Average at district free schools^ $2 63 3-4. 

Average cost per diem of each poor child sent to common schools, 4 1-lOc 

It is estimated that there are 166,000 children in the State, of an age fit to 
be taught j that is, between 71-2 and 16 years of age. 1 2,000 of these are sent 



1847.] NORTH CAROLIKA. 259 

to colleges, academies, and classical schools. More than 120,000, therefore, 
appear to attend no school whatever. The Governor, in his last Annual 
message, wishing to remedy this evil, recommends the adoption of a school 
system like that which exists in several of the northern States. 



XIII. NORTH CAROLINA. 

GOVEHNMBNT. 

Salary. 
William A. GEAHAM,of Hillshorough, Governor, (term of 

office, from Jan. 1, 1847, to Jan. 1, 1849,) A furnished house & $2,000 
William Hill, of Raleigh, Secretary of State ^ $800 and fees. 

Charles L. Hinton, of Wake Co., Treasurer^ 1,500 

Stephen Birdsall, of Raleigh, Clerk of the Treat. Dep\ 500 

William F. Collins, of Chatham Co., Comptroller, 1,000 

Council of State. — William O. Britton, of Bertie Co. ; James W. Howard, 
of Jones Co. ; Dr. Willie Perry, of Franklin Co.; Nathaniel M. Roan, of 
Caswell Co. ; James Lowry, of Buncombe Co. ; Absalom Myres, of Anson 
Co. j and Josiah Cowles, of Surry Co. 

Pay, $3 per diem while in service, and $3 for every 30 miles' travelling. 



JUDICIABT. 




Supreme Cowrt. 




» 


Salary. 


of Orange Co., Chief Justice, 


$2,500 


of Hillsborough, Associate Justice, 


2.500 


of Halifax, do. 


2,500 


of Raleigh, Reporter, 


aoo 


Clerk. 





Thomas Ruffin, 
Frederick Nash, 
Joseph J. Daniel, 
James Iredell, 
Bdm. B. Freeman, 

The Supreme Court holds two sessions in each year, in the City of Ra- 
leigh ; to wit, on the second Monday in June and the last Monday in Dc- 
cember ; and continues to sit at each term until all the business on the 
docket is determined, or continued upon good cause shown. It has power 
to hear and determine all questions at law, brought before it by appeal from 
a Superior Court of Law, and to hear and determine all cases in equity, 
brought before it by appeal from a Court of Equity, or removed there by the 
parties thereto. It has original and exclusive jurisdiction in repealing let- 
ters patent, and also has power to issue writs of certiorari, scire facias, habeas 
corpus, mandamus, and all other writs which may be proper and necessary 
for the exercise of its jurisdiction. 



260 



SOUTH CAROLINA. 



[1847. 



The judges of the Supreme and the Superior Courts are elected by joint 
ballot of both houses of the General Assembly, hold their offices during good 
behavior, and, under a provision in the amendments to the constitution of the 
State, their salaries cannot be diminished during their continuance in office* 



Judges. 

Thomas Settle, 
John M. Dick, 
D. F. Caldwell, 
B. M. Pearson, 
John L. Bailey, 
M. E. Manly, 
Wm, H. Battle, 



Supei'ior or Circuit Courts, 
Salary, $1,950 each.! Solicitors. 



of Rockingham. 
of Greensboro*, 
of Salisbury, 
of Davie Co. 
of Hillsboro'. 
of Newbem. 
of Chapel HOI. 



David Outlaw, of Bertie Co. 

John S. Hawks, of Washington. 
Robert Strange, of Fayetteville. 
Cadwallader Jones, Jr. of Orange Co. 
Hamilton C. Jones, of Rowan Co. 
Burgess S. Gaither, of Ashvillc. 



Spier Whitaker, of Halifax Co., Attorney General. 

Salary of a Solicitor — $20 for each Court which he attends, besides fees 
for conviction. The Attorney General receives, in addition, $100 for each 
term of the Supreme Court which he attends. 

The Superior Courts of law and the Courts of equity are holden in each 
and every county of the State, twice in each year, by the judges thereofl For 
this purpose, the State is divided into seven circuits, each of which com- 
prises about ten counties -, and the judges ride these circuits alternately, ac- 
cording to an arrangement agreed upon among themselves, the only restric- 
tion imposed upon them in making the arrangements being, that no judge 
shall ride the same circuit twice 'in succession. As judges of the Superior 
Courts of law, they have jurisdiction of all pleas, real, personal, and mixed ; 
of all suits and demands relative to legacies, filial portions, and estates of 
intestates ; and also, of all pleas of the State and criminal matters of what 
nature, degree, or denomination soever, whether brought before them by 
original or mesne process, or by certiorari, writs of error, appeal from any 
inferior Court, or by any other way or means whatsoever. As judges of the 
Courts of Equity, they have all the jurisdiction and powers appertaining to 
Courts of Chancery, 



William Aiken, 
J.F.Irvin, 
Robert Q. Finckney, 
WilUara C. Black, 



XIV. SOUTH CAROLINA. 

GOVEKNMENT. 

Governor J (term expires Dec, 1846.) 
of Darlington, lAeutenard Governor. 
of Charleston, Secretary of State, 
of Columbia, Comptroller General, 



Salary. 
$3,500 

Fees. 
2,000 



1S47.] SOUTH CABOUNA. 261 

Jeremiah D. Yates, of Charleston, Treasurer^ Ldwer Division^ 2,000 

PrancisBurt, of Pendleton, do. Upper Dimsion, 1,600 

Thomas Frean, of Newberry, Surveyor Generaly Pees. 

Henry Bailey, of Charleston, Attorney Generaly 1,100 and Fees. 

William W. Ancrum, of Summerville, Sup't ofPuUic ITorJb, 1,500 

r. H. Ehnore, of Charleston, Pres. Bank of the State ofS, C, 3,000 

W. E. Martin, of Grahamville, Clerk of the Senate, 

Thomas W. Glover, of Orangebnrg, Clerk of the House, 1,000 

# 
Judiciaht. 

Clumcellors in Equity, 

Appointed. Salary. 

Job Johnston. of Newberry, 1830, $3,000 

"William Harper, of Fairfield, 1835, 3,000 

David Johnson, of Columbia, 1815, 3,500 

Benj.FanenilDunkin, of Charleston, 1837, 3,000 

Judges of the General Sessions and Common Pleas, 

Appointed. Salary. 

D. L. Wardlaw, of Abbeville, 1841, $3,000 

John S. Richardson, of Sumter, 1818, 3,500 

Josiah J. Evans, of Society HjU, 1829, 3,000 

Edward Frost, of Charleston, 1844, 3,000 

A. Pickens Butler, of Edgefield, 1835, 3,000 

J.B. O'Neall, of Newberry, 1835, 3,000 

A. H Speers, of Laurens, State JRqxjrter, 1841, 1,500 

Courts of appeals in Law and Equity for hearing and determining all 
appeals, and motions in arrest of judgment, and for a new trial, are held in 
Columbia^ on the first Monday in May, and on the fourth Monday in Novem- 
ber, in every year. A similar Court sits in Charleston, on the 1st Monday 
in January, for cases brought up from the Courts in the Districts of George- 
town, Horry, Beaufort, Colleton, and Charleston. 

The Courts for the Correction of Errors, consisting of all the chancellors, 
and judges of the Courts of Law, are held at such time during the sitting of 
the Courts of Appeal, as the chancellors and judges may appoint Alex- 
ander Herbemont, Clerk of the Court of Appeals. 

Finances. 

Whele amount of State Debt, in year ending Sept. 30, 1845, $3,234,502 31 

The property of the State is as follows : 

Bank of South Carolina, for capital, . $2,466,922 74 

« « « for the Sinking Fund, . 685,545 83 

Debt of Railroad and Canal Companies, . 418,786 54 

Shares in L. C. and C. Railroad Co., . 800,000 00 

$4,371,255 11 



^ I 



262 



OlfiOSOIA. 



L1847. 



XV. GEORGIA. 

GOYEBNKENT. 

George W. Crawford, of Richmond Co., Governor^ 

(term of oflBce expires, November, 1846,) 



Saluy. 



Nathan C. Bamet, 
WilUam H. MitcheU, 
David E. Bothwell, 
P. M. Compton, 
John S. Thomas, 



$3,000 
1,600 
1,600 
1,600 
1,600 



of Clark Co., Secretary of States 

of Baldwin Co., Treasurer, 

of Jfifferson Co., Comptroller General, 

of Butts Co., Surveyor General, 

of Baldwin Co., Director of the Central Bank, 

Anderson W. Redding, of Harris Co., Keeper of the Penitentiary, 

Jesse H. Campbell, of Baldwin Co., Commissionerof the Deaf and Dumb. 

Absalom H. Chappell, of Bibb Co., President of the Senate, $5 a day. 

T. R. R. Cobb, of Clark Co., Secretary of the Senate, 500 
Charles J. Jenkins, of Richmond Co.,Speaker of House of Rep., $5 a day. 

John J. Word, of Cass Co., Clerk of House ofBq)., 500 

The pay of the members of the Legislature is $4 a day. The sessions of 
the Legislature are now held biennially. 



Judiciary. 




Supreme Court. 




' 


Term ends. 


Chief Judge, 


1852. 


Judge, 


1850. 


do. 


1848. 



Joseph H. Lumpkin, 
Hiram Warner, 
E. A- Nisbet, 

The term of office for these judges is six years. 

The State is divided into eleven Circuits, with a judge for each. 



W. B. Fleming, 
R. L. Gamble, 
N. C. Sayre, 
Charles Dougherty, 
James A. Meriwether, 
J. J. Scarborough, 
John Floyd, 
Robert B. Alexander, 
Aug. R. Wright, 
E. Y. Hill, 
Lott Warren, 
John W. Floumoy, 
J. ^. Harden, 

John W. Wilde, 



of Clark Co., 



of Chatham Co., Judge of the Eastern Circuit, $1,800 

do. Middle do. 1,800 

do. Northern do. 1,800 

cfo. Western do. 1,800 

do. Ockmulgee do. 1,800 

do. Southern do. 1,800 

do. Flint do. 1,800 

do. Chatahoochee do. 1,800 

do. Cherokee do. 1,800 

do. Coweta do. 2,100 

do. Southwestern do. 2,100 
Attorney General, $250 and perquisites, 
of Chatham Co., Judge of Court of Oyer and 

Terminer, Savannah, 1,000 
of Richmond Co., Judge of Court of Oyer and 

Terminer, Augusta, 1,000 



of Cass Co., 



1^47.] OEOBGIA. 263 

Inferior Court. — An Inferior Conrt is held in each county, composed of 
five justices, elected by the people every four years. These Comts possess 
the powers of Courts of Probate. The justices have no salary. 

By a census of the State of Georgia, taken in 1845, the population was 
found to be as follows : 

1838. 1840. 1845. 

Whites, 373,190 407,695 458,169 

Blacks, 268,511 283,697 316,156 

Total, 641,701 691,392 774,325 

Difference, 104,679 123,998 142,013 

Finances. 

Total amount received by the State in 1845, $626,958 59 

" " expended " « . 285,850 31 

Whole amount of State debt, . . 1,727,760 00 

Annual interest on this debt, . . . 109,296 32 

Principal' Items of Expenditure. I Chief Sources of Inamie. 

Civil establishment, $35,246 41 Direct taxes, $274,866 82 

Contingent fund, . 14,495 57] Taxes on bank stock, 19,078 84 

Interest on State debt, 109,296 32 Bank dividends, 10,394 00 

Reduction of State debt, 101,549 35'Bank stock, 262,300 00 

University of Georgia, 5,000 Oo| Reverted land lots, 77,850 00 

Teaching poor children, 7,692 37; Governor's deposit, 27,676 48 

Indigent lunatic, 3,470 95 Pedlers and auctions, 4,476 87 

Indigent deaf and dumb, 1,000 00 Balance from 1844, 58,312 25 

Kailroads. 

Railways already finished : 

Central Railroad, from Savannah to Macon, 192 miles. 

Greorgia Railroad, from Augusta to Atlanta, 170 do. 
W. and A. R. R"^, from Atlanta to Dawsonville, 80 do. 

442 do. 
To be finished in 1846 : 

Macon and Western Railroad, from Macon to Atlanta, 101 miles. 

Western and Atlantic R. R., from Dawsonville to Cross Plains, 22 do. 

The Macon and Western Railroad is virtually an extension of the Central 
Railroad. Atlanta is the common point at which the Georgia Railroad and 
the Macon and Western Railroad terminate. The Western and Atlantic 
Railroad is the extension of both to the westward : and when it reaches Cross 
Plains, the works of internal improvements in the State will be completed 
within fifteen miles of the southern boundary of the State of Tennessee. 

SVom Cross Plains to the seaboard, by railroad, is as follows : 

From Cross Plains to Savannah, . . . 395 miles. 

Prom Cross Plains to Charleston, . . 408 do. 

From Cross Plains toNashyille, via. Chattanooga, is about 160 do. 
23 



264 FLORIDA. [1847. 

Georgia Central Railroad and Banking Company, 

Amonnt of property in the banking department, $239,233 ; banking liabil- 
ities for circulation and deposits, about $80,000 ; expended for Railroad to 
Dec. 2, 1845, $2,964,193. 

The number of passengers transported on this road in 1845, was 14,611. 
The amount of receipts from passengers, $60,000; from freight, chiefly 
cotton, and mail, $308,340 ; total earnings of the year, $368,450 ; do. of the 
preceding year, $328,424. The number of bales of cotton transported, was 
114,641. The expenses of the year amounted to $186,886, of which $78,286 
were for maintenance of way, $54,460 for motive power and maintenance of 
machinery, and $8,573 for maintenance of cars. The number of miles nm 
by locomotives was 223,241. 



XVL FLORIDA. 

GOYEBNHBKT. 

Salarf. 

William D. Moselby, of Mickossukie, Governor y (term expires 

October, 1849,) $1,500 

James T. Archer, of Tallahassee, Secretary of State^ Fees & 600 

Nathaniel P. Bemis, do. Comptroller^ 800 

Benjamin Byrd, do. Treasurer ^ 800 

Oscar A. Mjres, do. Govemor^s Private Secretary^ 600 

James A. Bertheolet, of Leon Co., President of the Senate, $3 a day. 

Isaac Ferguson, Jr., of Gadsden Co., Speaker of the House, 3 a day. 

Thomas F. King, of Leon Co., Secretary of the Senate, 6 a day. 

Mariamno D. Papy, do. Clerk of the House, 6 a day. 

The General Assembly, chosen on the 1st Monday of October, meets on 
the 1st Monday in November of each year. The Representatives are elect- 
ed for one year, and the Senators for two years ; the number of Representa- 
tives can never exceed sixty. 

Jfdiciart. 

Circuit Courts* 

Thomas Douglass^ of Jacksonville, Chief Judge, Eastern Circuit, $2,000 

George S. Hawkins, of Apalachicola, Judge, Western do. 2,000 

Thomas Baltzell, of Tallahassee, do. Middle do, 2,000 

George W. McRea, of Key West, do. Southern do, 2,000 

Joseph Branch, of Tallahassee, Attorney-Gen. and Beporier, 500 

Mariamno D. Papy, do. Clerk of Supreme Courts Fees. 



1847.] ASABXMA. 265 

Salary. 
John C. Smith, of Apalachicola, SdicUoTj Western CircuUj Fees & 200 

Thomas J. Heir, of Mondcello, do. Middle do. " 200 
Felix G. Livingston, of Colambns, do. Eastern do. " 200 

Thomas F. King, of Key West, do. Southern do. " 200 

The Judges of the Circuits are also Justices of the Supreme Court, and 
hold court in the several circuits alternately. 

The Circuit Courts have original common law jurisdiction in all matters, 
civil and criminal. They also have original equity jurisdiction, until a sepa- 
rate Chancery Court shall be established by the Legislature. The judges 
are elected by concurrent vote of a majority of both Houses, and are chosen 
at first for five years ; after that term, during good behavior. They may be 
removed by impeachment, or by address of two thirds of each House. The 
Attorney General is elected by joint vote of the two Houses for four years ; 
the Solicitor also for each circuit for the same term. 



XVIL ALABAMA. 

GOYEBNMBNT. 

Salary. 
JOSHTTA L. Mahtiit, of Tuscaloosa, Governor ^ (term of office 

expires on the 1st Monday in December, 1847,) $2,500 

William Garrett, Secretary of State, Fees and 1,200 

Jefferson C. Van Dyke, ComptrcUer ofPiMic Accounts, Fees and 1,000 

Samuel G. Frierson, State Treasurer, Fees and 1,000 

Thomas D. Clarke, of Tuscaloosa, Attumey General, Fees and 425 

James W. Lang, of Mobile, Adj. and Inspector Cfen^ral, 200 

Carter R. Hairison, of Tuscaloosa, Quartermaster General, 200 

The Secretaiy of State, the Comptroller, and the Treasurer, are elected 
for two years, by a joint vote of the two Houses of the General Assembly. 

The Senate consists of 33 members, elected for four years, one half of them 
going out every two years. The House of JRepresentatives consists of 100 
members, elected for two years. The pay of the members of both Houses is 
$4 a day each. 

John A. Wington, of Sumpter Co., President of the Senate. 
Andrew B. Moore, of Perry Co., Speaker of the House. 

The legislature changed the seat of government from Tuscaloosa to the 
city of Montgomery. The building of the new State House in Montgomery 
has been commenced. The comer stone was laid, with Masonic ceremonies, 
on the 4th of July, 1846. The following is an extract from one of the me- 
morials deposited therein : 

23 



266 ~ AJULBAMA. [1847. 

" This city was foanded by Andrew Dexter, a native of the city of Boston, 
Mass. ♦ ♦ ♦ He died in the city of Mobile in the year 1837. The city 
was named after General Montgomery, who fell at the storming of Quebec. 
The county was named after Major Montgomery, who fell at the battle of 
the Horse Shoe." 

When the new State House shall be completed, the public offices of the 
State, its records and archives, are to be removed from Tuscaloosa to Mont- 
gomery. 

Judiciary. 

Supreme Court. 

Salary. 

Henry W. Collier, of Tuscaloosa, Chief Justice, $2,250 

John J. Ormond, of Tuscaloosa, AssocicUe Justice, 2,250 

Henry Goldthwaite, of Mobile, do, 2,250 

Thomas D. Clarke, of Tuscaloosa, Attorney General, Fees and 425 

James B. Wallace, of Tuscaloosa, Cleik, Fees. 

The judges of all the Courts, and the Chancellors, are elected by a joint 
vote of the two Houses of the General Assembly, for six years. The judges 
of the Supreme Com*t are the reporters of their own decisions, and the num- 
ber of volumes published is now 26. 

The Supreme Court has appellate Jurisdiction only, and only upon points 
of law, taken up from the Chancery, Circuit, County, and Criminal Courts, 
by appeal or writ of error. This Court sits at the seat of government, on the 
1st Monday of June and the 2d Monday of December. 

Court of CJiancery. 

SaJaiy, 

Anderson Crenshaw, of Manningham, CJiancdlor of the Southern Dio\ $1,500 
Wiley W. Mason, of Wetumpka, do. do. Middle do. 1 ,500 

David G. Ligon, ofMoulton, do. do. Northern do. 1,500 

The Southern division includes the counties of Mobile, Baldwin, Wash- 
ington, Clarke, Sumter, Marengo, Monroe, Conecuh, Covington, Butler, 
Dale, Coffee, Henry, Barbour, Pike, Montgomery, Lowndes, and Wilcox. 

The Middle division includes the counties of Husscll, Chambers, Ran- 
dolph, Macon, Tallapoosa, Coosa, Autauga, Dallas, Perry, Greene, Tusca- 
loosa, Pickens, Fayette, Marion, Walker, Jefferson, Bibb, and Shelby. 

The Northern division includes the counties of Lauderdale, Franklin, 
Lawrence, Limestone, Madison, Morgan, Blount, St. Clair, Marshall, Jack- 
son, De Kalb, Cherokee, Benton, and Talladega. 

The State is divided into forty districts, and one session of the Court is 
held annually in each district, except in Mobile, Sumpter, and Montgomery 
districts, where two sessions are held. 



CiaCDIT CODETS. 



CHmt'mjJ Covrt for MMU Co. 
Geoi^ W. Crabb, of Mobile, Judge, $1,500 

The Circail Court has origioal jnrisdiclion in all dvil and crimmBl caosea 
in the State ; and appellaw jnrisdiction in all appeals and certiomris brought 
up fiom inferior tribanols. Two eesaioni of thii Court are h«ld each 
year in every county in the State. The Soliciton Teceive S250 and fees, 
except the one in the Isl Circuit, who reeoiTes S350, mi the Attorney Gen- 
eral, who is Solicitor for the 3d Circuit 

The Criminal Court for Mobile County holds three tenns in each year, on 
die 1st Mondays of November, Februaiy, and June. 

Common School Ftaid. 
Thia fund arises from the sale of landa granted by CongreaB. Itbelonga, 
by the terms of the grant, to the several townships in the State, in proportion 
to the amount for which the lands lying in each township may have been 
sold. Mnch of the omoant of sales is not collected, and much of the land 
remains unsold. The fund actually collected, as ascertained from a report to 
the last legislature, is S9ST,849 80. This amouot includes the interest due, 
which in the same report is estimated at $B8,23S. The interest is applicable 
to the support of commott schools io each township. 

University Fund, 
The amount of this fund is $300,000. It yields an interest of 818,000 per 
annum. Balances of former years, the receipts for tuition, and moneys de- 
rived from other sources, made the available funds subject to eipenditnre on 
27th November, 1845, 833,820 01. The expenses for the year, paid from 
this amount, were at that date S!5,S17 84, leaving ui unexpended balance 
0f98,3D3 17. 

TisAScee. 



Total expenditures for the same period, 
Balance SIth November, 1845, 



268 AIJIBAMA. [1847. 

Principal Items cf Expenditure. 

Pay of members and other expenses of the Legislature, 

session 1844-'45, .... $48,039 48 

Salaries of State officers, . . 36,165 41 

Interest on State bonds, .... 159,645 83 

Prosecution of criminals, . . . 12,102 34 

Conveying convicts to the Penitentiary, . 2,965 IS 

All other expenses, .... 28,133 30 

Total, ..... $287,051 49 

Chief Sources of Income. 

Bonos from the Bank of Mobile, . . ' . $5,000 00 

Taxes of 1843, ..... 1,74191 

Taxes of 1844, ..... 265,955 59 

From a report of a committee of the legislature in January, 1846, it ap- 
pears that the indebtedness of the State is — 

For State bonds for banking capital, . $9,207,555 55 

" University and other school funds, . . 1,233,690 47 

** Circulation and other liabilities of banks, . . 1,686,861 56 

" Revenue fund, surplus revenue, and three per cent fund, 1 ,5 1 7 ,970 43 

Total indebtedness, .... $13,646,078 01 
The State bonds fall due as follows : 
$1,113,000 00 at 6 per cent in 1850 $3,843,000 00 at 5 per cent, in 1863 



959,000 00 at 5 per cent in 1865 
2,317,000 00 at 5 per cent in 1866 



300,000 00 at 5 per cent in 1852 
1,043,555 55 at 5 per cent in 1858 
600,000 00 at 5 per cent in 1859 

Hie interest on State bonds payable in England, . $184,707 80 

do. do. do. in the United States, 286,800 00 

do. on University Fund, . . 18,000 00 

do. on Common School Fund, . . 68,238 00 

$557,745 80 
The interest has heretofore been punctually paid. The last legislature 
provided ample means for maintaining the future credit of |he State. 

The aggregate of assets held by the banks is said by the same committee to 
be $14,023,1 13 08, from which, in their opinion, only $6,t)00,000 ^n be real- 
ized. The bank and branches are all in process of liquidation. From No- 
vember, 1844, to Nov. 1845, the total collections amounted to $1,746,741 68. 



1847.] 



MISSISSIFPI. 



269 



AxBEBT G, Brown, 
Wilson Hemingway, 
William Clark, 
James E. Matthews, 
James M. Lewis, 
Benj. G. Wier, 
George T. Swann, 
James Whitfield, 



XVIII. MISSISSIPPI. 

GOVEBNMENT. 

Governor y Term ends Jan. 1848, 

Secretary of State^ Nov. 1847, 

State Treasurer^ Nov. 1847, 

Auditor of Public AccouniSj Nov. 1847, 
Keeper of the Capitol ^ Librarian^ 
Keeper of the Penitentiary ^ 
President of the Senate. 
Speaker of the House, 

Judiciary. 



Salary. 

$3,000 
1,200 
1,500 
1,500 
500 
1,500 



High Court of Errors and Appeals. 

Term ends. Salarj. 

William L. Sharkey, of Vicksburg, Presiding Jtidge^ Nov. 1847, $3,000 

Alexander M. Clayton, Judge^ do. 1851, 3,000 

J. S. B. Thatcher, of Natchez, do. do. 1849, 3,000 

John D. Freeman, of Jackson, Attorney Gen., do. 1849, 1,000 

John M. Duffield, do. Clerk^ Fees. 

This Court, which has no jurisdiction except what properly belongs to a 
Court of Errors and Appeals, holds its sessions annually at Jackson, com- 
mencing on the 1st Mondays in January and November. 



Superior Court of Chancery, 



Term ends. Salary. 
Nov. 1851, $2,500 



Stephen Cocke, of Lowndes Co., Chancellor;^ 
Robert Hughes, of Jackson, Clerk. 

This Court, which has jurisdiction over all matters, pleas, and complaints 
whatsoever, belonging to, or cognizable in, a Court of Equity, holds two 
sessions annually, at the city of Jackson, on the 1st Mondays of December 
and June, "nliich continue as long as business requires. 

District Chancery Courts. 

Term ends. Salary. 

D. W. Dickenson, Vice Chancellm', Nortlieni IMst., Nov. 1851, $2,000 

James M. Smiley, do. SoutJiem Dist.^ Nov. 1849, 2,000 



Clerks of Northern District. 

William P. Bole, Carrollton. 
Jonathan T. Sims, Columbus. 
Hannibal Harris, Holley Springs. 



Clerks of Southern District. 

Erasmus S. Russell, Natchez. 
Abram W. Richards, Mississippi City. 
E. L. Bowen, MonticcUo. 



J. Bobbins, Fulton. 

These clerks are elected by the people, and hold office for two years. 

Time of holding Court. — For the counties of Jackson, Harrison, Greene, 
Hancock, and Perry, at Missispippi City, on the 2d Monday of February 

23* 



270 



MlSBISSIPri. 



[1847. 



and Angust, to contintie iu seBsion 12 judicial days, and no longer. For 
the connties of Lowndes, Winston, Octibbcha, Kemper, Noxabee, and 
Neshoba, 1st Monday in May and NoTember. For the counties of Itaw- 
amba, Pontotoc, Monroe, Chickasaw, and Tishamingo, 3d Monday in May 
and November. For the counties of Marshall, Coahoma, Tippah, De Soto, 
Fonola, Lafayette, and Tunica, 1st Monday in January and July. For the 
counties of Carroll, Choctaw, Holmes, Talabusha, and Tallahatchie, 3d 
Monday in June and December. For the counties of Copiah, Lawrence, 
Pike, Marion, Covington, Jones, and Wayne, at Monticello, 4th Monday 
in January and July, for 12 judicial days. For the counties of Wilkinson, 
Amite, Franklin, Jefferson, and Adams, at Natchez, 4th Mondays in June 
and December, for 24 days. 

These Courts have concurrent power and jurisdiction within the district 
with the Superior Court of Chancery, when the amount in controversy 
does not exceed $500,000. The Vice Chancellors are elected for term of 4 
years ; they must be at least 30 years of age. Appeals may be made to the 
Superior Court of Chancery, unless by consent of both parties, when the 
same may be taken directly to the High Court of Errors and Appeals. 

District or Circuit Courts. 

The Judicial divisions were reorganized in 1845, and formed into 7 
Districts, or Circuits. The salary of the Judges is $2,000 each. 



Dist. Judges. 



1. Stanhope Posey, 

2. Thomas A. Willis, 

8. George Coalter, 

4. Armstead B. Dawson, 

6. Rohert C. Perry, 

6. Francis M. Rodgers, 

7. Hugh R. seller. 



District Attorneys. 



William T. Marfan, 
T. McCartney, 

Fulton Anderson, 

G^eorge Wood, 

£. A. M. Gray, 
Septimus Caldwell, 

John W. Thompson, 



Counties of the Districts. 



Wilkinson, Adams, Jeflfierson, Franklin, 
Amite, and Claiborne- 

Copiah, Pike, Lawrence, Marion, Hancock.^ 
Simpson, Covington, Harrison, Smith, 
llankin, and Scott. 

Tunica, Coahoma, Bolivar, Washington, 
Warren, Hinds, Issaquena, and Sun- 
flower. 

Jasper, Newton, Jackson^ Jones, Greene, 
Perry, Wayne, Clarke, Lauderdale, Nox- 
ubee, Neehoba^and Eemi)er. 

Yazoo, Madison, Holmes, AttiOa, Winston, 
and Leake. 

Monroe, Lowndes. Octibbeha, Choctaw, 
Yalabusha, Tallahatchie, Carroll, and 
Chickasaw 

De Soto, Marshall, Tippah, Tishamingo, 
Itawamba, Pontotoc, La&yette, and 
Ponola. 



Common Schools. — An act establishing a system of common schools wtis 
passed March 4, 1846. The Boards of County Police are to appoint School 
Commissioners, one to each district, amounting to five in each county. 
These Commissioners are to superintend the schools, hire tie teachers, and 
report semi-annually to the Seretary of State, who is ex officio General 
School Commissioner, the number of pupils and of teachers, and the 
amount paid out of the State funds to teachers. Abstracts of these re- 
turns are to be published semi-annually, in July and Januaiy. The boards 
of police may levy a special tax for the schools, not to exceed the State 
tax ; but no township shall be taxed for this purpose without the consent of 



1847.] 



MISSISSIPPI. 



271 



a majority of its inhabitants. The funds arising from leases of the 16th 
sections of land, from fines and forfeitures, and from licenses to hawkers 
and pedlers, keepers of billiard tables, retiEiilers of liquors, and brokers, 
shall form part of the School Fund. 

Congressional Districts, 

First District. — Counties of Tishamingo, Tippah, Marshall, De Soto, 
Tunica, Coahoma, Bolivar, Tallahatchie, Sunflower, Ponola, Irafayette, 
Pontotoc— 69,544. 

Second District. — Itawamba, Monroe, Chickasaw, Yallobusha* CarroU, 
Choctaw, Oktibbeha, Lowndes, Noxubee — 51,102. 

Third District. — Winston. Attala, Holmes, Washington, Issaquena, 
Yazoo, Madison, Leake, Neshoba, Kemper,^ Lauderdale, Newton, Eankin, 
Hinds, Warren — 63,306. 

Fourth District. — Claiborne, Jefferson, Clark, Copiah, Simpson, Wayne, 
Smith, Jasper, Jones, Covington, Lawrence, Franklin, Adams, Wilkinson, 
Amit«, Pike, Marion, Perry, Greene, Jackson, Harrison, Hancock — 57,852. 

Finances. — The message of Governor Brown represents the finances of 
the State as greatly improved. The indebtedness on accoxmt of the Audi- 
tor's warrants, on the 1st of January, 1846, was $271,707 07, of which about 
$160,000 is not payable until January, 1847, so that the amount to be 
raised in 1846 is estimated as follows : 

Auditor's warrants, issued prior to January 1st, 1846, not 

fanded, or funded and due, in the year 1846, . $105,845 09 

Expenses of the Legislature, . . . 60,000 00 

State Government for 1846, . . . 125,000 00 

Total, ..... $290,845 09 

In regard to the Planters' Bank bonds, he entertains the hope that an 
instalment will be paid on them at no distant day, and thereafter be paid 
regularly as they fall due, though he anticipates no considerable amount 
from the State's stock in the Bank. 



Adams, 


3.840 


Amite, 


3,804 


Attala, 


5,433 


Bolivar, 


387 


Carroll, 


7,556 


Chickasaw, 


6,423 


Choctaw, 


6,652 


Claiborne, 


3,043 


Clark, 


2,987 


Copiah, 


5,703| 


Coahoma, 


1,109, 


Covington, 


2,015 


De Soto, 


7,303 


Franklin, 


2,188 


Greene, 


1,322 


Hancock, 


1,737 


Harrison, 


1,449 


Hinds, 


7,910 


Holmes, 


5,551 


Issaquena, 


378 


Itawamba, 


9,461 



Census of the Whites in Mississippi in 1845. 



Jackson, 

Jasper, 

Jefferson, 

Jones, 

Kemper, 

Lafayette, 

Lauderdale, 

Lawrence, 

Leake, 

Lowndes, 

Marion, 

Madison, 

Monroe, 

Marshall, 

Natchez, 

Neshoba, 

Newton, 

Noxubee, 

Oktibbeha, 

Pen^, 



1,570 


Pontotoc, 


6,823 


3,131 


Pike, 


3,795 


2,275 Ponola, 


4,058 


1,405 Rankin, 


3,621 


5,713 Scott, 


1,958 


6,061 


Simpson, 


2,839 


5,242 


Smith, 


2,590 


3,641 


Sunflower, 


330 


2,476 


Tunica, 


194 


7,320 


Tippah, 


11,669 


2,195 


Tishamingo, 


9,983 


4,400 


Tallahatchie, 


1,819 


6,591 


Vicksburg, 


2,865 


10,221 


W arren, 


6,242 


3,327 


Washington, 


474 


2,167 


Wayne, 


1,322 


2,694 


Wilkinson, 


3,503 


5,369 


Winston, 


4,341 


3,568 


Yallobusha, 


7,623 


1,508 


Yazoo, 


4,706 



247,880 



273 



LOUISIANA. 



[1847. 



XIX. LOUISIANA. 



Isaac Johnson, 
Trasimon Landry, 
Charles Gayarr6, 
Zenon Ledonx, Jr., 
Joseph Walker, 
Louis Bringier, 
Charles N. Rowley, 
Raphael Toledano, 
Paul 0. Hebert, 
Robert J. Kerr, 



Government. 

Term ends. Salary, 

of West Feliciana, Governor ^ Jan. 1850, $6,000 

of Ascension, Lieut. Governor, *' 1850, 4 a day. 

of New Orleans, Secretary of State, " 1850, 2,000 
of Pointe Coupee, Priv. Sec. to the Gov.^ Perqui. & 600 

of Rapides, Treasurer, Jan. 1848, 4,000 

of New Orleans, Surveyor General^ 600 

Adj. Sf Ins. General, 2,000 

Auditor of Accounts, 2,.50O 

State Engineer, 3,500 

Register of Land Office, 687 75 



of Concordia, 
of New Orleans, 
of Iberville, 



JUDICIABY. 



George Eustis, 
Pierre A. Rost, 
George R. King, 
Thomas Slidell, 



Supreme 

of New Orleans, 
of St. Charles, 
of Opelousas. 
of New Orleans, 



William A. Elmore, of New Orleans, 

Eugene Lasere, 

Pierre Labyche, 

M. A. Airiail, 

Henry M. Bry, 

Merritt M. Robinson, of New Orleans, 



Court. 

Chief Justice, 
Associate Justice, 
do. 
do. 
Attorney General, 
Clerk in New Orleans, 
do. in Opelousas, 
do. in Alexandria, 
do. in Monroe, 
Reporter, 



1854, 6,000 
1852, 5,500 
1850, 6,500 
1848, 5,500 
1848, 3,000 

Fees. 

Fees. 

Fees. 

Fees. 
Perquisites. 



District Couiis of New Orleans ; \st District. 



Districts. 
1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 



Districts. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 



Judges. Term ends. Salary. 

Isaac T. Preston, 1850, $3,500 

E. A. Canon, 1852, 3,500 

Thomas H. Kennedy, 1850, 3,500 

George Strawbridge, 1852, 3,500 

A. M. Buchanan, 1850, 3,500 

Other District Courts. 

Judges. Term ends. Salary. 

Octave S. Rousseau, 1848, $2,500 

J. Calvin Clarke, 1848, 2,500 

Thomas C. Nicholls, 1848, 2,500 

David A. Randall, 1848, 2,500 

John J. Burke. 1852, 2,500 



Clerks. 
Alfred Rousseau. 
Thomas C. Poole. 
William P. Bedlock. 
Thomas Gilmorc. 
Prosper Le Blanc. 



Attorneys, 
Alfred Bodin. 
Franklin Perin. 
Thco. Lawre. 
James L. Cole. 
Augustus Talbot. 



1847.J 




LOUISIANA. 




District. 


Judges. 


Tenn ends. 


Salary. 


Attorneys. 


7. 


Wniiam D. Boyle, 


1852, 


2,500 


Z. S. Lyons. 


8. 


Martin G. Penn, 


1850, 


2,500 


Nicholas Baylies. 


9. 


Fred. H. Farrar, 


1850, 


2,500 


William Beatly. 


10. 


Louis Selby, 


1850, 


2,500 


William Perkins. 


11. 


Greorge Mayo, 


1848, 


2,500 


Edward Barry. 


12. 


Greorge W. Copley, 


1850, 


2,500 


R. W. Richardson. 


13. 


Balph Cushman, 


1852, 


2,500 


Patrick Barry. 


14. 


Cornelius Voorhies, 


1848, 


2,500 


Malcolm A. Eraser. 


15. 


John H. Overton, 


1848, 


2,500 


James M Moore. 


16. 


James Taylor, 


1852, 


2,500 


Elisha Basse. 


17. 


Edward R. Olcott, 


1852, 


2,500 


John S. Gilbert 



273 



Abstract of the New Conbtitutiok, 

AdopUd in Oonvenium, May 14tA, 1845, and ratified by the People November 

5th, 1845. 

Representaliyes, not less than 70, nor more than 100, in number, shall 
be chosen every second year, on the 1st Monday in November, and shall 
meet every second year, on the 3d Monday in January following. A Rep- 
resentative must be a free white male, 21 years of age, who has been three 
years a citizen of the United States, three years a resident of the State, and 
one year a resident of the Parish where he is chosen. Every Parish shall 
have at least one Representative, and more according to population. A 
census shall be taken in 1847, another in 1855, and one every ten years 
thereafter. 

Every free white male, 21 years of age, two years a citizen of the United 
States, or resident in the State for two consecutive years next preceding tho 
election, and the last year thereof in the parish where he proposes to vote, 
shall have the right of sufirage. Absence from the State for more than 90 
consecutive days, unless the house or place of busmess of the absentee be 
occupied during his absence by his family or servants, shall interrupt the 
residence here required. United States soldiers and seamen, paupers and 
convicts, shall not vote ; and no one shall vote except in his own parish or 
election precinct. 

Senators, 32 in number, shall be chosen for four years, one half of their 
number being chosen every two yeacs. A Senator must be 27 years old, 
ten years a citizen of the United States, four years a resident of the State, 
and one year a resident in his district Deducting the population of New 
Orleans from that of the State, the remainder divided by 28 shall be the 
senatorial ratio for the districts. Senators and Representatives shall re- 
ceive $4 a day during their attendance, going to, and returning from the 
General Assembly, and no sessions shall last more than €0 days; acts 
passed after 60 days shall be invalid. No clergyman shall be eligible to the 
General Assembly, and no person entrusted with public money for which 



274 LOUISIJLNA. [1847. 

he has not received a dischaige. A State Treasurer shall be chosen bien- 
nially by joint ballot. 

The Governor and Lieutenant Governor, chosen by a plurality of the 
electors, shall hold office for four years. They must be thirty-five years old, 
and have been citizens of the United States and residents in the State for 
fifteen years. The Governor shall be inelegible for the four years succeed- 
ing his term of office. The Lieutenant Governor shall be president of the 
Senate. He may veto a biH, but two thirds of both Houses may pass it 
again in spite of his veto. 

The Supreme Court shall consist of a Chief Justice, receiving $6,000, and 
three Associate Justices, receiving $5,500 annually, appointed by the Gov- 
ernor, with the advice and consent of the Senate, for the term of eight years. 
The Court shall sit in New Orleans from the first Monday in November to 
the end of June, inclusive. All the judges may be impeached, and they 
may be removed by the Governor on the address of three fourths of both 
Houses. The Supreme Court shall have appellate jurisdiction only, when 
more than $300 are in dispute, when the legality of any tax is in question* 
on all fines and penalties imposed by municipal corporations, and in crim- 
inal cases, on points of law alone, when death, hard labor, or a fine of more 
than $300 is imposed. They may issue writs of habeas corpus in aU cases 
where they have appellate jurisdiction. If the judges are equally divided, 
the judgment appealed from shall stand affirmed. There shall be -an At- 
torney General, and as many District Attorneys as may be necessary, ap- 
pointed for two years. ^ 

The legislature shall divide the State into judicial districts, not less than 
12, or more than 20, in number, which may be re-organized every sixth 
year. One District Judge shall be appointed for six years, for each district, 
except for the Districts of New Orleans and Lafayette, where as many shall 
be appointed as are necessary. Each of these judges shall receive an annual 
salary, not less than $2,500, which shall not be increased or diminished 
during his term of office. He must be a citizen of the United States, over 
30 years old, a resident of the State for five years, and have practised law 
therein five years. The District Courts shall have jurisdiction when more 
than $50 are at stake, and in all criminal cases. 

All civil officers, except the Governor and the Judges, are removable on 
an actress of a majority of both Houses. Members may address either 
House in the French or English language. The seat of government shall 
be removed, after 1848, to a place distant at least 60 miles from New 
Orleans ; (Baton Kouge is the place selected.) The credit of the State 
shall not be lent to any person or corporation whatsoever \ but new bonds 
may be issued to replace outstanding ones. No State debt shall be con- 
tracted for more than $100,000, except in case of war, invasion, or insurrec- 
tion, unless andiorized by law for some distinctly specified object or work \ 
which law shall impose taxes to pay the mnnipg interest during the whole 



1847.] 



LOUISIANA. 



!S75 



term of the debt, and also to pay the debt itself at maturity ; and this law 
shall be irrepealable till the debt and interest are fully discharged, and shall 
not go into force till again enacted by the next legislature after its first 
passage. The State shall not subscribe to the stock of any company or 
corporation ; no corporate company shall be hereafter created, renewed, or 
extended with banking or discounting privileges. After 1890, the charters 
of all corporations may be revoked ; and no charter shall now be granted, 
except for municipal or political purposes, for more than 25 years. Taxa- 
tion shall be equal and uniform ; property shall be taxed according to its 
Talue, no one kind being taxed more than another ; an income tax may be 
levied. Any one who fights a duel, acts as second, sends or accepts a 
challenge, shall neither hold an office nor enjoy the right of suffrage in this 
State. 

There shall be a Superintendent of Public Education, holding office for 
two years. Free public schools shall be established throughout .the State ; 
the proceeds of lands granted for the purpose, and of lands escheated to the 
State, shall be held as a permanent fund, on which six per cent, interest 
shall be paid by the State for the support of these schools. A university 
shall be established in New Orleans, to be called the University of Louis- 
iana, consisting of four faculties, — law, medicine, natural sciences, and 
letters ; the Medical College of Louisiana, as now constituted, shall be its 
faculty of medicine. 

Amendments of this Constitution shall be first approved by three fifths of 
both Houses ; then published in the newspapers throughout the State three 
months before the next general election ; then approved by a majority of 
both Houses in the succeeding legislature ; then published again as before ; 
then submitted to the people, and if ratified by a majority of the voters, 
shall form a part of this constitution. 



Finances. 

The State debt proper amounts to . 
Contingent debt, — capital for property banks, 



$1,380,565 54 
14,857,564 52 



Chief Items of Receipt. 

State tax for 1844, $281,550 

Arrearages of taxes, about 52,000 

Taxes on professions, 100,183 

Auction duties, 41,479 

Hawkers and pedlers, 15,532 

Foreign insurance, 9,500 

Bonus, Mechanics' Bank, 24,211 
Bonus, Canal & Banking Co. 55,750 

Seminary lands, 21,725 

Internal imp't lands, 46,930 



Principal Expenditures. 



Legislature, 
Salaries, 

Collectors of taxes, 
Criminal prosecutions, 
Public schools. 
State Convention, 
Interest, 

Contingent expenses. 
Internal improvements, 
Jefferson College, 



The property of the State is estimated as follows *. — 



$38,265 
86,311 
27,844 
28,314 
48,421 
63,922 
89,200 
11,489 
20.000 
10,000 



276 



TEXAS. 



[1847. 



One square of ground on Canal Street, 

Slaves and machinery for public works, 

Notes and bonds of individuals, 

Shares in Clinton and Port Hudson railroad, 

One sixth of profits of Union Bank, . 

462,178 acres of land, given by the United States, at $3, 



$250,000 00 

60,000 00 

425,401 30 

20,000 00 

275,000 00 

1,386,536 25 

$2,416,937 55 



J. PiNCKNBT HjSNDBRSON, 

Albert C. Horton, 
David G. Burnet, 
John W. Harris, 
James H. Eaymond, 
James B. Shaw, 
William G. Cooke, 
Thomas W. Ward, 
Edward Burleson, 
W. E. Crump, 



XX. TEXAS. 

GOVEKNMENT. 

Term ends. 
Governor^ 1848, 

Lieut. Gov. ^ Pres. of Senate^ 1848, 
Secretary of State, 1848, 

Attorney General, 1848, 

Treasurer, 1848, 

OymptroUer, 1848, 

Adjvstant General, 1848, 

Commissioner of the Land Office, 
President pro tern, of the Senate. 
Speaker of the House. 

Judiciary. 



Salary. 
$2,000 
$3 a day. 
1,200 
1,000 
1,200 
1,200 
1,000 
1,500 



John Hemphill, 
Abner S. Lipscomb, 
R. T. Wheeler, 



Supreme Court. 

Chief Justice, 
Associate Justice, 
do. 



1852, 
1852, 
1852, 



$2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



Judges. 

1. James Love, 

2. Wm. E. Jones, 

3. R. E.B.Baylor, 

4. M. P. Norton, 

5. 0. M. Roberts, 



District Courts. 
Besidence. Salary. Dist. Attorney. Residence. Salary. 
Galveston, $1,750 Hiram Waller, Austin Co., $300 & f. 



Gonzales, 1,750 J. A. Green, Lagrange, do. 

1,750 Th. Johnson, Benham, do. 

1,750 C.W.Peterson, Jackson Co., do. 

SanAug'ne, 1,750 J. M. Ardry, San Aug'ne, do. 

6. W. B. Ochiltree, Nacogdoches, 1,750 John M. Clarty, Rush Co. do. 

7. John B. Jones, Polk Co. 1,750 Sam'l D. Hay, Huntsville, do. 

8. John T. Mills, Clarksville, 1,750 Wm. C. Young, Clarksville, do. 

First Judicial District. — Matagorda, Wharton, Colorado, Austin, Port 
Bend, Brazoria and Galveston counties. 

Second District. — Comal, Gaudaloupe, Trnvis, Bastrop, Fayette, La Vaca, 
DeWitt and Gonzales counties. 



1847.] TEXAS. 277 

4 

Third District, — Brazos^ Kobertson, Leon, Limesfbne, Navarro, Milam, 
Burleson and Washington counties. 

Fourth District. — Calhoun, Jackson, Victoria, Goliad, Kefugio, San 
Patricio, Nueces and Bexar counties. 

Fifih District. — Jasper, Newton, Sabine, San Augustine, Shelby, Panola, 
Upshur, Harrison and Cass counties. 

Sixth District. — Nacogdoches, Angelina, Houston, Cherokee, Busk, An- 
derson, Henderson, Smith and Dallas counties. 

Seventh District. — Harris, Montgomery, Walker, Grimes, Liberty, Polk, 
Tjler and Jefferson counties. 

Eighth District. — Bowie, Lamar, Bed Biver, Fannin, Grayson, Collin, 
Denton, Hopkins, Titus and Hunt counties. 

PtMic Lands. 

Superficial extent of Texas, as comprised within the 

limits defined by statute of first Texan Congress, 397,319 sq. miles, or 

p. 313, . . . . . 254,284,160 acres. 

Total amount of land issued by the various Boards 

of Land Commissioners, . 43,543,970 " 

Total amount recommended, from the above, as good 

and lawful claims, by the Commissioners appointed 

to defeat fraudulent certificates, . . 19,212,206 " 

Total amount issued by the Department of War, as 

bounty and donation claims, . . 6,300,000 " 

Total amount of Land Scrip sold by the Government 

of Texas, .... 368,787 " 

Total amdunt of legal claims to lands issued by the 

authorities of Texas, . . . 25,880,993 " 

Total amount issued by the various Boards of Land 

Commissioners, and supposed to be fraudulent, . 24,331,764 " 

Total amount of land issued by the authorities of 

Mexico, a portion of which is supposed to be invalid, 22,080,000 " 
Total amount of public domain subject to location, 

and unsurveyed, . 181,991,403 " 

Finances. 

[From a Beport of a Committee of the Texan House of Itepresentatives, 

inclosing a Beport from the Comptroller, March, 1846.) 

The Comptroller states, from the best evidence which can be obtained, 

that the outstanding domestic debt is as follows : — 

Balance of Audited Drafts, . . . $156,905 63 

Amount of Promissory Notes in circulation, 2,674,447 10 

Eight per cent, bonds, . . . 811,000 00 

Funded Debt at ten per cent, . . 1,675,800 00 

Interest accrued on preceding liabilities, . 1,873,804 92 

Outstanding claims, . . 822,000 00 

24 $8,013,957 65 



278 TEXA8. [1847. 

Foreign DdA» 

Borrowed of the Bank of the United States, for which ster- 
ling bonds amounting to £94,500, at 10 per cent, interest were 

issued, ...... $400,000 00 

Interest on these bonds from July 1839, to March 1846, 266,666 66 
Claim of J. Holford and others for purchase of steamer 

Zavella, paid in sterling bonds, £40,476. 13s. . 180,029 68 

Interest on these bonds, same dates, . . 120,019 73 

F. Dawson and others, payment for naval vessels, . 560,000 00 

Interest on this, from Nov. 1838, to March 1, 1846, . 408,333 33 

Total of foreign debt, . . . $1,935,049 40 

Domestic debt, as above, . . 8,013,957 65 

$9,949,007 05 

The Committee state, that Texas issued her securities during the war 
with Mexico at an enormous rate of discount, and that most nations have 
forborne to pay such revolutionary currency ; but the legislature, " desirous 
of sustaining the public faith and honor," will cause the creditors to be paid 
in full the amount which the republic actually received from them, so far 
as it can be ascertained, with the interest stipulated thereon; and they 
recommend the following classification of the debt for that purpose : 

First Class; dtbts contracted at their par value. 

Ostensible Equivalent 

amount. value. 

Foreign debt, due to U. S. Bank, J. Holford, 

and F.Dawson, . . . $1,935,049.40 $1,935,049.40 

Audited Drafts of a par issue, . 40,000.00 40,000.00 

Ten per cent. cons, stock, to S. Swartwout 

and others, and that for redeeming Land Scrip, 

including interest, . . . 140,609.55 140,609.55 

Outstanding claims, . . 822,000.00 822,000.00 

Second class ; to he paid at 33 j^ cenU on the dcGar, 
having produced that to the goverment. 

Balance of 10 per cent. cons, stock, including int. 1,213,755.45 404,585.15 

Third Class ; to be paid at 30 cents on the dollar, 

10 per cent stock of Feb. 5th, 1840, including int. 1 ,266,350.00 379,905.00 
8 " " " " « ** " 32,832.00 9,849.60 

Fourth Class; to he paid at 25 cents on the dollar. 

Audited Drafts, excluding those allowed at par, 116,905.65 29,226.40 
Promissory Notes, including interest, . 3,246,105.02 811,526.25 

8 per cent. Bonds, " *' . 1,135,400.00 283,860.00 

9,949,007.05 4,856,601 .35 



1847.] TSXAS. 279 

The Committee recommend, that a board of three commissioners be ap- 
pointed to examine and audit all the alleged debts and claims against the 
Kepublic of Texas ; that the United States be invited to purchase the pub- 
lic domain, and the proceeds of the purchase be inviolably pledged for the 
payment of the amount which may be found due to the public creditors ; 
and, if this purchase be not made, that the creditors receive land scrip for 
their claims, to be located and surveyed at the expense of the holder. 

AbSTBACT of the CONSTITITTION, 

Adopted in Convention at Austin, August 27th, 1845, and ratified by the people 

October I3th, 1845. 

Every free white male, 21 years old, a citizen of the United States, or of 
Texas when this constitution was adopted, who has resided in the State one 
year, and six months in the district, county, city, or town where he offers to 
vote, shall have the right of suffrage. Electors absent from home, but with- 
in their own district, may vote for district officers ; and anywhere in the 
State, they may vote for State officers. The sessions of the legislature shall 
be biennial ; representatives shall be chosen for two years, and they must 
be qualified voters, who have lived two years in the State, and one year in 
the place where they are chosen. Senators are chosen for four years, one 
half of them leaving office biennally ; they must be qualified voters, 30 
years old, who have lived in Texas three years, and the last year thereof in 
their district Persons holding lucrative office under the United States, or 
this State, those with public money in their hands, and clergymen, are not 
eligible to the legislature. The number of representatives shall not be less 
than 45, nor more than 90 ; a census shall be ordered at the first meeting 
of the legislature, and the representatives shall be apportioned according to 
the number of voters ascertained by it. The senators, not less than 19, nor 
more than 33, in number, shall be apportioned in like manner. The city of 
Austin shall be the seat of government till 1850, when a place shall be 
selected by vote of the people. Members of the legislature shall receive 
$3 a day, and $3 for every 25 miles of travel. 

The Supreme Court shall consist of a Chief Justice and two associates, 
each receiving annually not less than $2,000, holding office for six years, 
and shall hold sessions once a year, between June and October, in not more 
than three places in the State. This Court shall have appellate jurisdiction 
coextensive with the limits of the State ; but in criminal cases and appeals 
from interlocutory judgments, it shall be under legislative regulations. 
There shall be convenient judicial districts, one district judge in each, hold- 
ing office for six years, receiving annually not less than $1,750, who shall 
sit twice a year in each county. Judges shall be nominated by the gover- 
nor, and confirmed by two thirds of the senate ; they may be removed by 
address of two thirds of both houses. The District Courts shall have 
original jurisdiction in all criminal cases, and in all suits in which more than 



280 TJiXJLS. [4847- 

$100 are at stake. In criminal cases, if the punishmeiit be not specifically 
determined bj law, the jory shall determine it An Attorney General, 
holding office for two years, shall be nominated by the governor, and con- 
firmed by two thirds of the senate ; a district attorney for each district shall 
be chosen by joint ballot of both honses, also for two years. In equity 
causes, either party may demand a jury. 

The governor and lieutenant governor shall be chosen by a plurality vote 
of the people for two years, and shall not be eligible for more than four out 
of any six years. They must have the same qualifications as a senator, 
and the governor at first shall receive $2,000 a year. The lieutenant gov- 
ernor shall preside in the senate, and be paid the same sum as the speaker 
of the House. A secretary of state shall be nominated by the governor 
and confirmed by the senate for two years ; a state treasurer and a comp* 
troller of accounts shall be biennially chosen by joint vote of both houses. 
The governor may veto a bill, but two thirds of both houses may pass it 
in spite of his veto. 

Any person concerned in a duel, sending or accepting a challenge, shall 
be ineligible to any public office. Grants of money for private purposes, or 
for internal improvement, must be made by two thirds of both houses. 
Within five years, the laws, civil and criminal, shall be revised, digested, 
arranged, and published ; and a like revision shall be made every ten years 
thereafter. A wife's property, both real and personal, acquired before or 
after marriage, shall be her separate property ; and its registration shall be 
provided for by law. The legislature may protect by law some of the prop- 
erty of all heads of families from forced sale. A homestead of not more 
than 200 acres not included in a town or city, or city or town lots worth not 
more than $2,000, shall not be subject to forced sale for any debt hereafter 
contracted. No corporation shall be created, renewed, or' extended with 
banking or discounting privileges. Private corporations can be created 
only by a vote of two thirds of both houses ; the State shall not subscribe 
to their stock, and their charters may be revoked by making compensation 
for the franchise. The State shall not borrow money except by a like vote, 
nor contract an aggregate amount of debt of more than $100,000, except in 
case of war. Invasion, or insurrection. The salaries of the governor and 
judges are fixed at the minimum herein expressed, and shall not be in- 
creased for ten years. 

Two thirds of both houses may propose amendments to this constitution, 
which shall then be published three months before the next general election -, 
and if approved at that election by a majority of the voters, and then 
ratified by two thirds of both houses in the next legislature, they shall then 
be valid. 

No law shall be passed to emancipate slaves, except by their owners' 
consent, and by paying a full compensation for them. Emigrants to this 
State shall not be prevented from bringing their slaves with them, but the 



1847.] ABKANSJLS. 281 

bringing hither of slaves as merchandise may be forbidden. Laws may be 
passed obliging owners to treat their slaves with humanity, and to abstain 
from injaries to them affecting life or limb ; in case of disobedience of these 
laws, the slaves may be taken away and sold for the benefit of the owners. 
Slaves accused of higher crimes than petit larceny shall have a fair trial 
by jury. Any one who maliciously dismembers, or deprives a slave of life, 
shall be punished as if he had committed the same crime on a white person, 
except in case of insurrection of such slave. 

One tenth of the annual revenue of the State derived from taxation shall 
be set aside as a permanent fund for the support of free public schools. 
All public lands granted for such schools shall not be alienated in fee, nor 
leased for more than 20 years. The District Courts shall be open till July 
1st, 1847, to establish certificates for head-right claims to land not recom- 
mended by the commission appointed to detect fraudulent land certificates ; 
all such claims not sued before that time shall be barred. 

The ordinance passed by the convention on the 4th day of July, 1845, 
assenting to the overtures for the annexation of Texas to the United States, 
shall be attached to this constitution, and form part of it 



XXI. ARKANSAS. 

GOYBBNMENT. 

Salary. 
Thomas S. Drew, of Little Rock, Governor, 

(term of office expires Nov. 1848,) use of a house and $1,800 
David B. Greer, of Little Rock, Secretary of State, Perquisites & 600 
Elias N. Conway, do. Auditor of Public Accounts, Fees & 1 ,200 

Jared C. Martin, of Pulaski Co., Treasurer, Fees & 800 

The Secretary of State, Auditor, and Treasurer are elected by the Gen- 
eral Assembly, by a joint vote of both Houses. The election of a Repre- 
sentative to the 30th Congress and of members of the General Assembly 
and county officers takes place on the first Monday of August, biennially. 
The Legislature meets in Little Rock on the first Monday of November, 
1846, and biennially. Senators, 25; Representatives, 75. Their compen- 
sation is $3 per day during the session, and $3 for every 20 miles* travel in 
coming to and returning from the seat of Government 

Supreme Court. 

Term ends. Salary. 

Thomas Johnson, of Saline Co., Chief Justice, 1852, $1,500 

Edward Cross, of Hempstead Co., -Associate J«.<»</c<', 1848, 1,500 

Williamson S. Oldham, of Fayetteville, do, 1850, 1,500 

24* 



282 



TENNBSSSE. 



[1847. 



George C. Watkins, of Little Rock, Attorney General^ 
Lake E. Bai-ber, do. Clerky 

Elbert H. English, of Little Hock, Reporter, 



Circuit Court, 



Judges. 

1st Circuit, John T. Jones, 

2d do. Wm. K Sutton, 

3d do. Wm. Conway, 

4th do. Sebron G. Sneed, 

5th do. John J. Clendenin, 

6th do. George Conway, 

7th do. Rich. C. S. Brown, 



Salary. 

$1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 

i,ooo: 



Froflecuting Attorneys. 



N. M. Foster, 
Joseph W. Bocage, 
A. R. Porter, 
A. B. Greenwood, 
George C. Watkins, 
Allen W. Blevins, 
Jonas M. Tibbatts, 



Fees 



{( 



(C 



(( 



u 

H 



Salary. 

$600 

Fees. 

200 



Salary. 

&$300 
300 
300 
300 
60O 
30O 
300 



The Supreme Court has appellate jurisdiction only, except in particalar 
cases pointed out by the constitution ; it holds, annually, two terms, at Little 
Rock, in April and October. The judges are elected by the General Ais- 
sembly, by a joint vote of both Houses, for eight years. 

The Circuit Court has original jurisdiction over all criminal cases, which 
are not otherwise provided for by law ; and exclusive original jurisdiction 
of all crimes amounting to felony at the common law ; and original juris- 
diction of all civil cases which are not cognizable before Justices of the 
Peace, until otherwise directed by the General Assembly; and original 
jurisdiction in all matters of contract, where the sum in controversy is over 
one hundred dollars. It holds annually two terms in each circuit. The 
Judges are elected by the General Assembly, for a term of 4 years. 



Aaeon V. Brown, 

John S. Young, 
Robert B. Turner, 
Felix K. Zollicoffer, 
West H. Humphreys, 
Gerard Troost, 



XXn. TEIimESSEE. 

Government. 

Salary, 
of Pulaski, Governor y (term of office 

expires Oct. 1847,) $2,000 

of Nashville, Sec, of State ^ Lit. Imp. Com\ $800 & f! 
do. Treasurer ^ SupH of Pub. Inst\ 1,500 

do. Comptroller of the Treasury, 2,000 

do. Attorney General Sc Reporter, 1,000 

do. State Geologist, ' 500 



The legislature consists of a Senate of 25 members and a House of Rep- 
resentatives of 75 members ; all elected for two years. The members of the 
present legislature were elected in August, 1845. Pay of the Senators and 
Representatives, $4 per day. 



1847.] 



XBMNESSGE. 



283 



Jddiciabt. 

Supreme Court. 

Salary. 

William B. Turley, of Jackflon, Judge, Western Divitum^ $1,800 

William B. Reese, of Knoxville, do. Eastern do, 1,800 

Nathan Green, of Winchester, do. Middle do. 1,800 

The Judges of the Supreme Court are elected by a joint vote of the 
two Houses of the General Assembly, for the term of 12 years ; and those 
of the inferior coorts, in the same manner, for the term of 8 years. 



Salary. 

$1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 



Court of Chancery. 

Andrew McCampbell, of Paris, Chancellor, Western Division^ 

Tho^s L. Williams, of Knoxville, do. Eastern do. 
Terry H. Oahal, of Columbia, do. Middle do. 

Bromfield L. Bidley, of McMinnyiUe, do. Fourth do. 

Circuit Courts. 

The State comprises 14 circuits, and the judges are elected by a joint 
vote of the two Houses of the General Assembly, for the term of eight 
years. Salaiy of each judge, $1,500. Eacli circuit or district has an 
attorney whose salary is $200 and fees. 

Judgf«. 

1. Seth J. W. Lucky, 

2. Eben'r Alexander, 

3. John 0. Gannon, 

4. Abraham Camthers, 

5. Samuel Anderson, 

6. Thomas Maney, 

7. Mortimer A. Martin, 

8. £dm. Dillahnnty, 

9. William Fitzgerald, 

10. John Bead, 

11. Wm. C. Dunlap, 

12. R. M. Anderson, 
18. A. J. Marchbanks, 
14. James Scott, 



Besidenee. 
Jonesboro. 
Knoxville. 
MadisonTiUe. 
Carthage. 
Murfireesboro. 
Nashville. 
Clarksville. 
Columbia. 
Paris. 
Jackson. 
Bolivar. 
New Market. 
McMinnville. 
Savannah. 



.^ttorneya. 
T. A. R. Nekon, 
D. n. Cummings, 
S. A. Smith, 
John II. Savage, 
H. L. Davidson, 
G. W. Allen, 
W. B. Johnson, 
N. Baxter, 
J. B. Williams, 
D. P. SknrlocI?, 
John P. Caruthers, 
W. R. Caswell, 
J. W. Carter, 
Solon E. Rose, 



Criminal Court of Davidson County. 
William K. Turner, of Nashville, Judge, 



lUsidence. 
Jonesboro. 
Knoxville. 
Cleveland. 
Smithville. 
ShelbyvUle. 
Chkllatin. 
ClarksvUlc. 
Columbia. 
Paris. 
Jackson. 
Memphis. 
Dandridge. 
McMinnville. 
Lawrenoebui^. 

Salary. 
$1,000 



Commercial and Criminal Courts of Shelby County. 



Ephraim W. King, of Memphis, 

Finances. 

Total amount received in 1845, 
Total amount expended in 1845, . 



JudgCf 



$1,500 



$305,119 63 
245,074 14 



284 TENNESSEE. [1847. 

Whole amount of State debt, . $3,254,416 66 

Annual interest on this debt, . . 172,348 74 

Principal Items of Expenditure. Chief Sources of Income. 

Direct taxes on property, $94,272.29 
" " on privileges, 52,081.05 
" " on banks, 15,375.00 

Entries of Public Lands, 9,064.06 



Salaries of the Judiciary, $34,876.77 

Salaries of Exec, officers, 7,018.77 

State prosecutions, 25,709 89 

Common Schools, 122,287.16 

Academies, 17,040.00 

Internal Improvements, 3,500.00 

Charitable Institutions, 9,900.00 

State Capitol, 8,000.00 

U. S. Land Revenue, 4,85 J. 75 



Dividend of State Bank 

for Academies, 18,000.00 

" for Common Schools, 100,000.00 

Penitentiary, 8,000.00 

Turnpike Dividends, 3,684.96 



Conveving convicts to Prison,4,361 .62jMiscellaneous, 6,066.76 

Miscellaneous, 6,742.881 

Amount of School Funrf distributed in July, 1846, $117,805 08. 

Number of scholastic population at that time, 256,098. 

Lunatic Asylum^ at Nashville, opened for the reception of patients in 1840} 
Dr. John S. McNairy, Superintendent and Physician. The number of in- 
mates in 1845 was 49, of whom 32 were males and 17 females; 13 were 
discharged perfectly restored, and 5 much improved ; died, 5. 

Institution for the Instruction of the Blindj at Nashville ; established in 1846. 
Number of pupils, 14. 

Deaf and Dumb School^ at Knoxville; established in 1846. Number of 
pupils, 9. The Legislature at the last session appropriated $2,500, annual- 
ly, to each of these Schools. 

State Prison^ at Nashville. 

Earnings of convicts in two years ending Sept. 30, 1845, $51,345 47 
Expenditures of prison " " « " 36,535 11 

Number of prisoners in confinement Sept. 30, 1843, 194 

" *' since received, white males, 121;. black males, 8 

" females, 4; Total, 327 

Of these, 58 were discharged by expiration of their terms ; 43 by pardon 
under law of 1836, and 6 by general pardon; escaped, 2 ; died, 29 ; now in 
confinement, 189. There were sentenced for murder in first degree, 9 ; 
murder in second degree, 17; assault with intent to murder, 7; man- 
slaughter, 1 ; stabbing, 7 ; negro stealing, 7 ; harboring nmaway slave, 1 ; 
rape, 7 ; incest, 2 ; grand larceny, 49 ; petit larceny, 30; horse stealing, 16 ; 
bigamy, 4 ; buggery, 1 ; counterfeiting, 9 ; forgery, 4 ; burglary, 4 ; arson, 
3 ; perjury, 1 ; shooting, 2 ; robbery, 1 ; receiving stolen goods, 3 ; false 
pretences, 4. 



Ages when Convicted. 



Under 20 years, 
From 20 to 25 years, 
" 25 to 30, 



22 


From 40 to 50, 


46 


« 50 to 60, 


45 


" 60 to 70, 



16 

12 

4 



1847.] 



KENTUCKY. 



385 



XXin. KENTUCKY. 

GOVSBNMENT. 

Salitf7* 
William Owslet, of Boyle Co., Govetmor, (term of office 

expires in September, 1848, $2,500 

Archibald Dixon, of Henderson Co., Lieutenant Governor and 

Speaker of the Senate. Pay, while presiding, $6 a day. 

George B. Kincaid, of Frankfort, Secretary 6/ State, 750 

Assist. Sec. of State and 

Sec. for Sinking Fund, 1 ,1 66 

Auditor ofPrM; Accounts, 1,260 

2d Auditor, 1,500 

Register of the Land Office, 1,250 

Treasurer, 1,250 

Keepers of the P«ntfry,(l-3 the profits.) 

AdjutazA General, ' 150 

Quartermaster General, lOQ 

State Librarian, 250 

Sup. of Public InstruOion, 750 

Joseph B. Underwood, of Bowling Green, Speaker of the House, $6 a day. 

James Stonestreet, Clerk of the Senate, $10 a day. 

Thomas J. Helm, Clerk of the Souse, $10 a day. 

The Senate consists of 38 members, elected for four years, one fourth being 
elected every year. The Souse of Bepresentatives consists of 100, elected 
annually. Pay, $3 a day, for the first sixty days, and $2 a day afterwards, 
besides mileage of 12 1-2 cents per mile. 

JUDICIAST. 



A. S. Mitchell, 


do. 


Harry J. Bodley, 


do. 


Thomas S. Page, 


do. 


James Eobertson, 


do. 


James Davidson, 


do. 


Craig & Henry, 


do. 


Peter Dudley, 


do. 


Ambrose W. Dudley, 


do. 


George A Bobertson, 


do. 


Ryland T. Dillard, 


do. 



Ephralm M. Ewing, of Russellville, 
Thomas A. Marshall, of Lexington, 



Court of Appeals. 

Salary. 

Chief Justice, $1,500 

Judge, 1,500 

do. 1,500 

Clerk, Pees. 

Attorney General, $300 and fees. 

Serjeant, $2 a day & fees. 

Reporter. 

This Court has appellate jurisdiction only, in civil cases, both at law and 
in equity. In criminal cases, the judgments of the Circuit Courts are 
final, excepting only the power of the Governor to pardon, which is unlim- 
ited, except in cases of treason and impeachment 



Daniel Breck, 


of Bichmond, 


Jacob Swigert, 


of Frankfort, 


Owen G. Gates, 


do. 


James C. Colman, 


do. 


Benjamin Monroe, 


do. 



286 



KBNTUCKT. 

General Court. 



[1847. 



John L. Bridges, of Danville, Judge. A. H. Eennick, of Frankfort, Clerk, 

All the judges of the Circuit Courts are members of the General Court. 
But it is made the special duty of the judge of the 12th Circuit to hold the 
Court, and he is allowed $100 additional salary. 

LovisvUh Chancery Court. 









Salary. 


Samuel S. Nicholas, 


of Louisville, 


Chancellor, 


$2,000 


Charles J. Clarke, 


do. 


Clerk, 


Fees. 


Joseph Mayo, 


do. 


Master, 


Fees. 


John A. Crittenden, 


do. 


Marshal, 


Fees. 



Circuit Courts, 

The State is divided into nineteen Circuits or Districts ; and the following- 
are the Circuit Judges, who have each a salary of $1,200, except the judge 
of the 5th Circuit, at Louisville, who receives $1,500, and the judge of the 12th, 
$1,300. These Courts have original jurisdiction, both at law and in equity, 
and over criminal cases arising in their respective Circuits. Each Circuit 
has an attorney, who receives $300 and fees. 



Judges. 


Residence. 


Attorneys. 


Residerue. 


1. Walker Reid, 


Washington. 


Harrison Taylor, 


Washingtoa. 


2. Henry 0. Brown, 




Livingston Lyndsay, 


Princeton. 


8. Riehard A. Bucknear, Jr 


., Lesington. 


Alexander H. Robertson, 


Lexington. 


4. James Pryor, 


Carrollton. 


Richard Logan, 


Carrollton. 


5 William F. Bullock, 


LouisTille. 


Nathaniel Wolfife, 


Louisville. 


6. Asher W. Graham, 


Bowling Green. 


William V. Loving, 


Bowling Green. 


7. Benj. Shackleford, 


HopkinHTiUe. 


Ninia.nE.Grey, 


Hopkinsville. 


8. Christoplier Tompkins, 


Glasgow. 


Zachariah Wheat, 


Columbia. 


9. Samuel Lusk, 


Lancaster. 


George Shankiin, 


Nicholasville. 


10. James Simpson, 


Winchester. 


Thomas Turner, Jr., 


Richmond. 


11. Kenaz Farrow, 


Mount Sterling. 


Walter 0. Chiles, 


Mt. Sterlmg. 


12. John L. Bridges, 


Danyille. 


John B. Thompson, 


Harrodsburg. 


13. Armist. H. Churchill, 


Elizabeth town. 


Thomas W. Riley, 


Bardstown. 


14. John Calhoon, 


Hardinsburg. 


Alfred Allen, 


Hardinsburg. 


15. Tunstall Quarles, 


Whitley C. H. 


Silas Woodson, 


Barboursville. 


16. Wiley P. Fowler, 


Smithland. 


Richard L. Mayes, 


Mayfield. 


17. Mason Brown, 


Frankfort, i 


Thomas L. Crittenden, 


Frankfort. 


18. HJchard A. Backner, 


Greensburgh. 


Wm. R. McFerrin, 


Glasgow. 


19. William B. Kinkead, 




Green V. Goble, 


Louisa. 


Board of Intebk 


AL Improvement. 


k 








Salary. 


Thomas Metcalfe, 


of Nicholas, 


President, 


$1,000 


Dillis Dyer, 


of Rumsey, 


. State Treasurer, - 100 


Austin P. Cox, 


of Frankfort 


, Secretary, 


500 



1847.] KENTUCKY. 287 

FlNASrCBS. 
Receipts in 1845 from Internal Improvements, 

From Lexington and Ohio Railroad, . . $23,408 46 

*'• Kentucky River navigation, . . 19,928 93 

" Green and Barren River, . . . 185 76 

" Turnpike roads, . . . 24,220 32 

Total, .... $67,743 47 

Estimating this as 5 per cent. incx)me, it represents a capital of $1,354,869 j 
and this sum also being deducted from the State debt leaves but $1,784,087 
of actual debt 

. Items of Taxation. 

1844. 1846. 

Valuation of land, improvements, cattle, &c., $326,585 97 $342,732 24 

Carriages |ind barouches, . . . 2,756 00 2,784 00 

Pianofortes, . . . 1,155 00 1,251 00 

Grold watches, .... 4,400 00 4,718 00 

Auditors' list, . . . 5,453 30 5,280 79 

No. of white males over 21 years old, 127,931 134,340 

No. of slaves over 16 years old, . . 82,540 83,784 

No. of children between 5 and 16, . 160,834 166,871 

Studs, jacks, and bulls, . . . 2,073 1,889 

The Commissioners of the Sinking Fund are "W. Owsley, Governor and Chair- 
man ex officio ; John Tilford, Presiderd of the Northern Bank of Kentucky; 
Virgil McKnight, President of the Bank of Kentucky ; Harry J. Bodley, Au- 
ditor of Accounts ; Thomas S. Page, 2d Auditor of the State ; E. H. Taylor, 
Ssq. ; and A. S. Mitchell, Secretary, 

Revenue received for the fiscal year ending Oct. 10, 1845, including 
balance of $41,114 30; on hand Oct. 10, 1844, $395,808 46-, ordinary ex- 
penses of government, same time, $255,643 71 ; paid to Sinking Fund in 
the same time, $106,720 39 \ balance in treasury, Oct 10, 1845, $33,444 36. 
Valuation of property liable to taxation in the year 1845, $228,488,161 00 ; 
tax on the same, 15 cents on each $100; specific tax on carriages, &c., 
$17,031 79. One third of the net revenue is set apart by law for the use of 
the Sinking Fund, to pay interest on the State debt, contracted principally 
for turnpike roads, slackwatcring rivers, &c. The charges on the Sinking 
Fund, for interest on public debt, exchange, interest, contingent expenses, 
salaries, &c., from Feb. 20, 1845, to Jan. 1, 1846, $282,766 59 ; the receipts 
in the same time, $310,227 58. The State debt amounts to ^4,408,400 00, 
of which $3,793,400 at 6 per cent., and $615,000 at 5 per cent, makes an- 
naal interest $258,354. The State owns productive bank stock amoanting 
to $1,270,500. ** This sum deducted from the entire amount of debt, as 
above 0tated, leayen $3,138,956, which may be considered as the actual bnr- 



286 



OHIO. 



[1847. 



then of debt on the State. But when we consider that, to meet this indebt- 
edness, the State has a very large amount of stock in the varioas turnpike 
roads, and owns the entire Kentucky and Green River navigation, which are 
yearly becoming more prodacdve to the State, and therefore more valuable ', 
and that the State also owns the Lexington and Ohio Bailroad, which is in 
successful operation, and yielding a handsome rent to the State, — it will be 
seen that the indebtedness may be considered as greatly diminished by these 
vast assets, and all fears of oppression of the people, by reason of their State 
debt, dismissed as groundless and illusory." 



Chief Items of Beoeipt. 

General taxes, $315,413 

Clerks of Courts, 31,808 

Surplus revenue, 503 

Forfeited lands, 2,251 

City of Lexington, 500 

Miscellaneous receipts, 907 

Insurance offices, 604 

Runaway slaves, 416 



Principal Expenditures. 



35, Criminal prosecutions, 

46, Salaries, 

67 Appropriations, 

29!LegisIature, 

OO.Penitentiary, 

12| Clerks paid trustees, 

86; Support of idiots, 

36 Jailers, 



$15,241 71 
44,720 81 
27,084 28 
21,317 77 
5,000 00 
22,501 59 
17,500 62 
11,636 09 



XXIV. OHIO. 
Government. 



MoRDECAi Bastlbt, Govemor^ (term of office expires on tlie 1st 

Monday in December, 1846,) 
Samuel Galloway, of Ross Co., 
John Woods, of Butter Co., 

Joseph Whitehill, of Warren Co., 



Salary. 



James McBride, 
Demas Adams, 
L. Dewey, 
B. W. Brice, 
£. N. Slocum, 
John Grdner, 



$1,200 
JSec, of State, and Sup't of Schools, 900 
Auditor of State, 1,200 

Treasurer of Statej 1,000 

Chief ClerkinDepHof Pub. Works, 750 
Chief Clerk in the Auditot^a Office, 900 
Warden of the State Penitentiary, 800 
Adjutant General, 100 

Qimrtermaster General, 100 

Librarian of the State Library, 500 



Commissioners of the Board of Public Works, 

Oran Follett, of Sandusky City, 

Samuel Forrer, of Dayton, 

Jacob Blickensderffer, of Tuscarawas Co., 

E. N. Sill, Acting Commissioner of the Canal Fund, 



$750 
730 
730 
666 



The Auditor and Treasurer of State are advisory Commissioners of the 
Canal Fund. 

Seabury Ford, of Geauga Co.^ Speaker of the Senate, 

Elias F. Drake, of Xenia, Speaker of the House, 



1847.} OHIO. 289 





JUBICIAST. 






Supreme 


Chwrt, 








Elected. 


Salary. 


Reuben Wood, 


of Cleveland, 


Chief Jud^, 1840, 


$1,300 


Matthew Borchard, 


of Warren, 


Assoc, Judge, 1842, 


1,500 


Nathaniel C. Beed, 


of Cincinnati, 


do. 1842, 


1,500 


Peter Hitchcock, 


of Gleauga Co., 


do. 1845, 


1,500 


Henry Stanberry, 




Attorney Creneral, 




Hiram Griswold, 


of Canton, 


Reporter, 





The Judges of the Supreme Court, the President and Associate Judges of 
the Courts of Common Pleas, and the Judge of the Superior Court of Cin- 
cinnati, are elected by the legislature, for seven years. Of the Judges of the 
Supreme Court, the oldest in commission is Chief Judge, if the Chief Judge 
is not reelected. Two of the four Judges hold a court in each county once 
every year. 

Superior Court of Cincinnati. 

Charles D. Coffin, of Cincinnati, Judge, Salary, $1,000 

This Court has concurrent original civil jurisdiction, with the Court of 
Common Pleas of the county of Hamilton, at common law and in chancery. 

Courts of Common Pleas. 

Salary. 
George B. Holt^ of Dayton, Jtfdge 1st Circuit, $1,200 

Osias Bowen, ^ of Marion, do. 2d do. 1,000 

Eben Newton, of Canfield, do. Zd do. 1,000 

Corrington W, Searle, oi Zanesville, do. Ath do, 1,200 

John Pearce, of CarroUtown, do. 5th do, 1,000 

John H. Keith, of Chillicothe, do. 6th do. 1,200 

Elijah Vance, of Lebanon, do. 7th do. 1,200 

John E. Hanna, of McConnelsville, do. Sth do. 1,200 

W. B. Caldwell, of Cincinnati, do. 9th do. 1,200 

Owen T. Pishback, of Batavia, do. lOth do. 1,200 

Jacob Parker, of Mansfield, do, llth do. 1,200 

James L. Torbert, of Springfield, do. I2th do. 1,000 

Myron H. Tilden, of Toledo, do. 13th do. 1,000 

Benjamin Bissell, of Painsville, do. Uth do, 1,200 

William Kennon, of St. ClairsviUe, do. 15th do. 1,200 

Patrick G. Goode, of Sydney, do, IQth do. 1,000 

The several Courts of Common Pleas are held, three times a year, by a 
President Judge and three Associate Judges, in most of the counties ; but in 
the counties very recently organized, only twice a year. Six of the above- 
mentioned Judges receive but $1,000 per annum, because they were elected 
after the law of January, 1844, reducing the salaries of public officers, was 
passed. The Associate Judges receive $2 50 a day. 

25 



U90 



OHIO. 



[1847. 



Finances. 



Foreign debt, 

Domestic debt, 

Sdiool fands lent to the State, 



PrindpaL 
$16,964,282 
767,374 
1,455,124 



Annual int. 

$1,027,357 

46,042 

87,307 



Total debt and interest, . $19,186,780 $1,160,706 

Amount of taxable property, and of taxes assessed during the year 1845 : 



No. of aen» of land, 28,466,286 

Talue, including houses, $85,916,169 
Value of town lots and buildings, $22,269,575 

Na of horses, 887,200 

Estimated Tahis, S16,488/XX) 

No. of oattle, 728,853 

Estimated yalue, $5,786,824 

Capital and money at interest, $13,556,50 7 

No. of pleasure oaniages, 16,707 

Estimated value, $1,066,742 

Total am't of taxable property, $144,072,817 



State and eanal tax. 
County and school tax, 
Road tax. 

Township and poor tax. 
Corporation and bridge tax, 
Physicians' and lawyers' tax, 
School-house tax. 
Delinquencies, 

Total taxes. 



$1,006,001 25 
676,001 58 
150,301 20 
880,827 02 
109,986 78 
6,087 84 
18,356 88 
113,661 11 

$2,410,172 07 



IntEBNAL IMPBOVEMBNT8. 



Names of Works. 


Length 

in 
miles. 


Cost. 

$4,695,203 69 

1,287,552 16 

2,856,635 96 

3,028,340 05 

607,268 99 

975,129 57 

1,627,318 29 

256,334 93 

15,283,783 64 


Revenue in 
1846. 

$252,199 

74320 

32,007 

73,907 

28,461 

4,520 

1,184 

6,613 


Expenditure 
in 1846. 


Ohio Canal, . 
Htami Canal, 
Sliami Extension, 
Wabash and Erie Canal, 
Walhonding Canal, 
Hocking Canal, 
Muskingum Improvement, 
Western Res. & Maumee road. 


334 
85 

139 
91 
25 
56 
91 
31 


$129,184 

36,041 

189,727 

51,669 

19,666 

9463 

2,748 

2,664 

441,181 


Total, . 


852 


473,211 



More than $200,000 of this expenditure was for extending or completing 
the works, the actual revenue of the canals oyer the cost of ordinary repairs 
being $204,282 60. The public improYements which belong to the State 
are now completed, except the branches of the Walhonding canal. The ag- 
gregate cost of all the improvements owned by the State is $15,577,233 18. 
The investments of State stocks in canal and turnpike companies, 
$2,431,430 88. The amount invested by loans of credit in railroad com- 
panies, $747,132. Total amount of investments in public improvements* 
$18,755,796. In the year 1844, the products of this investment amounted 
to $544,949 84. 

Owing to a partial failure in the wheat crop in some sections of the State 
the past summer, the revenue arising from the canal has been reduced this 
year about $30,000 below the annual amount received last year. 

The following is an extract from the report of the Auditor of State, De- 
cember 9, 1845 : 

** Regarding the payment of the interest hereafter as beyond a reasonable 
doubt, let us look at the'means of the State to meet, in part at least, the 
principal of our debt : , 



1847.] MIGHIGAK. 391 

1st There is in the hands of the Fund Commissioners of 
the seyeral counties, with the balance in the Treasury, Sur- 
plus Beyenue belonging to the State, to the amount of $1,622,149 31 

This sum is pledged for the redemption of the turnpike 
bonds, which may all be paid during the year, and for the pay- 
ment of the million and a half seven per cent loan, payable 
1st January, 1852. 

2d. Stocks held by the State in turnpike, railroad, and 
canal companies, to tilie amount of $2,898,126 03 ; of this 
sum, $448,283 is in the stocks of three railroad companies, 
which may be regarded as at par. 448,283 00 

The turnpike stocks owned by the State now yield a reve- 
nue equal to 5 per cent, upon half a million \ ibsj may be 
safely estimated at that sum, 500,000 00 

Stock in the Pennsylvania and Ohio Canal, Milan Canal, 
and Whitewater Canal, $592,600, worth at least 182,667 00 

Canal lands owned by the State; estimated quantity, 
350,000 acres, worth $1 25 per acre, 437,500 00 

Amount of the funds, stocks, and lands owned by the State, 
estimated at their actual cash value, $3,390,599 31 

This sum, deducted from the whole debts of the State on the 15th Novem- 
ber, 1845, as above stated, leaves the balance of $15,860,581 04, which may 
be regarded as the actual indebtedness of the State, foreign and domestic 

In addition to the funds above stated, the State own 730 miles of canals, 
which are now finished and in full operation, forming two complete Unes 
through the State, from the Ohio River to Lake Erie, with their several 
branches ; 91 miles of slackwater steamboat navigation on the Muskingum 
River, and 31 miles of turnpike road. 

The accruing revenues upon these works will herea tec, probably, never 
be less than $600,000, which, m the course of a few years, when the repairs 
now in progress shall have been completed, will yield a net revenue sufficient 
to pay the interest upon more than half the balance of our whole debt*' 



XXV. MICHIGAN. 

GOYBBNMEITT. 

8alM7. 

AxpHEUS Felch, of Ann Arbor, Ckwemor, (term expires Ist 

Mondayof January, 1848,) $1,500 

William L. Greenley, of Adrian, Lieut, Gcvemor, Fay, $6 a day. 
Gideon O. Whittemore, of Pontiac, Secrdary of J^ate^ 1,000 

DigbyV.BeU, of MarshaU, Auditor General, l/KK) 



992 



MICHIGAN. 



[1847. 



Salary, 
of JacksoD, IVeastarer, $1,000 

of Mnnroe, Superintend. Public Instruc, 500 
of St. Joseph, (hmaCr of Int. Improvement^ 1,000 
of EdwarcUb'gh, CommV ofiht Land Office, 1,000 
of Marshall, Recorder of do. do. 400 

of Detroit, Quartermaster Generai, 500 

of Detroit, Adjutant Genercd^ 300 

of Tecumseh, Judge Advocate General- 
of Genesee Co., Agent of State Prison, 750 

The Senate consists of 22 members, elected for two years ; the House of 
Bepresentatives, of 66 members, elected annually. Pay of each, $3 a day, 
during the session of the legislature. The seat of government is at Detroit 
till 1847, when it is to be permanently established. 

Flavius J. Littlejohn, of Allegan, President pro tern, of the Senate, 
Isaac E. Crary, of Marshall, Speaker of the House. 



George B. Cooper, 
Ira Mayhew, 
John F. Porter, 
Abiel Silver, 
Henry C. Bnnce, 
Frederick H. Harris, 
John £. Schwartz, 
Peter Morey, 
Alonzo Ferris, 



Elon Famswortii, 
William Hale, 
Austin M. Gould, 
Edmund Rice, 
Alfred Treadway, 
John Barber, 
S. T. Douglass, 



JUDICIAKT. 

Court of Chancery. 
of Detroit, 



CJtancdlor, 

Register of \st Circuit, 
do. 2d do. 
do. 8d do, 
do. 4th do. 



Balarj. 
$L,50O 



do. 5th do. 
of Detroit, Reporter of Supreme Court 

and Court of Chancery, Profits of Reports and $500 

There are 5 Chancery Circuits. The terms of the 1st Circuit are held 
annually at the city of Detroit, on the 3d Tuesday in September, and the 2d 
Tuesday in March ; of the 2d Circuit, at Ann Arbor, on the 2d Tuesday in 
January and July ; <^ the 3d Circuit at Kalamazoo, on the 3d Tuesday in 
January, and the Thursday next after the 4th Tuesday in June ; of the 4th 
Circuit at Pontiac, on the 1st Tuesday in May, and the Tuesday after the 2d 
Monday in November; of the 5 th Circuit, at Adrian, on the 1st Tuesday in 
January, and the 3d Tuesday in June. 





Supreme Court. 










Salary. 


Epaphroditns Ransom, 


of Kalamazoo, 


Chief Justice, 


$1,600 


Charles W. Whipple, 


of Pontiac, 


Associate Justice, 


1,500 


Daniel Goodwin, 


of Detroit, 


do. do. 


1,500 


Warner Wing, 


of Monroe, 


do. do. 


1,500 


H. N. Walker, 


of Detroit, 


Attorney General, 


Fees and 800 


William Hale, 


of Detroit, 


Clerk of 1st Circuit, 


Fees. 



1847.] 



MICHIGAN. 



293 



The Judges of the Supreme Court are appointed by the Goyemor, with 
the advice and consent of the Senate, for the period of 7 years. The terms 
of this court are held at Detroit, on the 1st Tuesday in January; at Ann Ar- 
bor, on the last Tuesday in December ; at Kalamazoo, on the Ist Tuesday in 
July ; and at Fontiac, on the 3d Tuesday in January. 

Circuit Courts, There are 4 judicial circuits, in each of which one of the 
Judges of the Supreme Court sits as presiding Judge. In each county, one 
or two terms of the Circuit Court are held annually. 



1st Circuit, 
2d do. 



Presiding Judge. 
Daniel Goodwin. 
Warner Wing. 



Presi^ttng Judge. 
3d Circuit, Epaphroditus Ransom. 
4th do. Charles W. Whipple. 



District Criminal Courts for Wayne, Washtenaw, Jackson, and Oakland. 
B. F. H. Witherell, of Detroit, Presiding Judge^ SaJary, $1,000. 

Finances. 

^ Estimated Expenses for 1846. 

Salaries of Governor, Judges, and State officers, including clerks, 
and all office expenses, .... 

Interest on general fund and Penitentiary stock, outstanding gen- 
eral fund warrants, &c, .... 

Interest on school fund, for which the State is liable^ 

Expenses of legislature, revised code, printing laws, &c., 

Expenses of State Prison, including new buildings, &c., 

Miscellaneous appropriations. 



Total, . • • • 

Estimated Current Revenue for 1846. 

Balance in Treasury year ending Nov. 30, 1845, 
State tax of 2 1-2 mills, 

Specific State taxes, .... 
Office charges and interest on delinquent taxes, . 
Proceeds of State tax lands. 

Total, 

Total amount received into the treasury, 1845, . 
Total amount expended same year. 

Balance on hand, end of fiscal year 1845, 



$24,000 

10,000 
5,000 

55,000 
6,000 

10,000 

$110,000 



. $18,892 
72,305 

2,000 
10,000 

5,000 

$108,197 

$374,053 07 
355,160 26 



$18,892 81 

The value of the taxable property of the State, as assessed for 1845, was 
$28,922,097 59, and the State tax of 2 1-2 mills on flie dollar amounts to 
$72,305 23. 

25* 



294 KICUIGAK. 11847. 

State DM, 

Due pn the recognized and liquidated portion of the internal 
improvement bonds for " five million loan," including in- 
terest to July Ist, 1845, .... $1,754,036 80 

Due on the unadjusted balance of said loan, being amount 
received, including interest, to July 1st, 1845, . 1,607,593 12 

Due on general fund, Palmyra and Jacksonburgh Bailroad, 
Penitentiary and University bonds, including interest, 253,894 14 

Domestic debt, due from internal improvement fund, includ- 
ing interest to July, 1845, . $677,716 73 

Due from general fund, . 101,269 37 

778,986 10 



Total debt of the State, as reported Nov. 30, 1845, $4,394,510 16 

Resources, 

^Central and Southern Bailroads and fixtures, cost . $3,343,284 92 

Unsold State lands, . . . . 585,417 69 

Taxes past due and unsold State tax lands, . . 135.726 98 

Due from Detroit and Pontiac Railroad Company, about 140,000 00 

Annual State tax, current revenue, . 72,305 23 

Total resources as estimated Nov. 30, 1845, . . $4,276,734 82 

The interest on the general fund. Penitentiary stock, &c., is met from the 
annual State tax or current revenue. On the University bonds, the interest 
is paid regularly from the income of the University fund and from other 
sources. On the funded debt of the State, being her internal improvement 
debt, or what she has received on the '* five million loan," the interest has 
been funded, or authorized to be funded, up to July 1st, 1845 ; and for the 
interest falling due in January, 1846, and thereafter semiannually on the 
liquidated portion of this debt, viz., $1,754,036 80, the laws provide that the 
same shall be paid out of the net proceeds of the public works, and in case 
of deficiency from this source, a direct tax is to be levied for the balance. 
There being no money in the treasury on the 1st day of January, 1846, when 
the first payment of interest fell due, available for this purpose, the proper 
authorities of the several counties were officially notified of the quota of tax 
to be raised in each respectively. The total tax to be levied annually for 
the payment of the said interest is $105,242 20. 

It is, however, expected that the interest on this portion of the State debt 
will be more promptly paid from the proceeds of a sale of the " Central 
Railroad," which, by an act of incorporation passed by the legislature, 28th 
March, 1846, the State has conditionally made to a company of persons, 

• The Legislature, by act of March 28, 1846, poposed to sell these loads fbr $2,500,000. 



1 847.] 



MICHIGAN. 



295 



who are required to pay into the State treasuiy hy the 28th September, 
1846, a certain snm in the coupons of those bonds, or in spede funds, intend- 
ed for their payment, equivalent to two years' interest, (up to July 1, 1849.) 
If the proposed sale is not made, then the dependence is on the assessment 
and collection of the tax as abovementioned. 



Internal Improvements. 

Central Bailroad, from Detroit to Kalamazoo, finished and in 
full operation, length, .... 

Southern Bailroad, from Monroe to Hillsdale, finished and in 
full operation, length, 

Tecumseh branch of Southern Railroad, 

Total length of Railroads finished, belonging to the State, 



144 miles. 


68 


do. 


10 


do. 


222 miles. 



Central Railroad, 

Receipts, from Dec. 1, 1844, to Nov. 30, 1845, . . $202,746 57 

Disbursements. Running expenses during theyear, $104,118 09 

Paid into the State treasury, . 9,759 32 

Paid for railroad iron, locomotives, new cars, &c., 87,794 41 

Cash in hands of Commissioner, . 1,074 75 

$202,746 57 

Southern Railroad, 

Receipts from Dec. 1, 1844, to Nov. 30, 1845, . * $62,735 62 

DisbursetTients. Running expenses during the year, $15,884 73 
Repairs of road, new cars, &c., . 33,936 68 

Construction, and paid Commissioner, 12,914 21 

$62,735 62 

Comparative Statement of Receipts on the Central Railroad during the first seven 

months of the fiscal years o/*1845 and 1846. 



Month. 


» 1846. 


Freight. 


Passengers. 


U.S. Mail, &c. 


Total. 


December, 1844, 

January, 1845, 

February, " 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, " 


$4,469 66 
2,457 31 
2,483 84 
2,926 80 
4,941 93 
6,736 00 
4,207 61 


$3,454 08 
3,404 24 
3,341 23 
3,950 59 
6,076 76 
8,888 55 

10,112 34 


$697 69 
551 28 

1,483 40 
100 42 

588 46 

1,061 76 


$8,621 43 

6,412 83 

7,308 47 

6,977 81 

11,607 15 

15,624 55 

15,381 71 




$28,223 15 


I $39,227 79 


$4,483 01 


$71,933 95 



896 



MICHIGAN. 



[1847. 



Month. 


1846. 


Freight. 


Passengers. 


U.S. Mail, &c. 


Total. 


December, 1845, 
January, 1846, 
February, " 
March, " 
April, " 
May, " 
June, " 


$12,802 56 
13,679 47 
10,006 50 
14,651 03 
16,260 58 
18,572 42 
14,475 90 


$4,325 08 
4,092 10 
4,247 86 
5,118 69 
9,459 69 
14,346 43 
14,626 71 


$1,932 18 
2,484 82 

1,065 70 


$17,127 64 
19,703 75 
14,254 36 
22,254 54 
25,720 27 
32,918 85 
30,168 31 




bl00,448 46 


$56,216 56 


$5,482 70$162,147 72 



Excess of receipts in 1846, for the months aboyementioned, $90,213 77. 

Statb Land Office, locaUd at Marshall^ organized in 1843. 

The sales of internal improvement, school, University, and State 
building lands, and receipts on account of principal and in- 
terest, in 1843, amounted to . . , $105,866 19 
In4844, .... 178,606 92 
In 1846, .... 184,802 07 

Total receipts, . . . $464,275 18 

Of the half million acres of land granted by Congress to the State for in- 
ternal improvement purposes, 492,504 acres have been selected, of which 
there have been sold, to the close of the last fiscal year, Nov. 30, 1845, 206,832 
acres. The balance of the grant has been since selected in the mineral re- 
gion of Lake Superior. 

State Pbison, located at Jadhson, 
The number of prisoners remaining in prison, Oct. 31, 1845, was 119. 
Admitted during the year ending as above, 37. Discharged during the same 
period, 40. Whole number of commitments from March, 1839, to Oct 31, 
1845, 327, as follows: 



Received in 1839, 
do. in 1840, 
do. in 1841, 
do. in 1842, 



33 
56 
47 
50 



Received in 1843, 
do. in 1844, 
do. in 1845, 



43 

61 
37 

327 



Number discharged, died, &c., during same time, as follows : 

By expiration of sentences, 135 

By pardon, . . 40 

Escaped, . . 26 

I>ied, . . .5 



Committed suicide, 



Killed in attempt to recapture him, 1 
In prison Oct. 31, 1845, 



208 
119 



327 



1847.] MICHIGAN. 297 

Public Instruction. 

University Located at Arm Arbor. 

University Endowment and Revenue, — The principal of the UoiTersity fiind consists 
of the proceeds of the 72 sections, or 46,000 acres, of land granted hy Congress for the 
support of this institution. These lands haye been selected firom the most raluable of 
the State ; the minimum price of which was originally $20 per acre, now $12 per acre. 
Of these lands there were sold to Nov. 80, 1845, 17,142 acres, for $201,688. The reyenue 
of the University for the year ending Nov. 30, 1845, was $9,724 74, of which, after paying 
interest on their loan from the State, there was left available for the support of the insti- 
tution the sum of $6,138 89, which is an excess over the previous year of upwards of 
$2,000. 

Board of Regents. — Rev. 0. C. Taylor, Rev. Elijah Pilcher, Hon. Elon ramsworth, 
Hon. A. H. Redfield, Maj. Jona. Kearsley, Rev. Marvin Allen, Hon. Edward Mundy, John 
Owen Esq., Rev. George Duffleld D. D., Dr. Zina Pitcher, Hon. Austin E. Wing, Minot T. 
Lane, Esq. The Governor is ex officio President of the Board ; and the Lt. Governor, 
Chancellor, and Justices of the Supreme Court are ex officio members. Eben. N. Willcoz, 
Acting Secretary ; Prof. George P. WJlliams, Librarian ; Digby V. Bell, Treasurer. 

Faculty. — George P. Williams, A. M. Professor of Natural Philosophy and Mathemat- 
ics ; Abxam Sager, M. D. Professor of Zoology and Botany ; Rev. Andrew Tenbrook, A. H. 
Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy and Pre^dent of the Faculty ; Rev. Dan.-' 
iel D. Whedon, A. M., Professor of Logic, Rhetoric, and the Philosophy of History ; Rev. 
John H. A^ew, A. M., Professor of the Greek and Latin languages. 
Burritt A. Smith, A. B., Tutor in Latin and Greek. ( la University, 70 Students. 
Silas H. Douglass, M. D., Lecturer in Chem. and Geol. / Preparatory school, 12 
Branches, — At Kalamazoo, Rev. J. A. B. Stone, A. M., JFVtne^o^ 

At White Pigeon, Rev. J. Chaplin, A. M., do. 

At Romeo, Rev. RuAis Nutting, A. M., do. 

At Tecmnseh, Fletcher 0. Marsh, A. B., do. 

At Monroe, Charles A. Clark, A. B., do. 

At Pontiac, Edmund Fish, A. B., do. 

Total in University and Branches, 466 Students. 

Ubrary^ ^e. — The library was purchased in Europe, and consists of between 4,000 and 
6,000 volumes of well-selected standard works in the various departments of literature 
and science. 

The collections in the department of Natural History embrace a valuable cabinet of 
Minerals, consisting of between four and five thousand specimens ; and suits of specimens 
illustrative of the Geology, Zoology, and Botany of Michigan. 

Ea^enses. — The only charges of the Institution are an admission fee of $10, and a 
charge ranging from $6 to $7.60 a year, for room rent and the services of the Janitor. 
No charge is made for tuition. Including board, washing, and books, the necessary ex- 
penses of a student for a year will range from $70 to $100. 

Common Schools. -^The fund for the support of common schools arises ftt)m the sales 
of section 16, or Its equivalent, in each surveyed town of 88 sections, set apart by Congress 
for this purpose. 

The whole number of acres of School lands in the State Is 1,140,000, of which 769,618 
acres lie in the lower peninsula, and 880,482 acres in the upper peninsula. The miti- 
imum price of these lands is $5 per acre ; but a large quantity has already been sold afe 
a much higher price. Of these lands there were sold, up to Nov. 80, 1845, 69,421 acres for 
$457,042. The proceeds of this tand are annually distributed among the seveml school 



,12 


do; 


108 


do. 


24 


do. 


115 


do. 


43 


do. 


69 


do. 


40 


do. 



298 



IimiANJL. 



[1847. 



distrtete/ Ihfi amoant thoi distributed in May 1846, vn» t23^18, and in May 1846, 
$27,926 ; which last mm being dividfid among 90,008 scholars, the number reported for the 
year 1846, gires 81 cents for each scholar. In addition to this there is raised on the seT- 
eral townships, for the suj^rt of schools, a half mill tax, yielding about $14,000 more. 





SkUe Centua of Mickigan fw 


1845. 






Gountiee. 


1840. 


1845. 


Gain. 


Counties. 


1840 


1845. 


Gain. 


Allq^sn, 


1,788 


8,186 


1,376 


Lapeer, 


8,842 


6.814 


Bany, 


1,078 


2,602 


1,524 


Lenawee, 


17,889 


28;011 


6,122 


Berrien, 


5,011 


7,941 


2,930 


Livingston, 


7,430 


10,789 


8,869 


Branch, 


,^'^15 


9,070 


8,855 


MacUnaw, 


928 


1,667 


743 


Calhoun, 


10,699 


16,719 


6,150 


Blacomb, 


9,716 


13,509 


8,798 


Cass, 


6,710 


8,078 


2,868 


Monroe, 


9,922 


13,856 


8,484 


Chippewa, 


684 


1,017 


488 


Monroe City, 




2,496 




Clinton, 


1,614 


8,011 


1,897 


Oakland, 


28,646 


30,288 


6,642 


Detroit City, 




18,066 




Ottawa, 


704 


1,438 


734 


Saton, 


2,879 


4,613 


2,237 


Saginaw, 


892 


1,218 


329 


Genesee, 


•6,191 


9,266 


4,075 


SUawaasee, 


2,108 


3,829 


1,726 


Hillsdale, 


7,240 


11,126 


8,885 


St. Clair, 


4,606 


7,680 


3,074 


Ingham, 


2,498 


6,267 


2,769 


St. Joseph, 


7,068 


10,097 


8.029 


Ionia, 


1,928 


6,004 


8,081 


YanBuren, 


1,910 


8,743 


1,833 


Jackson, 


18,180 


16,852 


3,722 


Washtenaw, 


28,571 


26,979 


8,408 


Kalamaaoo, 
Kent, 


7,880 
2,687 


10,192 
6,158 


2,812 
8.Afi6 


Wayne, 


24,178 


82;a67 


8,004 


Total, 


212^7 


304,278 


92,011 



* Including four towns set off ftom Lapeer county since 1840. 



XXVI. INDIANA. 



GOTERNMENT. 

Salary. 

of Terre Haute, Gwernor^ (tenn of office 

expires in December, 1849,) $1,300 
of Madison, lAeiA, Governor^ Pay $3 a day. 

of Wash'n Co., Secretary of State^ 800 

of Shelbyville, Treasurer of State^ 1,000 

of Delphi, Auditor of Public Accounts^ 1,000 

of Indianapolis, Preadent of the State Bank, 1,300 
of Indianapolis, Cashier of the State Banky 1,100 
State Agent, $1,000 and tarayelling expenses. 
of Indianapolis, Quartermaster General, 100 

Adjutant GeneraL 

Samuel H. Patterson, of Jeffersonyille, Keeper of the Penitentiary ^ Profits. 
James B. Dillon, of Indianapolis, Stat€ Librarian, 500 

John S. Simonson, Speaker of the House, 

The number of Senators is 50, and of BepresentatiTes, 100. 



Jaxbs Whitcomb, 

P. C. Dunning, 
John H. Thompson, 
Boyal Majhew, 
H. J. Harris, 
James Morrison, 
James M. Bay, 
Michael G. Bright, 
Samuel Beck, 
David Beynolds, 



1847.] 



INDIAKA. 



299 



JUDICIABT. 

The Judges are appointed by the Governor and Senate for 7 years, and 
the senior in comnussion is the Chief Judge. 



Isaac Blackford, 
Charles Dewey, 
Samnel E. Perkins, 
Abram A. Hammond, 
Henry P. Cobnm, 



Supreme Court 

of Indianapolis, 
of Charleston, 
of Richmond, 
of Columbus, 



Chief Judge, 
Judge, 

do. 
Attorney General 
Clerk, 



Salary. 

$1,300 
1,300 
1,300 

Fees. 



of Indianapolis, 

This Court holds its sessions at Indianapolis, in May and Noyember. 
It has appellate jurisdiction only, except in cases in chancery in which the 
President of the Circuit Court may be interested. 



Circuit Courts, 



C&e. Rvaidmt Jmdgts, 

iBt, Isaae Najlw, of Oiawfordflrille. 

2d, William T. Otto, of Brownstown. 

3d, Oourtland Cnshing, of Madison. 

4tih, James Lockhart, of Eransriile. 

6th, WiUiani J. Peaslee, of Indianapolis. 

0th, J. T. Elliott, of Noweastle. 

7th, John Law, of Yinoennet. 

8th, John W. Wright, of Clay. 

9th, E. M. Chamberlain, of Goshen. 
10th, David McDonald, of Bloomington. 
11th, Jeremiah Smith, of Winchester. 



ProseeuHng Attamnfi, 
Jos. E. McDonald, of LafliTette. 
Gyros L. Dunham, of Salem. 
John Dmnont, 



A. A. Hammond, 

Jacob B. Julian, 

James M. Banna, 

Wm. Z. Stuart, 

R. L. Famswoith, 

Craven P. Hester, of Bloomington. 

John Davis, of Andersontown. 

Robert L. Douglass, of Angola. 



of Vevay. 

of Columbus, 
of CentrevlUe. 
of Greencamle. 
of Logansport. 
of South Bend. 



1201, James W. Bord«n, of Ft. Wayne. 

The President Judges are elected by the legislature, for 7 years; the 
attorneys are chosen by the people for 2 years ; and the Associate Judges 
and Clerks of the Courts are elected by the people for 7 years. The Presi- 
dent Judges receiye each a salary of $800, and the Judge of the 5th Circuit 
is allowed $300 in addition, optional with the County Commissioners of his 
Circuit: the Attorneys have each a salary of $150 and perquisites. The 
Judges hold two terms in each county annually. There are two Associate 
Judges in each county, who receive $2 a day during the session. 



Finances. 

Public Ddt, Bonds on which the State pays interest, 
Bonds on which the Bank pays interest, 
Arraars of interest due Jan. 1, 1846, . 

Total, 



$11,090,000 

1,390,000 

. 2,777,320 

15,257,320 



300 INDIANA. [1847. 

The annaal interest on the State Bonds is $556,220. There are also 
outstanding treasury notes, which, with the interest due on them, amount 
to $1,204,760 ; the annual interest on these notes is $51,552. Adding these 
sums, the grand total of the State debt is $16,462,080 ;«and the annual in- 
terest payable by it is $607,772. 

The legislature in 1846 passed an act to provide by taxation for the pay- 
ment of 2j per cent, of the interest on the public debt, relying, for the pay- 
ment of the remainder of the interest, on the tolls, water rents, and lands 
of the Wabash and Erie Canal. The old State bonds are to be surrend- 
ered, and new certificates issued, redeemable at pleasure after 20 years. 
Such new certificates specify the amount due as principal on the surrendered 
bonds, and also the amount due as intereist to 1st of January, 1847, compnt- 
ing such interest at the rate of two and a half per cent per annum. On 
the principal specified in such new certificates the State will pay two per 
cent per annum, from 1st January, 1847, to 1st January, 1853; at which 
latter period the amount of interest specified as haying been due on 1st 
January, 1847, together with one-half of one per cent, on the specified prin- 
cipal, from 1st January, 1847, to 1st January, 1853, shall be added to the 
principal*, and the State will pay interest atlhe rate of two and a half per 
cent per annum, upon the amount of principal and interest so added, until 
the same shall be finally redeemed. 

For the purpose of providing for the remaining two and a half per cent, 
per annum, not payable from taxation, the holders of State bonds shall 
have the privilege of raising among themselves, hjpro rata subscription on 
the amounts respectively held by each of them, before the 1st of January 
next, a sufficient sum (not less, however, than $2,250,000) to complete the 
Wabash and Erie canal to Evansville, within four years from the taking 
effect of this act. The canal lands and tolls and revenues of said canal are 
to be conveyed to trustees, to secure to said subscribers the reimbursement of 
said advances, and the payment of the remaining interest on the said bonds. 
This proposition has been accepted by the bondholders, and the State is 
freed from responsibility for the principal and interest of one half of this 
debt. 

The expenses of the State Government for the year 1845, amounted only 
to $71,122, a reduction of $22,246 upon the preceeding year; and the esti- 
mates for 1846 reduced that item still more, leaving it at $67,000. The num- 
ber of polls is 124,000, and the value of the taxable property $118,500,000, 
making an increase over the year 1844 of 6,000 poUs and $2,300,000 in the 
value of taxable property. The State revenue paid in during the fiscal 
year ending the 3l8t Oct 1845, amounts to $271,963. The domestic scrip 
has been nearly absorbed so far as the same is afloat, and a laige amoimt of 
the income of the State is thus left to be applied to pay the interest on the 
State bonds. 



1847.] 



ILUNOIS. 



301 



SuUemeni showing tJu prcbahU revenue from the Wabash and Erie Caned, from 
1846 to 1855, inclusive^ as estimated Bth December, 1845. 



Per 


cent on 


cost. 


3 3-8 


4 1-6 


5 1-6 


5 2-3 


6 1-6 


5 3-4 


6 5-8 





Length 


Yean. 


of canal. 




miles. 


1846, 


188 


1847, 


188 


1848, 


224 


1849, 


337 


1850, 


374 


1851, 


374 


1852, 


374 


1853, 


374 


1854, 


374 


1855, 


374 



Cost of con- 
struction. 



$2,929,000 
2,929,000 
3,404,000 
4,944,000 
5,585,000 
5,585,000 
5,585,000 
5,585,000 
5,585,000 
5,585,000 



Receipts in 
tolls, water 
rents, &c. 



$150,000 
175,000 
225,000 
330,000 
390,000 
425,000 
450,000 
475,000 
500,000 
500,000 



Cost of repairs 


Paid for 


and inciden- 


collec- 


tals. 


tion. 


* $120,000 


$3,600 


75,000 


3,600 


90,000 


4,500 


135,000 


6,600 


150,000 


7,800 


131,000 


7,800 


127,000 


8,000 


123,000 


8,000 


1 168,000 


8,400 


123,000 


8,400 



Net Rer- 
enue. 



$26,400 
96,400 
130,500 
188,400 
232,200 
286,200 
315,000 
344,000 
323,000 
368,600 



NoTS. — The cost of constructing the Canal to Lafoyette, as near as can be ascertained, 
-was $2,404,000. * Extraordinary repairs must be made this year, 
t About this time some structures will require rebuilding. 

Statement slwwing the value of taxables, the number of polls, the ammcd yield 
of a three mill tax up to 1850, inclusive, and thereafter three and a half miUs, 
and a poll tax of seventy-Jioe cents ; also, the net revenue to he derived from 
these sources, after deducting twenty per cent, for cost of collection and adin- 
quencies,for each year from 1846 to 1855, inclusive. The taxables are sup- 
pi^sed to increase on an average o/* $6,000,000 and the poUs 6000 per annum. 



Years. 


Taxables. 


No. of 
Polls. 


1 
Amount of 

Polls. 


Expenses of 

collection, 

&c. 


3 MiU tax on 
taxables. 


Total Beye- 
nue. 


1846, 
1847, 
1848, 
1849, 
1850, 
1851, 
1852, 
1853, 
1854, 
1855, 


$126,000,000 
132,000,000 
138,000,000 
144,000,000 
150,000,000 
156,000,000 
162,000,000 
168,000,000 
174,000,000 
180,000,000 


130,000 
136,000 
142,000 
148,000 
154,000 
160,000 
166,000 
172,000 
178,000 
184,000 


$97,500 
102,000 
106,500 
111,000 
115,500 
120,000 
124,500 
129,000 
133,500 
138,000 


$95,100 
99,600 
104,100 
108,600 
113,100 
117,600 
122,100 
126,600 
131,100 
135,600 


$378,000 
396,000 
414,000 
432,000 
450,000 
546,000 
567,000 
588,000 
609,000 
630 000 


$380,400 
398,400 
416,400 
434,400 
452,400 
532^800 
553,200 
573,600 
594,000 
614,400 



XXVn. ILLINOIS. 



GOVEENMENT. 

Salaiy. 
Augustus C. French, Governor, (term ends 1st Monday in Decem- 
ber, 1850,) $2,000 
J. B. Wells, Lieutenant Governor, $4 a day during the session, and $3 

for every 20 miles of travel. 
Thompson Campbell, of Galena, Secretary, (including clerk hire,) 800 

Thomas H. Campbell, Auditor, (do.) 1,600 

26 



302 ILLINOIS. [1847. 

Milton Carpenter, of Hamilton Co., Treasurer^ (do.) $800 

George B. Weber, Public Printer. 

The Governor is, ex officio^ Fund Commissioner, 

Dayid Leayitt, of New York, and W. H. Swift, of Massachusetts, are Comal 
Trustees on the part of the bond holders, and Jacob Fry, of Locli:p<n1;, on the 
part of the State. 

Each member of the legislature receives $3 a day during the session, and 
$3 for every 20 miles of travel. The Lieutenant Governor is Speaker of the 
Senate. 

JUDICIAUY. 

Supreme Court, 

William Wibon, ofCarmi, Chirf Justice, $1,500 

Samuel D. Lockwood, of Jacksonville, Associate Justice, 1,500 

Thomas C. Browne, of Galena, do, 1,500 

Richard M. Toung, of Chicago, do, 1,500 

Samuel H. Treat, of Springfield, do, 1,500 

Walter B. Scates, of Mount Vernon, do, 1,000 

John D. Caton, of Ottowa, do, 1,000 

Gustavus P. Keomer, of Belleville, do, l,O00 

Norman H. Purple, ofQuincy, do, 1,000 

James A. McDongal, of Chicago, Attomeif General, 500 

Charles Gillman, of Quincy, Beporter, 

Ebenezer Peck, of Chicago, Ckrh, Fees- 

Hugh T. Dickey, of Chicago, Judge of the Cook Co. Court, 800 
Patrick Ballingall, Attorney for Joe Daveiss Co. Fees and 200 

The judges are elected by the legislature, and hold their offices during 
good behavior. Five constitute a quorum. The judges all perform circuit 
duties, the State bemg divided into circuits corresponding with the number 
of Judges. There Is a State's Attorney for each circuit, who is elected by 
the legislature biennially. Salary, $250 and fees. 

The only other courts now in the State are those held by probate justices 
and justices of the peace. The former have jurisdiction in actions of debt or 
assumpsit by or against administrators, &c., where the amount in controversy 
does not exceed $1,000, and the general powers of probate courts. The lat- 
ter have jurisdiction in actions of debt or assumpsit, not exceeding in 
amount $100 ; and exclusive jurisdiction in cases of assaults and battery. 
In trespass on personal property and trover, where the damages claimed do 
not exceed $20, justices of the peace also have jurisdiction. In all suits for 
debts, where the damages claimed exceed $20, the Circuit Courts have juris- 
diction, and they are Superior Courts of general jurisdiction. 

The Governor and Jttstices of the Supreme Court constitute a Council of 
Revision, which acts upon all laws, approving or disapproving them. A bill, 
if disapproved, is returned to the house in which it originated; and if after- 
wards passed by a msjority of all the members elected in both houses, it 
becomes a law In spite of the disapproval. 



1847.] 



ILLINOIS. 



CoanlSeB, 

Adams, 

Alexander,* 

Bond, 

Boone, 

Brown, 

Bureau, 

Calhoun,t 

Carroll, 

Cass, 

Champaign,! 

Christian, 

Clark, 

Clay, 

Clinton, 

Coles,* 

Cook, 

Crawford, 

Cumberland, 

De Kalb, 

DeWitt, 

DuPage, 

Edgar, 

Edwards, 

Effingham^ 

Fayette, 

Franklin, 

Fulton, 

Gallatui, 

Greene, 

Grundy, 

Hamilton, 

Hancod^ 

Hardin, 

Henderson, 

Henry, 

Iroquois, 

Jackson, 

Jasper, 

Jefferson, 

Jersey, 

Joe Dariess, 

Johnson, 

Kane, 

Kendall,! 

Knox, 

Lake, 

LaSaUe,* 

Lawrence,* 

Lee, 

LivlngstOD, 

Logan, 



1845 

13,518 
1,315 
64218 
5,508 
5,372 
5,293 

2,682 
5,471 

2,168 

10,496 

3,556 

5,033 

8,675 

21,581 

6337 

2359 

4,013 

3,332 

7,194 

9,265 

3413 

2,561 

7,849 

4,979 

17,161 

11,175 

11,510 

1,304 

6,730 

22,569 

1,802 

3,418 

2327 

2,730 

5,038 

2,360 

7,611 

5,659 

12,625 

2,822 

12,718 

9,680 
8,236 
10,149 
5,609 
3,182 
1,000 
3,907 



CBsrsns of Illinois. 

1840 Ooimties. 



16,023 Macon,* 
3,000 Macoupin, 
5,211 McLean, 
1,719 McDonough, 
4,174 McHenry, 
3,159 Madison, 
1,650 Marion, 
1,178 MarshaU, 
2,974 Marquette, 
1,582 Mason, 
1,742 Massac, 
7,654 Menard,* 
3,263 Mercer, 
2,828 Montgomery, 
9,857 Monroe, 
11,955 Moultrie, 
4,632 Morgan,* 
Ogle, 
Peoria, 
Perry, 
Piatt, 
Pike, 
Pope, 
Pulaski, 
Putnam, 
Randolph, 
Richland, 
Rock Island, 
Sangamon,* 
Scott, 
_,_ . _ Schuyler, 
10,025|Shelby,* 
1398 Stark, 
St Oair, 
Stephenson, 
Tazewell,* 
Union, 
Yermillion, 
Wabash, 
Warren,* 
Washington, 
_,. __ Wayne, 
6,494 White, 

Whiteside,t 

WiU, 

Williamson, 

Winnebago, 

Woodford, 



1,744 

3382 

3,615 

8307 

3,073 

1,736 

6,223 

3,737 

13,592 

11,058 

10,993 

4,275 



1,261 
1,749 
3,595 
1,415 
5,620 
4,572 
6,494 
8,743 



7,175 
2,905 
10,013 
7,061 
1,921 
750 
2363 



1846 


1840 


2,929 


3,233 


10,062 


7,867 


6,904 


6,571 


6,266 


5,348 


10,04» 


3,002 


18,043 


13,260 


6,176 


4,800 


2,883 


1,840 


2,135 




3,198 




4,807 


4,481 


4,279 


2,532 


5,603 


4,436 


6,083 


4,466 


2,492 




16,544 


15,444 


6,113 


3,447 


10,549 


7,063 


4,752 


3,222 


1,037 




15,974 


11332 


4,057 


3,gf74 


1,795 




3,129 


2,103 


8,868 


8,156 


3,844 




5,058 


2,560 


18,697 


15,222 


5,653 


6,162 


8,681 


7,132 


6,972 


6,759 


2,483 


1,632 


17348 


13,340 


6344 


2369 


7,615 


8,506 


6344 


2,869 


10,235 


8,919 


3,359 


4,433 


6,101 


6,910 


5,895 


4309 


6,497 


6,148 


8,080 


7,936 




2,467 


10,156 


9,219 


5,780 


4340 


7,831 


4.545 


3,288 





Total, 



643,482 472,929 



* Poctioiui of thMe counties hafe been out off. 

t In thflMliMiroQuiitiep the ceafua for the year hM not been noelTed. 



304 MISSOURI. 11847. 

XXVm. MISSOURL 

GOYBRNMENT. 

Tenn ends. Salary. 

John C. Edwards, Governor, Nov. 1848, $2,000 
James Young, Lieutenant- Governor ^ do. 
Falkland H. Martin, of Jefferson, Secretary qf State, 

and Superintendent qf Common Schods, Nov. 1849, 1,300 

James H. McDeannan, of City of Jefferson, And. qf Accounts, 1849, 1,600 

Peter G. Glover, do. Treasurer, 1847, 1,350 

Benjamin F. Stringfellow, do. Attomei/ General, 1849, 750 

George W. Huston, do. Beg'r qf Lands, 1849, 1,250 

Gustavus A. Parsons, do. Adjutant General. 100 

Greorge W. Miller, do. Quartermaster General, 100 

Frederick Conway, of St Louis, Surveyor Creneral, 1,500 
E. Walsh, do. President qf State Bank. 

Henry Shnrlds, do. Cashier do. 2,000 

The Lieutenant-Governor is, ex qfficio. President of the Senate, and re- 
ceives $4 50 a day while presiding over the Senate ; and the pay of the 
Speaker of the House of Representatives is the same. The Senators are 
chosen every fourth year, and the Representatives every second year. Their 
pay is $3 a day. The legislature meets at the City of Jefferson biennially, 
on the 4th Monday in November. 

Judiciary. 

Supreme Court. 

Salary. 

William B. Napton, of the City of Jefferson, Presiding Judge, $1,100 

Priestly H. McBride, do. Associate Judge, 1,100 

William Scott, do. do. 1,100 

The Supreme Court is held at the City of Jefferson. This Court exercises 
appellate jurisdiction from the Circuit Court, and has original jurisdiction in 
cases of habeas corpus, mandamus, &c. 

Circuit Courts. 

Judges. Salary. Attorneys. Salary. 

James W. Morrow, 1st Circuit, $1,000 B. F. Stringfellow, $750 and fees. 

John D. Leland, 2d do. 1,000 James Gordon, 250 do. 

Ezra Hunt, 3d do. 1,000 Alfred W. Lamb, 250 do. 

Addison Reese, 4th do. 1,000 James C. Abemathy, 250 do. 



1847.] 






UISSOUBI. 




305 


Judges. 






Salary. 


Attorneys. 


Salary. 


John F. Ryland, 


5th Circnit, $1,000 


Robert Smart, 


$250 and fees. 


A. A. King, 


eth 


do. 


1,000 


George VV. Dunn, 


250 


do. 


F. P. Wright, 


7th 


do. 


1,000 


Thomas Ruffln, 


250 


do. 


John M. Knim, 


eth 


do. 


1,000 


Nathaniel Holmes, 


250 


do. 


John H. Stone, 


9th 


do. 


1,000 


John S. Brickey, 


250 


do. 


John D. Cook, 


10th 


do. 


1,000 


Albert Jackson, 


250 


do. 


James A. Clark, 


11th 


do. 


1,000 


W. Halliburton, 


250 


do. 


Sol. H. Leonard, 


12th 


do. 


1,000 


Isaac K Jones, 


250 


do. 


Charles S. Yancey, 


13th 


do. 


1,000 


John T. Coffee, 


250 


do. 


Charles H. Allen, 


14th 


do. 


1,000 


P. 0. Minor, 


250 


do. 



A Circuit Court for each county is held twice in each year. The jurisdic- 
tion of the Circuit Court extends to all matters of tort and contracts over 
90 dollars, where the demand is liquidated, and over 50 dollars, where the 
agreement is parol. It has exclusive criminal jurisdiction, and superintend- 
ing control over the County Courts and Justices of the Peace, subject to the 
correction of the Supreme Court. The Circuit Court is held in each county. 
The Judges of the Supreme and Circuit Courts are nominated by the Goyer- 
nor, and confirmed by the Senate ; and they hold their office during good 
behavior, though not beyond 65 years of age. 



Courts of St. Louis. 

Montgomery Blair, Judge qf Common Pleas, 
A. W. Manning, Judffe qf Criminal Couii, 



Salary. 

$200 and fees. 

$1,000 



Court qf Common Pleas for the City qf Hannibal. 



Thomas Van Swearingen, Judge^ 



$200 and fees. 



These are local tribunals, established for exercising jurisdiction only in 
the county. An appeal lies to the Supreme Court The Judge is appointed 
by the concurrent vote of the two Houses of the General Assembly ; and he 
holds his office during good behavior. ' 

County Courts. 

The jurisdiction of the County Courts is limited to matters of probate 
and local county affairs, as roads, &c. A County Court sits in each county, 
and is composed of three justices, who are elected by the people, and hold 
their offices for four years. An appeal lies to the Circuit Court 



Amount of State Debt, $664,997 40. 

26* 



Interest on Debt, $73,100. 



306 WISOOITBZN TBBBITOBT. [1847. 

XXIX. WISCONSIN TERRITOEY. 

GOYBBNMBNT. 

Salary. 
Henbt Dodge, of Dodgers Grove, Governor^ and Superintended 

of Indian Affairs, (tenn expires March, 1849,) $2,500 

John CatUn, of Madison, Secretary qf the Territory^ 1,200 

John White and David Merrill, Canal Commissioners, $3 a day. 

Gillet Knapp, of Madison, SupH qf Territorial Property and Libr'an, 300 

George P. Delaplaine, of Madison, Auditor, 60 

Jonathan Larkin, Treasurer, 60 

Nelson Dewey, of Lancaster, President qf the Council. 

Mason C. Darling, of Fond dn Lac, Speaker qfthe House. 

Wisconsin is soon to be admitted into the Union as an independent State, 
Congress having passed a law for that purpose in March, 1846; for which, 
and for a detail of the boundaries of the new State, see page 206. A con- 
vention to form a constitution was held at Madison, the capital of the Ter- 
ritory, on the first Monday of October, 1846. 

JUDICIABT. 

Supreme Court. 

Salary. 
Charles Dunn, of Elk Grove, Chief Justice qf Sup. Court, $1,800 

David Irvin, of Madison, Associate Justice do. 1,800 

Andrew G. Miller, ofMilwaukie, do. do. 1,800 

William P. Lynde, do. Attorney, Fees and 250 

John S. Rockwell, do. Marshal, Fees and 200 

La Fayette Kellogg, of Madison, Clerk, Fees. 

Thomas P. Burrett, Reporter. 

District Courts. — The Territory is divided into three judicial districts, in 
each of which a district court is held twice a year, for each county within 
the district, by a Judge of the Supreme Court, assigned to the district. 

1st Dist, Iowa, Grant, Crawford, and St. Croix ; Mr. Justice Dunn. 

2d do. Green, Bock, Walworth, Jefferson, Dane, Columbia, Sauk, and 

Portage ; Mr. Justice Irvin. 
3d do. Brown, Milwaukie, Racine, Dodge, Fond du Lac, and Sheboygan, 

Mr. Justice Miller. 

The Supreme Court appoints its own clerk, and holds its session at Madi- 
son, on the third Monday of July ; it has appellate jurisdiction of all cases 
Ax)m the District Courts, and original jurisdiction of all cases of mandamus, 
quo warranto, prohibition, error, &Ci 



1847.1 



IOWA. 



307 



Abstract of the Population of the several Counties in the Territory of 
Wisconsin, on the Ist day of June, A. D., 1846, except the Counties of 



v^ixippcTva) xm X %j 


fni.v%j% c*uu 


. Xli 


AV^AAAaiAVL) J 


LIUUA WUl 


OAX VUK>1.M > 


»l.\j U\I LVi 


blAXXlO. 


. 


White 


White 


Colored 


Colored 




Names of Gonnties. 


males. 


jSamales. 


mides. 


females. 


Total. 


Brown, . 


1,444 


1,214 


1 


3 


2,662 


Calumet, , 






383 


362 


50 


41 


836 


Columbia, 






1,143 


825 


1 




1,969 


Chippewa, 
















Crawford, 






905 


534 


2 


3 


1,444 


Dane, 






4,593 


3,693 


2 


1 


8,289 


Dodge, . 






4,279 


3,507 


1 




7,787 


Fond du Lac, 






2,071 


1,473 






3,544 


Grant, . 






7,189 


4,815 


17 


13 


12,034 


Green, 






2,629 


2,129 






4,758 


Iowa, 






8,962 


5,894 


36 


24 


14,916 


Jefferson, 






4,618 


4,062 






8,680 


La Pointe, 
















Manitouwoc, . 






414 


215 






629 


Marquette, 






607 


381 




1 


989 


Milwaukee, . 






8,748 


7,138 


19 


20 


15,925 


Portage, 






774 


155 




2 


931 


Racine, 






9,551 


8,398 


27 


7 


17,983 


Richland, 
















Rock, 






6,878 


5,523 


3 


1 


12,405 


Sauk, 






568 


434 


1 




1,003 


Sheboygan, . 






987 


643 


4 


3 


1,637 


St. Croix, 






914 


496 


7 


2 


1,419 


Walworth, 






7,191 


6,243 


3 


2' 


13,439 


Washington, 






4,070 


3,403 






7,473 


Waukesha, . 






7,440 


6,331 


15 


7 


13,793 


Winnebago, 






411 


230 


57 


34 


732 


• 






86,769 


68,098 


246 


164 


155,277 



XXX. IOWA. 

GOVEHNMENT. 

James Claskb, of Iowa City, Gcvemor and Sujperintendent qf 

Indian Affairs^ (term ends, July, 1848,) 
Jesse Williams, of Iowa City, Secretary^ 
Morgan Reno, do. Treasurer and Librarian^ 

Edwin Guthrie, of Fort Madison, Warden of the Penitentiary, 



Salary. 

*2,500 

1,200 

210 

500 



Iowa is already a State, as Congress passed a law, in 1846, (for which see 
page 205,) providing for its admission into the Union, and determining its 
boundaries in a manner more acceptable to the people than in the former 
law for this purpose, passed in February, 1845. Accordingly, on the 3d of 



308 



IOWA. 



[1847, 



August, 1846, the people voted to accept the constitution which had been, 
framed for them two years before, and Iowa is now one of the United States. 
Bnt the State officers were not chosen, nor was the goyemment organized 
when this sheet went to press. 



Charles Mason, 
Joseph Williams, 
Thomas S. Wilson, 
Edward Johnston, 
Gideon S. Bailey, 
James Grant, 
George S. Hampton, 
L. D. Stockton, 
£d. H. Thomas, 
James Crawford, 



Judiciary. 

of Burlington, 
of Bloomington, 
of Da Buque, 
of Fort Madison, 
of Bentonsport, 
of Davenport, 
of Iowa City, 
of Burlington, 
ofWasello, 
of Du Buque, 



Salary. 
Chitf Justice, $1,800 

Asaociate Justice, 1,800 

do, 1,800 

Attorney, Fees and 200 

Marshal, Fees and 200 



Reporter, 

Clerk, 

Attorney, 1st District, 
do. 2d do, 
do. 3d do. 



300 



Fees. 
Fees. 
Fees. 



The Judges are appointed for four years. The Territory is divided into 
three judicial districts, and the Judges perform circuit duties. The Supreme 
Court, composed of all the Judges, meets annually, in July, at Iowa City. 

Abstract op the Conbtitxttion, 

Adopted August 3, 1846. 

Every white male citizen of the United States, 21 years old, Insane or infa- 
mous persons excepted, having resided in the State six months, and in the 
county where he claims to vote thirty days, shall have the right of sufi&'age. 
The sessions of the General Assembly, consisting of a Senate and House of 
Representatives, shall be biennial, commencing on the first Monday in Janu- 
ary after their election. Representatives shall be chosen for two years on 
the third Tuesday of October ; they must have resided in Iowa for at least 
one year previous to the election. Senators, not less than one third, nor 
more than one half, as numerous as the Representatives, must be 25 years 
of age; they shaU be chosen for four years, one half biennially. Any 
member of the General Assembly may protest against an act or'resolution, 
and cause the reasons of his dissent to be entered on the Journal. The gov- 
ernor may reftise to sign a bill ; but if subsequently approved by two thirds of 
the members of both houses, it shall become a law in spite of his objections. 
No member of either house shall be appointed to any civil office which has 
been created, or the emoluments of which have been increased, during his 
term of service. No person holding any lucrative office under the State or 
the United States, shall be eligible to the Assembly. The pay of members 
shall not exceed $2 a day for the first 50 days, and $1 a day for the rest of 
the session. Every law shall embrace but one object, which shall be ex- 
pressed in the title. No divorce shall be granted by the Legislature. No 
county shall be liable for the expense of any road established by special act 
of the Assembly. A census of the State shall be taken within two years after 



1847.] IOWA. 309 

the first meeting of the General Assembly, and again in every subsequent 
fonr years for the term of sixteen years. Afber each census, members shalj 
be apportioned among the several counties according to the number of white 
inhabitants in each. The representatives shall not be less than 26, or more 
than 39, till the white population amounts to 125,000; afterward they shall 
not be less than 36, nor more than 72. For the first ten years, the salary of 
the governor shall not exceed $800 ; of the secretary of state and the auditor, 
$500 each; of the treasurer, $300, and of the judges of the supreme and dis- 
trict courts, $800 each. 

The governor and lieutenant governor shall be chosen for two years ; they 
must be 30 years old, and have resided in the state for two years. The lieu- 
tenant governor shall be president of the senate, and shal> be paid the same 
sum as the speaker of the house. A secretary of state, auditor, and treas- 
urer, shall be chosen by the people each for two years. 

The supreme court shall consist of a chief justice and two associates, elect- 
ed by joint vote of the General Assembly for four years, two of whom shall 
form a quorum. This court shall have appellate jurisdiction only in all 
chancery cases, and correct errors at law under restrictions provided by the 
General Assembly. The judges shall be elected by the qualified voters of 
their respective districts, each for four years. There shall be elected in each 
county one judge of probate, one prosecuting attorney, and one clerk of the 
district court, each for two years. 

No State debts shall be created exceeding $100,000, except in case of war 
or insurrection, unless authorized by a special law, which shall provide for 
the payment of the interest, and of the principal wlchin 20 years ; which law 
shall be irrepealable, and, before going into effect, must be submitted to the 
people at a general election, and be approved by a majority of the voters. 

No act of incorporation, except for public improvement, shall continue 
longer than 20 years ; the property of its members shall be liable for its debts, 
and the act may be repealed at any time by the Assembly. Private property 
shall not be used for any incorporated company without the consent of its 
owner. The State shall never become a stockholder in any corporation. 
No bank shall be created, except the act for its incorporation be approved 
by a majority of the voters at a general election. 

A Superintendent of Public Instruction shall be chosen by joint vote of the 
legislature for three years. All lands granted by Congress to this State, all 
escheated estates, and the five per cent, granted on the sale of the public 
lands in Iowa, shall constitute a perpetual fund, the interest of which shall 
be applied to the support of common schools. As soon as practicable, libra- 
ries in every township shall be provided, and all moneys received for ex- 
emption from military duty and for fines imposed by the courts, shall be 
appropriated to support such libraries. The money arising from the lease 
or sale of public lands granted for the support of a university shall remain 
a perpetual fund to maintain such an institution. 

Amendments to this constitution must be passed by a majority of all the 
members elected to both houses in two successive General Assemblies, and 
most then be submitted to the people, and ratified by a mtgority of the vot- 



SIO 



DISTRICT Ol* COLUMBIA. 



[1847. 



en. The Assembly shall not propose amendments oftener tlian <mce in six 
jean. Two thirds of the members of both houses may recommend a con- 
vention to revise or alter the constitntion; and if a majority of the voters 
afterwards assent to this recommendation, such a convention may be called 
by the next legislature. The first meeting of the legislature shall be held on 
the first Monday in November after the acceptance of this oonstltotion, at 
Iowa City, in Johnson county, which shall be the seat of goveiment till 1865^ 



XXXT. DISTRICT OF COLUMBU, 

The District of Columbia is under the immediate government of Congress. 
The city of Washington became the seat of the government of the United 
States, in 1800 ; and it is the residence of the President, and the other chief 
executive officers of the national government By an act of Congress, in 
1846, which was subsequently accepted by the people of Alexandria, the city 
and county of Alexandria were retroceded to the State of Virginia, and the 
District is now confined to the Maryland side of the Potomac. 



JUDICIAST. 



Circuit Court qf the District, 



William Cranch, 
James S. Morsel, 
James Dnnlop, 
Philip B. Key, 
Alexander Hunter, 
William Brent, 



of Washington, 
of Georgetown, 

do. 
of Washington, 

do. 

do. - 



CMrfJudge^ 
Associate Judge^ 
do. 

Attorney^ 
MoTshaLt 
Clerk^ 



8a]avy. 
92,700 

2,500 

2,500 
Fees and 200 

Fees. 

Fees. 



Thomas H. Crawford, 
William Brent, 



Criminal CouHfor the District. 

Judge, 
Clerk, 



$2,000 
Fees. 



This Court holds three terms a year, beginning respectively on the 1st 
Monday in March, the 3d Monday in June, and the 1st Monday in December. 



Nathaniel P. Causin, 
Edward N.. Roach, 



Orphans^ Court. 

Washington Co., 
do. 



Judge, 
Register, 



$1,000 
Fees. 



1847.1 



BBITI8H AMEBICAN PBOYINCBS. 



311 



AMERICAN STATES. 
B^ublics qf North America, 



United States, 

Mexico, 

Central America, 

Yucatan, 

Hayti, 



Population. 



17,069,4® 

7,723,000 

2,000,000 

580,948 

933,000 



Capitols. 



Washington, 
Mexico, 
San Salvador, 
Merida, 
Cape Haytien, 



Presidents. 



James K. Polk. 
Gen. Santa Anna. 

Miguel Barbachano. 
General Louis Pierrot./ 



Bepvtiics qf South America. 



Argentine Bepub. 

Peru, 

New Grenada, 

Bolivia, 

Chili, 

Venezuela, 

Equator, 

Paraguay, 

Uruguay, 



1,000,000 

1,700,000 

1,931,634 

1,030,000 

1,200,000 

900,000 

600,000 

300,000 

150,000 



Buenos Ayres, 

Lima, 

Bogota, 

Chuquisaca, 

Santiago, 

Caraccas, 

Quito, 

Assumption, 

Monte Video, 



Don Juan M. de Rosas. 
General Gamarra, 
General Herran. 
General Ballivian. 
General Bulnes. 
General Paez. 



Fructuoso Rivera. 



Brazil, 



Empire. Emperor. 

I 5,130,418 i Rio Janeiro. I Pedro II. 



The present population of most of the above States has not been very re- 
cently ascertained with any exactness. 



BRITISH AMERICAN PROVINCES. 

LobdEloik, Governor- General, Vice-Admiral, and Captain- G enerai qf aU 

the British Provinces qf North America. 



Provinces. 



Area in 
sq. miles. 



East Canada, . 

West Canada, 

New Brunswick, 

Nova Scotia, with C. Breton, 

Prince Edward's Island, 

Newfoundland, 

Honduras, 



194,815 
147,000 
27,700 
17,500 
2,134 
35,913 
62,740 



Population. 



693,649 

506,055 

130,000 

199,870 

34,666 

81,517 

3,958 



lieutenant Governors. 



Sir W. Colebrooke. 
Sir John Harvey. 
Capt. H. V. Huntley. 

Col. Fancourt. 



EUROPE 



EEIGNING SOVEREIGNS OF EUROPE. 



Name. 



Oscar I. 
Nicholas I. 
Chrfat'n Vni. 
Victoria 
WiUiamn. 
Leopold 
Fred. Wm. IV. 
Frederick 
Ern. Augustas 
Fred. Francis 
Oeorge V. 
Augustus 
\Villiam 
Adolphus 
Ch. Frederick 
Ernest 
Bernard 
Joseph 
Leopold 
Alexander 
Henry 

Fred. Gunther 
Gunther II. 
Henry XX. 
Henry LXII. 
Leopold 
Geo. William 
George 

Philip Aug'tus 
Ch Leopold Fr. 
WUliamn. 
liOuis II. 
Char's Antony 
Fred. William 
Aloys Joseph 
William 
Louis 
Ferdinand 
Louis Philip 
Isabella II. 
Maria U. 
Charles Albert 
Leopold II. 
Maria Louisa 
Francis IV. 
Charles Louis 
Pius IX 
Ferdinand 11. 
Otho 
Abdul Medjid 



Title. 



State. 



Date of B'th. 



King Sweden and Norway 
£mperor Russia 
King Denmark 
Queen Great Britain 
King Holland or Netherl'ds 
do. Belgium 
do. Prussia 
do. Saxony 
do. HanOTer 
Gr. Duke Mecklenburg-Schwer 
do. Mecklenburg- Strelite 
do. Oldenburg 
Duke Brunswick 
do. Nassau 
Gr. Duke Saxe- Weimar-Eisen 
Duke Saxe-Coburg-Ctotha 
do. Saxe-Meiningen>£Qld 
do. Saxe-Altenburg 
do. Anhalt-Dessau 
do. Anhalt-Bemburg 
do. Anbalt-Cothen 
Prince Schwartz'g Rudolst't. 
do. Schwartz^g Sonder'n 
do. Reuss, Elder Line 
do. Reuss, Younger Line 
do. Lippe-Detmold 
do. Lippe-Schauenburg 
do. Waldeck 
L'ndg'ye Hesse-Homburg 
Gr. Duke Baden 
Elector Hesse-Oassel 
Gr. Duke Hesse-Darmstadt 



Date of 
Acoesaion. 



July, 1799 »Iar. "SJM 
July e, 17961 Dec. 1,1826 



Aeligion. 



Sep. 18, 1786lDec. 8, 1839 



May 24, 1819 
Dec. 6,1792 
Dec. 16, 1790 
Oct. 15, 1795 
May 18, 1797 
June 6,1771 
Feb. 28, 1828 
Aug. 12, 1779 



June 20, 1837 
Oct. 7, 1840 
July 21, 1831 
June 7,1840 
June 6,1836 
July 20, 1837 
Mar. 7,1842 
Nov. 6,1816 
July 13, 1783 May 21, 1829146 
Apr. 25, 1806 Apr. 25, 1831 ~" 
July 24, 1817 Aug. 20, 1839 
Feb. 2, 1783 June 14, 1828 
Dec. 9,1806 
Dec. 24, 1803 
Sep. 29, 1834 
Aug. 9,1817 
Mar. 24, 1834 
Aug. 23, 1880 
Apr. 28, 1807 13 
Sep. 8,1836:33 
Oct. 31, 1836 40 



Prince |Hohenzol'n Sigmar'n 
do. Hohenzol'n Hechin'n,' 
do. Lichtenstein 
King Wurtemburg 

do. Bavaria 
Emperor Austria 

King France Oct. 

Queen Spain Oct 

do. Portugal Apr 

King Sardinia Oct. 

Gr. Duke Tuscany Oct. 

Duchess Parma Dec 

Duke Modena and Massa Oct. 

do. Lucca 

Pope States of the Church 
King Two Sicilies 

do. Greece 
Sultan iTurkey 



Jan. 2,1784 
Dec. 17, 1800 
Aug. 27, 1789 
Oct. 1,1794 
Mar. 2,1805 
July 80, 1778 
Nov. 6,1793 
Sep. 24, 1801 
June29,1794 
May 81, 1785 
Nov. 6,1796 
Dec. 20, 1784 
Sep. 20, 1789 
Mar. 11, 1779 
Aug. 29, 1790 
July 28, 1777 
Dec. 26, 1777 
Feb 20, 1786 
Feb. 16, 1801 
May 26, 1796 
Sep. 27, 1781 
Aug.25, 1786 
Apr 19,1793 
6,1773 
10,1830 



25 
22 
45 
22 
8 
45 
22 
29 
52 



4, 1819 
2, 1798 
8, 1797 
12, 1791 
6, 1779 



Apr. 17, 1818 32 
Apr. 4,1802 6 
Feb. 13,1787 2 
Sep. 9,1813 24 
Jan. 19, 1839 60 
Mar. 30, 1830 40 
Feb. 27, 1821 44 
Apr. 6,1830 62 
Oct. 17, 1831 46 
Sep. 12,1838 37 
Apr. 20, 1836 39 
Oct. 80, 1816 86 
Oct. 13, 1825 
Mar. 2,1835 
Aug. 9,1880 
~ 29,1833 



Sep 

May 2,1826 
Apr. 27, 1831 
June 18; 1824 
May 80, 1814 
June 8,1815 
Mar. 13, 1824 



Dec. 28, 1799 

1792lJune21,1846 
Jan. 12, 1810|Nov. 8,1830 
June 1,1815 May 7,1832 
Apr. 20, 1823lJuly 1,1839 



39 
42 
67 
8 
7 
32 
26 
22 
35 
24 
54 
20 
17 



Lutheran 

Greek Ch. 

Lutheran 

Pr. Episc. 

Refbnned 

Lutheran* 

Evangelical 

CathoUc* 

Protestant 

Lutheran 

do. 

do. 

do. 
Evangelical 
Lutheran 

do. 

do. 

do. 
Evangelioal 

do. 

Reformed 

Lutheran 

do. 

do. 

do. 
Reformed 

do. 

Evangelical 
Reformed 
Evangelical 
Reformed 
Lutheran 
CathoUc 

do. 

do. 
Lutheran 
Catholic 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do.* 

do. 

do. 

do.* 



16iMahometan 



* The King of Saxony is a Catholic, though the greater part of his subjects are Protest' 
ants ; the King of Belgium is a Protestant, though his subjects are mostly Catholics; and 
the King of Greece is a Catholic, though most of his sul^ts are of the Greek Church, 



1847.1 



STATES OF EUBOFE. 



313 



STATES OF EUROPE, 

with the form of Government^ Square Miles, and PopyJaiion, accordinff to 
McCutlocJCa Geographical Dictionary, with corrections. 



States and Titles. 



Andorre, Pyrenees, Repub. 
*Anhalt-Bemburg, Duchy, 
*AnhaIt-Cothen, do, 
*AnhaIt-De88aa, do. 

^Austria, Empire, 
*Baden, Grand Duchy, 
*BaTaria, Kingdom, 

Belgium, do. 
•Bremen, Free City^ 
•Brunswick, Duchy, 

ChurchjStates of, Popedom, 

Cracow, Republic, 

Denmark, Kingdom, 

France, do. 

•Frankfort, Free City, 

Great Britain, Kingdom, 

Qreeoe, do. 

•Hamburg, Free City, 
•Hanover, Kingdom, 
•Hesse Cassel, Electorate, 
•HesseBarmstadt, G. Duchy, 
•Hesse Homb'g, Landg^vHe, 
•Hohenzol.-Hechingen, Pr. 
•Hohenzol.-Sigmaiing^,<l(i. 

Holland, with Luxemburg, 

Ionian Islands, Republic, 
•Lichtenstein, Frincipality, 
•Lippe-Betmold^ do. 
•Lubec, Free City, 

Lucca, Duchy, 
♦Mecklen.-Schwerin,G*. Dm. 
•Mecklenburg-Strelitz, do. 

Modena and Masaa,,Duchy, 

Monaco, Principaiity, 
•Nassau, Duchy ^ 
•Oldenburg, Grand Duchy, 

Parma, Duchy, 

Portugal, Kingdom, 
•Prussia, do. 
•Reuss, Principalilies of, 
fRussia, Etnpire, 

San Marino^ Republic, 

Sardinia, Kingdom, 
•Saxony, do. 
•Saxe-Altenburg, DucJiy, 
•Saxe-Cob'g and Gotha, do. 
•Saxe-Mdn.-Hildbiirg., do. 
•Saxe-Weim.-Eisenach, do. 
•Schwartzburg, Prineipid of 
•SchAuenburg-Lippe, Prin, 

Sicilies,The Tm>,Kingdom, 

Spain, do, 

Sweden and Norway, do. 

SwitsEe^land, Republic, 
tTurkey, Empire, 

Tuscany, Grand Duchy, 
•^Valdeck, Principality, 
•Wurtemburg, Kingdom, 



Form of Qovemment. 



With two syndics and a council, 
States haying limited powers, 
Do. do. 

Do. do. 

Absolute monarchy, except Hungary, &c. 
Limited sovereignty ; two chambers. 
Limited monarchy ; do. 
Do. do. 

Republic ; senate and convention. 
Limited sovereignty ; one chamber, 
Absolute elective sovereignty, 
Senate and chamber of representatives, 
Absolute monarchy ; with prov; states, 
Limited monarchy ; two chambers, 
Republic ; senate and legislative body, 
Limited monarchy ; lorcU and commons, 
Limited monarchy, 

Republic ; senate and common council, 
Limited monarchy ; two chambers. 
Limited sovereignty ; one ctiamber. 
Limited sovereignty ; two chambers. 
Absolute sovereignty. 
Limited ; one chamber, 

Do. do. 

Limited monarchy ; two chambers. 
Under Brit, protec. ; council and chamb., 
limited monarchy ; with one chamber. 

Do. do. 

Republic ; senate and common council. 
Limited sovereignty ; with one chamber. 
Limited monarchy ; with one chamber, 

Do. do. 

Absolute sovereignty. 

Do. 

Limited sovereignty ; two chambers, 
Absolute sovereignty, 

Do. 

Limited monarchy ; one chamber of rep.. 
Absolute monarchy ; provincial states. 
Limited sovereignty ; one chamber, 
Absolute monarchy, 
Senate and council of ancients. 
Absolute monarchy. 
Limited monarchy ; two chambers. 
Limited monarchy ; one chamber. 

Do. do. 

Do. do. 

Do. do. 

Do. do. 

Do. do. 

Limited monarchy ; with a council. 
Limited monarchy ; with a legislature, 
lim. monarchy ; with a diet & storthing. 
Confederation of republics ; a diet. 
Absolute monarchy. 
Absolute sovereignty. 
Limited sovereignty ; one chamber. 
Limited monarchy ; two chambers. 

Total, 



Square 
miles. 



Popu- 
lation. 



190 

836 

310 

337 

255,226 

5,712 

28,435 

12,669 

67 

1,526 

17,048 

490 

59,762 

202,126 

91 

116,700 

10,206 

149 

14,600 

4,386 

8,198 

164 

136 

888 

13,890 

998 

62 

432 

142 

410 

4,701 

1,094 

2,073 

50 

1,736 

2,470 

2,184 

34.500 

106,302 

588 

2,041,809 

21 

28,830 

6,705 

491 

790 

880 

1,403 

766 

206 

41,621 

176,480 

284,530 

17,208 

188,140 

8,302 

456 

7,668 



3,708,871 



7,000 

46,920 

40,200 

61,480 

86,619,660 

1,263,100 

4,816,469 

4,242,600 

57,800 

269,000 

2,732,436 

131,462 

2,033,266 

84,194,876 

64,670 

26,831,105 

926,000 

163,500 

1,706,280 

704,900 

783,400 

23,400 

20,200 

42,990 

2,916,396 

208,100 

6,620 

82,970 

47,200 

168,900 

482,652 

87,820 

403,000 

7,000 

879,262 

267,660 

466,673 

8,650,000 

14,830,146 

103,550 

62,500,000 

7,600 

4,168,797 

1,652,114 

121,590 

140,050 

148,590 

246,820 

65,810 

27,600 

7,976,850 

12,286,941 

4,166,900 

2,126,480 

9,646,000 

1,436,785 

66,480 

1,634,664 



• Member of the Confederation of Germany 
X Including Wallachia, Moldavia, and Servia. 

27 



t Including Poland. 



814 OBBAT BBITAXH. [1847. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

The Rotal Family. 

The Qfteen, Alezandrina Victoria, bom May 24, 1819 ; manied Feb. 10, 
1840, to Prince Albert Francis Augustas Charles Emanuel, of Saxe Co- 
burg and Gotha, bom Aug. 26, 1819. 

Princtat EoyaL. Victoria Adelaide Mary Louisa, bom Not. 21, 1840. 

Prince of Wales. Albert Edward, bom Not. 9, 1841. 

Princess Boyci. Alice Maud Mary, bom April 25, 1843. 

A Bcycd Prince, Alfred Ernest Albert, bom August 6, 1844. 

A Boycd Princess, Helena Augusta Victoria, bom^ay 25, 1846. 

The Queen Dowager, Adelaide Amelia Louisa Teresa Caroline, widow 
of King William IV., sister of the reigning Duke of Saxe-Meiningen, bom 
August 13, 1792. 

Her Mdjesh^s Mother, Victoria Maria Louisa, Princess Dowager of 
Leiningen, Duchess of Kent, bom Aug. 17, 1786. 

RmfaJ Princes and Princesses. 

Emest Augustus, (King of Hanover,) Duke of Cumberland, bom June 
5, 1771, married May 29, 1815, to Frederica Carolina Sophia, daughter of 
the Duke of Mecklenburgh-Strelitz, and widow of Frederic William, 
Prince of Solms-Braunfels, bom March 2, 1778. Issue, Geoige Frederic, 
bom May 27, 1819. 

Adolphus Frederick, Duke of Cambridge, bom Feb. 24, 1774, married 
May 7, 1818, to Augusta Wilhelmina Louisa, daughter of the Landgrave 
of Hesse, bom July 25, 1797. Issue, George WlUiam, bom March 26, 
1819 ; Augusta Caroline, July 19, 1822 ; Mary Adelaide, Nov. 27, 1833. 

Mary, Dutchess of Gloucester, bom April 25, 1776. 

Sophia, bom Nov. 3, 1777. 

MnfiSTRT. — July, 1846. 

SalBzy. 

Lord John Russell, First Lord of the Treasury, £5,000 

Lord Cottenham, Lord Bigh Chancdlor, 14,000 

Marquis of Lansdowne, Lord President of the Council, 2,000 

Earl of Minto, Lord Privy Seal, 2,000 

Sir George Grey, Secretary of State — Home Dep, 5,000 

Viscount Palmerston, Secretary of State — Foreign Dep, 5,000 

Earl Grey, Secretary of State — Colonial Dep. 5,000 

Mr. Charles Wood, Chancellor of the Exchequer, 5,000 

Earl of Auckland, First Lord of the Admiralty, 4,500 

Thomas B. Macatday, Thymaster- General, 2,500 

Sir John Hobhouse, President of Board of Control, 2,000 

Lord Campbell, Chancdlor of the Duchy of Lancaster, 



1847.] 



CUVB^T BBlTAUr. 



816 



Viscomit Morpeth, 
Marqois of Clanricarde, 
Earl of Clarendon, 
Mr. Fox Manle, 



*** 



Duke of Wellington, 
Earl of Fortescue, 
Duke of Norfolk, 
John Jervis, 
Mr. Dondas, 
Sir Henry Hardmge, 
Earl of Besborongh, 
Mr. Labouchere, 



Woods and Forests, 

Postmaster GeneraL 

President of the Board of Trade, 

Secretary at War, £2,580 

The above form the Cabinet, 

Commander of the Forces. 

Lord Steward of the Household. 

Mister of the Horse. 

Attorn^' GeneraL 

Solicitor' General. 

Governor- General of India. 

Lord Lieutenant of Irdand, dC20,000 

Chief Secretary for Ireland. 

Fabliament. 



The Farliament of Great Britain consists of a Hoose of Lords and a 
House of Commons. 

The House of Lords consists of Lords Temporal, who are Feers of the 
realm, and whose honors, immunities, and priyileges are hereditary \ and 
Lords Spiritual, consisting of Archbishops and Bishops. 

The House of Lords is composed of all the five orders of nobility of 
England, viz.: dukes, marquises, earls, yiscounts, and barons, who have 
attained the age of 21 years, and labor under no disqualification \ of 16 
representative peers from Scotland; 28 representative peers from Lreland; 
2 English archbishops and 24 bishops, and 4 representative Irish bishops. 

Housp OF Commons. 

Elected July, 1841. — Bt Hon. Charles S. Lefevre, Speaker, 

The House of Commons consists of knights, citizens, and burgesses, 
respectively chosen by counties, cities, and boroughs, apportioned as 
follows : 

r Counties, 159^ 

England and Wales, for -j Universities, . . . . 4 >• 

I Cities and boroughs, . . 337 J 

! Counties, 30 
Cities and boroughs, . . 23 

I r Counties, 64 

Ireland, * A Universities, .... 2 

I Cities and boroughs, . * . 39 
Total, 

The Union of Ireland was carried into effect Jantiary 1st, 1801 ; and the 
Farliament which sat the same month, and which included the members 
from Ireland, is styled the 1^. Imperial Parliament; and the Farliament 



1 
1 



500 



53 



105 



658 



316 



ORBAT BBITAIH. 



[1847. 



which assembled January 29, 1838, is styled the lltk Imperial^ or 1st Be- 
formed Parliament. The following table exhibits the succession of Parlia- 
ments since the nnion with Ireland : 





When assembled. 


When dissolved. 


Existed. 










Y. M. D. 


2d Imperial Parliament, 


Augnst 81, 1802 


October 24, 1806 


4 1 25 


dd do. 


do. 


November 25,1806 


May 27, 1807 


6 2 


4th do. 


do. 


November 27,1807 


September 29,1812 


4 10 2 


6th do. 


do. 


November 24,1812 


June 10, 1818 


5 6 16 


6th do. 


do. 


August 4, 1818 


February 29, 1820 


1 6 25 


7th do. 


do. 


April 23, 1820 


June 2, 1826 


6 19 


8th do. 


do. 


November 14, 1826 


July 24, 1830 


4 1 22 


9th do. 


do. 


October 26, 1830 


April 22, 1831 


5 27 


10th do. 


do. 


June 14, 1831 


December 8, 1832 


5 20 


llthlm. orl8tIU)f.do. 


January 29, 1833 


December SO, 1834 


2 25 


12th do. 2d 


do. 


February . 19, 1835 


July 17, 1837 


1 4 26 


13th do.Sd 


do. 


October 15, 1837 


June 23, 1841 


4 12 


14th do. 4th 


do. 


August 19, 1841 







JUDICIAET. 

High Court of Chancery. — Lord Cottenham, Lord High Chancellor; 
salary, £14,000: — Lord Langdale, Master of the RoUs, £7,000: — Sir 
Launcelot Shadwell, Sir J. L. Knight Bruce, and Sir James Wigram, Vice 
ChanceUorSj £6,000 each. 

Court of the Queen^s Bench. — Lord Denman, Lord Chief Justice ; 
£10,000 : — Sir J. Patterson, Sir J. Williams, Sir J. T. Coleridge, and Sir 
Wm. Wightman, Judges, £5,500 each. 

Court of Common Pleas. — Sir Thomas "Wilde, Lord Chief Justice, £8,000 : 
Sir Th. Coltman, and Sir W. H. Maule, Sir C. Creswell, Sir W. Erie, 
Judges, £5,500 each. 

Court of Exchequer. — Sir Frederic Pollock, Lord Chief Baron, £7,000 : 
Sir James Parke, Sir E. H. Alderson, Su: E. M. Bolfe, Sir Thomas Piatt, 
Barons, £5,500 each. 

Scotland. 

Court of Sessions. — 1st Division. David Boyle, Lord President, £4,300 : 
J. H. Mackenzie, Lord JJ^Iackenzie ; J. Fullcrton, Lord Fallerton ; Erancis 
Jeffrey, Lord Jeffrey, Judges, £2,000 each. 

2d Division. — John Hope, ZorJ Justice Clerk, £4,000. — J. H. Forbes, 
Lord Medwyn ; Sir J. W. Moncrieff^, Lord Moncrieff ; H. Cockbum, Lord 
Cockbum, Judges, £2,000 each. — Those of the Judges who are also Judges 
of the Criminal Court, have an additional £600 a year. 

Outer House; Permanent Lords Ordinary, attached equally to both Divisions 
of the Court. J. Cunninghame, Lord Cunninghame; Sir J. A. Murray, 
Lord Murray; James Ivory, Zorrf Ivory; Alexander Wood, Xorcf Wood; 
Patrick Bobertson, Lord Robertson. 

Irdand, 

Court of Chancery. — Sir Edward B. Sugden, Lord Chancellor, £8,000 : 
Francis Blackbnme, Master of the Bolls, £4,500. 



1847.] 



OBSAT B&ITAIir. 



817 



Court of the Queen^s Bench. — Hon. E. Pennefaliher, Lord Chief Justiccy 
jC5,076. Charles Burton, Philip C. Crampton, l!onis Perrin, Judges^ 
jCd,692 each. 

Court of Common Pleas. — Hon. John Doherty, Lord Chief Justice^ 
£4,615. Robert Torrens, Nicholas Ball, and J. D. Jackson, Judges^ £3,692 
each. 

Abchbishops and Bishops of England. 



Cons. 
1813 


ArchJbuhops. 


Dioceses. 


No. 
Bene- 
fices. 

346 


Gross In- 
come. 


Wm. Howley, D. D., Primate. 


Canterbury, 


£129,946 


1791 


Edward Harcourt, D. C. L. 
Bishops. 


York, 


891 


223,220 


1824 


Charles J. Blomfield, D. D. 


London, 


640 


267,662 


1831 


Edward Maltby, D. D. 


Durham, 


192 


74,557 


1826 


Charles R. Sumner, D. D. 


Winchester, 


419 


153,995 


1812 


Richard Bagot, D. D. 


Bath and Wells, 


430 


120,310 


1820 


John Kaye, D. D. 


Lincoln, 


1,251 


373,d76 


1820 


WilUam Car^, D. D. 
Christopher Bethell, D. D. 


St Asaph, 


143 


42,592 


1824 


Bangor, 


123 


35,064 


1827 


Greorge Murray, D. D. 


Rochester, 


94 


44,565 


1827 


Edward Copleston, D. D. 


Llandaff, 


192 


36,347 






Oxford, 


196 


51,895 


1830 


James Henry Monk, D. D. 


Glouces. & Bristol, 


536 


158,608 


1830 


Henry Phillpotts, D. D. 


Exeter, 


613 


194,181 


1845 


Thomas Turton, D. D. 


Ely, 


150 


56,495 


1842 


Afihurst Turner Gilbert, D. D. 


Chichester, 


267 


82,673 


1837 


Edward Denison, D. D. 


Salisbury, 


397 


134,255 


1837 


Edward Stanley, D. D. 


Norwich, 


1,026 


331,750 


1837 


Thomas Musgrave, D. D. 


Hereford, 


321 


93,552 


1839 


George Davys, D. D. 
John Lonsdale, D. D. 


Peterborough, 


293 


98,381 


1843 


Litchfield and Cor. 


610 


170,104 


1839 


H. Pepys, D. D. 


Worcester, 


223 


73,255 


1840 


Connop Thirlwall, D. D. 
Hugh Percy, D. D. 


St David's, 


409 


60,653 


1827 


Carlisle, 


124 


22,487 


1828 


John Bird Sumner, D. D. 


Chester, 


630 


120,310 


1836 


Charles Th. Longley, D. D. 
T. V. Short, D. D. 


Ripon, 






1841 


Sodor and Man, 


23 


3,727 



Archbishops and Bishops op Ireland. 



• 

ld06 
1831 

1842 
1803 
1804 


Archbishops. 


Dioceses. 


• 

1 

1812 
1820 
1828 
1831 
1831 
1839 
1839 
1842 
1842 


Bishops. 


Dioceses. 


Lord J. G. Beresford, D. D. 
Richard Whately, D. D. 

Rahops. 

Edward Stopford, D. D. 
Charles TJndsay, D. D. 
Ld. R. P. Tottenham, D. D. 


Armagh. 
Dublin. 

Moath. 

*Kndaie. 

♦Clogher. 


John Leslie, D. D. 
Richard Mant, D. D. 
Rich'd Fonsonby, D. D. 
Samuel Kyle, D. D. 
Edmund Knox, D. D. 
Thomas PlunketD. D. 
Ludlow Tonson. D. D. 
J. T. O'Brien, D. D. 
Robert Daly, D. D. 


*Elphin. 
Down & Con. 
Derry. 
Cork. 
Limerick. 
Tuam & K. 
Killaloe 
Ferns & L. 
Cashel, &c. 



* The bishoprics thus marked aro to be abolished when they become vacant. 

27* 



318 



oxeat bkitaik. 
Ekolibh Colonial Bishops. 



[1847. 



Cons. 


Bishops. 


Dioceses. 


AUowanoe. 


Glergr. 


1843 


Aubrey George Spencer, D. D. 


Jamaica, 


X4,000 




1842 


Thomas Parry, D. D. 
John Inglis, V. D. 
Daniel Wilson, D. D. 


Barbadoes, 


4,000 


160 


1825 


Nova Scotia, 


2,400 




1832 


Calcutta, 


5,000 


37 


1836 


George J. Mounfiiin, D. D. 


Quebec, 


1,500 




1836 


Thomas Carr, D. D. 


Bombay, 


2,500 


12 


1836 


Wm. Grant Broughton, D. D. 


Australia, 


2,000 




1837 


G. T. Spencer, D. D. 


Madras, 


2,500 


24 


1839 


John Strachan, D. D. 


Toronto. 






1844 


Edward Field, D. D. 


Newfoundland. 






1845 


John Medley, D. D. 


Fred'cton, N. B. 






1841 


G. A. Selwyn, D. D. 


New Zealand. 






1842 


W.P.Austen, D.D. 


Brit, Guiana. 






1842 


George Tomlinson, D. D . 


Malta & Gibral. 






1845 


James Chapman, D. D. 


Columbo, Cey. 






1842 


F. R. Nixon, D. D. 


Tasmania. 






1842 


D. G. Davis, D. D. 


Antigua. 







Thb New Bsitish Customs Bill. :. 

RaU of duty. 

Wheat : Whenever the average price of wheat shall be, for every quarter — s. d. 

under 48s. the duty shall be for every qr. . . . . 10 

48s. and under 4Qb. , . . . • . 9 

498. and under 60s. . . . . . . .80 

50s. and under 61s. . . . . . 7 

5l8. and under 62s. . . . . . ,60 

52s. and under 68s. . . . . . . 5 

68s. and upwards, . . . . . , .40 

Barley, bear or bigg : Whenever the average price shall be for every quarter — 
under 28s. the duty shall be, for every qr. . . . . 5 

268. and under 27s. . . . . . .46 

27s. and under 28s. . . • . . . 4 

28s. and under 298. . . . . . . .36 

29s. and under dOs. . . . . • . 8 

SOs. and under 3ls. . . . . . .26 

Sis. and upwards, . . . . . . 2 

Oats : Wheneyer the average price shall be for every quarter — 
under 18s. the duty shall be, for every qr. . . . .40 

18s. and under 19s. . . . . . . 3 6 

198. and under 20s. . . . . . .34 

208. and under 21s. . . . . . . 2 6 

21s. and under 22s. . . . . . . .20 

228. and upwards, . . . . . . 16 

Rye, peas and beans— For every quarter, a duty equal to the duty payable on a quarter 
of barley. 

Wheat meal and flour— For every barrel, being one hundred and ninety-six pounds, a 
duty equal in amount to the duty payable on thirty-eight gallons and a half of wheat. 

Barley meal — ^For eyery quantity of 217j>ii pounds, a duty equal to the duty payable on a 
quarter of barley. 

Oatmeal— For every quantity of 181)^ pounds, a duty equal in amount to the duty paya- 
ble on a quarter of oats. 

Rye meal— For every quantity of 196 pounds, a duty equal to the duty payable on a 
quarter of rye. 

Pea meal and bean meal— For every quantity of 272 pounds, a duty equal to the duty 
payable on a quarter of peas and beans. 

From and after the Ist day of February, 1849, there shall be paid the following duties, 
viz. ; 

s. d. 
Wheat, barley, bear or bigg, oats, rye, peas, and beans, for every quarter, . 1 
Wheat meal, barley meal^oftt meal, rye meal, pea meal, and beiskn mjeied, for 

every cwt. . . . . . ; . 4^ 



1847.] 



GREAT BRITAIN. 



319 



Duties of Customs now chargeable on the articles imdtrnuKtumed. 

Agates or cornelians, set, Ibr eyery £100 yalue, 
Ale and beer of all sorts, for eyery barrel, . 
Almonds, paste of, for eyery £100 yalne. 
Amber, manufactures of, for every £100 yalue, 
Arrowroot, the cwt. .... 

" of and firom a British possession, per cwt. 

Sandstring twist, for every £100 value, 

" of and from a British possession, for every £100 value 
Barley, pearled, the cwt. .... 

" of and from a British possession, the cwt. . 
Bast ropes, twines, and strands, for every £100 value, 

" of and from a British possession, for every £100, . 

Beads, viz. : 

Arrango, for eveiy £100 value. 

Coral, for every £100 value. 

Crystal, for evefy £100 value, 

Jet, for every £100 value, .... 

Not otherwise enumerated or described, 
Beer, or mum, the barrel, .... 

Blacking, for every £100 value, 
Brass, manu&ctures of; for every £100 value, . . 

" powder of; for every £100 value. 
Brocade of gold or silver, for every £100 value. 
Bronze, manu&ctures of; for every £100 value, 

" powder, for every £100 value. 
Buckwheat, the quarter, .... 
Butter, the cwt ..... 

^* of, and from a British possesidon, the cwt. 
Buttons, metal, for every £100 value. 
Candles, viz. : 

Spermaceti, the pound, «... 

Stearine, tlie pound, . 

Tallow, the cwt. .... 

Wax, the pound, ..... 

Canes, walkhig canes, for every £100 value, 

Carriages of all sorts, for every £100 value, 

Casks, empty, for every £100 value, . 

Cassiva powder, the cwt. .... 

" of and from a British possession, the cwt. 
CaOings, for every £100 value, .... 

Cheese, the cwt. ..... 

" of and flrom a British possession, fhe cwt. . 
China or porcelain ware, for every £100 value, . 
Cider, the tun, ..... 

Citron, preserved in salt, for every £100 value, . 

Clocks, for every £100 value, ..... 

Copper manu&ctures and copperplates engraved, for every £100 value. 

Copper or brass wire, for every £lOO value, . 

Cotton, articles or manuf^tctnres of cotton, wholly or in part made up, not 

otherwise charged with duty, for every £100 TftiuOi • 
Cotton of and from a British possession, for every £100 value, 
Crayons, for every £100 value, .... 

Crystal, cut or manu&ctured, for every £100 value, 
CucumDers, preserved, for every £100 value, . 

" of and from a British possession, for every £100 value. 

Fish, cured, not otherwise enumerated, the cwt. 
Gauze of thread, for every £100 value, 

*' of and from a British possession, for every £100 value, 
Hair, manufactures of hair, or goat's wool, or of hak or goat's wool, and 

any other material, for every £100 value. 
Hair, of and from a British possession, for every £100 value, 
Hams, of all kinds, the cwt. . . 

" of and from a British possession, the cwt. 
Harp strings, or lute strings, silvered, for every £100 value, . 
Hats or bonnets, viz. : 

Of chip, the pound, ..... 

Of bast, cane, or horse hair hats or bonnets, each hat or bonnet not ex 
ceeding 22 inches in diamet^ the dozen, . 

Each hat or bonnet exceeding 22 inches in diameter, the dozen, . 

Straw hats or bonnets, the pound. 



£ $. d, 
10 
10 
10 
10 

2 










10 
6 



10 
5 



10 





10 





10 

6 

5 

10 

10 

10 



10 

6 

10 

10 

5 








2 10 

1 

10 

5 




6 
6 





2 6 

1 8 





10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

1 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

1 

10 

2 6 

10 



















3 
1| 
5^ 

10 
10 



2 





5 

1 



6 












2 



6 
6 


6 
























10 

6 

7 

2 

10 

8 6 

7 6 

10 

6 



320 GREAT BBITAIN. [1847. 



Hate, felt) ludr, wool, or iMftTer bate, each. .... 

*^ made of silk, silk shag laid upon felt, linAn, or other material, each, 
Hops, the cwt. ....... 

Iron and steel, wrought, for every £100 -value, . 

Japanned or lacquered ware, for ererj £100 value, . . • 

Lace, viz., thread, for every £100 value, .... 

" made bv the hand, whether of linen, cotton, or silken thread, for 
every £100 value, ...... 

Latten wire, for every £100 value, ...» 

Lead, manufactures of, not otherwise enumerated, for every £100 value, • 
Leather, manu&ctures of — Boots, shoes, and calashes, vis. : 
Women's boots and calashes, the dozen pair, 

Women's boots and calashes, if lined or trimmed with fur or other trim- 
ming, the dozen pair, ...... 

Women's shoes, with cork oc double soles, quUted shoes and clogs, the 
dozen pair, ...... 

Women's shoes, if trimmed or lined with fiir or any other trimming, the 
dozen pair, ....... 

Women's shoes of silk, satin, or other stuffls, kid, morocco, ac other 
leather, the dozen pair, ..... 

Women's shoes, if trimmed or lined with fur, or any other trimming, the 
dozen pair, ....... 

Girls' boots, shoes, and calashes, not exceeding seven inches in length, to 

be charged with two thirds of the above duties. 
Men's boots, the dozen pair, ..... 

Men's shoes, the dozen pair, ..... 

Boys' boots and shoes, not exceeding seven inches in length, to be charged 
with two thirds of the above duties, 
Leather boot fronts not exceeding nine inches in height, the dooen pair, 
** ** exceeding nine inches in height, the dozen pair, 

^ cut into shapes, or any other article of leather, for every £100 value. 
Linen, or linen and cotton, viz. : , 

Cambrics and lawns, commonly called French lawns, the piece not ex- 
ceeding eight yards in length, and not exceeding seven eighths of a yard 
in breadth, the piece, ...... 

Bordered handkerchief^ the piece, .... 

Lawns of any sort, not French, for every £100 value, . • 

Damasks, the square yard, . » . . . 

DamacAn diaper, the square yard, ..... 

Plain linen and diaper for every £100 value, 

jSails. not in actual use of a British ship, and fit and necessary for such 

ship, for every £100 value, ' . 
Articles, manufactures of linen, or of linen mixed with cotton, or with 
wool, for every £100 value, ..... 

Maize or Indian com, per quarter, ..... 

" meal, the cwt. ...... 

Musical instruments, for every £100 yalue, .... 

Mustard flour, the cwt. ...... 

Paper, printed, painted, or stained paper, or paper han^^g, or flock paper, 
ttie square yard, . . . . . 

Pencils, for every £100 value. ..... 

" of slate, for every £100 value, .... 

Perftimery for every £100 value, . .... 

Perry, the tun, ....... 

Pewter, manufactures of, for every £100 value. 

Platting of straw, the pound, ..... 

Pomatum, for every 100 value, . . • . , • 

Pots of stone, for every £100 value, . . < . . 

Puddings and sausages, the pound, .... 

Bice, the cwt. ....... 

" rough, and in the husk, the quarter, .... 

Sago, the cwt. ....... 

Sausages, or puddings, the pound, .... 

Seeds, viz. : 
Canary, the cwt. ...... 

Carraway, the cwt. ...... 

Carrot, the cwt. ....... 

Clover, the cwt. ... ... 

Leek, the cwt. ....... 

Mustard, the cwt ...... 

Onion, the cwt. ....... 



£ 


s. 


d. 





2 








2 





2 


5 





10 








10 








10 








10 








10 








10 











6 








7 


6 





5 








6 








4 


6 





5 





14 








7 








1 


9 





2 


9 


10 











2 


6 





2 


6 


10 














5 








2i 


10 








10 








10 











1 











6 


10 











6 











2 


10 








10 








10 








6 


5 





10 











6 





10 








10 














1 





1 








1 





,0 





6 








1 





5 








5 








6 








5 








6 








1 


3 





5 






1847.] 



OBBAT BBITAIN. 



321 



All other seeds, for erery £100 value, .... 

These seeds of and from a British possession to be charged only one 
half of these duties. 
Bilk manu&ctures : 
Manufactures of silk, or of silk mixed with metal or any other material, 

the produce of Europe, viz. : 
Silk or satin, plain, striped, figured, or brocaded, tIb. : 
Broad stufb, the pound, ...... 

Articles thereof, not otherwise enumerated, the pound, 

Or, at the option of the officers of the customs, for every £100 value, 

Ribbons, the pound, ...... 

Silk gause or crape, plain, striped, figured, or brocaded, viz. : 
Broad stuffs, the pound, ...... 

Articles thereof, not otherwise enumerated, the pound, 

Or, at the option of the oflOcers of the customs, for every £100 value, 

Bibbons, the pound, . . . . . ^ . 

Gauze of all descriptions, mixed with silk, satin, or any other materials in 

the proportion of one half part of the fabric, the pouhd. 
Articles thereof, not otherwise enumerated, the pound, 
Or, at the option of the officers of the customs, for every £100 value, . 
Velvet, plain or figured, the pound, .... 

Articles thereof not otherwise enumerated, the pound. 
Or, at the option of the officers of the customs, for every £100 value, 
Kibbons or silk embossed, or figured with velvet, the pound, . 
Manu&ctures of sUk, or of silk and any other material called plush, com- 
monly used for making hats, the pound, . . • 
Fancy silk net, or tricot, the pound, .... 

Plain silk lace, or net called tulle, the pound, 

Manu&ctures of silk, or of silk mixed with any other material, not other- 
wise charged with duty, for every £100 value, 
MiUinery, of silk, or of wnich the greater paft of the material is silk, viz. : 
Turbans or caps, each, ..... 

Hats or bonneto, each, ...... 

losses, each, . . . • * 

Manufactures of silk, or of silk and any other materials, and articles of 
the same, wholly or partially made up, not particularly enumerated, or 
otherwise charged with duty, for every £100 value, . 
Silk worm gut, for every £100 value, .... 

Skins, articles manufibctured of skins or furs, for every £100 value. 
Soap, hard, the cwt. ...... 

" of and from a British possession, the cwt. 
Soap, soft, the cwt. ...... 

" of and from a British possession, the cwt 
Soap, Naples, the cwt. ...*.. 

Spa ware, for every £100 value, ..... 

Spirits— viz. : brandy, Geneva, and other fbreign spirits, not being spirits or 
strong waters the produce of any British possession in America, or any 
British possession within the limite of the East India Company's charter, 
and not being sweetened spirits or spirite mixed with any article, so that 
the degree of strength thereof cannot be exactly ascertained by Sykes's 
hydrometer, the gallon, .... 

Steel, manujkctures o^ for every £100 value, • 

Tallow, the cwt. . . • • . 

'* of and teom a British possession, the cwt. 
Tapioca, the cwt. . . . • • 

Tin, manu&ctures of, not otherwise enumerated, ibr every £100 value. 

Tobacco pipes of clay, for every £100 value, 

Tonffues, the cwt. ...... 

" of and from a British possesion, the cwt. . . 

Turnery not otherwise described, for every £100 value, . 
Twine, for every £100 value, .... 

" of and from a British possession, for every £100 value. 
Tarnish, not otherwise described, fbr every £100 value. 
Wafers, for every £100 value, .... 

Washing balls, the cwt. .... 

Wax, sealing wax, for every £100 value, 
Whip cord, for every £100 value, 
Wire, gilt or plated, or silver, for every £100 value. 
Woollens, articles or manufectures of wool not behig goats' wool, or of wool 
mixed with cotton, wholly or in part made up, not otherwise charged for 
every £100 value, ...... 



£ s. d. 
6 



5 





6 





15 





6 





9 





10 





15 





Oil 





9 





9 





16 





9 





10 





15 





9 





2 





8 





8 





15 





8 


6 


7 





110 





15 





10 





10 





1 





14 





14 





10 





1 





10 








16 


. 10 




16 




1 




6 




10 




10 




7 




2 




10 




10 




6 




10 




10 




10 




. 10 




10 




. 10 



10 



3SS VJUNCS. [1847. 

£ s. d. 
WooUeiu of and frcni a British pcMBMHlon, for every dElOO T«lae. . • 6 

Qoodfl, 'wares, and merchandiae, being dther in part or whoUv mannflus- 
tored, and not being enumerated or described, not otherwise charged with 
duty, for every £100 value, . . . . . 10 

Free ; The duties of customs chargeable open the goods, wares, and merchandise hereafter 
mentioned, imported into the United Kingdom, shall cease and determine ; namely, ani- 
mids living, namely, asses, goats, kids, oxen and bulls, cows, calves, horses, mares, geld- 
logs, colts, foals, mules, sheep. Iambs, swine and h<^, pigs, sucking ; bacon ; beef, fresh 
or slightly salted ; beef salted, not being corned beef; bottles of earth and stone, empty ; 
casts of busts, statues, or figures ; eaviu^e ; cranberries ; cotton manufactoree, not being 
articles wholly or in piart made up, not otherwise charged with duty ; enamel ; gelatine ; 
glue ; hay ; hides, or pieces thereof, tawed, curried, or In any way dressed, not otiierwise 
enumerated ; ink for printers ; inkle, wrought ; lamp black ; linen, manu&ctoree of linen, 
or of linen mixed with cotton or with wool, not particularly enumerated, or otherwise 
charged with duty, not being articles whoUy or in part made up ; Magna Gmca warn ; 
manuscripts : majMS and charts, or parts thereof^ plahi or colored ; mattresses ; meat, 
salted or fresh, not otherwise described ; medals, of any sort ; palmetto thatch manufoc- 
tores : parchment ; pens ; plantains ; potatoes ; pork, fi«sh ; pork, salted, not hams ; 
Bilk, tnrown, dyed, namely, singles or tram, organane or crape silk ; telescopes ; thread, 
not otherwise enumerated or described : woollens, namely, manulketures of wool, not 
being goats' wool, or of wool mixed with cott(Mi, not particularly enumerated or de- 
Mribed, not otherwise charged with duty, not being articles wholly or in part made np ; 
Tegetablea, all, not otherwise enumerated or described ; veUom. 

After Ap, 5, After Ap. 5^ 
"^ 1847. IWS. 

Upon timber and wood goods, not otherwise charged, vis. : £ 8. d, £ s. d* 

Timber or wood, not being deals, battens, boards, staves, handspikes, 
oars, lathwood, or other timber or wood sawn, split, or othenHae 
dressed, except hewn, and not being timber or wood otherwise 
charged with duty, the load of 50 cubic feet, . . . 1 15 

Deals, battens, boards, or other timber or wood, sawn or split, and 

not otherwise charged with duty — the load of 60 cubic fee^ . 16 10 

Staves, if exceeding 72 inches in length, 7 inches in breadth, or 8^ 

inches in thickness — the load of 60 cubic feet, . 
Ilrewood—tiie fathom of 216 cubic feet. 
Handspikes, not exceeding 7 feet in length — the 120, . 

*^ exceeding 7 feet in length---the 120, . . 

Knees, nnder 6 inches square— the 120, 

*' 6 inches and under 8 inches square— the 120, • 
Lathwood— the &thom of 216 cubic feet, 
Oars— the 120, ..... 

Spars or poles, nndtf 22 feet in length, and under 4 inches in diam- 
eter—the 120, . . . . . 16 12 
Spars or poles, 22 feet in length and upwards, and under 4 inches in 

diameter, the 120, . . . . .1120140 

Spars or poles, of all lengths, 4 inches and under 6 inches in diame> 

ter— the 120, ..... 

Spokes for wheels, not exceeding 2 feet in length— the 1000, 

*< " exceeding 2 feet in length— the 1000, 

Wood, planed, or otherwise dressed or prepared fbr use, and not par^ 
tienlariy enumerated nor otherwise changed with duty, in addition 
to £10 for every £100 value, per foot of cubic contents, . .006 004 

FRANCE. 
MiNiBTRT. — October 29, 1840. 

Marshal Soult, Dake of Dalmatia, Pres. of the Council, 

M. Guizot, Minister of Foreign Affairs, 

M. Martm, (du Nord,) Minister of Justice and Public Worship, 

Admiral Duperi^, Minister of Marine and the Colonies, 

Count Duchatel, Minister of the Interior, 

M. Canm Gridaine, Minister of Commerce and AgricuUure, 

M. Teste, Minister of Publui Works. 

M. Villemaiii, (Peer,) Minister of Public Instruction. 

M. Lacave Laplagne, Minister of Finance. 

Gen. de St Yon, Minister of War. 



1 8 





18 





8 





6 





16 





012 





112 





1 


4 


8 





6 





112 





1 4 





112 





1 4 





6 





4 10 






8 4 





2 


8 





112 





1 


4 





8 4 





2 


8 






AMERICAN OBITUARY. 



18 4 5 



Oct. 13.— At UpperviUe, Va., Br. Brig. Gen. W. K Armistead, Colonel 
of the United States 3d regiment of artillery, aged about 60. " General 
Armistead entered the Army, a second Lieutenant of Engineers, more 
than forty-two years ago, and in his long career was uniformly distin- 
guished for correct military deportment and the highest moral excellence. 
For many years he was the Chief of the Corps of Engineers, whence he was 
transferred to the head of a marching regiment ; and, as a general officer, 
had for one campaign (1840-41) the chief command in the war against the 
Florida Indians. His loss will long he mourned by his surviving brothers in 
arms ; but the benefit of his virtuous example wiU remain to the service." 

Nov. 2. — In Elizabethtown, N. J., Rev. Frederick Beadey, D. D., aged 68. 
He was a distinguished churchman, and had attained reputation by various 
contributions to moral and metaphysical science. He was formerly Provost 
of the University of Pennsylvania. 

Nov. 4. — In Hanover, Luzem Co., Pa., Mr. Eleazer Blachman^ aged 85, the 
last survivor of the massacre at WyonUng, and a highly respectable citizen. 

Dec. 19. — Drowned, by the sinking of the steamer Belle Zane, in the Mis- 
sissippi river, about 500 miles above New Orleans, Charles Bowen^ aged 38, 
together with his wife and oldest child, a boy 13 years old. He was a native 
of Charlestown, Ms., but resided for most of his life in Boston. While in 
this city, he was the publisher, for many years, of the " North American 
Beview," the " American Almanac," the " Token," and other works. In 1838, 
he removed to Ohio, where he purchased an estate in the neighborhood of 
Zanesville, on which he lived till the time of his death. In 1840, and again 
in 1841, he was chosen by the county of Muskingum a member of the Ohio 
legislature, and was actively engaged in politics for some years. Afterwards, 
he resumed business in Zanesville, and was diligent and successful in its 
management tUl the close of his life. 

Dec. — In Hartland, Vt, Bev. Damd Breck, aged 97. Mr. Breck was bom 
in Boston, August 18, 1748. He was religiously educated at Princeton, and 
graduated there in 1774, just as the Revolutionary contest was about to com- 
mence ; and, being in sentiment heartily with his country, he entered the 
army as chaplain, and in that capacity accompanied Col. Porter's regiment 
into Canada. He was with the troops in the attack ux)on Quebec, and shared 
all the hardships of that arduous campaign. Having some interest in the 



n 



826 AMKBIOAN OBItUABT FOB 1845. 

expedition sent oat by goTemment to explore the sources of the Missis- 
sippi River, and made an able and yalnable report npon the botany of the 
re^on through which he then passed. On his return, he settled in Detroit, 
and continued In the practice of his profession nntil early in 1837, when he 
was appointed State Geologist. From that time nntil his death he continned 
in the laborions pnrsnit of his duties, and accomplished a great deal towards 
developing the resources of the State, especially in drawing attention to its 
mineral wealth and the real extent of its advantages. He was drowned near 
the mouth of Eagle River on Lake Superior, in a violent snow-storm, on the 
night of October 13th, 1845, with two voyageurs who accMnpanied hhn. 
The loss sustained by the State of Michigan especially is a very heavy one. 
It is seldom that a man can be found as well qualifled as Doctor Houghton 
Ibr the peculiar duties entrusted to him. His mind was keen and discrimin- 
ating ; and to an enthusiastic love of science he joined an unconquerable en- 
ergy, and a spirit of patient and candid investigation, which seldom failed In 
accomplishing a certain result In private life he was equally distinguished 
for generosity, affability, and firm integrity. Besides the stations already 
mentioned as having been filled by him, he was in 1842 elected Mayor of the 
city of Detroit. He was also, fh>m the commencement of its existence, a 
Professor in the State University. He was a member of the National lusti- 
tate, of the Boston Society of Natural History, and an honorary member of 
the Royal Antiquarian Society of Copenhagen, as well as of many other pub- 
lic literaxy and scientific associations hi the United States and abroad. He 
Was at the time of his death employed by the general government in prose- 
cuting a combined geological and linear survey of the region near Lake Su- 
perior, on a plan first suggested by' himself. 

Nov. 14. — In Huntsville, Ala., William John Mastin^ aged 37. He was bom 
in Frederick Co., Ya., in 1808, and graduated at Yale College hi 1829. He 
was a merchant in extensive business in Huntsvllle, Ala., and a very useful 
and much-respected citizen. 

Nov. 14. — In Belvidere, N. J., Hon. J. P. B. Maxtvdi, aged about 40, a 
member of Congress from New Jersey from 1837 to 1839, and iVom 1841 to 
1843. He was a graduate of Princeton College in 1823, studied law with 
Chief Justice Homblower in Newark, and was admitted to the bar in 1827. 

Dee. 18. — In Clark Co., Illinois, Samud McC^ure^ aged 97. He was bom in 
Augusta Co., Ya., May 16, 1748. He was a soldier of the Revolution, a brave 
and a good man. Shortly after the close of the war, he removed with his fam- 
ily to Kentucky. On his way they were overtaken by a party of Indians, 
his wife taken prisoner, and his four children butdiered. He made his 
etjcape, obtained help, overtook and severely punished the Indians, and se- 
cured his wife. 

Nov. 2. -—In Powhatan Co., Ya., Thomas Miller, Esq., aged 65, the presiding 
Judge in the County court. He had been a magistrate in his county 44 
years, and represented it in the General Assembly for many years, and 
throughout his life took an active interest in all that concerned his country, 
and especially Yirginia, his native State. He was a professing Christian, 
and deront and consistent member of the Baptist church. 



▲MEBICAN OBITUAKY FOB 1845. 327 

Oct. l.—Near HUton, DeU Eon. Samud JViynter, fonnerly governor of 
Delaware. 

Dec. 26. — In Baltimore, McL, Henry Payson^ aged 84, one of the most dis- 
tingciished merchants of that city. He was a native of Roxbury, Mass., and 
settled in BaltimcNre during the Revolutionary war, when the city had but 
about 7,000 inhabitants. He was one of the founders of its commercial pros- 
perity, and his name was known almost as far as the city in which he lived. 
He saw many reverses of fortune, but went through them all with fortitude 
unshaken and integrity unstained. 

Nov. 12. — In Gallatin, Tenn., Dr, Joseph H. Pei^on^ a member of Congress 
frovEL 1843 to 1845, and member elect of the 29th Congress. In the Senate of 
his own State, and in other public stations, he had acquired much politital 
reputation, and was highly esteemed in private life. 

Oct. 18. — At his family residence in Cabarrus Co., K C, John Phifer, Esq.^ 
in the 67th year of his age. He was graduated in the University of N. Caro- 
lina in 1799, and was afterwards for many years a distinguished member of 
the Legislature of North CaroUna, and a Ruling Elder in the Presbyterian 
church. 

Oct. 14.— In Bladen Co., N. C, WiUiam Pridgeny aged 123. He volun- 
teered to serve his country in the Continental Army of the Revolution, and, 
though even then exempt by reason of his being over age, he served a full 
term in that war, and had received a pension for many years past. He lived 
to follow all his children to the grave, except one, an aged daughter. His 
grand-children are aged people, and he left great-grandchildren upwards of 
40 years of age, and great-great grandchildren about 12 years of age. He 
retained his faculties tiU his death, except his sight, which he lost a few years 
ago. He was able to walk until a few days before his death, when attacked 
by fever, of which he died- 

Dec.28. — In Stonington, Ct, Dr. WiUiam Robinson, aged 81, a soldier in 
the Revolutionary army. He practised with great success in that town for 
S7 years, and was much respected. 

Oct 24. — At Cumberland, R. I., WiUiam Rude, aged 97 years, 7 months. 
Mr. R. was in the battle of Bunker Hill, was beside Col. Davis when he fell, 
and was with the brave Barton at the taking of General Prescott, from Ports- 
mouth, and was the last man to leave the island. He was at the battle of 
White ^lain, in most of the engagements of the war, and yet never was 
wounded. 

Oct. 13. — In Greene, Me., Nathaniel L. Sawyer, Esq., of Gardiner, Me., 
aged about 36, a graduate of Bowdoin College, and of the Law School in 
Harvard University, a young man of excellent talents and highly esteemed. 

Sept 14. — In Vernon, Sussex Co., N- J., Joseph Sharp, aged 88. He was 
chosen a member of the State Legislature 50 years ago, and was continued 
in office by successive elections for fifteen sessions. 

Nov. 7. — In Sharon, Ct, John CJotton Smith, Esq., President of the Ameri- 
can Bible Society, aged 80. He was bom in 1765, and graduated at Yale Col- 
lege in 1783. In the year 1800 he was elected a Representative to Congress 
from the State of Connecticut, and took his seat at the first meeting of that 
body held at the city of Washington. He was of course a participant in the 



338 AlIESlCAir 0BITt7ABT VOB 1845. 

fhmoti^ election for the Presidency between Jeffewon and Burr. Dnring the 
six years of his service in Congress, he was chairman of one of the most im- 
portant and laborious committees, and maintained a commanding and influ- 
ential position. In the year 1812 he was elected governor of Connecticut, 
succeeding in that office the distinguished and lamented Roger Griswold. 
This was at the commencement of the late war wkh Great Britain, and the 
duties of the office were then exceedingly arduous and responsible. Upon 
his retirement from office in 1817, his services were acknowledged by a 
unanimous vote of thanks in both branches of the General Assembly. Ib 
addition to serving the State in tiie capacity of Representative in Congress 
and chief magistrate, he was also Speaker of the House of Representatives in 
the State Legislature, Lieut. Governor, and Judge of the Superior Court. 

Nov. — In Hatfield, Ms., Oliver Smith, Esq.^ a wealthy and respected citi- 
sEcn, leaving an estate worth haif a million of dollars. Much of this is dis- 
posed of for charitable purposes. He has left $20,000 for the establishment 
of an Agricultural School in Northampton ; $360,000 to eight towns, viz. : 
Northampton, Hadley, Amherst, Hatfield, WilHamsburg, Deerfield, Green- 
field, and Whately, as a permanent ftmd for the benefit of orphan children, 
and children of the poorer classes ; and $10,000 to tiie Colonization Society. 
To eight towns he bequeathed a handsome legacy for the relief and support 
of poor widows. 

Nov. 1. — In Washlngtdn, D. C, Samud JTarrison Smitk, aged 73. He ed- 
ited a newspaper, "The New Worid,** in Philadelphia, in 1796 ; and when 
Washington became the seat of the National Government, he removed 
thither, and established "The National Intelligencer," which he continued to 
edit iiU 1810. After this period, he lived in private, except that in 1813 he 
was appointed Commissioner of the Revenue, which post he held till the 
office itself was abolished. He was an intimate friend of Jefferson, Madison, 
Hunroe, and their associates ; and in all the public and private relations of 
Bfe he was highly respected. 

Nov. 1. — At Intercourse, Lancaster Co.. Pa., Andrew Snyder, a soldier of 
the Revolutionary war, aged 112 years. 

Dec. 29. — At sea, off the coast of Africa, on board the V, S. ship Marion, 
of which he was purser, John C. Spencer^ Jr.^ in the 23d year of his age, son 
of the Hon. John C. Spencer. ^ 

Dec. — In Cumberland, Md-j Hon. Michad C. Sprigg. He was a represen- 
tative in Congress, has repeatedly represented Alleghany county in the Leg- 
islature, had been formerly the president of the Chesapeake and Ohio €anal 
Company, and had held other public responsible offices. 

Oct. 26. — In Petersburg, Va'., Bev. Andrew Syme, T>. D., aged 91, the oldest 
citizen of the town and the oldest clergyman in the State. He was bom in 
Lanarkshire, in Scotland, in September of the year 1754 ; between the year 
1790 and 1800 he came to the town of Petersburg, where he resided till the 
day of his death. As a teacher, he was industrious and useful; as a pastor 
of the Protestant Episcopal Church, he was affectionate and kind ; as a 
minister, he preached the "pure doctrines of the religion of Christ;" and 
as a citizen he was esteemed and beloved. 



AJiBBIOAN QBITJJARX VOU 1845. 329 

Dec. 2& — In St Mary's Co., Md., ffm. James Thomas^ formerly governor 
of Maryland, «ged 61. He was a most excellent and worthy man, and be- 
longed to the old school of Maryland genliemen. He filled in his life various 
public trusts under the State, and closed his public career as governor of 
Maryland in 1835, to which office he had been elected by the le^slature of 
the State. In eveiy relation of life he discharged his duty faithfully and 
energeticaily, and, by his many virtues, attached to him a large body of 
friends throughout the State. 

Dec. 26. —At Milton, Saratoga Co., N. Y., Bon, James Thompson, aged 70, 
fbr fourteen years first judge of the Saratoga county court, and a man greatly 
respecated. He was bom at Stillwater^ and was the son of Hon. John 
Thompson^ of that town. 

Oct. 9. — In Paris, France, David Bailie Warden, aged 67. He was Secre- 
tary of the United States Legation in France, nearly forty years ago, when 
Gen. Armstrong was Minister, and was subsequently appointed Consul of the 
United States at Paris, which office he held for several years. He was a 
member of the French Academy, and a man of letters and of varied 
learning. He was, it is believed, a native of Ireland. 

Sept. 22. — In Richmond, Ky., by suicide. Eon. John White, aged about 40, 
formerly Speaker of the House of Representatives in Congress. He was, at 
the time of his death, judge of the 19th Judicial District, to which station he 
was appointed by Governor Owsley, just before the termination of the last 
session of Congress. He represented the district in which he resided, for the 
last ten years, in the Congress of the United States, and presided as Speaker 
over the 27th Congress. He was a man of good talents and attainments, 
generous and noble, and was In an eminent degree endeared to a very large 
drcle of acquaintances and friends. 

Kov. 9. — In Boston, Mass., William C. Woodbridge, aged 50. He was 
graduated at Yale College in 1811, and pursued a course of theological study ; 
but ill health prevented his entering on the duties of the gospel minlstiy. 
He Hien began to devote himself to the Improvement of education, and was 
a pioneer in the great improvements which have recently been made in the 
common school system of the United States. His publications on this sub- 
ject and on geography are numax>us and highly esteemed. 

Dec. 15.— In Tallmadge, Summit Co., Ohio, Elisair Wright, aged 83. He 
was bom in Canaan Ct, and graduated at Yale College in 1781. He devoted 
himself to the pursuits of agriculture on his patemtd farm for many years. 
In 1810, he emigrated to Ohio with his numerous family. He gave much 
attention to sdentific studies, and several of his mathematical papers are 
printed in the American Journal of Science. 

July 30. — Near AUentown, N. J., Samuel G. WriglU, aged i5S, member 
elect of the House of Representatives; an active, enterprising man, and 
highly respected. 

28* 



960 AMSBIOAR OBITVAKT VOS 18M. 



1 846. 

Mftrch 27. — In Chariestown, Mass., Mt. Damd Adorns^ aged 96 yean and 
6 months, a rerolntionary soldier, and the oldest man fai the town. 

March 9.— At Newhnryport, Mass., Ephraim W. ABen, Esq., aged 66 
years. Mr. Allen was the conductor of the Herald fbr thirty years, inter- 
mpted only by one or two brief intervals of absence. He was distinguished 
fbr energy and industry, and, in the days of his eaiiy career, was the printer, 
the editor, and the carrier of his paper. In those times the communication 
with Boston was so slow, that not nnflreqnently, when Important events 
were pending, Mr. Allen would prepare his paper for press on the day pre- 
Tions to its publication, and then proceed on horseback to Boston, return 
with what news was to be found there, put it in type, woik off the sheets 
witii his own hand, and then distribute them himself to his subscribers- 
May 5. — At Perrysburgh, N. Y., Bof. Joseph Badger, aged 87. He was a 
aoldier of the Revolution, and was chaplain Under Cren. Harrison at Fort 
Meigs. He was a very exemi^aiy Christian, and liyed strictly in accord- 
ance with his profession. 

Feb. 8. — At Rochester, N. Y.yReo. Ashbd Baktmn, aged 89 years. He 
was bom at Litchfield, Ot., March 7th, 1797 ; educated at Yale College ; served 
in the Reyolutionary war as quarter-master, in 1777-8; and was ordained by 
Bishop S^ibury, in 1785. This was the first Episcopal ordination hcAd in 
ttte United States. Mr. Baldwin was an active and efficient man, and for 
more than twenty years was delegate to the General Convention of the 
Episcopal Church, and for fifteen years acted as secretary to that body. 

March. — At Conway, N. H., Mr. Ebenezer Bean, a Revolutionary pen- 
sioner, aged 90 years and 6 months. He was in the battie of Bunker HiU, 
where he had his gun shot off in his hands about eighteen inches ftom the 
lock, and many holes made through his clothes. He belonged to Capt 
Au:x)n Kinsman's Company, Col. John StarVs regiment 

Feb. 3.— At Fredericksburg, Va., Lawrence W. Berry, a lawyer (^high 
reputation, Attorney for the Commonweidth in several of the State courts, 
a man highly esteemed by all who knew him, and beloved by his friends. 
He was a native of the County of King George, was a resident of Freder- 
ti^burg, and died in this town at the age of 52 years. 

Feb. 26.— In Charleston, S. C, Rev, John Brazer, D. D^ pastor of the 
North Church in Salem, Mass., aged 56. Dr. Brazer was bom in Woroester, 
September 21, 1789, and graduated at Cambridge in 1813, with the highest 
distinction in his class. In 1815 he was appointed Latin tutor, and in 1817 
Latin professor, at the University, which oflice he held until November 14th, 
1820, when he was ordained as pastor of the North Society; being the third 
pastor of that society. The first pastor. Rev. Dr. Barnard, was ordained 
January 13, 1773, and died October 1, 1814. He was succeeded by Rev. J. E. 
Abbot, who was ordained 20th of April, 1815, and died October 7, 1819. In 
1829, Mr. Brazer was elected one of the Board of Overseers of Hanrard 



1 

tJniyersity. He was a member of the American Academy, and, in 1S36, re- 
ceived from the University the honorary degree of Doctor in Divinity. Dr. 
Brazer was devoted to literature and his profession. He wrote many arti- 
cles for the North American Review and other p^iodical publications, bnt 
his time was almost exclusively devoted to his profession. Few of our 
divines have produced such elaborate and finished discourses, many of 
which have been published. Dr. Brazer was especially distinguished for his 
devoted care to the poor and unfortunate. His rich and numerous society, 
conscious of his disposition to relieve the unfortunate, made him the almo- 
ner of their charities ; and many a disconsolate widow and friendless orphan 
have found in him a fieither and a friend. 

March 5. — In Gumberiafid County, Ya., Si(fiix Broum^ aged <me hwndred 
J{fkm yeoTs^fhur months andjwe daps. He was for many years the slave and 
personal servant of John Randolph, Esq., of Mattoax, father of the late John 
Randolph, of Roanoke. 

June 29. — At Albany, Matthias Brum, aged 80, for many years resident at 
Perth Amoy, N". J., and formerly a merchant in New York. 

July 6.— At Haekensack, N. J., Robert Campbdl, aged 82, a man grealiy 
respected. * ^ 

Jan. 4. — In Washington, D. C, Salvadore M. Cataiana^ sailing master in 

, the United States navy, aged 70. He was a native of Palenno in Sidly. His 

admission into the American navy was the reward of services as a volunteer 

to pilot the gallant Decatur into the harbor of Tripoli, when he. set fire to 

tlie American frigate Philadelphia, then in possession of the Iripolitans. 

Sept. — In New York, N. Y., while on a visit to that city, Gen. Joseph 
Chandler^ of Augusta, Me., aged 75. He was for some years collector of the 
Portland District of Maine, and had been prominent in the affairs of the 
state. He was engaged in the late war, a companion in arms of Gen. Dear- 
'bom, and others with whom he was on intimate terms. He had long en- 
joyed the respect of his acquaintances, and his death was much regretted. 

Feb. 23. — In Randolph, Vt, Hon. Dttdley Chase^ aged 74. He was speaker 
of the House of Representatives from the year 1808 to 1812, when he was 
elected a senator in Congress for six years. In 1817 he was made chief jus* 
tice of the Supreme Court. He held that office, for four years, and resigned 
it in 1821. At Ihe session of 1864 he was again elected to the United States 
Senate, and, having served out his time, he declined a re-election, and retired 
>fh>m public life in 1830* 

July 25. — In Indiana, Gen. Marston G. Clark, aged 74. He was bom in 
Iiunenburgh County, Virginia, on the 12th of December, 1771, and was one 
of a ftimily of twenty-nine brothers and two sisters, by the same father and 
mother. Before he was 21 years of age, he left his native state, and went to 
the West, then a wilderness. Gen. Clark shared much of the confidence 
and esteem of his fellow-citixens, having filled, with honor to himself and 
profit to his country many stations, both civil and military. He served in 
the campaigns of Gen. Wayne as a private soldier ; and was aid to Gen. 
Harrison at the sanguinary battie of Tippecanoe. As Indian agent also. 



1 



Gen. Clark served with mnch advuitege, and was repeated^ a member of 
both branches of the le^i^latare of Indiana. 

Aug. 12. — At Toronto, Canada Weet, Col. NoUhaniel Qfffm^ aged 80. He 
was a native of Boston, U. S., a U. £. loyalist, and served daring the last 
war between the United States and Great Britain. He was for a number, of 
years adjutant general of the militia for Upper Canada. 

March 18. — In Washington, D. C, Commodore William M. Crane^ of the 
United States navy. Chief of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography^ 
aged 61. He died by his own hand, having shot himself through the head, 
without any assignable cause for the act He was the sixth officer in the 
list of captains ; only Barron, Stewart, Jones, Morris, and Warrington, being 
older in commission than himself. He was bom at EUzabethtown, in :New 
Jersey, the 1st of February, 1776, and was the son of General WiUiam Crane, 
who served with distinction as colonel in the Bevolutionary army before 
Quebec, where he received a wound of which he ultimately died. Commo- 
dore Crane entered the navy on the 23d May, 1799, and first served as mid- 
shipman on board the fHgate United States in the following June. He served 
in this grade on board the Chesapeake, and as maater in the General Greene ; 
joined the brig Vixen in 1803 as lieutenant, and remained in her in the 
Mediterranean as part of the fleet under the command of Commodore 
Preble, and was present at all the attacks on Tripoli. 

His commission as captain is dated the 24th November, 1814. He distin- 
guished himself as a brave and meritorious officer before Tripoli against the 
Turks, and also during the late war in actions with vessels under the com- 
mand of Sir James Teo, on Lake Ontario. When lient. commander of the 
United States brig Nautilus, on lAke Ontario, he was taken by H. B. M. 
Irigate Southampton. 

His bravery as an officer, his skill as a sailor, and his g^tlemanly deport- 
ment as a citLsen, had endeared him to a numerous circle of friends, and 
won for him the esteem of the community generally. 

June 25. — Near Fort Mitchell, Ala., CoL John CrovxUy a man of remarka- 
ble energy of character. When the territoiy of Alabama was established in 
1817, he was chosen delegate to Congress, and served untU 1819. After the 
formation of a state constitution in this year, he was elected the first rei»e- 
aeutative to Congress, and served till 1821. Soon afterwards he was ap- 
pointed agent for the Creek Indians, then inhabiting large portions of Ala- 
bama and Greorgia, over whom, until their removal west oi the Mississippi 
in 1836, he exercised an extensive and salutary influence. 

Jan. 25.— In Fairfax County, Va., H<m, Charka OutU, aged 76. fie waa 
formerly a senator in Congress, and subsequently secretary of the senate for 
fourteen years. He was a graduate at Harvard University in the class of 
1789. 

Jan. 17. —-At New York, Elias B. Dayton^ aged 82, a native of Elizabeth- 
town, N. J., and long a respected inhabitant of that place. 

Aug. 6. — At Leonardstown, Md., Clement Doney^ associate judge of the 
First Judicial District of Maryland. He was in the 69th year of his age. He 
filled many pubUc stations, and in all discharged the duties devolving upon 



jkutmiHASf dBnvAarr «>eB Id4^. 339 

him wilii Btrict fidelity. He went to fhe gmre macli regretted, and tearing 
lieliiiid him the prond title of an honest man and Christian. 

May 24. — In Philadelphia, Penn., Hon. WiUtam Drayton, form&Ay & dis- 
tiagaished representative in Congress from the state of South Carolina, btzt 
for the last twelve or-fonrteen years a resident of the city of Philadelphia. 
As a sterling patriot, a man of unswerving integrity and uprightness, a gen- 
tleman of the highest breeding and the nicest sense of honor, he was uni- 
rersafly re8x>ected and esteemed. 

June 11. — In New York, Theodore Dwi^a, brotlier of the President Dwight 
of Tale College, aged 81. He was bom in Northampton, in 1765 ; his mother 
was a daughter of President Edwards. At the dose of Ihe Revolution, he 
Altered the office at Hartford, of his unde, Judge Pierpont Edwards, as a 
student of <law, atnd soon rose to a high place in the profession. He directed 
his pen to polltioal writing, and, in high Federal times, became very promi- 
nent He was a great admirer of the poBtics of Washington and his prind- 
ides. Being a ready debater and writer, he came into public life early, and 
WHS very popular, f^r a great number of years he was a senator in the 
state of Conaeetioat, and about the year 1809 was elected to Congress. He 
was a iffominent speaker, and often received the commendations of John 
Bandolphfor his elog^enoe. He took a leading part in the debate on the 
bUl for Ihe suppression of the slftve trade ; and it was one of the most grati- 
fying acts of his life, that he was permitted to vote for the final abolition of 
this trattc But his habits permitted him not to be absent from his family, 
and he resigned his seat. €uch was his talent for writing, that before the 
Evening Post was established, his friends, Alexander Hamilton, Oliver Wal- 
ootti, and oither leading federalists, selected him to preside over the columns 
of a journal, about to be established ; whidi offer was declined, and William 
Colman was seleeted in his place, ffis pen was not permitted to remain 
idle, and, under tbe advice of Timothy Pickering, George Cabot, James Hill- 
house, Roger GriswoM, and other distinguished men, he was called to con- 
duct a joumid at Hartford, the Mirror, which was the leading political journal 
in that state during the war. 

When the celebrated Hartford Convention assembled, Dr* Dwight was 
selected to be their secretarT^, which duty he performed with signal fidelity. 
The selection was most fortunate, in one particular at least, as he afterwards 
puhtished to the world the history of that celebrated body, which will always 
be the leading work for the events of those times. We believe that, with 
the exc^>tion of Harrison Gray Otts, and perhaps one other member, he 
was the last surrivor of that body of distinguished men. After the close of 
^e war, 1815, he was induced by the leading federal gentlemen of this state, 
Stephen Van Rensselaer, Judge W. W. Van Ness, Abm. Van Vechten, Elisha 
Williams, and others, to commence the Albany Daily Advertiser. After two 
years' experiment, a favorable opportunity offered for establishing a journal 
in this city, and in 1817 he began to publish the New Yorit Daily Advertiser, 
and continued assodate editor and proprietor until the great fire of 1836, 
when he relinquished his interest in the concern, and retired, with his family, 
to Hartford, where he has Uved until the last three years, the latter portion 
of which he has resided with his son. 



334 AHTOT041I omtvuMxr VO» 1846. 

Hr. Dwight waa one of the purest men we have ever knoim. He nerer 
uttered a thought or wrote a word he did not impUeitlj bdieye. He never 
adopted the sentiment that " the end justifies the means." He was a sincere 
and devoted Christian and a patriot His writings were always on the side 
of sound morals ; he was a friend to law and order, and always sustained 
the institutions of our country. 

He was one of the founders, and for a great number of years an actiTO 
director, of the American Bible Society. As a father, husband, and Mend, be 
was one of the kindest and most devoted that ever filled these relations. 

March 12.— In Washington, D. C, Jonathan EUiot^Esq^ aged 61. BCr. 
Elliot was bom near Carlisle, England, in the year 1784, and came to New 
York about the year 18Q2, where he commenced the business of book print- 
ing. In ISIO, he left New York to take part in the revolutionaiyanovement 
in Caraccas, to establish the independence of New Grenada, and was in sev' 
eral engagements under Bolivar, in one of which he was severely wounded. 
He was taken prisoner when General Miranda surrendered in 1812, and suf- 
fered many hardships. He was finally liberated, and returned to the United 
States in 1813 ; he then served in the American army in the late war. In 
1814 he became a permanent resident of the dty of Washington, and during 
thirteen years edited the Washington Gazette with much ability. Mr. Elliot 
is principally known to the public as the author of " The American Diplo- 
made Code," "Debates on the Adoption of the Constitution," "The Com- 
parative Tariffs," " Funding System of the United States," '' Statistics of the 
United States," &c In private life he was frank, generous, and waxm 
hearted, an affectionate father and a kind husband. 

Aug. 18.— At Cincinnati, Ohio, Breuet Colonel A C. W. Fanning^ 2d Begl- 
ment United States Artillery, aged d6. He was universally esteemed for lus 
bravery, his extensive experience, and his many excellent qualities. Colo- 
nel Fanning entered the army in 1812, shared the danger and the glory of 
the battles of Plattsburgh, Fort Erie, and New Orleans, served honorably 
through all the l^eminole wars, and was present at Onithlacoochee and Fort 
Mellon — two of the fiercest combats in which our soldiery have been en- 
gaged. He was a native of Massachusetts. 

April 17. — In Providence, B. I., Hon, Jame»»Fenner, for many years gov- 
ernor of Bhode Island, aged 76. For more than half a century. Gov. Fenner 
has been intimately and actively connected wiHi the public affairs of Rhode 
Island. He has represented the state in the senate of the United States, and 
was fourteen times elected governor — an office in which he succeeded his 
father, who had filled it for even a longer period. The part ^which he bore 
in the agitations and troubles of the last few years is fresh in the grateful 
recollection of the people, and has linked his name indissolubly with the 
history of the State, He was noted for his patriotism and fidelity, his firm- 
ness of purpose, and courageous and indomitable wfil which formed the 
distinguishing trait of his character. 

Jan. 25. — In Jamestown, Chautauque County, N. Y., Col. Nathatdd Fm^ 
ton, aged 82. He was bom in Mansfield, Ct., served in the Revolutionaiy 
army for several years, and in 1791 settled in Otsego, then Montgomery 



AMMBXOAS <»ITnAKT VOR 1846. 885 

ConnlyvHew York, fie was twice elected to the legldatiire, and senred in 
other public offices with fidelity and skill. 

Aug. 11.— In Boston, Mass., the Bt. Bev. Benedict Fenwick^ for twenty-one 
years Roman Catholic Bishop of Boston, aged 64. Bishop Fenwick was a 
natiyeof St Mary's Ck>unty, Maiyland. After determining to derote him- 
self to the church, he joined the order of Jesuits, and in the course of a few 
years became president of Georgetown College, a station which he filled 
with great distinction till the year 1825, when, and only in obedience to im- 
perative bulls from Pope Leo the 12th, he accepted the office of bishop of 
Boston. He was a profound theologian, a learned dTfilian, a powerftil 
preacher, a thoroughly read liistorian, and a sagacious and prudent coun- 
seUor in all that related to the interests of his church and what he deemed 
for the welfare of his people. His talents for administration were of the 
highest order; and the progress of his church in the eastern section of this 
country may be given as evidence of it When he received his appointment 
to the New England diocese, there were but two Catholic churches and two 
priests within its limits. Now there are over fifty churches and sixty priests, 
exclusive of those in Connecticut and Rhode Island, which, under his admin- 
istration, have been erected into an independent bishopric, and are no longer 
under the jurisdiction of the bishop of Boston. 

Sept 15. — In Cheshue, Ct., Hon, Scmud A. Foote^ formerly governor of 
Connecticut He was bom in Cheshire, and was for a time engaged in com- 
merce in New Haven. He was afterwards a member of the state legislature 
and speaker of the house of representatives ; then a representative in Con- 
gress, and afberwards a United States senator. After the expiration of his 
term as senator, he was again elected to the lower house, and, while a mem- 
ber, was made governor of the state in 1834. 

Aug. 12. — In Salem, Mass., Joseph Frothingham^ Esq., aged 75, greatly 
inspected fbr his industry, integrity, and benevolence. Mr. Frothingham 
was brought up to the now extinct occupation of a heel maker, or the manu- 
Hacturer of high heels for ladies' shoes. A change of fiishion having de- 
stroyed his occupation, he turned to other occupations, and acquired a veiy 
handsome estate, which he always employed to the most benevolent pur- 
poses. Several members of his family, by some peculiarity of organization 
becoming prematurely blind, found in him a friend and staff and support. 
Mr. Frothingham, in the maternal line, was the dh*ect descendant in the fifth 
generation from Ralph Sprague, who arrived in Salem in 1626, in the same 
ship with Gov. Endicott. 

March. — In Hingham, Mass., Mr. Azariah Fuller, a revolutionary soldier, 
a native of Fitohburg, Mass., aged 82. He entered the army at the ^age of 
16, and served through the war in Capt Bradford's company. 

March 2. — In Stanly Coimty, N. C, while on his circuit, the Hon. John 
Oilea, of Salisbury. He was graduated in the University of North Carolina 
la 1806, after which he adopted the profession of the law, of which he was 
an honored member for more than thirty years. In 1829 he was elected a 
member of the house of representatives in Congress from his native district 
^f Salisbury, but resigned before taking his seat on account of iU health. 



886 AMBRiCAX OBxtviax wom 1846. 

In 1835 he trat a mouber of ibft ooaventioa which met to tewiw$ Hie state 
constitation. 

Feb. 16. — In Fxovidence, R. I., William G, Goddard, Esq,, form&Ay Pro- 
fessor of Bhetoric and Belles Lettres in Brown Universit]^, ai^ed 52. He was 
an accomplished scholar, and commaaded the respect and affection of a 
hurge circle of ftiends and, acquaintances. 

March.— In Charleston, S. C, Mrs* Ann GcvrUtp, aged 09. Mrs. Gourlay 
has been a widow for half a century, and has outUred all her children and 
grandchildren, except one. In early life, at a ball in Maryland, her native 
state, she had danced with Gen. Washington, and perhaps was the last 
female in the United States who could daim this honor. All the acquaint- 
ance of not only her early dajBy but of maturer life, have long unce been 
cut off by death ; and she has been for many years a stranger in the landi 
not only of her fathers, but even of her children. 

Aug. 16. — In Boston, Mass., very suddenly, Harrison Grayy aged 54. Mr. 
Gray was an active and intelligent bookseller, having been formerly rery 
largely engaged in business, as one of the firm of Hilliard, Gray, & Co. He 
has also been, in various ways, an active and useful member of society, par^ 
tlcularly as a member of various benevolent associations, and more espe- 
cially as an efficient promoter of the temperance cause. 

March & — At Staten Island, N. Y^ .Tames Guyon, E$q^ in the 6dth year of 
his age. Mr. Guyon was highly esteemed by his fellow-citizens. He has 
represented the county in the state legislature and the district in Congress. 

Aug. 4.-<*In Detroit, Mich., Fisher Ames Hoarding, one of the editors of 
the Detroit Daily Advertiser. Mr. H. was bom at Dover, Mass. in 1811 ; he 
graduated at Harvard University in 1883, and studied law for two years in 
the office of Hon. Daniel Webster, at Boston. Ii^ 1835 he removed to Chi- 
cago for the practice of the law; in 1837 he went to Detroit to form a law 
partnership with Fletcher Webster, Esq., now of Boston. In 1841 he was 
elected a member from his county to the state legislature, and bore a con- 
spicuous part in the proceedings of the house of representatives. The same 
year he became associated with Morgan Bates, Esq. in the Detroit Daily 
Advertiser, and continued in coimection with it, excepting about a year's 
interval, to the time of his death. 

Jan. — In New Tork, N. T., Eli Hart, aged 65^ Mr. Hart was for many 
years one of our most active and enterprising merchants, and some seasons 
was probably the largest holder of flour in the United States. He acquired 
an ample fortune, and only retired item active pursuits a year or two since, 
when his health became impaired. He was a man of simple manners, but 
of great business capacity ; a kind husband, father, and Iriend, loi^ an ex- 
emplary and upright citizen. 

June 12.— At his residence in Raleigh, N. C, fjouis B. Henry, Esq., an 
eminent lawyer, in the 55th year of his age. Mr. Henry was several times 
a member of the House of Commons, of which during one session he was 
speaker. He was also one of the commissioners to settle the claims of our 
citizens under the treaty with Spain, and in 1843 he was selected by the demo- 
cratic party as their candidate for the office <tf governor. 



AMSRICASr OBITrABT FOB 1846. 337 

June 13. — At his residence, in Mason County, Va., Ja^n Hereford, Esq.^ in 
the 89th year of his age. He was bom on the bank of the Potomac river, in 
Fairfax county, but raised in Leesburg, Loudoun county. Almost to the 
last he was an active and most popular magistrate to his county. He served 
his country faithfully as a soldier of the Revolution, and for his gallantry 
and good conduct he was raised from the ranks, and acted in the capacity of 
adjutant under Col. John Alexander, of the Loudoun militia. Col. Dabny, of 
the Louisa militia, and Col. George West, of the Loudoun militia — and in 
this latter regiment he was at the siege of Yorktown. 

June 20. — At Washington, D. C, Richard P. HerricJc, aged 55, a member 
of Congress from the 12th Congressional District of New York. He had 
long been esteemed as one of the most active and upright citizens of his 
native place in Rensselaer County, N. Y., where his industry and enterprise 
laid the foundations of his fame and fortune. 

Feb. 28. — In Danby, Vermont, Capt. Miner Hilliard, aged 82 years and 
11 months, a revolutionary patriot. 

Jan. 19. — In Washington, D. C James Hoban, Esq., United States District 
Attorney for the District of Columbia, aged 38. He was a native of Wash- 
ington, where he had resided all his life, having risen from comparative ob- 
scurity to distinction. As a lawyer and a public officer he was highly re- 
spected. 

May 5. — In Farmington, Ct., Edvxird Hooker, aged 61. He was bom at 
Farmington, Ct., and graduated at Yale College in 1805. He studied for 
the profession of the law, but he spent most of his life in the active pursuits 
of agriculture. He filled various civil offices in his native town, and was 
through life distinguished for his intelligence and his integrity. He was a 
man of great conscientiousness and uncommon Christian benevolence. 

Aug. 2. — In Anne, Arundel County, Md., Hon. Creorge Hotvard, formerly 
governor of Maryland, a gentleman of the old school, highly esteemed and 
beloved. 

Aug. 16. — In Washington, D. C, Samuel Humphreys, chief naval constrac- 
tor of the United States, aged 68. 

Aug. 3. — At Wakefield, N. ll.,Mr. Solomon Hutchins, aged 86. He was 
with John Paul Jones, on board the " Bon Homme Richard " in its victorious 
action with the " Serapis," and was with Jones in some other of his daring 
exploits. He also served in the Revolutionary army. 

Jan. 17. — At New York, N. Y., Henry Inman,E8q., aged 44, a distinguished 
artist, and president of the National Academy of the Arts of Design. In- 
man was an artist of fine powers, principally exercised in the department of 
portrait painting. He wrought with astonishing despatch and precision, and 
with a peculiar freedom and grace of pencil. Many of his portraits are, in 
themselves, without reference to their originals, delightful pictures. 

March 8. — In Baltimore, M. D., Thomas Kdl, in his 74th year. He was a 
native of Baltimore, and commenced the practice of law In that city on the 
10th of August, 1796. He was appointed attorney general of Maryland in 
1824, which office he filled until his appointment as one of the associate 
judges of Baltimore County Court on the 17th of September, 1827. He con- 
29 



838 AHEBICAK OBITVABT TOU 1846. 

tinned on the bench nntil the 11th of April, 1833) when he was appointed 
clerk of Baltimore County Court, and discharged the duties of that office 
until February, 1845, when, under the revised constitution of the State, his 
term of office expired. 

Aug. — In Philadelphia, Pa., Bim. John Kennedy^ aged 71, one of the asso- 
ciate justices of the Supreme Court of Pennsylyania. 

May 26. — In Harford, Susquehanna County, Penn., jRt(/M« Kingsley^yrho 
was a drummer at the battle of Bunker's Hill, aged 84. He was bom in 
Windham, Ct., February 1, 1763, and entered the service as a drummer boy 
at the age of thirteen years, and continued till the close of the war. His 
wife, with whom he had lived happily for sixty years, survived her husband 
but three days. 

July 11. — In West Springfield, Mass., Hon, Samud Lathrop, aged 75. Mr. 
Lathrop was the representative of the district in Congress fh)m 1818 to 1826, 
and had ever enjoyed a large measure of the esteem and confidence of his 
feUow-citizens. ? 

April 20. — At Bedford, Va., Gen. Jod Lrftwich, Although an active sharer 
in the perils and glories of the Revolutionary struggle, from its commence- 
ment to its close, Gen. Leftwich, at the time of his death, was only 86 years 
of age. When he first joined the northern army, he was in his 16th year. 
He was at the battle of Germantown, and partook in all the hardships of 
the severe campaign by which that battle was preceded and followed. He 
was with Gates in the disastrous engagement at Camden, and afterwards 
with Greene in the unfortunate battle of Guildford, in which he was severely 
wounded. At that gloomy period when Gen. Hull's disgraceful surrender at 
Detroit had filled all hearts with sorrow and dismay, he went, at the head of 
a brigade, to the northwestern frontier, and was at Fort Meigs, under Gen. 
Harrison. After the close of the war, the legislature of Virginia promoted 
him to the rank of Major General, which he held until the infirmities of age 
induced him to resign a post the duties of which he was no longer able to 
perform. Gen. Leftwich has frequently represented the people of Bedford 
in the legislature, and held for a long period the useful and responsible posi- 
tion of a justice of the peace in that county, 

April 18. — In Cabot, Vt., Fifidd Lyford, aged 84. He was bom in Exeter, 
N. H. In his 13th year he went into the army of the revolution as a servant 
to his father, Lieut. Thomas Lyford, in which capacity he served one year, 
when he separated from his father at Ticonderoga and went to West Point, 
and served as one of the life guard of Arnold till that traitor deserted, and 
afterwards remained in the army till the close of the Revolution. 

June. — In Louisville, Ky., Hon, John James Marslwll^ Judge of the 5th 
District Court of Kentucky, aged 61. He was bom in Woodford County, 
Ky., August 4, 1785. He was graduated at Princeton College, N. J., with the 
highest honors, in 1807. He studied law with his matemal uncle, Hon. A. 
K. Marshall, and entered upon the practice of the profession, in which he 
soon became distinguished. In 1814 he was chosen to the legislature, and 
continued a member of that body for many years, always freely avowing his 
opinions as a federalist. He took an active part in all political contests, and 



AMB&ICAN OBITUABT FOB 1846. 339 

always commanded the respect and affection of those with whom he acted. 
In 1836 he was appointed to preside over the Circuit CJourt — a position in 
which all were glad to see him, and which he held till his death. Possessed 
of a magnificent estate, at a period of wild and minoas speculation, his 
purse was at the service of his friends, and his name A*eely attached to 
whatever paper they presented. His credit was almost as unbounded as hia 
generosity ; and his confidence in the integrity of others was based upon the 
honesty of his own heart. A short time brought reverses, and overwhelmed 
him with debts which he had not fully discharged when his life ended. 

March 1. — In Rochester, N. Y., Henry C. Mayer, of Chatauque County, 
aged 24. He was a native of Maryland, a learned and highly esteemed 
member of the Baltimore bar, an accomplished scholar, a sincere friend and 
Christian, and an affectionate husband and father. 

Jan. 10. — In Pittsburg, Pa., fibn. Charles McClure, formerly secretary of 
state for Pennsylvania and superintendent of common schools. He had 
relinquished poUtical life, and was devoting himself to the practice of law in 
Pittsburg. Both in his public and private career, he was widely esteemed 
and respected. 

Sept. — In Washington, D. C, Felix G. McConneU, a member of Congress 
from Alabama, aged 36. He was intemperate in his habits, and in a fit of 
excitement, from the use of liquor, he stabbed himself in many places with 
a ck^p knife, and was found dead in his room. Mr. McConnell was a native 
of Lincoln County in the state of Tennessee. In 1824, he removed to Talla- 
dega County, in the state of Alabama, where his family, consisting of a wife 
and four children, now reside. 

May 12. — In London, Eng., Gansevoort MdoiUe^ Esq.j secretary to the 
United States legation to Great Britain. 

June 14. — In Charleston, S. C-, Hon. Henry Middleton, aged 75. He was a 
member of a highly distinguished family in Carolina. Uniting the manners 
of a polished gentleman with the high sense of honor that should charac- 
terize that lofty relation, his munificent hospitality, his liberality as a patron 
of art and promoter of all charitable objects, were not more conspicuous than 
that blended suavity and dignity which rendered his social qualities highly 
attractive to all who had with him the pleasures of private intercourse. 

Mr. Middleton was elected a representative in the legislature in 1801. He 
was then chosen state senator, which post he occupied until elected governor, 
in 1810. In 1814 he was elected to Congress, in which he served two terms. 
Mr. Monroe then conferred on him, in 1820, the appointment of minister to 
Russia, at which court he remained several years. 

March 18. — Near Florisant, Mo., Gcv. JoJm Miller. Gov. Miller had long 
been known as a public man. As an officer in the last war, he was distin- 
guished for courage and conduct. Soon after the termination of that strug- 
gle, he was appointed to the office of register of public lands in the Howard 
district, Missouri. This office he filled for some years, and until he was 
elected by the people to the station of governor. He served the constitu- 
tional period, and was then elected, for several years, a member of Congress, 



840 AiUBBIOAN OBITUARY VOU 1846. 

In these capacities he enjoyed the confidence of his personal and political 
ftiends, and his death will be mach regretted by them. 

Aug. 11. — At Portland, Me., Capt. Lemuel Moody^ aged 79. HiB family 
was fh)m Newbury, and his father settled in Portland, then Falmouth, in 
1740. Capt M. followed the sea for many years, and was a successful and 
respectable shipmaster. About forty years ago he was active, with a few 
others, in forming an association to erect the Portland Observatory, which 
was under his direction, almost exclusively, from that time until his death. 
During the greater part of this period, he kept a register of the thermome* 
ter and weather, of which he published frequent,.and latteriy in the Portland 
Advertiser, monthly abstracts, with an annual summary. In the year 1825 
he published a carefully prepared and valuable chart of Oasoo Bay, with 
soundings of the coast and inlets from the mouth of the Saco to the Ken- 
nebec. 

Sept 20. — Al Cambridge, Mass., it^. Cyna Morse^ aged 51, well known 
for many years as the driver of the omnibus between Harvard College and 
Boston. He was bom in West Boylston, Mass., and was with the troops at 
South Boston in 1814. Immediately after the war he commenced driving 
the stage from Cambridge to Boston, and continued in this employment for 
thirty-two years, in which time only three accidents occurred to the vehicle 
under his guidance. The undergraduates made a characteristic pun. to his 
memory : Mors communis eat omnibus. 

Jan. 2. — In Cambridge, Mass., John Alex, Mtmroe^ of Bradford, a member 
of the junior class of Harvard University, aged 34. 

April 14. — In Portland, Me., John Fitz Henry Mussey^ Esq,, aged 30, a 
graduate of Harvard University in 1835. 

March. — In Sullivan, N. H., Capt. EUakim Nims<,A Revolutionary pen- 
sioner and a Bunker Hill man, at the advanced age of 94 years and 6 months. 

May 15. — At Weston, Ct, Bev. John Noyes^ aged 84. He was bom at New 
Haven, Ct, and was graduated at Yale College in 1779. In 1786 he was 
ordained and installed over the Congregational Church in Norfield, then a 
parish of the town of Fairfield. He continued his public ministrations till 
Maich, 1806, when, his health failing, he took a dismission from his pastoral 
relation in 1807. From that time, with occasional intermissions, he was em- 
ployed in vacant societies in Ihat vicinity, and maintained his useful labors 
up nearly to the close of his long life. 

Aug. — In New Haven, Ct, Denison Olmsted^ Jr.^ profesaor of chemistry 
in Yale College. 

April 5. — In Washington, D. C, Gen. Daniel Parker^ chief clerk in the 
War Department Gen. Parker was a native of Massachusetts. He came to 
Washington before the commencement of the last war, to fill the responsi- 
ble post of chief derk of the War Department From this arduous office, in 
the times in which he fiUed it, and where his signal services and extensive 
capacity for bus ress were justly appreciated by the administration of the 
excellent Madison, he was transferred to the office of Adjutant and Inspec- 
tor General of the Army, with the rank of Brigadier General, which he held 
to the year 1821. In late years he was again in the chief clerkship of the 



AMEKIOAM OBITUABT VOB 1846. 341 

department of war. In every public office he was distinguished by exem- 
plary devotion to official duty. 

Jan. 26. — At New York, N, Y., Matthew C, Patterson, Esq., United States 
district attorney, — an able and efficient officer. 

Aug. 1.— At Roxbnry, Mass., Samuel Perkins, aged 75. Until within a 
few years he resided in Boston ; he was a worthy and highly esteemed citi- 
zen. He was a mechanic, and one of those whom his brethren delighted to 
honor. He had been president of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic 
Association, and was ever ready to promote its interests and honor. 

May 5. — In Boston, Mass., Hon. John Pickering, LL. Z>., President of the 
American Academy of Arts and Sciences, aged 69. He was a son of the 
late Timothy Pickering, so much distinguished in the political history of this 
country, and was bom in Salem, Mass., where he resided till a late period of 
his life. He was educated at Harvard College, where he graduated in 1796. 
He entered into active life as a lawyer, and obtained much distinction as an 
able jurist and also as a politician, having served for several years as a mem- 
ber of the senate of Massachusetts. But his reputation rests chiefly on his 
attainments as a scholar and on his literary and scientific labors, which were 
of great service to the cause of learning in this country. His studies related 
chiefly to philology, and in this department he was excelled by no Ameri- 
can, except perhaps the late Mr. Duponceau. His chief publications were a 
vocabulary of Americanisms, and a Greek and English Lexicon, the first on 
the largest scale, we believe, which was ever published in this country. He 
studied thoroughly the aboriginal languages of America, and was acquahited 
to some extent with the Oriental tongues. He held the office of president of 
the Oriental Society at Boston, at the time of his death. He marked out the 
plan for reducing to writing the language of the Sandwich Islanders. His 
other labors are too numerous and important to be noticed in this sketch. 
In all the relations of private and public life, he commanded the respect and 
esteem of his Mends and the whole community. 

Feb. 27. — At Richmond, Va., John Hampden Pleasants, in the 49th year of 
his age, Arom wounds in a duel with Thomas Ritchie, Jr., a man of distin- 
guished talents, the founder of the Richmond Whig, in 1824, and its chief 
editor for twenty-two years. He was the oldest son of Gov. James Pleas- 
ants. His few faults were overshadowed by eminent virtues, which won him 
numerous friends. All Virginia mourns his loss. Even his enemies pay the 
tribute of admiration to poor Pleasants in the grave. 

March 3. — In Boston, Mass., Col. Henry Purkitt, aged 91, a soldier of the 
Revolution, and one of those who assisted in the destruction of the tea in 
Boston harbor. Mr. Purkitt was one of the original members of the Massa- 
chusetts Charitable Mechanic Association, and until the last year was able to 
be present at the triennial celebrations of this respectable body. Latterly, 
however, his strength failed him, his " day grew dim," and he passed away 
serene and quietly to '' the better country." 

May 30. — In PhUadelphia, Penn., Hon. Archibald Randall, aged 46, judge 
of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. 
Judge Randall had been a member of the bar about twenty-seven years, 

29* 



342 AMSBICJLX OBITUABT VOR 1846. 

having been admitted in the year 1818. He was appointed a judge of the 
Ck>mmon Pleas in 1834 ; and was raised to the bench of the United States 
Court by Pres. Tyler, in 1842, on the occasion of the death of the lamented 
Judge Hopkinson. Since April, 1844, when Judge Baldwin died, he has 
been presiding over both the Chrcoit and District Court of Eastern Pennsyl- 
yania. 

' May 8. — In Texas, killed in batUe with the Mexicans, Brwet Major Sam- 
uel Einggold, of the United States aitilleiy, aged about 50*. He was the eld- 
est son of the late Gen. Samuel Ringgold, of Washington County, Maiyland. 
His mother was a daughter of Gen. John Cadwalader, of Philadelphia, a 
distinguished citiaen in the days of the Beyolution. He entered the army as 
lieutenant of artilleiy in July, 1818, having graduated at West Point with 
much honor; being one of the five whose names were recorded as the most 
distinguished of the class. He was at once selected by Gen. Scott as one of 
his aids, and served in that capacity several years. During the campaign in 
Florida, he was actively engaged as a captain of artillery, and for his ser- 
vices obtained the rank of Brevet Major. He organized the corps of flying 
artillery in the army, and paid great attention to the instruction and disci- 
pline of this arm of the service. He fell by a caimon-shot, the same ball 
killing his horse under him, and wounding him mortally. As a gentleman 
and an officer his reputation was very high and untarnished. 

Jan. — In Lenox, Mass., Samuel Shtpardt D. D^ aged 72. ^ He was bom in 
Chatham, Ct, and was graduated at Yale College in 1793. He was engaged 
in the ministerial office in Lenox, Mass., for more than half a century. 

June 13. — At his residence in Salem, N. C^ Ejoanud Shober, Esq., a highly 
respectable lawyer. He represented the county of Stokes for many years in 
the legislature of the state, and also in the convention which met in 1835 to 
revise the constitution of the state. 

May 18. — In South Hanover, Pa., Hon. WiUiam Simonton^ late a repre- 
sentative in Congress from Pennsylvania. He was an exemplary and much- 
respected citizen, and he left a numerous circle of relatives and Mends. 

June 11. — In Stamford -Ct., Bev. Danid Smith, aged 78. He was bom at 
New Canaan, Ct, August 9, 1767, and was graduated at Yale College in 1791. 
He was ordained and installed pastor of the Congregational church in Stam- 
ford, Ct., in June, 1793, where he continued until his death. He was elected 
a member of the corporation of Yale College in 1818, and at the time of his 
death he was one of the oldest members of that Board. 

May 13. — At Bichmond, Va., Robert Stanard^ aged 66, a judge of the 
Court of Appeals of Virginia. He was an active and distinguished member 
of the convention of 1829-30, which framed tiie existing constitution of the 
state. Several sessions of the legislature he represented the city of Rich- 
mond in the house of delegates. He stood at the head of the celebrated bar 
of that city, when he was elevated to the bench of the highest conrt He 
labored diligently in the discharge of his judicial duties, and breathed his 
last just at the moment of concluding an elaborate opinion in confirmation 
of a decree of the Superior Court of Spotsylvania County. 

Jan. 31. — In Baltimore, Md., Dr. James Stewart^ aged 90. Dr. S. was bom 



AXBBICAN OBITUABT PO& 1846. 343 

at Annapolis, in 1755 ; waa at Edinburgh, a student of the Medical UniTeniiy, 
when the American Revolution commenced, and had many a manly contest 
with his feUow-Btudents, in behalf of the American cause, whilst detained 
there. In the year 1780 he succeeded, by a drcnitous route, in reaching his 
native city. His services as a physician were at once in requisition for the 
American army. He took up his residence in ^^ Baltimore town'' in the 
year 1792, and shared largely in its prosperity, witnessing a communily then 
of some fifteen thousand, expanding into a population of over a hundred 
thousand. 

March 2. — In Newcastle, Del., Thomas Stockton^ governor of <3ie state of 
Delaware. He was elected to the gubernatorial chair in the fall of 1844, and 
would, had he survived, have continued in office until January, 1849. Major 
Stockton was a brave and distmguished officer of the last war, and won a 
renown on our northern ftontier, which will long survive hiuL His charac- 
ter was estimable in the highest degree, and amid ail the rancor and bitter- 
ness which distinguished the campaign of 1844, no flaw in his general pro- 
bity could be detected by all the vigilance of partizan opponents. The state 
of Delaware lost in him a devoted pubUc servant, and his immediate ac- 
quaintances a fHend endeared by every social quality. 

Aug. 7. — In Chicago, Ol., Danid Stone^ professor of language and litera- 
ture in the University of Pennsylvania. 

April 3. — In Fallsbnrgh, M*. John Tappen, in the 93d year of his age. 
Mr. T. was a commissioned officer hi the Revolution. 

Jan. 17. — In Washington, D. C, Hon. William Taylor^ a representative in 
Congress from Yirginla. He was a native of Alexandria, D. C., a distin- 
guished lawyer, and an able and respected politician. 

Jan. 30. — In Jefferson County, Ya., Mrs, Lacy P. Toddy mother of WilUam 
Temple Washington, Esq., and only surviving sister of Mrs. Madison. She 
had in early life married George S. Washington, nephew and one of the 
heirs of Gen. Washington. After the death of. Mr. Washington she became 
united in marriage with the Hon. Thomas Todd, of Kentucky, one of the 
judges of the Supreme Court of the United States, whom she survived for 
many years. 

April 7. — Near Jefferson city. Mo., Bon. George Ton^kins, for a long tinM 
a justice of the Supreme Court of that state, a gentleman distinguished for 
his high moral worth, great legal knowledge, and for his intimate acquaint- 
Mice with the history of the men and manners, and political relations of the 
West, in which he spent the greater portion of a life that extended to sixty- 
six years. 

May 9. — In Baltimore, Md., Eev, Charles Turner Torrey, aged 33. He was 
bom at ScituatejMass., and was fitted for college at Phillips Exeter Academy 
under Dr. B. Abbot He was graduated at Yale College in 1833, when he 
began his studies for the Christian ministry, and was afterwards settled for 
a time at Providence, R. I., and at Salem, Mass. But he had become deeply 
interested in the opposition to slavery in the United States, and he entered 
actively into all the proceedings of the party that has been formed to destroy 
this institution. Imprudently engaging in an attempt to cany (^ some 



344 AMBBICAN OBITUABT TOB 1846. 

flUves from Maryland, he was apprehended, tried, convicted, and sentenced 
to a long imprisonment in the State Prison. While nndergoing this sentence, 
he died of consumption. His motives were nnqnestionably pore, humane, 
and noble ; bat his warmest admirers may well regret that his philanthropic 
zeal was not tempered with more discretion. 

March 19. — At Newark, N. J., Elias Van Andtde, LL, Z>., aged 75, one of 
the oldest and most eminent members of the bar of New Jersey, distingoished 
for integrity and ability in his profession. He had been thirty*three years 
president of the State Bank at Newark, which under his care has at ail 
times possessed a distinguished credit. 

March 7. — In Washington, D. C, Gen. John P. Van Ness^ aged 76. Gen. 
Van Ness was one of the oldest and most respectable inhabitants of Wash- 
ington. He was a native of New York, and was elected to Congress from 
that state during the first term of Mr. Jefferson*s administration. He shortly 
afterwards married the only child of the late David Bums, Esq., one of the 
original proprietors of the land on which Washington was built; and having 
accepted fh>m Mr. Jefferson a commission of migor of the militia in the 
district, it was deemed that by so doing he had forfeited his right to liis seat 
in the house of representatives. He then fixed his permanent residence in 
Washington, and contributed largely to the improvement of it When the 
bank of the metropolis was established in 1814, he became the president 
thereof, and continued to hold this office to the time of his death. He filled 
the office of mayor of the city, to which office he was elected by his fellow- 
dtizens; and he received many evidences of the estimation in which he 
was held by the several administrations of the general government His 
loss will be sensibly felt by a large circle of acquaintances, and by the 
community in which he lived, as the large property which he received with 
his wife enabled him to extend an elegant hospitality to his acquaintances 
and to strangers visiting the city, and to patronize with great liberalify all 
the public improvements and charitable and religious institutions in the city, 
without respect to sect or denomination. 

Aug. 5. — In St. John's, New Brunswick, Jchn Ward, Esq., "the Father of 
the City," aged 92. Mr. W. was bom in Westchester County, m the then 
British province of New York. He entered the army in 1776 and was fre- 
quently in action. At the peace of 1783 he embarked with his regiment, the 
" Loyal Americans," for this province, where the corps after a short time 
was disbanded. Mr. Ward then embarked in commercial pursuits, and at 
his death was the senior half-pay officer as well as the oldest merchant in New 
Brunswick. He has filled many public situations. For many years he rep- 
resented the county of St. John in General Assembly, and for a long period 
commanded the militia. He lived an unblemished life, and carried with him 
the high esteem and profound respect of the community, to whom his noble 
and venerable appearance, his strict integrity, and amiable disposition, had 
long been familiar. 

Aug. 8. — At Bergen Hill, N. J., William Chauncey Wetmore, commander 
in the United States navy, aged 49. Mr. Wetmore entered the naval service 
at the age of thirteen years, and took part, at that early period of his life, in 



AMSBICJLN OBITUABT FOS 1846. . 345 

much axjtive service. He was in Com. Chauncey^s fla^ ship, in his several 
engagements on Lake Ontario, and took an active part with the naval service 
at the battle of Little York, where Gen. Pike fell. 

Jan. 13. — At Great Barrington, Mass., Gen. John Whiting, aged 75. Gen. 
W. was a native of the town where he lived and died, and where he was in 
active business as a lawyer for fifty-two years — having entered the profes- 
sion at 21 — and having been for many years the oldest attorney in the 
county. He was for some time county attorney, and for a long period presi- 
dent of the bar of the county. During the time that he was in business, he 
was detained from attendance at the different courts in the county only two 
different terms — once by sickness and once by casualty. 

May 8. — In Walpole, N. H., Dr. John WUliams, late of Cambridge, in the 
98th year of his age. Dr. Williams was bom on the 20th of Jime, 1748, (old 
style.) During the war of the revolution, he was a practising physician at 
Hanover, N. H. ; afterwards he removed to Barre, where he remained awhile 
in the same professional business. Thence he removed to Providence, R. L 
He was for some time steward of the college in tiiat place, and during 
part of the time engaged unsuccessfully in commerce. Afterwards he came 
to Cambridge, and opened an apothecary^s shop in or about the year 1810, 
where he spent a large portion of his life, and was universally esteemed. 

May 27. — At Bangor, Me., Hon, William D» WHUamson, counsellor at 
law, aged 66. Judge Williamson commenced the practice of the law at 
Bangor in 1807. He was for several years in the senate of Massachusetts 
before and at the time of the separation of Maine from that state, and a 
senator in the first legislature of Maine at the organization of the new gov- 
emment He was a member of the Congress of 1821-23, and was subse- 
quently appointed judge of probate; in which office he continued until 1840. 
Jn 1832 he published a History of the State of Maine in two volumes octavo. 

Aug. 14. — In Cincinnati, O., Rev. Joshua L. Wilson, D. 2)., aged 72. He 
was liom in Virginia about the year 1774 While he was still young, the 
family emigrated to the state of Kentucky, where he was brought up to the 
trade of a blacksmith, at which he worked for some time, in the infant set- 
tlements of that state ; but possessing an inquisitive and vi^rous mind, he 
found time and means for study, and at length became himself a teacher. 
His first pastoral labors were in Nelson or Shelby County, Kentucky, where 
he married Miss Singleton, who has survived him. Early in 1808, more than 
thirty-eight years ago, Dr. Wilson was called to the pastorship of the First 
(then the only) Presbyterian Church of Cincinnati, and immediately there- 
after entered on his duties. With a constancy on the part of both pastor 
and people, rarely seen in the new and changeful communities of the West, 
the connection then formed was severed only by the hand of death. The 
house in which he began his ministerial labors for this society, was tiie first 
ever erected in Cincinnati for public worship. 

May 28. — At St, Johnsbuiy, Vt., Bev. Leonard Worcester, brother of the 
late Dr. Samuel Worcester, of Salem, and Noah Worcester, of Brighton. He 
was pastor of the Congregational church in Peacham, Vt., for nearly half a 
century, and was one of the most distinguished and excelleni; pastors of 
New England. 



CHRONICLE OF EVENTS. 



18 4 5. 

Sept 24. — An attempt at a revolution was made in the Roman States in 
Italy. The insarrection began at Rimini ; and the insurgents, having taken 
the fort and liberated the prisoners therein confined, were forced to retire to 
the mountains, and soon afterwards were entirely dispersed. 

Oct — Great alarm was excited in Ireland and in some of the Ck)ntinental 
States of Europe, by the prevalence of what is called the " potato disease," 
which tiireatened the almost total destruction of the potato crop, and caused 
serious apprehensions of a famine. 

Oct. 4. — A fire broke out in Griffin Town, a suburb of Montreal, Canada, 
which destroyed nearly one hundred houses, and was arrested at last by 
blowing up several buildings with gunpowder. 

Oct. 24. — England and France, having engaged by a public armed inter- 
vention to put a stop to the war between Buenos Ayres and Montevideo, de- 
clared a strict blockade of the port of Buenos Ayres. 

Oct. 26. — Disturbances and civil war continue in Hay ti. The Dominicans 
surprised the Haytian garrison at Laxaron, the chief frontier town on the 
cape side of the island, and after killing 128 men, took the fort, which they 
soon afterwards evacuated. 

Nov. 5. — The steamer Hibemia,on her passage fVopi Boston to Liver- 
pool, struck on Point Race, Newfoundland, and was so much injured that 
she was obliged to put in to St John's for repairs. 

Nov. 13. — A most disastrous fire occurred in Sag Harbor, N. Y., extend- 
ing to more than 100 houses, which were entirely consumed. The loss in 
building and merchandise was estimated at half a million of dollars. 

Nov. — Two of the leading Whig statesmen in England, Lord John Rus- 
sell and Lord Morpeth, in published letters, avowed a change of their opin- 
ion respecting the system of the British com laws, and that they were now 
in favor of the importation of bread stuffs without any duty. 

Nov. 20. — The combined English and French forces, which had been 
blockading Buenos Ayres, came to an action with the troops of Gen. Rosas, 
stationed in certain batteries on the river Parana, in which the latter were 
entirely defeated, with the loss of several hundred men. 

Dec. — A revolution took place in Mexico, the army under Gen. Paredes 
revolting against the established government under Gen. Herrera, because 
it had not acted with sufficient vigor against the United States in the affair of 
Texas. The insurgents were completely successful without bloodshed, and 
a provisional government was established with Paredes as its head. 

Dec 1. — The 29th Congress assembled at Washington, an unusually 
large number of senators and representatives being present on the first day 
of the session. Vice President Dallas took the chair in the Senate ; and John 
W. Davis, of Indiana, was chosen Speaker of the House. 

Dec. 11. — The English ministry, under Sir Robert Peel, resigned their 
places in consequence, as was supposed, of a difference of opinion between 
the Duke of Wellington and the Premier in respect to the expediency of 
abolishing the com laws. Lord John Russell received the Queen^s commands 
to form a new ministry. 



CHBONICLE OF EVENTS FOS 1846. 347 

Dec. 15. — Considerable excitement was prodnced thronghont the conntiy 
by the introduction of certain resolves into the Senate of the United States, 
and a speech by their introducer, Mr. Cass, which seemed to portend a war 
with England respecting Oregon. 

Dec. 22. — The 225th anniversary of the landing of the Pilgrims at Ply- 
mouth was celebrated by the Pilgrim Societv- at Plymouth by a public din- 
ner, at which Judge C. H. Warren presided.. Governor Everett, President 
Quincy, Mr. Choate, and about 500 other persons, were present. 

Dec. 22. — The joint resolution for the admission of Texas as a State into 
the Union, which passed the House of Representatives in Congress by a 
large mtyority a few days before, passed the Senate also by a vote of 31 
to 13. 

Dec. 19. — The steamer Belle Zane, while about 500 miles above New Or- 
leans, on her way down the Mississippi, struck a snag, filled, and almost 
instantly turned on her side. About 15 or 20 persons were drowned in her, 
and two or three others were frozen to death, as the accident occurred on 
one of the coldest nights ever known on the lower part of the river. 

Dec. 20. — Lord John Russell, finding himself unable to form a Whig min- 
istry of suflScient strength, retired, and Sir Robert Peel resumed office with 
most of his former colleagues. 

Dec. 21. — A battle was fought in the Punjaub between the English forces 
and the Sikh army, numbering 30,000 men, which had crossed the Sutlej. 
The loss was great on both sides ; but the Sikhs were defeated with the loss 
of 30 pieces of cannon, and the probable consequence is the annexation of 
a considerable part of the Sikh territory to British India. 



18 4 6. 

Jan. 1. — The Legislative Assembly of the province of YncataOi declared 
itself independent of Mexico, on the ground that the central government 
had broken its faith, and the province was no longer bound to pay it alle- 
giance. 

Jan. 22. — The British Parliament was opened by the Queen in person, 
and allusion was made in her speech to a contemplated great reduction of 
protective duties, and an ultimate repeal of the com laws. 

Jan. 12. — A distressing accident occurred at Carbondale, Pa., the roof of 
a part of the coal mines caving in and burying 50 or 60 persons, of whom 
about 15 were killed. 

Feb. 2. — A duel was fought at Bladensburg between Thomas F. Jones 
and Dr. Daniel Johnson, both of Elizabeth City, N. C, on the ground of an 
alleged insult by the latter to the wife of the former. Dr. Johnson was shot 
dead at the first fire. 

Feb. 9. — The resolutions for giving notice to Great Britain, that the con- 
ventions of 1S18 and 1S27 for the joint occupation of Oregon should be ter- 
minated at the expiration of twelve months from the time of giving the 
notice, passed the House of Representatives in Congress by a vote of 163 
to 54. 

Feb. 10. — The English forces in British India, under Sir H. Gough, num- 
bering 20,000 men, fought a great battle with the army of the Sikhs, esti- 
mated at 36,000. The latter were entirely defeated, and driven across the 
Sutlej, with the loss of 10,000 killed and wounded. The loss of the British 
was 2,383, including Maj, Gen. Sir R. Dick. 

Feb. 13. — The steamboat Saladin, passing down the Mississippi river, 
came in collision with the steamer Congress, by which accident the latter 
boat was destroyed, and 15 persons were drowned. 

Feb. 15. -r- A severe snow-storm, attended by a violent gale of wind, pre- 
vailed all along the Atlantic coast of the United States. Several vessels 
ppund into New York were wrecked on Squam Beach, among which was 



348 CHBOincLE or etekts foh 1846. 

the iMu^ket sldp John MintniD, fVom New Oileans, in which 30 persons were 
drowned. 

Feb, 23. — An extensive and well-organized insurrection broke out in the 
ancient kingdom of Poland. The insurgents, reported to be 40,000 strong, 
obtained possession of a great part of Gallicia, and marched on Cracow, 
where the Russians were maJ^ing great preparations to meet them. The re- 
bellion, in the course of a few days, was entirely put down. 

Feb. 25. — A fatal duel was fought near Richmond, Va., between John H. 
Pleasants, Esq. and Thomas Ritchie, Jr., two newspaper editors in that city. 
They were armed with swords and severdl pistols to each, and advanced on 
each other, firing several shots, and finally drawing swords. Mr. Pleasants 
received four pistol shots in his body, and one gash from a sword, and died 
Of his wounds two days afterwards. Ritchie was slightly wounded. 

Feb. 2S. — The great measure of Sir Robert Peel for reforming the com 
laws and the general system of trade was sanctioned in the House of Com- 
mons by a minority of 97. 

March 15. — A heavy fall of rain broke up the ice in the large rivers of 
the Northern States on the Atlantic, and the flood did much damage. The 
rise of the Merrimac, Hudson, and Susquehanna, was very great ; bridges 
were carried away, rail roads on the banks were flooded or broken up, and 
travelling was much impeded. 

March 30. — A ^eat freshet on the Penobscot river did more damage at 
Bangor and its vicinity than had been caused by any rise of water on that 
stream during the present century. The bridges were carried away, a con- 
siderable part of the city was ove Aowed, and property was destroyed to the 
amount of half a million. 

March 28. — The American army of occupation under Gen. Taylor, 3,500 
strong, arrived at the Rio Grande, and took post opposite Matamoras with- 
out any serious opposition firom the Mexicans. 

AprU 4. — The Spanish ministry under Gen. Narvaez was dissolved, by 
the influence of Queen Christina as was supposed, and a new administra- 
tion instituted under M. Isturitz. 

April 16. — The Resolution authorizing the President, but leaving it to 
his discretion, to give notice to Great Britain for terminating the joint occu- 
pation of Oregon, passed the U. S. Senate by a vote of 40 to 14. The House 
of Representatives acceded to the language of the Resolution, as modified 
by the Senate, on the 23d, when the Resolution was finally passed by both 
Houses by a large majority. 

April 16w — Louis Philippe, King of the French, when returning fVom 
Fontainebleau in a carriage with several members of the royal family, was 
shot at by a man from the side of the road. No one was hurt, though the 
ball cut the fringes of one of the curtains. The assassin was arrest^ ; his 
flame was said to be Lecompte. 

April 24. — HostiUties took place between the Mexican and the American 
armies on the Rio Grande. The American commander, Col. Taylor, sent 
out a detachment of cavalry, consisting of 70 or 80 men under Capt. Thorn- 
ton, to observe a portion of the Mexican troops who had passed round into 
his rear. This detachment came unexpectedly into the presence of the 
Mexicans, were surrounded, fired upon, and were all killed or taken pris- 
oners. 

April 30. — The Hon. Edward Everett was inaugurated at Cambridge 
with appropriate ceremonies as President of Harvard Universitjr. An ora- 
tion was delivered by him before a large concourse of the alumni^ who sub- 
sequently dined together, and attended an illumination of the college build- 
ings in the evening. 

May 2. — The British mail steamer Cambria, on her passage from Liver- 
pool to Boston, in a thick fog, ran aground at Truro on Cape Ood. After 
a detention of two days, she was got off without injury. 

May 8, 9. — Gen. Taylor, on his way back from Point Isabel to the Amer- 
icaii camp opposite Metamoras, with about 2,000 American troops, was 
ftttacked l^ the Mexicans, who were about 5,000 in number. The Americans 



CBBONICLB OV EVENTS FOB 1846. 349 

fonght their way through, entirely dispersing the enemy, capturing their 
baggage and artillery, and several of their superior officers. Gen. Taylor's 
loss was 48 killed, and 126 wounded ; that of the Mexicans, 262 kiUed, 355 
wounded, and 182 dispersed or taken prisoners. A cannonade, beginning 
on the 4th, was kept up for several days between the American camp and 
the Mexican batteries near Metamoras, without much ii\jury being done 
on either side. 

May 7. — The town of Grenada, Miss., was almost swept away by a great 
tornado which passed over it. Many houses were prostrated, about 20 per- 
sons were killed, and as many others were wounded. 

May 12. — A biU passed both houses of Congress by a very large major- 
ity, declaring that war with Mexico already existed by the act of that power, 
and authorizing 50,000 volunteers to be enlisted, and ten milhons of dollars 
to be anpropriated for the prosecution of the war. 

May^. — Queen Victoria gave birth to a princess, subsequently named 
Helena Augusta Victoria, the fifth child of herself and Prince Albert 

May 26. — Prince Louis Bonaparte escaped, in the disguise of a workman, 
Arom the fortress of Ham, in France, where he had been confined for many 
years. 

May 29. — Sir Robert Peel's bill for the repeal of the com laws having 
succeeded in the Commons, passed to its second reading in the House of 
Lords by a majority of 47. 

June 1. — Pope Gregory XVI. died at Rome, after having filled the Pon- 
tifical chair for more than fifteen years. 

June 4. — The steamer Queen City, Capt. Dugan, on her way from New 
Orleans to Cincinnati, burst her connection pipe while shoving out from 
Natchez. Ten persons were Instantly kiUed, and about thirty scalded, but 
few of whom were expected to recover. 

June 5, — Ibrahim Pacha, having made a visit to Paris, arrived in Eng- 
land, on a tour of pleasure and observation. 

June 8. — Lecompte, who attempted to shoot the king of the French on 
the 16th of April, was executed by the guillotine at Paris. The Court had 
sentenced him to die the death of a parricide. 

June 12. — A most disastrous fire occurred at St. John's, Newfoundland, 
by which nearly the whole town was destroyed. All the public buildings 
were consumed, and nearly 6,000 persons had to pass the succeeding night 
in the open air. Three lives were lost through the blowing up of a house 
with gunpowder. The loss of property was estimated at a million sterling. 

June 14. — A terrible accident took place in Quebec, Canada, by the 
burning of the Theatre Royal in St. Lewis street, when the building was 
crowded with spectators. The flames spread 'with great rapidity, and, the 
audience from the boxes becoming jammed together in a narrow staircase, 
forty-seven persons were burned to death. 

June 18. — The U. S. Senate, by a vote of 41 to 14, advised the ratifica- 
tion of the partition treaty, concluded two days before by the President with 
the British government, for the division of the territory of Oregon between 
the two powers on the basis of the 49th parallel of latitude. 

June 21. — Cardinal Mastai Ferreti, having been chosen Pope by the 
college of Cardinals, was this day inaugurated at Rome under the title of 
Pope Pius IX. He is 54 years old. 

June 25. — The English ministry were defeated in the House of Com- 
mons, thebr "Irish Coercion" bill being rejected by a mf^jority of 73 votes. 
On the next day. Sir Robert Peel with his colleagues resigned, and Lord 
John Russell was commissioned by her Majesty to form a new ministry. 

June 27. — The Nova Scotia brig Sutlej, on her way from Pictou, N. S., 
to Fall River, Mass., with about 70 persons on board, was wrecked in the 
Vineyard Sound, by striking on the rocks called the "Sow and Pigs," and 
foundering immediately afterwards. The passengers were miners, on their 
way to Maryland for employment 7 about 30 of them were drowned. 

July 3. — The bill for reducing the duty on imports, repealing the tariff 
of 1842, passed the House of Representatives in Congress by a vote of 114 

30 



MO GHBONIOUB or SVBVTB TOB 1846. 

to 05. It abolishes all specific duties and aU mtntmums. The clause im- 
posing a duty on tea and coffee was stricken out ; salt is taxed 20 per cent 
advMorem, 

July 6. — C!om. Sloat, of the IT. S. Pacific squadron, took possession, with- 
out resistance, of the Mexican town and harbor of Monterey, on the coast of 
California, and issued a proclamation that the whole of that country was an- 
nexed to the United States. 

July 8. — A dreadful accident occurred on the great North of France rail- 
way, between Paris and Brussels. While crossing a bridge, the locomotive 
ran off the track, and threw two passenger cars into deep water; fourteen 
persons were drowned or killed, and 20 or 30 others wounded. 

July 13. — A very destructiye fire occurred in Nantucket, Mass. The cen- 
tral part of the town, where most of the stores and public buildings were 
situated, was entirely laid waste by the flames. About 300 buildings were 
destroyed, and the property lost was estimated at more than $600,000 ; about 
one third of it was insured. 

July 17. — The ratifications of the Oregon treaty between Great Britain 
and the United States were exchanged at the Foreign Office in London, and 
the fact was announced in Parliament the same evening. 

July 24. — Louis Bonaparte, Ck>unt of St. Leu, ex-king of Holland, a 
younger brother of Napoleon, the husband of Hortense Beauhamois, who 
had been living in retirement at Florence for many years, died in that city, 
aged 67. Jerome, ex-kmg of WestphaUa, is now the only surviving brother 
of Napoleon. 

July 26. — The new tariff bill, repealing that of 1842, passed to a third 
reading in the U. S. Senate by the casting vote of ^e Vice President, and 
was then finally passed by a vote of 28 to 27 ; all the Whig members voting 
against it, except Mr. Jamagin of Tennessee, who acted under instructions 
firom his legislature in opposition to his own opinion. The Democratic 
members from Pennsylvania and Connecticut, also Messrs. Sturgeon, Came- 
ron, and Niles, voted against it. Mr. Haywood, a Democratic member from 
Nortb Carolina, resigned his seat the day before, in order to avoid voting in 
favor of the bill, or displeasing his party by voting against it 

July 29. — Another attempt was made to assassinate Louis Philippe, king 
of the French. Joseph Henri, a bankrupt merchant, formerly in good cir- 
cumstances, fired two pistol shots at him, as he was standing on the balcony 
of the Tuilleries in the midst of his fiEunily. Neither shot took effect, and the 
man was instantly arrested. 

Aug. 3. — President Polk returned to Congress the River and Harbor bill 
with his veto, on the ground that some of the appropriations were tmconsti- 
tutionaU and that the money was wanted for the Mexican war. 

Aug. 5. — A great fire took place at Lapiurie, Canada, opposite Montreal, 
by which nearly the whole town was destroyed. About three hundred build- 
ings were consumed. 

Aug. 6. — Another revolution took place in Mexico in favor of the exiled 
Gen. Santa Anna. The troops in Vera Cruz and its vicinity first declared in 
his favor, and were soon followed by those at the capital, who deposed and 
imprisoned Gen. Paredes, the President of the Republic, and proclaimed 
Santa Anna and the constitution of 1824. 

Aug. 8. — A bill which had passed both houses of Congress, appropriating 
$5,000,000 in land scrip to remunerate the sufferers under the French spolia- 
tions prior to 1801, was returned to the Senate by President Polk with his 
veto, on the ground that the subject, which had been forty years before Con- 
gress, had not been sufficiently considered, and that so much money could 
not be spared when the country was at war. 

Aug. 10. — Congress adjourned after the longest session ever held since 
the formation of the government, except that of 1841 — 2, under the admin- 
istration of John Tyler. 

Sept 7. — The steamer New York, on her way from Galveston to New Or- 
leans, encountered a heavy gale, and foundered at sea; about 20 lives were 
lost, and as many escaped. 



OHBONICLE or STENTS FOB 1846. 351 

Sept. 10. — As the steamboat Excelsior was about leaving New York city 
on her way to Ck)xsackie, her boiler burst and killed three or four persons. 
The boat took fire after the explosion, and was entirely burnt 

Sept 10. — Felix 6. McCk)nnell, member of (Congress from Alabama, com- 
mitted suicide at a hotel in Washington, while under the influence of deli- 
rium tremens^ by stabbing himself with a clasp knife. 



CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS. 



Page 99. — Greorge Bancroft has resigned his office of Secretary of the 
Navy J and is appointed Minister to Great Britain^ in place of Louis McLane, 
John Y. Mason, of Virginia, formerly Attorney General, is appointed Secre- 
tary of the Navyt in place of Mr. Bancroft Nathan Clifford, of Maine, has 
been appointed Attorney General, 

Page 101. — Treasury Department Wm. C. Bouck, of New York, As- 
sistant Treasurer of the United States at the dty of New York. Wm. Laval, 
of South Carolina, Assistant Treasurer at Charleston. Henry Hubbard, of 
New Hampshire, Assistant Treaswrer at Boston. George Penn, of Missouri, 
Assistant Treasurer at St. Louis. 

Page 106. — United States Senate. The residence of Samuel Houston, 
Senator from Texas, is in Montgomery county ; of Thomas J. Busk, at Na- 
cogdoches. 

Pages 107 - 111. — Bichard P. Herrick, Bepresentatire from New York, 
and Felix 6. Mc Council, Bepresentative from Alabama, are dead. Ster- 
ling Price, Bepresentatire from Missouri, has resigned. The residence of 
David S. Kaufman, Bepresentative from Texas, is in Sabine county ; of 
Timothy Pilsbury, in Brazoria county. 

Pages 118-120. — William G. Moorhead is Consul at Valparaiso, in 
place of Eben. B. Dorr. George Latimer is Consulat St John*s, Puerto Bico, 
in place of Henry G. Hubbard. 

Pages 121-128. — Henry W. Euhtmann is Consul for Austria at Charles- 
ton, S. C. Henrique T. Street is Vice-Consul of Portugal at Charles- 
ton, S. C. 

Page 125. — Charles S. McCauley is appouited commander of the Navy 
Yard at Washington. ^ 



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