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Full text of "An American ancestry"

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American Ancestry. 



BY 

ANNA RICHMOND WARNER FRENCH. 



Compiled from over two thousand gencaological volumes, with additional records 
gathered by Miss Abbie French and others. 



Minneapolis: 

Hall, Black & Co., Printers. 

1894. 







{h* 



NOV 2 , 195 : . 3l 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS. 

The main object of this index is to furnish a short and concise lcey to the whole book. 
The arrangement is so simple as to need no explanation. 
Page. 

145 Addis, — 1 William, — of Gloucester, Mass., 1642. d. Melicent m. 1 William 
Southmayd. 

1 Alden, — 1 John, Mayflower Pilgrim, 1600-1689, Plymouth, Mass. m. 2 Pris- 

cilla Molines. d. 2 Elizabeth m. 2 Wm. Pabodie. (With table.) 
145 Allyn, — 1 Matthew, from Devonshire, d. in Winsor, Conn., 1671. m. Mar- 
garet. 
145 Allyn, — 2 John (s. of above), Lieut. Col. of the Colonies under Gov. Andros. 
m. 2 Ann Smith, d. in Hartford, 1696. d. 3 Margaret m. 2 Wm. Southmayd. 
17 Beem, — Albert, from Hoogduytsland, Germany, m. Margrietjen Peesharen. 
d. 2 Elizabeth m. 4 Hendrik Deyo in Kingston, N. Y. 

2 Blancsan, — 1 Matthys, Huguenot from Artois, of Kingston and Hurley, m. 

Maddalen Jorisse. 
2 Blancsan, — 2 Kattryn (d. of above), 1635-1709. m. 1 Louis Du Bois of New 

Paltz. 
6 Booth, — John, of Scituate. d. Grace m. Ephraim Pray. 
4 Brightman, — 'Henry, of Freetown, Mass. m. Joan. 
4 Brightman, — 2 Joseph (s. of above), 1691-1753. m. Susanna. 

4 Brightman, — 3 George (s. of above), b. 1721. m. 5 Hannah Peckham. 

5 Brightman, — 4 Hannah (d. of above), 1752-1834. m. 5 Perez Richmond of 

Westport, R. I. 

6 Brownell, — 'Thomas, 1615-1655, of Portsmouth, R. I. m. Ann. d. 2 Sarah 

m. 2 Gideon Freeborne (with table). 

7 Chase, — William, 1600-1659, of Roxbury and Yarmouth, m. Mary. 

7 Chase, — 2 Benjamin (s. of above), 1639-1731. m. 2 Phillippe Shearman, d. 

Phillippe m. 3 Jacob Hathaway. 

8 I. Clarke, — (Gov.) Jeremiah, d. in Newport, 1652. From London. m. 

1 Frances Latham. 

8 I.Clarke, — (Gov.) 2 Walter (s. of above), 1640-1714. m. 2 Hannah Scott, d. 

3 Deliverance m. 4 George Cornell. 

9 II. Clarke, — John, d. in England, 1559. 

9 II. Clarke, — John (s. of above), d. 1598. m. Katharine Cooke. 

9 II. Clarke, — Thomas (s. of above), 1590-1627. m. Rose Kerridge. d. 

2 Mary m. John Peckham. 
10 III. Clarke, — 'Thomas, 1599- 1697, of Roxbury, Boston, and Harwich, m. 
Susan Ring. 



iv. Index of Subjects. 

Page. 

io III. Clarke, — 2 Andrew (s. of above), 1635-1706. m. 2 Mehitable Scotto. 

10 III. Clarke, — 3 Andrew (s. of above), b. 1678. m. 3 Elizabeth Winslow. d. 

4 Hannah m. 5 Jacob Hathaway. 

11 Cooke, — 1 Francis, Mayflower Pilgrim, d. in Plymouth, 1663. m. Esther. 

1 1 Cooke, — 2 John (s. of above), d. Nov. 23, 1695. m. 2 Sarah Warren, d. 3 Sarah 

m. 'Arthur Hathaway. 

12 Cornell, — 'Thomas, b. in England, 1595, of Portsmouth, R. I. m. Rebecca 

Briggs. 
12 Cornell, — 2 Thomas (s. of above), d. 1673. m. Elizabeth Fiscock. 

12 Cornell, — 3 Thomas (s. of above), 1653-1714. m. 2 Susannah Lawton. 

13 Cornell, — 4 Gcorge (s. of above), d. in Portsmouth, 1752. m. 3 Deliverance 

Clarke, family I. 

13 Cornell, — 5 Thomas (s. of above), b. in Newport, 1707. m. Dinah, d. 6 Mary 

m. 5 Joseph Reade. 

14 Cushing, — Thomas, of Hardingham, Norfolk, in time of Edward IV (with 

table). 
14 Cushing, — William (s. of above), d. 1493. m - Emme. 
14 Cushing, — John (s. of above), of the Manor of Flockthorpe. d. 1522. 
14 Cushing, — Thomas (s. of above), of Hardingham. 

14 Cushing, — Peter (s. of above), d. 1615. Of Hingham and London, m. 

Susan Hawes. 

15 Cushing, — 'Matthew (s. of above), 1588-1660, of Hingham, Mass. m. Naz- 

areth Pitcher. 

15 Cushing, — 2 John (s. of above), 1627-1708. m. 2 Sarah Hawke. d. 3 Deborah 

m. 3 Thomas Loring. 
(7 Davids, — 'Christoffel, of Kingston, N. Y. m. Maria Martenssen. 
17 Davids, — 2 Dcbora (d. of above), m. Peter Van Bommel. d. Margaret m. 

3 PIendrik Deyo. 

16 Deyo, — 'Christeyou, Huguenot from Holland, of Hurley, d. 2 Margaret m. 

2 Abraham Du Bois. 

16 Deyo, — z Pierre (s. of above), from Mutterstadt, Holland. m. Agatha 

Nickol. 

17 Deyo, — s Hendrik (s. of above), b. 1690, of New Paltz. m. Margaret Van 

Bommel. 
17 Deyo, — 4 Hendrikus (s. of above), 1730-1805. m. 2 Elizabeth Beem. 

17 Deyo, — 5 Hannah (d. of above), 1761-1849. m. 5 Noah Elting. 

18 Dillingham, — 'Edward, d. 1666. From Leicestershire. With notes of 

family. 

19 Dillingham, — s Benjamin, b. 1739. Of Dartmouth, m. 'Anne Hathaway. 

Vide also page 144. 

19 6 Anne (d. of above) 1769-1853. Of Fair Haven, Mass. m. 6 Joscph Hatha- 
way, thus uniting the two Hathaway families, d. 'Hannah m. 3 Furman 
Whitwell. With notes. 

21 Du Bois, — Chretien, of Wicre, Artois. 

21 Du Bois, — 'Louis (s. of above), 1626-1690. Huguenot. Of Hurley. Foun- 
der of New Paltz. m. 2 Kattryn Blancsan. 

2i Du Bois, — '-'Solomon (s. of above), 1669-1769. m. Tryntje Gcrritse. d, 
8 Magdalene m. 3 Josiah Elting. 



Index of Subjects. V. 

Page. 

22 Du Bois, — 3 Hendricus (s. of above), b. 1710. m. 4 Jannetje Houghtaling. 

d. 4 Dina m. 4 Abraham Elting. 

23 Du Bois, — 2 Abraham (s. of^ouis), 1656-1731. m. 2 Margaret Deyo. d. 

3 Sarah m. 2 Roeloff Elting. 

24 Durfee, — 1 Thomas, 1643-1712. Of Portsmouth, R. I. 

24 Durfee, — 2 Thomas (s. of above), 1669- 1729. m. 3 Anne Freeborn, d. 3 Mar- 

tha m. 4 01iver Reade. 

25 Elting, — Roeloffe, of Switchlaer, Holland, m. Aeltie. 

25 Elting, — 2 Jan (s. of above), b. 1632. m. 2 Jacomyntje Slecht. With table 

of historical comparisons. 
27 Elting,— 2 Roeloffe (s. of above), b. 1678. Of New Paltz. m. 3 Sarah Du Bois. 
27 Elting, — 3 Josiah (s. of above), b. 171 2. m. 3 Magdalene Du Bois. 
27 Elting, — 4 Abraham (s. of above), b. 1763. m. 4 Dinah Du Bois. 

27 Elting,— 5 Noah (s. of above), 1763-1S13. Of Highland, N. Y. m. 5 Han- 

nah Deyo. 

28 Elting, — 6 Jemima (d. of above), 1788-1866. m. 7 David Fowler, d. "Hannah 

m. 7 Eben Warner. 
28 Empson, — Sir Richard, d. Jane m. John Pyncheon. 
28 Fletcher,— \John. d. 1662. Of Wethersfield and Milford, Conn. m. 2 Mary 

Ward. d. 2 Rebecca m. 2 Andrew Warner. 

28 Fletcher, — 1 William. From Yorkshire. Of Chelmsford, Conn. d. 2 Hope 

m. 2 Samuel Stowe. 

29 Fowler, — 1 William. d. 1661. First magistrate of New Haven. 
29 Fowler, — 2 Henry (s. of above), d. in Fairfield, Conn., 1704. 

29 Fowler, — 3 William (s. of above), cl. in Flushing, L. I., 1714. m. Mary 

Thorne. 

30 Fowler, — *John ( s. of above ), 1686-1768. Of Rye and Newburgh, N. Y. 
30 Fowler, — 5 Isaac (s. of above), b. 1722. m. 5 Margaret Theall. 

30 Fowler, — 6 Isaac (s. of above), 1 746-1 821. Lieutenant in the Revolution, m. 

4 Gloriana Merritt. 

31 Fowler, — 7 David ( s. of above ), 1786-1852. m. "Jemima Elting. d. 8 Han- 

nah m. 7 Eben Warner. 

32 Freeborne, — 1 William. 1494-1670. Of Boston and Portsmouth, m. Mary. 

d. 2 Mary m. 1 Clement Weaver. With table. 

33 Freeborne, — 2 Gideon(s. of above), d. 1720. m. 2 Sarah Brownell. d. 

3 Ann m. 2 Thomas Durfee. 
35 French, — ^phraim. d. 1780. Of Raynham, Mass. m. 3 Elizabeth Presbrey. 

35 French, — 2 Enoch (s. of above), 1779-1847. Of Fall River, m. "Sarah Reade. 

36 French, — 3 George (s. of above), 1802-1889. Of Wilmington, N. C. m. 

Sarah Weeks. 
38 French, — 4 Charles ( s. of above). Of Minneapolis, Minn. m. °Anna 

Warner. 
38 French, — 6 Charles Elting (s. of above), b. 1889. 
145 Gaylord, — 'William. 1585-1673. Of Winsor, Conn. 
T45 Gaylord, — 2 Walter (s. of above), d. 1689. m. 2 Sarah Rockwell. 
145 Gaylord, — 3 Eleizur (s. of above), b. 1662. m. Martha Thompson. 
145 Gaylord, — 4 Samuel ( s. of above), b. 1696. Of Middletowu, Conn. m. 
3 Margaret Southmayd. 



vi. Index of Subjects. 

Page. 

45 Gaylord, — 5 Eleazer ( s. of above), d. 1806-7. Of Middletown, Conn. m. 
4 Eunice Gilbert, d. °Mary m. °Ebenezer Warner. 
39 Gibbs, — Robert. 1630-1718. Of Somerset, Mass. 
39 Gibbs, — 2 Robert (s. of above), 1670-1752. 
39 Gibbs, — 3 Henry (s. of above), b. 1726. 

39 Gibbs, — 4 Rhoda (d. of above), 1765-17S9. m. Captain "Sheffield Weaver. 

40 Gilbert, — 'Jonathan. 1618-1682. Of Hartford, Conn. m. '-'Mary White. 
42 Gilbert, — Jonathan (s. of above), 1648-1698. m. 3 Dorothy Stowe. 

42 Gilbert, — 3 Nathaniel (s. of above), b. 16S9. Of Middletown, Conn. m. 
Elizabeth Prout. 

42 Gilbert, — 4 Eunice (d. of above), 1729-1822. m. 5 Elcazer Gaylord (p. 145). 

43 I. Hathaway, — 'Arthur. Of Marshfield, 1643-1710. m. 3 Sarah Cook. 

43 I. Hathaway, — Jonathan (s. of above), b. 1671. d. Sept. 17, 1727. m. Su- 
sanna Pope. Vide page 141. 

43 I. Hathaway, — 3 Gamaliel (s. of above), 1707-1796. m. Anne Cathcart. 

d. Anne m. Captain 5 Benjamin Dillingham. 
142 II. Hathaway, — Nicholas. Of Taunton, 1639. (Not numbered because 
learned of too late.) 

43 II. Hathaway, — 'John (s. of above), 1629-1705. m. Martha. 

44 II. Hathaway, — -John (s. of above), d. 1729. Hannah Burt. 

44 II. Hathaway, — 3 Jacob ( s. of above), b. 1675. Of Assonet, Mass. m. 

3 Phillippe Chase. 

45 II. Hathaway, — -'Joseph (s. of above), b. 1798. m. :! Alice Strange. 

45 II. Hathaway, — 5 Jacob (s. of above), b. 1727, d. Oct. 5, 1792. m. 'Hannah 
Clarke. 

45 II. Hathaway, — 6 Joseph (s. of above), b. 1765, d. July 21, 1817. Of Fair- 
haven, Mass. m. "Anne Dillingham. 

45 II. Hathaway, — 7 Hannah (d. of above), 1795-1867. m. 3 Furman Whitwell. 

46 Hawke, — 'Matthew. 1610-16S4. From Cambridge, Eng. Of Boston, m. 

Margaret, d. 2 Sarah m. 2 John dishing. 
46 Hazard, — 'Thomas. 1610-1680. From Wales. Of Portsmouth, R. I. m. 

Martha, d. 2 Elizabeth m. George Lawton. 
46 Houghtaling, — 'Jan. From Holland, m. Ariantje Van Leyden. 
46 Houghtaling, — WVillem (s. of above), m. Ariantje Simmels. 

46 Houghtaling, — 3 Philjs (s. of above), 16S1- m. Jane Roosa. 

46 Houghtaling, — 4 Jannetje (d. of above), b. 1713. m. 8 Hendricus Du Bois. 

d. 4 Dina m. ''Abraham Elting. 

46 Jacob, — 'Nicholas, d. 1657. Of Watertown, Mass. m. Mary. d. 2 Hannah 

m. 2 Thos. Loring. 

47 Latham, — Lewis. 1555- 1655. Of Elveston, Bedfordshire. 

48 Latham, — 'Frances (d. of above), 1611-1677. From London, m. Governor 

'Jeremiah Clarke, of R. I. 

48 Lawton, — 'George, d. 1693. Of Portsmouth, R. I. m. 8 Elizabeth Hazard. 

d. 2 Susanna m. 3 Thomas Cornell. 

49 Loring, — 'Thomas, d. 1661. From Axminster, Devonshire. m. Jane 

Newton. 



Index of Subjects. vii. 

Page. 

49 Loring, — 2 Thomas (s. of above), 1629-1679. Of Hingham, Mass. m. 
2 Hannah Jacob. 

49 Loring, — 3 Thomas, (s. of above), 1667-1717. Of Duxbury. m. 3 Deborah 

Cushing. d. * Deborah m. 4 Perez Richmond. 

50 Marbury, — William, of Grisby, Lincolnshire, m. Agnes, d. of John Lenton. 

50 Marbury, — Francis (s. of above), 1560-1610. Of Alford and London, m. 

Bridget Dryden. d. Katharine m. * Richard Scott. 

51 Merritt, — 2 George. 1702-1760. Of Newburgh, N. Y. m. 4 Gloriana Purdy. 
51 Merritt, — 3 Caleb (s. of above), 1735-1793. Col. in the Revolution, m. 

5 Martha Purdy. 

51 Molines, — ' William, d. 1621. Mayflower Pilgrim. m. Elizabeth. d. 

2 Priscilla m. 'John Alden. With table. 

52 New-Paltz-on-the-Hudson, — The Founding of. 

53 Ormsby, — Susan, 1 753-1816. m. Williams, d. Susan m. John Weeks. 

54 Pabodie, — 1 John. From St. Albans, Hertfordshire. Of Bridgewater, Mass. 

m. Isabelle. 

54 Pabodie, — 2 William, 1629-1707. Of Duxbury, Mass. m. ^Elizabeth Alden. 

d. :! Elizabeth m. 3 John Rogers. 

55 Paine, — 1 Anthony, d. 1650. Of Portsmouth, R. I. With table. 

55 Paine, — a Mary (d. of above), d. 1687. m - 'John Tripp, d. 2 Isabel m. 

3 Samson Shearman. 
58 Parker, — 'George, 1611-1656. Of Portsmouth, m. Frances, d. 2 Mary m. 
Ichabod Sheffield. 

56 Pearce, — 'Richard, 1620-1678. Of Portsmouth, m. Susanna Wright. 

56 Pearce, — 2 John (s. of above), 1647-1707. Of Tiverton, R. I. m. 2 Ann 

Tallman. d. 3 Mary m. 3 John Reade. d. 3 Anne m. 3 Amos Sheffield. 
With table. 

57 Peckham, — 'John, d. 1681. Of Newport, R. I. m. Mary Clarke (Family II). 
57 Peckham, — 2 John (s. of above), 1645-1712. m. Sarah. 

57 Peckham, — 3 John (s. of above). 1671-1723. m. Mary. 

57 Peckham, — 4 Joseph (s. of above). 1702-1780. Of Little Compton, R. I. m. 

3 Elizabeth Wilbore. d. 5 Hannah m. 3 George Brightman. 
142 Pope, — Seth. b. 1648. d. March 7, 1727. Of Dartmouth, m. Deborah (she 
b. about 1674. d. Feb. 19, 1710-11). Their daughter Susanna (b. 1690. 
d. Feb. 5, 1760), m. Jonathan Hathaway. 
6 Potter, — 'Nathaniel, d. 1644. Of Portsmouth, m. Dorothy. 
6 Potter, — 2 Nathaniel (s. of above). 1637-1704. m. Elizabeth Stokes, d. 
3 Mary m. 2 Samuel Wilbore. 
60 Pray, — Notes on the supposed family of Grace Pray who m. * Joseph Reade. 

58 Presbrey, — 'William. 1690-1771. From London. Of Taunton, m. Hannah 

Smith. 

59 Presbrey, — 2 William. 1720-1765. m. Mary White. d. 3 Elizabeth m. 

3 Ephraim French. 
59 Purdy, — x Francis, d. 1658. From Yorkshire. Of Fairfax, Conn. 
59 Purdy, — 2 Joseph (s. of above), m. Elizabeth Ogden. 
59 Purdy, — 3 Samuel (s. of above), m. Charlotte Strang, d. 4 Gloriana m. 

2 George Merritt. 



viii. Index of Subjects. 

Pbge. 

59 Purdy, — "Francis (s. of 2 Joseph). 1697-1760. Of Newburgh. d. 3 Martha 
m. 3 Caleb Merritt. 
145 Pyncheon, — Nicholas. Sheriff of London, 1532. 
145 Pyncheon, — John (s. of above), d. 1573. Of Writtel, Essex, m. Jane 

Empson. 
145 Pyncheon, — John (s. of above). Of Springfield, Essex. 
[45 Pyncheon, — William (s. of above.) 1 590-1662. Of Springfield, Mass. d. 

Ann m. Henry Smith. 
61 Reade,— Holm. Of Newport, R. I. 

61 Reade, — 2 John (s. of above), d. 1721. Of Freetown, Mass. m. Hannah. 

62 Reade, — 3 John (s. of above), m. 3 Mary Pearce. 

62 Reade, — 4 01iver (s. of above), b. 1701. m. 3 Martha Durfce. d. 5 \Vait m. 

5 Samuel Weaver. 

63 Reade, — 5 Jonathan (s. of above), b. 1737. m. 5 Eunice Weaver, d. "Han- 

nah m. 2 Jamcs Whitwell. 

64 Reade, — Moseph (s. of 3 John). b. 170S. Of Freetown, Mass. m. Grace 

Pray. d. 5 Hannah m. 1 Oliver Whitwell. 

64 Reade, — 5 Joseph (s. of above). 1735-1793. Of Troy, Mass. m. 6 Mary 

Cornell, d. 6 Sarah m. 2 Enoch French. 

65 Richmond, — Edmond. Gentleman. Of Ashton, Keyes, Wiltshire. 

65 Richmond, — 1 John (s. of above), b. 1597. Of Taunton, Newport and 

Little Compton. 

66 Richmond, — 2 Edward (s. of above). 1632-1696. m. Abigail Davis. With 

notes on the family. 

68 Richmond, — 3 Sylvestcr (s. of above). 1672-1754. m. *Elizabeth Rogers. 

69 Richmond, — 4 Perez (s. of above). 1702-1770. Of Wcstport, R. I. m. 

4 Deborah Loring. 

70 Richmond, — 5 Perez (s. of above). 1741-1803. m. 4 Hannah Brightman. 
70 Richmond, — 6 Bradford (s. of above). 1776-1814. m. 7 Mary Weaver. 

70 Richmond, — 'Bradford (s. of above), b. 18 12. m. 4 Anne Whitwell. d. 

3 Anne m. 8 W. P. Warner. 
145 Rockwell, — -'William. From Dorchester, Eng. Of Winsor, Conn. m. 
Susan Capen. d. Sarah m. 2 Waltcr Gaylord. 

71 Rogers, — 1 Thomas, d. 1621. Mayflower Pilgrim. 

71 Rogers, — 2 John. Of Plymouth and Duxbury. m. Frances. 

71 Rogers, — 3 John. d. 1732. Of Boston, m. 3 Elizabeth Pabodie. d. *Eliza- 

beth m. 3 Sylvester Richmond. 

72 Scott, — Richard. Gentleman. Of Glemsford, Suffolk. 

72 Scott, — x Richard (s. of above). 1607-1680. Of Providence, R. I. 111. Kath- 

arine Marbury. d. 2 Hannah m. Gov. 2 Waltcr Clarke. 

73 Scotto, — 'Thomasine. Widow. Of Boston, Mass. 

73 Scotto, — 2 Thomas (s. of above). 1612-1660. m. Joan Sandford. d. 3 Mchit- 

able m. 3 Andrcw Clarke. 

74 Shearman, — Henry. Gentleman, d. 1589. Of Dedham, Suffolk, m. Agnes. 
74 Shearman, — Henry (s. of above), d. 1610. m. Susan Hills. 

74 Shearman, — Samuel (s. of above.) 1573-1615. m. Philis Ward Upscher. 
74 Shearman, — 'Philip (s. of above). 1610-16S7. Secretary of R. I. m. Sarah 
Odding. d. -Thillippc m. 2 Bcnjamin Chase. 



Index of Subjects. ix. 

Page. 

75 Shearman, — 3 Samson (s. of above). 1642-171S. rri. 2 Isabel Tripp, d. 3 Alice 

m. James Strange. (With table.) 

76 Sheffield, — 2 Ichabod. 1626-1712. Of Portsmouth and Newport, m. 2 Mary 

Parker. 
76 Sheffield, — 3 Amos (s. of above.) 1673-1710. Of Tiverton, m. 3 Anne Pearce. 

With table. 
yj Sheffield, — 4 Ruth (d. of above), b. 1704. m. ^Benjamin Weaver. With table. 
78 Slecht, — J Cornells Barentson. Of Woerden, Holland, m. TryntjeTysse Boz. 

78 Slecht,— 2 Jacomyntje. Of Kingston, m. Gerrit Foeken. d. Tryntje m. 

'Solomon Du Bois. m. 2nd, Jan Elting. 
145 Smith, — 1 Henry. Of Wethersfield, Conn. m. 2 Ann Pyncheon. d. 2 Ann 

m. 2 John Allyn. 
145 Southmayd, — 1 William. Of Gloucester, Mass. m. 2 Melicent Addis, 1642. 
145 Southmayd, — 2 William (s. of above). 1643-1702. m. 3 Margarct Allyn. d. 

3 Margaret m. 4 Samuel Gaylord. 

79 Stowe, — ijohn. 1592-1643. From Kent. Of Roxbury, Mass. m. Elizabeth 

Biggs. 
79 Stowe, — 2 Samuel (s. of above). 1622-1704. Of Middletown, Conn, m. 2 Hope 

Fletcher, d. 3 Dorothy m. 2 Jonathan Gilbert. 
90 Tallman, — 1 Peter, d. 1708. Of Portsmouth, m. Ann. d. 2 Mary m. 2 John 

Pearce. (With table.) 
81 Theall, — ''Nicholas, d. 1658. Of Watertown, Mass., and Stamford, Conn. 

m. Elizabeth. 
81 Theall,— 2 Joseph (s. of above), b. 1640. Of Rye, N. Y. 
81 Theall, — 3 Ebenezer (s. of above). 

81 Theall, — 4 Charles (s. of above), d. 5 Margaret m. 5 Isaac Fowler. 

Si Tripp,— 1 John. 1610-1678. Of Portsmouth, R. I. m. 2 Mary Tallman. d. 

2 Isabel m. 3 Samson Shearman. 
87 Ward, — Joyce, widow. Of Clipsham, Rutland Co. d. 1641. d. Mary m. 

'John Fletcher. 
87 Ward, — William (supposed to be son of above), m. Sarah, d. Ann m. 

3 John Warner. 

82 Warner, — John. Of Hatfield, Hertfordshire. 

82 Warner, — 'Andrew (s. of above). 1595-1684. Of Cambridge, and Hadley 
82 Warner, — 2 Andrew (s. of above), d. 1681. m. 2 Rebecca Fletcher. 

82 Warner, — 3 John (s. of above). 1671-1743. Of Middletown, Conn. m. 2 Ann 

Ward. 

83 Warner, — 4 John (s. of above). 1706-1761. m. Mary Wilcox. 

83 Warner, — 5 Hezekiah (s. of above). 1736-1773. m. Lois Penfield. 

84 Warner, — 6 Ebenezer (s. of above). 1768-1849. Of Skaneateles, N. Y. m. 

6 Molly Gaylord. 

85 Warner, — 7 Eben (s. of above). 1801-1853. Of Covington and Nunda, N. Y. 

m. 8 Hannah Fowler. 

85 Warner— «W. P. (s. of above), b. 1838. Of St. Paul, Minn. m. s Anna Rich- 

mond, d. 9 Anna m. 4 Charles E. French. 

86 Warren, — x Richard. Mayflower Pilgrim, m. Elizabeth Jouatt. d. 2 Sarah 

m. 2 John Cooke. With Pedigree. 



x. Index of Subjects. 

Page. 

88 Weaver, — Element. 1585-1683. Of Portsmouth, R. I. m. 2 Mary Freeborne. 

88 Weaver, — 2 Thomas (s. of above), d. 1753. Of Middletown, R. I. m. Mary. 

88 Weaver, — 3 Thomas (s. of above), b. 1664. Of Newport, R. I. m. Mary. 

89 Weaver, — 4 Benjamin (s. of above), 1702-1775. Of Freetown, Mass. m. 4 Ruth 

Sheffield, d. 5 Eunice m. 5 Jonathan Reade. 

90 Weaver, — 5 Samuel (s. of above). Of Somerset, Mass. m. HVait Reade. 

90 Weaver, — 6 Sheffield (s. of above). 1764-1839. m. 4 Rhody Gibbs. 

91 Weaver,- — 7 Mary (d. of above). 178S-1846. m. 6 Bradford Richmond. 

53 Weeks, — John. d. 181 5. From Wales. Of Wilmington, N. C. m. Susan 
Williams, d. Sarah m. 3 George French. 

92 White, — 'John. 1600-1684. Of Hartford and Hadley, Conn. d. 2 Mary 

m. 'Jonathan Gilbert. 

93 Whitwell, — 'Oliver. Of Freetown, Mass. m. 5 Hannah Reade. 

93 Whitwell, — 2 James (s. of above). 1771-1797. m. 6 Hannah Reade. 

94 Whitwell, — 3 Furman (s. of above). 1793-1861. Of Fairhaven, Mass. m. 

7 Hannah Hathaway. 

95 Whitwell, — 4 Anne Elizabeth (d. of above), b. 1816. m. 7 Bradford Perez 

Richmond, d. 8 Anna m. 8 W. P. Warner. 
99 Wilbore, — 'William, d. 1710. Of Portsmouth, R. I. 
99 Wilbor, — 2 Samuel (s. of above), d. 1740. Of Little Compton, R. I. m. 

3 Mary Potter, d. 3 Elizabeth m. 4 Joseph Peckham. 
99 Winslow, — Kenelm. d. 1607. Of Droitwych, on the Salwarpe, England. 

m. Katharine. 
99 Winslow, — Edward (s. of above). 1560-1631. m. Magdalen Ollyver. 

100 Winslow, — 1 Kenelm (s. of above). 1 599-1672. Of Marshfield, Mass. m. 

Eleanor Adams. 

101 Winslow, — 2 Kenelm (s. of above). 1635-1714. OfYarmouth. m. Damaris. 
101 Winslow, — 3 Elizabeth (d. of above), m, 3 Andrew Clarke, of Harwich. 



Volume II. 



Page. 

108 French, — 2 Ephraim, son of Ephraim, p. 35, Family Record. 

109 Lindsay, — 3 Eliza French, d. of 2 Enoch, p. 35, Family Record, 
no French, — 3 Asa Presbrey, s. of 2 Enoch, p. 35, Family Record, 
in French, — 3 Stephen, s. of 2 Enoch, p. 35, Family Record. 

112 French, — 3 Job Borden, s. of 2 Enoch, p. 35, Family Record. 

113 French, — 3 William Barnaby, s. of 2 Enoch, p. 35, Family Record. 

113 French, — 4 William Augustus, s. of 3 Gcorgc, p. 35, Family Record 
in Toms, — 4 Josephine French, d. of 3 Gcorgc, p. 35, Family Record. 

1 12 Derivation of many of the surnames herein mentioned. 

114 A True Pirate Story. Told by 7 B. P. Richmond. 

1 1 5 Story of 7 John Weaver. 

116 Weaver, — "Sheffield, p. 90, Family Record. 

117 Richmond,-- "George Brightman, s. of r Tcrez, p. 70, Family Record. 
117 Richmond, — "George Brightman, Letter of. 



Index of Subjects. xi. 

Page. 

118 Whitcomb, — 'Hannah Richmond, d. of 6 Bradford, p. 70, Family Record. 

118 Fowler, — 8 Elting, son of "David, p. 31, Family Record. 

119 Reade, — 5 Joseph, p. 64, Family Record. 

121 Reade, — 5 WilIiam, son of 4 Joseph, p. 64, Family Record. 

122 Reade, — 8 Samuel N., s. of 'Samuel, p. 119, Family Record. 
122 Reade, — 5 Benjamin, s. of ^Joseph, p. 64, Family Record. 
134 Reade, — 4 John, son of 3 John, p. 62, Partial Record. 

122-3 Hathaway, — 4 Jael, s. of 3 Jacob, p. 44, Family Record. 

125 Hathaway,— 3 Jacob, p. 44, Family Record. 

127 Hathaway, — 6 Joseph, p. 45, Family Record. 

128 Gibbs Family of Somerset, Mass., p. 39. 

129 Revolutionary Records of 3 Caleb Merritt, "Isaac Fowler, and 5 Benjamin 

Dillingham. For latter vide also Addenda at beginning of volume. 

130 Hathaway, — 5 Meletiah, s. of 4 Meletiah, p. 125, grandson of 3 Jacob, p. 44, 

Record. 

130 Hathaway, — Jonathan, s. of 2 Jonathan, p. 43, Family Record. 

130 Whitwell, — 'Oliver, p. 93, Family Record. 

131 Presbrey, — 2 William, p. 59. Records of his nine children. 

131 Richmond Family in Connecticut. 

132 Will of 'Chretien Deyo, p. 16. 
132 Certificate of 2 Pierre Deyo, p. 16. 

132 Mrs. Clement Biddle's Letter regarding Newport in 1824. 

134 Dillingham, — 6 Asa, s. of 5 Benjamin, p. 19, Family Record. 

134 Terry, — c Hannah Dillingham, d. of 5 Benjamin, p. 19, Family Record. 

135 Bragg, — 7 Mary Reade, d. of °Samuel, p. 119, Family Record. 
135 Swift, — 7 Charity Reade, d. of 6 Samuel, p. 119, Family Record. 

135 A Wedding Song of 1799. 

136 A Whaling Voyage, 1851. Verbatim Extracts from Log. 

140 Early Hathaway Records. The Hathaways in Acushnet Cemetery. 

141 Notes on the Hathaway family, with letter from C. A. Hathaway. 

142 The Richmond Burying Ground at Little Compton Commons. 

144 Note on the Dillingham family. 

145 Pedigree of Eleazer Gaylord. 
145 Parentage of Elizabeth Prout. 



ATTENTION. 



Every name in the book is indexed with references to every 
page it occurs on. 

Names in Small Caps in Vol. I designate the direct ances- 
tors of Charles French, Jr. 

Names in Small Caps in Vol. II are thus printed to draw 
attention to the fact that the surname is different from the one 
at the head of the article. 

All the original emigrants to America are numbered I. Their 
children are numbered 2, etc. Thus, the figure 7 preceding a 
name signifies that that individual's ancestors are traced backward 
in the male line six generations. The numbers always show the 
ancestry of the surname, never of the mother's family. 

The only families not traced to the emigrant ancestor are 
those of Oliver Whitwell and Ephraim French. 

Ancestors in England are not numbered, as with research 
they may be continually added to. 

Abbreviations: 
b. — born, 
bp. — baptized. 

d. — died (in a fezv cases, daughter), 
m. — married. 



PREFACE. 



The preface to a work like this is nec- 
essarily of little consequence, but it 
seems to me hardly fitting that I should 
end my labor without saying one word 
to explain how these pages came to be 
in just the form they are, and how they 
came to be at all. 

In the first place I never should have 
gathered together the memoranda from 
which I have written, except that, in 
1893, circumstances altered my life so 
that its ordinary duties were in abeyance 
and I had many lonely hours to be 
passed somehow. It was then that I 
studied genealogies, corresponded, and 
accumulated two large blank books of 
notes, from which the first part of this 
volume was drawn. I had no object 
except to make a genealogical tree for 
my boy which should interest him in 
the past of his family and of his 
country. Of course many others be- 
came interested in my object, and much 
material foreign to my own purpose was 
sent me. Naturally all who had aided in 
collecting were interested in the result, 
and the idea of printing my notes be- 
came familiar to us all. As my first plan 
narrowed the scope of the work to my 
own immediate circle, I added the sec- 
ond part which includes many distantly 
related branches of the same original 
stock. The last half dozen pages should 
really be called an appendix, for they 
contain only notes gathered too late to 
be placed properly. Those regarding 
the Hathaways are invaluable and will 
show my own paucity of information 
when I wrote the sketches in the first 
part. 



What I would like to have especially 
clear to the general reader is that the 
main purpose of this book is a private 
— not a public — one. I wanted to pre- 
serve certain dear names — to commem- 
orate certain lives, and perpetuate in 
other years the memories of generations 
passed away. While I have wholly 
ignored all traditions unless proven true, 
I have carefully preserved all I could 
learn of the real anecdotes and stories 
in the family. There is interwoven 
through these pages all I have been 
told as a child, had written to me as a 
historian, and studied for myself. The 
result is crude, but I have made a great 
effort that it should not be faulty. Such 
faults as there are are entirely my own 
for no one else has even read my manu- 
script. 

Such merit as there may be found 
herein is due to the one who endowed 
me with a goodly portion of his own 
memory, patience and ability to per- 
severe towards one end until it is finally 
accomplished to the worker's satisfac- 
tion; for if either of those three gifts 
had failed me the other two would have 
been useless, and the work must have 
gone undone. 

In conclusion I must speak of the 
great kindness shown me at the Minne- 
sota Historical Society, and of the wide- 
spread interest and assistance given me 
by the family. I hope the result will 
satisfy all. 

I have another hope which I sincerely 
wish to see fulfilled, and that is that 
the reading of these pages may make 
others care for their past and not allow 



XIV. 



Preface. 



America to be behind all the rest of the 
world in pride of birth and care of 
history. 

As I write these lines I sit in a hall 
where three generations of children 
have played, where the chairs have seen 
a century, and the old, old clock ticks 
as it ticked before my grandmother was 
born. As I look about at this dear 



home I feel deeply how great was the 
aim I set myself, and I beg the reader 
to believe that, however imperfectly it 
has been accomplished, the work was 
done with a deep sense of its worth and 
greatness, — an ardent desire to do my 
best. 

Anna R. W. French. 
Nunda, New York. 



CORRECTIONS AND ADDENDA. 



Page 3. For Jorst Jansen read Joost 
Jansen. 

Page 19. The services of Capt. Benj. 
Dillingham appear in the War In- 
dex of Revolutionary Archives of 
Massachusetts thus: 

Feb. 3, 1776. Ordered to be commis- 
sioned in council. Had served as 
captain in Col. Jedediah Hunting- 
ton's Regiment at Roxbury, Dec, 
1775 (vol.43, P- 315)- 

Feb. 27, 1776. Stationed at Winter 
Hill in Col. Jacob French's Regi- 
ment. 

March 26, 1776. Commissioned by 
Governor's Council. Raised from 
Bristol to Cumberland (vol. 43, p. 

IQ3)- 

March 28, 1776. Captain of forces sta- 
tioned at Dartsmouth (vol. 42, p. 

235)- 
Also referred to in vol. 18, p. 186, as 



on pay-role, and vol. 28, p. 13-, 
missioned captain, December 11, 1775. 
Certified to by Wm. Oliver, secretary 
of Massachusetts. 

Page 19. Anne Dillingham d. iSjj. 
Not 1843. 

Page 43. Jonathan Hathaway b. 1671. 
Not 1660. 

Page 45. Lovisa Hathaway m. Samuel 
West. Not Benjamin. 

Page 56. The date of Mary Pearce's 
birth is unknown. 

Page 93. The name of Oliver Whitwell 
appears among a list of men on 
board the Sloop Providence (J. P. 
Rathburne, captain), who have prize 
shares in the Schooner Loyalty, 
etc. Grade Midshipman. (From 
Record Index of the Rev. War 
Arch., Mass., vol. 52, page 84.) 



John Alden. 



ALDEN,— John. 

b. about 1600. 

m. Priscilla, daughter of William 
Molines. 

died Sept. 12, 1689. 
(of Plymouth.) 

I have seen an etching of Southamp- 
ton so exquisite as to be a fitting fron- 
tispiece for Longfellow's lovely Amer- 
ican classic, for it was from that old, 
old sea-port that John Alden sailed 
with the Pilgrims who had stopped 
there to get a cooper to go with the 
ship. 

Southampton at the head of South- 
water, had been noted for its wine trade 
as early as 11 20 and there is no great 
stretch of imagination in fancying the 
young cooper of the Mayflower the 
descendant of a long line of Aldens 
who had made barrels and headed casks 
for five hundred years. 

John Alden accompanied the little 
band of Pilgrims under the express 
stipulation that he should be allowed to 
return if he liked. He never did, how- 
ever, but settled in Duxbury, which 
took its name from the ancestral hall of 
the Standish family. Here, he and the 
sweet Puritan Priscilla lived quietly and 
raised a large family. I doubt if there 
be any couple of early emigrants who 
have had more descendants than these 
two for all America claims relationship 
with them. 

John Alden was interested in nearly 
all the Pilgrim Fathers' real estate ven- 
tures, and deeds bearing his signature 
are numerous. He owned tracts in 
Amherst — now New Bedford, — Plym- 
outh, Duxbury, etc. 

Of all the signers of the Cape Cod 
Compact he was the last to die. 



In regard to the children of John and 
Priscilla Alden there exists some con- 
fusion. Not in regard to the actual in- 
dividuals but because we are not certain 
of their order, and cannot account for 
as many as their cotemporaries award 
them. 

CHILDREN. 

2 Elizabeth, — b. 1645. 

m. William Pabodie. Vide same. 

d. May 3, 1 7 1 7. 
2 John, — b. 1622 (?) 

m. Elizabeth . m. 2, Elizabeth 

(Phillips) Evrill, April 1, 1660. 
2 Jonathan, — b. about 1628. 

m. Abigail Hallet, Dec. 10, 1672. 

d. Feb. 1698. 
2 Joseph,— b. 1624 (?) 

m. Mary Simmons. 

d. Feb. 8, 1697. 
2 David, — m. Mary Southworth. 

d. 1719. 
2 Sarah, — m. Alexander Standish. 
2 Ruth, — m. John Bass, May 12, 1657. 

d. Oct. 12, 1674. 
2 Mary, — m. Thomas Delano. 



Blancsan. 



BLANCSAN— Matthys. 



Matthys— Kattryn. 

BLANCSAN— ? Kattryn. 



This name, so frequently misspelled 
by the English and Dutch scribes of 
His Majesty's Province of New York, 
has come down to us as that of a man 
who gave up all for his faith, and twice 
became an exile before he found security 
for its practice. He was one of that 
vast number of French artisans who 
left their country under the ban of the 
Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, and 
found a temporary shelter in Holland. 
The French government sapped its own 
tree of prosperity in that cruel time 
even as Spain did when she drove forth 
the Moor. Holland however was cle- 
ver enough to see its opportunity, open 
its ports, and still further solidify its 
vast commercial importance. The city 
of Mannheim was founded for, and by 
the French Huguenots, and Leyden, in 
seventeen short years doubled its popu- 
lation of fifty thousand from their ranks. 

It was to the former city that our 
ancestor made his way, and there he 
dwelt for many years. His daughter 
Kattryn was married there in 1655. 
Some five years later the family pre- 
pared to emigrate and seek a permanent 
home in the "Nieu Amsterdam." 
Matthys Blancsan sailed on the "Gilded 
Otter" April 27, 1660, and we next hear 
of him as one of Hurley's earliest 
settlers, where he followed the trade of 
a distiller. He had five children who 
all removed to America with him. One 
of his daughters (Maria) married An- 
thony Krypel, a patentee of New Paltz; 
Elizabeth married Pieter Cornellissen 
Louw, the ancestor of the famous Low 
family. 



Daughter of the preceding, 

m. Louis du Bois, Oct. 10, 1655. 

d. in Hurley about 1709. 
(of Artois, France; Mannheim, Hurley 
and New Paltz.) 

The life of this brave woman is so 
full of romance that it is a constant 
temptation to the writer to fill in the 
imaginary details which would com- 
plete, the strong outlines of fact. One 
can guess the constant fear in which the 
French Huguenots lived after the death 
of Henry IV, and one can easily fancy 
how rumors must have started — spread 
—been dispelled — started again, and so 
on until the actual beginning of the 
Exodus into Holland showed that the 
long feared persecution was really 
commenced. 

The family of Matthys Blancsan 
were neither among the first nor last 
to fly to Holland, but they were part 
of the great throng of refugees, and 
Kattryn's childhood was passed in a 
strange land far from her native Artois. 

The city of Mannheim was founded 
by the Elector Frederick William IV 
of Baden, and from the outset was 
largely inhabited by Huguenots. Here 
Kattryn was raised and here she was 
married in 1655 to another refugee, 
Louis du Bois. He was possibly an 
old friend for he also was of Artois. 
After the marriage the young couple 
continued to live in Mannheim for 
five years. At the end of that time 
they decided to remove to the New 
World. There is no special account 
of their journey extant, but probably, 
like all the Dutch emigrants of the 
period, they went by boat down the 
Rhine to the sea-port and there took 



Blancsan. 



passage on one of the large Dutch 
merchantmen which went continually 
between the Colonies and the Father 
land. It was many weeks before the 
shores of Manhattan Island gladdened 
their eyes. New York was then but a 
collection of small houses clustered 
about a wooden fort on the lower end 
of the island. Can we conceive Kat- 
tryn's feelings as she stepped on land 
again? She was far from everything 
familiar to her and just as far from her 
old home as if the Ocean were Death 
itself. 

The little party tarried but shortly in 
the "Nieu Amsterdam" and then again 
set forth to Esopus. She must have 
been a courageous woman who sat in 
that small sail-boat, holding her two 
little boys close, and watched the grand 
mountain, the wide-flowing water, and 
the solitude and darkness deepening 
together over the Hudson. 

They settled at Hurley where the 
next year a third son was born. In 
June, 1663, when the little Jacob was 
about two years old, Louis du Bois left 
his home one morning to be absent for 
the day. It was a clay ever to be 
remembered as that of the horrible 
massacre at Kingston, and when he 
returned to the raided town - he found 
his wife and boys had been carried off 
captive by the red-handed Mohawks. 

Kattryn and her sons were taken to 
the Indian lodge twenty-six miles south 
of Kingston, and were kept prisoners 
there three months. The heart grows 
faint at the thought of all that she 
must have undergone during those 
weary weeks. She had no means of 
knowing whether her father and her 
husband were alive or not, or what her 
own ultimate fate would be. 



The rescue by Captain Kregier in 
September led to the discovery of the 
great desirability of the lands belong- 
ing to the Mohawk on the Walkill. 
This discovery led to the idea of a 
purely French settlement similar to 
that of the Dutch at Kingston. The 
story of the Founding of New Paltz 
will be found under that name in this 
volume. It is as romantic as the rest 
of Kattryn du Bois' life. 

She removed there with her family 
among the first settlers, and made her 
home with them for ten years. The 
immunity which New Paltz enjoyed 
when the Indians afterwards took the 
war-path is accounted to the treaty 
between savages and French which was 
made when the lands were purchased. 
But may we not look further and attri- 
bute the kindly feelings which existed 
between settlers and natives to that 
long captivity of the wives and child- 
ren, when they were mercifully treated 
and in time to come practiced the 
Golden Rule in return. 

Kattryn du Bois survived her husband 
and died in Hurley about 1709. She 
left seven sons and one daughter. 

CHILDREN. 

Abraham, — Vide Abraham du Bois. 
Isaac, — b. 1659. 

m. Maria Hasbroucq, June 1, 1683. 
Jacob, — Vide Jacob du Bois. 
Sarah, — b. 1664. 

m.-j- or c t -Jansen. J^f^^j/-" 
David, — b. 1667. 

m. Cornelia Vernoy. 
Solomon, — Vide Solomon du Bois. 
Louis, — b 1677. 

m. Rachel Hasbroucq, 1701. 
Matthew, — b. 1679. 

m. Sarah Mattheysen. 



Brightman. 



1 Henry — '- -Joseph — 3 George. 



BRIGHTMAN — 

The Brightman family have been 
prominent in Rhode Island for over 
two hundred years. They are of Eng- 
lish descent and claim a baronial an- 
cestry. 

Henry Brightman was recorded free- 
man in 167 1 and thereafter we find 
frequent mention of him in Newport 
and Portsmouth, he was also one of the 
early land holders in Freetown, Mass., 
and East Greenwich. Of his wife we 
know only the first name, Joan. She 
died in 1716, he in 1728. By his will 
he gave his son William the homestead 
and largest silver tankard. To Thomas, 
the Dartmouth farm, house-lot in New- 
port, yoke of oxen, five cows, sixty 
sheep, and a silver tankard. 

To Joseph, seal ring, half dozen 
spoons, silver cup and porringer, and 
all land in Freetown. 

The sons received other land, and the 
daughters had fifty pounds apiece and 
property beside. Each grand-son was 
handsomely remembered also. 

CHILDREN. 

2 Henry, — m. Elizabeth Lawton, Aug. 

1694, d. childless 1716. 
2 Hester,— m. - - Chandler. 
2 William, — m. Mercy Spun - , Jan. 22, 

1 70S. 
2 Thomas, — in. 

2 Sarah, — m. Hezekiah Hoar. 
2 Joseph, — Vide following. 

BRIGHTMAN,— "Joseph. 

b. 1 69 1. 

m. Susanna she d. 1751. 

d. March 3, 1 753. 
(ol Freetown, Mass.) 

In his will Henry Brightman spoke 
of his special debt to his son Joseph for 
caring for him in his old age, and for 
that reason made him a special bequest. 



Joseph Brightman was well off before 
his father died and left him — for those 
times, — wealthy. In 1717 he had been 
Tax Assessor, and in 1721 was on the 
Grand Jury. 

~p In his will 3 Joseph and •''George were 
named executors, and Henry seems to 
have been dead as he is not mentioned. 
The elder sons were to divide the farm 
occupied by Joseph, and James received 
the homestead, ferry and ferry-boat, and 
"my Great Neck of Land." The widow 
was to reside in the home as long as 
she lived and receive the income from 
all real estate. -j 

CHILDREN. tV*ff 

3 Henry — b. Sept. 19, 1716. Jt^j^.V 
•Joseph,— b. April 26, 1718. ^r^ 1 ^ 
3 George, — Vide the following. *\ r '» < 



3 Elizabeth, — b. July 9, 1730. 

m. Pitts. 

3 James,— b. May 22, 1734. 
3 Susanna, — b. May 14, 1736. 






BRIGHTMAN— George (Captain). 

b. Sept. 16, 1 72 1. 

m. Hannah, daughter of Joseph 
Peckham and Elizabeth Wilbor 1744. 
(she b. Oct. 13, 1728. 

m. 2, Lydia Simmons, daughter of 
Capt. Ambrose Barnaby, Nov. 25, 1775. 

(of Freetown, Mass.) 

In the old records of Little Compton 
we find this sadly mutilated notice, 
"Marriage between Hannah Peckham 
of Little Compton and George — 
of Freetown,— iS. 1744." The 

bride was sixteen and the groom twenty- 
three, when they went to dwell on the 
Brightman farm on Taunton River. 






I U' 



V- 









Brightman. 
* Hannah. 



I have taken the greatest interest in 
tracing out the family of George 
Brightman and his wife for they had 
vanished from the family memories and 
were resurrected from other sources 
with great difficulty and success. It 
was especialy interesting to find that 
the names Bradford and Alanson given 
by Hannah Brightman Richmond to 
her sons were family names to her, 
Alanson being a common first name 
with the Peckhams, and Bradford 
among the Wilbors. 

George Brightman was a wealthy 
farmer and I believe also a boat-builder. 
I know his sons engaged in the latter 
trade. He had a large family and was 
a generous father. When my great- 
great grand-mother, Hannah Bright- 
man, married 5 Perez Richmond of 
Westport, her father sent to England 
for her furniture and silver, much of 
which still remains in different branches 
of the family. 

The following list has been gathered 
from many sources and can hardly be 
perfect. It is presented for correction, 
with no pretense to perfection. 

CHILDREN. 

4 Elizabeth, — m. Caleb Earle, Dec. 6, 

1764. 
4 James, — 
4 Pardon, — 
4 Sarah, — m. Lemuel Taber, May 23, 

1771. 
4 Hannah, — Vide the following: 
4 Samuel, — married and had 5 Betsey, 

wife of John Weaver, Vol. II, and 

Capt. Samuel. Vide "A True Pirate 

Story," Vol. II. 
4 Susanna, — m. Earle Taber, May 23, 

1771. 



BRIGHTMAN— * Hannah. 

born Feb. 25, 1752. 

m. Dr. 5 Perez Richmond. Vide same. 



This lady is represented to the pres- 
ent generation by her silhouette which 
shows a woman of between sixty and 
seventy, in a stately cap with bows, who 
possesses fine and regular features, a 
straight, high forehead, slightly Roman 
nose and a very determined chin. The 
chin did not belie her character as we 
see it in her letters and the stories told 
of her. A letter written in 1825 con- 
tains 1 500 words in a script nearly as 
close as print, and the variety of relig- 
ious sentiments and exhortations is 
equally volumnious and diversified. 

Dr. Perez Richmond only lived long 
enough to have thirteen children and 
then left his widow to raise them. Ten 
grew to maturity and I believe they all 
did her credit in the end. All married 
and had families except the daughters 
Lucia and Elizabeth. The elder of 
these was an especially interesting 
maiden lady who, if the Brightmans 
were baronial and the Richmonds ducal 
in their origin, would have been fully 
equal to the weight of dignity. 

All of Hannah Brightman's family 
attained an advanced age like herself. 
She died in the old homestead at West- 
port where she had lived all her life, 
and left behind her the memories of an 
earnest Christian wife and mother who 
strove to do her duty well. — And did 
it. 



Booth — Bkownei.l — Potter. 



BOOTH— 'John. 

(of Scituatc.) 

John Booth was of Scituate in 1656. 
Afterwards removed, a A'^k ^Jc^inen 

CHILDREN. 

^Elizabeth, — b. Oct. 5, 1657. 

2 Joseph, — b. March 27, 1659; removed 

to Pennsylvania. 
2 John, — b. 1661. m. Mary Dodson, 1687. 
2 Benjamin, — b. July 4, 1667. 
2 Mary, — b. June 6, 1669. m. Abraham 

Barden, Oct. 1697. 
2 Abraham, — b. Feb. 7, 1673. 
/ckt^oii -"Grace, — b. July 4, 1677. Vide Eph- 

raim Pray. 
2 Judith. — b. March 13, 1680. m. Isaac 

Pierce, Jr. d. May 4, 1733. 



BROWNELL. 

BROWNELL,— 1 Thomas. 

b. about 161 5. 

m. Ann She died 1665. 

d. 1665. 

(of Portsmouth, R. I.) 
Thomas Browned first appears as a 

witness to John Walker's will, March 

18, 1647. Three years later he was 

made a freeman, and was Commissioner 

in 1655-61-62-63. 

From Thomas Browned to Charles 

French is eleven generations, thus: 

2 Sarah Browned m. 2 Gideon Freeborn. 

'Ann Freeborn m. 2 Thomas Durfee. 

3 Martha Durfee m. 4 Oliver Reade. 

•'Jonathan Reade m. Eunice Weaver. 

6 Hannah Reade m. 2 James Whitwell. 

■Furman Whitwell in. "Hannah Hatha- 
way. 

'Anne Whitwell m. 'Bradford Rich- 
mond, 
mond. 

8 Anne Richmond 111. W. P. Warner. 
Anne Warner m. Charles French. 
Charles French, Jr. 



CHILDREN. 

2 Mary, — b. 1639, m. Robert Hazard, d. 

Jan. 12, 1739. 
__ 2 Sarah, — m. Gideon Freeborn. Vide 

same. 
2 Martha, — b. May, 1643, m - Jeremiah 

Wait, m. 2nd Charles Dyer, d. Feb., 

1744- 
2 George, — b. 1646, m. Susanna Pcarce, 

Dec. 4, 1673. d. April 20, 1718. 
-William, — m. Sarah Smiton, d. 171 5. 
2 Thomas, — m. Mary Pearce. d. May 18, 

1732. 
2 Robert, — m. Mary - — , d. July 22, 

1728. 
2 Ann, — m. Joseph Wilbor, d. April 2, 

1747- 



POTTER. 

POTTER,— 1 Nathaniel. 

m. Dorothy (she b. 1617, d. Feb. 19, 
1676). 

d. 1644. 
(of England and Portsmouth, R. I.) 

CHILDREN. 

2 Nathaniel, — Vide following. 
2 Ichabod, — m. 2 Martha Hazard, d. 1676. 

POTTER — =Nathaniel. 

b. 1637. 

m. Elizabeth Stokes (she d. 1704). 

d. Oct. 20, 1704. 
(of Portsmouth, R. I.) 

children. 

•"Stoker, — m. Elizabeth , d. 17 18. 

s John, — m. Mary— — , d. 1769. 
:, Nathaniel, — m. 2 Joan Wilbur, d. 1736. 
3 William, — m. Ann Durfee, d. 1720. 



3 Benjamin, — m. Mary 



d. 1709. 



■Samuel, — b. 1675, m. Mary — , d, 1748. 
3 Mary, — m. 2 Samuel Wilbur. Vide same. 
•''Rebecca, — m. Robert Kirby. 
3 Elizabeth, — m. Benj. Tripp, July 31, 

•'Katharine, m. Qiomas Cornell. 

8 Ichabod,- m. Eleanor , d. 1755. 

•'Thomas, m. Susanna Tripp, 1(187, m. 

2nd, Lydia Shearman, 1720, d. 1728. 
8 John,- — b. 1665, m. Sarah Wilson, d. 
' 1715. 

8 Robert, m. Elizabeth, d. 1745. 
Mchabod,— m. Margaret Helm, d. 1730. 



CHASE— * William. 



Chase. 
1 William — ^Benjamin. 

CHASE— 2 Benjamin. 



Born in England ( probably about 
1600). 

m. Mary (about 1620). 
(she died Oct., 1659). 
d. May, 1659. 
(of Roxbury and Yarmouth). 

William Chase came from England 
in 1630, bringing his wife and oldest 
son, William, a boy of eight years. He 
was a carpenter by trade, and settled in 
Roxbury until 1637, when he removed 
to Yarmouth. In 1640 he was censured 
for misbehavior and ordered to leave the 
town within six months. June 6, 1654, 
he was before the council for driving a 
pair of oxen five miles on the lord's 
Day. In 1657 he was chosen one of the 
Surveyors of the Roads of Yarmouth. 

His Will may be found in the Old 
Colony Records. It is dated May 4, 
1659, and leaves one-third of his estate 
to his eldest son, and the rest to Ben- 
jamin. The eldest son was slightly 
feebly minded. 

The widow Mary Chase died so sud- 
denly that an inquest was held over her 
body. 

CHILDREN. 

2 William, — b. about 1622. 

m. 2 Hannah Shearman. 
2 Mary,— b. May, 1637. 

d. about 1653. 
2 Benjamin, — b. about 1639. 

Vide following' column. 



b. in Yarmouth about 1639. 

m. 2 Phillippe, daughter of 'Philip 
Shearman and Sarah Odding. (She was 
born Nov. 1, 1652.) 

d. 1731. 

Benjamin Chase was a cooper, and so 
styled himself in his will, proved July 
1 73 1. Among its provisions is the fol- 
lowing, relating to his daughter 3 Philis 
and her husband, Jacob Hathaway. 

"To daughter, Philip Hathaway, and 
son-in-law, Jacob Hathaway, all my 
land from and adjoining the land that 
my son J. H. bought of my son, Ben- 
jamin Chase, and shall be a quarter 
share in breadth and extending in 
length down to the River always ex- 
cepting three rods square, which is to 
be reserved as a burying ground." 

CHILDREN. 

Mary — 

m. Daniel Grinnel. 
3 Phillippe, — b. July 5, 1679. 

m. 3 Jacob Hathaway. 

Vide Hathaway. 
Benjamin, — born July 15, 1682. 

m. Mary Simmons, June 13, 1703. 
Walter,— b. Nov. 23, 1684. 

m. Deliverance Simmons, Jan. 29, 
1706-7. 
Bathia, — b. Dec. 3, 1686. 

m. Joseph Dunham, June 19, 1706. 
Sarah, — 



Clarke. (I.) 
1 Jeremiah — "Walter. 



CLARKE, — JEREMIAH. 

b. in England. 

m. Mrs. Frances (Latham) Dungan 
about 1638 (she was born 161 1. d. Sept. 
1677). 

d. Jan., 1652. 
(Of London, Eng., and Newport, R. I.) 

We assume that Jeremiah Clarke was 
a Londoner because he married the 
widow of a London man, (vide Frances 
Latham), whom, with her four little 
children, he brought with him to 
America the same year. He was ad- 
mitted an inhabitant of Aquidneck, 

1638, and signed the famous compact at 
Portsmouth the next year. 

That he was a man of prominence is 
amply proved by the following brief 
record of his services: 

1639, Treasurer during absence of Wm. 
Dutch. 

1642, Lieutenant. 
1644, Captain. 

1644-5-6-7, Treasurer of Newport. 
1648, President-Regent acting during 
Governor Coddington's trial. 
The Hon. Jeremiah Clarke died in 
1652, and was buried "in the tomb that 
stands by the street by the water-side in 
Newport" (Friends' Record). 

CHILDREN. 

2 Walter, — Vide the following. 

-Mary, — b. 1641, m.John Cranston, 1658. 

m. 2nd, John Stanton, d. Apr. 7, 171 1. 
2 Jeremiah, — b. 1643, m. Jane Audley. 
2 Latham, — b. 1645, m. Hannah Wilbur. 

m. 2nd, Mrs. Ann Newbury, d. Aug., 

1719. 
2 Weston,— b. Apr. 5, 1648, in. Mary 

Easton. m. 2nd, Rebecca Easton. d. 

1728. 
2 James, — b. 1649, 111. Hope Power, d. 

Dec. 1, 1736. 
2 Sarah, — b. 165 1, m. John Pinner, m. 

2nd, Caleb Carr, d. 1706. 



CLARKE— 2 Walter. 

b. 1640. 

m. Content Greenman, 1660. 
4 m. 2nd, Hannah, daughter of Richard 
Scott and Katharine Marbury (she 
was b. 1642, d. July 24, 1681), 1667. 

m. 3rd, Mrs. Freeborn Hart, daughter 
of Roger Williams, March 6, 1683 (she 
died Jan. 10, 1710). 

m. 4th, Sarah Gould, Aug. 31, 171 1. 

he d. May 23, 1714. 
(Of Newport.) 

Walter Clarke evidently inherited his 
mother's tendency to repeated marry- 
ing. We find mention of him Jan. 30, 
1671, as being allowed ,£1 for taking 
three men to Providence and bringing 
them "down again" in his boat. 

In 1673-4-5 and 169911c was Assistant, 
and in 1676-7-86-96-97 and 1698 Gover- 
nor of R. I. He was Deputy Governor 
from 1679 to 1686 inclusive, and from 
1700 to 1 714 inclusive. Surely this 
shows a degree of popularity and high 
standing almost unrivaled. 

In December, 1686, he was appointed 
a member of the Council of Gov. An- 
dros and summoned to Boston to attend 
the meeting on the 30th. February 27, 
1690, Walter Clarke and Walter New- 
bury read a paper before the Assembly 
disclaiming the present government, 
and a new governor was chosen, namely, 
Henry Bull. June 11, 169S, he deeded 
his son-in-law, Captain Gould, his tene- 
ment houses, slaughter house and yard 
in Newport. 

The second and third wives of Gov. 
Clarke were women of famous ancestry. 
^Hannah Scott was a niece of Ann 
Hutchinson, and a grand-niece of Sir 
P^rasmus Dryden. Through her great- 
grandmother, Elizabeth Cope, she was 



Clarke. (I and II.) 
Jolin — John — Thomas. 



descended from the best blood in Eng- 
land — the same blood which flowed in 
the veins of John Dryden, the poet. 

Freeborn Hart was the daughter of 
Roger Williams, the child whose very 
name echoed forth the spirit and pur- 
pose of her father's life. 

In his old age Gov. Clarke made his 
will, and then re-arranged it to that 
extent that it was almost unreadable. 
After his death the heirs gathered 
together and drew up an agreement 
with regard to the property, a full copy 
of which may be found in the R. I. His- 
torical Magazine. 

The agreement was briefly as follows: 
They gave to their uncles Latham and 
Weston all their father's clothes and 
four dozen silver buttons. To the wid- 
ow, all estate which she brought, and 
also house, bed, horse and cow in New- 
port. To Uncle Weston their father's 
seal, which was engraven with his arms. 
To widow Sarah £\o a year for life with 
the homestead and belongings, except 
such as had already been given away. 

Then the estate is to be divided into 
five parts, and one part to be given to 
the widow. 

This agreement was signed by the 
widow Sarah, by Thomas and Hannah 
Rodman, by Nathaniel and Katharine 
Sheffield, by George and Deliverance 
Cornell, and by Jeremiah Gould, son of 
Mary Chapman, deceased. 

From this it will appear that four of 
Walter Clarke's seven children died 
before him. 

CHILDREN. 

3 Mary — b. Jan. n, 1661, m. Daniel 

Gould, m. 2nd, Ralph Chapman, d. 

Aug. 10, 171 1. 
3 Frances, — b. Jan. 17, 1663. 
3 Content, — 
3 Hannah,— b. Oct. 28, 1667. m. Thos. 

Rodman, Nov. 26, 1691. d. Oct. 22, 

I73I- 



3 Katharine, — b. Sept. 6, 1671. m. 1st, 
James Gould, m. 2nd, 3 Nathaniel, 
son of 2 Ichabod Sheffield, d. Jan. 25, 
1752. 
3 Jeremiah, — b. Feb. 21, 1675. 
# 3 Deliverance, — b. July 4, 1678. m. 
4 George Cornell. Vide Cornell. 



CLARKE, John. 

(Probably of Suffolk Co., England.) 
buried March 3, 1559. Had sons John, 

bapt. Feb. n, 154 , and Thomas. 



CLARKE,— John. 

m. Katharine, daughter of John 
Cooke (she bapt. Feb. 12, 1 54 1 , buried 
March 30, 1598). 

buried April 7, 1598. 

Had John, Thomas, Carew, Pasor, 
John, Margret, and Mary. 

CLARKE, — Thomas. 

b. Oct. 31, 1590. 

m. Rose Kerridge (she d. Sept. 19, 
1627). 

d. July 29, 1627. 

children. 

Margret, — bapt. Feb. 1, 1600. 

Carew, — bapt. Feb. 3, 1602. 

Thomas, — bapt. March 31, 1605. 

Mary, — bapt. July 17, 1607. m. x John 
Peckham. Vide Peckham. 

John, — b. Oct. 8, 1609, d. Apr. 20, 1676. 

William, — bapt. Feb. II, 161 1. 

Joseph, — bapt. Dec. 16, 1618, d. June I, 
1694. Joseph Clarke had a daughter 
who married her cousin William 
Peckham. His son Joseph married 
the widow of his cousin Thomas 
Peckham. 
The wife of Carew Clarke died in 

Ruffum, Suffolk Co., from which we 

may infer it was the family home. 

No family connection is known between 

these and the preceding Clarkes. 



10 



Clarke. (III.) 
1 Thomas — *A ?idrew — z A?idrezu. 



CLARKE— i Thomas. 

b. in England, 1599. 

m. 2 Susan, daughter of the widow 
1 Maiy Ring, about 1634. 

m. 2, Mrs. Alice Nichols, daughter of 
Robert Hallet of Boston. 

d. March 24, 1697. 
(Of Plymouth, Boston and Harwich.) 

Thomas Clarke was born the same 
year as Oliver Cromwell. He came to 
America on the "Ann" in July, 1623, 
bringing cattle and other property with 
him, and was allotted land on the Eel 
River at Chiltonville. 

He married in Plymouth and all his 
children but John were certainly by his 
first wife. Later he removed to Boston 
where he lived in the vicinity of Scotto's 
Lane, owning and occupying the house 
he afterwards gave his son Andrew. In 
1654 he was one of a committee to 
secure means to fit out an expedition 
ordered by the Lord Protector. 

Still later in life he removed to Har- 
wich, where he died. His tombstone is 
the 'oldest on Burial Hill, and his mug 
and leather wallet can be seen in Fore- 
fathers' Hall. 

CHILDREN. 

2 Andrew, — Vide next article. 
2 James, — m. Abigail Lothrop. 
2 William, — m. Sarah Woolcot. 
2 Susanna, — b. 1641. 

m. Barnabas Lothrop, Nov. 3, 1658. 

d. Sept. 28, 1697. 
2 Nathaniel, — b. 1643. 

m. Dorothy Lcttice Gray. 

d. Jan. 31, 1717. 
2 John, — m. Mary Benjamin, Aug. 16, 

1695. 

d. Aug. 16, 1705. 



CLARKE— 2 Andre\v. 

b. about 163 V 

m. 3 Mehitable, daughter of 2 Thomas 
Scott and Joan Sandford, 1671. 

d. 1706. 
(of Harwich.) 

Andrew Clarke was a shoe-maker, 
and after his marriage received from 
his father the latter's Boston house, 
" which house and ground is by the 
street that goeth from the mill-bridge 
to Charles River." He was also Assis- 
tant Counsellor and several times 
Representative to the General Court. 
Later in life he removed to Harwich. 

children. 

3 Thomas, — b. July 10, 1672. d. 1759. 
3 Susanna, — b. March 12, 1674. 
3 Andre\v, — Vide next article. 
3 Scotto — b. 1680. 
3 Nathaniel, — m. Abigail Hedge. 
3 Mehitable— b. Dec. 8, 1684. 



CLARKE— 3 Andrew. 

b. 1678. 

m. 3 Elizabeth, daughter of 2 Kenelm 
and Damaris Winslow, Aug. 9, 171 1. 

d. 
(of Harwich.) 

children. 

♦Mehitable — b. Aug. 29, 171 2. 
4 Elizabeth,— b. May 25, 1714. 
♦Elizabeth — b. Jan. 18, 1716. 
♦Thankful— b. Nov. 18, 1721. 
♦Eunice, — b. Oct. 28, 1724. m. Samuel 

Foster, 1745. 
♦Hannah,— b. Jan. 13, 1726. m. "'Jacob 

Hathaway. Vide Hathaway. 



Cooke. 



ii 



1 Francis — -Jolin. 



COOKE— i Francis. 

b. probably in England. 

m. Esther. 

d. April 7, 1663. 
(Of Plymouth.) 

Francis Cooke (Pilgrim) was among 
those who left England about the end 
of the sixteenth century and settled in 
the Netherlands. There he married a 
girl of French parentage and a member 
of the Walloon Church. He was prob- 
ably a resident of Leyden, as he must 
have been an acquaintance of Gov. 
Bradford and Edward Winslow to have 
become one of the sharers in the peril- 
ous Mayflower voyage. He was ac- 
companied by his eldest son, John, and 
it was not until three years later that 
his wife and his other children joined 
him. They arrived on the "Ann" in 
1623. 

Bradford, in 1650, calls Francis Cooke 
a very old man who had great-grand- 
children; he was not so old however 
but that twelve years later he was 
among the first purchasers of Middle- 



borough. 



CHILDREN. 



" 2 John, — Vide next column. 

2 Jacob, — m. Damaris Hopkins, m. 2d, 

Mrs. Elizabeth Shurtleff. d. 1676. 
2 Jane, — m. Experience Mitchell, 1628. 

d. 
2 Esther, — m. Nov., 1644, Richard 

Wright, d. 
2 Mary, — m. John Thomson, Dec. 26, 

1645. d. March 21, 1715. 



COOKE— 2 John. 

b. in Holland. 

m. Sarah, daughter of Richard War- 
ren and Elizabeth Juatt, March 28, 
1634. 
(Of Plymouth and Dartmouth.) 

John Cooke was a passenger on the 
Mayflower with his father, and in 1634 
was old enough to be taxed equally 
with him. The same year he married 
Sarah Warren, the daughter of a fellow- 
pilgrim. 

He was a deacon of the Plymouth 
Church, but on account of dissension 
removed to Dartmouth, of which he 
and his father were two of the first pur- 
chasers (1652). There he was chosen 
representative in 1673, and was minister 
in 1676. 

He was living in 1694, the last surviv- 
ing male passenger of the Mayflower. 

children. 
2 Sarah, — born about 1635. m. Arthur 

Hathaway, Nov. 20, 1652. Vide 

Hathaway. 
2 Elizabeth, — m. Daniel Wilcox, Nov. 

28, 1661. d. 
2 Esther, — b. Aug. 16, 1650. 

m. 

d. 
2 Mercy, — b. July 25, 1654. 

m. 

d. 
8 Mary,— b. 1657. 

m. 

d. 



12 



Cornell. 



1 Thomas — "Thomas — 3 Thomas. 



i* 

« 



? 



s 






vs 



Ni V 



^ 



3 



CORNJXL,- g^s-g^ °^*£^/ 

The name of this English family is 
derived from "Cornwall," and signified 
originally a Cornwall, or Cornish, man. 
The baronial family of the name trace 
their descent to Richard, Earl of Corn- 
wall and son of King John. 

The first Cornell in America was 
Thomas, born in Hertford in hoc. He. 
married Rebecca Briggs A and in •iojo- 
emigrated to Boston. Sept. 6, 1638, he 
was licensed to keep an inn in that 
town, and June 4, 1639, was fined for 
several offenses, the most heinous being 
that he had sold beer at 2d. a quart. On 
June 6th, his fine was reduced £10, and 
he was given one month to sell off his 
beer. 

In 1641, Thomas Cornell removed to 
Rhode Island, and had land granted 
him in Portsmouth. He was admitted 
free-man March 16, of the same year. 
In 1642, he again changed his place of 
habitation, going to the New Nether- 
lands, where Gov. Kieft made him a 
grant in Westchester Co. of that tract_ 
since known as "Cornell's Neck.^^JJ^ 

He afterwards returned to R. I., where 
he died, and was buried on the old Cor- 
nell farm. His wife died Feb. 8, 1673. \ 



2 Thomas, 



CHILDREN. 

-Vide followim 



f~ 






S3 

1 



X 



SI 

1 



2 Sarah— m. Thos. WilletTf643. m - Chas. 

Bridges, 1647.4*7.} -W* 4 "^ f <M* «■? }^> 
2 Rebecca, — m. George Woolsey, 1647. 
2 Ann(?), — m. Thomas Kent. 
2 Richard, — b. 1630. m. Elizabeth 

d. 1694. 
2 John, — b. about 1637. m. Mary Russell. 
2 Joshua, — 

2 Samuel, — m. Deborah, cf r-fM' Jo* mx^ 
2 William — 
2 Elizabeth, — m. Christopher Almy, July 

9, 1661. d. 1 70S. 
2 Mary, — 



CORNELL,— 2 Thomas. 

b. in Hertford, Eng. 

m. Elizabeth Fiscock, Nov. 2d, 
1642. 

m. Sarah, daughter of Ralph and Joan 
Earle (she died 1690). 

d. May 23, 1673. 
(Of New Amsterdam and Dartmouth.) 

The Dutch Colonial Records give the 
first marriage of Thomas Cornell, Jr., 
calling the bride a native of Plymouth, 
Eng. They seem to have lived in the 
Dutch settlement many years after the 
elder Cornell had returned to Rhode 
Island. In 1667 there are records of 
Thomas Cornell's having a bill before 
the assembly regarding a military troop 
of horse. 

The question as to which children 
were by which wife is authoritatively 
settled by the order of the court which 
gave one half of the estate to the widow 
Sarah and her three children, and the 
other half to the other four children. 
The estate inventoried at £77, 19s. 6d. 
real and personal property in Dart- 
mouth. 

CHILDREN. 

3 Elizabeth, — bapt. Jan. 12, 1644. 

3 Thomas, — b. 1653. Vide following. 

3 Edward,—* "\>f ^y*^ "l "t^x>\^^> 

3 Samuel, — 

3 Steven,— * 't/l >V><>«*3- A ,£ 7J *"- W^'>W»s, 

8 Sarah, — 

:i Innocent,- 



/luu* &*>*»<( ****** ■<" 

CORNELL, 8 Thomas. 

b. 1 653.-1 

m. Susannah, daughter of George 
and Elizabeth Lawton (she d. Dec. 9, 

1712); ^ 

d. Oct. iiX [714. 
(Of Rhode Island.) 



-"VirU, Xy^ (UrUt 'WA^^aJ'^ 



Cornell. 
4 George — 5 Thomas. 



13 



3 Thomas Cornell left two sons, 

n jyylWft^ 4 1 nomas' and 4 George. I believe Tho- 

A i7^t^3 mas ' s tne same that married 3 Martha 

' Freeborn, but am not certain. \ %,\juubJk 

CORNELL— "George. 

b. 

m. Philadelphia Eustis, of Salem, 
March 19, 1695. m - 2 d, Deliverance, 
daughter of a Walter Clarke and a Han- 
nah Scott, Jan. 18, 1699 (she b. July 
4, 1678; d. Oct. 8, 1732). m. 3d, Abi- 
gail. 

d. March 13, 1752. 
(Of Portsmouth.) 

George Cornell and Deliverance 
Clarke were married by Gov. Cranston 
in 1699. 

They had a numerous family, and in 
searching for their individual records I 
have discovered a curious mistake in 
print regarding the births and marriages 
of this particular family. The original 
records all read "5 mo." or whatever the 
date may be, and are in the old style. 
Some early transcriber has written them 
out in the new style, making every date 
two months too soon. 

CHILDREN. 

C^" f ' v v^Ruth, — b. Feb. 12, 1697. m - Joseph 
Brownell, Jan. 5, 1717. (He was the 
brother of Susannah, the second wife 
of 3 John Reade.) 
/s Walter, — b. Dec. 24, 1700. m. Mary 
Nicolls, April 19, 1726. d. July 4, 

.1 l ^77- 
•>ify 5 Philadelphia, — b. Nov. 23, 1702. m. 

L^/ Thomas Cooke, March 30, 1722. 

5 George, — b. July 25, 1705. m. Rebecca 

Hicks, March 18, 1738. 
5 Thomas, — b. Sept. 6, 1707. Vide fol- 
lowing. 
5 Richard, — b. June 14, 1709. m. Mary 
Martin, Dec. 30, 1730. 



5 Job, — b. Feb. 6, . d. in infancy. 
5 Susanna, — b. May 29, 1712. m. William 

Brightman, Dec. 21, 1738. 
5 Clarke, — b. July 23, 1714. m. Priscilla 

Lawton, Oct. 2d, 1735. 
5 Joseph,— b. March 19, 1716. d. Sept. 

12, 1732. 

5 Benjamin, — b. June 28, 1720. d. Sept. 

25- 1732. _ _ 

5 Benjamin,-^n<.<J'7 5*~ tl*y4*a \ A >u^cT^^ % ' 

5 Sarah,^^» ?'tf^- .^Xu'ku.UlVN'^ 
5 Job, — 0. fu^iKn*!-* 

CORNELL,— "Thomas. 

b. Sept. 6,^707. , i lttrvUl ^ vOW 

m. Dinah 4-t^xxa^'{ she was born 1707, jf'fcC 

d. 1808, aged 101 years). 



nff 



) 



(Of Newport, R...I.) 

Thomas and Dinah Cornell were the 
parents of 6 Mary, who was married to 
5 Joseph Reade in Newport by the Rev. 
Nicolas Eyres, Dec. 5, 1754. Mrs. 
Dinah Cornell lived to the great age of 
one hundred and one years, dying in 
Troy (Fall River). She was distinctly 
remembered by the eldest son of her 
youngest grand-daughter, 6 Sarah Reade 
French. 

Mary Cornell and her husband Joseph 
Reade lived in the house afterward 
occupied by Enoch French. It was 
situate on the bank of Taunton River, 
and was finally torn down some twenty 
years since. 

Deacon French occupied it until 
after the death of his mother-in-law, 
when he built the house in town which 
was destroyed in the fire of 1843. 

I would be very grateful to anyone 
who could send me additional facts re- 
garding 5 Thomas Cornell or his wife. 

He was possibly born in the old 
Cornell homestead, for George Cornell 
lived there some years. 



^JjJlJi iUjfeMtf^f'***^ 



14 



Gushing. 
Thomas — William — John — Thomas — Peter. 



CUSHING. 

The Cushing family is one of some 
note and antiquity in England. A 
Family Genealogy of the American 
branch gives much of interest regarding 
the name, origin, arms, etc. 

The first recorded member of the 
family is — 

Thomas Cushing, of Hardingham Co., 
Norfolk. There is still extant a deed 
dated 1466 (time of Edward IV), in 
which he and his son William are 
mentioned. 

William Cushing, — married Emme, by 
whom he had sons, John, Robert, 
Thomas, and John, Jr; and daughters, 
Elyne, Ammable, and Agnes. Wil- 
liam Cushing's will was proven in the 
Bishop's Court at Norwich, March 
11, 1493. His wife's will (proven 
1507) styles each of her sons "gen- 
tleman." 

John Cushing, — of the Manor of Flock- 
thorpe in Hardingham. Will proven 
1522, naming children, John, Thomas, 
William, Margaret, Isabel, Margery. 
The eldest, John, was Lord of three 
Manors, and bore in 1653 the arms 
graven on the Cushing tomb in Bos- 
ton. 

Thomas Cushing, — second son of above. 
Inherited the house in Hardingham in 
which he lived. Left children, John, 
Nicholas, Edward, Stephen, Peter, 
and Ursula. 



Peter Cushing, — m. Susan Hawes, 
June 2, 1583. d. March, 1615. She 
d. 164 1. He held large estates in 
Lombard Street, London. Removed 
to Hingham in 1600. 

CHILDREN. 

Theophilus, — bapt. Nov. 4, 1584. Sailed 

in the "Griffin" with Gov. Haynes in 

1633. d. childless, March 24, 167S. 
Bridget, — bapt. Feb. 19, 1586. 

d. 
1 Matthew, — bapt. March 2, 1589. Vide 

next page. 
William, — bapt. April I, 1593. 

d. 
Barbara, — bapt. June 16, 1596. 

d. 
Thomas, — bapt. May 15, 1603. 

d. 



The Cushing family is one of the 
most prominent in New England, and 
has numbered many distinguished men 
among its descendants. The Rich- 
monds in this volume from the fourth 
generation down are descended from 
Peter Cushing, thus: 
1 Matthew Cushing m. Nazareth Pitch- 
er. 
2 Iohn Cushing m. 2 Sarah Hawke. 
3 Deborah Cushing m. 3 Thomas Loring. 
4 Deborah Loring m. 4 Perez Richmond. 
5 Pcyez Richmond m. 4 Hannah Bright- 
man. 
6 Bradford Richmond m. Man- Wea- 
ver. 
'Bradford Richmond m. 4 Anne Whit- 
well. 
8 Anne Elizabeth Richmond b. 1842. 



CUSHING. 

1 Matthew— 2 John. 



15 



CUSHING— 1 Matthew. 

b. in Hardingham the year of the 
Spanish Armada (1588), married Naza- 
reth, daughter of Henry Pitcher, Aug. 
5, 1613. (She was born about 1586; 
died 1681.) 

d. Sept. 30, 1660. 
(of Hardingham and Hingham, Eng- 
land, and Hingham, New England.) 

Matthew Cushing followed his elder 
brother to the New World in 1638. He, 
with wife, five children, and his wid- 
owed sister-in-law Frances (Pitcher) 
Riecroft, sailed from Ipswich on the 
"Diligent" in the summer of the year. 
The little vessel of 350 tons burden 
landed her six score passengers safely 
in Boston, Aug. 10, 1638. The Cushing 
family went at once to Hingham where 
the father received a grant of land and 
settled for life. In his will all his 
children are named as living except 
Deborah. 

CHILDREN. 

2 David, — bapt. April 20, 1619 (inEng). 
m. Lydia Gilman, June 10, 1645. m. 
2d, '-Elizabeth (Jacob) Thaxter, 
March 9, 1691. d. Dec. 3, 1700. 

2 Jeremiah, — bapt. Jan. 21, 162 1, m. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Wilkie. 

2 Matthew, — bapt. April 5, 1623. m. 
Sarah Jacob, Jan. 25, 1653. 

2 Deborah, — bapt. Feb. 17, 1624. m. 
Matthew Briggs, May 1648. 

2 John, — b. 1627. Vide following ar- 
ticle. 



CUSHING— John. 

b. in Hingham, England, 1627. m. 
Sarah, daughter of Matthew and Mar- 
gret Hawke, 1657 (she was born in 
1641, died 1679). 

d. March 31, 1708. 
(Of Hingham Co., Norfolk, and Scituate 

and Hingham, Mass.) 

John Cushing's name is generally 
preceded by the title "Honored," for 
he was colonel of the Plymouth Regi- 
ment and representative for many ex- 
tended periods. His wife was a 
daughter of that Matthew Hawke who 
was fellow-passenger to the Cushings 
on the "Diligent." 

CHILDREN. 

3 John — b. April 28, 1662. m. 3 De- 
borah Loring, May 20, 1687. 
d. January 19, 1738. 

3 Thomas, — b. Dec. 26, 1663. m. De- 
bora Thaxter, Oct. 17, 1687. 

3 Matthew, — b. Feb. 23, 1665. m. De- 
borah Jacob, 1689. 

3 Jeremiah, — b. July 13, 1666. m. Judith 
Parmenter, April 12, 1693. 

3 James, — b. Jan. 27, 1668. 

3 Joshua, — b. Aug. 27, 1670. 

3 Sarah, — b. Aug. 26, 1671. 

3 Caleb, — b. Jan. 6, 1673. m. Elizabeth 
Cotton, March 14, 1698. 

3 Deborah, — b. Sept. 14, 1674. m. 
3 Thomas Loring, 1699. Vide Loring. 

3 Mary, — b. Sept. 14, 1674. d. 

3 Joseph, — b. Sept. 23, 1677. m. Mary 
Pickels, Jan. 1, 1710. 

8 Benjamin, — Feb. 4, 1679. d. 



i6 



Deyo. 



1 Christeyou — 2 Pierre. 



DEYO— DOYAU— DOIOI — DOYOE 
— * Christeyou. 

A French Huguenot who, after a 
residence in the Palatinate, emigrated 
to America in 1675. The account of 
his journey appears in the narrative 
written by Abraham Hasbrouck regard- 
ing his grandfather's emigration. 

"Abraham Hasbroucq he was a native 
of France, of the town of Calais, and, 
finding the troubles and persecution 
and oppression coming on the Protes- 
tants in France (it being before the 
revocation of the Edict of Nantes), his 
father moved out of France with his 
two sons, Jean and Abraham, and a 
daughter, Catharine, into Germany in the 
Palatinate. .. .and there lived several 
years. In 1675, Abraham Hasbroucq 
undertook to come to America. . . . He, 
in company with several of his acquain- 
tances, all descendants or followers of 
Peter Walden, and they came from the 
Palatinate and went to Rotterdam and 
from thence to Amsterdam, and they 
embarked to England in April, 1675, 
and from England they sailed to Amer- 
ica and arrived in the town of Boston, 
and from Boston they sailed to New 
York and from New York to Esopus, 
Ulster County, and arrived there in 
July, 1675.... and the next year after 
he married in Hurley town to a young 
woman named Marie Doyau, the daugh- 
ter of one Christian Doyau with whom 
he had been acquainted in the Palatin- 
ate, and who was one of the passengers 
who came over with him to America." 

Christeyou, or Christian, Deyo, was 
an older man than the other patentees 
of New Paltz, as is evidenced by his 
four daughters all marrying patentees. 
I am told that he was called "Grand- 
pe re'' a title which almost all the third 
generation in New Paltz owed him 



naturally. Although Marie Deyo is 
called "a native of the Palatinate," I 
think it must refer merely to her place 
of birth, for the original of Deyo, "De 
Jou," is too clearly French to admit of 
argument. 

CHILDREN. 

2 Anna, — b. 1644. m. Jean Hasbroucq. 
Emigrated May, 1672. d. May 5, 
1694. 

2 Pierre, — Vide following. 

2 Maria, — b. 1653, m. Abraham Has- 
broucq, Nov. 17, 1676. d. March 27, 
1741. 

2 Elizabeth, — m. Simon Le Fever, 1678. 
m. 2nd Moses Quantine (Cantine). 

2 Margaret, — m. 2 Abraham du Bo is. 
Vide du Bois. 



DEYO— 2 Pierre. 

b. between 1646 and 1650. m. Agatha 
Nickol (Niecel), d. — . 
(Of Mutterstadt, Hurley and New Paltz.) 

Pierre Deyo emigrated with his father 
in 1675. He brought with him a certi- 
ficate from Jacob Amyot, dated at Mut- 
terstadt, Jan. 31, 1675, and stating that 
Pierre Doyou and his wife Agatha 
Niekel were regularly married, etc. 
(vide p. 132). Pierre Deyo was one of 
the twelve patentees of New Paltz. 

CHILDREN. 

3 Christian, — b. 1674. m. Mary Le 
Conte (or "de Graff") Feb. 20, 1702. 

3 Abraham, — b. Oct. 16, 1676. m. Elsie 
Clearwater. 

3 Mary, — bp. Apr. 20, 1679. d. young. 

3 Pieter, — bp. Oct. 14, 1683. d. young. 

3 Mary, — bp. Oct. 14, 1683. d. young. 

8 Maddelen— bp. Apr. 16, 1689. 

3 Henry, — bp. Oct. 12, 1690. Vide the 
following. 



Deyo, — Davids, — Beem. 



17 



DEYO— 3 Hendrik. 

bapt. at New Paltz, Oct. 12, 1690. 

m. Dec. 31, 171 5, to Margaret, daugh- 
ter of Peter Van Bojnmel and Debora 
Davids. (She bp. 23, 1693.) 

d. 

(Of New Paltz.) 

CHILDREN. 

4 Debora, — bp. at Kingston, Jan. 27,1717. 
m. Petrus Ostrander Feb. 19, 1749. 

4 Pieter, — bp. Nov. 9, 171S. m. Elizabeth 
Helm, Jan. 25, 1745. 

4 Benjamin, — bp. May 30, 1725. m. Jan- 
nek VanVliet Nov. 10, 1 75 1 . 

4 Johannes, — b. Nov. 6, 1726. m. Sarah 
Van Waganen Nov. 20, 1756. 

4 Christoffel, — bp. Feb. 4, 1728. m. De- 
bora Van Vliet. 

4 Haggeta, — bp. Oct. 19, 1729, m. Jo- 
hannes Freer May 5, 1749. 

4 Hendrik, — Vide the following. 

4 Sarah, — bp. Sept. 16, 1733. m. Isaac 
Van Wagenen. 

4 David, — bp. Jan. 9, 1737. 



DEYO,— s Annetje, or Hannah. 

b. May 17, 1762, bapt. Oct. 27, 1762. 
m. Noah Eltinp-. Vide Elting. 



DEYO, — 4 Hendricus. 

bp. 1730-31. 

m. Oct. 13, 1753, to Elizabeth, 
daughter of Albert Beem and Elizabeth 
Peesharen (she b. 1729, d. May 4, 1818). 

d. Dec. 14, 1805. 
(Of New Paltz.) 

children. 

5 Hendricus, — bp. June 16, 1754. m. 

Phoebe Woolsey and had 6 Henry 

who m. Elizabeth Bevier. 
5 Mary, — bp. July 11,1756. * 
5 Rebecca,— bp. April 16, 1758. 
5 Maria, — bp. Sept. 7, 1760. 
5 Annetje, — Vide the following. 
5 Joseph, — bp. Sept. 1, 1765. 



Hannah Deyo Elting became the 
mother of Jemima, who married David 
Fowler of Newburgh, and through her 
the great-great-great grandmother of 
Charles Elting French. Vide Fowler. 

She was also the mother of 6 Abra- 
ham Elting who m. Elizabeth Ransom 
and had Phoebe Ann, who married De 
Witt Hasbrouck Oct. 1, 1831. Their 
son Abraham m. Elizabeth, daughter of 
6 Henry Deyo and Elizabeth Bevier. 
It is to the son of the latter couple, Mr. 
Alvah D. Hasbrouck, that I am in- 
debted for this line of Deyo ancestry. 



DAVIDS— Debora. 

The Kingston church records give 
the baptism of Debora Davids on Jan. 
25, 1665. She was the daughter of 
Christoffel Davids and Maria Mar- 
tenssen. The date of her marriage to 
Peter Van Bommel is not given. 



BEEM, — Elizabeth. 

b. 1729-30, d. May 4, 1S1S. 

m. 4 Hendricus Deyo Oct. 13, 1753. 

Elizabeth Beem was the daughter of 
Albert Beem and Margrietjen Bees- 
aren, or Peesharen. They were both 
born in Hoogduytsland, Germany, and 
resided in Kingston in 1721. Their 
bans were published Aug. 13 of that 
year, and on the 23d they were "con- 
firmed in the state of matrimony." 



i8 



Dillingham. 



DILLINGHAM,— * Edward. 

Of Bitteswell, Co. Kent, Leicester- 
shire. 

m. Drusilla (she d. Feb. 6, 1656). 

d. 1666. 
(Of Lynn and Sandwich, Mass.) 

One of the earliest comers to Lynn 
was Edward Dillingham, Gentleman, 
who bore arms, and brought over con- 
siderable money to invest for his 
friends in Bitteswell. In 1637, he be- 
came one of the 10 original settlers of 
the town of Sandwich. In 1647 an( I 
1648 we find him one of those to inven- 
tory the property of James Holloway 
and George Knot. In 1657, he was 
arrested and admonished for sympa- 
thizing with the Quakers. He left two 
sons, his only daughter having pre-de- 
ceased him in 1650. 

The purpose of this page is to pre- 
sent an array of possible fathers for 
5 Benjamin Dillingham born in Berkley 
in 1739, and certainly the fourth gene- 
ration from this first Edward. As Ben- 
jamin Dillingham settled in Dartmouth 
I shall give the families in Harwich and 
Sandwich separately, leaving the reader 
to do his own supposing. 



'Benjamin Dillingham might have 
been the son of either 4 John or 4 Ed- 
ward. He named sons for each, and 
his son Edward married back into the 

Nye family. 



2 Henry Dillingham, son of 1 Edward, 
was born about 1627. He had eight 
children, of whom only the names of 

3 Dorcas, who married Ralph Earle in 
1692, and 3 Edward have been pre- 
served. 

3 Edward Dillingham was admitted 
freeman in Sandwich in 1691, and took 
inventory of estate of John Briggs the 
same year. He married Abigail Nye in 
1695, an d had eight children, as follows: 

4 Hannah, b. July 12, 1696. 'Abigail, b. 
Feb. 16, 1697. 4 Simeon, b. Sept. 24, 
1700, m. Elizabeth Bourne, May 26, 
1726. 4 Edward, b. March 12, 1704 
(assisted in building the minister's 
house in 1729). 4 Mary, b. Oct. 22, 1705. 
4 Experience, b. March 9, 1707. 'John, 
b. Nov. 14, 1710. 4 Dcborah, b. June 17, 
1716. 



2 John Dillingham, the second son of 
1 Edward, was born about 1630. He 
became a large landholder in Yarmouth 
in 1670, where he was taxed £6 odd in 
1676. He married Eliza, daughter of 
Henry Feake, March 24, 1650, and died 
May 27, 1715. They had a son 3 John, 
and three daughters. Hannah married 

Thorpe, 3 Rebecca married ■ 

Gray, and 3 Sarah married Jones. 

3 John Dillingham married Lydia, 
daughter of Isaac Chapman, about 
1700. He (or his son John) was Con- 
stable in Harwich in 1730. He died 
Sept. 11, 1746, and his wife died Sept. 
4, 1760, aet. 80. They had ten children 
as follows: 
4 John, b. March 23, 1702. Had 5 Desire, 

b. Nov. 30, 1729. m. Benjamin Bangs, 

1750. Also Susannah, b. March, 1732. 

m. Elkanah Bangs. Had no son Ben- 
jamin. 
'Eliza, — b. Aug. 2, 1703. m. Elnathan 

Wing. 
4 Lydia, — b. June 21, 1705. m. Roland 

Clark. 
4 Hannah, — b. Feb. 2, 1706. m. Jonathan 

Bourne. 
4 Rebecca, — b. June 24, 1709. m. .Vinos 

Knowles. 
4 Isaac, — b. May 4, 171 1. 
4 Abigail, — b. June 2, 171 3. m. Prince 

Freeman. 
4 Edward — b. May 17, 1715. 
'Thankful, — b. April 18, 1718. m. Thos. 

Pope, 1735. 
4 Sarah, — b. Pcb. 10, 1719. m. Benj. 

Freeman. 

I hope these facts, collected from 
many different books and records may 
serve someone else to verify the ances- 
try of Capt. Dillingham. He named 
his first daughter Esther, which we may 
presuppose his mother's name. This 
gives another clue to research and 
should be remembered. 




ANNE DILLINGHAM HATHAWAY 



Dillingham. 



19 



/^etffeet M? /4 "Benjamin 

DILLINGHAM,— (Capt.) 5 Benjamin. 

b. at Berkley, Feb. 3, 1739. 

m. Anne, daughter of Gamaliel Hath- 
away and Ann Cathcart, Aug. 29, 1761 
(she b. 1741, d. May 13, 1809). 
(Lived on his farm near Dartmouth.) 

Benjamin Dillingham was a captain 
in the Dartmouth militia during the 
Revolution, but was never called into 
active service. When the British landed 
at Clarke's Cove, Sept. 5, 1778, the 
family were greatly alarmed and threw 
the silver and valuables down an old 
well, while Anne Dillingham, aged nine, 
ran off and hid her best clothes in the 
woods. 

CHILDREN. 



Lost at sea, 
at sea, Sept. 



6 Paul, — b. Aug. 2, 1762. 
1790. 

•John, — b. July 6, 1764. d. 
1815. 

6 Esther,— b. Aug. 8, 1766. m. Philip 
Crandon. d. Dec. 30, 1803. 

6 Anne, — b. April 2, 1769. Vide follow- 
ing. 

"Benjamin, — b. Aug. 14, 1770. m. Char- 
ity Swift; removed to Chester, N. Y. 

6 Edward, — b. Feb. 17, 1772. m. Hannah 
Nye. 

6 Ruth, — b. Jan. 26, 1774. d. Dec. 7, 1808. 

6 Hannah, — b. June 2, 1776. m. Joseph 
Terry. Vide Vol. II for family Rec- 
ord, p. 134. 

6 Asa,— b. Sept. 10, 1777^ m. Debby 
Nash, 1800. d. 1S63. 
for Record, p. 134. 

6 Abigail, — b. Nov. 10, 
Hawes. 

6 Lemuel, — b. July 29, 
Hawes. 

6 Priscilla, — b. June 3, 
Kempton. 

6 Gamaliel, — b. Jan. 29, 
Weston. 



Vide 


Vol. II 


1779. 


m. 




1781. 


m. 


Mrs. 


I7S3- 


m. 


Wm. 


1785. 


m. 





DILLINGHAM— 6 Anne. 

b. April 2, 1769. 

m. "Joseph Hathaway, Nov. 7, 1790. 
d. March 4, 1853. 
(Of Fair Haven, Mass.) 



— 6 Anne. 

Anne Dillingham went to live in Fair 
Haven when she married Joseph Hath- 
away, and she used to go to Dartmouth 
to visit her home, riding on a pillion 
behind her husband. Afterwards she 
held one child, — then they each held a 
child, and there the story ends without 
our knowing whether they ceased jour- 
neys or bought a carriage. Mr. Hathaway 
was the head of a shoe-making estab- 
lishment, employing ten men and 
dividing his year between his stores in 
Fair Haven and Riceborough, Georgia. 
He was successful in business and built 
the house opposite the old Whitwell 
residence on Main Street. Both houses 
are standing yet and anyone who knows 
them will be interested to learn that, 
during the "Great Storm of 181 5," the 
Hathaway house stood in danger of 
being destroyed by having a brig which 
had washed ashore blown against it. 
The water had risen so high that the 
successive waves carried the vessel the 
length of Captain Wilson's property, — 
across Main Street, and left it stranded 
close to Joseph Hathaway's. His sec- 
ond daughter, Almira, lay on her bed 
sick unto death, and the family prepared 
a cot to carry her out of the house if 
the brig should come against it. 

This same year saw the marriages of 
Mrs. Hathaway's eldest son and daugh- 
ter. John Hathaway married Deborah 
N. Bates, and Hannah Hathaway mar- 
ried Capt. Wilson's nephew, Furman 
Whitwell. Both young couples went 
South, which was the "West" of that 
day, affording brilliant openings for the 
enterprising. 

Two years later Joseph Hathaway 
died in Riceborough, and his widow 
was left with four grown-up sons and 
daughters, three half grown sons, and 
one little girl. She continued in her 
home on Main Street where, in 1S24, 
her daughter Almira married Capt. 



20 



DlLLINHHAM. 



l£r~rUL 



Sheffield Reade, of whom it is said that 
he sailed thirteen whaling voyages and 
never was gone two seasons. In this 
same year Bradford Hathaway was 
married, and his brother Joseph started 
for Glasgow. He was never heard 
from after, but his mother, as long as 
she lived, never ceased to watch for his 
return, and often said that each strange 
footstep or unexpected knock made 
her heart leap with the wonder if her 
boy had come back. There were no 
cablegrams then, no reports from ocean 
steamships ; — only waiting, and hop- 
ing, and, after a long while, despairing. 

In i ,827 the Whitwell family gave up 
their southern home and returned to 
Fair Haven. Mrs. Hathaway and her 
two youngest children were then living 
abai tt- in the big house, and, as she 
wished her daughter to stay with her, 
Mrs. Whitwell and her little children 
became part of the family. 

Capt. Bradford Hathaway was off on 
the ocean then, and a pretty little story 
has been told me of his return. He 
had taken with him a large black dog, 
which had become a nuisance about 
the place ; and one night after the 
family were all abed a commotion was 
heard at the front door. Mr. Whit- 
well went down and opened it, and as 
he did so, a dog, dripping wet, darted 
through the crack, upstairs, and threw 
himself on Mrs. Hathaway's bed. It 
was her old dog, who had escaped from 
the ship when it first came near the 
shore, and run all the way home. The 
vessel did not make port in Fair Haven 
until the next noon. 

A few years more saw the last of the 
children married and the bk r house 



only a burden on its mistress' hands. 
So she sold it and moved into a little 
cottage not far from the Wilson place, 
which Mr. Whitwell had bought. Here 
she lived with her daughter Anne, 
whose husband had been lost at sea the 
year after their marriage, and it is in 
the cottage that I always imagine the 
dear, typical " Grandma." We have a 
portrait of her with large, white cap, 
glasses, and knitting. The face has 
the kindly, pleasant look which a long 
life bravely lived for others stamps on 
all features. The knitting-work in her 
hands shows one of the most promin- 
ent traits in her character — a tireless 
industry. The}" tell me, in her last ill- 
ness the busy hands would not be quiet, 
but made the movements of sewing and 
knitting after the work was laid aside 
forever. 

My daughter was named for this 
great - great - grandmother, and most 
precious of all her beautiful silver was 
a little teaspoon with the clear — doubly 
dear now — initials, A. H., and the date 
1790. 

NOTE ON THE NAME OF DILLINGHAM. 

I find that the name of Dillingham is 
derived from "dealing" and "ham," 
signifying the "dealer in the village," 
or some kindred meaning. The first 
Edward Dillingham bore arms and was 
styled "gentleman." It would be in- 
teresting to know what his arms were. 

There is a branch of the Dillingham 
family in Maine, which probably re- 
moved there when the Bangs family 
(with whom they were so closely al- 
lied) did so. I hope the exact con- 
nection may soon be traced. 



Du Bois. 



21 



Chre tien — x Louis. 



DU BOIS— Chretien. 

The Walloon ancestor of the Ameri- 
can family of Du Bois. 

He was a farmer living at Wicre, near 
La Bassee, in Artois, France. The 
births of three of his children are 
recorded in La Bassee, but the entries 
— like all French records of Huguenots 
— have been so defaced as to render 
them almost unreadable. 

From these dates we should infer 
that Chretien Du Bois was born about 
1600. He never came to America, and 
it is uncertain whether he ever went 
into exile, although his children did. 
His daughter Francoise married Pierre 
Biljouw in Leyden, April 20, 1649, and 
there was another daughter, Anne, and 
a son, who is the subject of the ensuing 
sketch. 



DU BOIS— Louis. 

b. at Wicre, Oct. 27, 1626. 

m. 2 Kattryn, daughter of 1 Matthys 
Blancsan and Maddalen Jorisse, Oct. 
10, 1665 (she b. 1635, d. 1709). 

d. June 28, 1690. 
(Of Wicre, Leyden, Mannheim, King- 

ston-on-the-Hudson, and New Paltz, 

N. Y.) 

"Louis the Walloon," as he was desig- 
nated by his Dutch c onfre re s, was a 
man of especial note in the early history 
of New York state. His life is so fully 
given under the headings of his wife's 
maiden name and the founding of New 
Paltz that it would be only repetition to 
detail it here. But a few words regard- 
ing his character will not be amiss. 

His is an example of how a strong 
mind and upright life may make a mark 



to outlast centuries. The town of New 
Paltz is a monument to his patriotism 
and devoted piety, which sought to give 
to the French refugees a home-town 
such as the Dutch had in Kingston. 

The peace and security in which the 
village dwelt speak loudly for the man 
who stood to the letter of his deed, and 
remembered that as mercy had been 
shown to him and his, so he owed 
mercy in return. 

CHILDREN. 

2 Abraham, — b. in Mannheim, 1656-7. 
Vide page 23. 

2 Isaac, — b. 1659. m. Maria Hasbroucq, 
June 1, 1683. 

2 Jacob, — bp. Oct. 9, 1661. m. Gerritse, 
daughter of Gerrit Foeken. d. 1745. 
Jacob Du Bois had a. son Barent, who 
m. Jacomyntje Du Bois and removed 
to Penn. Magdalena, the wife of 
Josiah Eltinge, is sometimes given as 
their child. This has been proven to 
be an error. 

2 Sarah, — b. 1664. m. Joost Jansen. 

2 David, — b. 1667. m. Cornelia Verney. 

2 Solomon, — Vide the following. 

2 Louis, — b. 1677. m. Rachel Hasbroucq, 

2 Matthew, — b. 1679. m. Sarah Matthey- 
sen. 



The following is an exact copy of a 
Dutch baptismal Record: 

Oct. 9. 1661 

Vadde van dit kint Loui Du Boi 

Modder Cattery Blancsan 

Kint Jacob 

Getruyum Antoy Crepel. Maddellena 

Joonse. 



22 



Du Bois. 
2 Solomon. 



DU BOIS, — 3 Solomon (sono^Louis 
Du Bois and -Catharine Blancsan). 

b. at Hurley in 1669. 

m. Tryntje Gerrits ( daughter of 
Jacomyntje Slecht — Vide Slecht — and 
her second husband), 1692. 

d. February, 1769. 
(Of Hurley and New Paltz.) 

Solomon du Bois was probably one 
of the children carried off by the Ind- 
ians at the time of the Kingston Mas- 
sacre. The incident did him no material 
harm, as he lived the alotted three 
score and ten after all. 

His life was just that of his brothers 
and all the other honest men in New 
Paltz. At twenty - three he married 
Tryntje, daughter of Gerrit Foeken 
and Jacomyntje Slecht. Her mother 
(Vide "Slecht") afterwards married Jan 
Elting, who, when he died, left Tryntje 
one-eighteenth part of his property. 
She dying, some dispute arose over the 
children's portion, in settlement of 
which the following deed was given: 

QUIT CLAIM DEED. 

To all Christian people to whom this 
present writing shall come : Roeloff 
Eltinge, of the New Paltz, in the Co. of 
Ulster and the Province of New York, 
in America, yeoman; Cornelius Eltinge, 
of Marbletown, in sd. Co., yeoman; 
William Eltinge, of Kingston, in sd. Co., 
carpenter; Gerrit Van Wagenen, of 
Kingston aforesaid, yeoman; Geertje 
Hall, widow of Thomas Hall, late of 
Raretan, in the Co. of Somerset in N. 



J. ; Gerrit Wyncoop and Hilletje, his 
wife, of Philadelphia, in Penn.; Jannetje 
Newkerck, widow of Cornelius New- 
kerck, late of Hurley, Ulster Co. ; 
Henry Pawling and Jacomyntje, his 
wife, of Philadelphia, in Penn., yeoman; 
Greeting. 

Now know ye, that whereas Jan 
Eltinge, late of Hurley, in Ulster Co., 
did by his last will and testament be- 
queath to his five children, Roeloff, 
Cornelius, William, Geertje Hall, and 
Aeltje Eltinge, mother of the aforesaid 
Gerrit Van Wagenen, one just half of 
his estate, and the other half to his 
wife's nine children, viz: Jannetje New- 
kerck, Hilletje Wyncoop, Jacomyntje 
Pawling, Roeloff, Cornelius and Wil- 
liam Eltincre, Gerrit Van Wagenen, 
Geertje Hall, Tryntje, late wife of 
Solomon Du Bois, of New Paltz, and 
in consideration the children of said 
Du Bois of their just right should be 
assured, the said (here follow the names 
of the heirs) have granted, etc., to the 
children of said Du Bois one just ninth 
part in the lot No. 5, lying in Dutchess 
Co., over against Roundout Creek, 
bound northerly by lot of Evert Van 
Wagenen, easterly by a creek, southerly 
by land of Evert Roosa, westerly by 
Hudson River. Also a just eighteenth 
part in a certain meadow commonly 
called Jacomyntje's Fly, to have, to 
hold, etc. 

August 2nd, 1727. 

Signed by seven witnesses and by 
Henry Pawling, Gerrit Wyncoop, Jan- 
netje Newkerck, Hilletje Wyncoop, 
Jacomyntje Pawling, Gerrit Van Wag- 
enen, Cornelius Eltinge, Roeloff El- 
tino-e and William Eltinge. 



Du Bois. 
! Hefidricus — * Abraham. 



23 



Solomon Du Bois and Tryntje Ger- 
ritse had seven children baptized at 
Kingston. 

CHILDREN. 

3 Isaac, — bp. Sept. 27, 1691. 
3 Jacomyntje, — bp. Nov. 5, 1693, m. 

3 Barent Du Bois April 23, 1715. 

Vide page 21. 
3 Benjamin, — bp. May 16, 1697. 
3 Sara, — bp. Feb. 11, 1700. 
3 Cathryn, — bp. Oct. 18, 1702. 
3 Magdalena, — bp. April 15, 1705. 
3 Hendricus, — bp. Dec. 31, 1710. Vide 

this page. 
3 Magdalena, — bp. Dec. 20, 171 3. m. 

3 Josiah Eltinge. 



DU BOIS— 3 Hendricus. 

m. Jannetje, daughter of Philip 
Hoogtaling and Jannetje Roosa, May 
6, 1733 (shebp. Feb. 15, 1713.) 

Hendricus Du Bois was a giant 
among men, and a curious instance of 
heredity is noted in the fact that the 
branch of the Elting family which de- 
scends from him frequently numbers 
unusually large men among it, although 
the rest of the Eltings are in no way 
remarkable for size. 

CHILDREN. 

4 Phillippus, — bp. April 21, 1734. 

4 Solomon, — bp. Feb. 15, 1736. 

4 Dina, — bp. February 12, 1738. Vide 
4 Abraham Elting, page 27. 

4 Tryntje, — bp. Oct. 9, 1740. 

4 Hendricus, — bp. May 1, 1743. m. 
Rebecca Van Wagenen. 

4 Mathusalem, — bp. June 30, 1745. 

4 Leah, — bp. June 28, 1747. m. Chris- 
tian Kiersted. 

4 Rachel, — bp. Dec. 24, 1749. m. John- 
son Hardenbergh. 

4 Mathusalem, — b. Oct. 27, 1751. m. 
Gertrude Bruyn. 



DU BOIS— ^Abraham. 

b. in Mannheim, 1656-7. 

m. 2 Margaret, daughter of x Chre- 
tien Deyo, about 1680. 

d. Oct. 7, 1 73 1. 
(Of Mannheim, Hurley, and New 

Paltz.) 

Abraham Du Bois was a sharer in his 
mother's Mohawk captivity. He was 
one of the patentees of New Paltz, and 
a member of the "Dusine," as the gov- 
ernment of the Twelve Patentees was 
called. He is named on his tomb as 
the survivor of the Twelve. 

In 1731 Abraham Du Bois was taxed 
on a value of ,£310. ,£88 was then the 
price of a stone house, barn and farm. 

Those were the days when the Puri- 
tans rated a bull at .£8 and a farm of 
forty acres the same. 

children. 

3 Sarah — or Leah, — bp. June 20, 1682. 

m. 2 Roeloff Eltinge June 13, 1704, 

Vide Elting, page 27. 
3 Abraham, — bp. April 17, 1685. 
3 Leah— bp. Oct. 16, 1687. m. Philip 

Frere — or Verrie. 
3 Mary, — bp. Oct. 13, 1689. d. young. 
3 Rachel, — bp. Oct, 13, 1689. m. 3 Solo- 

mon, son of 2 Isaac Du Bois, April 6, 

I7I3- 
3 Catharine, — bp. May 21, 1693. m, 

William Donaldson Oct. 24, 1728. 
3 Noach, — bp. Feb. 18, 1700. d. young. 
3 Joel,— bp. June 20, 1703. d. 1737. 



I find one account which gives addi- 
tional: 3 Benjamin, who removed to 
Catskill, and 3 Margaret, who married a 
Donaldson. I do not vouch for either. 



24 



DURFEE. 



^ 

^ 

* 



1 Thomas — 2 Thomas. 



DURFEE,— Thomas. Crm* 



ft* 



\ \ 



b. 1643. 
m. 



g^ago-r^eC /£ 6S 



X 
S3 

V 

4 



m. 2nd, Deliverance Hall, widow of 
Abiel Tripp (she died 1721). 

d. 1 712. fiat-^t 
(Of Portsmouth, R. I.) 

Thomas Durfee, the progenitor of all 
the Durfees of New England, was in no 
wise a prominent man. Like all the 
settlers he acquired considerable land, 
but in no other way did he amass any- 
thing. After his marriage with Mrs. 
Tripp, he ran the ferry which had been 
her late husband's, between Bristol and 
Rhode Island. 

CHILDREN. 

2 Robert— b. >>/^e/ /6& 
/lrt-y m _ Mary Sanford, d. 1718. 
2 Richard,— b. 

m. Ann Almy. d. 1700. 
2 Thomas, — Vide next column. 
"William,— b. 

m. 1st, Ann. 2nd, Mary. d. 1727. 
2 Ann — b. 

m. HVilliam Potter. 
2 Benjamin, — b. 
/i?Q — m. Prudence Earle. d. 1755. 
2 Patience, — b. 

m. Benj. Tallman, Sept. 23, 170S. d. 
1723. 
2 Deliverance, — b. 

m. 

d. 



DURFEE— 2 Thomas. 

b. probably about 1669. 

m. 8 Ann, daughter of 2 Gideon Free- 
born and Sarah Brownell (she was b. 
March 28, 1669; d. 1729). 

d. Feb. 11, 1729. 
(Of Portsmouth, R. I.) 

The rise in real estate made Thomas 
Durfee much better off than his father, 
so that in 171 5 he could mortgage land 
and raise .£350. His will, proved in 
1729, showed an easy plenitude of all 
the good things of the world. The 
property inventoried at .£550, and one 
item, viz: tailor shears, showed what 
had been the testator's trade. 

CHILDREN. 

3 Ann, — b. Aug. 25, 1691. m. — Estes. 
3 Sarah, — b. Mar. 1, 1693. m. — Dennis. 
3 Freeborn,— b. Dec. 15, 1695. 

d. 
3 Patience, — b. June 12, 1697. 

d. 
3 Mary, — b. Jan. 22, 1701. 

d. 
3 Martha, — b. Feb. 20, 1702. m. 4 Oli- 
ver Reade. Vide Readc. 
3 Gideon, — b. Jan. 15, 1704. 

d. 
■'Thomas, — b. June 6, 1706. 

d. 
3 Susanna, — b. 

d. 
3 Job— b. 

d. 
3 Elizabeth, — b. 

d. 



Eltinge. 



25 



ELTINGE ( Elten ),— iJan ( son of 
Roeloffe Elten and his wife, Aeltje.) 

b. in Switchlaer, Province of Drenthe, 
Holland, July 29, 1632. 

m. Jacomyntje, daughter of Cornells 
Barentson Slecht and Tryntje Tysse 
Boz. 

d. at Hurley, N. Y. 
(Of Flat Bush, L. I., and New Paltz, N. 

Y.) 

The first known of Jan Elten in this 
countiy is as a carpenter in a church in 
Flatbush, 1663. He soon removed to 
Ulster county, and in 1677 was one of 
the witnesses to the deed from the 
Indians to the Patentees of New Paltz. 
(Vide Louis Du Bois.) 

In 1679 he returned to Holland for 
some purpose unknown, and before 
sailing took special steps to prove his 
identity. The certificates attesting the 
same are among the New York Colonial 
MSS. They are sufficiently inter- 
esting to be again copied here. 

I. 

"To-day, the 10th of October, 1679, 
appeared before me, Capt. James 
Hubbard, Elbert Elbertson Stoothoff, 
and Jacques Corteljou, at the request 
of Jan Elten, a resident of Kingston, 
now about to depart for the Father- 
land, the worshipped Steven Coertin, 
aged. 79, Willem Roeloffs, aged 60, 
Jan Strycker, Armorer, aged 64, Jan 
Sbringh, aged 48, Coert Stevenson, 
aged 42, all natives of the Province of 
Drenthe, who declare that the above 
named petitioner is the lawful son of 
Roelof Elten, by his wife, Aeltje 
Elten, of the village of Swigtel, in 
said land of Drenthe. They further 
declare, to the best of their informa- 



" tion, that they have always known 
" him as an honest and virtuous man, 
" and that, as far as they can remem- 
" ber, they never knew any other man 
" of the same name. They are willing 
" to confirm their testimony on a sol- 
" emn oath. In witness of the truth, 
" they sign this with their own hands," 
etc. 

(Here follow signatures.) 

II. 

"A certificate concerning Jan Elten, 
" alias Elting, and his oath thereupon 
'' sent by him into Holland, attested 
" Oct. 13th," 1679. Hee went for Eng- 
" land. 

New York, on Manhattan's I., in 

America, Oct. 13th, 1678. 
"This day appeared before me Jan 
" Elten, alias Elting, and took his oath, 
* * * that hee never knew or heard 
" of any other of his name to bee the 
" son of Roeloffe Elten, his father, and 
" Aeltien, his mother. 

Mathias Nicolls, 
Sec. of the Province of New York." 

III. 

(The original of the following is in 
the possession of Edmund Elting, of 
New Paltz. It is in Dutch.) 

Jan Eltinge, son of Roelof and Aeltje 
Eltinge, was born at Switchlaer, a de- 
pendency of Beyle, situate in the Prov- 
ince of Drenthe, in the year 1632, on 
the 29th of July, old style; and hath 
received Christian baptism at the hands 
of one Rev. Mr. and father-in-law, Dr. 
Johannes Beeltsyder, and was named 
Jan Eltinge. Born of honest and vir- 
tuous parents, who have always sus- 
tained a good reputation among us, 



26 



Elting. 



and whose kindred is still numerous. 
* * * Done at Beyle, 20 Jan., 1680. 

(Signed) 

Guilielmus Hopstede, 
Eccl's Beylensis at Classis. 



The certificate further states that 
Roeloff Elten had two other children, 
Maria, born Feb. 28, 1630, and Bartelt, 
born Dec. 18, 1631. 

It is conjectured that Jan Elten re- 
turned to prove his right to certain 
property in dispute. 

His return took place previous to 
1684, when he became one of the part- 
ners in the Arie Roosa Patent in 
Dutchess county. The patent con- 
tained fifteen hundred acres and ex- 
tended along the bank of the Hudson. 
The share allotted to Jan Elten was 
bought of his heirs by Gerrit Aartsen 
in 1713. His death had taken place a 
little before in Hurley, — we cannot as- 
certain the exact date. 

His will is not on record either in 
Albany or New York, which is a pity, 
as its provisions were somewhat re- 
markable. One-half of his estate he 
left to his own five children, the other 
half to the nine children of his wife, 
Jacomyntje Slecht. (Vide same and 
also Solomon Du Bois.) 

Jan Elten was the first Dutchman to 
join the Huguenot settlement at New 
Paltz. He was a witness to the original 
deed between the Indians and Louis 
Du Bois. 

By his French compatriots his name 
was spelt "Eltinge," and pronounced in 
three syllables, with the accent on the 
second. 

All of the name in America are 
descended from the same emigrant 
ancestor of Long Island and Western 
New York. 



CHILDREN. 

2 Geertje (Gertrude), — m. Thomas Hall, 

of Marbletown, July 6, 1699. 
2 Aaltje (Adeline), — m. Aert Gerritse 

Van Wagenen, Oct. 26, 1695. m. 2nd 

Barent Van Barthuysen, April 17, 

1699. d. soon after. 
2 Roeloff, — Vide following page. 
2 Cornells, — bp. at Kingston Dec. 29, 

168 1. m. Rebecca Van Meeteren, 

Sept. 3, 1704. 
2 William, — bp. at Kingston, Jan. 19, 

1685. m. Jannetje Le Sueur. d. 

about 1642. 



The line of Elting traced in this 
volume runs thus: 

Jan Elting, b. 1632. 
(The year that Gusteivus Adolphits was 
killed at the battle of Lutzen. ) 

Roeloff Elting, b. 1678. 
( The year that the Treaty of Nimeguen 
zvas made by Louis XIV and William of 
Orange?) 

Josiah Elting, b. 1 712. 
( Three years after St. Petersburgk, 
Russia, was founded by Peter the Great. ) 
Abraham Elting, b. 1735. 
{Ten years before the landing of Charles 
Edward in Scotland.) 

Noah Elting, b. 1763. 
(Ending of the Seven Years' War.) 

Jemima Elting, b. 1788. 
(Between the first and seeo?id partitions 
of Poland) 

Hannah Fowler, b. 1809. 
(Napoleon at Vienna and ll'ag/am.) 

W. P. Warner, b. 1838. 
( Ten years before the fall of Louis 
Phillippe.) 

Anna Warner, b. 1S69. 
(Last year of the Pope's temporal power 
in Italy.) 

Charles Elting French, b. 1889. 



Elting. 



27 



2 Roeloff— 3 Josiah—* Abraham— * Noah. 



ELTINGE,— 2 Roeloff. 

bp. at Kingston, Oct. 27, 1678. 
m. 3 Sarah, daughter of 2 Abraham 
Du Bois and 2 Margaret Deyo, June 

13. 1/03- 

d. 
(Of New Paltz.) 

Roeloff Eltinge, born at Hurley, was 
carried into the old Dutch Church at 
Kingston and given his grandfather's 
name, probably during the first week of 
his life. Hendrik and Elsje Sleght 
stood sponsors for him. The next 
interesting event in his life was his 
marriage in the same church, after 
which there is silence. 

CHILDREN. 

3 Johannes, — bp. Sept. 3, 1 704. m. Ma- 

ritje Guimar, April 24, 1728. 
3 Jacomyntje, — bp. March 17, 1706. m. 

William Koddebeck, May 22, 1733. 
3 Abraham, — bp. Oct. 31, 1708. m. Sarah 

Person, March 4, 1732. d. 1745. 
3 Josiah, — Vide the following. 
3 Margrietjen, — bp. May 18, 1718. m. 

Abraham Bevier, Jr., 1742. 
3 Noach, — bp. Dec. 3, 1721. m. Jacoym- 

tje Elting, 1742. 



ELTINGE— 3 Josiah. 

bp. Oct. 12, 1712. 

m. 3 Magdalena, daughter of 3 Solo- 
mon Du Bois. 

d. 
(Of New Paltz.) 

CHILDREN. 

4 Cornelius, — m. Brandina Edmondorf. 
"T'oeloff, — m. Maria Louw. 



4 Solomon, — m. Catharine Louw. 
4 Catharine, — m. Jacobus Hardenbergh. 
4 Abraham, — Vide the following. 



ELTINGE— 4 Abraham. 

bp. Dec. 26, 1763. 

m. 4 Dinah, daughter of 3 Hendricus 
Du Bois and Jane Houghtaling, Nov. 
26, 1759. m. 2nd, Dorothy Bessimer. 

d. 
(Of New Paltz.) 

children. 

5 Josiah, — b. about 1761. m. Hester 

Brodhead. d. May 15, 1813. 
5 Henry, — m. Polly Sloat. d. 1810. 
5 Noah, — b. 1763. Vide the following. 
6 Philip, — m. his cousin Catharine Elting. 
6 Margaret, — m. her cousin Ezekiel 

Elting. 
5 Jane, — m. Roelif Hasbroucq. 
5 Jacobus, — (half brother) m. - 



Rose. 



ELTING— 5 Noah. 

bp. Dec. 26, 1763. 

m. t Hannah, daughter of 3 Hendricus 
Deyo and Elizabeth Beem (she was 
born 1 761. d. Sept. 30, 1849). 

d. April 6, 181 3. 
(Of New Paltz and Highland, N. Y.) 

Noah Elting located at New Paltz 
landing on a tract of 500 acres, and 
there established the first ferry to 
Poughkeepsie. His house was built 
near the landing, and the ferry was at 
first propelled by oars and a sail, — later 
by horse-power, finally by steam. 



28 



Fletcher. 



Jolin — I Villiam. 



Noah Elting's second son, Henry, 
was the founder of the town of High- 
land, and in its cemetery he and his 
parents are buried. 

CHILDREN. 

"Abraham, — b. Dec. 29, 1785. m. Eliza- 
beth Ransom, d. July 3, 1859. 

6 Henry Deyo, — m. Rebecca Miller. 

6 Jemima, — b. Feb. 3, 1788. Vide the 
following. 

"Joseph, — m. Sarah Hardenbergh. 

"Andrew, — drowned in the Hudson at 
the age of six years. 

6 Mary, — m. Bradner Woolsey. 

"David, — m. 1st, Rachel Hait. m. 2nd, 
Ruth Sheffield. 

"Eliza, — m. Clinton Woolsey. 



ELTING, — "Jemima. 

b. in New Paltz, Feb. 3, 1788. 

m. "' David, son of "Isaac Fowler and 
Gloriannah Merritt, 1806. (he was 
born Oct. 14, 1786, died Sept. 4, 1852.) 

d. Sept. 29, 1866. 
(Of New Paltz, Covington and Nunda, 

N. Y.) 

Mrs. Jemima Elting Fowler was one 
of the pioneer women of Western New 
York. She came thither on horse-back, 
as is related in the life of her husband, 
and she lived to see the day when she 
could plan a trip to Michigan by train. 

The Rev. J. K. Fowler, of Cedar 
Rapids, la., has oil portraits of both 
this lady and her husband. He remem- 
bers her well and speaks of her as 
strict in her way but very kind-hearted. 



She was a woman of more than ordinary 
attainments, and personal attractions. 



FLETCHER— !J0HN. 

b. in England. 

m. 2 Mary, daughter of the widow 
Joyce Ward. 

d. April 18, 1662. 
(Of YVethersfield and Milford, Conn.) 

John Fletcher was named executor in 
his mother-in-law's will, 1641. He re- 
moved to Milford the same year, where 
he joined the church and later became 
a deacon. 

His widow married John Clark. 

children. 

2 Mary, — m. — Stevens. 

2 Rebecca, — m. 2 Andrew Warner. Vide 
Warner. 

2 Sarah, — bp. 164 1. m. John Stanley. 

2 Hannah, — bp. 1643. m - John Chitten- 
den. 

2 Elizabeth, — bp. 1645. m. Elnathan 
Botsford. 

2 Samuel, — b. 1649. d. young. 

2 Abigail,— bp. 1652. 



FLETCHER — 1 William (had no 
known relationship to the above). 

A brother of Robert Fletcher of 
Yorkshire, who came with the latter to 
New England in 1630 and settled in 
Chelmsford. 

We know naught of him except that 
his daughter 'Hope married 2 Samuel 
Stow and became the mother of :i Doro- 
thy, who married '^Jonathan Gilbert. 



Fowler. 



29 



J Villi am — 2 Henry — 3 William. 



FOWLER — 

The name of Fowler is found among 
the earliest annals of English history. 
There is a tale of a Crusader bearing it, 
and the rolls of Agincourt show two 
knights called by it. In the fifteenth 
century there was a baronial family of 
Fowler, and Edward VI had a gentle- 
man of the bedchamber who came from 
that line. The arms of this family may 
be found in heraldry and are not the 
same as the crest of the American 
Fowlers. The latter is given in Wash- 
burn's Book of Heraldry, and I have 
also seen it cut on a seal ring. It must 
have been brought over by William 
Fowler, the progenitor of the New- 
burgh family. 

The baronial Fowlers originally were 
of Ricote, near Oxford. In 1592, Queen 
Elizabeth visited that place and stayed 
with Lord Norris, whose father had 
suffered on the scaffold for Anne 
Boleyn. 

While all manner of pageants were 
being enacted for the royal pleasure, 
there lay in Bridewell Prison, London, 
a young man, possibly of the same 
blood as William of Ricote. He also 
was a William Fowler, and he was one 
of many Puritan prisoners, allowed to 
lay in captivity month after month be- 
cause the Protestant Queen was merci- 
ful and did not burn those of a different 
faith as the Catholic Queen did. 

June 26, 1637, there came into Boston 
Harbor a ship bearing a large company 
of those who had suffered greatly in 
England. Among them was a man, 
past middle age, of scholarly attain- 
ments, and advanced religious views, 
who is believed to be identical with the 
Bridewell prisoner. He remained in 
Boston a short time and then removed 
to the town which honored him with 
the title of "First Magistrate of New 
Haven." There are few other records 
of him; he had sons William and 
Henry, and a daughter Mary, — proba- 
bly others. He died in New Haven, 
Jan. 25, 1661. 



FOWLER— 2 Henry. 

b. m. 

d. November, 1704. 
(Of Fairfield, Conn., and New York.) 

Robert Ludlow Fowler, in his little 
pamphlet called "Our Predecessors," 
has established the line of descent fol- 
lowed in these pages. The History of 
Newburgh and the "Fowler Geneal- 
ogy" disagree with him, and each other. 

Henry Fowler in 1664 removed from 
Fairfield to the neighboring county in 
New York. 

CHILDREN. 

3 Henry, — of Eastchester. 
3 William, — Vide following. 
3 Jeremiah, — b. 1673. d. 1723. 
3 Jonathan, — 
3 A daughter, — m. Richard Ward. 



FOWLER- 3 William. 

m. Mary, daughter of John Thorne. 

d. 1714- 
(Of Flushing, L. I.) 

In 1687, 2 Henry Fowler conveyed 
his house and home-lot to his son Wil- 
liam, of Flushing. William was already 
married and had two children. His 
wife was of humble birth, and I can 
learn but little of her father. His is 
the only English name on a long list of 
Dutch who took the oath of allegiance 
at one time. A century later the de- 
scendants of both John Thorne and the 
Hollanders had inter-married into one 
great family on the upper Hudson. 

children. 
4 William, — m. Mary Merritt. d. 1747. 
4 John, — b. 1686. Vide next page. 
4 Joseph, — m. Phoebe Hunt. d. 1727. 
4 Jeremiah, — m. Sarah Dusenbury. d. 

1766. 
4 Thomas, — m. Catharine. 
4 Henry, — 
4 Benjamin, — 

4 Rebecca, — b. d. 4 Sarah, — b. d. 
4 Hannah, — b. 
4 Mary, — m. Dusenbury. 



3° 



Fowler. 
4 John — 5 Isaac — e Isaac. 



i/i 



/ l b- 



FOWLER— "John. 

b. at Flushing, 1686. 

m. Abigail , about 

d. 1768. 

(Of Flushing, L. I., Rye, N. Y., and 
Newburgh.) 

John Fowler received from his 
father's estate 240 acres, the same being 
part of a large tract owned by William 
Fowler, near Rye. In 1742 John sold 
this land, and five years later removed 
to Highlands, the new town which 
Henry Elting founded near New Paltz. 
He built a house there, in which he 
died, and some of his descendants still 
live. 

CHILDREN. 

5 Samuel, — b. Oct. 12, 1720. m. Char- 
lotte Purdy. d. Oct. 13, 1789. 

5 Isaac, — Vide following. 

5 John, — m. Mary Ward (owned a sloop 
and carried on a freighting trade up 
and down the Hudson). 

5 James, — 

5 Nehemiah, — m. Abigail Purdy. d. 
1785. 

5 Daniel, — m. Bidd. 

5 Elizabeth, — m. Wiggins. 

5 , m. Joseph Bloomer. 



FOWLER— s Isaac. 

b. about 1722. 

m. Margaret, daughter of Charles 
Theall (about 1743). 

d. 

(Of Newburgh, N. Y.) 

Isaac Fowler was one of the original 
free-holders of Newburgh. He was 
born and raised in Highland near by, 
and married the daughter of a promin- 
ent farmer in the vicinity. They seem 
to have had but one child, Isaac Fowler, 
Jr. During the Revolution, the father, 
being too old for active service, served 
on the home-guard. Both he and his 
son were among the first to espouse the 
cause of freedom, but his brother Nehc- 
miah was true to the king for some 
time. 



FOWLER— ^ Isaac (Junior). 

b. April 3, 1746. 

m. Martha Tooker. 

m. 2nd Gloriana, daughter of Caleb 
Merritt and Martha Purdy. (She b. 
July 7, 1758. d. May 2, 1791. ) 

d. in Sharon, Conn., 1821. 
(Of Newburgh, N. Y.) 

When I projected writing regarding 
the family history, I said to my uncle, 
"Can't you tell me something about 
David Fowler's father?" "Well, yes," 
he said, "his name was David ( I be- 
lieve), and I know he was in the war, 
because we had his sword to play with 
in the attic. And his hat, I remember. 
And he had a coat of arms, an owl 
sitting on an elder-bush. And he 
owned slaves — it was in the days when 
they did, you know. And I think 
that's about all." 

I will supplement this with a bit of 
Revolutionary literature. 
"Honorable Gentlemen: — 

"Agreeable to your directions of the 
" ninth inst., the militia company of the 
" North District of Newburgh Precinct 
" assembled on the 26th inst., at the 
" house of Lemuel Concklin, and chose, 
" by a majority of the voices of the sol- 
" diers belonging to said District, the 
" following persons for their Militia 
" officers, viz.: Arthur Smith, Captain; 
" Isaac Fowler, Jr., 1st Lieutenant ; 
" John Foster, 2nd Lieutenant ; Daniel 
" Clark, Ensign. We are, &c, 

Moses Higby, )' Two of the 
Joseph Coleman, j Committee." 

This company rendered active ser- 
vice. 

children. 

'Caleb, — b. Feb. 8, 1775. m. Catharine 

Sebring. 
7 Martha,— in. Stephen Baker. 
"Charles, — m. Sarah Hill. 
'Gilbert,— 'Nehemiah,— 

7 D.-wid,— b. Oct. 14, 1786. Vide next 

page. 
7 Francis, — 7 Isaac, — 



Fowler. 
''David. 



31 



FOWLER— 7 David Isaac. 

b. at Newburgh, Oct. 14, 17S6. 

m. 6 Jemima, daughter of 5 Noah Elt- 

ing and 5 Hannah Deyo (she b. Feb. 3, 

1788. d. Sept. 29, 1866). 
d. September 4, 1852. 

(Of Newburgh, Fowlersville, and Nun- 
da, N. Y.) 

David Fowler seems to have been 
one of those men who displayed great 
good sense but once, and that once was 
when he chose his wife. It remains an 
open question whether a man does not 
gain more happiness in showing wisdom 
at that time even if it is the only time, 
than in dealing with all the rest of his 
life like a Socrates, and playing the 
fool on the one occasion when he se- 
lects a companion for the remainder of 
his earthly course. 

Mrs. Fowler used to say she first met 
her husband when out on horseback. 
She was a beautiful and attractive girl, 
and they were married with bright 
prospects. The family established the 
young husband in the tannery business, 
in which he failed soon afterward, los- 
ing the most of his property. His wife 
did not like to remain among her rela- 
tives with altered circumstaces, and de- 
termined to leave Newburgh. They 
decided to go into the western part of 
the estate and settle where the fancy 
took them. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fowler went on horse- 
back, with their household goods fol- 
lowing in wagons. Among their be- 
longings was the first carriage ever 
brought into western New York. It 
had a boot behind and steps which let 
down. 

Thus they came to Fowlerville, and, 
attracted by the name, settled there. 
Some years later they removed to Cov- 
ington, the same town where Deacon 



6 Ebenezer Warner's young son had come 
to start in life as a doctor. The young 
physician met Hannah Fowler and they 
were married, July 3, 1830. About 
seventeen years after, Dr. Warner and 
his wife went to Nunda, and, after they 
were established, Mr. and Mrs. Fowler 
made their home with them. 

In 1852, David Fowler and his son-in- 
law both died in the same night, the 
one of illness, the other from exhaus- 
tion and over-fatigue, combined with a 
slight attack of the same disease. 

Mrs. Fowler survived her husband 
fourteen years, living with her different 
children. In 1854, her son Elting de- 
cided to go to Michigan and settle 
there with his family. All the plans 
were made and the removal was to take 
place in a few days, when he was sud- 
denly taken ill and died. After that 
his mother devoted herself to her 
daughters and grandchildren. 

By religion she was an Episcopalian 
and a devoted Christian. She is de- 
scribed to me as a fine-looking woman, 
strict but kind - hearted. Her death 
took place in 1866, and she was buried 
beside her husband in the Warner lot 
in Nunda. 

Elting Fowler left a family who con- 
tinue the name in this particular branch. 
His brother died unmarried. 

CHILDREN. 

8 Mary, — b. Jan. 10, 1807. m. Levi 
Alsdorf. m. 2nd, — - Pray. d. Jan. 
8, 1885. 

8 Hannah, — b. June 15, 1S09. m. Dr. 
7 Eben Warner July 3, 1830. Vide 
Warner. 

8 Elting,—b. March 15, 181 1. m. Mar- 
garet Kennedy. Vide Vol. II for 
Family Record. 

8 Isaac David (Dr.) — b. Oct. 15, 1814. 
d. Feb. 24, 1843. 



Freeborn. 
1 William. 



FREEBORN (FREEBORNE, 
FREEBOURNE),— 1 William. 



b. 1594. 
m. Mary 



(she b. 1601 and d. 



May 3, 1670). 
d. April 28, 1670. 

(Of England, Boston, Mass., and Ports- 
mouth, R. I.) 

William Freeborn came in the "Fran- 
cis" from Ipswich in 1634, bringing his 
wife Mary, daughters Mary ( aged 
seven) and Sarah (aged two); also a 
servant, John Aldburg, of fourteen 
years, who is supposed to be the John 
Alboro who was counselor to Gov. 
Andros in 1687. 

The "Francis" sailed on the 30th of 
April and made a safe port early in 
June. Like nearly all the Pilgrims, 
the Freeborn family made a first settle- 
ment in or near Boston, probably at 
Roxbury, and the father was sworn a 
freeman of Massachusetts the 3rd of 
September. He was rather a promin- 
ent man, belonging to one of the chap- 
ters of the jurisdiction, but soon be- 
came infected with the popular heresy 
of the time and place, and Nov. 20th, 
1637, was one °f those to be warned to 
deliver up all guns, pistols, swords, etc., 
because "the opinions and revelations 
of Mr. Wheelright and Mrs. Hutchin- 
son have seduced and led into danger- 
ous errors many of the people here in 
New England." In the same year he 
joined the company who removed to 
Rhode Island, where he is named 
among the signers of the civil covenant 
at Newport. 

The next year he was in Portsmouth 
and signed another compact, with 



eighteen others. " We whose names 
are under witness do here solemnly, in 
the presence of Jehovah, incorporate 
ourselves into a Bodie Politick, and as 
he shall help, will submit our persons, 
lives and estates unto our Lord Jesus 
Christ, the King of Kings and the Lord 
of Lords, and to all those perfect and 
most absolute laws of his given us in 
his holy word of truth, to be guided 
and judged thereby." 

March 12, 1638. "William Freeborn 
and others having had license to depart 
from Massachusetts, summons was or- 
dered to go out for them to appear (if 
they be not gone before) at the next 
Court in the Colony, to answer such 
things as shall be objected." 

In 1639 he was granted a lot in 
Portsmouth on condition that he built 
within a year, and in 1641 was sworn a 
freeman. He was constable once, and 
commissioner once — the latter in 1657. 

CHILDREN. 

2 Mary, — b. 1627. m. 'Clement 
Weaver, from whom descend the 
Weaver family of America. Vide 
1 Clement Weaver. 

a Sarah, — b. 1632. m. Nathaniel Brown- 
ing, d. April 23rd, 1670. 

2 Gideon, — Vide following page. 

Note. — T Bradford Perez Richmond 
was the eighth in descent from William 
Freeborne, through his mother, 7 Mary 
Weaver. 

7 Mary Weaver was also descended 
from a Gideon Freeborne, through her 
paternal grandmother, 3 Martha Durfee. 
8 Furman Whitwell was great-grandson 
of the same 3 Martha Durfee. 



Freeborn. 
2 Gideon. 



33 



FREEBORN,— "Gideon. 

b. 

m. Sarah, daughter of Thomas and 
Ann Brownell (she d. Sept. 6, 1676) 
June 1, 1658. 

m. 2nd, Mary, widow of John Lawton 
and daughter of Mathew and Eleanor 
Boomer, June 3rd, 1678. (She died 

1715)- 

d. Feb. 28, 1720. 
(Of Portsmouth, R. I.) 

We are uninformed of the date or 
place of Gideon Freeborn's birth, but it 
probably took place in Roxbury about 
1640 or 1645. 

His life was uneventful. 1675-90- 
1703-4-13, Deputy. 1687, Overseer of 
the Poor. March 5th, 1690, he bought 
of James Sweet and 3 Jane, his wife 
(daughter of "Sarah Freeborn and 
Nathaniel Browning ), of Prudence 
Island, for .£12, a quarter of twenty 
acres in Portsmouth, given by * William 
Freeborn to the mother of said Jane. 
Sept. 27th, 1697, he deeded step-son, 
George Lawton, a quarter share in 
Misquamicut, for love, etc. May, 1708, 
he and wife Mary deeded daughter 
Mercy, wife of Thomas Coggeshall, a 
half share in East Greenwich. (The 
whole of his tract in the town was 180 
acres.) Aug. 1st, 1709, a similar gift 
was made to his daughter Mary, wife 
of Thomas Brayton. July 26th, 1712, 
he deeded kinsman Wm. Manchester 
ten acres in Potawomet. 

The will of Gideon Freeborn was 
proved March 14th, 1720. His son 
Gideon was named executor. Over- 



seers, sons-in-law Joseph Wanton and 
4 Thomas Cornell. "To son Gideon, all 
homestead farms for life, and at his 
death half to male heirs and other half 
to rest of sons' children (at disposal of 
said son Gideon); and whoever enjoys 
farms at death of son Gideon shall pay 
their mother ,£20 a year while widow. 
If son Gideon die without male issue, 
then next male heirs to have, and to 
pay each female issue of son Gideon 
.£50, and to grand - daughter Sarah, 
daughter of my son William, deceased. 
To wife Mary, ,£15 yearly while widow, 
use of great lower room in my new 
house, and lodging room adjoining, 
firewood, fruit of orchard, use of riding 
horse, feather bed, etc., and to her a 
good bed at her disposal. If she mar- 
ries, only £\o a year. To grandson 
Gideon Wanton, 120 acres in Tiverton. 
To daughters Sarah Wanton, 3 Anne 
Durfee, Martha Cornell, Susanna Free- 
born and Patience Anthony, 500 acres 
in Pennsylvania, equally. To daughter 
Comfort Freeborn, 100 acres in Free- 
hold, East New Jersey. To grandson 
John Freeborn and his children, farm 
in Coweset, Warwick, of 200 acres, and 
Negro boy Samson — when grandson is 
of age. To grandson Gideon Durfee, 
100 acres in Coweset. To daughters 
Mary Brayton, Mercy Coggeshall and 
Comfort Freeborn, each three acres in 
Coweset. To daughter Sarah Freeborn, 
100 acres in Coweset. To grand- 
daughters Elizabeth Borden, Sarah 
Wanton, Mary Wanton, 3 Ann, 3 Sarah, 
3 Patience, 3 Mary, 3 Martha, 3 Susanna and 
3 Elizabeth Durfee, Susannah and Sarah 
Cornell, Abigail and Susannah 



34 



Freeborne. 



: Gida 



"Anthony, Mary, and Hannah Brayton, 
and Elizabeth and Comfort Coggeshall, 
40s. each, when eighteen. To grand- 
sons William, George, and Gideon 
Cornell, 50 acres each in Coweset. To 
grandsons Gideon and David Anthony, 
each 50 acres in Tiverton, and to grand- 
son William Anthony, 45 acres in Tiv- 
erton. To grandsons 3 Thomas and 3 Job 
Durfee, each 50 acres in Coweset. To 
grandson Edward Wanton, 25 acres in 
Tiverton. To grandsons Gideon and 
Thomas Freeborn, each 50 acres in 
Tiverton, etc., etc. To daughter 3 Ann 
Durfee, £2$. Son Gideon to care for 
negro woman Betty for life. To son 
Gideon negro man Eben. * * To 
Quakers ten cords of wood to be deliv- 
ered at Meeting house a cord a year 
for ten years. To grandson Gideon 
Freeborn a silver spoon and silver 
cup. * * * " 

The inventory amounted to over 
^676, and among the articles named are 
Bible, spectacles, .£35 silver money, 
gun, .£11 in plate, and a warming pan. 

We gather from the bequest in his 
will that Gideon Freeborne was a 
Quaker. He was buried in his own 
family burying ground according to the 
custom of the day. 

CHILDREN. 

3 Mary, — b. Feb. 12, 1664. d. Oct. 2K, 
1676. 

3 Sarah,— b. Jan. 14, 1667. m. Joseph, 
son of Edward Wanton, Jan. 29, 1690. 
d. July 10, 1737. 

3 Ann— b. March 28, 1669. m. 2 Thos. 
Durfee. Vide same. 

8 Martha— b. Aug. 8, 1671. m. 4 Thomas, 
son of 8 Thomas Cornell and Susan- 
nah Lawton (vide both names in this 
volume), March 26, 1676. d. Nov. 15, 
1748. Grandmother of Rebecca Cor- 
nell Biddle. Vide Vol. II. 

3 Susannah, — b. March 24, 1674. d. Jan. 
21, 1723. 



'Patience,— b. March 4, 1676. m. Wil- 
liam Anthony, Sept. 7, 1698. d. April 

27. 1/57- 

3 Mary,— b. Aug. 24, 1679. in. Thomas 
Brayton, Aug. 23, 1704. d. 1761. 

HVilliam,— b. Feb. 3, 1682. m. Mary 
Hall, Dec. 21, 1698. d. 1705. 

3 Gideon, — b. Apr. 29, 16S4. m. Eliza- 
beth Nichols, Feb. 1, 1706. m. 2nd, 
Bethiah Shearman, Aug. 9, 1733. d. 
Feb. 21, 1753. 

3 Thomas, — b. Feb. 5, 1688. d. Oct. 1, 
1688. 

3 Comfort, — b. 1691. m. Josiah Cogges- 
hall, Feb. 4, 1715. d. Nov. 1, 1725. 

3 Mercy, — b. 1692. m. Thomas, brother 
of Josiah Coggeshall, March II, 1708. 
d. May 26, 1776. 



Four separate lines in this book run 
back to the Freebornes, thus. 

1 William Freeborne. 

2 Mary m. Element Weaver. 
2 Thomas Weaver. 
3 Thomas Weaver. 

4 Benjamin Weaver. 

r>Euuice m. ^Jonathan Reade. 5 Samuel Weaver. 
oHannah m. 2 Jas. Whitwell. 6Sheffield Weaver. 
sFurman Whitwell. 'Mary Weaver. 

4Anne Whitwell m. 7Bradford Richmond. 



1 William Freeborne. 

2 Gideon Freeborne. 
3 Ann m. 2 Thomas Durfee. 

3 Martha m. 4 Oliver Reade. 

.''Jonathan Reade. ''Wait Reade. 

oHannah m. 2Jas. Whitwell. ("'Sheffield Weaver. 
sFurman Whitwell. "Mary Weaver. 

4Anne Whitwell 111. 'Bradford Richmond. 

s Anne m. 8 W. P. Warner. 

9 Anne m. Chas. 4 French. 

5 Charles French, Jr. 



French. 
1 Ephraim — 2 Enoch. 



FRENCH,— 1 Ephraim. 

b. 

m. 3 Elizabeth, daughter of 'William 
Presbrey and Mary White, about 1775. 

d. about 1780. 
(Of RfofrtM m i Mass.) 

Ephraim French belonged beyond 
the shadow of a doubt to the old estab- 
Jished French family of Taunton aTTd 
Bridgewater; but, failing to trace the 
direct connection, I am obliged to 
number him as the- first of his family. 

The family tradition calls him a 
^Jio grandson of a certain Ephraim French 
who came over from England in 1680 
q and settled in Raynham. As I can find 
no possible trace of the first Ephraim, 
I feel a grave doubt of his existence, it 
appearing much more likely to me that 
he is a myth — at all events as to his 
name. The last Ephraim is almost as 
shadowy as his grandfather, as about 
the only fact we know regarding him is 
that he was not the Ephraim French 
who enlisted in Taunton in 1778. The 
full records of Capt. Ephraim French 
are obtainable and settle this point 
conclusively. 

FRENCH,— Deacon 2 Enoch. 

b. in Taunton, May, 1779. 

m. 6 Sarah, daughter of -'Joseph 
Reade and 6 Mary Cornell, Jan. 20, 
1799-1800 (she b. 1776, d. Feb. 8, 1828). 

m. 2nd, Mrs. 7 Mary (Weaver) Rich- 
mond Earle, Sept. 20, 1828 (she b. Jan. 
25, 1778, d. Aug. 28, 1846). 

d. May 16, 1847. 
(Of Taunton and Fall River, Mass.) 

Enoch French was born in that part 
of Taunton called "jjynhjfr 1 -.^Hp wa s 
hardly more than an infant when his 
father died, and his mother soon after 
contracted a second marriage with 
Capt. Jael Hathaway. It was Dec, 



1785, when the wedding took place and 
the two little French boys came to 
make part of the family in the old 
Hathaway homestead — the very house 
pictured in this volume. 

During the next few years Enoch 
French attended school, where he made 
the acquaintance of his future wife. 
She was the youngest child of 5 Joseph 
Read^f, the tanner, and in the early 
nineties her school-boy lover was ap- 
prenticed to her father. The latter 
died soon after and his son James be- 
came the head of the business and 
continued so until about the end of the 
eighteenth century. In 1799, Enoch 
French and 6 Sarah Reade were married, 
their old school master writing the 
wedding song, a part of which is given 
in Vol. II. Soon after the marriage 
James Read^ received a call to the 
ministry, and sold the tannery to hfisl- 
former apprentice. The original deed 
of transfer is in the possession of Miss 
Abbie French, of Fall River. This 
tannery was situated on what is now 
known as French's Hill. Its owner 
was also extensively interested in 
farming. 

In 1S20, Enoch French opened Fall 
River's first boot and shoe store, his 
sons, Asa, Stephen and Job, acting as 
clerks. The three were admitted to 
partnership in 1822, 1824, and 1826. A 
very complete account of this business 
and the lives of its owners may be 
found in the large History of Bristol 
County. 

In 1832, the firm separated, Asa tak- 
ing the tannery, Stephen the shoe- 
manufactory, and Job remaining with 
his father. 

The Great Fire of July 2, 1843, de- 
stroyed all the business- property of 
Mr. French, and also his residence. 



36 



French. 



3 George Reed. 



I copy the following list of losses 
and insurance as an interesting souvenir 
of the fire and the times: 

Shoe store of Richard French, loss 
#1,980. Insurance $1200. 

Shoe store of Enoch French & Co., 
loss $5,675. Insurance $4,375. 

Three -story building owned by E. 
French, loss $4000. Insurance 
$2,500. 

Residence of E. French. 

Shoe manufactory of Stephen French, 
loss $4,400. Insurance $1800. 

Store of W. B. French, loss $820. In- 
surance $250. 

To appreciate the value of the above, 
one must remember what money was 
worth in those days. Deacon French 
told his son George, when the latter was 
starting out in life, that if a man could 
keep up his running expenses and lay 
by two hundred dollars a year, he was 
getting rich fast enough. 

Nevertheless, the terrible fire losses 
only seem to have redoubled the ener- 
gies of father and son, and in the course 
of a very few months they were at busi- 
ness again as usual. 

As a man Deacon French is de- 
scribed to me as tall, with blue eyes 
and brown hair. His portrait is of a 
face characterized by firmness and in- 
flexibility. The upright carriage of the 
head and the well defined lines about the 
mouth attest to the truth of the ex- 
pression. There is a religious aspect 
to the figure, borne out by a Bible in 
one hand. Deacon French was a de- 
voted churchman; he was a rigid Bap- 
tist, and often assisted the blind pastor 
(Rev. Mr. Borden) with services. 
When the latter was away Mr. French 
frequently filled the pulpit alone. 



In all the relations of life he was one 
who acquitted himself above reproach. 
He was a devoted father, not only to 
his own children, but to his two step- 
children also. After the marriage with 
Mrs. Earle he became the legal guardian 
of her children, and remained such 
until they came of age. The two fami- 
lies were united in bonds of love and 
esteem which time has never lessened. 

CHILDREN. 

3 Asa Presbrey, — b. Nov. 19, 1S00. Vide 

Vol. II for family record. 
3 George Reade, — b. Jan. 24, 1S02. 

Vide the following. 
3 Stephen Leonard, — Vide Vol. II. 
3 Richard Cornell, — b. Feb., 1805. m. 

Abbey A. Peckham, June 20, 1831. 

d. Aug. 26, 1 85 1. J^^ ^-J*" H-/2r?^ 
3 Job B. ,— b. March 6, iSo6 X Vide Vol. ' 

II for family record. 
3 Nancy, — d. in infancy. 
3 Abiam, — d. in infancy. ^r?&- <? >-> ' 
3 William Barnaby, — Vide Vol. II for 

family record. 
3 James, — d. in infancy. 
3 Eliza, — m. William Lindsay. Vide 

Vol. II for family record. 



FRENCH,— 3 George Reade. 

b. Jan. 24, 1802. 

m. Sarah Caroline, daughter of John 
Weeks and Susan (Williams) Appoin, 
April 5, 1827 (she b. July 2, 1809. d. 
May 19, 1867). 

in. 2nd, Mrs. Sophia (Allen) Sawyer, 
Aug. 27, 1872. A&e-d, S/iHtr-t /?./<??£' 

d. March 15, 1S89. 
(Of Fall River and Wilmington, N."?jj)& 

George Reade French began his 
business life in his eighteenth year, 



^v&f Uf oM^t n <vf jLA^ik^ 




GEORGE READE FRENCH. 



French. 



37 



a shoe 
OneySville, 









when he became the manager of 
and leather manufactory in 
now part of Providence. 
His health failing, he was obliged to 
make a change, and embarked in the 
sloop "Rosetta" for Darien, Ga. There 
he entered the store of Perry Davis, 
who afterwards became famous as the 
proprietor of the world renowned "Pain 
killer." I do not know whether the 
great discovery was then in a shape to 
have benefited Mr. French, but after 
ten months' clerking for its inventor he 
was certainly able to return North, and 
complete arrangements for entering 
into a permanent business in Wilming- 
ton. This plan was carried out in the 
autumn of 1822, and the new firm of 
"Hathaway and French" began dealing 
in lumber and general merchandise. 
This Hathaway was John Hathaway, a 
de%cenaant of 4Tap,t — Ja©l — Hathaway 
(vide Vol. II): The firm was dissolved 
in 1828, and Mr. French opened a shoe 
and leather store under his own name. 
From that date until the time of the 
late war he was the sole manager of the 
business and so successful that in spite 
of the heavy expenses of a large family 
and an almost uncontrollable tendency 
to build and support churches, he had 
accumulated a comfortable fortune, 
and might well have retired on his lau- 
rels — and his income. 

The war changed all this. It ren- 
dered all Southern securities worthless 
and made good shoes and leather con- 
vertible into nothing better than paper 
money worth value only as paper. 

Mr. French was a decided Northerner 
in his opinions, and as he did not scru- 
ple to express them, and to say that the 



war was a piece of utter folly, he made 
himself heartily distrusted and disliked 
by the more rancorous and suspicious 
of his neighbors. This feeling culmi- 
nated on an occasion when his life stood 
in danger, and he was obliged to ask 
protection from the government. This 
very circumstance was almost invalua- 
ble to him when the war was over and 
the North triumphant, for of course it 
gave him special consideration. When 
he went to Boston and called a meeting 
of his creditors and laid the whole situ- 
ation before them, representing his 
ruined business and his future plans and 
resources, there was an instant's silence 
and then one man rose and said, "Gen- 
tlemen, you may do as you please, but 
Mr. French can come to my store and 
buy on his credit to any extent he 
needs." With one accord all said the 
same, and the man — who, though well 
past sixty and obliged to begin all over, 
was not discouraged — returned home 
triumphant. His sons entered into 
partnership with him and their energy 
so ably seconded their father's experi- 
ence that the firm was soon restored to 
its old financial position. 

During his commercial career Mr. 
French held many positions of public 
trust. He was president and director 
in the Bank of Wilmington, and direc- 
tor in three other banks, president of 
the Oakdale Cemetery Association and 
of the Seaman's Friend Society. In 
connection with the Baptist church he 
held many other positions. He was a 
strong churchman, and did more to- 
wards erecting the splendid church 
in Wilmington than any other man. 



38 



French. 
■' Charles — 5 Charles. 



In person Mr. French was tall, 
straight and well built up to the time of 
his death. Except for the snowy beard 
that fell to his waist he looked no more 
than sixty even after he had passed 
that period by a quarter of a century. 
His home life was ideally beautiful, two 
sons lived in Wilmington near him, and 
his seven other children came home 
often. It seemed as if his life would 
be prolonged indefinitely, and so it 
might have been but for the shock of 
his youngest daughter's sudden death. 
A month later he was laid by her side 
in that most lovely cemetery of Oak- 
dale. 

CHILDREN. 

4 Sarah Ann, — d. Jan. 24, 1890. 

4 Susan, — 

4 Georgiana, — d. in infancy. 

4 George Reade, — d. in infancy. 

4 William Augustus, — Vide Vol. II for 

family record. 
4 Margaret, — 

4 Caroline, — d. May 25, 1856. 
4 George Reade, Jr., — 
4 James, — 

4 Charles, — Vide the following. 
"Eliza — 
"Josephine, — d. Feb. 14, 1889. 

Vide Vol. II for family record. 



FRENCH— "Charles E. 

m. in St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 12, 188S, 

to 9 Anna Richmond, daughter of 8 W. 

P. Warner and 8 Anna Richmond (she 

b. Oct. 14, 1869). 

(Of Wilmington, N. C, and Minne- 
apolis, Minn.) 

Charles E. French removed to Min- 
neapolis in 1879 and remains in business 

there. 

CHILDREN. 

6 Charles Elting, — b. Sept. 19, 1SS9. 

Vide following. 
5 Anne Hathaway, — b. April 6, 1892. 

d. Dec. 17, 1892. 



FRENCH,— 'Charles Elting. 

b. Sept. 19, 1889. 
(Of Minneapolis and Saint Paul.) 

Charles French, Jr., is the tenth in 
descent from John Hathaway of Taun- 
ton, from John Tripp, from William 
Chase, from John Reade, Richard 
Pearce, Peter Tallman, William Free- 
born, Thomas Brownell, George Parker, 
Clement Weaver, Thomas Rogers, John 
Pabo_die, John Alden, Nathaniel Potter, 
Francis Purdy, Nicholas Theall, William 
Fowler, Louis du Bois, Chretien Deyo, 
Matthys Slecht, Jan Van Leyden and 
Matthys Blancsan, emigrants. 

He is ninth in descent from Andrew 
Warner, John Fletcher, John__White, 
John Stow, William Fletcher, John 
Richmond, Thomas Loring, Nicholas 
Jacobs, Matthew Hawke, John Peck- 
ham, William Wilbor, Ichabod Sheffield, 
Thomas Durfee, Thomas Clark, Thomas 
Scotto, Arthur Hathaway and Kenelm 
Winslow, all of whom were emigrants 
also. 

He is eleventh in descent from Francis 
Cooke and Richard Warren (Pilgrims), 
George Wright, Anthony Paine, and 
William Molines (Pilgrim). 

It may be interesting to know that 
one cannot have in a direct line more 
than eleven American ancestors. Few 
have ten, many children have nine, 
while the grown people of the present 
era are generally seventh or eighth in 
descent from the first comers. 

Charles French, Jr., is the thirteenth 
in descent from Wm. Cushing, who 
died 1493, — from Henry Shearman, of 
Dedham, Suffolk Co., from John Lcn- 
ton, Esq., and from Sir John Cope. 

He is twenty-second in descent from 
William de Warrene (1066). 

May his descendants be as many as 
his ancestors! 




CHARLES ELTING FRENCH. 
Page 38 



GlBBS. 



39 



1 Robert— 2 Robert—* Henry— \Rhoda. 



GIBBS — 

I wish to preface this short notice of 
the Gibbs family with a few words. 
The majority of the Gibbs well known 
in America are descended from Robert 
Gibbs of Boston. His family have a 
genealogy in print, and trace their 
pedigree back to Leofric and Godiva. 
Of the other branch little is known, 
and I believe the following are the first 
records ever printed. Under the cir- 
cumstances, I have thought best to add 
in the second part of this work all the 
additional information acquired which 
had no place just here. 

The grave stone inscriptions were 
copied personally by Miss Abbie 
French, to whose untiring efforts the 
whole of the record is due. Only an 
ardent genealogist can appreciate the 
labor of gathering so much from town 
records and interviews. 



GIBBS— i Robert. 

b. 1630. 

m. Elizabeth 



d. June 20, 1718. 
(Of Somerset, Mass.) 

The inscription on his tombstone runs 
thus: 

"Here lyeth ye body of Robert 
Gibbs. Aged 88 years. Died June 
20, 1718." 

He left a son. 



GIBBS— 2 Robert. 



b. 1670. 
m. Sarah 



, about 1 70 1. 

m. 2nd, Hepsibah , about 1722. 

d. 1752. 



(Of Somerset.) 



CHILDREN. 



3 John, — b. 1702-3. 
3 Israel, — b. 1706. 



3 Sarah, — b. 171 1. 

3 Elizabeth, — b. 171 5. 

3 Robert (Capt.), — b. 1724. m. Joanna 
Terry, Oct. 2, 1748. d. March 21, 
1810. Joanna d. Sept. 29, 1815. 

3 Henry, — Vide the following. 

3 Hepsibah, — b. 1728. 

3 Abigail, — b. 1731. 

3 Samuel, — b. 1733. 

3 Job— b. 1735. 



GIBBS,— 3 Henry. 

Wife not known, but her name was 
probably Mary. 



b. 1726. 



children. 



4 Robert (Capt.), — b. 1750. m. Martha 

Hicks, d. Sept. 21, 181 5. 
4 Benjamin (Capt.), b. 1758. m. Patience 

Wood. Lost at sea, 1795. 
4 Joseph, — 
4 Henry (Capt.), b. 1761. m. Barthana 

Luther, d. June 20, 1S27, aged 66 

yrs., 4 mos., 10 ds. 
4 Mary — 
4 Sarah, — 
4 Rhoda, — b. 1765. d. June 30, 1789. 

m. Capt. 7 Sheffield Weaver. Vide 

Weaver. 
4 Hannah, — 
4 Job — 



GIBBS— 4 Rhoda. 

b. 1765. 

m. Sheffield Weaver, June 13, 1785. 
d. June 30, 1789. 
(Of Somerset.) 

Rhoda Gibbs' life was so short that a 
hundred years after her death the 
greatest difficulty was experienced in 
discovering her Christian name. She 
left two children, a daughter, Mary 
(her mother's name probably), who be- 
came the wife of Bradford Richmond, 
and a son, John. Much of interest in 
regard to each is gathered in the first 
and second of these volumes. 



40 



Gilbert. 
1 Jonathan. 



GILBERT,— * Jonathan. 

b. in England, 1618. 

m. Mary, daughter of John Wright, 
Jan. 29, 1646. She died — 

m. 2nd, Mary, daughter of Hugh 
Welles, , 1650. 

d. Dec. 10, 1682. She died July 3, 
1700, aged 74 years. 
(Of Hartford, Conn.) 

John and Jonathan Gilbert, brothers, 
were among the earliest settlers of 
Hartford, Conn. John married Amy, 
daughter of Thomas Lord, in 1647, ar >d 
the boy John Gilbert, who was captured 
by the Nipmuck Indians in 1676, is be- 
lieved to have been her son. 

Jonathan, in whom we are more espe- 
cially interested, married Mary, the 
daughter of John White, in the winter 
of 1646, he being already a landholder 
in Hartford. In March of the same 
year the young wife's seat in church 
was recorded in the enterings of the 
General Court. It was the fourth seat 
in the middle aisle, and she shared it 
with three other women. That April, 
Gilbert acted as interpreter between 
the Indians and the English govern- 
ment, he having attained great profi- 
ciency in the native tongue. That 
accomplishment, and his courage and 
quickness, made him a leader in all 
affairs with the Indians. 

Increase Mather has drawn a quaint 
and interesting picture of the relations 
between the old and new inhabitants of 
America of that time, and it is well 
worth reading, although space forbids 
any lengthy quotations here. 

"There was Trouble and fears raised in 
the Country, by reason of the River 



Indians, * * * who, it seems, were 
secretly contriving the Death of those 
famous Worthyes, Mr. Hopkins, Mr. 
Hains, Mr. Whiting. * * * An Indian 
testified that Sequasson, the Sachim of 
Waranoke had given him a sum of 
money on condition that he would 
murther the gentleman mentioned. 

"Before the Commissioners convened, 
Mr. Hains had twice sent to Sequasson, 
but he neglected to make his appear- 
ance. Wherefore Jonathan Gilbert was 
sent to him again. * * * The mes- 
senger quickly returned, bringing word 
that he could not speak with Sequasson, 
who he supposed had received notice 
of his coming by other Indians, and 
was thereupon fled." 

The Colonial Records are full of sim- 
ilar notices regarding Mr. Gilbert. In 
1654, he was messenger to Ninigrate, 
Chief of the Narragansetts, returning 
with an answer as wily and evasive as it 
was lengthy. 

April 9th, 1657, the two Gilbert 
brothers went to the Sachem to de- 
mand that those who took part in the 
Massacre of Farmington should be de- 
livered up to justice. 

In 1657, the Government attempted 
to put a stop to the continued blood- 
shed, and Jonathan Gilbert was again 
their emissary. In 1657, he was one of 
those appointed to the command of the 
troops raised, and in 1657 and 1660 he 
was again "dealing" with the Indians. 

All this time his private business had 
never suffered. He was engaged in 
the coasting trade, and held many pub- 
lic offices; was marshall of the Colony 
repeatedly, and served several times in 



Gilbert. 



41 



the legislature. His first wife died at 
the birth of her second child, and he 
married again, the lady being niece of 
Gov. Thomas Welles of Connecticut. 
She was a woman of more than ordinaiy 
gifts, and much of his success was due 
to her. 

Jonathan Gilbert died immensely 
wealthy for the times, Dec. ioth, 1682, 
and was buried in the ancient cemetery 
of Hartford. 

A partial copy of his will is as fol- 
lows. 

"To my dear wife, Mary Gilbert, the 
use of my dwelling house (at Cold 
Spring), house, lotts, etc., warehouse, 
the land I bought of Mr. Callsey, the 
land I did exchange with Mr. Richards, 
the pasture I bought of Andrew Warner, 
and my wood-lott, during the time of 
her widowhood, and till my son Samuel 
be twenty-one years of age." 

(Vide life of Jonathan Gilbert on fol- 
lowing page for his share.) 

"To my son Thomas, my house and 
lot on the riverlet in Hartford, and my 
meadow land. Also ten acres of land. 
Also the lower end of my island, he 
paying to his mother 20s. a year, or 
twenty pounds of good hops. 

"To my son Nathaniel, my farm at 
Meriden; also thirty pounds. 

"To daughters Lidia, Sarah, and Mary 
twenty shillings each. 

"To daughter Hester Gilbert one 
hundred pounds after her marriage or 
at eighteen years of age. 

"To daughter Rachel the same. 

"To son Ebenezer 300 acres of land, 
and also the land in Farmington that I 



bought of Captain Clark, and also that 
purchase of land I bought of Messecap, 
commonly called Pagan Chaumischaug. 
And also £50. 

"My desire is that my wife do remem- 
ber Hannah Kelley and give her 20s. or 
more if she prove obedient. 

"To grandchild John Rossiter ,£10. 

"To grandsons Andrew Belcher and 
Jonathan Richelson, £5 each." 

(Signed Sept. 10, 1674.) 

The real estate was valued at £1312. 

(Refer to N. E. Historical Magazine 
and all Colonial Records.) 

CHILDREN. 

2 Jonathan, — b. May 11, 1648. Vide 
following page. 

2 Mary, — b. Dec. 15, 1649. d. in infancy. 

2 Sarah, — b. July 25, 1651. m. Andrew 
Belcher of Boston. Their son Jon- 
athan became governor of Massachu- 
setts, d. 

2 Mary.— b. 

m. 1, John Rossiter. 2, Samuel Hol- 
ton. d. 

2 Lydia, — b. Oct. 3, 1654. m. Jonathan 
Richelson. 2, Chapman, d. 

2 Thomas, — b. . d. 

2 Nathaniel, — b. . single. 

2 Samuel, — 

m. Mary Rogers, Oct. 2, 16S4. 

2 Ebenezer, — 



m. Charles Dick- 



2 Esther,- -b. — 

inson. d. 
2 Rachel,— m. Josiah Marshfield, Sept. 

20, 1686. d. 



Gilbert. 



* Jonathan — 3 Nathaniel — 4 Eun 



GILBERT.— JONATHAN. 

b. May II, 1648. 

m. 3 Dorothy, daughter of Rev. 2 Sam- 
uel Stow and 2 Hope Fletcher (she was 
born Aug. II, 1659. d. July 14, 1698). 

d. Feb. 1, 1698. 
(Of Hartford and Middletwon, Conn.) 

Jonathan Gilbert was a wild young 
man and was finally shipped to the 
West Indies to repent his misdeeds. 
After his return he was reconciled with 
his father, and towards the end of com- 
plete restoration to respectability mar- 
ried Dorothy, daughter of Rev. Samuel 
Stow. But when the senior Gilbert 
died, his first born had a most unpleas- 
ant surprise in discovering his share of 
his father's wealth to be either twenty 
pounds in cash or certain lands in Had- 
ham. He immediately petitioned the 
general court for a larger share, quoting 
Scripture to prove that the first-born 
ought never to be deprived of his inher- 
itance. I am sorry not to be able to 
state the results of this interesting law- 
suit, which must have been one of the 
first American attempts at will-breaking. 

CHILDREN. 

2 Mary — 

Jonathan, — 

2 John, — 

2 Nathaniel, — b. Dec. 27, 1689. Vide 

next column. 
2 Sarah, — 
2 Ebenezer, — born July, 1698. 



zee. 



GILBERT,- ^Nathaniel. 

b. in Middletown, Dec. 27, 1689. 

m. Elizabeth Prout. 

d. 
(Of Middletown.) 

Mrs. Vine S. Warner has a very curi- 
ous old book "printed in London for 
Robert Milbourne, 161S", which has 
written on the fly leaf "Elizabeth Gil- 
bert. Her Book. The binding of the 
book paid for by my son Ebenezer." 
This "Elizabeth" was Mrs. Nathaniel 
Gilbert, as is proven by the date, March 
1769. She probably had other children 
besides 4 Ebenezer and 1 Eunice, the sub- 
ject of the following. 



GILBERT,— 'Eunice. 

b. April 12, 1729. 

m. Eleazer Gaylord, March 12, 1749 
(he was born March, 1725. d. Dec. 9, 
1S06). 

d. Nov. 17, 1772. 
(Of Middletown, Conn., and Skaneateles, 

N. Y.) 

Mrs. Eunice Gilbert Gaylord was the 
grandmother of Dr. 7 Eben Warner. 
She and her husband spent their last 
years in the family of Deacon 6 Ebenezer 
Warner. 

CHILDREN. 

5 Eunice, — b. March 14, 1752. 
5 Annah, — b. Jan. 2, 1754. 
5 Susannah, — b. Jan. 2, 1754. 
5 Susannah, — b. July 2, 1756. 
5 Elizabeth, — b. June 17, 1758. 
s Eleazer, — b. Feb. 2, 1760. 
5 Hannah, — b. Feb. 6, 1762. 
5 Dolly, — b. March 12, 1764. 
6 Millicent, — b. Dec. 17, 1766. 
6 Millicent,— b. Dec. 17, 176S. 
5 Molly, — Vide "Ebenezer Warner. 
6 Sarah, — b. Aug. 3, 1772. 



Hathaway (I and II). 
1 Arthur — ~ Jonathan — 3 Gamaliel — x John. 



43 



HATHAWAY— ! Arthur. 

b. probably in Gloucestershire, 
m. 3 Sarah, daughter of 2 John Cook 
and 2 Sarah Warren, Nov. 20, 1652 (she 
was born about 1635). 
(Of Plymouth, Marshfield and Dart- 
mouth, Mass.) 

Arthur Hathaway came to Plymouth 
in 1630. He was a very young man, 
and is thought to be a relative of the 
John Hathaway mentioned in the fol- 
lowing pages. We find him a resident 
of Marshfield in 1638, and holding two 
positions of trust in Dartmouth in 1667, 
He was named freeman in the latter 
town in 1670, and was one of the orig- 
inal proprietors of the town of Dart- 
mouth in 1684. 

He left at least three children, a John, 
born Sept. 17, 1653, 3 Sarah, born 1655, 
and 2 Jonathan. As we have records of 
none but the latter, the honor of being 
descended from x Richard Warren is 
proven to belong only to his descendants. 



HATHAWAY— ^Jonathan. 

b. probably about 1660. 

m. Abigail . 

d. . 

(Of Dartmouth.) 

Mr. C. A. Hathaway of Berkley is 
the authority for Jonathan Hathaway's 
being the son of Arthur. Jonathan is 
rescued from oblivion only by being 
the son of his parents and father of his 
son. 

children. 

3 Gamaliel, — Vide the following. 
3 Jonathan, — b. Oct. 1, 1716. m. Bridget. 

d. May 22, 1802. 
3 Seth,— 



HATHAWAY— 3 Gamaliel. 

b. . 

m. Anne Cathcart. 

d. . 

(Of Dartmouth and Fair Haven.) 

Gamaliel Hathaway, both by inheri- 
tance and acquisition, became a very 
wealthy man. The Revolution shattered 
all this, and left him nothing in his old 
age but his farms in Fair Haven and 
Amherst. When he died he gave one 
to each of his sons and nothing to his 
only daughter. 

children. 

4 Eleazer, — b. Aug. 1, 1739. m. Alice 

Pope. 
*Anne, — b. 1741. Vide Capt. 5 Benj. 

Dillingham. 
4 Micah — 
4 Obed — 



HATHAWAY— » John (bears no 
proven connection to the preceding). 

b. in England, 1630. 

m. . 

m. 2nd, Ruth (she was born 1643. 
died Sept. 10, 1705). 

d. . 

(Of Taunton.) 

John Hathaway was a descendant of 
the Hathaways of Gloucestershire, a 
fact proved by the coat of arms in the 
possession of certain of his descend- 
ants, and which came to them through 
his son Abraham. It bears an old 
inscription which states that "This 
Coat Armour is of very ancient erec- 
tion in the Church of Rewardine, 



44 



Hathaway (II). 
* John— * Jacob. 



within the Forest of Dean in Glouces- 
tershire and pertained to the family of 
Hatheway of the same place." 

This interesting fact proves the Hath- 
away of Taunton to have been of good 
birth and in no way connected with 
John Hadaway of Barnstable — a sadly 
inferior character who is often confused 
with him. 

He was a man of great prominence 
in Taunton, where his name is con- 
nected with every foundation of that 
city's importance. He was representa- 
tive from 16S0 to 1684, and again in 
1691, and held innumerable local posi- 
tions. 

He married twice, and his two wives 
are buried in the farm once his in Berk- 
ley. It is believed that his body was 
carried back to England for burial, as 
no trace of his grave can be found. 

CHILDREN. 

2 John, — Vide the following. 

2 Abraham, — b. about 1652. m. Rebec- 
ca Wilbur, Aug. 28, 1684. d. August, 
1725. 

3 Isaac, — 

'-Rebecca, — m. Jared Talbot, 1689. 

^Abigail,— 

2 Jacob, — 



HATHAWAY ,— 2 John (called Jr.). 

b. . 

m. 1st, Hannah, m. 2nd, Christian. 

d. 1729-30. 
(Of Taunton and Freetown.) 

2 John Hathaway was one of the orig- 
inal settlers of Freetown (1669), and 
after its incorporation in 1683 held num- 
erous positions of trust and honor there, 
being selectman during the years 1687- 
'88- '98- '99- 1 700- 1 70 1 - '6- '7- '8- '9- ' 1 i - ' ! 2- 
''3-'i9- 



CHILDREN. 



3 John, — d. before 1724. 

3 Jacob, — Vide the following. 

3 Ephraim, — m. Abigail Davis, 171 7. 

3 Isaac, — m. Sarah Makepeace, 1710. 

3 Thomas, — 

3 Hannah, — 

3 Sarah, — 

3 Martha — 

3 Abigail, — m. David Shearman, 1710. 

3 Experience, — 



HATHAWAY,— 3 Jacob. 

b. in Taunton, 1675-6. 

m. 3 Philis, daughter of 2 Benjamin 
Chase and 2 Philippe Shearman, Jan. 
2S, 1697 (she was born July 5, 1679. 
d. .) 

d. . 

(Of Taunton and Assonet.) 

Jacob Hathaway and Philis Chase 
were married by Thomas Terry, Justice 
of Taunton. The bridegroom was en- 
sign of the local militia, a position 
which he must have resigned later on 
becoming a Quaker. In 1718-19 he 
was imprisoned for his faith, and is said 
to have named his eleventh child in 
memory of the persecution. Full 
records of all his children and especial- 
ly of his son Jael are given in Vol. II, 
each under his own name. It is there- 
fore not necessary to mention them 
here with any detail. 

CHILDREN. 

4 Joseph, — Vide following page. 
'Hannah,-- 4 Mcletiah — 

4 Jacob,— 4 John,— 

4 Isaac, — 4 Philip,— 

4 Guilford,— 4 Benjamin. 

4 Betty — 'Jael,— 



Hathaway. 



45 



* Joseph— * Jacob— - l ''Joseph— -'• 'Hannah. 



HATHAWAY — Joseph. 

b. about 1698. 

m. 3 Alice, daughter of 2 Jas. Strange 
and Alice Shearman. 

d.— 
(Of Assonet and Freetown, Mass.) 

(Called "Joseph, the Quaker.") 

CHILDREN. 

5 Paul,— b. 1719. Vide Vol. II. 
5 Gideon, — b. about 1721. m. Mary Dur- 

fee, Feb. 27, 1745. 
5 Abigail, — m. Lot Strange, Jr., Aug. 29, 

1745. m. 2nd, Moses Nichols, Dec- 

22, 1748. 
5 John, — 

5 Lot, — m. Mercy Hathaway, his cousin. 
5 Jacob, — Vide the following. 
5 Alice,— 



HATHAWAY— sJacob. 

b. about 1727. 

m. Oct. 28, 1750, to iHannah, daugh- 
ter of 3 Andrew Clarke and ^Elizabeth 
Winslow (she born July 13, 1726). 
(Of Freetown and Fair Haven, Mass.) 

CHILDREN. 

"Shadrach, — b. Aug. 7, 1754. d. on the 

Jersey prison ship during Revolution. 
"Lovisa, — b. April 13, 1750. m. 

Janney. m. 2nd, Rev. Benj. West, the 

prominent religious writer. 
6 Reuben, — b. Nov. 27, 1757. m. Nabby 

Winslow and inherited the Hathaway 

homestead. 
"Jacob, — b. Oct. 15, 1750. d. with Shad- 

rach. 
"Betty (or Priscilla), — b. Oct. 10, [762. 

m. Nathaniel Hammond. 
"Joseph, — b. June 2, 1765. Vide life of 

Anne Dillingham. For children vide 

Vol. II. 



"Thankful, — b. May 5, 1767. d. single. 
"Rebecca, — b. Aug. 27, 1769. m. Philip 
Crandon. 



HATH AWAY— 1 Hannah. 

(daughter of "Joseph Hathaway.) 

b. Aug. 16, 1795. d. Dec. 10, 1867. 
(Of Fair Haven, and Sunbury, Ga.) 

The life of this lady is so fully given 
with that of her husband ( 3 Furman 
Whitwell) that I shall only speak here 
of her very lovely character. Always 
delicate in health, suffering great sorrows 
early in life, and fearful physical mar- 
tyrdom in the later years, it would 
seem that her part in memory would be 
simply a memory. Yet her life was as 
full of thought for others and energy 
as any well person's, and the many 
whom she loved and planned for speak 
constantly of her, her life, her home, 
'and the little maidens whom she trained 
to be eyes, hands and feet to her in her 
helplessness. It is very sweet and 
touching to see how, in her last illness, 
she turned to "Fanny," for the little 
attentions which the young girl who 
had come to her a child of six could 
administer more tenderly even than a 
daughter. 

I have a portrait of this great-grand- 
mother, taken in the prime of life. 
Her hair is parted at the side and 
looped low under a cap of exquisite 
lace. The face is long and oval with a 
full chin, the eye-brows are high and 
arch inward, and the eyes are dark 
with heavy upper lids. The nose and 
mouth are large, but well formed, and 
express a certain self-contained firmness 
— a firmness toward self rather than 
others — which is the only likeness to 
her daughter that I can trace. 



4 6 



Hawke — Hazard — Houghtaling — Jacobs. 



HAWKE,— 1 Matthew. 

b. 1610. 

m. Margaret — — . 



d. Dec. 11, 1684. 
(Of Cambridge, England, and Boston.) 

Matthew Hawke with his wife, Mar- 
garet, and servant, John Fearing, came 
in the "Diligent," embarking at Lon- 
don and arriving in Boston Aug. 10, 
1638. He was made freeman 1642, and 
served once as town clerk. 

CHILDREN. 

2 Elizabeth, — b. July, 1639. m. Stephen 

Lincoln, Feb., 1660. d. Nov. 4, 1713. 
2 Sarah, — bp. Aug. 1, 1641. m. 2 John 

Cushing. Vide Cushing. 
2 Bathia, — bp. 1643. m - Benj. Stetson. 
2 Mary, — bp. Aug., 1646. m. a Benjamin 

Loring, Dec, 1670. d. 1714. 
2 James, — b. May, 1649. 
2 Deborah, — b. March, 1652. 
2 Hannah, — bp. July 22, 1655. m. 2 Peter 

Cushing, June, 1685. 



HAZARD,— 1 Thomas. 

b. 1610. 

m. Martha (she died 1669). m. 

2nd, Mrs. Martha- Sheriff, 1675. 

d. 16S0. 
(Of Boston and Portsmouth.) 

Tradition says Thomas Hazard came 
from Wales, bringing his son Robert 
with him, about 1635. He was m Bos- 
ton that year, but soon removed to 
Aquidncck, where he held several posi- 
tions of importance. In his will he cut 
all his children off with a shilling for 
disapproving of his second marriage. 

CHILDREN. 

2 Robert, — b. 1735. m. Mary Brownell. 
2 Elizabeth, — m. Geo. Lawton. Vide 

Lawton. 
2 Hannah, — m. Stephen Wilcox. 
2 Martha,— m. 'Tchabod Potter. 



HOUGHTALING,— 

I am sorry to be obliged to give the 
outline only of this particular line of 
Dutch ancestry. 

x Jan Hoogtaling came from Holland 
in the middle of the seventeenth cen- 
tury. He married Ariantje, the daugh- 
ter of Adrian von Leyden of Appel. 
They had sons, 2 Willem and 2 Jan. 

2 \Villem married Ariantje Simmels, 
and had: 3 Samuel, bp. at Kingston, 
June 8, 1679; 3 PHiLLiPUs(Jan. 31, 16S1); 
3 Dina (Oct. 14, 1683); and 3 Hiskia 
(Jan. 31, 16S6). 

3 Philjs, or Phillipus, married Jane 
Roosa and had children as follows: 
4 Ariantje, — bp. at Kingston, Sept. 17, 

1704. 
4 Anna Margarita, — bp. Aug. iS, 1706. 
4 Dina, — bp. May 17, 1710. 
4 \Villem, — bp. July 8, 171 1. 
4 Jannetje, — bp. Feb. 15, 1713. m. May 

6, 1733, to 3 Hendricus du Bois. 

same name. 
4 Rachel,— bp. May 1, 171 5. 
4 Sara — bp. Oct. 11, 171 7. 
4 Lea, — bp. Dec. 20, 1719. 



Vide 



JACOBS,— 1 Nicholas. 

m. Mary . 

d. June, 1657. 
(Of Watertown.) 

Nicolas Jacobs came in 1633 with 
wife and two children. He was Repre- 
sentative once. 

children. 
2 John, — b. in England. m. Margary 

Eames. 
2 Elizabeth, — b. in E . m. John 

Thaxter, 
a Josiah, — b. and d., 1642. 
2 Joseph, —bp. May 10, 1646. 
2 Mary, — m. John Otis. 
2 Sarah, — m. ~ Matthew Cushing. 
'-Hannah, — Vide 2 Thomas Loring. 
-Deborah, — m. Nathaniel Thomas. 



Latham. 
Lewis. 



47 



LATHAM— Lewis. 

b. 1555. 

m. Winifred. 

Buried at Elston, Bedford Co., May 
15, 1655. He died aet. 100 years. 

Falconer to Charles I. 

The life of Lewis Latham is chiefly 
interesting to the many Americans who 
can claim descent from him through 
his daughter Frances. 

The pedigree of Latham is given in 
Vol. Ill of the R. I. Historical Maga- 
zine, and although imperfect gives 
clews which might develop through 
research into a connected line. The 
arms borne by Lewis Latham were the 
same as those of the established family 
of the name. 

F. A. Holden advertises portraits of 
Lewis Latham for sale, and I should 
think such a photograph would be 
much valued by his descendants. (Vide 
Vol. Ill, R. I. Hist. Magazine, for ad- 
dress.) 

The will of this gentleman was as 
follows: 

"In the Prerogative Court of Canter- 
bury. 

"In the name of God, Amen. 

"The sixth day of May, in the year 
of our Lord God one thousand, six 
hundred fifty and three, I Lewis Latham 
of Elveston, in the county of Bedford, 
gentleman, being of perfect health and 
memory doe make and ordain this my 
last will and Testament, in manner and 
form following, that is to say: 

"First and especially, I bequeathe my 
soule into the hands of Jesus Christ my 
Saviour and Redeemer with the full 
assurance of the full pardon and remis- 
sion of all my sinnes. In and by and 
through the meritts, death and passion 



of Jesus Christ, my Saviour and Re- 
deemer, and my bodie to the earth from 
whence it came, to be buried at the 
direction of my executrix, hereafter 
named, and for my worldly goods as 
followeth: — 

"Imprimis, I give and bequeathe to 
my two sonnes Henry Latham and 
John Latham twelve pence apiece if 
they demand it. Item, I give and be- 
queathe to my daughters Anne Seagar, 
Frances Clarke, Katharine Garnett and 
Elizabeth Bibble twelve pence apiece if 
they come to demand it. Item, I give 
and bequeathe to Ellen Sherringham, 
my daughter, twelve pence if she come 
and demand it. Item, I give and be- 
queathe to Winnifred Dewnes one bed- 
steade without furniture theretoe be- 
longing. 

"All the rest of my goods, chattels 
and catties whatsoever, I give and 
bequeathe to Whinethred my loving 
wife whom I make executrix of this my 
last Will and Testament." .... 

(Here follows the customary disown- 
ing of previous wills.) 

"Sealed and delivered in the pres- 
ence of Robert Fernald, Jane Farnell 
and Susanna Farnell." 

Proved Sept. 1, 1655. 

The Whinethred above mentioned 
was probably a second or third wife, 
and not the mother of Frances Latham. 
Tradition, so fondly treasured by those 
who enjoy fiction more than history, 
has called Frances a daughter of Charles 
I. If any of her descendants should 
desire to refute such a slander, they 
will only need to point to the birth 
dates of the king and his reputed 
daughter. The question will then be 
settled. 



48 



Latham — Lawton. 



y- 



s 



y 






jp- 




LATHAM— Frances. 

b. 1611. 

d. Sept., 1677. 
(Of England and Rhode Island.) 

To those who love to read between 
the lines this lady's life presents a de- 
lightful study, for there must surely 
have been much of great interest in it. 

She was well born, the daughter of 
one Lewis Latham, a nd wa s -ia-early 
y o ulh- " s ometime — fefee — wife of L or d 
IL cnric - Weslun. " Before her seven- 
teenth year she became the wife of 
William Dungan, a perfumer of Lon- 
don, who lived in St. Martin's in the 
Fields, and died in 1636, leaving three 
little daughters and a son. 
. In about two years the young widow 
married Jeremiah Clarke and emi- 
grated with him to America, where they 
settled in Portsmouth. Mr. Clarke died 
in January, 1652, and his death was soon 
followed by that of the widow's fathet^ 
who bequeathed his daughter I2d., a 
bequest which suggests a good deal 
more than its value. 

Mrs. Clarke was married again very 
soon, this time to the Rev. William 
Vaughan, who survived her. 

She lies buried in Newport Cemetery 
with the inscription, "Here Lyeth ye 
Body of Mrs. Frances Vaughan, alias 
Clarke, ye mother of ye only children 
of Capt'n Jeremiah Clarke. She died 
ye first week in Sept. 1677 m Y e 67th 
year of her age." 

CHILDREN. 

Barbara, — b. 1628. m. James Barker. 
William- 
Frances, — b. 1630, m. Randall Holden, 

1648. 
Thomas, — m. Elizabeth Weaver. 
For children by Mr. Clarke vide Clarke. 



LAWTON— J George. 

b.— 

m. 2 Elizabeth, daughter of ^hos. 
Hazard by his first wife. 

d. Oct. 5, 1693. 
(Of Portsmouth.) 

George Lawton was admitted an in- 
habitant of Portsmouth in 1638. April 
30, 1639, he signed the famous compact. 
Jan. 25, 1648, he had forty acres granted 
him near his brother's land. Aug. 31, 
1671, the meeting to prepare defensive 
plans against the then threatening 
Indians was held at the house of George 
Lawton. Jan. 30, 1690, he was one of 
six to send congratulatory message to 
King William and Queen Mar)- on their 
accession and to inform them of the 
seizure of Governor Andros. 

George Lawton probably came over 
when a child, as his wife did, but as I 
cannot satisfy myself on this point I am 
obliged to number him as the first of 
his family. 

CHILDREN. 

2 Isabel, — m. Samuel Albio. d. Apr. 1, 

173°. 

2 John, — m. Mary Boomes. She m. 2, 

Gideon Freeborn, d. 1678. 
2 Mary,— m. John Babcock. d. Nov. 8, 

171 1. 
2 George,— m. Naomi Hunt, Jan. 17, 

1677. d. Sept. 11, 1697. 
2 Robert,— m. Mary Wodell, Feb. 16, 

168 1. d. Jan. 25, 1706. 
2 Susanna, — m. Thomas Cornell, d. 

December 9, 1712. Vide Cornell. 
2 Ruth,— m. William Wodell, Feb. 10, 

1681. d. April 15, 1726. 
2 Mcrcy— m. James Tripp, Jan. 19, 16S2. 

d. 1685. 
2 Job,— d. unmarried, Oct. 8, 1697. 
'Elizabeth,— m. Robert Carr. d. 1704. 



LORING. 

1 Thomas — 2 Thomas — 3 Thomas. 



49 



LORING— Thomas. 



b. in England. 

m. Jane Newton about 1627 (she b. 
-, d. Aug. 25, 1672). 



d. April 1, 1661. 
(Of Axminster, Devonshire; and Hing- 

ham, New England.) 

Thomas Loring and family left their 
Devonshire home Dec. 22, 1634, and 
emigrated to America. They made a 
short stop at Dorchester and then 
settled permanently in Hingham. Here 
the family dwelt in peace, the father a 
deacon of the church and beloved and 
respected on all sides. His death oc- 
curred in Hull where possibly, he was 
visiting his eldest son. Jane Loring 
survived her husband several years and 
at her death left her property as fol- 
lows: 

"To son Thomas a volume called 
'The Jewel of Contentment' printed at 
London in 1645. To his wife Hannah, 
a yellow pair of bodices, etc. To son 
John, a volume called 'The Covenant of 
Grace.' To his wife Mary, suit of head 
linen, kersey waistcoat with gold lace, 
etc. To Benjamin, the interest in a 
'Catch' or vessel at sea. To his wife 
Mary, riding suit, pillion, etc." 

CHILDREN. 

2 Thomas, — Vide following. 
2 John, — b. Dec. 22, 1630. m. Mary 
Brookes, Dec. 16, 1657. d. Sept. 19, 

I7I3- 

2 Josiah, — m. Elizabeth Prince, 1662. d. 
Feb. 14, 1713. 

2 Isaac, — bp. Jan. 22, 1640. d. Feb., 1640. 

2 Joshua, — b. 1643. d. young. 

2 Benjamin, — b. Nov. 17, 1644 (or Jan. 
9,1642. Bridgeman and Savage con- 
fuse the names), m. 2 Mary Hawke, 
1670. d. March 10, 1716. 



LORING— 2 Thomas. 

b. in Axminster, 1629. 

m. 2 Hannah, daughter of Nicholas 
Jacob, Dec. 13, 1657 (she was bp. Feb. 
23, 1640. d. Oct. 20, 1720). d. 1679. 
(Of Hingham and Hull, Mass.) 

Thomas Loring was named freeman 
in the town of Hull, 1673. He died in 
middle age, and his widow married 
Stephen French. 

CHILDREN. 

3 Hannah, — b. Aug. 9, 1664. m. Rev 
2 Jeremiah Cushing, 1685. 

3 Thomas, — Vide the following. 

3 Deborah, — b. March 15, 1668. t m. Hon. 
2 John Cushing, 1688. 

3 David, — b. Sept. 15, 1671. m. Eliza- 
beth Otis, Jan., 1699. 

3 Caleb, — b. June 9, 1674. m. Lydia 
Gray, Aug. 7, 1696. 



LORING— 3 Thomas. 

b. July 29, 1667. 

m. 3 Deborah, daughter of 2 John 
Cushing and 2 Sarah Hawkes, April 19, 
1699 (she was b. Sept. 14, 1674. d. Oct. 
iS, 1770). 

d. Dec. 5, 1717. 
(Of Hingham and Duxbury, Mass.) 

3 Thomas Loring's widow married 
Col. 3 Sylvestre Richmond, and his 
eldest daughter married the Colonel's 
son. There is a family genealogy of 
the Lorings published which speaks 
more fully of them than I have space 
to. It gives the family arms, tomb 
stones in Boston, etc., etc. 

children. 
4 Thomas, — 
4 Joshua, — b. 1 70 1. 
4 Nathaniel, — b. Aug. 21, 1704. 
4 Benjamin, — b. Oct. 12, 1708. 
4 Deborah, — Vide "Richmond, Perez," 
4 Hannah, — ■ 



So 



Marbury. 
I Villi am — Francis. 



MARBURY— William (Esq.). 

b. 

m. Agnes, daughter of John Lenton, 
Esq. 

d. 
(Of Grisby, in the Parish of Burgh- 

upon-Bains, Lincolnshire.) 

An English gentleman of the sixteenth 
century who had children as follows: 

Edward, — knighted in 1603. High 
Sheriff of Lincoln Co. at the time of 
his death in 1605. 
William, — died childless. 
Francis, — Vide the following. 
Mary- 
Anne, — 

Katharine, — m. Christopher Wentworth, 
Aug. 19, 1583. 



MARBURY, — Francis (Gentleman). 

b. at Grisby about 1 560. 

m. Elizabeth Moore about 1582. 

m. 2nd, Bridget, daughter of John 
Dryden, Esq., and Elizabeth Cope, 
about 1588. 

d. 1610-11 in London. 
(Of Alford Co., Lincoln, and London.) 

Francis Marbury — whose Christian 
name is sometimes given wrongfully as 
Edward, — might be lost in oblivion by 
this time, except that he was the father 
of two women whose names will ever 
be dear and honored to America. The 
famous Ann Hutchinson and the devoted 
Christian wife and mother, Katharine 
Scott, were both his daughters. Because 
he was their father much time and labor 
has been spent in England, tracing out 
his life and family, and the results have 
been most gratifying. I have space for 
only a brief summary of these interest- 
ing facts. Francis Marbury first 
appears as a "gentleman" at Alford, 
fifteen miles from his birth-place. lie 



had a numerous family whose births 
are registered there; there he lost his 
wife and married again. His second 
wife was a grand-daughter of Sir John 
Cope, and a sister of Sir Erasmus 
Dryden, afterwards grandfather to 
England's famous poet. Several years 
after his second marriage Mr. Marbury 
removed to London, where he took 
orders and, Oct. 28, 1605, was presented 
to the Rectory of St. Martin Vintry. 
He was afterwards presented with 
another living, and held them both 
until his death, which occurred between 
Jan. 25 (date of will) and Feb. 15, 
1610-11. He left each of his twelve 
surviving children 200 marks, a sum 
aggregating .£1600. 

children. 

Mar)', — bp. at Alford, Sept. 12, 15S5. 

m. Twyford, of Shropshire. 

Catharine, — 

Elizabeth, — buried at Alford, June 4, 

1601. 
John, — bp. Feb. 15, 1589-90. 
Anne, — bp. July 20, 1591. 
Bridget,— bp. May 8, 1593. buried Oct. 

15, 1598. 
Francis, — bp. Oct. 20, 1594. 
Emme, — bp. Dec. 21, 1595. 
Erasmus, — bp. Feb. 15, 1596-7. 
Anthony, — bp. Sept. 21, 159S. buried 

April 9, 1601. 
Bridget,— bp. Nov. 25, 1599. 
Jcremuth, — bp. March 31, 1601. 
Daniel, — bp. Sept. 14, 1602. 
Susanna, — 
Elizabeth, — bp. Jan. 20, 1604-5. buried 

in London, March 19, 1613-14. 
Anthony, — b. in London, about 1608. 
Catharine, — b. in London, about 1609. 

m. Richard Scott. Vide Scott. 



The Rev. Francis Marbury had three 
more children, — twenty in all. 



MERRITT — MOLINES. 



Si 



MERRITT,— 2 George. 

b. 1702. 

m. 4 Gloriana, daughter of 3 Samuel 
Purdy and Charlotte Strang (she died 
Sept. 13, 1765, aged 51 yrs., 5 mos., 13 
days). 

d. Feb. 2, 1760. 
(Of Newburgh, N. Y.) 

George Merritt is believed to have 
been a son of that John Merritt who 
settled in Rye about 1680. 

He married and removed to New- 
burgh about 1747, in company with the 
Purdy and Fowler families. 

children. 
3 George, - m. Mary Fowler, m. 2nd, 

Mrs. Sarah Ecker. 
3 Samuel, — b. 1739. m. Phila Townsend. 

d. Dec. 26, 181 1. 
3 Caleb,— b. July, 1735. Vide following. 
3 Gabriel,— d. 1776. 
3 David, — m. Nelly Weygant. 
3 Josiah, — m. Anna Purdy. m. 2, Rachel 

Sherwood, d. March 12, 18 17. 
3 Humphrey,— b. May 17, 1737. 
3 Elizabeth, — m. Thomas Merritt. 
3 Jane,— b. Sept. 25, 1747. m. twice. 
3 Gloriana, — m. Joseph Marcy. 



MERRITT— s Caleb. 

b. July, 1735. 

m. 5 Martha, daughter of * Francis 
Purdy (she b. Jan., 1736. d. June 24, 

1783)- 

d. Nov. 29, 1793. 
(Of Newburgh.) 

Caleb Merritt and Martha Purdy were 
second cousins, his mother and her fa- 
ther being niece and uncle. 

CHILDREN. 

4 Abigail, — m. George Weygant. 
4 Elizabeth, — m. Dr. David Fowler. 
4 Glorianna, — b. July 7, 1758. m. 6 Isaac 
Fowler. Vide Fowler. 



MOLINES— iWilliam. 

b. 

m. Elizabeth, 
d. Feb. 21, 1621. 
(Of Plymouth.) 

William Molines with his wife, son 
Joseph, daughter Priscilla, and servant 
John Carter, made five of the May- 
flower's hundred passengers. He was 
one of the few to prefix his name with 
"Mr." in the Compact signed before 
landing, and one of the many to die the 
same year. His daughter — the only 
member of the family who survived 
that first awful winter — married John 
Alden. 

There was a William Molines in Dux- 
bury in 1642 who is regarded as a pos- 
sible son of the Pilgrim. The latter in 
his will spoke of his son William in 
England. 

The name Molines — since degene- 
rated into Mullins — probably originated 
Jn the French Molyneux. It is but one 
of the many sad instances of grand old 
surnames wrought by time into a com- 
mon and not-to-be recognized form. 

The line traced in this volume is as 
follows: 

1 William Molines. 

2 Priscilla m. J John Alden. 

2 Elizabeth m. 2 Wm. Pabodie. 

3 Elizabeth m. 3 John Rogers. 

4 Elizabeth m. 3 Sylvester Richmond. 

Perez Richmond. 

6 Perez. 

'Bradford. 

'Bradford. 

8 Anne m. 8 W. P. Warner. 

9 Anne m. 4 C. E. French. 

5 C. E. French, Jr. 



New Paltz on the Hudson. 



By reference to the sketch of Cattryn 
(Blancsan) du Bois' life, one may learn 
how that beautiful tract of land now 
containing the town of New Paltz came 
to be known to the French settlers of 
Kingston and Hurley. The situation is 
one of the finest on the Hudson, and 
one writer defines its boundaries thus: 
"An alluvial valley, beginning at Rosen- 
dale, bounded on the west by the 
Shawangunk mountains, running as far 
south as a point called Gertrude's Nose, 
which now overlooks the town of Sha- 
wangunk, and stretching from there 
two points in parallel lines to the 
Hudson River, whose western shore 
constitutes its eastern boundary." This 
valley is watered by the Walkill, and 
overlooked by the grand Paltz Point. 

Immediately after the rescue of his 
wife and little ones in 1663, Louis du 
Bois began negotiating with the Indians 
regarding this land. A treat)-' was 
finally agreed upon and the transfer 
was made in 1666. The treaty was one 
of amity as well as business, and it is 
noteworthy that, when the Mohawk 
Valley was ravaged again and again, 
New Paltz never suffered. The Indians 
and the French never came to blood, 
and that one town and one treaty cry 
shame on New England and New York 
with their records of broken faith and 
mutual treachery to the natives. 

The first settlement was made the 
same year — 1666. There were but a 
few families in all, but they were bound 



together by the strongest of ties — blood, 
and religion, and nationality. 

They consisted of Louis du Bois and 
his family, Anthoine Crispel,(his brother- 
in-law), Chretien and Pierre Doyau, 
Louis Bevier, Hugo Freer, and Andre 
and Simon Le Febvre. Such as were 
married brought their families and 
household goods. 

When the little band reached the 
spot which was to be to them a home — 
not a mere sojourning place — they 
loosed the weary animals from yoke 
and harness, unloaded the wagons, and 
then, before taking food or rest, the 
whole party gathered about their leader, 
"Louis the Walloon," who, kneeling 
reverently opened his great Bible and 
read the 23rd Psalm, after which all 
bowed their heads and prayed God's 
blessing on their undertaking. 

Eleven years later the Indian treaty 
was confirmed by a patent from Gov. 
Andros, Sept. 29, 1677. 

It was signed by twelve men who 
were henceforth called the "Twelve 
Patentees." The same men acted as 
the governing power of the little com- 
munity, being designated the "Dusine." 
Abraham du Bois, the eldest son of 
Louis, is named on his tomb-stone as 
the survivor of them all. 

The town took its name from the 
Palatinate which had given asylum to 
the early settlers. 

Vide lives of Louis du Bois, Kattryn 
Blancsaai, Chretien Deyo. 



Ormsby — Williams — Weeks. 



53 



It is a strange circumstance that the 
South, which was peopled so exclusively 
by the better class from England, should 
be so far behind New England in the 
matter of records of all sorts. There 
seems to have been an utter lack of 
interest in anything pertaining to the 
past, except among the few very old 
and established families. 

This page contains all that can be 
collected regarding the ancestry of 
Sarah Caroline Weeks, wife of George 
R. French. The facts were gathered by 
their son George P. French, of Wil- 
mington, N. C. 

The origin of this family of Ormsby 
is not known. Susan Ormsby was born 
in 1753. Her parentage and place of 
birth are also unknown. She married a 
man of the name of Williams who died 
in the time of the Revolution. His 
death must necessarily have occurred 
almost immediately after his marriage 
if his wife was born in 1753. He left 
one daughter Susan. The widow made 
a second marriage, and died, Aug. 15, 
1816. 



unfortunate terminations of both Ral- 
eigh's colonies are well-known. 



WILLIAMS— Susan. 

b. March 13, 1777. 

m. Allan Appoin, 1801 (he d. same 
year). 

m. 2nd, John Weeks, 1807 (he d. 
Sept. 3, 1815.) 

m. 3rd, Capt. Stephen Swain, Jan. 22, 
1819 (he d. Sept. 9, 1823). 

d. July 23, 1849. 
(Of Wilmington, N. C.) 

Mrs. Susan Swain often spoke of a 
tradition which told of her family's 
coming over with Sir Walter Raleigh. 
This can hardly have been, as the 



WEEKS— John. 

m. Mrs. Susan Appoin, 1807. 

d. Sept. 3, 1815. 

John Weeks is said to have been a 
native of Wales, and the only member 
of the family who emigrated at that 
time. It was not in a good hour for 
him when he came, for he enlisted as a 
soldier in the War of 1812, and was 
killed two years later. He left no sons. 

WEEKS, — Sarah Caroline. 



b. July 2, i{ 

m. 3 George Reade French, Thurs- 
day, April 5, 1827. 

d. May 19, 1867. 
(Of Wilmington, N. C.) 

Sarah Caroline was the eldest daugh- 
ter of John Weeks. She was not quite 
eighteen when she married George 
French, who had come from Fall River 
to settle in Wilmington. I refer the 
reader to the sketch of his life. Mrs. 
French became the mother of twelve 
children, ten of whom reached the age 
of maturity, and seven of whom are 
living now. The close of her life was 
clouded and saddened by the war 
between the states, in which one of her 
sons took part, and all her family were 
necessarily more or less involved. The 
intense anxiety and apprehension which 
she (in common with hundreds of 
thousands of other women) was called 
upon to suffer for four long years, 
weakened her constitution and caused 
her early death. 

She was a "Southerner" who won her 
laurels, not on the battle field, but as a 
devoted daughter, wife and mother. 



54 



Pabodie. 
l John — 2 William. 



PABODIE— 1 John. 

b. probably in St. Albans, Hertford- 
shire. 

m. Isabel. 

d. 
(Of Bridgewater, 1645.) 

There is considerable doubt attached 
to all information concerning John 
Pabodie. There was such a man in 
Bridgewatcr and he had sons William 
and Francis and a daughter Annie. In 
his will made July 16, 1649, he named 
John, son of his son William, and that 
leads to the belief that his son William 
and the William Pabodie who married 
Elizabeth Alden are identical. Francis 
is believed to be the Francis who came 
from St. Albans in 1635, and for that 
reason it is thought to have been the 
family home. 

CHILDREN. 

2 Francis, — 

2 William, — Vide following. 

2 Annie, — m. Rouse. 



PABODIE— 2 William. 

b. 1629. 

m. 2 ELiZABETH,daughterof 'John Al- 
den and 2 Priscii.la Molines, Dec. 26, 
1644 (sheb. 1624-5. d. May 31, 1717). 

d. Dec. 13, 1707. 
(Of Duxbury, Mass., and Little Comp- 

ton, R. I.) 

William Pabodie held many promi- 
nent positions and we find records of 
him too numerous to detail. 

In 1686, he bought land at Scaconnet 
Neck of Awashoug, Squaw Sachem of 
the Narragansetts. This is the same 
Indian queen with whom Capt. Church 
signed the Treaty on 2 Edward Rich- 
mond's land. 

His will is a beautiful example of the 
partiality of the Puritans to their sons. 
To his daughters William Pabodie gave 
1 s. apiece, and all the rest (and there 
was plenty, too) went to the son. 



"The Boston News Letter" of June 
17, 1717, contains this notice, — 

"Little Compton, May 31. This 
morning died here Mrs. Elizabeth Pay- 
bodie in the 93d year of her age. She 
was daughter of John Alden, Esq., and 
Priscilla his wife, daughter of Mr. Wil- 
liam Mullins. This John Alden and 
Priscilla Mullins were married at Ply- 
mouth in New England. * * She 
was exemplary, virtuous and pious. 
* * Her grand-daughter Bradford is 
a grandmother." 

CHILDREN. 

3 John, — b. Oct. 4, 1645. d. Nov. 17, 

1669. 
3 Elizabeth, — b. April 24, 1647. m - 

John Rogers. Vide same. 
3 Mary, — b. Aug. 7, 1648. m. Edward 

Southworth, Nov. 16, 1669. 
3 Mercy, — b. Jan. 2, 1649. nl - John Sim- 
mons, 1670. 
3 Martha, — b. Feb. 25, 1650. m. Samuel 
Seabury. m. 2nd, Wm. Fobes. d. Jan. 
25, 1712. 
3 Priscilla, — b. Jan. 15, 1653. m. Ichabod 
Wiswall, Dec. 24, 1677. d. June 3, 
1724. 

(The poet Longfellow was descended 
from this couple through their daugh- 
ter Mercy, who married John Wads- 
worth. Gen. Pcleg Wadsworth, their 
grandson, was the father of Zilpha, the 
poet's mother. ) 
8 Sarah, — b. Aug. 7, 1656. m. John Coe, 

Nov. 10, 1 68 1. d. 1740. 
3 Ruth, — b. June 27, 1658. m. Benjamin 
Bartlett. d. 1740. (Their daughter 
Priscilla married John Sampson, and 
Susanna Sampson became the mother 
of Gen. Wadsworth, named above.) 
3 Rebecca,— b. Oct 16, 1660. m. Wil- 
liam Southworth. d. 1702. 
3 Hannah, — b. Oct. 16, 1662. m. Samuel 

Bartlett, Aug. 2, 1683. 
3 William, — b. Nov. 24, 1664. d. 1744. 

m. three times. 
3 Lydia, — b. April 3, 1667. m. Daniel 
Grinnel. 



Paine. 



55 



1 Anthony — ''■Mary. 



PAINE— * Anthony. 

b. 

m. 1st, (she died 1643). 

m. 2nd, Rose, widow of Matthew 
Grinnel, 1643 (she died 1673). 

d. 1650. 
(Of Portsmouth, R. I.) 

In 163S, Anthony Paine was admitted 
as an inhabitant of Portsmouth. The 
next year he was one of the signers of 
the famous compact. Before his second 
marriage he entered into a contract 
similar to that of 3 Sylvestre Richmond 
and Mrs. Loring. The will of Anthony 
Paine was short and to the purpose. It 
was made May 6, 1649, an ^ proved the 
next year. 

One clause reads as follows: "I do 
give and bequeath unto my daughter 
Alice, one cow, she or husband paying 
unto my daughter Mary Tripp, so 
much as the cow is judged to be more 
worth than the heifer; further my mind 
and will is to give unto my daughter 
Mary Tripp, so much as the cow is 
judged to be more worth than the heifer 
and one young heifer." 

The general tenor of the will does 
not give the impression that its maker 
owned much else than his cow and 
heifer. 

CHILDREN. 

2 Alice, — m. Lot Strange, d. 1690. 
s Mary, — Vide next column. 



PAINE— 2 Mary. 

b. probably in England, 
ra. 1st, John Tripp, 1639 (he died 
1678). 

m. 2nd, Benjamin Engel, April 4, 
1682. 

d. Feb. 12, 1687. 
(Of Portsmouth, R. I.) 

Mary Paine became the wife of the 
carpenter, John Tripp, about 1639. 
There is mention of her name in the 
records of the Court of Commission 
for 1666; "whereas, Mary Tripp, wife of 
John Tripp Sr. some twenty-five years 
ago bought of Richard Searle for a pint 

of wine 3 acres of land she being 

then unmarried, about which time 
Searle removed leaving no deed with 
Mary," and so the court made the sale 
good. John Tripp died in 1678, and 
three years later his widow married 
Benjamin Engel. Her death occurred 
in 1687. 

Mary Paine Tripp is the ancestress of 
the writer in an almost direct female 
line, thus: 

'Mary Paine m. 'John Tripp. 

3 Isabel Tripp m. 3 Samson Shearman. 

4 Alice Shearman m. 2 James Strange. 

3 Alice Strange m. 4 Joseph Hathaway. 

5 Jacob Hathaway. 

6 Joseph Hathaway. 

7 Hannah Hathaway m. 4 F. Whitwell. 

6 Anne Whitwell m. 7 B. P. Richmond. 

8 Anne Richmond m. 8 W. P. Warner. 

9 Anna Warner m. 4 C. E. French. 

5 Charles E. French. 



56 



Pearce. 
1 Richard— ■" John. 



PEARCE,'— i Richard. 

b. probably in England about 1620. 

m. Susanna, daughter of George 
Wright of Newport, R. I. (she d. 1678). 

d. 167S. 
(Of Portsmouth, R. I.) 

Richard Pearce was among those 
later arrivals in the New World who 
emigrated with much the same views as 
the new-comers of the present day. It 
is to be observed that Rhode Island 
was colonized chiefly from these and 
not from the Puritans who settled pre- 
vious to 1630. 

We may judge that ten years after 
the founding of New Plymouth the 
character and success of the attempt 
was pretty well known throughout the 
old country, and the more restless 
spirits there all naturally turned their 
eyes westward to seek for prospects of 
gain and freedom superior to those 
which the mother country could offer 
Naturally the second influx consisted of 
single young men of an adventurous 
turn of mind, and older men with fami- 
lies and some property. Richard 
Pearce was probably of the first class. 

In his will he gave his son Richard 
his entire farm with all appertaining to 
it. The other children received a shil- 
ling apiece. 

CHILDREN. 

8 Martha,— b. Sept. 13, 1645. m - Marsh- 
allalhashbaz Dyer. d. Feb. 24, 1744. 

2 John, — Vide the following. 

2 Richard, — b. Oct. 3, 1649. m - Experi- 
ence. 

2 Gilcs, — b. July 22, 1651, m. Elizabeth 
Hall, April 13, 1676. d. Nov. 19, 1698. 

2 Susannah, — b. Nov. 20, 1652. m. 
8 George Brownell, Dec. 4, 1673. d. 
Dec. 24, 1743. 

2 Mary, — b. May 6, 1654. m. 8 Thomas 
Brownell. d. May 4, 1736. 

2 Jeremiah, — b. Nov. 17, 1656. 

'James, — b. Dec. 6, 1658. 

2 Georgc, — b. July 10, 1662. m. Alice 



Hart, 1687. m. 2, Temperance Kirby, 
1721. d. Aug. 30, 1752. 
^William, — b. Dec. 22, 1664. 



PEARCE— 2 John. 

b. Sept. 8, 1647. 

m. Mary, daughter of Peter and 
Ann Tallman (she d. 1720). 

d. Dec. 5, 1707. 
(Of Portsmouth and Tiverton, R. I.) 

Col. Pearce, in his big volume of 
"Biographical and Historical Collec- 
tions," introduces one to all of these 
early settlers in a way that produces 
quite the feeling of personal acquaint- 
ance. I recommend the book to those 
who desire to know John Pearce more 
intimately. He was an upright and 
worthy man, ensign in the local militia, 
and died worth .£519, which he divided 
carefully among his children. His 
daughter Anne pre-deceased him and 
her four little ones made their home 
with the grandparents. (Vide Shef- 
field). 

children. 
8 John, — d. Jan. 1, 1755. 
3 Mary, — b. Feb. 14, 1674. m. 3 John 
Reade, Jr., and became ancestress to 
the Reade, French, Whitwell, and 
Weaver families of this volume. 
3 Susannah, — b. 1672. m. Richard Wood- 
hall. 
3 Anne, — b. Feb. 14, 1674. m. Capt. 
Amos Sheffield. Vide same. 

s Sarah, — m. Shearman. 

3 Elizabeth, — m. Cook. 

3 Rachel, — m. Cook. 

8 Alice, — m. Butts perhaps, and was 

mother to Susannah Butts mentioned 
in John Pearce's Will. 



Charles Elting French is descended 
from John Pearce through six lines, 
namely: Those of "Sarah Reade French, 
"Wait Reade Weaver, "Ruth Sheffield 
Weaver, 5 Eunice Weaver Reade, 8 Mar- 
tha Durfee Reade, and "Hannah Reade 
Whitwell. 



Peckham. 



57 



i John— * John— * John— * Joseph. 



PECKHAM,— iJohn. 

m. Mary Clarke (she d. 164S). Vide 
Clarke Family III." 

m. 2nd, Eleanor . 

d. 1681. 
(Of Newport, R. I.) 

Admitted inhabitant of Aquidneck, 
May 20, 1638. 

He lived in that part of Newport 
now called Middletown, and was a 
member of the First Baptist Church. 

CHILDREN. 

2 John, — b. 1645. Vide following. 
2 William, — b. 1647. m. Clarke, m. 

2nd, Phoebe Weeden. d. June 2, 1734. 
2 Stephen, — m. Mary . d. April 23, 

1724. 
2 Thomas, — m. 2nd, Mrs. Hannah Clarke. 

d. 1709. 
2 Clement, — d. 1706. 
2 Sarah, — m. Wm. Weeden. 
2 Rebecca, — m. John Spooner. 
2 Deborah, — m. Robert Taylor. 
2 Phcebe, — b. 1666. m. Thos. Gray. d. 

1746. 
2 Elizabeth, — m. Peter Taylor, d. May 

24, 1714. 



PECKHAM ,— 2 John, Jr. 

b. 1645. 

m. Sarah . 

d. 1712. 
(Of Newport.) 

Vol. IV of the "Vital Statistics of 
Rhode Island" distinctly states that 
John Peckham, father of Joseph, born 
1702, was the son of John Peckham, Jr., 
born 1645. 

CHILDREN. 

3 Elizabeth, — b. Sept. 17, 1668. 
3 John, — b. June 9, 1673. Vide follow- 
ing. 
3 Mary, — b. Sept. 30, 1674. 
3 Reuben, — b. Feb. 3, 1676. 
3 Peleg, — b. Dec. 11, 1677. 
3 Joseph, — b. March 8, 1679. 
3 Sarah, — b. Sept. 5, 1680. 
3 Timothy, — b. Aug. 5, 168 1. 
3 Benjamin, — b. June 9, 1684. 
3 Isaac, — b. April 11, 1688. 
3 Sarah, — b. June 26, 1690. 



PECKHAM— 3 John. 

m. Mary , 1695 (she d. 1756). 

d. Dec. 2, 1723. 
(Of Newport.) 

John Peckham's birth is sometimes 
given as 1671 and sometimes as June 9, 
1673. In all probability the John of 
the first date died in infancy and the 
next was named for him. " 

CHILDREN. 

4 John, — b. June 27, 1696. m. Mary 
Lumber. 

4 Joseph, — Vide the following. 

4 Lydia, — b. May 8, 1698. m. John James. 

4 Mary, — b. Oct. 3, 1704. 

4 Margaret, — b. June 30, 1707. m. Ben- 
jamin Chambers, Feb. 4, 1730. 

4 Ruth,— b. 1710. 

PECKHAM, 4 Joseph. 

b. Feb. 18, 1702. 

m. 3 Elizabeth, daughter of 2 Samuel 
Wilbur and 2 Mary Potter, Nov. 5, 1723 
(she b. Dec. 23, 1702). 

d. Oct., 1780. 
(Of Little Compton, R. I.) 

Joseph Peckham and Elizabeth Wil- 
bur were married by Thos. Church. 

CHILDREN. 

5 Mary,— b. Nov. 28, 1724. 

5 Elizabeth,— b. Aug. 13, 1726. 

5 Hannah, — b. Oct. 13, 1728. Vide 

Brightman. 
5 Martha,— b. May 28, 1730. m. Joshua 

Brownell, May 17, 1750. 
5 John,— b. Sept. 30, 1733. m. Mary 

Wood, 1760. d. May, 18 12. 
5 Samuel, — b. Nov. 20, 1735. 
5 Ruth,— b. 1737. d. Oct., 1S15. 
5 Sarah, — b. 1739. 
5 Rhoda,— b. 1741. 
5 Reuben, — b. 1743. 



Vol. IV of "Vital Statistics of R. I." 
gives copy of mutilated original 

"Record of marriage between Hannah 
Peckham and George , of Freetown, 

— 18, 1744." 



5* 



Parker — Presby. 



PARKER— i George. 

b. 1611. 

m. Frances (she m. 2, Nicholas 
Brown). 

d. 1656. 
(Of Portsmouth, R. I.) 

George Parker was a carpenter by 
trade and came in the "Elizabeth and 
Ann", which arrived May 11, 1634. In 
1838 he was admitted an inhabitant of 
Aquidneck, and shortly after was sum- 
moned to appear before the Court for 
general misbehavior and was sentenced 
to the stocks. Three years after he was 
made freeman, and in 1643 arrived at 
the dignity of sergeant. Ten years later 
he was advanced to that of general 
sergeant. 

CHILDREN. 

2 Joseph, — m. . d. 1685. 

2 Mary, — m. 2 Ichabod Sheffield. Vide 

same. 
2 Peter, — m. Sarah Clarke. 
2 Meribah, — m. John Slocum, 1674. d. 

1698. 
2 Frances, — m. Benjamin Hall, July 27, 

1676. 



PRESBRY— 1 William. 

b. in London about 1690. 

m. Hannah Smith about 1718. 

d. 1771. 
(Of Taunton, Mass.) 

In April, 1845, a great-grandson of 
William Presbry wrote out what facts 
he knew in regard to the family. I 
copy verbatim: — 

"My great-grandfather, William Pres- 
bry, was born as he said, in the city of 
London, about the year 1690; and at 
the age of ten years was impressed on 
board of a man-of-war and remained 



with her until he was about twenty-one. 
When the ship was lying in Boston 
Harbor, he with others of the crew were 
permitted to go on shore at times and 
ramble around the town. When on one 
of these town rambles he saw fit to take 
what is called 'French leave' and 
rambled off into the country by passing 
up through what is now Roxbury Street, 
and then taking to the fields and woods 
for fear he should fall in with some man 
or men who would take him back again 
and put him on board the ship — a float- 
ing Hell — to linger out the remnant of 
his days or be shot as a deserter. And 
it being summer he subsisted on what 
berries he could find and travelled and 
slept alternately during four days and 
nights, and at the expiration of that 
time he found himself in Taunton at 
the northerly part of the village and 
entered a house owned and occupied by 
Nathaniel Crossman, which stood on 
the north side of the road leading from 
the Universalist Meeting House to the 
Episcopalian, about half way between 
the two, near where the descent is im- 
mediate from the road to the little river 
or mill pond, and where, a few years 
since, the writer observed the old cellar 
and some of the bricks from the chim- 
ney. As Crossman was a farmer, mil- 
ler, and shoemaker, he remained with 
him a year or two and assisted in what- 
ever way he could be most useful. 
After this it is said he rigged the first 
vessel that was properly rigged in Taun- 
ton, and she was a small sloop built at 
Benjamin King's landing in Raynham. 
And some years after he married with 
a girl named Hannah Smith and bought 
him a tract of land, and built him a 
house, north of the burying-ground 



PRESBRY — PURDY. 



59 



near what is called the 'Spring Brook.' 
The old cellar is still visible near the 
confluence of the Boston Turnpike, and 
the old Boston Road, north of theG-mn, 
where he lived and died at the age of 
eighty-one years." 

CHILDREN. 

"William, — Vide following. 

"Joseph,— m. Molly Baker.A+v -U tyf PURDY— "Joseph. 

"Hannah, — d. single. 



PURDY,— 'Francis. 

Emigrated from Yorkshire, England, 
and settled in Fairfax, Conn., where he 
died in 1658. He left sons "Francis 
and "Joseph, who were born in York- 
shire and held commissions from the 
Crown as surveyors. 



PRESBRY— "William. 

b. about 1720. 

m. Mary White about 1745. 

d. 1765. 
(Of Taunton, Mass.) 

The MSS. quoted from in the pre- 
ceding sketch goes on to say that the 
second William Presbry owned a brick- 
yard (which in 1845 na cl come into the 
hands of Alex. Williams) and a farm. 
He was also a shoemaker and coaster. 
The two eldest sons of William Presbry 
continued the operation of the brick- 
yard, and ran a vessel to Providence to 
dispose of the brick, returning with 
freight. 

CHILDREN. 

3 Mary, — b. 1748. m. Francis Coward 

about 1770. d. Aug. 15, 1832. 
3 Elizabeth, — b. 1751. m. Ephraim 

French, m. 2, Jael Hathaway. Vide 

both. 
3 Seth, — b. 1752. m. Sarah Pratt, 1779. 

d. 1833. 
3 Lydia, — b. 1753. m. Samuel Haskins. 

d. 1823. 
3 William, — b. 1756. m. Lydia Pratt, d. 

1838. 
3 Simeon, — b. 1758. m. Anna Newland. 

d. 1834. 
3 John, — b. 1760. m. Prudence Pratt, d. 

1845- 
3 Levi, — b. 1768. m. Lina Pratt, d. 1800. 
3 Abigail, — b. 1765. m. Abijah Leonard. 

m. 2, Skinner. 



m. Elizabeth Ogden. 

Had children, 3 Samuel (vide the fol- 
lowing), 3 John, 3 Francis (vide the fol- 
lowing), 8 Daniel, and 3 Joseph. 



PURDY— *Samuel. 

m. Charlotte Strang. 

children. 
4 Gloriana, — m. "George Merritt. Vide 

same. 
4 Samuel, — m. Winifred GrifHng. 
4 Caleb, — m. Hannah Brown. 
4 Gabriel — m. Bethiah Miller. 
4 Charlotte, — m. 6 Samuel Fowler. 
4 Henry, — m. Mary Foster. 
4 Elizabeth, — m. Josiah Fowler. 
4 Josiah, — m. Charity Wetmore. 



PURDY,— 3 Francis (third son of Jos- 
eph Purdy and Elizabeth Ogden). 
b. 1697. 

m. . 

d. June 2, 1760. 
(Of Newburgh, N. Y.) 

The few notes I have on the Purdy 
and Merritt families are taken almost 
bodily from Ruttenber's "History of 
Newburgh." I hope they rn^y prove 
an incentive to further and more de- 
tailed research. 

children. 
4 David — 

4 Abigail, — m. 5 Nehemiah Fowler. 
4 Elizabeth, — m. Capt. Arthur Smith. 
4 Martha, — m. 3 Caleb Merritt. Vide 
Merritt. 



]/ 



60 Pray. 

PRAY, — in 1 64 1. There were probably other 
4 Joseph Read • married Grace Pray, children who were not recorded." The 
Of that we are certain. When it comes four children who died were born in 
to her ancestry we have only probabili- J 7 1 2- 1 3-1 5- 16 respectively. Thankful's 
ties, and probabilities, although a poor birth is not S iven but from her mar- 
substitute for facts, are an excellent d agc date she was probably younger 
foundation for them. Grace Pray's an- than the others. J^A ^ ^- &U*& 
cestiy consists in several probabilities Grace Booth was born 1*^1677, and in 
and I note them here for someone else seai "ching for an Ephraim Pray of a 
to prove. I am obliged to go backward suitable age to be her husband I find 
step by step with my reasons for "sup- onl >' the Ephraim, born 1681, and son 
posing", to make this line clear. of J ohn Pra y of Braintree. He was 
Pray was not a very common name in four y ears younger and the marriage 
1700. In Rhode Island there were two was probably about 1705. We hav e 
families, those of Ephraim and John, n.othwg-to sntetarrriate-^-is--TTenr-bTit 

both sons of Richard Pray of Provi- / l }£A r 'W}% of the four littk children - 
dence, who died 16S8. Ephraim had /Judith wTs the name of GracTBooth^A^ 

one daughter, John three sons, John, youngest sister. Vide Booth. Eph- 

Hugh, and Richard. The only other raim was naturally called for his father. 

Prays were of Braintree and sprung L )' dia is in "either family, but in the 

from 'John Pray wh^aFmafrfe^m year of her birth, 1715, Ephraim Pray's 

J?V*2 V 1657. His eldest son 2 John was born brother Joseph married Lydia White. 

March 11, 1658; his second child was Ruth was the name of Ephraim's third 

2 Ephraim, then followed 'Samuel, sisten Thus we see how the names 

1 77zr*~JH osc P h < 21I annah, and » Dorothy^ __ continue the supposition that Ephraim 

^7>Sl£Ephraim Pray married ^El if aT?c7f^ Pra y of Braintree had removed to Taun- 

daughter of John Hayden, and had nine ton and was thc husband of Grace 

, .^ chiHrenT 8 Ephraim, b. June 14, 1681. Booth. They were probably married 

te^tiu^ a John, b. Aug. 18, 1683. 8 Elizabeth, b. some years before coming to Taunton 
Sept. 27, 1685. 8 Hannah, b. June 3, and thc children recorded there are 
1687. 3 Ruth, b. March 28, '1689. 8 Sam- those born after the removal. Now is 
uel, b. May 14, 1690. 3 Joseph, b. Jan. lt not more than likely that our ancest- 
14, 1692. 3 Mary, b. Sept. 17, 1697, and ress Grace Pra y was onc of the children 
3 Sarah, b. Jan. 16, 1700. Dorn m Braintree or wherever Ephraim 
^ &/*-», Now let us turn back to Grace Pray a and Grace s P ent their fil 'st years of mar- 
moment and see who in the vicinity of ried life? J osc ph Reade was born 1708, 
Freetown could have been her parents. and his wifc vvas rnost probably of about 
We can find but one family and that the same a S e - If a littIc younger she 
does not name her among the children. would have been , born in '7 10 or '/' '• 
The record says - ^ /^<v^,<3& which would be just older than thc first 
-p -^Ep&fiZrt&f'ol ^Taunto/maTrfir recorded child of Ephraim Pray. Would 
JT ^P GfCct3oo%; daughter of John Booth she not havc been called 'or her mo- 
f? f f Seituate. ThcV had five children, ther when the eldest boy was named for 
.^£ ^Judith, Ephraim, Lydia, and Ruth, died th ^ fathc, ; ? , , S /?M~>~* 
^ a £ . young. Thankful married Robert Evans ] submlt this t0 ^proyen.p - >f\y* 

$**et^j{ jU+r~ "V*^ Jtm ^ ?-^<^S£ &£&!***& 



Reade. 



61 



iJohn—*John. 



READE— JJohn. 

(Of Plymouth, Eng., and Newport, R. 

I.) 

John Reade's life is among the ob- 
scurest in all respects. He seems to 
have been of humble birth and calling, 
as most educated men were sooner or 
later chosen to fill positions for which 
their schooling had fitted them. By 
trade he was a cordwainer — which, by 
the way, is neither more nor less than a 
tanner. We say he was a tanner, but 
there is no certainty of the fact, — it is 
traditional, like the story of his coming 
from Plymouth. He was pretty sure to 
come from Plymouth as that was then 
the principal shipping point for emi- 
grants, just as Liverpool is now. But 
whether it was his native town or not is 
quite another question. 

By comparing other dates and aver- 
aging certain facts which as a general 
rule give pretty correct conclusions, I 
think we may very reasonably place 
John Reade's birth about 1610 or 161 5. 
He was possibly married when he emi- 
grated, but more likely not, as his eldest 
son was born in the neighborhood of 
1640, when his father had been to 
America several years. 

This John Reade bore no arms and 
no possible relationship can be traced 
between him and the Reades who did. 
But time has proved to his descendants 
as it did to those of Robert of Norman- 
dy and Arlotta, that a tanner may be 
the ancestor of good stock quite as well 
as either knight or noble. 

CHILDREN. 

2 John, — Vide following. 
2 Ebenezer, — 
2 Oliver, — 



READE— 2 John. 

b. in Newport. . _, 

m. Hannah) (she d. Apr. 12, 1727). 

d. Jan. £3, .1721. 
(Of Freetown, Mass.) 

2 John Readesettled in Freetown in 
1677. He wa'sSsSe married and had a 
little family about him. A cordwainer 
by trade he set up his tannery and 
brought his sons up in the same calling. 
The business thus begun passed on 
through four generations of Reades, 
and then late in the eighteenth century 
was bought out by 6 Sarah Reade's hus- 
band, 2 Enoch French. It had grown 
into a large place at Troy, afterwards 
Fall River. I believe its site is noted 
in the old Fall River map, showing the 
town as it was early in the present cen- 
tury. Almost all the Reades of Amer- 
ica, and certainly all in this book, are 
descended from this John Reade. Some 
of the family prefer to spell it Reid, and 
others drop the final e, but all are of the 
same stock, the same old Anglo-Saxon 
race, who took their name from their 
favorite color, and sent it down through 
all the centuries of English history. 

There are three lines of Reades in Vol. 
I, and several branches of their de- 
scendants are given in Vol. II. Nearly 
all of these family records have never 
been in print before, as the Read Gene- 
alogy only contains a very few of them. 
If any reader should ever compare the 
two books and remark certain discrep- 
ancies I would like to have him know 
that these records have been given me 
as corrections of the older book, and 
rest on indisputable authorities. John 
Reade had children, 3 Hannah, 3 Joseph, 
and 3 John. Vide following. 



62 



Reade. 



syohn—* Oliver. 




READE— 3 JoHN (Jr.). 

b. . 

m. 3 Mary, daughter of 2 John Pearce 
and 2 Mary Tallman (she b. Feb. 14, 
1674. d. May 6, 1726). 

m. 2nd, Susannah Brownell. 

d. . 

(Of Freetown, Mass.) 

John Reade, Jr., was the town clerk 
of Freetown for thirty years. 

His marriage probably took place in 
the winter of 1689-90, at which date 
Mary Tallro ajj- was not quite sixteen. 
They had a large family whose descend- 
ants now spread over all America, and 
many of whom are noted men. 

John Reade was the great-grandfather 
of 2 James Whitwell, and of his wife 
"Hannah Reade, and of Mrs. Enoch 
French ('Sarah Reade). James Whit- 
well was the great-great-great-grand- 
father of 5 Charles French, Jr., and 
6 Sarah Reade French was his great- 
grandmother. 

CHILDREN. 

-? 4 Mary, — b. Nov. 19, 1690. m. Samuel 
Forman, Jan. 22, 1728./ 

4 John, — b. June 12, 1694. m. Mrs. Sarah 
Borden, Oct. 31, 1719. d. 1 75 1 . 

4 Thomas, — b. May 9, 1696. 

4 Hannah, — b. Oct. 12, 1697. d. Oct. 17, 
1718. 

4 William, — b. Sept. 9, 1699. m. Sarah. 

4 Oliver, — Vide next column. 

4 Penelope, — b. Oct. 12, 1703. m. Steph- 
en Borden, m. 2nd, John Bowen. 

4 Jonathan, — b. Jan. 23, 1705. m. Hope 
Durfee. 

4 Joseph, — b. March 5; 1708. m. Grace 
Pray. Vide p. 64. 

4 Sarah, — b. Feb. I, 1709. d. June 3, 172S. 

4 Nathan, — b. Feb. 23, 171 1. 



4 Susannah, — b. Feb. 27, 1 71 5. m. Joseph 
Borden, Jan. 26, 1735. 



READE— "Oliver. 

b. Oct. 1 1 or 14, 1701. 

m. 3 Martha, daughter of 2 Thomas 
Durfee and 3 Ann Freeborne, Dec. 27, 
1730 (she b. Feb. 20, 1702. d. ). 

d. 
(Of Freetown, Mass.) 

The first fifty years of the eighteenth 
century were uneventful in American 
history. There is little to record of the 
men of this period except that they 
lived and died. Their children were 
the soldiers of the Revolutionary days, 
and perhaps the sturdy vigor and 
dauntless courage of those soldiers was 
owing as much to the quiet, earnest, 
persevering, hard-working lives of their 
fathers as to the spirit of freedom and 
patriotism which arose with the times. 
The colonies were storing their strength 
and power for three score years before 
the day of need arose in which they 
put it forth. 

There is nothing recorded of Oliver 
Reade — not even his trade. He was 
the great-great-grandfather of both 
7 Bradford Richmond and his wife 
4 Anne Whitwell. 

children. 

5 Joseph, — b. Dec. 11, 1732. d. Feb. 1, 

1791. 
5 Oliver,— b. Aug. 21, 1734. 
5 Mary, — b. March 31, 1736. 
5 Jonathan, — b. Nov. 13, 1737. Vide 

next page. 
6 Wait,— b. Dec. 6, 1739. m. 5 Samuel 

Weaver. Vide Weaver. 
6 Nathan, — b. June 16, 1742. 



Reade. 



63 



^Jonathan. 



READE, — 5 Jonathan. 

b. Nov. 13, 1737. 

m. 5 Eunice, daughter of 4 Benjamin 
Weaver and 4 Ruth Sheffield, Apr. 24, 
1754 (she b. about 1735). 

d. . 

(Of Assonet and Freetown, Mass.) 

Jonathan Reade's name is very dear 
to me because it was through it that I 
passed from the family stories of the 
family into the great book world of 
printed genealogy. It never had oc- 
curred to me that there could be any- 
thing in a book about my people, and I 
grew dizzy when I saw in black and 
white the list of those men and women 
who had always figured in my mind as 
"Aunt Wilson," and "Uncle Weaver's 
second wife was a Reade," etc., etc. 

Jonathan Reade might be regarded as 
the pick-axe which gave the first blow 
on the hard earth of Ignorance and un- 
covered the traces of a goodly lot of 
buried ancestors. 

Lieut. Reade was a militia officer and 
a prominent man in Freetown. March 
2, 1772, he was elected Treasurer and 
served ten years. March 7, 1774, he 
was elected selectman and served twelve 
years. He was chosen auditor in 1771 
and served five years; was on the Com- 
mittee of Correspondence, Inspection, 
and Safety from 1776 to 1779; and 
assessor in 1794. 

Lieutenant Reade served in the mil- 
itia during the war, and had two sons in 
the army. 

His family relations are an excellent 
example of the general inter-marrying 
of the times. He and his sister Wait 
married the Weaver brother and sister. 
Then his daughter Lydia became the 
second wife of Wait's son 6 Sheffield. 
"Sheffield Weaver's first wife was 4 Rho- 
dy Gibbs, whose brother 4 Robert mar- 
ried Jonathan's daughter "Elizabeth. 



Her sister "Hannah married 2 James 
Whitwell, whose mother was Jonathan 
Reade's first cousin. /The latter lady 
had a brother who became the grand- 
father of 2 Enoch French. 2 Enoch 
French married for his second wife /cog. Si 
"Sheffield Weaver's daughter. This 
lady's son by her first husband married 
2 JamesWhitwell's and "Hannah Reade's 
grand-daughter. The grand-daughter 
of this couple married the grandson of 
2 Enoch French and became the mother 
of 5 Charles French, Jr. 

The happy descendant of any of the 
old Mass. and R. I. families needs not 
to study the time of Henry VIII for 
complicated family genealogies. ) 

children. 

"Forman, — b. Sept. 27, 1757. Was a 
colonel in the army. 

"Ichabod,— b. April 20, 1760. m. Eliz- 
abeth Law. d. Dec. 6, 1796 (cap- 
tain). 

"James, — b. June 7, 1762. 

"Lydia, — b. Sept. 7, 1764. m. Capt. 
"Sheffield Weaver, d. Oct. 6, 1833. 

"Elizabeth, — m. Robert Gibbs. Vide 
Gibbs, Vol. II. 

"Susannah, — b. July 3, 1767. m. Capt. 
Luther Wilson, Dec. 20, 1789. d. 
1848. He was the builder of the 
house Furman Whitwell afterwards 
bought, and also made the doll s four 
post bedstead which his wife "fur- 
nished" for a present to little Anne 
Whitwell when her father brought her 
north in 1820. 

"Hannah,— b. Aug. 1, 1769. m. 2 James 
Whitwell, 1792. Vide same. 

"Jonathan, — b. Sept. 7, 1771. m. Ellen 
Law. 

"Ruth, — b. 17 — . d. Oct., 1790. 

"Benjamin, — b. March, 1775. d. April 

21, 1776. 

"Eunice, — 



6 4 



Reade. 



4 Joseph — 5 Joseph. 



READE, — 4 Joseph (son of 3 John R., 

J r • ' • y*?7-77. &c 
m /{A^^b. March 5, 1 708. S 
Z^til^m- Grace Pray, Jan. 25, 1732^' 
(Of Freetown, Mass.) 

From town records of Freetown: 

"Joseph Reade Jr. and Grace Pray 
were married before Thomas Terry of 
Freetown esq. Jan. 25, 1733." 

"1738 — Joseph Reade Jr. the ear mark 
that he puts on his creatures is two 
half pennies on the line of under side 
the right ear." 

"Joseph Read appeared before Thomas 
Terry esq. 21 June 1740 took his oath 
to the trust when he was chosen pre- 
server of deer." 

There were a multitude of Joseph 
Reades in Bristol County a hundred 
years ago, but I am certain the first 
transcript refers to our particular 
ancestor. We know only four of his 
children. The records of his sons 
6 William and 5 Benjamin are given in 
Vol. II. His son 5 Joseph is noticed in 
the following column, and the remaining 
child, a daughter named 5 Hannah, 
married ] Oliver Whitwell, of Freetown. 
She lived to the age of 96 years, and 
was great-grandmother of 4 Anne Eliza- 
beth Whitwell, and grandaunt of 
3 George R. French, of Wilmington. 
Her granddaughter, Miss Maiy Read 
of Fall River, has given me a little 
yellow china mug which belonged to 
Hannah Read Whitwell (she died Feb., 
1830). 

CHILDREN. 

•'William,— b. 1)32. Vide Vol. 11.-/2/ 
■'Joseph, — Vide next column. A /y3b~~4 
'Benjamin,- - b. Nov. 15, 1733. Vide 

Vol. II. 
6 Hannah, — b. Dec, 1734. Vide Oliver 

Whitwell. 



READE, — 'Joseph. !^»tta^. 

b. i735^_^y^y^~~ ^ /^ 

m. 6 MXry, daughter of 'Thomas and 
Dinah Cornell, in Newport, Dec. 5, 1754 
(she b. about 1730. d. about 1816). 

d. about 1793. 
(Of Troy, now Fall River, Mass.) 

Joseph Reade was a tanner, and it 
was to him that Enoch French was 
apprenticed when his mother put him 
to learn a trade. Joseph Reade died 
soon after, and his son James continued 
the business. Then when James was 
called to the ministry Enoch French 
bought the tannery — he had already 
married James' youngest sister, — and 
also the Reade homestead. This house 
was torn down about 1870. 

Joseph Reade had a large family, of 
whom very full records are printed in 
the second part of this work. His 
youngest daughter Sarah, who married 
Enoch French, was a truly good woman, 
gifted with a beautiful character and an 
equally lovely voice. The highest tribute 
to her worth was the family she left, 
for a woman's spirit shines forth in the 
children she rears. 

CHILDREN. 

"Phoebe, — b. Nov. 29, 1755. Vide 

Vol. II. 
"Samuel, — b. Aug. 4, 1757. Vide 

Vol. II. 
6 George, — b. Dec. 14, 1760. Vide 

Vol. II. 
"Joseph, — b. March 9, 1763. 
s James,— b. 1768. Vide Vol. II. 
6 Nancy, — d. in infancy. 
"Nancy, — b. 1770 or '72. Vide Vol. II. 
"Sarah, — Vide French, also Vol. II. 



Richmond. 
Edmond — 1 John. 



65 



RICHMOND — 

In the latter part of the sixteenth 
century there lived in the Parish of 
Ashton Keyes, Wiltshire, an English 
gentleman of the name of Edmond 
Richmond. He had two sons, one of 
whom — John — was baptized in the 
church in 1597, and about thirty-five 
years later emigrated to America. The 
elder, Cliffe, remained in England, and 
the tombs of his grandson, great-grand- 
son, and great-great-grandson, each a 
"Cliffe Richmond, Gent.," may be seen 
in the Ashton Keyes churchyard to-day. 
The family removed in the middle of 
the eighteenth century and the body of 
"Jane Richmond, daughter of Cliffe and 
Joan Richmond, Gent." was brought 
from a distance in 1773 to be interred 
beside her parents. 

John Richmond came to America 
about 1630, and was one of the fore- 
most men in the makings of Newport, 
Taunton, and Little Compton. He was 
one of the original purchasers of the 
second named township, the considera- 
tion being .£100. His name occurs fre- 
quently in the Old Colony Records, but 
his private life is largely shrouded in 
mystery. As his grave is not among 
those in the family burial ground at 
Little Compton it is supposed it was 
carried back to England for burial. Of 
his wife all trace is lost although she 
must have lived in America as his chil- 
dren were born here. 

John Richmond built that house at 
Little Compton which is now the 
Seaconnet Hotel, and also the old farm 
house at Westport which was sold by 
'Bradford Perez Richmond to Peleg 
Manchester in 1833. The latter house 



was torn down in 1866. The carved 
stair-rail, the bricks for the great chim- 
ney, and all the furniture were brought 
from England. The writing desk of 
John Richmond, containing his papers 
and the deeds to his properties, also 
descended to 7 Bradford Perez Rich- 
mond and was destroyed in the house of 
his stepfather, Deacon 2 Enoch French, 
in the great fire of Fall River, 1843. 
The writing desk and valuable papers 
will do no more good to this generation 
than to teach them to hold on to one's 
own property one's self. This is a les- 
son which the last two generations sadly 
needed to learn, and the present 
searcher out of family history can only 
bitterly regret the priceless relics as 
missing links which vanished "when I 
lent it to Uncle Silas," or "when I let 
Sister Susan take those letters home 
with her." 

All the Richmonds of America are 
descended from the two sons of 1 John 
Richmond. Each had a large family. 
John settled in Taunton, and Edward in 
Westport and Dartmouth. I believe 
that with a little earnest effort all of the 
name can easily trace their line to one 
of these two. 

I am glad to add here that a Boston 
member of the family is now preparing 
a genealogy for publication which will, 
I hope, supply all the hidden informa- 
tion I have not been able to seek out. 



Vide following. 



CHILDREN. 

2 John, — 

3 Edward, — b. 1634. 

2 Sarah, — m. Edward Rew. m. 2, Nich- 
olas Stoughton. d. 1691. 

2 Mary, — b. 1639. m. William Paule. d. 
Oct. 3, 1715. 



66 



Richmond. 



"-Edward. 



RICHMOND,— "Edward ( son of 
^ohn). 

b. in 1632. 

m. Abigail Davis, daughter of Mrs. 
John Cowdall. 

m. 2nd, Amey Bull, daughter of Gov. 
Henry Bull. 

d. 1696. 
(Of Newport and Little Compton.) 

At "the sitting of the Council," 1656 
and 1657, Edward Richmond figured 
thus : — 

"Upon the petition of Richard Ussel 
to this Court concerninge an execution 
graunted to him against Edward Rich- 
mond of Newport, for the sum of three 
pound, thirteen shillings, which execu- 
tion being unserved by reason that noe 
estate was found to serve it on, and now 
being adjitiated in the Court for redress 
for same here appeared John Richmond, 
of Newport Sen'r, and to this court did 
pay, etc. — " 
Oct. 18th, 1756. 

"Ordered, that the business concern- 
inge Richard Ussell and Abigail, daugh- 
ter-in-law of Mr. John Cowdall, and Ed- 
ward Richmond is referred to the Court 
of Commission in May next." 
May 19th, 1657. 

"Report of the sub-committee yester- 
day chosen and sent to Abigail, daughter 
of John Cowdall, is that she, Abigail 
Davis, disclaimed Richard Ussell and 
only Edward Richmond, and further 
professed that what she had done with 
respect to Richard Ussell was for fear 
of being forced to do it by her father 
and mother." 



Report of Council : 
"It is ordered and by this Court de- 
clared that the marridge of Richard 
Ussell with Abigail Davis was an un- 
lawful marridge." 

This was probably one of the first di- 
vorces, if not the first, granted in America, 
and Edward Richmond and his wife 
lived happily after it until her death 
about twenty-five years later. 

In 1661 a share in the Misquamicut 
lands was appointed to him and two 
years later his father's death made him 
wealthy. 

In 1667-69-70-72 he was elected Gen- 
eral Solicitor, and began to take com- 
mand of a company of men in the con- 
stant warfare with the Indians. Full 
accounts of King Philip's War make 
frequent mention of Lieut, or Capt. 
Richmond, and it was on land belonging 
to him that Benjamin Church made the 
treaty with Awashongs, the queen- 
sachem. The place where the treaty 
was signed (still called Treaty Rock), 
is in the possession of the Richmond 
family at the present day. 
1672. — Edward Richmond appeared be- 
fore the Court to protest against the 
forfeiture of certain lands. 
1676. — It was noted in the Assembly 
that "Lieut. Richmond with his com- 
pany shall be allowed and have the 
one halfe of the produce of the seven 
Indians they brot in." 
Oct. 1677. — Five thousand acres in Nar- 
ragansett were appropriated for a 
township and five hundred set apart 



Richmond. 



6 7 



for the town (East Greenwich). 
Among the forty-eight to share it 
evenly were Edward Richmond and 
'Clement Weaver. 

1678. — Deputy from Newport to the 
General Council. 

16S0. — Taxed 14s. 

June 6, 1683. — Took oath of fidelity as 
freeman of Little Compton, of which 
town he was selectman 16S3-90. 

June 4, 1688. — Was made Lieutenant 
and fined ,£5 for selling liquor to an 
Indian. 

May 20, 1690. — Made Captain. 

Aug. 7, 1691. — Received a legacy at the 
probation of the will of his sister, 
Sarah Richmond Stoughton. 

Feb. 2, 1692. — Bought of Daniel Wilcox 
the twenty-seventh lot of Little 
Compton, for .£50. 

Feb. 16, 1692. — He sold to "my father- 
in-law, Henry Bull, being grandfather 
to my two youngest children, 120 
acres in Little Compton, for ,£80 for 
the use and behoof of my two young- 
est children Henry and Ann, with 
housing, gardin etc, reserving to self 
and wife Amey, the whole profits for 
life." 
Capt. Edward Richmond died in Nov., 

1696, and was laid in the family burying 

ground at Little Compton. The in- 
scription above him runs thus: 

"Here lyeth buried the body 

of Edward Richmond, Captain, 

who departed this life 

in ye 63d year of his age 

Nov. 1696." 

He was a member of the Church of 

England. 

His estate inventoried £326, 20s., 

besides a great deal of land and stock. 
Among the articles specially named 

were still-yards and a warming-pan. 



CHILDREN. 

3 Abigail, — b. 1656. m. John Remington, 
1679. m. 2nd, Henry Gardiner, 1689. 
d. 1744. 

3 Edward, — mentioned in his grandfa- 
ther's will) m. Sarah and had 

ten children. 

3 Mary, — m. William Palmer, about 1684. 

3 Elizabeth, — b. Dec. 6, 1666. m. John 
Palmer about 1686. d. Feb. 9, 171 7. 

3 John, — m. Elizabeth . d. 1738. 

3 Esther, — b. 1669. m. Thomas Burgess, 
d. Nov. 12, 1706. 

3 Sylvestre, — Vide following page. 

3 Sarah, — 

3 Henry, — (by second wife.) 
3 Ann (or Amey), — m. Henry Tew, 
April 6, 1704. 

Note: — It may be of interest to learn 
the curious ways in which a single 
family pedigree may be traced and 
completed. The line of Richmonds 
was given me from John to my grand- 
father by one of the family. The first 
names of two wives were mentioned, 
and the date of each man's death. 

^ohn Richmond's family was found 
in Col. Pierce's Genealogical Collec- 
tions, 2 Edward's and 3 Sylvestre's in 
Austin's Dictionary of Rhode Island. 

4 Perez was the last to be discovered, 
and was hunted up by a town clerk. 
That of s Perez, Junior, was given me 
by Mrs. Lucia Bosley, who was his 
granddaughter. 

I corresponded with some one in 
Ashton Keyes, Wiltshire, to try and 
learn of the family origin, and found 
out very little. Then Mr. Joshua Rich- 
mond, of Boston, who is preparing a 
book of the family, volunteered the 
information that John Richmond was 
the son of Edmond. 



68 



Richmond. 



z Sylvestre. 



RICHMOND— Colonel "Sylvestre. 

b. 1672. 

m. 1, 4 Elizabeth Rogers, daughter 
of 3 John Rogers and 3 Elizabeth Pa- 
bodie (she b. 1672. d. Oct. 23, 1724). 

m. 2, 'Deborah Cushing, widow of 
"Thomas Loring, 1727 (she d. Oct. 18, 
1770). 

d. Nov. 22, 1754. 
(Of Newport, Little Compton, and 

Dartmouth.) 

Sylvestre Richmond received from 
his father's estate by the terms of the 
will .£18, is., 8d. in land, and ^13, 3s., 
3d., in movables; a like amount was 
left his sister Sarah and his three bro- 
thers-in-law. The two eldest sons re- 
ceived decidedly the lion's share. 
May 29th, 1 70 1. —Col. Richmond 

bought; of John Rogers of Boston 

(his father-in-law) a tract of land in 

Little Compton for .£83. 
Feb. 4th, 1704. — He bought 40 acres in 

Little Compton of Wm. Earle for £60. 

These two transactions are about the 
only public records we have of Col. 
Richmond, with the exception of the 
covenant with Deborah and Caleb Lor- 
ing previous to his second marriage — 
the particulars of which are not given. 
He was one of the original members of 
the first Congregational Church. Col. 
Richmond and his two wives are buried 
in the family cemetery at Little Comp- 
ton with the following inscriptions: 

"Colon. Sylvestre Richmond of Dart- 
mouth. Died Nov. 22, 1754. In the 
81st year of his age." 



"Elizabeth, wife of Colonel Sylvestre 
Richmond. Died Oct. 23, 1724. In the 
52nd year of her age." 

"Deborah, the relict of Colonel Syl- 
vestre Richmond, formerly wife of 
Thomas Loring. Died Oct. 18, 1770, 
states 96." 

Col. Richmond's first wife was a de- 
scendant of John Al den's. Vide 
Rogers, Pabodie and Alden. 

His will, made Dec. 29, 1752, and 
proved Dec. 3, 1754, was as follows: 

To wife Deborah, £\%, 6s., iSd., riding 
chaise, easy chair, and silver tankard, 
for her use, and what things she brought 
at marriage, agreeable to covenant be- 
tween self and wife and Caleb Loring, 
before marriage, dated 1727, Feb. 7th. 
To wife also maintenance by testator's 
son Perez, out of estate I shall give 
him. To son William, all lands joining 
his homestead in Little Compton, he 
paying my grandson, Gamaliel Rich- 
mond, son of Peleg, ,£13, 6s., 8d., and to 
my granddaughter May Paine, who was 
daughter of my daughter Sarah, de- 
ceased, ^13, 6s., 8d. To son Sylvestre, 
30 acres in Dartmouth, and ,£205, 13s., 
4d., paid him by my son Perez. To son 
Peleg, 200 Spanish milled dollars, half 
of it in live stock. To son Ichabod, 
^33, 6s., 8d., and 3 acres in Little Comp- 
ton and use of room in west end of my 
dwelling house, and a bed. To son 
Rogers, .£200, half in stock. To daugh- 
ter Elizabeth, ^40, and silver tankard 
at death of wife, and if Elizabeth die 
before wife then the tankard to go 



Richmond. 
4 Perez. 



69 



to grand-son and grand-daughter Fisher, 
children of said Elizabeth. To daughter 
Ruth £a,o and two silver spoons. To 
daughter Mary ^20. To grand-daugh- 
ter Mary Paine £%. To grand-son Syl- 
vester, son of Sylvester, my silver-hilted 
sword. To grand-son Joshua, son of 
Perez, a brace of pistols and holsters. 
To grand-son Sylvester, son of William, 
three halberts and a fire-lock gun. To 
grand-son Richmond Loring, son of my 
daughter Mary, .£20. To negroes Nat 
and Kate, their freedom. To daughter 
Elizabeth £6, a feather bed and other 
household stuff. To daughters Ruth and 
Mary a bed and £6, each. To son Perez, 
my now dwelling house and homestead 
farm and the rest of real and personal 
estate, he supporting my aged wife and 
giving to his brothers, Peleg and Ischa- 
bod, a suit of apparrel, each." 

CHILDREN. 

4 William, — b. Oct. 10, 1694. d. in 1770, 
leaving children. 

4 Elizabeth, — b. May 10, 1696. m. 

Fisher. 

(Col.) 4 Sylvester, — b. June 30, 1698, 
commanded 1st Co. 6th Mass. Regi- 
ment against Louisburg. 

4 Peleg, — b. Oct. 25, 1700. 

4 Perez. — Vide the following. 

4 Ichabod, — b. Feb. 27, 1704. 

4 Ruth,— b. March 7, 1705. 

4 Hannah, — b. July 9, 1709. d. Jan. 20, 
1728. 

4 Sarah, — b. Oct. 31, 171 1. m. Paine. 

4 Mary, — b. Nov. 29, 171 3. 
m. Loring. 

4 Rogers, — b. May 25, 1716. 



RICHMOND— 4 Perez. 

b. Oct. 5, 1702. 

m. 4 Deborah, daughter of 3 Thomas 
Loring and 3 Deborah Cushing, March 
11, 1731 (she was b. 1710. d. April 14, 
1782.) 

d. Sept. 15, 1770. 
(Of Little Compton and Westport.) 

Through his mother Perez Richmond 
was the great-great-grand son of John 
Alden and Priscilla. He inherited the 
bulk of his father's property, and took 
a prominent place among the men of 
his time. 

The following inscriptions mark the 
graves of himself and wife in the old 
Richmond burial ground. 

"Capt. Perez Richmond of Dartmouth 
died Sept 16 1770 in ye 68th yr of his 
age." 

"Deborah, the relict of Capt. Perez 
Richmond of Dartmouth. Died April 14, 
1782, in ye 72nd yr. of her age. Fare- 
well, vain world, to me thou hast been 
dust and a shadow, these I leave with 
thee." 

CHILDREN. 

5 Hannah, — b. Jan. 15, 1732. 
5 Joshua, — b. July 1, 1734. 
5 Edward, — b. Aug. 6, 1736. 

5 Loring, — b. Dec. 27, 1738. d Sept. 20, 

I7S4- 

6 Perez, — Vide the following. 

5 Elizabeth, — b. Nov. 21, 1743. 

5 Benjamin, — b. Aug. 7, 1747. d. Feb. 

1814. 
5 Mary, — b. Aug. 26, 1749. 
5 Lucy,— b. July 3, 1751. 



70 



Richmond. 
6 Peres — " Bradford — ' Bradford. 



RICHMOND— (Dr.) 5 PEREZ. 

b. 1741. 

m. 5 Hannah, daughter of 4 Geokge 
Brightman and Hannah Peckham, May 
1770 (she b. Feb. 25, 1752. d. 1834.) 

d. Feb. 22, 1803. 
(Of Newport and Westport, R. I.) 

In 1790 Perez Richmond, Esq., was 
one of the Justices of the Court of Com- 
mon Pleas at Newport. 

CHILDREN. 

"Hannah, — (believed to have been) b. 

1772. m. William Pitts, d. 1841. 
"George Brightman, — Vide Vol. II. 
"Bradford, — Vide the following. 
"Susan, — d. in childhood. 
"Deborah, — b. 1782. m. Captain Samuel 

Pitts, d. 1813. 
"James, — b. May 1784. m. Lucy Fowler. 

d. Feb. 1869. 
"Susan,— b. 1786. m. Chas. Fowler, d. 

1863. 
"Elizabeth,— b. 1790. d. about 1873. 
"Alanson,— b. March 8, 1792. m. Rhody 

m. 2nd, Jane Ferguson, d. Oct. 

28, 1870. 
"Lucia,— b. Sept. 5, 1794. d. Oct. 28, 

1878. 
"Perry Otis, — b. 1796. Founder of the 

Richmond Mills at Lowell. 



RICHMOND,— "Bradford. 

b. at Westport, March 31, 1776. 

m. 7 Mary, daughter of "Sheffield 
Weaver and 4 Rhody Gibbs, 1809. 

d. Oct. 23, 1814. 
(Of Westport, R. I.) 

Bradford Richmond was born on his 
father's farm, at Westport, in the old 
house built by the first American Rich- 
mond a hundred and fifty years before. 

He spent his life in the same place, 
staying with his mother when his bro- 
thers removed into Western New York, 
and bringing his wife there in 1809. 
There his daughter and son were born 
and there the father died — still a young 



man — in 1814. Born in the midst of the 
Revolution, he died while another war 
was devastating his country. 

He was the last of the Richmonds to 
spend his life in the homestead. After 
his death it was rented to Peleg Man- 
chester, and in 1866 was torn down, hav- 
ing been bought by Mr. Manchester 
some time before. 

Mrs. Mary Richmond soon married 
again and took with her her children's 
share of the furniture and family papers. 
These were all destroyed in the great 
Fall River fire of 1841, when s Enoch 
French's house was burned. 

It was not a lucky generation for 
family relics. 

Vide " 7 Mary Weaver." 
children. 
7 Hannah Brightman, — Vide Vol. II. 
7 Bradford Perez, — Vide following. 



RICHMOND— 7 Bradford. 

b. in Westport, March 31, 1S12. 

m. 4 Anne, daughter of 3 Furman R. 
Whitwell and 7 Hannah Hathaway, Oct. 
6, 1836 (she b. June 10, 1816.) 
(Of Westport, Fall River, Fairhaven 

and Nunda, N. Y.) 

7 Bradford Richmond passed his boy- 
hood in the family of his step father, 
Enoch French. As a young man he 
was in business in Fall River and Fair- 
haven until he settled in Nunda, where 
he still resides. 1/, (P&£ /r, /r?y 

children. 

"James Whitwell,— b. Nov. 30. 1837. d. 

Nov. 2, 1S39. s~sr> /;./?, /^if/C/^r-n*- 
8 Georgia Virginia \VT, — b. Aug. 23, 1840. 
8 Anne Elizabeth W.,— b. Dec. 11, 1S42. 

Vide S W. P. Warner. 
8 Furman Whitwell,— b. Dec. 4, 1845. d. 

April 4, 1853. 
8 Mary French,— b. April 15, 1848. d. 

Aug. 15, 184S. 
8 Laura Virginia, — b. March 16, 1850. d. 

Aug. 30, 185 1. 
"Charles Bradford,— b. Nov. 18, 1854, 




BRADFORD PEREZ RICHMOND. 



Rogers. 



71 



1 Thomas — % John — % Jolm. 



ROGERS,— 1 Thomas. 



Mayflower Pilgrim. 

d. 1621. 
(Of Plymouth, Mass.) 

Thomas Rogers and his son Joseph 
were two of the hundred who came in 
the Mayflower. As John Alden was al- 
most the only man aboard the vessel who 
had not previously been an exile in 
Holland we feel certain that the two 
Rogers had been part of the little com- 
munity who so courageously conceived 
and executed the project of a second 
exile into a land peopled with savages 
and devoid of any trace of even the 
rough civilization of the seventeenth 
century middle classes. 

New England tradition is fond of 
claiming a descent for Thomas Rogers 
from the martyr of Queen Mary's day. 
It is impossible now to prove either the 
truth of this tale or the reverse. Any- 
one who reads Fox's "Martyrs" will be 
struck with the number of names which 
are familiar to us, as especially those of 
New England. On the score of names 
all the Clarkes, Cookes, Searles, All- 
brights, Wrights, etc., etc., might claim 
kin with men burned at Smithfield. 
But it should be remembered that these 
were the common names among the 
lower classes and borne by hundreds 
and thousands of men from Carlisle to 
Dover, and also that, common as these 
names were, they were not more com- 
mon than opposition to the accepted 
church, and consequent persecution by 
the government. 

I do not like to think so badly of hu- 
man nature as to believe that children 
who were made orphans by the rack 
and flames could raise their children to 
crop the ears of Quakers and drive 
women like Ann Hutchinson and men 



like Roger Williams forth from their 
midst into the wilderness. 

Thomas Rogers died early in the 
winter of the hardships suffered in the 
new land. He left three sons at any 
rate, a Joseph of Duxbury who died 
1678; 2 Eleazer, and 2 John. 

ROGERS— * John. ' ^»J~=> «* n 

m. Frances. 
(Of Plymouth, 1631. Duxbury, 1634.) 

John Rogers was representative in 
1657. 

CHILDREN. 

8 John, — Vide following. 

3 Joseph, — 

'Timothy, — 

3 Ann, — m. John Hu^sdon. (tvcJ»i<vv. 

3 Mary,— 

3 Abigail,— 



ROGERS— 3 John. 

m. Elizabeth, daughter of Wm. Pa- 
bodie and Elizabeth Alden, Nov. 16, 
1666 (she b. April 24, 1647. d. probably 
about 1680). m. 2, Mrs. Marah. 

d. 1732. 
(Of Duxbury, Boston, and Barrington.) 

John Rogers was a merchant of Bos- 
ton. At his death his property inven- 
toried at .£977, 1 8s. Among the items 
was a great amount of silver plate, sil- 
ver buttons and shoe-buckles. 

children. 

4 Hannah, — b. Nov. 16, 1668. m. Samuel 
Bradford, July, 1689. 

4 John, — b. Sept. 22, 1670. 

4 Ruth,— b. April iS, 1675. 

4 Sarah, — b. May 4, 1677. m. Nathaniel 
Searle. d. Jan. 19, 1790. 

4 Elizabeth, — Vide 3 Sylvestre Rich- 
mond. 



n 



Scott. 
1 Richard — -Hannah. 



SCOTT— » Richard. 

b. in Glemsford, Suffolk, 1607. 
m., about 1637-8, Katharine, daugh- 
ter of Rev. Francis Marbury and 
Bridget Dryden (she was born in 
London about 1 609. d May 2, 1687). 

d. 1680. 
(Of Glemsford, Ipswich, Mass., Provi- 
dence, R. I.) 

Richard Scott was the son of Richard 
Scott, Gent., of Glemsford, Suffolk. It 
is not certain just when he came to 
America, but it was in the year 1634, 
for he joined the church in Boston, 
Aug. 28, of that year. About three 
years after, he married the younger 
sister of Mistress Ann Hutchinson, and 
Gov. Winthrop notes, June 16, 1639, 
how "the wife of one Scott, sister of 
Mrs. Hutchinson, became affected with 
Anabaptistry and went to Providence, 
R.I." 

Richard Scott has acquired promi- 
nence as the first Quaker convert in 
New England. It would be interesting 
to know who converted him if he was 
the first. In 1658, Mary Scott's be- 
trothed, Christopher Holder, was 
imprisoned in Boston and cruelly muti- 
lated for being a Quaker. His mother- 
in-law was present, and because she 
raised her voice in prayer to God she 
was seized upon and mercilessly 
whipped. She is described as an 
"ancient woman" of pleasant appear- 
ance, and the mother of many children, 
but such claims on charity had no effect 
on those whose motto seems to have 
been, "Take especial care that ye do 
unto others exactly that which lias 
been done unto ye." 



When Mrs. Scott was released from 
her bonds she said, "If God calls to us 
woe be to us if we come not, and I 
question not but he whom we love will 
make us not to count our lives dear 
unto ourselves for the sake of His 
Name." 

To which Endicott replied, "And we 
shall be as ready to take away your 
lives as ye shall be to lay them down." 

In June of the next year, Patience 
Scott, a child of eleven years, went to 
Boston to testify against the persecu- 
tion of the Quakers and was imprisoned. 
Mary Holder going to see her husband 
was also imprisoned a month. 

In "A New England Firebrand 
Quenched," there appears a letter 
written by Scott, and much of interest 
regarding him and his family is found 
in that book and also in Bishop's "New 
England Judged." 

Roger Williams, in writing to Gov. 
Endicott, spoke especially of Mrs. 
Scott, and called her his friend. She 
seems to have been a woman of admir- 
able character, having her sister's spirit 
and persuasion tempered by a sweet 
womanliness. 

The New England Genealogical 
Register has many interesting pages of 
research regarding this brave family. 

children. 

-John, — m. Rebecca . d. 1677. 

2 Mary, — m. Christopher Holder, Aug. 

12, 1660. d. Oct. 17, 1665. 
2 Hannah, — b. 1642. m. Walter Clarke, 

Feb., 1667. Vide Clarke. 
2 Patience, — b. 1648. m. Henry Beere. 
-Deliverance, — m. William Richardson, 

Aug. 30, 1670. d. Sept. 10, 1676. 



SCOTTO. 

1 Thomasine — 2 Thomas. 



73 



SCOTTO,- 



The name of Scotto, Scottow or Scot- 
howe is of ancient origin in England. 
In its latter form its derivation is plainly 
traceable to the two words forming its 
syllables which signify "portion of the 
hill-side," and point to the location of 
the farm or cottage of the first to bear 
the name sometime in the twelfth cen- 
tury. 

The first of the family (and so far as 
is known the only ones) to emigrate to 
America were a Thomasine, a widow, 
and her two sons, the three being among 
the earliest settlers of Boston. The 
widow became a member of the First 
Church Sept. 2 1 st, 1634. Hersons joined 
May 19th, 1639. The younger, Joshua, 
was one of the founders of the "South 
Church," and was also the author of 
two tracts. It must not be supposed 
that he was an ultra-religious man, how- 
ever, for the Colonial records regard- 
ing him generally represent him as 
newly come into the possession of some 
other man's property — not always by 
the right means. 

The older son 2 Thomas (born 1612) is 
the one we are more particularly inter- 
ested in. He had a house and garden 
in School Street which he sold in 1645 
for ^55. It is believed that some of 
this property is now included in the 
City Hall Square. He also owned 4 



acres in what is now Brookline, but was 
then called "Muddy River," and a marsh 
at the same place. He was a joiner by 
trade, and was also overseer of the 
graves, gates and fences in the town for 
1644. 

He married Joan Sandford, but, al- 
though there were several families of 
that name in Boston at the time, it is 
impossible to find her parentage. We 
only know her mother was living when 
her husband made his will. Joan was 
deceased at that time and Thomas Scotto 
was living with his second wife, Sarah. 
He died in i66i,and 1 Thomas Clarke is 
named witness to his will, made March 
9, 1660. 

This family of Scotto is now extinct 
as far as the name goes. 

CHILDREN. 

3 Thomas, — bp. Dec. 8th, 1639. 

3 Thomas, — bp. April 10, 1641. d. in in- 
fancy. 

3 John, — b. May 2, 1644. m. Rebecca. 

"Thomas, — b. March 3rd, 1647. 

3 Mehitable, — b. Dec. 14th, 1648. bp. 
Feb. nth, 1649. m. 2 Andrew Clarke. 
Vide Clarke. 

(By second wife.) 

3 Joshua, — b. Dec. 3rd, 1655. 

3 Sarah,— b. Sept. 27th, 1657. 

3 Thomasine, — b. Aug. 14th, 1659. d. in 
infancy. 

3 Thomasine, — b. Aug. 18, 1660. 



74 



Shearman. 
Henry — Henry — Samuel — a Philip. 



SHEARMAN,— Henry. 

b. about the tenth year of Henry 
VIII. 

m. Agnes (she d. 1580). 

d. 1589. 
(Of Dedham, Suffolk County.) 

Bore the arms of the Suffolk Shear- 
man. 

CHILDREN. 

Henry, — Vide the following. 

Edmond, — b. about 1540. m. Ann Pe- 
latte, April 25, 1559. m. 2nd, Ann 
Clarke, d. 1600. 

Judith,— m. William Potfield, 1566. 

John, — 

Robert, — bp. Feb. 6, 1560. m. Bar- 
bara Brown, 1583. d. 1605.- (Of Col- 
chester and London.) 



SHEARMAN— HENRY. 

m. Susan Hills, 
buried Aug. 8, 1610. 
(Of Dedham, Suffolk Co.) 
Clothier by trade. 

CHILDREN. 

Henry, — b. 1571. d. 1645. 
Samuel, — Vide the following. 
Susan, — b. 1575. 
Edmond, — b. 1577. 
Nathaniel, — b. and d. 15S0. 

Nathaniel, — b. 1582. m. Priscilla . 

John, — b. Aug. 17, 1585. 
Elizabeth, — 

Ezekiel, — b. July 25, 1589. 
Mary, — b. July 27, 1592. 
Daniel, — m. Christian Chapin, 1602. d. 
1634. 



SHEARMAN— Samuel. 

b- 1573- 

m. Philis Ward-Upscher. 
d. 1615. 
(Of Dedham, Suffolk Co.) 

CHILDREN. 

Mary, — b. Oct. 22, 1599. 
Samuel, — b. Oct. 20, 1601. 
Henry,— b. Oct. 20, 1601. d. soon. 
Henry, — b. June 25, 1603. d. in Boston, 

1651. 
Martha, — b. June 24, 1604. 
Sarah, — b. Feb. II, 1606. 
Philip, — Vide the following. 



SHEARMAN,— 1 Philip. 

b. Feb. 5, 1610. 

m. Sarah Odding (she b. in Dedham, 
Essex Co., Eng. d. 1691 ). 

d. 1687. 
(Of Dedham, Suffolk Co., and Rhode 

Island.) 

Philip Shearman emigrated in 1633 
and settled in Roxbury, where he was 
admitted freeman the same year. Rev. 
John Eliot, in an interesting account of 
the members of his church, has left us 
this in regard to the first American 
Shearman. 

"Philip Shearman came in 1633. 
Single. This man was of a melancholy 
temp., he lived honestly and comfort- 
ably among us for several years upon a 
just calling; went for England and re- 
turned with a blessing, but after his 
Father-in-law John Porter was so car- 
ryed away with those opinions of famil- 
isme and seizure, he followed with them 
and removed with them to the Hand, he 
behaved himself sinfully in those mat- 
ters (as may appeare in the story), and 
was cast out of the church." 

Philip Shearman was among those 
who were warned Nov. 20, 1637, to de- 
liver up their weapons and fire-arms 
because of the dangerous opinions 
abroad. Soon after he left Roxbury, 
going to New Hampshire, but the cli- 
mate was so severe that he was forced 
to bring his family back and settle in 
Rhode Island instead. He was one of 
the signers of the Portsmouth Compact, 
March 7, 1638, and when the govern- 
ment was organized in 1639 Coddington 
was made Governor and Philip Shear- 
man Secretary. His name appears on 
the first purchase deeds of the Colony. 



Shearman. 
'■Samson. 



75 



It is quite impossible to give anything 
like an adequate account of this active 
and useful life in a couple of columns, 
so I must refer the reader to more 
extended works and to the colonial 
records of R. I. 

His death occurred in the winter of 
1687, and his will (proved March 22) 
was as follows: 

"Executor, son Samuel. To wife 
Sarah use of fire-room in west end of 
dwelling-house, a bed, and maintenance 
by son Samuel, in raiment and necessa- 
ries and to her ten good ewe sheep. . . . 
To eldest son Eber, ten acres in Ports- 
mouth. . . .To son Samuel rest of farm 
and my now dwelling house. . . .and all 
moveable goods except two great chests 
with lock and key each.... To son 
Samson a white-faced mare with her 
foal and those four Indians which we 

jointly bought To daughters Sarah, 

Mary and Philip ten ewe sheep each, 
etc., etc." 

To son Edmond is given Benj. Chase's 
son till of age. 

CHILDREN. 

2 Eber, — b. 1634. m. Mary . d. 1706. 

2 Sarah, — b. 1636. m. Thomas Mumford. 
2 Peleg — b. 1638. m. Elizabeth Lawton, 

July 25, 1657. d. 1719. 
2 Mary, — b. 1639. d. young. 
2 Edmond,— b. 1641. m. Dorcas . d. 

1719. 
2 Samson, — Vide the following. 
2 William, — b. 1643. d. young. 
2 John, — b. 1644. m. Sarah Spooner. d. 

April 16, 1734. 
2 Mary,— b. May, 1645. m - Samuel 

Wilbur. 
2 Hannah,— b. 1647. ™- 2 William Chase. 
2 Samuel,— b. 1648. m. Martha Tripp, 

Feb. 23, 1681. d. Oct. 9, 1717. 



2 Benjamin, — b. 1650. m. Hannah Mow- 
ry, Dec. 3, 1674. d. Sept. 24, 1719. 

2 Phillippe, — b. Oct. 1, 1650. Vide 
Chase. 



SHEARMAN— 2 Samson. 

b. 1642. 

m. March 4, 1675, to 2 Isabel, daugh- 
ter of ] John Tripp and 2 Mary Paine 
(she b. 1651. d. 1716). 

d. 1718. 

Samson Shearman inherited much of 
his father's energy, and also his worldly 
success in life. His will, proved July 
4, 1718, speaks of his possessions thus: 

"To daughter Sarah Chase, a great 
brass kettle and ,£10 to be paid by my 
son Philip. To son Philip all land in 
Westerly and Dartmouth. To daughter 
Alice Tibbotts, a great iron pot and ^10 
to be paid by son Abiel. To son Abiel 
land in Kingston which he is now in 
possession of, a gun or musket as he 
chooses, a silver spoon, great Bible, 
whip-saw, and negro boy Tommy.... 
To three daughters, equaly divided, a 
riding horse, two good cows, twenty 
sheep and rest of house-hold goods." 

5 Jacob Hathaway was the great- 
grandson of 2 Samson Shearman, and 
also of the latter's sister 2 Philis, who 
married 2 Benjamin Chase. 

children. 

3 Philip, — b. Jan. 16, 1676. 

s Sarah, — b. Sept. 24, 1677. m. — Chase. 

"Alice,— b. Jan. 12, 1680. m. James 
Strange (vide same), m. 2nd, George 
Tibbotts, by whom she had Alice, b. 
July 27, 1720. 

3 Abiel— b. Oct. 15, 1684. 

3 Isabel — b. 1686. 

3 Job— b. Nov. 8, 1687. 



76 



SHEFFIELD— 2 Ichabod. 



Sheffield. 
2 Ichabod — z Amos. 



b. 1626. 

m. 2 Mary, daughter of 1 George and 
Frances Parker, 1660. 

d. Feb. 4, 1712. 
(Of Portsmouth and Newport, R. I.) 

The name of Sheffield is one which, 
in old England, was and is now com- 
mon to all classes. The town of course 
gave it to numbers of the lowest ranks 
in life, and it is not surprising that we 
find Sheffields among the earliest comers 
to America. 

There was a Joseph Sheffield who was 
prominent in Portsmouth about 1643. 
The subject of this sketch is believed to 
have been his son. There can be very 
little doubt on the subject. The son 
never became very well known to history. 
He was taxed 5s. 6d. in 1680 and in 1690 
was Deputy. He lived to be nearly 
ninety -years of age and was buried in 
the Clifton Burying Grounds. 

CHILDREN. 

3 Joseph, — b. Aug. 22, 1661. m. Mary 
Sheriff Feb. 12, 1685. d. 1706. 

3 Mary,— b. April 30, 1664. 

3 Nathaniel,— b. April 18, 1667. m. Mary 
m. 2nd, Mrs. 3 Catharine (Clarke) 
Gould, daughter of Gov. 'Clarke, d, 
Nov. 12, 1729. 

3 Ichabod, — b. March 6, I670. m. Eliza- 
beth Manchester 1694. d. 1739. 

8 Amos, — Vide below. 



SHEFFIELD— 3 Amos (Captain). 

b. June 25, 1673. 

m. 3 Anne, daughter of 2 John Pearce 
and 2 Mary Tallman, March 5, 1696 
(sheb. Feb. 14, 1674. d. Nov. 27, 1760). 
m. 2nd, Sarah Davis, Dec. 22, 1708. 

d. 1710. 
(Of Tiverton, R. I.) 



3 Amos Sheffield was a blacksmith by 
trade, and a man of education in a cer- 
tain degree. He was captain in the local 
militia at Tiverton, where he had been 
one of the first settlers. 

His first wife died in 1706 when his 
youngest child, 4 Ruth was not two years 
old. In 1708 he married again but 
seems to have soon fallen into a state 
of declining health, for he made his will 
without mentioning his son by his last 
wife, which shows conclusively that he 
was expecting death before that child 
was born. The will is not drawn up in 
ordinary terms but shows a careful fore- 
thought for the immediate future of his 
four children, such as a dying man 
would make. 

He gave his son, John, his dwelling 
house, certain lands, black mare and colt 
and Josephus' Antiquities of the Jews. 
The daughter received other lands, and 
the children and their property were 
lefttothe guardianship of their mother's 
parents. 

The estate inventoried ,£474, and 
among the personal property we find 
mention of three spinning wheels, sword 
and belt, great Bible and small Bible, 
etc., etc. 

B. P. Richmond was descended from 
Amos Sheffield thus: 

3 Amos Sheffield. 

4 Ruth, m. 4 Benj. Weaver. 

5 Samuel Weaver. 

6 Sheffield Weaver. 

7 Mary, m. 6 B. Richmond. 

7 B. P. Richmond. 



CHILDREN. 

4 Susanna— b. Oct 11, 1697. 

4 John, — b. Jen. 8, 1699. m. Martha Taber 

1722. 
4 Mary— b. April 2, 1701. 
4 Ruth, — Vide next page. 
4 Aaron,— b. Dec. 8, 1709. 



Sheffield. 
iRuth. 



77 



SHEFFIELD— Ruth. 



b. Jan. ioth, 1704, at 1 p. m. 

m. 4 Benjamin Weaver, April nth, 

I723- 

(Of Tiverton, Freetown and Somerset.) 

Ruth Sheffield was motherless before 
she was three years old, and an orphan 
at six. 

Her father's will makes mention of 
her thus: (April 17th, 1807.) 

"I give and bequeath to my three 
Daughters Susana, Mary and Ruth Shef- 
field, all that my six score acre lott it 
being in number the seventh lott in the 
second Division of Pocasset Purchase. 

"To have and to hold to them their 
heirs and assigns to be Eaqually Divided 
betwixt them their parts to be severaly 
at their Dispose when they shall ar- 
rive to Eighteen years of age or Mar- 
riage 

"I give and bequeath to my Daughter 
Ruth one feather bed and Bolster and 
two pair of sheets and two Parts of 
Blankets and a Coverlid with a small 
chest and a box which is made of Oake 
and a wooden wheel and a book entitled 
the holy war by her to be Possessed and 
Enjoyed at Eighteen years of age of 
Marriage afores'd 

"And likewise my three Daughters 
above named to be put out severaly as 
they arrive to sixteen years of age to 
Learn the Trade of a Taylor." 

This will was proved Sept. 7th, 1710. 
One of its provisions was that the child- 
ren should be brought up by their grand- 
parents, John and Mary Pearce, (Vide 
Pearce) who thus in their last years were 
endowed with a nice little family of 



four children, ranging in age from six 
to thirteen. 

We may suppose that at sixteen Ruth 
went to learn the "Trade of a Taylor," 
and left it three years later to marry. 

Then we lose sight of her again until 
another will (that of her husband) men- 
tions her thus, 1774: 

"I give and bequeath to Ruth my well 
beloved wife the income and improve- 
ment of all my homestead farm, with 
all the buildings thereon during her 

widow-hood but no longer I also 

give to Ruth my wife what firewood she 
shall have occation for her own use. . . . 
.... I give unto my beloved wife my side 
saddle, bridle, pillion and all my pro- 
vision and provender that I shall have 
by me at my decease all the gifts and 
bequeasts herein given to Ruth my be- 
loved wife is in lieu of her thirds or 
dowry 

"All the rest and residue of my estate 
not before given away.... I give unto 
my beloved wife Ruth Weaver the bet- 
ter to enable her to pay my just debts 
and legacies whom I make constitute 
ordain and appoint with my loving son 
in law 5 Johnathan Reed my whole and 
sole Executor and Executrix " 

Ruth Sheffield Weaver is the ances- 
tress of two lines, thus: 
5 Samuel Weaver. 'Eunice (Reade). 
6 Sheffield Weaver. 6 Hannah(Whitwell) 
7 Mary (Richmond). 3 FurmanWhitwell. 
7 Bradf'd Richmond. *Anne (Whitwell). 

8 Anna Richmond Warner. 

"Anna Warner French. 

5 Charles E. French. 



78 



Slecht. 



1 Cornells — ^Jacomyntje. 



SLECHT (SLEGT),— Cornelis Ba- 
rentson. 



m. Tryntje Tysse Boz. 

Cornelis Barents Slegt was a native 
of Woerden in South Holland, eighteen 
miles from Leyden. In that place he 
had two daughters born, — and possibly 
other children also. The daughters are 
all that we know of. I have not been 
able to ascertain when their father 
emigrated, but in 1663 he was settled in 
Kingston, for his eldest daughter was 
married on the twenty-ninth day of that 
April to Cornelis Barents Kunst. We 
are interested in her as the ancestress 
to all the Eltings in America. Her 
husband died in the first years of their 
married life, and his widow wedded 
Gerrit Foeken at Kingston, Oct. 27, 
1668. She had four daughters by these 
two men, but it's beyond me to assort 
them properly. The early Dutch 
named their sons and daughters with 
the same naive mixture of surnames 
and Christian names that the Swedes 
and Danes of the present day delight 
in. I have studied the problem of 
these four daughters until I have 
decided that Tryntje was the daughter 
of Gerrit Foeken, who had been previ- 
ously married and had Gerritse, her 
half-sister. These half-sisters married 



two brothers, 2 Solomon and 2 Jacob du 
Bois, whose lives may be referred to. 

Gerrit Foeken dying, the widow 
made a third marriage (about 1675) 
with a Jan Elting, then a man over forty 
years of age. About the same time 
her sister Petronella married Jochem 
Hendrik Schoonmaker (Aug. 1, 1679). 

CHILDREN OF 2 JACOMYNTJE (SLECHT) 
ELTING. 



3 Hilletje— b. 



m. Gerrit Wyncoop 



and removed to Philadelphia. 

3 Jannetjc, — b. . m. Cornelius New- 

kerk, of Hurley. 
3 Jacomyntje, — b. . m. Henry Pawl- 
ing, of Philadelphia. 
3 Tryntje, — b. — . m. Solomon du 

Bois. Vide Du Bois. 
2 Roeloff,- ~1 
2 Cornelis, — 

2 William — - Vide Elting, 'Jan. 
2 Aaltje — 
2 Geertje, — 

Through her daughter 'Tryntje, 
2 Jacomyntje became ancestress to the 
Elting family a second time. Tryntje 
married Solomon du Bois and had a 
daughter named Magdallena. This 
daughter married Josiah Elting. A 
strange error has arisen which gives 
Magdallena a generation further re- 
moved. It is without foundation. 



Stow. 
1 John — 2 Samuel. 



79 



STOW— iJohn. 

b. in Kent about 1590-95. 

m. Elizabeth Biggs (she d. 1638). 

d. Oct. 26, 1643. 
(Of Kent, and Roxbury, Mass.) 

Gov. Winthrop, in his interesting 
diary of Puritan days and ways, men- 
tions how, in 1634, there were six ships 
arrived during the week of the sitting of 
the General Council in May. 

In one of these ships came John 
Stow, a Kentish man, and his wife and 
six children. We suppose him to have 
been middle-aged as his youngest 
daughter was married five years later. 
We know he must have been a man of 
education and property as his son Sam- 
uel was one of the first of Harvard stu- 
dents. In 1639 John Stow was Repre- 
sentative to two Courts. Four years 
later he died — not yet old. 

CHILDREN. 

'-Thomas, — m. Mary Griggs, Dec. 4, 

1639. d. 1684. 
2 Elizabeth, — m. Henry Archer, Dec. 4, 

1639. 
2 John, — 

2 Nathaniel, — m. Elizabeth. 
2 Samuel, — Vide following. 
^Thankful, — m. John Peirpont, Dec. 4, 

1639. 



STOW— 2 Samuel. 

b. in Kent about 1622. 

m. 2 Hope, daughter of 1 William 
Fletcher of Chelmsford, Conn. 

d. 1704. 
(Roxbury, Mass., and Middletown, 

Conn.) 

Samuel Stow was a boy twelve years 
old when his parents brought him to 
America in 1634. 

In his twentieth year he entered Har- 
vard College and was one of a class of 
seven to graduate in 1645. He then 
entered the ministry, going in '53 to 
Middletown, where he was the first and 
only officiating clergyman for fifteen 
years. 



Then dissensions arose in the church 
and Mr. Stow severed his connection 
with it. There was a perpetual diffi- 
culty in New England over the precise 
religious basis on which it stood. It 
was almost impossible for a minister 
and people to develop at just the same 
rate of speed, and whichever was most 
advanced or most conservative there 
was sure to be trouble. The Puritans 
had passed the point at which men can 
be coerced into a belief — but they had 
not come within sight of tljat other 
standing point which will not permit 
coercion of others. 

Mr. Stow removed to Simsbury for a 
while, and then filled various pulpits 
during absence of the regular incum- 
bents. But finally he retired wholly 
from the ministry and, returning to 
Middletown, spent the remainder of his 
life there, well liked and respected. 

Mr. Stow's daughter Dorothy married 
2 Jonathan Gilbert, Jr., and became the 
grandmother of * Eunice Gilbert Gay- 
lord. Vide 4 Gilbert, and 5 Warner. 

CHILDREN. 

3 John, — b. at Charleston, Mass., June 
16, 1650. m. Esther (Cornwell) Wil- 
cox, 1678. d. June 30, 1732. 

3 Ichabod, — b. at Middletown, Feb. 20, 
1653. m. Mary Atwater, Oct. 22, 
1688. d. Jan. 25, 1695. 

3 Hope, — b. Feb. 4, 1657. m. Abraham 
Smith, Feb. 15, 1678. d. Nov. 17, 
1678. 

3 Dorothy, — Vide 2 Jonathan Gilbert. 

3 Elizabeth, — b. Aug. I, 1662. m. May- 
bee Barnes, 1691. 

3 Thankful — b. May 5, 1664. m. Wm. 
Trowbridge. 

3 Rachel, — b. March 1 3, 1667. m. Israriah 
Wetmore. 

3 Margaret, — m. Beriah Wetmore. 



8o 



Tallman. 



1 Peter— * Mary. 



TALLMAN— ! Peter. 

b. 

m. Ann . 



m. 2nd, Joan Briggs, 1665 (she d. 1685). 

m. 3rd, Esther 1686. 

d. 1708. 
(Of Newport and Portsmouth, R. I.) 

PeterTallman was of Newport in 1655. 
Three years later he bought fifteen acres 
of land in Portsmouth and removed 
there, having the honor to be General 
Commissioner of Rhode Island. 

In 1665 the Assembly granted him a 
divorce from his wife — the mother of 
his five children who were all between 
three and fourteen years of age. 

I do not know what became of Mrs. 
Tallman. Her husband went to Taun- 
ton and married another wife just about 
as soon as he could arrange a contract 
with her regarding his own property. 
The second wife gave birth to eight 
children and died when the youngest 
was a year old. 

The year following the widower mar- 
ried again, and this last wife survived 
him. His youngest son, Samuel, was 
his only child by her. 

Peter Tallman was one of the Ports- 
mouth Jury who brought in the verdict 
on the man found hanging on a tree, — 
"That we do not find but that the said 
man said to be named John Craggs was 
absolutely the only actor of his own 
death." 

Although he seems to have been re- 
spected and honored by his fellow towns- 
people yet this man's life does not im- 
press me agreeably. I feel sorry for his 
wives, and am certain that their husband 
was lacking someway or the names of 
some of his children would not be for- 
gotten, and their births unregistered. 



'Bradford Richmond and his wife 
Anna Whitwell were each descended 
from Peter Tallman through his daugh- 
ter Mary Pearce's two daughters. Vide 
Pearce for tables of descent. 

3 George Reade French was also a 
descendant of the same man, thus: 
Peter Tallman d. 1708. 

2 Mary m. 2 John Pearce. 

3 Mary m. 3 John Reade. 

4 Joseph. 

s Joseph. 

6 Sarah m 2 Enoch French. 

3 George R. French. 

4 Charles E. French. 

5 Charles French, Jr. 



CHILDREN. 

2 Mary, — m. 2 John Pearce. Vide same. 

d. 1720. 
2 Elizabeth, — m. Isaac Lawton March 3, 

1674. d. May 20, 1701. 
2 Peter,— b. March 22, 1658. m. Mrs. Ann 

(Wright) Walstone Nov. 7, 1683. d. 

July 6, 1726. 
2 Ann, — m. Stephen Brayton March 8, 

1679. 
x 2 Joseph. 

2 Susanna, — m. Beckitt. 

2 , — m. William Wilbur, d. 1732. 

2 Jonathan, — m. Sarah . d. 1762. 

2 James, — m. Mrs. Mary Davol Mar. 18, 

1689. m. 2nd, Hannah Swain, Sept. 14, 

1701. d. 1724. 

2 — m. 2 Wm. Potter. 

'John, — . Mary . d. 1709. 

2 , — m. Israel Shaw 1689. 

2 Benjamin, — b. Jan. 28, 1684. m. Patience 

DurfeeSept.23, 1708. m. 2nd, Deborah 

Cook, June 7, 1724. d. May 20, 1759. 
'^Samuel— b. Jan. 14, 1688. 



Theall — Tripp. 



81 



THEALL,— 1 Nicholas. 



m. Elizabeth 



(she d. 1660). 



d. Aug. 19, 1658. 
(Of Watertown, Mass., and Stamford, 

Conn.) 

Nicholas Theall appears to have 
emigrated about 1638. He removed to 
Connecticut about 1645, and located at 
Stamford. His widow married Thomas 
Ufford, and died Dec. 27, 1660. 

CHILDREN. 

2 Joseph, — Vide the following. 
2 Elizabeth, — b. June 5, 1643. m. William 
Radcliffe. 



THEALL— 2 Joseph (Captain). 
b. Oct. 24, 1640. 



m. 



(Of Stamford, Bedford, N. Y., and Rye.) 
Joseph Theall was Representative 
1671-75-76-77. He held considerable 
property in Stamford, but in 1682 we 
find him "chiefe millitary officer of the 
Train band" of Bedford. In 1690 he 
was at Rye, where he was justice of the 
peace in 1694. He had at least one 
son, 3 Ebenezer. 



THEALL— 3 Ebenezer. 

(Of Rye.) 

In 1737, Ebenezer Theall gave his 
farm of 170 acres on "Budd's Neck" to 
his son 4 Charles. He had other child- 
ren, 4 Hachaliah, 4 Joseph, 4 Abraham 
and 4 Hannah. 



THEALL,— "Charles (Major). 

(Of Rye.) 

children. 
6 Gilbert — 
5 Thomas, — 
5 Joseph, — 

5 Margaret, — m. 4 Isaac Fowler. Vide 
Fowler. 



Cursory as this sketch of the Theall 
family is, it is absolutely all I have been 
able to discover regarding the family. 



TRIPP- iJOHN. 

b. 1610. 

m. 2 Mary, daughter of 1 Anthony 
Paine, about 1639. Vide 2 Mary Paine. 

d. 1678. 
(Of Aquidneck and Portsmouth.) 

April 30, 1639, John Tripp was one of 
the signers of the famous compact of 
Portsmouth. Of his family nothing is 
known save that he was a nephew of 
Robert Potter. By trade he was a 
carpenter. 

In 1655, he deeded certain property 
bought of 1 John Alden to his son Peleg, 
and, in 1671, certain similar property to 
his son Joseph. 

By the terms of his will his eldest 
son John received decidedly the lion's 
share. 

children. 

2 John, — b. 1640. m. Susan Anthony, 
Sept. 7, 1665. d. Nov. 20, 1719. 

2 Peleg, — b. 1642. m. Ann Sisson. d. 
Jan. 13, 1714. 

2 Joseph, — b. 1644. m. Mehitabel Fish, 
Aug. 6, 1667. d. Nov. 27, 1 718. 

2 Mary, — b. 1646. m. Gershom Wodell. 
m. 2nd, Jonathan Gatchell. d. 1716. 

2 Elizabeth, — b. 1648. m. Zuriel Hall, 
d. 1701. 

2 Alice,— b. 1650. m. Wm. Hall, 1671. * 

* Isabel, — b. 165 1. m. 2 Samson Shear- 
man, 1675. Vide Shearman. 

2 Abiel, — b. 1653. m. Deliverance Hall, 
Jan. 30, 1677. d. Sept. 10, 1684. 

2 James, — b. 1656. m. three times, d. 
1730. 

2 Martha,— b. 1658. m. 2 Samuel Shear- 
man, 1681. d. 1717. 



82 



Warner. 



John — ^Andrew — 2 Andrew — ^Jolin. 



WARNER— i Andrew. 

b. in Hatfield, Hertford, 1595. 

m. . 

m. 2nd, Esther, widow of Thomas 
Selden (she d. 1693). 

d. Dec. 18, 1684. 
(Of Cambridge, Hartford, and Hadley.) 

Andrew Warner was the son of John 
Warner, yeoman, of Hatfield. He emi- 
grated with his family in 1630, made a 
short stay in Boston, was in Cambridge 
in 1632, and a little later became one of 
the earliest settlers of Hartford, where 
he was a deacon in the church of the 
Rev. Mr. Hooker. 

In connection with the weir of John 
Clark on the Mennietonies River near 
Newton we find the following: 

'April 4, 1636. Andrew Warner and 
Joseph Cooke to make a rate for the 
division of the ale-wives. 

Agreed with An- 



"April 23, 1636. 



drew Warner to fetch home the ale- 
wives from the Weir; and he is to have 
xvi d. a thousand, and load them him- 
self for carriage; and to have power to 
take any man to help him, he paying 
him for his work." 

In 1659, he removed to Hadley, where 
he met and married his second wife, 
and died. 

CHILDREN. 

2 Andrew, — Vide the following. 

2 Robert, — m. 1st, Elizabeth Grant, m. 

2nd, Deliverance Bissell. d. 1690. 
'Jacob, — d. Sept. 29, 171 1. 
2 Daniel, — d. April 30, 1692. 
2 Isaac, — m. Sarah Boltwood, May 31, 

1666. d. in Dcerfield, 1691. 
2 Ruth,— m. - - Pratt. 
2 Mary,— m. 1st, John Steele, m. 2nd, 

Wm. Hills. 
'John, — 



WARNER— « Andrew. 

b. in Hatfield, Hertfordshire. 

m. Rebecca, daughter of John 

Fletcher and Mary Ward, 1653 (she 

was born about 1638. d. Jan., 1 7 1 5 ) . 
d. Jan. 26, 1681. 

(Of Cambridge, Hadley, and Middle- 
town.) 
In the tax list of the latter place for 

1670, Andrew Warner is rated at ,£84. 

His widow married Jeremiah Adams of 

Hartford. 

CHILDREN. 

3 Samuel, — b. Aug., 1659. 

3 Abigail, — b. 1660. 

■'Andrew, — b. March, 1662. d. April 9, 

1676. 
3 Mary,— b. April, 1664. 
3 John, — b. Sept., 1667. 
3 Hannah, — b. Nov. 15, 1668. d. Jan. 6, 

1730- 
3 John, — Vide the following. 
3 Joseph, — b. Feb. 20, 1672. 
3 Rebecca, — b. July 11, 1675. 



WARNER— 3 Joiin (Capt.). 

b. April 8, 1671. 

m. 2 Ann, daughter of 'William and 
Sarah Ward, Dec. 14, 1699 (she was 
born March 20, 1670. d. March 8, 1737). 

d. Aug. 5, 1743. 
(Of Middletown, Conn.) 

John Warner was a captain in the 
militia and a weaver by trade. 

There is but little doubt that his wife 
was the daughter of that William, who 
was son of the widow Joyce Ward and 
brother to John Fletcher's wife. The 
New England Genealogical Register 

If it were not distinctly stated that 
the elder Andrew Warner emigrated 
with his family , I should believe 'Andrew 
to have been American born, and place 
the date about 1634. 



Warner. 



83 



4 Joh n — ■' Hezekiah . 



has caused untold difficulty by revers- 
ing a 9 and giving John Warner's mar- 
riage in 1669. I wish the correction 
could be righted as publicly as Savage 
has "wronged" it in his invaluable Dic- 
tionary. 

CHILDREN. 

4 Ann, — b. June 9. d. June 19, 1702. 

4 Abigail, — b. Nov. 18, 1704. 

4 John, — b. March 31, 1706-7. Vide next. 

4 Jabez, — b. March 30, 1710. (Jabez 
Warner lived in Middletown and had 
in his possession an old account book 
giving the name of Andrew Warner's 
father as John.) 

4 Andrew,— b. Sept. 14, 1713. 

4 Ann, — b. April 12, 1716. 

4 Mary — b.Nov. 14, 1720. 



WARNER— 4 John. 

b. March 31, 1 706-7. 

m. Mary Wilcox. 

d. Feb. 12, 1 761. 
(Of Middletown, Conn.) 

The Warner genealogy was given 
me on such authority as that of Frank 
Starr, the well-known Connecticut gen- 
ealogist. I was searching for a father 
for Hezekiah Warner and Mr. Starr 
assured me that he was the eldest child 
of John Warner and Mary Wilcox. 



WARNER— « Hezekiah. 

b. Dec. 24, 1736. 

m. Lois Penfield, Feb. 8, 1859. 

d. Sept. 25, 1773. 
(Of Middletown, Conn.) 

In looking over the obituary of a fourth 
cousin on my father's side, I read that 



she was a descendant of Seth Warner. 
Anything in print always appears so 
indisputable to me that I only thought 
of looking up -the intervening connec- 
tions without ever questioning the main 
fact. I hunted up Seth Warner's pension 
record, his wife's name, and found he 
left three children whose ages were near 
that of my great-grandfather. My fa- 
ther had a cousin named Seth, presum- 
ably after the hero of Crown Point, and 
all the other circumstantial evidence 
was very beautiful. Then I wrote to a 
great-aunt to know what the names of 
the other children were and she prompt- 
ly answered that Ebenezer Warner's 
father was named Hezekiah, that his 
wife was a widow at the time of the war, 
etc., etc. She sent me his Concordance 
with the full name, that being the only 
one of his possessions which descended 
to his son. 

I have given this experience in full 
as an example of the folly of always 
claiming descent from the most illus- 
trious person of the name. It is so com- 
mon a failing and so wide-spread that 
almost eveiy genealogy begins with a 
dozen or so examples of it. They are 
all of a piece with the Gilbert who 
claimed descent from Thomas a Beckett 
because of the Moorish lady who wander- 
ed through London crying "Gilbert, 
Gilbert," in the old story. 

Hezekiah Warner was a farmer like 
his son, presumably; and had four sons 
and four daughters. The daughters' 
names are unknown, but the sons were 
6 John, 6 Junia, "Hezekiah, and "Eben- 
ezer. 

Research in the Penfield family would 
probably discover the source of the 
strange name Junia for a man. 



84 



WARNER,— 6 Ebenezer. 



Warner. 
s Ebenezer. 



b. July 4, 176S. 

m. Molly, daughter of Eleazer Gay- 
lord and 4 Eunice Gilbert, Jan. 5, 1790 
(she was born . d. July 8, 1804). 

m. 2nd, Catharine Dennison, Nov. 8, 
1804 (she d. Sept. 29, 1849). 

d. Feb. 15, 1849. 
(Of Middletown, Conn., and Skanea- 

teles, N. Y.) 

Mrs. Vine Starr Warner, of Skane- 
ateles, has in her possession a large 
number of letters written by different 
members of his family to Ebenezer 
Warner. One, from a brother-in-law, 
condoles with him on losing so good a 
wife, and winds up with the naive ques- 
tion, "Are you settled yet with Miss 
Dennison?" Mrs. Warner also has the 
Concordance which was the only me- 
mento Deacon Warner had of his 
father. Across the back runs the large, 
bold signature, "Hezekiah Warner," 
and on a leaf is the sad inscription, 
"Minerva Warner, my first born died A. 
D. November 5, 181 1, in the twentieth 
year of her age." This is in Ebenezer 
Warner's handwriting. 

As regards the personality of my 
great-grandfather, I will give in full a 
letter from Mr. Seth W. Houghton, of 
Winchester, Tenn., which he kindly 
wrote in answer to my questions. 

"My information is mostly from my 
mother, who was a favorite sister of 
your grandfather's" (Eben Warner). 
"She told me that she was born in Mid- 
dletown, Conn., and I suppose that 
Uncle Eben was born there too. I 
know nothing of the first wife, as when 
I first knew grandfather he was living 
with his second wife and grown children 
near Skaneateles, N. Y. 

"Of grandfather and Uncle Eben I 



can speak, as I saw them often since 
1830. I lived with grandfather and 
went to school in Skaneateles. Grand- 
father was a man of but few words, 
inflexible in his purpose without being 
harsh. Strictly honorable in all his 
dealings with his fellow men, Puritanical 
in his religion, Saturday at sundown all 
secular matters were suspended until 
Sunday at sundown. During that time 
all had to read the Bible or study their 
Sunday School lessons, and all had to 
load into the farm wagon Sunday morn- 
ing and go to church, — rain or snow, — 
hot or cold. Family prayers were as 
certain as the day came. To me they 
were an awful nuisance, as they were 
always long, and I generally got very 
hungry. Although he was a perfect 
autocrat he was kind to all who tried to 
do right, but woe to him who stepped 
aside! I loved him though he kept me 
as straight as a shingle. He was 
known to everybody as 'that good old 
Deacon Warner," and was a thrifty, 
intelligent farmer. I have heard mother 
speak of Uncle Eben. She said after 
he had aspirations above driving oxen 
he spoke to grandfather of wishing to 
study a profession. Upon which grand- 
father objected and told him to go and 
hang the scythe and cut the meadow. 
Uncle Eben hung the scythe on an 
apple tree, packed his grip, and went 
to Skaneateles, where he entered the 
office of a prominent physician and 
taught school through the winter to 
pay expenses. After he completed 
his studies he went to Western New 
York - , and practiced his profession 
with success which made grandfather 
very proud. lie married Aunt Han- 
nah" ('-Hannah Fowler) "there. The 
first time I saw her I thought 



Warner. 
i£6efi— *W. P— 9 Richmond. 



85 



her the most beautiful woman I had 
ever seen." 

The writer of the above letter was the 
son of 7 Sallie Warner and Joseph Hough- 
ton. Vide below. 

CHILDREN. 

'Minerva, — b. Oct. n, 1792. d. Nov. 5, 

1811. 
7 Maria, — b. July 17, 1794. m. Ebenezer 

D. Roberts April 16, 1813. m. 2nd, 
Fiske. d. May 23, 1845. 

7 Junia, — b. July 30, 1796. m. Lucinda 

Curtis, March, 1820. d. 1877. 
7 Sallie, — b. Feb. 25, 1799. m. Joseph 

Houghton, April 23, 1818. d. July 27, 

1S39. 
7 Eben, — b. Aug. 24, 1801. Vide follow- 
ing. 
7 Eleazer Gaylord, — b. Sept. 8, 1S03. m. 

Amelia T. Parsons, Sept. 25, 1827, d. 

Oct. 21, 1877. 
(By second wife.) 
7 Vine Starr, — b. Sept. 13, 1S05. m. 

Clarissa M. Stewart, Jan. 19, 1843. d. 

Oct. 30, 1885. 
7 John Penfield, — {probably 7iamed for 

his grandmother's father) b. Feb. 23, 

1809. m. Sarah S. Heydenbergh, 

March 27, 1839. 
'Fannie, — b. June 5, 181 1. m. Ebenezer 

Walker, Feb. 17, 1835. d. March 19, 

1867. 
'Minerva, — b. May 27, 1814. m. William 

E. Hoyt, January 12, 1859. 



WARNER— Dr. 'Eben. 

b. in Mayfield, N. Y., Aug. 24, 1801. 

m. 'Hannah, daughter of 6 David 
Fowler and "Jemima Elting, July 3, 
1830 (she b. Jan. 15, 1809. d. Nov. 28, 
1892). 

d. Sept. 5, 1852. 
(Of Skaneateles, Covington and Nunda, 

N. Y.) 

The story of Dr. Eben Warner's be- 
ginning in his profession is given in the 
sketch of his father's life. As a young 
man he came into Western New York 
and practiced medicine in Covington, 



where he married and resided until about 
1844. He then removed to Nunda, 
Livingston Co., where his death occurred 
in 1852. 

His character seems to have been 
drawn on much the same line as his fa- 
ther's, and although he only lived eight 
years in Nunda he is remembered as 
pre-eminent in his profession and un- 
sparing of himself in his ministrations 
to both high and low. 

children. 

8 Charles, — b. Aug. 30, 1832. m. Esther 

Town, June 14, 1854. 
8 Elting Fowler, — b. April 6, 1835. m - 

Josephine Bourne Thompson, 1864. 
8 William Penn, — Vide the following. 
8 George, — b. May 10, 1840. m. Fannie 

Estelle, 1866. m. 2nd, Elizabeth Bat- 

telle. 
8 Mary Cornelia, — b. July 2, 1843. d. Jan. 

5, 1847- 
8 Helen,— b. Oct. 9, 1846. d. Feb. 7, 

1865. 
8 Cornelia H., — b. Oct. 6, 1849. d. Sept. 

7- 1851. 
8 Octavia W., — b. Aug. 3, 1852. d. Nov. 

S- 1852. 



WARNER— 8 W. P. 

b. July 5, 1838. 

m. 8 Anna, daughter of 7 Bradford 
Richmond and 4 Anne Whitwell, June 
29, 1865 (she b. Dec. 11, 1842). 
(Of Nunda, Winchester, Tenn., and St. 

Paul, Minn.) 

W. P. Warner is a lawyer. Settled 
in Winchester, Tenn., removed in 1862 
to St. Paul, Minn., where he still resides. 

CHILDREN. 

9 Anna Richmond, — b. Oct. 14, 1869. 

m. 4 Charles E. French, Sept. 12, 1888. 

Vide French. 
9 Richmond Perez, — b. Aug. 26, i86r>... 



\ 



•s 



86 



Warren. 
1 Richard — a Sarah. 



WARREN— Richard. 

b. in England about 1580-90. 

m. Mrs. Elizabeth (Jouatt) Marsh 
(she was born 1583. d. Oct. 2, 1673). 

d. 1628. 
(Of Greenwich, Kent; Leyden; and 

Plymouth, New England.) 

Richard Warren was a merchant of 
Greenwich, where he had married a 
widow, presumably older than himself, 
as the marriage dates of his daughters 
cause us to place his own marriage 
about 1609 or 1610, at which date 
Mistress Marsh was in the neighborhood 
of twenty-eight. That he was a gentle- 
man born is proven by the affix "Mr." 
which Bradford in his account of the 
Mayflower compact appends to his 
name. 

Of his persecutions we know naught, 
or of when he settled in Holland, but 
in 1620 he became one of the famous 
hundred to cast his lot in the New 
Plymouth, leaving his wife and five 
little daughters behind in Holland. He 
was one of the seventeen to choose the 
site of the colony, as can be read in the 
account of the coming of the Mayflower, 
and Bradford speaks of him as an 
intelligent and highly useful member of 
the little community. 

Elizabeth Warren and her children 
came in the third ship (1623), and it 
was probably in connection with their 
coming that the father and husband 
had a separate lot of land on the Eel 
River assigned to him. This farm 
remained in the possession of his 
descendants up to within a very few 
years. 

Richard Warren died in 162S. His 
widow survived him forty-five years, 
dying Oct. 2, 1673. 



CHILDREN. 

Mary,— m. Robert Bartlett, 162S. He 
came over in the "Ann" with herself 
and mother in 1623 (July), m. 2nd, 
Thomas Delano, d. Oct. 24, 1699. 

Ann, — m. Thomas Little, April 19, 
1633. 

Sarah, — m. 2 John Cooke, March 28, 
1634. Vide Cooke. 
^Elizabeth, — m. Richard Church, 1636. 
Became the mother of Capt. Benjamin 
Church, the noted Indian fighter in 
King Philip's War. Vide a Edward 
Richmond, d. at Hingham, March 4, 
1670. 

Abigail, — m. Anthony Snow, 1639. 

Nathaniel, — b. after 1623. m. Phebe 
Murdock. d. 1707. 

Joseph, — b. between 1623 and 1628. m., 
in 1651, Priscilla, sister of the elder 
Thomas Faunce. d. 1689. 



The pedigree of Richard Warren 
has been traced thus by some of 
his descendants. He was son of 
19 Christopher, and Alice Webb, son of 
18 William, and Ann Mable, son of 
1 'Christopher, son of J "John, son of 
15 John, who died 1525, son of 14 William, 
d. 1496, son of 13 Lawrence, and Isabel 
Leigh, son of 12 John, and Isabel Stan- 
ley, son of ' 1 Lawrence, and Margery 
Bulkely, son of 10 John, and Agnes 
Wynnington, son of " Edward, and 
Cicely Eaton, son of 8 Edward, and 
Maude de Skcyton, son of 7 John, and 
Joan de Port, son of "John, and Alice 
de Townsend, son of "'William, and 
Isabel de Hayden, son of 'Reginald, 
and Adela de Mowbray, sun of 'Wil- 
liam de Warrenne, second carl, son of 
-William, first earl, and Gundreda, 
whose parentage is too well-known to 
need comment. 



Ward — Weaver. 



87 



WARD— !Joyce. 

(Of Clipsham Co., Rutland, England.) 
The "Widow Joyce Ward" became a 
reality only through her will, proved in 
1641, and naming her son-in-law, John 
Fletcher, executor. 

CHILDREN. 

2 Edward, — remained in England. 
2 Anthony, — believed to have emigrated. 
2 William, — believed to be the follow- 
ing. 
2 Robert,— 
2 John — 
2 Mary, — m. John Fletcher. Vide same. 



WARD— 2 William. 

m. Sarah (she d. 1659). m. 2nd, 

Phcebe (she d. Sept. 1, 1691). 

d. March 28, 1690. 
(Of Middletown.) 

William Ward is believed to have 
been the son of the Widow Joyce Ward, 
but there is no certainty. His daughter 
Ann is also believed to be the Ann 
Ward who married 8 John Warner. I 
apologize for the dubiousness of the 
family and pass over my own reasons 
for having little doubt of either connec- 
tion being real. 

CHILDREN. 

3 William, — b. and d. 1659. 

(By second wife.) 

3 Thomas, — b. Feb. 7, 1661. m. Hannah 

Tappen, 1683. d. 1728. 
3 Phoebe, — b. April 17, 1663. 
3 William, — b. Aug. 2, 1665. 
3 Sarah, — b. Dec. 18, 1667. 



3 Ann, — b. March 20, 1670. Vide Warner. 
3 Dorothy— b. March 5, 1672. 
3 Susanna, — b. June 6, 1674. 
3 John— b. May 12, 1678. 



WEAVER— J Clement. 






I ** A 



b. about 1585. 

m. 2 Mary, daughter of 1 William and 
Mary Freeborne (she was born 1627). 

d. 1683. 
(Of Newport, R. I.) 

There was a Clement Weaver in Massa- 
chusetts in 1640 who was fined for 
misbehavior. Savage regards him as the 
possible father of this sketch, but Austin 
in his admirable work on the old families 
of Rhode Island proves him to be 
identical with the Rhode Island Clem- 
ent, who, in 1655, was recorded freeman 
of Newport. He was juryman once and 
deputy once. In 1680 he deeded his 
eldest son 90 acres in West Greenwich 
to revert to his grandson William in the 
event of the death of Clement, Jr. 

Under the date of Oct. 20, 1683, 
Samuel Hubbard of Newport wrote to 
a friend "Old Weaver is dead, near a 
hundred years old," and his will was 
proved the next month. It caused some 
litigation as being signed by only two 
witnesses, the law requiring three. 

CHILDREN. 

^Elizabeth, — m. Thomas Dungan, son of 
Frances Latham Dungan Clarke. 

?? Clement, — m. 1st, . m. 2nd, Rachel 

Andrew, Sept. 26, 1677. d. 1691. 

^William — 

9John, — m. Catharine •. 

^Thomas, — Vide following page. 



ss 



Weaver. 



2 Thomas — % Thomas. 



WEAVER,— "Thomas. 

b. in Newport. 

m. Mary about 1674. 

d. 1753. 
(Of Newport and Middletown, R. I.) 

Thomas Weaver was probably born 
about 1655, for he was too young to 
witness a deed in 1664. In 1682, he had 
a grant of 100 acres in East Greenwich 
from his brother-in-law, Thomas Dun- 
gan. In 1699, he deeded 100 acres 
(probably the same) in East Greenwich 
to George Foster, his wife signing with 
him. From other dates I should judge 
the marriage to have taken place about 
1674, but all the early records of the 
Weaver family are very imperfect, to 
say the least, — although if we compare 
them with those of the generations of 
to-day they would take precedence. 
Family records seem to have gone out 
of style with family Bibles. 

Thomas Weaver's will was proved in 
1753. He must have lived like his 
father, to be nearly a hundred years of 
age. He made his son Thomas execu- 
tor and left him the homestead farm 
and buildings. To Clement he left the 
land "where he liveth," and to Benja- 
min "certain land in Middletown and 
buildings where he liveth." John re- 
ceived 50s., and Mary (Weaver) Foster, 

The estate inventoried at ,£401, of 
which the wearing apparel was ^100. 



CHILDREN. 

3 Thomas, — b. about 1674-5. Vide fol- 
lowing paragraph. 

3 Clement, — b. about 1677. m. Mary 
(Parker) Freeborn, d. 171 1. 

3 Mary, — b. about 1679. m. George 
Foster about 1799. 

3 Benjamin, — b. about 1681. m. Han- 
nah, d. 1754. —" /~ 

3 Elizabeth, — d. unmarried, 175 1. 

3 Comfort, — d. unmarried, 1752. 

3 John, — m. Alice Berry, March 15th, 
1710. 



WEAVER— 3 Thomas. 

b. about 1664-5. 
m. Mary, about 1693. 
(Of Newport, R. I.) 






CHILDREN. 

4 John, — b. Aug. 5, 1694. 

4 Mary— b. July 7, 1697. 

4 Hannah, — b. 1700. 

4 Benjamin, — Vide following page. 

4 Martha,— b. 1704. 

4 Peleg— b. 1706. 

4 Joseph, — b. 1708. 

4 Jonathan, — b. 171 1. 

4 Patience,— b. Aug. 4, 17 16. 

4 Mary, — b. Feb. 23, 1721. 

4 Thomas— b. July 6, 1713..1 

I find absolutely nothing regarding 
3 Thomas Weaver except that he was 
recorded freeman in 171 3. 



> 



Weaver. 



89 



'■Benjamin. 



WEAVER,— ^Benjamin. 

b. 1702. 

m. 4 Ruth, daughter of 3 Amos Shef- 
field and 3 Anne Pearce, Apr. nth, 1723. 
Vide Ruth Sheffield. 

d. Feb., 1775. 
(Of Freetown, Mass.) 

Benjamin Weaver makes his first ap- 
pearance — historically speaking — when 
he marries. His wife was the daughter 
of Capt. Amos Sheffield, of Tiverton, R. 
I., and under her maiden name I have 
given a few facts regarding her life. The 
record of their marriage can be read to- 
day in the old town book of Tiverton. 

After that interesting event Benjamin 
Weaver again retired into obscurity and 
remained there for ten years, until at 
the end of that time we find it recorded 
that "Benjamin Weaver, then of Swansea, 
and mariner, for the sum of ^300 bought 
of Stephen Bowen twelve acres of land 
bounded on Taunton River, and a cove, 
and to run to a rock by the grist-mill 
dam". The deed was dated March 31st, 
1733, and the land was situated in the 
"Showamet Purchase", which was in- 
corporated in 1790 and called "Somer- 
set". In 1745, "Benjamin Weaver, mari- 
ner," made a second purchase of land 
near by, — fifty-two acres, for which he 
paid ;£i 100.16 to Benjamin Kinsley. 
There was a grist-mill on the land which 
accounts for the price of it. Decem- 



ber 13th, 1756, he made a third purchase, 
thus giving himself a farm of nearly 
eighty acres in Somerset. Besides this 
he owned land in Freetown through his 
wife's inheritance. 

Benjamin Weaver lived on his farm 
in Somerset until his death. His will 
may be read in Peirce's "Biographical 
and Genealogical Contributions", but it 
is too lengthy to give here. I have 
noticed certain of its provisions in the 
lives of the widow and the son Samuel. 
One of the last items is as follows: "My 
will is that my Executor and Executrix 
hereinafter named shall sell that piece 
of land I bought of Samuel Slade and 
with the money arising there-by to pay 
my just debts and charges." 

The will was signed Nov. 19th, 1774. 
The inventory taken Feb. 25th, 1775, 
showed property amounting to ^1297. 

CHILDREN. 

5 Benjamin, — b. 172-. m. Joanna Barnaby, 
Nov. 4th, 1753. Drowned, 1756. 

5 Samuel, — Vide following page. 

s Parker— b. . m. Mary . Re- 
moved to Leicester, Mass. 

5 Anna, — b. . m. David Evans, Jr., 

Nov. 27, 1745. d. . 

5 Ruth, — b. . m. Stoughton Potter, 

March 8th, 1752. d. . 

5 Eunice, — b. . m. 5 Johnathan 

Reade. Vide same. 

5 Elizabeth, — b. . m. Look. d. 



go 



WEAVER,— Samuel. 



Weaver. 
5 Samuel — 6 Sheffield. 



m. 3 Wait, daughter of 4 Oliver Read 
and 3 Martha Durfee, Jan. 9, 1761 (she 
was b. Dec. 6, 1739. d. ). 

d. . 

(Of Somerset.) 

Samuel Weaver is mentioned as fol- 
lows in his father's will: 

"I give and devife unto my son Sam- 
uel, in addition to five hundred dollars 
I have here-to-fore given and paid for 
him, viz., The northerly part of my home- 
stead farm bounded as follows, Begin- 
ning at a tree by a highway where-on a 
gate now hangs from thence Easterly in 
range of the stone wall as it now stands 
until it comes to the fourth corner of my 
rye field and from faid corner on a 
straight line to the south-west corner of 
the meadow adjoining to Peter Weaver's 
land and from said corner in range of 
the wall as it now stands easterly to the 
brook and from the south-east corner of 
faid meadow on a straight line to Taun- 
ton great river and to be as wide at faid 
river as at aforefaid brook. . . . 

"I alfo give unto my faid fon Samuel 
my gun, fword, and faddle." 

CHILDREN. 

"Nathan, — b. 1762. m. 1st, . m. 2nd, 

Olive Bingham. 
6 Sheffield, — Vide next article. 
"John, — 
"Sybil, — b. . m. John Dyer. 



WEAVER, — Captain "Sheffield. 

b. in Somerset, 1764. 

m. Rhoda, daughter of 3 Henry Gibbs, 
June 13, 1785 (she was b. 1765. d. June 
31, 1789). 

m. 2nd, 6 Lydia, daughter of 5 Jonathan 
Reade and 5 Eunice Weaver, Oct. 20, 
1793 (she was b. 1764. d. Oct. 6, 1833). 

m. 3rd, Hannah Durfee, Feb. 24, 1838 
(she wasb. Feb. 4, 1779. d.Dec.S, 1S46). 

d. July 26, 1839. 
(Of Somerset.) 

Sheffield Weaver's elder brother, Na- 
than, was drafted into the Continental 
army at the outset of the war. He was 
soon taken ill and sent home and the 
subject of this sketch — then twelve years 
old — took his place. As he was too 
young to carry arms he drove a baggage 
wagon, and from that lowly position 
advanced steadily until, when peace was 
declared, he was a captain in the coast- 
guard at Tiverton, R. I. 

Soon after he married and settled on 
his farm below Dighton, where he built 
sailing vessels and engaged in the coast- 
ingtrade. He made frequent sea-voyages 
and was possessed of the daring courage 
so necessary in those days of adventure 
and piracy. 

A descendant in the fifth generation 
from Clement Weaver of Puritan days, 
Sheffield Weaver has descendants in the 
fifth generation from himself living now. 
His family and descendants are noted 
in Vol. II, with the exception of the sub- 
ject of the next article. 



Weaver. 



9i 



''Mary. 



WEAVER— 7 Mary. 

b. at Somerset, Jan. 25, 1788. 

m. 1st, 6 Bradford Richmond, son 
of 5 Perez Richmond and Hannah 
Brightman, 1809. Vide Richmond. 

m. 2nd, William Earle, Oct. 22, 181 5. 

m. 3rd, 2 Enoch, son of 'Ephraim 
French and 3 Elizabeth Presbrey, Sept. 
20, 1828. Vide French. 

d. Aug. 25, 1846. 
( Of Somerset, Westport and Fall River.) 

Mary Weaver was not a year old 
when her mother died, and that she had 
a good stepmother was proven by the 
character and industry of the woman 
she developed into. I could not name 
the linens of all qualities that Mary 
Weaver's descendants keep because it 
was her work. Her great-great-grand- 
son has a blanket on his bed woven by 
her nearly a hundred years ago, and 
which has been in constant use ever 
since. It is marked with the "M. W. ' 
that is embroidered in a neat little cross 
stitch on every piece of her work. 

Miss Patience Slade of Rochester 
tells me that in her childhood she had 
often heard her uncle William Lawton 
tell how he had skated full speed down 
Taunton River with Mary Weaver 
clinging to his coat tails; so she was 
not always spinning and weaving. 

The young girl was married before 
her twenty-first birthday to Bradford 
Richmond, and went to live in West- 
port in that old, old house which John 
Richmond had built two hundred years 
before. There her two children were 
born and there her husband died, Oct. 
23, 1814. 

The taste of the day did not run to 



prolonged mourning, and her second 
marriage took place the next year. By 
Mr. Earle she had one little sunny- 
haired daughter named Mirabel, who 
was drowned at the age of six. 

Mary Weaver's third marriage was 
probably her happiest, as her children 
formed one united family with Deacon 
French's, and time has only drawn the 
links of affection closer. 

In the great Fall River fire of 1843, 
Deacon French's homestead was burned 
and with it all his wife's Richmond and 
Weaver heirlooms, with the exception 
of some silver and two or three pieGes 
of furniture. This loss cannot be esti- 
mated. 

In person Mrs. French was short and 
rather stout, with dark complexion, 
hair and eyes. She was a busy, active 
woman, very capable and fully equal to 
whatever demands were made on her. 
To her own and her stepchildren she 
was an affectionate and loving mother, 
and her character in all ways bespeaks 
our admiration. Although she had no 
children by her third husband there is 
now living a little "French boy" who is 
descended from both, being the great- 
grandson of Deacon French and the 
great-great-grandson of his wife. 

Mrs. French died in Fall River in the 
fifty-eighth year of her age. She was 
buried in the French lot in the Fall 
River cemetery. 

The family of Mary Weaver Rich- 
mond French consisted of but two 
children. 

Vide "Bradford Richmond," this 
volume, and "Hannah Richmond Whit- 
comb," Vol. II. 



92 



White. 

1 John — 2 Alary. 



WHITE— iJohn. 

b. about 1600. 

m. Mary (she was living in 1666. 

d. before her husband). 

d. early in 1684. 
(Of Cambridge, Hartford, and Hadley.) 

There is an excellent genealogy of 
the White family, written by Mr. Kel- 
logg, and it deals so fully with John 
White and his descendants that I have 
merely copied some extracts here. 
John White and his family arrived in 
Boston, Sunday, Sept. 16, 1634. They 
came on the ship "Lyon," which sailed 
June 22. 

John White settled in Cambridge, 
and the library building of Harvard 
College stands either on, or very close 
to the land allotted him for a "cow-lot." 
He was one of the seven first selectmen 
for the town. In 1636 he joined the 
body of men who founded Hartford, 
and his family was probably part of that 
company of men, women, and children 
who went through so much suffering 
incident to their journey. 

John White's house in Hartford was 
next to Gov. Hopkins', and "Charter 
Oak" cast its shadow at sundown across 
his walls. 

In 1647, dissension arose in the church 
over a successor to Mr. Hooker, and 
Mr. White was one of the adherents of 
Elder Goodwin. The final results of 
the troubles were that a new settlement 
was projected at Hadley. John White 
was one of the foremost in the enter- 
prise, contributing .£,150, and became a 
leading man in the town. He lived in 



Hadley twenty-three years, returning to 
Hartford in his old age. Here he con- 
nected himself with the South Church, 
by which he was chosen Elder. 

Dec. 17, 1683, Mr. White made his 
will, being then in very feeble health. 
His death occurred between that date 
and Jan. 23, when the inventory was 
made. 

The will is interesting and in many 
parts rather amusing. 

CHILDREN. 

2 Mary, — b. in England, m. Jonathan 
Gilbert, Jan. 29, 1646. Vide Gilbert. 

2 Nathaniel, — b. about 1629 (Captain). 

m. 1st, Elizabeth . 2nd, Mrs. 

Martha (Coit) Mould. Two of her 
daughters married two of his sons. d. 
Aug. 27, 171 1. 

'-John, — (Serjeant), m. Sarah Bunce. 
d. Sept. 15, 1665. 

2 Daniel, — (Lieut.) b. in Hartford, 1639. 
m. Sarah Crow, Nov. 1, 1661 (vide 
White Genealogy for very interesting 
list of her wardrobe), d. July 27, 

I7I3- 

2 Sarah, — m. 1st, Stephen Taylor, m. 2nd, 

Barnabas Hinsdale, who was one of 
the ninety men massacred at Bloody 
Brook, Deerfield, 1675. m. 3d, Wal- 
ter Hickson, Feb. 3, 1679. d. Aug. 
10, 1702. (The youngest child of 
Sarah White, Jacob Hickson, was 
taken prisoner at Deerfield, Feb. 29, 
1704, and slain by the Indians on 
their way to Canada.) 
2 Jacob, — (Ensign), b. at Hartford, Oct. 
8, 1645. m. Elizabeth Bunce. d. 
about 1 70 1. 



■ WHITWELL.— * Oliver. 



Whitwell. 
1 Oliver — % James. 



93 



1 

U4 









\ 



X^ 






& 



b. . 

m. 5 Hannah, daughter of 4 Joseph 
Read and Grace Pray, Oct. 14, 1768 (she 
was born about 1734. d. in the winter 
of 1S30). 

d. . 

(Of Freetown and Steep Brook, Mass.) 

The "intention of marriage" of Oliver 
Whitwell and Hannah Read was pub- 
lished Oct. 1, 1768, and the event took 
place a fortnight after. The bride was 
thirty-three years old, — I wonder, was 
the groom, too, middle aged, or was he 
much her junior. 

The outbreak of the Revolution inter- 
rupted their early married life. The 
husband enlisted and his wife was left 
alone to care for her little family amid 
the turmoil and destruction of war. 
Oliver Whitwell's granddaughter, Miss 
Patience Slade , can remember his uni- 
form with its bright yellow facings. She 
possesses an interesting relic of those 
times, in a large pewtermug. When the 
troops disbanded and her grandfather 
received his pay in Continental money, 
that species of exchange was worth so 
little that Oliver Whitwell gave fifty dol- 
lars for two pewter mugs, one of which 
is Miss Slade's. 

Through the untiring efforts of Miss 
Abbie French, of Fall River, I have se- 
cured a very full account of the descend- 
ants of Oliver Whitwell, which is given 
in the second volume. The only excep- 
tion is his son James, who is separately 
noted in the next article. 



WHITWELL 



! James. 



b. in April, 1771. 

m. 6 Hannah, daughter of Lieut. 
5 Jonathan Reade and 5 Eunice Weaver, 
June 25, 1792 (she was born Aug 1, 1769. 
d. 1816). 

d. Sept., 1797. 
(Of Steep Brook.) 

James Whitwell grew up to become a 
farmer near Fall River. He married 
very young and his eldest son was born 
the following year. An English officer, 
named Col. Furman, who was then re- 
siding in the Whitwell family, gave his 
name to the child. 

In the fourth year of their marriage 
Mr. and Mrs. Whitwell had a daughter 
born to them. She died in the bright- 
ness of her youth, and would be almost 
forgotten now were it not for an exquisite 
silhouette in the possession of Anne 
Whitwell Richmond, herniece. Herface 
shows the perfect Puritan outline which 
rivals the Grecian in its purity, and ex- 
cells it in softness. 

James Whitwell died in his twenty- 
seventh year leaving three children. So 
short a life leaves few traces to be found 
after the lapse of nearly a hundred years. 

children. 

3 Furman, — Vide next article. 

3 Chloe, — b. Feb. 27, 1796. m. James 

Cleveland, d. same year, 18 16. 
3 James, — b. Feb. 10, 1798. d. July 1819. 



94 



Whitwell. 
z Furman. 



WHITWELL— 3 Furman Reade. 

b. Oct. 17, 1793. 

m. 'Hannah, daughter of 6 Joseph 
Hathaway, Sept. 17, 18 15 (she b. Aug. 
16, 1795. d. Dec. 10, 1867). 

d. Dec. 13, 1861. 
(Of Fall River, Sunbury (Ga.), and Fair 

Haven.) 

Furman Whitwell was fatherless be- 
fore he was four years old. His mother 
very soon made a second marriage and 
he was taken by Capt. Luther Wilson 
to raise and educate. Mrs. Wilson was 
his aunt, being one of Lieut. "Jonathan 
Reade's daughters. The Wilsons lived 
on Maine Street in Fairhaven directly 
opposite the old Hathaway homestead. 
The custom of that period was that a 
young man thus brought up by friends 
should freely serve them until his 
twenty-first year, when in return they 
gave him such a start in life as their 
means should allow. Furman Whitwell 
was barely nineteen when he had an 
opportunity to make a voyage to Eu- 
rope and he relinquished all claims on 
Capt. Wilson in return for the cancell- 
ing of his indentures. Thus he began 
the world entirely alone. 

The voyage terminated disastrously; 
the ship was wrecked at Archangel on 
the White Sea, and the crew were 
forced to spend the winter there. When 
Mr. Whitwell returned in the spring he 
brought Miss Hannah Hathaway a 
quaint little carved box of Russian 
make, and his descriptions of the strange 
land were regarded as well-nigh mar- 
velous. Snow that lay like sand for 
months and never melted and rivers 
frozen all winter were hardly seeming 
possibilities to the residents of New 
England then. 

After this Mr. Whitwell made one or 



two more voyages, and then he fol- 
lowed Joseph Hathaway to Ricebor- 
ough, Georgia, and opened a store 
there. In 1815 he married, and, after 
Mr. Hathaway's death (1817), moved 
to Sunbury, where the family settled for 
seven years. In 1824, when Lafayette 
made his second visit to America, Mr. 
and Mrs. Whitwell drove in to Savan- 
nah to see him, and the sight must have 
stirred strange memories in those two — 
both of whom were the grandchildren 
of soldiers. 

The seven years in Sunbury were 
much saddened by sickness and death, 
and finally it was decided to return 
north. The little town had begun to 
be considered unhealthy and proved so 
much so that it was ultimately aban- 
doned. The Whitwell house is in ruins 
now and the only reminders of the 
name are the stones in the Medway 
Cemetery which mark the graves of Mr. 
Whitwell's two little sons and his only 
brother, James. 

The change was made in 1826 and 
the family went to live with Mrs. Jo- 
seph Hathaway in Fairhaven. In 1831, 
Mr. Whitwell purchased Capt. Wilson's 
house, rebuilt it, and made that his 
home. He later also bought the Hath- 
away house which many years after was 
occupied by his son. The latter made 
me a Christmas present in my child- 
hood of a doll's house exactly modeled 
from this old homestead. 

In New Bedford he engaged in the 
whaling and shipping interests. He 
was one of those men whom neither 
time, place, nor circumstances can pre- 
vent continuing in the steady accu- 
mulation of a fortune. He was part 
owner of five whaling ships, two of 
which, the "Bark Isabella" and "Lydia," 
are still afloat. Two more, the "South 




FURMAN READE WHITWELL. 



Whitwell. 



95 



Boston" and "Albion," were bought by 
the U. S. government in r 86 1 and sunk 
in Charleston Harbor. The fifth — the 
"Favorite" — was taken by the "Shenan- 
doah" in July, 1865, and forms the basis 
of this family's Alabama Claims. 

I wish I had space for some of the 
many interesting and delightful anec- 
dotes and stories I have heard of Mr. 
Furman Whitwell. They are all of 
special interest to me, because they came 
from a daughter to whom he bore the 
most tender love and devotion, and in 
this side of his character I see as in a 
mirror another father whose deep affec- 
tion and thoughtfulness has been the 
light of my life. 

There is a large oil portrait of Mr. 
Whitwell, showing him seated at a desk 
with his pen and sand box at hand. The 
features have something the same cast 
as the well-known head of Commodore 
Perry, but the general aspect is more 
severe. A daguerreotype taken on his 
fiftieth birthday shows a face in which 
one traces a strong, well-balanced mind, 
keen and severely just business instincts, 
broad affections, and quick intuitions 
and sympathies. Such a character must 
always evoke the deepest admiration and 
teach a lesson whose moral is too evi- 
dent to need pointing out. 

CHILDREN. 

4 Anne Elizabeth, — Vide the following. 
4 Furman Reade, — b. March 6, 18 18. d. 

Nov. 6, 1823, aged five years. 
4 Georgia Virginia, — b. July 24, 1821. m. 

James O. Morse, June 16, 1847. d. 

April 15, 1892. 
4 James Furman, — b. Aug. 10, 1825. d. 

Nov. 15, 1826. 
A daughter,— b. and d. May 6, 1828. 
4 Caroline, — b. May 26, 1829. d. Sept. 26, 

1829. 



4 Laura Virginia, — b. March 13, 183 1 . d. 

May 29, 1834. 
4 Furman Reade, — b. Dec. 4, 1835. m - 

Elsie Newkirk Clarke, April 16, 1862. 

Has children, 5 Furman Reade, s Anna, 

5 Elsie and 5 Livingston. 



Note : — The name of Whitwell is so 
very dear to me that I have labored 
earnestly to discover the origin of the 
family and the date of the original emi- 
grant's arrival in America. Family tradi- 
tion says a Whitwell came to Newport, 
had sons Oliver and William, and died 
there. William left only daughters. 
Oliver is referred to in preceding pages. 
I find the Whitwell family of Boston go 
back to Samuel, son of William Whit- 
well of the 17th century. There was 
also a Samuel Whitwall who came over 
somewhat later, also to Boston. I 
cannot trace any connections between 
these families. 

I remember readingthe name of Whit- 
well in Tytler's "Scotland" (in connec- 
tion with border wars, if I recollect right- 
ly), and it was in the nth or 12th cen- 
tury. I find there was, and is, a very old 
family of that name in Yorkshire. The 
Boston family claim descent from the 
Yorkshire family and I have had cor- 
respondence with a Mr. William Whit- 
well whose father emigrated from there 
early in this century. I find mention of 
still another Whitwell come over from 
Yorkshire in the 18th century. There 
was a heavy immigration from Yorkshire 
to America during the latter half of the 
eighteenth century, and my own opinion 
is that the first Whitwell was a York- 
shire farmer. The name is encountered 
occasionally in Yorkshire pedigrees, 
showing that the family was of a stand- 
ing to marry well. 



9 6 



Whitwell 

i A>ine. 



WHITWELL,— ^Anne Elizabeth, eld- 
est child of 3 Furman Reade Whitwell 
and 7 Hannah Hathaway. 



One of the noblest and sweetest of 
women. — 

She was born in Sunbury, Georgia, 
June 10th, 1816, — a frail and delicate 
child, to whom, in compensation, the 
cradle-fairies gave a character contain- 
ing in itself all spiritual and mental 
graces. 

In her fifth year she came "North" 
with her parents, visiting in Fair Haven 
and Fall River, where the two grand- 
mothers lived. During their stay in the 
latter place they went to take tea with 
Mrs. Mary Richmond (Mary Weaver), 
and the little stoiy which follows is in- 
teresting as telling of the first meeting 
of two whose lives were afterwards to 
be joined. 

Perhaps the call was unexpected, — at 
any rate Mrs. Richmond called her son 
— aged eight years— and, giving him a 
pitcher, bade him go to the neighbor's 
and borrow some milk. — He returned 
with no milk and a broken pitcher, and 
when his mother said with emphasis, 
"Oh, Bradford, how couldyou?" — replied, 
"Why, it just dropped." 

The pitcher — which was a piece of 
Mary Weaver's wedding china — is in my 
possession now, with its quaint red dec- 
orative band showing a forest and two 
antiquated females twice or thrice re- 
peated. 

Four years later Mr. Whitwell brought 
his little daughter to Fall River again, 
and she saw the hero of the pitcher once 



more. He says, it was then that he fell 
in love with her, as she stood on a chair 
watching him mend an old pistol. He- 
describes her as a beautiful child, mature 
in face, and dressed according to the 
Southern ideas, which were far more 
tasteful and elaborate than those of the 
Puritan North. 

In 1827 Mr. Whitwell decided to give 
up his business in Georgia and remove 
permanently to New Bedford. There 
was a sad scene among the colored serv- 
ants when this decision was made known. 
The little girls were dear to their nurses 
as own children, and the Whitwell house 
was a beloved home to all the slaves. 

The day of departure came and the 
gig was brought to the door with the 
coach-man behind in his little cab-like 
seat. Mrs. Whitwell stepped in, and her 
husband seated himself beside her. Old 
Mammy Lyddy put the children in, 
weeping bitterly and crying "Oh, Mar's, 
mus' you tek my babies," and then the 
horse was started and Sunbury soon left 
behind. 

After the arrival in Fair Haven the 
family made their home with Mrs. Whit- 
well's mother in her home on Main street, 
and in the autumn little Anne Whitwell 
and her cousin, Deborah Hathaway, were 
the bridesmaids at the wedding of their 
young aunt 7 Anne and Captain Paul 
Burgess (October 22nd, 1827. Vide Vol. 
II, Hathaway, 6 Joseph). The bride 
wore white muslin, and her youthful at- 
tendants were attired in skirts of the 
same, ruffled to the waist, and ruffled 
pantalettes. 

Life went on quietly enough for the 
next few years. The family removed into 




ANNE ELIZABETH WHITWELL-RICHMOND. 



Whitwell. 



97 



Uncle Wilson's house just across the 
street — and then when Miss Anne Eliza- 
beth was sixteen she went to Ipswich to 
attend Miss Lyon's and Miss Grant's 
Boarding School. Miss Lyon afterwards 
founded the celebrated Holyoke Fe- 
male Seminary, and the school she had 
at Ipswich was considered a very fine one. 
Ralph Waldo Emerson was one of the 
lecturers, and his listener whose life I am 
sketching describes him thus: "I can 
see him now just as he used to look 
coming up the walk — tall and awkward, 
exactly like his pictures. We girls used 
to laugh and say he was coming for 
Miss Grant. His talks were long and 
tiresome, but were considered very 
choice." 

School over, Miss Whitwell returned 
to her home and prepared to take the 
next step in life. On the evening of 
Oct. 6th, 1836, she was married to Brad- 
ford Perez Richmond in the long draw- 
ing room of her father's house. Her 
dress (in which, a little less than fifty- 
two years after, the granddaughter who 
bore her name was married) was of bro- 
caded silk and satin, with immense 
puffed sleeves, folded waist, broad rib- 
bon belt, and full round skirt. Her 
hair was arranged in three standing 
bows at the back, and around them was 
a white wreath of artificial flowers. She 
presented each of her bridesmaids with 
a similar wreath — only pink. 

After this wedding — which was bril- 
liant as the fashion of the time set; to 
which all the two hundred guests came 
in carriages sent by their host; and for 
which the bride's father stopped the 
great hall clock with such emphasis 
that it was several years before it ever 
went again — after this wedding the 
young couple set out for their new 
home, going by boat to Fall River, by 
train to Albany, and then by stage over 
many weary miles into the wilds of 



western New York. The beautiful 
Genesee Valley, wherein lies Nunda, 
was then but a deep ravine of shadow 
among the hills, covered with the dark- 
ness of gigantic pines. They are gone 
now and in their place are farms and 
villages, but when our bride first came 
to her home she saw only a few acres 
cleared at long intervals, and — for the 
rest — the blackness of night lay be- 
neath the close-locked branches. 

Can any of us realize what the young 
girl who had been carefully raised 
amid every luxury went through upon 
being suddenly cast . upon her own re- 
sources in a country destitute of every 
element .of civilization? Only God 
knows! We hear much of what we owe 
to the Pilgrims, but some day America 
will recognize that there have been 
many generations of Pilgrim women, 
that privation, loneliness, and suffering 
arc just the same in every age and 
country — and that we owe the same re- 
spect and admiration to the wife of 
every "first settler", that we do to those 
courageous women who toiled in Ply- 
mouth. 

A woman's life does not belong to 
the world like a man's, and the story of 
this woman's noble carriage, through 
great sorrow and suffering, must remain 
closed in the hearts of those who love 
her. If it were right I would speak of 
one brave little life that was most dear 
to her, and that she has mourned with 
such deep, abiding mother-love that his 
untimely death is a living sorrow in 
hearts that did not beat until many, 
many years after he was gone from 
earth. 

She possessed a character which 
could have risen to any height, and 
truly proved its greatness by accepting 
with noble dignity the lot which Heaven 
awarded her. The bitter murmur of 
discontent has never entered the home 



9 8 



Whitwell. 



which she has made the dearest of all 
homes to those who come into it. And 
we, who comprehend the grandeur of 
that Soul which dictates all, in humble 
reverence of its greatness, hush our 
own wonder that so beautiful and gifted 
a woman should have been ordained to 
live her life out in one of the world's 
by-paths. 

There is an oil portrait of Anne 
Whitwell Richmond, painted by Joseph 
Hathaway about 1845. ^ shows a 
queenly looking woman holding her 
head with peculiar erectness. The dark 
hair is parted and looped to cover the 
ears. The dress is of yellow satin with 
a cloak of velvet and fur draped about 
the arms. 

But a daguerreotype taken a few 
years later is in my eyes far superior as 
a likeness. It shows a woman of about 
thirty-five seated beside a table; one 
arm leans on the table edge, and in the 
figure is seen the same stately pose of 
head and shoulders as in the oil por- 



trait. The features are perfect in their 
regularity; the magnificent hair is parted 
and looped in two large rolls on either 
side of the- high forehead. Under the 
straight brows are eyes in which one 
reads of heavy griefs patiently borne, 
fearful physical anguish outlived, and 
steadfast hope, and love. The Grecian 
nose and firm yet delicate mouth were 
inherited from her father. 

There is a calmness and reserve in 
this little picture that the artist failed 
to seize in the oil portrait; the more 
the pity, for these very qualities were 
two of the most prominent in this life. 
Few women are capable of accepting 
and bearing all that this world may 
bring them, within themselves. She 
could and did. 

And if such a one lives, and we have 
the great honor to claim her life as part 
of ours, and be descended from her, 
is there any more royal blood to flow in 
one's veins, or any nobler coat-of-arms 
to bear than her name, and the device — 

"She is our Mother." 



WlLBORE — WlNSLOW. 



99 



WlLBORE,— 1 William. 
(she d. 1710). 



d. 1710. 
(Of Portsmouth, R. I.) 

William Wilbore was a weaver by 
trade. June 10, 1654, he received a 
deed of 10 acres from Samuel Wilbur, 
Sr., of Taunton. Dec. 21, 1658, sold 8 
acres to Peter Tallman. Numerous 
other deeds are recorded. 

CHILDREN. 

a Mary, — m. Joseph Mowry, 1671. d. 

Apr. 17, 1720. 

-John, — m. Hannah . 

2 Joseph, — m. 'Ann Brownell, 1683. d. 

May 4, 1729. 
2 Thomas, — 
2 William,— m. 2 - 



Tallman. d. 1738. 
2 Martha, — m. 8 Wm., son of 2 Peleg 

Shearman, 168 1. 
2 Samuel, — Vide the following. 

2 Daniel, — m. Ann . d. 1741. 

2 Joan (Iona), — m. 3 Nathaniel Potter, d. 

175.9- 

2 Benjamin, — m. Mary Kinnecut. m. 2nd, 
Elizabeth Head, Nov. 2, 1710. d. 
1729. 



WILBOR— 2 Samuel. 

m. 3 Mary, daughter of 2 Nathaniel 
Potter and Elizabeth Stokes (she 
d. ). 

d. 1740. 
(Of Little Compton, R I.) 

Estate inventoried at ,£5,344, 13s., 3d. 

CHILDREN. 

3 Martha, — b. Oct. 22, 1690. m. James 

Pearce, March 5, 1712. d. Sept. 22, 

1760. 
3 Samuel, — b. Nov. 7, 1692. m. Eliza- 
beth Carr, Dec. 24, 1713. d. May, 

1752. 
'William, — b. Jan. 6, 1695. m. Esther 

Burgess, June 20, 17 17. d. Sept., 

'774- 
3 Mary, — b. Oct. 9, 1697. m - Chas. 

Brownell, July, 1717. 
3 Joanna, — b. June 8, 1700. m. John 

Taylor, 1719. 
'Thankful, — (twin) m. John Irish, May 

10, 1720. 
'Elizabeth,— b. Dec. 23, 1702. Vide 

Peckham. 



'Thomas, — b. Dec. 2, 1704. m. Susanna 

Irish, 1722. 
'Abial, — b. May 27, 1707. 
'Hannah, — b. Feb. 9, 1709. 
'Isaac, — b. Aug. 24, 171 2. m. Mary 

Brownell. 



WlNSLOW (WYNECLOWE or 
WYNSLOE),— Kenelm. 

b. in Droitwych, England. 

m. Katharine . 

d. 1607. 

Droitwych is a small town lying on 
the Salwarpe, seven miles N. N. E. of 
Worcester. Its name signifies "right to 
the salt spring." Kenelm Winslow was 
a yeoman of this place and the owner 
of two estates near. He died in St. 
Andrew's Parish, Worcestershire. 



WlNSLOW— Edward. 

b. Oct. 17, 1560. 

m. Eleanor, daughter of Sir Herbert 
Pelham. 

m. 2nd, Magdalen Ollyver, Nov. 4, 
1594, in St. Bride's Church, London. 

d. 1631. 
(Of Droitwych.) 

CHILDREN. 

Richard, — b. 15S5. Heir to all estates. 

Edward, — b. Oct. 18, 1595. Afterwards 

the famous "Governor." d. May 8, 

i655- 
John, — b. April 16, 1597. ■ m. Mary 

Chilton, Oct. 12, 1624. d. in Boston, 

1674. 
Eleanor, — b. April 22, 1598. Remained 

in England. 
Kenelm, — Vide the following. 
Gilbert, — b. Oct. 26, 1600. 
Elizabeth, — b. 1602. 
Magdalene, — b. March 6, 1604. d. 

1604-5. 
Josiah, — b. Feb. II, 1606. m. Margaret 

Bourne, 1636. d. in Marshfield, 

Mass., Dec. 1, 1674. 



The "Winslow Memorial" in two 
large volumes gives probable baronial 
ancestry of Kenelm Winslow. There 
are grave doubts as to whether this 
ancestry is even "probable". 



100 



WlNSLOW. 



1 Kenelm. 



WlNSLOW,— Kenelm. 

b. at Droitwich, Eng., April 29, 1599. 
m. Mrs. Eleanor Adams in 1634 (she 
was born about 1599, and died Dec. 5th, 
1 68 1, aet. 83 yrs.) 

d. at Salem Sept. nth, 1672. 
(Of Droitwich, Plymouth and Marsh- 
field). 

Kenelm Winslow is believed to have 
come on one of the second trips of the 
Mayflower, — probably in 1629 with his 
brother, Josiah. He was admitted free- 
man of Plymouth, January 1, 1632-3, and 
in June, 1634, married the young widow 
of John Adams. From the unusual name 
of "Eleanor," this lad)' is supposed to 
be no other than "Elen Newton," who 
came in the "Ann" in 1653, and had a 
share in the cattle allotted her by the 
council. By John Adams she had three 
children, John, James and Susannah. 

Kenelm Winslow was chosen town 
surveyor in Plymouth in 1640, and for 
neglecting the highway was fined ten 
shillings soon after. He had received 
a grant to lands in Marshfield March 
6, 1637-8, and in 1640 removed to that 
place. In the Plymouth Colonial Rec- 
ords we find the following entry, "all 
that parcel of land remaining of that 
neck of land lying on the east side of 
the lands lately granted to Josias Wins- 
low, at Green's Harbor, are granted to 
Kenelme Winslow and Love Brewster, to 
be divided between them, provided that 
Kenelme Winslow have that part next 
ad oinine; to his brother's." 



Kenelm Winslow was deputy in the 
General Court for eight years and sat 
on the Coroner's Jury in 1653. In the 
same year he "complained against John 
Soule for spekeing falsely and scandalic- 
ing his daughter." 

In 1669 he became one of the twenty- 
six original proprietors of Assonet, and 
received the 24th lot, part of which is 
still owned by one of his descendants — 
Barnaby Winslow. 

There is a record of a law-suit in New 
York in 1655, which is supposed to have 
been between this Kenelm Winslow and 
Samuel Moore. On account of his age 
then I should incline to the belief that 
the litigant was his son. Tradition how- 
ever assigns to the first Kenelm a high 
temper which was very conducive to 
quarrels. He died in Salem, Sept. 13th, 
1672. He is sometimes styled "joyncr" 
and sometimes "planter," and was en- 
gaged in the shipping trade more or less. 

CHILDREN. 

2 Kenelm, — b. about 1635. Vide follow- 
ing page. 

2 Eleanor, — b. 1637. m. Samuel Baker, 
d. Aug. 27th, 1676. 

-Nathaniel, — b. 1639. m. Faith Miller. 
d. Dec. 1st, 1719. 

2 Job, — b. 1641, m. Ruth . d. July 

14th, 1720. Father of Capt. ^ Job Wins- 
low, and ancestor of Winslow family 
in Vol. II. 



WlNSLOW. 



IOI 



2 Kenelm— * Elizabeth. 



WINSLOW,— 3 Kenelm. 



b. at Plymouth about 1635. 

m. Mary, daughter of Peter Worden. 

m. 2nd, Damaris . 

d. Oct. 4, 1714. 
(Of Plymouth and Yarmouth, Mass.) 

Kenelm Winslow removed to Cape 
Cod while a young man and settled in 
that part of Yarmouth which afterwards 
became Harwich. His homestead was 
in West Brewster, near what is now 
called "Winslow's Mills." He was 
taxed £4 and upwards for the charge of 
the Indian Wars. Like all the early 
Puritans he bought large tracts of land, 
one of 1000 acres in Windham (price 
^30), and another in the town of 
Rochester. 

As was the custom, Kenelm Winslow 
set aside a portion of his own land 
"near the Road leading from Nobscus- 
set to Sawtucket" for a family burying 
ground. The grave-stone of his first 
wife is the oldest in the plot and is said 
to have been brought from England. 
Here he was himself interred after a 
long and successful life. 

Like his father he was called "planter," 
an American denomination for the 
English "yeoman." His will is given 
in full in the "Winslow Memorial." It 
mentions the boundary of part of his 
land as being "Andrew Clarke's meadow 
ponds." The property inventoried at 
•£741- 

CHILDREN. 

3 Kenelm, — bp. Aug. 9, 1668. m. Bethiah 
Hall, Jan. 5, 1689. d. March 20, 1729. 

3 Josiah,— b. Nov. 7, 1669. m. five times. 

3 Thomas — b. Mar. 3, 1672. d. April 6, 
16S9. 

3 Samuel, — m. three times. 

3 Mary, — b. about 1676. 

3 Nathaniel, — m. Elizabeth Holbrook. 



3 Eclward,— b. Jan. 30, 1680. d. 1760. 
(By second wife.) 
3 Damaris, — m. Jonathan Small. 
3 Elizabeth, — Vide following. 
3 Eleanor, — m. Shubael Hamblin. 
3 John, — m. Bethiah Andrews, March 
15, 1721. d. about 1755. 



WINSLOW, - 3 Elizabeth. 

m. 3 Andrew Clarke of Harwich, 
Aug. 9, 171 1. Vide Clarke. 
(Of Harwich.) 

As a married woman Elizabeth Clarke 
lived in the southern part of Harwich 
near her sister Damaris. Here she 
raised a large family, named more fully 
below than was possible in the space 
allotted the Clarkes. 

CHILDREN. 

4 Mehitable, — b. Oct. 29, 1712. m. Cor- 
nelius Ellis, Jr., 1742. 

4 Elizabeth, — b. and d. 1714. 

4 Elizabeth, — b. and d. 171 5. 

4 Elizabeth, — b. Jan. 18, 1716. d. single. 

4 Anna, — bp. July 13, 1719. m. Benjamin 
Ellis, 1734. 

4 Thankful, — b. Nov. 18, 1721. m. Ger- 
shom Phinney, Jr., Oct. 11, 1750. 

4 Eunice, — b. Oct. 28, 1724. m. Peter 
Tinkham. 

4 Hannah, — b. June 13, 1726. m. 5 Jacob 
Hathaway, Oct. 28, 1750. Vide 
Hathaway. 



Hannah Hathaway's son "Joseph 
married Ann Dillingham and had Han- 
nah, who married Furman Whitwell, 
of New Bedford and Fair Haven. By 
reference to these names the full line of 
descent from Edward Winslow to Anne 
Elizabeth Whitwell Richmond may be 
traced. 



VOLUME II. 

COMPRISING FAMILY RECORDS OF THOSE WHO ARE 

DESCENDED FROM THE ANCESTRAL 

LINES GIVEN IN VOL. I. 



These Records have never been in print before. 



ATTENTION ! 



The families whose records are given in the following pages 
are all descended from those previously named in Vol. I. 

Each family is given under the heading of the immediate 
ancestor, as, — the record of Jael Hathaway contains all the direct 
descendants of Jael Hathaway. The record of Meletiah Hatha- 
way contains all his direct descendants. Small capitals draw 
attention to the fact that that particular family, coming through a 
female, bears a different surname. Italics designate the grand- 
children of him whose record is given. In such a mass of names 
it was necessary to have some guide-post separating the 
generations. 



ioS 



French. 



Ephraim. 



(The following records have been sent 
me by the family and are copied ad ver- 
batim) 

The generations are numbered from 
Ephraim II. 

RECORD OF S EPHRAIM 
FRENCH. 

(Eldest son of l Ephraim French and 

3 Elizabeth Presbrey.) 

b. Sept. 14, 1 774. 1'*, 

m. Betsey, daughter of Samuel Novvell 
and Mary Hopping, 1S02 (she was boixi 
June 20, 1 7S4. d. ■ )Jlec /( '— /T/3 

cl. -J~fy ^ /r/i? 

(Of Taunton and Boston.) 

The following circumstances in con- 
nection with the family of Ephraim 
French's wife may be here related. 

"The day Charlestown was burned by 
the British had been set for the wedding 
of Samuel York Nowell and Miss Mary 
Hopping. The bridegroom came from 
Newburyport on horseback and as he 
approached Chelsea he saw the smoke 
of the burning town. Miss Hopping's 
home was where the Navy-yard now" 
stands and before her lover had crossed 
the river on the horse-boat she and all 
her family had fled. The lovers were 
not re-united until three days later when 
Mr. Nowell found his lost bride in Con- 
cord. They were married at once, she 
wearing the indigo-blue calico she es- 
caped in. Betsey Nowell was one of 
their nine children." 

After Mrs. Elizabeth French's second 
marriage to Capt. 4 Jael Hathaway her 
two sons were each apprenticed, Enoch 
to ^Joseph Read, the tanner, and Eph- 
raim to a carpenter. The latter soon 
removed to Boston, where he married 
and raised a large family. 



DESCENDANTS OF EPHRAIM FRENCH. 

'■'Elizabeth Presbrey,— b. Feb. 10, 1803. 
m. Major Borden of Fall River, Dec. 
4, 182S. d. July 15, 1S76 (he was born 
May 10, 1S03. d. Oct. 26, 1880). 
Children: — 
—*Sarah Elizabeth, — b. Sept. 5, 1S29. 

m. Peleg Brightman, Jan. 26, 1852. 

d. April 20, 1879. 
^ z Emclinc Ann, — b. Jan. 28, 1831. m. 

Par Son Macomber, May 1, 1850. 
— 8 A son, — b. and d. Dec. 13, 1832. 
—*Mary Parks,— b. March 5, 1834. 

— * Arthur Ross,— b. April 20, 1836. m. 
Sarah J. Gunn, Nov. 15, i860, d. 
Nov. 1, 18SS. 

— s Asakel Morse, — b. June 8, 183S. m. 

Maria White, Aug. 20, 1862. d. Aug. 

9. 1871. 
— 8 Caroline H., — b. July 20, 1841. m. 

David Waring, Jan. 1, 1863. 
— s Lonisa Martha, — b. April 9, 1846. 

d. July 8, 1S47. 
2 Mary Nowell, — b. Jan. 11, 1804. m. 
John A. Peeler, Dec. 18, 1S34. d.June 
28, 1879 (he died Oct^i884). 
Children: — 

— "Mary French, — b. Jan. 31, 1836. d. 
Sept. 29, 1875. 

— '^George French,— b. July 24, 1838. 
d. July 28, 1S49. 

— '■Jolin Jacob, — b. June 20, 1S41. d. 
Sept. 5, 1841. 

— 3 Joh/i Jacob,— b. Oct. 25, 1S45. d - 

Aug. 17, 1S47. 
2 John Ephraim, — b. Nov. 27, 1S09. m. 
Alephia Sophia Baxter, June 13, 1S33. 
d. April 7, 1839 (she died Jan. 12, 1888). 
Children: — 
— '■Sarah Sophia, — b. April, 1834. m. 

Alex. McHenry, Nov. 16, 1853. 

111. 2nd, Daniel P. Lincoln, Sept. 

16, 1859. 




ELIZA FRENCH LINDSAY. 



French — Lindsay. 



iog 



Children: — 

4 Edward Homer,— b. July 5, 1S54. 
(adopted and took name of Lin- 
coln.) m. Annie I. Nelson, Nov. 
3, 1882. Had three children, 
5 Daniel Hudson, b. June 1, 1S83, 
and d. Jan. 5, 1886.— 5 Ruth Es- 
tella, b. Sept. 16, 1889.— 5 Ella 
Powers, b. Oct. 12, 1891. 
4 Mary Elizabeth— b. July 8, 1S60. 
m. Augustus C. Snyder, April 5, 
1877. Three children: 5 Lillian 
Alephia, b. Nov. 9, 1875. d - l8 7 8 - 
5 Sarah A., b. March 6, 1882, and 
5 Daniel P., b. Aug. 21, 1884. 
4 John Ebenezer,— b. May, 1835. 
2 Sarah Richardson, — b. (in Fall River) 
March 26, 1S12. m. Ebenezer French, 
April 2, 1835. d. Sept. 3, 1863 (he d. 
March 3, 1857. Ebenezer French 
was a descendant of Lieut. William 
French who came in the "Defence", 
1635. He was one of the pioneers of 
the California Gold Epoch). 
Children: — 
— s Sarak Richardson, b. Apr. 17, 1S36. 
m. Samuel Hall, Feb. 25, 1856 (he 
was born Feb. 25, 1834, and served 
in the War of 186 1). Has children, 
4 Alethia Wilder, b. Oct. 16, 1858. 
d. Dec. 5, 1S65. 4 Arthur French, 
b. Aug. 25, i860, and d. Aug. 1, 
1861. 
1856. 

1S93. 4 Clara Adelia, b. June 9, 
1868. 4 Emily Alice, b. Sept. 8, 

1873- 
— 3 Susan Crockett, b. Nov. 8, 1839. m. 
Andrew Wallace Peabody, June 4, 
1861. Had one daughter, 4 Helen 
Florence, b. March 26, 1S62. m. 
George A. Fuller of South Bos- 



4 Lucy Alethia, b. Feb. 27, 
m. Edwin 'Stevens, Nov. 4, 



ton, Feb. 3, 188 1 (he was born Oct. 
1, 185S). She died Nov. 26, 1884, 
leaving one daughter, 5 Marion P., 
who was legally adopted by her 
grandfather, and took the name of 
Marion Fuller Peabody. 
—*Mary Elizabeth,- b. March 14, 1848. 
Has been twice a missionary to 
India, and is now a matron in the 
Faith Home for Old Ladies, at 
Portsmouth, N. H. 



RECORD OF 3ELIZA FRENCH 
LINDSAY. 

(daughter of Deacon 2 Enoch French, 
Vol. I.) 
b. July 24, 1816. 

m. William Lindsay, Oct. 23, 1837. 
d. April 28, 1856. 

(Of Fall River.) 

children. 

4 Crawford E., — b. Aug. 19, 1838. m. 
Mary^.Cha^e^May 27, 1863. Had 
s William^. April 18, 1865. d. July 
26, 1865. — 5 Charles, b. Sept. 17, 
1866. d. Feb. 15, 1S68. 

4 Charles B., — b. April 25, 1841. 

4 Sarah, — b. July 5, 1844. m. Foster 
Hooper, June 5, 1872. Has 5 Foster, 
b. May 7, 1S74. — s Lindsay, b. Jan. 

17, 1882. im. 0e£ /?, J?oc Matte, i. -?as^l>-»t££ 



Crawford Lindsay, named above, was 
one of the originators of the Merchant's 
M'f'g Co., of Fall River. He was 
president of the Common Council in 
1870 and 1874, and mayor in 1878 and 
1S79. Is now president of the Fall 
River Savings Bank, and treasurer of 
the Canonicut Mills and Slater Cotton 
Co. (Pawtucket). 



I 10 



French. 



Asa. 



RECORD OF 3ASA P. FRENCH. 
( Eldest son of Deacon -Enoch French.) 



CHILDREN OF 8 ASA FRENCH. 



b. Nov. 19, 1800. 

m. Diodemia Gifford, Nov. 10, 1S23 
(she was born 1802. d. July 17, 1 S4 1 )- 

m. 2nd, Mrs. Mary Hooper, 1S43 ( sne 
was born Feb., 1799. d. Sept. 17, 1876). 

m. 3rd, Mrs. Mary Richardson, Apr. 
12, 1S81 (she was born Nov. 9, 1837). 

d. July 12, 1SS7. 
(Of Fall River.) 

(The following was written at the re- 
quest of the family by Mr. Dawfy^ 

"Asa P. French was the oldest of six 
brothers and possessed qualities of mind 
and heart common to them all. He was 
a man of good sense and judgment, 
which, combined with an active religious 
temperament, made him what he was. 
He was, for more than forty years, a 
memberof his father's Church, and loved 
it to the last. He did not stop to count 
the cost in the dispensation of his kind- 
ness and would confer favors even 
though they should prove disadvanta- 
geous to himself. In business relations 
he was not so well known as his bro- 
thers but, like them, he held deep relig- 
ious convictions and lived and died sus- 
tained by the Gospel of Jesus Christ." 

I may add that Mr. Asa French was 
in many ways a very remarkable man. 
He was well educated, a good talker 
and writer and an interesting companion. 
But he lacked a certain mental fiber 
which makes a man able to push his 
way successfully through this crowded 
world. In personal appearance he was 
handsome and striking looking. 



4 Orlando, — d. in infancy. 
"•Caroline, — d. in infancy. 
4 Enoch Pottcn,— b. Oct. 19, 1S29. d. at 

sea, Oct. 21, 1849. 
4 Mariana Crandall, — b. Aug. 27, 1831. 
m. Abram Bourne, June 5, 1S56. m. 
2nd, Stephen Bourne, Nov. 12, 1S59. 
One child, Clara Francesca, born Aug. 
7, 1862. 
4 Samuel Reid, — b. Oct. 12, 1833. m. 
Ellen Tyler, Oct. 8, 1S60; had * Enoch 
Winfield, b. 1861. — 6 Emma, b. 1862. 
d. [862.— fi Arthur, b. 1S65. d. \^J^- 
5 Louis, b. 1872. d. 1872. — 5 Carl Clif- 
ton, b. 1876. — s Lma Gertrude, b. iSjg.&^j 4/. 
4 Sarah Reid,— b. and d. 1834. 
4 Thcodore Wilbur, — b. June 12, 1S36. 
m. Emma Davenport, Dec. 25, 1859; 
adopted Sarah, ^Ks^XTS^T — /5 ^ 
4 Asa Bronson, — b. Jan. 1, 1839. d. in 

Andersonville Prison, 1864. 
4 Maria Diodemia,— b. July, [841. d.Oct.,^ 

1S41. 
♦Frederick, — b. March 21, 1844. m. 
Agnes AVood, Ausj. 8, 1866 (she was 
b. July 23, 1842). They had 5 Fred- , 
crick Foster, b. Aug. 1, 1S67. — 5 6£ww <^* A *^ 
C, b, May 1, 1869.- - 5 Franklin, b. Dec. 
2, 1S70. d. Nov. 19, 1S85.-- 5 George 
Bowen, b. Sept. 25, 1S72. — 5 Benjamin 
Wood, b. Dec. 28, 1874. d. June 11, 
iSSr. — s Bell Agnes, b. Jan. 8, 1SS1. d. 
May 14, 1882. (This family are resi- 
dents of Chicago.) 



French — Toms. 



hi 



RECORD OF ^STEPHEN FRENCH. 
(Third son of Deacon Enoch French.) 

b. Aug. 23, 1803. 

m. Abigail C. Alden, Sept. 11, 1828 
(she d. Dec. 11, 1S29). 

m. 2nd, Hannah M. Humphrey, May 
12, 1S3 [ (she d. June 3, 1836). 

m. 3d, Phoebe, daughter of Daniel 
Dwelley, June 12, 1838. </. M™ J. Sfeo 

d. Feb. 8, 1885. 
(Of Fall River, Mass.) 

(The following was written by Mr. 
in4i - Dawty at the request of the family.) 
ft "Few men have more honored their 

profession in the Christian religion than 
did Deacon Stephen French — or live it 
more consistently. His deep and unos- 
tentatious spirituality was the result of 
habitual meditation. His faith in the 
gospel was strong and abiding and he 
lived his belief in his daily life. He 
loved to read and study the Bible, and 
thus became the earnest Christian that 
he was. He was useful in the church 
and world — helpful, constant, and de- 
voted in all things. No man could be 
with him without feeling that he was in 
the presence of a good man, and it is 
not surprising that from such a life and 
character should come a fragrant and 
abiding memory." 

CHILDREN. 

4 Otis L.,— b. Oct., 1829. d. Nov. 5, 
1829. 

4 William Humphrey, — b. April 29, 
1836. m. Mrs. Jeanctte-Langley, 
April 16, 1859. One child, 5 Frank 
W., b. March 9, i860, m. Minnie E. 
Cooke, Nov. 24, 1881, and they have 
6 Chester R., b. Jan. 21, 1883.— Ear- 
nest W., Sept. 18, 1885.— 6 Edna J., 
b. Sept. 19, \l 



4 Hannah Humphrey, — b. Aug. 19, 1839. 
m. Wm. J. Osborne, June 19, 1873 
(he d. Nov. 3, 188S). One child, 
5 Charles French, b. May 2, Tfr?3 " : /y?jr / ' 

4 Charles B., — b. Aug. 5, 1841. d. in 
Wilmington, N. C, Jan. 12, 1867. 

4 Amanda Slade, — b. Jan. 29, 1844. d. 
Oct. 22, 1857. 

4 Jerome Dwelley, — b. Jan. 28, 1846. d. 
Nov. 22, 1873. ol. PUv 2X, /r/y 

4 Eliza Lindsay, — b. Jan. 18, 1848. m. 
George Edward Rodman, June 17, 
1876. Has two children: ^Francis 
Clark, b. June 7, 1S81. — 5 Karl French, 
b. Sept. 2, 18S8. </• >?W XtT, /Srff 

4 Enoch Judson, — b. Oct. 28, 1850. m. 
Ella C. Winward, Oct. 19, 1S8A Has 
two children, ^Ralph Winward, b. 
Oct. 4, 1S83. — b Corinna Dwelley, b. 
Sept. 22, \%^S&£t± a J<L££/lc-°&>r#-l>- 

4 Albert Sherman,— b.' Feb. 14, 1853. m. 
Emma C. Domin g, M^iy 4, 1881. Has 
three children: 5 Florence D., b. April 
19, 1882. — s Etliel Stewart, b. Aug. 16, 
18S6.— 5 Lucy Osborne, b. May 15, 
1892. 

4 James Henry,— b. Oct. 25, 1857. m. 
Elizabeth L. Gardner, Oct. 30, 1890. 
Has one child, ^Stephen Luther, b. 
March 9, 1892. 



a 



1? 



?,' 



RECORD OF "JOSEPHINE 

FRENCH TOMS. 
(Daughter of 3 George Reade French.) 

b. Oct. 6, 1849. m ' Marion C. Toms, 
Captain in the Confederate Army, Nov. 
19, *%6$-. d. Feb. 14, 18S9. Left one 
son: 
5 Charles French, — b. Sept. 5, 1872. m. 

Ethel Panknin, March 7, 1S94, in 

Augusta, Georgia (she was b. March 

5, 1876). aA*£ <&*',* 



112 



French. 



RECORD OF HOB BORDEN 
FRENCH. 

b. in Fall River, Mass., March 6, 1806. 

m. Abb*^, daughter of Wm. Allan, of 
NewporrfApril 17, 1S31, (she b. June 20, 
1807. d. March 17, 1870). 

m. 2nd, Mary, daughter of Robert 
Cook, Aug. 19, 1873 (she b. Sept. 15, 
1816. d. April 26, 1882). 

d. May 13, 1894. 
(Of Fall River, Mass.) 

The manuscript of this volume was 
going to press at the time of Mr. Job 
French's death and it was with deep 
grief that I recalled the sheets to add 
this last sad item. I had previously 
written a few lines regarding his life and 
noting the many high positions of public 
and private trust which he had filled so 
well and long; but now that his course 
is ended and we look upon it as a per- 
fect whole, we see his pre-eminent char- 
acter as a man in so bright a light that 
all the worldly honors he received are 
dimmed by it. He was so upright and 
honorable, so steadfast in his integrity, 
and yet of so sweet and loveable a dis- 
position that all whom he met became 
his friends and felt personally attached 
to him, while in his own family he was 
almost idolized. Like his only sister, 
Mrs. Eliza Lindsay, he possessed one of 
those natures which impress themselves 
strongly on all about them, by their 
innate goodness. We, who have our 
hands full raising the next generation 
of Frenches, can ask no more in our 
prayers than that they may become such 
men and women as "Uncle Job and Aunt 
Eliza." 

Mr. Job French was twice a member 
of the Legislature, and representative 
in the Common Council for several years. 
He was a trustee in the Fall River Sav- 
ings Bank for upwards of half a century, 
and president over sixteen years. He 
was also president of the Wcctamore 
Mills from the date of their organization. 

■(-0 (W C^<lca/D«-«> rn ^- J*«-y 7"(l S •***-»■* d\ (btvrl^ 



In 18S7, Mr. French made a trip West 
and spent some time in Minneapolis. It 
was at that date that I made his acquaint- 
ance and I am positive that he was then 
the finest old gentleman of his age that 
the world has ever seen. 

CHILDREN. 

4 Mary Elizabeth,— b. Nov. 8, 1832. m. 

David Hartwell Dyer, N0V.V3, 1 S58. 

d. March 19, 18S5; left children:— 

^Susan Chace, b. Oct 19, 1862. m. 

Edw. Bowen, Dec. 9, 1S91; has "Earl . 

Hartwell, b. Feb. 17,1893. ^William 

A., b. April 7. 186c. m. Clara T. Spink, 

Nov. 18, 1890. — 3 George French, b. 

Aug. 5, 1S66. K 
Haines Rcade,— b. Oct. 20, 1S37. d. Oct. 

3, 1856. 
4 Sarah Judson,--b. Sept. 22, 1839. m. 

Wm. Lind^fiy, Feb. 16, 18S1. d. Dec. 

28, 1892. ^e ct.7cJ M. /*9? 
4 Edward Allen, — b. Jul}- 19, 1S42. in. 

Eliza A. Ricketson, Oct. 31, 1871. d. 

Dec. 20, 1SS3. 
*Abb» Maria,— b. Aug. 31, 1S45. 
Hulia Whitconib, — b. June 27, 1S4S. 






DERIVATION OF NAMES. 

Clarke, — the "clerke" (literary origin). 

Cornell, — signifies "from Cornwall." 

Fletcher, — the "Flecher, ' maker of ar- 
rows. 

Fowler, — the bird-chaser, gamekeeper. 

Freeborn, — the free-born,-— no longer a 
serf. 

Gibbs and Gilbert, — from "gib," the cat. 

French, — "French," from France, first 
found as "Peter lc Frensch". 

Hawke, — he of like habit to a hawk. 

Juatt, — Jowett, Ivett, Ivo, derived from 
Yvo. 

Loring, — "Peter le Loringe," from Lor- 
raine. 

Ogden, — "tie IIogdene,"keepcrol swine. 

Parker, — the gamekeeper. 

Richmond, — from Rougemonl, Red 1 [ill. 

Shearman, — "le Sherere," the sheep- 
shearer. 

Warner and Warren, — "w arriner," 
gamewarden. 



lw 









~l». 



f»J- 










JOB BORDEN FRENCH. 



French. 



ii3 



5 



RECORD OF ^ WILLIAM FRENCH. 

(Son of 2 Enoch French and 6 Sarah 

Read, Vol. I.) 

b. May 10, 1S09. 

m. Almeda W. Tripp, Nov. 2, 183 1 (she 
was b. 1808. d. Nov. 13, 1867.) 

d. May 8, 1849. 
(Of Fall River.) 

CHILDREN. 

^\ 4 Henry Augustus, — b. Oct. 31, 1S32. d. 
J Dec. 9, 1853, 

\f 4 Caroline E., — b. July 22, 1834. m. Al- 
bert A. Sherman, July 2, 1851. d. 
March 1, 1852, aged 17 years, 7 mos. 
4 George Hill, — b. Jan. 28, 1837. d. in 

Cedar Keys, Florida in 1867. 
4 Helen Maria, — b. Oct., 1839. m. Henry 
C. Battell, Nov. 3, 1859. d. Aug. 21, 
1864. Four children. — Twins born and 
led, i860.— * Mamie Battell, b. 1861; 
adopted by Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Wood, 1865 and took their name. — 
5 William H., — b. Nov. 9, 1862; adopt- 
ed by his uncle, John French. eC. 
4 John Hathaway, — b. Jan. 22, 1843. m - 
1st, Eleanor Wilson, June 24, 1869. 
m. 2nd, Catalina Devere, Nov. 22, 
1886 (she was b. Nov. 31, 1863). 
Children:— ^' SZ^v-ty/fe^ 
5 Louisa, — b. 1870. d. young. 
sjohn Lambert,— b. May 17, 1878. 
Isabella M.,--b. March 23, 1844. d. 
April 29, 1845. 



It 



RECORD OF 4 WM. A. FRENCH. 

(Son of 3 Geo. R. French. *Vide Vol. I.) 

b. Dec. 15, 1835. 

m. Harriet Perkins Timmans, Dec. 13, 
1855 (she b. Feb. 7, 1835) . ',- c fi 

(Of Wilmington, N. C.) Jyeu/*-* ' 9" ^ ' 

children. 

5 John Timmans, — b. Jan. 3, 1S57. m. 

Mary Lou Herring, June 12, 1878.0^ 9:-™/ , / Y\ 
Had three children: ^ ^7a^U. lA'.^n 

6 George Read, — d. in infancy. 2?7^ -2-6~< W^f 
*> Louise, — b.June 12, 1883. d. young. 
*Hattie,—b. June 12, 1883. 
m. 2nd, Emma Irene Henshaw. Has 
two children: 

6 Irene, — b. Sept. 1, 1890. 

* Marshall William,— b. Dec. 9, 1892. 

5 Sarah Caroline, — b. Apr. 11, i860, m. 

Charles S. TH-ykse«7- of Cincinnati, 

March 22, 1892. 

5 Betsey Myers, — b. July 7, 1861. d. May 

10, 1862. 
•'Hattie Dell,— b. Feb. 8, 1866. d. Nov. 

22, 1877. 
5 Edelweise, — b. Oct. 19, 1870. m. Elias 
Richards, of New Orleans, Nov. 1, 
1892; has one child: 

6 William Augustus, b. August, 1893. 
5 William A., Jr.,— b. Aug. 2, 1875. 



~~S%. i^i^iiC 



U- 









ii 4 



A True Pirate Story. 



A TRUE PIRATE STORY. 

(This story was told me by Bradford 
Perez Richmond, and by reference to 
the Richmond, Brightman and Weaver 
Families in Vol. I. all the characters 
named may be found according to their 
numbers.) 



— /y?3 

[Story told in April, 4- 893 . Original 
words reproduced as far as possible.] 

" 7 Uncle John Weaver's wife, — she 
was Grandma Richmond's niece Betsey, 
you recollect, — had a brother and he 
was captain of one of the handsomest 
brigs I ever saw. The Brightmans built 
it at the wharf on their farm, and one of 
the boys, — Samuel, I think, — was its 
captain. He sailed for France and sold 
his cargo in Paris and had the gold all 
laid down in the ballast and made ready 
to sail back. — There came a gentleman 
to him and he was a dentist going to 
Charleston and he wanted to take pas- 
sage on the brig, and so Captain Bright- 
man took him. 

"He brought all his dentist tools on 
board and his two servants, and the 
ship sailed. 

"When they were two days off 
Charleston he came out of his cabin one 
night and w ; ent into the Captain's cabin 
just opposite and cut his throat, and 
then the three — all dressed in white, — 
went up on deck and stabbed the man 
at the wheel and the first mate — Hobson 
was his name. Him they wounded, but 
he climbed into the rigging out of their 
reach. Then they went below and 
murdered the sailors, and only spared 
one — a boy. 

"They were pirates, you see. — He was 
Tardy the Pirate! 

"Then when morning came they bar- 
gained with Hobson to spare his life if 



he'd come down and navigate the vessel 
into Havana. They could not navigate 
a brig and they were short-handed be- 
side, having only the boy — and him they 
made cook. — So Hobson come down 
and navigated towards Havana, but 
when it was night he steered north. You 
see he meant to get into Charleston 
Harbor. They went by his log-book 
and he falsified the entries, working 
north by night and steering by the 
compass. He told Tardy he'd gotten 
south of Havana and was working back. 

"Then he found he was going to make 
Charleston in daylight and he knew as 
soon as land came in sight Tardy would 
know where they were so he had to put 
out to sea again and beat back as night 
came on. 

"He made the boat ready to lower in 
the bow and when all was dark they 
sailed into Charleton Harbor. Tardy 
came on deck and asked where they 
were and Hobson told him just putting 
into Havana, — and then he ran forward 
and jumped into the boat, let her down, 
and cast off. Tardy ran to the rail and 
fired at him and that roused the Guard 
and they called others and put off in 
boats. Tardy and his men jumped over- 
board and swam ashore and got into 
the swamps and hid, but they were all 
captured and executed, and there was a 
pamphlet writ about it all and sent to 
Fall River. 

"Grandfather" — (Captain "Sheffield 
Weaver) — "had just finished the 'Gen- 
eral Marion,' named after the Revolu- 
tionary general — his son was named for 
him too — and he had a part}' on board 
when she was launched to take the first 
sail. My mother was on board and all 
his other children, Aunt 7 Rhoday, Uncle 
'Benjamin, and all the rest, — and I was 
there. 



Story of 7 John Weaver. 



US 



'■'We sailed down by Newport and 
when we got there we met Captain 
Brightman's brig being brought home 
by the government officials. They sig- 
naled and we signaled them. And the 
sails where Hobson climbed up above 
had been taken and rolled before they 
came into port because they were all 
streaked with his blood. 

"Hobson never went to sea again. — 
After that he stayed ashore." 



STORY ABOUT ^JOHN WEAVER. 

(John, eldest son of Captain 'Sheffield 
Weaver, was born 1 778, and died at sea 
May 12th, 1812. Vide Vol. I.) 

John Weaver began to sail as cabin boy 
with his father when nine years of age, 
and generally went with him even after- 
wards. When he was eighteen he had 
been first mate for some time. He was 
called after his father's partner, John 
Porter, of Charleston, with whom Capt. 
Weaver carried on a coasting trade, sell- 
ing the cargoes North, South, and in 
the West Indies. 

On one occasion when they were re- 
turning North the vessel was boarded 
by pirates in search of plunder. There 
was on board six thousand dollars in 
gold, the price of the cargo just sold. 
Capt. Weaver and his son were given 
permission to descend into a small boat 
at the ship's side and kept under guard 
there while their craft was plundered. 
The two managed to smuggle the gold 
down between them and with it hidden 
about them waited while the search 
went on, and when it was over, again 
went on board and continued their voy- 
age. 

Another time just after they made 
port the embargo act of 1807 was passed. 



A brig loaded with cotton was just 
ready to sail from Charleston, but under 
the circumstances a clever and trusty 
captain was needed. Mr. Porter sent 
North for John to come at once and 
take her out — he would provide a crew. 

"When the young man (then nineteen 
years of age) arrived in Charleston he 
found all ready and a crew of seven- 
teen negroes who could sail under orders. 
So one night they slipped safely out of 
port, and made for the West Indies, 
where the cotton was sold and the hold 
reloaded with indigo and spices. They 
had a safe voyage North, entered Taun- 
ton River and dropped anchor near the 
Weaver farm late one night. The indigo 
(200 boxes in all) was carried ashore 
and hid under hay stacks and the 
spices were taken upstairs in Capt. 
Weaver's farmhouse and placed in the 
fire-place, concealed behind the fire- 
boards. The brig then moved on to 
Dighton and in the morning John re- 
ported to the custom house officers. 
He then bid the negroes obey any orders 
given them by the men, whom he knew 
to be unfamiliar with any square rigged 
vessel, — and went himself to his father's. 

"The officers when they appeared 
were told that "Massa" had gone away. 
They attempted to take command of 
the vessel and had her beached in no 
time, upon which they went back to 
town. 

"The young captain returned at night, 
— waited for fall tide, — and then hoisted 
sail and made for Charleston with only 
the ballast and chalk on board. 

"The profits of the voyage were very 
handsome, and the courage and skill of 
the ship's young master speak for them- 
selves." 



Ii6 



Weaver. 



John Weaver married 5 Betsey, daugh- 
ter of 4 Samuel Brightman, and had one 
son, 8 John Taylor Weaver. 

RECORDS OF THE CHILDREN 
OF "SHEFFIED WEAVER. 

7 John Tjji lor , — b. 17S6. m. 5 Betsey, 
daughter of 4 Samuel Brightman (she 
m. 2nd, Abiah Booth, and d. 1816). 
d. at sea May 11, 1S12. 
One son. 

8 John T., Jr.,— b. May 26, 181 1. m. 
£ > a>&(ci'ir7nj L Eudora - Brown Tobey, Dec. 8, 1834 
(she d. April 27, 1863). d. Oct. 7, 
1883. Had,— 9 John Sheffield, b. May 
8, 1837. d. Aug. 5, 1836.— 9 Catharine 
Eudora, b. Jan. 20, 1840. m. Dustin 
Dana Bicknell, 1866 (he was b. 
Aug. 1, 1838); had, 10 Kate Bulah, 
b. 1870.— "Julius Myron, b. March 
15, 1846. m. Jane Washburn Mason, 
Jan. 28, 1874 (she was b. Oct. 9, 



1847); na d, 10 Franklin Pierce-Ma=_ 
- s on r Feb. 17, 1882.— 9 Mary G., b. 
May 17, 1847. d. April 13, 1852. 
7 Mary,— b. Jan. 25, 1788. Vide Vol. I. 
7 Rhoda, — b. Aug. 3, 1794. m. Abram 

Borden, Feb. 1820. 
7 Anna Maria, — b. Sept. 23, 1796. m. 

Job Stillwell. Had one 8 daughter 

who m. Reese Bronson. 
7 Lydia, — b. July 1, 1798. m. James M. 

Brown, d. July 1, 1826. 
7 Furman, — b. June 22, 1804. d. in New 

Orleans, Mar. 27, 182S. 
7 Frances Marion, — (called for General 

Marion), b, June 21, 1806. m. Mary 

Ann Brightman (she was b. Nov. 10, 

180S. d. Feb. 28, 1S88). He died in 

California, March 19, 1SS1. 
7 Charles Benjamin, — b. Feb. 9, 181 1. 

m. Rachel, daughter of Joseph E. 

Read, Esq., Dec. 11, 1834 (she was 

born Dec. 5, 1809. d. April, 1876). He 

died Jan. 26, 1807. 



REGARDING THE CORNELL HOMESTEAD. 



This venerable house, of which an 
excellent picture is given within these 
covers, has sheltered many generations 
of Cornells. One of the family, in an- 
swer to certain questions, lately wrote 
the following letter: 

"* * In regard to the old house, it 
was certainly built before 1673, as in 
the inventory of 2 Thomas the contents 
of the different rooms are mentioned 
by name, as certain old things stored in 
the old house; and as Thomas was in- 
debted to his mother for two years' 
rent of farm, it would not seem that he 
could have built so large a place. As 
to Mrs. Biddlc's letter: In 1823 my 
grand-uncle, Stephen B. Cornell, of 
Portsmouth, lived in the house of which 
you have a picture. He was born about 



1765 in the house, lived there, and died 
there in 1839. * * In 171 4 4 George 
and Deliverance lived there. * * * 
Mrs. Biddle's grand-father was brother 
of 4 George" (vide letter of Mrs Clem- 
ent Biddle, page 132). "There were 
but two children of 3 Thomas and Susan- 
nah Lawton. Mrs. Biddle's father was 
Gideon and married a Vaughan. * * 
I have seen several records of the 
different branches of 'Thomas' family, 
but none where I think more really 
good marriages have been made in 
Colonial days than by the descendants 
of 2 Thomas, and within a hundred years 
after him." 

Vide "Mrs. Biddle's account of her 
visit to Newport in 1824." Page 133. 




STEPHEN LEONARD FRENCH. 
Page III. 



Richmond. 



117 



RECORD OF ^GEORGE BRIGHT- 
MAN RICHMOND. 

(Son of Dr. 5 Perez Richmond and Han- 
nah Brightman, Vol. I.) 



"Richmond, — Geo. Brightman. 

(of Westport, Newport and Livonia, 

Western New York.) 

b. April 8, 1774. 

m. Lucy Caldwell Woodruff, May 29, 
1808 (she was born May 3, 1 791 . d, 
May 24, 1859.) 

He died June 17, 1858. 

CHILDREN. 

7 Perez Brightman, — born May 30, 1809. 
m. Hannah Warren, March, 1835. 
d. October, 1889. 

7 Lucia, — born April 27, 181 1. m. Dan- 
iel Bosley, March 1, 1832. 

7 Carolina, — born April 25, 1816. m. 
Nathan Platt, Jan. 12, 1842. d. Sept. 
6, 1892. 

7 Edwin R. ,— b. Sept. 5, 1818. m. Mary 
Chappel, Jan. 12, 1842. d. Jan. 9, 
1889. 

7 Elizabeth, — b. Dec. 29, 1825. d. Jan. 
3, 1826. 

7 Elizabeth, — b. June 13, 1834. m. Geo. 
O. Bosley, Nov. 9, 1854. He died 
July 30, 1859, and she married 2d, 
Merritt A. Spinnig, Sept. 4, 1862. 

The above record I owe to the kind- 
ness of Mrs. Elizabeth Spinnig. She 
also gave me the address of her sister, 
Mrs. Bosley, whom I called on. Mrs. 
Bosley is a very pretty old lady, who 
does not look sixty-five, and possesses 
a memory twenty years younger than 
her looks. She has a letter written by 
Mrs. 4 Hannah Brightman Richmond to 
her sons, 5 Brightman and 5 Alanson, in 
1825. It contains over 1500 words, and 



is chiefly about religion. Mrs. Bosley 
possesses another letter of far more in- 
terest, which I give in full below. It 
was written by Brightman Richmond to 
his wife five months after their mar- 
riage : 

Livonia, Oct. 29, 180S. 
" My dear Lucy : 

Though but four weeks 
since I parted with you, yet the time 
appears an age since I left you last, 
feeling anxious to get home to see after 
my business. I have realized the time 
will appear so hard before I will see 
you again ; but so it is that while we 
enjoy the possession of any heavenly 
blessing, we little know how to appraise 
its value till experience teaches what 
forethought would not suggest. 

" Though engaged in business, and 
though much occupied with care, yet 
the lovely image of my Lucy rushes on 
my mind; and while fancy paints her 
lovely form, sweet as the pearly dew 
exhaled from the fragrant rose, yet 
those sweets are not without alloy. 
For reason dictates that several more 
lonely hours must pass before time will 
grant what fancy paints ; oh, and per- 
haps the world of time, for we are but 
tenants at will — no lease of life, no 
promise of to-morrow. Then let us 
wisely improve to-day, without regret- 
ting that which is passed or too much 
depending on that which is to come, for 
God in due season will accomplish all 
his purposes, glory be to his name. 

" I have enjoyed health ever since I 
parted with you, and hope this will find 
you enjoying the same ; and if nothing 
unforeseen happens, and the roads are 
not too bad, I calculate to come after 
you within two weeks. Till then I 
must bid you farewell, after requesting 
you to present my respects to your 



uS 



Whitcomb — Fowler. 



parents, sisters and brothers, and sub- 
scribing myself 

Yours affectionately, 

Brightman Richmond. 

" P. S. On receipt of this I hope you 
will not fail to write me, for as honey 
to the taste and music to the ear, so is 
news from a friend." 



RECORD OF 'HANNAH RICH- 
MOND WHITCOMB. 

Richmond, — Whitcomb, — 7 Hannah B. 

b. Oct. 31, 1810. 

m. Walter Whitcomb, Oct. 12, 1331 (he 
b. Feb. 13, 180S. d. Feb. 7, 1880.) 

d. Dec. 30, 1890. 
(Of Nunda, N. Y.) 

Mrs. Whitcomb was one of the bright- 
est and most entertaining of women, and 
she preserved her charm of manner and 
conversation to the last of her life. 

She was named for her grandmother, 
Hannah Brightman, and in person much 
resembled her mother, Mary Weaver 
Richmond French. Vide all these names. 

CHILDREN. 

"Victoria— b. Dec. 23, 1832. m. John 
Pulaski Wood; had daughters, 9 Fran- 
ces and 9 Caroline, m. 2nd, Mr. Newton 
Colby, and had ^Robert, b. Sept. 5, 
1868. (New York.) 

8 Mary,-— b. July 21, 1834. d. May 12, 
1890. (This unselfish and devoted 
life deserves a volume of praise in- 
stead of a line.) 



8 Sophia,— b. Aug. 18, 1838. m. Arnold 
Medbury, Dec. 18, 1867; had sons, 
9 Robert, who m. Minnie Davey, Oct. 
6, 1890, and has '"Hazel, b. Sept. 8, 
1891.— *Will. (Detroit, Mich.) 

"Louisa, — b. June 4, 1841. m. Jas. 
Strang, June 4, 1S67; has * Walter, 
9 Arthur* Louise and 9 Sophia. (Geneseo, 
N. Y.) 

8 Helen, — b. Oct. 5, 1S42. m. George 
Chandler, June 15, 1S63; had child- 
ren, 9 Walter and 9 Elsie. (Milwaukee, 

• Wis.) 

8 Emily, — b. Jan. 7, 1847. 

"William, — b. Aug. 8, 1852. m. Lillian 
Bulkeley, Aug. 13, 1S79. 



RECORD OF 8 ELTING FOWLER. 

Fowler, — 8 Elting. 
(Son of "David, Vol. I.) 

b. March 15, 1S1 1. 

m. Margaret Kennedy (she d. 1S5S). 

d. Oct. 7, 1854. 

children. 

9 Isaac du Bois, — b. March 5, 1846. 

9 John K.,— b. Sept. 22, 1848. m. Helen 

Crosby, June 9, 1875; has, > "Kale, b. 

June 22, 1878, and l0 Mje, b. June 12, 

1S80. 
"Martha,— b. Apr. 4, 1S50. d. Dec. 4, 

1856. 
9 Archibald,— b. Feb. 22, 1S51. 
9 Elting J.,— b. May 25, 1854. d. April 

10, 1857. 



I am indebted to Rev. 9 J. K. Fowler, 
of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, for the above 
record, and other information. 



DESCENDANTS OF 
READ 



Reade. 
JOSEPH 



1842 (she d. April, 



119 



/Y/r 



1 



The following records of the descend- 
ants of 5 Joseph Reade and 6 Mary Corn- 
ell (married 1754) have been collected 
by Miss Abbie French, of Fall River. 
I believe they are the only published 
records of this particular branch of the 
Reade family. 

5 Joseph and Mary Read had seven 
children: "Phcebe, "Samuel, 6 George G., 
6 Joseph, 6 James, "Nancy and 6 Sarah. 
The latter, Sarah, married 2 Enoch 
French and her six sons are recorded 
under that name. 

6 Phqebe Read ., — (first child of Joseph), 
.b. Nov. 29, 1755. m. Jonathan Barn- 
aby, Nov. 14, 1798 (he was son of 
James and grand-son of Capt. Ambrose 
Barnaby. b. 1755. d. Jan. 8, 1835). 
d. 1822-3. 

7 



3). He d. 
/'June, 1870. Vide"Reid, S.N. "—Also 
8 Darius, b. March 8, 1820. d. at sea 
1842.— Also s Hope Ann,b. Sept. 12, 
1 82 1. m. Harry Pomeroy, Oct. 12, 
1842 (heVAijg. H82.) She is still 
living, alsd eight of her twelve 
children. — Also * George L. Reid, b. 
Dec. 6, 1823. m. Matv Jane Holmes, 
Feb., 1850 (shed.Dec^f8f33-4). He 
d. Dec, 1 86 1. —Also 8 Mary J b. Aug. 
24, 1825. m. Samuel White, May,.?? 
1847 ( slle d. Sept se, 1849. Hus- 
band and one daughter living. — Also 
8 Caroline Frances, b. Oct. 22, 1827. ^ a 



J/./i 




"Samuel Read , — b. Aug.14^1757. He 
was a farmer, tanner and currier. 
When the Revolution broke out he 
joined the army and was one of Gen. 

Washington^ body-guard, m. Charity^^/ Conn. Six children 
^-^"^^^ourn^tf&Sf and moved to Col- ' ^ this volume. 

Chester, Conn. d. Dec. 29, 1832.^/^i 7 Jared Reid,— b. Feb. 29, 1788 



m. Alfred Spencer, April 26, 1846 

(he wa^/b. 1S25. d. 1891). Seven J) ell /j. 

living children; 9 Samuel R. one^'.^^a^ 

7 Elizabeth, — b. Jan. 15, 1782. m. Ed- 
ward Smith, d. 1876-7; had child- 
ren, 8 Charity. m.Wm. Wadsworth. 
— % Eliza A. m. Orin Packard. 

7 Anna, — b. Nov. 3, 1783 
Sept. 8, 1866. 

'Charity Elizabeth,— b. March 7, 

1785. m. Nathan Swift, Nov. 8, 

1810. d. Feb. 14, 1827, at Lebanon, 

vide "Swift," 



'fir 



d. single 



T p ~~ c t /■ 



Children: — 

e&d. P<&\ 7 Mary, — b. Sept. 12, 1779. m. Samuel 

& Bragg ^he died Jan. 14, 1852). She 

d. Feb. 15, 1848. Vide "Bragg," 

this volume. 

/^et^d- — iSamuel, — b. Nov. 25, 1780. m. Eu- 

docia Taintor, April 29, 1818 (she 

/>W-b. +795-. d. Sept. 9, 1849). He d. 

Dec. 4, 1852; had ^Sanucel^b. Feb. 

10, 1819. m. El est a Messenger, 

Dec. 21, 1840 (she d. June, 1842)^ /«"■?/ 

m. 2nd, Louisa Austin, Dec. 28, 



1st, Sallie Bigelow. m. 2nd, Nancy 
Seabury, 1845. d. June 16, 1854. 
One son by first wife, % Jared, b. 
1824. m. Louise A. Dwight, April 
19, 1854 (she d. 1883). Children, 
9 Sarah, 9 Charles, 9 Edwin, » Harold 
and 9 Robert. The latter was one 
of the four artists chosen to decorate 
the Liberal Arts Building at the 
Chicago Exposition. 



/a 



&?~2JX-2^r-n_ 



4s£-C4>-t- 



0&) 



/? 



J (ht. 



' A^<??na^ 



fl-£<Ut>U JL^MrCC^- ^O^y^O. JZsJ/^,c& 






120 



Read. 







7 Sarah, — b. March 7, 1790. m. Dud- 
ley WORTHINGTON, Oct. 12, IS14. 

One daughter, s Sarah, b. June 25, 
1 816. m. Simon Huntington. 
hcebe, — b. Dec. 20, 1791. m. Wm/f 
Shaw, Oct., 1829 (he b. Aug. 20, 
17S9. d. Nov. 18, 1841.) d. Dec. 19, 
1889. 
Darius, — Vide " Reid, Darius," this 
volume. 



6 Joseph Read.— b. March 9, 1763. d. in 
hospital. 



"George G. Read (Captain), b. Dec. 

14, 1760. m. Isabel Evans, Oct. 20, 

1788 (she b. Aug. 12, 1768. d. April 

22,1851). He d. Dec. 6, iSoi.O^r^^, 

Children: 

^Baley Evans Read, — b. Feb. 10, 1790. 
d. unmarried March 4, 1807. 

'Joseph, — b. Sept. 28, 1792. m. 1st, 
Betsey Dean, 1S21. She d. Feb. IS, 
1853. m. 2nd, Mrs. Rebecca Evans 
Brown, April 24, 1S56. She d. Feb. 
12, 1867. m. 3d, Mrs. Mary (Lee) 
Healy, July 21, 1869. «£/~> /& / l irr» 

'Erastus B. Reid, — b. June 13, 1798. 
m. Betsey Hathaway, May 15, 1834 
(she died March 14, 1S79). He d. 
April 23, 186S. Children:— * Isabel, 
b. July 17, 1841. d. March 11, 1879. 
— Also, * Elizabeth, b. Jan. 17, 1S44. 
d. Oct. 9, 1844.— Also, s Elizabeth, b. 
Oct. 9, 1846. d. Feb. 26, 1847.— 
Also, s George, b. Oct. 4, 1848. d. 
Sept. 30, 1S49.— Also,* Mary, b. June 
15, 1S50. m. Charles F. Peirce 
Aug. 22, 1878 (he d. Nov. 30, 1S7S). 
— Also, *Myra, b. March 10, 1853. 
d. Oct. 4, 1853. 



"James Read,— b. 176S. m. Rebecca 
Barton, Oct. 7, 1796 (she d. 1833). He 
d. Oct. 21, 1S14. 

James Read was a tanner, like his 
father before him, and it was to him 
that Enoch French was bound appren- 
tice. When James Read felt called to 
the ministry, he sold his business to his 
young brother-in-law. The Rev. James 
Read was an exceptionally gifted spir- 
itual leader, and a faithful follower in 
Christ's pathway. 
Children: 

'Andrew Barton, — b. 1799. m. Betsey 
Sanders (she d. 1S77). /^Children: 
Rev. 8 Andrew Read. — Also ^Mar- 
garet B . — Also 8 Henry, now liv- 
ing in Providence. 
7 James, — born Aug. 20, 1S01. m. 1st, 
Mary Ann Taylor (she b. June 25, 
1802. d. Feb. 26, 1836). m. 2nd, Re- 



becca C. Sessions, July, 1841 (she 
d. March 27, 1843). m. 3rd, Hal^"^ 
nah C. Eddy, July 22, 1845. He 
d. June 5, 1S93. Children : — *A%ma@e 9 A{. /*■ 
b. Dec. 25, 1827. m. las. Sno«Xv^ 
Jr., 1848.— Also, *Cyru¥ A b. Oct. 26, 
1829. m. H. M. Bixby.— Also, *Re- 
becca A b. and d. March 19, 1S32. — 
Also, 8 Sophia, b. Nov. 13, 1834. m. 
A. N. D|AN, d. May 9, 1S72.— Also, 
8 Rebecca,' n b. Jan., 1S43. d. Oct. 2, 
1S43. 
'Samuel, — b. Nov. 14, 1S03. d. 1831. 



&,*.,, j /?. /(W. 



»>, No-rrn aA. *?> , /J ', y 4 /.,■,/. it, /yfj 

' '- . ■ er///> . 
?7Zau^ ft , «'. /r>% 



so 



■^\ 



R 



EID. 



121 



X c* x« Nancy Reade, — (sixth child of Joseph) 
> sjj b. 1770 or 1772. m. Nathan Bowen 
* \ 4 (he b. 1740. d. Nov. 9, 1825). She d. 
I <\^_\ about 1S30. 



Children: 



1^ 'cv^ 7 Joseph M., — b. May 20, 1797. 

>5 ?\, 7 Paul,— b. March 5, 1S00. m. Eliza- 

^ £ ? beth. 

RECORD OF 'DARIUS REID. 

(Son of "Samuel, son of s Joseph Read.) 

b. March 1, 1707. . , ■ 

m. 1st, Caroline RoacK, May 30, 1830 
(she was b. Jan. 29, 4802. d. Feb. 3, 
1827). 

m. 2nd, Anna Muir, Mar. 12, 1829 (she 
b. Jan., 1801). 

d. March 30, 1849. 

CHILDREN. 

8 Samuel Warner, — b. May 15, 182 1. d. 

May 24, 1822. 
8 Ann Elizabeth, — b. Oct. 12, 1822. d. 

Dec. 9, 1823. 
8 Adolphus Lafayette, — b. Nov. 13, 1824. 

m. Henrietta, April 20, 1848 (she d. 

Nov. 27, 1864. m. 2nd, Atlanta E. 

Martin, Oct. 20, 1868. 

Children: 0^j> 

9 Charles Edward, b. Sopt. 2, 1850. m. 
Mary McCoy. — Also 9 Z?/^j/Caroline, 
b. June 13, 1853. m. Wm. Brooks. 
— Also * George Campbell, b. Dec. 
17, 1855. d, Jan. 17, 1856.— Also 

sAnnaT&fTiec. 9, 1856. d. . — 

Also sRobb Morris, b. Dec. 23, 1858. 
— Also 9 Herbert Bayless, b. Mar. 26, 
1861. d. July 22, 1864. — also * Edgar 
Adolphus, b. April 1, 1864. — Also 
'/Wwl* a Mainic Moore, b. Sept. 18, 1869. 
m. Benjamin Powell. — Also * James 
Herbert, b. Feb. 20, 1872. — Also 
9 Emma Carroll, b. Oct 15, 1876. — 
Also »Amia Julia, b. Oct. 24, 1878. 
— Also *Homer Martin, b. Dec. 20, 

' 888 - *** ^..,.71 I 






8 Mary Ruth,— b. Sept. 5, 1S26. d. Aug. 

r, 1S27. 
8 William Muir,— b. Sept. 16, 1831. 
8 Samuel Payton, — b. Mar. 15, 1833.^^ La/sS^-i^t 
8 John M-eN#4ei7 — b. July 16, i^^WTof^^^C- 
8 Ruth Rice,— b. March 30, 1837. 
8 Benjamin Franklin, ) b. January 10, 
8 Darius Bourne, ) 1839. 

8 Mary Elizabeth,— b. 1S41. 
8 J. Wood Wilson,— b. 1843. d. Aug. 8, 

1851. 



RECORD OF ^WILLIAM READE. 

(Son of 4 Joseph Read and Grace Pray). 

b. 1732. 

m. Ruth Evans, Dec. 3, 1761 (she b. 
1742). 

m. 2nd, Dorothy, daughter of his 
cousin, Rev. Samuel Reade (she b. 1745). 

d. Dec. 25, 1813. 

CHILDREN. 

6 Elizabeth, — b. July 3, 1763. m. Robt. 
Hathaway, Jan. 3, 1782. 

6 Rebecca, — b. July 14, 1765. m. Guil- 
ford Evans, Dec. 11, 1783. 

6 Ruth, — b. April 27, 1767. m. Geo. 

Pickens. 
^William, — b. July 15, 1769. m. Prudence 
Valentine, Jan. 28, 1798. 

6 Sarah, — b. July 15, 1769. 

6 Thomas, — b. July 14, 1771. d. 1778. 

6 Rachel, — b. July 1, 1773. 

6 John, — b. July 5, 1775. m. Rosemond. 

6 Joseph E., — b. Sept. 15, 1776. m. Sybil 
Valentine, Jan. 17, 1S03. 

6 Amy W., — b. Jan. 3, 1779. m. John 
Hathaway, and had John B. Hatha- 
way. Vide descendants of Jael H-atha- 
.Vttiy, Lhii. Volume. 

6 Nancy — b. Oct. 8, 1781. m.-Baa Davol. tziec 

6 Phoebe, — b. Oct. 4, 1783. m. Henry 
Brightman. 
5 William Read was a brother of Mrs. 

Oliver Whitwell, and also of 5 Joseph 

Read, who married Mary Cornell. Vide 

Vol. I, y? „ r / 






122 



Read — Hathaway. 



a/ 






RECORD OF SAMUEL N. REID. 

(Son of 7 Samuel, son of 6 Samuel, son 
of 5 Joseph Reade. Vol. I.) 
b. Feb. 10, 1819. 
d. June, 1870. 

CHILDREN. 

(By second wife, Louisa Austin.) 
"Charles M.,— b. March 5, 1844. d. Dec. 

8, 1865. £k**w£, & 
3 George, — b. Oct. 20, 1846. d. Feb., 1847. 
9 Georgiana^b. May 1, 1845. m - Israel 
J **&.;/. /& ""Newton, d. Sept. 20, 1S90. 

3 Isabella,4rb. Nov. 13, 1847. m. E. W. 

Latham.J&s it./rtf. &z a. &yf- m 

(Rev.) 'George D., — b. July 11, 1849. 

m. Phcebe Sykes.^./ /(. /Sr>£ 
"Frank H., — b. June 23, 1S51. m. Lilly 

M. Hancock. O^a^r /W 
"Samuel N^-b^S"'/^ d. May 25, 1S5S. 
' /rn\ J. >*>>7 9 Eloise A.(— b. 1857. d. May 12, 1859. 
rtff. <*• 'r*7 9 j ohn E _ b j uly IQj l8sg d _ j uly 2g) 

1859- /iiY 

"William A.,— b. Sept. 8, i860, d. Oct. 
31, i860. 

RECORD OF sBENJAMIN READE. 

(Son of Moseph Read. Vol. I.) 

b. Nov. 15, 1733. 

m. Sarah Evans, Nov. 23, 1758 (she 
b. April iS, 1740). 
d. Sept. 1, 1S02. 

CHILDREN. 

6 Bailey, — b. March 29, 1759. 
6 Sarah, — b. Feb. 19, 1761. 
6 Charlotte, — b. Feb. 16, 1763. 
6 Mary, — b. Dec. 16, 1765. 
"Susannah, — b. Jan. 12, 1767. 
6 Phcebe, — b. March 2, 1769. 
"Hannah, — b. June 8, 1771. 
6 Ruth, — b. 1773. 
"Benjamin, — b. April 1, 1774. 
"Ruby, — b. Aug. 26, 1776. 
"Grace, — b. March 17, 1779. 
"Clarissa, — b. Feb. 22, 17S1. 
6 Dean H.,— b. May S, 1783. 
rjamcs P., — b. March 9, 17S5. 
B Tamer, — b. March 9, 1785. d. Mar. 25. 



s 









\J\ 






Vj 


v 




% 


^ 








^s 


S* 


°r 




V 






A 


S 


\\ 


^ 





RECORD OF MAEL HATHAWAY. 

(Son of 3 Jacob H. and Philis Chase. 

Vol. I.) 

b. in Freetown, 1719. 

m. Rebecca Simmons, March 24, 1739 
(she d. Jan. 24, 1784). 

m. 2nd, 3 Elizabeth Presbry, widow of 
Ephraim French, Dec, 1785 (she d. 
May 1, 1816). 

d. Jan. 10, 1S1 1. 

Capt. Jael Hathaway made a marked 
figure in Revolutionary days because he 
was a Tory. The old house to which 
'he brought his second wife is still stand- 
ing in Steep Rock, and I have an excel- 
lent photograph of it before me as I 
write. The front door has an upper 
and lower half and are to be fastened 
with a beam across it. The photographer 
(Mr. Douglas, of Fall River,) has made 
an interesting picture of the old place 
and one which should interest each of 
the Hathaway family. It is the original 
of the one in this volume. 

There is great difficulty in arranging 
these records so as to make them clear. 
It should be remembered all the genera- 
tions are numbered from the first l John 
Reade. 4 Jael Hathaway had nine child- 
ren, 5 Jael, 5 Marcy, 5 Hannah, 5 Susanna, 
5 Jonathan, 5 Rebecca, 5 Lloyd, 6 Russel 
and 5 Betsey. 5 Jael was drowned on a 
whaling voyage. Marcy married her 
cousin 5 Lot, son of Hoseph Hathaway, 
(Vol. I.), and is named elsewhere; — the 
rest are named in the following pages. 

These records are due to the kindness 
of Miss French of Fall River, who has 
been largely aided by members of the 
family. 



<S 






I 



O 

o 




Hathaway. 



123 



DESCENDANTS OF 4 JAEL HATHAWAY. 

5 Hannah, — m. Barton. 

5 Susannah, — b. 1743. d. Nov. iS, 1809. 
5 Jonathan, — b. 1746. m. Rhoda Davis, 

1772. d. Oct. 21, 1805. ^ /^ 

5 Rebecca, — b. 1786. m. Stephen 

Leonard, 1S01. d. 1881. 

Children : — 

■ — * Hail taw ay,— b. in Fall River, May 
5, 1802. m. Mary B. Witherell, Sept. 
9, 1824 (she b. in Norton, Sept. 20, 
1881. d. Jan. 3, 18S3). He d. April 
21, 1871. Has children: — 7 Harriet 
C, b. June 19, 1825. d. April 12, 
1850. — 7 Laura M., b. Nov. 24, 1826. 
d. May 6, 1848.— 7 Alden H., b. June 
7, 1829. — 7 Otis R., b. June 6, 1S31. 
— 7 Curtis, b. June 26, 1833. d. June 
2, 1878. — 7 Emily A, b. Oct. 6, 
1836. d. Feb. 28, 1837.— 7 Emily A -. 
b. April 5, 1835. d. April 29, 1835. 
— 7 Marion, b. July 8, 1838. d. Dec. 
u r 1866. — 7 Charles, b. Sept. 17, 
1840. 

— e Lydia, — b. Nov. 16, 1805. m. Eddy 
Lincoln, d. Feb. 28, 1879. Had 
children: 7 Daniel and 7 Lewis. 

— 6 Rebecca, — b. 1808. m. Geneason 
Lincoln. Had, 7 Henry, $" Moses, 
7 Victoria, 7 Russel,(by 2ndhusband, 
Leonidas Dean) 7 Leonadas and 
7 Job. 

— ^George R., — b. April 6, 1S10. m. 
Patience E. Lincoln, Oct. 3, 1837. 
Had: — 7 Elizabeth,^ b. April 9, 1840. 
— 7 George, b. Jan 13,1843. — 7 Ever- 
ett^. Feb. 10, 1846. — 7 S. Lewis, b. 
Jan. 31, 1851. 
5 Lloyd, — b. March 14, 1788. m. Han- 
nah Miller, May 7, 1809. d. July 18, 

1828. - 

Children : — 
1 — *Nancy Bowen, — b. Sept. 9, 1810. m. 
Edmond Davis, July 12, 1829. d. 



Aug. 20, 1887. Had:— 7 Sarah, b. 

July 8, 1830. m. Wm. P. Marbel,/#n- I 

1858; and had 8 Willie, b. 1863. d. 

1868.— 7 Lloyd, b. March 14, 1832. 

d. 1856.— 'Helen, b. June, 1834. 

d. Feb. 8, 1839. — 7 George, b. May, 

1837. d. Nov. 1, 1846.— 7 Hannah 

b. April, 1840. d. Oct. 12, 1840. 

— 7 Phoebe, b. May 17, 1845. — 

7 NellieM., b. 184S. d. Oct. 1 1, 1875. 
> — 6 Candace Weaver, — b. Augt^ 1 8 1 1 . 

m. Wm. P. Marbel, Sept., 1848. d. 

Aug. 9, 1856. 
— ^Plicebe, — b. April 7, 1813. m. Corey 

Durfee, Dec. 16, 1833. d. Nov. 2, 

1843. Had:— 7 John, b. May 16, 1835. 

d. Aug. 16, 1836.— 7 Phcebe, b. Mch. 

2, 1839. d. Nov. 2, 1839.— 7 Han- 
nah, b. Dec, 1 84 1. d. June, 1842. 
— ^Hannah, — b. Jan. 3, 1815. m. David 

Thurston, Jan. 30, 1834. d. Sept. 

24, 1857. Had:— 7 George Henry, b. al ?U, /f, /??■? 

Jan. 13, 1835. m - J u li a Eliza Lap- 
ham, Oct. 24, 1 861; and had 

8 Marionf4). Aug. 4, 1862. m. Louis 

N. Read, Oct. 5, 1S87. 
— G Elizabeth Presbry— b. Sept. i 9 ,d.J^ -U Ji% 

1817. m. Dennis White, April 20, 

1840. Had: — 7 Hannah, b. Aug. 26, 

1841. m. James Bucklin, Jan. 28, 
1865, and has 8 Abby, b. Oct. 28, 
1867. m. Henry Slade, June 14, 

1893.— 7 Abbey, b. March 28, 1843. ^ ^ ° ? ' /re ? 
m. Arthur Robinson, Jan. 23, 1S65. 
— 7 Albert D., b. April 3, 1S46. m. 
Jennie White, Dec. 9, 1873, and had , _ 

8 Maryff^Sept. 26, 1874, and Mary, lAzc^U 
b. 1877. d. March 16, 1874. 
C — ^Edmond, — b. March 1, 1824. m. 
Fannie Flint, Feb. 1845 ( sne d. 
-Aug^f, 1S77). m. 2nd, Mrs. Mary /? 
Wescott, Nov. 12, 1S79. d. May 6, 
/ry \^ P - Had children,— 7 Franklin <=tj*~ J, //*/ 
Flint, b. 1846. m. Sarah Clarke, 



/ 



I2 4 



Hathaway. 



91. si 



1869, and had 8 Fannie, b. Feb. 24th, 
1872. d. 1873. 8 LuellaW., b. Nov. 
16, 1873. — s Helen Imogene.b. Nov. 
19, 1 875. - S M able Antoinette, b. Jan. 
1878. — s Anna Frances, b. Nov. 24, 
1884.— ^Mary Emma, b. Dec. 184^ 
Jg-^Yd- 4-S46-— 8 Candace Evelyn, b. Oct. 
/y(^ 2 S' ^848. — /"Walter Clarendon, b- 
Oct. 24, 1850. m. Addie A. Mar- 
shall, April 25, 1S72. Had 8 Alvah, 
b. April 16, 1S73. — 8 Fannie, b. 1876. 
d. Dec. 28, 1878.— s Helen Electa, 
b. Sept. 30, 18S0. — s Florence, b. 
June (9, 18S6. 
5 Russel, — b. Sept. 12, 1790. m. Rhoda 
Terry, Sept. 19, 181 1. d. Dec, 1870. 
Children: 

— G S2isa?ma, — b. 1812. d. young. 
— a Ruth,—b. June 25, 1S13. d. 1S21. 
— e RusseI,—b. Nov. 17, 181 5. 
— tjfob T.—b. MarchriSi7. 
— 6 David—b. Dec. 21, 1818. 
— c Job T.,— b.and d. 1S22. 
— gRusscI, — b. Oct. 1, 1S24. 
Sanborn, March 29, 1852. 
Mary Bryden, Jan. 6, 1S73. Had 
7 David T., b. Oct. 20, 1S53. m. 
Sarah W. Ellis, Oct. 23, 1873. — 
'Charles R., b. May 27, 1S55. drown- 
ed, 1880— 7 Russel— b. Oct. 18, 
1875. 
— G Ab/ier, — b. June 19, 1826. d. in 

California, 1859. 
— (.Albert, — b. 1827. d. 1859. 
— tjob, — b. April 7, 1S32. m. Emeline 
Gibbs, June 16, 1S57, and had: 
7 Rhoda, b. 1862. m. Wm. Read, 
1S88. d. 1S92.— 7 Lizzie H. and 
"Albert. 
— ^Bradford, — b. 1S29. m. Jane Bow- 
ker, Sept. 16, 1866. Had: 'Bradford 
and 7 Harold. 
5Bctscy, (or Elizabeth) — b. 1792. m. 
Corey Durfee, April 24, 1S08. he 
d. at sea, July, 181 5. m. 2nd, Capt. 
John Hathaway, about 1817. he died 
in Wru liinnlun, Feb. 6, 1859. she 
d. Nov. 14, 1S6S. Children: 



to 



d. 


1823. 




d. 


1821. 




d. 


1S43- 




n. 


Clara 


Zk 


m. 


, 2nd, 





(The full name is given each time 
avoid confusion, if two families.) 
—(•Hope Durfee, — b. Dec. 25, 1S10. 
m. William Winslow, Augrf 1831. 
died 1838. 
—(•Deborah Durfee,— b. March 25, 
1811. m. Job Wilson, July 2, 1829. 
d. Feb. 7, 1SS1. 12 children. 
— (-Corey Durfee, — b. March 31, 181 3. 
m. Phebe H. (his cousin), Dec. 16, 
1S33. d. July 31, 1842. 
— ^ftn'Durfee,— b.Feb. 13, 1815. m. 
John young, m. 2nd, Henry Ide, 
Dec. 19, 1S78. ^. ?<n«^ /?. /y f ? 
—sjolin Hathaway,— b. May, 181S. d. 

May 11, 1825. 
— panics L. Hathaway,— -b. Sept ^/ KH 
1S19. m. Martha HaskTns, Aug. 
23, 1S41.5 Children: ot^J*^*. r./S-?Z 
7 Mary Lincoln, b. June 18, 1S44. 
m. Edward H. Kidder, Oct. II, 
1S65. d. Dec. 25, 1S90. Had: 
8 Edward H., b. July 17, 1867. 
d. May 3, 1876.— 8 Jarnes H., b. 
Sept. 25, 1869.— 8 Mary Grace, b. 
Jan. 2, 1S7S. 
7 John Valentine, b. March 30, 1S46. 

d. Sept. 5, 1847. 
7 Martha Elizabeth, b. Oct. II, 1848. 
m. Henry Wheeler, March 19, 
1879, and had: 8 Henryy b. Aug. 
31, 1882.— 8 Elizabeth, b. Jan. 
•** 1884./^ 
'Emma Caroline, b. Sept. 10, 1S50. 
m. JasT Billings, March 31, tegfe /fCtfi 
Has: «Mary H., b. June 14, 1882. 
7 James,— b. Nov., 1S51. d. May 
25, ^1852. 
— WrtryTiathaway,— b. May II, 1S22. 
m. Silas Lincoln, 1840. d. Sept. 21, 
1843. Had'John. 
— ("Susan Hathaway, — b. Oct. 21, 1823. 
d. young. 
'-^Elizabeth Hathaway, — b. May 11, 

1825. d. young, 
- 6 JoIin Hathaway, — b. May 11, 1825. 
d. Nov. 21, 1845. 



Hathaway. 



125 



DESCENDANTS OF 3 JACOB HATHAWAY. 

(m. Philis, daughter of Benj. Chase, 
Page 44.) 

CHILDREN. 

4 Hannah, — b. Feb. 24, 1701. m. Lot 
fy/tid 'Strange, AugTa^ 1745 , and had : 

— s Phillippe,—b. Oct. 2, 1722. m. John 

Paine, April 10, 1738. m. 2nd, Seth 

Chase, 175 1. m.3rd, John Crandon, 

Dec. 14, 1768. 
— 5 John, — b. Feb. 25, 1724. m. Joanna 

Jocelyn, Feb., 1746. d. June 4, 1776. 
— h Mary, — b. Nov. 14, 1725. m. Geo. 

Chase, Sept. 17, 1741. 
5 Abigail, — b.Sept. 24, 1727. m. Charles 

Chase, Jan. 19, 1744. 
s Jacob, — b. Jan. 3, 1729. m. Elizabeth 

Winslow. 
— 5 Melctiah, — b. Sept. 24, 1732. m. 

Ruth Ward. 
— 5 'James, — m. 5 Diodemia Hathaway. 
— s Sylvanus, — b. Aug. 10, 1734. 
— b Hannah, — b. Oct. 22, 1738. m. Jo- 
seph Valentine. 
— s Alice. 
— 5 Betsey. 
4 Guilford, — m. Lydia Simmons, and had: 
— s Hannah, — b. Sept. 21, 1729. m. 

Thomas Evans, 1750. 
— s Lydia, — b. May 28, 1731. 

Benj. Grinnel, Jr., about 1757. 
— 5 Trypheua, — b. Feb. 22, 1723. 
— h Guilford, — b. Nov. 25, 1734. 

Rebecca Durfee, March 21, 1756. 
— ^Phoebe, — b. Apr. 7, 1737. m. Thos. 

Chase. 
— 5 Huldah, — b. Dec. 9, 1739. m. 

Charles Chase, Nov. 9. 1762. 
— b Drusilla, — b. Jan. 9, 1742. m. Paul 

Perry, Nov. 30, 1758. 
— 5 Diodemia, — b.Sept. 30, 1748. m. 

1st, 5 James Strange (son of Lot). 

m. 2nd, 3 Joseph Hathaway (son of 

4 Philip), Nov. 27, 1783. d. July 9, 

1827. 
— ^Dudley, — b. May 24, 1746. m. 

Margaret Briggs, Nov. 1769. d. 

April 19, 18 10. 
4 Betty, — m. John Winslow, Oct. 9, 1729. 
Had: 

— 5 Huldah, — b. March 18, 1730. 
— b Abner, — b. May 17, 1732. m. &Re- 

becca Hathaway (daughter of 4 Phil- 

ip), 1759. d. April 13, 1803. 



m. 



m. 



— 5 Sylvia, — b. March 10, 1734. m. 

Samuel Barnaby, 1757. 
— 5 Lucia, — b. Jan. 20, 1736. m. Thos. 

Wood. 
— 5 A?idrew, — b. Feb. 19, 1737. 
— ^Lemuel, — b. Dec. 25, 1739. m. 

Abigail Hathaway, 1762 (daughter 

of 4 John). 
— 5 Louisa, — b. March 16, 1741. m. 

Wm. Roper, Nov. 7, 1763. m. 2nd, 

Wm. Southwich. 

— ^Eunice, — b. April 24, 1744. m. 
5 Joseph Hathaway (son of Philip). 

— s Oliver, — m. Lydia Evans, abt. 1733. 

— 5 William. 
4 Meletiah, — m. Ann Harkins, Feb. 9, 

173&V m. 2nd, Sarah Hathaway, Nov. 

29, 1758. 

— 5 Meletiah, — b. Sept. 14, 1732. m. 
Judith Pierce. Member Constitu- 
tional Convention, 1780. Vide p. 130. 

— 5 James, — m. Abigail Pierce. 

— 5 Sylva?nts, — m. Busher. 

— 5 Seth — m. Wealthy Howland, Jan. 

13- 1771- 
—sjob—b. 1736. 
— *Anna, — m. Silas Pierce. 
— $Mercy, — m. Sergeant John White. 
4 John,— b. 171 1. m. Meribah Simmons, 
March e.-rSjSyand hacL>//^j 
— sBctty, — m. BarlTaBasCANEDY, 1757. 

d. Nov. 6, 1768. 

— Eleazer, — m. Betty Peirce. 

— ^Abigail, — m. 5 Lemuel Winslow, 

1762. 
—^Hope—b. 1750. m. Zephaniah 

Terry, 1770. 
— s Abraham, — b. 1756. m. Mary 

Brown, 1780. d. Feb. 25, 1792. 
4 Philip, — m. Martha Simmons, Dec. 11, 

1735- 
— ^Rebecca, — b. March 31, 1738. m. 

°Abner Winslow, 1759. 
— 5 Philip,—b. July 19, 1740. m. Lucy 

Valentine, Sept., 1764. m. 2nd, 

Mary Pudget, 1804. 
— ^Joseph, — m. 5 Eunice Winslow. m. 

2nd, 5 Diademia Strange (daughter 

of 4 Guilford Hathaway), Nov. 27, 

I783- 
— ^ Martha, — b. Aug. 18, 1749. m. 
Seth Dunham, Aug., 1768. m. 2nd, 
Jonathan McCoon, 1792. 



126 



Hathaway. 



— ^Hannah, — b. 1752. m. David Val- 
entine, Aug., 1 771. He led the 
Bristol Co. rebels in Shay's Rebel- 
lion, 1786. 
4 Benjamin, — m. Mary Davis, Sept. II, 

1735. Had: 

— ^Elizabeth, — b. Oct. 10, 1737. m. 
Henry Tew. 

— 5 Clothier, — b. July II, 1739. m. 
Dorcas Wrightington, Dec. 11, 1761. 

— 5 Maty, — b. Oct. II, 1741. m. 

Baker. 

— s Kcziah, — b. Aug. 7, 1743. m. Dan- 
iel Tew, Oct. 28, 1762. 

— h Zilpah, — b. May 27, 1745. m. 
David Perkins, Feb. 16, 1764. 

— 5 Benjamin, — b. March 28, 1747. 

— 5 Sarah, — b. May 7, 1753. d. Aug. 
22, 1770. 

— 5 Abiel, — b. Dec. 16, 1769. m. Eliz- 
abeth Babbitt. 
4 Jacob, — removed to Connecticut and 

died 1768. 
4 Isaac, — m. Rebecca Warren, a descen- 
dant of l Richard Warren, p. 86. 

Children: 

— & Joshua, — b. Jan. 19, 1728. Major 
during the Revolution. m. Mrs. 
Mary Evans, Aug. 23, 1749. 

— & Isaac, — b. July 29, 1729. d. June 

7< 1749- 
— s Irena, — b. May 17, 1731. m. 
Ephraim Shaw, 1752. d. Sept. 30, 

I7S3- 
— b Pluneas, — b. Feb. 11,1733. 
-- h Da?iiel, — b. May 25, 1735. 
— 5 Prudence, — b. May 7, 1737. 

— ^Susanna, — b. April 28, 1741. m. 
Benjamin Wilkinson, d. Aug. 30, 

1795- 
4 Joscph, — Vide p. 45. m. 2 Alice 
Strange. 
— 5 Jacob, — Vide p. 45. 

— 5 Lot, — m. 4 Mercy Hathaway, 
daughter of Jael. Vide Record of 
latter. 

— s Paul, — b. 1719. m. Rachel, who 
d. Nov. 2, 1795. m. 2nd, Hannah 
Padclford. died Oct. 10, 1812. 
Had: 

6 Elsie, b. 1740. d. May 8, 1776. 
6 Joseph, b. 1746. d. July 2, 1819. 

Vide next column. 
6 Lazarus, m. Olive Pratt, Dec. 1, 

1774- 
6 Rachel, b. 1750. m. Stafford 
Hammond, d. March 2, 1821. 



6 Mary, b. 



m. Levi Pratt, 



March 20, 1777. 
4 Jael, — Vide p. 123. 

4 Seth, — Sometimes given as a twelfth 
child. Nothing more known of him. 



RECORD OF 'JOSEPH HATHA- 
WAY. 

(Grandson of Joseph, p. 45. Vide pre- 
ceding column. 4 Joseph. 5 Paul.) 
m. Hannah Warren, May 23, 1776 
(she was born 1755; was a descendant 
of ' Richard Warren, p. 86. d. Oct. 
31, 1S96). 

m. 2nd, Ruth Alden, Aug. 9, 1809. 
Had by first wife: 
7 Paul, — b. April 13, 1777. m. Lois, 
daughter of Zephaniah Shaw and 
Hannah Pratt, Sept. 13, 1801 (she b. 
March 7, 1781. d. Oct. 19, 1S67). d. 
April 28, 1865. Children: 
— ^Joseph, — b. Aug. 17, 1802. m. 
Lucy, daughter of Job Alden and 
Lydia Shaw, Sept. 2, 1S35. (she b. 
Aug. 8, 1S12. d. Dec. 10, 1S87.) 
d. Nov. 10, 1877. He was a 
portrait painter, and painted the 
portraits of Deborah Hathaway 
Mara and 4 Anne Whitwell Rich- 
mond. Had: °Lucy Malina, b. May 
27, 1836, d. March 21, 1840.— 
'Emma, b. Jan. 13, 1841. 
— 8 Angelina, — b. Nov. 3, 1804. m. 
Joseph, son of Simeon Backus and 
Hannah Alden, Nov., 1842 (he 
b. Aug. 29, 1799; d. Oct. 23, 1SS1 ). 
she d. Feb. 20, 1SS9. One son, 
9 Isaac, b. May 1, 1843, d. Sept. 4. 
—^Hannah, — b. Nov. 17, 1S06. m. 
Abram perkins, — (he b. Sept. 10, 
1807; d. June 7, 1872.) She d. Feb. 
19, 1870. Had 

8 Georgia Angelina, b. March 2, 
1834. m. Daniel McC. Smith; and 
has: 10 Lois Violet, b. Nov. 5, 
1862; d. Feb., 1S76. > "Cyrus 
Hamilton, b. June 17, 1S65. 
10 Hannah, b. June 8, 186S; d. 
Dec. 17, 1 886. 10 Embert Howard, 
b. Jan. 16, 1S71. l0 Martha Lil- 
lian, b. Nov. 21, 1872. 10 Charles 
McC.b. Feb. 2, 1876. 
'Cyrus, b. July 2, 1S36. d Jan. 1, 

1863. 
!, Isaac Edson, b. Jan. I, 1S40. m. 
Harriet, daughter of Zephaniah 



Hathaway. 



127 



Drake and Rhoda Wetherell, 
Jan. 8, 1863 (she b. Aug. 3, 1838). 
Had children: 10 Hattie Backus, 
b. Nov: 6, 1863. d. April 27, 1864.— 
1 » Earnest Isaac, b. April 28, 1865. 
m. Edith Ashton, daughter of James 
Reed and Georgiana Dorr (she b. 
Jan. 7,1872). One child, "Sumner, 
b. Nov. 1, 1892. d. Jan. I, 1893. — 
10 Jesse Francis, b. Feb. 26, 1868. 
9 Ezra Hamilton,— b. June 30, 1843. 
d. Nov. 5, 1864. 9 Jairus Hatha- 
way, — b. Aug. 13, 1845. 9 Lois 
Hathaway,— b. June 17, 1843. m - 
Embert, son of Carey Howard and 
Sylvia Packard, May 17, 1870 (she 
b. July 23, 1842). Has children: — 
10 Mary, b. May it,, 1871.— 10 Lena, 
b. May 21, 1876.— 10 Dora, b. May 
20, 1878. 9 Hannah, — b. Dec. 24, 
1852. d. Jan. 22, 1855. 

^Otis Warren, — b. Jan. 8, 1809. m. 
Sarah, daughter of Enoch Williams 
and Hannah Gusher, Oct. 6, 1836 
(she b. April 3, 1815. d. Dec. 3, 
1884). He d. Oct. 15, 1882. Had: 
9 Sarah Otis, — b. Jan. 27, 1S39. d. 
Feb. 27, 1840. 9 James Otis, — b. 
'June 7, 1 841: d. May 2, 1849. 
9 Louise Edson, — b. May 22, 1844. 
9 Annie Williams, — b. Aug. 30, J848. 
9 Joseph Melvin, — b. Jan. 15, 1851. 
d. Oct. 4, 1852. 9 Sarah Isadora, — 
b. Oct. 8, 1853. m. Walter Griffith, 
Nov. 12, 1879. Has: — 10 Norman, 
b. May 25, 1881. 

~ s Jaints, — b. March 25, 1813, removed 
to Paris, France. 

-*Lois Hathaway, — b. March 26, 18 16. 
m. Amos Dunham Clark, May 11, 
1837 (he was b. March 9, 1814. d. 
Oct. 30, 1848). d. March 31, 
1876. Had one son: 9 Paul Otis, — 
b. Jan. 31, 1838. m. Mary P.JDay. 
Has: 10 Harry, b. March 11, 1861. 

-^ Sarah Eaton Hathaway, — b. Aug. 
2S, 1819. m. David, son of John 
Clark and Sarah Bartlett Ryder, 
Jan. 8, 1843 ( ne b. Feb. 26, 1819. d. 
Oct. 29, 1851). 
Children: 

9 David Roberts, — b. Dec. 14, 1743. 
m. Sarah Mariah White, Dec. 19, 
1871 (she born June 22, 1848). Has: 
10 Flora, b. Sept. 14, 1893.— ^Har- 
old, b. May 14, 1886. 



'Amos Dunham, — b. March 16, 
1847. m - Lydia Holmes, Dec. 23, 
1869. Has: — 10 Edwin, b. Dec. 23, 
1875. 9 George Henry, — b. May 10, 
1850. d. May 24, 1884. 

RECORD OF "JOSEPH HATHA- 
WAY. 

(Son of 5 Jacob Hathaway and 4 Hannah 
Clark, m. cAnne, daughter of Capt. 
Dillingham, p. 45.) 

children. 

7 John Dillingham, — b. July 28, 1792. m. 
Deborah N. Bates, July 31, 1815. d. 
Nov. 22, 1884. Had one daughter: 
i Deborah, m. James C. Mara. I am 
indebted to Mrs. Mara for all of the 
records of the Hathaways, with the 
exception of 4 Jael's and 3 Jacob's. 

7 Shadrach, — b. Jan. 19, 1794. m. Con- 
tent Athean. Feb. 15, 1815. m. 2nd, 

Elenor , Apr. 4, 1819. m. 3rd, 

Ann Wiswall, Feb. 25, 1846. d. 1885. 
(He removed to Rising Sun, Ind.) 
Had children: ^Content, b.Jan. 2, 1820. 
— 8 Bradford, b. July 29, 1 82 1 .— s Harriet, 
b. Nov. 17, 1823. — 8 AImira Augusta, 
b. July, 1 83 1. — s Thos. Henry, b. Aug. 
22, 1849. — 8 Elizabeth Cushing, b. Sept. 
11, 1853. — *Furman Whitwell.b. Sept. 
15, 1855. 

7 Hannah, — Vide page 45. 

7 Almira, — b. Aug. 7, 1797. m. Capt. 
Sheffield Read, May 23, 1824. d. 
April 1, 183 1. 

'Bradford, — b. July 3, 1799. m. Martha 
B. Mitchell, June 14, 1824. d. Sept. 
27, 1864. 

7 Joseph, — d. at sea. 

7 Paul, — b. March 4, 1804. m. Nancy 
Nelson,Sept. 13,1835. d. Jan. 3, 1846. 
Had: 8 Anson, b. July 21, 1836. 
— a Lewis, b. Sept. 2, 1837. d. Feb. 4, 
1842. — *John D., b. Jan. 30, 1839. 
— 8 Joseph, b. Nov. 17, 1840. d. Jan. 30, 
1841. — s Mary Ann, b. Jan. 12, 1841. — 
*Almira R., b. Nov. 8, 1843.— * Henry 
B., b. Aug. 21, 1845. d - J an - I 5> l8 47 
(of Columbia, Maine). 

7 Anne Hathaway, — b. Aug. 3, 180S. m. 
Capt. Paul Burgess, Oct. 22, 1827. 
d. Nov. 15, 1881. Had: *Paul. d. in 
infancy and 8 Joseph, m. Lizzie Piatt; 
and had: 9 William, 9 Frank, 9 Clara, 
m. J. W. Marston, and had: 1 °James 
Chester. 



128 



GlBBS. 



THE GIBBS FAMILY. 

The following family records have 
never been printed before as this Gibbs 
family does not' trace directly to the 
better known branch of the same name. 

In the following tables each family is 
numbered in generations and each par- 
agraph in perfect sequence. I think 
there will be no difficulty in following 
the references. 

1. 1 Robert Gibbs of Somerset d. 
June 20, 171S, aged 8S years. He 
married Elizabeth and had a son. 

2. 2 Robert Gibbs, — m. 1st, Sarah, 
and had: 3 John, b. 1702. Vide 3. 
— 3 Israel, b. 1706. — 3 Sarah,b. 1711. 
— B Elizabeth, b. 171 5. m. 2nd, 
Hepsibah, and had: 3 Robert, b. 
1724. Vide 4. — 3 Henry, b. 1726. 
Vide 5.— 3 Hepsibah, b. 1728.— 
3 Abigail, b. 1731. — 8 Samuel, b. 1733. 
— 3 Job, b. 1735. 2 Robert Gibbs d. 
1750, aged 80 years. 

3. 3 John Gibbs,— b. 1702. Had 
4 Anson and 4 Cynthia. 

4. Captain 4 Robert Gibbs, — b. 
1724. m. Joanna Terry, Oct. 2, 
174S, and had: 4 Betsey, b. 1746. 
— 4 Hannah, b. 1749. — 4 Robert, 

UJSJ.b- b_if4i,— 4 John, b. 1754. ¥ido 6 . 

— 4 Samuel, b. 1757. Vide 7. — 
4 Hepsibah, b. 1764. — 4 Joanna, b. 
1 77 1. Captain 3 Robert Gibbs d. 
March 21, 1 810. 

5. 3 Henry Gibbs,— b. 1726. Had: 
4 Robert, b. 1750. Vide 8— •'Ben- 
jamin, b. 175S. Vide 9. — 4 Joseph, 
b. — . Vide 10.— 4 Henry,b. 1761. 
Vide 11.— 4 Mary.— 'Sarah.— 
4 Rhoda. Vide p. 39. — 4 Hannah. 
— 4 Job. /y^-j 

J^A^jJr G. .i^ehH Gibbs— b. ^7-5-4. Had 
children, 5 Lydia, 5 Abigail, 
jjEunice, 5 John, 5 Ruth, 5 Polly, 
Hepsibah and 5Louis. 
7 4 Samuel Gibbs, — b. 1757. m. 
Mary Peirce, d. 1816. she d. 
Oct. 12, 1 812. Children: ''Sam- 
uel, b. 1794. Vide 13. — 5 John, 
b. 1798. Vide 14.— B David, 
b. 1799. — 5 Joseph, b. 1S01. — 
sjoanna, b. 1S04. m. Jonathan 
Cartwright. — 5 Mary, b. 1807. 
m. John Cartwright. — F George, 
b. 1711. 



8. 4 Robert Gibbs, — b. 1750. m. Martha 
Hicks, d. Sept. 21, 1815. she d. June 
4, 1838. Had children: 3 John, b. 
iyyf. Vide 15.— 5 Robert, b. 1779. 
Vide 16. — 5 Henry,b. 1785. m. Betsey, 
daughter of 4 Geo. Brightman and 
Hannah Daggett, d. May 16, 1847. — 
B Hannah,b. 1792. Vide 17.— 5 Martha, 
m. Benjamin West. 

9. 4 Benjamin Gibbs, — b. 1758. was 

lost at sea, 1795. m. Patience Wood,*. /?-?1 
and had: 5 Benjamin, b. 1792. Vide 
18. — sRody, b. 1786. m. Henry 
Gibbs. Vide 19.— 5 Nancy, m. Clark 
Chase, Aug. 13, 1807. 

10. *Joseph 'Gibbs, — had: B Rhoda, 
5 Mary, 5 George, 5 John and 5 Wata. 

11. Capt. 4 Henry Gibbs, — b. 1761. m. 
Bathana Luther, d. June 20, 1827. she 
d. April 19, 1822. Children: 5 Henry, 
b. 1788. Vide 19.— 5 Bathana, b. 
1 79 1. m. Wm. Chace. m. 2nd, Edw. 
Dobson. m. 3rd, Seth Brown. — B John. 
— B Joseph. — 5 Benjamin, b. 1800. Vide 
20. — 5 Anna Maria, b. 1S04. m. Sam- 
uel Gibbs. Vide 13. 

13. B Samuel Gibbs, — b. 1794. m.Anna^«^<4 
Gibbs. Vide 11. d. Feb. 20, 1S43. 

Had: 6 Samuel, b. 1S25. 6 Joseph, b. 
1826. 6 Edward, b. 1828. 6 Anna 
Maria, b. 1S30. °Edmund, b. 1832. 
^William C, b. 1834. e Amanda W., b. 
1835. 6 Samuel W., b. 1836. °Bethana 
D., b. 1840. 6 Henry V, b. 1841. BWil- 
liam O. Gibbs had a daughter ?Hattie. 

14. s John Gibbs, — b. 1798. m. Martha 
L. Anthony, d. Sept. 3, 1S75. she d. 
Feb. 18, 1882. Had: b May, m. Dan- 
ford Chace. m. 2nd, Nelson Cura- 
mings. °Caroline, m. Valentine Perry, 
m. 2nd, Rufus Chace. "John, d. at s 
sea. 6 George. G Elizabeth. 'Amanda. ^\ 
G David. ^ 

15. B John Gibbs, — b. 1776. m. Nancy°y 
Chace. m. 2nd, Polly Gibbs. Vide 6. t 
m. 3rd, Hepsibath Gibbs. Vide 6s^ 
Had: Tolly, n> .-^Tullock . 6 ]o\mJ\ 
Vide 21. u Nancy?m. Capt. Arrived 
Pratt. "Apphaxed. "Louise, m. Syl- 
vester Davis. t; Horatio. B Abigail, m. 
Capt. Davis. 

1(). Capt. D Robcrt Gibbs, — b. 1779. m. 
Elizabeth Read, p. 63. d. Sept. 3, 
1849. srie d. April 12, 1856. 



CHILDREN. 

6 Eliza, b. Feb. 25, 1806. d. Jan. 
1821. "Harriet, b. May 13 



Gibbs. 

V 
V 



6 Harriet, b. May 13, iSoS*\ 
^^^■fendwifeof Capt. Alfred Prattr-VTdeV 
/ '" //r ^/l5. "Maria, b. March 31, 1810. m. 
John Peirce, 1832. 6 Polly, b. May 
24, 1812. m. Leonard Chace, son 
of Clark Chace and Nancy Gibbs. 
Vide 9. 6 George W., b. Feb. 5, 
1814. Vide 22. 6 Robert, b. May 
1, 1816. Vide 23. 'Eunice W. 
(called for her grandmother, 5 Eu- 
nice Weaver, vide page 89), b. 1819. 
m. Benjamin Chace, Jan. 15, 1838. 
17. 5 Hannah Gibbs, — b. 1792. m.Slade 
Earle. d. Jan. 4, 1S68. Children: 
6 Lloyd, b. Dec. 11, 1812. 6 Gibbs, b. 
July 20, 1814. 6 George W., b. April 
25, 1818. 6 Slade W., b. Jan. 24, 1820. 
6 Hannah J., b. Feb. 19, 1824, and 
6 John W., b. July 3, 1830. 
18 . 5 Benjamin Gibbs, — b. 1792. m. Ruth 
Wilcox and had: 6 Benjamin, Vide 24. 
"Rody. "William H. 6 Charles (pir- 
ate during war). 

19. Capt. 5 Henry Gibbs,— b. 1788. d. 
Aug. 25, 1849. m - Mary Chace, Feb. 
11, 1813. she d. Jan. 24, 1S19. m. 2nd, 
Nabby Chace; she d. Dec. 23, 1822. 
m. 3rd, 5 Rody Gibbs, vide 9. she d. 
Jan. 27, 1850. Children, 6 John. Vide 
25. 6 Mary. 6 Gardner. Vide 26. 

20. 5Benjamin Gibbs, — b. 1800. Had 
6 John. Vide '27. 6 Benjamin Dobson. 
Vide 28. 

21. <John Gibbs, — m. Mary Chace, and 
had; 'John, Vide 29, and 7 Emily. 

22. 6 George W. Gibbs— b. Feb. 5, 
1814- m. Susan Bell Whelpley, and 
had 'Maty, 'George M., 'Robert, 
'Susan, Dr. 'Samuel, 'Harriet. 

23. B Robert L. Gibbs— (Jr.) b. May 1, 
1 816 (of Fall River), d. April 27, 
1885. m - Sisson. m. 2nd, Al- 
ma Handy, m. 3d, Emilia Mason. 
m. 4th, Susan Gardner. Had chil- 
dren, 'Eliza, b. Aug. 21, 1839. 
'Louisa, b. July 17, 1841. 'George 
H., b. Sept. 5, 1842. 'Robert S., b. 
May 8, 1844. '"Ann, b. July 7, 1845. 
'Alma, b. May 15, 18^3. 'Robert, b. 
March 16, 1855. 

21. e Benjamin Gibbs, — had children: 

7E' and 'Susan. 
25. 8 John Gibbs— had children: 7 H. 



129 

Francis, 'William H., 'Richard B., 
and 'Nelson H. 

26.- GGardner Gibbs, — had children: 
rHenry, b. Sept. 9, 1844. 'Fred- 
erick, b. 1849, vide SO. 'Mary E., 
b. May 23, 1852. 'William C, b. 
1854, vide 31. 'Annie E., b. Oct. 
30, 1857. 

27. (John Henry Gibbs, — had children 
'Nancy C, and 'Lola. 

28. ^Benjamin Dobson Gibbs, — had 
children, 'Benjamin C, 'Mary F., 
and 'Lottie. 

29. 'John C. Gibbs, had children: 
s Flora, 8 Charlie, s Herman_ s Ber- 
tie, and s B4ftdve. /2&>^eJ, 

30. 'Frederick R. Gibbs, b. March 
27, 1849; has 8 Gardner D., b. Aug. 
22, 1881. 

31. 'William- C. Gibbs, b 
1854; has 3 Charles G., 
1879. 



. May 24, 
b. Aug., 



REVOLUTIONARY RECORDS. 

In Fourth Regiment of Levies and 
Militia of New York; Col, Jonathan 
Hasbrouck; Isaac Fowler, first lieuten- 
ant. Commissioned Oct. nth, 1775. 
From North District of Newburgh. 

Caleb Merritt, first lieutenant from 
South District of New Marlborough. 
Commissioned Sept. 20, 1775. Pro- 
moted captain from the South-east 
District, Oct. 11, 1775. 

Vide New York Revolutionary Rolls. 

Three companies for service were 
raised in Dartmouth, Mass., of which 
one was under the command of Captain 
5 Benjamin Dillingham (minute man) of 
Acushnet, 1776. Among those enlisted 
in these companies were the following, 
with date of enlistment. Arthur Hath- 
away, 1780. Gideon Hathaway, 1778. 
Jacob Hathaway, 1780. Isaac Hatha- 
way, 177S. John Hathaway, 1775. Four 
Indians were enrolled, and two negro 
slaves. 

The time of service was three months, 
allowance for travel, a penny a mile; 
average number of miles per day, fifty- 
four. The headquarters for these com- 
panies were at Roxbury, near Boston. 



no 



Hathaway — Whitwell. 



RFXORD OF sMELETIAH 
HATHAWAY. 

(Son of *Meletiah Hathaway. Vide 

page 125.) 

b. Sept. 14, 1732. 

m. Judith Pierce (she born Feb. 24, 
1736) d. 1800. 

CHILDREN. 

— "Abiah — b. 1754. 

— "Anna, — b. 1755. m. John Lawrence. 
One son, "'Samuel. 

— oAbigail,— b. 175S. m. — Palmer. 
Had: "'Mercy and "'Judith, who m. — 
Gifford, of Fairhaven, Mass., and 
had 8 — , who m. Henry Rogers. 

— "Judith,— b. 1760. m. — Maxfield. 

— "Elizabeth,— b. 1761. m. Abraham 
Maxfield. Had: 'Isaac, "Henry, "'Di- 
nah, "Abbey, "'Betsey, ''Lucy. 

— cMary, — b. 1763. m. Richard Hatha- 
way, of Canada. 

— eHenry, — b. 1766. d. 180S. m. Mary 
Evans, of Assonet. Had iRcliancc, 
"Seth, "'Ebcnczcr, "Mclctiah. 

— "Chloe, — b. 176S. m. Ebenezer Akins. 
Had "'Jonathan, 7 William, - { Marion, 
''Ruth, ''Mary, ''Eliza and ''Anna. 7 Anna 
m. VVm. Potter, of Dartmouth, and 
had s Ruth, 8 Mary, 8 Ruby, 8 Thomas, 
8 Stephen, 8 Elizabeth and 8 William 
James, Jr. Wm. J. Potter, Sr., was 
the celebrated Unitarian clergyman. 

— "Ebenezer, — b. 1770. d. 1790. 

— oHope, — b. 1772. m. Nicolas Davis, 
of Dartmouth, and had "Joseph and 
iMary. 

— "Reliance, — b. 1774. m. Shubael 
Terry, of New York, and had 7 Seth, 
tReliance, 1 Joanna, 1 Mary, 1 Rcco?icile 
and "' 'Mercy. 

— "Seth,— b.' 1777. d. 1798. 



RECORD OF ^JONATHAN HATH- 
AWAY. 
(Son of Jonathan. Vide page 43.) 

b. Oct., 1716. 

m. Bridget, daughter of Nathaniel 
Delano (she b. Feb., 1723. d. June 23, 
1S02). d. May 23, 1783. 

children. 
4 Robert, — b. Nov. 5, 1747. m. — , sister 

of Isaac Sherman. Removed to Maine. 
4 Susanna, — b. Sept. 16, 1749. d. March 

29, 1 82 1. 
4 Paul, — b.Nov.9, 1751. m.andhad ason. 
Hssachar, — b. Jan. 20, 1754. d. June 29, 

1775, in Roxbury. Was private in 1st 

Co. raised in Dartmouth for the War. 



4 Arthur, — b. June II, 1756. m. Esther 
Tobey, of Rochester, Mass., and re- 
moved to N. Y. 

4 Elizabeth, — b. July II, 1759. d. Aug. 
3, 1S32. m. Joseph Blossom: Had 
children. 

4 Jonathan, — b. Feb. 27, 1762. d. on a 
N. Y. prison ship in Feb., 1783. 

4 Nathaniel, — b. April 7, 1765. d. Feb. 

27, 1S02. Had 5 Mary, who m. 

Stiles and had "William Hathaway 
Stiles. 

RECORD OF 1OLIVER WHIT- 
WELL. 

(Vide page 93.) 

children. 

— 2 Sally, — b. in Freetown, 1768. m. 
Daniel Read, 1793 (he b. 1769. d. 
1805). d. June 10, 1851. Had: 
3 Stephen, d. 1794. — 3 Daniel, b. April 
20, 1794. m. Mary Winslow, June 20, 
1818. d. Feb. 20, 1824. — 3 George, b. 
July 2, 1796. m. Ann Bennett. — 3 John, 
b. May 10, 1798. — 3 Bradford, b. Dec. 
10, 1799. d. June 6, 1822. — 3 Oliver, b. 
1800. d. at sea, 1829. — 3 Nancy, b. Dec. 
2, 1801. m. Joseph Bennett, Sept. 10, 
1826. d. Aug. 19, 1SS5. — * James, b. 
Aug. 25, 1803. d. 1825. 

— 2 James, — Vide p. 93. 

— ~ George, — d. young. 

— 2Mary, — b. 1776. m. Jas. Morrison. 
d. Dec. 14, 1S44. Had: ^Hannah. 
— 3 Rhoda, b. 1801. m. Anthony Morse, 
d. 1843. — '^Hannah and s Louise, b. 
1803. — 3 Clarissa, b. May 20, 1S06. m. 
John Brown, d. 1867. — 3 Barthana, b. 
1809.— iMary, b. 1S1 1. — *Mary, b. 
Dec. 20, 1813. m. Chas. Morse, Jan. 
8, 1S37. d. 1891. — '^Catharine, b. Dec. 
7, 1815. m. Joseph Boodry, Jul}- 3,<4.t£/ W9 
1846, and had *Charles, b. April 11, 
1848; 4 Jerusha, b. Dec. I, 1S49; *Wil- 
lis, b. Aug. 11, 1S59. d. Aug. 25,1859. 

— '-Thomas, — d. in infancy. 

— -Hannah, — b. Sept., 17S0. m. Robert 
Slade, 181 1. d. April, 1871. Had: 
^Patience and *Mary Ann, who m. 
Geo. Slade and hacDGeorgia, 4 I ,ouisa, 
-Anna, -'Henry (Geo. Slade, Sr., d. 

1893). 

— 2 01iver, — 111. Elizabeth Y\ inslow. m. 

2nd, her sister Lois. Had: ^George, 
^Frederick, % Lncretia, .'■Elizabeth. 
— 2 Betsey, — m. David Cleveland, Feb. 
5, 1809. Had: z Enos, who removed 
South, and 3 Betsey, who in. Curtis 
Dot)', 1 83 1. m. 2nd, Louis Allen. 



Presbrey — Richmond. 



131 



'ija-o-C 



RECORD OF nVILLIAM PRES- 
BREY. 
(Vide page 59.) 

CHILDREN. 

3 Mary, — b. 1748. m. Francis Goward 
about 1770 (heb. 173&/M. July 17, 1797). 
shed. 1S32. Had: A Lticinda, b. 1775. d. 
Sept. 25,1815. — i Isracl,b. Dec. 5, 1778. 
d. Feb. 4, i860, m. Patty Williams 
about 1800 and had 5Harriet, 5 Israel, 
Sally, 5 Josiah, 5 Martha, 5 Zephaniah, 
s Louis,5Francis and 5 Julia. — 4 Isaac, b. 
Oct. 28, 1782. d. JuneS, 1855. m. Abi- 
gail Lathrop, Sept. 30, 1804, and had: 
^ Graoc , 5 Sally, 5 Francis, 5 Ruth, ft Wat- 



3Abigail, — b. 1765. m. Abijah Leonard. 
3 William, — b. 1756. m. Lydia Pratt, d. 

1838. 
3Simeon, — b. 1758, m. Anna Newland. 

1 78 1. d. 1834. she d. March 21, 18 14. 

had:— i Simcon,b. Dec. 8. I782d. 1S5S. — 
' Joseph, (Josiah). b. July, 1. 1784. cl. 

1842.— ^Daniel— b. Dec. 1. 1785. A.J^>^-i. A 

1856. — i Nancy, — b. April 2. 1790. cf. 

Aug. 27, 1 79 1. — +Nancy, b. May 12. 

1792. d. 1847. — ' Abigail, b. June 23, 

1794. d. 1 82 5. — x <Alfard, b. Nov. 9. 

1796. d.iS23.— Bradford, b.i> Nov. g,/>?6 

1S1S. — ^Esther, b. Aug. 15, 1798. d. 

1844. — Amasa, b. Jan. 8, 1800. d. 1850. 
3 John, — b. 1760. m. Prudence Pratt, d. 

1845. 
3 Levi,— b. about 176S. m. Lina Pratt, d. 
1800. 



RICHMOND FAMILY 
NECTICUT. 



IN CON- 



son, 5 Louisa, 6 Jason, sFidelia (m. 

George Thomas), and sBetsey Ann. — 

4 Polly, — m. Mr. Carpenter, m. 2nd — 

Record. 
3 Elizabeth, — Vide Ephraim French. 
3 Seth, — b. 1752. m. Sarah Pratt, Dec. 23, 

1779. d. 1883. Had,— iSeth, b. March 

11, 17S0, m. Maiy Dean, d. April 8, 

1862. Had 5 Silas, 5 Billing, 5 Harrietand 

5 Benjamin. — ±Sarah, b.Oct. 1, 1782. m. 

Micah Paull. — ^Barney, b. June 28, 

1785, m. Abigail Godfrey, d. Feb. 12, 

1835. shed. Jan. 1, 1836. Had 5 Barney, 

b. 181 2, d. 1 88 1, m. Nancy Lindsay 

and had °Mary, b. 184^. m. Jacob B. 

Phillips, 6 Isabel, b. 1S4/. m. Wm. N. 

Parker. 6 Annie, b. 1851. m. Gordon 

Godfrey. ^Ella, b. 1854. m. W. H. 

Chase. 6 William, b. 1856. m. Fannie 

Sherman. 5 Abigail. b. 1815. d. 1832. 

5Seth,b. 1818, d. i848, 5 Samuel, b. 1S20. 

d. 1849. 5 George, b. 1822. d. 1835, 

5 Henry. b. 1823, d. i860, m. Sally Cush- 

man. — * Allen — b. and d. 1788. — 

4 Allen, — b. Jan. 17, 1790. m. Hariett 

Dean. 2nd, Mary Locke, (by first wife 

had) 5 Allen, 5 Francts, and 5 David. (by 

second wife) 5 Joseph h, 1825. m. Su- 
san Godfrey, Dec. 247and had "Fred, eanor, James, Lavant, Isabel, and Aribel. 

b. May 18, iS52/Arthur,b. Aug. 1848-jr Warren Richmond, b Dec. 9. 1832, m. 

5 Mary, s Abigail,and 5 Allen.— killings. Mary Learning, who d. Oct. 22, 1SS2. 

b. Jan. 14, 1793. d. May 22, 1815.^- They had one daughter, Kate Eleanor, 

''Samuel,— b. Sept. 8, 1796. m. Maifj^V April 2, 1S66. d. May 1. 1872.— I hope 

Williams, d. Oct. 6 1834. shed. 1875. these records may be of use in establish- 
aLydia— b. March 10, 1753. m. Samuel ing the descent of this branch of the 

Haskins. d. 1823. family. 



There was a Richmond family in 
Connecticut at an early date. In En- 
field, Conn, lived Benjamin Deane whose 
three daughters Hannah, (b.1682), Eliz- 
abeth (b. 1694-5), and Mehitable (b. 
1697) all married men of the name of 
Richmond. From this family of Deans 
came Sarah, b. Jan. 9, 1744, who mar- 
ried Jacob Richmond of Guilford, Conn, 
and died Oct. 28, 1844. They had one 
son Robert, b. Oct. 25, 1773, who mar- 
ried Phoebe Parmelee, and had Harriet, 
Leverett, Sarah, Sherman, Austin, Lydia, 
David, Mary and Emily. 

Austin Richmond m. Malvina Stimp- 
son and had John, Warren, Bela, El- 



H2 



Will of Christian Deyo. 



WILL OF CHRISTIAN DEYO. 
(Page 16). 

"In ye name of God, amen. 

"Ye first day of February Anno Do- 
mino 1686-7 Christian Doyou of ye 
New Paltz in ye county of Ulster being 
sick in body and of good and perfect 
memoiy, thanks be to Almighty God, 
and calling to remembrance the un- 
certain state of this transitory life and 
that all flesh must yield to death when 
it shall please God to call, I do make, 
constitute, ordain and declare this my 
last will and testament in manner fol- 
lowing, revoking and annulling by these 
presents all and every testament in 
manner following: 

"I will first that all my just debts be 
paid within convenient time after my 
decease by my executors as named. I 
give to my son Peter Doyou fifty-six 
dollars that my son was indebted to 
me and then to share equally with all 
the rest of my children of my estate, 
and further I do give my son's son 
Christian Doyou forty pieces of eight 
and a small gun and then I do hereby 
give unto my five children all }-c rest 
of my estate of lands, housings, chat- 
tels and moveable goods to them, their 
heirs, executors and assignees forever. 
As witness my hand and seal in Kings- 
ton, ye day and year above written, and 
I do desire that my corpse may be 
buried at ye New Paltz. 

x 
ye mark of Christian Doyou. 

"Signed and sealed and delivered in 
presence of 

Nicator Depew, 
William DuMont, 
John David, 
Hunphrey Davcnol. 



CERTIFICATE OF PIERRE DEYO. 

(page 16). 
(which he brought from Holland.) 

This is to certify that Peter Doio and 
Agatha Nickol both in honor living in 
Curr Pfaltz, Mutterstadt, circuit of New 
Stadt have been united in marriage the 
intent of such marriage having been 
announced three times from the pulpit, 
that they are members of the Reformed 
Church and as far as we know the 
same are well beloved people. 
Mutterstadt, Curr ) Jacob Amyot, 
Pfaltz, 
31 Jan. 1675. ) Pastor. 



MRS. CLEMENT BIDDLE'S AC- 
COUNT OF HER VISIT TO 
NEWPORT IN 1824. 



"After an absence of sixty years I 
found the mansion house (near New- 
port, R. I.) in precisely the same state 
in which I had left it. It is situated on 
the east side of the island six miles 
from the town of Newport. The farm 
connected with it contained one hun- 
dred and twenty acres besides two 
other farms containing a hundred and 
eighty acres each which were owned by 
my father's brothers William Cornell 
and George Cornell. 

"We also visited another farm be- 
longing to my father on. the west side 
of the island containing about the same 
number of acres. I went to see my 
father's town residence in Newport a 
very good house in Thames Street op- 
posite the Liberty Tree; and another 
dwelling house which he leased and 
resided in many years opposite the 
Parade Grounds, near the State House. 

"At the early age of fifteen years 



Letter of Mrs. Biddle. 



133 



my father Gideon Cornell, at the time 
of his father's death (Thomas Cornell, 
who died at the age of fifty-five), came 
into the possession of a considerable 
landed estate, the farms and house 
above mentioned and fifteen thousand 
Spanish milled dollars in cash besides 
a very considerable estate in the Island 
of Jamaica. 

"Thomas Cornell died in the year 
1726, and his son, my father, in the 
year 1766, at the same age ,to-wit, fifty- 
five, at Kingston in the Island of Ja- 
maica, where he had gone to receive a 
large sum of money awarded to him 
there by the British Government. I 
was his only child, and at the time of 
his death he was the King's lieutenant, 
governor and chief justice of the colony 
of Rhode Island. (His commissions 
as such are in the possession .of Chap- 
man Biddle, his great-grandson.) 

"I, Rebecca Biddle, was born in the 
year 1755 at my father's farm on the 
east side of the Island of Rhode Island 
in Middletown township, six miles from 
the town of Newport. My father, 
Gideon Cornell, in the year 1732, at the 
age of twenty-one, married Rebecca 
Vaughan. I had a brother who died an 
infant at the age of nine months. 

"My mother's father, Capt. Daniel 
Vaughan, was master of a vessel, and in 
the year 1717 was lost in a vessel then 
under his command on Ocracoke Bar 
on the coast of North Carolina. 

"I will relate to you the following 
circumstances connected with his loss. 

"In the year 1 7 1 7 an old woman in 
Newport reported to be a witch, and 
known by the name of Mother Carey 



came to the house of my aunt Cadman 
(where my grand father Capt. Vaughan 
then resided), where was a quantity of 
fresh butter put up for the intended 
voyage. Mother Carey told the cap- 
tain that she must have one of these 
kegs of butter, which, however, he 
would not give her, when she observed 
to him that he would repent of it, which 
the captain did not regard, although 
his friends (such was the superstition of 
that day) urged him to give the old 
woman the butter. 

"Shortly after this time the vessel he 
commanded sailed from Newport 
bound to North Carolina, and on Christ- 
mas Day, 17 17, arrived and came to 
anchor off Ocracoke Bar, on the coast 
of North Carolina. Several of Captain 
Vaughan's friends who saw the brig 
come to anchor went down to the shore 
to meet him and distinctly observed a 
boat putting off for the shore from the 
brig. 

"It being a very bitter cold day, 
they remarked that they would go to 
the only house on the beach and warm 
themselves before the Captain and his 
people came on shore. 

"After remaining in the house some- 
time they became anxious about the 
boat, and accordingly went out to look 
for her; they could perceive no sign of 
the boat or of the appearance of any 
person being on board the brig. They 
then all went out to the brig and upon 
getting on board found the kettle boil- 
ing in the camboose, the sails furled, 
and everything in order, but no living 
thing on board except a little dog. 



134 



Dillingham — Terry — Reade. 



A crew was afterwards sent from 
Newport and brought the brig back 
there, but neither Captain Vaughan nor 
any of his people were afterwards heard 
of." 



RECORD OF "HANNAH 
TERRY. 



D. 



In connection with the above letter 
the following items may be of interest: 

4 Thomas Cornell ( son of 3 Thomas, 
page 12), married 3 Martha, daughter of 
2 Gideon Freeborn, in 1696. (Vide 
pages 13 and 34.) 

Their son Gideon was born in Ports- 
mouth, July 11, 1 710. He married Re- 
becca Vaughan in Newport, Feb. 22, 
1732. (See mention of him in the will 
of Gideon Freeborne, page 34.) 

As Gideon Cornell lived in Newport 
and Mary Cornell and Joseph Reade 
were married in that town, in 1754, the 
question has been advanced whether 
she was not a daughter of Gideon's. 
The above letter settles the question. 



(Daughter of 5 Benjamin Dillingham, 
Vol. I.) 

Joseph Terry, — b. Nov. 27, 1774. m. 
6 Hannah Dillingham, 1789. d. Nov. 
25, 1S09. She d. Sept. 23, 1842. Had 
children: 

— 7 Mary Ann, — b. June 30, 1799. m. . 

d. Oct. 10, 1824. 
—'Hannah Nye, — b. June 5, 1806. m. 
A. H. Tobey, May 14, 1826. d. Feb. 
10, 1S87. Had: 
^William Isaac, — d. 1875. 
8 Jose/>h Terry, — m. Ruth Ryder, 1862. 

Had: 9 Walter, 9 Frank, 9 Charles. 
*Priscilla Juliet, — m. George Bray- 
ton, 1856. Has: 9 Edward.— 9 Myra, 
m. Chas. Morse, 1887, and has: 
"•Philip Brayton.— "Robert Dil- 
lingham. — 9 Lucy Maria. 
6 Martha — 
s Lucy Maria, — 
— 7 Priscilla Dillingham, — b. Feb. 17, 
1S09. 



RECORD OF "ASA DILLINGHAM. RECORD OF 4 JOHN READE. 



(Son of Capt. 5 Bcnj. Dillingham. ) 
b. Sept. 10, 1777. 
m. Deborah Nash, 1800. 
d. 1863. Leaving children: 
'Abigail Nash, — b. June, 1804. m. 
Frederick S. Reade, 1824, and had: 
8 Anne Dillingham, b. 1821;. m. James 

Chipman, 1847. 
% Edward S., — b. June, 1S27. m. Sarah 
Lewis, 1854. d. 1S56. Had: °Mari- 
on. m. Martin Pierce, and has 
10 Etta. 
'■Frederick, — b. 1835. m. Mary Ray- 
mond, d. 1S66. Had: "Winifred, 
b. 1S64. m. Henry Snow, 1S91. 
'Edward, — b. August, 1S02. d. Feb., 

1824. 
'John,— b. 1807. m. twice, d. child- 
less, Oct., 1882. 



(Son of 3 John Reade, of Freetown, 

page 62.) 

4 John Reade, — (b. June 12, 1694). 

m. Sarah Burden, Oct. 31, 1 719. 

They had a numerous family (Vide 

Reade Genealogy), of which the eldest 

« 
was : 

5 John, — b. Nov. 17, 1720. m. Ruth 
Lawton, Jan. 9, 1745. They had four 
sons, — George, Stephen, Martin and 
Daniel. Vide Whitwell, page 130. 
6 Daniel married Sarah, daughter of 
'Oliver Whitwell and 5 Hannah Reade. 
Their son Daniel married Mary Win- 
slow and had one child, Mary Pelham, 
b. Feb. 13, 181 5. 

It was Miss Mary Reade who gave 
me the little china mug which belonged 
to Hannah Whitwell, her grandmother, 
and very great - great - great - grand - 
mother. 




ENOCH FRENCH. 



RECORD 



OF 7 MARY 
BRAGG. 



READ 



(Daughter of 6 Samuel, son of 5 Joseph.) 

b. Sept. 12, 1779. ^2^,ur 

m. Samuel Bragg (he d. Jan. 14, 1852). 
d. in Aseonet, Feb. 15, 1848. 



m. 
22. 



^U^ l0 ^> returning 
- ' ^Everett, b. Oct. 



CHILDREN. 

8 Samuel Reid, — b. Jan. 27, 1800 
Eliz a Hathaw ay. He d. Aug. 
1852, returning frorn Cal. They had. 

7, 1839. m. Melosa^ 
Whitcomb (she b. Feb. 24, 1847), an< ^ 
has 10 Katharine Lavina, b. Oct. 7, 1876 
— Also ^Mary Carpenter, b. July 3, 
1847. m - Geo. Hart Davijs. Has 
loGeorge Everett, b. Sept. 26. m. 
Mary Wilson, Sept. 21, 1S93. 10 Her- 
bert Hart, b. June 27, m. Mary 
Schrieder and has "Louis, b. Dec. 
12, 1889. 10 Mary Ella, b. Sept. 25, 
1868. 10 Annie Reid, b. Dec. 12, 1872. 

- 8 Sarah Wheaton, — b. April 23, 1S02, 
m. Humphrey Shaw. 

-sjohn Carpenter, — b. Oct. 31, 1805. 

-sFrederick Plummer, — b. June 9, 
1807. 

- 8 Jared Reid,— b. Feb. 8, 18 10. 

- 8 Mary Ann, — b. Jan. 21, 1812. m. 
Asahel Stockwell. 



Bragg-Swift. , 135 

- 8 Harrie1i,— b. Feb. 23, 1820. m. Isaac 
Chappell, March 27, 1839. d. Jan. 24, 
1893, New Haven, Conn. 

-sSamuel Worcester, — b. Dec. 5, 1824.^^-^'*^^^ 
m. Mary H. Diamond, April 20, 1851^ ■£<"™ al > c ^ ' 
(shed. Nov. 11, 1855). m. 2nd, Jennie 
T. Harrington, Sept. 7, tg&j. /r^ 



— 8 Julia Hyde, — b. Aug. 1, 1826. m. 
Elias B. Mainwaring, d. in New 
Haven, May 25, 1S93. p2*» <P#, 



d~7^e^y~< 






t, 

RECORD OF 7 CHARITY;,READ 

SWIFT. 
(Daughter of 6 Samuel, son of 5 Joseph.) 

b. March 7, 1785. 

m. Nathan Swift, Nov. 8, 18 10. 

d. Feb. 14, 1827, at Lebanon, Conn. 

CHILDREN. 

— 8 Charles Augustus, — b. July I, 18 12. 
m. Henrietta Benjamin, April 17, 
1837. d. in Colchester, Ct, Jan. 18, 

— 8 Rev. Jared Reid. — b. Aug. 5, 1814. 

m. Hattie Hamford, Oct. 20, 1848. d. 

at Crab Orchard, Ky., Oct. 16, 1852. 
— 8 Charity Elizabeth, — b. Feb. ji, 18 iS. 

m. Welcome K.Adams, Feb. 4, 1841. 

d. Dec. 10, 1846. ^„^^,,^ gj t 



A WEDDING SONG OF 1799. 

(Sung at the wedding of 2 Enoch 
French and 6 Sarah Read.) 

When Adam was created, 

He dwelt in Eden's shade, 

As Moses has related, 

And soon a bride was made. 

The woman was not taken 

From Adam's head, we know, 

To show she must not rule him, 

'Tis evidently so. 

The woman was not taken 

From Adam's feet, we see, 

So he must not abuse her 

The meaning seems to be. 

So here we see connected 

The duty of the bride, 

That she should be subjected 

Can never be denied. 

And now, most noble bride-groom, 

To you I turn aside 

To your lovely consort 

Or to your lovely bride 

As you have been my scholars 

I taught you both to read, 

As to what I offer 

I beg you would give heed. 

To the Book that's called the Bible 

Be sure not to neglect, 

In every scene of action 

It will you both protect. 

There is counsel for the bridegroom, 

And likewise for the bride, 

Let not this Sacred Volume 

Be ever laid aside, 

The bride-groom is commanded 

That he should love his bride, 

Live as becomes a Christian, 

And for his house provide. 

The bride she is commanded 



i s6 



A Whaling Log. 



Her husband to obey 
In everything that's lawful 
Until her dying day, 
Avoiding all contention 
Nor sow the seed of strife. 
These are the solemn duties 
Of husband and of wife. 

Old-fashioned as these verses are, the 
advice given in the closing ones is none 
too antique for a good many modern 
couples to act upon without any dam- 
age to themselves or anybody else. 



A WHALING VOYAGE. 

There was the day — hardly thirty 
years ago — when more than 300 whaling 
ships made New Bedford as their home 
port. That time is passed now. Two 
years ago while 9 Richmond Warner was 
in the old town he saw a whaler that 
had been off on a three years' cruise 
come into the bay, and it was an unusual 
sight even to the townspeople. He 
secured a photograph of the vessel with 
all its rigging out — a very pretty pic- 
ture. 

There has been frequent mention of 
whaling among the lives of the men of 
Fairhaven and New Bedford, and a very 
good idea of a voyage can be gained 
from the extracts from the log of the 
Ship Lydia. The book belongs to Mrs. 
B. P. Richmond, whose father, F. R. 
Whitwell, was a heavy owner in the 
"Lydia." 

(Copied from the original, verbatim.) 

Ship Lydia's Book. 1851. 
Behring's Straits. 
II. F. Worth, Master. 
Saturday, Nov. 8th— Latter part at 8 A. 
M. weighed anchor, dropped down to 
the light-house and came to again all 
ready for sea. 
Sunday, Nov. 9th — Commenced light 
breeze from S. W. — most of the crew 
on board. Middle part strong breeze 



from N. W. At 9 A. M. all hands on 
board weighed anchor and proceeded 
to sea. At 12 M. the Pilot left. So 
ends this daw Light breeze blowing 
S. S. E. 

Friday, Nov. 14 — Commenced with 
strong gales from W. stirring S. E.by 
E. At dark put two reefs in the fore 
and Maintop sails. At 1 shipped a 
sea, took larboard boat off the cranes, 
stove the waist boat, broke three 
dravyes, lost one, so ends this day. 

Saturday, Nov. 15 — Commences with 
strong breeze from N. stirring E. by 
S. with two reef top sails, Jib and 
Mainsail. Employed filling boats 
and various Jobs. 

( Virtually the same record for many suc- 
ceeding days. ) 

Thursday, Nov. 20 — Commenced strong 
breeze from N. stirring E. by S. E. 
with all sail set. Employed fitting 
craft * * and breaking ought oak 
plank for repairing damages. So 
ends this day repairing damages. 

Wednesday, Dec. 3 — Commenced with 
strong breeze from N. E. stirring S. — 
At 2 P. M. saw one of the Cape 
Verde Islands. At 4 P. M. broke 
ought for bread and molasses. * * 
At day-light saw St. Nicholas Island. 
At 10 A. M. captain and boat crew 
went ashore for hogs. 

Friday, Dec 5th — Commences with 
strong breeze from N. E. lying off 
and on. At 3 P. M. boat came off 
with more hogs. Took up boat and 
made sail running to the leeward of 
the Islands. At dark" Island of St. 
Nicholas bearing N. stirring S. S. E. 
Latter part at daylight saw the Island 
St. Iago. at 1 1 A. M. Capt. and boat 
crue went ashor at Port Pray. So 
ends this day lying off and on. The 
Bark Ocean and Ship Margaret Scoat 
lying off and on. 



A Whaling Log. 



137 



Saturday, Dec. 6 — Commences with 
strong breeze lying off and on at St. 
Iago. At 1 p. m. the Capt. came off. 
The Ship John Adams boat came 
alongside and got 3 pips of bread, 
16000 pounds. At 3 P. M. Capt. went 
on shore again. At 6 P. M. Capt. 
came off with 20 hogs and 2000 
oranges and 2 Turkes. 
Thursday, Dec. 11 — Commences with 
rainy weather, light air and varibels. 
Middle part light breeze with varibels 
and rain. 

[The "varibels" continued several days. 
Thursday, Dec. 16 — Spoke Bark 
Charleston, packet from New Bed- 
ford, at 8 A. M. 

Lat 06 09. S 
{The next entries tell of squalls and 
high winds, atid the handwriting bears 
testimony to the truth. ) 
Friday, Jan. 16, 1852 — * * All sail set. 
Saw many birds. * * Saw Fin-backs. 
Saturday, Jan. 17th — Commences with 
light airs and varibels. At 4 P. M. 
lowered the boats for the first time. 
Wednesday, Jan. 28th— Lat. 5S 007. 
Commences with light breeze from 
W, S. W. heading N. W. with cloudy 
weather. Got out watter and meat. 
Sunday, Feb. 8th * * Employed re- 
pairing fore-topsail, at 4 P. M. un- 
bent fore-top sail and bent the one 
that we repaired. At 7 P. M. thick 
and sultry. * * At 10 A. M. saw 
spirm whales lowered, struck two. 
So ends this day. 
Monday, Feb. 9th — * * Took one 
whale along side and cut from the 
others. At 9 finished cutting * * 
Sunday, Feb. 15th— At 6 P. M. spok 
Ship Marengo of New Bedford, saw a 
ship a-boiling. Saw the land * * 

Lat. 41: 35 s. 
Friday, Feb. 20th — * * Saw many Fin- 
backs. Saw a bark to the Windward. 
At 4 P. M. bent new fore-sail, at 



dark took in sail * * At 8 A. M. 
spok Ship Valparaso with 12000 
spirm * * 

Thursday, Feb. 26th — Commences with 
fine weather, stirring N. W. Wind S. 
S. W. Middle part strong breeze, at 
nine the boat sterer came down and 
told the captain that there were 
spirm whale alongside. Wore ship 
heading E. 

Saturday, Feb. 28th — At dark calm, 
land in sight * * At 10 A. M., got 
the ankors off. At 11 A. M., entered 
the Bay. So ends this day off Tal- 
cahuno. 

Monday, March 1st — * * Watch on 
shore, at sun-down sent in the boat 
* * Three deserters. Richard Tirpin, 
Thomas Bremham, Peter Fingin. So 
ends this day. One brig came tew 
ankor. 

Thursday, March 4th — Commencing 
with light breeze from S. Imployed 
painting Ship * * Landed six hun- 
dred gals spirm oil. 

Tuesday, March 16th —Ship Currier 
came tew anchor and a steam-boa. 
At 11 A. M. got under way and stir- 
red down the Bay* * 

Sunday, March 28 — Commences with 
light breeze from S. E., stirring N. 
W. by W. with all sail set * * At 9 
A.M. saw spirm whales going fast. At 
10 A. M. lowered and chased. 

Monday, March 29th — Boats off in 
chase of spirm whales* * 

Saturday, April 24th — Commences with 
varibel winds, at 3 P. M. Pilot came 
on board. At 6 P. M. came tew an- 
kor off Mami with larboard ankor 
with 60 fathoms of chain. At 8 A. 
M. Boat went ashore. Five Natives 
came on board to go on ship. 

Monday, April 26th — All ready for sea 

waiting for wind * * 
Wednesday, May 19th — Commences 
with fresh breeze from E. N. E. stir- 
ring N. W. with some snow * * 



133 



A Whaling Log. 



Lat 49: 08 N. 

Tuesday, June 1st — at 6 P. M. saw a 
ship take whale * * So ends this day 
threading out of the ice * * 

Saturday, June 5— At 4 P. M. Fog lit 
up * * Saw several ships * * Sev- 
eral ships blow fog horns * * 

Monday, June 7th — * * Several ships 
in sight and plenty of ice. No whales 
so ends this day. Spoke Ship Albion 
of Fairhaven. Nothin this season. 

Lat. 61. 53, N. 

Thursday, June 10th — Commences with 
light breeze from N. N. E. Plenty ot 
Ice and plenty of ships, but no whales. 
Thick fog. At 7 ankored 20 fathoms 
of water. 

Saturday, June 12th — Commences with 
strong gales from S. heading off and 
on between the land and ice, several 
ships in sight, saw several whales at 

6 P. M., hedingoff shore * * lowered 
and chased them in the Ice. So ends 
this day in the Ice chasing Whales. 

June 13, Sunday — * * Boats off. At 
1 1 took a whale alongside, com- 
menced cutting * * At 4 A. M. fin- 
ished cutting. 

Monday, June 14th — At 7 A. M. com- 
menced boiling * * 

Friday, June iSth — Spoke Ship India of 
New Bedford * * Saw no Ice * * 
At 6 A. M. lowered for Whales. At 
1 1 A. M. took one alongside and 
commenced cutting. 

Sunday, June 20 — Commences with fine 
weather imployed Boiling and stor- 
ing oil. Several ships in sight. At 

7 finished Boiling. * * imployed 
storing oil and scraping bone. So 
ends this day. 

Wednesday, June 23 — At 1 P. M. saw 
Whales, lowered and Fascned to one 
went off spouting blood in the Ice * * 

Thursday, July 1st— Lowered the Boats 
to tow the Ship out of the Ice * * 

Saturday, July 3— * * At 6 P. M. saw 



Whales. Lowered and struck one. 
kild and sunk in the ice. lost two 
lines and three Ions. So ends hard 
luck with a thick Fog. * * 

Sunday, July 4th — Took a whale along- 
side. * * 

{Same entry on the yth, lotli, ijth, igtli, 
and 26th of July.) 

Sunday, Aug. 1st — Took a whale along- 
side. * * 

Friday, Aug. 6 — Off St. Lawrence bay. 
* * imployed storing oil. * * 

Tuesday, Aug. to— at 4 A. M. saw a 
dead whale, lowered and took him 
alongside. * * 

Sunday, Aug. 15 — Took a whale along- 
side. 

(Same entry on the 25 insl., and Sept. 8th.) 

Wednesday, Oct. 20 — Mami in sight, at 
4 P. M. came tew ankor with 19 other 
ships lying tew ankor. 

Sunday, Oct. 24 — * * Imployed paint- 
ing ship, one Bark came tew ankor 
which makes thirty ships in all tew 
ankor. Latter part fine. All hands 
went on shore. So ends this day. 

Monday, Oct. 25 — * * Employed 
breaking out oil from between decks 
to store down in the hold. James 
Stark deserted. 

Monday, Nov. 15 — * * All ready for 
sea. * * At 5 A. M. weighed ankor. 

Wednesday, Nov. 17 — * * Steering W. 
by N. with all sail set, at 7 P. M. 
Woohoo bearing W. by N. dist. 15 
miles. Found one man on board that 
did'n't belong to the Ship Lydia. * * 
Steering in for Woohoo. At 11 A. 
M. came to ankor outside of reef. * * 

Monday, Nov. 22 — * * Lying off and 
on. At 6 P. M. Capt. Worth came 
off, made sail and stood S. by E. 

Sunday, Dec. 5— * * At 5 P. M. saw 
spirm whales going fast to the wind- 
ward lowered two boats and chased 
until Sunday. * * 

Tuesday, Dec. 7 — * * Thunder and 
lightening. 



A Whaling Log. 



139 



Lat 14:56 S. 

Friday, Dec. 10 — * * Imployed paint- 
ing spars and bone. Spun yarn. At 
4 P. M. got out watter. * * Middel 
part fine. * * At 4 saw the Island of 
Oritango. At 10 A. M. Capt. Worth 
and boat crue went on shor. 

Lat 21:16 

Saturday, Dec 11 — Boat came off with 
12 hogs and frute. * * 

Tuesday, Jan. 11, 1853 — * * At 9 A. 
M. saw wright whales. 

Lat 42:40. Long. 93:18. 

Monday, Feb. 14— At 1 P. M. entered 
the bay of Talcahuno. * * 

Tuesday, Feb. 23 — * * Imployed get- 
ting out oil and storing it on board 
the Bark Hesper. * * 

Sunday, March 13 — * * One watch on 
shor. * * Four deserters. * * 

Thursday, March 24— * * at 4 P. M. 
took up ankor and stird out of the 
bay. 

Monday, May 9— * * Middel part 
strong breeze from N. E. stirring W. 
by N. tew the weather of ow-y-hee. * * 
(In this day of discussion regarding 

Hawaii the above phonetic spelling of that 

generally mis-pronounced name should be 

interesting. ) 

Saturday, June 1 1 — At 4, saw saw a dead 
whale. At 7 P. M. got the whale 
alongside. No craft in the whale. 
No. 150 lbs. 

Sunday, June 12 — Took a whale along- 
side. 

(Same entry Jidy 15, and Aug. 5th, and 
28th.) 

Sunday, Sept. 4 — * * Boat off at 1 P. 
M. larboard boat got fast. Whale 
took the line and went off. * * 

Monday, Sept. 27 — at half past fore 

buried Anton, a native of the Flores. 

* * 

Lat 33:12 N. 
Thursday, Oct. 6 — * * heading in for 



Mori, at 12 came tew ankor with lar- 
board ankor, starboard chain. * * 

Sunday, Dec. 24 — * * at 12, a heavy 
gale from S. S. W. the Fore top gallin- 
sail Mast, Fore Royal Mast, and Fly 
Jib boom, and head of the Jib Boom, 
and Main Royal Mast, main Top sail, 
fore top gallinsail. fore royal and 
main Royal, Fly Jib and larboard boat, 
and two davyer, three studdin sails 
washed off. * * So ends this day 
Mast and yards flying in all shapes. 
Lat. 47:00 S. 

Wednesday, Jan. 25, 1854 — * * at 5 P. 
M. put John Morrow in irons. He 
struck Capt. Worth three or four times 
in the face with his fist, he was at the 
wheel at the time * * at 8 A. M. all 
the foremast hands came aft. one man 
by the name of Joseph Gilgarand ses 
to Capt. Worth that you must take 
that man out of irons. Capt. Worth 
ses to him spose then i dont what you 
gout tew do. He sas you will see 
what we will do. Capt. Worth ses tew 
them you gout tew take my ship. 

( The account of the mutiny aids abruptly 
here. ) 

Thursday, Jan. 26 — Commenced with 
light breeze and varibels. Heding E. 
N. E. * * 

Lat 31:51 S. 

Sunday, March 12 — * * Heding in at 
2 P. M. hauled up the chains and bent 
them. * * At 9 took a pilot. * * 
Stirring up the bay at 10 A. M. came 
tew the wharf in Fairhaven, at 1 1 A. 
M. furled sails. All hands went ashor. 
So ends this voyage. 



The sailor's day began at noon. Can 
its monotony be imagined when I say 
that I have transcribed every incident 
that occurred during three years? — I 
have only suppressed wind and weather. 



140 



Early Hathaway Records. 



EARLY HATHAWAY RECORDS. 

There is hardly a more interesting 
name in New England than that of 
Hathaway, and it is a matter of some 
wonder to me that when so much is 
known regarding the first generations 
of the family, so very little is printed. 
The few records given in this volume 
contain nearly all the information 
previously placed in books, and that is 
only about a quarter of the whole here 
collected. This shows how very little 
of the Hathaway history is at present 
open to the general public. 

Since the first volume of this book 
was in press, I have added greatly to 
my own knowledge in this particular 
direction, and especially as regards the 
family of Arthur, the early settler of 
Dartmouth. In this connection I dis- 
covered that nearly all the Hathaway 
tombstones in the old Acushnet Ceme- 
tery were those of Arthur's descendants. 
With a very few exceptions I could 
easily trace the ancestry of each of 
these long dead men and women, and, 
as the Acushnet Burial Record has been 
highly confusing to very many genea- 
logical students it occurred to me that 
a copy with the descent of each indivi- 
dual would certainly be a valuable ap- 
pendix to these pages. 

1 Arthur Hathaway had sons John, 
Thomas and Jonathan. 2 John d. 1732. 
2 Thomas' will is dated 1742. 2 Jonathan 
d. 1727. 2 John had sons 3 John and 
^Jonathan. 2 Thomas' family do not 
seem to figure in the Acushnet Ceme- 
tery (if he had any); 2 Jonathan had 
sons 3 Gamaliel, 3 Seth, 3 Elnathan, s Jon- 
athan, and 3 Silas. 3 Jonathan, son of 
ijohn, had sons 4 Jonathan, 4 Thomas, 
Hsaacand * Philip. Bearing these facts 
in mind the readers may easily trace 
the individual branches. (Birth dates are 
added for convenience.) 



(Copied from) 
Memorial Record of the Acushnet 

Cemetery, 1881. 
Hathaway, Isaac, d. Feb., 1762, aet. 28 

(b. 1734), son of Jonathan, 2 John, 

1 Arthur. 
Hathaway, Silvanus, d. July II, 1768, 

aet. 47 (b. 1721). 
Hathaway, Philip, d. March 2, 1769, aet. 

27 (b. 1742), son of 3 Jonathan, 2 John, 

1 Arthur. 
Hathaway, Captain 4 Eleazer, d. Aug. 

28, 1803, aet. 65, son of 3 Gamaliel, 

2 Jonathan, l Arthur. 
Hathaway, Alice Pope. His wife. d. 

May 7, 1778, aet. 34. 
Hathaway, s Gamaliel. Three infant sons 

of above. 
Hathaway, Anna, 2nd wife of 4 Eleazer, 

d. Apr. 30, 1839. 
Hathaway, Mrs. Hannah, d. May I, 

1796, aet. 87 (b. 1709). 
Hathaway, 2 Jonathan, d. Sept. 17, 1727, 

aet. 56 (b. 1671), son of * Arthur. 
Hathaway, Susanna Pope. His wife, d. 

Feb. 5, 1760, aet. 70. 
Hathaway, Abigail, wife of Seth Spoon- 

er, d. Oct. 14, 1792, aet. 78. 
Hathaway, Abigail, dau. of Jonathan 

and Deborah, d. Jan. 25th, 17S9, aged 

17- 

Hathaway, Lieut. Seth, d. May 1 1, 17S3, 

aet. 72, son of 2 Jonathan, l Arthur, 
Hathaway, Hannah Willis. His wife, 

d. Jan. iS, 1760. 
Hathaway, 3 Gamaliel. Vide reference 

in index. 
Hathaway, Hannah. His wife. Vide ref- 
erence in index. 
Hathaway, 3 Jacob (of the Taunton 

family. Vide page 45 and index). 
Hathaway, Royal, d. Nov. 12, 1854, aet. 

86. 
Hathaway, Clara J., dau. of Job, d. Sept. 

16, 1S51. 
Hathaway, Mary, wife of James, d. 1852, 

act. 69. 




ASA PRESBREY FRENCH. 
Page I 10. 



Early Hathaway Records. 



141 



Hathaway, Ann, wife of Royal, d. 1851, 

aet. 86. 
Hathaway, Capt. William, d. May 24, 

1839, aet. 11. 
Hathaway, Abigail. His wife, d. March 

14, 1750, aet. 83. 
Hathaway, 3 Jonathan, b. June 23, 1697, 

d. May 11, 1759, son of 2 John, Ar- 
thur. 
Hathaway, Abigail. His wife, d. Dec. 

30, 1776, aet. 75. 
Hathaway, Jonathan, d. Feb. 3, 1793, 

aet. 44. 
Hathaway, Deborah. His wife, d Dec. 

27, 1808, aged ■j'j. 
Hathaway, 3 Elnathan, d. Feb. 25, 1S09, 

aged 89 (son of a Jonathan, son of 

1 Arthur). 
Hathaway, Esther. His wife, d. Oct. 2, 

1777, aged 60. 
Hathaway, Margaret, dau. of 4 Eleazer 

and Anna, d. March 1, 1854, aged 63. 

(Eleazer was son of 3 Gamaliel.) 
Hathaway, George, son of Elisha and 

Ann, d. Sept. 9, 1813, aged 5. 
Hathaway, Mary, daughter of James 

and Mary, d. 1808, aged 16. 
Hathaway, 4 Micah, d. Jan. 6, 1816, aged 

73 (son of 3 Gamaliel, g-son of Ar- 
thur of Dartmouth). 
Hathaway, Mary, his wife, d. Jan. 8, 

1793, aged 45. 
Hathaway, Susanna, his daughter, d. Oct. 

18, 1789, aged 20. 
Hathaway, Jonathan, d. Feb. 19, 1794, 

aged 23 (son of 4 Micah, son of 

3 Gamaliel). 
Hathaway. Mary, d. 1843, aged 70 

(Sister of above). 
Hathaway, Sarah, d. 1824, aged 49 

(Sister of above). 
Hathaway, Thankful, wife of Isaac, d. 

1799, aged 29. 
Hathaway, 6 Joseph, page 45, d. July 21, 

1817, aged 52. 
Hathaway, 6 Anne (Dillingham). His 

wife, page 19. 
Hathaway, "Reuben, d. March 5, 1831, 



aged 73 (son of 5 Jacob and Hannah, 

page 45). 
Hathaway, Abigail, His wife, d. Dec. 

17, 1851, aged 78. 
Hathaway, 3 Jonathan, d. May 23, 

1783, aged 68 (son of ''Jonathan, son 

of 1 Arthur). 
Hathaway, Bridget (Delano). His wife, 

d. 1802, aged 80. 
Hathaway, Susanna (Chaffee), wife of 

Jabez, d. Sept. 10, 1S05, aged 45. 



NOTE ON THE HATHAWAY 
FAMILY. 

Just as the last pages of this book 
went to press I received a letter from 
Mr. C. A. Hathaway, of Berkley, which 
so completely proves his statement in 
regard to the relationship of 1 Arthur 
and 3 Gamaliel (page 43), that I cannot 
forbear quoting from it here, and also 
giving the student the added knowledge 
regarding this old Dartmouth family. 

"Jonathan Hathaway, of Dartmouth, 
was a son of Arthur of the same place. 
He is named in the will of Arthur, which 
I have held in my hands and read. He is 
named in a deed dated i6g6, by which 
instrument Arthur conveys to him one-half 
of the {homestead) farm, in Dartmouth, on 
the Acushnet River, i. e.: — the southerly 
half. Arthur had also sons Thomas and 
John. I judge John may have been the 
eldest, Jonathan the youngest. The will of 

Thomas is dated IJ42, April 5 My 

notes say that Jonathan, son of Arthur, 
died intestate Sept. 17, 1727, aet. 56 (there- 
fore born about 167 1). Lucius R. Paige, 
in his History of Hanlwicke, Mass., says 
(page JQ5), in reference to Arthur, 'In his 
will Feb. q, 170Q-10, proved Feb. 6, ijii- 
12, he names wife Sarah, and children, 
John, Thomas, Mary (Hammond), Lydia 
(Sissoii), and Hannah (Codman).' I pre- 
sume that he may possibly consider John 
and Jonathan as identical — I do not. John 



142 



Note on the Hathaway Family. 



?narried Joanna Pope and died in 1732. 

From the division of Jonathans estate, 

we have that Gamaliel was his eldest son. 
The division is dated May 17, 1761. Other 
children named are Scth, Elnathan, John, 
Hannah, Abigail (Spoon er), Deborah 

(Swift), and Silas (dead at this time) 

Now notice. There was some trouble about 
the division of the estate of Jonathan. 
He was a wealthy man. He' had a large 
family. His wife was a daughter of 
Colonel Scth Pope, her name was Susanna. 
Her husband died in 1727, at middle age, 
leaving yomig children under 14, for on 
Sept. 17, 1728, she was appointed guardian 
of Jonathan, Silas and Elnathan, under 

that age (Bristol Co. Probate Records) 

By the way, did you know that John 
Hathaway, Senior, of Taunton, born 1630, 
had a father named Nicholas, one of the 
earliest settlers of Taunton f The fact came 
to light the past year." 

In connection with the above letter I 
will give a few tomb stone records from 
the old cemetery at Acushnet, with men- 
tion of other facts which reached me 
too late for entrance in the proper place. 

The tomb stone of the Jonathan 
Hathaway described above is still stand- 
ing and I have a photograph of it. It 
is of that old shape described in the 
notes on the Richmond Burial ground, 
at Little Compton. Jonathan's wife 
Susanna died Feb. 5, 1760, aged 70. 

•'Gamaliel Hathaway (page 43), was 
their son and my great-g-g-g-grand- 
fathcr. He was born 1707, died May 
28, 1796. His wife Anne (or Hannah) 
Cathcart, died June 19, 1745, aged 29 
years. 

3 Jonathan Hathaway (Gamaliel's 
brother, page 43 and 130) born 1716, 
died May 23, 1783. 

Lieut. 3 Seth Hathaway (another bro- 
ther), born 171 1, died May 11, 1783. 
His wife Hannah, daughter of Colonel 
Samuel Willis, died Jan. 18, 1760, aged 

45- 



3 Gamaliel's son 4 Micah, born 1743, 
died Jan. 6, 1S16. His house is still 
standing, and it was to that house that 
Mrs. Anne Dillingham Hathaway went 
with her stricken child during the small 
pox panic and deliberately took the 
disease, and suffered while she nursed 
the child, so that when both were well 
she might return home able to care for 
all the sick without personal fear. The 
house is plain and substantial, with 
shingled sides, and bears little resem- 
blance to any fancied scene for such 
heroic courage and grand self sacrifice 
as that which really took place under its 
low roof. 

THE RICHMOND BURYING 
GROUND. 

(At Little Compton Common.) 

Probably one of the most interesting 
monuments in America is that erected 
to Elizabeth Alden Pabodie, the grand- 
mother of Col. 3 Sylvester Richmond, 
who died at the home of the latter in 
171 7, and lies in the family graveyard. 
The tall, white marble shaft towers 
above the broad, low stones which fill 
all the space about. On three sides are 
the inscriptions given below, while in 
the fourth is set bodily the ancient 
stone which used to mark her grave. 
It reads thus: 

"Here lycth ye Body of Elizabeth, 
ye wife of William Pabodie, who dyed 
May 31, 1 71 7, and in yc 94th year of 
her age." 

Another side reads: 

"Elizabeth Pabodie, daughter of the 
Plymouth Pilgrims, John Alden and 
Priscilla Mullin. The first white woman 
born in New England." 

The last side is as follows: 

"A bud from Plymouth's Mayflower sprung, 
Transplanted here to live and bloom, 
Her memory, ever sweet and young, 
The centuries guard within this tomb." 



The Richmond Burying Ground. 



143 



The tombs of Colonel 3 Sylvester 
Richmond and his two wives are near 
by, bearing inscriptions given on page 
69. Also those of his son, 4 Perez, and 
his wife Deborah. All of these are the 
old shape, carven all over and having a 
large curve at the top and two smaller 
ones at the sides of the top. Cherubims 
are sculptured over the inscriptions. 

5 Perez Richmond and wife have 
stones cut perfectly square at the top 
and inscribed thus: 

"Sacred to the memory of Perez Rich- 
mond, Esq., of Westport (date). He 
was a worthy and respectable citizen, 
renowned for honesty and uprightness 
in all his dealings." 

"Sacred to the memory of Mrs. 
Hannah Richmond, relict of Perez Rich- 
mond, Esq., of Westport, who departed 
this life in the city of Providence, on 
the 22nd of June, 1835, a g e d 83." 

Then follows a high eulogium on her 
virtues. This lady was 4 Hannah 
Brightman, page 5. 

There are various stones to other 
members of the family — to Deborah, 
the daughter of 3 Sylvester and Eliza- 
beth, and to her sister Hannah. To 
Loring, the son of 4 Perez Richmond, 
and to many out of the direct line. 

In the same country are some very 
old graves built of brick, with a large, 
flat stone on top. This form was once 
the most desired, and is that referred 
to in old wills where special instructions 
are given to "build a brick grave." 
They were shaped for a single coffin, 
or for a man and wife to lie together. 
They were practically mausoleums for 
one alone. 

The last of the Richmond family to 
be laid in this sacred and time-honored 
ground was my great-grandfather, 
6 Bradford, the son of s Perez Richmond, 
of Westport. He died in the old home- 
stead in 1 8 14, leaving a young widow 



and two small children. My grand- 
father, who was then two years and a 
half old, distinctly remembers being 
taken in his Aunt Lucia's arms to look 
a last time upon his father's face. Then 
they took the body and carried it over 
four miles of tortuous, twisting country 
road to Little Compton, and laid it 
there beside the four generations who 
had gone before. The stone erected 
above bears this inscription: 

"This Marble 

the last sad tribute 

of affection is devoted 

to the Remembrance of 

Bradford Richmond, Esq 

of Westport, Mass. 

who died Oct. 23, 1814. 

Aged 38 years. 

In human hearts 

What nobler thoughts can rise 

than Man's presumption 

on to-morrow's dawn." 



The widow returned to her father's 
house near Fall River, and married 
again there, and when her son came of 
age, in 1833, he sold the homestead 
into the Manchester family, who thirty- 
three years after tore down the house 
and built a new one a few rods away. 

Thus this little model of an English 
estate, which an English gentleman 
had bought in 1636, and which had 
gone from heir to heir for two hundred 
years, came to an end. The house 
which John Richmond built stood on 
the line between Massachusetts and 
Rhode Island, and the sons and daugh- 
ters married into the families of both 
states. But just as the clear-cut Eng 
lish . people held its own against all 
inter-marriages, so the English pride 
and primogeniture held its own against 
the Rhode Island hatred of pride, and 
the Puritan hatred of primogeniture, 
down through seven generations and 
ten score of years. 



144 



Note on the Dillingham Family. 



NOTE ON THE DILLINGHAM 
FAMILY. 

Captain Benjamin Dillingham — the 
Revolutionary soldier — lies in the old 
Acushnet Cemetery outside of Fair 
Haven. His grave is unmarked but 
that of his wife beside him bears testi- 
mony that she died May 13, 1809, aged 
68. She was the only daughter of 
3 Gamaliel Hathaway. The day that 
the British entered Clark's Cove the 
Dillinghams were one of the many fam- 
ilies who fled in fright. They had sick- 
ness among them — a little child so near 
death that the tiny cap and shroud had 
been made, — but they hastily put food 
in baskets, threw valuables into the 
well, and took to the woods. The fath- 
er remained concealed near his home 
to watch for an opportunity to save 
something, possibly to extinguish the 
flames which the invaders nearly always 
lighted before leaving any house. He 
saw the red-coats wantonly waste and 
destroy, as less than a hundred years 
later the Northern army did in Southern 
homes, — he saw provisions poured on 
the ground, pillows and mattresses rip- 
ped open, etc., etc., until finally they 
marched away and left the dismantled 
house alone. The family returned to 
find all a chaos, the soldiers had spared 
but once, — the preparations made for 
the dying baby. The little clothes were 
just as they had been left. By the way, 
the child lived. 

Captain Dillingham's house is stand- 
ing yet, — one of his houses; I do not 
know whether it is the same that he oc- 
cupied in Revolutionary days. The ex- 
isting house is at Dartmouth, — a pretty 
two-story dwelling raised above the 
street and terraced, with a stone wall. 

G Edward Dillingham, son of the sold- 
ier, was a sea-captain, trading with the 
East Indies. "Uncle Edward's" own 
family tea service was brought from 
those distant lands and was of yellow 
ware, with hand-painted floral decora- 
tions. The cups testify to their age, being 



of that fashion which had no handles. 
In my china cabinet is one of these an- 
cient cups with its saucer — a gift from 
Captain Edward's grandniece, Mrs. De- 
borah Hathaway Mara. Near it is Mrs. 
Anne Dillingham Hathaway's wedding 
cream-jug, which Mrs. Mara gave my 
daughter because of her name. The 
cream-jug is of white English porcelain, 
a graceful shape, and daintily flowered. 
The bride of 1790 evidently did not 
have all her china match, for Mr. W. 
Burgess has sent me one of her cups 
(also made without a handle) and saucer, 
and they are of the old blue ware, made 
in England and decorated in deep blue. 

The cottage where ejoseph Hathaway 
and 6 Anne Dillingham went to house- 
keeping is still standing. It is over a 
hundred years old, and, like her father's 
house, shows few traces of its age. 
And yet of the house where Joseph 
Hathaway was born there are only ruins 
left, — a stoned cellar in a meadow-like 
tangle of grass. To look at those ruins 
makes America's history shrink, for 
my mother remembers "Grandma 
Hathaway," and yet Grandma's 
mother-in-law, 4 H a n n a h Clarke 
Hathaway ,who lived in the house 
now fallen down, was a grandniece of 
Governor Winslow, one who lived at 
Plymouth and saw the Mayflower often. 
Hannah Clarke Hathaway died Oct. 5, 
1820, aged 94, and is buried in the 
Acushnet Cemetery, beside her husband, 
Jacob, who died Oct. 5, 1792, aged 63 
years (Page 45). 

In this same burial ground are the 
graves of Rev. Samuel West and wife. 
Samuel West, who graduated from Har- 
vard, was one of the first clergymen of 
New Bedford. For his second wife he 
married "Louisa Hathaway, the daugh- 
ter of the before mentioned Jacob and 
Hannah. She died March 18, 1797, 
aged 41, and her husband survived her 
ten years, dying Sept. 4, 1807, aged ~^. 
He was ordained in 1761, resigned 1S03. 



PEDIGREE OF S ELEAZER GAYLORD. 



MS 



Nicolas Finchon. 
Sherifl" of London, 1532. 
(.bore arms and crest.) 

John. 

m. Jane, heiress of 

Sir Richard Empson. 

(settled in Writtle, Essex.) 

d. Nov. 29, 1573. 

John. 

(second son) 

of Springfield, Essex. 

i William. 
Came in the fleet with Win- 
throp, 1630. Settled in 
Springfield, Mass., 1636. 
Was prosecuted for certain 
religious writings, and with 
second "wife and all his 
children but two, returned 
to England, 1653, and d. at 
Wraisbur3 r on the Thames, 
Oct. 1662, aet. 72 yrs. 

2ANN. 

m. Rev. iHenry Smith, of 
Wethersfield, who returned 
to England, 1653. 

2Ann Smith. 

m. John Allyn, Nov. 19, 

1651. 



William Rockwell 
and Susan Capen were 
married in Holy Trinity 
Church, of Dorchester, 
Eng., April 14th, 1624. 
Susan was b. April 11, 
1602. d. Nov. 13, 1666. 
They emigrated 1630, and 
settled in Winsor, Conn., 
where Wm. was made a 
deacon of the church. 



i Matthew Allyn. 
of Brampton Co., 
Devon, Eng. Came 
to Charlestown in 
1632. Removed to 
Winsor, Conn. m. 
Margaret. d. Feb. 
1, 1670-1. 

2J0HN. 
(called "Honored.") 
Served the C olonies 
in many prominent 
tv ays. Representa- 
tive for many years 
and made Lieut. -Col. 
by Gov. Andros. d. 
at Hartford, Nov. 11, 
1696. 



Sarah. 
b. July 24, 16*8. m. Wal- 
ter Gaylord, March 22, 
1658. 



3Margaret. 
b. July 29, 1660. d. March 16, 1733. 



1 William Gaylord 
was chosen a deacon at 
the church gathering at 
Plymouth, Eng., March, 
1630. He came to America 
in the "Mary and John" 
soon after, and settled in 
Winsor, Conn. His wife 
d. June 20, 1657. He d. 
July 20, 1673, aet. 88. 



2Walter. 
m. twice, d. Aug. 9, 16S9. 



^Eleazer. 
b. March 7, 1652. 
m. Aug. 11, 1686. 



Martha 
Thompson. 



iWm. Southmayd. 



Wm. Addis. 



a Gloucester ship- of Gloucester, 
wright and mari- 1643. Brewer in 
ner. m. Milicent New London, 
Addis, Nov. 28, 1658-62. 
1642. 

2MELICENT. 



2W1LLIAM. 
b. Sept. 12, 1643. Captain of a ship 
in the West Indies trade. Settled in 
Middletown, Conn. in. Margaret 
Allyn, 16S4. d. Dec. 4, 1702. 



4SAMUEL. 
b. March 9, 
1696. Settled 
in Middletown, 
Conn. Was a 
mariner sailing 
with his father- 
in-law, William 
Southmayd. 
(Had children: 
Melicent, 
Samuel, 
Ann, and 
Eleazer.) 



4Margaret, b. 1691. 



Eleazer Gaylord married 4 Eunice, the daugh- 
ter of 3 Nathaniel Gilbert and Elizabeth Prout. 
I have been fortunate in securing the Gaylord 
ancestry even — at this, the eleventh hour. The 
reader is referred to Stiles' "History of Win- 
sor," to the Visitations of Essex, to Vol. II of 
the Heraldic Journal, to Savage, and to the N. 
E. Gen. Register. 



sEleazer Gaylord. 
m. 5Eunice Gilbert. 



6MOLLY. 

m. 6Ebenezer Warner. 



7EBEN. 
m.8Hannah Kowler. 



8Wm. P. 
m. £Anna Richmond. 



cjRichniond. 
P. Warner. 



gAnna. 
m. C. E. French. 



Charles Elting French. 



PARENTAGE OF ELIZABETH PROUT. 



In spite of repeated effort I cannot 
learn the identical family from which 
the wife of 3 Nathaniel Gilbert sprung. 
I am inclined to believe she was the 
daughter of s Timothy, because she 
named a son Eleazer, and was herself 
Elizabeth — the name of his first wife. 

But I submit the question. 



By his second wife, Grace, Ebenezer 
Prout had: Eunice, 1690; Mary, 1694; 
and John, who died young. 



(Timothy Prout. 

ship-w right, 

was at Boston, 1644. 

m. Margaret. 

m. 2nd, Elizabeth Upshall, 

wid. of Wm. Greenotigh. 



iTimothy. 

b. March 10, 

1645. m. 

Deborah, 

daughter of 

Zechariah 

Symmes, of 

Charlestown, 

Dec. 13, 

1664. 



sSusanna. ajohn. 

b. April 26, bp.Feb. 11, 



1647. 



1649 
Mary Hall, 
Aug. 23, 1681 



rjoseph. 
b. 1651. m. 
Mary Jack- 
son. 



3Mary. 

m. John Dixwell, 

the regicide, in 

Middletown, 1708. 



2\Villiam. sBenjamin. 2Ebenezer. 

b. May 23, b. March 14, b. March 14, 1657. 
1658. m. 1655. d. Apr. m. Elizabeth, daugh- 
Love. 5, 1669. ter of Capt. Timo- 

thy Wheeler. 1678. 
She d. Oct. 11,1683. 

3Timothy. 
left Middletown and 
went to Boston. 






INDEX. 

Every name in the book is catalogued in the following single index. 

There are three instances of where a name was only used once and all 
the family named on the same page. The individuals in these families are 
not named separately. 

The small figuers preceeding Christian names indicate that the person in- 
dicated is so many degrees removed from an original ancestor of the same 
name in the first volume. Thus the figure 4 placed before the name of 4 May- 
dalen DuBois indicates that the ancestry is traced directly to 1 Louis DuBois, 
Vol. I. It anyone finds the numbers confusing they may be ignored without 
any resultant loss of knowledge, only of time. 

The Gibbs family which are double-numbered, are explained under the 
name in the index. 

Brackets enclosing a page number indicates that the life of the individual 
named is specially noticed on that page. 



Aarsten, — Gerrit 26 

Acushnet 1 

Acushnet Cemetery 140, 144 

Acushnet Burial Record 140 

Adam 135 

Adams, — Eleanor 100 

James 100 

Jeremiah 82 

John 100 

Susannah 100 

W. K 135 

Addis, — Melicent 145 

William 145 

Akins, — Anna 1 30 

Ebenzer 130 

Jonathan 1 30 

Marion 130 

Mary 130 

Ruth 130 

William 1 30 



Alabama Claims 95 

Albany, N. Y 26, 96 

Albro,— John 32 

Samuel 48 

"Albion,"— (Whaling Ship) 95, 13S 

Aldbury— John 32 

Alden— Abigail C in 

2 David 1 

2 Elizabeth 1, 54, 71, 142 

Hannah 126* 

John. ..([,) 51, 54, 68, 69, 81, 142 

Job 126 

John, Jr 1 

Jonathan 1 

Joseph , 1 

Lucy 126 

Mary 1 

Priscilla (Molines) 1, 142 

Ruth 1, 126 

Sarah 1 



148 



Index. 



Alford, Lincolnshire 

Allen,— Abbie 

Charles 

Louis 

Sophia 

Allyn, — John 

Margaret 

Matthew 

Almy, — Anne 

Christopher 

Alsdorf, — Levi 

Amherst, Mass 

Amsterdam 

Amsterdam, Nieu 

Amyot, Jacob 

Anabaptistry 

Andersonville Prison 

Andrew, Rachel 

Andrews, Bethiah 

Andros, Governor 8, 32, 4S, 52, 

'Ann,"— (Ship) 10, 1 1, 86, 

"Ann," "the Elizabeth and" (ship) 

Anne, — (Boleyn) 

Anthony, — Abigail 

David 

Gideon 

Martha L 



50 
1 12 
1 12 

130 

36 

MS 

MS 

145 

24 

12 

31 

. 43 
16 



16, 13 



0- 

72 

1 10 

87 
101 

MS 
100 

58 
29 

33 

34 

34 

128 



81 

33 
34 
46 

46 

53 
36 



Anthony, Patience 33 

Susan 

Susanna 

William 

Appel, — Adrian Van Leyden of. 

Ariantje 

Appoin, — Allan 

Susan 

Aquidneck 8, 46, 57, 58, 81 

Archangel on the White Sea 93 

Archer, — Henry 79 

Aric Roosa Patent, N. Y 26 

Arlotta 61 

Armada, — The Spanish 15 

Artois, France 2,21 

Ashton Keyes, Wiltshire 65 

Assonet, Mass 43. 45. 63, 130 

Athean, — Content 127 

Atwater, — Mary ... 79 

Audley, — Jane 8 

Austin, — Louisa 1:9, 122 

Austin's R. I. Genealogical Dic- 
tionary 87 

Awashong, (Queen. Sachem) 36, 64 

Axminster, Devonshire 49 



Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire 



29 



B 



Babbitt, — Elizabeth 126 

Babcock, — John 48 

Backus, — Isaac 126 

Joseph 126 

Simeon 126 



Baker,— Mrs. Mary 

Molly 

Samuel 

Stephen 

Bangs, Benjamin 

Elkanah 

Baptist Church, — (of Newport). . 
Baptist Church, — (of Wilming- 



126 

59 
100 

30 
18 
18 

57 



}6, 37 



i/, 38 
6 



ton, N. C.) 

Bardcn, — Abraham 

"Bark Isabella,"- (ship) 94 

Barker, — James 48 



Barnaby, — Capt. Ambrose .... . J, 119 

Joanna 89 

James 119 

Jonathan 1 19 

Lydia 5 

Samuel 125 

Barnes, — Maybee 79 

Barnstable 44 

Barrington 71 

Bartlett. — Benjamin 54 

Robert S6 

Samuel 54 

Barton 123 

Rebecca 1 20 

Pass, — John I 

Bates, - Deborah N 19, 127 

Battelle- Elizabeth 85 



Index. 



149 



Battelle, Henry C 113 

Minnie 113 

Baxter, — Alephia Sophia 109 

Beckitt 80 

Bedford County, England 47 

Bedford, N. Y 81 

Beeltsyder, — Johannes 25 

Beem — Albert (17) 

Elizabeth (17), 27 

Beere, — Henry 72 

Beesharen, — Elizabeth 17 

Behring Straits 136 

Belcher, — Andrew 41 

Jonathan.... 41 

Benjamin, — Henrietta 135 

Mary 10 

Bennett,— Ann 1 30 

Joseph 130 

Berkley, Mass iS, 19, 43, 44 

Berry,— Alice 88 

Bessimer, — Dorothy 27 

Betty, ( slave) 34 

Bevier, — Abraham 27 

Elizabeth 17 

Louis 52 

Beyle, Holland 25 

Bibble, — Elizabeth Latham 47 

Bicknell 116 

Biddle, — Chapman 132 

Mrs. Clement 116, 132 

Rebecca Cornell 34, 132 

Bigelow, — Sallie 119 

Biggs, — Elizabeth 79 

Biljouw, — Pierre 21 

Billings, — James 124 

Mary 124 

Bingham, — Olive 90 

Bissell, — Deliverance 82 

Bitteswell, Co. Kent iS 

Bixby — H. M 120 

Blancsan, — Catharine (2,) 21,52 

Elizabeth 2 

Kattryn (2,) 21, 52 

Maria 2 

Matthys (2,) 3, 21 

Bloody Brook Massacre 92 

Bloomer, — Joseph 30 



Blossom, — Joseph 1 30 

Bois, — vide DuBois 

Boltwood, — Sarah 82 

Bommel, — vide Van Bommel 

Boodry, — Charles 130 

Jerusha 130 

Joseph 130 

Willie 130 

Boomer, — Eleanor , 33 

Mary 48 

Matthew 33 

Booth, — Abiah 116 

2 Abraham 6 

2Benjamin 6 

Elizabeth 6 

2 Grace 6, 60 

ijohn (6,) 60 

2 John 6 

2 Joseph 6 

ajudith 6, 60 

2 Mary 6 

Borden, — Abram 116 

Elizabeth 33 

Joseph 62 

Major 108 

Rev. Mr 36 

Sarah 62 

Stephen 62 

Bosley 117 

Boston, Mass. — 8, 10, 12, 15, 16, 29, 32, 
37- 46, 49. 58, 68, 71, 72, ji, 74, 
82, 92, 99, 108, 109, 129. 

"Boston News Letter" 53 

Botsford 28 

Bourne, — Abram no 

Charity 119 

Clara F 110 

Elizabeth 18 

Jonathan 18 

Margaret 99 

Stephen 110 

Bowen, — Earl Hartwcll 112 

Edward A 112 

Elizabeth 121 

John „.. ., . . . 62 

Joseph 121 

Nathan 121 



150 



Index. 



i i, 



Bowen, Paul 

Stephen 

Bowker, — Jane 

Boz, — Tryntje Tysse 

Bradford 

Gov 

Samuel - 

Bragg, — Everett 

Frederick 

Jared 

John 

Katharine 

Maty 

Mary Ann 

Mary Reid 

Samuel 

Samuel 

Sarah 

Braintree 

George 

Edward 

Brampton, Devonshire 

Brayton, — Hannah 

Lucy 

Mary 

Myra 

Stephen 

Thomas 

Brewster, — Love 

Bridewell Prison, London 

Bridges, — Charles 

Bridgewater 

Briggs— Joan 

John 

Margaret 

Matthew 

Rebecca 

Brightman,— 5 Betsey 5, 114, 11 

3 Elizabeth 

^Elizabeth 

3 George (4), 5, 

George 

*Hannah (5), 14, 70, 91, 11; 

1 Henry 

2 Henry 

3 Hcnry 



121 

89 

124 

25. /3 

•5- 54 
71,86 

7i 

135 
135 
i3S 
135 
135 
135 
135 
'35 
135 
119 

135 
60 

134 

134 

M5 

34 

134 

33' o4 

134 

80 

100 
29 
12 

35.53 

. So 

iS 

125 

15 

12 

6, 1 28 

4 

5 

57 ■- 70 

128 

', 1 1 8, 

(4) 

4 

4, 121 



Brightman,2 — Hester 4 

3 James 4 

4 James 5 

2 Joseph (4) 

3 Joseph 4 

Mary Ann 116 

4 Pardon 5 

Peleg 108 

Samuel 5, 114, 116 

2 Sarah 4 

4 Sarah - 5 

Susannah 4, 5 

2 Thomas 4 

William 4, 13 

Bristol 24 

Bristol Co., Mass 64 

Brodhead, — Hester 27 

Bronson, — Reese 116 

Brooker, — William 121 

Brookes, — Maiy 49 

Brookline, Mass 73 

Brown, — Barbara 74 

Hannah 59 

James N 116 

John 130 

Mary 125 

Nicholas 58 

Seth 128 

Mrs. Rebecca E 126 

Brownell, — 2 Ann 6, 33, 99 

Charles 99 

George 6, 56 

Joseph 13 

Joshua 57 

2 Mary 6, 46, 99 



^Martha 

2 Robert 

2 Sarah 6, 24 

Susannah 13 

'Thomas (6), 

2 Thomas 6 

2 \\'illiam 

Browning, — Nathaniel 30, 33 

Bruyn, Gertrude 23 

Bryden, Mary 1 24 

Buckinghamshire 29 

Bucklin, — Abbie 123 



6 
6 

1 ^3 

62 

33 

56 

6 



Index. 



i 5 1 



Bucklin, — James 123 

Budds' Neck, N. Y 81 

Bull,— Amey 66, 67 

Henry 8, 66, 67 

Bulkely, — Lillian 118 

Margery 86 

Bunce, — Elizabeth 92 

Sarah 92 

Burden, — Sarah 134 

Burgess, — Clara 127 

Esther 99 



Burgess — Frank 127 

Joseph 127 

Paul 96, 127 

Thomas 67 

William 127, 144 

Burgh-upon-Baines Lincolnshire.. 50 

Burial Hill, Boston 10 

Busher 125 

Butts,— Alice 56 

Susannah .■ $6 



Calais, France 16 

California 109, 116, 124 

Callsey, — Mr 41 

Cambridge, England 46 

Cambridge, Mass 82,92 

Canedy, — Barnabas 125 

Canonicut Mills 108 

Canterbury, — Court of 47 

Cantine, — Moses ] 6 

Cape Cod Compact 1,51 

Capen, — Susan 145 

Carey, — Mother 133 

Carpenter, — Mr 131 

Carr, — Caleb 8 

Elizabeth 99 

Robert 8 

Carter, — John 51 

Cartwright, — Jonathan 128 

John 128 

Cathcart, — Anne 19, 43, 140 

Cedar Keyes, Florida 113 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa 28, 118 

Crab Orchard, Ky 135 

Chaffee, — Susanna 141 

Chambers, — Benjamin 57 

Chandler, — Elsie 118 

George 118 

Walter 118 

Chapin, — Christian 74 

Chapman, — Isaac 18 

Lydia 18 

Mary Clarke 9 

Ralph 9 



Chappel, — Isaac 135 

Mary 117 

Charity, — Aunt 38 

Charles 1 47 

Charles Edward 26 

Charles River 10 

Charlestown, Mass 79, 108 

Charleston, S. C 95, 114, 115 

Charter Oak 92 

Chase, — ~ Benjamin (7,) 44, 75, 125 

Benjamin 129 

3 Benjamin 7 

3 Bethiah 7 

Charles 125 

Clarke 128, 129 

Danforth 128 

George 125 

Leonard 129 

Mary 7, 109,129 

Nabby 129 

Nancy 128 

3 Phillipa 7, 44, 75, 125 

Chase, — Rufus 1 28 

3 Sarah 7 

Seth 125 

Thomas 125 

3 Walter 7 

W. H 131 

nVilliam (7) 

2 William 7 75 

William 128 

Chaumischaug 41 

Chelmsford, — Mass , 28, 79 



I 5 2 



Index. 



Chelsea, Mass 10S 

Chester, N. Y 19 

Chicago 110 

Chilton, — Mary 99 

Chiltonville 10 

Chipman, — James 135 

Chittendon, — John 28 

Church, — Benjamin 53, 66, 86 

Richard 86 

Thomas 57 

Church of England 67 

Cincinnati 113 

Clarke's Cove 19, 144 

Clarke, — Abigail 13 

2Andrew (10,) J2,, 101 

3Andrew ( 1 o,) 45 

Amos D 127 

*Anna 101 

Captain 41 

Carew 9 

3 Contcnt 9 

4 David 127 

Daniel 30 

3 Delivcrancc 9, 13, 1 16 

Edwin 127 

4 Elizabeth 10, 101 

Elsie Newkcrk 95 

■lEunice 10, 101 

Flora 127 

Frances Latham 8, 47, 48 

3 Frances 9 

George H 127 

4 Hannah 10, 45, 191, 144 

4 Hannah 127 

3 Hannah 9 

Mrs. Hannah 57 

Harold 127 

Harry 127 

2 James 8, 10 

Jeremiah, Gov (8,) 48 

Jeremiah 8, 9 

John (9,) 10, 28, 92, 127 

Joseph 9 

3 Katherine 9, 76 

2 Latham 8,9 

Margaret 9 

Mary 8, 9, 57 



Clarke, — Mehitabel 10, 101 

2 Nathaniel 10 

Pasor 9 

Paul 127 

Roland 18 

Sarah 124 

Sarah 8, 9, 58 

Susanna i 

Scotto 10 

Thomas (9), (io),73 

Thankful 10, 101 

2 Walter, Gov (8), 9, 13, 72 

2 Weston 8, 9 

William 9, 10 

Clearwater, — Elsie 16 

Clerkenleap Manor 99 

Cleveland, — Betsey 1 30 

David 130 

Enus 130 

James 93 

Clifton Cemetery, Newport 76 

Clipsham, England 87 

Coddington, — Gov 8, 74 

Codman, — Hannah Hathaway.... 141 

Coe, —John 54 

Coertin, — Stephen 25 

Coggeshall, — Comfort 34 

Elizabeth 34 

Joshua 34 

Josiah 34 

Merc\' 33 



Thomas. 



33. 34 

Coit, — Martha 92 

Colby, — Newton 1 1 S 

Robert 118 

Colchester 74, 119, 135 

Coleman, — Joseph 30 

Colonial Records 73 

Columbia, Maine 127 

Conklin, — Lemuel 30 

Concord, Mass 108 

Concordance 83 

Congregational Church 68 

Connecticut 1 26, 1 2 1 

Conte, — Mary lc 17 

Cooke, — Debosah 80 

Elizabeth n, 56 



Index. 



153 



Cooke, — Esther 11 

'Francis (11) 

2 Jacob 11 

2 Jane 11 

John g, (11 ), 43, 86 

Joseph S2 

Katharine 9 

Mary 11, 112 

Mercy 11 

Minnie 1 1 1 

Rachel 56 

Robert 112 

3 Sarah 1 1, 43 

Thomas 13 

Cope, — Elizabeth 8, 43 

Sir John 43 

Cornell, — (derivation of name, 112) 

2 Anne 12 

5 Benjamin 13 

5Clarke 13 

Deborah . 12 

Deliverance Clarke g, 13 

Dinah ,...13, 64 

3 Edward • • • ■ 12 

^Elizabeth 12 

"George g, (13), 34, 116, 132 

5 George 13 

Gideon 34, 116, 133, 134 

s Innocent 12 

5 Job 13 

2 John 12 

6 Joseph 13 

2 Joshua 12 

Martha 33 

Mary.... ,.12, 13, 35, 64, 119, 134 

Philadelphia 13 

2 Rebecca 12 

Richard 12, 13 

5 Ruth 13 

Samuel 12 

Sarah 12, 13, 33 

Stephen 12, 116 

Susannah 13, 33, 34 

'Thomas (12) 

Thomas 6, 12, 13, 33, 34, 48, 64, 

116, 113, 134 
5 Walter 13 



79 

IS 
49 
85 



Cornell, — William 12, 34, 132 

Cornell's Neck, N. Y 12 

Cornwall,— Richard, Earl of 12 

Cornwallis 112 

Cornwell, — Esther 

Corteljou, — Jacque 

Cotton, — Elizabeth 

"Covenant of Grace," (book) .... 

Covington, N. Y 28, 31 

Cowdall, — Mrs. John 66 

Coweset 33, 34 

Craggs,— John 80 

Crandon, — John 125 

Philip ig, 45 

Cranston, — Gov 13 

John 8 

Crispell, — vide Krypcl. 
Cregier, — vide Kregier. 

Crocker, — Capt. Josiah 35 

Crosby, — Helen 118 

Crossman, — Nathaoiel 58 

Crow, — Sarah g2 

Cromwell, — Oliver 10 

Cummings, — Nelson 1 28 

Cushing Genealogy 14 

dishing, — Agnes 14 



Ammable. 
Barbara. . . 
3 Benjamin. 



14 
14 
IS 
14 
IS 
IS 



Bridget 

3 Caleb 

2 David 

Debora 14, 15 

3 Deborah 14, 68, 69 

Edward 14 

Elyne 14 

Emme 14 

Isabel 14 

3 James 15 

'-Jeremiah 15, 49 

2 John (15), 46, 49 

John (14), 15,49 

3 Joseph 15, 49 

3 Joshua 15 

Margaret 14 

Margery 14 

2Mary 15 



154 



Index. 



Cushing, — iMatthcw (15), 14,46 

2 Matthew 15 

Nicholas 14 

Peter (14), 46 

Robert 14 

3 Sarah 15 



Cushing, — Stephen 14 

Thcophilus 14 

Thomas (14, 15 

Ursula 14 

William (14) 

Cushman, — Sally 103 



D 



Daggett, — Hannah 

Darien, Georgia 

Dartmouth, Mass. 4, II, 12, iS, 19, 
65, 68, 69, 75, 125, 130. 

Dawty, — Mr no, 

Davenol, Humphrey 

Davenporf, Emma 

Davey, Minnie 

Davids, Deborah ( 

Christoffel ( 

John 

Davis, — Abigail 44, 

Annie Reid 

Captain 

Edmund 

George 

George E 

George H 

Hannah 

Helen 

Herbert 

Joseph 

Lloyd 

Louis 

Mary 126, 

Mary Ella 

Nellie M 

Nicholas 

Perry 

Phoebe 

Rhoda 

Sarah 76, 

Sylvestre 

Daval, — Ezra 

Mary 

Day,— Mary P 

Dean— A. N 

Benjamin 



12S 
39 
43- 

1 1 

32 
01 
18 
7) 
7) 
32 
66 

35 
28 



Dean, — Betsey 120 

Elizabeth 1 31 

Hannah 131 

Harriet 131 

Job 123 



35 
35 



35 
30 
23 
35 
30 
35 

30 
57 



-0 
28 
21 
80 

27 
20 

31 



Leonidas 123 

Mary 131 



Mehitable 131 

Sarah 131 

Dedham, Suffolk 74 

Deerfield, Conn S2, 92 

"Defence" — (ship) 109 

De Graffe— Maria 16 

De Jou, — vide Deyo. 

Delano, — Bridget 43, 130, 141 

Nathaniel 1 30 

Thomas 1 , 86 

Deming, — Emma C 1 11 

Dennis— Mr 24 

Dennison, — Catharine S4 

Depew, — Nicator 132 

Devonshire 145 

Dewnes, — Winifred 47 

Deyo, — sAbraham 16 

2 Anna 16 

s Annetje (17) 

sAriantja 17 

4 Benjamin 17 

Christian 16, 12, 132 

3 Christian 16 

Christeyau (16), 52 

Christoffel 17 

4 David 17 

'Deborah 17 

-Elizabeth 16 

rElizabeth 17 

4 Haggetta 17 

■ r, llannah ( 17), 27 



Index. 



155 



Deyo, — *Hendrik ( 17), 27 

sHendrikus 17 

3 Henry 16, (17) 

6 Henry 17 

4 Johannes 17 

Joseph 17 

sMadallen 16 

2 Margeret 16, 21, 27 

5 Maria 17 

sMarie 16, 12 

3 Mar>' 16 

5 Mary 17 

2 Pierre (16), 52, 132 

3 Pierre 16 

4 Peter 17 

5 Rebecca 17 

4 Sarah 17 

Diamond, — Mary H 135 

Dickinson,— Charles 41 

Dighton go, 116 

"Diligent," — (ship) 15, 46 

Dillingham, — 4 Abigail 18 

6 Abigail 19 

^Abigail 134 

6 Anne. . . .(19), 101, 127,141, 144 

6 Asa .19, (134) 

sBenjamin 18, (19), 43, 45, 127, 
129, 144. 

6 Benjamin 19 

4Deborah 18 

B Desire iS 

3 Dorcas 18 

Drusilla 18 

iEdward (18) 

3 Edward 18 

4 Edward 18 

6 Edward 18, 19, 144 

7 Edward 134 

4 Eliza IS 

6 Esther 18, 19 

4 Experience 18 

°Gamaliel 19 

3 Hannah 18 

4 Hannah 18 

6 Hannah 19 

7 Hannah 134 

2 Henry 18 



Dillingham, — 4 Isaac . 



sjohn . . , 
3 John. . 
4 John.. 
"John . . 
7 John . . 
"Lemuel 



IS 
iS 
18 
18 
19 
134 
19 



*Lydia iS 

4 Mary 18 

e Paul 19 

6 Priscilla 19 

3 Rebecca 18 

4 Rebecca iS 

"Ruth.... 19 

4 Sarah 18 

5 Susannah. .... 18 

4 Thankful iS 

Dobson, — Edward 12S 

Dodson, — Mary 6 

Dorchester, Eng 145 

Dorchester, Mass 49 

Dorr, — Georgiana 127 

Doty, — Curtiss 1 30 

Douglass, — Mr 122 

Doyau, — vide Deyo. 

Drake, — Harriet 126 

Zephaniah 126 

Drenthe, — Province of, (Holland) 25 

Droitwych, England 99, 100 

Diyden, — Bridget 50, 72 

Sir Erasmus 8, 50 

John 9, 50 

Du Bois, — 2 Abraham, 3, 16, 21, (23,) 17, 

52. 

3 Abraham 21 

Anne.. 21 

3 Barent 27, 7S 

3 Benjamin 23 

3 Catharine 21 

Cattryn 23 

Chretien (21 ) 

2 David 3 

4 Dinah 23, 27 

Francoise 21 

3 Hendricus 23, 27, 46 

4 Hendricus 23 

2 Isaac 3, 21, 23 



1 5 6 



Index. 



!!■ 



DuBois, — 3 Jacomyntje 23, 27, 78 

Jacob 3, /S 

3 Joel 21 

4 Leah 23 

'Louis 2, 3, (21), 51 

2 Louis 3 

3 Magdalen 23 

4 Magdallena 27, 78 

sMary 21 

2 Matthew 

4 Methusalem. 

3 Noach 

4 Phillippus. . 

3 Rachel 

* Rachel 

2 Sarah 

3 Sarah 

^Solomon . . 3, 
3 Solomon .... 
4 Solomon .... 
4 Tryntje 

Du Mont,— William. 
Dungan, — 2 Barbara. 

Frances 

Thomas 

William 

Dunham, — Joseph . . . 

Seth. 

Durfee, — Anne 

Benjamin 

Betsey 

Corey 124, 12: 

Deborah 124 

2 Deliverance 24 

Elizabeth 24, 33 



(21), 22, 23, 



23 
21 

23 
21 

23 

3 

2 3. 2 7 

26, 78 

21 
23 
23 



48 

....8, 48, 87 
...48,87,88 

48 

7 

125 

•6, 24, 33, 34 

24 

124 

23 



Durfee, — 3 Freeborn 24 

Gideon 24,33 

Hannah 90, 123 

Hope 62, 124 

Job 24, 34 

John 123 

Martha 6, 33, 34, 62, 90 

Maty 24, 33, 45 

Patience 24, 33, So 

Phoebe 123 

Rebecca 125 

2 Richard 24 

2 Robert 24 

Sarah 24, 33 

Susannah 24, 33 

Thomas 6, (24), 34, 62 

3 Thomas 24 

2 William 24 

Dusenberry, — Sarah 29 

"Dusine," — (The) 21, 52 

Dutch,— William 8 

Dutch Colonial Records 12 

Dutchess Co. N. Y 26 

Duxbury 1 , 49, 54 

Dwelly, — Daniel 1 1 1 

Phcebe 1 1 1 

Dwight, — Louise A 119 

Dyer, — Charles 6 

D. H 112 

George F 112 

John 90 

Marshallalhashbaz 56 

Susan, C 112 

W. A 112 



Eames, — Margery 46 

Earle, — Caleb 5 

Gibbs, — vide paragraph 17, 
Gibbs Genealogy 128 

G. W. — vide above 

Hannah, — vide above 

Joan 12 

Lloyd, — vide above 

Mary 35 

Mirabel 91 



Earle, — Prudence 24 

Ralph 12, 18 

Sarah 12 

Slade, — vide paragraph 17, 

Gibbs Genealogy 128 

William 68, 91 

Eastchester, N. V 29 

East Greenwich 4, 33, 67, 88 

Easton, — Man" 8 

Rebecca S 



Index. 



157 



Eaton, — Cicely 86 

Eben, — (slave) 34 

Ecker, — Sarah 51 

Eddy, — Hannah C... 120 

Edict of Nantes 2, 16 

Edmondorff, — Brandina 27 

Edward IV, — 14 

Edward VI 29 

Eel River, Mass 10,86 

Elbertson, — Elbert 25 

"Elizabeth and Ann," — (ship). . . 58 

Elizabeth, — Queen 29 

Elliot, — Rev. John 74 

Ellis, — Benjamin 101 

Cornelius 101 

Sarah W 124 

Elston, England 47 

Elten, — vide Elting 

Elting, — Aaltje..,. 22, 25 

2 Altje -. . .26, 78 

Abraham 17, 27 

4 Abraham 23, 26 (27) 

G Abraham 1 7, 28 

•Andrew 28 

Barteldt 26 

Catharine 27 

Cornelius 22, 27, 78 

6 David 28 

Edmund 25 

6 Eliza 28 

Ezekiel 27 

2 Geertje 26, 78 

Henry 27, 28, 30 

Jacomyntje 27 

*Jan 22 (25), 78 

Jacobus 27 

5 Jane 27 



Elting, — 6 Jemima. . . 17, 26, (2S), 31, 85 

3 Johannes 27 

6 Joseph 28 

Josiah 26, (27), 78 

5 Margaret 27 

Maria 26 

"Mary 28 

3 Noach 27 

5 Noah 1 7, 23, 26, 28 

Phoebe Ann 17 

2 Roeliff 22, 26, (27), 78 

4 Roeliff 27 

Solomon 17 

William 22, 26, 78 

Elveston, Bedford Co., England. . 47 

Emerson, — Ralph Waldo 96 

Empson, — Jane 145 

Sir Richard 145 

Endicott, — Governor 72 

Enfield, Conn 131 

Episcopalian Church, Fall River, 58 

Esopus, N. Y 3,16 

Essex, — Visitations of 145 

Estes 24 

Estill, — Fannie 85 

Eustis, — Philadelphia 13 

Evans, — David 89 

Isabel 120 

Lydia 125 

Maiy 1 26, 1 30 

Robert 60 

Ruth 1 2 j 

Sarah 122 

Thomas 125 

Errill, — Elizabeth 1 

Eyres, — Rev. Nicholas 13 

Exeter, England 112 



Fairfax, Conn 59 

Fairfield, Conn 29 

Faii-haven, Mass, 19, 43, 45, 94, 99, 101, 

130, 136, 139. 
Fall River, Mass., 13, 35, 36, 61, 64, 65, 
70, 91, 93, 94, 96, 97, 
108, 109, in, 112, 113, 
119, 122, 123, 129, 143 



Fannie 45 

Farmington, Conn 40, 41 



Farnell, — Jane 

Susanna 

Faunce, — Priscilla. . 

Thomas 

"Favorite," — (ship) 



47 
47 
86 
86 
95 



i S3 



Index. 



Feake, — Eliza 18 

Henry iS 

Fearing, — John 46 

Fernald, — Robert 47 

Fiscock, — Elizabeth 12 

Fish,— Mehitabel Si 

Fisher 69 

Elizabeth 69 

First Church, — ( Boston) jt, 

Flatbush, L. I 25 

Fletcher, — (derivation of name 112.) 

2 Abigail 2S 

2 Elizabeth 28 

2 Hannah 2S 

2 Hopc 28, 42, 79 

John (28), 82, S7 

2 Mary 2S 

2 Rebecca 2S, 82 

Robert 28 

2 Samuel 28 

2 Sarah 28 

William (28), 79 

Flint, — Fannie 123 

Flockthorpe, — (Manor) 14 

Flushing, — 29, 30 

Fobes, — William 54 

Foeken, — Gerrit 21, 78 

Forefathers' Hall 10 

Forman, — Samuel 62 

Foster, — George 88 

John 30 

Mary 59 

Samuel 10 

Fowler, — (derivation of name, 112). 

Abigail 30 



^Archibald 11S 

*Benjamin 29 

c Caleb ^0 



Charles 30, 70 

Daniel ^0 



Dr. David 51 

c David 17, 28, (31), 85, 11S 

G Elizabcth 30 



Elting 31, 118 



"Elting. 
Francis . 
6 Gilbert. 



118 
30 



Fowler, — 'Hannah 29 

THannah 26, (31), 84, 85 

2 Henry (29) 

5 Isaac 28, (30), 51, Si, 129 

"Isaac (30) 

7 Isaac D 31 

9 Isaac Du Bois 11S 

5 James 30 

Jeremiah ». 29 

John 29, (30), 11S 

John Kennedy 28, 118 

3 Jonathan 29 

4 Joseph 29 

Josiah 59 

10 Kate 118 

Lucy 17 

!"Mae Crosby 118 

Martha 30, 118 

Mary 29, 31, 51 

Nehemiah 30, 59 

4 Rebecca 29 

Robert Ludlow 29 

Samuel 30, 59 

4 Sarah 29 

4 Thomas 29 

William (29) 

France 2, 16, 1 14, 127 

Fraunceis 112 

"Francis," — (ship) 32 

Frederick William IV 2 

Freeborn, — (derivation of name, 112. 

3 Ann 6, 24, 34, 64 

3 Comfort 33, 34 

2Gideon 6, 24, 32 (33) 

.Gideon 33, 34, 48, 134 

4Gideon 34 

■•John 33 

3 Martha 13, 34, 134 

Mary 32, 33 

2 Mary 32, S7, 88 

aMary 34 

Mercy 34 

3 Paticnce 34 

Sarah 32, 33, 34 

3 Susannah 33, 34 

Thomas 34 

'William (32), ^ 34,87 



Index. 



159 



Freeborn, — 3 William 33, 34 

Freeman, — Benjamin 18 

Prince 18 

Freer, — Hugo 51 

Johannes 17 

Philip 21 

Freetown 4, 43, 44, 45, 57, 61,62, 64, 77, 

89, 93. 134- 

"Friends' Record" 8 

French, — (derivation of name)... 112 
Abbie M. . . .39, 93, 112, 119, 122 

Abram 36 

Albert S 11 1 

Amanda S 1 1 1 

Anna. .' 26 

5 Anne H 38 

Arthur 108, no 

Asa 3, 35 (no) 

Asa P 1 1 

3 Asahel 108 

Bell Agnes 1 10 

Benjamin W no 

Betsey M 113 

Carl Clifton 1 10 

Caroline 38, 10S, no, 113 

Charles B in 

Charles E 6, (38) 

Charles Elting, 6, 17, 26, (38), 85, 
91. 

Chester R in 

Clara C no 

Corrinna 1 1 1 

Ernest W in 

Ebenezer 109 

Edelweiss 113 

Edna J in 

Edward 109,112 

Eliza 38, 108, (109), 1 1 1 

Elizabeth 36 

^noch, 13, (35), 36, 61, 64, 65, 
So, 91, 10S, 109, no, 

113. I3S- 

2 Enoch 1 10, in 

Enoch, Winfield no 

Emeline 108 

Ephraim, (35), 59, 91, (10S), 119, 

120, 122, 131. 



French, — Ethel in 

Florence D 1 1 1 

Frank in 

Franklin no 

Frederick no 

George B no 

George H 113 

George R., 3, (36), 38, 53, 61, 64, 
in, 113. 

Georgiana 38 

Hannah in 

6 Hattie 113 

5 Hattie Dell 113 

Helen 113 

Henry 113 

6 Irene 113 

Isabella 113 

James 36, 38, in, 112 

Jerome m 

Job 35- 36, (112) 

John 10S, 113 

4 Josephine 38, (ill) 

Julia W 112 

Lena no 

Louisa 108, 113 

Lucy O in 

4 Margarct 38 

Maria no 

Mariana no 

6 Marshall W 113 

Mary E 109, 112 

2 Mary N 108 

s Mary P 10S 

Mary W. R 36, 118 

3 Nancy 36 

4 Orlando no 

Otis L in 

Ralph in 

3 Richard 35, 36 

Sarah Ann 38 

Sarah Caroline 113 

Sarah E 10S 

Sarah Judson 112 

Sarah R 109, no 

Sarah S 1 oS 

Stephen 35, 36, 49, (in) 

Stephen Luther in 



i6o 



Index. 



French, — Susan 38, iog French, — William 109, III, (113) 

Theodore no Frensche, — Peter le 112 

William A 38, 113 Fuller, — George A 109 



William A., 
William B. 



1 r 



36, (113) 



Marion P 109 



67 

47 
42 
42 



Gardiner, — Elizabeth Ill Gibbs, 

Henry 

Garnett, — Catharine Latham. . . . 

Gaylord, — Annah 

Dolly 

5 Eleazer 42, 79, S4, 145 

3 Elcizur 145 

Elizabeth 42 

Eunice Gilbert 42 

Hannah 42 

Millicent 42 

Molly 42, 79, 84 

4 Samuel 145 

Sarah 42 

Susannah 42 

= Walter 145 

1 William 145 

Genesee Valley 97 

Germany 17 

"General Marion, "—(sailing vessel) 1 15 

Gerritse, — Gerritse 78 

Tryntje 22, 23, 7S 

Getchell, — Jonathan 81 

Gibbs Genealogy. — (The following is a 
genealogy of the Somerset and 
Fall River Gibbs. The refer- 
ences are to paragraphs on pages 
12S, 129, unless prefaced with the 
word page.) 

3 Abigail, — 2, page 39 

5 Abigail, — 6. 
"Abigail, — 15. 

7 Alma, — page 23 

•Amanda,— 14. 
6 Amanda W., — 13. 

7 Ann, — page 23 

5 Anna Maria,— 1 1,13. 
"Anna Maria, — 13. 
'Annie E.,— 26. 
4 Anson, — 3. 



— (vide explanation at first men- 
tion of name.) 
G Aphaxed, — 15. 
5 Bathana, — 11. 
4 Benjamin, — 5, 9, page .... 39 

5 Benjamin, — 9, 18. 
5 Benjamin, — 1 1, 20. 
"Benjamin, — iS, 24. 
G Benjamin, — 20, 28. 
'Benjamin, — 2S. 

s Bertie, — 29. 
6 Bethana D., — 13. 
4 Betsey, — 4. 
s Blacke, — 29. 

6 Caroline, — 14. 
"Charles, — iS. 

8 Charles, — 29. 
8 Charles G., — 31. 
4 Cynthia, — 3. 

5 David, — 7. 

6 David, — 14. 
"Edmund, — 13. 
"Eliza,— 16. 

7 Eliza, —23. 

3 Elizabeth, — 2, page..".... 39 
"Elizabeth, — 14. 

Elizabeth, — page 39 

Emelinc, — page 124 

7 Emily, — 21. 
5 Eunice, — 6. 
"Eunice Weaver, — 16. 

8 Flora, — 29. 

7 Frederick, — 26, 30. 
"Gardner, — 19, 26. 
"Gardner, — 30. 
6 George, — 10. 
"George, — 14. 
"George W., — 16, 22. 
7 Gcorge M, — 22. 
'George H.,— 23. 



Index. 



161 



Gibbs, — (vide explanation at first men- 
tion of name.) 
5 Georgia; — 7. 
5 Hamed, — 17. 

4 Hannab, — 4, page 39 

4 Hannah, — 5. 

5 Hannah, — 8, 17. 

6 Harriet,— 16. 

7 Harriet, — 22. 
7 Hattie— 13. 
4 Henry, — 5, 11. 

8 Henry,— 2, 5, pages (39), 90 

"Henry — 8. 

5 Henry, — II, 19. 

6 Henry, — 13. 

7 Henry, — 26. 

Hepsibah, — 2, page 39 

3 Hepsibah, — 2, page 39. 
4 Hepsibah, — 4. 
5 Hepsibah, — 6, 15. 

8 Herman, — 29. 
7 H. Francis, — 25. 

3 Israel, — 2, page 39 

4 Joanna, — 4. 
5 Joanna, — 7. 

3 Job — 2, page 39 

"Job— s, page 39 

3 John — 3, page 39 

4 John — 4, 6. 
5 John, — 6, 7, 14. 
5 John, — 8, 15. 
5 John, — 10, 11. 
6 John, — 15, 21, 27. 
6 John,— 14, 19, 25. 
'John, — 21, 29. 

4 Joseph— 5, 10, page 39 

5 Joseph, — 7, 11. 
e Joseph, — 13. 
7 Lola, — 27. 
7 Lottie,— 28. 
5 Louis, — 6. 

6 Louise 15 

7 Louise,— 23. 

5 Lydia, — 6. 

6 Maria, — 16. 

5 Martha — 8. 

4 Mary — 5, page 39 



Gibbs, — (vide explanation at first men- 
tion of name.) 

5 Mary — 8, 10. 

6 Mary, — 14, 19. 

7 Mary, — 22, 28. 

7 Mary E— 26. 

5 Nancy, — 9, 16. 

6 Nancy, -15. 

7 Nancy C, — 27. 

7 Nelson H.,— 25. 

5 Polly,-6, 15. 

G Polly— 16. 

4 Rhody, — page (39,) 90 

5 Rhoda, — 10, 19, page 70 

'Richard B.,— 25. 

1 Robert, — 1, page (39) 

2 Robert, — 2, page (39) 

4 Robert, — 2, page 39 

*Robert,— 4, 5, 7, page 39 

B Robert— 8, 16. 

G Robert, — 16, 23. 

7 Robert, — 22. 

7 Robert S., — 23. 

5 Rody,--9, 19. 

6 Rody— 18. 

sRuth— 6. 

3 Samuel,— 2, page . 39 

4 Samuel, — 4, 7, page 39 

5 Samuel, — 7, 13. 

"Samuel, — 13. 

7 Samuel, — 22. 

3 Sarah, — 2, page 39 

'Susan, — 22, 24. 

5 Wata,— 10. 

6 William, — 13, 18. 

7 William, — 25, 26, 31. 
Gifford 130 

Diodemia 110 

Gilbert, — (derivation of name 112) 

2 Ebenezer 41 

3 Ebenezer 42 

4 Ebenezer 42 

Elizabeth Prout 42 

^Esther , 41 

3 Eunice 79 

4 Eunice (4-,) S4 

John 40, 42 



l62 



Index. 



Gilbert, — Jonathan (40,) 42, 79 

Jonathan 28, 41, (42) 

Jonathan 42 

-Lydia 41 

Mary White 41 

Mary 41.42 

Nathaniel 4 r , ( 42, ) 79 

2 Rachcl 41 

2 Samucl 41 

Sarah 41,42 

2 Thomas 41 

"Gilded Otter,"— (ship) 2 

Gilgar, — Joseph 139 

Gilman, — Lydia 15 

Glasgow 20 

Glemsford, Suffolk Co ji 

Gloucester, Mass 143 

Gloucestershire 43 

Godfrey, — Abigail 

Gordon 

Susan 

Godiva 

Goodwin, — Mr 

Captain 



131 

131 

39 

92 

8 



Catharine 76 



Daniel 

Gould, —Jeremiah . 

James 

Sarah 

Goward, — Betsey . 

Fidelia. . . . 

Francis .... 

Harriet. . . . 

Isaac 

Israel 



9 
9 
9 
8 

3 
3 



Goward, — Jason 

Josiah 

Julia 

Lucinda 

Louisa 

Martha 

Ruth 

Sally 

Watson 

Zephaniah 

Grant, — Miss 

Elizabeth 

Gray, — Dorothy L 

Lydia 

Thomas 

Greens Harbor 

Grcenman, — Content 

Greenwich, Kent 

Griggs, — Man- 

"Griffin," (ship) 

Griffing, — Winifred 

Griffith, — Norman 

Walter 

Grinnel, — Benjamin 

Daniel 

Matthew 

Rose 

Grisby, Kent 

Guildford, Conn 

Guimar, — Marictje 

Gundreda 

Gunn, — Sarah J 

Gusher, — Hannah 

Gustavus Adolphus,-- (of Sweden) 



3 
j * 
3i 
97 
82 
10 
49 
57 
100 
8 
S6 
79 
14 
59 



/ 



1. 

127 

i-5 

7. 54 

55 

55 

50 

131 
27 
86 

109 

127 

26 



H 



Iladley 82, 92 

Hait — Rachel 28 

Hall— Alethia W 109 

Arthur 109 

Benjamin 34, 58 

Bethia 101 

Clara A 109 

Deliverance 24, Si 

Elizabeth 56 

Emily A 109 



Hall, — Geertje 22 

Lucy A 109 

Mary 34 

Samuel 1 09 

Thomas 22, 20 

Zuriel 81 

Hallet,— Abigail 1 

Alice 10 

Robert 10 

Hamford, — Hattie 13s 



Index. 



163 



Hamlin, — Shubael 101 

Hammond, — Nathaniel 45 

Hammond, — Mary Hathaway 141 

Hancock,— Lillie M 122 

Handy, — Alma 129 

Hardenbergh, — Jacobus 27 

Johnson 23 

Sarah „ 28 

Hardingeham, England 14, 15 

Hardwicke, Mass., — History of... 141 

Harrington, — Jennie 135 

Hart, — Alice 59 

Freeborn Williams 8, 9 

Hartford, Conn 40, 82, 92, 145 

Harvard College 79, 92, 144 

"Harvard Graduates" > 79 

Harwick, Mass 1, 10, iS, 101 

Hasbrouck, — Abraham 16, 17 

Alrah D 17 

De Witt 17 

Jean 16 

Jonathan 1 29 

Katharine 16 

Maria 3 

Rachel 3 

Roelif 27 

Haskins, — Anna 125 

Martha 124 

Samuel 59, 131 

Hatfield, England 82 

Hathaway, — 5 Abiel 126 

6 Abiel 130 

Abigail 141 

2 Abigail 44 

3 Abigail 44 

5 Abigail 45, 125 

6 Abigail 1 30 

6 Abner 124 

2 Abraham 44 

5 Abraham 125 

e Albert 124 

7 Albert 124 

5 Alice 45 

Alice Pope 140 

7 Almira 19, 127 

8 Almira Augusta 127 

8 Almira R 127 



Hathaway, — Angelina 

c Anna 

Anna 140, 141, 

6 Anna 

7 Annah F 

4 Anna 19, 

7 Anne 96, 

9 Anne W 

8 Anson. 

Arthuni, (43), 129, 130, 140, 

4 Benjamin 43, 

6 Benjamin 

Betsey 1 20, 122, 

4 Betty 43, 

5 Betty 

"Betty 

°Bradford 19, 124, 

7 Bradford 

8 Bradford 

BridgetDelano 43, 

C A 43, 

G Candace Weaver 

7 Candace 

Charles R 

G Chloe 

Christian 

Clara J 

5 Clothier 

s Content 

5 Daniel 

e David 

7 David T 

Deborah 141, 

8 Deborah 96, 126, 

B Diodemia 

B Drusilla 

5 Dudley 

Ebenezer 

6 Edmund 

4 Eleazer 43, 140, 

5 Eleazer 

Elisha 

4 Elizabeth 

5 Elizabeth 124, 

°Elizabeth 124, 

7 Elizabeth P 

8 Elizabeth C 



\6 

'■5 
42 

jo 
24 

43 
27 

7 

27 

41 
26 
26 
24 

25 

25 

45 
27 

24 
7 
4i 
4i 
23 
24 

24 

30 
44 
40 
26 

7 
:26 

24 
24 

:44 
27 
25 
=5 
! 5 
30 
23 
41 

25 
41 
30 
:26 
30 

23 
:28 



1 64 



Index. 



Hathaway, — Eliza 134 

■ 3 Elnathan 140, 141, 142 

°Elsie 126 

'Emma 126 

'Emma C 124 

3 Ephraim 44 

Esther 141 

3 Experience 44 

8 Fannie 124 

s Florence 124 

'Franklin Flint 123 

8 Furnman Whitwell 127 

3 Gamaliel, 19, (43,) 140, 141, 142, 

144. 

George 141 

°Gideon 45, 129 

Guilford 43, 125 

4 Hannah 125 

5 Hannah 126 

°Hannah 6, 123 

Hannah, 19, 44, (45,) 43, 70, 96, 

101, 122, 123, 125, 127, 

140, 144. 

s Hannah 126 

'Harold 124 

s Harriet 127 

10 Hattie Backus 127 

8 Helen E 124 

'Helen 1 124 

6 Henry 130 

8 Henry R 127 

Hope 125, 130 

5 Huldah 125 

5 Irena 126 

Isaac 44, 126, 129, 131, 140 

4 Israel 131 

4 Issacher 1 30 

3 Jacob 7, 125, (44,) 140 

4 Jacob. 126 

5 Jacob, 10, (45,) 75, 101, 126, 127, 

144. 

Jacob 7- 44, 45 

*Jael, 35. 37. 'OS, 121, (122,) (123,) 

126. 

5 Jael 122 

Jael 59 

8 Jarius 127 



Hathaway,- — 5 James 

ti James L 

James 124, 1 40, 

,J James O 

Job 125, 

°Job 

G Job B 

'John (43,) 

2 John 144,) 43, 

a John 44, 140, 

"John 43, 

5 John 

,; John. 

'John 19, 124, 

8 John D 

John 37, 121, 124, 

John B 

"Jonathan, (43.) 130, 140, 141, 

Jonathan 43, (130,) 

4 Jonathan 1 30, 

5 Jonathan 122, 

4 Joscph (45,) 122, 

,r, Joscph 

"Joseph, (45.) 94. 96, 9S, 
(127,) 141, 144. 

Joseph 19, 54. 

'Joseph 19, 

8 Joscph 126, 

'•'Joseph M 

5 Joshua 

''Judith 

Keziah 

5 Lazarus 

Lizzie 

r 'Lloyd 122, 

8 Lois 

5 Lot 45, 122, 

8 Luclla W 

'Louise E 

8 Louisa 45, 

9 Lucy Malina 

Lydia 125, 

'Mabel Antoinette 

Margaret 

8 Martha 

r 'Martha 

'Martha E 



25 
34 
41 
27 
40 
24 
•■4 
42 
40 
42 

■5 
45 

'■4 

-7 
27 
29 
21 
42 
40 
:40 

=3 

26 

25 
01, 

127 

>-7 

127 

:6 
30 
26 
26 
M 
23 

26 

2 3 
7 

[44 

126 

141 

24 

[41 

44 
'■5 
24 



Index. 



i6 S 



Hathaway, — Mary 

5 Mary 

6 Mary 124, 126, 

7 Mary E 

"Mary Lincoln 

8 Mary Ann 

4 Meletiah 43, 125, 

5 Meletiah 125, ( 

'Meletiah 

B Mercy 45, 122, 125, 

4 Micah 43, 141, 

6 Nancy Bowcn 

4 Nathaniel 

Nicholas 

*Obed 

8 0tisVV 

4 Paul 

5 Paul 45, 

'Paul 126, 

Philip 7, 43, 125, 

"Phineas 

5 Phcebe 

G Phcebe 123, 

6 Rachel 

2 Rebecca 

6 Rebecca 122, 123, 

fi Rebecca 

6 Reliance 

6 Reuben 45, 

'Rhoda 

Richard 

4 Robert 

Royal 1 40, 

5 Russel 122, 

6 Russel 

'Russel 

Ruth 43, 

Sarah [25, 

2 Sarah 

3 Sarah 

5 Sarah 

9 Sarah E 

9 Sarah I 

g Sarah O 

Seth 43, 125, 126, 130, 

Shadrach 45, 

3 Silas 



40 

30 
30 
24 
24 
27 
30 

;o) 

30 
26 
42 

23 
30 
42 

43 
27 

30 
26 
27 
40 
26 

25 
24 

26 
44 

25 

45 
3° 
4i 
24 

30 
30 
4i 
24 
24 
24 
24 
4i 
43 
44 
26 
27 
27 
27 
40 
27 
40 



Hathaway, — 6Susan 124 

Susannah 1 22, 124, 126, 130, 140 
141. 

5 SyIvanus 125,140 

Thankful 141 

G Thankful 45 

2 Thomas 140 

3 Thomas 44 

8 Thomas Henry 127 

5 Tryphena 125 

'Walter C 124 

William 141 

5 Zilpah 126 

Hawaii 139 

Hawes, — Susan 14 

Hawke, — (derivation of name, 112). 

2 Bethiah 46 

2 Deborah 46 

2 Elizabeth 46 

2 Hannah 46 

2 James 46 

Margaret 1 5, 46 

2 Mary 46, 49 

Matthew 15, (46) 

2 Sarah 14, 15, 46, 49 

Hayden, — Elizabeth 60 

Isabel de 86 

John 60 

Haynes, — Governor 14, 40 

Hazard, — Elizabeth 46, 48 

2 Hannah 46 

2 Martha _ 6, 46 

2 Robert 6, 46 

1 Thomas (46), 48 

Head, — Elizabeth 99 

Healy, — Mary Lee 120 

Hedges, — Abigail. 10 

Helm, — Elizabeth 17 

Margaret 6 

Henry IV, — (France) 2 

Henry VIII, — (England) 74 

Henshaw, — Emma Irene 113 

Herring, — Mary Lou 113 

Hartford, England 12,82 

Heydenbergh, — Sarah 85 

Hicks, — Martha 39, 128 

Rebecca 13 



1 66 



Index. 



Hickson,— Walter 9 2 

Higby— Moses 3° 

Highland, N. Y 27, 30 

Hills— Sarah 3° 

Susan 74 

William 82 

Hingham, Conn 1 5, 49, 86 

Hingham, England 14, 15 

Hinsdale, — Barnabas 92 

Jacob 9 2 

Historical and Genealogical Reg- 
ister (N. E) 82 

Hoar, — Hezekiah 4 

Hobson,— Mr 114 

Hegdene, — de. Vide Ogden. 

Holbrook— Elizabeth 101 

Holden,— F. A 47 

Holder, — Christopher 72 

Holland 2, 11, 16, 25, 78, 86 

Holloway, — James 18 

Holmes,— Lydia 1 27 

Mary 119 

"Holy War,"— (book ) 77 

Hoogduytsland '7 

Hooker,— Mr 82, 92 

Hooper, — Foster 109 

Lindsay 109 

Mrs. Mary no 

Sarah L 109 

Hopkins, — Damans it 

Gov 40,9 2 

Hopping, — Mary 1 08 

Hopstede, — Guilielmus 26 



Houghtaling, — lAnna 46 

4 Ariantje 46 

Dina 46 

4 Hannah 46 

3 Hiskia 46 

Jan (46) 

Jane 27,(46) 

4 Jannetje. 23, (46) 

4 Leah 46 

s Philip 23, (46) 

4 Rachel 46 

3 Samuel 46 

4 Sarah 46 

2 William (46) 

Houghton, — Joseph 85 

Seth W S4 

Howard, — Casey 1 27 

Dora 127 

Embert 127 

Lina 127 

Mary 127 

Howland, — Wealthy 125 

Hoyt— W. E 85 

Hubbard, — Samuel S7 

James 25 

Hudson, The 3, 26, 28, 30, 5 1 , 52 

Hull 49 

Humphrey, — Hannah 1 1 1 

Hunt,— Naomi 4S 

Phoebe 29 

Huntingdon, — Simeon 1 20 

Hurley, N. Y.— 2, 3, 16, 22, 25, 26, 27, 

52, 78. 
Hutchinson,— Anne S, 32, 50, 72 



I 

Ide,— Henry 124 Ipswich, England 15 

India 109 Ipswich, Mass 32, 72, 97 

Indian Wars 22, 101 Irish— John 99 

Indians 75 Susanna 99 



Jacob,— Deborah 1 5, 46 Jacob— 2 John 46 

^Elizabeth 15,46 2 Joscph 46 

2 Hannah 46, 49 "Josiah 46 



Index. 



167 



Jacob, — Mary 46 

'Nicholas (46), 4g 

2 Sarah 15, 46 

Jamaica 133 

James, — John 57 

Janney, 45 

Jansen, — Joost 3 

"Jewel of Contentment" (book).. 49 



Jocelyn, — Johanna 125 

"John Adams" (ship) 137 

Jones iS 

Jorisse, — Madallen 21 

Josephus' Antiquities of the Jews 76 

Jouatt, — (derivation of name) .... 112 

Elizabeth 1 1 , 86 



K 



Kate (slave) 69 

Kelley, — Hannah 41 

Kempton, — William 19 

Kennedy,— Margaret 31, 118 

Kent, England 79 

Kent, — Thomas . ... 12 

Kerridge, — Rose 9 

Kidder, — Edward H 124 

James 124 

Mary 124 

Kieft, — Gov ... 12 

Kiersted, — Christian 23 

King, — Benjamin 58 

Kingston Church Record 17 

Kingston, Jamaica 133 



Kingston Massacre 22 

Kingston-on-the-Hudson, — 3, 17, 21, 27, 
51, 75, 78, 132. 

King Philip's War 66, 86 

Kinnecut,— Mary 99 

Kinsley, — Benjamin 89 

Kirby, — Robert 6 

Temperance 56 

Knot, — George 18 

Knowles, — Amos 18 

Koddebeck, — William 27 

Kregier, — Captain 3 

Krypel, — Anthoine 2, 21, 51 

Kunst, — Cornells Barents 78 



LaBassee, Artois 21 

Lafayette, — General 94 

Langley, — Mrs. Jeanette ill 

Lapham, — Julia E 123 

Latham, — Anne 47 

Elizabeth 47 

Ellen 47 

E. W 47 

Frances 8,47, (48), 87 

Henry 47 

John 47 

Katharine 47 

Lewis (47). 48 

Whinethred 47 

Lathrop, — Abigail 10, 131 

Barnabas 10 

Law, — Elizabeth 63 

Ellen 63 



Lawrence, — John 1 30 

Samuel 1 30 

Lawton, — Elizabeth 4, 12, 48, 75 

George 12, 33, 46, (48) 

Isaac So 

Isabel 48 



48 
33>48 

33-48 



Job 

John 

Mary 

Mercy 

Naomi 12 

Priscilla 13 

Robert 48 

Ruth 48, 134 

Susanna 12, 34, 48, 116 

William 91 

Lebanon, Conn 1 19, 135 

Learning, — Mary 131 



i68 Index. 

Le Febvre, — Andre i6 Lombard St., London 14 

Simeon 16 London, — 8, 14, 46, 48, 50, 58, 72, 74, 

Simon 16 99, 145. 

Leicestershire 18 Loring, — (derivation of name, 1 12.) 

Leigh, — Isabel 86 "Loring Genealogy" 49 

Lenton, — Agnes 50 Loring, — Benjamin 46,49 

Leonard, — vide page 123 Loring, — 3 Caleb 49, 68 

John 50 3 Deborah 1 5, 49 

Le Sueur, — Jannetje -■ 26 4 Deborah 14, 49, 69 

Lewis, — Sarah 134 Mrs. Deborah Cushing. . . .49, 69 

Lexington 1 29 3 David 49 

Leydon, Holland 2,11,21,78,86 3 Hannah 49 

Lima University 31 4 Hannah 49 

Lincoln, — Daniel 108, 109, 123 2 Isaac 49 

Eddy [23 2 John 49 

Edward 109 Joshua 49 

Ella P 109 2 Josiah 49 

Geneason 123 ^Nathaniel 49 

Henry..... 123 Richmond 69 

John 109,124 1 Thomas (49) 

Lewis 123 2 Thomas (49) 

Mary E 109 3 Thomas 14, 15, (49), 68, 69 

Moses 123 4 Thomas 49 

Patience 123 Thomas 46 

Russell 123 Lorraine 112 

Ruth 109 Lothrop, — Abigail 10, 131 

Silas 124 Barnabas 10 

Stephen 46 Louis Phillippe 26 

Victoria 123 Louisburg 69 

Lincolnshire 50 Louw, — Catharine 27 

Lindsay,— C. E (109) Maria 27 

Charles B 109 Pieter Cornellisen ... 2 

Eliza French ( 109) Lumber, — Mar)' 57 

Nancy 131 Luthers, — Barthana 39, 128 

Sarah 109 Lutzen, — Battle of 26 

William 36, 109, 112 "Lydia," — Voyage of the Whaling 

Little,— Thomas S6 Ship 136 

Little Compton, R. I.,— 4, 53, 57, 65, 66, "Lydia," — (ship) 93 

67, 68, 69, 1 43. Lynn, Mass 18 

Livonia, N. Y 117 "Lyon," — (ship) 92 

Locke, — Mary 131 "Lyon,"— Miss 97 

M 

Macomber, — Pardon 10S Mami 137 

Mainwaring — Elias 135 Manchester, Elizabeth 76 

Makepeace, — Sarah 44 Peleg 65, 70 



In£>ex. 



169 



Manchester, — William 33 

Manhattan Island 3, 25 

Mannhiem 2,21 

Mara, — Deborah Hathaway. ... 126, 144 

James C 127 

Marble,— Ann 86 

Willie 123 

Wm. P 123 

Marbletown, N. Y 22, 26 

Marbury, — Anne 50 

Anthony 50 

Bridget 50 

Daniel 50 

Edward 50 

Elizabeth 50 

Emme 50 

Erasmus 50 

Francis ( 50), 72 

Jeremuth 50 

John 50 

Katharine 8, 50, 72 

Mary '. . . . 50 

Susannah 50 

William (50) 

"Marengo", — (ship) 137 

Marsh,— Elizabeth 86 

Marshall, — Addie 1 24 

Marshfield, — Josiah 41 

Marshfield, Mass 43-99- 101 

Marston,— J. W 127 

James 127 

Martenssen, — Maria 17 

Martin, — Atlanta 121 

Mary 13 

Mason, — Emilia 129 

Jane W 116 

Mass. Colonial Records 40 

Mather, — Increase 40 

Mattheysen, — Sarah 3 

Maxfield 1 30 

Abbie 130 

Abraham 1 30 

Betsey 130 

Dinah 1 30 

Henry 1 30 

Isaac 130 

Lucy 130 



Mayfield, N. Y 88 

"Mayflower," — (ship) I, II, 51, 71, 86, 
100. 

McCoon, — Jonathan 125 

McCoy,— Mary 121 

McHenry, — Alexander 108 

Medbur/— Arnold 118 

Hazel Frances 1 1 8 

Robert 118 

Sophia Whitcomb 118 

Will 118 

Medway Cemetery 94 

Merritt,— 4 Abigail 51 

Caleb (51), 59, 129 

3 David 51 

Elizabeth 51 

3 Gabriel 51 

^George (51), 59 

3 George 51 

Gloriana 28, 30, 51 

3 Humphrey 51 

3 Jane 51 

John 51 

3 Josiah 51 

Mary 29 

3 Samuel 5 1 

Thomas 51 

Messecap 41 

Messenger, — Elesta 119 

Michigan 28 

Middleborough 11 

Middletown, Conn., 42, 79, 82, 84, 87, 
145. 

Middletown, R. 1 57, 88 

Milbourne, — Robert 42 

Milford 28. 29 

Miller,— Bathiah . . » . 29 

Faith 100 

Hannah 123 

Rebecca 29 

Milwaukee, Wis , 1 iS 

Minneapolis 38 

Misquamicut 33, 66 

Mitchell, — Experience 11 

Martha 127 

Mohawk 3, 21 

Molines, — Elizabeth 51 



I/O 



Index. 



Molines, — 2 Joseph 51 

2 Priscilla 1, 51, 54, 69 

iWilliam 1, (51), 54 

Moore, — Samuel 100 

Morey, — Joseph 51 

Morrison, — vide page 130 

Morrow, — John 139 

Morse, — Anthony 1 30 

Charles 1 30, 134 

James 94 



Morse, — Philip 134 

Robert 134 

Mould,— Martha 92 

Mowbrey — Adela de 86 

Muddy River, Conn 73 

Muir, — Anna 121 

Mumford, — Thomas 75 

Murdock — Phcebe 86 

Mutterstadt, Holland 16, 1 32 



N 



Narragansett 40, 54, 66 

Nash, — Deborah 10 

Nat, — (slave) 69 

Nelson, — Annie 1 109 

Nancy 127 

Netherlands 11 

New Amsterdam 2, 3, 12 

New Bedford, Mass., 1, 63, 94, 101, 136, 

137. M4- 
Newburgh, — Ruttenber's History 

of 29, 59 

Newburgh 17, 30, 31, 51, 121 

Newbury, — Anne 8 

Walter 8 

Newbuiyport 108 

New England Genealogical Reg- 
ister 82 

New Hampshire 74 

New Haven, Conn 29, 135 

Newkerk, — Cornelis 22, 78 

Jannetje 22, 78 

Newland, — Anna 131 

New Marlborough 129 

New Netherlands 12 

New Orleans 116 

New Paltz, N. Y., 2, 3, 16, 17, 21, 22, 25, 

27, 28, 30, (52), 132. 
"Newport Place," (Manor in Eng- 
land) 99 



Newport, R. I., 4, S, 13, 32, 48, 57, 61, 

65, 66, 68, 70, 76, 80, 

87, 112, 115, 116, 117, 
132, 133, 134. 

Newton, — (town) S2 

Newton, — Elen 100 

Jane 49 

New York Colonial Records 12, 25 

New York Revolutionary Rolls.. 129 

New York 16, 25, 26, 130 

Nicol, — Agatha 16, 132 

Nichols, — Alice 10 

Elizabeth 34 

Mary 13 

Mathias 25 

Moses 45 

Niecel, — Agatha 16, 132 

N migrate 40 

Nobseusset 101 

Norfolk, England 14 

Norris, — Lord 29 

Norton, Mass 123 

Norwich, England 14 

Nowell,— Betsey 108 

Samuel 1 08 

Nunda, Livingstone County, New 

York 28, 31, 85, 1 lS 

Nye, — Abigail 18 

Hannah 19 



o 



Ocracoke Bar, N.C 133 

Odding, — Sarah 7, 74 

Ogden, — (derivation of name, 112). 



Ogden, — Elizabeth 59 

Old Colony Records 7, 65 

Ollyver,— Magdalen 99, 100 



Index. 



171 



Oneysville, R. 1 37 

Oritango 139 

Ormsby, — Susan (53) 

Osborn, — Charles French 1 1 1 

William J Ill 



Ostrander, — Petrus 17 

Otis, — Elizabeth 49 

"Our Predescessors," — (by R. L. 

Fowler) 29 

Oxford 30 



Pabodie, — Elizabeth. .. 51, (54), 71, 142 

Hannah 54 

Isabel 54 

Mohn i, (54) 

3 John 54 

3 Lydia 54 

3 Martha 54 

3 Mary 54 

3 Mercy 54 

3 Priscilla 54 

3 Rebecca 54 

3 Ruth 54 

3 Sarah 54 

2 William 1, 51, (54), 142 

3 William 54 

Packard, — Orin 119 

Sylvia 127 

Padelford, — Hannah 126 

Pagan Chaumischaug 41 

Paige, — Lucius R 141 

Paine, — 2 Alice 55 

Anthony (55), 81 

John 125 

Mary (55), 68, 69, 75, 81 

Rose 55 

Sarah 68 

Palatinate, — (The) 51, 116 

Palmer, — John 67 

Judith 130 

Mercy 130 

William 67 

Panknin, — Ethel ill 

Paris 1 14, 127 

Parker, — (derivation of name)... 112 

Frances 5 8, 76 

George (58), 76 

2 Joseph 58 

2 Mary 58, 76, 88 

2 Meribah 58 



Parker,— aPeter 58 

William N 131 

Parmelee, — Phcebe. 131 

Parmenter, — Judith 15 

Parsons, — Amelia T 85 

Partition of Poland 26 

Paull,— Micah 131 

William 66 

Pawling, — Henry 22, 78 

Jacomyntje 22, 78 

Pawtucket 108 

Peabody, — vide Pabodie. 

A. W 109 

Helen M 109 

Pearce, — Abigail 125 

3 Alice 56 

3 Anna 56, 76, 7 7 

Betty 125 

Charles F 120 

3 Elizabeth 56 

Experience 56 

2 George 56 

2 Giles 56 

James 56, 99 

2 Jeremiah 56 

2 John (56), 62, 76, 77, 80 

3 John 56 

2 Martha 56 

Mary 6, 56, 62, 77 

3 Rachel 56 

Richard (56) 

3 Sarah 56 

Silas 125 

Susannah 6, 56 

William 56 

Peckham, — Abbie A 36 

2 Clement 57 

3 Benjamin 57 

2 Deborah 57 



172 Index 

Peckham, — Eleanor 57 

Elizabeth 57 

5 Hannah 4, 57, 70 

John 9, (57) 

'-John (57) 

3 John (57) 

''John 57 

5 John 57 

Joseph 4, 9. (57). 99 

4 Lydia 57 

4 Margaret 57 

5 Martha 57 

Mary 57 

3 Peleg 57 

2Phoebe 57 

-Rebecca 57 

Reuben 57 

5 Rhoda 57 

Ruth 57 

5 Samuel 57 

Sarah 57 

Stephen 57 

2 Thomas 9, 57 

2 William 9, "57 

Peeler, — George 108 

John 108 

Mary 10S 

Pierpont, — William 79 

Peesharem, — Elizabeth 17 

Pelatte,— Ann 74 

Pelham, — Eleanor 99 

Sir Herbert 99 

Penficld, — Louis 83 

Pennsylvania 6 

Perkins, — vide pages 1 26, 127 

Perry, — Commodore 95 

Paul 125 

Perry, — Valentine 128 

Persson, — Sarah 27 

Peter the Great 26 

Philadelphia 78 

Phillips, — Elizabeth 1 

Jacob B 131 

Phinncy, — Gersham 101 

Piatt,— Lizzie 127 

Pickles, — Mary 15 

Pickins, — George 121 

/ 



"Pierce Biographical Collections," 89 

Pierce, — (vide Pearce) 

Etta 134 

Isaac, Jr 6 

John 129 

Judith 125, 130 

Martin 134 

Mary 128 

Pirate Story, — A True 114 

Pitcher, — Frances 15 

Henry 15 

Nazareth 14, 15 

Pitts 4 

William 70 

Samuel 70 

Piatt,— Nathan 117 

Plymouth Colonial Records 100 

Plymouth, — England.. .. 12, 61, 71 

Plymouth, Mass. 1, 10, 11, 15, 43, 51, 
54, 86, 99, 100, 101. 

Pocasset "]] 

Poland, — Partition of 26 

Pomeroy, — Harry 119 

Pope, — The 26 

Pope, — Alice 43 

Joanna 142 

Susanna 142 

Seth. 142 

Thomas . . iS 

Porte, — Joan de 86 

Porter, — John 74 

Portsmouth Compact, -The 32, 55, 74 

Portsmouth, N. H 108 

Portsmouth, R. I. 4, 6, S, 12, 13, 24, 

32, 33, 46, 48, 55, 56, 58, 75, 
76, 81, 99, 116, 120, 134. 

Potfield 74 

Potowamut 33 

Potter, — 'Benjamin 6 

Dorothy Stokes 6 

Eleazer 6 

Eleanor 6 

Elizabeth 6, 130 

2 Ichabod 6, 46 

:! Ichabod 6 

:! John 6 

8 Katharine 6 



Index. 



'73 



Potter,— Mary 6, 57, 130 

Nathaniel (6), 99 

3 Rebecca 6 

Robert 81 

Ruby 130 

Ruth 1 30 

3 Samuel 6 

Stephen fc . . 130 

Stokes 6 

Stoughton 89 

Thomas 6, 1 30 

William 6, 24, 80 

William J 130 

William J., Jr 130 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y 27 

Power, — Hope 8 

Pratt,— Capt. Alfred 128, 129 

Hannah 126 

Levi 126 

Lina 59, 131 

Lydia 59, 131 

Olive 126 

Prudence 59, 131 

Sarah 50, 131 

Pray 3 1 

Elizabeth 60 

Ephraim 6, 60 

Grace 60, 64, 93, 121 

Hannah 60 

Hugh 60 

Isaac 60 

John 60 

Joseph 60 

4 Judith 60 

4 Lydia 60 

3 Mary 60 

Richard 60 

Ruth 60 

Samuel 60 

3 Sarah 60 

"Thankful 60 

Presbrey, — 8 Abigail 59, 131 

4 Abigail 131 

5 Abigail 131 

5 Alden 131 

"Alfred 131 

4 Allen 131 



Presbrey, — 5 Allen 131 

4 Amasa 131 

6 Anne 131 

6 Arthur 131 

4 Barney 131 

5 Barney 131 

5 Benjamin 131 

"Billings 131 

5 Billings 131 

4 Beresford 131 

"Daniel 131 

5 Daniel 131 

3 Elizabeth 35, 59, 91, 108, 122, 

6 Ella 131 

4 Esther 131 

5 Francis 131 

5 Fred 131 

5 George 131 

2 Hannah 59 

5 Harriet 131 

5 Henry 131 

6 Isabelle »i 3 1 

4 James 131 

3 John 59, 131 

2 Joseph 59 

4 Joseph 131 

5 Joseph 131 

"Josiah 131 

3 Levi 59, 131 

59 

131 

59. 131 

131 

6 Mary 131 

"Nancy 131 

5 Samuel 131 

"Sarah 131 

8 Seth 59, 131 

"Seth 131 

5 Seth 131 

5 Silas 131 

3 Simeon 59. 131 

"Simeon , 131 

William (58) 

2 William 35, (59), (131) 

3 William 59, 1 3 1 



3 Lydia 
5 Lydia 
3 Mary. 
5 Mary. 



174 



Index. 



Presbrey, — "William 131 Purdy, — 4 Elizabeth 59 



Prince, — Elizabeth 49 

John 8 

Prior, — Capt 1 29 

Prout, — Elizabeth 42, ( 145) 

Providence, R. 1 8, 59, 72, 143 

Prudence Island, R. I 33,37 

Pudget,— Mary 125 

Pulloch 128 

Purdy, — Abigail 30, 59 

Anna 51 

:4 Caleb 59 

Charlotte 30, 59 

3 Daniel 59 

4 David 59 



Francis 5 ! > ( 59 ) 

4 Gabriel 59 

4 Glorianna 51, 59 

4 Henry 59 

3 John 59 

Joseph (59) 

4 Josiah 59 

4 Martha $1.59 

Samuel 51, (59) 

Pyncheon, — Ann 145 

John 145 

Nicholas 145 

William 145 



Quakers 18, 34, 44, 45 Ouantine, — Moses. 



16 



R 



Radcliffe— William 

Ransom, — Elizabeth 17 

Raretan, N. Y 

Raymond, — Mary 

Raynham, Mass 35 

Reade, — 8 Adolphus L 

•Amy W 

"Andrew Barton 

8 Andrew 

7 Anna 

8 Anna 

9 Anna 

Anne D 

8 Anne Elizabeth 

9 Anne Julia 

9 Bailey 

7 Bailey 

5 Benjamin 64, 

6 Benjamin 63, 

8 Benjamin F 

3 Bradford 

8 Caroline 

^Charity E 

9 Charles 119, 121, 

c Charlottc 



81 
28 
22 
134 
,58 
121 
121 
120 
120 
119 
120 

T2I 

134 
121 
121 
122 
120 
122 
I 22 
121 
130 
119 
119 
122 
122 



Reade, — "Clarissa 122 

8 Cyrus 120 

Daniel 1 30, 1 34 

3 Daniel 130 

7 Darius 120, 121 

8 Darius 119, 121 

6 Dean A 122 

Dorothy 121 

2 Ebenezer 61 

2 Edgar Adolphus. 121 

Edith 127 

Edward S 134 

9 Edwin. , 119 

"Elizabeth 63, 121, 128 

7 Elizabcth. 119 

8 Elizabeth 120 

9 Eloisc 122 

9 Emma C 121 

7 Erastus 120 

"Eunice 63 

6 Forman 63 

9 Frank : 1 22 

Frederick 134 

3 George 130 

6 George G 64, 1 20 



Index. 



175 



Reade, — 8 George 119, 120 

9 George 121, 122 

9 Georgiana 122 

"Grace 122 

3 Hannah 61 

4 Hannah 62 

5 Hannah 64, 93, 134 

"Hannan, 6, 34, 61, 62, 63, Jj, 93, 

122. 

9 Harold 119 

s Henry 120 

9 Herbert 121 

'Homer M 121 

8 Hope Ann 119 

6 Ichabod 63 

8 Isabel 120 

9 Isabella 122 

James 127, 130 

"James 35, 63, 64, 120, 122 

7 James 120 

9 James H 121 

Jared 119 

!john (61), 62 

2 John (61) 

3 John 13, 56, 61, (62), 130 

4 John 62 

5 John 134 

"John 121 

8 John McNeder 121 

9 John E 122 

John 134 

4 Jonathan 62 

Jonathan, 6, 34,62, (63), 77, 89, 

90, 93, 94, 128. 

"Jonathan 63 

3 Joseph 61 

4 Joseph, 60, 62, (64), 93, I2i, 122 
5 Joseph, 13, 35, 61, 62, (64), 121, 

119, 108, 122, 134. 

"Joseph 64, 120 

7 Joseph 120 

Joseph E 1 16, 121 

8 J.WoodW 121 

Louis N 123 

9 Lucy C 121 

e Lydia 63 

Mamie Moore 121 



Reade, — 8 Margaret 120 

Marion 134 

Martin 134 

Mary 64, 121, 134 

"Mary 62 

5 Mary 62 

6 Mary 122 

7 Mary 119 

8 Mary Ruth 121 

8 Mary 119, 120, 121 

8 Myra 120 

3 Nancy 130 

"Nancy 64, 1 2 1 

4 Nathan 62 

6 Nathan 62 

3 01iver 130 

4 01iver 6, 24, 34, 61, (62), 90 

6 01iver 62 

4 Penelope 62 

6 Phcebe 64, 12 1, 122, 119 

7 Phcebe 120 

Rachel 116, 121 

Rebecca 120, 121 

9 Robb Morris 121 

9 Robert 119 

Rosemond 121 

6 Ruby 122 

6 Ruth 63, 122 

8 Ruth Rice 121 

6 Samuel. . . .64, 119, 121, 122, 135 

'Samuel 119, 120, 122 

8 Samuel 1 19, 122 

8 Samuel Pay ton 121 

8 Samuel Warner 121 

9 Samuel N 122 

4 Sarah 62 

"Sarah— 13, 35, 61, 62, 64, 113, 

121, 122, 135. 

7 Sarah 120 

9 Sarah , 119 

Sheffield 20, 1 27 

8 Sophia 120 

Stephen 130, 134 

4 Susanna 62 

"Susanna 63, 122 

6 Tamer 122 

Thomas 62, 121 



176 



I 



NDEX. 



Reade — 5 Wait 34, 62, 63, 90 

* William 62 

5 William 64, 121 

e William 121 

9 William A 122 

8 William Muir 121 

William 124 

Winifred 134 

Record,— Mr 131 

Remington, — John 67, 68 

Rewardine, — Church of 43 

Rhode Island Historical Magazine, 9, 47 

Riceborough, Georgia 19, 94 

Richards,— Mr 41 

Elias 131 

William 131 

Richardson, — Jonathan 41 

Mrs. Mary no 

William -72 

Richelson, — Jonathan 41 

Richmond Burying ground of Lit- 
tle Compton, R. I. 
Richmond, — (derivation of name, 
112.) 

3 Abigail 67 

"Alanson 69, 70, 117 

*Anne....6, 15, 38, 70, 77, 85, 93 

3 Ann 67 

Aribel 131 

Austin 131 

Bela 131 

5 Benjamin 69 

6 Bradford... 14, 39, (70), 91, 143 
7 Bradford, 6, 17, 32, 34, 38, 62, 65, 

(70), 77, 80, 85, 91, 96, 97, 

114, 136. 

'Caroline 117 

Cliffe 65 

"Charles B 70 

Daniel 131 

Deborah Loring 68, 69, 143 

6 Deborah 70 

Edmund (65) 

2 Edward 54, 65, (66), 67 

3 Edward 67 

6 Edward 69 

7 Edwin R 117 



Richmond, — Eleanor 131 

Elizabeth 67 

4 Elizabeth 68, 69 

5 Elizabeth 69 

6 Elizabeth 5, 70 

7 Elizabeth 117 

Emily 131 

3 Esther 67 

8 Furman W 70 

"Gamaliel 68 

6 George B 70, (1 17) 

8 Georgia 70 

4 Hannah 69 

6 Hannah 69 

6 Hannah 6, 70 

7 Hannah Brightman 70 

Harriet 13 1 

3 Henry 67 

Hchabod 69 

Isabel 131 

Jacob 131 

James 131 

"James 70 

8 James Whitwell 70 

Jane 65 

Joan 65 

\John (65)70, 9 1 - J 43 

2 John 66 

John 131 

3 John 67 

5 Joshua 69 

Kate Eleanor 131 

8 Laura 70 

Lavant 131 

Leverett 131 

5 Loring 69 

6 Lucia 5, 70, 143 

7 Lucia 117 

5 Lucy 69 

Lydia 131 

Mary 131 

2 Mary 66 

3 Mary 67 

4 Mary 69 

5 Mary 69 

8 Mary French 70 

Mary Weaver 35, 64, 96 



Index. 



177 



Richmond,— 4 Peleg 68, 69 

4 Perez 14, 5 1 . 68, (69) 143 

5 Perez 14, 5, 69, (70) 91, 117, 143 
'Perez 117 

6 Perry Otis 70 

Rhody 70 

Robert 131 

4 Rogers 68, 69 

4 Ruth 69 

2 Sarah 66,68,67 

4 Sarah 69 

Sarah 131 

Shearman 131 

6 Susan 70 

3 Sylvestre, 49, 51, 55, 67, (68) 71, 

142, 143. 

4 Sylvestre 68, 69 

5 Sylvestre 69 

Warren 131 

4 William 68, 69 

Ricote, England 29 

Riecroft, — Frances Pitcher 15 

Ricketson — Eliza H 112 

Ring— 1 Mary 10 

2 Susanna 10 

Robert of Normandy 61 

Roberts — Ebenezer 85 

Robinson — Arthur 123 

Rochester, N. Y. , 91, 101, 130 

Rockwell — Sarah 145 

William 145 

Rodman — Ella C 1 1 1 

KarlF in 

Francis ill 

George in 

Hannah Clarke 9 

Thomas 9 

Roeloffe — William 25 



Rogers — 3 Abigail 7 1 

3 Ann 7 1 

2 Eleazer 7 1 

4 Elizabeth 5 1 - 68, 71 

2 Francis 7 1 

4 Hannah 71 

Henry 130 

2 John (71) 

3 John (71) 

4 John 7 1 

John 5 1 . 54 

Joseph 7 1 

Mary 41. 7 1 

4 Ruth 7 1 

4 Sarah 71 

Sylvestre 68 

3 Timothy 7 1 

Thomas (7 1 ) 

Roosa — The Arie Roosa Patent . . 26 

Evert 22 

Jane 46 

Jannetje : 23 

Roper — William 125 

Rose 27 

Rosendale 5 2 

"Rosetta,"— (the sloop) 37 

Rossiter — John 4 1 

Rotterdam, Holland 16 

Rougemont 112 

Rouse — Anna 54 

John ■ 54 

Roxbury — Mass 7, 32, 74, 79, 130 

Ruffum, Suffolk Co 9 

Russell— Mary 12 

Ruttenber's History of Newburg. 59 

Ryder— Ruth 134 

Sarah B 127 

Rye, N. Y 30, Si 



Salem, Mass 13, 100 

Salwarpe 101 

Samson (slave) 33 

Sanborn, — Clara 124 

Sanders, — Betsey 120 

Sandwich, Mass 18 



Sanford, — Joan 10, 73 

Mary 24 

Sawtucket 101 

Savage's Genealogical Diet S3, 87 

Savannah, Ga 94 

Sawyer, — Mrs. Sophia 36 



1 7 8 



Index. 



Schoonmaker, — Hendrick 78 

Schreider, — Mary 135 

Scituatc, Mass 6, 15 

Scott, — '-Deliverance 72 

2 Hannah 8, 13, 72 

sjohn ' 72 

Katharine Marbury S, 50 

-Mary .' 72 

2 Patience 72 

iRichard S, 50, (72) 

Scotto, — John 73 

Joshua 73 

3 MehitabeI 10, 73 

Rebecca 73 

Sarah 7^ 

-Thomas 10, (73 ) 

Thomasine (7^) 

Scotto's Lane 10 

Seabury, — Nancy 1 1 g 

Samuel 54 

Seaconnet, Hotel Newport 65 

Seaconnet Neck 54 

Seager, — Anna Latham 47 

Seaman's Friend Society 37 

Searle, — Nathaniel 71 

Richard 

Scbringh, — Catherine 

Jan 

Selden, — Esther 

Thomas 



Shearman, — 2 Benjamin 75 

Bethiah 34 

Daniel 74 



55 

3° 

25 

S2 

82 

Sequasson 40 

Sessions, — Rebecca C 1 20 

Sharon, Conn 30 

Shaw, — Ephraim 126 

Humphrey (35 

Israel 80 

Lois 126 

Lydia 126 

William 120 

Zephaniah 1 26 

Shawangunk 51 

Shay's Rebellion I 26 

Shearman,— ! Derivation of name 112.) 

3 Abiel 75 

Agnes 74 



Albert T . 
Alice.... 



■45. 55- 75 



David 44 

Dorcas 75 

'-'Eber 75 

2 Edmond 75 

Edward 74 

Elizabeth 74 

Ezekiel 74 

Fannie 13 c 

-Hannah 7. 75 

Henry (74) 

Isaac 130 

Isabel 75 

:i .Iob ( 75 

John 74, 75 

Judith 74 

Lydia 6 

Martha 74 

Mary 74. 75 

Nathaniel 74 

z Peleg 75,99 

'Philip 7.(74) 

-Philip 7, 75 

;! Philip , 75 

-Phillippe 7. 44. 75 

Hriscilla 74 

Robert 74 

-Sampson 55, Si, (75) 

Samuel ( 74,) 75,81 

Sarah 56, 74. 75 

Susan 74 

William 75, 99 

Sheffield,— 4 Aaron 76 

•Vunos 56, ( 76,) 77, Sg 

2 Ichabod 9, 58, (76) 

3 Ichabod 76 

'John 76 

3 Joseph 76 

Katharine 9 

Mary 76 

"Nathaniel 9, 76 

Ruth 28, 05, 76, (77,) 89 

'Susannah 76 

Sheriff, Martha 46 

Mary 7 6 



Index. 



179 



Sherringham, — Ellen Latham. ... 47 

Sherwood, — Rachel 51 

Showamet Purchase 89 

Shurtleff ,— Elizabeth 11 

Simmels, — Ariantje 46 

Simmons, — Deliverance 7 

John 54 

Lydia 4, 125 

Martha 112 

Mary 1, 7 

Meribah 125 

Rebecca 122 

Simsbury, Conn 79 

Sisson 1 29 

Anne 81 

Skaneateles, N. Y 42, S4 

Skeyton, — Maude, de 86 

Skinner, — Mr 59 

Slade, — Anna 1 30 

George 130 

Georgia 130 

Henry 123, 130 

Louisa 130 

Mary Ann 130 

Patience 91, 93, 130 

Robert 130 

Samuel 8g 

Slecht, — 1 Cornelis Barentson. .25, (78) 

Elsje 27 

Hendrick 27 

2 Jacomyntje 22, 25, (78) 

Petronella 78 

Sloat, — Polly 27 

Slocum, — John 58 

Small, — Jonathan 101 

Smith, — Abraham 79 

Ann 145 

Arthur 30, 59 , 

Charity 119 

Charles 1 26 

Cyrus 1 26 

Daniel 126 

Edward 119 

Eliza A 119 

Embert H 126 

Hannah 58, 126 

Henry 145 



Smith, — Lois V 126 

Martha 126 

Smiton, — Sarah 6 

Snow, — Anthony 86 

Henry 134 

James 120 

Snyder — Augustus 109 

Daniel 1 09 

Lillian 109 

Sarah 109 

Somerset 77. §9, 90, 92, 12S 

Soule, — John 100 

"South Boston," — (ship) 94 

South Church 73, 92 

Southampton 1 

Southmayd, — s Margaret 145 

1 William 145 

2 William 145 

South-water 1 

Southwick, — William 125 

Southworth, — Edward 54 

Mary 1 

William 54 

Spain 2 

Spanish Armada 15 

Spencer,- -Alfred 119 

Samuel R 119 

Spink, — Sarah T. . 112 

Spinnig, — Merritt A 117 

Spooner,— Abigail 142 

John 57 

Sarah 75 

Seth 142 

Springfield, Conn 145 

Springfield, Essex 145 

Spurr, — Mercy 4 

St. Bride's, — London 101 

St. Martin's in the Fields 48 

St. Martin's Vintry 50 

St. Paul, Minn 38, 85 

Stafford, Conn 

Stamford, Conn 81 

Standish, — Alexander 1 

Stanley, — Isabel 86 

John 28 

Stanton, — John 8 

Starr, — Frank F S3 



iSo 



Index. 



Steele, — John 82 

Steep Brook 93 

Stetson, — Benjamin 46 

Stevens 28 

Edwin 109 

Stevenson, — Coert 25 

Stewart, —Clarissa M 85 

Stiles, — Mr 130 

W. H 130 

Stillwell— Job 116 

Stimpson, — Malvina 131 

Stockwell, — Ahasel 135 

Stokes, — Elizabeth 6, 99 

Storm of 1815, — (The Great).... 19 

Stoughton, — Nicholas 66, 67 

Stowe, — 3 Dorothy 28, 42, 79 

Elizabeth 79 

3 Hope 79 

3 Ichabod 79 

John (79) 

3 Margaret 79 

2 Nathaniel 79 

3 Rachel 79 

2 Saumel 28, 42, 79 

3 Samuel 79 

Thankful 79 

Thomas 79 

Strang, — Arthur 1 iS 

Charlotte 5 1 , 59 

James 118 

Louise 118 

Sophia 118 

Walter 11S 

T 

Taber, — Earle 5 

Lemuel 5 

Martha 76 

Taintor, — Eudocia 1 19 

Tallman 99 

Anne 56, So 

2 Benjamin 24, So 

^Elizabeth So 

2 Jamcs So 

Jonathan 80 

2 Joseph 80 



-3 

25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
72 



oi> 



Strange, — Alice 45, 55, 126 

Alice 

Betsey 

Hannah 

Jacob 

James 45, 55, 75, 

John 

Lot 45, 55, 

Mary 

Meletiah 

Phillipe 

Sylvanus 

Stryker, — Jan 

Suffolk Co 

Sunbury, Ga 45, 93, 96 

Swain, — Hannah 80 

Stephen 53 

Swansea S9 

Sweet, — James 33 

Jane 33 

Swift, — Charity 19, (135) 

Charles 1 

Deborah 142 

Harriet 135 

Jared Reid 135 

Julia 135 

Nathan 119, 135 

■ Samuel 135 

Swigtel, Holland 25 

Switchlaer, Holland 25 

Sykcs, — Phcebe 1 22 

Symmes, — Zechariah 145 

Deborah 145 



Tallman, — 2 Mary 56, 62, j6, 80 

iPeter 56, (80,) 99 

Samuel So 

Susanna So 

Tappan, — Hannah S7 

Tardy the Pirate [ 14 

Taunton, Mass. 35, 43, 58, 59, 65, 80, 108 

Taunton River 4, 60, 89, 90, 91, 115 

Taylor, — John 99 

Mary Ann 1 20 

Peter 57 



Index. 



181 



Taylor — Robert 57 

Stephen 92 

Terry,— Hannah N (134) 

Joanna 39, 128, 130 

Joseph 19, 34 

Mary 130, 134 

7 Mercy 130 

Priscilla 134 

Reconcile 1 30 

Reliance 130 

Rhoda 124 

Robert 57 

Seth 1 30 

Shubael 130 

Thomas 44, 64 

Zephaniah 125 

Tew,— Daniel 126 

Henry 67, 126 

Thaxter, — Deborah 15 

Elizabeth 15 

John 46 

Theall— * Abraham 81 

4 Charles 30, (81) 

3 Ebenezer (81) 

Elizabeth 81 

5 Gilbert 81 

4 Hachaliah Si 

*Hannah '. 81 

Joseph 81 

Margaret 30, 81 

Nicolas (81) 

Thomas, — George 131 

Nathaniel 46 

Thompson, — John 11 

Josephine 131 

Martha 145 

Thorpe 18 

Thorne, — John 29 

Mary 29 



Thurber, — Charles S 113 

Tibbotts, — Alice 75 

George 75 

Timmans, — Harriet P 113 

Tinkham, — Peter 101 

Tiverton, R. 1 34, 66, yy, 89, 90 

Tobey, — Abishai Hockford 134 

Charles 



134 

Esther 130 

Eudora B 115 

Frank 134 

Joseph 134 

Lucy 134 

Martha 134 

Walter 134 

William 134 

Tommy, — (slave) 75 

Toms, — Charles French (ill) 

Tooker, — Martha 30 

Town, — Esther 85 

Townsend, — Alix de 86 

Phila 51 

Treaty Rock 66 

Tripp, — Abiel 24, Si 

2 Alice 81 

Almeda W 113 

Benjamin 6 

Deliverance 24 

2 Elizabeth 81 

Isabel 55, 81, 75 

James 48, 81 

John 55, 75, (81) 

Joseph Si 

Martha 75, 81 

Si 

81 

6 

ii, 64 

no 



Mary 

Peleg 

Susannah 

Troy, — (now Fall River) 13, 

Tyler, — Ellen 



u 



Ufford, — Thomas 81 Upshall, — Elizabeth 145 

Ulster Co., N. Y 22, 30 Ussel, — Richard 66 

Upsher, — Philis 74 



182 



Index. 
V 



Valentine, — David. 125, 

Joseph 

Lucy 

Prudence 

Sybil 

"Valparaiso," — (ship) 137 

17 

17 

.... 26 



Van Bommel, — Margaret. 

Peter 

Van Barthuysen, — Barcnt. 
Van Leyden, — vide Appel 
Van Meeteren, — Rebecca. 
Van Vliet, — Deborah 

Jannek 



126 

125 
121 
121 



26 
17 



Van Wagenen, — Aart Gerritse. 

Evert 

Gerrit 

Isaac 

Rebecca 

Sarah 



26 
22 
22 

17 



Vaughn, — Daniel 1 33 

Rebecca 133, 134 

William 48 

Vernoy,— Cornelia 3 

Verrie, — Philip 21 

Vienna 26 

Vital Statistics of R. 1 5 



/ 



w 



119 



Wadsworth, — William 

Wagenen, — vide Van Wagenen. 

Wait, — Jeremiah 6 

Walden — Peter 16 

Wales 46, 53 

Walker, — Ebenezer 85 

John 6 

Walkill— (river) 5- 

Walloon, Louis, the— vide Louis 

Du Bois. 

Walloon Church 11,21 

Walston,— Anne Wright 80 

Wanton, — Edward 34 

Gideon 33 

Joseph 34 

Mary 

Sarah 

Thomas 

Waranoke 

Ward,— 3 Anne 82, 87 

2 Anthony 87 

3 Dorothy S7 

2 Edward 87 

John 87 

'Joyce 28, 82, (87) 

Mary 28,30, 82,87 

Phillis 74 

Phoebe ^7 

Richard . 29 



33 
40 



Ward,— Robert 87 

Ruth 125 

Sarah 82, 87 

3 Susanna Sj 

Thomas S7 

William 82, (S7) 

Waring, — David 108 

Warner, — (derivation of name 1 1 2.) 



3 Abigail 82 

4 Abigail S3 

1 Andrew 41, (82) 

2 Andrew 28, (82) 

3 Andrew 82 

4 Andrew S3 

'Ann S3 

9 Anna 6, 3S, 85 

^Charles 85 

6 Cornelia . . . . 85 

2 Daniel 82 

7 Eben....3i, 42, 79, S3, (85), S4 
6 Ebenezer. . .42, 79, 83, (84), 1 14 

7 Eleazer Gaylord 85 

8 Kiting Fowler 85 

7 Fannie S5 

8 George S 5 

3 Hannah S2 

Hannah 126 

Helen 85 

sHezekiah (83), 84 



Index. 



183 



Warner, — 6 Hezekiah 83 

2 Isaac.„„. 82 

4 Jabez 83 

2 Jacob 82 

John (82) 

5 John 82 

3 John (82) 

4 John (83) 

6 John S3 

7 John Penfield 85 

3 Joseph 82 

6 Junia 83 

7 Junia 85 

7 Maria 85 

2 Mary 82 

s Mary 82 

4 Mary S3 

s Mary 85 

'Minerva 85 

8 0ctavia 85 

2 Robert 82 

3 Rebecca 82 

9 Richmond Perez. ... 51, 85, 136 

2 Ruth 82 

'Sallie 85 

3 Samuel 82 

'Vine Starr 85 

Mrs. Vine Starr 42, 84 

8 W. P 6,26,38,70,79,(85) 

Warren, — (derivation of name, 112.) 

2 Abigail 86 

2 Ann 86 

Christopher S6 

Edward 86 

2 Elizabeth 86 

Hannah 117 

John 86 

2 Joseph 86 

Lawrence 86 

2 Mary 86 

2 Nathaniel 86 

Rebecca 126 

Reginald 86 

Richard 11, 43, (86), 126 

2 Sarah 11, 43, 86 

William 86 

Warwick, R. 1 33 



Washington, — General 1 19 

Watertown, Mass 46, 81 

Weaver, — s Anna S9 

'Anna Maria 116 

3 Benjamin 88 

4 Benjamin 63, yy, 88, (89) 

5 Benjamin 89 

'Benjamin 117 

Catharine 87, 116 

'Charles B 1 16 

1 Clement . . 32, 34, 67, 87, ( 88), 90 

2 Clement 87 

3 Clement 88 

3 Comfort 88 

Elizabeth 48, 87 

3 Elizabeth 88 

5 Elizabeth 89 

5 Eunice... 6, 62, 63, yy, 89, 90, 93 

' Francis M 1 16 

10 Franklin P 116 

' Furman 116 

Hannah 88 

John 88, 90 

'John, s, 39, 87, 114, (115), (116) 

s John T 116 

4 Jonathan 88 

4 Joseph 88 

9 Julius Myron 1 16 

'Lydia n6 

Mary 88, 89 

4 Martba 88 

4 Mary yy 

'Mary, 14, 32, 34, 35, 39, 70, yy, 

89, (91), 96. 

9 MaryG 116 

'Mary 115, 116 

6 Nathan 90 

5 Parker 89 

4 Patience 88 

4 Peleg 88 

Peter 90 

'Rhoda 115, 116 

5 Ruth S9 

5 Samuel...34, 62, 63, yy, 89, (90) 
Sheffield, 34,, 39, 63, 70, yy, (90), 

US- (n6). 
4 Susannah yy 



1 84 



Index. 



Weaver, — 6 Sybil 90 

Thomas 34, 87, (38) 

"William 87 

Webb— Alice 86 

Wedding Song, A 135 

Weeden, — Phoebe 57 

William 57 

Weeks,— John 36, (53) 

Sarah Caroline 36, (53) 

Welles,— Hugh 40 

Mary 40 

Gov. Thomas 41 

Wentworth, — Christopher 50 

West, — Benjamin 128 

Samuel, D. D., printed Ben- 
jamin by mistake 45, 144 

Westchester Co., N. Y.. .... 12 

Westcott — Mrs. Mary 123 

Westerly 75 

West Greenwich 87 

West Indies 42, 115 

Weston 19 

Lord Henrie 48 

Westport, R. I., 5, 65, 69, 70, 91, 117, 

143- 

Beriah 79 

Wetmore, — Charity 59 

Israriah 79 

Wetherell— Rhoda 127 

Wethersfield, Conn 28, 145 

Weygant, — George 51 

Nellie 5 1 

Whaling Voyage, Log of a 1 36 

Wheeler,— Elizabeth 124 

Henry 124 

Timothy 145 

Elizabeth 145 

Wheelwright,— Mr 32 

Whelpley— Susan Bell 129 

Whitcomb, — Emily 1 iS 

Hannah Richmond. ... 91, (118) 

Helen 1 IS 

Louisa 118 

Mary 118 

Melora 135 

Walter 118 

William 118 



Whitcomb, — Victoria 118 

White, — Abbie 123 

Albeit D 123 

Daniel 92 

Dennis 123 

Elizabeth 92 

Hannah 123 

Jacob 92 

^ohn 40, (92) 

Serg. John 125 

Jonathan 92 

Lydia 60 

Maria 10S 

Mary 35, 40, 42, 59, 92, 123 

Nathaniel 92 

Samuel 119 

Sarah 92, 127 

White Genealogy 92 

White Sea 94 

Whiting,— Mr 40 

Whitwell— 5 Anna 95 

4 Anne, 6, 14, 34, 62, 63, 64, 70, 

77> 85, (95). 9 6 > ] °b I26 . ! 36 

3 Betsey 130 

4 Carolinc 95 

3 Chloe 93 

5 Elsie 95 

3 Frederick 130 

3 Furman Reade, 6, 19, 32, 45, 70, 

77, So, 93, (94), 96, 10, 136 

4 Furman 95 

5 Furman 95 

3 George 130 

4 Georgia 95 

'-Hannah 130 

Hannah Hathaway 20 

2 Jamcs...6, 34, 62, 63, (93), 130 

3 James 93 

4 James 95 

4 Laura 95 

•'Livingston 95 

8 Lucinda 13° 

-'Man- 130 

'Oliver 64, (93), ( 130), 134 

-Oliver 130 

-Sally 130. 131 

Samuel 95 



Index. 



185 



Whitewell, — 2 Thomas 130 

William 95 

Wicre, — La Bassee, Artois 21 

Wiggins 30 

Wilbor, — Abial 114, 99 

Ann 99 

Benjamin 99 

Daniel 99 

Elizabeth 4, 57, 99 

Hannah 8, 99 

Isaac ... 99 

2 Joan 6, 99 

John 99 

Joseph 6, 99 

Martha 99 

Mary, 99 

Rebecca 44 

2 Samuel 6, 57,75,(99) 

Thankful 99 

Thomas 99 

William (99) 

Wilcox, — Daniel . . . 1 1, 67 

Esther 79 

Mary 83 

Ruth 129 

Stephen 46 

Wilkie, — Elizabeth 15 

Wilkinson, — Benjamin 126 

Willet, — Thomas 12 

Williams, — Alexander 59 

Enoch 127 



Myra . . 
Patty . . 
Roger. 



131 

131 

■ 8, 9 



Sarah 127 

Susan Ormsby 36, (53) 

William and Mary 48 

Willis, — Hannah 140 

Wilmington, N. C, 36, 37, 38, 64, III, 
113, 124. 

Wilson,— Eleanor 113 

Job 124 

Luther 19, 63, 94, 96 

Mary 135 

Sarah 6 

Wiltshire 65 

Winchester, Tenn 84, 85 



Wing, — Elnathan lS 

Winslow, — 5 Abner 125 

s Andrew 125 

Barnaby 100 

Damaris 10, 101 

Edward II, (99), 101 

Eleanor, 99, 100, 101 

Elizabeth, 10, 45, 99,(101), 125, 130 

Gilbert 99 

Huldah 125 

2 Job 100 

3 John 101 

John 99, 125 

Josiah 99, 100, 10 1 

Katharine 99 

Kenelm ( 99 ) 

2 Kenelm 10, (100), 101 

3 Kenelm 1 o I 

Lemuel 125 

Lois . , 130 

Louisa 125 

Lucia 125 

Magdalene 99 

Mary 101, 130, 134 

Nabby 45 

Nathaniel 100, 101 

Oliver 125 

Richard 99 

Samuel 101 

Thomas 101 

William 124, 125 

"Winslow Memorial" 99, 101 

Winslow's Mills 100 

Winsor, Conn 145 

Winthrop, — Governor 72, 79, 145 

Wiswall, — Ichabod 54 

Anne 127 

Withered,— Mary B 123 

Wodell, — Gershom 81 

Mary 4S 

William 48 

Woerden, South Holland 7S 

Wood, — Agnes no 

Caroline 11S 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles , 113 

Frances 1 1 S 

John Pulaski 118 



i86 Index. 

Wood,-— Mary 57 Worth,— Captain H. F 136 

Minnie 113 Worth ington, — Dudley. . . . 119 

Patience 39, 128 Sarah 119 

Thomas 125 Wraisbury, Eng 145 

Woodhull, — Richard 56 Wright, — George 56 

Woodruff — Lucy C 117 Richard 11 

Woohoo 138 Susanna 56 

Woolcot.^Sarah 10 Writtel, Essex 145 

Woolsey,— Clinton 128 Wyncclow, — vide Winslow 

George 12 Wyncoop, — Gerrit 22, 78 

Phoebe 17 Hilletje 22,78 

Worden, — Mary 101 Wynnington, — Agnes 86 

Peter 101 



Yarmouth 7, 18, 101 Young, — John 124 

Yorkshire 28, 59 Yvo 112 



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