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Full text of "American cookery"

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Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 
in 2013 



littp://arcliive.org/details/annericancookery19unse_6 



ASTOR HOUSE SALAD AND BOSTON CREAM PIE ^ / 

AMERICAN 



ORERY 




rORAVDRLTT 



E, BOSTON 
-SCHOOLMAGAZINE 

DFCULINARY- SCIENCEand DOMESTIC- ECONOMICS 




f 



r 




You'll Know 

When You Open the Oven Door 

what makes the aroma from those steaming, hot 
biscuits so delicious. Everj^ ingredient has retained 
its natural flavor and freshness. Just that has made 



RUM FORD 

THE WHOLESOME BAKING POWDER 



famous. It is recognized by food experts as the baking 
powder that produces wholesome and nutritious food. 

The leavening action is uniform, even and SURE — 
positively insuring results that satisfy every member 
of the family. 



RUMFORD COMPANY 



Dept. 19, 



Many helpful suggestions 
are contained in Janet Mc- 
Kenzie Hill's famous book 
"The Rumford ^Yay of 
Cookery and Household 
Economy" — sent free. 

Providence, R. I. 



American Cookery 



FORMERLY 



The Boston Cooking-School Magazine 



OF 



Culinary Science and Domestic Economics 
Volume XXVI 

June- July, 1921— May, 1922 



* 5 3 ^ 




o o -^ -■ O J 



Published by 
THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE COMPANY 

Pope Bldg., 221 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass. 



i^f 



Copyrighted, 1921, 1922, by The Boston Cooking-School Magazine Co. 



/F^'So- f'f%V 









COMPLETE INDEX, VOLUME XXVI 

June-July, 1921— May, 1922 



Adding Beauty to Homes at Small Extra 
Cost 

Apartment Schedule, An 

Appetizers for Zest 

As a Man Speaketh 

As Sally Sees It . 

Attractive Corner, The 

Aunt Alida Says So . 

Back-Fence Offerings 

Back Yard Possibilities 

Boiling as an Art 

Bon Voyage . . 

Budgets and Bankruptcy 

Canned Economy 

Changing the Garb with the Season 

Chicken Gospel for Home Use , 

Come Into the Kitchen ... 

Compensations 

Concerning Breakfasts 

Conservation in Food and Fuel 

Cry for Good Cookery, A 

Diet for the Aged ... 

Dinner for Ned 

Dishes to Make Food Attractive 

Do Your Feet Hurt.? 

Eat Thou Honey ... 

Editorials, 30, 110, 190, 270, 350, 431, 510. 
670, 750 

Education in the Kitchen 

Family Affair, A . . 

Fine China . 

Firelcss Heat . - 

Getting the Household Ahead 

Great Grandmother Sets the Fashion in 

Dressing Tables 

Guests and Gumption . 

Happiness Expert, The 

Hill Happiness 

Hints for the Woman Who Would Run a 

Successful Eating Place 
Homage to the French Menu 
Home Ideas and Economies, 51, 131, 211, 
370, 450, 530, 610, 690, 770 

Home-Keeping Hearts 

Homing-It in an Apartment .... 

Hospital Nurse, The 

Household Budgets 

Housekeeping in the Philippines 
"Humph! Nerves.?" Says Mary Ann 
Importance of Cleanliness, The 

In re Peter and Paul 

Insidious Tantrum, The 

Jelly in General 

Keep Cool 

Kitchen Considerations 

Lack in Equipment 

Ladies and "Liverouts" 

Late Summer Canning 

Legacy from Grandmother, A ... 

Maryland Suppers .... 
Menus, 42-44, 122-123, 202-203, 282-283, 
363, 442-443, 522-523, 602-603, 682 
761-762. 
Misery Entertains Company .... 
Mrs. Popplegate's Problems .... 

Mistress of the House 

Neutr ' Grounds 

New Looks 378, 

New Mc ico Supper, A ..... . 



PAGE 

New Potatoes Out of Season 
331 Ninety Per Cent Mystery 
422 Old-Time Christmas Feast, The 
449 Omelet Insurance ... 
418 One-Dish Meals for August 

27 Orange Jelly 

11 Otter Creek Tea-Room, The 
95 Partnership in Maple Sugar, A 
18 Pincho'This, aShakeo'That, A 

731 Pluck and Personality in the Tea-House 

445 Business 

503 Poetry of Foods, The 

24 Polly's Thanksgiving Party 

447 Porch Talks, The ... 

91 Pungent Mint, The 

204 Pursuit of Success and Happiness, The 

606 Rearranging the House for Summer 

179- Roofs of Yesterday and Today . 

284 Run on Pie, A 

45 Salads and Salad Dressings . 

100 Salads for All Occasions . 

367 Salem Cooking Pot, The 

28 Seasonable Seasonings in New Orleans 

188 She Was Modern 

581 Silver Lining, The, 64, 228, 310, 386, 460, 
507 620, 702. 

590, Small, Dark Bedroom, The . 
Small Home, The 

368 Some Recipes for Preparing Poultry 

107 Somebody's Cat 

420 Southern Cooking 

684 Standards That Serve 

343 Teaching Janet How to Cook 

Teeth as a National Asset 

571 Thrice-Daily Grind in the Kitchen, 

338 Tiny House, The 

664 To Express Personality . 

176 Too Much Brown ... 

Transplanted Housewife, The 

103 Twice-Done Duties 

578 Use and Care of the House, The 

292, Visit from the Plumber, A 

What Deep Breathing Can Do for You 

424 What Shall We Eat.? . . 

263 When the House Gets Settled 

105 When Tasks Stale 

604 Windows and Their Fitments 

659 With the Aid of Grandmother's Blue Delft 

743 You're Not Supposed to, Jimmie 

348 Your House Garden .... 

669 Your Own System . . 

106 
127 Seasonable-and-Tested Recipes 

48 Abatis a la Bourgeolse 

15 Alaska, Individual Baked. 111. . . 

208 Apples, Savory, to serve with Roast 

342 Artichokes a la Printaniere 

207 Asparagus with Green Peas 

735 Asparagus with Orange Sauce. 111. 

l^d Asparagus, Mousseline of ... . 

362- Baba, Brioche, etc.. Making of. 111. . 

683, Bass, Baked, with Raisin Sauce 

Beans, String, Canned in Pressure Cooker 

186 111. , . ^ 

366 Beef, Creamed Corn, au Gratin 

500 Beef, Rib Roast .of, with Yorkshire 

768 Pudding. 111. . . . 

458 Beef and Beans, Roumanian 

206 Beef and Calf's Head, Stew of 



Th 



182, 



page 
50 
576 
336 
529 
124 
526 
748 
655 
528 

415 
346 
290 
651 
129 
584 
764 
491 
667 
46 
508 
444 
505 
745 
538, 

171 
411 

286 
260 
608 
495 
498 
427 
763 
,255 
265 
741 

98 
364 
586 
589 
368 
684 
428 
340 
251 

22 
258 
747 
524 



116 
759 
353 
753 
755 
675 
675 
757 
674 

116 

756 

277 
601 
594 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



111. 



111. 



with 
111. 



Icing. 111. 



111. 



Beets, Conserve of 

Beets with Sour Sauce 

Beurre de Montpellier 

Birds without Bones 

Biscuit, Maryland Beaten 

Blueberries and Boulettes 

Boudin Blanc 

Bouillon, Beet 

Bouillon, Cold Sorrel 

Bread, Afternoon Tea. 111. 

Bread, Stirred Brown .... 

Breakfast, New England Sunday. Ill 

Brioche, Baba, etc.. Making of. 111. 

Brother Jonathan 

Buns, Hot Cross. 111. 

Cake, Children's. Ill 

Cake, Christmas, with Filling. 111. 

Cake, Christmas Pastry , 

Cake, Dutch Cheese 

Cake, Fig-and-Nut 

Cake, Heart-Shaped. 

Cake, Italian. 

Cake, Marzipan 

Cake, May Festival 

Cake, Potato Layer. 

Cake, Pyramid Birthday 

Cake, Thanksgiving Corn, 111. 

Cakes, Five o'Clock Cream. 111. 

Cakes, Little Chocolate, with Icln_ 

Cakes, Cocoanut 

Cakes, Heart, for Engagement Luncheon. 
111. .......... 

Cakes, Mocha, with Mocha Cream. 111. 

Cakes, Moscow Tea . . 

Cakes, Parsnip Breakfast , 

Cakes, Small, Decorated Sponge. 111. 

Cakes for School Liinch-Box 

Capon a la Creme . . 

Carrot Strips, Candied 

Cassolettes, Potato, with Sweetbreads. 111. 

Cauliflower a I'Espagnole 

Cauliflower, Savory Puree of 

Charlotte Russe, Individual. 111. . 

Cheese, Calf's Head 

Chicken, Guinea. Ill 

Chicken a la King, Timbale Cases for. Ill 

Chicken, Moulded Jellied 

Chicken, Ramekins of, Mexican Style 

Chips, Saratoga. Ill 

Chops, Marinaded Kidney 
Chutney, Gooseberry . 

Come Agains 

Conserve of Rhubarb, Orange Peel and 

Raisins ... 
Cookies, Pilgrim, 111. 
Cordial, Cocoa Fruit 
Cranberry-and-Apple Mound , 

Cream, Mocha 
Creams, Martello 
Croquettes, Sweet Potato 
Cucumber Rings, Fried . 
Cucumbers and Tomatoes, Sauteed 
Cup, Chocolate Christmas 

Cups, Turnip 

Custard, Frozen, with Raisins and Carame 

Sauce 

Custard, Frozen Peach 
Cutlets, Marinaded 
Cutlets, Agra Dolce Salmon 
Dinner, Satisfying Vegetable. Ill 
Dressing, Bread 



197 



PAGE 
40 

36 
437 
194 
358 
118 
-281 
353 

33 
677 
280 
193 
757 
275 
598 
438 
359 
361 
598 
599 
519 
198 
681 
760 
601 
280 
277 
760 

39 
41 

40 
358 
600 
194 
520 
121 

35 
361 
515 
754 
514 
439 
436 
276 
595 
441 
596 
596 
754 
121 
439 

756 
279 
758 
356 
358 
41 
434 
114 
281 
359 
521 

518 
200 
276 
754 
195 
594 



Duck, Roast Canvasback or Redhead 354 


Duckling, Bean-Pot Fricassee of 


754 


Ducks, Prepared for Roasting. Ill 


.355 


Ducks, Roasted. 111. , 


356 


Ducks, Stew of Wild 


441 


Eclairs. 111. 


680 


Eggnog, Hallowe'en Cider. 111. 


199 


Eggplant, Chartreuse 


434 


Eggs, Baked .... 


518 


Fanchonettes, Pumpkin. 111. 


279 


Fanchonettes, Rhubarb. 111. 


679 


Farci, Green Pepper 


355 


Figs, Spiced 


598 


Filling, Cream, for Eclairs 


680 


Filling for Christmas Cake . 


359 


Filling for Fig-and-Nut Cake , . 


599 


Fish, Baked Blue, with Stuffing. 111. 357 


Fish, Broiled Sword. 111. . 


195 


Fish, Fried in Spanish Sauce 


34 


Fish, Savory Smoked 


441 


Fish, Soused . . 


37 


Flan au Fraises 


440 


Fowl Supreme. 111. 


116 


Frappe, Black Coffee 


601 


Frappe, Sweet Cider. 111. 


278 


Fritters, Paschal . . 


676 


Frosting, Steamed. 111. 


439 


Fruit Supreme 


299 


Frumenty 


196 


Garnish for Roast Turkey . 


. . 274 


Goose, Peanut-Stuffed, Grapefruit S 


auce . 513 


Grape Juice Cup, Creamed 


38 


Grill, Mixed. 111. 


196 


Grillade, Creole . 


195 


Gumbo Filet with Oysters 


193 


Ham, Planked, for Easter. 111. 


596 


Ice, Italian Tutti Frutti 


39 


Ice, Melon, in Melon Shells. 111. 


120 


Ice Cream, Almond , 


199 


Ice Cream, Mint Stick 


199 


Ice Cream, Orange. 111. 


439 


Ice Cream, Pineapple-and-Banana 


758 


Jelly, Apple Mint, for Roast Lamb 


, . 276 


, elly, Cranberry, Individual Mould of. 111. 518 


^ elly, Currant, Cold Process 


41 


Jelly, Four-Fruit 


38 


Jelly, Sweet Pickle. 111.. 


37 


Kisses, Cocoanut. 111. 


440 


Kuchen, Honig 


357 


Lady Fingers 


439 


Lady Locks. Ill, 


360 


Lamb Pigeons * 


521 


Lamb, Rack of. Ill 


. 754 


Lamb, Roast, on Bed of Spaghetti. 


111. . 514 


Lemons, Salpicon of, in Shells 


593 


Liver, Baked Calf's. 111. . . . 


674 


Lobster, Steamed Mould of. 111. 


117 


Lobster in Rice Border. 111. 


517 


Lolly-Pops. Ill 


360 


Macaroni, Reale 


354 


Macaroni and Liver, Timbale of 


114 


Macaroons, Fig-and-Nut 


758 


Mackerel, Spiced . 


• . 353 


Madison's Whim 


40 


Marguerites. Ill 


. 120 


Meat Cakes, Maison Duval 


, 36 


Moulds, Pudding. Ill 


. . 357 


Muffins, Bran, with Raisins. 111. . 


. . 515 


Muffins, Graham or Rye 


. . 681 


Muffins, Potato Flour. 111. 


. . 34 


Muffins, Crusty Rye. 111. . . 


. . 596 



II 



COMPLETE INDEX 



Mushrooms on Toast. III. 
Mutton Hot Pot 
Nectar, Orange-and-Raspberry 
Omelet, Chicken. 111. 
Omelet, Friars' . 
Omelet, Vegetable 
Onions, Glazed 
" Oxtails, Braised . 

Oyster Plant, Baked 

Oysters, Deviled 

Pancakes, Potato. Ill 

Pancakes, Swedish, with Aigre-Doux Sauce 

Parsnips, Dry Deviled 

Pastry, Danish. Ill 

Pates de Fole Gras, Imitation . 
Patty, Potato-and-Beef . 
Pears in Grape Juice 
Pickerel Farci ... 
Pie, Apricot Meringue 

Pie, Boston Cream. Ill 

Pie, Brussels Sprouts-Potato . . 
Pie, Soft Shell Clam, with Potato Crust 

Pie, Fig-and-Cranberry 

Pie, Fruit-and-Steak . 
Pie, Grapefruit. 111. 
Pie, Pineapple . . 
Pie, Potato-and-Herring 
Pie, Rhubarb-and-Strawberry 
Pie, Washington. 111. . . 
Pie, Washington's Birthday 

Popovers. Ill 

Pork, Roast Crown, with Apple Rings. 111. 

Pork, Stuffed Leg of. Ill 

Potage Parmentier • . . 
Potatoes, Duchesse .... 
Potatoes, French Fried. 111. 
Potatoes O'Brien. 111. . 
Potatoes, Spanish 
Preserve, Cherry Plum 
Preserve, Pear-and-Quince . 
Pudding, Asparagus 
Pudding, Black-and-White . 
Pudding, Cardinal's . 
Pudding, Chocolate Rice 
Pudding, Corn-and-Chicken 

Pudding, Fish 

Pudding, Green-Gage Bread 
Pudding, King's, with Apple Sauce 

Pudding, Thanksgiving 

Pudding, Yorkshire . 

Puffs, Raised Peach . 
Puifs, Raisin. Ill._ . . 

Punch, Coffee Fruit 

Punch, Lemon Ginger, Frozen , 

Punch, Pineapple 

Puree, Asparagus 

Puree, Carrot .... 

Puree, Oyster-and-Onion 

Rabbit, with Bacon. Ill 

Ragout of Chicken Livers, Eggplant and 

Macaroni . . 
Rolls, Crescent. 111. . 
Rolls, Salad, for Tea. 111. . 
Rosettes, Potato. 111. , 

Sablefish, Filets of. 111. 

Salad, Astor House, Fruit-and-Cheese, 111. 

Salad, Castilian. Ill 

Salad, Cherry-and-Chestnut. 111. 
Salad, Chicken, Spring Style. 111. 
Salad, Chicken, in Terrapin Dishes. Ill, 

Salad, Dandelion. Ill 

Salad, Easter Egg 



516 
201 
121 
675 
356 
594 
355 
516 
433 
434 
516 
280 
•278 
198 
435 
514 
121 
755 
200 

38 
361- 
681 
278 
196 
599 

41 
601 
679 
520 
520 
678 
354 
194 
273 

34 
114 
435 
531 
200 
121 

37 
440 
681 
517 
201 
113 
196 
278 
277 
277 
118 
119 
278 
681 
119 
753 
597 
274 
755 

676 
438 
759 
679 
436 
36 
197 
518 
757 
435 
757 
676 



Salad, Frozen Fruit. 111. 
Salad, Fruit. 111. ... 
Salad of Lobster and Peppers . 
Salad, New England. 111. 
Salad, St. Patrick's Day 
Salad, Salmon. 111. . . , 
Salad, Spinach-and-Lima Bean, 111 
Sally Lunn. 111. 

Salmon a la Creole 

Salmon, Pickled .... 

Salmon Steaks, Planked. 111. . 

Sandwiches. Ill 

Sandwiches, Country Club . 

Sandwiches for St. Valentine's Day. Ill 

Sauce, Aigre-Doux 

Sauce, Caramel 

Sauce, Creole 

Sauce, Foamy 

Sauce, Grapefruit 

Sauce, Horseradish 

Sauce, Horseradish Cream 

Sauce, Orange . . 

Sauce, Raisin 

Sauce, Spinach 

Sauce, Tartare . 

Sausages, Halibut 

Sausages, Potato-and-Peanut 

Scallops, Fried. 111. ... 

Scallops of Deviled Crabs. 

Scrod, Broiled. _ 111. ._ , 

Shad, Baked, with Raisins. 111. 

Shad Roe, Casserole of 

Sherbet, Rhubarb-and-Strawberry . 

Shortcake, Apple 

Shortcake, Peach. Ill 

Shortcake, Company Strawberry. 111. 

Sole, Filets of. Spinach Sauce 

Souffle, Riced Potato, Sweet 

Souffle, Sweet Pepper 

Soup, Green Apple 

Soup, Iced Cherry ... 

Chicken-and-Lettuce . 

Chicken-and-Oyster 

Clear Chicken. 111. 
Soup, Cressy ... 

Soup, Crumb Cream 

Soup, Flemish 

Soup, Garspacho, A Summer Soup 

Scotch Oatmeal 

Prima Donna . . 

Cream of Raisin 

Sweetbread 

Soup, Maigre Vegetable 

Squash, Southern Summer, Baked. Ill 
Steak, Skirt, with Raisin Sauce 
Steaks, Halibut, Bread Dressing 

Stew, Dry. Ill 

Stew of Beef and Calf's Head 
Stew of Wild Ducks . , 

Stuffing for Baked Bluefish 
Stuffing for Roast Turkey 
Succotash, Plymouth. III. 
Sweetbreads, Creamed .... 
Sweetbreads, Green Mountain Style 
Tart, Cranberry, with Cranberrv Fi 

III 

Tarts, Maple Sugar Strawberry 

Tarts, Tea. Ill 

Tasties, Calves' . , 

Timbale Cases for Chicken a la King 

Tomato, Mustard 

Tomatoes, Surprise. 111. 



Soup, 
Soup, 
Soup, 



Soup, 
Soup, 
Soup, 
Soup, 



111. 



PAGE 

359 
119 

678 
275 
593 

35 

37 
600 
275 
201 

34 
680 
756 
519 
280 
518 
597 
119 
513 
756 
516 
675 
674 
597 
437 
676 
273 
355 
521 
755 
676 
674 
601 
361 
118 
758 
597 
678 
441 
113 
753 

33 
193 

33 
356 
513 
513 
113 
433 
673 
433 
673 
593 
115 
281 
594 
114 
594 
441 
357 
274 
275 
515 
673 

279 
758 
200 
516 
595 
201 
36 



III 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



PACE 

Tomatoes, Stuffed with Crabmeat. 111. , 677 
Tongue, Baked . . 434, 514 

Tongue, Cold Beef , 356 

Turkey, Roast. 111. . 274 

Valentine Hearts . 520 

Veal, Delicate. III. 597 

Venison Steak in Chafing Dish ' 201 

Waffles. 111. . • . • 678 

Queries and Answers 

Apfel Strudel, Hungarian . . 376 

Apfel Strudel, Points on Making 614 

Barbecue, A Southern 775 

Beans with Tomato Sauce .60 

Beverages, Service of 615 

Birds, Service of Small , 776 

Brandy, Substitute for, in Cake Keeping . 56 

Bread, Brown, with Raisins .... 138 

Bread, Gluten ^ 60 

Bread, Rising in Pans 58 

Bread, Uses for Stale 616 

Bride and Groom at Dinner, Seating of . 616 

Buttermilk, How to Neutralize Acid of . 698 

Cabbage, Jellied Red 135 

Cake, Angel . . ' . 134 

Cake, Mock Angel 538 

Cake, Fruit, or Plum Pudding, To Keep 695 

Cake or Pudding, Ice Box 215 

Cake, Indian Loaf . 456 

Cake, Kossuth 700 

Cake, Pork 216 

Cake, Scotch Barm 216 

Cake, Sunshine 134 

Cake Baking, Temperature for 298 

Cakes, Care of, After Baking 134 

Cakes, in Greaseless Pan 455 

Cakes, Heavy Streak at Bottom, Cause of 614 

Cakes, Savory Nut Crumb 616 

Cakes, Yorkshire Curd 218 

Celery, Braised 135 

Chicken, To Roast 295 

Chocolate, Use of Soda with 136 

Chop Suey, Chinese . . 618 

Chowder, Rich Clam or Fish . . 375 

Cocktails, Concerning ... 698 

Coffee, Clear, in Percolator 618 

Corn and Potatoes, To Boil 295 

Crab, a la Poulette 58 
Crabs, Gumbo . .58 

Crabs, To Prepare Fresh 58 
Cutlets, Tenderloin of Beef with Tomato 

Sauce 538 

Doughnuts, Thin Crust 58 

Etiquette, Certain Points in Table 374 

Filling, Marshmallow 454, 776 

First Course at Dinner, Where Serve . . 615 

Fish, To Broil 298 

Foods that Contain Lime 455 

Forks, Use of, with Salad 56 

Fowl in Casserole 138 

Frosting, Caramel, To Harden ... 535 

Frosting, Marshmallow 454 

Fruit Bars 458 

Gingerbread, Soft 60, 298 

Guest of Honor at a Luncheon .... 778 

Hopping John 220 

How $3 Per Capita, Per Week, May Be 

Spent for Food 138 

Ice Cream, Bread-Crumb 616 

Ice Cream, Chocolate, in Lady Finger Cases 60 

Ice Cream, New York 534 



Ice Cream, Classes of 

Ice Cream, Two Quarts of 

Icing, Caramel 

Icing, Chocolate 

Jaune Mange 

Jelly, Mint-Flavored Apple 

Jelly, Sweet Red Pepper 

Macaroons 

Marrons Glace 

Measurements 

Meat, Ripening of 

Meringue, To Keep from Watering 

Nuts, Food Value of 

Pancakes, Sour Milk 

Patties, English Bread 

Peach Whip 

Pie, Deep-Dish Apple 

Pie, Carrot . . 

Pie, Chocolate Cream 

Pie, Harding Crumb . 

Pie, Lemon, Why Watery 

Pie, Vinegar 

Pie, Temperature for Baking Custard . 

Pimientos, Canned , , . . . 

Pineapple, Spiced ..... 

Planking Board, How to Make and Keep 

Plates, Removing, etc., from Dinner Tabl 

Poisoning from Canned Food 

Potatoes, Candied Sweet 

Potatoes, Crisp Fried 

Potatoes Lyonnaise 

Poultry, Result of Freezing 

Pudding, Steamed Fig Bread 

Pudding, Ice Box 

Puffs, Temperature for Baking Cream 

Punch, Tea-Fruit 

Rhubarb, Gingered 

Roll, Chocolate Sponge 

Roll, Coffee 

Rosettes, How to Keep Crisp 

Salads, Romaine-and-Escarole 

Sandwich, Club 

Sauce, Butterscotch, for Ice Cream 

Sauce, Cream 

Sauce, Currant Jelly, for Game 

Sauce, Tartare 

Sauerkraut 

Serving, Buffet Style 

Shortbread, Scotch 

Shortbread, Points in Making 

Silver, Arrangement of, for Luncheon anc 

Dinner a . 

Souffle, Prune 

Soup, To Make Tomato without Curdling 

Soup, Yellow Split Pea 

Steak, Difference between Skirt and Flanl 

Sugar, Powdered or Castor 

Syrup, Maraschino . . 

Table Service, Instructions on 

Tea, Spiced 

Temperature for Baking 
Timbale Cases 
Tonic, Herb, for Invalids 
Veal, Filet of ... 

Veal, Galantine of 
Veal Steak, Fricassee of 
Vegetables, How to Serve 
Vinegar in Frying Doughnut 
Wafers, Rolled Nut . 
Wafers, Vanilla ... 




IV 









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My House of Dreams 

At dawn I wake — all day I bake 

And scrub and dust and stew. 
I wash and sweep and hunt things cheap, 

'Mongst other things I do. 

I get three meals, darn porous heels, 
And wash small hands and ears. 

I rip and press and turn a dress, 
And banish wee ones' tears. 

And still I smile — for all the while 

Beyond my busy hands 
My house of dreams, dear, shining dreams. 

Just 'round the corner stands. 

And still I sing while fancies bring 

Those fair white portals near. 
There's leisure there and wealth to spare. 

And music rare to hear. 



And so I sew and make things go, 

And laugh, and sing, and pray 
That when I see that house I'll be 

As happy as today. 

Mabel Louise Brightman. 

















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American Cookery 



VOL. XXVI 



JUNE-JULY 



NO. 1 



The Attractive Corner 

By Margaret Ryan 



IN the spring or fall when the house 
mother rehabilitates the rooms of her 
house, she may turn her thought to 
the fitting up of attractive corners. This 
part of a room is naturally cold and 
geometrical, almost impossible to make 
home-like and yet, carefully worked out, 
the most uncompromising lines and 
spaces can be transformed into most 
alluring and decorative bits of the room. 
The error in many of our American 
homes is that we are far too content to 
fill spaces with inconsistent imitations, 
which, cheaper than the genuine, are in 
poor taste. The error is to choose what 
is smart without thinking out its fitness 
and adaptability to our own particular 
needs. We do not realize that, in so 
doing, we lose the delight of producing, 
through honest study, decorative bits 
that are worth while. 

This can apply in houses where the 
most elaborate surroundings are shown 
and also in the modest home, for in the 
working out of the decorative scheme 
that is individual, we can make it fit our 
pocketbook. Built-in furniture has been 
used as it is space-saving, yet there are 
many ways of utilizing the space other 
than this, for different corners demand 
different treatment, and it depends upon 
the part of the house you are considering 
as to what shall be done with it. 

The first thing to be considered is the 
background; necessarily this differs with 
the location and purpose of the room. 
In a remodeled house it should have the 
colonial note; the walls should be hung 
with a light neutral tint in accord with 
the white woodwork. A brave use of 



color can be worked out by pictures and 
the introduction of scarlet geraniums, 
well placed on the window sill. There is 
a temptation to over-drape the windows 
through the use of fussy curtaining. 
This is entirely wrong and should be 
avoided. Cotton voile or Dutch Swiss 
muslin are appropriate and, if you desire 
to work out the true Colonial idea, a 
braided rug should be placed on the floor. 
That the furniture be of the right period 
for uniformity in furnishing is a necessity, 
everything being on the same scale and 
, in harmony with the color-scheme. 




CORNER m A FARM HOME 



11 



12 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




PICTORIAL WALL PAPER IN HALL 

The library, which is essentially the 
man's room, can have built-in furniture. 
This should follow the woodwork used in 
the room. Old English oak, mahogany, 
or gum wood are all admissible; the 
latter can be stained to represent, as 
nearly as possible, the wood used in 
Colonial days. Proper grouping is what 
makes the corner attractive and great 



care should be taken that the pieces be 
well related to each other, thus making it 
a livable sort of place, a spot where one 
feels good taste has supplanted the 
extreme. The furniture should be com- 
fortable and the table, lacking in bric-a- 
brac, with ample provision for maga- 
zines. As for the floor, either hard wood 
or a tile surface is correct. The use of 
rugs is admissible, but they are so apt 
to curl up that many people prefer to do 
away with them. 

In many houses all the space that can 
be alloted to a man is nothing more than 
a den, but individual problems can be 
carried out, taking the limited space into 
consideration. It is a very clever idea to 
have a built-in bookcase of wood, using 
the same wood as that of the wainscot. 
This can be built so as to take in the 
space between the door and the inner wall 
and should reach to the ceiling. For a 
writing table it can be broken in the 
center and the part underneath can be 
planned for drawers on the one side and 
closets on the other. Here the lighting 
is better, if single fixtures can be inserted 
on either side of writing desk. This 




ATTRACTIVE FOR CHILD OR'ADULT 



. THE ATTRACTIVE CORNER 



13 



throws the light down and saves strain 
on the eyes. There should be uniformity 
in the furnishing, that is, if you wish to 
have the illusion of space even in con- 
tracted quarters. 

The hallway has well been termed the 
keynote of the house. It is much more 
attractive where it is broken than where 
it extends straight through the house. 
There should be an insistent simplicity 
that demands its beauty in one compre- 
hensive glance. Yet, it should be ar- 
ranged so invitingly that one is tempted 
to linger; all the more, if there is an 
unmistakable note of hospitality worked 
out, no matter how unpretentious or 
imposing the architecture. The size and 
shape should be taken into consideration 
as well as the lighting. 

A large hall lends itself to decorative 
schemes better than a small one. In the 
former, corners can be worked out at the 
sidss of the fireplace, and, if possible, a 
window should be introduced that is 
ornamental in its design. This should 
correspond with the type of architecture, 
as for instance, in a Dutch Colonial 



house, the window should follow the same 
period. Designed properly, it should 
show heavy mullions and small panes. 
The draperies should not be heavy but of 
plain material hung next to the glass, and 
reaching to the floor. For wall treatment 
the broad hall allows for pictorial paper, 
or it can be hand-painted on textile, 
while for the long, narrow hall, ending 
with a staircase, it should be either of 
one tone or white woodwork. Tile floors 
are much more fashionable than hard 
wood; they can be used in two colors or a 
solid color laid in white cement. 

The furnishing is an important feature, 
for here so few things are usable. The 
old-fashioned clock is always in place, 
for a corner can be introduced under the 
winding staircase and many architects 
affect torcheres for lighting purposes. 
A wall fountain, or receptacle for plants, 
is admissible. Nowhere is there a greater 
need for carefully balanced and sym- 
metrical grouping of furniture, and if the 
house owner co-operates with the archi- 
tect in carrying out his ideas, the right 
results can be produced. 




SCREEN WITH WINDOW ABOVE 



14 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



The breakfast room, while informal in 
its nature, often has to be formally 
treated. Movable furniture allows con- 
stant changes, but the most practical 
thought is the employing of the service 
table, more particularly if it is a painted 
one, to stand next to the corner window. 
Here th^ color-scheme lies in the drap- 
eries, which hang in simple, straight lines. 
The inner ones of casement cloth, reach- 
ing to the sill, while the outer ones of 
printed linen are finished with a valance 
trimmed with fringe. Paneled woodwork 
is the proper setting, for it brings out the 
dark background of both table and 
hangings. 

For picture effects no bit can be more 
picturesquely worked out than in the 



sun-room. The red-tile floor makes a 
pleasing scheme of red and white. If 
one paints the woodwork the latter color 
and introduces plants bearing white 
flowers, a note of color brightens up the 
corner through the use of printed linen 
chair-cushions of bright hue. 

In general, there is no house but the 
severe corners are improved by right 
treatment. There can be a varying by 
changing the furniture-setting with the 
season. Coolness and restfulness demand 
soft coloring during the warm weather, 
while the open wood fire in the winter 
months calls for a gay setting. It is 
these corners, rightly treated, that give 
an individual charm, and render the 
house beautiful so much in demand today. 




A SCREEN SET BACK OF BREAKFAST TABLE 




STEP-SAVING AKRAXGEMEXT AXD VEXTILATION' HOOD 



Kitchen Considerations 

By Marion Brownfield 



AS the kitchen has two functions 
in the home — the workshop and 
the temporary sitting room — 
for the average homemaker without help, 
it should be attractive as well as con- 
venient. 

A great deal of attention in making 
the kitchen cheerful, light, and well 
ventilated, comfortable to sit in, as w^ell 
as work in, is time well spent and actually 
saved, in the long run. Good spirits 
depend so much on cheerful surroundings 
that the housekeeper in a dark kitchen 
will be astonished at the unaccountable 
buoyancy she will feel, if the kitchen be 
repainted in a fresh, light enamel. Work 
to keep it clean can be minimized in sev- 



eral ways. One of these is to have the 
kitchen range ventilated above, with a 
hood and a shutter in the ceiling to carry 
off steam. The moisture, both from 
cooking and laundry w^ork, is responsible 
in large degree for the collection of grease 
and dust on w^oodw^ork. The illustration 
shows a glimpse of the up-to-date hood — 
tile lined — and lighted conveniently 
with electricity for dark hours. Getting 
rid of steam is preventive of soiled wood- 
work; a light color, also, keeps the room 
cheerful. A domestic science expert tells 
us of her charming apple-green kitchen 
that shares with its big, airy windows all 
the pleasantness of the orchard just 
outside. 



15 



16 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Windows, exposure, doors and floor 
space are indeed the first things to plan, 
for both a pleasant and labor-saving 
kitchen. If the north side of a house 
must be used for living or bedrooms, by 
all means have plenty of windows placed 
to light the kitchen sink while dish wash- 
ing and performing other routine work. 
Often the window in the outside door can 
lighten a dark kitchen wonderfully. 
Placed as it is in the illustration, it seems 
to lighten the inner wall very nicely. 
But in no place does a window give the 
measure of daily content as when placed 
over the sink, so that in all weathers the 
housekeeper can have a glimpse of the 
outdoors, plenty of light, and in warm 
weather, a breeze. 

Today there is much debate about the 
size of a convenient kitchen. Many 
maintain that the shortest distance from 
the range to the sink and cupboards 
simplifies work. Actually, the size of the 



woman who uses it must be considered. 
A tall woman usually hates a sink as 
"low" as the average person likes it, and 
one tall housekeeper says the average 
kitchen breakfast nook is just an aggra- 
vation, for it bumps her knees and elbows! 
A kitchen so large that it permits the 
introduction of numerous pieces of equip- 
ment, such as cabinet, refrigerator, table 
and so forth, is likewise apt to be a 
stumbling place that makes for extra steps 
at cleaning times. The ideal amount of 
floor space, probably, is just enough to 
walk, without interference, to all the 
necessary daily equipment, as stove, sink 
and cupboard, and enough extra space for 
a comfortable chair, while cooking food 
must be watched. A really attractive 
plan to make the room restful as well as 
convenient, is to have a little bay window 
or niche just large enough to accommo- 
date a rocker. A drop shelf would easily 
add comfort to this nook, to hold a plant, 






A WINDOW'IN'OUTSIDE DOOR MAY HELP LIGHTEN THE KITCHEN 



KITCHEN CONSIDERATIONS 



17 



reading matter, or the mending basket for 
the "pick-up moment." The advantage 
of such an arrangement is that this nook 
need not be traversed in doing ordinary 
housework, yet is handy for. a relaxing 
moment so essential to a happy, healthy 
housewife. The built-in breakfast nook, 
in a way, is developing into this type of 
"cosy corner." Most of the tables are 
movable and just as useful for other 
things as for eating. The seats, too, are 
often cushioned. 

For further consideration of comfort, 
there is the kitchen floor covering. 
Cement, composition, tile, wood and 
linoleum are all up-to-date and sanitary, 
but for warmth and resiliency to the feet, 
linoleum is undeniably first. To gain 
these two advantages, many a housewife 
places rugs on the kitchen floor, but 
these add work. Very new, for floor cov- 
ering, is "interlocking rubber." This 
costs the most, at first, but it will outwear 
linoleum and has many advantages. 
Among them are resiliency, warmth and 
sanitation, for it is easily kept fresh with 
soap and water, a broom or a vacuum 
cleaner. It is made to be removable, like 
the mats in pullman cars, or it can be 
tacked down permanently. In color 
many pretty effects, similar to linoleum. 



such as buff and blue, or blue and white 
are obtainable. Bordered effects, also, 
can be chosen for a pretty kitchen. 

Built-in conveniences for the kitchen 
are constantly being improved and in- 
creased in number. The tendency is to 
cover all shelves and labor-saving devices 
with doors,. both to keep things clean and 
give the room a generally neat appear- 
ance. Thus the built-in ironing board 
"disappears" into the cupboard above 
when not in use. Most of the built-in 
effects have another great advantage; 
they cost less than similar equipment 
bought new at a furniture store. Thus the 
cupboard space, shown in the illustration, 
with bread board, sugar and flour bins and 
cooling closet takes the place of a more 
expensive kitchen cabinet, very efficiently. 

A final consideration is the curtaining 
of the kitchen windows. Simple white 
muslin, easily laundered for perpetual 
freshness, is most pleasing. Whether 
curtains must cover the window com- 
pletely depends upon the proximity of 
neighbors. Where privacy and a pleasant 
outlook are obtainable, a mere ruffle 
across the top, with side drapes, also of 
white and washable material, are recom- 
mended, for the sake of all the charm of 
light, air and sunshine possible. 



The Roses of June 

The roses are here, the roses are here, 
All bending 'neath diamonds of dew. 

While dawn breaks above the gardens we love, 
And skies are so tenderly blue. 

The roses are here, the roses are here, 

The beautiful roses of June, 
Their fragrance so rare floats soft on the air, 

While bobolink whistles a tune. 

The roses are here, the roses are here, 
The red and the yellow and white, 

For loved ones who died, for each bonny bride 
We gather the roses so bright. 

Ruth Ravmond. 



Back-Fence Offerings 

By Harriet Whitney Symonds 



WHEN Mrs. Grafton of Barnett- 
ville learned that her brother, 
Mr. Daniel Hardy of Brandon, 
had lost his housekeeper, she dispatched 
her son Edward to look into the situation. 
"If he hasn't any help yet," she 
admonished the youth, "bring him 
straight home with you, where I can 
look after him, myself. I know Dan; 
he'll think of everything in the wide 
world but his own needs." 

Mr. Hardy was in his back yard, 
tightening a loose fence picket when his 
nephew arrived, and, as he had left his 
front door ajar, Ned, being a prompt 
young man, not only walked in, but 
invaded his bachelor uncle's provision 
department without delay. He opened 
the door of the pantry closet with trepida- 
tion, apprehending a desert of crusts and 
fragments, but in this met with a surprise. 
"Shades of Great-aunt Abigail's rolling- 
pin!" he broke forth. "Has Uncle Dan 
been taking a cooking-school course.? If 
not, whence these beguiling eats.?" 

He stood back to admit fuller light 
upon the objects of his astonishment, 
viz.: upon the lower shelf, two great 
moons of pies, blandly displaying a rich 
wine-red raspberry filling through deli- 
cate spirals of tan-golden ciust; upon the 
second shelf, a round Alp of a cake, 
drifted over with a cocoanut frosting as 
purely white as the fleecy mountain snow. 
"Ah-h!" Ned drew in a waft of per- 
fume as ethereal as the soul of violets. 
"I shall take supper with Uncle Dan on 
the thinnest invitation." 

"Hello, there, you prowler!" A bluffy 
hearty voice came in at the back doer, 
accompanied by the comfortable per- 
sonality of Uncle Dan. "You appear to 
be admiring my brie a-brac. I'll take 
it as a dutiful act, if you'll help in its 
disposal. Will you.?" 

IS 



"Won't I.?" Ned enacted a movie of 
a boy consuming a large section of 
imaginary and very juicy pie, smacking 
his lips relishingly and wiping his mouth 
rapturously with his sleeve as a finale. 
"But you aren't telling me you got up 
these gorgeous creations, uncle.?" 

"Not I, believe me," negatived Uncle 
Dan. "I'd as soon undertake to build 
airships. The next-door lady is respon- 
sible. She steals over of evenings in the 
dusk and sets the things on the fence- 
shelf I fixed for the milkman's conven- 
ience. Then she scoots off before I can 
say Teter Piper.' " 

"A lady! Oh, uncle! Is she young.?" 
"Jiggs — I'm no judge of a woman's 
age. She's uncommonly thin, though. 
If she lives on that kind of stuff herself, 
I don't know why she doesn't fattfen up. 
I'd sooner eat plain victuals, myself." 

"Uncle, you ungrateful old heathen," 
said Ned, disrespectfully. "And| don't 
you know who she is.?" 

"Oh, sure I do. She's a Miss Lawton. 
I don't mean to be ungrateful; I know 
she's fetching the du-dabs out of kind- 
ness, and they do look mighty eatable. 
Same time, if it wasn't for the beans and 
corn bread Mrs. Pigeon puts on my fence 
on the other side, I'd come near going- 
hungry — or else get too fat." 

"Mrs. Pigeon! Another woman! 
Uncle," Ned shook an accusing finger at 
his relative, "I fear you are a flirtatious 
young man. Is Mrs. Pigeon a widow.?" 
"She is not; nor young; she has a 
husband and a brood of grandchildren. 
She and Miss Lawton are both members 
of my church and probablv think it a 
Christian duty to save an unfortunate 
^^^other from starvation at their gates. 
I^ut Miss Lawton hasn't lived long in 
Brandon, and I've ne-^er been Introduced' 
to her." 



BACK-FENCE OFFERINGS 



''Well, uncle, I have orders from 
Mammy to bring you home with me, if 
you're out of help, but I can't see that 
you are in any danger of starvation so 
far." 

"I should say not. And my new house- 
keeper is coming tomorrow. Thank your 
mother just the same, though. By the 
way, you'll stop a bit with me, now you're 
here — hey.?" 

"Sure. I can stay a week," Ned 
agreed, cheerfully. "I'm on my vaca- 
tion. And maybe I'll get to meet this 
lady of the splendatious eats." 

Ned swam gaily into the social tide of 
Brandon, and not long after his coming 
to his uncle's, realized the pleasure of an 
introduction to Miss Selma Lawton, a 
slender maiden with curly brown hair 
and a dimpled chin. 

Totally unlearned in round-about tac- 
tics, he drove straight at the matter 
occupying his mind. 

"Miss Lawton — excuse me for asking, 
but I want to know — you live next door 
to my uncle, Mr. Dan Hardy, do you 
not?" 

The young lady nodded assent with a 
pleasant smile. 

"Then," Ned wen^t on, in his head- 
foremost fashion, "you must be the good 
fairy who leaves such delicious things on 
Uncle Dan's back fence." 

"Well, no, I'm not; that's Aunt Lois; 
she — " 

"Aw!" breathed Ned, a frankly dis- 
appointed expression on his open, boyish 
face. "That puts a kink in my neat 
little scheme." 

"Scheme.?" The young lady looked 
quizzically at him. 

"Yes; because you aren't^your aunt, 
or she isn't you — " Finding himself in 
something of a muddle, Ned desper- 
ately blurted his case. "I made a vow 
that the being who designed those won- 
derful donations should be Mrs. Edward 
•Grafton, if I could turn the trick. And 
now after meeting you, and you say 
you^re not the author, I don't see how I 
can keep the vow — now I've put my 



foot in it! Do please excuse me — I'm 
so brash — " 

But the girl was laughing In a jolly, 
hearty fashion that helped Ned out of the 
bog. 

"Aunt Lois Is very nice," she observed, 
wiping the merry tears from her eyes. 
"And she's the best cook in Brandon. I 
give you my word, Mr. Grafton, she's 
a much greater prize than I am." 

"I don't believe it; but" — Ned, him- 
self again, made haste to seize the bit of 
advantage her words presented, "I'd like- 
to know her, anyway. Do you think 
she'd allow me to call on her soon.?" 

"She might," conceded Miss Selma. 

And Ned did not neglect his oppor- 
tunity. 

He found Miss Lois a pleasant little 
woman, slim and brown-haired like her 
niece. She was apparently about thirty- 
five years of age, and a little reserved in 
manner. To Ned's flowery praise of her 
kindness to his uncle, she merely replied 
that it was her custom to give neighborly 
assistance when needed, and men were 
more or less careless in the matter of 
providing for themselves. 

Having thus blazed the trail, Ned soon 
ventured on a second visit to the aunt 
and niece, and this time proposed that his 
uncle accompany him. Mr. Hardy was 
contrary minded. 

"It's better for me that I shouldn't go, 
because," he candidly explained, "unex- 
pected results have been known to grow 
out of trifling incidents. I'm a bit sus- 
ceptible to the charms of the ladies, 
myself, though you mightn't suspect it; 
and at the same time, I'm inclined to grow 
fat. Now, in case it should come to pass 
that I possessed a wife who fed me up on 
sweet stuff and pastry as a regular thing, 
think what I might come to!" 

"Well, I'm awful sorry," Ned gave up 
the point with reluctance. "I can't have 
Miss Lois myself, because I want Selma, 
but we ought not to let her get out of the 
family, and if you don't profit by yomr 
chance, some other fellow is liable to." 

On the eve of his returw %o Barnett- 



20 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



ville, Ned cajoled Selma into a promise to 
correspond with him, in order that he 
might know how affairs were going with 
his uncle, who seldom wrote letters. As 
it was only a couple of weeks before he 
was back in Brandon and nothing of any 
moment had happened to Mr. Hardy, it 
would hardly seem necessary for him and 
Selma to have written fourteen letters, 
each, in that time. However, it may be 
that love laughs as lightly at logic as at 
locksmiths; and love must certainly have 
taken a hand in the game played by the 
two young folks, since at the termination 
of this last visit Ned had important news 
for his uncle. 

"I hope you'll call at Miss Lawton's 
with me this one evening. Uncle Dan," 
he urged, "so as to make acquaintance 
with your new niece; that's what Selma 
will be about the first of September." 

Uncle Dan took the announcement 
agreeably, and yielded to his own ordeal 
like a man. 

"Bushels of congratulations. Boy," he 
said, heartily. "And I'll admit that the 
way I've dodged thanking Miss Lawton 
for the donations is a disgrace. I'll try 
to make amends now. But — you don't 
think I need to — ■ to keep up the calling 
business after this evening, do you?" 

"Not at all," Ned assured him. "In 
fact, you can't keep it up after Selma and 
I are married, not if we can persuade Miss 
Lois to live with us. And won't we live 
in clover, if she agrees!" 

The evening chanced to be sultry, and 
Miss Lawton's living room was a pleasant 
spot, with its light, cool drapings and 
comfortable bamboo furniture. Neither 
was Miss Lois, herself, out of harmony 
with her setting, as she sat hemstitching 
napkins beside a round table by the light 
of a tall, softly shaded lamp. 

Mr. Hardy made brave haste to do his 
neglected duty at the first opportunity. 

"I am very much ashamed, Miss 
Lawton, of my failure to thank you for 
your neighborly kindness to me in the 
way of — • of — ■" As Uncle Dan, who 
had not a fluent tongue, paused a mo- 



ment to select the proper word, Miss Lois 
came to his assistance by observing in a 
matter-of-fact tone, 

"I should rather you would not speak 
of it now. The trifling things I presented 
you were not worth mentioning, Mr. 
Hardy." 

"Oh, yes, indeed they were very supe- 
rior, and — and — " 

This time Ned rushed in with first aid 
to the embarrassed: 

"I can back Uncle Dan up in all he 
says. Miss Lois; those pies of yours were 
the toppingest ever, and the cake with 
the brown and white rick-rack was 
simply gorgeous — " 

"Oh, but you ought to see auntie's 
little seed cakes," Selma cut in, animat- 
edly. "Baked violets wouldn't be a 
patch to the way they smell, and as for 
taste — but wait a minute — " 

She stepped briskly from the room and 
returned in a few minutes bringing a 
pitcher of lemonade and a large platter of 
the thinnest, brownest, most deliciously 
scented wafers one could have fallen upon 
in a dream. 

"These," she declared, as she passed 
them to the callers, "I consider the finest 
that even auntie could invent. They — " 

Her lively panegyric was cut square off 
by Miss Lois, who suddenly flung her 
napkin, needle and all, upon the table 
and sprang to her feet. 

"Selma Elizabeth Lawton, stop exactly 
there," she ordered in a determined tone. 
"I've sailed under a flag of deception just 
as far as I'm going to; and you've brought 
the thing to a head by trying to fasten 
those cakes on to me in addition to every- 
thing else. 

"Mr. Hardy," she turned to Uncle 
Dan, "this young relative of mine, merely 
to save herself a bit of embarrassment on 
her first meeting with your nephew, 
threw the responsibility for that pastry 
stuff upon me, and I let it go. But now 
that there's no occasion for keeping up 
the fiction, even as a joke, I repudiate it 
from this instant." 

"Oh, now, auntie," protested Selma, 



BACK-FENCE OFFERINGS 



21 



strangling with laughter, "you've not 
only let the cat out, but you've spoiled 
the beautiful surprise I was keeping 
for Ned — " 

"Hey? What?" Ned almost swal- 
lowed a wafer whole. "You're not telling 
me it was Selma who cooked all those 
perfectly delightful goodies, Miss Lois?" 

"That's the simple truth, Mr. Ned. 
When your uncle's housekeeper deserted 
him so suddenly, I should have been glad 
to help him out with home-made bread, 
or anything sensible, but sister Pigeon 
took that line out of my hands. Then 
Selma volunteered to provide the orna- 
mental stuff, if I would deliver it. And 
that's all I ever did about it." 

"I gather from your words, Miss Law- 
ton," Uncle Dan having patiently awaited 
his chance, slid gently into the discus- 
sion, "that you do not consider these 
lighter items of daily sustenance so 
indispensable as the more solid articles." 

"You are quite right," Miss Lois 
assured him. "Though I shouldn't deny 
that sensible desserts have their place in 
the daily menu, I still must believe that 
a pan of baked beans will carry one 
farther in the day's march than an angel 
cake could do, and that a leg of mutton is 
a more reliable stand-by than the finest 
pie ever created could be." 

"My view entirely!" Mr. Hardy im- 
pulsively offered the hand of fellowship 
to Miss Lois across the table. "Too 
much ornamental diet spoils the taste for 
plain fare, just as an excess of gaiety and 
amusement interferes with one's interest 
in the serious business of life." 

"And as too much light reading 
destroys the liking for solid and sensible 
literature," contributed Miss Lois. 

"Listen to 'em," whispered Ned, pity- 
ingly to Selma. "They must be getting 
old, poor things. Give me the frilligigs 



every time, in summer or in winter." 
"Me, too," murmured Selma. "We'll 
live on them when we keep house." 

"But, darling," Ned drew his chair 
close to Selma's and whispered, "Aunt 
Lois will always be perfectly welcome to 
a home with you and me, you know, just 
the same." 

Extract from a letter to Ned Grafton 
from Selma Lawton, shortly before the 
day set for the wedding: 

"Can't write you much tonight, boy, 
dear; I'm sleepy and my wrist is lame 
from the beating, creaming and stirring 
it has done today. But don't I wish you 
could take a squint at the three top 
pantry shelves! Wouldn't you be *hap- 
pified' by the lovely things you'd see and 
the delicious things you'd smell! 

Aunt Lois is the dearest thing; she's 
given me a whole raft of mixers and 
beaters and kneaders, and a set of icing 
tubes. You don't begin to know how 
fascinating it is to turn out beautiful 
little roses and lilies of snow-white frost- 
ing! But auntie, you know, has a very 
practical streak in her make-up, and has 
given me stern notice that I must learn 
to cook solid stuff, such as the baked 
beans and meat-loaves she and Uncle 
Dan set so much store by. She says that 
when you and I get old — say twenty- 
five or thirty — we will not want to live 
entirely on ^uh-duhs. Well, maybe — 

I fell asleep right there and made that 
terrible blot — I must quit, straight off. 
Your own, 

Selma. 

P.S. Ned, we can't have auntie to live 
with us when we're married; she posi- 
tively refuses to come, because she and 
Uncle Dan are going to be married at the 
same time you and I are!" 



July! 



Down the ages hearts shall beat 
With thanksgiving as they greet 
Thy returning year on year, 
With a thrill of joy and cheer. 



Honored month of FREEDOM'S birth! 
Honored sires of sterling worth! 
We shall ever reverence thee 
For thy gift of LIBERTY! , 

Caroline L. Sumn 



With the Aid of Grandmother's Blue Delft 

By Flora Swetnam 



DAISY CANTRELL regarded the 
letter which she had just received 
with an expression of dismay. 
She had been a member of the Book Club 
and of the Embroidery Club for several 
years, but she had been a housekeeper 
only six months. Those two clubs had 
held a yearly union meeting for the last 
ten years. That meeting was quite 
popular with the ladies of the village, and 
it was considered quite an honor to be 
the one appointed to furnish the place of 
entertainment. Daisy was conscious of 
the honor, but housekeeping was so new, 
and her house not very large. There 
were twenty-five ladies and she knew they 
would every one be present. 

Marjorie May and Jane West, her two 
nearest neighbors, could be counted on to 
help, but what about dishes? Mechani- 
cally she laid the letter away and went 
about her work. As she put the house to 
rights, she planned the details. She was 
sure it could be managed — • all but the 
dishes. Marjorie and Jane would lend 
her anything, but she hated to ask for 
dishes. She put off thinking of that till 
the last thing. Perhaps there would be 
some other way. 

Later in the day, she met Mrs. Jamie- 
son, the chairman of the program com- 
mittee. That lady beamed on her. 
"Well," she said, "now I am ready to tell 
you our subject for discussion. We shall 
talk about Washington Irving and 
read selections from the Knickerbocker 
History.'* 

Daisy approved, of course. It was 
customary to approve the work of the 
committees, but she did not know how 
much she approved till she had reflected 
upon it all the way home. It came to her 
suddenly, a story which she had heard 
her mother tell. The story was, that 
when Daisy's great grandmother had 



celebrated her china wedding with a 
great ingathering of all the relatives, 
there had been five complete sets of 
dishes of the kind of ware commonly 
known as blue Delft. Great grand- 
mother always refused to part from any 
of them because they were presents from 
those whom she loved, so they had 
descended to Daisy's grandmother, and 
now reposed in a large box in the attic. 
Daisy was so pleased with the idea that 
she laughed aloud. 

"I'll go and see grandmother at once," 
she said, and suited the action to the 
word. 

She found Grandmother Carlton at 
home, and explained her errand without 
delay. "If you will let me use them, 
grandmother," she promised, "I'll be so 
careful that they will all come home safe. 
Will you.?" 

"Goodness, child, yes. I borrowed 
part of them several times in my early 
married life." 

"Oh, I'm so glad. And you'll be sure to 
be there, won't you? I'd like to make 
you feel proud of your granddaughter if 
I can." 

"I am that already, but I'll try to be 
there." 

Daisy went home filled with a most 
delightful dream. If she could only 
carry out her plan, she felt sure the union 
meeting would be a grand success. 
Marjorie was on the porch waiting for her 
when she came. 

"I have just heard that the union 
meeting is going to be here," she said. 

"Yes. It scared me nearly to death, at 
first," confessed Daisy. "To think I 
should have all those women descend 
upon me while housekeeping is still so 
new, made me think of running away." 

"Well, it was your turn, Mrs. Anderson 
said. I thought of all that, and wished 



22 



WITH GRANDMOTHER'S BLUE DELFT 



23 



you had been there to speak for yourself, 
but Jane whispered that we'd help you." 

"I just couldn't attend the meeting 
that afternoon," replied Daisy. "I 
wanted to be there very much." 

"Have you made any plans.?" 

"Yes. That is what I went to see 
grandmother about." 

Daisy began telling about the blue 
Delft. Marjorie was pleased with the 
notion, and while they were talking, Jane 
ran in. 

"Do you know," she demanded, "that 
the state president of the women's clubs 
of this state is going to be present at our 
meeting.?" 

"No," answered both together. 

"Well, she is. Mrs. Jamieson has a 
letter from her. She is an author of some 
importance." 

"Horrors!" cried^Daisy. "What will 
she think of our arrangements .? I think 
I'm frightened worse than ever now." 
P'' She hastily told Jane of her plan. 
"And I intended to stencil and cut out 
mills from blue cloth and baste them 
neatly on the table cloths. Will she be 
shocked.?" 

"It wouldn't shock me," replied Jane, 
"and I guess my nerves are about as 
delicate as hers." 

"How many tables will you have.?" 
asked Marjorie. 

"It will take three the size of mine," 
said Daisy. "I'll have to borrow of you 
two." 

"All my earthly goods are at your 
service," declared Jane. 

"Mine, too," said Marjorie. 

"But will my dining room hold them.?" 
asked Daisy in some consternation. 

"Let's go and look at it," suggested 
Marjorie. 

They went. After some planning, it 
was settled that it would do. They 



decided on blue flags as the proper flowers. 
Marjorie said that she had always heard 
that they loved low, wet places, there- 
fore, they ought to grow in Holland. 

"Now," queried Jane, "what can you 
have for tea that will keep your color 
scheme, blue and white.?" 

"I've been thinking of that all day," 
admitted Daisy. "It will mostly have to 
be white, but the dishes will furnish the 
blue. I shall have a white-meat salad, 
cottage cheese, and wafers, some blocks 
of maple sugar, frosted, a white custard 
and jam cake. The way grandmother 
makes it, it will be nearly blue. How 
will it do.?" 

"It sounds all right to me," answered 
Marjorie. 

"Have the tea hot," advised Jane, 
"with cream and a marshmallow. That 
will look pretty in those blue cups." 

"All right. It will be easy enough, if 
we have nothing hot but the tea, and you 
are two dears to help me so much." 

Three women worked diligently during 
the intervening time, and Daisy had the 
satisfaction of seeing all her plans materi- 
alize. When it was all done Jane de- 
clared the dining room a dream. The 
last thing had been done and nothing 
forgotten. 

The guests came in two's and three's. 
The program was original and inter- 
esting, and the display of embroidery 
artistic and unique. Almost before any 
one thought of It, it was time for tea. 

The ladies gasped at sight of the dining 
room, and their looks of admiration more 
than repaid Daisy for her days of plan- 
ning and work. Her cup of happiness 
nearly overflowed, however, when the 
distinguished guest turned to her as she 
rose from the table and said, 

"My dear, you have the soul of a poet 
and of an artist." 




Budgets and Bankruptcy 

(In Which One Learns to Look after the Littlest Leaks) 
By Ida R. Fargo 



IT was a blustery Saturday afternoon. 
Helen Caruthers sat before her open 
fire lost in a restful reverie. The fire 
was cosy, her work was all done, and in 
spite of the elements the world seemed a 
place of peace. Only an impatient clang 
at the knocker brought her to her feet. 
Then she realized that a taxi had been 
insistently purr-purring outside her gate. 

"Now who is that.?" she conjectured, 
as she sped to the door. And almost in 
the same breath, "Mabel Martins!" she 
exclaimed. "In all this drizzle! Come 
in before you blow away." 

Unusually silently the guest slipped 
from her wraps. The doleful droop still 
clung to her shoulders even after she had 
settled in the cretonned rocker in front of 
the fire, even as she toasted her toes at the 
congenial, blaze — for Helen had poked 
up the coals and put on another stick: 
The whistle of the rain on the windows 
had made the day seem chill. 

"What is it?" ventured Helen, a 
moment after. "Tell me at once. You 
look like The Worst had happened." 

"It has," breathed the little guest with 
a tragic shrug; a rebellious line trekked 
in between her brows. "I might as well 
tell you! — I might as well proclaim it at 
the market places! I'm going bank- 
rupt in this housewife business. Wilbur 
is awfully worried — we're living too high. 
Oh, It Is costing too much — ' everything 
is costing too much! I've got to cut 
expenses — and I don't know where to 
begin." 

There was appeal and mutiny and 
longing for comfort in the tense young 
tone. 

"We're drifting — drifting — ," she 
went on; "and one doesn't drift — • up- 
stream! While you — ^" reproached the 
voice, "if I didn't actually know better, 
I'd believe you had landed at the Edge of 



Easy Street. Your problems seem so 
simple, and you are always sweet to 'look 
at, and never out-at-the-elbows; you set 
as good a table as I do — even better — 
you and Dick take in some of the luxuries 
of life — shows and an ice cream 
sundae — !" the voice broke on a half sob. 
"Oh, you get along beautifully! You 
don't act like you had to scrimp — and 
scrimp — ■ and scrimp — Helen, how do 
you do it.?" 

The young wife flung out her arms with 
a look of acrid abandon. 

"There, there, there!" brooded her 
friend. "Maybe it Isn't as bad as it 
seems. Maybe I can help you." 

"That's why I've put my pride In my 
pocket — and come," quivered Mabel 
Martins. "You get on — and your hus- 
band hasn't any more salary than mine." 
The dark eyes looked desperate. "But 
me — it's all a tangle. I don't know 
where to begin." 

Deliberately, silently, strongly, Helen 
Caruthers prodded the coals till a very 
smother of sparks went hurtling up the 
broad dark throat of the chimney. 
Then; 

"Begin at the table," she said. "That 
is an easy place to begin." And after a 
little drift of thought, ^ reminlscently: 
"Do you remember the luncheon I gave 
last spring.?" 

"Do I.?" accused Mrs. Martins mourn- 
fully. "Strawberries — green peas — oh, 
it was perfect. Your luncheons always 
are. But I don't see — " 

"You will," assured her hostess; "wait 
a bit. That luncheon cost me half what 
it would if I had given it two weeks 
earlier. It was better, too, because the 
berries and peas were so perfectly fresh. 
My dear, they came out of my own gar- 
den — I plan my luncheons that way. 
Serve something home-grown. I never 



24 



BUDGETS AND BANKRUPTCY 



25 



buy at the beginning of a season, or out 
of season, when prices are high. But by 
bringing my garden into the game I 
could keep within my budget. And 
every one seemed to enjoy — •\ 

^'They did — they did!" interrupted 
the listening wife. "We all had such a 
delightful day — • it couldn't have been 
better if you had imported creamed 
peacocks' tongues from Peru!" But she 
caught her breath precipitously. "Your 
garden! Why, I have a garden, too; but 
things out of bne's garden always seemed 
so — common." 

"Ex-act-ly," mused Helen Caruthers. 

"I've always wanted to do something 
— better." 

"And go bankrupt — in the housewife 
business. And muss up your budget. 
And — " 

A small foot poked absently at a 
charred coal on the hearth. "I'm begin- 
ning — to — • see," murmured Mabel 
Martins. "I've always entertained at 
any old time, and ordered everything 
from town, no matter what the price. I 
thought I had to. But, oh, my budget 
has been smashed to smithereens ! And — " 

"Of course," said her friend. "If we 
housewives don't consider the budget, 
the budget will never consider us. It's 
a good friend, and a wicked old ogre — 
and it gets out of hand as quickly as Jack's 
beanstalk — if we don't keep an eye out." 
She laughed lightly. "But entertaining 
is just one little item. I spoke of it just 
to illustrate. Suppose you lived out of 
your garden like Dick and I do.^" 

"Lived out — ■ of — • your — • garden," 
echoed a troubled voice. 

"Yes," asserted Helen Caruthers. "You 
have as much back yard as we do — and 
as much time to hoe it. We don't order 
green peas; we grow 'em. And wait for 
'em. They are better than the shlpped- 
in, wilted product one buys, and we appre- 
ciate them twice as much as if we had 
ordered from the market early. Our 
appetite isn't surfeited by the time our 
vegetables are ready." 

"But isn't it hard to wait? I always 



buy the first In the market." And then 
the listening one blushed, thinking of the 
price — ■ and a bankrupt housewife's bud- 
get. She hurried on, "And isn't a garden 
a lot of trouble.?" 

"Fun, I'd say," assured the other. 

There was a little sigh, soft as a summer 
breeze. "Maybe I ought to confess," 
breathed its owner, "that we haven't 
much garden. Not really. I sort of 
talked Wilbur out of it. He had the 
notion at first. You see, I thought — I 
didn't know — " 

"Yes," voiced her friend; "I'd guessed. 
But 'live and learn.' There are more 
years ahead. . . . Besides, there are 
other points — ■ if one means to get the 
best of a budget. There's left-overs, for 
instance. You threw three slices of 
bread in the garbage can the last time I 
wiped dishes for you. Perfectly good 
slices." 

"Two days old," apologized little Mrs. 
Martins. "Wilbur does so hate dry 
bread. He says when we get to where 
we can't afford good bread — •" 

"There's French toast, and milk toast, 
and — Why, my dear, your last house- 
hold magazine has a whole page on left- 
over breads. Dry breads. Besides, there 
was that bit of cold salmon that went the 
way of those three perfectly wholesome 
slices!" Helen paused but there was a 
twinkle in her eye. "You can hardly 
look at a cookery page these days without 
finding some way to use left-overs — 
creamed, and steamed, and flaked, and 
stirred. You must study your 'trade 
journals,' and that's exactly what cookery 
pages are to a successful housewife. 
Ex-act-ly!" 

"Trade journals," said the other 
thoughtfully. " I hadn't considered them 
in that light. Wilbur wouldn't do with- 
out his trade journals for anything. 
Says they save him dollars where he 
would save cents otherwise." 

"Call me up mornings, tell me what 
you've got In your cupboard, and I'll 
help you get started," said Helen com- 
fortingly. "I've been In this housewife 



26 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



business a bit longer than you, and I love 
to plan menus. Making menus with a 
pocketbook as flat as though an elephant 
had stepped on it is an interesting occu- 
pation," she laughed. "It takes skill, as 
much skill — " with a smile at her 
friend — "as it does to plan a wardrobe 
on the same basis. Or just about. Now 
I'd say your clothes, Mabel, I'd say 
they — " 

"Cost a lot," finished the girl-wife 
soberly. "They do. But I can't go 
looking like a fright. I can't!" Her 
breath caught with a little fluttering, 
frightened protest. 

"You can't," assured the other; "and 
you don't need to. But, dear heart, 
buy conservative things. They're pretty 
— ■ and last so much longer than the 
extremes in cut and style. Your last 
suit, I remember, was mightily modern 
in cloth and cut and color; you looked 
like a peach in it — then. But now — " 
dubiously. 

"Oh, I've had to buy another — since 
then," confessed a shamed voice. "And 
it is conservative. Really. Because I've 
been watching you. I've been buying 
two suits to your one — ■ and never looking 
a whit better, but I didn't know what was 
the matter, not right at once." 

Her friend nodded. "Keep to a stand- 
ard color, then you don't have to buy 
everything at once. You will always 
have something left over; gloves or veils 
or, oh, just the little things that cost so 
much and mean more, if one would look 
well dressed. And avoid fads — • like the 
smallpox. It pays." 

"If one has to budget," said Mabel 
Martins. 

"If one has to budget," said Helen 
Caruthers. 

For a little moment Dick's wife and 
Wilbur's wife sat reading lessons in the 
fire. Like so many of the rest of us, they 
did not have the spending of vast amounts 
of money. Then: 

"But what about going places — 
amusements.? Must we give up all that.? 
And yet — you and Dick don't," ques- 



tioned the wife of Wilbur^ curiously. 

"No, we don't." 

High lights danced in the eyes of Helen 
Caruthers. She seemed no whit cast 
down over her friend's worried words. 

"We indulge in inexpensive outings," 
she went on; "it can be managed. Now 
that week-end at Newport you and Wil- 
bur took last month cost as much, I'd 
say, as all our six months of comings and 
goings, Dick's and mine. We travel by 
trolley. Haven't you noticed.? And we 
stay till the stars come out. We eat our 
lunch in the open, and we don't go where 
the crowds do; we love the country, the 
quiet, where one can relax and rest. It's 
what Dick needs after a day in the office. 
And it is what a busy housewife needs, 
too, and so often doesn't get. . . . 
Time to rest and relax. Quiet and stars, 
and, maybe, the pungent smoke of an 
open fire." 

"And that,'' mused Mabel Martins, 
"is why you always look so fresh, as 
blooming as a ripened peach, while I'm 
a jaded jaunter. Oh, but I was weary 
after that Newport frolic!" A sudden 
smile caught at the corners of her mouth. 
"I'm learning," she added solemnly. 
"I'm picking up points all along the line. 
Not that I'm going to do exactly as you 
do, but — ^ I'm learning," whimsically. 
"A budget — bankruptcy? — well, not 
yet." She counted on her fingers: "Live 
out of a garden; serve things in season; 
look after the left-overs; study ^trade 
journals'; avoid fads and extremes in 
wardrobe lines, in fact, be conservative, 
and try for a ^standard color'; vacationizc 
in ways restful and original." 

"I always guessed you could orient 
your ideas — once set a-going," chuckled 
her hostess. She poked a snapped coal 
from the carpet with the point of a paper 
knife. "Bankruptcy.? — I guess not." 

"I'm to be sensible," murmured Mabel 
Martins, heedless of her friend's inter- 
rupting words, "live simply, and fit my 
buying to my budget, rather than try to fit 
my budget to my buying. The latter 
can't be done. It truly can't." An 



AS SALLY SEES IT 



27 



applef-bloom blush chased out the bleak 
look from the young face. The dimples 
came into play. "Really — " she rose to 
go — -"it is going to be fun to be original. 
I see I have always been trying to do the 
thing 'they' do — • those very troublesome, 
intangible theys. I guess I have been 
like a little boy afraid in the dark, only 
my bugaboo has been, Tt isn't done, my 
dear!' Well, there are some things which 
are going to be done, oh, a lot of things! 
And thank you, Helen, a thousand times 
over, for pointing to the signboards — 
those signboards that say use your com- 



mon sense, in a lot of things." 

It was a happy young matron who 
peeped into the hall mirror for a moment 
of veil adjustment. She tucked away a 
strand of hair, buttoned a last button. 

"Besides," she added, "what's the use 
of having a perfectly good business brain 
— oh, I have, my dear — and not use it! 
I am going to begin being individual. 
Why — •" enthusiastically — • "if it wasn't 
for individualism, we would all be copy- 
cats. Or sheep. Now, wouldn't we.^" 

"Well — maybe — " laughed Helen 
Caruthers. 



As Sally Sees It 

By A. Borden Stevens 



IT'S mighty educating working 'round 
at other people's houses the way I 
do. My! When I think of the 
narrow way some folks live, never going 
outside their own back yards, I don't 
know how they do it. I've been working 
out at one thing or another for forty years, 
and there isn't a place where I can't 
learn something new, even now, old as 
I be. 

I was just about to retire from the 
washing business when the war came, 
but laws! everybody just flocked to the 
b -its where they'd get more money and 
time off. You couldn't get help in the 
house for love nor money. I couldn't 
leave Mrs. Brown high and dry like that, 
and her with two sons in the navy, and 
no one to turn a hand. Mrs. Brown is a 
real lady, and I like to work for her. 
She keeps to her own part of the house, 
so I do as I please, same's if it was my 
own kitchen. I see so much to do all the 
time that seems to me I'll never get 
caught up. Yes, I love Mrs. Brown just 
like she was my sister. 

Of course, she's ornery once in awhile; 
everybody is; but she gives me all her 
old clothes, which is a great help to me 
and my daughter's family — more'n you'd 



think. What if her room always looks 
like a hoorah's nest! It does pay for 
cleaning up. No, I've never seen a 
hoorah, but I've seen their nests — just 
thrown together, hit or miss, without 
rhyme or reason. 

Mrs. Brown is just possessed about 
dust. "Wet your broom, Sally," she'll 
say, when there isn't a speck in the air 
anywhere. There's Mrs. Grey, now. 
Mrs. Grey won't let you touch your broom 
to water, no matter what. It's real 
educating, remembering folk's ways and 
trying to see the reason for them, which 
mostly there appears not to be any that 
an honest woman can find. 

No, I don't use a vacuum cleaner any 
amount. These new fangled things are 
all right; I've seen them work, but folks 
don't have them much where I go, and 
if they do, they have a man to clean. 
Now there's Mrs. Green for one; I've 
done her fancy laundry for years, but I 
never move out of her wash-room, never. 
It's not like one of these places where you 
are called now here and now there, till you 
don't know which end you're on. To be 
sure she was always bringing collars and 
cuffses to do "<2^ once,^^ after my boiler is all 
put away, but Mrs. Green's mighty good 



28 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



to her help, what with Christmas and 
other times; we all like to work for her, 
we do. 

After washing for Mrs. Green with 
starch here, and starch there, it is a job 
to wash for Mrs. Bright next day. Mrs. 
Bright doesn't want a mite of starch in 
anything, be it ever so sheer. It's 
mighty educating to go around doing 
things other folk's ways, when you know 
as well as anything that the right way is 
entirely different, yes. Ma'am, entirely 
different. That is how it was at Mrs. 
Jones's. I cooked for Mrs. Jones, and 
she wanted things plain. Now a cook 
has some pride, so when she'd say plain 
tomatoes, I'd fry them up nice and 
brown, and if she said poor man's rice 
pudding, I'd put in raisins or cocoanut. 
Fuss? Never. She was glad of it. 
When you've worked around as long as 
I have, which — excuse me — you never 
will, you'll know how to tell what people 
want a far sight better than they know 
themselves. 

Yes, you do meet with exceptions. 
There was one; I didn't go there long. 
Looking back, I wonder that I stayed as 
long as I did. Mrs. Black warn't a lady! 
No, I couldn't call her a lady, and she 
didn't know how to treat a lady. She was 
always poking about to see if I was work- 



ing, and if I was cleaning up stairs, she'd 
snoop up and peek to see if the jewelry 
was safe. Yes, there are people just like 
that in the world. They don't trust any- 
body, not even themselves. I heard her 
over the 'phone one day talking to a 
friend while I was cleaning the upper hall. 
She said, "No, Mrs. What-you-call-it, I 
won't go out today. Sally is here sweep- 
ing — you know! — I can't leave the 
house all alone." 

Well, I stood it as long as I could. 
Some days she'd take a chair and sort of 
sit over me while I worked, and me a 
deaconess of the church, with more con- 
science in my little finger than she had in 
her whole body! I do get stirred up 
when I think of it; you must excuse me. 
We all have our feelings, you know. One 
day I just walked right out. I said, 
"Mrs. Black, you ain't no lady, and 
I always work for ladies." 

It certainly went home, for to this day 
she'll sneak down a back street rather 
than meet me face to face! I never 
quarrels with any one at all; I stay, or I 
leave; but it's mighty educating, going 
from one house to another and putting 
up with their ways, and all. I don't see 
how folks stand it who never leave their 
own back yards, and never know how 
their neighbors do. 



Dinner for Ned 

By R. G. Foster 



IUCIE glanced over the menu card 
and quickly ordered soup, fish, 
-^ potatoes, salad, rolls and ice 
cream. Ned hesitated over his order, 
but finally decided on oysters, fish, chops, 
bread, milk and pie a la mode. While 
they waited to be served, Lucie regarded 
her husband with a critical eye. He 
seemed a little heavier, his eyes were dull 
and he nervously fingered his silver, 
impatient at the waitress' slowness. 
They had been separated for several weeks 



and, during his absence, Ned had suffered 
from illnesses of one kind or another, and 
had become so discouraged that Lucie 
had decided to close up the house and 
join him on his business trips for a time. 
Some months before, when they had 
first gone to housekeeping, Lucie had 
discovered that her husband was averse 
to eating vegetables and fruits and con- 
stantly demanded meats, hot breads and 
sweets. He was at home so little that she 
liked to please him when he was there, 



DINNER FOR NED 



29 



and yet she knew that unless she could 
change his eating habits he would never 
be well. 

"Ned," she said suddenly, "how do you 
decide what to eat when you have to order 
your meals every day?" 

"Why, I just pick out what I think will 
taste good. Isn't that what you do?" 

"Well, yes, and then I try to choose the 
things that will keep me well." 

By this time Ned's oysters and Lucie's 
soup had appeared. He fell to eating in 
a preoccupied manner, evidently think- 
ing of his afternoon's work. But Lucie 
was not to be silenced. 

"For instance, I ordered soup instead 
of oysters, because I wanted something to 
stir up my appetite so the rest of my meal 
would taste good and digest well. I 
don't really get very hungry, riding on the 
train all day, and nothing on the menu 
makes my mouth water. But I know I 
must eat nourishing things, and I know 
how much I need to give me the energy 
for the work I do. A person doesn't need 
very much of food like meat, fish, eggs, or 
cheese each day. That's the reason I 
just ordered fish instead of oysters and 
chops. And I chose a green vegetable, 
because I know it contains some rough, 
indigestible material, which helps the 
other food along its way and at the same 
time yields minerals, such as iron and 
sodium and calcium, which keep my blood 
in good condition as well as regulating 
some of the other processes in the body." 

While she had been talking Ned's fish 
and chops had disappeared, accom- 
panied by a large glass of milk. And 
even then the waitress was bringing in 
pie a la mode, with cheese on the side. 
Lucie smiled. 

"What's funny?" asked Ned. 

"I was just thinking what a good 
guesser I am. I knew that cheese would 
come along with the pie." 

"Well, isn't that all right?" 

"No, it isn't, Ned. You have already 
had too much food of that kind today. 
Eating that cube of cheese is just like 
eating another chop or a couple of small 



eggs and you wouldn't think of doing that, 
would you?" 

"Lucie, do you really think I overeat?" 

"I know you do, dear, and you don't 
eat the right kind of things." 

"I know — • when I'm home I feel lots 
better than I do when I'm out on trips." 

"The reason you feel better at home is 
partly due to our regularity of meals, and 
partly due to the things we eat and the 
exercise you take. When you're on a 
trip, you eat breakfast at 6.30 one day 
and 9 o'clock the next. Some days you 
eat no lunch and other days you eat a 
heavy lunch. I think I can guess what 
you had for breakfast this morning — ■ 
oatmeal, with sugar and cream — lots of 
cream, cocoa, ham and eggs, toast and 
griddle cakes with syrup." 

"You're almost right, except I had 
biscuit instead of toast." 

"So much worse. Why, Ned, that 
breakfast is more suited to a hard working 
farm-hand than to you, for you get prac- 
tically no exercise." 

"I guess that's true. I've never 
thought much about it before. I always 
thought the reason you wouldn't let me 
have pancakes and biscuits and cheese 
and meat and such was that you didn't 
like them. You know at home we used 
to pay a lot of attention to feeding our 
stock, but we boys just ate what we 
wanted and usually a lot more than we 
should have — Lucie, if you'll order my 
meals all the time you're on this trip, I 
promise to eat everything — just sort of 
an experiment, you know." 

During the weeks that followed Lucie 
saw that Ned, though constantly hurrying 
from one place to another, had his meals 
at regular hours and that they were 
suited to his needs. Instead of choosing 
the whole bill of fare at the eating houses 
along the way, she suggested choices that 
would give variety and at the same time 
make every day's food balanced. It had 
now been some time since Ned had com- 
plained of any discomfort after meals and 
his bright eyes and clear skin testified to 
Continued on Page 6? 



30 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



AMERICAN COOKERY 

FORMERLY THE 

BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL 
MAGAZINE 

OF 

Culinary Science and Domestic Economics 

Subscription $1.50 perYear,Single Copies ISc 
Postage to Foreign Countries, 40c per Year 

TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The date stamped on the wrapper is the date 
on which your subscription expires; it is, also, an 
acknowledgment that a subscription, or a renewal 
of the same, has been received. 

Please renew on receipt of the colored blank 
enclosed for this purpose. 

In sending notice to renew a subscription or 
change of address, please give the old address 
as well as the new. 

In referring to an original entry, we must know 
the name as it was formerly given, together with 
the Post-office, County, State, Post-office Box, 
or Street Number. 

Entered at Boston Post-office as Second-class Matter 



O KIKDLY JUNE! 

O kindly JUNE, fair nature's queen 
Of perfect and inspiring days, 
Thy pulsing, throbbing life conveys 

A message from a power unseen 

Of life immortal! We may glean 
Unfolding truths from thee always, 
KINDLY JUNE! 

Each budding flower and leaf of green, 
Each nodding blade of grass allays 
Our doubts. The soul like thee obeys 
God's gentle touch and faith is keen, 
O KINDLY JUNE! 

Caroline L. Sumner. 



THE STRIKE 

AMERICAN COOKERY was late In 
getting out last month. This was 
solely on account of the strike of printers 
in this city. We hope our clientage will 
not lose their patience. The strike will 
end soon, as most strikes do, and we shall 
try in the future not to be late in our day 
of publication. 

At the present time, and under existing 
circumstances, can anything be more 
senseless than a strike.? It entails only 



loss and trouble to everybody concerned. 
Why any group of men, in the year 1921,, 
should engage in a strike is beyond human 
comprehension. Already thousands of 
men are in want of occupation. Do the 
strikers wish to join the ranks of the idle 
and unemployed.? No building boom is 
in sight. Stagnation in trade and com- 
merce, and in production in general, is 
indicated on every hand. What can be 
gained by a strike, anyhow.? The world 
seems all askew. "O judgment! thou 
hast fled to brutish beasts and men have 
lost their reason." 

In this year of 1921 all strikes and 
drives and extravagant appropriations 
for new projects are inopportune and out 
of order. Do you believe in smaller 
armaments.? We certainly do for Amer- 
ica, no matter what other nations may do. 
Do you believe in cutting down anomalous 
salaries and war-time wages.? We do, 
evenly and justly, from top to bottom. 
Do you believe in a reduction in the 
present rates of taxation.? Most surely 
we do. The present burden of taxation 
is the chief menace to the peace and 
prosperity of the world. We believe in 
all these things, also we believe in getting 
to work speedily, on the part of every- 
body, and in producing to the utmost 
limit in every line of industry. In no 
other way can relief be found and read- 
justment be made from the unequal, 
abnormal conditions, both economic and 
social, which seem to prevail at present. 
As a business proposition striking is an 
exceedingly poor policy. Nobody can be 
benefited thereby, unless it be the paid 
agitator. Above all things else people 
need steady, genial, useful occupatloa. 

THE PROSPECT 

WHAT with printers' strike, the cost 
of print-paper and labor, the 
complications of transportation and mail- 
ing, the publishers of magazines have 
been forced to contend with adverse con- 
ditions and troubles. Indeed. These after- 
effects of war speem inevitable, but they 
are destined soon to amend, we truet 



EDITORIALS 



31 



Already we are looking forward to more 
propitious times. 

We are glad to say that the circulation 
of American Cookery, through all 
vicissitudes, has steadily increased; it is 
nov/ larger than at any date in its history. 
This would point to a constantly growing 
interest and concern in home life. The 
importance of prudent, economic, health- 
ful housekeeping is more widely felt than 
ever before. The matter of food and 
feeding has become a subject of scientific 
study and investigation. Today the 
young woman who anticipates a home of 
her own wants to know how to buy, how 
to prepare, and how to serve wholesome 
food. The thing has become a necessity. 
She is interested in how to conduct a 
home and prepare food. Life, health and 
well-being are dependent on this much of 
practical knowledge. Indifferent, care- 
less ways of housekeeping are no longer 
in statu quo ante helium. What once 
seemed trivial has now become significant. 
The proper feeding of children, the sani- 
tary house, are matters of immediate 
prominence. In every age, food, shelter, 
clothing, are the first needs of people. 
Upon this, as a foundation, civilization is 
built. Once the knack of cookery was 
handed down from mother to daughter; 
now it is taught in the better class of 
schools. Domestic science, in its several 
departments, is regarded as worthy of the 
careful study of scientific experts. The 
subject has become of nation-wide im- 
portance. As especially concerned in the 
welfare and prosperity of home life, each 
issue of American Cookery is prepared 
for you. 

THE PUBLIC CONSUMER 

UNDER prevailing conditions the con- 
sumer, that is, the public, simply 
and almost involuntarily, has stopped 
activities and refused to carry on. He is 
awaiting readjustment of some sort, some 
standardization of prices. Is the price of 
coal to advance or decline ? Is the cost of 
leather to be lower than in pre-war days, 
and the price of shoe* to be whatever the 



dealer dares ask.f^ At present prices, 
nobody can buy or build a house unless 
he has been a profiteer. The distance 
between producer and consumer is too 
great, too uncertain. It gives rise to sus- 
picion, and a suspicion of this nature must 
be destroyed. Public confidence must 
be restored, that all may work together, 
harmoniously, for the common weal, 
the resumption of business and increased 
production in every craft and trade. 

A BUSINESS MAN IN EUROPE 

THE president of the National Cash 
Register Company is traveling in 
Europe, where he is making a study of 
business conditions. He recently cabled 
this laconic message to his fellow country- 
men: 

''The world's business is in trouble. 
Some nations cannot sell their surplus 
of agriculture, industries and minerals. 
Other nations greatly need them. Plenty 
of idle ships to carry them. Millions of 
people out of employment. 

''Nations are still spending money for 
war like drunken sailors. The world's 
business has no directing head. It needs 
an association of nations whose object is 
to do good to all the people, to stop war 
and fight with brains, not with bullets; 
to stop bolshevism, to extend inter- 
national credit, to prevent disease. Civ- 
ilization is at stake. Wake up, America, 
before it is too late." 

COME INTO THE KITCHEN 

IF you could go to a certain home in one 
of New York City's finest suburbs, you 
would find the cook and the maid to be 
two charming college girls, graduates of 
one of the state's foremost universities. 
Their present positions are not the result 
of a wager, nor are they seeking atmos- 
phere for a book. They have chosen 
housework as their vocation. 

After graduation they secured posi- 
tions as stenographers. For months they 
struggled along, trying to make ends 
meet, never having any fun, never having 
a cent left over to put in the bank, not 



32 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



even having enough money for a Vaca- 
tion. One day they saw an advertise- 
ment for a cook and a maid. They 
began to figure how much the positions 
would pay and found they could save 
nearly all they would make. Upon 
investigation they liked the place, took 
it, and today they are perfectly happy. 
They have all the comforts of a beautiful 
home, separate bedrooms and bath, a 
living-room in which to entertain their 
friends, the use of a library and of a 
motor car. 

''Would we go back?'* they ask. 
"Well, we should say notJ^ — Exchange. 

MILK MEANS HEALTH 

MILK is rich in vitamines, says Dr. 
M. J. Rosenau, professor of preven- 
tive medicine at Harvard. Furthermore, 
he says that milk is rich in calcium in a 
readily available form — children need 
five times as much calcium per pound of 
body weight as adults. 

"In order to supply this important salt 
to growing bones and developing teeth, 
as well as to furnishing vitamines for the 
utilization of food, a child should drink a 
quart of milk a day. It will not then 
sufl^er from a deficiency disease. 

"Our health, as well as power to utilize 
food, depends upon the daily intake of 
these vitamines. Life itself is threatened 
by deprivation of them for any length of 
time. Hence, the vitamine problem is 
of daily and universal interest to all 
persons." 

These statements corroborate those of 
other leading authorities in this country, 
and they explain, in part, some reasons 
for the wonderful results obtained from 
the use of more milk in the home. 

THE most urgent problem before the 
country today, excepting only im- 
migration, is the deflation of the tax- 
gatherer — Congress, State Legislature 
and City Council, There can be no final 
deflation of anything, no settled pros- 
perity, no return to the "normalcy" of 



which we have been hearing so much in 
political speeches, until this is accom- 
plished. But at present the thought of 
our legislators largely runs to changing 
methods of taxation and to tapping new 
sources of revenue instead of to cutting 
down expenditures. 

Taxation was once a fighting matter in 
America; there is even more reason for 
fighting today. The taxgatherer must 
be deflated; for no question is more inti- 
mately bound up with the liberty of a 
people than taxation. g. h. l. 

Leisure is time for doing something 
useful. This leisure the diligent man 
will obtain, but the lazy man never. A 
life of laziness and a life of leisure are two 
things. A man may, if he knows not how 
to save as he gets, keep his nose all his 
life to the grindstone and die not worth a 
groat at last. Benjamin Franklin. 

"I have no use for faith," said the 
man; "what I know I know!" Then he 
went out and bought some wildcat 
mining stock and a second-hand motor 
car! — Christian Life, 

FOURTH OF JULY SONG 

Left, right, left, right! 

When my country calls 
I shall leave my work and play, 

DofF my overalls. 
Left, right, left, right! 

Without a sigh or groan 
I'll take my gun and face the foe, 

America, my own! 

Left, right, left, right, * 

I will march along! 
Left, right, left, right. 

Every step a song! 
In heat or cold, in snow or rain. 

Enduring without end, 
I'll give my brain and brawn to you, 

America, my friend! 

Left, right, left, right! 

Even when there's peace; 
Left, right, left, right, 

My zeal shall never cease. 
The spade shall be my right hand man, 

The hoe shall be my brother. 
Just put your confidence in ME, 

America, my mother! 

— Helen Cole Crew. 











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CLEAR CHICKEN SOUP 



Seasonable-and-Tested Recipes 

By Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 

TN ALL recipes where flour is used, unless otherwise stated, the flour is measured after sifting 

once. Where flour is measured by cups, the cup is filled with a spoon, and a level cupful is 

meant. A tablespoonful or a teaspoonful of any designated material is a LEVEL spoonful. In flour 

mixtures where yeast is called for, use bread flour; in all other flour mixtures, use cake or pastry flour. 



Chicken-and-Lettuce Soup 



CHOP three good-sized heads of 
lettuce and cook in a covered 
saucepan with one-half a cup of 
butter for five minutes after the lettuce 
is hot throughout. Sift over this six 
tabiespoonfuls of flour, and stir over the 
fire for five minutes longer. Add three 
pints of chicken stock, stir until it boils, 
then let simmer for thirty minutes, keep- 
ing saucepan closely covered, and making 
up the quantity if there is much evapora- 
tion of the liquid. Season shortly before 
serving, and strain into a tureen. Deco- 
rate with spoonfuls of whipped cream, 
and serve with bread sticks. 

Clear Chicken Soup 

Reduce chicken (not fowl) stock by 
boiling until it is of the consistency to 
become jelly when cold. Remove fat. 
Reheat; add a few bits of chives, cubes of 



cooked white chicken meat, slices of car- 
rots, peas and string beans (all cooked). 
Let boil five minutes and serve. 

Sorrel Bouillon, Cold 

Chop a heaping cup of fresh sorrel, two 
or three button onions, a little parsley, 
and a small bunch of beet greens, and 




POTATO-FLOUR MUFFINS 



33 



34 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



cook very slowly in water to cover until 
quite tender. Strain off liquid, press out 
juice from greens, and add one quart of 
good bouillon. Season to taste, and 
serve in cups with a thin slice of lemon in 
each cup and one or two fresh sorrel 
leaves. This soup may be served hot 
if desired, in this case the liquid from the 
sorrel, etc., should be added to the hot 
bouillon, and the two allowed to boil up 
together. 

Potato-Flour Muffins 

(Marshall Field's Tea Room) 
Beat the whites of four eggs very stiff; 
beat the yolks of four eggs quite thick, 



place on fish plank; let cook fifteen 
minutes in a hot oven; remove plank 
from oven. Have ready in pastry bag 
one pint of Duchesse potatoes; pipe 
around edge of plank; brush edges of 
potR,to with beaten yolk of egg, diluted 
one -half with cold water. Return to 
hot oven to brown potato. Just before 
serving add fresh green peas and garnish 
with lemon. 

Duchesse Potato 

To a pint of hot riced potatoes add two 
tablespoonfuls of butter, half a teaspoon- 
ful of salt, the beaten yolks of two eggs 
and enough hot milk to let the mixture 




Pi.A;\KKI) SALMOX Sl^EAKS 



then beat in half a teaspoonful of salt, and 
one tablespoonful of sugar and fold into 
the whites; sift on half a cup of potato 
flour and half a teaspoonful of baking 
powder, that have been sifted together 
twice, and fold the two mixtures to- 
gether; laLtly, fold in two tablespoonfuls 
of ICE water. Bake in hot, well- 
greased muffin tins, in a moderate oven, 
twenty to thirty minutes. These muffins 
are particularly tender and delicate. 

Planked Salmon Steaks 

In a well-oiled broiler, over a clear fire, 
broil two salmon steaks five minutes, 
turning^ once. Remove from broiler. 



pass through a pastry-bag with tube 

attached. 

a' 

Fish Fried in Spanish Sauce 

Heat in a spider one cup of olive oil 
with one-fourth a cup of vinegar and a 
teaspoonful of salt, stirring all together. 
Pound through cheesecloth one clove of 
garlic and two red-pepper pods in a little 
water on an agate plate, and add the 
liquid extract to the oil, etc., over the 
fire. When the whole is very hot drop 
in smelts, trout, or any other small fish, 
or larger fish, cut into steaks, and fry 
until cooked. Fish of not especially rich 
flesh and of not pronounced flavor are 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



35 




SALMON' SALAD 



rendered piquant ana delicious by this 
method. 

Capon a la Creme 

Truss and roast a large capon; let cool, 
and remove the breasts. Chop these 
fine, and mix with an equal amount of 
fine bread crumbs, moistened in hot milk. 
Add seasoning of one-half a cup of melted 
butter, one-half a cup of fine-chopped 
cold, cooked ham, one tablespoonful of 
onion pulp, one teaspoonful of chopped 
parsley, two sliced mushrooms, and one 
or two hard-cooked eggs, chopped. 
Divide the mixture into two parts; use 
one part to re-form the breasts; add to 
the other part enough boiled and mashed 



sweet potatoes, or a mixture of white 
potatoes and boiled and sifted chestnuts, 
to make enough to stuff the body of the 
capon. Brush over the breasts with 
melted butter, set under a gas flame until 
these are browned, then place the capon 
in a covered casserole with a little water 
or stock and cook until reheated through. 



Sal 



mon 



Salad 



Cook two pounds of salmon two min- 
utes in rapidly boiling water, seasoned 
with one-fourth a cup of vinegar, one 
tablespoonful of salt, one slice of onion, 
one slice of carrot and one teaspoonful of 
whole mixed spices. Remove to heat 
that reduces the water to simmering. 





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ASTOR HOUSE SALAD 



36 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



After cooking In this way forty minutes 
drain salmon with a silver knife and fork; 
break (not cut) into large pieces and set 
aside to chill. In a salad bowl mix one 
teaspoonful of salt, one-eighth a teaspoon- 
ful of pepper, three tablespoonfuls of 
vinegar, two tablespoonfuls of olive oil, 
and a teaspoonful of chopped parsley; 
add the salmon and mix very carefully; 
arrange on lettuce leaves; garnish with 
stoned olives, a tablespoonful of capers, 
and two hard-cooked eggs, cut In slices. 

Astor House Salad, Fruit and Cheese 

Arrange In a nest of heart leaves of 
crisp lettuce six large strawberries, the 



with two tablespoonfuls of sugar until 
well blended, and stir this Into a mixture 
of one-fourth a cup of water and one- 
fourth a cup of vinegar, heated to boiling 
point. Cook, stirring constantly, until 
sauce has boiled for ten minutes, keeping 
up the quantity of water if necessary. 
Pour this over hot, cooked, young beets 
and serve at once. Any other vegetables 
may be served In the same way. 

Meat Cakes, Maison Duval 

Take one pound of chopped round 
steak, and form into six cakes one inch 
thick. Make a depression In the center 
of each, and cook on a hot pan In butter 




TOM \ I 01 s SURPRISE 



pulp of one-half an orange, cut In sections, 
and two tablespoonfuls of pineapple 
cubes. Make a dressing by mixing with 
one-fourth a cup of salad oil two table- 
spoonfuls of lemon juice, a little salt, a 
speck of paprika, and when well blended 
add two tablespoonfuls of grated Par- 
mesan cheese. Beat all together, and 
pour over salad before serving. 

This makes an individual portion; the 
ingredients can be multiplied by the 
number to be served. 

Beets with Sour Sauce 
(Agra Dolce) 

]Mix two tablespoonfuls of cornstarch 



to which onion juice has been added. 
Remove to a hot dish, and fill the centers 
with grated onion pulp, four over and 
around the meat cakes a sauce made by 
sifting one quart can of tomatoes, cooking 
down until thick, after adding salt to 
taste, and four sweet green peppers, 
cored and steamed until soft, then cut 
Into shreds. Arrange a wreath of fine- 
chopped green cabbage around the platter 
before serving. 

Tomatoes Surprise 

Peek omatoes. Remove thin slice from 
top of each and take out seeds and some 
of the pulp. Sprinkle with salt, turn 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



39 




LITTLE CHOCOLATE CAKES WITH ICINH 



with a wooden mallet. Let stand an 
hour, place over fire, and heat slowly 
until sugar is melted. Continue cooking 
until the mixture boils, and the fruits have 
all risen to the surface. Now dip out the 
fruits with a small strainer and put into 
small glasses as marmalade, and con- 
tinue cooking the syrup until it jells; 
pour into glasses and seal. 

Italian Tutti-Frutti Ice 

Choose several kinds of fruits, such as 
oranges, plums, strawberries, raspberries, 
cubes of watermelon — • as great a variety 
as you please, removing the stones from 
plums, apricots, etc., and using only the 
pulp and grated rind of the oranges. 
Weigh, and allow an equal weight of 
sugar. Make alternate layers of fruit 
and sugar in a deep bowl or jar, being 
sure to have a sugar layer on top, and let 
stand overniglit. In the morning heat 
almost, but not quite, to boiling, to make 
sure the su2:ar is all dissolved and the 
fruit juices ha-.-c come out, then let cool, 
and when almost cold put into the 



freezer and freeze as for any ice. This is 
the genuine Italian tutti-frutti. 

Little Chocolate Cakes en Surprise 

Sift together one cup and a half of 
flour, three-fourths a cup of sugar and 
one teaspoonful of soda. Add one cup 
of thick sour milk, one square and one- 
half of melted, unsweetened chocolate, 
one tablespoonful of melted shortening 
and one-half a teaspoonful of vanilla 
extract. Beat until smooth. Then bake 
in small muffin or biscuit pans for about 
twenty minutes. Remove from tins and 
with the point of a sharp steel knife cut 
out a circular piece in each cake; discard 
the soft part and save the crusty disc. 
Fill the cavities with whipped cream, re- 
place the disc of crust and cover with 
chocolate icing. 

Chocolate Icing for Little Choco- 
late Cakes 

Melt two squares of unsweetened 
chocolate, and two tablcspoonfuls of 
butter with tw^o tablcspoonfuls of hot 




AFTERNOON-TEA BtSCUlT (For recipe see May number) 



40 



AMERICAN COOKERY 







Hmi. 



A DISH OF STRAWBERRIES 

water. Stir until well blended, then add 
sufficient confectioners' sugar to make a 
smooth icing. A few drops of vanilla 
extract may be added if desired. 

Madison's Whim 
(Old Southern Cake Recipe) 

Cream three-fourths a pound of butter 
with one and one-half pounds of sugar; 
add the beaten yolks of six eggs, then the 
stiff-beaten whites, alternately^ with one 
aad three-fourths pounds of pastry flour, 
sifted with one-half of one grated nutmeg 
and one teaspoonful of ground cloves. 
Lastly, add carefully and a little at a 
time one pint of rich milk, or milk enough 
to make a stiff batter. When this is 
smooth and light, add one pound of white 
Sultana raisins, chopped or cut in pieces 
and lightly dredged with flour. This 



cake should be baked in a large pan, not 
more than three inches deep, half-filled 
with the batter. 

Heart Cakes for Engagement 
Luncheons 

Cream one-half a cup of shortening; 
add one-half a cup of sugar, the grated 
rind of one orange and four egg-yolks, 
beaten very light. Sift together one cup 
of flour, one tablespoonful of cornstarch 
and one teaspoonful of baking powder. 
Add this mixture to the butter mixture, 
alternately, with the whites of four eggs 
beaten dry. Bake in a heart-shaped 
cake pan about thirty-five minutes. 
Cover with a boiled frosting and decorate 
with hearts of fondant or hearts and 
arrows cut from red candied pineapple. 

Conserve of Beets 

Carefully peel one dozen small beets 
and cook in two or three cups of water 
20 minutes, or until beets can be pierced 
with a wooden toothpick. Skim, and 
add four pounds of sugar, the juice of six 
lemons and the grated yellow rind of 
four, one dozen cloves and four inches of 
stick cinnamon, tied up in thin cheese- 
cloth, and boil for one hour. Remove 
spice, skim out beets into sterile jars, boil 
syrup until thick and pour over. Seal 
as for any preserve. This makes a 
delicious conserve, and a spoonful of the 




HEART CAKES FOR ENGAGEMENT LUNCHEONS 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



41 



juice gives a lovely color to ice creams, 
whipped cream, jellies, sherbet, mayon- 
naise, or cake icings. 

Cold Process Currant Jelly 
(A French Recipe) 

Pick the currants when just ripe, or a 
little under-ripe; remove from stalks, 
and crush them in a large bowl until the 
juice flows, being careful not to crush the 
seeds. Put ' juice and fruit into jelly 
bags, and let drip; at the last the bags may 
be gently squeezed. Weigh the juice, 
and allow two pounds of sugar to every 
pound (or pint) of juice. Stir until all 
the sugar is dissolved. Cover the sweet- 
ened juice, and set in the refrigerator for 
twenty-four hours, frequently stirring 
during this period. Then pour into jelly 
glasses, set in hot sunshine for two or 
three days; cover, and store in ice-house 
or refrigerator until mid-winter, when the 
jelly should be fit to use and will be 
found very superior. 

Pineapple Pie 

In the top of a double boiler, scald one 
can of grated pineapple; sift together 
three tablespoonfuls of flour, three table- 
spoonfuls of cornstarch, one-half a tea- 
spoonful of salt and one cup of sugar; 
add this mixture to the hot pineapple 
and stir constantly until the mixture 
thickens; cover and let cook about fifteen 
minutes; then beat in one tablespoonful 
of butter and the grated rind and juice of 
half a lemon. Line a pie plate with 
pastry; fill with the pineapple mixture, 
which has been slightly cooled; set strips 
of pastry over the filling in lattice fashion. 
Dredge with sugar, and bake to a golden 
brown. 

Fresh Cocoanut Cakes 

Drain the milk from one large, fresh 
cocoanut; break the shell, remove the 



meat, and grate fine in the nut-grinder. 
Measure the milk; add an equal quan- 
tity of water, and cook with two cups of 
sugar until a ropy syrup is formed. Pour 
this into a bowl; add the whites of three 
eggs, beaten with one cup of sugar as for 
a meringue and mixed with the grated 
cocoanut. These should be added grad- 
ually, beating all the time, and the syrup 
should be hot enough partly to cook the 
whites of egg. If the batter is too thin, 
a very little flour and sugar sifted to- 
gether in equal parts may be added. 
Drop by spoonfuls on buttered paper, 
and bake until firm. They are better if 
not allowed to brown. 

Martello Creams 

Soak one package of gelatine in one 
cup of milk until the gelatine has absorbed 
the milk. This takes much longer than 
when water is used. When fully hydrated 
dissolve in three cups of hot milk, and, 
when the gelatine is completely liquefied, 
add one cup and one-half of sugar. 
Place over fire until the milk is very hot, 
and then beat in three well-beaten egg- 
yolks, removing from fire, but continuing 
to beat until mixture coats th,e spoon. 
Set away to cool, and meantime whip 
stiff one pint of cream, and in a separate 
bowl the whites of the three eggs. When 
the gelatine begins to harden round the 
edges, whip into it, a little at a time and 
alternately, the whipped cream and the 
beaten whites, adding by degrees the 
juice of a large lemon. Arrange in the 
bottom of two or three cylindrical moulds 
a circle of candied cherries; add enough 
of the gelatine mixture to keep them in 
place, and when nearly firm fill the moulds 
with the remainder of the mixture, to 
which one-half a pound of candied fruit 
of any kind, chopped fine, has been beaten 
in. Unmould when formed, and eat 
with chocolate sauce or melted fruit jelly. 




Seasonable Menus for Week in June 



Breakfast 

Strawberries, au Naturel 

Broiled Calf's Liver and Bacon 

Potatoes Hashed in Milk Rye Muffins 

Coffee 



Dinner 

Mock Turtle Soup 

Riced Potatoes Filet of Veal Currant Jelly 

Creamed Bermuda Onions Fresh Peas 

Romaine Salad 

Cafe Parfait French Pastry 

Half Cups of Coffee 



Luncheon 

Welsh Rabbit Sandwiches 

Fresh Pineapple Cookies 

Tea 



Breakfast 

Grape Juice 

Boiled Rice, Cream 

French Omelet with Peas 

Dry Toast Glazed Currant Buns 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Cream-of-Asparagus Soup 

Olive-and-Cream Cheese Sandwiches 

Strawberry Tarts 

Tea 

Dinner 

Cold Roast Beef, Sliced 
Hashed Brown Potatoes, Asparagus on Toast 

Lettuce Salad 

Vanilla Ice Cream Crushed Pineapple 

Wafers Coffee 



Breakfast 

Stewed Prunes 

Gluten Grits, Top Milk 

Salt Codfish, Creamed 

Baked Potatoes Corn Meal Muffins 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Spinach-and-Lima Bean Salad 
Pulled Bread Cocoa 

Dinner 

Veal (reheated in gravy) 

Mashed Potato Spaghetti, Tomato Sauce 

Rhubarb-and-Raisin Sauce 

Baked Indian Pudding 

Coffee 



Quaker Oats 
Shirred Eggs 



Breakfast 

Strawberries 



Coffee 



Cream 

Spider Corn Cake 



Luncheon 

Consomme 

Strawberry Shortcake 

Cocoa or Tea 



Dinner 

Hungarian Goulash Corn Fritters 

Lettuce-and-Peppergrass Salad 

Rhubarb-and-Pineapple Tart 

Half Cups of Coffee 



Breakfast 

Orange Juice 

Cream of Wheat 

Minced Veal on Toast 



Waffles 



Coffee 



Maple Syrup 



Luncheen 

Lettuce-and-Egg Salad 

Baking Powder Biscuit 

Charlotte Russe 

Tea 

Dinner 

Prime Ribs of Beef, Roasted 

New Potatoes New Beets, buttered 

Endive Salad 

Apricot Sherbet Sponge Drops 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Salt Codfish Balls, Cucumbers 

Popovers 

Doughnuts Coffee 

Luncheon 

Lobster Salad 
Graham Bread 4 
Lady Fingers Tea 

Dinner 

Boiled Salmon, Lobster Sauce 

Green Peas Boiled Potatoes 

Water Cress Salad 

Rhubarb Sherbet j 

Half Cups of Coffee 



Breakfast 

Creamed Salmon au Gratin 
TSTiite Hashed Potatoes 

Pickled Beets 

Yeast'Rolls (reheated) 

Coffee 



Luncheon 

Corn Chowder 

Toasted Crackers 

Prune Pie 

Tea 

42 



Dinner 

Cannelon of Beef 

Macaroni 

with Tomato-and-Cheese 

Lettuee-and-Green Mustard Salad 

Cream Cakes 

with Sugared Strawberries 

Coffee 



Menus for Occasions in June 

LUNCHEONS 
I 

Choice Strawberries with Hulls Retained 

Cream-of-Green Pea Soup, Bread Sticks 

Radishes ' Olives 

Halibut Timbales Shrimp Sauce 

Light Colored Beets, Stuffed with Chopped Cucumbers 

Chicken en Cassarole, Asparagus, Hollandaise Sauce 

Rice Croquettes, Pineapple Sauce 

Sultana Roll, Crushed Strawberry Sauce 

Little Cakes, Fondant Frosting Coffee 

n 

Strawberries or Red Raspberries 

Clam Broth, Whipped Cream 

Creamed Lobster in Timbale Cases 

Little Filets of Beef, Stuffed 

Fried Bananas, Brown Mushroom Sauce 

Parker House Rolls 

Lettuce-and-Asparagus Salad 

Graham Bread-and-Cream Cheese Sandwiches 

Vanilla Ice Cream Molded with Strawberry Sherbet 

Little Cakes 

Coffee 

CLASS SPREAD 
I 

Fresh Salmon-and-Lettuce Salad 

Cold Chicken, Sliced Thin Olives 

Bread-and-Butter Sandwiches 

Salad Rolls, Buttered 

Vanilla-Strawberry-and-Chocolate Ice Cream 

(Served in Cups) 

II 

Chicken Salad (chicken, nuts, cucumbers) 

Bread-and-Butter Sandwiches 

Tiny Cream Cakes, Whipped Cream Filling 

Chocolate Frappe, Strawberry Ice Cream 

III 

Sardine-and-Egg Sandwiches 

Deviled Ham Sandwiches 

Pickles Olives 

Assorted Cake 

Strawberry Cup (Lemon Sherbet with Sugared Strawberries) 

WEDDING RECEPTION 
I 

Lobster Salad 

Chicken. Sweetbread-and-Cucumber Salad 

Salad Rolls (buttered) 

Lettuce Sandwiches 

Pineapple Sherbet 

Strawberry Bombe Glace 

Angel Cake Sponge Cake Macaroons 

Iced Tea with Pineapple Juice 

11 

Jellied Chicken Broth In Cups 

Cold Mousse of Chicken with Lettuce, French Dressing 

Bread-and-Butter Sandwiches 

Raspberry Ice Cream 

White Fruit Cake Sunshine Cake 

Lemonade with Grape Juice 



43 



Seasonable Menus for Week in July 



Breakfast 

Blueberries 

Eggs Poached in Cream on Toast 

Graham Muffins Coffee 

Dinner 

Broiled Spring Chickens 

Delmonico Potatoes String Beans 

Rice Croquettes, Currant Jelly Sauce 

Tomato-and-Lettuce Salad 

Raspberry Sherbet Angel Cake 

Half Cups of Coffee 

Luncheon 

Creamed Asparagus on Toast 

Boston Cream Pie 

Tea 



Breakfast 

Grapefruit 

Lamb, Potato-and-Pepper Hash 

Potato Flour Muffins Doughnuts 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Asparagus on Toast, Poached Eggs 

Rye Biscuit (yeast) Berries 

Jumbles Tea 

Dinner 

Stuffed Leg of Lamb, Roasted 

Franconia Potatoes Swiss Chard as Greens 

Peas Sliced Tomatoes 

Cottage Pudding, Raspberry Hard Sauce 

Half Cups of Coffee 



Breakfast 

Orange Juice 

Minced Chicken on Toast 

Fried Rice Maple Syrup 

Coffee 



Luncheon 

Cold Boiled Tongue 
Blueberries Crackers 

Tea 



Potato Salad 
Milk 



Dinner 

Broiled Mutton Chops 

Scalloped Potatoes 

Stuffed Tomatoes Summer Squash 

Cucumbers, French Dressing 

Blueberry Pie, Cream Cheese 

Half Cups of Coffee 



Breakfast 

Raspberries 

Broiled Ham (thin sliced) Baked Potatoes 

Poached Eggs Toast 

Coffee 



Luncheon 

Creamed Crab Flakes on Toast 

Bread Crumb Griddle Cakes, Syrup 

Tea 



Dinner 

Lamb reheated with Macaroni and Tomato 

French Fried Potatoes Spinach 

Vanilla Ice Cream, Hot Chocolate Sauce 

Little Cakes Coffee 



Breakfast 

Sliced Pineapple 

Quaker Oats, Top Milk 

Eggs Scrambled with Dried Beef 

Toast Coffee 



Luncheon 

Lamb Stew, Dumplings 
Nut Cake, Caramel Frosting Tea 

Dinner 

Lobster Soup 

Veal Cutlets, Tomato Sauce 

Potato Croquettes 

Hot Raspberry Shortcake 

Half Cups of Coffee 



Breakfast 

Blueberries 

Cream of Wheat, Top Milk 

Goldenrod Eggs Toast 

Waffles Maple Syrup 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Fresh Fish Chowder 

Cabbage Sala^ 

Stewed Blueberries Orange Cookies 

Tea 

Dinner 

Tomato Soup 

Baked Fish, Stuffed Riced Potatoes 

Cucumbers Summer Squash Peas 

Hot Rice Raisin Pudding, Cream 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Orange Juice 

Gluten Grits, Cream 

Eggs Cooked in Shell 

Corn Muffins 

Fried Mush, Syrup Coffee 



Luncheon 

Salmon Salad 

Parker House Rolls 

Tapioca Cream Cocoa 

44 



Dinner 

Broiled Tenderloin Steak 

Creamed Potato 

Horseradish Sauce 

Buttered Beets 

Lettuce-and-Tomato Salad 

Butterscotch Pie 

Half Cups of Coffee 




Conservation in Food and Fuel 

By F. M. Christianson 



EVERY housewife and every one 
whose duty it is to cook should 
know the beef cuts of an animal in detail. 
Such knowledge will not only provide 
better meats for the table, but it will 
prove economical as well. The cheaper 
cuts of meat provide just as much nutri- 
ment as dearer ones, provided the cook 
knows how to prepare them. 

Take that part of the beef, for example, 
that is known as the Brisket. It is of 
fine texture, the fibres lying close together, 
hence it requires long cooking, but it is 
good eating. Suppose you bought a 
four-pound chunk, then you can easily 
cut off a pound of pure lean meat, which 
may be put through the meat-cutter, 
mixed with egg as a binder, formed into 
pats and fried for flavor in a little meat 
dripping for dinner one day. 

The fat, at least half a cup, can be tried 
out to use for other frying and still you 
have enough of the brisket left for a 
boiled dinner for another day. And yet 
the meat need not cost more than 
7S cents. 

Two small veal shanks have great pos- 
sibilities and a soup made of them is in a 
class by itself. I had veal shanks from 
the same butcher for years, when one day 
he told me he never had veal shanks now. 
"Oh!" I said, with as much surprise as I 
could muster. "Do calves not have 
shanks any more.?" 

"Yes, but we cut the meat off the 
shanks now and that brings many times 
over what the shanks did." 

But that was only one butcher. I can 
always get veal shanks when I want them. 



Put the shanks in a pot of cold water 
and bring slowly to a boil; skim the pot 
as required. After it reaches boiling 
point keep the liquid gently rippling or, 
as the Continental Woman puts it, keep 
the soup-pot smiling, but never laughing. 
When the meat has been simmering for 
about an hour, add potatoes, carrots, 
onions, a stalk of celery, and cabbage, 
shredded fine, a spoonful of peas or a 
helping of tomato left over from the day 
before. Flavor with salt and pepper and 
a sprig of chopped parsley; a dozen 
raisins or three or four good, fat prunes 
put in with the carrots will improve the 
soup. A half cup of barley or rice may 
also be put in, if you choose. 

Cook slowly till done; serve piping hot 
in hot plates. The labor of cooking is 
very small and may be attended to in the 
course of other duties about the house. 
About 5 cents' worth of gas will be 
required to do the cooking. 

The soup-pot should be of iron and it 
should never be covered tight. Too 
intense heat ruins the flavor of both meat 
and vegetables. It is quite possible, 
after the pot boils, to keep it simmering 
on less than 2 feet of gas the hour. In 
other words more fuel is needed to fry, 
say, beef or pork chops for ten minutes 
than is needed to simmer meat for some 
three hours. 

When simmering, use a front burner 
and then by having the tea kettle on the 
back burner, just opposite, you will get 
enough heat from that to heat water in 
the tea kettle with which to replenish the 
water in the soup-pot, lost by boiling. 



45 



46 



AMERIC VN COOKERY 



When your meal is over, turn the ?t)up 
from the iron pot into a good crock and 
when it is cool, it may be set 'n th^Mce 
box, or in some cool place .nd used 
another day. 

Note, too, in case you need a k ctle of 
hot water in a hurry. Do not till the 
kettle with water and set over l\ . flame. 
This is sheer waste of time d gas. 
But try this way: put a dipf :r full of 
water in the tea kettle; when it is near 
boiling, add another and so on till the 
kettle is full. You'll have a kf ,leful of 
boiling water in less than half ae time 
required by the first m hod. 

The iron pot is be soup-making 

and pot-roasting. It "^o apply 

dry heat and so brov * or fowl, 

increasing the flavo. ang to its 

appearance. And app. ance often helps 
the appetite just as savory odors do, 
when these make the mouth water, in 
anticipation. 

The sickly, white, consumptive-looking 
meat and fowl and sauce, which should 
be a rich brown, that is so often served, 
is not appetizing, to say the least, and 
we can say with Dickens that, "A poor- 
ness of blood flowed from that table." 



For thickening gravy, potato flour^ 
cornstarch or wheat flour may be used. 
If cornstarch is used, take as much as you 
think will be needed to thicken the 
amount of gravy you have; place it in a 
cup and add a little cold water, to dis- 
solve it, and stir it into the gravy. If 
the gravy is then too thick, you can dilute 
it with a little hot water or with a little 
good cold coffee. A chef I know does 
this and it gives an extra fine flavor to his 
gravy. 

Long, slow cooking is the way with all 
the cheaper cuts of fresh meat and 
corned beef. 

The food value of meat is larger than 
that of vegetables; the former provides 
protein or tissue-building material, thus 
meat seems essential in the diet of all 
persons whose labor calls for the expendi- 
ture of muscular energy. Besides under- 
fed or poorly nourished folk fall an easy 
prey to disorders, which healthy people 
escape. 

Seneca, the Roman -philosopher, came 
to the conclusion that, "Man does not 
die, he kills himself." This might be 
said with reference to present-day reck- 
lessness in eating and drinking. 



Salads and Salad Dressings 

By J. J. O'Connell 



SALADS furnish endless ways for the 
use of left-overs. The housekeeper 
may almost always find in her ice box 
remnants of left-overs of cooked fish, meat 
and vegetables which are waiting for the 
cri^p green, the dressing and the deft 
fingers. The secret of a salad is all in the' 
dressing. French and mayonnaise dress- 
ings are most commonly used on salads, 
but for those who never enjoy olive oil, 
boiled dressings have been concocted. An 
ordinary French dressing is very easily and 
quickly made. Mix three-fourths a tea- 
spoonful of salt, one-fourth kteaspoonful 



of pepper, two tablespoonfuls of vinegar 
and four tablespoonfuls of olive oil, and 
stir until well blended. 

Parisian Dressing — Mix one-half a cup 
of olive oil, five tablespoonfuls of vinegar, 
one-half a tablespoonful of powdered 
sugar, one tablespoonful of fine-chopped 
Bermuda onion, two tablespoonfuls of 
fine-chopped parsley, one teaspoonful of 
salt, four red peppers and eight green 
peppers. Cover and let stand one hour. 
Then stir or shake vigorously for five 
minutes. The red and green peppers are 
the small ones found in the pepper sauce 



SALADS AND SAU D DRESSINGS 



that may be bought at the grocery. 

Boiled Salad Dressing — ■ Mix one-half 
a tablespoonful of salt, one-half a table- 
spoonful of mustard, three-fourths a 
tablespoonful of sugar, one &gg^ slightly 
beaten, two and one-half tablespoonfuls 
of melted butter and three-fourths a cup 
of thin cream. When thoroughly blended 
add very slowly one-fourth a cup of 
vinegar. Cook in a double boiler, stirring 
constantly until the mixture thickens 
slightly, then strain and cool. 

Brunswick Salad — • One and one-half 
cups of fine-cut celery, one cup of nut 
meats, broken in pieces, and one cup of 
shredded cabbage, mixed and moistened 
with boiled dressing. Serve in salad bowl 
made of a small, firm, white cabbage. 

Lenox Salad — Remove the skins and 
seeds from white grapes. Add an equal 
quantity of English walnut meats, broken 
in pieces. Mix with French dressing and 
arrange on lettuce leaves. 

Lyman Salad — • Select long, green pep- 
pers, cut in halves, lengthwise, remove 
the seeds and fill with grapefruit-pulp, 
celery and apple, fine-cut, and pecan nut 
meats, broken in pieces, using half as 
much, each, of celery and apple as of 
grapefruit and allowing three nut meats 
to each case. Arrange on lettuce leaves 
and cover with mayonnaise dressing. 

Tomato Ciboulets — • Tomatoes from 
which the skins have been removed, cut 
in slices and sprinkled with fine-chopped 
fresh tarragon, are delicious when simply 
served with a French dressing. 

Stuffed Tomato Salad — • Peel six small 
tomatoes, cut a slice from the stem end 
of each, remove the soft inside, sprinkle 
the insides with salt and let stand, in- 
verted, thirty minutes. Mash half a ten 
cent cream cheese, add six chopped 
pimolas, one tablespoonful of fine-chopped 
parsley, one tablespoonful of tomato pulp, 
one-fourth a teaspoonful of dry mustard 
and enough French dressing to moisten. 
Pill the tomato cases with the mixture 
and serve on lettuce leaves with mayon- 
naise dressing. 

Tomatoes Stuffed with Pineapple — 



F'c re medium-sized tomatoes ^e a 

tl" n slice from the top of eaci and take 
ou . the. seeds and some of he pulp, 
sprinkl^y mside with salt and invert and 
let s md in a cold place thirty minutes. 
Fila . ases with pineapple, cut in small 
cubes or shredded, and nut meats broken 
in snojU pieces, using two-thirds pine- 
apple;, ;^nd one-third nut meats mixed 
with mayonnaise dressing. Arrange on 
lettuce leaves and garnish with mayon- 
naise, halves of nut meats and slices cut 
from , c tops, cut square. 

Drej.ed lettuce, chicory, romaine or 
endive make a-;Yery popular salad course 
at dinners, s^ i^d, with wafers, cheese 
straws, sandwc 'jj s- or cheese balls. 

Berkshire fe*?^', — Mix two cups of 
cold riced po^ , e? and one cup of pecan 
nut meats bro-.^^a in pieces. Mix with a 
French dressing, arrange in a mound on a 
bed of watercress and garnish with halves 
of pecan nut meats. 

Oak Hill Salad — Cut cold boiled 
potatoes in half-inch cubes. There should 
be two cups; add one-half cup of fine- 
cut celery and a medium-sized apple, 
pared, cut in eighths and eighths cut in 
thin slices. Mix with French dressing, 
arrange in a mound and garnish with celery 
tips and sections of a bright red apple. 

Egg Salad — Cut hard-boiled eggs in 
halves, lengthwise, remove the yolks and 
rub to a paste; add an equal quantity of 
sardines, freed from skins and bones, and 
moisten with a small quantity of mayon- 
naise dressing; arrange the mixture in a 
mound on a bed of lettuce. Place the 
little center tuft of lettuce at the top of 
the mound and at the base arrange the 
whites of the eggs, filled with mayon- 
naise dressing. 

Washington Salad — Wash four me- 
dium-sized beets and cut into small 
pieces; place in a stew pan with one 
tablespoonful of chopped onion, one 
tablespoonful of chopped red or green 
pepper, three tablespoonfuls of sugar, one 
saltspoonful of salt, one bay leaf, four 
cloves and three peppercorns. Pour over 
all^one pint of cold water and^let cook 



48 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



slowly until the beets are tender; then 
add one-half a cup of lemon juice. Soak 
one large tablespoonful of granulated 
gelatine in a little cold water ten minutes. 



then strain the hot mixture over it. 
Blend thoroughly and strain again. Turn 
into individual moulds and set on ice 
until firm. Serve on ribboned lettuce. 



Keep Cool in Summer, and Keep Well, by 
Using Cooling Drinks and Desserts 

By Mary Mason Wright 



WHEN the hot weather comes there 
is a demand for cooling drinks, 
and frozen desserts, even the fruit sherbets 
and sorbets are very acceptable, although 
they are not much more than frozen 
drinks; yet with the addition of egg- 
whites, nut-meats and conserves or whole 
fruit, they are not only delightful to the 
palate, but are nourishing, and suited to 
the needs of the s)^stem during hot 
weather. 



B 

1 pint whole milk 

2 eggs 

2 oranges 
2 cups sugar 



anana ^ream 



Ci 



1 pint cream 

1 pint banana pulp 

I lemon 

1 teaspoonful vanilla 



Just bring the milk to the boil, then 
stir in the well-beaten eggs, add the sugar 
and cook until smooth; then let cool and 
add the vanilla. Add the cream and 
pour into the freezer and partly freeze; 
then stir in the banana pulp, and the 
fruit juices and complete freezing. Serve 
in glasses with balls of banana rolled in 
lemon juice, and then in powdered sugar. 



Orange Cream 



I cup rice 
4 oranges 
1 pint cream 



1 quart whole milk 

2 cups sugar 

i teaspoonful salt 



Place the milk and the rice and salt in 
a double-boiler and cook until tender; 
let simmer a little of the grated rind 
of the oranges in this; then add the 
sugar and cook a little while longer. 
Pass through sieve. Cool, and then 
turn into a freezer, and when it has 
commenced to freeze stir in the whipped 



cream, and the orange pulp, and finish 
freezing. A good orange cream is also 
made without the rice. Use two eggs to 
a pint of milk and one of cream. Scald 
the milk, and pour over the well-beaten 
eggs, and stir over the fire until smooth; 
then add the sugar to taste, and cool. 
Pour into a freezer and partly freeze, stir 
in the whipped cream and the juice and 
pulp of the oranges. Complete freezing. 

Melon Cream 

1 pint melon pulp I 1 quart whipped 

1 teaspoonful vanilla | cream 
§ cup powdered sugar 

Choose small nutmeg melons that are 

fine-flavored, and after removing the 

seeds and membranes remove all the 

pulp that can be removed, cutting it up 

in small pieces, and pass through sieve. 

Flavor the whipped cream with the 

vanilla, and sweeten to taste with the 

powdered sugar; then fold into the 

melon pulp. Freeze until stiff and serve 

with glace oranges, or a half cup of 

orange or pineapple juica may be added 

to the melon pulp. 

Pineapple-Mint Sherbet 

1 pint chopped pine- 2 cups sugar 
apple 3 lemons 

8 mint leaves 5 cups boiling water 

2 egg-whites 1 tablespoonful gela- 

tine 

Place the mint leaves and the thin rind 
of the lemons in a cup or two of the water, 
and let simmer for about twenty minutes, 
then strain. Stir the gelatine dissolved 
in a fourth cup of water. Add the sugar 
and the remaining water and let boil to 
a syrup; add the lemon juice and let 



COOLING DRINKS AND DESSERTS 



49 



cool; then add the mint and pour into 
freezer and freeze to a mushy consistency; 
then stir in the pineapple pulp, and com- 
plete freezing. 

Caramel Ice Cream 



3 cups heavy cream 
2 whole eggs 
% cup caramelized sugar 
I teaspoonful salt 



3 cups milk 

1 tablespoonful 

vanilla 
1 cup light brown 

sugar 



Scald the milk in a double-boiler; beat 
sugar and eggs together until light; add 
to the scalded milk and stir until the 
mixture thickens; add salt. While still 
warm add the caramelized sugar, brown 
the sugar, but be careful not to let it 
burn, and one-fourth a cup of boiling water. 
Turn into a freezer and partly freeze; 
then stir in the whipped cream, and com- 
plete freezing. Pack down in salt and 
ice and allow to stand a few hours before 
serving. A few fine-chopped nut meats 
improve this cream 

Grape Ice Cream 

1 pint heavy cream 1 pint top milk 

1 cup grape juice 1 cup sugar 

1 tablespoonful gela- 
tine 

Scald the milk, adding just a pinch of 
salt and the sugar; then stir in the gela- 
tine, dissolved in a little cold water. Let 
cool, freeze, partly, and stir in the grape 
juice and the whipped cream. Freeze, 
and pack down in salt and ice and let 
stand one or two hours. 



Cocoa Ice 



1 pint water 

1 cup heavy cream 

1 teaspoonful vanilla 



1 pint milk 
6 tablespoonfuls cocoa 
(level) 
6 tablespoonfuls sugar 

Mix the cocoa and sugar; add a little 

of the water and mix to a paste, then add 

the remainder of the water. Bring to the 

boiling point and let boil two or three 

minutes; add the milk and bring to the 

boiling point again. Remove from the 

fire, and let cool. Flavor with the 

vanilla. Pour into a freezer and freeze 

to a mushy consistency; then stir in the 

cream, whipped stiff and sweetened with 



a little powdered sugar. This is nice 
served with maple-nut sauce. By using 
shaved ice with this instead of freezing 
it in a freezer you have a delicious iced 
cocoa. Top with the whipped cream. 

Orange-and-Peach Sherbet 



1 quart peach pulp 

1 pound sugar 

2 egg-whites 



2 cups strained orange 

juice 
1 pint water 



Boil the water and sugar together for 
about twenty minutes, then let cool. 
Add the peach pulp, using nice, ripe, 
uncooked peaches that will mash fine, 
and the orange juice, and pour into 
freezer and freeze to a mushy consistency, 
then stir in the whipped egg-whites and 
continue freezing by packing down in 
ice and salt, but do not stir any more. 

Maple-Nut Mousse 



1 cup maple syrup 
1 tablespoonful gela- 
tine 



1 pint heavy cream 
1 cup chopped nut 

meats 
Plain ice cream 

Place the maple syrup in a double 

boiler and heat, then stir in the gelatine 

that has been dissolved in a little cold 

water; then add the chopped nut-meats, 

and fold in the cream, whipped until 

light. Line a mould with plain ice cream, 

and fill the center with this mousse, cover 

tightly and pack down in ice and salt for 

two or three hours. Dip the mould in hot 

water, turn out on cold platter and slice 

down. This is fine with chocolate ice 

cream, also; line the mould with the 

chocolate cream instead of the plain ice 

cream. 

Frozen Fig Pudding 



1 pound good figs 
1 pint heavy cream 

1 cup sugar 

2 eggs 

Wash the prunes 



1 quart good milk 

1 lemon 

1 pint water 

and let soak in the 



water overnight; add the sugar and let 
simmer slowly until the figs are tender, 
then remove and when cool cut up into 
bits. Place the milk in a double boiler 
and add the beaten eggs and cook until 
smooth, stirring constantly. Let cool 



50 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



and freeze partly, then stir in the figs and 
the whipped cream. Pack down in salt 
and ice. Add sugar to the custard cream 
to taste before freezing. 

Melon Lily with Ice Cream Center 

Small, fine-flavored cantaloups or muskmelon 
Ice cream 

Halve the melons, remove the seeds 



and the membranes, and cut into about 
ten sections. Arrange on plate in the 
form of lily petals, and place in the center 
a small, round or C3ne-shaped mould of 
ice cream, using either a coffee or choco- 
late ice cream, or use a plain vanilla ice 
cream, grate a little chocolate over it. 
Select melons with a yellow or deep 
orange flesh. 



New Potatoes Out of Season 

By Ann K. Robinson 



I WAS paring old potatoes, hateful 
task, when Jane descended upon me, 
crisp and cool in her newest apron. "My! 
what thick skins you have, Grand- 
mother," she mocked in true Red Riding- 
hood style. Now, I am grandmother to 
no one, least of all to this particular person, 
who is barely ten years my junior, so I 
knew she was referring disdainfully to my 
old-time methods. Jane has her eyes 
open, so for that matter have I, yet from 
force of necessity one of mine is turned in 
the direction of Son, and while the other 
is a perfectly good, wide-awake eye, too 
much cannot be expected of it. Jane's 
eyes, on the other hand, work in double 
harness and what they don't see simply 
is not worth looking at. 

With a "show-me" air I handed the 
knife to her, gleefully hoping she would 
demonstrate her latest wrinkle while I 
fried the steak. No such luck for mine, 
for she laid it down and picked up the 
vegetable brush; with a vengeance she 
gave each potato the scrubbing of its life 
and then a plunge in the hot water, while 
I vainly protested that I was going to 
mash them. "Well, you may when the 
proper time comes," she promised, as she 
clapped on the lid. When they were 
about half done she drained, peeled and 
quartered them and returned them to the 
pot- and poured on fresh hot water. In 



ten minutes, explaining solemnly that the 
proper time was upon us, she drained 
them again and before I knew it, she had 
them fluffed up, a snow-white mass that 
was considerably larger than it would 
have been had a good percentage re- 
mained on the raw skins. 

"The time between operations can be 
extended indefinitely," she explained, 
kindly. "I often partly boil mine Saturday 
afternoon, then peel and return them to 
hot water for a second boiling when I 
come home from church. 

"And I know something else about 
potatoes," she volunteered, with the 
pardonable pride of two months' expe- 
rience. 

"I learned this by accident: To save 
time I sometimes pare potatoes for 
dinner while I am doing up the mornmg 
work, and I noticed that after standing 
in cold water all day they seemed fresher. 
So I extended the experiment one Sunday 
by paring them Saturday afternoon. I - 
changed the water at bed time and again 
the first thing m the mornmg and we had 
'new' potatoes for dinner Sunday. 
Truly, they were new ones for old ones, 
like the lamp the wicked magician 
wanted to trade for Aladdin's," she 
laughed, and I took off my hat to Jane 
with her two months' experience in 
housekeeping. 




Home Ideas 

anci 

Eyconotnies 




Contributions to this dapartmant will be gladly received. Accepted items will be 
paid for at reasonable rates. 



Making a Lawn 

MANY things have to be taken into 
account in the making of a lawn. 
Among them are the kind of soil, the 
grass seed or sod used, the amount of sun 
or shade on it, moisture in the soil, 
drainage and, not least, the care given it 
when once started. 

If it is to be started from the beginning, 
the soil must be spaded and turned to a 
depth of a foot or nearly so. The earth 
must be worked until soft and free of 
clods, stones and all sticks. If some 
fertilizer or manure is used, it must be 
worked into the soil evenly and when the 
ground is smooth and level it is ready for 
the seed. 

Great care must be used to get the best; 
even if it does cost a little more it will be 
cheapest in the long run, for poor grass 
seed will have to be replaced many times. 
A mixture of grass seed is best. Ken- 
tucky blue grass is usually satisfactory 
for most lawns. If the lawn is much 
shaded, then it is best to get the special 
grass seed which grows in the shade, as 
there is such a grass. 

When soil and seed are both ready the 
sowing should take place when it is not 
windy and the hand should scatter it 
close to the ground, so that it will not 
blow away. It should be sowed both 
ways across the lawn to insure evenness in 
growth, first sowing east and west, then 
north and south or vice versa. If the 
ground is very dry, it is best to roll it 
after the seeding and then use a gentle 
spray over it evenly. Where sod is used 



instead of grass seed the soil is prepared 
as if for seed and, when the squares of 
sod are placed, they should be pounded or 
pressed well down and together, and if 
some light earth is sprinkled over the sod 
all the better. If exposed -to a hot sun 
it must have plenty of moisture, else it will 
wither and die before taking root. 

After the grass has come up a couple 
of inches it should be mowed that its 
strength may go into the spreading in- 
stead of height. 

As to the arrangement of shrubs or 
vines, or trees and flowers, with regard 
to the lawn; where these are placed has 
much to do with the appearance of the 
house and lawn or grounds. 

The lawn itself should be kept as much 
as possible an unbroken space. This 
increases its size in appearance and makes 
it easier to care for. Where shrubs, etc., 
are used they should be planted along the 
outer edges or sides of the lawn, as a 
border. In this way they can be worked 
about without disturbing the grass of the 
lawn. Nothing, in my opinion, so mars a 
lawn or yard as the digging up of the 
choicest spots of it for flower beds or 
bushes, which would grow just as well or 
better on its edges or sides forming a 
border of color to its green center. 

Many bushes and flowers can be chosen 
for this border. Among them are honey- 
suckle, bridal wreath, hollyhocks, ver- 
benas, geraniums, sweet peas and nas- 
turtiums, not to mention the old-fash- 
ioned garden flowers and rose bushes. 

When the lawn is made and the flowers 
bloom and the vines vine, the whole will 



51 



52 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



not yet be a success unless the lawn mower 
is used frequently and the hose does its 
share to keep all of this verdure fresh 
and moist. If all these are done, the 
lawn will not only be a success but a con- 
tinued delight to the eye and the heart. 
* * * 

About Washing Dishes 

DISHWASHING is a disagreeable 
sequel to cooking. Whether we 
call it a thankless job, a bugbear or a 
nuisance, or whether we simply accept it 
as part of the day's work, it must be done 
but, fortunately, there are time and 
temper saving methods of doing it. 

In the first place is your sink the right 
height to save you from round shoulders 
and a backache.? If, when you stand 
erect, close to the sink, your finger tips 
touch the bottom of the sink, it is high 
enough. If not, you can get the same 
results by raising your dish pan. I find 
that a granite hand basin turned upside 
down raises my dish pan the desired 
number of inches. You might find it 
easier to make a stand out of a wooden 
box, or a small wooden footstool, with the 
legs cut the proper height, would give 
the same result. 

When you serve your meals it takes but 
a moment to fill the empty pots and pans 
with water, and it saves time and energy 
when washing them. Remembering to 
rinse or soak your greasy dishes first with 
hot water, and dishes that have had egg, 
milk or pasty foods in them first with 
cold water, is a practical point. 

When dishes are scraped and piled 
together in order, they never seem 
many. But do you realize that putting 
the dirty dishes on the right-hand side 
of your dish pan and the drainer for the 
clean ones on the left, saves time and 
energy? It is reasonable enough, for you 
naturally pick up a dish with your right 
hand, put it into the water, hold it in your 
left hand when washing it and with the 
least number of movements take it out 
with that same hand to put it in the 
drainer close by. Conservation of motion 



means saving of energy. Watch your- 
self the next time you wash dishes and 
try this arrangement of dishes, pan and 
drainer, if you have not before. In the 
same way the cleared place for the dry 
dishes should be on the left of the drainer. 

On the whole, dish wiping is unneces- 
sary and unsanitary. Rinsing with hot 
water dries china better than a towel, 
leaving only glasses and silverware to be 
hand wiped. If wiped before they be- 
come cold and half dry there will be no 
streaks to polish away. 

In a mission school in New York City 
I watched what was called a "Kitchen 
Garden Class" at work. Thirty small 
Italian girls, in white caps and aprons, 
went through the motions of a day's 
housework with toys while they sang of 
what they were doing. They swept, 
dusted, made beds, set a table and 
washed dishes. The game of dishwashing 
called for the most corrections from the 
teacher. She watched closely, as they 
scraped their toy dishes, arranged the 
pan and cloth and drainer and, suiting 
action to words, sang: 

"First the glasses, then the silver, then 
the cups and saucers clean," etc. 

It required accuracy and attention for 
those children to play the game well and 
we who wash real dishes three times a day 
can make tedious dishwashing another 
minor test of the efficiency of our every- 
day housekeeping methods. e. m. h. 

* * * 
A Chance to Kedp Young 

IT is not only the brides of a few weeks 
or months who have much to learn in 
the way of household science; it applies 
as well to wives and housekeepers of sev- 
eral years' standing, even though they 
have mastered the rudiments of house- 
keeping and homemaking. But in order 
to keep on learning we must keep out of 
ruts, to follow which is just what we 
are prone to do. For instance, we serve 
the same things in the same manner, 
and cooked in the same way, that we 
learned years ago, with never a thought of 



HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES 



53 



changing. We do our housework in the 
same routine and by the same methods 
as those we first became accustomed to. 
But this is not as it should be. No matter 
how old one lives to be, one can never 
master all knowledge, or even knowledge 
in one particular line. There is always 
something more for the searching mind 
and hand. There are new methods, new 
tools, new lines, to study. By being 
constantly on the lookout for any, or all, 
of these things, we keep our minds alert, 
forget that we are leaving youth behind 
us, because we are looking forward 
instead of backward. This makes us 
much more interesting to our friends and 
neighbors, and altogether, we find life 
much more enjoyable than when we plod 
along in the same old ruts, year after year. 
Just try keeping up-to-date in child 
training and education, in cooking, can- 
ning, gardening, entertaining, sewing and 
fancy work, in house decoration; yes, even 
in your recreations, such as reading, mo- 
toring, politics, etc., and you will gain 
much from life that you would, otherwise, 
miss. It is the full life that is the happy 
one. D. F. c. 

* * * 

The Best Time Ever 

MEN and boys, when asked this ques- 
tion, will invariably tell about some 
hunting or camping trip, or possibly a 
boy scout jaunt. It will at least be a 
story of time spent in the open. 

Girls are not so unanimous, about 50 
per cent of them will tell of some wonder- 
ful ball or party, and the others will recall 
a hike or marshmallow bake. In many 
instances it will be the event when Prince 
Charming arrived. 

The spirit of the great out-of-doors is 
taking a firmer hold on women every 
year. This may come through the activi- 
ties of college life, or it may be a result of 
the broadened outlook of women of today. 
At any rate, the "best time ever" for the 
majority of people was when formalities 
were cast aside and folks -could be real. 
Campfires, mountains and open spaces 



seem to bring men closer together and 
closer to God. Business men crave these 
trips, and wise doctors prescribe them 
frequently. 

Camping out may be made so luxurious 
that we miss the really big part of it. 
Sleeping under the sky with plenty of 
blankets is a sensation . indescribable. 
Old Sol will be your "Big Ben," with an 
alarm that is not intermittent; and a day 
that begins at dawn usually means an 
early bedtime. 

Such a sleep makes one capable of sur- 
prising endurance and gives an enormous 
appetite. What a breakfast you eat — 
you, who had been dieting on zwieback 
and orange juice, consume bacon, eggs, 
biscuits, coffee, coffee and more cofi'ee. 

Oh! Girls who work in busy offices and 
in crowded shops, don't spend your 
vacation in the dirty city. Get out in the 
open. If you have no friends who are 
going, join a campers' club or a Y. W. 
C. A. Camp, or get in touch with one of 
the many companies who arrange camp- 
ing parties and furnish guides. 

Get a hiking suit and take plenty of 
warm clothes. Forget your cold shower 
and ostermoor and rouge. Nature will 
provide a mountain stream, a bed of pine 
boughs and permanent "pink de cheek." 

s. H. Y. 
* * * 

New Turnips and Green Peas 

PEEL eight or ten new turnips of 
medium size and boil till tender in 
salted water. Have a pint of green 
sweet peas, shelled. Cook these in 
salted water in a saucepan. When done 
add one-half a cup of milk and a generous 
lump of butter and flavor with a dash of 
pepper. Mix a little cornstarch in water 
and add to peas to thicken. 

Place the boiled turnips in a warm, 
deep dish and pour the prepared green 
peas over them. This is a dish you will 
have often, once you try it. 

Fried Apples 

Peel good eating apples. Core, quarter 



54 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



and cut each quarter into fours. Have 
ready an iron frying pan with a little beef 
dripping in it. Put the apples in and 
fry a rich brown. Serve hot as a garnish 
to your beefsteak. 

When strawberries or raspberries come 
to the table we find it an advantage to 
hull and wash and place in large glass 
dishes, enough for both dinner and 
supper, at the same time. Thus pre- 
pared, the dishes of fruit are set in the 
ice box and further ripening is arrested. 
About half an hour before serving time 
they are taken from the ice box and 
sugar is added; they are not too cool to 
eat comfortably, and all the flavor is 
retained. 

F. M. c. 

* * * 

Delicate Whipped Cream Pie 

One whole egg, beaten. Mix two 
tablespoonfuls of flour and three table- 
spoonfuls of sugar and add to the egg 
mixture, then stir in gradually four table- 
spoonfuls of milk. Cook over hot water 
until thick; add one-half a teaspoonful of 
vanilla and set aside to get cold, after 
which fold in one cup of cream, whipped, 
and pour into a baked crust. May be 
garnished with whipped cream. 

F. V. D. 

* * * 



Coffee Cream 



1 pint top milk 

1 cup sugar 

3 pints thin cream 



^ cup ground coffee 
2 eggs 
Pinch of salt 



Tie the coffee in a muslin bag and place 
in the milk to soak for two oi three hours, 
then very gradually bring to the boil. 
Remove the coffee bag, add the sugar 
and when this is dissolved remove from 
the fire and stir in the beaten eggs, and 
cook in a double boiler until smooth and 
thick. Add the salt. Let this mixture 
cool and then add the cream, and pour 
into the freezer and freeze as you would 
plain cream. If you do not care for such 
a strong coffee flavor, use less coffee. 

M. M. w. 



Savory Filling 

Spread rye rounds very light with liver 
sausage to which pepper, salt, a grated 
onion, and enough French dressing to 
make a spreading paste have been added. 

Rice Sandwiches 

Take a cup of fresh-boiled rice and add 
to it a generous lump of butter, salt, a 
little honey and a little whipped cream. 
Add six salted Brazil nuts chopped fine 
and a tablespoonful of rose jelly. Mix 
well and spread thin on rye diamonds. 

J. Y. N. 
* * * 

How I Peddled Green Peas 

OUR circle of fifteen had each pledged 
to raise five dollars for foreign mis- 
sions by doing something that would in 
no way interfere with the daily household 
or personal expenses. I had never done 
anything in the way of earning special 
money, and I puzzled over the "how" and 
the "what" more than I ever did my 
prayers. 

Of course I could ask "hubby" for the 
money and he would smilingly hand it 
over, as is the way with "hubbies." But 
that was not the idea. I was supposed 
to EARN that money, and my blood was 
stirred by the thought that some sacri- 
fice must accompany this earning. Pride, 
also, in achieving a desired end, and glory 
in doing creditably what some other 
member of the fifteen m4ght not do. A 
good deal of egotism and self-approbation 
entered into my resolution, to do or die. 

But how.? Came a neighbor one eve- 
ning, and in our talk my husband made a 
remark: "There's lots of money being 
made out of green peas this year." 
Stupid! I thought, why of course there 
is my chance all planned out; all I have 
to do is the actual work of picking the 
peas, carry them from house to house, get 
the money and come home happy. 
Funny I hadn't thought of that! 

We were suburbanites with a few acres 
which we rented to a truck gardener, 



HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES 



5S 



we taking half of all that was grown. 
The yield of Telephone peas, this sum- 
mer, was wonderful — far exceeding our 
expectations. We ate them three times 
a day; punished our neighbors and rela- 
tives the same way (not by eating them) 
and after the huckster had taken all he 
wanted, we still had peas. Seemed as if 
those vines stayed awake nights to see how 
many peas they could crowd into a pod. 

Early next morning we denuded the 
vines, and my share lay there, fat, green, 
and shiny — ■ enough for a regiment, I 
thought — • and ready for their great 
adventure in helping to Christianize the 
heathen. Carefully I sorted and packed 
them in quart boxes. 

"Now, shall I charge fifteen or tw^enty 
cents per.?" I queried. ''Well, seeing I am a 
green one at peddling, I guess fifteen will 
do." With all that I could cs-^v. though, 
I would be short my five dolk:.. "Never 
mind," I thought, "If folks like me and my 
wares, I'll start In on the carrot bed." 

Now, I might as well 'fess up. I 
dreaded that venture. Ringing door 
bells and soliciting strange people with 
cold, unfriendly eyes: People who 
looked you over, appraising you from 
head to toes, thinking you an impostor, 
a freak, or something that ought to be 
caged. It came to me how uncere- 
moniously I had treated just such ped- 
dlers who had tried to show their wares, 
and I had a fellow-feeling for those I had 
turned away, often unkindly, I am 
afraid. Anyway, I would not hide my 
peas, but frankly show at once my reason 
for ringing. . . . Ought I to go to the 
front, side, or back door.? What is it 
Oliver Wendell Holmes says about "side- 
door acquaintances".? Something not 
very complimentary, if I remember. 

It was hot and close. I almost prayed 
for a thunder storm to keep me home — 
until another time. ... I certainly 
must take a peep at the morning mail, 
and new magazine . . . and then 
on my way. . . 

On the cool and screened veranda I 
settled down for a moment. The quiet- 



ness and loveliness of a perfect summer 
day was too soothing, and I was soon 
asleep — • pulling door bells, and green 
peas, became a shadowless thing in no- 
man's-land. 

"Yes, yes, yes ... I m-u-s-t go to 
town with those peas — p-e-a-s" . . . 
kept ringing in my sleepy, half-awake- 
senses. . . . Who spoke.? Surely 
som.e one was moving around the veranda I 
Some one came near! A hot wind was on 
my face! A cool, wet, raspy something- 
was licking my hand! With a start to 
consciousness I turned in the porch swing. 
Good Lord! A big, black bear was calmly 
stretched on the floor by my side! I 
suppose fear will galvanize as well as 
paralyze, for I vaulted clear over the 
animal and out the screen door, fastening 
it on the outside. Evidently Bruin was 
sleepy also, for he (she) paid no attention 
to me. Nerveless, I picked up the morn- 
ing paper which was lying on the steps 
and began to fan myself. An item in 
big head-lines caught my eye: 

"TAME BEAR ESCAPES FROM 
JOHN BALL PARK LAST NIGHT. 
DON'T SHOOT HLM. 35.00 reward."" 

"Now, Mr. Bear, I've got you and you 
haven't got me." 

I knew all the coors were locked on the 
inside and was wondering how to get into 
the house to use the telephone when I 
heard a distant rumble and knew the 
huckster would soon be back. 

I could have kissed the hem of his 
garments when he jumped out of the old 
jitney. He was greatly excited when I 
told him my story and I could hardly 
persuade him to stand guard while I 
telephoned, he was so anxious to shoot, 
or kill Bruin with a pitch-fork. 

Truth compels me to say this old 
grandma bear followed her keepers away 
as meek as a lamb. When they paid my 
reward, one said: "Lor miss, she wouldn't 
hurt you if she played round here a 
month. She hasn't a tooth in herThead, 
we have to feed her pap." 

Need I say we had green peas to give 
away again.? a. j. d. 



THIS department is for the benefit and free use of our subscribers. Questions relating to recipes, 
and those pertaining to culinary science and domestic economics in general, will be cheerfully 
answered by the editor. Communications for this department must reach us before the first of the 
month preceding that in which the answers are expected to appear. In letters requesting answers 
by mail, please enclose address and stamped envelope. Address queries to Janet M. Hill, Editor. 
American Cookery, 221 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass. 



Query No. 4217 — "How much Vinegar 
should be added to the fat in frying doughnuts? 
Should Salad Forks be used if the salad is served 
with the luncheon or dinner? Is there a sub- 
stitute for the brandy used in soaking the fruit 
for fruit cake, and how may such a cake be kept 
for three or four months?" 

How Much Vinegar to Use with 
Fat in Frying Doughnuts 

THE best rule we know is to add the 
vinegar until there is a slight, but 
perceptible, odor. It should be 
added as soon as the fat is melted, but 
not very hot; then when the fat is hot 
enough to fry in, the odor of vinegar 
should be perceived, or, if lacking, some 
more vinegar should be carefully added. 
Try one-fourth a cup to a kettle of fat. 



Should Forks Always Be 
with Salad? 



Used 



Yes, even though the salad is not 
served as a separate course, but accom- 
panies the main dish of the dinner or 
luncheon, it is preferable to serve a 
separate small fork for this dish. 

Substitute for Brandy in Keeping 
Cake 

Cider or lemon juice may be used to 
soak the fruit; the use of molasses 
instead of sugar, black coffee instead of 
milk, butter instead of a butter-substi- 
tute, and abundance of fruit, will all tend 
to keep a cake fresh for several months. 
It is also said that to ice the cake imme- 
diately on taking from the oven, or to 



pack it away buried in granulated sugar, 
or to keep several apples or raw potatoes 
in the cake box, or even an uncovered glass 
or bowl of water, will preserve the cake 
from drying out. It is not yet estab- 
lished without a doubt whether any of 
the above methods are effective in keep- 
ing the cake from growing moldy on the 
inside. 



Query No. 4218 — "Why do my Rosettes 
lose their crispness, and grow soft and soggy with 
the fat they are cooked in?" 

To Keep Rosettes Crisp 

Rosettes ought to be fried in a fat 
that is hard when cooled, and not in oil, 
butter, lard, or a fat that is sensitive 
to changes in temperature. Neither 
should one of the soft fats be used in 
making them. Salt should not be used 
in mixing the batter. Care should be 
taken that they are cooked exactly right, 
and neither too much nor too little. 



Query No. 4219 — "Will you kindly publish 
a list of Acid-Forming and also of Alkali-Forming 
foods.? I wish a recipe for a nourishing Raisin 
Bread, made with entire wheat and plenty of 
raisins." 

Acid- and Alkali-Forming Foods 

You will find these in American 
Cookery for March, page 588. We may 
add to this that the acid found in prunes, 
plums, and cranberries is benzoic acid, 
which is unaltered in the body, hence 
tends to acidity of the blood. Also, 
while milk is an alkali-producer, its 



56 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



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saves V2 ^^ work 



Here's a new way of canning 
fruit, berries and vegetables. 
A new, safe, economical and 
more successful way, which 
every woman should know. 
The results are remarkably 
delicious. The canned fruit, 
berries afid vegetables have 
the "fresh-from-the-garden" 
look and taste. 
NOTE — -You do it in your 
gas oven equipped with the 
"Lorain'' Oven Heat Regulator. 
It is as siviple as baking 
potatoes. 

Oven Canning Is so 
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Prepare the material by 
washing. Blanch if the recipe 
calls for it. Then fill the 
glass jars, put in the oven, 
set the "Lorain" wheel at 
250 degrees. Then forget it 



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No fuss, no bother, no hang- 
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Unbelievably Easy 

No apparatus to buy. A 
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hardly believe it, till you 
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One man writes us that last 
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200 quarts of fruit. And it 
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He just followed instructions. 
So can you. 



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58 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



derivatives, such as cheese and cream, 
form acid. 

Wholewheat Raisin Bread 

Sift three pints of wholewheat flour 
with two teaspoonfuls of salt, and 
stir into a quart of milk, water, or half- 
milk and half-water, to which one-half a 
cup of brown sugar or molasses has been 
added, and one-half a compressed 
yeast cake. The batter should be as 
thick as a cake batter, but not thicker, 
hence it may be that a little more milk 
or water will be needed. Beat until 
smooth, and let rise overnight. Stir 
down in the morning, and fill it into 
greased bread pans until half-full. Let 
rise until mixture fills the pans, and bake 
for an. hour. These quantities should 
make two good-sized loaves. Before 
putting into the pans, add to the batter 
one pound of seeded raisins. This batter 
bread is easier. to make than the whole- 
wheat bread, which i s kneaded and for 
which general rules will be found on page 
218 of the October number of American 
Cookery. 



Query No. 4220. — "Aly Doughnuts form a 
thick crust in frying; what will prevent this? 
Why does Bread that rises overnight in a sat- 
isfactory manner often take three hours to rise 
in pans before it is ready to bake?" 

. Thin-Crust Doughnuts 

The more egg used in making dough- 
nuts the thinner the crust ought to be, 
other things being equal. Less baking 
powder or other leaven, resulting in less 
porosity, will also tend to make a close, 
thin crust. 

Why Bread Is Slow to Rise in Pans 

Sometimes what is called the initial 
activity of the yeast is exhausted, and the 
last rising will be slow when the first was 
rapid. This is especially apt to be the 
case, when either liquid or compressed 
yeast is used, which is full of life and 
vigor from the start, and loses this first 
vigor in the second rising; while the 
dried yeast, being in a dormant condi- 



tion, is slow to wake up in the first rising,, 
and comes to its full vigor only in the 
second. Sometimes it is a matter of 
temperature; for a higher temperature 
is called for in the second rising. It may 
be, also, that you are expecting too much 
of your bread — • that its night-rising 
occupied eight to ten hours, and for the 
morning-rising three hours ought not to 
be thought a too large proportion. 

Query No. 4221. — "Will you give me some 
recipes for the use of fresh and canned Crab 
Meat?" 

Fresh Crabs, To Prepare 

After boiling, remove the stomach, 
which is situated back of the eyes; pick 
out the intestine, this is coiled up in the 
middle of the back; and pull off the soft 
fins from under the legs. Scrape out all 
the soft, white curd from the shell lining, 
and preserve the fat, which is dark green 
or black, and looks objectionable, but is 
very good. Then proceed according to 
any of the following recipes, which are 
equally suitable for canned crab meat. 

Crabs a la Poulette 

Measure two cups of crab meat, pref- 
erably in large pieces. Prepare the 
following sauce: Put into a bowl two 
eggs, one-half a cup of softened butter, 
two tablespoonfuls of vinegar, one tea- 
spoonful of salt, one-fourth a teaspoonful 
of pepper, and one-half a cup of boiling 
water. Set bowl in a saucepan of boiling 
water, and begin incAnediately to beat 
with a Dover beater, and keep up the 
beating until the sauce is thick. Add 
the crab meat at once, and serve in a hot 
dish. 

Crab Gumbo 

Brown in two tablespoonfuls of butter 
one small onion, chopped, and one green 
pepper. Add one slice of minced cooked 
ham, and turn the whole into a quart of 
white stock or fish broth, heated in a 
deep kettle. Add three tablespoonfuls of 
flour, blended with three tablespoonfuls 
of soft butter, and stir until the whole 



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59 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



boils. Add a pint of okra pods, sliced, 
and two sliced tomatoes, and, lastly, from 
one to two cups of crab meat. 

Crab-and-Tomato Toast 

Mix two cups of crab meat with one 
cup of stale sifted crumbs, three-fourths 
a cup of tomato pulp, the juice and part 
of the grated rind of one-half a lemon, 
one-half a cup of stock, with salt and pep- 
per to taste and a trace of cayenne. Let 
heat through, and add, if necessary, more 
water or stock to moisten. Serve on hot 
buttered toast, and garnish with cress. 



Query No. 4222. — "Will you please publish 
in American Cookery a recipe for Carrot Pie; 
also one for Baked White Beans with Tomato 
Sauce?" 

Carrot Pie 

Boil or steam the vegetable, and sift 
through a potato ricer or a colander. To 
two cups of the pulp add three-fourths a 
cup of sugar, or a mixture of sugar and 




molasses, or of molasses and corn syrup. 
Heat one cup of milk; add to it one- 
fourth a cup of very fine, stale crumbs, 
and stir together; add two tablespoon- 
fuls of shortening, one-half a teaspoonful 
of salt, and one teaspoonful of grated 
nutmeg. Beat this into the carrot pulp, 
then turn the whole into a pie-plate lined 
with pastry, and bake without an upper 
crust in a hot oven. If the mixture is 
very stiff, a little more milk may be added, 
this depends on the staleness of the 
crumbs. 

White Beans with Tomato Sauce 

Soak overnight a quart of white beans 
in either stock or water. In the morning 
cook in a covered saucepan^ letting 
simmer only, from three to five hours or 
until tender. Put them into a beanpot 
with one-half as much sifted tomato 
pulp as there are beans, a tablespoonful, 
each, of chopped celery and green pepper, 
and one small onion, sliced, also salt and 
pepper to taste. Bury in the beans a 
small cube of salt pork, cover the pot, 
and bake for a couple of hours, or until 
liquid is well absorbed. 

Query No. 4223. — ■ "Please print a recipe for 
Soft Gingerbread made with either sweet or sour 
milk; also one for Gluten Bread." 

Soft Gingerbread 

Heat one cup of molasses, and dissolve 
in this one cup of butter or a substitute, 
and one of sugar. Add one cup of sour 
milk or buttermilk, two teaspoonfuls of 
soda dissolved in a little hot water, three 
tablespoonfuls of ground ginger, and 
flour enough to make ^ thick batter. 
Two or three beaten eggs will improve 
this cake, yolks and whites, beaten 
separately, and added the last thing. 
Bake in two shallow pans, lined with 
greased paper, and in a slow oven. 

Gluten Bread ^ 

Blend one compressed yeast cake with 
a Uttle water, and stir into one cup of 
milk. Add one tablespoonful of sugar 
and one teaspoonful of salt, one cup of 
warm water, and a tablespoonful or two 



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- Do not accept substitutes 
60 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




The Beverage Question 

In that most hospitable corner of the ice-box devoted to summer beverages 
the resourceful housewife will have a variety of delightful and refreshing drinks 
all ready to serve at a minute's notice. 

There will be raspberry shrub, perhaps, old-fashioned but very delicious 
and refreshing; home canned grape juice for high-balls and punches, root beer 
with the tang of woods and fields; the pleasant acid of currants; the rich flavors 
of blackberry and elderberry. These are only a few of the ice-box treasures 
which may be prepared successfully at home. 

All of the beverages are much better when kept in glass jars sealed with 
GOOD LUCK rings. They keep fresh and are easily handled both at the time 
of preparation and at the time of serving. 

How pleasant to offer your guest a choice of these delightful, cooling drinks 
which require only to be poured on cracked ice and served. 

GOOD LUCK rubbers come packed with all new Alias E-Z Seal fruit jars 

Owing to our capacity of more than 5,000,000 GOOD LUCK Rubbers daily, we are able to announce the return ef 
the GOOD LUCK ring to the pre-war price of 10 cents per dozen without in any way affecting its high standard of 
quality. Order through your dealer, or, if he cannot supply you, send 10 cents for sample dozen. Send 2c. stamp 
for our new cook book on Cold Pack Canning. 

GOOD (§) liUCK 

RED JAR RINGS 

BOSTON WOVEN HOSE 65 RUBBER COMPANY 
n HAMPSHIRE STREET, CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 

The Largest Manufacturers of Rubber Rings 
in the World 




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61 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



"Choisa" 

Orange Pekoe 

Ceylon Tea 



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Pre-War 
Prices 

1-lb. Cartons, 60 cents 
J^-lb. Cartons, 35 cents 




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We invite comparison with any tea 
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S. S. PIERCE CO. 



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\yhich KILLS — Flies, Mosquitoes, 
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On the farm it kills Flies on Horses and Cattle, 
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Pleasant aromatic odor; harmless to fowl, 
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Pint Cans .75c Pint Sprayers 60c 

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For sale by 

DRUGGISTS, GROCERS AND DEPT. STORES 

Sawyer Crystal Blue Co., Aoents 

88 Broad Street, BosTOisr, Mass. 



You don't have to 



of lard. Mix all, and add gluten flour, 
enough to make a soft dough — ^ about 
three or four cups. Knead, and let rise, 
in a greased, covered bowl, in a warm 
place until double in bulk — it will take 
perhaps two hours — ■ then knead again, 
shape into loaves, put in pans and let 
double in bulk again. Bake in a moder- 
ate oven for an hour. This will make 
two small loaves or one large. 

Query No. 4224. — "Can you give me a 
recipe for an Ice Box Pudding? This is a pud- 
ding made of ladyfingers and melted chocolate. 
Also recipes for Sunshine and Angel Food Cakes? 
At what temperature should these cakes be 
baked?" 

We are not sure what you mean by the 
Ice Box Pudding. Perhaps it is a frozen 
chocolate pudding in a case made of lady- 
fingers. If so, here is a recipe for 

Chocolate Ice Cream in 
Ladyfinger Case 

Make a rich ice-cream mixture by cook- 
ing four well-beaten eggs in a pint of 
cream to the consistency of a soft custard. 
Sweeten this with two cups of sugar, 
cooked to a syrup with two ounces of 
grated chocolate and one cup of water. 
Cool, and beat in one pint of heavy cream 
whipped to a stiff froth. Freeze, and 
pack into a case of ladyfingers made as 
follows : 

Make a soft icing of powdered sugar 
and white of egg, and into this dip the 
sides of as many ladyfingers as are 
needed to surround a cylinder-shaped 
saucepan or bowl large enough to hold 
the ice cream. Lay the ladyfingers 
around the outside of this cylinder (very 
stiff cardboard would do), and bind them 
in place with a strip of cheesecloth or soft 
cloth of any kind. When the icing is 
quite hard, remove the cylinder care- 
fully, and fill the ring of ladyfingers with 
the ice cream. Garnish with fine-chopped 
nuts. 

If there is danger of the ladyfingers 
breaking apart before serving, a soft 
ribbon may be used to bind them, and 
will serve for a decoration. 

The cake recipes will be given in our 
next issue. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
62 



ADVERTISEMENTS 






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As there is published in the last number (May) of each volume a com- 
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AMERICAN COOKERY 



THE MOST EXCLUSIVE CLUBS, HOMES AND APART- 
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Built for homes, large and small, apartment buildings, hotels, 
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tachment, if specified. 

Send for Free Booklet 
"FOOD SAFETY" 

Contains valuable hints for arrangement of food in any 
refrigerator to secure the best results ; also other helpful 
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T^ood keeps BEST/72 the 

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The Silver Lining 

The Bond 

Most lovers can tell, if they will, how it 
happened — 

A vivid first glance, or the flash of an eye, 
A dimple, a curl, or the sharing of laughter, 

A gesture, a look, or a tone, or a sigh. 
But few of the memories cherished between them 

Are painfully sweet as the one I recall — 
When you were the bashfullest lad at the party 

And I was the shyest small girl of them all! 

Despairing I watched ihem, the bold and the 
haughty, 
The maids who could scoff and the maids who 
could scorn — 
The tall, gallant lads with an eye for the 
charmers — ■ 
And ah, how I wished I had never been born! 
My braids were as sleek as small fingers could 
make them; 
Your shoes were a light in the sheltering 
gloom — 
But — I was the shy little girl in the corner, 
And you — were the awkwardest boy in the 



I twisted my sash and we talked of the weathdr, 

Or talked not at all, and your sulking grew 

less — 

lou told me your hopes and you told me your 

hatreds, 

And Jew were the dreams that I didn't confess! 

And firm was the bond that was welded between 

us, 
i Though painfully welded of shame and 

despair — 
When you were the bashfullest lad at the party, 
And I was the shyest small girl who was there! 
Helen Cowles LeCron. 



A Sunday school teacher asked a small 
girl the other day why Ananias was so 
severely punished. The little one thought 
a minute, then answered, "Please, 
teacher, they weren't so used to lying in 
those days." — • London Post. 



"My Italian fruit-vender," writes a 
Boston subscriber, "is enthusiastic in his 
good-citizenship. The morning after elec- 
tion he said: 'T'em for'ners — we tol' 
'em sunthin' yest'day. Dey tink dey run 
our gov'ment. We tol' 'em where dey 
git off all right.' " Boston Transcript. 



Mark Twain told Redpath, the lyceum 
man, not to make engagements for 



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64 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



/^. /fikyi^/ h^ 



What is Your Favorite Dessert ? 

WHAT is your favorite gelatine dessert? Which of the one hundred desserts given in the Knox 
booklet "Dainty Desserts" is most popular in your home? I imagine it will be one of the 
four recipes given here, each so delicious it is hard to select the best one. 

Make them up for different luncheons or dinners — (only one package of Knox Gelatine is needed 
to make the entire four desserts, each one of which will serve six persons) — • and write me your vote 
so that I may present to the women of the land the nation's most popular Knox Gelatine dessert. 

I believe every woman will be interested in the result of this test which I will publish on this 
page. Here are the recipes: 

STRAWBERRY BAVARIAN CREAM 

3^2 envelope Knox Sparkling Gelatine 1 cup strawberry juice and pulp 1 tablespoonful lemon juice 

J4 cup cold water 1}^ cups heavy cream beaten until stiff J^ cup sugar 

Soak gelatine in cold water five minutes, anrl dissolve by standingcup containing mixture in hot water. Strain into 
strawberry juice mixed with lemon juice. Add sugar and when sugar is dissolved, set bowl containing mixture in pan pf 
ice water and stir until mixture begins to thicken; then fold in cream. Turn into wet mold lined with strawberries cut in 
halves, and chill. Garnish with fruit, selected strawberries, and leaves. Adelicious cream may also be made with canned 
strawberries. 



LEMON SPONGE OR SNOW PUDDING 



3^ envelope Knox Sparkling Gelatine 
J^ cup cold water 



% cup sugar Whites of two eggs 

14: cup lemon juice 1 cup boiling water 

Soak gelatine in cold water five minutes, dissolve in boiling water, add sugar, lemon juice and grated rind of one lemon, 

strain and set aside; occasionally stir mixture and when quite thick, beat with wire spoon or whisk, until frothy; add 

whites of eggs beaten stiff, and continue beating until stiff enough to hold its shape. Pile by spoonfuls on glass dish. Chill 

and serve with boiled custard. 



CHOCOLATE BLANCMANGE 



l^ teaspoonful vanilla 
Few grains salt 



3^ envelope Knox Sparkling Gelatine 1 ounce grated unsweetened chocolate or 

34 cup cold water 3 tablespoonfuls cocoa 

1 pint milk 3.2 cup sugar 

Soak gelatine in cold water five minutes. Scald milk and add sugar, chocolate or cocoa rubbed to a smooth paste 
with a little water and salt. When sugar is dissolved, add soaked gelatine, then add flavoring. Turn into mold, first 
dipped in cold water, and chill. Serve with whipped cream, sweetened and flavored with vanilla. 



RICE PARFAIT 



14, envelope Knox Sparkling Gelatine 
2 cups hot boiled rice 
13^ cups milk 



1 cup chopped nut meats 
1 teaspoonful vanilla 



1 cup cream 
1 cup sugar 
34 teaspoonful salt 

Soak gelatine in milk ten minutes and dissolve in hot rice. Add sugar and salt, and when cool, fold in cream beaten 
until stiff. Add nuts and flavoring. Turn into a mold, and pack in ice and salt. 

Send for ** Dainty Desserts" 
The Favorite Dessert Book 

There is only room here to give four of the one hundred delicious dessert recipes given in my 

book, "Dainty Desserts" — which also contains recipes for ice creams, sherbets, salads, candies, etc. 

Write for a free copy before sending in your family's vote on the nation's most popular dessert. 

You may find in it a dessert you like even better than any I have published here. Enclose 4 cents 

in stamps to cover postage and mention your 

grocer's name. 

Any domestic science teacher can have suflScient gelatine 
for her class, if she will write me on school stationery, stating 
quantity and when needed . 




'Wherever a recipe calls for Gelatine — it means KNOX' 
MRS. CHARLES B. KNOX 

KNOX GELATINE 



107 Knox Avenue 



Johnstow^n, N. Y. 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitute* 
65 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



M 




It Makes a Difference 

ALUMINUM is the Ideal mate- 
/-\ rial for kitchen utensils. But 
it does not follow that all 
aluminum utensils are equally good. 
Therefore you should not only de- 
mand aluminum, but WaGNER CAST 
Aluminum with the Wagner name 
cast in the bottom of every piece. 

In this way you will secure solid, 
seamless, one-piece castings, without 
seam or flaw. You will get the ad- 
vantage of the best materiaf in its 
most enduring and beautiful form. 
This will be equally true whether 
you buy a single piece or a complete 
kitchen outfit in an individual chest. 

Write for Illusirated Booklet. 

THE WAGNER MFG. COMPANY 
Dept. 74 Sidney, Ohio 




w^mMm^MmMFM. 



lectures in churches. "I never made a 
success of a lecture in a church yet," he 
wrote. "People are afraid to laugh in a 
church." Jesus, as you will remember, 
was a man who radiated happiness and 
joy. His neighbors liked to have him at 
weddings. Children liked to play with 
him. Why, then, all those gloomy 
churches.'' 



In a certain New England village there 
lives a doctor noted for his reckless auto- 
mobile driving. One day when he was 
summoned to the telephone a woman's 
voice inquired w^hether the doctor in- 
tended to drive that afternoon. 'T 
hardly think so," replied the physician. 
"But why do you ask.?" "Well," re- 
sumed the voice, "I want to send my little 
daughter downtow^n on an errand if you 
are not." — Harfer^s Magazine. 



A teacher in one of our public schools in 
Boston was asking the usual questions of 
the pupils at the beginning of the year. 
Antonia Gianelli was called. "You are 
an ItaUan .?" "No." "Why, your father 
is an Italian." "Yes." "Is your mother 
American.?" "No." And so she was 
told to bring her mother the next morning 
to have the matter settled. Next morning 
appeared Mrs. Gianelli, shawl over her 
head, Italian undoubtedly. Again the 
question, "Is Mr. Gianelli an Italian.?" 
"Yes." "And are you an Italian?" 
Again the answer, "Y^es." "Why, then 
Antonia must be an Italian." "No! No!" 
(with much emphasis). ''She Irish — 
she born in Boston!" . D. 



"Flyosan ' — The Insect Death Ga% 

"Used with a sprayer, forms a gas which 
kills Flies, Mosquitoes, Roaches, Moths > 
Fleas, Lice, Bedbugs, Spiders, Ants, 
Hornets, etc. 

"On the Farm — It kills Flies on Cattle, 
Lice and Fleas on Cats, Dogs, Chickens 
and Hogs. 

"It is Non-Poisonous and Non-Explo- 
sive, — ■ see advertisement." — Adv. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
66 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




Serve It With Desserts 

Use Carnation Milk just as you would use cream for puddings, 
desserts and coffee. You will find it more economical than 
cream and equally delicious. Just cows' milk, evaporated to the 
thickness of cream and sterilized in hermetically sealed containers, 
it is absolutely pure. Buy it from your grocer, and write today 
for the Carnation Cook Book which we will send you free. 



Carnation Milk 
658 Consumers Building, Chicago 



Products Company 

758 Stuart Building, Seattle 



Carnation 

"From Contented Cows" 



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Milk 



The label is red and white 



Carnation Milk Products Co 
Seattle Cliicago Aylirier, Ont. 



Cafe Mousse — Mix well together 2 cups of Carnation 
Milk, 3 tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar, 1 tablespoonful 
of vanilla, and K of a cup of very strong coffee; chill 
thoroughly, then whip. Set the bowl in a pan of ice watc r 
while whipping; take off the froth as it rises. Turn tlie 
drained whip carefully into a mould, cover tightly, binding 
the edges with a ptrip of mu«lin dipped in melted butter, 
bury in ice and salt for freezing. Let stand for 3 hours, 
wipe off mould, and turn on serving dish. ^ .^ 



Boiled Soft Custard— H cup Carnation jNlilk, \H cms 
water, yolks 3 egg-^, K cup sugar, plncli of salt, 1 ter.- 
spoonful vanilla. Heat Carnation Milk and water,, -Bent , 
eg-gs, sugar and salt. Add slowly to m'i Ik, flavor and cook 
In a double boiler unt'.l a coating forms on spoon. ■ ■ ' 

There are many other recipes ais good as these^iii 
_the Carnation Recipe Bo©k. Send for it. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
.67 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



A' PEOOTCIS y 



Sticky Fly Paper, StickyFlyRibbok 
Tr ee Tanglefoot. Roach -^-^Ant Powd er, 

TheO&W.Thum CcManufacturers. 
Grand Rapids. Mich. Walk£RVille,Caiwba. 



*The Art of Spending" 

TclU how to get more for your money --how to /»'pf i«j^r and 
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AM. SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS, 503a W, 69'h ST., CHICASO 




CAKE and MUFFIN TES TER 



Convenient, Sanitary and Hygienic 
Year's Supply for a Dime. Send lOc. (Stamps or Coin) to 

PERCY H. HOWARD 
2 Central Square Cambridge, Mass. 



Dehydrating Foods 

By A. LOUISE ANDREA 

"The Book of the Hour"— 

Spokane Spokesman-Review 

Absolute economy,- if nothing else, will 
cause the Dehydration of fruits, vegetables, 
fish and meats to become a regular house- 
hold duty, within the next few years. 

The process is simpler than canning, re- 
quires neither cans, jars — nor sugar. This, 
the first authoritative treatise on the subject 
of the practical conservation of food, is just 
out of the press. Postpaid ^1.85. 

The Comhill Publishing Company 
2A Park Street, Boston 



SALAD SECRETS 



100 recipes. . Brief but complete. ISc by mail. 100 Meat- 
kss^jecipes 15c _ 50 Sandwich redpes 15c. All three 30c 
L R. BRIGGS, 25(1 Madison St., Brooklyn. N.Y. 



A Dishwasher for $2.50! 

Keeps hands out of the water, no wiping of dishes, saves | the 
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Ant Sch«ol HMne EMMaiics, S03 W. 69th Street, Chicago 



Dinner For Ned 

Conc'.uded from page 2Q 

the care he was getting. Lucie regarded 
him with pride — her eager, active, clever 
Ned! 

On-.^ day, he burst Into the room with a 
paper ^n his hand. "Lucie," he cried, 
joyously, "I've got it!" 
"Got what.?" 

"This plan I've been working on for the 
last three montlis. And it's all to your 
credit!" 

"Why, what have I done.?" 
"Everything, sweetheart. You've 
shown me that If I'm not stuffing myself 
and thinking about my stomach all the 
time, I can work a lot better. And since 
you've been with me I haven't had a 
single ache or pain and I've been able to 
think! Old Potter says this is the best 
thing I've done. You're some little 
partner!" After he had swung her 
around the room his face grew serious. 
"I tell you, Lucie, all my life my stomach 
has been a receiver for things that *had 
to be eaten so they wouldn't go to waste' 
and for things I liked, but from now on 
I'm going to stick to what's good for me. 
You know I was just thinking our bodies 
are a good bit like stoves — • when the ■ 
fire is hot enough don't put in an extra : 
lump just becauso it happens to be in the ' 
bucket." 

"That's it exactly, Ned. You know I 
have to leave you Saturday and I want 
you to be sure to stay on the right road. 
So while you were *out I made out this 
little reminder." She handed him. a 
card neatly lettered which bore the 
following: 

"MR. NED" 
7.30 Breakfast 

Fruit, cereal, toast, or rolls, or 

muffins, coffee, or cocoa. \ 

12.30 Luncheon 

Cream soup, or fish, or cheese, or 
milk. Bread and butter, vegeta- 
ble, light dessert. 
6.30 Dinner 

Soup — meat, potato, or rice, or 
macaroni. Green vegetable,; 



Buy advertised Goodi — Do not accept substitutes 
68 



ADVERTISEMENTS 








"WILSON'S 

Meat Cookery" 

Free 

Our handsome cook 
book, each recipe 
prepared and tested 
by experts, telling 
how to buy and use 
meats economically, 
will be mailed you 
free on request. Ac - 
dress Dept. 64'', Wil 
son & Co., Chicago. 



Two CenU§led Delights 

for hot weather luncheons 

WILSON'S "square pressed" Cooked Ham is luscious in 
flavor — every whit of its goodness is saved for you 
because we cook it in vapor. Mildly sweet, tender, it certainly 
is tempting. One slice makes two sandwich fiUingsi Ready 
to serve, it appeals at once to the housewife who meets the 
daily problem of "What shall we have for luncheon or tea.'" 

Wilson's Certified Oil blends marvelously in a salad dressing, 
giving it the rich, nut flavor that marks the successfial 
creation. This pure vegetable oil is a favorite for cooking as 
well as for salad dressings; on -every can you will find a 
"money-back" guarantee of satisfaction. Ask your dealer for 
these products now and realize the excellence secured by the 
Wilson principles of selecting, handling and preparing each 
product with respect. 



"ThiAinaAk 



^ /A /7 



WILSON & GO 



i^owi ^uooontee' 



\j v 



o^& Ijj^JU&yx. -£a^€£ ^b4x>^£c£) ^<m/r -^5j^^ 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
69 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



r ^riE Mountain Refrigerators 

•'/''/f/r ) Built on scientific principles and 

tested by use 

"in over a million homes" 

Easy to clean — economical — 
durable and efficient. 
Sold in every ciiy and important 
town in the United States. Send for 
hatidsome catalogues and booklets. 

Maine Manufacturing Co. 

Nashua, N. H. Established 1874 

look for the name WHITE MOUNTAIN 



Cuts your ice bill 





Inches Square, 5 Inches High 

I can be the beat cake maker in your 
clnbortown. Yon can make the same Anprel Food 

Cake and many other kinds that I make and sel! at $3 a 

loaf-profit, $2, If you 

Learn the Osborn Cake Making' System 

My methods a-e different. They are the result of twenty years 

experience as a domestic science expert. My way if. easy to learn. 

It never fails. I have taught thousands, ^^t me 3end you fall 

particulars FREE. 

Mrs. Grace Osborn Dept. D 5 Bay City, Mich. 



RAPID 

\ Fireless Cooker 

Special Low Factory Price 

direct to you. Cooker is alumi- 
num lined throughout. Full 
set of famous "Wear Ever" 
aluminum cooking utensils 
comes with it. Ask for free 
Home Science Book. 
WM. CAiVIPBELL CO. 
Dept. 73 Detroit, Mich. 





ROBERTS 

' Lightning Mixer 
Beats Everything 

Beats eggs, whips cream, chums butter, mixes 
gravies, desserts and dressings, and does the 
work in a few seconds. Blends and mixes 
malted milk, powdered milk, baby foods and 
all drinks. 

Simple and Strong. Saves work — easy 
to clean. Most necessary household 
article. Used by 200,000 housewives 
and endorsed by leading household 
magazines. 
If your dealer does not carry this, we will send 
prepaid (luart size $l.-'5, pint size 90c. Far 
West and South, quart $1.40. pint $1.00. 
Recipe book free with mixer. 

CAMBRIDGE 39, BOSTON, MASS. 



NATIONAL CO. 



Two New Household Helpers 

Oq 10 dayi' free trial! They save you at least an hour a day, 
worth at only 30 cents an hour, $2.10 a week. Cost only the 
10 cents a week for a year. Send postcard for details of these 
"helpers," oar two new home-study courses, "Household 
Eneineerin/^'' and "Lessons in Cooking," now in book form; OR 
SEND ^5.00 in full payment. Regular price $6.28. 

AM. SCHOOL OF HOMt ECONOMICS, 503 W. 69th ST., CHICAGO 



or 



bread and butter, celery, 
lettuce. Light dessert. 
Several weeks later Ned wrote Lucie 
that he had "lost the reminder, but don't 
need it, because I know it by heart. I 
feel fine and my meals don't cost as much 
as they used to. I sure am glad you 
studied Home Economics at the State 
College. I think all the boys ought to, 
too. And say, Ned, Jr., is going to be fed 
according to rules — -your rules! 

Just your own balanced-ration, happv, 
healthy, Old Ned." ^ 



*'The Art of Spending" 

How to Live Better and Save More -^ 

SPENDING is as important as earn- 
ing and it is not the amount of 
money spent, but the kind of life 
it buys that counts. If you would like to 
make your income go further, make it 
yield more nearly what you want, you will 
be interested in this handbook which tells 
how a plan of spending or "Budget" 
helps to stretch the dollar, gives sugges- 
tions for drawing up a practical budget 
and shows how to keep check on the ! 
budget without household accounts by the 
use of the new Self-Accounting Check \ 
Book which is illustrated and described. 'I 

The new check book gives automatically 
the cost of Food, Clothing, Operating, 
etc., from month to month and year to 
year. Your bank can secure a set of the 
special interleaves and have the new 
check book made up for you at small 
expense. 

The new Weekly Allowance Book — 
"Where My Money Goes" is also il- 
lustrated and described, — a simple little 
book of 32 pages, small enough for your 
pocketbook, easily kept, but giving 
classified records of all household or 
personal expenses. Price 10 cents; price 
of "The Art of Spending," lOcents. Amer- 
ican School of Home Economics, 503 W. ., 
69th Street, Chicago. — Adv. 



Buy advertised Gowds 



• Do not accept substitutes 
70 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




use 



For Flaky Shortcake 
and Fluffy Biscuits 

You will have "better luck" with your baking if 
you will follow grandmother's time-tried rule and 



STICKNEY & POOR'S 

Guaranteed Pure 

Cream of Tartar 

A pure leavener, made from grapes, that has been famous for its quality 
through many generations. Recommended for every purpose where baking 
powder is used. Try it next baking day. 



Your grocer can supply you with 
Stickney & Poor's Cream of Tartar 
— and with all other reliable Stickney 
& Poor Spices, Mustards and Fla- 
vorings. Ask him for them — they 
never disappoint. 

Order by Name 



Delietous^ 



STICKNEY & POOR SPICE COMPANY 

1 815 — Century Old — Century 'Honored — 1921 

Mustard - Spices BOSTON and HALIFAX Seasonings - riavorings 

THE NATIONAL MUSTARD POT 






»^'^ 






^^. 



^ 

m 



m- 






:(s^ > 



:^~r' 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
71 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



GOSSOM'S CREAM SOUPS 




n Powdered Form 

Split pea, Green pea, Lima, Celery, Black^bean, Clam 
Chowder, Onion and (Mushroom 25 cents). 
Quickly and Easily Prepared 
Just add water and boil 15 minutes. One package makes 3 
pints of pure, wholesome and delicious soup. Price 15 cents 
each, $1.75 per dozen at leading grocers , or sample sent 
prepaid on receipt of 20 cents in stamps ofiCoin. 

Also GOSSOM'S "QUICK-MADE" [PUDDINGS 
Contain the egg, milk, sugar and all necessary ingredients. 
Rice Custard, Tapioca Cieam, Chocolate Bavarian, Blanc- 
mange, 8 portion package, 25 cents. 

B. F. Gossom, 692 Washington St., Brookline, 46, Mass. 



"Free-Hand Cooking'* 

Cook without recipes! A key to cookbooks, correct proportions, 
time, temperature; thickening leavening, shortening, 105 fun- 
damental receipes. 40 p. book. 10 cents coin or stamps. 

Am. Sdiool of Home Economics, 503 W. 69th Street, Chicago 



^ 



Gluten Flour yBv 

40% GLUTEN ^-^^^ 



Guaranteed to comply in all respects to 

Standard requirements of U. S. Dept. of 

Agriculture. 

UaBofaetiiredby 

FARWELL St. RHINES 

WatertowB, N. Y. 



C^ 



M 



Cream Whipping Made 
Easy and Inexpensive 

r; REMO- Y ESCO 

Whips Thin Cream 

or Half Heavy Cream and Milk 

or Top of the Milk Bottle 

It whips up as easily as heavy cream 

and retains its stiffness. 

Every caterer and housekeeper 

wants CREMO-VESCO. 

Send for a bottle to-day. 



Housekeeper's size, 1^ oz., .30 prepaid 
Caterer's size, 16 oz., $1.00 

(With full directions) 



Cremo-Vesgo Company 

631 EAST 23rd ST., BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Pacific Coast Agents: 
MILES MFG. CO.,949-951 E. 2nd St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



Old Mister Nid-Nod 

Old Mister Nid-Nod walks through the town 

Softly, at evenfall; 
In one hand a robe, and in one hand a crown; 
And his steps are lighter than thistledown. 

But you hear him gently call: 
"Come, little weary ones! Leave your play — 
Old Mister Nid-Nod is passing your way!" 

Thousands of beautiful robes he brings. 

Woven of flowers and dew: 
"Dreams in the pockets, and rainbow wings, 
And a crown to wear, as each new day springs, 

And the world awakes anew. 
Come, little weary ones! Leave your play — 
Old Mister Nid-Nod is passing your way!" 

Beatrice Laxon Swfel. 



Cooking for Profit 

By Alice Bradley 

Principal, Miss Farmer's School of Cookery 
Cooking Editor, Woman's Home Companion 

IF YOU wish to earn money at home 
through home cooked food and 
catering — ■ if you would like to own 
and conduct a food shop, tea room, cafe- 
teria or lunch room — if you wish to 
manage a profitable boarding house or 
small hotel, you will be interested in 
this new correspondence course. 

It explains just how to prepare food, 
*'good enough to sell"; just what to 
cook, with many choice recipes; how to 
establish a reputation and a constant 
profitable market; how to cater for all 
occasions, and tells in detail how to 
establish and conduct successful tea 
rooms, etc. — • how to manage all food 
service. 

The correspondence instruction is under 
the personal direction of Miss Bradley 
and the fee for the course is very moder- 
ate and may be paid on easy terms. 
This months two "Household Helpers" 
are included free, to show how to gain the 
time for money-making work. For full 
details write to American School of Home 
Economics, 503 W. 69th Street, Chicago. 

— Adv. 

The Secret of Good Cooking 

ColburnsW 

Spices -Mustard-Condiments 

THE A. COLBURN CO., Philadelphia 

EstmbUshed 1857 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
72 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



HEBE 




Richy smooth and delicious 

sauces made with this 
wonderf ul, economical cooking aid 



^S5- Tomi 50UC^ 
k ^HE HEBE COMPAQ 



UsemBE/or 

CorttiMiitfins 
Oiickena la King^ 

Curried EggSi 

Egig^s Goldenrod 

; Creamed Dried Beef 

Russian ^lad Dressing 

Banana "Fritters 
Chocolate and Cocoa 

Serve HESEwlth 
Tea ii7w/_Coffeer^o 



Make the white sauce with Hebe for creamed meats, 
fish, chicken, eggs, patties, vegetables, etc. The richness, 
smoothness and fine flavor will delight the most particular 
cookery expert. 

Hebe is of special interest to domestic scientists be- 
cause it helps to cut down table costs and one of the good 
things about it is the fact that you can use it in almost 
anything you cook or bake. Get Hebe from the grocer 
and test it. 

There is no other food product just like Hebe. It is 
pure skimmed milk evaporated to double strength en- 
riched with cocoanut fat. Its purity is sealed in the can 
and it stays sweet in a cool place several days after open- 
ing, because it is sterilized. 

The Hebe recipe booklet contains many suggestions 
for serving delicious, well-balanced meals at less cost. 
Send for it. Address 3715 Consumers Bldg., Chicago. 



THE HEBE COMPANY 



Chicago 



Seattle 



Buy advertised Goods — ■ Do not accept substitutes 
73 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




For summer 

desserts — 

Whipped Cream 
in 30 seconds 



DMi\lap 



Brings quick results 
for every mixing, beat 
ing need and no spat- 
ter due to flexible, per- 
forated blade, vibrates as 
it whirls, (a patented fea- 
ture.) Cuts the cream in- 
stead of beating. 

Standard Model, earthenware 
bowl, $1.25 (Western States 
$1.50.) De Luxe Model, ebony 
handle, casserole bowl, $2.50 
(Western States $2.75.) 

Mailed prepaid on receipt of 
price, if dealer hasn't it; men- 
tion his name. 

CASEY 

HUDSON 
COMPANY 
363 E. Ohio St. 
Chicago 





MADE H^iVA MILK 



"Milk" means nourishment and "Junket" 
means Milk in a dainty, delicious form, 
so attractive to children and grownups. 
Serve Junket often as an enjoyable dessert 
and you will be serving Health at the 
same time. 

Junket can now be made from Junket 
Powder as well as Tablets. Junket 
Powder is already sweetened and flavored. 
Simply stir in milk and let "set" — 
convenient. Comes in 6 flavors. 

Send 4c. in stamps and your grocer's name, for 
sample {or isc. for full site package of Junket Tab- 
lets: 20C. for full sixe package of Junket Powder) 
with recipes, 

THE JUNKET FOLKS, Little Falls, N. Y. 

Chr. Hansen's Canadian Laboratory, Toronto, On 



* 'Household Helpers" 

IF YOU could engage an expert cook 
and an expert housekeeper for only 
10 cents a week, with no board or 
room, you would do it, wouldn't you.'' 
Of course you would! Well, that is all 
our "Two Household Helpers" will 
cost you the first year — ■ nothing there- 
after, for the rest of your life. 

Have you ever considered how much 
an hour a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a 
year is worth to you? Many workmen 
get $1 an hour — ■ surely your time is 
worth 30 cents an hour. We guarantee 
these "Helpers" to save you at least an 
hour a day, worth say ?2.10 a week. 
Will you invest the 10 cents a week to gain 
$2 weekly .f* 

And the value our "Helpers" give you 
in courage and inspiration, in peace of 
mind, in the satisfaction of progress, in 
health, happiness and the joy of living, — 
is above price. In mere dollars and cents, 
they will save their cost twelve times a 
year or more. 

These helpers, "Lessons in Cooking" 
and "Household Engineering," were both 
prepared as home-study courses, and as 
such have been tried out and approved 
by thousands of our members. Thus 
they have the very highest recommenda- 
tion. Nevertheless we are willing to send 
them in book form, on a week's free trial, 
in your own home. Send the coupon. 

In these difficult days you really cannot 
afford to be without our "Helpers." You 
owe it to yourself and family to give them 
a fair trial. You cannot realize what 
great help they will give you till you 
try them — ■ and the trial costs you 
nothing! Send no money — send the cou- 
pon. 

FREE TRIAL FOR ONE WEEK 

A. S. H. E. — 503 W. 69th Street, Chicago, lU. 

Send your two " HOUSEHOLD HELPERS," prepaid 
on a week's trial, in the De Luxe binding. If satisfactory, I 
will send you $5 in ftiU payment (OR) 60 cents and %\ per 
month for five months. Otherwise I will return one or 
both books in seVen days. (Regular mail price $3.14 each). 

Name and 
Address 

Reference 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
74 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



(ra wlord 



IN GRAY ENAMEL FINISH 

Bake in three ovens and use 

the gas broiler at the 

same time 

The new Victory Crawford is the only range 
on the market which does this — and in 
addition has room for four kettles on the coal 
griddles and five on the gas burners. 

And though there is so much oven space — ^ 
six and a half square feet, or thirteen square 
feet with the racks — the Victory Crawford 
measures only forty-three inches from end 
to «id. 

It's a thoroughly up-to-date combination 
gas and coal range with many exclusive im- 
provements which make it efficient, economi- 
cal, easy to keep clean — a time and step 
saver for the busy housewife. Ask your 
dealer to show you the Victory Crawford — 
you'll find it just the range you've always 
wanted. 



Sold by Leading Dealers 



WALKER & PRATT MFG. CO. 

BOSTON, U. S. A. 

Makers of Highest Quality Ranges 
Furnaces and Boilers 




I ANY ONE CAN USE I 

i ixiki A ^ix XNP- i-r i 



KNACK-OF-IT 

KNIFE SHARPENER 

^ Cn Rest either end flat over 

OUC* table edge. Draw edge 

N^ of knife between disc . 

Discs will tip at prop>e) 

angle and that'^ the 

Knack Of It. 

Dealers or Parcel Post 

Standard Silverware Co., Boston 9, Mass, 





mSKisaMatom™EM\\\iftvv*'> 



Women's Leather Finish 

Shopping Bag 

Neat, Compact, Folds sma'l, holds 
much. Well made. Just right for 
shopping or marketing. Bi? Value. 
$1 .00 Prepaid. Agents Wanted, 

GENERAL SPECIALTY CO. 
151 Berkeley St., Boston, Mass. 




Maple Fudge and 
Frostings 

are two tempting dainties you^can quickly 
prepare with 

Uncle John's Syrup 

The real flavor from the mapb grove 
makes it a favorite for swestening ard 
flavoring many tasty dis':ies You'll 
like it on biscuits, stewed fruits, 
etc. Four convenient sizes — ask 
your grocer for a can — today. 

NewJEngland Maple Syrup Co. 



/ 



Winter Hill 



Boston, Mass. 




Buv advertised Good* — Do not accept substitutes 
75 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



O Sanitary Steel Cake Testers r) 

J (Pat. applied for) Y 

I 



Recmmended by Teachers of Domestic Science 







Made from best steel piano wire by 

LISBON. NOVELTY COMPANY 

LISBON FALLS MAINE 

Send lO^centsand receive one by mail 

Veceione 



rmA^e MAfuc aec v.s.fiAT. orr. 



VEGETABLE PROTEIN — THE MUSCLE 
BUILDING, STRENGTH GIVING FOOD 
ELEMENT 

FLAVOR — LIKE SWEET MEAT JUICE 
COOKED BROWN 

EFFECT — APPETIZING 

COST — ONLY 2 CENTS A PORTION 

iMAitt that latitf^g riciiBesa aad flavor to soupt, travy, sauces 

•■• atcwi that bnag praiae to your cookiac- 

Mahea a rich, appetizing coasomm^ soup by merely dissdviag 

ia Mfiag water aad at a cost of only 2 c«ats a ^at«. 

Nm aa expense, but an economy aad needed la ev«ry kitchen. 

R«tnlar reuU price, 4-ounce tin, Sf cents. 

Tkne 4-«uncc tins seat postpaid for t\. Order diynct and save 

danlcr's profit. 

Money refunded if not found satisfactory after a fair ttial. 

BISHOP-GIFFORD CO.. Inc. Baldwin, L I^ N. Y. 



AS NEVER BEFORE YOU NEED A 
COPY OF 

CANNING, PRESERVING 
AND JELLY MAKING 

By JANET McKENZiE HILL 

The economic condition of the times 
demands that all surplus vegetables and 
fruit be carefully preserved for future 
use. Modern methods of earning and 
jelly making have simplified and short- 
ened preserving processes. In this book 
the latest ideas in canning, preserving 
and jelly making are presented. 

We will send a copy of this book, postpaid, on receipt 
of price, $1.75. 

We will send a copy of this book, postpaid, and renew 
your subscription for American Cookery one year, both 
for $3.00. 

We will send a copy of this book, postpaid, to any 
present subscriber sending her renewal at $1.50 and two 
new subscribers for American Cookery at $1 50 each. 

Address 

The Boston Cooking-School Magazine Co. 
Boston, Mass. 



BREAKFASTS, LUNCHEONS an J DINNERS 

By MARY D. CHAMBERS 

Should be in every home. It treats in detail the three meals a day, in their several varieties, f/om 
the light family affair to the formal and company function. Appropriate menus are given for each 
occasion. The well-balanced diet is kept constantly in view. Table china, glass and silver, and 
table linen, all are described and illustrated. In short, how to plan, how to serve and how to behave 
at these meals, is the author's motive in writing the book. This motive has been clearly and admir- 
alby well carried out. Table etiquette might well be the subtitle of the volume. * 

Cloth, 150 pages. Illustrated, $1.25 net. 

We will send this book postpaid on receipt of price, $1.25 

THE BOSTON COOKING SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO., 



Boston, Mass. 



PERSONAL BODY DEVELOPMENT The correct 

met hod of 
obtaining a Perfect Figure, overcoming Nervousness, Constipa- 
tion, Biliousness, Flabbiaess of flesh ajd thinness of body. 

Price, $1.00. Fully Guaranteed. 
THE NEW IDEAS CO. 14 Collins Bldg., LIMA, OHIO 



** Where My Money Goes'/ 

Weekly Allownce Bonk — simple little book il pages, small 
CBOagh for your pocketbook, easily kept; gives classified record 
of all personal or household expenses. lO cents. 
AM. SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS, 503a W. 69th ST., CHICAGO 



SERVICE TABLE WAGON — 

Large Broad Wide Table 
'T«p — Removable Glass 
Service Tray — Double 
Drawer — Doub'le 
Handles— Large Deep 
Undershelves — "Scien- 
tifically Silent" Rubber 
Tired Swivel Wheels. 

A high grid* piece of furni- 
ture surpassing anything yet «t- 
lempted for GENERAL UTILITY. 
ease of action, an* absolute 
noiselesanesa. WRITE NOW 
roR A DESCRIPTIVE PAMPHLET 
AND DEALER'S NAME. . 4Kf 

COMBINATION PRODUCTS CO. 

SMJCmNBMc. Cbi(ai«,HI. 




Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
76 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Prune / 
CofieeCake 

Heres a happyidea cake that not only 
makes the breakfast but makes it more 
healthful besides. Can you think of a better 
day's start than this Prune Coffee Cake — 
with its brown, beckoning crust decked out 
from end to end with luscious, sugar-sweet 
prunes and sprinkled with nuts? 

It's enough to lure anyone on to a second 
or third cup of coftee, providing — the coffee 
cake holds, out! And, for you, here's the 
treat'iest part of it: iVs so easy {and eco' 
nomical] to make, A simple muffin "fouu' 
dation," a few minutes' preparation, then 
into the oven and — it's done! 

Even so, it is but one of 35 unusual reci' 
pes waiting for you in our Sunsweet Recipe 
Packet. The recipes — prepared by a famous 
domestic scientist — are printed on gummed 
slips [5x3'] so you can paste them in your 
scrapbook or on recipe filing cards. This 
unique packet is free— simply address 

\ California Prune ^Apricot Growers Inc, 
5505 Market Street, San Jose, Cal. 
10,000 growevmembers 



How to make this 
20-miiiute cake: 

Two eggs well beaten; i 
cup sugar; 'A cup milk; 2 
cups sifted flour; i tea- 
spoons baking powder; Vs 
cup melted shortening; i 
teaspoon vanilla extract. 
Beat eggs, add sugar, sift 
flour and baking powder; 
add to mixture gradually 
with milk, beat until 
smooth, add melted short- 
ening and extract. Pour in 
2 greased layer cake pans, 
cover top with uncooked 
pitted Sunsweet Prunes 
and sprinkle with nuts. 
Bake in moderate oven. 




SUNSWEET 

Califyrnlas Nature ^Li])ored prunes 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

n 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Experience has shown that the most satisfactory way 

to enlarge the subscription list of American Cookery is through its present subscri- 
bers, who personally can vouch for the value of the publication. To make it an 
object for subscribers to secure new subscribers, we offer the following premiums: 



CONDITIONS 



• Premiums are not given with a subscription or for a renewal, but only 
- to present subscribers, for securing and sending to us new yearly sub«= 

gcriptions at $1.50 each. The number of new subscriptions requited to secure each premium is clearly 

Stated below the description of each premium. 

Transportation is or is not paid as stated. 

INDIVIDUAL INITIAL JELLY MOULDS 

Serve Eggs, Fish and Meats in Aspic; 
Coffee and Fruit Jelly; Pudding and other 
desserts with your initial letter raised on 
the top. Latest and daintiest novelty for 
the up-to-date hostess. To remove jelly 
take a needle and run it around inside of 
mould, then immerse in warm water; jelly 
will then come out in perfect condition. 
Be the first in your town to have these. 
You cannot purchase them at the stores. 





This shows the jelly turned from the mould 
Set of six (6), any initial, sent postpaid for (1) new subscription 



This shows mould 
(upside down) 



Cash Price 75 centSe 



••PATTY IRONS' 




As illustrated, are used to make dainty, flaky 
pat^s or timbales; delicate pastry cups for serv- 
iag hot or frozen dainties, creamed vegetables, 
salads, shell fish, ices, etc. Each set comes 
securely packed in an attractive box with recipes 
and full directions for use. Sent, postpaid, for 
two (2) new subscriptions. Cash price, $1.50. 



SILVER'S 

SURE CUT 

FRENCH FRIED 
POTATO CUTTER 

One of the most 
modern and efiScient 
kitchen helps ever in- 
vented. A big labor 
and time saver. 

Sent, prepaid, for 
one (1) new subscrip- 
tion. Cash price 75 
cents. 




FRENCH ROLL BREAD PAN 




P<n quality blued steel. 6 inches wide by 13 
krg. One pan sent, prepaid, for one (1) new 
[I Ifcjiption. Cash price, 75 cents 

SEAMLESS VIENNA BREAD PAN 




Two of these pans sent, postpaid for one (1) 
new subscription. Cash price, 75 cents for two 
pans. 




HEAVY TIN BORDER MOULD 

Imported, Round, 6 inch 

Sent, prepaid, for one (1) new subscription. 
Cash prifee, 75 cents. 



THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO. :: :: Boston, Mast. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
78 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



PREMIUMS 



AN EGG SLICER SAVES TIME 
AND EGGS 

Does the work 



r-^=^0 




subscription. Cash price, 75 cents, 



quicker and bet- 
ter than it can 
be done in any 
other way. One 
will be sent post- 
paid to any 
present subscri- 
ber as a premium 
for securing and 
sending us one 
(1) new yearly 



Empire Kitchen Knives 




Highly polished rubberoid finished 
handles. 

These knives have blades forged from 
the finest cutlery steel, highly tempered 
and ground to a very keen edge. These 
Knives will cut. Two knives, as showm 
above, sent, prepaid, for one (1) new 
subscription. Cash Price 75 cents. 




A SET OF 24 TINS 

Sent, postpaid, for one (1) new subscription. 
Cash Price, 75 cents. 

FRENCH 
BUTTER CURLER 

Unique and Convenient 
Tke «asiest way to serve batter. FuU 

directions with each cutler. 

Sent, postpaid, for one (1) new subscription. 

Cash price, 75 cents. 



PRINCESS PATTY TINS 

FOR BROWNIES OR 
OTHER SMALL CAKES 

BROWNIES 



J cup of Butter 
i cup of Sugar 
J cup of Molasses 
(dark) 

Mix in the usual manner, but without separat- 
ing the egg. Bake in small, fancy shaped tins. 
Press half a nut meat into the top of each cake. 



1 Egg, well beaten 
1 cup of Flour 
1 cup of Nuts, Pecan 
or Walnuts 





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AMERICAN COOKERY 



Jell-0 

c^rnQTicas Most Famous Dossorf 



UTT 7E Americans have a way with desserts that 
▼ » is all our own. It is an Anglo-Saxon trait 
to eat a heavy pie or pudding that is a meal in itself 
after a hearty dinner ; and we alone of all people 
discourage the flow of gastric juices by generous 
servings of frozen ices and creams as a last course. 
The ideal dessert is one that is light, not too sweet, 
delicate and not an added burden to digestion ; a 
dainty, for a gracious ^farewell,^ not a substantial 
course. 

Dishes that have gelatine as a basis have just 
these characteristics. They melt in the mouth, they 
are chilled without being frozen, solid without being 
hard, and they furnish nutrition in the way of pro- 
tein and sugars, supplemented by the whipped cream 
or fruit that is added to them. Plain or with cream, 
they make an ideal dessert for children, giving a 
sweet taste without an undue amount of sugai;" 

New York Tribune Institute. 

A beautiful Jell-O Book which describes the many uses of 
Jell'O in desserts and salads will be mailed free on request 



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**ENCORE" 



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AMERICAN COOKERY 

Vol. XXVI AUGUST-SEPTEMBER, 1921 No. 2 

CONTENTS FOR AUGUST- SEPTEMBER page 

CHANGING THE GARB WITH THE SEASON. 111. 

Margaret Ryan 91 

AUNT ALIDA SAYS SO. Ill Ida R. Fargo 95 

THE TRANSPLANTED HOUSEWIFE .... Alice M. Ashton 98 

A CRY FOR GOOD COOKERY Ladd Plumley 100 

HINTS FOR THE W^OlMAN WHO WOULD RUN A SUCCESSFUL 

EATING PLACE : Nancy D. Dunlea 103 

THE HOSPITAL NURSE Clara Seaman Chase 105 

THE INSIDIOUS TANTRUM Louise Taber 106 

A FAMILY AFFAIR Barbara Erwin 107 

EDITORIALS 110 

SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES (Illustrated with half-tone 
engravings of prepared dishes) 

Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 113 

MENUS FOR WEEK IN AUGUST 122 

MENUS FOR WEEK IN SEPTEMBER 123 

ONE-DISH MEALS FOR AUGUST .... Florence L. Tucker 124 

JELLY IN GENERAL Grace McKinstry 127 

A GUEST AT DUSK Arthur W. Peach 128 

THE PUNGENT MINT -*.... 129 

HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES: — Saving — The Road to 
Health — The Last Word — Making Use of Left-Overs — Meat 
and Fish Compared as Food — What to Serve for Breakfast, Lunch- 
eon and Dinner 131 

QUERIES AND ANSWERS .134 




$1.50 A YEAR Published Ten Times a Year 15c A Copy 

Foreign postage 40c additional 
Entered at Boston post-office as second-class matter 
Copyright 1921, by 

THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO. 
Pope BIdg., 221 Columbus Ave., Boston 17, Mass. 



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ADVERTISEMENTS 




' When it rains 
— it pours" 



For Good Results: Good Salt 



No artist ever painted a good picture with poor paints, 
and no cook ever prepared a perfect dish with poor salt. 
You 11 find it's worth while to use Morton's Salt in your 
cooking as well as on the table. It brings out and adds to 
the natural flavor of foods. 

Aside from that, you'll appreciate its endless convenience — it 
always pours. Maybe you wonder why. The reason : the crys- 
tals are so formed they cannot stick together; no adulterants. 

Buying Mortons is like casting bread upon the waters; it 
repays you a thousandfold — in economy, in convenience. 

" The Salt of the Earth " 

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AMERICAN COOKERY 



INDEX FOR AUGUST-SEPTEMBER 



Aunt Alida Says So 

Changing the Garb with the Season 

Cry for Good Cookery, A 

Editorials . . . , 

Family Affair, A . 

Guest at Dusk, A ... 

Hints for the Woman Who Would Run a Successful Eating Place 

Home Ideas and Economies . 

Hospital Nurse, The 

Insidious Tantrum, The 

Jelly in General 

Menus .... 

One-Dish Meals for August . 

Pungent Mint, The 

Transplanted Housewife, The 



PAGE 

95 

91 

100 

110 

107 

128 

103 

131 

105 

106 

127 

122, 123 

124 

129 

98 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



Abatis a la Bourgeoise 

Beans, String, Canned in Pressure Cook( 

111 

Blueberries and Boulettes 
Cakes for School Lunch-Box 
Chutney, Gooseberry- 
Cucumber Rings, Fried . 
Fowl Supreme. 111. 
Ice, Melon, in Melon Shells. 111. 
Lobster, Steamed Mould of. 111. 
Macaroni and Liver, Timbale of 
Marguerites. 111. . 
Nectar, Orange-and-Raspberry 
Pears in Grape Juice 



116 

116 
118 
121 
121 
114 
116 
120 
117 
114 
120 
121 
121 



Potatoes, French Fried. 111. 

Preserve, Pear-and-Quince 

Pudding, Fish 

Puffs, Raised Peach 

Puffs, Raisin. 111. 

Punch, Pineapple . 

Salad, Fruit. III. 

Sauce, Foamy 

Shortcake, Peach. III. 

Soup 

Soup, Garspacho, A Summer Soup 

Squash, Southern Summer, Baked. 111. 

Stew, Dry. Ill 



114 
121 
113 
118 
119 
119 
119 
119 
118 
113 
113 
115 
114 



QUERIES AND ANSWERS 



Bread, Brown, with Raisins 
Cabbage, Jellied Red 
Cake, Angel . 
Cake, Su^nshine 
Cakes, Care of, after Baking 
Celery, Braised 
Chocolate, Use of Soda with 
Fowl in Casserole . 
How $3 Per Capita, Per Week, 
Spent for Food . 



May B( 



138 
135 
134 
134 
134 
135 
136 
138 

138 



Ice Cream, Two Quarts of 

Icing, Chocolate ^ 

Peach Whip . 

Pie, Chocolate Cream 

Potatoes, Lyonnaise 

Rhubarb, Gingered 

Salads, Romaine-and-Escarole 

Shortbread, Points in Making 

Timbale Cases 



138 
136 
138 
136 
134 
135 
136 
135 
136 



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American Cookery. We have an attractive proposition to make 
those who will canvass their town; also to those who will secure a 
few names among their friends and acquaintances. Write us today. 

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THE BOSTON COOKING- 
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In addition to its fund of general information, this latest edition contains 
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Instructor in Household Management 
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Book of Entrees. Mrs. Janet M. Hill . . . 2.00 
Boston Cook Book. Mary J. Lincoln.. 2.25 
Boston Cooking-School Cook Book. 

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Bread and Bread-Making. Mrs. Rorer . .75 
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Candy Cook Book. Alice Bradley 1.75 

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Canning, Preserving and Pickling. 

Marion H. Neil 1.50 

Care and Feeding of Children. L. E. 

Holt, M.D 1.25 

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Century Cook Book. Mary Ronald 3.00 

Chafing-Dish Possibilities. Farmer.... 1.50 
Chemistry in Daily Life. Lassar-Cohn . . 2.25 
Chemistry of Cookery. W. Mattieu 

Williams 2.25 

Chemistry of Cooking and Cleaning. 

Richards and Elliot 1.00 

Chemistry of Familiar Things. Sadtler 2.00 
Chemistry of Food and Nutrition. 

Sherman 2.10 

Cleaning and Renovating. E. G. Osman 1.20 

Clothing for Women. L. L Baldt 2.50 

Cook Book for Nurses. Sarah C. Hill . . . . 90 
Cooking for Two. Mrs. Janet M. Hill. . 2.25 

Cost of Cleanness. Richards 1.00 

Cost of Food. Richards 1.00 

Cost of Living. Richards 1.00 

Cost of Shelter. Richards 1.00 



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Dainties. Mrs. Rorer 1.00 

Diet for the Sick. Mrs. Rorer 2.00 

Diet in Relation to Age and Activity. 

Thompson 1.00 

Dishes and Beverages of the Old South. 

McCulloch- Williams 1.50 

Domestic Art in Women's Education. 

Cooley 1.50 

Domestic Science in Elementary 

Schools. Wilson 1.20 

Domestic Service. Lucy M. Salmon . . . 2.25 

Dust and Its Dangers. Pruden 1.25 

Easy Entertaining. Benton 1.50 

Economical Cookery. Marion Harris 

Neil 2.00 

Elementary Home Economics. Mat- 
thews 1.40 

Elements of the Theory and Practice of 

Cookery. Williams and Fisher 1.40 

Encyclopaedia of Foods and Beverages. 10.00 
Equipment for Teaching Domestic 

Science. Kinne 80 

Etiquette of New York Today. Learned 1.60 

Etiquette of Today. Ordway 1.25 

European and American Cuisine. 

Lemcke 4.00 

Every Day Menu Book. Mrs. Rorer.... 1.50 
Every Woman's Canning Book. Hughes .90 

Expert Waitress. A. F. Springsteed 1.35 

Feeding the Family. Rose 2.40 

Fireless Cook Book 1.75 

First Principles of Nursing. Anne R. 

Manning 1.25 

Fish Cookery. Spencer and Cobb 2.00 

Food and Cookery for the Sick and Con- 
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Food and Feeding. Sir Henry Thompson 2.00 

Food and Flavor. Finck. . . .4 3.00 

Foods and Household Management. 

Kinne and Cooley 1.40 

Food and Nutrition. Bevier and Ushir 1.00 

Food Products. Sherman 2.40 

Food and Sanitation. Forester and 

Wigley 1.40 

Food and the Principles of Dietetics. 

Hutchinson 4.25 

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Food for the Invalid and the Convales- 
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Food Materials and Their Adultera- 
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Food Study. Wellman 1.10 

Food Values. Locke 2.00 

Foods and Their Adulterations. Wiley 6.00 
Franco-American Cookery Book. D^li^ 5.00 

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Furnishing the Home of Good Taste. 

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Golden Rule Cook Book (600 Recipes for 

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Handbook of Home Economics. Flagg 0.90 
Handbook of Hospitality for Town and 

Country. Florence H, Hall 1.75 

Handbook of Invalid Cooking. Mary A 

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Handbook on Sanitation. G. M. Price, 

M.D 1.50 

Healthful Farm House, The. Dodd. . . .60 
Home and Community Hygiene. 

Broadhurst 2.50 

Home Candy Making. Mrs. Rorer 75 

Home Economics. Maria Parloa 2.00 

Home Economics Movement 75 

Home Furnishing. Hunter 2.50 

Home Nursing. Harrison 1.50 

Home Problems from a New Standpoint 1.00 
Home Science Cook Book. Anna Bar- 
rows and Mary J. Lincoln 1.25 

Hot Weather Dishes. Mrs. Rorer 75 

House Furnishing and Decoration. 

McClure and Eberlein 2.50 

House Sanitation. Talbot 80 

Housewifery. Balderston 2.50 

Household Bacteriology. Buchanan. . . 2.75 
Household Economics. Helen Campbell 1.75 
Household Engineering. Christine Fred- 
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Household Physics. Alfred M. Butler. . 1.50 

Household Textiles. Gibbs 1.40 

Housekeeper's Handy Book. Baxter... 2.00 
How to Cook in Casserole Dishes. Neil 1 50 
How to Cook for the Sick and Convales- 
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How to Feed Children. Hogan 1.25 

How to Use a Chafing Dish. Mrs. Rorer .75 

Human Foods. Snyder 2.00 

Ice Cream, Water Ices, etc. Rorer. ... 1.00 

I Go a Marketing. Sowle 1.75 

Institution Recipes. Emma Smedley. . 3.00 

Interior Decorations. Parsons 5.00 

International Cook Book. Filippini. . . 2.50 
Key to Simple Cookery. Mrs. Rorer. . . 1.25 

King's, Caroline, Cook Book 2.00 

Kitchen Companion. Parloa 2.50 

Kitchenette Cookery. Anna M. East. . . 1.25 
Laboratory Handbook of Dietetics. Rose 1.50 
Lessons in Cooking Through Prepara- 
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Lessons in Elementary Cooking. Mary 

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Like Mother Used to Make. Herrick. . 1.35 

Luncheons. Mary Ronald 2.00 

A cook's picture book; 200 illustrations 

Made-over Dishes. Mrs. Rorer 75 

Many Ways for Cooking Eggs. Mrs. 

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Marketing and Housework Manual. 

S. Agnes Donham 2.00 

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Allen 2.00 

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My Best 250 Recipes. Mrs. Rorer 1.00 



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Nursing, Its Principles and Practice. 

Isabels and Robb 2.00 

Nutrition of a Household. Brewster. . . 2.00 

Nutrition of Man. Chittenden 4.50 

Philadelphia Cook Book. Mrs. Rorer. . 1.50 
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Mrs. Mary F. Henderson 1.75 

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Story of Germ Life. H. W. Conn 1.00 

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AMERICAN COOKERY 



^ ' « 





Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 



The Everlasting Hills 

High up on the rim of the earth I dwell, 

Like a bird in my wee, brown cage, 

Aperch on the hillside steep. 

Above me the mountain slopes climb and swell. 

Sides all seamed like a face by age, 

And tops in the clouds asleep. 

The trees encircle and climb the hills, 
The sky above with smiles aglow 
Embraces earth's curving line. 
Enraptured my heart with happiness thrills; 
For I'm kin with the winds that blow. 
The hills and the sky are mine. 

High above hate and the strife that lies 

In the hearts of men down below, 

In my care-free joy I sing. 

As a bird to the heights, my spirit Hies, 

And their grandeur and strength bestow 

Peace no joys of earth can bring. 

And when I descend to the haunts of men. 

This peace in my heart still abides, 

And still near to God I seem. 

The sorrows and fears, in their lives I ken 

As only a shadow, that strides, 

A fleeting shadow, a dream. 

Hattie H. d^Autremont. 




SPINACH CEREAL AND EGG FOR BREAKFAST 



American Cookery 



VOL. XXVI 



AUGUST-SEPTEMBER 



NO. 2 



Changing the Garb with the Season 

By Margaret Ryan 

SUMMER GARB 
HORT and sweet is the summer 
but not too short to give 



C season 

V-^ attention to indoor comfort, nor 
yet so sweet that there are not days of 
blistering heat and frequent rains which 
bar excursions into out-of-doors and 
confine us to the four walls of home. 

Why, then, is it that frequently the 
thrifty housewife putting her house in 
surnipier order, destroys so systematically 
the beauty and comfort of the winter 
home ^ 

Relentlessly and with swift precision 
the rugs are rolled and are sent to the 
cleaners, only .to be 
stored when they re- 
turn. Down come the 
curtains and hangings 
that grace the windows 
and wide doorways. 
Over the furniture, 
mournful, baggy cover- 
ings are slipped, and out 
to the porch and garden 
go the plants that through 
all the winter were such 
a cheery presence. 

It seems a mistake to 
banish the beauty and 
comfort of the winter in- 
terior just as soon as the 
miracle of Spring is born 
again, and the great 
Artist, working swiftly, 
completes the picture of 
another Summer. 

There cannot be too 
much beauty, and when 
it can be had without the 



sacrifice of economy, it seems too bad not 
to make the summer interior a near rela- 
tion to the gay out-of-doors. 

Putting away the rugs that lend warmth 
and color for winter use is not a bad idea. 
Open doors and windows, admit quanti- 
ties of dust, and rugs suffer much more 
wear in summer, as a rule, than during 
the winter season. 

But this does not mean that our floors 
need be bare. Rag rugs that are light 
and summery in appearance are also not 
expensive and combine the added advan- 
tage of being washable. Braided rugs. 



/w^wm>^ 





LINOLEUM IS SUITABLE FOR ANY ROOM 
91 



92 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



when not of conglomerate color, are 
splendid floor coverings, if one is lucky 
enough to have one of those nice old 
ladies who lives in every town to make 
them. And even grass rugs can be used 
effectively for summer time where much 
of the living-room furniture is willow or 
wicker. 

But even if we brave the summer's 
wear and tear on our rugs, our rooms need 
lose nothing of summer freshness by their 
presence. 

All the coolness and freshness of an 
old-fashioned garden can be brought into 
our homes by the use of chintz or cretonne. 

Chintz has a charm all its own. It 
can make a lovely, cool-looking room. 
But care must be taken to find the pat- 
tern and color combinations to suit the 
individual interior. Is it dark or sunny, 
small or spacious, are questions to be 
asked in making a selection. 

To replace the heavy hangings that 
make for cosiness in winter, chintz and 
cretonne are in weight and color admira- 



bly adapted for summer. As coverings 
for chairs and cushions they are cool 
to the touch and an excellent protection 
for rich upholstery fabrics. 

To save the linens of pre-war days, 
they make charming substitutes on 
dresser and chiffonier. And as window 
shades, they present, from within and 
without, a pleasant diversion from the 
formal shade of green or tan. 

What of it if the world outside is gay 
with bloom .^ Transplant a little of it 
indoors, to replace the winter plants, now 
enjoying a vacation out-of-doors. Keep 
the vases full of flowers from the garden 
or the field. They help abundantly to 
make your summer interior cool and 
inviting. 

Field daisies and feathery ferns cost 
nothing but the time to gather them. 
But so prone are we to value things by 
their cost that the potted marguerite, 
for which in early spring we pay the 
florist a handsome price, and which is only 
a sister to the daisy, is valued far more. 




CHIiNTZ FOR COVERS TAKES AWAY THOUGHT OF HARM FROM DUST 



CHANGING THE GARB WITH THE SEASON 



93 



By all means, save your linens in these 
days of scarcity, in this commodity. 
Summer dust makes frequent launderings 
of fine needlework on white linen impera- 
tive. But tan-colored crash and linen 
make excellent substitutes for summer. 

Used for table scarfs, it can be hem- 
stitched, stenciled or have figures from 
the chintz appliqued to form a border or 
corner decoration. The same idea can 
be carried out for the buffet and serving 
table, and even attractive breakfast 
runners and luncheon sets can be de- 
veloped to match the hangings in the 
dining room. 

Perhaps nothing does more for any 
room at any time than mirrors. Fortu- 
nately placed, the mirror borrows from 
the color and movement of the room. 



From every angle the mirror reflects a 
different view. It presents a series of 
pictures. It reflects the bowl of flowers 
directly in front, to the left the vivid 
colors of the cretonne hangings, to the 
right a glimpse of the room beyond and 
a blazing fire on the hearth. 

But in summer tinle, placed so as to 
reflect a bit of garden, the mirror brings 
into the colors of the room the gay beauty 
of the world outside, and becomes a 
potent factor in its scheme and decoration. 

Furniture arrangement may give a 
distinctly different note to the summer 
room. The low table and carefully 
shaded lamp, that cling so closely to the 
fireplace in winter, choose, for summer, 
a place beside the window with the 
fairest view and the coolest breezes. 




-A VASE OF FLOWERS I\ OUIDOOR LI\'L\G-ROOM 



94 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




CRETONNE FOR WINDOW IN SUMMER 

And the dining table may leave its 
place, in the center of the room, and take 
up a position near a window or group of 
windows where the freshness of morning 



or the cool o^ evening lends much to the 
pleasure o*" rhe meal. 

These changes from winter to spring 
raiment in our homes may be made with 
comparative ease, if the plan of one 
practical homemaker is followed out. 
She has all draperies, furniture covers and 
summer linens carefully laundered in the 
fall before putting them away. Her 
summer garb can be put on at a moment's 
notice. And she declares that the saving 
of upholstery and rich hangings is only 
a small part of the satisfaction, in changing 
the interior from season to season. 

The altered aspect of the house sup- 
plies that element of change so necessary 
and soothing to our feverish modem 
living. 

The charm of the summer-clad interior 
furnishes in the all-year-round house 
something of the novelty of a separate 
summer home. And when the leaves 
fall and the days grow chill, the warmth 
of heavy hangings, the cosiness of warm 
upholstery and the green of plants, fresh 
from a sojourn in the open, will be more 
appreciated for their absence in summer. 




LIGHT SATEEN WITH INLAY STRIPES HELPS OUT 



Aunt Alida Says So 

By Ida R. Fargo 



I 



NEVER saw so many moth mill- 
ers. "complained my sister, "never, 
in all my life, as I've seen this 
summer. I can't imagine where they 
come from. They're worse than the 
plagues of Egypt!" 

Sister looked cross enough to scold. 
' "They're a fright — sure are!" con- 
doled I. 

My comment was meant to be brief 
and agreeable. Partly, maybe, because, 
if Sister scolded, there was no one to 
scold except me. And — ! Well — ! 

You see, it was three o'clock in the 
afternoon, and Sister had just got 
around to sit down. She had cooked 
breakfast, and put up the children's 
lunches, and washed dishes, and swept, 
and dusted, and mopped the kitchen and 
the back porch, and hunted up a lost 
harness buckle for Ben — • Sister is mar- 
ried to Ben — ■ and churned, and got 
dinner, and answered the 'phone 'steen 
times, and washed the dishes again (I 
might have done that, but I didn't get 
out till two, because of that awful history 
exam.), and set sponge for bread and a 
lunch for me, and — 

•But I am not going to try to tell all 
Sister'd been doing, and got done, by 
three o'clock in the afternoon, because 
it would take two pages, fine print. 
Sister says a man's work is some satis- 
faction. He can concentrate. He can 
settle down to do one set thing straight 
through the day. Consequently, when 
night comes, his work shows. But a 
woman's work isn't that way. She has 
to do a dozen-and-one things and then a 
dozen-and-one more, and keep right on — 
putter, putter, putter! "That's woman's 
work," says Sister. "Nothing to show 
for it, come night. Nothing that counts. 
Not so's folks would notice. Talk about 
a woman concentrating! She can't, not 



an' keep house. 'Cause of the kind of 
work she's up against." 

That's what Sister says. But I didn't 
start in to talk about Woman's Work. I 
wanted to talk about moths. 

You see, I have just found out about 
moths this summer. Sister has had 'em 
dreadful — and so has Aunt Alida. But 
Sister worries, and Aunt Alida don't. 
That's the difference. 

"I've put every blessed thing I own 
out on the line twice already," Sister went 
on, "only to find moth holes this very 
morning et in the sleeves of Ben's best 
winter coat! It's enough to drive a 
saint to distraction." 

Then Sister suddenly sprang up and 
began spatting around the room, jump- 
ing up and bringing her hands together. 




GOING OUT TO SISTER'S 



95 



96 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



like something had accidentally happened 
to her mental balance wheel. 

''What—? What is it?" I gasped. I 
was really startled. 

"There — ^! There — ^! Don't you see 
it?" shrilled Sister. 

"See what? I don't see a thing!" 

"That moth miller! Another one — 
and I've killed five this very morning," 
panted Sister. "Oh — -there he goes! 
Above the bookcase!" 

"Wait — sit down," coaxed I. "I'll 
get the fly spatter." 

Which is what I did, having seen Aunt 
Alida do the same, and killed that 
treacherous miller — poor thing! — forth- 
with, and without commotion. Funny 
Sister don't ever think of the fly spatter 
for anything except flies. But I didn't 
say a word to commend myself — I knew 
better. When Sister has a double line 
between her brows, and it is the middle 
of the afternoon, and her hair isn't 
combed because she hasn't had time to 
brush it, why — I know she is apt to be 
edgey. It is a part of good policy for me 
to be meek. So I merely mentioned: 

"Aunt Alida had moths when I was 
down there last month. She says they 
come and go. Some years we have 'em, 
and some years we don't, like weevils, 
and grasshoppers. Some years they're 
bad and some years they aren't. Grand- 
father Dodge was there and he said he 
knew one year out in Kansas when the 
grasshoppers were so thick they looked 



like a passing cloud; that where they lit 
they et the peaches right off'n the trees 
and left the pits hanging on to the bare 
branches. And Aunt Alida said, 'Yes, 
some years pests are worse'n others.' " 

"Well, I don't see that that helps 
matters any," snapped Sister like a pair of 
scissors going shut. "I don't know's I 
want Ben's best winter coat et full o' 
holes while the plague's on." 

"Why don't you do something?" 

I'm sure my suggestion was as soft and 
low-sounding and nerve-soothing as our 
pasture brook down in the curve of the 
marshland where the skunk cabbage 
grows. And yet — 

"Do something! Do something!" 

gibed Sister in little sharp staccato notes. 
"Ain't I hung every blessed wool thing 
out'n the sun, time in and time out, just 
as I said? Do something!" 

But I kept still, as Ben says sometimes, 
I "saved my breath to cool my porridge." 

"Do something!" sneered Sister again, 
her pretty blue eyes all full of high lights 
and scorn, as they are sometimes when 
she's real provoked with me. "Now 
just what would you do?" 

"Like Aunt Alida does," said I. 

"Aunt Alida," sighed Sister, "has a 
cedar chest. I'm going to — when my 
ship comes in. If it ever does." 

"But home-made chests are good, 
Aunt Alida says so. Uncle Thad made 
her some out of pine boards, made them 
perfectly tight, and soaked up the joints 




THE SORROWS OF SARA" — JUST FINISHED! 



AUNT ALIDA SAYS SO 



97 



with cedar oil," I explained. *'Then 
papered them with newspapers — moths 
don't like printer's ink, Uncle said — ■ 
with not a loose edge anywhere. Aunt 
Alida packed them full of things that had 
just been thoroughly aired and sunned — 
to kill the hidden-away moth eggs, if 
there were any — and then she put on the 
covers and pasted strips of newspaper 
over the seams, though I'm sure they were 
already so tight a moth never could creep 
in. I said so. But Aunt AHda said: 

** 'You never can tell. It's well to be 
on the safe side.' 

"Then she slid the packed chests away 
in the low closet under the eaves, and 
forgot all about them. I think she did. 
She never mentioned them again." 

" Ben could make me some boxes — 
he's that handy with a hammer," mused 
Sister. I felt encouraged. 

"Sometimes, so Aunt Alida says," I 
continued, "she sprinkles spices through- 
out the boxes. Whole cloves, mostly. 
Because moths abhor strong odors — 
cloves or perfumery or cedar or moth 
balls. Aunt Alida says she don't like 
the smell of moth balls herself, but she 
doesn't object to cloves, and she really 
likes the cedar-y scent. Oh, yes; and 
usually she puts a layer of tar paper 
"between things. She says it's safer, all 
-around. And when she opens her chests, 
come fall, they make her think of the 
spice rooms of Araby." 

"Much you know about spice rooms," 
mumbled Sister. Which is all true 
enough, since I've never been anywhere, 
•except out to Aunt Alida's and Roxbury 
High. But I've smelled moth balls, 
and — 

"Tar paper, spices, newspapers — " 
continued Sister, thinking right out loud, 
■"all as easy to get as butter. And me 
never knowing what was good for moths." 

I could see that Sister was becoming 
interested, and growing less edgey, so I 
went on: 

"Oil of cedar doesn't cost much — not 



like cedar chests do. Aunt Alida buys it 
by the six-ounce bottle at the corner 
drug store, and a little goes a long ways. 
She paints it along the seams of her 
chests, and in the corners, not very 
much, not enough to make oil spots 
through the paper lining and on to the 
packed garments, just enough to smell 
woodsy and fragrant, like outdoors in 
a forest in springtime." 

Just then we heard Ben drive up on the 
gravel at the back gate. Sister jumped 
up as quick as if the cat had caught the 
canary, and ran out on the porch. 

"Want to send for anything?" calls 
Ben. "Got to go in to town for a king 
pin." 

"Yes," says Sister. "Two things — 
or three — " 

"Write 'em down," returns Sister's 
husband, "or I'll likely forget." 

So Sister took the envelope I was 
using to mark the place in my book, and 
borrowed the pencil I'd forgotten to take 
out of my hair, and wrote — I could tell 
what she was writing by the tw4st of her 
mouth: Whole cloves, tar paper, oil of 
cedar — 

And I went back to my reading. The 
most interesting story! Lottie Evens let 
me take the book, "The Sorrows of 
Sara." I really did hope Sister wouldn't 
want to know anything more, not till I 
got to the end of the chapter, anyway. 
Because something was surely going to 
happen, and I'd been simply crazy for 
thelasthalf hour to find out about it. . . . 
But Sister seems to be just as absorbed 
in What-to-do-for-Moths as I am in "The 
Sorrows of Sara." Queer what just 
getting married makes folks interested 
in — musty old things like moths, and 
the like. But Sister's been that way ever 
since she and Ben went to housekeeping. 
Anyway, I'm glad I could tell her what 
Aunt Alida said — maybe she won't be 
asking about my book, or that awful 
History Exam. Really, I'd rather she 
wouldn't. 



The Transplanted Housewife 

By Alice Margaret Ashton 



M 



"AYBE I'm callin' oftener than 
you're accustomed to. Maybe 
you'll agree with Pa — " 

"What has 'Uncle Wallace' been say- 
ing now?" demanded pretty Betty Jack- 
son, spiritedly, opening the side screen 
door for her early caller. "Seems some- 
times as if the men could never let us do 
a bit of neighboring and harmless gos- 
siping without—" 

"Why, Pa says, 'Don't for goodness 
sake wear out your welcome, Marthy. 
Them children don't want old folks, like 
us, hanging round all the time.' But I'd 
just heard about the old Beaman house — " 

"Across the road?" demanded Betty 
Jackson interestedly. "The empty one — 
all fluttery shingles and cracked little 
panes?" 

"Yes, yes, but it won't be fluttery and 
cracked for long, because it has been 
bought — ■ by young folks like you and 
Jimmie." 

"Oh, lovely," exclaimed Betty with 
shining eyes. 

"That makes the fourth empty house — 
right round here — bought by young 
folks! I declare I'm so pleased I'm half 
loony, I guess. This neighborhood has 
been running out and getting older and 
every year more empty houses. And 
then the Ladds commenced it and then 
you — you do like it, don't you, Betty?" 

"I love it. Let me take your sun- 
bonnet, Aunt Martha. Course you can 
sit a minute! 

"Who wouldn't love it with no rent, 
and a coop for chickens and the grocery 
billonly twelve dollars?" 

"Twelve dollars!" gasped Aunt Martha. 
"They must have made a mistake 
figgerin' — you couldnH have et that 
amount in one week, child." 

"But that's less than it was in the 
city — I tried to keep it down to fifteen. 



but you ought to have seen the items!'* 
"Maybe you'd better let me see," 
suggested Aunt Martha, gently. "I 
want you young folks should do well and 
get started saving your money." 

"Well, we want to," agreed Betty. 
Adding meekly as she passed over the 
itemized bill, "I thought twelve dollars 
was doing pretty well." 

Aunt Martha studied the figures with 
a puzzled face for a few minutes. Then 
her brow cleared. 

"I see what's the trouble, child," she 
said, patting Betty's tanned little hand 
reassuringly. "You're a transplanted 
housewife and you haven't learned how to 
manage under your new conditions. If 
you'll not resent the interference of an 
old lady who has always 'housekept' in 
the country — " 

"Goodness, if you can tell me how to 
keep the bills down and still have plenty — 
Jimmie likes to eat, you know!" 

"Course he does, and so do you — so 
do all young folks, an' most old folks for 
that matter. 

"But look what you've been eating — 
things shipped in, in tin cans and paste- 
board boxes and such. An' right round 
you the farms are full of food, lots of it 
going to waste." 

"I've always considered the package 
stuff cheapest — there's no waste," de- 
fended Betty. 

"In the city, maybe. But let's ^tudy 
over this bill. 

"Now, here's meat — a big item. Why 
not buy less meat and use more eggs and 
milk. The eggs you are producing your- 
self. Milk you can buy just a step up the 
road for ten cents a quart. How much 
milk do you use now?" 

"A pint a day and a gill of cream." 
"Better 'cut out' the cream and get a 
couple quarts of milk to start with^ 



98 



THE TRANSPLANTED HOUSEWIFE 



99 



* Set ' the milk at n'ght and skim your own 
cream in the morning. Then use every 
drop of that milk." 

"But how in the world — " 

"Study how to use milk in your cook- 
ing. Before this you have studied how 
not to use it! Good, clean milk, at any 
reasonable price, is the cheapest food you 
can buy and one of the best. 

"Doesn't Jimmie like 'milk desserts' 
— cream an' custard pies an' rice pud- 
dings an' tapioca cream.?" 

"Um! Well, I guess we both do! 
Only I never make them very often, 
'cause there is never milk enough and I 
thought it was extravagant to buy it on 
purpose.^'* 

"W^ell, it isn't— not in the country, 
anyway. An' there's scalloped dishes. 
An' milk in your bread instead of just 
water; better yet, make cottage cheese of 
your milk and use the whey in making 
bread. An' nothing Is better for supper 
on a hot night than just bread and milk — 
cr on a c -Id one than hot mush and milk. 
Pa and I have never outgrown popcorn 
and milk. Why, even when old Fannie 
gives a big pailful, we use every drop some 
way o' ruther." 

"What else about that bill.?" de- 
manded Betty. "You've converted me 
to milk." 

"Well, now, here's fruit — quite an 
item it figures up to." 

"But fruit Is so healthful — " 

"The more fruit the better. But not 
necessarily fruit out of season, or fruit 
that has been shipped two-three thousand 
miles. A little of that for variety and 
special treats. But when you live in an 
apple country like we do, you should 
make apples and local fruit your staple." 

"But there hasn't been an apple man 
through here since we came, so I've just 
ordered other fruits from the grocery, as 
I've always done." 

"Well, It's time now to lay In your 
apples for winter. Three barrels, any- 
way, Pa and I always figger on and we 
eat them, too! This year they are extra 
cheap. You can get them at the farms 



for seventy-five cents a bushel — even 
for fifty, if you pick them yourself. 
JImmie'll have to go with Pa Saturday 
afternoon and lay In a stock." 

" We've never eaten very many apples," 
observed Betty. "I am afraid we'd 
never use one barrel, even." 

"You'll acquire the apple habit just 
like any other. Don't you like apple 
pies.? An' apple jelly — from the par- 
ings .? An' there's apple puddings a-plenty 
and all good. An' apple salad. Dried 
apples are fine to keep when the fruit is 
cheap and goin' to waste. An' there's 
the apple-before-you-go-to-bed habit. 
Apples! My sakes. course you can use 
apples!" 

"I — I believe we could," Betty ac- 
knowledged. "I remember the good 
things Mother used to make with apples 
when I was a youngster." 

"Then there's potatoes," persisted 
Aunt Martha. "Since the high pi ices, 
city folks seem to have bep-. sort of 
scared about using potatoes. Now r hey 
are cheaper, especially so In the countiy. 

"Get your whole winter's supply put 
by In your cellar. And use lots of thcxa 
— nothing better. It's a regular game 
trying to see how many good ways you 
can find to use potatoes. 

"When potatoes are cheap I use then' 
In my bread — makes the biead ejctry 
good and requires less flour. Just rr.ash 
'em or put them through the p 'tato 
ricer. As much as a quart will do no 
harm. 

"I like adding a cup of riced potato to 
my doughnuts — they seem to keep 
better that way. 

"I suppose we might get othrr winter 
vegetables that way now we h^vQ a cellar 
to store them.?" said Betty tLouglitfuUy. 

"And at a real saving, too," said Ai^rt 
Martha, "If you order only what you can 
use while they are fresh. 

"When the weather gets cold and 
farmers begin butchering, you can often 
buy meat of them — a large piece of beef, 
a whole ham or half a pig. 

"There's other things, too. Popcorn 



100 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



bought at the farm doesn't cost a quarter 
what it does in pasteboard boxes. 

"An' lots of times you can get hickory 
nuts. Or a big jar of butter, or a case of 
honey." 

^'Oh, oh, we like honey! I never ate 
such honey as you gave me the other day, 
Aunt Martha." 

"Well, we can walk over to Abe 
Farney's some nice afternoon, you an' 
me, and you can order your winter's 
supply — only twenty-five cents a pound, 
he asks, if you return the boxes. He'll 
deliver it some day when he is driving 
into town. 

"But, good land, look at the clock! 
Pa'll say I'm crazy sure to stay all fore- 



noon and bother, all about nothing." 
"Bother!" said Betty indignantly. 
"When I love to have you come.? And 
when I'm at your house hours every day.? 
And when you show me how to do so I 
can reduce expenses even more than I 
ever dreamed possible.?" 

"Oh, well, we all have to learn when we 
change our way of living," observed Aunt 
Martha cheerfully, as she tied on her 
bonnet. 

"Anyway, being a 'transplanted house- 
keeper' in this dear little place beside you 
is the nicest change I ever made," de- 
clared Betty. "And I'll pass your advice 
along to all the other newly transplanted, 
see if I don't!" 



A Cry for Good Cookery 

By Ladd Plumley 



AS sportsmen, some of us visit 
every summer remote backwoods 
valleys, where we are sometimes 
obliged to spend a night or, perhaps, a 
week, acting the part of what a friend 
calls "paying guests." Generally, in such 
back-from-the-railroad regions there are 
plenty of eggs, plenty of fresh vegetables, 
plenty of milk, and when we are fishing, 
generally plenty of fresh trout; indeed, 
plenty of every kind of raw provisions, 
with the exception of fresh meat, which is 
generally scarce. With this exception 
there is every kind of good thi'ng, all 
ready to be spoiled, and spoiled with a 
spoiling skill that is fairly amazing. 

In back regions, particularly in moun- 
tain valleys, food is so wretchedly pre- 
pared that, time and time again, some of 
us have cooked our trout at midday on the 
stream and roasted potatoes in the ashes 
of a streamside fire, so as to have at least 
one digestible and appetizing meal each 
day. 

Go back into almost any such region, 
back from the railroad towns, and gen- 
erally potatoes will be cut into small 
chunks and boiled, coming to the table a 



SrOggy and watery pulp; trout will be fried 
in plenty of insufficiently heated grease, 
and are fit only for the pig-sty; meat, 
when fresh meat is to be had, will be 
fried into the semblance of black leather, 
or boiled into shreds. Very frequently 
the housekeeper will lament, "'Pears like 
my las' bread be a bit sour!" And sour 
bread is so frequent that you always mis- 
trust it when it comes to the table. 

My wife and I once spent a month In 
a lovely valley far back from the railroad 
in the central Catskill* Mountains. The 
family we stayed with owned a splendid 
farm, a herd of magnificent dairy cattle, 
an army of fine chickens, had an excellent 
vegetable garden, and the cellar was 
stocked with apples and every kind of 
root vegetables. Fresh meat was dlfii- 
cult to getj so we had practically none, 
but trout were plenty, and we sometimes 
had in the spring house twenty to fifty 
beautiful fish. They were generous with 
their chickens, in fact, generous as to 
everything. Chickens were on the table 
at dinner twice to three times a week. 

The woman of the house was kindly and 
desired to suit our city tastes, but she 



A CRY FOR GOOD COOKERY 



101 



had as little idea of good cookery as a 
digger Indian. Moreover, she was of 
that sort who resent any hint from others. 
She had learned her strange and almost 
magic arts of spoiling things from her 
mother, and, doubtless, the m.other from 
her mother. 

Her method of cooking chickens was to 
put them in cold water, and plenty of cold 
water, and boil them at a thumping rate 
until you had a mass of chicken shreds 
mixed with chicken bones. Then she 
took some of the chicken water, mixed it 
with a little milk and flour, stirred it up, 
and called it "white gravy." 

When asked by my wife how she 
cooked the chickens she answered, "Jes' 
put 'em in an iron pot with lots of cold 
water and bile 'em and bile 'em well." 

It was so difficult to get a soft boiled 
egg that we gave up trying. A favorite 
method of cooking potatoes was to boil 
them until they were a soggy mess, drain 
off the water and mix the potatoes with 
lard. These were called "smashed 
potatoes." 

One of the sons and two of the daugh- 
ters suffered pitifully with dyspepsia. The 
only wonder was that all of us didn't 
die within a week from some stomach 
disease, brought on by the misuse of a 
wealth of good food. 

That kind of cookery is pretty common 
in all remote rural districts, and it is 
little wonder that in such regions entire 
families suffer from stomach troubles. 

I have an excellent basis for my belief 
that one of the reasons why the male 
youth of American farms seek the city is 
because in the city food is so much more 
appetizing and so much more healthful 
than on the old home farm. Primitive 
man is an eating animal and he has an 
instinct for good food. If he doesn't get 
it where he is, he will go, if he can find 
that place, where good food can be 
obtained. And the cheapest and poorest 
city restaurant would be ashamed to 
bring to the table food cooked in the 
manner that it is frequently cooked back 
on the dear old home farm. 



I have never forgotten a youthful 
country male friend, whose mother was a 
past mistress in the not-difficult art of 
spoiling trout and, indeed, everything she 
put on the excellent wood range in her 
kitchen. The son's mouth fairly watered 
as he told me of the dinner that could be 
had at a country hotel on the route out to 
the railroad. At the end of my fishing 
trip, he drove me out of the valley, and 
all that morning he talked of the won- 
derful dinner we would get. It proved a 
most indifferent dinner, but so much 
better than the meals behind us "up 
valley" that it is little wonder the young 
man smacked his lips and fairly gor- 
mandized over his plate. 

Now, back in what is now a remote past, 
country cookery was very different from 
what it is today. And I hold to the 
theory that back-country cookery is 
getting worse and worse. One reason 
for this change may be that in former 
times, say thirty years ago, a housewife 
had more help than she has at present, 
or has had for the last few years. Hence 
she could give more attention to her table 
than she gives nowadays. But probably, 
also, the standard of good cookery on 
farms has much lowered. Country gath- 
erings are not as frequent as they once 
were, where rivalry, as to the best pie and 
cake, naturally brought much attention to 
the art of cookery. Whether growing 
worse or not, there can be no question 
that in many farming regions cookery is 
so bad that the wonder is how it could be 
worse. 

If we want our male youth to stay on 
the farms, and this is an imperative need, 
our young men should have appetizing 
and healthful food. Back on a trout 
stream, where I do some of my fishing, you 
see none but aged men getting in the hay 
and harvesting the crops. Last summer 
I asked one of these aged farmers — he 
is a man of seventy-five — where his 
sons and male relatives had gone. He 
told me of two sons and a nephew, who 
were in clerical positions in cities. 

"Don't for the life of me see why they 



102 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



went," he said sadly to me, it seemed. 

I may be wrong, for I never took a meal 
at that farmer's house, but if the food 
there is what I have eaten in some near-by 
farmhouses, I can guess one of the reasons 
why the two sons and the nephew are 
^'clerking it" far from the dear old home 
farm. 

There is one plan that is perfectly 
feasible, that is practicable, that would 
be comparatively inexpensive, and that 
would bring about a revolution in country 
cookery. The state provides instruction 
in a great variety of subjects, even in the 
smallest and most_ remote cross-roads 
schoolhouse. Granted that it is impor- 
tant to give instruction to the girls of 
remote farming regions in arithmetic, 
algebra and all the rest, it is far more 
important that they should have instruc- 
tion in the art of cookery. Indeed, this is 
more important than all the rest. To 
their fathers, their brothers and their 
future husbands and children, good 
cookery means health and happiness, 
good cookery means, indeed, life itself. 

Now a state could have paid teachers of 
country cookery, these teachers to spend, 
say, a month at one of the localities on 
their rounds through their assigned dis- 
tricts. There would be no difficulty in 
getting farmers' wives to offer their 
kitchens for instruction to the girls of the 
locality, say on different farms for three 
or four afternoons a week. The class 
would gather, bring with them such raw 
provisions as were assigned, and spend 
an afternoon under the instructions of a 
skilled cook. Afterward, a supper could 
be served to invited farmers, where the 
members of the class would have a 
chance to show their acquired skill. 

In this way the only expense would be 



the salaries of the instructors and their 
boarding expenses, and the latter would 
be small in the regions referred to. If 
the county paper notified the farmers of 
the region that a state cooking instructor 
was about to visit a certain locality, the 
girls would be ready to assemble for 
cookery instruction. 

Some will say that the indictment 
against back country cookery Is not true 
of some regions like New England, for 
example. But, as a matter of fact, 
although once upon a time country cook- 
ery in New England was good cookery, 
at the present time this is merely a 
tradition, a tradition which has lingered 
far beyond the fact. This may not be 
as much true of New England as it is of 
some other regions, but, unfortunately, it 
is true of even many New England back 
valleys. 

And it would seem to be axiomatic 
that until rural attention Is directed to 
good cookery, and the vital Importance of 
good cookery, and the girls of the back 
country farms have Instruction from, 
outside their own homes, no change 
can be expected to take place. And it 
would, also, seem that. If we are really In 
earnest in making the home farm, and 
home-farm life, as attractive as possible, 
our states should take up the matter of 
Instruction In cookery for back country 
regions. To make farm life attractive, 
libraries have been suggested, lectures at 
the cross-roads schoolhouse are given, 
and other means for evening entertain- 
ment have been discussed. But no one 
can read a book with pleasure during an 
attack of dyspepsia, and, after such a 
supper as I have frequently eaten back in 
the mountains, I defy any one to enjoy a 
lecture. 




Hints for the Woman Who Would Run 
A Successful Eating-Place 

By Nancy D. Dunlea 



THE first thing to decide in opening 
an eating-place is the location. 
If it is to be a woman's place — 
run by a woman who caters to women — 
it is more likely to be successful if near the 
places wealthy women frequent, such as 
exclusive specialty shops, theaters and- 
clubs. If it is a place that specializes on 
home cooking, with the idea of appealing 
to men, or general patronage, it must, of 
course, be in the business district. The 
first kind of eating-place — an attractive 
place for well-to-do women — is more 
often a successful business venture for 
women, as they excel in giving dainty 
service in prptty surroundings. Women 
who patronize an eating-place of this kind 
look for a certain refinement and orig- 
inality. But if a woman decides to bid 
for men's trade, her feature must be 
generous quantities of plain, substantial 
food, well cooked, plus anything else she 
decides to making a drawing card. 

It is something worth considering, when 
deciding to open an eating-place — 
whether it shall be a man's or woman's 
place, for the line is more distinctly drawn 
than perhaps the average person realizes. 
If at a "man's place" the sign invites 
feminine intrusion by such a placard as 
"Seats for Ladies," the gradual growth of 
feminine trade will just as surely reduce 
masculine patronage. This happens for 
two reasons. First, many men prefer to 
eat a hasty meal "with no style" with 
"no women around"; and second, as 
women come into the place, the demand 
for more particular service, such as table 
linen, thinner dishes, and daintier salads 
and desserts is sure to make itself felt. 
The management who responds to it, in 
order to continue profitably, nearly 
always yields to the temptation to cut 
down the size of the portions. The 
result is, as the writer has frequently 

103 



heard men complain, "they're cutting 
down the quantity. Too many women 
come there now, anyhow. So I don't eat 
there any more — " 

After the type of eating-place has been 
decided upon, and the location best 
suited to the class of trade, a name for 
it is of real importance. With men, 
perhaps, it has less attraction, than for 
women, but it is wise to have one short 
and catchy, so that it will be easy to 
remember as well as recommend. 

With the up-to-date woman of means 
a "smart" name is more likely to appeal. 
Names of some tea-rooms that have been 
successflil in southern California include 
the Copper Tea Kettle, Idle W^hile, 
Log Cabin Inn, and Vanity Fair Tea 
Room. Names of some other light lunch 
places as well as more general eating 
places include The Orange Blossom, The 
Wistaria, the Colonial Cafeteria, Choco- 
late Inn, The Dragon Fly and the Bunga- 
low Sweet Shop. 

The name that is "different," and one 
that lends itself to various forms of 
advertising is a good one. For example, 
a name such as "The Clover Blossom" 
or "The Blue Bird" is really practical, 
for it can be used so attractively on such 
articles as the dishes, table cloths, nap- 
kins, the signboard without, business 
cards, posters and any other advertising 
notices in newspapers or street cars or on 
programs. And any name that can be 
symbolized frequently by some object 
such as a bell, a cat, or a flower, is a 
catchy advertisement for an eating- 
place, for it has a good chance to attract 
public fancy and remain long enough in 
the memory to gain fame. This is 
particularly true with women, with whom 
such seeming trifles have a certain appeal. 
Both the exterior and interior of a tea 
room or any similar place must be both 



104 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



dainty and original to attract feminine 
trade. This does not mean, necessarily, 
a great deal of expense. But it does 
require spotless windows and napery, 
flowers or plants and many such acces- 
sories as frilly little curtains, pretty 
candlesticks and mirrors. A small bou- 
quet of flowers for every table, fresh — 
strictly fresh — every day is always 
pleasing to feminine patrons. Very plain 
glass vases that can be kept sparklingly 
clean, and ordinary flowers, like geraniums 
or field daisies, fresh every day, are much 
more attractive than more expensive 
posies from the florist's, that can only 
be cnanged twice a week. A place cool 
in summer, warm in winter, well aired, 
and certainly free from flies must be 
maintaiiled. An artistic color scheme is 
a great factor in making even cheap furni- 
ture harmonious and nice looking. 

Just the plainest, cheapest kind of 
dining chairs and tables enamelled in the 
light, up-to-date colors, such as white, 
cream, dove gray or light green, make a 
very dainty, pretty eating place, if the 
walls are the right color, to make the 
place seem cheerful and spotless. Light 
gray walls can have any number of 
various treatments. The Idle While Tea 
Room, mentioned above, has a light gray 
tint, marked off in panels with stencilled 
borders of conventional orange and green 
flowers. With cream-colored furniture 
and fresh green growing ferns bordering 
the front windows, the effect is very 
inviting. Another color, good with the 
practical gray, is a border of roses to 
match side drapes of rose-flowered cre- 
tonne. Gay tulips of crimson or yellow 
would be equally good for a border, and 
curtains of plain yellow. In a rich, deep 
tone would be sure to lend sunshine to a 
dark location. Still another pretty color 
is gray walls with Dutch blue acces- 
sories — say a wind-mill border, blue 
dishes, dull blue side drapes and wait- 
resses wearing blue dresses with starched 
white aprons and perky caps, just as do 
the girls in some of the Dutch chocolate 
shops and bakeries. 



The view from the street, through the 
front window, is one of the best adver- 
tisements any woman's eating place can 
have. To this end, the window should 
be wide, but cosily draped. Plants 
either in a plant stand within, or a window 
box without, are part of the picture. In 
summer, the right awning will add both 
comfort and a certain air of smartness. 
The *' table by the window" should 
always be particularly alluring. Right 
here, it might be said, that this kind of 
an eating place gains a certain home-like, 
more individual air with a variety of 
tables, than a dozen or two all of the same 
size. Let the table or two by the window 
be irregular-shaped, with, perhaps, a 
Windsor chair drawn up to suggest a very 
comfortable tete-a-tete. And perhaps a 
wicker standard, from which hangs a bird 
cage holding a carolling canary, will com- 
plete the charming "inlook" from the 
street. 

Now, of course, the main thing at any 
eating place is "The Eats." It is taken 
for granted that any woman who con- 
templates opening such a business has a 
positive talent for making good things to 
eat, or, at least, can make some specialty 
that Is sure to be popular with the public. 
If she can't cook herself to any great 
extent, then she must certainly have 
sufficient capital and "good business" 
to hire an A-one cook. For, after all is 
said and done, the most picturesque place 
in the world will not hold the eating 
public. They may try it once from the 
sheer fascination of looking through the 
windows — "but never again," if the 
food is poorly cooked or badly served. 
Right here is another fact, true psycho- 
logically, about large quantities. Every 
one feels outraged at "stingy helpings." 
They are really more than ready to pay 
more, if the plate always looks generously 
filled. So any woman is wise to serve 
Large Portions! — even if she has to 
charge more. It soon becomes a mouth 
to mouth advertisement, "They do give 
you such a lot on your plate at ■-^. Yes, 
of course, they charge so and so. But I 



WHO WOULD RUN A SUCCESSFUL EATING-PLACE 



105 



don't mind paying when I get plenty — 
Really, one order is enough for two — " 
Just so did women used to talk about a 
certain dry goods store tea-room where 
six fried oysters were served for sixty- 
five cents. 

"But," objected one woman to another 
who recommended it, "I never spend over 
twenty-five or fifty cents. I get a 
malted milk, a sandwich and tea, salad 
or ice cream for half that — " 

"But, my dear," replied the boosting 
woman, "you only get 'half filled.' 
Their six oysters are fried deliciously 
brown and are a whole meal!" 

The point is, whatever is charged to the 
patrons, men or women, a "whole meal" 
means a fame and success worth striving 
for. 

"Specials" are undoubtedly drawing 
cards. Watch a popular soda fountain 
some day and see. The "fruit salad 
sundae," which sells for five cents lest 
than the regular strawberry nut sundae, 
attracts a crowd, and one, at least, of 
every two women who flock there for 
a special, adds something to her menu, 
or chooses something more expensive than 
the special. A few suggestions for "spe- 
cials" are "Vegetable Dinners and Lunch- 
eons," "Business Girls' Lunches," "A 
Matinee Luncheon," "Holiday Picnic 
Lunches," "English Tea" or "Boston 
Baked Bean Suppers." A straight charge 
for every item included in the special is 
preferred by most patrons. For example, 
if a Boston Baked Bean Supper is charged 
thirty-five cents for, this may Include an 
individual pot of beans, two slices of 



brown bread and one of white, butter, 
one piece of apple pie and coffee, and 
perhaps a pickle relish or a square of 
cheese added. 

Specials that are sure to appeal to boys 
are turnovers of all kinds, apple pie a la 
mode (apple pie with ice cream on top), 
doughnuts, squares of gingerbread, pint 
bottles of milk accompanied with a straw, 
and gingersnaps, tomato spaghetti, hash 
with brown gravy, and hot sandwiches 
composed of buns filled with either roast 
beef, pork, welners, bacon or fried eggs. 

The college miss is much keener for 
every kind of a salad concoction and every 
possible accessory from olives, radishes 
and potato chips, pickles, to "Dream 
sandwiches," a slice of dripping chocolate 
layer-cake, frothy drinks and fancy ices. 

Your real matinee girl "adores French 
pastries" with her ice cream, while her 
mother may order a cup of tea with a 
couple of English muffins. 

If it is fancied that sweet desserts are 
to be restricted at a place for men, or 
general patronage, watch the eager line 
at a cafeteria some midday, and see two 
desserts on the men's trays, like for 
example, strawberry shortcake and apple 
pie or watermelon and cocoanut layer-cake ! 

The profitable part of the "special" Is 
to feature it when its principal ingredient 
Is cheapest in the market, for vegetables, 
strawberries and peaches, for example, 
all have their cheapest season. 

With all these things, and with prompt, 
cheerful service added unto them, the 
smallest venture of an eating-place will 
grow larger, because It cannot help it! 



The Hospital Nurse 



You ring— then comes the nurse all fresh and white, 
And it is comfortable to have her near; 
At her approach discomforts disappear, 
As she makes window-shades and pillows right. 
Perhaps it is her smile, attractive, bright, 
Perchance her voice, restful and good to hear, 
That helps one to meet pain or haunting fear. 
That gives one courage for the wakeful night. 



Oh, who of us would so forgetful grow 

As to neglect life's joyous, gallant task 

Of easing burdens and relieving woe 

For those who need — for some who do not ask? 

Let us remember, pledging with' right good-will, 

The nurse — and prove that we are grateful still. 

Clara Seaman Chase. 



The Insidious Tantrum 

By Louise Taber 



THE mere word, tantrum, all but 
crackles with electricity, as it 
animatedly whisks a kite-like 
tail of synonyms, that hint of such divert- 
ing foibles as — tempestuousness, whim- 
sicality, captiousness. The genealogy of 
the tantrum, itself, dates from the Adam 
and Eve period. It is no respecter of 
persons, and it flatly refuses to be ham- 
pered by rules of etiquette. With artful 
cunning it stirs its victims as though by 
a devil's elixir, to fierce and awful delight 
in wilful words and actions. The dimpled 
cherub, cooing in his be-ribboned bassinet, 
is quite capable of registering a family 
upsetting tantrum, by subtly holding his 
precious little breath until he becomes 
black in the face; this is his way of making 
it understood that he will brook no delay 
in the ministrations of his devoted slaves. 
Grown old with the lapse of time — 
perhaps a deacon in his favored church — 
the tantrum still hot on his trail will 
slyly induce him, now and then, to slam- 
bang a door with unseemly violence; to 
vindictively kick at the cat, or if too 
hard-pressed, to the fervid utterance o-f a 
neat little unorthodox dammit. 

A frenzied clatter of pans and skillets, 
in the kitchen, indicates that Cook, 
armed with her trusty rolling-pin, is good 
and ready for a set-to with the passing 
vexations of a perverse and sinister day. 
Indignation is in every step she takes. 
Rebellious fires leap in her eyes as she 
scrubs, and polishes with furious energy. 
Her every act confirms the truth of her 
proud boast that she is descended from 
good old fighting Irish stock. Later on, 
her emotional effervescence dispersed and 
the white dove of peace again hovering 
over her clean, and shining kitchen, she 
will hum snatches of melodious Irish 
songs, while she bustles about, heavy- 
footed, but light of heart, in the prepara- 



tion of a peace offering, in the form of a 
super-dinner. 

In a stately drawing room, its shining 
old mahogany, and gleam of Oriental 
rugs warring against its massive glooms, 
Miss Endicott, very impressive in a 
black satin dinner gown, is seated in a 
great carved chair that oddly typifies her 
own haughtiness. A footman enters with 
the coffee service. Punctiliously filling 
a demi-tasse, he adds the accustomed two 
lumps of sugar and effects a noiseless exit. 
In the midst of pomp and luxury, Kliss 
Endicott becomes for the moment just a 
desolate old woman oppressed by an awful 
sense of loneliness. She is overcome by 
the idea that stubborn pride, and self- 
sufficiency have kept from her the real 
things of life. She is not living, she tells 
herself — she never has lived, having 
neglected love and human companion- 
ship. Her eyes grow misty and forlorn, 
but scorning the weakness of tears she 
forces them back to ponder aloud — 
1-life is not only a r-riddle, it is h-hell and 
the d-devil, too. With reluctant delicacy 
we turn away; and in that delectable 
moment it must have happened. For 
when next we direct a news-mongering 
gaze upon Miss Endicoltt's affairs, the 
Georgian hall-marked coffee pot, in its 
silver-satin glory, lies on the floor welter- 
ing in its own coffee; and a shattered 
little Dresden china cup is keeping it 
company. Miss Endicott has, indeed, 
trailed decorum and dignity in the dust; 
she has offered the supreme insult to her 
revered ancestors now doubtless writhing 
in their respective graves. Furthermore, 
she snaps her fingers at Destiny itself, by 
animatedly planning to devote her re- 
maining years to the vicarious enjoyment 
of youth, and romance, and love. 

As mornings go in California, it is the 
utter ultimate of perfection; a morning 



106 



THE INSIDIOUS TANTRUM 



107 



of sapphire skies, radiant sunshine, and 
flower-scented breezes. A mocking bird 
warbles his repertoire of songs from the 
topmost bough of a spicy-smelling- 
eucalyptus tree. There is a tang of the 
sea, too, as the sparkling, blue Pacific, 
with boom of tumbling surf gives stead- 
fast old Point Loma a hail and farewell 
salute in passing. In blithesome mood 
you spring from your downy nest; in 
response to the call of the breakfast bell 
you leap the stairs two at a time. 
With a poet's rapture you behold the 
brown Japanese basket, heaped with 
tangerines, crimson pomegranates, clus- 
ters of purple grapes, and flaming 
Tokays, that glorifies the breakfast 
table. The lyrical tap of a spoon against 
the shell of your costly, four-minute egg, 
reveals a golden yolk, glowing through a 
quiver of jellied white. The toast Is 
crisp perfection. You sip fabulous nectar 
from a thin, white cup; the high gods of 
Olympus have nothing on you. 

The sun, now partially veiled by a 
trailing wisp of cloud, looks not unlike a 
huge, lopsided Chinese lantern flaming 
low In the sky; pouff — It sinks from 
sight. And with it vanish your fine- 
spun fantasies of the morning. A dark- 
ling mood descends upon you while 



clinging to a strap in a crowded street 
car; you fiercely long to smite the idiot 
across the aisle who prattles loudly of 
afterglows, purple Cuyamacas, and all 
that rot. You are hard-pressed and 
heavy-laden, and your shoes are full of 
feet. Home at last, you fling yourself 
into a chair and wearily close your eyes. 
Then it is that your vexations and short- 
comings, your heartaches and misdeeds 
hem you in on all sides, and with malevo- 
lent faces taunt and goad, until — swish, 
bang, zip! you are waylaid by a fit of 
brooding resentment and animosity 
toward the world and its diabolical 
treachery. You are almost angry against 
God. 

Like a touch of a cool hand on a 
fevered brow Is kindly psychology to a 
tantrum-ridden world. It tracks to their 
very lairs, these troublesome under- 
currents that sway one's being. It dis- 
covers the tantrum, shorn of its erstwhile 
flavjr of disreputability, timorously hob- 
nobbing with worth and respectableness. 
In the guise of a sort of clearing-house for 
the overburdened mind. Be It as It may, 
we may rest assured that like the bogy- 
man, the tantrum Is a-goin' to get us if 
we don't watch out. In fact it Is a-goin' 
to git us whether we watch out or not. 



A Family Affair 

By Barbara Erwin 



Y 



'ES, dear, I hear you. Mr. Arms 
for dinner and the other man is 
coming, too. Well, I'll do the 
best I can." 

Mrs. Ellis hung up the receiver with a 
tired sigh. Her husband was bringing 
two business friends home to dinner, 
she had already ordered hash and corn 
bread for the family and she must descend 
and make a change. "Hilda won't like 
It a bit," she thought, the anxious lines 
growing deeper in her forehead; "we 
had company last night and she is so 



disagreeable about it lately — if I couM 
find any one else I'd discharge her. but 
I must have •■ coz' I I've undertaken all 
this club wor.. and John and the boys 
ought to be able to bring their triends 
home when they want to without causing 
an uprising." 

With this not-too-agreeable jumble of 
thoughts in her mind, and trying to look 
pleasantly firm when she felt only weary 
and harassed, she went down to the 
kitchen to do battle with the belligerent 
Hilda. 



108 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Mr. and Mrs. Ellis, with their three 
sons, lived in a pretty home in Baxter 
— a rapidly growing, mid-western city. 
They had married yo -ng and had grown 
with the place until now John Ellis 
was at the top of a thriving business 
and the three boys were almost young 
men, deep in high school and social life, 
both of which they found exceedingly 
interesting. With the passing years the 
simple mode of living of the Ellis family 
had become more complicated until Mrs. 
Ellis sometimes experienced a passing 
feeling of regret for the days when she and 
John were poor and the children all 
babies together. She enjoyed her touches 
with the outside world, her executive and 
club work, but during the war it had 
become almost impossible to secure good 
help in the house and she had endured the 
usual succession of one poor maid after 
another. There were cars in the garage 
which the boys drove, for they managed 
only a man to take care of the lawn and 
wash windows. 

"As soon as I hear of a good chauffeur 
I'm going to hire him," John had said, 
only that morning. "But you boys can 
keep your hands off of him. Ell give you 
the Buick and you can take care of it and 
run it to suit yourselves." Ejaculations 
of approval and disapproval followed, 
with the usual hubbub of boyish vo'ces. 

Hilda proved as "ornery" as Mrs Ellis 
had expected and was only placated by 
the offer of an extra afternoon off that 
week. Poor, little Mrs. Ellis started for 
her meeting with an aching head. She 
noticed the white threads in her pretty 
brown hair as she put on her hat. "It's 
not sorrow, but cooks, that bring them 
there," she thought to herself, with a 
whimsical smile at her own suiferings. 

The dinner party, however, went off 
very well. The three boys were away, 
as the athletic association was giving a 
spread at school, so Hilda had not so 
many to serve, and the business friends 
proved pleasant and conversational. They 
sat on the porch afterwards to enjoy the 
soft June night, while the men smoked. 



Mrs. Ellis felt tired and drowsy and her 
mind seemed obsessed with the thought of 
a huge pile of undarned socks and un- 
mended b. v. d.'s, which were heaped on 
the rocker in her room. No matter 
which way the talk turned, this image 
came back to her. Perhaps through 
some magical moonlight process they 
would disappear and she would find them 
tomorrow all mended and put away in 
their respective chiifonier? and high- 
boys. But no such luck was hers, for 
when the guests finally departed and she 
and her husband went upstairs, the heap 
loomed bigger than ever. 

"Feel all right, don't you, Ruth.?" her 
husband asked, noticing her flushed 
cheeks and weary droop. 

"Oh, yes. My head aches a little. The 
dinner went off well, didn't it, dear? 
Don't lock the back door, Hilda is out. 
And be sure to leave a light for the boys." 

All night Mrs. Ellis dreamed. Miles 
of undarned socks, unwritten committee 
reports and unmollified cooks passed 
through her weary brain. Morning found 
her with an aching head and sore throat. 

"Hey, you! Dick, Tony, Aleck! — 
get up!" called Mr. Ellis, pounding at 
his sons' doors. "Your mother's sick. 
Scoot now, and get down to breakfast 
without too much noise." 

Soon three heads in various degrees of 
sleepy dishevelment were poked in at 
Mrs. Ellis's room. 

" Oh, say, mum, too bafl." " Don't get 
sick, what'll we do without you.?" 
"Where does it hurt.?" "Shall I bring 
up your coffee.?" 

Mrs. Ellis managed a feeble smile. 
"Hurry up, darlings. Tell Hilda not to 
burn the waffles," she croaked. 

The doctor came, murmured something 
about a little touch of grippe, left some 
pills and departed. But that evening 
Mrs. Ellis's fever mounted, a nurse was 
installed and three weeks of influenza 
followed, during which she did not stir 
from the room. At first, she was too pick 
to know what went on in the house, or 
to care. But finally one morning she 



A FAMILY AFFAIR 



109 



awoke with a normal pulse and head 
almost clear. 

"How have you gotten along?" she 
asked her husband when he came in to 
see how she was. He looked a little worn 
and shabby, she thought. "It must have 
been so hard for you. Was Hilda 
decent about things?" 

"We're doing just splendidly," he 
assured her. "Now don't you worry. 
The boys are all fine, and full of the 
<lickens, and I want nothing except to 
have you get well." 

To this she weakly acquiesced, but the 
next day she was much stronger and the 
boys all trooped in to make her a call. 
Then the true state of affairs leaked out. 

"Who has been paying Hilda?" she 
:asked. 

"Hilda!" blurted out Aleck, the young- 
^est. "Why, she's gone. Left the first day 
you were sick. Afraid she might get the 
-flu. Hope she chokes, old tightwad!" 

"Why, Aleck! But who has been 
'doing the cooking?" 

"WE have. All of us!" came the 
• chorus of eager voices. 

"No, sir, I always cook the meat by 
myself," Dick asserted. 

"Me for the baked potatoes! I wash 
'em good, you bet!" This from the elegant 
'Tony. 

"Dad makes slick cofi"ee," Aleck put 
in, not willing to have his adored father 
neglected. 

"Boys, you don't mean to say you 
haven't had any help with the work. 
'Why, how in the world have you man- 
aged?" said their mother, trying to get a 
•straight story amidst interruptions and 
'Contradictions. " Dick, you tell me while 
"the others keep quiet — if they can!" 

"Well, you see, mum, Hilda went 
almost right away after you got sick. 
Dad tried to get some one else but he 
couldn't. So we said, * We'll do it our- 
selves!' And we got along fine! Had 
most of our dinners at the Inn, but last 
night we cooked it here. We all help 
with breakfast, and then wash the dishes 
■in the evening. Of course, the boys stay 



at school for lunch and the washwoman 
has been cleaning the kitchen. Every- 
thing looks real nice. Yoa wait and see I " 

In spite of his affectionate reassurance, 
Mrs. Ellis felt tears of worry and weak- 
ness rising to her eyes. She must hurry 
and get well to meet this new^ situation. 
And yet her sons looked happy and 
healthy in spite of some missing buttons 
and oddly assorted articles of apparel. 
They evidently had not suffered as yet, 
and her husband, when she talked to him 
that evening, was equally confident that 
they could manage things until she was 
well again. 

"You just take your time about it and 
keep Miss Smith as long as you need her. 
It will do us all good to fend for ourselves, 
and the boys are really enjoying the 
adventure." 

So she must perforce settle back and be 
content, not asking too many questions, 
even when one morning there came a 
terrific crash from the kitchen. "There 
goes my rose and white breakfast set," 
she thought, tremulously. 

But Aleck explained, wlien he appeared 
a little later, that he had accidentally 
dropped the wash boiler. 

"I was going to put the dishes to soak 
in it. That old dish pan is no good! 
Too small!" 

How delightful the house looked that 
first afternoon down stairs! A little 
extra dust, perhaps, but the furniture 
and dishes all unbroken and in place, and 
some one had even watered the ferns 
every day, for they looked fresh and 
green. Anyway, nothing else mattered, 
it was so good to be well again and able 
to move about. At five her husband 
came home with his arms full of roses 
and the boys made their usual vociferous 
entrance, each with a big bear-hug for 
"mum," who was down stairs, at last, 
after these many days. They put her 
In an arm chair by the front windows and 
all repaired to the kitchen, even John, 
looking as if he really enjoyed the pros- 
pect of getting a meal. There was 
Continued on Page 14.0 



110 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



AMERICAN COOKERY 

FORMERLY THE 

BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL 
MAGAZINE 

OF 

Culinary Science and Domestic Economics 



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REDEMPTION 

The old gods wait where secret beauty stirs. 

By green, untempled altars of the Spring, 
If haply still there be some worshippers 

Whose hearts are sweet with long remembering. 
The cloven feet of Pan are on the hill. 

His reedy music's sadder than sad rains. 
Since none will seek — pipe ever as he will — 

Those unanointed and neglected fanes. 

Beauty and joy — the bread and wine and afil — 
We have forsworn; our noisy hearts forgot; 

We stray and on strange altars cry and call. 
Ah, patient gods, be patient with us yet. 

And Pan, pipe on, pipe on, till we shall rise, 
And follow, and be happy, and be wise. 

David Morton. 



THE MONDAY PAPERS 

"The cabaret's a tool of Satan!" 

Thunders the Reverend John Roach Straton. 

"Let's keep our hands off Russia," foams 
The Reverend Doctor John Haynes Holmes. 

"Ford's charges are a pack of lies!" 
Declares the Reverend Stephen Wise. 

"Away with hypocrites and cant!" 

— The Reverend Percy Stickney Grant. 

If preachers did not preach on Sunday, 
How could they fill the sheet on Monday.? 



PROFIT AND LOSS 

THE printers' strike has been de- 
clared off and we hope we may be 
able to resume our regular routine of 
business and get our publication out on 
time. The law of supply and demand 
must be fulfilled. Gradually we are 
reaching that condition, it would seem. 
The farmer and the retailer are the last to 
yield to the general reduction in prices. 
Amid the present war of prices no one can 
be exempt. Each must submit to the 
inevitable, take his losses, and begin 
anew. We know no Way of getting an 
honest living except by constant eifort 
and saving something, from time to time. 
We must live within our means and try to 
have something left over for the rainy 
day. To get rich quick is not the way of 
wisdom. It is not fair to other workers. 
No good results therefrom. 

"Reason's whole pleasure, all the joys of sense, 
Lie in three words — health, peace and compe- 
tence." 

THE NEED OF EDUCATION 

IN a republic, is it not plain that intelli- 
gence must have a leading part in 
guiding its destiny.^ We appeal for 
universal education, for raising the stand- 
ards of'instruction and spreading intelli- 
gence among all the people. The count- 
less institutions, richly endowed and 
flourishing, all over the land, show how 
much has already been done for educa- 
tion in America, and yet masses of people 
are not reached at all. We have recently 
visited institutions where millions of 
dollars have been spent in the most per- 
fect equipment to train and develop 
youth. This is well. Herein lies the 
well-being of the state. But how about 
our common schools.? These must be 
enlarged and perfected, to reach all 
classes, to the end that intelligence be- 
come universal, and everywhere prevail. 
We are tired of reading of the rule of the 
proletariat. We need intelligence to 
direct us in right-living, in manners and 
morals, above all, in religion and in gov- 
ernment. "Order is Heaven's first law."* 



EDITORIALS 



111 



DISARMAMENT 

IT would appear that the lessons of 
the past six years should be enough to 
convince anybody of the danger of 
nations striding up and down the earth 
armed to the teeth. But no one nation 
can reduce armaments unless all do. 
Isn't it, then, time for an awakening 
among enlightened peoples to the end 
that the leading powers may reach some 
rational agreement which would not only 
relieve the world of this terrible financial 
load, but which in itself would be a long 
step toward the prevention of war.^" 
John J. Pershing. 

"Disarmament is the only practical 

method of limiting war. It is the only 

means of preserving the world from 

bankruptcy and civilization from ruin." 

Maj.-Gen. Tasker H. Bliss. 

We agree with the foregoing most 
heartily. We believe in prohibition and 
the full enforcement of the law. The 
old soaks will soon pass oif the stage 
and peace and rest will prevail at last. 
We advocate disarmament to the utmost 
limit. We urge the cutting down of 
expenses in every department of the gov- 
ernment, and a reduction in the oppres- 
give burden of taxation. Will our Con- 
gressmen ever come to see that these 
things are the imperative demands of the 
people who are ever pleading for the 
untrammeled right to life, liberty and the 
pursuit of happiness.^ Peace, industrial 
prosperity, the protection of life and prop- 
erty, are indispensable conditions of 
happiness. 



NOW is the time we would like to 
take subscriptions to American 
Cookery. Now is the time the earnest 
housewife can ill afford to be without a 
reliable culinary publication. We want to 
be helpful in the way of comfort, health 
and economy. What are your principal 
needs .^ What do you want to find in 
American Cookery I Write us a friendly 
letter, criticalif you please. We will take 
note of your suggestions and try to make 
our publicationof real worth to you. 



THE COOKING STOVE AN ENEMY 
"/^NE of the greatest enemies of 

V-/ health-living is the cooking stove," 
says Dr. Leonard Williams. 

"The probability is that cooking is 
more deadly to certain vitamines than to 
certain others," he adds. "This is to be 
conjectured from the fact that hundreds 
of people who never eat raw foods at all, 
nevertheless manage to survive and do 
useful, vigorous work. 

"Vitamines reside in raw foods in the 
same way that vitality resides in live 
people and living things. If you eat a 
raw apple, you eat something which is 
alive, and you get the benefit of the 
vitality which it contains. 

"The message which modern dietetics 
has for those who are wise enough to 
hearken is that the present fashion of 
cooking all our foods is a very serious 
mistake. At this time of year, especially, 
nature provides us with large quantities 
of fruits and of vegetables which can be 
eaten as salads, and these are the things 
for which a taste should be carefully 
cultivated, especially amongst the young. 

MOST of us are conscious that a 
house has an atmosphere: That 
is, the habitat of human souls absorbs 
the character and personality of those 
who dwell there. Of course, we have 
been in some houses which are so little 
lived in that they reflect only the hodge- 
podge of personality inherited from 
decorators, upholsterers, caretakers, etc. 
Their atmosphere is chilling. Again, 
we have entered the simplest cottage, and 
felt the glow of life as soon as the door was 
opened to us. 

It was our aim and hope to make our 
first home a living place. And during 
even the first half year of our married 
life, we were conscious that the little 
house was growing its own personality — 
that it was gradually acquiring a certain 
character which would speak volumes to 
those who crossed its threshold — we 
longed for its words to be of life, and hope, 
and love. 



112 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Two principal factors contributed to 
its personality: The first, the living and 
the working of its owners; the second the 
gifts brought to it, and left with it, by 
its visitors. 

During the first month of possession it 
fell for the most part under the influence 
of its owners: They were very busy 
clothing it. Some of its most necessary 
garments, such as beds, etc., they bought 
new, and ready-made. But since they 
were married at the time when furniture 
had soared to top-notch prices, they spent 
a great deal of time turning old furniture 
into new. After a long search, they dis- 
covered some second-hand furniture 
•strong in base, but shoddy and hide- 
ously ugly in externals. Careful engi- 
neering, and good fresh cretonne, which 
harmonized with the wall-paper and wood- 
work, produced a settee, and five chairs, 
useful, comfortable, and attractive in 
appearance. Then, there were many 
bookcases, and a great linen chest, made 
out of a piano box, all of which were 
replete with the thought, and hopes, and 
joy of the owners. It was a constant 
delight to save up, and then buy such 
luxuries as an afternoon tea-table, elec- 
tric lamps, arm chairs, and piazza furni- 
ture — not to mention a couch hammock, 
.and a fireless cooker! 

It was all such fun, that even before 
we were settled we longed for others to 
taste the joy of what we found a very 
perfect little home. So, we decided that 
if finances would allow, we should have 
visitors. And, early experiments proved 
to us that it was possible to entertain 
simply and sincerely for very little 
money, if we supplied plenty of thought 
and planning. Indeed, the first year of 
our married life, we lived on a little over 
a hundred dollars a month — • and, more 
than half this sum was eaten up in rent! 

And so, guests came to us, and it 
seemed that each one brought our little 
home a gift — some magic power which 
went towards creating the atmosphere 
we call "home.'' 



One, for instance, during a three-day 
visit, poured out the inestimable blessing 
of an understanding courtesy: Another 
left us the urge of ambition towards a 
wider life. 

Again there came to us the gift of 
serene happiness: It was borne by a 
gentle, appreciative octogenarian, whose 
love of life and human nature manifested 
itself in an unselfish joy in the genuine 
happiness of others. 

Another gift, dear to the housewife's 
heart, was brought by a keen appreciation 
of thrifty, scientific household manage- 
ment (the hidden aim of the house- 
wife!) Though this guest never pried 
into the secret springs of the house, she 
gave such real recognition to its fruits, 
that she spurred the owners to continued 
and renewed efforts. 

And, with all our guests there grew an 
ever-increasing store of the atmosphere 
of friendship. So that It became more 
and more possible for our friends to come 
to the little house and expand, and give 
of their best. Now, the atmosphere 
grows ever richer and fuller of life and of 
life's experience. i. t. 

AUGUST 

Hazy dawn above dim mountains, slackened 

rivers in the plain; 
Dusty yarrow by the roadside, purple asters, 

clematis; 
Windless slopes of upland pasture, dry as rock 

beneath the kiss 
Of the fervid sun, incarnate, in the Harvest's 

golden gain. 

Blood-red briars, tipped with sweetness, drooping 
from the dusky weight; 

Ripened trees, whose leaves hang heavy, waiting 
for the tap of frost; 

All the air a-shrill with song infinitesimal, soon 
lost; 

Silence only in the forest, to cool shadow con- 
secrate. 

Soft nights flooded with the glory of the sum- 
mer's last warm moon; 

Tender dews that rest, too briefly, on the mellow 
hoard of life; 

All the rich-cropped land, ripe, peaceful, loosened 
from the bonds of strife. 

That through all the year have bound it, and will 
bind again, full soon. 

Katharine Sazvin Oakes. 




MELONS 



Seasonable-and-Tested Recipes 

By Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 

IN ALL recipes where flour is used, unless otherwise stated, the flour is measured after sifting 

once. Where flour is measured by cups, the cup is filled with a spoon, and a level cupful is 

meant. A tablespoonful or a teaspoonful of any designated material is a LEVEL spoonful. In flour 

anixtures where yeast is called for, use bread flour; in all other flour mixtures, use cake or pastry flour. 



Garspacho, a Spanish 
Summer Soup 

LET stew slowly in one quart of 
water one hour, one generous 
quart of fresh tomatoes, peeled 
and sliced thin, one cucumber, and a 
small clove of garlic. Add salt and 
pepper to taste — • one teaspoonful of 
salt and one-fourth a teaspoonful of 
pepper would make a very light season- 
ing — also one level tablespoonful of 
;granulated sugar. When sugar is dis- 
solved strain the soup into a tureen, and 
set it aside to cool. When the soup is 
thoroughly cooled add a few pieces of 
ice, and one cup and one-half of thin- 
sliced cucumbers, sprinkled with pepper, 
salt, and vinegar, and let chill in the 
refrigerator an hour. Just before bring- 
ing to the table toss into the garspacho 
one cup of croutons, which have been 
sprinkled with tarragon vinegar. 

Green Apple Soup 

Chop ten sour apples without coring or 

113 



paring, and cook in two quarts of water 
until pulpy. Strain, return liquid to 
kettle, and thicken with four tablespoon- 
fuls of arrowroot .stirred to a paste with 
four tablespoonfuls of water, and then 
added to one-half a cup of the apple 
soup, the whole poured into the kettle and 
well stirred until the soup boils. Add a 
dash of white pepper, and two table- 
spoonfuls of sugar. Just before serving 
add the juice of one-half a lemon, and 
garnish with green lettuce leaves cut into 
small rounds with a vegetable cutter and 
scattered over the soup like confetti. 

Fish Pudding 

Left-over fish may be used for this 
dish, or fresh, newly cooked fish. The 
fish should be freed from skin, bones and 
be flaked with a fork. There should be 
enough of the flakes to fill a quart bowl, 
lightly pressed down. Make a soft cus- 
tard with a pint of milk and the yolks of 
six eggs. While warm stir in one-fourth 
a cup of butter, seasoning of salt and 
pepper, one tablespoonful of Worcester- 



114 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



shire sauce or of anchovy paste, softened 
in a little hot water, and two teaspoonfuls 
of lemon juice. Put the flaked fish in 
a baking dish and pour the custard over 
it. Bake until the whole is well cooked. 

Dry Stew 

Put about three pounds of lamb into 
two quarts of boiling water. When it is 
a little more than half done put in somiC 
onions, peeled and left whole, or cut in 
halves; some yellow turnip, sliced; and 
if liked, three or four parsnips and three 
or four carrots, peeled and cut in halves 
lengthwise. About thirty minutes before 
serving time add some potatoes, peeled 



herbs, two or three mushrooms, one bay- 
leaf, and the grated rind of one-half a 
lemon. Add one-half a pound, each, of 
chicken and calves' liver, and cook until 
these are done. Rub the livers smooth,, 
or put them through the food chopper, 
and add enough softened butter to bind 
them to a paste. Season to taste with 
salt and white pepper, with a little ground! 
cloves and a few grates of nutmeg.. 
Butter thick the inside of a timbale mould,, 
and line it with cold, boiled, macaroni, 
arranged in honeycomb or any other 
pattern, and fill the inside with the liver 
paste, with here and there bits of cold,, 
cooked tongue, cold, cooked chickei^ 




DRY STEW 



and cut in halves, lengthwise, salt to taste 
and a dash of pepper. About fifteen 
minutes before serving add some dump- 
lings, setting them on the potatoes and 
being careful that there is not liquor 
enough in the kettle to touch the dump- 
lings, which should simply steam to be 
light. To serve this dinner, place the 
meat in the center of a platter and 
arrange the vegetables around it as a 
border. Thicken the liquor left in the 
kettle and serve it as a gravy. Beef, 
veal and chicken may be used instead of 
lamb. 

Timbale of Macaroni and Liver 

Cook in one pint of slightly salted water 
one chopped onion, one bunch of sweet 



gizzard, and hard-cooked eggs. Cover 
the mould, and let steam thirty minutes^ 
or until hot through. Turn out ancf 
serve with fried cucumber rings. 

Fried Cucumber Rings 

Pare the cucumbers and slice; cut out 
seeds and centers with a small, circular 
vegetable cutter and put them in ice 
water for an hour; then dry, and fry in 
deep fat like Saratoga potatoes. 

French Fried Potatoes 

Pare potatoes of uniform size, cut each- 
into quarters, lengthwise, and the quar- 
ters into halves or thirds, lengthwise. 
Let stand several hours in cold water,- 
drain and dry on a cloth. Set to cook in 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



117 




FOWL SUPREME 



the meat to cook. Place the breast, skin- 
side up, in a casserole without water, put 
on cover and let cook one hour; do not 
remove cover while cooking, as the steam 
escapes and the flesh is toughened; cut 
dark meat in cubes and add to a pint of 
white sauce; place the breast on a serving 
dish with a head of fresh-cooked cauli- 
flower; surround with sauce and garnish 
with toast points. 

Steamed Mould of Lobster 

Chop the meat of one large lobster, or 
of one pint of canned lobster, and mix 
with three-fourths a cup of stale bread- 
crumbs, one-half a cup of cream or rich 



milk, one teaspoonful of salt and one- 
eighth a teaspoonful of cayenne, a table- 
spoonful of capers, and two slices of salt 
pork fat, chopped fine. Bind wath two 
beaten eggs. Stir all together until 
crumbs have absorbed excess of moisture; 
then pour into a well-greased melon 
mould, cover, and steam one hour or until 
firm in center. Unless the crumbs are 
quite stale, it may be necessary to add 
more; the consistency of the mixture 
when poured into the mould should be that 
of a quite thick batter. Serve with a 
white sauce flavored with a very little 
anchovy paste, and mixed with fine- 
chopped parsley. 




MOULD OF LOBSTER, STEAMED 



118 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Peach Shortcake 

Pass two cups of pastry flour, one-half 
a teaspoonful of salt, one tablespoonful 
of sugar, and four level teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder through a sieve, two or 
three times; work in two tablespoonfuls 
of lard and three tablespoonfuls of butter 
with two knives; add one-half a cup of 
milk, a little at a time, mixing it in mean- 
while with a knife. The dough should 
be as soft as can be handled. 

Turn the dough on a floured board, 
pat with the rolling pin, and roll into a 
sheet about three-fourths an inch thick; 



make a dough as soft as can be handled, 
and let rise again until very light. Divide 
into pieces the size of a small egg; roll 
flat and thin, and enclose in each the 
half of a freestone peach. Form into 
balls by wetting the edges of the dough 
and pressing together; let rise again, and 
fry in deep fat at the temperature right 
for uncooked mixtures. The cooking 
should be prolonged until the puffs are 
very well browned. Serve hot with 
lemon sauce. 

Blueberries and Boulettes 

Make the boulettes by adding three 



/ t 









PEACH SHORTCAKE 



cut into rounds; bake from fifteen to 
twenty minutes. Slice six peaches and 
sprinkle with sugar. Split and butter 
each shortcake; fill with sliced peaches; 
place one above another; cover liberally 
with whipped cream and garnish with 
peach slices. 

Raised Peach Puffs 

Make a batter with a pint of flour, a 
cup of milk, two tablespoonfuls of butter, 
one-fourth a cup of sugar, and one-half a 
teaspoonful of salt. When smooth stir 
into it one-half a yeast cake, blended with 
a little water. Let rise until light, then 
beat in two beaten eggs. Add flour to 



tablespoonfuls of sour^cream to two table- 
spoonfuls of melted butter, then adding, 
one at a time, three eggs, beating each 
well in. Sift three cups of flour with one 
teaspoonful of salt, and add gradually to 
the first ingredients until the mixture is 
the consistency of a soft dough. Have 
ready three or four quarts of rapidly 
boiling water, and in this cook the 
boulettes by dropping in a small spoonful 
at a time of the mixture, and letting it 
remain until it rises to the surface. Put 
them into a hot dish, lay pieces of butter 
over, and heap the dish with blaeberries 
and sugar. Any other berries may be 
ased. 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



119 




FRUIT SALAD 



Fruit Salad 

Prepare two cups of watermelon and 
two cups of cantaloupe by cutting in 
inch-cubes; add one cup of sliced peaches, 
and mix thoroughly, using a silver fork; 
let chill, and arrange on lettuce leaves; 
add French dressing and serve at once. 

Raisin Puffs 
Beat two eggs, add one-third a cup 
of softened butter, two teaspoonfuls of 
sugar, and a little salt. Next add two 
cups of flour that has been sifted with 
three teaspoonfuls of baking powder; 
then one cup of chopped raisins, and beat 
this all together. Lastly, add one cup 
and one-fourth of milk. Beat the mixture 
again. Steam it thirty minutes in cups 
or in baking powder cans. This quan- 



tity is enough for six one-pound cans. 
Serve hot with foamy sauce. 

Foamy Sauce 

Beat one egg and one cup of sugar 
together. Add a piece of butter the size 
of an egg to one-third a cup of scalded 
milk. Pour this over the beaten egg and 
sugar and beat it until it foams. Flavor 
it with vanilla. 

Pineapple Punch 

To two cups of boiling water add four 
cups of sugar, and cook without stirring 
until the syrup threads. Remove from 
fire, and add two fresh, grated pine- 
apples. Let cool slightly; add the juice 
of six lemons, and let the whole stand 
overnight. Strain before serving; pour 
over a block of ice in the punch bowl, and 




RAISIN PUFFS, FOAMY SAUCE 



120 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




MARGUERITES 

add one quart of Apollinaris, or of plain 
water. 

The pineapple pulp may be added to 
an orange or apple marmalade. 

Marguerites 

Boil one cup of sugar and half a cup 
of water until it registers 240 deg. Fahr. 
on the sugar thermometer (or until it 
makes a thread two inches long). Re- 
move to back of range and drop in five 
marshmallows, cut in pieces. Let stand 
to dissolve, then gradually pour on to the 
whites of two eggs, beaten until stiff. 



Add two tablespoonfuls 
of shredded cocoanut, 
one-fourth a teaspoonful 
of vanilla and one cup of 
English walnut meats, 
broken into bits. Drop 
by teaspoonfuls on salt- 
ines and brown slowly to 
a delicate tint in a slow 
oven. This quantity will 
require four dozen crack- 
ers. 

Melon Ice in Melon 
Shells 

Freeze until mushy one 
quart of water in which 
two cups of sugar have 
been boiled for five minutes, then allowed to 
cool; now add the juice of three lemons. 
While freezing scrape out the centei of 
four small Jenny Lind melons, press 
through a colander, and sprinkle with one- 
half a cup of sugar; let stand awhile, then 
add to the almost-frozen mixture and 
complete the freezing. At the same time 
that the melon is added a little spinach 
juice may, also, be added, for coloring. 
Serve the mixture in the scraped-out 
melon shells. Flowers may be used in 
decorating this dish, as shown in our 
illustration. 




MELON ICE IN MELON SHELLS 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



121 



Pears in Grape Juice 

Boil together two quarts of grape juice 
and two pounds of sugar until thick and 
syrupy — • the mixture will probably be 
reduced one-half by this time — • and add 
enough fine, ripe pears, pared, cored, and 
cut in quarters, to fill the kettle until they 
are barely covered with the syrup. Con- 
tinue cooking until the pears are per- 
fectly soft, and the whole quantity is 
greatly reduced in bulk. Fill into sterile 
jars, put on lids without clamping, and 
put into a hot oven set on layers of 
paper on the rack of a baking pan. Allow 
to remain in the oven until the fire has 
gone out and the oven is cooled off. Then 
clamp the jars secure, and store as for 
any preserves. 

Pear-and-Quince Preserve 

Pare and core six pounds of pears and 
three pounds of quinces. Squeeze over 
the fruit, after paring, the juice of two or 
three lemons, to keep it from turning dark. 
Stew down the cores and parings in water 
to cover until soft; strain them out, slice 
the fruit and add to the water, increasing 
the quantity almost to cover the fruit. 
Cook until soft; mash with a wooden 
pestle until smooth, then add five to six 
pounds of sugar and the grated yellow 
rind of the three lemons with any juice 
left over. Continue cooking an hour 
longer, stirring carefully to keep from 
burning, and testing a little, from time to 
time, until it jellies when cold. Imme- 
diately fill into small jars, and when cold 
cover with melted paraffin. 

Orange-and-Raspberry Nectar 

Squeeze the juice from six oranges, and 
mix with the pressed-out juice from a 
pint of canned or preserved raspberries. 
Add one cup of sugar, and dissolve in the 
fruit juices, applying gentle heat to aid 
the solution, but being careful not to 
allow the mixture to get very hot. Grate 
the yellow rind of one-half the orange 
skins, and cook in a pint of water, allow- 



mg it to boil for a few minutes. Strain, 
cool, and add liquid to the orange and 
raspberry juice. When cold set in re- 
frigerator until needed, then dilute with 
an equal volume of ice water, fill tall 
glasses half-full; add ginger ale to com- 
plete each serving, garnish with a few 
fresh raspberries, and put straws or 
muddlers in the glasses. 

Gooseberry Chutney 

Cut heads and tails from two quarts 
of green gooseberries, they are better if 
not quite ripe, and cook to boiling in one 
quart of vinegar. Allow to cool, and 
add, one by one, with careful stirring the 
following ingredients : Two cups of sugar 
boiled to a syrup with two cups of vine- 
gar; two cups of salt; one-half a pound 
of onions and three-fourths a pound of 
garlic, chopped fine; one pound of pow- 
dered ginger; one-half a pound of red 
peppers, chopped, one pound of seeded 
raisins; one pound of mustard seed, 
crushed; add enough extra vinegar to 
make the right consistency, and stir the 
whole thoroughly until the chutney is 
smooth. Put away in wide-mouthed 
bottles and seal. 

Cakes for School Lunch-Box 

Dissolve in one cup of warm milk one- 
half a cup of sugar, and one teaspoonful 
of salt, then add one compressed yeast 
cake, blended with a little water, and 
flour enough to make a batter — one cup 
should be sufficient. Place in a warm 
place to rise; and when well risen add in 
the order given, one-half a cup of softened 
butter or other shortening, one well- 
beaten egg, one cup of seeded raisins, a 
little candied citron, one teaspoonful of 
ground cinnamon, and enough flour to 
knead, which should be from one cup and 
one-half to two cups. Shape into oblong 
rolls; let rise again until light, and bake. 
One or more of these may be slipped into 
the lunch-box for school or travel, either 
plain, or cut open and any good sandwich 
filling inserted. 



Seasonable Menus ^or Week in August 



Breakfast 

Cantaloupe 

Corn Flakes, Top Milk 

Fish Balls of Salmon and Potato 

Buttered Toast CoflFee 



Dinner 

Planked Chicken 

Sweet Potatoes Green Corn 

Tomato-and-Cress Salad 

Maple Sugar Ice Cream Sponge Cake 



Luncheon 

Steamed Clams Crackers 

Warmed Graham Muffins 

Blueberries and Cream Orangeade 



Breakfast 

Apple Sauce with Puffed Wheat 

Small Sausages Baked Potato 

Cream Toast Coffee 

Luncheon 

Cucumber Cream Soup 

Scrambled Calves' Brains with Eggs 

Vegetable Hash 

Wild Strawberry Shortcake 

Iced Tea with Lemon 

Dinner 

Small Leg of Mutton, boiled in Pickle 

Farina Balls Parsnip Fritters 

Endive-and- Apple Salad 

Orange Sherbet 

Coffee 





Breakfast 


Breakfast 






Farina with Chopped Dates and Milk 

Scrambled Eggs with Steamed Potatoes 

Bread Pancakes Maple Syrup 

Coffee 


Rocky Ford Melons 

Gluten Grits with Milk 

Creamed Dried Codfish 

Vienna Rolls Coffee 




Q 

o 


Luncheon 

Puree of Carrots 

Wholewheat Bread Sticks 

Thin-Sliced Virginia Ham Coleslaw 

Fig Sandwiches Tea 


Luncheon 

Savory Jellied Meat 

Baked Sweet Potatoes 

Berry Salad 

Steamed Nut Bread 

Cocoa 


3 

> 




Dinner 


Dinner 




Veal Steaks, Raisin Sauce 

Mashed Potatoes Spiiiach 

Hard-cooked Egg-and-Apple Salad 

Steamed Fruit Pudding, Lemon Sauce 

Milk Coffee 


Sirloin Steak Broiled Bananas 

Sweet Pickles 

Baked Carrots and Potatoes 

Lemon Meringue Pie 

Coffee 





Breakfast 

Watermelon 

Shredded Wheat, Hot Milk 

Fish-and-Potato Hash 

Coffee Cake Coffee 

Luncheon 

Spanish Omelet 

Escaloped Macaroni and Tomato 

Blueberry Corn Cake 

Tea Punch 

Dinner 

Roast Lamb, Sorrel Sauce 

Savory Rice Timbales Green Peas 

Raspberry Jelly, Cream 

Almond Jumbles Coffee 



Breakfast 

Blackberries 

Cracked W^heat with Light Cream 

Soft-Cooked Eggs 

Rye Meal Gems 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Jellied Bouillon en ^Tasse 

Cheese Souffle 

Orange-and-Escarole Salad 

Parker House Rolls 

Tea 

Dinner 

Cream-of-Spinach Soup 

Salmon Moussalines 

Mashed Potatoes Tomatoes 

Date Cake Frozen Custard 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Stewed Blueberries 

Cream of Wheat, Top Milk 

Fritadella, Potato and Liver 

Graham PanctUces Coffee 



Luncheon 

Eggs Benedict, 

Hollandaise Sauce 

Italian Vermicelli 

Lettuce-and-Apple Salad 

Oatmeal Macaroons 

Milk or Tea 

122 



Dinner 

Shepherd's Pie 
Escaloped Cabbage with Tomato 

Compote of Duchesse Apples 
Sponge Fingers Coffee 



Seasonable Menus for Week in September 



Breakfast 

Sliced Peaches 

Cream of Wheat, Milk 

Poached Eggs Lettuce 

Raisin Bread Coffee 

Dinner 

Mutton Chops with Grape Jelly Sauce 

Baked Potato Celery 

Escarole Salad 

Tutti Frutti Water Ice 

Macaroons Cafe Noir 

Luncheon 

Spanish Chocolate 

Toasted Pilot Crackers, Buttered 

Baked Apples 



Breakfast 

Casaba Melon 

Pettijohn and Top Milk 

Soft-Cooked Eggs 

Wheat Gems Coffee 

Luncheon 

Cauliflower-and-Tomato Soup 

Fish Hash 

Baked Macaroni Boiled Onions 

Ripe Pears 

Currant Buns Cocoa 

Dinner 

Roast Ribs of Beef, Dish Gravy 

Mashed Potatoes Boiled Young Turnips 

Hearts of Lettuce 

Gooseberry Fool with Cream 



Breakfast 

Oranges 

Oatmeal Porridge, Milk 

Grilled Bacon and Sliced Potatoes 

Wheat Muffins Coffee 

Luncheon 

Celeried Oysters 
Salad of Oranges-and-Cottage Cheese 
Graham Toast Tea or Cocoa 

Dinner 

Planked Meat Hash 

Steamed Potatoes 

Cauliflower with Sauce Supreme 

Fig-and-Apple Pudding 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Grapes 

Quaker Oats, Top Milk 

French Chops Grilled Sweet Potatoes 

Cream Waffles Coffee 

Luncheon 

Brown Stew 

Creamed Parsnips Swiss Chard 

Maple Syrup Cake 

Baked Gravenstein Apples 

Tea 

Dinner 

Broiled Mutton Cutlets 

Peach Plum Jelly 

Boiled Potatoes Butter Beans 

Snow Pudding Custard Sauce 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Blackberries with Barley Crystals 

Broiled Kidneys with Water Cress 

Raised Muffins Coffee 



Luncheon 

Eggs Poached in Tomatoes 

Shredded Cabbage-and-Pecan Salad 

Peach Fanchonettes 

Cocoa 



Dinner 

Pulled Brook Trout with Lemon Sauce 

Chives 

Stewed Cucumbers Riced Potatoes 

Sweet Cider Gelatine Jelly 



Breakfast 

Green Gage Plums 

Ralston's Breakfast Food, Top Milk 

Creamed Finnan Haddie 

Spoon Corn Bread 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Tomato Omelet 

Summer Squash Baked Green Corn 

Junket with Sliced Peaches 

Hermits Chocolate 

Dinner 

Baked Haddock with Oysters 

Baked Potatoes 

Stewed Okra 

Jellied Apples Graham Nut Cakes 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Oranges 

Brown Bread Brewis 

Light Cream 

Liver, Bacon, and Potato Saute 

Baking Powder Biscuits 

Coffee 



Luncheon 

Tripe Birds, Tomato Sauce 
Peas and Potatoes, Stewed in 

Milk 

Popovers with Apple Sauce 

Tea 



Dinner 

Casserole of Veal and Ham 

Potato Puffs 

Butter Beans Hot Slaw 

Creamy Rice Pudding with 

Raisins 

Coffee 



123 




One-Dish Meals For August 

By Florence L. Tucker 



FOR the month of August let's do on 
as little cooking as possible. Not 
as little food — oh, no! But as far 
as we can, let us have easily prepared or 
uncooked food! The one-dish meal is 
what we want; it gives the feeling of 
simplifying and cutting down. We can 
tell ourselves we are eating as people 
should during the hot weather, and light- 
ening the labor, and all the things we tell 
ourselves when we would undertake some- 
thing. And the better to carry it out we 
will make a sort of schedule the first of 
the month. 

This one month in the year it may be 
easier than at any other time to get 
together better on "eats." Every one is 
a little fagged with the heat and lacking 
robust appetite. Here is where the house- 
mother's best gain comes in; she will 
plan proper meals suited to the person of 
average digestion, and ask all to share 
' them in the interest of the general good. 
The meals, simple as they may seem, will 
have been carefully thought out, and 
all the necessary constituents provided 
for; and she will save in planning as in 
preparation. Just the work of planning 
three times a day is a burden to be 
relieved of, which has an inviting look. 
The first thing to settle upon is that in 
our August adventure we shall hearken to 
the authorities, and rich or difficult diet 
eschew for the time. The proteins must 
not be too heavy; too-fat meats, highly 
seasoned gravies, baked beans, over-rich 
roasts, whether red or white meat, we 
shall omit, or at least have but seldom, in 
favor of the more delicate meats and 
eggs; winter puddings with their rich 

124 



sauces, dried fruits, baked cheese, the 
many tasty dishes that make up the 
pleasures of a winter dinner — not one 
will we remember during this month of 
summer delights. 

Green vegetables and fresh fruits will 
afford the mineral salts the body demands ; 
and the vltamines in leaves we can have 
as not at any other time of the year. The 
vitamines are found especially in fresh 
leaves, so that raw salads have a value 
that we used not to realize; so in all the 
greens ■ — spinach, Swiss chard, beet tops 
— in them all. 

Planning the day's meals is a business 
requiring, at all seasons, thought and some • 
degree of knowledge. If our family 
apprehends now that it is going to be put 
on light diet, and manifests a little 
distrust, it must understand, at once, 
that the fifteen different elements of the. 
body which, combined, form hydro- 
carbons, carbohydrates, proteids and 
mineral salts, or better recognized as . 
starches, sugars, albumins, fats and 
mineral salts — all these will be taken 
care of. The hand that stokes the human 
engine is, or ought to be, backed by a 
brain that is on the job, to use man's 
phrase. When Solomon said, "All the 
labor of man is for his mouth and yet the 
appetite is not filled," it sounded mightily 
like a give-away of the incompetency of 
his wives; but since custom decreased the 
number of wives, wifely wisdom has been 
on the up trend. Food may differ in 
character from its usual form and appear- 
ance and yet "fill the appetite." 

A "dish of new milk" would make a 
perfect breakfast, a one-dish meal. But 



ONE-DISH MEALS FOR AUGUST 



125 



we have allowed ourselves the variety 
that charms the eye as well as the palate 
— even Dr. Wiley takes with his milk 
whole-wheat or cornmeal porri-dge and 
eggs and fruit. The porridge would seem 
to fit as nicely into our scheme as into the 
fireless cooker. But since cooked cereals 
are winter's standby, suppose we plan 
mainly without them, by way of change — 
just for August. 

Here is a one-dish breakfast that will 
please and satisfy. On the platter are 
placed squares of toast, over which has 
been poured, sparingly, the essence from 
breakfast bacon. Our bacon is cooked in 
the oven on a rack, the essence falling to 
a dripping pan, and the crisp slices laid 
on the "flavored" toast. At one end of 
the platter are heaped tender young car- 
rots fresh from the garden, and a gen- 
erous handful of young nasturtium leaves 
— one of the most delicate of the greens 
for garnishing. Fresh carrots for break- 
fast make a delicious appetizer, and, as 
all know, the carrot is chief of the raw 
foods in value. This dish we will precede 
by chilled cantaloupe, for fruit is the 
main feature of the first meal of the day. 
It is not easy, of course, to make of 
breakfast a balanced ration, but what 
was not included can be had at the eve- 
ning meal; the day's balance can be 
spread over the three meals. The best 
food specialists agree that the fewer the 
mixtures and different foods eaten at one 
meal the better. A good breakfast 
should start the day, when the stomach is 
rested and ready for its usual fuel allot- 
ment. At noon a glass of buttermilk is 
the only nourishment many business 
people find they want; with stayers-at- 
home habit is so strong a light refresh- 
ment need be set forth; but fancy table 
mats, yard flowers and tinkling ice on a 
hot mid-day are so compensating that 
sandwiches and a salad prove quite 
enough. 

Salads cannot be overestimated in food 
value, especially in warm weather when 
they seem to fill a peculiar need. A raw 
vegetable or fruit salad is equally good 



accompanied by graham bread and butter 
or toasted crackers. The lettuce and 
celery used are friendly to the nerves; 
and no fat, animal or vegetable, is so 
easily digested as olive oil. Any com- 
bination salad for a noon repast may be 
sufficiently hearty for hot weather. 

Vegetables twice a day is the rule laid 
down. Spinach and eggs will be a good 
main dish for the late meal. And while 
we shall be tempted, remembering that 
this is the principal meal of the day, to 
humor the whims of our different eaters, 
as at other times, let us hold out for the 
short menu without exception, merely 
seeing to it that a sufficient quantity, as 
well as the right elements, be provided. 

Canned goods, while the luxury of 
winter, are but a second best for summer. 
A hot dish of canned tomatoes on the 
table in August is a confession of ineffi- 
ciency or ignorance. The fresh tomato 
being one of nature's best medicines, not 
to use it straight from the vine, or, if 
cooked tomatoes be wished, fresh cooked 
— not to use it in preference to canned 
is unforgivable. 

Spinach when fresh is exquisite in its 
delicacy, but it can so seldom be had, or 
at such exorbitant price, that here is one 
article we are thankful to have canned. 
A good "brand, long aerated before cook- 
ing, is so fine that no fault can be found. 
For our one-dish meal we will drain oflp the 
liquor (to be used for a little broth for 
whoever may be ailing), and heat the 
spinach thoroughly in the oven. A 
proper amount of butter — no salt — is 
all that is needed. Sometimes, perhaps, 
a very little salt. The dish will be 
served warm — moulded into shape, 
sprinkled over with a little fine-grated 
cheese, and surrounded with rings of 
hard-boiled eggs, and this in turn with 
slices of lemon; a good dressing for 
those who like, furnishing the fat. Bread 
and butter and iced tea with cup custard, 
for the sweet will round out a satisfying 
meal. 

When possible let us serve fresh fruit 
for the dessert; but fresh fruits are acid, 



126 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



spinach is acid; so, the custards would be 
preferred at this meal. 

Nothing makes more for the pleasure 
of summer than having meals in the open. 
Dinner near sunset on the porch or under 
the trees in the yard is a different affair 
from the usual meal in the house by 
electric light. And it is naturally not a 
hot meal; though the fireless cooker is 
such an accommodating helper that the 
food can be just as you want it. 

An acceptable hot one-dish meal for 
the early out-of-door dinner will be young 
chicken and rice. The rice fills the 
middle of the platter; on it the disjointed 
chicken and gravy, while around is a 
ring of raw tomatoes, cut lengthwise, and 
outside this a fringe of parsley. Parsley 
is more and more esteemed, but must be 
gathered young. The coarse parsley, 
sold in most of the markets, is an abom- 
ination. To get it young and tender is 
what we must do, for raw greens in 
variety are insisted upon. And parsley 
is one of the most valued since the days 
of the ancients. Sliced peaches with 
thin bread and butter go well after this 
dish. 

Where the one-dish platter comes with 
compartments, the arrangement deter- 
mines itself. Few housewives have these 
as yet, but even the usual platter may be 
made very attractive. For instance, with 
our lamb roast we will serve the peas in 
potato cups — mashed potato shaped into 
balls and then hollowed to hold a spoonful 
of French peas. 

Water cress is preferred with lamb. 
And raw tomatoes. For when they can 
be used — and when is it they cannot.^ — ■ 
they are in their place in one form of 
garnish or another. The red fruit glori- 
fies a dish, but it is not for the garnish 
first that we want it, but for the vegetable 
calomel it contains. Water cress, too, 
^has its meaning; its sulphur keeps the 
blood pure. 

Tomatoes stuffed and baked and 
ranged about the cold sliced beef, when 
its day comes round, make an attractive 
effect. The potatoes we will cut in 



fingers and bake in preference to the 
French fried, utilizing the oven heat for 
as many things as may be. Potatoes help 
to maintain the alkalinity of the blood, 
and offset the acid-forming tendencies of 
meat; besides, in the potato we get 80 
per cent of water; so, with our meat 
dishes potatoes are an essential part. 
Parsley goes better with beef. 

The impression seems to be too general 
that, in order to have the proper amount 
of protein, we must have daily meat or 
eggs. But no — peas or beans may 
occasionally supply what is needed. 
String beans make a highly favored one- 
dish meal accompanied by new potatoes 
boiled in the jacket, skinned and dipped 
in butter, raw tomatoes, and young 
onions that act as a stimulant upon the 
digestive juices. 

Our one-dish meal is never complete 
until followed by fruit or dessert of some 
kind. Whenever possible we will have 
fresh fruit; when there is nothing for 
change we will go back and have the 
same things over again. Peaches twice 
a day seldom lose in popularity, and fresh 
pineapple is generally to be had. Pears, 
stewed or baked, are excellent, and have 
their flavor greatly enhanced by the 
addition of one quince to, say, a quart of 
pears. 

Egg omelet with summer apples panned 
and sprinkled with sugar and garnished 
with nasturtium leaves makes a lovely 
breakfast. * 

Lamb chops, baked potatoes (the 
skins must be eaten to miss none of the 
potassium salts), sliced tomatoes and 
water cress will prove a good breakfast 
for the day that string beans are planned 
for the evening; with grapes for fruit. 

Shirred eggs, broiled tomatoes and 
parsley are liked after stewed pears, with 
bran cookies, heated and buttered. 
Stewed pears for breakfast and baked 
pears for dinner — taste will order that. 

As the days succeed each other, it may 
be found that, however we have planned, 
we may be able to make occasional 
changes in favor of raw food. An oppor- 



JELLY IN GENERAL 



127 



tunlty like this we will not neglect; for 
the value of food is in proportion to the 
amount and kind of electricity it affords, 
and raw food supplies best the electrical 
vitality because of the organic salts. 
The spirit with which we undertake 



and pursue a quest — not the quest 
itself — ■ determines its success. And 
nothing so inspires as enthusiasm. Our 
August one-dish meal adventure may be 
the most interesting experience of the 
summer, if we but make it so! 



Jelly In General 

By Grace McKinstry 



P 



iOOR Mrs. Allen, what a shame 
she is ill!" exclaims your aunt, 
full of sympathy, and she at once 
bustles off to wrap up a glass of her 
delicious quince jelly to send Mrs. Allen. 
As you watch her, the association between 
illness and jelly grows stronger in your 
mind, probably becoming as fixed as the 
diverting connection between small boys 
and jam. You think of the currant jelly 
sent you so often during your convales- 
cence from measles, long ago; above all, 
you remember the surprise and delight 
of that lovely pink delicacy that Mrs. 
Caldwell used to send over in a sherbet 
cup — white of tgg and currant jelly 
beaten up to the rosy lightness of a cloud 
at dawn. You remember how often you 
have read in "Cranford" about Mrs. 
Forrester's bread-jelly, which she so 
loved to send to the sick: 

"A present of this bread-jelly was the 
highest mark of favor Mrs. Forrester 
could confer. Miss Pole had once asked 
her for the recipe, but she had met with 
a very decided rebuff; that lady told her 
that she could not part with it to any one 
during her life, and that after her death 
it was bequeathed, as her executors 
would find, to Miss Matty." 

But if you happen to be lunching, 
nowadays, at the various restaurants, 
pastry-shops or soda fountains in New 
Orleans (or in other cities, for that matter) 
you will be convinced that jelly is no 
longer Intended mainly for the sick-room, 
or for the finishing touch to a dinner — 
pretty and appetizing, but unimportant. 
Consider jelly doughnuts, for Instance. 



They haven't been with us quite as long 
as the Ice-cream cone, but they are found 
everywhere. Big, round, solid — • twice 
as large as an aj)ple, not particularly 
tender when they don't happen to be 
freshj they are as far from an invalid's 
lunch as one can Imagine. In the 
middle of your doughnut is a tablespoon- 
ful of very bright red jelly — ■ the impor- 
tant feature, of course. And only five 
cents; — a lunch In itself! If you don't 
happen to "feel fur" a doughnut, how- 
ever, and begin to read over the list of 
sandwiches at the back of the soda 
fountain, very likely you will find "Jelly 
Sandwiches" listed, and you will choose 
them In place of ham or cheese, because 
they seem "so like home." 

The number of cake-shops in this, and 
other cities, since the war, is simply 
amazing. Our sugar-fast must have 
made us cake-hungry, for all of the pastry 
shops do a thriving business, while, at the 
same time, housewives are resuming fine 
cake-making. Just a few years ago, 
Americans seemed to have decided that 
it looked "countrified" to serve cake, 
excepting at weddings, or very special 
occasions. They served sweet wafers 
with Ice cream, and grew mirthful over 
the recollections of their aunts and grand- 
mothers who thought it the proper thing 
to have four or five kinds of frosted cake 
for supper the night the new minister was 
there. The layer cakes seemed particu- 
larly unnecessary' — the jelly cakes of 
many exceedingly thin layers and elabor- 
ate frosting, on a tall cake stand. And 
now, behold, the jelly cake is once more 



128 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



among us, in the pastry shops and in the 
homes, and is welcomed with much joy! 
It always was the favorite cake of the 
*'men folks," for it wasn't sickishly sweet. 

And the jelly roll! That, before the 
war, was a rather commonplace, cheap 
cake that we occasionally brought home 
from the bakers', paying ten or fifteen 
cents for it. Now it has grown smaller, 
finer, more delicate and attractive ■ in 
every way. It stands among the French 
pastries in all the New Orleans restau- 
rants, and you have to pay ten cents a 
slice for it. The outside is covered with 
some thin white or pink frosting, with, 
perhaps, some cocoanut in it, and the 
little slice is very dainty, but it really 
does seem expensive. If one wants 
jelly tarts, instead, there are any number 
of puff-paste, jelly-filled rounds, squares, 
triangles and oblongs in the glass case, 
and it is the jelly that makes them so 
attractive and desirable; what would the 
baker do without it.? 

You eat jelly-omelets, at times, and 
you, occasionally, have a rice pudding 
whose meringue is enlivened with red 
jelly dots; once in a while you have 



French pancakes, delicate and delicious, 
rolled up with powdered sugar and jelly. 
Did you ever eat jelly blintzen.? Not in 
New Orleans, perhaps, but surely in New 
York, for the dish is Jewish. Blintzen 
are oftenest made with cottage cheese, 
but many restaurants make them with 
jelly, as a variation. In appearance, 
they are like French pancakes, but their 
texture is more like fritter batter. Three 
nice, hot, jelly blintzen for fifteen cents 
or so makes pretty nearly a lunch; just 
try them some time, if you haven't yet. 
So, jelly has come out into the world of 
men most decidedly during the past year. 
Christmas saw any number of perfectly 
well, husky people receiving from their 
friends glasses of quince, currant, crab- 
apple or raspberry jelly with a frolicsome 
verse enlivening the paper over the top. 
A very suitable gift; something that has 
the home-touch, and doesn't make the 
recipient feel a sense of obligation, any 
more than a box of candy would. Tell 
your aunt this, for she has more of her 
delicious quince jelly, like Mrs. Allen's 
glass, and it will help solve some Christ- 
mas problems. 



A Guest at Dusk 

In quiet eves the stars will bring 

Their ancient sense of peace to earth; 

On hedges where the roses cling, 
The dew will come to crystal birth. 

Then down the highway of the dusk, 
One dream shall come with happy feet, 

And at a doorway patient stand, 
And words as old as earth repeat. 

And will you greet her tendefly, 
And bid her enter as a friend 

For long awaited, to remain 

'Till years and life itself have end.? 

Ah, waiting heart, if in the dusk 

A Dream comes softly to your door, 

Throw wide the latch, remembering 
That Love denied may come no more ! 

Arthur Wallace Peach. 



The Pungent Mint 



MINT as a flavoring fills a very incon- 
spicuous place in the menus of 
many cooks. Mint sauce with lamb, a 
sprig of mint in the iced-tea glass and the 
possibilities of mint are exhausted. 

A little search will, however, disclose a 
number of delightful uses for this,piquant 
flavor, the secret of whose use, especially 
in desserts, is moderation. If the extract 
is used, only a few drops are required. If 
leaves are at hand, one should not be 
tempted by their abundance to use too 
large a bunch. 

In selecting mint leaves one should, of 
course, be able to distinguish between the 
two commonly used varieties, pepper- 
mint and spearmint. For any one with 
a moderately sensitive palate, the test of 
taste is sure. But there are uncritical 
persons to whom mint is mint and they 
should know that the peppermint plant 
has a purplish stem and the spearmint a 
green one. 

In the following recipes the commer- 
cial extract, as well as the mint leaves, 
is used. 

Mint Sauce 



1 tablespoonful sugar 
^ cup vinegar 



1 bunch or 12 stalks of 
mint (usually spear- 
mint) 

Wash the leaves and chop them very 
fine. Add the sugar and stir it thor- 
oughly into the leaves. Add the vinegar, 
cover and allow to stand for an hour. 

Mint Jelly 

Mint jelly may be made by adding a 
few drops of extract of peppermint to 
either apple or plum jelly, after the jelly 
is taken from the fire. The exact amount 
of extract used will depend upon its 
strength. Usually from three to five 
drops will be sufficient for a pint of jelly. 
Attempts to make mint jelly from fruits 
which are more acid than apples or plums 



are less successful. The excessive sour- 
ness seems to kill the mint flavor. 

Chocolate Mint Blancmange 

6 teaspoonfuls gelatine 1 quart sweet milk 

i cup cold water 1 cup sugar 

3 ounces grated choco- Pinch of salt 

late or 5 tablespoon- 

fuls cocoa 

Soak the gelatine in the cold water five 
minutes; bring the milk to a boil, then 
add the sugar and chocolate (or cocoa) 
and salt. Add this to the dissolved gela- 
tine, stirring constantly. When par- 
tially cooled, add three or four drops of 
extract of peppermint. Mould and serve 
cold with sweetened whipped cream. 

Mint Sherbet 



Leaves from 20 stalks 
of peppermint 



2 lemons 

1 pound sugar 

1 quart boiling water 

Over the grated rinds of the lemons 
pour the boiling water. Cover tight 
and allow to stand ten minutes. Add 
sugar, lemon juice and leaves pounded 
t3o a pulp. Strain, cool and freeze. 



Turkish Mint Paste 

gela- 



tablespoonful 
tine 

cups granulated 
sugar 



2 tablespoonfuls 
lemon juice 

Few drops pepper- 
mint extract 



i cup water 
Pour the water over the gelatine and 
let stand until the gelatine is dissolved. 
Put the sugar and water into a kettle and 
stir until it commences to boil. Add the 
gelatine and cook to 222 deg. Remove 
from the fire, add the lemon and mint 
and enough green coloring to tint it 
delicately. Pour into unbuttered pan 
and leave until cold and firm. Remove 
it from the pan by loosening it with the 
point of a knife and then gently pulling 
it to a paper covered with XXXX sugar. 
Cut into squares and roll each one in 
XXXX sugar. e. k. c. 



129 




Home Ideas 

.—^ and 

rvconomies 




Contributions to this department will be gladly received. Accepted items will be 
paid for at reasonable rates. 



Saving 

" A PENNY saved is a penny earned." 

-^^ Many's the time I have said that, 
and many's the time I have heard my 
mother and my grandmother say the 
same before me. But my daughter flung 
out at me: 'But how's one going to save^ 
Mother.^ Save! Save! It's easy to say, 
but it's another thing to do. Save, 
dad — " she swung round to her father — 
"how's a body going to do it with a house 
and a husband and a baby to keep 
going?" 

I looked at Maud, and could hardly 
believe I was grandmother. Maud didn't 
seem a day older than when she majored 
in Household Economics. But her dad 
just looked up and said: 

"The only way to save is to save.''^ 

Then he went back to his book, some- 
thing about the "Economic Evolution of 
the Individual." Maud looked at me. 
Dad's explanation had not been very 
enlightening. "Mother, how did you do 
it, you and dad," she asked, "how did 
jQ-'A get ahead.?" 

I thought back — • when dad and I were 
married we hadn't anything, and we were 
some hundred dollars in debt, and our 
income wasn't any more than the average. 

*'Did you have any special device-^ 
drop nickels in a savings bank, or — 'oh, 
anything?" persisted Maud. 

"Why, Maud—" I puzzled, "I don't 
believe there's anything tellable to it, 
the way your dad and I did. We just — 
just got along on what we had. It is 
wonderful — how well one can get along 
on what one has — if one tries hard 



enough. We did without a lot of things 
— but I don't know's we've ever gone -' 
hungry — • or shabby. It took a lot of 
planning, a lot of scheming, but we did 
it. Got along on what we had. And when 
our income didn't cover all the things 
we wanted, we went without. Going 
without is good discipline, daughter." 

"Humph!" said Maud. 

"And it pays, in the end, to put away 
a few pennies out of every dollar — even 
if It means made-over suits and mush- 
and-milk for supper. . . . And pennies 
count up pretty fast; that's the way your 
pa and I paid for this new bungalow — 
with the pennies we didn't spend. The 
pennies we began saving when you were 
a baby. . . . And, daughter, seems to 
me you've turned otit just as well — 
grown up as healthy and married as 
happily — as if you'd had embroidered 
bibs and a silk-lined baby buggy. Just 
as well as if — " 

By the time I finished talking Maud 
was looking over the lafidscape, such as 
we can see from our kitchen window, 
rather dreamily. 

"Well," she said, "if you and dad 
could do it, John and I ought to. Con- • 
ditions are different," she dimpled, "but 
I hope I've inherited some brains from 
my parents; I'm going to use them. I'm 
sure I can study out this problem in 
economy — and I guess I won't buy that 
new voile waist; I don't need it anyhow. 
Not really. And the best parts of those 
discarded gingham dresses will make baby 
some splendid rompers. And John said 
he knew I could make him some shirts — 
buying the collar bands as one can- 



ISO 



HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES 



131 



and save half. I'm glad I'm handy with 
a needle — • thanks to you, Mother. . . . 
And I know more simple suppers would 
be better for our digestions. Besides — " 
When daughter rose to go she called 
out whimsically to her dad, "I guess 
you're right, dadum; the only way to 
save is to save!^^ i. R. f. 

* * * 

The Road to Health 

IN talking of scientific cookery, a 
celebrated chef said that the Secret 
of Success consisted in the knowledge of 
the mutual influence of the ingredients, 
and the judicious management of heat. 
The addition of a little chopped parsley 
will make a delicious dish of a boiled 
breast of veal, while just a little too much 
parsley will make this nourishing and 
economical dish positively unpleasant to 
the taste. Too much salt with any- 
thing sweet is nauseous, a generous pinch 
of salt being all that is necessary when 
baking a cake. 

To Boil A Breast of Veal 

Put from two to three pounds of the 
thick part of the breast of veal in salt and 
water for fifteen minutes and then wash 
in clear water. Pour over enough hot 
water to cover the meat in the sauce- 
pan; let come to the boil, skim, and then 
add six peppercorns and a half tea- 
spoonful of salt. Let simmer gently 
one hour and a half. Now comes the 
judicious management of the heat, for 
if allowed to boil hard, the meat will be 
tough and indigestible. Mix a table- 
spoonful of flour with a little water and 
a teacup of gravy from the veal, putting 
a pinch of salt and a dash of pepper in 
the flour before mixing. Put the meat 
on a hot platter. Then pour the thick- 
ening into the saucepan. Stir and boil 
ten minutes to cook the flour; add a 
teaspoonful of chopped parsley and pour 
over the meat. Serve with plain boiled 
potatoes, mashed white turnips, and red 
currant jelly. This dish will be equal 
to a boiled fowl and far more economical. 



To Fry Bacon 

Use a thick, or what is called a well- 
seasoned, frying pan. Put the slices of 
bacon in the cold pan and set over a slow 
fire until cooked, pour off the fat and set 
aside, not mixing it with other frying fats, 
for it is best kept separate for cooking 
eggs and frying slices of graham bread. 
Put some of the slices of bacon back into 
the pan to crisp, for those who like it that 
way, and toss about. 

To Bake A Madeira Cake 

Put the yolks of two eggs into a mixing 
bowl, then with a wooden spoon beat in 
a cup of sugar and half a cup of butter. 
Add two cups of well-sifted flour, with a 
heaping teaspoonful of baking powder in 
it, then half a cup of sweet cream and a 
grating of nutmeg, beating all the time. 
Last of all, fold in the well-beaten whites 
of the eggs. Line a round cake tin with 
greased paper, pour in the cake mixture, 
placing a large slice of candied citron on 
the top. Bake an hour and a quarter in 
a moderate oven, lowering the heat after 
the cake has risen. i. a. g. 

* * * 

The Lost Word 

ONE word was lost from our vocabu- 
lary during the war; the word 
"renovate." It was a word in frequent 
use in other days. Later we forgot it, 
poked it out of sight, ignored it, just as 
long as we could. 

There came a time when peeling paint 
and dusky shades fairly shouted at us; 
the word came back like a giant of wrath 
grown unexpectedly menacing through 
long neglect. 

*' Painters receive a dollar an hour," we 
said, facing truth. 

"It is an awfully big house, measured 
in hours!" 

"Don't! I'm thinking." 

The result of thought was the con- 
clusion, 

*'We can't afford to have it done." 

Simultaneously we reached a decision; 



132 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



it was a wonderful decision, indeed. 

Somewhere on the way we had ab- 
sorbed and sheltered an idea handed 
down from the Middle Ages, that increas- 
ing years meant increasing peace and 
freedom from care. We had rested in 
that comfortable fiction. 

"Now," I said accusingly, thinking of 
paint, "I have known you to spend all 
the morning on the golf links without 
fatigue — " 

"Well, and you can work harder in an 
hour trying to reduce — " 

We fairly shouted our decision, 

"Let's do it ourselves!" And we did. 

The old myth that life at any stage 
means a lessening of effort exploded into 
a thousand pieces; the privilege of age 
came to mean a renewal of youth. 

There were lame days, and discouraged 
days, and delightful picnics at the end of 
tired days; but you should see the house! 
Newly painted woodwork led to new 
shades. Sitting down at the end of the 
week to figure our savings at one dollar an 
hour, we found that we could have new 
draperies, too. We discovered wonder- 
ful cretonne at prices that we had sup- 
posed extinct, and created new effects 
that drew rounds of applause from the 
Coming Generation. We took courage of 
experience and shouldered life again — 
not exactly where we left ofi" when the 
war struck us, but a little higher up. 

A. B. s. 
* * * 

Making Use of the Left-Overs 
Stale Bread 

IN almost every household are house- 
wives confronted with the problem of 
preventing waste. Stale bread accum- 
ulates so rapidly that it is a source of 
worry to many who wish to be economical. 
In a large number of families it is easily 
and heedlessly disposed of by throwing 
it away. A little care is all that is nec- 
essary for the intelligent housewife to 
conquer this wasteful habit. 

Run the stale bread through a food 
chopper. The crumbs may then be put 



into a glass jar to be kept until needed. 
There are innumerable uses for these 
crumbs. They may be used in escal- 
loped dishes, for rolling foods in before 
frying, for "dressing," etc. Most house- 
keepers are familiar with these more 
common uses, but here are given several 
recipes for special uses. 

Tip-Top Omelet 

3 eggs I ^ cup milk 

1 cup bread crumbs | 1 tablespoonful butter 
Seasoning to taste 

Boil the milk; add butter and mix with 
crumbs. Add seasoning and yolks of 
the eggs, well beaten. Stir in slowly the 
whites of the eggs, stiflp-beaten. Brown 
in frying pan in melted butter. 

Brown Bread 



2 teaspoonfuls salt 
3^ teaspoonfuls soda 
If cups cold water 



2 cups stale bread 
crumbs 

1§ pints cold water 

Ij cups molasses 

1| cups, each, of gra- 
ham flour, cornmeal, 
and rye meal 

Soak bread crumbs in the pint and 
a half of cold water over night. Rub 
through a sieve and add molasses and 
other ingredients as named. Steam three 
hours. 

Ham Patties 



2 cups cold, cooked 
ham, chopped fine 

3 eggs 



3 cups bread crumbs 
Enough sweet milk to 
make a soft batter 



Mix well; drop into gem pans, put small 
piece of butter on each, and bake till 
brown. 

Pimiento-and-Cheese Roast 

3 pimientos I 2 cups lima beans 

J pound cream cheese I (cooked) 
Bread crumbs 

Put pimientos, cheese, and beans 
through chopper. Mix well, add enough 
bread crumbs to form into a roll. iBake 
twenty minutes. Baste frequently with 
water and butter. Serve with bacon 
gravy or tomato sauce. Good for a 
hearty meal. 



HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES 



133 



Nut Loaf 

1 teaspoonful mush- 
room ketchup 
^ teaspoonful onion 

juice 
IJ teaspoonfuls salt 
I teaspoonful pepper 

Mix ingredients as named. Bake one 

hour in moderate oven, covered for the 

first half-hour. Baste occasionally with 

melted butter. Serve hot with brown 



1 cup chopped nuts 

2 cups bread crumbs 
J cup hot water 

^ cup melted butter 
1 egg, well beaten 



sauce. 



K. MAC D. 



Meat and Fish Comparison As a 
Food 

MEAT is the general term applied to 
the parts of animals used for food. 
It includes the muscular flesh, sinews, 
fat, heart, liver, stomach, sweetbreads, 
brain and tongue. Meat is one of the 
nitrogenous foods and is made up of four 
elements, nitrogen, carbon, hydrogen and 
oxygen, combined with some mineral 
matter and a large percentage of water. 
Fish is similiar to meat in composition 
and belongs to the nitrogenous class of 
foods. The strength-giving substances 
are the same as in meat, albumin, 
myosin, and fibrin. They are made up 
of the four elements, nitrogen, hydrogen, 
oxygen, and carbon. The cooking tem- 
perature is the same as for meat and eggs, 
160 deg. F. to 180 deg. F. Fish, on 
account of its abundance, cheapness and 
wholesomeness is invaluable as an article 
of food. It is less nutritious and less 
stimulating than meat, because it con- 
tains less solid matter and more water. 
As it contains little fat it is easily digested, 
the white varieties particularly, and 
having a large proportion of nitrogenous 
material, it is especially useful to those 
upon whom there are demands for ner- 
vous energy. The idea that fish has 
special value as a brain food is erroneous. 
The latest authorities state that there 
is no evidence to prove that fish is any 
richer than meat in phosphorus. 

Fish is not only nutritious and whole- 
some as food, but it afi"ords variety so 
essential in any dietary. 

M. D. w. 



What to Serve for Breakfast, 
Luncheon and Dinner 

FRUIT may be served at every break- 
fast, but do not serve acid fruits, like 
oranges and grapes, when a cereal is 
served. 

Serve plain foods, simply cooked. 

Serve home-cooked, coarse cereals with 
eggs. 

Serve baked potatoes with creamed fish. 

Serve creamed potatoes with smoked 
fish and lamb chops. 

Serve nuts and dates, orfigs, with cereal, 
in place of meat. 

Do not serve elaborate made dishes 
for breakfast. 

Use left-overs for luncheon. 

Serve a soup with waffles or griddle 
cakes. It will be an innovation in some 
families, for the waffles are even better 
than at breakfast. 

Or serve a made meat dish, a salad, 
and a dessert. 

Serve mayonnaise with egg, meat, fish, 
or shell fish salads. Also with the more 
delicate vegetable salads, as tomato, 
asparagus or celery. 

Serve a boiled salad dressing with 
vegetable salads. 

Serve French dressing with all green 
salads. 

Serve plain lemon with all fat fish, as 
salmon, herring, mackerel — or a green 
salad with French dressing. 

Serve a rich butter sauce or Hol- 
landaise with the white fish, like halibut, 
haddock and smelts. 

Tomatoes may be served with fish In 
place of lemon. 

For dinner serve a clear soup, meat, 
potatoes, or a starchy vegetable, like rice 
or hominy, a green vegetable and dessert. 
Orme^t, potatoes, or a substitute, a salad 
and dessert. Or a cream soup, a made 
dish of meat and potatoes, and dessert. 

With roastmeat, serve potatoes mashed, 
or roasted in the pan with the meat. 

With fricasseed meats, serve baked 
potatoes. 



THIS department is for the benefit and free use of our subscribers. Questions relating to recipes, 
and those pertaining to culinary science and domestic economics in general, will be cheerfully 
answered by the editor. Communications for this department must reach us before the first of the 
month preceding that in which the answers are expected to appear. In letters requesting answers 
by mail, please enclose address and stamped envelope. Address queries to Janet M. Hill, Editor. 
American Cookery, 221 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass. 



Query No. 4225. — "Please give me recipes 
for Angel and Sunshine Cakes. At what temper- 
ature should these cakes be baked?" 

Angel Cake 

Measure one cup of whites of eggs — 
this will probably call for the whites of 
eight large, or nine or ten small eggs. 
Put into a good-sized mixing-bowl, and 
beat with a Dover beater until foamy. 
Add three-fourths a teaspoonful of cream 
of tartar, and continue beating with the 
Dover beater until the whites are stiff, 
fine-grained, and when drawn up with the 
beater will form humps or projections 
nearly two inches high on the surface of 
the beaten froth. Fold in, from the 
bottom up, one cup and one-fourth of the 
finest granulated sugar, using a spoon- 
shaped wire beater, but mixing by means 
of folding, and neither beating nor stir- 
ring. Sift one cup of pastry flour with 
one-fourth a teaspoonful of salt, and fold 
in similarly to the sugar, adding at the 
same time one teaspoonful of flavoring. 
Pour mixture into a tube pan, which is 
smooth and polished on the inside, and 
ungreased, and bake at a temperature of 
from 345 deg. to 400 deg. F. forty minutes, 
or until cake has completely risen, then 
increase temperature and complete the 
baking as quickly as possible. 

Success in making angel cake depends 
largely on the freshness of the eggs, 
which arc best when from one to three 
days old. 

Sunshine Cake 

Cream two-thirds a cup of butter with 



one cup and one-fourth of sugar. Let 
this stand while you beat, enough to mix 
them, the yolks of eight or nine eggs, or 
the number left after making the Angel 
Cake. When yolks are mixed; add one 
teaspoonful of cream of tartar, and con- 
tinue to beat hard with the Dover beater 
until the mass is thick and lemon- 
colored. Add to these the creamed butter 
and sugar, and beat together. Add 
alternately two cups and one-half of flour, 
sifted with one-half a teaspoonful of soda 
and one teaspoonful of baking powder, 
and two-thirds a cup of milk. Beat the 
whole well together, and bake in an 
ungreased tin at about the same tempera- 
ture as the angel cake, or a little under, 
since the yolks of eggs coagulate at a 
lower temperature than the whites. 

Care of Cakes after Baking 

In each of the above cases, the tin 
containing the cake should be inverted on 
a cake rack when the baking is completed, 
and allowed to stand in a cool place, but 
not in a draught, until nearly cold. If 
by this time the cakes have not become 
loosened by shrinkage from the tins, a 
small-bladed knife may be inserted at the 
point the cake catches, to detach it, and 
the tin is again inverted. 



Query No. 4226. — "Will you kindly print a 
recipe for the Lyonnaise Potatoes served in the 
Chop Suey restaurants.'"' 

Lyonnaise Potatoes 

There is only one correct way to cook 
Potatoes Lyonnaise, whether or not this 



134 



QUERIES AND ANSWERS 



135 



is the one followed in the restaurants you 
mention. Cook four tablespoonfuls of 
butter and one small onion, chopped fine, 
in a large pan until the onion is slightly 
browned. Add to pan one pint of cold, 
cooked potatoes, sliced, and cook until 
they have absorbed the butter and are 
lightly browned on the outside. Season 
with salt and pepper when about half- 
done. When this dish is made in per- 
fection, every slice of the potato is 
browned, and this is done as quickly as 
possible and at a high temperature, 
otherwise the potatoes will be toughened. 
Sprinkle with fresh-chopped parsley when 
ready to serve. 



after following these instructions, let us 
know the proportions and ingredients in 
your recipe. 



Query No. 4227. — "In my childhood home 
in Scotland we used to enjoy Gingered Rhubarb 
with our desserts of rice. How is this made? 
Is there any royal road to making Shortbread? 
When I follow my recipe, the result is a crumbly 
mass which fails to adhere. I know I have the 
correct proportions of ingredients." 

Gingered Rhubarb 

Add to six pounds of rhubarb, cut in 
one-inch pieces, four pounds of granu- 
lated sugar, and let stand overnight in a 
porcelain saucepan. The sugar should be 
mixed previously with one ounce of 
powdered ginger. Next morning heat to 
boiling, and then cook slowly one hour 
and one-half. The rhubarb should not 
be peeled. Two ounces of dry ginger 
root may be substituted for the powdered 
ginger, but if this is done, the root should 
be bruised and tied in cheesecloth. More 
ginger may be used according to taste. 

Points in Making Shortbread 

The butter should be exceedingly soft, 
and the flour warmed. Sometimes one- 
third of the butter is reserved to melt and 
use as liquid after the larger portion 
has been rubbed into the flour. The 
melting should be done over hot water. 
The less the bread is kneaded the shorter 
it will be, unless the weight of butter, 
used, exceeds one-half the weight of flour 
— with so large a proportion as this the 
mixture may be kneaded rather thor- 
oughly. If your bread is not satisfactory 



Query No. 4228. — "Can you let me have a 
recipe for the Braised Celery served in the 
Berkeley Hotel, London? Also a recipe for the 
Jellied Red Cabbage as served in Holland?" 

Braised Celery 

We never presume to give the recipe 
for a dish served in a special hotel or 
restaurant, since every chef has his own 
methods and often his own special 
recipes, composed by himself and not 
given to the public. Hence, we confess 
ourselves unable to tell you how the 
braised celery of the London hotel was 
prepared. But we can give the usual 
English recipe for this dish. 

Trim the tops and the roots from a 
half-dozen heads of celery, and cook ten 
minutes in boiling salted water. Remove, 
and plunge into cold water. Drain and 
let stand while you prepare the braising 
pan. Set the lower part of the pan over 
a hot fire and melt in it one-fourth a cup 
of butter. When hot add to pan one 
cup, each, of carrot, turnip, and onion, 
cut in small pieces and well mixed. Over 
these lay the celery, cut across once or 
twice to make portions easy to serve. 
Cover pan, and continue to cook directly 
over fire, or in a very hot oven, ten 
minutes. Then reduce oven tempera- 
ture to moderate or low, add three cups 
of rich brown stock, and cook two hours, 
keeping closely covered. Serve on toast 
for an entree, or as a vegetable to accom- 
pany roast turkey, especially wild turkey, 
or any roast meat. 

Jellied Red Cabbage 

We do not claim that the following is 
the recipe for the cabbage you have eaten 
in Holland, but it makes a pretty dish. 
Drain the vinegar from the cabbage, 
chop it, and add enough gelatine, pre- 
viously hydrated and dissolved, to 
moisten the mass. . For a pint of the 
cabbage, drained from vinegar and well 
pressed down, there will be needed, at 



136 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



least, one-eighth a box of any gelatine 
which furnishes enough per box to make 
a two-quart mould. Hydrate this in one- 
fourth a cup of cold water, and dissolve 
by pouring over it three-fourths a cup of 
boiling water. Pack the cabbage into a 
mould; add the dissolved gelatine, but 
only in sufficient amount to bind the 
cabbage without floating it. When thor- 
oughly chilled and firm, turn out on a 
bed of lettuce, and garnish with mayon- 
naise. Small individual moulds may be 
used for a winter salad, or the jellied 
cabbage may be used to accompany cold 
meat. 

Query No. 4229, — "Will you repeat, for the 
benefit of myself and other new subscribers, the 
recipe issued in December, 1919, for Chocolate 
Icing that holds its gloss? Also, will you tell me 
why Soda is used in so many of the recipes for 
chocolate cake, puddings, and cookies, which 
appear in American Cookery, and where ao 
cream of tartar is mentioned?" 

Chocolate Icing that Holds Its 

Gloss 

The one secret of a glossy icing is that 
it should not be beaten too mucli before 
being spread. Spread while still "runny," 
or if too stiff, smooth with a knife heated 
in hot water — the water allowed to 
remain on the knife. 

Use of Soda with Chocolate 

The use of soda with chocolate is 
partly for a leaven — since soda alone, 
being a carbonate, is decomposed by heat 
with liberation of carbon-dioxide. Where 
cream of tartar, an acid, is used with t,he 
soda, carbon-dioxide is also given off, and 
there is not the discoloration or the 
slightly unpleasant taste which is found 
when soda alone is used. But soda alone 
may be used where chocolate, spices, 
molasses, or other ingredients of dark 
color or pronounced flavor are present, 
since in such cases the discoloration and 
the taste produced by the soda are 
masked by these other ingredients. A 
second reason for the use of soda is that 
it tends to make the chocolate smoother, 
through combination with its fat resulting 
in a form of saponification. We do not 



recommend the use of soda alone as a 
customary proceeding, but there is small 
harm to be feared in employing it, occa- 
sionally, in dishes for healthy adults. 

Query No. 4230. — "I should like a recipe 
for Chocolate Cream Pie." 

Chocolate Cream Pie 

Dissolve one ounce of scraped choco- 
late and six tablespoonfuls of sugar in one- 
half a cup of water; let cook until a 
smooth syrup. Add this to two cups of 
rich milk or thin cream, heated to boiling, 
then stir in quickly the beaten yolks of 
four eggs or two whole eggs, and let cook 
like soft custard. Pour into pastry shell, 
and bake until firm. Spread a meringue 
over the top, and brown it slightly in the 
oven. Instead of eggs, the milk may be 
thickened with flour or cornstarch — six 
to eight tablespoonfuls of flour or from 
two to six tablespoonfuls of cornstarch, 
cooked as for a thick white sauce, and 
adding the chocolate syrup when done. 

Query No. 4231. — "I should like recipes for 
the following: Timbale Cases, Romaine Salad, 
Escarole Salad, Peach Whip, Fowl in Casserole." 

Timbale Cases 

Sift three-fourths a cup of flour with 
one teaspoonful of sugar, and stir into 
one-half a cup of milk. Beat one tgg; 
strain to remove the "string," and stir 
into the batter. Lastly, add one table- 
spoonful of olive oil. Heat the timbale 
iron in fat at the temperature for un- 
cooked mixtures, or ho^ enough to brown 
a small cube of bread in forty seconds. 
Wipe with a soft cloth, and dip the iron 
three-fourths of its height into the batter, 
then immerse in the fat. If the iron is 
too cold, the batter will not adhere, 
neither will it remain, if the Iron is too 
hot. A little practice will enable you to 
do excellent work. Where the batter is 
too thick, or where salt is used, the 
timbale shells soften more readily. This 
also happens where the fat used for 
frying is soft at ordinary temperatures. 

Romaine and Escarole Salads 

Romaine is one of the many varieties 



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137 



138 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



of lettuce, and escarole is a name given 
to French endive, or the domestic, large- 
leaved chicory. There is no special 
recipe for making these into salads; they 
can be used alone or in combination with 
tomatoes, fruits, etc., and served with a 
French or any other dressing. 

Peach Whip 

Sift enough peaches to make one cup of 
pulp, sweeten, if fresh, with one-half a 
cup of sugar, add the unbeaten white of 
one egg, and beat with Dover beater in a 
large bowl until the mixture will pile up. 
Add small pieces of the unsifted fruit to 
increase the flavor, if desired. Too much 
beating makes this dish " choky " and dry. 
Stop as soon as it will pile up in a froth. 

Fowl in Casserole 

Cut up the fowl as for fricassee, and 
brown in broiler over clear coals, or in a 
very hot pan. Place in the casserole, and 
add enough water to cover, or chicken 
or veal stock if available; cover close, and 
cook for two hours in a moderate oven. 
The length of time to cook depends on 
the age of the fowl and the toughness. 



Query No. 4232 — "Will you let me have a 
good recipe for Brown Bread with Raisins? 
Also one for three pints or two quarts of Ice 
Cream?" 

Brown Bread with Raisins 

We assume that you mean the steamed 
brown bread. For this you should have 
one cup, each, of rye meal or flour, 
yellow corn meal, and Graham flour. 
Mix with one teaspoonful of salt, and 
add to a mixture of three-fourths a cup of 
dark molasses and two cups of nicely 
clabbered sour milk. Dissolve one tea- 
spoonful of baking soda in one table- 
spoonful of hot water and add to the 
batter. Let stand twenty minutes, then 
add one-half a pound of seeded raisins, 
pour into well-greased tins until three- 
fourths full — water-tight, one-pound 
coffee canisters or baking-powder tins 
will do — put on the lids, stand the tins 
on strips of wood or muffin rings or 



trivets in a deep kettle; fill with cold 
water almost to height of batter in the 
tins, place over fire, and let cook three 
hours and one-half to four hours, after 
water begins to boil. 

Two Quarts of Ice Cream 

One quart and one-half of liquid, 
including cream, milk, fruit juice or 
syrup, will expand from the turning of 
the freezer into about two quarts of ice 
cream. A more specific recipe is, five 
cups of thin cream, one cup of straw- 
berry preserve, one-half a cup of sugar. 
Or three pints of thin cream, one cup 
and one-half of sugar, flavoring of 
vanilla to taste. Or three pints of thin 
white sauce, one cup and one-half of 
sugar, one cup of crushed and sifted 
macaroons, vanilla or almond extract. 
The thing to remember is that a two- 
quart freezer should be no more than 
three-fourths full at the beginning of the 
freezing. It is better to make the 
required quantity in a larger freezer, to 
allow for easier turning. 



Query No. 4233 — "Will you tell me how 
$3. per person per week may be spent for food?" 

How $3 Per Capita Per Week May 
Be Spent for Food 

This is a very usual allowance in 
average families where there is a thrifty 
manager. The items will vary according 
to taste and judgment, those we give are 
only suggestive. The prices are current 
for April, 1921. 

Cereals (Breakfast grains) 3.07 

Butter, f lb. at 3-50 per lb 37^ 

Coffee, i lb. at 3.32 per lb. 08 

Flour, 3 lbs. at 3-05 per lb 15 

Fruit and vegetables .80 

Milk, one pint per day at 3-15 per qt. .52§ 
Proteins, meat, fish, cheese, eggs, 

beans 82 

Sugar, lib. at 3-08 per lb 08 

32.90 
The above quantities yield 2.8 ounces 
protein and more than 3,000 calories. 



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RELIABLE 



National Stove Co. Div., Lorain, Ohio Reliable Stove Co, Div., Cleveland, Ohio 

iVe manufacture oil and coal stores for use inhere gas is not available 



[1921] 



Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
139 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



A Family Affair 

{Concluded from page log) 
much talking, or shouting rather, back 
and forth between dining room and 
kitchen. Aleck set the table with one 
of her aprons tied around his neck, and 
once she thought she smelled something 
burning. But the meal, when it finally 
appeared, was surprisingly good. Chops, 
baked potatoes, salad and special coffee 
in her honor. 

"Any one can cook if he puts his mind 
to it," Dick declared, flourishing his knife 
and fork and quite unconscious of the 
smut across his nose. 

"Aw, of course you can," Tony 
growled, *'you always do the things you 
like to do 'cause you're the oldest, and 
leave the others to me. I fixed the salad," 
looking to his mother for approval. 

"It is delicious, every bit of it, and I 
am proud of you," she declared. 

Afterwards the boys stacked up the 




dishes — • they would not let her even 
look into the kitchen — while she, with 
her husband's help, took a stroll around 
the yard in the sweet summer evening. 

"Did you try all the intelligence 
offices.?" she asked when they had come 
in and were cosily settled around the 
big reading table. "Oh, how I dread 
another new maid. Some ignorant thing 
cluttering up the house." 

"Yes," her husband answered soberly, 
"the big mill has been opened and the 
girls are flocking to it, there is not one to 
be had for domestic service." 

"What shall we do.?" 

"Let us go on as we are for a while. 
I have ordered a dishwasher. Went to 
see them today and I know you'll like it. 
The boys will be crazy about working it. 
We can always get dinners at the Inn 
and old Anna will come whenever you 
want her for cleaning." 

"Very well. We'll try it," she acquiesced 
with a secret little sigh of relief. "Per- 
haps later we can get some one." 

But as the summer passed and winter 
came, the Ellis family still ran their own 
house with a division of labor which 
caused no one individual to suffer from 
overwork. The dishwasher proved a 
great success and was Tony's particular 
care and pride, as he was the mechanical 
one of the lot. Mrs. Ellis, herself, got 
down the old cook book she had had 
when she married and bought a new one 
and found a real joy in preparing well- 
balanced meals in her sunny kitchen. 
Their dinners at the Inn were surpris- 
ingly few, for the men all liked so much 
better to be at home. "We'll cook it 
ourselves, mum, if you're tired," they 
would say and sometimes she let them. 
To be sure she could not do much enter- 
taining in the house, but she found just 
as much time for club work as before and 
she enjoyed it with no thought of trouble 
and grudging service at home. To her 
surprise the interest of her sons in cooking 
and dish-washing held during the entire 
winter. She even caught Dick poring 
over the cook book, while Tony spent 
many spare half-hours down in the base- 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
140 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




Canning a Salad Course 



*'X TOTHING in the market for salad but just lettuce.' 



Outside of the largest cities this condition is a very common one during 
several of the winter months. Why not provide for a variety in the salad course 
by canning a shelf full of vegetables especially for this purpose? Very young 
string beans, asparagus tips, baby beets and whole tomatoes are all useful for 
winter salads. 

Young ears of some small variety of corn picked as soon as the grains are well 
formed make a novel garnish for salads. Cook the ears until tender and pickle 
in highly spiced vinegar as they have, of course, little flavor of their own. Use 
with cress and lettuce or any other fresh salad which the market affords. 

GOOD LUCK rubbers come packed with all new Atlas E-Z Seal fruit jars 

Owing to our capacity of more than 5,000,000 GOOD LUCK Rubbers daily, we are able to 
announce the return of the GOOD LUCK ring to the pre-war price of 10 cents per dozen without 
in any way affecting its high standard of quality. Order through your dealer, or. if he cannot sup- 
ply t^ou, send 10 cents for sample dozen. Send 2 cent stamp for our new cooJi boo\ on Cold Pack 
Canning. 



GOOD m IjUCK 

RED JAR RINGS 

BOSTON WOVEN HOSE 66 RUBBER COMPANY 
n HAMPSHIRE STREET, CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 
The Largest Manufacturers of Rubber Rings 



in the World 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
141 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



"Choisa" 

Orange Pekoe 

Ceylon Tea 




Pre- War Quality 

We invite comparison with any tea 
sellin(i under $1.00 a pound 

S. S. PIERCE CO. 

BOSTON BROOMLINE 



You don^t have to 




Used with sprayer forms a gas which Kills 

Flies, Mosquitoes, Roaches, Moths, Fleas, Lice, 

Bed'Bugs, Spiders, Ants, Hornets, etc. 

On the farm it kills Flies on Horses and Cattle, Lice 

and Fleas on Cats, Dogs, Chickens and Hogs. 

Pleasant aromatic odor, harmless to fowl, 

mammals and paint 

For Sale by Druggists, Grocers and Dept. Stores 

Pint Cans .75 Pint Sprayers 60c 

Quart " 1.25 Quart " 85c 

Special Mail Offer 

1 Qt. can, 1 Pt. sprayer. Postage prepaid, $2.00 

SAWYER CRYSTAL BLUE CO.. Agents 

88 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 

Does away with unsightly Sticky and Poison Fly Paper 



ment working on an attachment to 
improve the dishwasher. Old Anna kept 
the house tolerably clean and they spent 
a happy, healthful winter together, with a 
common interest which they had never 
had before. 

One evening in the spring Mr. Ellis 
announced, "The mill is going to turn 
off hands. I think you could get a maid 
now." 

"What do you say, boys, shall we.^" 
Mrs. Ellis questioned. 

The three boys were studying around 
the big reading light. 

"I suppose she won't let me cook any 
more," said Dick, doubtfully. 

"Aw, she'll probably bust up the dish- 
washer," groaned Tony. 

"What do you say, mum?" asked Aleck, 
the thoughtful. 

"If you boys will keep on helping — 
I'd rather not!" 

"The noes seem to have it," said Mr. 
Ellis, taking up his evening paper. 

Mrs. Ellis began to sing softly as she 
rocked and darned, a heap of socks on the 
table beside her. She knew, of course, 
that there were some jolts and jars ahead 
in the family track, but these did not 
matter, for they were working together 
and getting a certain amount of fun out 
of the work and she felt well satisfied. 



Apricot Cake 

Cut a slice from the top of any circular- 
shaped cake, and with a small, sharp 
knife cut out enough from the center to 
make a cavity that will hold about two 
cups. Cook a pint of canned apricots 
with three-fourths a cup of sugar ten 
minutes, or until the mixture is thick and 
syrupy, and pour this into the cake- 
cavity, reserving enough of the liquid to 
soak the under side of the slice removed 
from the top. Replace this slice, cover 
the cake with a thick custard or with 
whipped cream, and serve for dessert. 

The part removed from the center can 
be allowed to grow stale, crumbled, mixed 
with any sweet preserve, moulded in a 



gelatine jelly, or added to 
frozen cream. 



a can 



of half- 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
142 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




For the Man Who Works 
'with Hands or 'Brain 

Probably the very best in- 
spiration for the strenuous 
work of the day comes with 
the invigorating delicious- 
ness of White House Coffee 
at the morning meal. 

J -3-5 lb. Packages Only 



Yes, Madam," Says the Grocer, 
White House Coffee is Different 
— Very Different — 

— and that's just the real reason you will prefer it to any 
other brand. The 'promise of a good cup of coffee' you 
make to yourself when you put White House in your 
coffee pot is just as certain to be realized as that the 
daytime will follow the night. Users of White House 
invariably anticipate meal time for the keen enjoyment 
afforded by this splendid coffee, which always has the same 
delicious flavor that has made it the most talked-about 
and popular brand in the United States. Try it and see!" 



DWINELiLi -'WRIGHT CO^ iboston - Chicago 



\ Principal Coffee Roasterai 




Practical Binders for American Cookery 

We have had made a number of binders in green, red and ecru buckram, 
appropriately lettered. They are neat, attractive and practical. Each holdt 
conveniently from one to ten copies (a full year) of the magazine. 

As there is published in the last number (May) of each volume a com- 
plete index, by preserving the magazines in a binder one will have at th« 
end of the year a complete book on cooking and household science alwayi 
handy for reference. 

Sent postpaid lOr one (1) new subscription to Americaa Cookery. Cash Price 75c 

The Boston Cooking School Magazine Co. m^* 



MISS FARMER'S SCHOOL OF COOKERY '''"^^'"' 



30 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 



BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



Intensive Courses of four and eight weeks 



Six Months* Homemakers Course 



SUMMER COURSES 



JUNE 6 TO JULY 1 

1st and 2nd COURSES IN COOKERY 
MARKETING 

TABLE SERVICE 
FOOD VALUES 



JULY 5 TO JULY 29 

ADVANCED COOKERY 
DIETETICS 

MENU PLANNING 

COOKING FOR PROFIT 



HOUSEHOLD ADMINISTRATION 

Otf^n mil the year 



CANDY MAKING 

S^nd for ballmtinm 



Buy advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 
143 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



DIABETIC 



QUICKLY MADE WITH 



RICH IN 
PROTEIN 
AND FAT 






CONTAINS 

PRACTICALLY 

FLOUR N0 5TARCh 



: Srtnj s a Cantrotu Samplm 



Thompson's Malted Food Compsuiy 

17 River Drive Waukesfia. Wiscorsin 



SEttVICE YABLE WAGON 




Large Bioad Wide Table 
Top — Kemovable Glass 
Service Tray — Double 
'•rawer — Double 
Handles — Large Deep 
Undershelves — "Scien- 
tifically Silent" -Rubber 
liied Snivel «he.>ls. 
A high grade piece of fur- 



niture eurpassingr a n y • 
thing yet attempted foi 
GENERAL UTILITY. 



cage of action, and abso- 
lute noiselesa.iess. Write 
now for descriptive pam- 
phlet and dealer's name. 
COMBINATION PRODUCTS CO. 

504)GunardBi<ig. Chicago, III. 




^^Domestic Scien 

Home-study Courses 

Food, health, housekeeping, clothing, children. 

For Homemakers and Mothers; professional 
courses for Teachers, Dietitians, Institution 
Managers, Demonstrators, Nurses, Tea Room 
Managers, Caterers, "Cooking for Pr«fit," etc. 
"The Profession of Home-making." 100 
page handbpok,/re<?. Bulletins: "Free-hand 
Cooking," "Food Values," "Ten-Cent Meals," 
"Family Finance," "Art of Spending" — 10c ea. 

American School of Home Economics 
(Charted in 1915) 503 W. 69th Sto, Chicago, IlL 



Dress Designing Lessons FREE 

Women — Girls — 1 5 or over, can easily learn 
Dress and Costume Designing during their 
spare moments IN TEN WEEKS 
Dress and Costume Designers Frequently Earn 

$45 to $100 a Week COUPON 




Many Start Parlors in 
Their Own Homes 
1^ Every woman who 
now does plain sew- 
ing should take up / 
Designing. 

Send Coupon 
Immediately 



.' Mail to 

;' Franklin Institute, 
;■ Dept.L-637 
/ Rochester, N. Y. 

Kindly send me sample of 

lessons in Dress and Cos- 
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10 weeks' spare time 



Name- 
Address 



The Silver Lining 

Admitted 

Miss Powderly: "Women are more 
forgiving than men." 

Mr. Smart : "I'll admit that they make 
up oftener." 

Boston Transcript. 



It is probable that when the time comes 
for the meek to inherit the earth, taxes 
will be so high they won't want it. 

Dallas News. 



"Do you go out a great deal.^" "We 
never go anywhere. We pay such high 
rent we have to stay in to get the worth 
of our money." — Life. D. 



A small boy, being asked in an^examina- 
tion, "Why are you interested in the 
Northmen.?" replied truthfully, "I'm 
not," — ■ and the unsympathetic teacher 
marked him zero on the question. 



"Just think, Rose," said he, looking out 
upon the Grand Canyon, "it has taken 
thousands and thousands of years for 
that river to wear down through that 
rock." "Thousands and thousands.? 
Why, this is only 1921." 



Elsie: "Mamma, George Washington 
must have had an awful good memory, 
didn't he.?" 

Mother: "Why, my dear.?" 

Elsie: "Because everywhere I go I see 
monuments to his memory." 

New York Christian Advocate. 



R. S. V. P. 

Here is a true story from a girls' school 
in the English Midlands: A "general 
knowledge" lesson was in progress. "Can 
any one," demanded the teacher, "tell 
me the meaning of the letters R. S. V. 
P. .? " There rose the daughter of wealthy 
parents, whose receptions drew all the 
local society. "Rush in, Shake, and 
Vanish Pleasantly," she replied. 

London Morning Post. 



huy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
144 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



/W. /fnaftjj h^ 



What is Your Favorite Dessert ? 

WHAT is your favorite gelatine dessert? Which of the one hundred desserts given in the Knox 
booklet "Dainty Desserts" is most popular in yoiir home? I imagine it will be one of the 
four recipes given here, each so delicious it is hard to select the best one. 

Make them up for different luncheons or dinners — (only one package of Knox Gelatine is needed 
to make the entire four desserts, each one of which will serve six persons) — and write me your vote 
so that I may present to the women of the land the nation's most popular Knox Gelatine dessert. 

I believe every woman will be interested in the result of this test which I will publish on this 
page. Here are the recipes: 

STRAWBERRY BAVARIAN CREAM 

J^ envelope Knox Sparkling Gelatine 1 cup strawberry juice and pulp 1 tablespoonful lemon juice 

Ji cup cold water 13^ cups heavy cream beaten until stiff J^ cup sugar 

Soak gelatine in cold water five minutes, and dissolve by standing cup containing mixture in hot water. Strain into 
strawberry juice_ mixed with lemon juice. Add sugar and when sugar is dissolved, set bowl containing mixture in pan pf 
ice water and stir until mixture begins to thicken; then fold in cream. Turn into wet mold lined with strawberries cut in 
halves, and chill. Garnish with fruit, selected strawberries, and leaves. Adelicious cream may also be made with canned 
strawberries. 

LEMON SPONGE OR SNOW PUDDING 

J4 envelope Knox Sparkling Gelatine ^ cup sugar Whites of two eggs 

J^ cup cold water J^ cup lemon juice 1 cup boiling water 

Soak gelatine in cold water five minutes, dissolve in boiling water, add sugar, lemon juice and grated rind of one lemon, 
strain and set aside; occasionally stir mixture and when quite thick, beat with wire spoon or whisk, until frothy; add 
whites of eggs beaten stiff, and continue beating until stiff enough to hold its shape. Pile by spoonfuls on glass dish. Chili 
and serve with boiled custard. 



CHOCOLATE BLANCMANGE 



^envelope Knox Sparkling Gelatine 
]4: 9up cold water 
1 pint milk 



J^ teaspoonful vanilla 
Few grains salt 



1 cup chopped nut meats 
1 teaspoonful vanilla 



1 ounce grated unsweetened chocolate or 

3 tablespoonfuls cocoa 

?/2 cup sugar 

Soak gelatine in cold water five minutes. Scald milk and add sugar, chocolate or COCOa rubbed to a smooth paste 
with a little water and salt. When sugar is dissolved, add soaked gelatine, then add flavoring. Turn into mold, first 
dipped in cold water, and chill. Serve with whipped cream, sweetened and flavored with vanilla. 

RICE PARFAIT 

H envelope Knox Sparkling Gelatine 1 cup cream 

2 cups hot boiled rice 1 cup sugar 

IVi cups milk li teaspoonful salt 

_ Soak gelatine in milk ten minutes and dissolve in hot rice. Add sugar and salt, and when cool, fold in cream b«aten 
until stiff. Add nuts and flavoring. Turn into a mold, and pack in ice and salt. 

Send for ** Dainty Desserts** 
The Favorite Dessert Book 

There is only room here to give four of the one hundred delicious dessert recipes given in my 

book, "Dainty Desserts" — which also contains recipes for ice creams, sherbets, salads, candies, etc. 

Write for a free copy before sending in your family's vote on the nation's most popular dessert. 

You may find in it a dessert you like even better than any I have published here. Enclose 4 cents 

in stamps to cover postage and mention your 

grocer's name. 

Any domestic science teacher can have sufficient gelatine 
for her class, if she will write me on school stationery, stating 
quantity and when needed , 




"Wherever a recipe calls for Gelatine — it means KNOX' 

MRS. CHARLES B. KNOX 

KNOX GELATINE 



107 Knox Avenue 



Johnstown, N. Y. 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
145 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



{ra; wfdrd 



IN GRAY ENAMEL FINISH 

Bake in three ovens and use 

the gas broiler at the 

same time 

The new Victory Crawford is the only range 
on the market which does this — and in 
addition has room for four kettles on the coal 
griddles and five on the gas burners. 

And though there is so much oven space — 
six and a half square feet, or thirteen square 
feet with the racks — the Victory Crawford 
measures only forty-three inches from end 
to end. 

It's a thoroughly up-to-date combination 
gas and coal range with many exclusive im- 
provements which make it efficient, economi- 
cal, easy to keep clean — a time and step 
saver for the busy housewife. Ask your 
dealer to show you the Victory Crawford — 
you'll find it just the range you've always 
wanted. 



Sold by Leading Dealers 



WALKER & PRATT MFG. CO. 

BOSTON, U. S. A. 

Makers of Highest Quality Ranges 
Furnaces and Boilers 




Perhaps, In Next Moonlight | 

A pretty young woman stepped into a 
music shop in the city the other day. 
She tripped up to the counter where a new 
clerk was assorting music, and in her 
sweetest tones asked: "Have you 'Kissed 
Me in the Moonlight'?" 

The clerk turned, looked, and said: "It 
must have been the man at the other 
counter. I've only been here a week." J 



She Knew A Good Thing - 

During a dangerous epidemic in a small 
western town every infected house was 
put under quarantine. After the disease 
had been checked the health officers were 
taking down the quarantine signs, when 
an old negress protested. 

"Why, auntie," said an officer, "don't 
you want me to take that sign down.^" 

"Well, sah," was the reply, "dey ain' 
be'n a bill collectah neah dis house since 
dat sign went up. You-all let it alone." 



A Western evangelist makes a practice 
of painting religious lines on rocks and 
fences along public highways. One ran, 
"What will you do when you die.^" 
Came an advertising man and painted 
under it: "Use Delta Oil. Good for 
burns." — American Legion Weekly, 



"It is indeed a pleasure," remarked the 
man who approves of prohibition, "to be 
able to walk the streets without seeing a 
saloon on every corner." "And yet," 
returned the unregenerate one, "it's a 
great comfort to know they are there, 
even if you don't see them." 

New York Sun. 



A German Wooing 

In the autobiography of Andrew Carj 
negie we find an account of William Kk 
man, a German business man in the" 
Carnegie employment who rose to an 
income of about 350,000 a year. He had 
gone to Germany to visit a former school- 
fellow, and on his return he wished to tell 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
146 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




n n 







44 



From Contented Cows'' 



OUT in the country where the grass is green in rolling pas- 
tures, sleek dairy herds produce the good rich milk you 
buy under the Carnation label. Evaporated to the thickness of 
cream, this milk is sealed in air-tight containers, and sterilized 
to insure its purity for you. Use it for every milk purpose : for 
cooking, drinking, and as cream with cereals, coffee, and desserts. 
Send for Carnation Cook Book. It contains tested recipes. 

Carnation Milk Products Company 

858 Consumers Building, Chicago 958 Stuart Building, Seattle 



Carnation 

^^F r o m Contented Cows'' 



iW^^^^^j 




Milk 



The label is red and white 

Carnation Milk Products Co. 
Seattle Chicago Aylmer, Ont. 



Pea Timbales — 1 can peas or K can pea pulp, 3 eggs, 1 
cup Carnation Milk, 1 cup water, 1 teaspoonful salt, Ys 
teaspoonful white pepper, speck of cayenne, few drops of 
onion juice. Rinse peas and rub through a sieve. Add 
beaten eggs, milk, and seasonings. Mix and pour into 
buttered individual molds. Set in shallow pan of hot water 
and bake in a medium oven until set. Turn out on deep 
platter and pour two cups of thin white sauce mixed with 
one cup peas. Garnish with parsley. 



To Season Fresh Vegetables — Cook peas, string beans, 
lima beans, cauliflower, sweet corn, etc., in salted water 
in the usual way. (For peas and beans, cook in little 
water, and simmer down to 2 tablespoonfuls of water.) 
Add Carnation Milk as desired, and season to taste. 

There are many other recipes as good as these in the 
Carnation Recipe Book. Send for it. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
147 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



A' pMDircis y 



Sticky Fly Paper, Sticky FirRiBBoy, 
Tr eeTanglefoot. Roach 'Ji'A NT Powd er. 

TheO&W.Thum CcManufacturers, 

Grand Rapids. Mich. Walk£RV1LLE.Canaoa. 



'•The Art of Spending'' 

IT«Ui kow to get more for your Tjoney — how to iw httttr and 
tM« w^rt! How to record moathiy household expense* withevt 
lUnttkM scgountt. 32 pp. illustrated xo tents 
AM. SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS, 503a W. 69th ST., CHICAGO 




CAKE and MUFFIN TES TER 

Convenient, Sanitary and Hygienic 
Year's Supply for a Dime. Send 10c. (Stamps or Coin) to 

PERCY H. HOWARD 
2 Central Square Cambridge, Mass. 



Dehydrating Foods 

By A. LOUISE ANDREA 

"The Book of the Hour*'— 

Spokane Sfokesman-Riview 

Absolute economy, if nothing else, will 
cause the Dehydration of fruits, vegetables, 
fish and meats to become a regular house- 
hold duty, within the next few years. 

The process is simpler than canning, re- 
quires neither cans, jars — nor sugar. This, 
the first authoritative treatise on the subject 
of the practical conservation of food, is just 
out of the press. Postpaid $1.85. 

The Comhill Publishinsr Company 

2A Park Street, Boston 



SALAD SECRETS 



100 recipes. Brief but complete. 154 by mall. 100 Meat- 
les»_fecipes 15c _ 50 Sandwich redpcs ISc. AU three 30c 
B. R. BRIGGS, 250 Madiaon St.. Brooklyn N.Y 



A Dishwasher for $2.50! 

Kaepi kaadi out of the water, ■• wiping of dishei, lares \ the 
ttase. Ceniists ef tpeeial feldinc dishdrainer, special wire 
kasket, f special Ions- handled brashes. Full directiaas far nse. 
Sent prepaid for $2.56. Full rcfand if not satisfactory. 

Am; Scked Heme EoenafBiics, 503 W. 69th Street, Giicago 



Mr. Carnegie something "particular." 
His story was as follows: 

"Well, Mr. Carnegie, his sister who 
kept his house was very kind to me, and 
ven I got to Hamburg I tought I sent her 
yust a little present. She write me a 
letter, then I write her a letter. She 
write me and I write her, and den I ask 
her would she marry me. She was very 
educated, but she write yes. Den I ask 
her to come to New York, and I meet her 
dere, but, Mr. Carnegie, dem people 
don't know noting about business and de 
mills. Her bruder write me dey want 
me to go dere again and marry her In 
Chalrmany, and I can go away not again 
from de mills. I tought I yust ask you 
aboud It." 

"Of course you can go again. Quite 
right, William, you should go. I think 
the better of her people for feeling so. 
You go over at once and bring her home. 
I'll arrange It." Then, when parting, I 
said: "William, I suppose your sweet- 
heart Is a beautiful, tall, 'peaches-and- 
cream' kind of German young lady.?" 

"Veil, Mr. Carnegie, she is a leetle 
stout. If / had the rolling of her I give her 
yust one more pass.^' 



A Cherished Experience 

The spinster waited two or three hours 
to be admitted to the presence of the man 
who visited their town once a month to 
retail good advice andjils own proprietary 
medicine. At last she was admitted. 

"Yes, yes," said the brusque doctor. 

"I want to know if influenza can be 
transmitted by kissing.?" 

"Beyond a doubt, madam." 1) 

"Well, a man with a pronounced case of 
influenza kissed me." 

"How long ago was this.?" 

"Well, let's see. I think It was about 
two months." 

"Why, madam, no harm can comiC to 
you now from the exposure. It Is quite 
too late." 

"I knew It," she sighed, "but I just 
love to talk about It." 



Buy advertised Goods — Do net accept substitutes 

148 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Dr. Price's 

Vanilla 



YOU always have splen- 
did results when you 
use Price's Vanilla! It 
couldn't be otherwise, for 
Price's is the pure juice 
crushed from the choic- 
est, finest quality vanilla 
beans. And Price's is full 
flavored — neither too weak 
nor too strong. Price's 
Vanilla is aged in wood — 
its rich, mellow taste will 
delight you! 



You take no chances 
when you use Price's. 
For nearly seventy years 
Price's Vanilla has helped 
make delicious pastries, 
puddings, home-made can- 
dies and ice-cream. It is 
absolutely pure and de- 
lightfully good! Buy a 
bottle from your grocer 
and just try it for your- 
self! 



PRICE FLAVORING EXTRACT CO., Chicago, 111. 
"Experts in Flavor" In Business 68 Years 




Only 

75c. 



r 



/ 



0^ 



ror 

this set of 

STAY SHARP 
Kitchen Knives 

You will be delighted at their 
lasting cutting quality. 

Each has its individual every-day usefulness in par- 
ing and slicing fruit, vegetables and meat. Blades 
of high grade tool steel that retain their keenness. 
Handles are waterproof and are securely riveted to 
the blades. 
ALL THREE KNIVES IN A BOX for only yCp 

If your dealer can't supply you, order from us f tlv/« 

R. MURPHY'S SONS CO. (Dept. A) Ayer, Mass. 

Makers of Fine Cutting Since 1850 



^^^' 



y"^; 



WAGNER Cast Alummum 
utensils are cast, not 
stamped. Being in one solid piece 
there are no rivets to loosen, no 
seams to break, no welded parts. 
Wagner Cast Aluminum Ware 
wears longer and cooks better. 
The thickness of the metal is the 
reason — heat is retained and evenly 
distributed — food does not scorch 
r burn as is liable in stamped 
sheet utensils. 

'"''v Wagner Ware combines dura- 
bility and superior cook- 
^^^ ing quality with the most 
3^ beautiful designs and fin- 
M ish. At best dealer's. 

y Don^t ask for aluminum 

y ware, askjor Wagner Ware 

The Wagner Mfg. Co. 

Dept. 74 SIDNEY, OHIO 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
149 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



r^fckiTE ^to^AIN Refirigq-ators 

> "The Chest with the Chill in it" 

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Sold in every city and important 
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handsome cataJogues and booklet. . 

Main' Manufacturing Co. 

Na-=v.uaN.H. Established 1874 

Look for tbe name 'HiTE MOUNTAIN 



Cuts your ice bill. 






QUARTi 
ONLY 



SPANISH RECIPES 



10 recipes, most tasty, delicious Spanish dishes 25c 
specially adapted to American taste, sent for ^*J^ 
SENORA MENDOZA RECIPE COMPANY 
233 Laughlin Building, Los Angeles, California 

PERSONAL BODY DEVELOPMENT The correct 

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B. W. J. COMPANY, Dept. A.C. 
1996 Indianola Ave., Columbus, Ohio 



ROBERTS 

Lightning Mixer 
Beats Everything 

Beats eggs, whips cream, chums butter. mixes 
gravies, desserts and dressings, and does the 
work in a few seconds. Blends and mixes 
malted milk, powdered milk, baby foods and 
all drinks. 

Simple and Strong. Saves work — easy 
to clean. Most necessary household 
article. Used by 200,000 housewives 
and endorsed by leading household 
magazines. 
If your dealer does not carry this, we will send 
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Recipe book free with mixer. 

NATIONAL CO. Cambridge 39, boston, mass. 



Two New Household Helpers 

On 10 days' free trial! They save you at least an hour a day. worth 
at only 30 cents an hour, ^2.10 a week. Cost only the 10 cents 
a week for a year. Send postcard for details of these "helpers," our 
two new home-study courses, ^'Household Engineering'^ and 
"Lessons in Cooking,'' now in book form; OR SEND ^5.00 in full 
payment. Regular price $6.28. 

AM. SCHOOL Of HOME ECONOMICS, 503 W. 63th ST., CHK^OS 




Due to the accounts of numerous 
taxicab robberies last winter the women 
of New York were afraid to use public 
conveyances when alone, and the cab- 
bies, as a result, suffered considerably. 
An actress in one of the Broadway suc- 
cesses left her apartment with just 
fifteen minutes to get to the theater. 
She called a taxicab. 

"Driver,"' she announced before get- 
ting in. "this string of beads I have on 
cost a dollar and a half. The only ring I 
have is my wedding ring, and this purse 
you see here contains exactly sixty-five 
cents. Drive me to the — - — • Theater." 

"Aliss/' declared the dumfounded 
chauffeur, "I could stake you to a dollar 
if youse needs it." 



**The Art of Spending" 
How to Livf Better and Save More 

SPENDING is as important as earn- 
ing and it is not the amount of 
money spent, but the kind of life 
it buys that counts. If you would like to 
make your income go further, make it 
yield more nearly what you want, you will 
be interested in this handbook which tells 
how a plan of spending or "Budget" 
helps to stretch the dollar, gives sugges- 
tions for drawing up a practical budget 
and shows how to keep check on the 
budget without household accounts by the 
use of the new Self-Accounting Check 
Book which is illustrated and described. 

The new check book gives automatically 
the cost of Food, Clothing, Operating, 
etc., from month to month and year to 
year. Your bank can secure a set of the 
special interleaves and have the new 
check book made up for you at small 
expense. 

The new Weekly Allowance Book — 
"Where My Money Goes/' is also il- 
lustrated and described, — a simple little 
book of 32 pages, small enough for your 
pocketbook, easily kept, but giving 
classified records of all household or 
personal expenses. Price 10 cents; price 
of "The Art of Spending," lOcents. Amer- 
ican School of Home Economics, 503 W. 
69th Street, Chicago. — Adv, 



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"WILSON'S 

Meat Cookery" 

Free 

Our handsome cook 
book, each recipe 
prepared and tested 
by experts, telling 
how to buy and use 
meats economically, 
■will be mailed you 
free on request. Ad- 
dress Dept. 64'', Wil- 
son & Co., Chicago. 



Two Centl^led Delights 

for hot weather luncheons 

WILSON'S "square pressed" Cooked Ham is luscious in 
flavor — every whit of its goodness is saved for you 
because we cook it in vapor. Mildly sweet, tender, it certainly 
is tempting. One slice makes two sandwich fillings. Ready 
to serve, it appeals at once to the housewife who meets the 
daily problem of "What shall we have for luncheon or tea?" 

Wilson's Certified Oil blends marvelously in a salad dressing, 
giving it the rich, nut flavor that marks the successfial 
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"money-back" guarantee of satisfaction. Ask your dealer for 
these products now and realize the excellence secured by the 
Wilson, principles of selecting, handling a'-'d preparing eac^ 
product with respect. 



Zr-X7 



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Experience has shown that the most satisfactory way 

to enlarge the subscription list of American Cookery is through its present subscri- 
bers, who personally can vouch for the value of the publication. To make it an 
object for subscribers to secure new subscribers, we offer the following premiums: 

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I to present subscribers, for securing and sending to us new yeariy sub- 

•criptions at $1.50 each. The number of new subscriptions required to secure each premium is cleariy 
■tated below the description of each premium. 

Transportation is or is not paid as stated. 




INDIVIDUAL INITIAL JELLY MOULDS 

Serve Eggs, Fish and Meats in Aspic; 
Coffee and Fruit Jelly; Pudding and other 
desserts with your initial letter raised on 
the top. Latest and daintiest novelty for 
the up-to-date hostess. To remove jelly 
take a needle and run it around inside of 
mould, then immerse in warm water; jelly 
will then come out in perfect condition. 
Be the first in your town to have these. 
You cannot purchase them at the stores. 




Thia shows the jelly turned from the mould 
' Set of six (6;, any initial, sent postpaid for (1) new subscription 



This shows mould 
(upside down) 



Cash Price 75 cents. 



TATTY IRONS' 




As illustrated, are used to make dainty, flaky 
pat€s or timbales; delicate pastry cups for serv- 
ing hot or frozen dainties, creamed vegetables, 
salads, shell fish, ices, etc. Each set comes 
securely packed in an attractive box with recipes 
and full directions for use. Sent, postpaid, for 
two (2) new subscriptions. Cash price, $1.50. 



SILVER'S 

SURE CUT 

FRENCH FRIED 
POTATO CUTTER 

One of the most 
modern and efficient 
kitchen helps ever in- 
vented. A big labor 
and time saver. 

Sent, prepaid, for 
one (1) new subscrip- 
tion. Cash price 75 
cents. 




FRENCH ROLL BREAD PAN 




Ecsi quality blued gteel. 6 inches wide by 13 
Iccg. One pan sent, prepaid, for one (1) new 
fvbfcription. Cash price, 75 cents 



SEAMLESS VIENNA BREAD PAN 




Two of these pans sent, postpaid for one (1) 
new subscription. Cash pi*ice, 75 cents for two 
pans. 




HEAVY TIN BORDER MOULD 

Imported, Round, 6 inch 

Sent, prepaid, for one (1) new subscription. 
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Crisps made with these moulds 
representing Hearts, Diamonds, 
Clubs and Spades, are ideal for 
serving at card-party luncheons. 

The bottom of the center space 
is closed; in this can be served any 
creamed meat, oysters or vegeta- 
bles, garnished around the edges 
with parsley, radishes or olives. 

Another excellent way of using 
is to set the shell on a lettuce leaf 
and fill with salad; or fill the shell 
with an ice or ice cream and gar- 
nish with fruit. 

Sent, with recipes and direc- 
tions, postpaid, for two (2) new 
subscriptions. Cash Price $1.50. 




3 Pint Aluminum Sauce Pan 

First Class Heavy Spun Aluminum 

Sent, postpaid, as premium for one (1) new 
subscriber. Cash price 75c. 



3 Pint Aluminum Double Boiler 

A heavy, superior 
article. An absolute 
necessity in every 
kitchen. Sent, prepaid, as 
premium for two (2) new 
subscriptions. Cash Price 
$1.50. 




Patent Individual Charlotte Russe Moulds 

Can be used, not only in making charlotte russe, but for many other 
dishes. 

Wherever individual moulds are called for, you can use these. 

The moulds we offer are made by a patent process. They have no 
seams, no joints, no solder. They are as near perfection as can be had. 

A set of six (6) Patent Charlotte Russe Moulds will be sent postpaid 
for two (2) new subscriptions. Cash Price $1.50. 




GOLDEN ROD CAKE PAN 



For "Waldorf Triangles," "Golden Rod Cake," 
"Orange Slice Cake" and many other fancy cakes. 
Substantially made of the best tin. Sent, postpaid, 
for one (1) new subscription. Cash Price 75c. 



REMOVABLE RING MUFFIN PAN 

Made of best quality blued steel. Strong and durable. Size 
12 rings 2f inches diam. Pan 8| inches by 11 inches. Rings 
are removable, pan may be jised for cake or candy making. 
Sent, prepaid, for one (1) new subscription. Cash Price 75c. 




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PREMIUMS 




PASTRY BAG AND FOUR TUBES 

(Bag not shown in cut) 

A complete outfit. Practical in evtry way Mad« 
especially for Bakers and Caterers. Eminently suit- 
able for home use. 

The set sent, prepaid, for one (1) new subscription- 
Cash price, 75 cents. 




THE A. M. C. 
ORNAMENTER 

Rubber pastry bag and 
twelve brass tubes, assorted 
designs, for cake decorat- 
ing. This set is for fine 
work, while the set des 
scribed above is for more 
general use. Packed in a 
wooden box, prepaid, for 
two (2) new subscriptions. 
Cash price, $1.50 




"RAPIDE" 
TEA INFUSER 

Economic, clean and con- 
venient. Sent, prepaid, for 
one (1) subscription. Cash 
price, 75 cents. 



CAKE ORNAMENTING SYRINGE 

For the finest cake decorating. Twelve German 
silver tubes, fancy designs. Sent, prepaid, for four (4) 
new subscriptions, Cash price, $3.00. 





HOME CANDY MAKING 
OUTFIT 

Thermometer, dipping wire, moulds, and 
most of all, a book written by a professional 
and practical candy maker for home use. Sent» 
prepaid, for five(S) new subscriptions. Cash 
price, $3.75. 



The only reliable and sure way to make Candy, 
Boiled Frosting, etc., is to use a 

THERMOM ETER 

Here is'just the one.you need. Made 
especially for the purpose by one of the 
largest and best manufacturers in the 
country. Sent, postpaid, for two (2) 
new subscriptions. Cash price, $1.50 






300- 



2oo||lh-;:' 

80- 



60-£ 




VEGETABLE CUTTERS 

Assorted shapes. Ordinarily 
sell for 15 cents each. Six 
cutters ^— all different — pre- 
paid^ for one (1) new subscrip- 
tion. Cash price, 75 cents. 



THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO., Boston. Mass. 



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AN EGG SLICER SAVES TIME 
AND EGGS 

Does the work 
quicker and bet- 
ter than ^ it can 
be done in any 
other way. One 
will be sent post- 
paid to any 
present subscri- 
ber as a premium 
for securing and 
sending us one 
(1) new yearty 
subscription. Cash price, 75 cents. 




Empire Kitchen Knives 



mMm 



Highly polished rubberoid finished 
handles. 

These knives have blades forged frons 
the finest cutlery st.el, highly tempered 
and ground to a very keen edge. These 
Knives will cut. Two knives, as showE 
above, sent, prepaid, for one (1) new 
subscription. Cash Price 75 cents. 




A SET OF 24 TINS 

Sent, postpaid, for one (1) new subsc iption. 
Cash Pr;c>. 75 cents. 

FRENCH 
BUTTER CURLER 

Unique and Ck>nTenient 
Tke easiest way t« serve batter. FoM 

directioBs with each curler. 

Sent, postpaid, for one (1) new subscription. 

Cash price, 75 cents. 



PRINCESS PATTY TINS 

FOR BROWNIES OR 
■ OTHER SMALL CAKES 

BROWNIES 

i cup of Butter 1 Egg, well beaten 

i cup of Sugar i 1 cup of Flour 

i cup of Molasses i 1 cup of Nuts, Pecan 

(dark) ! or Walnuts 

Mix in the usual manner, but without separat- 
ing the egg. Bake in small, fancy shaped tins. 
Press half a nut meat into the top of. each cake 





LADY FINGER PAN 

Six Boelds on a base. E*ch mould 4^ 
iackes by l}i i»eli«f. Extra heaTy tin. 
NieWy made. Seat pMtpaid, for two (2) 
■ew subacriptioBS. Cask price, $1.50. 




ROTARY 

MINCING 

KNIFE 



Nickel plated. Ten revolving cutters. EflFect- 
ually chops parsley, mint, onions, vegetables, 
etc., and the shield frees the knives from the 
materials being cut. 

Sent, prepaid, for one (1) new tubscriptioa. 
Cash Price 73 cents. 



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AMERICAN COOKERY 




M 



ETHODS of living have undergone great changes in America in the last 
few years. Elaborate desserts, such as boiled and baked puddings and 
dyspepsia-producing pies, have given place to the more attractive and 
healthful desserts made from Jell-O. These desserts are economical both 
in money and time. Why should any woman stand for hours over a hot fire, 
mixing compounds to make people ill, when in two minutes, with an expense of 
a few cents, she can produce such attractive, delicious desserts ? Its economy is 
particularly in point now that it is again selling at 2 packages for 25 cents. 



III! 



THE GENESEE PURE FOOD COMPANY 
Le Roy, 'New York Bridgeburg, Ontario. 




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160 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




HEAT 



'/ 



aintv -- Appetlzind 
conomical 

One package will make nine 
quarts of delicious cooked food. 
Can you beat this for economy ? 

Buy a package today 



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161 



AMERICAN COOKERY 

Vol. XXVI ■ OCTOBER, 1921 No. 3 



CONTENTS FOR OCTOBER page 


SEPTEMBER . Katherine Oakes 


169 


THE SMALL, DARK BEDROOM, 111. . . Mary A. Wheelwright 


171 


HILL HAPPINESS Ethel B. Wells 


176 
179 


COMPENSATIONS Ruth Fargo 


WHICH.? Caroline L. Sumner 


181 


THE TINY HOUSE Ruth Merton 


182 


MISERY ENTERTAINS COMPANY .... Agnes Louise Dean 


186 


DISHES TO MAKE FOOD ATTRACTIVE . Marion Brownfield 


188 


THE STORM Hattie H. d'Autremont 


189 


EDITORIALS 190, 


192 


SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES (Illustrated with half-tone 


engravings of prepared dishes) 




Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 


193 


MENUS FOR WEEK IN OCTOBER 


202 
203 
204 


MENUS FOR OCCASIONS 


CHICKEN GOSPEL FOR HOME USE .... Saidie L. Slover 


A NEW MEXICO SUPPER Louise Lloyd Lowber 


206 


LATE SUMMER CANNING ....... Eunice Marcia Smith 


207 


LACK IN EQUIPMENT Caroline B. King 


208 


HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES: — Beaten Biscuit — With*Esther 




in the Kitchen — A Can of Tomato Soup ■ — Pie Secrets — 




My Canning Log 


211 


QUERIES AND ANSWERS 


215 


THE SILVER LINING '. 


228 






$1.50 A YEAR Published Ten Times a Year 15c A Copy { 

Foreign postage 40c additional 
Entered at Boston post-office as second-class ntiatter 
Copyright 1921, by 

THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO. 
Pope Bldg., 221 Columbus Ave., Boston 17, Mass. 




Please Renew on Receipt of Colored Blank Enclosed for that Purpose 

162 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



■•iiiiiiiif 



r¥f7:'/r/-fyTfYfr?rri-iri:gyfiiiHtr^^'^ /#??•- 



rp5?yjT'J^f^r./^|^^ 



l!;i 




:'^j^r^^jj^f^ 



"When it rams — it pours' 

Discover it for yourself 

n^O READ about the virtues of Morton 
Salt isn t half so pleasant as finding 
them out for yourself 

It certainly gives you a sense of security 
and content to find that Morton s won't 
stick or cake in the package when you 
want it; that it pours in any weather — 
always ready; always convenient. 

You'U like its distinct bracing flavor 
too. Better keep a couple of packages 
always handy. 

MORTON SALT COMPANY, CHICAGO 

''The Salt of the Earth'' 




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163 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



INDEX FOR OCTOBER 



Chicken Gospel for Home Use 

Compensations . 

Dishes to Make Food Attractive 

Editorials 

Hill Happiness . ■ . 

Home Ideas and Economies 

Lack In Equipment 

Late Summer Canning 

Menus 

Misery Entertains Company 

New Mexico Supper, A 

September . 

Silver Lining, The 

Small, Dark Bedroom, The 

Storm, The 

Tiny House, The . 

Which? .... 



PAGE 

204 
179 
188 
190 
176 
211 
208 
207 
202, 203 
186 
206 
169 
228 
171 
189 
182 
181 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPEb 



Birds without Bones 

Breakfast, New England Sunday, 111. 

Cake, Italian 

Cakes, Parsnip Breakfast 

Croquettes, Sweet Potato, 111. 

Custard, Frozen Peach '. 

Dinner, Satisfying Vegetable, 111. 

Eggnog, Hallowe'en Cider, 111. 

Fish, Broiled Sword, 111. 

Frumenty 

Grill, Mixed, 111. . 

Grillade, Creole 

Gumbo Filet with Oysters 

Ice Cream, Almond 

Ice Cream, Mint Stick 



Cake or Pudding, Ice Box 

Cake, Pork 

Cake, Scotch Barm 

Cakes, Yorkshire Curd 

Hopping John 

Jaune Mange 



194 
193 
198 
194 
197 
200 
195 
199 
195 
196 
196 
195 
193 
199 
199 



Mutton, Hot Point 

Pastry, Danish, 111. 

Pie, Apricot Meringue . 

Pie, Fruit-and-Steak 

Pork, Stuffed Leg of, 111. 

Preserve, Cherry Plum 

Pudding, Corn-and-Chicken 

Pudding, Green-gage Bread 

Salad, Castilian, 111. 

Salmon, Pickled 

Soup, Chicken-and-Oyster 

Tarts, Tea, 111. 

Tomato Mustard . 

Venison Steak in Chafing Dish 



QUERIES AND ANSWERS 



201 
198 
200 
196 
194 
200 
201 
196 
197 
201 
•193 
200 
201 
201 



215 Macaroons . . . . . .215 

216 Patties, English Bread . ♦ . . .218 
216 Sandwich, Club .... 216 
218 Wafers, Vanilla .... 216 
220 Tonic, Herb, for Invalids . . .220 
218 TemperaturesforBaking,OvenThermometers 220 



We want representatives everywhere to take subscriptions for 
American Cookery. We have an attractive proposition to make 
those who will canvass their town; also to those who will secure a 
few names among their friends and acquaintances. Write us toda7. 

AMERICAN COOKERY - BOSTON, MASS. 



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Are You Using this Latest Edition of 
America's Leading Cook Book? 

THE BOSTON COOKING- 
SCHOOL COOK BOOK 

By FANNIE MERRITT FARMER 

For 25 years the acknowledged leader of all cook books, 
this latest revised edition of "The Boston Cooking-School 
Cook Book" is undoubtedly the most complete, most prac- 
tical and serviceable book of general knowledge for the 
experienced, as well as the inexperienced, housewife. 

Containing 2,117 Thoroughly Tested Recipes 

In addition to its fund of general information, this latest edition contains 
2,117 recipes, all of which have been tested at Miss Farmer's Boston Cooking- 
School, together with additional chapters on the Cold-Pack Method of Canning, 
on the Drying of Fruits and Vegetables, and on Food Values. 

This volume also contains the correct proportions of food, tables of measure- 
ments and weights, time-tables for cooking, menus, hints to young housekeepers. 




it 



Good Housekeeping^^ Magazine says: 

" 'The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book' is one of the volumes to which good house- 
wives pin their faith on account of its accuracy, its economy, its clear, concise teachings, and 
its vast number of new recipes." 

656 Pages 122 Illustrations. $2.50 net 



CANNING, PRESERVING 
AND JELLY MAKING 

By JANET McKENZIE HILL 

IN this book the latest ideas in canning, 
preserving and jelly making are presented 
by the editor of American Cookery. 

Recommended by the American Library 
Association: — "Aims to present the latest 
ideas on the subject, using the methods found 
to be the simplest and shortest by the experi- 
ments of the U S. Department of Agricul- 
ture, state universities and cooking experts." 
Illustrated. $1.75 net 



MARKETING AND HOUSE- 
WORK MANUAL 

By S. AGNES DONHAM 

Instructor in Household Management 
Garland School of Homemaking, Boston 

THIS book deals with marketing, and con- 
tains sets of marketing charts for meat, 
fish, groceries, fruit and vegetables, with 
directions for the choice, purchase and care 
of foodstuffs. The book also gives brief 
rules for the care of the house, with directions 
for each process, and lists of necessary ma- 
terials and utensils. $2.00 net 



For Sale at all Book-Sellers or of the Publishers 

LITTLE, BROWN & COMPANY, 34 BEACON ST., BOSTON 



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AMERICAN COOKERY 



Books on Household Economics 



THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE COMPANY presents the foUowing as a 
list of representative works on household economics. Any of the books will be sent postpaid 
upon receipt of price. 

Special rates made to schools, clubs and persons wishing a number of books. Write for quota- 
tion on the list of books you wish. We carry a very large stock of these books. One order to us 
saves effort and express charges. Prices subject to change without notice. 



A Guide to Laundry Work. Chambers. $1.00 
Allen, The, Treatment of Diabetes. 

Hill and Eckman 1.75 

American Cook Book. Mrs. J. M. Hill 1.50 
American Meat Cutting Charts. Beef, 
veal, pork, lamb — 4 charts, mounted on 

cloth and rollers 10 

American Salad Book. M. DeLoup .... 1 
Around the World Cook Book. Barroll 2 
Art and Economy in Home Decorations, 

Priestman 1 

Art of Home Candy- Making (with ther- 
mometer, dipping wire, etc.) 3 

Art of Right Living. Richards 

Bacteria, Yeasts and Molds in the 

Home. H. W. Conn 

Bee Brand Manual of Cookery 

Better Meals for Less Money. Greene 1 

Blue Grass Cook Book. Fox 2 

Book of Entrees. Mrs Janet M. Hill ... 2 
Boston Cook Book. Mary J. Lincoln . . 2 
Boston Cooking-School Cook Book. 

Fannie M. Farmer 2 

Bread and Bread-Making. Mrs. Rorer . 
Breakfasts, Luncheons and Dinners. 

Chambers 1 

Bright Ideas for Entertaining. Linscott 
Business, The, of the Household. Taber 2 
Cakes, Icings and Fillings. Mrs. Rorer 1, 
Cakes, Pastry and Dessert Dishes. Janet 
M. Hill 2 



.00 
.50 
.50 

.50 

.75 
.50 

.48 
.75 
.35 
.00 
.00 
.25 

.50 
.75 

.25 
.90 
.50 
.00 

.00 
.50 
.75 
.00 



1.75 



1.50 



Candies and Bonbons. Neil 1 

Candy Cook Book. Alice Bradley 1 

Canning and Preserving. Mrs. Rorer . . 1 
Canning, Preserving and Jelly Making 

Hill 

Canning, Preserving and Pickling 

Marion H. Neil 

Care and Feeding of Children. L. E. 

Holt. M.D 1.25 

Catering for Special Occasions. Farmer 1.50 

Century Cook Book. Mary Ronald 3.00 

Chafing-Dish Possibilities. Farmer.... 1.50 
Chemistry in Daily Life. Lassar-Cohn , . 2.25 
Chemistry of Cookery. W. Mattieu 

Williams 2.25 

Chemistry of Cooking and Cleaning. 

Richards and Elliot 1.00 

Chemistry of Familiar Things. Sadtler 2.00 
Chemistry of Food and Nutrition. 

Sherman 2.10 

Cleaning and Renovating. E. G. Osman 1.20 

Clothing for Women. L. L Baldt 2.50 

Cook Book for Nurses. Sarah C. Hill . . . .90 
Cooking for Two. Mrs. Janet M. Hill. . 2.25 

Cost of Cleanness. Richards 1.00 

Cost of Food. Richards 1.00 

Cost of Living. Richards 1.00 

Cost of Shelter. Richards 1.00 



Course in Household Arts. Duff $1.30 

Dainties. Mrs. Rorer 1.00 

Diet for the Sick. MM- Rorer 2.00 

Diet in Relation to Age and Activity. 

Thompson 1.00 

Dishes and Beverages of the Old South. 

McCulIoch- Williams 1.50 

Domestic Art in Women's Education. 

Cooley 1.50 

Domestic Science in Elementary 

Schools. Wilson. 1.20 

Domestic Service. Lucy M. Salmon . . . 2.25 

Dust and Its Dangers. Pruden 1.25 

Easy Entertaining. Benton 1.50 

Economical Cookery. Marion Harris 

Neil 2.00 

Elementary Home Economics. Mat- 
thews 1.40 

Elements of the Theory and Practice of 

Cookery. Williams and Fisher 1.40 

Encyclopaedia of Foods and Beverages. 10.00 
Equipment for Teaching Domestic 

Science. Kinne 80 

Etiquette of New York Today. Learned 1.60 

Etiquette of Today. Ordway 1.25 

European and American Cuisine. 

Lemcke 4.00 

Every Day Menu Book. Mrs. Rorer.... 1.50 
Every Woman's Canning Book. Hughes .90 

Expert Waitress. A. F. Springsteed 1.35 

Feeding the Family. Rose 2.40 

Fireless Cook Book 1.75 

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Food and Cookery for the Sick and Con- 
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Food and Feeding. Sir Henry Thompson 2.00 

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Foods and Household Management. 

Kinne and Cooley * 1.40 

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168 






September 

September hath a dignity, flaming with color 

gay — 
A sweet, assured maturity, deepening day by 

day; 
Stately she broods o'er gorgeous fields, — (Soon 

will those fields be gray, — 
Soon it will be November). 

Harvested meadows steeped in sun, sultry with 

gold and green; 
Vivid trees veining dark fir woods, in patterns 

of Damascene, — 
(Shortly their glory will depart and will be no 

more seen, 
Save only to remember). 

Mountains all blue and violet, poignant with 

summer's glow, — 
Delicate etching on a sky. pale where their 

contours flow, — 
Deepening zenithward, and quick with clouds 

a-drifting low, — 
(Clouds white as chill December). 

Mellow air soft with sun and tinged with fruited 
smells of fall; 

Peace in the world; a grateful sense of friend- 
liness to all; 

* * * 

Soon will the wind sweep down the hills; Winter 
will soon enthrall 
September, — sweet September. 

Katharine Sazvin Oakes. 



American Cookery 



VOL. XXVI 



OCTOBER 



NO. 3 



The Small, Dark Bedroom 

By Mary Ann Wheelwright 



MANY people live with ugly sur- 
roundings, year after year, look- 
ing forward to a time when 
wonderful changes are to be made. 
Begin today. Don't wait for that happy 
but vague future when you expect to 
have all the old mahogany you want and 
a real garden. Start a window box and 
take stock of the furniture. If the suc- 
cess of a story lies in what is left unsaid, 
the success of a room no less consists in 
what it does not contain. Put in one pile 
the things you cannot live without, place 
in a second what remain. Note the 
difference in the two piles, the ratio may 
be as the mole hill to the mountain. 



Have you ever noticed how refreshing 
and attractive a room seems after it has 
been carefully cleaned and before the 
pictures and so-called ornaments have 
been put back.^ Possibly you stop to 
rest, surveying the scene with satisfaction. 
The walls are unadorned, the tops of the 
tables as are bare as a historic cupboard. 
Perhaps you do not analyze your pleasure. 
You attribute it to that shining quality 
which is ranked next to godliness, rather 
than to the inevitable bric-a-brac await- 
ing a second dusting. 

You may not realize it, but this moment 
is a critical one. It is what our dear old- 
time clergymen would call a turning 




CHAMBER IN A MODERN GARAGE 
171 



172 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



point. That they knew nothing of the 
decorative problems that beset the soul 
of modern women makes no difference 
with the comparison. 

There are two ways of meeting the 
decorative turning point, one is to go on 
dusting and putting back the bric-a-brac 
with the calm deliberation shown by 
Thackeray's Charlotte in cutting bread 
and butter. This is the popular way. 
The other is to determine once for all that 
the old order passeth. This is the un- 
popular way. By a circuitous route I am 
leading up to the small, dark, bedroom, 
that everlasting problem of those who 
dwell in large cities. 

Richard Le Gallienne once described 
his ideal house in a delightfully whimsical 
way. After several thousand words of 
charming digression, the three essentials 
of his ideals were given. There was a 
library, a chapel, and a garden. The 
chapel was the simplest of the trio to 
follow. Three things only were required. 



sunshine, silence, and a crucifix. If you 
can find the old magazine containing this 
rather unknown bit of Le Gallienne, read 
it by all means. It shows the author of 
"The Quest of the Golden Girl" at his 
best. It is impossible of achievement, 
but none the less full of possibilities. 

The small, dark bedroom does not con- 
tain sunshine, very rarely is there silence, 
but it can be restful and it can suggest 
sunlight. "Suggest," magical word. This 
is the age of suggestion in all lines, 
no place more so than in the hands of the 
decorator. 

If you can command the services of a 
painter, who can put on paint so that the 
walls of your little room will have texture 
rather than gloss, secure this valuable 
man by all means. Texture is very im- 
portant, not less so than tone and quality. 
Paint is a wonderful medium, so good and 
so bad. There are the painted walls of 
the village painter, cold, hard, and shiny. 
There are the painted walls of such a 




NOTE EFFECT OF PAINT AND DECORATION 



THE SMALL, DARK BEDROOM 



173 



decorator as Mr. Wolfe — luminous, at- 
mospheric, full of texture. Study texture 
in the objects about you. The book- 
covers on your table, the wall paper in 
your neighbor's house, the decorative 
fabrics in the shops. Think of it as 
doubly important in this small, dark 
room. Decide on the medium which 
gives you the kind of texture you wish, 
whether paint, paper or fabric — • par- 
ticularly in a sleeping room. They may 
be found in all the tones of gray, tan, 
buff, ivory and white. White is no 
longer just white, any more than black is 
just black. 

Whether, like Whistler, we can distin- 
guish thirty-four different whites is a 
matter of doubt, but we all know cold 
white and warm w^hite. Cold white has 
gone out as a decorative color. The 
danger now lies in the other direction, ■ — 
in using a white that is such a deep ivory 
that it is almost like buff. 

Suppose you choose light gray for your 
walls and the palest cream-colored paint 



— not chilly, blue gray, but a tone that 
has a glint of yellow. Do you know how 
interesting Delia Robbia blue is and how 
well it fits into a small room ? Blue is a 
space-suggesting color. Here are two 
suggestions for a blue, gray and ivory 
room. The first calls for the luminous 
gray walls just mentioned, ivory painted 
woodwork, a floor coA'ered with Delia 
Robbia filling and curtains in a boldly 
printed fabric of this beautiful blue and 
creamy white. You may find the latter 
in expensive chintz or inexpensive Amer- 
ican cretonne. The second scheme gives 
to the walls the creamy tone, to the wood- 
work the gray, to the floor the blue 
filling, but to the curtains a small figured 
material in which the brightest possible 
colors are blended with the selfsame blue. 
Either of these schemes will be interesting, 
if the little room is kept very simple. A 
plain iron bedstead, enamelled ivory or 
gray, a coverlet like the curtains, pillows 
rather square, four in number, covered 
with day slips of the same material, a blue 



ISS^t 



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'^ 





BRIGHT FLR.MTLRE FOR THE CHILDREN 



174 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



and gray, or a blue and cream rug, and 
the fewest possible pieces of furniture. 
If the room is to serve merely as a sleeping 
room without any dressing room features, 
very little is needed. A chest of drawers, 
one chair and a small table ought to be 
sufficient. These pieces may be m.ade 
very interesting. The plainer the shape 
the better, and, insomuch as they are 
to be painted gray or cream-color, a 
very inexpensive wood may be used. 
On the smooth, lusterless surface deco- 
rative motifs may be painted, thus 
adding to the general charm of the room. 
The possibilities of painted furniture are 
tremendous, and the variations are al- 
most without limit. 

Other attractive schemes, which sug- 
gest themselves for this same little room, 
are ivory paint, a light gray-green wall, a 
plain gray-green velvet rug, and Chinese 



flower chintz at the windows, in which 
there is a good deal of lavender. The 
furniture in this case is to be painted 
lavender and unadorned. Another effect, 
run on this same scheme, gives a plain 
lavender-velvet rug to the floor and a 
gray-green paint to the furniture. On 
the furniture the flower motifs are to be 
painted — leaves a deeper green, and the 
queer Chinese flowers in lavender, old 
blue and faded pink. 

Just a word in regard to painted deco- 
rations on furniture. They must be well 
done, of course, but not necessarily elab- 
orately done. Choose a definite design, 
following, if you must be a copyist, a good 
tracing. Wall papers offer a host of 
attractive motifs, particularly those of 
Chinese significance. 

A stunning small bedroom furnished by 
a bachelor was brought to my notice, the 




INTERESTING AND ATTRACTIVE 



THE SMALL, DARK BEDROOM 



175 




PLAIN AND OLD-FASHIONED 



Other day. On the wall hung what the 
owner called his beef-steak paper. It 
reminded him, he said, of the butcher 
paper that once wrapped the family 
steak. It was rather gray for market 
paper, but similar in quality, rough in 
texture and without glaze. The wood- 
work and floor were painted the same 
color and the furniture, including the 
bedstead, had been given seven coats of 
mandolin red. It glowed like red lacquer 
which, indeed, it cleverly imitated. Over 
the narrow mantel hung an old Chinese 
painting. The rug was a real triumph. 
It was plain jute, dyed vermilion, and 
then washed after the manner of Oriental 
rugs. There was no curtain at the small 
window — only a gray shade, the color of 
the paper. Gray Russian crash covered 
the bed, and the whole effect was soft 
gray, dull gold and lacquer red. 

Every room, no matter how small, 
needs a culminating point of interest. A 
simple scheme with a plain wall is to 



frame a stunning piece of fabric, or an 
equally effective piece of wallpaper. 
Some of the Chinese, Japanese, William 
and Mary, and Jacobean wallpapers are 
admirably adapted to this idea. Select 
a general piece, large enough to carry the 
motif but not "the repeat" and frame 
it in a flat band of wood, painted either 
to match the woodwork or the furni- 
ture. You can tell which will be the more 
attractive as you work out the scheme. 
Some of the papers with black back- 
grounds and gay birds, butterflies and 
flowers might just fit into your plan. 

One rather daring little room, recently 
seen, carried white walls, woodwork 
painted a bright blue-green, a dull black 
ceiling brought down to a broad blue- 
green molding, a black floor on which 
there was a blue-green rug, furniture of 
the same blue-green, on which the most 
brilliant flower schemes were painted. 

Between two windows, and framed by 
the blue-green molding and the blue- 



176 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



green baseboard was a roll of black paper, 
adorned with the gayest of birds and 
flowers. The queer blue-green was also 
conspicuous. The only metals were black 
iron and a few pieces of highly burnished 
copper. 

The color-scheme was unusual but not 
erratic. It just missed the latter by 
reason of a fine balance. Also there was 
no clutter of unrelated things. Space 
was suggested, and there was the repose 
that comes from proportion and order. 

A well known decorator who saw the 



room liked the idea so well that he 
elaborated it for a wealthy patron.' " He 
used old lacquer panels in place of the 
wall paper, commissioned an expert in 
painted furniture to furnish designs, 
used rare black Hawthorne ginger jars to 
fill a set of blue-green shelves, did won- 
derful stunts in dyeing to get just the 
needed results, and, finally, went to 
Europe, to find a bedstead, and all be- 
cause an enthusiastic amateur was not 
afraid to be thought queer by his friends 
and madly mad by his devoted family. 



Hill Happiness 

By Ethel B. Wells 



T! 



|HERE is absolutely nothing to 
do. Aunt Alice. Can't you sug- 
gest something.^" 

The tone was despairing, the expression 
in the young face rebellious. 

" Birds .^" I suggested, trying to re- 
awaken her first interest. "Blue birds 
flown yet from the old tree stump .'^ 
Sparrows gone from the nest.'^ You have 
not had the young ones out for some time. 
Has the bush-with-the-berries-aviary lost 
its interest.? No new birds to discover.? 
Remember the grosbeak that peeked in 
our butternut tree.? All gone.?" 

"Oh, I am tired of them all! Even the 
goldfinches are not fun any more." 

"Blueberrying.?" 

"Oh, heavens. Aunt Alice, I can't for 
fun. If you want me to do it to provide 
for the table I will, but not for fun. I 
have picked them, and vegetables, too, 
for the table, haven't I.?" 

I nodded silently, remembering the 
small green cucumbers that had found 
their way to my table through Betty's 
hands the day before, because I had told 
her that young, tender vegetables were 
the special luxury a garden of one's own 
afforded. I had forgotten to exclude 
cucumbers from the list. 

"Well, then, let's see. The view.? 



No.? The river.? Fishing, canoeing, 
bathing.?" 

"All alone.? What's the use! I want 
some fun. I want a good time for a 
change. I am tired of the country and 
nature and lovely, peaceful things. I 
want just a roaring, downright good 
time. Oh, dear, nobody 'round but us! 
Don't you feel lonely, too.? Does the 
view always satisfy you, and looking over 
your garden, and making wise selections 
for the day's vegetables.? Do you ever 
get tired of getting blueberries and wild 
strawberries, and milk and fresh eggs.? 
Don't those fool goldfinches, with their 
everlasting roller-coaster-dip and chatter, 
pall on you after awhile.? Some day I 
shall try to kill that bitd that says, 'keep 
your seat' all the time I am sitting on the 
piazza!" 

The young thing needed a change. I 
realized that well enough, and that an 
old maid aunt had been too settled down 
for a girl of eighteen, though my peace- 
fulness she little realized had been fought 
out and was an escape from such revolt 
as she was going through then. 

"I tell you what to do! Write to one 
of your girl friends to come up and visit 
you. Then take it down to the post- 
office — and walk fast! Work off some 



HILL HAPPINESS 



177 



of your extra steam. You will feel 
better for it. Also" — a second, awful, 
middle-aged thought — "while you are 
in the village you might get — " 

Betty's smile stopped me.. "More 
providing?" she asked sweetly. 

The old dilapidated orchard was peace- 
ful in the late afternoon sun after Betty 
had gone. I had run away from all dis- 
turbing elements. It had been an up- 
setting time for my temper. I wished to 
recover my point of view, which was a 
very precious thing. 

The orchard had been a practical thing 
in the past, but the trees had been neg- 
lected too long before my purchase of 
the place for me to bring them back to 
life. So the pines and the white birches 
were allowed to grow instead of apple 
trees. Blackberry vines and ferns, check- 
erberry and wild strawberry carpeted the 
space unoccupied by anything else. A 
stone wall separated the orchard from 
the clear, grass-grown open hill on which 
the house stood. Following the wall 
the trees grew thick, so that the orchard 
was a thing apart, quiet, secluded, green. 

Through the parting of the trees, at the 
lower end of the orchard, blue Kearsarge 
stood up to the north-west, separated 
from us by twelve miles of wooded, 
farmed valley, with the railroad running 
up to other valleys out of sight, beyond 
the farthest hills. 

It was good to sink down in the soft 
green under the trees and take stock once 
more. All the joy of the place for the 
moment had departed. I had felt sud- 
denly old and middle-aged. My pleasure 
in the simple life seemed crude and 
foolishly elemental — poverty stricken. 
In this age of luxury and spending, of 
motoring and feting, wasn't a simple love 
of country and "views," sunsets and fresh 
air, just a sour grapes attitude, after all.^ 
Wouldn't I, if I were young and had more 
money to spend, be speeding over the 
world from Inn to Inn, from mountain 
to mountain, from shore to shore, instead 
of looking through a gap in my orchard 
wall to a little hill-mountain, thinking it 



blue and lovely.? Wouldn't I be having a 
gardener or two to pick my vegetables, 
my only relation to the cucumbers, 
squashes, corn, tomatoes, and all, the 
enjoyment of them on my table.? Was it 
not foolish to creep out at sunrise and 
watch the valley, filled with white mist, 
respond to the touch of the golden light; 
to listen to the chorus of the birds that 
accompanied the glory of the awakening 
day.? Wasn't Betty's point of view the 
only real, vital point of view of life.? 
People and good times, excitement and 
young joy.? I sighed. I realized fully 
that I was thirty-five and past all that 
frenzy of youth. The "providing" and 
the quiet and the peace were all that were 
left. 

The afternoon train crept up the valley, 
and from middle-aged habit I watched the 
smoke as it marked its approach. The 
train stopped below at the flag station, 
and then proceeded farther up the valley, 
discharging its load of summer pleasure 
seekers. I wished, for Betty's sake, that 
some one was expected by us, some jolly 
people who could swim and paddle and 
walk and play with her in a young way. 

But gradually the peace of the after- 
noon came back; the orchard was lovely 
in the sunset light. A bright chewink 
cocked his head on one side and looked at 
me from the tree. Presently I laughed 
to myself: "Youth or no youth, disturb- 
ing nieces or not, I am going to be happy 
in my own way. I do love you, you 
orchard, and I do love to pick things and 
'provide,' and I am going to pick wild 
strawberries this minute to eat with 
that luscious cream." 

The strawberries were thick under the 
trees. I was busy for fifteen minutes. 
Then suddenly I became aware that some 
one was looking over the stone wall, 
some one I had never expected to see 
again; some one I had once loved and had 
been trying to un-love ever since. 

A beaming smile overspread his face, 
but he stood motionless, looking at me. 
I stood with my basket as I had arisen 
from the berry picking. 



178 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



It was a strange way to greet a person 
after ten years' parting, but he said 
quietly, "Alice, how beautiful you are! 
I had forgotten, if, perhaps, I ever knew 
before." 

"Where have you come from?" I 
demanded. 

He bounded over the wall and came 
quickly toward me. 

" From the ends of the earth to find you. 
I suddenly realized out there what a 
botch I had made of our lives, and that it 
wasn't riches and luxury and adventure 
that I needed, but just you and peace and 
happiness." 

"You must be growing old," I said 
wickedly. 

"No, but I have seen the world and 
have had my fill. It is all a sham. — 
that sort of thing." 

"I wish that I could have had a little 
of it," I answered sadly, looking off to 
where the train was disappearing in the 
valley purple, miles away. 

"Forgive me, dear, I wish you had. 
I wish that we had had all the young 
adventure together. It was my fault, 
I know. I take all the blame. I ran 
away from all responsibility and care and 
left you to bear it alone. But, child, there 
is a whole lot left, a big slice of rich, full 
life to come to us still. Will you try it 
with me.^ We haven't a day to lose. 
We must make up for lost time, and 
gather all the joy to our hearts." 

He stretched out his arms to me. All 
maidenly shame and pride against past 
hurt seemed to have left me, for I just 
crept into them without a word, and 
cried quietly on his shoulder. 

"Peace, joy, happiness will come to 
us now, Alice." 

"They have come to me already," I 
smiled. Then — -"Look out for the 
strawberries," I warned; "we must have 
them for supper. Come on," and I fled 
up to the house. 

We burst laughing into the hall and 
almost collided with Betty and a tall 
young man who were just passing through 



the other way. Betty was brilliant with 
color and laughter. 

"Oh, Aunt Alice, this is my friend Jack 
Meredith whom you have heard so much 
about. He had just come on the train, 
so I brought him along." 

I could feel the child fluttering with 
excitement by my side. Then she turned 
and saw my stranger, standing quiet and 
smiling. 

"More company, Betty! My friend, 
Mr. Blake, whom you have not heard a 
lot about, but whom I used to know 
years and years ago!" 

My exaggerated tone brought the color 
to her face, but she went bravely up to 
him and gave him her hand. 

"How do you do! Isn't it nice that 
we could all meet here! Isn't Aunt Alice 
silly to say 'years and years ago!' This 
is my friend Mr. Meredith, Mr. Blake." 

We left the men to themselves and 
went to the kitchen. Just out of sight 
Betty suddenly put both her arms around 
me and whispered in my ear, "I see it all 
right in your face. It's true, isn't it, 
that you love each other and are going 
to be married .^ O Auntie!" as I silently 
nodded. 

For a moment we stood in a girlish 
embrace. Suddenly Betty held me off 
at arm's length. 

"Heavens! Those men have probably 
got fearful appetites, and there's nothing 
much for supper, is there.? What shall 
we do.?" 

I named over a passably good supper 
that by force of habit I had planned 
quickly. Then — "And while you were 
away I picked some wild strawberries — 
provided them, you know," I added. 

Betty flung her arms around me again. 
"Auntie, forgive me! Please forgive me! 
I did not understand. I have been an 
old selfish pig all the time." 

"No, dear, not that." I felt very 
tolerant in my new-found happiness. 
"No dear, not selfish, only just a little 
young and that is easily forgiven." 
And I kissed her happily. 



Compensations 

By Ruth Fargo 



REBELLION settled upon the heart 
of the charwoman; despair, like 
a vulture at a feast, huddled 
above her fancy. Her Ups set in a hard 
white line. Her knees were wet to the 
skin. As she knelt on the damp floor 
she pulled aside her drabbled skirts from 
the ever-advancing tide of dingy water; 
she twisted her loosened hair into a 
tighter knot with hands that were 
swollen and moisture-bleached; she 
worked stolidly with a frantic energy 
dulled by long hours; stooped, aching 
hours, of hum-drum demand. Bravely, 
faithfully, without complaint, she had 
answered The Call; opportunity had not 
found her sleeping. 

Once she had been youthful, and 
buoyant, and fair to look upon. So 
long ago, it was, she had quite forgotten 
— aeons ago, in that time when her 
husband lived and her two babies played 
upon the floor. And now — now it 
seemed that she had always been a char- 
woman, for her husband's tragic death 
had left her in need, utterly untrained, 
and with two small mouths demanding 
daily food. And now her daughter was 
in high school, and her son talked of a 
job! 

But she, she was a charwoman! Just 
d. charwoman, unnoticed, unconsidered. 
Silver heavily streaked the brown of her 
hair. She was worn and tired. Re- 
bellion and despair, having waited so 
patiently through the long years of work, 
of courage, of grim determination, today 
came into their own. They whirled 
about her head and her heart, engulfing 
her in a gloom of swIrHng wings. Soggy 
tears dropped Into the soggy tide that 
soaked her knees. She was utterly 
discouraged. 

" I ought to be home with the children," 
gulped the charwoman. "I ought to be 
home with my babies. They need me, 



179 



they need me more than when they were 
little." She spoke aloud, for the offices 
were all deserted. Already darkness was 
slipping Into the corners of the corridors, 
the shadows of coming winter night. Light 
after light blinked out to twinkle over the 
streets. The charwoman worked on. 
Often her stint took her far along the 
dusk: halls must be clean, rooms must 
be fresh for morning: she could never 
afford to lose her job. She could not 
afford — ! She could not afford — ! The 
thought sickened her soul, as ten years 
ago it could not have done. Age had 
sunk its red-hot brand of Fear upon her 
cringing heart. 

"I — I ought to be home," she la- 
mented. ''Polly's too pretty a girl to 
leave unprotected — too pretty a girl to 
be a daughter of mine! Oh, but a girl is 
light-hearted. A girl craves life, and 
fine garm.ents and jewels — and love! 
But how can a girl tell gold from gew- 
gaws ! And the lights and the sounds and 
the scents call so vividly; and the streets 
glitter so gayly ! And I — " m.oaned the 
charwoman, "I leave Polly alone — 
alone through the long evening." 

Weary and worn the woman sank back 
m an unscrubbed corner, her arms 
stretched across her aching knees, her 
swollen hands clutching the tools of her 
trade. She leaned her head against the 
wall. Her eyes closed. Perhaps she 
prayed. 

Once her lips moved. "Life Is hard for 
the poor," she whispered, "hard for the 
untrained. Truly I have tried. I have 

kept bread m the mouths of my babes 

all these years. But they are young — 
they cry for cake!" 

Heavily she sank closer Into the dingy 
corner. 

''But yesterday my daughter cried for 
a ring — a bauble of irised glass! 
Alas, my Polly is pretty — beauty piles 



180 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



temptations along one's path. And I — 
I cannot be home to care for her: I must 
scrub far into the night to earn the thing 
that we term life. Indeed, my burden 
has become so great. It is the heaviest 
on earth. I can no longer bear it." 

The bent form sagged lower against the 
wall. An epitome of weariness masked 
the face of the worker. 

Then it was as if a light sifted through 
the dingy dusk, and a soft voice seemed to 
reproach. 

"Woman of work," it said, "choose. 
There are many burdens, for no one on 
earth is free. Each carries his own 
pack." The soft voice paused as if to 
sigh. Then: "Choose," it suggested in 
soothing cadences, "choose the burden 
that you would bear. It shall be yours." 

The charwoman laughed aloud. 
Choose? How easy a task! Only today 
a proud woman had swept scornfully 
past, a woman in velvet and fur. She 
had not deigned to look upon the woman 
of work in the corridor. Choose! The 
laugh of the charwoman was not pleasant 
to hear. 

"Burdens, indeed," mocked the hud- 
dled form in the corner. " I will take the 
burdens of that fair lady who shrank from 
me in the halls this day. Perfumed like 
a rare, rare rose — what burdens are hers?" 

"You have chosen?" The murmur of 
the voice was full of patience, and sorry. 
It was very gentle. 

"I have chosen," answered the char- 
woman. 

Then the voice vanished. The dingy 
darkness was as before. The huddled 
form in the corner was still. Night 
hovered stealthily over the city. And 
it was with the charwoman as if years had 
passed: they had melted swiftly into 
eternity like snow over a warm chimney. 
And still she huddled in the dingy corner; 
but now she implored: 

"Take this burden from me — this 
thing for which I begged. I spoke in 
blindness. I did not know. For how 
may we know of the burdens another 
bears? And I, in my folly, demanded a 



curse — and guessed it not. Make me a 
charwoman again; return to my shoulders 
the pack that years of pressure have 
taught me to carry: it is nothing — noth- 
ing measured by this unfamiliar load, 
this load for which I asked, for which I 
have no skill (or patience) to manage. 
How could I know that gold and jewels 
and fine raiment and position may chain 
the heart with meshes of brass^ may hold 
the eyes at the edge of a mocking preci- 
pice into which one must daily look down? 
How could I know that Success may be 
an unwholesome thing like an apple with 
a worm at the core? Indeed, I had for- 
gotten that death is better than love 
grown cold; I had forgotten that the sins 
of parents may stare back from innocent 
eyes; I had forgotten — " 

The charwoman stretched out pleading 
arms. 

"Blindly I bartered away the burden 
that was my own," she agonized; "return 
it to me, and I will rejoice, and repine no 
more." 

The woman's head bowed in shame and 
sorrow. She did not see the faintness of 
the opal light. But she seemed to sense 
a soft voice saying: 

"Take that which is thine own. Covet 
no more the burden of another. To you 
is given but mortal sight. Much there 
is which must forever remain cloaked in 
shadow." 

The light faded. Night hovered over 
the city. 

The charwoman started. Staring, she 
clasped her hands against a fiercely beat- 
ing heart. She glanced about. There 
lay the tools of her trade. The floor was 
not yet dry. Hurriedly she wrung the 
water from her dripping skirts, but a song 
brushed her lips, light as a butterfly's 
wing. She smiled. 

At the door of her home her daughter 
met her. 

"We have tea all hot for you," cried 
Polly with a hug of joy. "We had almost 
begun to worry. Bob and I. You are so 
late, motherling dear. And we have good 
news for you!" 



I 



COMPENSATIONS 



IS I 



Polly bent and kissed her — Polly who 
already measured two inches taller than 
mother. 

"You won't always have to work so 
hard," cried the girl. "I am making 
good. Next term I shall teach — think 
of it, Mother. Your girl a teacher! 
And then — and then — " She laughed 
gaily. "You shall never work so hard 
again, mother mine, never, never, never! 
— Now drink your tea while it is piping 
hot!" 

"And I, mother — " the charwoman's 
son dropped to a stool by her side. "I 
have finished all my arithmetic problems, 
I am doing better. Soon I shall be in 
Eighth A.'^ His voice grew shy. "And 
I have been promised a job as soon as 
vacation comes. I shall deliver for Bate- 
man the Market Man. Oh, mother, you 
will never need to work so hard again" 

Tears rolled down the cheeks of the 
charwoman. 

"Burdens.?" she whispered. "What 
burdens have I .? Blessings ! — only bless- 
ings have come to me, and I did not 
know. . . . My beautiful daughter 
with the white flame in her heart which 
no earth soil can tarnish! And my son 
with his father's own ways!" 

Happiness sang in the home of the 
charwoman. 



''Your tea," chided Polly lightly; 
"drink your tea, mother dear. . . . 
And guess what I have for your supper." 

" Some day — some day — • I am going 
to be a great man," mused the boy at the 
woman's knee. "Then, mother, you will 
be so proud of me." 

The charwoman laughed. Her eyes 
were shining. She hugged her burden to 
her^ for she had seen its core of gold. 

And the children said: 

"Isn't our mother the nicest mother! 
There isn't another mother in all the 
wide, wide world quite so good as ours!" 

The shadows played in the corners of 
the little bare room like elves at hide-and- 
seek. They slipped behind the clock 
case, they snuggled down the woodbox, 
they crept back of the stove, they hunted 
for places to hide — there were not many 
places to hide in the little bare room; 
and then they suddenly danced out to 
clap hands with "I spy! — I spy!" and 
"You're IT — it — IT!" And then the 
next minute they did it all over again, 
while the street lights twinkled and 
blinked, jealously; and somewhere a hand 
organ played soft music. Brooding night 
peered curiously in at the curtainless 
windows, but nobody cared; nobody 
noticed; they were so happy together, the 
charwoman and her children. 



Which 

There are those who contend as this liferoad they 
wend 
That they purpose to have a good time 
Without thought of the morrow — no care do 
they borrow 
Of stern duty or honor sublime! 

There are others who say as they travel life's way, 
"Oh, I'll never live this day again. 

So I'll give of my best to meet life's every test, 
That my life may be lived not in vain." 



'^hich appeals most to 



Now be honest and true 
you, 
As you ponder the viewpoints I've quoted? 
Would you live just for fun or to win in life's run, 
To your God and your ideals devoted?, 

Carolina L. Sumner 



The Tiny House 

By Ruth Merton 



THE tiny house has seldom solved 
the problem of adequate privacy 
for the individual, and has been re- 
jected by many families of simple tastes 
and modest incomes because in it they 
found themselves continually in each 
other's way, and felt that their life as a 
family and all their household arrange- 
ments were too much under the scrutiny 
of their most casual visitor. 

Now the defect is, we believe, due not 
so much to the size of the house, as to its 
plan, the distribution of its rooms and its 
lack of suitability to the needs of its 
tenants. 

We choose a house which has the cor- 
rect number of rooms, and, quite ignoring 
the importance of the aesthetic, we settle 
down in it as best we may, with little 
thought as to whether or not it suits us 
in general character and personality. 

Of course it is ridiculous to talk of the 
personality of houses. That is, most 
practical people would consider them- 
selves bound to laugh, if told that they 
would be happier in a square house than 
a long one, or that Colonial architecture 
and antique furniture did not suit them. 

Yet, as a matter of fact, one should 
choose the shape and character of one's 
house as carefully as the colors and style 
of one's clothes; for many are the mis- 
takes of judgment in architecture which 
seriously interfere with the business of 
life, to say nothing of its pleasure! 

Unfortunately, here in America, too 
many houses are put up with an eye to 
the "average" tenant and with no thought 
of any particular family and its particular 
characteristics and needs. As the average 
human being exists only in calculations, 
and the average house is alas! the easiest 
to build, thousands of misfits occur 
between the man and his hom.e. 

Even if a family plans its house, the 
architect in too many cases aims to 



follow his own ideas instead of trying to 
properly interpret the individuality of 
the family. Or, if he sincerely tries to 
carry out the desires of his client, he fails 
in the difficult task of making them 
practical and aesthetic, and at the same 
time acceptable to the man whose house 
it is. 

If every person who starts to build a 
house, could divest himself of all pre- 
conceived notions of what is necessary 
in a house, and could see himself set 
down suddenly on his plot of ground, and 
obliged to make for himself a structure 
which could best serve the purposes of 
his daily life, we should soon have houses 
almost perfect in balance and design, 
although the man who built them was 
neither artist nor architect. 

This is well shown in the houses of 
European peasants, and, though we 
admire the picturesqueness of their 
buildings, and the appropriateness of 
these buildings to their use and sur- 
roundings, we seldom dream that our 
own houses should follow the same laws 
in choice of essentials. 

There was once a bride and groom who, 
in violent revolt against all convention, 
started out to keep house with nothing 
but a mattress and some cooking utensils. 
They soon discovered what furniture was 
really essential to people of their pursuits, 
and, as it became necessary, added to 
their stock, tables, chairs and many 
things which are found in the most con- 
ventional houses. Strangely enough, 
bookshelves were discovered to be of the 
utmost importance in this particular case, 
and were soon given a prominent and 
dominating place in the principal room. 
The rest was furnished always with 
reference to that book-lined wall. 

Then there was another family, who, 
having reluctantly disposed of "parlor" 
and "bedroom suites" when moving to 



182 



THE TINY HOUSE 



183 



the city, could not bring themselves to 
part with a monstrous engraving in a 
six-foot walnut frame, and always had to 
consider that picture when they wished 
to rent another apartment. Finally they 
built a house more or less after their own 
hearts, and that engraving hangs per- 
manently enshrined in the most con- 
spicuous place above the living-room 
mantel. And to tell the truth, it seems to 
suit the place, and the house and its 
occupants, very well indeed. 

Now these two families certainly had 
a very definite idea of what they con- 
sidered important, and if they followed 
out, step by step, in the building of their 
respective houses, this method of attend- 
ing first to the essentials, they have made 
themselves admirable homes. 

So few people know what they really 
want when it comes to houses. They 
admire this and that house along the* 
road, never taking into consideration 
that probably what appeals to them is 
the extreme fitness of the house to its 
present use and owner. 

Who has not seen a place, which, 
almost ugly in the hands of a certain 
family, suddenly, through a change of 
ownership, took on a charm and interest 
not to be accounted for in any external 
or visible alterations.^ 

Or again have you not seen an empty 
house about which lingers the characteris- 
tics of its one-time occupant.^ 

Who can doubt that houses lose or 
improve in beauty according to their 
adaptability to the life of their inmates.'' 

It is not always the person who wants 
to live in a tiny house and considers the 
tiny house the best expression of his per- 
sonality, who is obliged to confine himself 
to four or five rooms. 

But even to this supposed misfit in the 
tiny house, there are words of comfort 
if he will but heed them, and, if he chooses, 
his small house may become his castle, 
with boundless space for his lonely 
meditation. 

First of all he must rid himself of tradi- 
tions, and be willing to set his little house 



on its plot not according to the prevailing 
custom, but with no guide but the land 
itself and the points of the compass. 
Let him stand on that plot on a hot day, 
on a cold day, on a windy day, on a wet 
day, and let him determine the location 
of each and every room according to his 
own needs, and be not afraid to put the 
kitchen on the street and his front door 
at the side, if that seems to him the best 
arrangement after due consideration of 
the elements. 

The ground-plan and the site will 
determine the style of architecture, if our 
client has the strength to put aside his 
pre-conceptions about "periods" and let 
himself be guided purely by the shapes 
and proportions he has marked to repre- 
sent his rooms. 

He will find it easier, if he traces the 
plan on a clean, white paper, then goes 
over it, room by room, noting the direc- 
tion each one faces, taking account of the 
sunshine which will enter, and at what 
time of day in the different seasons, 
remarking the view to be framed by each 
window when the house shall stand 
built upon its plot. 

Next he must think about all his furni- 
ture, and find on his plan a space large 
enough to hold each and every necessary 
chair and table. And not only must they 
fit, and leave space for getting about, 
but they must seem to stay where they 
are put and not come looming from the 
white sheet in uncomfortable blots, nor 
look like islands in a map of the South 
Pacific Ocean. 

To be really happy in a small house, one 
must renounce. I say in a small house, 
though as a matter of fact, every house 
is the more livable for containing only 
what is absolutely necessary. 

But if the man of the tiny house hap- 
pens to have some special furniture which 
cannot by rights be included in the plan, 
and is not to be renounced, he must not 
make the mistake of thinking he will find 
a place for it once the house is furnished. 
This would be to damn his tiny house 
and make it just another misfit. 



184 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



So if he possesses a typewriter, or a 
bicycle, or a baby-carriage, which is 
essential to his happiness, he must find 
a niche for it in his plan, before the house 
is built. And when he has successfully 
done this he will have come upon the 
secret of happy life in a tiny house; that 
is, a place for every necessary thing, 
every necessary thing in its place, and 
plenty of clear floor space left over. 

Now I dare say, if most of us thought 
about it at all, we should discover that 
many things we take for granted in the 
average house, can be quite well elimi- 
nated in our house. This is especially 
true in a tiny house. 

Take dining rooms, and dining-room 
furniture, for instance. 

No one doubts that a large family, 
living in a fair-sized house, may probably 
need a room set apart in which to take 
their meals. This is especially true 
where there are servants. 

A large family in a small house will find 
that, with only a few rooms at their dis- 
posal, they will be more comfortable, if, 
instead of giving up a room to be used 
only three times a day as a place in which 
to eat, they shall make two living rooms 
and eat in one of them. 

As for the small family in a tiny house, 
they may discover that a kitchen, planned 
also as a dining room, will solve the 
question of adequate breathing space for 
them in what would otherwise be cramped 
quarters. 

"Eat in the living room!" says a horri- 
fied upholder of all that is orthodox. 
And when it comes to eating in the 
kitchen, even some of the radicals and 
independents seem unenthusiastic. 

And yet in houses all over the country 
— especially on farms — dining rooms 
stand empty and unused through more 
than half the year, attesting to the popu- 
larity of kitchens as places to eat. And 
who ever disputes the charm of Sunday 
evening supper eaten off the laundry tubs ! 
As for living rooms, some attempt has 
been made to build combination living 
and dining rooms, but they are usually 



unsatisfactory because they are neither 
one thing nor the other and fail as both. 

What we need is an out and out 
renaissance of all ideas on the subject of 
dining rooms, and a consequent honest 
putting-by of our old associations and 
prejudices, in order to see them reju- 
venated and usable once more. 

The dining room more than any other 
room is a place where the family assembles 
"en masse." 

It should, therefore, be the largest room 
in the house, especially if the family is a 
hospitable one which often entertains at 
meals. 

But in a house of only a moderate 
number of rooms it seems a shame to give 
up the largest room to be used only three 
times a day. In a tiny house it would be 
absolutely stupid. 

So the logical thing to do is to make the 
largest room a real assembly room at 
meal time or any other time when the 
whole family is to be together. "But," 
some one objects, "how about dining 
room furniture.?" And I reply that any 
one who has thoroughly divested himself 
of his old prejudices, will find that in this 
day of well-planned pantries and built-in 
cupboards, sideboards, china cabinets 
and other bulky furniture (all belonging, 
by the way, to a formal age when rooms 
were never less than thirty feet long) are 
only an encumbrance and have outlived 
any use they ever had. 

A dining table and Chairs may be as 
integral a part of the living-room furni- 
ture as any other table and chairs. And 
a small serving table is certainly not out of 
place when it may take so many different 
forms, and range all the way from a 
simple side table to one of the ornamental 
consoles so popular at present. 

There you have, then, a large room 
which comfortably holds the family at 
meals and other times, which is, in fact, 
a real "living room." 

The next step is to provide an "other 
room." 

We have all suffered a bit from that 
tendency which, some years ago, induced 



THE TINY HOUSE 



185 



us to build houses in which the living 
room occupied the whole first floor. We 
liked the feeling of space it gave us to 
dispose ruthlessly of all partition walls 
and step through our front door into an 
apartment where we sat, ate, enter- 
tained, worked, and amused ourselves all 
together — a joyous ideal family around 
a field-stone fireplace! 

Rut lately we have had a reaction. 

We found it was not quite comfortable 
to sit in a room into which opened a stair- 
way and a front door. No matter how 
close to the fire we got there were draughts 
playing about, and, as a nation, we 
cannot abide draughts. 

The room was no work-room either; 
for in spite of the numerous alcoves and 
nooks, we could never seem to get far 
enough away from the chatter about the 
fire really to bury ourselves in the subject 
of our thoughts. 

Then it must always happen that on the 
very day when we felt least inclined to 
ask any one to eat with us, some one 
arrived just as lunch was set forth in the 
living room, and we hastened to lay 
another place at table and be hospitable 
whether we would or no. 

And oh! the tragedy of tragedies when, 
on a hot afternoon, we dallied and lingered 
over late magazines instead of going up 
to dress, and were caught by a formal 
caller who was ushered in before we could 
make a dash up the too-open stairway — 
the one and only stairway in this "back- 
to-nature" house! 

By such circumstances we have come 
to believe in "other rooms." 

The other room may take many and 
various forms according to the tastes of 
the family. As a library, a salon, a 
music-room or a study, it does duty both 
as a quiet place of retirement or as a 
formal reception room when the living- 
room is out of the question; and no 
matter what name it takes or how it is 
furnished, the "other room" is not to be 
dispensed with if the tiny house is to be a 
success. 



So if there are to be only two rooms on 
the first floor of your tiny house, be sure 
to have one of them an "other room." 

Of course, you must have a kitchen. 
Some effort has been made lately to 
suppress kitchens under the delusion that 
they are horrible places where women 
drudge their lives away. 

It is far from our thought to dispute 
the fact that drudgery and kitchens are 
certainly linked together in some indis- 
soluble way. On the contrary, let us 
admit the fact, and set about a reform in 
kitchens and consequent abolition of 
drudgery. 

Of late years — all the time we have 
been constructing kitchenettes and kitch- 
enless apartments, in fact — we have 
fallen more and more under the charm of 
American Colonial houses, and have 
imitated as nearly as possible, under 
modern conditions, the architecture, the 
furniture, and decorations of the time 
when our ancestors were adapting them- 
selves to life in a new country. But we 
have seemed to overlook entirely one of 
the most charming features of the simple 
Colonial house — its kitchen. 

It is never wise to try to resurrect the 
past, no matter how much we think it 
an improvement on the present. On the 
whole it is only very near-sighted people 
who cannot see that whatever was worth 
bringing out of the past has lived, and is 
now so incorporated with the present 
that we no longer distinguish it as part 
of the past. 

So the charming Colonial kitchen has 
survived, but not as a kitchen. We have 
kept the living-room idea of it, and dis- 
carded the kitchen part that got mixed 
up with drudgery and women's wasted 
lives. And so kitchens are in danger of 
quite going out of houses at all,, except 
as they exist in laboratory-like spotless- 
ness in some homes, or as the dens of 
shiftless servants in others, or as toy 
kitchenettes in still others. 

{Concluded in November) 



Misery Entertains Company 

By Agnes Louise Dean 



MISERY really does love company 
— after they have been fed and 
sped. That is the funny thing, 
almost the only funny thing about Mis- 
ery, I mean about my sister-in-law. Her 
real name is Persis. That any of our 
hilarious tribe, Sunny Jim most of all, 
should marry a person named Persis! 

Jim calls her "Percy," of course, and 
acts proud of her fastidious housekeeping. 
But young Michael's name for the wife 
of his adored big brother is "Misery." 

MoUie and I cannot make him stop 
it — you know how it is with a youngster 
whose eyes are blue and whose hair is 
red, he does as he likes. Never to her 
face, nor when Jim can hear him; but 
always when we are around, and Persis 
herself may drop in any minute. 

A bad boy is Michael, but discerning. 
Jim's wife is beautiful, and it is sweet 
dresses she wears, but about housekeeping 
she is serious minded. She keeps house 
grimly; and when she entertains, holy 
angels, what a mockery of jiospitality she 
makes of itl 

We have always been poor enough to be 
busy; and busy enough to be happy. 
The cradle was mostly earning its keep; 
though before Michael came it idled a 
matter of five years in the attic. Father 
and mother. Heaven rest them, worked 
early and late, and died while there was 
still laughter in their throats and a 
twinkle in their eyes. 

It was "set an extra plate, some of 
you; a friend sups with us," when 
father brought home a crony, or a good 
cousin stepped in for an hour's chat. 
That is as it should be in big families 
where love makes the potatoes go around 
and a joke or two comes out with the 
scrapings of the bean-pot. 

Furthermore, mother was a great hand 
for special parties. She had practice, 
bless her, with our little birthday doings, 



and the frosted cakes with our names on 
that the children of the neighborhood were 
bidden in to share with us. 

She liked our big, shabby house to put 
a good foot foremost when there was 
"company," and the old gold and white 
china was to be used, and the cake accord- 
ing to Grandmother Malone's receipt, 
and the child whose turn it was could 
beat up the nine eggs. 

Oh, to be sure, mother had a way with 
her we were that pleased to run our legs 
off fixing up for company I There'd be 
Jim mending the fence, with little 
Michael standing by, holding nails. 
And Alollie and I sweeping out the front 
chamber, singing frolicsome tunes in 
spite of the choking dust. And the twins 
setting out (as soon as ever they'd cleared 
the breakfast dishpan) for the handsome 
bunches of wild flowers they knew the 
whereabouts of — and no one else did. 
There'd be father, extra careful to wipe 
his shoes on the doormat, and to knock 
out his pipe without the door. There'd 
be the best tablecloth, with its deep, 
straight creases; 5nd what silver we had 
shining- like the altar service; and our 
goblets polished like soap bubbles. 

Sure we were busy — ■ and excited. It 
was like Christmas eve iox laughter and 
scrambling; and the house scented with 
news of mother's biscuits and fried 
chicken. Everybody was that happy! 
The big girls scrubbing the little ones and 
tying their hair ribbons and buttoning 
their white ruffled dresses. Jim would 
have an eye to the part of Ray's hair; 
and send a comb through Michael's curls, 
Michael letting him, for there was com- 
pany coming, and it had to be. Mother 
would be in her sprigged lawn, and 
joking while she looked us over, but her 
glance missed nothing, and we were a 
credit to her when the company trooped up 
to lay its wraps on the front chamber bed. 



186 



MISERY ENTERTAINS COMPANY 



187 



Mollie and I, when we were old enough, 
fetched and carried from the kitchen, 
father heaped the plates as often as they 
were passed, with a joke here, and a wish- 
bone there, and good cream 'gravy in 
plenty. 

You may be sure the company loved 
mother, and she them, and her parties 
were spoken of all about. But the best 
of it was how we all grew up to think that 
having company was a great treat and 
good fortune, and making ready for 
guests a big piece of luck to have a share 
in.. 

I'm wishing mother could have lived 
to teach Persis, Jim's wife, what having 
company ought to be like, for Jim's sake, 
and for the sake of Jim's children — if 
God sends them any! She'll not learn 
it from us, for it's a bit condescending 
towards us she feels; nor from Jim either, 
he being the lovable sort that takes color 
from the woman he wants to please. 
Once it was mother's spell he was under, 
but I misdoubt he is veering about to 
catch "Percy's" view of things. So 
there's no help coming to Jim's wife — 
and she needing it sore. 

For 'tis thus Persis has in the company. 

"Jim," she'll say, and he will drop down 
the newspaper at the sound of doom in 
her pretty voice, "we are obliged to have 
the Forresters for dinner. 'Twas months 
ago they had us there." 

"Sure we'll have 'em," says Jim. 
"How jolly! Pick your night. Would 
you think to have the Thomases and the 
Browns, too.'' I like enough of a crowd 
to swing it." 

"Mercy, yes," says Persis, "we owe 
them a dinner, too. A very nice dinner." 

So far, good enough, though Jim sees a 
look in Persis' eyes that makes him add, 
"Don't let's make too much work of it, 
Percy." 

But, bless you, what Persis will make 
of it is no such wholesome and honest 
thing as a bit of work. From the mo- 
ment the company accepts — and 'tis a 
lie that they'd be pleased to come, if they 
could know of the disruptions and tor- 



ments poor Jim will undergo for their 
sakes — from the moment that Persis 
gets the word, her name is Misery, as 
young Michael truly says. 

For she breathes hard, and her sweet 
eyes stare; and it's up by the roots must 
come her small house and all in it. What 
with a loose tile set in the bathroom, and 
a lick of paint to the window-boxes; 
what with fresh curtains everywhere, and 
an extra dozen of party plates to choose, 
there is a great to-do and bustle. 

With Jim so handy, you might think 
'twould be a pleasure, his helping around, 
but Misery (yes, I'll take over Michael's 
name for her) pulls a woeful face at his 
whistling, and an absent ear she turns to 
his jokes. 

Misery is giving a party: let no dog 
laugh. Misery is giving an exquisite ■ 
party: let no one be light hearted lest 
some detail be overlooked. Misery is 
giving the best party she knows how — 
but dancing, that blessed dancing of the 
heart, is left out entirely. 

With us, 'twas a pleasure mixing a cake 
and seeing it come out of the oven a 
perfect thing. But Misery stirs up her 
batter with a face that grim you'd think 
she was Lucretia Borgia herself, and the 
poisons misbehaving at the eleventh 
hour! 

Mother used to wheedle and encourage 
the colleen she had in to help her when 
need was, and her smile gave the timid a 
warm feeling of consequence. But Mis- 
ery is one to expect little and get less, 
with her own nerves up edgeways, and 
her tongue as crisp as a wafer of bacon. 

However, she is a proud woman, is 
Jim's wife. Misery. Her days of gloomy 
exertion, when the happiness of her house- 
hold flies before the driving of her will, 
end in a party that does her fine credit. 

All is in order; candles shine softly on 
hot house flowers; the table is fitly 
spread; the food is so good that no better 
can be had anywhere; it is served 
quietly by a neat, watchful maid whose 
hands shake only a little; Misery looks 
charming, and Jim begins to relax. 



188 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



At first he is like to have the expression 
of one who has been holding his breath 
under water and has just come up for air. 

I have been at some of Misery's parties, 
for Misery regards MoUie and me as part 
of her duty to Jim; and she truly wishes 
to please Jim, does Misery. But what 
with the flowers and the candles and the 
shadow of Misery's joyless preparation 
across the feast, I feel as one in a house 
of mourning and my heart keening for 
that which should be the glory of the 
home, dead in the next room. I eat the 
good food in sorrow, and the taste of it is 
as salt as tears. 



When the guests are gone, the beauty 
of relief from tension sits between Persis^ 
brows. 

"I am proud of you, darling," says 
Jim, big, comfortable, loyal Jim. "It 
was a thumping success." 

"It was a nice party, I think," says 
Persis, looking happy for the first time in 
a week, "certainly I tried hard enough!" 

But sure 'tis a husband's sister will 
grudge the wife her hour of triumph. I 
grudge it to Persis, minding me of Jim's 
mother and mine, and the shining of her 
happy eyes as she made all fit for 
company. 



Dishes to Make Food Most Attractive 

By Marion Brownfield 



WE hear a great deal about 
"the psychology" of this, that 
and the other. The psychology 
of color is a favorite topic for the psy- 
chologist as well as the interior decorator, 
for it is recognized that cheer and con- 
tent — such essential home virtues — • 
are very largely influenced by pleasant 
color combinations. 

On the table the effect of color has 
doubtless an influence upon the appetite. 
Not only serving foods daintily in dishes 
that set it off to best advantage en- 
courages appetite and good digestion, 
but, stimulates jaded palates. Change 
from sheer monotony indeed is what 
makes other people's cooking — no better 
than ours — taste good. Different table- 
ware, too, makes food seem to have a 
different flavor. So variety of dishes, 
used for a change with the same recipe, 
makes a difference that is unconsciously 
transferred to the enjoyment of the food 
itself. For this reason a little study in 
serving foods in dishes that by color- 
contrast or harmony, set them off, really 
pays the thoughtful housewife. 



Some suggestions for different foods in 
dishes of different colors follow. Blue 
dishes, of which every household is 
pretty sure to have some, set off particu- 
larly anything yellow in hue. Thus 
oranges, apples (yellow or red), eggs, 
Hubbard squash and such yellow foods as 
cornbread, cornstarch pudding and cus- 
tards all look delightful in blue dishes. 
Red foods also look well, but have more 
contrast with green ware, so will be 
spoken of farther along. 

White dishes with gold bands have a 
pleasing delicacy and are therefore suit- 
able for dainty effects. Crisp blanched 
lettuce, water cress, pineapple and water- 
melon are appetizing served in them. 
Foods of strong flavor sometimes need a 
simple background, also. Onions, fish, 
and wieners, for this reason, may bci 
palatable in these dishes. 

Yellow dishes which may be banded,! 
flowered or plain, offer a great oppor-j 
tunity for a cheerful effect. Foods thatj 
have no great charm of color themselvesj 
look well in yellow. Thus a steak, chops 
or hash gain a certain richness in these! 



DISHES TO MAKE FOOD ATTRACTIVE 



189 



dishes. Macaroni, a colorless food, un- 
less combined with tomato, gains char- 
acter in a yellow dish. Chocolate recipes 
make an effective contrast, also, while 
purple foods such as grapes, blackberries 
and plums, either fresh or in sauce, go 
effectively in yellow dishes. 

Red foods contrast strikingly in green 
dishes of which there are many designs. 
Banded, flowered or the delicately solid 
pale green Seiji ware are a few of the 
artistic varieties of green ware. Beets, 
salmon, strawberries, raspberries, cherries, 
gelatines, desserts, frosted cakes and 
ice cream look invitingly cool in green for 
summer service. 

Pink dishes should be reserved for 
white foods. Among these are cereals of 
all kinds, mashed or riced potatoes, white 
cakes, plain or frosted, vanilla ice cream 
and white desserts such as rice Rebecca, 
pudding, junket and so forth. 

Red dishes of Japanese design may 
effectively hold green foods such as green 
peppers, cucumbers, string beans, peas. 
They also add character to colorless foods. 
And strawberries make a pleasing all-red 
effect in them that seems to add luscious- 
ness to the berries. 

The very colorful dishes, of which 
every one has a few, are often just the 
thing to make certain foods tempting. 
Chocolate, lemon gelatine and white foods 
should be tried in these dishes for pleasure. 

Of course a great deal depends upon 
the season both as to food and dishes. 
In general, brighter colored dishes are 
more cheerful in winter and daintier hues 
are more enjoyable in hot weather. 



Glassware, especially, is attractive for 
the summer table as it is so cool looking. 
Even cocoa, coffee and desserts can be 
contrived to be served in glassware. The 
plain puddings of rice or bread, indeed, 
garnished with fruit or jelly, or ac- 
companied by sauce, look far more at- 
tractive served in glass punch-cups or 
sundae glasses, than in the usual saucers. 
Glass saucers, however, are useful for 
cereal, fruit and even salad. Prunes in 
gold banded goblets of glass, topped with 
whipped cream or marshmallow,are very 
alluring, while all fruits, ices and gelatines 
look refreshing in glassware. The large 
variety of glassware manufactured now- 
adays, from cooking ware to the exquisite 
Venetian glass designed for beverages, 
fruit, bonbons, finger bowls and flowers, 
makes it possible to serve practically 
everything in glassware if so desired. 
Pie and casserole recipes can, indeed, be 
served right from the oven to the table. 
And as glass is often reserved for com- 
pany use only, why not surprise the 
family occasionally with a pleasing 
change .'' 

Instead of serving strawberries, halved 
peaches and figs in saucers, try serving 
them next time on small bread-and-butter 
plates that contrast effectively — adding 
a sprinkling of powdered sugar and a 
green leaf as a garnish. 

Cake, cookies, doughnuts, sandwiches 
and breads of all kinds as well as fruit and 
nuts are good to look upon in a basket. 
And here variety also is possible. A 
paper doily is sufficient protection and 
saves dish washing. 



The Storm 

The winds rage and howl my cabin about 
With ghoulish glee, they clamor and shout. 
They roar down the chimney and shake the walls, 
They try to appall me with shrieking calls; 
But serene, in warmth and peace, I hurl 
Defiance to their deafening whirl. 
In anchorage firm, my house and I 
Fierce storms and threats forever defy, 
For my house and I are types of thought, 
To which earth's shocks become as naught. 

Hattie H. d^Autremont. 



190 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



AMERICAN COOKERY 

FORMERLY THE 

BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL 

MAGAZINE 

OF 

Culinary Science and Domestic Economics 



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WOOING SLEEP 

Fitful sleep, the saucy maid, 
Refused last night my lids to kiss. 
Wide-eyed, then I sought to find 
What day-time things I'd done amiss. 

Drowsy poppy tricks I droned, 
Baby lullabys I crooned, 
Even all my prayers intoned, 
But far away she stayed. 

Flashing lights passed by my door, 
To count them as they went I tried. 
Stars above like jewels gleamed. 
How many worlds, I wondering, cried! 

All my life, a pageant bold, 
Night's cinema then unrolled, 
Every deed and thought there told. 
(Oh, where was the wayward maid.^') 

At last, to woo her I refused. 

"I care not when she comes," I mused. 

"I will not call her name." 

And then it was, she came. 

Hattie H. d^ Autremont. 



THE TINY HOUSE 

WE invite the attention of our 
readers to our article in this 
number on the Tiny House. The article 
is so complete and well done, we felt 



constrained to give it a place, though it is 
somewhat long for our pages. We print 
it in two installments, the second of 
which is, perhaps, better than the first. 
Do not, however, be misled by the 
title into building a small house for a 
permanent home. Perhaps this tend- 
ency is necessary in these days, when the 
clamor for houses is loud and insistent 
and the demand cannot be met. People 
are more likely to build too small, rather, 
than too large a house. The small house 
with its pinched rooms and cramped 
appointments can never be satisfactory 
and will prove to be a life-long disap- 
pointment. Of course, one must adapt 
his dwelling more or less to his needs and 
requirements. At the same time, he 
should consider the future and aspire 
to build for comfort and contentment. 

We see much of our houses, for we are 
wont to occupy them many years. This 
means a good deal more to us than can 
well be told. Our tastes, our aspirations, 
and our ideals, all are largely revealed 
in our houses and environments. Cer- 
tainly no less pleasure is derived from the 
building and furnishing of one's own house 
than in dwelling therein. Do not hurry, 
then, in its construction. Prolong the 
pleasure and study of housemaking. 
May the house that holds our household 
penates be of no mean proportions, may 
it be built with painstaking care and 
thought — ^ in a word, may it be a place- 
fit to live in. 

At any rate, read carefully our article 
by Mrs. Merton and note the study and 
thought given to the scope and design of 
the modern tiny house. 



B 



FOOD PRICES GOING UP 

Y two bulletins, which have just: 
been issued, the department of labor 
serves notice on the public that the- 
retail prices of food have begun tO' 
mount again. During the month from. 
June 15 to July 15, 1921, the prices rose 
in all but three of the fourteen principal- 
cities of the United States. The larger 
increases were 5 per cent in Boston^. 



EDITORIALS 



191 



Portland, Me,, Cleveland and Denver; 
6 per cent in Indianapolis and Butte, 7 
per cent in Buffalo and 8 per cent in 
Minneapolis. Thus it appears that the 
movement extends over a large part of 
the country. The change may represent 
a growing tendency or only a mere 
fluctuation. Which it is cannot be 
known without futher experience. The 
figures for the year, from July 15, 1920, 
to July IS, 1921, are brighter. They 
show how the prices fell during the twelve 
months, the decreases ranging from 30 
per cent in Boston to 38 per cent in 
Omaha. 

Again there comes the darker shade 
when we turn to the comparison between 
the retail cost of food in July, 1913, and 
the cost in July, 1921. Notwithstanding 
the considerable decrease in the last 
twelve months, the present prices average 
about 50 per cent more than the prices 
of eight years ago, the increases ranging 
from 37 per cent in Louisville to 54 per 
cent in Boston and 57 per cent in Wash- 
ington, D. C. But it may be well to 
remember that if we had been in Europe 
we should have fared worse. The final 
report of the joint committee of the 
British trades union congress, the labor 
party and the co-operative union states 
that the cost of living in September, 
1920, was 189 per cent above the level 
of Jtily, 1914. Never have we had to 
bear a burden so great as that which the 
British have carried. And in other Eu- 
ropean countries the people have bent 
under heavier loads. Who wants war 



agam, 



— • The Herald. 



WHY should food prices go up.? 
No good and valid reason seems 
to be given why the price of food and 
fuel in this country should go up. Oc- 
casionally we read about a scarcity of 
fuel or some article of food and at once 
feel certain some one is trying to scare us 
into immediate purchase. In case an 
adequate supply of fuel has not been 
mined and marketed, it is due to culpable 
neglect or lack of efficiency somewhere. 



In case our food supply is not plentiful 
and reasonable in price, let some one, not 
interested in maintaining the present 
scale of prices, arise and explain. . We are 
no longer to be scared and cajoled by 
selfish propaganda. The fact is we have 
too many corporations, too many com- 
bines, too many associations, all con- 
cerned in keeping up the high prices of 
commodities. Thousands are idle; pro- 
duction is in demand. Why do we not 
all settle down in honest toil and effort 
to produce and still produce.? The world 
- is our market-place. 

REDUCTION OF EXPENDITURES 

THIS dull old world is at last open- 
ing its eyes to its choice between 
money and munitions. 

At last, people seem to realize that 
expenditures mustbe reduced, that wemay 
be relieved from our excessive burdens of 
taxation and prosperity be restored. 
Where else, for example, can the tragedy 
of the competition in armaments be 
found more tersely stated than by our 
President: "The enormous disbursements 
in the rivalries of armaments manifestly 
constitute the greater part of the en- 
cumbrance upon enterprise and national 
prosperity; and avoidable or extravagant 
expense of this nature is not only without 
economic justification, but is a constant 
menace to the peace of the world rather 
than an assurance of its preservation." 

To reduce expenses we must buy fewer 
things, that is, spend less and, conse- 
quently, have less. Waste and extrava- 
gance of every kind must be cut off. 
How can taxation, direct or indirect, be 
reduced and at the same time expendi- 
tures be increased? Both must come 
away down. Theprices of all things must 
be greatly reduced. 

We got into our present unfortunate 
condition by raising wages and the cost 
of every necessity of life. Our govern- 
ment was responsible; the bills were 
endorsed. Now the • process must be 
reversed. Wages must decline and the 
cost of the necessities of life must be 



192 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



reduced. The decline must be all round, 
and without exception. There is no 
other solution of our economic problem. 
No one, at the present time, is inclined 
to build houses or enter upon new enter- 
prises with prices that now prevail. 
It means loss and failure. People are 
tired of the exhibition of extravagance 
in high places, lavish public expenditures, 
and excess profits of the few. They are 
staggered at the thought of world in- 
debtedness. The cry for disarmament is 
universal. With the cost of a single 
battleship a deal of good could be done 
in the way of education and enlighten- 
ment, of which the country is greatly in 
need. In short, we have wandered far 
from the path of thrift and prosperity; let 
us now retrace our steps and once more 
pursue steadily the beaten trail of 
progress onward and upward to the 
summit of our ambition. 

A MAINE SENATOR'S LETTERS 

A MAINE paper does well to spread 
before its readers some extracts from 
the "intimate letters" of John Fairfield, 
well remembered as a Governor of Maine 
and a representative of his state in both 
houses of Congress. The names of 
many interesting men, long gone but 
well remembered, abound in this corre- 
spondence, and references to events 
that were vital topics of conversation in 
the 1840's, although yielding only amuse- 
ment today. Consider, for instance, some 
of the allusions in his telling his wife in 
Maine about the dinners he attended at 
Washington. 

In December, 1844, he dines with the 
widow of the fourth President. He says: 
"I found Dolly Madison a pretty good 
trencherman, I can assure you. I thought 
she ate enormously. She appeared, 
though, younger and handsomer than I 
ever saw her before and was in fine 
spirits." When Senator Fairfield goes 
to dine with Mr. Packinham, the British 
minister, a bachelor of 55, living in 
Daniel Webster's house, he partakes of 
a simple meal, which includes soup 



and fish, sweetbread, chicken "curiously 
cooked," canvasback ducks, boiled ham, 
oyster pie, saddle of mutton, "intermixed 
with jellied jams and sauces," and ending 
with "icecreams, cakes, grapes and knick- 
knacks, and at that he has not enumer- 
ated probably more than half." And 
those we think of as the days of plain 
living and high thinking. 



Miss Helen Kinne went to Teacher's 
College, N. Y., and began her teaching 
in 1891. During her years of work she 
trained about 3,000 teachers of home 
economics who are now rendering service 
in all parts of the world. 

"When the history of home economics 
is written. Miss Kinne will be counted 
among the half-dozen national leaders^ 
who in the early development of this 
work won a place for it in the school 
curriculum, and by training competent 
teachers made that place secure. Her 
own department at Teachers College 
increased from a mere handful of stu- 
dents to over a thousand each year in 
regular and special courses. In the 
country at large the subject has found a 
place in most of the women's colleges, in 
a large number of universities, and in 
nearly every public normal school and 
public school system." 

This entire growth and development of 
home economics has been witnessed by 
American Cookery. 

MIRAGE 
Tonight the crowds prfess hard on me, 

A surging, smothering tide. 
Under the lights they love to see 

They sway from side to side. 

Yet even as I draw swift breath 

To hold my thoughts my own, 
That throng is no more real than death — 

A vision past me blown. 

I know it but a drifting dream — 

A mist-wreath whirling by, 
For I have lingered by a stream 

Under a sunset sky. 

1 know — the scents of fern and pine — 

How sun-warm grasses feel — 
Cool o' the woods — No longer mine, 

But nothing else is real! 

J Id is Dunb«r. 




FISH CAKES 



EAKLD BEANS 
NEW ENGLAND SUNDAY MORNING BREAKFAST 



Seasonable-and-Tested Recipes 

By Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 

IN ALL recipes where flour is used, unless otherwise stated, the flour is measured after sifting 

once. Where flour is measured by cups, the cup is filled with a spoon, and a level cupful is 

meant. A tablespoonful or a teaspoonful of any designated material is a LEVEL spoonful. In flour 

mixtures where yeast is called for, use bread flour; in all other flour mixtures, use cake or pastry flour. 



Chicken and Olive Soup 

REMOVE the stones from thirty 
ripe olives by slitting them open 
carefully at the side with a small 
French boning knife, making the incision 
barely large enough to remove the stone. 
Then slice each crosswise in rather thin 
slices, most of which should be rings. 
Cook, at simmering point only, for a quar- 
ter of an hour in three-fourths a cup of 
water, acidulated with one tablespoonful 
of lemon juice. Dissolve two quarts of 
jellied chicken stock, and when hot 
thicken with one tablespoonful and one- 
half of arrowroot; add the olives with the 
liquid in which they were cooked, season 
with salt and celery seed, and stir until 
the soup boils. Serve with saltines, 
toasted. 

Gumbo Filet with Oysters 

To one quart of chicken stock add the 
liquor from a quart of oysters and two 
ounces of fine-chopped cooked ham. 
Thicken with six tablespoonfuls of flour 



rubbed to a paste with a little water and 
stirred into the broth. Add the oysters, 
and let cook until the gills separate, then 
stir in one-fourth a teaspoonful of pow- 
dered mixed herbs, and serve with wee 
croquettes of boiled rice, no bigger than 
a thimble, fried in deep fat until brown, 
and added to the tureen. 

New England Sunday Breakfast 
Brown Bread 

Sift together one cup, each, of rye meal, 
corn meal and Graham flour, one tea- 
spoonful of salt, two teaspoonfuls and 
one-half of soda. Add two-thirds a cup of 
molasses and two cups of thick sour milk. 
Beat thoroughly, pour into mould, and let 
steam four hours. 

Baked Beans 

Let one pint of pea beans soak in cold 
water over night. In the morning wash 
and rinse. Pour into kettle; add one 
teaspoonful of soda and water to cover. 
Let come to the boiling point. Rinse thor- 
oughly. Put one onion into a bean pot; 



193 



194 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



pour in one-half of the beans. Pour 
scalding water over one-fourth a pound of 
salt pork and after scoring rind place in 
bean-pot. Add the remaining beans. 
Mix four tablespoonfuls of molasses and 
one teaspoonful, each, of mustard and salt 
with hot water to pour and turn over the 
beans. Then add boiling water to cover. 
Put cover on bean-pot and bake eight 
hours in a moderate oven. Keep beans 
covered with water until last hour. 

Fish Cakes 

To half a package of shredded codfish 
(placed in a cloth, dipped and wrung out 
of cold water), add two cups of hot riced 



toms in boiling salted water for thirty 
minutes or until tender. Drain and cut 
in dice, and cook with one tablespoonful 
of butter in a small pan until slightly 
brown. Make an omelet of four well- 
beaten eggs, three tablespoonfuls of but- 
ter, and seasoning to taste. When it 
begins to set, put the artichokes in the 
center, roll the omelet, and turn out on a 
hot platter. 

Parsnip Breakfast Cakes 

Scrape and cook enough parsnips to 
make one cup of the mashed vegetable, 
and add this to two cups of warm milk 
in which one compressed yeast cake has 




LEG OF PORK, STUFFED AND ROASTED 



potatoes, one tablespoonful of butter, 
also a sprinkle of salt and pepper. Shape 
and fry in deep fat. 

Stuffed Leg of Pork 

Remove bone from leg of pork. Stuff 
with one cup of cracker crumbs, mixed 
with salt, pepper, one-half a tablespoonful 
of poultry seasoning and one-fourth a cup 
of melted butter. Roast in a moderate 
oven four hours. Serve with cooked 
cabbage and carrots. 

Omelet With Artichoke Bottoms 

Remove the leaves from three young 
artichokes (if very young the leaves may 
be used for a salad, otherwise for a puree), 
take out the chokes, and cook the bot- 



been blended, and two teaspoonfuls of 
salt, two tablespoonfuls of sugar, and 
one-half a cup of butter have been dis- 
solved. Add flour to * make a thick 
batter, about three cups, and let the 
mixture rise until double in bulk. Add 
flour enough to knead lightly, using as 
little as possible; roll into a thin sheet, 
cut into rounds about three inches in 
diameter, and lay on a greased baking 
sheet to rise again. Bake in a quick 
oven; split open and eat while hot. 

Birds Without Bones 

Spread over slices of beef tenderloin 
thin slices of cooked ham of exactly the 
same size; place in the center of each a 
few ripe olives and a little chopped sage; 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



195 




roll, and tie firmly in middle and at 
ends, or secure with wooden toothpicks. 
Melt two or more tablespoonfuls of 
butter in a saucepan; add one-fourth a 
cup of chopped mushrooms, and cook 
until butter is colored. Add the birds, 
cook, turning over on all sides until 
brown; fill up saucepan with stock, 
cover, and cook until birds are done. 
Place on platter; add seasoning and 
thickening to the sauce, pour around the 
birds, and lay on each a slice of currant 
or apple jelly, cut from an unmoulded 
glass. 

Broiled Sword Fish 

Brush broiler with olive oil; broil fish 
ten minutes, season with lemon juice, 
butter, salt and chopped parsley. Serve 
with pickled beets. 

Satisfying Vegetarian Dinner 

Around a mound of chopped spinach 
place slices of grilled sweet potatoes, raw 



cabbage that has been sliced thin, rolled in 
a wet cloth and chilled on ice; and 

Lima Bean Puree 

Soak dried beans over night, drain, 
cover with cold water and let simmer 
until tender and the water has evaporated. 
Replenish with boiling water as needed 
during cooking. Season with salt when 
partly cooked. Press through a sieve; 
add butter or cream, black pepper and 
more salt if needed. Return to the fire 
to become hot. Pipe around edge of 
platter. 

Creole Grillade 

Cut slices of lamb, veal, mutton, or 
any tender meat, and partly cook them on 
a pan in olive oil mixed with chopped 
peppers, parsley, onions, and seasoned 
with salt. After turning them over in 
this mixture until brown, lift them into a 
casserole, and pour over them the grillade 
or mixture of oil and seasonings; add 




A SATISFYING DINNER (MOULDED SPINACH, GRILLED SWEET POTATOES, 
SHREDDED CABBAGE, LIMA BEAN PUREE) 



196 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



one-half a cup of vinegar, cover with 
buttered crumbs, and complete the 
cooking by baking in a hot oven until the 
crumbs are browned. 

Fruit-and-Steak Pie 

Divide into six pieces one pound and 
one-half of rump steak, and place on a 
bed of four large apples, pared, cored, and 
cut in slices, in the bottom of an earthen 
baking dish. Scatter over the meat one- 
half a pound of raisins, and dust the 
raisins with a mixture of ground cloves 
and pepper. Add three-fourths a cup of 
stock or water mixed with one-fourth a 
cup of vinegar; cover dish, and allow to 



let boil fifteen minutes. Stir in two 
tablespoonsful of butter rubbed smooth 
with four tablespoonfuls of flour and 
cook until mixture is slightly thickened; 
add two beaten eggs, one-half a tea- 
spoonful of powdered cinnamon, and the 
grated yellow rind of one-half a lemon. 
Stir over fire until eggs are set, and serve 
in bowls with a garnish of whipped 
cream. 

Green-Gage Bread Pudding 

Cut into one-inch dice one-half a loaf 
of stale bread, and arrange in a baking 
dish with alternate layers of canned 
green gages, with a layer of the bread on 




MIXED GRILL (MUTTON CHOP, SAUSAGE, KIDNEY, BACON, STUFFED TOMATO; 



Stew in a moderate oven until meat is 
tender. Cover with a rich baking-powder 
biscuit dough, and bake with increasing 
heat until crust is brown. 

Frumenty 

Soak one cup of whole wheat (the un- 
ground kernels of wheat after reaping and 
thrashing) in cold water to cover, over- 
night, or put on to soak in the morning 
and allow to cook in fireless cooker over- 
night. The cooking should be pro- 
longed until the kernels are soft, adding 
more water from time to time, if the 
fireless cooker is not used. Heat one 
quart of milk; add the wheat, and one 
cup of raisins and currants mixed, and 



top. Pour over all a pint of rich milk 
mixed with two beaten eggs and one cup 
of sugar. Bake untiUbread is brown on 
top; garnish with dots of quince marma- 
lade, and serve with a sauce made from 
the juice drained from the can of green 
gages, heated, sweetened, and flavored 
with the juice of one lemon. 

Mixed Grill (Individual) 

Broil one mutton chop, saute one sliced 
lamb kidney, bake sausage, broil bacon. 
Arrange on platter with toast and one 
stuffed and baked tomato. 

Sweet Potato Croquettes 

Bake sweet potatoes. As soon as they 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



197 




SWEET POTATu LRU'^UETTE> 



are ^soft, break apart, scrape out pulp. 
and pass through a coarse sieve. To each 
pint of pulp add one teaspoonful of salt, 
two tablespoonfuls of butter, one beaten 
egg and hot milk to make of consistency 
to handle. Form into shape, egg-and- 
bread-crumb and fry in deep fat. 

Castilian Salad 

;0n lettuce leaves place pineapple sec- 
tions decorated with slices of apple, 
grapes (cut in halves and seeds removed), 
bits of celery and Brazil nuts thin-sliced. 
Serve with French dressing or with boiled 
dressing. 

Danish Pastry 

Rinse a bowl and a wooden spoon in 
hot water, then in cold, letting cold water, 
changed once or twice, stand in the bowl 



until the bowl is chilled. Then refill 
the bowl wdth cold water, and in it work 
I a cup of butter, with the spoon, until the 
butter is pliable and waxy throughout. 
Then pat it into two thin cakes, pressing 
out all water — WTap in a cloth and chill 
until hard. Sift three cups of bread 
flour with one-fourth a teaspoonful of mace 
and one teaspoonful of salt; rub one of the 
pats of chilled butter into the sifted ilour 
until the mixture resembles coarse meal.- 
Beat three eggs and stir them w4th one 
cup of sugar, two cups of milk, grated 
rind of one lemon and a yeast cake soft- 
ened in one-fourth a cup of luke-warm 
water; combine this mixture with the 
flour mixture. Beat very hard, adding 
more flour slowly (five or six cups) until 
the w^hole mixture becomes top stiff to 
handle with a spoon. Turn the dough on 




CASTILIAN SALAD (PINEAPPLE. NUTS, APPLES, GRAPES, CELERY 



198 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




DANISH PASTRY (SET TO RISE) 

a floured board and knead until elastic. 
Return the dough to the bowl, cover with 
a cloth and place in refrigerator for one- 
half hour. Chill rolling-pin by placing on 
ice for one hour. Dredge the moulding 
board lightly with flour and roll out the 
chilled dough into a rectangular sheet. 
Have the sheet of dough a little more than 
twice the width and three times the 
length of the second cake of chilled but- 
ter. Set the butter in the middle of the 
lower half of sheet of dough, the greatest 
length of the butter over the greatest 
length of the dough. Then turn the 
dough lengthwise over the butter, thus 
folding the dough in the center, length- 
wise, and enclosing the butter. Press the 
three open edges of dough together, then 
fold one end of the dough over and the 
other under the butter. There will now 



be three layers of dough over and three 
under the layer of butter. Now turn 
dough around, in order to roll the sheet 
of dough in a direction opposite to the 
first rolling. Then pat gently with pin 
and roll the dough into a long strip, 
taking pains to roll the butter between the 
layers of dough and without letting the 
dough break through to the butter. 
Fold to make three even layers with 
edges perfectly straight. Then turn 
dough half way round so as to roll in 
opposite direction. Repeat process three 
times. Place in refrigerator for one hour. 
Twist or roll or cut into desired shapes, 
arrange in buttered pans — • brush with 
egg and milk mixture — set to rise in a 
warm temperature two hours, then place 
in refrigerator until next day. Bake in a 
moderate oven , Frost with confectioners * 
frosting, tinted as desired; or sprinkle with 
chopped nuts just before baking; or 
use as tartlet paste, or as buns, etc. 

Pasta di Geneva 

(Italian Cake) 

Put into a patent cake-mixer the fol- 
lowing ingredients in the order given: 
One-quarter pound, each, of raisins and 
currants; one-quarter pound of mixed 
candied peel, lemon, orange, citron, cut 
fine; one-half a pound of sifted flour; 
three-fourths a cup of sugar; four eggs; 
one cup of softened butter; and the 
grated yellow rind of one-half a lemon. 







■ J 



DANISH PASTRY COOKED) 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



199 



Turn the cake-mixer rapidly and long 
until the ingredients are thoroughly 
mixed — if too stiff a little milk may 
be added — ■ pour into a tin lined with 
greased paper, and bake for forty-five 
minutes or until done. When cool ice 
with confectioner's sugar stirred into the 
unbeaten white of one egg, flavored with 
a little lemon juice, and sprinkle the top 
thick with chopped blanched almonds. 
Place the cake under a gas flame until 
both icing and nuts are delicately browned. 

Mint Stick Ice Cream 

Whip one pint of cream, and beat into 



oughly mingled with one cup of granu- 
lated sugar, in one quart of half-milk and 
half-cream and stirring until smooth and 
thick. Let cool, and add a little almond 
flavoring if needed, and beat into the 
mixture one pint of heavy whipped cream. 
Freeze as usual. 

Hallowe'en Cider Egg-Nog 

Beat together the yolks of four eggs 
and the whites of three; add by degrees, 
and while beating vigorously, one quart 
of hot sweet cider and one or two table- 
spoonfuls of sugar. Pour into six glasses, 
filling them three-parts full. Beat the 




HALLOWE'EN CIDER EGG-NOG 



it the stiff-beaten whites of two eggs. 
Dissolve one-half a pound of mint stick- 
candy in a pint of milk, slightly warmed; 
let cool, and add to the whipped cream 
and egg-whites. Freeze, and serve in 
sherbet glasses garnished with candied 
mint leaves, or fine-chopped fresh leaves, 
or small green mint candies. 

Almond Ice Cream 

Blanch and pound to a smooth paste 
three ounces of sweet almonds and one 
ounce of the bitter. Add these to a 
quart of white sauce, made by cooking 
four tablespoonfuls of arrowroot, thor- 



remaining egg-white with enough straw- 
berry, cranberry, or other red syrup to 
color it — about a tablespoonful — and 
use this to decorate the glasses of egg- 
nog, sifting powdered sugar over the 
beaten white and serving with straws or 
muddlers. 

Tea Tarts 

Sift together one cup and one-fourth 
of pastry flour, one-fourth a teaspoonful of 
salt and one-fourth a teaspoonful of baking 
powder; with tips of fingers work in one- 
third of a cup shortening, then add 
cold water, a few drops at a time, until the 



200 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




TEA TARTS 

mixture forms a stiff paste. Roll into a 
rectangular sheet. Have ready one- 
fourth a cup of creamed butter; spread over 
the paste, then roll up like a jelly roll. 
Set on end, pat and roll into sheet, 
spread with jelly, roll from ends in two 
rolls toward center, cut off in slices 
one-half inch thick and bake in hot oven. 

Peach Custard, Frozen 

Boil one cup of water and one cup of 
sugar; add a dozen peaches, pared and 
quartered. If the stones are cracked 
and the kernels blanched and chopped, 
this will improve the flavor. Cook until 
peaches are pulpy, then sift through a 
colander, and add one-half a box of 
gelatine, hydrated in one cup of water 
and dissolved by heating the same. Stir 
in a custard made by cooking three 
beaten eggs in one cup and one-fourth of 
thin cream, sweetened with six table- 
spoonfuls of sugar. Set the bowl or 
saucepan containing the mixture into a 



pan of cracked ice and salt in equal parts, 
and stir until it is thick, then put into a 
melon or other mould, cover close, seal 
the joints with any hard fat, and bury in 
ice and salt until serving time. The 
custard may be tinted a delicate pink 
with a little beet juice or any red coloring 
matter; or slightly yellow with a little 
saffron squeezed out of hot water. 

Apricot Meringue Pie 

Roll the paste as for any pie; lay over 
the inverted pie plate and trim to the edge 
of the plate; prick all over with a fork 
and set the plate on a baking sheet. Bake 
from five to ten minutes. Remove from 
the plate and set inside a clean plate of the 
same size and shape. Fill the shell with 
dried apricots, the hand peeled varieties are 
best, that have been cooked with sugar 
and a small piece of lemon rind. Cover 
with a meringue made by beating the 
whites of two eggs dry, then gradually 
beating in one-fourth a cup of granulated 
sugar. Bake in a very moderate oven 
until the meringue is a straw color. 

Cherry-Plum Preserves 

To one quart of boiling water add four 
pounds of sugar; when the boiling point 
is reached add four pounds of sugar 
plums, which have previously been wiped 
and pricked with a coarse needle. Let 
them boil very gently for one-half hour. 



%fpilllffll 


1 


* 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



201 



Have ready sterilized jars; fill them with 
the fruit and syrup and seal at once. 

Pickled Salmon 

Cut the salmon into one-inch slices; 
drop into boiling water, and cook for one 
minute. Lift out with a skimmer, and 
measure one pint of the water in which 
the fish was boiled; add this to two quarts 
of vinegar, one dozen, each, of white 
peppercorns, cloves, and blades of mace, 
two teaspoonfuls of made mustard, a 
heaping tablespoonful of sugar, a couple 
of shallots, minced, and two or three 
small red pepper-pods. Bring this pickle 
very slowly to a boil, and allow to boil for 
ten minutes, then drop in the salmon 
slices; let boil up for two minutes; lift 
out the fish into sterile jars; fill up with 
the boiling pickle, seal, and store in a 
cool, dark place. Halibut may be sim- 
ilarly pickled. Fish prepared in this 
way will keep for years. Freshen in 
cold water before using, and cook in 
boiling water. 

Tomato Mustard 

Slice six red pepper-pods; cut in halves 
one peck of tomatoes, and boil the two 
together for one hour. Strain, rub pulp 
through a colander, and return pulp and 
liquid to the kettle with the following 
seasonings: Two good-sized onions, 
chopped fine, one-fourth a pound of salt, 
and the following spices tied loosely in 
bags and pounded before adding to the 
kettle: One-half an ounce, each, of whole 
cloves and mace, one ounce of allspice, 
one ounce of whole black pepper. Boil 
again until very thick; lift kettle from 
fire and let contents cool; then stir in, a 
little at a time, one-fourth a pound of 
dry mustard, one teaspoonful of cayenne, 
and one cup of cider vinegar. Keep stir- 
ring until all are well incorporated, then 
bottle, seal, and keep in a cool, dark place. 

Venison Steaks in Chafing-Dish 

For four small steaks put into the 



chafing-dish two tablespoonfuls of butter, 
and when hot add the steaks, cut not 
more than one-half inch thick. Keep 
turning until well browned on the out- 
side, then remove to a hot platter, cover, 
and set in a warm place until the sauce 
is ready to pour over them. This is 
made by adding two tablespoonfuls of 
flour mixed with one-fourth a teaspoonful 
of salt and one-eighth a teaspoonful of 
pepper to the fat in the dish, stirring it 
smooth, and then adding one cup of 
stock, one-third a cup of currant or wild 
grape jelly, and one tablespoonful of 
lemon juice. Let all boil, and pour over 
the steaks. Just before serving place 
on each steak a small pat of fresh, 
unsalted butter. 

Mutton Hot Pot 

Pare and slice from four to six potatoes, 
lay a layer of the slices in the bottom of a 
large casserole, and place over them three 
mutton chops from the loin. Add two 
kidneys, chopped with one onion, salt and 
pepper, and a half-dozen oysters. Repeat, 
making another layer of sliced potatoes, 
chops, kidneys, onions and oysters. 
Place a layer of the potatoes at the top, 
pour over all a cup of stock or water, 
cover, and bake in a slow oven for three 
hours. 

Corn-and-Chicken Pudding 

Cut up a young chicken and saute in 
butter on a hot pan until brown. Cook 
a dozen ears of corn, cut from cob, and 
add to a custard made by thickening a 
quart of chicken or veal stock with four 
tablespoonfuls of flour, blended with four 
tablespoonfuls of butter, and stirred over 
fire until thick, seasoned with celery salt, 
and having two to four beaten eggs stirred 
into it the last thing. Arrange the 
browned pieces of chicken in a casserole, 
alternately, with the corn custard, cover 
with a layer of mashed potatoes with 
fine-ground, hard cheese sprinkled over 
the top; bake imtil the top Is brown. 



Seasonable Menus for Week in October 



Breakfast 

Casaba Melon 

Puffed Wheat with Cream 

Tomato Omelet with Shredded Lettuce 

Buttered Toast 

Coffee 

Dinner 

Roast Leg of Lamb 

Currant Jelly Mint Sauce 

Savory Rice Baked Squash 

Vanderbilt Salad 

Cafe Noir 

Supper 

Broiled Oysters 

x\pple-and-Nut Salad 

Graham Gems 

Chocolate 



Breakfast 

Sliced Oranges-and-Apricots 

Barley Porridge 

Fish Hash Watercress 

Bread Pancakes Maple Syrup 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Gumbo Filet with Oysters 
Escalloped Potatoes 
Apple-Jelly Omelet 
Milk and Vichy 

Dinner 

Brown Fricassee of Chicken 

Riced Potatoes 

Brussels Sprouts 

Italian Cake Ginger Ice Cream 

Coffee 



< 

Q 

o 



Breakfast 


Breakfast 




Ripe Pears 

Hominy and Milk 

Meat-and-Potato Hash 

Corn Bread 

Coffee ♦ 


Corn Flakes 

Sausages with Apple Sauce 

Johnny Cake Marmalade 

Coffee 




Luncheon 


Luncheon 


S 


Potato Soup with Grated Cheese 

Grapefruit-and-Orange Salad 

Fresh Graham Bread 

Russian Tea 


Chicken-and-Olive Soup 

Baked Stuffed Tomatoes 

Rice with Raisins 

Chocolate 


> 


Dinner 

Birds without Bones 

Baked Potatoes 

Sliced Tomatoes 

Greengage Bread Pudding 

Coffee 


Dinner 

Baked Ham 

Mashed Potatoes 

Cabbage-and-Apple Salad 

Baked Pears with Melted Cheese 



i 



Breakfast 

Baked Apples with Rolled Oats 
Poached Eggs on Toast 
Popovers 
Coffee 

Luncheon 

Baked Fish 

Creamed Potatoes and Cucumbers 

Whole Wheat Bread with Raisins 

Cocoa 

Dinner 

Creole Grillade 

Browned Sweet Potatoes 

Cauliflower, Hollandaise Sauce 

Sliced Peaches in Soft Custard 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Frumenty with Cream 

Baked Eggs 

Baked Potatoes 

Graham Muffins 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Potato-and-Hatai Pie 
Stewed Celery 
Apricot Shortcake with Cream 
Cafe au Lait 

Dinner 

Filets of Halibut Sauce Supreme 

Green Peppers Stuffed with Rice 

Fried Eggplant 

Apple Pie with Cheese 



Breakfast 

Grapes 

Oatmeal and Milk 

Parsnip Breakfast Cakes 

Fried Perch 

Coffee 



Luncheon 

Pickled Salmon 

Boiled Potatoes 

Re-heated Baker's Rolls 

Steamed Apple Pudding Tea 



Dinner 

Braised Beef 

Horseradish Sauce 

Mashed Sweet Potatoes 

Boiled White Turnips 

Macaroon Pudding 

Coffee 



202 



Menus for Special Occasions 



HALLOWE'EN DINNER 

Black Bean Soup Saltines 

Curled Celery • Salted Pecans 

Roast Duck Wild Grape Jelly 

Mashed Potatoes Candied Parsnips 

Salad of Mixed Fruits 

Hallowe'en Egg-Nog 

Fig Pudding Currant Jelly Sauce 

Almond Ice Cream Small Frosted Cakes 

Nuts and Raisins Bonbons 

Crackers Pineapple Cheese Black Coffee 



AN OYSTER SUPPER 

Raw Oysters with Cress and Lemon 

Brown Bread-and-Butter Triangular Sandwiches 

Broiled Oysters with Brown Sauce 

Escalloped Oysters with Celery and Cheese 

Olives Candied Ginger Radishes 

Crisp Crusty Rolls 

Salad of Cooked Oysters, Apples and Lettuce 

Lemon Jelly Custard Sauce Macaroons 

Coffee Chocolate 



BUFFET LUNCHEONS 
I 

Jellied Bouillon in cups, with Crackers 

Timbales of Sweetbreads, with Green Mayonnaise 

Lettuce Sandwiches 

Small Frosted Cakes 

Chocolate Coffee Tea 

II 

Creamed Chicken in Scooped-out Crusty Rolls 

Tomato-and-Endive Salad 

Peach Ice Cream and Sponge Cake Sandwiches 

Chocolate Coffee Tea 

III 

Orange Soup with Whipped Cream 

Bread Sticks 

Cream Cheese-and-Pimiento Sandwiches 

Salad of Jellied Veal on Lettuce 

Frozen Custard with Hot Chocolate Sauce 

Coffee Tea 



>03 




Chicken Gospel for Home Use 

By Saidee L. Slover 



CHICKEN and fowl have flesh of 
shorter fibre than that of animals, 
and the fat is found in layers next 
to the skin and around the intestines. 
The white meat is more easily digested 
and is considered choicer than the dark 
meat, but the dark meat is juicier and has 
a sweeter flavor than the white. 

Cold storage poultry should never be 
bought if it is possible to secure that 
which is freshly killed. The age of 
poultry may be determined by examining 
the cartilage at the end of the breast- 
bone. When both are soft it is a chicken; 
but if they are hard, it is a fowl. A 
chicken has soft feet and smooth skin, 
and a good many pin feathers. If long 
hairs are found on poultry, it denotes age. 
A fowl has feet that are dry and hard with 
coarse scales on the legs, and the cartilage 
at the end of the breastbone has turned to 
bone. 

After the bird has been killed, it should 
be allowed to bleed well. After the blood 
has stopped flowing and the bird is 
thoroughly dead, it should be scalded in 
boiling water and all the feathers and 
pin feathers removed, unless one wishes 
to dry-pick the bird. Then it should be 
singed by holding over flame and turning 
it until all hairs are removed. 

The bird may be cut at the leg joint, 
or the skin cut around the leg an inch and 
a half below the leg joint, and then place 
leg at that point over the edge of a board 
or table and snap the bone. Then the 
feet and tendons are pulled off. In 
fowls the tendons often have to be pulled 
one at a time. 



To prepare a fowl for roasting, make a 
cut below the breastbone just large 
enough to admit the hand, and remove the 
entrails, gizzard, liver and heart with the 
hand. The gall bladder must be re- 
moved from the liver, care being taken 
not to burst it, as it contains a small 
amount of bile that imparts a bitter 
taste to the parts with which it comes in 
contact. The lungs are removed from 
either side of backbone, as well as the 
kidneys which lie near the hollow. The 
windpipe is removed from neck and crop. 
The neck is cut off close to body, leaving 
the skin long enough to fasten under the 
back. The oil bag is removed. The 
outside of the fowl should be washed and 
cold water run through the inside to 
cleanse it, but the fowl should not be 
allowed to soak in cold water. The veins 
and blood should be removed from the 
heart, and fat and membrane from 
gizzard. The thick part of gizzard is 
cut through and the inside removed. 
Trim the gizzard. The gizzard, liver and 
heart are called giblets, and they should 
be washed and cooked together with the 
neck in a little water. 

To prepare a chicken for frying, cut 
at the leg joint, removing feet. Then 
cut wings from body by cutting through 
skin and flesh around upper wing joint 
next to body. To remove the legs, cut 
through the skin and flesh of leg between 
the leg and body, bend the leg back dis- 
jointing it and cut through the flesh, re- 
moving it from body. Cut the leg at 
joint, thus separating the upper part of 
leg, or thigh, from the drumstick. Re- 



204 



CHICKEN GOSPEL FOR HOME USE 



205 



move wishbone, then the breastbone, 
which is cut in from two to four pieces. 
The entrails are next removed, and the 
heart, gizzard and liver which are fixed 
as for roast chicken. Cut off oil bag, 
and cut the back crosswise through the 
middle. Remove lungs and neck, and 
break the rib bones to aid in thorough 
cooking when frying. 

After the fowl is dressed it should be 
stuffed with a good stuffing, which should 
be put in by spoonfuls at the neck end 
using enough to fill the body and skin so 
the bird will look plump when served. 

An excellent stuffing is made of one- 
half a cup of boiling water, two cups of 
cracker crumbs, one-fourth a cup of 
melted butter, one-half a teaspoonful of 
salt, one-fourth a teaspoonful of pepper, 
and one teaspoonful of poultry seasoning. 

A fowl is trussed by crossing the drum- 
sticks and tying them with strong string, 
and then tying to tail. The wings are 
fastened close to body with a skewer, and 
the skin at the neck drawn under the 
back and pinned with a second skewer. 
Then the fowl is turned on its back and 
the string which is fastened to tail is 
drawn around skewers, fastened and cut. 
Rub the fowl well v/ith salt and the breast 
and legs with flour and butter worked to- 
gether. After placing in pan, sprinkle 
the bottom of the pan with flour. Brown 
quickly, and then cook slowly, basting 
often. The basting is made by melting 
butter, half the size of an egg^ in three- 
fourths a cup of hot water, and is used 
while it lasts. Then the fat in the pan 
is used. The fowl should be turned oc- 
casionally in order to brown it alike on all 
sides. It should be cooked until the 
breast meat is tender, which will take 
about an hour and a half for a four pound 
chicken. The strings and skewers are 
removed before serving, and whether one 
carves it or not before bringing to the 
table is a matter of season, whether the 
meal is formal or an informal affair. 

Gravy is made by browning four table- 
spoonfuls of flour in five tablespoonfuls 
of fat from pan in which fowl is roasted. 



Then add two cups of the stock in which 
neck and giblets have been cooked. Boil 
for five minutes, season with salt and 
pepper — strain if preferred — add the 
giblets, which are chopped, and serve hot. 

A more elaborate stuffing is made of 
one cup and one-fourth of soft bread 
crumbs, two cups of hot mashed potatoes, 
one-fourth a cup of chopped bacon, one- 
third a cup of butter, one onion chopped 
fine, one teaspoonful- and one-half of 
salt, one teaspoonful cf sage, and one egg. 

All the animal heat should be out of a 
chicken or fowl before it is cooked, else 
the meat will have an unpleasant slick 
taste near the bone. If one has ice, it 
may be chilled, otherwise one or more 
hours should elapse between kilHng and 
cooking. 

For frying, the chicken is salted and 
peppered well, and then dredged with 
flour, or rolled, first in beaten egg, and 
then in bread crumbs. The last named 
method is better than the first as the egg 
prevents the meat from taking up so 
much of the fat in which it is fried. The 
pieces of chicken should be placed in a 
skillet of fat that half covers it, seared on 
one side and turned over. Then con- 
tinue cooking with a cover over the skillet. 
If the chicken is large, turn a griddle over 
skillet and finish cooking inside the oven. 
Or a little hot water may be added if one 
prefers to cook It on top of the stove. 

When chicken is cooked at too high 
temperature it is usually tough. If 
cocked at too low temperature, it will be 
greasy and soggy, and will not brown. 
The fat may be tested by dropping a 
small piece of bread in it when hot. If 
the bread browns in forty seconds, the 
temperature is high enough. 

Delicious gravy is made by adding salt 
and two heaping tablespoonfuls of flour to 
the fat in which the chicken was fried. 
When flour browns, add two cups of 
milk, or half milk and half water, and 
cook until thick. 

There are many ways of preparing 
chicken. Few dishes equal a rich, juicy 
chicken-pie, or braised chicken; while 



206 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



chicken gumbo is an old favorite in the 
South. Stewed chicken with dripped 
dumpHngs is made of a batter of one egg, 
flour, a pint of- milk, and soda, stirred 
until thick and dropped into the pan 
of gravy a spoonful at a time, making 
little round dumplings, and has a dis- 



tinction all its own. To say nothing of 
chicken salad on lettuce leaves with 
salad dressing, and chicken croquettes 
fried a golden brown in deep fat; or of 
chicken in celery sauce to be served with 
hot toast, or of creamed chicken on toast 
for an entree. 



A New Mexico Supper 

At the Famous Enchilada House in Old Albuquerque 
By Louise Lloyd Lowber 



YOU are either a sated tourist seeking 
a new local flavor in this picturesque 
corner of new Spain, a resident with an 
acquired, but no less sincere, taste for the 
highly seasoned disrhes of the Southwest, 
or a native, to the chile born, if you 
patronize the Enchilada House. 

This low adobe building with its bare, 
alkali-encrusted approach, situated just 
off the historic plaza of Old Albuquerque, 
is a favored haunt of many New Mexicans. 
Here you may come for your noon-day 
Spanish lunch, bring your bucket^ in 
which to carry home some steaming 
tamales, or come in your evening dress for 
an after-theatre supper. 

And here you may be sure that you are 
getting the genuine Mexican dishes, 
cooked in the traditional manner by a 
native woman. The plump senora, who 
-officiates over the roaring stove, makes 
change from a pocket under her broad 
apron, all the time miraculously avoiding 
the little white dogs and cats under foot, 
a typically native feature, is a born cook. 
For years she served as cocinera to one 
of the F. F. N. M. and for the past 
decade she has been proprietor of a little 
restaurante in Old Town. 

Suppose you order of the dark-eyed 
senorita who stands ready to serve you 
"the regular Spanish supper." The menu 
card, if there were such a modern note, 
would read like this: 

Enchiladas 

Frijoles Chile con came 



Tarn ales 



Pan 



Cafe 



Except for the pan (bread), cafe (coffee) 
and frijoles (beans) the other items on the 
menu have no English equivalents. You 
must learn them by the "direct method." 

Las Enchiladas, for instance, are unlike 
anything else under the sun. You may 
follow, if you like, the fascinating process 
of concoction of this piece de resistance of 
your meal. The senora is frying tortillas, 
the corn pancake which is the foundation 
of the enchilada. 

From a snowy mass of corn meal 
dough she pinches a ball which she spins 
and pats between her plump hands into 
a thin wafer about six inches in diameter. 
She browns this on top of the stove, 
rotating and turning it with her moistened 
palm. When three tortillas have been 
beautifully browned they are next 
dropped into a kettle of boiling fat where 
they bubble and turn until the real build- 
ing process begins. * 

First a tortilla in the center of a plate. 
Then a flood of rich, red chile sauce from 
a near-by kettle, a layer of grated cheese, 
another tortilla, more chile and more 
cheese sprinkled between in layer-cake 
fashion, and the whole topped with a 
high crown of chopped onions in which 
nestles an tgg, which has been broken 
for a minute into the hot lard. An 
artistic and cooling garnish of lettuce — 
and behold an enchilada! 

The ubiquitous chile sauce in which the 
enchilada floats and which is added by the 
native cooks to beans, meats and almost 
everything edible, is made from the pulp of 



LATE SUMMER CANNING 



207 



the native New Mexico pepper. Mixed 
with a little hot lard and blended with 
chopped onions and garlic, cider or wine 
and herbs, it is used as a basis for many 
dishes. Although chile burns the throat 
unaccustomed to highly spiced food, it is 
so prepared as to be absolutely digestible. 

Frijoles or New Mexico pinto beans are, 
of course, inevitable. Seldom are meals 
served without them and for the poor they 
are the mainstay of their diet both winter 
and summer. They are served in a large 
dish from which you help yourself, dash- 
ing a spoonful of the nutty pellets on the 
side of your enchilada. Occasionally you 
will find them fried dry, and always you 
must flavor them with chile. 

Chile con came is another staple dish 
among the native people in the south- 
western United States. This familiar 
stew is made from the chile pulp, tomato 
pulp and cubes of beef or mutton. It is 
flavored with onions and garlic, and 
sometimes with pulverized oregano, a 



native herb. Sheep herders are often seen 
eating it from a common bowl, each man 
scooping up a mouthful in a cupped tor- 
ilia, and eating both the stew and the 
receptacle at the same time. 

It's a hungry man whom an enchilada 
and a bowl oi frijoles do not satisfy. Nor 
can hot tamales properly be considered a 
dessert,but they are generally ordered just 
to "top off with." The tamale is a rela- 
tive to the sandwich, except that it is hot 
and rolled and encased in a corn-husk 
wrapper. It combines meat, vegetable 
and bread in its inside layer of corn meal, 
and the center stufling made from cubes 
of beef, pork or chicken, with the chile 
pulp, tomatoes and characteristic flavor 
of garlic and onions. 

Tamales are always kept hot in steam- 
ing water, and are not infrequently 
peddled through the streets of Albu- 
querque in a tiny cart, after the fashion 
of the ice-cream cone wagons in some 
cities. And they are almost as popular, 
in the South and in Mexico. 



Late Summer Canning 

By Eunice Marcia Smith 



S 



UCH a dayl" sighed the Friend- 
next-door to the Bride Lady, as 
she dropped into a rocker on the 
latter's cool front porch. "All of this 
blessed day I have been doing up straw- 
berries and I am in a semi-liquid state 
this minute. But you should see the 
jars reposing on my kitchen table." 

"You poor dear," sympathized the 
Bride Lady as she poured lemonade 
from a tinkling pitcher. "Why don't 
you buy your jellies at the delicatessen 
the way I do?" 

"Delicatessen indeed! Don't mention 
my lovely jellies in the same breath with 
delicatessen stuff!" protested the Friend- 
next-door. "Muddy, gummy stuff that 
was forced through the jelly bag, I know. 
Why, my Jim would probably get a 



divorce if I gave it to him on his muffins of 
a morning." 

"Harry eats it without any visible 
signs of protest, but he isn't enthusiastic 
I'll admit." 

"You poor kids don't know what real 
preserves are. Come on over and I'll let 
you sample mine. I want somebody to 
admire mine, anyway." 

"You know," continued the Friend- 
next-door, leading the way to her back 
door, "there are few things more soul- 
satisfying than the sight of a well-filled 
preserve cupboard, the work of one's 
own hands. It's worth the bother and 
heat ten times over. And then the 
saving!" 

"Oh, but such a lot you have," admired 
the Bride Lady. "Jelly and preserves 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



and sauce and .... what's that juice 
for?" 

"That's some I had left over. I 
bottled It to use for fruit lemonades this 
summer." 

"Yum, yum," observed the Bride 
Lady. 

"See those four jars on the window sill.? 
They contain strawberries and pineapple, 
a most delicious combination. And these 
six jars are filled with strawberries and 
rhubarb, half and half. You know rhu- 
barb is a lot cheaper than the berries 
and it doesn't change the flavor a bit, 
unless you use more than half rhubarb." 

"I never heard of strawbery jelly," 
said the Bride Lady, admiring the clear, 
ruby color. "I thought strawberry jelly 
wouldn't jell." 

"It won't unless you add a cup of 
apple pectin to every cup of strawberry 
juice. Then you will have a jelly fit for 
a king. You know you can make peach 
jell the same way, only adding a little 
lemon juice." 

"Is this all the canning you've done so 
far.f*" asked the younger woman inter- 
estedly. 

"No, indeedyl I started with the very 
earliest fruits and made grapefruit marm- 
alade last spring. And then I made 
orange jelly and orange marmalade before 
the later fruits came on the market." 

"I think I'd like to try my hand at 
some canning. I think I'd like to show 
Harry I could do it," said the Bride 
Lady. 

"The Eternal Feminine," laughed the 
Friend-next-door. "We simply can't 
resist the urge. "But you're too late for 
strawberries. These were the last on the 
market. June is the time for straw- 
berries. But there are lots of other 
fruits coming." 

"Make a canning schedule like I do. 
Can certain fruits when they are cheapest 
and most plentiful. For instance^ in 
July, we have raspberries, loganberries 
and gooseberries, currants and huckle- 
berries. And tomatoes for tomato pre- 
serves. 



"In August come plums, pears and 
apricots. Also peaches. These are 
cheaper toward the last of the month. 
And you will want to pickle some cu- 
cumbers and water-melon rinds, too. 

"September brings grapes and apples 
and more peaches and pears." 

"Oh, I'm going to start right away and 
make some jelly. I want to make a nice 
red jelly," exclaimed the Bride Lady. 

"Try currants then. They make a 
lovely red jelly and do not require any 
apple pectin to make it jell." 

"You spoke of pectin before, what is 
it.?" 

"Pectin is the substance in some fruits 
that causes the fruit juices to congeal. 
Apples, plums and currants have it. 
Strawberries and peaches do not. So 
if you cook a fruit that does not contain 
the pectin, you must supply it. Com- 
prendez-vous?^^ 

^^ Parfaitement, ma cherie,^' laughed 
the Bride Lady. "Now if you will just 
lend me your cook-book, I will buy me 
some currants and wield a wicked jelly- 
strainer. I believe that is the correct 
phrase.?" 

"Speaking of strainers, my lamb, when 
you are ready to pour the jelly into the 
hot glasses, put a clean cloth dipped in 
hot water over your sauce pan and pour 
the jelly through it. It will make the 
jelly crystal-clear." 

"Thanks, I will. Many thanks for the 
recipes." 

And these are some of the recipes that 
made husband Harry the most ardent 
wife-booster in the whole Flatbush club. 
Try them on your husband: 

Quince Jelly 

Use yellow quinces that are not quite 
ripe. Rub off fuzz, core and cut small.^ 
Put in kettle with a teacup of water 
for each pound of fruit. Stew gently 
until soft; do not mash. Put in thin 
muslin bag with the juice and strain. To 
each pint of liquor produced add a pound 
of sugar, stirring until it is dissolved. 



LACK IN EQUIPMENT 



209 



Let it boil gently until it jells on a cold 
plate. Turn into hot glasses. 

Plum-and-Pear Jelly 

Plums and pears cooked together in the 
usual way make a delicious jelly with a 
different flavor. 

Preserved Plums 

Make a syrup of three pounds of sugar 
to one pint of water for every nine pounds 
of fruit. Dip plums in hot water and 
remove skins. Drop into hot syrup and 
cook until a silver fork pierces them 
without difficulty. Or preserve by cold 
pack method by pouring the hot syrup 
over the fruit in the hot jars and boiling 
for 16 minutes. 

Pear-and-Pineapple Conserve 

To every pound of pears, cut in cubes, 
add the grated rind and juice of one-half 
lemon, the grated rind and juice of one 
orange, one-half a pineapple, cut in cubes, 
and three-fourths as much sugar as fruit 



by weight. Cook until fruit is tender. 
Measure and add sugar and cook until 
transparent. Pour into glasses and cover 
with paraffin when cold. 

Harlequin Jelly 

Remove stem and blossom ends from 
one peck of Baldwin apples and four 
quinces and take out cores from latter. 
Quarter and put in kettle with one quart 
cranberries. Almost cover with water. 
Cook slowly until fruit is soft. Strain 
through jelly bag. Boil juice 20 min- 
utes and add an equal quantity of sugar. 
Boil until it jellies. 

Peach Butter 

Pare ripe peaches and put in kettle 
with enough water to boil them soft. 
Put through colander and add one and 
one-half pounds of sugar to every quart 
of peaches. Boil very slowly for one 
hour, stirring often. Take care that it 
does not burn. Put in glass or stone 
jars. 



i 



Lack in Equipment 

By Caroline B. King 



SOMETIMES, when I am being 
shown over the domain of a brand 
new housewife, I am conscious of a 
great lack in her equipment. There are 
plenty of tables and chairs, pictures and 
bric-a-brac; friends have seen to it that 
she has an ample supply of linen and 
enough silverware to stock a small hotel; 
there are lamps and clocks, and cushions 
of all kinds and descriptions, perhaps 
there is even a smart little car in the smart 
little garage at the back of the house. 
The kitchen range is all that even an old 
and seasoned housekeeper could desire, 
and shining pots and pans stand in neat 
rows on the shelves of the neat pantry, 
but not a single book pertaining to the 
profession of housekeeping is visible in 
any room of the cunning abode. 



"Cookery books .^'' she msiy reply 
smilingly to my question, "O, I feel that 
our meals will be so simple for a long time, 
that I have not even thought of a book 
to tell me how to prepare them." 

But this is all wrong, at least, in my 
opinion. Not only should a good stand- 
ard book on cookery be given a prominent 
place in every kitchen, but a whole shelf 
of not too meager proportions should be 
relegated to the literature of the kitchen. 
I know of many housewives, excellent in 
their line, I must admit, who possess no 
books whatever on the important profes- 
sion which is theirs. They get along as 
best they may, sometimes achieving 
wonderfully satisfactory results, but sel- 
dom finding it possible to secure the same 
success twice in succession. 



210 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



There are so many excellent books on 
the subject of household lore and many of 
them not at all expensive, so it seems a 
pity that every woman should not own 
several of them. Good judgment must 
be exercised in their selection as in every- 
thing else, but I am glad to say that 
nearly all of the most popular of the books 
on cookery and similar subjects are 
entirely reliable. 

No business man would think of con- 
ducting his affairs without trade journals 
to keep him posted on conditions govern- 
ing his business, nor would a woman 
attempt to cut out a garment without a 
paper pattern or its equivalent, but al- 
most any woman thinks that she can 
prepare the three meals a day, or keep 
her home in running order without any 
guide but her own, sometimes, limited 
experience. 

And then there are the very good cooks 
who, having learned their profession in 
the school of experience, continue serving 
the same dishes day after day, never 
making any variation in preparing a sur- 
prise salad or an unusual dessert, be- 
cause they feel that what was good enough 
for their mothers is certainly good enough 
for any one else; or, perhaps, they permit 
themselves to get into a rut unwit- 
tingly, and would gladly welcome fresh 
recipes and new ideas, if they knew where 
to look for them. So I would advise the 
establishing of the kitchen library, the 
substantial shelf whereon may rest the 
cookery books, (for I would have more 
than one of these interesting volumes in 
my library) the scrap book in which the 
best recipes clipped from magazines and 
papers have been pasted; the latest num- 
ber of Today^s Housezoife, and other 
favorite publications, all ready for im- 
mediate reference. 

The Government Bulletins, which may 
be had for little or nothing and which con- 
tain an endless amount of important 



information for housewives, may be had 
by applying to the Department of Agri- 
culture, and these neat booklets should 
most certainly find a place in the kitchen 
library. A list of the various publica- 
tions will be sent on request, and from 
it one may select the bulletins which she 
most needs. None of these are high 
priced, indeed, I think five cents is the 
maximum charge for any one of them, 
while several are to be had for nothing. 
The recipes in the newspapers, household 
advice and other information might be 
clipped, pasted on cards and filed in a box J 
and kept on the shelf with the other f 
books; and there are, in addition to all of 
those I have mentioned, valuable book- 
lets published by the manufacturers of 
food products, which are free for the 
asking. Give these a place in the kitchen 
library, by all means, for they are usually 
filled with ideas and suggestions of the 
most helpful sort. 

You will be surprised how interesting 
your library in the kitchen will become to 
you as you add to its scope, and how 
many useful bits of information, how 
many new things you will learn from it as 
you wait for the potatoes to boil, or the 
pudding to brown. 

Rolls in the Morning 

If one wants fresh-baked rolls for 
breakfast — • and who does not.? — they 
may be satisfactorily planned for. If 
the sponge be set about the middle of the 
afternoon, it will be ready to knead at 
five o'clock. It may then rise and be cut 
down, successively, until ten p.m., or 
later, when it should be formed into its 
shapes and placed in the baking-pan. Set 
in a rather cool place until morning. 
Then, if necessary, bring into a warmer 
situation to hasten rising. Spread melted 
butter over the tops and bake just in time 
for breakfast. You will be applauded by 
an appreciative family. 




I 







Home Ideas 
t/conomies 




Contributions to this department will be gladly received. Accepted items will be 
paid for at reasonable rates. 



Beaten Biscuit 

BEATEN biscuit are a typical South- 
ern dish, but one that, if well 
enough known, would be as popular in 
Massachusetts as in Mississippi. They 
are so light and so easily digested that 
they are prescribed for invalids, and 
so delectable they would be eaten, if they 
could not be digested. 

Once upon a time, every Southern 
family had its biscuit block, a small table 
of hard oak with a hinged cover like a box 
top to protect the board and the iron rod 
with which the biscuit were beaten when 
not in use. Now the work is done with 
a special machine. Sometimes a marble 
slab or ordinary bread board is used and 
the biscuit beaten with a rolling pin or 
flatiron. 

The ingredients are simple — flour, salt, 
shortening, and a liquid with which to 
mix them. 

Recipes differ slightly in details. One 
cook uses ice water; another, cold sweet 
milk; another, cracked ice and cream. 
One will use only butter, while another 
prefers home-made lard. Some recipes 
direct that the biscuit be beaten twenty 
minutes. Others call for so many licks. 

All agree, however, that the materials 
must be thoroughly chilled, that the work 
must be done rapidly and that the dough 
must be beaten till it is full of little 
blisters. So important is it that the 
dough be very cold that many cooks 
place it on ice for some time before beat- 
ing. Success also depends on maintain- 
ing a steady heat in the oven while the 
biscuit are baking. 



Here is a recipe that has been used with 
delightful results by one Alississippi 
family for more than a hundred years. 
Sift one quart of flour with one 
teaspoonful of salt. With the tips of 
the fingers, work in two tablespoonfuls of 
butter. Moisten with a teacup of ice- 
cold milk, and knead till it forms a 
smooth, easily handled dough. Beat the 
dough till it blisters, roll into a sheet 
half an inch thick, cut into small rounds 
(about the size of a silver dollar), prick 
with a fork, letting the marks go entirely 
through, and bake about thirty minutes. 

o. s. 
* * * 

With Esther in the Kitchen 

GLINTING auburn hair has Esther 
and she affects apple green check- 
ered aprons; also she effects the most 
wonderful melting fudge and great thick 
delicious cakes that delight while they 
mystify. "How do you do it.^" I 
insisted and she replied, "Easy." It 
looked easy as I watched her and, when 
I caught the "tricks" of her mouth- 
watering fudge, it was easy. 

One of them was in long beating rather 
than in long cooking. She used a small 
part of light brown sugar and canned 
milk, slightly diluted, and a very little 
cocoa (not half the amount I was in the 
habit of using), and she let it cool before 
she started the beating. Flavoring, but- 
ter and a tiny bit of salt were added just 
here, and a tedious -arm breaking period 
followed. But the results! A creamy 
mixture, smooth as velvet, that took its 
own time about hardening, settled into 



211 



212 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



the platter and offered up a tantilizing 
fragrance. She didn't score it for an 
hour and it wasn't conditioned for 
another hour, but when it was, the real 
fun began. 

"I like the salt; it cuts that cloying 
sweetness," she remarked complacently, 
as she licked the tapering fingers that are 
as capable with the typewriter as they 
are with the fudge-pan. "So do I," I 
agreed, "and I like it in cake." "Mercy, 
don't put it in cake," she gasped and 
stuck to her decision, even while I de- 
fended numerous recipes calling for the 
same. "It might do in an occasional 
recipe," she conceded, "but I have never 
found that particular one, and I notice 
that any cake that I put it in, is a dis- 
appointment." 

"Another thing that seems unimport- 
ant, but is really the rock on which so 
many cake-rafts are wrecked, is the 
mixing. I learned by sad experience that 
to stir the batter pushes the air out, but 
that to beat it, lifting each stroke high, 
works the air into it and of course lightens 
it.'^ 

"Then I make sure of a good icing by 
using confectioner's sugar: I .take the 
whites of two eggs and after beating them 
I add a tablespoonful of cold water, and^ 
mind you, a teaspoonful of baking powder. 
The powder keeps the icing from 
hardening. Mercy!" and with one look 
at the clock she slipped off the apple- 
green apron and putting the glinting 
locks under a brown sailor started for the 
office. A. K. R. 



A Can of Tomato Soup 

THE housewife, who in the fall, 
cooked her tomatoes, carefully 
strained them, and canned them as 
tomato soup has a reservoir upon which 
to draw to give variety to the home table 
throughout the winter and the spring 
months. The advantage of using the 
strained soup instead of the ordinary 
canned tomatoes in cooking is, that when 



the time for preparing the dish comes, no 
delay is required for straining the vege- 
table, and the ingredients are quickly 
combined. 

Occasionally when serving Hamburg 
Steak try making a Tomato Sauce. Heat 
one pint can of tomato soup, and thicken 
with one-fourth a cup of flour beaten 
smooth with a little cold water. Season 
with salt and pepper and pour over the 
steak. This same sauce may be served 
with stewed tripe, kidneys and omelets. 
A cheap steak may be put in a casserole, 
covered with a can of the soup and a 
sliced onion, seasoned with salt and 
pepper and cooked slowly in the oven for , 
three hours. 

Once in a while, add a can of tomato 
soup to the Saturday baked beans. The 
change will please the family. 

Some day instead of a meat dish, serve 
Macaroni au Italian. Break one-fourth a 
pound of macaroni into a dish of boiling 
water. Add two tablespoonfuls of butter 
and a small sliced onion. Cook slowly 
for one hour. The water should boil down 
to a creamy liquid. Add a cup of grated 
cheese, a pint can of tomato soup, place 
in a baking dish and sprinkle with 
buttered crumbs. Bake for ten minutes 
in a hot oven. 

A delicious supper dish is Venetian 
Eggs. Heat a can of the soup to the 
boiling point, add one pound of grated 
cheese and a pinch of soda and stir until 
the cheese is thoroi?ghly melted. Add 
one cup of milk to a beaten egg, and 
combine the egg-mixture with the cheese 
and tomato, stirring very rapidly. Season 
to taste and serve on saltines. 

Risotto is another supper dish. Place 
one cup of washed rice in cold water and 
cook briskly for five minutes after it 
begins to boil. Drain and add two 
tablespoonfuls of melted butter and one- 
half an onion chopped fine. Cook until 
the butter is absorbed, then add one cup 
of tomato soup, and two cups of water. 
Cook until the rice is tender and the water 
is absorbed. Add one-half a cup of 
grated cheese and serve at once. 



HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES 



213 



For Egg-and-Tomato Salad cook one 
pint can of soup, a slice of onion and a 
stalk of celery for fifteen minutes. 
Season with salt and pepper and, add one- 
fourth a package of soaked gelatine. 
Strain and add two hard-boiled eggs 
which have been sliced. IMold in cups 
and serve on lettuce with boiled or may- 
onnaise dressing. 

To make Tomato-and-Cheese Puddingy 
add one cup of bread crumbs, one-third 
a cup of grated cheese, and one-half a 
teaspoonful of salt to a pint of tomato 
soup, and pour into a baking-dish. Mix 
one-third a cup of bread crumbs with one 
tablespoonful of melted butter, and two 
tablespoonfuls of grated cheese, spread on 
the pudding and bake for twenty min- 
utes. 

Poached Creole Eggs: To prepare add a 
shredded green pepper to a can of soup 
and after heating thoroughly, pour the 
mixture on a platter. Arrange four 
slices of toast on the sauce, on each slice 
of toast place a poached tg^, and pour 
over them two tablespoonfuls of melted 
butter. E. s. b. 

* * * 

Pie Secrets 

IN making pie-crust be careful not to 
get too much water into the mixing. 
Remember that all the water that is 
used has to "do out" of the paste during 
the time of baking in order to make the 
crust crisp and flaky. If mixed too wet, 
it will be either too hard or soggy. 
Enough water should be stirred in lightly 
to make the mass cling together without 
being, in the least, sticky. 

In making fruit pies, cut the upper 
crust larger than the plate and turn the 
margin over and under the lower crust, 
pressing the rounded edge firmly upon 
the plate. This "hem" effectually seals 
up the juices for the edge of the pie 
crisps up before the fruit begins to 
simmer. 

Never put a pie in the oven and forget 
about it. It often needs turning to get 
an even brownness. Burned pie-crust 



leaves a rather bad taste in the mouth. 

Left-over pieces of dough may be kept 
in the ice-chest, if closely covered, for 
several days. It is sometimes very con- 
venient to have the dough on hand when 
one wishes to make a pie in a hurry. 
Mixing the paste for the pie can, there- 
fore, be one of the "day before" duties 
when one expects company. 

To give your pie an "indefinable 
charm" incorporate a little grated orange 
or lemon peel into the crust oi flavor it, 
ever so little, with lemon extract. 

Turn a few tablespoonfuls of cold tea 
over your apple pie in addition to what- 
ever spice, cinnamon or nutmeg, is used. 

Bits of orange peel mixed with the 
rhubarb pie give it a fine blended flavor. 

Apples may be stewed and strained and 
then used exactly as you would pumpkin, 
allowing rather more flour to thicken. 

A sprinkling of cocoanut or chopped 
nuts over the top of a meringue gives it 
character. a. a. k. 



I 



My Canning Log 

F one has been particularly fortunate 
when buying for canning, either in 
price or quality or both, it is an event 
which should be remembered for the next 
year, and if the canner buys by consulting 
advertisements and then going where 
there seems most promise of satisfaction, 
generally she is purchasing of too many 
different people to recall all their names 
the next year. In the same way she 
cannot be expected to remember offhand 
the amount of each kind of fruit she 
bought, or the price. Sometimes she 
even forgets just which dealers imposed 
upon her trusting nature, in selling her 
fruit. 

I write my log, diary style, in an 
ordinary school composition book. It 
could be called a diary or journal, but 
my forbears were all seafaring people; 
log I have named it, and log it shall be. 
In it I have written, the kind and amount 
of each fruit purchased, of whom pur- 
chased, the price, and also the quality of 



214 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



each lot. Then below this information I 
have written a short account of the wa}" 
the fruit was used, giving proportions and 
the time of cooking. Also when various 
helpful facts are brought to my attention 
during the canning process, I record them 
too. For example, from my log written 
last summer I read: 

"To the 6 lbs. of apricots I added sugar 
syrup made of 4 cups of sugar and 6 
cups of water. Had nearly 2 cups of 
syrup left after finishing." 

This year I shall be able to judge more 
accurately how much syrup to make for 
my apricots. About the same time too 
I discovered and entered in my log the 
fact that the average amount of syrup 
needed for a pint of fruit, is one cup, 
though later I found that hard fruits like 
rhubarb, for example, take less, because 
miore pieces can be packed into a jar 
without crushing. 

One does not have to confine the record 
to prosy names and prices. I often write 
in some little occurrence in connection 
with the purchase that proves amusing or 
interesting to read afterward. As an 
example, I will quote from June 10th of 
last year: 

"June 10th, 1919 — Apricots — Peter- 
son Ranch 13-2 lbs. — -SSc, (fine ones). 

"John and I rode out to the Peterson 
Ranch on the Camel Back road with the 
Cramers yesterday afternoon. We 
picked the apricots ourselves; at least, the 
men did. Mrs. Cramer and I ate as fast 
as we picked, and so did not help materi- 
ally in fining the bags. John picked 
thirteen and one-half pounds of fine 
large ones, and Mr. Peterson charged us 
only thirty-five cents, partly because we 
did the picking and partly, I think, be- 
cause he knows the Cramers so well. 



Our bag burst on the way home and the 
apricots spilled all over the floor of the 
car, but we managed to retrieve them all, 
and today I have used ten pounds of 
them. About half I combined with 
pineapple, and put up by the cold pack 
method, [Note — This is the method I 
use almost exclusively], using one thirty- 
cent can of broken, sliced pineapple to six 
pints of apricots. This is enough to give 
a good flavor. Then I boiled enough of 
the fruit in sugar syrup, without the 
pineapple, to make two more pints, and 
after that I had enough left out of the 
ten pounds to make a fat pie for dinner." 

This year before buying fruit I shall 
glance through my log, and read some- 
thing like this: 

"Apricots, 8c lb. — Ryan, fruit dealer 
— good. 

"Apricots, 9c lb. — Elite Grocery — 
stringy, poor. 

"Figs, 10c lb. — Culver Ranch — ex- 
cellent. 

"Peaches, 15 lbs. for ^1.00 — Tyler 
Ranch — good. 

"Plums, 10c lb. — Smith Wholesale — 
fair. 

"Plums, 8 lbs. for 31-00, (Satsumas) — 
Rex Ranch — good." 

Then I shall go out and buy. 

On the inner side of the log's covers, I 
keep a list of the kinds of fruit I can, the 
number of jars filled, and the date of 
canning. For example: 

Kind Date Number Canned 

Satsuma Plums Jun»25 10 pints 

Figs July 5 6 pints 

Of course there is nothing especially 
helpful about this list except as a stimu- 
lant to my ambition, and it is surprising 
how I want to add to it. Then, too, it 
makes my log more complete, e. t. f. 




THIS department is for the benefit and free use of our subscribers. Questions relating to recipes, 
and those pertaining to culinary science and domestic economics in general, will be cheerfully- 
answered by the editor. Communications for this department must reach us before the first of the 
month preceding that in which the answers are expected to appear. In letters requesting answers 
by mail, please enclose address and stamped envelope. Address queries to Janet M. Hill, Editor. 
American Cookery, 221 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass. 



Query No. 4234. — "Will you please give a 
recipe for Ice-Box Pudding made with lady- 
fingers and melted chocolate.^" 

Ice-Box Pudding 

THIS query was received some 
months ago, and we replied in 
the issue of the magazine for 
June-July that we were not familiar with 
the name, but we gave a recipe for a 
pudding made with ladyfingers and 
chocolate ice cream. Since then two 
subscribers very kindly sent us recipes 
for Ice-Box Cake, which they think is 
what the query called for. 

Ice-Box Cake I 

"This cake is made by placing lady- 
fingers in a paper-lined cake pan (of the 
square variety) and pouring over the 
cakes the following mixture, allowing the 
whole to stand in an ice-box over night, 
or from eighteen to twenty-four hours, 
depending on the temperature. Melt one 
pound of sweet chocolate in a double 
boiler, adding three tablespoonfuls of boil- 
ing water and stir until smooth. Re- 
move this mixture from the fire and 
beat in the yolks of four eggs, one at a 
time. Beat the whites of the four eggs 
light, and fold in the chocolate mixture. 
Spread this filling over the cakes and at 
the end of the allotted time it should set 
firm enough to cut with a warm knife. 
The pudding is served with sweetened and 
flavored whipped cream." 

Our thanks are due for this recipe to 
Miss N. K., Boone, Iowa. . 



Ice-Box Cake No. II 

"Take one cup of sweet chocolate 
grated, three tablespoonfuls of water and 
two tablespoonfuls of sugar, put these into 
a double boiler and add one at a time the 
yolks of three eggs, beating each in. 
Cook the mixture to a custard consis- 
tency, then let cool and add the whites of 
the three eggs, beaten stiff. Line a pan 
or dish with parafin paper, then line it 
with ladyfingers all around sides and 
bottom. Pour in a layer of the mixture, 
then set a layer of ladyfingers, until there 
are three layers of each. Put in the ice- 
box overnight, and serve with ice cream 
or whipped cream." 

For this we thank Mrs. E. S. W., 
Hopkins, Minn. 



Query No. 4235. — "Please publish in your 
magazine a good recipe for Macaroons. I have 
tried several, but none of them look anything 
like macaroons." 

Macaroons 

Work together on a large, flat platter 
one cup of almond paste and six ounces of 
powdered sugar. It is better to use the 
hand in mixing these. Beat stiff the 
whites of three eggs, and mix with the 
paste and sugar until the whole is smooth; 
a spatula, a wire beater, or a wooden 
spoon may be used in this process. 
Spread oiled paper on a baking sheet, and 
drop the mixture on it in small spoonfuls, 
about an inch apart. Bake from fifteen 
to twenty minutes in a moderate oven. 
215 



216 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



They may be removed from the paper by 
slipping a flexible knife under each, or by 
wetting the bottom of the paper with hot 
water. This method is very simple, 
and success is easily attained, but to try 
to make macaroons without the genuine 
almond paste, the real marzipane, is not 
at all satisfactory. 



Query No. 4236. — "Will you please print 
recipes for Vanilla Wafers, Club Sandwiches, and 
Pork Cake?" 

Vanilla Wafers 

Cream one-third cup of butter or a 
substitute — half-and-half butter and 
lard is very good — and work into it one 
cup of fine granulated sugar and one 
unbeaten egg. The mixture should be 
worked until the sugar seems dissolved, 
and the batter is as smooth as butter. 
Sift together two cups and one-half of 
flour with two teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder and one-half teaspoonful of salt, 
and add to the first mixture as much of 
this as it will take up, then continue to 
add the remainder, alternately, with one- 
fourth a cup of milk until the whole is a 
smooth dough. From one to two tea- 
spoonfuls of vanilla extract will be needed 
to flavor, this should be added before the 
last portion of flour, and while the dough 
is soft. Chill in the ice-box for several 
hours, then roll out one-fourth of the 
dough at a time, making a sheet as thin 
as possible. Cut out the wafers with a 
small cutter; place them on a greased 
baking sheet and bake in a moderate 
oven. Proceed in this way with the 
remaining portion of the dough, using 
only as much at one time as can be worked 
with while cold and stiff. 

Club Sandwich 

Toast quickly three oblong slices of 
bread, so that they are soft inside, yet 
well-browned outside. Spread two of 
them with a thick mayonnaise dressing; 
over this lay lettuce leaves, then slices 
of white meal of chicken and strips of 
toasted breakfast bacon. Lay these slices 



over one another and place the remainiBg 
slice on top. The work should be done 
so quickly that the toast is yet warm when 
the sandwich is served. 

Pork Cake 

Put one pound of clear fat from pork 
through the fine chopper, place in a bowl, 
and potir over it one cup of boiling water. 
Stir until the fat begins to dissolve, then 
add one cup of dark brown sugar and stir 
until dissolved. In cold weather the 
bowl may be set over hot water to retain 
warmth. Add two cups of molasses, four 
cups of flour sifted w4th two teaspoonfuls, 
each, of ground allspice and cinnamon, 
and one-half of one nutmeg, grated. 
Stir into the batter two pounds of raisins, 
seeded and floured, one pound of dates, 
stoned, cut into quarters, and floured, 
and, lastly, two teaspoonfuls of baking 
soda dissolved in a very little hot water. 
Pour into a tube pan, lined with greased 
paper, and before putting in the oven 
insert, bit by bit, with the fingers, one- 
half a pound of citron, shaved very thin. 
This cake calls for a moderate oven and 
careful watching during the baking, 
lest the molasses burn. 



Query No. 4237. — "I should like a recipe 
for Scotch Cake — not the shortcake, but a 
raised cake made with raisins, etc." 

Scotch Barm Cake 

Possibly the cake you mean is the barm 
cake or raised cake made in the old coun- 
try at Christmas time^ and raised with 
the liquid, home-made barm. If com- 
pressed yeast be substituted, the follow- 
ing recipe will result in something as like 
the original as may be made outside the 
land of cakes. Blend one-half a com- 
pressed yeast cake in a little milk, and 
when well mixed, add milk enough to 
make a pint. Sift three pints of flour 
with one teaspoonful of salt; add to milk 
and yeast, and knead to a soft dough. 
Cream one cup of butter; mix with it two 
cups of brown sugar and one table- 
spoonful of mixed spice, cinnamon, nut- 
meg, allspice; divide this into two parts. 



i 



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AMERICAN COOKERY 



and knead one-half into the dough. 
Cover, and let rise overnight or until 
doubled in bulk. Then add the re- 
mainder of the butter, sugar, and spice, 
together with one cup of raisins, seeded 
and floured, one-half a cup of currants, 
cleaned and floured, and one-half a cup 
of fine-shaved citron. The fruit should 
be mixed with the dough, then placed in 
a well-greased loaf pan, or in two cake 
pans, and the citron inserted by hand. 
Let rise again in a warm place until 
light, and bake in a moderate oven for 
one hour and one-half. This cake im- 
proves on keeping. 

Query No. 4238. — "Can you suggest to me 
a pretty yellow sweet dish, to be served at a 
buffet luncheon for a Golden Wedding.'' I 
should also like a recipe for the Yorkshire Curd 
Cakes the same as I have eaten in England, and 
one for the English Bread Patties served in that 
country." 

Jaune-Mange 

Try the following for your yellow sweet 
dish. Hydrate one-half a box of any 
gelatine that is particularly clear and 
sparkling, and dissolve in two cups of 
boiling water. Add the following in- 
gredients in the order given: One cup of 
granulated sugar, the strained juice of 
two oranges and the grated yellow rind 
of one, the juice of one large lemon, 
strained, and one-half the grated yellow 
rind, and one or two drops of saffron 
juice, made by tying a few shreds of 
saffron in cheesecloth, dipping in hot 
water, and pressing out the coloring 
matter. Pour the whole into a bowl set 
in a pan of ice water, and keep the 
gelatine stirred or beaten until creamy. 
If it grows too white from the stirring, 
add a little more of the saffron juice. 
Pour into a ring mold, and when inverted 
it should show a creamy yellow mound, 
with a layer of clear, bright yellow on the 
top. Fill the center with preserved 
apricots, or with a mixture of orange 
marmalade and whipped cream. 

Yorkshire Curd Cakes 

We do not guarantee that these cakes are 
the same as those you have eaten in Eng- 



land, but the recipe is, so far as we know, 
the usual one for Yorkshire curd cakes. 
Make a bowl of curds by heating two 
quarts of milk to simmering point, and 
adding -to it some soured buttermilk, 
adding one-half a cup at a time, and 
gently stirring until the curds of the milk 
separate from the whey. How much 
buttermilk has to be used depends on its 
acidity. Strain off the whey, press the 
curds rather dry, return to the bowl and 
beat into them one cup of rich, heavy 
cream, one cup of granulated sugar, and 
one cup of dried currartts, first washed 
and spread on a pan to heat in the oven 
until plumped. Add one-half an ounce 
of fine-chopped candi'ed peel, one-half a 
teaspoonful of salt, a few grates of nut- 
meg, and, lastly, beat in one or two eggs, 
the yolks and whites beaten separately. 
Pour by spoonfuls into shells of puff- 
paste, and bake in a quick oven. These 
are very good, whether they are the same 
as those you have eaten or not. 

English Bread Patties 

There are many different recipes for 
these patties, but this is the best we know. 
Fry a pint of chopped fresh mushrooms 
with one minced onion in a couple of 
tablespoonfuls of butter or dripping until 
they are brown. Add these to a mixture 
of one pint and one-half of bread crumbs 
moistened with hot milk — a cup or more 
according to the staleness*of the crumbs — 
and one-fourth a cup of melted butter. 
Next add an equal volume — that is, 
one pint and one-half — of minced veal, 
chicken, rabbit, or any delicate white 
meat — or part may be chopped cooked 
ham, which improves the flavor. Season 
the whole to taste, chopped cauliflower 
pickles are sometimes used, and bake in 
individual tin patty cases first well 
greased and then floured. The oven 
should be hot, and the baking continued 
until the patties are brown. This mix- 
ture should be enough for ten or a dozen 
not too large patty shells. When ready 
to serve these should be inverted on a 
platter, and garnished with cress. 



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ROYAL BAKING POWDER CO., 168 William Street, New York 



HOW TO MAKE IT 

LT^se level measurements for all materials 

\i cup shortening 4 teaspoons Royal Baking- Powder 

1^ cups sugar 1 cup milk Grated rind of % orange 

1 egg and 1 yolk 2% cups flour % teaspoon salt 

\% squares (IJ^ozs.) of unsweetened chocolate (melted) 

Cream shortening, add sugar and grated orange rind. Add beaten egg yolks. 

Sift together flour, salt and Royal Baking Powder and add alternately with 

the milk; lastly fold in one beaten egg white. Divide batter into two parts. To 

one part add the chocolate. Put by tablespoonfuls, alternating dark and light 

batter, into three greased layer cake pans.. Bake in moderate oven 20 min. 

FILLING AND ICING 

3 tablespoons melted butter 3 squares (3 ozs.) unsweetened chocolate 
3 cups confectioner's sugar 2 tablespoons orange juice 1 egg white 
Grated rind of J^ orange and pulp of 1 orange 
Put butter, sugar, orange juice and rind into bowl. Cut pulp from orange, re- 
moving skin and seeds, and add. Beat all together until smooth. Fold in 
beaten egg white. Spread this icing on layer used for top of cake. 
While icing is soft, sprinkle with unsweetened chocolate shaved 
in fine pieces with sharp knife (usej^square). To remaining 
icing add 2% squares unsweetened chocolate which has 
been melted. Spread this thickly between layers and 
^ on sides of cake. 




Buy advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 
219 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Query No. 4239. — "What is Hopping John? 
Will you give me a recipe for salt-rising bread? 
Could you possibly tell me how to make the old- 
fashioned 'Steep' for invalids, of herbs, fruit, 
spices, etc., which our foremothers used for a 
pleasing tOnic drink?" 

Hopping John 

Cook slowly in four cups of water two 
cups of dried peas until about half done, 
then add one pound of bacon, cut in 
small strips, and continue cooking until 
peas are soft. Now add one cup of 
rice; let cook at boiling point for a quarter 
of an hour, then simmer, covered, until 
soft. More water may be needed after 
the rice is added, but the mixture should 
be stiff enough to sputter while cooking. 
Season to taste with salt and pepper be- 
fore serving. Stock may be used instead 
of water. 

Salt-Rising Bread 

Scald one-half a cup of milk and pour 
over two tablespoonfuls of corn-meal 




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mush, or two teaspoonfuls of dry meal. 
Mix well and place, uncovered, in a 
warm place until bubbles form and the 
mixture grows light. This may take all 
day or all night. ^ Then add two cups of 
water, warm, but not hot, in which one- 
half teaspoonful of soda has been dis- 
solved, add flour to make a thin batter, 
and allow to rise in a warm place until 
the sponge is light, as you would with any 
other bread. Next add flour to make a 
soft dough, mixed with one tablespoonful^ 
each, of sugar and shortening, and let rise 
in a bowl again. Lastly, knead down 
once more, this time adding a little more 
flour mixed with salt in the proportion of 
one teaspoonful to every three cups of 
flour used in making the bread. It 
should now be put in the baking pans, and 
let rise to double its bulk before baking. 
Salt-rising bread is leavened by wild 
yeasts from the air falling into the un- 
covered mixture of meal and milk used 
as a starter. These are allowed to multi- 
ply, and the salt, which inhibits their 
growth, is not added until last. 

Herb Tonic for Invalids 

- Mix together one-fourth a pound, 
each, of red clover and raspberry leaves 
with two pounds of raisins and one pound 
and one-half of figs, both chopped. 
Steep in one gallon and one-half of water 
overnight, in the morning add two 
pounds of sugar and bring slowly to a 
boil. Let boil three or four hours ■ — it. 
should be reduced one-third — and for, \ 
the last fifteen minu'fes add two ounces of 
whole cloves and one-fourth a pound of 
cinnamon bark, bruised and tied in 
coarse netting. Strain into sterile jars, 
and keep in a cool place. 



Query No. 4240. — "Please give me some 
information about oven temperatures, what 
degree bv the thermometer is meant by a slow, 
a moderate or a quick oven? Do you advise the 
use of an oven thermometer for an inexperienced 
housekeeper?" 

Baking Temperature and Oven 
Thermometers 

A slow oven is usually supposed to be 
one in which the temperature in the 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
220 



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Nature's own condiment — the tonic tang of health- 
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piquant flavor to meats — hot or cold. 

When cooked with pot-roast or cheaper cuts of 
meats cranberries make the meat tender and de- 
licious. (See recipe folder for this and other recipes.) 

8 lbs. cranberries and 2V2 lbs. of sugar make 10 tumblers of 
beautiful clear jelly. Try this recipe : — 

Crainberry Jelly 

Cook until soft the desired quantity of cranberries with iK pints of 
water for each two quarts of berries. Strain the juice through a 
jelly bag. 

Measure the juice and heat it to the boiling point. Add one cup 
of sugar for every two cups of juice; stir until the sugar is dis- 
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tumblers, porcelain or crockery molds. 

Always cook cranberries in porcelain-lined, en- 
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A recipe folder, containing many ways to use and 
preserve cranberries, will be sent free on request. 

For quality and economy specify "Eatmor" Cranberries 
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AMERICAN COOKERY 



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middle of the oven is from 250° to 350° 
Fahrenheit. A moderate oven has a 
temperature of from 350° to 400° Fah.; 
a quick or hot oven is one heated to 450° 
Fah.; and a very hot or pastry oven is 
heated to 500° or 550° Fah. Sometimes 
the baking of a dish is done by maintain- 
ing the same temperature from start to 
finish; sometimes the temperature is high 
at first, as in the roasting of meats, and is 
then decreased; sometimes it is low at 
first, as very often in bread or cake 
baking, and is gradually increased. 

By all means we recommend the use of 
an oven thermometer or some device for 
registering the heat, and maintaining it 
at a constant degree. Every house- 
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successful cooking. Not only this, but 
different flavors may be developed by 
the use of gradually increasing, or gradu- 
ally decreasing the temperature of her 
oven, and the cook who has mastered the 
science of using the correct temperature 
for different dishes will be pretty sure of 
success; she can play with her tempera- 
tures to produce the result she wishes. 

All the house-furnishing stores or de- 
partments now carry improved and up- 
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oven-temperature; you will do well to 
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Boston Cooking Magazine: - i 

In your recent numbers you speak about .t| 
bread flour being used in all published 
recipes where yeast is used. Otherwise 
pastry flour. What is the difference in 
thickening properties of the two flours.^ 
How much, generally speaking, of milk 
and baking powder should be used for 
recipes with pastry flour. '^ Where we 
have old recipes where bread flouris used, 
how can we change them so as to use 
pastry flour in cake, etc. .^ What is the 
general proportion for thickening, wet- 
ting, etc.? 

Miss M. T. Nixon. 



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Bread Flour vs. Pastry Flour in | 
Batters and Doughs ' 

Since we have been asked to discuss 
this subject'let us begin at the beginning, 
and describe first how one may be known 
from the other. 

The color of bread flour is a creamy j 
white; its texture, when tested by rub- •■ 
bing a little between the tips of finger and , 
thumb, is very slightly rough; and if a i 
handful is squeezed hard in the fist it will | 
not show the marks of the lines or creases 
of the fingers. 

Pastry flour is a purer white: its 
texture is smooth and velvety; and when 
squeezed in the hand it retains the mark" ! 
of every crease. 

In working with the two, it will be 
found that bread flour "goes farther" 
than pastry flour — that is, it takes up j 
more water, so that a larger loaf, results i 
from the same quantity of wetting or 
liquid used in the making. Here let us | 
say that it is always the liquid, rather j 
than the flour, which is the measure of the | 
loaf. The liquid is the constant, the ' 
standard, for the flour varies according to 
the brand. Hence, it will be seen that 
bread flour is more economical, other 
things being equal, since it will yield a 
larger number of loaves for the same 
volume. This is because its gluten is, to 
use the trade, term, "stronger," it will 
stand more kneading, it will take up more 
water. Experiment has shown that one- 
eighth more pastry flour by volume is 
needed to make a dpugh or batter of the 
same thickness as that made by any given 
volume of bread flour. 

The dough or batter made by bread 
flour will be tougher than that made by 
pastry flour. This is why the latter is 
recommended for delicate cakes and : 
pastry, it will make them more tender., 
crisp and flaky. 

But the flavor of bread flour is richer, 
therefore, when rich cakes are made with 
a great deal of shortening, many persons || 
prefer to use a strong bread flour, for in 
this case the shortening will counteract 
the toughness. 



Buy advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 
224 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



^4.4^u>i^ I h^ 



\ THINK THIS IS 
-^ BEST DESSERT 
i^ THE WORLD 



ff 



THIS recipe was sent in by a woman from California. I have found it easy to make, delightful 
to the eye, appropriate for any occasion — and delicious for grown-ups as well as children. Try 
it and see if you, too, do not think it is the best dessert you ever tasted! 




PINEAPPLE BUTTERFLY PARFAIT 

^2 (envelope Knox Sparkling Golatine 1 cup cream 3^ teaspoonful salt 

2 cups hot boiled rice 1 cup chopped nut meats 1 teaspoonful vanilla 

1 '2 cup^ milk 1 cup sugar 

Soak gelatine in milk ten minutes, dissolve in hot rice. Add sugar and salt, when cool fold 
in cream, beaten stiff. Add nut meats and flavoring. Turn into wet mold; pack in ice and 
salt. Cut round slices of canned pineapple across center; decorate mold with these before 
serving, placing curved edges together to imitate butterfly wings. If possible decorate wings with 
cut cherries and pour pineapple juice over all. White, maple or brown sugar may be used, the 
latter preferable. Brown rice is delicious and has more nourishment than white. 

A Booklet of the "Best Desserts" 
My booklets, "Dainty Desserts" and "Food Economy," containing numberless recipes 
for other "best desserts," salads, meat and fish molds, 
relishes and candies, sent free if you will enclose 
„, ,, four cents in stamps for postage, and mention your 

I'^NC/jK^ Is grocer's name. 

- mm ■ ~ 

Any domestic .science teacher can have sufficient gelatine 
for tier class, it *he will write me on school stationery, stating |3|i'"| 
quantityand when needed. illM' 

"Wherever a recipe calls for Gelatine — think of KNOX" 

MRS CHARLES B KNOX 




KNOX GELATINE 



107 Knox Avenue 



Johnstown, N. Y. 




Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
225 



AMERICAN COOKERY 






Bake in three ovens and use 

the gas broiler at the 

same time 

The new Victory Crawford is the only range 
on the market which does this — and in 
addition has room for four kettles on the coal 
griddles and five on the gas burners. 

And though there is so much oven space — 
six and a half square feet, or thirteen square 
feet with the racks — the Victory Crawford 
measures only forty-three inches from end 
to end. 

It's a thoroughly up-to-date combination 
gas and coal range with many exclusive im- 
provements which make it efficient, economi- 
cal, easy to keep clean — a time and step 
saver for the busy housewife. Ask your 
dealer to show you the Victory Crawford — 
you'll find it just the range you've always 
wan ted . Made in black, ^rid gray enamel fin ish . 
Sold by leading dealers. 



WALKER & PRATT MFG. CO. 
BOSTON, U. S. A. 

Makers of Highest Quality Ranges 
Furnaces and Boilers 




Whenever yeast is the leaven employed 
in any flour mixture, it is better to use 
bread flour, since it holds the carbon 
dioxide given off during the slow process 
of the growth of the yeast, and its gluten 
resists any tendency to burst the bubbles 
better than the weaker gluten of the 
pastry, flour. 

As a general rule, the proportions for a 
thin batter are equal parts of flour and 
liquid; for a thick batter, twice as much 
flour as liquid; for a soft dough three 
times as much flour as liquid; and for a 
stiff dough, four or more times as much 
flour as liquid. When pastry flour is 
used in a bread-flour recipe, add two 
(level) tablespoonfuls to every cup of 
flour the recipe calls for. Examples of 
the thin batter are pan- or griddle-cakes, 
waffles, popovers, and sometimes fritter 
batters, etc. The thick batter is the one 
used for cakes and muffins, steamed pud- 
dings, for the fritter batters which are 
mixed with chopped vegetables, fruity 
etc., rather than used to coat articles 
whose shape it is desired to preserve, and 
this batter is also used for the batter 
breads. The soft dough is the ordinary 
bread dough, the biscuit dough, the 
dough for doughnuts and crullers; and 
the stiff dough is called for in making 
noodles, and some kinds of cookies and 
crackers. 

No exact proportions of flour can ever 
be given, for no two brands of flour are 
alike, and it may even be said that no two 
millings of flour are identical. Much de- 
pends on the weather, the soil, factor? 
over which the manufacturer has little 
control. The general proportions given 
above are merely good working rules, but 
the experienced cook will use a little less 
or a little more according to her judgment 
When eggs are added to a recipe, some 
flour should be deducted, for eggs have a 
thickening property equal to, at least, two 
tablespoonfuls of flour. 

Practice, experience, and good judg- 
ment are needed for excellence in working 
with flour mixtures. 



Bu 



idvertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
226 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




It Gives a Greater Relish 

For creaming chicken, vegetables and soups, for corn fritters, 
muffins, pie fillings, cakes and frostings, you will find Carnation 
Milk gives a fine flavor, a greater relish. Use Carnation for cook- 
ing and baking, with desserts and in your coffee. For it is always 
pure, just cows' milk evaporated to the thickness of cream, then 
sterilized in hermetically sealed containers. Send for the Carna- 
tion Cook Book. It contains 100 tested economical recipes. 

Carnation Milk Prodi/cts Company 

1058 Consumers Building,- Chicago 1158 Stuart Building, Seattle 



Carnation 

'''From Contented Cows" 



mm. 




NlLK^^j 



Milk 



Sold by Grocers Everywhere 

Carnation Milk Products Co. 
Seattle Chicago Avlmer, Ont. 



Creamed Chipped Beef — Shred 32 pound of chipped 
beef with a fork, and pour boiling water over it. Stand a 
few minutes and drain. Put 2 tablespoonfuls butter in a 
pan, and when hot throw in the beef and cook until it 
looks frizzled in appearance. Add ]/2 cup boiling water 
and K cup Carnation Milk, mixed together, and thicken 
with 1 tablespoonful of flour which has p.eviously been 



creamed with a little Carnation Milk. Cook for five min- 
utes, stirring the while. Add the beaten'yolks of 2 eggs 
and a dash of white pepper. Serve hot on toast or with 
baked potatoes. 

There are many other recipes as good as this in the 
Carnation Recipe Book. Send for it. 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
227 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




To Time Your Eggs a 

or a 

Telephone Call 




^%' 



Look for 

this Seal in 

Stores 

and 

Gift Shops 



The'Egg-timer that you've looked for everywhere. It's on the 
principle.of. the old-fashioned hourglass. We imported the timeis 
and fitted them[into dainty green wood cases. Put up in the unique 
and attractive Pohlson way. They're also handy for timing tele- 
phone calls. Postpaid, $1.25. This is one of the hun- 
dreds of useful, novel and inexpensive gifts shown in our 
catalog. Look for the Pohlson Gifts in your store or gift 
shop, or send for illustrated catalog, free on request. It 
makes holiday shopping a pleasure. 

POHLSON GIFT SHOP Pawtucket, R. I. 





CAKE and MUFFIN TESTER 

Convenient, Sanitary and Hygienic 
Year's Supply for a Dime. Send 10c. (Stamps or Coin) to 

PERCY H. HOWARD 
2 Central Square Cambridge, Mass. 






»— + 



ANY ONE CAN USE 

KNACK-OF-IT 
KNIFE SHARPENER 

Made from highest grade tool steel 

- |v Rest ei th er end fla t over 

t)UC. table edge. Draw edge 
^N^ of knife between discs. 
Discs will tip at proper 
angle and that's the 
Knack Of It, which 
makes perfect work 
easy. 
Dealers or Parcel Post, 50c. 

Standard Silverware Co., Boston 9, Mass. 




-aMlilMil 



SALAD SECRETS 



100 recipes. Brief but complete. I5c by mail. 100 Meat- 

|i^_recipes 15c _ 50 Sandwich recipes I5c, All three 30c 

B. R. BRIGGS, 259 Madison St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



"Ten- Cent Meals" 

42 Meals with receipts and directions for preparing each- 48 pp. lOe. 

Am. School of Home Economics, 503 W. 69lh St., Chicag9 



The Silver Lining 

Limb-ericks 

Oa, the Two-toed Sloth swung from a tree. 
Lpside-down he was dangling in glee. 

And he said, 'Tm unique. 

I'm the one jungle freak 
That has had no dance named after mg!" 

Once a poet whose name we won't quote, 
\\ ished in verse a fair maiden to note. 

But her short skirts he spied, 

i\nd no sonnet he tried, 
But a lim(b)erick — that's what he wrote! 
Blanche Elizabeth JVade. 



Bernard Shaw: "Say, Einle, do you 
really think you understand yourself.^" 



Einstein: "No, Bernie — do 



you, 

Life. 



x\merica is now witnessing the rise of 
the great meddle class. 

Norfolk P^irginia7i-Pilot. 



"Tom, go fetch the old horse." "Why 
the old one, father.''" "Wear out the old 
ones first, that's my motto." "Well, 
then, father, you fetch the horse." 



Foreman: "What are you doin' of, 
James ,^" 

Bricklayer: "Sharpenin' a bit o^ 
pencil." 

Foreman: "You'll 'ave the Union 
after you, me lad. That's a carpenter's 
job." — Punch. 



Judge: "And why haven't you a horn 
on your automobile.^"* 

Prisoner at the Bar: "Plesa, Alister 
Joodga, I don't needa da horn. It says 
on da front, 'Dodge Brothers.' " 



Willis: "What is the solution of our 
present industrial chaos .^" 

Gillis: "Labor must come down. 
Capital must come across. Efficiency 
must come up. and Taxes must come 
o^r — Judge. 



Mrs. London tells the following of her 
famous husband, Jack London. "No ad- 



Ru^■ advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitute: 
228 



AD\ ERTISEAIENTS 



Mrs. Rorer's Famous 

PHILADELPHIA 
COOK BOOK 

Price now $1.50 

But shucks, the price doesn't count for much when you con- 
sider what a great help and comfort the book is in the daily 
routine of the home. It's what the book does for you, how it 
makes Hfe easier, how it breaks up difficulties — these are the 
things that count. Let's put it this way: 

In the first pla:e its 1200 recipes are dead sure, and the direct'ons so plain 
that one can follow them without fear of failure. It is not a hit-or-miss 
matter, but one of surety. 

Then its 581 pages teem with good things, covering every phase of cookery; 
how best to buy, cookandservefoods;how to do and manage the thousand- 
and-one duties of the household. Oh, it's a great time and nerve saver. ' 

Then again, it helps to lighten labor, and any book or thing that can do 
that ought to be welcome anywhere. To take away the strain of house- 
keeping and ease the daily burden, is surely a worthy accomplishment. 

Cloth boiiiTd, $L50; By mail $L65 

Mrs. Rorer's Canning and Preserving, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 
Mrs. Rorer's Ice Creams, Wate- Ices, etc., $1.00; by mail, 1.10 
Mrs. Rorer's Home Candy Making, 50 cents; by mail, .55 
Mrs. Rorer's Ways for Cooking Eggs, 50 cents; by mai, .55 

For sale by Boston Cooking-School Magazine Co., Department and Bookstore 3, or 

ARNOLD & COMPANY, 420 Sansom St., Philadelphia 



Bm' advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



PIGTURCSQUB 

Made with 

FAIRY 
FUEL 



UOG riRBS 





Look for 

this seal 

in stores 

and 

gift shops 



If you have an open fireplace, send for a box of this driftwood 
flame today. Crystals sprinkled on burning logs give beautiful 
colors to the flame. Harmless. Box sent Postpaid 75c. Ask for 
No. 1334. Our catalog shows hundreds of novel things which make 
attractive gifts for every member of the family. Send for a copy 
and make your Christmas shopping a pleasure. Pohlson Gifts 
are shown in stores and gift shops everywhere — look for them. 

POHLSON GIFT SHOP, PAWTUCKET, R. I. 



SPAN SM RECIPES 



1 recipes, most tasty, delicious Spanish dishes O C _ 
specially adapted to American taste, sent for ^*'^ 
SENORA MENDOZA RECIPE COMPANY 
233 Laughlin Building, Los Angeles, California 



PERSONAL BODY DEVELOPMENT Tt'hTd'ol 

•btaining a Perfect Figure, overcoming Nervousness, Constipa- 
tion, Biliousness, Flabbiaess of flesb and thinness of body 

Price, $1.00. Fully Guaranteed. 
THE NEW IDEAS CO. 14 Collins Bldg., LIMA, OHIO 



FREE FOR 30 DAYS Sxr,l"tRE>iM' 

m a bottle of MILK ? This SEPARATOR 

•,t PERFECTLY. Send this ad., your 

name and address, and we will send one. 

■« Pay postman 50 cents. Tse for 30 days; if 

not entirely SATISFACTORY retuni and 

we will refund your money. 

B. W. J. COMPANY, Dept. A.C. 
1996 Indianola Ave., Columbus, Ohio 



ROBERTS 

Lightning Mixer 
Beats Everything 

Beats eggs, whips cream, churns butter, mixes 
gravies, desserts and dressings, and does the 
work in a few seconds. Blends and mixes 
malted milk, powdered milk, baby foods and 
all drinks. 

Simple and Strong. Saves work — easy 
to clean. Most necessary household 
article. Used by 200,000 housewives 
and endorsed by leading household 
niaga.^.ines. 
If your dealer does not carry this, we will send 
prepaid quart size $1.25, pint size 90c. Far 
West and South, quart $1.40, pint $L00. 
Recipe book free with mixer. 

NATIONAL CO. Cambridge 39, boston, mass. 



A Dishwasher for $2.50! 

Keeps hands out of the water, no wiping of dishes, saves 5 the 
time. Consists of special folding dishdrainer, special wire 
basket, 2 special long-handled brushes. Full directions for use. 
Sent prepaid for $2,50. Full refund if not satisfactory. 

Am. Sohool of Home Economics, 503 W.69th St., Chicago 




QUARTS 
ONLY 




mission except on business. No business 
transacted here." This sign he tacked to 
the front door of his summer house. The 
legend on the back door was like unto it: 
"Please do not enter without knocking. 
Please do not knock." 



Mother: "No, Bobbie, I can't allow 
you to play with that little Kim boy. He 
might have a bad influence over you." 

Bobbie: "But, mother, can I play 
with him for the good influence I might 
have over him.^" ■ — ■ New York Globe. 



"Home-Making as a Profession" 

H3ME-MAKING is the greatest 
of all the professions — greatest 
in numbers and greatest in its 
influence on the individual and on society. 
All industry is conducted for the home. 
directly or indirectly, but' the industries 
directly allied to the home are vastly 
important, as, the food industries, clothing 
industries, etc. Study of home eco- 
nomics leads directly to many well paid 
vocations as well as to home efficiency. 

Since 1905 the American School of 
Home Economics has given home-study 
courses to over 30,000 housekeepers, 
teachers, and others. The special text- 
books have been used for class work in 
over 500 schools. 

Of late years, courses have been de- 
veloped fitting for many well paid posi- 
tions: — -Institution Management, Tea 
Room and Lunchroom Management, 
Teaching of Domestic Science. Home 
Demonstrators, Dietitians, Nurses, Dress- 
making, "Cooking for Profit." Home- 
Makers' Courses : — Complete Home 
Economics, Household Engineering, Les- 
sons in Cooking, The Art of Spending. 

BULLETINS: Free-Hand Cooking, 
Ten-cent Meals. Food Values, Family 
Finance, Art of Spending, Weekly Allow- 
ance Book, IOC. each. 

Details of any of the courses and in- 
teresting 80-page illustrated handbook. 
"The Profession of Home-Making" sent 
on request. American School of Home 
Economics, 503 W. 69th Street, Chicago. 

--Adv. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




STICKNEY Sl POOR'S 

PURE SEASONINGS 

Are Sa^e, Savory, Marjoram and Thyme 

SAGE is used largely as a condiment for flavoring dressings 
for roast meats, fish and fowl — also used for season- 
ing home-made sausage and cheese. 

SAVORY is an aromatic herb that is largely used for season- 
ing various dishes, alone and in combination with 
other herbs, such as marjoram, sage, etc. 

MARJORAM is peculiarly aromatic and fragrant and 
is much esteemed by good cooks for its flavoring 
qualities. 

THYME is a pungent aromatic herb that adds a tasty 
flavor to soups, sauces, etc. 

Every housewife that prides herself upon her good cooking 
should always have a package of each of the above herbs on 
her pantry shelf. 

BUT— BE SURE YOU BUY 

STICKNEY & POOR'S 

PURE HERBS 

This Trade Mark stands for the Best in Mustard, Spices, 
Seasonings and Flavorings. It is an outward sign of "Stand- 
ard" quality within. You can depend upon it. Always 
found on Stickney & Poor's Products. 

Your co-operating servant, 

"MUSTARDPOT." 






A^ STICnNEY & POOR SPICE COMPANY ^ I jgj 

^1^ ^„ 1815— Century Old— Centnrv Honored— I92I ^BBBk. ^^ 



SEASONIKg.RAVURINCS 



•Century Old— Centnry Honored— 1921 
-— BOSTON and HALIFAX 

The Only Manafaclurers of Pure Mustard in the New England States 



M 



i 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
231 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




JUST THE THING FOR THE HOT WEATHER 

Gossom's Cream Soups (in Powdered Form) 

Pure, Wholesome, Delicious 

Quickly and 
Easily Prepar- 
ed. 

Simply add 
water and boil 
15 minutes and 

you have a delightful soup, of high food value and low 

cost. One 15 cent package makes 3 pints of soup. 

These soups do not deteriorate, so may be continually on 

hand and thus found most convenient. The contents 

also keep after opening. 

Split pea, Green pea, Lima, Celery, Black Bean, Clam 

Chowder, Onion and (Mushroom 25c). 

Sample sent prepaid on receipt of 20 cents, or one dozen for 

$1.75. 

For Sale by leading grocers 15 cents a package, 20 cents in 

far West. 

Manufactured by 

B. F. Gossom, 692 Washington St., Brookline, 46, Mass. 



"Free-Hand Cooking" 

Cook without recipes! A key to cookbooks, correct proportions, 
time, temperature; thickening, leavening, shortening, 105 fun- 
damental recipes. 40 p. book. 10 cents coin or stamps. 

Am. School of Home Economics, 503 W. 6?th Street, Chicagj 



1^ 



Gluten Flour yBv 

40% GLUTEN ^-^^^^ 



Guaranteed to comply In all respects to 
Standard requirements of U. S, Dept. of 



^ 



Agriculture. 

Uannfaetiired by 

FARWELL & RHINES 

Watertown, N. Y. 



J& 



Cream Whipping Made 
Easy and Inexpensive 

ri REMO- y ESCO 

Whips Thin Cream 

or Half Heavy Cream and Milk 

or Top of the Milk Bottle 

It whips up as easily as heavy cream 

and retains its stiffness. 

Every caterer and housekeeper 

wants CREMO-VESCO. 

Send for a bottle to-day. 



Housekeeper's size, H oz., .30 prepaid 
Caterer's size, 16 oz,, $1.00 " 

(With full directions) 



Cremo-Vesco Company 

631 EAST 23rd ST., BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Pacific Coast Agents: 
MILES MFG. CO.,949-951 E. 2nd St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



A little Scotch girl was being sent to 
Sunday-school for the first time. "Noo, 
Jean," said her mother, "here's a penny; 
ye're to put it in the plate when they pass 
it aroon', mind!" "A'richt, mamma," 
said Jean, "an wha' do I get for it.''" 
— Lif^. 

From a New England paper: Rev. E. 
Thompson will preach his farewell ser- 
mon on Sunday next. The choir will ren- 
der an anthem of joy and thanksgiving 
specially composed for the occasion. 
Boston Transcript. 

As the Sunday-school teacher entered, 
she saw leaving in great haste a Uttle girl 
and her smaller brother. "Why, Mary, 
you aren't going away.'"' she exclaimed in 
surprise. "Pleathe, Mith Anne, we've 
got to go," was the distressed reply. 
"Jimmy thwallowed hith collection." 
Boston Evening Transcript. 

Cooking for Profit 

By Alice Bradlev 

PrincipaL Miss Farmer's School of Cookery- 
Cooking Editor, Woman's Home Cornpanion 

IF YOU wish to earn money at home 
through home cooked food' and 
catering — if you would like to own 
and conduct a food shop, candy kitchen, 
tea room, cafeteria or lunch room — if 
you wish to manage a profitable guest 
house or small hotel, you will be interested 
in this new correspondence course. 

It explains just how to prepare food, 
"good enough to sell"; just what to 
cook, with many choice recipes; how to 
establish a reputation and a constant 
profitable market; how to cater for all 
occasions, and tells in detail how to 
establish and conduct successful tea 
rooms, etc. ■ — • how to manage all food 
service. 

The expense for equipment is little or 
nothing at first, the ' correspondence 
instruction is under the personal direc- 
tion of Miss Bradley which assures your 
success, the fee for the course is very 
moderate and may be paid .on easy 
terms. For full details write to American 
School of Home Economics, 503 W. 69th 
Street, Chicago. — Adv. 



ad\-ert;sed Goods — Do not accept s-ubstitulcs 
232 



ADXERTISEMENTS 




M 



ETHODS of living have undergone great changes in America in the last 
few years. Elaborate desserts, such as boiled and baked puddings and 
dyspepsia-producing pies, have given place to the more attractive and 
healthful desserts made from Jell-O. These desserts are economical both 
in money and time. Why should any woman stand for hours over a hot fire, 
mixing compounds to make people ill, when in two minutes, with an expense of 
a few cents, she can produce such attractive, delicious desserts ? Its economy is 
particularly in point now that it is again selling at 2 packages for 25 cents. 



Mill 



THE GENESEE PURE FOOD COMPANY 
Le Roy, hleu) York Bridgeburg, Ontario. 




Bu^ 



idvertised Goods — Do not accept subsiitures 
233 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Dr. Price's 



Vanilla 



Supper — with little chocolate-iced caked 
or a foamy snow pudding. How good the; 
are, made with Price's Vanilla! 
PRICE FLAVORING EXTRACT CO. 
"Experts in Flavor." Chicago, 111. 




'Look for 
x^ Price's 
*^ _, Tropiki " 
^A.*^^ on the 
label 




^i_- ^ 



For sale by a little orphan girl 

BEAUTIFUL HAND-MADE FLOWERS 

Tully as beautiful as natural flowers. Will last forever and hold 

their natural delicate colors. Lilies, Roses, or any color wanted. 

Mail orders promptly filled, and satisfaction guaranteed. 

Large bouquet, $1.00. Prepaid. 

MISS LETTIE D. POPE .... Corpus Christi, Texas 

*' Where My Money Goes'' 

Weekly Allowance Book — simple little book 32 pages, small 
enough for your pocketbook, easily kept; gives classified record 
of all personal or household expenses, lo cents. 

AM. SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS. 503a W. 69th STREET, CHICAGO 



YOUR GOVERNMENT 

recently Installed the BUDGET SYSTEM 

for greater economy. Why not CONTROL YOUR 
HOUSEHOLD FINANCES by this method? 

UNIUERSAL 
HOUSEHOLD 
/ BUDQET 

"!T SAVES WHSLE YOU SPEND" 

A practical Budget Book 

that is easy to maintain, 

is always balanced, and shows at any 

time how much you can afford to spend. 

CUT OUT COUPON AND ATTACH $1 00 

HOUSEHOLD EFFICIENCY BUREAU 

88-A KEYSTONE AVE. RiVER FOREST, ILLINOIS 

Enclosed find \ money order \ for SI, for which 
you may send me The Universal Household Budget. 
You are to refund this amount if I return the book 
within S days, and am not convinced that it wilt 
save money for me. 

NAME 




ADDRESS 



"Household Helpers" 

IF YOU could engage an expert cook 
and an expert housekeeper for only 
10 cents a week, with no board or 
room, you would do it, wouldn't your 
Of course you would! Well, that is all 
our "Two Household Helpers" will 
cost you the first year — nothing there- 
after, for the rest of your life. 

Have you ever considered how much 
an hour a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a 
year is worth to you? Many workmen 
get $1 an hour — surely your time is 
worth 30 cents an hour. We guarantee 
these "Helpers" to save you at least an 
hour a day, worth say 32.10 a week. 
Will you invest the 10 cents a week to gain 
$2 weekly.? Send the coupon. 

And the value our "Helpers" give you 
in courage and inspiration, in peace of 
mind, in the satisfaction of progress, in 
health, happiness and the joy of living, — 
is above price. In mere dollars and cents, 
they will save their cost twelve times a 
year or more. Send the coupon. 

These helpers, "Lessons in Cooking" 
and "Household Engineering," were both 
prepared as home-study courses, and as 
such have been tried out and approved 
by thousands of our members. Thus 
they have the very highest recommenda- 
tion. Nevertheless we are willing to send 
them in book form, on a week's free trial 
in your own home. Send the coupon. 

In these difficult days you really cannot 
aiford to be without our "Helpers." You 
owe it to yourself and family to give them 
a fair trial. You cannot realize what 
great 'help they wilt give you till you 
try them — and the trial costs you 
nothing! ' Send no money — send the cou- 
pon. 

American School of Home Economics. Chicago. 



FREE TRIAL FOR ONE WEEK 

A. S. H. E. — 503 W. 69th Street, Chicago, III. 

Send your two 'HOUSEHOLD HELPERS." prepairl 
on a week's trial, in the De Luxe binding. If satisfactory, I 
will send you ?^5 in full payment (OR) 50 cents and SI per 
month for five months. Otherwise I will return one or 
both books in seven days. (Regular mail price $3.14 each'' 

Name and 

Address 

Reference 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
234 



ADVERTISEAIENTS 



SToyoH a 



"The gas company recommended it - 
to me when I bought my range, and 
it certainly has* kept it new and 
clean. It just 'kills' rust and leaves 
a beautiful polish. No labor or 
horrid black grime — and what do 
you think: it doesn't stain your 
hands. Get it from your dealer. 

Price .50 cents Money Hack Guarantee 

Superior Laboratories 

V\\v \ , Grand Rapids, Mich. 

l\:oili, Dept.100 





I lnchei> Square, 5 Inches High 

You can be the best cake maker in yonr 
cinb or town. You can make the same Angrel Pood 

Cake and many other kinds that I make and sell at $3 a 

loaf-profit, $2, if you 

Learn the Osborn Cake Making System 

My methods are different. They are the result of twenty years 

•xperience as a domestic science expert. My waj is easy to learn. 

It never fails. I have taught thousands. t.?t me send ' "' 



particulars FREE. 
Mrs. Grace Osborn 



you fall 



Dept. J 5 Bay City^ Mich. 



'*The Art of Spending'' 

ells how to get more for your money — how to live better and 
ive more! How to budget expenses and record them cvitkout 
\ousehold accouiits. 24 pp. illustrated, lo cents. 

M. SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS, 503a W. 63th ST.. CHICAGO 



This Big 5 Pound Bag of $1 75 
Delicious Shelled Peanuts |i 

Direct from grower by Prepaid Parcels 
Post to your door. More and better 
peanuts than $5 will buy at stands or 
.stores. Along with Recipe Book tell- 
ing of over 60 ways to use them as 
foods. We guarantee prom]>t delivery 
and ship at once. 10 lbs, $3.00. Money 
back if not delighted. 

EASTERN PEANUT C0.,10 A. HERTFORD, N. C. 




Help! Help!! Help!!! 

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$2,10 a week. Cost only the lO cents a week for a year. Send 
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AM. SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS, 503a W. 69th STREET, CHICAGO 

Salt Mackerel 

CODFISH, FRESH LOBSTER 

RIGHT FROM THE FISHING BOATS TO YOU 




COOK BOOK FREE 

^ "VN'nte for thi.s book, "be.i 
Food^; How to Prepare and 
^erveThem." With it we send 
our list with delivered price of 
each kind of fish. 
USE COUPON BELOW 

FAMILIES who are fond of FISH can be supplied DIRECT 
from GLOUCESTER, MASS., by the FRANK E. DAVIS 
COMPANY, with newly^caught, KEEPABLE OCEAN FISH, 
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We sell ONLY TO THE CONSUMER DIRECT, sending 
by EXPRESS RIGHT TO YOUR HOME. We PREPAY 
express on all orders east of Kansas. Our fish are pure, appe- 
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to your complete approval or your money will be cheerfully 
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SALT MACKEREL, fat, meaty, juicy fish, are delicious for 
breakfast. They are freshly packed in brine and will not spoil 
on your hands. 

CODFISH, as we salt it, is .white, boneless and ready for 
instant use. It makes a substantial meal, a fine change from 
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FRESH LOBSTER is the best thing known for salads. 
Right fresh from the water, our lobsters simply are boiled and 
packed in PARCHMENT-LINED CANS. They come to 
you as the purest and safest lobsters you can buy and the meat 
is as crisp and natural as if you took it from the shell yourself. 

FRIED CLAMS are a relishable, hearty dish, that your whole 
family will enjoy. No other flavor is just like that of clams, 
whether fried or in a chowder. 

FRESH MACKEREL, perfect for frying, SHRIMP to 
cream on toast, CRABMEAT for Newburg or deviled. SAL- 
MON readv to serve, SARDINES of all kinds. TUNNY 
for salad, SANDWICH FILLINGS and every good ..---' 

thing packed here or abroad you can get direct .-'■'pR a imic 
from us and keep right on your pantry -••'r nAVlVrO 

shelf for regular or emergency use. .---„' .r. , ifn r 

iTDANTirc riAVlcr-A 60 Central Wharf 

FRANK E. DAVIS CO. Gloucester, Mass. 

60 Central Wharf ...--■'' Please send meyourlatest Se;i 

Gloucester ..--'' Food Cook Book and Fish Price List 



Mass. 



Namt 



Statt 



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Save Time and Labor by Using 

LIBERTY 
BAKING CUPS 




Liberty 
^Baking 
I Cups 



Make neater, cleaner, pleas- 
anter and easier baking. 

~"^^~^ ''Always Cook with Cups*' 

One hundred cups for 25 cents. See May number American Cookery, page 758 

WILLIAM W. BEVAN COMPANY EVERETT, MASS, 




BREAKFASTS, LUNCHEONS an J DINNERS 

By MARY D. CHAMBERS 

Should be in every home. It treats in detail the three meals a day, in their several varieties, from 
the light family affair to the formal and company function. Appropriate menus are given for each 
occasion. The well-balanced diet is kept constantly in view. Table china, glass and silver, and 
table linen, all are described and illustrated. In short, how to plan, how to serve and how to behave 
at these meals, is the author's motive in writing the book. This motive has been clearly and admir- 
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Cloth, 150 pages. Illustrated, $1.25 net. 

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A Coal and Gas Range 
With Three Ovens 
That Really Saves 

Although it is less than four feet long it can do every 
kind .of cooking for any ordinary family by gas in warm 
weather, or by coal or wood when the kitchen needs 
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for coal and one for gas. Both ovens may be used at 

one time — or eith- 
er one singly. In 
addition to the two 
baking ovens, 
there is a gas broil- 
ing oven. 





The Range that "Makes 



Easy" 



Coal, Wood and Gas Range 
See the cooking surface when you want to rush things 
—five burners for gas and four covers for coal. 

The illustrations show the wonderful pearl grey porcelain enamel fin- 
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to clean your range instar. tly. Ihey certainly do Make Cooking Easy. 

^W^ Gold Medal m 

Cftenwood 

Write to-day for handsome free booklet 118 that tells all about it, to 

Weir Stove Co., Taunton, Mass. Manufacturers of the Celebrated Glenwoo^ 
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The real breakfast "dessert"! 



f# 



CRISP, delicious, light waffles— Wagner Waf- 
fles! a really cheerful beginning for any sort 
of day. Folks just love them— they seem never 
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You'll be surprised how easily and 
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Ask your dealer, to show you Wag- 
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tell you where to get them. Remember 
to insist upon the genuine Wagner 
Iron if you want the BEST Waffles. 
The Wagner Manufacturing Co. 
Dept. 74 Sidney, 0. S 



UU 






Thi,-; package con- 
tains 12 cups of 
flour — -will make 
6 average cakes, 
4 large cakes, or 12 
Angel Food cakes. 



DELICATE CAKE REQUIRES A DELICATE FLOUR 

Good bread is strength-giving and substantial. The 
very essence of good cake is delicacy of taste and texture. 
Naturally a flour that makes big, upstanding loaves of 
bread is not specially adapted to the fine-grained, fluffy 
consistency of cake. 

S^mNS Down 

Prepared [Hot Self -'Rising) 

Cake Flour 

Preferred by Housewives for 27 years 

is perfect for all kinds of cake and pastry. It is just rich, soft winter 
wheat ground to a velvety smoothness. Nothing is added, but the 
hard, tough part of the wheat grain is removed. Cake made with 
this feathery flour is always lighter, whiter and finer than it is possi- 
ble to make with any bread flour. 

Swans Down represents a real money-saving, too, for it does away vvith baking fail- 
ures and the waste of expensive ingredients — a worth-while consideration these days 

your grocer can supply you 

IGLEHEART BROTHERS 

Established 1856 
Evansville, Indiana 

Also manufacturers of Instant Swans Down (dry cake batter, ready to mix with 
water and bake), the only product of its kind made with Swans Down Cake Flour. 




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Experience has shown that the most satisfactory way 

to enlarge the subscription list of American Cookery is through its present subscri= 
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itated below the description of each premium. 

Transportation is or is not paid as stated. 




ITksis shows the jelly turned from the mould 



INDIVIDUAL INITIAL JELLY MOULDS 

Serve Eggs, Fish and Meats in Aspic, 
Coffee and Fruit Jelly; Pudding and other 
desserts with your initial letter raised on 
the top. Latest and daintiest novelty for 
the ap-to-date hostess. To remove jelly 
take a needle and run it around inside of 
mould, then immerse in warm water; jelly 
will then come out in perfect condition. 
Be the first in your town to have these 
You cannot purchase them at the stores. 




This shows momM 
(upside down) 



9®t of six (6;, any initial, sent postpaid for (1) new subscription. Cash Price 75 centSo 



PATTY IRONS' 




As illustrated, are used to make dainty, flaky 
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salads, shell fish, ices, etc. Each set comes 
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vented. A big labor 
and time saver. 

Sent, prepaid, for 
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tion. Cash price 75 
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Imported, Round, 6 inch 

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PREMIUMS 




PASTRY BAG AND FOUR TUBES 

(Bag not shown in cut) 

A complete outfit. Practical in every way Made 
especially for Bakers and Caterers. Eminently suit 
able for home use. 

The set sent, prepaid, for one (1) new subscription 
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THE A. M. C. 
ORNAMENTER 

Rubber pastry bag and 
twelve brass tubes, assorted 
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CAKE ORNAMENTING SYRINGE 

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HOME CANDY MAKING 
OUTFIT 

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60 



2Q- 

2O0-|jj 
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sell for 15 cents each. Six 
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AN EGG SLICER SAVES TIME 
AND EGGS 

Does the work 
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ter than it can 
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Empire Kitchen Knives 




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and ground to a very keen edge. These 
Knives will cut. Two knives, as shown 
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A SET OF 24 TINS 

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FRENCH 
BUTTER CURLER 

Unique and Convenient 
The easiest way to serve butter. Pull 

directions with each curler. 

Sent, postpaid, for one (1) new subscription. 

Cash price, 75 cents. 



PRINCESS PATTY TINS 

FOR BROWNIES OR 
OTHER SMALL CAKES 

BROWNIES 

i cup of Butter 1 Egf:, well beaten 

i cup of Sugar 1 cup of Flour 

i cup of Molasses 1 cup of Nuts, Pecan 

(dark) or Walnuts 

Mix in the usual manner, but without separat- 
ing the egg. Bake in small, fancy shaped tins. 
Press half a nut meat into the top of each cake. 





LADY FINGER PAN 

Six moulds on a base. Each mould 4^^ 
inches by Ij^ inches. Extra heavy tin. 
Nicely made. Sent postpaid, for two (2) 
new subscriptions. Cash price, $1.50. 




ROTARY ! 
MINCING 
KNIFE 



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etc., and the shield frees the knives from the 
materials being cut. 

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Do You Realize That 

Success in Baking 

Depends Upon The Leavener? 

In reality, if the baking powder is not PURE and PER- 
FECT in its leavening qualities, food will be spoiled in spite 
of skill and care. 

RUMFORD 

THE WHOLESOME BAKING POWDER 

leavens just right. RUMFORD makes the dough of a fine, even texture. 
It brings out in the biscuits, muffins, cakes or dumplings the natural, 
delicious flavor of the ingredients. 

RUMFORD contains the phosphate neces- 
sary to the building of the bodily tissues, so 
essential to children. 





\, 



Many helpful 
su ggestion s 
are contained 
in Janet Mc- 
Kenzie Hill's 
famous book 
"The Rum- 
ford Way of 
Cookery and 
Household 
Economy " — 
sent free. 



\ 



RUMFORD 
COMPANY 

Dept. 19 
Providence, R. I. 



4 







ih 



.^!*^ 




WJEPOUIW 

mm 

Sakino 

?PWDi? 




C-83 J 



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241 



AMERICAN COOKERY 

Vol. XXVI NOVEMBER, 1921 No. 4 

CONTENTS FOR NOVEMBER page 

WINDOWS AND THEIR FITMENTS. IlL 

Mary Ann Wheelwright 251 

THE TINY HOUSE. Ill Ruth Merton 255 

YOU'RE NOT SUPPOSED TO, JIMMIE ... Eva J. De Marsh 258 

SOMEBODY'S CAT Ida R. Fargo 260 

HOMING-IT IN AN APARTMENT .... Ernest L. Thurston 263 

TO EXPRESS PERSONALITY Dana Girrioer 265 

EDITORIALS 270 

SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES (Illustrated with halftone 

engravings of prepared dishes) 

Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 273 

MENUS FOR WEEK IN NOVEMBER 282 

MENUS FOR THANKSGIVING DINNERS 283 

CONCERNING BREAKFASTS Alice E. Whitaker 284 

SOME RECIPES FOR PREPARING POULTRY Kurt Heppe 286 

POLLY'S THANKSGIVING PARTY . . . Ella Shannon Bowles 290 
HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES: — Vegetable Tarts an^l Pies — 

New Ways of Using Milk — Old New England Sweetmeats . . „^. ' 292 

QUERIES AND ANSWERS 295 

THE SILVER LINING , . 310 



$1.50 A YEAR Published Ten Times a Year 15c A Copy (J^ 

Foreign postage 40c additional ^' 

Entered at Boston post-office as second-class matter 
Copyright 1921, by 

THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO. 
Pope Bldg., 221 Columbus Ave., Boston 17, Mass. 

Please Renew on Receipt of Colored Blank Enclosed for that Purpose 





ADVERTISEMENTS 



• f ^-^rif isimxixiii'/; 




"When It rains — it pours 



i 1 . 1 1 '. 5 i 



Discover it for yourself 

n^O READ about the virtues of Morton 
Salt isn't half so pleasant as finding 
them out for yourself 

It certainly gives you a sense of security 
and content to find that Morton s won t 
stick or cake in the package when you 
want it; that it pours in any weather — 
always ready; always convenient. 

Youll like its distinct bracing flavor 
too. Better keep a couple of packages 
always handy. 

MORTON SALT COMPANY, CHICAGO 

''The Salt of the Earth'' 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
243 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



INDEX FOR NOVEMBER 



















PAGE 


Concerning Breakfasts . 




..... . . . 284 


Editorials .... 














270 


Home Ideas and, Economies . 














292 


Homing-It in an Apartment . 














263 


Menus . . . 














. 282, 283 


Polly's Thanksgiving Party . 














290 


Silver Lining, The 














310 


Some Recipes for Preparing Poultry 














286 


Somebody's Cat . 














260 


Ti-ny House, The . 














255 


To Express Personality 














265 


Windows and Their Fitments 














251 


You're not Supposed to, Jimmie 














258 


SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 


Beef, Rib Roast of, with Yorkshire Puc 


1- 


Parsnips, Dry Deviled . . . .278 


ding. Ill 


277 


Pie, Fig-and-Cranberry . 




. 278 


Boudin Blanc .... 


. 281 


Potage Parmentier 




. 273 


Bread, Stirred Brown 


. 280 


Pudding, King's, with Apple Sauce . 




278 


Brother Jonathan .... 


. 275 


Pudding, Thanksgiving . 




277 


Cake, Pyramid Birthday . _ . 


280 


Pudding, Yorkshire 




277 


Cake, Thanksgiving Corn. 111. 


. 277 


Punch, Coffee Fruit 




278 


Chicken, Guinea. III. . 


276 


Puree, Oyster-and-Onion 




274 


Cookies, Pilgrim. 111. .. 


279 


Salad, New England. 111. 




275 


Cucumbers and Tomatoes, Sauteed . 


281 


Salmon a la Creole 




275 


Cutlets, Marinated .... 


276 


Sauce, Aigre-Doux . . 




280 


Fanchonettes, Pumpkin. 111. , 


279 


Sausages, Potato-and-Peanut . 




273 


Frappe, Sweet Cider. 111. 


278 


Steak, Skirt, with Raisin Sauce 




281 


Fruit, Supreme .... 


299 


Stuffing for Roast Turkey 




274 


Garnish for Roast Turkey 


274 


Succotash, Plymouth. 111. 




275 


Jelly, Apple Mint, for Roast Lamb 


276 


Tart, Cranberry, with Cranberry Filling. Ill, 279 


Pancakes, Swedish, with Aigre-Uoux Sauce 


280 


Turkey, Roast. Ill 274 


QUERJ] 


2S AND ANSWERS 


Cake Baking, Temperature for 


298 


Pies, Lemon, Why Watery . . .296 


Chicken, To Roast . . 


295 


Pimientoes, Canned 






300 


Corn and Potatoes, To boil 


295 


Pineapple, Spiced . 








295 


Fish, To broil .... 


298 


Potatoes, Crisp Fried 


* 






296 


Gingerbread, Soft .... 
Ice Cream, Classes of . 


298 
300 


Sauce, Cream 








298 


Icing, Caramel 


295 


Sauce, Tartare 








296 


Pie, Deep-Dish Apple . . 


298 


Table Service, Instructic 


)ns on 






296 



We want representatives e\erywhere to take subscriptions for 
American Cookery. We ha\ c an attractive proposition to make 
those who will canvass, their town; also to those who will secure a 
few names among their friends and acquaintances. Write us today. 

AMERICAN cookery - BOSTON, MASS. 



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ADVERTISEMENTS 



Are You Using this Latest Edition of 
America's Leading Cook Book? 

THE BOSTON COOKING- 
SCHOOL COOK BOOK 

By FANNIE MERRITT FARMER 

In addition to its fund of general information, this latest 
edition contains 2,117 recipes, all of which have been tested 
at Miss Farmer's Boston Cooking School, together with 
additional chapters on the Cold-Pack Method of Canning, 
on the Drying of Fruits and Vegetables, and on Food Values. 
This volume also contains the correct proportions of food, tables of measure- 
ments and weights, time-tables for cooking, menus, hints to young housekeepers. 




(( 



Good Housekeeping^^ Magazine says: 

" 'The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book' is one of the volumes to which good house- 
wives pin their faith on account of its accuracy, its economy, its clear, concise teachings, and 
its vast number of new recipes." 



656 Pages 



122 Illustrations 



$2.50 net 



TABLE SERVICE By Lucy G. Allen 

A clear, concise and yet comprehensive exposition of the waitress' duties. 
Detailed directions on the duties of the waitress, including care of dining room, 
and of the dishes, silver and brass, the removal of stains, directions for laying the 
table, etc. Fully illustrated. $1.75 net 

COOKING FOR TWO By Janet McKenzie Hill 

" 'Cooking for Two' is exactly what it purports to be — a handbook for young 
housekeepers. The bride who reads this book need have no fear of making mis- 
takes, either in ordering or cooking food supplies." — Woman's Home Companion. 

With 150 illustrations. $2.25 net 

JUST PUBLISHED 

FISH COOKERY By Evelene Spencer and John N. Cobb 

This new volume offers six hundred recipes for the preparation of fish, shellfish, 
and other aquatic animals, and there are recipes for fish broiled, baked, fried and 
boiled; for fish stews and chowders, purees and broths and soup stocks; for fish 
pickled and spiced, preserved and potted, made into fricassees, curries, chiopinos, 
fritters and croquettes; served in pies, in salads, scalloped, and in made-over 
dishes. In fact, every thinkable way of serving fish is herein described. $2.00 net 

For Sale at all Booksellers or of the Publishers 
LITTLE, BROWN & COMPANY, 34 BEACON ST., BOSTON 



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Books on Household Economics 



Write for quota- 
One order to us 



2.00 
2.00 
2.25 



THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE COMPANY presents the foUowing as a 
list of representative works on household economies. Any of the books will be sent postpaid 
upon receipt of price. i * u i 

Special rates made to schools, clubs and persons wishmg a number of books, 
tion on the list of books you wish. We carry a very large stock of these books, 
saves effort and express charges. Prices subject to change without notice. 

Course in Household Arts. Duff $1.30 

Dainties. Mrs. Rorer 1.00 

Diet for the Sick. Mrs. Rorer 2.00 

Diet in Relation to Age and Activity. 

Thompson • • 1-00 

Dishes and Beverages of the Old South. 

McCulloch- Williams 1.50 

Domestic Art in Women*8 Education. 

Cooley 1-50 

Domestic Science in Elementary 

Schools. Wilson 1.20 

Domestic Service. Lucy M. Salmon... 2.25 

Dust and Its Dangers. Pruden 1.25 

Easy Entertaining. Benton 1.50 

Economical Cookery. Marion Harris 

Neil ^^ • 2.00 

Elementary Home Economics. Mat- 
thews • 1-40 

Elements of the Theory and Practice of 

Cookery. Williams and Fisher 1.40 

Encyclopaedia of Foods and Beverages. 10.00 
Equipment for Teaching Domestic 

Science. Kinne • -80 

Etiquette of New York Today. Learned 1.60 

Etiquette of Today. Ordway •. • • • ^'^^ 

European and American Cuisine. 

Lemcke 4.00 

Every Day Menu Book. Mrs. Rorer .... 150 
Every Woman's Canning Book. Hughes 90 

Expert Waitress. A. F. Springsteed 1.35 

Feeding the Family. Rose 2.40 

Fireless Cook Book 1 "75 

First Principles of Nursing. Anne R. 

Manning ^-^^ 

Fish Cookery. Spencer and Cobb 2.00 

Food and Cookery for the Sick and Con- 
valescent. Fannie M. Farmer 2.50 

Food and Feeding. Sir Henry Thompson 2.00 

Food and Flavor. Finck 

Foods and Household Management. 

Kinne and Cooley .,• 

Food and Nutrition. ^Bevier and Ushir 

Food Products. Sherman 2.40 

Food and Sanitation. Forester and 

Wigley ^-^^ 

Food and the Principles of Dietetics. 

Hutchinson A ' : " * t*^5 

Food for the Worker. Stern and Spitz. 1.00 
Food for the Invalid and the Convales- 
cent. Gibbs • 75 

Food Materials and Their Adultera- 
tions. Richards 1-00 

Food Study. Wellman 110 

Food Values. Locke 2 00 

Foods and Their Adulterations. Wiley 6.00 
Franco-American Cookery Book. D6Ii6e 5.00 

French Home Cooking. Low 

Fuels of the Household. Marian White 
Furnishing a Modest Home. Daniels 



A Guide to Laundry Work. Chambers. $1.00 
Allen, The, Treatment of Diabetes. 

Hill and Eckman L75 

American Cook Book. Mrs. J. M. Hill 1.50 
American Meat Cutting Charts. Beef, 
veal pork, lamb — 4 charts, mounted on 

cloth and rollers 10-00 

American Salad Book. M. DeLoup. 150 

Around the World Cook Book. Barroll 2.50 
Art and Economy in Home Decorations. 

Priestman ; • , " ^'^^ 

Art of Home Candy-Making (with ther- 
mometer, dipping wire, etc.) 3.75 
Art of Right Living. Richards . . 50 
Bacteria, Yeasts and Molds in the 

Home. H. W. Conn 1.48 

Bee Brand Manual of Cookery 75 

Better Meals for Less Money. Greene 1.35 

Blue Grass Cook Book. Fox 

Book of Entrees. Mrs Janet M. Hill. . . 
Boston Cook Book. Mary J. Lincoln. . 
Boston Cooking-School Cook Book. 

Fannie M. Farmer • • • • . 2.50 

Bread and Bread-Making. Mrs. Rorer. .75 
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247 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

248 

















FRUIT SUPREME 

Fruit Supreme 

Select choice, fresh fruit of all varieties 
obtainable. Slice, using care to remove 
all skins, stones, seeds, membranes, etc.; 
for example, each section of orange must 
be freed from the thin membranous skin 
in which it grows. Chill the prepared 
fruit, arrange in fruit cocktail glasses 
with maraschino syrup. A maraschino 
cherry is placed on the very top of each 
service. 





American Cookery 



VOL. XXVI 



NOVEMBER 



NO. 4 



Windows and Their Fitments 

By Mary Ann Wheelwright 



THROUGH the glamour of the 
Colonial we are forced to ac- 
knowledge the classic charm shown 
in late seventeenth and early eighteenth 
century window designs. Developed, as 
they were, by American carpenters who 
were stimulated by remembrance of their 
early impressions of English architecture 
received in the mother land, there is no 
precise or spiritless copy of English 
details; rather there is expressed a 
vitality that has been brought out by 
earnest effort to reproduce the spirit 
desired. Undoubtedly the lasting suc- 
cess of early American craftsmanship has 
been due to the perfect treatment of 
proportions, as related one to the other. 
That these are not imitations is proved 
by an occasional clumsiness which would 
be impossible, if they were exact copies of 
their more highly refined English pro- 
totypes. 

The grasp of the builder's mind is 
vividly revealed in the construction of 
these windows, for while blunders are 
often made, yet successes are much more 
frequent. They are evolved from remem- 
bered motives that have been unified and 
balanced, that they might accord with 
the exterior and be knitted successfully 
into the interior trim. Some of these 
windows still grace seventeenth century 
houses, and are found not only on old 
southern plantations, but all through New 
England, more especially along the sea 
coast. True products are they of Colonial 
craftsmanship, brought into existence by 
si ;ans, who have performed their 

w erfectly that today they are 

fc npaired, striking a dominant 



note in accord with the architectural 
feeling of the period. 

There is no question but that windows 
such as these lend character to any house, 
provided, of course, that they coincide 
with the period. Doubtless the design- 
ing of modified Colonial houses is respon- 
sible, in part, for the present-day revival 
of interest, not solely in windows of the 
Colonial period, but also in that which 
immediately preceded and followed it. 

The first ornamental windows were of 
the casement type, copied from English 
cottage homes. Like those, they opened 
outward, and were designed with small 
panes, either diamond or square shaped. 
As they were in use long before glass was 
manufactured in this country, the Colon- 
ists were forced to import them direct 




GROUP WINDOWS ON STAIRWAY 



251 



252 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



from England. Many were sent ready to 
be inserted, with panes already leaded in 
place. Proof of this is afforded by 
examples still in existence. These often 
show strange patches or cutting. The 
arrangement of casements varies from 
single windows to groups of two or three, 
and they were occasionally supplemented 
by fixed transoms. Surely no phase of 
window architecture stands out more 
conspicuously in the evolution of our 
early designs than the casement with its 
tiny panes, ornamented with hand- 
wrought iron strap-hinges which either 
flared into arrow heads, rounded into 
knobs, or lengthened into points. That 
they were very popular is shown from the 
fact that they withstood the changes of 
fashion for over a century, not being 
abolished until about the year 1700. 

Little drapery is needed in casement 
windows where they are divided by 



muUions. The English draw curtain is 
admirable for this purpose. It can be 
made of casement cloth with narrow side 
curtains and valance of bright material. 
A charming combination was worked out 
in a summer cottage. The glass curtains 
were of black and white voile with tiny 
figures introduced. This was trimmed 
with a narrow black and white fringe, 
while the overdrapery had a black back- 
ground patterned with old rose. 

In the field of architectural progress, 
more especially during the last few years, 
there have arisen vast possibilities for 
the development of odd windows. These, 
if properly placed, showing correct group- 
ing, are artistic, not only from the out- 
side, but from the inside as well. The 
artistic woman, realizing the value of 
color, will fill a bright china bowl with 
glowing blossoms and place it in the 
center of a wide window sill, where the 




GROUPED WINDOWS WITH SQUARE PANES, LACE GLASS CURTAINS 
AND CRETONNE OVER CURTAINS 



WINDOWS AND THEIR FITMENTS 



253 




FOR FRENCH DOORS, USE MUSLIN WITH SILK-LINED OVERHANG 



sun, playing across them, will carry their 
cheerful color throughout the room. 
She also trains vines to meander over the 
window pane, working out a delicate 
tracery that is most effective, suspending 
baskets of ferns from the upper casement, 
that she may break the length of her 
Colonial window. Thus through many 
artifices she causes her simple room to 
bloom and blossom like a rose. 

The progress made in window archi- 
tecture is more apparent as we study the 
early types. Then small attention was 
paid to details, the windows placed with 
little thought of artistic grouping. Their ' 
only object to light the room, often they 
stood like soldiers on parade, in a straight 
row, Hning the front of the house. 

Out of the past has come a vast array 
of period windows, each one of which is 
of interest. They display an unmistak- 
able relationship to one another, for 
while we acknowledge that they differ in 
detail and ornamentation, yet do they 
invariably show in their conception some 
underlying unity. There is no more 



fascinating study than to take each one 
separately and carefully analyze its every 
detail, for thus only can we recognize and 
appreciate the links which connect them 
with the early American types. 

We happen upon them not only in the 
modified Colonial structures, but in 
houses in every period of architecture. 
It may be only a fragment, possibly a 
choice bit of carving; or it may be a 
window composed in the old-fashioned 
manner of from nine to thirty panes, 
introduced in Colonial days for the sake 
of avoiding the glass tax levied upon them 
if over a certain size. A charming exam- 
ple of a reproduction of one of these 
thirty-paned windows may be seen in a 
rough plaster house built in Salem, after 
the great fire. The suggestion was taken 
from an old historic house in a fine state 
of preservation in Boxford, Mass. 

The first American homes derived their 
plans and their finish from medieval 
English tradition. They were forced to 
utilize such materials as they were able 
to obtain, and step by step they bettered 



254 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



the construction and ornamentation of 
their homes. As increasing means and 
added material allowed, they planned and 
executed more elaborately, not only in 
size and finish, but in the adding of 
window casings, caps, and shutters. 

The acme of Colonial architecture was 
reached with the development of the 
large square houses with exquisitely 
designed entrances and porticos. These 
often showed recessed and arched win- 
dows, also those of the Palladian type. 
At the Lindens, Danvers, Mass., a 
memory-haunted mansion, may be seen 
one of the finest examples of these 
recessed windows. This famous dwell- 
ing, the work of an English architect, who 
built it in about 1770, is linked with 
American history through its use by 
General Gage as his headquarters during 
the Revolution. 

The recessed windows that are found 
here reveal delicate mouldings in the 



classic bead and filet design, and are 
surmounted by an elaborate moulded 
cornice, which lends great dignity to the 
room. This is supported by delicate 
pilasters and balanced by the swelling 
base shown below the window seats. 
Such a window as this is no mere incident, 
or cut in the wall; on the contrary, it is 
structural treatment of woodwork. An- 
other feature of pronounced interest may 
be noted on the stair landing, where a 
charming Palladian window overlooks 
the old-fashioned box-bordered garden 
that has been laid out at the rear. 

We have dwelt, perhaps, too much on 
the old Colonial types, neglecting those 
of the present day, but it has been through 
a feeling that with an intimate knowledge 
of their designs we shall be better able to 
appreciate the products of our own age, 
whose creators drew their inspiration 
from the past. A modern treatment of 
windows appears in our illustration. 








m 
IIP 

litiillRi 

iiiiV'{!riPi'n'!D 

mm 





75 BEACON STREET, BOSTON 




THATCHED-STYLE COTTAGE FOR AMERICAN SUBURBS 

The Tiny House 

By Ruth Merton 

{Concluded from October) 



IF, some fine day, all housewives awoke 
to the fact that most of the trouble 
in the world originates in the kitchen, 
there would shortly be a little more inter- 
est in kitchen problems and not so much 
distaste for and neglect of this im- 
portant part of the house. 

Of course, women will cry out that we 
have never in our lives been so intent on 
just that one subject, kitchens, as we are 
today. 

I admit that there is a good deal of 
talk going on which might lead one to 
believe that vacuum cleaners and electric- 
washing machines, etc., are to bring about 
the millenium for housekeepers; and 
there is also a good work going forward to 
make of housework a real profession. 

But, until in the average home there 
comes the feeling that the kitchen — • the 
room itself — is just as much an expres- 
sion of the family life and aims and ideals 



as the living room or any other room, we 
shall be only beating about the bush in 
our endeavor to find a remedy for some of 
our perplexing troubles. 

Nowadays, women who are doing 
much work out in the big world — • the 
so-called "enfranchised" women — are 
many of them proving that they find 
housework no detriment to their careers 
and some even admit that they enjoy it. 

But so far most of them have standard- 
ized their work and systematized it, with 
the mere idea of doing what they have to 
do "efficiently" and well, with the least 
expenditure of time and energy. And 
they have more than succeeded in proving 
the "drudgery" plea unfounded. 

Now, however, we need something 
more. We need to make housework 
attractive; in other words, to put charm 
in the kitchen. 

There is one very simple way of doing 
255 



256 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



this, that is to make kitchens good to 
look at, and inviting as a place to stay 
and work. 

For the professional, scientifically in- 
clined houseworker, the most beautiful 
kitchen may be the white porcelain one, 
with cold, snowy cleanliness suggesting 
sterilized utensils and carefully measured 
food calories. 

But to the woman whose cooking and 
dishwashing are just more or less pleasant 
incidents in a pleasant round of home and 
social duties, the kitchen must suggest 
another kind of beauty — • not neces- 
sarily a beauty which harbors germs, nor 
makes the work less conveniently done, 
but a beauty of kindly associations with 
furniture and arrangements. 

Who could grow fond of a white-tiled 
floor or a porcelain sink as they exist in 
so many modern kitchens! And as for 
the bulgy and top-heavy cook stoves, 
badly proportioned refrigerators, and 
kitchen cabinets — well, we should have 
to like cooking very well indeed before 
we could feel any pleasure in the mere 
presence of these necessary but unneces- 
sarily ugly accompaniments to our work. 



We have come to think of cleanliness 
as not only next to godliness, but as 
something which takes the place of 
beauty — is beauty. 

This attitude is laziness on our part, for 
we need sacrifice nothing to utility and 
convenience.; yet may still contrive our 
kitchen furniture so that it, also, pleases 
the senses. With a little conscientious 
reflection on the subject we may make 
kitchens which have all the charm of the 
old, combined with all the convenience of 
the new; and woman will have found a 
place to reconcile her old and new selves, 
the housewife and the suffragist, the 
mother-by-the-fireside and the partici- 
pator in public affairs. The family will 
have found a new-old place of reunion — 
the kitchen! 

Granted then that our tiny house has a 
kitchen-with-charm, and an "other 
room," the rest of the available space 
may be divided into the requisite number 
of bed and living rooms, according to the 
needs of the family. 

There is only one other very important 
thing to look out for; that is the matter 
of closets. There is no rule for the 




KITCHEN FOR THATCHED-STYLE COTTAGE 



THE TINY HOUSE 



257 



number of closets which will make the 
tiny house livable, but I should say, the 
more the merrier. If there is ever ques- 
tion of sacrificing a small room and gain- 
ing a large closet, by all means do it, 
for absolute neatness is the saving grace 
of small quarters, and storage places are 
essential, if one does not wish to live in a 
vortex of yesterday's and tomorrow's 
affairs with no room to concentrate on the 
present. 

Inside and outside the tiny house must 
conform to one law — ■ elimination of non- 
essentials; and the person who has a 
clear idea of his individual needs and has 
also the strength of will to limit his needs 
to his circumstances, will find in his tiny 
house a satisfaction more than compen- 
sating for any sacrifices he may have 
made. 



No one doubts that it is a sacrifice to 

give up a lesser pleasure even to gain the 

"summum bonum" and that it does take 

will power to keep oneself from weakly 

saying in the face of temptation, "Oh, 

well! what does it matter! My little 

house would perhaps be better without 

that, but I have grown accustomed to it, 

let it stay!" 

Such weakness is fatal in a tiny house. 
But how much more fatal in a tiny garden! 

Oh! the waste lands which lie beneath 
the sun trying to call themselves gardens! 
Oh! the pitiful little plots, unfenced, 
unused, entirely misunderstood by people 
who stick houses in the middle of them 
and call them "gardens"! 

No amount of good grass seed, or 
expensive planting, or well-cared-for flow- 
{Continued on page 28 g) 



Li ■■ if ^ /■ PU 




i 



FIRST-FLOOR PLAN OF THATCHED COTTAGE 



''You're Not Supposed To, Jimmie'' 

By Eva J. DeMarsh 



H 



"UH!" exclaimed Jennie, "there 
comes Aunt Rachel! Wonder 
what she wants now? Last 
time it was — no, it wasn't — • that was 
the time when Jimmie Upson and his 
wife were here. How scandalized Aunt 
Rachel looked! Said I'd ruin my hus- 
band, and a lot of such tommyrot. As 
though Jimmie and I couldn't afford a 
spread now and then! I didn't, and I 
won't, tell Aunt Rachel that it was a 
special party and a special occasion. 
Of course, I know Jimmie isn't a million- 
aire, but — it's none of Aunt Rachel's 
business, so there!" she finished defiantly. 

Aunt Rachel plodded blissfully up the 
walk. "Jennie'll be glad to see me, I 
know," she mused. "She's high-headed, 
but she knows a good thing when she 
sees it, and I help her a lot." 

Jennie received her aunt with cor- 
diality, but not effusiveness. To be 
discourteous was something she could not 
be. Besides, she liked Aunt Rachel and 
pitied her idiosyncrasies. "Why can't 
she be as nice when she goes to people's 
houses as she is when she is at home.?" 
she mused. "I love to go there, and 
everything is just perfect, but the minute 
she steps outside the door — well, we all 
know Aunt Rachel! And she doesn't go 
home early either. Jimmie'U be furious. 
She always calls him 'James' and asks 
after his health and — • and everything. 
I do so want him to like her, but I'm 
afraid he never will. I do wish I could 
get her interested in something. I have 
it!" she exclaimed triumphantly. "The 
very thing!" 

Aunt Rachel looked up in surprise. 
"What's the matter, Jennie?" she in- 
quired. 

"Oh, nothing much, Auntie! I was 
just thinking aloud." 

"Don't!" said Aunt Rachel. "It's a 

258 



bad habit, Jennie — though I do do it 
myself, sometimes." 

"Sometimes!" Jennie turned away to 
hide her smile. Why, Aunt Rachel made 
a business of talking aloud! 

As luck would have it, the dinner went 
off to Aunt Rachel's satisfaction. It was 
good, but conservative. 

"Jennie is learning," thought the old 
lady to herself. "After I've been here a 
few times more, she'll get along all 
right." 

Aunt Rachel hadn't noticed that every 
idea Jennie has used was, strictly, either 
Jennie's own or her mother's. 

"How long does your aunt expect to 
stay?" asked Jimmie, casually, while 
Jennie was clearing the table. Aunt 
Rachel was in the kitchen. She prided 
herself on never being "a burden on any 
one." Doubtless, some of her friends 
would have preferred that she be. Most 
of us have a skeleton we do not wish to 
keep on exhibition. 

"Oh, I don't know, maybe a week or 
two," said Jennie, mischievously. "She 
hasn't told me yet." 

"Oh!" replied Jimmie, in a disap- 
pointed voice. "Business down town"? 
"Dinner at the Club"? No, he couldn't 
keep that up indefinitely. Besides, what 
did a man want of a Ifome, if he wasn't 
going to live^ in it? Covertly, Jennie 
watched him. She knew every expres- 
sion of his face. It amused her, but she 
was sorry, too. "Jimmie wants awfully 
to flunk — and dassent," was her mental 
comment. j 

"Anything on for this evening, Jimmie ?" 
inquired Jennie, sweetly, too sweetly, 
Jimmie thought. He had heard those 
dulcet tones before, 

"Yes — ■ no !" stammered Jimmie. How 
he wished he had! However, as Jennie 
said no more, he dismissed the subject 



YOU'RE NOT SUPPOSED TO, JIMMIE 



259 



from his mind. She probably didn't 
really mean anything, anyway. 

When James Atherton reached home 
that evening, he found the house lighted 
from top to bottom. Beautifully dressed 
women were everywhere, and in their 
midst — ^Aunt Rachel, at her best! 

"Ladies," she exclaimed, and Jimmie 
paused to listen, "I am honored — ■ more 
so than you can guess — at the distinc- 
tion conferred upon me. This afternoon 
you have seen fit to make me one of your 
leaders in a most important movement 
for civic betterment — ■ an honor never 
before accorded a woman in this city -^ 
and I need not assure you that you shall 
not regret your choice. As a member of 
the Civic Betterment Committee of 
London ,1 shall do my duty." ("I bet 
she will!" commented Jimmie, sotto 
voce.) "Again I thank you!" went on 
Aunt Rachel. "There's a work for you 
and for me now to do, and — ^" she 
paused impressively, "we will do it." 
("I'll bet on you ^yqtj time. Auntie," 
commented Jimmie to himself.) 

"Jimmie Atherton, what in the world 
are you doing .f^" whispered an exasper- 
ated voice. "Hurry, Jimmie, hurry — 
do!" urged Jennie. "Dinner is almost 
ready to serve, and you haven't even 
made the first move to dress. Hurry, 
Jimmie, please!" And Jimmie did. He 
fairly sprinted into his clothes, appearing 
presently fully clad and good to look 
upon. 

"Bet you a nickel Jennie couldn't have 
done that," he reflected, complacently. 
"Women never can get a move on them, 
where clothes are concerned." 

That was the best evening Aunt Rachel 
had ever spent. She was the center of 
attraction; she had found a mission — 
not a desultory one, but one far-reaching 
in scope, so it seemed to her; and like a 
war-horse, she was after the charge. 

Jennie's plans went through without a 
hitch. Aunt Rachel became, not only a 
member of the Committee on Civic 
Betterment, but, as well, its head and, 
in due season, mayor of the little city 



itself. Under her active management, 
Loudon became noted as a model city of 
its size, one good to look upon and good 
to live in. Crime fled, or scurried to 
cover, and Aunt Rachel blossomed like a 
rose. One day when Jimmie came home 
something seemed to please him greatly. 

"What do you think, Jennie," he said, 
"Aunt Rachel is going to be married! 
Yes, she is! I've got it on the best of 
authority — the groom himself." 

"Who .^" gasped Jennie. "Why, Jimmie, 
she just HATES men! She's always 
said they were only a necessary evil." 

"Yes, I know," smiled Jimmie, "that's 
what she used to say, but she'd never met 
Jacob Crowder then." 

"Jacob Crowder!" exclaimed Jennie. 
"Why, Jimmie, he's as rich as Croesus, 
and he's always hated women as much as 
Aunt Rachel has hated men!" 

"Yes," said Jimmie, "but that was 
before he met Aunt Rachel. He has 
been her righthand man for some time 
now, and they've seemed to hit it ofl 
pretty well. Guess they'll get along all 
right in double harness." 

"When the girls and I steered Aunt 
Rachel into politics," said Jennie, "little 
we thought where it would all end. I'm 
glad, glad, though! Aunt Rachel is 
really splendid, but I've always thought 
she was suffering from something. Now 
I know what — • it's ingrowing ambition. 
She will have all she can do now to take 
care of her own home and we won't see 
her so often." 

"Oh, ho! So that's it.?" smiled Jimmie. 
"Well, you girls, as has happened to 
many another would-be plotter before 
now, have found things have gotten 
rather out of your hands; haven't you.?" 

Jennie shrugged her shoulders. 

"We can have the wedding here, can't 
we, Jimmie.?" she asked, somewhat 
wistfully. 

Jimmie wondered if she had heard him. 
Perhaps — and then again, perhaps not. 

"I don't see where we come in on it," 
he remarked. "It's a church affair, you 
know." 



260 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



"Oh!" said Jennie. "But there'll be a 
reception, of course, and if she'll let us 
have it here, I'll have every one of us girls 
she has helped so much in the past." 

Jimmie stared., "Consistency — " he 
muttered. 



"What's that you said, Jimmie.? Are 
you ill.?" inquired Jennie, anxiously. 

"No!" replied Jimmie, "it's you women! 
I can't understand you at all!" 

"You're not supposed to, Jimmie, 
dear," answered Jennie sweetly. 



Somebody's Cat 

By Ida R. Fargo 



I NEVER thought I should come to 
like cats. But I have. Perhaps it 
is because, as my Aunt Amanda used 
to say, we change every seven years, sort 
of start over again, as it were; and find 
we have new thoughts, different ideas, 
unexpected tastes, strange attractions, 
and shifting doubts. Or, it may be, we 
merely come to a new milestone from 
which, looking back, we are able to regard 
our own personality from a hitherto 
unknown angle. We discover ourselves 
anew, and delight in the experiment. 

Or, it may all be, as my husband 
stolidly affirms, just the logical result of 
meeting Sir Christopher Columbus, a 
carnivorous quadruped of the family 
Felidce^ much domesticated, in this case, 
white with markings as black and shiny 
as a crow's wing, so named because he 
voyaged about our village, not in search 
of a new world, but in search of a new 
home. He came to us. It is flattering 
to be chosen. He stayed. But who 
could resist Sir Christopher.? 

My husband and my Aunt Amanda 
may both be right. I strongly suspect 
they are. I also strongly suspect that 
Sir Christopher himself has much to do 
with my change of mental attitude: 
He is well-mannered, good to look upon, 
quite adorable, independent and patient. 
(Indeed, if people were half as patient 
as my cat this would be a different world 
to live in.) More: He has taught me 
many things, he talks without making 
too much noise; in fact, I have read 
whole sermons in his soft purrings. A\id 



I verily believe that many people might 
learn much from the family cat, except 
for the fact that we humans are such poor 
translators. We know only our own 
language. More's the pity. 

Had I known Sir Christopher as a 
kitten, doubtless he might have added 
still more to my education. But I did 
not. He was quite full grown when I 
first laid my eyes upon him. He was 
sitting in the sun, on top of a rail fence, 
blinking at me consideringly. The fence 
skirted a little trail that led from my 
back yard down to Calapooia Creek. It 
seemed trying to push back a fringe of 
scrubby underbrush which ran down a 
hillside; a fringe which was, in truth, 
but a feeler from the great forest of 
Douglas fir which one saw marching, file 
upon file, row upon row, back and back 
to the snows of the high Cascades. 

And the white of Sir Christopher's vest 
and snowy gauntlets was just as gleam- 
ingly clean as the icy frosting over the 
hills. Sir Christopher, * even a cat, be- 
lieved firmly in sartorial pulchritude. 
I admired him for that, even from the 
first glance; and, afterward, I put me 
up three new mirrors: I did not mean to 
be outdone by my cat, I intended to look 
tidy every minute, and there is nothing 
like mirrors to tell the truth. Credit for 
the initial impulse, however, belongs to 
Christopher C. 

But that first morning, I merely 
glanced at him, sitting so comfortably on 
the top rail of the fence, blinking in the 
sun. 



SOMEBODY'S CAT 



261 



"Somebody's cat," said I, and went on 
down to the creek to see if Curlylocks 
had tumbled in. 

Coming back, the cat was still there. 
Doubtless he had taken a nap between 
times. But he might have been carved 
of stone, so still he lay, till my youngest, 
tugging at my hand, coaxed: 

"Kitty — • kitty — kitty. Muvver, see 
my 'ittle kitty.?" 

And I declare, if Sir Christopher (my 
husband and ten-year-old Ted named 
him that very evening) didn't look at me 
and wink. Then he jumped down and 
followed, very dignified, very discreet. 

I attemipted to shoo him back. But 
he wouldn't shoo. He merely stopped 
and seemed to consider matters. Or 
serenely remained far enough off to "play 
safe." 

Meanwhile, my youngest continued to 
reiterate : "Kitty — kitty — • kitty ! My 
'ittle kitty!" 

"No, Curlylocks," said I, "it isn't your 
little kitty. It is somebody's cat." 

Which merely shows that I knew not 
whereof I spoke. Sir Christopher pro- 
ceeded to teach me. 

Of course, at first I thought his stay 
with us was merely a temporary matter; 
like some folk, he had decided to go on a 
visit and stay over night. But when Sir 
Christopher continued to tarry, I en- 
quired, I looked about, I advertised — 
and I assured the children that some one, 
somewhere, must surely be mourning the 
loss of a precious pet; some one, some- 
time, would come to claim him. 

But no one came. 

Days slid away, weeks slipped into 
months, winter walked our way, and 
spring, and summer again. Sir Chris- 
topher C. had deliberately adopted us, 
for he made no move toward finding 
another abiding place. He was no longer 
Somebody's cat, he was our cat; for, 
indeed, is not possession nine points of 
the law.? 

Then one day when heat shimmered 
over the valley, when the dandelions had 
seeded and the thistles had bloomed. 



when the corn stood heavy and the 
cricket tuned his evening fiddle, when 
spots in the lawn turned brown, where 
the sprinkler missed, when the baby 
waked and fretted, and swearing, sweat- 
ing men turned to the west and won- 
dered what had held up the sea breeze — 
Sir Christopher missed his supper. He 
vanished as completely as if he had been 
kidnapped by the Air Patrol. Three 
weeks went by and we gave him up for 
lost, although the children still prowled 
about looking over strange premises, 
peeping through back gates, trailing 
down unaccustomed lanes and along 
Calapooia Creek, for "We might find 
him," they insisted. Truly, "Hope 
springs eternal." 

"Perhaps, he has gone back where he 
came from," said Daddy. "Perhaps, he 
has grown tired of us." 

But My Man's voice was a little too 
matter-of-factly gruff — indeed, he had 
grown very fond of Sir Christopher — 
and as for the children, they would 
accept no such explanation. 

It was Curlylocks who found Sir 
Christopher — • or did Sir Chris find 
Curlylocks.? Anyway, they came walk- 
ing through the gate, my youngest 
declaiming, "Kitty — kitty — kitty! 
My 'ittle kitty!" 

And since that time, every summer, 
Sir Christopher takes a vacation. He 
comes back so sleek and proud and happy 
that he can hardly contain himself. He 
rubs against each of us in turn, purring 
the most satisfied purr — • if we could but 
fully understand the dialect he speaks! — 
as if he would impart to us something 
truly important. 

"I declare," said Daddy, one day, "I 
believe that cat goes up in the hills and 
hunts." 

"Camps out and has a good time," 
added daughter. 

"And fishes," suggested Ted. "Cats 
do catch fish. Sometimes. I've read 
about it." 

Daddy nodded. "Seems to agree with 
him, whatever he does." 



262 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



"Vacations agree with anybody," as- 
serted my oldest. And then, "I don't 
see why we can't go along with Sir Chris. 
At least we might go the same time he 
does." 

"Mother, couldn't we.^" — ^ it was a 
question that gathered weight and mo- 
mentum like a snowball rolling down 
hill, for I had always insisted that, with 
a big family like mine, I could never 
bother to go camping. I wanted to be 
where things were handy: running water 
from a faucet, bathtubs and gas and 
linoleum, a smoothly cut lawn and a 
morning postman. Go camping with a 
family like mine.? Never. 

But the thought once set going would 
not down. Perhaps, after all, Sir Chris- 
topher was right and I was wrong. For 
people did go camping, most people, even 
groups to the number of nine (the right 
count for our family), and they seemed to 
enjoy it. They fought with mosquitoes, 
and fell into creeks; they were blotched 
with poison oak, black from exposure, 
lame from undue exercise, and looked 
worse than vagrant gipsies — but they 
came home happy. Even those who 
spent days in bed to rest up from their 
rest (I have known such) seemed happy. 
And every one sighs and says, "We had 
such a good time! We're planning to go 
back again next summer." 

So at last I gave up — or gave in. We 
went to the mountains, following up the 
trail along Calapooia Creek; we camped 
and hunted and fished to the hearts' 
content. We learned to cook hotcakes 
out-of-doors, and how to make sourdough 
biscuit, and to frizzle bacon before a bon- 
fire, and to bake ham in a bread pan, such 
as our mothers fitted five loaves of bread 
in; we learned to love hash, and like 
potatoes boiled in their jackets, and 
coffee with the cream left out. We went 
three miles to borrow a match; we divided 
salt with the stranger who had forgotten 
his; we learned that fish is good on other 
days than Friday and that trout crisps 
beautifully in bacon grease; we found 
eleventeen uses for empty lard pails and 



discovered the difference between an owl 
and a tree toad. We gained a speaking 
acquaintance with the Great Dipper, and 
learned where to look for the north star, 
why fires must be put out and what chip- 
munks do for a living. We learned — 

Last night we came home. 

"Now, mother, aren't you really glad 
you went.?" quizzed Daddy. 

"Yes-s," said L slowly, "I'm glad I 
went. It has been a new experience. I 
feel like I'd gained a degree at the State 
University." 

My understanding mate merely chuck- 
led — ■ and went on unpacking the tin- 
ware. But Ted spoke up: 

"Gee! Bet I make good in English III 
this year. Got all sorts of ideas for 
themes. This trip's been bully." 

"We'll go again, won't we, Mother.?" 
asked my oldest. 

"I think we'll always go again," 
answered I — some sober thinking I was 
doing, as I folded away the blankets. 

"Let me get supper" — • it was Laura, 
my middle girl, speaking — "surely I can 
cook on gas, if I can over a campfire." 
And Laura had never wanted to cook! 
Strange tendencies develop when one 
lives out in the open a space of time. 

But Curlylocks was undisturbed. 
"Kitty — • kitty — kitty! My 'ittle 
kitty!" he reiterated. And truly, so my 
neighbor told me. Sir Christopher had 
beat us home by a scant twenty-four 
hours. He rubbed about us in turns, 
happily purring. 

"He's telling us all what a good time he 
had," said I, understanding at last, "but 
he is adding, I think, that the best part 
of going away is getting home again." 

"But if we didn't go we couldn't get 
home again," said Somebody. 

And somebody's cat purred his ap- 
proval. Perhaps, after all, he finds us a 
teachable family. Or perlfaps he knows 
that once caught by the lure of the hills, 
once having tasted the tang of moun- 
tainous ozone, we will always go back — 
he has rare intuitions, has Sir Christopher. 
For, already, I find myself figuring to 



i 



HOMING-IT IN AN APARTMENT 



263 



fashion a detachable long handle for the 
frying pan: Yes, next time, we shall plan 
to conserve both fingers and face. Next 
time! That is the beauty of vacation 
days: We think of them when the frost 
comes, when the snow drifts deep, when 



the arbutus blooms again — ■ and we plan, 
plan, plan! And are very happy — ■ 
because of memory, and anticipation. 
We have opened barred windows, and 
widened our life's horizon. Does Sir 
Christopher guess. ^ Wise old Sir Chris! 



Homing-It in an Apartment 

By Ernest L. Thurston 



THERE were four of them — all 
girls employed in great offices. 
Alone, far away from their home 
towns and families, they were all suffer- 
ing from attacks of too-much-boarding- 
house. Each was longing for a real, 
hom.e-y place to live in. And out of that 
longing was born, in time, an idea, which 
developed, after much planning, figuring 
and price-getting, into a concrete plan 
and a course of action. They were good 
friends, of congenial tastes, and so they 
decided to "home-it" together. 

Now this is nothing new, in itself. It 
was the thorough way they went about it 
that was not so common. They applied 
the rules of their business life, and 
studied their proposed path before they 
set foot in it. They looked over the field, 
weighed the problems, decided what they 
could do, and then arranged to put them- 
selves on a sound financial basis from the 
start. 

All had occupied separate rooms in 
sundry boarding houses. Each had ex- 
perience in "meals in" and "meals out." 
Each could analyze fairly accurately her 
expenses for the preceding six months. 
After study, they decided that, without 
increasing their combined expense, they 
could have comfortable quarters of their 
own and more than meet all their needs. 
"Freedom, food, furniture, fixing and 
jriends^^ said Margaret, "without the 
boarding house flavor." 

They longed for a little house and 
garden of their own. But they were busy 
people, and this would mean extra hours 



of care and labor, more demands on their 
strength, and a longer travel distance — 
a load they felt they could not carry. 
So they sought an apartment. 

The search was long but they found it. 
It was in a small structure, on a quiet 
street, and several flights up, without 
elevator. But, as Peggy said, "Elevators 
have not been in style in our boarding 
houses, and flights of stairs have — so 
what matters it.^" The suite, when you 
arrived up there, was airy and comfort- 
able. It provided two bedrooms, a 
cheery living room, a dining room and a 
kitchenette. Clarice remarked, "The 
'ette' is so small we can save steps by 
being within hand's reach of everything, 
no matter where we stand." 

The rent was less than the combined 
rental of their four old rooms. Heat and 
janitor service were provided without 
charge, but they were obliged to meet the 
expense of gas for the range and of 
electric lights. 

They might have lived along happily 
in their new nest without a budget, and 
without specific agreements as to expense. 
But they were business girls. So they 
sat right down and decided every point, 
modifying each, under trial, to a work- 
able proposition. Then they stuck to it 
and made it work. 

There was the matter of furnishing. 
Each partner, while retaining personal 
title to her property, contributed to 
general use such articles of furniture she 
possessed as met. apartment needs. From 
one, for example, came a comfortable 



264 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



bed, from another, chairs and a reading 
lamp, from a third a lounge chair, and 
from the fourth her piano and couch. 
Of small rugs, sofa pillows, pictures and 
miscellaneous small furnishings there 
were sufficient to make possible a real 
selection. 

Then the four determined on further 
absolute essentials to make the rooms 
homelike. There were needed comfort- 
able single beds for each, dressing tables, 
bed linen, dining-room equipment, 
kitchen ware, a chair or two, and drap- 
eries. Their decisions were made in 
committee-of-the-whole, and nothing was 
done that could not meet with the willing 
consent of all. 

To meet the first cost they each con- 
tributed fifty dollars from their small 
savings, and assessed themselves a dollar 
and a quarter per week thereafter. They 
then bought their equipment, paying 
part cash and arranging for the bal- 
ance on time. And be sure it was fun 
getting it! 

Then there was the question of meals. 
It was determined to prepare their 
breakfasts and dinners and to put up 
lunches. To allow a certain freedom, it 
was agreed that each should pack her own 
lunch, and that regular meals should be 
cooked and served, turn and turn about, 
each partner acting for a week. A second 
member washed the dishes and took 
general care of the apartment. Thus a 
girl's general program reduced to. 

First week Cooking 

Second week Free 

Third week Dishes, etc. 

Fourth week Free 

Fifth week Cooking 

Etc. 
During an experimental period, the 
cost of provisions and ice was summed up 
weekly and paid by equal assessment. 
Later a fixed assessment of seven dollars, 
each, was agreed to, and proved sufficient. 
There were even slight surpluses to go 
into the mannikin jar on the living room 
mantel, which Clarice called the "Do 
Drop Inn", because it provided from its 



contents refreshment for those who 
dropped in of an evening. 

Naturally there was a friendly rivalry, 
not only in making the most of the allot- 
ment, but in providing attractive meals 
and dainty special dishes. Clarice's 
stuffed tomatoes won deserved fame, 
and Margaret made a reputation on 
cheese souffle. Peggy, too, was a wizard 
with the chafing dish. 

Consideration was given the matter of 
special guests, either for meals, or for 
over-night. The couch in the living 
room provided em.ergency sleeping quar- 
ters. As for meals, separate fixed rates 
were set for breakfasts and for dinners. 
This was paid into the regular weekly 
provision fund by the girl who brought 
the guest, or by all four equally, if she 
were a "general" guest. The girl who 
brought a guest also "pitched in" and 
helped with the work. 

Whenever the group went out for a 
meal, as they did now and then for a 
change, or for amusement, or recreation, 
each girl paid her own share at once. 

Finally, there was the factor of laundry. 
After a little experimenting, household 
linen was worked out on an "average" 
basis, so that a regular amount could be 
assessed each week. Of course each girl 
met the expense of her own private 
laundry. 

As a result of this planning, each 
member of the household found herself 
obligated to meet a weekly assessment 
containing the following items: Rent, 
furniture tax, household laundry, extras 
(31.00) and personal laundry. Of these, 
the only item not positively fixed, as to 
amount, was the last. Each girl, natur- 
ally, paid all her strictly private expense, 
including clothes, and medical and dental 
service. 

One of the number was chosen treas- 
urer for a three-months' term, and was 
then, in turn, succeeded by another, so 
that each of the four served once a year. 
The treasurer received all assessments, 
gave the weekly allotment to the house- 
wife, and paid other bills. Minor defi- 



TO EXPRESS PERSONALITY 



265 



ciencies were met from "surplus." More- 
over, she kept accurate accounts. 

Once settled comfortably in their 
quarters, with boarding-house memories 
receding into the background, it took but 
little time for a happy, home-y atmos- 
phere to develop. Of course, with closer 



intimacy, there were temperamental ad- 
justments, as always, but they came 
easily. The household machinery ran 
smoothly, almost from the first, because 
there was a machine, properly set up, 
operated and adjusted — rather than an 
uncertain makeshift. 



To Express Personality 

By Dana Girrioer 



K 



EEP house.?' I should say not!" 
answered Anne, who had jour- 
neyed out into the suburbs to 
"tell" her engagement to Burt Win- 
chester to the home folks before she 
"announced" it. "I'm going to retire to 
the Kensington, or some nice apartment 
hotel, at the ripe old age of twenty-four. 
What'd you think, we're back in the dark 
ages, B. F..?" 

" 'B. F.'.?" repeated Aunt Milly. 

"Before Ford," said Anne, laughing. 
"Oh, it was the thing for you. Auntie, 
you couldn't have brought up your own 
big familj^ in a city apartment, to say 
nothing of stretching your wings to cover 
Little Orphant Annie, besides, everybody 
kept house when you were married!" 

"And now nobody does, except a few 
Ancient Mariners .?" inquired Cousin Dan. 

Anne blushed. "Of course it suits 
some people, now," she amended, hastily. 
"Perhaps it's all right to keep house, if 
you have a big family, or lots of money 
and can hire all the fussing don-e." 

"You don't need to hire fussing, if 
you've a big family," said Aunt Milly, 
her eyes twinkling behind the gold-bowed 
spectacles. "You'll keep on with the 
drawing — illustrating.?" 

"Surely," answered Anne. "Burt will 
keep right on being a lawyer." 

"I see," said George. "Well, Queen 
Anne, I suppose when we want to visit 
you we can hire a room in the same block, 
I mean, hotel. I thought, perhaps, hav- 
ing so far conformed to the habits of us 



Philistines as to take a husband, you 
might go the whole figure and take a 
house!" 

"Please!" begged Anne. In that tone, 
it was a catchword dating back to nursery 
days which the elf-like Anne had shared 
with a whole brood of sturdy cousins, and 
meant, "Please stop fooling; I want to be 
taken seriously." 

"I love to draw — but my people don't 
look alive, somehow," said little Milly, 
wistfully. 

Cried Anne: "Keep trying, Milly; 
there is nothing so lovely as to have even 
a taste for some sort of creative work, and 
to develop it; to express your own per- 
sonality in something tangible, and to be 
encouraged to do so. Do understand me. 
Auntie and the rest; it isn't that I want 
to shirk, but I do want to specialize on 
what I do best! I'll wash dishes if it's 
ever necessary, but why must I wish a 
whole pantry on myself when either Burt 
or I could pay our proportionate share of 
a hotel dish-washer, or butler, or what- 
ever is needed.?" 

At the studio it was much easier. 

"Some time in the early fall," Anne 
told her callers, who arrived by two's, 
three's and four's, as the news began to 
circulate among her friends. 

"No, I won't keep this," with a jerk of 
her thumb towards the big, bare room 
which had been hers since she left Aunt 
Milly and the little home town. "There's 
a room at the top of the Kensington I can 
have, with a light as good as this, and 



266 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



that settles the last problem. I'd hate 
to have to go outdoors for meals, when 
I'm working." 

"Nan Gilbertl" exclaimed her dearest 
friend. "You have the best luck! You 
can do good work, and get good pay for 
it, and be happy all by yourself; and now 
you're going to be happier, with a husband 
who'll let you live your own life; you'll 
be absolutely free, not even a percolator 
to bother with, nothing to take your mind 
from your own creative work, free to 
express your own personality!" 

"Mercy," said Anne, closing the door 
upon this last caller. "If I don't set the 
North River, at least, on fire, pretty soon, 
they'll all call me a slacker." 

She hung her card, "Engaged," upon 
the door leading into the hall (some one 
had scrawled "Best Wishes" underneath 
the printed word), and proceeded to get 
her dinner in a thoughtful frame of mind. 
The tiny kitchenette boasted ice-box, 
fireless, and a modest collection of electric 
cooking appliances; in a half-hour Anne 
had ev^olved a cream soup, a bit of steak, 
nearly cubical in proportions, slice of 
graham bread, a salad of lettuce and 
tomato with skilfully tossed dressing, a 
muffin split ready to toast, with the jam 
and spreader for it, and coffee was drip- 
ping into the very latest model of coffee- 
pots. Anne had never neglected her 
country appetite, and was a living refu- 
tation of the idea that neatness and art 
may not dwell together. She moved 
quietly and with a speed which had 
nothing of haste; her mind was busy 
with a magazine cover for December, she 
believed she'd begin studying camels. 

After dinner came Burt Winchester, a 
steady-voiced, olive-skinned young man, 
in pleasant contrast to Anne's vivacious 
fairness, and together they journeyed up- 
town and then west to the Kensington, 
for a final decision upon the one vacant 
apartment. The rooms were of fair size, 
they were all light, and the agent had at 
least half a yard of applicants upon a 
printed slip in his pocket. 

Burt studied the apartment not at all, 



but his fiancee with quiet amusement. 
He was much in love with Anne, but he 
understood her better than she had yet 
discovered. 

"I don't think we'll ever find any- 
thing better," she was saying to him. 
"Perhaps he'd have it redecorated for us, 
with a long lease — " 

The agent coughed discreetly. "The 
leases are for one year, with privilege of 
renewal," he said to Burt. "It has just 
been redecorated; is there anything 
needed.^" 

"It would all be lovely, if one liked 
blue," murmured Anne. "Just the thing 
for some girl, but not for me, all that pale 
blue and silver, it doesn't look a bit like 
either of us, Burt. I had worked out the 
most stunning scheme, cream and black, 
with a touch of Kelly green — " 

Another cough, somewhat louder, and 
accompanied by an undisguised look of 
sympathy for Burt. "The owner pre- 
fers to decide the decorations, Madame," 
said the agent. "Tastes differ so, you 
understand." 

"Please hold the suite for me until 
tomorrow night," said Burt, decisively. 
"I suppose we'll take it; if not, I'll make 
it right with you." 

"I should say, 'tastes differ,' " laughed 
Anne, tucking her arm into Burt's, as they 
began the long walk down-town. "Do 
you know. Aunt Milly and the girls 
thought, of course, we'd keep house, and 
Dan and George are going to pick out 
girls that will keep house, I saw it in 
their eyes. You — • you*' re going to be 
satisfied, Burt.?" 

"I think so," answered Burt, judi- 
ciously, and then with a change of tone, 
"Nan, you precious goose, you've always 
told me you were not domestic." 

"And you've always said you were no 
more domestic than I was," finished 
Anne, happily. She entirely missed the 
quizzical expression of the brown eyes 
above her. "Nuff said. — ■ Are we going 
to Branton tomorrow, Burt, with the 
crowd.? Can you take the day?" 

Anne's "crowd," the half-dozen good 



TO EXPRESS PERSONALITY 



267 



friends among the many acquaintances 
she had formed in the city, were invited 
for a day in the country. She and Burt 
now talked it over, agreeing to meet in 
time to take the nine-thirty train, with 
the others. 

But at nine, next morning, Burt had 
not appeared at the studio; instead, Miss 
Gilbert had a telephone message that 
Mr. Winchester was delayed, but would 
call as soon as possible. It was unlike 
Burt, but Anne, sensibly, supposed that 
business had intervened, and, rem.oving 
her hat, was glad to remember that she 
had not definitely accepted the invitation 
when it was given. The "crowd" were 
sure enough of each other and of them- 
selves to appear casual: Burt and she 
could take a later train, and have just as 
warm a welcome. 

At nine-thirty Burt appeared, explain- 
ing briefly, "Best I could do. There's a 
train in twenty minutes, we'll catch it if 
we hurry." 

Anne hurried, which proved to be 
unnecessary, as the train seemed late in 
starting; during the trip there was little 
conversation, as Anne was tactful, and 
Burt preoccupied. 

"Branton!" called the conductor, at 
least it sounded like Branton, Burt came 
out of his revery with a start, and Anne 
followed him down the aisle. They 
stood a moment upon the platform of the 
quiet little station and watched the train 
pull out; as they turned back into what 
seemed the principal street, Anne craned 
her neck to look around an inconvenient 
truck piled with baggage, and made out 
the sign, Byrnton. 

"Oh, Burt, what were we thinking of.?" 
she exclaimed. "This isn't the right 
place at all! We were to take the road 
up past a brick church — and there isn't 
any here — this is Byrnton, and we 
wanted Branton. What shall we do — 
why don't you say something.?" 

"Fudge!" said Burt, soberly, but in his 
eyes the dancing light he reserved for 
Anne. 'T'U ask the ticket-agent." 
He came out of the station, smiling. 



"This isn't the Branton line at all, but a 
short branch west of it," he informed her. 
"We took the wrong train, but he says lots 
of people make the same mistake, and 
they are going to change one name or the 
other, eventually. I am to blame. Nan, 
for I know this place, Byrnton; I have, 
or used to have, an Aunt Susan here, 
somewhere — shall we look her up .? We 
have nearly .three hours to kill. It will 
be afternoon before we can get to Bran- 
ton — and Aunt Susan will give us 
nourishment, at least, if she's home." 

"Very well," Anne assented. If Burt's 
business absorbed him like this, she must 
learn to take it philosophically. 

"What a pretty place, Burt! Do see 
those wonderful elms!" 

Byrnton proved to be an old-fashioned 
village, which had had the good fortune 
to be remodelled without being modern- 
ized. Along the main street many of the 
houses were square, prim little boxes, with 
front yards bright with sweet williams, 
marigolds, and candytuft; these had an 
iron fence around the garden, and, invar- 
iably, shutters at the front door. An 
occasional house stood flush with the 
brick or flagged sidewalk; in that case 
there were snowy curtains at the window, 
and a glimpse of hollyhocks at the back. 
The newer houses could be distinguished 
by the wide, open spaces around them; 
the late comers had not planned their 
homes to command the village street, and 
neighbors, as an older generation har* 
done, but these twentieth century tq 
did not begin until one had left t^ 
railway station well behind. 
"What a homely, homey - 
Anne, noting everything wi 
an artist. "I don't see h 
forget it, if you have an a- 

"That's the question. 
"Have I an aunt livin- 
be in California; ho\ 
the key will be unde- 

Anne continued t 
sparkling eyes. ' 
lived in a place ' 
yet," she told 



268 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



spoiled the place for me, but they made 
business good for Uncle Andy and the 
boys, and Aunt Milly likes the bustle, 
she'd think this was too quiet. — • Isn't it 
queer how people manage to get what 
they want — in time?" 

"It is, indeed," smiled Burt. "There, 
Nan, that low white cottage at the very 
end, the last before you come to open 
fields. That's Aunt Susan's." 

They quickened their pace; Anne was 
conscious of an intense wish that Aunt 
Susan might be home. She wanted to 
see the inside of the white house, bun- 
galow, it might almost be called, if one 
did not associate bungalows with stucco 
or stained shingles. This cottage was of 
white wood, with the regulation green 
blinds. There was an outside chimney 
of red bricks; a pathway of red bricks in 
the old herringbone pattern led up to the 
front door, with its shining brass knocker. 
A row of white foxgloves stood sentinel 
before the front of the house, on each side 
the entrance, their pointed spires coming 
well above the window-sills; before them 
the dark foliage of perennial lupins, toss- 
ing up a white spray of flowers, and then 
It seemed as if every old-fashioned flower 
of white, or with a white variety, ran 
riot down to a border of sweet alyssum. 
Above all the fragrance came the unmis- 
takable sweetness of mignonette. 

"Oh, Burt!" called Anne, "I do hope 

'^e's home. What a woman she must 

can guess some things about her, 

1, the outside of her house. I 

"how me the inside of it." 

\ his head. "She'd have 

this and been out here," 

'Come 'round to the 

premises proved no 

e was the neatest of 

able garden, and a 

ch Anne regarded 

vistful eyes. 

-fashioned -flow- 

hite frilled kind, 

has the wash 

merated, "and 



runs her automobile h^ ^m sure, 

for she's a practical person ,/ell; if she 
were just a sentimental flower-lover, she'd 
have had something or other climbing up 
the house, and it spoils the woodwork." 

"It's safe to say Aunt Susan's in Cali- 
fornia," said Burt, disregarding this. 
"No joke. Nan, she has a married 
daughter who has been trying to get her 
out there for years, and Aunt Susan's 
always threatening to go. Never thought 
she would, but we can soon find out; I 
know who'll have the key." 

He left Anne and walked back to the 
house just passed, and presently reap- 
peared with the key. "Here you are. 
Aunt Susan left it with Mrs. Brown, who 
is to look after the place, and to use her 
judgment about letting people in. Aunt 
Susan has only been gone two days, she 
went hurriedly at the last, and A/[rs. 
Brown is to close the house for her, but 
she hasn't got 'round to it yet. Lucky 
for us, there'll be everything we need for 
lunch; I brought eggs — see.?" 

Laughing like a boy, Burt unlocked the 
back door, and then produced four eggs, 
from as many pockets. He laid them 
carefully down upon the kitchen table. 

"Now, Nan, we can use anything in 
the kitchen or pantry, and Mrs. Brown 
has a blueberry pie in the oven which 
she'll give us, she'll bring it over when 
it's done. — 'Want to go over the house.'' 
■ — • Give you my word it's all right, in fact 
Aunt Susan told Mrs. Brown she wished 
she could rent it, as is, if she only knew 
somebody who would love it — that was 
her word. You can love it until the 
afternoon train, can't you.'"' 

If Anne heard, she made no reply, she 
was exploring. 

Downstairs, a wide hall occupied a 
central third of the house; it was well 
lighted by the windows each side the 
front door, and by double doors of glass, 
which opened on to the back porch. On 
one side the hall were kitchen and pantry, 
nearly equal in size, and glistening with 
white paint, aluminum, and blue and 
white porcelain. With a hasty glance 



TO EXPRESS PERSONALITY 



269 



over these treasures, to which she was 
coming back, Anne stepped out into the 
hall again, and around to the front of the 
winding staircase, and entered what she 
knew at once for the "owner's bedroom." 
There were windows on two side's, as this 
was a front room, and each broad sill 
bore its own pot of ferns. The furniture 
here was all old-fashioned, of some dark 
wood that had been rubbed to a satin 
finish, the floor was of plain surface, with 
braided mats, and a blue and white 
counterpane provided the only bit of 
drapery in the room. Anne's bright 
he^d nodded with satisfaction. Here 
was character; to win Aunt Susan's 
respect would be no light task, her per- 
sonal and intimate belongings showed an 
austere sense of values and an almost 
surgical cleanliness. Yet Aunt Susan 
could not be a martinet; her hall, fur- 
nished for other people, showed due 
regard for their comfort; the living room, 
which took the entire western side of the 
cottage, bore unmistakable signs of much 
occupancy, with wide and varied interests. 
A set of dark shelves, at the lower end, 
held china, and suggested that one might 
also eat at the refectory table, which was 
furnished as a desk and held a few books, 
many writing materials, and a foreign- 
looking lamp. There was also a piano, 
well littered with music, a sewing bag 
thrown down upon a cretonned window 
seat, and the generous fireplace was 
flanked by two huge baskets, one heaped 
with magazines, the other a perfectly 
round mound of yellow fur, which sud- 
denly took form and life as a yellow 
tabby cat fastened hopeful topaz eyes 
upon them, blinked away a brief disap- 
pointment, and then yawned with ennui. 

"His missie left him all alone," said 
Anne, bending to stroke the smooth head. 
"What's upstairs, Burt.?" 

"Go and look, I'll take your place with 
the Admiral until you come back," 
offered Burt, and at sound of his name 
the yellow cat jumped out and began 
rubbing against a convenient table leg. 
Anne found them in the same relative 



positions when she returned from her 
inspection of the upper floor. 

"Your Aunt Susan must use it for 
sewing," she told Burt, dreamily. "With 
that big skylight — it could be a studio, 
couldn't it?" 

"It is," Burt informed her. "Aunt 
Susan is an artist — with her needle. 
She gives, or gave, dressmaking lessons, 
in her idle moments. She gave up dress- 
making, when she bought this house and 
settled here, but now she teaches the 
daughters of her old customers, they come 
out in automobiles every Wednesday, 
in winter. Saturday afternoons she has 
some of the young girls in the village, here, 
— without price — and without taste, 
too, some of them! And Nan, I hate to 
mention it, but — ■ Aunt Susan is a pretty 
good cook, tool" 

"Feed the brute!" quoted Nan, with a 
gay laugh. "Will the Admiral drink 
condensed milk.?" 

Mrs. Brown came over with her blue- 
berry pie as Burt was summoned to 
luncheon. She surveyed the table, which 
Nan had laid in the kitchen, and then the 
Admiral, who was making his toilette in 
a thorough manner that suggested sev- 
eral courses, with outspoken approval. 

"My, I wish Susan Winchester could 
pop in this minute. You found the pre- 
pared flour, and all — ■ baked 'em on the 
griddle! Wa'n't that cute! I never did 
see an omelet like that except from Susan 
Winchester's own hands, and she learned 
from a Frenchwoman she used to sew 
with. Some folks can pick up every 
useful trick they see." 

Turning to Burt, she continued: 

"With all the new fangle-dangles of 
these days, women voting and all, you're 
a lucky boy to have found an old-fash- 
ioned girl!" 

"I know it," said Burt, brazenly, but 
he did not meet Anne's astonished eyes. 
"My girl has learned the best of the new 
accompHshments, without losing what 
was worth keeping of the old." 

Anne's judgment told her it was a good 
(Continued on Page 302) 



270 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



AMERICAN COOKERY 

FORMERLY THE 

BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL 
MAGAZINE 

OF 
Culinary Science and Domestic Economics 



Subscription $1.50 perYeaRjSingle Copies 15c 
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Entered at Boston Post-office as Second-class Matter 



LOVE'S DAY 

When the morning on the hill crest snuffs the 

candles of the night, 
And the wide world blooms in beauty with the 

coming of the light. 
With the morn awakens, ever sweet and ever new. 
The happiness of knowing I share the dawn with 

you. 

When the morning shadows shorten on the sunny 

slopes of noon. 
And the roads of earth are humming with toil's 

deep, insistent tune, 
Fragrant as a sea wind, 'blowing from an island 

blue. 
Through moiling hours of toiling comes my 

memory of you. 

When the shadows of the twilight like long 

lashes dim and gray 
Close in slumber softly o'er the weary eyes of day, 
Calling through the twilight like harbor lights 

from sea. 
Your love becomes a beacon that shines with 

cheer for me! 

Arthur Wallace Peach. 

LIMITATION OF ARMAMENTS 

ON Armistice Day, November 11, at 
the hour w^hen the twenty-four men 
representing the six participating nations 
first face each other across the council 



table, a nation-wide demonstration will 
be under way in the United States. 
Organized labor announces that in every 
town and city the workers will join with 
other citizens in mass-meetings and 
parades and that the keynote of Armistice 
Day should be, 'It is time to disarm.' 
It will help in impressing upon our own 
government and upon other governments 
that the people are weary of war-made 
tax burdens; that they are deeply in 
earnest in their demands that these bur- 
dens be removed. It will strengthen the 
purpose of the four men who are to repre- 
sent America to know that they have the 
support of the workers and the voters. 
The action of organized labor will help in 
liberating and directing these 'moral 
forces'; but Labor cannot do it alone. 
There are others of these 'forces' that 
cannot be tapped or directed by Labor, 
and these must come into action. The 
time is drawing nigh for their mobiliza- 
tion." Philadelphia Public Ledger. 

"Without the crowding, persistent, 
fighting force of the masses the crusade, 
cannot be won. This is the people's 
salvation and it is, therefore, the people's 
fight. It is now up to the people of this 
country to make their wishes known and 
their opinions felt. It should be con- 
stantly in mind that, without the mobil- 
ized moral force of those upon whom these 
crushing burdens are now falling, there- 
is little hope that the load will ever be 
lifted. If it is not lifted, no one can 
prophesy what lies beyond. There can 
be no relief from taxes, no relief fronL. 
expenditures and no relief from war, 
except through disarmament." 

W. E. Borah. 

"One more war, fully prepared for, 
prepared for with all the diabolical per- 
versions of science, will reduce Europe: 
and America to what Russia is today." j 

Churchman. i 

s 

Certainly we believe in the closest: 

limitation of armament. In this matter- 



EDITORIALS 



271 



we would go to the extreme limit. We 
are tired of militarism and tired of war 
and the rumors of war. While we need 
and desire a merchant marine, we have 
no use for fighting ships or submarines. 
Years ago we began to dre'am that 
America would never engage in another 
war, but we have witnessed the most 
horrid conflict that ever devastated the 
earth. How can any one ever want war 
again ? The nation that makes an aggres- 
sive attack on another should be regarded 
as an outlaw and treated as such by 
the rest of the world. Dissensions are 
sure to arise, but these can be settled 
by conference and agreement or by 
arbitration. 

Prosperity is dependent on peace. No 
other world-wide saving can equal that 
which can be gained through limitation 
of armament. The wealth of the world 
consists of just what the world produces. 
The one master word of the day is Produc- 
tion. People are not producing enough 
to satisfy all their wants; there is not 
stuff enough to go round. As a nation we 
need less of politics and more of produc- 
tion. Our main contention should be a 
mxoral appeal for unity in the industrial 
world. "The field for constructive, imag- 
inative, and creative minds is the field of 
commerce." 

A PIONEER IN HOME ECONOMICS 

FROM a recent report by Mr. Eugene 
Davenport, vice-president of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois, we draw the following: 
Miss Isabel Bevier retired this year 
from her work in Home Economics at the 
University of Illinois. She entered the 
service of the University in 1900. Dur- 
ing the twenty-one years of its existence, 
Professor Bevier has given herself unspar- 
ingly to the development and conduct, 
day by day, of the department of Home 
Economics. The field was almost en- 
tirely new, as a university subject. The 
courses have been outlined and con- 
ducted with a double purpose In mind. 
First, the presenting of home economics 
as a part of a liberal education; and sec- 



ond, the development of courses leading 
to a profession in teaching, dietetics, and 
cafeteria management. 

The first graduating class in 1903 num- 
bered three. The number rapidly in- 
creased, reaching ninety-four in 1918. 
The total number of students coming 
under the instruction of the staff of 
teachers for the last twenty-one years is 
approximately 5,000. 

If efforts are to be judged by their 
results, whether in respect to alumnae or 
the present registration of undergraduate 
students, it is not too much to say that 
the purposes of this department have 
been in the main accomplished, by which 
is meant that the department has trained 
hundreds of competent executives and 
teachers without such exclusive attention 
to the professional as to break the contact 
with that great mass of university women 
who are to become, not teachers or profes- 
sionals of any kind, but the heads of 
American homes. To achieve this double 
purpose has been the great ambition of 
the department, in which it has eminently 
succeeded. 

, It is not too much to say that at present, 
no department of the university enjoys 
m.ore of the confidence and respect of 
the institution than does the department 
of Home Economics. 

At the Recognition Service in honor of 
Professor Bevier, in May, 1921, the 
alumna presented the University with 
an excellent portrait of Miss Bevier. 

"FEEDING-THE-FAMILY" CLUB > 

WOMEN are waking up to the fact 
that upon their shoulders rests 
the responsibility of having a healthier 
nation. Too many people are dying of 
avoidable diseases. Rich foods have 
taken more toll of life than war and 
pestilence, dieticians tell us. More and 
more stress is being placed upon diet — 
not for the sick only, but for those in 
good health, that they may preserve it. 
By diet we mean the proper combina- 
tions of foods and the scientific uses of 
vitamines, starches, proteins and acids. 



272 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



What we need is more than a reading 
acquaintance with those subjects. 

A certain group of women in Long 
Beach, Calif., have decided that the 
acquisition of knowledge concerning food 
properties is the only way to better living 
for their families. They have grouped 
together under the name of the "Feeding- 
the-Family" Club, and, under the leader- 
ship of the head of the department of 
domestic science of the public schools, 
they meet on Wednesday evening each 
week for two hours to learn how to pre- 
pare healthful, nourishing meals for the 
average family. There are sixteen women 
in the group, representing fifty-six per- 
sons, most of whom are children in school. 
Think what it means to those children to 
have mothers who are vitally interested 
in seeing them grow up to be strong, 
virile men and women. "Knowledge makes 
Power," aye, the knowledge of the moth- 
ers of today makes for the powerful 
citizens of tomorrow. r. c. c. 

DO YOUR OWN WORK AND SAVE 
MONEY 

IF you are one of the people who are 
"sick unto death" of these thrift 
articles and are utterly weary of reading 
how to clean your porcelain gas-stove 
and keep your electric washer in repair. 

The magazines are so full of helpful 
hints to the 55,000 and upwards class, 
that it seems as though a mere person like 
myself might inquire, "How about poor 
us? Won't somebody write something 
for us.^ How can we, who make up most 
of the world, live within our incomes.?" 

As nobody has responded as yet, I am 
going to tell how we manage and, possibly, 
some one else may be helped thereby. 

Six years ago, when my husband and I 
awoke from our honeymoon trance, we 
found ourselves in California, strangers 
in a lone land, penniless and jobless. 
My husband was blessed with neither 
college education nor profession, but we 
were both young and undaunted — 
therefore we pulled through. We rented 
an apartment, furnished, at $1S per 



month and buckled in. I might say that 
the rent didn't have to be paid in advance 
or we wouldn't have moved in. My soul 
mate — • otherwise husband — worked as 
a truckman, a taxi driver, a cement lamp- 
post worker, a chauffeur, a night watch- 
man, a salesman, a cook and a dish- 
washer. In five years we moved twenty 
different times, an average of once every 
three months (not because we wished to 
skip our rent, but because my husband 
found jobs in so many different parts of 
the city). 

The end of the sixth year has found 
us located, at last. We get ^150 per 
month and live on that alone. We are 
buying our own home, a flivver stands in 
the garage, our house is nicely furnished 
(a good deal of the furniture we have 
made ourselves) and we dress and live 
respectably. I do all my own cooking, 
washing, ironing, sewing, cleaning, bak- 
ing and gardening, with a little writing 
thrown in as a spare-time occupation. 
No electric machine, 3300 gas stove, 
3700 bedroom set, nor blue-goose 
stenciled kitchen yet graces our home. 
No little tea-wagon runs our food to the 
table. We don't lay by 35 cents in one 
envelope, 31-25 for electricity in another, 
nor 63 cents per week for meat in an- 
other. We merely save a small portion 
each month. First, toward our home and 
the rest we spend or save as we see fit. 
Our twenty chickens help out a little in 
meat and eggs, but one whole year passed 
by before we bought linoleum for kitchen 
or bath-room. At present we are work- 
ing on a 37 second-hand writing desk 
with varnish remover and putty knife 
and in the end we shall have a very 
modern, pretty, little, fumed-oak desk for 
one-seventh the cost of a new one. 

So, Ladies, get in and do your own 
work. Forget the servant problem and 
the money question. Make things your- 
selves and see how much fun there is in 
Life. Don't be afraid to soil your hands 
— cold cream will fix them. Get as 
much fun out of each day as possible. 

H. w. p. 




SOME HOMELY THANKSGIVING VEGETABLES 

Seasonable-and-Tested Recipes 

By Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 

IN ALL recipes where flour is used, unless otherwise stated, the flour is measured after sifting 

once. Where flour is measured by cups, the cup is filled with a spoon, and a level cupful is 

meant. A tablespoonful or a teaspoonful of any designated material is a LEVEL spoonful. In flour 

mixtures where yeast is called for, use bread flour; in all other flour mixtures, use cake or pastry flour. 



Potage Parmentier 

COOK the well-washed, white stalks 
of two or three leeks, sliced length- 
wise, in two tablespoonfuls of fat in 
a saucepan, and allow to remain over the fire 
for five or six minutes, or until slightly 
colored. Add four large potatoes, pared 
and sliced, one quartof cold water, and two 
teaspoonfuls of salt, cover, and cook for 
twenty minutes after the water boils. 
Strain out the potatoes and leeks and 
press through a colander. Thicken the 
water by adding one-fourth a cup of flour, 
blended with two tablespoonfuls of butter 
or a substitute; stir until it has boiled 
for one minute; add one-half a teaspoon- 
ful of white pepper, stir into it the potato 
puree, and let the whole come to a boil. 
Pour into the tureen, and add one-half a 
cup of rich cream, a cup of well-browned 
croutons, and a few chervil leaves, or the 
green leaves of cress or any preferred 
h"rb. The addition of the half-cup of 



rich cream is essential to the soup "par- 
mentier." 

Potato-and-Peanut Sausages 

Mix one cup of roasted and fine- 
ground peanuts with one cup and one- 
half of highly seasoned mashed potatoes. 
Add one beaten egg, and form the mixture 
into small sausage-shaped rolls, rolling 
each one in flour. Roll on a hot pan, 
greased with bacon fat, or bake in a very 
hot oven, until the outside of the sausages 
is lightly browned. Pile in the center of 
a dish, and garnish with curls of toasted 
bacon, placed on a border of shredded 
lettuce. 

Roast Turkey 

Clean, stuff and truss a twelve-pound 
turkey, that, when cooked, may rest on 
the wings level on the platter, the drum- 
sticks close to the body. Rub all over 
with salt and dredge with flour. Cover 
the breast with thin slices of salt pork. 



273 



274 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Set on a rack in a baking-pan (a "double 
roaster" gives best results). Turn often, 
at first, to sear over and brown evenly. 
For the first half hour the oven should be 
hot, then lower the heat and finish the 
cooking in an oven in which the fat in the 
pan will not burn. Cook until the joints 
are easily separated. It will require 
three hours and a half. Add no water or 
broth to the pan during cooking. For 
basting use the fat that comes from the 
turkey during cooking. 

Turkey Stuffing 

Add one teaspoonful of salt, one- 
fourth, a teaspoonful of pepper and one 



crumbs and melted butter and mix thor- 
oughly. Season the inside of the cups 
with salt, then stuff with the prepared 
mixture. Bake slowly about half an 
hour, basting with melted butter. Serve 
decorated with celery tips. 

Oyster-and-Onion Puree 

Steam one pound of white onions, and 
when tender sift through a colander. 
Cook one quart of oysters in their liquor 
until the gills separate; strain, and chop 
the oysters in a chopping bowl. Return 
the liquor to the saucepan, and cook with 
three tablespoonfuls of flour and three 
tablespoonfuls of softened butter, rubbed 




ROAST i-urk1';y 



tablespoonful and one-half of poultry 
seasoning to three cups of cracker crumbs; 
mix thoroughly and add three-fourths a 
cup of melted butter. 

Garnish the Roast Turkey with 
Stuffed Onions 

Parboil eight choice onions about one 
hour. Remove from the water and cut 
out a circular piece from the top of each 
to form cups. Chop, fine, the pieces of 
onion; add an equal measure of cold, 
cooked ham, salt and pepper to season, 
one-fourth a cup, each, of fine, soft 



together, stirring constantly until well 
thickened and smooth. Season with one 
teaspoonful and one-half of salt and one- 
half a teaspoonful of pepper. Sift into 
the onion-pulp one-fourth a cup of flour, 
and stir until blended; add one-fourth a 
teaspoonful of celery seed and one bay- 
leaf, and mix with the thickened oyster 
liquor. Stir until the whole comes "•> ;• 
boil and the puree is thick as porrioi.': 
Add the chopped oysters and one pin; ■' 
thin cream, let heat through, and s( , ■ 
with oysterettes, saltines or other p ■■ 
crackers. 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



275 



Salmon a la Creole 

Clean and scale a small salmon, stuff 
with one-half a loaf of stale bread moist- 
ened with hot water, seasoned with one- 
fourth a cup of butter, salt and pepper to 
taste, and one-half a cup of capers. Mix 
all well, and bind with one beaten egg. 
Place the salmon on the rack of a baking- 
pan in a very hot oven, cover with thin 
slices of bacon, and let cook until done. 
Serve on a bed of chopped fresh mush- 
rooms, cooked in a little bouillon, and 
garnish the dish with small fresh tomatoes. 

Brother Jonathan 

Make a mush of yellow cornmeal, and 
mould in cylindrical moulds, such as 
baking powder boxes or brown bread 
moulds. Let stand until next day, and 
cut into slices. Arrange the slices on a 
large porcelain pie-plate in pyramidal 
form, sprinkling each layer with some 
sharp, hard cheese, grated, and seasoned 
with a very little red pepper. Sift 
buttered crumbs freely over the whole; 
brown in a hot oven, and serve as a 
vegetable with fish, with sour grape jelly 
melted and poured over it. 

Plymouth Succotash 

Boil, separately, one chicken and four 
pounds of corned beef. The next day 
remove meat and fat from both kettles 
of liquid, combine liquids, season with 




NEW ENGLAND SALAD 

salt (if needed) and pepper; when boiling 
add five quarts of hulled corn; remove 
to slow fire and let simmer three hours. 
Have ready three pints of New York pea 
beans that have been soaked twelve 
hours, boiled until soft and strained 
through a sieve; add to soup (for thick- 
ening). Boil one yellow turnip (or two 
white turnips), and six potatoes; when 
done add to succotash. This recipe 
makes eight quarts. 

New England Salad 

Dress flowerets of cold, cooked cauli- 
flower with oil, salt, pepper and vinegar. 
From cold, cooked beets remove the top 
and center portions to make beet cups. 
Arrange the prepared cauliflow^^ -^^ ^^^ 
cups, pour over boiled salad dre^ 
arrange a heart of celery in Cc 
beet-cup. 




PLYMO 



)TASH 



276 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Guinea Chickens 

Clean and truss two guinea chickens; 
place on a bed of sliced, uncooked carrots, 
potatoes and celery, arranged in the 
bottom of a casserole — (a large bean- 
pot serves as well). Sprinkle the chicks 
with salt and pour over them melted 
butter; set the cover in place. Bake 
in a moderate oven one hour and one- 
quarter, basting every fifteen minutes 
with melted butter. Add no water to 
the casserole. 

Rib Roast of Beef with 
Yorkshire Pudding 

Place a rib roast of beef on a rack in a 



of which has been brushed over with 
roast beef drippings; when well risen in 
the pan, baste with the hot roast beef 
drippings. Bake about twenty minutes. 
Cut into squares and serve around the 
roast. 

Apple Mint Jelly for Roast Lamb 

Cut the apples in quarters, removing 
imperfections. Barely cover with boiling 
water, put on a cover and let cook, undis- 
turbed, until soft throughout. Turn into 
a bag to drain. For a quart of this apple 
juice set one and one-half pounds of 
sugar on shallow dishes in the oven to 
heat. Set the juice over the fire with 
the leaves from a bunch of mint; let 




dripping pan; dredge with flour and sear 
over the outside in a hot oven, then add 
salt and pepper and drippings and let 
cook at a low temperature until done, 
basting every ten minutes. Remove to 
a platter and serve with Yorkshire 
pudding. 

Yorkshire Pudding 

Sift together one cup and a half of 
flour, and one-third a teaspoonful of 
salt; gradually add one cup and one- 
half of milk, so as to form a smooth 
batter; then add three eggs, which have 
been beaten until thick and light; turn 
into a small, hot dripping pan, the inside 



cook twenty minutes, then strain into a 
clean saucepan. Heat to the boiling 
point, add the hot sugar and let boil till 
the syrup, when tested, jellies slightly on 
a cold dish. Tint with green color-paste 
very delicately. Have ready three to 
five custard cups on a cloth in a pan of 
boiling water. Let the glasses be filled 
with the water; pour out the water and 
turn in the jelly. When cooled a little 
remove to table. (English recipe.) 

Marinaded Cutlets 

Cut a pound of the best end of neck of 
mutton into cutlets, allowing two cutlets 
for each bone, beat them with a cutlet bat 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



277 



and trim them neatly. Let them soak 
for an hour in a marinade made by mixing 
six tablespoonfuls of red wine vinegar, 
one tablespoonful of oHve oil, half a tea- 
spoonful of salt, six bruised peppercorns, 
a minced onion, a sprig of thyme, and a 
bayleaf. At the end of the hour drain 
the cutlets, and dredge them with flour to 
dry them. Brush over each one with 
beaten egg, and roll it in bread-crumbs; 
repeat the egging and breadcrumbing a 
second time, and, if possible, leave them 
for an hour for the crumbs to dry on. 
Half fill a deep pan with frying-fat, and 
when it is heated, so as to give off a pale 
blue vapor, place the cutlets carefully in 
the pan, and when they float on top of the 
fat and are of a rich brown color, they are 
sufficiently cooked, and must be taken 
from the fat and drained on kitchen paper 
before being served en couronne, or on a 
mound of mashed potatoes, green peas, 
French beans, or Brussels sprouts. 

Veal cutlets, fillets of beef, fillets of 
white fish, or cutlets of cod or hake, are 
excellent when prepared by the same 
method. (English recipe.) 

Thanksgiving Corn Cake 

Sift together two cups of corn meal, two 
cups of white flour, four heaping tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder, one level 
teaspoonful of soda, one teaspoonful of 
salt, and one-half a cup of sugar. Add 
one cup of sour milk (gradually), three- 




RIB ROAST WITH YORKSHIRE PUDDING 

fourths cup of sour cream, four eggs and 
one-third a cup of melted butter. 

Thanksgiving Pudding 

Beat the yolks of four eggs; add one 
pint of soft bread crumbs, one cup of 
sugar, the grated rind of a lemon, one 
teaspoonful of salt, and one cup of 
large table raisins from which the seeds 
have been removed; mix all together 
thoroughly, then add one quart of rich 
milk. Bake in a very moderate oven 
until firm in the center. When the 
pudding has cooled somewhat, beat the 
whites of four eggs dry; beat in half a 
cup of sugar and spread or pipe the 
meringue over the pudding; dredge with 
granulated sugar and let cook in a very 
moderate oven about fifteen minutes; 
the oven should be of such heat that the 
meringue does not color until the last 
few minutes of cooking. 




THANKSGIVING CORN CAKE 



278 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Coffee Fruit Punch 

Add one-half a cup of fine-ground 
coffee to one cup of cold water, bring very 
slowly to a boil, and let simmer for ten 
minutes. Strain, allow grounds to settle, 
decant, and add one cup of sugar. Mix 
one-half a cup of sifted strawberry pre- 
serve with the juice of two lemons, the 
juice of three oranges and the grated rind 
of one, and half a cup of pineapple juice. 
Let the whole stand together for half an 
hour; then strain, add the coffee, a quart 
or more of Vichy, or any preferred spark- 
ling water, and serve in tall glasses filled 
one-third full with shaved ice; garnish 
each with a thin strip of candied angelica. 



move from fire, and stir in two table- 
spoonfuls of butter and the juice of one- 
half a lemon. Put into a pastry shell, 
arrange strips of paste in a basket pattern 
over the top, and bake until these are 
browned. 

Dry Deviled Parsnips 

Wash and scrape — not pare — three 
large parsnips; cut in halves, lengthwise, 
and place, cut side uppermost, on the 
grate of a rather hot oven to bake for 
thirty to forty minutes, or until soft and 
lightly browned. Soften one-half a cup 
of butter, without melting it, and rub 
into it the following mixture: Two tea- 
spoonfuls of salt, four tablespoonfuls of 




SWEET CIDER FRAPPfi 



Sweet Cider Frappe 

Make a syrup by boiling one cup of 
sugar and two cups of water fifteen 
minutes; add one quart of sweet cider 
and one-half a cup of lemon juice; when 
cool freeze — ■ using equal parts of ice and 
salt. Serve with roast turkey or roast 
pork. 

Fig-and-Cranberry Pie 

Chop one-half a pound of figs and cook 
until tender in a pint of water. Add a 
pint of cranberries, and cook until they 
pop. Mix one cup of sugar with four 
tablespoonfuls of flour and stir into the 
fig-and-cranberry mixture; let boil, re- 



dry mustard, one-half a teaspoonful of 
cayenne, one teaspoonful of white pepper, 
and flour enough to stiffen the paste. 
When the parsnips are eqpked make four 
slanting cuts in each of the halves, and 
fill each with as much of the paste as it 
will hold. Spread over the flat side with 
the remainder of the paste, arrange on the 
serving dish, sift fine buttered crumbs 
over them, and place under the gas flame, 
or on the upper rack of an oven until 
crumbs are brown. 

King's Pudding 
With Apple- Jelly Sauce 

Soak, over-night, one-half a cup of 
well-washed rice, and cook in one pint of 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



279 



milk in double boiler until very tender. 
Mix this with three cups of apple sauce, 
well-sweetened and flavored with cinna- 
mon. Add the beaten yolks of two eggs, 
one ounce, each, of candied citron and 
orange peel, very fine-chopped, and one- 
half a cup of raisins. Add, the last thing, 
the whites of the eggs, beaten to the 
stiffest possible froth. Line a deep dish 
with a good, plain paste, pour in the 
pudding, bake until both paste and pud- 
ding top are brown, invert on serving 
dish and pour the sauce over it. 

Apple- Jelly Sauce 

Beat one-half a cup of apple jelly until 
it is like a smooth batter; gradually add 
two tablespoonfuls of melted butter, the 
juice of one lemon and one-half the 
grated rind, and a few gratings of nutmeg. 
Set into a saucepan of boiling water until 
ready to use, then beat well and pour 
over the pudding. 

Cranberry Tart 

Spread a round of paste over an 
inverted pie plate, prick the paste with 
a fork eight times. Bake to a delicate 
brown. Remove the paste from the 
plate, wash the plate and set the pastry 
inside. When cold fill with a cold, 
cooked cranberry filling and cover the 
filling with a top pastry crust, made by 
cutting paste to a paper pattern and 
baking in a pan. Arrange tart just 
before serving. 




CRANBERRY TART 

Cooked Cranberry Filling 

Mix together three level tablespoonfuls 
of cornstarch, three-fourths a teaspoonful 
of salt and one cup and one-half of sugar; 
pour on one cup and one-half of boiling 
water and stir until boiling, then add one- 
third a cup of molasses, two teaspoonfuls 
of butter and three cups of cranberries, 
chopped fine. Let simmer fifteen 
minutes. 

Pumpkin Fanchonettes 

Mix together one cup and a half of dry, 
sifted pumpkin,, half a cup of sugar, two 
eggs, two tablespoonfuls of molasses, one 
tablespoonful of ginger, two tablespoon- 
fuls of melted butter, one teaspoonful of 
cinnamon, one-fourth a teaspoonful of salt, 
and one cup of rich milk. Pour into 
small tins lined with pastry, and bake 
about twenty-five minutes. Serve cold; 
just before serving decorate with whipped 
cream. 

Pilgrim Cookies 

Let soak overnight one cup of seedless 




PUMPKIN FANCHONETTES 



280 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




PILGRIM COOKIES 



raisins, then drain and dry on a cloth. 
Cream one-third a cup of butter; beat 
in one cup of brown sugar, one tablespoon- 
ful of milk, and two eggs, beaten light. 
Add the raisins, and one cup of flour, 
sifted with one-half a teaspoonful, each, 
of nutmeg and cinnamon and two teaspoon- 
fuls and one-half of baking powder. When 
thoroughly mixed, add one-half a cup of 
graham flour, unsifted, and one-half a cup 
of bran, unsifted. 

Pyramid Birthday Cake 

Bake any good layer cake or other 
simple cake mixture in one or two thin 
sheets, in a large pan. When done cut 
into as many graduated circles as the 
child is years old. Ice each circle, top and 
sides, with any good cake icing, either 
white or tinted, and lay one above the 



other with layers of jelly or preserves 
between slices. Around each layer ar- 
range a decoration of fresh or candied 
fruits of bright colors, glaceed nuts, 
candied rose petals or violets, bits of 
angelica, or any other effective decora- 
tion. Let the cake stand on a hand- 
somely decorated dish, and small flags 
be inserted in the topmost layer. 

Stirred Brown Bread 

Measure three cups of graham flour 
into a large mixing-bowl; add one cup of 
bran, and sift on to these one cup and 
one-half of white flour, to which one and 
one-fourth a teaspoonful of salt has been 
added. Stir together until mixed. Dis- 
solve one teaspoonful of baking soda in 
a tablespoonful of hot water, and add to 
two cups of buttermilk. Melt two table- 
spoonfuls of butter and one of any pre- 
ferred substitute, mix with one-half a 
cup of molasses, stir into the buttermilk, 
and add all to the dry ingredients, stirring 
vigorously. Lastly, add one-half a 
compressed yeast cake to the batter, and 
stir again until the yeast is thoroughly 
incorporated with the batter, which 
should be very stiff. Place in a greased 
bread pan, cover, set in a warm place 
until batter has risen to top of pan or 




FRUIT AND MELONS 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



281 



doubled In bulk. Bake one hour In an 
oven with gradually Increasing heat. 
This bread keeps fresh for a long time, 
and Is particularly good sliced thin for 
sandwiches. 

Swedish Pancakes 
With Aigre-Doux Sauce 

Beat, until light, the yolks of six eggs; 
add one-half a teaspoonful of salt, one 
teaspoonful of soda, dissolved In one 
tablespoonful of vinegar, then two cups 
of sifted flour, alternately, with the 
beaten whites of the eggs, and If necessary 
add enough milk to make a thin batter. 
I^our a small ladleful at a time on the 
griddle; spread each cake, when cooked, 
with raspberry jam, roll up like a jelly 
roll, pile on a hot platter, dust over with 
powdered sugar, and serve with each one 
a spoonful of Aigre-Doux Sauce. 

Aigre-Doux Sauce 

Add to two cups of sour cream the 
juice and fine-grated rind of one large 
lemon. Stir in enough sugar just to 
develop a sweet taste, one-half a cup or 
more, and beat hard and long with a 
Dover beater until the sauce is quite light. 

Sauteed Cucumbers and Tomatoes 

Pare four large cucumbers and cut in 
quarter-inch slices; season by sprinkling 
with salt and pepper, then dip In beaten 
egg, and afterwards in fine, sifted crumbs. 
Proceed in the same manner with two 
firm tomatoes, removing the skin by 
dipping first Into boiling water, then Into 
cold, and rubbing the skin off. The 
tomatoes should be cut In half-inch 
slices. Heat a large spider until very 
hot; add two or more tablespoonfuls of 
dripping or other fat, and saute in this, 
first the cucumbers, then the tomatoes, 
turning the slices when browned on one 
side, and cooking until crisped. Serve 
in^a hot^vegetable dish. 

Skirt Steak, with Raisin Sauce 

Make a rich stuffing by chopping 
together three-fourths a pound of veal, 



one-half a pound of ham, and an ounce of 
beef suet or other fat. Add the grated 
rind of a small lemon, and a teaspoonful 
of dried, mixed herbs, or of kitchen 
bouquet, two beaten eggs, a grate of 
nutmeg, and one cup of cream. Cook all 
together over hot water until mixture is 
the consistency of custard; thicken 
further with fine bread crumbs, and let 
cool. Divide a two-pound skirt steak 
into halves, crosswise, spread the stuffing 
over both parts, roll up each one and tie. 
Let steam for half an hour, then put Into 
a hot oven to finish cooking and brown. 
Serve with Raisin Sauce. 

Raisin Sauce for Skirt Steak 

Add one-half a cup of seeded raisins 
to one pint of cold water, set over fire, 
bring slowly to a boil and let simmer, 
gently, for fifteen minutes. Blend two 
tablespoonfuls of flour with one-half a 
teaspoonful of salt and one-fourth a 
teaspoonful of white pepper, and stir this 
Into two scant tablespoonfuls of melted 
butter or butter substitute; add to the 
raisins and water, and let boil, keeping 
stirred, for three minutes. Remove from 
fire and add the juice of one-half a lemon 
or two tablespoonfuls of vinegar. 

Boudin Blanc 

Cook a dozen small onions, sliced, in a 
saucepan with one cup of sweet leaf-lard. 
While cooking put through the meat 
chopper one-half a pound, each, of fresh 
pork and the dark and white meat of a 
fowl or chicken. Add to saucepan con- 
taining onions and lard, and stir In enough 
fine bread crumbs to make the whole the 
consistency of a soft dough. Add season- 
ing of salt and pepper with a spoonful of 
mixed dried herbs. Lastly, add one cup 
of sweet cream and three well-beaten 
eggs, and stir the whole until the eggs are 
set. Stuff this Into pig entrails, making 
links six Inches long. Keep stored in a 
cool place, and cook like sausage. Or 
the boudin may be packed into jars, and 
sliced or cut Into dice and sauteed when 
cold. 



Seasonable Menus for Week in November 





Breakfast 


Breakfast 






Oranges 


Winter Pears 






Corn Flakes with Hot Milk 


Wheatena, Milk 






Codfish Balls Buttered Toast 


Pork-and-Potato Hash 






Marmalade 


Raised Pancakes, Syrup 






CofiPee 


Coffee 




?H 


Dinner 


Luncheon 


S 


< 


Roast Leg of Lamb Mashed Potatoes 


Ovster-and-Onion Puree 




Q 


Spinach with Egg Creamed Turnips 


Crusty Rolls ' 






Celery Salad 


Apple-and-Nut Salad 


I- - 


Date Souffle 


Cocoa 


c 




Coffee 


Dinner 


> 




Supper 


Skirt Steak with Raisin Sauce 






Oyster Stew Crackers 


Dry Deviled Parsnips 






Lettuce-and-Peanut Butter Sandwiches 


Baked Sweet Potatoes 






Soft Gingerbread 


Cherry Pie 






Cocoa 


Coffee 






Breakfast 


Breakfast 


• 




Malt Breakfast Food, Top Milk 


Cream of Wheat, Cream 






Scrambled Eggs with Tomato 


Tomato Omelet 






Graham Muffins 


Stirred Brown Bread 






Coffee 

- 


Coffee 




>^ 


Luncheon 


Luncheon 




< 


Potage Parmentier 


Potato-and-Peanut Sausages 


c: 




Savory Hash, Meat and Potatoes 


Cabbage-and-Celery Salad, with Cheese 


X 


1^ 

o 


Tea Tarts 


Strawberry Gelatine Jelly 


X 


s 


Russian Tea 


Tea 


> 




Dinner 


Dinner 






Planked Steak, Parkerhouse Style 


Boiled Tongue Steamed Potatoes 






Head Lettuce 


Creamed Carrots Brussels Sprouts 






King's Pudding, with Apple Jelly Sauce 


Apple Pie a la Mode 






Black Coffee 


Coffee 





Breakfast 

Dates 
Gluten Grits, Cream 



Baked Potatoes 



Bacon 



Graham Toast, Butter 
Coffee 

Luncheon 

Salmon a la Creole 

Pulled Bread 

Sweet Potato Croquettes 

Pears in Syrup 

Milk or Tea 

Dinner 

Stuffed Leg of Pork 

Mashed Potatoes Apple Sauce 

Fig-and-Cranberry Pie 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Grapefruit 

Cracked Wheat, Milk 

Creamed Finnan Haddie 

Hashed Brown Potatoes 

Popovers 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Frumenty with Cream 
Escaloped Chipped Beef and Potatoes 
Chocolate Layer Cake 
Cafe au Lait * 

Dinner 

Halibut Steaks 

Brother Jonathan 

Creamed Cabbage Chow-Chow 

Aprciot Puffs with Custard Sauce 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Gravenstein Apples 

Quaker Oats, Milk 

Scrambled Eggs with Bacon 

Steamed Brown Bread 

Coffee 



Luncheon 

Puree of Baked Beans 
Castilian Salad 
(Pineapple, Nuts, Apples, 

Grapes, Celery) 
Swedish Pancakes with 
Aigre-Doux Sauce 
Chocolate 



Dinner 

Veal Stew 

Browned Sweet Potatoes 

Lima Beans in Tomato Sauce 

Leaf Lettuce with Fr. Dressing 

Brown Betty with Foamy Sauce 

Coffee 



282 



Menus for Thanksgiving Dinners 

I 

Three-Course Dinner for Small Family in Servantless House 

Roast Chicken, stuifed with Chopped Celery and Oysiers 

Baked Sweet Potatoes Boiled Onions 



Salad 

(Fine choppe'd apples and nuts in red apple cups) 

Cream Dressing 

Mince or Squash Pie a la mode 
Sweet Cider Coffee 

II 

A Simple Company Dinner of Six Courses ■ 
Celery Clam Bouillon, Saltines Ripe Olives 

Roast, Chestnut-Stuffed Turkey, Giblet Sauce 

Buttered Asparagus Glazed Sweet Potatoes 

Moulded Cranberry Jelly 

Chicken Salad in Salad Rolls 



Thanksgiving Pudding Hard Sauce 

Chocolate Ice Cream Strawberrv Sauce 



Assorted Fruit Coffee 

III 

A Formal Company Dingier. Eight Courses 

Curled Celery Oyster Soup, Bread Sticks Radish Rosettes 

Turbans of Flounder Hollandaise Sauce Potato Straws 

Olives Crustv Rolls Salted Nuts 



Capon a la Creme 

(Stuffing of Potatoes, Mushrooms, Chestnuts, ere. i 

Mashed Potatoes Green Pea Timbales Cranberry Sauce 

Sweet Cider Frappe 

\'enison Steaks Currant Jelly Sauce Baked Parsnips 

Apple-and-Grape Salad 

Macaroon Pudding 
Frozen Mince Pie Hot Chocolate Sauce 



Glaceed Walnuts Fruit Black Coffee 

IV 

Elaborate Forjnal Dinner. Ten Courses 

Fruit Cocktail 

Oysters on Half-shell 

Brown Bread-and-Butter Sandwiches Quartered Lemons 

Clear Bouillon, Oysterettes 
Radishes Cel< 



Boiled Halibut Potato Balls in Parsley Sauce 

Sweet Pickles 



Cauliflower au Gratin 



Braised Turkey or Capon 
Bread Stuffing Giblet Grav}- Duchesse Potatoes Spinach 

Cr\-stallized Ginger Salted Pecans 

. Pineapple Fritters, Lemon Sauce 

Granite of Cider and Apples 

Cutlets of Duck, with Chopped Celery 

Orange Salad 

Pumpkin Pie Raisin and Cranberry Tarts 

Chocolate Parfait Almond Cakes 



Xuts Raisins Bonbons Can'died Orange Peel 

1^1 a ck Coffee 




Concerning Breakfasts 

By Alice E. Whitaker 



A CERTAIN Englishman who break- 
fasted with the Washington family 
in 1794 wrote of the occasion: "Mrs. 
Washington, herself, made tea and coffee 
for us. On the table were two small 
plates of sliced tongue and dry toast, 
bread and butter, but no broiled fish, as 
is the general custom." However sparing 
the mistress of Mt. Vernon might have 
been, it was the usual custom in old times 
to eat a hearty breakfast of meat or fish 
and potato, hot biscuits, doughnuts, 
griddle cakes and sometimes even pie was 
added. A section of hot mince pie was 
always considered a fitting ending to the 
winter morning meal in New England, 
at least. 

When Charles Dickens was in the 
United States, in 1842, he stopped at the 
old Tremont house in Boston. In his 
^'American Notes," which followed his 
visit to this country, he wrote critically 
of the American breakfast, as follows: 
*'And breakfast would have been no 
breakfast unless the principal dish were a 
deformed beefsteak with a great flat 
bone in the center, swimming in hot 
butter and sprinkled with the very black- 
est of pepper." 

For a time my household included a 
colored cook, who, according to local 
custom, went to her own home every 
night. Invariably before leaving she 
came to me with the short and abrupt 
question, "What's for.?" This expe- 
rience taught me the difficulty of planning 
breakfasts oflp hand. More than one 
beginner in housekeeping wonders whether 
a light breakfast of little but a roll and 



coffee is more healthful than one of 
several courses. It is an old American 
idea that luncheon or supper may be 
light, dinner varied and heavier, but 
breakfast must be wholesome and nour- 
ishing. This is based on the belief that 
it is natural for man and beast to wake up 
in the morning with a desire for food and 
unnatural to try to do the hardest work 
of the day with but a pretence at eating. 

About twenty years ago there was much 
talk of the alleged healthfulness of going 
without breakfast entirely. For a time 
this plan was the object of much discus- 
sion and experiment by medical and 
scientific men and workers in general. 
The late Edward Everett Hale was a 
strong opponent to abstinence from 
breakfast by brain workers, while those 
who labored with hand and muscle looked 
with little favor on the morning fast. 
Finally the no-breakfast idea went the 
way of most fads in food. 

As a compromise between the extremes 
of going without any breakfast, and the 
old-time, over-hearty ^eal of several 
courses, there came into fashion the 
simple meal of fruit, cereal and eggs. 
This is to be commended, if the egg, or 
its substitute in food value, is not omitted. 
Too often a sloppy cereal is washed down 
rapidly with a cup of coffee and called 
sufficient. Sometimes the ready-to-eat 
cereal and the milk bottle left at the 
kitchen door include the entire prepara- 
tion for the morning meal. 

The adaptabihty of this quick break- 
fast, and its ease of preparation, keep it 
in favor, but filling the stomach with a 



I 



284 



CONCERNING BREAKFASTS 



285 



cereal, from which some of its best ele- 
ments have been taken, means, for 
women folks at home, placing the coffee 
pot on the range to warm up the cup that 
will stop that "gone" feeling so, common 
after a near-breakfast. The man at 
work might once have found solace in a 
glass of beer; now', perhaps, he smokes an 
extra cigarette. It is well understood 
that children grow^ listless and dull before 
noon, when an insufficient breakfast is 
eaten. One who has breakfast leisurely 
at nine o'clock may be satisfied with a 
roll and a cup of hot drink, but a com- 
muter with a trip ahead to office or shop, 
and the farmer who must make an early 
start in the day, cannot rely on light, 
quickly digested food in the morning. 
Their energy and working capacity will 
slow down long before noon. 

Objection is sometimes made to a good, 
sustaining breakfast because of a distaste 
for food in the morning. In such a case, 
look to the quality or quantity of the 
night meal; it may be too heavy or 
indigestible. 

Between a breakfast with warmed-over 
meats, and one w^ithout meat, especially 
if eggs are substituted, the choice should 
i be given to the latter. Twice-cooked 
meats, however pleasing they may be to 
the palate, are not easy to digest. They 
serve merely as a way to use left-overs, 
which good management will keep to the 
minimum. 

When selecting fruits for breakfast, 
the fact must not be overlooked that the 
starch of cereals and acid fruits, like a 
sour orange, often disagree. When apples 
are plentiful nothing is better than this 
fruit when baked, but in cities the banana 
frequently costs less and it stands at the 
head of all fruits in food value. When 
perfectly ripe it has about 12 per cent 
of sugar, but as it is picked green, the 
fruit sold in the markets is often but 
partially ripe and is more easily assimi- 
lated, if baked like the apple; it then 
becomes a valuable breakfast food. 

It is a common mistake in a meatless 
breakfast to use too large a proportion of 



cereal. While the standard cereal foods, 
when dry, are from two-thirds to three- 
quarters starch, with the balance made up 
of a little protein, fat, water, fibre and a 
trace of mineral matter, it should not be 
forgotten that while cooking they absorb 
several times their bulk of water, which 
reduces the food value of the product. 
Oatmeal and corn meal are best adapted 
for winter use because they contain a 
little more fat than wheat or rice, which 
are suitable for summer diet. 

Eggs are the most available substitute 
for meat at breakfast and it is doubtful 
economy to omit them, except in times 
of extreme high prices. They are not 
essential in all desserts and saving in 
their use should begin at that point. 
Eggs may be cooked in many ways so 
that they need never become a monoto- 
nous fare. All kinds of fish are an excel- 
lent substitute for meat, and, as prepared 
for the table, nearly equal beef and mutton, 
in the amount of protein, w^hich is the 
element missed in a non-meat diet, unless 
it be carefully planned. 

Breakfasts without Meat 

The following are adapted to different 
seasons and the beverage may be selected 
to suit the taste. 

1. Strawberries, eggs baked in rame- 
kins, oatmeal muffins. 

2. Fruit, cheese omelet, rice griddle 
cakes. 

3. Oranges, codfish balls, wheat muf- 
fins. 

4. Oatmeal, baked bananas, scram- 
bled eggs, rice muffins. 

5. Cereal, hashed browned potatoes, 
date gems. 

6. Oranges, soft boiled eggs, lyon- 
naise potatoes, dry toast. 

7. Cereal with dates, whole wheat 
muffins, orange marmalade. 

8. Stewed prunes, French omelet, 
creamed potatoes, dry toast. 

9. Grapefruit, broiled salt codfish, 
baked potatoes, corn muffins. 

10. Fresh pineapple, broiled fresh 
mackerel, creamed potatoes. French bread. 



286 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



11. Sliced bananas, omelet with peas, 
rusked bread. 

Breakfasts with Meat 

1. Fresh apple sauce, pork chops, 
/Stewed potatoes, graham muffins. 

2. Dried peaches, stewed, broiled 
honeycomb tripe, escalloped potatoes, 
reheated rolls. 

3. Fruits, minced mutton, potato 
puffs, rice griddle cakes, lemon syrup. 

4. Baked apples, baked sausages, 
hashed potatoes, corn cakes. 

5. Baked rhubarb and raisins, ham 



omelet, bread-crumb griddle cakes, cara- 
mel syrup. 

6. Melon or berries, broiled ham, 
shirred eggs, creamed potatoes. 

7. Oranges, broiled beef cakes, French 
fried potatoes, toast. 

8. Steamed rice, sliced tomatoes, bacon 
and eggs, rye muffins. 

9. Berries, broiled chicken with cream 
sauce, fried potato cakes, muffins. 

10. Cereal with syrup, scaldedtomatoes 
with melted butter, baked hash, dry toast. 

11. Melon, veal cutlet, cream sauce, 
baked potatoes, corn bread. 



Some Recipes for Preparing Poultry 

By Kurt Heppe 



FOWLS should be divided into four 
classes, according to their uses. The 
uses are controlled by the age of the fowl. 

What is suitable for one dish is not 
suitable for others. In fowls the age of 
the bird controls the use to which it can 
be put. This is something the caterer 
and the housewife must remember. 

A young bird can be distinguished from 
an old one by the pliability of the tip of 
the breastbone. When this tip bends 
under pressure, then the bird is young. 
If it is hard and unyielding, then it is old. 

Very old birds are used for soup and for 
fricassee. 

Aledium-aged birds are used for roasts. 

Spring chickens are used for broilers 
and for sauteed dishes. 

Very young chicks are used for frying 
in deep fat; for this purpose they are 
dipped in a thin batter, or else in flour, 
and in eggs mixed with milk and after- 
ward in breadcrumbs. These chicks, 
and also spring chickens, are used for 
casserole dishes and for cocottes (covered 
earthen ware containers, in which the 
fowls are roasted in the oven). 

The liver of fowls is used in different 
wavs; it makes an excellent dish. It is 



best when sauteed with black butter. 
Some of the fine French ragouts consist 
mostly of chicken livers. 

With omelettes they make an incom- 
parable garnish. 

In very high-class establishments the 
wings and breast are often separated from 
the carcass of the fowl and served in 
manifold ways. Sometimes the entire 
fowl is freed of bones, without destroying 
the appearance of the bird. These latter 
dishes are best adapted for casserole 
service and for cold jellied offerings. 

Capons are castrated male fowls. They 
fatten readily and their flesh remains 
juicy and tender, owitig to the indolence 
of the birds. The meat of animals is 
tenderest when the animal is kept in- 
active. For this reason stall-feeding is 
often resorted to. When the animal has 
no opportunity to exercise its muscle- 
the latter degenerate, and nourishment, 
instead of being converted into energy, 
is turned into fat. Range birds and 
animals are naturally tough; this is 
especially true of the muscles. 

Large supply houses now regularlx 
basket their fowls for about two week.- 
before putting them on tlie maikct. 



SOME RECIPES FOR PREPARING POULTRY 



287 



During this time they are fed on grain 
soaked in milk. This produces a white, 
juicy flesh. 

When a bird is to be roasted it should 
be trussed. This is done by forcing the 
legs back against the body (after placing 
the bird on its back); a string is then 
tied across the bird's body, holding the 
legs down. The wings are best set firmly 
against the breast by sticking a wooden 
skewer through the joint and into the 
bony part of the carcass, where the 
skewer will hold against the bones. 

In preparing birds for the oven their 
breasts should be protected by slices of 
bacon. Otherwise they will shrivel and 
dry before the birds are cooked. 

For broiling, the birds are cut through 
in the back, in such a manner that they 
quasi-hinge in the breast; they are then 
flattened so they will lie evenly in a 
double broiling iron; for this purpose 
the- heavy backbone is removed. 

Stuffed Poularde 

After trussing the bird rub it with lemon 
so it will keep of good color; now cover 
the breast with thin slices of bacon 
(these can be tied on). The poularde 
is put into a deep, thick saucepan and 
cooked with butter and aromatics in the 
oven. When it is nearly done it is 
moistened with poultry stock. If this 
stock reduces too fast, then it must be 
renewed. It is finally added to the sauce. 

These fowls may be stuifed with a 
pilaff of rice. This is prepared as fol- 
lows: Half an onion is chopped and fried 
in two ounces of butter. Before it 
acquires color half a pound of Carolina 
rice is added. This is stirred over the 
fire until the rice has partly taken up the 
butter; then it is moistened with con- 
somme (one quart); and covered and 
cooked in a moderate oven for fifteen 
minutes. It is now combine^ with a 
little cream, a quarter a pound of dice of 
goose liver and some dice of truffles. 

The rice should not be entirely cooked 
by the time it is stuffed into the bird; 
the cooking is completed inside the bird. 



The cream is added to provide moisture 
for the rice to take up. 

Instead of cream one may use con- 
somme, and the truffles and fat liver may 
be left out, if too expensive. 

The bird is served with a suitable sauce. 

The best sauce for this purpose is 
Sauce Supreme, and is prepared as fol- 
lows : Put two pints of clear poultry stock 
and some mushroom-liquor into a saute- 
pan. Reduce two-thirds. 

While this is going on prepare some 
poultry veloute by bringing some butter 
in a pan to bubble, and adding some flour. 
This is brought to a boil while stirring 
constantly. The flour must not be 
allowed to color. Now, gradually, add 
some poultry-stock,, stirring all the while 
with a whisk. Salt, pepper and nutm-eg 
are added. This is simmered on the side 
of the fire, and then strained. 

Now add one pint of this veloute to 
the supreme sauce; reduce the whole on 
an open fire, while constantly stirring. 
Gradually add half a pint of good cream 
and finish with a little butter. 

Sauteed Chicken 

Young chickens should be used for this 
purpose. Feel the breast bone; if it 
bends beneath pressure the bird is right. 

Empty, singe and clean, and disjoint 
the bird. This is done by cutting the 
skin at the joints and loosening the bones 
with a knife. 

The wings are cut off in such manner 
that each holds half of the breast; the 
pinions are entirely cut off; the different 
pieces are seasoned with salt and pepper; 
now heat some clarified butter in a 
saute-pan; when it is very hot insert the 
pieces of chicken and let them color 
quickly; turn them over, from time to 
time, so as to get a uniform color; cover 
the utensil and put it in a fairly hot 
oven. The legs are cooked for about 
ten minutes more than the breast and 
wings. The latter are kept hot sep- 
arately. 

When ail pieces are done, they are 
dished on a platter and kept hot in the 



288 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



oven; the pan is now moistened with 
mushroom-liquor, or chicken stock, and 
again put on the fire; only a very 
little moistening is put in the pan. As 
soon as it boils swing it around the pan 
and then add to it, gradually, the sauce 
that is to be served. This swinging in 
the pan dissolves the flavor, w^hich solidi- 
fies in the bottom of the pan; it greatly 
improves the sauce. 

A simple sauce for sauteed chicken is 
nut butter, that is, butter browned in the 
pan. This may be varied by flavoring 
it with a crushed garlic-clove. An 
addition of fine herbs will further improve 
it. A dark tomato sauce may also be 
scrv^ed. 

A good garnish for sauteed chicken is 
large dice of boletus mushrooms, sauteed 
in garlic butter; also dice of raw potatoes 
sauteed in clarified butter, and again fresh 
tomatoes cut up and sauteed in butter. 
Egg-plants are also excellent for a 
garnish. 

Sauteed chicken may be baked and 
served in the cocotte. 

Poulet en Casserole Bourgeoise 

The chicken is trussed; the breast is 
covered with strips of bacon and put into 
a deep, thick saucepan. It is colored in 
the oven, and when nearly done is trans- 
ferred to a casserole. It is now moist- 
ened with some chicken-stock and a 
little white wine. This moistening is 
used in the basting, and after being freed 
of fat, added to the sauce. 

A few minutes before the fowl is done 
bouquets of fresh vegetables are added to 
the chicken, in individual heaps, and the 
chicken is then served, either with a 
sauce, or else with an addition of butter. 
It should be car\'ed in sight of the guests. 



Chicken Pie 

A fowl is cooked (boiled) with flavoring 
vegetables until done, and is then cut up 
as for fricassee; the pieces are seasoned 
with salt and pepper and sprinkled with 
chopped onions, a few mushroom-buttons 
and some chopped parsley. The pieces 
are now put into a pie-dish, legs under- 
most, some thinly-sliced bacon is added 
and some potatoes Parisienne (spooned 
with the special potato spoon). The pie- 
dish is now filled two-thirds with chicken 
veloute (chicken-stock thickened with 
flour and egg-yolks), and a pie crust is 
laid over all, pressed to the edges of the 
dish and trimmed off. The crust is slit 
open (so the steam can escape), it should 
be painted with egg-yolk, and be baked for 
one and a half hours in a moderate oven. 

Supreme de Volaille Jeanette 

Of a poached cold fowl the supremes 
(boneless wing and breast in one piece) 
are loosened and trimmed to oval shape. 
They are covered with white chaudfroid 
sauce, by putting the pieceis on a wire 
tray and pouring the sauce over while 
still liquid. They are decorated with 
tarragon leaves. 

In a square, flat pan a half-inch layer 
of aspic is laid. On this slices of goose 
liver are superimposed (after having been 
trimmed to the shape of the supremes); 
the supremes are now put on top of the 
fat liver, and then covered with half- 
melted chicken jelly. 

When thoroughly cooled and ready to 
serve, a square piece is cut out of the now 
solid jelly around the supremes. The 
supreme is thus served Incrusted in a 
square block of thick jelly; the dish is 
decorated with greens. 




The Tiny House 

[Concluded from Page 257) 



ers and lawns will ever make the average 
suburban lot anything but a "lot," and 
most of them might as well, or better^ 
be rough, uncultivated fields for all the 
relation they bear to the houses upon 
them or the use they were intended for. 

It is to be supposed that when a man 
gives up the comforts of town apart- 
ments and hies him to the country, it is 
the garden, the outdoors, which lures him. 

Why is it, then, that he seems to take 
particular pains to arrange his garden so 
that it is about as much his own as 
Central Park is? 

It might give the average man a great 
deal of pleasure to be able to say t3 all 
the passersby on the Mall, "This little 
bit of the Park belongs to me! I cut 
that grass, I weed those flower beds in the 
evening when I come home from the 
oflice; and every Saturday afternoon I 
take the hose and thoroughly soak that 
bit of lawn there, you may see me at it 
any week in the summer." 

But then, we are not dealing with the 
fictitious average man, and we firmh' 
believe that many "commuters" wonder 
deep down in their hearts why it is they 
get from their gardens so little of the 
pleasure they anticipated when they 
came to live out of the city. 

Any one who has traveled abroad, has 
admired and perhaps "coveted the gardens 
of England, France, and Italy. Their 
charm is undeniable, and thought to be 
too elusive for reproduction on American 
soil v/ithout the aid of landscape garden- 
ers and a fair-sized fortune. 

Just why we, as a nation, are beset by 
the idea of reproducing instead of orig- 
inating beautiful gardens is a question 
apart from this discussion. But as soon 
as we try to develop, to their fullest extent, 
the advantages of our climate, and soil, 
in combination with our daily life as a 
people, we shall produce gardens which 
will equal, without necessarily resembling, 
those of other countries. 

In every case we must, however, fol- 



low the same procedure which every suc- 
cessful garden is built upon, whether it 
be in Mesopotamia or in Long Island 
City. That is, we must study the place, 
the people, and the circumstances. 

The most general fault in American 
gardens is their lack of privacy. 

No one claims that the high walls of 
Italy and France or the impenetrable 
hedges of England would invariably suit 
the climate here. But there are many 
ways to obtain seclusion without in any 
way depriving us of much-needed air in 
summer and sun in winter. One way is 
by placing the house rationally upon its. 
lot. Our custom has been to invariably 
build so that we had a "front yard," 
"back yard," and two side yards, all 
equally important, equally uninteresting, 
unbeautiful and useless. 

Of course, we have the porch which in a 
way takes the place of the outdoor living 
room, always so attractive in foreign 
gardens. And recently some laudable 
efforts are being made to incorporate the 
porch into the house, where it belongs^ 
as a real American institution, instead of 
leaving it disconsolately clinging to the 
outside and bearing no resemblance to 
the house either in shape or detail. 

But after all, a porch is a porch, and a 
garden is a garden, and one does not take 
the place of the other. 

Especially is this true of the tiny 
property. 

If you have only ten feet of ground to 
spare outside your tiny house, plan it so 
that every foot contributes to your joy 
at being in the country. Arrange it so 
that on a warm summer evening when 
the porch seems a bit close and dark, you 
wander out into your garden and sit 
beneath the stars in quiet as profound 
as on the Desert of Sahara. And in the 
winter, let your garden provide a warm 
corner out of the wind, where on a 
bright Sunday morning you may sit and 
blink in the sun. 

Once }'ou have got the desire for a 



289 



290 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



room outdoors, a real garden, which is 
neither flower beds, nor lawns, nor 
hedges, nor trees, but a place for your 
comfort, with all these things contribut- 
ing to its beauty, you will know as by 
divine inspiration where to put each 
flower and bush and path. Your plant- 
ing will be no longer a problem for 
landscape architects, but a pleasant 



occupation for yourself and family. 

So then will your successful tiny house 
stand forth in its real garden, an object 
of pride to the community and a tribute 
to one man who has refused to be the 
impossible average, and has dared to 
build and plant for his own needs. 

May he live forever and ever happy in 
his tinv house! 



Polly's Thanksgiving Party 

By Ella Shannon Bowles 



THE idea for the party came to Polly 
one night as she was washing the 
dinner dishes, and that very evening she 
waved away the boys' objection that 
Thanksgiving was a family affair pure 
and simple. 

"I'm not planning to have any one in 
for dinner," she said, "though there's 
nothing that would suit me better, if the 
apartment boasted a larger dining room. 
Buf there are three girls in my Sunday 
School class that can't possibly go home 
this year, and I've no doubt you boys 
could find somebody that won't be 
invited anywhere. Thanksgiving is such 
a cheerless place in a boarding house! If 
Ave ask a few young people in for a party 
in the evening, it will liven things up a 
bit for them, and I think it will be pretty 
good fun for us, don't you.^" 

In the end Polly had her way, and just 
a week before Thanksgiving, she sent 
invitations to three girls and to two boys 
whom Rupert and Harry suggested. 

Polly searched the shops for a card of 
two-eyed white buttons of the size of 
ten cent pieces. She carefully sewed a 
button on the upper part of a corres- 
pondence card, added eyebrows, nose and 
miouth with India ink, copied a body and 
cap from Palmer Cox's "'Brownie Book," 
painted the drawing brown, and behold. 



a saucy brownie grinned at her from the 
invitation. Underneath the picture, she 
carefully printed a jingle. 

"This Thanksgiving Brownie brings a message 

so gay, 
To visit our house on Thanksgiving Day, 
To help celebrate with all kinds of good cheer 
The 'feast of the harvest" at the end of the 

year." 

The boys took a walk into the country 
on Thanksgiving morning and came laden 
with sprays of high-bush cranberries. 
These, with the bunches of chrysan- 
themums which they bought, and Polly's 
fern and palm, gave the small living rocm 
a festive appearance. 

Assisted by her brothers, Polly served 
the dinner early. After clearing the 
dining room table, she placed a pumpkin 
jack-o-lantern in the center, and arranged 
around it piles of apples, grapes, and 
oranges. 

After the guests had been introduced 
to each other, Polly passed each one a 
paper plate containing a picture, cut and 
jumbled, into small pieces, and a tin}- 
paper of paste and a toothpick. Each 
girl and boy was asked to put the "pi" 
together and paste it on the inside of the 
plate. When arranged, the pictures were 
found to be of Thanksgiving flavor, 
"Priscilla at the Wheel," "The Pilgrims 
Going to Church." "The First Thanks- 



POLLY'S THANKSGIVLNG PARTY 



291 



giving," and others of the same type. 
To the person making his "pi" first a 
small and delicious mince pie was 
awarded. 

Pencils and paper were then passed. 
On one slip was written, "WhatT have to 
be thankful for," on the other, "Why I 
am thankful for it." The slips were 
collected, mixed up, and distributed 
again. Each guest was asked to read 
the first slip handed him with the answer. 
The result caused much laughter. 

This was followed by a modification of 
the famous "donkey game." Polly had 
painted a huge picture of a bronze turkey, 
but minus the tail, and this was pinned to 
the wall. Real turkey feathers with pins 
carefully thrust through the quills were 
handed about, and each guest was blind- 
folded and turned about in turn. To the 
one who successfully pinned a feather in 
the tail was given a turkey-shaped box of 
candy, and the consolation prize was a 
copy of "Chicken-licken." 

A pumpkin-hunt came next. Tiny 
yellow and green cardboard pumpkins 
were concealed about the apartment. 
The yellow pumpkins counted five and 
the green two points. At the end of the 
search a small pumpkin scooped out, and 
filled with small maple sugar hearts, was 
presented to the guest having the highest 
score, and a toy book of, "Peter, Peter, 
Pumpkin Eater" was awarded to the 
unfortunate holding the lowest score. 

Polly had determined to keep the 
refreshments very simple. The day be- 
fore Thanksgiving she made an easy 
salad dressing by beating two egg^ adding 



one-half a cup of cider vinegar, two table- 
spoonfuls of sugar, one teaspoonful of 
mustard and one-half a teaspoonful of 
salt, and a tablespoonful of melted butter. 
She placed the ingredients in a bowl, set 
in a dish of water on the front of the 
stove, and when they thickened she re- 
moved it from the fire and thinned with 
cream. To make sandwiches, she mixed 
the dressing with minced turkey, added 
half a fine-chopped pepper, and spread 
the mixture between dainty slices of 
bread. 

The sugared doughnuts she made by 
beating two eggs, adding one cup of 
sugar, one cup of sour milk, three table- 
spoonfuls of melted butter and flour, 
sifted with one-half a teaspoonful of soda 
and two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
to make the mixture thick enough to roll 
without sticking to the moulding board. 
They were cut with a small cutter, fried 
in deep, hot fat, and sugared plentifully. 

Rupert contributed "Corn Popped in a 
Kettle." A large spoonful of lard and a 
teaspoonful of salt were placed in the 
bottom of a large kettle over a hot fire. 
A cup of shelled popcorn was added and 
stirred briskly with a mixing spoon. 
When the kernels began to pop, the 
kettle was covered and shaken rapidly, 
back and forth, until filled with fluffy, 
white popcorn. 

With the fruit and "grape-juice lemon- 
ade," the sandwiches, doughnuts and pop- 
corn made a pleasing "spread," Polly 
felt. She served everything on paper 
plates and used paper napkins, decorated 
with Thanksgiving designs. 



To Make a Tiny House 

Oh, Little House, if thou a home would'st be 

Teach me thy lore, be all in all to me. 

Show me the way to find the charm 

That lies in every humble rite and dail\" task 

within thy walls. 
Then not alone for thee, but for the universe 

Itself, 
Shall I have lived and glorified m\' home. 

Ruth Melton. ' 




Home Ideas 

and . 

Evconotnies 




Contributions to this department will be gladly received. Accepted items will be 
paid for at reasonable rates. 



Vegetable Tarts and Pies 

ELIZABETH GOOSE of Boston be- 
stowed a great blessing upon Ameri- 
can posterity when she induced her good 
man, Thomas Fleet, to publish, in 1719, 
"The Mother Goose Melodies," many of 
which rhymes dated back to a similar 
publication printed in London two hun- 
dred years before. Is it strange that, 
with this ancestral nursery training, the 
cry against the use of pastry goes un- 
heeded, when as children, we, too, have 
sung to us, over and over, the songs of 
tarts and pies.^ 

The word tart comes from the Latin 
word tortus, because tarts were originally 
in twisted shapes, and every country 
seems to have adopted them into their 
national menus. That they were tooth- 
some in those early days is shown in 
these same nursery rhymes, and, that 
tarts seemed to have been relished by 
royalty and considered worthy of theft 
is evinced in the rhymes, 
"The Queen of Hearts she made some tarts," 
and, 

''Little King Boggen he built a fine hall, 
Pie-crust and pastry-crust that was the wall." 

Again this ancient lore speaks of "Five 
and twenty blackbirds baked in a pie," 
and, too, there was that child wonder, 
"Little Jack Horner" who, with the same 
unerring instinct of a water wizard with 
a willow twig, could, by the sole means of 
his thumb, locate and extricate, upon the 
tip of the same, a plum from the Christ- 
mas pie. 

American tarts and pies are in a class 
of their own. Pies were very closely 



allied to pioneer, and the Colonial house- 
wife of early days was forced to concoct 
fillings out of sweetened vegetables, such 
as squash, sweet potatoes, and even some 
were made of vinegar. Yet the children 
still doted on these tempting tarts, pies 
and turnovers, for were they not trotted 
In babyhood on a 

"Cock horse to Banbury Cross, 

To see what Tommy can buy: 
A penny white loaf, a penny white cake, 

And a two-penny apple pie." 

The next time you have a few varieties 
of vegetables left over, or wish a dainty 
luncheon side dish, try making a tray of 
vegetable tarts with various fillings, and 
they will prove as fascinating to choose 
from as a tray of French pastries. 

While I have worked out these modern 
recipes in tempting ways of serving left- 
overs, using common vegetables, I will 
lay all pastry honors to our fore-mothers, 
who passed on to us the art of pie-making. 
Proof as to the harmlessness of pies in 
diet Is shown in the fine constitution of 
our American doughboy, who is* certainly 
a great credit to the heritage of pastry 
handed down by the Daughters of the 
American Revolution. * 

The moral of this discourse is that^ 
"The child Is father of the man," and 
men dote on pies. 

Potato Tarts a la Gratin 

Line round muffin pans with pastry 
circles as for other preserve tarts, and 
fill with the following: 

Dice cold-boiled potatoes, season with 
salt and pepper, moisten with white 
sauce, made of two tablespoonfuls of flour^ 
two tablespoonfuls of lard, one cup of milk. 



292 



HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES 



293 



one-half a teaspoonful salt. Mix with this 
grated cheese. Fill the shells and sprinkle 
grated cheese on top. Bake a light 
brown. 

Baked Onion Dumplings 

Parboil medium-sized onions in salted 
water. Cut half way down in quarters, 
add salt, butter, and pepper. Place each 
on a square of biscuit dough or pastry, 
rolled thin. Bring together opposite 
corners, twist, and place in a moderate 
oven to bake the onion tender. Serve 
with white sauce. 

Fresh Tomato Tart Salad 

With a round cooky cutter make 
rounds of pastry. Cut an equal number 
with the doughnut cutter. Prick, sprin- 
kle lightly with grated cheese and bake 
a light brown. Place a plain shell on a 
crisp lettuce leaf, add a slice of tomato, 
not larger, on top. Then pour on a little 
mayonnaise and place on top the tart 
shell with a hole in the- center. Serve at 
once. 

Green Tomato Mince Pie 

One peck of green tomatoes, put 
through a food chopper. Boil, drain and 
add as much water as juice drained out. 
Scald and drain again. Add water as 
before, scald and redrain. This time add 
half as much water, then the following: — 

3 pounds brown sugar 2 tablespoonfuls cloves 

2 pounds raisins 2 tablespoonfuls all- 

2 tablespoonfuls nut- spice 

meg 2 tablespoonfuls salt 

2 tablespoonfuls cinna- 
mon 

Boil all together, and add one cup of 
vinegar. Cook till thick as desired. Put 
in jars and seal. 

To one pint of this mixture add one 
cup of chopped apple and the juice and 
rind, grated or ground. Sweeten to 
taste, fill crust and bake as the usual 
mince pie. 

Evaporated apples may be used, but 
grind before soaking and do not cook. 

These pies will not harm children, and 
are very inexpensive, as compared to 



those made of mincemeat. 

Plum Tomato Preserves Turnovers 

Make a circle as big as a saucer, or a 
square equal in area. Fill the center with 
plum tomato preserve and fold over 
matching edges, either as a half circle, or 
a triangle. Prick and bake. 

Turnovers are especially ideal as pies 
for fitting into lunch boxes, and may be 
made of any sweetened vegetable preserve 
for school lunches. 

King Cabbage Tarts 

Use cabbage, which has been boiled in 
salted water and seasoned with salt and 
pepper to taste. Make a white sauce and 
pour over, mixing well with the cabbage. 
Fill round mufhn pans lined with pastry 
circles, sprinkle with cheese over the top 
and bake. Carrots may be used the 
same way, omitting the cheese and using 
latticed strips of pastry over the top. 
These will be hardly recognizable as such 
common vegetables. m. k. s. 



New Ways of Using Milk 

WHILE probably the best way of 
using milk is to drink it in its 
raw or pasteurized state, many children 
and adults will not use it in that form. 
In that case, the problem is to disguise 
or flavor the milk in some way so that the 
food value will ' not be changed or de- 
stroyed, and yet be more palatable than 
the natural product. 

It has been found that children will 
drink flavored, sweetened milk when they 
will simply not touch pure milk. In 
order to demonstrate how universal the 
craving for sweetened, cold drinks has 
become, and how easy it is for the milk- 
men to cater to this demand. Prof. J. L. 
Sammis of the Wisconsin College of 
Agriculture • conducted a booth at the 
1921 Wisconsin state fair and dispensed 
milk in twenty-iive new, pleasing, and 
attractive ways over a soda fountain. 

Thousands of these milk drinks were 



294 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



consumed, and a report from a Tennessee 
county fair also revealed that 10,000 
similar drinks were sold there by an 
enterprising dairyman. There is nothing 
elaborate about the proposition. If these 
drinks are to be prepared in the home, 
and the whole question is largely one of 
increasing the home consumption of milk, 
Professor Sammis declares: 

"Take any flavor that happens to be 
on the pantry shelf, put a little in a glass, 
add sugar to taste, fill the glass with 
milk, and put in some ice. That is all 
there is to it. Be sure that the milk is 
drank very cold, when it is most pala- 
table. Vanilla is a very good flavor." 

It is not even necessary that whole 
milk be used, as condensed milk will do 
very well. Simply dilute the condensed 
milk with an equal volume of water, and 
use as whole milk. Condensed milk, 
however, has a cooked flavor found 
objectionable by many, and, in that case, 
a suitable substitute is powdered milk, 
which has no such cooked flavor. 

To prepare a powdered milk drink, put 
the flavor into the receptacle first, then 
the sugar, and then the powdered milk 
with a little water. Beat the powdered 
milk with an egg beater until it is wet 
through, and then add the rest of the 
water, finishing with the ice. 

By adding fruit colors these various 
milk drinks can be given a changed 
external appearance, and wise is the 
mother who will prepare them often when 
her children show an inclination not to 
drink enough milk. Served at the table, 
they attract every member of the family. 
These milk drinks are no more expensive 
than many of the more watery and less 
useful compounds, so often substituted. 

Soda fountains might well consider 
these various forms of sweetened and 
flavored milk to attract new trade. At 
the fountains the various flavoring syrups 
would naturally be used, and no sugar is 
necessary. And instead of clear water, 
carbonated water is used. The variety 
of these drinks is limited only by the 
ingenuity of the dispenser. w. a. f. 



Old New England Sweetmeats 
Crab-Apple Dainty 

WASH seven pounds of fruit and let 
boil with a little water until soft 
enough to press through a colander. 
x^dd three pounds of sugar, three pints of 
vinegar, and cloves and cinnamon to 
taste, and let the mixture boil, slowly, 
until it is thick and jelly-like. 

Pumpkin Preserve 

Pare a medium-sized pumpkin and cut 
into inch cubes. Let steam until tender, 
but not broken. Or cut the pumpkin 
into large pieces and let steam a short 
time and then cut the cubes. 

Prepare a syrup of sugar and water, 
about three pounds of sugar and a pint- 
and-a-half of water, in which simmer the 
juice and rind (cut into strips) of two 
lemons. Drop the pumpkin cubes into 
the syrup and let simmer, carefully, until 
the pumpkin is translucent. Dip out the 
pumpkin and pack in ordinary preserve 
jars; pour over the syrup and lemon and 
close the jars. s. a. r. 

Hi H: ^ 

Apple-Orange Marmalade 

TAKE seven pounds of apples, all 
green, if possible; wash and remove 
any imperfections, also the blossom and 
stem. Cut, but do not core nor peel. 
Cut in very small pieces. Three oranges; 
wash and remove peel, which put through 
finest knife of food-chopper, after dis- 
carding the inner white peeling, also seeds. 
Put the apple on to boil, adding water 
till it shows among the fruit, and boil 
to quite soft; mash fine and put in jelly 
bag to drain over night. Boil the juice 
with the orange pulp, cut in very small 
pieces; add the orange peel and cook 
for twenty minutes, or till the orange 
is cooked. Add five (5) pounds of granu- 
lated sugar and let boil until a little in a 
cold saucer will jell. ; 

This recipe has never been in print to ' | 
my knowledge and will prove very satis- 
factory to the majority of people. B.F.B. ^^ 




uer I es 

and 




^MM^ 



THIS department is for the benefit and free use of our subscribers. Questions relating to recipes 
and those pertaining to culinary science and domestic economics in general, Vv^ill be cheerfully 
answered by the editor. Communications for this department must reach us before the first of the 
month preceding that in which the answers are expected to appear. In letters requesting answers 
by mail, please enclose address and stamped envelope. Address queries to Janet T\I. Hill, Editor. 
American Cookery, 221 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass. 



Query No. 4241 — "I wish you would let me 
have a good recipe for Caramel Icing, the kind 
that does not call for the whites of eggs." 

Caramel Icing 

Add two cups and one-half of dark 
brown sugar to three-fourths a cup of 
milk, and let boil thirteen minutes. When 
nearly done add three tablespoonfuls of 
butter and one teaspoonful of vanilla. 
Beat until nearly cold, then spread on top 
of cake. It may also be used between the 
layers. If a sugar thermometer be used, 
the syrup should be boiled to the soft-ball 
stage, or between 235 deg. Fah. to 240 
deg. Fah. 

Query No. 4242. — "Please let me have a 
recipe for Spiced Pineapple." 

Spiced Pineapple 

Weigh six pounds of pineapple, after 
paring, coring, and cutting in rather small 
pieces. Cook in a porcelain kettle with 
three cups of the best white vinegar, 
until the pineapple is softened, keeping 
the kettle closely covered, and turning 
the fruit once in a while so that the pieces 
may be equally exposed to the action of 
the vinegar. Tie in cheesecloth or net- 
ting one ounce, each, of whole cloves, pre- 
viously bruised, and stick cinnamon, 
broken into small pieces; add these to 
the kettle with five pounds of granulated 
sugar, and let cook until the mixture is of 
the consistency of marnrialade, being care- 
ful to avoid burning. The spices may be 
removed as soon as they have given the 
flavor desired. 



- Query No. 4243. — "Will you kindly answer 
the following in your Department of Queries and 
Answers.^ Should Boiled Potatoes be started 
in cold or boiling water.^ Should Corn on the 
cob be put on in cold water and allowed to 
simmer for several minutes after it comes to a 
boil, or be put on in boiling water and boiled- 
five minutes.'' Should Chicken, Turkey, or 
othe'r Fowl be covered during roasting.^ Can 
you give a clear and up-to-date article on correct 
Table Service.''" 

To Boil Potatoes 

Very young, new potatoes — • the kind 
hardly bigger than walnuts, should be 
put on in cold water and brought quickly 
to a boil, for potatoes so young as to be 
immature contain more or less of a bitter 
principle, which is desirable to get rid of 
in the cooking. Potatoes in their prime, 
as from Sepl^mber to March, are best 
put on in boiling, salted water. Later in 
the spring, when the potatoes begin to 
sprout and shrivel they ought to be put 
on in coLd water and brought, as slowly 
as possible, to a boil, or allowed to stand 
in cold water for some hours before 
cooking. 

To Boil Corn 

It is usually preferred to put on the 
corn in cold water, bring to a boil, and let 
simmer until done. But to steam the 
ears will give, in our opinion, the best 
results. 

Should Chicken Be Covered While 
Roasting? 

Decidedly not; it spoils the flavor not 
only of chicken and turke}^, but of any 



2 '^5 



296 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



prime joint of meat to bake it iii a covered 
pan. The covered pan is properly used 
for braising only, for the tough cuts which 
have to be braised call for the combination 
of baking and steaming which results 
from the covered pan. All kinds of 
poultry, and all prime joints of meat 
should be placed on a rack in an uncov- 
ered roasting pan, put into a very hot 
oven for the first ten or fifteen minutes, 
and then have one or two cups of water 
poured over them, mixed with fat if the 
meat is lean, this water to be used for 
basting every ten or fifteen minutes. 
The rack in the pan serves both to allow 
a circulation of air around the meat, and 
to keep it from touching the water. It 
is this circulation of air that gives the fine 
flavor of the properly roasted meat, and 
the frequent opening of the oven door 
for the basting serves to supply the fresh 
air needed for the best results. 

Instructions on Table Service 

The Up-to-Date Waitress, by Janet 
M. Hill, or Breakfasts, Luncheons, and 
Dinners, by Mary D. Chambers, both 
contain clear and up-to-date directions 
for table service. We can supply these 
books if you wish to have either of them. 

Query No. 4244. — "Will you tell me In your 
paper why my Lemon Pies become watery when 
I return them to the oven to brown the meringue? 
Also give me some suggestions for Desserts for 
Summertime, other than frozen dishes." 

Why Lemon Pies Become Watery 

A lemon pie may become watery when 
put in the oven to brown the meringue, 
if it be left in the oven too long; or it may 
water because the filling was not suffi- 
ciently cooked before putting into the 
pastry shell; or it may be from an insuffi- 
ciency of flour being used in making the 
filling. If you had told us just how your 
pies are made, we would be better able 
to solve your problem. 

In future we hope to answer queries as 
soon as they reach us, and by direct reply 
to each individual questioner; but up to 
the present we have answered most of 
them in this department of the magazine, 



and since it takes two or three months to 
get the manuscript into print many of the 
questions are answered too late. So it 
happens with your inquiry regarding 
desserts for Summertime. Any of the 
cold desserts, such as gelatines, custards, 
blancmanges, or fresh fruits with cream, 
are suitable for summer and are easily 
prepared. 

Query No. 4245. — "Will you oblige me by an 
answer to the following in the pages of American 
Cookery? How shall I make Tartare Sauce? 
What should be the temperature of the fat for 
French Fried Potatoes or for Potato Chips? 
Mine are never crisp, can you tell me why? 
Also tell me how to Broil Fish, how to make a 
good Cream Dressing for fish, meat, or cro- 
quettes, and how to make Soft Gingerbread with 
a sauce to put over it." 

Tartare Sauce 

A Tartare Sauce or Sauce Tartare is 
merely a mayonnaise dressing with pickles 
chopped into it, a tablespoonful, each, or 
more, of chopped cucumber, cauliflower, 
and olives, with a tablespoonful of capers 
and two teaspoonfuls of red pepper to a 
pint of the mayonnaise. There is, how- 
ever, a hot Tartare Sauce which is made 
by adding to one cup of thick white 
sauce the following ingredients: One 
tablespoonful, each, of chives, parsley, 
pickled gherkins, olives, and capers, all 
put through the food chopper. Stir into 
the white sauce; heat while stirring con- 
stantly, but do not allow the mixture to 
boil, and add one tablespoonful of vinegar 
just before serving. 

Crisp Fried Potatoes 

We think your trouble is not so much 
the temperature of the fat, which should 
be about 350 deg. to 375 deg. Fah., as it 
is that potatoes, to be crisped by deep 
frying, should first be soaked in cold 
water for twenty to thirty minutes, then 
dried perfectly before immersing in the 
fat. Also, they should be removed from 
the fat the moment they are done, and 
drained dry. 

To Broil Fish 

Wipe the fish dry, and brush it lightly 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




Housewvcs 
the j.-»Lion over 
wi-1 be en:husias- 
tic over the ap- 
pointment of Mrs. 
Belle DeGraf a5 
Domestic Scienc 
Director oftheCal- 
ifornia Prune anc. 
Apricot Grower 
Mis. DeGraf en- 
joys a country- 
wide reputation 
as a home-cook- 
ing expert and as 
an authority on 

food values. 




Ineverkne'w what prunes and apricots could do until 

I came to analy2,e the flavor-and'health values of these two fruit- 
foods. At first their use seemed rather Hmited but with each new 
dish others immediately suggested themselves. 

The chief nutritive element in both prunes and apricots, of 
course, is fruit sugar. But you derive great value, too, from their 
mineral salts and organic acids. These improve the quality of the 
blood and counteract the acid-elements in meat, eggs, cereals 
and other high-protein foods. 

Also, they are rich in tonic iron and other mineral and vita- 
mine elements neededafor body tone. Nor should I forget to 
mention that prunes especially provide a natural laxative made 
in Nature's own pharmacy. 

But aside from these essential health values, I found that 
Sunsv^eet Prunes and Apricots offer wonderful possibilities — 
varying from the most delicate souffle to the more substantial 
cobbler, pie or pudding. —Belle DeGraf 

The new 1922 Sunsweet Recipe Packet— edited by Mrs. Belle DeGraf — 
will be nothing less than a revelation to you. The recipes are printed on 
gummed slips [5x3"] for easy pasting in your cook book. And it's free! 
California Prune (S* Apricot Growers Inc., 1 196 Market St., San Jose, CaL 

SUNSWEET 

California's nature-'Fltworjed 

PRUNES '^APRICOTS 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
297 



298 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



with oil or melted butter. Place it in a 
double wire broiler, and cook over a clear 
iire, turning every other minute until 
both sides are a light, even brown. Re- 
move carefully from the broiler, using a 
sharp boning knife to free it from adhe- 
sions. If the fish is thoroughly oiled, it 
should not adhere to the broiler. 

Cream Sauce 

Blend together butter and' flour, and 
add to hot milk; keep stirring until the 
whole has boiled for at least one minute. 
Add seasonings to taste, at the beginning 
of cooking. The proportions for a thin, 
a medium, and a thick sauce are, respect- 
ively: ■ One, two, and four tablespoonfuls 
of flour to one cup of milk. And an equal 
volume of butter, or one-third less than 
the flour, is called for. 

Soft Gingerbread 

To two beaten eggs in a mixing-bowl 
add two tablespoonfuls of butter, melted, 
three-eighths a cup of sour milk, and one 
cup of molasses. Beat all together; add 
two cups of flour, sifted with one-half a 
teaspoonful of salt and one teaspoonful 
of baking powder, and one tablespoonful 
of ginger. Lastly, add one teaspoonful 
of baking soda, dissolved in two tea- 
spoonfuls of water. Bake in a sheet, and 
serve with whipped cream for a simple 
dessert. 



Query No. 4246. — "Can you give me a 
recipe for Deep-Dish Apple Pie.'' It has a thick 
top covering, I cannot call it a crust, for it is 
something between a cake and a biscuit dough — 
not at all like pie crust." 

Deep-Dish Apple Pie 

This is the genuine English Apple Pie — 
they would call ours an apple tart. It is 
made in oval baking-dishes of thick 
yellow ware, about two and one-half or 
three inches deep, and with flat rims an 
inch in width. The first thing to do is to 
invert a teacup — preferably one without 
a handle — in the bottom of the dish, 
then core and pare sour, juicy apples — 
any number, from six to a dozen, depend- 



ing on the size of the family and the dish — 
and divide them in eighths. Arrange 
these in alternate layers with sugar in the 
dish, with a generous sprinkling of whole 
cloves over each layer, and pile, layer on 
layer, until not another bit of apple can 
go in anywhere without toppling out. 
The apples are piled up as high again as 
the depth of the dish, or higher. Now 
lay over all a very rich biscuit dough, 
lightly rolled out to one-fourth inch in 
thickness. Decorate this with leaves, 
or other cut-out designs, and arrange 
them over the covering and moisten the 
under sides with water, to make them 
adhere during the baking. Place long 
strips of the dough over the brim of the 
pie-dish, and press with the bowl of a 
spoon in concentric designs. Bake in a 
moderate oven for an hour. Pieces of the 
crust are cut off for serving, and spoonfuls 
of the apple pulp are served with them on 
the plate, then, as soon as convenient the 
inverted cup is removed, and the rich 
liquid collected under it is spooned over 
each serving of crust and apples. 

Query No. 4247. — "I wish very much to 
know the right temperature for Baking both 
layer and loaf, white, butter Cakes, also for 
chocolate Cake. Should the Baking begin with 
a cold or a warm oven.? How long should each 
kind of cake bake?" 

Temperature for Cake Baking 

The usual time and temperature for 
baking layer cakes is 400 deg. Fah., for 
twenty minutes. Loaf cakes, made with 
butter, with or without chocolate, take 
a temperature of from 350 deg. to 375 
deg. Fah. for from forty minutes to an 
hour. These temperatures are approxi- 
mate, and are in accordance with the 
general rules for oven temperature, but 
this has to be adapted to the recipe. The 
more sugar used the lower should be the 
temperature, to avoid burning, and espe- 
cially when molasses is used does the 
need to decrease temperature become 
imperative. The more butter used the 
higher should be the temperature, at 
least, until the cake is "set," to keep it 
from falling. Cakes with much butter 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




Another 
Mystery Cake 

Can You Name It ? 

THE first Royal Mystery Cake Contest created a countrywide sensation. 
Here is another cake even more wonderful. 'Who can give it a name 
that will do justice to its unusual qualities? 

This cake can be made just right only with Royal 
Balding Powder. Will you make it and name it? 

$500 For The Best Names 

For the name selected as best, we will pay $250. For the second, third, fourth, and iifth choice, we will 
pay $100, $75, $50, and $25 respectively. Anyone may enter the contest, but only one name from each 
person w^ill be considered. All names must be received by December 
15th. In case of ties, the full amount of the prize will be given to each 
tying contestant. Do not send your cake. Simply send the name you 
suggest with your own name and address, to the 

ROYAL BAKING POWDER CO., 168 "William Street, New York 



HOW TO MAKE IT 

Use level measurements for all materials 

4 teaspoons Royal Baking Powder 
1 cup milk Grated rind of ^ oranpre 

1 egg and 1 yolk 2>^ cups flour ^ teaspoon salt 

114 squares (IJ^ozs.) of unsweetened chocolate (melted) 



^ cup shortening 
1 ^ cups sugar 



Cream shortening, add sugar and grated orange rind. Add beaten egg yolks. 
Sift together flour, salt and Royal Baking Powder and add alternately with 
the milk; lastly fold in one beaten egg white. Divide batter into two parts. To 
one part add the chocolate. Put by tablespoonfuls, alternating dark and light 
batter, into three greased layer cake pans. Bake in moderate oven 20 min. 

FILLING AND ICING 

3 tablespoons melted butter 3 squares (3 ozs.) unsweetened chocolate 
3 cups confectioner's sugar 2 tablespoons orange juice 1 egg white 
Grated rind of ^ orange and pulp of 1 orange 
Put butter, sugar, orange juice and rind into bowl. Cut pulp from orange, re- 
moving skin and seeds, and add. Beat all together until smooth. Fold in 
beaten egg white. Spread this icing on layer used for top of cake. 
While icing is soft, sprinkle with unsweetened chocolate shaved 
in fine pieces with sharp knife (use ^square). To remainintr 
icing add 214 squares unsweetened chocolate which has 
been melted. Spread this thickly between layers and 
^ on sides of cake. _ 



Biiv ad-\-crtiscd Goods — Do not 
299 



tccept su 



bstitutes 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



need the greatest heat at first, and then 
a reduced temperature. So do all cakes 
of small size. Large cakes are better at a 
uniform temperature, not so high as the 
average. A different flavor is produced, 
especially in very rich cakes with a good 
many eggs, when put into a cool oven 
and baked with gradually increasing heat, 
from that developed by a high initial 
temperature and then a decreased heat. 
The quality of the flour and shortening 
also affect the temperature and time 
needed in baking. It is a good safe 
thing to follow the rules, and to temper 
them with judgment. When the cake is 
just firm in the center, and has shrunk 
from the sides of the pan, it is done, no 
matter what the tempeiature has been 
or how long it has baked. But you will 
always get your cake at this condition, 
more surely and safely, by following the 
rules, though you must be on the alert to 
use them with flexibility. 



Query No. 4248. — "Will you please give- 
me a recipe for Canned Pimientoes.^" 

Canned Pimientoes 

Cut round the stem of each, arid with 
a small, sharp knife remove the seeds and. 
the white partitions inside. Set on a. 
baking sheet in a hot oven until the thin, 
outside skin puffs and cracks, then remove- 
it with a small, sharp knife. Or the}r 
may be scalded, then dipped into cold 
water and the skin be carefully removed.. 
Sometimes the skin is left on. Now 
press each one flat, and arrange them ini 
layers, alternately overlapping one an- 
other, in the jars, without liquid, and 
process for twenty-five • to thirty-five 
minutes at 212 deg. Fah. During the 
processing a thick liquid should exude^ 
covering the pimientoes. 




Query No. 4249. — "I should like a recipe for 
New York Ice Cream." 

Classes of Ice Cream 

There are three distinct classes of Ice 
Cream: The Philadelphia, which is 
supposed to be made of heavy cream; the 
French, which is made with eggs on a 
soft custard foundation; and the so- 
called American, which is made on the 
foundation of' a thin white sauce. Alt 
three classes are made in New York, and 
in every other large city, but we have 
never heard that any special recipe for 
ice cream is peculiar to New York. The 
less expensive forms. of cream, in that and 
every other city, are those based on a 
thin white sauce, sweetened, flavored, and 
frozen. 



— - _f| 

It was the custom of the congregation 
to repeat the Twenty^third Psalm in con- 
cert, and Mrs. Armstrong's habit was to 
keep about a dozen words ahead all the 
way through. A stranger was asking one 
day about Mrs. Armstrong. "Who," he 
inquired, "was the lady who was already 
by the still waters while the rest of us 
were lying down in green pastures?" 

Metropolitan. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
300 



ADVERTISEAIENTS 



^^^' 



.tec 



The Finest Relish with Beef 
as well as Poultry 

Nature's own condiment — the tonic tang of health- 
giving cranberries gives zest to the appetite, and a 
piquant flavor to meats — hot or cold. 

When cooked with pot-roast or cheaper cuts of 
meats cranberries make the meat tender and de- 
licious. (See recipe folder for this and other recipes.) 

8 lbs. cranberries and 2V2 lbs. of sugar make 10 tumblers of 
beautiful clear jelly. Try this recipe : — 

Cranberry Jelly 

Cook until soft the desired quantity of cranberries with VA pints of 
water for each two quarts of berries. Strain the juice. through a 
jelly bag. 

Measure the juice and heat it to the boiling point. Add one cup 
of sugar for every two cups of juice; stir until the sugar is dis- 
solved; boil briskly for five minutes; skim, and pour into glass 
tumblers, porcelain or crockery molds. 

Always cook cranberries in porcelain-lined, en- 
ameled or aluminum utensils. 

A recipe folder, containing many ways to use and 
preserve cranberries, "will be sent free on request 

For quality and economy specify "Eatmor" Cranberries 
American Cranberjy Exchange, 90 We8t Broadway, New York City 



mm^u^' 






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Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
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AMERICAN COOKERY 



"Choisa" 

Orange Pekoe 

Ceylon Tea 



Pre-War 
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l-lb. Cartons, 60 cents 
3^-lb. Cartons, 35 cents 



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We invite comparison with any tea 
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BOSTON BROOKLINE 



Baked Apples wiih 
Marshmallows 



6 apples ^ cup boiling water 
^2 box Campfire Marshmallows 
1 tablespoon butter 

Wipe apples, remove core, cut through skin 
half way down to make points and place in 
baking dish. Reserve six Campfire Marsh- 
mallows, cut remainder in pieces and put in 
center of apples. Put bits of butter on top. 
Surround apples with water and bake in hot 
oven until soft, basting frequently. _ Be very 
careful that they do not lose their shape. 
Remove from oven, put a whole marshmallow 
in the top of each apple, and return to oven 
until slightly brown. 
Surround with the syrup from 
the pan and serve hot or cold 
with cream. 

Recipes on each package 



tyoz. 

'6\ 



)acWt 



MarshmaUoivs 



heautiful Recipe Book FREE 
Dept. A, THE CAMPFIRE CO., Milwaukee, Wis. 



To Express Personality 

{Concluded from Page 26q) 

luncheon — no better than she served 
herself at home, though. She stared at 
her own slim, capable fingers. Was she 
domestic, after all.'' 

"We've been looking at apartments in 
the city," Burt went on — - "apartments 
in a hotel, you know. — Try the omelet, 
Mrs. Brown — Nan's don't fall flat as 
soon as other omelets do. — • But we 
haven't found what really appeals to us." 

"I should think not," declared Mrs. 
Brown, vigorously. "I always say a 
person hasn't a spark of originality that 
will go and live in a coop just like hun- 
dreds of others, all cut to the same 
pattern. Look at your Aunt Susan, now. 
This house belonged to old Joe Potter, 
he built it less'n ten years ago an Mis' 
Potter she had it the way she wanted it, 
and that was like the house she lived in 
when she was a girl, little, tucked-up 
rooms, air-tight stoves, a tidy on every 
chair, and she made portieres out of 
paper beads that tickled 'em both silly — 
yes, and tickled everybody in the ear that 
went through 'em, though that wan't 
what I meant to say. When she died, 
Joe wouldn't live here, said he wouldn't 
be so homesick for Julia in another house, 
this one was full of her. So, your Aunt 
Susan bought it, and what did she do.^ 

"She knocked out partitions, took 
down fire-boards, threw out a good parlor 
set and lugged in tables and chairs from 
all over, put big panes of glass where 
there was little ones — in some places, 
she did, and only the good angels and 
Susan Winchester knows why she didn't 
change 'em all, they're terrible mean to 
wash — ■ made the front hall into a setting 
room and the parlor into a bedroom, got 
two bathrooms and no dining room • — 
well, to make a long story short, this 
house is now Susan Winchester. Any- 
body that knows Susan would know it was 
her house if they see it in China. 

"Did you learn to keep house with your 
mother.?" 

The transition Was so abrupt that Anne 



Biiv advertised Goods — Do not accept sub<;titu<-cs 
302 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




. anut has tht 
.:t fresh fror 

- ■ : jdness the v~. 

— d realize, too, that : 
.. : JUS- and nourishing— T 
other foods. 

There IS a secret behind the wonderful flavor of 
Baker*s,^ See if YOU can find it in the can. 

In the can: — Baker's Fresh Grated Coconut- 
canned in its own milL 

In the package : — Bah ^ 

— sugar-cured — for tho; 
fashioned kind. 

Have YOU a copy of the Baker Recipe Booklet } 
If not, write for it NOW—it's free. 

THE FRANKLIN BAKER COMPANY, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



BAKER'S COCONUT 



Buy advertised Goods ^- Do not accept substitutes 
303 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



DIABETIC 



QUICKLY MADE WITH 



RICH IN 
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PRACTICALLY 
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Thompson's Malted Food Company 

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COMBINATION PRODUCTS CO. 

ir 504)CuaarilBldg. Chicagt.lil. 



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Dress Designing Lessons 
FREE 

Women — Girls — 15 or over, can easily learn Dress 

and Costume Designing during their spare moments 

IN TEN WEEKS 

Dress and Costume Designers / 

Frequently Earn / Cut and Mail to 

$45 to $100 a Week /^^^f^'li" J^^titute, 

Many Start Parlors in / Rochester, N. Y. 

Their Own Homes _/ gend me AT ONCE free 
Every woman who now / sample lessons in the sub- 
does plain sewing / ject here checked, 
should take up / Q Dress Designing D MiUinery 
Designing 




Hundreds Learn 
Millinery by Mail 



/ Name.. 
Address 



Started. "I — • my aunt brought me up 
— and nine cousins," she answered. "My 
aunt is as unlike Burt's as you can imag- 
ine, but just, as dear and good. She had 
a big family, and there was never time 
enough to have her home as she wanted 
it — • so she thought — and I thought so, 
too — but yet — • Aunt Milly's home was 
always full of happy children, and, per- 
haps, that's what she really wanted, more 
than dainty furnishings or a spotless 
kitchen." 

"Folks, mostly, get what they want^ 
even if they don't know it," confirmed 
Mrs. Brown. "Look at the Admiral, 
here. He don't want to come over and 
live with me, same as Susan meant he 
should. He wants to stay right in his 
own home, and have his meals and petting 
same as usual, and here you come along 
today and give them to him. Trouble is, 
folks don't always know what it is they 
want." 

When Mrs. Brown went back to her 
own dinner, she left Anne with something 
to think about. Washing the dishes in 
Aunt Susan's white sink, which was fitted 
to that very purpose, drying them upon a 
rack which held every dish apart from its 
neighbors, and, finally, poUshing the 
quaintly shaped pieces upon Aunt Susan's 
checked towel, which remained dry and 
spotless; opening every drawer and cup- 
board to see that all was left in the dainty 
order she had found there, Anne had a 
clear vision of the blue and silver furnish- 
ings at the Kensington. What had she 
told Burt: "It doesn'4: look Uke either of 
us".'' — while Aunt Susan's home — 

"Burt," she called, "come and answer 
this question. Did you come to Byrnton 
instead of Branton on purpose.^" 

"What's this.?" said Burt. "Cross- 
examination?" 

"It's an examination, surely, but I 
won't be cross," replied Anne, with a rare 
dimple. "You must answer my question 
truly." 

"Yes, Your Honor," said Burt. "I 
did. Your Honor." 

"Did you know your Aunt Susan 
wouldn't be home?" 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
304 



ADVERTISEMENT 



/^./f^ 




nojti 



Household Discoveries with Gelatine 

HOUSEKEEPERS everywhere are constantly sending me new and unusual uses 
for gelatine. These hints are so interesting that I am giving as many as possible 
here, together with one of my own gelatine specialties. If you, too, have discovered 
some new use for Knox Gelatine, send it to me that I may publish it on this page. 



A DELICIOUS THANKSGIVING DESSERT 

] envelope Knox Sparkling Gelatine 1 teaspoonful vanilla ^ pound nut meats, chopped 

Yi cup cold water 1 cup maple syrup }/% teaspoonful salt 

White of 1 egg . 2 cups cream 

Soften the gelatine in the cold water ten minutes and dissolve over hot water. Heat the maple 
syrup and pour on the beaten white of the egg, beating until very light. Beat in the gelatine and, 
when cool, fold in the cream, beating well, and add vanilla, salt and nut meats. Line mold with 
lady fingers or slices of stale sponge cake. Turn in the cream and chill. 

For after 'dinner candies, try Knox Gelatine mints 

Fruit juices, from canned or **put-up" fruits, need not be served with the fruit 
but poured off, saved and made into Knox Gelatine desserts and salads. The juice 
from canned strawberries, loganberries, or blackberries makes a most delicious jelly 
when combined with Knox Gelatine, or with nuts, cheese and lettuce, a delightful 
fruit salad. 

Canned apricot juice, jellied with spices and grated orange rind, makes an appe- 
tizing relish for meat or fish. 

Canned pineapple juice, molded with sliced tomatoes or cucumbers, makes a 
most unusual jellied salad. 

In these fruit juice desserts and salads, use one level tablespoonful Knox Gelatine 
for every two cups of juice, or two level teaspoonfuls to a cup of liquid. First soften 
gelatine in cold water and add fruit juice, heated sufficiently to dissolve gelatine. 
Pour into wet molds and chill. 

Bread crumbs, rice and nuts, combined with Knox Gelatine, make a nutritious 
"Vegetarian Nut Loaf." This may be used in place of meat and is appropriate for 
a simple home luncheon or dinner. See detailed recipe, page 5, of the Knox booklet, 
"Food Economy." 

MANY GELATINE DISCOVERIES IN KNOX BOOKLETS 

There are many additional uses for gelatine in my recipe booklets. "Dainty Desserts" and 
"Food Economy," which contain recipes for salads, desserts, meat and fish molds, relishes, candies, 
and invalid dishes. They will be sent free for 4 
cents in stamps and your grocer's name. 




Any domeslic science teacher can have sufficient gelatin,' 
for her class, if she will write me on school stationery, stating 

quantity and when needed. 



'Wherever a recipe calls for Gelatine — think of KNOX" Wf' 
MRS CHARLES B. KNOX 

KNOX GELATINE 

107 Knox Avenue 



Johnstown, N. Y. "^^1 




Buy advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 
305 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




A Delicious and 

Sustaining Breakfast 

All the wholesome, 
nutritious food ele- 
ments of wheat, and 
malt are combined in 

MALT 

BREAKFAST 

FOOD 

With cream or milk, 
it makes a healthful, 
substantial morning 
meal for the whole 
family. At grocers, — 
in the blue and yellow 
package with the 
little Dutch girl on it. 
Try it — ^ tomorrow 

THE MALTED CEREALS CO. 
Burlingrton, Vermont 




DELISCO 




The Most 

Delicious 

Substitute 

for Coffee 

Drinkers 

Endorsed by 



Physicians and 

Professor Allyn 

ofWestfield 



Soothes the nerves, equals in taste 
and aroma the choicest grades of 
coffee, without the caffeine effects 



Delisco contains 21% protein 



For Children, Adults and Invalids 

At your Grocer's — 50 cup pkg. — 48c 

By Parcel Post Prepaid : 

1 package 55c; 2 packages $1.00 

Sawyer Crystal Blue Go. 

Sole Selling Agents 
88 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 

I^= LOCAL AGENTS WANTED °=^ 



"Our Aunt Susan," corrected Burt. — 
"No, Your Honor — • that is, I thought—" 

"You knew she was going to Cali- 
fornia.?" 

"Yes, Your Honor." 

"This summer.?" 

"I didn't know exactly when — • hon- 
estly, Nan, I did want you to meet her." 

"Why?" 

"I knew you'd like the way she keeps 
house. I didn't realize that the house 
could speak for itself, without her. — 
You do like it, Nan.?" 

"I don't have to answer questions, 
because I'm the Judge," Nan told him. 
"I'll ask you one more. Do you want me 
to ask you to take this cottage, for us, in 
the fall, and stay'in it until Aunt Susan 
comes back.?" 

"Not unless Your Honor pleases." 

"Case dismissed, for lack of evidence," 
said Nan. — ■ "Burt, could we live here.?" 

"We could. I'll admit it's what I'd 
like, if you do. The difference in rents 
would buy gasoline. Could you work 
here, and keep house, too.?" 

"I can if I'm smart," answered Nan, 
soberly. "I wonder if I'm smart." 

"Dear," said Burt. "What have you 
done since you came to New York but 
work and keep house, too, in less con- 
venient quarters than this, and with no 
one to help you — no good husband 
likeme— .?" 

"That's so!" she turned a radiant face 
upon him. 

"If we like, we can begin another home, 
of our very own, when Aunt Susan wants 
hers back," Burt sAiiled quizzically. 
"No one else's 'house would suit you for 
always, Nan. Ask me why." 

"Why.?" 

"Because," said Burt in triumph, 
"personality, like the measles, will out!" 



Mother: "No, Bobbie, I can't allow 
you to play with that little Kim boy. He 
might have a bad influence over you." 

Bobbie: "But, mother, can I play 
with him for the good influence I might 
have over him.?" — -Nezu York Globe. 



Buy advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 
306 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




Some Hebf 
Suggestions 

Tomato Puree 

Chicken Pattie 

A^eal Fricassee 

Salad Dressings 

Doughnuts 

Waffles 

Pumpkin Pic 

Puddings 



Try this recipe for Gingerbread 

— delicious and economical 



2 cups flour 
V4: teaspoon salt 
1 teaspoon ginger 
Vz teaspoon soda 



V2 teaspoon mace 
1 egg beaten 
Vz cup Hj3E diluted witli 
2 tablespoons water 
1 cup seedless raisins 



M cup brown sugar 
1,4 cup butter 
V2 cup corn syrup 
% cup molasses 







25 S? TOTAL SOiias 
W JHE HEBE COMPAf*^ J 



Sift flour, salt, soda and spices 
into bowl. Melt together Hebk, 
water, sugar, butter, syrup and 
molasses. Cool slightly and add to 
dry ingredients with egg and raisins. 
Turn into greased and floured cake 
tin and bake in moderate oven for 
an hour. 

You'll love gingerbread made 
tills way. It's a good wholesome 



food and an always welcome des- 
sert. Hebe gives it that good 
rich flavor and the fine texture 
tliat makes it melt in your mouth 
— and Hebe adds nutriment too. 
Hebe is pure skimmed milk 
evaporated to double strength 
enriched with cocoanut fat. In 
cooking it serves a threefold 
purpose — to moisten, to shorten 
and to enrich. 



Order HEBE today from your grocer and write to us for the free 
Hebe book of recipes. Address 4315 Consumers Building, Chicago 



THE HEBE COMPANY 



Chi 



LgO 



Seattle 



Buy advertised Goods — ■ Do not accept substitutes 
307 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




"WIN- A- SPIN" TOPS 

Fortune may smile on the winner. White for fame, pink 
for gold and blue for happiness. The longest spinner is the 
winner. Box of 3 tops, 50c. postpaid. (Ask for 
No. 4249.) Our catalog shows hundreds of novel, 
inexpensive gifts for young and old. Send for a 
copy today and make your Christmas shopping 
a pleasure. See the Pohhon things in stores and 
gift shops. Look for the Pohlson seal of distinction. 




POHLSON Gift Shop 



Pawtucket, R. I. 




CAKE and MUFFIN TESTER 

Convenient, Sanitary and Hygienic 
Year's Supply for a Dime. Send 10c. (Stamps or Coin) to 

PERCY H. HOWARD 
2'CentraI Square Cambridge, Mass. 



We wish the following back numbers 
of AMERICAN COOKERY 

June 1915 
May 1917 
December 1919 
June 1920 
November 1920 
March 1921 

and will remit one dollar to any one sending us 
the above SET of SIX numbers 

{We desire only complete sets of 6 numbers) 

The Boston Cooking School Magazine Co. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



SALAD SECRETS 



too recipes. Brief but complete- I5c by mail. 100 Meat- 

^5 recipes 15c 50 Sandwich recipes 15c. All three 30c. 

B. R. BRIGGS, 250 Madison St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



"Ten -Cent Meals" 

42 Meals with receipts and directions for preparing each. 48 pp. 10c. 

Am. School of Home Economics, 503 W. 69th St., Chicago 



The Silver Lining 

It's Only Old Pot Liquor, After All 

Respectfull)- dedicated to the eminent scientist, 
Dr. H. Barringer Cox 

SOUTHERNERS have been rather 
amused to read lately that the favor- 
ite dish of the children and the colored 
people, "Pot Liquor," that is the liquid in 
which turnip greens, beans, etc., with 
bacon, have been boiled, has now been 
pronounced a most valuable food by 
scientists. "Pot Liquor" is usually eaten 
with "corn pone," that is, plain corn 
bread. 



I feel advanced and erudite, 

Because I recently did read 
Where skilful scientist did write 

A column full of learned "feed." 

O'l. it was all about such things 
As "vltamines" and kindred terms; 

I read and read how some food brings 
Eviction to the naughty germs. 

I read of how we all should eat 

The "essence" strong of turnip greens, 

And oh, he showed in language meet 
For science that he did "know beans." 

Aly head did almost ache with weight 

Of all the learning I obtained; 
And v/hen I read, through language great, 

I marvelled at the knowledge gained. 

Black "Mammy" would have never known 
A germ. Alas! that she has died 

Before her nurslings' feast, "corn pone" 
In juice of greens was glorified. 

Please, Mr. Scientist, so wise, 

Since you "pot liquor" do so raise 

To nth degree, nutrition size, 
Send us another screed to praise 

A 

In learned phrase, "pot liquor's" true 

And constant partner, good "corn- pone"; 

O 1, we "down South" do beg of you 
Leave not our childhood's friend alone; 

But drop in scientific stew — 

Of course in language hard to read — 

A "corn pone hunk" — we promise you 
A noble, satisfying "feed." 

Then honorable mention take 

Our "side meat," then such generous shar 
Such unction and such healing make 

As "inner consciousness" should bear. 

In earlier days we only knew 

"Pot Liquor" and we did not bow 

To "vitamines." Alas! 'tis true, 
Bacon, a real aristocrat is now. 



Buv advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 
308 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




ere are some of 



Mrs. Rorer's Standard 
Books of peculiar interest 
just at this time: 



HOME CANDY MAKING 

Has an appealing sound. The idea of making candy is enticing. And here 
are ways easily understood for making all sorts of delicious confections. 
The directions are plain and easily followed. 

Bound in cloth, 75 cents; by mail, 80 cents 

CAKES, ICINGS AND FILLINGS 

This is another book that has an appeal. Every housewife has pride in her 
knowledge of cake making, or at least likes to have them for her home and 
her guests. Well, here are recipes in abundance. 

Bound in cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 

KEY TO SIMPLE COOKERY 

A new-plan cook book. Its simplicity will commend it to housewives, for 
it saves time, worry and expense. By the way, there is also the layout of 
a model kitchen, illustrated, that will save many steps in the daily work, 
Bound in cloth, $1.25; by mail, $1.40 

DAINTIES 

Contains Appetizers, Canapes, Vegetable and Fruit Cocktails, Cakes, 
Candies, Creamed Fruits, Desserts, Frozen Puddings, etc. 
Bound in cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 

PHILADELPHIA COOK BOOK 

A famous cook book, full of all the brightest things in cookery. Hundreds 
of choice recipes, all good, all sure, that have stood the test by thousands 
of housewives. The beginner can pin her faith on these tried recipes, and 
the good cook can find lots to interest her. 

Bound in cloth, $1.50; by mail, $1.65 

MY BEST 250 RECIPES 

Mrs. Rorer's own selection of the choicest things in every department of 
cookery, as for instance, 20 Best Soups, 20 Best Fish Recipes, 20 Best Ways 
for Meat, 20 Best Vegetable Recipes, and so on through the whole"range 
of table food. Bound in cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 



For sale by Boston Cooking-School Magazine Co., Department and BDakstorej. or 

ARNOLD & COMPANY, 420 Sansom St., Philadelphia 



Buy advertised Goods — D 



I rvri 



o not accept substitutes 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



No. 
4244 







DAINTY 
DORIS 

Bringing 8 yards of 
finely-woven wash- 
able silk lingerie 
tape with bodkin, 
all ready for run- 
ning. ■*"• Your choice 
of pink or blue 
in delicate shades, 
85c postpaid . Just 
one of hundreds of 
equally attractive 
things shown in our 
catalog of 




Gifts for every member of the family and for every gift 
occasion. Select from our catalog and make your Christmas 
shopping a pleasure. Send for it today. Look for the 
POH-LSON things in stores and gift shops of your town. 

POHLSONGIFT SHOP, Pawtucket, R. I. 



PERSOJ^AL BODY DEVELOPMENT l^,\ZTo\ 

•btaiaini^ a Perfect Figure, overcoming Nervousnew, Constipa- 
kioa. Biliousness, Flabbioess of flesh and thinness of body. 

Price. $1.00. Fully Guaranteed. 
THE NEW IDEAS CO. 14 Collins BIdg., LIMA, OHIO 



FREE FOR 30 DAYS "Xr.he^EAM 

rem a bottle of MILK? This SEPARATOR 

it PERFECTLY. Send this ad., your 

name and address, and we will send one. 

"^ Pay postman 50 cents. Use for 30 days; if 

not entirely SATISFACTORY return and 

we will refund your money. 

B. W. J. COMPANY, Dept. A.C. 
1996 Indianola Ave., Columbus, Ohio 




QUARTS 
ONLY 




PRACTICAL CHRISTMAS GIFT 
ROBER>S 

[Li^htnin^ Mixer 

BEATS EVERYTHING 

Beats eggs, whips cream, churns butter, mixes 
gravies, desserts and dressings, and does the 
work in a few seconds. Blends and mixes 
malted milk, powdered milk, baby foods and 
all drinks. 

Simple and Strong. Saves work — easy 
to clean. Most necessary household 
article. Used by 200,000 housewives 
and endorsed by leading household 
magazines. 
If your dealer does not carry this, we will send 
prepaid quart size $1.25, pint size 90c. Far 
West and South, quart $1.40, pint $1.00. 
Recipe book free with mixer. 

NATIONAL CO. Cambridge 39, boston, mass. 



A Dishwasher for $2.50! 

Keeps hands out of the water, no wiping of dishes, saves i the 
time. Consists of special folding dishdrainer, special wire 
basket, 2 special long-handled brashes. Full directions for use. 
Sent prepaid for $2.50. Full refund if not satisfactory. 

Am. School of Home Economics, 503 W.69th St., Chicago 



Oh, so advanced I feel, for I — 

No science in my cranium small — 

In learned dress, old friend do spy — 
It's only our "Pot Liquor" after all. 

By M. E. Henry-Ruffin. 



What are you doin' of, 
"Sharpenin' a bit o' 



Foreman: 
James.?" 

Bricklayer: 
pencil." 

Foreman: "You'll 'ave the Union 
after you, me lad. That's a carpenter's 
job." — ■ Punch. 



"Home-Making as a Profession" 

HOME-MAKING is the greatest 
of all the professions — greatest 
in numbers and greatest in its 
influence on the individual and on society. 
All industry is conducted for the home, 
directly or indirectly, but the industries 
directly allied to the home are vastly 
important, as the food industries, clothing 
industries, etc. Study of home eco- 
nomics leads directly to many well paid 
vocations as well as to home efficiency. 

Since 1905 the American School of 
Home Economics has given home-study 
courses to over 30,000 housekeepers, 
teachers, and others. The special text- 
books have been used for class work in 
over 500 schools. 

Of late years, courses have been de- 
veloped fitting for many well paid posi- 
tions: — Institution Management, Tea 
Room and Lunchroom Management, 
Teaching of Domestk Science, Home 
Demonstrators, Dietitians, Nurses, Dress- 
making, "Cooking for Profit." Home- 
Makers' Courses : — Complete Home 
Economics, Household Engineering, Les- 
sons in Cooking, The Art of Spending. 

BULLETINS: Free-Hand Cooking, 
Ten-cent Meals, Food Values, Family 
Finance, Art of Spending, Weekly Allow- 
ance Book, IOC. each. 

Details of any of the courses and in- 
teresting 80-page illustrated handbook, 
"The Profession of Home-Making" sent 
on request. American School of Home 
Economics, 503 W. 69th Street, Chicago. 

■ — Adv. 



Buy advertised Goods — 

3 



Do not accept substitutes 
10 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




i 

I 
I 



ItickneVW 

;;^ ANO * '-**■= 

Poor's 




SPICED 
POULTRY 5,.., T«_^_s= 

:Seasoning1^|^H 

TWO -^ oOnces :"H*!^ 

BOSTON P^:^-^ 



THANKSGIVING TIME 

means company and lots of preparing 
for the Feast 

Turkey — Chicken — Roast Duck 

stuffed with dressing seasoned with 

STICKNEY & POOR'S 
POULTRY SEASONING 

PIES 
Pumpkin — Squash — Mince 

all seasoned with 

STICKNEY & POOR'S 
DEPENDABLE SPICES 

Stickney & Poor's Seasonings have been used by New England 

Housewives in preparing Thanksgiving dishes for more than a century . 

Your Mother and Grandmother learned to depend upon them, 

and you should, too, because they are always pure, full strength, and 

of uniform quality. 

Ask your grocer for Stickney & Poor's Seasonings. 

Your co-operating servant, 

"MUSTARDPOT." 




Sticknev & Poor Spick Co.mpany 

1815— Century Old— Century Honored— 1921 

Muslard-Spices BOSTON and HALIFAX Seasonings-Flavorings 

THE NATIONAL MUSTARD POT 




1 [g'^/^?:/^^^/^^^/:/^^^^^^^ 






i 



Buy advertised Goods — • Do not accept substitutes 
311 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




JUST THE THING FOR THE HOT WEATHER 

Gossom's Cream Soups (in Powdered Form) 

Pure, Wholesome, Delicious 

Quickly and 
Easily Prepar- 
ed. 

Simply add 
water and boil 

15 minutes and 

you have a delightful soup, of high food value and low 

cost. One 15 cent package makes 3 pints of soup. 

These soups do not deteriorate, so may be continually on 

hand and thus found most convenient. The contents 

also keep after opening. 

Split pea, Green pea, Lima, Celery, Black Bean, Clam 

Chowder, Onion and (Mushroom 25c). 

Sample sent prepaid on receipt of 20 cents, or one dozen for 

$1.75. 

For Sale by leading grocers 15 cents a package, 20 cents in 

far West. 

Manufactured by 

B. F. Gossom, 692 Washington St., Brookline, 46, Mass. 



"Free-Hand Cooking" 

Cook without recipes/ A key to cookbooks, correct proportions, 
time, temperature; thickening, leavening, shortening, 105 fun- 
damental recipes. 40 p. book. 10 cents coin or stamps. 

Am. Sdiool of Home Economics, 503 W. 69th Street, Chicago 



m 



Gluten Flour ^9^ 



40% GLUTEN 



Guaranteed to comply in all respects to 

Standard requirements of U. S. Dept. of 

Agriculture. 

Uanixfaetiiredby 

FARWELL & RHINES 

WatertowB, N. Y. 



2SL! 



^B^ 



Cream Whipping Made 
Easy and Inexpensive 

r'REMO-AT'ESCO 



V 



Whips Thin Cream 

or Half Heavy Cream and Milk 

or Top of the Milk Bottle 

It whips up as easily as heavy cream 

and retains its stiffness. 

Every caterer and housekeeper 

wants CREMO-VESCO. 

Send for a bottle to-day. 



Housekeeper's size, 1^ oz., .30 prepaid 
Caterer's size, 16 oz.. $1,00 
(With full directions) 



Cremo-Vesco Company 

431 EAST 23rd ST., BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Pacific Coast Agents: 
MILES MFG. CO.,949-951 E. 2nd St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



Bernard Shaw: "Say, Einie, do you 

really think you understand yourself?" 

Einstein: "No, Bernie — -do you?" 



As the Sunday-school teacher entered, 
she saw leaving in great haste a little girl 
and her smaller brother. "Why, Mary^ 
you aren't going away?" she exclaimed in 
surprise. "Pleathe, Mith Anne, we've 
got to go," was the distressed reply. 
"Jimjny thwallowed hith collection." 



DELISCO is considered by connois- 
seurs a most delicious, refreshing and 
healthful drink. It fully satisfies, by 
its aroma and flavor, the natural desire 
of the coffee drinker who has heretofore 
continued to take coffee because unable 
to find a satisfactory equivalent. When 
properly made, experts have been unable 
to distinguish DELISCO from the finer 
grades of coffee. — ■ Adv. 



Cooking for Profit 

By Alice Bradley 

Principal Miss Farmer's School of Cookery 
Cooking Editor, Woman's Home Companion 

IF YOU wish to earn money at home 
through home cooked food and 
catering — if you would like to own 
and conduct a food shop, candy kitchen, 
tea room, cafeteria or lunch room — if 
you wish to manage a profitable guest 
house or small hotel, you will be interested 
in this new correspondence course. 

It explains just how to prepare food, 
"good enough to sell"; just what to 
cook, with many choice recipes; how to 
establish a reputation and a constant 
profitable market; how to cater for all 
occasions, and tells In detail how to 
establish and conduct successful tea 
rooms, etc. — how to manage all food 
service. 

The expense for equipment is little or 
nothing at first, the correspondence 
instruction is under the personal direc- 
tion of Miss Bradley which assures your 
success, the fee for the course is very 
moderate and may be paid on easy 
terms. For full details write to American 
School of Home Economics, 503 W. 69th 
Street, Chicago. —Adv. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
312 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Dr. Price's Vanilla 

To know pure, delicate, full-flavored vanilla 
extract at its very best — try Price's Vanilla. 
Only the highest quality beans, carefully 
chosen, are used. Perfectly cured and ex- 
tracted to get the true, pure flavor ; this flavor 
is then aged in wooden casks to bring out all 
its richness and mellowness. That — and that 
alone — is Price's Vanilla. 

For nearly seventy years — the quality of 
Price's Vanilla has never varied. It is always 
the best that can be made ! Insist upon Price's 
from your grocer — don't take a substitute. 
If he hasn't it in stock, he can easily get it 
for you! 

PRICE FLAVORING EXTRACT COMPANY 




'Experts in Flavor' 



In Business 68 Years 



Chicago, 111. 





^or tfie 

Tki$ines$Man$ 

T^reakfhsb 



A 



STEAMING 

cup of White 
House Coffee at the 
morning meal gives, 
to most men, just the 
needed impetus which 
carries him through a 
strenuous day and 
brings to him the suc- 
cesses he strives for. 

U3-Slh. 
Packages Only 



DWINELLi " WRIGHT CO. boston - Chicago 



•Principal Coffee Roasten 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
313 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



No SALAD is quite so PERFECT 

as when served with ROSE APPLES 

Six hundred leading hotels, from Bangor to Los Angeles, 
are using them. 

A new sweet pepper used as salad cups, garnishes, etc. — 
beautiful red — rich, nutty flavor — crisp — tender — melting 
— juicy. 

If not on sale in your Fancy Grocery we will deliver, charges 
prepaid, east of Denver, a case of six full quarts for $3.90. 
Each quart will serve 13 to 16 people. 

Try them at your next dinner. Your guests will rave. 
The first expression is: "The lovely things, what are they.!*" 
Then at the first taste: "How delicious; where can I get them.''" 

If dissatisfied after using one quart, return the remainder at 
our expense and we will return all money paid. 

A new book of SALADS in every case, or sent free on re- 
quest, with the name of your retail Fancy Grocer. 
KEHOE PRESERVING COMPANY, Terre Haute, Indiana 



French Ivory Manicure Sets 

(21 Pieces) 

In black cobra grain, plush lined case. 
Only $7.00. Only a few left 

H. L. CARROLL 



New Jersey Ave., S. E. 



Washington, D. C. 



** Where My Money Goes'' 

Weekly Allowance Book — simple little book 32 pages, small 
enough for your pocketbook, easily kept; gives classified record 
of all personal or household expenses, JO cents. 

AM. SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS, 503a W. 69th STREET, CHICAGO 



WAGNER Cast Aluminum 
utensils are cast, not 
stamped. Being in one solid piece 
there are no rivets to loosen, no 
seams to break, no welded parts. 
Wagner Cast Alu mi num Ware 
wears longer and cooks better. 
The thickness of the metal is the 
reason — heat is retained and evenly 
distributed — food does not scorch 
or burn as is liable in stamped 
sheet utensils. 

Wagner Ware combines dura- 
bility and superior cook- 
ing quality with the most 
beautiful designs and fin- 
ish. At best dealer's. 

Don't ask for a/umtnum 
ware, ask for Wagner Ware 

The Wagner Mfg. Co. 

Dept. 74 SIDNEY, OHIO 



"Household Helpers" 

IF YOU could engage an expert cook 
and an expert housekeeper for only 
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room, you would do it, wouldn't you.? 
Of course you would! Well, that is all 
our "Two Household Helpers" will 
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Will you invest the 10 cents a week to gain 
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they will save their cost twelve times a 
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These helpers, "Lessons in Cooking" 
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prepared as home-study courses, and as 
such have been tried out and approved 
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they have the very highest recommenda- 
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owe it to yourself and f^amily to give them 
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great help they will give you till you 
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American School of Home Economics, Chicago. 



FREE TRIAL FOR ONE WEEK 

A. S. H. E. — 503 W. 69th Street, Chicago. III. 

Send your two "HOUSEHOLD HELPERS." prepaid 
on a week's trial, in the De Luxe binding. If satisfactory, I 
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both books in seven days. (Regular mail price $3.14 each). 

Name and 
Address 

Reference 



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-Do 

314 



not accept substitutes 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




IVf TT "K" — Nature's first food — is turned 
■^^-'-*"*^-*^ into an attractive, delicious dish 
that children and adults ^w/oy when it is made 
into Junket. 

Junke 

is wholesome milk in tasty dessert form. It is 
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Junket can now be made with Junket Powder, as well 
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Both Grocers and Druggists sell Junket 
Send 4c. in sla^nps and your grocer's name, for 
sample {or isc. for full size package of Junket Tab- 
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zvith recipes. 

THE JUNKET FOLKS, Little Falls, N. Y. 

Chr. Hansen's Canadian Laboratory, Toronto, Ont. 



Ati^elFoodCake 



> Inches Square, S Inches High 

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Mrs. Grace Osbern Dept. K 5 Bay City„ Mich, 



*'The Art of Spending'' 



Tells how to get more for your money 

save more! How to budget expenses and record them 



household accounts. 24 pp. illustrated 

AM SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS, 503a W. 63ih ST 



how to live better and 
iliout 
10 cents. 



CHIOAGO 




This Big 5 Pound Bag of $1 75 
Delicious Shelled Peanuts |i 

Direct from grower by Prepaid Parcels 
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peanuts than $5 will buy at stands or 
.stores. Along with Recipe Book tell- 
ing of over 60 ways to use them as 
foods. We guarantee prompt delivery 
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back if not delighted. 

EASTERN PEANUT CO..10 A. HERTFORD. N. C. 



Help! Help!! Help!!! 

Our two new household helpers on 7 days' free trial! They 
save you at least an hour a day, worth at only 30 cents an hour. 
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courses, "Household Engineering" and "Lessons in Cooking," 
now in book form; OR SEND $5.00 in full payment. Regular 
price $6.28. Full refund if not satisfactory. 
AM. SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS, 503a W. 69th STREET, CHICAGO 



Salt Mackerel 

CODFISH, FRESH LOBSTER 

RIGHT FROM THE FISHING BOATS TO YOU 




%\ COOK BOOK FREE 

S' - ' '^wm ^"*^ ^^^ *^'^ ^^''^' ''^'* 

r ^"^k ^^B\ Foods; How to Prepare and 

■ ^ ' "^" vv^fm\ Serve Them." Withitwesend 

^A.J^^ our list with delivered price of 
each kind of fish. 
USE COUPON BELOW 

FAMILIES who are fond of FISH can be supplied DIRECT 
from GLOUCESTER, MASS., by the FRANK E. DAVIS 
COMPANY, with newly caught, KEEPABLE OCEAN FISH, 
choicer than anv inland dealer could possibly furnish. 

We sell ONLY TO THE CONSUMER DIRECT, sending 
by EXPRESS RIGHT Tp YOUR HOME. We PREPAY 
express on all orders east of Kansas. Our fish are pure, appe- 
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to your complete approval or your money will be cheerfully 
refunded. 

SALT MACKEREL, fat, meaty, juicy fish, are delicious for 
breakfast. They are freshly packed in brine and will not spoil 
on your hands. 

CODFISH, as we salt it, is white, boneless and ready for 
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meat, at a much lower cost. 

FRESH LOBSTER is the best thing known for salads. 
Right fresh from the water, our lobsters simply are boiled and 
packed in PARCHMENT-LINED CANS. They come to 
.\ou as the purest and safest lobsters you can buy and the meat 
is as crisp and natural as if vou took it from the shell vourself. 

FRIED CLAMS are a relishable. hearty dish, that yo'ur whole 
family will enjoy. No other flavor is just like that of clams, 
whether fried or in a chowder. 

FRESH MACKEREL, perfect for frying. SHRIMP to 
cream on toast, CRABMEAT for Newburg or deviled, SAL- 
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for salad. SANDWICH FILLINGS and every good ...--■ 

thing packed here or abroad you can get direct .--'rrD xpjK 
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shelf for regular or emertrency use. .-•'''', .r- , ir^L r 

^w,..,w^^%.v.»7wr.y-./^ 61 Central Wharf 

FRANK E.DAVIS CO. Gloucester, Mass. 

61 Central Wharf ...•-" Please send me yourlatest Sea 

Gloucester ..--' Food Cook Book and Fish Price List 

^^^^- ...-■■" Name 

.. ■ ' Street : 

■ ' City- State 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
315 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



We ask you to try 

PRINCE BRAND 

MACARONI or SPAGHETTI 

We know it will p'ease you because of its 
superior qualities. Easy to cook, deli- 
cious in taste, ve y 1 igh in food value. 
Insist on getting our quality. 



PRINCE MACARONI MFG. 

BOSTON 



CO. 



OYSTERS CLAMS 

DEHYDRATED 

These delightful delicacies preserved with all 

their salt water flavor 

ALWAYS READY EASILY PREPARED 

In powder form so that but ten minutes in hot water or 
milk makes them ready to serve. An oyster stew or 
broth; clam stew^, bouillon and chov^der always in the 
kitchen ready for instant use. Packed in bottles that 
make a quart of stew and in larger bottles that make 8 
quarts. 

OYSTERS, small bottles, 30 cents each 
CLAMS, small bottles, 30 cents each 

We pay delivery costs 
Enjoy a bottle of each of these delicacies 

BISHOP-GIFFORD CO., Inc., Baldwin, L I., N. Y- 



BREAKFASTS, LUNCHEONS an J DINNERS 

By MARY D. CHAMBERS 

Should be in every home. It treats in detail the three meals a day, in their several varieties, from 
the light family affair to the formal and company function. Appropriate menus are given for each 
occasion. The well-balanced diet is kept constantly in view. Table china, glass and silver, and 
table linen, all are described and illustrated. In short, how to plan, how to serve and how to behave 
at these meals, is the author's motive in writing the book. This motive has been clearly and admir- 
ably well carried out. Table etiquette might well be the subtitle of the volume. 



Cloth, 150 pages 



lllus 
We will send this book postpaid on receipt of price, $1.25 



Illustrated, $1.25 net. 



THE BOSTON COOKING SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO., 



Boston, Mass. 




A Coal and Gas Range 
With Three Ovens 
That Really Saves 

Although it is less than four feet long it can do every 
kind of cooking for any ordinary family by gas in warm 
weather, or by coal or wood when the kitchen needs 
heating. There are two separate baking ovens— one 
for coal and one for gas. Both ovens may be used at 

one time — or eith- 
er one singly. In 
addition to the two 
baking ovens, 
there is a gas broil- 
ing oven. 




The Range that "Makes Cooking Easy' 



Coal, Wood and Gas Range 

See the cooking surface when you want to rush things 
—five burners for gas and four covers for coal. 

The illustrations show the wonderful pearl grey porcelain enamel fin- 
ish—so neat and attractive. No more soiled hands, no more dust and 
smut. By simply passing a damp cloth over the surface you are able 
to clean your range instantly. Ihey certainly do Make Cooking Easy. 

JM^ Gold Medal m 

uenwood 

Write to-day for handsome free booklet 118 that tells all about it, to 

Weir Stove Co., Taunton, Mass. Manufacturers of the Celebrated Glenwood 
Coal, Wood and Gas Ranges, Heating- Stoves and Furnaces. 



Bur advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 
316 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Amrnran (Enakprg 



will br srat to goa for r 
SFrrmbrr taanf. j& 



S>iisgegtiong for Cftrisitmasi ^iit^ 

W'OULD not many of your friends to whom you will make Christmas Gifts 
be more pleased with a year's subscription to AMERICAN COOKERY 
($1.50) than with any other thing of equal cost you could send them> 
The magazine will be of practical use to the recipient 365 days in the year 
and a constant and pleasant reminder of the 
donor. 

To make this gift more complete, we will 
send the December number so as to be received 
the day before Christmas, together with a card 
reading as per cut herewith. 

This card is printed in two colors on heavy _ 
stock and makes a handsome souvenir. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^1^ 

We will make a Christmas Present of a copy of the American Cook 
Book to every present subscriber who sends us two "Christmas Gift" 
subscriptions at $1.50 each. 

Practical and Useful Cookery Books 

By MRS. JANET M. HILL, Editor of American Cookery 

AMERICAN COOK BOOK $1.50 

This cook book deals with the matter in hand in a simple, concise manner, mainly with the 
cheaper food products. A cosmopolitan cook book. Illustrated. 

BOOK OF ENTREES $2.00 

Over 800 recipes which open a new field of cookery and furnish a solution of the problem 
of "left overs." There is also a chapter of menus which will be of great help in securing 
the best combination of dishes. Illustrated. 

CAKES, PASTRY AND DESSERT DISHES $2.00 

PI A Mrs. Hill's latest book. Practical, trustworthy and up-to-date. 

CANNING, PRESERVING AND JELLY-MAKING $1.75 

Modern m'ethods of canning and jelly-making have simplified and shortened preserving 
processes. In this book the latest ideas in canning, preserving and jelly-making are 
presented. 

COOKING FOR TWO $2.25 

Designed to give chiefly in simple and concise style those things that are essential to the 
proper selection and preparation of a reasonable variety of food for the family of two 
individuals. A handbook for young housekeepers. Used as text in many schools. 
Illustrated from photographs. 

PRACTICAL COOKING AND SERVING $2.50 

This complete manual of how to select, prepare, and serve food recognizes cookery as a 
necessary art. Recipes are for both simple and most formal occasions; each recipe is 
tested. 700 pages. Used as a text-book in many schools. Illustrated. 

SALADS, SANDWICHES AND CHAFING DISH DAINTIES ^ $2.00 

To the housewife who likes new and dainty ways of serving food, this book^proves of 
great value. Illustrated. 

THE UP-TO-DATE WAITRESS $1.75 

A book giving the fullest and most valuable information on the care of the dining-room 
and pantry, the arrangement of the table, preparing and serving meals, preparing special 
dishes and lunches, laundering table linen, table decorations, and kindred subjects. The 
book is a guide to ideal service. 

We will send any of the above books, postpaid, upon receipt of 
price; or, add one dollar ($1) to the price of any of the books and we 
will include a year's subscription for American Cookery. 

THE BOSTON COOKING SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO., Boston, Mass. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
317 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Experience has shown that the most satisfactory way 

to enlarge the subscription list of American Cookery is through its present subscri- 
bers, who personally can vouch for the value of the publication. To make it an 
object for subscribers to secure new subscribers, we offer the following premiums: 

/^Q"M'r\TnrTQ"VrC . Premiums are not given with a subscription or for a renewal, but only 
^■^■■^^"~— ^■~"'^""""~~" to present subscribers, for securing and sending to us new yearly sub- 
scriptions at $i.5o each. The number of new subscriptions required to secure each premium is 
clearly stated below the description of each premium. 

Transportation is or is not paid as stated. 

INDIVIDUAL INITIAL JELLY MOULDS 

Serve Eggs, Fish and Meats in Aspic; 
Coffee and Fruit Jelly; Pudding and other 
desserts with your initial letter raised on 
the top. Latest and daintiest novelty for 
the up-to-date hostess. To remove jelly 
take a needle and run it around inside of 
mould, then immerse in warm water; jelly 
will then come out in perfect condition. 
Be the first in your town to have these. 
You cannot purchase them at the stores. 





This shows the jelly turned from th mou 

Set of six (6), any initial, sent postpaid for (1) new subscription 



This shows mould 
(upside down) 



Cash l*riee 75 cents. 



PATTY IRONS" 




As illustrated, are used to make dainty, flaky 
pates or timbales; delicate pastry cups for serv- 
ing hot or frozen dainties, creamed vegetables, 
salads, shell fish, ices, etc. Each set comes 
securely packed in an attractive box with recipes 
and full directions for use. Sent, postpaid, for 
two (2) new subscriptions. Cash Price $1.50. 



SILVER'S 

SURE CUT 

FRENCH FRIED 
POTATO CUTTER 

One of the most 
modern and efficient 
kitchen helps ever in- 
vented. A big labor 
and time saver. 

Sent, prepaid, for 
one (1) new subscrip- 
tion. Cash Price 75 
cents. 







FRENCH ROLL BREAD PAN 




Best quality blued steel. Six inches wide by 
13 long. One pan sent, prepaid, forgone (1) new 
subscription. Cash Price 75 cents. 



SEAMLESS VIENNA BREAD PAN 




Two of these pans sent, postpaid, for one (1) 
new subscription. Cash Price 75 cents for two 
pans. 




HEAVY TIN BORDER MOULD 

Imported, Round, 6 inch 

Sent, prepaid, for one (1) new subscription. 
Cash Price 75 cents. 



THE BOSTON COOKING SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO., Boston, Mass. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
318 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



PREMIUMS 




PASTRY BAG AND FOUR TUBES 

(Bag not shown in cut) 

A complete outfit. Practical in every way. Made 
especially for Bakers and Caterers. Eminently 
suitable for home use. 

The set sent, prepaid, for one (1) new subscrip- 
tion. Cash price, 75 cents. 




THE A. M. C. 
ORNAMENTER 

Rubber pastry bag and 
twelve brass tubes, assorted 
designs, for cake decorat- 
ing. This set is for fine 
work, while the set de- 
scribed above is for more 
general use. Packed in a 
wooden box, prepaid, for 
two (2) new subscriptions. 
Cash price, $1.50. 




''RAPIDE" 
TEA INFUSER 

Economic, clean and con- 
venient. Sent, prepaid, for 
one (1) subscription. Cash 
price, 75 cents. 



CAKE ORNAMENTING SYRINGE 

For the finest cake decorating. Twelve German 
silver tubes, fancy designs. Sent, prepaid, for four (4) 
new subscriptions. Cash price, $3.00. 





HOME CANDY MAKING 
OUTFIT 

Thermometer, dipping wire, moulds, and 
most of all, a book written by a professional 
and practical candy maker for home use. Sent, 
prepaid, for five (5) new subscriptions. Cash 
price, $3.75. 



The only reliable and sure way to make Candy, 
Boiled Frosting, etc., is to use a 



THERMOMETER 

Here is just the one you need. Made 
especially for the purpose by one of the 
largest and best manufacturers in the 
country. Sent, postpaid, for two (2) 
new subscriptions. Cash price, $1.50. 



40 

20-1 

2oo-t: 

80 
60- 
40 
20-1^ 
100 



..^.l 




VEGETABLE CUTTERS 

Assorted shapes. Ordinarily 
sell for 15 cents each. Six 
cutters — all different — pre- 
paid, for one (1) new subscrip- 
tion. Cash price. 75 cents. 



THE BOSTON COOKING SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO., Boston, Mass. 



Buy advertised Goods — • Do not accept substitutes 
319 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




'Hasn't 

Scratched 
Yef 




Cake or Powder 
njohiche'ver yoii prefer 



Watch how easily Bon Ami and I clean this 
mirror. A damp cloth and a littl6 Bon Ami 
are all one needs. When the Bon Ami film has 
dried — a few brisk rubs with a dry cloth and 
presto! every speck of dust and dirt has vanished. 

So it is with everything. The magic touch of 
Bon Ami brightens up windows, brasses, nickel, 
linoleum and white woodwork. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do rut accept substitutes 
320 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Cre-am 

'Seat 




..rf«^™»^^^»^,Jj,i ^..W^iiifi,..,,.,^:^^ -^jU..^»*».,,,,^-».i.»,,i&»^^ 



■ Maybe 'Cfmm of WheM 

i nt got no v i tamines; 
dorit know what tliem 



iUll^SPimi^PiiS^i 



hey aiirt none in Of am of 

Mi&Gt M sties sho" good - 
to eot and cheapC osts 'bout ^ 
1^ lb' Ci great bi^di^^ 



% 




I.I iiiiii' i;i;aiiiHim.ttiiiiiiyhim[".«il 



^^. 



Painted by Edw. V. Brewer for Cream of Wheat Co. 



Copyright 1921 by Cream of Wheat Co. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
321 



AMERICAN COOKERY 

Vol. XXVI DECEMBER, 1921 No. 5 



CONTENTS FOR DECEMBER page 

ADDING BEAUTY TO HOMES AT SMALL EXTRA COST. 111. 

Margaret Ryan 331 

THE OLD-TIME CHRISTMAS FEAST C. E. Browne 336 

GUESTS AND GUMPTION Alice M. Ashton 338 

WHEN TASKS STALE Salena Sheets Martin 340 

THE SPIES Frances E. Gale 341 

LADIES AND "LIVEROUTS" Martha Mack 342 

GETTING THE HOUSEHOLD AHEAD Emmett Campbell Hall 343 

REVELATION Caroline L. Sumner 345 

THE POETRY OF FOODS Emma Gary Wallace 346 

THE IMPORTANCE OF CLEANLINESS Jeanne K. Loomis 348 

EDITORIALS 350 

SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES (Illustrated with half- 
tone engravings of prepared dishes) 

Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 353 

MENUS FOR WEEK IN DECEMBER 362 

MENUS FOR CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY . 363 

TWICE DONE DUTIES Margaret Brent 364 

MRS. POPPLEGATE'S PROBLEMS . . Harriet Whitney Symonds 366 

DIET FOR THE AGED S. A. Rice 367 

WHAT DEEP BREATHING CAN DO FOR YOU 

Marion Brownfield 368 

EDUCATION IN THE KITCHEN B. Claunch 368 

HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES: — The Wizard of the Salt Shake 
— • A Winter Picnic — The Real Spice of Life Is Variety — • Uses for 

Cloth Flour Sacks — The Home Kitchen, Candy, etc. . a . . . 370 

QUERIES AND ANSWERS 374 

NEW BOOKS 378 

THE SILVER LINING 386 

MISCELLANEOUS 390 



$1.50 A YEAR Published Ten Times a Year 15c A Copy {[r^ 

Foreign postage 40c additional 

Entered at Boston post-office as second-class matter 

Copyright 1921, by 

THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO. 
^1 Pope Bldg., 221 Columbus Ave., Boston 17, Mass. 



Please Renew on Receipt of Colored Blank Enclosed for that Purpose 

322 





ADVERTISEMENTS 




EVERY woman knows that 
the only salt that's "worth 
its salt" is the kind that pours; 
any time; all the time. 

Look about and you'll see Morton 
Salt in every home where folks 
believe in having the best. 

It's there because it pours — the 
height of convenience. 

Other reasons too; the full vigor- 
ous flavor; the real economy— you 
can use every grain of Morton's. 

•"The Salt of the Earth'* 

MORTON SALT COMPANY 



Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
323 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



INDEX FOR DECEMBER 








PAGE 


Adding Beauty to Homes at Small Extra 


Cost 


331 


Diet for the Aged 










367 


Editorials . , . . 














350 


Education in the Kitchen 














368 


Getting the Household Ahead 














343 


Guests and Gumption . 








' 




, 


338 


Home Ideas and Economies . 














370 


Importance of Cleanliness, The 














348 


Ladies and "Liverouts" 














342 


Menus .... 














. 362, 363 


Mrs. Popplegate's Problems . 














366 


New Books .... 














378 


Old-Time Christmas Feast, The 














336 


Poetry of Foods, The . 














346 


Revelation . . . 














345 


Silver Lining, The- 














386 


Spies, The .... 














341 


Twice Done Duties 














364 


What Deep Breathing Can Do for You 












368 


When Tasks Stale . 












340 


SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 




Apples, Savory, to Serve with Roast . 353 


Kuchen, Honig 


. 357 


Biscuit, Maryland Beaten. 111. 


. 358 


Lady Locks. 111. . 




. 360 


Bouillon, Beet .... 


353 


Lolly-Pops. 111. . 




. 360 


Cake, Christmas, with Filling. 111. . 


359 


Macaroni, Reale 




. 354 


Cake, Christmas Pastry . 


361 


Mackerel, Spiced . 




. 353 


Cakes, Mocha, with Mocha Cream. 111. 


358 


Moulds, Pudding. 111. 




. 357 


Carrot Strips, Candied . 


361 


Omelet, Friars 




. 356 


Cranberry-and-Apple Mound . 


356 


Onions, Glazed 




. 355 


Cream, Mocha . . 


358 


Pie, Brussels Sprouts-Potato 


. 361 


Cup, Chocolate Christmas 


359 


Pork, Roast Crown, with App! 


e Rings. 111. 354 


Duck, Roast Canvasback or Redhead 


354 


Salad, Frozen Fruit. 111. 


. 359 


Ducks, Prepared for Roasting. 111. 


355 


Scallops, Fried. 111. 


. 355 


Ducks, Roasted. 111. . 


356 


Shortcake, Apple . 


. 361 


Farci, Green Pepper 


355 


Soup, Cressy 


. . 356 


Filling for Christmas Cake 


359 


Stuffing for Baked Bluefish 


. 357 


Fish, Baked Blue, with Stuffing. 111. 


357 


Tongue, Cold Beef 


.' . .356 


QUERIES AND ANSWERS 


A 


Apfel Strudel, Hungarian . . .376 


Poisoning from Canned Food 


. 375 


Chowder, Rich Clam or Fish . . .375 


Temperature for Cake Baking 


... 376 


Etiquette, Certain Points in Table . . 374 


Vegetables, How to Serve 


. 375 


Meat, Ripening of .... 374 


Wafers, Rolled Nut 


. 375 


We want representatives ever} 


Awhere to take subscri 


ptions for 


American Cookery. We have 


an attractive propositio 


n to make 


those who will canvass their tow 


n; also to those who wi 


[1 secure a 


few names among their friends a 


nd acquaintances. Writ 


e us today. 


AMERICAN COOKERY 


BOSTO> 


t, MASS. 



Buy advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 
324 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




Cf)ri£itmag ©inner 

was a delight to her guests. No embarrassment. She had 
fortified herself against failure and disappointment. The din- 
ner was a veritable feast of good things, everybody was happy, 
and her husband tickled to death. Why? Because she had to 
guide her 

iWrsi. 3IEvorer*g i^eto Cook IPook 

which told her what to buy, how to prepare and serve it, and 
the young husband how to carve the bird. Truly a wonderful 
book for a Christmas Gift. 

Price: bound in cloth, $2.50; by mail $2.70 



or- 



here are 5 other gems of goodness 
making welcome Christmas Gifts 



My Best 250 Recpes 

Mrs. Rorer's favorite recipes, 
covering all departments of cookery. 
Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 

Mrs. Rorer's Cakes, Icings 
and Fillings 

Enticing and valuable recipes for 
cakes of all sorts and conditions. 
Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 

Mrs. Rorer's Home Candy 
Making 

k joy book in any home where 
candy is appreciated. 
Cloth, 75 cents; by mail, 80 cents 



Mrs. Rorer's Philadelphia 
Cook Book 

That grand standby of so many 
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Plum Pudding for Children 

Melt one-half a cup of butter; add one 
cup of molasses, one cup of milk, two 
eggs, three cups of entire wheat flour 
mixed and sifted with one teaspoonful of 
soda and one teaspoonful of salt. Add 
two cups of seedless raisins. Turn into a 
buttered mould and steam three hours. 
Serve with hard sauce. 



American Cookery 



VOL. XXVI 



DECEMBER 



NO. 5 



Adding Beauty to Homes at Small Extra Cost 

By Margaret Ryan 



THERE is one benefit that we 
should have gained from the com- 
memoration last December of the 
three hundredth anniversary of the 
landing of the Pilgrims. It was having 
our attention called again to what their 
immediate descendants contributed to 
the domestic architecture of this country. 
The house pictured here marks a pos- 
sible return to their style of dwelling. 
It has been built recently in an Iowa town 
under circumstances that promise much 
for the builder of the small home. 

The Pilgrims themselves worked labor- 
iously to put together simple log cabins 
and shacks that protected them from the 
weather, and from the savage attacks of 
both man and beast. But as the bounty 
of nature blessed the colonies, their sons 
and daughters had more leisure and 
wealth and were quick to seize the oppor- 
tunity to build for themselves homes that 
possessed not simply elements of creature 
comfort, but also extraordinary beauty. 
These homes have been bequeathed to us 
as one of our most priceless heritages. 
Nothing like the architectural master- 
pieces that were built in New England, 
and on our eastern shore has been done 
since. The Colonists developed for us, 
influenced, of course, by the mother 
country, the one distinctive American 
architectural type — • the Colonial home. 
Howsoever far afield we may roam in our 
search for something different we invari- 
ably come back to the Colonial as that 
of which we can never tire. 

Colonial houses continued to be the 
predominant style of domestic archi- 
tecture in this country until about the 
middle of the nineteenth century. They 



reached the height of their development 
shortly after the close of the Revolution- 
ary War. It was not until after the 
Civil War that the development of 
American industry and the exploitation 
of the natural resources of the country 
diverted our attention, and we entered 
upon what has been called the great 
American decadence in architecture, when 
we stuck fancy contraptions, even to 
sunbursts, on to the outside of our houses, 
and on the inside of them endured the 
period of black walnut and haircloth; 
tied turkey-red tidies to the backs of our 
plush-upholstered chairs; pulled down 
the shades in the "parlor," lest the sun 
might fade our gorgeous rugs, and kept 
religiously out of that musty room except 
when we had "company," weddings, or 
funerals. 

This state of mind towards things 
architectural and beautiful begot its own 
downfall. We suddenly sloughed it off 
and went to the other extreme. We took 
up "mission" woodwork and furniture, 
and, finally, there came the bungalow 
epidemic. Now, isn't it about time we 
took a look at ourselves and reached a 
realization of how we can make our 
houses sensibly serve our bodily and 
spiritual welfare, rather than tickle our 
vanity or cater to our idiosyncrasies.^ 

If we stop to think about it, we will 
realize that the really satisfactory house 
combines three essentials: Good design, 
which includes good planning; good 
construction; and good materials. The 
prospective homebuilder who seeks a 
house that combines these essentials will 
not go far until he realizes the need of a 
competent guide: He will, undoubtedly, 



331 



332 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



seek the counsel and assistance of an 
architect. 

The peculiar economic conditions of 
our country, particularly of recent years, 
have thrown the problem of building a 
home into high relief. The 1920 census 
returns show the enormous growth of our 
cities at the expense of the rural districts. 
For urban residents, this has complicated 
the housing problem by injecting the land 
question. The city homebuilder often 
finds himself confronted with the proposi- 
tion of making his house accommodate 
itself to a site that is hopelessly small. 
This makes it all the harder to build a 
comfortable and beautiful home at a 
reasonable cost. 

Even in those cities where architects of 
standing have offices that are accessible 
to the small builder, the architect cannot 
afford, in the majority of cases, to plan, 
and design in detail the average small 
house for the fee that he receives. He is 
forced to devote his attention to larger 
buildings. This tends to dissociate him 
from the small-house field. On the other 



hand, the small-home builder cannot 
afford, as a rule, to pay the necessary 
extra cost, in both money and time, for the 
production of the architect's special 
details, manufactured on a made-to-order 
basis. The American Institute of Archi- 
tects have taken cognizance of this 
situation and have proposed various 
schemes to circumvent it, but as yet 
little or nothing has come of this effort. 
This, and the fact that there has, hereto- 
fore, been no such thing as good archi- 
tectural stock-forms, which the architect 
of standing could recommend, and the 
homebuilder could aflford, have left the 
average small house woefully lacking in 
architectural interest. The first essen- 
tial of homebuilding — good design — 
has, therefore, been left largely to the 
jerry-builder to supply, or to the sellers 
of materials who have furnished plans and 
designs as a means of disposing of their 
wares. The result is deplorable to con- 
template. What can be done about it is 
a serious question! 

Perhaps the little house illustrated 




SHOWING ONE END OF DINING-ROOM BEFORE RUGS AND FURNITURE HAVE BEEN PLACED 



BEAUTIFUL HOMES AT SMALL COST 



333 



'^ 







5!i 






U,*f 







BEHLXD THE CLOSED DOOR IN THIS BEDROOM IS 

DECORATIVE AND 

with this article suggests a way out of the 
dilemma. Here is a house that is well 
planned, and it combines genuine beauty, 
good construction and good materials in 
a surprisingly economical manner. It is 
suggestive of the possibilities in store for 
the small builder to whom an architect's 
advice and help are not available, or who 
cannot afford the made-to-order details 
that an architect might find necessary to 
design. It is the product of a house-plan 
service that is very similiar to the serv- 
ices which have been prepared, and are 
being prepared, by the various State 
Chapters of the American Institute of 
Architects. 

This house is a genuine Colonial home, 
and is indicative of the return to the 
Colonial that is noticeable through- 
out the entire country, from the East 
where the Colonial home originated, to 
the far West, where it is displacing the 
bungalow in popularity, in the native 
habitat of that type of house. The 
Colonial and the other types of houses 



A CASE OF DRAWERS. THE BUILT-IN DRESSER IS 
ARCHITECTURAL 

comprising the service of which this house 
is representative were planned and 
designed by one of the foremost firms of 
architects in this country - — • a concern 
that is responsible for two of "the twelve 
best houses in America," and that is 
recognized as an authority in the field of 
domestic architecture. 

A study of the pictures is sufficient 
to show the beauty of the fine proportions, 
simple lines and exquisite details of this 
house. It has been possible to build 
true to an architectural type at an eco- 
nomical cost, because only standard, or 
stock, materials have been employed. In 
this respect the house is a product of the 
war, for standardization and quantity 
production have been the main theme of 
American industry during and since the 
war. There is no reason why the econ- 
omies of standardization and quantity 
production should not be applied to the 
field of homebuilding. The result of 
using stock materials in this house is 
convincing that a beautiful home can be 



334 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




THE PRACTICABILITY OF BUILT-IN FURNITURE IN 
THE KITCHEN 

built, at a low cost, without the least 
sacrifice of artistic quality. 

As every one knows, all building mate- 
rials must needs come in certain sizes. 
Lumber is sold as 2 x 4's, 2 x 6's, and in 
different lengths, varying by two feet; 
bricks are sold as units 2x4x6, and in 
other sizes; similarly with hollow tile 
and every other material that goes into 
the average home, with one principal 




ALL EXTERIOR DETAILS, EVEN TO THE ARCHED 
TRELLIS, ARE STANDARD, STOCK ITEMS 



exception — the woodwork, z. ^., the 
mouldings, doors, windows, frames, inte- 
rior trim, stairways and built-in furniture. 
This house has been planned, designed 
and constructed to use nothing but 
standard materials from start to finish, 
even including standard woodwork forms, 
which, heretofore, have not been available. 

These architectural details comprise, 
perhaps, 20 per cent of the cost of the 
average house, and they are responsible, 
in a great measure, for the beauty of a 
home. The absence of such architectural 
forms has contributed much to the medi- 
ocrity of present-day, American small- 
house architecture. 

Beauty in a house is both architectural 
and decorative. On the interior, the 
decorative elements consist of the furni- 
ture, lamps, rugs, curtains, which are 
moved in. The architectural elements 
are built in as a part of the house itself. 
They form the background, against which 
the decorative elements are placed. 
Unless there is harmony between the 
two, a beautiful interior cannot result. 
We have long had good standard designs 
in furniture — period creations and the 
like ■ — ■ but no architectural elements of 
equal merit. 

It can be seen from the illustrations 
that no sacrifice of individuality has 
resulted from the employment of stock 
forms of woodwork in standard sizes in 
this house. Good architecture, as one 
authority states, is not so much the 
using or inventing of many new and 
strange forms, as it is the proper disposing 
and utilizing of a few good forms, whether 
they be standardized 9t otherwise. In 
support of this statement, we find in the 
Colonial homes, built prior to the estab- 
lishment of our Republic, such items, as 
doors, windows, jambs, and muntins, 
which were in nearly all cases of the same 
pattern. This is particularly true of 
certain periods, and the fact is also to be 
observed in other expressions, as for 
example, in English architecture, as well 
as in American Colonial. The forms 
used in the house of the accompanying 



BEAUTIFUL HOMES AT SMALL COST 



335 



illustrations were selected from a large 
variety, including designs suitable for 
other types of houses, as well as the 
Colonial. The mantel and French doors 
in the living room are examples of these 
designs; likewise, the several parts that 
compose the characteristic Colonial stair- 
way; the corner china closets in the 
dining room; the dresser and built-in 
ironing board in the kitchen; the built-in 
dressing table in one of the bedrooms; 
the door and window frames; and the 
shutters, twelve-light windows, and trellis 
porch posts on the exterior, even to the 
little arched gateway to the tasteful home 
in its attractive setting. 
^ The future doubtless holds forth to the 
person of moderate means great possi- 
bilities in homebuilding with houses of 
this type now available to him. He can 
find, in the group of which this house is 
one, a variety of plans with as few rooms 
as three, or as many as twelve. The 
particular needs of the farmer have also 
been provided for, in some of these plans, 
so^he farmer's family, too, need no longer 



do without a beautiful home, now that 
one can build a home that is beautiful at 
no more, but often less, cost than one of 
mediocre design. 

Builders who prefer the English or 
half-timber house to the Colonial type 
will also find designs in that expression 
that will realize their fondest expecta- 
tions. Some builders may not fancy 
either the Colonial or English, but prefer 
instead a house similiar to the type which 
has been built more recently in the West 
and middle West, and which is charac- 
terized by wide, overhanging eaves and 
exposed rafter ends. Houses of this 
type are also to be found. Those who 
live in warm climates, and who do not 
require a basement under their houses for 
heaters will be delighted with the simpli- 
fied Colonial type in the one-story cottage, 
which employs an abundance of fireplaces, 
and has a fuel shed in the rear, in place 
of the basement coal bin. 

All who are interested in seeing our 
country become a nation of beautiful 
homes will rejoice over the application of 




QUANTITY PRODUCTION OF MANTELS HAS BROUGHT INTERIOR DETAILS WITHIN REACH OF 

THE SMALL BUILDER 



336 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



the efficiency and economy of modern will truly contribute, as Ruskin said, "to 
industry to the ancient problem of pro- their mental health, power and pleasure," 
viding habitation for human families that as well as to their creature comforts. 



The Old-time Christmas Feast 

By C. A. Browne 



A ROLLICKING, happy-go-lucky 
lot of folks they must have been, 
away back in the early part of the 
seventeenth century, if we may judge 
them by the gleeful spirit who penned 
these cheery lines: 

"Now all our neighbors' chimneys smoke, 
And Christmas blocks are burning; 

Their ovens with the baked meats choke, 
And all their spits are turning. 

Without the door let sorrow lie, 

And if for cold it hap to die, 
We'll bury it in a Christmas pie. 

And evermore be merry," 

The little poem must have been 
written before 1644, because in that year, 
Christmas celebrations of every kind 
were forbidden by a stern parliament. 
For the Puritans were in power; and in 
their over-zeal, they looked upon the 
toothsome plum pudding and mince pie 
as downright heathenish; and on the 
same grounds, they passed rigorous laws 
prohibiting Christmas games and merri- 
ment. 

Among those who loved the Christmas 
celebrations, there were many that hotly 
resented these high-handed measures; 
and at Canterbury, as well as at some 
other places, there was actual bloodshed 
on the anniversary of the Advent of 
Peace on Earth. 

Merrie England had been the soil in 
which the joyous celebration of Christ- 
mas had taken its firmest root. And 
our hospitably inclined English ances- 
tors took it as a matter of absolute 
right, that they should continue to ob- 
serve the Day, by overfeeding themselves 
and every one else within reach; the rich, 
in all cases, taking upon themselves the 
feeding and amusement of their poor 



retainers and dependents, rank and file. 

Moreover, Christmas was not, as with 
us, a single feast day. But the celebra- 
tion began with December 16, and did 
not end until January 6, which was 
called the Twelfth Night, because the 
legends say that after the Wise Men had 
seen His Star in the East, they traveled 
twelve days, or rather twelve nights, 
until they finally came to the Stable, and 
unloaded their camels, in order to give 
the wondrous Babe the symbolic gifts; — ■ 
gold, for a king, frankincense for a high 
priest, and myrrh for the great physician. 
Because the newly-born was destined to 
be all three of these to suffering humanity. 

In those early centuries where the 
houses were great comfortless barns, ac- 
cording to our notions, our forebears took 
solid enjoyment in the mere act of eating. 
It was before the delicatessen store was 
evolved, or the art of tin-can house- 
keeping. 

So that on Christmas, especially, the 
cook was a person of supreme importance. 
And there was a wide-spread superstition 
to the effect that if the fire burned 
brightly on Christmas morning, it be- 
tokened prosperity. But if it smoul- 
dered, adversity was predicted for that 
family. 

The real old-fashioned English Christ- 
mas was a monumental feast of good 
cheer, — with its stuffed peacock, its 
roast boar's head, and so forth, and so 
on, until the end of the Twelfth Night. 

There were old-time delicacies, the 
very names of which are puzzling to our 
modern ears. Such things as sillabub, 
cart-wheel with clotted cream, and there 
was gooseberry fool. 



THE OLD-TIME CHRISTMAS FEAST 



337 



Full and plenty to eat and drink 
was prepared for everybody, includ- 
ing beggars and strangers. The 
house was open to all, and each 
received a cordial welcome. 

Vegetables were not indulged in, 
to any extent, by our ancestors; 
and the simple life diet, as under- 
stood by us, did not appeal to them 
in the least, according to the 
descriptions of their culinary master- 
piece. 

The Boar's Head 

When, in those medieval times, 
the knights and barons kept open 
house at Christmas, for a whole fortnight, 
and revelry reigned supreme, the grand 
feast of all, — ■ which was given by the 
feudal chieftain to his friends and re- 
tainers, — took place with great pomp 
and magnificence. 

First and foremost on the board was the 
boar's head. And in those good old days, 
it was borne into the banqueting hall 
upon the shoulders of the very tallest of 
the men servants: while its entrance was 
heralded by a great blare of joyful 
trumpets, as a greeting to the royal dish. 

For it must be the head of a wild boar, 
and not that of the lowly domestic hog; 
and it must be served by no one less than 
the master of the house himself. 

Carried on a gold or silver platter, at 
the head of a procession of nobles, 
knights, and ladies, this foremost dish 
of the feast made the round of the hall, to 
the accompaniment of merry minstrelsy. 

It had already been garnished with 
slices of spiced beef; and when it was 
finally given its proper place, rosemary 
and bay were spread around it, a 
pippin was placed on its tusk and a 
mammoth pot of mustard set close at 
hand. 

At the time of the Commonwealth, 
this feast of the boar's head was for- 
bidden by an act of Parliament. And 
although it was officially freed of the 
ban, after the restoration of the mon- 
archy, in the person of Charles II, it 




FOR THE CHRISTMAS FEAST 

never quite recovered its former place 
as a part of the Christmas feast. 

Yet it is said, that in some of the fa- 
mous English educational institutions, 
the boar's head is still to be seen at the 
Christmas dinner. 

The good Queea Victoria, who dearly 
loved the old-time observances, retained 
this custom in her own palace, to the last. 

The feast of the boar's head is, in fact, 
a relic of the old Druidical times; for at 
the festival of Frey, the goddess of peace 
and plenty, the Druid priests always 
killed a wild boar; and as this period 
comes at the same time as the Yuletide, 
the other ancient ceremonial was con- 
tinued as well. 

While its flesh was never so much 
esteemed, next in importance to the 
boar's head, came 

The Peacock 

This magnificent bird is a native of 
India; and is said to have been brought to 
Palestine by the fleets of King Solomon. 

i\lways an object of show, or venera- 
tion, this bird sometimes appeared at the 
baronial feasts dressed in all its fine 
feathers, and with its beak gilded. 

It had been carefully skinned, of 
course, before being roasted; then, after 
the cooking process, the skin was neatly 
drawn over the body, again, and the 
head and tail were raised to a life-like posi- 
tion, by means, of slender willow twigs. 



338 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



They tell us it was a most gorgeous 
sight to look upon; and as the peacock 
was considered too noble a bird to be left 
to the hands of a servant to carve, that 
privilege fell to the Queen of Beauty, or 
to the lady who was the guest of honor. 

She must have found it anything but 
an easy task to avoid sending a portion of 
the meat without a garnish of the feathers, 
also. 

Occasionally, the peacock appeared in 
a resplendent pie; with its head standing 
forth from the crust at one side of the 
vast pastry, while its splendid tail was 
proudly erect, at the other edge. 

Every English family of any social 
standing seems to have possessed an 
individual, inherited recipe for the famous 
English Plum Pudding. This dainty was 
always in evidence at such feasts, so gay 
with its sprigs of holly, and served in a 
dish of blazing brandy. This is an article 
of faith, at Christmas-time; and yet I 
have met with ' stubborn disbelievers 



who "threaped" that the blazing brandy 
lent neither charm, nor added flavor. 

The Cart-wheel was an enormous 
round loaf of bread, with several kinds of 
jams forming the spokes, and all decorated 
with clotted cream, besides. 

Gooseberry Fool was another celebrated 
dish of the Middle Ages. It was made of 
whipped cream and preserved goose- 
berries. 

Sillabub was somewhat similar to 
gooseberry fool, except that it was made 
with cream and wine. 

Edward Everett Hale, himself a dear 
lover of the Holiday Time, is firmly con- 
vinced that for all of us people who speak 
the good English language, ninety-nine 
hundredths of our history and of our 
literature go back to those old days of the 
yule log, when the spirit of hospitality 
ever prompted to 

"Heap on more wood, the wind is chill; 

But let it whistle as it will, 

We'll keep our Merry Christmas still." 



Guests and Gumption 

By Alice Margaret Ash ton 



W! 



'HEN we bought this place we 
thought it was worth any sacri- 
fice," said Betty Jackson. 

"Well, so it is — • owning one's home," 
agreed Aunt Martha emphatically. 

"And then, once we possessed the deed, 
we saw so many things that ought to be 
done to it," Betty admitted further. 

"Course, it is always that way," agreed 
her elderly neighbor, understandingly. 
"We want our own place should look like 
our own, not like some neglected, rented, 
for-sale ruin." 

"It does look sweet, doesn't it.^" ques- 
tioned Betty, a bit wistfully. 

"I never see folks do just the right 
thing every time like you and Jimmie 
have done — • fixin' over," Aunt Martha 
praised warmly. 

"And we love it, every bit — except 



the mortgage! But that mortgage is 
dreadful, Aunt Martha! It will take 
years and years to pay and it's like a great 
greedy sponge that sops up every cent of 
our gift money and our fun money and 
every little saving we contrive to make.'^ 

"Oh, well," comforted Aunt Martha, 
"that's the way, child. E\^rything worth 
having in this world we have to pay for 
one way or 'nother — love and children 
and friends and — 'homes!" 

"I know that. And I'm willing. But 
it doesn't- seem right we should have to 
give up everything — not dare invite a 
few friends in to dinner, even." 

"Course you don't mean that," smiled 
Aunt Martha comfortably. 

"But I do. I do, indeed. It costs 
frightfully to entertain. And we have a 
predestined place for just practically 



GUESTS AND GUMPTION 



339 



every cent of Jim's salary. And I'm 
ashamed to accept another invitation 
without some reciprocation. And we 
carit stay home until that wretched 
mortgage is done for!" 

^^Wj land, I believe you do mean it," 
exclaimed the good lady, amazedly. "But 
you can have company to dinner as often 
as you need to, child. Any woman with 
all the nice things laid by in her cellar 
and pantry and storeroom that you've 
got can afford company if she's got any 
gumption." 

"Gumption.'^" Betty's voice sounded a 
bit edgy. "You needn't think I intended^ 
having a dinner sent in from the caterer's 
or employing a trained waitress or even 
ordering by telephone! 

^Tve been round and got prices myself 
a dozen times and things are frightfully 
high — things I'd want for a nice 'com- 
pany' dinner." 

"But you wouldn't need to buy any- 
thing except it was a little sugar or coffee, 
if you happened to be a little low. You 
could get up a dinner fit for a king — 
especially so for city friends, if they hap- 
pen to be most used to restaurant and 
cafeteria and grocery-store supplies." 

"I'd have to have meat," observed 
Betty with a patience she considered 
little short of miraculous. Aunt Martha 
was a dear, but she did not always under- 
stand young ways and city ways. "And 
meat costs — " 

"Where'd you find anything nicer for 
company dinner than those young 
roosters you've raised so carefully.^ 
There's a dozen ways you can serve 
them. " But lots of times folks — es- 
pecially men folks — like 'em best in 
just the plain, old-fashioned ways. Fried 
with hot biscuits and plenty of rich 
gravy. Stewed with dumplings. Roasted 
with lots of stuffing. And you don't often 
see folks refuse a piece of good, home- 
made chicken-pie, according to my sixty- 
odd years of experience! 

"Then, when your dressed pig arrives, 
plan for some of your entertaining. 
Baked spare-rib is a rare treat to lots of 



town folks. And It is fun to cut out 
chops and roasts and think what they'd 
cost at the market." 

"Yly goodness," Betty admitted, "I 
never thought of those things. I thought 
I had to buy something — ■ special — " 

"Don't overlook potatoes," cautioned 
her adviser. "A body can almost build a 
good meal round a tempting ^dish of 
potatoes. Try first how to cook them per- 
fectly in plain ways — baked and boiled 
and mashed — then experiment on some 
of those interesting recipes I see in your 
cooking magazines. Lots of my tow^n 
company beg for my creamed potatoes 
'cause It's the real thing- — -not made 
from the milk in the last half of the 
bottle. 

"No chef can make more tempting 
salads than you can learn to make. And 
they needn't look common or ordinary, 
either! If you paid five cents apiece at 
the fruit store for red apples to make 
your salad cases, you'd think them real 
fine — but when you have 'em down 
cellar In a barrel — " 

"I'd forget I had them. Or think they 
were common," finished Betty guiltily. 
"I see what you mean by having gump- 
tion. Aunt Martha. And truly I haven't 
had it." 

"Well, now, I didn't mean you, 
specially. But It does take planning and 
it does take work to get up a nice com- 
pany dinner or luncheon at home. But 
it doesn't cost nothing like ordering 
things — • ready cooked — and It is more 
satisfying, I think, to the guests as well as 
to the cook. 

"Dessert needn't trouble you, either. 
The way you make pumpkin pies with 
top of the milk — and dressed up a little 
special with whipped cream and some of 
your currant jell! And when your beef 
comes you will be making a jar of mince- 
meat. And there are so many light 
desserts, 'glorified' with whipped cream, 
which you can have a-plenty. 

"i\nd don't overlook the cottage cheese 
that no one can beat you making. That 
will make a hit, I'll guarantee. Pa and 



340 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



I bought some one day when we was 
taking lunch in town. Well, our tasting 
apparatus was some surprised!" And 
Aunt Martha's amused laugh and Betty's 
delighted giggle blended happily. 

"You've given me ideas enough for all 
winter," Betty admitted gratefully. 

"We expect a big jug of fresh cider 
next week. Why couldn't I have a 
little evening party of some old friends, 
and serve cider — " 

"And doughnuts and pumpkin pie," 
added her friend. "And maybe popcorn. 



Right before the fireplace, informal-like. 
I'll come over and help you fry the dough- 
nuts. It'll take an amazing lot of them, 
you will find." 

"And not cost enough to count," 
figured Betty contentedly. 

"No need at all," reiterated her self- 
appointed guide in the mysteries of real 
home-making, "no need at all in ruining 
your housekeeping budget entertaining 
your friends a reasonable amount." 

"If you've got gumption," added Betty, 
purposefully. 



When Tasks Stale 

By Salena Sheets Martin 



IT was a busy morning at the Brown's 
apartment, for the men of the house 
were there — ■ the decorators, eu- 
phoniously so called in some cases. At 
this particular hour the apartment looked 
more like it had been turned over to a 
wrecking crew. Bureaus, chiffoniers, 
chairs, tables and the household lares 
and penates stood about in unusual 
places and fantastic positions as the 
"decorators" mixed and messed in riot- 
ous possession, with the bathroom as the 
base of operations and supplies. 

Mrs. Brown was trying to hold the 
kitchen and maintain a semblance of 
order there, at least. 

Opening the rear door, in answer to a 
ring of the bell, she found her near 
neighbor and fellow-tenant, Mrs. Carson, 
who entered hurriedly. 

"May I borrow your morning paper for 
a few minutes.^ Mine has blown away," 
was her greeting. 

"Surely you may, I haven't time in this 
confusion to read it, anyway," replied 
Mrs. Brown. 

"Aren't you tired of it all — • I mean 
the whole problem of housekeeping.?" 
queried Mrs. Carson, as she lingered, 
paper in hand. 

"It does look rather discouraging just 



now," admitted Mrs. Brown, glancing 
about the seemingly disorderly room. 
"But think how fine it will be when it's all 
done — ^ so fresh and clean for spring." 

"I am sick of it all, utterly," continued 
Mrs. Carson. "It means dish-washing, 
floor-cleaning, dusting, looking after 
Baby's needs, or something of the sort, 
every waking minute, and I am always 
wanting to do other, bigger things. 
Something that takes one out in the 1 
world and gives one contact with others 
who are doing worthwhile things." 

"But, Mrs. Carson, one of these very 
same experienced world workers has _ 
said, 'We never shall get the thing we m 
long for by running away from, or neglect- 
ing, the duty at hand,' " earnestly ex- 
postulated Mrs. Brown. * 

"Yes, I know, but I feel qu-alified to 
do other and higher work than washing 
dishes and getting meals day after day, 
year in and year out." (Mrs. Carson 
had been married and keeping house only 
a little more than three years.) 

"But what work would you consider 
higher than the care and rearing of your 
little James.?" pleaded Mrs. Brown. 

When point blank with the question, 
Mrs. Carson admitted she had not really 
thought what she would, or could do, in 



WHEN TASKS STALE 



341 



the event of being free to choose her work, 
but she was decided it would be far, far 
removed from housekeeping cares. She 
had thought a little of taking up the 
study of medicine. 

It was the next afternoon that ]Mrs. 
Brown had a call from her girlhood friend, 
Miss, or rather Dr., Gilmore, who had run 
in for a "consolation" chat as she was 
wont to call their visits. Today she 
seemed to be in especial need of cheer, 
for she, too, was dissatisfied with her 
life, as it now faced her. 

'T am tired to death of an office and 
the sight of patients," she burst out. 
"They wouldn't need to be patients, if 
they used com.mon sense about their way 
of living — most of them, anyway. They 
stuff themselves with all sorts of wrong 
things and then expect me to get them 
well and keep them so, that they may go 
on and repeat the same experiences," and 
Dr. Gilmore metaphorically washed her 
hands of the lot of her annoying patients. 

"Suppose everybody was wise enough 
to live so that you doctors would not be 
needed, what would you all do for a 
living.'^" queried Mrs. Brown. 

"This minute I'd gladly change places 
with a housemaid and wash dishes, cook 
and sweep for a living, if I could be sure of 
a good home. I tell you, I'm tired of 
sick people and their whims. I'd even 



go to farming, if I could be sure of getting 
a man, woman or child to live with me." 

"My dear Doctor, did you ever think 
that it's about all that people who are 
married, who have solemnly promised to 
'love, honor and cherish' each other 
through life, can do, to weather the 
storms and stick, to say nothing of some 
one you might hire to live with you .?" 
appealed Mrs. Brown. 

"I know," replied Dr. Gilmore, "but 
I've got to make a change, and I don't 
care much what it is." 

"I have an idea!" ejaculated Mrs. 
Brown, suddenly, as a new light spread 
over her face. "I want you to step down 
with me to the next apartment and meet 
my neighbor, Mrs. Carson." 

Swept suddenly off her feet, meta- 
phorically, thus, Dr. Gilmore wonder- 
ingly followed. On being admitted, Mrs. 
Brown wasted no words as she introduced 
the two women, but tersely explained, 
"Each of you seems to have what the 
other wants. I am going to leave you 
to talk it over together." 

Did they find some mutually satis- 
factory arrangement.'* 

I only know the Doctor w^as in her 
office next day with a helpful, encourag- 
ing smile for each patient, and Mrs. 
Carson sang as she went about her house- 
work, and baby James cooed happily. 



The Spies 



Stockings still empty and corners all dark; 

Surely he hasn't forgotten the night! 
What was that sound.? Was it reindeer bells? 
Hark! 
S'pose in the chimney he should have stuck 
tight! 
If he should catch us here what would he say.'' 
W^ould we dare speak to him, or run away? 

Mother says Santa's the Spirit of Love; 
Father says he has a pack full of toys, 
But that he carries them — - Jimmie, don't 
shove! — ■ 
Only for those who are good girls and boys. 
Will he remember my doll and your sled? 
P'raps he's behind us! Let's run back to bed. 
Frances E. Gale, • 



Ladies and *'Liverouts*' 

By Martha Mack 



LAST winter there was an extra and 
an urgent need of money in my 
family. The "rainy day" had 
come and our small provision for it was, 
and still is, tied up in a Boston bank that 
has been closed. 

At home, as general manager, cook, 
nurse and seamstress, I could not very 
well be spared. But old mother Neces- 
sity sent me out in search of part-time 
employment. 

Work was dull, and I had neither trade 
nor profession. I had never worked out- 
side my own home, and I was no longer 
young. But I was determined to find 
something, and to take anything, pro- 
vided that it was decent. The efficient 
woman in the employment office advised 
me to "do second work on the eight hour 
day basis, twelve till eight, forty cents an 
hour." 

She sent me to a Beacon Hill address 
where a lady who "lived all alone with 
four in help" wanted a new second-maid. 

While I waited in the mellow light and 
grateful warmth of the lady's hall, I 
planned just how that 319.20 for my first 
week would be spent, and I rejoiced at the 
arrangement of the hours — • from twelve 
till eight — that gave me a chance to do 
work at home in the morning. The fear 
of having to borrow or go into debt had 
been lifted from me, but another fear had 
fallen upon me: 

"What will your friends say when they 
hear that you are 'working out' — a 
servant in another woman's house .^ Is 
that fair to your daughter — • she is 
almost sixteen.^ How can you keep this 
from your well-to-do relatives.^" 

To these questions, which Fear and 
Pride had thrust upon me, I made haste to 
answer: 

"There is nothing disgraceful about 
'working out.' It is all in the way that 

342 



one looks at it. Looked at in the right 
way, housework is just as honorable an 
occupation as — • as almost anything. It 
is better paid than typewriting or shop 
work. It is just one way of buying 
money — an honest exchange — service 
for money. It — " 

I heard the lady's step upon the stairs 
and I arose. She was preceded by a 
little white, fat and fluffy dog that I 
wanted to swoop down upon and cuddle. 

"You have come from the X — em- 
ployment office.^" the lady began, as she 
motioned me to a seat and, switching on 
a strong light, faced me across a small 
table. 

She was a soft-voiced lady, and she 
smiled an encouraging smile as she 
delved into my history — • age, religion, 
nationality, present and previous con- 
dition. Was my health good.^ Was I 
cheerful.^ Was I willing.^ Nothing was 
neglected. At last it was over and the 
lady seemed satisfied with her findings, 
but I had no reference. 

Might she talk with my pastor over 
the telephone.^ She might. 

When she returned it was to tell me 
that I could come to work the next day at 
twelve — • "wear plain black," she admon- 
ished, "I'll supply aprons and caps, later 
I shall get you the regular uniforms, and 
— and, of course, you doc't mind being 
called 'Martha.' " 

"No — no, indeed!" I lied cheerfully. 

"Well, you have more sense than some 
of them have," her soft voice had become 
snappy. "I had to let a perfectly good 
new cook go last week because she insisted 
upon my calling her Mrs. Something." 

"She was too — too sensitive," I ven- 
tured, as I moved toward the door. 

"Altogether!" the lady agreed. "The 
large pay and the short hours that pre- 
vailed during war time have completely 



LADIES AND "LIVEROUTS' 



343 



robbed these 'liverouts' of their use- 
fulness." 

Out in the street I told myself: "That 
is nothing! She is just sore — ^ servant 
problem — • no doubt. Nothing for you 
to be so flustrated over. If you had as 
many diamonds and things as she has, you 
would be just as careful about the kind 
of woman that worked for you. Remem- 
ber that you are out to buy money, and 
that that 319.20 represents the price of a 
ton of coal — you have just got to get it!" 

All the way across the Common and 
down into the subway I and Myself 
quarreled, and above the roar of the 
elevated the word "liverout, liverout, 
liverout," beat through my tired head, 
but upon reaching home we had settled 
the quarrel. Myself and I, and Myself had 
won. I called the lady up and told her 
that I had decided not to take the place. 

The next morning found me again in the 
employment office. 

"Just as well you didn't take it," the 
efficient woman at the desk told me, "no 
one I send to her ever stays long." 

Her shrewd eyes flashed over me. 
"Can you do plain sewing and mending. f*" 
I could. 

"This lady wants some one to come 
in by the hour." 

She handed me a card with a Back Bay 
address, and once more I set out to buy 
some money. 

It was about ten o'clock when I rang 
the bell and informed the maid who 
answered it that "I have come to sew for 
Mrs. • D — •. She wanted some to do 
plain sewing." 

"Show her up to the sewing-room, 
Lizzie, I'll be up immediately," a lady's 



cheerful voice broke in from somewhere. 
I followed Lizzie up three flights, through 
clean, sweet-smelling halls to a large, 
well-equipped sewing-room. 

"She's eating breakfast," Lizzie vol- 
unteered, "an' she'll be up soon." 

In a few minutes Mrs. D — came in 
with a cheerful "Good morning — • I have 
heaps and heaps of sewing for you." 

She went over the work with me: 
Sheets and pillow cases to be made, cross 
curtains, linen covers for chairs, stockings 
to be darned and no end of mending. 

"Jennie, my personal maid, used to do 
all this," she explained, "but now I 
refuse to let her, she is getting old — she 
has been with me forty-two years." 

From early in January till Mrs. D — 
closed her city home in May, I sewed for 
her every day from ten till five. She had 
a delightful way of making those who 
worked for her feel that she regarded 
them as real human beings, and not as 
mere things to serve her.^ I know that 
she was respected, and I think she was 
loved, by every one under her roof. 
And I, for one, have come to the con- 
clusion that the "servant problem" is a 
"mistress problem." 

The woman who works in another 
woman's house, even the most ignorant 
scrub woman, instinctively fights against 
the woman who sees in her nothing more 
than a cog in the wheel of the domestic 
machinery. And the women who employ 
women sometimes forget that human 
beings are social beings, requiring work 
under conditions that inspire them to give 
their' best, and they sometimes forget 
that the work-worn body of their "liver- 
out" harbors a soul. 



Getting the Household Ahead 

By Emmett Campbell Hall 



I 



T is no reflection upon a household, if 
it occasionally requires credit to 
bridge a period of shortage of cash, if 



this shortage is due to unusual and un- 
foreseen demands for money, but it is to 
the discredit of a household which is 



344 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



maintained by a fixed income, as from a 
salary, to habitually run behind, and the 
number that do, without actually real- 
izing it, is astonishing. From an eco- 
nomic standpoint this state of affairs is 
even worse for the family that depends 
upon an uncertain and fluctuating in- 
come. Just how far behind the family is 
running depends almost invariably upon 
the length of the intervals between "pay 
days"; if the income-earner is paid once a 
week, the family outlay is just a week 
ahead of receipts, or it is a month behind, 
if supported by a monthly salary. This 
state of affairs, which practically pre- 
cludes any hope of ever attaining inde- 
pendence, much less prosperity, is almost 
invariably not the result of necessity, but 
is merely a bad habit, and one that may 
be broken with surprising ease. The 
resulting benefits, both in financial af- 
fairs and peace of mind, are enormous as 
compared to the effort necessary to 
attain them. 

The average family does most of its 
running behind on the grocery bill, 
purchasing supplies where credit is most 
freely extended, and settling up promptly 
when the pay envelope is received, at the 
end of each week or each month, the 
money being spent not actually before it 
is earned, but before it is received, and, 
at best, this is a hand-to-mouth existence. 

Buying thus, the top price is paid for 
everything, not necessarily because the 
merchant is trying to make an unreason- 
able profit, but because, as a rule, he 
also must run behind on his accounts with 
the wholesale houses, if his customers run 
behind on their individual accounts, and 
he cannot, therefore, avail himself of the 
discounts and special opportunities which 
are granted the retailer who pays spot 
cash. Moreover, there is an incidental 
overhead charge for bookkeeping, and a 
certain amount of loss due to uncollected 
accounts, which the credit-giving grocer 
must distribute among his customers. 
Also, there is to be considered the practi- 
cally universal tendency to buy a little 
more freely when one has merely to say 



— at the time — "Charge it," than when 
the cash is paid down. 

In reply to these remarks, thousands 
would answer: "Yes, that is all very true, 
but we are in a hole and can't climb out. 
Ourregular expenses just about equal our 
income, and it takes all our available cash 
to settle up at the end of each week or 
month. How can we get money enough 
on hand to get on a cash, pay-as-you-go 
basis ? We would like to save some money, 
but how can we.^" 

As in the case of most of those old 
"sayings," that we use without ever 
really thinking about, there is absolute 
truth in the assertion, that "where there 
is a will there is a way," and in this case 
the way is neither difficult nor painful. 
A little thought — a tiny bit of self- 
denial for a brief time, and it is ac- 
complished. 

In every city, and in most towns and 
even villages, there are stores which sell 
for less than others, either the "chain 
stores," "self-service" establishments, or 
"cash and carry" institutions, their 
prices running from ten to even twenty 
per cent below the average of the credit- 
giving and delivery-making grocers. For 
the sake of illustration, we will assume the 
minimum difference of ten per cent. 

Suppose the weekly grocery account 
averages ten dollars. Obviously, if one 
must buy on credit, the only way to save 
anything is to prune this expense, and a 
trial will show that it is surprisingly easy 
to do so. With no more thought of 
saving than ordinary, write out the 
grocery order as usual, and*add the items, 
which, we'll say, amount to 31-60. Next, 
go over the list thoughtfully, considering 
how it may be cut ten per cent — how 
16 cents may be lopped off. Is there not 
some not really necessary item, actually 
a luxury or "extra," that could be dis- 
pensed with without much self-denial.^ 
Some ginger-ale, or fancy cakes, perhaps. ^ 
Or, maybe, it would not be necessary to 
cut out the item entirely — • perhaps to 
reduce the quantity would serve to save 
that little 16 cents. To specify, a less 



GETTING THE HOUSEHOLD AHEAD 



345 



expensive, though really just as good and 
nutritious cut of meat would undoubtedly 
do It. No effort should be made to reduce 
the order more than ten per cent, but 
one should firmly do that much, every 
day. Say just once, "There doesn't 
seem any way to reduce the order today, 
but I will make up for it tomorrow," and 
the scheme may as well be abandoned at 
once, for the person who allows himself to 
slip like that will never succeed In any- 
thing. On the other hand, excessive en- 
thusiasm and a too vigorous pruning of 
the order will result in a scanty fare, 
general dissatisfaction, and probable even- 
tual abandonment of the plan. If It is 
perfectly and entirely easy to save more 
than the stipulated ten per cent of the 
order, it Is well to do it, of course, but 
if twenty per cent is saved one day, this 
must not be taken as an excuse for saving 
nothing the next. 

At the end of the week it will be found 
that the grocery bill is ten per cent — • 
say ^1 — -less than usual. This amount 
Is available in cash, beyond all argument, 
as it would have been forthcoming to 
apply on the grocery bill had that bill 
been the usual amount. Despite all 
temptations to spend this money for 
any purpose whatsoever, it must be de- 
posited in a savings bank, preferably a 
regular banking house, but. If not, then 
in a little home bank or box which will be 
regarded as inviolate. This money must 
be treated as though It did not exist; this 
can be done, for, had It been spent on the 
grocery bill, it would not exist, so far as 
this particular household Is concerned. 

This program, which would be found 
to be of Increasing Interest, must be kept 
up for ten weeks. At the end of this time. 



there will be in the bank ten deposits of 
ten per cent of an average weekly grocery 
bill, or a total of 310, continuing the 
assumption of a forty-dollar-a-month 
expenditure. With this sum one em- 
barks on the cash-payment method of 
buying, patronizing those stores where 
the lower rates are to be found. The 
thing is accomplished — ■ the household is 
running a week ahead, instead of a week 
behind. • 

Buying at the lower-cost stores, it will 
be found that, even though as much of 
everything is purchased as was used be- 
fore the saving campaign was started, 
there is a dollar left over at the end of 
each week. Obviously there must be, 
unless the purchases exceed In quantity 
what was being bought on the old charge- 
it plan. Probably the habit of pruning 
the order list will have become estab- 
lished, and the cash balance will exceed 
31, but even If not, that will be some- 
thing worth while, attained without any 
self-denial whatsoever. This balance 
should be religiously deposited In the 
bank each week, and at the end of one 
year from the time the original get- 
ahead plan was Instituted, there will be a 
balance in the bank of 342 plus interest. 
Here Is an acorn which properly cultivated 
will grow to a goodly oak. 

The same plan may be adopted with 
regard to all other family expenditures 
which are of a recurrent nature, though 
the grocery bill affords the best field for 
operation. To attain success, however, 
it must be a fixed and absolute rule that 
the identical and specific sum saved, in 
theory, be saved. In actuality — • that is, 
not saved on the grocery account and 
spent on clothing, for instance. 



Revelation 



The heart yearns ever for guidance 

To conquer its daily load, 
And welcomes the Yuletide season 
When passing along life's road. 

This season of all the seasons 
Reveals to the soul of man 
All that which is good and kindly 
In God's own eternal plan. 

Caroline L. Sumner 



The story of Bethlehem's Saviour 
Brings hope to the tired soul, 

And faith, with its consecration 
To right, keeps aglow life's goal 



The Poetry of Foods 

By Emma Gary Wallace 



UPON food every living creature 
depends. The proper food, its 
assimil?.tion, its metabolism, and 
its nourishment, bulk large in the scheme 
of things. Food, in the last analysis, is 
the foundation of all. 

There are those who pride themselves 
that they care so little for food, they 
merely eat to live; while others, of epi- 
curean temperament, look upon the 
pleasures of choice foods as one of the 
joys of life. 

■ Poets have extolled the effects of food 
upon the senses mainly by comparison. 
And the poetry of food is not inconsider- 
able. We would not expect that the 
most exquisite and spiritual forms of 
rhythm would be composed by a grossly, 
gluttonous Individual; nor yet that the 
most exalted poetical art would be 
created by the brain of some one suffering 
for the actual need of daily bread. 

The proper use of food calls for dis- 
crimination and moderation. Strength of 
body, or character, or imagination is not 
gained by giving full rein to the appetite; 
nor yet by a condition bordering on mal- 
nutrition. It is rather the outcome of 
self-control governed by intelligent under- 
standing. 

Nature intended that we humans 
should enjoy food, or such an endless 
variety of fruits, vegetables, meats, fish, 
nuts, and other delicacies would not have 
been designed for our use. It was the 
Creator's purpose that we should com- 
bine and prepare foods and season and 
flavor them to our liking, or He would not 
have furnished us with fire and a vast 
fund of resourceful ingenuity. 

Again and again, during the childhood 
of the race, people were directed to take 
food materials, and to roast them, or to 
make them sodden with water, and fine 
herbs — presumably preparing a stew, or 



as it was known in those times, a dish of 
savory meat. 

There are those who would have us 
believe that we should eat only of such 
materials as are ready for our use without 
cooking, but this is not a consistent con- 
tention. We might as well argue that 
we have no right to build houses, but 
should live under the shelter of rocks and 
trees; nor that we have cause to weave 
clothing, and to manufacture it into dif- 
ferent garments, for we should dress in 
leather or fig leaves. 

We might go on and multiply these 
examples, for fire itself for warmth, and 
light, and power would come under the 
ban, and civilization would soon revert 
to aboriginal conditions. 

Since early times, poets have not only 
sung the praises of food, but have com- 
pared lovely woman to satisfying viands. 
Wordsworth describes woman as: 

"A creature not too bright or good 
For human nature's daily food; 
For transient sorrows, simple wiles, 
Praise, blame, love, kisses, tears, and smiles." 

Shakespeare uses food as a means of 
making clear his imagery when he says: 

"Chewing the food of sweet and bitter fancy." 

Milton declares that: 

"Smiles from reason flow, 
To brute deny'd, and are c^ love the food." 

And Crabbe recognizes the possibili- 
ties of satiety in these words: 

"Books cannot always please, however good; 
Minds are not ever craving for their food." 

Both Matthew Henry and Dean Swift 
agreed, '^ Bread to be the staff of lifeJ^ 
And Swift extolled the services of the 
agriculturist in these words, "Whoever 
could make two ears of corn, or two 
blades of grass, to grow upon a spot of 
ground where only one grew before, 



346 



THE POETRY OF FOODS 



347 



would deserve better of mankind, and do 
more essential service to his country, 
than the whole race of politicians put 
together." 

Jonathan Swift was born in 1667 and 
died in 1745, and yet the thoughts which 
he advanced concerning foods are often 
quoted today. He became a little caustic 
in his comparisons, and not without 
reason, when he said: 

" 'Tis an old maxim in the schools, 
That flattery's the food of fools; 
Yet now and then your men of wit 
Will condescend to take a bit." 

Sir Philip Sidney, who lived in the 
sixteenth century, defended poetry in 
these words: 

"Sweet food of sweetly uttered knowledge." 

The following oft-quoted remark is 
.attributed to Beaumont and Fletcher: 

"What's one man's poison, signor. 
Is another's meat or drink." 

From Lucretius comes the still earlier 
saying: 

"What is food to one man may be fierce poison 
to others." 

Wordsworth expresses intense lone- 
liness and longing when he pictures his 
lament in this graphic way: 

'"And homeless near a thousand homes I stood, 
-And near a thousand tables pined and wanted 
food." 

Charles Dickens speaks of refinement 
in expression and manner in these words: 

^'Papa, potatoes, poultry, prunes and prism, all 
very good words for the lips — especially 
prunes and prism." 

And he hints at the philosophy that, we 
are what our food makes us when he sings 
'of the ivy in his never-to-be-forgotten 
manner: 

"Oh, a dainty plant is the ivy green, 
That creepeth o'er ruins old! 
Of right choice food are his meals, I ween, 

In his cell so lone and cold. 
Creeping where no life is seen, 

A rare old plant is the ivy green." 

Cervantes, who departed this life in 



1616, magnified the blessings of sleep by 
comparing it, first, to Nature's food, and, 
second, to valuable coins of the realm. 

"Now, blessings light on him that first invented 
this same sleep! It covers a man all over, 
thoughts and all, like a cloak; it is meat for the 
hungry, drink for the thirsty, heat for the cold, 
arid cold for the hot. It is the current coin that 
purchases all the pleasures of the world cheap, 
and the balance that sets the king and the shep- 
herd, the fool and the wise man, even." 

As we ponder on his meaning, we are 
bound to understand what the skillful 
physician means when he speaks thus of 
a weary, pain-racked, or discouraged 
patient: "Sleep will do him more good 
than medicine." And the reason that 
sleep is so beneficial is that it is really 
Nature's way of filling up the nerve cells 
with the vital forces, and restoring lost 
energy and courage, silently but surely. 

The cook is not forgotten. We are 
assured by Burton in the sixteenth 
century, that: 

"Cookery is become an art, a noble science; 
cooks are gentlemen." 

About the same time, Tusser wrote: 

"God sendeth and giveth both mouth and the 
meat." 

Taylor has it: 
"God sends meat, and the Devil sends cooks." 

To read between the lines, one is com- 
pelled to believe that Taylor had suffered 
at the hands of those of poor skill in 
cooking, and had possibly developed a 
grouch along with indigestion. 

A century or so later, David Garrick 
penned these lines: 

"Are these the choice dishes the Doctor has 

sent us.'' 
Is this the great poet whose works so content us .'* 
This Goldsmith's fine feast, who has written 

fine books .^ 
Heaven sends us good meat, but the Devil 

sends cooks." 

Sometimes we dream of food. We may 
see rare and wonderful viands which 
tempt us to sample them, but it is rather 
unusual to dream of actually partaking 
of food. If we are to believe those who 
would interpret .dreams for us scienti- 



348 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



fically, this is of no special significance, 
as dreams are said to be made up of 
fragments of stored memories recalled by 
some physical or mental stimuli. 

But the superstitious would tell us, 
that to dream of. eating is an indication 
of want and a warning to practice extreme 
frugality; while others have it that to 
dream of eating is a sign of impending 
illness. There seems to be some sense 
in the latter, if we have previously eaten 
to the point of disturbing digestion. 

The poetry of food is more particularly 
connected with our waking moments, and 
with those experiences in our lives where 
the senses are pleased by choice combina- 
tions and artistic appeal. We may long 
remember either a simple meal or an 
elaborate banquet at which delicious 
foods are served, and eaten In congenial 
company. The memory gives us the 



same kind of pleasure as to recall a satis- 
fying song, or a poem which expressed 
our own ideas better than we could voice 
them ourselves. 

We may feel at times that we would 
rather have "A narcissus for our soul than 
a loaf of bread," but, after all, food is 
tremendously important in the scheme of 
things, and Owen Meredith voiced a very 
practical sentiment when he wrote: 

"We may live without poetry, music and art, 
We may live without conscience, and live- 
without heart; 
We may live without friends; we may live 

without books; 
But civilized man cannot live without cooks. 

He may live without books — what is knowl- 
edge but grieving? 

He may live without hope, — what is hope but 
deceiving? 

He may live without love, — what is passion 
but pining? 

But where is the man that can live without- 
dining?" 



The Importance of Cleanliness 

By Jeanne K. Loomis 



ONE scrubs the potatoes and picks 
over the berries, and then one 
holds the lettuce under the faucet 
for a space; and how often is this as far as 
many ordinarily careful cooks go along the 
path of perfect food wholesomeness! 

At the risk of being termed finicky, I 
would impress the advisability,- — more, 
the importance, — 'of washing with at- 
tention, many foodstuffs in addition to the 
ones we have always been taught to clean 
before preparing. In some of the most 
sanitary kitchens I have found that dried 
fruits and rice, for example, receive very 
little of the careful cleansing quite in- 
dispensable for the tasteful serving of 
either. On my errands among sundry 
victuallers, I have shuddered away from 
the repellant "laying on of hands," by 
grimy and heedless grocer boys. I could 
write columns on the unclean methods of 
handling edibles by indifferent and hard- 
worked clerks, and on the repugnant idea 



of bringing these contaminated foods; 
home to our tables. Oh, yes, it is very 
surely up to the purchaser to look well 
after the cleanliness and desirability of 
the eatables she offers her family. 

As for the extra time such duty may- 
demand, nearly all cooks in these times, 
have access to sinks with running cold- 
water, and hot water Is usually at hand.. 
With the water, an extra pan or two, and 
a little speed, we can add immeasurably 
to the savour of our repasts. Sufficient 
attention should be given as a matter of 
course to the following materials: 

Prunes should be well washed between, 
the hands in cold water and afterwards in 
hot water. Notice the grime that runs 
away. Then cover with clear cold water 
and soak over night. The fruit may then 
be put to cook in the water in which it has 
stood, with the certainty that It will look 
and taste clean and will be a much more 
dainty dish than we have come to regard 



THE IMPORTANCE OF CLEANLINESS 



349 



it. We are accustomed to speak of prunes 
slightingly, and the boarding-house prune 
is the symbol of very poor feeding, indeed. 
This idea arose, I believe, from serving 
the fruit cooked with its original sand and 
dirt clinging to it. 

All dried fruits and black figs should be 
washed in the above manner. 

Lemons should be scrubbed under the 
faucet before being used in any way. 

Nut-meats, purchased shelled, should 
be doused with hot water. Observe how 
much cleaner and brighter they look, and 
how very much better they taste I 

After rice has been carefully looked 
over, it should be washed between the 
hands in at least six waters, and finally 
allowed to soak an hour in a seventh 
clear water, before being put on to cook 
in boiling water. It is unbelievable how 
many good cooks object to these separate 
washings for rice. The reason for the 
much washing is a good one and connected 
with the preparation of rice for commerce. 

We may all remember to wipe the roast 
with a damp cloth, but how many of us 
omit holding the steak under the faucet, 
turning it over to allow the water to reach 
all surfaces.^ One of the best cooks I 
know, and a former domestic science 
instructor, held up her hands in horror 
when the suggestion was made that she 
wash the steak she was preparing for the 
broiler. Her manner indicated that some 
exceedingly valuable element would es- 
cape, if the meat were subjected to such a 
cleansing process. The only elements 
that would escape would be the quite 
superfluous ones that might possibly 
cling to a butcher's hands and transfer 
themselves to the meat he handles, — • 
and the tiny splinters of bone which the 
use of the cleaver leaves imbedded here 
and there. 

When making fruit cake, the seeded 
raisins should be covered once or twice 
with hot water, — ^ followed with cold. 
Examine the raisins before and after this 
proceeding, and be convinced. Soften 
the citron with hot water before slicing, 
and incidentally purify it. 



There is no flavor that will escape from 
foods so treated, if the work is done 
rapidly and deftly; and the resulting 
delicacy of taste repays the extra at- 
tention. Another thing I would em- 
phasize: Apples brought up from the 
cellar should be washed and wiped. 
They acquire an imperceptible mould 
which should be removed. Grapes should 
be placed in a colander and held under 
the faucet, turning on the water with just 
enough- force to remove the touch of the 
handlers and the spider-webs and sand 
that settle during shipment, but with not 
enough energy to jar the grapes from 
their stems. 

Referring back to the subject of berries, 
my method of washing strawberries, 
used in a demonstration during the 
summer, appeared to' disturb many of the 
women, and on inquiry I found they had 
the firm idea that the procedure must of 
its nature destroy the delicate flavor of 
the fruit. This is not really so, and I ask 
my readers to try it. Of course, the fol- 
lowing precaution is unnecessary, if you 
have gathered your own berries. If from 
the store, look them over, hulling as you 
go, and deposit in a colander. Dash hot 
water, — hot, observe, — over them, 
tossing them carefully so as to get the 
water over all. Twice do this, and finish 
with a copious douche of cold water. 
Carefully drain them, turn into a cold, 
dry dish and set in the icebox. Just try 
this. No one knows how many or whose 
hands have touched the delicious things, 
— 'besides stray flying things and un- 
sanitary dust. Surely, surely, we can 
very well spare the flavor those things 
are quite sure to add! Only remember 
to work with a swift and a very light 
touch. 

One more item: eggs. Do not put 
eggs in your refrigerator until the marks 
of the poultry yard have been gently, but 
firmly, washed off. Of course, every one 
knows that when putting eggs in water 
glass for the winter, they should not 
be washed, but only those used that have 
come immaculate from the nest 



350 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



AMERICAN COOKERY 

FORMERLY THE 

BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL 
MAGAZINE 

OF 
Culinary Science and Domestic Economics 



Subscription $1.50 perYear,Single Copies 15c 
Postage to Foreign Countries, 40c per Year 



TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The date stamped on the wrapper is the date 
on which your subscription expires; it is, also, an 
acknowledgment that a subscription, or a renewal 
of the same, has been received. 

Please renew on receipt of the colored blank 
enclosed for this purpose. 

In sending notice to renew a subscription or 
change of address, please give the old address 
as well as the new. 

In referring to an original entry, we must know 
the name as it was formerly given, together with 
the Post-office, County, State, Post-office Box, 
or Street Number. 

Entered at Boston Post-office as Second-class Matter 



Statement of the Ownership, Management, etc., required by 
the Act of Congress of Aug. 24, IQ12, of the 

AMERICAN COOKERY, published monthly 
except July and September, at Boston, Mass., 
for October 1, 1921. 

Publishers 

Boston Cooking-School Magazine Co. 

221 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Editor: Janet M. Hill 

Business Managers 

Benj. M. Hill and Robert B. Hill 

Owners 

Benj. M. Hill, Janet M. Hill, Robt, B. Hill 

Known bond or other security holders. None 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 3rd day of October, 
1921. 

(Seal) RALPH I. BENTON, 

Notary Public. 

THY^ VISION 

No vision and you perish, 

No ideal and you're lost; 
Your heart must ever cherish 

Some faith at any cost; 

Some hope, some dream to cling to. 

Some rainbow in the sky, 
Some melody to sing to, 

Some service that is high. 

Then hold in mind thy treasure, 

See that it bears the stamp 
And seal of God's good pleasure, 

To be to thee a lamp. 

Harriet H. d'' Autre mo nt. 



CHRISTMAS GREETING 

THIS current number of American 
Cookery embraces the holiday sea- 
son. Our readers need no reminder of 
this, but we simply desire to offer the 
compliments of the season, and to express 
our best wishes to each and all of our 
readers and patrons. 

We now have a goodly family of sub- 
scribers and readers of American Cook- 
ery; no fewer than forty thousand will 
receive the present issue. That this 
number be made fifty thousand by the 
first of January would be pleasant, 
indeed. 

We hope American Cookery is pro- 
viding gratification to some, and real 
helpfulness to all who earnestly peruse it. 
It seems to us that the time never was 
when so much concern was manifested in 
wise, prudent, healthy, wholesome living 
as at present. Verily, today, ignorance is 
sinful. The way of the transgressor has 
always been hard. In these latter days, 
the violation of nature's laws, the simple 
ways of healthful living, must be regarded 
as largely voluntary or wilful. Scientific 
research, universal education, the printed 
page, have made the way of the modern 
homemaker comparatively safe and easy. 
No occupation is more necessary or abid- 
ing than hers, and none is fraught with 
more far-reaching results. May the wide- 
spread aspiration for better homes and 
more perfect homelife inspire us all to 
greater efforts in the future. To inter- 
pret the spirit of the times, to keep in 
sympathy with the tendency of the day, 
along the line of Home Economics, is the 
constant aim of American Cookery. 

LAST TO ECONOMIZE 

THERE is only one way to reduce 
taxes — • and that is to reduce expen- 
ditures. This simple truth seems to have 
been perceived in Washington, where the 
administration is making conspicuous 
efforts to cut down departmental expense, 
and where Congress itself is paying far 
more heed to economy than is its tradi- 
tional custom. Even at state capitals 



EDITORIALS 



35 1 



there is a manifest tendency to think in 
less extravagant terms, if not to make 
sharp cuts in appropriations. 

Local authorities — • mayors and coun- 
cilmen of cities, selectmen and citizen- 
legislators of towns — have -been less 
quick to note the demand of the times for 
economy. Notwithstanding the general 
decline in prices, which should begin to 
reduce the cost of living for municipali- 
ties as well as individuals, many a town 
and many a city government has boosted 
its tax rate by 10, 20 or 30 per cent this 
year, and many another, not quite daring 
to affront the tax payers so openly, has 
merely put off the evil day by using up 
its last dollar of surplus and running still 
further into debt. 

Henry F. Long, Massachusetts com- 
missioner of corporations and taxation, 
warned against the lack of thrift and 
financial common sense shown by city 
officials and town meetings which spend 
faster than they dare to indicate in the 
tax rate. More businesslike methods are 
clearly needed in levying and collecting 
taxes and in the avoidance of cumulative 
borrowing. But the need reaches deeper 
than that — to the avoidance of unwar- 
ranted expenditure. Local governments 
must stop every unnecessary leak, every 
misplaced or superfluous expenditure of 
money, unless they would drive the tax- 
payers — • meaning everybody — to de- 
spair, migration or rebellion. 

— The Boston Traveler. 



SURELY there is only one way to 
reduce taxes, and that is to reduce 
expenditures. Likewise there is only one 
way to reduce the cost of living and that 
is to reduce wages. There is only one 
way to reduce unemployment, and that 
is to set everybody to work, regardless of 
daily wage. The laborer is worthy of his 
hire and no more. The war has been 
closed now some three years and peace 
has been declared. Yet many people do 
not seem to be a^yare that conditions have 
changed, and the time has come to pay 
up for wasteful extravagance and to 



practice the strictest thrift and economy. 
No longer are there short cuts to com- 
petency and riches. The ranks of the 
unemployed are full. A part, at least, of 
this situation is voluntary and unjusti- 
fiable. People seem unwilling to work 
unless at an enormous wage. 

Recently two men had been seeking a 
job. One was heard berating the other 
for his attitude in proposal for employ- 
ment. "You must understand at once," 
he said, "that people are no longer offering 
eight or ten dollars a day for work." 
Now that is just the point. They are 
not. The average employer is not earn- 
ing that amount himself. He has not the 
means to pay the present price demanded. 

The truth is, rents, wages, taxes, the 
cost of living in general, all must be 
reduced in order that legitimate business 
be resumed. The present scale of living 
is too high. Some one may say, "No 
matter how high the scale be, provided it 
prevail all round." The statement is 
false, from any and every economic point 
of view. The wealth of the world, at any 
time, consists of the stuffs and com- 
modities that are produced and distrib- 
uted. That these be plentiful and in- 
creased to the limit, no one should be 
unoccupied, everybody must be engaged 
in some kind of industrious and lucrative 
production. Idleness and unemployment 
indicate that something, even much, is 
wrong. From a moral point of view, by 
which we are tried and judged, the world 
is suffering from the lack of right- 
eousness. 

WE LIVE AND LEARN 

THE prevailing high cost of living — 
especially of food and fuel — forced 
me to give more thought to foods and 
food-values than had ever been my 
custom. I found a new way of living — • 
of feeding my family. By it I save time, 
labor and money, and, best of all, I 
consider it, after a six months' trial, 
superior to the old way. 

Early last spring I read an article on 
vitamines. The physician who wrote it 



352 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



advised the use of raw vegetables, as 
cooking "destroys the vltamines." He 
spoke especially of the vitamine value of 
raw cabbage and carrot, and of how very 
essential these vitamines are to the wel- 
fare of the body., 

I was not especially interested in the 
vitamines. I had, until then, never heard 
of them, and I have no idea yet what they 
are. But I was interested in the fact that 
raw vegetables are just as good to eat, 
and probably better, than cooked vege- 
tables; and immediately, without consult- 
ing my small family, I set about ways and 
means of serving them. 

It was on a Monday, and there was 
part of a meat-loaf left from Sunday's 
dinner. I put my raw cabbage through 
the meat chopper, my carrots I scrubbed 
thoroughly and grated through a coarse 
grater. Then upon lettuce leaves I spread 
the cabbage, sprinkled with salt, pepper 
and a tiny trace of sugar, the carrots 
likewise, and then I added mayonnaise 
dressing. It looked good and it tasted 
just as good as it looked. We liked it. 

Since then I have varied my vegetable 
dish by serving raw beet, parsnip and 
turnip grated and mixed with chopped 
onion, celery or cabbage, and with oil 
or mayonnaise dressing — sometimes on 
lettuce, sometimes on new cabbage leaves. 
Never again shall I trouble to cook 
vegetables. 

One member of my family who for 
years had had a stubborn case of eczema 
that caused her much annoyance by in- 
tense itching, and had failed to respond to 
various remedies, discovered that her 
eczema had departed soon after our raw 
vegetable courses had begun. We like 
to think that the vitamines did it. 

M. M. 

BIBLE IN SCHOOL • 

THERE is an increasing demand for 
re-introducing the Bible into the 
public schools. The question at once 
proposes itself: Why was it ever removed f 
Has it been replaced by an exercise more 
beneficial to children.^ Was it opposed 



by teachers on the ground that children 
got their lessons better and behaved 
better without it.^ Did committees and 
superintendents oppose it because it was 
not good literature.? As a matter of fact, 
the ban was placed on the Bible during 
a hysteria of sectarian feeling. Those 
who controlled the schools concluded that 
it would not do to read the Bible before 
groups of children representing a wide 
variety of faiths. The decision was 
fallacious. The Bible is the book univer- 
sal, the most human book in existence. 
It contains passages of such literary 
excellence and inspirational merit that 
children, whether they believe in the 
tenets of the Christ, Zoroaster, or Buddha, 
could hot help deriving benefit by hearing 
them read. 

By all means put the Bible back in the 
school. Heaven knows the boys and 
girls of these times require its stabilizing 
influence. — ■ The Christian Register. 

MY MOUNTAIN ROAD 

Page Hill Road! No happy step along your 

rugged way 
I do not know, I have not loved, and counted 

as my own; — 
The spring beneath the spruce, that, dark 

and fragrant, stands alone; 
The steep, rough climb beyond it, where the 

sapling maples sway; 

Pastures, that, rimmed with gray stone walls, 
from tamarack swamps uptend , 
To clasp the craggy Pilot Range, a-sweep 

from east to north; 
Eager, young brooks, that, keen from purple 
heights, leap singing forth, 
And trilling gaily down the mountains, in the 
lowlands blend. 

Far valleys, green until the ha«e of distance dims 
their space; 
Skies, that, above white cloud peaks, arch 

blue intervales divine 
O'er air that, sweetened by the breath of 
basswood, beech, and pine, 
Sifts whispering through the coolness where 
their shadows interlace. 

1 love you. Page Hill Road! I love your vagrant 

curves, your song; 
The little flowers that trail beside; the 

rustling in the brush; 
The sun and color on the heights; the chill 
and tender hush 
Of low fields banded with white mist when 
twilight shadows throng. 

Katharine Sawin Oakes. 




CHRISTMAS LOLLYPOPS IN PROCESS (For Recipe see page 360) 



* Seasonable-and-Tested Recipes 

By Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 

TN ALL recipes where flour is used, unless otherwise stated, the flour is measured after sifting 

once. Where flour is measured by cups, the cup is filled with a spoon, and a level cupful Js 

meant. A tablespoonful or a teaspoonful of any designated material is a LEVEL spoonful. In flour 

mixtures where yeast is called for, use bread flour; in all other flour mixtures, use cake or pastry flour. 



Beet Bouillon 

A Christmas Soup 

BOIL two to four good-sized beets, 
after removing the skin, with two 
onions. Sift when soft, and add to 
three pints of white stock, previously 
thickened with two tablespoonfuls of 
arrowroot, rubbed smooth into one- 
fourth a cup of melted butter. The 
arrowroot makes a transparent thicken- 
ing, preserving the red color of the beets. 
Garnish with slices of hard-cooked egg, 
or strips of green lettuce, or both. 

Spiced Mackerel 

Split three fresh mackerel down the 
back and clean them, removing the bones, 
and scraping all the thin black skin from 
the inside. Cut off heads and tails, and 
divide each half crosswise. Arrange the 
pieces in a shallow baking dish, pour over 
enough vinegar to reach, almost but rot 
quite, to the top of the pieces of fish, then 
sprinkle salt and pepper over them, with 



a very little cayenne, place a bay leaf on 
each, and drop, here and there, into the 
vinegar eight whole cloves, and four 
allspice berries. Bake in a slow oven for 
two hours. Serve with hot, baked po- 
tatoes, or the dish may be used cold^ 
garnished with quarters of lemon. 

Savory Apples to Serve 
with a Roast 

Cook with two cups of white stock 
one teaspoonful of minced onion, one 
small bay leaf, one-half a teaspoonful of 
salt and one-fourth a teaspoonful of 
white pepper. Let simmer for twenty 
minutes, and strain. Pare and core six 
or eight greenings, put them in a granite 
pan, pour the stock around them, cover, 
and bake or let simmer until tender. 
Lift the apples with a skimmer out of the 
stock and arrange around the platter on 
which the roast stands, then quickly fill 
their cavities with the following filling, 
which should be ready prepared. Four 
tablespoonfuls of currant jelly, mixed 



353 



354 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



with one cup of chopped pecans and one- 
half a cup of ripe olives, with a light 
sprinkle of paprika. Pour over them 
the stock, which should have been kept 
hot, and serve as dish gravy. 

Roast Canvasback or 
Redhead Ducks 

Draw the ducks, but do not wash, and 
wipe thoroughly with a damp cloth. 
Stuff each with one-third a cup of chopped 
onion and one cup and one-third of 
chopped, green celery stalks. This stuf- 
fing is not served, it is used to flavor the 



Macaroni Reale 

An Italian Dish 
Boil until tender a cup of macaroni, 
broken into short lengths, and arrange 
in the form of a border on a circular dish. 
Fill the center with one cup and one- 
half of chopped chicken giblets, stewed 
in one cup of brown sauce, made same as 
white sauce with one bouillon cube dis- 
solved in one cup of water, seasoned and 
thickened with two tablespoonfuls, each, 
of butter and flour. Decorate the border 
of the dish with alternate rounds of sliced 




CROWN ROAST OF PORK WITH APPLE RINGS 



bird. Truss, dredge lightly with flour, 
seasoned with salt and pepper, and cook 
in a very hot oven on the rack of a baking 
pan for not more than twenty minutes. 
The oven door should not be tight- 
closed, to provide ventilation, and the 
heat should be as high as for pastry. 
The birds should be basted every eight 
or ten minutes with slightly salted water. 
Serve with a sour apple marmalade, and 
an olive sauce, made by cooking chopped 
olives in brown stock, slightly thickened 
with flour and seasoned with a teaspoon- 
ful of onion juice to every cup of sauce. 



lemon and hard-cooked egg, with parsley 
or cress between. ^ 

Crown Roast of Pork with Apple 
Rings 

A crown roast of pork is fashioned 
from two loins with seven or eight rib 
bones in each. The bones should be 
freed of flesh, nearly to the "kernel" of 
the chops. Cut apart the backbone at 
the base between each chop, but do not 
cut up into the flesh; this allows spread- 
ing the loins apart at the base. Tie the 
ends together with two stitches, one 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



355 



above the other, at each side, 
so that the kernel of the 
chops will be inside. Wrap 
each rib in a slice of fat, salt 
pork to keep the bones from 
charring. Cook from one and 
a half to two hours, basting 
frequently. To serve, remove 
the pork from the bones and 
fill the center with small 
onions, well buttered; and 
garnish with fried rings of 
apple. 

Green Peppers Farci 

Cut the tops from six green peppers, 
scoop out the insides, and let simmer 
gently for five minutes in water to cover 
the scooped-out peppers and the slices 
cut from the tops. Remove the peppers 
to a well-greased baking-pan, and fill the 
cavities with the following: One cup and 
one-half of minced, cooked veal, one cup 
and one-half of breadcrumbs, three- 
fourths a cup of chopped, cooked ham, 
the chopped green tops of the peppers, a 
tablespoonful of minced parsley, one 
teaspoonful, each, of salt and onion juice, 
three tablespoonfuls of melted butter, and 
enough cream or rich stock to moisten 
and bind the whole. Bake for half an 
hour at gentle heat, basting every ten 
minutes with water or stock. 

Chopped tomatoes and cheese in equal 
parts, or sifted baked beans flavored with 




FRIED SCALLOPS IN BREAD CASES 

tomato catsup, may be substituted for 
the veal. 

Glazed Onions 

A Garnish for Steak or Chops 
Cook small white onions until soft, but 
firm enough to hold their shape. Make 
a syrup of one cup of sugar and one-half 
a cup of stock, and cook to the soft-ball 
stage; add the onions and continue to 
cook for two or three minutes. Lift 
out when the syrup begins to discolor, 
and arrange on the platter with the steak. 

Fried Scallops 

Cover the scallops with boiling water 
and keep hot fifteen minutes without 
boiling; drain and dry on a cloth. Roll 
in cracker crumbs (powdered fine and 
seasoned with salt and pepper), dip in 




PREPARATIONSIFOR roasting DUCKS , 



356 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



egg and roll again In cracker crumbs; fry 
In a basket in deep fat, until well browned. 
Arrange in bread cups that have been 
spread with butter and browned in the 
oven. Serve with Tartar" Sauce. 

Friar's Omelet 

To six large apples, cored, pared, and 
quartered, add barely enough water to 
cover, and stew to a pulp. Stir in 
enough sugar to sweeten while the apples 
are hot, also the grated rind of one-half a 
lemon and the juice of one whole lemon. 
Before the sauce cools, add one-fourth a 
cup of butter and grated nutmeg to taste. 



stock, and one-half a cup of fine crumbs. 
Let simmer until the vegetables are all 
soft enough to be put through the 
colander. After sifting, add the whole 
to one quart of thin white sauce, made 
by thickening a quart of milk with one- 



fourth a cup, each, of butter 



;ub- 



stitute and flour, with seasoning to taste. 
Garnish with leaves of cress. 

Cranberry-and-AppIe Mound 

Cook together one pint of cranberries 
and four good-sized apples in barely 
enough water to keep from burning. As 
soon as apples are soft, sift both through a 




k(jAhl DLCKS, (.lARM.^il ('1 v_ 



Apply a thick coating of butter to the 
inside of a large baking-dish, and sift over 
this as much fine crumbs, sifted and 
browned, as thebutter will hold. When this 
is firm, pour in the apple-mixture, spread 
crumbs over the top, stick cloves, here 
and there, and bake; serve cold with cream. 

Cressy Soup 

(Carrot and Bread) 
Scrape and cut in slices one-half a 
pound of carrots, and cook in one-fourth 
a cup of butter with the white part of two 
leeks and one small onion, sliced, until 
onions begin faintly to color the butter. 
Add to saucepan two cups of water or 



colander, measure the resulting pulp, and 
for each pint of this add one cup and one- 
half of granulated sugar and the juice of 
one lemon. Return to fire and stir until 
sugar is dissolved, and let simmer slowly 
for five minutes. Let cool; add to the 
mixture the unbeaten whites of two fresh 
eggs, and beat the whole long and vig- 
orously until stiff. Pile into sherbet 
glasses, or mould in any fancy shape. 
Serve with a custard sauce made of the 
yolks of the eggs. 

Cold Beef Tongue 

A Holiday Luncheon Dish 
Boil the tone:ue until tender in a meat 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



357 




BAKED BLUEFISH 



Stock that has been well flavored with 
vegetables, such as carrots, onions, and 
parsnips; herbs, like sweet marjoram, 
chervil or basil, and a very little mint; 
and the usual seasoning of salt, pepper, 
celery salt, and a very little cayenne. 
Remove the skin from the tongue, brush 
it over with slight-beaten tgg, and strew 
it thick with fine bread crumbs. Bake 
for half an hour in a hot oven, basting 
every eight minutes with a mixture of, 
half and half, vinegar and water. Re- 
move from oven, let get quite cold; 
place on a large, handsome platter and 
cut with a sharp knife into thin slices, 
allowing it to retain its shape. Spread 
a thick mayonnaise over triangles of 
toast; decorate these by covering with 
thin-sliced pimientoes, and arrange them 
around the sliced tongue on a bed of 
shredded lettuce or chopped parsley. 



Baked Bluefish 

Clean a four-pound bluefish, stuff and 
sew in with twine. Bake one hour. 

Fish Stuffing 

Mix one-fourth a loaf of bread crumbs, 
one tablespoonful of chopped parsley, one 
teaspoonful of onion juice, one teaspoon- 
ful of sweet basil, one-fourth a teaspoonful 
of salt, one-fourth a teaspoonful of pepper 
and one-fourth a cup of melted butter. 

Honig Kuchen 

(Dutch Christmas Cake) 
Mix with one cup of honey one tea- 
spoonful and one-half of powdered cinna- 
mon, one-half a teaspoonful, each, of 
ground ginger and baking soda, one- 
fourth a teaspoonful, each, of cloves, 
white pepper, and salt, and if possible 




STYLES OF PUDDING MOULDS 



358 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



one teaspoonful of powdered cardamon 
seed. Put all in a large agate-ware bowl; 
add three-fourths a cup of sugar, and heat 
until the sugar is dissolved and the smell 
of the spices is evident. Care should be 
taken that the honey does not boil over. 
Let cool somewhat, but while still warm 
sift into the mixture, while stirring con- 
stantly, from two and one-half to three 
cups of flour, or enough to make a thick 
batter, sifted with three teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder. Add two ounces of 
chopped, blanched almonds, one-fourth 
a pound of dried figs, previously steamed 
and chopped, and one-fourth a pound, 
each, of raisins and currants. Let mix- 
ture stand in the pan for twenty minutes 



firm dough. Beat the dough with a mal- 
let about twenty minutes or run it 
through a biscuit brake until it is beau- 
tifully smooth and velvety. Cut into 
rounds, prick with a fork (some cutters 
prick the dough as it is cut into rounds); 
bake about half an hour in a moderate 
oven. These biscuits will sometimes split 
evenly and the texture is similar to that 
of crackers. Some cooks prefer to mix 
the biscuit with buttermilk into which 
one-fourth a teaspoonful of soda has 
been stirred. 

Mocha Cakes 

Bake a sponge cake in a sheet. When 
baked it should be an inch in thickness. 







MARYLAND BEATEN BISCUIT 



before putting in the oven — it should be 
baked in a large, round pan, the batter 
not more than three-fourths an inch deep 
— ■ and bake at a low temperature for 
from thirty to forty minutes, or until done. 
Sprinkle the top with coarse granulated 
sugar, and decorate with a border of 
red and green tinted icing, arranged 
in the form of leaves and berries. 

Maryland Beaten Biscuit 

With the tips of the fingers work a 
teaspoonful of butter into a pint of flour, 
then mix with milk or water to a very 



Cut the cake in small rounds, spread the 
sides with jelly, then roll in chopped 
walnut meats. With pastry bag and 
star tube, pipe mocha cream, round and 
round, over the top of each cake. Finish 
with a candied cherry in the center. 

Mocha Cream 

Wash a cup of butter in cold water to 
free it from salt, pat it to remove all water, 
and then beat to a cream; add a beaten 
egg-yolk, and, gradually, two cups and 
one-half of powdered sugar and enough 
coffee extract to give the flavor desired. 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



359 





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MOCHA CAKES 



Frozen Fruit Salad 

Cut In small bits the fruit in one can, 
each, of pineapple, white cherries, pears 
and peaches. Mix prepared fruit, the 
juice from the cans, two oranges and one- 
fourth of a grapefruit, cut in bits, two 
cups of mayonnaise and one pint of 
cream, whipped. Turn into the can of a 
freezer and freeze, turning crank very 
slowly; pack the frozen mixture in quart 
brick moulds and let stand in ice and salt 
one hour. Serve, cut in slices, on lettuce 
leaves. This recipe will serve thirty-five 
people. 

Chocolate Christmas Cup 

Shave one ounce of chocolate, and cook 
with two tablespoonfuls of sugar in one- 
fourth a cup of water until so thick that 
the spoon will leave its track in the 
mixture. Add one pint of boiling water. 



one cup of juice from canned raspberries 
or strawberries, one-fourth a cup of 
lemon juice, and the juice of two large 
oranges, with the grated rind of one. 
Sweeten to taste, if more sugar is needed; 
let the whole come to boiling point; stir, 
and fill chocolate cups three-fourths full 
with the mixture. Place a marshmallow 
on top of each, and as it melts gar- 
nish with candied cherries and bits of 
angelica. 

Christmas Cake 

Cream one-half a cup of shortening; 
gradually add one cup and one-half of 
sugar. Sift together two cups of flour 
and two teaspoonfuls of baking powder; 
add to the butter mixture, alternately, 
with three-fourths a cup of milk, one 
teaspoonful of vanilla and the whites of 
four eggs, beaten stiff. When thor- 
oughly blended bake in three layers. 




FRUIT SALAD, FROZEN 



360 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




CHRISTMAS CAKE 



Filling for Christmas Cake 

Boil two cups of sugar and three- 
fourths a cup of water to 236 deg.; pour 
slowly on to the whites of two eggs, 
beaten dry, beating constantly; then 
add one tablespoonful of lemon juice. 
When cool add one dozen marshmallows, 
one cup of walnuts and two dozen 
Maraschino cherries, all cut Into small 
pieces. Put this filling between the 
layers and over the top and sides of the 
cake. Cover this filling with a frosting 
made by boiling two cups of sugar and 
three-fourths a cup of water to 240 deg. 
Pour this on to the whites of two eggs, 
beaten dry. Pipe stars above the frost- 
ing and decorate with citron and cherries. 

Lady Locks 

W Roll puif-paste one-eighth an inch 
thick and cut in long strips three- 
fourths an inch wide; wind around lady- 



lock forms; trim the ends even with the 
sticks. Bake on a tin In a slow oven; 
remove the curls from the sticks and when 
cool fill with whipped cream, sweetened 
and flavored before whipping. 

Lolly-Pops 

Mix thoroughly one cup and one-half 
of sugar, one-half a cup of Karo (white), 
and three-fourths a cup of water; add 
two squares of melted chocolate just as 
boiling begins; boil until a little is hard 
when tested in cold water, about 300 
deg. Fahr. At this stage, when pressed 
between the teeth the candy leaves them 
clean and free. Pour a generous table- 
spoonful into each buttered muffin tin. 
Before hardening commences, remove 
with a spatula or knife, adjust skewer and 
allow to harden on wax paper. For 
other flavors, omit chocolate and use 
fruit juice instead of water; color as 
desired and flavor with extract. 




THE FORMS 



LADY LOCKS 



ON FORM, UNBAKED 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



361 



Christmas Pastry Cake 

(Scotch Recipe) 
Sift a teaspoonful of salt with one 
pound of bread flour, and work in with 
the fingers three ounces of butter. Add 
liquid, milk, water, or creamy coffee, or 
a mixture of two or more, to make a 
dough, working in one compressed yeast 
cake, blended smooth in a little water. 
Let rise to double its bulk, and add the 
following, all well floured: One pound of 
raisins, three-fourths a pound of currants, 
one-half a cup of chopped, blanched 
almonds, one ounce, each, of fine-shaved, 
candied citron, orange, and lemon rind, 
and one teaspoonful, each, of ground 
ginger and powdered cinnamon. Shape 
into a ball; flatten this into cylinder form, 
and let rise again in a cylinder-shaped 
pan. When it has risen to double its 
bulk, bake slowly for an hour and one- 
half. Have ready, on removing from 
pan, a sheet of light, flaky pastry, rolled 
thin. Enclose the cake in the pastry, 
working quickly so that the paste will 
not soften; prick several holes in the top, 
place on several folds of paper on a 
baking sheet, and put into a hot oven 
until the pastry is done. Let cool, and 
decorate the top with candied fruit. 

Candied Carrot Strips 

Cut one pound and one-half of carrots 
into strips, after first washing and scrap- 
ing, and drop into rapidly boiling salted 
water for two minutes. Lift out, drain, 
and add to a syrup, made by cooking two 
cups of sugar in one cup of water with the 
grated yellow rind of one lemon, for ten 
minutes. In this allow the carrot strips 
to cook until the syrup threads, or regis- 
ters 232 deg. to 235 deg. Fah. by the sugar 
thermometer. Spread the strips on oiled 
paper to dry, and when nearly dry roll 
each in fine granulated sugar. Pile on a 
glass dish. 

Brussels Sprouts Potato Pie 

Cook one quart of Brussels sprouts for 



ten minutes in boiling, salted water; 
drain, place in baking dish, and jx)ur over 
them a pint of rich stock, preferably 
chicken, thickened slightly with one 
tablespoonful of flour. Mash four large, 
fresh-boiled potatoes with a cup of hot 
milk or cream, two tablespoonfuls of 
butter, two teaspoonfuls of onion juice, 
a generous teaspoonful of salt and one- 
half a teaspoonful of pepper. Add while 
still hot the slightly-beaten yolks of one 
or two eggs, and, lastly, beat in the 
slightly-beaten whites, beating vigor- 
ously until the whole is light. Pile over 
the Brussels sprouts in the baking dish, 
grate hard cheese over the top, and bake 
until well browned. 

Apple Shortcake 

Place in a mixing bowl one cup and 
three-quarters of flour, one half a tea- 
spoonful of salt, four level teaspoonfuls 
of baking powder, four tablespoonfuls of 
sugar, four tablespoonfuls of shortening, 
one cup of milk or water. 

Beat to mix and then turn into a 
well greased-and-floured, deep, layer- 
cake pan and spread quite high on the 
sides. 

Cover thick with thin-sliced apple and 
dot with two tablespoonfuls of butter 
and sprinkle with: 

One teaspoonful of cinnamon, one-half 
a teaspoonful of nutmeg, one-quarter a 
teaspoonful of allspice, two-thirds a cup 
of brown sugar. 

Bake in a slow oven for thirty-five 
minutes and serve hot with the following 
sauce: 

Place one quart of water in stewpan, 
one-half a cup of sugar, one heaping 
teaspoonful of butter; mix tjwo table- 
spoonfuls of flour and water to a cream, 
and add to sauce slowly, stir constantly 
and remove from fire when cooked; add 
one teaspoonful of extract of lemon or 
vanilla, and grated nutmeg to taste. 

This dish is extnemely rich in sulphur 
and mineral salts and health-giving vita- 
mines. 



Seasonable Menus for Week in December 



Breakfast 

Grapefruit 

Puffed Wheat with Milk 

Egg Toast 

Baker's Crusty Rolls, reheated 

Cafe au Lait 

Dinner 

Pork Tenderloin with Steamed Apple Rings 

Brussels Sprouts Potato Pie 

('hopped Celery, Apple-and-Cabbage Salad 

Cooked Dressing 

Deep-Dish Apple Pie 

Coffee 

Supper 

Macaroni Reale 

Thin-Sliced Buttered Bread 

Stewed Fruit Cake 

Cocoa 



Breakfast 

Grapes 

Gluten Grits, Top Milk 

Smoked Herring Creamed Potatoes 

Bran Biscuits 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

• Scalloped Oysters 

Date Muffins 

Cabbage-and-Celery Salad 

Apple Sauce Cookies 

Tea or Milk 

Dinner 

Rib Roast of Beef 

Potatoes Creamed Onions 

Spiced Apple Jelly 

Creamy Rice Pudding 

Coffee or Milk 





Breakfast 


Breakfast 






Malted Breakfast Food, Thin Cream 


Malt Breakfast Food with Dates 






Sausages with Baked Apples 


and Top Milk 






Wheat Puffs 


Creamed Codfish 






Coffee 


Potato Pancakes 
Coffee 






Luncheon 






>* 


Tomato Cream Soup 


Luncheon 


< 
Q 


Creamed Dried Beef Baked Sweet Potatoes 


Creamed Tuna Fish Baked Potatoes 


a 


Raisin Bread 


Currant Buns 


^ 


O 


Sliced Oranges 


Canned Pears with Whipped Cream 




^ 


Tea 


Chocolate 


> 
>< 




Dinner 


Dinner 




Roast Veal 


Meat Loaf with Tomato Sauce 






Steamed Potatoes Spinach 


Riced Potatoes Sauerkraut 






Coleslaw 


Creamed Carrots 






Graham Pudding, Jelly Sauce 


Pineapple Fritters with Honey 






Coffee 


Coffee or Milk 


'- 




Breakfast 


Breakfast 






Sliced Oranges and Bananas 


Oranges 






Bacon and Poached Eggs 


Cream of Wheat, Milk 






Graham Toast 


Corned Beef Hash 






Coffee 


Graham Buns 
Coffee 




X 


Luncheon 


Luncheon 


HrJ 


< 


Corn Chowder 


Potato-and- Liver Sauteed 


W* 


Q 


Lettuce-and- Cheese Salad 


Tomato Sauce 


1—4 


en 


French Toast, Syrup 


Buttered Toast 


P 


Lemon Jelly with Cream 


Baked Bananas Apple Jelly Sauce 


><l 


H 




Milk or Tea 4 






.Dinner 


Dinner 






Veal Birds 


Halibut Steaks 






Mashed Potatoes Savory Apples 


Potato Balls Green Peppers Farci 






Celery 


Lettuce Salad 






Raisin Pie 


Friar's Omelet 


■^ 




Coffee 


Coffee or Milk 





Breakfast 

Gluten Grits 

Steamed Figs and Cream 

Fish Hash 

Corn Bread 

Coffee 



Luncheon 

Bean Puree 

Chicken Giblets on Toast 

Jellied Sweet Cider 

Fresh One-Egg Cake 

Cocoa 

362 



Dinner 

Brown Stew with Dumplings 
Baked Squash 
Plum Tapioca Pudding, 

Custard Sauce 
Coffee or Milk 



Christmas Holiday Menus 



CHRISTMAS DINNER 

(Old English Dishes) 

Cressy Soup (carrot and bread) 
Fried Cheese Balls Plums Stuffed with Nuts 



Salmon Steaks, Garnished with Cress 
Apple Rings, Sauteed in Butter 



Boar's Head of Brawn 

Roasted Potatoes 

Gooseberry Chutney Stuffed Carrots 



Sweet Cider Frozen Punch 



Venison Pasty, or Pigeons in Cabbage 

Curds and Cream with Raisins 
in Lettuce Hearts 



Plum Pudding 



Mince Patties 



Fruits Nuts Candies Glaceed Ginger Coffee 



II 
CHRISTMAS DINNER 

(Franco- American) 

Canapes of Caviar 

Oyster Cocktail in Red Pepper Cups 

on Lettuce Leaves 



Pimolas 



Beet Bouillon 



Croutons 



Smelts in Orange Sauce 
Sweet Potato Balls Steamed Cucumbers 

Sweet Pickled Pears 



Saddle of Canada Mutton 

Garnished with Cherries 

Currant Jelly Sauce 

Kice Timbales Buttered Asparagus Tips 

Grape Juice Frappe 

Foie Gras on Shredded Lettuce . 

Raisin-and-Citron Tartlets 
Strawberry Bombe Glace 

Assorted Nuts and Fruits 

Crackers Cheese 

Cafe au Turc 



Celery 



Salted Nuts 



III 
BACHELOR'S DECEMBER DINNER 

Anchovy-and-Cheese Canapes 
Green Turtle Soup 

Crab Meat in Scallop Shells 
Currant Jelly 

Whole Roast Piglet 

Oregon Baked Potatoes 

Cranberry-and- Apple Mound 

Mustard Pickles 



Saltines 



Candied Green Ginger 



Frozen Tom-and-Jerry 
(Ginger Ale and Grape Juice with Whipped Cream) 

Roast Canvasback or Redhead Ducks 
Braised Celery 

Waldorf Salad in Lettuce Hearts 
Bent Crackers 



Deep-Dish Cherry Pie with Cream Cheese 
Frozen Custard 



Bonbons 



Crackers 



Sharp Cheese 



Black Coffee 



IV 
WINTER BUFFET LUNCHEON 

Jellied Bouillon 
Chicken Croquettes Salad Rolls 

Sandwiches of: 
Apple-and-Cress 
Nut-and-Celery 

Ham-and-Oysters 
Anchovy Paste 

Sifted Steamed Figs-and-Lemon 

Salmon Mousse 

Creamed Shad Roe in Pastry Cups 

Orange Jelly M acaroons 

Chocolate-and- Raisin Ice Cream 

Hot Tea Hot Coffee Hot Chocolate Cup 



CHILDREN'S VACATION PARTY 

Salpicon of Bananas, Pineapple, and Oranges 

in Me'on Shells 

Chicken Bouillon with Individual 

Initials of Macaroni 



Crown of Lamb 
Stuffed with peas, carrots, and rice 

Salad of Cream Cheese and Candied Cranberries 

in Cucumber Cups 

Animal Crackers 



Individual Custards, Garnished with Red Jelly 
Ice Cream in Individual Moulds c 



Lemonade 



363 




Twice Done Duties 

By Margaret Brent 



WHILE I was still a very young 
housekeeper, I went, one day, to a 
club meeting, and during intermission, 
between business and literature, a friend 
told an eager group of would-be efficient 
and economical women of a good, cheap, 
easy, delicious dish for dinner. Natur- 
ally we listened open-eared. It was 
called mock-duck. One procured a large 
slice of round steak; one beat salt and 
flour into one side of it; one turned it 
over, made a stuffing similar to poultry 
stuffing — with onions a-plenty — rolled 
it into the meat, tied it about with string, 
placed it in the roaster, poured a can of 
tomatoes over and baked it for four hours. 

I went home keen for the new dish. I 
promised my husband a treat. I lay 
awake fully two hours remembering the 
new recipe, which there had been no 
opportunity to write out; I chastened 
my "forgettery" not to neglect bringing 
up a can of tomatoes from the cellar when 
I went down for potatoes, and also not to 
neglect waking early enough to get the 
meat in time for the first delivery, since 
the club member had said mock-duck was 
a mere nothing, at all, if not cooked at 
least four hours. Also I wondered if 
there were onions ! 

After that I slept, dreaming of frantic 
tiforts to get an ever-busy telephone line, 
and that a quart can of tomatoes, starting 
up the cellar stairs of its own volition, 
suddenly grew to giant size and refused 
to come through the cellar door, when 
a person — it must have been I — 
branished a can-opener as large as a 
broom in its direction and plunged it in 
only to find the can becoming an onion. 



I am sure you will be glad to hear that 
the Mock-Duck — looking patheti- 
cally real on its hot platter — was as 
good as its recommendation; and you will 
not be surprised to know its creator was 
a wreck who never wanted to see the dish 
again in spite of a husband's sincere 
praise. 

For nothing is truly good, easy, cheap 
— even if to the rest of the family it 
tastes delicious — if in the making the 
cook is exhausted and a disproportionate 
amount of time or strength has gone to 
the achievement. 

In the mock-duck episode, the amount 
of time and worry was solely the cook's 
fault, and largely the result of inexperi- 
.ence and too great zeal. But such dishes 
as make a cheap cut of meat really tender 
and eatable take time. If you like to 
balance your time against the saving, well 
and good. The cheap cut is equally 
nutritious. But don't think mock-duck 
a labor-saving device. 

I recall a time during those early 
housekeeping days when the making of a 
pie stared me in the face, just as writing a 
letter of condolence, or deciding about 
wall-paper does a Kttle neighbor of mine. 

Each to his taste — or rather distaste; 
for carefully considered, it is dread of 
doing something, be that something pies 
or darning, that makes one do it in the 
mind over and over before it takes out- 
ward form. And it is dreaded because 
it is intrinsically difficult, or not rightly 
understood or wrongly approached. For 
the intrinsically difficult, the only help 
to mastery is to march up and face the 
monster; and if it is impossible to make 



364 



TWICE DONE DUTIES 



365 



friends with him, tell him that, as an 
enemy, he is about to be conquered. 
Like other cowards, this sort of difficulty 
often slinks away or grows easy on the 
approach of courage. 

But most we dread is dreaded because 
of ignorance. We learn this lesson, if 
never before, when we have children and 
try to help them over hard places, which 
at their age — if we are fair and honest in 
remembering our own youth — we found 
too difficult to be easily mastered; but 
which, taken up again at maturity, seem 
nothing. The mistake parents often 
make is just here — in lack of sympathy, 
of seeming to see no seriousness in childish 
problems — which filled the entire hori- 
zon when we were young and ill-equipped 
for problem-solving. 

Even when we have learned the ordinary 
duties of life, so they no longer have 
power to fret us or rob us of sleep, the 
unaccustomed, or the unwanted retains 
a nightmare hold upon nerves and brain. 
How often we dislike a duty simply 
because it interferes with a plan, and we 
stew over the difficulties of our particular 
lot and sink into self-pity, because we 
don't meet the obstacle to peace in the 
same quietness of spirit we bring to the 
task we love. It is, perhaps, too much 
to ask of humankind that work we love 
shall be only as alluring as that we loath. 
But meet the unloved task as a challenge 
to strength and patience, as without any 
doubt, in the sight of the angels, some- 
thing we need to do for our soul's good, 
and get it done and over with. 

I spoke of pies. I shall not soon for- 
get, and probably it is wise to remember, 
the excuses I made to my pie-loving 
husband before I had conquered pies. 
They were unwholesome. They took 
time from the care of the baby. They 
were expensive. I blackened my soul 
with equivocations before ever I saw that 
I must face the music and learn to make 
pies. That the only true reason why my 
poor husband was deprived of them was 
my ignorance and lack of courage to 
learn. 



Only the garbage man and the chickens 
will ever know how it went with my pies. 
The chickens, very considerately, didn't 
die; and the garbage man didn't tell; 
and I contrived, having a long experience 
in deceit, to camouflage the sugar and 
fruit bills. But at length, after a long 
course in prayer — entirely sincere and 
greatly needed prayer — on my part — 
and fasting on the part of my husband, I 
did get the better of pies. 

The beautiful thing about it is that 
they are easy and popular and very 
delicious at our house now. 

It can be done. We, in adult life, for- 
get there is still growing and learning to 
achieve. Women in particular are likely, 
after marriage, to learn nothing much 
except daily news and bridge and, pos- 
sibly, theatrical news, or about clothes. 
Their husbands grow, business compels 
it, and talking with other growing men 
helps much. Many, many marriages are 
clouded — to use no blacker term — 
because the woman doesn't master her 
business as her husband does his; but 
mopes if she has to work hard, or if the 
work does not antagonize her, at least 
lets herself deteriorate into a machine 
for doing it. 

All the New Thought people, and 
adherents of any other cult that has 
reason and truth behind it, tell their 
disciples that worry is of all things most 
futile, most destructive. To do things 
over and over mentally when the mind 
might be used constructively, pleasantly, 
even joyously, is poor sense and poor 
religion. 

If you are dreading your work because 
you are ignorant of it, then by all means 
put an end to this state of affairs by 
mastering it. If it's got you because it's 
too hard, get more strength from the 
fountain of strength. It's a perfectly 
sensible, possible proposition. There's 
no limit to human power, fortified as it 
can be fortified. And there's nothing 
mystical about it. It means a healthy 
body, and a mind at work, not worrying 
but really working, and the uplifted soul. 



366 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



For, explain it how you may, there are, 
as poet, philosopher, saint, physician, or 
just a plain person who has tried it, will 
tell you, resources, "reservoirs of energy" 
in the phrase of Professor James, to be 
"tapped" by the soul. Wisdom, too, to 



him who "wavereth not" and knowledge 
of the way to him "whose feet point 
straight onward." For faith opens the 
resources which make light the task, and 
faith is law, just as much law as what the 
stars obey and the tides. 



Mrs. Popplegate's Problems 

By Harriet Whitney Symonds 



MORNING, Mrs. Crookshaw, come 
right in. I'll be out o' the pantry 
in a minute — was just prospecting 
'round a bit to see what I got left in the 
way of pie-stock. 

The outlook's kind of slim; don't these 
end-o'-winter days make you plumb wild, 
getting up meals.'' They do me. Seems 
like my folks get tired of everything; 
nothing new coming on, and we been 
eating the same old provender right 
along till we've all got as notionate as a 
pet poodle. Of course, it's up to me to 
find some new kind of dishes, if I have to 
invent 'em out of my own head — or new 
ways of doing old dishes, anyhow. 

I gave the folks a mess of what I call 
mock-sausages this morning — a big 
plateful, and there wasn't a one too 
many. How did I make 'em.? Well, I 
took the remnants of yesterday's pot 
roast, which only made a skimp cupful 
when it was chopped as fine as mince- 
meat; then I took all the broken pieces 
of bread I found in the bread box and 
crisped 'em in the oven and crumbled 
'em right fine and mixed in with the 
meat, and about a half a cup of cold 
cooked rice and a few left-over baked 
beans; I seasoned the mixture with salt 
and pepper and a bit of dried sage, 
and moistened it with the pot-roast gravy 
that was left yesterday, and made it 
out in little flat cakes the size of sausages, 
dustod them with flour and fried them 
brown and crisp in bacon fat, and dished 
'em sizzling-hot out of the pan. You see 
that was cutting both ways — saving the 
left-overs, and giving the folks something 
a little different from common. 



One thing that kind of bothers me is 
having some different dessert every day. 
Most popular thing in this family is pie — 
just so I vary the inside decorations 
pretty often. That's where a big variety 
of canned fruit comes handy, and I was 
looking to see what I had left. We've 
thinned it out a good deal lately. I see 
there's one jar of quince honey left, but 
that's too good to fill a whole pie with. 
Fine! Here's a lump of left-over pie 
dough in the cabinet. I can just bake 
some patty shells and fill them with 
chocolate blancmange and then top 'em 
off with the quince honey. How'U that 
do for once.f' 

For tomorrow's dessert, I think I'll 
cook tapioca plain, just in water, with the 
juice of a lemon and a pinch of salt, and 
enough sugar to sweeten it good, and 
then I'll slice in two or three bananas and 
mould it in custard cups and serve it with 
a lemon sauce. 

I make it a cast-iron rule to keep all 
such things as cornstarch and tapioca 
and gelatine and sea-moss on hand, and 
they've pulled me out oi a tight place, 
many a time. 

I can remember 'way back, when I was 
a little tad, along about this time of 
year my mother'd get into quandaries 
what to fix for dessert, and she'd sit 
and study and frown for a good bit, then 
all of a sudden she'd laugh and say, 
"Well, children, I reckon I'll have to 
make a vinegar-pie this time." And 
she'd set to work with flour and vinegar 
and a few eggs and some spices, and, tell 
you what, she'd make a right good- 
tasting pie, too. Anyhow, we young- 



DIET FOR THE AGED 



367 



sters liked it. But I've often thought 
since, that if she'd had some cornstarch 
and flavorings and lemons on hand, she 
could-a made a better pie without half the 



bother and waste of time and strength. 
It pays to keep such things in stock all 
the time, but they come especially 
handy right along this season. 



Diet for the Aged 

By S. A. Rice 



THOSE who have the privilege and 
pleasure of caring for old people 
are often puzzled about a suitable diet 
for them. The following suggestions are 
offered by one who has had several years 
of experience in the care of the aged. 

In the first place, the principal meal for 
them should be in the middle of the day, 
although healthy old people generally 
like quite a substantial breakfast. If 
a noon dinner is not convenient, a hearty 
luncheon can be planned, and some simple 
dish added to the evening dinner menu. 
However, this is difficult to manage as 
elderly people are easily tempted to eat 
what is bad for them, and their powers of 
self-control are weakened. 

In the second place, study their indi- 
vidual tastes. If the old gentleman of the 
family likes salt codfish, he would enjoy 
a dish of it prepared in the way he was 
accustomed to eat it in his boyhood; a 
slice of fish cooked tender, boiled pota- 
toes, and a gravy made of milk and 
butter. Some people like it made as a 
chowder, others prefer the articles cooked 
separately, and mixed at the table. My 
old gentleman used to say, ''Be sure to 
have plenty of potatoes." 

As a rule, old people do not care for much 
variety at a meal. One or two simple 
dishes satisfies them. If the teeth are 
poor, soups and minced foods are ac- 
ceptable. For the evening meal a plate 
of soup is always a good selection, except 
in hot weather. These can be made of 
left-over vegetables, potato, tomato, or 
celery, occasionally peas or beans, or a 
thick beef soup. Coarse breads are liked 
by old people, but they do not always 
agree with them. Graham bread, com 
bread, and Boston brown bread are al- 



ways favorites. Once in a while hot 
biscuits for breakfast are a treat. Fruit 
is essential for their welfare, preferably 
cooked; baked apples and apple sauce, 
stewed prunes and canned berries; for 
uncooked fruits, oranges, apples, and 
peaches are best. Sometimes they can 
digest nuts, though as a general thing 
they are to be avoided. I have noticed 
they do not requre much meat; indeed 
meat is often, forbidden, especially when 
there is a tendency to high blood pressure. 
Bacon is relished by them, and chicken, 
although some old people find the fat of 
chicken disturbs digestion. Lamb or 
mutton is preferable to red meats, but a 
piece of steak or slice of roast beef, once 
in a while, does no harm, when meat is a 
part of the dietary. Green vegetables 
are excellent, but some old people do 
not like them, and eat their spinach and 
sprouts and lettuce under protest. Maca- 
roni and baked beans seem to upset the 
digestion of some old people, I have 
noticed. 

As a rule, they are fond of sweets and 
look forward to dessert as the best part of 
the meal. Simple puddings are best for 
them, but a piece of pie, provided the 
meal is not hearty, does no harm, to a 
healthy old person. They crave candy, 
and it doesn't seem to injure them, unless 
sugar is forbidden by the physician. An 
old lady I knew was fond of fudge and 
said it agreed with her. We kept sweet 
chocolate on hand for her and it seemed 
to benefit her. 

They should not be encouraged in 
being given to food fads. The best plan 
is to eat, in moderation, the things they 
like and enjoy, unless they are known 
to disagree. An old gentleman under- 



368 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



took to give up his morning cup of coffee 
for a substitute with the mistaken idea 
of improving his already good health, 
and it took some argument to convince 
him the sacrifice was unnecessary. 



To recapitulate: the things to bear in 
mind when catering for the aged are: 

Principal meal in the middle of the day, 
consult individual tastes and pecu- 
liarities, avoid food fads. 



What Deep Breathing Can Do For You 

By Marion Brownfield 



BOTH athletes and singers realize the 
immense advantages of deep breath- 
ing, both for health and getting results in 
their work. It is a form of exercise, too, 
that requires no special gymnasium ap- 
paratus, no special costume, and it can 
be indulged in, at any time of day in 
most any place. It costs nothing except 
a little thought to make the effort. Once 
practiced regularly, it becomes a bene- 
ficial habit to breath more deeply in just 
ordinary moments. 

Breathing deeply enough to use the 
lungs' full capacity, summed up: 

Dispels lassitude. 

Raises the spirits. 

Banishes nerves. 

Restores poise. 

Overcomes sleepiness. 

Develops the chest. 

Strengthens the back and the abdomi- 
nal muscles. 

The way to begin ''practicing deep 
breathing" is to relax completely, letting 
out the breath. Then slowly take in a 
long, deep breath, holding the hands on 
the hips and elevating the chest. This 
should be done, preferably, in the fresh 
air, and the little air sacs above the collar 
bone and under the floating ribs, close to 
the belt, should be inflated. When the 
lungs are completely filled with fresh air 
for two minutes, one will become aware, 
very shortly, of feeling better. 

Night and morning are good times to 
give special attention to this exercise, as 
it means either starting the day right, or 
emptying the lungs of stale air and con- 
sequent fatigue, to insure a refreshing 
sleep. Breathing deeply at critical mo- 
ments does more to make one master of 



the situation than all the clever plans 
put together, because it makes one clear 
headed and mentally alert as well as firm 
of resolve. When one is nervous, fidgety 
or blue enough to sigh, it is a sure sign 
that one is not breathing deeply enough. 
Notice it, the next time you become con- 
scious of feeling "out of sorts." Then 
try a few deep breaths and see if you 
cannot laugh at most all your troubles, 
real or fancied! 

To achieve good health and good spirits, 
however, deep breathing must be per- 
sisted in regularly. One needs to breathe 
often as deeply as one does when running. 
So after all it is good practice to run for a 
street car or up and down stairs, if one 
has no heart trouble. If one cannot do 
this without diflficulty afterwards, it is time 
to consult a doctor. Perhaps a little pain 
felt, is only gas on the stomach. Again, 
the discomfort of panting for a long inter- 
val after exercise may be just fat! In this 
case, deep breathing and exercise that in- 
sures it, such as swimming^ tennis, wood 
chopping or sawing, playing ball, sweeping 
or singing, is more than ever a necessity 
for the person who wishes to be eflRcient. 

To test one's self for lung capacity and 
the consequent ability to expand the 
chest, a simple, easy way is to stand a few 
inches away from a curtain and try to 
blow it with all the air possible sent from 
one's mouth. Keep standing farther 
away from the curtain until the point is 
reached where blowing barely moves the 
curtain. Measure the distance of this 
point from the curtain and then try each 
day to get results when standing farther 
away. In this way one can see if lung 
power is gained. 



i 



Education in the Kitchen 

By B. Claunch 



1 WONDER how many women realize 
the utter absurdity of "pottering" 
around and living in the kitchen most of 
the time? Housework can be made 
drudgery or delight — according to the 
education of woman. Education, I may 
add, does not mean graduation from a 
college. 

I am a modern married woman, not 
content to go on and do things the exact 
way my mother and grandmother did. 
I educate my husband and children, as 
well as myself, by setting an example of 
practicing what I preach. How do I 
do it.? 

I read a lot and keep my eyes and ears 
open; I am known as a listener rather 
than a talker. I talk only when I know 
my subject and feel that I have something 
worth while to say. My hobby is house- 
hold magazines; education in the culinary 
line is worth the study; it means better 
health for the entire family. 

The hints in magazines are worth 
noting and remembering; they make 
things easier and simplify work wonder- 
fully. Since magazines are bulky and 
accumulate, it is sometimes inconvenient 
to go through a great many for a certain 
half-remembered hint or recipe. In this 
instance a note book is serviceable; 
whatever hints or recipes appeal each 
month, those may be put in the book 
and immediately catalogued for future use. 

Education in the kitchen, to me, 
means preparing foods in their natural 
state as far as possible. Raw vegetables 
as salads, "roughage" for the system 
(vitamine-foods) take little time to pre- 
pare and do untold good to the human 
body. Did you note the fine salads and 
dressings in June-July of American 
Cookery.? "Salads and Salad Dress- 



ings" is an article not to be overlooked 
or disregarded. 

Cooked vegetables are also very impor- 
tant. Fried foods are taboo in our 
household. Our meats are generally 
roasted, broiled, or stewed; potatoes are 
baked or cooked with their jackets on. 
Many people do not realize that health 
and disease originate in the kitchen; 
many women would be highly insulted if 
their doctors were truthful enough to tell 
them that food brought on their illness 
and other bad feelings. Right com- 
binations, foods that have not been 
robbed of the life-giving elements, food 
sufficiently cooked, food not cooked to 
death — all these are important factors 
in promoting health and are worth think- 
ing about. A woman should study for 
marriage (especially the kitchen) fully 
as much as the person who makes teach- 
ing his vocation; for housework is the 
recognized vocation of every married 
woman and meal-preparation is a vital 
part of it. 

I'm learning every day, also making 
mistakes and trying to do better. Are 
you.? 

I discovered an excellent satisfying 
meal in a soup the other day. I guar- 
antee its delicious taste and food value. 

Chop up, fine, two or three large onions 
and cook in a covered pan with two table- 
spoonfuls of butter or bacon fat until the 
onions are tender. 

In another pan cook one cup of rice in 
plenty of water, salted; this rice water is 
to be used as "stock." When the rice 
is thoroughly cooked, add the onions and 
cut up several fresh tomatoes. Cook 
about ten minutes and add chopped 
parsley. This is what we call a real 
"health soup." 



369 




Home Ideas 

.^^ and 

E/conomxe8 




Contributions to this department will be gladly received, 
paid for at reasonable rates. 



Accepted items will be 



The Wizard of the Salt Shake 



H 



OW in the world do you make 
chocolate blancmange, and lemon 
pie taste so good?" I asked my hostess, 
whose cooking always delighted and 
amazed me. "I never eat those desserts 
anywhere but here." 

"The Wizard of the Salt Shake helps 
me," was the cryptic answer. 

"What do you mean. ^" I persisted, still 
more puzzled. 

"I mean that I put a pinch of salt in the 
pie and pudding which takes away that 
raw taste so objectionable in anything 
made with cornstarch. In this day and 
age," she continued, "salt is one of the 
most useful and economical factors in 
cooking, as its price hasn't soared very 
high — yet — . Our grandmothers made 
their concoctions taste good by using 
quantities of salt butter, but that is too 
expensive for this generation, so the wise 
housewife substitutes salt for butter, 
whenever possible. Not too much, fre- 
quently, not enough to taste, just a hint 
or suggestion as the French use garlic. 
Take Indian meal pudding, for instance, 
pumpkin and squash pies, and ginger- 
bread are all improved by the judicious 
addition of salt, especially if one wants 
to economize on butter; but the cook 
books rarely include it in their list of 
ingredients for those desserts. 

"Cranberry sauce, also rhubarb, can be 
sweetened with about a third less sugar, 
supplemented with a pinch of salt. There 
is practically no limit to the uses of salt 
in the household. It is almost as cheap 
as air and water, and about as necessary 
to the welfare of the human race. 



"Since I have been keeping house, I have 
understood why the Savior likened His 
disciples to SALT. It is by far the most 
valuable of all minerals; gold and radium 
are not in the same class. 

"Salt not only makes our food more 
palatable and nourishing, but also pre- 
serves it. Medicinally, salt is of incal- 
culable value, and doctors are finding 
new uses for it every day. The poorest 
man or woman can be refreshed and 
rejuvenated by soaking the tired feet in 
salt and water before retiring; while 
people, unable to afford having their 
tonsils removed, can keep them in such a 
healthy condition, by gargling their throats 
with salt and water the first thing in the 
morning, and the last at night, that an 
operation is unnecessary." 

My hostess paused for lack of breath, 
so I remarked, "You think a lot of your 
Wizard,' don't you.?" 

"I certainly do," was the emphatic 
answer, "for believe me, the Genie, in the 
Arabian Nights, has nothing on my 
Wizard of the Salt Shake." 



L. M. W. 



^ r^ :Sii h 



A Winter Picnic 

"T AM sorry, Peggy," said Bob Graves, 
A regretfully, 'but I really do not see 
how we can afford a big party for Helen 
now." 

"I know it. Bob, but she's my oldest 
friend," sighed his wife; "ever since she 
announced her engagement the girls 
have entertained her elaborately, and 
I cannot let an occasion like this go by 
without doing something for her. Then, 
too, Harvey is such a friend of yours." 



370 



HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES 



371 



Bob looked thoughtfully around the 
pretty living room of their new home. 
All his savings had gone into their home 
and its furnishings and now business was 
dull and strict economy necessary. 

"Well," he said finally, "we certainly 
can't go as strong as Helen's other 
friends, but maybe we can figure out 
something that will fill the bill and still 
not put us in the poorhouse, but it must 
be something that is not a lot of work, for 
I will not have you wear yourself out for 
a dozen Helens." 

"There's no snow for a sleighing party, 
and ; theater parties cost too much," 
mused Peggy, "but let's think hard and 
perhaps we will have an inspiration." 

And they did — an inspiration that 
solved the whole problem. 

Helen and her fiance, with sixteen other 
guests, were bidden to a very informal 
supper and requested to "please not dress 
up." Upon their arrival, they were 
greeted by their pretty hostess in middy 
blouse and blue skirt, and ushered into 
the living room, where a surprising scene 
met their eyes. Instead of the cozy 
room they knew so well, here was a de- 
lightful nook in the summer woods. 
Little evergreen trees and flowering 
plants (the latter borrowed from the 
entire neighborhood) were massed around 
the walls, and in one corner was an old 
well made from a barrel covered with 
moss. A cheery fire crackled its welcome 
in the fireplace and the floor was covered 
with green cloth (many old white pieces 
dyed and patiently stitched together by 
P^ggy) to simulate grass. Best of all, 
in the center of the room was a long white 
tablecloth spread on the floor ready for 
a picnic feast and paper plates, napkins 
and tin cups. When all were seated, the 
hostess and two of the girls carried in 
trays of the best of picnic viands — the 
main dish being hot baked beans — 
delicious sandwiches and a salad, ac- 
companied by perfect coffee and a simple 
dessert. The novelty of the occasion 
drove away all formality and the "pic- 
nic" was a jolly one. When the supper 



was over, the guests "stacked their 
plates" and filed hilariously to the kitchen 
with them and the table was cleared in 
a twinkling. The "grass" was removed 
from the floor and the phonograph 
furnished music for dancing. Lemon- 
ade was served during the evening from 
a big tin pail concealed in the moss- 
covered well and, all the time, there were 
popcorn to pop and marshmallows to 
toast at the open fire, and not a moment 
lagged. 

When the last guest had departed, 
each and all proclaiming the "best time 
ever," Peggy turned a radiant face to her 
husband. 

"And just to think," she cried, rap- 
turously, "only a few dishes to wash and 
no napkins to do up, and, O Bob, 
wasn't it fun.?" k. e. m. 

* * * 

The Real Spice of Life* is Variety 

BREAD, Meat and Potato Diet often 
causes bad digestive ills. 

Often the erratic appetite of the family 
may be caused by a rut fallen into in 
preparing the meals. So many women 
feel satisfied with just bread, meat and 
potato meals, that it requires some in- 
tensely strong initiative to make them 
realize that this is really the cause of 
many of the ills that constantly beset the 
entire family during the winter. 

Remember that variety is the real spice 
of life — that is a trite saying, but never- 
theless it is true. Oftentimes the family 
dislike a dish just because they have had 
it so often, or because it has not been 
served in an attractive way. 

Carrots and turnips are real homely 
vegetables and many people refuse to 
recognize them when they grace the 
family board, yet if these same vegetables 
were prepared in unusual ways, nine 
times out of ten the family would rave 
over them. Use as many vegetables as 
possible. 

The European housewife realizes that 
an abundant diet of vegetables brings 
big dividends in health; it is better to take 



372 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



a spring tonic in the form of these succu- 
lent vegetables than in noxious doses of 
drugs. Early green foods may, indeed, be 
called the elixir of life. 

Scallions-and-Carrot Salad 

Dice one cooked carrot and add a 
bunch of scallions, chopped fine. Shred 
one-half a head of lettuce. Mix and 
dress with mayonnaise and dust with 
paprika. 

The fried tomatoes will prove a really 
attractive supper dish, and usually the 
southern tomatoes can be purchased at 
from 25 to 35 cents per pound of five 
or six tomatoes of medium size. 

For the best salad, cook new beets until 
tender and then drain, remove the skins 
and slice. Add four sliced onions and 
one-half cup of vinegar. Chill and serve 
with shredded lettuce. 

Lamb Cutlets With Braised 
Onions 

Have the butcher cut the neck or 
breast into cutlet-sized pieces about 
one inch thick. Wipe with a damp cloth 
and then dip in flour and brown quickly 
in hot fat. Now add six tablespoonfuls of 
flour and brown well. Add; one dozen 
onions, one cup and one-half of water, 
one cup of diced carrots, one cup of 
diced green tops of scallions. Cover and 
cook very slowly until meat is tender, 
usually about two and one-half hours. 
Season. To serve, lift the meat on pieces 
of toast and pour over some of the vege- 
tables and gravy, then mask with a 
tablespoonful of Hollandaise sauce. 
Sprinkle with fine-chopped parsley. 

Potato-and-Onion Pancakes 

Grate four potatoes and chop very fine 
six medium-sized onions. Place in a bowl 
and add: one egg, one cup of milk or 
water, three cups of flour, one teaspoon- 
ful of salt, one-half teaspoonful of white 
pepper, two level tablespoonfuls of baking 
powder. Beat to mix and then cook in 
the usual manner for pancakes. 

G. J. MCD. 



Stewed Steak 

THE coming of the cool weather 
makes large cuts of meat possible 
for the thrifty housewife, because of the 
economy attached, and also the sense of 
security a supply of this base of sub- 
stantial foods affords. Also when one 
tires of roasts and chops, etc., the specter 
of the old-time stew rises up before friend 
cook, and she is torn between the longing to 
serve a real good stew, and the possibility 
of company catchingher" with the goods." 

Of course, stews have been done and 
overdone until it is only one of those 
rare born-cooks who can make a really 
tempting dish that the neighbors sniff at 
with envy, nevertheless meat steamed or 
stewed is more easily digested by children, 
to say nothing of our dyspeptic friends. 
Because, therefore, we are tremendously 
ambitious to produce the biggest and 
most husky specimens of manhood pos- 
sible out of our ravenous young males who 
are the worry, perhaps, of the neighbors, 
but the secret pride of our mother-heart, 
we have made a special study of the stew 
problem, and have evolved a splendid 
recipe that one serves under the clear, 
bold heading of steak. 

If you have a roast or a boil that is 
too large, cut several thick, juicy slices 
off it and fry or grill them well in a gen- 
erous quantity of boiling lard. Remove 
the meat and add water and seasoning to 
make a nice brown gravy. Pour this 
over the meat which you must place in a 
stewing pan which has a decidedly close- 
fitting lid. Turn the heat very low, and 
add a fine-cut onion, and let it simmer a 
little over three hours. 

When ready to serve thicken the gravy, 
and pour it all into a casserole which you 
may keep in the oven until ready to go to- 
the table. This usually disappears with 
great rapidity. l. b. 

* * * 

Uses for Cloth Flour Sacks 

SOME time ago our bakery advertised' 
flour sacks for sale. I had heard of 



HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES 



373 



using them for dish towels, so purchased 
a dozen and a half, intending to make a 
good supply of towels. 

First, I bleached the sacks. This was 
done by soaking in water over night, the 
next morning rubbing well with soap and 
hot water; then boiling, using washing 
powder and a teaspoonful of cream of 
tartar in the water; finally, rinsing and 
laying on the grass in the sunlight. The 
result was that the cloth was as good as 
that for which one pays a much higher 
price at the dry goods store. So I 
decided to use it for making garments. 
Out of the dozen and a half sacks I made 
night gowns for two children and myself, 
also four combination suits. I then had 
plenty left for several good-sized towels. 

These sacks could also be used for 
other wearing apparel, such as children's 
rompers, or, if dyed, they would be nice 
for linings for comforters. As the material 
in them is heavier than ordinary cotton 
cloth, it is warmer and wears much 
better. f. c. 

The Home Kitchen 
Candy 

"Sweets to the Sweet." 

Hamlet. 

WHY not make your own candy? 
It would be less expensive, and 
just as delicious as that bought at the 
confectioner's. Here are some good re- 
cipes; you will find it worth while to try 
them. 

College Cream 

1 pound brown sugar 1 cup water 

Boil until it hardens in a little water. 
Beat the white of one t^g stifi" and pour 
the hot sugar over this, beating all the 
time; when it begins to cream put in 
desired nuts. 

Peppermint Creams 

1^ cups of granulated sugar ^ cup water 

Boil until it spins a thread. Add six 
drops of extract of peppermint. Beat 
until it creams, then drop on glazed paper. 



Put the peppermint in after the syrup has 
finished boiling. 

Cocoanut Kisses 



Whites of two eggs 
\ teaspoonful flavor- 
ing extract 



2 cups molasses 
^ cup milk 
Teaspoonful vanilla 



1 fresh cocoanut, 
grated 

§ its weight in pow- 
dered sugar 

Grate the cocoanut and weigh it; add 
the sugar, mixing well. Beat the whites 
of the eggs very stiff, and add them to 
the grated cocoanut and sugar. Beat the 
mass hard for five minutes. Add the 
extract, then drop it in small spoonfuls 
on buttered paper, and let dry in a slow 
oven for five minutes. 

This will make two dozen kisses. 

Chocolate Caramels 

2| tablespoonfuls but- 
ter 
1 cup brown sugar 
3 squares chocolate 

iPut butter into the kettle; when melted 
add molasses, sugar and milk. Stir until 
sugar is dissolved; when boiling point is 
reached, add chocolate, stirring con- 
stantly until chocolate is melted. Boil 
until when tried in cold water a firm ball 
may be formed in the fingers. Add 
vanilla just before taking from the fire. 
Turn into a buttered pan, let cool and 
mark into squares. 

Cream Candy 

1 cup of cream 2 cups sugar 

Cook until it forms soft ball when 
dropped in water; flavor to taste, then 
beat and pour into a greased dish. 

M. B. D. 



Quick Chocolate Caraunels 

Melt three squares or ounces of 
chocolate in a saucepan; add three- 
fourths a cup of butter, one-fourth a cup 
of red label Karo and one pound and a 
half of brown sugar. Stir and cook to 
244 degrees Fahrenheit by the sugar 
thermometer. Add a cup of nut meats 
broken in pieces, and turn into two 
bread pans. When nearly cold cut into 
cubes. 



THIS department is for the benefit and free use of our subscribers. Questions relating to recipes^ 
and those pertaining to culinary science and domestic economics in general, will be cheerfully 
answered by the editor. Communications for this department must reach us before the first of the 
month preceding that in which the answers are expected to appear. In letters requesting answers 
by mail, please' enclose address and stamped envelope. Address queries to Janet M. Hill, Editor. 
American Gck)keRy,. 221 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass. 



Query. No.. 4250. — "Is it right to eat the 
pastry cup or timbale in which creamed chicken 
or a similar dish is served? Is it right to eat the 
lettuce leaf on which a salad is served.'* Is it 
right to leave a small portion of food on the plate 
'for manners'?" ' . ' 

Certain Points in Table Etiquette 

It Is entirely correct to eat the pastry 
cuportimbalnnwhich food is served; it is, 
in fact, more correct to eat it than not. 
It is, likewise, entirely correct to eat the 
lettuce leaf on which a salad is served, 
but since it is often difficult to divide the 
leaf with the salad fork, it is quite per- 
missible not to attempt to do this, and 
to leave the leaf untouched. On the 
whole it is better to eat, at least, a portion 
of it, since it is a -greater courtesy to the 
hostess to partake of everything edible 
that is served. For this reason the 
dishes that used, a generation ago, to be 
placed on the table purely for decoration 
are no longer in vogue. Similarly, the 
inedible forms of garnishing, like roses 
cut out of raw turnips, strips of leaf- 
gelatine, puffed up Into weird shapes by 
frying in deep fat, and all the decorations 
of various dishes that are not edible, are 
now considered in bad taste, and the 
garnlshlngs of every dish are not only 
edible, but are substances that correctly 
accompany that particular dish. , 

To leave a portion "for manners" Is by 
no means good form. But to leave a 
portion because you have eaten a suffi- 
ciency Is entirely correct. At present, 
sincerity at table is fashionable, and 
insincerity is rightly considered an affecta- 



tion. In the days of our grandmothers, it 
was thought polite to refuse a second 
helping,, and to yield to acceptance of it 
only on repeated pressure from the host. 
Now, the guest accepts or declines 
according to whether he has an ;appetite 
for more or not, and the host does not 
embarrass him by Insisting that his plate 
be refilled. So It Is with eating the whole 
of the portion served, or not. Your 
Inclination Is to be followed, and if you 
leave a piece. It shows that you were 
helped to more than enough, or that you 
did not like the part you left. 



Query No. 4251. — "Should Meat be Rip- 
ened before eating, and if so would there be any 
danger of bacteria in the meat while ripening? 
Why do some canned foods, for instance 
spinach, cause poisoning if eaten? Should 
small dishes be used for individual serving of 
vegetables, or should vegetables be served on the 
plate?" 

Ripening of Meat 

The red meats, that I^, butchers' meat 
In general, like beef, mutton, pork, need 
to be ripened to promote tenderness and 
good flavor. After slaughtering the meat 
becomes hard and rigid for a time, and Is 
not fit to use until this condition passes 
off. The longer It Is hung after this 
rigidity has passed away, the better the 
flavor, provided always that It is not kept 
so long that rancidity ensues. 

Bacteria and other germs abound In the 

air all around us, and are found on our 

clothing, our hair, our hands, If exposed 

to the air for as little as five or ten mln- 

374 



QUERIES AND ANSWERS 



375 



utes after washing them. It is unlikely 
to suppose they will not also be found on 
meat. But cooking destroys practically 
all the germs that convey disease, and the 
others are harmless, if not useful. In 
times of epidemic all raw fopds should 
be thoroughly washed before cooking, 
and during certain epidemics it is a risk 
to use any kind of food, even water, that 
has not been sterilized by boiling. But 
warning is given by our Boards of Health 
when these conditions are present. Ordi- 
narily, there is no reason to fear the germs 
in meat, if it is from healthy animals. 

Poisoning from Canned Food 

Sometimes the form of poisoning known 
as botulism is to be feared when the cold- 
pack method of canning is used, if the 
food is not cooked after it is taken from 
the can. So it is, probably, well to be on 
the safe side and not to use canned food, 
fresh from the can, for salads, etc. But 
we have been notified by the Department 
of Nutrition Investigations that five or 
ten minutes' cooking, after taking from the 
can, makes all cold process foods safe. 

Imperfect sterilization sometimes 
causes poisoning, but this is hardly any 
more to be feared, since the standard 
brands of canned food are put up under 
perfect conditions. A couple of genera- 
tions ago, when purveyors were new at the 
business, this was not always the case, 
but the canning factories of today are 
thoroughly inspected, and do their work 
as it should be done to ensure sterilization. 

How to Serve Vegetables 

Vegetables are now preferably served 
on the plate with the meat they accom- 
pany, unless they are of such a nature, 
like a thin, stewed tomato, that they 
would be "runny" and spoil the neat 
appearance of the service. Because it 
is thought more correct to serve vegeta- 
bles directly on the dinner plate, there 
has been a change in the methods of 
cooking many of them, and the recipes, 
which result in forms that keep their 
shape reasonably well, are easy to eat 



with a fork, and do not run all over the 
plate, are now the most favored. 



Query No. 4252. — "Please give me a recipe 
for Nut Rolls, I have eaten these when served 
with ioe cream; they are very thin and crisp, 
and rolled up like a small jelly cake." 

Rolled Nut Wafers 

Cream one-fourth a cup of butter (not 
all substitutes for butter can be used in 
this dish), until it is as smooth and as 
white as thick cream. After this condi- 
tion has been reached, add very gradually 
one-half a cup of powdered sugar. Next, 
add, a drop at a time, one-fourth a cup of 
milk, keeping up the beating after the 
addition .of each drop. The mixture 
should not be allowed to "grain" or curdle 
in the least. Lastly, add not quite one 
cup of bread flour— from three-fourths 
to seven-eighths a cup is about right, 
depending on the strength of the flour. 
Now invert a dripping pan, or deep 
baking pan, grease the bottom with some 
fat free from salt, and spread the mixture 
over it with a broad-bladed knife in a 
smooth, thin layer. Sprinkle with very 
fine-chopped nuts, and with the back of 
the knife make creases in the batter, 
separating it into squares of the desired 
size. Bake for a few minutes, until 
delicately browned. Cut apart at the 
lines of the squares, and while hot roll 
into cylinders or cornucopias. They 
harden and grow brittle very quickly, 
and if this happens before all are rolled, 
they may be softened by replacing in the 
oven for a moment. 



Query No. 4253. — "Kindly publish a recipe 
for Fish Chowder, also one for Clam Chowder. 
I should like very rich recipes." 

Rich Fish Chowder 

Cut into small strips three or. four 
slices of fat ham, and cook with one large 
onion, sliced thin, on a pan until onion is 
nicely browned. Pare and slice six 
medium-sized potatoes; remove skin and 
bones from two pounds of haddock, 
halibut, or other white fish, cut into 
slices, and arrange, in alternate layers of 



376 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



potatoes and fish, interspersed with the 
bits of ham, in a deep kettle until all 
have been used up. Sprinkle each layer 
with seasoning of salt and pepper. 
Pour over the whole two cups of fish 
stock or court bouillon, cover, and simmer 
for half an hour or until potatoes are 
cooked. Add one pint of thin cream, let 
heat through for a moment and serve at 
once with small pilot crackers. 

Rich Clam Chowder 

Remove from their shells two dozen 
clams, and chop them a little. Prepare 
potatoes, ham, and onion as for Fish 
Chowder, and proceed as in that dish to 
make alternate layers of the potatoes and 
clams, with the bits of ham here and there. 
Season with salt and pepper, and with 
one-half a teaspoonful, each, of dried 
summer savory and sweet marjoram. 
Pour over the whole the liquor from the 
clams, cover close, and cook over gentle 
heat until potatoes are soft. Serve with 
a tablespoonful of fresh, unsalted butter 
with each portion, or with thick whipped 
cream, and small pilot or Boston crack- 
ers, toasted. 



Query No. 4254. — "May I ask the length of 
Time and the Temperature for Baking both 
layer and loaf white butter Cakes made with 
baking powder; also for chocolate cake made 
with soda, and should the baking begin with a 
cold or a hot oven, and if with a hot oven at 
what temperature should it start?" 

Temperature for Cake Baking 

You will find the answer to another 
query about temperature in cake-baking 
in^the Queries and Answers Department of 
American Cookery for November. How- 
ever, we will answer more in detail here. 

The accepted temperatures for baking 
the cakes you refer to, and the time 
allowed, we give in the following table. 

Minutes 
Layer cake 400° Fah. 20-30 

Loaf cake 350°-375° Fah. 40-60 

Chocolate cake 350°-375° Fah. 40-60 

The more sugar that is used, the lower 
the temperature should be, to avoid 
burning. Molasses cakes call for an 



especially low temperature. The more 
butter is used, the higher the initial tem- 
perature should be, to "set" the cake and 
keep it from running. 

A diiferent flavor is produced by put- 
ting the cake in a cold or cool oven, and 
gradually increasing the heat, from that 
which results from putting the cake into 
a very hot oven, at first, and then decreas- 
ing the temperature. The latter is best 
for rich cakes of small size; the first for 
large cakes made with a good deal of 
flour. As a rule, we prefer an even, 
steady temperature from first to last, 
perhaps reducing the heat a little towards 
the end of the baking. No hard and fast 
rules can be absolutely relied on, since so 
much depends on the ingredients, also 
on the depth of the batter in the pan, and 
whether or not a tube pan be used. 



Query No. 4255. — "Will you be so good as 
to tell me how to make the Apple Cake called 
Strudel, or Hungarian Apple Strudel?" 

Hungarian Apfel Strudel 

Make a dough by kneading together 
one cup of butter, one pound of bread 
flour, one cup of warm water, and four 
beaten eggs, plus the beaten white of an 
additional egg. Work the dough in a 
large bowl until it is smooth and satiny, 
does not stick to the fingers, and is 
elastic. This working had better be done 
by hand. Place the dough on a floured 
board, cover with a clean towel, and let 
it stand to get mellow for twenty minutes. 

Spread a cloth over a small table (about 
four feet square) ; the cloth should be clean 
and smoothly ironed — * an old starched 
tablecloth is the best — and dredge the 
cloth with flour evenly and all over. 
Place the ball of dough in the center of 
the cloth, and roll with a rolling pin, or 
pat with hands, until it is a circle about a 
foot in diameter. Brush over the upper 
surface with melted fat, to keep it from 
drying out too much. The dough must 
now be stretched to cover the table. 
This can be done by one person, but two 
are better. The extended hands, palms 
up, are placed under the dough, the two 




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Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
377 



378 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



persons standing opposite, and then each 
one walks slowly around the table in the 
same direction, white the dough is evenly 
stretched by using the heel of the hand 
rather than the fingers, which are apt to 
tear it. This is the part of the work that 
requires practice and experience. There 
will likely be a thick outside border to 
hang over the table, and this should be 
cut off with large scissors. Let stand for 
fifteen or twenty minutes while you mix 
two pounds of chopped apples, one pound 
of raisins, chopped, one pound of brown 
sugar, and two teaspoonfuls of cinnamon. 
By this time the dough should be of such 
a consistency that it will not stick when 
rolled. Now spread a thin layer of the 
apple mixture, so as to cover nearly all 
the dough, and then roll like a jelly roll, 
not by using the hands, but by taking 
hold of the cloth a little way from the 
table edge, lifting it, and jerking it in such 
a way that the cloth rolls the dough. 
The roll should be light, so as to leave air 
spaces between the layers. Now turn 
in the edges and press together so that the 
juices will not run out, and twist the roll 
spirally, like a shell, or shape into horse- 
shoe form, or into a circle. Bake on a 
greased pan for three-quarters of an hour, 
or until the roll is crisp and brown. 
Brush over with butter at the close of the 
b)aking. Serve hot, with cream and 
powdered sugar, for dessert or luncheon. 

Well-made strudel will have lacey, 
delicate layers of the paste, and this 
•effect is the result of two steps; first, of 
developing to a high degree the elasticity 
of the gluten in the flour by thorough 
kneading, and keeping the dough warm 
during the manipulation. (This is why 
warm water is used.) Second, by careful 
stretching of the dough to an even, thin 
sheet. The first step is the more im- 
portant, the second is the moie difficult. 

It takes even a skilled worker from one 
and one-half to two hours to make the 
strudel. 



New Books 



America is now witnessing the rise of 
the great meddle class. 



Successful Family Life on the Moderate In- 
come. By Mary Hinman Abel. J. 
B. Lippincott Company. 

What is success and how are the great 
number of families living on the average 
income in this country to win it.^ How 
are they to obtain development and hap- 
piness.^ Are any principles to be laid 
down or examples cited .^ Are "disruptive 
tendencies" as great as has been claimed.^ 
Mrs. Abel discusses the subject in all its 
relations, from income and finances to the 
satisfactions and pleasures of life. She 
outlines the problems which each of us 
must solve in our own way, giving exam- 
ples and experiences taken from many 
sources. 

The majority of us are debarred from 
self-expression in the recognized forms of 
art, but not in the art of living, which 
includes self-development, the use of all 
personal resources, and an adjustment of 
our relations to those near us and to the 
community. For most of us this must 
remain the greatest of all the arts, espe- 
cially as practiced in the family group. 

This is more than a book on home 
economics. It is a broad-minded study, 
both analytical and inspirational, of the 
fine art of living. Ethical discussions of 
home-life abound, but except in studies of 
the homes of the poor, economic condi- 
tions as affecting the character of home- 
life have not been given sufficient weight. 
It may be that in the family groups above 
the poverty line, the reaction of all that 
concerns spending of *the money, what 
they choose as necessary, and what they 
reject as non-essential, will be found to be 
of great significance. The following dis- 
cussion is addressed to all those who are 
inclined to give thoughtful attention to 
the present-day problems of the family. 
Among those to whom the book may be of 
special interest are professional students 
of the social and economic aspects of the 
family, students of home economics in 
schools and colleges, men and women 
who are trying to solve the problems of 



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AMERICAN COOKERY 



their own homes, and groups of club 
women who are taking up part-time 
studies of the home. 

Mrs. Abel was a pioneer in the study of 
home life. The earliest item we can 
recall on this subject was PRACTICAL. 
SANITARY AND ECONOMIC COOK- 
ERY by Mary Hinman Abel. This was 
a prize essay and is now out of print, we 
think. The author has been among the 
leaders in the study of home economics 
for a quarter of a century. The volume 
before us holds the results of years of 
thought, study and experience. The 
author concludes, "Everything goes to 
prove that we are doing a cruel and stupid 
thing in not directing the splendid initia- 
tive and driving power of the young to fird 
its scope and expression in constructive 
home life." 

"Certainly the time has come for all 
educational and social forces to play 
their part in the development of home 
life. A sympathetic study of the problem 
according to scientific methods will go 




hand-in-hand with such co-operation." 
This book was not made to order. In iis 
pages are discussed, intelligently, from 
every point of view, and in detail, the 
present-day problems of the family-group. 

Elementary Home Economics, By Mary 
LocKwooD Mathews. Boston. 
Little, Brown and Company. 

This volume is intended for use in 
classes beginning the study of foods and 
cookery and also of sewing and textiles. 
It has been arranged for use in the ele- 
mentary schools and presupposes little 
training in general science. It is in- 
tended for use in schools where one book 
is desired to cover the entire course, and 
is strictly an elementary treatment of the 
subjects. 

For this purpose, it is very evident the 
volume has been attractively and ad- 
mirably prepared. As an elementary 
text book, it can be highly commended. 

The Vitamine Manual. By Walter H. 
Eddy. Williams and Wilkins Com- 
pany, Baltimore, Md. 

The presentation of essential data con- 
cerning vitamines to succeeding groups of 
students has become increasingly difficult 
with the development of research in this 
field. The demand on the part of the 
layman for concise information about the 
new food factors is increasing and worthy 
of attention. For these reasons it has 
seemed worth while to collate the existing 
data, and put it in a form which would be 
available for both student and layman. 
Such is the purpose of this little book. 

It has been called a manual, since the 
arrangement aims to provide the student 
with working material and suggestions 
for investigation as well as information. 

Since the type of the present manual 
was set, Drummond of England has sug- 
gested that we drop the terminal "e" in 
Vitamine, since the ending "ine" has a 
chemical significance, which is, to date, 
not justified as a termination for the 
name of the unidentified dietary factors. 
This suggestion has been generally 
adopted by research workers and the 
spelling now in use is Vitamin A, B, or C. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do hot accept substitutes 
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AMERICAN COOKERY 



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The suggestion of Drummond is sound 
and will undoubtedly be generally adopted 
by research workers in the subject. 

What is now known about Vitamines; 
how they were discovered, their chemical 
nature and properties, also the sources of 
the same, are herein set forth. The last 
two chapters of the book, "How to 
Utilize the Vitamines in Diets," are of 
special value and import to laymen. Here 
in about a dozen pages is contained all the 
information every-day people need to 
know, and, that is, all that can be known 

1 

Fish Cookery. By Evelene Spencer 
and John N. Cobb" Little, Brown 
& Co., Boston. 

In this new book Mrs. Spencer gives 
over six hundred recipes for cooking fish 
and its accompanying sauces and dress- 
ings, many of which she herself origin- 
ated. There are recipes for fish broiled, 
baked, fried and boiled; for fish stews 
and chowders, purees and broths and 
soup stocks, etc. In fact, every thinka- 
ble way of serving fish is herein described. 
All the well-known varieties of fish are 
included, and the housewife will be 
astounded to discover how many addi- 
tional ones are available and how valua- 
ble are their food properties. 

Mr. Cobb, the co-author, is director of 
the College of Fisheries, University of 
Washington, Seattle, and the author of 
numerous works on Fishery. He has 
contributed valuable information as to the 
fish themselves, and tables as to their food 
value, their location, seasons, etc. Thus 
these recipes are available for housewives 
in every part of the United States. 

This is a very cpmplete and satis- 
factory book. It leaves little to be said 
about the care, cooking and service of 
fish, also of the place it holds in the diet 
of all peoples. 

A Thousand Ways to Please a Husband 
with Bettina^s Best Recipes. By 
Louis£ Bennett Weaver and 
Helen Cowles Le Cron. Cloth. 
A. L. BuTt Company, New York. 
This is something different from the 

ordinary cook book. It is styled the 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

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ADVERTISEMENTS 




44 



'^ee if you can find 
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Romance of Cooking and Housekeeping. 
In brief, it gives the first year's experience 
of a young bride's housekeeping, in trying 
to please a husband and in catering to his 
tastes. 

The daily menus are chosen with dis- 
cretion and care, and plain, explicit 
directions are given for the more impor- 
tant dishes of each meal. The plan is 
well conceived and carried out; cer- 
tainly the book is not uninteresting. 

" 'And a whole year has gone,' said 
Bob, as his eyes met Bettina's across the 
little table set for two. 

" 'This is our anniversary and I'm mak- M 
ing a speech. You are wise because from ™ 
the first you've realized that we get out 
of life just what we put into it. You've 
faced things. You've realized that mar- 
riage isn't a hit-or-miss proposition. 
It's a business — ' 

" 'A glorified business, Bobby. Dealing 
in materials that can't all be felt and seen 
and tasted, but that are, nevertheless, 
just as real as others. And, after all, 
romance is really in everything that we 
do lovingly, and intelligently. I find it 
in planning and cooking the best and most 
economical meals that I can, and in 
getting the mending done on time, and 
in keeping the house clean and beautiful. 
And — 'in having you appreciate things.' " 



A story of Lincoln's early political life 
is told in John Wesley Hill's new book, 
''Abraham Lincoln, Man of God" (Put- 
nam). It seems that in 1846, during a 
canvass for Congress, Lincoln attended a 
preaching service of Peter Cartwright's. 
Cartwright called on dl desiring to go to 
heaven to stand up. All arose but Lin- 
coln. Then he asked all to rise who did 
not want to go to hell. Lincoln remained 
still seated. " I am surprised," said Cart- 
wright, *'to see Abe Lincoln sitting back 
there unmoved by these appeals. If Mr. 
Lincoln does not want to go to heaven and 
does not want to escape hell, perhaps he 
will tell us where he does want to go." 
Lincoln slowly arose and replied, "I am 
going to Congress." 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 
384 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



^M/f7uyft< I h^ 




DESSERT and CANDY for CHRISTMAS 

IX planning your Christmas dinner this year why not try the ever-welcome Plum Pudding, made 
in the new, up-to-date way? It is so delicious and dainty and makes such a perfect ending to 
the usual hearty Christmas dinner. It may be made the day before, and no more attention given 
to it until serving time. I am giving the recipe here and if you try it I am sure every member of your 
family will feel like extending me a vote of thanks for telling you about it. 

Then, too, it would not be a real Christmas unless you had some good, pure, wholesome, inex- 
pensive, home-made candy — the kind you can make with Knox Sparkling Gelatine. This may 
be served with your dinner or put up attractively in boxes for gifts. I can give only one recipe here 
but others will be found in my booklets and special candy recipe slip. 




KNOX PLUM PUDDING 



1 envelope Knox Sparkling Gelatine 1 cup seeded raisins 

y^ cup cold water Yi cup figs 

1 cup