(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "American cookery"

ci"'. ,;•:■- .),. tir ' ^y.-f. 




Digitized by tiie Internet Arciiive 
in 2013 



littp://arcliive.org/details/americancookery19unse_5 



FOR SUNDAY NIGHTS SUPPER b Ip 

AMERICAN 
COOKE 



rORAVBRLY 



THE, BOSTO 
OOKING-SCHOOLMAGA 

►F- CULIN AKV- SCIENCEand DOMESTIC • ECONOMICS 










7 









¥ f 



^iiiiijl 



3'^ /J//fn'- 



They Couldn't Wait ^^j 

because they know her cake is 
always even, fine-grained and 
delicious since she commenced using 



RUHFORD 

The Wholesome Baking Powder 

Housewives, everywhere, who are the best cooks are more and more com- 
ing to makeRumford their final and regular choice because they have learned 
by experience that Rumford is the best baking powder at 
the price and there is no better baking powder at any price. 

Get a can from your grocer, today; try it and everything 
you bake will be fine-grained, light and delicious — per- 
fectly leavened — used over quarter of a century Rumford 
has never spoiled a balding. 

FreeCookBook. Let us send you your copy of Janet McKenzie Hill's Helpful and 
interesting cook book "The Rumford Way of Cookery and Household Economy." 





Rumford Company 

K77 



Dept. Providence, R. L 



American Cookery 



FORMERLY 



The Boston Cooking-School Magazine 



OF 



Culinary Science and Domestic Economics 



Volume XXV "^ X^iri (^ ^'/J^ / 



June- July, 1920— May, 1921 




/ 



p" 



Published by 

THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE COMPANY 

Pope Bldg., 221 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass. 



-^ .i^-7// 



Copyrighted, 1920, 1921, by The Boston Cooking-School jMagazine'JCo. 



'• .". «*: 



COMPLETE INDEX, VOLUME XXV 

June-July, 1920 — May, 1921 



Adventure in Vegetarianism, An 

All Kinds of Gingerbread 

At Breakfast 

At the Sign of the Red Apple .... 
Aunt Anna Gives a Cooking Lesson 

Automatic Menus 

Best He Had, The 

Blanched Almonds 

Breakfast Room, The, or Starting the Day 

Aright 

Business Wife and the Wasted Watt, The 
Camping and Camp-Cooking .... 

Camping De Luxe 

Cheerful Christmas Holly, The 
Christmas Day in the Countrv 

Cile's Waffles ' . . . . 

Company Touches for the Summer Hostess 
Co-operative Lunch Experiment in a Sub- 
urban School, A 

Cupid and the New Year 

De Gustibus non Disputandum .... 

Dietary Blunder, A 

Do You Know 

Dorothea, Afraid-of-a-Dog 

Ears of the Tea Kettle, The .... 

Easy Housekeeping 

Editorials, 30. 1 10, 190, 270, 350, 431, 510, 

670, 750 
Efficiency Through Maintaining One's 

Normal Weight 

Efficient Spending 

Engineering Boston Cream Pie 

Fireless Picnic, The 

Food for Two 

Food the Foundation of All .... 
Forefathers' Boiled Dinner, The 
For Every Meal and Between Meals . 
For Sunday Night's Supper .... 
French Cook Books, Old and New 
Glazed Chintz and Its Uses .... 

Golden Opportunity, A 

Good-Bye Cook Book 

Harding House, The 

Heirlooms and Degeneracy 

Henrietta 

Home Budget, The 

Home Ideas and Economies, 49, 128, 208, 

370, 452, 532, 612, 691, 771 
Home of the Big Red Apple, The . 
Hope Valley Maids' Club, The . . . 
Housekeepers' Course at the Kansas State 

Agricultural College .... 
How Foreign Housewives Save Where 

American Women Waste 
How Much Milk Do You Use? 

How Sally Does It 

How Will You Have Your Dining Room? 
Importance of Being a Cook, The . 

Jack and Sylvia 

Linen for the Breakfast Table . 
Luncheon Table and Table Linen, The 
Making Apples Your Medicine Chest . 
Male Cookery Incompetency 
Meats and Their Sauces .... 



PAGE 

366 
611 
364 

738 
184 
524 
256 
586 

251 
259 
107 
22 
368 
331 
584 
124 

525 
337 
589 
342 
9 
577 
19 
448 
590, 



262 

504 
607 
100 
604 

528 
687 
605 

47 
422 

651 

503 

21 

500 

655 
186 

285 
288, 

180 
176 

495 

450 
684 

27 
411 

424 
659 
25 
182 
204 
661 
283 
729 



PAGE 

Menus, 41-43, 122-123, 202-203, 281-282, 362- 
363, 442-443 > 522-523, 602-603, 682-683, 
762,763 

Michael's Chunk 497 

Missouri, My Housekeeper 188 

Mother's Left-Overs 445 

My Best Investment 581 

My Lady's Apron 664 

Naughty Pussy Willow, The .... 509 

Nest and Home 746 

Never Trouble Trouble Till Trouble 

Troubles You 690 

New Books .... 58,138,378,702,782 

New Salads for Summer Days .... 125 

Nothing Like Trying 416 

One-Course Breakfasts 444 

Our Oregon, A Land of the Camper's De- 

. light . _ 734 

Painted Furniture 491 

Partnership in the Home 768 

Perennial Pageant, The 489 

Placing Pictures and Bric-a-Brac . . . 171 

Principle of It, The . 665 

Pumpkin Pie! — Have a Piece? • • • 97 

Purdue University's New Practice House . 91 

Quantities Needed in Serving .... 287 

Reason, The 269 

Salads 609. 

Sauces in French Kitchens 44 

School Centers for Training Little House- 
wives 745 

Secrets of a New England Cook . . . 267 

Silver Lining, The, 62, 142, 220, 300, 460, 542, 
706, 784 

Slip-Covers 11 

Small Town or Country House, The . . 579 

Something New for Fourth of July . . 28 

Squash Pie 421 

Squeaks 178 

Stretchers 686 

Talks to Teachers of Domestic Science, 265, 427, 

507, 587, 667, 747 

Tercentenary of the Pilgrims, The . . . 571 

Time Thrift 102 

To You 608 

Too Good to Throw Away 575 

True and False Thrift 447 

Value of Oils in Maintaining Health, The . 583 

Vanity of Vanities 16 

Varieties of Luncheons 105 

Waste 689 

What the French Housewife Does with the 

Left-overs 764 

What to Do with Sacks 206 

When the Wife Is Away 741 

Will You Be My Valentine? .... 425 

Window Boxes 731 

Winter Flowers 409 

Youngest Bride and the Household Gospel, 

The 344 

Seasonable-.\nd-Tested Recipes 

Aigrettes, Parmesan. Ill 438 

Almonds, Deviled 761 

Artichokes, Boiled. Ill 517 

a 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



PAGE 

Asparagus in Bread Boxes. 111. . . 677 

Asparagus in Croutes 753 

Bacon, Grilled, on Baked Eggs . . 675 

Bacon and Canned Corn, Scrambled . . 354 

Basket, Easter 6oi 

Bavaroise, White and Gold 600 

Beef, Corned, with Vegetable Salad. 111. 195 

Beef Tenderloin, Larded. Ill 676 

Biscuit, Afternoon I'ea, in Paper Cases. 111. 758 
Bombe, Rhubarb, with Charlotte Russe 

Filling. Ill 759 

Bombe Glace, Blackberry. 111. . . . 199 

Bouillabaisse, New Orleans 513 

Bread, Batter 677 

Bread, Date-and-Nut. Ill 757 

Bread, Fluted Crust. Ill 358 

Bread, Pulled. Ill 278 

Cabbage, Chinese, with Ming Toy Sauce . 438 

Cabbage, Delicious 113 

Cabbage, Dutch 441 

Cabbage, Spring, Scalloped with Tomato . 33 

Cake, Bavarian, Easter 600 

Cake, Chocolate, Cream Filling. 111. . 280 
Cake, Chocolate Cream, Pinehurst Style, 

with Chocolate Frosting. 111. . . 680 

Cake, Christmas Holly. Ill 359 

Cake, Date Loaf 521 

Cake, Ginger Fruit, Glazed with Chocolate 681 

Cake, Maple Syrup. Ill 198 

Cake, Pecan-and-Pineapple 361 

Cake, Persian 200 

Cake, Pistachio Layer. 111. . . . 40, 120 

Cake, Raised Caraway 681 

Cake, Stuffed, May-Party Dessert . . 761 

Cake, Washington's Birthday. 111. . . 520 

Cakes, Christmas 361 

Cakes, Convent 199 

Cakes, French Pastry. 111. .... 600 

Cakes, Irish Potato 274 

Cakes, Little Christmas. Ill 359 

Calves' Brains and Eggs en Plat . . . 677 

Candy, Marbled 681 

Carrots, Flemish 756 

Carrots, Pickled Young I2i 

Celery and Brussels Sprouts en Casserole . 441 

Charlotte Russe Mixture for Bombe . . 199 

Cheese, d'Anton 441 

Chicken a la King. Ill 597 

Chicken, Broiled. Ill 754 

Chicken, Galantine of, Christmas Decora- 
tion. Ill 356 

Chicken, Oyster-stuffed Smothered . . 754 

Chicken, Pressed. Ill 115 

Chicken, Turban of. Ill 36 

Chops, Lamb, Italian Fashion .... 516 

Chutney, Apple Il8 

Coffee, Iced. Ill 120 

Conserve of Mixed Fruits 1 18 

Conserve of Rhubarb and Figs .... 39 

Cream, Bavarian, with Coffee Jelly. 111. . 440 

Cream, Coffee or Tea Bavarian . . . 761 

Cream, Pineapple Bavarian. 111. . . . 760 

Cream, Vanilla Bavarian. Ill 599 

Croquettes, Almond 280 

Croquettes, Chicken and Sweetbread. 111. 756 

Croutes de Caviare 601 

Crullers. Ill 598 

Cucumbers, Supreme of 193 

Currant Cup 121 



PAGE 

Curry, Vegetable, in Potato Border . . 594 

Custard, Acadian Apple 361 

Custard in Ambush 778 

Custard, Baked. Ill 38 

Custard, Chicken 521 

Custard, Pistachio 601 

Custard, Tartlets of Apple 201 

Cutlets, Lamb a la Soubise. III. . . 115 

Date Bars. Ill 440 

Dessert, Cake-and-Cheese 518 

Dinner Cooked in Pressure Cooker . . 676 
Doughnuts, Albany, or Olicooks . . .521 

Dressing, Potato . 517 

Dressing, Russian Salad 515 

Dressing, Thousand Island 118 

Duck, Mallard, Stuffed and Roasted . 274 

Duck, Roast. Ill 514 

Dumplings, Baked Apple 441 

Dumplings, Easter 595 

Easter Snow 601 

Eggs, Benedict, with Sauce Hollandaise. 111. 193 

Eggs, Mayflower. Ill 754 

Eggs, Samuel Butler. Ill 36 

Eggs, Shirred. Ill 756 

Filling, Almond Cream 116 

Filling, Charlotte Russe 759 

Finnan Haddie in Shells. Ill 757 

Fish, Baked Filets of. Ill 435 

Flanc de Peches 198 

Fondant 360 

Fowl a la Toscana 196 

Fowl in Blanket 674 

Fowl, Guinea, Southern Style .... 273 
Frappe, Apple Sauce, with Hot Alaple 

Sugar Sauce 518 

Frappe, Cranberry. Ill 277 

Fricassee, Italian 675 

Fritters, Sweet, of White Potatoes . . .514 

Frosting, Chocolate 680 

Frosting, Maple Syrup 199 

Frosting, Ornamental. Ill 681 

Game in Currant Juice 434 

Gateaux Polonaise 521 

Glaze, Chocolate 681 

Goose, Roast, with Potato Stufl5ng. 111. . 354 

Haddock and Oysters 596 

Halibut Steaks, Beet Decoration. 111. . 754 

Halibut Steaks, Italian 596 

Halibut Steaks with Lobster Sauce. 111. . 114 

Ham, Virginia Boiled. Ill 518 

Ham-and-Egg with Eggplant. 111. . . 515 

Hash, Planked. Ill 195 

Heart, Baked Stuffed. Ill 517 

Ice, Tutti Frutti Water 118 

Ice Cream, Afternoon Tea 439 

Ice Cream, Chocolate and Vanilla. 111. . 40 
Ice Cream, Junket, with Butterscotch 

Sauce. Ill 649 

Ice Cream, Lillian Russell. 111. . . . 117 

Jelly, Cucumber 118 

Jelly, Gooseberry 121 

Jelly, Kumquat. Ill 678 

Jelly, Mint 121 

Jelly, Savory, of Rabbit, Veal or Chicken 594 

Jelly, Tomato. Ill 198 

Jumbles, Almond 38 

Jumbles, Orange. Ill 760 

Kabobs, Indian 196 

Lady Fingers. Ill 279 

729 b 



COMPLETE INDEX 



Lamb, Casserole of, with Macaroni and 

Cheese 676 

Lamb, Roast Ribs of. Rolled. 111. . . 275 

Lamb, Stuffed Shoulder of. 111. . 194 
Lettuce, California Iceberg, with Thousand 

Island Dressing. Ill 118 

Lobster, Baked. Ill 34 

Macaroni, Honeycomb 756 

Macaroni in Cheese Shell, with White 

Sauce. Ill 595 

Mangoes, Mock Pickled I2i 

Marmalade, Raisin-and-Apple .... 201 

Meringues with Banana Cream. 111. . . 119 

Moosemeat, Casserole of 276 

Mousse, Chicken. Ill 678 

Mousse^ Fish. Ill 595 

Mousselines, Salmon, with Green Peas . 355 

Muffins, Cornmeal. Ill 357 

Muffins, Rve. Ill 119 

Mush, Fried. 111. 674 

Mutton, Savory, Casserole of ... . 34 

Nougat, Carrot 440 

Olicooks, or Albany Doughnuts . . 521 

Omelet, Asparagus 34 

Omelet, Celestin 438 

Omelet, Hunter's 675 

Omelet, Pineapple. Ill 598 

Onions, Browned 115 

Onions, Don Carlos 276 

Ortolans or Reed Birds 275 

Oysters, Baked. Ill 517 

Oysters, Celeried 441 

Oysters a la Charterhouse 521 

Parsley, To Roast 673 

Peach Melba. Ill 600 

Peaches Glazed in Foam. Ill 278 

Peaches Preserved without Cooking . . 39 

Pears, Stuffed 201 

Peppers, Canned Fresh Red .... 279 

Peas, Minted, with Lettuce . . . . 113 

Pickle, "Best Ever" 121 

Pickle, Everready 201 

Pie, Chocolate Cream. Ill 519 

Pie, Dried Peach. Ill 679 

Pie, Duck 273 

Pie, Pumpkin. Ill 280 

Pie, Quail 274 

Pie, Salt Codfish 434 

Pie, Sour Cream n? 

Pigeons in Cabbage. Ill 194 

Pot au Feu, Spanish, or Puchero . . . 513 
Potato Cases, Baked, Crab Meat Filling. 

Ill 276 

Potatoes, Duchesse 196 

Potatoes, New, a la Baviere . . . . 113 
Potatoes, St. Patrick's Day, with Beurre 

Verte 593 

Potatoes, Sausage 33 

Preserve, Pear-and-Lemon 200 

Preserve, Pumpkin 200 

Prune Whip. Ill 760 

Prunes, Turban of 361 

Puchero, or Spanish Pot au Feu . , . 513 

Pudding, Almond 439 

Pudding, Apple-and-Plum 201 

Pudding, Cabinet. Ill 439 

Pudding, Economical Plum 440 

Pudding, Iced May Spanish .... 761 

Pudding, Pomona 278 



of 



111. 



Ill, 



Pudding, Raisin Tapioca 

Pudding, Toast-and-Rhubarb 

Puddings, Little Plum. Ill, 

Puree, Chestnut, for Peppers 

Puree, St. Patrick's Day 

Relish, Herring 

Rhubarb and Figs, Conserve 

Roe, Shad, and Bacon Rolls 

Rolls, Almond Ring. 111. 

Rolls, Easter Egg. 111. . 

Rolls, Sweet French. III. 

Rosettes. 111. 

Salad, Coronado Beach . 

Salad, Endive. 111. . 

Salad, Ginger-Ale. 111. . 

Salad, Italian. 111. . . 

Salad, Lobster. 111. . 

Salad, Mock Lobster. 111. 

Salad, Monte Cristo. 111. 

Salad, Pineapple-and-Cheese 

Salad, Prune-and-Nut. 111. 

Salad, Salmon, Potato Dressing 

Salad, Vanderbilt. 111. . 

Salmon, Boiled, Shrimp Sauce. Ill 

Salmon, Turban of, with Brussels 

Samp, Baltimore . 

Samp with Cheese 

Sauce, Butterscotch . 

Sauce, Chaudfroid, for Galantin 

Sauce, Cream Almond 

Sauce, Hollandaise 

Sauce, Lobster .... 

Sauce, Hot Maple Sugar 

Sauce, Ming Toy 

Sauce, Peach, for Cold Meat 

Sauce, Shrimp, for Boiled Salmon 

Sauce, Soubise 

Sauce, W^hite . 

Scones, Cream. 111. . 

Scrod, Broiled, ^^•ith Maitre 

Butter. Ill 

Shortcake, Strawberry 

Shortcake, Raised Strawberry 

Shortcake, Steamed Strawberry 

Shortcakes, Blackberry. 111. 

Shortcakes, Peach 

Shrimp Okra Gumbo 

Sole, Filets of. 111. . . . 

Souffle, Spinach .... 

Soup, Asparagus .... 

Soup, Baked Bean. 111. 

Soup, Baked Wrexham . 

Soup, Cauliflower-and-Tomato 

Soup, Sour Cherry 

Soup, Chicken-and-Spinach 

Soup, Cream of Parsley . 

Soup, Cucumber Cream . 

Soup, Pineapple .... 

Soup, Red Currant 

Soup, Prune-and-Barley 

Soup, Russian Julienne . 

Soup, Scotch, with Prunes . 

Soup, Spanish Christmas 

Spinach in Croustade 

Sponge, Banana. 111. 

Sponge, Grape. 111. . 

Squash, Fried Summer. 111. 

Steak, Baby Lamb. 111. 

Steak, Planked, Parker House Style 



Sprout! 



193 



d'Hc 



tel 



111. 



518 
758 
358 
277 

593 
433 

39 
673 
116 
598 

37 
359 

39 
515 

36 
437 
677 
197 

39 
519 
351 
517 
599 

35 
514 
196 
196 
649 

357 
200 

J 515 
114 

518 
438 
441 
35 
115 
595 
439 

274 
38 
758 
519 
117 
117 
352 
594 
354 
753 
674 
433 
433 
33 
33 
673 
513 
753 
353 
273 
593 
193 
353 
515 
37 
197 
116 

355 

277 



729( 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Steak, Broiled Veal. Ill 

Strawberries for Company Breakfast. 111. 

Stuffing, Potato 

Sundaes^ Plum Pudding 

Sweetbreads, Broiled, with Stuffed Mush- 
rooms. 111. 

Tapioca, Lakewood Style. 111. 

Tartlets, Banana-and-Tangerine 

Tea Ring, Swedish. Ill 

Timbales of Corn and Pimiento 

Tomatoes in Aspic 

Tongue. Slices, a la Indienne. 111. 

Tripe Birds, with Tomato Sauce 

Trout, Pulled Brook, with Water Cress 

Turkey, Pick-up of 

Veal Rolls. Ill 

Veal, Tomatille of 

Velute d'Ognon 

Venison, Mock. Ill 

Vol-au-Vent. Ill 

Waldorf Triangles. Ill 

Queries and Answers 

Apples, Varieties for Winter Use 

Apples, Ways of Serving 

Arrowroot 

Artichokes, Suggestions for Cooking . 

Bananas, Recipes for 

Beef, Corned 

Beef, Round of, Italian Style . . . . 

Beefsteak and Pressure Cooker 

Biscuits, Bread or Pastry Flour 

Blancmange, Irish and Iceland Moss . 

Bouillon, Clam, en Tasse 

Bread, Steamed Brown, from Stale White 
Bread . . . .' 

Bread, Econonu- in Home Made 

Bread, Rules for Making Wholewheat 2iJ 

Butter, Almond 

Butter, Peanut 

Cake, Caramel, with Caramelized Sugar . 

Cake, Fruit 

Cake, To Remove Paper from . . . . 

Cake, Two-layer 

Cakes, Cocoanut . . . 

Cakes, Flat-topped 

Cakes to Serve with Parfait or Ice Cream 

Candy, Vinegar 

Cheese, Club House 

Chicken, Potted in Fat 

Chocolate, Why It Reddens Cake . 

Chop Suey, Chinese 

Chowder, Onion 

Chowder, Rhode Island Fish . . . . 

Citron and Raisins, To Keep from Sinking 

Clam Bake for Eighteen Persons . 

Cocktails of Crab, Shrimp, Oysters, etc. . 

Cocoa, How to Substitute for Chocolate . 

Consomme, Royal 

Cookies, Honey 

Crumpets, or English Muffins . . . . 

Currants, Bar-le-Duc 

Desserts, Simple, to Serve Twenty-five 

Doughnuts, Vinegar in Fat 

Dressing, French 

Dressing, Russian Salad 

Dressing, Thousand Island Salad . 

Dressing, To Keep Salad 

Dressing, Whipped Cream-and-Mustard 
Salad 

Filling, Chocolate ....... 



PAGE PAGE 

435 Filling, Lemon Cream-Pie 539 

759 Filling, Soft Chocolate, for Layer Cake . 132 

354 Fillings for Patty Shells 775 

358 Fish Roe, How to Cook 296 

Food, Cost a Person Per Week . 620 

436 Foods, Laxative and Constipating . . . 376 
119 Forcemeat Balls 296 

679 Frosting, Boiled 212 

520 Frosting, Failure with Boiled .... 539 

435 Frosting, Use of Fruit Juice in ... . 540 

761 Fruit, Salpicon of, in Cups 53 

437 Fruits, Macedoine of Chilled .... 53 
194 Honey, Putting up Fruits in, etc. . . . 134 

755 Hors d'Oeuvres 776 

516 Ice Cream, Individual Moulds for . . . 56 

596 Jelly , How to Keep Ribbon, from Separating 296 

36 Kitchen Economies 56 

273 Marshmallows 56 

434 Meats, Accompaniments to 292 

355 Mincemeat from Green Tomatoes . . 540 

680 Muffins, English, or Crumpets .... 539 
Parfaits, How to Keep from Salt . . 294 

294 Paste, Marshmallow 618 

458 Pastries, French, How to Serve . . . 374 

376 Pate de Guimauve 619 

618 Peaches, Spiced 375 

780 Pickles, Value of, in Diet 218 

619 Pie, Old-fashioned Chicken 456 

620 Pie, Is It Wholesome? 218 

537 Pie, Nut Crust for 218 

618 Pie, Nut Mince 457 

457 Pie, Sea 456 

53 Pot Herbs and Their Uses 458 

Potato-Puffs 698 

298 Potatoes, Candied Sweet 776 

218 Potatoes, Glazed Sweet 457 

i, 298 Potatoes, Hungarian 376 

216 Potatoes, O'Brien 696 

214 Pretzels 696 

375 Prunes, Senna 457 

698 Pudding, Yorkshire 132 

214 Refrigerator, Canton Flannel .... 459 

778 Relish, Philadelphia, in Lemon Skins . 53 

618 Rolls, Caramel 617 

698 Rolls, Finger 132 

56 Rolls, Parker House 538, 776 

698 Rolls, Vienna 696 

376 Salad, Frozen Fruit 374 

136 Salad, Fruit 132 

376 Salad, Salmon 540 

775 Salmon, Canned, a la Newburg . . 456 

620 Salmon Fish Balls 456 

298 Sauce for Spanish Omelet 776 

778 Serving Guests, Order of 56 

136 Soup, Black Bean 296 

775 Soup, Cock-a-Leekie 54 

212 Stew of Sheep's Haslet 459 

619 Stuffing, Sage-and-Onion 409 

134 Sugar Saving in Fruit Preserving . . 134 

539 Tarts, Sand 214 

619 Timbales, Corn 214 

540 Timbales, Pea . . 539 

537 Torte, Hazelnut 375 

54 Vinegars, Tarragon and Chervil . . . 296 

374 Vitamines 537 

696 Vrai Fromage a la Creme 778 

136 Waffles, Soft, on Electric Iron .... 375 

Was the Recipe Wrong? 695 

457 Welsh Rabbit . ." 214 

778 Yeast, Home Made 216 

729d 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




/ht/e Indian — Sio\f:>Cor Crow, 

/itde O^rosty Ssquimo, 

/Tttle ^Mrk orjapanee. 

Ok! don t you wish that you were me . 



Painted by Edward V Brewer for Cream of Wheat Co 



Q/du have curious things to eat 
lam Jed on — C^EAM OF WHEAT 

Apologies to RLS 

Copyright 1920 by Cream of Wheat Co. 



Bu\- advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
1 



AMERICAN COOKERY 

Vol. XXV JUNE— JULY, 1920 No. 1 



CONTENTS FOR JUNE— JULY 

PAGE 

DO YOU KNOW Doris Scott Orth 9 

SLIP-COVERS. Ill Mary H. Northend 11 

VANITY OF VANITIES Ruth Fargo 16 

OVER THE HILLS AND FAR AWAY . . Christine Kerr Davis 18 

THE EARS OF THE TEA KETTLE . . Katharine Smith Spencer 19 

GOOD-BYE COOKBOOK Quincy Germaine 21 

CAMPING DE LUXE Hazel B. Stevens 22 

LINEN FOR THE BREAKFAST TABLE . . Mary D. Chambers 25 

HOW SALLY DOES IT Mabel Dardnell 27 

SOMETHING NEW FOR FOURTH OF JULY . Alice U. Fewell 28 

EDITORIALS 30-32 

SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES (Illustrated with half-tone 
engravings of prepared dishes) 

Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 33 

MENUS FOR WEEK IN JUNE 41 

MENUS FOR WEEK IN JULY 42 

MENUS FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS 43 

SAUCES IN FRENCH KITCHENS Kurt Heppe 44 

FOR SUNDAY NIGHT'S SUPPER . . . Elizabeth X. Simmonds 47 
HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES: — On Buying a Shirt Waist — 
Chicken Fat for Many Purposes — • Hurry-up Picnic Lunches 
— -A Hint for Canning Days — 'How to Keep Pimientos — Odd 

Recipes, etc 49 

QUERIES AND ANSWERS 53 

NEW BOOKS 58 

TLIE SILVER LINING 62 




$1.50 A YEAR Published Ten Times a Year 15c A Copy 

Foreign postage 40c additional 

Entered at Boston post-oflBce as second class matter 

Copyright, 1920, by 

THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO. 
Pope Bldg., 221 Columbus Ave., Boston 17, Mass. 




Please Renew on Receipt of Colored Blank Enclosed for that purpose 

2 



AD\'ERTISEMENTS 



Tvfienitmins 
ffPOURi: 




MORTON'S 
SALT 



A FTER you use Morton's Salt, 
J/\, you'll wonder how you ever 
got along without it. 

It's so economical and conven- 
ient, because it always pours in any 
weather. That means you can use 
it when, and in what proportions 
you will, without waste. 

You'll never find it caked in 
table cellars. You'll never have to 
gouge it out of the handy blue 
pantry package. It can't cake there 
—it pours. The ideal salt for every 
purpose. 

"The Salt of the Earth" 

Morton Salt Company 



CHICAGO 



^ 






Morton's 

^^EE RUNNING 

Salt 

stpODP 



^^^ttSALTCOMPAMVADDREgCHl^ 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
3 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



INDEX FOR JUNE -JULY 



Camping De Luxe 
Do Vou Know- 
Ears of the Tea Kettle, The 
Editorials 

For Sunday Night's Supper 
Good-Bye Cookbook 
Home Ideas and Economies 
How Sally Does It 
Linen for the Breakfast Table 
Menus ... 

New Books 

Over the Hills and Far Away 
Sauces in French Kitchens 
Silver Lining, The 
Slip-covers ... 
Something New for Fourth of 
Vanitv of Vanities 



July 















PAGE 

22 
■ 9 
19 
30 
47 
21 
49 
11 
25 
41,42,43 
58 
18 
44 
62 
11 
28 
16 



SEASONABLE- AND-TESTED RECIPES 



Cabbage, Spring, Scalloped with Tomato 


33 


Cake, Pistachio Layer. 111. 


40 


Chicken, Turban of. 111. 


36 


Conserve of Rhubarb and Figs . 


39 


Custard, Baked. 111. 


38 


Eggs, Samuel Butler. 111. 


36 


Ice Cream, Chocolate and \"anilla. 111. 


40 


Jumbles, Almond .... 


38 


Lobster, Baked. 111. 


34 


Mutton. Savory, Casserole of . 


34 


Omelet, Asparagus .... 


34 


Peaches Preserved without Cooking . 


39 


Potatoes, Sausage .... 


33 



Rolls, Sweet French. 111. 


37 


Rhubarb and Figs, Conserve of 


39 


Salad, Coronado Beach 


39 


Salad, Ginger-Ale. 111. . 


36 


Salad, Monte Cristo. 111. 


39 


Salmon, Boiled, Shrimp Sauce. 111. . 


35 


Sauce, Shrimp, for Boiled Salmon 


35 


Shortcake, Strawberry 


38 


Soup, Chicken-and-Spinach 


33 


Soup, Sour Cherry .... 


33 


Spohge, Banana. 111. 


37 


Veal, Tomatille of . 


36 



QUERIES AND ANSWERS 



Bouillon, Clam, en Tasse . 


53 


Ice Cream, Individual Molds for 


. 56 


Cakes to Serve with Parfait or Ice Cream 


56 


Kitchen Economies .... 


. 56 


Cookies ...... 


56 


Marshmallows .... 


. 56 


Dressing, French .... 


54 


Relish, Philadelphia, in Lemon Skins 


. 53 


Fruits, Macedoine of Chilled 


53 


Guests, Order of Serving 


. 56 


Fruit, Salpicon of, in Cups 


53 


Soup, Cock-a-Leekie 


. 54 



We want representatives everywhere to take subscriptions for 
American Cookery. We have an attractive proposition to make 
those who will canvass their town; also to those who will secure a 
few names among their friends and acquaintances. Write us today. 

AMERICAN COOKERY - BOSTON, MASS. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 



ADVERTISEMENTS 





1 



hvii 



mism: 



wrJi 



"Mf-BiSd 



ir 



THE difference between food that 
- tastes good and food that tastes 
bad is FLAVOR. 

SAUER'S VANILLA, ripened and 
mellowed with age, is the source of 
the purest, strongest and finest 
full flavor nature's bounty and 
man's skill ever has provided. A 
rich, lasting full flavor that is 
distinctive and inimitable. 

Old Virginia 
Fruitti -Punch 

The new Sauer delicacy — a general pur- 
pose flavor and home beverage — 2- 
ounce bottle makes 2 gallons of delicious 
fruit punch. 

At Your Grocer's 

If your grocer cannot supply you with 
Fruitti-Punch send us his name and 
ten (10) cents, and we will send you a 
sample bottle, also a free copy of 
"Table Treats." 



"^Ti- 



SauehS : 



iVANILLA: 



fiii^j>jjii±i^^/^ 



ZPic C,F Sauer Company 

S^WDSTfo'RllL'RtTYSTRfNGTH AND FINE tL^Or? j 



JMmaaM! 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitute; 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



A 



Give the JUNE BRIDE a copy of this New Edition 
of America's Leading Cook Book 

The BOSTON COOKING- 
SCHOOL COOK BOOK 

By FANNIE MERRITT FARMER 

F)R many years the acknowl- 
edged leader of all cook books, 
this New Edition contains in addi- 
tion to its fund of general informa- 
tion, 2,117 recipes, all of which 
have been tested at Miss Farmer's 
Boston Cooking-School, together 
with additional chapters on the 
Cold-Pack Method of Canning, on 
the Drying of Fruits and Vege- 
tables, and on Food Values. 







H 






The ry„] 

CookBoJ" 



„0err>' 



f/ffaf/ner 





MISS Farmer's Cook Book is un- 
doubtedly the most scientific, 
most practical, and serviceable work of its kind. It 
contains the classification and correct proportions of 
food, tables of measurements and weights, time tables 
for cooking, menus, and much information not to be 
found elsewhere. 

" The Boston Cooking School Cook Book is one of the volumes to -which good housewives 
pin their faith, on account of its accuracy, its economy, its clear, concise teachings, and its vast 
number of new recipes. " — Good Housekeeping Magazine. 

" The best cook book on the market." — Woman's World, New York. 

\ The recipes are compounded with a know^ledge of thescience of cooking." — The Outlook. 
" As a household companion, for mistress or maid, and guide to the art of Cookery, it is a 
that can well be desired." — Boston Cooking School Magazine. 

619 Pages 133 Illustrations $2.50 net 

For Sale by all Booksellers 



LITTLE, BROWN & COMPANY 

Publishers, 34 Beacon Street, Boston 



n 



^ 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
6 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Useful Summer Books 

MRS. RORER'S Helps for Hot Weather 



Canning and Preserving 

Really the only book on the subject 
worth having. It is true and abso- 
lutely sure. It stands the test of 
years. It tells how to can and pre- 
serve all fruits and vegetables, make 
jellies, jams, marmalades, fruit butters, 
syrups, catsups, etc . There is no chance 
for failure if you follow directions. 

Cloth, $1.00; by mail, 81.10. 



Vegetable Cookery and 
Meat Substitutes 

This book will surprise you. In 
addition to some of the most delightful 
dishes, so good that you can forget 
meat, there is a bewildering array of 
choice and novel recipes for cooking and 
serving our many vegetables, and 
introducing vegetables not commonly 
used, but easily gotten. It contains 
more substitutes for meats than any 
book published. 

Cloth, $1..50; by mail, $1.65. 



New Salads 

You will be delighted with the many 
original recipes for making attractive 
salads. The salad is a dish made to 
appeal not only to. the appetite but to 
the eye. Here you have them. And 
they are very, very good. 

Cloth, $1.00; bv mail, $1.10. 



Hot Weather Dishes 

A very enticing and timely book, and 
one to be thoroughly appreciated. 
When the thermometer is climbing up 
and up. it is well to have a friend at 
hand to help in concocting appetizing 
meals. Here's the best friend. Lots 
of good, wholesome, delectable dishes, 
warranted to entice the most jaded 
appetite. 

Cloth, 7") cents; by mail, 80 cents. 

Ice Creams, Water 
Ices 

Another hot weather comfort. Re- 
cipes for the celebrated Philadelphia 
Ice Creams, Neapolitan Water Ices, 
Frozen Puddings and Fruits, etc. A 
big money's worth of comfort and 
pleasure. 

Cloth, $1.00; by mail, 81.10. 

Sandwiches 

The sandwich ■ — the most useful and 
dependable article of food, w^o much 
variety can be given to it. The handy 
thing for suppers, teas, social calls, 
picnics, lunches, etc. Here are some 
wonderful and tasty combinations. 

Cloth, 75 cents; by mail, 80 cents. 

Philadelphia Cook Book 

For summer time and all the time. 

Mrs. Rorer's famous cook book, full 
of the brightest things in cookery. 
For the beginner as well as the one 
who "knows how." 

Cloth, $l.oO; by mail, $1.6.5. 



For sale by all Bookstores and Department Stores, or 

ARNOLD & COMPANY, 420 Sansom St., Philadelphia 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
7 



AMERICAN COOKERS 



x~s!'|^»»*<^»v ■;<4'*^ / 



l« 



^ and 



sh 



33 



5P 



Walls 

Floors 

Woodwork 



tir 1 



Makes 

Hoiisecleaning 
Easy 



I 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 



Do You Know? 

Oh, do you know the woods in the wonder of the 
morn? 
White mists breaking, 
A million voices waking. 
Ev'ry treetop reaching to the glory of the dawn, 
Blazoning o'er Heaven that the soul of Earth 
is born! 

Oh, do you know the woods in the sultry heat of 
noon? 
Light airs stirring, 
Heady locusts shirring. 
The pungent scent of resin makes the heated 

senses swoon, 
Where the pines cast deep reflections in the 
mirror-faced lagoon. 

Oh, do you know the woods in the mystery of the 
night? 
Lonely, affrighting. 
Secret love inviting. 
Hid beneath its branches are the paths to deep 

delight. 
Oh, do you know the woods in the blindness of the 
night ? 

Doris Scott Orth 



American Cookery 



VOL. XXV 



JUNE — JULY 



No. 1 



Slip Covers 

By Mary Harrod Northend 



s 



LIP covers, which have today come 
into general use, are one of the 
most economical of furniture cov- 
erings. While they were used formerly 
only during the summertime, today we 
consider them as an all-year-round 
requisite. They are very much cheaper 
than having shabby furniture re-covered, 
and where the dust sifts in from the 
street, or the furnace, they save the wear 
on new covering, so that, when for any 
special occasion we are obliged to remove 
them, instead of discolored or worn chair 
covers, these are as bright and fresh as 
when they were first done. There is, too, 
much saving in labor and wear, if one 
can simply slip off a chair cover and 
launder it, instead of the hopelessly 



inadequate beating and dusting process 
of spring cleaning time — even when 
aided by the vacuum cleaner. 

Then, it is easily seen that the color- 
scheme of a room can be completely 
changed for the summer; a cool and 
cheerful atmosphere is easily attained 
by the use of some of the attractive 
materials to be found in the shops. In 
these days one may not feel like throwing 
away old and dingy furniture, but with 
a very moderate outlay of money, a 
little time and thought, a living-room or 
parlor may be so changed that one would 
hardly recognize the old furniture In its 
new dress. 

Formerly covers were made by cutting 
a pattern and fitting them on to the chair 




SOMETIMES LINEN IS USED WITH A PIPING OF DARKER COLOR 

11 



12 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



without mucli thought to good tailoring, 
but now that they have become so gen- 
erally used it is most important that 
they fit tight at the seams and follow the 
lines of the chair, being very much more 
effective if a piping of a different color 
be used. This, however, is only for 
the plain linen or cotton slip covers, for 
with cretonne or chintzes piping of the 
same color is used throughout, as a plain 
bit of contrasting piping would not be 
in as good taste. 

We have learned from the English 
that it is very much better to make two 
sets of covers. This is so that, when one 
gets soiled and has to be sent away to be 
cleaned or perhaps carefully laundered, 
there is always a fresh one that can be 
quickly slipped on. There are various 
types of covers that can be made; every 
one may carry out her own ideas, some 
preferring perfectly plain covers with 
only a hem at the bottom, while others 
consider them better looking, if they are 
finished with a ruffle, plaiting or shirring. 
Then, again, they can be edged with a 



contrasting material or possibly a smart 
fringe, which is one of the most fashion- 
able finishes being used just at present. 

There are many materials that are 
suitable for this purpose. The prettiest 
of them all are the fascinating chintzes 
that come in such alluring patterns. 
While the prices, especially since the war, 
have become almost prohibitive, yet 
they can be purchased at from 50 to 75 
cents a yard. Being single-width fabrics 
they run from 32 to 36 inches in width. 
Double-width chintz averages 50 inches 
wide, but the price is proportionately 
higher. 

Then there are the checked ginghams 
that are very effective, especially in 
summer or country homes, but particular 
care should be taken that they are thick 
and durable to insure their being dust- 
proof and of a quality that will last, at 
least, one season and withstand frequent 
washing. White ones are very stylish 
and are very cool, especially in warm 
weather, although they require launder- 
ing more often than the colored ones. 




PLAIN LINEN FASTENED WITH BRASS TACKS WHICH CAN EASILY BE REMOVED 



SLIP COVERS 



13 




CHINESE CHINTZ SHOWING PAGODA, IN A BEDROOM FURNISHED WITH CHINESE PIECES 



These should button down the back and 
be tied underneath with tapes, that fasten 
to the back of the chair; this way of 
finishing makes them very easy to remove, 
much more so than those that are hooked 
along the arm and up the sides. 

In case the latter method of fastening 
be used, there is great danger in launder- 
ing that the hooks will become rusty and 
spot the cover, thus spoiling it for further 
use. Then, too, they are much more 
difficult to iron than those that button 
and are fastened with tapes. The cotton 
dress-goods department offers many 
materials that are suitable for this pur- 
pose of covers, and are very often as 
striking, if not more so, than the cheap 
chintzes. 

Small checks and simple plaids make 
up into quaint covers, especially for 
chambers, and these should be of the 
tone of the hangings. Ginghams, per- 
cales and similar fabrics are to be found 
in all varieties of stripes, ranging from 
the so-called pencil stripe up to the two, 
three and four inch stripes, and can be 
used rightly in any room of the house. 



particularly in the halls and living- 
rooms, where they are very fashionable. 

What we call very inexpensive today 
is much more than the cost of a year ago, 
and you are more than likely to find that 
cotton material has risen from 5 to 25 
cents a yard. For ordinary gingham, 
that two or three years ago could be 
purchased at 8 cents a yard, one must 
now pay at least 25 cents, and we have 
no assurance that it will not be even 
more. 

Percales are also very good for this 
purpose, coming today at from 25 to 
35 cents a yard, and these are among 
the most inexpensive materials. There is 
a distinct advantage in using percales 
instead of gingham, for the reason that 
they are 32 inches wide, while the latter 
is only 27. This may seem to be only a 
very trifling matter of a few inches, but 
it may save piecing a cover, which will 
fit over a davenport or any other large 
piece of furniture, and surely that is 
well worth considering. 

Within the last year plain cotton reps 
and even poplins are being used for slip 



14 



AMKRICAN COOKERY 




ROSES AS A COLOR NOTE, PREFERABLY USED 
WITH A SOFT GRAY GROUND 

covers, and for more elegant coverings 
damasks are used. They range all the 
way from 38 to 75 cents for a single yard 
width. Often in making up this material 
the French seam is used for the finish. 



or else one binds the outside seams with 
white linen, possibly using a tape of some 
contrasting color. As an example of 
this, if one is using a plain blue covering, 
it is much more effective to bind it wdth 
\'ellow, or if gray goods has been chosen 
you can use black or white. 

There is a new Japanese print on the 
market, which resembles very much a 
thin mohair, and this can be purchased 
in very unusual designs. It is on a 
natural tannish background and sells for 
about 70 cents a yard. This is not 
advisable to use in a room where the 
hangings or furniture show" patterned 
goods, for here covers of plain tans, 
brown, w^hite, or, possibly, self-striped 
cotton damask should be used. These 
cost from 50 to 80 cents per yard foi 
36-inch material. 

Sunfast silks have the advantage that 
they are absolutely guaranteed to hold 
their color. These come in almost any 
shade. The sunfast poplin, which is 
50 inches wdde, is admirably suited for 
slip covers. Sometimes handsome por- 




SLIP COVERS SUPPLEMENTED BY SOF I' CUSHIONS UN EASY CllAIRb 
AND REPEATED IN THE HANGINGS 



SLIP COVERS 



IS 



tieres are covered during the summer 
months when the sun would be apt to 
fade them. The lighter-weight sunfast 
silks would be excellent for this. In 
chambers, bed covers, table covers and 
slip covers for chairs and other furniture 
can be made out of the light-weight 
sunfast silk. Then one can open wide 
the windows, let the sun stream In and 
never worry about fading. 

Sideboards, dinlng-tables and other 
large pieces are sometimes covered In 
this same way, but it Is a much more 
intricate matter to fit them than the 
smaller pieces of furniture. It Is only 
in damp climates or where the pieces are 
unusually beautiful that this treatment 
is a necessity. 

Many people feel that this Is work for 
an upholsterer, but as a matter of fact 
It can be done equally well at home by 
exercising a little care. 

There are three types of chair covers 
that can be constructed very easily at 
home. The general directions are prac- 
tically the same, but the methods of 
finishing diff"er. After the material has 



been selected, It should be put on the 
chair wrong side out, and pieces cut to 
fit the back, front, seat and side arms, 
with narrow strips for the top, the 
round upholstered arms and back; then 
the seams can be basted together on the 
wrong side, using the chair as a dummy. 
The seams may be finished on the right 
side with a narrow piping of contrasting 
material, or a cord may be slip-stitched 
on over the seams, or they can be left 
entirely plain, if the material is figured. 
The number of pieces used will vary with 
the kind of chair to be covered, and 
will have to be decided accordingly. 
The principal things to remember are 
to fit the cover smoothly and finish it 
neatly. 

Slip covers made by an upholsterer are 
very expensive, but when one can make 
them at home so easily and successfully 
no one need hesitate to make her home 
more attractive, to provide the living- 
room with new freshness and beauty, 
to make the house over, as it were, by 
the use of these very practical and 
charming furniture covers. 




CRETONNE IN FLOWER DESIGN, REPEATED IN LAMP SHADE. CAN BE USED THE YEAR AROUND 



''Vanity of Vanities!" 

By Ruth Fargo 



MY uncle Alfred Applegate, bach- 
elor, slightly bald of pate, re- 
cently possessed of a medal, a 
cork leg, and an aristocratic limp, is to 
be numbered among the salt of the earth, 
so think we all, his adoring relatives. 
But our good opinion is not based on the 
medal, the leg, or the limp. It springs 
from an entirely different source; viz., 
this: 

Our beloved uncle, being not rich in 
purse, but blessed with a healthy family 
affection, has made it a practice, for a 
dozen years and more, to travel across 
the breadth of the continent, once in 
every two years, just to see the folks. 
Just to see the folks! — there must be 
something real pulling about genuine 
family aflFection. But however that may 
be, Uncle Al does the traveling. The 
folks, having various ties and hindrances, 
cannot well travel across the continent 
to see Uncle Alfred; besides, the folks 
are of considerable number, and Uncle 
Al is only one. . . . And yet, when 
one is only one, one does not always, so 
I have often noted, journey 3,000 miles 
and more just to set eyes upon Gram 
and Gramp, and a few dozen more 
remote and less conspicuous relatives. 
Uncle Alfred Applegate does. . . . Uncle 
Alfred is among the Salt of the Earth! 

And yet, until yesterday, Uncle Al's 
last visit dated back into ancient history. 
It was before the time of the medal, the 
cork leg, or the limp. It was before the 
time of the submarines, the gas mask, 
or the khaki-clad. To be exact, it was 
six years ago. And upon such fact hangs 
a simple and unexpected contretemps. 
Indeed, if we had ever dreamed, six 
years ago, that a brain-mad cataclysm 
could catapult its way across the earth — ! 
But we never dreamed. And so it was 
that Uncle Alfred said to me in that 



ancient history time, six years ago: 

"Remember, Eda, you are to wear this 
same pale pink gown when I come back 
next time. We'll go to the pinkest of 
Pink Teas. You'll prove to me that 
a thing so fragile — ^" touching my crisp 
lawn sleeve — "yet has wearable 
qualities." 

Alas, I was to prove yet other things. 
A promise is a promise, and Uncle Al 
had said "next time." The expected 
two years became six, and the pretty 
pink frock lay forgotten in the bottom of 
my trunk. 

You see, in that ancient history time, 
my palest and prettiest of pink frocks 
was new, and modish, and hand-made. 
It had cost me hours of beauty sleep and 
shut-in Sundays; for I am something of 
a needle woman myself, or would be, if 
I did not spend all my minutes manipu- 
lating pencil pot-hooks and typewriter 
keys for the manager of the Merrywell 
Mercantile Company, incidentally put- 
ting pennies in my always thin purse. . . 
Indeed, I had made the dress myself. 
It might have been imported from Paris — 
"stunningly chic,'^ said my bosom chum. 
I thought so myself, and I held my head 
proudly, and I bragged a bit to Uncle 
Al. Surely, any girl would be excusable 
under the circumstances. Besides, Uncle 
Al is so delightfully human to brag to. 
Just listen: 

"I'll bet there isn't a niftier thing on 
Fifth Avenue," appreciated Uncle Alfred 
Applegate. And then. Uncle Al has 
an amazingly practical streak in his 
original make-up, "But will the stuff 
tub.^ — it's sure a bit thin." 

"Oh, it will tub. It will wear like 
iron. It will last me forever," foolishly 
chirruped I, and thereby hangs this 
tale. 

"You are easy on clothes, Eda," opined 



16 



VANITY OF VANITIES 



17 



Uncle Al graciously. "Some folks be." 

"I'll wear it when you come again," 
promised I importantly — indeed, so 
perfectly, niftily, modishly clad I felt; 
as though, once that perilous place 
attained — the faultlessly dressed woman 
— I might stay there perennially, like a 
pine tree. (I forgot to count on Fashion, 
the lickle jade!) 

"Shake," said Uncle AL "It is a 
promise. To make it more emphatic 
I'll wear this same suit I have on." 

"And we'll celebrate our ^ thrift," 
giggled I, "at the pinkest Pink Tea in 
town." 

That was six years ago. 

But only yesterday, it was, that 
Uncle Al 'phoned: "I'm coming on the 
4.30 limited. Remember the pak pink 
gown and the pinkest Pink Tea!" . . . 
Uncle Al does love to go places. (And 
perhaps he would forget the cursing 
carnival of desolation he has lived 
through! . . . the insolent, unbelievable 
impossibility that came to pass! — the 
nightmare of Hell that thrust us, who 
stayed at home, into big white aprons 
and set us working, top speed, after 
hours, making yards and yards and 
yards of gauze bandages; the while 
trying to spill from our minds the thought 
of zvhy we were making them! But even 
the white-faced mothers gave brave 
smile for brave smile. . . . And even 
things born of the Inferno have an end. . . 
The war was over. . . . Uncle Al came 
home.) 

And I, I delved into the bottom of my 
oldest trunk after that once-beautiful, 
palest of pink gowns. It was there. It 
was intact. It was without rent or 
blemish. In fact, it was just as good, 
so little had I worn it, as on the day 
when I proudly bragged of its beauties 
to my Uncle Alfred Applegate, six years 
ago. I drew it forth; I pressed it care- 
fully; I appraised its merits. But doubt 
grew ever deep and dark within my 
heart. "It is impossible," I moaned — 
"impossible! — impossible! 



sible!' 



■ impos- 
But a promise is a promise. 



At least, it is in the Applegate family. 

Down at the station, all in a flutter, 
clad in a little white frock simply and 
seasonably made, I had met my Uncle 
Al; after six years! 

"Just the same little Eda," petted 
Uncle Al; "just a rosebud bloomed — • 
and never sweeter." And sometime 
later: "Put on your pink frock." 

I did. I paused before my mirror. I 
gasped in dismay. It was worse even 
than I had imagined. Indeed, my pretty, 
frilly frock had been fashioned at a time 
when certain freaks of style held sway. 
But it had seemed sweetly becoming then, 
because we feminine folk were all alike; 
but now! "Honest to goodness," I 
moaned, "I look like one deformed! If 
Uncle Al hadn't already seen me he'd 
think I'd been caught in a train wreck, 
and patched into a caricature!" (Honest, 
don't some of your old photographs look 
like that.?) 

I went down stairs. Probably, if I 
hadn't been an Applegate, I should have 
taken the thing off, and told Uncle Al — 
oh, anything! But being an Applegatej 
and having a sense of humor, I went down 
stairs, and stood before my fastidious 
masculine relative, who looked me over 
curiously, but without comment. . . . 
And we set out for that Pink Tea, and 
we stayed — oh, we stayed till the red 
crept up under the tan in Uncle Al's 
bronzed .face, and I kept my eyes down 
for fear I would catch a glin^pse of myself 
in a glass. Isn't it queer how proud a 
girl can be in a garb today, and how 
shamed she will feel in the same thing 
some season hence.? 

"Did you think it was to be a fancy 
dress afl"air.?" whispered my hostess 
consolingly. ... It wasn't unkind: I 
just knew her that well. 

Then we came home. Uncle Alfred 
Applegate and I. 

"What has happened to that dress.?" 
fumed Uncle Al, at last, perfectly furious. 
"What have you done to it.?" 

"Nothing," snapped I. "It's a per- 
fectly good frock. There's not a thing 



18 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



the matter with it — except it is out of 
style. But I might as well stuff it in the 
rag bag! — I might as well mop the 
floor with it! — I might as well use it to 
rub the kitchen range! — for all the good 
it will ever do me. Think of all this 
handwork wasted! Think of all the 
time I spent making the thing! — and 
I don't have time to burn, like some 
folks do, or money to waste like a female 
Schwab! . . . My pretty, pink frock! 
I wanted it to be a perennial, and it is 
nothing but an annual. ' I was so proud 
of it, and I kept it so good, and I wanted 
it to last — and now I look like a frump 
in my pretty, pale pink frock! It is an 
outrage. It is a deformity. It is an 
imposition upon humanity in female 
form. . . . Oh, the dress really isn't 
so awfully old, but it might just as w^ell 
have belonged to the wife of Methuselah! 
And I might as well mimic Eve and sew 
up a few fig leaves — " 

"There, there, there!" crooned Uncle 
Al solicitously. "There, there, there ! " 

Home, I sped up the stairway like an 
escaping highwayman ; leaving my adored 
relative staring at the chandelier, saying 
something that sounded like: "Female 



fashions ought to have some stability of 
front!" . . . 

But. when I came down again Uncle 
Al was over by the window. He was 
admiring the moonlight and quoting 
Scripture — Uncle Al always did have a 
habit of talking to himself. He must 
have forgotten about my palest pink 
frock, for he was saying, "Vanity of 
vanities!" When I touched him on the 
arm, he turned and looked down at me, 
not seeing me at all, his thoughts out 
wool-gathering, and muttered again, 
"Vanity of vanities!" before he came to, 
and took me to the movie. . . . 

But it was more than a week before I 
actually realized that my Uncle Alfred 
Applegate, true to his promise, had worn 
his six-year-old suit to that horrible 
Pink Tea. . . . But nobody noticed. 
. . . Aren't some things queer .^ Queerer 
than queer. Maybe it isn't exactly fair 
— I'm not sure. But, nevertheless, I 
doubt if there's a single Daughter of Eve 
who really wants to wear a garment not 
in style. Yet to be "in style" makes so 
much extra fuss — and expense — and — 
Perhaps there isnH any solution. Per- 
haps there is. . . . I wonder — wonder. 



Over the Hills and Far Away 

Over the hills and far away 

I will go roaming, some fine day! 

Over the field, where the grass is tall, 

Through the wood, where the shadows fall, 

Over the hills and far away, 

I will go roaming, some fine day! 

Over the hills and far away, 

That's where the rainbow ends, they say, 

I will follow the shaft of light 

Far away to the edge of night. 

Over the hills and far away, 

I'll find the rainbow gold some day! 

Over the hills and far away, 

I will follow the West Wind gay. 

For I have seen in the sunset light. 

Fairy towers of cloudy white, 

Over the hills and far away 

I will find Fairyland, some fine day! 

Christine Kerr Daiis 



The Ears of the Teakettle 

By^ Katharine Smith Spencer 



T 



HE ears of the teakettle can tell a 
wondrous story and one worth 
the trouble of human ears to 
listen to. 

Should it happen that the teakettle 
stands on a stove that shows effectual 
work of the polishing brush, its ears will 
tell you, and likewise its polished exterior 
and non-lime-flaked interior, that the 
owner is a lady who always keeps a clean 
dishcloth, even the one for washing the 
pots and kettles; and with clean ears to 
boast of a teakettle knows that the broom 
is neatly hung on a hook or placed up- 
right in the broomholder, with the dust- 
pan clean, and hung beside it for com- 
pany; that all the floor-brushes and all the 
cleaning utensils are in their places. 
The dish towels are properly washed and 
hung where air and sunshine abound. In 
fact, the kitchen wqll always show order 
and neatness, where the teakettle's ears 
are free from dirt. 

You may remember that little Mrs. 
Peerybingle's teakettle, of Dickens' 
famous story, must have been rather 
dilapidated, "for it would lean forward 
with a drunken air; the lid first of all 
turned topsy-turvy; that it dived side- 
ways in — down to the very bottom of 
the kettle," but even then its ears may 
have been clean, for Dickens tells us what 
a neat little housewife was Mrs. Dot. 

This same teakettle "sang a song of 
invitation and welcome to somebody out 
of doors," and its song mingled w^ith the 
cheerful chirp of the cricket, but from the 
description of it — with its sides out of 
shape "so that it would not allow itself 
to be adjusted on the top bar and would 
not hear of accommodating itself kindly 
to the knobs of coal," — we judge it was a 
sorry looking teakettle, even if it did be- 
long to Mrs. Dot. The cover would not 
fit the opening, we are told, so, withal, we 



may conclude that this was partly be- 
cause poor Tilly Slowboy had the care of 
it while Mrs. Dot "minded the baby!" 

Poor Tilly Slowboy, as we see many 
mistresses of the kitchen, was not a good 
housekeeper, for if she had been, it would 
not have been said of her that "her dress 
always afi"orded glimpses in the region 
of the back of a pair of stays," — those are 
the kind of housekeepers who never wash 
the ears of the teakettle and who, when 
they wash the dishes, go about it with 
the dishwipers thrown over their 
shoulders! There are too many Tilly 
Slowboys among our housekeepers ! When 
a child, the writer heard a lady, who was a 
model housewife, remark, "I would 
rather my son should marry a woman who 
keeps the ears of the teakettle clean, than 
one who can play the piano." The 
writer turned to her shining stove and 
looked at the brightly polished teakettle, 
and wondered where its ears were! Time 
and experience have taught the writer 
that one may have a wife who keeps the 
ears of the teakettle clean and, also, plays 
the piano. 

Many young housekeepers imagine 
that they have acquired the art by watch- 
ing and helping the mother who is a model 
housewife and noted for her good cook- 
ing, and it is true that such knowledge of 
the art of homekeeping learned when 
young is of great value. It is when the 
reins of homekeeping are alone in her 
hands that the young housewife finds how 
little she has really acquired, but if she 
has learned the one lesson from her 
mother of keeping the ears of the tea- 
kettle clean, she can be trusted with the 
reins, and we are sure with time and ex- 
perience, the two best teachers, she will 
not be a Tilly Slowboy! 

Watch a good prescription druggist and 
you will learn that when a prescription 



19 



20 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



is to be compounded, each bottle used 
from is carefully replaced as soon as the 
desired amount is taken from it, which not 
only lessens the danger of using from the 
bottle another portion, but expedites the 
work when the label is finally placed on 
the prescription, filled, for the case is left 
neat and orderly, as it was before the 
work was begun. Watch a neat cook, and 
the process is the same, but with a 
slovenly housekeeper the flavoring bottles 
will be left on the table to be covered with 
<;ugar, flour, spice and grease, and put 
back anywhere on a dirty shelf. The 
flour will be on the floor, chairs, and much 
of it on herself. The table a muss, the 
sink decorated with cooking utensils, and 
more likely than not, an old rag, she calls 
a dishcloth, left to keep company with 
them. Follow the latter process into the 
dining-room and there will be found 
nothing but untidiness, with the linen 
sticking out from partly closed drawers 
of the sideboard; then maybe there will 
be a glimpse into the bedroom with the 
covers still holding the heat of the occu- 
pants, clothes strewn about, and so on 
to the front windows, where the lace cur- 
tains will be found awry — and the 
secret of it all is that such a homekeeper 
never learns to wash the ears of the tea- 
kettle. 

We wonder how the teakettle can sing a 
merry tune of welcome to anybody, when 
the house is in disorder, and especially 
''to some one out of doors," who comes in 
after a hard day's work, only to meet a 
Tilly Slowboy. If this "someone" is a 
husband with orderly habits, and who 
enjoys the comforts of an orderly home, 
pity him, even if the teakettle will 
^'sing a song of invitation and wel- 



come," when the home -environments 
are in chaos^ the sweetest woman in the 
world cannot expect as warm a welcome 
from her husband, as she counts herself 
entitled to, unless she has learned all the 
essentials accompanying the well-kept 
ears of her teakettle. 

No matter if her home contains every 
modern improvement; the most choice 
linens, dainty dishes, and shimmering 
silver, and iridescents of cut glass; 
mahogany furniture, all that contributes 
to the beauty of a home, if she fails to 
give proper care to them, it is a pity that 
she possesses them, and a sacrilege that 
she is mistress of so beautiful a home. 
Dirty ears of the teakettle, no matter how 
well the rest of it shows some effects of a 
bath, reminds one of the young lady who 
called to her mother, "Shall I wash for 
high or low neck.'^" The two certainly 
belong together, and to the person who 
answers thus, when a recipe is requested, 
"Oh, take a little of this, and a little- of 
that, and use your own judgment." 

Rev. Frank Crane has said wisely, 
"one would suppose that cooking, and 
housekeeping would attract the supremest 
skill. But one would be wrong. It does 
not. It is about the poorest, punkest 
business in the known world. It is 
badly done. And by people mostly that 
hate it — housekeeping, which is the 
noblest, grandest and most needed busi- 
ness on earth. The consumption of food 
is an absolute necessity. It is even more 
important, for it is a luxury. It seems, 
from my acquaintance, that an average of 
eight women out of nine detest the kit- 
chen, and it is a great pity." These are 
the women who never clean the ears of the 
teakettle! 




Good-Bye Cook Book! 

By Quincy Germaine 



THE cook book was a glorious 
institution. We don't have it 
now. We have recipes. 

"That is not so," you retort at once. 
"I have Miss So-and-so's latest edition." 

Precisely. So have I. Miss So-and- 
so's latest is not what I call a cook book. 
It is a collection of recipes, neatly bound, 
clearly printed, wqth glossary and index, 
hints and suggestions for every pos- 
sible civilized emergency. It is a D(>- 
mestic Science manual, if you will. A 
life-saver, perhaps. A comforter in 
trouble, occasionally. It is all of these 
things, I grant, but it is not a cook book, 
for it lacks that almost indefinable thing, 
which makes the difference between the 
modern kitchen guide and its predecessor. 
It lacks personality. 

Perhaps you don't care about per- 
sonality in your kitchen, nor atmosphere, 
nor local color, — call it w^hat you will. 
How, may I ask, do you reply when the 
Head-of-the-house remarks: 

"This pudding is a corker! What do 
you call it.?" 

"Miss So-and-so's apple-fluff." 

If that is your answer, how^ much 
further does the conversation go? Unless 
you explain in terms of cupfuls and 
teaspoonfuls you have said it all. Miss 
So-and-so is a household word, of course, 
but unless in a lesson you w^atched her 
make that apple-fluff you have no 
anecdote to cause a smile, not even a 
memory by which to grace the m.eal. 

Now listen to this! 

"Take as many eggs as you please, 
the weight of the eggs in sugar, half 
their weight in flour." 

That is old black Asia's rule for sponge 
cake. Instantly flashes into your mind 
the smell of the honeysuckle and the 
drone of bees, the rare, cool fragrance of 
the sherry with which that cake was 



served. Old black Asia lives again, 
mountainous of limb, cranky, but utterly 
forgiving, and once again to the edifica- 
tion of those who never even heard her 
name she chases you from her kitchen 
with the rolling-pin. 

Does Aliss So-and-so, in her latest 
edition, ever use as heading, "This is a 
delicious potato-pie".? Does she ever 
begin a rule "Boil a fine, fat, young 
chicken".? — Not often. Does she advise 
you to "use Aunt Jennie's silver fruit 
knife in paring peaches".? No, indeed. 
This is what you miss by not having a 
cook book from which to prepare the 
meals. 

My cook book has evidently been 
many things before serving its ultimate 
purpose. It is of heavy red leather, 
embossed in gold with my mother's 
name. It is dog-eared and warped of 
cover, but the rules inscribed on its 
pages are as clear as the day they w^ere 
set down. Several bear the date of 
January 7, 1869, from which I judge that 
at an anniversary party various great 
aunts contributed from their wisdom, — • 
probably at grandmother's wish, for my 
mother was then a v^ery little girl. 

Upon that date, likewise. Aunt Harriet, 
of blessed memory, wrote, "Trust in the 
Lord with all thine heart; and lean not 
unto thine own understanding." This 
aunt of the entire family is reputed never 
to have handled a kitchen spoon, but the 
w^ords she left in the cookbook would 
indicate that she might well have tried 
and been successful. 

Poetry finds a place upon these pages, 
too. "One by one the duties wait thee," 
one line says; "Thus may we here that 
bliss enjoy — " another begins. But the 
oddest record of all is that which reads: 

"Here is written, first, in the two 
grander of the twenty languages of 



21 



11 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



India, viz., the Bengali and the Sanscrit 
(or Deva-nagri) characters — the Hindoo 
maxim 'Go life, stay honor!' And now 
follows in characters Hindostani, Greek 
and Hebrew, the pleasant name of my 
little friend." 

A scholar, eminent the world over, wrote 
the characters which I cannot copy into 
print. His reputation and achievement 
comes to me the more vividly every time 
I run over the pages of my cookbook, — 
so closely are connected always the sub- 
lime and the ridiculous! 

But of the rules themselves: 

"Rye Griddle Cakes. (When father 
had dyspepsia.)" "Cranberry Roller. 
Mother's." "Maggie's Cream Pie." 

"Miss Jane's doughnuts." "Cider Cake, 
Mrs. Curtis." Grandfather had dys- 
pepsia in my day, too. Grandmother, 
Maggie and Bridget are as real as the 
explicit directions they left for me to 
follow. Mrs. Curtis is a myth to me, 
but Miss Jane kept the boarding house 
where as children we spent our summers. 
These rules are "tested." They never 
fail. Provided I take no liberties with 
the written page, the result is as certain 
as time or the everlasting hills. 

But there is one page at which the 
book opens a bit more readily than at 
any other. Here I find the caption, 
"Raised Buns. Fourth of July," and I 
remember — many things! 



"Scalded milk, butter, sugar. Yeast, 
flour. Butter and sugar again, the spice 
and raisins." The rising, baking and 
glazing are similar, probably, to any 
other buns, but not the fragrance, the 
taste nor the memories. For at the 
bottom is written this afterword, a 
postlude to the harmony. "If mixed 
in the morning, these will be done at 
midnight, and still warm at four o'clock." 

O Declaration of Independence, was 
it to celebrate your greatness we scram- 
bled up each year at four o'clock.^ Alas, 
I fear that it was not. It was for those 
raisin buns. Firecrackers, torpedoes and 
cannon, notwithstanding, the gang that 
gathered by our pantry window was more 
hungry than patriotic. They knew a 
good thing, and the word went around in 
a way to put modern advertisers to shame. 
The years went by till there was no 
longer any gang, but still there were 
buns for those who came more formally 
on Fourth of July. 

'Tis of such things as this I think, when 
I lift my hand to the shelf where the 
"cookbooks" live. 'Tis of these things 
I think and my hand moves past Aliss 
So-and-so's latest edition to rest upon 
the faded, dilapidated treasure, which so 
many hands before mine have touched. 
Perhaps you once had something of the 
sort and have put it away. If so I hope 
it is in roses and lavender. 



Camping De Luxe 

By Hazel B. Stevens 



BEING myself a lover of the out- 
doors, and having some name — 
honestly earned, I hope — for 
equable temper and geniality among 
youth, I have acted for years as chaperon 
to successions of camping parties of the 
unfledged. 

Theory, backed by experience, sends 
me on such expeditions always armed 
with certain schemes for preserving 
harmony. For instance, early in the 



game I use the indirect method to sug- 
gest some stable adjustment of duties; 
then I tell some variation of the famous 
"biscuit" story — of the camp, you 
know, whose office of cook passed auto- 
matically to the next complainer, and 
of the thoughtless member who, having 
commented on too much salt, added 
hastily, "but they're good, though!" — 
as opening for a vote to muzzle com- 
plaint; in the same way I hint mildly 



CAMPING DE LUXE 



23 



for some rule against eating between 
meals, unless with the approval of the 
cooks, and unless all share alike; and 
I put what barricades I have thought 
out against certain other sources of 
discord commonly arising among harum- 
scarum, irresponsible, deliriously happy, 
thoroughly delightful, young folk. 

But in this particular crowd of pros- 
pective campers, made up of a Home 
Economics class, under an instructor, I 
was to be merely a guest, — at liberty to 
enjoy myself without responsibility, and 
to look on at the machinery of organiza- 
tion at a safe distance. However, from 
force of habit I couldn't help "butting 
in" a little bit: "Are you sure you 
haven't forgotten something.?" I asked 
my friend, the instructor, the night before 
the start. 

"Oh, the girls have it arranged," she 
said. "You know we are working this 
out as a 'project.' They are to keep 
expenses within a given amount, and 
have charge of all ordering." 

I said nothing further, but I added 
to my own suitcase a package, each, of 
matches, sugar, pepper and salt. 

Automobiles collected us and our 
blankets and bags on schedule time. I 
found the "Home Economics" girls as 
"giggly" a lot, as wildly excited, as 
hysterically rakish in costume and re- 
mark, as any I had ever set out with, 
under the low sun of an after-the-stores- 
close start. Nonsense bubbled out of 
those close-packed automobiles every 
inch of the climb to dense woods, and 
to the smell of damp hawthorn bushes, 
and to the trickle of spring water. 

We arrived a bare hour before dark. 
There was some screaming around to 
inspect nooks, some rivalry as to who 
should sleep in the old stage coach, 
which constituted one of the bedrooms; 
and then somebody, — • not the instructor, 
— said, "If you people will see that your 
blankets are put with your own beds, 
we'll get them made up in a jiify." 

Some other bodies began dragging in 
wood, and by some magic, before one 



could believe it, coffee was steaming 
odoriferously, and supper laid out on the 
pine table within light of the bonfire, — 
without any confusion of digging into 
supplies, one of the bugbears of a late 
arrival in camp. It seems that the 
meal for the night had been packed 
separately in a hamper, dishes and all 
complete, so that it was no trick to set 
it out and add to it the hot coffee. 

Around the bonfire after supper, as- 
signments were detailed out for camp 
routine. . . . "Don't give yourself regu- 
lar duties," I had warned, from my lore, 
my friend the instructor. "There's sure 
to be a girl a day who can't cook, or has 
cut her finger, or has her feelings hurt. 
Take it easy on the easy days, for you'll 
be doing most of the work by the end of 
the trip anyhow." 

The girls appointed to get breakfast 
next morning withdrew to a log, out of 
hearing, and sat whispering and chuck- 
ling, and both talking earnestly at once, 
and getting out little slips of paper, — 
evidently having the time of their lives. 
I lifted an eyebrow and looked again. 
Cooking in camp, as I understood it, 
was one of the necessary evils of the trip; 
those who drew the "lemon" were 
temporary martyrs to the cause, but I 
had not seen before any one get fun out 
of the process. The instructor answered 
my questioning look half jokingly: "The 
object of Home Economics study is not 
merely to teach girls to cook, but to 
remove cooking from the realm of 
drudgery by showing them how to enjoy 
it, etc. . . . See page 10 of textbook — ." 

"We'd better get up and have a fire 
for them tomorrow, and give them a good 
start. There are all those dirty dishes 
from supper — " were my last sleepy 
words that night as I dozed off. 

The clanging of cymballed pans, and — 
"Twenty minu-utes till breakfa-a-a-ast!" 
were the first sounds I heard next morning. 
Perhaps my amazement was tempered 
with a mental reservation as I tumbled 
out: "New brooms sweep clean — ." 

But I am re^dy to testify now that, 



24 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



during the seven days' stay, I never 
once lifted my hand to cook, or to wash 
a dish, or to crack a bit of kindling wood. 
More than that, on, at least, one of the 
mornings, the "getting-up" call was 
accompanied by a knock, and "bell boy 
with hot water," and a jocular palm 
extended for tip. Can you "beat that" 
for luxury in the outdoors? 

About ten o'clock of that first morning, 
with all chores and near-at-hand explor- 
ing done, halloo arose for a tramp up 
canyon. Again I fear my veracity will 
be doubted when I say that before the 
start, vegetables were neatly pared and 
in covered sauce pans, ready to pop on 
for dinner the minute we returned. . . . 
I remembered my superfluous advice to 
the instructor: "Take just canned and 
quick stuff — no use bothering with raw 
vegetables, for the girls simply won't 
get around to preparing them." 

How those girls, in relays, managed to 
turn out the delicious and finished meals 
which they did, using a dilapidated cook 
stove that smoked, inadequate oven, and 
limited, wrong-sized cooking vessels, the 
equipment of the rented kitchen, — is 
one of the mysteries. Except that they 
put something of their joy and earnest- 
ness into their endeavors. There were no 
failures. Each meal had been planned 
ahead, and each girl had brought some- 
thing extra good from home to adorn 
her own contribution in the way of menu. 
Casual visitors, dropping in unexpectedly 
to a meal, were handled, whatever their 
numbers, with as much ease as any one 
of the girls would have done at home. 

This does not mean that there were 
no mishaps! But there was no grum- 
bling. Comment upon some extra good 
sandwiches, served one evening around 
the bonfire, called forth the admission 
that the squirrels had "got of!" with the 
butter, so a salad dressing had been 
concocted and substituted. The fol- 
lowing story, too, though unpoetic, is 
too good to keep. 



Some one had brought a delicious cold 
roast of beef. The girls had been 
warned about taking care of meat, and 
had spared no pains. This day, when 
the roast had been sliced for the midday 
meal, it remained covered up to the very 
second when we were called to sit down. 
But some diversion came up to delay a 
few minutes, and — • well, the meat was 
passed to me first, I took the first slice, 
and left it uneaten upon my plate. The 
girls who had brought the roast were 
much concerned and disappointed, that 
I did not like the meat, — but said 
nothing. The girl to my right passed 
me the platter again, wondering if I 
"liked it better done." At that moment 
a huge yellow-jacket swooped, and began 
buzzing around me — • horrors ! — • draw- 
ing the attention of the tableful, espe- 
cially of my next neighbors, to my 
untasted meat. I disposed of it hastily, 
on excuse of "removing temptation from 
the yellow-jacket." . . . True to the 
rules of politeness, no comment whatever 
was made upon the incident. That 
there was a kitchen consultation after- 
ward, and that cooks, even expertly 
trained ones, are human, I have only this 
proof: After lights were out that night, 
I heard from the bed next, — "What's 
that noise in the tree.^" 

"Why, it's a magpie" — and then came 
explosions of muffled laughter long drawn 
out, from beneath the wriggly blanket 
that covered the cooks of the day. 

These girls were not seasoned campers. 
Not one of them, in fact, had ever slept 
overnight before beneath a tent roof. 
Their success was due to application of 
some rules they had learned, and some 
enthusiasm for home-things they had 
acquired, to primitive housekeeping under 
the open sky. 

I can conscientiously recommend, for 
real pleasure, a trip to the woods with 
a Smith-Hughes class in Home Eco- 
nomics, from Granite High School of Salt 
Lake City; for it is Camping de Luxe. 



Linen for the Breakfast Table 

By Mary D. Chambers 



AROUND table is the prettiest for 
breakfast, but a square or an 
oblong table may be used quite as 
well. The silence cloth, of thick cotton 
felt, or the large mat of asbestos cloth or 
felt, made to fit the table, is always put 
under the tablecloth. Though called the 
"silence" cloth, its chief function is that 
of a non-conductor, to protect the 
polished surface of the table from being 
injured by hot dishes. Fine, heavy, 
double damask table linen is no longer in 
vogue for the family breakfast, but simple 
tablecloths of heavy muslin, or of plain 
unbleached linen, or of daintily tinted 
linen — -gray, azure, sage green, pink, or 
even of Venetian or Pompeian red — with 
scalloped or hemstitched edges are much 
in vogue. There seems to be an un- 
written law that a solid color of any kind, 
with scalloping in a contrasting color or 
in white, is admissible for either breakfast 
or luncheon; but that a two-colored fabric 
is not to be thought of, still less a checked 
one. An exception is made for the 
Japanese cloths of heavy crepe, with 
printed designs in deep blue. These are 
entirely in good form; they are easy 
to launder, and will give good wear. 
Either white table napkins, or napkins 
to match the cloth, may be used according 
to preference. 

The breakfast cloth may come exactly 
to the edge of the table, or may hang a 
few inches below it. Breakfast napkins 
should be smaller than dinner napkins, 
and may be from fifteen to twenty Inches 
square. For home and family use a 
napkin of twenty-two to twenty-five 
inches square is often used for all the 
meals. Quite small dollies, fringed or- 
scalloped, are sometimes placed under the 
fruit plates to be used when peaches or 
other juicy fruit is served. Where the 
rest of the table linen is white, it Is 



allowable to have colored fruit dollies, 
and red is often chosen, so that fruit 
stains may not be too much In evidence. 
With the blue-and-white Japanese cloths, 
the doilies may either match, or be solid 
blue. With other colors they match the 
cloth, or they may be plain white, or white 
with colored embroidery. For home and 
family use the sensible custom Is sanc- 
tioned of having small paper napkins, 
folded square, for use after the fruit course. 
The pretty fashion of setting the break- 
fast table without a cloth, using runners 
and doilies Instead, Is decorative and 
attractive, provided there be no danger to 
the table surface from hot dishes. This 
can be guarded against by placing mats 
under the doilies or the runner where the 
cereal and meat dishes are set, or cereal 
and meats can be served from a side 
table. Two doilies at each place, one for 
the breakfast plate, and a smaller one for 
the w^ater glass, are all that will be needed, 
and the temptation to use more than this 
must be resisted, if you would avoid a 
scrappy effect. 

Setting the Breakfast Table 

Each person should be allowed a full 
two feet of space along the table edge, 
and of this two-feet lateral space, twenty 
Inches are allowed for the cover, though 
the cover at breakfast seldom calls for 
so much, unless it is a company meal. 

The cover Is a word used to signify the 
place set for each person at the table; 
that is, the articles which are furnished 
for each one's use, such as plate, napkin, 
silver and glass. The word Is used in a 
certain figurative sense, too, the phrase 
"a dinner of twelve covers" meaning a 
dinner for twelve guests. 

The breakfast plate occupies the center 
of the cover. This is a plate of smaller 
size than the dinner plate, being not less 



26 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



than seven inches In diameter. Care 
must be taken that the monogram or 
design, if either appears on the plate, 
shall be turned in the right direction. 
The rim of the breakfast plate should be 
one inch from the edge of the table. 

The breakfast knife and fork are of 
smaller size than those used for dinner. 
The fork, tines up, is set to the left of the 
plate; the knife, with its sharp edge 
towards the plate, is set at the right. 

The cereal spoon^ concave side up, goes 
next to the knife at the right side, or it 
may be placed above the plate, but the 
first position is preferable. The cereal 
spoon is spoken of under the name 
"dessert spoon," for it is catalogued in 
this way by the silversmiths, but it is the 
correct spoon for use with all kinds of 
breakfast cereals; and it is a sign of 
ignorance of good usage to eat one's 
cereal with a teaspoon — • a fact that 
girls in school, or even in college, are not 
always aware of. The cereal spoon, 
and the breakfast knife and fork, are 
placed with the handles one-half inch 
from the edge of the table, and close to 
one another, the distance between them 
being not greater than one-half an inch, 
and preferably less than this. 

The water glass goes at the point of the 
breakfast knife, almost touching it. 
Tumblers are used for drinking water at 
breakfast, goblets at dinner or luncheon. 

The bread-and-butter plate is set at the 
left, in very nearly the same relation to 
the fork that the water glass bears to 
the knife. The butter spreader is laid 
diagonally across the bread-and-butter 
plate, with the handle towards the right. 
The butter, formed into a neat cube or 
square — • or better, a dainty ball or 
roll — is put on the farther side of the 
plate, leaving the part of the plate nearest 
the guest free for the roll or muffin. To 
put the butter ball at the nearer side is 
one of the common mistakes; in this way 
it is less convenient for the guest. The 
small" chips "formerly used for butter are 
not now thought to be in correct taste. 

The fruit plate is placed on the breakfast 



plate. It may be of china to match the 
breakfast set, or of the well-known ware of 
solid green, or it may be of glass. The 
fruit knife and fruit spoon are put on the 
fruit plate. For convenience, the fruit 
is usually placed on the plate before the 
family assembles for breakfast, but it is 
often arranged in a handsome basket or 
dish in the center of the table, where it 
serves as a decoration. This is always 
the preferred mode of serving mixed 
fruits, and the dish is passed to each person 
after he is seated. 

The fruit doily, which is usually not 
more than four or five inches square, is 
spread flat on the breakfast plate, under 
the fruit plate. Or a paper napkin, 
folded square, may as we have already 
stated, be substituted for a linen doily. 
In some hotels and restaurants it is the 
custom to place a lace paper doily, with a 
stiff, glazed center, directly on the fruit 
plate, under oranges, melons, grapefruit, 
or any other fruit eaten from its "shell." 
This custom is not sanctioned for the 
home by women of fine taste, first, be- 
cause it savors too much of hotel or 
restaurant fashions; second, because the 
use of paper to simulate a lace-edged 
linen doily is not thought correct — 
imitation being in questionable taste; 
third, because this doily under the 
fruit serves no useful purpose, since it is 
unfit to use to wipe the fingers, and it is 
only an embarrassment to the guest. 

The finger bowl, which may be of small 
size for breakfast, and of plain glass, is 
placed on either a plate or on an em- 
broidered doily in front of the breakfast 
plate, or, if this place is occupied by 
individual salts and peppers, it is put a 
little above and to the left of the bread- 
and-butter plate. 

Individual salts and peppers go in front 
of the breakfast plate; where one pair Is 
allowed for two persons they are set be- 
tween the covers. 

The breakfast napkin may be folded in 
oblong shape and placed with one of its 
long edges towards the plate; or it may be 
folded three-cornerwise, with either the 



HOW SALLY DOES IT 



27 



long edge or the corner opposite to It 
nearest the plate; or It may' be folded 
square. The square fold Is employed 
only, If the napkin Is large enough to be 
used for dinner as well as breakfast. 
The place for the napkin Is outside the 
fork, to the left of the plate, except where 
the fruit course Is omitted, or served as 
part of the cereal. In this case, the 
napkin may or may not be placed on the 
breakfast plate. 

Napkin rings are not used at any meal, 
at tables where the best usage Is practiced. 

The table decorations for breakfast may 
be the handsome dish of fruit already 
mentioned, or they may be cut flowers, or 
a very simple jardiniere. The cut 
flowers for breakfast decoration ought 
not to be of the hothouse or out-of- 
season kind, or of a costly description. 



Best of all Is a pi*etty arrangement of wild 
flowers, especially for country or subur- 
ban dwellers. The best arrangement of 
flowers for breakfast is In low, flat masses, 
or in the form of a small bouquet at each 
person's place. 

Many of these little points may seem 
"fussy" to any one who does not know 
that table setting Is a matter of great 
exactness, as well as a fine art. A beau- 
tifully appointed and well-set table Is 
something every womati should be justly 
proud of, and It is something that needs 
careful study on the part of the hostess, 
since few waitresses have either the 
training or the taste required for this work, 
In all Its niceties. Unless a woman her- 
self gives the last touches to her table, 
she can never be quite sure that It Is set 
In such a way as to do her credit. 



How Sally Does It 

By Mabel Dardnell 



W 



'E have a new hired girl at our 
place," announced Mrs. Jones, 
"and I want to tell you she 
Isj none of those new-fangled efficiency 
teachers, either; why she has them all beat 
to pieces, when It comes to labor saving 
over the cook stove. She does things In 
half the time It takes me to do It. When 
I make a layer cake, I always cut paper to 
fit the pans, but Sally don't, she just 
greases the tins well, then tosses a hand- 
ful of flour into them and turns it till 
the whole pan Is dusted, then empties the 
surplus out. 

"Her cakes never stick either. 

"Shehadmegether a cheap paint brush 
for greasing pans, and to make sure the 
bristles wouldn't fall out Into things, 
she dropped some shellac varnish on the 
bristles where they are set Into the wood. 

"Now take her way of making cookies. 
She rolls the dough out In one sheet and 
bakes it In one large dripping pan. Then 
just as soon as she takes It from the oven 



she scores It Into squares or triangles and 
the cookies break off neatly when cool. 

'"Yes, and I thought I knew all about 
making pies, but to see her go about it 
makes me feel as though I didn't know 
anything; she always measures every- 
thing used, and then she mixes the 
shortening In with a fork. 

"I suppose you think she has been to 
college by the way she measures every- 
thing, but she says it's more economical 
than guessing, and I'm beginning to 
think she Is right. 

"And did you ever hear of weighing the 
shortening.? Sally says It is far easier to 
weigh It than measure it, because one 
pint of lard weighs one pound. 

"And what do you suppose she uses for 
a rolling pin.? Why a big, round bottle 
full of Ice or ice water. She got the Idea 
from a place where she used to work in the 
city; they had a hollow rolling pin that 
they could fill with Ice. 

"Gee! Sally is *great on saving dish 



28 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



washing, too. She never seems to use 
my bread board for pies or anything. 
Instead she uses a piece of white paper, 
or waxed paper, and I have seen her use 
the inside of a paper flour sack. It is 
thrown into the fire and there is nothing 
to wash but the utensils used. 

"Andlneversaw anybody put the food 
chopper to so. many different uses; in- 
stead of grating the lemons, and her 
fingers, too, she takes a sharp knife and 
pares off the rind, then runs it through 
the food chopper. Cheese is treated the 
same way, and she can prepare vegeta- 
bles in a 'jiffy,' and they cook quicker, 
too, for the fine cutting. Once when we 
were late at starting supper and I didn't 
think there would be time to cook 
potatoes, she had them peeled and run 
through the food chopper while I was 
worrying what to have in place of them. 
They fried in a few minutes. 

"Another thing Sally hardly ever uses 
is my chopping bowl. She had Max 
plane oif a square board that she keeps 
lying on the kitchen table. When a 
vegetable is to be sliced or chopped she 
simply holds it on the board and cuts it 
down with a heavy, sharp knife. 

Cabbage, nuts, pineapple, and so many 
things are all laid out on the board, and, 
using the knife as kind of a lever, cut into 
even lengths in half the time it takes by 
the old wav. 



"Vegetables, like salsify and parsnips, 
are scraped on the board. She holds 
them firmly against the board and with 
the other hand scrapes with regular 
downward strokes. 

"And let me tell you how Sally crushes 
bread crumbs; she says one is silly to roll 
them with a rolling pin and have the 
crumbs flying all over the room, she 
always uses a sugar or salt sack and fills 
it with the dried crumbs and pounds it 
with a mallet. Now isn't that simple 
enough } But I never would have thought 
of it. 

"Oh, yes, and another thing Sally uses 
so much is my scissors. I think she uses 
them more in the kitchen than I do in the 
sewing-room and, when she cuts up any- 
thing sticky, like raisins or marshmallows, 
she rubs a little butter along the blades 
and on her fi.ngers, too, and then she can 
work so much faster. She always uses 
a big pair of shears to cut up a chicken, 
and w^here I always sewed up the opening 
of a stuffed fowl, why Sally don't, she 
just does it in a few minutes by sticking 
toothpicks into the edges and lacing it 
up with a string. It is so easy to remove, 
too. 

"When Sally first came to our house, I 
didn't think she knew anything about 
cooking, but really she can fix up the 
daintiest meal I ever ate with her labor- 
saving methods, as she calls them." 



Something New for Fourth of July 

By Alice Urquhart Fewell 



HERE are new ideas for the Fourth 
of July menu. These sugges- 
tions are suitable for use at a 
home dinner, or for refreshments to be 
served at a Fourth of July party. 

Fire Cracker Salad 

Make a well-season-ed jelly from 
strained tomatoes and gelatine, using a 
little more gelatine than usual, so that 



the jelly will be very firm when cold. 
Mould this mixture in baking powder cans 
of the very smallest size. Baking pow- 
der comes in these very small cans which 
measure about three inches in height 
and about an inch and three quarters 
in diameter across the top and bottom. 
One baking powder can must be used for 
every person served. When the jelly 
is firm, turn it out from the moulds, and 



SOMETHING NEW FOR THE FOURTH OF JULY 



29 



arrange these little red fire crackers on 
lettuce leaves. Insert a piece of shredded 
celery in one end to represent the fuse, 
and serve with mayonnaise or cream 
salad dressing. 

Four!h of July Ice Cream 

Color vanilla ice cream red with 
vegetable coloring. Freeze as usual, and 
when hard, pack the ice cream into 
individual baking powder cans of the 
smallest size as described above. Put 
paraffin paper over the top before the 
tin top is put on the can, and seal around 
the edges of the top with a piece of white 
cloth dipped in melted paraffin. Pack 
these individual moulds in salt and ice 
for two to three hours. Turn from the 
moulds on to individual serving plates 
and put a strip of angelica in one end of 
the ice cream fire crackers to represent 
the fuse. 

Patriotic Cake 

Bake pound cake in bread pans. 
When cold cut into slices about half 
an inch thick. Frost each slice with 
white frosting. Color some of the frost- 
ing red with vegetable coloring, and when 
the white frosting on the cake is thor- 
oughly dry, make red stripes lengthwise 
across the slices of cake. This is best 
done with a flat ribbon pastry tube. 
These little cakes, representing the stripes 
on the flag, are very attractive when 
served with brick ice cream, also made 
in red and white layers. 

Fire Cracker Cakes 

Use any favorite cake recipe, and bake 
the mixture in baking powder cans of 
the very smallest size. When the cakes 
are cold dip them into fondant frosting, 
which has been colored red, and insert a 
piece of angelica in one end to represent 
the fuse of the fire cracker. One of 
these cakes should be served to each 
person. The cakes may be held on the 



tines of a fork while the dipping is accom- 
plished, and they will have a better 
appearance if they are allowed to Ary 
while standing on one end on paraffin 
paper. 

Star Cake 

To reproduce the star cake shown in 
the illustration one must first purchase 
a star-shaped cake pan, which may be 
had at any "ten-cent" store. Grease 
the pan very thoroughly so there will be 
no danger of the cake sticking, and fill 
it with any cake mixture desired. When 
baked turn from the pan, and frost with 
white frosting. As the frosting begins 
to dry, outline the points of the star with 
small red candies. The six little cannons, 
which are placed in between the points 
of the star, are made of long, narrow 
cylinder-shaped pieces of candy, which 
can be bought at any confectioner's. 
The four cannon balls on top, which 
support the flag are made of candied or 
fresh cherries. This cake representing 
a star from the flag makes a very attrac- 
tive centerpiece for the table at any 
Fourth of July celebration. 

Fourth of July Candies 

Mould small pieces of fondant into 
the correct shape for fire crackers. 
Melt another portion of the fondant over 
hot water and color it red. Dip the 
fire cracker centers, and allow them to 
dry on paraffin paper. A small shaving 
of angelica may be used for the fuse. 
If one is a little artistic, small pieces of 
the fondant may be moulded to repre- 
sent the Liberty Bell. Do not try to 
make the bell hollow, but mould the bell 
shape from a solid piece of fondant. 
Dip these centers into melted chocolate, 
and allow them to dry on paraffin paper. 
When dry, the little bells may be turned 
on their sides, and a clapper made from 
a tiny piece of angelica inserted in the 
base. 



30 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



AMERICAN COOKERY 

FORMERLY THE 

BOSTON COOKING -SCHOOL 
MAGAZINE 

OF 
Culinary Science and Domestic Economics 

Subscription $1.50 per Year,Single Copies 15c 
Postage to Foreign Countries, 40c per Year 

TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The date stamped on the wrapper is the date 
on which your subscription expires; it is, also, an 
acknowledgment that a subscription, or a renewal 
of the same, has been received. 

Please renew on receipt of the colored blank 
enclosed for this purpose. 

In sending notice to renew a subscription or 
change of address, please give the old address 
as well as the new. 

In referring to an original entry, we must know 
the name as it was formerly given, together with 
the Post-ofhce, County, State, Post-office Box, 
or Street Number. 

Entered at Boston Post-office as Second-class Mattep 



Close the Trenches 

Close the trenches, pouring there 
A libation and a prayer! 

These dark pits, wherein there lay 
A million lads by night and day — 
They have been so blinding-bright 
In dream-watches of the night! 
Thrice a million children sweet 
Came on lightly-dancing feet, 
Laughing o'er the bloody rim 
At big brother stained and grim. 
Thrice a million women drew 
Near, and passed the tangle through 
Of wire betwixt them and their own. 
Many a mother stretched her hand 
To her lad, from No Man's Land 
Where the seeds of death were sov>n. 
Many a man at hurried rest 
Laid his head on a white breast 
Beside his babes; and many a boy, 
Kissing hands he loved the best . . . 
Loveliest! Loveliest/ . . . 
Knew the sacrament of joy. 

Close the trenches, shutting there 
Myriad ghosts' so sweet, so fair! 

Helen Coale Crezv. 

THE GOSPEL OF WORK 

IN this country there is no shortage of 
food, notwithstanding what may be 
said about it. No matter what may be 



seen in the headlines of the newspapers, 
our markets are abundantly supplied 
with all the foodstuffs that are needful 
for health and comfort. 

No scarcity of fuel exists in this country 
though the price of wood, coal and oil is 
abnormal. We heat our houses above 
70° F. and complain at the slightest 
variation in the temperature. Let us 
contrast these facts with the conditions 
of living reported by eyewitnesses in 
parts of Europe and especially in Vienna, 
and begin at once to practice prudence 
in all things, in short, seek for wisdom in 
life and in government. "Wisdom is the 
principal thing; therefore get wisdom, 
and with all thy getting get under- 
standing." 

There is no lack of opportunities to 
work. Everybody who wants it can find 
work, and at prices above anything ever 
known before. 

Our trouble seems to be first, the prices 
of all things have risen to a point calling 
for a scale of living that cannot possibly 
be kept up. The vicious spiral has 
reached the climax of human endurance. 
There are not funds or resources enough 
to go around. We must gradually get 
back to a more normal state of equilibrium, 
or collapse. 

In the second place, too many people, 
it seems, are not anxious to work. Not 
a few people will not work unless actual 
need makes it obligatory. The old law 
of supply and demand is still true. The 
demand of the world for materials of all 
kinds was never so great, but the goods 
are not forthcoming. If ever a time was, 
when the call to work, to produce, to save 
for ourselves and the world at large, was 
urgent and appealing, that time is now. 

The breaking down of exchanges and 
the lack of international credits are among 
the results of the lack of production. 
When people do not produce things they 
cannot exchange them. When Europe 
gets back to work they will produce 
sufficient coal for themselves, as in pre- 
vious years, and will not then need our 
coal. So with other things in part or in 



EDITORIALS 



31 



whole. In other words, work and saving 
are at the basis of the solution of the 
whole trouble. 

The late Theodore N. Vail wrote: 
"Our country's prosperity was built 
up by industry and thrift. Our forbears 
had a lust for work and accomplishment. 
Instead of this, our youth of today are 
seeking easy ways of subsistence, when 
there is no such thing as an easy way 
except at the expense of their own and 
our country's future." 

TAXES AND WAGES 

DOMESTIC help, like other questions 
of labor, seems to be in chaotic 
condition. To secure efficient service in 
the home is well-nigh impossible; the 
cost also is prohibitive. All employment 
of help is based upon the principle that 
the helper must earn his wages, and some- 
thing more. Certainly one can ill afford 
to pay a helper more than he is earning 
himself. Such a policy cannot be con- 
tinued long, for it leads straight to bank- 
ruptcy and ruin. This seems to be the 
trouble with our railroads just now. 
They are paying out more money than 
they are earning or taking in. At the 
same time equipment is running down. 
It would appear that certain concerns 
now engaged in new construction are 
employing help regardless of cost. These 
concerns are trying to get rid of excess 
war profits. After this has been accom- 
plished what are the prospects of occu- 
pation and labor .^ Wages in general at 
the present time are excessive. The 
services rendered are not adequate to the 
wages demanded. Any advance in the 
price of employment today is little less 
than criminal. When a reduction in the 
schedule of prices comes, as surely it must, 
it means friction and trouble between 
employers and employees. We have 
seen nothing better than the following 
words, spoken in reference to the conduct 
of governmental affairs, but worthy of 
consideration by everybody: 

"What we want is to come to a peace 
and get back to a government based on 



law and order as soon as possible. Cut 
every unnecessary expense; eliminate 
every unnecessary employee; bring all 
expenses down to the last degree; spread 
the war burden over a longer period of 
years. The heavy excess profit taxes and 
other war taxes are killing American 
business, when it needs most to be 
extended." 

SELF-EVIDENT 

CERTAIN things are self-evident. 
They are conceded by all careful 
observers. It is evident, first that profit- 
eering in the sale of foodstuffs, clothing, 
etc., is general, and that our laws to curb 
profiteers are either ineffective, or they 
are not properly enforced. Second, it is 
evident that the prices of many articles 
are being juggled for the benefit of a few 
and at the expense of the masses. The 
price of printing paper is an example; 
likewise the price of potatoes, sugar, fruit, 
etc. Why are these things kept at a 
distance and out of reach of the public.^ 
It is a shame and disgrace to a people who 
claim to be prosperous and at peace with 
the world. Third, it is evident that 
taxation has become oppressive in the 
extreme. Taxes and high prices go hand- 
in-hand. Already the limit has been 
reached and passed. People are ready 
to revolt. It is time a reduction be made 
in general expenditure and the burden of 
excessive taxation be lightened, lest 
people everywhere go into bankruptcy. 

ECONOMIC FORCES 

ECONOMIC questions cannot be 
neglected today. They force rec- 
ognition; they are in evidence on every 
hand and foremost in every home. Our 
resources, the matter of supply and de- 
mand, the production, transportation and 
distribution of commodities, are subjects 
that concern individual and home life; 
they cannot be ignored. As housekeepers 
and homemakers we are called upon to 
take an active part in the readjustment of 
domestic affairs, and in promoting real 
constructive work in legislation and 



32 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



reform. Out of the prevailing unrest 
some gain must be made. 

A hopeful sign is the increased interest 
and prominence given to domestic science 
in both private schools and public institu- 
tions. Homemaking has become a scien- 
tific study. Instruction is to begin in 
childhood. We now know the part food 
plays in life is not only of interest, but of 
intense and vital consequence. Misery 
or happiness, success or failure in life, are 
determined by food, its kind, quality and 
character. Out of his own experience the 
child should be taught to appreciate that 
what he eats has a direct and important 
bearing on his health and comfort. 

A MILLION 

YESTERDAY I read in a newspaper 
of a man who had inherited a million 
dollars, and I began to wonder what I 
would do if a similar fortune should come 
to me. 

I might travel abroad to see the won- 
derful works done by man, but nothing 
man has fashioned can compare with the 
white oak God has built in my back yard. 

I might hear famous singers, but no one 
of them has a voice that can compare 
with that of the mocking bird that sings 
in the hedge near my kitchen door. 

I might make the acquaintance of great 
men, but I have greater in the books on 
my shelf. 

I might make new friends, but I have 
one who walks with me without dis- 
simulation and takes no thought of my 
faults. 

I might live in a great hotel, but thus 
I should forfeit the beaten biscuit and 
fried chicken we have at home. 

I might build a great house and hire 
servants, but servants would rob me of 
privacy and a great house would oppress 
me. 

I might buy fine clothes and hire a 
valet and become a great deal of trouble 
to myself, but I feel more at ease when 
I am puttering about the premises in 
overalls. 

I might buy many motor cars, but I 



have one that talks low in its throat and 
chuckles at the approach of a hill. 

I might give it to the needy, but the 
gift would rob them of self-respect and 
self-reliance and whet their appetites for 
further charity. Moreover, my friends 
would think me a fool and come near 
converting me to their opinion. 

And also there would be the income tax. 

On the whole, I much prefer the game 
of making a dollar go further to the 
game of making it go faster. 

R. Q., in The Saturday Evening Post. 

OLD CLOTHES 

THE movement to wear old clothes is 
commendable. The present fad to 
don khaki and overalls is alike in purpose, 
but it may result in putting denims in the 
list of luxuries and so defeat a worthy 
object. The practice of wearing old 
clothes did not begin in 1920. Some have 
complied with the suggestion for several 
years past, partly from necessity, and 
partly in protest at excessive prices of 
wearing apparel. However, that the 
custom be widely extended is a most 
desirable thing, for to patch and mend, 
to clean up, make over and wear old 
clothes means a drop in the present 
exorbitant cost of clothing, and that, too, 
at no distant day. When public senti- 
ment demands a reduction in prices, the 
reduction will be made. The old-clothes 
man may not call at our door; we are 
wearing that sort of garment. 

American Cookery is trying to help 
its readers meet the , demands of the 
times. 

My Loves 

The patter of rain on a cottage roof 
Is a sound that I love full well — 
And I love the break of an autumn day 
And the woodland's leafy smell. 

I love the turn of a pasture lane 
Where the asters mimic the mist, 
And I love the orchard fruit that glows 
To a blush where the sun has kissed. 

The man who dwells in the city's heart 
With his eyes turned on the throng 
Is a purblind beggar when all is said. 
Who misses earth's fairest song. 

R. R. Greenwood. 




GIXGER-ALE SALAD (See Page 36i 

Seasonable-and-Tested Recipes 

By Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 

TN ALL recipes where flour is used, unless otherwise stated, the flour is measured after sifting 

once. Where flour is measured by cups, the cup is filled with a spoon, and a level cupful is 

meant. A tablespoonful or a teaspoonful of any designated material is a LEVEL spoonful. In flour 

mixtures where yeast is called for, use bread flour; in all other flour mixtures, use cake or pastry flour. 



Sour Cherry Soup 

Crush a pint of sour cherries, cracking 
the pits, and cook in a pint of water for 
ten minutes after water boils. A stick of 
cinnamon and the rind of one-half a 
lemon cut into strips will improve the 
flavor. Strain liquid, return to saucepan, 
and thicken with two teaspoonfuls of 
arrowroot blended with a little of the 
cherry water. Add one quart of clear 
bouillon, season with salt, pepper, and 
two teaspoonfuls of white sugar, and 
serve with toasted oysterettes. 

Chicken-and-Spinach Soup 

Wash and pick over two pounds of 
fresh spinach, and cook in one-half a cup 
of butter for live minutes, or until tender. 
Add one-half a cup of flour mixed with 
one tablespoonful of salt and one tea- 
spoonful of white pepper, and stir into 
the mixture of spinach and butter. 
When thick rub through a colander, and 
add to two quarts of hot chicken broth. 
Stir until it boils, and serve in individual 
bouillon cups, garnished with whipped 
cream. 



The large, dark leaves of lettuce may 
be used instead of spinach. 

Spring Cabbage Scalloped with 
Tomato 

Cook a six-pound head of spring cab- 
bage until tender, drain, and chop. Put 
a quart can of tomatoes through a col- 
ander, season with a tablespoonful of 
onion juice, two teaspoonfuls of salt, and 
one-fourth a teaspoonful of pepper, and 
cook until thick and smooth, stirring 
constantly; add three tablespoonfuls of 
flour and three of butter or a substitute, 
rubbed together, when the tomato is 
hot, and continue the cooking until the 
whole boils. Arrange the cabbage and 
tomatoes in alternate layers in a two- 
quart casserole or baking dish, and cover 
the top with fine-sifted buttered crumbs. 
Bake until the tomato begins to bubble 
up through the crumbs. 

Sausage Potatoes 

Select large new potatoes, and with an 
apple corer remove the centers length- 
wise. Fill in with little sausages, and 
bake on the rack of a dripping pan in a 



33 



34 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



moderate oven. Serve with a grav}' 
made by adding water to the pan, and 
seasoning to taste. 

A roUed-up slice of breakfast bacon 
may be used to stuff the potatoes if 
desired, or they may be filled with raw 
chopped meat, flavored with onion. In 
the latter case, a piece of the core should 
be used to stop the ends on which the 
potatoes rest in the pan. 

Savory Casserole of Mutton 

Cut from the middle part of a leg of 
yearling mutton a slice two inches thick. 
Remove bone, and fill the cavity with an 
onion, or with several two-inch strips of 
celery. Dredge with flour, salt, and 
pepper. Prepare in the bottom of a 



long and let all simmer in boiling, salted 
water until tender. Melt three table- 
spoonfuls of butter and cook in it three 
tablespoonfuls of flour, a scant half- 
teaspoonful of salt and a dash of black 
pepper; when frothy add one cup and a 
half of the water in which the asparagus 
was cooked (cooled for this purpose) 
and stir and cook until boiling; beat in 
a tablespoonful of butter and add the 
asparagus. Have ready the yolks of 
four eggs, beaten light, and the whites, 
beaten dry. To the yolks add one- 
fourth a teaspoonful, each, of salt and 
pepper, then turn them over the whites 
and cut and fold the two together. Melt 
a tablespoonful of butter in a hot ome- 
let pan; turn in the egg mixture, and, 




BAKED LOBSTER 



casserole a rich gravy of one cup of brown 
stock, one-half a cup of currant jelly, a 
dozen chopped olives, six peppercorns, 
three whole cloves, and one tablespoonful 
of lemon juice. Thicken when boiling 
with one tablespoonful of flour mixed 
with a little water to a paste. Lay into 
this the round of mutton; spread the 
top with chopped beef marrow, cover 
casserole, and bake for an hour and a half 
in a moderate oven. 

Asparagus Omelet 

Cut all but three stalks of a bunch of 
asparagus into pieces about an inch 



when "set" on the bottom, put the pan 
into the oven and let cook until no un- 
cooked egg clings to a knife thrust into 
the center of the omelet. Score at right 
angles to the handle of the pan. Put 
some of the asparagus on half of the ome- 
let; fold and turn out on to a hot platter. 
Dispose the three stalks of asparagus 
on top of the omelet and the rest of the 
asparagus and sauce around it. Serve 
at once. 

Baked Lobster 

Select a fresh boiled lobster weighing 
one pound and one-half; split lengthwise, 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



35 




BOILED SALMON, SHRIMP SAUCE 



remove all of the meat and cut into small 
cubes. Discard large claws. Melt four 
tablespoonfuls of butter in a saucepan; 
when it bubbles, add four tablespoonfuls 
of flour, one-half a teaspoonful of salt, 
one-fourth a teaspoonful of white pepper, 
and cook and stir until the mixture looks 
yellow (from three to five minutes). 
Add two cups of cold milk or cream 
gradually, and stir constantly. When 
the sauce boils, add the lobster meat, one 
tablespoonful of Worcestershire sauce and 
two teaspoonfuls of fine-chopped parsley. 
Fill the half-shells of lobster with the 
mixture, and sprinkle with one-half a 
cup of fresh bread crumbs, mixed with 
two teaspoonfuls of melted butter. Bake 
in oven until well browned. 



Boiled Salmon 

Place three pounds of fresh salmon, a 
tablespoonful of salt, one tablespoonful 
of white-wine vinegar and six pepper- 
corns in two quarts of rapidly boiling 
water. Remove to a place on the range 
where the fish will cook gently for forty- 
five minutes. Serve with 

Mushroom-and-Shrimp Sauce 

Stir four tablespoonfuls of flour into 
four tablespoonfuls of butter heated to a 
foam. Add one teaspoonful of salt, 
one-eighth a teaspoonful of pepper, one 
cup and one-half of cold milk, and one 
cup of stock in which the fish is cooked. 
Stir constantlv until the sauce boils. 




TURBAN OF CHICKEN 



-">b 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Break fresh mushrooms into small pieces. 
Prepare enough to fill a cup. Saute 
gently in a little butter for five minutes. 
Break one can of cooked shrimps into 
small pieces. Add mushrooms and 
shrimps to sauce. 

Turban of Chicken 

Strip the meat from the bones of a 
two or three pound chicken, and chop 
very fine with one-fourth a pound of 
cooked ham. Mix together one-fourth a 
cup of softened butter and four table- 
spoonfuls of flour; season with one table- 
spoonful of salt, and a mere trace of 
cayenne. Stir into this two cups of 
boiling milk; cook until thickened, and 
add chopped chicken and ham. Beat 



pepper are arranged on top. Serve with 
Tomato Sauce. 

Ginger-Ale Salad 

Soften one-half a package of gelatine 
in one-half a cup of cold water twenty 
minutes. Dissolve in one cup of boiling 
water. Strain, add one cup and one- 
half of ginger ale, one-half a cup of sugar 
and the juice of one lemon. Add one 
cup of strawberries, cut into halves, and 
one banana, sliced thin. Stir, mould and 
chill. Serve with lettuce and French 
dressing. 

Stuffed Lettuce Salad 

Remove the hearts from small, firm 
heads of lettuce, and fill cavities with a 




EGGS. SAMUEL BUTLER 



in two well-beaten eggs; pour the mixture 
into a well-greased ring mold, cover with 
buttered paper, and let steam or oven- 
poach until firm. Turn out carefully 
on platter, and fill center with sliced 
tomatoes. 

Serve with bechamel, celery, or oyster 
sauce. 

Eggs, Samuel Butler 

Prepare as many slices of toast as there 
are eggs to be cooked. Place a slice of 
broiled bacon on toast, on the bacon a 
poached egg, above the egg a large 
cooked fresh mushroom (or a wreath of 
small mushrooms). Pieces of sweet red 



mixture of chopped chicken, mushrooms, 
shredded almonds, and tender celery, 
moistened with mayonnaise. Serve on 
leaves of escarole garnished with red 
cherries, strawberries, and sections of 
orange pulp. 

Tomatille of Veal 

Cut from a leg of veal six or eight thin 
slices, three by five inches. Spread each 
with a spoonful of the following stuffing: 
One-half a cup of chopped pork, one-half 
a cup of bread crumbs, seasoning of 
chopped green pepper, salt, etc., and 
bind the whole with beaten egg. Roll, 
secure with wooden toothpicks, and stew 



SEASOXABLE-AXD-TESTED RECIPES 



37 




SWEET FRENCH ROLLi 



slowly in rich brown stock, thickened with 
flour, one tablespoonful to one cup of 
stock, in covered saucepan for forty-five 
minutes. 

Sweet French Rolls 

Soften one cake of compressed yeast 
in one-fourth a cup of scalded-and- 
cooled milk; add to one cup of scalded- 
and-cooled milk. Stir in two cups of 
bread flour. Beat the mixture until 
smooth; cover and let stand in a warm 
place until light and puffy, then add one- 
fourth a cup of sugar, one teaspoonful 
of salt, one egg, one-fourth a cup of 
melted butter, one-eighth a teaspoonful 
of grated nutmeg and flour enough to 
knead (about one cup and three-fourths). 
Turn on to a floured board and knead 
until elastic; cover closely and let stand 
until doubled in bulk. Shape into small 
balls, then roll with flneers into lone, thin 



shapes one-half the size required b}' the 
French roll pan. Place in pan when 
doubled in bulk and bake twelve minutes 
in a hot oven. 

Banana Sponge 

Soften one-fourth a package of gela- 
tine in one-fourth a cup of cold water. 
Remove the skin and coarse threads from 
four small bananas, and press the pulp 
through a ricer. There should be a 
generous cup of pulp. Scald the pulp 
over a quick fire; add the softened gela- 
tine and stir until dissolved; add half a 
cup of sugar and the juice of a lemon, 
and stir over ice-water until the mix- 
ture thickens slightly; then fold in the 
whites of two eggs, beaten dry. Turn 
into a mold lined with slices of banana. 
Squeeze a little lemon juice o^-er the 
slices of banana to keep them from 
discolorine. 




BAXANA SPONGE 



38 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Baked Custard 



4 eggs, well beaten 
§ cup sugar 



I h teaspoonful salt 
I 3 cups milk 
nutmeg 



Hull, wash, and drain two baskets of 
berries. Save a few choice fruits for a 



garnisJ 



nd cut the rest in halves. 



Beat the sugar and salt into the eggs 
and stir in the milk. Pour into a glass 
baking dish and set on several folds of 
cloth or paper in a baking pan; pour in 
boiling water to half the height of the 
baking dish; let bake without the water 
boiling, until firm in the center; grate a 
little nutmeg over the top of the custard 
and let chill before serving. Serve from 
baking dish. This custard may be made 
with three eggs. 



Mix the latter with one cup and a half of 
sugar, and set aside for an hour or more 
in a warm place. 

Sift together one cup and a half of 
pastry flour, half a cup of cornstarch, half 
a teaspoonful of salt, and four teaspoon- 
fuls of baking-powder. With the tips of 
the fingers w^ork into these ingredients 
one-fourth a cup of butter; add gradually 
about one cup of milk, mixing with a 
knife to form a rather soft dough. Toss 
on ,to a floured board and knead lightly. 





3 





BAKED CUSTARD 



Almond Jumbles 

Cream one-half a cup of butter; add 
two cups of sugar, the yolks of five well- 
beaten eggs, and two cups of flour, 
sifted with one-half a teaspoonful of 
salt — the flour to be added, alternately, 
with one cup of thick soured milk, to 
which one small teaspoonful of soda, 
dissolved in a little boiling water, has 
been added. 

Add three-fourths a pound of almonds, 
blanched and chopped as fine as pos- 
sible. Lastly, beat in the whites of five 
eggs, beaten stiff. Form into small rings 
on buttered paper on a baking sheet, and 
bake immediately. 

Strawberry Shortcake 

Reprinted from June-July No. 1898 
by request 



Divide into two pieces. Pat, and roll 
out to fit a round cakepan. Put one 
piece on the pan, spread the top with 
softened butter, and place the other 
lightly above it. Bake in a quick oven 
fifteen or twenty minutes. Pull the 
two layers apart, and spread liberally 
with softened butter. Put one layer on a 
serving-dish, pour over half of the sugared 
berries, above this put the other layer, 
then the rest of the berries. 

Add one-fourth a cup of milk to a cup 
of thick cream, and beat until stiff; 
add three tablespoonfuls of powdered 
sugar, and, if desired, half a teaspoonful 
of vanilla; and, when well mixed, use as a 
garnish for the top of the cake. 

Coronado Beach Salad 

Divide four tangerines into their 
carpels, remove the seeds and cut away 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



39 



the skin from these. Mix with six plums, 
apricots, or any other stone fruit, sliced 
and the stones removed. Add two sweet 
red peppers, shredded to an exceeding 
fineness, arrange on white heart-leaves of 
head lettuce, sprinkle with lemon juice, 
and dot over with mayonnaise tinted pink 
with pounded lobster coral or beet juice. 

Preserved Peaches Without 
Cooking 

Put the peaches into a deep dish, and 
pour over them boiling water to cover. 
Let stand until nearly cool, then rub off 
the skins, divide the peaches into halves, 
and place in layers in the preserving 
jars, alternately, with layers of an equal 
weight of granulated sugar. There 

should be about an inch of sugar at the 
top of each jar. Seal the jars, and store in 
a cool, dry place, in the dark. 

Monte Cristo Salad 

Arrange four nests of lettuce leaves on 
a salad plate. In one nest arrange a 
mound of diced lobster meat; on the 
second, slices of hard-cooked egg; on the 
third, diced boiled potatoes; and on the 
fourth, mushroom caps. In the center 
of the four mounds place the crisp heart of 
lettuce. Serve with mayonnaise dressing. 

Conserve of Rhubarb and Figs 

Cook two pounds of iigs in water barely 




STAR CAKE (On Page 29) 

to cover, until soft. Add four pounds of 
rhubarb, cut into short lengths, the cut- 
up yellow rind of two lemons, and the 
juice of one, one-half a cup of chopped, 
nuts, one teaspoonful of whole cloves,, 
four one-inch pieces of stick cinnamon,, 
and three pounds of sugar. Cook all 
together until the mixture is thick and 
about as stiff as a drop batter. Great. 







-•-*-*. : 


^ 



MONTE CRISTO SALAD 



40 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




CHOCOLATE-AND-\AMLLA ICK CREAM 



care must be used to avoid burning. 
Pour into small jars, and cover with 
paraffin or waxed paper. This is a de- 
licious conserve. 

Chocolate-and-Vanilla Ice Cream 

Heat two cups of double cream, two 
quarts of rich milk and two cups of sugar 
until just lukewarm. Remove from fire 
and stir in two junket tablets that have 
been dissolved in two' tablespoonfuls of 
cold water. Add two tablespoonfuls of 
vanilla flavoring, and let stand in a warm 
place until the mixture jellies. Let chill, 
then pour into can of the freezer and 
freeze. When thoroughly frozen stir 
in ice-cold chocolate syrup to the depth 
of half the can. Repack and let stand 
three hours before serving. 



Chocolate Sauce 

Sift together one-fourth a cup of cocoa 
and one cup and one-half of sugar, pour 
on one cup of boiling water and stir while 
bringing quickly to the boiling point. 

Pistachio Layer Cake 



^ cup shortening 

1 cup sugar 
5 cup milk 

2 cups flour 



3 teaspoonfuls baking 

powder 
1 teaspoonful pista- 
chio extract 
3 egg-whites 

Cream the butter; add the sugar, 

gradually, beating constantly; add the 

milk and extract, alternately, with the 

flour and baking powder sifted together. 

Beat the mixture thoroughly to secure 

a fine grain, then beat In, lightly, the 

whites of eggs beaten dry. Bake in two 

round layer cake pans. Fill and cover 

with a boiled frosting, 

pistachio extract, and 

pistachio nuts. 

Gooseberry Gelatine Jelly 

Stew one quart of gooseberries in a 
pint of water until very tender. Mash 
through a colander, and add one cup of 
sugar and one-half a box of granulated 
gelatine previously hydrated in one- 
fourth a cup of cold water. Mold in 
small custard cups, and serve with 
sweetened whipped cream, garnished 
with candied cherries. 



flavored with 
sprinkle with 




PISTACHIO LAYER CAKE 



Seasonable Menus for Week in June 



Breakfast 

Cereal, Thin Cream 

Salt Codfish Balls, Sauce Tartare 

Baking Powder Biscuits Strawberries 

Coffee 

Dinner 

Tomato Bouillon 

Boiled Salmon, Mushroom-and-Shrimp Sauce 

New Potatoes Fresh Green Peas 

Ginger-Ale Salad 

Vanilla-and-Chocolate Ice Cream 

Little Cakes Tea or Coffee 

Luncheon 

Eggs, Samuel Butler 

Pineapple Marmalade 

Cocoa 



Breakfast 

Asparagus Omelet 

Spider Corn Cake 

Philadelphia Butter Buns (reheated) 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Deviled Crabs 

Lettuce-and-Tomato-Jelly Salad 

Dry Toast 

Strawberries Cocoa 

Dinner 

Pot Roast, Onions 

New Carrots Beet Greens 

Cream-of-Rice Pudding 

Tea or Coffee 



Breakfast 

Stewed Prunes 

Wheatena, Top Milk 

Broiled Bacon Fried Eggs 

Potatoes Hashed in Milk 

Dry Toast Coffee 

Luncheon 

Macaroni with Tomatoes and Cheese 

California Lettuce. French Dressing 

Rhubarb Baked with Sultana Raisins 

Tea 

Dinner 

Breast of Veal, en Casserole 

Spinach 'Riced Potatoes 

Strawberry Short Cake 

Tea or Coffee 



Breakfast 

Raspberries, Rolled Oats 

Thin Cream 

Smoked Halibut, Creamed 

Graham MuflSns 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Asparagus on Toast 
Lima Beans, Stewed 
Raspberry Shortcake 

Dinner 

Boiled Breast of Lamb, Caper Sauce 

Boiled Potatoes 

Boiled Turnips New Beets, Buttered 

Hot Gingerbread Cream Cheese 

Half Cups of Coffee 



Breakfast 

Stewed Peaches (dried) 

Eggs Cooked in Shell Oatmeal Muffins 

Fried Mush (Cream of Wheat), Maple Syrup 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Cream-of-Asparagus Soup 

Parker House Rolls 

Prune Whip Boiled Custard 

Tea 

Dinner 

Tomato-and-Veal Soup 

Broiled Filets Mignon 

Asparagus Hollandaise 

Baked Potatoes, Paprika 

Watercress Salad 

Strawberry Bavarian Cream 

Tea or Coffee 



Breakfast 

Sliced Bananas, Gluten Grits 

Spanish Omelet 

Popovers 

Doughnuts Coffee 

Luncheon 

Hot Cheese Sandwiches 

Cold Beet Greens, French Dressing 

Sponge Jelly Roll 

Tea 

Dinner 

Bluefish. Stuffed and Baked 

Escalloped Potatoes 

Stringless Beans Cucumber Salad 

Frozen Apricots Macaroons 

Half Cups of Coffee 






Breakfast 

Sliced Pineapple Cereal 

Broiled Liver and Bacon 
• Potatoes Hashed in Milk 
Glazed Currant Buns 
Coffee 



Luncheon 

V'egetable Hash, Horseradish 

Whole- Wheat Bread and 

Butter 

Strawberries 

Tea 

41 



Dinner 

Clear Soup, Bread Sticks 
Baked Lobster 
Delmonico Potatoes 
Tomato, Cucumber and 

Lettuce Salad 
Raspberry Water Ice 
Vanilla Wafers Tea or Coffee 



Seasonable Menus for One Week in July 



Breakfast 

Boiled Rice, Thin Cream 

Shirred Eggs Popovers 

Raspberries Coffee 



Dinner 

Cream-of-Lettuce Soup, Croutons 

Roast Veal, Bread Dressing 

New Potatoes 

Sliced Tomatoes Stringless Beans 

Strawberry Shortcake 

Half Cups of Coffee 



Supper 

Monte Cristo Salad Toasted Muffins 
Sliced Pineapple Cocoa 



Breakfast 

Stewed Peaches (dried) 

Gluten Grits Toast 

Veal Hash with Green Peppers 

Coffee Rolls Coffee 

Luncheon 

Chicken-and-Spinach Soup Rye Muffins 

Baked Custard Pistachio Layer Cake 



Dinner 

Clear Tomato Soup, Croutons 

Cold Roast Beef, Potatoes Maitre d'Hotel 

New Onions Buttered 

Romaine Salad 

Fruit Cup Cookies 

Iced Tea 



Breakfast 

Bananas 
Toasted Corn Flakes, Thin Cream 
• Scrambled Eggs Dry Toast 

Doughnuts Coffee 

Luncheon 

Mock Scallop of Crabs 

Baking-Powder Biscuit 
Pinneapple Sponge, Boiled Custard 
Tea 

Dinner 

Veal Croquettes Minted Peas with Lettuce 
Baked New Potatoes Macaroni Italien 
Cherry Pie 
Cheese Tea or Coffee 



Breakfast 

Raspberries 

Quaker Oats, Cream 

Omelet Creole Hashed Brown Potatoes 

White Mountain Muffins 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Tripe Birds with Tomato Sauce 

Blueberry Pie 

Cream Cheese Tea 

Dinner 

Cream of String Bean Soup 

Broiled Lamb Chops Green Peas 

New Turnips in Cream, Delmonico Potatoes 

California Lettuce, French Dressing 

Gooseberry Tarts 

Tea or Coffee 



Breakfast 

Blackberries 

Cream of Wheat, Top Milk 

Broiled Fresh Mackerel 

Potatoes Hashed in Milk 

Yeast Rolls Coffee 

Luncheon 

Chicken Loaf Entire* Wheat Muffins 

Coronado Beach Salad 

Toasted Crackers Cocoa 

Dinner 
Roast Beef (First cut of Rump) 

Franconia Potatoes 

Spinach Buttered Beets 

Horseradish Sauce 

Almond Jumbles Banana Sponge 

Tea or Coffee 



Breakfast 

Sliced Pineapple 
Broiled Halibut, Toasted Brown Bread 

Baked Potatoes 
Currant Buns Coffee 



Luncheon 

Lettuce-and-Egg Salad, Pulled Bread 

Red Raspberry Shortcake 

Cocoa 



Dinner 

Clam Broth,''Whipped Cream 

Boiled Lobster (cold) Salad Rolls 

Philadelphia Relish 

Peach Pie 

Iced Coffee 



Breakfast Luncheon 

Blueberries, Milk, Yeast Rolls Lobster Newburg, 



Fish Cakes 
Pop-Overs 



Broiled Bacon 
Coffee 



Blueberry Muffins 
Griddle Cakes, Syrup 
Tea 



42 



Dinner 

Beef Balls, Brown Sauce 

With Vegetables in Cubes 

(onions, carrots, turnips) 

jTomatoes, French Dressing 

Bread-and-Butter Pudding, 

Hard Saure 
Tea or Coffee 



Menus for Special Occasions 



WEDDING BREAKFAST (M.) 

I II 

Strawberry-and-PineappIe Cup Whole Strawberries in Paper Boxes 

Filets of Fish (Fried) Cucumbers Powdered Sugar 

Creamed Potatoes Clam Broth, Whipped Cream 

Lady Finger Rolls Creamed Lobster in Swedish Timbale Cases 

Sliced Tenderloin of Beef, Mushroom Sauce Young Chickens Broiled 

Fried Bananas Asparagus, Hollandaise Sauce 

Lettuce-and-Asparagus Salad Parker House Rolls 

Graham Bread-and-Cheese Sandwiches Lettuce Hearts, French Dressing 

Sultana Roll, Strawberry Sauce Cheese Straws 

Bride's Cake Vanilla Ice Cream, Molded 

Coffee With Strawberry Sherbet 

Little Cakes 
Coffee 



CLASS SPREADS 

I n 

Chicken, Pecan-Nut-Meats-and-Cress Salad Fresh Salmon-and-Lettuce Salad 
Creamed Chicken in Patties Cold Chicken Olives 

Bread-and-Butter Sandwiches (Assorted Bread) Salad Rolls, Buttered 

Vanilla, Strawberry and Chocolate Ice Cream Raspberry Sherbet 

Cake Little Cakes 

III 

Cabbage Salad Sandwiches 

Ham Sandwiches * 

Assorted Cake 
Lemon Sherbet with Sugared Strawberries 



PICNIC LUNCHEONS 

I II 

Chicken Salad, Brown Bread Sandwiches Bouillon (Thermos) Crackers 

Olives Radishes 

Deviled Eggs Coffee (Thermos) Sardine Sandwiches, Sliced Lemon 

Chilled Watermelon Buttered Yeast Rolls 

Sliced Tomatoes 

Cream Cheese-and-Currant Jelly Sandwiches 

Salted Nuts Candy 

in 

Baking Powder Biscuit, Buttered 
Broiled Bacon '/ /-• i j r^ c 

Baked Potatoes \ ^°°^^^ °^^" Campfire 
Sliced Cucumbers (Thermos) 
Raspberry Tarts Little Cakes 
Coffee 



43 



Sauces in French Kitchens 

By Kurt Heppe 



THE reproach that rich foods are a 
cause of deranged digestion is not 
so much due to French sauces, as rather 
to the faulty preparation of these 
sauces. 

To a healthy digestion there is no de- 
light more exquisite than a perfectly 
prepared French sauce. Such a sauce is 
a thing of surpassing delicacy. It is an 
expensive thing, too. 

To a poor digestion any sauce will be a 
source of malease. 

In French cookery the spicing (flavor- 
ing) is the thing most conspicuous. 
French cookery has developed the art of 
spicing to the point of perfection. 

There are very few nationals, other 
than French, who can hit every time that 
indefinable mark of absolute perfection. 
A coarse person cannot attain it. Only 
men who do not smoke, nor drink 
habitually, can expect to become dis- 
criminating master-cooks. 

Sauces are a thickened fluid, flavored 
with vegetables, savored with meat and 
bones, and spiced with aromatics. 

The thickening consists of egg-yolks 
or starch (in the form of roux, which is 
flour braized in butter), or cornstarch, or 
arrow- root. 

The fluid may be stock, milk, butter, 
or, in cold sauces, oil. 

The vegetable flavoring-agents are: 
onions, green peppers, leeks, carrots, 
celery and mushrooms. Zest is some- 
times added from lemons and oranges. 

The spices are: salt, pepper, paprika. 

The aromatics are: cloves, thyme, 



bay-leaves, mace, and sometimes curry 
and chili-powder. 

The bones are preferably veal-bones, 
(crushed and roasted). 

The meat is extracted in the stock. 

To simplify the making of sauces, cooks 
make a general basic sauce for all brown 
sauces, called "Espagnole," and a general 
white basic sauce, called "cream-sauce." 

Tomato sauce is in a class by itself and 
is made very much like a soup. In fact, 
sauce-making is a process much remindful 
of soup-making. The object, of course, 
is to flavor a fluid with savory essences 
and to make this fluid a proper accom- 
paniment of certain specialized dry 
dishes. 

Fish sauces, in hotels, are nearly al- 
ways made to order, without a basic 
sauce. They are made like other sauces, 
but instead of using meat-stock, a fish 
stock is made from fish-heads, fish- 
bones and spices and this stock gives the 
fish-flavor to the sauce. 

These fish-sauces cannot be used with 
meat, or in intermixture with meat- 
stock sauces. 

Experience and practice alone dictate 
the quantities to be used in cooking basic- 
sauces. 

To make the Espagnole. take chopped 
calves' feet and veal bones (crushed), 
with raw ham-trimmings (cut into small 
pieces), chopped carrots, leeks, onions, 
celery and parsley-roots, salt, pepper, 
cloves, bay-leaves and thyme, put all in 
a flat roasting pan, spread a little grease 
over all to prevent burning, and get a 



44 



SAUCES IN FRENCH KITCHENS 



45 



golden color in a hot roasting or baking 
oven. 

Now stir the whole and let the under- 
surfaces, also, get golden colored, then 
sprinkle with flour and let the flour get 
light brown. Stir again to get the flour 
uniformly brown and to prevent the stuff 
scorching. 

Then take the whole mass and put it 
into a stew-pan, fill up with stock and 
add a can of tomatoes, or an equivalent 
quantity of tomato trimmings. 

Now let it simmer on the back of the 
range for six hours; then press through 
a sieve into another stew-pan and reduce 
again by simmering for another three 
hours. During both these cooking stages 
the sauce must be occasionally cleared by 
skimming off the impurities and the fat, 
which come to the surface. 

While the cooking is going on, mush- 
room liquor from cans, trimmings of 
meat, trimmings of fowl or vegetables 
should be added to the stock, which is 
simmering in another pot on the back of 
the range, and whi-ch will provide the 
fluid of soups and sauces the next day. 
In this fashion nothing is discarded in the 
French kitchen. 

After the Espagnole has simmered for 
nine hours it is worked through a china- 
cap (fine, funnel-shaped wire sieve) into a 
large sauce-pan and put in a draught, 
with a wxdge underneath, to effect a fast 
cooling. 

When cold it isjput in the ice-box and 
from there drawn upon as required. 

To make the basic sauce for milk 
sauces, called "cream-sauce," it must 
first be impressed that this sauce has the 
consistency of cream, but does not con- 
tain any cream. 

Take a sauce-pan, put in half butter 
and half fowl-fat, make this fat very hot 
so it bubbles, then add a heaping hand- 
ful of flour for every gallon of cream- 
sauce you intend to make, and stir the 
flour and cook for ten minutes; in the 
meantime make your milk boiling .hot in 
the bain-marie; add the milk, gradually, 
to this hot roux and stir constantly. 



Sufficient fat must be used in the first 
place to allow the flour to become a fast- 
bubbling thick mass, before the milk is 
gradually added. 

After the milk is added, is well stirred 
and has been permitted to mellow for 
about fifteen minutes, the salt, pepper 
and a little nutmeg is added, and any 
mushroom liquor that may be handy 
(but from cans only, as fresh mushroom 
liquor will color the sauce dark). The 
sauce is now worked through a china cap, 
with a small soup ladle, and is so made 
smooth and rendered free from lumps. 
Then the sauce is poured into the re- 
spective containers, in which it is intended 
to cool, and the top is sprinkled with 
butter to avoid skin formation. Then 
\t is put into a draught, with a wedge 
underneath to permit fast cooling. This 
fast cooling arrests fermentation, and 
is, in summer, particularly, of the greatest 
importance. 

Mornay Sauce. — • Boil some cream- 
sauce with some of the stock, fish or 
whatever the sauce is to be used for; if 
no such stock is handy use plain veal or 
chicken stock; reduce the sauce a quarter; 
add some grated Swiss and Parmesan 
cheese and put on the fire again for a few 
minutes and insure the melting of the 
cheese by stirring with a wire whisk. 
Finish the sauce away from the fire with 
butter added by degrees. 

Horseradish Sauce — Boil for twenty 
minutes some white consomme with 
grated horseradish, then add some butter 
sauce with cream and bread crumbs, 
thicken by reducing on a brisk fire and 
rub through a tammy. 

Add the yolks of two eggs, salt and 
pepper and a little mustard, dissolved 
in vinegar. 

Butter Sauce — Mix some melted butter 
with sifted flour; dilute with salted 
boiling water. Stir briskly. Do not 
allow to boil. Add the yolks of some 
eggs, mixed with cream and some lemon 
juice. Strain and butter. This sauce 
must not be let boil after the eggs have 
been added, otherwise it will curdle. 



46 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Hollandaise Sauce — Take some egg- 
yolks and a little lemon-juice, salt and 
mignonette pepper, put Into a saucepan 
and set into the bain-marie; add a spoon- 
ful of water and work with a whisk until 
the yolks begin to thicken. Then remove 
the saucepan to a tepid place, and grad- 
ually pour melted butter on the sauce, 
while constantly stirring. When the 
butter is absorbed, the sauce will be 
thick and firm and creamy. Strain and 
keep in a warm place, but do not allow to 
become too hot, or it will dissolve. 

Bearnaise Sauce. — ■ Put into a small 
saucepan some chopped shallots, chopped 
taragon, chopped chervil, a little mignon- 
ette pepper, salt and vinegar. Reduce 
the vinegar by two-thirds; let cool a little 
and add some egg-yolks. Then put back 
on a small fire and add some melted 
butter, stirring all the time. While the 
eggs cook, the sauce thickens. It is 
imperative, however, that in all sauces 
where egg-yolks are being used, that the 
sauce must not be allowed to become 
very hot, or else the yolks will boil into 
lumps. Add a very little cayenne and 
strain. If there should be difficulty in 
securing taragon, then taragon vinegar 
should be used. This is obtainable in 
any high-class grocery store. 

Tomato Sauce. — ■ Put into a large 
saucepan on a brisk fire some butter, 
lean raw ham cut into small pieces, 
chopped carrots, onions and leeks, some 
chopped parsley, cloves, whole pepper, 
bay-leaves, thyme, some chopped green 
peppers, garlic, salt and powdered sugar. 
Mix well with a wooden spoon until 
golden brown. Add some flour, mix 



well, cook for five minutes, then add some 
quartered or canned tomatoes and stock. 
Mix thoroughly, cover and let boil for an 
hour and a half, mixing once in a while. 
Strain and cool. It will keep in perfect 
condition for a long time when properly 
cooled. 

Mayonnaise Sauce. — ■ Put into a basin 
some raw egg-yolks. Season with salt 
and pepper, paprika and a little cayenne. 
Pour a little vinegar onto the yolks while 
whisking briskly. Then add one quart 
of oil, letting it trickle down in a thread 
(this is very intportant). Whisk the 
sauce constantly. The sauce is finished 
with a little lemon juice and a very little 
boiling water. The oil should not be too 
cold, merely cool. This is a sauce very 
easy to make, and, if directions are fol- 
lowed, it will invariably succeed. The 
vinegar must be put in first and the oil 
added in a thread under constant stirring. 

Veloute Sauce for Fricassee, — Put a 
sauce-pan on the fire with butter and 
fowl fat. Add, when the butter is blister- 
ing hot, one heaping handful of flour for 
every gallon of sauce you intend to make. 
Stir the mixture with a whisk until 
bubbles appear. Then add your hot 
stock gradually. Be sure and keep on 
stirring all the time. When all the roux 
is evenly absorbed and the sauce has been 
allowed to cook for fifteen minutes it 
should be taken off the fire, a little 
lemon juice added and some egg-yolks, 
which have been separately diluted with 
some of the stock.- Whisk the whole 
well to insure a perfect absorption. 
This sauce is spiced with salt, white 
pepper and very little nutmeg. 



Richly purple, and deeply golden, 
Fashioned by God's own hand, 

So exquisitely dainty and sweet. 
They seem sent from a fairyland. 



Pansy Blooms 



"Pansies for thoughts," they say; 

And their mystic little faces, 
Should bring thoughts most dear and^true, 

For they're blest by all the graces. 



Sweetest flowers of any clime, ' 

Fanned by northern or southern breeze, 

We could search the wide world over. 
And find no flowers so sweet as these. 

Edith C. Lane. 



For Sunday Night's Supper 

By Elizabeth X. Simmonds 



" ¥X THAT shall we have for supper 

VY tomorrow?" asks the harassed 
housewife, week after week, as the 
Saturdays come around. 

She has grown weary of the favorites 
in her own particular culinary groove, 
and longs to borrow a few of the most 
successful from somebody else. It is 
essential that they should be dainty and 
easily made; more particularly does that 
qualification appeal to those women who 
are seeking to evade the intricacies of 
present-day domestic problems by being 
mistress and servant in one. 

The following recipes are neither nec- 
essarily new nor strikingly original, but 
they are all essentially practical, and have 
answered the test of proof; they assume 
that the housewife believes that the best 
ingredients make the most nourishing 
food, and are therefore cheapest in the 
long run. All the dishes can be made on 
Saturday. 

Apple Delight. For this are required 
three or four large cooking apples, one 
tablespoonful of butter, two level table- 
spoonfuls of sugar, an Qg^ and a piece of 
lemon. 

Boil the apples, after washing them 
and cutting them up into small pieces, 
without either peeling or coring them. 
Use as little water as possible, as a good 
deal of water will come from the apples 
themselves. When they are tender, rub 
them through the sieve with a wooden 
spoon. Add the result of a few good 
squeezes of lemon to the apple pulp, and 
while it is still hot, stir in the butter and 
sugar. Then leave the mixture to cool, 
while you grease a pan, and beat up the 
Qgg in a separate dish. Next add the 
Qgg to the apple pulp, stirring vigorously 
all the time, and finally transfer the 
whole to the pan and bake fairly gently 
for about half an hour. This pudding 



is good hot, but quite as delicious cold. 

Banana Custard is not less dainty, 
for which are required two bananas, 
three tablespoonfuls of jam (strawberry 
is best), one pint of milk, two eggs 
(yolks only), one ounce of pulverized 
sugar and a few drops of vanilla extract. 

Cut the bai^nas into thin, round 
slices. Spread a layer of these over the 
bottom of a glass dish. Over them 
spread one tablespoonful of jam. Cover 
this with the rest of the banana slices and 
over them spread the remainder of the 
jam. Then put the milk and sugar into 
a saucepan, and heat them almost to 
boiling point. Beat up the yolks of the 
eggs, pour the hot milk over them, stirring 
well; place this custard in a pitcher, and 
stand the pitcher in boiling water, and 
then continue to stir until it thickens. 
Finally pour the custard over the banana 
and jam in the glass dish, and set the 
whole in a cool place till it is wanted. 

Lemon Snozv, comes next and for this 
have in readiness: 

Two lemons, two tablespoonfuls of 
sugar, half an ounce of gelatine, and a 
very little hot water in which to dissolve 
it, and the whites of two eggs. 

Put the lemons in a coolish oven for a 
few minutes before squeezing them. 
This will make them yield their juice 
more readily. Then put the sugar with 
the very thinly-peeled lemon rind in a 
pan on the fire, and melt it, taking great 
care not to let it burn. Melt the gelatine 
and add it to the sugar. Put the whites 
of two eggs into a dish and beat them to 
a stiff froth; gradually add the lemon 
juice, then strain the sugar and gelatine, 
and add them, continuing to beat the 
whole very thoroughly together. Finally 
pile the mixture up in a glass dish ready 
for serving. 

Little Rhubarb Custards are very little 



47 



48 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



trouble to make, and are very nice for a 
change. For them you need two sticks 
of rhubarb, an egg, one tablespoonful of 
sugar, half an ounce of gelatine, the 
juice of half a lemon, one large cup of 
milk and a few drops of vanilla. 

Cut the rhubarb into pieces and boil 
it gently in the smallest possible quantity 
of water until tender. Place it then on 
a sieve set over a bowl and press it to a 
pulp with a wooden spoon. When all 
the available juice has been collected 
in the bowl, transfer it to a small sauce- 
pan and dissolve the gelatine in it by 
heating them together gently. Mean- 
while whip the white of an egg to a 
stiff froth. Beat it into the sugar and 
lemon juice, then still beating the whole 
thoroughly, add the rhubarb juice and 
dissolved gelatine. Cool it slightly and 
then rinse out some tiny cups and fill 
them with the mixture, which should be 
a very pretty pale pink. When set, 
turn the little jellies out on to a glass 
dish. Then heat a sweetened cup of 
milk almost to the boiling point. Beat 
the yolk of the tgg and pour it slowly 



into the milk in the saucepan. Flavoi 
with a few drops of vanilla. Stir and 
heat carefully; turn the custard into the 
glass dish all around the little jellies. 
Serve quite cold. 

Golden Sandwich is very quickly and 
easily made. It only requires two well- 
beaten eggs, some golden syrup, three 
ounces of flour, a few bread crumbs, one 
and a half to two ounces of sugar and a 
teaspoonful of baking powder. 

Grease a small, square tin and place 
it beside you w^hile you mix the flour, 
baking powder, and sugar well together, 
and then moisten and make them into a 
dough with the beaten eggs. Spread as 
quickly as possible, fairly thick, in the 
greased tin and bake it in a quick oven. 
It should only take about seven minutes. 
When finished, place it on a sieve to let 
the steam escape, or it will be heavy. 
Finally, mix the bread crumbs thoroughly 
into the syrup. Cut the square o'f cake 
like pudding into fingers, slit them open 
lengthwise, spread them with the syrup 
mixture, put them daintily on to a small 
dish ready to be served. 



Details of Making French Pastries 



(IN ANSWER TO QUERY 4148) 



THESE are so simple that no book 
is needed. An^/ one who can man- 
ipulate neatly, and who has artistic per- 
ception of color, etc., can make the pretty 
things that are brought to you on trays 
at the fine restaurants, at the rate of 25 
cents a morsel, for less than one-third the 
cost, at home. 

Two classes of these dainty sweets are 
offered under the general name of French 
Pastry, the pastries proper, and the 
gateaux. The pastries are usually in the 
form of small patties, and may be made 
of plain pie paste, puff paste, or the real 
French paste, for which recipes were 
given on page 772 of American Cookery 



for May. The patties may be filled with 
a spoonful of any good cake batter, and 
baked until nicely browned. They may 
then be fancifully decorated with rings 
of colored icing, or of the butter icing, 
and put into dainty patty cases of fluted 
white paper. Or the patty shells may be 
baked the same as any pastry shells, and 
filled when cold with a fruit gelatine 
jelly. Green grapes or gooseberries, or 
green plums in a lemon jelly, the top 
decorated with pink icing; or straw- 
berries molded in gelatine, with white and 
green decoration of icing, angelica sticks, 
etc., are very pretty. 

Concluded on page 64 




Contributions to this department will be gladly received, 
paid for at reasonable rates. 



Accepted items will be 



On Buying a Shirt Waist 

I READ In a high school paper the 
other day, a plea for the freer use of 
milk, since milk is only "sixteen cents a 
quart." For those born lately enough 
to make this a true impression of cheap 
milk, my article will have no interest. 
And yet the young people who published 
that paper are now having their first 
initiation as shoppers, and they are the 
ones who will set the values and standards 
before another ten years are past. Small 
wonder that we, who can remember when 
milk was five cents a quart, take fright. 

But this is a tale of shirtwaists; It 
might as easily be one of shirts, or of a 
dozen other necessities. one might name. 
The slogan of the war, "Wear your old 
clothes," kept many of us out of the 
shops for several years. There were the 
people with plenty of money who could 
afford to go about shiny and worn; and 
there were the people who perforce 
rejoiced In a new respectability, walking 
forth as usual in their ancient clothes. 
But the extremes of the world, — the 
very rich and thoughtless, and the once 
poor, but now prosperous, — kept on 
buying, and from their demand, many of 
the present-day problems have arisen. 

There is still the waist for a dollar and 
ninety-eight cents. But when wearing 
it, never cross the street to speak to 
anybody; it requires shade and j^er- 
spective. A cold, suspicious air from 
once warm friends is often accounted for 
by this waist. 

The old two-dollar waist masquerades 
on the five-dollar table. Not that It Is 



boldly marked five dollars; but when one 
looks at one's change, one remembers 
that yeast cakes are now three cents 
Instead of two, and that nothing can be 
done with this residue outside the penny 
bank or the weighing machine. 

When choosing whether to buy a 
really good gown, or whether a really 
good shirtwaist in conjunction with a 
pre-war suit may not do as well, one 
votes for the article with the price 
marked in two figures instead of three. 
But two such figures! In despair of the 
wearing qualities of the cobweb textures 
bearing French names, I buy a hand- 
made lawn, part with ten dollars cheer- 
fully, and console myself with memories 
of recent encounters with the sensible 
and the durable, at various afternoon 
affairs since the new year. 

Where will It end.^ If one pays for 
one waist the amount that will keep one's 
child In college another week or so, 
which Is important: to be educated, 
or to be fittingly clothed.^ Who can 
tell us which of these states is safest for 
democracy.^ Shabby attire will never 
put us in command of the situation, and 
if we spend all our substance on clothes, 
and the rest on food, what is there left 
for that pre-war aspiration mentioned 
In all well-regulated budgets, and called 
"The Higher Life".? 

* * * 



Chicken Fat for Many Purposes 

N the Home Ideas and Economics De- 
partment of a recent number of 
American Cookery I found an interest- 
ing article on the use of chicken fat in 



I 



49 



50 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



pie crust, as exemplified by a French 
chef. It was a surprise to me as I had 
supposed that pie crust was one thing that 
chicken fat could not be used for on ac- 
count of its softness; but I shall try it 
the next time a Plymouth Rock is in- 
troduced to the axe. Meanwhile, I 
wonder if the cl^ef has missed something, 
for well clarified chicken fat makes the 
most delicious shortening for cakes and 
cookies. It has the same relation to a 
cake that an extra fine olive oil has to a 
mayonnaise dressing. Besides, chicken 
fat takes the place of butter in making 
thickening for cream gravies, especially 
those that are to be used with light meats 
or entrees. When all the facts con- 
cerning her composition are well known, 
poor old Biddie's chances will be slimmer 
than ever! 

Fat for Deep Frying 

IN these days of forty cent lard and with 
substitutes but little cheaper, the 
frying kettle is too often replaced by the 
frying pan. Lard enough to fry a few 
dozen doughnuts should be classed as a 
luxury while fritters assume the look of 
pancakes. However, there is a means of 
securing the necessary fat for deep frying; 
its name is THRIFT. Start a small 
crock or pail of fat remnants and you will 
be surprised to see how soon you may 
have doughnuts for breakfast. 

We all know the value of ham and 
bacon drippings, but how many realize 
that they are bur the A. B. C. of kitchen 
fats.^ If you boil a ham, cool the water, 
skim oflF the fat, clarify it, strain through 
muslin and start your crock of savings. 
If you have any kind of a soup that must 
be skimmed, don't throw the skimmings 
away; clarify them, strain them, and add 
them to your crock. If you have roast 
or stew of either lamb or mutton, don't 
think that the fat from it is too strong; 
put it in the crock as soon as it has been 
clarified and strained. If your piece of 
boiling beef must be skimmed before the 
gravy is made, save those spoonfuls, 
clarify them and put them in the crock. 



If your pot roast has so large a streak 
of fat that some remains on the platter 
when the lean is gone, cut it into small 
pieces, set it in a pan on the back of the 
stove, and strain the ensuing fat into the 
same old crock. If the hen that was 
surely too fat to lay is being stewed for 
Sunday dinner, put her butter-like lubri- 
cator into the crock, if you don't know 
what else to do with it, but it has many 
better uses! If you are boiling corned beef, 
let its skimmings follow the others; the 
family will never know it. 

In fact, any kind of fat that has not a 
specific use elsewhere belongs in the 
crock, even "to the strips that are left 
from chops, provided that they are 
properly clarified and strained. To clar- 
ify fat of any kind, add a very little water 
and boil until all water or broth is boiled 
away, and the grease itself looks very 
clear. The fritters, croquettes, and 
doughnuts will more than pay for all your 
trouble. f. r. h. 



Hurry-up Picnic Lunches 

WHEN a picnic lunch is planned for 
a few days or weeks ahead, it is 
comparatively easy to cook a lunch that 
will be both inexpensive and appetizing, 
but when a friend unexpectedly tele- 
phones, "It's such a lovely afternoon, 
we're going to drive to the beach and 
have supper. We'll drive by for you in 
half an hour, and just bring along any- 
thing you happen to have in the pantry," 
it is necessary to do some quick thinking. 
Even when we chance to have sufficient 
food for all the members of the picnic 
party, we are likely to be apologetic for 
the kind of food we are bringing, for 
everyday meals do not seem suitable, 
usually, for a picnic. Sandwiches, cake 
and fruit are probably what we think of 
when picnic is suggested. Cold boiled 
potatoes, cold wieners and a box of 
peaches in the refrigerator do not seem 
very promising food to fix into a picnic 
lunch, yet they are! 

Having had a number of experiences, 



HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES 



51 



recently, in preparing hurry-up picnic 
lunches for friends who honked impa- 
tiently at the front door in half an hour 
after they telephoned the invitation, I ven- 
ture to offer some suggestions; for I have 
found these outings give twice as much 
fun as those that are planned weeks 
ahead; one can't get very tired or 
worried over the cooking of a picnic 
lunch in half an hour. There isn't time! 

To go back to the refrigerator contain- 
ing the cold potatoes, wieners and 
peaches. With some bread and butter, 
and a box of fancy crackers, there is a 
complete lunch. The potatoes, if one 
happens to have a bit of onion and some 
bottled salad dressing, will make a nice 
salad. If there are radishes or cucum- 
bers in the garden, these will give the 
salad additional zest. Lacking salad 
dressing, the potatoes may be boxed up, 
and with a frying pan and just enough 
fat to brown the potatoes, carried to the 
picnic; for it is not much trouble to take 
along most any cooking utensil in a ma- 
chine, and fuel for a fire can almost al- 
ways be gathered at the beach or moun- 
tains. Special picnic grounds and city 
parks, nowadays, are nearly always sup- 
plied with stone stoves and plenty of 
fuel to cook anything from a pot of 
coffee to a pot of beans. With browned 
potatoes and the wieners, either chopped 
or sliced into sandwich filling for the 
bread and butter, the first course of the 
picnic lunch is provided. 

Many fruits as well as salads will 
arrive in first-class condition for the 
picnic lunch, if carried in a wide-mouthed 
glass fruit-jar, and go a long way in 
making an otherwise dry lunch tempting. 

A reserve shelf of canned goods is, 
of course, a great resource for a hurry- 
up picnic lunch. Among the canned 
meats that are useful for either sandwich 
fillings or salads are corned beef, tongue, 
veal, chicken and minced ham. Among 
the delectable canned fish are tuna, sal- 
mon, lobster, shrimps, sardines, crabs and 
oysters. Other canned goods that are 
useful, on the reserve shelf for the picnic 



as well as other meals, are pineapple, 
pimiento cheese, baked beans, asparagus, 
peas, spaghetti, peanut butter, canned 
soups, olives, pickles, jellies, marmalades 
and jams. 

Below are given some picnic menus 

that can be prepared upon short notice, 

and that will taste just as good as some 

that require much more work. 

1 

Hard-boiled Eggs 

Potato Salad 

Plain Bread and Butter and Lettuce Sandwiches 

Pineapple and Banana diced together 

Molasses Cocoanut Bars 

Coffee 

2 

Tomato Soup carried hot in a thermos bottle 

Tuna Sandwiches Olives 

Gingerbread (baked at home in 20 min.) 

Peaches and Pears 

3 

Vegetable Salad (from left-over vegetables) 

Peanut Butter-and-Ham Sandwiches 

Fig Bars and Graham Crackers 

Cantaloupe Nuts 

4 

' Shrimp Salad Assorted Crackers 

Pimiento Cheese and Jelly Sandwiches 

Grapes Tea m. B. B. 

* * * 

Odd Recipes 

Apple Potato Pudding 

Six potatoes boiled and mashed fine; 
add a little salt and a piece of butter, size 
of an tgg; roll this out with a little flour, 
enough to make a good pastry crust, 
which is for the outside of the dumpling; 
into this put peeled apples chopped fine; 
roll up like any apple dumpling, and let 
steam one hour; eat hot with liquid sauce. 

To Preserve Strawberries Whole 

Take equal weights of the fruit and 
refined sugar; lay the former in a large 
dish, and sprinkle half the sugar in fine 
powder over; give a gentle shake to the 
dish that the sugar may touch the whole 
of the fruit; next day make a thin syrup 
with the remainder of the sugar, and 
instead of water allow one pint of red 
currant juice to each pound of straw- 
berries; in this simmer them until suffi- 
ciently jellied. 

Choose the largest scarlets, or others 
when not dead ripe. h. w. 



52 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



A Hint for Canning Days 

WHEX rhubarb, or pieplant, is at 
its best, and I am stewing it for 
sauce, I always cook an extra pint or two 
whic4i I can, using some little pint jars 
with glass covers that I can use over and 
over — the covers, I mean. Then, as 
other fruit comes on, berries, etc., I open 
these little pint jars and mix the rhubarb 
with any other fruit that may fall short, 
or that may be scarce. A small amount 
of pieplant may be mixed with most any 
kind of fruit, cooked together, and the 
difference scarcely be detected. Pieplant 
is especially nice to combine with all 
kinds of berries. It should, when being 
prepared for canning, be cut in very small 
pieces; place on a bread board and slice 
rapidly with a sharp knife. Cut in larger 
pieces it cooks nicely, but presents a 
fibrous appearance, which does not blend 
so well with other fruits. The proper- ' 
tions may van.', anywhere up to half and 
half. Pieplant is nice canned with ap- 
ples, especially apples that are not very 
tart. . . . And I might add, I can up a 
good bit of applesauce when apples are 
most plentiful and the flavor is at its best. 
There is nothing like capturing the flavor 
in fruit, and apples — nicely as they 
keep — do not have the same flavor when 
cooked after long keeping as they do fresh 
from the trees early in season. Then, 
too, many kinds of apples — some that 
make the most delightful of sauces — 
will not keep at all. Can these early, 
when in season, and give variety to your 
fruit cupboard. 

\\ hile sugar is so costly, one may use 
a tiny bit of soda with acid fruits. They 
will take much less sugar, and many like 
the result quite as well. It is worth 
while, I find, to experiment and learn just 
what the family like. ... By the way, 
luse the glass-topped, pint jars, when I am 
canning such things as pieplant, which I 
expect to open again within a few weeks 
or two months, at most, simply because 
I do not need to buy new covers each 
time the jars are opened. It is one of my 



little economies. Then these little pint 
jars are used again, late in the season, for 
canning strained cooked tomatoes, sea- 
soned and ready for soup. Enough to- 
mato puree for a large dish of tomato soup 
may be packed away in a little pint jar. 
I always can enough to last us the winter 
through — and, last but not least, my 
little pint cans are so much easier to open 
than the heavy tin in which tomatoes 
bought at the store must be canned. 
Just a little thing — • all just little things 
— but, after all, isn't a big lot of house- 
keeping just made up of little things ": 

I. R. F. 
* * * 

How to Keep Pimientos 

I have kept pimientos just fine for two 
months after opening them by putting 
them in a small jar and covering them 
with vinegar and sugar. 

They are very much improved for 
sandwiches, etc., by treating them this 
way. M. s. H. 

^ * 5j; 

Corn Syrup Instead of Sugar in 
Cake 

This substitution is very easy to make. 
Simply measure corn syrup instead of 
sugar in any good recipe for cake that you 
are accustomed to make. 

To Wash Separator and Milk Pail 

Use enough household ammonia in the 
water to make it feel slippery. Unless, 
the water is unusually hard, 'this will 
"cut'' the grease and remove the slime. 

Dyeing at Home 

At present all dyestuffs are being man- 
ufactured under difficulties, and there is 
more or less uncertainty in their use. 
But if you live in a hard water region, 
this may quite likely be the cause of the 
trouble you mention. m. d. c. 



The Chinese have a kitchen-god, which 
is supposed to go to the Chinese heaven 
at the beginning of each year to report 
upon the private life of the families under- 
his care. 









THIS department is for the benefit and free use of our subscribers. Questions relating to recipes 
and those pertaining to culinary science and domestic economics in general, will be cheerfully- 
answered by the editor. Communications for this department must reach us before the first of the 
month preceding that in which the answers are expected to appear. In letters requesting answers 
by mail, please enclose address and stamped envelope. For menus, remit $1.00. Address queries 
to Janet M. Hill, Editor. American Cookery, 221 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass. 



Query No. 4143. — "Will you please give the 
following recipes and information? 

"Philadelphia Relish in Lemon Skins. 

"Salpicon of Fruit in Cups. 

"Macedoine of Chilled Fruits. 

"Clam Bouillon en Tasse. Is any kind of 
bread, toast, etc., served with this.' 

"How do you make and serve French 
Dressing.' 

"What kind of Dainty Fancy Cakes are nice 
to serve with parfait or ice cream.' Are the 
cakes served on the plate or are they passed with 
the cream.' 

"Where can attractive Individual Molds for 
freezing creams, also for molding butter, be 
purchased.' 

"At an informal dinner, what is the correct 
Order of Serving Guests.'" 

Philadelphia ReHsh in Lemon 
Skins 

TO make Philadelphia relish mix 
two quarts of green tomatoes, 
four pounds of green cabbage, 
one quart of small green cucumbers, and 
eight sweet green peppers, all chopped 
fine. Put into a porcelain saucepan three 
quarts of vinegar, with the following 
spices, each' loosely tied in a little square 
of cheesecloth: One ounce, each, of 
allspice berries, whole cloves, blades of 
mace, whole black pepper, celery seed 
and mustard seed. Let the whole come 
slowly to a boil, then add the chopped 
vegetables, with one cup of salt, and cook 
for twenty to thirty minutes. Put into 
jars while hot. 

This or any other chopped pickle may 
be put into halves of lemon skins, and 
served as a relish with individual portions 
of cold meat, hash, etc. 



Salpicon of Fruit in Cups 

Most cups, even of after-dinner coffee 
size, are too large for a salpicon proper, 
although mixed fruits are often served 
in cups for the first course of a luncheon. 
"Salpicon" means salted bits, and is a 
word applied to one form of the little 
appetizers, which are served at the open- 
ing of a dinner of many courses. They 
are too small to be considered a course, 
and come under the head of " Beginnings."' 

Originally the salpicon was made of 
bits of fish, caviare, pickle, anchovy, 
etc. Now it is more often made of fruit, 
and the chefs tell us that there should be 
three kinds, moistened with lemon juice. 
It is served in a very small glass, and 
there is no more than a good teaspoonful 
in the glass. Its function is merely to 
whet the appetite. 

Macedoine of Chilled Fruits 

A macedoine means sometlnng that 
is macerated or crushed. A macedoine 
of any soft, pulpy fruits may be pressed 
together in a mold; the mold is usually 
dome-shaped, and after being chilled, 
turned out on a platter. Since this is 
not always an attractive dish, the most 
common form of macedoine now con- 
sists of a great v^ariety of fruits molded 
in a transparent and well-sweetened 
gelatine jelly. The jelly is richly colored, 
such as a strawberry jelly, if the fruits 
are light in tint; if the fruits are colored, 
a lemon-flavored jelly is used. 



SI 



54 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



The macedoine is made by putting a 
layer of the fruits in the bottom of the 
mold, and adding a very little gelatine, 
not sufficient to float them. When this 
is almost hard, but not quite, another 
layer of fruit and jelly is added, and so 
on. When unmolded it makes a very 
handsome dish. 

Clam Bouillon en Tasse 

Place the clams in a large kettle with a 
very little water, having first scrubbed the 
shells thoroughly, and heat until the 
shells open and' the liquor exudes. Then 
remove the clams, take out of their shells, 
return to kettle with seasonings of pepper 
and a little salt, and let cook for ten 
minutes. A few small bits of mace and 
of red peppers, chopped, are liked by 
some persons. This bouillon is served 
hot in cups with a little bit of butter in 
each cup, or a spoonful of whipped cream. 
Small pilot crackers, either toasted or 
plain, are served with it, or any plain 
cracker. Where clams are not pro- 
curable, the manufactured bouillon may 
be used very conveniently. 

French Dressing 

The proportions for a French dressing 
are one-third as much vinegar as oil. 
The vinegar should be added to the oil 
drop by drop, stirring as for mayonnaise, 
and the dressing, when correctly made, 
should be a grayish emulsion. A little 
salt may be added, but not pepper, at 
least, not until the last thing, for this 
causes a separation of the oil from the 
vinegar. The dressing may be passed 
with a salad, or mixed with the salad 
immediately before serving. If allowed 
to stand awhile after adding to the salad 
it causes a wilting of such greens as 
lettuce, romaine, etc. 

Query No. 4144. — "My husband is 
Scotch, and he says I do not make his favorite 
soup, the Cock-a-leekie. as good as the same soup 
in his home in Aberdeen. Will you give me the 
best recipe for it?" 

Cock-a-Leekie Soup I 

The ordinary kind is made of one 
fowl of the kind long past its first youth — 



for the Scotch are a thrifty race — boiled 
in about a gallon of stock with three or 
four bunches of- leeks and seasoning of 
salt and pepper. The fowl should be 
cooked whole, trussed as for roasting, 
and before serving it is neatly carved into 
pieces large enough for individual por- 
tions; these are placed in a tureen, and 
the soup poured over them. The leeks 
are cut up before putting into the soup 
pot, and in most Scotch homes they like 
the soup "thick o' leeks." 

A friend from Aberdeen gives us the 
following recipe for the cock-a-leekie as 
made in her home. 

Cock-a-Leekie Soup II 

This calls for a young pullet, two 
pounds of leeks, two dozen large prunes 
and one-fourth a pound of bacon, in 
addition to the ingredients ordinarily 
used. The bacon, cut into dice, and all 
but one-half a pound of the leeks, go into 
the pot at the beginning of the process, 
with the young fowl. When the fowl is 
cooked it is cut as before, and the leeks 
are pressed through a colander and mixed 
with one cup of fresh butter, softened and 
blended with one-half a cup of flour. 
Both fowl and leeks are then returned to 
the soup-kettle, and with them the 
remaining half-pound of leeks and the 
prunes. The cooking is continued until 
the prunes are soft, when the whole is 
turned into a tureen. This soup will be 
better on warming it up for a second day, 
and it will keep for several days in a cool 
place. 



Query No. 4145. — "Will you suggest some 
Economical Dishes and Economical Ways of 
Cooking and Preparing Food?" 

Kitchen Economies 

The most important point that just 
now occurs to us is that the water in 
which meat, vegetables, or any other 
food, is cooked should not be poured 
away, but saved and utilized. Scientists 
tell us that this water contains nutritional 
principles of great importance, often of 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



can ^jou eat 
fried foods? 



Don't say you can't, until you have tried 
your favorite dishes fried in Crisco. You'll 
be surprised to find they digest as easily 
as if they were baked. 




Get Crisco from your grocer in 
this sanitary, dust-proof container. 
Convenient sizes, one pound and 
larger; net weight; never sold in 
bulk. 



Crisco is also made 
Canada. 



and sold in 




Can you answer these ques- 
tions about deep frying? 



What is the best utensil ? How do 
you test the temperature of the 
fat? When is. a frying basket re- 
quired? How much fat should you use? Which requires hot- 
ter fat — doug hn uts or potatoes? What makes doughnuts 
crack? How can you keep fried foods from soaking fat ? All 
of these questions and scores of others about frying and all 
branches of cooking are answered in the splendid cookbook, 
"The Whys of Cooking," written esi>ecially for Crisco by 
Janet McKenzie Hill, founder of The Boston Cooking School, 
and editor of "American Cookery." Also tells how to set the 
table, plan the kitchen, and serve meals correctly, besides 
giving many of Mrs. Hill's original recipes. Illustrated in 
color. Each copy of "The Whys of Cooking" now costs us 
29c. As an advertising offer, we will send you one copy, for 
I>ersonal use, for only 10 cents postage. Address Department 
A-6, The Procter & Gamble Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



It's the Crisco that makes all the difference. 

Crisco differs from other cooking fats in 
that it is entirely vegetable — a pure, white 
shortening produced by the special Crisco 
process of solidifying edible vegetable oil. 
Being strictly vegetable, Crisco itself is 
easy to digest. Therefore, foods fried in it 
are perfectly digestible, too. 

Crisco frying also makes things taste better, 
because Crisco has neither taste nor odor. 
You can not detect this delicate fat on 
anything fried in it. This improves foods 
more than you will believe, until you have 
tried for yourself. 

Crisco is economical for all cooking. 
You can use the same Crisco again 
and again for frying; you can make 
light, tender pastries and biscuits with 
one-fifth less Crisco than lard; you 
can use Crisco instead of expensive 
butter in the most delicate cakes. Try 
it— it's better for every cooking purpose. 




Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
55 



56 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



more importance than the food that was 
cooked in it. 

Better still is it not to use water in 
cooking food, but to bake, oven-poach, or 
cook by steam. One method recom- 
mended by a high authority is the 
following: 

Put the meat without a drop of water 
in a close-covered kettle; set this into a 
pan containing boiling water, and let 
cook in the oven until meat is done. 
Those who have tried this way say it is a 
great economy, for the meat goes farther, 
not losing so much as it would if boiled, 
and the flavor is fine. 

Cakes to Serve with Parfait or 
Ice Cream 

Lady fingers, macaroons, or any small, 
dainty cakes are proper to serve with 
frozen desserts. Neatly cut slices of 
loaf cake may also be used. Unless a 
large company has to be served, it is 
preferable to pass the cake after the 
cream is served, rather than to place it 
on the plate with the cream. 

Individual Molds for Ice Creams 

They can be procured at any first- 
class house-furnishing place. The cream 
is not frozen in the mold, it is packed into 
the mold after freezing, and the whole 
re-packed in ice and salt until serving 
time. Ice cream for molding in this way 
should be made on a rich custard founda- 
tion, or stiffened with gelatine, so that 
it will keep its shape. 

Order of Serving Guests at an 
Informal Dinner 

The woman who is the greatest 
stranger, or the most distinguished, or 
the oldest woman present, is served first; 
and then the others, men and women, 
in the order of their seating. At a small 
and informal dinner, where, with the 
exception of one or two guests, the others 
are members of the family, the greatest 
stranger is served first to all the courses. 



Where there are several courses, she 
should be served first to soup, to the 
chief meat course, and to the sweet 
course; and some others served first to 
the fish, salad, game and entrees, so that 
no one person may be the last to be 
served at all the courses. But in plan- 
ning the rotation, care should be taken 
that the guest of honor is never quite 
the last one to be served to any course. 



Query No. 4146. — "Could you give me a 
recipe to make Marshmallovvs?" 

Marshmallows 

In American Cookery for May you 
will find two recipes for marshmallows, 
in answer to Query No. 4141, on page 
lie. 



Query No. 4147. — "Will you please publish, 
some time before very long, a few recipes for 
Cookies? " 

Cookies 

You will find this question answered 
in the reply to Query No. 4142, on page 
778 of American Cookery for Mav. 



Query No. 4148. — • "Please tell me how the 
Butter Cream on the top of French pastry is made.'' 

"Is there any manual of French Pastries that 
gives all the details concerning them?" 

Butter Icing for French Pastry 

Beat one cup of butter until white and 
of the consistency of a fine mayon- 
naise — that is, that it will not drop, 
but hang, from the spoon. The color of 
the butter should then be almost white. 
G^-adually beat into this one cup of 
XXXX confectioner's sugar, and flavor- 
ing to taste. The icing may also be 
colored any desired tint w4th any of the 
harmless coloring substances. It should 
be of such consistency that it may be 
piped through an ornamental pastry 
tube without losing shape. If too soft, 
add more sugar. 

• (See page 48) 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



i ii i ifii i i i i i iiii i i iiiiiiiiii i ii i ifi ii i iii i ii i ii mii iii i ii i ii m iiii i ii i ii ii i i i i i mii i »i i Mt itfff 

the Dependable Baking Powder 

RyZON's DEPENDABIIJTY has been proved over and 
over again — by home economics experts, chefs of hotels 
and restaurants, and housewives. 

Successful baking is always possible with Ryzon, because 
of its absolute accuracy and uniform quality. Every step 
in its manufacture is checked by careful laboratory tests. 
Its strength is always the same. 

Wholesome, digestible food, economical methods of bak- 
ing — in all this Ryzon is helping the leaders of household 
science bring about higher standards of eating and living. 

Ryzon is packed in full 16 ounce pounds — also 35c and 
20c packages. A pound tin of Ryzon and a copy of the 
Ryzon Baking Book will be sent free, postpaid, to any 
household science teacher who writes us on school sta- 
tionery, giving official position. 

GENERALCHEMICALCQ 

FOOD DEPARTMENT 
NEW YORK 



The Ryzon 
lenjel measure 




li 










jHtf ■■ 













i i i ii i i ii ii i i i i i i e iiiiii iii iiiii iiii liiiiiiiiiii i iiiiii m i mu i Hnmiii ii nmi i i i nni i nm iii iiii 



H«MMMM*MAMMMMM**MMiMUAMM«UMMMiiMAMMMMMMiri 



kMMMM 



uy advertised Goods — • Do not accept substitutes 
57 



New Books 



li'hat to Drink. By Bertha E. L. 

Stockbridge. 12mo. Cloth, 31-50 

net. D. Appleton and Company, 

New York. 

This book contains the recipes of 

practically all the favorite non-alcoholic 

drinks that have tickled the palates of 

thirsty mortals, and, in addition, many 

equally delectable new concoctions. 

The drink that makes the picnic jolly 
and the guest happy — the drink that 
tempts the invalid and revives the tired 
tramper, the drink to make you toasty 
on the nipping day, and cool when the 
thermometer goes up and up, the drink 
for the children's party and the grown- 
ups, the drink for outdoors and in- 
doors — • for the woods, the porch, the 
play room, the living room, the smoking 
room and the dining room. The drink 
for breakfast time, lunch time, tea time, 




Baby Midget 

HOSE SUPPORTER 

holds the socks securely and allows the little one 
absolute freedom of action, so necessary to its 
health, growth and comfort. The highly nickeled 
parts of the "Baby Midget" have smooth, 
rounded comers and edges and they do not come 
in contact with the baby's skin. 
Like the Velvet Grip Hose Supporters for 
women, misses and children it is equipped 
with the famous All-Rubber Oblong Button, 
which prevents slipping and ruthless ripping. 
Silk, 15 cents; Lisle, 10 cents 

SOLD EVERYWHERE OR SENT POSTPAir* 
GEORGE FROST CO., MAKERS, BOSTON 



supper time, bed time, between time — 
the drink for all tastes at all times In all 
places — all are here revealed. 

There are one or two things I would 
Impress upon the hostess. 

First: The necessity for selecting 
attractive glassware, which need not be 
expensive, but should be thin and clear, 
and, when in use, should always be 
polished. 

When purchasing linen, select it be- 
cause of its daintiness, rather than for 
Its elaborateness. 

If drinks are served by the maid, it is 
essential that her cuifs, collar, cap and 
apron be as spotless as the dollies on the 
service plates. 

When cold drinks are served, be sure 
that the glasses are chilled. 

For hot drinks, heat the cups or glasses 
before pouring the drinks. 

Place the glass or cup on a doily on a 
small plate. 

When serving an invalid, be over- 
particular; the glass must shine, the 
doily be spotless, and the plate the most 
attractive obtainable. If it is possible 
lay a flower on the plate or tray before 
it is sent to the ill one's room. 

The appetite of a very finicky person 
may be tempted by this over-carefulness. 

Omar Up To Date 

A box of chocolates underneath a bough, 
An ice cream cone, some lemonade, and thou 
Beside me singing in the wilderness 
Make prohibition Paradise enow. 



This is an apt and timely volume, 
will find favor in many households. 



It 



Natural Food and Care for Child and 

Mother. By Susan Harding Rumm- 

LER. Price, ^1.60 net. Rand 

McNally & Company, Chicago, 

Illinois. 

According to the author Right Living 

means, in general: (1) Preferring the 

Natural to the Artificial; (2) seeking and 

recognizing Nature, and placing faith in 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
58 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Which supper would 
you like best? 

^-— -^ J ^ Wheat bubbles or bread? 





Millions of children now get Puffed Wheat in their milk dish. 

They get whole wheat, with every grain a tidbit. The grains are toasted bubbles, 

thin and flimsy, puffed to eight times normal size. The taste is like airy nut-meats. 
Every food cell is exploded, so digestion is easy and complete. It is better liked 

and better for them than any other form of wheat. 

Three grains are steam exploded 

Professor Anderson has found a way to puff wheat, rice and corn hearts. All 
are steam exploded, all shot from guns. 

So these three grains are at your service in this 
ideal form. 

Serve all of them, and often. Not for breakfast 
only, but all day long. 

Use in every bowl of milk. Use as nut-meats on 
ice cream, as wafers in your soups. 

Crisp and douse with melted butter for hungry 
children after school. 

Keep all three kinds on hand. These are the best-cooked grain foods in existence 
and the most delightful. 



^^^5(0 



\^mf^ 




c 






Puffed to 8 times normal size 




Mix with strawberries 

Puffed Rice or Corn Puffs 
makes a delightful blend. The 
texture is flimsy, the taste like 
nuts. 

They add what crust adds to 
shortcake, tarts and pies. They 
add as much as the sugar or the 
cream. 



Puffed Wheat 

Puffed Rice 

Corn Puffs 

Also P-ffed Rice Pancake 
Flour 



The Quaker Qats G>mpany 



Sole Makers 



3368 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
59 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



GOSSOM'S CREAM SOUPS 




In Powdered Foi-m 

Split pea, Green pea, Lima, Celery, Black hean, Claui 
Chowder, Onion and (Mushroom 25c.) 

Quickly and Easily Prepared 
Just add water and boil 15 minutes One package make's 3 

Kints of pure, wholesome and delicious soup. Price 15<- at 
!ading grocers, or sample sent prepaid on receipt of 20c in 
stamps or coin. 

Also "GOSSOM'S "QUICK-MADE" FUDGE 
will give you a delightful surprise. So easy. A 50c pkg. 
makes over a pound of the mo«t exquisite fudge 
Manufactured by 

B. F. Gossom, 692 Washington St., Brookline, 46, Mass. 



Eat More Bread 



Bread is the most important food 
we eat. It furnishes abundant 
nourishment in readily digestible 
form. The fact that it never be- 
comes tiresome though eaten day 
after day, is proof of its natural 
food qualities. 

Eat plenty of bread made with 

FLEISCHMANN'S YEAST 



Pasadena, California 

Catering business, established twelve years, for 
sale, in city where people of wealth spend lavishly 
for elaborate social functions. 

Excellent opportunity for some one who under- 
stands this business. All-year season. Wonderful 
climate. Price $2,000, including modern equip- 
ment, linen, silver and dishes. The net yearly 
rentals alone amount to nearly one-third of this 
sum. Address owner today. 

NETTIE TOMASCHKE, 

151 N. Euclid Ave., Pasadena, California. 



=Domestic Science=^ 

Home-study Courses 

Food, health, housekeeping, clothing, children 

For Homemakers and Mothers; professional 
courses for Teachers, Dietitians, Institution 
Managers, Demonstrators, Nurses, "Graduate 
Housekeepers," Caterers, etc. 

"The Profession of Home-making." 100 
page handbook, /ree. Bulletins: "Free-hand 
Cooking," "Food Values,'^ "Seven-Cent 
Meals," "Family Finance." — 10 cents each. 

American School of Home Economics 

(Charted in 1915) 503 W. 69th St., Chicago, III. 



^ 



=^ 



its power to heal and restore; (3) be- 
lieving that there is no -'Royal Road" 
to Health and Happiness, and that the 
only way is obedience to Nature's Laws; 
(4) acting on the belief that only the 
removal of the causes of illness, the ceas- 
ing of disobedience to the laws of Nature, 
can permanently cure disease. 

The purpose of thi.s book is: (1) To help 
others discover for themselves the laws 
of Nature, as they apply to their par- 
ticular problems; (2) to encourage them 
never to lose faith in Nature, but to fear, 
trust and reverence it beyond all human 
and artificial means; (3) not to become 
a stumbling block to any by inducing 
them to accept, for all cases, what merely 
seems the truth in the case of any one 
individual. Hence, the author invites 
the critical attitude, which ^experiments 
and discovers for itself, merely offering 
her own testimony and beliefs, based on 
practical experience, in the hope that 
they may be helpful to others in the never- 
ending search for Truth. 

This is a book for mothers. We have 
seen no work of its class and kind more 
worthy of careful perusal and study by 
young mothers. 



Japanese Tea Philosophy 

Tea is a work of art and needs a master 
hand to bring out its noblest qualities. 
We have good and bad tea, as we have 
good and bad painting — generally the 
latter. There is no single recipe for mak- 
ing the perfect tea, as there are no rules 
for producing a Titian or a Sesson. Each 
preparation of the leaves has its indivi- 
duality, its special affinity with water and 
heat, its hereditary memories to recall, 
its own method of telling a story. The 
truly beautiful must always be in it. 
Lichihlai, a Sung poet, has sadly remarked 
that there were three most deplorable 
things in the world: The spoiling of fine 
youths through false education, the 
degradation of fine paintings through 
vulgar admiration, and the utter waste 
of fine tea through incompetent manipula- 
tion. — From The Book of Tea by 
Okakufa Kakuzo. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
60 



AD\ERTISEMENTS 




Have You had THIS trouble? 

Hundreds of women complain that their jiir rings "blowout," as shown in the right- 
hand jar in the illustration above. Ordinary rings will not stand the long boiling used 
in modern methods of canning, because they soften and swell. 

GOOD (§) LUCK 

RED JAR RINGS 

are necessary for cold pack work because they are made of tough, live rubber 
unaffected by heat or long boiling. Do not accept substitutes. GOOD LUCK 
rubbers are never sold under any other brand. They are used by canning dem- 
onstrators everywhere. Standard equipment on Atlas E-Z seal jars. 

// you haven t tried Good Luck rubbers be sure to get them this year 
Your dealer can get them for you as all wholesalers carry them 

Price 13c. per dozen 
25c. for 2 dozen 

Send 2c. for best canning booklet 
ever published 

Boston Woven Hose 
& Rubber Co. 

27 Hampshire Street 
Cambridge - Mass. 

Makers of the famous ''GOOD LLCK" 
Garden Hose 




Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
61 



AA4ERICAN COOKERY 




111 



m 



Good for Children 



Milk, Nature's own best 
food, is even more readily 
digestible and more enjoy- 
able to the taste by being 
made into Junket. 

That is why it is recognized 
as one of the finest foods for 
children — and grown-ups. 




MADE FKiM MILK. 

serves the double purpose 
of a wholesome food and a 
dainty dessert. 

Keep Junket Tablets on 
hand, and treat your family 
to Junket often, especially 
the children. Sold by 
grocers and druggists 
everywhere. 

THE JUNKET FOLKS 

LITTLE FALLS, N. Y. 

Canadian factory: 

Chr. Hansen's Canadian Laboratory 

Toronto, Ont. 




The Silver Lining 

Kicking in a Vacuum 

A negro was trying to saddle a fraction 
mule, when a by stander asked: "Doe 
that mule ever kick you, Sam?" 

"No, suh, but he sometimes kick 
where I'se jes' been." 

• The American Legion Weekly. 



A sailor had been showing an old lad} 
over a large liner, and after thanking 
him, she suddenly remarked, "I see that 
according to the ship's orders, tips are 
forbidden." The sailor then turned tc 
the visitor and, wdth a knowing look, 
answered, "Why, bless yer, ma'am, sc 
were apples in the Garden of Eden." 



Mrs. Bingen: "My goodness, what a 
cheerful woman Mrs. Joley is!" 

Mrs.Harde: "Isn'tshe.? Why, do you 
know that woman can have a good time 
thinking what a good time she would have 
if she were having it!" 



"How's this, waiter.^ You've charged 
me two dollars and a half for planked 
steak!" "Sorry sir, but lumber's gone 
up again." — The Home Sector. 



"Good morning, madame. I deal in 
cast-off clothing." "Oh, how lucky! 
Do you think you have anything that 
would suit my husband. f^" — Punch. 



DIETITIANS WANTED FOR 

HOSPITAL POSITIONS 

EVERYWHERE 

Many excellent positions now open 
for Dietitians in all parts of the United 
States. If interested in securing a 
Hospital position anywhere, send for 
free book. Write today for it. 

AZNOE'S CENTRAL REGISTRY FOR 
NURSES 

30 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago 



Buy advertised Good; 



- Do not accept substitutes 
62 



AD\'ERTISEMEXTS 




WAFFLES! this morning? 

with 

UNCLE JOHN'S SYRUP 

What could be nicer — and here's a confidential word 
to the Brides of this beautiful month — 

Start your day Uncle John's Way 

Fluffy biscuits — toasting hot waffles or the good old- 
fashioned griddles, with pure, wholesome UXCLE 
JOHN'S SYRUP, will send your Hubby to his work 
with a smile- 

FOR COOKIXG TOO — cakes and cookies, also frost- 
ings and candies, and we'll give you a book of nice 
recipes if you wish. Order a tin today. 

NEW ENGLAND MAPLE SYRUP CO. 

WINTER HILL 

:^zizzizr= Boston, Mass. zzinmizzizirzz 



Cream Whipping Made 
Easy and Inexpensive 

|[^ REMO- y ESCO 

Whips Thin Cream 

or Half Heavy Cream and Milk 

or Top of the Milk Bottle 

It whips up as easily as heavy cream 

and retains its stiffness 

Every caterer and housekeeijer 

wants CREMO-VESCO. 

Send for a bottle today. 



Housekeeper's size, 1 ^oz., .30 prepaid 
Caterer's size, 1 6oz., $1.00 
(With full directions.) 



Cremo-Vesco Company 

631 EAST 23rd ST., BROOKLYN, N. Y. 




"It's Banquet 



99 



That is the oft-repeated answer to the query 
which the subtle flavor of Banquet Tea so 
invariably provokes. 



BANQUET TEA 



** The Tasty Tea for Every Taste ** 

Three kinds to choose from 

Banquet Blend - — a favorite combination of green and 
black tea — in the red canister. 

Banquet India and Ceylon — blended with other 
choice grades —in the green canister. 

Banquet Orange Pekoe — -distinctive and de!i<?htful 
in flavor — in the orange canister. 

If you are a lover of fine teas, choose your favorite from 
these, the Banquet kind; and learn the delights of a 
really fine tea. 

Remember — Banquet Teas are full flavored. You use 
less. 

If your dealer has not stocked Banquet Teas, write us 
direct. 

McCORMICK& CO., Baltimore, U.S.A. 

Importers and Packers 



I 

r 

A 



Send for our BEE BRAXD Manual 
of Cookery, 50 cents coin or stamps. 
Ask also for FREE BOOKLETS on 
spices, teas and flavoring extracts. 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
63 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Price's Vanilla 



Look for the lit- 
Tropik'id on 
the label. 




Price's Vanilla means delicious desserts. 
It is the "just-right" flavoring in strength. 
Insist on Price's at your grocers. 

Price Flavoring Extract Co. 
Chicago, U. S. A. 



^ ^^^ ^ TnwtolUrtB^glifredT 



40% GLUTEN 



"^^ 
^Sk 



Guaranteed to comply in all respects io 

•taadard requirements of U. S. Dept. of 

Agriculture. 

Manufactured by 

FASWELL & KHINES 

WatertowB. N. Y. 



1^ 



M 



^ 



/- 



'-^v 



,^6 Nt b 

CAST ^^ f\ 

A *^ - 



Ak-O.M 1 N UM 



Xi« 



WAGXtR Cast Aluminum 
utensils are cast, not 
stamped. Being in one solid piece 
there are no rivets to loosen, no 
seams to break, no welded parts. 
Wagner Cast Aluminum Ware 
Avears longer and cooks better. 
The thickness of the metal is the 
reason — heat is retained and evenly 
distributed — food does not scorch 
or burn as is liable in stamped 
i'/JlK^ sheet utensils. 

Wagner Ware combines dura- 
bility and superior cook- 
ing quality with the most 
beautiful designs and fin- 
ish. At best dealer's. 

DonU ask for ahtmtnum 
ware, ask for JVagner Ware 

The Wagner Mfg. Co. 

Dept. 74 SIDNEY, OHIO 



■1 



French Pastries 

Concluded from page 48 

For the gateaux a fine-grained cak 
mixture is best, such as the Italian Cake 
for which a recipe will be found on pag 
79 of this magazine for November, 1919 
but any fine cake will do. Cut the cak 
into half-inch slices, two or two and on 
half inches square. Spread one slic 
with rich, thick syrup from any preserve 
fruit, lay the other slice over it, brush th 
entire outside with the same preserv 
and dust over the whole surface wit 
shredded cocoanut, ground fine in 
nut chopper. Then, with a very fin 
pastry tube decorate with colored filagre( 
work all over the top; or use candie 
flowers, nuts or fruit. Larger gateau 
may have pyramids of rich candied fruil 
such as cherries, etc., piled on the top 
There is no end to the charming decora 
tions that can be devised by any one wit 
an eye for color. The materials are b 
no means expensive, the work is not 
all difficult, and it is a most fascinatin 
occupation. 

Among the pleasantries of the day w 
find nothing more apropos to the time 
than the following from London Opin 
ion: "Fables that grandmothers ca 
begin to relate to their grandchildrer 
There was once an apartment to rem 
There was once a company unthreatene 
by any strike. There was once upon 
time a very poor coal dealer. There wa 
once a man who was able to eat slices 
bread spread with real butter." 



"Is life worth living.^" "I think tha 
question has been answered for good an 
all. The cost has been more tha 
doubled, and we all hang on." 

— ■ Louisville Courier-Jo^irnal. 



TANGLEFOO 

^J The Non-Poisonous Fly Destroyer 

"^^ The U. S. Dept. of Agriculture says in the 

■ Bulletin: Special pains should be taken 

■ fs to prevent children from 
I ^^^^ drinking poisoned baites 

■ ^Ppu^ and poisoned fliesdropping 

■ J r\ into foods or drinks. 




Buv advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
64 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Nourishing Desserts 

A GROWN-UP'S as well as a child's dessert should be more than just something 
"*^ sweet to top off the meal; it should be a wholesome and nourishing dish which 
rounds out and perfects the luncheon or dinner. 

For insteince, a good nourishing dessert which I have found to be a general favorite with all the family 
is Chocolate Bleinc Mange. It is a favorite with the housewife, too, because it does not have to be 
cooked over the fire, and it is so easily and quickly made. 

A woman recently wrote me that this is now her husband's favorite dessert because it is so smooth 
and creamy and is always just right. He was very fond of Chocolate Blanc Mange, but every time 
she made it of cornstarch, he complained that it was lumpy and not smooth. A friend told her about 
my recipe; she tried it and it was a revelation to her. Now her liusband praises it and complains 
because she does not serve it of tener — ■ especially when they have compeiny. 




Chocolate Blanc Mange 

^ envelope Knox Sparklins: Gelatine }4 teaspoonful of salt 

}4 cup cold water }/^ teaspoonful vanilla 

1 pint of milk 1 square chocolate or 4 tablespoonfuls of cocoa 

}/2 cupful of sugar 

Soak gelatine in cold water 6ve minutes. Scald milk and add sugar, grated chocolate or cocoa and salt. When well 
blended, add the soaked gelatine and flavoring; pour into a wet mold or individual custard cups, and chili. Serve with 
milk, cream or custard sauce. 

Not only does Knox Sparkling Gelatine make many delicious desserts which require practically no 
cooking at all — but being unflavored, it will blend with meats, fish, cheese, vegetables and fruits 
to make many different kinds of meat and fish loaves, cheese, vegetable and fruit salads — each 
adding an appetizing, luxurious touch to the meal — although in reality they are most inexpensive. 
Besides being a pure, super-refined gelatine. Knox Gelatine is a favorite with housekeepers because 
of its economy. One package of Knox Gelatine goes four times as far as the ready-prepared packages, 
and serves four times as many people. Flavored packages serve only six people and do for only one 
meal, while one package of Knox will make twenty-four individual helpings and serves a family of 
six with a tempting dessert or salad for four different meals. That is why experts call Knox the 
"4-to-r' gelatine — because it goes four times as far as the flavored packages, besides having four 
times as many uses. 

SPECIAL HOME SERVICE 

If you are interested in other "Nourishing Des- 
serts" and salads, write for my recipe books "Dainty 
Desserts" and "Food Economy," enclosing a two 
cent stamp and giving your grocer's name. 

Any domestic science teacher can have sufficient gelatine 
for her class, if she will write me on school stationery, stating 
quantity and when needed. 

•* Wherever a recipe calls for Gelatine — it means KNOX" 

MRS. CHARLES B. KNOX 

KNOX GELATINE 

107 Knox Avenue, Johnstown, N. Y. 





Buv advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
65 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




-MAKES DAINTIES 
MORE DAINTY 



The next time you prepare a cake^ 
dessert, ice cream, or a sundae use 
that toothsome flavoring — Mapleine. 
Your guests will be delighted with 
the rich, old-fashioned maple taste it 
imparts. It adds greatly to the joy 
of any occasion. So use 



MAPLEINE 

VAq Go f don 7 favor 



MAKES INSTANT SYRUP 

To make a pint of syrup 

2 Clips sugar. 1 cup water and half 
teaspoonful of Mapleine. 

And for corn syrup 6a%'oring, 
or for flavoring the many cane 
syrups grocers sell, Mapleine is 
remarkable. 

Mapleine contains no maple 
sugar, syrup nor sap, but pro- 
duces a taste similar to maple. 
Grocers sell Mapleine. 
2 oz. bottle 35c.; Canada 50c. 
4c. stamp and trade mark 
from Mapleine carton ^^ill bring 
the .Mapleine Cook Book of 200 
recipes including many desserts. 

CRESCENT MFG. CO. 

323 Occidental Ave. 

Seattle, Wash 




TEN- CENT MEALS «-,^.- ri^ 

meals with recipes and directions for preparing each. This 
46 pp. Bulletin sent for lOc or FRLE for names of two 
friends who may be interested in our Domestic Science Courses. 



Am. School Home Economics, 503 W. 



St., Chicago 



Household Help 



IF you could engage an expert cook and an 
expert housekeeper for only 10 cents a week, 
with no board or room, you would do it, 
wouldn't vou.? Of course vou would' Well, 
that is all our "TWO HOUSEHOLD HELP- 
ERS" will cost you the first year — nothing 
thereafter, for the rest of your life. 

Have you ever considered how much an hour 
a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year is worth 
to you.' Many workmen get $1 an hour — 
surely your time is worth 30 cents an hour. 
We guarantee these "Helpers" to save you 
at least an hour a day, worth say $2.10 a week. 
Will you invest the 10 cents a week to gain $2 
weekly.' 

And the value our "Helpers" give you in 
courage and inspiration, in peace of mind, in 
the satisfaction of progress, in health, happiness 
and the joy of living, — is above price. In mere 
dollars and cents, they will save their cost 
twelve times a year or more. 

These helpers, "Lessons in Cooking" and 
"Household Engineering" were both prepared 
as home-study courses, and as such have been 
tried out and approved by thousands of our 
members. Thus they have the very highest 
recommendation. Nevertheless we are willing 
to send them in book form, on a week's free 
trial in your own home. Send the coupon. 



Household Engineering 

Scientific Management 

in the Home 

by Mrs. Christine Frede- 
rick. 544 pp., 134 Illus., 
I Leather Stvle. Gold 
Stamped. CONTENTS: 
The Labor-Saving Kitchen; 
Plans and Methods; Help- 
-ful Household Tools; 
Methods of Cleaning; Food 
and Food Planning; Prac- 
tical Laundry Work; Fam- 
ily Finance; Efficient Pur- 
'"hasing; The Servantiess 
Household; Planning the 
Efficient Home; Health 
and Personal Efficiency. 



Lessons in Cooking 
Through Preparation 
of Meals 
by Robinson & Hammel. 
.500 pp. Illus., I Leather 
Style. Gold Stamped. 

CONTENTS: Menus with 
recipes for 12 weeks and 

FULL DIRECTIONS FOR PRE- 
PARING E.\CH MEAL. Menus 

and Directions for Formal 
and Informal Dinners, 
Luncheons, Suppers, etc. 
12 Special Articles: Serving, 
Dish Washing, Candy Mak- 
ing, etc. Also Balanced 
Diet, Food V'alue, Ways of 
Reducing Costs, etc. 



Membership Free 

With the books to include: a. All Personal 
questions answered, b. All Domestic Science 
books loaned, c. Use of Purchasing Department. 
d. Bulletins and Economy Letters. 

In these difficult days you really cannot 
afford to be without our "Helpers." You owe 
it to yourself and family to give them a fair 
trial. You cannot realize what great help they 
will give you till you try them — and the trial 
costs you nothing. Send the coupon. 

American School of Home Economics CHICAGO 



A. S. H. E. — 503 W. 69th Street, Chicago, HI. 

Send your two "HOUSEHOLD HELPERS,;' prepaid, 
on a weeks trial, in the de Lu.xe binding. If satisfactory, I 
will send you $o in full payment (OR) 50 cents and $1 per 
month for five months. Membership to he included free. 
Otherwise I will return one or both books in <e\eB day-. 
(Resjular mail price %2.6i each.) 

Name and 

Address 

Reference 



Buv advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
66 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




Taus! Chile Spaghetti Au Giatin 

Cook 1-2 lb. spaghetti until 
done. Put in baking dish. 
.\d(i 2 tablespoons bacon 
t-'rease, pint tomatoe,':. t.-ible- 
<po()n Faust Chile Pt wder 
and mix. Sprinkle with 
t^rared cheese, and bake slow- 
l.v in oven until top is brown. 




It's All in the Seasoning 

That indescribably "different taste" between a home-cooked meal 
and a meal prepared by a famous chef is merely the difference in the 
seasoning of things. 

Knowing how to season is what makes a famous chef. He uses any 
number of ingredients in almost every dish — and it is the combination 
of all of them in the right proportions that produces that wonderfully 
delicious "different taste." 

FAUST CHILE POWDER 

was originated by Henry Dietz, the chef of the historical, 
world-famous Faust Cafe, and now Bevo Mill. It is a com- 
bination of spices, herbs, seeds, paprika, chile pepp>er and 
other seasonings. It's the seasoning you must use if you want 
your dishes to rival those prepared by famous chefs, and it's 
the seasoning you WILL use if you try it once. Use Faust 
Chile Powder in all salad dressings, in all relishes, in stews, 
soups, chile con carne. au gratin dishes, etc. 

If your dealer hasn't it in stock now, send 20c to cover cost, 
jjlj^ packing and postage of a can of Faust Chile Powder 

-^K^ and Recipe Book. 

C. F. Blanke Tea and Coffee Co. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Manufacturers of the world-famous Faust 
Instant Coffee and Tea 



Bin 



idvertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
67 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



SOUPS and GRAVYwithout 



Vegeione 

are like dinner without potatoes. To introduce and 
until distribution is established we will mail three 4 
oz. tins (retail price $1.50.) for $1.00. You are not 
taking a chance, for vour monev will be refunded if 
vou do not like VEGETONE. 

A DELICIOUS MEATLESS GRAVY 

Bring pint of water to a boil in pan, add heaping teaspoonful of 
Crisco, or other fat, dissolve well rounded teaspoonful of VEG- 
ETONE, stir in flour to thicken and allow to boil for few min- 
utci-CSMakes rich, tasty, brown gravy. 

BISHOP-GIFFORD CO., Inc. Baldwin, L. I., N. Y. 



Ati|elIbodCake 



8 Inches Square, 5 Inches Hlg!i 

Would you like to make cakes that a!I 
your friendswill say are "Perfectly delicioas?"! can 
teach you to make Angel Food Cake and many other kinds- 
Cakes that Sell for $3, Profit $2 

My instrucMons a-.> so complete that vou are s"re to sacceed the 
very first time. The Osborn Cake Making System is different 
but easy to learn. Twenty years' exnerience has proved its perfec- 
tion. I will send you full particulars FREE. 

Mrs. Grace Osborn Dept. L-7 Bay City, Mich. 



Nothing equals 

SAPOLIO 

for / 
scouring 
and y 
polishing 
cutlery. 
Makes all 
metalware 
look like new 




(( 



Free-Hand Cooking" 



Cook zvithout recipes! A key to cookbooks — correct proportions, 
time, temperature; thickening, leavening, shortening, 105 fun- 
damental recipes. 40 p. book- 10 cents coin or stamps. 

Am. School of Home Economics, 503 W. 69th Street, Chicago 



SEBVICE TABLE WAGON • — 

Large Broad Wide Table 
Top — Removable Glass 
Service Tray — Double 
Drawer— Doub"le 
Handles — Large Deep 
Undershelves — "Scien- 
tifically Silent" Rubber 
Tired Swivel Wheels. 

A high gratj* piece of Furni- 
ture surpassing anything yet at- 
tempted for General utility. 
ease of action, and absolute 
noiselessness. WRITE NOW 

FOR * Descriptive Pamphlet 
AND Dealers Name 
COMBINATION PRODUCTS CO. 
SU41 Cunard Bide Chicigo, III. 




COOKERY BOOKS 



BY JANET McKENZIE HILL 



AMERICAN COOK BOOK 



$1.50 



This cook book deals with the matter in hand in a simpl. 
concise manner, mainly with the cheaper food product 



A cosmopolitan cook book. Illustrated. 

BOOK OF ENTREES 



$2.00 



Over 800 recipes which open a new field of cookery aiii 
furnish a solution of the problem of "left overs." There 
is also a chapter of menus which will be of great help lu 
securing the best combination of dishes. Illustrated. 

CAKES, PASTRY AND DESSERT DISHES 

$2.00 

Mrs. Hill's latest book. Practical, trustworthy and up- 
to-date. 

CANNING, PRESERVING AND JELLY- 
MAKING $1.50 

Modern methods of canning and jelly-making have sim- 
plified and shortened preserving processes. In this book 
the latest ideas in canning, preserving and jelly-making 
are presented. 

COOKING FOR TWO $2.00 

Designed to give chiefly in simple and concise style those 
things that are essential to the proper selection and prepara- 
tion of a reasonable variety of food for the family of two; 
individuals. A handbook for young housekeepers. Used 
as text in many schools. Illustrated from photographs. 

PRACTICAL COOKING AND SERVING $3.00 

This complete manual of how to select, prepare, and serve 
food recognizes cookery as a necessary art. Recipes are 
for both simple and most formal occasions; each recipe is 
tested. 700 pages. Used as a text book in many schools 
Illustrated. 

SALADS, SANDWICHES AND CHAFING 

DISH DAINTIES $2.00 

To the housewife who likes new and dainty ways of serving 
food, this book proves of great value. Illustrated. 

THE UP-TO-DATE WAITRESS $1.75 

A book giving the fullest and most valuable information 
on the care of the dining-room and pantry, the arrangement 
of the table, preparing and serving meals, preparing special 
dishes and lunches, laundering table linen, table decorations, 
and kindred subjects. The book is a guide to ideal service. 




Sent Postpaid on Receipt of 
Price as Listed Above 

THE BOSTON COOKING SCHOOL 
MAGAZINE CO. 

BOSTON (17) MASSACHUSETTS 



Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
68 



AD\"ERTISEMEXTS 



i[=]E 



^1 




\\ onderful results that are now every 
day events with thousands of women — 

Whips 
Evaporated Milk 

• — \^ hips cream m 30 seconds 

— Beats egg in 1 minute 

— \X hips cream off top of bottle 

— Mixes mayonnaise in 4 mmutes 

These are t\pical results secured by users or the 



Dunlap 



Silver Blade Cream Whip 



No Spatter! No Waste! 

Whipping cream ceases to be a vexmg. tirmg job. 
A few turns of the Dunlap handle and the cream 
is billowy and thick. 

Only the Genuine Dunlap 

has the patented features that get the wonderful 
results mentioned above. The thin, flexible, 
perforated blade — vibratmg as it whirls — cuts 
the cream into millions of globules — whips, beats, 
mixes like magic. 



.\sk your Hardware or Dept. Store for the Ehinlap 

If yours doesn t handle it send dealer s name and 
we will supply you by mail, postpaid, at prices 
below. 



No. 266 — Dunlap Silver 
Blade Cream \^ hip: 
earthenware bowl: 
natural wood handle 
The model that built 
Dun lac reDutat:on. 
$1.25. 



No. 500 — Dunlap De- 
Luxe pictured: white 
enamel handles; hang- 
up ring: brown and 
white casserole bowl: 
in special gift pack- 
age . . $2.50 



'esternStates$].50 \^'estern States$2 



CASEY HUDSON CO. 



363 E. Ohio Street 



Chi 




■"• 


^ 


== 


=j. 


11= 


^^ 








Bu) 


£cver: 


isec G: 


:c5 — Do nc: .:: = : 
69 


: r..:5:::-:r5 



AIVIERICXN COOKKR^ 



PNN\\_S ON 



Free — " Wilson's 

Meat Cookery"— 
our helpful book 
on the best way to 
buy and use 
meats. mailed free 
on request. Ad- 
dress Dept. 647, 
Wilson <& Co. 
Chicago. 



Appetizing foods help make 
the sturdiest youngsters 

HEALTH authorities everywhere 
are emphasizing the necessity of 
body -building foods for the growing 
children of today. Wilson products, 
carefully selected and skillfully pre- 
pared, are just the kind of foods that 
makes strength and vitality. 

Their full-flavor and appetizing taste is 
splendidly demonstrated in Wilson's 
Certified Ham. Mildly sweet, tender, 
juicy, Wilson's Certified Ham proves 
the merit of our patient cure and 
smoking. Ask your dealer for it. 



WILSON & CO. 



V \J 



yniA fUMontMT 



O^^ \4j-JU4^i^ -^XiiUii ^yxja{£c^ -H^^oxji/r -^toJltCjU 



Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
70 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




Not So Bad this Month 



For the first time in many months the expense account fails to pro- 
duce anxiety and wrinkles. 'It's the first time," the young housekeeper 
says, "the figures haven't given me a horrid feeling." 

What a lot of money and time she has wasted on things to eat, 
and especially desserts, when Jell-0 would have helped her out. 

Millions of American women understand just how Jell-0 helps 
them out. To any who do not we shall be glad to 
send a copy of the 1920 Jell-0 Book, which contains 
fuller information on this important point than any 
published heretofore. 

Jell-0 is made in six pure fruit flavors : Strawberry, 
Raspberry, Lemon, Orange, Chocolate, Cherry, and is sold 
by all grocers and dealers. 

THE GENESEE PURE FOOD COMPANY 
Le Roy, N. Y., and Bridgeburg, Ont. 




Buv advertised Goods — • Do not accept substitutes 
71 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



forSERFCE" ^ G .»* 



t^^ y 




A RITESHAPE Tip 

for June Brides 

When the new housewife goes out to select her grocer and 
butcher, she can judge a store by the kind of dish used to 
package bulk foods. 

The best food retailers are putting all meats and foods not 
factory wrapped into the clean, sanitary wooden RITE- 
SHAPE dish. 

The Oval Wood Dish Company 

MANUFACTURERS 
FACTORY AT TUPPER LAKE, N. Y. 



EASTERN OFFICE 

110 W. 40th St. 
New York City 



WESTERN OFFICE 

37 S. Wabash Ave, 
Chicago, 111. 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
72 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




When 
Visitors Come 



and you want to add a real 
delicacy to your welcome, 
what could be finer than a 
pan of Grandmother's Bis- 
cuits or plump, light straw- 
berry shortcakes made 
(Grandmother's way) with 



It's 

What 

Makes 

Them 

Both Nice 



A standby for generations — whole- 
some and dependable — prepared 
from grapes. The ideal leavener 
when Grandmother was a girl — the 
ideal leavener NOW. 

A Pleasing Beverage 

Just a level teaspoon of S & P 

Cream of Tartar in a glass of cold 

water — add a little lemon juice^ — • 

sweeten to taste and stir. It's re- 
freshing and healthful too. 




Guaranteed to test 
99 ^ pure 



Delicious 

StravOberr 

Shortcakes 



Stickne Y & Poor Spice Comeajv y 

1815— Century Old— Century Honored— 1920 

Mustard-Spices BOSTON and HALIFAX Seasonines-flavorines 

The only manufacturers of Pure Mustard in New England 




Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
73 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




Furniture, Leather Upholstery 

Varnished, Painted and 

Enameled Surfaces 

and Windshields 



Makes Old Cars and Old 
Furniture Look Like New 



WARRANTED FREE FROM 
ACID AND GREASE 



WILL NOT BURN 



$1.00 
l.EO 



Pint Screw Top Cans 
Quart •' 

Sent Parcel Post Prepaid 
Cash with order 

Local agents wanted in U. S. and 
Canada. 

Send Postal for Booklet and agents' prices. 

SAWYER CRYSTAL BLUE CO. 

Sole Selling Agents 
88 Broad St., Boston, Mass. 



USED 

DAILY IN A 

MILLION 

HOMES 



Colburn^s 

^- ©Red Label 

Spices 

TheA.ColburnCo., 
Philadelphia,U.SA 



ROBERTS 

Lightning Mixer 
Beats Everything 

Beats eggs, whips cream, chums butter, mixc^ 
gravies, desserts and dressings, and does thn 
work in a few seconds. Blends and mixc^ 
malted milk and all drinks. 

Simple and Strong. Saves work — easy 
to clean. Most necessary household 
article. Used by 2 00,000 housewives. 

A USEFUL CHRISTMAS GIFT 

If your dealer does not carry this, we will 
send prepaid quart size Sl.OO, pint size 75( 
Far West and South, quart $1.25, pint 90( 
Recipe book free with mixer. 

NATIONAL CO. les ouver st, boston, mass. 



AS NEVER BEFORE YOU NEED A 
COPY OF 

CANNING, PRESERVING 
AND JELLY MAKING 

By JANET McKENZIE HILL 

The economic condition of the times 
demands that all surplus vegetables and 
fruit be carefully preserved for future 
use. Modern methods of canning and 
jelly making have simplified and short- 
ened preserving processes. In this book 
the latest ideas in canning, preserving 
and jelly making are presented. 

We will send a copy of this book, postpaid, on receipt 
of price, $1.50. 

We will send a copy of this book, postpaid, and renew 
your subscription for American Cookery one vear, both 
for $2.75. 

We will send a copy of this book, postpaid, to any 
present subscriber sending her renewal at $1.50 and two 
new subscribers for American Cookery at $1.50 each 

Address 

The Boston Cooking-School Magazine Co. 
Boston, Mass. 



MISS FARMER'S SCHOOL OF COOKERY ^'"/^IS?"'''^ 



30 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 



BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



Courses of four and eight weeks from April to November 

SUMMER COURSES 

JUNE 7 TO JULY 2 JULY 6 TO JULY 30 

1st and 2nd COURSES IN COOKERY ADVANCED COOKERY 

MARKETING DIETETICS 

TABLE SERVICE BALANCED MENU MAKING 

FOOD VALUES COOKING FOR PROFIT 

HOUSEHOLD ADMINISTFIATION HOUSEWIFERY 

CANDY COURSES 

Open all the year Send for bulletins 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept 
74 



lubstitutes 



I 



ADVERTISEMEXTS 



SIGN 
O LJ 

"TRUST 




Yoli llave Alwaiig s Waiixea 
Tkis EMCD Ki^cWIkclcage 

SAVE YOUR NERVES 

This EMCO Kitchen Package will lighten a lot of household burdens. Clean, 
strong wooden plates for serving lunches and less formal family meals, for picnics 
and outings, for storing left-overs in ice box and pantry. Cuts out dishwashing, 
broken china and a lot of "bother." 

Other needful things accompany the plates. Each package contains 



50 9-inch EMCO Wooden Plates 
12 EMCO Handy Dishes 



2500 EMCO Toothpicks 
60 EMCO Clothespins 



$1.00 ANYWHERE, POSTPAID 

Cut the coupon today and join the happy housewives who "wouldn't keep 

house without the EMCO . Kitchen 
Package." 



E SCAN ABA MFG. CO. 
Departmext D 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Herewith find $1.00 for which please send 
me postpaid the EMCO Kitchen Package. 

Name... 



Street... 
City. 



.Stat 



Escanaba Manufacturing Company 

Manufacturers 

ESCANABA - MICHIGAN 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
7S 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




More than half the pleasure and conve- 
nience of electrical appliances lies in hav- 
ing them ready for immediate service. 

There should be a place in every room 
where such an instant attachment can be 
made without fuss or bother of remov- 
ing light bulb. The 






does this for you. Provides two connec- 
tions from a single socket. Gives you 
light and either heat or power at the 
same time. 

*' Every Wired Home Needs Three 
or More" 

AT YOUR DEALER^S 

Folder free on request 

BENJAMIN ELECTRIC MFG. CO. 

Chicago 



New York 



San Francisco 




fhe Quality Plug 



Ask your dealer to equip the cords of your electrical appliances with Benjamin 903 
Swivel Attachment Plug, It screws into the socket without twisting the cord. 
Benjamin No, 2452 Shade Holders enable you to use any shade with your 
Two-Way Plugs. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
76 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




Sister Says It's Best for Fudge 

For home-made candies, as for cooking and drinking, 
Carnation Milk is unsurpassed. 

It is pure cows' milk evaporated to the consistency of 
cream, then sterilized; therefore it is absolutely pure. 

It satisfies every milk purpose most conveniently and 
economically, and the number of homes wherein it is 
the only milk used increases every day. 

It is sold by all grocers. 

A booklet containing 100 economical, tested recipes, 
among these a special fudge recipe, sent on request. 

Carnation Milk Products Company, 658 Consumers Building, Chicago, III. 



Carnation ™ Milk 



''From Contented Cows" 




Sold by Grocers 
Everywhere 

The label is red and white 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
77 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Experience has shown that the most satisfactory way 

to enlarge the subscription list of American Cookery is through its present subscri- 
bers, who personally can vouch for the value of the publication. To make it an 
object for subscribers to secure new subscribers, we offer the following premiums: 

CONDITIONS : premiums are not given with a subscription or for a renewal, but only 
* to present subscribers, for securing and sending to us new yeariy sub- 
scriptions at $1.50 each. The number of new subscriptions required to secure each premium is clearly 
stated below the description of each premium. 

Transportation is or 15 not paid as stated. 




INDIVIDUAL INITIAL JELLY MOULDS 

Serve Eggs, Fish and Meats in Aspic; 
Coffee and Fruit Jelly; Pudding and other 
desserts with your initial letter raised on 
the top. Latest and daintiest novelty for 
the up-to-date hostess. To remove jelly 
take a needle and run it around inside of 
mould, then immerse in warm water; jelly 
will then come out in perfect condition. 
Be the first in your town to have these. 
You cannot purchase them at the stores. 




This shows the jelly turned from the mould 
Set of six (6), any initial, sent postpaid for (1) new subscription 



This shows mould 
(upside down) 



Cash Price 75 cents. 



PATTY IRONS' 




As illustrated, are used to make dainty, flaky 
pates or timbales; delicate pastry cups for serv- 
ing hot or frozen dainties, creamed vegetable^ 
salads, shell fish, ices, etc. Each set comes 
securely packed in an attractive box with recipes 
and full directions for use. Sent, postpaid, for 
one (1) new subscription. Cash price, 75 cents. 



SILVER'S 

SURE CUT 

FRENCH FRIED 
POTATO CUTTER 

One of the most 
modern and eflBcient 
kitchen helps ever in- 
vented. A big labor 
and time saver. 

Sent, prepaid, for 
one (1) new subscrip- 
tion. Cash price 75 
cents. 




FRENCH ROLL BREAD PAN 




open 
End 



Best quality blued steel. 6 inches wide by 13 
long. One pan sent, prepaid, for one (1) new 
«nbscnotion Cash price. 75 cents 

SEAMLESS VIENNA BREAD PAN 




Two of these pans sent, postpaid for one (1) 
new subscription. Cash price, 75 cents for two 

pans. 




HEAVY TIN BORDER MOULD 

Imported, Round, 6 inch 
Sent, prepaid, for one (1) new subscription. 
Cash price. 75 cents. 



THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO. 



Boston, Mass. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

78 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



PREMIUMS 



The Empire Grape Fruit and Orange Knife 



Is made from the finest cutlery steel, finely tempered, 
curved just to the right angle and ground to a very keen 
edge, will remove the center, cut cleanly and quickly 
around the edge and divide the fruit into segments ready 
lor eating. The feature of the blade is the round end, 
which prevents cutting through the outer skin. A grape 
fruit knife is a necessity, as grape fruit are growing so 
rapidly in popularity as a breakfast fruit. Sent, post- 
paid, for one (1) new subscription. Cash Price 75 cents. 



Empire Kitchen Knives 




Highly polished rubberoid finished 
handles. 

These knives have blades forged from 
the finest cutlery steel, highly tempered 
and ground to a very keen edge. These 
Knives will cut. Two knives, as shown 
above, sent, prepaid, for one (1) new 
subscription. Cash Price 75 cents. 



AMERICAN 
CRUSTY ROLL PAN 

Best quality, blued steel. 93^ inches 
by 103^ inches. Makes 6 delicious 
crusty rolls. Recipes sent with each 
pan. 

Sent, postpaid, for two (2) new sub- 
scriptions. Cash Price, $1.50. 



FRENCH 
BUTTER CURLER 

Unique and Convenient 

The easiest way to serve butter. 
Full directions with each curler. 

Sent, postpaid, for one (1) new sub- 
scription. Cash Price, 73 cents. 





MAGIC 
COVER 



for Pastry Board and Rolling Pin; chemically 
treated and hygienic; recommended by leading 
I teachers of cooking. Saves flour, time and patience. 
Sent, postpaid, for one (1) new subscription. Cash 
Price, 75 cents. 




ROTARY 

MINCLNG 

KNIFE 



Nickel plated. Ten revolving cutters. Effect- 
ually chops parsley, mint, onions, vegetables, 
etc., and the shield frees the knives from the 
materials being cut. 

Sent, prepaid, for one (1) new subscription. 
Cash Price 73 cents. 



THE BOSTON COOKING SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO.. Boston, Mass. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
79 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



ea^YmsHT i»}o by the pnocTfn 4 1 



CO. C'hCINhiTi 




IVORY SOAP 

IT FLOATS 



I 

i 



Send for free sample package 
of Ivory Soap Flaies snow- 
like flakes of genuine Ivory 
Soap which warm water melts 
into Safe Suds in a Srcond. " 
Quicker and easier for laun- 
dering silks and frail fabrics, 
and for the shampoo. Address 
Dept. 1-F. The Procter & 
Gamble Co., Cincinnati, 0. 



44 
100/3 



O wonder that baby splashes in glee at the 
sight of Ivory Soap. 

To him the floating white cake means handfuls 
of bubbling foam, covering his chubby body 
with a fragrant, velvety coat. 

It means a joyful thrill of surprise when the 
lather disappears like magic at the first touch of 
clear water. 

It means a gentle towelling that leaves his skin 
soft and smooth, and feeling so good. 

Everybody enjoys a daily bath with pure, mild 
Ivory Soap. It cleanses thoroughly. It can 
not irritate. 




-f^^*^" 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
80 




VjfRASS stains, mud stains, damp- 
ness stains — they all come right off my 
white shoes at a touch of Bon Ami. 
It does not paint a temporary layer of 
white over a layer of grime as the 
shoe whiteners do; but it uncovers the 
orioinal white and makes the shoes 



You can use either the cake or powder form of Bon Ami. Avoid too 
much water— don't sop the shoes. Shoe trees are helpful. Use 
Bon Ami for white canvas, cloth, and all white leathers except kid. 



look like new again. (You don't need 
any shoe whitener until the original 
white is actually worn through; and 
even then you should clean the shoes 
with Bon Ami first to give the whitener 
a clean foundation, permitting a thin 
coatingto avoid the flaky filled-uplook!) 



Made in both 

cake and 
powder form 

'Hain't scratched yet f" 




JDOR PRESS, BOSTON 



fomfortinq^Cup 




"Choisa" 

Orange Pekoe 

Ceylon Tea 



Established 



stablished ^*C 
1B58 gir ^Crystal 

S^BLUE 

^^ AND 

AMMONIA 

The Ammonia loosens the dirt, 
making washing easy. The Blue 
gives the only perfect finish. 



I^^BgSiiqSgg^ 






'/y/AW^ 1 _.. ' wm 



^'^mn\^^0' 



A Select High-Grade Tea 
at a Moderate Price 



Pure 



Rich 



Fragrant 



S. S. PIERCE CO. 

BOSTON BROOKLINe 



The Cream 

of Cream of Tartar 

To be absolutely sure to get the abso- 
lutely pure and highest test cream of 
tartar you should insist upon having 



SLADE'S 




Slade's is always the same high grade; it 
does not vary in strength or density; it 
is uniformly good. 

Uniformity is essential to the best results 
in cooking. 

Ask grocers for Slade's and do not accept 
inferior kinds. 

D. & L. SLADE CO. 

BOSTON, MASS., U. S. A. 



I 



i 



vose 



PIANOS 



•l.-live' «* 



have been established more than 50 YEARS. By our syst»iu o 
payments every family in moderate circumstances cai 
VOSE piano. We take old instruments in e.xchanne and 
the new piano in your home free of expense. Write for cataioj; 1) and explanatiDU.' 

VOSE & SONS PIANO CO., 160 Boylston St., Boston, Mass 



NEW SALADS FOR SUMMER DAYS 

AMERICAN 



COORERy 



bL> 



Sy 







rORM.BRJJV 



THE BOSTON 
WNG-SCHOOLMAGAZINE 



ULlNARy- SCIENCEAm> DOMESTIC- ECONOMICS 



»^««? 




They Couldn't Wait 

because they know her cake is 
always even, fine-grained and 
delicious since she commenced using 



The Wholesome Baking Powder 

Housewives, everywhere, who are the best cooks are more and more com- 
ing to makeRumford their final and regular choice because they have learned 
by experience that Rumford is the best baking powder at 
the price and there is no better baking powder at any price. 

Get a can from your grocer, today; try it and everything 
you bake will be fine-grained, light and delicious — per- 
fectly leavened — used over quarter of a century Rumford 
has never spoiled a baling. 

FreeCook Book. Let us send you your copy of Janet McKenzie Hill's helpful and 
interesting cook book "The Rumford Way of Cookery and Household Economy." 

Rumford Company Dept. Providence, R. I. 

K77 




ADVERTISEMENTS 





FeeirilFo! 
Fum! 

I smell 

Cream 
^ Wheat 

. Tum-YuinlYum-Yiiiii! 




tainted by G. C. Wulney for Cream of Wheat Co 



Copyright 1909 by Cream of Wheat Co. 



"JACK. THE GIANT-KILLER." 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
81 



AMERICAN COOKERY 

Vol. XXV AUGUST— SEPTEMBER, 1920 No. 2 



CONTENTS FOR AUGUST— SEPTEMBER 

PAGE 

PURDUE UNIVERSITY'S NEW PRACTICE HOUSE. 111. 

Mabel L. Harlan 91 

PUMPKIN PIE! — HAVE A PIECE.? Ruth Fargo 97 

THE FIRELESS PICNIC Klea Alexander Thogerson 100 

TIME-THRIFT Margaret Wheeler Ross 102 

VARIETIES OF LUNCHEONS Mary D. Chambers 105 

CAMPING AND CAMP-COOKING Kurt Heppe 107 

EDITORIALS 110, 111, 112 

SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES. (Illustrated with half 
tone engravings of prepared dishes) 

Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 113 

MENUS, SEASONABLE, FOR WEEK IN AUGUST 122 

MENUS, SEASONABLE, FOR WEEK IN SEPTEMBER .... 123 

COMPANY TOUCHES FOR THE SUMMER HOSTESS 

May Belle Brooks 124 

NEW SALADS FOR SUMMER DAYS . Alice Urquhart Fewell 125 

TWILIGHT PINES A. W. Peach 127 

HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES : — On the Help Situation — How 
to Make a Milk-Shake — -A Kolpak Kanning Klub — 'Trled-and-. 
Tested Recipes — Goodies for all the Year — Hints for the 
Laundry — 'Culinary Suggestions, etc 128 

QUERIES AND ANSWERS 132 

NEW BOOKS 138 

THE SILVER LINING 142 



$1.50 A YEAR Published Ten Times a Year 15c A Copy Q^^^ 

Foreign postage 40c additional 

Entered at Boston post-office aa second class matter 

Copyright, 1920, by 

THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO. 
Pope Bldg., 221 Columbus Ave., Boston 17, Mass. 

Please Renew on Receipt of Colored Blank Enclosed for that purpose 

82 





ADVERTISEMENTS 




Many years ago, 
after we learned 
what women "put 
up with" from 
ordinary salts, we 
aimed to make a salt that would 
pour freely in any weather. 

After many years' experiments we 
learned that salt, to pour, must 
first be refined, then made in per- 
fect crystal cubes "just so.*' 

We crystallized it thus, and Morton 
Salt appeared. It succeeded 
because it always poured — no mat- 
ter how moist the day. 

Get it from your grocer. 

"The Salt of the Earth" 

Morton Salt Company 

CHICAGO 



E^^akesT'rharShI] 



Mortons 

^REE RUNNING 

Salt 



^POUR^ 



\S^sS!7^SS^Sv^m^ 



MORTON'S 
SALT 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

83 



AMERICAI^ COOKERY 



INDEX FOR AUGUST- 


SEPTEMBER 






PAGE 


Camping and Camp-Cooking ........ 107 


Company Touches for the ^Summer Hostess 












124 


Editorials ...... 












110 


Fireless Picnic, The 














100 


Home Ideas and Economies . 














128 


Menus . - . 














. 122, 123 


New Books 














138 


New Salads for Summer Days 














125 


Pumpkin Pie! — ^ Have a Piece? 














97 


Purdue University's New Practice House 












91 


Silver Lining, The .... 












142 


Time Thrift 












102 


Twilight Pines . • . 












127 


Varieties of Luncheons 












105 


SEASONABLE- AND-TESTED RECIPES 


Cabbage, Delicious . . .113 Lettuce, California Iceberg, with Thousand 


Cake, Pistachio Layer 


120 Island Dressing. Ill US 


Carrots, Pickled Young . 


121 Mangoes, Mock Pickled 






121 


Chicken, Pressed. 111. . ... 


115 Meringues with Banana Crean 


1. Ill' 




119 


Chutney, Apple .... 


118 Muffins, Rye. 111. 






119 


Coffee, Iced. 111. . . .' . 


120 Onions, Browned . 






115 


Conserve of Mixed Fruits 


118 Peas, Minted, with Lettuce 






113 


Currant Cup .... 


121 Pickle, "Best Ever" 






121 


Cutlets, Lamb, a la Soubise. 111. 


115 Pie, Sour Cream 






117 


Dressing, Thousand Island 


118 Potatoes, New, a la Baviere 






113 


Filling, Almond Cream . 


116 Rolls, Almond Ring. 111. 






116 


Halibut Steaks with Lobster Sauce. 111. 


114 Sauce, Lobster 






114 


Ice, Tutti Frutti Water . 


118 Sauce, Soubise 






115 


Ice Cream, Lillian Russell. 111. 


117 Shortcakes, Blackberry. 111. 






117 


Jelly, Cucumber .... 


118 Shortcakes, Peach 






117 


Jelly, Gooseberry .... 


121 Squash, Fried Summer. 111. 






116 


Jelly, Mint 121 Tapioca, Lakewood Style. 111. . .119 


QUERIES AND ANSWERS 


Chicken, Potted in Fat .... 136 Honey, Putting up Fruits in, etc. . . 134 


Clam Bake for Eighteen Persons 


136 Pudding, Yorkshire 




132 


Cookies, Honey .... 


134 Rolls, Finger . . . . 




132 


Dressing, Salad, to Keep 


136 Salad, Fruit ._ . . " . 




132 


Filling, Soft Chocolate for Layer Cake 


132 Sugar Saving in Fruit Preserving 


'. 134 


We want representatives everywhere to take subscriptions for 


American Cookery. We have an attractive proposition to make 


those who will canvass their town; also to those who will secure a 


few names among their friends and acquaintances. Write us today. 


AMERICAN COOKERY - BOSTON, MASS. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

84 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Good Food 
Well Cooked 

is the high-water test 
of kitchen efficiency 

To get efficiency — which means economy of effort, 
time and money — you will find Mrs. Rorer's 
Cookery Books the one sole, reliable guide, one 
that never fails. It is this absolute confidence in 
what she has to say that makes her work so 
valuable and popular. Here are a few books 
for summer use: 

Mrs. Rorer's Canning and Preserving 

Tells how to put up all our fruits and vegetables 
Bound in cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 

Ice Creams, Water Ices, Frozen Puddings 

Make your own, enjoy it more, and save money 
Bound in cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 

Mrs. Rorer's Hot Weather Dishes 

Your work planned for you. Take advantage of it 
Bound in cloth, 75 cents; by mail, 80 cents 

Sandwiches New Salads 

A tempting and delicious variety This is the time and here the salads 

Cloth, 75 cents; by mail, 80 cents Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 

For sale by all Bookstores and Department stores, or 

ARNOLD & COMPANY, 420 Sansom St., Philadelphia 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
85 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Books on Household Economics 



THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE COMPANY prcaenta the foUowing ai « 
list of representative works on household economics. Any of the books will be sent poitpaid 
upon receipt of price. 

Special rates made to schools, clubs and persons wishing a number of books. Write for quota- 
tion on the list of books you wish. We carry a very large stock of these books. One order to us 
saves effort and express charges. Prices subject to change without notice. 



A Guide to Laundry Work. Chambers. $1.00 
Allen, The, Treatment of Diabetes. 

Hill and Eckman 1.00 

American Cook Book. Mrs. J. M. Hill 1.50 
American Meat Cutting Charts. Beef, 

veal, pork, lamb — 4 charts, mounted on 

cloth and rollers 10.00 

American Salad Book. M. DeLoup.... 1.50 
Around the World Cook Book. Barroll 2.50 
Art and Economy in Home Decorations, 

Priestman 1.50 

Art of Home Candy- Making (with ther- 
mometer, dipping wire, etc.) 3.00 

Art of Right Living. Richards 50 

Bacteria, Yeasts and Molds in the 

Home. H. W. Conn 1.48 

Better Meals for Less Money. Greene 1.35 
Book of Entrees. Mrs. Janet M. Hill. . . 2.00 
Boston Cook Book. Mary J. Lincoln . . 2.25 
Boston Cooking-School Cook Book. 

Fannie M. Farmer 2.50 

Bread and Bread-Making. Mrs. Rorer. .75 
Breakfasts, Luncheons and Dinners. 

Chambers 1.25 

Bright Ideas for Entertaining. Linscott .75 
Business, The, of the Household. Taber 2.50 
Cakes, Icings and Fillings. Mrs. Rorer 1.00 
Cakes, Pastry and Dessert Dishes. Janet 

M. Hill 2.00 

Candies and Bonbons. Neil 1.50 

Candy Cook Book. Alice Bradley 1.50 

Canning and Preserving. Mrs. Rorer. . 1.00 
Canning, Preserving and Jelly Making. 

Hill 1.60 

Canning, Preserving and Pickling. 

Marion H. Neil 1.50 

Care and Feeding of Children. L. E. 

Holt, M.D 1.25 

Catering for Special Occasions. Farmer 1.50 

Century Cook Book. Mary Ronald 3.00 

Chafing-Dish Possibilities. Farmer. . . . 1.50 
Chemistry in Daily Life. Lassar-Cohn . . 2.25 
Chemistry of Cookery. W. Mattieu 

Williams 2.25 

Chemistry of Cooking and Cleaning. 

Richards and Elliot 1.00 

Chemistry of Familiar Things. Sadtler 2.00 
Chemistry of Food and Nutrition. 

Sherman 2.10 

Cleaning and Renovating. E. G. Osman 1.20 

Clothing for Women. L. I. Baldt 2.50 

Cook Book for Nurses. Sarah C. Hill. . . .75 
Cooking for Two. Mrs. Janet M. Hill. . 2.25 

Cost of Cleanness. Richards 1.00 

Co«t of Food. Richards 1.00 

Cost of Living. Richards 1.00 

Cost of Shelter. Richards 1.00 

Course in Household Arts. Sister 

Loretto B. Duff 1.10 



Dainties. Mrs. Rorer $1.00 

Diet for the Sick. Mj-s. Rorer 2.00 

Diet in Relation to Age and Activity. 

Thompson 1.00 

Dishes and Beverages of the Old South. 

McCulloch- Williams 1.50 

Domestic Art in Women's Education. 

Cooley 1.40 

Domestic Science in Elementary 

Schools. Wilson 1.20 

Domestic Service. Lucy M. Salmon . . . 2.25 

Dust and Its Dangers. Pruden 1.25 

Easy Entertaining. Benton 1.50 

Economical Cookery. Marion Harris 

Neil 2.00 

Efficient Kitchen. Child 1.50 

Elements of the Theory and Practice of 

Cookery. Williams and Fisher 1.40 

Encyclopaedia of Foods and Beverages. 10.00 
Equipment for Teaching Domestic 

Science. Kinne 80 

Etiquette of New York Today. Learned 1.60 

Etiquette of Today. Ordway 1.00 

European and American Cuisine. 

Lemcke 4.00 

Every Day Menu Book. Mrs. Rorer.... 1.50 
Every Woman's Canning Book. Hughes .75 

Expert Waitress. A. F. Springsteed 1.25 

Feeding the Family. Rose 2.10 

First Principles of Nursing. Anne R. 

Manning 1.00 

Food and Cookery for the Sick and Con- 
valescent. Fannie M. Farmer 2.50 

Food and Feeding. Sir Henry Thompson 2.00 

Food and Flavor. Finck 3.00 

Foods and Household Management. 

Kinne and Cooley 1.40 

Food and Nutrition. Bevier and Ushir 1.00 

Food Products. Sherman 2.40 

Food and Sanitation. Forester and 

Wigley 1.00 

Food and the Principles of Dietetics. 

Hutchinson 4.25 

Food for the Worker. Stern and Spitz. 1.00 
Food for the Invalid and the Convales- 
cent. Gibbs 75 

Food Materials and Their Adultera- 
tions. Richards 1.00 

Food Study. Wellman 1.10 

Food Values. Locke 1.75 

Foods and Their Adulterations. Wiley 6.00 
Franco-American Cookery Book. D61i6e 4.50 

French Home Cooking. Low 1.50 

Fuels of the Household. Marian White .75 
Furnishing a Modest Home. Daniels 1.25 
Furnishing the Home of Good Taste. 

Throop 4.00 

Golden Rule Cook Book (600 Recipes for 
Meatless Dishes). Sharpe 2.50 



Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
86 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Handbook for Home Economics. Flagg $0.75 
Handbook of Hospitality for Town and 

Country. Florence H. Hall 1.50 

Handbook of Invalid Cooking. Mary A. 

Boland 2.50 

Handbook on Sanitation. G. M. Price, 

M.D 150 

Healthful Farm House, The. Dodd. .60 
Home and Community Hygiene. 

Broadhurst 2.50 

Home Candy Making. Mrs. Rorer 75 

Home Economics. Maria Parloa 2.00 

Home Economics Movement 75 

Home Furnishing. Hunter 2.50 

Home Furnishings, Practical and Artis- 
tic. Kellogg 2.00 

Home Nursing. Harrison 1.50 

Home Problems from a New Standpoint 1.00 
Home Science and Cook Book. Anna 

Barrows and Mary J. Lincoln 1.00 

Hot Weather Dishes. Mrs. Rorer 75 

House Furnishing and Decoration. 

McClure and Eberlein 2.00 

House Sanitation. Talbot 80 

Housewifery. Balderston 2.50 

Household Bacteriology. Buchanan . . . 2.75 
Household Economics. Helen Campbell 1.75 
Household Engineering. Christine Fred- 
erick 2.00 

Household Physics. Alfred M. Butler.. 1.30 

Household Textiles. Gibbs 1.25 

Housekeeper's Handy Book. Baxter.. 2.00 
How to Cook in Casserole Dishes. Neil 1.50 
How to Cook for the Sick and Convales- 
cent. H. V. S. Sachse 2.00 

How to Feed Children. Hogan. 1.25 

How to Use a Chafing Dish. Mrs. Rorer .75 

Human Foods. Snyder 2.00 

Ice Cream, Water Ices, etc. Rorer 1.00 

I Go a Marketing. Sowie 1.75 

Institution Recipes. Emma Smedley. . 3.00 

Interior Decorations. Parsons 5.00 

International Cook Book. Filippini. . . . 2.50 
Key to Simple Cookery. Mrs. Rorer.. 1.25 

King's Caroline Cook Book 2.00 

Kitchen Companion. Parloa 2.50 

Kitchenette Cookery. Anna M. East. . . 1.25 
Laboratory Handbook of Dietetics. Rose 1.50 
Lessons in Cooking Through Prepara- 
tion of Meals 2.00 

Lessons in Elementary Cooking. Mary 

C. Jones 1.25 

Like Mother Used to Make. Herrick. . 1.25 

Luncheons. Mary Ronald 2.00 

A cook's picture book; 200 illustrations 

Made-over Dishes. Mrs. Rorer 75 

Many Ways for Cooking Eggs. Mrs. 

Rorer 75 

Marketing and Housework Manual. 

S. Agnes Donham 2.00 

Mrs. Allen's Cook Book. Ida C. Bailey 

Allen 2.00 

More Recipes for Fifty. Smith 2.00 

My Best 250 Recipes. Mrs. Rorer 1.00 

New Book of Cookery, A. Farmer 2.50 

New Hostess of Today. Larned 1.75 

New Salads. Mrs. Rorer 1.00 



Nursing, Its Principles and Practice. 

Isabels and Robb $2.00 

Nutrition of a Household. Brewster. . 1.00 

Nutrition of Man. Chittenden 4.50 

Philadelphia Cook Book. Mrs. Rorer. . 1.50 
Planning and Furnishing the House. 

Quinn 1.25 

Practical Cooking and Dinner Giving. 

Mrs. Mary F. Henderson 1.60 

Practical Cooking and Serving. Mrs. 

Janet M. Hill 3.00 

Practical Dietetics. Gilman Thompson 6.00 
Practical Dietetics with Reference to 

Diet in Disease. Patte 2.25 

Practical Food Economy. Alice Gitchell 

Kirk 1.35 

Practical Points in Nursing. Emily A. 

M. Stoney 2.00 

Practical Sewing and Dressmaking. 

Allington 1.50 

Principles of Chemistry Applied to the 

Household. Rowley and Farrell 1.50 

Principles of Food Preparation. Mary 

D. Chambers 1.25 

Principles of Human Nutrition. Jordan 2.00 
Recipes and Menus for Fifty. Frances 

Lowe Smith 2.00 

Rorer's (Mrs.) New Cook Book 2.50 

Salads, Sandwiches, and Chafing Dish 

Dainties. Mrs. Janet M. Hill 2.00 

Sandwiches. Mrs. Rorer 75 

Sanitation in Daily Life. Richards 60 

School Feeding. Bryant 1.75 

Selection and Preparation of Food. 

Brevier and Meter. 75 

Sewing Course for Schools. Woolman. . 1.50 
Shelter and Clothing. Kinne and Cooley 1.40 
Source, Chemistry and Use of Food 

Products. Bailey 2.00 

Story of Germ Life. H. W. Conn 1.00 

Successful Canning. Powell 2.50 

Sunday Night Suppers. Herrick 1.35 

Table Service. Allen 1.60 

Textiles. Woolman and McGowan 2.25 

The Chinese Cook Book. Shin Wong 

Chan 1.50 

The House in Good Taste. Elsie 

de Wolfe 4.00 

The Housekeeper's Apple Book. L. G. 

Mackay , 1.25 

The New Housekeeping. Christine Fred- 
erick 1.90 

The Party Book. Fales and Northend. . 3.00 

The St. Francis Cook Book 5.00 

The Story of Textiles 3.50 

The Up-to-Date Waitress. Mrs. Janet 

M. Hill 1.75 

The Woman Who Spends. Bertha J. 

Richardson 1.00 

Till the Doctor Comes and How to Help 

Him 1.00 

True Food Values. Birge 1.25 

Vegetable Cookery and Meat Sub- 
stitutes. Mrs. Rorer 1.50 

With a Saucepan Over the Sea. Ade- 
laide Keen 1.75 

Women and Economics. Charlotte Per- 
kins Stetson 1.50 



Address all Orders: THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO., Boston, Mass. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
87 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




A 



K"" 



mWi 



are 



Easily 
Cleaned 



Oltl Dutch Clean^tr k«rj.- it hriirlit aiul sanitaiv 
without difficulty or handwork. Ea-ih remove> 
>lains. corrosiou and di>colorationr. 

Goe? further and ^vcs })etter results than soaps, 
Mourinj: hrick*. caustic <»r alkali preparations: >\ith 
a bi«: saving in time. mkh. \ and labor. 

Old Dutch qualitv in>nivs economv and effi- 
ciencv for all liou«ehokl cleaninL^ 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 




Ice Cream Sandwich 

Between two slices of cake, place a 
slice of ice cream that has been molded 
in brick form, and serve with chocolate 
fudge sauce or marshmallow sauce. 

The cake slices should be of the same 
size as the slice of ice cream. Use 
chocolate or strawberry ice cream with 
any white or yellow cake and chocolate 
sauce, or use vanilla ice cream with 
chocolate cake, and serve with marsh- 
mallow sauce. 



A 



Cook 



merican v-.ooKery 

VOL. XXV AUGUST — SEPTEMBER 



No. 2 



Purdue University's New Practice House 



By Mabel L. Harlan 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION', PURDUE UNIVERSITY 



T 



HE object of all education is to 
fit men and women for service." 
"Are you hostess or house- 
keeper this week?" is one of the leading 
questions heard on the campus now, for 
Purdue girls are "keeping house," as a 
part of their college course, in the new 
practice house. 

Under the supervision of Prof. Alary 
L. Matthews, Head of the Home Eco- 
nomics Department, Purdue Unlversit}', 
a ten-room house has been leased and 
completely furnished for the use of the 
girls taking the course in home manage- 
ment. The house has a reception hall, 
living room, dining room, kitchen, ofhce, 
five bedrooms and bath. All the fur- 
nishings were planned and purchased by 
the girls taking the course in "The 
House," under Professor Matthews, and 
a very attractive and livable house it is. 

The handsome furniture for the living 
room was donated by a woman who has 
long sponsored the movement for better 
homes. Several gifts have been received 
in addition, among them being a suction 
sweeper, books, pictures and table linen. 

Every one of the hundreds of men and 
women who visited the practice house at 
an "open house" recently, remarked, 
"What a complete home it is!" after they 
had surveyed it from the well-equipped 
kitchen, to the comfortably furnished 
living-room, the tastefully furnished bed- 
rooms, and the little office adjoining the 
kitchen where the menus are made out, 
the records kept, and where is found a 



study-table and a case of books on all 
phases of housewifery. 

Perhaps the best way of describing the 
practice house is to repeat the remarks of 
a certain bright young miss, aged eleven, 
who did not have an opportunity to visit 
the "at home," but who, nevertheless, 
was very much interested. 

"Aunt , what Is the practice house 

really like.?" 

To which Aunt responded, 

"Why, it is like a well-furnished home 
kept in perfect order." 

"Which is most unnatural." said little 




PREPARING A MEAL 



91 



92 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Aliss Eleven Years, and who, in truth, 
is really used to good housekeeping. 

It is safe to predict, however, that it 
will be perfectly natural for the young 
women who are taking this training to 
keep a well-ordered house, for here all 
of the duties involved in managing a 
house are actually performed by the girls 
during their course of instruction. 

In reality, the practice house is a 
laboratory, just as the shops are a labora- 
tory for the men taking the courses in 
engineering. "The purpose of this work," 
says Professor Matthews, "is to estab- 
lish more fully standards of right living; 
to afford each student an opportunity to 
measure herself by these standards; to 
afford the teaching staff a means of 
checking efficiency of training given, and 
to afford a limited amount of vocational 
experience." 

The general plan of operation of the 
practice house, and the duties of the 
various members of the group occupying 
the house follow: 

General Plan 

Each girl to stay in the house thirty 



days; each girl to pay 310 when she 
enters the house; in addition, she will pay 
whatever her board costs. The special 
equipment which the girl needs to bring 
with her to the house is: One wash house 
dress, white aprons, colored aprons, 
towels and bedding; th-e work of the 
house is to be divided into six divisions: 
(1) Cook, (2) assistant cook, (3) waitress, 
(4) hostess, (5) housekeeper, (6) assistant 
housekeeper; each girl will act in each of 
these capacities for five consecutive days 
during her thirty days' stay in the house; 
mothers and sisters may be invited to the 
house as over-night guests ; no other over- 
night guests permitted; Tuesday and 
Saturday evenings will be the evenings 
on which guests may be invited to dinner. 
Permission to have guests should be asked 
of the supervisor. Occasional guests of 
the house will be entertained at other 
times. Guests' meals will be 30 cents per 
meal; one conference of the girls with 
the supervisor will be held during the 
five days, the time will be arranged with 
each group; each girl is to keep a record 
of the time spent on her work during the 
month, the card on which this record is 




LAYING THE TABLE 



WORK AT PRACTICE HOUSE 



93 




SWEEPING IS PLAY 



kept will be turned In to the supervisor 
when the girl leaves the house; all cor- 
rections of work will be posted in the 
study-room some time during each 
day; the student will be graded on: 
(1) accuracy of work; (2) promptness; 
(3) executive ability; (4) co-operation; 
(5) initiative. 

Duties 

Hostess: 

She collects and pays all bills by check; 
keeps accounts; files bills. She enters 
all items in the household account book. 
She buys all supplies except food. She 
takes care of the bank account, paying 
all bills by check when possible; she 
receives all house guests; she serves at 
table; she turns out lights at night and 
sees that doors are locked; she reads gas 
and electric meters at end of month and 
checks bills with readings; she meets all 
emergencies, such as providing for care of 



the sick; she totals the cost per girl for 
board during the five days; she is respon- 
sible for the general appearance and 
"atmosphere" of the house; she is 
responsible for seeing that all work is 
done as assigned; she attends to the 
"occasional'' task, such as attending to 
the washing of curtains, the planning for 
social aiTairs, care of the yard, etc. 

Housekeeper: 

She cares for up and down-stairs halls, 
stairway, bathrooms, living room, study 
and front porch and walks, both daily 
and weekly; she keeps linen drawers in 
order; she cleans chaperon's room once 
a week; she takes an invoice of house 
when she takes over duties, to see that 
all furnishings are on hand. 

Assistant Housekeeper: 

She makes beds and straightens bed- 
rooms each morning; she prepares laun- 



94 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



dry to be sent out; checks and puts it 
away upon its return; she does all daily 
and weekly cleaning of upstairs bed- 
rooms; she changes lower sheet and 
pillow cases on each bed on Saturday; 
she keeps clean guest towels in bathrooms; 
she cleans the dormitory and attic stairs, 
when necessary. 

Waitress: 

She does both daily and weekly clean- 
ing in dining-room; she polishes silver; 
she launders doilies; she sets table for 
each meal; she clears the table after 
meal; she keeps linen, dishes and silver 
in order in buffet; she assists with wash- 
ing the dishes and puts away all china, 
glassware and silver. 

Cook: 

She prepares menus with assistance of 
the hostess; all menus being approved 
by the supervisor; she takes full charge 



of the preparation and service of meals; 
she does all the buying of food supplies; 
she turns over all bills to the hostess; she 
takes care of refrigerator and pantry and 
puts away all food; refrigerator is to be 
thoroughly cleaned once in five days; 
she makes and bakes good yeast bread 
once during the week; she takes an 
invoice of food on hand at close of five 
days and sells same to next cook; she 
must make statement of this to hostess. 

Assistant Cook: 

She assists cook with preparation of 
meals, the cook directing work; she 
washes the dishes with the assistance of 
the waitress; she washes the tea towels 
after each using; she cleans the kitchen 
and back porch both daily and weekly; 
she attends to garbage. 

Accounts are kept under the headings 
of food and operating expenses. Rent is 




THE FIRST GROUP TO OCCUPY THE HOUSE 



WORK AT PRACTICE HOUSE 



95 



the only Item under "shelter" with which 
the girls deal, while "clothing" and 
"higher life" are divisions in the budget 
that cannot be dealt with in the type 
which the class must use. 

The food accounts are classified as 
staples, fresh vegetables and fruits, meat 
and eggs, dairy products. Under operat- 
ing expenses come gas, electricity, laundry 
and household supplies. 

The cook makes an invoice of all 
supplies left after her term of service and 
these are sold to the next cook. Time 
cards, giving complete service, are kept 
for each of the five days of service. 

The menus are prepared by the cook 
with the assistance of the hostess and are 
filed in the Menu Book. The following 
menus were used the first week of opera- 
tion and the average cost per person per 
meal was nineteen cents. 

Each time when guests have been 
entertained at dinner on Sunday, the 




WASHING DISHES 

cook and assistant cook have gone to 
church. The main dishes were left to 
cook in the fireless cooker. It is inter- 
esting to note that dinner was served on 
time at 1.15 P.M.. and the cooks returned 
from church at 12.30 P.M. 




MAKING BEDS 



One Week*s Menus at the Practice House, Purdue University 



MONDAY 



Breakfast 




Lunch 


Grapefruit 

Rolled Oats 

Toast 

Coffee 


Creamed Salmon on Toast 

Spiced Grapes 

Bread 

Butter 




Dinner 






Swiss Steak with Gravy 

Browned Potatoes 

Creamed Corn 

I,ettuoe Salad with Cooked Dressi 

Apricots 

Vanilla Wafers 

Tea 


ing 




TUESDAY 




Breakfast 

Oranges 

Wheatena 

Muffins 

Coffee 


Dinner 

Pork Chops with Gravy 

Glazed Sweet Potatoes 

Waldorf Salad 

Jello 

Wafers 

Coffee 


Lunch 

Baked Beans 
Brown Bread 
Baked Apple 



WEDNESDAY 



Breakfast 

Corn Flakes with Sliced Bananas 

Biscuits and Syrup 

Coffee 



Spanish Rice 

Lettuce with French Dressing 

Bread and Butter 

Stewed Apricots 



Dinner (Guests were entertained) 

Meat Loaf with Tomato Sauce 

Delmonico Potatoes 

Head Lettuce Salad with Thousand Island Dressing 

Hot Rolls and Butter 

Ice Cream and Macaroons 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Corn Flakes 

French Fried Toast 

Syrup 

Coffee 



THURSDAY 



Lunch 

Cream-of-Tomato Soup 

Potato Salad 

Bread 

Butter 



Dinner 

Meat Loaf (left from Wednesday) 

Brown Gravy 

String Beans 

Lettuce-and-Carrot Salad 

Bread (home made) and Butter 

Apricot Jelly with Whipped Cream 



Breakfast 

Cream of Wheat with Dates 
Toast 
Bacon 
Coffee 



FRIDAY 



96 



Lunch 

Spaghetti with Cheese 

Banana Salad 

Bread and Butter 

Jam 



PUMPKIN PIE I — HAVE A PIECE 



97 



Dinner 

Veal Steak with Gravy 

Baked Potatoes 

Perfection Salad 

Bread and Butter 

Raisin Pudding with Orange Sauce 

SATURDAY (Dinner always served at noon on Saturday) 
Breakfast Lunch 

Oranges Lettuce-and-Cheese Sandwiches 

Rolled Oats Bean Salad 

Buttered Toast Pineapple 

Coffee ' Cocoanut Wafers 

Dinner 

Roast Beef and Brown Gravy 

Browned Potatoes 

Coleslaw 

Bread, Butter and Jam 

Fruit Salad and Whipped Cream 

Cocoanut Wafers 



Breakfast 

Grapefruit 

Cream of Wheat 

Hot Cakes and Syrup 

Coffee 



SUNDAY 



Lunch (in evening) 

Left-overs from Dinner 

at noon 



Dinner (guests entertained) 

Swiss Steak and Gravy 

Hot Rolls, Butter and Strawberry Jam 

Buttered Peas 

Stuffed Potatoes 

Perfection Salad and Saltines 

Olives 

Pineapple Sherbet 

Chocolate Cake 

Coffee 



T 



Pumpkin Pie! — Have a Piece? 

By Ruth Fargo 



IHERE!" exclaimed the little 
bride gayly. "That's done, and 
I'm sure it's right." 

"You didn't forget the salt — like the 
last recipe you copied," twinkled Aunt 
Anna, with a nod bv way of emphasis. 

"No — I — did — not!" laughed 
Dorothea Dent. "Listen. I'll read." 

Dorothea was perched in her favorite 
place, the high stool in Aunt Anna 
Atwood's kitchen, and she had been busy 
copying dow^n one of Aunt Anna's famous 
recipes into a little blank book which was 
fast turning its pages into a valuable 
cookbook, holding nothing but recipes 



tested and tried. The girlish, bright- 
eyed matron tucked the pencil she had 
been using into her abundant brown hair, 
waved her free hand in a little command- 
ing gesture, held up her note book and 
read aloud: "PUMPKIN PIE! — (Have 
a piece .^) 



Teaspoonful salt 
Scant cup sugar 
Two eggs 

Two level teaspoon- 
fuls cornstarch 



Two cups pumpkin, 

sifted after being 

steamed tender 
Two cups milk 
Teaspoonful ginger 

There! And it makes two pies," de- 
lighted dainty Dorothea. 

"Yes, it is as easy almost to make two 
pies, as one," said Aunt Anna, matter-of- 



98 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



fact-ly; and making two pies at a time 
saves fuel. The heat that will bake one 
pie will bake two. Besides, pumpkin pie 
keeps good." She considered a moment, 
and added: "If it has a chance to keep. 
Pa and me eat 'em up so fast they don't 
have a chance to get stale. We don't 
like 'em hot either. But pumpkin pie 
seems to be real palatable — and real 
digestible. I don't know a better pie, 
myself — and it only takes one crust. 
That is a point in its favor with folks as 
thinks pie crust ain't a good thing to eat; 
and it is a point In its favor with folks 
as have to be savin' of fat — lard and 
sich — same's you and me have to save, 
and everybody ought to," aiBrmed the 
practical, plump, little old lady, who had 
cooked for forty years and more. 

"My little one-burner gas stove oven 
will hold two pies, as easy as one," said 
Dorothea, "but that is all it will hold. 
I'm going always to make two. Jerry 
is awfully fond of pumpkin pie," 
indulgently. 

"My oil-stove oven is jes' same size 
as your gas oven," meditated Aunt Anna. 
"They bake pies right nice, them little 
ovens. But when I want to use the 
range," she went on, "I always bake up 
on the grate. The bottom crust bakes 
better, and is never soggy or burned, if 
one bakes pies on the grate." 

"But *just right,' like the Little Wee 
Bear's porridge," lilted Dorothea. "My 
oven burns on the bottom something 
dreadful." 

"Get some little asbestos mats for your 
oven," advised the older woman quickly. 
"Or have you.?" 

"No-o-o," admitted Dorothea. "I 
mean to — but I keep forgetting. I'll 
surely buy some next time I am down 
town." 

"So do," said Aunt Anna succinctly. 
"You won't have half the trouble after 
that." 

The eyes of the younger woman went 
skimming over her recent recipe. "I can 
steam my pumpkin the day before," she 
mused. "If I have it ready, I can steam 



it while getting a meal, breakfast or 
supper, and save fuel. Or I can steam it 
over the flat-topped sitting room stove. 
There are several ways to waste fuel, 
aren't there.?" turning to her older neigh- 
bor. "And several ways to save." 

Aunt Anna nodded and Dorothea 
mused on: 

"After I have the pumpkin steamed 
tender, put it through a potato ricer. 
That is the easiest way to sift it. And 
scoop the pumpkin clear of the outer hull 
before putting it into the ricer, then the 
small holes will not become clogged with 
pumpkin rind, and bits of tough rind will 
not be found in the pumpkin pies — as it 
sometimes is, if a housewife is not pretty 
particular. Being particular — •" with a 
twinkling glance at her neighbor, who had 
taught her all these fine points in cook- 
ery — -"makes nicer pies. It pays to be 
particular," with satisfied accent. 

"It do," said Aunt Anna. 

"Now milk. I can use condensed if I 
want to — one-third milk and two-thirds 
water. . . . The ginger and salt and 
sugar and cornstarch I sift together and 
stir into a little of the milk to dissolve, 
and then add to the pumpkin. Jerry and 
I both like ginger in pumpkin pie. We 
surely do." 

"Then you can heap your teaspoons 
some," said Aunt Anna. 

"One needs to modify a recipe accord- 
ing to the family tastes, doesn't one.?" 
mused the younger woman. "I used to 
think a recipe was a sort of cut-and-dried 
thing. Dump all the ingredients to- 
gether, cook, and pour out a perfect 
product." She shook her head ruefully. 

"There are 'tricks to all trades,'" 
quoted her neighbor. "And I some- 
times think cooking has got more tricks 
to it than any one ever gives credit for 
being. Not only because people's tastes 
arc different, but the things one works 
with are so different. All kinds of quali- 
ties, and all kinds of conditions. Some- 
times a pumpkin Is dry-meated as meal, 
and sometimes as wet as water. . . . And 
eggs," meditatively. " I've seen two eggs 



PUMPKIN PIE! — HAVE A PIECE? 



99 



equal to three, many's the time. A 
pullet's tgg is always small. Not much 
more'n half-size. But we pay jes' the 
same for pullets' eggs as any. An egg 
is an egg.^^ 

"I guess it is," laughed Dorothea. 
"And pretty important these days, judg- 
ing by the price. That is why you use 
cornstarch, isn't it, to save on eggs.^" 

"Yes," said Mrs. Atwood, "and in 
most things you cook you can substitute 
a tablespoonful of cornstarch for one egg.'' 

"An item worth knowing," thought 
Dorothea. Then: "If I use beet sugar, 
shall I make my cup 'scant'.? " 

"Best not," answered her teacher. 
"Beet sugar, as a rule, is much coarser 
grained. A scant cup of a fine-grained 
sugar is equal in sweetening power to a 
full cup of a coarser-grained sugar. That's 
a thing many a housewife don't consider." 

"They forget about the amount of 
empty spaces surrounding lump things 
piled together," giggled the young house- 
wife, "even if the lumps are very tiny." 

"So tiny we call 'em grains," nodded 
her neighbor. 

And then, slipping off her high stool, 
"Did you ever eat powdered sugar 
candy, uncooked.?" queried Dorothea. 
"Talking about sugar made me think of 
it." 

"Not's I know of," answered Aunt 
Anna. 

"Then I'm going to bring you over 
some. Right away. I made it last 
night, for Jerry and me — • after the fire 
went out. . . . It's so easy. Like this. 
Aunt Anna. One cup of powdered sugar, 
and just enough condensed milk to wet 
it up a tiny bit. Just so it will pack 
together with a spoon, and just so a body 
can roll it out in the palms of the hands. 
Add a few drops of pineapple flavoring. 
Add a half walnut meat to each rolled- 
out sugar marble. Or, this way: Add 
an extra teaspoonful of the condensed 
milk and then stir in all the shredded 
cocoanut the candy will take up. Drop 
out on a buttered plate and let dry over 
night. It's splendid. But I'll bring you 



some. And Uncle Jonas has a * sweet 
tooth,' too. Good for him," laughed the 
little neighbor. "He will appreciate my 
candy." 

"We'll both appreciate your candy," 
twinkled Aunt Anna Atwood. "Uncle 
Jonas ain't the only one here as has a 
'sweet tooth.' " She nodded vigorously. 
And then: "My soul; make candy as 
easy as that, Mis' Dent! If you tell 
Jonas, he'll be making it his'self. Same's 
he sits here by the fire and pops corn 
evenings. Sometimes jes' to be doin', I 
do believe. But if we don't eat it all 
up — and mostly we don't — Jonas jes' 
slips down the garden walk and 'cross the 
alley and up the Hoskinses' back path, 
and taps light on the kitchen door of the 
Hoskins' home. Mis' Hoskins comes to 
the door. Jonas jes' pokes over a pan 
o' popped corn, and then hikes back 
home. There's two little people over 
there, besides Pa and Ma Hoskins, and 
Jonas usually pops enough corn for six." 

"I wonder if I haven't made enough 
candy for six," mused little Dorothea 
Dent, hurrying on her way home. "The 
Hoskins, of course. I ought to call, I 
never have. They're newcomers, too. 
And he has been sick so long, I hear, 
maybe it is hard making both ends meet. 
I wonder — wonder. I believe Jerry 
and I will run over there this evening, it 
wouldn't be anything more than just 
neighborly." And then Dorothea laughed 
gayly. "I declare," she admitted, "I 
believe the credit will belong to Aunt 
Anna. She's a regular inspiration — ^ so 
interested in folks herself. Just folks! 
I believe being interested in folks is Aunt 
Anna's hobby. . . . Anyway, I'm most 
awfully glad she was interested in w<?," 
decided the little bride. "If she had not 
been — " wryly, "I guess you would have 
hit a number of rocks in the road, Mrs. 
Dorothea Dent! Especially culinary 
rocks." 

With which Dorothea disappeared in 
her own brown cottage, and proceeded to 
investigate the condition of a platter of 
dainty white candy. 



The Fireless Picnic 

By Klea Alexander Thogerson 



THE Parent-Teachers Association 
had decided that, since the 
weather had turned so hot early 
in the spring, the picnic season was 
ripe, and the day for their annual affair 
was ready for the picking. Since the 
men were to come out from the city only 
early enough for supper on the grounds, 
the wives thought that they themselves, 
being most interested, should hold a 
special meeting to arrange the details. 
The Methodist Church ladies were to 
serve dinner to those who did not wish 
to be bothered by carrying a lunch, and 
the school would furnish the amuse- 
ments, fish pond and games. It all 
solved itself so simply that Mrs. Cook 
thought it almost lacked enthusiasm. 

Her family, together with the Allisons 
and Rogers, were planning to make a 
neighborhood affair of it. The ladies 
would go for the day in order to keep one 
eye on the children, using the other for 
their tatting. So, a few days before the 
event, the three ladies could be found on 
Mrs. Cook's porch, discussing the all- 
important menu for the evening meal. 
The lunch at noon would consist of as 
little as possible in order to insure an 
appetite for the supper, when the men 
should leave their cares in the city and 
find boyish pleasure in holding a drum- 
stick in one hand and a sandwich in the 
other. Mrs. Allison smilingly announced 
she would fry chicken in her fireless just 
to prove that, nowadays, preparing for 
a picnic did not mean such hours of labor 
as to rob the event of pleasure. Mrs. 
Cook took such pride in the cakes she 
had learned to turn out of her new fire- 
less that she at once declared her inten- 
tion of calling this a fireless picnic by 
taking one of her justly-famed cakes 
baked therein. 

Poor Mrs. Roger felt quite out of it 
because the potato salad she was to take 



could not live up to the fireless idea. 
But Mrs. Cook told her to make the 
salad the night before and after putting 
a small chunk of ice in her fireless, then to 
shut in her salad. In that way she 
could keep the onion smell out of the 
refrigerator and save time the morning 
of the eventful day. As they parted, 
the ladies agreed to keep the fireless idea 
a secret until the psychological moment, 
when, filled to repletion and completion, 
even the boys should refuse another 
helping. Then they would announce to 
their husbands what joys were these 
late additions to the domestic menage. 
As there is always a postscript to a 
woman's letter, so now was there one last 
conversation at the foot of the steps on the 
subject of what to wear. Common sense 
told them that the old, faded summer 
dresses were the things to wear, instead of 
new white skirts, but then, — you know 
one sees so many, at a place like that, that 
one never sees anywhere else! 

The morning of the great day dawned 
hot and clear, and with not a cloud to 
mar the sky of happiness, the various 
patrons found their way to the picnic 
grounds. Of course, the children met at 
the school and marched to the grounds 
headed by the band, but busy mothers 
found their way later to the park on the 
bank of the lazy stream dignified by the 
name of river. 

The neighborhood group in whom we 
are interested found benches far from the 
maddening crowd, where they visited with 
passing friends or tatted, pausing once 
in a while to tear off a coupon for the 
children, said coupon to be redeemed for 
a glass of lemonade from the communit}' 
barrel. So the day passed on, taking its 
toll of strength from each one, leaving in 
its wake the wish that the men might 
hurry so they could have supper and get 
the tired children home to bed. There 



100 



THE FIRELESS PICNIC 



101 



were other reasons for wishing the men 
would hurry, for ominous black clouds 
of regular picnic day variety were piling 
up in the west. The idea of going home 
was mentioned, but since the men could 
not be notified, it was decided that, as 
the crowd thinned, they w^ould gather 
with their belongings in the bandstand 
the musicians had vacated. 

As it grew near the time for the men to 
arrive, anxious wifely eyes watched the 
shaded pathway, now dusk because of 
the low clouds, hoping each moment to 
see the fathers approach. Finally they 
were to be seen hurrying along and when 
the group was assembled, there was a 
suggestion made by a timid soul that it 
might be better to go home and picnic 
on the Allisons' spacious porch. But 
some one finally said, "It's merely 
sprinkling. Why riot eat, since we're 
here.^" I am hoping for the sake of Mr. 
Cook's apoplectic nature that he will 
never learn the identity of the one 
who rashly suggested remaining in the 
bandstand. 

The tablecloth was spread, the appe- 
tizing food set forth with order and 
decency, as became a group of people 
who saw a bad storm settling down to a 
mere quiet drizzle. Mr. Roger had 
bought a pail of lemonade from the man 
who had been the high priest of the 
lemonade barrel. The ladies served the 
food until they saw that no one wanted 
for anything, and then with sighs of 
happiness filled their own plates and sat 
down, ready to appreciate to the utmost 
the bountiful feast provided. They were 
ready to enjoy it, but enjoy it they did 
not, for at that moment a single, low- 
swinging, viciously inclined cloud came 
darting out from the background of gloom 
and swooped uninvited down upon the 
scene, with such a gust of wind that there 
were actually white caps of weaves in the 
lemonade pail! No one had time to 
become seasick by watching them, for it 
was all hands to the rescue. Mrs. Cook 
plumped one foot on an escaping pile of 
paper napkins, pressed a knee against a 



ballooning corner of the tablecloth, hov- 
ered over the salad in a vain effort to 
prevent the flying dirt from giving it an 
appearance of being over-spiced. Mr. 
Allison was caught enjoying a piece of 
his wife's donation of fried chicken, and 
upon her frantic cry to hold down the 
cake, which had not yet been cut, he 
plunged the drumstick head on through 
the icing. He has wondered ever since 
why it is that a woman asks a man to do 
something for her and then seems to lack 
appreciation when he instantly does her 
bidding. 

Poor Mrs. Roger had a new Panam.;- 
hat. When she saw it cavorting about, 
daintily touching each and every article 
of food set forth, her simple faith saw 
therein a speedy punishment for her 
having worn a perfectly good hat to a 
picnic. The children hovered like birds 
in leafy boughs, trying to keep warm 
while the temperature dropped, dry 
while the slanting rain reached every 
corner of the bandstand, and gay, though 
they saw signs of a speedy end to their 
feasting. By heroic efforts, the food was 
hastily, and for the most part, safely 
stowed away in the baskets, and Mrs. 
Allison was prevailed upon to wrap 
herself in the tablecloth. Even that did 
not keep her from showing how chilled 
she was. But she strove valiantly not to 
add to the general discomfort by show- 
ing her feelings. Her husband noticed 
her shivering and said he thought hot 
coffee would be more appropriate than 
lemonade. Mr. Cook had been inwardly 
seething and at that he erupted, "Any 
fire enough to boil coffee would seem a 
blessing sent by a forgiving Providence 
to foolish mortals who would go to a 
picnic." If you will recall, Mr. Cook i.ad 
vowed he would not take time to go to 
this picnic when it was first mentioned. 
Mrs. Roger heard the word "fire," as she 
hovered there with her arms folded, 
trying to keep warm, and the word awoke 
her brain to action. "What was it about 
fire, anyhow.^ Oh, yes, fireless, that was 
it, fireless!" In the stress and hurry the 



102 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



other ladles seemed to have forgotten 
the happy little reminder to their hus- 
bands of how much they enjoyed their 
cookers, but not Mrs. Roger. Far be it 
from that dear, tactless soul ever to 
forget the right thing at the wrong 
moment! And smiling sweetly around 
at the glum faces of the men, who seeing 
the deluge now upon them, were thinking 
of croup, toothache and earache, each 
according to his family's weakness, she 
said, "Did you men know that this is a 
*fireless' picnic.'"' Mr. Cook opened 
his mouth to reply, but as Mrs. Roger 
continued talking he closed it again to 
keep warm. "Yes, almost everything 
here was cooked in the fireless." Seizing 
his opportunity, Mr. Cook showed him- 
self far from being extinct by saying. 



"Yes, fireless, I should say so, even the 
weather. I wish I had an old-fashioned 
kitchen range for about five minutes!" 
What more he might have said there is 
no telling, but just at that moment a 
capacious motor truck drew up beside 
the bandstand. On its windshield was 
the magic word "Service." A deep 
throated call of " Last trip to the car line " 
cleared the atmosphere as no sudden 
shower on a dusty day had ever done. 

Later on, watching the rainbow from 
her comfortable chair on the warm side 
of her porch, Mrs. Cook meditated thus, 
as she watched the clouds clearing like- 
wise from her husband's countenance, 
"No drownings, no broken bones, home 
safe and sound. But what a hornet's 
nest a tactless woman can stir up!" 



Time Thrift 

By Margaret Wheeler Ross 



I 



CANNOT understand," said Grace 
Murray, taking up her darning bag 
for an afternoon's visit with her 
friend Hilda Green, "why people do not 
preach time-thrift as zealously as they 
do money-thrift." 

"Yes, since time is money," answered 
Hilda. 

"It is perfectly true," went on Grace, 
as she pulled out a long black stocking 
and surveyed an ugly hole, "that the 
woman who will stint and grind in the 
most niggardly fashion in money matters 
will be absolutely improvident of her 
spare moments, and will thereby dissipate 
hours that might be turned to profit." 

"But most women," interrupted Hilda, 
as she tatted vigorously, "have not been 
trained in saving time, and after all, as is 
everything else, it is a matter of training." 

"That's the rub," assented Grace, "the 
mother who will teach penny-wise thrift 
to her children in finances will allow them 
to indulge in pound-foolishness when 
spending their time. That is the most 



difficult problem I have to meet in the 
rearing of my children. They chafe 
under the restrictions I place upon them, 
because so many of their playmates are 
totally undisciplined in time-thrift." 

"Well, certainly, you seem to have 
your domestic machinery under perfect 
control, for the regularity and serenity of 
your home life is the envy of most of the 
women in the neighborhood," put in 
Hilda. 

"That's the best sort of a compliment," 
replied Grace. "I'd rather my neighbors 
judged me a successful housekeeper than 
anything else." 

" I see I cannot flatter you," said Hilda, 
as she straightened a tangled thread. 

"Not at all," promptly answered 
Grace. "A woman who has as much to 
do as I, and I might add, who fails in so 
many attempts, is perfectly safe from the 
wiles of flattery. Indeed, she needs a 
little from the outside, and a good deal 
from the home circle properly to en- 
courage her. Perhaps," she continued 



TIME THRIFT 



103 



with a sly wink, "that is why, in certain 
directions, I seem to do well — ^you know 
how Jack and the children, to quote them, 
can hand out that jollying dope." 

"But seriously speaking," said Hilda, 
"here you are without money enough for 
a maid, doing the bulk of the drudgery 
in your home, and yet you seem to find 
a spare moment for a new book, a caller 
or a call; perhaps a party, and time for 
even such feminine nonsense as a bit 
of fancy work. Come now, give me your 
recipe." 

"Here it is — one magic word; and it 
is the secret of the success of every large 
business concern, system. Now the 
great enterprise confronting each one of 
us is the successful culmination of the 
individual life. It matters not where we 
are nor what we are doing, this victorious 
end is the aim of all. Though some 
women have better opportunities, more 
money, wider acquaintance, and greater 
genius than others, no one can conscien- 
tiously say she has less time than her 
sister. She may have more demands 
upon her share of time, but that should 
make her the more thrifty with its 
expenditure." 

"A time for ever>'thing, and every- 
thing on time, would be a good running 
mate for the old adage, wouldn't it.^" 
put in Hilda. 

"Yes, indeed," emphatically answered 
Grace, "for that would mean system. 
There is no work so nearly routine, and, 
therefore, so adaptable to regular division 
and assignment, as is housework. At 
the same time there is no form'of labor 
done with so little system. Now in my 
home I use the card index, just as a first- 
class business house would do. I have 
a list of the days of the week with regu- 
larly assigned employment for each day 
for all of us. Then the days are sub- 
divided into parts, and special duties 
allotted to each subdivision, then into 
hours with certain tasks for each hour. 
We all work on time, and the gain is 
astonishing, and I am sure you will 
admit that we do not seem to be rushed. 



nor mechanically stupid in our living." 

"To the contrary," replied Hilda, "you 
seem to have more leisure than most of 
us in the neighborhood, and you get more 
done with less hurry and rush." 

"Well, you see," went on Grace, "to 
start out on Monday morning with a 
well-planned week puts the reins of the 
domestic government at once into the 
housekeeper's hands. There is no waste 
of time in deciding what to do first, and 
the result is a successful journey to the 
Saturday night goal. If the children 
thoroughly understand what is expected 
of each one of them in doing their part — 
and they should have a part, there is then 
no loss of time in wrangling over which 
one shall do certain things, and besides, 
you can hold them individually respon- 
sible for the thing they fail to do, which 
you will admit is good discipline, and 
helpful in character development." 

"I begin to see now how you manage 
to get so much help from your children," 
put in Hilda. 

"Time-thrift; that's all," replied 
Grace. "I've seen too many homes 
where the rush begins in the morning 
when the children are hurried off to 
school with a hastily prepared and a 
half-eaten breakfast, and ends with the 
drawing of the curtains at bed-time on 
a scene of utter confusion and disorder, 
as the weary mother lies down, worn out 
in body and mind, a martyr to anarchism. 
It is just such domestic chaos Stevenson 
had in mind when he said: 'Into how 
many homes would not the note of the 
Monastery bell, dividing the day into 
manageable portions, bring peace of 
mind and healthy activity of the body!' " 

Grace paused, as she folded a neatly- 
darned pair of hose. 

"Go on," said Hilda, as her shuttle flew 
faster and faster, "I'm terribly interested, 
and it is all so businesslike." 

"When Iwas a bride," resumed Grace, 
"some one gave me a cookbook that had 
on the inside cover a dedication some- 
thing like this: 'To those plucky house- 
wives who master their work, instead of 



104 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



allowing it to master them.' I made up 
my mind then to be thrifty with my time, 
and to apportion it systematically, that 
I might be master, instead of slave to that 
grinding tyrant, Drudgery. It took me 
a good many years to work out my system 
satisfactorily, just as it does any business 
concern, and mine would not do for 
everybody, but I am satisfied that, funda- 
mentally, some form of card-index system 
could be adopted with profit in time- 
saving in every home, each housewife 
working out her own scheme in minor 
details." 

"I agree with you," said Hilda, "you 
have certainly put me to thinking along 
different lines." 

"Oh! there are so many small ways in 
which you can practice time-thrift," 
resumed Grace. "You can enlarge your 
speaking vocabulary by memorizing and 
defining words while you are making your 
toilet for the afternoon — keep a list 
pinned up on the dresser; and you can 
commit quotations and inspiring verses 
and hymns while you are making beds 
and dusting and washing dishes — that 
sort of housework does not require con- 
centration, and it keeps one from getting 
into careless mental habits, allowing the 
mind to be idle, or drift along on the 
petty affairs of life." 

"You'd be a lot happier, too," p)ut in 
Hilda, "you would not be pitying yourself 
so much, as you are apt to do when at 
the same old routine tasks." 

"Right you are," replied Grace. "And 
another thing, you can keep your needle 
work or the darning bag handy so you 
won't have to waste time while you visit 
with your friends," laughed Grace. 

"I'm going to take my doll rags and 
go home," pouted Hilda. 

"Not yet," replied Grace, "for I'm 
not through. You can keep, on the 
kitchen table, a magazine of current 
afi"airs, that you can look into while you 
wait for the kettle to boil, and the gems 
to brown ^- or burn," she laughed, "and 
then you'll know a few things about 
which you can talk intelligently to his 



Royal Highness at meal-times, and 
thereby retain his respect and admira- 
tion — ■ but, let me give you a note of 
warning, born of bitter experience, don't 
try to do any of these mental stunts when 
you are actually cooking — that is bak- 
ing, and the like, or the results might 
be disastrous." 

"Something might go in you couldn't 
take out, and vice versa," laughed Hilda. 

"Exactly," replied Grace, "for suc- 
cessful cooking really requires thought 
and concentration. But that, you know, 
is only one phase of housekeeping, and 
it, too, can be greatly simplified by time- 
thrift, — • planning ahead, and using up 
the odd moments in making things, for 
instance. I tell you," she solemnly con- 
tinued, "the live? of all those who have 
become truly great are testimonials to the 
value of time-thrift. They lived no 
longer than others, but they lived more 
wisely. Matthew Arnold accomplished 
his great work by using every minute in 
systematic routine, and he was a great 
man who did much drudgery. So also 
did Gladstone and Ruskin. Many of 
the best-known women in literature have 
done their share of drudgery, and have 
surmounted the obstacles over which 
the average woman falls by using the 
moments that their less systematic sisters 
waste." 

"Time-thrift," mused Hilda, toying 
with her shuttle, "those are, indeed, 
magic words." . - 

" I think so," replied Grace. " I tell you, 
if we will be thrifty in the disposition of 
our golden hours, we will reap the reward 
of well-regulated and wisely planned 
lives, and acquire that exquisite ease and 
perfect poise, that come only by orderly 
and tranquil living." 

"I've enjoyed this visit more than I 
can tell you," said Hilda, gathering up 
her things. "I feel I've learned a tremen- 
dous amount, and I'm going home and 
work out a card-index system for the 
house of Hilda Green and Company, and 
I'm going to adopt for our trade-mark 
the magic words, Time-Thrift." 



Varieties of Luncheons 

By Mary D. Chambers 

Author of "Principles of Food Preparation" and "A Guide to Laundry Work' 



LIKE breakfasts, there are many 
kinds of luncheons, but most of 
the varieties of this meal may be 
grouped under three heads: The busi- 
ness luncheon; the home luncheon; and 
the company luncheon. 

The Business Luncheon 

Too often this means a hearty noon 
meal, following a hurried breakfast. 
This full meal at noon, eaten in the noise 
and rush of a "Quick Lunch" restaurant 
or cafeteria, between a dash from the 
office, or store and another dash back, is 
not conducive either to health or effi- 
ciency. A dish of milk toast and a few 
figs; or a cream soup and a salad; or a 
baked potato with a stuffing of grated 
cheese and a little fresh fruit for top-off; 
or a glass of egg-malted milk and a 
cracker; or a bottle of kumiss or other 
form of fermented milk with a crusty 
roll; or any preferred combination of one 
or two simple, nutritious, and easily 
assimilated foods in such amount as to 
satisfy hunger without taxing digestion, 
would be a better kind of luncheon to fit 
in between a moderate breakfast, un- 
hurriedly enjoyed, and a good home 
dinner, when the cares of the day are 
done with. 

Somebody has said that the business 
man's lunch is responsible for the busi- 
ness man's early physical breakdown, and 
that unless this meal can be followed by a 
full thirty minutes of rest and idleness, 
it had better be cut out of the day's 
schedule. But any of the substitutes 
suggested above might take the place of 
the heartier and hastily bolted meal with 
much advantage to all persons in business 
or professional life — • or in school, shop 
or office — who have only a brief time for 
luncheon, and who have to work with ^ 
body or brain immediately after eating it. 



The Home Luncheon 

Where most of the family are absent at 
school or work, the housekeeper naturally 
plans for a labor-saving luncheon. There 
may, or may not be a soup, there will 
likely be cold meat, warmed-over pota- 
toes, a dish of canned fruit, bread and 
butter, cake and tea. This menu will be 
repeated without variation, other than 
cold mutton one day and cold beef the 
next, canned pears one day and canned 
peaches another, until the meal is often 
a depressing one, and is shirked whenever 
possible. 

Yet the home luncheon can be planned 
to be both labor-saving and appetizing. 
A good, nutritious soup, a salad, and a 
well-relished dessert, with the usual 
accessories of breadstuffs, etc., should 
furnish a delicious luncheon. Or any 
of the one-piece dishes, where meat and 
vegetables are cooked together, and a 
dessert of fruit, ought to make a palatable 
meal. Or one of the egg dishes, with one 
or more uncooked vegetables, and an 
easily-prepared dessert, would be another 
good luncheon for the home. In planning 
these luncheons three chief points should 
be kept in mind: (1) Select, so far as 
possible, vegetables and fruits which may 
be served without cooking. For most 
of us they are wholesomer uncooked, and 
to serA'e them in this way saves time and 
work. (2) Be forehanded enough * to 
double your recipe for breakfast muffins 
or biscuit — • perhaps you can sometimes 
bake half of it in a different form — for 
use at the luncheon of the next day but one^ 
when it can reappear either after heating 
in the oven a few minutes, or transformed 
into a shortcake, or in any disguise which 
will make it like an old friend with a new 
face. (3) Look up recipes that take only 
a short time to prepare, and that can be 



105 



106 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



cooked in the fireless, or by some slow and 
sure method where the dish takes care of 
itself, and will not be greatly hurt by a 
little more or a little less time in cooking. 

The Company Luncheon 

The company luncheon includes, at 
least, three distinct kinds. There is first 
the little home luncheon, small and early, 
but of extra good quality, to which the 
hostess invites a friend or two, and which 
she can serve without a maid. Next, 
there is a more elaborate luncheon, with 
a few extra courses, which calls for the 
services of a trained waitress, if not a 
skilful cook, besides whatever help the 
mistress herself may give in the prepara- 
tion of the dishes. Third, there is the 
highly formal company luncheon, long 
drawn out, and, many think, over- 
elaborated. This should never be at- 
tempted without the services of a trained 
corps of household help. 

The company luncheon may be served 
at any time from half-past twelve to two 
o'clock, and the more formal the luncheon 
the more it inclines to the later hour. A 
formal luncheon differs only a little from 
a formal dinner, but the slight differences 
between luncheon and dinner are quite 
as marked as those between breakfast and 
luncheon. At luncheon, the soup may 
be either hot or cold, like a cold fruit 
soup, or an iced or jellied bouillon. But 
whether hot or cold, and no matter what 
the variety of soup, it is for luncheon 
preferably served in bouillon cups, and 
eaten with bouillon spoons. The chief 
meat dish for luncheon is of the kind 
that may serve for a dinner entree, that 
is, something such as a fillet of beef, a 
fricandeau of veal, a planked steak or 
fowl, or an elaborate made dish, rather 
than the great joints or roasting pieces 
that are used for the main course of a 
dinner — though a roast joint often forms 
part of a luncheon in England. At 
luncheon, chocolate may be substituted 
for coffee, or a choice may be offered of 
chocolate, coffee or tea. The table- 
setting for luncheon is of a much more 



frilly and fanciful kind than for dinner, 
but lights are not used for decoration 
unless there is need of them for 
illumination. 

Women wear hats to luncheon, as they 
do at breakfast, and either handsome 
tailored suits or pretty dresses, which are 
not dinner dresses. Gloves may either 
be worn, or carried in the hand to the 
table. An English gentlewoman, who 
was companion for many years to a 
European Princess, told the writer that 
the Princess, on even very formal oc- 
casions, never put on her gloves for a 
luncheon, she carried them in her hand, 
through motives of economy. An excellent 
lesson for American Princesses. 

Discussion of the Three Kinds 
of Company Luncheon 

For the small and homey luncheon, 
where the hostess may have also to be 
cook and waitress, all that are needed to 
compose a dainty and appetizing meal are 
a soup, a meat dish with one vegetable, 
besides potatoes, a sweet dish, and a hot 
beverage. A salad may, or may not, be 
added. If the soup and the sweet are 
served cold, and can be prepared the day 
before or early in the morning of the day 
she entertains, the labor of immediate 
preparation will be very much lessened 
for the hostess. Sometimes the hostess 
cooks one or more dishes at the table, in 
a chafing dish, and this adds to the 
enjoyment of the party. 

The second, and more elaborate kind 
of luncheon, may begin with either fruit 
or shellfish; then a soup, served in 
bouillon cups, with either breadsticks or 
croutons; a fish course, which may be 
Crustacea, especially if fruit was sub- 
stituted for shellfish in the first course. 
After the fish will come the chief meat 
course; then the salad; a sweet course of 
pudding, jelly, or a frozen dish; the 
luncheon to conclude with bonbons, 
fruit and coffee. This is the most general 
sequence of courses for the formal com- 
pany luncheon, and is elaborate enough 
for almost any occasion. 



CAMPING AND CAMP-COOKING 



107 



The highly-elaborate luncheon will 
begin with either choice fruit, oysters or 
clams, or a salpicon or canapes. This 
will be followed by a soup of some kind; 
then fish; followed by an entree; then 
the meat course with one or two vegeta- 
bles; then a frozen punch, which precedes 
the game course, which is served with the 
salad; then the sweet course; and, lastly, 
bonbons, fruit and coffee. The following 
menu shows all the courses of 



An Elaborate Formal Luncheon 

Fruit Cocktail 

Oysters 

Clam Bouillon, garnished with Whipped Cream 

Olives Celery 

Broiled Smelts Hollandaise Sauce 

Timbales of Chicken and Spaghetti 

Grenadines of Beef, larded Mushroom Sauce 

Candied Sweet Potatoes Deviled Tomatoes 

Sweet Cider Frappe 

Broiled Squab Romaine Salad 

Pineapple Alousse Sponge Fingers 

Bonbons Salted Pecans Cluster Raisins 

Coffee 



Camping and Camp-Cooking 

By Kurt Heppe 



WITH the moose calling in the 
forest it is timely that we should 
turn our thoughts to camping 
and to camp-cooking. 

In this line we learn from the Indians. 
These, who are, practically, always camp- 
ing, have developed camp-cookery to a 
science. 

A couple of years ago we were out with 
a party in the Great Lakes region. We 
had one Indian guide and a carrier. The 
guide did the cooking and the carrier was 
all-round kitchenman. 

The members of the party had to 
hustle for provender, and each did this 
within his limitations. 

As we were traveling light, it fell to the 
guide to build the accommodations. 
This he invariably did with rare genius. 
He cut saplings and built a crude frame 
house, in the lee of the camp. The roof 
was covered with bark-strips, which the 
gentlemen of the party had to furnish. 

Bunks were made from bough-beds, 
with a thick mattress of dry grass. All 
the raw material the dude-members of 
the party had to gather, while the guide 
only attended to the craftsman execution. 

Where the campiire was, a deep hole 
was dug and lined with live embers. In 
this was set an earthen vessel, filled with 
alternate layers of cooked beans, wild 
onions and game or bacon. Birch bark 



was fitted into the top, and the regular 
cover was then put on. The pot was 
covered with live coals of hardwood 
chips, earth filled over the whole busi- 
ness, and the night-fire lit on top. 

This night-fire was another ingenious 
device. It was so set that the heat was 
reflected from a rock-wall, or screen, and 
the wood supply was self-feeding. This 
was achieved as follows: Two saplings 
were driven in the earth slanting back- 
wards. In front of these were placed two 
logs for fire-dogs. In front of the fire- 
dogs were two rocks that held the burn- 




A LEAN-TO OF POLES 



108 



AMERICAN COOKERY 







SELF-FEEDING xMGHT FIRE 

ing logs in place. One log was laid 
across the fire-dogs so it rested against 
the holding rocks. Behind this log, and 
ranging upward, on the slanting saplings, 
were other logs, one always on top of the 
other. As the lowermost log was con- 
sumed and fell between the fire-dogs, 
the next one slid in its place and so on, 
all the night through. 

This provided heat and was at the same 
time cooking the breakfast for the next 
morning. We were having only two 
meals those days, because we wanted to 
take full advantage of daylight. Those 
who went fishing did not want to be dis- 
turbed, and the hunters sometimes went 
quite far away from camp. 

Charlie, our cook, when in camp, 
amused himself with setting traps and 
sometimes brought in more provender 
than the hunters together. 

There were always several fires burn- 
ing, because he was a crank on embers. 
He did all his cooking in hot ashes 
and used a process of extremely slow 
cooking. But this process did produce 
wonderful food. Such corn bread we had 
never eaten before. He always bought a 
lot of dry corn, whenever we passed an 
Indian's homestead. He boiled the corn 
in water, with wood-ashes, and when the 
outer skin began to soften, he poured the 
corn on a large slab of stone and crushed it 
with another stone. It was then patted 
into flat cakes, wrapped in leaves and 
buried in embers. It took time to cook, 
but oh! boy, when it was ready! 



Fowl he drew, cut off the legs and 
heads and wrapped it in a paste of clay, 
about half an inch thick, which he 
sealed hermetically. This ball of clay 
was then buried in hot ashes and after 
two hours the roast was done. On 
cracking the clay the feathers came off 
with the clay and all the juices were in 
the flesh. It was deliciously tasty. 

From macerated acorns, with dried 
cherries and service berries, he made a sort 
of flat cake; also very good. 

Coffee he made by roasting the macer- 
ated acorns, and while it was not exactly 
"Biltmore" coffee, yet it made a very 
refreshing drink. 

Fish was baked in leaves in hot ashes, 
or else a pointed stick was thrust into its 
neck and the stick planted in the earth 
near the fire. In this way the fish was 
exposed to the heat of the fire and be- 
came gradually roasted; when it was done 
on one side, the stick was turned and the 
other side was set to the fire. 

Bread of wheat-dough was made the 
same way. A stiff dough was made and 
wound spirally around a pole. The pole 
was set in the earth in such wise that the 
bread baked first on one side and then, on 
turning the pole, it became done on the 
other side. 

As we often were away from settle- 
ments for a long time, he provided us 
with but.ter from hickory and filbert 
nuts. These he crushed and dropped into 
boiling water. The fat he skimmed off 




POT-HANGERS 



CAMPING AND CAMP-COOKING 



109 



and preserved in birch-bark basins. The 
nutmeats he later mixed with his roasts 
and breads, and the nutwater made a very 
refreshing drink. 

Of birch bark he peeled off the outer 
bark and used only the bast. This could 
be incised and bent just like cardboard. 
For basins he attached the outer rim to a 
hardwood holder and in this way made all 
kinds of utensils. The binding, the same 
as the binding of the bark-slabs of the 
roof, was done with bast-fiber. 

Ladles were made by fastening a round 
piece of bast on one end in a split stick. 
Spoons and forks were carved from hard- 
wood branches. 

When we were on short trips and had 
killed an animal, he would cut the 
paunch, trim out a large, square piece, 
fasten it between four sticks and then put 
in water, blood and meat, and by con- 
tinually immersing hot stones he pre- 
pared a very strengthening soup. The 
stones were heated in a fire some distance 
away from the hide, and, when hunters 
had been out all day, a hot meal was not to 
be despised. 

He also sometimes baked large fish on 
a board of hardwood, in a regular stone- 
chamber, which had been heated by 
having had hot embers in it. 

The game, when we were in camp, was 
always aged before being used. For this 
purpose it was cleaned and the diflFerent 
pieces wrapped in rushes, so that birds 
could not get at it. It was hung high 
up in the trees. 

Smoked fish was prepared by cutting 
it first in halves, then incising the meat 
down to the skin, so that the dry air could 
reach every part, and it was later hung up 
in the smoke. 




HEAT RADIATING BACK INTO TENT 

Meat was cut in very thin and long 
slices and these were first hung over 
scaffolds and later in the smoke. 

Roots', and even fruits and berries were 
dried and preserved. Charlie always had 
some kind of fruit for his cakes. On 
rainy days and on long marches these 
little attentions came in most agreeably. 

A number of times when we were canoe- 
ing and wanted to reach a certain destina- 
tion before dusk, we just had parched 
corn, which had been mixed with grease 
or nutfat. It was wonderfully sustaining. 
With that went a cold draught of acorn 
coffee. 

That the food was wholesome was 
evidenced by the fact that we were all 
gaining weight, notwithstanding the 
strenuous exercise we were undergoing. 

We white people would have starved 
amidst plenty, if it had not been for these 
ingenious redskins. They could find 
tree-fruits and earth-roots where no 
white man would have suspected food- 
substance. 

But the glory of all of Charlie's cook- 
ing was undoubtedly the bean-pot, from 
the bean-hole. Its contents we could 
eat every day and never get tired of it. 




110 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



AMERICAN COOKERY 

FORMERLY THE 

BOSTON COOKING- SCHOOL 
MAGAZINE 

OF 
Culinary Science and Domestic Economics 

Subscription $1.50 PER Year.Single Copies ISc 
Postage to Foreign Countries, 40c per Year 

TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The date stamped on the wrapper is the date 
on which your subscription expires; it is, also, an 
acknowledgment that a subscription, or a renewal 
of the same, has been received. 

Please renew on receipt of the colored blank 
enclosed for this purpose. 

In sending notice to renew a subscription or 
change of address, please give the old address 
as well as the new. 

In referring to an original entry, we must know 
the name as it was formerly given, together with 
the Post-office, County, State, -Post-office Box, 
or Street Number. 

Entered at Boston Post-office as Second-class Mattep 



The Call to Duty 

Let us now be up and doing — 

Faith renewing — 
For the world needs us today. 
In our hearts a bold endeavor 

Now and ever 
To press on for RIGHT alway. 

On all sides is mischief brewing, 

Sin accruing, — 
Loyalty to God and man 
Is assuming false proportions, 

Strange contortions, 
Founded on a selfish plan. 

All the world is seeking pleasure 

Without measure — 
If the cost be right or wrong. 
And the inner soul is stunted 

When confronted 
By the things for which hearts long. 

Let us herald for the story 

And the glory 
Of a life upright and true. 
Let us advocate clean living — 

Ever giving 
Thought to honor's point of view. 

Caroline E. Sumner. 



Every page of American Cookery 
bears matters of interest and profit to 
housekeepers. On account of its form 
and size it is easily handled and read. 



PAST AND PRESENT 

ONCE, as a people, we had more or 
less pleasant subjects of thought. 
These were matters pertaining to letters 
and history, science and art, recreation 
and travel. Even our politics barely pro- 
vided enough excitement to give zest to 
life. Today thrust upon our attention, 
in conspicuous headlines of the daily press, 
are tales of strikes and combines, profit- 
eering and grafting, propagandism, social- 
ism, sovietism, etc. Certainly these are 
not agreeable subjects of thought; they 
are indicative of the after-effects of war, 
and the widespread unrest of the times. 
Often it seems people are more united in 
their struggles for existence than in their 
days of peace and prosperity. 

"Now there are three qualities," says 
an eminent observer of men and events, 
"which are essential to success, and, con- 
sequently, to future happiness; viz., 
honesty, industry and thrift. Without 
these there can be no success that is en- 
titled to credit; with them there can be no 
failure that is subject to criticism." Suc- 
cess or power, individual or national, has 
its basis in character, in doing what is 
right. "Righteousness exalteth a nation; 
but sin is a reproach to any people." 

OUR DAILY BREAD 

O WHERE are the fifty thousand new 
subscribers who ought to be added 
to our family of readers.? Now, if ever, 
is the time when people are interested in 
thrift and economy, food and cookery, 
health and eflficiency. The relation of fit 
and wholesome food to individual and 
social well-being is just beginning to be 
fully comprehended and realized. "Tell 
me what you eat and I will tell you what 
you are" has national or world-wide sig- 
nificance. A shortage in a single essen- 
tial food-product upsets the world. The 
thing of first importance in the great prob- 
lem of living is to feed people. Our daily 
bread is ever the leading topic of this 
household publication. Would that some 
Laymen's League might put a copy of 



EDITORIALS 



111 



American Cookery into every home 
in America that could receive benefit from 
its perusal. We would appeal to house- 
keepers everywhere that now is the time 
to look well to the ways of your house- 
hold! Now is the time to subscribe 
for American Cookery! We wish to 
make American Cookery so useful and 
desirable to home-makers that old sub- 
scriptions will be cheerfully renewed and 
many new subscriptions will be added 
monthly to our list. 

A BUSINESS POINT OF VIEW 

AMERICAN COOKERY believes 
in scientific study and research, 
in progress and improvement in every 
form; at the same time it is of the opinion 
that the average housekeeper has to do 
chiefly with the results of the studies and 
researches of the scientists, rather than 
with their theories and formulas. The 
American kitchen is a private laboratory, 
the main object of which is the prepara- 
tion and serving of palatable and whole- 
some food to the several members of a 
household. 

The saying is trite : The oldest business 
in the world, the universal business of the 
world, is that of getting a living. The 
purpose of government and civilization, 
of commerce and industry, of art and 
invention, is to keep unbroken the pro- 
cession of human beings who, in a con- 
tinuous stream, travel the highway of 
life. To the end that life be made pos- 
sible and pleasant, the labor and ingenu- 
ity of mankind are exercised. It is to the 
general welfare that children be born of 
sound bodies and minds; that they be 
properly fed and their minds and bodies 
so developed that each can do his share 
of the world's work, when his turn comes. 

Surely the business of housekeeping is 
an undertaking of no mean order. It 
is fundamental, universal and vital to 
human well-being. In these days of 
change and stress, the subject of food has 
become of especial significance. As never 
before the nations of the earth are con- 
cerned in the production and distribution 



of food. The influence of conditions pre- 
vailing today is felt in every home and 
increases the duty and responsibility of 
every housewife in the land. Is not the 
American kitchen the last place to be 
disregarded; should not whatever con- 
tributes to efficiency of effort here be 
considered well-nigh indispensable.? The 
favor of a renewal of subscription to 
American Cookery, in every instance, 
will be thankfully received. 

ONE PERSON NOT TO BE PITIED — 
YOURSELF 

SELF-PITY is death to growth, to 
initiative, to success. The man who 
pities himself has no pity for any one else. 
Being constantly sorry for yourself con- 
duces to the development of an enormous 
egoism. A person whose sole thought is 
centered on himself discovers an amazing 
number of reasons why he should receive 
special consideration. He insists that 
others should recognize his claims to at- 
tention and favor, and when they are not 
forthcoming, he develops a deep-seated 
grouch. . And the man with a grouch 
is doomed to failure, humiliation and 
contempt. 

Make allowances for everything and 
everybody but yourself. Put yourself 
in the other fellow's shoes. When you 
discover how hard and in how many 
places they pinch, you will not condemn 
him so harshly for his sins of omission 
and commission, and it may dawn upon 
you that he is doing the best he can under 
difficult circumstances. 

When your shoes pinch, and you are 
inclined to ask to be excused from this, 
that and the other job, because of it — 
don't! Change your shoes, or take the 
pinch out of them in one way or another, 
but for your own sake, never let on that 
your feet hurt. Nobody is interested in 
your feet. Every man is thinking about 
his own. The man who expects and 
exacts special consideration may get it, 
under protest, but he gets something 
quite different, with usury, at the first 
opportunity. 



112 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



The average man resents being forced 
to consider another person's likes and 
dislikes, and there is no surer way to make 
him your enemy than to attempt to force 
him to pay honor and respect, and show- 
special favor where he does not consider 
it due nor deserved. — • a. j. s. 

THRIFT AND SAVING 

THRIFT is the expression of real 
patriotism in these days, just as it 
was in the period of the war. That warn- 
ing and appeal has just been issued to the 
American people by the National Asso- 
ciation of Credit Men in the form of a 
letter, directed from New York to each 
of its members. " The dance of industrial 
death in which the people of America are 
now participating should cease before 
they have to pay the piper," the appeal 
declares, in urging the American people 
to desist from their "rampage of ex- 
travagance." 

"The extravagance of our people since 
Armistice Day is one of those psychologi- 
cal phenomena to which man is subject. 
During the war we sacrificed gladly, but 
with the cessation of hostilities, the 
restrained feeling broke loose, and we went 
on a rampage of extravagance, such as 
never before has been exhibited in the land. 

"This nation is sound fundamentally, 
and this soundness will continue, if people 
will give up their folly, will become more 
diligent, will work as human beings should 
work, during a time of stress and strain. 
Thrift is, in our opinion, the expression 
of real patriotism in these days, just as 
it was in the period of the war. The 
people who spend recklessly are losing 
sight of the nation's traditions; Indeed, 
they are endangering our institutions, 
which some low spirits we are harboring 
are secretly plotting to destroy. 

"We should practise and preach con- 
stantly, declaring that, for ourselves, we 
shall do our best to stop this insanity and 
bring to a close the melodrama, of extrava- 
gance that Is casting fear Into the hearts 
of the people and producing results that 
are immoral and destructive. 



"Prices can be lowered by economies 
practised all along the line, if labor as 
well as capital will do Its part. 'Watch 
the price' has been our watchword for 
months. Here has been the chief danger 
point in. our situation and we welcome 
anything that will keep prices from soar- 
ing to a point from which violent reaction 
would inevitably bring on a sudden 
collapse In our structure." 

The stand taken by the National Asso- 
ciation of Credit Men on the economic 
situation has been previously expressed 
in co-operation with the campaign of the 
Savings Division of the Treasury Depart- 
ment, for it was realized that thrift and 
saving could not produce an adequate 
economic effect, unless the savings gained 
were safeguarded in safe and productive 
investments. Such investment is pro- 
vided by the savings securities of the 
government. War Savings Stamps and 
Treasury Savings Certificates, designed 
to obviate the mistaken policy of "sav- 
ing at the spigot and wasting at the 
bunghole." 

The annual copies of American 
Cookery can be preserved and used for 
reference. Specimen copies are sent upon 
request by card or otherwise. We wel- 
come as subscribers and readers those 
who want just the kind of publication 
we present. 

Adventure 

My little eager soul and I 

Went on adventurings. 

And always slipped my soul ahead; 

I could not catch her as she fled. 

The flagstones in the morning heat 

Were hot beneath my truant feet; 

And in the meadows wide, alas, 

There were sharp prickings in the grass. 

My body stumbled on afoot; 

My soul flew forth on wings. 

My little sated soul and I 

Came back from venturings. 

And always dragged my soul behind 

With tendrils 'round her dreams entwined. 

My weary body trudged ahead 

At thoughts of supper and of bed; 

But she forever turned her eyes 

Back to the glamor of the skies. 

Empty her mind of bread and milk 

And full of visionings. 

Helen Coale Crew. 




ICED COFFEE (See page 120) 

Seasonable-and-Tested Recipes 

By Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 

TN ALL recipes where flour is used, unless otherwise stated, the flour is measured after sifting- 

once. Where flour is measured by cups, the cup is filled with a spoon, and a level cupful 'is 

meant. A tablespoonful or a teaspoonful of any designated material is a LEVEL spoonful. In flour 

mixtures where yeast is called for, use bread flour; in all other flour mixtures, use cake or pastry flour. 



Minted Peas with Lettuce 

CHOP a half-cup of green mint, and 
put Into a saucepan with two 
heads of lettuce, sliced, two table- 
spoonfuls of onion juice, one quart of 
young peas, one-half a cup of stock or 
water, and seasoning to taste of salt and 
pepper. Cover saucepan closely, and 
cook for from twenty to thirty minutes, 
shaking the saucepan once in a while to 
prevent burning. When peas are tender 
stir in two tablespoonfuls of butter rubbed 
smooth with two tablespoonfuls of flour, 
and one cup of rich cream. Let the whole 
come to a boil and serve very hot. 

New Potatoes a la Baviere 

Slice four good-sized new potatoes, 
and arrange one-half of these In a casse- 
role, previously well greased. Over the 
potatoes arrange slices of hard-boiled 
egg; dot these with little bits of butter, 
and sprinkle with salt and paprika. Mix 
one cup of heavy cream with one table- 
spoonful of made mustard, and pour one- 



half of this over the potatoes. Add the 
remaining half of the potatoes, with 
sliced, hard-boiled eggs as before, butter 
and seasoning, and cover with the rest of 
the cream. Place over the top a layer of 
buttered crumbs mixed with grated hard 
cheese, and bake in a hot oven until the 
cream bubbles up through the crumbs. 

Delicious Cabbage 

Cook a four-pound head of firm white 
cabbage in boiling water until done. 
Drain, chop, season with two teaspoon- 




WATERMELON SALAD (See page 126) 



113 



114 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



fuls of salt and one-half a teaspoonful of 
pepper; add two tablespoonfuls of butter, 
one-fourth a cup of heavy cream, two 
beaten eggs, and two teaspoonfuls of 
vinegar. Stir all the ingredients well 
together, pour into a buttered baking 
dish, bake in a hot oven until the surface 
is a light brown, and serve while warm. 

Halibut Steaks with Lobster 
Sauce 

Have two halibut steaks cut an inch 
and a half in thickness. Lay thin 
slices of salt pork upon a fish-sheet. 
Place one of the steaks upon the pork. 
Have prepared a dressing made of one- 
half a cup of bread crumbs, one teaspoon- 
ful of chopped parsley, one small gherkin. 



add three tablespoonfuls of flour, one- 
half a teaspoonful of salt and one-eighth 
a teaspoonful of pepper; cook and stir 
until the mixture takes on a yellow 
appearance. Add one cup and one-half 
of milk, gradually, and stir constantly 
until the boiling point is reached. Draw 
to a cooler part of the range; add the 
lobster meat, cut into cubes, and let 
stand to heat thoroughly. 

Pressed Chicken 

Cover a five-pound fowl, cut in pieces, 
with boiling salted water, to which a 
slice of onion and a stalk of celery have 
been added. Let cook slowly until 
tender. Remove the skin and bones 
and return them in the broth to the 




HALIBUr STKAkS WITH LOBSTER SAUCE 



chopped, a few drops of onion juice, 
salt, pepper and one tablespoonful of 
melted butter; spread dressing on steak. 
Place the second steak on the dressing; 
season and lay slices of pork on the top. 
Bake thirty-five minutes, basting three 
times with butter melted in hot water. 
A few minutes before the fish is to be 
removed from the oven, remove the pork 
and cover the top with a cup of cracker 
crumbs that have been stirred into two 
tablespoonfuls of melted butter. Serve, 
when the crumbs are browned, with 

Lobster Sauce 

Melt three tablespoonfuls of butter 
in a small saucepan; when it bubbles, 



fire; let cook until the broth is reduced 
to two cups; strain and set aside to 
become cold. When the meat is cool 
enough to handle, cut into small bits. 
Remove the fat from the broth, reheat 
and stir the chicken into it. Pack 
this mixture while hot into a mould 
and let stand until cold and set. Serve 
with cucumbers and tomatoes sliced 
thin. 

Cucumbers Fried, ItaHan Fashion 

Cut the cucumbers into thin strips 
lengthwise, without removing the paring. 
Throw into ice water for a few minutes, 
until well chilled. Drain dry, place in 
frying-basket and fry in deep fat like 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



115 




PRESSED CHICKEN WITH CUCUMBERS AND TOMATOES 



potatoes. Before serving sprinkle with 
salt and pepper. 

Lamb Cutlets a la Soubise 

Wipe the chops with a damp cloth, 
to remove any bits of bone clinging to 
them. Scrape the flesh from the ribs 
of such as contain this bone. Broil on 
a hot, well-oiled broiler from six to ten 
minutes, according to thickness. Have 
ready a ring or mound of hot, mashed 
potato, and dispose the chops on the 
mound; pour a soubise sauce around the 
mound and dispose in the sauce as many 
browned onions as persons to serve. 
Cover the rib bones with paper frills. 

Soubise Sauce 

Slice four onions of medium size; add 
four sprigs of parsley and boiling water 
to cover, and let simmer until the onion 



is tender and the water reduced some- 
what, then remove the parsley and press 
the rest through a sieve. Prepare a cup 
of sauce, using milk, cream or broth as 
the liquid; add the onion puree and beat 
in two tablespoonfuls of butter with salt 
as needed. 

Browned Onions 

Butter a baking dish. Set the re- 
quired number of peeled onions in the 
dish and pour around them a cup of 
beef broth (dark in color); put in some 
left-over bits of cooked bacon or a 
tablespoonful of fine-chopped, raw, lean 
ham, sprinkle a little sugar on the top of 
each onion, and above this set a bit of 
butter; cover the whole with a buttered 
paper and let cook slowly until it is 
tender, and the liquid is reduced. It 
will take from one to two hours. This 




LAMB CUTLETS A LA SOUBISE 



116 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




ALMOND RING ROLLS 



be used in making 



liquid (strained) may 
the soubise sauce. 

Almond Ring Rolls 

Soften a cake of compressed yeast in 
one-fourth a cup of scalded-and-cooled 
milk; mix and add to one cup of milk, 
scalded-and-cooled. Stir in enough flour 
to make a batter; beat until smooth, and 
set aside to become light. Add yolks of 
three eggs, one-fourth a cup of sugar, 
one fourth a cup of melted butter, half a 
teaspoonful of salt and flour to make a 
dough that may be kneaded. Knead 
until smooth and elastic. Set aside to 
become double in bulk. When light 
divide into eighteen pieces of the same 
size; shape these into balls, place on the 
kneading board, cover and let stand to 
become light. Roll each ball into a 
rectangular-shape about one-fourth an 
inch thick; as soon as one is rolled spread 
with almond cream, then roll like a jelly 
roll. Join the ends to form a ring in the 
pan, slashing each roll in three places 
with scissors. Let stand to become 
light. Bake about twenty-five minutes. 

Almond Cream Filling 

Beat one-fourth a cup of butter to a 
cream; gradually beat in one-fourth a 



cup of almond paste, then one-fourth a 
cup of sugar and one egg. Use to spread 
the Almond Ring Rolls. 

Fried Summer Squash 

Pare and slice the squash. Beat two 
tablespoonfuls of milk into one egg; add 
salt and pepper to taste. Dip the slices 
of squash into the egg mixture, then into 
flour or fine bread crumbs. Fry in a 
spider. 

Blackberry Shortcakes 

Wash and drain about two baskets of 
choice, ripe blackberries; sprinkle over 
them from a cup and a half to two cups 
and a half of granulated sugar; mix,, 
crushing somewhat, and set aside at the 
back of the range to warm a little, not to 
cook. Sift together two cups of pastry 
flour, half a teaspoonful of salt, and two 
rounding teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 
With two knives cut in one-third a cup 
of shortening, then mix to a soft dough 
with milk. With the mixing knife turn 
the dough upon a floured board; turn it 
in the flour to become coated a little^ 
then knead slightly and roll into a sheet 
about three-fourths an inch thick, and 
cut into rounds. Bake about fifteen 
minutes. Pull the biscuits apart, and 




FRIED SUMMER SQUASH 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



117 




BLACKBERRY SHORTCAKES 



spread each half generously with creamed 
butter. Put berries between and above 
the halves of each biscuit, and serve at 
once. 

Peach Shortcake 

Prepare and bake a rich biscuit mix- 
ture as for strawberry shortcake. Spread 
one layer, well buttered, with pared 
peaches, sliced and mixed with sugar; 
set the second layer in place, and cover 
with more of the prepared peaches. Dis- 
pose halves of choice peaches around the 
edge, dredge them with sugar, then pipe 
a rosette of whipped cream in the hol- 
low of each half-peach. 

Ice Cream, LilHan Russell 

Heat one quart of milk, one cup of 
double cream, one cup of sugar, and one 
tablespoonful of vanilla to a lukewarm 
temperature, not over 100 deg. F. Add 
one Junket tablet, crushed and dissolved 
in a tablespoonful of cold water. Mix 
thoroughly, and let stand undisturbed in 



a warm room until the mixture jellies; 
then chill and freeze. Serve in halves of 
chilled muskmelon. Sprinkle powdered 
cinnamon over the top of the cream 
in each melon. 



)our 



C 



ream 



Pie 



1 cup sour cream 

^ cup chopped raisins 
f cup sugar 

2 egg-yolks 

a little cinnamon 



a little nutmeg 
a little cloves 
a rounding table- 
spoonful of flour 



Beat these ingredients together well 
and then cook in a double boiler until 
thick enough for a pie filling. Turn into 
a baked crust; cover with a meringue 
made of the two egg-whites. Place in 
oven long enough to brown and cook 
meringue. 

Raisin Pie, made the same way, using 
two-thirds a cup of unchopped raisins 
and one cup of water in place of sour 
cream and no spice, is fine. Of course, 
this has a meringue and is cooked and 
put into a baked crust like the other. 




ICE CREAM, LILLIAN RUSSELL 



118 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Apple Chutney 

Pare .and cut in quarters three dozen 
green apples (windfalls will do), peel and 
slice one dozen onions; and put through 
the food chopper three pounds of seeded 
raisins. Mix all together, and add to 
mixture two quarts of cider vinegar in 
which one-half a pound of salt and three 
pounds of sugar have been dissolved. 
(Molasses may be used instead of sugar.) 
Tie in a cheesecloth bag two ounces of 
mustard seed, four ounces of bird's-eye 
chilies, and two ounces of whole cloves, 
bruised. Boil the whole, until apples and 
onions are tender, and the color of the 
chutney is a rich brown. This will 
probably take three hours. 

Conserve of Mixed Fruits 

Pare and quarter a dozen peaches, six 
quinces, six pears, and two apples; and 



Freeze, and serve with a sauce made of 
syrup from preserved strawberries or 
raspberries. 

This recipe also makes a delicious 
summer drink, by first cooking the 
shredded pineapple in the water, strain- 
ing, and squeezing the juice from the pulp. 

Cucumber Jelly 

Pare and slice two or three large cu- 
cumbers, and cook, with one small sliced 
onion and seasoning of salt and white 
pepper, in two cups of water until soft. 
Sift through a colander, and add half an 
ounce of soaked gelatine. Arrange on the 
sides of small glasses some slices of fresh 
cucumber, by dipping each in the warm 
cucumber jelly, and placing against the 
sides of the glasses until the jelly hardens, 
then pour in the rest of the jelly, and when 
hard turn out the little molds on fresh 
lettuce and garnish with green mayon- 




CALIFORNIA ICEBERG LETTUCE 



cut into slices three lemons, removing the 
seeds. Pass all the fruit through the 
food chopper, and weigh. Allow three- 
fourths of a pound of sugar for every 
pound of fruit (the above mixture should 
weigh about six pounds), place fruit and 
sugar in alternate layers in a porcelain 
preserving kettle, and let stand overnight. 
Boil until mixture becomes very thick. 
Pack into sterile jars, and seal at once. 

Tutti Frutti Water Ice 

Mix with two cups (one pint can) of 
shredded pineapple, two cups of sugar, 
one cup of orange juice, one-half a cup of 
lemon juice and one quart of water. 



naise. Or the glasses may be sealed with 
paraffin, and stored all winter. 

California Iceberg Lettuce 
Served with Thousand 
Island Salad Dressing 

Put into a French dressing bottle half 
a cup of olive oil, the juice of half a lemon 
and half an orange, a teaspoonful of 
grated onion-pulp, one-fourth a tea- 
spoonful, each, of salt and paprika, one 
teaspoonful of Worcestershire sauce, one- 
fourth a teaspoonful of mustard and 
three sprigs of parsley, chopped fine; 
shake vigorously until well mixed, then 
pour over lettuce. 



SEASOXABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



119 







4 


^^i^ 


1 ^^BB 


•1i 


iri 


^^^^K 


n 


^^^ 


^ 


^ 


O^Eh^^^ja^l 


k^ 


^ ~-^^^^BHH 






'^^'.i^H^ 




^^Sj). 



RYE MUFFINS 



Rye Muffins 



Sift together one cup of rye flour, one 
cup of white flour, three teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder, one-fourth a cup of sugar, 
and one-half a teaspoonful of salt. 

Beat one egg; add one cup of milk, and 
stir in the dry ingredients; when thor- 
oughly mixed, add two tablespoonfuls of 
melted shortening and beat again. Dis- 
pose in a hot, well-oiled muffin pan. 
Bake about twenty-five minutes. 

Tapioca, Lakewood Style 

Stir two tablespoonfuls of minute 
tapioca into one pint of hot milk and let 
cook in a double boiler until transparent; 
beat the yolks of two eggs; add one-third 
a cup of sugar, one-half a teaspoonful of 
salt, and beat again; then stir into the 
tapioca; when cool add a few drops of 
vanilla, and pour into individual glass 
cups. 

Beat the two egg-whites with one 
tablespoonful of confectioners' sugar, and 



fold in the sifted pulp of two small 
bananas. Pipe this mixture on to the 
custard and grate bitter chocolate over it. 

Meringues with Banana 
Cream 

Beat the whites of four eggs dry; then 
gradually beat into them one cup and a 
half of granulated sugar. Fasten strips 
of paper on to hardwood boards an inch 
thick. Shape the meringues into oval 
shapes with two tablespoons or a pastry 
bag. Place the shapes an inch apart 
and dredge with granulated sugar; let 
bake in a cool oven nearly three-fourths 
of an hour. Increase the heat for the 
last ten minutes to color the tops of the 
meringues delicately. Remove them 
carefully from the baking board, press in 
the bottom of each and set them on a wire 
rack to dry. 

Peel three or four ripe bananas and 
rub them through a sieve; add a few 
drops of vanilla, then mix with one-third 




TAPIOCA, LAKEWOOD STYLE 



120 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




MERINGUES WITH BANANA CREAM 



a cup of whipped cream. Fill the mer- 
ingue shells, place two together, arrange 
on a plate and serv^e. Do not fill the 
shells until time to serve, as the mixture 
will soften the shells. 

Pistachio Layer Cake 

Layer Cake. Cream one cup and 
one-half of sugar with one-half a cup of 
butter. Add one-half a cup of milk, two 
cups of flour, sifted with two teaspoonfuls 
of baking powder and one-half a tea- 
spoonful of salt. Lastly, add the whites of 
three eggs, stiffly beaten. Bake in two pans. 

FilliJig for Cake. Grind through a nut- 
grinder one-half a cup of pistachio nuts, 
Tnix these with the well-beaten white of 
one Qg^ and as much powdered sugar as 



will make a paste that will not run, and 
spread over one of the layers, placing 
over it the other. 

Icing for Cake. To the beaten white of 
two eggs add one teaspoonful of extract, 
of almonds, and pow^dered sugar to make! 
of the desired thickness. Color a deli- 
cate green with spinach juice, and apply 
to both top and sides of the cake. Deco- 
rate with candied violets or rose leaves. 

Iced Coffee 

Pour fresh-made coffee into large 
glasses, each containing one tablespoon- 
ful of cream and a generous amount of, 
cracked ice. Garnish each service w'lXX 
whipped cream. Serve with or wdthoul 
powdered sugar. (See page 113.) 




INGREDIENTS FOR THOUSAND ISLAND SALAD DRESSING 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



121 



Currant Cup 

AN ENGLISH GARDEN-PARTY DRINK 

This delicious drink is made of a mix- 
ture of one quart of strong coffee, one 
quart of Ceylon tea, and one quart of 
rich raspberry syrup. One pound of 
sugar, boiled until dissolved in one-half 
pint of water, is added, and the mixture 
is cooled, served in glasses half-iilled with 
crushed ice, and garnished with candied 
rose leaves. 

It also makes an excellent sherbet when 
frozen. 

Mint Jelly 

Pack solid, one cup of fresh mint 
leaves; add one cup of boiling water, 
cover, and let steep in a double boiler, 
or on the back of the stove for an hour. 
Meantime prepare two quarts of apple 
juice, as you would for making apple 
jelly, by cooking two quarts of chopped- 
up green apples until tender in the same 
quantity of water, and draining through 
a jelly bag. Add to this the liquid from 
the mint leaves, and the juice from the 
leaves themselves, wrung out through 
cheesecloth. Then proceed, as in making 
apple jelly. A trace of spinach juice or 
green vegetable coloring matter may be 
added the last thing before pouring into 
the glasses. This jelly makes a pretty 
garnish for cold meats, for roast lamb, 
fish or salads. 

Mock Mangoes, Pickled 

Cut a section from the side of each of 
a dozen young, green melons, and scoop 
out the seeds. Fill each cavity with a 
good spoonful of the following mixture: 
One cup of English mustard seed, one 
cup of scraped horseradish, one table- 
spoonful, each, of celery seed, ground 
mustard, chopped garlic, and sugar. 
Pound the mixture in a mortar, moisten 
with olive oil, add a dozen whole pepper- 
corns and two teaspoonfuls, each, of 
ground mace and nutmeg. When the 
cavities have been filled, replace the sec- 
tion cut off, and tie up each melon with 



strong thread. Lay in strong brine for 
three days, then pack in a deep stone jar 
and cover with boiling vinegar. After 
two days drain off the vinegar, boil, and 
pour over the melons again; repeat this 
process after an interval of two days 
more, then cover the jar and set away in 
a cool and very dry place. The melons 
will not be fit to use for mock mangoes 
for three or four months, but should then 
be ver>' fine. This pickle will keep for 
many years. 

Pickled Young Carrots 

Use very small carrots — the kind 
pulled out to thin the rows will do nicely 
— and boil in salted water until tender. 
These little carrots need not be scraped, 
only scrubbed with a brush and the heads 
and tails cut off. Measure the carrots, 
and for every two quarts allow one pint 
of cider vinegar, boiled for fifteen min- 
utes with one cup of sugar, and one 
ounce of mixed pickling spice, tied loosely 
in cheesecloth. Remove spices, add car- 
rots, boil ten minutes longer, and put 
into sterile jars. If the vinegar boils 
away, the quantity should be replenished. 

"Best Ever Pickle'* 



7 pk. of ripe tomatoes 
3 ripe peppers 
3 green peppers 
Big bunch celery (cut 
into small bits) 



10 cents' worth white 
mustard seed 

Tablespoonful ground 
biack pepper 

I cup salt 
1^ cups vinegar 

Cut up the vegetables and add the 
seasoning mixed with vinegar; pour over 
them. 

This keeps fine. Does not have to be 
cooked. 

Gooseberry Jelly 

Cook the berries until tender in water in 
the proportion of one cup and one-half 
to every pound of berries. When the 
fruit is quite tender and broken drain off 
the liquid, and boil with an equal volume 
of sugar until it jells. This jelly can be 
made from either the green or the red 
gooseberries. The green gooseberry jelly 
should be light colored and transparent, the 
red is a good substitute for guava jelly. 



Seasonable Menus for Week in August 



Breakfast 

Berries Buttered Toast 

Salt Codfish in Cream Sauce 

Baked Potatoes Coffee 

Dinner 

Roast Chicken Riced Potato 

Green Corn Custard, Currant Jelly 

California Iceberg Lettuce with 

Thousand Island Salad Dressing 

Sliced Peaches, Cream 

Little Cakes 

Half Cups of Coffee 

Luncheon 

Baked Apples Buttered Crackers 
Whole Milk Cottage Cheese 



Breakfast 

Wheatena, Thin Cream Prunes 

Poached Eggs on Toast 

Waffles Coffee 



Luncheon 

Chicken Souffle, Tomato Sauce 
Iced Coffee Coffee Rolls 



Dinner 

Broiled Mackerel Pickled Beets 

Lima Beans Boiled Potatoes 

Corn on Cob 

Apple Pie Cheese 



Breakfast 

Boiled Rice, Cream 



Broiled Bacon 
Corn Muffins 



Dates 
Potatoes in Milk 
Coffee 



Luncheon 

Eggs Benedictine Endive 

Rye Bread 

Iced Tea Sponge Cake 



Dinner 

Roast Fillet of Veal Boiled Potatoes 

Green Peas Spiced Currants 

Apple Salad 

Ice Cream Sandwiches Coffee 



Breakfast 

Popovers Raspberries 

Quaker Oats, Top Milk 

Boiled Eggs Doughnuts 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Succotash Pulled Bread 

Cucumber Salad 

Crackers Cream Cheese Currant Jam 



Dinner 

Cream of Corn Soup 

Veal Sweetbreads Eggplant Fritters 

Lettuce and Tomato Salad 

Pear Meringue Half Cups of Coffee 



Breakfast 

Cantaloupe Melons French Omelet 

Creamed Potatoes 
Rye Muffins Coffee 



Luncheon 

Green Corn Chowder, Toasted Crackers 
Philadelphia Butter Buns Cocoa 



Dinner 

Cold Roast Veal, Sliced Thin Corn Fritters 

Suanmer Squash Potato Salad 

Blackberry Shortcake 

Iced Tea 



Breakfast 

Salt Codfish Cakes, Graham Muffins 

Baked Apples, Cream 

Fried Cereal (Cream of Wheat) 

Coffee or Cocoa 

Luncheon 

Corn on Cob Macaroni and Cheese 

Pineapple Salad Iced Tea 

Dinner 

Baked Halibut Steaks, Lobster Sauce 

Boiled Potatoes 

Stringless Beans, Escarole, French Dressing 

Peach Pie 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Barley Crystals Blackberries 

Broiled Ham Eggs 

Baked Potatoes 

Graham Bread Toast 

Coffee or Cocoa 



Luncheon 

Stewed Lima Beans 

Baking Powder Biscuits 

Sliced Tomatoes 

Raspberry Jello, Sponge Cake 

Chocolate 

122 



Dinner 

Boiled Leg of Lamb, Drawn 

Butter 

Sauce with Nasturtium Seeds 

Mashed Turnips, Riced Potatoes 

Lettuce-and-Peppergrass Salad 

Blushing Apples, Orange Sauce 

Tea 



Seasonable Menus for Week in September 





Breakfast 




Breakfast 


Watermelon 




Peaches 


Quaker Oats Toast 




Barley Crystals, Top Milk 


Broiled Bacon 




Creamed Dried Beef Toast 


Baked Potatoes 




Almond Ring Rolls Coffee or Cocoa 


Delicate Muffins 






Coffee or Cocoa 




Dinner 




Fried Chicken, Corn Fritters 


Luncheon 




Summer Squash Sweet Pickled Pears 


Cream Celery au Gratin 


Tomatoes, French Dressing 


Popovers 


Xfi 


Peach Ice Cream 


Grapes Tea 


> 


Half Cups of Coffee Little Cakes 






Dinner 




Luncheon 


Cream-of-Corn Soup 
Broiled Lamb Chops 




Welsh Rabbit, Toasted Crackers 


Scalloped Tomatoes 




Lettuce-and-Pineapple Salad 


French Fried Potatoes Celery Hearts 




Tea 


Apple Pie Coffee 





Breakfast 

Melons 

Cream of Wheat Yeast Rolls 

Fried Oysters 

Coffee or Cocoa 

Luncheon 

Omelet with Creamed Peas 

Brown Bread 

Blackberries Tea 



Broiled Hamburg Steak 

Potatoes, Maitre d'Hotel 

Boiled Onions, Cream Sauce 

Tomatoes, Mayonnaise 

Peach Sherbet Cake 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Cereal, Thin Cream 

Baked Apples 

Scrambled Eggs Corn Bread 

Coffee or Cocoa 

Luncheon 

Oyster Stew, Small Crackers 

Cottage Pudding, Blackberry Sauce 

Iced Tea 

Dinner 

Veal Balls with Macaroni, Casserole 

Lettuce and Celery, French Dressing 

Steamed Blackberry Pudding 

Hard Sauce 

Half Cups Coffee 



Breakfast 

' Berries 

Green-Corn Griddlecakes 

Eggs in Shell 

Toast Coffee or Cocoa 

Luncheon 

Cream of Lima Bean Soup 

Sliced Peaches, Baking Powder Biscuit 

Tea 

Dinner 

Broiled Schrod Delmonico Potatoes 

Shredded Raw Cabbage, Boiled Dressing 

Green Peas 

Peach Pie 

Coffee or Tea 



Breakfast 

Broiled Fish French Fried Potatoes 

Parker Hguse Rolls 

Sliced Peaches Coffee or Cocoa 

Luncheon 

Shell Beans (boiled) 

Rye Bread 

Celery-and-Apple Salad 

Hot Chocolate 



Dinner 

Broiled Swordfish Creamed Potatoes 

Cabbage au Gratin Boiled Beets 

Peach Shortcake 

Iced Tea 



Breakfast 

Stewed Peaches 

White Mountain Muffins 

Corn Beef Hash New Pickles 

Coffee or Cocoa 



Luncheon 

Broiled Tripe, with 

Bechamel Sauce 

Rye Rolls 

Gingerbread Cocoa 

123 



Broiled Beef-teak 

Stringless Beans 

Baked Sweet Potatoes 

Celery Salad 

Baked Apple Tapioca Pudding 

Iced Tea 



Company Touches for the Summer Hostess 

By May Belle Brooks 



HOT weather is no time for visiting — 
yet most of it is done during July 
and August, doubtless because that is the 
vacation season. Especially does the 
combination of company and the dog 
days find little acclaim from the woman 
who does her own work. The solution 
for her lies in simple service and easily- 
prepared meals. Elaborate dishes that 
leave their mark upon the hostess are in 
bad taste, no matter how tasteful they 
may prove to the palate, for most of us 
would prefer an underdone roast, to an 
overdone cook. 

Avoid, above all things, overloading the 
table. It is no longer a compliment to 
the hostess to say that her table "groaned 
under the weight of good things," as the 
country papers used to put it. Three or 
four well-cooked and tastefully-served 
dishes is the epitome of hospitality these 
days. 

It is natural, to be sure, for one to 
wish to add an extra touch out of compli- 
ment to the guest, but that may be 
accomplished without undue effort. An 
unusual garnish, or a new form, which 
the commonplace food may be made to 
assume, will achieve the result desired. 
Such a simple thing as passing a dish of 
grated cheese with a cream soup is a 
touch extraordinary. Equally so is a 
slice of lemon in the bouillon or clear soup, 
or cooking some a-b-c noodles in the 
same. In some cases, a spoonful of 
whipped cream is all that is needed to 
grace the commonplace. 



It is now the fashion in many homes to 
serve ' aspics in place of soup in warm 
weather. This is nothing more than a 
highly-seasoned soup added to gelatine 
and chilled. 

Garnish the meat sometimes with 
nasturtium blooms or leaves, or wild 
mustard blossoms instead of the con- 
ventional parsley. If you wish your 
roast to be distinctive, sprinkle a quan- 
tity of caraway seeds over it before 
roasting. Canned salmon or tuna fish 
become really attractive by combining 
them with cracker crumbs, an egg or two, 
some minced parsley and a few drops of 
lemon juice and molding into small balls. 
Fry in deep fat and garnish with tiny 
triangles of buttered toast sprinkled with 
minced parsley or cress. 

Plain mashed potatoes become aristo- 
cratic, served in the following manner: 
Put a layer of the potato in a large tureen ; 
add whatever creamed vegetable may be 
on your menu, such as peas, Lima beans, 
young carrots, even onions, and cover 
with the remainder of the potato. Dec- 
orate the top with slices of hard-cooked 
eggs and bits of pimiento or green pepper. 
This saves labor, for you have two dishes 
served and garnished as one. 

Cooking some things that are usually 
served raw adds novelty. Young green 
onions, for instance, are lifted out of the 
commonplace by being boiled in salted 
water and served on toast, like asparagus, 
with a butter dressing or cream sauce. 
Then there are creamed cucumbers or 



124 



NEW SALADS FOR SUMMER DAYS 



125 



cucumbers stuffed with a forcemeat and 
baked. Creamed radishes, too, are de- 
h'cious, if not too old and pungent. 

Jellied potato salad is cooling. To 
make it, pour over about a pint of the 
usual salad one pint of hot bouillon in 
which one tablespoonful of gelatine has 
been dissolved. 

Nothing is more suitable for a dinner 
salad than crisp lettuce with a French 
dressing of oil and vinegar. To dress it 
up for company, sprinkle grated cheese 
over the top. Or, omit the dressing and 
pass, instead, a mayonnaise, mixed with 
tomato catsup. 

An easily prepared supper dish would 
be boiled ham, cut into rounds with the 
biscuit cutter, and heaped with potato 
salad, sprinkled with dill pickle run 
through the food chopper. 

Chop suey is not difficult to make and 
the novelty will appeal to many. For 
six persons, put a tablespoonful of fat 
in the skillet and drop in it one pound, 
each, of veal and pork (or chicken and 
beef) cut into small pieces. When well 
browned, add two cups of water, two 
cups, each, of chopped celery and onions, 
two tablespoonfuls of New Orleans mo- 
lasses and the same of chop suey or 
oriental sauce (which may be obtained 
from any large grocery). Add more 
sauce, if liked, and thicken at the end of 
ten minutes with a little flour or corn- 
starch. This dish is good even without 
the oriental touch, and all that is needed 
to complete the meal is plain boiled rice, 
served in little individual bowls, and tea. 
If a dessert be desirable, nothing could 
be more appropriate than chop-suey 
sundae, which is plain vanilla ice cream 
covered with a sauce of chopped figs, 



dates, raisins and a bit of candied ginger 
cooked in a thick syrup. If ice cream 
be out of the question, use whipped 
cream, and add the fruits minus the 
syrup. Whipped cream is one of the 
best aids to the busy hostess, and it 
would be wise for her to include in her 
emergency supplies a bottle of a liquid 
that is now on the market for making 
thin cream whip. 

A very pretty dessert that suggests a 
poached egg on toast is quickly put to- 
gether. It consists of a halved peach 
inverted on a slice of sponge cake with 
whipped cream piled all around it. 

For a heavy luncheon dessert. Banana 
Sandwich will not be an arduous under- 
taking. Have a cold boiled custard 
ready and slice a banana in halves length- 
wise. Spread some thick jam or stewed 
fruit between the halves and cover gen- 
erously with the custard. • Place a mer- 
ingue of the whites of the eggs and sugar 
over the top, or use whipped cream. A 
few nuts or candied cherries will add to 
its attractiveness and food value, without 
in the least overtaxing the cook. 

If you are planning to have a plain 
gelatine with orange flavor, try molding 
it in orange shells, and at serving time 
cut into sections, peeling and all, keeping 
them intact at the base. Heap whipped 
cream or custard in the center. Another 
way to serve a plain gelatine is on a slice 
of pineapple. 

But after all, the simplest things are 
always the daintiest. No hostess need 
feci abashed to offer her guests a collec- 
tion of choice fruits, such as neat quarters 
of oranges, plump grapes, candied cherries 
and whole nut meats, arranged in separate 
groups on a pretty plate. 



New Salads for Summer Days 

By Alice Urquhart Fewell 



THERE are few things more refresh- 
ing, both to the sight and the appe- 
tite, than a green salad, served crisp and 



cold on a hot day. Salads, especially 
those composed of fruit and vegetables, 
should play a leading role in the summer 



126 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



menu. An attractive salad, together 
with iced tea and crackers or cheese 
straws, makes an acceptable luncheon 
menu for the warm days of summer. 

Salads are composed of green plants, 
such as lettuce, celery and water cress, 
combined with various forms of vegeta- 
bles, fruits or meats. These salad plants 
contain little nutriment, but they possess 
very valuable mineral salts, are cooling, 
slightly stimulating to the appetite, and 
give bulk to the food. The oil that 
forms a large part of nearly all salad 
dressings gives nutriment, which the 
salad plants lack. 

Salads of all kinds should be served 
cold and crisp. Lettuce must be washed 
thoroughly, drained, and allowed to dry 
by patting it between the folds of a towel. 
Lettuce may be chilled in ice water, or 
by folding in a towel and allowing it to 
remain on the ice until serving time. 
Salads should not be combined until just 
before serving. The various ingredients 
may be prepared, and chilled ready for 
the final mixing. 

Garnishing is a detail, but an important 
one, for on the garnishing depends the 
attractive appearance of the salad. Let- 
tuce, parsley, celery, celery leaves, rad- 
ishes, olives, nuts, red and green peppers, 
hard-boiled eggs, lemons and capers are 
all used to garnish salads. The arrange- 
ment and combination with various 
salads is a matter for individual taste. 

The dressing is an important part of 
every salad, and the success of many 
salads depends largely on the choice of a 
suitable dressing. French dressing is 
used for a variety of salads. It makes 
a good combination with lettuce served 
alone, with tomatoes, and other vegetable 
salads, and with some fruit salads, such 
as orange, banana or pear salad. French 
dressing is also used to marinate meat and 
fish salads. The marinating is accom- 
plished by mixing the dressing with the 
meat or fish, which has been cut in dice, 
and allowing the whole to stand until well 
seasoned. Salads, made in this way, are 
usually served with mayonnaise or boiled 



dressing. Mayonnaise is used in com- 
bination with tomatoes, fish, meat, 
chicken, etc. Boiled dressing may be 
used in much the same manner, and also 
combined with potato and fruit salads. 
Cream dressing Is most acceptable when 
served with fruit salads, and makes the 
best dressing for this kind of salad. The 
dressing, except in the case of marinating, 
should be added to the salad just before 
it is served, as it tends to wilt lettuce and 
other greens when allowed to stand in 
combination with them. Salads are gar- 
nished after the dressing is added. 

Watermelon Salad 

Chill a watermelon, cut in halves, and 
with a French potato cutter scoop out 
balls from the melon. The seeds should 
be avoided in cutting out the balls. 
Arrange on crisp lettuce leaves, and serve 
with French dressing or cream dressing. 
This is a very attractive^ looking salad, 
and most acceptable on a warm day. 

Marshmallow Salad 

Mix equal parts of marshmallows and 
canned pineapple, both cut In small cubes. 
Serve on lettuce leaves with cream dress- 
ing, and garnish with maraschino 
cherries. Some of the cherries may be 
cut in halves and mixed In with the salad, 
and this method gives an attractive com- 
bination of color. 

Frozen Fruit Salad 

Mix equal parts of bananas, oranges, 
white grapes, and pineapple, cut In small 
pieces. Add walnut meats, broken in 
small pieces, and mix the whole well with 
cream dressing. Turn into an ice cream 
freezer, pack in salt and ice, and freeze to 
a mush. The dasher and crank should 
not be used In the freezer, but the mixture 
stirred occasionally while freezing with 
a long-handled spoon or wooden paddle. 
Serve on crisp lettuce leaves, and garnish 
with maraschino cherries. Various other 
combinations of fruit may be used, as 
strawberries, pears, cherries, etc. This 
salad is very attractive if served in 



NEW SALADS FOR SUMMER DAYS 



127 



chilled cantaloupes, which have been cut 
in halves crosswise. 

Spinach Salad 

Boil spinach until tender, drain, and 
chop fine or rub through a sieve. Add a 
little chopped onion, and mix well with 
French dressing, chill and serve on lettuce 
leaves with mayonnaise dressing, and 
garnish with hard-cooked eggs cut in thin 
slices, or with slices of lemon. Lettuce 
may be boiled and served in the same way. 
This is an economical method of using the 
large outside leaves from a head of lettuce, 
which are too often thrown away. 

Lettuce-and-Bacon Salad 

Fry strips of bacon until crisp; drain 
on paper, and allow to cool. Break or 
cut the bacon into small pieces and mix 
it with shredded lettuce. Serve on 
lettuce leaves with French dressing. 
Garnish with radishes or olives. 

Beet-and-Potato Salad 

Mix equal parts of cold boiled potatoes 
and beets, serve on lettuce leaves with 
boiled dressing. The potatoes and beets 
should be cut into small cubes. 

Macaroni Salad 

Boil large macaroni until tender, drain, 
and allow to cool. With a pair of scissors, 
cut the pieces of macaroni into small 
slices, forming little rings. Marinate 
well with French dressing, to which 
chopped onion has been added, and serve 
on lettuce leaves. This salad may be 



garnished with red and green peppers, 
or paprika may be sprinkled generously 
over the macaroni. 

Crab Cocktail Salad 

Shred crab meat, chill and serve on 
lettuce leaves with the following cocktail 
dressing: 



2 tablespoonfuls to- 
mato catsup 
2 tablespoonfuls water 
1 tablespoonful lemon 
juice 



5 drops Tobasco 
sauce 

Salt 

1 teaspoonful Worces- 
tershire sauce 



Mix all together and serve as dressing 
for crab salad. Shrimps or lobster may 
be served in the same way. 

Plum Pudding Salad 

Mix equal parts of candied cherries, 
candied pineapple and candied orange 
peel, all cut in fine pieces. Add Sultana 
raisins, cut in halves, crystalized ginger, 
cut fine, and walnut meats broken in 
small pieces. Mix with cream dressing, 
and serve very cold on lettuce leaves. 

The following menu for a "Salad 
Luncheon" is one in which each course is 
served in the form of a salad. It is ideal 
for a summer luncheon. All the recipes 
in the menu will be found above. 

Salad Luncheon 

Shrimp Cocktail Salad 

Lettuce-and-Bacon Salad 

Spinach Salad Macaroni Salad 

Frozen Fruit Salad 

The menu above, when served with 
iced tea, cheese straws and hot rolls, 
forms a very well-balanced meal. 



Tw^ilight Pines 



I hear within the twilight pines 
The murmur of a distant sea, 

The voices of the waters far 
Around the Isles of Memory. 

I see the golden twilight creep 
Unheard across a silver bar, 

And at the verge of sky and deep 
The beauty of the dusk's first star. 



And then where headlands ever fling 
Defiant challenge to the sea 

I watch with wistful heart and thought 
A beacon light burn mellowly. 

To listening hearts. O twilight pines, 
You sing of love that is to be, 

Or of a light upon the shore — 
The love that is a memory! 

Arthur Wallace Peach. 



Contributions to this department will be gladly received. Accepted items will be 
paid for at reasonable rates. 



A New Thought on the 
Help Situation 

ONE woman who had been accus- 
tomed to keeping good help, and 
who found a reasonable amount of assist- 
ance an absolute necessity, for the reason 
that she is a professional woman, was 
unable to find any one to give the regular 
service of other days. 

It was possible to send the laundry out, 
to have simple meals, part of the time at 
least, and to take some meals in public 
eating places; but a couple of aged mem- 
bers of the family called for a well-kept 
home — and that was where the trouble 
lay. 

Every effort to obtain a regular maid 
proved futile. Even women by the day 
were scarce, high-priced, and not espe- 
cially efficient. So our friend evolved this 
plan. 

She placed an advertisement in the 
daily paper, which read as follows: 

" Young man, possibly a student, willing 
to make himself generally useful about a 
home, in spare time, will learn of some- 
thing to his advantage by applying in 
own handwriting to Box — . References 
required." 

In answer to this, she had a surprising 
number of applicants. Some were high 
school fellows, several students of busi- 
ness colleges, and one a theological 
seminary student, who was using every 
endeavor to put himself through. 

She frankly explained to the young man 
she selected her position. She was willing 
to give a comfortable room, good board, 
and fair pay for about three hours' work 

128 



each day, Saturday afternoon, and part 
of Sunday time. 

The young man in return would have 
to agree to be exceptionally neat about 
his person, and to wear a white coat and 
white apron in the house. These were 
furnished by a regular firm who supplied 
these to the stores, and our friend paid 
for the laundering of them. 

His work was to consist of caring for 
the furnace in season, walks, mowing the 
lawn also in season, bed making, using 
the electric vacuum sweeper and polish- 
ing the hard wood floors, cleaning the 
kitchen floor and cellar stairs, keeping 
coal and gas range in order, preparing 
vegetables, washing dishes, doing such 
simple cooking as might be easily taught 
— the making of coffee, cooking of cereals, 
roasting of meat, and so on. He was also 
to serve at table in a helpful capacity, but 
the table service was purposely simplified 
for his benefit. 

At the end of three months the young 
man, who was bright and intelligent, 
strong and willing, could go ahead with 
very few directions. He did not find the 
work unduly arduous, and he not only 
had his home and living, but enough with 
which to pay his school expenses. 

During the vacation, he was able to 
earn enough extra to provide clothing and 
incidentals for the year. He not only 
had a comfortable home, but the use of 
an excellent library, for he proved himself 
worthy of special privileges. 

Our professional friend found it a 
comfort to have some one who would 
clean a window, shake a rug, clean the 
refrigerator or perform the lighter tasks 



HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES 



129 



with deftness and thoroughness. All In 
all, the plan proved satisfactory, to one 
woman, at least! e. g. w. 



How to Make a Milk-Shake 

CAN you make a milk-shake? A 
food drink of feal nutritive value 
and tempting appearance and taste is 
the well-made milk-shake. It is a lunch 
in itself and is always a satisfying bev- 
erage for one who is tired and hungry. 

The home-made milk-shake is just as 
good as the one made by the very best 
confectioner, if it be properly made. To 
begin with, if you would be a past master 
in the art of shake-making, you must 
possess yourself of a shaker. One of nickel 
plate that is strong enough to stand 
hard shaking will cost about 31 or less. 

For an egg milk-shake, break an egg 
into the shaker; add flavoring and sweet- 
ening, half fill the shaker with rich milk 
and shake vigorously, in both hands, for 
three or four minutes. Pour into a 
glass and fill it with milk. If a plain milk- 
shake is wanted, put flavoring, sweetening 
and milk in the shaker and shake them 
together by holding one hand over the 
top, the other over the bottom of the 
shaker, and shaking vigorously from the 
elbows. 

If vanilla or some other flavoring 
extract is used, sweetening, either in the 
form of granulated sugar or a sweet syrup, 
made by melting sugar over the fire in just 
enough water to hold it in solution, must 
be used with it. If a flavoring syrup is 
used, that is generally sufficiently sweet. 

Chocolate syrup can be kept on hand 
for making milk-shakes. To make it 
mix a third of a cup of cocoa with two 
cups of boiling water and let the mix- 
ture boil for five minutes. When it is cold 
add a teaspoonful of vanilla and a tea- 
spoonful of very strong coffee. This 
mixture of flavors produces a delicate 
taste, but the coffee can be omitted and 
twice as much sugar added instead. 
About two tablespoonfuls of the sugar 
are needed for one glass of milk. 



If the milk-shake, made according to 
the directions already given, proves too 
heavy, make it with two-thirds milk and 
one-third Apollinaris water, ice cold. 
You will find this a most healthful drink 
for an invalid. j. w. w. 



**A Kolpak Kanning Klub" 

THOUGH I am now only fourteen 
years of age, and not supposed to 
"can as well as my mother," I do can, 
and have canned for two years. I belong 
to a school summer-club, called "The 
Kolpak Kanning Klub." There are sev- 
eral hundred members belonging to this 
club, and there are a number of " centers " 
where we meet. We started in to con- 
serv^e food during the war, and the club 
was such a success we have kept on with 
it during the summer months. 

We meet certain days a week (usually 
twice for each class) and have a teacher 
as a guide. My class met at the Roose- 
velt School, which has a splendid cook- 
ing-room with every convenience. We 
canned everything on the market. For 
the vegetables we used the pressure- 
cooker, which is very satisfactory. For 
fruits, however, which do not need so 
much cooking, we did not use that so 
much. I like the old-fashioned Mason 
glass jars better than any other kind. 
When I use those, I uQver lose a jar by 
having it spoil. 

Last summer I canned beans, peas,, 
beets, pears, rhubarb, cherries, peaches^ 
apricots, made conserves and jellies. I 
had on my shelf 110 jars in all (not to 
mention those my mother canned). I 
use the cold-pack method and find it 
entirely satisfactory. Our class also did 
commercial canning and sold it to the 
less-energetic, though older, housekeep- 
ers. Quite a nice amount of money was 
made by us in that way. During the war 
some of the patriotic business men paid 
our gas bill, which was a help. 

At the Interstate Fair, held here in 
Spokane two years ago, I won two prizes 
on my work. Last summer I took one 



130 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



prize at our own school fair-exhibit, as a 
demonstrator. Canning is no bother to 
me, thanks to the "Kolpak Kanning 
Klub." V. M. c. 



Tried-and-Tested Recipes 

Soft Gingerbread — Half a cup of 
sugar; one cup of molasses; one-half a cup 
of butter; one teaspoonful, each, of ginger, 
cinnamon and cloves; two teaspoonfuls 
of soda, dissolved In one cup of boiling 
water; two and one-half cups of flour; 
add two well-beaten eggs the last thing 
before baking; when cool spread with 
either marshmallow cream or plain milk 
and sugar boiled until it creams. This 
will be found to be excellent. 

Feal Loaf — ^ Take one and one-half 
pounds, each, of veal and pork, not too 
fat, grind in food grinder, clean out the 
grinder with one cup of crackers or left- 
over toasted bread; put together in a ' 
bowl and add two eggs, one teaspoonful 
of salt and one-half a teaspoonful of 
pepper; mix all together and pack in a 
baking dish or pan, allowing one good 
inch from top of pan; smooth down and 
cover with water, place in hot oven and 
bake for sixty minutes. This is very 
good, either hot or cold, but it makes a 
splendid dish to serve cold for lunch, and 
looks very dainty, if you garnish your 
platter with parsley. 

Creole Stew — ■ Take two slices of bacon, 
cut in cubes, and fry brown ; two medium- 
sized onions, also, cut fine and browned; 
add one cup of fine-cut cold beef, and 
when well browned add one tablespoon- 
ful of flour, and one cup of boiling water; 
add salt and pepper, and, lastly, one cup 
of tomatoes; cook for about ten or 
fifteen minutes and serve. This makes 
enough to serve four people, d. l. w. 

4: * 4: 

Goodies for All the Year 

NEARLY all magazines have nice 
recipes in them, but the most of 
them have things that the farmers' wives 
do not have. I would like to give a few 



of the things I have on my table that 
are in reach of all. 

Tuna Croquettes 

One ten-cent can of tuna, one ^gg, a 
little onion minced fine, two table- 
spoonfuls of salad dressing, or vinegar, a 
little flour. Make into balls or long- 
shaped croquettes, dip in corn meal and 
fry a golden brown. Delicious. Father 
will like them. 

Sour Milk or Clabber Biscuit 

Two cups of flour, one-half a teaspoon- 
ful of baking soda, two level teaspoonfuls 
of baking powder, one heaping table- 
spoonful of lard, milk to make a soft 
dough; roll out, fold the dough, roll again 
until you have rolled the dough three 
times. The result is biscuits that are 
light, flaky, and melt in your mouth. 

Lettuce Sandwiches 

Slice bread thin, spread each slice with 
salad dressing, place two lettuce leaves 
coated with salad dressing between them. 

Pineapple Sandwiches 

Thin slices of bread spread with salad 
dressing, a slice of pineapple between; 
vary them by placing a lettuce leaf on 
one slice of bread, then the pineapple, 
also sprinkle cheese on pineapple. A i 
can of pineapple contains eight large i 
slices; they should be sliced in two and I 
make sixteen sandwiches. Cheese can, i 
also, be bought in cans, so farmers' 
wives do not have to do without these 
things. 

Let sandwiches lighten the burden of 
the summer; all the family will like them. ; 



Here is an easy way to make salad 
dressing. The yolk of one Ggg beaten 
until thick; add one teaspoonful of salt, 
slowly beating the same way all the time; 
add one-half a teaspoonful of sugar, slowly 
then add one cup and one-half of Wes- 
son oil, slowly, one-half a teaspoonful 
at a time; thin with vinegar as needed 
and also to taste. Fine. j. d. b. 



HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES 



131 



Laundry Hints 

ALWAYS look for stains before placing 
clothes in water. 

Soak coffee or cocoa stains in real warm 
water. 

Use ammonia for iodine. Strong borax 
water will remove many stains, if they 
are laid in the sun after being moistened 
in it. 

Dissolve the soap before using, if you 
have a machine. Use borax instead of 
blueing and the clothes will be whiter. 
Set color in all new goods before washing. 
Use a strong salt water for blues and a 
vinegar solution for pinks. j. f. p. 

* * * 

Hulling Straw^berries 

A QUICK and easy method which I 
have discovered in hulling straw- 
berries is to use a sharp-pointed spoon, 
when picking off the stem. In this way 
the tips of the fingers are not so badly 
stained, and the work of stemming a box 
of berries is done in half the time. 

For Children's Books 

Children are often careless when turn- 
ing pages in their story books, and fre- 
quently a page is torn. If the torn page 
is immediately repaired with adhesive 
transparent tape or gummed paper, the 
book is again as good as new. Other- 
wise, it soon presents a ragged and 
tattered appearance. This gummed tape 
is inexpensive, and can be bought at any 
book or stationery store. 

Meat Balls in Cabbage 
Leaves 

To give variety and flavor to soup meat 
or stew meat, which of necessity must be 
served again, try grinding the cold meat 
through a food chopper and seasoning it. 
Then pat it into rolls or cakes like meat 
balls, and wrap each inside of a hot cab- 
bage leaf, which has just been parboiled. 
Then place in a well-greased pan, and 
bake a light brown. The family will 
relish this. 



When Making Jelly 

Hot jelly poured from the kettle into 
a pitcher, before filling the small glasses, 
will prevent the jelly from spilling and 
running over the edges of the jelly 
jars. 

New Use for Prunes 

For variety of flavor, try using prunes 
in your next batch of doughnuts, drop 
cakes or cookies. Cut the prunes into 
very small pieces, or run them through 
the food chopper, and mix them with the 
cookie dough or cake batter instead of 
raisins or currants. e. w. f. 



Limes Preserved Whole 

Put the limes on to cook in cold water; 
bring slowly to a boil, and then let simmer, 
adding fresh water as the quantity is 
reduced by boiling, until the limes can be 
easily pierced by a fork. Now weigh 
one pound and one-half of sugar for every 
six limes, and cook this in half its volume 
of water to a clear syrup. The water 
drained from the limes may be used, if it is 
desired to preserve all their flavor. Pour 
the hot syrup over the fruit, and let stand 
for a day. Drain off, add one-fourth a 
cup of water, boil again, and pour over 
limes on the next day. Repeat this 
process for the third day, then boil the 
limes and syrup together for twenty 
minutes, and the preserve will be ready 
to go into sterilized jars. 

Pickled Eggs 

Boil eggs until hard, remove from shells 
and put into wide-mouthed preserving 
jars. Pour over them the following: 
To one pint of vinegar add one table- 
spoonful, each, of salt, mustard seed, and 
peppercorns; one-half a tablespoonful of 
allspice, four cloves of garlic or one 
chopped onion, one-fourth a teaspoonful 
of cayenne, and, if desired, one table- 
spoonful of curry powder. 

These are delicious with salad, with 
fish, or, chopped, in a cream sauce. 




/" 








THIS department is for the benefit and free use of our subscribers. Questions relating to recipes, 
and those pertaining to culinary science and domestic economics in general, will be cheerfully 
answered by the editor. Communications for this department must reach us before the first of the 
month preceding that in which the answers are expected to appear. In letters requesting answers 
by mail, please enclose address and stamped envelope. For menus, remit $1.00. Address queries 
to Janet M. Hill, Editor. American Cookery, 221 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass. 



Query No. 4149 — "Will you kindly pub- 
lish a good recipe for Finger Rolls to be served 
with a dinner.? Also a nice soft Chocolate Fill- 
ing for Layer Cake?" 

Finger Rolls 

ADD to a pint of warm milk one- 
half of one yeast cake, blended 
with a little water, and two table- 
spoonfuls of shortening. Sift together 
live cups of flour, one teaspoonful of salt, 
and one tablespoonful of sugar, and add 
to milk and yeast. It should be a very 
soft dough, too soft to knead, and should 
be mixed with a spoon. Let rise until 
double in bulk, then form into finger rolls 
by taking a piece of the dough about as 
large as an ^%g^ and shaping it first into 
a smooth ball, then into an elongated form 
about as thick as the finger. This must 
be done with the hands, first well greased. 
If necessary, a very little more flour may 
be added. The rolls are set in a dripping 
pan, or any other deep pan, side by side, 
and allowed to rise quickly in a warm 
place, then baked in a very hot oven for 
fifteen minutes or until well browned. 

Soft Chocolate Filling for 
Layer Cake 

Soften or melt in a saucepan one-half 
a cup of butter, and stir into it one-half 
a cup of flour. Add gradually two cups 
of hot water or milk, and cook, with very 
careful stirring, until mixture is smooth 
and thick. Melt over hot water one 
ounce and one-half of chocolate, and add 
to mixture in saucepan with one cup of 



granulated sugar. Let all boil up once, 
and spread immediately over cake layers. 
Only very careful and rapid stirring will 
ensure success in making this filling. It 
may be enriched by adding one or two 
well-beaten eggs before removing from 
the fire, but this is not necessary. 

Query No. 4150. — "Through the columns 
of your magazine will you please give me the 
following recipes? Yorkshire Pudding; Fruit 
Salad, using canned pears; Honey Cookies." 

Yorkshire Pudding 

Beat vigorously until as light as pos- 
sible three eggs; add two cups of warm 
milk, and two cups of flour sifted with 
one-half a teaspoonful of salt. Beat the 
whole again until full of bubbles, and 
bake in hissing hot gem pans for forty- 
five minutes. Serve as a garnish for 
roast beef, basted with some of the beef 
gravy. The mixture is sometimes baked 
by pouring it into the dripping pan under 
the beef, and is cut into squares before 
serving. It must not be allowed to stand 
before baking, but put into oven while 
still bubbling, or it will be flat and 
indigestible. 

Fruit Salad 

To make a fruit salad with canned 
pears, the pears may be cut or sliced, 
mixed with mayonnaise or any good 
cooked salad dressing, and served on 
lettuce leaves. A few fresh strawberries 
may be used as a garnish, or a few bits of 
pimiento, or a spoonful of chopped nuts. 
Since canned pears are rather insipid, a 



132 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



wh\j will (risco 
improve \jour 
cookiag ? 




Get Crisco from your grocer in 
this sanitary, dust-proof container. 
Convenient sizes, one pound and 
larger, net weights. Never sold 
in bulk. 

Also made and sold in Canada. 




Would you serve beans, 

macaroni and corn at 

the same meal? 



— because Crisco is 100% rich — a 
solid white cream produced by 
hardening edible vegetable oil. This 
richness accounts for the tender 
flakiness of Crisco pastries and bis- 
cuits, and the butter -like quality 
of Crisco cakes. 

—because Crisco has no taste, no 
color, no odor. It does not make 
foods look, taste or smell greasy. 
It lets the natural food flavors 
prevail. 

— because Crisco is a digestible fat. 
This is because it is strictly vege- 
table. The richest fried foods and 
pastries can be eaten safely if 
they are made with Crisco. 

Try Crisco and see for yourself 
what an improvement it is. 



"Balanced Daily Diet" will give 
you real, practical help in planning 
nieals that contain the proper com- 
binations of food elements to build strong, healthy bodies and 
minds. This is not a "fad" book. It uses the ordinary, easily 
cooked foods that everybody likes, and tells how to combine 
them to get the best food value at every meal. Gives recipes, 
72 sample menus, and classified lists from which you can select 
the dishes you especially like. Written by the cookery au- 
thority, Janet McKenzie Hill, founder of the Boston Cooking 
School and editor of "American Cookery." Illustrated in 
color. Each copy of this valuable cookbook costs us 28c. You 
may have one copy, for personal use, for only 10 cents in 
stamps. Send stamps and your name and address to Depart- 
ment A-8, The Procter 8b Gamble Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 




Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 

133 



134 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



mixture of some other fruits, oranges, 
cherries, etc., will be an Improvement. 
When the fruit is molded in a sweetened 
gelatine jelly, flavored with lemon, etc., 
it may be served for dessert with whipped 
cream, and if unmolded on lettuce leaves 
the dish is often, though not correctly, 
called a fruit salad. 

Honey Cookies 

Boil in an agate saucepan for fifteen 
minutes, with careful stirring, one cup of 
honey, two cups of milk, and two cups 
of sugar. Dissolve one-half a teaspoon- 
ful of baking soda in a little water, stir 
into above, and let cool; add flour to 
make a soft dough, with salt in the pro- 
portion of one-fourth a teaspoonful to 
each cup of flour, and baking powder in 
the proportion of one teaspoonful to a 
cup of flour. A quart of flour will prob- 
ably be needed. The dough is rolled one- 
fourth an inch thick, cut into rounds, and 
baked in a rather hot oven until crisp 
and brown. We do not know whether 
this is the recipe to which you refer, but 
we know this to be a good one. The 
cookies will be especially delicious, if the 
following ingredients are added: Two 
cups of almonds, blanched and chopped; 
one cup of walnuts, chopped; one-fourth 
a pound of mixture of candied orange, 
lemon, and citron rind, fine-chopped or 
shredded; two teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, 
one teaspoonful of ginger, and one-half 
a teaspoonful of cloves. The spices are 
sifted with the flour, and the nuts and 
candied peel are stirred Into the mixture 
when about half the flour has been added. 
These richer cookies are better after a 
month's keeping, and will remain fresh 
for one year If stored In a tin box. 



Query No. 4151. — "Please suggest to me 
some ways of Sugar-saving in putting up fruit. 
Also, whether Honey, Molasses, or Syrup may be 
substituted for sugar in fruit preserving." 

Sugar Saving in Fruit-Preserving 

Any kind of fruit can be preserved 
without the use of sugar, If complete 
sterilization of jars, covers, and rubbers 



Is secured. Small fruits, such as berries, 
may be put up by pouring boiling water 
over them in the jars, and sealing imme- 
diately. Larger fruits, with firm flesh, 
need cooking until quite soft, either by 
the cold-pack method, or in an open 
kettle. Rhubarb and cranberries need 
nothing but cold water poured over them 
In the jars, and sealing. The juice of 
both of these is unfavorable to the growth 
of germs. The advantage of preserving 
without sugar is twofold: First, the nat- 
ural flavor of the fruit Is better retained; 
second, since the cooking together of 
sugar and fruit-juice causes a loss of two- 
fifths in the sweetening property of sugar, 
it Is, therefore, much more economical to 
postpone the addition of sugar until the 
time comes to use the preserved fruit at 
the table. 

Other methods of sugar-saving are: 

(1) The mixing of sweet fruits with sour, 
such as figs with rhubarb, raisins with 
cranberries, sweet pears with currants. 

(2) The mixing of sweet vegetables with 
sour fruits. Thus, the pulp from haked 
carrots or beets may be used with sour 
fruits — • the carrot pulp with the light- 
colored varieties, the beet pulp with the 
darker. (3) The long, slow baking of 
fruits before canning, which develops the 
incipient sweetness of the fruits so that 
less sugar, or none, will be needed. The 
following process Is a good one to follow: 

Follow any recipe for putting up fruit, 
as to Ingredients and proportions, but 
use only one-half the given quantity of 
sugar, and no water. Pack fruit and 
sugar In layers In a bean pot or other 
stone jar that will stand heat, cover, tie 
two or three thicknesses of oiled paper 
over the top, and bake for three hours in 
a moderate oven, or cook In the fireless 
overnight. Transfer the mixture to ster- 
ile jars, and seal. In this method. If de- 
sired, the use of sugar may be omitted 
altogether. 

Putting Up Fruit in Honey, Etc. 

Honey may be substituted, bulk for 
bulk, for sugar in fruit-preserving, and 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



■IIIIIB 
■■■■■■■1 

■■■■■■■a 

■ ■■■■■■■r- 

■ ■■■■■■■r 

■■■■■■ 
■■■■III 




■■■■■■"■■■■■■■■■■■■■a ■■■■■!■ 

'■■■■■"■■■ ■■■liiiii ■■!:"!!■ 
^■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■Si 

*■•■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■(•' 



The Ryzoa 
lenjel measure 



«■■■■■■■■■■■!*• 



the Healthful Bailing Powder 

Ryzon has more than one claim to being a healthful baking 
powder! 

Its principal ingredient is monosodium phosphate, and phos- 
phate is known to be a necessary constituent of our food. All 
Ryzon ingredients are the purest and best obtainable. Every step 
in its manufacture is characterized by scrupulous cleanliness. 

And because of its scientific accuracy and unvarying quality 
and strength, cakes and biscuits and pastry made with Ryzon 
always produce wholesome and digestible food. 

Ryzon is packed in full 16 ounce pounds — also 35c and 20c 
packages. A pound tin of Ryzon and a copy of the Ryzon 
Baking Book will be sent free, postpaid, to any household 
science teacher who writes us on school stationery, giving 
official position. 

GENERALCHEMICALCQ 

FOOD DEPARTMENT 
NEW YORK 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept siabstitutes 
135 



136 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



all preserves made with honey are much 
more delicious. Fruit jelly, made with 
honey, is especially good. But since 
honey contains about one-fourth its vol- 
ume of water, this should be allowed for 
in measuring the water for firm-fleshed 
fruits, and juicy fruits will need longer 
cooking to evaporate the surplus moisture. 
Syrup or molasses may also be used 
instead of sugar, but very great care has 
to be used in the sterilization process, 
since both of these substances ferment 
readily. They lend themselves admira- 
bly to use with spiced fruit, for certain 
spices, notably cinnamon, mace, nutmeg, 
and cloves, have an antiseptic action 
which, if these are used in sufiicient quan- 
tity, will tend to balance the tendency of 
syrup or molasses to fermentation. 

Query No. 4152. — "Our family has only 
lately come from the old country, and we should 
like to make a Clam Bake on our own shore lot, 
but have only a vague idea of how to set about 
it. We seek help from your valuable magazine." 

Clam Bake for Eighteen Persons 

The following Instructions will serve 
for a good bake for you and your neigh- 
bors. Make a flat space of sand, and 
floor it with flat stones; it should be about 
two and one-half feet square. Build up 
a row of stones around the edge, about a 
foot high, and roof it over with stones 
set on sticks. Now throw in dry wood 
and kindle a good fire, which should burn 
until the roof falls in. Very quickly rake 
out the cinders, and spread a little more 
than an inch of seaweed over the hot 
stone floor; spread on this a dozen and a 
half of onions; a bushel of clams; one- 
half a peck of potatoes; one dozen and 
one-half ears of sweet corn, and five or 
six pounds of any fresh fish. Cover all 
with a large square of well-washed un- 
bleached muslin, then pile on more sea- 
weed, until there is no longer an escape 
of steam visible. Let stand for forty 
minutes, and if your primitive oven was 
very hot to begin with, and the filling of 
the oven was done with sufficient rapid- 
ity, you should have an excellent clam- 
bake. 



Query No. 4153 — "At a friend's house I ate 
some Salad Dressing which she told me was a 
boiled dressing that she made in quantity, 
stored in jars, and which kept for months. Can 
you give a recipe for this.-"' 

Salad Dressing to Keep for 
Months 

We do not know what recipe your 
friend used, but the following makes an 
excellent dressing, which will keep for 
the season, if sealed in jars in the ice box. 

Soften one-half a cup of butter over 
gentle heat; add four tablespoonfuls of 
flour, and blend smooth. Stir in by de- 
grees, one pint of milk, two tablespoon- 
fuls of sugar, two tablespoonfuls of salt, 
and cook until thick. Lastly, add four 
eggs, beaten with one cup of vinegar and 
two tablespoonfuls of dry mustard. Cook 
until the consistency of soft custard, and 
pour into small jars. If desired this 
dressing may be mixed with cream at 
serving time. 



Query No. 4154 — "Can you tell me any- 
thing about how Chicken and other fowl are 
Potted in fat to keep through the winter?" 

Chicken Potted in Fat 

After the birds are picked, singed, and 
drawn, season them Inside with a liberal 
allowance of a mixture of salt, pepper, 
grated nutmeg, and ground cloves. Two 
tablespoonfuls of salt, two teaspoonfuls 
of pepper, and one teaspoonful, each, of 
the spices may be allowed for each 
chicken. Then break the breastbones, 
press the birds as flat as possible, and 
bake on the rack of the dripping pan. 
Drain, and place, while hot, in heated, 
sterile kettles of agate or porcelain, and 
pour over them melted fat of almost any 
kind except butter. Suet, lard, bacon 
fat, drippings from corned beef, all an- 
swer nicely. When the fat has solidified, 
cover the kettles, and keep in a cold 
cellar. Care must be used in pouring in 
the fat that no air-spaces are left. 

Squab, pheasants, pork or beef tender- 
loin, venison steaks, etc., may similarly 
be stored for winter use. 



AD\'ERTISEMENTS 




THE NATIONAL EXTRACT 

VANILLA ANO 32 OTHER FLAVORS 



<^^ ^IL^rocersS 



THE LARGEST SELLING. BRAND IN THE U.S 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
137 



New Books 



Food and Life. By Marion F. Lansing 
and Luther H. Gulick. Ginn and 
Company, Boston, Mass. 
''The health of our children is the foun- 
dation stone which supports the future of 
our countr}" and its civilization." This is 
the warning of the Child Health Organi- 
zation, and a call to which the teachers 
throughout the country have responded. 
But the teachers of the younger children 
have had difficulties in finding books to 
put into the hands of their pupils to fur- 
ther this work. 

Starting with the child's normal, spon- 
taneous interest in food, this little book 
summons him to a more intelligent and 
active understanding of his food needs 
and habits. The short-story form of the 
chapters appeals to the child at the same 
time that it is answering a great many of 
his "whys." The data is scientifically 



Baby Midget 

HOSE SUPPORTER 

holds the socks securel)- and allows the little one 
absolute freedom of action, so necessary to its 
health, growth and comfort. The highly nickeled 
parts of the "Baby JNIidget" have smooth, 
rounded comers and edges and they do not ccine 
in contact with the baby's skin. 
Like the Velvet Grip Hose Supporters for 
women, misses and children it is equipped 
with the famous All-Rubber Oblong Button, 
which prevents slipping and ruthless ripping. 
Silk, 15 cents; Lisle, 10 cents 

SOLD HVERYWHERH OR SENT POSTPAI . 
GKORGK FROST CO., MAKERS, BOSTON 




correct and thoroughly up-to-date; t 
original pictorial studies of food valu 
interpret the more technical points; an' 
always the child is impressed with the 
importance of his own part in the greal 
problem of food, as it relates to mon 
perfect health. 

This book aims to begin instruction ic 
food where the importance of the subject 
demands, in the public schools of the land, 
Teachers and educators will be invited 
to take an interest in the matter and 
methods presented in this little volume. 



I 



Mrs. Wilson's Cookbook. By Mrs. Mart 
A. Wilson. Cloth, ?2.50 net. J. B. 
Lippincott Company, Philadelphi 
Pa. 
All of Mrs. Wilson's best ''tried-in-th 
fire recipes," the actual working results of 
many years' teaching and lecturing, are 
contained in this volume. The auth'^f 
has wisely departed from the usual hea 
cookbook style, and presents the recipesl 
as if she were conversing with the reader! 
upon the dish in question. Menus of i 
simplest to the richest and most elaborate 
can be prepared from this volume. j 

'"Scientific cooking means the elimina-| 
tion of waste, the preservation of edible 
resources and conservation of their ;, 
tential energy, through the preparatictr. 
of attractive, vitalizing food with mini- 
mum cost and labor, thus providing, in 
wide, deep measure, for harmony, personal 
comfort and domestic peace." 

The Microbiology and Microanalysis oj 
Foods. By Albert Schneider, 
Ph.D. Octavo. 131 Illustrations. 
33.50 net. P. Blakiston's Son & Co., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
This volume is intended as a guide to 
the study of microbiological decomposi- 
tion changes in foods. It also presents a 
practical working basis for ascertaining 
the decomposition limits of foods suitable 
for human consumption, by means of the 



Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
138 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



l±-i: 



xV 



i 




^ 



C^^^s-ir^^ 




\ Puffed W 

|iW N In a Bowl of 



Wheat 

MUk 



Any Puffed Grain 

With Creaon and Sugar 




How do you like 

Bubble Grains? 



Ask people what cereal they like best and most folks mention Puffed Grains. 

Ask which PufiFed Grain and you'll get three opinions, for each has its own delights. 

Ask about ways of serving and a dozen people may favor a dozen different ways. 

Millions of Dishes Daily 

In summerfime Puffed Grains have countless uses. 

Here are bubble grains, flimsy, flavory, toasted, puffed to eight times normal size. They seem 
like food confections, yet two are whole grains with whole-grain nutrition. 

Every food cell is exploded, so digestion is easy and complete. At any hour they form the 
ideal foods. 

Folks serve them at breakfast, then later in the day they float them in bowls of milk. They 

use them like nut-meats on ice cream, as wafers 
in their soups. 

Let children revel in them — serve in all the 
ways they will. But don't forget Puffed "Wheat in 
milk — those flaky, fragile whole grains, rich in 10 
elements which growing children need. 



Puffed Wheat Puffed Rice 

Corn Puffs 
Also Puffed Rice Pancake Flour 



The Quaker Qats G>mpany 



Sole Make»-s 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
139 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



GOSSOM'S CREAM SOUPS 




In Powdered Form 

Split pea, Green pea, Lima, Celery, Black bean. Clam 
Chowder, Onion and (Mushroom 25c.) 

Quickly and Easily Prepared 
Just add water and boil 15 minutes. One package makes 3 

f)ints of pure, wholesome and delicious soup. Price 15c at 
eading grocers, or sample sent prepaid on receipt of 20c in 
stamps or coin. 

Also "GOSSOM'S "QUICK-MADE" FUDGE 
will give you s delightful surprise. So easy. A 50c pkg. 
makes over a pound of the most exquisite fudge. 

Manufactured by 
B. F. Gossom, 692 Washington St., Brookline, 46, Mass. 



Eat More Bread 



Bread is the most important food 
we eat. It furnishes abundant 
nourishment in readily digestible 
form. The fact that it never be- 
comes tiresome though eaten day 
after day. is proof of its natural 
food qualities. 

Eat plenty of bread made with 

FLEISCHM ANN'S YEAST 



=Domestic Science=^ 

Home-study Courses 

Food, health, housekeeping, clothing, children 

For Homemakers and Mothers; professional 
courses for Teachers, Dietitians, Institution 
Managers, Demonstrators, Nurses, "Graduate 
Housekeepers," Caterers, etc. 

"The Profession of Home-making." 100 
page handbook, /ree. Bulletins: "Free-hand 
Cooking," "Food Values," "Seven-Cent 
Meals," "Family Finance." — 10 cents each. 

American School of Home Economics 
(Charted in 1915) 503 W. 69th St., Chicago, 111. 



V 



SERVICE TABLE WAGON 




Large Broad Wide Table 
'Top — Removable Glass 
Service Tray — Double 
Drawer— Doub'le 
Handles— Large Deep 
Lindershelves — "Scien- 
tifically Silent" Rubber 
Tired Swivel Wheels. 

A high gradtt piece of furni- 
ture surpassing anything yet at- 
tempted for GENERAL UTILITY, 
ease of action, and absolute 
noisclessness. WRITE NOW 
FOR A DESCRIPTIVE PAMPHLET 
AND DEALERS NAME 

COMBINATION PRODUCTS CO. 

504) CiHiard Bidg. Chicago. III. 



direct methods of microanalysis. The 
microanalytical examination of milk, of 
water and of other beverages is included. 
While the text is addressed to army 
dietitians and food examiners, it will serv 
as a text and laboratory guide for student 
in universities and colleges where courses 
in dietetics, in home economics, in food 
testing, in food decomposition, in food 
analysis, etc., are given. 

A Little Preserving Book for a Little Girl. 
By Amy L. Waterman. Cloth, 
12mo, 31.00. The Page Company, 
Boston, Mass. 

Here, in simple story form, is explained 
every step of the process of preserving 
and canning fruits and vegetables. 

Marmalades, Jams, Jellies, Conserves, 
Spiced Fruits, Pickles, Preserving and 
Canning all are presented in plain and 
simple language. Each process is given, 
explained and actually done. In form 
and style the volume is attractive; it 
might be very interesting to young girls 
who are inclined to take part in the house- 
hold affairs of the present day; there are 
many such already and the number is 
increasing. 



Overall Clubs 

SUNDAY a cotton manufacturer was 
talking overalls to us. He agrees 
that the wearing of denim by the general 
public can have but two bad results. In 
the first place, it will send overall prices 
up, and in the second, high overall 
prices will cause dissatisfaction among 
the laboring men who have to have them. 

We cannot help taking a fling at the 
overall clubs. While the fundamental 
idea is excellent, the thrifty intent is 
thwarted by the economic result. 

Now, if some one will help us form an 
old-clothes club and help us get along 
with odd coats and trousers, ring us up. 
Like many others, you are probably sick 
of the demand of fashion that every one 
must be all dressed up every day. 



Buy advertised Goods 



Do not accept substitutes 
140 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




Canning,' Teachers insist on 

GOOD (§) LiUCK 

RED jAR rubbers 

Because they have made 

"Cold Pack'' canning safe 

One of the leading canning demonstrators, who was 
among the firstin the field when the Government began 
to teach "Cold Pack" canning, said to us recently: 

"TFe could never have carried out our early canning programs 
in tfieface of all the difficulties that confronted us without GOOD 
LUCK rubbers. The rubber ring was the one item of equipment 
nniversullij poor in quality. The GOOD LUCKwas the one ring 
ive could always rely iqjon." 

GOOD LUCK rings have eliminated the biggest risk from the "Cold 
Pack" process because they can be boiled for three, four or five hours 
as the case requires without "bulging" or 'blowing out" — and they 
will keep contents of jars sealed air-tight without shrinking or 
cracking for years and years — almost indefinitely. 
Only recently a case was called to our attention where a jar of mus- 
tard pickles containing acid (vinegar) and oil, two natural enemies 
of rubber, was opened after being sealed for eleven years with a 
GOOD LUCK ring (one of the first ever made) and the contents 
found as fresh and piquant as the day they were sealed in the jar. 

GOOD LUCK rubbers are standard equipment on Atlas E-Z Seal and 

other fruit jars 

13c per dozen, 2 dozen for 25c 

Send 2c stamp for our booklet, " Cold Pack Canning." If your local 

store doesn't keep GOOD LUCK rubbers, send 13c for sample 

dozen or 25c for 2 dozen to be mailed with the book 

BOSTON WOVEN HOSE AND RUBBER CO. 

27 HAMPSHIRE STREET, CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
141 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Even when they don't Hke milk, 
they will ask for more Junket — 
which is simply milk in a more 
attractive and readily digestible 
form. 



Junket 



Let them have all they want of it, 
because it is among the best foods they 
could eat. 

It is delicious to the taste, and whole- 
some and nourishing. 

When ice cream is made with a Jun- 
ket Tablet it not only requires less 
cream and produces ice cream of a 
smooth, velvety texture, but the cream 
is then more easily digestible. 

Junket Tablets are sold by grocers 
and druggists everywhere. 



Nesnah — 

the 

Powdered 

Junket 

is the same as Junket 
Tablets, except it is 
in powdered form and 
already sweetened 
and flavored. It 
comes in 6 pure fla 
vors, delicious in 
taste and appearance. 
Simply add milk. 



The Junket Folks 
Little Falls, N. Y. 

Canadian Factory: 

Chr. Hansen's 

Canadian Laboratory 

Toronto, Ont. 





The Silver Lining 



Youth 

Within the convent walls, the nuns 

Were bending low in prayer; 
And in the garden, one alone 

Attended to its care. 
Ah, she was pale, and slim, and young; 

A pure flower soul, and meek; 
And there with blossoms fair, she danced 

A minuet antique. 

The sunshine quivered on the hills; 

It shone the cloisters through; 
And stately trees leaned toward its warmth; 

The cypress, ilex, yew. 
The blossom hearts were filled with joy; 

The pure flower soul, and meek. 
Moved on in steps of measured grace, 

A minuet antique. 

Nor was it wrong; the far-off hymns 

Her very being thrilled. 
'Twas merely that the joyous sun 

A rhythmlnew instilled 
Until her pulses caught the beat. 

The pure flower soul, and meek, 
Responded too, and quaintly danced 

The minuet antique. 



Alone the sunny garden lay; 

Within the walls she prayed; 
And in her pkce, with hearts of gold, 

The stately lilies swayed. 
The sunshine joy was in her heart. 

The pure flower soul, and meek, 
Gave thanks for that sweet hour she danced 

The minuet antique. 

Blanche Elizabeth Wadt. 



The Light in the Window 

The transport had entered New Yorl 
harbor. On board was one lone colored 
soldier among the homeward bound. As 
the ship passed the Statue of Liberty- 
there was absolute silence when suddenly 
the dusky doughboy broke the quiet by 
remarking: "Put you' light down, honey, 
I'se home." 




ANGLEFOO 



The Non-Poisonous Fly Destroyer 

The U. S. Oept. of Agriculture says in the 

Bulletin : Special pains should be taken 

to prevent children from 

drinking poisoned baites 

and poisoned flies dropping 

into foods or drinks. 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
142 



*^ ' 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




Fudge 



made 
with 



UNCLE JOHN'S SYRUP 

is simply delicious and one pan of it will 
convince you that it's a clever idea to 
have a can of UNCLE JOHN'S handy. 
For the table also — with hot biscuits, 
griddlecakes, waffles, cereals and stewed 
fruits, it's satisfying. 
Suppose you follow our suggestion and 
try a can NOW. 

New England Maple Syrup Co. 

WINTER HILL BOSTON, MASS. 



V 



Whips Thin Cream 

or Half Heavy Cream and Milk 

or Top of the Milk Bottle 

1 1 whips up as easily as heavy cream 

and retains its stiffness. 

Every caterer and housekeeper 

wants CREMO-VESCO. 

Send for a bottle to-day. 



Housekeeper's size, l|oz.: .30 prepaid 
Caterer's size, 16oz., $1.00 
(With full directions.) 



Gremo-Vesco Company 

631 EAST 23rd ST., BROOKLYN, N, Y. 



Cream Whipping Made 
Easy and Inexpensive 

r^REMO-A^ESCO 



TASTY TEAS 
for 
EVERY TASTE 




Serve It Cold! 

You will discover an added delight 
in Banquet Tea if you will make 
it in generous quantity and serve 
it iced when days and nights are hot. 



BANQUET TEA 



is a wonderfully satisfying thirst quencher — 
creating safely the added energy often needed 
on sultry days. 

Whatever your tea taste, you'll find your kind 
in the three Banquet Teas. 

Banquet Blend — a blend of green and black 

teas — in the /^e J Canister. 

Banquet India and Ceylon — in the Green 

Canister. 

Banquet Orange Pel^oe — in the Orange Canister. 

Packed in pounds, halves, and quarters. 
If not at your dealer's write us direct. 

McCORMICK & CO., Baltimore, U.S.A. 

Importers and Packers 



Send 50 cents in 
coin or stamps for 
our valuable BEE 
BRAND Manuai 
cf Cookery. Interest- 
ing booklets on 
Spices, Teas an 
Flavoring Extrc. 
sent FREE. 




Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
143 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



THE MAGICIAN OF THE KITCHEN 



Vegeione 

Has the rich flavor of meat juices, yet no meat what- 
ever enters its composition. Cold meats warmed 
over in a VEGETONE sauce, served on toast, prove 
a tasty morsel. A delightful hot-weather dish — 
COLD JELLIED CONSOMME 

To four cups of boiling water add one good tablespoonful of 
VEGETONE. Salt and pepper to taste. Dissolve two 
tablespoonfuls of Cooper's Granulated Gelatine in half a cup 
of cold water. Pour the boiling water and VEGETONE over 
the gelatine. Stir well, strain through a fine cloth and let it 
jell in a cool place. 

Four-ounce tin, 50 cents, or three for 31-00, postpaid when 
ordered direct. 

BISHOP-GIFFORD CO., Inc. Baldwin, L I., N. Y 

"Free-Hand Cooking" 

Cook without recipes! A key to cookbooks — correct proportions, 
time, temperature; thickening, leavening, shortening, 105 fun- 
damental recipes. 40 p. book. 10 cents coin or stamps. 
Am. School of Home Economics, 503 W. 69»h Street, Chicago 



£^ 




Picklin' Time! 

THE right kind of pickling spice! That is the 
principal thing to ensure success at pickling 
time--the secret of tasty, appetizing relishes that 
wiil give you fame as a housewife. 

BEE BRAND PICKLING SPICE is rich, full, 
^^____ piquant. Made of fifteen 

different spices and herbs iin- 
ported direct to our mill and 
expertly blended. 

Bee Brand Pickling Spice costs you 
less than buying the necessary ingre- 
dients separately and combining at 
home. And Bee Brand never varies 
in quality — always pure and full 
strength. 

For the best i7i spices, ask i/oitr grocer for 
BEE BRAXb 

McCORMICK & CO. 

BALTIMORE, U. S. A. 



McCORNICKS 



PEeBRAND 




SPICES 



What the Doctor Took 

There is an old ji'Qgro living in.AIemphls 
who was taken ill several days ago and 
called a physician of his race to prescribe 
for him. But the old man did npt see;© Xc 
be getting any better, arid finally a white 
physician was called. 

Soon after arriving he felt the negro's 
pulse for -a moment, and then examined 
his tongue. 

"Did your other doctor take your tem- 
perature.'"' he asked his patient, kindly. 

"I don't know, sah," he answered, 
feebly. "I hadn't missed anything but 
my watch as yet, boss." 

Philadelphia Star. 



We will pay 25 cents 
each for copies of our maga- 
zine of the following dates, 

May 1903, January 1911, 

March 1911, April 1914, 

and December 1914 

The Boston Cooking School Magazine Co. 

BOSTON, (17), MASS. 



Angel IbodCake 



8 Inches Square, 5 Inches High 

teacli vou to make them better 
thim von over made them before--the most deli- 
cious Auyel Food Cakes and many other kinds. 

They Sell for $3-Profit $2 
I will make you the most expert cake maker in your 
vicinity. ]My methods are original. They never fail. 
You succee<l the very first ti me with The Osborn Cake 
Making System. Easy to learn. I have tautrht thou- 
sands. Let me send you full particulars FliKK. 
Mrs. Grace Osborn Dept. L-9 Bay City, Mich. 



TEN- CENT MEALS »i;^-„-5 

meals with recipes and directions for preparing each. Thi 
48 pp. Bulletin sent for lOc or FREE for names of tw 
friends who may be interested in our Domestic Science Courses 

Am. School Home Economics, 503 W. 69th St., Chicag 



USED 

DAILY IN A 

MILLION 

HOMES 



Colburn's 
Spices 

TheA.ColburnG)., 
Philadelphia,U.SA 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
144 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




FOR over a quarter of a century, Wagner Cooking Utensils have been 
the pride of thousands of particular housewives. They have such a 
distinct refinement and obvious quality, combined with a sturdy use- 
fulness, that they appeal to the woman who takes pride in her home. 

Wagner Cast Iron De Luxe combines all 
of the old-fashioned coolcing goodness of 
cast iron, with the modern advantages of 
lighter weight and a better finish. There is 
a wide assortment of styles in both the iron 
and aluminum. Ask your dealer. 



Wagner Cast Aluminum is made in one 
solid piece — no rivets to loosen — no welded 
parts. Because of its unusual thickness it 
cooks better, retaining heat longer and dis- 
tributing it evenly. In design and finish it 
compares with the finest of silver. 



If your dealer can't 
supply you, write us. 




The Wagner Mfg. Co. 
Sidney, O. Dept. 74 



IV Dishwasher for$2.50! 

^eeps bands out of thevwater, no wiping of dishes, saves ^ the 
me. Consists of special folding dishdrainer, special wire 
asket, 2 special long-handled brushes. Full directions for use. 
ent prepaid for $2.50 or C. O. D. Full refund if not satisfactory. 

vm. School Home Economics, 503 W. 69th Street, Chicago 



^^^^ TndaMtfkBeglatered. 

/>(^luten Floiic 



40% GLUTEN 



0S. 



Guaranteed to comply in all respects ^e 

•taadard requirements of U. S. Dept. of 

Agriculture. 

Manufactured b« 

FARWfXL & KHINES 

Watertown. N. Y. 






!2£ 



Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
145 



AMERICAN COOKERY 






Bake in three ovens and use 

the gas broiler at the 

same time 



The new Victory Crawford is the only range 
on the market which does this — and in 
addition has room for four kettles on the coal 
griddles and five on the gas burners. 

And though there is so much oven space — 
six and a half square feet, or thirteen square 
feet with the racks — the Victory Crawford 
measures only forty-three inches from end 
to end. 

It's a thoroughly up-to-date combination 
gas and coal range with many exclusive im- 
provements which make it efficient, economi- 
cal, easy to keep clean — a time and step 
saver for the busy housewife. Ask your 
dealer to show you the Victory Crawford — 
you'll find it just the range you've always 
wanted. 



Sold by Leading Dealers 



WALKER & PRATT MFG. CO. 

BOSTON, U. S. A. 

Makers of Highest Quality Ranges 
Furnaces and Boilers 




I 



I 

^■1 



Household Help 

F you could engage an expert cook and a 
expert housekeeper for only 10 cents a wee 
with no board or room, you would do i 
wouldn't vou.^ Of course you would! Well 
that is all our "TWO HOUSEHOLD HELP 
ERS" will cost you the first year — nothiniii 
thereafter, for the rest of your life. 

Have you ever considered how much an hou i 
a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year is worth 
to you? Many workmen get $\ an hour — 
surely your time is worth 30 cents an hour 
We guarantee these "Helpers" to save yor 
at least an hour a day, worth say $2,10 a week i 
Will you invest the 10 cents a week to gain $. 
weekly.? 

And the value our "Helpers" give you iiii 
courage and inspiration, in peace of mind, ii 
the satisfaction of progress, in health, happines; 
and the joy of living, — is above price. In men 
dollars and cents, they will save their cos* 
twelve times a year or more. 

These helpers, "Lessons in Cooking" and 
"Household Engineering" were both preparec 
as home-study courses, and as such have been 
tried out and approved by thousands of oui 
members. Thus they have the very highest 
recommendation. Nevertheless we are willin] 
to send them in book form, on a week's fre 
trial in your own home. Send the coupon. 



Lessons in Cooking 

Through Preparation 

of Meals 

by Robinson & Hammel 
500 pp. Illus., 1 Leathei 
Style. Gold Stamped 

CONTENTS: Menus with 
recipes for 12 weeks and 

FULL DIRECTIONS FOR PRE- 
PARING EACH MEAL. Menus 
and Directions for Formal 
and Informal Dinners, 
Luncheon.s, Suppers, etc. 
12 Special .\rticles: Serving, 
Dish Washing, Candy Mak- 
ing, etc. Also Balanced 
Diet, Food Value, Ways of 
Reducing Costs, etc. 

With the books to 
questions answered. 



Household Engineering 

Scientific Management 

in the Home 

by Mrs. Christine Frede- 
rick. 544 pp., 134 Illus., 
I Leather Style. Gold 
Stamped. CONTENTS: 
The Labor-Saving Kitchen; 
Plans and Methods; Help- 
ful Household Tools; 
Methods of Cleaning; Food 
and Food Planning; Prac- 
tical Laundry Work; Fam- 
ily Finance; EflScient Pur- 
chasing; The Servantless 
Household; Planning the 
EflScient Home; Health 
and Personal Efficiencj. 

Membership Free, 

elude: a. All personal 

All Domestic Science books loaned, c. Use 
Purchasing Department, d. Bulletins and Econ- 
omy Letters, e. Credit o'n our full Professional | 
or Home-Makers' Correspondence Courses. 

In these difficult days you really cann : 
afford to be without our "Helpers." You ow< 
it to yourself and family to give them a fai^ 
trial. You cannot realize what great help the} 
will give you till you try them — and the trial 
costs you nothing. Send the coupon. 

American School of Home Economics, Chicago, Ill\ 



A. S. H. E. — 503 W. 69th Street. Chicago. 111. 

Send your two "HOUSEHOLD HELPERS." prepaifl 
on a week's trial, in the de Luxe binding. H satisfactory, 
will send you $5 in full payment (OR) 50 cents and 81 ] 
month for five months. Membership to be included fr 
Otherwise I will return one or both books in seven dayl 
rRegular mail price $2.64 each.) 

Name and 

Address 

Reference 



Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
146 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




That indescribably "different taste" between a home-cooked meal 
and a meal prepared by a famous chef is merely the difference in the 
seasoning of things. 

Knowing how to season is what makes a famous chef. He uses any 
number of ingredients in almost every dish — and it is the combination 
of all of them in the right proportions that produces that wonderfully 
delicious "different taste." 

FAUST CHILE POWDER 

was originated by Henry Dietz, the chef of the historical, 
world-famous Faust Cafe, and now Bevo M.'l. It is a com- 
bination of spices, herbs, seeds, paprika, chile pepper ajid 
other seasonings. It's the seasoning you must use if you want 
your dishes to rival those prepared by famous chefs, and it's 
the seasoning you WILL use if you try it once. Use Faust 
Chile Powder in all salad dressings, in all relishes, in stews, 
soups, chile con came, au gratin dishes, etc. 

If your dealer hasn't it in stock now, send 20c to cover cost, 
packing and postage of a can of Faust Chile Powder 
and Recipe Book. 

C. F. Blanke Tea and Coffee Co. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Manufacturers of the ^vorld-fatnous Faust 
nstant Coffee and Tea 




Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
147 



AMERICAN COOKERY 





Cakes for Kiddies! 

BE most particular about the flavoring you use in 
cake making. Good cakes are nourishing; but 
impure extracts may upset children's delicate 
stomachs. 

Use BEE BRAND VANILLA. It is absolutely pure. 

Made from the finest ingrecients, with greatest care 

and skill. 

Next time you buy Vanilla, ask for 
"Bee Brand. ' ' Its rich, clear flavor 
has unusual quality and strength. 
Bee Brand Vanilla "goes farther." 
Bee Brand Extracts are sold in all 
flavors. 

An interesting booklet called 
the ^'Story of Extracts" will 
be sent upon request. Men- 
tion your dealer' s name. 

McCORMICK & CO. 

BALTIMORE, U. S. A. 



Bee®B rand 

EXTRACTS 



SAI^AD»^ECREa^ 



100 recipes. Brief but complete. 15c by mail. 100 Meat- 
less _recipes 15c. _ 50 Sandwich recipes 15c. All three 30c. 
J. R. BRIGGS, 250 Madison St., Brookiym N Y. 



ROBERTS 

Lightning Mixer 
Beats Everything 

Beats eggs, whips cream, churns butter, mixes 
gravies, desserts and dressings, and does the 
work in a few seconds. Blends and mixes 
malted milk and all drinks. 

Simple and Strong. Saves work — easy 
to clean. Most necessary household 
article. Usedby 200,000 housewives. 

A USEFUL CHRISTMAS GIFT 

If your dealer does not carry this, we will 
send prepaid quart size $1.00, pint size 75c. 
Far West and South, quart $1.25, pint 90c. 
llecipe book free with mixer. 

NATIONAL CO. les oiivw si., boston, mass. 



Price's 




Vaniu A 



^ 



>>» « 




J'PRICf, 



Look for 
the little 
Tropikid ) 

on the 

label. 



Flavoring is the keynoteof a delicious pud- 
ding, custard, cake or home made ice-cream. 
Ask tor Price's Vanilla— it means purity, rich, 
mellow flavor and just-right strength. 

PRICE FLAVORING EXTRACT CO. 
Chicago, U. S. A. 




Furniture, Leather Upholstery 

Varnished, Painted and 

Enameled Surfaces 

and Windshields 



Makes Old Cars and Old 
Furniture Look Like New 



WARRANTED FREE FROM 
ACID AND GREASE 



WILL NOT BURN 

Pint Screw Top Cans - - .$1.00 
Qvart " a ^i _ _ 1 £0 

Sent Parcel Post Prepaid 
Cash with order 

Local agents wanted in U. S. and 
Canada. 

Send Postal for Booklet and agents ' prices. 

SAWYER CRYSTAL BLUE CO. 

Sole Selling Agents 
88 Broad St., Boston, Mass. 



Two New Household Helper! 

On 10 days' free trial! They save yt)u at least aw hour a day 
worth at only 30 cents an hour. !i(2.10 a week. Cost only thf 
10 cents a week for a year. Meynbership free. Send postcard 
or note for details of these "helpers," — our two new home- 
study courses, now in hook form or /5.00 in full p.i\ ineiit. 

AM. SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS. 503 W. 69th ST, CHICAGO | 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
148 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




The Most Beautiful of Foods 

No other food permitted in the dietary of practically every case of 
sickness can be used in so many forms and served in so many ways 
as Jell-0. 

No other can be made and served so easily and quickly — with so 
little fuss and so little loss of time. 

Prepared by the nurse who has no special dietetic training but only 
follows the simple directions, it is as delicious and as attractive to the 
patient as though served by a professional dietitian. 

The use of Jell-0 for invalid feeding is becoming universal. The 
patient finds its delicious flavor the most palatable of any food on his 
tray, while the nurse has the satisfaction of knowing that it cannot 
cause a digestive upset. . 

There are six of the flavors: Strawberry, Raspberry, Lemon, 
Orange, Cherry, Chocolate. 

THE GENESEE PURE FOOD COMPANY 
Le Roy, N. Y., and Bridgeburg, Ont. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
149 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




WILSON'S 

CertiRed teed 

Boiled Ham 

for making real sandwiches 



SOMETIMES we are astonished at 
the hearty appetliGS of growing boys 
and girls— but big appetites are Nature's 
way of helping children to get what they 
need to grow into strong, healthy men 
and women. Let your boys and girls 
feast on generous sandwiches made 
with Wilson's square-pressed boiled 
ham; give them all the nourishing, 
muscle-making qualities of this delicious 
food. 



\1C ZILSON'S square-pressed boiled ham 
* '^ is carefully selected, trimmed and 
boned so that there is no waste when 
sliced. Its tempting flavor is emphasized 
through careful cooking by expert chefs. 
The illustration shows how it is specially 
•'square-pressed'* so that each slice makes 
two neat sandwiches. Buy it, sliced 
fresh to order, of your meat dealer, deli- 
catessen store or grocer. The Wilson 
label guarantees its fine quality. 



1^^^ 






Bu\' advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
150 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



This would be a good page to tear out and paste in your cook book. It is valuable. 



Selecting Ingredients 

A good cake cannot be made with poor in- 
gredients. For the best results choose only the 
purest materials obtainable. Cake is a food that 
contains the most nutritive elements, such as 
eggs, butter, milk, sugar, flour, etc. Cake is more 
delicate than bread and needs a more delicate 
flour. This flour is Swans Down Cake Flour, soft, 
white and velvety, made especially for cake and 
pastry baking. Swans Down costs but a few 
cents more per cake and yet it insures against dis- 
appointment and costly cake failures. Lighter , 
whiter, finer, better cakes if you use Swans Down. 



QoodQake "taking 




Measuring 




All ingredients called for in any good recipe 
must be accurately mixed and alF measurements 
should be level. This is necessary in order to 
obtain the same results in each baking. The 
standard one-half pint measuring cup should be 
used and the recipe followed exactly. 



Careful Mixing 

1 1 is necessary in successful cake baking that all 
ingredients be perfectly measured and utensils 
cind cake tins be ready before beginning to mix 
the cake. Always beat the shortening to a cream 
before adding any sugar. Add sugar gradually, 
creaming the mixture meanwhile. Add a little of 
sifted Swans Down Cake Flour, with baking 
powder added, then a little milk and so on alter- 
nately until all the flour and milk are used. Beat 
the batter, never stirring, after each addition of 
flour and milk. Add flavoring. The stiffly -beaten 
egg-whites should next be folded in very care- 
fully if recipe calls for same. Work quickly, but 
carefully, in mixing your cake. 



Correct Oven Heat 

The heat of oven for cake baking is of very 
great importance. There are some general guides 
for temperature which may be profitably ob- 
served. All thin layer, small cakes and cookies 
require a hot oven (350-375^ F.). Thick layer 
and cakes baked in a loaf require a moderate oven 
(325-350° F.) while spbnge cakes and angel cakes 
require a slow oven (250-300° F.). Fruit cakes 
require even a slower oven (225-250° F.). 



The helpful hints above are taken from "Cake Secrets," an 
authoritative booklet on cake baking by Janet McKenzie Hill, 
editor of American Cookery Magazine. You are welcome to a 
copy, full of original recipes, directions, illustrations — for 1 Oc 
sent to Igleheart Brothers, Evansville, Indiana, Department A 8. 
Best grocers everywhere have Swans Down Cake Flour. If you 
cannot get it write us. Use it in your cake baking. 



''-^€M3SSS^ 




r 



Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
151 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



ppsbape 

for SERy^CE • 




If your grocer and butcher send your bulk foods home 
in a Riteshape dish you can put the package right on the 
cake of ice. 

The Riteshape is a wooden dish, as sanitary as nature 
made the sweet, clean wood. 

The Riteshape will not contaminate the food, nor 
soften nor collapse. under moisture of the oils and juices 
in the food. 

The Oval Wood Dish Company 

FACTORY AT TUPPER LAKE, N. Y. 



EASTERN OFFICE 

now. 40th St. 
New York City 



WESTERN OFFICE 

37 S. Wabash Ave. 
Chicago, 111. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
152 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




What a treat 

IcG QroamJ 

for iKo Kiddies 

How their Little Eyes Sparkle 
Such Satisfaction to Watch the Enjoyment 

Has it ever occured to you how much the flavoring means to Ice Cream, 
— and that you should always select what you know is the best? 

STICKNEY & POOR'S 

VANILLA AND ORANGE EXTRACTS 

Measure up to the highest standard of purity and strength. You know they are made right, 
for, think of it — the house of STICKNEV & POOR has served our public for generations and 
was honored at your grandmother's table as on yours today. 

The spices and seasonings made by STICKNEY & POOR are always pleasing in every way 
Do not forget them at this season when they add so much to your cooking The Standard of 
Standards STICKNEY & POOR'S Prepared Mustard, is the nicest relish with cold meats, 
fish, salads, etc., which one likes to serve in hot weather 

Your co-operating Servant, 

MUSTARDFOT. 



I 




Stickivey & Poor. Spice Compainy 

1815 — Century Old ~ Century Honored — 1920 
Mustard-Spices BOSTON and HALIFAX Seasonings-Flavorings 

THE NATIONAL MUSTARD POT 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
153 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




And a package of White House Coffee, 
please. No! I must have White House 
- nothing else will do." 



It is useless to try to sutsfitute some- 
thing else for White House. 

The new, up-to-date package keeps 
all goodness in, all badness out, assur- 
ing you the same splendid quality you 
have always had. ^ '~" 



White House 

Coffee and Teas 

White House Coffee comes in 1, 3 and 5-lb. 

packages only— never in bulk. 
White House Teas— five favorite varieties— 

1-4 and 1-2 lb. packages. 

DWINELL- WRIGHT COMPANY, Principal Coffee Roasters. BOSTON-CHICAGO 



COFFEE 



This New Range Is A 
Wonder For Coohing 

Although less than four feet long it can do every kind 
of cooking for any ordinary family by gas in summec 
or by coal or wood when the kitchen needs heating. 

There is absolutely no danger in this combination, as 

the gas section is as entirely separate from the coal 
section as if placed in another part of the kitchen. 

Note the two gas 
ovens above — one 

for baking, glass 
paneled andone for 
broiling with white 
enamel door. The 





The Ranse that "Makes Cooking Easy' 



Coal, Wood and Gas Ran^e 

large square oven below is heated by coal or wood. 

See the cooking surface when you want to rush thing's— five burners 
for gas and four covers for coal. The entire range is always available 
as both coal and gas ovens can be operated at the same time, using 
one for meats and the other for pastry. It Makes Cooking Easy. 

^%^ Gold Medal m 

Glenwood 

Write to-day for handsome free booklet 151 tKat telb all abont it, to 

Weir Stove Co., Taunton, Mass. Manufacturera of the Celebrated Glenwood 
Coal, Wood and Gas Runtres, Heating Stoves and Furnaces. 



i 



Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
154 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



ENCO 



A SIGN 
N^ CD LJ 

TRUST 



Lidlrtens ilie JDurcLens oi 
iloT Weaxner Uousekeepind 




EMCO PRODUCTS 

STYLE DISHES 




Keep house the EMCO way during the hot season. Use EMCO 
Plates for all the meals and cutout the dish washing. EMCO Plates 
are made from genuine North Michigan Sugar Maple. This kitchen 
package contains 

50 9-in. EMCO dinner plates, used once and thrown away. 
12 handy EMCO wood dishes. 
2500 EMCO Toothpicks. 
60 EMCO Clothespins. 

AH for One Dollar, postpaid, anywhere in 
ESCANABA MFG. CO. the United States. Write today and get the 

Department D package that has made a thousand- house- 

Escanaba, Mich. wives happy. 

Herewith find $1.00 for which please send 
me postpaid the EMCO Kitchen Package, 

Name 



Street.... 
City. 



State. 



Escanaba Manufacturing Company 

MANUFACTURERS 

ESCANABA - MICHIGAN 



Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 

155 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




The cord used on the Washing Machine sho^ivn in the picture is fitted i.vith a Benjamin No. 903 Szvivel 
Attachment Plug, n^vhich scre^xvs into the socket ^cvithout tavistin^ or damaging the cord. Ask your dealer to 
equip the cords of your appliances n.vith it. 
Benjamin No, 2452 Shade Holders enable you to use any shade <vtjith your Benjamin Tnjuo-Way Plugs. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
156 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



HEBE 



-the wholesome cooUjig aid 
that emiches your other jvods 
makes living costless^ adds 
variety to your memi^ 

For economy use Hebe 

in meat, egg and fish dishes 



COOKING with HEBE offers a 
wonderful opportunity to econo- 
mize and at the same time you have rich 
and attractive meals. The less expensive 
cuts of meat, also fish and eggs, can be 
prepared in a variety of ways. Prepared 
with HEBE they are additionally nutri- 
tious, and delicious in flavor, and the cost 
of living is reduced. 

Cooking experts will find many new 
and delightful ways of preparing foods 
with HEBE. Order HEBE from the 
grocer today. Keep several cans on hand 



all the time. It stays sweet indefinitely 
until the can is opened if kept in a cool 
place. You wdll find it a balanced food — 
pure skimmed milk evaporated to double 
strength enriched with cocoanut fat. In 
the hermetically sealed can HEBE retains 
its purity and wholesomeness guarded >so 
carefully in its manufacture. 

Write for HEBE Book of Recipes, show- 
ing how HEBE can be used in cooking of 
all kinds. Address Home Economy Dept., 
2915 Consumers Bldg., Chicago. 



THE HEBE COMPANY 

Chicago Seattle 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
157 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Experience has shown that the most satisfactory way 

to enlarge the subscription list of American Cookery is through its present subscri- 
bers, who personally can vouch for the value of the publication. To make it an 
object for subscribers to secure new subscribers, we offer the following premiums: 

CONDITIONS : premiums are not given with a subscription or for a renewal, but only 
* to present subscribers, for securing and sending to us new yearly sub- 
scriptions at $1.50 each. The number of new subscriptions requited to secure each premium is clearly 
Stated below the description of each premium. 

Transportation is or is not paid as stated. 

INDIVIDUAL INITIAL JELLY MOULDS 

Serve Eggs, Fish and Meats in Aspic; 
Coffee and Fruit Jelly; Pudding and other 
desserts with your initial letter raised on 
the top. Latest and daintiest novelty for 
the up-to-date hostess. To remove jelly 
take a needle and run it around inside of 
mould, then immerse in warm water; jelly 
will then come out in perfect condition. 
Be the first in your town to have these. 
You cannot purchase them at the stores. 





This shows the jelly turned from the mould 



This shows mould 
(upside down) 



Set of six (6), any initial, sent postpaid for (1) new subscription. Cash Price 75 cents. 



TATTY IRONS' 




As illustrated, are used to make dainty, flaky 
pates or timbales; delicate pastry cups for serv- 
ing hot or frozen dainties, creamed vegetables, 
salads, shell fish, ices, etc. Each set comes 
securely packed in an attractive box with recipes 
and full directions for use. Sent, postpaid, for 
two (2) new subscriptions. Cash price, $1.50. 



SILVER'S 

SURE CUT 

FRENCH FRIED 
POTATO CUTTER 

One of the most 
modern and eflBcient 
kitchen helps ever in- 
vented. A big labor 
and time saver. 

Sent, prepaid, for 
one (1) new subscrip- 
tion. Cash price 75 
cents. 







FRENCH ROLL BREAD PAN 




^^^^V^\J^Va#^ 



'^\4#^' 




Open 
End 



Best quality blued steel. 6 inches wide by 13 
ttg. One pan sent, prepaid, for one (1) new 



rSest quality blued steel, o i 
long. One pan sent, prepaid, 
subscription. Cash price, 75 cent8 

SEAMLESS VIENNA BREAD PAN 




Two of these pans sent, postpaid for one (1) 
new subscription. Cash price, 75 cents for two 



pans 




HEAVY TIN BORDER MOULD 

Imported, Round, 6 inch 

Sent, prepaid, for one (1) new subscription. 
Cash price, 75 cents. 



THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO. 



Boston, Mass. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
158 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



^ 



A 



\-^ii 



■x^ 



Give the JUNE BRIDE a copy of this New Edition 
of America's Leading Cook Book 

The BOSTON COOKING- 
SCHOOL COOK BOOK 

By FANNIE MERRITT FARMER 

P)R many years the acknowl- 
edged leader of all cook books, 
this New Edition contains in addi- 
tion to its fund of general informa- 
tion, 2,117 recipes, all of which 
have been tested at Miss Farmer's 
Boston Cooking-School, together 
with additional chapters on the 
Cold-Pack Method of Canning, on 
the Drying of Fruits and Vege- 
tables, and on Food Values. 



M 







BoshnO>o^Z U 

1A 



fi0'^ 



CoohBoJ^ 





ISS Farmer's Cook Book is un- 
doubtedly the most scientific, 
most practical, and serviceable work of its kind. It 
contains the classification and correct proportions of 
food, tables of measurements and weights, time tables 
for cooking, menus, and much information not to be 
found elsewhere. 

" The Boston Cooking School Cook Book is one of the volumes to which good housewives 
pin their faith, on account of its accuracy, its economy, its clear, concise teachings, and its vast 
number of new^ recipes." — Good Housekeeping Magazine. 

" The best cook book on the market. " — Woman's World, New York. 

'\ The recipes are compounded with a knowledge of thescience of cooking." — The Outlook. 
" As a household companion, for mistress or maid, and guide to the art of Cookery, it is all 
that can well be desired." — Boston Cooking Scfwol Magazine. 

619 Pages 133 Illustrations $2.50 net 

For Sale by all Booksellers 



LITTLE, BROWN & COMPANY 

Publishers, 34 Beacon Street, Boston 



n 



n 



n 




Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
159 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



LAT 



PROCTER 4 GAMBLE 



Dub a cake of Ivory Soap be- 
•^^ tween your wet hands, and 
watch the wonderful Ivory lather 
foam up in millions of lively 
bubbles. 

Rub the lather into your skin. No- 
tice how grateful it feels — not a 
suggestion of irritation. Notice 
that it does not dry down nor go 
"flat," but spreads its velvety coat 
over your entire body. 

Dash water upon it. See it vanish 
instantly. Observe the clear, satiny 
smoothness it gives to your skin, 
and the exhilarating sense of per- 
fect cleanliness which envelops you. 

Do you wonder that the people 
who use Ivory Soap can be satis- 
fied with 'no other? 



IVORY SOAP 

99 i^ % PURE IT FLOATS 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
160 











^«;SS*J» 



on 
Ami 



— and isnt it clear! 

It's so easy to keep mirrors sparkling like 
jewels with Bon Ami. 

Just cover the glass with a thin lather of 
Bon Ami. It dries in a jiffy. Then wipe off 
with a soft, dry cloth. And the fly-specks 
and dust will vanish like magic, leaving the 
mirror clear as crystal. 

Bon Ami lightens house-cleaning. It is fine 
for cleaning and polishing windows, nickel, 
brass, enamels, linoleums and tiles. 



Made in both cake 
and powder form. 





I 



E TUDOR PRESS, BOSTON 



rWtfwbngJ&jp 



^^«^«=Q^^ 



^ 



SAK£R:s COCOA. 

ispiire and delicious. 
Trade mark on every 

package. 
WALTER BAKER & CO. ltd. 

ESTA8USHED 1730 DORCHESTER, MASS. 



"Choisa" 

Orange Pekoe 

Ceylon Tea 




A Select High-Grade Tea 
at a Moderate Price 



Pure 



Piich 



Fragrant 



S. S. PIERCE CO 



BOSTON 



BROOKLINE 



Established ^^C 

IB58 ^|r ^Crystal 

S^BLUE 

K^ AND, 

AMMONIA 

The Ammonia loosens the dirt, 
making washing easy. The Blue 
gives the only perfect finish. 



J^tSf The People* s 
Choice for Over 
Sixty Years 



1858 



1920 





SAWYER CRYSTAL BLUE CO. 

88 Broad St., Boston, Mass. 



The Cream 

of Cream of Tartar 

To be absolutely sure to get the abso- 
lutely pure and highest test cream of 
tartar you should insist upon having 



SLADE'S 




Slade's is always the same high grade; it 
does not vary in strength or density; it 
is uniformly good. 

Uniformity is essential to the best results 
in cooking. 

Ask grocers for Slade's and do not accept 
inferior kinds. 

D. & L. SLADE CO. 

BOSTON, MASS., U. S. A. 



vose 



ni A \inC ^*^'® ^^^^ established more than 50 YEARS. By our system of 
I lAlll^iN pavments every family in mo.lerate eireiimstaiues can own .. 
1 IfTl^V^/ VOSE piano. We take old instruments in exehanjre an.l d<li\ 
tlu' iiiw piano in your home free of expense. Write for catalog 1) ami explanation 

VOSE & SONS PIANO CO., 160 BoyUton St., Boston, Mass. 



NEW ENGLAND ELECTION CAKE (p ip 

\MERICAN 



ORERY 




rORAlBRXV 



E, BOSTON 
G-SCHOOLMAGAZINE 

CULINARY- SCIENCEand DOMESTIC-ECONOMICS 





Si 



>r*9^ 



mCY 



I'l 



i^,\ fe -^ 



/I 



Vj 




:':mBW7r 



•till' 



JPI71 



They Couldn't Wait fe j 

because they know her cake is \ 
always even, fine-grained and 
delicious since she commenced using 

RUMFORD 

The Wholesome Baking Powder 

Housewives, everywhere, who are the best cooks are more and more com- 
to makeRumford their final and regular choice because they have learned 
by experience that Rumford is the best baking powder at 
the price and there is no better baking powder at any price. 

Get a can from your grocer, today; try it and everything 
you bake will be fine-grained, light and delicious — per- 
fectly leavened — used over quarter of a century Rumford 
has never spoiled a balding. 



mg 



.AUNFDRD 






rmbakinsc 



FreeCook Book. Let us send you your copy of Janet McKenzie Hill's helpful and 
interesting cook book "The Rumford Way of Cookery and Household Economy." 



Rumford Company 

K77 



Dept. Providence, R, I. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




THE BLOCKS TELL THE STORY" 



'>ra'ttm by Otto Schneider for Cream of Wheat Co. 



Copyright by Cream of Wheat Co. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
161 



AMERICAN COOKERY 

Vol. XXV OCTOBER, 1920 No. 3 



CONTENTS FOR OCTOBER 

PAGE 

PLACING PICTURES AND BRIC-A-BRAC. 111. 

Mary H. Northend 171 

THE PRESENCE Arthur W. Peach 175 

THE HOPE VALLEY MAIDS' CEUB .... Elsie Splcer Eells 176 

SQUEAKS Clyde Robertson 178 

THE HOME OF THE BIG, RED APPLE . Antonia J. Stemple 180 
THE LUNCHEON TABLE AND TABLE LINEN 

Mary D. Chambers 182 
AUNT ANNA GIVES A COOKING LESSON . . . Ruth Fargo 184 

HENRIETTA A. Borden Stevens 186 

MISSOURI, MY 'HOUSEKEEPER .... Mary Ethel Sanders 188 

EVENING Elizabeth Eskenburg 189 

EDITORIALS 190-192 

SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES (Illustrated with half-tone 
engravings of prepared dishes) 

Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 193 

MENUS FOR WEEK IN OCTOBER 202 

MENUS FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS 203 

MAKING APPLES YOUR A4EDICINE CHEST 

F. M. Christianson 204 

BOBBY AND SLANG Blanche Elizabeth Wade 205 

WHAT TO DO WITH SACKS Minnie L. Church 206 

HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES: — New England Election Cake 
— How to Serve- Planked Steak — A Historic Pie — Hot Southern 

Slaw — For the Kitchen and Laundry 208 

QUERIES AND ANSWERS 212 

THE SILVER LINING 220 



$1.50 A YEAR Published Ten Times a Year 15c A Copy Q^^ 

Foreign postage 40c additional 

Entered at Boston post-office as second class matter 

Copyright, 1920, by 

THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO. 
Pope BIdg., 221 Columbus Ave., Boston 17, Mass. 

Please Renew on Receipt of Colored Blank Enclosed for that purpose 
/ 162 





ADVERTISEMENTS 



MRS. RORER 

AND SOME OF HER COOKERY BOOKS 



Canning and Preserving 

Shows how to can and preserve 
fruits and vegetables; Marma- 
lades, Jams, Fruit Butters and 
Jellies, Syrups, Catsups; Drying, 
Pickling, etc. 

Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 

Every Day Menu Book 

A menu for every meal in the 
year, besides menus for Special 
Occasions and Social Functions. 

Cloth, $1.50; by mail, $1.65 



Key to Simple Cookery 

A new-plan cook book. Its very sim- 
plicity will commend it to house- 
wives, for it saves time and worry. 

Cloth, $1.25; by mail, $1.40 

Ice Creams, Water Ices 
Frozen Puddings 

Philadelphia and Neapolitan Ice 
Creams, Water Ices, Frozen Pud- 
dings and Fruits, Sherbets, Sorbets, 
Sauces, etc. 

Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 



MRS. RORER'S NEW COOK BOOK 

Over 700 pages, 1,500 recipes, 128 illustrations, making a big, hand- 
some book, containing the choicest and best things in cookery. 
Every recipe is tried and proved. Xo mistakes can occur. A most 
dependable helper for Marketing, Preparing, Cooking and Serving 
food; also chapter on Carving. 

Cloth, illus., $2.50; by mail, $2.70 



Vegetable Cookery and 
Meat Substitutes 

Delightful new methods of cooking 
our vegetables, with wonderful 
recipes for dishes to use in place 
of meat. You'll be charmed with it. 

Cloth, $1.50; by mail, $1.65 

My Best 250 Recipes 

Mrs. Rorer's own selection of the 
best things in each department of 
cookery. Very choice and enticing. 

Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 



Cakes, Icings and 
Fillings 

Contains a large number of enticing 
and valuable recipes for cakes of 
all sorts and conditions. 

Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 

Dainties 

Contains Appetizers, Canapes, Vege- 
table and Fruit Cocktails, Cakes, 
Candies, Creamed Fruits, Desserts, 
Frozen Puddings, etc. 

Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 



For sale by all Bookstores and Department stores, or 

ARNOLD & COMPANY, 420 Sansom St., Philadelphia 



Buy advertised Goods 



— Do not- accept substitutes. 
163 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



INDEX FOR OCTOBER 



Aunt Anna Gives a Cooking Lesson 

Bobby and Slang . 

Editorials 

Evening 

Henrietta 

Home Ideas and Economies 

Home of the Big, Red Apple, The 

Hope \'alley Maids' Club, The 

Luncheon Table and Table Linen, The 

Making Apples Your Medicine Chest 

Menus .... 

Missouri, My Housekeeper 

Placing Pictures and Bric-a-Brac 

Presence, The 

Silver Lining, The 

Squeaks .... 

What to Do with Sacks 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



Beef, Corned, with Vegetable Salad. II 

Bombe Glace, Blackberry. 111. 

Cakes, Convent .... 

Cake, Maple Syrup. 111. 

Cake, Persian .... 

Charlotte Russe Mixture for Bombe 

Cucumbers, Supreme of 

Custard, Tartlets of Apple . 

Eggs Benedict, with Sauce Hollandaise 

111 

Flanc de Peches 

Fowl a la Toscana 

Frosting, Maple Svrup 

Hash, Planked, lilt . 

Jelly, Tomato. 111. 

Kabobs, Indian 

Lamb, Stuffed Shoulder of. 111. . 



195 
199 
199 
198 
200 
199 
193 
201 

193 
198 
196 
199 
195 
198 
196 
194 



Marmalade, Raisin and Apple 

Pears, Stuffed 

Pickle, Everready 

Pigeons in Cabbage. 111. 

Potatoes, Duchesse 

Preserve, Pear and Lemon 

Preserve, Pumpkin 

Pudding, Apple and Plum 

Salad, Alock Lobster. 111. 

Samp, Baltimore 

Samp with Cheese 

Sauce, Cream Almond 

Sauce, Hollandaise 

Soup, Scotch, with Prunes 

Sponge, Grape. 111. 

Tripe Birds, with Tomato Sauce 



PAGE 
184 

205 
190 
189 
186 
208 
180 
176 
182 
204 
202, 203 
188 
171 
175 
220 
178 
206 



201 
201 

201 
194 
196 
200 
200 
201 
197 
196 
196 
200 
193 
193 
197 
194 



QLERIES AND ANSWERS 



Pread, Economy in Homemade 

Bread, Rules for Wholewheat 

Butter, Almond . 

Butter, Peanut 

Cake, To Remove Paper from 

Cocoa, How to Substitute for Chocolate. 

Frosting, Boiled . . . . 



218 
218 
216 
214 
214 
212 
212 



Pickles, Value in Diet 
Pie, Is It Wholesome.' 
Pie, Nut Crust for 
Tarts, Sand 
Timbales, Corn . 
Welsh Rabbit 
Yeast, Homemade 



218 
218 
218 
214 
214 
214 
216 



We want representatives everywhere to take subscriptions for 
American Cookery. We have an attractive proposition to make 
those who will canvass their town; also to those who will secure a 
few names among their friends and acquaintances. Write us today. 

AMERICAN COOKERY - BOSTON, MASS. 



Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
164 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



c^^ 



8 




Give the Fall Bride a copy of this New Edition 
of America' s Leading Cook Book 

The BOSTON COOKING- 
SCHOOL COOK BOOK 

By FANNIE MERRITT FARMER 

P)R many years the acknowl- 
edged leader of all cook books, 
this New Edition contains in addi- 
tion to its fund of general informa- 
tion, 2,117 recipes, all of which 
have been tested at Miss Farmer's 
Boston Cooking-School, together 
with additional chapters on the 
Cold-Pack Method of Canning, on 
the Drying of Fruits and Vege- 
tables, and on Food Values. 



MISS Farmer's Cook Book is un- 
doubtedly the most scientific, 
most practical, and serviceable work of its kind. It 
contains the classification and correct proportions of 
food, tables of measurements and weights, time tables 
for cooking, menus, and much information not to be 
found elsewhere. 

" The Boston Cooking School Cook Book is one of the volumes to which good housewives 
pin their faith, on account of its accuracy, its economy, its clear, concise teachings, and its vast 
number of new recipes." — Good Housekeeping Magazirx. 

" Tlie best cook book on the meirket. " — IV Oman's [Vorld, New York. 

" The recipes are compounded with a knowledge of thescience of cooking." — The Outl\jok- 
" As a household cojnpanion, for mistress or maid, and guide to the art of Cookery, it is all 
that can well be desired. — Boston Cooking School Magazine. 

656 Pages 133 Illustrations $2.50 net 

For Sale by all Booksellers 




LITTLE, BROWN &>COMPANY 

Publishers, 34 Beacon Street, Boston 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
165 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Books on Household Economics 

THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE COMPANY presents the foUowing as a 
list of representative works on household economics. Any of the books will be sent postpaid 
upon receipt of price. 

Special rates made to schools, clubs and persons wishing a number of books. Write for quota- 
tion on the list of books you wish. We carry a very large stock of these books. One order to us 
saves effort and express charges. Prices subject to change without notice. 



A Guide to Laundry Work. Chambers. $1.00 
Allen, The, Treatment of Diabetes. 

Hill and Eckman 1.00 

American Cook Book. Mrs. J. M. Hill 1.50 
American Meat Cutting Charts. Beef, 

veal, pork, lamb — 4 charts, mounted on 



Dainties. Mrs. Rorer $1.00 

Diet for the Sick. Mrs. Rorer 2.00 

Diet in Relation to Age and Activity. 

Thompson 1.00 

Dishes and Beverages of the Old South. 
v^ McCulloch- Williams 1.50 



cloth and rollers 10.00 Uomestic Art in Women's Education. 



American Salad Book. M. DeLoup. . . . 1.50 



Cooley . 



V V^^WUICJ 1.40 

Around the World Cook Book. Barroll 2.50 ^Domestic Science in Elementary 
Art and Economy in Home Decorations, Schools. Wilson 1.20 

Priestman 1.50 '"'Domestic Service. Lucy M. Salmon. . . 2.25 

Artof Home Candy-Making (with ther- Dust and Its Dangers. Pruden 1.25 

mometer, dipping wire, etc.) 3.00 Easy Entertaining. Benton 1.50 

Art of Right Living. Richards 50 ^Economical Cookery. Marion Harris 

Bacteria, Yeasts and Molds in the Neil 2.00 

Home. H. W. Conn 1.48 Efficient Kitchen. Child 1.50 



Better Meals for Less Money. Greene 1.35 
''^ Book of Entrees. Mrs. Janet M. Hill . . . 2.00 
^ Boston Cook Book. Mary J. Lincoln . . 2.25 
Boston Cooking-School Cook Book. 

Fannie M. Farmer 2.50 

Bread and Bread-Making. Mrs. Rorer. .75 
^Breakfasts, Luncheons and Dinners. 

Chambers 1.25 

Bright Ideas for Entertaining. Linscott .75 
Business, The, of the Household. Taber 2.50 
Cakes, Icings and Fillings. Mrs. Rorer 1.00 
' Cakes, Pastry and Dessert Dishes. Janet 

M. Hill 2.00 

Candies and Bonbons. Neil 1.50 

Candy Cook Book. Alice Bradley 1.50 

Canning and Preserving. Mrs. Rorer. . 1.00 
Canning, Preserving and Jelly Making. 

Hill 

Canning, Preserving and Pickling. 

Marion H. Neil 1.50 

Care and Feeding of Children. L. E. 

Holt, M.D 1.25 

Catering for Special Occasions. Farmer 1.50 

Century Cook Book. Mary Ronald 3.00 

Chafing-Dish Possibilities. Farmer.... 1.50 
Chemistry in Daily Life. Lassar-Cohn . . 2.25 
Chemistry of Cookery. W. Mattieu 

Williams 2.25 

Chemistry of Cooking and Cleaning. 

Richards and Elliot 1.00 

Chemistry of Familiar Things. Sadtler 2.00 
Chemistry of Food and Nutrition. 

Sherman 2.10 

Cleaning and Renovating. E. G. Osman 1.20 

Clothing for Women. L. I. Baldt 2.50 

Cook Book for Nurses. Sarah C. Hill . . 
Cooking for Two. Mrs. Janet M. Hill. 

Cost of Cleanness. Richards 1.00 

Co«t of Food. Richards 1.00 

Cost of Living. Richards 1.00 

Cost of Shelter. Richards 1.00 

Course in Household Arts. Sister 

Loretto B. Duff 1.10 



Child 

Elements of the Theory and Practice of 

Cookery. Williams and Fisher 1.40 

Encyclopaedia of Foods and Beverages. 10.00 
NEquipment for Teaching Domestic 

Science. Kinne 80 

Etiquette of New York Today. Learned 1.60 

Etiquette of Today. Ordway 1.00 

European and American Cuisine. 

Lemcke 4.00 

Every Day Menu Book. Mrs. Rorer.... 1.50 
Every Woman's Canning Book. Hughes .75 

NExpert Waitress. A. F. Springsteed 1.25 

Feeding the Family. Rose 2.10 

First Principles of Nursing. Anne R. 

Manning 1.00 

Food and Cookery for the Sick and Con- 
valescent. Fannie M. Farmer 2.50 

Food and Feeding. Sir Henry Thompson 2.00 

Food arid Flavor. Finck 3.00 

Foods and Household Management. 

Kinne and Cooley 1.40 

Food and Nutrition. Bevier and Ushir 1.00 

Food Products. Sherman 2.40 

Food and Sanitation. Forester and 

Wigley 1.00 

Food and the Principles of Dietetics. 

Hutchinson 4.25 

Food for the Worker. Stern and Spitz. 1.00 
Food for the Invalid and the Convales- 
cent. Gibbs 75 

Food Materials and Their Adultera- 
tions. Richards 1.00 

Food Study. Wellman 1.10 

Food Values. Locke 1.75 

Foods and Their Adulterations. Wiley 6.00 
.75 ^Franco-American Cookery Book. D61i6e 4.50 

2.25 French Home Cooking. Low 1.50 

Fuels of the Household. Marian White .75 
Furnishing a Modest Home. Daniels 1.25 
Furnishing the Home of Good Taste. 

Throop 4.00 

Golden Rule Cook Book (600 Recipes for 
Meatless Dishes). Sharpe 2.50 



1.60 



Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
166 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Handbook for Home Economics. Flagg $0.75 
Handbook of Hospitality for Town and 

^ Country. Florence H. Hall 1.50 

Handbook of Invalid Cooking. Mary A. 

Boland 2.50 

Handbook on Sanitation. G. M. Price, 

M.D 1.50 

Healthful Farm House, The. Dodd. . . .60 
Home and Community Hygiene. 

Broadhurst 2.50 

Home Candy Making. Mrs. Rorer 75 

Home Economics. Maria Parloa 2.00 

Home Economics Movement 75 

Home Furnishing. Hunter 2.50 

Home Furnishings, Practical and Artis- 
tic. Kellogg 2.00 

Home Nursing. Harrison 1.50 

1^ Home Problems from a New Standpoint 1.00 
^Home Science and Cook Book. Anna 

Barrows and Mary J. Lincoln 1.00 

Hot Weather Dishes. Mrs. Rorer 75 

House Furnishing and Decoration. 

McClure and Eberlein 2.00 

House Sanitation. Talbot 80 

Housewifery. Balderston 2.50 

Household Bacteriology. Buchanan . . . 2.75 
Household Economics. Helen Campbell 1.75 
Household Engineering. Christine Fred- 
erick 2.00 

Household Physics. Alfred M. Butler. . 1.30 

Household Textiles. Gibbs 1.25 

.Housekeeper's Handy Book. Baxter.. 2.00 
>How to Cook in Casserole Dishes. Neil 1.50 
How to Cook for the Sick and Convales- 
cent. H. V. S. Sachse 2.00 

How to Feed Children. Hogan 1.25 

How to Use a Chafing Dish. Mrs. Rorer .75 

Human Foods. Snyder 2.00 

Ice Cream, Water Ices, etc. Rorer 1.00 

I Go a Marketing. Sowle 1.75 

\lnstitution Recipes. Emma Smedley. . 3.00 

Interior Decorations. Parsons 5.00 

International Cook Book. Filippini. . . . 2.50 
k Key to Simple Cookery. Mrs. Rorer. . 1.25 

^ King's Caroline Cook Book 2.00 

Kitchen Companion. Parloa 2.50 

Kitchenette Cookery. Anna M. East. . . 1.25 
Laboratory Handbook of Dietetics. Rose 1.50 
xLessons in Cooking Through Prepara- 

tion of Meals 2.00 

^Lessons in Elementary Cooking. Mary 

C. Jones 1.25 

Like Mother Used to Make. Herrick. . 1.25 

Luncheons. Mary Ronald 2.00 

A cook's picture book; 200 illustrations 

Made-over Dishes. Mrs. Rorer 75 

Many Ways for Cooking Eggs. Mrs. 

Rorer 75 

Marketing and Housework Manual. 

S. Agnes Donham 2.00 

Mrs. Allen's Cook Book. Jda C. Bailey 

Allen 2.00 

More Recipes for Fifty. Smith 2.00 

My Best 250 Recipes. Mrs. Rorer 1.00 

"New Book of Cookery, A. Farmer 2.50 

New Hostess of Today. Earned 1.75 

New Salads. Mrs. Rorer 1.00 



Nursing, Its Principles and Practice. 

Isabels and Robb $2.00 

Nutrition of a Household. Brewster.. 1.00 

Nutrition of Man. Chittenden 4.50 

Philadelphia Cook Ek>ok. Mrs. Rorer. . 1.50 
Planning and Furnishing the House. 

Quinn 1.25 

Practical Cooking and Dinner Giving. 

Mrs. Mary F. Henderson 1.60 

Practical Cooking and Serving. Mrs. 

Janet M. Hill 3. 00 

Practical Dietetics. Gilman Thompson 6.00 
Practical Dietetics with Reference to 

Diet in Disease. Patte 2.25 

Practical Food Elconomy. Alice Gitchell 

Kirk 1.35 

Practical Points in Nursing. Emily A. 

M. Stoney 2.00 

Practical Sewing and Dressmaking. 

Allington 1.50 

Principles of Chemistry Applied to the 

Household. Rowley and Farrell 1.50 

\Principles of Food Preparation. Mary 

D. Chambers 1.25 

Principles of Human Nutrition. Jordan 2.00 
Recipes and Menus for Fifty. Frances 

Lowe Smith 2.00 

_^ Rorer's (Mrs.) New Cook Book 2.50 

^^alads, Sandwiches, and Chafing Dish 

Dainties. Mrs. Janet M. Hill 2.00 

Sandwiches. Mrs. Rorer 75 

Sanitation in Daily Life. Richards 60 

School Feeding. Bryant 1.75 

Selection and Preparation of Food. 

Brevier and Meter 75 

Sewing Course for Schools. Woolman. . 1.50 
Shelter and Clothing. Kinne and Cooley 1.40 
Source, Chemistry and Use of Food 

Products. Bailey 2.00 

Story of Germ Life. H. W. Conn 1.00 

Successful Canning. Powell 2.50 

Sunday Night Suppers. Herrick 1.35 

Table Service. Allen 1.60 

Textiles. Woolman and McGowan 2.25 

The Chinese Cook Book. Shin Wong 

Chan 1.50 

The House in Good Taste. Elsie 

de Wolfe 4.00 

The Housekeeper's Apple Book. L. G. 

Mackay 1.25 

The New Housekeeping. Christine Fred- 
erick 1.90 

The Party Book. Fales and Northend. . 3.00 

The St. Francis Cook Book 5.00 

^he Story of Textiles 3.50 

The Up-to-Date Waitress. Mrs. Janet 

M. Hill 1.75 

The Woman Who Spends. Bertha J. 

Richardson 1.00 

Till the Doctor Comes and How to Help 

Him 1.00 

. True Food Values. Birge 1.25 

Vegetable Cookery and Meat Sub- 
stitutes. Mrs. Rorer 1.50 

With a Saucepan Over the Sea. Ade- 
laide Keen 1.75 

Women and Economics. Charlotte Per- 
kins Stetson 1.50 



Address all Orders: THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO., Boston, Mass. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
167 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




^ 1, and Span 
J* BathRoom 




^.-.T^m^ 




FOR the daily clea^-up use Old Dutch in the bath- 
room. Makes everything clean and bright with 
little labor. Goes further and does better work. 

Easily removes stains and scum. Restores original 
beauty of porcelain, enamel and marble surfaces. 

Old Dutch is superior to soap and caustic or acid 
preparations. Quick— Thorough — Economical. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
168 



Evensong 

fnto the harbor of night 

Have drifted the sails of day, 
And the dream ship takes its flight 

Through the skies where the dim stars play. 

So nod, little flower, and rest. 

Sleep, tiny cooing dov^e, 
Cuddle to mother's breast 

In the warmth of her boundless love. 

The blossoms have closed their eyes, 
And the shadow-elves are at play 

In the leaves where the night wind sighs 
And the glistening dewdrops stay. 

So nod, little flower, and rest. 

Sleep, tiny cooing dove, 
Cuddle to mother's breast 

In the warmth of her boundless love. 

And dream all the long night through 

In slumber deep and sweet; 
No harm shall come to you 

For the Father watches his sheep. 

So nod, little flower, and rest, 

Sleep, tiny cooing dove. 
Cuddle to mother's breast 

In the warmth of her boundless love. 

R. R. Greenwood. 



American Cookery 



VOL. XXV 



OCTOBER 



No. 3 



Placing the Pictures and Bric-a-Brac 

By Mary Harrod Northend 



DON'T have too many pictures! 
That is the first and cardinal 
principle. Don't make of a 
home either a museum or a curio shop. 
If there were no other reason for not 
doing it; the amount of time and energy 
wasted on the dusting would be a suf- 
ficient one — but the effect of a mass of 
small, fragile articles staring down from 
wall or mantel or bookcase is, at first, 
startling and overpowering. All thought 
of rest and repose in such a room is lost. 
Some walls seem so overloaded that a 
stranger has an uncomfortable feeling 
that the ornaments may come crashing 
down upon him. If in doubt whether 
there are too many things about, be on 
the safe side and put some away. It is 
easy enough to bring anything out again 
if, after living awhile without it, the space 
seems too bare. Few homes are on the 
side of too little. 

In the arrangement of the small things 
the same rules apply that were the guide 
in the treatment of the room as a whole. 
To scatter a lot of them carelessly about 
with the hope that the room will, conse- 
quently, seem better furnished and dec- 
orated is to insure an indifferent result. 
In homes that have been handled by 
clever decorators, not one little vase, not 
one tiny picture is placed without careful 
thought of the effect from every angle 
and the best possible spot and the best 
possible article for that spot are chosen. 
These minor details indicate the work of 
the true artist, and perhaps only the true 
artist can fully appreciate them, but even 



the most ordinary perception can realize 
the difference between this kind of a room 
and one in which there is a haphazard 
conglomeration. Every article should be 
placed in relation to the others. 

The pictures on the wall must be hung 
with as much attention to balance and 
proportion of spacing and mass as is given 
the large pieces of furniture. They must 
be distributed about the room evenly so 
that no one part of the room will secure 
more prominence than another. One 
wall cannot properly bear a group of half 
a dozen or more striking pictures and the 




PKUPliR SETTING AND WELL DONE 



171 



172 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



rest of the room have none. If there is 
no other available wall space, then let 
the one spot have only one or two pictures 
that shall not seem to outweigh the 
absence of them in the other parts. 

Hang them to decorate the wall space. 
Treat each division of the wall between 
the interruptions of architectural features, 
the doors, windows, fireplace or the furni- 
ture as a panel that is to be decorated, 
on which the pictures are to be arranged 
so that the proportions of the space are 
kept beautiful. The position of the fur- 
niture against the wall will influence this 
arrangement. The furniture will seem 
partially to support the picture above 
it, so that a heavy mission frame is out 
of the question above a slender table, 
which could not in reality bear its 



weight. In the same way, a large 
picture should be placed squarely over 
the piece of furniture beneath it so 
that it may convey an impression of 
balance. If this necessitates an uneven 
division of the wall space above, then a 
smaller picture can be placed to the side 
to give interest to that fact. 

Think of this wall space as a sheet of 
paper, which is to be divided in such a 
way that it will become more beautiful 
and more interesting. Supposing that 
there are three pictures, which you wish 
to put on the wall; the position of the 
largest is determined by the furniture 
beneath. You can mark out on a piece 
of paper the proportions of the wall space, 
and put in it a rectangle to indicate the 
main picture. Then cut two smaller 




PICTURE AND MIRROR ARK WKLL PLACKI) 



PLACING PICTURES AND BRIC-A-BRAC 



173 




NOTE DUTCH PiC'I'URE, MIRROR AND BANJO CLOCK 



rectangles, in the proportions of tlie 
smaller pictures, and move them about 
until you have discovered the most 
interesting positions. All the rules of 
composition, which the painter must 
know, the laws which guide the printer 
In his typographical work, can be brought 
into use here and the longer one studies 
the matter the more interesting will the 
arrangement become. Perhaps one of 
the most important rules to remember is 
that when there is a division of space, one 
part should predominate. That will pre- 
vent the arranging of three or more pic- 
tures of the same size along in a row with 
equal spaces between them. It is a 
much more interesting grouping to put 
them one on each side a little lower or a 
little higher than the center one. Or if 
the proportions of the room demand that 
the wall space be made to seem as high 
as possible, if the ceiling is low and a ver- 



tical, rather than a horizontal motive is 
needed, place the smxall picture on one 
side above, and that on the ot!>er side 
below the center line. 

In certain rooms, where the treatment 
of the furniture is entirely formial, the 
pictures should be hung with equal 
formality. That is, the mirror or the 
picture must be placed exactly on the 
center of a table and smaller pictures 
exactly on each side at even distances; 
the effect should be a little stiff and 
precise. But in other roomys, which are 
furnished less formally, living-rcon. s and 
bedrooms especially, the pictures can 
well be hung so that they do not establish 
an exact symmetry. 

The question of how high to place 
pictures should be settled generally by 
the arrangement of the space. In rooms 
the walls of which have been properly 
treated, this will bring the center line of 



174 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



the picture about on a line with the eye 
when standing. It is amusing to notice 
how short people generally hang pic- 
tures so that they seem too low to a 
tall person and a small individual com- 
ing into another's home often feels that 
the pictures are almost at the ceiling. 
A happy medium should be struck; four 
and a half feet is a good average height 
at which to have the central point of 
interest in the picture. This will be 
somewhat influenced by the relation of 
it to the furniture below — a picture 
carrying out a vertical line of interest 
over a table should not be placed so 
high over the table that it seems to have 
no connection with it. But this rela- 
tion can often be maintained by a tall 
object on the table such as a candlestick 
or vase, that will reach up to meet the 
lower line of the frame. 

It should be quite needless to say that 



a picture must not overlap any of the 
panels or other fixed spacing in a room. 
It is evident, in such a case, that it has 
been hung without the slightest regard to 
the spacing, to the feeling of proportion 
or beautiful subdivision of the wall. 
But, unfortunately, it is a very common 
error that many a woman commits, 
when she has a picture that she wants 
to hang, and places it regardless of the 
effect. It is also important that the 
ornament on the furniture beneath the 
picture does not hide part of the frame. 
This again gives a crowded, misfit im- 
pression. 

Finally, remember that the lines of 
a picture should follow the lines of the 
room; just as no housewife would have 
a picture hanging crooked so that the 
top and bottom are not parallel with 
the floor and ceiling, so should the sides 
be parallel with the wall, the doors and 




AN EXAMPLE OF POOR TASTE. I'OO MANY OB I KC i S — NO r IN LINK. ETC. 



THE PRESENCE 



175 



windows. In other words, don't let the 
picture tilt out from the wall. Put the 
screws so near the top that the weight 
of the frame below will keep it upright. 
This in a measure, applies to the wiring 
also. It is generally better to have two 
straight wires hanging from two hooks 
on the molding than the one forming 
two slanting lines. But there is no 
actual principle broken by using the one 
wire, for the axis of the whole remains 
truly vertical, and the wires are simply a 
varying direction of line, just as if they 
were a triangle, the base of which is 
placed on the top of the picture. They 
are not often decorative, but, occasion- 
ally, they are even colored by being 
treated with the color-note of the entire 
scheme. 

The arrangement of the mantel shelf 
and the tops of bookcases, side tables, 
bureaus, and so on requires exactly the 
same kind of thought and planning. 
An exact and careful balancing is essen- 
tial. Many people understand this to 
mean absolute symmetry, and symmetry 
is the surest means of a successful 
result for the inexperienced. A candle- 
stick on one side of a mantel, balanced by 
its mate on the opposite side, at just the 
same distance from the end, is sure to be 




A NURSERY IX GOOD TASTE 



correct. But it is not as interesting, 
perhaps, and it calls for much less skill, 
certainly, than the arrangement which 
balances unequal objects, differing in 
mass, color, height and breadth, and 
balances them unerringly. 



The Presence 

The poets say the fairest spot 

That men have dreamed is Arcady; 
Their toil and sorrow are forgot, 

And that sweet grief called memory; 
Yet do I know that for its joy 

I should not care — 
Indeed, its song and mirth would cloy 

With vou not there! 



There is a land unfamed in song, 

A shadowed place of vain regret, 
Where lonely streams move still along 

And w'nds are harsh with din and fret; 
Yet do I know that land would seem 

Divinely fair, 
A place where hearts might joy and dream — 

If you were there! 

Arthur Wallace Peach. 



The Hope Valley Maids' Club 

By Elsie Spicer Eells 



B 



E it resolved that maids are 
people. Girls are girls even 
under an irreproachable black 
gown and white apron. We're all just 
alike under our skins!" cried Polly, with 
the same contagious little chuckle that 
won our hearts the first time we heard it 
on the college campus. Polly is the 
mother of four, but, to look at her in her 
new geranium-colored hat, you'd never 
dream that she was as grown up as that. 
"I had to go to South America to find 
that out," remarked Sylvia thoughtfully. 
"When I learned that my Brazilian cook 
was just as afraid of big crawly lizards as 
I was, she became a real human being to 
me for the first time. Even a course in 
biology couldn't get the fear of creeping, 
crawling things out of my system, and 
black Narcissa was just like me. She 
didn't happen to know that the world 
was round when she came to me, and I 
didn't know how to cook rice; but we 
were ever so much alike in really vital 
things." Sylvia's husband is an engineer 
and her first baby lies buried somewhere 
in Brazil. A little hush fell on our group 
for a moment, as it always does when 
Sylvia speaks of any of her Brazilian 
experiences. 

It was the October, 1919, meeting of the 
Hope Valley College Woman's Club. 
The subject for consideration was a new 
interest to take the place of the war work, 
which had so crowded our lives the past 
two years. Before the war our meetings 
used to consist largely of tea and gossip, 
but now a return to that custom did not 
seem like answering the call of our day 
and age. Phyllis, our president, is just 
as full of inspired ideas as when she used 
to set the pace for us back in college. Her 
new maid had complained of the dullness 
of Hope Valley. The girl was spending 
an evening or two a week going to dances 
20 miles away in Center City. 

1 



"She's absolutely good for nothing the 
day after," Phyllis had said. "And yet 
I can't blame her. There isn't anything 
for her to go to any nearer, except the 
movies, and the movies, with all their 
charms, aren't particularly sociable. 
Annie is like me and has a craving for 
the companionship of her friends. No 
amount of matinees and concerts, dearly 
as I love them, could take the place of 
gatherings like this, for instance. The 
problem of my Annie has set me to think- 
ing of what we could do to give our maids 
something to live for here in Hope Valley. 
They have plenty of money to spend in 
these days of high wages, but any one who 
has had to hire recently a new maid well 
knows that they are not happy enough in 
their work to make it a popular calling. 
All sorts of splendid welfare work is being 
done for our husbands' employees." 

Eleanor, our hostess, stirred the wood 
fire in the big fireplace. Before the war 
Eleanor would have rung to have a ser- 
vant attend to it. "My canteen work 
taught me all sorts of things about the 
dignity of labor," she said. "In the 
canteen we did not object to serving our 
washlady's son, if he wore the uniform of 
our country. Why can't we carry some 
of the spirit of our canteen work into 
giving the maids of Hope Valley the time 
of their lives .^" 

"That is exactly the sort of thing I had 
in mind," replied Phyllis. "Some of the 
canteen units have taken up industrial 
work to furnish a substitute for the saloon. 
Why isn't it our job to provide something 
jolly for the workers in our homes .^ \M1] 
some one please make a motion.^" 

Thus it was that the Hope \'alley 
Alaids' Club had its beginning. Of 
course, it didn't keep that title long. The 
very first business at the opening meeting 
was choosing a name for the club. ''The 
Lafi'alots" was what was selected. It 



IG 



HOPE VALLEY ^L\IDS' CLUB 



177 



might have been worse. It stands for 
good cheer and typifies kitchens redolent 
with the odor of gingerbread and cinna- 
mon tarts. 

It is not my purpose to chronicle our 
discouragements. Of course, we had 
them. In the first place the maids were 
not so enthusiastic and responsive as we 
had expected. They were afraid of being 
patronized. We saw to it that the 
Charter Members had such glorious 
times that they were an advertisement 
for the club. 

Hope \'alley is so fortunate as to have 
a new community house, donated as a 
memorial to the Hope Valley boys who 
fell "somewhere in France." This is 
our meeting place. If we had under- 
taken this work before the war, we should 
have had to use the parish house. 

The Woman's College Club was at 
first the only godmother of "The Laffa- 
lots," but later the D. A. R. and the 
Reading Club joined us. Three or four 
of us are always present and serve the 
light refreshments with which the meet- 
ing closes. It gives us the excuse for 
being there, just as it did in the Canteen, 
and when one's daily work is serving food 
to other people one is not exactly crazy 
about doing it one's evening out. 

The girls have their own organization 
with their own officers. Their dues pro- 
vide the refreshments. With the high 
wages Hope Valley pays its maids, they 
are by no means an object of charity. 

At first, until we all got well acquainted 
with each other, our evenings were music 
and dancing ones. Then we tried old- 
fashioned games and charades for a 
change. "The Laffalots" taught us a 
surprising number of new games, too. 
Later some delightful Fireside Evenings 
were introduced, with stories and songs 
around the open fire. It was Sylvia who 
told folk tales in her inimitable way and 
by her sympathetic understanding in- 
spired the girls to tell the stories told 
them in their own childhood. With 
representatives from Ireland, Yorkshire, 
Norway, Sweden and Poland, they fur- 



nished a most interesting collection. 
Sylvia took notes, and is thinking seri- 
ously of making them into a book. Who 
knows but we may be able to provide a 
collection of folksongs and folk dances all 
our own, not to mention a game book? 
The girls are as happy as can be to con- 
tribute stories which Sylvia gets enthu- 
siastic about. 

Polly's next door neighbor remarked 
the other day, that since her maid joined 
the club she is able to make herself intel- 
ligible when she answers the telephone. 
She is Swedish, and when she came to 
Hope \*alley her English was limited to 
simple household terms. Her vocabu- 
larv has expanded wonderfullv as a 
"Laffalot." 

In summer we have picnics and out- 
door campfires to take the place of the 
Community House fireplace. We are 
going to organize a tennis club, too. next 
summer. We are planning to use the 
courts on the Community grounds, which 
are lighted at night, and we'll not be 
limited to daylight playing. 

It was the new minister's wife who 
suggested that we supplement our eve- 
nings with Sunday afternoon walks to 
initiate the girls into enjoying the lovely 
outdoor world which we have here in Hope 
Valley. We thought it a splendid idea. 

One of the special things we had in the 
back of our minds, when we started the 
club, was a far-away dream of domestic 
science talks and demonstrations. Mrs. 
Jamieson, who has made domestic science 
fashionable among club women, is a 
friend of Phyllis. \Mien she heard about 
our club, she offered of her own free will, 
Phyllis says, to -come down from the city 
and talk to the girls. Knowing Phyllis, 
I suspect Mrs. Jamieson was hypnotized 
into making that off^er. 

When the Hope \^alley women heard 
that the famous Mrs. Jamieson was to 
speak to the "Laffalots," they were all 
eager to come to the meeting. As soon 
as it was announced, we began to have 
telephone calls in regard to it from every- 
bodv in town. We saw in it exactlv the 



178 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



sort of an opportunity for democracy 
that we had hoped for sometime, but 
never expected to see realized so soon. 

"When I was a girl In the country," 
said Polly, after Mrs. Jamleson's meeting, 
when a few of us were lingering at the 
Community House to talk things over, 
"we always took the ^ hired girl' to church 
with us. She sat In the family pew with 
the rest of us, and she went to all the 
church sociables, and . . . ." 

" She ate at the family table, too, didn't 
she.^" queried Eleanor, laughing. 

"You who were brought up with 
butlers should not ridicule us who were 
brought up with 'hired girls,' " retorted 
Polly. "The determination of the New 
England 'hired girl' to eat at the family 
table had In It some of the spirit of 
democracy, which the founders of this 
country Intended to build the nation with. 
It Is part of the same democracy which 
our boys fought In France for. ..." 

"I'm properly humbled," laughed Elea- 
nor. " I enjoyed that meeting which Mrs. 
Jamleson addressed as much as anybody, 
though, I must confess, I smiled to my- 
self when I thought of what my mother 
would say to see me sitting there beside 
Sylvia's cook and chatting with her inti- 
mately at the Intermission. By the way, 
she was taking notes in a much neater 
hand than I write myself." 

"What if the young men of the first 
families should get as eager to come to 
the 'LaflFalot' dances as their mothers 
were to come to Mrs. Jamleson's meet- 
ing.^" asked Phyllis. 



We gazed at each other In startled 
horror, until Polly said emphatically, 
"They won't. They're Invited to too 
many other dances. There is only one 
Mrs. Jamleson." Then she added this 
question for us to consider, "Why would 
it be any worse for a young man to go to 
a dance attended by his mother's maid 
than to go to one attended by his father's 
private secretary?" 

"The point of the whole matter Is this," 
said Phyllis, with the little toss of her 
dark head, which we who know her so 
well particularly love. I have always 
thought that if the Winged Victory had 
a head, she would carry it the way Phyllis 
does hers. "The maids employed In 
Hope Valley must be the fine, straight 
type of girls whom it wouldn't harm any 
young man to go to dances with. I'd 
never take the time to do another thing 
for. 'The LafFalots,'if I didn't believe with 
all my heart that the club Is doing some- 
thing to make the girls grow in the right 
direction. The girl who leads a busy, 
happy life, full of normal, legitimate good 
times, Is not the girl who is a menace to 
the community. Neither is she the girl 
who talks about leaving her job and hunt- 
ing up a new one. When the doctor's 
wife had her maid get married, my Annie 
found a new girl to take her place im- 
medlaftely. I believe 'The Lafi"alot Club' 
Is doing a bit to solve the domestic 
service difficulty." 

"Happy are they who serve themselves 
In serving others," twinkled the irre- 
pressible Polly. 



Squeaks 

By Clyde Robertson 



MRS. BROWN opened the front 
door of their little apartment 
and gathered up the scattered 
sheets of the morning paper and laid 
them on the breakfast table. Then she 



passed on through the tiny kitchenette 
and unlocked the back door and picked 
up the milk bottle. "O, Mary," came 
the voice of her husband from the bath- 
room, "cook my eggs soft." "Yc<. 



SQUEAKS 



179 



John, you've dinned that in my ears 
every morning since we've been married," 
returned Mary, wearily. 

"Mary, I wish you'd tell that half- 
witted laundryman, if he can't get my 
shirts clean, you'll send them some place 
else. Just look at that cuff," and John 
emerged from the bathroom, wrathfully. 

"Well, don't bother me now, the toast 
is burning." 

" But look at it, Mary," persisted John, 
holding out the offending cuff, accusingly. 

"For Heaven's sake, John, get another 
laundryman and quit fussing. You act 
as though I'd washed the shirt myself." 

John looked up quickly — "What's the 
matter, Mary, don't you feel well.^" 

"How can anybody feel well when they 
don't half sleep .^" and Mary burst into 
tears. "John, when I die don't lay me 
out on that squeaky bed, or I'll haunt 
you all the days of your life. I've spent 
night after night in one position, scarcely 
daring to breathe, until I was half para- 
lyzed, to quiet that impish squeak, and 
just as I'd be going to sleep from sheer 
exhaustion, you'd flop over and start the 
old thing going again." 

"Why, I never hear anything, Mary. 
It's your nerves, that is what it is. If 
you'd cut out the coffee and — " 

"John, you should have been a food 
administrator or a surgeon. All you can 
advise is elimination. 

" First, it was cut out the picture shows, 
then cut out the bridge club, and now it 
is cut out the coffee. Mine is a problem 
of addition, not subtraction. Do you 
know what I pray for every night.? No, 
it isn't my soul's salvation or a successful 
peace conference, or you, John — I just 
say — 'Now I lay me down to sleep, 
Lord, give me a bed that doesn't squeak.' 
Can't we move into that other apart- 
ment, John.?" 

"Why, there is the same kind of a wall 
bed in there, 'Mary; you can't have any 
other kind in these bandboxes, and be- 
sides that apartment costs 310 more 
a month." 

"Yes, I know, John, but there is one 



more room and I could get a single bed 
with a nice thick mattress and I know 
I'd sleep all right then." 

"Well, we can't afford it now unless 
you use the money you've saved up out 
of the household allowance." 

"How much do you think I've saved?" 
asked Mary quietly. 

"I don't know how much you have 
saved, but I know what you should have 
saved, and it would be plenty to pay that 
extra $\0 for several months and move 
us besides," and John scrambled into his 
overcoat and grabbed his hat. "Good- 
bye, Mary, hope you get to feeling better," 
and wiih a perfunctory kiss he was gone. 
Mary Brown sat for thirty minutes look- 
ing into the future through the bottom 
of her coffee cup. In that short space 
of time she divorced John and re-married, 
joined the movies and invaded the 
lecture platform. Then she got up and 
washed the breakfast dishes. Before 
sitting down to her desk to finish an 
article she was preparing for the woman's 
page of a local publication, she got out the 
oil can, determined to unearth the hidden 
demon that made her nights hideous and 
render him voiceless forevermore. That 
she had been on his track previously was 
evidenced by the oily persecution of 
innocent bolts and hinges. As Mary 
poked viciously at the under side of the 
heavy iron bar that served as a lever to 
raise the bed, she discovered a small open 
space that had hitherto eluded her search. 
Here, at last, was the secret dwelling of 
the unseen disturber. Armed with the 
scissors she attempted to insert a piece 
of lubricating waste into the narrow 
crevice, only to find it filled by a closely 
folded piece of paper. On digging it out, 
she was surprised to see it addressed — 
"To Whom This May Concern." Open- 
ing it she read — "This is my legacy, to 
the woman, who, in the course of an in- 
vestigation superinduced by the sleepless 
miseries that I, too, suffered, discovers it. 

"Take it and move. This bed caused 
me to leave my husband, quarrel with my 
neighbors, lose my religion and murder 



180 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



the janitor. Out of a small fortune I 
never expected to inherit, I leave this 
hundred dollars to my unlucky successor, 
hoping to save her from my tragic fate." 

When John came home to dinner that 
night, Mary met him at the' door with 
the announcement — ^"I've rented the 
other apartment and we move tomorrow." 

"So you've decided to give up that 
money you've been holding out on me, 
eh, Mary.^" John chuckled. 

"Yes, I'll pay the extra 310 for six 
months and buy the new bed, but John, 
dear, you can manage so much better 
than I, so I'm going to turn over the house 
bills to you afterthis," Mary said s,weetly. 

"Good girl," beamed her husband. 
"Stewed tomatoes for dinner; just what 



I wanted," he continued cheerfully, 
"Don't forget to put soda in them, Mary, 
mother always did." 

"Now, John, I've told you repeatedly 
your mother did not put soda in stewed 
tomatoes, but in tomato soup." 

"Well, I don't see the difference," John 
grumbled. 

"No, dear, I suppose you don't. Being 
a man, there are a number of things you 
don't seem to be able to see, hear or 
understand." 

"Meaning nerv^es and squeaks, I sup- 
pose.^" he questioned. 

"Yes, John, that's just what I mean. 
It isn't the tangible, crashing calami- 
ties of life that get a woman; it's the 
squeaks, John, the maddening squeaks." 



The Home of the Big, Red Apple 

By Antonia J. Stemple 



E\^ERY one who* raises or eats 
apples has heard of the far-famed 
fruit of Nova Scotia, in Canada. 
Of late years, the apple growing industry 
of that section has advanced by leaps and 
bounds, new markets have been found, 
and new methods of handling the fruit 
introduced. Naturally, the farmers of 
the United States are much interested in 
what their neighbors are doing, and pos- 
sibly have been spurred on to new en- 
deavors by reports of what the growers 
of Nova Scotia are acTcomplishing. 

The whole of the beautiful Annapolis 
Valley of Nova Scotia — • the land of 
Evangeline, so-called — • makes its living 
from fruit growing, particularly of apples. 
To go through this valley in apple har- 
vesting time is both a revelation and an 
inspiration, and opens the eyes to the 
immense possibilities and opportunities 
for wealth through supplying the never- 
satisfied demand for apples, which seems 
inborn in every normal son and daughter 
of Eve. 

In and about Berwick is the apple 



eaters and growers' Paradise. Apple 
trees and orchards are everywhere. As 
far as the eyes can reach, rows upon 
rows of trees stretch away into the dis- 
tance. Here is one apple orchard of 320 
acres, owned by Samuel D. Chute, who 
is known as "the apple king" of this 
section. He shipped some 15,000 bar- 
rels of apples from this orchard in 1919, 
and could have secured more had he had 
all the help he needed. 

The trees are planted far apart and 
are, of course, carefully sprayed. New 
trees are constantly being set out. The 
frees are not allowed to grow very tall, 
so that picking the fruit is easy. Such 
heavily-loaded limbs can be seen nowhere 
else, except, possibly, in some sections of 
New England, in an extra good year. 
The soil and climate of Nova Scotia seem 
particularly suited to apple culture, so 
that enormous crops are secured with 
far less attention than is necessary in 
most sections of the United States. 

Gravensteins are the apples most 
largely raised. A large proportion of 



THE HOME OF THE BIG, RED APPLE 



181 



these are shipped to England, where the 
demand for this apple far exceeds the 
supply. The Gravensteins are good keep- 
ers and the Berwick growers have devel- 
oped the market for their fruit in England 
by wise methods — • and, of course, the 
quality of the apples they ship is an 
important factor. The growers co-oper- 
ate and frequently send one of their 
number abroad to study the English and 
other markets, and in this way they are 
able to sell to better advantage. 

The first of the Nova Scotian apples 
to mature are the Crimson Beauties, so 
well named, which ripen in August; then 
come the Duchess, Early William, Gra- 
venstein and Emperor, but the greatest of 
all is the Gravenstein. 

There are no poor in this apple growers' 
Paradise, for everybody raises apples and 
sells all he can raise. Even a tree or 
two in the back yard of a private residence 
is a distinct asset, for the owners will net 
from 320 up for the fruit, besides having 
all he can eat or give away. Since there 
are apples, apples everywhere, naturally 
apple eating is a continual performance 
by everybody, and if the old adage of 
''an apple a day will keep the doctor 
away" is true, nobody living in the Anna- 
polis Valley ever ought to require the 
services of a medical man. Even in 1919, 
when apples brought a very high price, 
one could buy a bushel in Berwick for 
25 cents, and before the weighty deal was 
closed, the seller would first deliver half 
a peck free "for a sample." Even at 
that, Berwickers, who had to ' buy a 
bushel or two for any reason, thought the 
price outrageously high. And so it was, 
when generally almost any neighbor will 
give you all the fruit you want for nothing. 

All day long the great wagons and 
trucks, loaded with apples, are delivering 
their loads at the mammoth warehouses, 
and, day in and day out, numbers of car- 
load lots are shipped out. All the talk 
everywhere centers about apples, and 
substantial fortunes are made every year. 

Girls and boys and women do much of 
the apple-picking and much of the work 



of grading and packing. Life is not so 
strenuous in Nova Scotia as it is in Amer- 
ica, and as labor prices are very much 
lower than in this country, it does not 
cost the grower nearly so much to get 
his apples picked and packed, despite the 
very moderate gait maintained by every 
kind of labor in the land of the Blue- 
noses, as it does in the United States. 

Cooper shops are numerous, and all the 
barrels used are made near the orchards. 
Last summer apple barrels were very 
high, costing from 65 to 75 cents each. 
The standard barrel, the same for the 
United States and for Canada, is used. 
The expert Nova Scotia cooper makes 
about 150 barrels a day. 

The great warehouses where the apples 
are sorted, graded and packed are inter- 
esting places to visit. There is none of 
the rush and bustle as in our country, and 
the boys and girls have a mighty good 
time at their work. There are four 
grades of apples: Nos. 1, 2, 3 and domes- 
tic, the last being a family apple of all 
sizes, with skin blemishes. The price is 
very low. There is an allowance of 10 
per cent for defects in the No. 1 grade, 
and of 20 per cent in the No. 2. The 
excelsior and paper pads, which are put 
in the top and bottom of each barrel to 
prevent bruising, are also made in the 
warehouses, and all the apple barrels are 
branded with the name of the shipper and 
the name and grade of the fruit. 

There is the closest co-operation among 
the growers, and many ways of effecting 
economies in the handling of the apple 
crop are in practice. The middleman is 
eliminated as much as possible. Cer- 
tainly every one who appreciates the 
apple, the king of fruits, would enjoy a 
visit to the delectable Annapolis Valley in 
Nova Scotia. In the spring, when the 
hundreds of thousands of trees are in 
bloom, the sight and perfume are long to 
be remembered, but the twin picture, in 
the mental picture gallery, is the Annapolis 
Valley, when the promise of spring has 
come to fruition, and it's apples, apples, 
everywhere. 



The Luncheon Table and Table Linen 

By Mary D. Chambers 

Author of "Principles of Food Preparation" and "A Guide to Laundry Work" 



AROUND table for a small com- 
pany is the prettiest and seems 
the most sociable, but where more 
than six or eight are to be seated the 
greater diameter of a sufficiently large 
round table is likely to remove opposite 
guests to too great a distance. Square, 
oblong or oval tables are all appropriate, 
or the oblong table with rounded ends, 
which is one of the newest styles. For a 
large, formal luncheon the banquet 
arrangement of tables is very good; or 
the party may be broken up into several 
small tables, each seating from four to 
six, with a special table at the head of 
the room or the center for the hostess and 
the most distinguished guests. Or the 
progressive form of entertainment may 
be used where there are many small, 
separate tables. In this the hostess and 
the distinguished guests eat the first 
course together, and then each one picks 
up her napkin and her water glass, and 
takes the place of one of the heads of a 
little table, who in her turn goes to the 
seat vacated by the one who changes 
places with her. A similar progressive 
exchange is made at the close of each 
course, and this not only gives everybody 
a chance to meet the most distinguished 
members of the party, but it also takes 
off the edge of stiifness, and makes for 
gaiety. Such a "change partners" busi- 
ness would be unthinkable at a formal 
dinner, but almost anything that pro- 
motes amusement and pleasure is per- 
mitted at luncheon. 

If a tablecloth is used, it may either 
come exactly to the edge of the table, or 
it may hang from four to six inches over 
the edge. Except for a company lunch- 
eon, the tablecloths may be the same as 
those used at breakfast. For company, 
the cloth may be of fine, plain, white 
damask, or it may have a stencilled 



border, or be decorated with colored em- 
broidery, or, where cost is not a deterrent, 
it may be trimmed with' edging and inser- 
tion of heavy lace. Very often a drawn- 
work cloth, or one trimmed with lace 
inserts, is spread over a cloth of colored 
linen, satin or silk. This, again, would not 
be approved of for the conservative formal 
dinner, but all kinds of "frills" are admis- 
sible at luncheon. Perhaps, with all the 
freedom of choice allowed, and sometimes 
unwisely taken advantage of, nothing is 
prettier for the luncheon table than to 
set it with handsome lace-edged doilies 
and runners. These, over mahogany or 
other fine wood, are highly efi"ective and 
beautiful. 

The napkins for luncheon are, as a rule, 
of the same size as breakfast napkins, or 
they may be a little smaller, 13 inches 
square. At a large and formal luncheon 
the larger-size napkin, of 20 or 25 inches, 
is often used, folded either square or 
oblong. Fancy folding of napkins, espe- 
cially the many varieties of creasing the 
napkin' and arranging it in the water 
glass, is decidedly disapproved of, but a 
simple, half-fancy fold to hold the bread 
or roll is still allowable at luncheon, 
though never at dinner. Paper napkins, 
for use with fruit, are admissible in the 
home, but they are taboo at even the 
smallest and friendliest of company 
luncheons. 

The fruit doily at luncheon is placed 
on the plate under the finger bowl, and 
it used to be slipped out from there to 
wipe the fingers. This custom no longer 
holds; the doily is now so elaborately 
embroidered in colored silks, or is made 
all of fine lace except a spot in the center 
no bigger than a dollar, that it must be 
considered more for ornament than use; 
its original function seems to have been 
forgotten and the only excuse off"cred for 



182 



THE LUNCHEON TABLE AND TABLE LINEN 



183 



its presence is that it keeps the finger 
bowl from making a noise on the plate. 

The space allowed for each person, and 
the space for the cover for each are the 
same as that for breakfast. 

The correct luncheon plate is a small 
dinner size, eight inches in diameter. As 
at breakfast, the rim of the plate is one 
inch and the handles of the knives, forks 
and spoons are one-half inch from the edge 
of the table, and in a straight line. But 
where there are bouillon spoons, or short- 
handled oyster forks, it is allowable to 
arrange these in a graduated form, and 
t is also allowable to arrange the silver 
at each side of the plate in such a way 
that the handles are, alternately, one inch 
and one and one-half inches from the 
table edge. 

For the formal luncheon, there will be 
placed at each cover a knife and fork for 
the fish course, a knife and fork for the 
meat course, a fork for the salad, and a 
bouillon spoon. The place for knives 
is invariably at the right of the plate, and 
that for forks at the left, with the single 
exception of the oyster fork, which is 
placed either at the right, or on the oyster 
plate. It is thought In better taste, espe- 
cially at luncheon, to place only three 
pieces of silvfer at each side of the plate, 
and these pieces should be so arranged 
that the one on the outside, that is, 
farthest from the plate and nearest to the 
hand of the guest, Is the first to be used. 
Thus, the salad fork, the last to be used, 
goes nearest the plate at the left side; 
just outside It comes the fork for the chief 
meat course, and outside this the fork 
for the fish course, the first one needed, 
for the oyster fork will be brought In on 
the oyster plate. At the right hand, the 
last knife needed, that for the meat 
course, is placed nearest the plate; next 
outside it is the knife for the fish, and 
then the bouillon spoon. 

The water-glass, which for luncheon Is 
preferably goblet-shaped, is put at the 
point of the knife nearest the plate. 
Where much formality is affected, It Is 
not thought correct to place a bread-and- 



butter plate at the cover for luncheon. 
In this case, by way of concession to the 
weaker brethren, a little dish containing 
butter balls is unobtrusively offered by 
the waitress after the meat course is 
served, and the guest who accepts one is 
supposed to put it on the edge of his meat 
plate. This inconvenient method of ap- 
parently not serving, while yet serving 
butter for luncheon, is becoming less and 
less the custom, and the hostess now 
courageously takes her stand on one side 
or the other, and decides whether she will 
be fashionable and formal and deny 
butter to everybody; or whether she will 
sacrifice smartness to make her guests 
comfortable, and have a regular bread- 
and-butter plate at each cover. 

If fruit Is served at the beginning of a 
luncheon, except when in the form of a 
fruit cup, or a cocktail, the finger-bowl 
is placed as it is at breakfast. Otherwise 
It is brought on at the end. Silver for 
the pudding or other sweet course may 
be placed in front of the luncheon plate, 
for this saves trouble in the case of an 
inexperienced waitress. Individual fancy 
dishes of salted nuts may also be placed 
in front of the plate. 

The centerpiece of flowers, on a hand- 
some doily, should be artistically ar- 
ranged, either in a low ma.ss, or a moder- 
ately high one, not so high as to obstruct 
the view across the table; or in sprays 
in quite tall vases, so tall that they do not 
interfere with anybody's view of anybody 
else. This last arrangement is the most 
dlflficult to make with just the right eflfect, 
and is usually combined with a low, flat 
mass of blossoms in the center of the 
table. A round or oval mirror, bordered 
with a wreath of foliage or flowers, or 
with flowers reflected in it from a low 
dish in the center, is effective, but some- 
what artificial. Flowers frozen in a 
block of ice, standing in a large glass dish 
In the center of the table, is another de- 
vice, more ingenious than agreeable, since 
It savors of a straining after effect. A 
miniature Japanese garden, an imitation 
rockwork, a Jack Horner pie, spun sugar 



184 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



baskets, and countless other forms of 
decoration are used for the center of the 
luncheon table. 

Instead of lights at the luncheon table, 
slender glasses, each holding a single rose, 
or a carnation, or a lovely blossom of any 
kind, are put at each guest's place, or 
where candles would be placed at dinner. 

Care should be taken not to overdo 
this matter of decoration of the luncheon 



Aunt Anna Gives a Cooking Lesson 

By Ruth Fargo 



I 



F you'd had a donation party — 
and it was prunes — what would 
you make, Aunt Anna.^" 

The pretty, flower face of Jerry Dent's 
young wife peeped in at the kitchen 
screen, and her laughing voice flung the 
question straight at her elderly neighbor, 
folding clean tea towels by the kitchen 
table. 

"My soul! how you startled me, Doro- 
thea Dent. My wits had gone clean out 
tonowheres a-wool-gathering, I guess; an' 
I didn't sense anybody bein' around. . . . 
But come right in — don't stand there 
waitin', child. Come in — come in!" 

"I can't," giggled the little girl-wife. 
"You've hooked the screen inside." 

" Pshaw, if I ain't! " Aunt Anna Atwood 
made a quick movement. "There now 
— come in! I don' know jes' what I 
hook that screen for. Matter qf habit, 
I guess, since Lucy's twins have been here 
so much. They're too little to be let 
run yet a while, and we don't dast leave 
a door unlocked, or they're out'n away, 
goodness sakes where to! Livin' in the 
country so, with all outdoor to play in, 
they ain't afraid o' nothin', an' one time 
we found 'em settin' as content as two 
kittens right on the street car track. . . . 
Now what was it you asked, Dorothea.'' 
Once I get started talkin' about the twins, 
so Pa says, I ripple along like a perpetual 
phonograph; all anybody else needs to do 
is put in the punctuation." 



table, for very often it is so heaped up ' 
with pretty favors for each guest, with 
oddities in the shape of curious orna- 
ments, with ribbon sashes and bows, that 
the luncheon can hardly be seen through | 
its excessive adornment. It should not 
be necessary to say that the hostess of i 
good taste will avoid such extremes. 
"Favors" at luncheon are placed at the 
left of the cover. 



The elderly woman chuckled, a little, 
pleasant, throaty sound, like low waters 
rippling around a stone. 

"Oh, prunes it was. I remember now." 

"A pound of prunes," opined Doro- 
thea; "and what am I to do with them.^" 

"Prune pudding." 

Aunt Anna's decision came as swift as 
the dropping of tropical dusk. 

"Prune — pudding.^ Why — why — 
a sort of plum pudding.^ — like Thanks- 
giving — or Christmas.?" 

"No," laughed Aunt Anna. "No, 
dear heart, no; nothing so difficult as 
that — not by a jugful, as. Jonas would 
say. Suthin' enough sight easier; and 
suthin' you can have every day for a week, 
and not get tired of. Good for your 
stomichs, too." 

"Well, then, I want to know how to 
make it. . . . You don't mind explain- 
ing, do you, Aunt Anna.'' — You're 
sure I'm not going to be a bother.?" 

"Bother, not at all, my dear. If 
there's one thing above another I d'ruther 
do, it's give a cooking lesson. I was cut 
out for a cook. If I hadn't been born so 
soon, prob'ly I'd be teaching in a cooking 
school this minit." 

"If you hadn't found Uncle Jonas 
— and married him, just as you did," 
giggled the girl. 

"Of course — of course," admitted 
the elderly woman calmly, "Jonas might 
have been real upsetting; men often arc. 



AUNT ANNA GIVES A COOKING LESSON 



185 



We women jes' have to take care of 'em,, 
and look after 'em, somehow or other, 
and do the cookin' for 'em, and mend 
their socks — ■ and shirts — and — ^" 

Aunt Anna paused. Her eyes went 
wandering dreamily out of the window. 

*'Did Jerry ever try to 'batch' — • 
you being home to your mother's.^" she 
meditatively asked. 

"Twice." The answer was rueful. 
"Jerry just hasn't the knack." 

"No man I ever knew had," asserted 
Aunt Anna, mildly. "I guess cookin' 
sort o' ain't their 'sphere', so to speak. 
Nor washing dishes. Nor reddin' up the 
house. Nor mendin' — • nor nothin' 
like that. Them things don't seem to 
come natur'l to men-folk. No, they 
don't." 

Aunt Anna placidly put away the 
folded tea towels. 

"Jes' look in that lower, right-han' 
drawer where you be, my dear; and take 
out that oilcloth covered cookbook. I've 
got that prune pudding recipe writ down 
on the back flyleaf. I learned it out to 
Lucy's last summer. . . . Yes, that's it. 
Course I could tell it off, but likely as not 
I'd leave out suthin' as ought to go in. 
I don't when I'm doin^ it, but tellin' is 
different. A sight different. As dif- 
ferent as ducks and dumplings." 

"This is it, isn't it. Aunt Anna.?" 

The young wife held up the open 
cookbook. 

"That's it," observed Aunt Anna with 
direct brevity. "Read what it says." 

Dorothea read: 

"Two cups dried prunes; cook, remove 
stones, sweeten slightly, and return to 
kettle. 

Two tablespoons cornstarch dissolved 
in two tablespoons cold water, and added 
to the beaten yolks of two eggs. 

Beat the two egg-whites to a fluff, and 
add one tablespoon sugar. 

To the kettle of hot prunes add one 
cup warm water, also add the egg-yolks 
with the dissolved cornstarch, stir well. 
Add one-half teaspoon cinnamon and a 
flavoring of lemon juice. Cook for ten 



minutes; add more water if needed to 
keep soft. 

At the end of ten minutes draw the 
prunes to the back of the stove, spread 
over the beaten whites of the eggs, and 
put in the oven to brown. As soon as 
brown, stir the whites into the pudding. 
Bake ten minutes. 

Serve the pudding cold. Whipped 
cream or pudding sauce is nice with this." 

"Well," said Dorothea, "it sounds 
good. But — " she paused. "You 
have written, 'Enough for eight people.' " 

"It keeps splendidly," answered Aunt 
Anna, "and is always ready. But you 
can make just half of it — enough for 
four people. Then it will serve you and 
Jerry twice. Dinner today and dinner 
tomorrow." 

"It is nice to cook something that will 
do for two meals," admitted the little 
wife with a satisfied sigh. "And Jerry 
isn't finicky. I've known some folks 
who never wanted the same thing twice 
in a week. Except, maybe, bread or 
potatoes." 

"Such a notion is downright foolish," 
scolded the older woman. "Such people 
ought to have to cook for four months at 
a stretch, to say nothing of year in and 
year out, come sun or come snow. I 
guess they'd learn a thing or two. I 
guess they would — specially, if they 
did anything besides cook." 

The younger woman's eyes danced. 

"Mend, and sweep, and dust," she 
said; "and wash and iron and sew; and 
keep minutes for Ladies' Aid, and teach 
a Sunday School class, and go to church. 
And earn a dollar extra now'n then for 
the heathen, and hoe in the strawberry 
bed, and piece quilts for the Donation 
Society. Not to mention knitting sweat- 
ers for little granddaughters, and giving 
cooking lessons to an ignorant neighbor- 
woman who doesn't know what to do with 
prunes when they are given to her — " 

"Pshaw, pshaw, pshaw! All them 
things ain't nothin' much. Jes' part 
of a day's work. We women are alius 



186 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



doing this an' that an' t'other. I guess 
it's what we are 'tended to do. Some 
one has to keep up the frayed ends of 
things, and if we don't do it, who will .^ " 

"Who will.?" echoed Dorothea lilt- 
ingly — '"who will.? I'm sure I don't 
know, Aunt Anna. If it's a puzzle, I 
give it up." 

She cocked her head on one side like 
a robin out on the lawn, and looked over 
her recipe. 

*' Anyway," she announced, "my prune 
pudding today and my prune pudding 
tomorrow aren't going to be alike. I'll 
serve it with whipped cream once, and 
with pudding sauce next. And Jerry 
will wonder what new thing I've learned 
to cook." Dorothea Dent tucked the 
recipe, which she had penciled on the 
back of an old envelope, into the pocket 
of her bungalow apron. "And Jerry 
likes 'most everything." 

"It is a nice way to be — to know 
how to like most everything. And more 
folks could be like that if they'd jes' take 
the trouble to try. Tastes ain't any- 
thing set an' fixed, like the laws of the 
Medes an' Persians was, or like the old 
cherry tree back of the barn. Tastes 
can grow, an' improve, same as the mind 
and body can. I've learned that. Cousin 
Lydia was here one summer an' I'll never 
forget what she said when I asked her to 
have some tomatoes, half-remembering 
that she didn't eat tomatoes, and wonder- 
ing what I'd give her instead. But she 



said, 'Yes, I've learned to like tomatoes, 
Anna. I decided I was missing some- 
thing by not eating things other people 
did. So I learned. . It isn't so hard as 
some other things I've learned in ni}' 
life, and just as worthy, what I can see. 
. . . Yes, Anna, I'll take some tomatoes.' '' 

"Dear me, if that isn't like I was about 
green peas. Funny, I never could eat 
green peas, and most folks so fond of 
them. Mother took me in hand. 'See 
here, daughter,' she said; 'you eat a 
spoonful of green peas every time they 
are served, and before many summers 
are past you will be eating as many as 
any of us.' And that is just the way it 
turned out. I simply love green peas 
now. Why, it would be simply horrid if 
I hadn't learned — and gone right 
along — always — not liking something 
so good." 

Dorothea considered. Then continued: 

"But Jerry and I both like prunes. 
We always have. We eat the dried ones 
as if they were dates. And they're real 
good for one's digestion." 

"They are that," said Aunt Anna. 

"But if my pudding is going to be cold 
for dinner, I'd better, hurry home and 
make it," mused the young wife, sliding 
from off the high stool where she perched. 
"Goodby, Aunt Anna — till- after- 
noon. Remember we're going to Aid 
together. And thank you — millions 
— for teaching me how to make — prune 
pudding!" 



Henrietta 

By A. Borden Stevens 



HENRIETTA is an accommodater; 
the word isn't in the dictionary, 
but is in the vocabulary of her 
kind. 

Henrietta is dark of color and strong 
of will, and cherishes a home to which she 
returns at night after her day's work 



"out." That we monopolize her week 
makes no difference to the status. She 
insists on being paid by the day, just the 
same, and on keeping Sundays for her 
own. 

Henrietta knows that "accommodater" 
is no longer a proper name for help, but 



HENRIETTA, AN ACCOMMODATER 



187 



she claims to be distinct from the number 
who strike, or join the unions. She has 
never needed these aids to self-respect. 
Her old Southern dignity becomes and 
protects her as a garment, and as she 
gives us much, she claims much In return. 
Because of this dignity, we take as much 
pride In her manner in our dining room 
as we do In the old treasures of Colonial 
days, the pewter platter, and the warming 
pan. She passes the finger bowls with 
a grace that makes us forget the black 
calico cap that covers her tight curls 
in working hours; we overlook those 
seasons, when, feeling "pushed" by our 
insistencies, she refuses to change her 
apron. We give her liberties commen- 
surate with the air of gentlehood she lends 
the house. 

Henrietta follows our rules and menus 
to the letter, but we occasionally coax 
from her experience recipes, which we 
never by any chance try, but which we 
eagerly listen to as lore of another world. 
She tells us how, at the end of the week, 
the coveted bacon rind masquerades with 
cabbage In a way never dreamed in our 
economies. For Sunday she buys steak, 
— • not trimmed with fringes of fancy 
jvegetables, but to be eaten with bread 
and butter; plenty of It! 

"No, Ma'am," she assures me, "I 
never buy less 'n a pound. What would 
the butcher think of me, askin' for less'n 
a pound!" 

There are families who cannot keep 

their cooks, but we cannot lose Henrietta. 

Sometimes, at my ripe age, I resent being 

reminded of rubbers, and dislike being 

called "Honey-bunch" at unexpected 

times. At times when this oversight of 

I Henrietta's becomes particularly haunt- 

I ing, I take refuge In 111 temper. But she 

does not leave; she works on silently, 

I until I explain my sad slip, and call forth 

I smiles again. 

She Is full of the antipathies of her 
race. One Is directed against the tea 
wagon. For a long time I could not 
discover the reason, but one day she 
told me: 



"No, Ma'am, I'd no more touch that 
daid wagon! No, Ma'am, I'm goln' to 
live as long as I can and die when I cain't 
help it. I don't need It; 'deed I don't!" 

She turns scornfully from all conven- 
iences, and the simple, awkward tools of 
my grandmother's time complicate my 
occasional days in the kitchen. 

Henrietta has been with us for some 
years; yet she cannot take a room apart 
and put It together again according to 
any precedent. But at night-school she 
led her class; she reads, and can plan a 
simple budget and make it work in spite 
of changing conditions and hard times. 
Where, O ye testers of Intelligence, do 
you place Henrietta.'* 

Coming each day fresh to her field of 
action, she brings a spirit for conquest 
that overrides us all, on days when there 
is special work to do. In spite of her 
growing infirmities, she drives all before 
her, and no one Is safe from interruption 
within her path of duty. Her energy 
searches out weak places in our arrange- 
ments and tramples peace and comfort 
under foot. These are the days, when I 
devoutly pray for strikes, or unions, or 
any other excuse to send Henrietta to 
other fields of labor. But there are no 
strikes; for dear to her heart, and never 
far from her thoughts, are the days when 
we turn out closets, and treasures, dusty 
with the allotted seven years of keeping, 
are piled for her removal. Nothing comes 
amiss. Later we hear of a barrel sent to 
Virginia, where the most wonderful 
grandchildren In the world make royal 
holiday with Its contents, and their 
mother returns tearful thanks for each 
separate article. Then, what a light In 
Henrietta's eyes! 

Soon It will take her two days to do the 
work of one; even now her smile is often 
twisted by rheumatic pains. Old eyes 
pass over corners never neglected before, 
and the hours of work shrink curiously. 
But Henrietta Is an Institution, and as 
long as she can pass the finger bowls in a 
way to waft us in thought to some grand 
banquet hall, and as long as she can im- 



188 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



press the person who rings our bell with 
the greatness of his privilege on entering 
here, we shall overlook the mothering 
that becomes license, and the browbeating 
that precludes peace. We shall keep 



Henrietta with us, restraining our desire! 
for new methods; and while grumbling to'' 
ourselves about these things, take pride 
in her perfections, and revel in her 
eccentricities. 



Missouri, My Housekeeper 

By Mary Ethel Sanders 



I HOPED with the greatest patience 
imaginary, but was in a mood of that 
tired, sluggish feelingof glad-when-I-shall- 
have-gone-through-with-it. Up to the 
eighth month I had been my own house- 
keeper, sending my husband to work at 
8, and the children to school at 8.30 
o'clock in the morning. We could not 
get a fireman to stick to the job, so the 
chances were that I had to look after the 
furnace during the day, and had up to 
this time. 

Becoming so discouraged in having 
kept an advertisement in the papers for 
six weeks, at intervals, three days in and 
three out, I decided I would seek a helper 
from some charitable institution. I 
needed a housekeeper so badly that I was 
willing to pay a kingly salary. 

On the last day of November I stood 
watching the swiftly-falling snowflakes 
from my window. Then I saw the street 
cleaners direct a very young looking girl 
to my home. I rushed downstairs for 
the interview. "How old are you.^" I 
asked, then, "I really need an older per- 
son, .one that can take full charge." 
Upon coming into the living-room she 
exclaimed, "Oh, how bright and cheerful 
is the fire!" and with her eyes fixed upon 
a picture that hangs upon the wall de- 
clared, "the Cupies darling!" "And I 
have two children," I said faintly, be- 
cause of what the trying to secure help 
in a family of children means. She re- 
plied, "I do love children, provided, there 
are not too many, and the few are 
trained." "You help me chaperone 
mine," I suggested. Then we were 



seated, and I listened to her story. She 
was Missouri Colter, reared on a ranch 
in Montana, and began keeping house at 
home. Upon finishing a correspondence 
course in home economics, she was 
placed by that institution in a home 
located in Long Beach, Calif. She did 
second work there for two years. One 
year ago she came north for a change. 
She had worked six months for a well- 
known family in this, my city. In that 
family there are five grownups and nine 
children under 12 years. She did all the 
cooking, and the lower floor work at $16 
cL week to 'start. After working three 
months she threatened to quit the job; 
the result was she remained three months 
longer at ?32 a week. After which time, 
she finally quit, even though she could 
have remained longer at $S0 a week. 
She said that the children were untrained 
and unruly, and their parents thought 
them too dear to be obedient. Her story 
heard — I then asked the salary she ex- 
pected to get. To my surprise the 
answer, "When I first started to work, 
the salary came first; now I consider it 
lastly. Ten dollars a week will do to 
start me." 

We all like Missouri. First, because 
she was only a young girl of twenty, and 
had had such wonderful experience in 
keeping a home. Second, because she 
loved children and could amuse them. 
She was a guest and helper — the hostess 
of our home, and we were her guests from 
the first until the last day. 

Before "Sonny" came she had gotten 
everything clean and sanitar\-. "Before 



MISSOURI, MY HOUSEKEEPER 



189 



that nurse gets here," she had said. She 
was accustomed to them, and knew how 
careful they are about living quarters. 
The nurse liked her, and instead of taking 
her usual hours off, she preferred spend- 
ing a part of her time with Missouri. 
She had never met a girl so competent; 
for Missouri was that, and she said that 
Missouri was the first cook in her con- 
nection that carried no grouch. 

Dishwashing Missouri says can be 
made a drudge, if one is not careful. So 
she avoided her drudgery by not using 
more things than needed for cooking or 
serving. She always stacked everything 
in order to wash, and kept her dishcloths 
clean. 

She had a never-failing recipe for pan- 
cakes, viz.: To each single cup of flour, 
use two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
one of sugar and one of shortening. 
About one-fourth a teaspoonful of salt, 
and one-half as much warm water as flour, 
and, where two or more cups of flour are 
used, use one egg. Cook on a very hot 
griddle. By the way, should I use the 
expression, do you know that by using 
salt tied in cloth and rubbed on the 
griddle, they bake without your greas- 
ing it.? 

Missouri kept my silverware bright 
and shiny all of the time. She preferred 
Electro Silicon and bought it by name at 
anyofthegrocerystores. It Isusedinthe 
same method that other polishes are used. 



To shine windows was a day of pleasure. 
You have heard of Bon Ami. Well, she 
would put a little of the powder into a 
dish. Add enough water to make a thin 
paste. Rub on each window, and leave to 
dry. Then come again with a clean, dry 
cloth, and rub off, leaving theglass shining. 
It is just as easy as drawing water 
from a faucet. 

Egg a La Sal 

Missouri prepared a dish of eggs very 
palatable by this method: take hard- 
boiled eggs, cut into quarters, and pour 
or mix into a white sauce. Fill a 
baking dish, and finely crumble bread 
crumbs over the top, and spot with 
butter. Bake about fifteen minutes. 
Every cook has her own method of 
making white sauce. 

You can use Cream of Wheat very 
economically, should you consider it. 
To three cups of boiling water gradually 
stir in three-fourths a cup of Cream of 
Wheat. Let cook as for a breakfast 
cereal, and in the usual way as a break- 
fast food. Afterward, add four level 
tablespoonfuls of any good cocoa, one- 
fourth a cup of butter, one-fourth a cup of 
canned milk, and one egg; sweeten and 
flavor to taste. This will serve as a 
chocolate pudding. 

Should I tell you ? I am beginning to do 
my own work; for Missouri is happily 
married. 



.venms: 



Spirit of unrest, 

Leave me for tonight! 
I would clean the silver 

Till it mirrors bright. 

I forget the ocean 

Reaches to a land 
Where clear cameo touches 

Prove the artist hand. 

I have dreamed of cities, 
And their shout by day — 

Music-stilled at evening. 
While the masters play. 



There creative thinking 

Lashes mind to mind. 
Joyful out of friction, 

Kind shall answer kind. 

I have yearned for country — 

Passionate, unknown 
Jungle and Sahara, 

Danger-overgrown. 

Spirit of unrest, 

Go and let me be! 
I would lay the cloth. 

I would brew the tea. 

Elizabeth Eschenhur^i 



190 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



AMERICAN COOKERY 

FORAIERLY THE 

BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL 
MAGAZINE 

OF 
Culinary Science and Domestic Economics 

Subscription $1.50perYear.Single Copies 15c 
Postage to Foreign Countries, 40c per Year 

TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The date stamped on the wrapper is the date 
on which your subscription expires; it is, also, an 
acknowledgment that a subscription, or a renewal 
of the same, has been received. 

Please renew on receipt of the colored blank 
enclosed for this purpose. 

In sending notice to renew a subscription or 
change of address, please give the old address 
as well as the new. 

In referring to an original entry, we must know 
the name as it was formerly given, together with 
the Post-ofhce, County, State, Post-office Box, 
or Street Number. 

Entered at Boston Post-office as Second-class Matter 



Introspection! 

Can mind conceive the promise 

Of God above to man. 
For plain assent to duty, 

By his eternal plan.^ 

Can ear tune its vibrations 

To be alert and kind — 
And heed the call of others — 

The lame, the halt, the blind.? 

Can eye behold the blessings 

Of influence and might — 
The power that each possesses 

To live a life for right.? 

Can tongue always be guided 

To sound a message true 
Of honor, truth and justice — 

From every point of view.? 

Miss Caroline L. Sumner. 



THE ISSUE OF THE DAY 

PEACE, progress and prosperity have 
been suggested as the slogan of a 
party in our coming Presidential Cam- 
paign. All these blessings we want, and 
we want them earnestly. How to secure 
them in most sure and satisfactory man- 
ner is the point at issue. 

We want peace at home and abroad, 



in Mexico and Peru, in Europe and Asia. 
How can peace on earth and good will to 
mankind be 'gained and maintained.^ In 
peaceful pursuits alone happiness on 
earth is to be conserved. 

We want progress that results in a i 
speedy reduction of living expenses and li; 
in lifting the excessive burden of taxation, 
and in a radical reform in the administra- 
tion of ourgovernment. People are well- 
nigh ready to repudiate the grievous 
taxes now imposed and to revolt at the 
muddled condition of affairs in general. 
One cannot buy a match or whittle a 
toothpick without contributing an enor-. 
mous fee to the government. The war is 
over, a year has passed away, and no 
considerable curtailment in expenditures 
seems anywhere to have been considered. 
Extravagance is abroad in the land and 
indifference to work is noticeable in all 
ranks of life. 

We want prosperity that comes from 
increased production in every line and 
branch of industry. Work, efficient work, 
is the one thing now needful. The ma- 
terial resources of the earth have been 
woefully diminished by the calamity and 
wastefulness of war. The waste places 
need now to be restored. 

In all matters pertaining to progress 
and reform, we believe in leveling up, not 
down. Let us hold fast to what has al- 
ready been achieved in civilization and 
build up thereon. People everywhere 
are at liberty to choose their own form 
of government, as some have already 
chosen. A form of government that 
cannot exist unless it destroys all other 
forms of government, the world has no 
use for. Aggressive and offensive propa- 
ganda, as aggressive war, must be dis- 
continued. Earth has no place for regi- 
cides, murderers and assassins, anyhow. 
Law and order, economy and thrift, are 
essential conditions to peace and pros- 
perity. Pacifistism, socialism, commun- 
ism, Internationalism, point the way that 
leads straight down to anarchy and perdi- 
tion. As a people we can serve the world 
best by maintaining our independence and 



EDITORIALS 



191 



holding to the constitution of our fathers. 
Ours Is not a one-man government. 

' 'Our fathers created a government and 
gave conceptions of liberty and justice 
that are of supreme value. This Is a 
sacred heritage that must be guarded 
with the greatest care. 

This country, however, needs a .much 
higher Ideal of citizenship than it has 
today. Political parties are necessary, 
but the individual citizen needs a much 
higher conception of his personal rela- 
tion to the nation, one that will not 
yield to the party boss or a radical, self- 
seeking agitator. 

If the people are not on a high plane 
of thought and action, the trouble-maker 
will rise up and succeed in his attempt 
to rule or reign. The charlatan and the 
quack flourish where there are ignorance 
and prejudice. If America Is at her best 
as a nation; If the highest and noblest 
citizenship obtains; If the golden rule 
becomes the fundamental principle of 
national life; if education carries with It 
a dominating moral ideal and an unselfish 
conception of service, then the people will 
be much less likely to worry their neigh- 
bors." 

THE DOCTRINE OF SWEAT 

THE world is full of strange doctrines. 
On every corner is a dreamer or a 
hypocrite full of words, using a grievance 
as a text, preaching folly to the foolish, 
seeking converts who may be persuaded 
to grind his ax. There is but one whole- 
some doctrine. It Is the doctrine of 
salvation by sweat, and sweat without 
work availeth nothing. 

Wealth Is not a product of printing 
presses. Making coins of metal will not 
make men rich. All wealth, howsoever 
far removed from toil, is the product of 
sweat. By sweat men live arid prosper 
and know happiness, and there can be no 
life, prosperity or happiness without it. 

One who dreams of a soft-handed way 
to universal prosperity is utterly mad. 
There is no short cut. In so much as 
men relax their muscles and lighten the 



burden on their shoulders, by so much do 
they lessen the world's prosperity and 
their own. 

Because man is fully cognizant of his 
own troubles and burdens, and almost 
wholly Ignorant concerning the troubles 
and burdens that oppress his fellows, and 
because he is by nature a little suspicious 
and a little envious, he nurses an uncom- 
fortable conviction that the lot of other 
men Is easier than his own. The farmer 
dreams of becoming a banker, the desk 
man dreams of becoming a farmer; the 
clerk would go adventuring, and the sea- 
man would have a job ashore; the laborer 
envies the soft hands of the financier, and 
the financier envies the digestion and 
sound sleep of the laborer. 

If the salaried man who wears a white 
collar thinks himself unjustly treated 
because his monthly check does not in- 
crease as fast as the price of food, why 
doesn't he quit paved streets and follow 
a plow."^ There are many idle acres. 
If one who works with his hands thinks 
himself unjustly treated because other 
men work at desks, why doesn't he study 
at night and equip himself for a white- 
collar job ^ There is an unfailing demand 
for men who can handle big jobs well. 

The truth is that nearly all men are 
satisfied with their present employment. 
It has become a habit with them. They 
are bound to It by the friendship of fellow 
workers. It Is more than meat and bread. 
It Is social life, a creed, a horizon. They 
complain because it is man's nature to 
complain, but the fact that they do not 
break established ties and venture In new 
fields is sufficient proof that their griev- 
ance Is more' Imaginary than real. 

Pretty theories and wild promises may 
for a time wean men away from their 
common sense, but no preachment of 
folly can long survive the assault of 
facts, and no promise can long suffice 
in place of food. 

Any effort to curtail production — 
any willingness to ease the strain — any 
plan to lay down the hammer and close 
the desk — will in some degree lessen the 



192 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



world's prosperity and work hardship on 
the whole people. 

One may wish for a return of Eden. 
Wishing will not change the scheme of the 
universe. Men must sweat or die. One 
may, at his pleasure, change the nature of 
his task. This is a free country. But 
toil he must if he would live. In sweat 
is salvation from all economic ills. There 
is no other. — The Saturday Evening Post. 

UNREST 

A SPIRIT of unrest seems to be 
worldwide. Apparently people do 
not know just what they want. Yet some 
things are true. In order to be happy 
and contented people must enjoy a fair 
degree of prosperity. They must look 
forward, with hope, to better things in 
the future. Faith and hope are both 
essential to happiness; likewise are lofty 
ideals. 

The world is now well-nigh rid of rule 
by divine right; dogmatism in religion 
has been badly scotched, but not killed. 
Toleration is a plant of slow growth, but 
it has grown apace. Can it be expected 
that people will ever agree on all matters 
of consequence.^ Such a state is incon- 
ceivable; nor is it desirable. Certainly 
the millennial age is far distant. 

For instance, as a people, we have 
voted for and accepted prohibition as a 
national blessing. Our English friends 
are bitterly opposed to prohibition in toto. 
With them food and drink are insep- 
arable. To dine without liquors is not 
to dine at all. Their constant and carp- 
ing criticism on this subject is truh' 
ridiculous; it is a source of mirth and 
laughter. We feel like saying only one 
thing: Let the Britisher stick to his beer 
and wines, and in every line of eifort in 
which efficiency is a factor, we Yanks will 
beat him two to one. Just let us try it 
out and see the result. 

But what is the remedy for unrest.' 
There are certain things every American 
can do, which are of the highest A-alue. 
First, we must put our own house in order. 
Every family must put its house in order. 



Also every individual must do his share 
in house and home making. Intelligence, 
intelligence that is based on universal 
education and love of country must be 
cultivated and cherished, else shall de- 
mocracy become a failure. 



"W^hat this country needs is more pro- 
duction." "What the country needs," 
replied Farmer Corntossel, with a slight 
trace of irritation, " is less talk about what 
it needs an' more enthusiasm about de- 
liverin' the goods." — ■ JVashijigton Star. 



A teacher gave her pupils the following 
sentence, asking them to put it in their 
own words: "The boy climbed the tree 
and stole the bird's nest." The rendering 
by one boy was as follows: "The kid 
shinned up the tree and skun the chippie's 
bunk." — M. m 



Life 

Sunrise to sunset, 
And between the two, 
For me and for you, 
The rush and the fret 
Of thoughts that beget 
The deeds of a day, 
Come crowding our wa}'. 

Work, play, war or peace, 

Joy, laughter or tears, 

High courage or fears. 

Deep sorrows surcease, 

Ajtid the soul's release, 

Lack or wealth's estate. 

Human love or hate, 

Many dreams of a day, 

And Faith, Truth, Love, God's way. 

Sunset to sunrise. 

And between the two. 

For me and for you. 

More work and play lies. 

Sleep for tired eyes, 

Restlessness that tries 

To turn night to da}'. 

And dreams, dreams alwa>', 

And Faith, Truth, Love. God's might. 

All these in a night. 

Sunrise to sunrise. 
And between the two. 
For me and for you, 
A whole lifetime flies, 
And eternit)' lies, 
For life never dies, 
'Tis only our dreams, 
Only just what seems. 
That shall pass awa>-, 
And lca\c us God's day. 

llaitie II. d\4utrfmont. 




JELLY WITH FRUIT AND NUTS (See Page 198) 

Seasonable-and-Tested Recipes 

By Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 

TN ALL recipes where flour is used, unless otherwise stated, the flour is measured after sifting 

once. Where flour is measured by cups, the cup is filled with a spoon, and a level cupful is 

meant. A tablespoonful or a teaspoonful of any designated material is a LEVEL spoonful. In flour 

mixtures where yeast is called for, use bread flour; in all other flour mixtures, use cake or pastry flour. 



Scotch Soup with Prunes 

Cut Into thin strips one pound and 
one-half of lean veal, and three ounces of 
bacon. Put into a soup-kettle with one 
large onion, sliced, three ounces of butter, 
two tablespoonfuls of sugar, one of salt, 
and one teaspoonful of pepper. Cook 
until the veal is lightly browned. Add 
three pints of water, and one dozen and 
one half of prunes, and cook slowly for one 
hour. Strain, thicken slightly with three 
tablespoonfuls of fiour, rubbed smooth 
with a little water; let soup boil up once 
more and serve with a garnish of whipped 
•cream. 



Eggs Benedict 

Split and toast English muffins 
and dot with bits of butter. Set 
a slice of hot broiled ham above 
each half of muffins and a 
poached egg above this, and 
pour Hollandaise sauce over 
the whole. 



Hollandaise Sauce 

With a small wooden spoon, cream one- 
half a cup of butter; add the yolks of two 
eggs, one at a time, beating until butter 
and eggs are thoroughly blended; add 
one-fourth a teaspoonful of salt, a few 
grains of cayenne, and one-half a cup of 
boiling water, and cook in a double- 
boiler, stirring constantly, until the mix- 
ture thickens; then add the juice of half 
a lemon and remove from the fire at once. 

Supreme of Cucumbers 

Pare four large cucumbers, and cut into 




EGGS BENEDICT 



193 



194 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



one-inch slices. Cook in boiling salted 
water until tender. Remove to a shallow 
casserole, and pour over them one cup of 
good stock, preferably chicken, let come 
to a boil, and thicken with one table- 
spoonful of butter blended with one 
tablespoonful of flour. Stir until stock 
is thick, taking care not to break the 
cucumbers. Just before removing from 
the fire, add one well-beaten egg mixed 
with two tablespoonfuls of cream and 
the juice of one-half a lemon. Dust over 
with salt and pepper before bringing to 
the table. 

Tripe Birds with Tomato Sauce 

Cut one pound of boiled tripe into 
strips about four inches long and less 



Season with one teaspoonful of salt, one- 
fourth a teaspoonful of paprika, four 
cloves, and two inches of stick cinnamon. 
Cook together until onion is brown, and 
add one cup and one-half of strained 
tomato. Let all boil together, and, 
shortly before removing from fire, add 
one-fourth a cup of capers. 

Stuffed Shoulder of Lamb 

(FRENCH STYLE) 
Remove the bone from a shoulder of 
yearling lamb, and fill the cavity with 
the following stuffing: One-quarter a 
pound of veal, chopped with two ounces 
of breakfast bacon and one parboiled 
sweetbread; seasoned with pepper and 
salt and one teaspoonful of mixed sweet 




STUFFED SHOULDER OF LAMB 



than two inches wide. Spread with the 
following stuffing, roll and tie or skewer. 
One-fourth a cup of cooked, chopped 
ham, mixed with one-half a cup of crumbs, 
two tablespoonfuls of chopped sweet 
pepper, moistened with stock or water. 
Saute the birds until brown in hot bacon 
fat, and serve in a deep dish, with the 
following sauce poured over them. 

Tomato Sauce, Savory 

Blend two tablespoonfuls of flour with 
two tablespoonfuls of melted butter in 
saucepan; add one tablespoonful of 
minced onion, one tablespoonful of 
chopped parsley, and one small bayleaf. 



herbs. Lay the meat on the rack of a 
baking pan in the oven, cover with slices 
of bacon, pour one or two cups of hot 
water over it, and bake in a moderate 
oven for one hour. Serve with a brown 
sauce, thickened with flour, with chopped 
mushrooms added, and garnish the dish 
with slices of lemon and parsley. 

Pigeons in Cabbage 

(FRENCH) 

Cut two pigeons in quarters, put them 
into a saucepan with several slices of 
breakfast bacon, or strips of ham, and 
six small sausages. Add a little water, 
and cook slowly until the birds are tender. 



SEASOXABLE-AXD-TESTED RECIPES 



195 




PlGKu^^ L\ CABBAGE 



Cut out the heart from a large cabbage, 
leaving only enough of the outer leaves 
to hold the shape. Fill the cavity with 
the pigeons, bacon and sausage, with 
seasonings of onion juice, chopped celery, 
salt and pepper. Tie it in cheesecloth, 
and steam until cabbage is cooked. 



Pressed Corned Beef w 
Vegetable Salad 

Let corned beef cool slightly 



th 



In the 

water In which It has been cooked; re- 
move to a board; cut with knife and fork 
into one-inch cubes and mix so that fat 
and lean may be equally disposed. Put 
In a bread pan; press twenty-four hours. 



Cut uncooked white cabbage in long, 
thin strips; wash, drain, roll in cheese- 
cloth and place on ice. \Mien crisp, 
arrange the cabbage on a cold platter; 
above the cabbage place the pressed 
meat. Garnish liberally with boiled beets 
and carrots. Serve with French dressing. 

Planked Hash 

Chop cooked corned beef to make one 
cup and one-half. Moisten with milk, 
and spread evenly on a plank. Make a 
border and nests of Duchesse Potatoes, 
using pastry bag and tube. Brown 
potato In oven. Put a poached egg in 
each nest and garnish with stuffed green 
peppers. 




PRESSED CORNED BEEF WITH VEGETABLE SALAD 



196 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Duchesse Potatoes 

To two cups of hot, riced potatoes add 
two tablespoonfuls of butter, one-half a 
teaspooiiful of salt, the beaten yolks of 
three eggs and enough hot milk to let 
the mixture pass easily through a pastry 
bag and tube. 

Fowl a la Toscana 

Truss a young fowl or a large chicken 
as for roasting, and put it into a deep 
saucepan or kettle, the bottom of which is 
covered with slices of breakfast bacon. 
Chop the following together, and lay over 
the fowl: one onion, one carrot, one stalk 
of celery, the heart, liver, and gizzard 
of tlie fowl, and one good slice of smoked 



four onions, and cut into slices one- 
fourth an inch thick. Arrange all these 
ingredients on skewers, first apple, then 
meat, then onion, pressing them close 
together, and continuing until two pieces 
of each ingredient are on each skewer. 
Season with salt and pepper, place over 
each skewer a thin slice of fat pork, and 
cook by suspending the skewer in a deep 
dripping pan in a hot oven. Serve one 
skewer to each person, with curried rice. 

Baltimore Samp 

Pour a quart of boiling water over a 
cup of Baltimore samp and heat quickly 
to the boiling point; let boil two or three 
minutes, then drain and add a second 
quart of boiling water. Let boil rapidly 




ham. Cover, and cook over fire until 
bacon in bottom of saucepan is melted 
and well browned. Add enough rich 
meat stock to half-cover the fowl; cover 
the saucepan closely, and cook in a slow 
oven until quite tender. Before sending 
to table add one-fourth a cup of tomato 
sauce mixed with chopped mushrooms. 

Indian Kabobs 

Pare four sour apples, core, and cut 
into rings one-half an inch thick. Cut 
pieces of about the same size from the leg 
of mutton, the round of beef or veal, or 
from fresh ham or shoulder of pork. Peel 



HASH 



about half an hour, then cover and let 
set on the back of the range to simmer for 
the rest of the day. Add boiling water 
as needed, and, after cooking about six 
hours, a teaspoonful and a half of salt. 
During the last of the cooking the water 
should evaporate. The samp is now 
ready to serve, reheated, as a breakfast 
cereal, or it may be further seasoned to 
serve as a vegetable at luncheon or dinner. 
To serve as a cereal, add a little hot water 
and reheat. It is improved b)- recooking. 

Baltimore Samp, with Cheese 

Melt two tablcspoonfuls of butter; in 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



197 



9 






J^^^_^-^ 



GRAPE SPONGE 



it cook two tablespoonfuls of flour, 
one-fourth a teaspoonful of salt, also 
one-fourth a teaspoonful of paprika, if 
desired, and when well blended stir in 
one cup of cream or rich milk; continue 
stirring until the sauce boils, then stir 
in from two tablespoonfuls to half a 
cup of grated cheese and one cup and a 
fourth of the cooked samp. Let the 
samp stand over hot water or in the oven 
until very hot. Fine-chopped parsley 
and a little onion juice may be used with 
the cheese or without it. 

Grape Sponge 

Soak one-fourth a package of gelatine 
in one-fourth a cup of cold water and 



dissolve by standing t^e di 

Dissolve three-fourths a c 

the juice of one lemon ; 

grape juice. Strain t • 

this. Set into ice and 

occasionally until the n:i: 

thicken; then add, grad' 

of three eggs, beaten to 

beat until the whole is v r 

enough to hold its s'l-^ 

in individual glasses and ^erve very cold. 

Mock Lobster Salad 

Boil a piece of halibut aid wlien tender 
drain off the water, Hav - ready enough 
hot strained tomato to co^' -r th.e fish and 
pour over at once. L ■' ^tand several 



1 t water. 

:-^ <UK^■M in 

d • cni' of 

'" 1- til' irto 

t , and stir 

t Kleins to 

a"' . t e wlites 

^ti'^ 'rot' , and 

lip- t and stiff 

. PiE liirKtly 




MOCK LOBSTER SALAD 



198 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



hours, preferably overnight. Flake the 
fish, dispose on heart-leaves of lettuce, 
and serve with mayonnaise dressing. 

Flanc de Peches 

(A FRENCH DISH) 
Make enough light piecrust to line a 
quart mold of cylinder shape; a tin sauce- 
pan could be used very successfully. 
Make a decorated border for the top of 
the mold, and put it on in such a way that 
the whole thing can be removed without 
coming apart after baking. After the 
mold has been lined, arrange paper on 
the inside, and fill with dry flour or any 
other substance which will keep the pas- 
try in shape. Remove from oven, when 



of onion, a stalk of celery, a teaspoonful of I 
whole mixed spices and one-half a 
teaspoonful of salt. Add one-half a box 
of gelatine softened in one-half a cup of 
cold water; stir until the gelatine is 
dissolved, then strain and mold. Serve 
on lettuce leaves; garnish with mayon- 
naise. 

Jelly with Fruit and Nuts 

Soften one-fourth a box of granu- 
lated gelatine in one-fourth a cup of 
cold water, and dissolve in three-fourths 
a cup of boiling water; add half a cup 
of sugar, the juice of half a lemon and 
half a cup of grape juice. Turn a little 
of the mixture into the bottom of four 




fp 
th. 

fou 1 

on - 

yeli 

unt'l 

peel 

cc^ol 

an(' 

cr( . 

red 



TOMATO 

IS stiff, empty the flour, take mold 

t c tin, and return to oven to brown 

: I face well. 

• U- a rich syrup of one and one- 
cups of sugar, boiled in one and 

ilf' cups of water with the thin 

liud of one lemon. In this cook, 

transparent, one dozen peaches, 

I stoned, and cut in halves. Let 
^l:ice pastry -mold on serving dish, 

II with the peaches. Pile whipped 
on top, and decorate with bits of 

11\', candied fruit, etc. 

Tomato Jelly 

., fifteen minutes, two cups and 
If of cooked tomatoes with a slice 



JELLY 

or five glasses; when firm set two halves 
of walnut meat and two candied or 
maraschino cherries on the jelly and 
against the glass in each cup, pour in a 
little more of the mixture and, when this 
is set, finish filling the glasses. Beat half 
a cup of double cream, half a teaspoonful 
of vanilla extract and a tablespoonful of 
sugar until firm, then use to pipe on the 
jelly in the glasses. 

Maple Syrup Cake 

Cream two-thirds a cup of butter; add 
one cup and one-fourth of sugar and one 
tablespoonful and one-half of Uncle 
John's Syrup. Beat three eggs without 
separating; add two-thirds a cup of 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



199 




MAPLE SYRUP CAKE 



water 'to the eggs, mix thoroughly and 
add to the creamed butter and sugar. 
Then add three cups of flour and four 
level teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
sifted together. 

Maple Syrup Frosting 

Cook one cup and three-fourths of 
Uncle John's Syrup to 240° F. by the 
sugar thermometer. Pour in a fine 
stream on the whites of two eggs beaten 
dry, beating constantly. Return the 
frosting, in a saucepan, to the fire over 
hot water; heat slowly until the frosting 
thickens a little; add three-fourths a 
cup of nut-meats; spread upon the cake. 

Blackberry Bombe Glace 

Boil one quart of water and two cups of 
sugar twenty minutes; add one teaspoon- 
ful of gelatine softened in cold water; 
strain, and, when cold, add the juice of one 



lemon and a pint of blackberry juice and 
freeze. Have a three-pint melon mold 
set in equal measures of salt and crushed 
ice. Line the mold with the blackberry 
sherbet; fill the open center with char- 
lotte-russe mixture and cover this with 
some of the sherbet, filling the mold to 
overflow. Lay a paper over the top, 
press the cover in place and finish packing 
with ice and salt. Let stand three hours. 

Charlotte Russe Mixture for 
Bombe 

Beat a cup of cream and one teaspoon- 
ful of vanilla till very firm. Beat the 
white of one egg dry; fold in one-third 
a cup of sugar, then fold the whole into the 
whipped cream. 

Convent Cakes 

Mix the yolks of six eggs with two cups 
of fine granulated sugar. Beat the 




BLACKBERRY BOMBE GLACE 



200 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



whites to a froth, adding while beating 
one-half a pound of almonds, blanched 
and ground in a nut mill, or almond paste 
may be substituted. When the egg- 
whites and nuts have been beaten very 
stiff, mix them with the beaten yolks and 
sugar, and add one scant cup of sifted 
pastry flour, the grated yellow rind of two 
lemons, and one-fourth a cup of citron, 
very thin sliced and chopped. Put the 
mixture into small cake pans, not filling 
them more than half full; bake in a rather 
quick oven, and when the little cakes are 
firm enough, turn out on a baking sheet 
and replace in oven to brown and harden 
the bottoms. 

Cream of Almond Sauce 

Blanch, chop and brown in the oven 
two ounces of sweet almonds and one 
ounce of the bitter almonds. Put both 
through the nut-chopper and grind fine. 
Mix with one cup of powdered sugar, and 
beat the mixture into one cup of good 
cream. The beating should be con- 
tinued until the sauce is thoroughly 
mixed. This is a specially delicious sauce 
for cold puddings, or it may be served as 
a garnish with plain ice cream. 

Persian Cake 

Cut a large, round sponge cake into 
five round slices, like layer cakes. Spread 
the first slice with strawberry, the second 
with green gage, and the third with 
raspberry jam — or any other fruit jams 



will serve. Lay four of the slices ovei 
one another in the original forni, anc 
press lightly together. Now cut out th( 
center from the cake, leaving a border a . 
least two inches and one-half wide. Pu' ; 
the center part of the cake into a bowl 
and mix with rich syrup from the preserve 
jars, until the cake is thoroughly soaked 
Replace in the cavity, and place the last 
slice of cake over all. Cover the whole 
with any good cake-icing, tinted pink oi 
yellow, and decorated with blanched 
almonds, candied rose leaves, citron and 
angelica. 

Preserved Pears and Lemons 

Slice four lemons and remove the seeds. 
Boil until tender, drain, and add one quart 
of pears and one pound and one-half of 
sugar. Boil all together until syrup 
begins to jell, then pour into glasses and 
seal with paraffine as in jelly making. 

Pumpkin Preserve 

Cut in halves a good sweet pumpkin, 
pare, remove seeds, and slice in pieces 
one-half an inch thick. Weigh and allow, 
for each pound of pumpkin slices, three- 
fourths a pound of sugar, and the juice 
of two lemons. Arrange pumpkin and 
sugar in alternate layers in a deep dish, 
pour the lemon juice over, and let stand 
two or three days. Add one pint of 
water, and boil the whole until pumpkin 
is tender, then turn into a pan and let 
stand for a week. Drain off the syrup; 




M'W KNGLAM) I. l.l'X' 1 1U.\ CA K !•. iScc I'aL'c JOS ) 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



201 



^boll until quite thick with the addition 
of a little bruised ginger root or sliced 
vellow rind of lemon for flavoring. When 
thick, pour the syrup over the pumpkin 
in jars, set the jars on the rack of the 
preserving kettle, let cook for ten minutes, 
and seal. 

Raisin-and-Apple Marmalade 

Pare, core and slice a dozen large cook- 
ing apples, and put over a slow fire with 
.one-half a cup of water and one cup of 
sugar. Add two pounds and one-half of 
seeded raisins, and cook slowly, taking 
care to avoid burning. A little water 
may be added, if the mixture is too thick, 
or it may be cooked overnight in the fire- 
less. When the apples are soft, sift the 
whole through a colander, and store in 
sterile preserve jars. This marmalade is 
excellent to spread on bread, to make 
sandwiches, or to serve with whipped 
cream for dessert. It may, also, be used 
for layer cake filling, or to decorate 
pastry. 

Ever-Ready Vegetable Pickle 

Boil together two quarts and one-half 
of cider vinegar, one-half a cup of grated 
i horseradish, two sweet red peppers, 
chopped, one-half an ounce of whole 
cloves, one-half an ounce of allspice 
berries, one-half a pound of peppercorns, 
and one-fourth a pound of ground mus- 
tard. Let boiling continue for five min- 
utes, then cool, and pour into a large jar. 

Into this may be dropped all sorts of 
left-over vegetables, cucumbers, carrots, 
beets, salsify, cauliflower, without any 
further preparation, until jar is full. 
The pickles may then be bottled in smaller 
jars for convenience in use. 

Apple-and-PIum Pudding 

Pare and chop three large apples; 
stone and cut in quarters a dozen ripe 
plums; and stir these into a batter made 
of two cups of flour, two teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder, two well-beaten eggs, one- 



half a cup of heavy cream, and one cup ot 
sugar. One teaspoonful, each, of grated 
nutmeg and powdered cloves may be 
sifted with the flour, if desired. Bake 
the pudding in a well-greased mold for at 
least one hour and one-half. Serve while 
hot with a hard sauce. 

Stuffed Spiced Pears 

Cut in halves one dozen large pears, 
and scoop out the cores with the round 
scoop used for making potato balls. Fill 
these cavities with a mixture of bits of 
broken ginger root, cinnamon bark, and 
whole cloves, and fasten the halves of 
each pear together with strips of cinna- 
mon bark. Meantime prepare the fol- 
lowing pickle: One pint of vinegar, one 
pint of any fruit juice left over from 
canning — ^ or grape juice will do, or 
water — -three and one-half pounds of 
sugar; and the following whole spices, 
divided into four parts and tied in cheese- 
cloth: One ounce, each, of cinnamon and 
allspice, one-half an ounce, each, of cloves 
and mace. Let boil slowly for thirty 
minutes; remove spices, add pears and 
cook for ten minutes or until pears are 
soft, remove pears into sterile jars, fill up 
with liquid, and let stand overnight. In 
the morning drain oflt liquid; add to any 
liquid that was left over; cook until 
thickish; add pears and cook for five 
minutes; replace pears in jars and fill up 
with the syrup. Seal and store in a cool, 
dark place. 

Tartlets of Apple Custard 

Cream one cup of butter, and add 
gradually two cups of sugar, the yolks of 
six eggs, and the grated pulp of a dozen 
tart apples. Beat all together; add the 
juice of one lemon and one-half the yellow 
rind, grated. Lastly, beat in the very 
stiff-beaten whites, and bake the mixture 
in pastry shells, with narrow strips of 
pastry crossed over the top. Sprinkle 
with a little grated Parmesan cheese just 
before serving. 



Seasonable Menus for Week in October 



Breakfast 

Muskmelons 

Sausages Rolls Baked Potatoes 

Buckwheat Griddle Cakes 

Maple Syrup 

Coffee 

Dinner 

Chickens Roasted Candied Sweet Potatoes 

Creamed Celery Corn Fritters 

Cranberry Sauce 

Tomato-and-Lettuce Salad 

Blackberry Bombe Glace 

Oatmeal Macaroons 
Half Cups of Coffee 

Supper 

Oyster Stew, Crackers 



Apple Sauce 



Toast 



Tea 



Breakfast 

Melons 
Barley Grits, Thin Cream 
Broiled Honeycomb Tripe 

French Fried Potatoes 
Corn Meal Muflfins Coffee 

Luncheon 

Pressed Corned Beef 

Vegetable Salad 

Hot Rolls 

Maple Syrup Cake Tea 

Dinner 

Veal Cutlets, Breaded and Fried 

Boiled Potatoes Tomato Sauce 

Boiled Cauliflower Endive Salad 

Cabinet Pudding, Hard Sauce 

Tea 



I 



Breakfast 

Baked Apples 

Cream of Wheat, Top Milk 

Boiled Eggs Baking Powder Biscuit 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Chicken Stew, Dumplings 
Corn on the Cob 
Cottage Cheese Currant Jelly Crackers 
Tea 

Dinner 

Boiled Corned Beef 

Boiled Potatoes Cabbage Beets 

Turnips Carrots Horseradish Sauce 

Apple Pie Cheese 

Half Cups of Coffee 



Breakfast 

Sliced Peaches 

Calf's Liver Fried Bacon 

Graham Muffins Hashed Potatoes 

Zwieback Coffee 



Luncheon 

Mexican Rarebit 
Waffles, Caramel Syrup 



Toast 



Tea 



Dinner 

Clear Tomato Soup 

Pressed Corned Beef 

Corn Bread Vegetable Salad 

Macaroon Custard 

Half Cups of Coffee 



Breakfast 

Stewed Prunes 

Quaker Oats, Thin Cream 

Salt Codfish Balls Bacon 

Popovers Coffee 

Luncheon 

Cream-of-Celery Soup Croutons 

Baked Indian Pudding, Cream 

Cocoa 

Dinner 

Boiled Fresh Fish, Egg Sauce 

Boiled Potatoes Boiled Onions 

Jellied Cabbage Salad 

Apple Dumplings, Maple Syrup 

Half Cups of Coffee 



Breakfast 

Blackberries 

Cereal 

Omelet Hashed Potatoes 

Toasted English Muffins 

Coffee 



Corn Chowder 

Peach Shortcake 



Luncheon 

Toasted Crackers 



Cocoa 



Dinner 



Stuffed Halibut Steaks Potato Balls 

Green Lima Beans Cucumber Salad 

Frozen Apricots 

Half Cups of Coffee 



Breakfast 

Bananas 

Quaker Oats, Thin Cream 

Creamed Dried Beef on Toast 

Doughnuts Cheese 

Coffee 



Luncheon 

Stuffed Tomatoes, Baked 

Baking Powder Biscuit 

Cake Baked Pears 

Tea 

202 



Dinner 

Broiled Sirloin Steak 

Baked Sweet Potatoes 

Creamed Onions Succotash 

Celery-and- Apple Salail 

Blanc Mange 

Coffee 



Menus For Special Occasions 



DINNER 

Salpicon of Fruit in Tiny Melons, cut in halves 

Fish Turbans baked in cream 

Cauliflower au Gratin Cucumber Salad 

Sweetbread-and-Oyster Patties 

Roast Partridge, Bread Sauce 

Grape Punch 

Celery-and-Pineapple Salad Philadelphia Cream Cheese 



CLUB TEA 

Bread-and-Sauce Tartare Sandwiches 

Oatmeal Bread-and- Marmalade Sandwiches 

Tiny Pound Cakes Graham Wafers 

Grape Sherbet Tea 



HALLOWE'EN SUPPER 

Cabbage-and-Nut Salad 
Rye Bread (Caraway Seed) and Butter Sandwiches 
Boston Brown Bread with Raisins 
Apples Doughnuts Salted Butternuts 

Toasted Marshmallows Popcorn Balls 



WEDDING BREAKFAST 

Chicken Soup in cup with Whipped Cream 

Celery Hearts Olives Salted Filberts 

Halibut Timbales, Shrimp Sauce, Philadelphia Relish 

Veal Cutlets, Tomato Sauce Potato Croquettes 

Green Lima Beans 
Peach Cup Pistachio Ice Cream Coffee 



LUNCHEON 

White and Purple Grapes Cream-of-String Bean Soup 

Oyster Croquettes, Sauce Tartare 

Broiled Chicken, Cranberry Sauce, Potato Balls 

Celery-and-Apple Salad 

Chestnut Parfait 

Macaroons Lady Fingers Coffee 



203 



Making Apples Your Medicine Chest 

By F. M. Christianson 



THERE may be as good fruit as the 
apple, but there is none better. 
The natural keeping qualities of the 
apple make it the people's fruit. There 
are hundreds of ways in which apples 
may be used; they are good fresh, canned, 
dried, fried, made into apple-butter, 
jellies and jams. 

Apples, when well grown and mature, 
are of fine flavor and texture, some varie- 
ties excelling others. To use apples 
before they are ripe is as foolish and 
wasteful as it is to burn green wood. 

The fruit chosen should be sound and 
well flavored, and then it is not necessary 
to add flavors; indeed, "doctoring" 
detracts from the dish. 

Apples are rich in water, proteins, 
acids and carbohydrates; they have 
considerable cellulose. They contain 
organic acids and essential natural salts, 
chief of which is potassium, the great 
cell-tissue food. This it is that keeps 
body, bone, blood and nerve, in good 
working order. Potassium is a metallic, 
alkaline element in the composition of 
the blood, and is a powerful enemy of 
disease germs. 

Apples are nutritive; the cellulose 
they contain helps digestion by giving 
bulk to the diet. 

In the fully ripened fruit the starch has 
been converted into sugar; thus the 
sweeter apples are the more valuable. 

The eating of apples produces the same 
good results as buttermilk in relieving 



and curing such sinister ailments as gout, 
rheumatism and indigestion. 

Aromatic apples are more pleasant for 
eating raw, but there are so many ways 
with this universal 'fruit that those who 
do not relish them raw can eat them 
cooked, baked, stewed or fried. 

Is not an apple just plucked from the 
tree something superb.^ 

When you eat an apple you may think 
to yourself that you are eating sugar, 
gum, albumen (pectose), malic and gallic 
acids, phosphorus, potassium, fibre and 
water. If you eat too much meat at 
dinner, you may correct the error by 
eating apples during the afternoon. 

Apples are the finest of cosmetics; 
a generous apple diet will clear your skin, 
give you bright eyes and drive out all 
humors from the system. 

The phosphorus renews the brain cells 
and spinal marrow. The ancients es- 
teemed the apple Ambrosia — the food 
of the gods. The apple in their esti- 
mation was the Elixir of Life, the 
Magic Renewer of youth, and so they ate 
apples whenever they felt themselves 
growing old or feeble. It is well known 
that starchy foods, like potatoes, are useful 
in all dietaries, but if you want quick 
results, sugar must be used and plain 
sugar is the poorest form in which it can 
be given; to eat it in the form of apples 
is highly beneficial. Proteids and fats 
are not enough for proper diet, there 
must be sweets, and when any tissue has 



204 



MAKING APPLES YOUR MEDICINE CHEST 



205 



been exhausted, sugar will restore the 
■energy quickly; therefore, eat apples. 

Farmers often permit horses to run in 
the orchards in the fall to clean up the 
apples, left after the crop has been 
gathered, and it is remarked how fat and 
fine and sleek the h6rses get after just a 
few weeks on a generous apple diet; 
•wchlle milch cows, fed on good ripe apples, 
greatly increase their milk yield, which 
is not only richer, but of finer flavor. 

To eat apple sauce with roast pork and 
sausage is more than custom; it is based 
on good psychology. 

Fritters made with apples are the Dan- 
ish national dish. And a fritter is not 
a fritter unless it is dry and crisp, and 
thoroughly cooked through. 

Grandmother did not think she could 
make mince meat without apples and 
boiled cider, which was prepared by 
reducing four quarts of new sweet cider 
to two quarts by boiling. It gave an 
added richness and consistency to the 
mince meat. 

Barberries and mountain ash (rowan 
berries) make an exquisitely bright- 
colored, tart jelly, that goes so well with 
meat dishes made up separately, but 
either is much improved, in my estima- 
tion, when combined with apples. 

A pie plate, full of baked sweet apples, 
is a rare dish to provide for the pupil 
who must sit up at night to prepare his 
lessons. 

A good, clean, light, fly-proof attic is 
an ideal place to dry apples. The sliced 
fruit is spread out on a muslin-covered 
hanging shelf, windows opened, and the 
warm breeze does the drying. They 
require turning about twice a day. When 



dry they are packed in tin or glass con- 
tainers. We like apple sauce made from 
apples of our own drying. To prepare 
the sauce, a pint of dry apples is washed 
and put to soak in cold water overnight. 
In the morning they are put on the stove 
to cook in the water in which they were 
soaked and a handful of seedless raisins 
is added, and brought to a boil quickly 
and allowed to cook slowly till done. 
Then sufficient sugar Is added and the 
dish is just brought to a boil again and 
removed from the fire. 

Apple honey — ■ Cook well-flavored 
apples to a mush and put through the 
colander. Return apple pulp to fire, and 
add, at least, one cup of sugar to one cup 
of pulp and let-it boil up for a few minutes. 
Remove from fire and beat till cool. It 
is so rich, fine grained and sweet it is 
rightly called honey, and has the exquisite 
apple flavor. 

Fried apples — • Select large, well- 
flavored apples (without paring), and cut 
Into eighths and fry in the drippings from 
beefsteak. These are a delicious and 
appetizing garnish to the dish. 

Apple water like rhubarb water, made 
by cooking the fruit in lots of water and 
draining off the water and cooking it up 
with sugar, makes, when cold water is 
added, a nice drink for a hot day. 

Encourage the youngsters to spend 
their pennies for apples rather than 
candy. Teach them to eat apples, not 
only by precept, but by example. 

Apples are a cheap fruit even at 12 
cents a pound. 

Know the varieties of apples. Buy 
apples by the quantity. Eat at least one 
apple a day. 



Bobby and Slang 



My mother says, "O, Bobby, dear, 
Be careful! What is that I hear? 
You use far too much slang, I fear." 
But she said Blimp! 

And Daddy says, "Well, I declare! 
My son, I'm sure I don't know where 
You get the slang I hear you air!" 
And he says Flivver! 



My teacher's nice as she can be; 
And yet she's always after me 
For using words of low degree. 
Yet she said Gob! 

Perhaps when I can speak and spell 
The long, polite words, I can tell 
Which ones are slang and which aren't. Well, 
It's up to me! 

Blanche Elizabeth Wade. 



What To Do With the Sacks 

By Minnie L. Church 



I 



IN this day of high prices I wonder if 
the average homemaker reaHzes the 
possibihties of the homely flour and sugar 
sacks? If one does much baking, these 
sacks accumulate, or they may be pur- 
chased from the grocer or from the 
bakery at much less than a similar 
quality of new goods would cost. 

As to the uses of sacks: These are as 
manifold as the mistress of the house 
chooses to make them. With an eye to 
economy and service to the family, the 
homemaker will find, by using her in- 
genuity, that the possibilities of the sacks 
are multitudinous. She will discover new 
uses for them a'.most every day of her 
busy life and mar^^el that each discovery 
was not thought of before. 

In selecting uses for the sacking, it 
might be well to begin with the part they 
take in home decoration. The half 
curtains in the kitchen and pantry are 
neat and pretty when made from either 
flour or sugar sacks, although the sugar 
sacks are preferable, as they are a thinner 
muslin and the threads draw more easily. 
The sacks must have all printed matter 
removed by soaking and boiling in water 
containing one of the reliable wash- 
ing powders, and then be thoroughly 
bleached. The curtains may be made 
plain, by hemming the top and bottom, 
but since every woman adores a touch of 
handiwork, even to her kitchen curtains, 
she will doubtless enjoy hemstitching 
them, or better still working a simple 
pattern of Mexican drawn work across 
the lower section — one or more rows, 
depending on the time she has to give, 
and her own individual fancy. The 
result will more than repay the time taken 
to do it, and the curtains will not appear 
to be common sacking, but something 
entirely different. The wearing qualities 
of these curtains are much in their favor, 
and the ease with which they launder is 
another. 



A short time ago I called on Mrs. W — ^ 
an unusually hospitable woman in very 
modest circumstances, who has worked 
wonders with sacking. She met me at 
the door attired in a neat white house- 
dress, piped with lavender and with a 
lavender belt. I remarked on its attrac- 
tiveness. "It is made from flour sacks," 
was her simple reply. 

Mrs. W — has drawn-work half-cur- 
tains of sugar sacks in her inviting white- 
and-blue dining room as well as in the 
kitchen, and whoever sees these cheery 
rooms admires them for their fresh home 
simplicity. In the two bedrooms, under 
the roof, with their low ceilings and short, 
broad windows, she has sacking curtains, 
hemstitched and stenciled. One room is 
done in a buif design and the other in 
pink, carrying out two charming color 
schemes. On the bed in the pink room 
there is a pink and white block quilt. 
The pink blocks are made from scraps of 
house dresses, the children's aprons, etc., 
while the white blocks are made from sack- 
ing. The mouth pieces on the blankets 
and comforters are made from sugar sacks 
and have a simple pattern of crochet 
around them. 

The tea towels of many economically- 
inclined women are made from flour 
sacks, but my home-loving friend has 
added an extra touch to hers that places 
them in a class of their own. Her towels 
are neatly hemmed, and in one corner 
there is outlined, in colored cotton, a 
simple design. These may be varied — 
a bunch of cherries, a pretty flower, a 
cup and saucer, etc. In fact, looking 
over her assortment of towels, and she 
has a goodly number, I found no two 
that were worked alike. This dainty 
touch of femininity helps to take the task 
of drying dishes out of the drudgery class. 
The young girl of the family, who is 
learning to sew and embroider, may find 
splendid practice work on tea towels, and 



206 



WHAT TO DO WITH THE SACKS 



207 



if she is handled diplomatically by her 
mother, she will better enjoy drying the 
dishes when her own handiworked towel 
is used to do it with. 

The torn sacks are as readily utilized 
as the more perfect ones. The smaller 
pieces are selected for dish rags. This 
disgraceful kitchen article need not be 
disgraced any longer, if it is hemmed, 
sterilized in boiling water after bemg 
used, and frequently dried in the glowmg 
sunshine. The larger pieces of the torn 
sacks may be laid away, if no immediate 
use appears for them, and later they may 
be dyed and used with other scraps, when 
cutting rags for the bedroom rug. 

There is the ever-important question of 
keeping the house stocked with linen. 
Why not try using the homely sacks for 
the breakfast table and even for the 
family luncheon.^ The saving in the real 
linen will be apparent and the sacking 
tablecloths are quite attractive. There 
are a number of ways in which the cloths 
are made, depending on the time the 
homemaker has to expend on them, and 
also the inclination she has for handi- 
work. Most attractive of all such table- 
cloths is the one that is hemstitched 
around each of four sacks, the sections 
then being joined together into a large 
square with a crocheted insertion. The 
outer edge is trimmed with an edging to 
match the insertion. 

Another neat cloth is made by lapping 
each of« the four sacks 1 inch and hem- 
stitching them together on each side of 
the lap. This conceals, in a sightly 
manner, the joinings, and the outer edge 
of the cloth is hemstitched, also. Napkins 
to match the different styles of cloths are 
easily made, each sack making four. 
These are not large, but they are of 
sufficient size for breakfast or. luncheon. 
To the woman who finds hemstitching 
out of the question, neat hemming should 
be done. The effect- is not so dainty, of 
course, but the same service from the 
sacking is acquired. Other table acces- 
sories may be made, such as center- 



pieces, edged with crochet or rick-rack 
braid, sideboard runners, etc. 

Hot pot holders are extremely handy 
to have around. Use for padding a half 
dozen or more layers of sacking, cover 
these with a larger piece of the same 
material, securely stitch around and 
across each one. Outlined in a simple 
design in colored cotton, these holders 
are charming in a white kitchen, or where 
the colored outlining is done in the pre- 
dominating shade of the room. 

Pillow cases are another household 
necessity that may be made from sacking. 
They are especially serviceable for the 
small pillows that receive hard usage on 
the children's beds. Also each case can 
be made from one sack, whereas the 
larger pillows require two sacks. These 
cases are simply hemmed, hemstitched, 
have ruffles or crocheted edging for 
decoration. 

Then there are sacking sofa pillow tops 
in Mexican drawn work, placed over a 
colored slip on the pillow and buttoned 
on so that they may be easily removed for 
the laundry. To one who uses dyes, the 
sacking may be colored any desired shade 
for the pillow tops, when they will take 
the place occupied by the crash-covered 
pillows that receive hard everyday 
usage. 

In homes where little folks are growing 
up, not a scrap of sacking need be wasted, 
for each sack takes the place of an equal 
quantity of muslin, since there are so 
many necessary little garments to be 
made. The sacking, while not fine in 
quality, is most serviceable for drawers, 
petticoats, underwalsts, etc. These gar- 
ments may be made plain, or have a 
touch of crochet or torchon lace for 
trimming. The dollars saved in this way 
may help these same little folks toward 
an education later on. Nor need the wee 
tots be the only ones of the family to 
wear sacking garments, the grownups may 
utilize them in the making of aprons, 
drawers, petticoats, corset covers, and 
even nightgowns and pajamas. 



Contributions to this department will be gladly received. Accepted items will be 
paid for at reasonable rates. 



Pittsfield, Maine, 
May 13, 1920. 
Editor of American Cookery, 
Dear Madam: — 

Within the last two or three years you 
have printed in American Cookery a 
recipe for "Old-fashioned Election Cake," 
and Ihave thought several times that I 
would write and send you the genuine 
old recipe, as the one you have printed is 
but a "quick cake" substitute for the 
real article. 

Having been brought up a Connecticut 
Yankee, and had this cake every fall and 
winter, I know what the real thing is, and 
would like to pass along our family 
recipe which is more than sixty years old, 
since I copied it from my grandmother's 
cook book. I have passed it on to many 
of my friends who have expressed much 
satisfaction in having it, for it really is a 
cake which cannot be substituted in any 
way. 

To begin with, we make our own 
yeast in the old-fashioned way, and, at 
the same time we make the cake, we 
make the old-fashioned raised dough- 
nuts, also. 

The old way was to make up a "batch" 
at Election Time, at Thanksgiving and 
at Christmas, and each "batch" was 
generous as to quantity so it would last 
a long time. 

If you care to print these recipes, I 
would be very glad to have you, for I 
believe there are many who would enjoy 
the real article. 

Yours very truly, 

M. II. B. 

208 



Homemade Yeast 



1 level tablespoonful 
hops 

1 pint cold water 

2 small potatoes 



1 teaspoonful salt 
1 teaspoonful ginger 
I cup sugar 
1 veastcake 



Let hops come to a boil and strain. 
Throw away hops and reserve water, in 
which boil the potatoes until soft. 
Strain and mash, reserving hop water. 
Mix mashed potatoes, salt, ginger, sugar, 
and enough flour to make a thin gravy. 
Cook until blended; when cool, add 
yeast cake. Put in a bowl and set in a 
warm place several hours, until it shows 
life, then put in tight-corked bottles (only 
fill one-half full), and let stand at least 
24 - 48 hours before using, in a cool 
place. Yeast will keep a long time, but 
should be used up in less than a week to 
be best. 

Raised Doughnuts 



1 pint milk 

1 tumbler homemade 

yeast 
flour to make thick 

dough 



^ tumbler butter and 

lard 
If tumblers sugar 
3 eggs 
nutmeg 



Warm milk and flour, make dough with 
hands. Add one-half creamed butter and 
sugar and beaten eggs. Mix in morning, 
let rise; add the rest of shortening at 
night. Let rise over night. Knead in 
morning and cut into squares, about one 
and one-half inch, set these on a floured 
board and cover with a cloth to rise. 
When ready fry as any doughnuts in hot 
fat. 

New England Election Cake 

(Sometimes Called Loaf Cake) 



HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES 



209 



1 quart milk 

f tumbler yeast 

2 lbs. 6 oz. flour 
If lbs. sugar 

1 1 oz. butter 
^ oz. lard 



1 grated lemon peel 
3 eggs 
nutmeg 
mace 

1 cup raisins 
1 cup citron shaved 
in tiny pieces 



Beat the eggs, add the creamed short- 
ening, sugar and lemon. 

Warm milk and flour; mix together 
with yeast. Put in one-half of the eggs 
and sugar, etc., when wetting up the 
cake, at noon. Cover and set in a warm 
place until early evening; beat down and 
add the rest of the shortening and t^^ at 
night, also the nutmeg and mace. Put 
back in a warm place and let rise over 
night. 

In the morning add raisins and citron, 
also two tablespoonfuls of lemon juice. 
(Brandy was generally used). When 
this is thoroughly beaten, put in round 
loaf-cake tins which have been buttered 
and papered, let rise slowly to doubk its 
bulk. 

Bake slowly and carefully an hour or 
more. 

When cool, cover with confectioner's 
frosting or leave plain, as preferred. 

Notes: This cake takes nearly two 
days of careful w^ork to make. The old- 
fashioned way is to cream the butter and 
sugar; add the beaten eggs and the dough, 
all by hand in a large tin pail which has a 
cover, and it rises in this pail. 

The recipe makes six or eight loaves 
and the cake \y\\\ keep a long time. In 
fact it is much better when at least a 
week old. M. h. b. 

* * * 

How to Serve Planked Steak 

DID you ever sit in a restaurant and 
watch the waiters bring in the 
planked steaks and fish and bear them 
proudly to their tables for inspection.^ 
Most good cooks have. When one was 
brought to their table they have wished 
that they might do it, but it looked 
altogether too elaborate for them. 

But they are not as impossible as they 
look. If you have a plank, you can plank 



a steak or shad, or indeed any sort of 
meat or fish that can be cooked that w^ay, 
every bit as well as a high-priced chef. 
Just try it some day and see. In the 
first place, you must know how to prepare 
vegetables that are placed about it 
symmetrically. The potato is usually 
plain mashed potato; or potato with the 
yolks of two eggs beaten into it to make 
it a bit more fluffy. It can be put on 
with a pastry bag or you can make the 
border on the plank with a spoon. 

Suppose you are going to try a steak. 
Get a nice sirloin or tender rump and 
fry it in a hot spider over the coals, or 
broil it, if you have a broiler. Then lay 
it on the plank on which you have made 
the potato border. Group the vege- 
tables about it and place in a hot oven 
till the potatoes are browned a bit and 
everything is piping hot through. 

There are all sorts of vegetables to use. 
Carrots and onions may be scooped out 
into tiny round balls and cooked in 
boiling salted water, or they may be cut 
into fancy shapes with a vegetable cutter. 
Tomatoes and peppers may be stuffed 
and baked ready for use, one for each 
person to be served. Spinach and rice 
may be packed into little molds and 
turned out when they become well formed. 
Beans, peas and asparagus are all good. 

Do. not try too many at once. Small 

stuffed peppers, spinach molds, a cup of 

lima beans and a cup of carrot balls will 

do nicely for the first attempt, and will go 

nicely with the steak. A fish can be 

planked w^th the potato and when taken 

from the oven garnished with well 

seasoned cucumbers (sliced), radish roses, 

slices of lemon and parsley butter. 

J. w. w. 
* * * 

To Remove Silks from Roasting 
Ears 

IT is tedious and sometimes almost 
impossible to remove all the silks 
from roasting ears. Many times the 
silks boil out from between the rows of 
kernels, appearing on the surface after 
the corn is cooked. 



210 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



A small brush kept purposely to remove 
silks from sweet corn will work wonders. 
After removing the husks from the ears, 
strip off as many of the silks as possible 
with the hands. Then brush up and 
down and crosswise over the ear with 
your brush, using care not to break the 
kernels. 

An inexpensive brush, purchased in a 
ten-cent store, will serve the purpose. 

,Hot Southern Slaw 

In a skillet, melt, but do not brown, 
one level tablespoonful of butter, also 
one tablespoonful of meat fryings, or 
better, lard; work in two tablespoonfuls 
of flour and put in your chopped or 
shredded cabbage. Salt to taste and 
add from one-half to one cup of cold 
water. Stir and cook. 

While the cabbage is cooking, prepare 
the following dressing: 

One-half cup of sour cream, one tea- 
spoonful of sygar and two tablespoonfuls 
of vinegar. Whip all these together 
until thick. When the cabbage is cooked, 
pour this dressing over the cabbage in 
the skillet, stir and take up immediately, 

before it boils. G. v. 

* * * 

A Historic Pie 

EX-GOVERNOR GEER, of Oregon, 
in his autobiography, tells how in 
the early, pioneer days he and Mrs. 
Geer managed to grow a few sickly pie 
plants, whose progress was watched with 
great interest by their two little daugh- 
ters. After weeks of suspense the great 
day came and the plants were made into 
a pie, neither spacious nor deep but 
marking an event in the lives of those 
two little girls. Just as the family was 
sitting down to this sumptuous repast, 
two ranchmen rode up and in accordance 
with the hospitality of that day were 
invited to dinner. The table and the 
china accommodated only four people, 
so the little girls, now compelled to wait, 
took up their stations in the doorway 
with solicitous eyes' upon the pie, which 



was now being cut into six pieces. The 
ranchmen ate their slender portions and 
complimented its excellence. My, it 
was good pie! They couldn't understand 
why people didn't grow more pie plant. 
Then, under the horrified gaze of those 
children in the doorway, those two men 
helped themselves to the remaining pie, 
with the host's acquiescence rather than 
by his invitation. The little daughters 
let out a scream and fled into the garden 
which had grown the plants that had 
come to such a futile end. The father 
excused himself and went out to them, 
but they were heartbroken and would not 
be comforted. 

The sequel of this tragedy occurred 
at the state capitol many years later 
when Mr. Geer was governor of Oregon. 
These two ranchmen, now also holding 
high office, were introduced to two young 
ladies, his daughters, and frank reference 
was made to a pioneer rhubarb pie. The 
embarrassment of the men was sufficient 
revenge. a. p. 

Household Ideas 

A TABLET hanging over my kitchen 
sink, with a pencil attached, is the 
best small device I have discovered! 
Here I jot down groceries-to-be-ordered, 
as I become aware of the need; appoint- 
ment with the dentist, date of setting a 
hen, date of subscription to daily paper, 
a hundred and one details, in fact, coming 
up in daily life, with which it is unneces- 
sary to burden the memory. It is easy 
enough to tear off the shopping list and 
slip it into my purse when I am ready to 
go to town. 

Menus made out ahead for the week are 
an energy saver for the housewife. This 
scheme also saves time on the marketing, 
since a single ordering will do for all non- 
perishables. Moreover, the most popular 
of these menus can be kept on file, and 
re-used, after a little, in toto. 

Crack the shells of hard-boiled q^^?> 



HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES 



211 



when dropping them into cold water pre- 
paratory to shelling them. The crack 
lets out the steam, and the shell will not 
cling. 

Most women nowadays "shrink" ging- 
hams and other wash materials before 
having them made up; it saves "letting 
out hems," etc. Salt water is the com- 
mon medium. Try adding two table- 
spoonfuls of turpentine to your bucket of 
water, as well as half a cup of salt; — 
your goods will come out with colors 
bright as new. The water should be 
poured upon the goods hot, and left until 
cold. The goods are then hung without 
wringing, and allowed to drip dry. 

To save time for clumsy fingers, in 
wrapping a parcel that I need to carry 
up town, I use half a dozen paper clips to 
fasten the edges of the paper, instead of 
twine. . These I drop into my purse when 
their office is accomplished, ready to use 
on the next occasion. 

A little card carried in the purse con- 
taining sizes of gloves, shirt collars and 
hose, for all members of the family, will 
save much trouble and many extra trips 
in picking up unexpected bargains on a 
^shopping tour. h. b. s. 



For Kitchen and Laundry 

IF you have put too much soda in your 
batter-bread, and have no sour milk 
■or clabber, correct the soda with a little 
vinegar. 

To remove ink stains from the floor 
(whether fresh stains or dry ones), pour 
•on a little vinegar and rub with a rough 
■cloth. When the spots are removed, 
wash off the vinegar. 

To remove mildew from white goods, 
mix equal quantities of soap and starch 
into a soft paste with a little warm water. 
Spread it on the cloth and lay it in the sun, 
:sprinkling with water when it becomes 



dry. Keep this up for a day or two and 
then rinse the garment, and if the mildew 
is not entirely removed, continue the 
process until it is. 

To remove soda stains from matting: 
If water in which soda has been dissolved 
spills on matting, put a little vinegar in 
water and wash the spot immediately, 
and the yellow stain will disappear. 

To remove iron-rust, dampen the spot 
with water, rub with a lump of citric 
acid, and lay in the sun. If the spot is 
a bad one, and does not disappear by 
the time the cloth is dry, dampen and 
lay in the sun again. If the spot still 
remains after renewing the water several 
times, then rub again with the lump of 
citric acid, and repeat until successful. 

In removing spots from a delicate 
fabric, it is better to dissolve the acid 
in a little water, and dampen the spot 
with the solution. e. h. g. 



Peach or Plum Cheeses 
An Enghsh Recipe 

Any stone fruit, such as apricots, 
damsons, etc., may be used for a fruit 
cheese. Put the fruit into a large casse- 
role or a bean pot, with one-half a cup of 
granulated sugar to every quart of fruit, 
and bake in a slow oven until very soft. 
Let cool slightly, and press the pulp 
through a colander with a wooden spoon, 
potato masher, or pestle. Measure the 
pulp into a porcelain lined saucepan, and 
add one cup of sugar to every two cups of 
pulp. Cook over a slow fire, stirring all 
the time, until mixture is thick. The mix- 
ture should then be poured into small 
molds, paraffin poured over, and stored 
for use. The little cheeses are best not 
used for three or four months. They 
may be used for sandwich filling, or to 
garnish puddings, or, cut into small pieces 
and rolled in powdered sugar, as a con- 
fiture, or very small molds may be served 
in individual portions for dessert, with a 
custard sauce. m. d. c. 



: 




/• 








THIS department is for the benefit and free use of our subscribers. Questions relating to recipes, 
and those pertaining to culinary science and domestic economics in general, will be cheerfully 
answered by the editor. Communications for this department must reach us before the first of the 
month preceding that in which the answers are expected to appear. In letters requesting answers 
by mail, please enclose address and stamped envelope. For menus, remit $1.00. Address queries 
to Janet M. Hill, Editor. American Cookery, 221 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Query No. 4155.— 
much Cocoa to use as a 
of Baker's chocolate, ca 



'Will you tell me how 
lubstitute for one square 



H 



ow to 



or 



led for in a recipe: 

Substitute Cocoa 
Chocolate 

ONE square of Baker's Chocolate 
calls for one ounce — or two 
tablespoonfuls of cocoa — as a 
substitute. This will answer well enough 
in following any ordinary recipe, but to 
make a true substitute of cocoa for 
chocolate in nutritional value about one 
tablespoonful of butter should be used 
with every ounce of cocoa. This is 
because chocolate is very rich in fat, 
and this fat is taken out in the process of 
manufacturing cocoa, and made into the 
cocoa butter of commerce. 



Query No. 4156. — "A recipe that I fol- 
lowed in making boiled frosting directed me to 
cook it until I could blow a big, colored bubble. 
I could not blow a bubble at all, and the frosting 
went to sugar. Will you please give me a recipe 
for a superior Boiled Frosting in large amount.^ 
I know very little about cooking. 

Also will you give a recipe for Welsh Rabbit 
and one for Sand Tarts.^" 

Boiled Frosting 

Since you confess your inexperience 
in cooking, we shall give you a few points 
about the cooking of sugar. The weather 
has a very strong influence on sugar- 
cooking, and where the sugar has to be 
boiled to even a moderately high degree 
nothing will be so successful, if the day is 
damp or rainy or the humidity high, as 
when the weather is clear and dry. But 
there is one consolation — in working 



with sugar, no matter how bad your 
failure may be, unless you have abso- 
lutely burned the sugar to a cinder you 
can melt down the product, begin over 
again, and go on until you have success. 
The only difference will be that after 
several re-meltings the sugar will 
"yellow" a little, like clothes that have 
not been bleached. Another thing, one- 
half as much water as sugar, where a 
pound, or less than a pound, of sugar is 
used in the recipe, is a good proportion, 
and one-third as much water as sugar 
where there is over a pound. Less watc 
can be used, if one-fourth a teaspoonful o: 
cream of tartar be added for every three- 
cups of sugar. Stir the sugar and water 
until the sugar has dissolved, then do not 
stir after this. Let the mixture boil until 
a teaspoonful dropped into a cup of ice 
water can be gathered up between the 
fingers into a soft ball. Or, if you use a 
sugar thermometer and let the syrup 
boil until it registers 238° Fahrenheit, 
this will be more accurate. The syrup 
should then be poured in a thin stream 
on the stiflF-beaten whites of either one or 
two eggs to a pound, or a half-pound, of 
sugar, and the mixture should be well 
beaten while the pouring is going on and 
afterwards, until it is thick enough t(^ 
spread on the cake. The larger the 
proportion of egg-whites, the easier the 
frosting is to make, but the longer it will 
take to get hard. One pound of sugai 
ought to make frosting enough to ict 
two large cakes. 



212 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



make 

rich,delicious cakes 
without butter 




Crisco is always sold in this dirt- 
proof, sanitary container, never in 
bulk. One pound and larger sizes, 
net weights. All good grocers sell 
Crisco. Also made and sold in 
Canada. 




— Crisco gives them the quality you 
want at about half of butter cost. 

You couldn't imagine shortening 
daintier or more wholesome than 
Crisco. It is nothing but the 
purest, richest vegetable oil — en- 
tirely edible — brought to creamy 
thickness by the special Crisco 
process. There is nothing else like it. 

It is odorless, colorless, tasteless. 
Yet, just by adding salt (a level 
teaspoonful for every cupful of 
Crisco) it makes cakes so delicious 
that folks think you have used 
butter. 

Doesn't it seem extravagant to pay 
the price for butter when Crisco 
makes your baked things just as 
good? 



What are the two chief causes 
of thick-crusted cakes? 



What are the two chief reasons 
why cakes fall in the center? 



Crisco is equally satisfactory for pastry 
making and frying. Try a pound and 
see how good it is. It keeps fresh and 
sweet down to the last spoonful in the 
can, without being put on ice. 

The answer to these questions and 
all the other cookery lore of Marion 
Harris Neil, (^formerly cookery edi- 
tor of The Ladies' Home Journal) are given in the Crisco 
coolibook "A Calendar of Dinners." The 231 pages tell 
everything the home-maker needs to know about cookery; 
five 615 delicious recipes and 365 complete dinner menus — 
one for every day in the year. Illustrated. Cloth bound. 
Each copy costs us 29 cents. We will send you one copy, 
for personal use, for only 10 cents in stamps. Write now, to 
Dei^artment A- 10, The Procter and Gamble Company, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. 




Buv advertised Goods — ■ Do not accept substitutes 
213 



214 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Welsh Rabbit 

Stir one tablespoonful of flour Into one 
tablespoonful of butter melted in a 
saucepan. Add one-half a cup of liquid, 
and stir until the mixture is thick. Add 
one-half a pound of cheese, either grated 
or sliced thin, season with one-half a 
teaspoonful, each, of salt and dry 
mustard, and a speck of cayenne or any 
other desired seasoning; stir until the 
cheese is melted, and pour over toasted 
bread or crackers. 

Other additions to the rabbit may be a 
teaspoonful of Worcestershire sauce, one 
or two tablespoonfuls of tomato catsup, a 
bit of green pepper very fine-minced, or 
chopped, a chopped pickle or two, etc. 

The liquid prescribed in the recipe 
may be thin cream, or milk, or water. 
It may be the brine from a bottle of 
olives, in which case the seasoning of salt 
may be omitted, and the chopped olives 
may be added the last thing to the rab- 
bit. Similarly, the liquid may be the 
liquor from a pint of oysters, and the 
oysters, parboiled and chopped, may be 
added the last thing to the dish. 

A rabbit Is sometimes enriched by the 
addition of a well-beaten egg just after 
the cheese has melted, the cooking then 
to be prolonged a minute or two, until the 
egg has set. The addition of egg is, 
however, not necessary. 

Sand Tarts 

This name is applied to any rather rich 
cooky mixture, cut into rings, sprinkled 
with a mixture of sugar and cinnamon, 
and often garnished with three halves of 
almonds or any other nuts. The follow- 
ing recipe is a good one. Cream to- 
gether one-half a cup of butter, and beat 
Into it one cup of sugar. Add one egg, 
beat all together, and sift In one cup and 
one-half of flour mixed with two tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder. The mix- 
ture should be very stiff. Set into the 
refrigerator, or In the cellar, until it is 
hard enough to roll out on a floured 
board to a thin sheet. Cut with a dough- 



nut cutter, arrange the circles on a 
baking-sheet, previously greased and 
floured, and brush them over with 
beaten egg, then sprinkle them with a 
mixture of granulated sugar and cinna- 
mon, and decorate with the halves of nuts 
placed In the shape of a triangle. They 
need not more than ten minutes to bake, 
if the oven Is right. 

Query No. 4157. — "When I bake a cake 
with a good deal of fruit in it, the paper with 
which I line the pan is hard to remove. How 
can I take it off? Will you give me a recipe for 
Corn Timbales?" 

To Remove Paper from Cake 
After Baking 

Pass over the surface of the paper a 
cloth dipped in very cold water, then pull 
off the paper while the steam arises. 
If the paper Is not removed, the cake will 
keep fresh longer, and when it Is cut Into 
slices for serving the paper will come off 
without difficulty. 

Corn Timbales 

Sift through a colander a pint can of 
sweet corn; add a cup of milk, three or 
four well-beaten eggs, a tablespoonful of 
onion juice, a dash of paprika or cayenne, 
one teaspoonful of salt, and one-fourth a 
teaspoonful of white pepper. Fill timbale 
molds three-fourths full, and stand In a 
pan of hot water in a moderate oven 
until the mixture is firm. Invert on 
platter, and garnish with cress and sliced 
fresh tomatoes. 



Query No. 4158. — "Will you give me a 
recipe for Peanut Butter, also, if possible, one 
for Almond Butter? I should also like to have 
a recipe for the old-fashioned Liquid Yeast of our 
grandmothers' days; and I should like to know 
the difference in the results of this kind of yeast 
in breadmaking from the yeast we use now. I 
ate some bread while in the country made from 
this kind of yeast, and it had a fine flavor. Was 
it on account of the yeast .^" 

Peanut Butter 

Put a quart (or more) of the shelled 
peanuts Into a cool oven, have the, nuts 
well spread out on a pan, and allow them 
to heat gently until the husks, or thin, 
papery coverings, can be rubbed off. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



nvffnfffiffvfffi 

■■■■•■■■■■■■■I 

liimiimmi 



pfffffitm n i imi i m ii imi iiiii miim»"sini ii m i i i m i nn i imm i mii i 

■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■•■■■•■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■•■■•taaiiiii 
■" - -■■■■■«■■■■■■■■■■■■■«■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ ■■■■,,■■■■■■■,. 




The Ryzon 
U'vel measure 



the Economical BaHin^ Powder 



It is true economy to use a dependable, high quaUty 
baking powder. Ryzon has proved, after thorough test- 
ing, that it can be depended upon absolutely for scientific 
accuracy and strength. With its use successful baking 
becomes possible — good materials are never wasted. 

And being lighter than other baking powders, Ryzon 
yields more spoonfuls to the pound. 

Right from the beginning, household experts recog- 
nized the features which make Ryzon not only the eco- 
nomical baking powder but also the "Perfect Baking 
Powder!" Their endorsement has helped introduce it 
into home kitchens all over the country. 

Ryzon is packed in full 16 ounce pounds — also 35c and 20c pack- 
ages. A pound tin of Ryzon and a copy of the Ryzon Baking Book 
will be sent free, postpaid, to any household science teacher who 
writes us on school stationery, giving official position. 

GENERALCHEMICALCa 

FOOD DEPARTMENT 
NEW YORK 



■ ■ ■■■■■■tfnfftTfffii ii ii iii i miimmi i i i minii ii iiM ii i i i ii iimm ii i i i i i i " i " ii i i iii iii n fl 

■■■■■■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■-■■■"■■■■■■■■■■•■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 

- ._-_ TM«B«1B1««««» » ■■■■■■■■MIB ■-■ ■■■■■■■■■ ^Mm 



MiMI 



yUliliiiiiliiliiiiliiiili 



yuu 



blilMiiiiiiiiAl 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

215 



216 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Care should be taken that the nuts do 
not get brown. A good way to get rid 
of the husks is to put the peanuts into a 
flour sack, and work them with a kneading 
motion until the husks are loosened, then 
shake them from the sack on to a pan; 
do this out-of-doors in the breeze. 
Grind the nuts very fine in a nut grinder, 
and cook for several hours in a double 
boiler without adding water to the nuts. 
Fill the butter into jars when of the right 
consistency. 

Almond Butter 

Proceed as for peanut butter, only the 
almonds may be blanched by pouring 
hot water over them, and rubbing off 
the skins after they have stood for three 
or four minutes in the water. They may 
be set into the oven to dry, being very 
careful they do not brown in the least, 
then ground and packed into jars with- 
out further cooking. 

Home-Made Liquid Yeast 

Pare and slice four large potatoes, and 
put on to boil in two quarts of water, 
slightly salted. Tie one cup and one- 
half of dried hops in a square of cheese- 
cloth, and boil with the potatoes. Re- 
move the potatoes when soft, and mash, 
adding one-fourth a cup, each, of flour 
and sugar. Pour over this the boiling 
liquid that still contains the hops, stir 
and set away to cool slightly.- It should 
be very slightly thick, and if not, it 
should be returned to the fire to cook 
until all the starch cells are ruptured. 
The hops should be squeezed to obtain 
all of the liquid. When the preparation 
has cooled to lukewarm, a "starter" 
must be added, in the shape of a cup of 
already made liquid yeast from a neigh- 
bor, or one-fourth to one-half a yeast 
cake, blended with a little water. Cover 
the bowl that contains the mixture, and 
set in a warm place for twenty-four 
hours, stirring at intervals, then bottle, 
and store in a cool cellar. 

There is a different flavor produced 
by the use of home-made yeast in bread- 



making. It is, in part, due to the hops, 
and is objected to by some persons. The 
hops prevent the growth of bacteria in 
the yeast, hence they help to keep it 
sweet. If, instead of potatoes, oatmeal 
water is used, made by boiling a pound of 
oatmeal in two quarts of water, the flavor 
of the bread is delicious. In some of the 
country farmhouses this liquid yeast is 
made at the "hanging of the crane," 
and is renewed by adding potato water or 
oatmeal water, with a little flour paste 
and sugar; and when thus renewed every 
week, after the baking of huge batches of 
bread, and kept in a good, dry cellar, 
it will keep almost indefinitely. The 
writer has seen some that was "started" 
a hundred years ago with a little liq.uid 
yeast brought from Scotland, and has 
been used through all the generation^ 
since then. Unquestionably the flavor 
of this yeast was excellent in the bread, 
and the scientific explanation is that this 
flavor was due to the development of 
little-understood by-products during the 
growth of the yeast. The difference in 
the flavor of quick-process and slow- 
rising bread is accounted for in the sanu 
way. The use of home-made yeast is an 
economy now, since yeast cakes, like 
everything else, have "gone up." 



Query No. 4159. — "At the home of a 
friend recently I ate an especially delicious Pie- 
Crust, which she told me was a nut-crust. Could 
you furnish a recipe for this?" 

Nut Crust for Pies 

We cannot guarantee to furnish the 
recipe used by your friend, but the follow- 
ing makes a very delicious crust, and one 
that goes especially well with apple pies.^ 

Grind any kind of nut meats through a 
nut grinder until so fine that they re- 
semble meal. Use one-half a cup of this 
to each cup of flour, and proceed as usual 
for pie-crust. Walnuts and pecans are 
particularly good used in this way. It 
should be noted that a little extra salt 
has to be used whenever nuts form part 
of the ingredients of any recipe, otherwise 
the taste will be flat and the nut flavor 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




arorect wftj^ 



SAUERS 




THE MATlOrfAL EXTRACT 

VANILLA AND 32 OTHER FLAVORS 

v_-^%^/^ U /grocers 
THE LARGEST SELLING BRAND IN THE U.S. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
217 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



will not be developed to its full extent. 



Query No. 4160. — "I am a business girl, 
but am new to the business of housekeeping. 
We have only just begun in our own home. 
Will you please tell me whether it pays, that is, 
whether it is more economical, to make bread 
at home than to buy it from the bakery? Also, 
my husband is very fond of pickles. Are they 
wholesome.'' What kind are the best.f" He is, 
also, fond of pie, indeed it seems to me he is 
fond of all the unwholesome things. What 
ought I to do about it.'' And will you please 
give me some rules for making Wholewheat 
Bread? I can make white bread very nicely, 
but I fail in the other." 

We are especially pleased to be asked 
for help by a new homemaker, and we 
hope to be freely called on at all times 
for the same. 

Economy in Making Bread at 
Home 

Experienced housekeepers estimate 
that one-third the cost is saved when 
bread is made at home. This estimate 
includes cost of materials and fuel, but 
not the cost of the labor and time. This 
will be but little, if a bread-mixer is 
used, and anvwav, in most cases, a house- 




Baby Midget 

HOSE SUPPORTER 

holds the socks securely and allows the little one 
absolute freedom of action, so necessary to its 
health, growth and comfort. The highly nickeled 
parts of the "Baby Midget" have smooth, 
rounded comers and edges and they do not come 
in contact with the baby's skin. 
Like the Velvet Grip Hose Supporters for 
women, misses and children it is equipped 
with the famous All-Rubber Oblong Button, 
which prevents slipping and ruthless ripping. 
Silk, 15 cents; Lisle, 10 cents 

SOLD BVERYWHKRB OR SENT POSTPAID 
GEORGR FROST CO., MAKERS, BOSTON 




keeper could not put her time to morCi 
advantage than in making bread at home. 

Value of Pickles in the Diet 

Many persons find that an attack of' 
biliousness is warded off by the use of 
pickles. Those who crave pickles usually 
need acid in their diet, and the body calls 
for the sourest thing in sight — so tO' 
speak. There is no harm in a moderate 
use of good pickles at dinner, that is, for 
most persons; and they furnish a relish 
with a simple dinner that is of much use,, 
for food does us more good when eaten; 
with an appetite. If you put up your 
pickles at home, I would choose cauli-; 
flower in preference to cucumber, as! 
being more easily masticated. If you 
believe your husband uses pickles in 
very great excess, try serving acid in 
some other form, such as lemonade for; 
a beverage, grapefruit in the morning, a 
sour-sweet sauce with meats, or lots of 
sour apples in sauce, pie, or puddings, 
lemon juice or vinegar with lettuce, 
beans, etc. 

Is Pie Wholesome? 

For persons in normal health there is no 
objection to pie for dessert, even three 
or four times a week. Make them, 
preferably, of fruit, apples, peaches, 
figs, etc., or a combination of two or more 
fruits, and have a light, plain crust. 
Rich puff-pastry is not so wholesome as 
the light, plain paste, to which there is 
small objection so long as two conditions 
are fulfilled, i. e., that it is lighi^ and 
well-browned. 

Rules for Making Wholewheat 
Bread 

Use at least one-third white flour, and 
set your sponge with the white flour. 

After the wholewheat flour is added, 
knead the dough more thoroughly than 
for white bread, and let it rise for a shorter 
time in a warmer place. 

Put the bread into an oven that is 
hotter at the start than you would have 
it for white bread, and after the first 
fifteen minutes decrease the temperature, 
and allow the loaves to bake for ten or 
fifteen minutes longer than white loaves. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
218 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




Where Money Goes in Your Foods 

Mark what you pay for water and waste in many most excellent foods — up to 40 cents per 
pound. 

In Quaker Oats there is no waste, and the water is but 7%. That's one reason for its economy. 

Quaker Oats yields 1,810 calories of nutriment per pound. Round steak yields 890 and eggs 635. 

Quaker Oats is almost a complete food. It is nearly the ideal food. It is rich in the elements 

needed for growth, for body repair and for vim. Everybody, young and old, should eat it every day. 

Yet lesser foods for breakfast cost ten times Quaker Oats. 
Quaker Oats means a delicious breakfast. It means 
great economy, for the cost is but one cent a dish. It 
means that children get the elements they need. 

Other meals can bring you variety, but the breakfast 
should be based on Quaker Oats. 



Cost Per 1,000 
Calories 

Quaker Oats 6^c 

Average meats .... 45c 

Average fish 50c 

Hen's eggs 60c 

Vegetables . . lie to 75c 



Saves 85 per cent 

Note these costs per 1,000 calories, based on prices at 
this writing. A Quaker Oats breakfast, compared with 
meats, eggs, fish, etc., saves some 85 per cent. It saves 35 
cents for a familv of five. 



The Extra- Flavor y Flakes 

This brand is flaked from queen grains only — just 
the rich, plump, flavory oats. We get but ten pounds 
from a bushel. 

It makes the oat dish doubly inviting, yet it costs 
no extra price. Millions of people send overseas to 
get these flavory flakes. You need only ask to get 
them. 

Packed in sealed round packages with 
removable cover 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
219 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



GOSSOM'S CREAM SOUPS 




In Powdered Form 

Split pea. Green pea, Lima, Celery, Black bean, Clam 
Chowder, Onion and (Mushroom 25c.) 

Quickly and Easily Prepared 
Just add water and boil 15 minutes. One package makes 3 

[)ints of pure, wholesome and delicious soup. Price 15c at 
eading grocers, or sample sent prepaid on receipt of 20c in 
stamps c coin. 

Also "GOSSOM'S "QUICK-MADE" FUDGE 
will give you a delightful surprise. So easy. A 50c pkg. 
makes over a pound of the most exquisite fudge. 
Manufactured by 

B. F. Gossom, 692 Washington St., Brookline, 46, Mass. 



Eat More Bread 



Bread is the most important food 
we eat. It furnishes abundant 
nourishment in readily digestible 
form. The fact that it never be- 
comes tiresome though eaten day 
after day, is proof of its natural 
food qualities. 

Eat plenty of bread made with 

FLEISCHMANN'S YEAST 



=Domestic Science==^ 

Home-study Courses 

Food, health, housekeeping, clothing, children 

For Homemakers and Mothers; professional 
courses for Teachers, Dietitians, Institution 
Managers, Demonstrators, Nurses, "Graduate 
Housekeepers," Caterers, etc. 

"The Profession of Home-making." 10,0 
page handbook, /ree. Bulletins: "Free-hand 
Cooking," "Food Values," "Seven-Cent 
Meals," "Family Finance." — 10 cents each. 

American School of Home Economics 

arted in 1915) 503 W. 69th St., Chicago, 111. 



\j^ 



SERVICE TABLE WA60N 




tT SEBVEi VOUB HOHt 
JAVtS VOUB TIMt 
IS PRACTICAL tCON 



Large Broad Wide Table 
Top — Removable Glass 
Service Tray — Double 
Drawer — Doub'le 
Handles— Large Deep 
Undershelves — "Scien- 
tifically Silent" Rubber 
Tired Swivel Wheels. 

A high grade piece of furni- 
ture surpassing anything yet at- 
tempted for GENERAL UTILITY, 
ease of action, and absolute 
noiselessnesa. WRITE NOW 
FOR A Descriptive Pamphlet 

AND DEALER S NAME 

COMBINATION PRODUCTS CO. 

5041 Cunard Bidg. Chicago. Ii.. 



The Silver Lining 

Cook and Scholar 

Belinda was a maid, good looking, 
Who liked young men and also cooking 
Estelle, her sister, rather taller, 
Liked men, also, but was a scholar. 

Belinda talked of roasts and stuffin's, 
And fed her suitors perfect mulHns. 
Estelle, with deeper lore of college, 
Refreshed her swains on mental knowledge. 

Belinda wed in self-defense, 
Her hordes of suitors were so dense. 
Estelle's chief fad was eating herbs. 
Men liked it not, nor Latin verbs. 

Belinda's choice, a youth named Green, 
Was underfed and passing lean. 
Estelle, howe'er, had no such luck; 
Fast to the family tree she stuck. 

Belinda's husband takes on fat; 
Belinda's well content at that. 
But fair Estelle oft wonders why 
Men pass by learning for the pie. 

Miss Ellen M. Ramsay. 



At the Wellesley Summer School oj^ 
Christian Work, which has just closed its 
sessions, some of the young ladies wished 
to go swimming in the lake on Sunday 
morning, before the religious services 
began, but were not certain that it would i 
be proper. So they applied to the dea- 
conesses for advice. They, in their turn, 
suggested that it should be left to l\\i' 
decision of Father Huntington, who this 
year has been acting chaplain. Timidly 
they approached him and sought his 
counsel. With his sweetest smile he 
replied, "Young ladies, when God pro- 
vided water in which to bathe. He didn't 
prescribe the size of the bathtub." Ii 
Father Huntington had not already taken 
the vow of celibacy, he would now be 
in great peril. — The Churchman. 



Dr. Lyman P. Powell gives some eX" 
amples of the lengths to which petty bit- 
terness between sects will sometimes carry 
men. "A visitor in a certain town, which 
had four churches and adequately sup- 
ported none, asked a pillar of one poor, 
dying church, 'How's your church get- 
ting on .^ ' ■ Not very well,' was the reply, 
'but, thank the Lord, the others are not 
doing an}' better.' " 



Buy advertised Good; 



Do not accept substitutes 
220 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




THIS big, tempting cake, made es- 
pecially delicious with Dromedary 
Cocoanut, is just the dessert for your next 
luncheon or dinner. 

Such a cake can be made quickly. 
You need take no time or bother to 
hand-grate a fresh cocoanut, yet you get 
the same rich, natural flavor. 

Dromedary Cocoanut is high in food 
value and supplies fuel and energy to 
active bodies. Give yourfamily a nourish- 
ing and delicious treat by adding its 
wholesome goodness to every-day dishes. 

New recipes for cocoanut pies, candies, 
cakes, puddings, and ices are- given in 
our "1920 RECIPE BOOK." Free on 
request. 

The HILLS BROTHERS Go. 

Dept.G, 375 Washington Street, New York 

jJlso Importers and Packers of 



3f 



aiures 
Cyonfeci 




rom \yfie 
ardenofEcUn 




Ready for Use 



Open a package of 
fresh-keeping Drome- 
dary, and you have 
ready for instant use 
a cocoanut that rivals 
vor the fresh- 
rated nut. Use as 
much as you need, 
and the rest in the 
"Ever-Sealed" box 
will keep fresh to the 
last shred. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
221 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




%all like 
^^ this 



sa 



lad 



1 envelope COX'S INSTANT POW- 

DERED GELATINE. 2 cups (I pint) 
water, 3 large grapefruit, 1 Vi cups (Vt lb.) 
sugar or honey, I cup ('/4 pint) chopped pine- 
apple, criip lettuce leaves, French dressing. 

Mix gelatine and sugar, and dissolve in water. 
Remove peelings and separate grapefruit into 
small pieces, being careful to remove all white 
skin. When gelatine is cool, add pineapple and 
grapefruit, pour into a wet mold, and allow to 
set. Serve on lettuce with dressing. 

You will also find Cox's 
Gelatine excellent for smooth 
sauces, creamy rich desserts and 
nourishing soups. 

It is surprising in how many 
ways the use of Cox's Gelatine, 
unsweetened and unflavored,can 
improve your cooking. Did you 
know that the use of gelatine is 
one of the most valuable secrets 
of the successful chef? 

You'll recognize Cox's by the 
checkerboard box. Keep a box on 
the pantry shelf. 

Write for the new Cox Manual 
of Gelatine Cookery. 




Instant F^nvdered 



H 



QELM1ME 



THE COX GELATINE CO. 

Dept. D, 100 Hudson St., New York 



=8 



OLD CAP MORTON has been tell- 
ing war stories every day for more 
than fifty years, and one was pretty good. 
Cap made the march to the sea with 
Sherman, and says that one day they 
passed through a little town in Georgia. 
The streets were full of soldiers carrying 
loaded muskets and horses pulling cannon. 
As Cap Morton's regiment passed a little 
house a little dog barked savagely at the 
soldiers. 

The little dog's owner finally appeared 
in a great state of excitement, as she 
believed the little animal was dangerous, 
and said, "Trip! Trip! You bad dog, 
don't bite the army!" 

War is a grim business, but Cap Morton 
says many of the warriors smiled over the 
incident. He has heard that the story 
found its way along the line to General 
Sherman himself, and that it amused him. 



Two women traveling in the same pas- 
senger coach could not agree about the 
window, and finally appealed to the brake- 
man. "If that window remains open, I 
shall catch my death of cold," objected 
one, to which the other promptly replied, 
"If it is closed, I shall smother to death." 
The brakeman scratched his head in per- 
plexity, until an old gentleman sitting 
near by proposed, "Open the window 
until one freezes to death, and then close 
it until the other smothers to death, and 
then the rest of us can finish our journey 
in peace." — Nezv York Times. 



"Please hurry," said the wife, im- 
patiently, to her husband. "Have you 
never buttoned a dress behind before.?" 

"No," replied her husband, also impa- 
tiently, "you never had a dress that 
buttoned before behind." 

Our Dumb Animals. 



ANGLEFOOT t 

rom I .9 

^1 1 



m The Non-Poisonous Fly Destroyer 
"*■ The U. S. Dept. of Agriculture says in 

■ Bulletin: Special pains should be taken 

■ ^ to prevent children from 
I ^^M^ drinking poisoned baites 
I ^wKl and poisoned flies dropping 

■ VTV into foods or drinks. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

222 



ADVERTISEMENTS 








fS' 


4i>!:,Ni;i 


— » 


,JiA 


i 


BAKEBSf 


m : A'^^ 


I I 




1 


FRESH GRATED 


V^^^PT , ^, 



COCONUT cocoKu 










(§(o)(g@rayT 

^ I ^HE reason for juice in the orange Buy a can of this DIFFERENT coco- 

X is the reason for milk in the coco- nut today. You'll appreciate its unusual 

nut — FLAVOR! And Baker's Fresh flavor for cakes, pies, candies and all 

Grated Coconut, therefore, is canned other coconut dishes. Or, if you prefer 

WITH THE MILK. It is as fresh, the old-fashioned sugar-cured kind, ask 

juicy and wholesome as the freshly for Baker's Dry-Shred Coconut — sold 



picked nut. 



m paper cartons. 

THE FRANKLIN BAKER COMPANY 



;cipe for the coconut cake illus- 
above will be found on the inner 



If Baker's Canned or Dry Shred C 
nut is not obtainable at your eroc 



^m^Mmm 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
223 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Vegeione 

TMAaZ MAfM f)£C. V.S.PAT, ofr. 

Nothing starts a dinner quite so well as a ridi, 
full-flavored, home-made soup. The appetizing 
zest imparted by VEGETONE has won the appro- 
bation of housewives seeking economical foods, yet 
maintaining food value. It must be tried to be 
appreciated and we will refund the purchase price 
if not satisfactory. 

CREAMED SOUPS 

From Left-Over Vegetables 
To a pint of vegetable pulp add one quart of boiling water 
in which one teaspoon of Vegetone has been dissolved. Thicken 
with one tablespoon of butter and two teaspoons of flour, 
rubbed together until smooth. Season with butter and salt. 
Remove from the stove and add one cup of milk. Then strain 
again, so that it will be perfectly smooth. 

One 4-ounce tin 50 cents, or three for $1, postpaid, when 

Baldwin, L. I., N. Y 



ordered direct. 

BISHOP-GIFFORD CO., Inc. 



"Free-Hand Cooking" 

Cook without rtcipes! A key to cookbooks — correct proportions, 
time, temperature; thickening, leavening, shortening, 105 fun- 
damental recipes. 40 p. book. 10 cents coin or stamps. 
Am. School of Home Economics, 503 W. 69th Street, Chicago 



J9^1uten Floiic 



409) GLUTEN 



^ 



Guaranteed to comply in all respi 
•taadard requirements of U. S. D( 
Agriculture. 
Manufactured b' 
FARWELL & SHINES 



ecta io 
ept. of 






Watcrtoivn. N. Y. 



M 



Cream Whipping Made 
Easy and Inexpensive 

n REMO- y ESCO 

Whips Thin Cream 

or Half Heavy Cream and Milk 

or Top of the Milk Bottle 

1 1 whips up as easily as heavy cream 

and retains its stiffness. 

Every caterer and housekeeper 

wants CREMO-VESCO. 

Send for a bottle to-day. 



Housekeeper's size, Hoz., .30 prepaid 
Caterer's size, 16oz., $1.00 
(With full directions.) 

Cremo-Vesco Company 

631 EAST 23rd ST., BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



"Any good fishing around here.^" asked' 
the visitor of the little village lad. "Yes, 
sir," answered the boy. "You goes down 
that private road until you comes to ai 
sign in a field wot says, 'Trespassers will) ^ 
be prosecuted.' Well, you go across the' 
middle of that field, and then you comes 
to a pond, with a notice-board wot says, 
'No Fishing Allowed.'" "Yes.?" "Well: 
— that's it." — Farm and Home. 



A nervous passenger on the first day of 
the outward voyage importuned the cap- 
tain to know what would be the result if 
the steamer should strike an iceberg while 
it was plunging through the fog. "The 
iceberg would move right along, madam," 
the captain replied courteously, "just as 
if nothing had happened." And the old 
lady was greatly relieved. 

Youth^s Companion. 



Of Sir William Osier's human nature a 
friend and student has given an amusing 
example in the following incident: "There 
was a quiet dignity about him that held 
a certain type of familiarity in check. 
One day, as the class was leaving the ward 
a patient in a bed near the door called 
out, 'Good morning. Doc!' Doctor Osier 
made no comment then, but when the 
corridor was reached, and we were out of 
the man's hearing, he stopped and turned 
to the students and said: 'Beware of the 
men that call you "Doc." They rarely 
pay their bills.' " 

Patronize the Hotel BolshevikI; two 
thousand rooms and a bath. 

Purple Cozv. 



rEN-CENT MEALS «,^-„r1 

meals with recipes and directions for preparing each. Thii 
48 pp. Bulletin sent for 10c or FREE for names of twc 
friends who may be interested in our Domestic Science Courses 

Vm. School Home Economics, 503 W. 69th St., Chicage 



USED 

DAILY IN A 

MILLION 

HOMES 



Colburn^s 
Spices 

TheA.ColburnG)., 
Philadelphia,U.SA 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

224 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



/^.^ 




n&jti 



Low-Cost Dishes for High-Cost Days 

\\THEN a ten-thousand-dollar-a-year chef is paid to create pop-over cream puffs 
^* from left-over muffins, unbaked custards with left-over cocoa, or luncheon appe- 
tizers from unused slices of tomato, why shouldn't we home-makers be proud instead 
of apologetic at our own home talents in this direction? 

There is nothing that the chef uses more than Knox SparkHng Gelatine. It will be just as helpful 
to you in making left-overs, canned foods, fruits and juices, into ten-thousand-dollar chef creations. 
It will transform half-a-can of tomatoes or other vegetables into a delicious salad, use up unattrac- 
tive bits of fruit in a colorful dessert, or stretch cold meat from a roast into twice the number of 
portions it might ordinarily serve. 

Here are a few "low-cost dishes" which you will find helpful in solving your home-food problems 
in these high-cost days. 




LEFT-OVER MEAT LOAF DE LUXE 

Take two cups of any left-over stock, bouillon or diluted gravy, bring to boiling point, add one envelope Knox Spark- 
ling Gelatine softened in one-half cup cold water. When mixture begins to stiffen, add two cups of any cold chopped meat 
at hand — veal, ham, beef, or chicken, which has been salted to taste. Also mold in a little red or green pepper, celery, 
onion if desired, or parsley. Turn into a square mold, first dipped in cold water and chill. Remove from mold to platter 
for serving, or cut in slices. 

JELLIED VEGETABLES LUXURO 

Soak one envelope Knox Sparkling Gelatine in one-half cup cold water ten minutes. Add one-half cup mild vinegar, 
two cups boiling water, one-half cup sugar and one teaspoonful salt. Strain and when mixture begins to thicken, add any 
left-over vegetables on hand, such as string beans, peas, beets, chopped cabbage, a few stalks of celery, a little cucumber or 
pepper. Turn into mold, first dipped in cold water and chill. May be served with or without mayonnaise and lettuce. 

UNBAKED CUSTARD 

Soak one-half envelope of Knox Sparkling Gelatine in one-fourth cup cold water ten minutes. Make a custard of 
two egg yolks, one-third cup sugar, a few grains of salt and two cups milk. Add soaked gelatine to the hot custard and, 
when nearly cool, add whites of eggs, beaten until stiff, two-thirds cup stale cake crumbs and one teaspoonful vanilla. Turn 
into small cups, first dipped in cold water, and chill. Any left-over cocoa may be used instead of the milk. 

MUFFINS OR POP-OVER CREAM PUFFS 

If pop-overs are left from breakfast, make an opening in each one just large enough to fill the center. For six pop- 
overs take one-half cup cream, two tablespoonf uls sugar and one-half teaspoonful vanilla, a pinch of salt, and one teaspoonful 
Knox Sparkling Gelatine, softened in one-fourth cup milk ten minutes and dissolved over hot water. When mixture is 
cool, fill pop-overs. 

Not only does Knox Gelatine make up into many low-cost dishes, but it is an economy in itself, 
for one box makes twenty-four individual servings or provides a family of six with four delicious 
salads or desserts for four different meals. 

If you would like other suggestions for attractive 

■^%'^l::-^^<:^^-^'' ^^ low-cost dishes, write for my booklets — "Food 

Economy" and "Dainty Desserts." They are free 

of charge. Just enclose a 2-cent stamp to cover 

postage charges and mention your grocer's name. 



KNOX 

5PARKUHQ 






ElatiH£ 



Any domestic science teacher can have sufficient gelatine 
for her class, if she will write me on school stationery, stating 
quantity and when needed. 

"Wherever a recipe calls for Gelatine — it means KNOX** 

MRS. CHARLES B. KNOX 

KNOX GELATINE 

107 Knox Avenue. Johnstown, N. Y. 




Buy advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 
225 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



frs wford 



The new Victory Crawford 

makes your kitchen a more 

efficient workshop 

It saves you time and steps. And saves 
space, too. for it's only 43 inches from end 
to end. 

Yet. compact as it is. it has room for nine 
kettles — four on the coal griddles and five 
on the gas burners. And there are two gas 
ovens and a broiler, as well as a large coal 
oven. This gives you six and a half square 
feet of oven space, which you can double by 
using the racks. 

And it's the only range made in which you 
can bake in three ovens and use the broiler 
at the same time! 

The Victory Crawford is a range you'll want 
the minute you see it. Ask your dealer to 
show it to you and to explain its many exclu- 
sive, up-to-the-minute features. 



Sold by Leading Dealers 



WALKER & PRATT MFG. CO. 

BOSTON, U. S. A. 

Makers of Highest Quality Ranges 
Furnaces and Boilers 



i^S. 




Brown: "What's old Jones doing 
now?" 

Robinson: "Oh, he's working his son's 
way through college." ■ — • Londo7i Mail. 



If a man has a great deal to say, you 
may be sure that it won't take him very 
long to say it. — Nezu York Evening Sun. 

"Say, Porter, that Isn't right; one's a 
black shoe an' the other Is a tan." "Dat's 
a funny thing, boss; you am de second 
man dis morning what tole me dat." 

Life. 

Cooking for Profit 

By Alice Bradley 



Principal, Aliss Farmer's School of Cookery: 
Cooking Editor, Woman's Home Companion 



T 



HE demand for home-cooked food 
Is constant everywhere. Many 
"born cooks" have succeeded In 
building up a more or less successful 
business In this line. Many more women 
need to earn money and still maintain 
their homes Intact, but do not know hiow 
to go about establishing a profitable busi- 
ness in home-cooked foods, catering, etc. 

We are having a new correspondence 
course, written especially for such women, 
by Miss Bradley, the well-known au- 
thority on cookery and catering. It 
explains. In detail, just how to prepare 
food "good enough to sell"; just what 
to cook, with many choice recipes; how 
to establish a reputation and a constant 
profitable market, how to cater for all 
entertainments; how to conduct a prof- 
itable boarding house or small hotel; how 
to run successful tea rooms, cafeterias, 
lunch rooms, etc. ^ 

The outlay for equipment Is little or 
nothing, and the fee for the course Is very 
moderate, and may be paid on easy terms. 
The course is In twelve lessons, to be sent 
weekly, and the correspondence Instruc- 
tion Is under the direction of Miss 
Bradley. Our two "Household Helpers" 
are Included to show how to gain the 
time for money-making work. For full 
details and synopsis write to American 
School of Home Economics, 503 W. 69th 
Street, Chicago, Illinois. — Jdv. ^ 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept suhstitutes 
226 



ADVERTISEMENTS 





It's All in the Seasoning 

That indescribably "different taste" between a home-cooked meal 
and a meal prepared by a famous chef is merely the difference in the 
seasoning of things. 

Knowing how to season is what makes a famous chef. He uses any 
number of ingredients in almost every dish — and it is the combination 
of all of them in the right proportions that produces that wonderfully 
delicious "different taste." 

FAUST CHILE POWDER 

was originated by Henry Dietz, the chef of the historical, 
world-famous Faust Cafe, and now Bevo Mill. It is a com- 
bination of spices, herbs, seeds, paprika, chile pepper and 
other seasonings. It's the seasoning you must use if you want 
your dishes to rival those prepared by famous chefs, and it's 
the seasoning you WILL use if you try it once. Use Faust 
Chile Powder in all salad dressings, in all relishes, in stews, 
soups, chile con carne, au gratin dishes, etc. 

If your dealer hasn't it in stock now, send 20c to cover cost, 
packing and postage of a can of Faust Chile Powder 
and Recipe Book. 

C. F. Blanke Tea and Coffee Co. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Manufacturers of the world-famous Faust 
Instant Coffee and Tea 



Buy advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 

227 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Price's vanilla 



Household Help 




Look for 

Price' M Tropikid 

on the label 



Crisp cookies, delicious cakes, puddings 
and home-made ice cream — all made with 
Price's Vanilla! 

Price's — the standard vanilla extract for 

Dearly 70 years, is absolutely pure, rich 

in flavor and just right in strength. 

PRICE FLAVORING EXTRACT CO. 

Chicago, U. S. A. 





I teach you to make them better than 
you ever made them before — the most 
delicious Angel Food Cake and many other kinds, 
the most appetizing cakes you ever tasted. 
They Sell for $3.00— Profit, $2.00 
1 will make you the most expert cake-maker in 
your vicinity. Your cakes will be praised and 
sought for. Your cakes will become famous, if 
you make them by the 

Osbom Cake Making System 
My methods are original. They never 
fail. They are easy to learn; you are 
sure to succeed the very first time. I 
have taught thousands. I can teach you. 
Let me send you particulars fkee. 



Dept. 
L-10 



MRS. GRACE OSBORN 
Bay City Michigan 



famous, if 



SALAD SECRETS 



100 recipes. Brief but complete. 15c by rTiail. 100 Meat- 
less .recipes 15c 50 Sandwich recipes 15c. All three 30c. 
B. R. BRIGGS, 250 Madison St., Brooklyn NY. 



ROBERTS 

Lightning Mixer 
Beats Everything 

Beats eggs, whips cream, churns butter, mixes 
gravies, desserts and dressings, and does the 
work in a few seconds. Blends and mixes 
malted milk, powdered milk, bab.T foods and 
all drinks. 

Simple and Strong. Saves work— easy 
to clean. Most necessary household 
article. Used by 200,000 housewives 
and endorsed by leading household 
magazines. 
If your dealer does not carry this, we will send 
prepaid quart size $1.25, pint size 90c. Far 
West and South, quart $1.40, pint $1.00. 
Recipe book fre^ with mixer. 

NATIONAL CO. CAMBitiBtf 39. boston, mass. 




IF you could engage an expert cook and am 
expert housekeeper for only 10 centa a week, 
with no board or room, you would do it, 
wouldn't v'ou? Of course you would! Well, 
that is all our "TWO HOUSEHOLD HELP- 
ERS" will cost you the first year — nothing 
thereafter, for the rest of your life. 

Have you ever considered how much an hour 
a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year is worth 
to you."* Many workmen get $1 an hour — 
surely your time is worth 30 cents an hour. 
We guarantee these "Helpers" to save you 
at least an hour a day, worth say $2.10 a week. 
Will you invest the 10 cents a week to gain $2 
weekly.^ 

And the value our "Helpers" give you in 
courage and inspiration, in peace of mind, in 
the satisfaction of progress, in health, happiness 
and the joy of living, — is above price. In mere 
dollars and cents, they will save their cost 
twelve times a year or more. 

These helpers, "Lessons in Cooking" and 
"Household Engineering" were both prepared 
as home-study courses, and as such have been 
tried out and approved by thousands of our 
members. Thus they have the very highest 
recommendation. Nevertheless we are willing 
to send them in book form, on a week's free 
trial in your own home. Send the coupon. 



Household Engineering 

Scientific Management 

in the Home 

by Mrs. Christine Frede- 
rick. 544 pp., 134 Illus.. 
i Leather Style. Gold 
Stamped. CONTENTS: 
The Labor-Saving Kitchen; 
Plans and Methods; Help- 
ful Household Tools; 
Methods of Cleaning; Food 
and Food Planning; Prac- 
tical Laundry Work; Fam- 
ily Finance; Efficient Pur- 
chasing; The Servantless 
Household; Planning the 
Efficient Home; Health 
and Personal Efficiency. 



tb 



Lessons in Cooking 

Through Preparation 

of Meals 

bv Robinson & Hammel 
500 pp. Illus., } Leather) 
Style. Gold Stamped 

CONTENTS: Menus with 
recipes for 12 weeks an 

FULL DIRECTIONS FOB PRE- 
PARING EACH MEAL. Menus! 
and Dir^-ctions for Formal! 
and Informal Dinners, 
Luncheons, Suppers, etc. 
12 Special .\rticles: Serving.i 
Dish Washing, Candy Mak-' 
ing, etc. Also Balanced 
Diet, Food Value, Ways of 
Reducing Costs, etc. 



Membership Free, With the books to in- 
clude: a. All personal questions answered, b. 
All Domestic Science books loaned, c. Use of 
Purchasing Department, d. Bulletins and Econ- 
omy LetterS; e. Credit on our full Professional 
or Home-Makers' Correspondence Courses. 

In these difficult days you really cannot 
afford to be without our "Helpers." You owe 
it to yourself and family to give them a fair 
trial. You cannot realize what great help they 
will give you till you try them — and the trial 
costs you nothing. Send the coupon. 

American School of Home Economics, Chicago, IlL 



A. S. H. E. — 503 W. 69th Street, Chicago, 111. 

Send your two "HOUSEHOLD HELPERS," prepaid, 
on a week's trial, in the de Luxe binding. If satisfactory,! 
will send you $5 in full payment (OR) 50 cents and $1 per 
motrth for five months. Membership to be included free. 
Otherwise I will return one or both books in seven days. 
(Regular mail price $2.64 each.) 

Name and 

Address 

Reference 



Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 

228 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




A Dishwasher for$2.50! 

«eeps hands out of the water, no wiping of dishes, saves J the 
jme. Consists of special folding dishdrainer, special wire 
.asket, 2 special long-handled brushes. Full directions for use. 
■ent prepaid for $2.50 or C. O. D. Full refund if not satisfactory 

vm. School Home Economics, 503 W. 69th Street, Chicago 



1S4%IF 



CHILD'SNAPKIN CLIPS ^^^f.oii^ai;:^^ 

A gift to delight any child. Choice of five loved ani- 
mals. Made of Boring nickel silver, finely silver plated 
2U in. hi^h. Order by name. Price postpaid in U. S. 
$1.00 each. 

Gets The 
KenielOutWhole! 




Cracks any Pecan, Walnut, Brazil 
Nut.Filbert, etc.— without crushing 
kernel! Ko scattered, flyinp: shells, 
pinched fingtirs or lost tempers. 

IDEAL NUT CRACKER 

Just a quick easy turn of the 
hantile bring;s the kernel out 
whole, !^o simple a child can 
do it. No levers, springs 
or clamps. Lasts forever. 
Thousands in use. Money 
back if not pleased. Order 
early for Xmas. 
Styles. PlainnicktlplatedeOe 
Styled. Highly polish' d "86c 
Postage paid anrwhere in U. S. 

COOK ELECTRIC CO. 

9(^ W.VanBuren,Chicafi:o.lU. 



UNCLE JOHN'S SYRUP 

as deliciously satisfying 
for sweetening and 
flavoring puddings, 
sauces and frostings as 
it is on griddle cakes, 
hot biscuits and juicy 
baked apples! Try it. 

Order a can today — 3 convenient sizes 

New England Maple Syrup Co. 

Winter Hill Station :: :; Boston, Mass. 

Fine on ,^ 
Griddle 1 1 
CaKcs 




Buv advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
229 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



SAVE MEAT -SAVE MONEY 



|C1UD«, 



With every roast of 
meat, poultry and ( 
and every b.-iked 
fish, servo a lib- 
eral amount of 
STUFFING or 
DRESSING fla. 
vored with Bell's 
Seasoning. In- 
crease the pie; 
ure and decrerise 
the cost. Hotel 
chefs recom 
mend it. If 
your grocer 
will not sup- 
ply you send 
10c for snm- 
pie package. 

«tk Graeers For BELL'S SEASONING 



f?fLLS 



!sa>o« 



i^^'^m 




FOR AUTOMOBILES 



Furniture, Leather Upholstery 

Varnished, Painted and 

Enameled Surfaces 

and Windshields 



Makes Old Cars and Old 
Furniture Look Like New 



WARRANTED FREE FROM 
ACID AND GREASE 



$1.00 
1.50 



WILL NOT BURN 

Pint Screw Top Cans 
Quart " 

Sent Parcel Post Prepaid 
Cash with order 

Local agents wanted in U. S. and 
Canada. 

Send Postal for Booklet and agents ' prices. 

SAWYER CRYSTAL BLUE CO. 

Sole Selling Agents 
88 Broad St., Boston, Mass. 



Two New Household Helpers 

On 10 days' free trial! They save you at least an hour a day, 
worth at only 30 cents an hour, $2.10 a week. Cost only the 
10 cents a week for a year. Membership free. Send postcard 
or note for details of these "helpers," — our two new home- 
study courses, now in book form or $5.00 in full payment. 

AM. SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS, 503 W. 69th ST., CHICAGO 




How CHldren 
Love Junket! 

Even when they don't like milk, 
they will ask for more Junket — 
which is simply milk in a more 
attractive and readily digestible 
form. 



Junke 

^ MADEft^iMMILK 



Let them have all they want of it, 
because it is among the best foods they 
could eat. 

It is delicious to the taste, and whole- 
some and nourishing. 

When ice cream is made with a Jun- 
ket Tablet it not only requires less 
cream and produces ice cream of a 
smooth, velvety texture, but the cream 
is then more easily digestible. 

Junket Tablets are sold by grocers 
and druggists everywhere. 



Nesnah — 

the 

Powdered 

Junket 

Is the same as Junket 
Tablets, except it is 
in powdered form and 
already sweetened 
and flavored. It 
comes in 6 pure 
vors, delicious i 



The Junket Folks 
Little FaUs, N. Y. 

Canadian Factory: 

Chr. Hansen's 

Canadian Laboratory 

Toronto, Ont. 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
230 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



What are your problems of cookery? 

Let our Domestic Science Department answer them. This 
service is given without charge to housewives^ domestic 
science teachers, and others interested in food preparation. 



Here are some questions 
we answer for you : 

How to buy good meat most 
economically. 

What to serve at parties. 

When canned meats can help 
you lighten kitchen work. 

How to make your table most 

attractive. 
What is a '* balanced" meal? 
Menus for every day. 

♦ ♦ 

How other women value 

our service 

"l want to thank you and your company 
for the meat charts. For years I have 
wanted just such charts to use in my 
cookinir classes— the girls all seem to 
understand the different cuts so much 
better with the colored charts. 
"Regina Spellman Home Economics. 
"3316 Troost St., Kansas City, Mo." 

"I wish to acknowledge your charts on 
beef, pork and mutton chops. They are 
the finest of their kind I have ever seen. 
I have wondered if you have sent these 
charts to the Agricultural Department 
of the University of Idaho. We had 
nothing nearly so good on the subject 
when I was there. 

"C. W. McCullough, Craigh, Mont." 

"I want to congratulate you on the Wil- 
son Meat Charts not only for their 
appearance but their informative value. 
"I think they are so splendid that I 
want to use them in an early issue of 
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING in the 
department of Cookery. Have we the 
permission of your firm? 
"Mildred Maddocks, Director, Good 
Housekeeping Institute." 



T TQUSEKEEPING and home management 
-^ ^ have become a practical science. Selecting, 
buying and serving food in the right way has 
greater money importance today than ever before. 
Yet these things are easier, because someone else 
has already worked out the problems that confront 
you. 

You can find out how to buy more economically. 
You can know just what nourishment your family 
will get from a certain cut of meat. You can turn 
to a chart giving a wide choice of meats and vege- 
tables which constitute a **balanced" meal. You 
can have recipes worked out to fit modern cook- 
ing conditions. These and an endless number of 
other facts are at your command by the use of a 
postage stamp. 

Let Our Domestic Science 
Department Help You 

Miss Eleanor Lee Wright, Director of the 
Domestic Science Department of Wilson & Co. is 
at your service. Her department is open to house- 
wives, clubs, schools and teachers. She will answer 
other specific questions. She will send you interest- 
ing reprints of articles on *'The Economic and 
Dietetic Value of Jams and Jellies — Canned Fruits 
— or Canned Meats." There are motion pictures, 
slides, charts and printed lectures to cover many 
phases of food preparation. Write for the informa- 
tion you wish — it is given free. 



Write a letter or mail the coupon 

Get a copy of "Wilson's Meat Cookery," 
handsomely illustrating meat cuts in color 
and telling how to buy most economically. 
Settle your problems and questions today by 
using this free service. 



r\ 



WILSON & CO. 



\y \y 



ynM 



WILSON & CO., Chicago, 111. Dept. C. 
Please send me information on articles checked below: 

□ Wilson's Meat Cookery 

D I^eaflet on 

D Meat Charts. 

a Information about teacher's material for instruc 
tion in 



Name 



Address, 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
231 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



^^^^■j 


■ 


H 


&•»'> ; ■ i^^ ■ 


i^^^^^^^^i 


HHHH 


^^^H 


■ 


^ 




^1 


^^^H 


■ 


r 

< 

^ 1 


4 


1 


1 


■ 




L 


ij 


Tj 


H 


r^H 


^^^^V'v ' <" ^ 




jiiL 


.^^^ 


^^Li^iHB 


^i^^^^^^^^l 


Hj^^ 


m 


i 


^ 


F* 


r V ^H 


BH^^^K^.^-.. . 










^Bt^^lHHII^Hi 



You Need Not Cook This Icing 

Do you realize how many tempting, economical ways 
there are for using Carnation Milk in the kitchen ? Try 
this recipe for uncooked icing: 

Four tablespoons Carnation Milk. Three tablespoons raelted butter. One-half teaspoon 
vanilla. One-half teaspoon salt. Three and one-half cups powdered sugar. Cream 
some of the sugar and milk. Add more sugar until proper consistency. Spread on 
cake and set away in cool 'place. Chocolate or fruit coloring may be added if desired. 

There are more than one hundred tested recipes to be found 
in the Carnation Cook Book which will be sent free on 
request. Carnation Milk is pure cows' milk, evaporated 
to the consistency of cream and sterilized. Economical, 
convenient, pure — it is sold by grocers everywhere. 

Carnation Milk Products Company 

1058 Consumers Building, Chicago 1058 Stuart Building, Seattle 



Carnation HJ Milk 



'From Contented Cows 




Sold by Grocers 
Everywhere 

The label is red and white 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
232 



ADVFRTISEMENTS 




Your Pickling-Time Helper— 

STIGKNEY & POOR'S 
WHOLE MIXED SPICE 

A three-ounce box of Stickney & Poor's Whole Mixed Spices 
will furnish flavor and zest for 100 small cucumber pickles and is as 
economical for chili sauce, piccalilli, and all your other pickling. A 
recipe for real, old-fashioned cucumber pickles is printed on every box. 



Real Old-Fashioned Cucumber Pickles 

One cupful of salt dissolved in enough boiling water to cover 100 
small cucumbers. Let them stand two days in a covered jar. Drain 
and wipe each cucumber carefully and put in empty jar with a good 
sized onion full of cloves and a small piece of alum. Put i pound of 
Stickney & Poor's Whole Mixed Spice in a muslin bag and boil a few 
minutes with enough vinegar to cover the cucumbers. Put the bag 
in the jar and pour on the vinegar. 



* 



ORDER NOW FROM YOUR GROCER 

STICKNEY & POOR SPICE COMPANY 

1815— Century Old — Century Honored — 1920 

Mustard-Spices BOSTON and HALIFAX Seasonings-Flavorings 
The Only Manufacturers of Pure Mustards in the N. E. States 



Jjyjj 






Buy advertised Goods 



— Do not acceptsubstitutes 

233 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii|i|iiiin 



II I I I II I i l l III 1 1 1 i ii iii ii miiiiiiiiiiiiii i !iiiii i !iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii i ii ii in H 




Jaill/e 





A IVjhite //oce sc'C/&:%s 



IS a common topic ofintere^ 
in the intimacy of thousands 
upon thousands of homes 
where its deliciousness. un- 
iformity and aftogfether high 
character are recogrrized and 
. thoroughly appreciated. 

} "WHITE HOUSE COFFEE" 
>^^ should easily ^rik^yoi/r \x\' 
\ tere^. \bur grocer has it or 
can easily procure it for^ou. 

1-3-5 Ib.Packag^es Only 

NEVER >SOLDlN BULK. 
DWlNELL-WRli^HT Ca 

/=>v>7 c//o^/ Co^e /^ocLiy/er^r 

BOSTON CHICAGO 



'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim 



i i i i iii iii i iii i i i i i iiiiiiiiii ii i ii iiiiiii 



This New Range Is A 
,Wonder For Cooking' 

Although less than four feet long it can do every kind 
of cooking for any ordinary family by gas in summer 
or by coal or wood when the kitchen needs heating. 

There is absolutely no danger in this combination, as 

the gas section is as entirely separate from the coal 
section as if placed in another part of the kitchen. 

Note the two gas 
ovens above — one 

for baking, glass 
paneled and one for 
broiling with white 
enamel door. The 




r^H 


^MMHN^^ 1 






Wj -»-----^ d 


'v^ 


^ J^i^^^^Lrl^KHl^ il^9 


.c^S 


yfi^a^Tj^p^^j^^^H 







Coal, Wood and Gas Range 



The Range that "Makes Cooking Easy' 



large square oven below is heated by coal or wood. | 

See the cooking surface when you want to rush things— five burners 
for gas and four covers for coal. The entire range is always available 

as both coal and gas ovens can be operated at the same time, using 
one for meats and the other for pastry. It Makes Cooking Easy. 

gf\% Gold Medal « 

G^enwood 

Write to-dajr for handsome free booklet 165 that tells all about it, to 

Weir Stove Co., Taunton, Mass. Manufacturers of the Celebrated Glenwood 
Coal, Wood and Gas Ranges, Heatinff Stoves and Furnaces. 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
234 



AD\ERTISEMEXTS 



Enjoy Unlimited Use of Your 
Electric Light and Appliances 

Use your electrical conveniences wherever and 
whenever you want to. Have light at the same time 
and without the bother of removing bulbs. The 




makes electricity and the pleasure of 
owning electrical conveniences, time, 
labor and money saving appliances 
actually double in value. 

Fits any and all electric light 
sockets. A twist of the wrist and 
it's done. 

**Every Wired Home Needs 
Three or More*' 

At Your Dealer s 



Made Only by 

BENJAMIN ELECTRIC MFG. CO, 




Chicago 



New York 



Ask your Dealer about the Benjamin 903 Szvivel At- 
tachment Plug for Electrical Appliance Cords. It 
screws into the socket without twisting the cord and pro- 
longs its useful life greatly. 
Benjamin No. 2452 Shade 
Holders enable you to use any shade 
with your Two- Way Plugs. 



Bu\- ad\-ertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
235 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Experience has shown that the most satisfactory way 

to enlarge the subscription list of American Cookery is through its present subscri- 
bers, who personally can vouch for the value of the publication. To make it an 
object for subscribers to secure new subscribers, we offer the following premiums: 

CONDITIONS : Premiums are not g^iven with a subscription or for a renewal, but only 
— to present subscribers, for securing and sending to us new yeariy sub- 
scriptions at $1.50 each. The number of new subscriptions requited to secure each premium is cleariy 
stated below the description of each premium. 

Transportation i« or is not paid as stated. 




INDIVIDUAL INITIAL JELLY MOULDS 

Serve Eggs, Fish and Meats in Aspic; 
Coffee and Fruit Jelly; Pudding and other 
desserts with your initial letter raised on 
the top. Latest and daintiest novelty for 
the up-to-date hostess. To remove jelly 
take a needle and run it around inside of 
mould, then immerse in warm water; jelly 
will then come out in perfect condition. 
Be the first in your town to have these. 
You cannot purchase them at the stores. 




This shows the jelly turned from the mould 
Set of six (6), any initial, sent postpaid for (1) new subscription. 



Thi^ shows mould 
(upside down) 



Cash Price 75 cents. 



PATTY IRONS' 




As'Jllustratfed, are used to make dainty, flaky 
pates'or timbales; delicate pastry cups for serv- 
ing hot or frozen dainties, creamed vegetables, 
salads, shell fish, ices, etc. Each set comes 
securely packed in an attractive box with recipes 
and full directions for use. Sent, postpaid, for 
two (2) new subscriptions. Cash price, $1.50. 



SILVER'S 

SURE CUT 

FRENCH FRIED 
POTATO CUTTER 

One of the most 
modern and eflScient 
kitchen helps ever in- 
vented. A big labor 
and time saver. 

Sent, prepaid, for 
one (1) new subscrip- 
tion. Cash price 75 
cents. 




FRENCH ROLL BREAD PAN 




Best quality blued steel. 6 inches wide by 1? 
long. One pan sent, prepaid, for one (1) new 
subscription Cash price, 75 cents 

SEAMLESS VIENNA BREAD PAN 




Two of these pans sent, postpaid for one (1) 
new subscription. Cash price, 75 cents for two 
pans. 




HEAVY TIN BORDER MOULD 

Imported, Round, 6 inch 

Sent, prepaid, for one (1) new subscription. 
Cash price, 75 cents. 



THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO. 



Boston, Mass. 



Buy advertised Goods — • Do not accept substitutes 

236 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



PREMIUMS 




PASTRY BAG AND FOUR TUBES 

(Bag not shown in cut) 

A complete outfit. Practical in every way. Made 
especially for Bakers and Caterers. Eminently suit- 
able for home use. 

The set sent, prepaid, for one (1) new subscription. 
Cash price, 75 cents. 




THE A. M. C. 
ORNAMENTER 

Rubber pastry bag and 
twelve brass tubes, assorted 
designs, for cake decorat- 
ing. This set is for fine 
work, while the set des 
scribed above is for more 
general use. Packed in a 
wooden box, prepaid, for 
two (2) new subscriptions. 
Cash price, $1.50 




••RAPIDE'^ 
TEA INFUSER 

Economic, clean and con- 
venient. Sent, prepaid, for 
one (1) subscription. Cash 
price, 75 cents. 



CAKE ORNAMENTING SYRINGE 

For the finest cake decorating. Twelve German 
silver tubes, fancy designs. Sent, prepaid, for four (4) 
new'subscriptions, Cash price, $3.00. 




1 


I 


HOME 

CANDY 

MAKING 


1 


' ' Mt 


.?:: ■ ■.. ■,^- ■■'■.n\.-: -.vS-^^oV'.-.;;..,; 




m 


* m iH 



HOME CANDY MAKING 
OUTFIT 

Thermometer, dipping wire, moulds, and 
most of all, a book written by a professional 
and practical candy maker for home use. Sent, 
prepaid, for four (4) new subscriptions. Cash 
price, $3.00. 



The only reliable'^and sure way to make Candy, 
Boiled Frosting, etc., is to use a 

_D^ THERMOMETER 

Here is just the one you need. Made 
especially for the purpose by one of the 
largest and best manufacturers in the 
country. Sent, postpaid, for two (2) 
new subscriptions. Cash price, $1.50 



mi 



20-1 



r'^r 



FRUIT CUTTER 




Cores and splits apples, pears and 
quinces into six pieces with one opera- 
tion. Silver plated, turned wooden 
tray. Sent, postpaid, for one (1) new 
subscription. Cash price, 75 cents. 



THE BO!iTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO.. Boston, Mass. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

237 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



PREMIUMS 




Crisps made with these moulds 
representing Hearts, Diamonds, 
Clubs and Spades, are ideal for 
serving at card-party luncheons. 

The bottom of the center space 
is closed; in this can be served any 
creamed meat, oysters or vegeta- 
bles, garnished around the edges 
with parsley, radishes or olives. 

Another excellent way of using 
is to set the shell on a lettuce leaf 
and fill with salad; or fill the shell 
with an ice or ice cream and gar- 
nish wath fruit. 

Sent, wath recipes and direc- 
tions, postpaid, for two (2) new 
subscriptions. Cash Price $1.50. 




3 Pint Aluminum Sauce Pan 

First Class Heavy Spun Aluminum 

Sent, postpaid, as premium for one (1) new 
subscriber. Cash price 75c. 



3 Pint Aluminum Double Boiler 

A heavy, superior 
article. An absolute 
necessity in every 
kitchen. Sent, prepaid, as 
premium for two (2) new 
subscriptions. Cash Price 
$1.50. 




Patent Individual Charlotte Russe Moulds 

Can be used, not only in making charlotte russe, but for many other 
dishes. 

Wherever individual moulds are called for, you can use these. 

The moulds we offer are made by a patent process. They have no 
seams, no joints, no solder. They are as near perfection as can be had. 

A set of six (6) Patent Charlotte Russe Moulds will be sent postpaid 
for tw^o (2) new subscriptions. Cash Price $1.50. 




GOLDEN ROD CAKE PAN 



For "Waldorf Triangles,"" "Golden Rod Cake," 
"Orange Slice Cake" and many other fancy cakes. 
Substantially made of the best tin. Sent, postpaid, 
for one (1) new subscription. Cash Price 75c. 



REMOVABLE RING MUFFIN PAN 

Made of best quality blued steel. Strong and durable. Size 
12 rings 2f inches diam. Pan 8| inches by 11 inches. Rings 
are removable, pan may be used for cake or candy making. 
Sent, prepaid, for one (1) new subscription. Cash Price 75c. 




THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO., Boston, Mass. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
238 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



PREMIUMS 



The Empire Grape Fruit and Orange Knife 



Is made from the finest cutlery steel, finely tempered, 
curved just to the right angle and ground to a very keen 
edge, will remove the center, cut cleanly and quickly 
around the edge and divide the fruit into segments ready 
for eating. The feature of the blade is the round end, 
which prevents cutting through the outer skin, A grape 
fruit knife is a necessity, as grape fruit are growing so 
rapidly in popularity as a breakfast fruit. Sent, post- 
paid, for one (1) new subscriT)tioii. Cash Price 75 cents. 



Empire Kitchen Knives 




Highly polished rubberoid finished 
handles. 

These knives have blades forged from 
the finest cutlery st.el, highly tempered 
and ground to a very keen edge. These 
Knives will cut. Two knives, as shown 
above, sent, prepaid, for one (1) new 
subscription. Cash Price 75 cents. 



AMERICAN 
CRUSTY ROLL PAN 

Best quality, blued steel. 9^ inches 
by 103^ inches. Makes 6 delicious 
crusty rolls. Recipes sent with each 
pan. 

Sent, postpaid, for two (2) new sub- 
scriptions. Cash Price, $1.50. 



FRENCH 
BUTTER CURLER 

Unique and Convenient 

The easiest way to serve butter. 



Full 



directions with each curler. 

Sent, postpaid, for one (1) new subscription. 
('a>h price, 75 cents. 






LADY FINGER PAN 

Six moulds on a base. Each mould 4 3^^ 
nches by \14_ inches. Extra heavy tin. 
tNicely made. Sent postpaid, for two (2) 
[lew subscriptions. Cash price, $1.50. 




ROTARY 

MINCING 

KNIFE 



Nickel plated. Ten revolving cutters. Effect- 
ually chops parsley, mint, onions, vegetables, 
etc., and the shield frees the knives from the 
materials being cut. 

Sent, prepaid, for one (1) new subscription. 
Cash Price 75 cents. 



THE BOSTON COOKING SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO., Boston, Mass. 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
239 



AMERICAN COOKERY 





Send for free pctch-^^ 
of Ivory Soap Flakes 

— snowlike flakes of 
genuine Ivory Soap, 
that make "Safe Suds 
in a Second" for laun- 
dering the finest silks, 
chiffons, georgettes, 
knitted things, flan- 
nels, and sheer fabrics, 
without rubbing. See 
how easy it is to care 
for your lovely clothes 
yourself, at practically 
no expense. For free 
trial size package, ad- 
dress Dept. I -J, The 
Procter acGamble 
Co., Cincinnati, p. 



HINwTING 

ONE of the delights of using 
Ivory Soap is that it does not 
cling to your skin when you want to 
rinse it off. The first touch of clear 
water — warm or cold — carries away 
the bubbling lather, leaving the skin 
free from soap and dirt. 

This perfect rinsing denotes the care 
and skill with which Ivory is made. 
It contains only the purest ingredi- 
ents, perfectly combined. 

This is why Ivory is the "right" soap 
for every skin. There is no excess oil 
to leave an unsightly shine; no excess 
alkali to make the skin feel hard and 
drawn and dry after the soap itself is 
gone. 



IVORY SOAP 




99.^0 /» PURE 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
240 



idj 



IP©wi©ip 




Wonderful 
for Linoleum! 



You'd think it was new 
linoleum now, wouldn't 
you? 1 here's a wonderful 
absorptive power in that 
sof tcrumbly Bon Ami Pow- 
der- — it drinks up grease 
and grime like a sponge! 



Made in both 
cake and powder form. 



You can clean linoleum 
by any other method you 
please and then make a visi- 
bly cleaner bright spot on 
it with Bon Ami Powder. 
For linoleum, congoleum 
or oil cloth. 




IE TUDOR PRESS, BOSTON 



c 



A 
oin^orbm^CuD 




BAKERS COCQ/l 

is pure and delicious. 
Trade mark on every 

package. 
WALTER BAKER & CO. ltd. 



ESTABLISHCO I700 



DORCHESTER, MASS. 



Established ^C 

S^ BLUE 



AND, 



AMMONIA 

The Ammonia loosens the dirt, 
making washing easy. The Blue 
gives the only perfect finish. 



l^fcStf The People's 
Choice for Over 
Sixty Years 



1858 



1920 



SAWYER CRYSTAL BLUE CO. 
88 Broad St., Boston, Mass. 





"Choisa" 

Orange Pekoe 

Ceylon Tea 




A Select High-Grade Tea 
at a Moderate Price 



Pure 



Rich 



Fragrant 



An Extra Good 
Prepared Mustan 



AT ONLY 

lOc 

PER TUMBLEII 

SLADE'; 

Prepare! 
MUSTAR 



Ask Grocers for SLADE 'S and do nl 
accept inferior goods 




S. S. PIERCE CO. 

BOSTON BROOKLINE 



D. &. L. SLADE C 

BOSTON, MASS., U. S. A. 



vose 



PIANOS 



have been established more than 50 YEARS. By our systei 
payments every family in moderate circumstances can owl 
VOSE piano. We take old instruments in exchan»;e and dell 
the new piano in your home free of expense. Write for catalog D aiul oxplanaU<| 

VOSE & SONS PIANO CO., 160 Boylston St.. Boston, Ma 



MENUS FOR THANKSGIVING DAY \^ (^ 

AMERICAN 



RERY 




rOR-AVCRLY 



BOSTON 
-SCHCDLMAGAZINE 

[F- CULlNAIOr- SCIENCEano DOMESTIC • ECONOMICS 




/% 




"THE GREAT AMERICAN DAILY" 

P<mUed by Edw. V Brewer for Creavr of Wheat Co Copyright 1920 by Cream of Wheat CM 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




\ 




They Couldn't Wait 

because they know her cake is 
always even, fine-grained and 
delicious since she commenced using 

RUMFORD 

The Wholesome Baking Powder 

Housewives, everywhere, who are the best cooks are more and more com* 

ing to makeRumford their final and regular choice because they have learned 

by experience that Rumford is the best baking powder at 

the price and there is no better baking powder at any price. 

Get a can from your grocer, today; try it and everything 
you bake will be fine-grained, light and delicious — per- 
fectly leavened — used over quarter of a century Rumford 
has never spoiled a halting. 

FreeCookBook. Let us send you your copy of Janet McKenzie Hill's helpful and 
interesting cook book "The Rumford Way of Cookery and Household Economy." 

Providence/ R. L 



Rumford Company 

K77 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
241 



AMERICAN COOKERY 

Vol. XXV NOVEMBER, 1920 No. 4 



CONTENTS FOR NOVEMBER 

PAGE 

THE BREAKFAST ROOM, OR STARTING THE DAY ARIGHT. 

Ill Mary H. Northend 251 

THE BEST HE HAD Harriet Whitney Symonds 256 

THE BUSINESS WIFE AND THE WASTED WATT 

Ida R. Fargo 259 

EFFICIENCY THROUGH MAINTAINING ONE'S NORMAL 

WEIGHT Emma Gary Wallace 262 

TALKS TO TEACHERS OF DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

Mary D. Chambers 265 

SECRETS OF A NEW ENGLAND COOK Ella Shannon Bowles 267 

THE REASON Arthur W. Peach 269 

EDITORIALS 270-272 

SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES (Illustrated with half- 
tone engravings of prepared dishes) 

Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 273 

MENUS FOR WEEK IN NOVEMBER 281 

MENUS FOR THANKSGIVING DAY . 282 

MEATS AND THEIR SAUCES Eunice M. Smith 283 

QUANTITIES NEEDED IN SERVING .... Julia W. Wolfe 284 

THE HOME BUDGET Clarence E. Flynn 285 

HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES: — Scheme for Leisure Hours In 
Winter — Do You.^ — 'Feast of the Seven Tables — Home-made 

Soap — The Alligator Pear, etc 288 

QUERIES AND ANSWERS V . . 292 

THE SILVER LINING 300 



$1.50 A YEAR Published Ten Times a Year 15c A Copy 

Foreign postage 40c additional 

Entered at Boston post-office as second class matter 

Copyright. 1920, by 

THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO. 
Pope Bldg., 221 Columbus Ave., Boston 17, Mass. 

Please Renew on Receipt of Colored Blank Enclosed for that purpose 

242 





ADVERTISEMENTS 



j£VER rAKf^'op'TTAPnENS] 



Norton's 



FREE RUNNING 



Salt 



^IPOUSI 



^sEneaiKEijajj^^i^ 



M O RTO N'S 
SALT 



'T'HE tendency of the times 
is to buy the best and make 
it go the farthest. 

In your pantry, on your table, 
Morton Salt will do 
that for you. 

Morton Salt is crystal 
pure — it pours in any 
weather — out of the 
blue pantry package 




with the sensible spout and 
out of the table cellars. 

Because you can use it accu^ 
rately it's the most economical 
salt. And because it 
never lumps or cakes, 
the most convenient. 
"The Salt of the Earth" 

Morton Salt Co. 

CHICAGO 



Tvhen it rains 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
243 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



INDEX FOR NOVEMBER 



Best He Had, The . . . 

Breakfast Room, or Starting the Day Aright, The. 111. 
Business Wife and the \\ asted Watt, The 
Editorials ...... 

Efficiency Through Alalntalning One's Normal Weight 

Home Budget, The 

Home Ideas and Economies . 

Meats and Their Sauces 

Alenus .... 

Quantities Needed In Serving 

Reason, The 

Secrets of a New England Cook 

Silver Lining, The 

Talks to Teachers of Domestic Science 



PAGE 

256 
251 

259 
270-1-2 
262 
285 
288 
283 
281, 282 
287 
269 
267 
300 
265 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



Bread, Pulled. 111. 


278 


Cake, Chocolate, Cream Filling. 111. 


280 


Cakes, Irish Potato 


274 


Croquettes, Almond 


280 


Duck, Mallard, Stuffed and Roasted 


274 


Fowl, Guinea, Southern Style . 


273 


Frappe, Cranberry. 111. 


277 


Ladv Fingers. 111. 


.279 


Lamb, Roast Ribs of, Rolled. 111. . 


275 


Moosemeat, Casserole of 


276 


Onions, Don Carlos 


276 


Ortolans or Reed Birds . 


275 



Peaches, Glazed in Foam. 111. . . 27S 

Peppers, Canned Fresh Red . . . 27 

Pie, Duck 11? 

Pie, Pumpkin. Ill 280 

Pie, Quail 274 

Potato Cases, Baked, Crab Meat Filling. 111. 276 

Pudding, Pomona .... 278 

Puree, Chestnut, for Peppers . . . 277 

Scrod, Broiled, with Maitre d'Hotel Butter. 

Ill 274 

Soup, Prune-and-Barley . . . 273 

Steak, Planked, Parker House Style . 277 

Velute d'Ognon ..... 273 



QUERIES AND ANSWERS 



Accompaniments to Meats . . . 292 

Apples, Varieties for Winter Use . 294 
Bread, Steamed Brown, from Stale White 

Bread 298 

Bread, Rules for Making Whole Wheat . 298 
Chowder, Rhode Island Fish . . .298 

Fish Roe, How to Cook .... 296 



Forcemeat Balls ..... 296 
Jelly, How to Keep Ribbon, from Separating 296 
Parfaits, How to Keep from Salt . . 294 

Soup, Black Bean . . . . .296 

Vegetables, Storing Winter . . . 294 

Vinegars, Tarragon and Chervil . . 296 



We want representatives everywhere to take subscriptions for 
American Cookery. We have an attractive proposition to make 
those who will canvass their town; also to those who will secure a 
few names among their friends and acquaintances. Write us today. 

AMERICAN COOKERY - BOSTON, MASS. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
244 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Give the Fall Bride a copy of this New Edition 
of America' s Leading Cook Book 

The BOSTON COOKING- 
SCHOOL COOK BOOK 

By FANNIE MERRITT FARMER 

P)R many years the acknowl- 
edged leader of all cook books, 
this New Edition contains in addi- 
tion to its fund of general informa- 
tion, 2,117 recipes, all of which 
have been tested at Miss Farmer's 
Boston Cooking-School, together 
with additional chapters on the 
Cold-Pack Method of Canning, on 
the Drying of Fruits and Vege- 
tables, and on Food Values. 







r7Jff.ool 
Wook 

former 






fa0i^ 




MISS Farmer's Cook Book is un- 
doubtedly the most scientific, 
most practical, and serviceable work of its kind. It 
contains the classification and correct proportions of 
food, tables of measurements and weights, time tables 
for cooking, menus, and much information not to be 
found elsewhere. 

" The Boston Cooking School Cook Book is one of the volumes to which good housewives 
pin their faith, on account of its accuracy, its economy, its clear, concise teachings, and its vast 
number of new^ recipes." — Good Housekeeping Magazine. 

''The best cook book on the market." — Woman's World, New York. 

]| The recipes are compounded with a knowledge of thescience of cooking." — The Outlook- 

" As a household companion, for mistress or maid, and guide to the art of Cookery, it is all 
that can well be desired." — Boston Cooking School Magazine. 

133 Illustrations $2.50 net 



656 Pages 



For Sale by all Booksellers 




LITTLE, BROWN & COMPANY 

Publishers, 34 Beacon Street, Boston 




Buy advertised Goods — • Do not acceptsubstitutes 
245 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Books on Household Economics 

THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE COMPANY presents the following as a 
list of representative works on household economics. Any of the books will be sent postpaid 
upon receipt of price. 

Special rates made to schools, clubs and persons wishing a number of books. Write for quota- 
tion on the list of books you wish. We carry a very large stock of these books. One order to us 
saves eflfort and express charges. Prices subject to change without notice. 

Dainties. Mrs. Rorer $1.00 

Diet for the Sick. Mrs. Rorer 2.00 

Diet in Relation to Age and Activity. 

Thompson 1.00 

Dishes and Beverages of the Old South. 

McCulloch- Williams 1.50 

Domestic Art in Women's Education. 

Cooley 1.40 

Domestic Science in Elementary 

Schools. Wilson 1.20 

Domestic Service. Lucy M. Salmon . . . 2.25 

Dust and Its Dangers. Pruden 1.25 

Easy Entertaining. Benton 1.50 

Economical Cookery. Marion Harris 

Neil 2.00 

Efficient Kitchen. Child 1.60 

Elements of the Theory and Practice of 

Cookery. Williams and Fisher 1.40 

Encyclopaedia of Foods and Beverages. 10.00 
Equipment for Teaching Domestic 

Science. Kinne 80 

Etiquette of New York Today. Learned 1 60 

Etiquette of Today. Ordway 1.00 

European and American Cuisine. 

Lemcke 4.00 

Every Day Menu Book. Mrs. Rorer.... 1.50 
Every Woman's Canning Book. Hughes .75 

Expert Waitress. A. F. Springsteed 1.25 

Feeding the Family. Rose 2.10 

First Principles of Nursing. Anne R. 

Manning 1.00 

Food and Cookery for the Sick and Con- 
valescent. Fannie M. Farmer 2.50 

Food and Feeding. Sir Henry Thompson 2.00 

Food and Flavor. Finck 3.00 

Foods and Household Management. 

Kinne and Cooley 1.40 

Food and Nutrition. Bevier and Ushir 1.00 

Food Products. Sherman 2.40 

Food and Sanitation. Forester and 

Wigley 1.00 

Food and the Principles of Dietetics. 

Hutchinson 4.25 

Food for the Worker. Stern and Spitz. 1.00 
Food for the Invalid and the Convales- 
cent. Gibbs 75 

Food Materials and Their Adultera- 
tions. Richards 1.00 

Food Study. Wellman 1 10 

Food Values. Locke 1 75 

Foods and Their Adulterations. Wiley 6.00 
Franco-American Cookery Book. D^li^e 4.50 

French Home Cooking. Low 1.50 

Fuels of the Household. Marian White .75 
Furnishing a Modest Home. Daniels 1.25 
Furnishing the Home of Good Taste. 

Throop 4.00 

Golden Rule Cook Book (600 Recipes for 
Meatless Dishes). Sharpe 2.50 



A Guide to Laundry Work. Chambers. $1.00 
Allen, The, Treatment of Diabetes. 

Hill and Eckman 1.00 

American Cook Book. Mrs. J. M. Hill 1.50 
American Meat Cutting Charts. Beef, 

veal, pork lamb — 4 charts, mounted on 

cloth and rollers 10.00 

American Salad Book. M. DeLoup. ... 1 50 
Around the World Cook Book. Barroll 2.50 
Art and Economy in Home Decorations. 

Priestman 1.50 

Art of Home Candy- Making (with ther- 
mometer, dipping -wiref etc.) 3.00 

Art of Right Living. Richards. 50 

Bacteria, Yeasts and Molds in the 

Home. H. W. Conn 1.48 

Better Meals for Less Money. Greene 1.35 
Book of Entrees. Mrs Janet M. Hill. . . 2.00 
Boston Cook Book. Mary J. Lincoln.. 2.25 
Boston Cooking-School Cook Book. 

Fannie M. Farmer 2.50 

Bread and Bread-Making. Mrs. Rorer. .75 
Breakfasts, Luncheons and Dinners. 

Chambers 1.25 

Bright Ideas for Entertaining. Linscott .75 
Business, The, of the Household. Taber 2.50 
Cakes, Icings and Fillings. Mrs. Rorer 1.00 
Cakes, Pastry and Dessert Dishes. Janet 

M. Hill 2.00 

Candies and Bonbons. Neil 1.50 

Candy Cook Book. Alice Bradley 1.50 

Canning and Preserving. Mrs. Rorer. . 1.00 
Canning, Preserving and Jelly Making. 

Hill 1.60 

Canning, Preserving and Pickling. 

Marion H. Neil 1.50 

Care and Feeding of Children. L. E. 

Holt. M.D 1.25 

Catering for Special Occasions. Farmer 1.50 

Century ook Book. Mary Ronald 3.00 

Chafing-Dish Possibilities. Farmer. . . , 1.50 
Chemistry in Daily Life. Lassar-Cohn. . 2.25 
Chemistry of Cookery. W. Mattieu 

Williams 2.25 

Chemistry of Cooking and Cleaning. 

Richards and Elliot 1.00 

Chemistry of Familiar Things. Sadtler 2.00 
Chemistry of Food and Nutrition. 

Sherman 2.10 

Cleaning and Renovating. E. G. Osman 1.20 

Clothing for Women. L. L Baldt 2.50 

Cook Book for Nurses. Sarah C. Hill ... .75 
Cooking for Two. Mrs. Janet M. Hill. . 2.25 

Cost of Cleanness. Richards 1.00 

Cost of Food. Richards 1.00 

Cost of Living. Richards 1.00 

Cost of Shelter. Richards 1.00 

Course in Household Arts. Sister 

Loretto B. Duff 1.10 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
246 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Handbook for Home Economics. Flagg $0.75 
Handbook of Hospitality for Town and 

Country. Florence H. Hall 1.50 

Handbook of Invalid Cooking. Mary A. 

Boland 2.50 

Handbook on Sanitation. G. M. Price, 

M.D 1.50 

Healthful Farm House, The. Dodd. . . .60 
Home and Community Hygiene. 

Broadhurst 2.50 

Home Candy Making. Mrs. Rorer 75 

Home Economics. Maria Parloa 2.00 

Home Economics Movement 75 

Home Furnishing. Hunter 2.50 

Home Furnishings, Practical and Artis- 
tic. Kellogg 2.00 

Home Nursing. Harrison 1.50 

Home Problems from a New Standpoint 1.00 
Home Science and Cook Book. Anna 

Barrows and Mary J. Lincoln 1.00 

Hot Weather Dishes. Mrs. Rorer 75 

House Furnishing and Decoration. 

McCIure and Eberlein 2.00 

House Sanitation. Talbot 80 

Housewifery. Balderston 2.50 

Household Bacteriology. Buchanan . . . 2.75 
Household Economics. Helen Campbell 1.75 
Household Engineering. Christine Fred- 
erick 2.00 

Household Physics. Alfred M. Butler.. 1.30 

Household Textiles. Gibbs 1.25 

Housekeeper's Handy Book. Baxter. . 2.00 
How to Cook in Casserole Dishes. Neil 1.50 
How to Cook for the Sick and Convales- 
cent. H. V. S. Sachse 2.00 

How to Feed Children. Hogan 1.25 

How to Use a Chafing Dish. Mrs. Rorer .75 

Human Foods. Snyder 2.00 

Ice Cream, Water Ices, etc. Rorer 1.00 

I Go a Marketing. Sowle 1.75 

Institution Recipes. Emma Smedley. . 3.00 

Interior Decorations. Parsons 5.00 

International Cook Book. Filippini. . . . 2.50 
Key to Simple Cookery. Mrs. Rorer. . 1.25 

King's Caroline Cook Book 2.00 

Kitchen Companion. Parloa 2.50 

Kitchenette Cookery. Anna M. East. . . 1.25 
Laboratory Handbook of Dietetics. Rose 1.50 
Lessons in Cooking Through Prepara- 
tion of Meals 2.00 

Lessons in Elementary Cooking. Mary 

C. Jones 1.25 

Like Mother Used to Make. Herrick. . 1.25 

Luncheons. Mary Ronald 2.00 

A cook's picture book; 200 illustrations 

Made-over Dishes. Mrs. Rorer 75 

Many Ways for Cooking Eggs. Mrs. 

Rorer 75 

Marketing and Housework Manual. 

S. Agnes Donhapi 2.00 

Mrs. Allen's Cook Book. Ida C. Bailey 

Allen 2.00 

More Recipes for Fifty. Smith 2.00 

My Best 250 Recipes. Mrs. Rorer 1 00 

New Book of Cookery, A. Farmer 2.50 

New Hostess of Today. Lamed 1.75 

New Salads. Mrs. Rorer 1.00 



Nursing, Its Principles and Practice. 

Isabels and Robb $2.00 

Nutrition of a Household. Brewster. . 1.00 

Nutrition of Man. Chittenden 4.50 

Philadelphia Cook Book. Mrs. Rorer. . 1.50 
Planning and Furnishing the House. 

Quinn 1.25 

Practical Cooking and Dinner Giving. 

Mrs. Mary F. Henderson 1.60 

Practical Cooking and Serving. Mrs. 

Janet M. Hill 3.00 

Practical Dietetics. Gilman Thompson 6.00 
Practical Dietetics with Reference to 

Diet in Disease. Patte 2.25 

Practical Food ELconomy. Alice Gitchell 

Kirk 1.35 

Practical Points in Nursing. Emily A. 

M. Stoney 2.00 

Practical Sewing and Dressmaking. 

•Allington 1.50 

Principles of Chemistry Applied to the 

Household. Rowley and Farrell 1.50 

Principles of Food Preparation. Mary 

D. Chambers 1.25 

Principles of Human Nutrition. Jordan 2.00 
Recipes and Menus for Fifty. Frances 

Lowe Smith 2.00 

Rorer's (Mrs.) New Cook Book 2.50 

Salads, Sandwiches, and Chafing Dish 

Dainties. Mrs. Janet M Hill 2.00 

Sandwiches. Mrs. Rorer 75 

Sanitation in Daily Life. Richards 60 

School Feeding. Bryant 1.75 

Selection and Preparation of Food. 

Brevier and Meter 75 

Sewing Course for Schools. Wool man. . 1.50 
Shelter and Clothing. Kinne and Cooley 1.40 
Source, Chemistry and Use of Food 

Products. Bailey 2.00 

Story of Germ Life. H. W. Conn 1 00 

Successful Canning. Powell 2.50 

Sunday Night Suppers. Herrick 1.35 

Table Service. Allen 1.60 

Textiles. Woolman and McGowan 2.25 

The Chinese Cook Book. Shin Wong 

Chan 1.50 

The House in Good Taste. Elsie 

de Wolfe 4.00 

The Housekeeper's Apple Book. L. G. 

Mackay 1.25 

The New Housekeeping. Christine Fred- 
erick 1.90 

The Party Book. Fales and Northend. . 3.00 

The St. Francis Cook Book 5.00 

The Story of Textiles 3.50 

The Up-to-Date Waitress. Mrs. Janet 

M. Hill 1.75 

The Woman Who Spends. Bertha J. 

Richardson 1.00 

Till the Doctor Comes and How to Help 

Him 1.00 

True Food Values. Birge 1.25 

Vegetable Cookery and Meat Sub- 
stitutes. Mrs. Rorer 1.50 

With a Saucepan Over the Sea. Ade- 
laide Keen 1.75 

Women and Economics. Charlotte Per- 
kins Stetson 1.50 



Address all Orders: THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO., Boston, Mass. 



Buy advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 
247 



AMERICAN COOKERY 





A Cook Book 
A Vegetable Book 
A Cake Book 
A Diet for Sick Book 
A Canning Book 
An Ice Cream Book 
A Chafing Dish Book 
A Salad — Egg— Bread 
Candy Book 



or 



If 



SO J Mrs. Rorer's books on these topics will meet your desires. 
They are full of wonderful recipes, all tested and proved. You 
can rely on them. Also fullest instructions how to do every- 
thing told in a simple, easy-to-understand manner. 



Mrs. Rorer's New Cook Book 

Cloth, illus., $2.50; by mail, $2.70 

Philadelphia Cook Book 

Cloth, $1.50; by mail, $1.65 

Vegetable Cookery and Meat Sub- 
stitutes 

Cloth, $1.50; by mail, $1.65 

Diet for the Sick 

Cloth, $2.00; by mail, $2.15 

Key to Simple Cookery 

Cloth, $1.25; by mail, $1.40 

Every Day Menu Book 

Cloth, $1.50; by mail, $1.65 

My Best 250 Recipes 

Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 

Ice Creams, Water Ices, etc. 

Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 

Canning and Preserving 

Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 



"New Salads 

Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 

Dainties 

Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 

Cakes, Icings and Fillings 

Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 

Sandwiches 

Cloth, 75 cts.; by mail, 80 cts. 

Many Ways for Cooking Eggs 

Cloth, 75 cts.; by mail, 80 cts. 

Made-Over Dishes 

Cloth, 75 cts.; by mail, 80 cts. 

Home Candy Making 

Cloth, 75 cts.; by mail, 80 cts. 

How to Use a Chafing Dish 

Cloth, 75 cts.; by mail, 80 cts. 

Bread and Bread Making 

Cloth, 75 cts.; bv mail, 80 cts. 



For sale by all Bookstores and Department Stores, or 

ARNOLD & COMPANY, 420 Sansom St., Philadelphia 



Bu^■ ad\ertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

248 




CENTERPIECE OF FRUIT 



Our Prayer 



Imbue us with Thy blessing, Lord, 
This glad Thanksgiving Day — 

Make us to feel Thy boundless love 
For each of us — alway! 

Keep Thou our hearts from envy free, 

Our minds alert and keen 
To do each dutyl Keep our souls 

True, genuine and clean! 

Make us to feel a sacred trust 

In this our native land — 
Help us fulfil its sacred laws 

With willing heart and hand. 



Grant we may have a vision clear 

To see the right, and then 
We'll welcome each Thanksgiving Day 

With gratitude — Amen! 

Miss Caroline E. Sumner. 



American Cookery 



VOL. XXV 



NOVEMBER 



No. 4 



The Breakfast Room 



or 



^'Starting the Day Aright" 

By Mary Harrod Northend 



HALF the difficulties of the day are 
over if we start it right, and how 
can this be better accomph'shed 
than by setting apart a special room for 
the first meal of the day? 

The dining room is too cold and formal 
for this morning repast, where the family 
feels at liberty to come straggling in as 
the spirit moves it. And what a joy to 
the man of business to find his breakfast 
ready for him, the table set in the midst 
of summer surroundings! Somehow it 
lightens his care for the day, and he takes 
up his task more willingly from the bit 
of sunshine he has absorbed. 

Whether this fact is responsible for its 
popularity or not it would be hard to 
decide, but surely the idea of breakfast 
rooms has grown so rapidly that they 
are, today, to be found, not only in the 
homes of the wealthy, but in those of 
moderate means. 

Locate it where it will meet the morning 
sunshine, and if possible arrange flowers, 
either by grouping, or on shelves around 
the room. In this way you add a note 
of cheer without unnecessary expense, a 
thing to be considered in these days when 
the cost of living is being discussed in 
every nook and corner. 

Not all of these cheery nooks are simple 
in design and furnishing. Many are 
most elaborate and are found, not only 
in summer homes, but also, during the 
winter months, in city houses. 

The architect and decorator have 
become cognizant of the value of this 



room and in planning houses are intro- 
ducing it, conjuring up novelties that are 
not only livable, but artistic and restful. 

It is necessary to surround the outdoor 
or glassed-in breakfast room with light, 
dainty furniture, such as a sun-parlor 
demands, bringing into use flowers, 
draperies, rugs and plants. Indoors a 
far different treatment is required, fol- 
lowing, as far as possible, the furnishing 
and architecture of the dining room. 

A charming scheme was worked out 
by transferring the pantry to an end of 




LINOLEUM IN A BREAKFAST ROOM 



251 



252 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



the hallway, which was partitioned off 
for this purpose, the pantry space being 
utilized for the designing of a charming 
breakfast room. Let-in china closets 
were arranged in two panels at the oppo- 
site side from the entrance and inside 
them were placed bright-colored glass 
and china that lent a note of brightness 
to the room, which was painted a soft 
green. The floor was of second-hand 
brick and a lire-frame with Hessian 
soldiers for andirons was evolved. Over 
this was uniquely placed a mirror and 
painting combined. The furniture was 
of the old-time period, the colt's-foot 
table and the rush-bottom chairs giving 
it a Colonial atmosphere, although, in 
reality, it was a combining of Colonial 
and Italian types, as shown In the tall 
fruit vase on the quadrangle table in the 
corner of the room. 

There is an endless variety of fitments 
that are suitable here and appropriate 



for either outside or inside the house. It 
Is easy to paint and stain the room to 
match the furniture, making It a shade 
lighter to strengthen the effect. Unusual 
and delightful Is the use of tapestry for 
chair treatment. In one instance a story 
was revealed by a study of the backs of 
the different chairs. This was taken from 
some medieval legend and worked out 
by a clever artisan's hand. The drap- 
eries took on the color tone found in the 
chair treatment, and the table was of 
polished mahogany. 

A fireplace in the breakfast room Is a 
comfort, more especially in cool weather, 
or when old Boreas howls outside, the 
merry crackle of the cheerful blaze creat- 
ing a feeling of quiet enjoyment. For 
the outside breakfast room, this feature 
Is generally designed with a facing of 
brick or Caen stone, both of which are 
suitable for wall treatment, also. 

However, for indoor treatment we 




REAKFAST ROOM IN E. S. ATWOOD'S HOUSE. CLOICI-.S li: R, MASS. 



THE BREAKFAST ROOM 



253 




BRKAkI- ASJ- ROOM 1\ A I^>R( 



have a wider range, as it may be much 
more elaborate, depending for finish upon 
the period of the room. Sometimes it is 
of wood, again tiling is advisable, and 
frequently, where the woodwork is white, 
carving is introduced, not only in the 
columns, but in the mantel itself. 

The background, naturally, is the 
starting point. Therefore special atten- 
tion should be paid to its finish, that it 
may bring out effectively the value of the 
furnishings. Plenty of light is a neces- 
sity, and this can be produced by intro- 
ducing grouped windows on the sunny 
side of the house. To strain the light so 
that it shall not fall too brightly on the 
table and on the floor, use sunfast material 
in semi-transparent weaves such as green- 
ish blue, soft yellow or cream. English 
casement cloth is also ideal, admitting 
sufficient light and yet softening the 
glare of the sun. Hemstitched muslin is 
sometimes the most desirable, being so 
sheer that it does not shut off the outside 



vistas, although it tempers the light. 

Wood, tiling or cement is suitable for 
flooring, the most effective results being 
brought about by the use of tiles that 
can be purchased today in a great variety 
of shades and finishes. 

There are many reasons why tiling is 
admissible for a breakfast room. It is 
easily kept clean, does not deface, as 
spots are easily washed off, and is ideal 
as a foundation. It can be covered with 
rugs or not, according to one's fancy, and 
there is no set rule as to what kind is 
most desirable. 

For an indoor room Oriental rugs often 
give a bright touch, although frequently 
the rag mat or Crex rug is more suitable. 
Cement floors, while cold and hard, lack- 
ing rich coloring, are often used and brick, 
either laid plainorin herring-bone fashion, 
are popular. They are generally, how- 
ever, finished with a border, either in 
conventional pattern or plain, and some- 
times an edge of white on all sides of the 



254 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



room is made use of to effect a scheme of 
contrasting color. 

Heating is easily introduced, as the 
pipes can be carried under the floor. 
Generally the radiators are concealed, 
although sometimes they are let into the 
side of the room, two grilles being in- 
stalled, the one above the other. 

When the radiator follows the line of 
the room, it is effective for the growing of 
plants, but the tops should be covered 
with either brick or asbestos, possibly 
both, and the moulding made high enough 
to cover the exterior of the pots, so that 
the green of the leaves, and the colorful 
note of the flowers are the only things 
visible. In the placing of plants great 
attention should be paid to color-scheme 
that they blend the one into the other 
without a discordant note. 

Small tables placed around the room, 
here and there, allow for pots of bright 
flowering plants, and occasionally a 



wrought iron brazier is utilized for this 
purpose. The grouping of flowers in 
corners is also approved, and today many 
people are adding branches of trees for 
foliage backgrounds. 

Birds are a necessary adjunct to flowers, 
and ornamental cages are hung about 
these rooms, inside of which the little 
feathered prisoners preen their plumage 
or pour forth a melody of song. Thomas 
Chippendale has designed odd cages 
that are placed high on stands, while 
the bell motif in gay colors swings from 
the ceiling, held by silken cords. 

Goldfish add a shimmer of light, as 
they dart inside their transparent globes, 
on the surface of which float varicolored 
witch balls, a relic of olden days when 
they hung in the windows to keep off the 
witches. Aquariums of tinted or painted 
glass rest on ornate pedestals, often en- 
riched with choice carving, imparting 
a touch of color and adding a novelty, 




BREAKFAST ROOM IN MRS. R. P. PERKINS' HOUSE. WAKEFIELD MASS. 



THE BREAKFAST ROOM 



255 




BREAKFAST ROOM IN VERAXDA OF SIMOX VOREXBERG'S HOUSE, SWAMPSCOTT, MASS. 



which is often a necessity in this, the 
breakfast room. 

Indirect lighting is very often installed, 
while decorative candles and sconces are, 
in many cases, employed, as they har- 
monize with every type of furniture. 

The use of candles is rapidly coming 
into favor, and although they are not an 
absolute necessity in a breakfast room, 
yet ofttimes on a dull and dreary day they 
are lighted simply for effect. 

A charming breakfast room, evolved 
in a summer home, was finished with 
Caen stone walls, brightened by heavy 
draperies of chintz in gay colors with a 
soft gray background to match the tone 
of the interior. The floor was in blue 
tile, which shade was carried out in the 
cane-seated furniture, the polished table 
showing inlay. 

Green and white is the theme in an- 
other breakfast room, where the table is 
painted a charming shade of green that 



tones in with the trim of the windows 
and the color of the chairs. This room 
is used all the year round, in summer 
screens replacing the glass windows. 

Instead of plain shades it is often more 
advantageous to use painted ones. Con- 
soles are also adaptable for a room of this 
type, on which may be placed painted 
vases filled with fruit, adding a decorative 
touch. 

Painted furniture has come very much 
into style and we find it finished in cream, 
delicate yellow or peacock blue, depend- 
ing upon the fitting of the room for 
color note. 

A wall fountain, if placed near the 
table, adds a musical note during the 
morning meal, while care should be taken 
that the windows frame vistas. 

Lattice work is very popular and may 
be used for ceiling or wall treatment. 
Pictures hung in the interstices of the 
wall also give an unusual note, and,occa- 



256 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



sionally, we find Japanese lanterns hung 
at intervals around the room for lighting 
purposes. 

By all means create a breakfast room, 
informal in furnishing and lending a 



restful note to the early morning meal. 
It does not tend to do away with family 
discipline, rather does it bring about a 
friendly feeling through its piquant 
attractiveness. 



''The Best 

By Harriet Wh 

MIN PELHAM was experiencing 
one of those days of discontent 
that come to us all, usually when 
the wind blows from the east and the 
sky is gruel-gray and chimney flues won't 
draw. 

Her name was Minerva, but who 
could think of a dumpling kind of a girl, 
with merry brown eyes and a humorously- 
tilted nose, by such a stately title .^ Min- 
erva by name she might be, but "Min" 
by nature she was. 

The causes of her present state of mind 
were chiefly of the small, naggy kind, and 
they kept parading maliciously through 
her mind as she stood at the kitchen table 
whisking up the bread sponge she had 
forgotten to set the night before. That 
was one of the trouble-gnats; her baking 
would trail over half the afternoon, now, 
and it wouldn't do well on such a day, 
anyway, owing to the east wind, the cook 
stove being subject to moods, just as 
people are. Then, she couldn't think 
what to cook for luncheon that would be 
quick and easy to prepare, and would 
agree with everybody and not take too 
many eggs. If she could just get a warm, 
human opinion from somebody. But not 
a soul knew or cared about such trifles, 
besides herself. Her father was oflp in his 
study calmly writing about Cliif Dwellers, 
or something equally vague and valueless, 
and would never know whether he got 
any lunch at all or not, and Calista was 
in her attic eyrie composing free verse for 
a top-lofty magazine. Calista was teacher 
of literature in the Hatherton High 
School, and knew who Virgil and Dante 
and Sophocles were and could criticize 
the Rubaiyat; but she hadn't a glimmer 



He Had" 

itney Symonds 

as to how soup was made. As for cousin 
Leonard Havens, the remaining member 
of the household, what would he know 
about it. ^ Min flung a bread cloth over 
her jar of sponge and sat down with a 
puckered brow, for the thought of cousin 
Leonard had brought up the greatest 
worry-problem of all. Cousin Leonard, 
who was really only a step-cousin and no 
blood relative whatever, had come from 
an Eastern city to assist Erasmus Pel- 
ham, professor of ancient history, in his 
work, and prospects were excellent that 
he would follow in that worthy scholar's 
steps so closely as to bump upon his heels. 

Now, though Min respected scholars 
and learned people generally, she had a 
secret conviction that the occasional 
society of cheerful dunces might be a 
pleasing contrast. She revered her father, 
but the tribulations of her departed 
mother had left a dark impression upon 
Min's mind. She could not recall a 
single harsh word having ever passed 
between her parents, but she had known 
her father to eat the leg of a stewed 
squirrel, his head in the clouds all the 
while, and then to remark amiably: 

"That was a very nice bit of chicken, 
my dear." 

"I just couldn't stand it, if Leonard 
should do that, in case — in case — " 

Min flew up and went to clattering the 
saucepans and digging at the slothful fire 
in an effort to forget the ordeal that was 
hanging over her. 

Leonard Havens had been in the Pel- 
ham home scarcely three weeks, and 
already he had twice petitioned Min to 
marry him. By great adroitness she had 
on each occasion squirmed out of the 



THE BEST HE HAD 



257 



difficulty, contriving to hang up the 
question neatly in mid-air and leave it 
thus suspended indefinitely. But the 
respite was only temporary — she knew 
it, saw it in Leonard's compelling eye. 
There would have to be a flat "No," or 
"Yes," ere long, and zuhich would the 
voice of Wisdom counsel.^ Leonard was 
a personable young man, but he was on 
the way to be a professor of Something- 
ology and would write treatises on mouldy 
old themes and forget his dinner, and 
would never, never understand her wor- 
ries and moods. 

Thus far he had seemed amiable — yes, 
too amiable. Her father was amiable; 
so was a clock, for that matter. He, 
Leonard, ate what was set before him, 
making no comment, which was one of 
the provoking points about a scholar. 
You might scorch yourself and frizzle 
your nerves manufacturing a new kind 
of pudding with a marvelous sauce, and 
he would as likely as not call it a pie and 
not even inquire what it was made of. 
Leonard unquestionably had beautiful 
eyes, but — Min, recalling the squirrel's 
leg, shook her head determinedly. 

"I'd as soon he would throw the dishes 
around, as to be so dense," she reflected 
mournfully. 

It was when Min was dishing the 
luncheon that the most tragic happening 
of the day befell. How she managed to 
be stupid enough to pour a tide of scald- 
ing soup over her right hand, she couldn't 
tell, nor can I. Probably her wits had 
gone off on a wool-gathering enterprise. 
There was nothing uncertain, however, 
in the shriek that ascended to the ear of 
Leonard Havens, and which brought him 
out of his study, down the stairs and into 
the kitchen on the fly. 

"There's some linseed oil — and — 
cotton on the second shelf of the closet," 
Min groaned, as she fell into a chair, "and 
— camphor and stuff, and if you'd just — " 
her head fell back; her face was very 
white. 

She opened her eyes soon after, to find 
her head resting against a comfortable 



shoulder, a cool feeling about her face, of 
having been sprinkled, and the tang of 
camphor in her nose. 

"Now, can you sit up a minute, while 
I fix this poor hand.?" Leonard asked, in 
a businesslike tone. "I'll soon have you 
all right." 

He rummaged the necessary articles 
out of the closet with dispatch, and — ■ 
whIflF — the soup hadn't even grown cold 
ere he had the burned hand lotioned and 
bandaged and all. 

Professor Erasmus Pelham patted 
Min's head gently and bewailed the mis- 
fortune that had befallen "his little 
housekeeper"; and Calista made moan 
over her, towed her to the couch in the 
living room, planted her among the pil- 
lows, which she piled picturesquely about 
her, and said how fortunate it was that 
Cousin Leonard had known just what to 
do. And then the learned ones ate their 
luncheon and went back to their Cliff 
Dwellers and free verse, respectively, 
totally forgetful that Min had not eaten 
a bit nor a scrap. 

Min didn't realize it, herself, until 
Leonard came in bringing her a cup of 
hot, but badly-made tea and some queer 
looking pieces of toast on a plate, with a 
pat of butter. 

" I thought you ought to eat something, 
and there wasn't anything left on the 
table that I fancied you would care for," 
he apologized, "so I found the tea-box 
and made some fresh; it didn't settle very 
well, somehow, but perhaps it'll do." 

Do! Min drank the tea, cheerfully 
swallowing all the bits of floating tea-leaf, 
and ate every atom of the scorched toast, 
out of gratitude, and then lay back in the 
pillows with a sweet glow in her heart. 
Never, since her mother's passing, had 
any one made toast and tea expressly 
for her! 

The unaccustomed idleness she was 
enjoying caused a drowsiness; after a 
little she began to slip away into a deli- 
cious mist, when a sudden thought 
brought her back in a hurry. Her 
bread! The sponge must be up by now, 



258 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



and how was she going to work out the 
dough with one hand? She began slowly 
to pull herself up, and then stopped. All 
doors were open between the living room 
and the kitchen, and against the far 
window of the latter was a moving picture 
of Leonard Havens, future professor of 
Something-ology, with sleeves rolled back, 
a hand towel pinned crookedly around 
him, punching heartily away at a pan 
of dough. 

Min dropped back, buried her head in 
a couch pillow and giggled and giggled 
almost hysterically. Then she fell into 
another mood, a dreamily reflective one, 
and during this period the Sandman 
happened along with a choice brand of 
his especial ware. 

Emerging from the fogs of slumber, 
Min perceived a fragrance in the atmos- 
phere like that of newly baked bread. 
Up she got and headed for the kitchen, 
where she found the potential professor, 
Leonard Havens, inspecting, with rapt 
attention and some perplexity, two ob- 
jects upon the kitchen table. Bread 
loaves they certainly were, and shapely 
and well baked, yet withal, lacking in 
something — a certain rotundity of form 
that is one of the prime requisites of 
model bread. 

"Oh," relief shone out of his eyes at 
sight of Min. "I'm so glad you're here. 
I baked your bread, and was very careful 
not to burn it, but — what makes it so 
flat.'' Is — is it all right, do you think?" 

With her good left hand, assisted by 
the bandaged right, Min lifted one of the 
loaves, and found it apparently made of 
concrete. 

"Did you let the dough rise after put- 
ting it in the baking pans?" she asked, 
mildly. 

"Why- — no!" Leonard's eyes opened 
widely. "I — I — didn't know it had 
to rise but once; the sponge stuff was 
very light. I used to watch my mother 
working out her dough, when I was a 
little chap, but I never noticed what she 
did with it after that. And now — I've 
ruined your baking!" He smote his 



head with a lusty fist. "Bone — bone! 
It's bone clean through. Cousin Min, 
why don't you tell me I'm the prize bone- 
head of the world?" 

" Because you're not," said Min. "And 
if you were, I wouldn't call the only 
person — man-person, I mean — who 
ever tried to pull me out of a bog by such 
a name." 

"That's mighty good of you; and I'll 
tell you what," he beamed hopefully, 
"I'll expiate my stupidity by eating 
every bit of that bread myself, if the rest 
can't, and if that will help." 

"You needn't. I'm pretty mean, but 
not mean enough to "let you expiate your- 
self into a chronic dyspeptic. There are 
such things as gems and muffins and Sally 
Lunns; the Pelham family won't suffer." 

"But your poor hand! You can't — " 

"It's not so serious; and I can stir 
things left-handedly." 

"Well, you must let me help. I'll do 
anything, even pick up chips for your fire." 

Min's heart that afternoon was as light 
as her loaves should have been. Each 
time those dismal monoliths caught her 
eye, a laugh that was as tender as a tear 
gurgled from her lips, and a scrap of one of 
Riley's poems rippled through her head: 

He does, his best, and when his best's bad, 
He don't fret none, nor he don't get sad — 
He simplv 'lows it's the best he had, 
Old John Henry! 

At five-thirty P.M., Leonard arrived 
promptly at the scene of action, meaning 
the kitchen, just as Min had broken two 
eggs into her bowl of muffin batter. 

"Here," he shoved his cuffs back 
briskly, "let me beat that stuff." 

She handed him the spoon. "Beat it 
hard," she directed, as she greased the 
muffin tins, "fill the pans only half full, 
and set 'em in the oven." 

The batter bubbled vigorously under 
Leonard's mighty strokes, and was dis- 
tributed into the pans according to 
directions. And then an earnest face with 
care upon its brow appeared at the door 
of the dining room, where Min was laying 
the table. 



THE BUSINESS WIFE AND THE WASTED WATT 



259 



"I say, Min, do the thingumbobs have 
to stand a while before you put 'em in 
to bake?" 

*'0h, no; just put them right into the 
oven." 

"But — but — " he looked puzzled, 
"that's the way I spoiled your bread, 
isn't it?" 

"Yes; but that was yeast bread; the 
gems are raised with baking powder." 

"Oh." He fell into a profound study, 
lasting five minutes or so, then followed 
her into the kitchen. 

"Say, Min, I've just been thinking, I 
ought to learn about these cooking kinks, 
oughtn't I ? My wife might be sick some 
time, and I ought to know how to do 
things." 



Min was measuring tea into a plump 
earthen teapot. 

"Three," she counted, and looked at 
him uncertainly. 

"I mean my wife-to-be, of course," he 
went on. "And Min — while we're on 
the subject, I'd like that thing we were 
talking about the other day settled. 
You didn't say outright you'd be Mrs. 
Leonard Havens, but that was the under- 
standing I got, somehow. Was I right, 
Min ? You will be Mrs. H., won't you ? " 

Min, with wistfully sweet eyes upon 
his eager face, measured sixteen teaspoon- 
fuls of tea into the teapot without 
counting. 

"Yes," she answered, gently, at last, 
"I will — Old John Henry." 



The Business Wife and the Wasted Watt 

By Ida R. Fargo 



DID you ever pay perfectly good 
coin for something you did not 
use at all? Before last summer's 
experiment that is exactly what I did, 
and never once realized I was wasting 
money. Peter it was, with that broad- 
ened outlook which business training 
bestows upon the average male of the 
species, who first noticed the leak. Peter 
was waiting for the eggs to poach. 

"Hurry, Honey." Peter slid along the 
little seat in our breakfast alcove. "I 
mustn't be late." 

I glanced at the clock. Goodness me! 
— 'Time must have stepped on the 
accelerator. Where had all the morning 
minutes gone to? Toast and coffee 
hustled themselves to the table; it was 
quite essential that Peter should not be 
late. A young man in line for promotion, 
and with the responsibility of a wife and 
a home to look after more or less, really 
cannot afford to be late. Nobody knows 
that better than I. Because I was a 



business maid before I was Peter's busi- 
ness wife, and I realize perfectly well 
what a Moloch modern business may come 
to be. Oh, I knew enough not to be 
jealous of Business. Of course, Peter 
must go when it came time to go! 

The toast was half-toasted. And the 
coffee was half-steeped. 

Peter began to eat. 

Meantime, he glanced over the bills 
which present themselves at the first of 
each month, as certain as sunset, as sure 
as neap tide. The electric bill frosted 
the heap. He considered it, I noticed, 
an unusually long time; evidently he 
was calculating, after the manner of men. 
Presently he said, as I slipped to my 
place across our bit of a table: 

"Honey, we're paying for a lot of 
electricity we don't use." 

The tone of my life partner actually 
complained. 

"Paying for a lot — we don't use?" 
puzzled I. "Why-ee— " ^ 



260 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



"We pay the minimum rate, no matter 
If we use or don't use," explained 
matter-of-fact Peter. "That's company 
ruling. We have to abide by it. See 
here, Sweetheart — •" 

And right then and there I took my 
first lesson in practical electricity. The 
poached eggs grew cold, but Peter did 
not seem to care. He ate them as if he 
liked them thus — and ran to catch his 
car. Perhaps because he had so enjoyed 
explaining his hobby. People are like 
that. 

Back in the kitchen I sat down at the 
deserted breakfast table and pulled that 
electric bill toward me. And thought! 

"I've always been careful," I said 
right out. Popcorn, the kitten, fancied 
I was speaking to her, and came and 
jumped up on the bench beside me. "I've 
always turned off every light we did not 
need — and n^ver once left it burning in 
the basement, or the bathroom all night 
— and I've economized on the electric 
iron, and — ■ Anyway, what's the use of 
burning up perfectly good electricity just 
to catch up with that minimum? I won't 
do it, so there. Suppose I should get the 
habit .^ Goodness me! — what would I 
do then when winter came on.^ We 
always use the minimum, and a good deal 
more, when winter comes. But in sum- 
mer — • Oh, dear; if I just could cook 
with those wasted watts — and save oil — " 

I've always been daffy over an electric 
stove; but up to date the price has made 
the thing impossible for Peter and me. 
I've had to content myself with a darling 
little range (dinky, my well-to-do sister 
calls it), a home-made fireless cooker, and 
a two-burner oil stove, gas not being one 
of the luxuries included in the price of 
this Honeymoon Cottage of ours. And 
I've managed to do wonders with my 
cookery equipment. Peter says because 
I've studied the subject. Peter is so com- 
fortingly understanding. 

"If I could only cook with that extra 
electricity — • which we pay for — • and 
don't use," I mused again. And right 
then and there my Fairy Godmother 



heard me — and granted the wish. I 
bounced from off that bench with an 
energy that sent Popcorn flying, to hide 
her small self under my stool; and I 
climbed up to the top shelf of my stow- 
away cupboard and lifted down a Christ- 
mas gift that was given with good intent, 
but had never been put to practical use. 

You see, it had come in the dead of 
winter, when a fire in my doll-range 
seemed quite, quite necessary, and to use 
two fuels when one was enough would be 
sheer extravagance, so Peter had said. 
Then I had forgotten all about my little 
gift in the shape of an electric toaster. 
Now I pulled it forth and brushed off the 
dust, glad as if I had found a gold nugget 
in a pullet's crop, or a bushel of nuts on 
my filbert tree. Oh, quite as glad as if 
I'd found a copper mine, or had tickets 
to hear Caruso, or been willed a four- 
door sedan and an electric cleaner. That's 
the fun of being poor, the fun of having 
to count pennies; one can revel in such 
wonderful thrills over almost nothing at 
all. And when all is said and done, it is 
the wonderful thrills that add to life its 
"sugar and spice and all things nice." 
Besides, one gets the habit. And some 
habits are awfully nice to have. Bettel* 
than a bank account. 

Well, Robinson Crusoe couldn't have 
been more tickled over sighting a sail 
than I was when I climbed down from 
that high stool with my precious electric 
toaster under mv arm. 
' "Heigh-ho!" i jubilated. "We'll just 
show Peter-Peter-Pumpkin-Eater a thing 
or two. We'll use all the juice of the 
wire which we are entitled to — and save 
on kerosene. I'll continue to economize 
on lights, and get breakfast with the 
surplus. Peter can't say any more about 
wasted watts. Because we'll put every 
one Into cooking eggs for breakfast! 
Heigh-ho!" 

Next morning the little toaster held 
center place on my table. . With a 
chuckle I dropped down opposite Peter, 
and began turning the toast, already 
appetlzingly brown, and fragrant as 



THE BUSINESS WIFE AND THE WASTED WATT 



261 



roses and new mown hay. A moment 
Peter looked on with an odd little sur- 
prised air. 

"Golly, Hon," he ejaculated; "I'd 
forgotten we owned that new wrinkle. 
Why didn't you trot it out before this.?" 

"A frank confession is good for the 
soul," I opined briskly. "I also -had 
forgotten, but not for keeps. The thing 
popped back to my laggard memory when 
I realized we could use more electricity, 
and have no bigger bill, after your lecture 
yesterday morning, my dear." 

"Hmm-mm!" commented Peter. 

He swiftly unfolded his napkin. 

"My luck! Watch the thing toast, 
will you! Here's your piece — one small 
corner burned. Say, honey, a fellow 
needs to be on his job to keep up with 
this humpty-dumpty arrangement." 

Peter's language is sometimes more 
picturesque than plain. But just then 
I didn't have time to remonstrate. 
" Don't toast any more woz^," I instructed. 
"It's better piping hot. . . . Beats the 
oil stove oven, doesn't it, dear.? And I 
don't have to get up." 

" I never did enjoy seeing you bob about 
all through breakfast," confessed my 
sober business man. "I like to have you 
sit down with me and eat. I'd call this 
some like," with a satisfied chuckle. 

From that day, my little toaster be- 
came an established article of economy. 
It has saved me quarts of kerosene. But 
if Peter had not accidentally called my 
attention to that electric light bill, prob- 
ably I should have gone right on using 
my oil stove all summer, using it for work 
that my toaster could just as well as 
not do, and at no extra expense. Indeed, 
that little electric toaster has made 
possible my morning visits .with Peter 
— and, goodness knows, visits with Peter 
are none too many, because of that 
•Moloch — business. And many's the 
young housewife who has had just my 
experience. These morning visits with 
the Peters of our fair land are not to be 
lightly considered. Besides, when Peter 
makes the toast, he forgets to be absorbed 



in the morning paper — and that is an 
item. He can read it quite as well going 
in on the car. He says so himself. 

Just the other day, while Peter was 
toasting the toast, he chanced to remark: 
"Cousin Ann knew what she was about 
when she gave us this little arrangement, 
now didn't she.?" And after a minute, 
"Why-the-nicked-sugar bowl, don't every- 
body give practical presents.?" 

"I wish they would," said I. 

"Let's us. Always and forever," said 
Peter. 

" Amen. Cross-my-heart-hope-to-die," 
answered I, as soberly as when Peter and 
I played ante-over and broke somebody's 
basement window a dozen years gone by. 

"We are getting a sight more fun out of 
this toaster of Cousin Ann's than we do 
out of those thing-a-ma-doo, cut-glass 
concerns stuck up in the china closet," 
mused my admirable mate. 

"Our wedding presents! Goodness, 
Peter, you shouldn't say such things. 
Suppose some one should hear.?" 

"Shucks! Don't suppose I say that 
to them^ do you.?" 

Peter manipulated the toaster. 

I sighed. But I didn't press the sub- 
ject. Instead, "And it took me six 
months to appreciate your cousin's gift," 
I remarked. "That's because I'm such 
a neophyte of a housewife. Cousin 
Ann's an old hand. I wonder if I'll ever 
know as much." 

"You'll probably know more," easily 
assured Peter. "Where's your egg-pan.? 
I've toast enough here for an army." And 
then, "We'll hate to give up this cooking 
machine, come winter, won't we. Honey .?" 

I leaned over the table. 

"Peter, listen. I'm not going to give 
it up. I couldn't have the heart to tuck 
it up on any old top shelf to gather dust 

— again. I've been thinking, and doing 
some figuring. Suppose, Peter, suppose 

— by using one dollar's worth of elec- 
tricity, come winter, I could save two 
dollars' worth of coal.? That would be 
honest economy, now wouldn't it.?" 

Peter stared. 



262 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



"Just wait," asserted I. "That's going 
to be my next demonstration. I'm sure 
I can do it. I've been thinking it through, 
and testing it out, little bits at a time. 
And it's — going — to — work! But it 
takes a bit of management, Peter-man." 

I laughed and I sighed, and my partner 
reached over and patted my shoulder. 
If this had been a story, Peter should have 
kissed me at this point. But it isn't a 
story. It's just fact. Besides, Peter was 
very busy eating toast and tgg — you 
see, he had to catch the next car — so 
(I read this somewhere, maybe you did, 
too) Peter "kissed me with his eyes." 

And, after all, it was a very satisfactory 
kiss, one that left my heart feeling warm 
and full of glow, one that made me wonder 
if we young folk, who have to economize. 



aren't really among the most favored of 
earth after all. I've a "hunch" (as 
Peter would say) that it is we who garner 
the ripest grains in the fields of life. 

And that morning, remembering cer- 
tain facts, after Peter was gone, I took 
my little note book full of names of 
friends and gifts for giving, and wrote: 
"This Christmas, give Eva — an electric 
toaster." I put the book by with a sense 
of real satisfaction. You see, I wanted 
to give Eva something nice, and I hadn't 
known what. 

And now I know. 

Another problem solved. 

"She'll be tickled as tunket," I pro- 
nounced aloud, borrowing from grand- 
father's vocabulary, and patting Popcorn; 
"why didn't I think of it before?" 



Efficiency Through Maintaining One's 
Normal Weight 



By Emma Gary Wallace 



EVERY intelligent individual is 
interested in being both efficient 
and happy. If one is to live the 
present life abundantly, he should not be 
satisfied to achieve 30, 60 or 80 per cent 
of his possibilities. There should be a 
distinct effort to get as near the 100 per 
cent mark as possible. 

There is a very marked awakening at 
the present time in every direction, con- 
cerning the importance of one's weight 
being right for age and height. Reliable 
tables, giving such weight, are frequently 
published and are always available from 
insurance companies. 

It is claimed, and the claim substanti- 
ated by those who have a right to speak 
with a voice of authority, that ten pounds 
under-weight, or ten pounds over-weight 
is a serious matter. With young people, 
the condition of being under-weight marks 
malnutrition, and the probability of the 
invasion of devastating disease. With 



people who are middle aged, or past that 
period, being under-weight is less serious 
than being over-weight, for the latter 
condition imposes too great a strain upon 
kidneys, heart and particularly the ner- 
vous system. 

The ancients made a great point of 
much bathing, frequenting the public 
baths, where their daily ablutions took 
on the nature of a social function and 
were frequently enjoyed several times 
a day. It was contended by them that 
this repeated bathing made their bodies 
sit lightly about their souls. Without 
doubt, there was much in it, provided the 
baths were of a nature to aid them in 
maintaining a normal avoirdupois. 

There is no doubt about it that too 
much weight burdens the individual, 
interferes with the functioning of the 
body, and indirectly, but nevertheless 
surely, with the mental processes. The 
mind becomes less alert, the vision 



EFFICIENCY THROUGH AIAINTAIXING NORMAL WEIGHT 263 



clouded and unsteady, and the disposi- 
tion irritable. There is a proneness to a 
dislike of exercise, and more flesh is taken 
on, thus keeping the influence of the 
vicious circle growing constantly stronger. 

Nearly every person who is over- 
weight recognizes these facts. He may 
not do so at first, for the initial plumpness 
is rather pleasing, but that stage is soon 
passed, and then the chain of the fleshy 
slavery is steadily forged. 

Relatively few people, who travel down 
the path to obesity, ever turn back. A 
few start, but become discouraged or lack 
the will power to continue. Some make 
a false beginning and rightly grow ner- 
vous over the results, which indicate 
strain and increased nervousness. A 
fair proportion, however, succeed — and 
"Nothing succeeds like success." 

These people will tell you that the 
methods followed were not especially 
difficult, and are sure to testify that they 
individually feel vastly better and inde- 
scribably freer, and more buoyant than 
in the old days when they were sub- 
merged in billows of tallow. Much has 
been said and written concerning what 
must be done and not done to get rid of 
too much flesh. A good deal of this is a 
rehash and repetition of what most 
people know. 

Two things must be remembered in 
this connection. The first is, that the 
over-stout individual is very likely to fol- 
low the line of least resistance, for the 
will power and the actual physical ability 
to do strenuous things is lacking. And 
second is, that in the maze of prolonged, 
tiresome, and complicated directions as 
to scientific reasons, elaborate menus, 
and a regime of life including exercises 
which take too much time, • the patient 
becomes bewildered and discouraged. 
Perhaps before he even starts! 

So that person who can boil the whole 
situation down into a nut shell readily 
becomes a public benefactor. 

To begin with, the person who is over- 
stout should determine just how much 
excess baggage he is carrying. This is 



important. Next, he should consult a 
physician in whom he has confidence, to 
discover whether there is any physical 
reason, such as kidney disease or incipient 
trouble of any kind, that makes weight 
reduction undesirable or dangerous. It 
is always a good plan to get started right 
and not to rush ahead and to wish after- 
wards that you had taken time enough to 
get posted in the beginning. Wrong 
starts mean not only a waste of time, but 
the courting of disaster. 

If you, the patient, are assured that 
you will be better to get rid of the extra 
flesh, the next step rests wholly and 
absolutely with you. No doctor, no diet, 
no outside influence, will prove of any 
avail, unless your desire to reduce is greater 
than your desire to indulge in the pleasures 
of fat-forming foods. 

One charming young society matron, 
who lost forty-five pounds a year and a 
half ago, and who has not gained it back, 
declares that she felt, before the loss of 
her flesh, as though she were weighted 
with flagstones; that her knees were 
weak and trembling upon the slightest 
exertion, her breath short, and her system 
sluggish. She was troubled constanth" 
with headaches and extreme nervousness. 

In twelve weeks of very simple, com- 
mon-sense living, she got rid of forty-five 
pounds, and this was a great deal, con- 
sidering her height. At the end of that 
time, she was stronger than she had been 
in years. Her system was doing its work 
beautifully, she looked twenty years 
younger, was much more cheerful, and 
scarcely knew that she had nerves except 
as she became over-tired or remembered 
her previous condition. 

When people asked her if it wasn't 
exceedingly difficult for her to stick to the 
course undertaken even for the three 
months, she invariably replied: 

"No, because I wanted to lose that 
extra flesh a good deal more than I 
wanted to eat the chocolates of which I 
was fond, the rich salads, dressed with 
mayonnaise, and the other good things 
I was in the habit of partaking of. It 



264 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



is merely a case of what you want 
most!" 

This lady has given the secret of the 
whole situation. It is zvhat you want 
most. Some people claim that they want 
to get thin, or, at least, come to a normal 
condition, but it is merely with them a 
matter of words and not of actual desire. 
// is a case of will power and of the ability 
to stick to the course undertaken until the 
goal is reached. 

Unless the patient can stand squarely 
on that platform, and is willing to sign up 
with his own conscience, there is no use 
going any farther. If he is, then the 
battle is, at least, half-won. The rest 
consists in a common-sense routine. It 
is to partake freely of proteins to build 
muscle and tissue, of fruits and vegetables, 
which will give vitamines and satisfying 
bulk, and to live on one's own fats. 
Simple, isn't it.^* 

The rigorous exercise, so often recom- 
mended, urged and insisted upon, may 
not be possible, at first. As rapidly as 
the patient is able to do it with ease and 
pleasure, additional exercise, preferably 
walking in the open air, with the body 
held erect and the muscles of the abdomen 
drawn in, will be enjoyed. It is a good 
plan to walk a little farther each day, 
perhaps doing errands that have been 
long delayed, or merely going for the 
pleasure of the effort. But the desire 
to exercise is sure to come with the 
ability or strength to undertake it. 

The most important thing is — not 
dieting, but a diet. For there is no 
occasion for any one going hungry or 
feeling weak or deprived of necessary 
foods. The very thought that one is 
working out a desirable problem is a 
pleasure in itself. In place of attempting 
to live on three sparse meals a day, most 
people reduce more satisfactorily to take 
food oftener and to take less at a time. 

Upon first arising, sip a glass of cold 
water containing a pinch of soda. Do 
this in a leisurely way and enjoy it. 
Dress, take a cool, sponge bath, if it is 
possible to do so. Partake of a breakfast 



of one slice of crisp, unbuttered toast, 
masticated slowly and thoroughly, and 
a cup of strong black coffee, without 
cream or sugar. By taking this in a 
leisurely manner, the appetite will be 
satisfied. At 10.30 or. 11, take one large, 
juicy orange. 

At noon, a piece of any lean meat, except 
pork or greasy fish; two vegetables 
(omitting potatoes, peas and beans), 
cooked in boiling salted water, but not 
.dressed with cream, butter or an Qgg 
sauce or dressing of any kind; and a 
dessert of stewed or fresh fruit; a cup 
of tea or a glass of water or buttermilk. 

At 4 o'clock, a cup of strong black coffee 
may be taken. For those for whom any 
other arrangement is inconvenient, that 
coffee may be used, which is instan- 
taneously dissolved in boiling water. 

The evening meal may consist of a 
portion of lean meat again, fish, or the 
lean part of fowl; one vegetable, pre- 
pared as at noon; a green salad, dressed 
with vinegar or lemon juice, and salt and 
pepper — • a liberal amount of this may 
be taken; one slice of thin, stale bread 
or unbuttered, crisp toast; and fruit for 
dessert without sugar. 

If the need of it is felt, light refresh- 
ments may be taken at 10 o'clock, in the 
form of an apple, an orange, a glass of 
unsweetened lemonade, or a cup of weak 
tea, if wakefulness is not feared. 

In a very few days, the stomach will 
grow accustomed to these lighter meals, 
and loss in weight will be noticeable from 
the first week with most people. Some- 
times the loss will appear to be gained 
back again for a few days, but strict 
adherence to the diet and close attention 
to the bodily hygiene will show a steady 
decrease. 

Dieting to the extent of weakening the 
body is undesirable, and should never be 
permitted. As weight is lost, there will 
be a real pleasure in exercise, and it will 
be anticipated. This is a simple and 
common-sense routine, which has worked 
out successfully in many cases, and is 
one laid out by a specialist of note. 



Talks to Teachers of Domestic Science 

By Mary D. Chambers 

Author of "Principles of Food Preparation" and "Breakfasts, 
Luncheons and Dinners" 



SOMEBODY lately asked a girl what 
new subjects she was studying in 
school this fall. 

"I have taken up Domestic Science," 
said the girl. 

"What is it like.?" 

"Well, it is awfully like kitchen work." 

Now teachers, are you willing to have 
this said of your subject.? Of course, the 
cooking, the dishwashing, and keeping 
the cooking room clean, are extremely 
like kitchen work; even if you teach 
nothing but the kitcheny side of the 
subject, you may still be sure that you 
are teaching something highly useful and 
essential, something needed in every 
home, something that will help to make 
every home a better and a happier place. 
This is one of the wonderful things about 
our subject — ■ that even if it is not taught 
in the best possible way, it, nevertheless, 
cannot help but be useful to the girl who 
studies it, and this is a fine thing to be 
able to say of any subject. It is, however, 
no reason why we should be satisfied to let 
well enough alone, and not try todo better. 

There are three general reasons why 
Domestic Science is not taught better. 
First, because the subject is new; second, 
because it is rich and many-sided; third, 
because, in its infancy, it was crippled by 
binding it hard and fast to the inductive 
system. Let us briefly discuss each 
of these handicaps. 

The Subject is New. This means it has 
no historical background for comparison. 
We cannot say: "The famous teachers 
of Domestic Science in ancient Greece and 
Rome presented the subject to their girls 
in such-and-such a manner." Neither is 
it old enough for generations of modern 
pedagogues to have given much of their 
attention to it, and studied out the reac- 
tions of students to various methods of 
presentation. In one way this makes It 



hard for us, but in another it makes it 
interesting, and opens wide the door of 
opportunity to do something worthwhile. 

The Subject is Many-Sided. This, per- 
haps is the most difficult of all our diffi- 
culties. Domestic Science has an effi- 
ciency side and a cultural side; a manual- 
training side and a scientific side; an 
economic side and a hygienic side. Some- 
times these many sides conflict, sometimes 
it Is hard to choose between them, and 
we do not know which of them all Is the 
one to brand: "This Side Up." 

The Subject is Fettered by the Inductive 
Method. It is chiefly the scientific side 
that is so fettered. Early In the present 
generation a certain dictum was uttered 
by a certain university, and its propa- 
ganda was rapid. Teachers were ex- 
horted, implored, commanded not to tell 
the child anything he could be made to find 
out for himself. Instead of telling our 
classes that It takes half an hour to boil 
a potato of average size, we thought we 
had painfully to make our unhappy pupils 
boil potato after potato of different sizes, 
estimate which was the potato of average 
size, and then estimate the average time 
of cooking. It would be as reasonable to 
decree that no child should have money 
spent for him that he did not earn him- 
self; but, unfortunately, the child-labor- 
laws, to regulate toilsome work without 
need, did not apply in the school room, 
neither did the inheritance laws, com- 
pelling the transmission of the knowledge- 
wealth of the fathers to the children. 
Hence, we could Insist on the girl In a 
Domestic Science class finding out for 
herself how long she should boil a potato, 
when we could have told her in four 
seconds by the clock. 

So far was this fad of induction carried 
that, If a girl said her teacher told her 



fact. It branded the teacher 



;th 



265 



266 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



disgrace in tlie eyes of the parent, the 
supervisor, or the other kind of teacher 
who could proudly boast that she never 
told her classes anything! 

All this preamble is designed to make 
the teacher of Domestic Science discon- 
tented with restricting herself to kitchen 
work; and to make her feel free to give 
her children by word of mouth such facts 
as will not only enrich them mentally, 
but will make for right-living on the 
physical plane. We hear much just now 
about the teaching of health, and how 
important it is, and how health-teaching 
should be done by every teacher and in 
every class. So far as health is related 
to food there is surely no place where it 
might be more forcefully taught than in 
the cooking-class, and the teaching of 
health is not one of the subjects best 
adapted to the inductive system. 

This Domestic Science work is of far 
too valuable content to restrict it to 
instruction in the preparation of food. 
No child should leave a course in this 
subject without knowing when to eat, 
how to eat, what are the chief essentials 
in the daily diet, how different foods act 
in the body, what they do for the body, 
and how they should be combined in a 
meal. It will, we know, be objected that 
time is lacking in the brief class-period 
for such lecture work. We do not mean 
it to be lecture work. Children hate 
lectures, especially if they are held back 
by them from such delightful activities as 
beating batters in a bowl, stirring and 
tasting, adding spices and seasonings, 
and making the good smells that are fore- 
runners of good tastes. But, if in the old 
monasteries, 

"The reader droned from the pulpit 
Like the murmur of many bees, 
The legend of good Saint Guthlac, 
And Saint Basil's homilies"; 

and if, in the modern hotels, musical 
recitals accompany the meals and engage 
the attention of the guests, so should easy, 
informal, chatty little talks from the 
teacher accompany many of the processes 
of mixing and baking and eating what has 



been baked, and washing the dishes 
afterwards. If a teacher should casually 
remark while her class was slicing carrots, i.' 
that sugar was down to 10 cents a pound, !' 
or that a sale of hats was on at Smith's, 
or that Bolshevists were besieging Boston, 
don't you think every girl would hear 
every word.? Similarly a teacher can 
make little remarks — ■ not too many, nor i 
too long at a time — embodying what 
every girl ought to know about food and 
how to use it. 

In this series" of papers we propose to 
boil down the results of the latest research 
in the matter of food, that is, such results 
as make for its best and most intelligent 
use, and we shall trust to the teacher to 
employ whatever methods seem best to 
her in making this a part of the mental 
equipment of her girls, or, to use the 
parlance of the day, in "getting it across 
to them." The first subject in our series 
of talks to the teacher will be. 

The Reasons for Cooking Food 

The chief reason for cooking food is to 
make it taste better. This looks like a 
silly and frivolous reason, but it is not 
such a light-minded one as it seems, 
since anything that we enjoy and that 
tastes real good is ever so much easier 
to digest. One of those ancient Greeks, 
whom we mentioned awhile ago as not 
knowing anything about Domestic 
Science, knew this fact, for an aphorism 
from him has come down to us: "Food 
that is relished is half digested." His 
name was Hippocrates, and he has since 
been known as the Father of Medicine. 

Only recently, comparatively, have 
scientists discovered the reason why 
food that is relished Is easier to digest. 
They have discovered that those diges- 
tive juices, which we are so apt to think of 
as having, each one, its own definite 
composition — the gastric juice com- 
posed of such-and-such and the Intestinal 
juice composed of so-and-so — vary in 
composition according to the kind of food 
each is called upon to digest. That is, 
they vary within the limits of the In- 



SECRETS OF A NEW ENGLAND COOK 



267 



gredients of each. To make this clear, 
let us compare any one of the digestive 
juices with a cup of coffee. You may 
put a lot of cream into your cup of 
coffee, or you may put very little, or 
you may drink, it black; and you may 
make it exceeding sweet, or you may use 
hardly a trace of sugar, or serve it with- 
out sugar; or you may like it very, very 
weak, or as strong as lye; but no matter 
how you may vary the proportions of 
its ingredients, it will still be a cup of 
coffee. So it is with the digestive juices, 
the ingredients, each is composed of. 
may vary in their proportion to such an 
extent that the kind of juice secreted for 
the digestion of peanuts will be so differ- 
ent from that required for the digestion 
of pork as to bear to one another no 
more family resemblance than a cup of 
weak cafe au lait does to a thimbleful 
of Turkish coffee. And just as we make 
our coffee to suit our tastes, so does 
Nature mix each digestive juice to suit 
the food it is called upon to digest. 
When we drink milk, the right kind of 
mixture for the digestion of milk is pro- 
vided; when we eat meat, a different 



mixture is needed — bread calls for one 
kind of "blend," bananas for another; 
and the bread mixture is not so good for 
digesting bananas, nor will the milk 
mixture so well digest meat. 

But when we eat anything that we 
exceedingly relish, so that our mouths 
water at the sight and the smell of it, 
and its taste on our tongue is delicious 
to the last degree, then a kind of mixture 
is secreted to which its discoverer (Pavlov) 
gave the name of "Appetit-jus," or the 
digestive fluid secreted when the appetite 
for any food is keen and ravenous. This 
kind of secretion he found to differ from 
all the others in that it is able to digest 
practically everything. 

There is a great deal more to be said 
about appetite and the appetite juice, 
but it must wait until our next monthly 
talk. The moral of this one is the im- 
portance of being able to cook well, and 
to make the simplest kind of dish taste 
as good as it possibly can, so that we, and 
all whom we love well enough to cook for, 
may eat with great relish, and that the 
"food which they relish will be half- 
digested." 



Secrets of a New England Cook 

By Ella Shannon Bowles 



SHE raised her hands in protest, as 
I carried a baked cocoanut pie 
toward the oven door. 

"You aren't planning to put that pie 
in the oven again, are you, dearie?" she 
inquired. 

"Why, of course," I answered. "I 
must brown the meringue." 

"Don't you know that you must never 
try to brown the meringue of a cocoanut 
pie.^" she asked. "The cocoanut will be 
hard and won't taste well at all. Beat 
the whites of two eggs so they'll stay in a 
bowl when it's turned upside down; add 
two tablespoonfuls of sugar and two 
tablespoonfuls of shredded cocoanut and 
pile upon the pie just before serving." 



During the past thirty years, Mrs. 
Patterson had reigned in the kitchens of 
the various hotels and boarding-houses 
for which the little mountain summer 
resort was famous. Her cooking had 
called forth words of praise from the 
guests who ate her delicious food with 
its "homey" flavor, and she proudly told 
me that once a world-famed celebrity had 
called her into the dining room of a large 
hotel and publicly complimented her upon 
her culinary ability. Now that she was 
retired and was my nearest neighbor, she 
gave me many ideas in preparing food. 

"Perhaps you would like my rule for 
Cocoanut Pie^''^ she continued. "Beat 
the yolks of three eggs and the white of 



V 



268 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



one with two-thirds of a cup of sugar. 
Add a pinch of salt, one-half a cup of 
shredded cocoanut, one teaspoonful of 
vanilla, and a pint of heated milk, and 
pour into a pie-shell. Have the oven hot 
enough, at first, to hold the shell in shape, 
but allow it to cool gradually, and bake 
the pie until the custard is firm. Beat 
the two egg-whites and make the cocoa- 
nut meringue, or if you wish a plain 
meringue, omit the cocoanut, add the 
sugar, one-half a teaspoonful of vanilla, 
and a pinch of baking powder; cover the 
pie, when it is cooled, and brown the 
meringue. The baking powder helps 
keep the meringue in shape." 

The following morning Mrs. Patterson 
opened my back door. 

"I thought, maybe, you'd like some 
of my plain doughnuts," she said, as she 
removed a napkin from a willow-ware 
plate and disclosed half a dozen perfectly 
browned fried cakes. "They're pretty 
good with maple syrup." 

"Oh, Mrs. Patterson," I cried, "do 
tell me just how you make them." 

^^ Plain Doughnuts are easy enough to 
make, when you get the knack," she 
answered. "Tonight, after supper, beat 
up an &gg with two tablespoonfuls of 
sugar, add one tablespoonful of melted 
butter, one teaspoonful of salt, and one 
cup of sour milk, in which one level tea- 
spoonful of soda has been dissolved. 
Then add flour to make the dough stiff 
enough to knead. After kneading it well, 
put the dough in a greased bowl to rise 
overnight. In the morning cut off strips 
of the dough, twist into rings and fry. 
Don't have the lard as hot as for sweet- 
ened doughnuts, and let each cake brown 
on one side before turning on the other. 
They're nice with coffee for breakfast or 
served with maple syrup for a dessert." 

"Now tell me some kind of a cake to 
make," I said, after I had written down 
the directions for making the doughnuts. 

"Why don't 3'^ou try Mother's Cream 
Cake? It can be' stirred up quickly and 
has a nice flavor. Break two eggs in a 
cup, and fill the cup with sour cream. 



Turn into a mixing-bowl and add one 
cup of sugar, one cup and one-half of 
flour that has been sifted with two level 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder, and one- 
half a teaspoonful of soda. Add one 
teaspoonful of vanilla and one-fourth a 
teaspoonful of salt and bake in a moderate 
oven for half an hour. If you wish to 
vary the flavor, try a teaspoonful of 
cinnamon instead of the vanilla." 

^'How do you make that nice fluffy 
White Mountain Frosting? '^ I asked 
next. 

"Boil together a scant cup of sugar and 
one-third a cup of water, until the syrup 
really hairs when you drop it from a 
spoon," she replied. "Pour it slowly 
over the beaten white of an ^gg., having 
some one beating with an egg-beater as 
you do it. Add a pinch of cream of tartar 
to make it light and stir rapidly with a 
mixing spoon. Then place over the top 
of a boiling tea kettle, and leave until the 
sugar forms a coating on the side of 1^e 
bowl. Flavor to taste, beat again, and 
pour over the cake. If you wish the 
frosting to cut without cracking, add two 
drops of glycerine just before you beat 
the last time." 

"Oh, Mrs. Patterson, what shall I have 
for dessert.^" I called across the fence 
after Aunt Em had telephoned that she 
would arrive in half an hour. 

"If you'd keep a little pie crust or a 
couple of pie-shells made up ahead, you 
could make a pie in a jiffy, but I don't 
suppose you have either," my neighbor 
said resignedly. 

I sadly shook my head. 

"Well, if I were in your place, I'd 
make a Tapioca Indian Pudding at this 
short notice. I'll tell you how to make 
the Tapioca Indian Pudding. Cover a 
third of a cup of minute tapioca w'th 
milk and soak for ten minutes. Heat a 
quart of milk in a double boiler; add two- 
thirds a cup of molasses, stir in gradually 
two tablespoonfuls of cornmeal, the 
tapioca, one-half a teaspoonful of salt 
and a tablespoonful of butter. Turn 
into a buttered baking dish, cover with 



SECRETS OF A NEW ENGLAND COOK 



269 



a cup of cold milk, and bake for an hour 
in a moderate oven. Serve the pudding 
with plain or whipped cream. 

"I made cream puffs this morning, and 
I'm going to bring you over some to help 
you out," she added. 

"Oh, how I wish that I could make 
them," I said enviously. 

"A baker told me how, years ago. 
Here's his rule for Cream Puffs and you 
won't find one just like it in any recipe 
book. Place one-half a cup of lard 
and one-half a cup of hot water in a 
saucepan on the stove; when the ingre- 
dients are boiling hard, add one cup of 
sifted flour, and stir rapidly from the 
bottom of the pan into a ball. Remove 
from the fire, and when the dough is 
slightly cooled, stir in three eggs, one at 
a time. Drop by spoonfuls on a greased 
tin and bake for forty-five minutes. 
Most rules say bake for half of an hour, 
but it isn't long enough, I find. Have 
the oven quick, at first, and, in spite of 
the usual directions, look at them as 
frequently as you like. Just before 
serving, split and fill with boiled custard 
or whipped cream." 

"By the way," I said, "Ralph wished 
me to ask you just how you prepared that 
Pot Roast that we ate at your house last 
Sunday." 

"I expect he liked it because the gravy 
was so brown. Most men do. Put the 



cut of beef in an iron kettle without any 
water, and let it sear over, turning it 
frequently, that it may brown on all 
sides. Cover with boiling water and 
cook slowly for at least three hours. Add 
a tablespoonful of cider vinegar during 
the last hour of cooking, to loosen the 
fibre, and do not salt until fifteen minutes 
before the pot roast is done. When the 
gravy is thickened with flour, you will 
find it nice and brown. Slice the meat 
and while it is still warm, place bits of 
butter on each slice. Another way is to 
fry out the fat from salt pork and heat 
the slices in it, but don't put the meat 
in the pork fat until just before you 
serve it." 

During the time that Mrs. Patterson 
has lived beside me, she has revealed 
many other secrets that she has worked 
out. She told me to use stale doughnut 
or cake-crumbs, soaked in milk, in place 
of rye flour in brown bread, — to make 
my baking-powder biscuit of bread in- 
stead of pastry flour, and to dip each 
biscuit in milk before baking, — to keep 
boiled potatoes on hand for quick French 
fries, — to try maple sugar mixed with 
sweet cream for the fillings of afternoon 
tea sandwiches, — to boil my roasts of 
pork for fifteen minutes before placing 
them in the oven, and to use a teaspoon- 
ful of olive oil in fritter-dough to make 
them smooth. 



The Reason 



Fourscore and ten is little time 

To fashion right the simplest rhyme; 

So we must do the best we can 

With toil and thought and pondered plan. 

The summer labors at a rose 
That still so much of error shows 
It tries again, come June once more, 
With magic of the seasons' lore. 



The tides to listening shores rehearse 
The music of its mighty verse; 
Unresting does it search and long 
To phrase at last the perfect song. 

The winds upon the hills repeat 

Old themes while seeking others sweet; 

And so I think that I can see 

Why God gave us eternity! 

Arthur JFallace Peach. 



270 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



AMERICAN COOKERY 

FORMERLY THE 

BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL 
MAGAZINE 

OF 

Culinary Science and Domestic Economics 

Subscription $1.50perYear.Single Copies 15c 
Postage to Foreign Countries, 40c per Year 

TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The date stamped on the wrapper is the date 
on which your subscription expires; it is, also, an 
acknowledgment that a subscription, or a renewal 
of the same, has been received. 

Please renew on receipt of the colored blank 
enclosed for this purpose. 

In sending notice to renew a subscription or 
change of address, please give the old address 
as well as the neiv. 

In referring to an original entry, we must know 
the name as it was formerly given, together with 
the Post-office, County, State, Post-office Box, 
or Street Number. 

Entered at Boston Post-office as Second-class Matter 



Statement of the Ownership, Management, etc., required by 
the Act of Congress of Aug. 24, 1912, of the 

AMERICAN COOKERY, published monthly 
except July and September, at Boston, Mass., 
for April 1, 1920. 

Publishers 

Boston Cooking-School Magazine Co. 

221 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Editor: Janet M. Hill 

Business Managers 

Benj. M. Hill and Robert B. Hill 

Owners 

Benj. M. Hill, Janet M. Hill, Robt. B. Hill 

Known bond or other security holders. None 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 29th day of September, 
1920. 

(Seal) JOHN E. PROUTY, 

Notary Public 



THANKSGIVING 

WE present our readers, this month, 
with a variety of menus and 
dishes suitable to the occasion and the 
season. No attempt is made to carry 
out in detail a Thanksgiving festival. In 
these days people want, no doubt, to use 
their own discretion and adapt the pro- 
gram of holiday celebrations to their own 
individual circumstances and needs. We 
have much to be thankful for. Crops 
have been plentiful, work is in demand, 
and prosperity is in a larger number of 



homes than ever before. Certainly the 
conditions provide a cheering call for 
Thanksgiving. 

We can only regret that the spirit of 
unrest is still widespread. It is the 
inevitable result, we presume, of transi- 
tion from a state of war to a state of peace. 
However, let us not delude ourselves 
with fanciful notions of progress and 
reform. May we not forget, 

"Though the mills of God grind slowly. 
Yet they grind exceeding small, 
Though with patience He stands waiting, 
With exactness grinds He all." 

Prosperity is dependent, primarily, 
upon earnest, efficient and protracted 
labor. "A prosperity, which is the result 
of other than increased production of real 
wealth, in the form of goods and commo- 
dities and products of the soil, is a false 
prosperity. Higher wages with less work 
and less production never made for 
prosperity, for the money wages become 
valueless." 

Is there a greater blessing and one 
more to be thankful for than to be 
engaged busily and agreeably, in some 
productive industry.'* 

A NEW ERA 

W'E are living in a new era. ''The 
old order changeth, yielding place 
to new." We no longer hold to the beliefs 
and opinions of men and women of fifty 
or more years ago. Science and experi- 
ence have steadily enlarged the vision of 
man and broadened his outlook from age 
to age. 

Recently we visited Brook Farm, the 
residence, for a short time, of Margaret 
Fuller, famous teacher and reformer. 
The place has now, for many years, been 
an orphans' home. But how few know 
anything about the social experiment 
once tried out at Brook Farm, or the 
actors who took part in the same. We 
do not live in the same fashion, read the 
same books or think the same thoughts 
as did the people of a past generation. 
Who, for instance, today, would care to 
read J. G. Holland's "Bitter Sweet," or 



EDITORIALS 



271 



Goethe's "Hermann and Dorothea"? 
Who would try to wade through the 
novels of Cooper and Scott or even 
Dickens' once famous stories? Romance 
the world over is the same; the love of 
music, poetry and song is ever the same, 
but the sentiment is expressed in a dif- 
ferent form than in by-gone days. The 
tales that are told are ever of the old 
themes, but the thought and language in 
which they are told are quite new and 
unfamiliar today. The idea we would 
suggest is indicated by the following bit 
of verse, which we clipped from the daily 
press. It was written, it seems, almost 
unconsciously, by a rather pleasing ver- 
sifier of the present day. The title of 
the poem is: 

Answered 

"What is love like?" All the poets and sages 
Asking and answering, down through the ages, 
Give us their formulae, show us their vision: 
Beauty, variety — yet no decision. 
Love is a flame! No, love is a flower. 
Love is a beggar. Love carries a dower. 
Love is eternal. All love is but fleeting. 
Love lies in parting. True love comes at 

meeting. 
Love is unselfish; love's marked by exaction. 
Love is a spirit; love's fleshly attraction. 
Love's for today; love lives for tomorrow. 
Love is true joy; love always brings sorrow. 
So runs the argument, tireless, unceasing, 
Every pronouncement confusion increasing; 
Yet it's as simple as is two times two — • 

What is love like, dear.-" Whv, love is like You! 

Iris. 

RELIGION AND PATRIOTISM 

PATRIOTISM and religion are insep- 
arable. Their source is from the 
same emotion, affection. If my country 
does not aspire after divine guidance and 
the favor of the supreme ruler of events, 
I cannot give it loyal support and ap- 
proval. We believe in justice, right- 
eousness and truth. We believe in God 
as a being who inspires and favors the 
achievement of these things among man- 
kind. But what are justice, righteousness 
and truth? Who shall decide the mean- 
ing of these terms? The answer is, the 
still small voice, the moral conscience, 
implanted in every human soul, which is 
the voice of God himself. In fact, has not 



the matter of right and wrong, as a moral 
Issue, just been tried out and settled, 
we hope, for all time? We, together with 
the peoples of the greater part of earth, 
did not believe in Kaiser William, with 
his lofty assumption that might makes 
right, and his Gott as co-partner in the 
rule of earth, and were willing to try it 
out, reluctantly, by force; the result Is 
now well known throughout the world. 
Again we feel assured that righteousness 
exalteth a nation, while sin Is a reproach 
to any people. 

Patriotism and religion are indlsso- 
lubly connected, because in every trans- 
action and affair of life the moral Issue 
is the decisive factor. In every contro- 
versy between men, find the moral point 
at issue and the way of settlement is made 
plain. Keep religion out of politics! It 
cannot be ndone. In matters of morals 
there is no middle ground; no such thing 
as neutrality. He that Is not for me Is 
against me. Ways and means of attain- 
ment are debatable; opinions and beliefs 
are variable and subject to constant 
mutation, but moral principles and truth 
are everlastingly the same and unchange- 
able. By no manner of thought or 
reason can we separate religion and 
patriotism. We have faith and trust in 
the one, because we have faith and trust 
In the other. 

Patriotism, as well as manners and 
morals, should be cultivated in the public 
schools. To make our inheritance secure 
let us see to it that the public school and 
the public library advance, step by step, 
to make the United States a nation of 
enlightenment. To this end the preacher 
and the teacher are factors foremost in 
significance. From a moral point of view 
do we fully realize the responsibility of 
these agents. The fate of the Republic 
is dependent on the intelligence and 
character of its citizens. 

WOMAN'S RESPONSIBILITY 

"►T^HE housewives of America are 

A going to take an active. Instead of 

a passive part in the financial and eco- 



272 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



nomic future of the nation and we are 
going to help to do so." That is the way 
Mrs. Thomas G. Winter, president of the 
General Federation of Women's Clubs, 
sums up the policy of the federation for 
the next two years, as decided on at the 
recent meeting of the executive committee 
in Washington. 

"To that end," Mrs. Winter says, 
*'we have adopted a country-wide cam- 
paign for thrift and for the study of home 
economics. In each of those campaigns 
we will work in co-operation with the 
Federal Government. In the thrift cam- 
paign we will follow the movement 
inaugurated by the Savings Division of 
the Treasury for thrift, saving and safe 
investment in government securities. 

"In the campaign for betterment of 
home economic conditions, we will work 
with the Department of Agriculture. 

"The housewives of this country, it is 
estimated, last year did work to the value 
of 319,000,000,000. Although they were 
not paid in wages or salary for this work, 
they are one of the most potent economic 
forces in the nation. They are entitled 
to their fair share of advancement and 
they are not getting it. They have the 
right to improve their condition, to make 
their work more effective and efficient, 
and they should have the opportunity 
to do so. 

"They earn their full share of the 
household wealth and they have an equal 
right to determine its disposition. In 
fairness to themselves and their children 
they must see to it that it is disbursed 
effectively and safeguarded properly. 
We aim to place before them the prin- 
ciples of thrift and financial safety that 
will enable them to enjoy their respon- 
sibilities to the full." — M'rs. T. G. W. 



"Prohibition and Suffrage! Both 
within the short space of a few months! 
Surely the world does move! The times 
in which we live will be noted in after 
times as among the great years of human 
progress toward the goal of perfection. 
In the new order, that possible dangers 



may be avoided, and the greatest good 
may come out of the changed relations of 
women to the state, clear thinking and 
serious efforts are called for. In this 
great drama the teacher and the school 
will play an important part." 



American Cookery is designed to 
appeal directly to home-makers and 
teachers of domestic economy. It special- 
izes only in the quality and character 
of its contents. We aim simply to be 
useful and helpful in the conduct of the 
average American home. The price of 
the publication is reasonable, thus render- 
ing it available. Since the war our cir- 
culation has grown apace in size and 
strength. We would respectfully invite 
the attention of housekeepers to the ' 
merits of American Cookery. If you ' 
have not given us your subscription wb.y 
not do so now.^ 



A People Blest of God 

Uplift the song of praise 

To him, our fathers' God! 

Who led them o'er the watery ways 

To lands untrod: 
Seed of a race to be, 
Upon this new-world shore; 
The home of law and liberty 

Forevermore. 
• 

Lift high the song of praise, 

O nation grown in power! 

Hold fast through good and evil days 

Thy glorious dower! 
The age-long hope fulfil, 
New-quickened at thy birth; 
Thy strength thy God, whose righteous will 

Rules heaven and earth. 

Uplift the song of praise! 
His love and wisdom own. 
Who leadeth still in unseen ways, 

By paths unknown. 
His purposes of old 
And promises endure, 
And through the circling years unfold, 

Forever sure. 

Lift high the song of praise 

And bless his holy name! 

Whose care above the passing days 

Abides the same. 
Our fathers' confidence, 
Through all their pilgrimage; 
Our dwelling-place and our defence 

From age to age. 

Frederick Lucian Ilosmer. 




THANKSGIVING TABLE, COUNTRY STYLE 

Seasonable-and-Tested Recipes 

By Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 

TN ALL recipes where flour is used, unless otherwise stated, the flour is measured after sifting 

once. Where flour is measured by cups, the cup is filled with a spoon, and a level cupful is 

meant. A tablespoonful or a teaspoonful of any designated material is a LEVEL spoonful. In flour 

mixtures where yeast is called for, use bread flour; in all other flour mixtures, use cake or pastry flour. 



Prune-and-Barley Soup 

COOK one-half a pound of barley 
In a quart of water until tender 
— three or four hours. Cook one 
pound of prunes in a pint of water until 
soft, then stone, and press through a 
colander. Drain the water from the 
barley; add the sifted prunes with the 
grated yellow rind of one-half a lemon, 
one-half a cup of sugar, and a stick of 
cinnamon, broken into one-inch pieces. 
Let the whole boil for a few minutes, 
then strain into a tureen, and add the 
juice of one lemon. Serve hot. 

Veloute d'Ognon 

Cook one cup of thin-sliced' onions in 
a covered porcelain saucepan with four 
tablespoonfuls of bacon fat for thirty 
minutes, or until quite soft. Add two 
tablespoonfuls of flour, and stir until it 
is blended smooth with the fat. Add two 
cups of milk, and let cook with careful 
stirring until the mixture boils. Sift the 
whole through a colander; add seasoning 



of salt and pepper to taste, with one 
beaten egg or two yolks, and one-half a 
cup of rich cream. Stir until the whole 
is hot through. This soup is both rich 
and delicate, also very nutritious. 

Duck Pie 

Cut the meat from the bones of cold, 
left-over duck, and boil the bones, skin, 
and trimmings in a pint of water for a 
couple of hours. The water should be 
reduced one-half. Lay into a deep 
baking dish a layer of onion puree, 
made by sifting boiled white onions 
through a colander. Over this lay a 
layer of pieces of duck meat, then a 
layer of onion, and so on until the dish 
is nearly filled. Pour over all the 
liquid in which the bones were boiled, 
seasoned with salt and pepper, and cover 
the top with a crust of mashed sweet 
potatoes. Bake until crust is brown. 

Guinea Fowl, Southern Style 

Lay slices of onion to cover the bottom 
of a casserole, and over these place the 



273 



274 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



guinea fowl, first cut into pieces as for 
fricassee, sprinkled with salt and pepper, 
rolled in rice fiour and sauteed in hot 
chicken fat. Pour one-half a cup of stock 
or water over fowl in casserole, cover 
closely, and bake in moderate oven until 
meat is tender. Water should be replen- 
ished if it boils away. 

Irish Potato Cakes 

Boil six potatoes until quite soft, mash 
with milk and butter, and season slightly 
w^ith salt. Work into the mashed pota- 
toes as much flour as they will take up to 
make a dough just firm enough to be 
slightly-kneaded and rolled, one about 
three-fourths of an inch in thickness. 
Cut into rounds or triangles, and bake 
on a spider in the oven until brown on 



utes. Reduce temperature, pour a cup 
of hot water into the pan, and baste every 
five minutes until duck is cooked. A 
large duck needs to cook from three- 
quarters to one hour. 

Broiled Scrod 

Split a haddock dow^n the back; 
remove backbone; place in a w^ell-greased 
wire broiler. Broil flesh side, turn and 
broil skin side until skin is crisp and 
brown. Remove to hot platter. Spread 
with 

Maitre d'Hotel Butter 

Cream one-fourth a cup of butter; add 
half a teaspoonful of salt, a dash of 
pepper, half a tablespoonful of fine- 
chopped parsley, and three-fourths a 




BROILED SCROD 



both sides, or they may be sauteed in fat 
on the top of the stove. These cakes 
should be eaten hot with butter. 

Mallard Duck, Stuffed 
and Roasted 

Singe, remove pinfeathers, and draw. 
Sprinkle lightly inside with black pepper, 
and fill with the following stuffing: One 
cup of boiled onions, one cup of chopped 
sour apples, one cup of dried crumbs from 
corn bread, moistened with hot water. 
Add salt and pepper, two tablespoonfuls 
of butter or chicken fat, and a teaspoonful 
of powdered sage. Sew up the duck, 
truss, skewer, and place on rack of baking- 
pan. Cover with little bits of butter or 
chicken fat, and put into a very hot oven. 
The bird should be brown in five min- 



tablespoonful of lemon juice, very slowly. 
The heat of the fish dissolves the butter. 

Quail Pie 

Truss and stuff the birds after cleaning, 
and cut the joints nearly, but not quite 
through, then parboil for ten minutes in 
a little water. Line a deep baking dish 
with puff-paste, spread over the bottom 
several slices of nicely streaked bacon, 
over this sliced hard-boiled eggs with 
plenty of butter and a sprinkling of 
pepper, lastly, lay on the birds. Place 
on the breast of each two tablespoonfuls 
of butter rolled in flour, sprinkle with 
minced parsley, and squeeze over them 
the juice of one lemon. Now cover them 
with slices of hard-boiled egg, then with 
slices of bacon, pour in a cup of the water 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



275 




CELERY. CUT CLUB STYLE 



in which the birds were parboiled, then 
put on the upper crust of puff-paste, cut 
a hole in the middle of it, and bake the 
pie in a hot oven for one to one-and-a- 
half hours. 

Roast Ortolans or Reed Birds 

When the birds are picked, drawn, and 
cleaned, they should be filled with fresh, 
unsalted butter, for the secret of cooking 
ortolans is that they must never be 
touched by salt, which destroys their 
peculiarly delicious flavor. The butter- 
filled birds must then be tied up in thick 
slices of fresh white bread; even this is 
better if made specially for the purpose 
without the addition of salt. They are 
baked on the grate of a dripping pan in 



a very hot oven, with the door left open 
just a crack for the flavor given by ven- 
tilation. They should be basted every 
five minutes, first with unsalted butter 
and later with their own drippings, 
and a few minutes before serving the 
bread should be untied and placed in 
the dripping pan, then on the platter 
under the birds, when these are nicely 
browned. 

Roast Ribs of Lamb, Rolled 

Purchase a strip of ribs (sometimes 
called a rack) of lamb. Roll and tie se- 
curely. Sprinkle with salt; dredge with 
flour and roast one hour and a quarter in 
a hot oven. This is considered the most 
choice and delicate roast of lamb. 




ROAST RIBS OF LAMB, ROLLED 



276 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Tomato Marmalade, Dutch Style 

Cut In slices, without paring, one-half 
a peck of ripe tomatoes and two pounds 
of sour apples. Add four lemons, cut 
into quarter-inch cubes. Alix with these 
one pound of chopped raisins, put the 
whole over a slow fire In an agate kettle, 
and when it begins to boil, add one ounce, 
each, of whole cloves, stick cinnamon, 
and ginger-root, tied in cheesecloth. Let 
cook slowly until it nears the jelly stage, 
then remove spices, add four pounds of 
sugar, and continue cooking until the 
marmalade forms a firm jelly when tested. 
Seal in sterile jars. 



liquor, add butter and flour to thicken 
and the juice of one lemon, then pour Into 
the casserole, and allow to cook a few 
minutes longer. 

Don Carlos Onions 

Peel six medium-sized Spanish onions, 
cut a slice from the stem end of each, and 
parboil In boiling salted water. Plunge 
into cold water for a minute, and scoop 
out a hollow from the Inside of each. 
Prepare a stuffing of one cup and one- 
fourth of well-seasoned, mashed potatoes, 
mixed with the same quantity of sausage 
meat, the whole bound with one well- 
beaten egg. Fill the cavities in the 




BAKED POTATO CASES, CRAB MEAT FILLING 



Casserole of Moosemeat 

(Venison may be cooked in this way, 
too.) Cut lean pieces of the moosemeat 
into one-Inch squares, and cook In a 
saucepan until nearly done. Put Into 
the casserole with the liquor, cover, and 
set into the oven. While baking cook 
the fat, gristle and other trimmings WTth 
water to cover, and seasoning of sweet 
herbs, pepper, salt, nutmeg, and a 
shallot. When the good has been ex- 
tracted from these, or after cooking for 
from one to two hours, strain off the 



onions with this mixture, and stew until 
tender, in good brown stock. Serve each 
on a slice of broiled ham. 



Baked Potato Cases, 
Meat Filling 



Crab 



Melt three tablespoonfuls of butter in 
a saucepan; add one slice of onion and 
one Chili pepper and move to back part 
of range for twenty minutes. Remove 
onion and pepper. Place the saucepan 
on the front of range. When the butter 
bubbles, add three tablespoonfuls of 
flour and one teaspoonful of salt and cook 



SEASONABLE-AXD-TESTED RECIPES 



277 




CRANBERR 

and stir until the mixture takes on a 
yellow appearance. Add one cup and 
one-half of milk and cook and stir until 
the mixture begins to boil. Add the 
contents of one can of crab meat. Have 
ready four baked potatoes. Remove the 
pulp from the skins and pass through a 
ricer. Fill the skins one-third full of the 
riced potato and complete filling with 
the creamed crab meat. 

Cranberry Frappe 

Boil one quart of cranberries in a pint 
of water five or six minutes and strain 
through a coarse cheesecloth; add the 
juice of two lemons and two cups of 
sugar. Freeze to a mush. Serve either 
with or after roast turkey. 

Planked Steak, Parker House Style 

The steak should be cut about an inch 
and a quarter thick. \Mpe carefully 



V FRAPPE 

with a damp cloth. Have ready a hot 
broiler, well-oiled or rubbed over with 
a bit of fat. Cook the steak over the 
coals about eight minutes, turning four 
or five times. Set the steak on a hot 
plank. Pipe hot, mashed potato around 
the edge of the plank. Set four cooked 
onions on the steak. Brush over the 
edges of the potato and the onions with 
the yolk of an egg^ beaten and diluted 
with a little milk, and set the plank into 
a hot oven, to brown and reheat the po- 
tato, brown the edges of the onions, and 
finish cooking the steak. Remove from 
the oven. Set four parboiled, green pep- 
pers, stuflPed with chestnut puree, at one 
end of the steak, pour over a brown 
mushroom sauce. Serve at once. 

Chestnut Puree for Peppers 

Blanch the chestnuts; cook until ten- 
der in boiling water; drain and press 




PLANKED STEAK, PARKER HOUSE STYLE 



278 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



through a ricer; to a cup and a half of 
puree, add three tablespoonfuls of but- 
ter, two tablespoonfuls of chopped 
pimlento, a tablespoonful of grated onion, 
half a teaspoonful of salt and hot milk 
or cream as needed (the yolk and milk 
left after brushing over the potato, etc., 
may be used); beat thoroughly and use 
to fill the peppers. The stem, seeds and 
veins should be removed from the pep- 
pers before the peppers are parboiled. 
Set the open end of the peppers upon the 
steak. 



blended. Stir this mixture into one-half 
a cup of warm, sweet cider in a saucepan, 
and keep stirring until thick and smooth. 
Add the juice and pulp of three oranges. 
Pour into a baking dish; make a meringue 
of the w^hites of three eggs, beaten with 
six tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar; 
beat this into two cups of soft cooked 
rice, and dispose in a border around the 
orange mixture in the baking dish. Bake 
or steam until meringue is set, and dec- 
orate with angelica, candied fruit, or 
glaceed sections of oranges. 




PULLED BREAD 



Pulled Bread 

Grate off a thin layer of brown from 
the outside of a long loaf of French bread. 
Gash the loaf at ends and pull apart into 
halves, pulling from the outside toward 
the center. Gash the halves and separate 
into quarters. Break into desired lengths. 
Place on a rack in a pan and dry out the 
moisture in a slow oven; then brown to 
a delicate color. The bread snaps when 
broken. 

Pomona Pudding 

Mix four tablespoonfuls of flour with 
one-half a cup of sugar and one-fourth 
a teaspoonful of salt until thoroughly 



Glazed Peaches in Foam 

Drain the syrup from a quart can of 
peaches, and add water, if necessary, to 
make up one pint of liquid. Heat this 
with one-half a cup of sugar, and stir 
into it two tablespoonfuls of gelatine, 
softened in one-third a cup of water, and 
the juice of one lemon. Reserve one- 
half cup of this mixture, place over hot 
water, and beat the remainder, as soon 
as it begins to thicken, with a Dover 
beater, until it forms a thick white froth. 
Beat into this an equal volume of whipped 
cream, or the beaten whites of three eggs. 
Place in a pretty serving dish, and set 
the halves of the canned peaches, pit side 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



279 




GLAZED PEACHES IN FOAM 



down, over It. Glaze the peaches by 
pouring over each a spoonful of the 
reserved syrup, and serve with lady 

fingers. 

Lady Fingers 

Beat the yolks of three eggs, thick; 
add the grated rind of one-half a lemon, 
and one-half a cup of sugar; fold Into 
this mixture, alternately, the whites of 
three eggs, beaten very light, and five- 
eighths a cup of flour. Fill lady-finger 
pans half full, dredge wdth sugar. Bake 
about fifteen minutes. 



Canned Sweet Red Peppers 

Remove seeds from sweet red peppers, 
cut Into strips, pour boiling water over, 
and let stand two or three minutes. 
Strain, plunge Into cold water, strain 
again, and pack solid In sterile jars. Boll 
one pound of sugar In a quart of vinegar 
for fifteen minutes, and pour over the 
peppers In the jars, filling to overflowing. 
Seal, and keep In a cool place. 

Almond Croquettes 

Blanch and grind one pound of almonds, 




LADY FINGERS 



280 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




PUMPKIN PIE 

or one-half a pound, each, of almonds 
and pecans, and mix with two cups of 
mashed potatoes, seasoned with two 
teaspoonfuls of salt, one-half a teaspoon- 
ful of pepper, and two teaspoonfuls of 
onion juice. Bind the mixture with one 
well-beaten egg^ form into croquettes, 
and fry in deep fat. Serve with celery 
sauce, made by heating together one cup 
and one-half of cream with an equal 
amount of fine-chopped celery, and 
seasoning to taste. 

Pumpkin Pie 

Line a deep pie plate with flaky paste, 
making a fluted edge. Press cooked 
pumpkin pulp through a sieve. To each 
cup and a half of prepared pumpkin add 
one cup of milk and half a cup of rich 
sweet cream, scalded, one egg, well 
beaten, a half cup of sugar, and one 
fourth a teaspoonful, each, of salt and 
mace. Mix together thoroughly and 



pour into pie-plate lined with paste. 
Bake slowly. 

Chocolate Cake — Cream Icing 

Beat one-fourth a cup of butter to a 
cream and the yolks of two eggs until 
thick. Then gradually beat half a cup 
of sugar into each, and combine the two 
mixtures. Add four ounces of chocolate, 
melted over hot water. Then, alter- 
nately, half a cup of milk and one cup and 
a half of sifted flour, sifted again with two 
level teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 
Lastly, beat in the whites of two eggs, 
beaten dry, and a teaspoonful of vanilla 
extract. Bake in two layers about eight- 
een minutes. Put the layers together 
with the following icing. Spread the 
same icing over the top. 

Cream Icing for Chocolate Cake 

Set two cups of granulated sugar, one 
tablespoonful of butter, and two-thirds a 
cup of rich milk into a sauce pan of boil- 
ing water, and stir occasionally until 
melted. Then set over the fire, and stir 
constantly, while boiling from four to 
six minutes. The mixture should boil 
at once, or the time cannot be judged 
accurately. When thick as cream, re- 
move^from fire and beat until cool enough 
to spread. Flavor with a teaspoonful of 
vanilla extract. The icing should be 
perfectly smooth, and cover the two 
layers to a depth of one-fourth an inch. 




CHOCOLATE CAKE — CREAM FILLING 



Seasonable Menus for Week in November 





Breakfast 


Breakfast 






Cereal Cooked with Raisins, Cream 


Grapefruit 






Planked Hash Dry Toast 


Cream of Wheat Dry Toast 






Coffee Cake Coffee 


Shirred Eggs 
Popovers Coffee 






Dinner 




^ 

m 


;h 


Cream of Celery Soup 


Luncheon 


< 


Pulled Bread 


Scalloped Oysters New Pickles 


o 


Q 


Roast Loin of Lamb Mashed Turnips 


Squash Pie Tea 




Z 


Franconia Potatoes 




g 


Apple-and-Celery Salad 


Dinner 


O 




Cranberry Pie Cream Cheese 
Black Coffee 


Cream of Lima Bean Soup 
Lamb Souffle Baked Potatoes 


> 




Luncheon 


Candied Sweet Potatoes 






Eggs Poached on ToaSt 


Cabbage Salad 






Canned Pears 


Queen of Puddings 






Cookies Tea 


Coffee or Tea 





Breakfast 

Dates Quaker Oats, Thin Cream 

Lamb and Potato Hashed with Green Pepper 

Corn Meal Muffins 

Coffee 



Potato Nests 
Apple Sauce 



Luncheon 

Creamed Crab Meat 
Baking Powder Biscuit 



Tea 



Dii 



Broiled Hamburg Steak, Tomato Sauce 

Mashed Potatoes Baked Squash 

Baked Tapioca Pudding, Chocolate Sauce 

Coffee or Tea 



Breakfast 

Corn Meal Mush, Milk Bananas 

Bacon Potato Cakes 

Currant Buns (reheated) 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Creamed Celery au Gratin 

Oatmeal Bread Quince Marmalade 

Nut Cake, Caramel Frosting 

Tea 

Dinner 

Round Steak en Casserole 

(potatoes, carrots, turnips, onion) 

Lettuce, French Dressing 

Chocolate Junket Little Cakes 

Tea 



Breakfast 

Baked Apples 

Gluten Grits, Cream 

Home- Made Sausage Rice Griddle-Cakes 

Coffee 



Luncheon 

Succotash Rye Muffins 

Baked Custard Tea 

Dinner 

Broiled Scrod, Maitre d'Hotel Butter 
Riced Potatoes Philadelphia Relish 

Tomato Scallop 

Apple Dumpling 
Tea 



Breakfast 

Sliced Oranges 

French Omelet Hashed Potatoes 

Parker House Rolls 

Zwieback Coffee 



Luncheon 

Smoked Halibut, Creamed 

Baked Potatoes 

French Toast, Maple Syrup Tea 

Dinner 

Fish Timbales, Shrimp Sauce 

Potato Souffle, Cauliflower, Hollandaise Sauce 

Romaine, French Dressing 

Baked Indian Pudding, Cream 

Coffee or Tea 



Breakfast 

Sliced Hawaiian Pineapple 

Codfish Balls Bacon Rolls 

Toasted English Muffins 

Coffee 



Luncheon 

Fish Chowder 
Pickles Crackers 

Fruit Salad Tea 



281 



Dinner 

Pork Tenderloin, Roasted 

Boiled Potatoes 

Apple Sauce, cooked in Bean Pot 

Squash Scalloped Onion 

Cabinet Pudding, Hard Sauce 

Half Cups of Coffee 



Menus for Thanksgiving Dinners 



FORMAL 

I 

Raw Oysters 

Celery Radishes Olives 

Eggs Stuffed with Anchovies, Sauce Tartare 

Hot Galantine of Turkey, Giblet Gravy 

Cranberry Punch 

Onions Stuffed with Pecan Nuts Mashed Potatoes 

Squash Baked with Molasses and Butter 

Broiled Partridge Celery-and-Red Pepper Salad 

Pumpkin Pie Individual Charlotte Russe 

Nuts Raisins Grapes Pears 

Black Coffee 



II 

Oyster Broth Celery 

Boiled^Halibut, Oyster-Crab Sauce Boiled Potatoes 

Roast Turkey Stuffed with Chestnuts 

Sausage^Croquettes Cranberry[Frappe 

Buttered Onions Squash au Gratin 

Chicken Timbale, Fresh Mushroom Sauce 

Cress Salad 

Banbury Cakes 

Nuts . Raisins 

Coffee 



Caramel Bavarian Cream 
Fruit 



COUNTRY 
I 

Celery Olives 

Roast Turkey, Bread Stuffing, Giblet Gravy 
Squash Turnips 

Cranberry Jelly 
Squash Pie Pumpkin Pie 

Cranberry Tarts 
American Cheese 
Nuts Raisins 



Fruit 



Radishes 



Mashed Potatoes 

Buttered Onions 



Apple Pie 



Coffee 



Roast Pork Tenderloin 

Onions in Cream 



II 

Oyster Stew, Browned Crackers 
Celery 



Nuts 



Cranberry Sauce 

Pumpkin Pie Cottage Cheese 

Raspberry (Canned) Sherbet Macaroons 

Raisins 



Candied Sweet Potatoes 
Baked Squash 



Coffee 



Vanilla Ice Cream 
Nuts 



THANKSGIVING SUPPER 

Grapefruit Cocktail 

Oyster Patties Olives 

Chicken-and-Celery Heart Salad 

Salad Rolls 

Raspberry Sauce 
Coffee 
Raisins 



Preserved Peaches 
Bonbons 



282 




Meats and Their Sauces 

By Eunice Marcia Smith 



SAUCES, as accompaniments to 
meats, are as essential to a true 
flavor as salt or pepper, in the 
opinion of those artists of the kitchen, 
the noted chefs of metropolitan hotels. 
These masters of cuisine consider often 
a sauce originated by them the chef- 
d'oeuvre of their whole culinary career. 

It is a fact that the added zest and tang 
of the food served in the famous restau- 
rants of the country come from the sauces 
and accompaniments that are usually 
lacking in home cookery. At one time 
the secrets of these sauces were jealously 
guarded by the originators, but of late 
the secrets have been disclosed, and no 
roast or fowl need grace the home table 
without its proper sauce, to the added 
glory and name of the cook. 

The importance of these sauces is seen 
by the fact that grills have been made 
famous by the serving of a certain sauce. 
And who can think of lamb without mint 
sauce, or roast pork without apple sauce.? 
One could as soon visualize the dreary 
spectacle of ham without eggs. 

All sauces, of course, are not equally 
good with all meats. Each dish has its 
own especial accompaniment. 

Probably no turkey has ever tickled 
the palate of hungry diners without its 
mound of quivering, scarlet cranberry 
jelly. Currant jelly has sometimes been 
offered as a substitute, but somehow it 
cannot fill the part. 

Roast beef tastes best when served with 
tomato sauce, mushroom 'sauce, or mus- 



tard. Tomato or onion sauce transforms, 
the usually tasteless veal roast to a suc- 
culent viand. Currant jelly is a delicate 
accompaniment for the mutton roast. 
Boiled mutton is enhanced by caper 
sauce. Wild fowl is rendered especially 
palatable when sauce made of ripe olives 
is served with it. Spiced crabapple and 
spiced currants are very appetizing with 
cold meat or hot. 

Venison and wild duck really need a 
tart jelly to give the desirable tang. 
Wild rice is excellent with wild duck. 

Fish, too, is better when accompanied 
by a sauce. Oyster sauce is good with 
almost any fish. Bechamel and brown 
sauce are also excellent fish sauces. Egg 
sauce or mushroom sauce makes broiled 
shad a dish fit for a king, while boiled 
blue fish, with lemon sauce, is equally 
delicious. Stewed gooseberries are de- 
licious with fresh mackerel. 

Some of the most tasty sauces that are 
easily prepared by the clever cook are 
given here. 

Ripe*^ Olive'^ Sauce 

Melt four tablespoonfuls of butter in 
saucepan; add one sliced onion and cook 
until slightly brown. Remove onion and 
stir bTitter well until browned. Add 
five and one-half tablespoonfuls of flour, 
sifted with a teaspoonful of salt and one- 
fourth a teaspoonful of pepper, and stir 
to a smooth paste. Add two cups of 
brown stock gradually, and continue 
browning, beating constantly. Pare the 



283 



284 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



meat from a dozen ripe olives, removing 
pits; cover with boiling water and cook 
seven minutes. Drain and add sauce. 

Caper Sauce 

Chop capers slightly. Add capers to 
half a pint of drawn butter, with a large 
spoonful of the juice in which capers are 
sold. Let simmer and serve in tureen. 

Onion Sauce 

Work together a half-cup of butter with 
a large tables.poonful of flour. Add 
slowly two cups of boiling milk. Stir 
constantly until mixture boils. Add four 
boiled onions, chopped fine. Season to 
taste. 

Tomato Sauce 

Add a bit of onion and two cloves to a 
quart of tomatoes and boil in stewpan 
twenty 'minutes. Strain, and add to 
drawn butter. 

Bechamel Sauce 

Add three tablespoonfuls of sifted flour 
to three tablespoonfuls of melted butter. 
Beat together with a bit of nutmeg, a few 



peppercorns and a teaspoonful of sal 
Add three slices of onion, two slices c 
carrot, and some diced mushrooms. Ad 
to whole mixture a pint of stock and 
cup of cream. Cook slowly for an hou; 
strain. 

Spiced Currants 

Put into preserving kettle three quarl 
of currants, one quart of sugar, one-ha 
pint of vinegar, a tablespoonful of clove 
and the same of cinnamon. Skim carci 
fully when mixture boils. Cook fcl 
one-half an hour after it begins to boi 
Put up in glasses. 

Hollandaise Sauce 

Beat half a cup of butter to a cream 
add to it the yolks of two eggs, then th, 
juice of half a lemon, a dash of peppe 
and salt. Beat very thoroughly. Plac 
the bowl in a pan of boiling water anc 
beat with a Dover egg-beater until i 
thickens. Add half a cup of boilin; 
water, still beating. Stir until the con 
sistency of soft custard, continuing th* 
beating for several minutes after taking 
pan from fire. 






Q 



uantities Needed in Serving 

By Julia W. Wolfe 



IF one person eats a certain amount, 
how much will twenty-five persons 
eat.? Or, if one quart serves a certain 
number, how many quarts will be re- 
quired to serve half as many people, or 
five times as many people, as the case 
may be? Several factors enter in that 
make it impossible to fix these quantities 
with accuracy. 

In the first place, a great deal depends 
on the nature of the function. In serving 
a salad, for instance, it makes a difference 
whether it is for a luncheon, an afternoon 
tea, a Sunday school picnic or a dinner 
for men alone, even though the same 
number of people are served. Not only 
do differences occur, according to the 
nature of the function and the kind of 



people who attend it, but fully as mucB 
they depend upon other foods servec 
on the same occasion, and the manner 03 
serving. The amount of chicken salad 
required to serve fifty persons, when 
served simply with lettuce, will vary from 
the amount necessary to serve it in sand- 
wiches or in small cases. Then again it 
will be a different amount, if chicken 
salad is served alone than when a richer 
salad is served on the same occasion. 
Where it would require perhaps two 
quarts of chicken salad to serve a com- 
pany, it is likely to take a total of perhaps J 
two and one-half quarts when two kind? 
are served. 

A difficulty .frequently encountered is 
that many books and recipes fail to telli 



THE HOME BUDGET 



285 



how many people the proportions given 
will serve, or how much of the finished 
product they make. The latter can be 
easily obtained by adding the amounts of 
' the ingredients, making allowance for 
the dissemination of liquid or semi- 
liquid dressings and sauces with dry 
stuff and sometimes for loss in prolonged 
cooking. . 

We find, nevertheless, that some foods 
served ordinarily at social functions may 
be, to a certain extent, grouped. In one 
group the basic ratio is one quart of 
finished product for every six or eight 
people; the actual numbers may be 
larger. In this connection it is a further 
convenience to know about what raw 
weight of the foundation ingredients is 
necessary for a certain amount of the 
finished product. Here again there exists 
a variable in the recipe used and the 
estimate can only be approximated. We 
may enumerate: 

Chicken Salad: 4 pounds of fowl to 
make a quart of salad, 10 pounds of 
fowl for a salad for 25 people. 
Salmon Salad: 3 pounds of fresh salmon 

for 25 people. 
Sweetbread Salad: 1 pound of sweet- 
bread to 6 or 8 people. 
Bouillon: Hot, 1 quart will serve 8 
persons; jellied, 1 quart will serve 6 
persons. 
Ice Cream: 1 quart will serve 6 people. 
In serving ice cream, it may be noted 
that by ordering bricks already cut, 
^arrangements may be made with some 
firms, provided it is stipulated in advance, 
for returning any unused portion. To 
do this the portions must be standard 
size, six to a brick. 



Lemonade or fruit punch: 10 quarts to 

50 people. 
Frappe and sherbet: 2 to 3 gallons for 

50 people (varying with the manner 

of serving on account of melting). 
Chocolate: 25 to 30 cups to a gallon, 

one-half pound of chocolate. 
Whipped cream: 1 quart will yield 25 

spoonfuls. 
Loaf sugar: 1 pound for 25 people. 
Berries: 7 to 10 quarts for 50 people. 
Sugar for berries : 2 pounds for 50 people. 
Wafers, varying with the kind (when other 

cakes are served): 3 boxes to 50 people. 
Cakes, cut in quarters, then sliced: a large 

round cake may serve 8 to 15 people. 
Bonbons: 1 pound to 16 people. 
Olives are computed by number to suit 

an occasion. There are 200 usually 

in a quart bottle. 
Croquettes: IJ quarts meat make cro- 
quettes for 25 people. 
Oysters by number: 4 to a person. 

Used chopped, 2 quarts for 25 people. 
Chicken or turkey: 25 pounds, dressed, 

for 50 persons. Alost roasts weigh 2 

to 2J times more raw than net weight 

of meat after roasting. 
Sandwiches, made from sandwich loaf, 

loaves varying and thicknesses of 

sandwiches varying, roughly: 
Two whole sandwiches after cutting serve 

3 people. 
Twenty-four sandwiches may be counted 

to a loaf. 
One pound of butter to 3 loaves. 
One quart of other filling to 1 loaf. 

W^hile it would be impossible to give a 
complete list, a novice may find these 
estimates a basis for further com- 
putations. 



The Home Budget 

By Clarence E. Flynn 



" A FTER he had gained the pinnacle 
' £\ of his success some one asked 
Andrew Carnegie to formulate the secret 
of wealth. His reply was as significant 
as it was laconic. He said: "Pay as you 
go, and keep books." 



Each part of this formula is important. 
They are very closely related, but the 
second is the more fundamental. How- 
ever important it is to pay as one goes, 
his chances for doing so are rendered very 
uncertain if he fails to keep books. 



286 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



There are different ways, however, of 
keeping books. Some keep books only 
as a means of knowing where they stand 
with their finances and current bills. 
This is good as far as it goes, but it is 
possible to make the process of keeping 
books yield a much greater service. 

Others realize this, and keep books as 
a means of keeping in the right relation 
to their financial affairs. They make 
their bookkeeping system represent their 
plan of operation. It then serves to 
keep them from getting too near the edge 
of any financial precipice. If one is to 
get on, one of the first principles he 
must learn is the necessity of keeping 
within his income — • and a little more. 
Books can be kept in such a way as to 
enable one to do it. This is keeping 
books according to the budget plan. 

Some one is always certain to say that 
bookkeeping systems and budget plans 
are very well for people who have ade- 
quate incomes. It is said that the rich 
have something to keep books on, but 
that it is of little use for those who tread 
the ragged edges of want to undertake 
anything of the kind. 

This assumption is a grand mistake. 
Whatever benefits the budget system has 
are certainly common to all who care to 
adopt it. It is even more greatly needed 
by the home with an income below the 
normal level than by that with an income 
above the line of necessity. This is 
because its purpose is to enable one to 
make the most of the amount of money 
at command, whatever that sum may be. 
This service is not needed so much by 
those who have an abundance. It is 
calculated to help most those who 
must watch their corners and husband 
their resources. The budget system is 
a desirable plan in the home of wealth; 
it is a helpful thing in the home of mod- . 
erate circumstances; but it is a necessity 
in the home where takes place an oc- 
casional battle with want. 

The budget plan is a sort of blue print 
•of what one proposes to do with the funds 
at his command. The builder can do 



his work properly only with suitable plans 
before him. The difference between th 
structure erected with a plan and that! 
erected without one is great. The dif-^ 
ference between the results of an income 
administered according to system and 
those of one spent at random is one of 
just about the same degree. To attempt 
any work without a well-formulated plan 
of procedure means several regrettable 
things. It means a waste of materials; 
it means poor co-ordination of effort; 
it means a haphazard and unsatisfactory 
result. 

The budget plan is based on a system I 
of appropriations. Such is the plan used 
by all successful business interests. The 
business is first analyzed and divided into 
departments. Then the amount of 
money needed for the work of each de- 
partment is estimated. This amount, 
or as nearly this amount as the sum of 
money at command will permit, is then 
appropriated to the work of that depart- 
ment. It is left to keep its accounts up 
to the total placed at its disposal. It is, 
of course, held responsible for the use it 
makes of the funds given it. If at the 
end of the year it is found that the distri- 
bution was not equitable, the proportion 
can be changed. 

The same plan can be adapted to home 
use, and it will do just as much for the 
guidance and welfare of the family treas- 
ury as for that of some great business 
corporation. The work may be done 
after about the same fashion. The needs 
of the family should be analyzed, and 
divided into departments. The re- 
sources at command may then be esti- 
mated and apportioned to the various 
departments of expenditure in the same 
way. Expenses are then to be kept 
within the appropriation, and, if the 
division is found unfair to any interest, 
it can be changed. 

If this is properly done, the benefits 
derived will be very great. If income is 
always consulted before outgo is de- 
termined, the effect of the system on the 
family resources will be found to be little 



THE HOME BUDGET 



287 



less than magical. The funds in each 
department will so accumulate as to 
keep a surprising balance on hand all the 
time. 

The reason for this certain growth in 
reserve funds is plain. One will not 
purchase a thing in a given department 
of expense until enough money has ac- 
cumulated in that particular department 
to pay for it. Suppose, for instance, 
that one would like to buy a suit of 
clothes or an article of furniture. Ordi- 
narily, he would get them if he could 
command the money to do so from the 
total at his disposal. Therefore, he 
would stand a chance of paying for it 
with money which really should have 
gone to something else. Moreover, the 
habit of buying anything he wants and 
can pay for, keeps his funds down to the 
low water mark all the time. 

When finances are cared for on the 
budget plan, the case is* very different. 
Before one purchases a suit of clothes, an 
article of furniture, or anything else, he 
first looks at the page on which the 
finances of the department in question 
are recorded. If the money is on hand, 
he proceeds with the purchase. If the 
funds are insufiicient, he waits until they 
have increased to a point where the pur- 
chase is possible. 

This plan accomplishes two things. It 
keeps personal or family expenditures 
within the income from which they must 
be made. It also avoids the mistake of 
spending for one thing the funds which 
rightfully belong to something else. 
These, by the way, are two of the 
fundamental principles involved in the 
matter of getting from a dollar its full 
worth. 

If the family income is fixed and regu- 
lar, it can be divided arbitrarily among 
the difi"erent classes of things for which 
It is to be spent. So much may be ap- 
propriated to one class of things and so 



much to another. In this case the divi- 
sion is easy and simple. 

However, in many homes the income 
Is not regular as to either time or amount. 
In this case it can best be appropriated 
on a percentage basis. A certain per- 
centage Is set aside for each division of 
family expense. It is then credited to 
„ the account of the departments involved. 

In making this division, a number of 
things have to be taken into account. 
Among them are the size of the income, 
the needs and tastes of the family, and 
the financial condition of the family when 
the plan is adopted. One home I know 
works on the following basis: Religion 
10%, Indebtedness 10%, Savings 10%, 
Clothing 20%, Groceries and household 
supplies 30%, Home furnishings 10%, 
Miscellaneous Expenses 10%. Each 
home can choose its own plan. It can 
also change its plan at will. 

It is well to get a loose-leaf book of 
suitable size, and to have a page devoted 
to each division of expenses. The money 
is kept in one sum in the bank, but all 
receipts are credited and all expenditures 
charged under the proper headings. 
Then the bottom figure on each page 
represents the amount available for the 
particular department of expense repre- 
sented there. 

This plan simply provides for system 
In spending. It serves to balance ex- 
penditures. It also does the best that 
can be done to provide a reserve for every 
need. It helps the well-to-do to greater 
independence. It enables the poor to 
keep from growing poorer, and often 
enables them to reach comfortable cir- 
cumstances. It does not make of a dollar 
more than a hundred cents. That is 
Impossible. However, It does enable the 
owner of a dollar to get the full value of 
a hundred cents from it. It Is a good 
way in which to "pay as you go, and 
keep books." 








.y 



Home Ideas 

and , 

ilyconomies 




Contributions to this department will be^gladly received. Accepted items will be 
paid for at reasonable rates. 



Schemes for Leisure Hours 
in the Home 

"How well I know what I mean to do when the 
long, dark autumn evenings come." 

WHETHER written with a meta- 
phorical meaning or not, Brown- 
ing's lines serve very well as an expression 
of one of the pleasures of settling down 
for the winter. It is delightful to arrange 
a program of occupations, now that the 
long, dark hours are coming, hours which 
are sure to be full of boredom or enjoy- 
ment, according to the manner in which 
they are regarded and in which our time 
is filled. 

The first task to be undertaken is that 
of setting one's house in order. Even 
such prosaic happenings as buying new 
curtains, seeing that the furniture covers 
of summer are changed for those of 
winter and making the necessary altera- 
tions in the disposal of one's household 
gods, may be fraught with immense 
satisfaction, if set about in the spirit of 
enjoyment. 

Shall the new curtains be made of 
velvet, or the washable sheeting, so well 
liked by lovers of the simple life, or per- 
haps silk repp with a bordering of pat- 
terned galloon! The last will recall those 
of fifty years ago, and will be in keeping 
with rooms in which highly-polished 
mahogany furniture is found. 

There will be flowers everywhere, bulbs 
in pots to be watched with interest, as 
they grow to blossom and flower, the 
latest novels, magazines and reviews, and 
needlework to amuse one and bring 
pleasure and comfort to others. 



Among the first things I am going to 
do is to betake myself to the living room 
and solemnly consider the subject of 
turning the furniture about to secure a 
new aspect for the room, and one that 
will suit my winter needs. 

I shall rearrange the ornaments in all 
my rooms, putting behind glass and in 
cabinets delicate silver pieces that would 
be tarnished in an hour by smoke or 
dampness, bringing forth in their stead 
bibelots that have taken a secondary 
position during the summer. 

There will be social engagements to 
enliven the dull days, but I and my girls 
will have ample time on our hands to 
pursue other occupations than pleasure 
seeking of the stereotyped kind. En- 
couraging them by example, I shall set 
myself a definite course of study for the 
winter' months. 

A period that has always interested 
me deeply, that of the late eighteenth 
and early nineteenth centuries, will be 
the subject of my serious reading, in- 
cluding autobiography, biography, novels, 
essays, poetry and drama, and into it 
I shall weave other pursuits, such as 
curio-hunting, picture-gallery researches 
and so forth, all connected with the same 
epoch. It is wonderful what rejuvena- 
tion such a hobby brings in its train, 
giving life and fresh interest and adding 
to one's store of knowledge in numerous 
details, practical and artistic. 

There are many ways in which we 
might, with advantage, follow the ex- 
ample of our grandmothers, and one is 
by instituting once again their custom of 
reading aloud. On my program there 



288 



HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES 



289 



will be placed an hour each day for 
needlework and reading, in which my 
girls and I will join. 

Each of them will also apply herself 
to a definite pursuit during the winter 
months. They will join classes, one for 
language, perhaps, another for drawing; 
they will take lessons in music, literature, 
cookery and other- domestic arts. We 
shall subscribe to the best concert series, 
see the best plays, attend the best lectures 
and go to the best picture exhibitions. 

In order to help my daughters to be- 
come interested and practically useful, I 
shall relegate to them many duties in the 
house. They shall learn to order the 
meals, shall regulate the exchequer, shall 
regard themselves and be regarded as 
their parents' stewards. 

All this have I planned for the days 
that are to come. Surely our winter 
should be a pleasant as well as a profit- 
able one, and when the bright spring days 
come again, may they find us farther 
advanced in knowledge and in wisdom. 

E. X. s. 

* * * 

Do You? 

DO you make pillow slips of your worn 
sheets.^ Use the ends that are 
usually fairly good when the middle is 
badly worn. The same hems will 
answer and it is but a few minutes' work 
to close the cases on the sewing machine, 
and they will well repay the time spent. 

Do you make table napkins from your 
outworn table cloths.^ Cut them in any 
size that will avoid holes and thin places. 
Put them where they make handy 
"pick-up work" and you will be sur- 
prised at how soon you will have them 
hemmed. Use them for "everyday" 
and picnics. In these days of high- 
priced linen the saving will be consider- 
able and your family will not be critical of 
the irregular pattern of the figures on the 
damask. 

Do you make afternoon aprons for 
yourself or the children out of your 
husband's pretty striped and figured 



shirts when the worn-out cuffs and collar 
bands have put them into the discard 
for him.^ The back of the shirt makes an 
apron front and the fronts, side gores, for a 
shortapron, which may be shaped to taste. 

Usually the feet of your stockings wear 
out first, but sometimes, through dropped 
stitches, or other flaws, the reverse hap- 
pens. Do you save all the good feet and 
all the good legs and put them together 
to make new hose.^ Cut them off at the 
ankle and sew them together with a very 
loose and somewhat deep overhand stitch, 
so that the seam will pull out flat and not 
break when stretched over the foot. 
Worn with high shoes the seam will be 
hidden. Of course they cannot be used 
with low shoes. Children's hose, which 
wear out first at the knee, can have their 
life prolonged when the first small darns 
have been made by a similar process — • 
cutting off at ankles and turning the leg 
around. The small darns under the knee 
will scarcely be seen and you have almost 
double wear from them. 

Of course you make petticoats from 
night gown bottoms and keep yourself 
supplied with kitchen aprons for the 
rough work, such as cleaning and dish 
washings from the skirts of your old house 
dresses, but do you cut out the centers 
of worn-out towels and sew the ends 
together with a neat felled seam for 
generous bath-tub wash cloths.^ 

E. B. G. 
* * * 

Feast of the Seven Tables 

(This is entirely original — worked out 
and tried out) 

A MOST unique and altogether de- 
lightful "spread" can be served at 
little expense. This original affair may 
be offered solely for the benefit and 
entertainment of guests, or it can be held 
for both profit and entertainment by the 
Ladies' Aid, Church Socials, and the like. 
Call it the "Feast of the Seven Tables." 
If for the benefit of guests in the home, 
more than one room may be used — 
according to the number, of guests. 



290 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



But if it is to be a profitable, as well as 
entertaining affair, then secure an empty 
hall or other large room or rooms. This 
can easily be transformed, with scarcely 
any expense at all, into "a thing of 
beauty and a joy forever." If small 
details are carefully looked after, success 
will, invariably, be yours beyond your 
fondest expectations. 

Place seven tables at stated intervals 
throughout the large room, or rooms, as 
the case may be, and decorate each one 
in an individual color; the linen, candles 
(or light globes), shades, flowers and 
menu at each table harmonizing. 

When the guests begin to arrive, they 
are escorted to the white table, where 
they are served by two ladies arrayed in 
snowy linen. The menu consists of: 

White Bread Potato Salad 

(Not necessarily wheat) 

Breast of Chicken (white meat) 

A small bell jingles somewhere near, 
and the company moves on to the second 
table. Here, two ladies, attired in red 
frocks, serve: 



Baked Beans 



Ketchup 



Ripe Tomatoes 

Again the merry jingle, and again they 
move on. The third table is presided 
over by two ladies dressed in delicate 
green gowns, serving: 



Peas 



Pickles 



Lettuce 



The fourth table presents a faint, 
roseate hue, from the pink-gowned ladies 
who preside, to the delicacies: 

Pink Jello Pink Cake 

Pink Lemonade 
While yet mentally avowing that no 
decoration could excel, or even compare 
with, the splendor of the pink table, the 
feasters will draw an eager, quick breath, 
as a halo of light, rivaling the soft moon- 
light, greets their vision. Two fairy 



figures, attired in shimmering golden 
garments, advance and serve: 

Bananas Cream 

Golden Cake 

At the sixth table they are served by 
ladies dressed in smart brown suits, to: 
Devil Cake Coffee 

Chocolate 

The seventh, and last, table is presided 
over by a dear, silver-haired, silver- 
robed lady, holding a large silver cornu- 
copia in her arms, and, if it happens to be 
an affair for profit, the delighted guests 
are more than glad to drop a silver 
twenty-five cent piece into it. 

This makes a splendid church or other 
entertainment where funds are to be 
raised. If it's a home affair, not for 
profit, then the cornucopia, instead of 
being a depository for money collected, 
may hold neat silver or silver-colored 
souvenirs — one for each guest. 

A. E. H. 



I 



A Home-made Soap 

OUR forbears discovered that ashes 
mixed with water, give a smooth, 
slippery feeling and also that the mixture 
has cleaning power. ■ 

The reason is found in that the ash is 
rich in soda or potash, both of which are 
good for washing, but to use them alone 
is hurtful to fabrics; so we combine them 
with fats and make a soap, but it is the 
alkalies (soda and potash) that cut into 
the dirt and grease and make it easy for 
the water to rinse them away. 

An excellent hard white soap can be 
made in this way: Take two cans of 
lye and dissolve each can, separately, in 
a quart jar of soft water and set aside 
until cool. Melt eight pounds of fat, 
free from salt and water, in an iron or 
brass kettle, and set by till of blood heat. 
Then pour the dissolved lye slowly into 
the grease and stir the two thoroughly 
together, which should be in three or four 
minutes. Then stir in about a cup of 
flake ammonia, previously dissolved in a 



HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES 



291 



little water, and stir another three or 
four minutes. 

Take a shallow wooden box for a mold 
and line it with cotton cloth and pour 
in the liquid soap. 

Cover well with a carpet or rug, and 
let set for two or three days. Then turn 
out ^and cut into cakes as desired. It 
makes an excellent soap that can be used 
for the hands and all laundry purposes. 

The fat may be bacon fryings, lard, 
or butter that has gone bad, poor lard 
and all manner of kitchen fat. Not a 
particle of fat should be wasted,. 

Soak Your Fowl before Plucking 

When it falls to your lot to pick a 
chicken or turkey again, try dipping 
the bird into a bucket of boiling water for 
a couple of minutes and then roll the 
bird up in a clean bag or piece of carpet 
and leave it for live or ten minutes. 

It lessens labor greatly, just as soaking 
the clothes over night does; no unsightly 
appearance is given to the skin of the fowl. 

Hubbard Squash Marmalade 

Take a rips, warty Hubbard squash. 
Peel and cook, and put through the 
colander. To a quart of pulp, add two 
oranges and two lemons, juice, rind and 
pulp, removing all hard parts. Add 
sufficient sugar and let cook very slowly 
until a fine, thick confection results. 
This is a fine relish; there is also much 
food value in the squash. 

The season of celery is almost here, and 
it is one of the very best vegetables, in 
that it can be eaten raw. It is excellent 
for all, but especially the gouty and 
rheumatic. Its water content and the 
amount of cellulose it contains make it 
a real health vegetable. 

A Celery Sandwich That's 
Different 

Mix a cup of iine-shredded celery with 
a cup of fine-chopped sweet apple, and 
one-fourth a cup of fine-chopped nuts and 
a little pimiento cheese and moisten 



with sweet cream. Spread between slices 
of brown bread. f. m. c. 



The Alligator Pear 

The Avocado, or Alligator Pear, as it 
is called in Florida, may be found in 
select northern markets whose traveled 
patrons consider the fruit a delicate salad. 

The Avocado is a native of the tropics, 
and is grown in our own country, both in 
California and Florida, though it is raised 
only, on an extensive commercial scale, 
in sub-tropical southern Florida. The 
trees grow to a great size, the fruit is 
larger than the average pear, resembling 
the northern fruit in name and shape 
only. Its color is a bright grass-green, 
although some varieties have a reddish- 
brown cheek, and the seed is also very 
curious, being about 2 inches in diameter. 

An Avocado must be quite ripe when 
ready for use, and then gives to a slight 
pressure of the thumb, and should be used 
at once. It contains 2 per cent fat, and 
has a delicious, nutty taste, making a 
nutritious substitute for meat, and is 
easily digested, even by those unable to 
partake of animal fat. As with olives, 
one often has to learn to enjoy them, but 
once liked they prove a choice delicacy. 
Though there are many ways of pre- 
paring Avocadoes as a salad, using the 
hollow of a half to hold the salad mixtures, 
the more simple forms of serving are the 
preferred ways in the South. 

No. 1. After chilling the pears on ice, 
peel off' the skin, which separates readily 
from the fruit. Cut in halves, remove the 
large seed, serving one-half to a person. 
A simple dressing of oil, lemon juice, salt 
and pepper, or lime juice, sugar, salt and 
pepper, is all that is necessary. Crisp let- 
tuce leaves or cress make a dainty garnish. 
No. 2. A more elaborate Spanish 
salad is made by cutting the pears in rings, 
instead of halving, and scattering over 
them thin slices of ripe tomato, and crisp 
cucumbers. Dress with salt, pepper, oil 
and lemon juice. The Spanish call this 
pear the "Avocato." — m. k. s. 



'"r*HIS department is for the benefit and free use of our subscribers. Questions relating to recipes 
A and those pertaining to culinary science and domestic economics in general, will be cheerfully 
answered by the editor. Communications for this department must reach us before the first of the 
month preceding that in which the answers are expected to appear. In letters requesting answers 
by mail, please enclose address and stamped envelope. For menus, remit ^1.00. Address queries 
to Janet M. Hill, Editor. American Cookery, 221 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass. 



Query No. 4161. — "I should be very much 
pleased if you would print in your magazine an 
authoritative list of the correct Accompanirnents 
to Meats of dift"erent kinds — that is, the vegeta- 
bles, sauces, etc., which are correct to serve with 
different meats and fish." 

Accompaniments to Meats, Etc. 

The following accompaniments are 
correct, but there is no very hard and 
fast rule, and changes are often made 
dependent on current fashion, season, 
location, etc. However, you cannot go 
wrong, if you follow the following list. 
Roast beef. Tomato sauce, grated horse- 
radish, cranberry sauce; and vegeta- 
bles in season. 
Roast veal. Tomato, cranberry, mush- 
room or onion sauce. Spinach goes 
particularly with veal, or any other 
fresh vegetable. 
Roast pork. Apple sauce, mustard, cran- 
berry sauce. The root vegetables go 
well with pork, also greens like brussels 
sprouts. 
Roast mutton. Currant jelly, caper 
sauce. White turnips, parsnips, cauli- 
flower, etc. 
Roast lamb. Mint sauce, sorrel sauce; 
green peas, lettuce or any delicate 
vegetables. 
Boiled mutton. Caper sauce, onion sauce 
or soubise sauce; and vegetables the 
same as for roast mutton. 
Boiled beef or other meat. Mashed tur- 
nips, the root vegetables, and greens of 
any kind. 
Roast turkey. Cranberry sauce; cur- 



rant, grape or apple jelly; almost any 

vegetables except boiled cabbage. 
Boiled turkey. Oyster sauce, sweet po- 
tatoes, boiled onions, or any delicate 

vegetables. 
Roast goose. Same as roast pork. 
Boiled fowl. Bread sauce, cream sauce, 

drawn butter. Vegetables same as 

boiled turkey". 
Mackerel, fresh, boiled or broiled. Stewed 

gooseberries. Vegetables same as for 

roast pork. 
Salmon, fresh. Green peas, cream sauce; 

macaroni, cucumbers, and almost any 

vegetables. 
Broiled shad. Mushroom sauce, parsley 

or egg-sauce. Any desired vegetables. 

As a rule, the very pungent sauces, like 
horseradish, and the very pungent condi- 
ments, like mustard, should accompany 
only the heartier meats, such as beef, pork, 
corned meats, etc. Also the acid sauces, 
like tartare, vinaigrette, and all with 
vinegar as a basis, should be served only 
with the fatty meats, such as pork and 
roast goose, or the rich and fatty fish. 
Neither should pickles, unless a very 
delicate sweet pickle, accompany young 
spring chicken, early spring lamb, squab, 
partridge, or the white, delicate meats. A 
starchy vegetable goes with everything, the 
more delicate kinds, like rice, with chicken, 
lamb, and the more delicate meats. 

As for the other vegetables, there is no 
rigid rule, and those that are the most 
common accompaniments are given in 
the list. (See also page 283). 



292 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



can yjou improve 
yjour pie crust ? 

yes, if you are not using 
Crisco. Crisco makes 
better pie crust — 




Ask your grocer for Crisco in this 
sanitary, dust-proof container. 
Never sold in bulk. Pound and 
larger sizes, full net weights. 
Crisco is also made and sold in 
Canada. 




Would you serve lima beans, 
spaghetti and custard at the 
same meal? 

"Balanced Daily Diet", an up-to- 
date cookbook written by Janet 
McKenzie Hill, founder of the 
Boston Cooking School, and edi- 
tor of "American Cookery", gives 
you an easily followed table for 
planning wholesome, enjoyable 
meals, with everyday foods. 
Ready-planned menus for those 
who do not wish to plan their own 
meals. More than 150 tempting 
new recipes. Illustrated in color. 
Send only 10 cents postage and 
receive a copy by prepaid mail. 
Address Department A-11, The 
Procter & Gamble Co., Cincin- 
nati, O. 



-because Crisco is the richest short- 
ening that can be made — ^just pure, solid- 
ified vegetable oil of the highest grade. 
It contains no moisture, no salt, no pre- 
servatives, no adulterants. This richness 
makes the pie crust tender. 

because Crisco is tasteless and odor- 
less, Crisco pastry never tastes nor 
smells of the shortening. Crisco pies 
have crispy, crunchy, delicate crusts 
that bring out the full flavors of fruit or 
custard fillings. 

-because Crisco itself is easy to digest. 

Practically everybody can enjoy rich pies 
and pastries, when they are made with 
Crisco. 

Use Crisco for all your cooking. It 
makes butterlike cakes, feathery 
biscuits, greaseless fried foods. And 
it stays fresh and white and sweet 
until the last spoonful in the can is 
used, whether or not you keep it 
on ice! 




Buy advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 
293 



294 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Query' No. 4162. — "When I make a mold of 
Ribbon Jelly, using three or more colors and 
flavorings, such as white at the bottom, then 
red, then yellow, the diff'erent layers are apt to 
slide oflp one another on the way to the table, or 
while I try to serve it, and the pretty effect is 
spoiled. What is the remedy.'"' 

To Keep Ribbon Jelly 
from Coming Apart 

The remedy Is very simple. Let each 
layer, as you pour it on, be quite hot, so 
that it will dissolve, to a slight extent, 
the surface of the layer it is poured over, 
and will thus adhere to it. If the gela- 
tine is cold when you pour it over the 
already hardened layer, the smooth and 
glassy surface of the hard layer will afford 
it no place to grip, so to speak, and the 
layers will not adhere. 



ist. 



Query No. 4163. — "Last winter we tried for 
the first time to Store Potatoes, Apples, and Root 
Vegetables in our cellar, but without success. 
Most of the stuff spoiled. Won't you please tell 
us how to do better this year.? Also tell us the 
best varieties of apples to'store for winter." 

Storing Winter Vegetables 

Unless your cellar is cool and the air 
is moist it will not pay to attempt the 
storage of vegetables, and much loss has 
resulted from following advice to buy and 
store while cheap, when the storage con- 
ditions were not right. The right con- 
ditions are: 1. The temperature should 
be just above freezing; 33° F. is excellent 
for all root vegetables, but apples keep 
well at 35° F. or 36°. The temperature 
should also be constant, and not vary a 
great deal from one day to another. 
Apples are especially sensitive to fluc- 
tuations in temperature. 2. There must 
be good ventilation, and the air must 
circulate through the vegetables or fruit. 
This may be brought about by storing 
the fruit or vegetables in slatted crates, 
not too large, or if large the crates should 
have square ventilators, also made of 
slats, inserted in the middle. The crates 
should be propped up, at least, a half-foot 
from the floor, and they should stand a 
half-foot from the wall and from each 
other. This ought to ensure good ven- 



tilation. 3. The air should be mois 
especially for potatoes and apples. Pails 
of water set on the floor will cause mois- 
ture enough, by evaporation. 

One more condition is demanded for 
potatoes; they must be kept in a dark 
place. But if all these requisites can be 
provided, potatoes will keep as good as 
new from the autumn of one year to the 
August of the next. I have seen a 
winter's supply of potatoes stored in the 
closet of an unoccupied room in a city 
flat, and apples for the family stored in 
the same way. 

Varieties of Apples to Store 
for Winter 

This depends very much on individual 
taste, also, on the locality, for apples 
vary according to the region where they 
are grown, so that there is no variety of 
apple that will not develop a different 
flavor and character in different soil and 
climate. Thus the name of the apple is 
not always a sure thing to go by. Per- 
sons who know nearly all there is to be 
known about apples, tell us that for 
themselves they store only three kinds 
every winter: The Gravenstein, which 
will keep until January in a cool cellar 
without loss of flavor; the Northern Spy, 
which is not at its best until January and 
will keep until March; and the Green 
Newtown Pippin, or Winter Pippin, which 
is slightly russeted, is not at its best until 
March and will keep until June. All of 
these are standard varieties, and have 
proved their excellence during many 
generations. 

Query No. 4164. — "Last summer I tried 
several times to make Mousse, Parfait, and other 
frozen dishes of the kind that are packed in ice 
and salt in covered molds and frozen without 
stirring. But in every case the salt got into the 
mold, and spoiled part, if not most of its con- 
tents. I followed the cook-book directions most 
carefully. What was the trouble.'"' 

To Keep Salt Out of Parfaits, Etc. 

Very few of the cook-books tell how 
to avoid this trouble. In hotels and 
large establishments the molds contain- 



I 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




Fried Fish Cakes for Breakfast! 



Delicious, wholesome Fried Fish Cakes 
for your breakfast ! Made in your own 
kitchen from choicest Cod and Haddock. 



New England's famous fish dishes are 
as near to you as your grocer. Note 
the two tempting suggestions below. 



BURNHAM & MORRILL 
FISH FLAKES 

Appetizing Dishes for Any Meal Quickly 
and Easily Prepared 



Fried Fish Cakes 

Cook in boiling salted water until tender, 
two cups raw potatoes cut i n quarters. Drain, 
mash and add one tin B & M Fish Flakes, two 
tablespoons butter, or cream sauce, a pinch of 
pepper and a little hot^milk. Beat thorough- 
ly, shape in cakes, dip in flour and fry in fat 
tried out from three or four slices of bacon. 



Baked Fish Flakes 

To one cupful cream sauce add one tin 
B & M Fish Flakes and pour into a shallow 
baking dish. Cut three hard boiled eggs in 
half lengthwise and arrange on top otthe fish, 
pressing down slightly. Cover witn bread- 
crumbs and grated cheese. Bake i n a hot o ven 
for 20 minutes until top is a golden brown. 




And many other tempting fish dishes 

Many other delicious recipes sent free upon 

request, in "Good Eatingr," a recipe 

book for Burnham & Morrill 

Fish Flakes 



Direct from the Sea to 

You and immediately 

obtainable at your 

grocer's 




BURNHAM & MORRILL COMPANY, 75 Water Street, Portland, Me. 

Packing and specializing in State of Maine Food Products only — the best of their 

kind — including B & M Paris Sugar Corn, B & M Pork and Beans, 

B&M Clam Chowder, B& M Clams, B&M Lobster 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
295 



296 






AMERICAN COOKERY 



ing the mixture for a sweet dish to be 
frozen without stirring, are simply placed 
in what is called the ice cave, and allowed 
to remain there until frozen. This is a 
receptacle surrounded by freezing mixture 
so that its temperature is very low, but 
the dish to be frozen does not come into 
contact with anything except the cold 
air that surrounds it. In this way It is 
easy to make all these fancy dishes such 
as mousses, etc. In the ordinary home, 
where the mold containing the mixture 
has to be Immersed In Ice and salt, a fat 
of some kind must be used to seal the 
joints where the lid goes on, and this is 
done as follows: After putting on the 
lid of the mold, a layer of grease Is ap- 
plied — It will be safe to make It nearly 
one inch wide and a quarter of an Inch 
thick — • over the place where the lid 
joins the mold. To make security doubly 
sure, a strip of muslin may be firmly 
bound over the grease, to keep it from 
slipping off. You will then be safe In 
Immersing the mold In the Ice-and-salt 
mixture without the slightest danger that 
the salt will penetrate and spoil the 
contents. 



Query No. 4165. — "I want a recipe for 
making the flavored vinegars like Tarragon and 
Chervil." 

Tarragon and Chervil Vinegars 

A quarter of a pound of tarragon is 
allowed •to a gallon of vinegar. The 
leaves are cut or chopped, put into the 
vinegar, and allowed to stand from ten 
days to two weeks. The vinegar is then 
strained off and bottled. 

Green mint, sage, burnet, sweet basil, 
sweet marjoram, or thyme, may be used 
in the same way. The flavored vinegar 
Is novel and delicious for sauces, salad 
dressings, or for almost any purpose 
where vinegar is used, and can be made 
at home much cheaper than if bought. 

Chervil vinegar calls for a different 
method. A bottle or fruit jar is filled 
half-full with the chervil leaves, Is then 
filled up with vinegar, and set on a rack 



In a deep kettle of cold water. The water 
Is brought to a boil, allowed to boil for a 
few minutes, the whole thing is let stand 
until cold, then the jar or bottle must 
stand in the pantry for two weeks before 
the vinegar is strained off. 

Query No. 4166. — "I should like to know- 
how to make Forcemeat Balls, the kind that are 
dropped into a soup tureen and served with the 
soup. I also want to know how to make a real 
good Soup from Black Beans; and I wish a recipe 
for cooking the Roe of Shad or any other fish." 

Forcemeat Balls 

Put some cooked veal or chicken 
through the chopper, and chop very fine. 
There should be about a cup, measured 
after chopping. Add one cup of fine 
breadcrumbs, the yolks of four hard- 
boiled eggs, blended smooth with one or | 
two tablespoonfuls of milk, and season 
all with salt and pepper. Sprinkle over 
the mixture a tablespoonful of flour, and 
bind with a beaten egg. Flour the hands 
well, form the forcemeat Into balls not 
larger than a small nutmeg, and drop 
these Into the soup about twenty minutes 
before serving. 

Black Bean Soup 

Soak a pint of black beans overnight, 
and next day boil in two quarts of water 
until soft. Dip up the beans from the 
pot, and add to the water in which they 
were boiled one tablespoonful of salt, one 
teaspoonful of pepper, and one teaspoon- 
ful of the following herbs, dried and tied 
up In cheesecloth: Summer savory, 
thyme, marjoram. Next sift the cooked 
beans through a colander, and return to 
the soup pot together with six tablespoon- 
fuls of flour and four of butter, rubbed 
together. Stir until the soup boils, and 
just before serving add two hard-boiled 
eggs, sliced, and one-half of a lemon, 
sliced and quartered. This soup Is par- 
ticularly good, and is said to resemble 
mock turtle. 

To Cook Fish Roe 

Drop the roes into boiling water and 
let simmer for twentv minutes. Drain, 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
297 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



place on an agate pie plate and dredge 
well with salt and pepper, then spread 
with soft butter and over this dredge with 
flour or very fine sifted crumbs. Bake 
one-half hour, basting every ten minutes 
with a mixture of water, butter, salt and 
pepper, and flour. Garnish with sliced 
cucumbers and parsley before serving. 



Query No. 4167. — "Will you be so good as 
to publish, as soon as possible, a recipe for the 
real Rhode Island Fish Chowder.?" 

Rhode Island Fish Chowder 

In the bottom of an iron kettle fry five 
or six slices of fat salt pork, cut into small 
pieces, until it is crisp and brown. Cut 
up four pounds of either fresh codfish or 
sea bass into two-inch cubes, put into 
the kettle and cover with thin-sliced 
streaky bacon. Over this place a layer 
of onions, also very thin-sliced, and hand- 
ful of chopped parsley, and a pinch of 
summer savory. Next put on a layer 
of Boston crackers, split and soaked in 
warm water until soft but not broken. 




Baby Midget 

^^^^ 

HOSE SUPPORTER 

holds the socks securely and allows the little one 
absolute freedom of action, so necessary to its 
health, growth and comfort. The highly nickeled 
parts of the "Baby Midget" have smooth, 
rounded comers and edges and they do not come 
in contact with the baby's skin. 
Like the Velvet Grip Hose Supporters for 
women, misses and children it is equipped 
with the famous All-Rubber Oblong Button, 
which prevents slipping and ruthless ripping. 

Silk, 15 cents; Lisle, 10 cents 

SOLD EVERVWHHRB OR SENT POSTPAII. 
GHORGK FROST CO., MAKERS, BOSTON 



Proceed by repeating these layers until 
all the fish is used; the crackers for the 
top layer should be thickly buttered 
Add cold water to cover, and cook gently 
for one hour. If the water boils away sc 
that the top crackers get dry, add boiling 
water. Remove the solid parts of th( 
chowder carefully with a skimmer intcii 
the serving dish, and thicken the liquic 
in the pot with two tablespoonfuls of fioui 
and two of butter, rubbed together. Lei|| 
boil up once and pour over chowder il 
Serve with sliced lemons, pickles anci? 
stewed tomatoes. 



Query No. 4168. — "Can you tell me how tc 
use up Stale White Bread in making Steamec 
Brown Bread?" 



nee. J 

il 



Steamed Brown Bread from Stsue 
White Bread 

Break up into small pieces, in a larg( 
bowl, some very hard and stale whit(j 
bread — ■ there should be two and one-f 
half quarts of the pieces — and pour ovei* 
them one quart of boiling water. Covei 
closely, and let 5tand half an hour, oi 
until quite soft. Then mash smooth, anc 
add two cups of yellow cornmeal, mixec 
with one-half a cup of white flour, cm 
teaspoonful of salt, and two teaspoonfuli; 
of baking soda, rubbed smooth. Moisteij 
the mixture with from one-half to three| 
fourths a cup of molasses, and enougl 
boiling water to make a thick batter. 
Pour into greased tins, and let steam fron 
four to six hours. This makes deliciou! 
brown bread. 






A Perfect Right 

It was just after a thunderstorm, an( 
two men were strolling down the stree, . 
behind a young damsel who was liftinj| 
her skirt rather high. After an alter; 
cation as to the merits of the case, on' 
of the men stepped forward and said 
"Pardon me, miss, but aren't you hold, 
ing your skirt rather high.?" "Haven' I 
I a perfect right.?" she snapped. "Yoi, 
certainly have, miss, and a beauty of i 
left," he replied at once. 

Reedy's Mirror. ^ 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
298 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



I 




A Food ELxpert 

Met a great surprise 

This is the story of Puffed Wheat 

Prof. A. P. Anderson, formerly of Columbia University, planned to make whole wheat wholly 
digestible. 

So he sealed the whole grains in a small model gun, applied a fearful heat for an hour. Then 
he shot the gun, exploded the kernels, and out came a surprise. 

Each grain was puffed to eight times normal size. Each was a bubble, flimsy and flaky, 
with a taste like toasted nuts. He found his scientific grains the finest wheat food in existence. 

Now the daily joy of millions 

He made Puffed Rice from whole rice and Puffed Corn from broken corn. Now millions 
enjoy these three Puffed Grains, served in a dozen ways. 

These are the supreme foods. Cereals were never made so delightful, never so fitted to digest. 

\ou who serve but one, or at breakfast only,, lose many a delight. Each has its own fas- 
cinations, and each is an all-day food. 

The night dish is Puffed Wheat in milk. Toasted whole wheat puffed to bubbles, made easy 
to digest. 

The food confection is Corn Puffs. Serve with cream and sugar, mixed with fruit or doused 
with melted butter. 



New Pancakes for Tomorrow 

Your grocer now has Puffed Rice Pancake Flour. It is 
ground Puffed Rice, mixed in an ideal blend. The Puffed 

Rice flour makes the pan- 
cakes fluffy and gives them 
a nutty flavor. Serve them 
tomorrow. They are the 
finest pancakes you have 
ever tasted. Simply add 
milk or water. 




Puffed Wheat 
Puffe£Rice 
Puffed Corn 

Puffed to 8 times normal size 

Also Puffed Rice Pancake 
Flour 



Jhe Quaker Qats Ompany 



Sole Makers 



3459 



Buy advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 
299 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



GOSSOM'S CREAM SOUPS 




In Powdered Form 

Split pea. Green pea, Lima, Celery, Black bean, Clam 
Chowder, Onion and (Mushroom 25c.) 

Quickly and Easily Prepared 
Just add water and boil 15 minutes. One package makes 3 

Kints of pure, wholesome and delicious soup. Price 15c at 
'■ding grocers, or sample sent prepaid on receipt of 20c in 
stamps o' coin. 

Alao "GOSSOM'S "QUICK-MADE" FUDGE 
will give you • delightful surprise. So easy. A 50c pkg. 
makes over a pound of the most exquisite fudge. 
Manufactured by 

B. F. Gossom, 692 Washington St., Brookline, 46, Mass. 



Eat More Bread 



Bread is the most important food 
we eat. It furnishes abundant 
nourishment in readily digestible 
form. The fact that it never be- 
comes tiresome though eaten day 
after day, is proof of its natural 
food qualities. 

Eat plenty of bread made with 

FLEISCHMANN'S YEAST 



=Domestic Science=\ 

Home-study Courses 

Food, health, housekeeping, clothing, children 

For Homemakers and Mothers; professional 
courses for Teachers, Dietitians, Institution 
Managers, Demonstrators, Nurses, ^^ Graduate 
Housekeepers," Caterers, etc. 

"The Profession of Home-making." 100 
page handbook, /ree. Bulletins: "Free-hand 
Cooking," "Food Values," "Seven-Cent 
Meals," "Family Finance." — 10 cents each. 

American School of Home Economics 

^(Charted in 1915) 503 W. 69th St., Chicago, 111. 



SERVICE TABLE WAGON ' — 

Large Broad Wide Table 
Top — Removable Glass 
Service Tray — Double 
Drawer — Double 
Handles— Large Deep 
Undershelves— "Scien- 
tifically Silent" Rubber 
Tired Swivel Wheels. 

A high grad* piece of hirni- 
ture surpassing anything yet at- 
tempted (or General Utility, 

noiselessness. WRITE NOW 
FOR A DESCRIPTIVE PAMPHLET 
AND DEALER S NAME. 

COMBINATION PRODUCTS CO. 

504J lunard Bids. Chicago, III. 




The Silver Lining 

Numbers and Exodus 

A bashful curate found the young 
ladies in the parish too helpful. At last 
It became so embarrassing that he left. 

Not long afterward he met the curate 
who had succeeded him. 

"Well," he asked, "how do you get on 
with the ladies.^" 

"Oh, very well indeed," said the other. 
"There is safety in numbers, you know." 

"Ah!" was the instant reply. "I only 
found it in Exodus." — -Dallas News. 



An inquisitive woman was once talking 
with James Whitcomb Riley about the 
poor material reward that comes to poets. 
"But, Mr. Riley," she said, "you have no 
cause for complaint. You must be a very 
rich man. I understand that you get a 
dollar a word for all you write." "Yes, 
madam," said Rile}^, with his slow drawl, 
"but sometimes I sit all day and can't 
think of a single word." 



The "Coos" and the Pump 

A Scottish farmer one day callfed to a 
farm-hand: 

"Here, Tam, gang roon and gie the 
coos a cabbage each, but min' ye gie 
the biggest ta the coo that gies the maist 
milk." 

The boy departed to do his bidding, and 
on his return the farmer asked if he had 
done as he was told. 

"Aye, maister," replied the lad. "I 
gied 'em a cabbage each, and hung the 
biggest een on the pump handle." 



Why Mention It? 

Mary Ellen, "oop fro' the country,'^ 
got into an omnibus. Presently the con- 
ductor said affably: "Your fare, miss." 
The girl blushed. The conductor re- 
peated, "Your fare, miss," and the girl 
blushed more deeply. By this time the 
conductor began to look foolish. After a 
pause, he again repeated: "Miss, your 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
300 



ADVFRTISEMENTS 




AMBROSIA — food for the gods as 
proclaimed by the ancient Greeks. 
Ambrosia made with Dromedary Cocoa- 
nut rivals that historic dish. 

Rich in its natural flavor, Dromedary 
: adds a fresh cocoanut flavor that never 
' fails to please family or guests. 

Dromedary Cocoanut is ready for use; 
you need take no time or bother to grate 
a fresh cocoanut. In the "Ever-Sealed" 
box Dromedary keeps its fresh goodness 
till the last shred is used. 

The many ways to use Dromedary 
Cocoanut give pleasing variety to your 
menus. By adding its wholesome good- 
ness to every-day dishes you increase the 
good flavor, as well as the food value. 

New recipes for cakes, pies, cookies, 
ices, muflins and many unusual dishes are 
given in our latest "1920 RECIPE 
BOOK." Sent FREE on request. 

The HILLS BROTHERS Co. 

Dept. G, 375 Washington Street, New York 

Also Importers and Packers oj 



y\(alure's 
LyorifeclU), 




rom ijfie 
nrdenofEdeti 




4- 



E R E VER 



the sun s h i n e s on 
Southern shores, the 
cocoanut is part of 
the daily food in the 
tropics. With the 
happy, luxurious na- 
ves of the South 
Sea Islands, cocoa- 
nuts are iood, drink, 
clothing and fuel. 
Every dish is flavored 
with cocoanut This 
delightful tasle of the 
tropics conies to you 
in each package of 
Dromedary Cocoa- 
nut. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
301 



AxMERICAN COOKERY 




Ever Make 
Banana Whip? 

1 envelope COX'S GELATINE, V2 cup 
(1 gill) cold water, 2 cups (1 pint) hot 
milk, 3 ripe bananas sieved, 1 lemon, 1 
cup ( \2 lb. ) sugar, ^2 teaspoonf ul red or 
yellow color. 

Mix Gelatine and water together, add 
milk, and when dissolved add bananas, 
strained lemon juice, sugar, and color. 
Beat until the mixture begins to stiffen, 
pour it into a serving dish, set in a cool 
place for a few hours and serve with 
milk or cream. 

This is just one of the delicious 
rich desserts that can be made 
with Cox's Gelatine. Pure, un- 
sweetened, and unflavored, Cox's 
Gelatine is the secret of many 
creamy puddings, appetizing sa- 
vories, and dainty salads. 

Keep a box or tw^o always on 
the pantry shelf. You will find it 
convenient in making delicious 
desserts and different salads. 

Our new book is brimful of 
recipes for making dainty and 
tempting desserts, salads, soups, 
etc. We shall be very glad to send 
you a free copy. 

Write for Cox's Gelatine Recipes. 




^^^Jnstant^Powdered 

GELMME 

THE COX GELATINE CO. 

Dept. D, 100 Hudson Street, N. Y. 



Briggs: "Well, I see this year they are 
going to make a big fuss about the land- 
ing of the Pilgrim Fathers." 

Griggs: "But it's too late to do any- 
thing about it now. It can't be helped." 



Jones: "Well, did you find the 
plumber.?" 

Servant (in a puddle of water caused by 
a burst pipe): "Yes, sir. But he won't 
come. He says he's dressed for dinner." 



"Did that cultured book agent sell you 
a set of Hugo's works.?" "No, I talked 
him out of it." " How did you do that ? " 
"I noticed that every time I mispro- 
nounced 'Les Miserables' he writhed in 
his chair, so I kept it up until he fled." 
Birmingham Age-Herald. 



Mistress: ^"Bridget, it always seems to 
me that the crankiest mistresses get the 
best cooks." 

Cook: "Ah, go on wid yer blarney!" 
Illustrated Bits. 



fare." "Well," said the girl, "they do 
say I'm good-looking at home, but I 
don't see why you want to say it out 
loud." 

Miserable Singers 

A little girl was asked, upon her return 
home, how she liked the singing of the 
congregation in the church. 

. " I liked it very much indeed," she said, 
"although all the people said it was bad." 

"All the people said it was bad .? What 
do you mean, my dear.?" 

"Oh, it was so bad that I heard the 
people praying, *Lord, have mercy upon 
the miserable singers.' " — Tit-Bits. 

"How shall we curb the criminal 
rapacity of the profiteer.?'" sternly de- 
manded the orator. "How shall we 
rescue the nation from his octopus-like 
clutch .? How " — "I haven't the slight- 
est idea," calmly replied old Gaunt N. 
Grimm. "I have not attended a single 
high-school commencement this year." 
Kansas City Star. 



Buy advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 
302 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




Keep Living Expenses Down 

Learn to save on food and fuel by using 
inexpensive cuts of meat; by canning 
fruit, vegetables and meat when cheap for 
use.when expensive; by cooking the whole 
meal over one burner of your range; by 
using left-overs in new and delicious ways. 

CONSERVO 

LOWERS LIVING COSTS 

Cooks the entire meal over a single burner; 
cans by steam pressure 14 quart jars at 
one time, by cold pack method, which 
insures perfect keeping. Write for free 
book telling eight ways to cut living costs. 
Address Dept. 75 

TOLEDO COOKER CO. - Toledo, Ohio 




Buy advertised Good; 



— Do not accept substitutes 
303 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Vegeione 

rmA»i MAOK flic u.s.fAT. orr. 

Nothing stalls a dinner quite so well as a rich, 
full-flavored, home-made soup. The appetizing 
zest imparted by N'EGETONE has won the appro- 
bation of housewives seeking economical foods, yet 
maintaining food value. It must be tried to be 
appreciated and we will refund the purchase price 
if not satisfactory. 

CREAMED SOUPS 

From Left-Over Vegetables 
To a pint of vegetable pulp add one quart of boiling water 
in which one teaspoon of Vegetone has been dissolved. 1 hicken 
with one tablespoon of butter and two teaspoons of tlour, 
rubbed together until smooth. Season with butter and salt. 
Remove from the stove and add one cup of milk. Ihen strain 
again, so that it will be perfectly smooth. , •, . 

One 4-ounce tin 50 cents, or three for $1, postpaid, when 
ordered direct. 

BISHOP-GIFFORD CO., Inc. Baldwin, L. I., N. Y 



"Free-Hand Cooking" 

Cook teithout rtcipes! A key to cookbooks— correct proportions, 
time, temperature: thickening, leavening, shortening, 105 fun- 
damenul recipes 40 p book 10 cents coin or stamps. 

Am. School of Home Economics, 503 W. 69th Street, Chicago 



Pg^luten Flour. 



40% GLUTEN 






Quaranteed to comply in all respects ibO 

•taadard requirements of U. S. Dept. of 

Agriculture^ 

Manufactured hj 

FARWELL & RHINES 

Watertown. N. Y. 



^W^ 
]^^ 






CreamWhip ping Made 
Easy and Inexpensive 

r'REMO-ArESCO 



V 



Whips Thin Cream 

or Half Heavy Cream and Milk 

or Top of the Milk Bottle 

It whips up as easily as heavy cream 

and retains its stiffness. 

Every caterer and housekeeper 

wants CREMO-VESCO. 

Send for a bottle to-day. 



Housekeeper's size, Hoz., .30 prepaid 
Caterer's size, 16oz., $1.00 
(With full directions.) 



Gremo-Vesgo Company 

631 EAST 23rd ST., BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Miscellaneous 

"You'll pardon my saying so, I hope, 
old fellow, but I've noticed that lately 
you've been looking rather peculiar." 
"Yes — -well, the fact is that ever since 
the New Year, I've been trying to live 
up to the principle of 'He who hesitates 
is lost' coupled with that of 'Fools rush 
in where angels fear to tread,' and you see 
what it has done to me." 

London Opinion. 



A one-sided conversation on the side- 
walk between two young women : "Fifteen 
dollars a week fer teachin' school .^^ It's 
a shame! They oughta give ya eighteen 
or twenty dollars. Why, I'm gettin' 
forty dollars down to th' factory." 

Life. 



Last month the Buifalo Charity Organ- 
ization Society received a gift of one 
dollar, with the line: "You are welcome 
to this. I can't buy anything with it." 

The Survey. 



I asked a boy in Sunday school about 
the difference in the time of writing the 
Old Testament and the New Testament. 
He rdplied that the Old Testament was 
written before, and the New Testament 
behind. — • G. 



" What do you work at, my poor man ? " 
"At intervals, lady." 

St. Paul Non~Partiian Leader. 

TEN -CENT MEALS *^'"' ■"" ""' 

per person : 4^ 
meals with recipes and directions for preparing each. This 
48 pp. Bulletin sent for 10 cents, stamps or coin. ■ 

Am. School of Home Economics, 503 W. 69th St., Chicagoi 



USED 

DAILY IN A 

MILLION 

HOMES 



Colburn^s 

^«- ©Red Label 

Spices 

The A.Colburn G)., 
Philadelphia,U.SA 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
304 . 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



/ %4./fit&fC€ / hffC 



Every-Day Surprises 



the 



ON holidays — at Thanksgiving and Sunday dinners, as well as for every-day occasions - 
crowning delight is the surprise dessert that can be made with Knox Sparkling Gelatine. 

One of these special desserts is the Knox Charlotte Surprise, which seems at first glance 
to be only a cake — but when cut, the center reveals a fine, smooth ice-cream-like fruit filling, similar 
to a frozen charlotte — indeed a great surprise. 

Another creation that brings happy exclamations is the Knox Apple and Rice Delight, a com- 
bination so urtique that it is simply irresistible. Both are easy to make. Try them. 

CHARLOTTE SURPRISE 



^2 envelope Knox Sparkling Gelatine 
^ cup cold water 
^2 cup boiling water 
2 tablespoonfuls lemon juice 

Soak gelatine in cold water for five minutes and dissolve 



Whites of 3 eggs 

1 cup sugar 

1 cup canned peach juice and pulp 

1 square or round sponge cake 

boiling water. Add sugar and when dissolved add lemon 



juice. Strain, cool slightly and add peach or other fruit juice and pulp, which has heen rubbed through a strainer. When 
mi.\ture begins to stiffen beat until light; then add egg whites, beaten until stiff and beat thoroughly. When quite thick, 
but still soft enough to pour, fill a square or a round sponge cake, the top of which has been removed carefully and the 
center hollowed out to within an inch or inch and a half of the sides and bottom. Fill to within an inch of the top and then 
replace top part of cake, fitting it in place carefully so it looks as though it had never been cut. Place in ice box to chill. 
Serve on platter with or without whipped cream, or a fruit sauce. Cut like brick ice tream. If desired, this recipe may 
be served without the cake Any fresh, preserved or canned fruit may be used in place of the peaches, or a cocoa or choco- 
late filling made if preferred. One cup of whipped cream may be used in place of the egg whites. 




APPLE AND RICE DELIGHT 



Few grains salt 

1 cup whipped cream or 2 egg whites 

1 teaspoonful vanilla 

Coddled or stewed apples 



14 envelope Knox Sparkling Gelatine 

^ cup cold water 

}/2 cup milk 

1 cup cooked rice 

J 2 cup sugar 

Soak the gelatine in cold water for ten minutes, and dissolve by standing cup in hot water. To the cooked rice add the 
milk, sugar and salt. Strain into this the dissolved gelatine and mix thoroughly. Cool slightly, add the whipped cream 
or the egg whites beaten until stiff. Add the vanilla and turn into a wot mold. Chill and serve with coddled or stewed 
apples, made by cooking unpared, quartered or round .slices of apple in a syrup of one cup of sugar and ^ cup of water 
until soft and transparent. Other fresh or canned fruits may be used in place of the apples. This recipe will make an 
ample dessert for a family of six or seven, and uses only }^ of a package of Knox Sparkling Gelatine. 

SURPRISE DISHES 

If you would like recipes for other Surprise 
Dishes send 2c stamp and grocer's name for my 
booklets, "Dainty Desserts" and "Food Economy." 

Any domestic science teacher can have suflBcient gelatine 
for her class, if she will write me on school stationery, stating 
quantity and when needed. 

"Wherever a recipe calls for Gelatine — it means KNOX" 
MRS. CHARLES B. KNOX 

KNOX GELATINE 

l07 Knox Avenue Johnstown, N. Y« 





Buy advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 
305 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Jones, McDuffee & Stratton Corp'n 
TABLE CROCKERY, 
CHINA AND GLASS 

For Thanksgiving 




DINNER SETS or CHINA DINNER WARE 

of all grades taken from our large assortment 
of Stock patterns enable the purchaser to 
select just the articles desired without being 
obliged to purchase the articles not required 
at the time, with the added advantage of being 
able to obtain matchings or additional pieces 
of the same pattern later on. 




Pyrex Cooking Glassware 

Clean, transparent Glass to bake in! 

Ware that oven heat cannot break I 
Casseroles Pie Plates 

Bread Pans Ramekins Bakers, etc. 

Pyrex Gift Set — consisting of eleven items for 
$7.00, packed in a neat box, is especially 
attractive. 
Kitchen Crockery — Plain white or low-priced 
decorated ware for the pantry and kitchen. 

Yellow Mixing Bowls Shirred Egg Dishes 

Yellow Nappies Covered Jars for Ice Chests 

Popover Cups Chicken Casserole Dishes 

Pudding Pots Egg Poachers 

Chicken Pie Baking Nappies 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton Corp'n 

CROCKERY, CHINA and GLASS 
33 Franklin Street - Boston 

Near Washineton and Surrmer Streets 



Orange-and-Currant Jelly Sauce J 

Dissolve in a bowl over hot water one- 
half a cup of red currant jelly; mix with 
it one teaspoonful of mixed mustard, one 
eighth a teaspoonful of white pepper, and 
one tablespoonful of onion juice. Grate 
the yellow rind from four oranges; stir 
into the dissolved jelly, add one table- 
spoonful of vinegar, and bottle ready for 
use. It may be served immediately, and 
is excellent with cold meat, game, roast 
goose or duckling. 



Cooking for Profit 

By Alice Bradley 

Principal, Miss Farmer's School of Cookery; 
Cooking Editor, Woman's Home Companion 

THE demand for home-cooked food 
is constant everywhere. Many 
"born cooks" have succeeded in 
building up a more or less successful 
business in this line. Many more women 
need to earn money and still maintain 
their homes intact, but do not know how 
to go about establishing a profitable busi- 
ness in home-cooked foods, catering, etc. 

We are having a new correspondence 
course, written especially for such women, 
by Miss Bradley, the well-known au- 
thority on cookery and catering. It 
explains, in detail, just how to prepare 
food "good enough to sell"; just what 
to cook, with many choice recipes; how 
to establish a reputation and a constant 
profitable market, how to cater for all 
entertainments; how to conduct a prof- 
itable boarding house or small hotel; how 
to run successful tea rooms, cafeterias, 
lunch rooms, etc. 

The outlay for equipment is little or 
nothing, and the fee for the course is very 
moderate, and may be paid on easy terms. 
The course is in twelve lessons, to be sent 
weekly, and the correspondence instruc- 
tion is under the direction of Miss 
Bradley. Our two "Household Helpers" 
are included to show how to gain the 
time for money-making work. For full 
details and synopsis write to American 
School of Home Economics, 503 W. 69th 
Street, Chicago, Illinois. — Adv. 



huy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
306 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




faust Chile Spaetietti Aa (ratin 

Cook 1-2 lb. spaghetti until 
done. Put in baking dish. 
Add 2 tablespoons bacon 
grease, pint tomatoes, table- 
spoon Faust Chile Powder 
and mix. Sprinkle with 
grated cheese, and bake slow- 
ly in oven until top is brown. 




That indescribably "different taste" between a home-cooked meal 
and a meal prepared by a famous chef is merely the difference in the 
seasoning of things. 

Knowing how to season is what makes a famous chef. He uses any 
number of ingredients in almost every dish — and it is the combination 
of all of them in the right proportions that produces that wonderfully 
delicious "different taste." 

FAUST CHILE POWDER 

was originated by Henry Dietz, the chef of the historical, 
world-famous Faust Cafe, and now Bevo Mill. It is a com- 
bination of spices, herbs, seeds, paprika, chile pepper and 
other seasonings. It's the seasoning you must use if you want 
your dishes to rival those prepared by famous chefs, and it's 
the seasoning you WILL use if you try it once. Use Faust 
Chile Powder in all salad dressings, in all relishes, in stews, 
soups, chile con carne, au gratin dishes, etc. 

If your dealer hasn't it in stock now, send 20c to cover cost, 
packing and postage of a can of Faust Chile Powder 
and Recipe Book. 



C. F. Blanke Tea and Coffee Co, 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Manufacturers of the world-famous Faust 
Instant Coffee and Tea 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept 
307 



lubstitutes 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Price's 

Vanilla 



TRY Price's Va- 
nilla today and 
notice the difference 
in your baking. 
Rich, mellow flavor, 
just right strength, 
absolutely pure. 

PRICE FLAVORING 

EXTRACT CO. 

Jn business 67 Years 

Chicago, 111. 




A Dishwasher for$2.50! 

Keeps hand.<; out of the water, no wiping of dishes, saves i the 
time. Consists of special folding disndrainer, special wire 

basket, 2 special long-handled brushes. Full directions for use. 
"Sent prepaid for $2.50 or C. O. D. Full refund if not satisfactory. 

Am. School Home Economics, 503 W. 69th Street, Chicago 



ik€%y 



CHILD'SNAPKIN CLIPS °n'r.lJiT.rr«^ 

A gift to delight any child. Choice of five loved ani- 
mals. Made of spring nickel silver, finely silver plated 
2^ in. high. Order by name. Price postpaid in U. S. 
$1.00 each. 

Gets The 
Kernel OutWhole! 

Cracks any Pecan, Walnut, Brazil 
Nut,Filbert, etc.— withoutcrushing 
kernel ! No scattered, flying shells, 
pinched fingora or lost tempers. 

IDEAL NUT CRACKER 

Just a quick easy turn of the 
handle brings the kernel out 
whole. So simple a child can 
do it. No levers, springs 
or clamps. Lasts forever. 
Thousands in use. Money 
back if not pleased. Order 
early for Xmas. 
Styles. Plainniek4lplated60c 
Stylei. Highly polish' d " 86c 
Postage paid anrwhere In U. S. 

COOK ELECTRIC CO. 

904 W.VanBuren,Chica8ro.Ill. 




Household Help 



IF you could engage an expert cook and an 
expert housekeeper for only 10 cent! a week, 
with no board or room, you would do it, 
wouldn't vou.'' Of course you would! Well, 
that is ali our "TWO HOUSEHOLD HELP- 
ERS" will cost you the first year — nothing 
thereafter, for the rest of your life. 

Have you ever considered how much an hour 
a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year is worth 
to you? Many workmen get $1 an hour — ' 
surely your time is worth 30 cents an hour. 
We guarantee these "Helpers" to save you 
at least an hour a day, worth say $2.10 a week. 
Will you invest the 10 cents a week to gain $2 
weekly? 

And the value our "Helpers" give you in 
courage and inspiration, in peace of mind, in 
the satisfaction of progress, in health, happiness 
and the joy of living, — is above price. In mere 
dollars and cents, they will save their cost' 
twelve times a year or more. 

These helpers, "Lessons in Cooking" and 
"Household Engineering" were both prepared 
as home-study courses, and as such have been 
tried out and approved by thousands of our 
members. Thus they have the very highest 
recommendation. Nevertheless we are willing 
to send them in book form, on a week's free 
trial in your own home. Send the coupon. 



Household Engineering 

Scientific Management 

in the Home 

by Mrs. Christine Frede- 
rick. 544 pp., 134 Illus., 
J Leather Style. Gold 
Stamped. CONTENTS: 
The Labor-Saving Kitchen; 
Plans and Methods; Help- 
ful Household Tools; 
Methods of Cleaning; Food 
and Food Planning; Prac- 
tical Laundry Work; Fam- 
ily Finance; EflScient Pur- 
chasing; The Servantless 
Household; Planning the 
Efficierit Home; Health 
and Personal Efficiency. 



Lessons in Cooking 

Through Preparation 

of Meals 

by Robinson & Hammel. 
500 pp. Illus., } Leather 
Style. Gold Stamped. 

CONTENTS: Menus with 
recipes for 12 weeks and, 

FULL DIRECTIONS FOR PRE- 
PARING EACH MEAL. Menus 
and Dir»*ctions for Formal 
and Informal Dinners, 
Luncheons, Suppers, etc. 
12 Special Articles: Serving, 
Dish Washing, Candy Mak- 
ing, etc. Also Balanced 
Diet, Food Value, Ways of 
Reducing Costs, etc. 



Membership Free, With the books to in- 
clude: a. All personal questions answered, b. 
All Domestic Science books loaned, c. Use of 
Purchasing Department, d. Bulletins and Econ- 
omy Letters, e. Credit on our full Professional 
or Home-Makers' Correspondence Courses. 

In these difficult days you really cannot 
afford to be without our "Helpers." You owe 
it to yourself and family to give them a fair 
trial. You cannot realize what great help they- 
will give you till you try them — and the trial : 
costs you nothing. Send the coupon. 

American School of Home Economics, Chicago, Ilh 



A. S. H. E.— 503 W. 69th Street, Chicago. 111. 

Send your two "HOUSEHOLD HELPEI^S,;' prepaid. 
on a week's trial, in the de Luxe binding. If satisfactory,! 
will send you $6 in full payment (OR) 50 cents and $1 per 
month for five months. Membership to be included free. 
Otherwise I will return one or both books in sevea days^ 
(Regular mail price $2.64 each.) 



Name and 

Address 

Reference 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
308 



' ADVERTISEMENTS 






Drip-Drop'Roastcr^c^/? 

Old l-ashionQd Dutch Oven 

<r^k5HE very name "Dutch Oven", 
mC\ makes you think of good , whole- 
VZx some foods — j uicy , tender meats 
and fowl, savory stews, wonderful 
roasts. 

The modern housewife also prepares 
perfectly cooked food and at the same 
time is able to serve appetizing dishes 
with less worry and bother. 

The Wagner "Drip-Drop" Roaster 
is a real old-fashioned Dutch Oven 
with close fitting cover and the exclu- 
sive Wagner self-basting feature. The 
thorough distribution of the heat 
through its walls and bottom, the retention of all the moisture 
and juices during the cooking, and the "Drip-Drop" Cover 
design insures evenly distributed basting. 

The "Drip-Drop" Roaster is a typical Wagner Cast Iron 
De Luxe Utensil — carefully made, good-looking, long-wearing. 
Also made in Cast Aluminum. Your dealer should be able to 
supply you. 

Write for booklet. 
THE WAGNER MANUFACTURING COMPANY 




Dept. 74 



I ton Deluxe 



Sidney, Ohio 





Cast Aluminum 



■^^. 



s. 



I 






1 



>™U 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
309 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



SAVE MEAT -SAVE MONEY 



With eyery roMt of 
meat, poultry and f am*, 
»nd every bak*" 
fish, servo a lib- 
eral amount of 
STUFFIxN'G or 
DRESSING fla- 
vored with Bell's 
Seasoning. In- 
crease the pleas- 
ure and decrease 
the cost. Hotel 
cheffl reconi' 
mend it. If 
your grocer 
Will not sup- 
ply you send 
10c for sam- 
pie package. 

Ask Brietrs For BELL'S SEASONING 



BILLS 



Salome 




y I teach you to make them better than 
^^ >ou ever made them before — the most 

delicious Augel Food Cake and many other kinds, 
the most appetizing cakes you ever tasted. 
They Sell for $3.00— Profit, $2.00 
1 will make you the most expert cake-maker in 
your vicinity. Your cakes will be praised and 
sought for. Your cakes will become famous, if 
you make them by the 

Osborn Cake Making System 
My metiiuds are original. They never 
fail. They are easy to learn; you are 
sure to succeed the very fir.st time. I 
have taught thousands. lean teach you. 
Let me send you particulars free. 
Dept. MRS. GRACE OSBORN 
LrlO Bay City Michigan 



famous, if 




ROBERTS 

Lightning Mixer 
Beats Everything 

Beats egg.s. whips cream, churns butter, mixes 
gravies, desserts and dressings, and does the 
work in a few seconds. Blends and mixes 
malted milk, powdered milk, baby foods and 
all drinks. 

Simple and Strong. Saves work — easy 
to clean. Most necessary household 
article. Used by 200,000 housewives 
and endorsed by leading household 
magazines. 
If your dealer does not carry this, we will send 
prepaid quart size Sl.'25. pint size 90c. Far 
West and South, quart S1.40. pint Sl.OO. 
Recipe book free with mixer. 

NATIONAL CO, Cambridge 39, boston, mass. 



Two New Household Helpers 

On 10 days' free trial! They save you at least an hour a day, 
worth at only 30 cents an hour, $2.10 a week. Cost only the 
10 cents a week for a year. Membership free. Send postcard 
or note for details of these "helpers," — our two new home- 
study courses, now in book form or $5.00 in full payment. 

AM. SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS, 503 W. 69th ST., CHICAGO 




Have Some Junket 

How good it is! And how 
wholesome! 

The simple use of the little 
Junket Tablet transforms 
milk, as if by magic, into a 
tempting, delicious dish fit 
"to set before the king." 

Junket 

should be eaten often, especially 
by children, because it is simply 
milk in a more easily digestible 
form — and more enjoyable to 
the taste. 

Serve it both as a food and as a 
dessert. And use 
the Junket 
Tablet for mak- 
ing the finest ice 
cream you ever 
tasted. 




Nesnah — 

the 

Powdered 

Junket 



is the same as Junket 
Tablets, except it is 
in powdered form 
and already sweet- 
ened and flavored. 
It comes in 6 pure 
flavors, delicious in 
taste and appearance. 
Simply add milk. 



The Junket Folks 
Liltle Falls, N. Y. 

Canadian Factory: 

Chr. Hansen's 

Canadian Laboratory 

Toronto, Ont. 




Buv advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 
310 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




Tempting Maple 
Fudge and Taffy 

are quickly and easily made with Uncle 
John's Syrup. Delicious for the holi- 
days. Lots of fun making it. too. But 
be sure to use 

UNCLE JOHN'S 
SYRUP 

— it has the real flavor from the 
maple grove that every one likes. 
Write for candy-making and other 
recipes — free. 

New England Maple Syrup Co 



Winter Hill 



Boston, Mass 




Hemstitching and Picoting Attachment 

works on any and all machines; simple and easy to 
work. You can now make the nice things in your 
own home that you had to hire made or go without. 
SURE to please. Price. $2.50. 

GEM NOVELTY CO. 

Corpus Christi, Texas Box 1031 

**Low Cost Cooking*' 

By Florenck Xksbitt. B. A. 
The best book on the subject in print. 205 recipes: 8 weeks' menus 
with directions for preparing: balanced Diet. Home Management, 
How to Buy, Food and Care of Children, etc.. Index. 12i pages, 
cloth bound. Sent on ai)proval. PRICK. ONLY .')0c.. postage lOc. 
for one copy. Vic. for two. Mill scire cost trecklu. 

Am. School of Home Economics, 503 W. 69lh St., Chicago 



r 



Cream Dipper 



Gift No. 4033 
60c i>ostpaid 



^^ 



it^ 





Made of aluminum, no sharp comers, it is easy to take the cream 
from the bottle. Cream is valuable, so is this dipper and anv 
Housekeeper will find it very useful. It is a gift that will he used 
and valued. In ouryearbook are illustrated gifts for all: babies, 
ladies, men and children: articles that have merit and at the same 
time are interest hig. Send for it or ask the best shop in your town 
tor Pohlson Gifts with our trade mark. 



^PohUon Gift Shop 



Pawtucket, R. I 




Fine for Fall Days 



Nothing is more invigorating and healthful, 
on cold, raw fall days, than a cup of delicious 
steaming 



BANQUET TEA 



made in the right way. 

The best tea is made in an earthenware tea- 
pxjt. Rinse pot with boiling water. Allow 
a teaspoonful of Banquet Tea (your favorite 
flavor) for each cup and pour on fresh boiling 
water. Steep from three to seven minutes, 
according to directions on package — strain 
and serve. 

There's a Banquet Tea for every taste 

Banquet Blend — finest green and black teas I)lended 
— in Red canisters. 

Banquet India and Ceylon — in Green canisters. 
Banquet Orange Pekoe — in Orange canisters. 
Pounds, halves and quarters. At your dealer's or 
write (Jirect to us. 

McCORMICK & CO., Baltimore, U.S.A. 

Packers of the Famous Banquet Tea 



1 

r 






Wriie for FREE booklets giving 
interesting facts on Spices, Teas and 
Flavoring Extracts. Send 50 cents, 
cash or stamps, for valuable BEE 
BRAND Manual 0/ Cookery. 




Buv advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 
311 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



HEBE 



'The food product tliaf hrings 
ifwreased nourishment and 
economy to every fnml. 




Mother's making doughnuts 



>y 




2S.S5. ItJT.fU. MUDS 
^HE HEBE COMPAKV^ 



— the same plump, golden 
brown doughnuts made popu- 
lar by the Salvation Army 
"Over There", because she 
is making them with Hebe. 

Since we published a year 
ago the famous recipe by 
Margaret Sheldon, the origi- 
nal "doughnut lassie," thou- 
sands of mothers have used 
it and expressed their de- 
light. One of them writes : — 
"I have tried your recipe for 
doughnuts and from the rush 
on the cookie jar, I feel safe 
in saying they are the best I 
have ever made." 



Hebe is an ideal product 
for all cooking purposes and 
for use in coffee. Foods pre- 
pared with it are improved 
in taste and texture and are 
made more nourishing. 
Hebe is pure skimmed milk 
evaporated to double strength 
enriched with cocoanut fat. 

Teachers of cooking and 
domestic science will find 
valuable suggestions in the 
Hebe Recipe Booklet for 
economical, nutritious, mcII- 
balanced meals. Address 
the Home Economy Depart- 
ment, 311 5 Consumers Bldg., 
Cliicasro. 



Chicago 



THE HEBE COMPANY 



Seattle 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
312 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




I 

I 

I 
I 

I 



Iticknev 

•:^ AND ** : 

Poor's 




SPICED 
POULTRY 

± Seasoning 1^ 

^TWO -' OUNCES L.i<>'.X^ 

BOSTON 




You're looking forward to 

THANKSGIVING 

THE DAY THAT BRINGS REUNION FOR FEAST AND THANKS — 
THAT CHEERS OLD AND YOUNG— RICH AND POOR ALIKE 

THE ONE DAY 

of the year when everything must be done 
to a turn with seasoning, spice and flavor 
that leave in each mind the feehng of 
enjoyment and gracious thankfulness for it. 

The Stickney & Poor Spice Company 

are not unmindful of the day or the 

pleasures that come with it. If their 

wic]e range of 

SEASONINGS, SPICES, MUSTARDS AND FLAVORINGS 

will help you in the kitchen and on the 
table — make you more sure of the success 
of your cooking — add a little to the sparkle 
and tang of each dish — it will be a real 
satisfaction and you will all the more 
keenly appreciate 

Your co-operating servant, 

MUSTARDPOT 



Stickn^ey & Poor Spice Company 

1815 — Century Old — Century Honored — 1920 

Mustard-Spices BOSTON and HALIFAX Seasonings-Flavorings 

THE NATIONAL MUSTARD POT 




Vy/cj;^>o^/c7/3^>cWo^^^ 



I 
I 

I 

I 

I 
I 

I 

I 

I 



Buy advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 
313 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



, 11.11 Ill II Ill I I I I 1 1 mil I II I I I 1 1 III iiiiiiiiii'ii i imiii i iiiiii i iuinimiiii 








COFFEE 

is a common topic of intere^ 
in the intimacy of thousands 
upon thousands of homes 
where its deliciousness, un- 
iformity and aftogfether high 
character are recognized and 
thoroughly appreciated. 

"WHITE HOUSE COFFET 

/ should^ easily ^rii\SiyourJx\- 
tere^. \bur grocer has it or 
can easily procure it for^ou. 

1-3-5 Ib.Packages Only 

NEVER >SOLDlN BULK. 
DWINELL-AVRIOHT Ca 

7^A~/r2 c//o^/ Co^e /PodtfT^er^r 

BOSTON CHICAC^O 



'■""""""""""""""""" '"" IIHIMII MIMIIMIIIIIHIIM.miMimiMI 



""■'"" imiimiriMMinniin 




This New Ran^e Is A 
Wonder For Cooking' 

Although less than four feet long it can do every kind 
of cooking for any ordinary family by gas in summer 
or by coal or wood when the kitchen needs heating. 

There is absolutely no danger in this combination, as 

the gas section is as entirely separate from the coal 
section as if placed in another part of the kitchen. 

^ Note the two gas 
ovens above — one 




The Range that "Makes Cooking Easy' 



for baking, glass 
paneled and one for 
broiling with white ^ iw ^ An t> 

enamel door. The Coal. Wood and Gas Range 

large square oven below is heated by coal or wood. 

See the cooking surface when you want to rush things — five burners 
for gag and four covers for coal. The entire range is always available 

as both coal and gas ovens can be operated at the same time, using 
one for meats and the other for pastry. It Makes Cooking Easy. 

^W^ Gold Medal m 

CHenwood 

Write to-day for handsome free booklet 165 that tells all about it, to 

Weir Stove Co., Taunton, Mass. Manufacturersof the Celebrated Glenwooa 
Coal, Wood and Gas Ranges, Heating Stoves and Furnaces. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
314 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




Have an Added Outlet Ready 
For Any Appliance 

Nearly every home wired for electricity now-a-days 
has an Electrical Appliance for use in every room. Yet only 

single sockets for one lighting bulb are usually available. Use your appliance and 

do without light or have light and do without the convenience of the appliance? 

—No. 

The Benjamin Two-Way -Plug makes single sockets double workers. Screws into sockets like 

electric light bulbs. Double the convenience of electricity. Light and Heat or Light and 

Power at the same time. Millions in use. 

" Every Wired Home Needs Three or More ' ' 

Made Only by 

Benjamin Electric Mfg. Co. 



New York 



Sail Francisco 



Chicago 

The Benjamin 903 Swivel Attachment Plug keeps the kinks out of cords. It screws into 

the socket ^without turning the cord nxith it. Adds life to the cord and the appliance. 

The Benjamin No, 2452 Shade Holder enables you to use any shade ivith your Tivo- Way Plug. 



J 



Bu\- advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 
3LS 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



i 



feuggestions! for CJiristmasi #ift£! 

WOULD not many of your friends to whom you will make Christmas Gifts 
be more pleased with a year's subscription to AMERICAN COOKERY 
($1.50) than with any other thing of equal cost you could send them? 
The magazine will be of practical use to the recipient 365 days in the year 
and a constant and pleasant reminder of the 
donor. 

To make this gift more complete, we will 
send the December number so as to be received 
the day before Christmas, together with a card 
reading as per cut herewith. 

This card is printed in two colors on heavy 
stock and makes a handsome souvenir. 



Anipriran (Caokrrg 



r 



We will make a Christmas Present of a copy of the American Cook 
Book to every present subscriber who sends us two "Christmas Gift" 
subscriptions at $1.50 each. 

Practical and Useful Cookery Books 

By MRS. JANET M. HILL, Editor of American Cookery 

AMERICAN COOK BOOK $1.50 

This cook book deals with the matter in hand in a simple, concise manner, mainly with the 
cheaper food products. A cosmopolitan cook book. Illustrated. 

BOOK OF ENTREES $2.00 

Over HOO recipes which open a new field of cookery and furnish a solution of the problem 
of "left overs." There is also a chapter of menus w^hich will be of great help in securing 
the best combination of dishes. Illustrated. 

CAKES, PASTRY AND DESSERT DISHES $2.00 

Mrs. HilTs latest book. Practical, trustworthy and up-to-date. 

CANNING, PRESERVING AND JELLY-MAKING $1.60 

Modern methods of canning and jelly-making have simplified and shortened preserving 
processes. In this book the latest ideas in canning, preserving and jelly-making are 
presented. 

COOKING FOR TWO $2.25 

Designed to give chiefly in simple and concise style those things that are essential to the 
proper selection and preparation of a reasonable variety of food for the family of two 
individuals. A handbook for young housekeepers. Used as text in many schools. 
Illustrated from photographs. 

PRACTICAL COOKING AND SERVING $3.00 

This complete manual of how to select, prepare, and serve food recognizes cookery as a 
necessary art. Recipes are for both simple and most formal occasions; each recipe is 
tested. 700 pages. Used as a text-book in manv schools. Illustrated. 

SALADS, SANDWICHES AND CHAFING DISH DAINTIES $2.00 

To the housewife who likes new and dainty ways of serving food, this book proves of 
great value. Illustrated. 

THE UP-TO-DATE WAITRESS ^ $1.75 

A book giving the fullest and most valuable information on the care of the dining-room 
and pantry, the arrangement of the table, preparing and serving meals, preparing special 
dishes and lunches, laundering table linen, table decorations, and kindred subjects. The 
book is a guide to ideal service. 

We will send any of the above books, postpaid, upon receipt of 
price; or, add one dollar ($1) to the price of any of the books and we 
will include a year's subscription for American Cookery. 



THE BOSTON COOKING SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO., Boston, Mass. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
316 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



BAKERS 



BA?Efi$ 






FRESH GRATED 



COCONUT cocoNU 



\ 


1 
( 


^^ 


■>J 




©©©©raai] 



THE reason for juice in the orange' ' Buy a can of this DIFFERENT coco- 
is the reason for milk in the coco- nut today. You'll appreciate its unusual 
nut — FLAVOR! And Baker's Fresh flavor for cakes, pies, candies and all 
Grated Gx:onut, therefore, is canned other coconut dishes. Or, if you prefer 
WITH THE MILK. It is as fresh, the old-fashioned sugar-cured kind, ask 
juicy and wholesome as the freshly for Baker's Dry-Shred Coconut — sold 
picked nut.. in paper cartons. 

THE FRANKLIN BAKER COMPANY 

Philadelphia. Pa. 



»:ipe (or the coconut cake i 
above will be found on the i 
• the can label. A Free Re 



If Baker's Canned or 
nut is not obtainable 
send 20 cents in stai 






,-MvS^'*ts3#^%^^f^'^' 



^iSt'i" 



^^■^M 






i^^H 




HIHHIUiliiiiii^^^^ 



iiiuv advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 
317 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Experience has shown that the most satisfactory way 

to enlarge the subscription list of American Cookery is through its present subscri- 
bers, who personally can vouch for the value of the publication. To make it an 
object for subscribers to secure new subscribers, we offer the following premiums: 

CONniTIONS • Prerniums are not given with a subscription or for a. renewal, but only 
— ^ to present subscribers, for securing and sending to us new yeariy sub- 
scriptions at $1.50 each. The number of new subscriptions required to secure each premium is clearly 
Stated below the description of each premium. 

Transportation is or is not paid as stated. 




This shows the jelly turned from the mould 



INDIVIDUAL INITIAL JELLY MOULDS 

Serve Eggs, Fish and Meats in Aspic; 
Coffee and Fruit Jelly; Pudding and other 
desserts with your initial letter raised on 
the top. Latest and daintiest novelty for 
the up-to-date hostess. To remove jelly 
take a needle and run it around inside of 
mould, then immerse in warm water; jelly 
wi.l then come out in perfect condition. 
Be the first in your town to have these. 
You cannot purchase them at the stores. 




This shows mould 
(upside down) 



Set of six (6), any initial, sent postpaid for (1) new subscription. Cash Price 75 cents. 



PATTY IRONS' 




As illustrated, are used to make dainty, flaky 
pates or timbales; delicate pastry cups for serv- 
ing hot or frozen dainties, creamed vegetables, 
salads, shell fish, ices, etc. Each set comes 
securely packed in an attractive box with recipes 
and full directions for use. Sent, postpaid, for 
two (2) new subscriptions. Cash price, $1.50. 



SILVER'S 

SURE CUT 

FRENCH FRIED 
POTATO CUTTER 

One of the most 
modern and eflBcient 
kitchen helps ever in- 
vented. A big labor 
and time saver. 

Sent, prepaid, for 
one (1) new subscrip- 
tion. Cash price 75 
cents. 




FRENCH ROLL BREAD PAN 




Best quality blued steel. 6 inches wide by 13 
long. One pan sent, prepaid, for one (1) new 
subscription. Cash price, 75 cents 

SEAMLESS VIENNA BREAD PAN 




Two of these pans sent, postpaid for one (1) 
new subscription. Cash price, 75 cents for two 

pans. 




HEAVY TIN BORDER MOULD 

Imported, Round, 6 inch 

Sent, prepaid, for one (1) new subscription. 
Cash price, 75 cents. 



THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO 



Boston, Mass. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

318 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



PREMIUMS 




PASTRY BAG AND FOUR TUBES 

(Bag not shown in cut) 

A complete outfit. Practical in every way. Made 
especially for Bakers and Caterers. Eminently suit- 
able for home use. 

The set sent, prepaid, for one (1) new subscription. 
Ca h price, 75 cents. 




THE A. M. C. 
ORNAMENTER 

Rubber pastry bag and 
twelve brass tubes, assorted 
designs, for cake decorat 
ing. This set is for fine 
work, while the set des 
scribed above is for more 
general use. Packed in a 
wooden box, prepaid, for 
two (2) new subscriptions. 
Cash price, $1.50 




"RAPIDE" 
TEA IINFUSER 

Economic, clean and con- 
venient. Sent, prepaid, for 
one (1) subscription. Cash 
price, 75 cents. 



CAKE ORNAMENTING SYRINGE 

For the finest cake decorating. Twelve German 
lilver tubes, fancy designs. Sent, prepaid, for four (4) 
Jiew subscriptions, Cash price, $3.00. 





HOME CANDY MAKING 
OUTFIT 

Thermometer, dipping wire, moulds, and 
nost of all, a book written by a professional 
ind practical candy maker for home use. Sent, 
>repaid, for five(5) new subscriptions. Cash 
>rice, $3.75. 



The only reliable and sure way to make Candy, 
Boiled Frosting, etc., is to use a 

_Di_ THERMOM ETER 

Here is just the one you need. Made 
especially for the purpose by one of the 
largest and best manufacturers in the 
country. Sent, postpaid, for two (2) 
new suh-icriDtions Ca'^h price, $1.50 




VEGETABLE CUTTERS 

Assorted shapes. Ordinarily 
sell for 15 cents each. Six 
cutters — all different — pre- 
paid, for one (1) new subscrip- 
tion. Ca§h price, 75 cents. 



THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO., Boston, Mass. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
319 



AMERICAN COOKERY 





OTHER reads her baby's eyes and knows that his sweet, 
serious, drowsy look spells deep contentment. 

Contentment because he has just been bathed with the 
velvety, soothing lather of Ivory Soap. How soft it felt 
against his tender flesh; how clean and smooth and satiny his rose- 
leaf skin after clear water had rinsed away the soapy bubbles. 

Contentment because he is clothed in fresh, sweet garments, 
washed snowy white with Ivory. No soapy smell or chafing 
harshness to the soft, fine fabrics cleansed with this pure, mild, 
easy-rinsing soap. 

Physicians, nurses, careful mothers know that Ivory is the ideal 
soap for nursery use. 



Send for free sample package 
of Ivory Soap Fla!ic 

— snowlike flakes of Ivory Soap 
for the convenient laundering 
of baby's finest dresses, sweat- 
ers, silk robes, and blankets 
without rubbing. Ivory Soap 
Flakes will keep all your love- 
liest things like new. For free 
trial size package, write to 
Department i-K, The Procter 
QC Gamble Co., Cincinnati, O. 



IVORY SOAP . 




. 99.^0^ PURE 




Buy advertised Goods — ■ Do not accept substitutes 
320 





4' ^4 





Wonderful 
for Linoleum! 



You'd think it was new 
linoleum now, wouldn't 
you? There's a wonderful 
absorptive power in that 
sof tcrumbly Bon Ami Pow- 
der — it drinks up grease 
and grime like a sponge! 







Made in both 
cake and powder form. 



You can clean linoleum 
by any other method you 
please and then make a visi- 
bly cleaner bright spot on 
it with Bon Ami Powder. 
For linoleum, congoleum 
or oil cloth. 



'Hasn't 
scratched 
yetl " 





^^ 


!L^ 


rTMuHi 


m 


^^^ 


pii>* 


A>i| 




M 



IE TUDOR PRESS, BOSTON 



(Wrfwbng[Cup 




BAKER'S C0CQ4 

is pure ^md delicious. 
Trade mark on every 

package. 
WALTER BAKER & CO. ltd. 

ESTABLISHED I7SO DORCHESTER.MASS. 



"Choisa" 

Orange Pekoe 

Ceylon Tea 




A Select High-Grade Tea 
at a Moderate Price 



Pure 



Rich 



Fragrant 



S. S. PIERCE CO. 

BOSTON BROOKLINE 



Established 



1658 '^^jT ^Crystal 

S/i BLUE 



ANo: 



AMMONIA 

The Ammonia loosens the dirt, 
making washing easy. The Blue 
gives the only perfect finish. 




The People's 

Choice for Over 

Sixty Years 



1858 



^/i 1920 



SAWYER CRYSTAL BLUE CO. 

88 Broad St., Boston, Mass. 




A Joyous Thanksgiving 

is ensured if you use 

SLADE'S 
SPICES 



and Flavoring 
Extracts, for these 
flavor most and 
flavor best. 

Why accept doubtful] 
spices and extracts 
that are liable 
to make the 
Thanksgiving 
feast a disap 
p o i n t m e n 
when the bes 
(SLADE'S) can b< 
bought with thtj 
same money? 
Ask Grocers for SLADE'S 




D. & L Slade Co. , Boston, Mass., U.S.«^ 



vose 



PIANOS 



have been established more than SO YEARS. By our system c\ 
payments every family in moderate circumstances can own 
VOSE piano. We take old instruments in exchaii>;e and delivf 
the new piano in your home free of expense. Write for catalog? 1) and explanation; 

VOSE & SONS PIANO CO., 160 Boylston St., Boston, Mass 



PLUM PUDDINGS AND CHRISTMAS CAKES 




RICAN 

RERY 



u 



FOR-AVCRLY 



THE BOSTON 
::CORING-SCHa)LMAGAZINE 

i-CULINARY- SCIENCEand DOMESTIC- ECONOMICS 




DECEMBER, 1920 

VOL. XXV No. 5 



^_f^ •• '• v..v;l| 


. .'•■•"■.•■••.■■.'':•••.■; 


^--^ 


« 


^^^H 


1 


^^^M 







wm 









^i-^'^^sj 






PUBLISHED 
BY 

THEBOaSTON CGDKING 
JCHODL MAGAZINE C^ 

221 COLUMBUS AVE, 
BOSTON MASS 




Mother said 

RUMFDRD 



99 



Send for free copy of 
Janet Mackenzie Hill's 
book "The Rumford Way 
of Cookeryand Household 
Kconomy" — it will save 
you money. 




INKING 

! (i^<&''?ephosphaleP<^i,eal''' 
*^lQ§tormbakinrquaWy*^ 




Mother knows baking success depends upon the 
baking powder. 

Mother knows there is no guess work in measuring 
Rumford — a level spoonful, always — its leavening power 
at the bottom of the can is as efficient as it is at the top. 

Mother knows the true economy of Rumford lies in 
the perfect foods it produces— always light, moist, fine- 
grained and wholesome, easy to digest. 

Rumford stands for delicious food at reasonable cost. 
Good cooks have known these truths about Rumford 
for over a quarter of a century. 

Your grocer has RUMFORD 

THE WHOLESOME 

BAKING POWDER 

Rumford Company, Dept. 19, Providence, R. I. 



^;^i^W^-??^'WK^^Wir^1^^^1iiL^^^Bi'^HIIi'^ 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



^ 


! 


m7 


1 1 


i 














1 




i 


i 


1 


1 




Id Santa knows 

what's good to eat 
He always chooses 



Cream of Wheat 









Drawn by E. B. Bird for Cream of Wheat Co. 



Copyright by Cream of Wheat Co. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
521 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Vol. XXV 



DECEMBER, 1920 



No. 5 



CONTENTS FOR DECEMBER 

PAGE 

A CHRISTMAS VISION Caroline L. Sumner 329 

CHRISTMAS DAY IN THE COUNTRY. 111. Catherine Currian 331 

CUPID AND THE NEW YEAR . . . Harriet Whitney Symonds 337 

A DIETARY BLUNDER Mary Graham 342 

THE YOUNGEST BRIDE AND THE HOUSEHOLD GOSPEL 

Margery Fifield 344 

TALKS TO TEACHERS OF DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

Mary D. Chambers 347 

THE CHRISTMAS PATH Harriet W. Symonds 349 

EDITORIALS 350-352 

SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES (Illustrated with half-tone 
engravings of prepared dishes) 

Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 353 

MENUS FOR WEEK IN DECEMBER 362 

MENUS FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS . 363 

AT BREAKFAST Florence L. Tucker 364 

AN ADVENTURE IN VEGETARIANISM ' 

Jeannette Young Norton 366 

THE CHEERFUL CHRISTMAS HOLLY . 368 

HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES: — Tea and Toast — Southern 
Art in Cooking Cabbage — Ways of Giving Money at Christmas — 

Government Apples — • Household Advice 370 

QUERIES AND ANSWERS .374 

NEW BOOKS 378 

MISCELLANEOUS 386 



$1.50 A YEAR Published Ten Times a Year 15c A Copy Q^c 

Foreign postage 40c additional 

Entered at Boston post-office as second class matter 

Copyright, 1920, by 

THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO. 
Pope BIdg., 221 Columbus Ave., Boston 17, Mass. 





Please Renew on Receipt of Colored Blank Enclosed for that purpose 

322 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




lofien it rains 



MORTON'S 
SALT 

YOU'LL be done forever with the ordinary- 
kind once youVe tested Morton Salt. 

You'll be tickled with the way it pours in any 
weather — out of the tiniest cellars, or through 
the sensible spout of the handy blue package in 
which it comes. 

You'll appreciate the way it permits you to use 
it accurately to season foods exactly. You'll be 
thankful for its convenience, and the pennies 
that it saves. 

Ask your neighbor — and your grocer — about 
this salt that always pours. 

"l!\ie salt of the earth" 

Morton Salt Company 

CHICAGO 






Morton's 



^f^EE RUNNING 



Salt 



irpOUP 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
323 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



INDEX FOR DECEMBER 



Adventure In \>getarianism, An 

At Breakfast 

Cheerful Christmas Holly, The 

Christmas Day in the Country 

Christmas Path, The 

Christmas Vision, A 

Cupid and the New Year 

Dietary Blunder, A 

Editorials 

Home Ideas and Economies 

Menus 

Miscellaneous '. 

New Books 

Talks to Teachers of Domestic Science 

Youngest Bride and the Household Gospel, The 



PAGE 

366 
364 
368 
331 
349 
329 
337 
342 
350 
370 
362 
386 
378 
347 
344 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



Bacon and Canned Corn, Scrambled 
Bread, Fluted Crust. III. 
Cake, Christmas Holly. 111. . 
Cake, Pecan-and-Pineapple 
Cakes, Christmas .... 

Cakes, Little Christmas. 111. . 
Chicken, Galantine of, Christmas Decora 
tion. 111. ..... 

Custard, Acadian Apple 

Fondant ..... 

Goose, Roast, with Potato Stuffing. 111. 
Mousselines, Salmon, with Green Peas 
Muffins, Cornmeal. 111. 



354 Prunes, Turban of 

358 Puddings, Little Plum. III. . 

359 Rosettes. 111. . ... 
361 Salad, Prune-and-Nut. 111. . 
361 Sauce, Chaudfroid, for Galantine 

359 Shrimp Okra Gumbo 
Souffle, Spinach 

356 Soup, Red Currant 

361 Soup, Spanish Christmas 

360 Steak, Baby Lamb. 111. 

354 Stuffing, Potato . . 

355 Sundaes, Plum Pudding . 

357 Vol-au-Vent. 111. . 



361 
358 
359 
351 
357 
352 
354 
353 
353 
355 
354 
358 
355 



QUERIES AND ANSWERS 



Arrowroot ..... 

Cake, Caramel, with Caramelized Sugar 

Cheese, Club House 

Chocolate, Why It Reddens Cake . 

Dressing, Russian Salad 

Foods, Laxative and Constipating . 



376 Pastries, French, How to Serve 

375 Peaches, Spiced 

376 Potatoes, Hungarian 
376 Salad, Frozen Fruit 
374 Torte, Hazelnut . 

376 Waffles, Soft, on Electric Iron 



374 
375 
376 
374 
375 
375 



We want representatives everywhere to take subscriptions for 
American Cookery. We have an attractive proposition to make 
those who will canvass their town; also to those who will secure a 
few names among their friends and acquaintances. Write us today. 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



BOSTON, MASS, 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

324 ■ 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Nothii 


ng 

T 


Better 


Mrs. Rorer's New Cook Book 


For Christmas 


Cloth, illus., $2.50; by mail, $2.70 






Philadelphia Cook Book 


H 


Thev make a most de- 


Cloth, $1.50; by mail, $1.65 


* 


Vegetable Cookery and Meat Sub- 


A 


sirable gift, one that will 


stitutes 

Cloth, $1.50; by mail, $1.65 


be enjoyed for many a 


Diet for the Sick 


N 


year. Not expensive, 


Cloth, $2.00; by mail,.$2.15 


either. 


Key to Simple Cookery 






Cloth, $1.25; by mail, $1.40 




These books are all 


Every Day Menu Book 

Cloth, $1.50; by mail, $1.65 


M 


written in an easy style. 


My Best 250 Recipes 


R 


and even a learner can- 


Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 


not make mistakes, if 


Ice Creams, Water Ices, etc. 




1 * * r 1 1 1 


Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 


S 


directions are loilowed. 


Canning and Preserving 

Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 


Each book contains 


New Salads 




the finest recipes, with 


Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 


R 


full directions what to 


Dainties 




Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 


O 


do, beside many side- 


Cakes, Jcings and Fillings 


lights on how to market 


Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 
Sandwiches 


R 


economically, cooking. 


Cloth, 75 cts.; by mail, 80 cts. 


serving, carving, etc. 


Made-Over Dishes 


E 




Cloth, 75 cts.; by mail, 80 cts. 


For sale by all Bookstores and 


Home Candy Making 


-^r— ^ 


Department Stores, or 


Cloth, 75 cts.; by mail, 80 cts. . 


R 


ARNOLD & COMPANY 


Bread and Bread Making 


420 Sansom St. 


Cloth, 75 cts.; by mail, 80 cts. 


S 

ry 


Philadelphia 


Cooke 


Books 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
325 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




IGOODBOOKSFORGIFTSI 



,4:^')^.*S,;«f; 



% 



CAREERS FOR 
WOMEN 

Catherine Filene 

complete and authoritative 
to the vocations open to 
women, written by successful pro- 
fessional and business women under 
the editorship of Miss Filene. $4.00 



A 

guide 



-p^'^^'s 


.■^^ 


H jT' ' 


TOVT BIEN»- 


W^ 




i 



FOOD FACTS FOR 
THE HOME-MAKER 

Lucile Stimson Harvey 

"An admirable manual for the 
modern scientific home-maker, well 
arranged, informed in substance 
while untechnical in manner, and 
fitted to the needs of the average 
household." A^. Y. Post. $2.50. 



MARY MARIE 

Eleanor H. Porter 

"Mary Marie" has just the touch of optimism, humor and good cheer that 
makes Mrs. Porter's books ideal for Christmas gifts. The Sunbeam Girl 
brings happiness to hearts of all readers — young and old, and has been 
called "The most intensely alive and adorable girl that has brightened Ameri- 
can literature for years." Illustrated, $2.00. 



HOMESPUN TALES 

Kate Douglas Wiggin 
Mrs. Wiggin's three popular stories, 
"Rose o' the Sea." "Old Peabody Pew" and 
"Susanna and Sue," are re-issued in this 
attractive volume. Illustrated, $2.00. 

HIDDEN CREEK 

Katharine Newlin Burt 

"Follows no beaten path; its plot is 
skillfully developed and the story told with 
realism and a sparkling wit." N. Y. Times. 
Illustrated, $2.00. 

JOHNNIE KELLY 

Wilbur S. Boyer 

"Admirably done, real and human, deserv- 
ing of a place in the literature of American 
boydom as permanent as 'Huckleberry 
Finn.' " Illustrated, $2.00. 



THE ITALIAN TWINS 

Lucy Fitch Perkins 
The millions of children made happy by 
the famous "Twins" will welcome this 
delightful addition to the international 
family.^ Illustrated, $1.75. 

JOHN MARTIN'S 
BIG BOOK 

Here is John Martin's Big Book once 
again, and it's better, bigger, and more 
brimful' of good things than ever. Illus- 
trated in color and black and white, $3.50. 

INJUN and WHITEY 

William S. Hart 

A real book full of thrills and human 
interest, for real boys, written by a man 
who knows the West, and knows what boys 
like. Illustrated. $1.90. 



The Courtship of 

MILES STANDISH 

Illustrated by Wyeth 

The favorite poem of America's favorite poet, published in commemoration 
of the Pilgrim Tercentenary, lavishly illustrated with black and white sketches 
and full-color reproductions of paintings by America's leading illustrator. 
A most sumptuous and appropriate gift book for young and old. $3.00. 



I IHOUGHTON- MIFFLIN- COMPANY 



Buy^advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
326 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



; Cook poofesi Jfor Ci^tisstmasi (giftg 



THE BOSTON COOKING 
SCHOOL COOK BOOK 

By Fannie Merritt Farmer 

FOR many years the acknowledged 
leader of all cook books, this New 
Edition contains in addition to its 
fund of general information, 2,117 
recipes, all of which have been tested at 
Miss Farmer's Boston Cooking School; 
together with additional chapters on 
the Cold-Pack Method of Canning, on 
the Drying of Fruits and Vegetables, 
and on Food Values. 
122 illustrations, 6^6 pages.] $2.§o net 

THE CAN3Y COOK BOOK 

By Alice Bradley 

HOWEVER little interest one may 
possess in "the gentle art of 
cookery," this one branch of the 
science, at least, appeals to every 
person with a sweet tooth; also there 
is a lure to candy making which other 
kinds of cookery frequently lack. The 
recipes in "The Candy Cook Book" 
are wholesome, entirely practical, and 
the directions are so clear that the 
veriest amateur may be confident of 
obtaining toothsome results. 
Illustrated. $1.^0 net 

TABLE SERVICE 

By Lucy G. Allen 

A CLEAR, concise and yet com- 
prehensive exposition of the wait- 
ress' duties. 

Recommended by the American 
Library Association. — "Detailed di- 
rections on the duties of the waitress, 
including care of dining room, and of 
the dishes, silver and brass, the re- 
moval of stains, directions for laying 
the table, etc." 

Fully illustrated. $i.6o net 

OUR COMPLETE CATALOG OF COOK 



COOKING FOR TWO 

A Handbook for Young Wives 
By Janet McKenzie Hill 

GIVES in simple and concise style 
those things that are essential 
to the proper selection and preparation 
of a reasonable variety of food for the 
family of two individuals. Menus for 
a week in each month of the year are 
included. 

" * Cooking for Two' is exactly what 
it purports to be — a handbook for 
young housekeepers. The bride who 
reads this book need have no fear of 
making mistakes, either in ordering or 
cooking food supplies." : — Woman's 
Home Companion. 

With ijo illustrations, $2.2^ net 

THE PARTY BOOK 

Invaluable to Every Hostess 

By Winnifred Fales and 

Mary H. Northend 

IT contains a little of everything 
about parties from the invitations 
to the entertainment, including a good 
deal about refreshments." — New York 
Sun. 

With numerous illustrations from pho- 
tographs. $3.00 net 

SAUDS, SANDWICHES AND 
CHAFING DISH DAINTIES 

By Janet McKenzie Hill 
"]1 /TORE than a hundred different 

IVX varieties of salads among the 
recipes — salads made of fruit, of fish, 
of meat, of vegetables, made to look 
pretty in scores of different ways." — • 
Washington Times. 

New Edition, Illustrated, $2.00 net 

BOOKS WILL BE MAILED ON REQUEST 



{ 



bSSk's'tSSe little, brown & CO., Publishers "SSS' 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
327 



AMERICAN' COOKERY 




£^ 




m^^~ 




v 



,-4 



Kitchen 



ci 



]e 



an 



liness 



Old Dutch Ck^anser jjiakes 
everything in the kitchen clean 
and sanitary and is a real safe- 
guard to health. Vou v\ill get 
i>etter and easier results Vjy us- 
ing it for all household cleaning. 

THF: Qt AIJTY INSLKRS ECONOMY 




Buy advertised Goods — Ho not acceptfsubstituies 
328 




lABLh LAID l-QR BRhAKFAS'I. MRr^T COLRSK f-RLK COLr. i 



A Christmas Vision! 

There's a glory in the dawning 

Of the morning 
Christ, the king of kings, was born; 
And a joyous exultation 

And elation 
That drives doubt and fear to scorn. 



There's a magic in the blending 

Of unending 
Praises of God's boundless love. 
And his children will endeavor 

To forever 
Worship him in heaven above! 

There's a glowing adoration 

By the nation 
For His precious gift to man I 
And within each heart a burning 

And a yearning 
To fulfil His every plan I 

Caroline E. Sumner 



A 



Cook 



merican v^ooKery 

VOL. XXV DECEMBER No. 5 



''Christmas Day in the Country" 



By Catherine Cullian 



PERHAPS it was because we had 
never spent a Christmas in the 
country, or possibly it was on 
account of our new summer home that 
the trip was planned. It was suggested 
during the summer months in a casual 
way, and like a rolling ball the thought 
grew until we just knew it must be 
carried out. 

The party, which was to include three 
of my girl friends and three of my hus- 
band's college chums, was not to be simply 
a Christmas Day affair, but that we might 
the better learn to appreciate the beauty 
of the country and have plenty of time 
to make all our preparations, we decided 
to start a few days earlier. There was 
no danger of cold and chilly rooms, for 
we had installed a furnace in the house 
and the caretaker and his wife would look 
after that. Then, too, a great pile of 
wood had been accumulating just outside 
our back door and there would be more 
than enough for the proverbial fire on the 
hearth that Is so linked with the winter 
season. 

It had been previously stipulated that 
we should be thoroughly prepared for 
outdoor, as well as Indoor festivities, and 
for a reason not yet disclosed, each guest 
was requested to add to his outfit a 
scarlet cape with pointed hood. In addi- 
tion to skates, skees, toboggans and snow- 
shoes. 

As enough snow had fallen to save It 
from being a green Christmas, we decided 
to snowshoe over the frozen crust, send- 
ing our baggage direct to the house. 

It was impossible to be blue in that 



sparkling sunset forest, coming as we had 
from the blackened city streets, and the 
beauty of such vast expanses of snow 
filled us with exhilaration. It was an 
interesting study to distinguish the feath- 
ery hemlocks and larches from the rigid 
pines and spruces and point out the dif- 
ferent cone-bearing trees, known by the 
number of needles that grew in bundles 
and groups. Singularly none of us had 
ever seen the tamarisk arrayed In Its 
winter dress, flaunting Its plume of pink 
flowers against the white of the snow, or 
come upon the witch hazel bush ablaze 
with strange yellow blossoms, the only 




CHRISTMAS GIFTS IN THE HALL 



331 



3n 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



shrub In tlie woods remaining In full bloom 
after the snow had fallen. 

We recalled the legend of the balsam 
which caused it to be chosen from all the 
trees in the forest glades for our Christmas 
tree. It was when Anagarius went forth 
to preach of the White Christ to the 
Vikings of the North that the Lord God 
sent three messengers, Faith, Hope and 
Love, to find and light the first tree. They 
searched far and wide for one that should 
be as high as Hope, as wide as Love, and 
that should bear on every bough the sign 
of the cross, and thus they found and 
dedicated the balsam fir. 

There were tiny footsteps imprinted in 
the crust, for the snow is a great betrayer 
of secrets. Funny little rabbit tracks, 
two footprints close together, two larger 
ones farther apart, led everywhere among 
the trees and were mysterious in their 
tracing, that is, if one did not know that 
the rabbit makes his front tracks with 



his hind feet, and his hind tracks with 
his front feet. Surely, white-footed mice 
must have scampered over these snow- 
clad fields, for there were the marks of 
their long tails dragging behind them. 
We then came upon corn shucks stand- 
ing like wigwams along the pasture lands, 
around them a veritable cartwheel of 
small tracks, as if leading to a grand 
general station yet radiating on all sides, 
for the crows and bluejays, rats and 
squirrels had come a-calling in search of 
food. 

It was late, almost dusk when we first 
viewed the bungalow, situated on the 
crest of Indian Hill, overlooking long 
stretches of meadow and grass lands, and 
afar off could be seen a fringe of dark firs 
outlined against the sky. 

The house was of fireproof construction, 
being finished with cement on the inside 
and slap dash for exterior, brightened 
by a red roof and green shutters, these 




TASTE IN DECORATION 



CHRISTMAS IN THE COUNTRY 



333 



latter showing arrow ornamentation, sug- 
gestive of the days when this was a fav- 
orite resort of the Aborigines. 

Exhausted and happy, we were de- 
lighted to find great fires blazing on the 
hearth, for fireplaces were a fad in our 
home and installed in every room. They 
were not extravagant, for wood could be 
had for the cutting, and w4iat is more 
cheerful than an open fire on a cold or 
stormy day.'' 

What ravenous appetites we had devel- 
oped during our long, cold trip, and when 
we gathered around the table we did full 
justice to the ample meal, talking and 
planning for the coming days. 

We then drew our chairs close to the 
fire, luxuriating in the heat until one of the 
party cried, "Let's view nature on a 
moonlit night!" and simultaneously we 
arose and entered the sun parlor, which 
had been built across one side of the house 
overlooking the ravine and snow-clad 
hills beyond. 

The night was beautiful, the full moon 
casting its white glory over the gleaming 
snow, the sky aglow with stars, and the 
peaceful serenity of the winter landscape 
and the intense stillness of the night 
emphasized more poignantly the per- 
petual tragedy of the woods. 

It was bright and late the next morn- 
ing, when we arose and after a hearty 
breakfast of corn pones and flannel cakes 
started off, each with a bag slung across 
his shoulder containing chocolate, sand- 
wiches and a thermos bottle of hot coffee 
for lunch. 

The sun rose, creeping higher over the 
hillside, driving the deepening glory before 
it. From golden to orange, from orange 
to rose, the color deepened. The hills 
were transfigured. There was white fire 
in the frost, and it tingled in our veins 
as we triumphantly crossed the valley, 
where stretched before us a field of un- 
broken snow, gleaming with deep, blue 
shadows. Up hill and down we zig- 
zagged, crossing spaces where the wind 
swept fiercely in our faces, tacking from 
side to side, tangling as we tried to turn. 




TRIMMING FOR CHANDELIER 

The woods were unutterably still and 
the mood of the valley was gentle and 
pensive. The sunshine was fitful, play- 
ing hide and seek with the heavy snow 
clouds, that intermittently drifted across, 
hiding it from view. 

We were looking for long, trailing rib- 
bons of ground pine, and bunches of 
princess pine, which grew under the ever- 
green trees, but it was only after shovel- 
ling the snow away that we found it. 
The exercise whetted our appetites, and 
we devoured our sandwiches, drank our 
coffee, and plied each other with snow 
balls during the half hour we allowed our- 
selves for lunch. We then gathered the 
red alderberries for their splash of color 
and robbed the barberry bush, which 
stood out defiantly, giving us a joyous 
note of welcome. Its berries, we realized, 
would mingle attractively with our green. 

Where the snow had drifted we found 
the partridge berry, which we added to 



334 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



our collection, together with the black 
alderor winter berry, bittersweet, with its 
orange capsules, opening three valves to 
disclose a crimson berry, bunches of ever- 
green and laurel, as well as hardy ferns, 
more especially the sword fern which is 
found green all the year round. 

Last came the selection of the Christ- 
mas tree itself, and we chose a silver fir, 
strapping it to a toboggan, for it was a 
giant and no one could have carried it. 

Farther and farther we traveled until 
the descending sun and creeping shadows 
of the western hills warned us that day- 
light was fast waning, and we were a long 
distance from home. 

As we neared the house a shout of joy 
followed by "Hurrah! the Yule log!" and 
sure enough, there It was, as though laid 
out for our use by the Queen of the Forest 
Fairies, and soon that also was strapped 
to the toboggan with the Christmas tree. 

The day before Christmas dawned 




TREATMENT OF AN ALCOVE 



bright and clear and we were no laggards 
for there was a-plenty to do, the house 
to trim, the carol tree to choose — but 
there, I am ahead of my story. 

As we sorted the greens in preparation 
for our decoration we added to them 
mistletoe, holly and everlasting, which 
latter had been gathered and dyed last 
fall, and tied In bunches for this festive 
occasion. As we worked we related the 
legends connected with each and every 
one. Laurel In the days of the Romans 
was used as an emblem of victory. Holly 
suggested with its spike leaves a crown 
of thorns, the red berries signifying 
Christ's blood, these facts giving to it 
the name of holly or holy tree. Mistletoe, 
which Is associated with holly, was found 
by the Druids on oak trees, cut with a 
golden sickle on the sixth day after the 
first new moon. Caught In a white cloak 
by two white-robed priests it was dis- 
tributed with solemn ceremony among 
the people as a talisman to guard against 
all magic. 

How pleasant It was to recall all these 
myths, as we twined the ropes of laurel 
and hung them in garland effects along 
the walls! In the windows we placed 
stars, crescents and crosses, instead of 
wreaths, tying bits of holly in the 
chair backs, with aggressive red berries. 
Spruce, hemlock and princess pine, with 
plumes of sumach, were used for mantel 
decoration, while the sun room, which was 
to be the home of the Christmas tree, was 
covered with a carpet of pine needles, 
which as one crushed them under the 
feet emitted a delicious odor. Around 
the edge of this woodland carpet was laid 
a border two feet wide of red and white 
everlasting. 

It was nearing midnight and the mood 
of Christmas was upon us as we trooped 
upstairs to put on the scarlet mantles and 
hoods we had brought for our carol sing- 
ing. In solemn procession we descended, 
carrying old-fashioned lanterns, wending 
our way over the snow to the forest glade, 
until we stood before the most perfect 
tree In the grove. Placing our lanterns 



CHRISTMAS IN THE COUNTRY 



335 




WINDOW WITH WREATH 



every door and bursts of laughter and 
shouts of " Merry .Christmas " were 
heard, as each one, hastily scrambling 
into clothes, joined in until the rafters 
rang. 

Immediately after breakfast the doors 
of the sun parlor were thrown open and 
the presentation of gifts consumed the 
entire morning, followed by a Christmas 
dinner that would have done honor to 
any baronial hall. 

Turkeys, brown and crisp, bursting 
with dressing of roasted chestnuts, plump 
geese, and even chicken, mince and apple 
pies, plum pudding, nuts, raisins, oranges, 
candy and even ice cream, which was 
partaken of with a twentieth century ap- 
preciation, even if it did seem a bit of 
anachronism. 

When finished it was dusk and the 
candles were lighted, chairs being moved 
back against the wall in preparation for 
the dance. 

There was the slow and stately minuet, 
known as the dance of little steps and the 
Pavane, which derived its name from the 



in the snow we danced around the tree 
singing Christmas carols. 

"I Saw Three Ships" 

"And all the bells on earth shall ring 
On Christmas day, on Christmas day, 
And all the angels in Heaven shall sing 
On Christmas day in the morning," 

followed by "God Rest You, Merry 
Gentlemen," through the "Legend of the 
Cherry Tree," and all the carols we knew, 
ending with "In Excelsis Gloria." As 
the last note died away on the quiet air, 
the snow began to fall, as though the 
White Christ himself heard and answered 
by bestowing his white benediction 
upon us. 

The clock struck one as we "entered the 
bt^ngalow, but little cared we, so inter- 
ested were we in our festivities, and as we 
opened the door the yule log lay invit- 
ingly before the open fire, gay in its 
holiday garb of mistletoe and holly, as if 
awaiting our arrival. 

The next morning carols were sung at 




JUST A CORNER 






AMERICAN COOKERY 



Latin pavo, peacock, as its movement 
closely imitated the slow strutting of the 
glorious bird. It was grave, solemn and 
ceremonial, consisting of backward and 
forward marches, toe pointings and 
saluting with a high strutting step, accom- 
panied by the flute and piano. One after 
the other the old dances were enjoved, es- 



pecially the Virginia Reel, which afforded 
such a splendid opportunity for a 
romp. 

We look back upon our mid-winter 
festivities with pleasure, for did it not 
cause us to realize, as never before, the 
glory, peace and quiet of Christmas Day 
in the country.^ 




TABLE LAID FOR DINNER, FIRST COURSE BOUILLON. CENTERPIECE OF FIR CONES 

FAVORS LOLLY-POP DOLLS 




Cupid and the New Year 

By Harriet Whitney Symonds 



I 



WOULDN'T go a step, if it wasn't 
for Phebe Price being flat on her 
back with a rheumatic spell, and 
not a soul there to look after her, and 
I'd be a heathen if I didn't; but I am 
bothered about leaving you alone on 
New Year's Day, Dean, and you just 
come on a visit, and all — " 

"Now, please, auntie, stop being 
bothered." Dean Holbrook sprawled 
himself comfortably before the old- 
fashioned fireplace, lighting his pipe with 
a twig off a burning oak branch. "Who 
am I, to worry the best little woman in 
Christendom? What's an old bachelor, 
anyway, to disarrange other people's 
plans?" 

"That's just it." Mrs. Rosanna Croft 
brushed a few flecks of ashes from the 
hearth with a whisk broom, a troubled 
pucker on her kind little face; "a bach- 
elor's the most helpless mortal I know of; 
exactly like a pet house chicken, or a 
duckling the old hen won't own, or any- 
thing that has to be taken particular care 
of. It's been a kind of cross to me that 
you never married. Dean," 

"Well, auntie, it isn't everlastingly too 
late yet; I'm only thirty — not quite out 
of the ring. It's a bit of a snag to me, 
too, that the girl I picked for a sweetheart 
never crossed my path but once." 

"Sweetheart!" Mrs. Croft let the 
whisk broom slide out of her hand, as 
she peered sharply at her nephew through 
her spectacles. "This is the first I ever 
heard of your having a sweetheart. Who 
is she, I'd like to know, and where did 
you meet her?" 

"To the last question, right here in 
your own house, auntie. To the first, I 
don't know exactly who she is. Do you 
remember a summer, some nineteen years 
ago, when I was quartered on you for a 
whole vacation, and you broke your 
ankle stepping down the cellar-way?" 



"I should say I do, especially the 
ankle." 

"And the streams of kin-folks and 
friends that poured in on you from every 
corner of the county?" 

"Mercy, yes; some of them I hardly 
knew by sight." 

"Well, in that tide of relatives, one 
day an especially jolly little wave washed 
in a roly-poly maiden about six years 
old with the roundest, brownest eyes I 
ever beheld. A sociable bit of goods she 
was, and she got clean away with my 
bashful young heart by calling me 'Reddy' 
and teaching me a wonderful game called 
'cat's cradle' within ten minutes after I 
met her." 

"And what was her name?" 

"Beyond 'Kitsy', I haven't the slim- 
mest idea." 

"Who'd she come with?" 

"A large, pinkish lady who was ad- 
dressed as 'Aunt Lois,' and who had 
smooth, flat hair and talked slowly, with 
a little twang." 

"That describes Lois Truman all 
right. She's aunt to most of the county; 
and I recollect her visit; the child I don't 
seem to remember about, but she must 
have been Kittie Lindell, Lois's grand- 
niece; she 'most always tagged Lois 
around, and she'd have been six at that 
time. Her name is Katherine, and her 
folks called her by every absurd nick- 
name, from 'Katerine-chen' to 'Kittens.' 
Well, Kittie was a nice little girl." 

" Kittie Lindell," mused Dean. "With 
a tangible name-tag, who knows but I 
may find a trail yet? I gave her a 
sassafras whistle, and she — do you re- 
member the pin cushion she sent me a 
few days after her visit? It came in a 
box of stuff that some one — Aunt Lois, 
I suppose — ■ sent you." 

"I believe I do, now you mention it, 
though I had forgotten about it; a comi- 



337 



338 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



cal, crooked little contrivance, wasn't 
it?" 

With mind absorbed in a retrospective 
trip to Boyhood, Dean Holbrook, after 
his aunt's departure, sat beside the fire 
watching a shaft of bluish flame, as It 
dipped and swirled about a snaggy old 
tree-branch. A tiny tag of smoke, fling- 
ing Itself beyond its own confines and 
assailing Dean's sensitive nose with a 
pungent tang, brought his senses back to 
the port of the present. He arose, 
thrusting the smoking brand into its 
cavern, and walked restlessly to the 
window. The atmospheric outlook was 
not stimulating — a vast, vague sweep of 
zincky-gray, it seemed, through which 
sparse flakes were spiritlessly drifting. 

"A good day to stay home and sleep," 
yawned Dean; "fit neither for driving, 
sleighing nor motoring — but great Gen- 
erals, somebody's evidently trying that 
last!" as a loud, long, melancholy skirl 
cut through the air and started a neigh- 
bor's dog to howling. 

From the vapory desolation of distance 
a motor car rapidly developed outline, 
slowing, as it neared the Croft gate, and 
stopping with a second dolorous blast. 

*'Hal And who may be these way- 
farers.?" wondered Dean, as three people 
stepped from the car and came up the 
door path. "Pilgrims and strangers, or 
some of Aunt Rosanna's innumerable 
relatives.? Well—" 

He stepped to the hall door as the three 
persons reached the piazza. 

"Friend," saluted the masculine one- 
third of the party, in a pompously polite 
tone, "can you tell us how far it Is from 
here to the Old Mission Inn.? We have, 
In some way, missed the trail, and have 
been told a dozen times. In answer to our 
inquiries, that the Inn was *ten miles 
further on.' The question now Is, which 
direction do we take to go 'further on'.? " 

"You must have taken a wrong turn," 
Dean Informed him. "The Old Mission 
Inn is some sixty miles south of here." 

"Sixty miles! Oh-h, Laurin!" pro- 
tested a dismayed voice from a bundle of 



furs and a muffle of veils at the first 
speaker's elbow. "And I'm ready to 
expire of cold and hunger now; I can't 
hold out one more mile. Do ask if we 
can't come in and warm up and have 
some refreshments; we'd pay well — " 

" Madam, no request Is needed." Dean 
threw the door wide. "The lady of this 
house has never been known to close her 
doors or her stores to man, woman, child, 
beast or bird. In her name I Invite you 
to enter." 

"How nice," purred the voice. "Help 
me up the step, Laurin. Come, Kate; 
I hope you have my smelling salts in your 
satchel." 

"I have; and your throat drops, and 
your camphor bottle, and your mint 
lozenges." This third voice was heart- 
somely clear and cheery. Dean looked 
back at Its proprietor, whose bright face, 
ruddy from the keen air, and smooth, 
firm throat were unshielded by veil or 
muffler. 

"Oh, I'm frozen to my toes," moaned 
the voice out of the veils. "Laurin, 
did you get my foot-brick from the car.?" 

"I did," assured Laurin, adding as he 
stepped Into the Croft living room, "you'll 
not want It here, however." 

"Oh," screamed the muffled lady, 
"what a delicious big fire! Do let me 
have' the rocker with that patchwork 
cushion. Kate, come and unwind my 
veils, won't you.? And then if I could 
have a little sip of something hot — " 

As the small woman, coming out of her 
chrysalis of wrappings, cuddled Into the 
glow from the fireplace, the fretful puckers 
softened from her little faded blonde face. 

The man of the party, having husked 
himself out of his overcoat, began an 
introduction: 

"I am Laurin Hllliard, from the city. 
These ladles are respectively, my wife, 
Mrs. Hllliard, and my sister-in-law — " 

"And, oh, my stars!" the small blonde 
broke Impulsively in, with a cajoling 
smile at Dean, "we're all on the very 
brink of starvation. Did you say we 
might have some refreshments.?" 



CUPID AND THE NEW YEAR 



339 



"Mrs. Hilllard, you are more than 
welcome to anything there may be in 
this house," Dean assured her. "I am 
a visitor here, myself — ■ Dean Holbrook, 
if you please. My aunt was called away, 
but I have never known her pantry to be 
short on supplies; the one difficulty is 
that I am not skilled in the proper prep- 
aration of a meal. I can make coffee, 
after a fashion — " 

"Oh, Kate'll help you out, there," 
twittered Mrs. Hilliard. "She's a splen- 
did cook — knows all about such things — " 

"There, now, Maidie," laughed Kate, 
who had laid aside her coat and hat and 
come up to the fire; "keep something 
for a pleasant surprise. I'm quite ready, 
Mr. Holbrook, to do what I can in the 
way of first aid to the hungry, if you'll 
show me where to find the supplies — " 

"It's immensely obliging of you," said 
Dean, admiringly, as the young lady 
tucked back her sleeves in businesslike 
style and followed his lead to the kitchen; 
"but if you'll merely supervise — tell me 
how things go together, I'll do the actual 
execution." 

"No, let me help," she insisted. "If 
you'll fill that nice, shiny teakettle with 
water, that'll be a good beginning. I 
see the lady of the house is an expert 
housekeeper." 

"My little auntie's a 'top-notcher' in 
that," boasted Dean. "And as for 
cooking — it's her hobby." 

"Ahl She's a kindred spirit, then. 
Now, let me peep into the pantry, if you 
please. Oh, how delicious! And here's 
the very last word in aprons, which I shall 
appropriate, temporarily." 

She buttoned herself into Aunt Ros- 
anna's plaid gingham apron, whose 
glossy panoply covered her skirt to the 
hem and adjusted its ruffled bib to her 
rounded chin in the friendliest manner. 
Smoothing its trim pockets, she stood for 
several minutes gazing about the room 
with frank interest. 

"I'm a crank on kitchens," said she; 
"and this is my ideal; I believe I must 
have dreamed it. some time or other." 



With a laugh she turned again to the 
pantry. 

"Here's an elegant cold roast turkey; 
we'll have it hot in a twinkle. And a 
dish of mashed potato that only needs 
warming over; and beet salad; and a 
bread box full of lovely bread and rolls; 
and pickled peppers!" 

"There's a three-story layer cake some- 
where," contributed Dean, "with nuts 
and stuff in the middle; auntie built it 
this morning; and she said there were 
mince pies on the top shelf. The butter's 
in a stone crock to the left." 

"Kate," arose a pathetic wail from the 
living room, "are we going to have some- 
thing to eat soon.? I'm getting light- 
headed." 

"We're going to have a banquet in 
something less than no time," Kate 
cheerfully assured her, as she set Dean 
to grinding coffee and laying the table 
while she heated, seasoned, garnished and 
otherwise enhanced the excellence of the 
various cold dishes to the very point of 
poetry. 

When the last touch, a glass dish of 
pungent mustard pickles, had been added, 
Kate inspected the heaped board with a 
gleam of pride. 

"How does it look, Mr. Holbrook?" 

"Gorgeous!" Dean savored the gravy 
steam with rapturous snifi's. "Aunt 
Rosanna herself couldn't put a finer 
spread together!" 

Fussy little Mrs. Hilliard was beguiled 
into a near-cheerful mood by the sight of 
the completed meal, and even the pom- 
pous Laurin relaxed into a judiciously 
restrained geniality. 

Yet, a shadow sat at Dean's elbow 
during the banquet — the knowledge of 
what its close presaged. His exhilara- 
tion over the day's adventure collapsed 
like an aeroplane stricken in mid-air, 
when preparation for the departure of 
the party was made immediately after 
dinner. 

"We simply have to get to the Old 
Mission Inn this afternoon," Mr. Hilliard 
asserted, "and we're in for a snow storm. 



340 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



now. Kate, you'll never have time to 
assist iMr. Holbrook in clearing up — 
I'll make that all right — " 

But Kate, flitting about, setting away 
the dinner left-overs and sorting the 
dishes into neat piles, continued her 
course. 

"I'm going to help do the dishes," she 
declared, firmly. "It won't take long; 
the kettle's boiling now." 

A joyful task it was to Dean to dry the 
various articles of china and cutlery on 
the large, soft tea-towel that Kate put 
into his hands, as she deftly lifted them 
from the hot suds and rinsed them in a 
pan of clear, scalding water. But, though 
he prolonged the rite by every practicable 
art, the end of a golden quarter-hour 
found the dish-washing fully completed. 
Kate restored the big pan to its especial 
nail, pulled her sleeves down and hung 
up her apron with a thoughtful expression. 

"I seem to know just where everything 
belongs," she said, "and I don't know 
how it happens. If I didn't dream this 
house, I must have seen it before, but — " 

"Kate, aren't you ever coming.^" 
called Mrs. Hilliard, impatiently. "I 
shouldn't think you'd want to be late, 
considering the occasion, and it's begin- 
ning to snow like fury; we'll have to 

fly-" 

Then Hilliard came, to hasten his 
sister-in-law and vex Dean's spirit with 
an insulting proffer of a ten-dollar bill, 
and all in a flash, as it seemed, they were 
gone and Dean was watching the big 
gray car fade in a whirl of flying snow. 

"Bonehead!" ranted the indignant 
young man, applying the elegant epithet 
to himself. " She's gone — • gone! I don't 
know where she lives; outside of 'Kate' 
I haven't a glimmer of idea what her 
name is! I'm a fine imitation of a being 
with a brain, letting her get away In that 
style I" 

He slumped Into a chair, contemplated 
the waning blaze in the fireplace with 
glooming brow for several moments, then 
smote his knee lustily with the force of a 
sudden idea. 



"I'll stake every button I've got, that 
girl is Kittle LIndell!" 

And Aunt Rosanna, when she heard 
about the day's doings, was inclined to 
the same view. 

" She might be her just as easy as not," 
said she. "The Hilllards I don't know a 
thing about, but there were a lot of the 
older LIndell girls, and I never heard who 
they all married. They lived over at 
Rolllnsville. Tell you what I could do, 
Dean; I could find out from Lois Truman 
if KIttie lives there now, or where she Is." 

"Auntie, you've struck the idea square 
on the head." Dean cut a boyish caper 
and gave his relative a .happy salute on 
her plump cheek. "Let the good deed 
be speedily done, and remember I prob- 
ably shan't sleep a wink until I hear 
from you." 

So he carried a sprig of hope back to 
the great, money-grinding mill of the 
city, and on the third day of the new 
year his heart gave a joyous bounce at 
sight of a letter from Aunt Rosanna's 
post-office town. This was its brief 
message: 

"Greenlea, Jan. 2, 19 — ■. 
Dear Nephew, 

I was fixing to ride over to Lois Tru- 
man's today to find out what you wanted 
to know, but it won't be any- use to go 
now. This morning's Press says that 
Kittle LIndell was married at the Old 
Mission Inn yesterday evening at eight 
o'clock, to a Mr. Benjamin Lenox. So 
that's why they were in such a to-do to 
get away New Year's Day. And I 
must say I think that girl Is a minx not 
to have told you a word about it. But 
you take my say-so, there's lots of just 
as nice girls in the sea as any Kittle 
LIndell ever was. 

Your affectionate aunt, 

Rosanna Croft." 

" Sic transit the romance of my youth," 
reflected Dean, with a glum shake of his 
head. "If I can't have the girl of my 
heart, all Aunt Rosanna's other 'nice 
girls' are dust and ashes to me." 



f 



CUPID AND THE NEW YEAR 



341 



The great money-mill of the city 
ground on for almost twelve months 
more, and then anotherof Aunt Rosanna's 
sparse and spare missives made its way 
to Dean Holbrook. 

"Greenlea, Dec. 29, 19—. 
Dear Nephew, 

Be sure and come to Greenlea a day 
ahead of New Year's this time. Aunt 
Lois Truman is going to have a gathering 
to watch the old year out and has invited 
you and me both, but I wouldn't want 
to drive Comet 'way over there in the 
evening unless you were along. 

Your affectionate aunt, 

Rosanna Croft." 

"I dare say the little auntie has 
another ' nice girl ' up her sleeve," grinned 
Dean, to himself; "and it's Kittie or 
nobody for me; but I'll go." 

A New Year's eve, twinkling and 
sparkling with clear white stars and firm, 
crusty snow, a tidy cutter and a lively 
black pacer — this combination. Dean . 
Holbrook owned to his aunt, made the 
trip from Greenlea to Clover Bend a 
dream of exhilaration. Arctically cold the 
air was, but Aunt Lois Truman's living 
room was a riot of light and warmth with 
the glow of tall, red-shaded oil lamps and 
gorgeous flames, crackling about cor- 
pulent hickory limbs. Aunt Lois, her- 
self, bustled out to meet the guests at 
the outer door. 

"Come right along in, to the fire," she 
greeted heartily. "It sure is a nipping 
cold night. I'll send Jot to put Comet 
in the barn. Here, Rosanna, lemme have 
your wraps. And this is that big nephew 
of yours that I haven't set eyes on since 
he was a little red-headed tackey — land 
alive! Proud to meet you again, Mr. 
Dean; come in. I've got a whole skiff 
load of young folks I'd like you to 
meet." 

Dean, following his aunt and hostess 
to the living room, felt as if he had fallen 
into a flower garden of the greatest 
brilliance. Girls, plump, slim, tall, small, 



light and dark, blossomed suddenly upon 
him, the roses, violets, verbenas, ger- 
aniums and marigolds of maidenhood. 
In one dot of a girl with a few freckles 
sprinkled over her rosy face, he saw the 
emblem of a dainty little speckled pink, 
and was about to settle, butterfly-like, 
beside her. Aunt Lois, however, spoiled 
his plan. 

"iMidge," she called, "I shouldn't 
wonder if Mr. Holbrook would like some 
hot coffee after his cold ride; make your- 
self useful and show him to the dining 
room." 

And, now that he thought of it, Dean 
decidedly approved of the idea; he was 
hungry, and he found the large dining 
room, balmy with the clean warmth from 
a wood stove, a most desirable haven. 

A great table was spread with every 
known variety of sandwich, besides 
salads, spiced pickles, and the most be- 
guiling of home-baked cakes. The lady 
in charge of these delights presented only 
a back view at the moment, as she stood 
peeping into the mysterious depths of a 
large coffee pot. What was it about her, 
Dean wondered, that seemed to fit so 
naturally with the atmosphere of New 
Year's day one year ago.^ 

A tumult of fresh arrivals arose in the 
hall, and the speckled pink of a girl spun 
about on her high-heeled slippers, bub- 
bling a hasty introduction in which Dean 
caught the name of Lenox. 

"And Aunt Lois says to give Mr. 
Holbrook some coffee, Kate, and — 
excuse me — •" She was gone, as though 
wafted away by a zephyr. 

The lady of the coffee-pot turned, and 
Dean was looking into the brown eyes 
that had disrupted his peace during 
twelve long months. 

"Mr. Holbrook, once more," she 
smiled, cheerily. "How fine! Some 
coffee.^ I remember exactly how you 
like it—" 

"But — -but — " he felt bewildered. 
"Mrs. Lenox—" 

''Miss Lenox," she corrected, quickly. 
Concluded on page 380 



A Dietary Blunder 

By Mary Graham 



W 



'E both have fed as well," said 
Cassius in comparing him- 
self and Brutus with the great 
Caesar. Even so long ago as that, ac- 
cording to the Illustrious Bard of Avon, 
it was known that what we feed on makes 
us what we are. Later researches have 
more fully established the fact and shown 
its scientific basis, and now we justly give 
praise or blame to those who fix our diet 
and fix our physical status for better or 
for worse. Neither the praise nor the 
blame can be extreme, for the science of 
dietetics is as yet too new and too little 
known for the average housekeeper to be 
able to act with certainty in planning her 
meals. Still there are some well estab- 
lished laws that all may safely obey. 
From the standpoint of Nature the viola- 
tion of these laws is a crime, the fixed 
penalty for which Is sickness and often 
death. In Nature's court, as in man's, 
*' Ignorance of the law excuses no one"; 
and somebody pays the penalty for every 
violation, — more often the innocent than 
the guilty. 

Dietary blunders vary in different sec- 
tions and among different classes, but one 
of the most common is the use of an over- 
abundance of fat in the preparation and 
serving of food. It is eaten In too many 
combinations; and it is, in a way, a 
means of concealing poor cookery. 
Cooks and all who eat seek to improve 
the taste of poor food, poorly cooked, by 
seasoning, and the cheapest and com- 
monest form of seasoning Is fat. In some 
homes it enters into the preparation of 
every dish, and the amount used is enor- 
mous. The amount of fat recommended 
by authorities on food is about four 
ounces per day for men at work. The 
quantity used in most household diet- 
aries far exceeds this amount, — with the 
result of frequent cases of illness and 
decided physical frailty among the mem- 
bers of the family. 



An intimate knowledge and compari- 
son of our own and our neighbors' culi- 
nary departments will produce a good 
deductive proof of the harmfulness of 
such an ill-balanced diet. One family, 
In which this writer boarded when a child, 
consumed a ten-pound bucket of cooking 
fat every week. For children and grown 
people of sedentary habits, dietarians 
allow two or three ounces of fat per day. 
This family used nearly four ounces per 
member besides what they got In meat, 
butter, eggs and milk. Did they profit 
by it, were they well and strong.^ The 
children had all the ills that little folks 
are heirs to. Colds, fevers and sore 
throats were taken as a matter of course. 
The mother was a bundle of nerves 
and both she and her husband had to go 
to bed, occasionally, and call in the doctor. 
This, too, was a matter of course. Of the 
seven children in the family, three died 
in childhood; one is a confirmed drunkard 
and, at forty, looks like sixty; one 
daughter has had various illnesses and 
operations; the other daughter, now a 
woman of forty-three, has never been 
"quite well"; and the youngest son has 
had at least one operation and is the pic- 
ture of frailty. 

Recently, a family of four more or 
less afflicted members lived near me. 
The mother had rheumatism; the father 
had terrible spells of illness and a chronic 
case of what a specialist called "nerv- 
ous indigestion"; the one son had a 
"bumpy" complexion, bad eyes and 
ears, and a frequent inability to apply 
himself to his studies, though he had a 
very bright mind; and the one daughter 
lost her voice at one time, has had two 
operations, is liable to go to bed sick at 
any time, and always has more than her 
share of those delicate little fibers called 
nerves. J;udging from the recipes that 
the mother of this family used and the 
odors of frying things that came from her 



342 



A DIETARY BLUNDER 



343 



kitchen, they must each have averaged 
three ounces of fat per day, exclusive of 
meat, eggs and other fat-producing foods. 

A dear old lady, who died a few years 
past seventy after many hard spells of 
sickness and years of suffering from 
"sick-headaches," was noted for her 
"good, rich cooking." She habitually 
used half a pound of butter in a single 
chicken pie, and insisted that the thing 
to be considered in diet is what "tastes 
good." She never seemed to realize 
that taste is very often merely a matter 
of habit, and all too frequently a habit 
formed through the agency of an ignor- 
ant, careless cook. Her one child in- 
herited her headaches — likewise her 
cooking recipes. 

Another old lady, not yet seventy, 
who must have all her food "well 
seasoned" (with fat) and who closely 
resembles the moth, in that she "makes 
the butter-fly," was an invalid for two 
years of her life, had to have an opera- 
tion, has been very sick many times 
besides, is often "not at all well," and 
has never been strong enough to keep her 
house in order. She has six children, 
one dead, and not one of the other five 
can be called strong. This woman has 
one little granddaughter, a very bright, 
beautiful four-year-old. The little girl 
has, according to a fine osteopath, poor 
intestinal digestion; and she eats bacon, 
gravy and quantities of butter. Her 
mother insists that these things agree 
with her; but. for some reason, she 
often has fever, cold and tonsilitis for 
days at a time, and is a regular little 
medicine bottle. 

Probably every woman responsible for 
such cookery and such suffering would 
say that the amount of fat that she uses 
in cooking has nothing to do with it, 
that we must have fat to eat, and that 
"every one is sometimes sick." And 
it would, perhaps, be absurd to draw con- 
clusions from the observation of one 
person, or even a dozen persons, if these 
conclusions did not conform to a well 
supported physiological theory. The first 



principle on which this theory is based is 
the fact, accepted by practically the 
whole medical profession, that nearly 
all our bodily ills, even age itself ac- 
cording to Dr. Metchnikoff, are caused 
by decomposing waste matter in the 
alimentary canal. Everything in the 
way of disease, from bilious fever to the 
terrible incurable afflictions, is either 
caused directly or aggravated by this 
impurity in the body. Even the com- 
mon infectious diseases, like chicken-pox, 
measles, and tuberculosis, are made more 
violent and more common by the fact 
that the white corpuscles of the blood 
are too busy, trying to carry off the 
impurities generated internally, to give 
proper attention to those that come from 
without. If these little carriers were 
not given too much to do, they could keep- 
the blood clean and the body well. 

The next point to be noted is that this 
unclean condition of the alimentary canal 
is relieved, according to Nature's plan, 
by the proper action of the liver, which 
furnishes the natural purgative of the 
body. If the liver fails to do this work, 
those organ^ that help in removing waste 
from the body, the skin and the kidneys, 
are more than apt to be injured by the 
extra work given them to do. 

The last important fact in this theory 
is that the liver furnishes the bile which, 
with the pancreatic and intestinal juices, 
must digest all sweets and fats taken into 
the body and all starch and protein left 
undigested by mouth and stomach. If 
too much fat or sugar is taken in the 
food or too much starch or protein is 
left undigested by the proper organs, the 
liver is given more than it can do and 
undigested food is left in the colon to 
decay and breed disease. 

It may be contended that some other 
element of food may be responsible for 
this condition. It Is true that too large 
an amount of protein or of sugar is the 
cause of very serious disorders, and an 
overabundance of starch in the diet Is 
sure to form a disease-breeding obstruc- 
tion in the large intestine. There are 



344 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



some popular dishes in which starch 
foods are combined with fats in a way 
that renders them almost impossible of 
proper digestion; as, for instance^ pie 
crust and any sort of fried dough or bat- 
ter. In such cases the particles of flour 
are surrounded by fat, and therefore can- 
not be digested in the mouth, their proper 
place of digestion, but must be digested 
in the duodenum after the fat around 
them has been assimilated. This places 
an extra burden — an impossible one, if 
the quantity eaten is large — • on that 
part of the digestive apparatus. How- 
ever, protein bearing foods are rather 
too scarce and expensive to be such a 
common menace to health as fat; and, 
as a matter of fact, sweets and starches 
are not served in such superfluous abun- 
dance and in such a variety of combina- 
tions. More than that, children are not 
allowed to eat meats, the commonest 



protein bearing foods, as they are allowed 
to eat butter and gravy, and do not 
acquire such a fondness for meats as 
they do for fats — a fondness that lasts 
through life. 

In the capacity of public school teacher, 
this writer had occasion to know and to 
study more than four hundred children. 
An unusually good opportunity to know 
their people and their home conditions 
led to the belief that most of the illness, 
the affliction, bad temper, defective 
senses, and stupidity found among that 
large number of children could be traced 
to bad diet, to ignorance in the kitchens 
of their homes; and later observation has 
confirmed the belief that more of the ills 
that injure childhood, wreck manhood, 
and bring an impotent old age are due to 
this one great culinary blunder — an im- 
moderate use of fats — than to any other 
one cause. 



The Youngest Bride and the Household 

Gospel 

By Margery Fifield 



O 



H, Aunt!" exclaimed the Young- 
est Bride, as she sat down 
breathlessly on the divan in her 
aunt's living room, "what do you suppose 
happened to me last night? You never 
could imagine anything so awful!" 

"Oh, yes I could!" laughed the Aunt. 
"I can guess the first time. It was the 
bugaboo of all housekeepers — unex- 
pected guests — and nothing in the house 
to eat! Am I right.?" 

"Auntie, you wonderful thing! aren't 
you always right.? But how did you 
guess.?" 

"I've been there," she said grimly. 
"It was Sunday night §upper, I suppose. 
What did you give them.?" 

"It makes me shudder to think of it. 
I sent Bob to the delicatessen and he 
brought back slimy potato salad and 



spaghetti, pickles and anemic cake. I 
felt so mortified when I thought of all the 
lovely Sunday night suppers we have had 
at the Whiting's, and I'm sure they felt 
that they were unwelcome guests from 
the way Bob flew out and I flew around." 

"I imagine every one has been through 
it, but several years ago I scared away 
forever that bugaboo. Unexpected guests 
for lunch, dinner or supper have no ter- 
rors for me now. In fact, I welcome 
them. Perhaps you would like to hear 
my secret, so that in the future they may 
hold no terrors for you." 

"I might have known, Auntie, that 
you would have something up your sleeve 
to tell me. Let's have it, do," she said, 
as she tucked her feet up under, tailor 
fashion, on the divan. 

"I have an emergency shelf — " 



THE YOUNGEST BRIDE AND THE HOUSEHOLD GOSPEL 345 



"So have I," interrupted the Bride, 
"but you can't feed your guests tea and 
coffee and cinnamon, can you?" 

"That isn't an emergency shelf. Every 
good housekeeper should keep things like 
that in the house all the time. My shelf 
is something different, and it's my 
eleventh commandment that nothing on 
it shall be touched unless for the specific 
purpose of entertaining unexpected 
guests." 

"But you can't keep enough in the 
house to get a meal, can you.^" 

"That is its purpose. I keep things 
like canned meats and fish, cheese, mar- 
malade, canned fruit and so forth. I 
really can get quite a respectable meal. 
You and Bob have had them often, but 
you didn't realize it," she laughed. 

"I never thought of keeping things in 
the house for that definite purpose," the 
Bride said thoughtfully. "Wouldn't it 
have made a difference last Sunday night, 
though," she mused. "Give me some 
ideas, can't you, Auntie .? I'll get a pencil 
and paper." 

"Better yet, I'll show you my shelf. 
I'm quite proud of it," she said, as she 
led the way into the kitchen. 

"Why, Aunt," the Bride exclaimed, as 
she viewed the top shelf of the cupboard 
with its imposing array of cans and jars, 
" I believe that you are stocking up hoping 
that the next royal visitor will come your 
way. Tell me what are the best things 
to begin on. I can't have as big a supply 
as you have." 

"You don't need to," her aunt replied. 
"I really have more than I need, but I 
do take such a foolish pride in it that I 
can't help splurging a little. Just let me 
have your paper and pencil," she said, 
"and, perhaps, I can give you some 
suggestions. 

"Here you are," she said after she had 
busied herself with the pencil for a few 
minutes. "Here is the foundation of an 
emergency shelf, which is to take care of 
your unexpected company. You can 
elaborate on it as your tastes and your 
finances will permit. 



1 can sardines (the real sardines if you 
can afford them — otherwise a reliable 
brand) 

1 can tuna fish (salmon, shrimp or 
chicken, etc.) 

1 can peas 

Saltines (in paraffin-wrapped package) 

Soda crackers (in parafiin-wrapped pack- 
age) 

Lump sugar 

1 can tomato soup (celery or asparagus, 
etc.) 

Bouillon cubes 

1 can pineapple 

1 can fruit (peaches, apricots, etc.) 

1 can pears (for salad) 

Olive oil 

1 jar jam 

1 package of sweet crackers 

1 jar bacon 

1 tin of cheese 

Dried milk 

Few nut meats 

1 jar good salad dressing 

"Those are just the things that you 
are apt to have in the house from time to 
time, anyway, but unless you do as I do 
and keep them for a specific occasion you 
will find that you haven't them when 
you want them most." 

"Now tell me, Aunt, how to get a 
respectable meal out of them. Sunday 
night supper, for instance." 

"I'll give you some sample menus, and 
you can write them down, if you like," 
replied her Aunt. "If you are keeping 
house, you will have things like bread and 
butter, milk, eggs and, perhaps, even 
lettuce in the house. Of course lettuce 
really makes the salad, but if you have 
none, you can serve a salad, such as the 
one in the following menu, without it 
and it will be very acceptable. You can 
take this Sunday night supper, not out 
of your refrigerator, but off of your 
emergency shelf. 

Escalloped Tuna Fish Buttered Toast 
Pineapple-and-Cheese Salad 

Canned Apricots Sweet Crackers 
Tea 



346 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



I 



"Or something simpler: 

Grilled Sardines with 

Toast Points and Lemon 
Saltines with Cheese and Jam Tea 

*'0r: 

Cheese and Bacon Toast 

Pear-and-Nut Salad 

Sweet Crackers Tea 

"That is naming only a few of the pos- 
sibilities of your shelf." 

"I could do -the same thing for lunch, 
couldn't I? The girls drop in so many 
mornings, but usually I don't dare invite 
them to stay for lunch because Bob and 
I are such ravenous wolves at dinner that 
the larder is bare." 

"Certainly you could. With the addi- 
tion of potatoes, which you always have 
in the house, how would this be for an 
impromptu company luncheon.^ 

Cream of Tomato Soup 

Salmon Souffle Baked Potatoes 

Apricot Betty Tea 

"Now press your ice box into service. 
Suppose that you have unexpected guests 
today. What have you on hand that you 
could use.'"' 

"Absolutely nothing. A little cold 
lamb, a saucer of peas. You can't get 
much lunch out of that." 

"Just the thing," exclaimed the Aunt, 
"the lamb for croquettes, served with a 
white sauce with the peas in it, some hot 
biscuits, and with the shelf providing the 
rest you have 

Bouillon 

Lamb Croquettes 

Tiny Baking Powder Biscuits 



Pear-and-Nut Salad 
Crackers Jam 



Tea 



"You've no idea, either," continued the 
Aunt, "how helpful your shelf will be 
when you want to dress up the rather 
plain dinner for the 'man from the office' 
about whom Bob telephones a half-hour 
before dinner time." 

"He's never done it yet," said the 
Bride, emphatically. 

"But he will, my dear," asserted the 
Aunt, "all men do. And it's nice not to 
discourage them in it. W^hen a man is 
proud of his home it gives him great 
pleasure to bring his associates to it," 
she advised. " Now what are you having 
for dinner tonight.^ That would be a 
good starting point from which to plan 
our company dinner." 

"This is the third day on our roast 
beef," she laughed, "lettuce, the inevita- 
ble carrots, baked potatoes and tapioca." 

"Not at all bad," replied the Aunt as 
she wrote, "but doesn't it sound better 
now } 

Cream of Tomato Soup with Croutons 

Meat Pie Carrots and Peas 

Potatoes on the Half Shell 

Lettuce with French Dressing 

Tapioca w^th Jam Small Cups of Coffee 

"You see I have taken soup from the 
emergency shelf, then peas to mix with 
the carrots. Also I have dressed up the 
dessert a little bit, by topping each por- 
tion with a spoonful of jam." 

"That sounds like a grand meal to me," 
said the Bride enthusiastically, "and Pm 
going out this minute to begin my emer- 
gency shelf." 

"Don't spend quite all your money," 
advised her Aunt laughing, "remember 
vou have to eat occasionallv vourselves." 




Talks to Teachers of Domestic Science 

By Mary D. Chambers 

Author of "Principles of Food Preparation" and "Breakfasts, Luncheons 

AND Dinners" 



THE fact that the digestive organs, 
under the stimulus of a savory 
and delicious food, when this is 
either seen, or smelt, or tasted, are capa- 
ble of secreting a digestive fluid of more 
than ordinary power has been taken 
advantage of in the manufacture of the 
pepsin of commerce. This is prepared 
from the stomach of the pig. A fine, 
healthy young animal Is selected, and 
then well fed and cared for until it Is as 
plump and happy as piglets ever are. 
Piggy is accustomed to getting his food 
at regular hours, until, at last, a day 
comes, when he Is in the very pink of 
condition, yet meal-time passes without 
a meal being served. He squeals remon- 
strance, but nobody responds. This goes 
on for a meal or two, until piggy's healthy 
young appetite is most voraciously keen, 
and then a tempting trough of the food 
he likes best, something that smells good, 
is placed just beyond the bars of his pen. 
At the sight and smell of the coveted food 
his appetite-juice is immediately and 
abundantly poured forth In anticipation 
of digesting it, and then our piggy is 
quickly and painlessly killed, and the 
extracted digestive juice is made Into 
the preparation of pepsin we buy at the 
drug stores. If piggy's appetite had not 
been aroused, the extracted juice would 
be only fit to digest whatever he ate last, 
and would be of no use except for an aid 
in the digestion of the same thing. 

Enough should have been said to show 
the importance of eating well-relished 
food, or, at least, of having something at 
every meal that will taste good enough to 
promote a secretion of appetite-juice. 
Did you ever try faithfully to masticate 
your way through slices of stale bread 



spread with a very little butter, and then 
observe the difference made by adding 
a spoonful of marmalade.^ It seems as 
if something awakened within you, and 
thus your whole body became more alive. 
The serving of a sweet course after dinner 
Is far from being a luxury or even merely 
a frill, for the small helping of a delicious 
pudding or other sweet, after the most 
important meal of the day, is a decided 
help to the digestion of that meal. The 
menu-maker ought to see that, on days 
when the dinner has for Its main dish 
something wholesome and nutritious but 
uninteresting to the taste, the dessert 
shall be extra delicious and appetizing, 
so that It will be the means of providing 
enough good appetite-juice to digest the 
unrelished course which preceded it. 

So we find particular care taken in the 
preparation of dainty dishes for invalids, 
for delicate children, for persons of weak 
digestion. The food that is relished is 
half-digested. 

Very strong and vigorous persons, with 
the digestions of ostriches, can eat food 
that is far from appetizing and be none 
the worse for it — • within certain limits. 
Once a squad of hardy young men was 
experimented on, under the supervision 
of the United States Department of 
Nutrition Investigation. They were 
given nothing to eat except meat that 
had been prepared in such a way that all 
the taste was boiled out of it, as it is when 
soup stock Is made, and the meat left In 
the kettle is thought good for nothing 
but the dog. This left-over meat is 
really the most jiutritlous part, as we 
teachers have all learned, and the good- 
tasting soup contains very little besides 
Its good taste, to nourish the body. But 
347 



34S 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



ihink what it would be like to eat such 
tasteless stuff for breakfast, dinner and 
supper, with nothing to mitigate its 
monotony, and to continue this regime 
day after day. The young men held out 
as long as they could, and showed no loss 
in weight or in vigor, and the stuff was 
found to be well digested. Then, one 
by one, after several days they gave up 
ir>ing to eat any more, they could no 
longer force themselves to it. They 
wanted to go on with the experiment for 
I he sake of science (perhaps it was other- 
wise made worth their while, personally), 
but one and all their bodies rebelled, and 
they could no longer compel themselves 
to do what nature so intensely disliked. 
I suppose the lesson to be drawn from this 
is that we were meant to enjoy our food, 
and that although, for a time, we may, 
by the exertion of a strong will-power, 
compel ourselves to eat and digest dis- 
tasteful food, we cannot keep it up beyond 
a certain limit. It is easy to see what 
harm may be done, in the case of sensi- 
tive, delicate children, by forcing them 
to eat things they dislike. It is easy to 
see that the time of recovery from sick- 
ness is not the time to exert any extra 
amount of will power in the effort to eat 
anything that is excessively disliked. 
Also we may infer that it pays to have 
at least one dish for every meal that is 
especially liked by every one. 

Now, the worst of this business of 
highly-relished food is that we have 
rather overdone it, during the progress of 
civilization, and our skilful chefs have 
composed dishes so delicious that they 
are eaten in excess. It is highly ques- 
tionable whether the true appetite-juice 
is manufactured by the body under such 
artificial stimulation, or at any time when 
the temptation is yielded to to eat more 
than we need. This brings us to the ques- 
tion of 

Hunger Versus Appetite 

Appetite, strictly speaking, is the symp- 
tom oi hunger, just as pain is the symptom 
of injury. Hunger is the need of the 



body for food, and this need is indicated 
by the sensation of appetite or desire for 
food, in the same way that the need of a 
broken arm or an ulcerated tooth for 
help or medication is indicated by the 
sensation of suffering. 

Nature meant us never to eat until we 
felt an appetite, so that appetite-juice 
might always be secured. The savage, 
living according to the dictates of nature, 
ate, as a rule, only when his appetite 
impelled him. A witty writer puts into 
the mouth of a neolithic man the follow- 
ing prophetic utterance, which caused his 
neighbors, so far was it from their condi- 
tion at that time, to be 

". . . . startled and surprised. 
He said: My friends, in course of time 
We shall be civilized! 
We are going to live in cities! 
We are going to fight in wars! 
We are going to eat three times a day 
Without the natural cause! " 

The natural cause being, of course, the 
sensation of appetite. 

Mr. Horace Fletcher would have us all 
return to the neolithic way, inasmuch as 
not eating until we felt appetite. This 
he practices himself. But owing to the 
artificialities of civilization, it is possible 
for us to be hungry without feeling appe- 
tite, and, conversely, to feel appetite 
without being hungry. 

If we are deeply engrossed mentally, 
greatly absorbed in urgent or interesting 
work, meal times may come and go, and 
the body may need food and call for it, 
but its call, in the form of the sensation 
of appetite, may be so overborne by our 
absorption in the thought or the work 
which engages us that we shall be uncon- 
scious of it. Every one has had experi- 
ence of times like these. 

On the other hand, we may feel an 
appetite without being hungry, when 
our too-skilful chefs artificially stimulate 
it, as already mentioned. There are 
still other times when we are both hungry 
and feel an appetite, but have to let both 
go unsatisfied, either because there is no 
food or no money to buy it. Or perhaps, 
as in the case of hunger-strikers, we delib- 



TALKS TO TEACHERS OF DOMESTIC SCIENCE 



349 



erately exercise the will to deny ourselves 
food. This brings us to 

The Effect of Prolonged Fasting 

Some years [ago a sanitarium was 
opened where patients paid high prices 
to carry out prolonged fasts under medical 
supervision. The following results were 
generally observed: Fresh air, plenty of 
pure water, and alternate rest and exer- 
cise were part of the regime, and for the 
first few days without food the appetite 
of the fasters grew keener and keener, 
but as the craving for food was denied, 
the desire for it gradually became less, 
until after a week or ten days everybody 
declared that no wish for food remained. 
Why.^ Because the body had begun to eat 
itself^ hence was no longer hungry, and 
did not need to send out the call for food 
through the sensation of appetite. An- 
other general result was that as the fast 
was prolonged everybody felt stronger, 
more vigorous and buoyant, and able 
to undertake feats that would have 
exhausted them before. Why.^ Because 
the stomach was relieved of the heavy 
work of digestion, and the energy that 
had been devoted to that process was 



now liberated to be used in doing some- 
thing else. The final result, after the 
fast was over, and the patient gradually 
resumed a normal diet, was a sensation 
of complete regeneration, and a return 
to the health and vigor of youth. Why.'^ 
Because in consuming itself the body 
first ate up its fat — ■ the fasting method 
is well known as an effective one in 
reduction cures for overweight — 'then, 
when the fat was gone, the lean meat of 
the muscles was consumed to a certain 
extent, and this meant that all the old, 
decrepit, worn-out cells of the body were 
eaten up, and when the habits of eating 
were begun again, the use of the purest 
and most wholesome food and well- 
balanced meals being insisted on, the 
body formed healthy, vigorous young 
cells to take the place of the outworn 
ones. 

A healthy, and well-nourished adult 
can live without food, provided plenty 
of water is allowed, for from three to four 
weeks, or longer. Not until the weight 
of the body is reduced one-half is there 
said to be danger of death from the fast. 
We shall have a little more to say about 
fasting in the next month's paper. 



The Christmas Path 



If everfit might come to pass, ' 

At twilight-time, when dream-winds blow 
And Pixie-people at their wheels 

Spin webs of fiufTy, gleaming snow, 
That one sublime and splendid wish 

Might for an hour be granted me, 
I'd quickly find the star-set path 

To Christmas-times-that-used-to-be. 

And, following its winding trail, 

My step should never lag until 
I'd reached a cottage, agate-gray, 

And passed across its foot-worn sill 
Into a quaint old living room 

Whose woody-fragrant atmosphere 
Held, as within a magic web, 

The very soul of Yule-time cheer. 



And ah, the treasures I should find, 

By faithful Memory tucked away — 
The spangled shells, the pompous clock 

O'erhung with peacock feathers gay; 
The velvet bloom of potted plants, 

The willow rocker, wide and low, 
The purring kitten, half asleep 

Within the chimney's drowsy glow; 

The woodland's lavish oflferings 

Of glossy fir and cone-set pine. 
The holly berries, caught like sparks. 

Among the loops of hardy vine, 
And all the gracious plenitude 

By bounty of the season wrought — 
The overflooding tide of joy 

The olden Christmas ever brought. 



I'd find again the golden creed 

Of One whose goodness held no flaw — 
The creed of kindliness and love, 

Supreme above all earthly law. 
The sweet, keen hope and fervency 

Of youth should be restored to me, 
If I could find the star-set path 

To Christmas-times-that-used-to-be! 

Harriet Whitney Symonds. 



350 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



AMERICAN COOKERY 

FORMERLY THE 

BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL 
MAGAZINE 

OF 
Culinary Science and Domestic Economics 



Subscription $1.50 perYear, Single Copies 15c 
Postage to Foreign Countries, 40c per Year 

TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The date stamped on the wrapper is the date 
on which your subscription expires; it is, also, an 
acknowledgment that a subscription, or a renewal 
of the same, has been received. 

Please renew on receipt of the colored blank 
enclosed for this purpose. 

In sending notice to renew a subscription or 
change of address, please give the old address 
as well as the new. 

In referring to an original entry, we must know 
the name as it was formerly given, together with 
the Post-office, County, State, Post-office Box, 
or Street Number. 

Entered at Boston Post-office as Second-class Matter 



ROOSEVELT THE HUSBAND 

IN a recent interview Maeterlinck said, 
"I have come here to tell you my 
belief that the personality of a man 
lives on after what we call death." Was 
it necessary for him to cross the ocean to 
tell the American people this thing with 
the great example of the man Roosevelt 
living after death in our midst in so many 
different phases.^ No one today would 
deny the greatness of Roosevelt in the 
flesh, on the other hand every one must 
admit his transcendency in death. When 
he walked among us surcharged with life, 
the vigor of his personality; the energy 
of his actions; the multitudinous affairs 
in which he engaged — in short, his many- 
sidedness dazzled us, and prevented a 
proper appraisement of the man. 

In a way it was like looking at an im- 
pressionistic picture at too close range. 
We saw only huge daubs of bright colors, 
hard lines and imperfect figures. We 
needed distance to get the perspective, 
and the proper light to blend the massing 
of color and to bring out the fine lines 



and delicate shades in his apparently 
brusque character. His untimely pas- 
sage to the Beautiful Beyond made the 
perfect setting for the picture, and as we 
view it today, with awe and reverence, 
we pronounce it a masterpiece. He 
passes before us a statesman, soldier, 
author, scientist, explorer, a valuable 
friend and a wonderful parent. He seems 
a composite being, a Superman, all things 
in one. But, looking through the eyes 
of wifehood, measuring all these strong 
titles — great as they are, and honorable, 
too, I place him first as a husband. 

W^hat man in history has left us so 
priceless a heritage.? Thayer epitomizes 
his intimate biography by saying, "Pic- 
turesque he was, and picturesqueness 
made whatever he did interesting." 
Abbott concludes, ''His greatest con- 
tribution to his country was personality," 
while Sewall says, "He traveled in the 
footsteps of Washington and Lincoln." 
In any summary we cannot afford to over- 
look the happy note Kipling struck in 
"Greatheart." But the true Roosevelt, 
the real man, the key to the heart of his 
achievements is found in his own work, 
the delightful "Letters to his Children." 
It is in these pages, too, that we get these 
fascinating glimpses of him as a husband. 

The word husband is variously defined. 
It may mean simply a "married man." 
Thousands are this and nothing more. 
Most any modern woman can husband 
for herself in the sense of merely provid- 
ing for, and managing frugally. But 
every married woman knows that there 
is a deep, inexpressible significance to the 
word husband. To her it connotes 
providence and protection, plus — what 
every woman craves more than these two, 
intimate companionship, saturated with 
sympathy, love, tenderness, spiced up 
with a good bit of flattery. Roosevelt 
caught this vision. In these letters we 
see a tremendously busy man appor- 
tioning to his wife a definite amount of 
his time. They walked regularly in the 
garden; they sat under the trees and 
visited together. They went off alone to 



EDITORIALS 



351 



the quiet and seclusion of the country- for 
brief periods where they cooked and did 
the homely little things of life in close 
companionship. He found time for this 
and then he wrote the children about it, 
and the spirit of the letters shows that he 
enjoyed it. He admired her clothes and 
commented upon them, a simple thing, 
but one that always pleases a wife. He 
noticed the things she did, and appre- 
ciated the care and attention she gave 
the children and the house, and let her 
know that he did. He had pride in her 
skill on horseback — the thing he liked 
himself, and he rode with her with gen- 
uine pleasure. With the ardor of a 
youthful lover he applies to her such 
adjectives as "cunning," "sweet," 
"pretty," "lovely," and they do not 
seem sentimentally saccharine, so grace- 
fully are they placed. Indeed, we love 
him for these tender little scenes, in- 
tensely human, and skillfully portrayed, 
and pronounce him the ideal husband, 
responsible for the ideal wife. 

Think what an example this must have 
been for the children! Could they fail 
to honor her when she was daily so hon- 
ored before them by so honorable a man? 
Perhaps this beautiful love element in 
his life explains his amazing achieve- 
ments. Certainly he lost no time nor 
strength brooding over or clearing up 
domestic infelicity, and he must, at all 
seasons, and under all conditions have 
been sustained, encouraged and succored 
by the devotion that existed between 
them. 

What a lesson to the young couple 
starting out on the matrimonial journey. 
Let the foolish, vain, married woman 
who would popularize herself, and jeop- 
ardize the future success and happiness 
of her husband by trivial and silly flir- 
tations read these letters. Let the weak, 
passionate, and easily flattered married 
man, who believes himself injured and 
abused at home, and who falls so easily 
a victim to the flirtatious woman peruse 
and profit by these letters. 

Verily, the personality of Roosevelt 



lives on after what we call death. In 
the years to come he will be held up vari- 
ously as an example. Instructors, gen- 
erally, and all sorts of leaders in all sorts 
of movements are going to point to him 
as a pattern and guide. I wish that 
every mother in America might present 
her son on his wedding day with a copy 
of these Letters, and advise him to look 
between its covers for the best guide on 
the gentle art of being a husband. 

M. W. R. 

THE WAY TO REDUCE 
IS TO REDUCE 

OUR Presidential election is over and 
now may we not look up and on to 
better times in the near future.^ Alay we 
not begin, at least, to anticipate and hope 
for peace, progress and prosperity in 
accordance with American traditions and 
ideals.^ Of this much we may feel 
assured, ours is a representative form 
of government — a government of the 
people, by the people and for the people. 
Our constitution is subject to amend- 
ment but not to subversion. 

Nothing is more evident than this: The 
people of this country want a reduction in 
the cost of living, a reduction in the enor- 
mous burdens of taxation, a reduction in 
the extravagant administration of the 
government, a reduction all along the line^ 
from top to bottom, ^^'e want, also, low 
tariff rates always, just as low as living- 
conditions in xA.merica will allow. A 
policy of administration that does not 
face low tariff is doomed to failure and 
defeat. People are tired of being taxed 
against their will. A tariff in any form is 
a tax on the consumer of commercial 
products. AdA'ance in the price of any- 
thing or in wages, is, at this time, out of 
order, a matter of utter disapproval and 
condemnation. This is not the way of 
peace and prosperity — rather of bitter- 
ness and strife. 

How great has grown the responsibility 
of women today. Think of it: Equal 



352 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



suffrage, national prohibition, the tools 
in the hands of those who are best able 
to use them, all in half a decade. Unless 
woman now avails herself of her privilege 
and tits herself to vote and to vote i^itel- 
ligently, the unintelligent voter will surely 
defeat the highest hopes of mankind. 
Henceforth, betwixt good and ill, educa- 
tion and intelligence are to decide matters 
of vital importance. A campaign of 
education must be conducted systemati- 
cally throughout the land. In political 
affairs, sense, plain common sense, is the 
one thing needful. 

^Are not women in large measure respon- 
sible for the present extravagant ways of 
living.? The prices of all things will drop 
when the general public demands it and 
sees to it that the demand Is enforced. 
How can this be done.? Refuse to buy, 
for a season, only the necessities of life 
and the law of supply and demand will 
soon settle the matter of the prices of 
commodities. In order to bring about a 
general reduction of expenditure, indivi- 
dual expenses must be reduced. Some- 
body, why not everybody, must sacrifice. 
In this war there are no exemptions. 

And now the retail dealer seems to be 
chief offender in maintaining high prices. 
The sooner we get back to reason and 
common sense in trade and commerce the 
better it will be all round. We object, for 
instance, to paying for a cotton shirt that 
used to cost 31-50, $S plus 50 cents in war 
tax. That is, the cotton shirt is now to 
be listed among the luxuries of living. 
Apples are selling at from five or six to 
ten cents apiece. What a dastardly way 
to sell apples, anyhow! This comes 
simply from the fact that the sale of fruit 
has been monopolized and suspicion Is 
strong that the present abnormal price 
of fruit is thus maintained. However, 
this condition cannot be continued long. 
"Vengeance Is mine; I will repay, saith 
the Lord." Let us plant the apple, plum 
and peach tree in our gardens. Espe- 
cially let us plant the apple tree. 



ALL progress is the accumulation of 
.capital. 

We usually think that only money or 
things with money-value can be capital. 

But learning Is capital. 

The apprentice learning how to run a 
locomotive is storing up skill-capital. 

A man's reputation Is his moral capital. 

Destroy all capital, or redistribute it, 
and the very first thing labor would do 
would be to begin anew to create It. 

For the very purpose of labor is to make 
capital, as the business of bees Is to make 
honey. — Current Opinion. 

CHRISTMAS 

THE Christmas season is approaching. 
Note how many good and appro- 
priate things this number of American 
Cookery contains. As the field of 
domestic science enlarges, as time en- 
hances the significance of home life, does 
not your special household journal become 
of increasing Interest and greater concern 
to you.? We would make it so. May 
the Christmas of 1920 be full of promise 
and meaning even greater than those of 
the years that have now passed into 
history! 



The Song of the Telegraph 

Like Aeolian harp its wires run 

Where the winds of heaven blow, 

High up in the air 'gainst sky and sun. 
And the even's afterglow. 

The song it sings is the wind's own song, 

Exultingly high and clear, 
Or swelling low on a note so strong, 

It trembles on the ear. 

And the song is set to words unheard 

As they flash along the wire, 
Methinks 'tis sad or gay as it's stirred 

By the message on the lyre. 

At the end is one with a key, 

Who translates the words it sings. 

By dots and clicks mysteriously 
The lyric homeward brings. 

When life's last message is finally sent, 
And the songs have all been wired, 

May The Great Interpreter's ear down bent 
Hear only those inspired. 

Hattie II. d'' Autremont. 




LITTLE PLUM PUDDINGS (See page 358) 

Seasonable-and-Tested Recipes 

By Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 

TN ALL recipes where flour is used, unless otherwise stated, the flour is measured after sifting 

once. Where flour is measured by cups, the cup is filled with a spoon, and a level cupful is 

meant. A tablespoonful or a teaspoonful of any designated material is a LEVEL spoonful. In flour 

mixtures where yeast is called for, use bread flour; in all other flour mixtures, use cake or pastry flour. 



Red Currant Soup 

SQUEEZE a quart can of red cur- 
rants through a colander; add two 
cups of water, a few pieces of stick 
cinnamon, the juice of one lemon, and 
heat together. Thicken with two table- 
spoonfuls of arrowroot, blended smooth 
with a little water; stir until the mixture 
boils, and serve with a fried oyster in 
each portion and a spoonful of chopped 
parsley, added the last thing. This makes 
a pretty soup for the Christmas dinner. 

Spanish Christmas Soup 

Shell and blanch one pound and one- 
half of sweet Jordan almonds and a dozen 
bitter almonds. Pound them together 
in a mortar, or put through a fine nut 
grinder. The nuts should be as smooth 
as paste, and in reducing them to this 
consistency they sometimes separate into 
oil and curd — • this may be prevented by 
adding a little ice water, from time to 
time, during the grinding or pounding. 
Add the nuts to six cups of hot chicken 



stock, thickened slightly with flour, a 
scant tablespoonful to each cup, and 
flavored by heating with it the grated 
rind of one-half a lemon and a few cori- 
ander seeds. Stir the almonds and stock 
together until hot through, and serve 
with a garnish of candied cranberries. 
Powdered cinnamon is sprinkled into the 
tureen when this soup is served in Spain, 
and forcemeat balls are substituted for 
cranberries. 

Shrimp Okra Gumbo 

Slice a pint of okra and let cook until 
brown in butter or fat, with one good- 
sized onion, minced, and a sprinkling of 
salt and pepper. Cook in another sauce- 
pan a pint can of shrimps with two ounces 
of chopped bacon and a pinch of cayenne. 
Sift one quart can of tomatoes and cook 
in a soup kettle with thickening of one- 
fourth a cup of flour, rubbed to a paste 
with a little water. Add to this both the 
okra and the shrimps, let boil together; 
add salt, if not sufficiently seasoned by 
the ham, and serve with fried rice balls 



353 



354 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



and thin strips of green pepper. This 
soup should be as thick as a puree, but 
if too thick it may be thinned out with 
water or stock. 

Spinach Souffle 

Cook one quart of spinach and thor- 
oughly drain. Season with one teaspoon- 
ful of salt and one-fourth a teaspoonful 
of pepper. Stir into it the well-beaten 
yolks of two eggs, and cook for a short 
time over gentle heat until the egg is set. 
Let cool and beat in the stiff-beaten 
whites. Half-fill with the mixture, the 



separate easily. The time depends on 
the age of the goose, and will vary from 
one hour and a half to three hours. A 
goose from four to six months old is the 
best. The goose a year old should be 
steamed before browning in the oven. 
Serve with apple or apple and barberry 
sauce. If desired, the goose may be 
stuffed. Apple salad is appropriate with 
either roast goose or pork. 

Potato Stuffing for Roast Goose 

Take two cups of mashed potato, one 
cup of soft white bread crumbs, about 




ROAST GOOSE 



small stone-ware cups used for popovers, 
first greasing the insides, and bake in a 
hot oven for fifteen minutes, or until well 
puffed up. 

Roast Goose 

Scrub and wash thoroughly outside 
and in. Wipe dry. Season inside with 
salt and pepper. Cut the neck, do not 
cut the skin, on a line with the top of 
the wing bones, then turn the skin down 
over the back and truss through the 
wings and the legs in the same manner 
as a turkey is trussed for roasting. Cook 
about an hour, turning to cook on all 
sides; then pour oflF the fat from the pan, 
dredge with flour, and lay slices of salt 
pork over the breast and let cook, basting 
with salt pork fat, until the joints will 



one-third a cup of butter and onion juice, 
powdered sage, salt and pepper to season 
to taste; mix thoroughly. 

Scrambled Bacon and Canned 
Corn 

Cook, in a deep spider, one-half a pound 
of sweet breakfast bacon, cut into thin 
strips lengthwise, and these cut across 
into small pieces. When slightly browned 
add to the pan one pint of canned sweet 
corn. Stir until hot, then break into 
pan four fresh eggs, and stir the whole 
rapidly; add one-fourth a cup of milk, 
one teaspoonful of salt and one-half a 
teaspoonful of pepper, and when the 
eggs have slightly solidified, serve on a 
hot dish over slices of buttered toast, 
garnished with cress or parsley. 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



355 




BABY LAMB STEAKS 



Salmon Mousalines with 
Green Peas 

Remove the bones and skin from a pint 
can of salmon, and put the fish through a 
colander. Mix with one cup and one- 
half of bread crumbs, moistened with 
hot water, and one-half a cup of cream. 
Season with salt and pepper, a pinch of 
ground mace, two teaspoonfuls of lemon 
juice, one teaspoonful of Worcestershire 
sauce, and beat in the stiff-beaten whites 
of four eggs. Steam in a ring mould, 
well greased, and fill the center with 
green peas. 

Baby Lamb Steaks 

Brush over with olive oil two lamb 



steaks. Broil; arrange on platter, sea- 
son with salt and pepper and decorate 
with peas, string beans, cauliflower and 
asparagus. 

Vol-au-Vent 

Roll puff-paste into a sheet half an 
inch thick; mark out an oval of the size 
desired; then with a sharp knife, dipped 
in hot water, cut out the pastry, lay on a 
piece of double paper on a baking sheet. 
Cut out a second piece of paste of same 
thickness and size, then cut out the 
center, leaving a rim an inch and a 
quarter wide, brush the edge of the first 
paste with cold water and press the rim 
upon it. Set aside to chill. Bake about 
an hour. Roll out the pieces, cut out in 



m^im^M 





\ ()i.-\i -\ i-.\ 



356 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



making the rim, to the size of the other 
pieces of paste; chill and bake about 
twenty-five minutes. This forms the 
co\er. Ser\'e the vol-au-vent as a con- 
tainer for an)' delicate creamed mixture, 
such as chicken. 

Galantine of Chicken, Christmas 
Decoration 

Select a fresh-killed, undrawn chicken 
of about four pounds in weight. Singe 
and remove pin feathers. Cut off the 
pinions. Cut through the skin down the 
entire length of the backbone, then push 
and cut the flesh from the bones, to 
secure the framework in one piece and 



Spread the skin on a meat board and 
sprinkle lightly with salt and pepper. 
Trim the skin as needed, to secure a 
rectangular shape. Cut the breast meat, 
previously set aside, in thin, even slices; 
lay these slices over the skin as uniformly 
as possible; over these spread a layer 
of the forcemeat; lengthwise on the 
forcemeat set rows — equally distant from 
each other — ■ of the cubes of pork and 
tongue and two truffles cut in thin slices, 
alternating the articles and having them 
at a uniform distance, one from the other, 
and cover with forcemeat; repeat^the 
rows of cubes and finish with forcemeat. 
Then roll into a neat and compact shape, 




GALANTINE OF CHICKEN, CHRISTMAS DECORATION 



the flesh in another. Take oflF the white 
meat and set it aside. Wipe the outside 
and inside of the flesh; push the skin 
of the wings and legs inside and remove 
the flesh. Put this flesh, scraped from 
the tendons, with one pound, each, of 
fat and lean pork and lean veal, and 
chop and pound to a smooth paste, sea- 
soning with half a teaspoonful, each, of 
salt and pepper, adding a little broth, 
meanwhile, but do not make very moist; 
press through a sieve, add one teaspoon- 
ful of onion juice, one tablespoonful of 
chopped parsley, three or four table- 
spoonfuls of wine, and one beaten egg 
Cut cooked ox-tongue and fat salt pork 
in cubes of a scant three-fourths inch 
Pour boiling water over the pork, drain 
rinse in cold water and drain again 



the skin upon the outside, and sew 
secure. 

Roll the meat in a piece of cheese- 
cloth, tie the cloth close to the ends of 
the meat and tie tape around it in two 
or three other places. Finish dressing 
the bones of the chicken; wash care- 
fully, then add bits of veal and cover the 
whole with cold water; let heat slowly 
to the boiling point; add the usual soup 
vegetables; on the bones set the galan- 
tine and let simmer until tender. Let 
stand until cooled a little, then untie the 
pieces of tape, unroll the cloth, and roll 
again smooth, tie the tapes as before 
and set to cool under a weight. Strain 
off the broth and when cold remove the 
fat and use the broth for aspic jelly and 
chaudfroid sauce. When the galantine 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



357 




PRUNE-AND-NUT SALAD 



is cold, remove the skin, wipe to remove 
fat if present, then set on an inverted 
soup plate and pour over it chaudfroid 
sauce, on the point of "setting," to cover 
completely and smoothly the galantine. 
Have ready one or two cooked string 
beans, cut to simulate stems, and pimiento, 
cut to represent the petals of a poinsettia 
blossom, also some sifted yolk of a hard- 
cooked egg. Dispose these on the sauce to 
simulate a poinsettia blossom; cover with 
half-set aspic and set aside to become 
firm. Serve, sliced thin, with shredded 
endive (or celery), sprigs of cress and 
strips of pimiento, seasoned with French 
dressing. 

Chaudfroid Sauce for Galantine 

Make an ordinary sauce of two table- 
spoonfuls, each, of butter and flour, one- 
fourth a teaspoonful, each, of salt and 



pepper and half a cup, each, of cream 
and chicken broth. Add to the hot 
sauce one tablespoonful of gelatine, soft- 
ened in one-fourth a cup of cold water 
or chicken broth. Stir until the gelatine 
is dissolved, then use as above. 

Prune-and-Nut Salad 

Cook one-half a pound of prunes. Do 
not overcook; they should cut in smooth, 
firm pieces; add one-fourth a teaspoonful 
of salt and one-half a teaspoonful of 
paprika to the prunes, cut in lengthwise 
strips, and to one-fourth a pound of pecan- 
nut meats, cut in three pieces, each. Beat 
one cup of double cream and two table- 
spoonfuls of lemon juice until firm 
throughout. Mix three-fourths of it with 
the prunes and nuts. Arrange on lettuce 
leaves, decorate with rest of beaten cream 
and nuts and strips of prune. 




358 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Cornmeal Muffins 

Sift together three-fourths a cup of 
cornmeal, one-fourth a cup of potato 
flour, one cup of wheat flour, one-fourth 
a cup of sugar, half a teaspoonful of 
salt and four teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder. Beat one egg: add one cup 
of sweet milk and three tablespoonfuls 
of melted shortening and stir into the 
dry ingredients. Bake in a hot, well- 
greased muffin pan about twenty-five 
minutes. This will make seven muffins, 



When doubled in bulk, it is ready for the 
oven. 

Little Plum Puddings 

Pour one cup of scalded milk over one 
pint of bread crumbs, taken from the 
center of a stale loaf of bread; when cool, 
add three-fourths a cup of sugar, one 
teaspoonful of salt, and the yolks of four 
eggs, beaten together, then one-half a 
pound of suet, mixed with one-half a cup 
of chopped almonds, one-half a pound of 
currants and one-half a pound of seeded 




FLUTED-CRUST BREAD 



shape and size of an ear of corn, or one 
dozen muffins of ordinary size. 

Fluted-Crust Bread 

Scald one cup and one half of milk. 
Pour into a bowl and add one tablespoon- 
ful and one half of sugar, one table- 
spoonful and one half of shortening, and 
three-fourths of a teaspoonful of salt. 
When cooled to a lukewarm tempera- 
ture, add one-third a compressed yeast 
cake, softened and mixed with one-third 
a cup of lukewarm water; then stir in 
about four cups and one-half of flour. 
Knead, set to rise overnight. Next 
morning cut down the dough and fill the 
lower half of a fluted-crust bread pan. 



raisins; lastly, add one-third a teaspoon- 
ful, each, of cloves and mace and one 
teaspoonful, each, of cinnamon and nut- 
meg; then fold in the whites of four eggs, 
beaten stiff. Pour into buttered indi- 
vidual moulds and steam one hour. This 
recipe makes twelve little puddings. 
Serve with hard sauce. 

Plum Pudding Sundaes 

Add to a quart of rich cream one cup 
of sugar and two ounces of chocolate, 
scraped or broken and cooked to a smooth 
paste in one-half a cup of water. Freeze 
until mushy; then add from one to two 
cups of a mixture of equal parts of 
steamed and chopped figs, raisins, and 



SEASOXABLE-AXD-TESTED RECIPES 



359 




CHRISTMAS HOLLY CAKE 



almonds or walnuts ground fine and 
sprinkled with one-half a teaspoonful of 
salt, and continue freezing until mixture 
is stiff. At serving-time pour over each 
individual mound one-fourth a cup of 
any red fruit juice, cooked with sugar to 
a syrupy consistency and garnish each 
with a wee sprig of holly. 

Christmas Holly Cake 

Cream one-half a cup of shortening; 
add, gradually, one cup of sugar, two 
egg-yolks, beaten light; then add, alter- 
nately, one half a cup of milk and one 
cup and a half of flour, sifted with two 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Lastly, 
beat in two egg-whites, beaten very light, 
and one teaspoonful of vanilla extract. 
Bake in tube pan for forty-five minutes. 
Cover with boiled frosting and ornament 



top and sides of cake with angelica 
holly leaves and berries. 

Rosettes 

Beat two eggs slightly. Add one tea- 
spoonful of sugar, one-fourth a teaspoon- 
ful of salt, one cup of milk and one cup 
of flour. Screw the handle Into the 
rosette iron and put iron into hot fat. 
When thoroughly heated dip into the 
batter, not letting the batter come over 
the top of the Iron. Return It to the hot 
fat, thoroughly covering the Iron, for 
thirty seconds, then shake off fat, remove 
to plate and take off the rosette with a 
clean cloth. 

Little Christmas Cakes 

Cut small cakes from a sheet of pound 
cake. Beat white of egg only enough to 




ROSETTES 



360 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




LITTLE CHRISTMAS CAKES 



make it more liquid and mix it with a 
little sugar. Brush over the surface of 
the little cakes with this mixture and 
allow them to stand until the next day to 
dry out. The best of all icings is 

Fondant 

which is also the basis of all French cream 
candies. Set over the fire and stir until 
boiling begins, two cups of sugar and half 
a cup of water. Then remove the spoon 
and in a few moments, with the hand 
dipped in cold water, brush down the 
sides of the saucepan, to remove any 
grains of sugar that may have been 
thrown up in boiling. Cover and let 
■cook about five minutes. Now add one- 
fourth a teaspoonful of cream of tartar; 
put the thermometer into the syrup, and 
let cook until the temperature rises to 



240° F. When the sugar is done, turn it 
on to a large platter, lightly dampened 
with water or rubbed over with the best 
grade of olive oil. Let stand undis- 
turbed until a dent can be made in the 
surface, then work the candy back and 
forth, with a silver knife, to a white, 
smooth, soft, creamy paste. While the 
paste is still soft and warm gather to- 
gether and knead for a few minutes with 
the hands, then press into a bowl and 
cover closely with confectioners' paper. 
Store in a cool place. After twenty-four 
hours it is ready for use. (If the fondant 
be granular repeat the whole process, 
using the same paste and adding to it 
one-half a cup of cold water.) To pre- 
pare for icing, put fondant into the upper 
part of a double-boiler, set over hot 
water; add a few drops of hot water, and 




CREAM ROLL, CHOCOLATE MARSHMALLOW 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



361 



such flavoring as is desired and beat 
while it melts. Tint if desired. Take 
cake to be dipped on a fork and lower in 
fondant to almost the depth of the cake. 
Remove from fondant, invert, and slip 
from fork. Decorate with nuts or candies 
or both. 

Bavarian Schnee Wandeln 

(CHRISTMAS CAKES) 

(These cakes, to be perfect, must] have the 
ingredients weighed.), 

Cream together four ounces of butter 
and five of sugar. Add three ounces of 
sifted pastry flour, and beat in, gradually, 
the whites of five eggs, beaten as stiff" as 
possible. Now beat the whole together 
until the mass is as light and white as 
snow. Have ready a dozen small patty 
pans, lightly greased and then floured; 
half fill each with the batter, then spread 
over it a spoonful of any fine preserve, 
and cover with another spoonful of 
batter. Bake carefully in a rather hot 
oven; serve the little cakes in inverted 
form, first brushing over with sugar syrup 
and then dusting lightly with rather 
coarse crystallized sugar. 

Pecan-and-PineappIe Cake 

Cream together one cup of buttei; and 
two of sugar; add two cups of flour, sifted 
with two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
and one-half a teaspoonful of salt, and 
one-half a cup of milk. Lastly, beat in 
the stiff-beaten whites of six eggs. Bake 
at once in layers. To make the filling 
put two cups of shelled pecans through 
the nut-chopper, and mix these with one 
cup of shredded pineapple. Stir together 
the unbeaten whites of two eggs with 
enough powdered sugar to make a thick 
paste, and mix with this the nuts and 
pineapple. Use the mixture for both 
filling and icing the cake, and garnish 
the top with halves of whole pecans 
arranged in a border while the icing is 
soft. 



Turban of Prunes 

Soak one pound and one-half of prunes 
overnight in water to cover, and cook 
next day in the same water until soft. 
Drain, remove the stones, measure the 
water and add to it two tablespoonfuls of 
sugar and two teaspoonfuls of gelatine, 
previously softened in cold water to every 
cup of the liquid. Dip each prune into 
this, place a blanched almond (or a 
prune kernel, stoned and blanched) on 
the outside of each, and apply in rows to 
the inside of a ring mold. When hard 
fill in with the liquid, to which a little red 
coloring matter has been added. When 
ready to serve turn out on a pretty dish 
and fill the center with whipped cream, 
garnished with candied cherries and 
angelica. 

Chocolate Marshmallow Cream 
Roll 

Gradually beat one cup of sugar and 
two tablespoonfuls of cocoa into four eggs 
beaten light without separating. Beat 
in two tablespoonfuls of melted butter: 
then fold in one cup of flour, in which one 
teaspoonful of baking powder has been 
mixed. Bake about fifteen minutes. 
Turn on a cloth, trim off the crisp edges 
on the four sides, spread with marsh- 
mallow filling and roll like a jelly roll; 
roll in the cloth and let stand half an hour 
or longer. Spread confectioner's choco- 
late frosting over the top of the cake. 

Marshmallow Filling 

Set one-fourth pound fresh marsh- 
mallows to heat and soften in a double 
boiler. Melt one cup granulated sugar 
in one-fourth cup of boiling water and 
cook to 240° F. (soft-ball stage). Pour 
in a fine stream on the whites of two eggs, 
beaten light, beating constantly mean- 
while; add the melted marshmallows and 
continue to beat until smooth; add the 
one-half teaspoonful of vanilla extract. 




Seasonable Menus for Week in December 



Breakfast 

Grapefruit 

Scrambled Bacon and Canned Corn 

Parker House Rolls (reheated) 

Waffles Maple Syrup Coffee 

Dinner 

Shrimp Okra Gumbo 

Leg of Pork, Roasted Mashed Potato 

Dutch Cabbage Apple Rings 

Turban of Prunes 

Half Cups Coffee 

Supper 

Celeried Oysters Toasted Crackers 

Waldorf Salad Chocolate 

Ginger Cookies 



Breakfast 



Gluten Grits 

Broiled Bacon 
Dry Toast 



Baked Apples 
Creamed Potatoes 
Coffee 



Luncheon 

Omelet Celestine French Fried Potatoes 

Apple Tapioca Tea 

Dinner 

Cold Roast Beef (sliced thin) 

Baked Sweet Potatoes 

Macaroni with Tomatoes and Cheese 

Creamed Turnips Spinach 

Hot Apple Pie 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Cream of Wheat, Top Milk 

Stewed Figs 

Corned Beef Hash Rye Muffins 

Doughnuts Coffee 



Luncheon 

Spinach Souffle, PulIed'Bread 

Apples Baked with Almonds, Whipped Cream 

Tea 



Dinner 

Rib Roast of Beef Franconia Potatoes 

Squash Sweet Pickle Jelly 

Cole Slaw 

Chocolate Cottage Pudding, Foamy Sauce 



Breakfast 

Wheat Cereal Stewed Raisins 

Broiled Ham Spider Corn Cake 

Buckwheat Griddle-cakes Coffee 



Date Loaf Cake 



Luncheon 

Welsh Rabbit 

Dinner 



Cocoa 



Shoulder of Lamb Hashed Brown Potatoes 

Baked Bananas, Sultana Raisin Sauce 

Cauliflower, Hollandaise Sauce 

Mince Pie, Cottage Cheese 

Coffee (half cups) 



Breakfast 

Quaker Oats, Dates, Thin'Cream 
Riced^Potato 



Yeast Rolls 



Coffee 



Luncheon 

Pork (cold roast) Sliced Thin,' Baked Potatoes 
Gingerbread Cocoa 

Dinner 

Boiled Fish, Egg Sauce Boiled Potatoes 

Tomato_Curry, Pickles Buttered Onions 

Acadian Apple Custard 



Breakfast 

Oranges 

Salt Codfish Balls Toasted Brown Bread 

Glazed Currant Buns Coffee 

Luncheon 

Succotash Cheese Souffle 

Entire Wheat Bread 
Stewed Apricots Wafers Tea 



Dinner 

Fish, Baked and Stuffed Potato Balls 

Caper-and-Pickle Sauce Philadelphia Relish 

Brussels Sprouts, Creamed Squash 

Indian Pudding, Cream 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Tokay Grapes 

Dried Beef, Creamed Toast 

Fried Mush, Caramel Syrup 

Coffee 



Luncheon 

Potato Salad Cold Ham 

Baking Powder Biscuit 

Canned Pears Macaroons 

Tea 

362 



Dinner 

Broiled Hamburg Steak 

Lyonnaise Potatoes 

Stewed Lima Beans 

Cold Spinach, Salad Dressing 

Pineapple Sherl>et 



Menus for Special Occasions 



FORMAL DINNERS FOR DECEMBER 

I 

Canapes 

Red Currant Soup 



Roast Turkey 

Cranberry Frappe 
Venison Steak 



Oyster Patties 

Creamed Chestnuts 
Celery 
Potato Croquettes 
Romaine-and-Orange Salad 
Raspberry Ice Cream Christmas Cakes 

Bonbons Raisins Nuts 

Coffee • 



I 



II 

Grapefruit Cocktail 

Christmas Consomme 

Truffled Fish Mousse, Hollandaise Sauce 

Hot-House Cucumbers, French Dressing 

Roast Goose, Apple Sauce 

Mashed Potatoes Brussels Sprouts 

Mayonnaise of Chicken and Celery (Pimiento Garnish) 

Plum Pudding Peach Melba 

Crackers Cheese Coffee 



CHRISTMAS SPREAD FOR CHILDREN (One O'Clock) 

Salpicon of Oranges, Pineapple and Cherries in Glass Cups 

Lamb Broth with Macaroni Dolls 

Roast Turkey, Cranberry Jelly 

Sweet Potatoes Glace Creamed Onions 

Celery-and-Apple Salad 

Vanilla Ice Cream, Strawberry Sauce 

Bonbons Lollypops Raisin Turtles 

Salted Nuts Ginger Ale 



FORMAL HIGH TEA (Guests) 



I 



Scalloped Oysters 

Olives Salted Nuts 

French Rolls Galantine of Turkey 

Rice Croquettes Currant Jelly 

Macaroon Ice Cream 

Marrons Glace Little Cakes 

Coffee 



II 



Spanish Christmas Soup 

Cold Roast Chicken, Yeast Rolls 

Tomato Jelly with Celery-and-Nut Salad 

Frozen Pudding 

Fruit Cake Macaroons 

Coft'ee 



363 




i 



At Breakfast 

By Florence L. Tucker 

Good-Breeding Is the Bulwark of Safety Nowhere So Much as at Table 
IN Compelling Consideration for Others It Safeguards Digestion 



IS breakfast a pleasant meal? 
And who thinks why, or why not, 
each one should brmg to table what 
Robert Louis Stevenson called a "morn- 
ing face"? Ordinary good manners de- 
mand it. certainly, but there is a 
weightier reason — grouchiness creates 
poison and indigestion. 

Twenty years ago how many health 
magazines had we? Ten years ago how 
many publications devoted space to 
what should be fed the human animal? 
Perhaps they were not needed so much 
then; stomachs were a different proposi- 
tion with our forbears, — those of us who 
are gray-haired can even remember our 
own conquests with fried ham and hot 
batter breads. But modern tension has 
refined the machinery until, if we feed the 
up-to-date stomach what it cannot handle, 
we do it at our peril. 

Further than that, it is not just the 
food we have to consider, but the thought 
served with it; for many times digestion 
is dependent not so much on its own ap- 
paratus as on the tongue — the tongue of 
some one else. Cheerful speech, provoca- 
tive of smiles and pleasant frame of 
mind, sets the friendly "juices" con- 
tentedly to work, and bread strengthens 
man's heart, as the psalmist puts it, as 
well as his body. But acrid words, dis- 
agreeable temper, furnish a poison, in its 
action as potent. An abnormally deli- 
cate stomach, taking food accompanied 
by domestic stir-up, will in an incredibly 
short time develop distension and hard- 



ness with pain, or worse, a sort of coma 
A normal person would conceive this dif- 
ficult of belief, but to the physically 
sensitive it is actual experience. 

It is absolutely amusing how afraid, we 
are of each other in this world. A woman 
we have known always has for twenty- 
five years played (or preyed) upon the 
digestion of her family till now they have 
none; her temper is so certain they know 
what to count on; when the fire burns, 
words but fan the conflagration, so words 
are held back; and when temper is 
quiescent the situation is too good to, 
disturb. So this woman possibly has 
never realized the full extent of what she 
has done; no one would dare tell her! 
And she is still going on, serving her meals 
and her acid spirit together, and seeing 
her family with downcast faces leave 
the table to seek the medicine chest in 
quest of something to get them rid of the 
food she has just given them. 

Conservation, like charity, begins at 
home; if it does not it tears down while 
it builds. We are all obsessed by the idea 
of outside interest; we must get out of 
the house as promptly as possible^ to 
some sociological or civic or community 
service — just anything to let us feel we 
are in the swim of activity. If breakfast 
is a scramble, hurried through with im- 
patience, no one with time for thought 
for anything but getting some food, how 
fit do the workers go forth to the day*s 
work ? 

A very efficient physio-therapist just 



! 



364 



i^J 



AT BREAKFAST 



365 



returned from over-seas service said the 
other day, "I don't think the home 
ought to hold the woman ; if she is capable, 
let her follow her calling — • but somebody 
must be there to make the home.^' Ay, 
there it is! And there's the failure or 
success of those who work — it depends 
upon the some one at home. The house- 
mother who plans her proper breakfast 
served on time, and so controls that it is 
a cheerful meal, sends her workers out 
equipped and ready. A proper meal 
does not just happen; it is the result of 
thought, of time, of labor and pains, and 
of something else — a mental adjustment 
that achieves the end unto which it was 
planned, the nourishing of the family; 
then, the mother, her food well prepared, 
must have herself in poise, must be able 
to ward off any little accident, such as 
petty word or mood in any one, and steer 
the meal through pleasant courses. And 
is not sending husband ^nd boys and 
girls to the day's duty ready for it. con- 
tributing far more in the aggregate to 
the day than the one more individual 
unready hand could .^ For where break- 
fast is a hurried, unthought-out meal, 
and mother scrambles out at eight 
['o'clock with the rest, is it conceivable 
that she is serving better this way, and 
that the world's gain will be greater for 
the one more in number.? 

As we are learning to use our hands 
more than ever we have done, so have we 
come to wider mental realizations, among 
them the real positron and value of the 
home-worker. "They also serve who 
seefn to stand and wait," may be a better 
reading of the immortal line just now. 
And certainly it were a juster valuation, 
for too long has the home-maker been 
rated a non-producer; and not until we 
justly compute her contribution to the 
world's work will women be willing longer 
to give themselves as they must to the 
duty of preparing those who find their 
work outside. And how many stop to 
consider that there can be no solid foun- 
dation of preparedness in individuals 
where the body is not fed and cheered.'* 



But unless, the position of home-maker 
is duly regarded and appraised, can 
women be expected to continue to 
"stand and wait".? There is too little 
of the glory and eclat of these stirring 
times. 

And if one has not thought far enough 
to know that the woman who can properly 
feed us and keep us pleasant through 
breakfast is the member of the family 
with the gray matter, he has not used 
what mind he had. It takes the sixth 
sense to keep our ordinary five within 
bounds of politeness and good temper 
early in the morning. And did you ever 
think, it is not alone a matter of finesse 

— it involves strain on the sixth-senser.? 
In our home, though we are a busy 

household, no members must hurry early 
away. So breakfast is our favorite meal 
for inviting a guest, especially during the 
season that the roses are in bloom. One 
spring morning, asking a young friend to 
meet a distinguished connection of her 
own house, we registered a failure doleful 
to recall. From the moment of her 
arrival she took the floor and held it, and 
when she had gone our guest's only 
remark was, "Well, our young cousin 
enjoyed herself!" And how bad we felt! 

— for we were fond of her, and had wished 
her to make a good impression. 

It is just as a woman was heard to 
remark the other day: "It is only right 
that we should protect our friends 
against themselves. Do not let them 
go away giddy with their own clatter, 
and wishing they had not said this or 
that. Had we talked more, they might 
not have been led into indiscreet words 
and irrelevances. Certainly silence were 
as much to be avoided as over-talking, 
and the tact of the hostess must relieve 
one as well as control the other." 

But we had to confess, on the occasion 
of "our young cousin's" visit, the hostess 
failed, for she was not allowed to put in. 
And if that carefully planned breakfast 
was a feast of nourishment for any one 
who partook of it, it must have been 
"young cousin," whose usual heavy 



366 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



weight gave no appearance of loss, while 
we were positively wasted and thin with 
disappointment — and uncomfortableness. 

Conversation is give and take; and 
for the meal to be a success there should 
be conversation — not the holding forth 
of one brilliant talker to the exclusion 
of every one else present. Do you not 
know that guest who, absorbed in her 
own flights, helps herself to the dish as 
it reaches her, sets it down with no 
thought of her neighbor, and goes right 
on? And to get that dish started again 
is something of a problem, for she does 
not like to be interrupted in her ceaseless 
flow. 

But take them all in all, guests are 
pretty well behaved — we do very well 
ourselves when there is company; — 
the breakfast that must be taken with 
concern is the one that brings the family 
daily together, and should furnish a 
wholesome, cheerful starter for each one's 
work. We allow ourselves liberties with 
our own family; if we feel cross, we are 
frankly cross, and to remain glum when 
some one essays a pleasantry is the sacred 
privilege of family life. That is what 
family and home are for — 'to afford us 
.a place to be our real selves. Of all 
times and places it is breakfast we are 
best not left to ourselves. We had a 
friend in years gone who had a pleasant 
little custom gratefully remembered; she 
used sometimes to appear at table with 
3. joke or an amusing little picture to 



excite merriment, and it was wonderfully- 
effective; the intent that prompted the 
little deed was so wholesome and kindly 
it warmed all hearts at once. 

Funny thing, how hearts will warm at 
ever so slight an effort on the part of 
somebody — just anybody. We are not 
such a bad lot, if some one will but gently 
lead us. But it is like locking the house 
door at night — it cannot be left to just 
whoever may think of it; somebody must 
be responsible. 

And some one is responsible; — per- 
haps we do not stop to think who, any 
more than before the war we never gave 
a second thought to the sugar that 
sweetened the morning cup. That 
Mother should see that the breakfast 
is just as it ought to be to suit everybody 
— • tea for one, cocoa for another, and for 
the rest coffee; soft eggs for Father, 
medium for Daughter, while Son will 
scorn anything'but an "Adam and Eve"; 
the table attractive, the atmosphere kept 
clear. That Mother should see to these 
things is just Mother. 

And Mother, in her imposed self- 
forgetfulness, but half realizes herself 
the magnitude and beauty of her devo- 
tion and sacrifice. Having sent her 
family out cheerful and fit, with nothing 
to interfere with digestion, their health 
safeguarded, she may heave a sigh as 
she takes up the day's work but just 
begun. But she smiles, too, — for she 
knows it was worth while. 



An Adventure in Vegetarianism 

By Jeannette Young Norton 



TO the confirmed meat-eater's idea of 
culinary comfort the vegetarian has 
a pretty slow time of it, especially on high 
days and holidays. Feasting becomes a 
habit, and it seems as if the more the meat 
eaters eat, the more they want to eat. 

Who shall say whether too hearty 
feeding is a form of debauchery, or a 



horribly near approach to gluttony.^ We 
will leave the question to the advanced 
food economist to decide. The vegeta- 
rian eats to repletion, but never over- 
feeds for the simple reason that his food 
seems to satisfy the appetite more quickly 
than animal food and overfeeding is 
impossible. 



AN ADVENTURE IN VEGETARIANISM 



367 



Whether meat-eaters are more material 
in mind, grosser in appetite and more 
irascible in temperament than the vegeta- 
rians is another point for scientists to 
enlighten us upon. It is the general 
impression among modern thinkers, how- 
ever, that the bloodless diet results in 
strong, healthy bodies, great powers of 
endurance, good resistance against dis- 
ease, clear heads for brain work, freedom 
from nervous disorders, and a higher form 
of spiritualization. Be this as it may, it 
is interesting thought material, and for 
many of us inspiring enough to encourage 
an adventure in vegetarianism, as our 
next thrilling sensation. 

It is quite as necessary to balance the 
vegetable diet, as it is the meat diet, a 
fact the recruit fails to take into con- 
sideration, so soon votes it a failure and 
returns to the mixed diet of his fore- 
fathers. Proper cooking and seasoning 
of vegetables is, also, of the greatest 
importance. 

A meat-eater would likely have the 
same experience did he attempt to eat 
meat three times a day, and meat only, 
poorly cooked and inadequately seasoned. 

One thing has been proven conclusively 
in this diet question, and that is the fact 
that a vegetarian, once launched and 
established on his diet of garden products, 
rarely, if ever, returns to the fold of the 
meat-eaters again. 

To have a festive dinner on vegetables 
does not seem possible to those who are 
looking forward eagerly to their own 
favorite pieces of the national bird, and 
the vision of a boiled cabbage reposing 
on the center of the old turkey platter 
draws forth much derisive laughter. If 
they might see, and taste, the following 
dinner, however, it is safe to say the 
laugh would be on the other side. 

First the menu, and then the recipes 
for the dishes it contains, will relieve the 
mind of the hostess, young or old, from 
all responsibility of planning the foods 
herself and leave her free to work out her 
table decorations. Every housekeeper 
wants her table to be as attractive as 



possible to the eye, as her food is to the 
taste, and it takes artistic feeling, coupled 
with a knack of doing things of this sort 
well, to achieve the happy result. 

By way of a suggestion, why not con- 
sider the holly star table .? This is attract- 
ive in appearance, not difficult to accom- 
plish, and inexpensive, or less expensive 
than flowers are at Christmas time. 
Cover the table with the usual white 
damask cloth. Place in the center a 
large, seven-pointed, flat star, made of 
holly, showing a lot of the berries. At 
each point of the star set a candlestick, 
holding a red candle and a holly shade. 
In the little spaces between lay small red 
stockings, silk or net, containing sou- 
venir gifts for the guests. 

Beside each place set a tiny market 
basket filled with Marzepan vegetables; 
the card tied with red ribbons at the top 
forms the ' place card. Red apples of 
papier mache may be filled with salted 
nuts and laid beside the baskets. Red- 
banded china, if it can be managed, adds 
to and heightens the color scheme. Be 
liberal in garnishing the dishes with 
greenery and wee bits of holly where 
appropriate. A large red rose, or paper 
holly ball, suspended above the table and 
filled with favors, released by pulling on 
the satin ribbons floating below, is a 
pretty addition, but not a necessity to 
the festivities. 

Menu 

Fruit Cocktail 
Brazilnut Soup, Croutons 
Artichoke Oysters, Tartare Sauce 
Walnut Loaf Turkish Eggplant 

Asparagus Baked Mashed Potato 
Grapefruit-and-Cabbage Salad 
Toasted Crackers and Cheese 
Plum Puddmg Cofi"ee 

The fruit cocktails, made of all fruits 
in season, or rather in market, are made 
in the usual way and should be well 
chilled. 

Brazilnut Soup. Shell and skin one 
pound of Brazilnuts, then run them 
through the food-chopper, or nut-mill. 



368 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Add a sliced Spanish onion, a small cup 
of chopped celery, a half red pepper, 
freed from seeds, and two quarts of water. 
Boil gently, but steadily, for two hours, 
then add a quart of hot milk, seasoning 
and thickening slightly with a little butter 
and flour rubbed to a paste When done 
strain into the tureen and serve croutons 
with the soup. 

Artichoke Oysters. Pare and boil Jeru- 
salem or Chinese artichokes until tender. 
Slice in thick slices, dip in a good t^^ 
batter and fry in hot nut butter. When 
done drain and serve on a napkin with 
tartare sauce. 

Walnut Loaf. Mix a half-pint of fine 
bread crumbs with a half-pint of ground 
or chopped walnut meats. Make a 
white sauce of one ounce of butter, one 
ounce of flour and a cup of milk. When 
done add two dessertspoons of cream to 
the nut mixture, beating it well, then stir 
in the sauce. One hour before serving 
beat thoroughly the whites of two eggs 
and stir into the mixture, adding pepper, 
salt and a teaspoon of sugar. Pour into 
a lightly buttered mould and bake or 
steam a half hour. Unmould and serve 
with a smooth, well-seasoned tomato 
sauce, made not^too thick. 

Turkish Eggplant. Trim the end of a 
large eggplant and cut it in half length- 
wise. With a sharp spoon hollow out the 
centers and chop them fine with one 
onion, a little celery and two tablespoons 
of pine nuts. Add two tablespoons of 
fine crumbs, pepper, salt and a beaten 
t^^. Fill the shells with the mixture, 
after oiling them inside and out, and bake 
until the eggplant is tender when tried 
with a broom splint. The same tomato 
sauce may be used over this dish, or a 



special drawn-butter sauce can be made. 
Serve the asparagus, boiled, drained and 
dressed with melted butter. The potato 
is mashed, seasoned, and after adding a 
small cup of smooth apple sauce, it is 
put into a buttered baking dish, dusted 
with crumbs and a little grated cheese, 
then put in the oven long enough to 
brown it. 

Grapefruit-and-Cabbage Salad. Take 
the pulp, in pieces, from two heavy 
grapefruit and set to drain. Select a 
small cabbage, remove outer leaves and 
the heart, then chop as much as is needed, 
about three cups, not too fine. Add to 
it the grapefruit, a fine-chopped red 
pepper, a half-cup of chopped walnut 
meats and enough well-seasoned mayon- 
naise to moisten thesalad. Servein lettuce 
leaves with toasted crackers and cheese. 

Plum Pudding. Mix one pound, each, 
of bread crumbs and flour together. 
Add a pound of well-washed currants, 
a pound of seeded raisins, four tart apples, 
pared, cored and chopped fine, two ounces 
of chopped candied peel, a tablespoon of 
mixed spices, a teaspoon of ground 
ginger, half a nutmeg, a half-cup of 
chopped nuts, a half-pound of sugar and 
six beaten eggs. Rub into the flour and 
crumbs a half-pound of unsalted butter, 
then .add the other ingredients and mix 
thoroughly. A little vanilla flavoring, 
or the juice of an orange may be added if 
desired, also a quarter-cup of thinly sliced 
citron. Turn the mixture into a floured 
bag, leave enough room for the pudding 
to swell, and boil for eight hours. Cool 
and let stand a few days, then boil two 
hours at time of serving. Use any good 
pudding sauce or fruit juice over the 
pudding. 



The Cheerful Christmas Holly 

WHAT more brightly beautiful tree else is drab and sombre and so much seems 

can we find in the winter wood- lifeless, than that the full-blooded, radi- 

lands than the holly.? What more fitting ant holly should be taken as an emblem 

in its shining green and scarlet, where all of immortality? 



THE CHEERFUL CHRISTMAS HOLLY 



369 



No wonder we bring its branches into 
our homes at Yuletide, and think the 
Christmas atmosphere incomplete with- 
out this joyous evergreen. And we are 
perpetuating a custom as old as Chris- 
tianity, itself, when we do it, for the 
earliest Christians decorated their dwell- 
ings with holly at each recurring anni- 
versary of the Saviour's birth. 

Further back still, holly was used as a 
symbol of rejoicing in pagan festivals. 
The Romans adorned their homes with 
its berried branches at the great feast of 
Saturn, and the first Christians in Rome 
were simply diverting the ancient heathen 
custom when they made the holly play 
a symbolic part in the feast of Christmas. 
Better taste was never shown in choos- 
ing an emblem of joy. For the holly 
laughs aloud in the empty woods. How 
the sun fills it with light, where it stands 
in the leafless copse! How the firelight 
dances on its rich green and red, where it 
entwines the pictures in the room set for 
the feast. Beautiful in the church, 
wreathing pillars and altar and font for 
the Christmas morning gladness. 

In the winter woods it has other mercies 
than its silent message of cheer and 
aesthetic delightfulness. It provides a 
safe and snug roost for hosts of wild birds. 
It yields them food, too, in the last resort 
of winter poverty. Not till all the other 
wild berries have been consumed will the 
birds turn to the hollies, for the fruit of 
the latter is really unpalatable to most of 
the feathered tribe, and when they do 
attack it you may know that they have 
been forced to an extremity. 

Once the berries of the holly were a 
human physic. It is scarcely more than 
two hundred years since a dose of berries, 
swallowed like pills, was supposed to 
effect a cure for certain ailments. But 
we can well aff"ord to discard the idea that 
the holly is, or ever was, of benefit to 
mankind from the medicinal standpoint; 
there is so much else in the tree good 
and pleasing to know and think about 
that it is endeared to human hearts 
everlastingly. 



Then there is the mistletoe, that 
charming parasite of the apple, pear, 
maple, horse-chestnut and many other 
trees, but very rarely of the oak. 

Here, again, ^ve employ, in our Yule- 
tide festivities, a plant which originally 
did duty in heathen ceremonies. But it 
is not because of this phase in the history 
of the mistletoe that we do not introduce 
it into the scheme of Christmas decoration 
in our churches. 

Mistletoe has come to have a very 
particular significance at this season of 
merriment, and its presence in the church 
might not aid the spirit of devotion. 

The generally graceful growth of the 
plant, with its yellow-green leaves and 
clustered pearly berries, renders it very 
beautiful. None the less for its beauty, 
however, it is a parasite, to be given short 
shift on any tree upon which value is 
set. 

On the other hand, if you wish to grow 
mistletoe, it is exceedingly easy to do so, 
for all that is necessary is to take a berry 
and crush it into a crack in a branch of 
the tree selected, so that some of the tiny 
seeds are held fast. The crack should be 
on the under side of the branch, so that 
the seeds be not washed out by rain or 
found and eaten by hungry birds. 

The birds themselves are often the 
agents by which a crop of mistletoe is 
spread. When they clean their bills after 
a feast of the waxen berries they scrape a 
stray seed or two on to the branch, and 
the deed is done, if one seed finds a sure 
lodgment in the bark. In three or four 
years there will be a bush of berried 
mistletoe thriving on that spot. 

But it is after all the radiant holly that 
we love the best, so brightly beautiful it 
seems to belong in a special manner to this 
happy season. Its crimson berries blend 
with the pure white of the Christmas 
snow, symbolic of love and purity and 
childhood's innocence. Thus Earth her- 
self puts on her festive robes in honor of 
this holy season, and all nature seems to 
rejoice in the birth of Christ the Lord. 

E. X. S. 




Home Idcaa 

Eand . 
conomie8 




Contributions to this department will be gladly received, 
paid for at reasonable rates. 



Accepted items will be 



Tea and Toast 

THE jok6 about the young bride not 
knowing how to boil water without 
burning it sounds flat, but there is more 
point to the joke than one may suppose. 
For nothing so mars the delicacy of a pot 
of tea as poorly, or rather, insufficiently, 
boiled water. 

There is an old rhyme that goes some- 
thing like this: 

"Unless the teakettle boiling be, 
Filling the teapot spoils the tea." 

And the same thing applies to coffee. 
Too often the water that is poured over 
the latter is boiled water, to be sure, but 
not boiling water — it has been allowed 
to cool, and as a result the coffee is 
scarcely more than colored liquid. 

Afternoon tea plays an important role 
in the social life of the day and every 
potential hostess, if she is wise, makes it 
a point to learn how to make a cup of tea 
par excellence — she discovers the best 
kind of tea to use for a light beverage in 
the afternoon and the right kind of pot 
to steep it in, and the necessity of boiling 
water afresh for every service. 

But what shall she serve with tea.^ 
She decides upon toast, for it is one of 
the things that most people never weary 
of when it is well made, crisp and of tempt- 
ing flavor and fine of grain. If she has 
mastered the art of toast-making, there 
are a number of delectable dishes that 
she can concoct with it as a basis — 
Welsh rabbit, for instance, and a club 
sandwich, etc. 

It is the fine-grained bread that always 



makes the best toast, and it ought not be 
cut into slices more than half an inch 
thick. Warm the bread thoroughly before \ 
actually toasting it — it will make the 
toast lighter. Heat it on one side and 
turn it before browning it. Notice how 
the first heated surface contracts and the 
outside surface rounds out through this 
drying of the bread. 

Do not dry the bread too slowly, or the 
result will be exactly like cake, or bread 
that has been cooked by too slow a fire. 
Singed bread is never good. When the 
bread is thoroughly hot, but not too dry, 
nor too moist, the result is that fine, 
delicate brown that is so palatable. 

Toast that welters in butter is not 
wholesome, all opinions to the contrary 
notwithstanding. Have the butter warm 
and butter the toast while hot, but do not 
press down the butter upon the toast, 
unless the latter is totally dried out. 
Then it does not make so much differ- 
ence. If you can possibly avoid it, do 
not lay one buttered slice upon another. 

To return to tea; it has been decided 
by a jury of experts that the best sort of 
a pot is the unglazed earthenware type. 
When making ready for the tea, fill the 
pot with hot water and let stand while 
boiling the water for the tea. For each 
cup allow one teaspoonful of tea. For 
sanitary reasons the experienced housewife 
pours a little boiling water over the dry 
tea and then pours it off again, and then 
adds the amount of water required. Let 
the boiling water and the tea stand for 
about five minutes and then pour all the 
tea from the grounds into another hot 



370 



HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES 



371 



pot, if there is to be another serving "all 
round." 

In summing up, remember these items: 
Water to be boiling must be disturbed 
over its entire surface, the water itself 
must be galloping and this is the only 
temperature at which to use the water. 
The pot must be hot and the time of 
drawing short. As for toast, dry bread, 
quick fires, and carefully applied butter 
will give the best results. — j. w. w. 



Southern Art in Cooking 
Cabbage 

"Every man shall eat in safety under his own 
vine, where he plants." 

ONE of our favorite and most nutri- 
tious vegetables is the cabbage, 
which is composed of: Proteid, 2.1; 
fat, .4; carbohydrates, 5.8; mineral 
matter, 1.4; water, 90.3. 

Cabbage should be cooked rapidly in 
an uncovered vessel, as it contains 
volatile oil, and if cooked in a covered 
vessel will emit unpleasant odors. 

Whole heads of cabbage . should be 
cooked in boiling salted water for one 
hour and a half. Chopped cabbage may 
be cooked in less water than the whole 
heads, for twenty or thirty minutes. 

How to Cook Cabbage 

Select a firm, heavy head of cabbage. 
Remove outside leaves, and cut up very 
fine as for slaw. Put one pint of water 
in a vessel, one tablespoonful of lard, salt 
to taste, and let it come to a boil. Put 
the cabbage in and cook twenty or thirty 
minutes. 

Creamed Cabbage 

Shred one-half of a small, firm cabbage, 
and boil in clear water thirty minutes. 
Drain off water, add one tablespoonful 
of butter, one cup of sweet milk or cream, 
pepper and salt to taste. Make a thick- 
ening of one tablespoonful of flour and a 
little water, and let cook a few minutes, 
then mix in cabbage. 



Stuffed Cabbage 

Select a nice, firm head of cabbage; 
scald with boiling water and let stand for 
half an hour, drain and dry with a soft 
cloth. Take two teaspoonfuls of rice, 
one-half a pound of sausage meat, a little 
chopped onion and parsley, and mix well. 
Open the center of the cabbage and care- 
fully put in spoonfuls of the mixture 
between the leaves, until each layer is 
stuflfed. Press together, tie in a cheese- 
cloth bag, put in salted boiling water and 
boil for two hours. Serve hot with cream 
sauce and garnish with fried sausage. 

Boiled Cabbage 

Remove outside leaves of a firm head 
of cabbage, cut in quarters, and remove 
tough stalk. Wash in cold water, and 
cook in an uncovered vessel in boiling 
salted water one hour and one-half. 
Add one-fourth a teaspoonful of soda as 
this prevents any disagreeable odor during 
cooking. 

Boiled cabbage may be seasoned with 
bacon or fat; or butter and pepper may 
be used if preferred. 

Hot Slaw 

Cut one-half a firm, white head of 
cabbage into fine pieces (it is better to 
shred it). Put in a pan with one tea- 
spoonful, each, of salt and pepper, and 
a piece of butter the size of an egg. Add 
one teacup of vinegar and half a teacup 
of water. Cover and cook until cabbage 
becomes tender, stirring often. 

Canned Cabbage 

Select heavy, firm heads of cabbage, 
wash, and cut into fine pieces, beginning 
at the top of cabbage. To one gallon of 
boiling water add one cup of salt, put in 
a large stewpan that will hold at least 
two gallons. Fill pan with cabbage and 
cook from ten to fifteen minutes. 

Have glass fruit jars cleaned and steril- 
ized ready to fill. Fill jars with cabbage 
and pack as full as possible, and when all 
are filled put lids on to protect the con- 



372 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



cents, but do not screw them on. Put 
jars in a tub or boiler of cold water over 
a hot fire, being careful to place paper, 
cloth or strips of wood in the bottom to 
protect jars and keep them from breaking. 
Let the water come to a boil, and boil 
fifteen or twenty minutes after the boiling 
point is reached. 

Remove jars from water and fill each 
jar nearly full of fresh boiling water, if 
they are not already full. Have paraffine 
wax melted and pour about one table- 
spoonful on top of water in each jar, seal 
tight and set aside until cool. Wrap 
jars in paper and set away for winter use. 
Cabbage put up by this method will keep 
indefinitely, and will be enjoyed when 
used. s. L. s. 



Ways of Giving Money at 
Christmas 

IT is sometimes desirable to give money 
as a Christmas present. Just how to 
do this delicately and kindly is worth 
giving a little serious thought. 

Though the thought may be "serious," 
the results should not be. The money- 
gift, to be acceptable, must be wrapped 
up in drollery. Below are given a few 
original ways for making such presents. 

The Wish-Bone Lady 

Take a chicken for turkey) "lucky- 
bone" and make a plaited dress of a one- 
dollar bill, or a greenback of any denom- 
ination desired. Let it open in front and 
secure it around the neck by means of 
red "baby-ribbon." Draw a laughing 
"face" on the tiny bit of the bone that 
serves for a head, and pin this rhyme 
conspicuously on the dolly somewhere: 

"This small, bow-legped lady- 
Is Miss Lucky-bone O'Crady; 

Her 'heart's' as full of love as it can pack! 
Should you ever need some money, 
She will smile so bright and sunny, 

And will give the very gown from off her 
back." 

Nuts to Crack 

With a dull knife split the shells of a 



number of English walnuts. Pick out the 
meats, and in their place pack a small 
coin, wrapped in tinfoil or tissue paper, 
so as not to rattle. A dime, a nickel, a 
small gold coin, or five bright pennies 
will fit nicely into half of the shell, and a 
bit of glue applied to the edges will make 
the other half stick to it so that no one 
can suspect what is inside. A handful 
of these, mixed in with other nuts, which 
have not been tampered with, make a 
great deal of fun for a party of young 
folks, or indeed for any one, young or old. 
A little box of such "doctored" nuts 
went to a girl last Christmas with this 
inscription: 

"If ever you are feeling blue' 

And things seem out of whack, 
Just go and get a hammer 

And give these nuts a crack; 
It may relieve your feelings, 

And won't hurt mine a bit; 
I'm not the one to ki-yi — 

'Twill be your thumb that's hit!" 

A Dime-Safe 

A friend, who was often caught without 
car fare was given one of these nuts with 
silver "filling" to keep in her shopping 
bag. The rhyme that went with it was 
as follows: 

"Peter, Peter, money-eater. 
Had a dime and couldn't keep her; 
He put her in a walnut-shell, 
And there he kept her very well." 

A. B. B. 



Household Advice 

ORANGE peel, when dried, is excellent 
for lighting fires. 

Drying Clothes. To dry clothes in a 
hurry, when it is raining, hang them in 
the house and turn on the electric fan. 

Mud Stains. To remove from tan 
slippers or shoes use a slice of raw potato. 

Worth Knowing. When meat has be- 
come frozen do not thaw out too quickly; 
hang it in a cool place overnight, or if 
you cannot do this, put it in a pan oi cold 
water and in this way it will thaw without 
losing its flavor. i. a. g. 



I 



HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES 



373 



Government Apples 

ALL my life I have heard of evapo- 
rated apples, but until this winter 
I have never tried to use them. This is 
because we have always managed to beg, 
buy or raise our own fruit. 

Many people have attempted new fields 
since 1914, and I am no exception. Still, 
those apples have been on my conscience, 
instead of on my pantry shelves, for as 
many months as have passed since the 
paternal government turned its attention 
to our needs. 

I have a terror of the unknown. I did 
not know how to handle evaporated 
apples. Hoping that they were forgotten 
by the family, I kept a guilty silence and 
ignored my duty. 

"By the way," said the professor one 
day, *' did you ever do anything with those 
apples we bought at the sale.^" 

With great presence of mind I answered 
casually, "Not yet." 

No more was said, for I am supposed 
to know how to run the table to the best 
advantage, forhave we not been well taught 
of late, both by precept and by purse.'* 

The professor's question set me to won- 
dering whether even evaporated apples 
might not spoil if left too long to 
themselves. 

I timidly asked the laundress about it. 
She had lived in the country, and proved 
an authority, indeed! 

"Yes'm; worms gets in 'em," she said 
with decision. "Many's the apple I've 
dried myself, and they don't keep long." 

I simply didn't dare to open that tin 
box. How could I look upon a waste 
like that! 

But hope dies hard, and I decided to 
look for further data before throwing the 
whole thing out. So I asked the dress- 
maker, whom life has led by devious paths 
to the needle, what she* knew about 
evaporated apples. 

"Why," said she, "they'll last all 
summer. Of course they'll keep!" 

Thus encouraged I opened the box, — 
and found them perfect. 



Being assured that they would keep 
indefinitely I became anxious at once to 
use them up. There must be a reason 
for this sort of impulse, it is so common. 
It was strong in me at that moment. 
But I reflected that Martha was coming 
to do some cooking on the new basis of 
hourly work we were trying out; why 
not leave them to her.** 

So when Martha came, I told her to 
put a bag of the apples in soak, and then 
I went to my study and pulled the screen 
around the door, as I do when I do not 
want to be interrupted. I did feel vexed 
when Martha took the liberty to push it 
away with one sweep of her arm, and even 
more than her accustomed air of assur- 
ance. She had a bag of the apples under 
her arm. 

"You surely don't want me to put all 
these in soak. Ma'am! Why, there must 
be all of five pounds here; they'd fill a 
boiler, Ma'am!" 

I looked up long enough to tell her to 
use her own judgment, that a big bowl- 
ful might do; then my shoulders regis- 
tered "Go!" and she took the hint. 

Some hours afterward, when I went 
down stairs, the bowl was full, and several 
more besides, and the tide was still rising. 
Martha scrubbed and cooked and sifted 
and sugared all the next day, and we made 
pies and sauce and tarts and mincemeat 
and pudding, and still had canned sauce 
to put away. 

I learned a great deal about the amount 
of moisture contained in raw apples, and 
discovered the cheapest, most economical 
food available at the present time; inval- 
uable as a dry ration, if nibbled raw, and 
capable of indefinite expansion when 
cooked. 

But I am glad that our own apple tree 
grows larger every year. a. b. s. 

"You can often mend broken dishes and 
broken friendships, mend 'em pretty 
good," said a wise old woman; "but 
they're never just the same again — the 
place where the break was is sure to 
show." 



THIS department is for the benefit and free use of our subscribers. Questions relating to recipes, 
and those pertaining to culinary science and domestic economics in general, will be cheerfully 
answered by the editor. Communications for this department must reach us before the first of the 
month preceding that in which the answers are expected to appear. In letters requesting answers 
by mail, please enclose address and stamped envelope. Address queries to Janet Al. Hill, Editor. 
American Cookery, 221 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass. 



Query No. 4169. — "Kindly publish a recipe 
for Frozen Fruit Salad." 

Frozen Fruit Salad 

^lake a water-ice flavored with lemon, 
orange, or any desired fruit juice. The 
usual proportions for this are one cup of 
fruit juice and one cup of sugar to three 
cups of water; except that when lemon 
juice is used only one-half a cup is 
needed. When the water-ice is frozen 
almost stiff, add sliced peaches, pears, 
apples, oranges, or any fruit or mixture 
of fruits, and continue freezing until you 
can no longer turn the dasher. Serve in 
small ladlefuls on crisp, chilled lettuce, 
with a spoonful of mayonnaise poured 
over. If canned or preserved fruit is used 
it may be added at the beginning, pro- 
viding the fruit has been canned in a 
sugar syrup. Or fresh fruit may first be 
cooked in a sugar syrup, and then added 
when beginning the freezing. 



Query No. 4170. — "What is the correct way 
to serve French Pastries, with a spoon or a fork, 
or may they be eaten from the fingers.'"' 

How to Serve French Pastries 

French pastry is served on a plate, 
never on a saucer, and is to be eaten with 
a fork. The plate should not be too 
large; six or seven inches in diameter is a 
good size, and the fork should be one of 
small size, such as a breakfast fork. All 
rich cakes, cakes with icing, and layer 
cakes, are correctly eaten with a fork, and 
are eaten with the fingers only when so 
dry in texture that they do not grease the 



fingers or cause stickiness. In hotels and 
restaurants the French pastries are some- 
times served on a lace-paper doily on a 
plate, and this fashion has been copied 
in some homes. It is, however, thought 
in finer taste to avoid all these lace-edged 
articles, made of paper, when serving food 
in the home. 



Query No. 4171. — "What is Russian Salad 
Dressing, and how is it made.^" 

Russian Salad Dressing 

When a tartare sauce is used to dress a 
salad this is often called a Russian salad 
dressing, but the only difference between 
the sauce and the dressing is that the 
pickles in the dressing are ground up 
finef. Pounded anchovies or caviar, 
added to a mayonnaise, may, also, be 
called a Russian salad dressing. Or a 
more elaborate and highly-seasoned form 
may have a greater variety of ingredients, 
such as the following: To a cup of 
mayonnaise, or boiled dressing, add, 
when ready to serve, one-half a table- 
spoonful of tarragon vinegar, or any 
other flavored vinegar, mixed with two 
tablespoonfuls of chili sauce, two tea- 
spoonfuls, each, of fine-chopped green 
pepper and chives, a teaspoonful of 
onion juice, and one small sweet Spanish 
pepper, canned or fresh, cut into thin 
shreds. 



Query No. 4172. — "I should like to ha\( 
the following recipes: One for a Caramel Caki 
made with caramelized granulated sugar; aiu 
one for Spiced Peaches." 



374 



QUERIES AXD ANSWERS 



375 



Caramel Cake Made with 
Caramelized Sugar 

Sift three cups of flour with four tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder and one 
teaspoonful of salt. Cream three-fourths 
a cup of butter or fat with one cup of 
sugar, add three well-beaten eggs, and 
one cup of sugar that has been cooked 
on a pan until it has melted and become 
a brown syrup, and to which three- 
fourths a cup of water has then been 
quickly added, and the whole cooked over 
gentle heat until all of the browned sugar 
has melted. No other flavoring should 
be added to the cake, but fruit, nuts, etc., 

may be used in any quantity desired. 

> 

■ Spiced Peaches 

Peel and stone enough peaches to make 
six pounds in weight after stones and 
peel have been removed. Weigh three 
pounds of granulated sugar, and put on 
to boil in an agate or porcelain kettle 
with three cups of cider vinegar and one 
teaspoonful of salt. When the sugar has 
melted, add two ounces of stick cinnamon, 
crushed, and tied loosely in a cheese- 
cloth bag; one ounce of whole claves, 
pounded and similarly tied in cheese- 
cloth; and one ounce of mixed pickling 
spice or of allspice berries, tied in cheese- 
cloth. Cover the kettle, and let the 
contents boil for ten or fifteen minutes, 
then add the peaches, cut in halves. 
Keep stirring, to avoid burning, and cook 
until the mixture is well flavored with 
spice — this will take at least half an 
hour — then remove the cheesecloth bags 
and continue cooking until the mixture 
is as thick as marmalade. Put into jars, 
and keep in a cool, dry place. If direc- 
tions are followed the spiced peaches will 
keep without sealing. 



Query No. 4173. — "Can you give me a 
recipe and directions for making a Hazelnut 
Torte.?" 

Hazelnut Torte 

Blanch one-half a pound of the nuts. 
and grind through a nut grinder. Heat 



until soft in a quart saucepan one- 
fourth a cup of butter; stir into it one- 
fourth a cup of flour, and add by degrees 
two cups of milk, stirring over the fire 
until the whole boils and is a smooth, 
thick paste. Add two cups of granulated 
sugar, one-half a grated nutmeg, and 
one-fourth a cup of candied orange peel 
and citron, cut into very small pieces. 
Lastly, stir in three well-beaten eggs and 
cook until these are set; add the nuts, 
and use this mixture to fill nearly full as 
many small patty cases or pastry shells, 
Swedish timbales, or the like, as you need. 
There should be enough for about a dozen. 
Or the whole could be poured into one 
large pastry shell, and this crossed with 
narrow strips of paste and set into the 
oven until these are brown. 



Query No. 4174. — "Will you kindly tell me 
how to make Soft Waffles on an electric waffle 
iron? The batters, so soft and delicious when 
cooked in the old way, seem hard and tough 
when cooked on the electric irons. Why is this?" 

Soft Waffles on an Electric Iron 

The old-fashioned iron waffle-iron 
needed a lot of greasing, and this kept 
the wafl^les soft. The fine-grained waflile 
irons of aluminum, used for cooking by 
electricity, do not need to be greased, and 
this results in an apparent toughening of 
the cakes. Try doubling the amount of 
shortening in your recipe, and keep on 
increasing the quantity until you have 
soft and tender cakes. 



Query No. 4175. — "In the place where my 
mother lived, sixty years ago, she says they used 
to cook something which looked like a Beetroot, 
only it was white and yellow; it was dry, and 
it used to be boiled in either milk or water until, 
when cold, it became thick and hard. Can you 
tell me what this was, and where it can be gotten 
now? What is arrowroot made from, and how 
is it used? Why does a cake become red when 
chocolate is cooked in it? When a recipe calls 
for one-half a cake of chocolate does this mean 
one-half of one of the squares of the half-pound 
cake?" 

Can some reader answer this.? We 
confess ignorance as to the nature of the 
vegetable so interestingly described by 



376 



AAdERICAN COOKERY 



our correspondent. Can any of our 

readers help us out? Meantime we will 

inquire, and try to ascertain what it 
may be. 

Arrowroot 

Arrowroot is a starchy substance made, 
commercially, from the roots of certain 
tropical plants. It is one of the most 
expensive forms of starch, and is at pres- 
ent quoted at 80 cents a pound. It is 
very easily digested and wholesome, 
hence is used in the diet of invalids. It 
is used in ordinary cooking, when it is 
desired to thicken a clear soup, such as a 
clarified bouillon, or one of the clear fruit 
soups, since the genuine arrowroot makes 
a perfectly transparent thickening for 
soups and sauces. Its thickening prop- 
erty is much greater than that of flour, 
and only one-half or one-third the quan- 
tity need be used. The Bermuda arrow- 
root is considered the best. 

Why Chocolate Reddens a Cake 

Under ordinary circumstances pure 
chocolate should tint the cake a deeper 
or a lighter brown, according to the 
quantity used. If you tell us the other 
ingredients used in the cake, we may be 
able to account for the red color. 

One-half a cake of chocolate in a recipe 
means one-half of one of the squares in a 
half-pound cake. 



Query No. 4176. — "Can you give me a list 
of foods that are Laxative, and of some that are 
Constipating.'"' 

Laxative and Constipating Foods 

While this is something which every 
woman ought to know, it is not easy to 
make exact statements, or an exact 
classification, since the effect of the same 
food may be different with different 
individuals. However, the following lists 
will be found accurate in most cases. 
Laxative foods include the coarser breads, 
especially bran bread and muffins; many 
of the fats, such as cream, olive oil, 
chicken fat, etc.; vegetables that are 



eaten raw, such as lettuce, celery, toma- 
toes; cooked vegetables, such as spinach, 
brussels sprouts and boiled onions; the 
citrous fruits; and dried fruits like prunes 
and figs. Other foods are also laxative, 
but the above are to be depended upon 
in almost all cases. Constipating foods 
are the finer breadstuffs made of fine flour, 
also the finer grains like white rice; also 
cornstarch in puddings; milk, cottage 
cheese and hard cheese; and the fruits 
rich in tannin of which blackberries, 
especially when eaten without the seeds, 
are a good example. It would be a good 
plan to combine foods from both classes 
in the daily meals. 



Query No. 4177. — **I should like very much 
to know of some novel way to use up cold boiled 
potatoes, something besides hash, or potato 
cakes, or creamed potatoes, or any of the old 
ways we are tired of at our house. Also can you 
tell me how to make the Club House Cheese that 
we have to pay so much for when bought in its 
little pots at the groceries.?" 

We think we have the very thing you 
ask for in the way of serving left-over 
cold potatoes. It is called 

Hungarian Potatoes 

Brown a heaping tablespoonful ol 
chopped onion in three tablespoonfuls ol 
fat. 'Stir in two tablespoonfuls of flour,] 
two cups of sifted canned tomatoes, a] 
quart of cold, cooked potatoes cut in dice,! 
two teaspoonfuls of salt, one-fourth aj 
teaspoonful of paprika, and pour all ini 
a greased casserole. Bake for half ai 
hour in a moderate oven, and sprinkh 
two tablespoonfuls of chopped parsleyj 
over the top before serving. 

Club House Cheese 

Grate or grind through a food-choppe^ 
one pound of hard, sharp cheese. A< 
two teaspoonfuls of salt, one of d] 
mustard, a dash of cayenne, and a hall 
cup of white vinegar. Beat these ingre 
dients thoroughly into the grated cheese] 
then add one tablespoonful or more 
olive oil, enough to make a smooth past< 
Fill into small jars when done. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



wKy Have 
fried food taste 
of tKe cooking fat? 




Crisco is sold the right way, by 
net weight, in sanitary dust-proof 
containers. Never sold in bulk. 
One pound and larger sizes, at all 
good dealers. 



Crisco ii 
Canada. 



also made and sold in 




Which requires hotter frying 
fat, doughnuts or croquettes 
— and how should you test it? 

Learn all about easy Crisco frying 
in the practical cookbook, "Rec- 
ipes for Everyday," prepared by 
the famous cook, Janet McKenzie 
Hill, for users of Crisco. The 
founder of the Boston Cooking 
School, and editor of American 
Cookery also gives many delicious 
recipes suitable for everyday fam- 
ily use. Well bound; illustrated 
in color. One copy mailed, post- 
paid, on receipt of 10 cents in 
stamps. Address Department 
A- 12, The Procter & Gamble 
Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



— when Crisco fries perfectly without 
adding the slightest flavor of its own. 

Until you try it, you can't imagine how 
much this delicate, tasteless frying fat 
betters fried food — how it lets you enjoy 
every shading of natural flavor in fruity 
fritters, spicy doughnuts and toothsome 
croquettes. 

It is better from the health standpyoint, 
too, because it is a strictly vegetable 
product. Perfectly digestible itself, 
foods fried in it are digestible. 

It is economical, because it quickly forms 
a crisp crust on the food and does not 
soak in, and because you can use what 
is left again and again. It does not 
carry the taste of one food, even fish or 
onions, to the next thing fried. 

Use Crisco for tender, flaky pastry, 
delicious biscuits, and butterlike 
cakes. It's always pure, white, 
fresh — gives you the utmost quality 
and richness for every cooking 
purpose. 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

377 



New Books 



Clothing: Choice, Care, Cost. By Mary 
ScHENCK WooLMAN. Illustrated. 
Cloth. J. B. Lippincott Company, 
Philadelphia. 
To the new consumer, who plans to live 
on a budget and become conversant with 
staple materials, their properties, values, 
prices, and reliability, and who wishes to 
dress well at a fair cost, this volume will 
prove a windfall. In addition to giving 
a vast amount of information regarding 
clothing of ail kinds, there are also chap- 
ters on the care, repair, and renovation of 
clothing; on dyeing, laundering, and 
spot removal, as well as suggestions for 
the clothing budget, all of which are 
invaluable, if you would dress well at the 
least expense. One can learn here, also, 
how pretty and serviceable dresses and 
suits for children can be readily prepared 
from the used clothing of grown-ups. 

To buyers, sales people and advertisers 
of clothing this work will prove equally 
valuable. The wise merchant sails with 
the current of public opinion. The new 
consumer has arrived, and is preparing to 
tell what he or she will expect of the cloth- 
ing trade from now on. 

Teachers of home economics will find 
in this volume the complete, practical, 
up-to-date guide to the wise selection and 
choice of clothing and textiles, which they 
require in their work. 

Cocoa and Chocolate. Their History from 

Plantation to Consumer. A. W. 

Knapp. Chapman and Hall, 

London. 

This is a plain account of the production 

of cocoa and chocolate. 

After a brief survey of the history of 
cocoa and chocolate, the author begins 
with the growing of the cocoa bean and 
follows the cocoa in its career until it 
becomes the finished product ready for 
consumption. 

A great deal of time and effort has 
been expended in the preparation of this 



little book. The illustrations are numer- 
ous, unique and in many cases rare. 
From no other single source, perhaps, can 
so much information be obtained con- 
cerning the production and process of 
preparation of an important food product, 
now well known and extensively used in 
all parts of the world. How the fruit of 
a plant has been transformed into the 
present delicate, tasty and pleasant 
articles of commerce and consumption is 
somewhat amazing. This little book tells 
the story. 

Textbook oj Chemistry for Nurses and 
Students of Home Economics. By 
Annie Louise Macleod. 180 
pages, illustrated. McGraw-Hill 
Book Co., New York. 
A concise presentation of those general 
principles of chemistry — inorganic, or- 
ganic, and physiological — • which give the 
necessary foundation for practical courses 
such as nutrition, dietetics and cookery, 
materia medica, and bacteriology, which 
are more or less dependent on a basis of 
chemical theory. 

The book conforms to the requirements 
of the committee on education of the 
National League of Nursing Education 
and of the New York State Board. It 
will be of value to nurses, also to students | 
of domestic science and home economics. 
Throughout the text the author has kept ; 
particularly in mind the needs of the 
nurse-in-tralning. For this class of stu- 
dents, here is an excellent text book and 
manual. 

Manual of Cookery. McCormick & Com- 
pany, Baltimore, Md. 
The time table, the table of weights 
and measures, marketing hints, numerous 
recipes and hints worth knowing, render 
this little manual a very convenient and 
complete hand book for the kitchen. It 
holds a child's corner, as well as a com- 
plete index. The volume is wall fitted. 



378 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



i 



y ^. /f^uyfCJ ^ ^^ ^ 



A Christmas Dessert and Candy 

AFTER eating a hearty Christmas dinner have you ever felt that the Plum Pudding was just a 
little too much> 1 have, and began experimenting on a recipe that would avoid the heaviness 
of the meal and yet be so palatable and attractive that it would add just the finishing touch to it. 

I have found that this fruited Plum Pudding, which requires so little time and trouble to make, 
and saves standing over a hot stove, is the very thing that appeals to all members of the family. 
Decorated with a bit of holly, it carries out the spirit of Christmas, and while I call it a Christmas 
Plum Pudding, you will find it suitable for any dinner. 

I am also giving you a recipe for Christmas candy that I am sure you will find dainty, delicious, 
and which will add pleasure to your day. 




CHRISTMAS PLUM PUDDING 



1 envelope Knox Sparkling Gelatine 
^ cup cold water 
1 cup sugar 



teaspoonful vanilla 



14 cup sliced citron or nuts 
J4 cup currants 

1 H squares chocolate or 5 tablespoons cocoa 
Pinch of salt 
1 cup seeded raisins 3^ cup dates or figs 1 pint of milk 

Soak the gelatine in cold water for fi%e minutes. Put milk in double boiler, add melted chocolate or cocoa which has 
been stirred to a paste in a little water, and when scalding point is reached add sugar, salt and soaked gelatine. Remove 
from fire and when mixture begins to thicken add vanilla, fruit and nuts. Turn into mold, first dipped in cold water, and 
chill. Remove to serving dish and garnish with holly. Serve with whipped cream, sweetened and flavored with vanilla. 



CHRISTMAS CANDY 



2 envelopes Knox Sparkling Gelatine 
4 cups granulated sugar 



1 H cups boiling water 
1 cup cold water 



Soak the gelatine in the cold water five minutes. Add the boiling water. When dissolved add the sugar and boil 
slowly for fifteen minutes. Divide into two equal parts. When somewhat cooled add to one part one teaspoonful extract 
of cinnamon. To the other part add one-half teaspoonful extract of cloves. Pour into shallow tins that have been dipped 
in cold water. Let stand over night; turn out and cut into squares. Roll in fine granulated or powdered sugar and let 
stand to crystallize. Vary by using different flavors such as lemon, orange, peppermint, wintergreen, etc., and different 
colors, adding chopped nuts, dates or figs. 

OTHER CHRISTMAS SUGGESTIONS 

If you would like suggestions for a MARSHMALLOW ROAST and other delicious candy recipes, 
write for special Christmas suggestions. Our book- 
lets, "Dainty Desserts" and "Food Economy," con- 
taining recipes for Desserts, Salads, Ice Creams, etc., 
will also be sent free, if you enclose a two-cent stamp 
to cover postage and mention your grocer's name. 
Any domestic science teacher can have suflScient gelatine 
for her class, if she will write me on school stationery, stating 
quantity and when needed. 

it means KNOX" 



KNOX 

tlELATlNL I 



"Wherever a recipe calls for Gelatine 

MRS. CHARLES B. KNOX 

KNOX GELATINE 

107 Knox Avenue Johnstown, N. Y. 




Buy advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 
379 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Indeed, for handy use in the kitchen, 
where the most important processes of 
the household are carried on. 



Cupid and the New Year 

Continued from page J41 

"Miss!" His look of utter perplexity 
made the young lady laugh. 

"Certainly; what is so puzzling about 
that.?" 

"I thought — I was told that you — 
that is, Kittie Lindell, had married a 
Mr. Lenox last New Year's day." 

"Kittie Lindell did; she married my 
brother, Ben Lenox, at the Old Mission 
Inn, a year ago tomorrow. I was at the 
wedding." 

"Then — you are not Kittie Lindell, 
after all!" 

"I certainly am not and never have 
been Kittie Lindell. How — but wait," 
she interrupted herself, "until I get you 
some coffee and sandwiches." 

He watched her wistfully as she moved 
about her hospitable task, noting her 
lissom slenderness, the soft tidiness of 




Baby Midget 



HOSE SUPPORTER 

holds the socks securely and allows the little one 
absolute freedom of action, so necessary to its 
health, growth and comfort. The highly nickeled 
parts of the "Baby Midget" have smooth, 
rounded comers and edges and they do not come 
in contact with the baby's skin. 
Like the Velvet Grip Hose Supporters for 
women, misses and children it is equipped 
with the famous All-Rubber Oblong Button, 
which prevents slipping and ruthless ripping. 
Silk, 15 cents; Lisle, 10 cents 

SOLD EVERYWHERE OR SENT POSTPAII. 
GEORGE FROST CO., MAKERS, BOSTON 



her dark brown hair, the satisfying sim- 
plicity of her costume. 

"Now, then," she slipped at last into 
the chair opposite him, a smile dimpling 
the corners of her lips, " I want very much 
to know what gave you the idea that I 
am or ever was Kittie Lindell." 

Dean studied for a moment. 

"You had vague recollections, you 
know," he reminded her, "of a house like 
Aunt Rosanna's, which you must have 
known in your early youth. That, in 
some way, linked you in my mind with 
Kittie Lindell, as I remembered her." 

"Then you knew Kittie Lindell.?" 

"For a day; at the romantic age of 
eleven years I was spending my school 
vacation with my Aunt Rosanna; Kittie, 
six and sweet, came visiting with her 
Aunt Lois, and somehow wiled my cub 
heart away. That was my first love 
affair. Miss Lenox. My second and last 
began — at a recent date." 

"Hum," mused Kate, looking thought- 
fully down at her laced fingers. "Tell 
me a little more about this first idyl of 
yours; did the aunts favor it.?" 

"They didn't know anything about it. 
Aunt Rosanna was laid up with a broken 
ankle, and Aunt Lois and the other 
grown-ups were too much concerned with 
her to bother about us. Aunt Rosanna 
hadn't a suspicion of my early romance 
until a year ago, when I made her a full 
and free confession. Even then, she had 
to study a bit to dig out the fact that it 
was Kittie Lindell who had won my young 
affections, for beyond 'Kitsy,' I had 
never had an idea what my little sweet- 
heart's name really was." 

"Ah!" The perplexed shadow lifted 
from Kate's face. "Tell me, Mr. Hol- 
brook, do you recall a wonderful whistle 
that you made out of sassafras wood for 
this 'Kitsy'?" 

" Don't I .? I nearly missed my dinner, 
searching for a twig perfect enough for 
her—'' 

"And do you remember the adventure 
you and Kitsy had with a barbed wire 
fence that enclosed a tempting melon 
patch, when I — ■ when Kitsy went head- 



Buy advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 
380 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Food 
Prices 



Calories per 


pound 


Quaker Oats 


. . 1810 


Round Steak 


. . 890 


Average Fish 


. . 350 


Potatoes . . 


. 295 


Canned Peas 


. 235 




Study Costs 

Many breakfasts cost you ten times Quaker Oats 

Quaker Oats costs one cent per large dish. 

You can serve, 12 dishes of Quaker Oats for the cost of a single chop. Or 5 dishes for the cost 
of an egg. 

Quaker Oats yields 1,810 calories per pound — the energv measure of food value. Round 
steak yields 890 — eggs 635. 

Quaker Oats is only 7 per cent water. In fish the waste and water are 85 per cent. In eggs 
they are 77 per cent. 

Meat, eggs and fish will average nine times Quaker Oats in cost, for equal calories of nutri- 
ment. That means 35 cents on a breakfast for five, or $125 per year. 

Oats the supreme food 

Yet the oat is the greatest food that grows. It is almost a complete food — nearly the ideal 
food. As a body-builder and a vim-food it has age-old fame. It is the best food you can serve 
to start the day. 

Millions of people nowadays make Quaker Oats their basic breakfast. They save immensely 
on their food cost. They guard against underfeeding. The breakfasts are delicious. Then they 
use the saving to buy costlier foods for dinner. 

oaker Oats 

The finest oat dish created 

• \. ^^* lovers the world over get Quaker Oats for flavor. This brand is flaked from queen grains only — just the 
nch, plump, flavory oats. We get but ten pounds from a bushel. Yet this extra flavor costs no extra price. Ask 
for Quaker and you get it. 

Packed in sealed round packages with removable cover 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
381 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




VVWVWrtrt^fWWWWrt 



An Appetizing 
Meat Loaf — 

and made the new Cox way ! Try this — 

MEAT LOAF 

1 envelope Cox's Gelatine. 3 cups (1% 
pints) water, 1 teaspoon beef extract or 
bouillon cube. 1 cup % pint) chopped celerw. 
4 tablespoons chopped sweet red peppers. 1 
teaspoon salt. % teaspoon pepper. 3 cups ( % 
lb.) chopped cooked meat. Parsley. 

Pour water into a saucepan, sprinkle in Gela- 
tine and dissolve over Are; add beef extract or 
bouillon cube and cool; then add celery, red 
peppers, seasoning and meat. Pour into a wet 
mold and leave in a cool place over night. 
Turn out at serving time, cut in slices and 
garnish with parsley. 

Any kind of left over meat may be used in 
this way. 

There are any number of other ways 
in which to use Cox Gelatine to make 
your cooking better. The underlying se- 
cret of many a dainty and unusual salad 
and rich, delicious dessert is one of the 
little checkerboard packages of Cox's 
Gelatine. 

The new Cox Book of Gelatine Recipes 
shows you the surprisingly varied ways 
in which Cox's Gelatine, pure, unfla- 
vored and unsweetened, will improve 
your cooking. 

Write for a free copy. 




Instant Powdered 



GELATME 



THE COX GELATINE CO. 

Dept. D, 100 Hudson St., New York 



long into a loose end of wire, and how you, 
in coming to the rescue, fell over a snag 
and bumped your nose?" 

She brushed a clinging brown lock from 
her left temple and touched a tiny scar 
with her finger. 

"Miss Kate!" Dean shouted. ''You are 
the 'Kitsy' of my dreams, and Kittie 
Lindell isn't — has never been, anything 
in my life but a name! You — " 

"Wait," laughed Kate, "until all the 
evidence is in. Among the souvenirs of 
my childhood I have a sassafras whistle, 
given me by a curly-headed boy, known 
to me only as 'Reddy.' This was during 
a brief visit I paid to a sick lady with 
Aunt Lois Truman — who is my *aunt* 
only by reason of being my mother's 
oldest friend — " 

"And the pincushion — did you send 
him that.?" 

Kate nodded. "I made it all by 
myself," she owned, with modest pride, 
"and stuffed it with feathers picked out 
of my pillow. I tagged it with a pain- 
fully printed 'Reddy, from Kitsy,' and 
sneaked it into a box of jellies Aunt Lois 
was sending your Aunt Rosanna." 

"Kate," Dean abandoned his dish of 
spiced peaches and moved his chair over 
beside hers, " for nineteen years I dreamed 
of my child-sweetheart. For one year 
I have dreamed of the girl I want as my 
life's sweetheart. The two, as it appears, 
are one, and if I do not win her I shall 
never marry. I am too impetuous, I 
know; I should have waited, gone 
through the regular routine of courting; 
but don't be angry; think how much 
time I have lost — " 

She smiled, the natural velvety glow 
in her cheeks spreading until throat and 
brow were all a-bloom. 

"And I," she said, "have dreamed 
about but one hero in my life — *Reddy,' 
my gallant little knight of a day." 

"And tell me, * Kitsy,' did you find, in 
the lonely old bachelor you helped to 
cheer last New Year's day, any reminder 
of 'Reddy'.?" 

"Only subconsciously, I think, at the 
time. We were half way to the Old 
Mission Inn before light, began really to 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

382 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Why does Nature put milk in the coconut shell? 

THA f 'S no conundrum. You KNOW ceming housewives everywhere. It is 

the reason for the juice in the canned in its own milk. It comes to you 

orange and the water in the melon. For with all its original NATURAL flavor. It 

the milk in the coconut the reason is gives you an entirely new idea of how 

the same— FLAVOR. good coconut can be. 

That is why Baker's Fresh Grated Coco- Buy a c^n of Baker's Fresh Grated Coco- 
nut is fast becoming the choice of dis- nut today. You'll like it. 



E FRANKLIN BAKER COMPANY 
PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



^-s^t^fl 



The recipe for ihe wonderful 
candy illustrated will be 
found in a FREE RECIPE 
BOOKLET that i. av.il.hle 



lAKERS 



'^l\ ^-J^, 



i^mm: 



pifr 



•4't 



BAKERS 



>"*?&: 



(fresh grated 



COCONUT cocoNU 



fzssw, 



PURE COCON 



BAKE 



m. 



- U' 

383 



II Institutes 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Vegeione 

rmA*e mauk hcc u.s.»at. or/: 

Nothing starts a dinner quite so well as a rich, 
full-flavored, home-made soup. The appetizing 
zest imparted by VEGETONE has won the appro- 
bation of housewives seeking economical foods, yet 
maintaining food value. It must be tried to be 
appreciated and we will refund the purchase price 
if not satisfactory. 

CREAMED SOUPS 

From Left-Oveb Vegetables 
To a'pint of vegetable pulp add one quart of boiling water 
in which one teaspoon of Vegetone has been dissolved. Thicken 
with one tablespoon of butter and two teaspoons of flour, 
rubbed together until smooth. Season with butter and salt. 
Remove from the stove and add one cup of milk. Then strain 
again, so that it will be perfectly smooth. 

One 4-ounce tin 50 cents, or three for $1, postpaid, when 
ordered direct. 

BISHOP-GIFFORD CO., Inc. Baldwin, L. I., N. Y. 



(( 



Free-Hand Cooking" 



Cook without rttipes! A key to cookbooks — correct proportions, 
time, temperature; thickening, leavening, shortening, 105 fun- 
damental recipes. 40 p. book- 10 cents coin or stamps. 
Am. School of Home Economics, 503 W. 69th Street, Chicago 



Tr>d»lUrfcEa<tifrtd. ^ ^^^y 

Gluten FloiiraC 

¥0* GLUTEN '■^ ^^^ 



Ouarante 

staadsrd »s»juiiBiucufc« wi \j» a* A^cf^ «■ 
^m ^^ Apiculture, 

^^y^^ Manufactured by ^A^f 

jQt FARWELL & SHINES jaT 
^^^^ Watertown.N.Y. .^^^^ 



CreamWhipping Made 
Easy and Inexpensive 

p REMO- y ESCO 

Whips Thin Cream 

or Half Heavy Cream and Milk 

or Top of the Milk Bottle 

1 1 whips up as easily as heavy cream 

and retains its stiffness. 

Every caterer and housekeeper 

wants CREMO-VESCO. 

Send for a bottle to-day. 



Housekeeper's size. Hoz., .30 prepaid 
Caterer's size, 16oz., $1.00 
(With full directions.) 



Gremo-Vesco Company 

631 EAST 23rd ST., BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



dawn, and it was not until last week that 
it fully appeared, when I came over to 
see Aunt Lois and we had a talk — " 

"Kate, my bonny Kate," with love's 
own boldness he captured her interlocked 
hands, "dreams are sweet, but fulfillment 
is better. Let the New Year fulfill the 
dreams of the old — " 

" Sh — • sh ! " she warned him. " I hear 
some one at the door." 

In the dim hallway two elderly con- 
spirators were giggling like a couple of 
school girls in mischief. They had just 
been peeping into the dining room, and 
one was now poking the other's ribs with 
an excited finger. 

"Did you see how close to one another 
they were sitting, 'Sanna.^" she tittered. 
"Bet you a stick of chewing gum they're 
signed up to travel together, as slick as 
sealing wax. And didn't I tell you we 
could work it.? If you'd only been 
minded to come over here and see me the 
time Reddy got tangled in his ideas about 
Kittie LIndell, I believe my soul we'd 
a-had 'em married by now." 

"I wish I had," sighed Aunt Rosanna, 
"and I would have, if I'd had a suspicion 
it wasn't Kittie Lindell that was at my 
house that day. I'm clean thankful you 
got a-hold of the snarl and came over to 
see me. But you might just as well have 
let me tell Reddy about Kate, when I 
wrote him to come today, Lois." 

"No," dissented Aunt Lois; 
"'twouldn't have been wise. If young 
folks find out you've got things all cut 
and basted ready for 'em, it flusters 'em; 
makes 'em feel skittish like, and causes 
delays. But let 'em meet all sudden 
and unbeknown, slap, and they'll tumble 
head first into a settlement before they 
know where they are. You trust me for 
it, 'Sanna; you never helped make a 
match before, and look at all the nieces 
I've had a hand in marrying off — more 
than one of 'em by giving Cupid a good, 
timely jog. 

"Well," she added, peering up at the 
old clock in the hall, "here 'tis, right on 
the heels of twelve; let's gather all the 
young folks together and go watch the 
Old Year out by the fireplace." 



Buy advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 

384 . 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




to Your Table 

This Deep Sea Fish, with the freshness of Old Ocean, 
makes New England's famous fish dishes as near 
to you as your grocer. This tempting recipe for 
Fried Fish Cakes will delight your family. 

BURNHAM&MORRILL 
FISH FLAKES 

The firm white meat of choicest Cod and Haddock, 
direct from the cold, deep sea, with wholesome fresh- 
caught flavor, and immediately obtainable 
AT YOUR GROCER'S 
Ready for instant use in preparing 
Creamed Fish Fish Hash 

Fish Chowder Fish Souffle 

and many other tempting fish dishes. 

Free on request — "Good Eating," a booTclet of delicioui 
recipes for Burnham & Morrill Fish Flakes. 

BURNHAM & MORRILL CO. 

75 Water Street, Portland, Maine 

Packing and specializing in State of Maine food products — the best of 
their kind — including B bf M Paris Sugar Corn, B (^ M Pork and 
Beans, B i^ M Clam Chowder, B^ M Clams, B^ M Lobster. 




Fried Fish Cakes 

Cook in boiling salted water until 
tender, two cups raw potatoes cut in 
quarters. I/rain, mash and add one 
tin B & M Fish Flakes, two tablespoons 
butter, or cream sauce, a pinch of pep- 
per and a little hot milk. Beat thor- 
oughly, shape in cakes, dip in flour and 
fry in fat tried out from three or four 
slices of bacon. 






.J'<^-£^^i§i1fii 



sBiiegsiiiii 

zs-r"""iiHi 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
385 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



GOSSOM'S CREAM SOUPS 




In Powdered Form 

Split p^a. Green pea, Lima, Celery, Black bean, Clam 
Chowder, Onion and (Mushroom 25c.) 

Quickly and Easily Prepared 
Ju«t add water and boil 15 minutes. One package makes 3 
pints of pure, wholesome and delicious soup. Price 15<' at 
leading grocers, or sample sent prepaid on receipt of 20c in 
stamps o' coin. 

Also "GOSSOM'S "QUICK-MADE" FUDGE 
will give you a delightful surprise. So easy. A 50c pkg. 
make!) over a pound of the most exquisite fudge. 
Manufactured by 

B. F. Gossom, 692 Washington St., Brookline, 46, Mass. 



Eat More Bread 



Bread is the most important food 
we eat. It furnishes abundant 
nourishment in readily digestible 
form. The fact that it never be- 
comes tiresome though eaten day 
after day. is proof of its natural 
food qualities. 

Eat plenty of bread made with 

FLEISCHMANN'S YEAST 



^Domestic Science=^ 

Home-study Courses 

Food, health, housekeeping, clothing, children 

For Uomemakers and Mothers; 'professional 
courses for Teachers, Dietitians, Institution 
Managers, Demonstrators, Nurses, '^Graduate 
Housekeepers,'' Caterers, etc. 

"The Profession of Home-making." 100 
page handbook, /ree. Bulletins: "Free-hand 
Cooking," "Food Values," "Ten-Cent Meals," 
"Family Finance." — 10 ccnt^ each. 

American School of Home Economics n 
^Charted in 1915) 503 W. 69th St., Chicago, 111. . 



SERYICE TABLE WAGON • — 

Large Broad Wide Table 
Top — Removable Glass 
Service Tray — Double 
Drawer— Doub'le 
Handles — Large Deep 
Undershelves — "Scien- 
tifically Silent" Rubber 
Tired Swivel Wheels. 

A high grade piece o( furni- 
ture surpassing anything yel at- 
tempted tor General Utility, 
ease of action, and absolute 
noiselessness. WRITE NOW 
FOR A Descriptive Pamphlet 
AND Dealer s Name. 
COMBINATION PRODUCTS CO. 

5041 CiHiard Bidg. Chiage. III. 




Tomato Curry 

Cook a tabFespoonful of minced onion 
in butter until yellow. Add one good- 
sized sour apple, chopped, an/d cook for 
about eight minutes longer. Add one- 
half a cup of brown stock, a pint of sifted 
tomato pulp, one cup of boiled rice, and 
seasoning of one-half a tablespoonful of 
curry powder, a teaspoonful of vinegar, 
a teaspoonful of salt, one-half a tea- 
spoonful of white pepper; let all boil 
together for five minutes after boiling 
has begun. 

Cooking for Profit 

By Alice Bradley 
Principal, Miss Farmer's School of Cookery: 
Cooking Editor, Woman's Home Companion 

THE demand for home-cooked food 
is constant everywhere. Many 
"born cooks" have succeeded in 
building up a more or less successful 
business in this line. Many more women 
need to earn, money and still maintain 
their homes intact, but do not know how 
to go about establishing a profitable busi- 
ness in home-cooked foods, catering, etc. 

We are having a new correspondence 
course, written especially for such women, 
by Miss Bradley, the well-known au- 
thority on cookery and catering. It 
explains, in detail, just how to prepare 
food, "good enough to sell"; just what 
to cook, with many choice recipes; how- 
to establish a reputation and a constant 
profitable market, how to cater for all 
entertainments; how to conduct a prof- 
itable boarding house or small hotel; how 
to run successful tea rooms, cafeterias, 
lunch rooms, etc. 

The outlay for equipment is little or 
nothing, and the fee for the course is very 
moderate, and may be paid on easy terms. 
The course is in twelve lessons, to be sent 
weekly, and the correspondence instruc- j 
tion is under the direction of Miss I 
Bradley. Our two "Household Helpers" 
are included to show how to gain the 
time for money-making work. Fbr full 
details and synopsis write to American 
School of Home Economics, 503 W. 69th 
Street, Chicago, Illinois. — Adv. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
386 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




^romedary 
Cocoa hmt 



HOLIDAY candies and cookies for 
the family table or for gift baskets 
are unsurpassed in goodness when made 
with Dromedary Cocoanut. 

iVlany other dishes are very easily and 
successfully made with Dromedary. It 
is ready for instant use — ■ fresh and de- 
licious — just as if you had grated it 
lyourself — ^ yet you take none of the time 
land bother that hand-grating requires. 

Furthermore, fresh-keeping Dromedary 
jCocoanut gives you that rich, natural 
jflavor which is rivaled only by a fresh 
cocoanut. Use as much as you need, and 
the remainder will keep fresh and full- 
flavored in the "Ever-Sealed" box till 
the last shred is used. 

New recipes for cocoanut candies, cookies, 
cakes, pies, puddings, and many unusual 
dishes are in our " 1920 RECIPE BOOK." 
lent Free on request. 

The HILLS BROTHERS GO. 

Dept. G, 375 Washington St., New York 

.■llso Importers and Packers of 




ures 



LyOfifecL 




ardeaofEden 




Children, as well 
as grown-ups, enjoy 
the treat of home- 
made confections, 
especially w hen 
made with Drome- 
dary Cocoanut, be- 
cause of its richness 
and delightful fla- 
\- o r . Holiday 
goodies are made 
better by adding the 
wholesome good- 
ness of Dromedary 
Cocoanut. 



387 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Price's 

Van I ll a 

gives to cakes, cookies, custards, 
etc., a deliciousness hard to de- 
scribe to those who have never 
used Price's vanilla. Absolutel> 
pure, just right strength. No arti- 
ficial coloring nor flavor. 

PRICE FLAVORING 
EXTRACT CO. 

"Experts in Flavor" 

In business since 1853 

Chicago, U. S. A. 




Look for 
Price's 

Tiopikid 
on the 
label 




^ 



A Dishwasher for $2.50! 

Keeps hands out of the water, no wiping of dishes.^saves \ the 
time. Consists of special folding disndrainer, special wire 
basket, 2 special long-handled brushes. Full directions for use. 
Sent prepaid for $2.50. Full refund if not satisfactory. 

Am. School Home Economics, 503 W. 69th Street, Chicago 



#K%lf 



Bunny Bushy tail 

Heavily Silver Plated 
$1.00 Each 



Tippytoea Tabby Teddy 

CHlLD^S NAPKIN CLIPS 

A gift to delight any child. Choice of five loved 
animals. Made of spring nickeled silver, fine ly sil- 
ver plated, 2fi in. high. Order by name. Price 
postpaid in U. S. $1.00jeach. 

Give One 
For Xmas! 

Just send us names of friends 
whom you wish to surpri se— mailing 
us check or money order for proper 
amount— and we will send an 

IDEAL NUT CRACKER 

to each oie and tell them who is 
playin» "Santa Claus" thru us. 
I'M e "Ideal" cracks any Pecan, 
Walnut, Brazil Nut, Filbert. Jut 
a quick, easy twist of thewri;! — 
and the kernel comes out whole! 
No flyins shells or pinched fingers. 
Order early for Xmas! 

Style2, Plain nickelplated 60c 
Style It, Highly pohsh'd" 85c 
Postage paid anywhere in U. S. 

COOK ELECTRIC CO. 

iU W.VanBurenSt. Chicago, III. 




Household Help 



IF you could engage an expert cook and an 
expert housekeeper for only 10 centt a week, 
with no board or room, you would do it, 
wouldn't you? Of course you would! Well, 
that is all our "TWO HOUSEHOLD HELP- 
ERS" will cost you the first year — nothinf 
thereafter, for the rest of your life. 

Have you ever considered how much an hour 
a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year is worth 
to you.^ Many workmen get $1 an hour — 
.surely your time is worth 30 cents an hour. 
We guarantee these "Helpers" to save you 
at least an hour a day, worth say $2.10 a week. 
Will you invest the 10 cents a week to gain $2 
weekly.^ 

And the value our "Helpers" give you in 
courage and inspiration, in peace of mind, in 
the satisfaction of progress, in health, happinest 
and the joy of living. — is above price. In mere 
dollars and cents, they will save their co»t 
twelve times a year or more. 

These helpers, "Lessons in Cooking" and 
"Household Engineering" were both prepared 
as home-study courses, and as such have been 
tried out and approved by thousands of our 
members. Thus they have the very highest 
recommendation. Nevertheless we are willing 
to send them in book form, on a week's free 
trial in your own home. Send the coupon. 



Household Engineering 
Scientific Management 

in the Home 
by Mrs. Christine Frede- 
rick. 544 pp., 134 lUus., 
J Leather Style. Gold 
Stamped. CONTENTS: 
The Labor-Saving Kitchen; 
Plans and Methods; Help- 
ful Household Tools; 
Methods of Cleaning; Food 
and Food Planning; Prac- 
tical Laundry Work; Fam- 
ily Finance; Efficient Pur- 
chasing; The Servantless 
Household; Planning the 
Efficient Home; Health 
and Personal Efficiency. 



Lessons in Cooking 

Through Preparation 

of MeaJs 

by Robinson & Hammel. 
500 pp. lUus., } Leather 
Style. Gold Stamped. 

CONTENTS: Menus with 
recipes for 12 weeks and 

FULL DIRECTIONS FOR PBE- 
PARINQ EACH MEAL. MenUL 

and Directions for Formal 
and Informal Dinners, 
Luncheons, Suppers, etc. 
12 Special Articles: Serving, 
Dish Washing. Candy Mak- 
ing, etc. Also Balanced 
Diet, Food Value, Ways of 
Reducing Costs, etc. 



Membership Free, With the books to in- 
clude: a. All personal questions answered, b. 
All Domestic Science books loaned, c. Use of 
Purchasing Department, d. Bulletins and Econ- 
omy Letters, e. Credit on our full Professional 
or Home-Makers' Correspondence Courses. 

In these difficult days you really cannot 
afford to be without our "Helpers." You owe 
it to yourself and family to give them a fair 
trial. You cannot realize what great help they 
will give you till you try them — and the trial 
costs you nothing. Send the coupon. 

American School of Home Economics, Chicago, III, 



A. S. H. E. — 503 W. 69th Street, Chicago, 111. 

Send your two "HOUSEHOLD HELPERS,;* prepaid, 
on a week's trial, in the de Luxe binding. If satisfactory, I 
will send you $5 in full payment (OR) 50 cents and $1 per 
month for £ve months. Membership to be included free. 
Otherwise I will return one or both books in sevea days. 
(Regular mail price $2.64 each.) 



Name and 

Address 

Reference 



Buy advertised Goods — ^jDo not accept substitutes 
388 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



New material for classes in 
Domestic Science 

Get motion pictures^ slides^ charts^ lectures , leaflets^ and 
sp-: ^ijic answers free from our Domestic Science Department. 



Facts that will interest 
your students 

How to buy good meat 

economically. 
What constitutes a **bal- 

anced" meal. 
How to make the table most 

attractive. 
Menus for every day. 
♦ ♦ 

How other teachers 
value our service 

"l want to thank you and your company 
for the meat charts. For years I have 
wanted just such charts to use in my 
cooking classes— the girls all seem to 
understand the different cuts so much 
better with the colored charts. 

"Regina Spellman, Home Economics. 
"3316 Troost St.. Kansa" City, Mo."' 

"I am returning the slides for the 
"Lecture on Domestic Economy.' About 
forty students and three teachers at- 
tended the lecture. I am sure the slides 
were most helpful in fixing in the pupils' 
minds the elements needed in the body 
and the places of certain foods in the 
diet. 

"Abby McCardall. Thurmont High 
"School, Thurmont. Md." 

"The Wilson Meat Charts have certainly 
been a joy to our cookery classes. They 
are the best charts of the kind obtain- 
able. 

"Mildred L. Swift, The Schools of 
"Oshkosh, Oshkosh, Wis." 



I 



F YOU teach or are interested in domestic 
science, this offer will help you. 



You are welcome to use the experience and expert 
knowledge of Wilson & Co., who set the ''Certi- 
fied" standard of excellence in food selection. 

Write to Miss Eleanor Lee Wright, director of 
our department of domestic science. She can furnish 
you recent information on vitamine-content of 
various foods, calories and specific nutritive values. 
You can get her latest facts on cooking by temper- 
ature, and other questions encountered in your 
daily work. 

Use the Co-operation of Our 
Domestic Science Department 

Your students will take greater interest in subjects 
illustrated by our stereopticon lectures on food 
preparation. It is easier to instruct with pictures 
in natural color, showing various meat cuts and 
their location. Teachers get much valuable material 
from our reprints on "The Economic Dietetic 
Value of Jams and Jellies — Canned Fruits — or 
Canned Meats." The answers to numerous ques- 
tions on home economics and domestic science 
will be gladly given you. Write for the information 
you wish — it is supplied free. 



Write a letter or mail the Coupo?t 

Dietitians, teachers, housewives, schools, are 
finding our help invaluable. Send us your 
needs — we will meet them to the best of 
our ability without cost to you. 



I WILSON & CO., Dept. 1247, ^Ist. and Ashland Avenue, 
Chicago. 111. 

I Please send me information on article checked below: 
n I,eaflet on 

I D Meat Charts. 

I D Wilson's Meat Cookery. 

n Information about teachers' material for iustruc- 



Name 



v\ 



r\ 



Address. 



VVfLSON & CO. 



V \J 



^aniK i^tanoraet 



(If you wish, write a letter outlining your 
needs in more detail.) 



^>txr6£cCb 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
389 



AMERICAN COOKERY 





I teach you to make them better than 
you ever made them before — the most 
delicious Angel Food Calie and many other kinds, 
the most appetizing cakes you ever tasted. 
They Sell for $3.00— Profit, $2.00 
1 will make you the most expert cake-maker in 
your vicinity. Your cakes will be praised and 
sought for. Your cakes will become famous, if 
you make them by the 

Osborn Cake Making System 
My metiiods me original. They never 
fail. They aie eas^y to learn; you 
sure to succeed the very first time. I 
have taught thousands. lean teach you. 
Let me send you particulars frek. 
Dept. MRS. GRACE OSBORN 
LrlO Bay City Michigan 



famous, if 




ROBERTS 

Lightning Mixer