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COLD MEAT MOULDED IN ASPIC JELLY fo fo 

AMERICAN 

COOKE 



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FORMERLY 




THE, BOSTO 
:(DKING SCH00LMAGAZ1NE 

F- CULINARY* SCIENCE*™ DOMESTIC •' ECONOMICS 




-JULY, 1922 

XXVII No. 1 



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PUBLISHED 
BY 

THE BOSTON CGDKING 
SCHQD L MAGAZINE C<* 

221 COLUMBUS AVE^ 
BOSTON MASS 



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AO AffTH T J C* 




When Parker House Rolls are made 
just right — the "Rumford" kind — 
light as snowflakes, with thin, dainty- 
crust, with the fold-over ready to 
open itself — they melt in your mouth. 

Such Parker House Rolls can only 
be made at home. The kind you buy 
are not of that exquisite texture, 
taste and wholesomeness. 
WHY NOT make them at 
home ? 

Of course it's an art. But 
if you follow the "Rumford 
way "it's an easy art to learn, 
and it pays in home hap- 
piness and health. The 
nutritious phosphates in 
Rumford make the food most 
wholesome and digestible. 




Iaking 

*fej»e Phosphate P^**" 
V£ nor 'n baking gaality* 

■"WiuUcluttd t» |IW #r 




Varker^jKouse ^glts 
arc made in your 
own kitchen 



Try The Rumford Way. 

The " Rumford way" means the use 
of Rumford Baking Powder — the 
Wonderful Leavener. 



Try this Recipe for Parker House Rolls: 

{All measurements are level.) 

2 cups flour; V2 teaspoon salt ; 

4 teaspoons 2 tablespoons 

Rumford; shortening; 

2 teaspoons sugar; % cup milk. 

Sift well together the flour, salt and baking 

powder; rub in the shortening as lightly as 

possible with the fingers, just working it 

until the fat is blended well with the flour. 

Then mix to a \ery soft dough with the 

milk, or milk and water, as cold as possible. 

Roll to Vi inch thickness, cut out with round 

or oval cutter, and crease in center with 

handle of a case knife first dipped in flour. 

Brush one-half with melted butter and fold 

over. Put in pan, V2 inch apart. Bake in 

quick oven 15 minutes. 

Write us for our free Recipe Book, 
"The Rumford Modern Methods of 
Cooking." 

RUMFORD COMPANY 

Dept. 19 PROVIDENCE, R I. 



Your Grocer has this can waiting for ^ou 



American Cookery 



FORMERLY 



The Boston Cooking-School Magazine 



OF 



Culinarv Science and Domestic Economics 






Volume XXVII 



1 1 



June-July, 1922 — May, 1923 






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Published by 



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THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE COMPANY 
Pope Bldg., 221 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass. 






Copyrighted, 1922, 1923, by The Boston Cooking-School Magazine Co. 



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ADVERTISEMENTS 



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"NO TffESPA^lNG 




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ITTLEJIMONVENTAFIvSHIN 
FOR TO CATCH A WHALE, 
He CAUGHT ONE, AND WHATS I10RE- 
HE CAUGHT IT BY IT 5 TAIL; 
^U ASK HOW JlMON GAINED 
THE STRENGTH 
To DO THI5 WONDROUS FEAT! 
THE ANSWER IS: HE GAINED 
" HIS STRENGTH 
5Y EATING 

CeanOtWeat 



Painted by John G. Scott for Cream of Wheat Co. 



Copyright 1922 by C>-ea»' of Wheqt Co. 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

1 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Vol. WY1I 



JUNE-JULY, 1922 



No. 1 



CONTENTS FOR JUNE- JULY page 

GREAT AUNT SARAH'S HOMEMADE RAG RUGS. 111. 

Edith M. Thomas 11 

\ JUNE CHRONICLE Mary B. Norman 17 

THE HEART OF THE HOUSE Alice M. Ashton 21 

AT MRS. MORRISON'S TABLE Ernest L. Thurston 23 

GOOSE LIVERS AND TRUFFLES. 111. . . , Blanche McManus 25 

A SIMPLE CURTAIN FIXTURE Callie S. Amberg 28 

EDITORIALS 30 

SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES (Illustrated with half- 
tone engravings of prepared dishes) 

Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 33 

MENUS FOR WEEK IN JUNE 42 

MENUS FOR WEEK IN JULY 43 

SECOND TABLE Quincy Germaine 44 

THE BUSINESS OF HOME-MAKING . . S. S. M. 45 

POSSIBILITIES OF THE SOUFFLE Elsie F. Radder 47 

HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES: — The Shrimp of New Orleans — 

Success in Making Custard 51 

QUERIES AND ANSWERS . 53 

NEW BOOKS 60 

SILVER LINING 68 




$1.50 A YEAR Published Ten Times a Year 15c A Copy <fS 

Foreign postage 40c additional 

Entered at Boston post-office as second-class matter 

Copyright 1922, by 

THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO. 
Pope Bldg., 221 Columbus Ave., Boston 17, Mass. 




Please Renew on Receipt of Colored Blank Enclosed for that Purpose 

2 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



WHEN IT RAINS — IT POURS 




("MrTaRes 1 OR _HAg2SSl 



Morton's 

FREE RUNNING 

Salt 



ttPOURs 



^SAlTcgMPANY^^^i^' 




NO ONE questions the advantages 
of a salt that pours. The question 
to raise is "Why does it pour?" 

Morton's Salt, unlike most salts, pours 
naturally; its pure kiln dried particles 
form as cube -shaped crystals which 
when set in motion continually tumble 
off one another; they do not lump or 
cake in damp weather. 

Put some of it on a table knife and 
watch how much better Morton's pours 
than ordinary salts. 

For 70 years we've been making all 
kinds of salt, and this salt with its re- 
markable handy and sanitary package 
we consider our finest product. 

MORTON SALT COMPANY 

CHICAGO 



Do you t^nou) — that a strong solution of Mortons 
Salt and Wuter immediately relieves mosquito bites, 
hives and similar abrasions? 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



INDEX FOR JUNE-JULY 



At Mrs. M : : i- m's Table 
Busine Home-Making, The 

Editorials ..... 
Livers and Truffles 

Great Aunt Sarah's Homemade Rag Rugs 

Heart of the House, The 

1 1 mie Ideas and Economies 

June Chronicle, A .« 

Menus .... 

New Books 

Possibilities of the Souffle 

Second Table 

Silver Lining, The 

Simple Curtain Fixture, A 



42. 



PAGE 

23 
45 
30 
25 
11 
21 
51 
17 
43 
60 
47 
44 
68 
28 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



Apricots, Glace of 

Bombe, Raspberry. 111. . 

Bouillon, Red Beet .... 

Bread, Date. Ill 

Bread, Yeast Raised Oatmeal 

Cakes, Raised Drop, Sour Cream 

Cakes, Shrewsbury. 111. . 

Carrots, Pickled .... 

Charlotte, Gooseberry 

Delight, Strawberry, Vanilla Ice Cream. 

Eggs, Stuffed. 111. .... 

Fish, Moulded, Hollandaise Sauce. 111. 

Goose, Green, and Gooseberries 

Ice, Raspberry, Cream Filling . 

Ice Cream, Pistachio 



111 



40 
38 
41 
37 
38 
37 
39 
41 
41 
40 
37 
35 
34 
38 
40 



Lemonade, Raisin 

Macaroni, Baked. 111. 

Mackerel, Vinaigrette 

Meat, Cold Sliced, in Aspic. ^111. 

Parfait, Grape Juice. 111. 

Pie, Green Apricot . 

Preserve, Sweet Beet 

Pudding, Chicken 

Pudding, Baked Fresh Strawberry 

Salad, Prune-and-Cream Cheese. Ill 

Sauce, Hollandaise . 

Souffle, Potato-and-Herring 

Soup, Black Plum 

Sugar, Spun. 111. 



37 
35 
36 
34 
39 
41 
41 
33 
33 
36 
35 
36 
33 
40 



QUERIES AND ANSWERS 



Cake, To Make Moist 

Candles at Luncheon or Dinner 

Coasters, Use of 

Coffee, How Long to Percolate 

Cookies, Bran 

Dressing, French vs. Russian Salad 

Griddle, Best Kind of Pancake 



56 
56 
56 

54 
54 
54 
54 



Mirrors, Use of, in Decoration 

Oven Temperatures 

Paraffin, The Use of 

Plates at Dinner 

Salad, Shrimp, in Salad Rolls 

Sherbets and Ices, To Give Body to 



56 
53 
58 
56 
53 
58 



We want representatives everywhere to take subscriptions for 
American Cookery. We have an attractive proposition to make 
those who will canvass their town; also to those who will secure a 
few names among their friends and acquaintances. Write us todar. 

AMERICAN COOKERY - BOSTON, MASS. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

4 



COMPLETE INDEX, VOLUME XXVII 

June-July, 1922 — May, 1923 



PAGE 



367 
689 
366 

23 
429 
736 
338 
609 
491 
669 
259 
743 
364 
261 
331 

45 
108 
583 
208 
124 
347 
335 
187 
188 
581 
288 
731 
509 
523 
588 



Apples and Soap . 
April Ways .... 
Art of Being Ready, The 
At Mrs. Morrison's Table 
At Tony's, The Greek 
Aunt Imogene Instructs 
Awakening of Aunt Lodie, The 
Beautiful Transparent Oven Ware 
Bedroom and Its Furnishings, The 
Beneficial Change of Mind, A . 
Bird in the Hand, A . 
Blooming Budget, The 

Brains and Food 

Budgeting Time 

Bungalows of the Riviera 

Business of Home-Making, The 

Camp-Cooking Fires 

Camp Fish Cookery .... 

Can Opening, by a Can Opener 

Cape Ann Turkey Dinner, A 

Christmas Closet, The 

Closets for Every Part of the House 

Concerning Lunch 

Consider the Lilies 

Cub, The 

Decorating the Thanksgiving Table 
Decorative Value of Books, The 
Dietetics, A Vocation for Women . 

Dieting and Dining 

"'Doughnuts a la Meta" 

Editorials, 30, 110, 190, 270, 350, 430, 510, 590, 

670, 750 
Emerging from an Emergency . 
Engine of Success, The . 
English Pork-Pie, The 
Ever-Watchful Isadore, The 
Every Woman Her Own Caterer 

Fans 

Fete Days in March 587 

Fete Days in May 769 

First Aid for Genevive 268 

First Snow, The 370 

Florist's Window, The 658 

Flower Pictures 209 

Good Cook, The 204, 283 

Goose Livers and Truffles 25 

Great Aunt Sarah's Homemade Rag Rugs 11 

Grove of Growth, The 576 

Handy with a Hammer . . . . . . 343 

Heart of the House, The 

Henry Gets into Print 

Home as an Abiding Place, The 

Home Ideas and Economies, 51, 130, 211, 

371, 450, 531, 610, 690, 770 
Hot Cross Buns and Other Recipes 

Household Problems 739 

Housekeeping Hearts . . ... 176 

Housewarming at the Hutch, The . 499 

How Does Your House Look from the Street? 264 

How the Other Half Lives 186 

How to Be Well 767 

I Don't Believe It, but It Sometimes Happens 

659, 748 

I Thank You 103 

I Thank You 589 

In Spring a Young Man's Fancy . 685 

James Is Surprised 686 



178 
444 

265 

527 
363 

342 



21 

100 

256 

290, 

606 



PAGE 

January, a New Year's Day .... 369 

June Chronicle, A 17 

Latin-American Markets ... 529 
Lobster Supper One Hundred and Eighty 

Miles Inland, A 585 

Making Harry Happy . 105 

March's Wooing 569 

Mary Ann as a Meddler 496 

Menus, 42-43, 122-123, 202-203, 281-282, 361- 

362, 442-443, 521-522, 602-603, 682-683, 

762-763 

Modern Jack and Mrs. Spratt, The . 505 
New Books . . . . 60, 300, 380, 620 

New Sunday Dinner Menu, A . . . . 289 

New Year's Social, A 368 

Ocean Fairyland, An 655 

Old-Time Southern Chicken Dishes 604 
Other Side of the Story, The (The Boss We 

Like Best) 423 

Over the Camp Fire 662 

Pipes of Spring, The . 649 

Possibilities of the Souffle 47 

Power of Example, The 665 

Problem Solved, The 745 

Problems of a Countrv Tea-Room . 667 

Reality . . .' 169 

Restoration of a Colonial Tavern, The 91 

Ruler of the World, The 764 

Sally's Salad-Shop 428 

Second Table 44 

Servant of the Seasons, The . . . .651 
Silver Lining, The, 68, 226, 306, 384, 624, 708, 784 

Simple Camp Cooking 180 

Simple Curtain Fixture, A 28 

Sofas, Old and New ....... 571 

Some Foreign Culinary Customs 446 

Some None-Too-Well-Understood Terms . 128 

Song in My Heart, The 489 

Stay-at-Home, The 416 

Story of a Cook Book, The 425 

Stretching That Salary 345 

Summer in a Tea House, A 502 

Summer Squash '. 126 

Supperites 688 

Surprise Dinner, A 183 

Thoughts for the Kitchen 263 

Three Meals a Day .... .579 

To Saint Valentine . 530 

Treatment of Corners, The 411 

Tropical Messes 95 

Tulips for Luncheon 608 

Ultra Modern Thanksgiving Dinner, An . 286 

Value of Paneling, The 171 

What Grandma Knows 421 

What to Eat and How to Market . 125 

Why Not Bulbs? 251 

Wild Goose Chases after Health . 684 

Wind's Wings, The 729 

With Violets 507 

Without Haven 182 

Seasonable-and-Tested Recipes 

Apples, Ring Mould of. Ill 520 

Apricots, Glace of 40 

Artichokes, Puree of Jerusalem 273 

Bananas, Baked 194 

Bananas, Whole, Fried in Deep Fat. HI. . 677 



I 



AMERICAN OX)kKRY 



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Bass, Black, with Tomato 

Bass, Stuffed Sea, with Piquant S 

Beans and Beef, Spanish Fashion 

Beans, Peppered, with Pimientoi 

Bea S tnish 

Beans, String, with Agra Dolce Sauce . 

Beef, Sliced Filet of, with Mushroom Sauce. 
Ill 

Beef, Flank of, Rolled Spiced 

Bird's Nest, Easter 

Biscuit, Baking Powder. 111. 

Biscuits, Breakfast or Tea. 111. 

Bombe, Raspberry. 111. 

Bouillon, Red Beet 

Bread, Bran, Bolsa Chica 

Bread, Four o'Clock Tea Bran. 111. 

Bre. up.. Ill 

Bread, Carolina Corn ... 

Bread, Raised Corn . 

Bread, Date. 111. . . . 

Bread, Raisin Graham. 111. 

Bread. Oatmeal .... 

Bread, Yeast Raised Oatmeal 

Bread, Rve ... 

Bread, Tea. Ill 

Breakfast Dish, A. 111. . . 

Brussels Sprouts with Cream Sauce 
Bunny, Mexican. 111. 
Buns, Raised Fruit .... 
Cake. Almond-and-Chocolate Pota 
Cake, Chocolate, with Frosting 
Cake, Grandmother's Date. 111. 
.ke. Economy. 111. 

Cake, Harrison 

Cake, Christmas Honey, Gateau de 
Cake. Ice Box. 111. . ' . . . 
Cake for Lincoln's Birthday 
Cake, May Festival Layer . 
Cake. California Pound . 

Cake. Praline. Ill 

Cake, Reception. 111. 

Cake. Thanksgiving. II!. 

Cakes. Afternoon Tea. 111. 

Cakes, Christmas. 111. . 

Cakes, Cocoanut Drop . 

Cakes, Cinnamon Coffee 

Cakes. Raised Drop, Sour Cream 

Cakes. Shrewsbury. 111. 

Capon. Roast, with Savory Stum 

Truffle Sauce 

Carrots, Compote of . 
Carrots, Fricassee of . 
Carrots, Moulded .... 
Carrots, Pickled . . 
Carrots and Peas, Glazed, Mint Fl 
Cases. Swedish Timbale. 111. . 
Cauliflower, Mashed .... 
Charlotte, Gooseberry 
Charlotte Russe. 111. 
Cheese-and-Cracker Luncheon Dish 
Cheese. Rinktumditty of 
Chicken Roast. 111. . 
Chop Suey. 111. 
Chops, French, with Pineapple. 
Lamb, Maintenon. 111. 
Chowder. Clam. 111. 
Chowder, Maryland Fish 

-Collops, Yea! 

Compote, Raisin-and-Orange 
Conserve. Fruit Medlev . 
Cookies. : 1!!. ' . . 



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p.\(Jt: 

195 
436 

518 

194 
75l 
599 
197 
438 
18 
41 
581 
597 
27 

i - i 

1 5 • 

201 

; " 

sn 

59S 
38 
279 
199 
593 
. : ; ; 
437 
277 
681 
121 
520 
599 
197 
560 
600 
519 
760 
680 
198 
440 
278 
759 
560 
359 
440 
57 
39 

435 

279 
279 
200 

41 
678 
757 
354 

41 
439 
559 
758 

~ : 4 
196 
195 
115 

:~4 

196 
441 

120 
200 



PAGE 



( roquettes, Cheese. 111. 

Cucido, The Portuguese Pot an Feu 

Cucumbers, Puree oi 

Cup St. J acq ues. 111. 

Cups, Marcella. III. 

Custard. Almond 

Custard Renverse. 11!. . 

Delight, Strawberry, Yanilla Ice Cre 

Dinner, Spring Vegetarian. 111. 

Doughnuts, Small Chocolate, for '1 

Dressing, Thousand Island Salad 

Drumsticks. Mock Turkey 

Duck, Curry of 

Duck, Roast, Olive Stuffed, with M 
Island Sauce 

Duck and Oysters. Savory Stew of 

Eggplant, Baked 

Eggplant, Fried Sandwiches of 

Eggs. Luncheon. 111. 

Eggs. Shirred with Tomatoes. Ill 

Eggs, Stuffed. Ill 

Eggs in Eggplant .... 

Eggs in Forcemeat .... 

Entree. Meatless. 111. . 

Figs and Yanilla Ice Cream. 111. 

Filet Mignon. 111. 

Filling, Lemon 

Fish, Baked Stuffed. 111. . . 

Fish, Moulded, Hollandaise Sauce. 

Frappe, Rhubarb. 111. . 

Fritters. Apple. 111. 

Fritters, Beet 

Frosting, Yanilla Butter 

Frosting for Reception Cake 
Gateau de Paques .... 
Gems, Jonathan Apple . 
Ginger Balls, Lafayette . 
Gingerbread, Rochester. III. 
Gingerbreads, School Lunch 
Goose, Green, and Gooseberries 
Grapefruit, Candied 
Haddock, Scotch Fashion 
Halibut Steaks with Apple Sauce 

Halibut Strips. Ill 

Ham, Baked. Ill 

Hens. Guinea, in Casserole. 111. 

Ice, Lemon 

Ice, Lemon Mint 

Ice, Raspberry, Cream Filling 

Ice Cream, Maple, with Pecan Mea 

Ice Cream, Pistachio 

Ice Cream, Yanilla, and Figs. 111. 

Jelly, Cider. 111. .... 

Jelly, Cranberry, in Moulds. 111. 

Jelly, Gingered Gelatine 

Lamb, Brains and Tongue 

Lamb, Leg of. Ill 

Lamb, Stewed a la Poulette 
Lamb Noisettes. 111. 
Lemonade, Raisin .... 
Liver, Calves', a la Espagnole 
Lobster, Deviled. 111. 
Lobster, Southern Style. 111. . 
Macaroni. Baked. 111. . 
Mackerel,' Baked Stuffed. 111. . 
Mackerel. Yinaigrette 
Marmalade, Citrous Fruits, and Pi 
Meat, Cold Sliced, in Aspic. 111. 
Molasses Hurry-Lps .... 
Muffins. Dainty Bran. 111. 
Mushroom Xewbere. 111. 



ackina 
Domesti 



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111. 



Ill 



111. 



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II 



COMPLETE INDEX 



Mushrooms in Pepper Cups .... 

Mutton, Spiced Shoulder of .... 

Mutton and Tomatoes, Scalloped . 

Nuts Glace. Ill 

Okra, Savory Stewed 

Ollycoeks, Dutch 

Omelet, Apricot. Ill 

Onions, Stuffed. Ill 

Oysters, Hidden 

Oysters, Scalloped. 111. 

Pancakes, Raw Potato 

Parfait, Grape Juice. Ill 

Parsnip Balls 

Parsnips, Broiled 

Pastries, French, Maple Syrup and Straw- 
berry 

Pear la Reine. Ill 

Pears, Farci of 

Peas, with Pork Tongue and Beets. 111. . 

Pickerel, Vinaigrette of 

Pickle, Corn-Cabbage ...... 

Pickle, Watermelon Sweet. 111. 

Pie, One-Crust Apple. Ill 

Pie, Green Apricot 

Pie, Cantaloupe 

Pie, Cheese Cake 

Pie, Deep Dish Cherry . 

Pie, Sweet Cider 

Pie, English Game 

Pie, Greengage, Deep Dish 

Pie, Hazlet and Brains 

Pie, Lemon. Ill 

Pie, Macaroon Custard 

Pie, Mutton-and-Apple 

Pie, Quail 

Pie, Rhubarb Custard 

Pie, Squash. Ill 

Pike-Perch, Holland Style 

Pike or Pickerel, Larded and Stuffed with 
Forcemeat 

Plombiere with Filberts Glace. 111. 

Pork, with Pease Pudding 

Porterhouse, Kitchen Barbecue of . 

Potage Blanc aux Noix 

Potato Balls 

Potatoes, Blue Ridge Sweet, in Casserole . 

Potatoes, Candied Sweet, with Ham. 111. 

Potatoes, Franconia 

Potatoes, French Fried 

Potatoes, Spanish 

Potatoes, Fried Sweet. Ill 

Potatoes, Sweet, Stuffed with Prunes . 

Praline. Ill 

Preserve, Sweet Beet 

Pudding, Apple Custard 

Pudding, Emergency Bread .... 

Pudding, Carrot 

Pudding, Chicken 

Pudding, Cornflakes Fruit 

Pudding, Hungarian Christmas. 111. . 

Pudding, Jewel 

Pudding, Nesselrode, with Sauce. 111. 

Pudding, Imitation Nesselrode .... 

Pudding, Pease 

Pudding, Baked Fresh Strawberry 

Puff, Baked Fish-and-Potato .... 

Puffs, Strawberry Cream. Ill 

Pumpkin, Curry of 

Pumpkin and Parmesan 

Punch, Grape. Ill 

Queens, Filled Lemon. Ill 



PAGE 

434 

594 
514 

679 
113 
201 

676 
675 
598 
274 
594 
39 
275 
674 

761 
118 
279 
357 
754 
121 
116 
197 
41 
121 
681 
761 
359 
356 
118 
677 
600 
517 
357 
441 
601 
277 
115 



513 

679 
316 
674 
193 
595 
279 
356 
674 
116 
754 
677 
437 
117 

41 
199 
678 
681 

33 
438 
358 
198 
358 
761 
516 

33 
601 
760 
514 
355 
114 
758 



PAGE 



Ragout, Beef Kidnev 194 

Relish, Jellied. Ill 436 

Ring, Meat Jelly .756 

Rings, Onion. Ill 754 

Rolls, Quick Yeast. Ill 598 

Rolls, Turkish. 111. 517 

Sablefish Steaks, Thermidor of ... 280 

Salad, Asparagus. Ill 756 

Salad, Bridge. 111. . . • 597 

Salad, Cabbage. Ill 277 

Salad, Endive, Kumquat-and-Cream 

Cheese. Ill 517 

Salad, Florida. Ill 196 

Salad, Hearts of Palm. Ill 759 

Salad, Jamboree 597 

Salad, Prune-and-Almond. 111. . . . 519 

Salad, Prune-and-Cream Cheese. 111. . 36 

Salad, Raisin-and-Green Pepper. 111. . . 519 

Salad, Stuffed Rose Apple. 111. ... 117 

Salad, Scallop-and-Celery 436 

Salad, Sea Food. Ill 678 

Salad, Simple Valentine Party .... 518 

Salad, Winter. Ill 357, 435 

Sauce, Agra Dolce 594 

Sauce, Cream 355 

Sauce, Cucumber 755 

Sauce, Hollandaise 35, 676 

Sauce, Horseradish 759 

Sauce, Mackinac Island 274 

Sauce, Mushroom 194 

Sauce, Hot Orange 355 

Sauce, Piquant, for Sea Bass .... 436 

Sauce, Truffle 435 

Sauce, White 675 

Sausage, Baked in Biscuits. 111. . . 195 

Savarin. Ill 679 

Scallops, Scalloped 356 

Sherbet, Italian Peach 120 

Sherbet, Peach Milk. Ill 120 

Shortcake, Blackberry. Ill 119 

Shortcake, Shaker Blueberry . . . . 116 

Shrimp-and-Tomatoes, Scallop of . . . 441 

Sole, Filets of, with Tomato. 111. . . 514 

Souffle, Potato-and-Herring .... 36 

Soup, Globe Artichoke with Rice . . . 513 

Soup, Red Beet 593 

Soup, Belgian, of Brussels Sprouts . . 513 

Soup, Spring Cabbage 753 

Soup, Cream of Cheese 433 

Soup, Duck Giblet 433 

Soup, Anglo-Indian Mulligatawny . . . 192 

Soup, Cream of Mushroom 113 

Soup, Onion, a la Clemenceau. 111. 434, 593 

Soup, Cream of Parmesan and Pepper . 753 

Soup, Black Plum 33 

Soup, Quince-and-Apple 353 

Soup, Moussaline of Salmon .... 673 

Soup, Spring Beauty 673 

Soup, Squash-and-Tomato 273 

Soup, Veal with Brains 353 

Spinach a la Sousa 437 

Sprouts, Brussels, with Cream Sauce. 111. 355 

Steak, Hamburg, with Onion Rings. 111. 754 

Steak, Planked, Parker House Style. 111. 329 
Steaks, Halibut, with Apple Sauce . . -755 

Stew, Lamb, en Casserole. 111. . . . 515 
Stew, Mexican, of Calf's Liver . . .516 

Stew, Virginia Brunswick 353 

Succotash, Winter 437 

Sugar, Spun. Ill 40 

Sweetbreads, with Orange Sauce. 111. . 355 



III 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Tart, Rhubarb Jam 

Tartlette, Christmas Citron 

Tarts, Italian. 111. . 

Tart lington 

Tea, Afternoon 

Tongue in Aspic, Individual 

Turkey Poult, Roast 

Turkey Prepared for Roasting. 

Veal, Frigadel of ... 

Vegetables, Assorted Sliced . 

Waffles. Ill 

Whirls, Midget. 111. . . 



III. 



PAGE 

698 
360 
119 
518 
759 
114 
114 
275 
195 
758 
674 
760 



Queries and Answers 

Apples, To Redden in Cooking 218 

Bags, To Clean Rubber Pastry ... 535 

Baking Powder, Homemade .... 776 

Barbecue, Southern 218 

Bars, Date 540 

Butter, How to Store for Winter . 134 

Butter, Peanut 456 

Butter, Pumpkin 135 

Cake,. Chocolate Angel 696 

Cake, Troubles with Angel 456 

Cake, Fruit, Loss of Weight in Baking . 375 
Cake, Light Yellow Fruit . . . 535, 776 

Cake, Lady 538 

Cake, Lightning 296, 538 

Cake, Silver 538 

Cake, To Make Moist 56 

Cakes, Kossuth 133 

Cakes, Large Layer 693 

Cakes, Streak at Bottom 294 

Candied Fruit, Tender 776 

Candles at Luncheon or Dinner ... 56 

Carve, A Little about How to . . . 616 

Celery, Stuffed 456 

Cheese, Frozen 773 

Cheese Loaf 457 

Cherry Olives 218 

Chicken Loaf 216 

Chocolate, Milk 376 

Chowder, Clam, The Right Kind . 774 

Chutney, English 133 

Cider, To Preserve Sweet 454, 696 

Club, How a Home Economics, Can Help 

Its Town 614 

Coasters, Use of 56 

Cocktail, Sauce for Canteloupe . . . 456 

Cocktails, Novelties in 376 

Coffee, How Long to Percolate ... 54 

Coffee, Why Is Boiled, Bitter .... 456 

Consomme, Cloudy 294 

Cookery, Fancy Dishes for 378 

Cookies, Bran 54 

Corn, Softening of Canned 291 

Cream, Chocolate Bavarian, without Eggs 133 

Definitions Wanted 375 

Dining Room, On Leading the W r ay to . 694 



PAGE 

Dinner, What to Serve First at 698 

Dishes, How to Serve and Remove at a Meal 296 

Dressing, French vs. Russian .... 54 

Dressing, French, To Keep from Separating 694 

Frosting, Curdling of 535 

Fruit, Tender Candied 776 

Griddle, Best Kind of Pancake ... 54 

Grill, The Mixed 536 

Ham, Mousselihe of 693 

Ham, Piece of, Smoked 454 

Ham, Whole, Smoked 454 

Herbs, Definition of . . .... 455 

Home Economics, Exhibit of ... . 536 

Hors d'Oeuvres 215 

Ice Cream Cones, Homemade .... 214 

Icing, Cake, Half an Inch Thick 614 

Jelly, Mint-flavored Apple 136 

Jelly, Reboiling Mouldy 295 

Loaf, Cheese 457 

Loaf, Chicken 216 

Menus, Our Over-elaborate 615 

Mirrors, Use of, in Decoration .... 56 

Noodle Ring . 696 

Olives, How to Pass 535 

Oven Temperatures 53 

Paraffin, The Use of, in Candy-making 58 

Pastries, French 134 

Peanut Butter 456 

Pie, Elderberry 296 

Pie, Molasses 457 

Pie, Brown-Topped Pumpkin . . 375, 696 

Pimientos, How to Keep . . 216, 457 

Plates at Dinner 56 

Potatoes, How to Serve Baked .... 694 

Pudding, Date, Why It Falls .... 616 

Pudding, Marshmallow 214 

Pudding, Christmas Plum 693 

Pudding, Creamy Rice (Poor Man's) . 135 

Refreshments, Sequence in Afternoon . 536 

Salad, Shrimp, in Salad Rolls .... 53 

Sauce, To Make Velvety Cream . 295 

Sauce for Cantaloupe Cocktail .... 456 

Scallions and Leeks, Ways of Using . . 214 

Sherbets and Ices, To Give Body to 58 
Soda with Chocolate, Molasses and Baking 

Powder 216 

Suppers, Wedding, and High Tea . 774 

Syrup, Pancake, of Sugar and Water . . 216 

Table Service, Points on 457 

Tablespoonful, Three or Four Teaspoonfuls 

in 455 

Tea, High, and Wedding Suppers . . 774 

Thermometer on Oven Door .... 696 

Toast, Cinnamon 214 

Torte, Almond 296 

Vitamines in Grapefruit 773 

Yeast, How to Make with- and without 

Starter 295 



The Higher Vision 

The simple, pleasant things the dreamer sees — 

Blown bud and spangled shell and moon-glade 

white — 

Attune themselves, for him, to chords and keys, 

That stay his breath with heartbreak and 

delight. 

The sounds he daily hears — the breeze of morn, 
A-riot in the brown and crimson leaves, 

Or fluttering the milky-scented corn, 
The threnody of gusty autumn eves. 

The chanson of the hidden forest thrush, 
The lullaby of clover-breathing rains, 

He feels — he holds them, in his pulses' rush, 
And winds them with his music's crystal 
skeins. 

And, listening, we dream of breeze and shower, 
Of beating wave and rain-bent orchard spray, 

Yet know not that the master draws his power 
From dear, familiar things we slightieach^day. 

Harriet Whitney Symonds. 




BRADFORD TORRE Y 

MASSACHUSETTS NATURALIST AND AUTHOR 

(Apropos page 17) 



American Cookery 



VOL. XXVII 



JUNE-JULY, 1922 



NO. 1 



Great-Aunt Sarah's Homemade Rag Rugs 

By Edith M. Thomas 



GREAT-AUNT Sarah Landis used 
to say, she could not "make some- 
thing from nothing," but she 
certainly did fashion the most original, 
artistic and useful rugs from faded, 
partly worn silk, cotton and woolen 
materials, absolutely useless for any 
other purpose. 

It has been my good fortune to see 
numberless homemade rag rugs, but 
never have I beheld any rag rugs (fash- 
ioned without using a loom), braided, 
hooked, or knitted, which equalled those 
shown me by Aunt Sarah Landis, designed 
and made by her own hands. 

One cannot imagine a more interesting, 
useful, or fascinating handicraft for the 
housewife to pursue in leisure moments, 
while resting in her favorite rocker on a 
shady, vine-covered porch during long 
summer days, than the fashioning of 
simple rag rugs. 

The work is so simple it may be easily 
learned; the rug may be picked up at 
odd moments, a few stitches added, or a 
few strands braided, and in a short time — 
a pretty, serviceable rug, suitable for 
either kitchen, bedroom, bathroom or 
porch, is made at comparatively small 
outlay of time, labor or money. When 
questioned as to what was required to 
make the rugs, the little old lady of 
eighty, with the enthusiasm of a girl of 
sixteen, replied, "Certainly, I'll be de- 
lighted to tell you what I know about 
rag-rug making." 

The only thing needful for making a 
braided rug, besides the rags (which, of 
course, have been washed and dyed, 
either in harmonizing or contrasting 



colors), will be a spool of coarse, linen 
thread. "Perhaps you'd like to see my 
collection of rag rugs," continued the old 
lady; answered in the affirmative, the 
rugs were brought to the room in which 
we were sitting, and spread on the floor 
before us for inspection; I gasped in 
amazement on beholding the perfectly 
wonderful rugs of harmoniously blended 
colors and original designs she had 
evolved from discarded materials. 

First, with pardonable pride, she dis- 
played an oval rug, made from a very 
much worn, old Paisley shawl, inherited 
from her grandmother, of rich, Oriental 
colorings of dull blue, wine, copper-color, 
and several shades of green; she said 
she wished to hand down the shawl to 
future generations, and could think of 
no other way to preserve it, except in 
making a braided rug. The rug was 




BRAIDED RUG FROM HOME-WOVEN COVERLET 



11 



12 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



thirty-seven inches long and twenty- 
eight inches wide, and was made as 
follows: The rags were cut into strips 
about two inches wide; these were turned 
in on each side, then folded together in 
the center (to make them more durable), 
then caught together with long stitches 
on the under side; the strips then meas- 
ure about one-half to three-quarters of an 
inch in width, and should not be more 
than one and one-half to two yards in 
length before being braided. Three of 
these strips or strands of rags were 
fastened together at one end and braided; 
when the braided strip measured eighteen 
or twenty inches in length, it wao doubled 
together, the two edges being doubled 
together and overcast on the under side 
with coarse linen thread; the remaining 
three strands were then braided and sewn 
continuously round and round the rug 
to form a perfect oval. When you have 
sewed to within a few inches of the end of 
the braided strip, add to each separate 
strand another strand by sewing the two 



together in a seam, then fold each strand 
together, having the seam inside, and 
overcast with long stitches, being careful 
to keep this seam on the under or wrong 
side when braiding; continue in this 
manner until the- braided piece is of the 
desired length. The two rows, each of 
green and red, separated by several rows 
of black, which formed the border of the 
rug, were made from a discarded woolen 
blanket, dyed to match the colors in the 
shawl. 

A very unusual rug was next shown; 
it was evolved from an old-fashioned, 
partly worn, home-woven coverlet (also 
an heirloom), one hundred and twenty 
years old; woven in tiny, broken checks, 
or blocks of indigo blue, tan and terra 
cotta. Aunt Sarah informed us she had 
cut the rags for this rug about three- 
quarters of an inch in width; the edges 
of the strands were not turned under, as 
were those made from the Paisley shawl; 
the strands with cut, frayed edges were 
braided together, then coiled around the 




RUG FROM OLD PAISLEY SHAWL 



HOMEMADE RAG RUGS 



13 



rug continuously, and firmly sewed 
together on the wrong side, forming a 
circular rug with a rough surface, quite 
different from any homemade rug I had 
ever seen. The rug possessed a border 
of plain indigo blue, half of an old woolen 
blanket having been dyed to match the 
blue in the coverlet. 

Nearing completion was an unusually 
good-looking rug with a velvety surface, 
made by combining an old cinnamon- 
brown chenille portiere and a faded tan 
chenille table cover; both of which arti- 
cles, we were laughingly informed, had 
been found at house-cleaning time in the 
attic. The strands for this braided rug 
had been cut about one and three- 
quarters inches in width, cut length- 
wise of the material, on account of a 
tendency of the chenille threads to ravel. 
The strands were folded together until 
exactly one-third the original width; 
then overcast with long stitches, the seam 
always on the under side, when braiding 
the strands. The center of the rug was 
made from the portiere, the table cover 
was cut in half, one-half of it being dyed 
a shade of tan to harmonize with the 



brown center, the remaining half of table 
cover was dyed several shades darker 
than the center and used as a border; as 
this rug was unfinished we examined it 
closelv in order to see exactlv how the 
strands were braided. 

We admired Aunt Sarah's braided rugs 
immensely; but fairly gasped with aston- 
ishment when her crocheted or hooked 
rugs were spread on the floor. 

Quaint looking rugs of original design, 
painstakingly developed from old mate- 
rials, dyed in soft, pretty colors. I 
noticed she showed a partiality for various 
shades of brown and tan in her rugs. 
One reason the rugs were so distinctive 
was because she was exceedingly careful 
and solicitous about every smallest detail 
of her work. 

She invariably crocheted her cut rags 
over a piece of twine almost as thick as a 
common lead pencil; one never having 
seen a rug made in this manner, cannot 
possibly realize what a very great differ- 
ence it makes in the appearance of the 
finished rug; when twine is used the 
rug will be much heavier and firmer, the 
rows of crocheted rags resembling cords. 




CHENILLE RUG FROM OLD PORTIERE 



14 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Should the rug, crocheted over twine, be 
inclined to ruffle (i. e., be too full), or 
should the rug curl up at the edges, not 
be full enough, either fault may quickly 
be corrected by simply drawing the 
twine more closely, or by adding a stitch 
occasionally or pulling the stitches more 
loosely over the twine; or should the 
twine be visible between stitches, add 
an extra stitch occasionally. Common 
crochet stitch was used, the cut rags 
being drawn through the two top stitches, 
instead of through only one stitch, making 
the rug more durable; particularly should 
this be done when using old materials. 

The following instructions for making 
crocheted, or hooked, rugs were given us: 
First the rags should be cut, or torn, 
about three-quarters of an inch in width; 
if the material used be very thin, cut rags 
a trifle wider, if flannel or heavier woolen 
material be used, rags should then be cut 
narrower; a good plan is to cut a piece of 
the goods to be used and twist it to judge 
of the thickness before cutting rags of 
various materials in order to have rags 
of uniform thickness. 

Her rags were cut and sewed, and then 
wound into long skeins, fastened together 
at one end for convenience when dyeing 



them; then when thoroughly dried, the 
various shades were assorted, sewed 
together, and wound into balls before 
commencing a rug. With a long wooden 
crochet needle, about the size of a com- 
mon wooden lead pencil, with a hook at 
one end (similar to an ordinary coarse, 
bone crochet hook), she crocheted about 
twelve stitches over the twine (single 
crochet, do not wrap thread over needle 
before taking up stitch), draw twine con- 
taining stitches as tightly together as 
possible .to form a small circle, and sew 
firmly together on wrong side, then 
crochet into the first stitch, which com- 
pletes the circle, crocheting over the 
twine, which held loosely is carried along 
and crocheted over round and con- 
tinuously. Occasionally lay the rug on 
the floor to determine if it lies perfectly 
flat; if not, it may, by means of the 
twine, be easily pulled into shape before 
finishing. 

Among other things, we were told 
never to cut hose or woven material 
lengthwise of the goods, but round and 
round, or across, as it then has the 
appearance of a cord, when being cro- 
cheted. 

One rug we particularly admired was 



ri'VYiVU/ifrji''"' « '*»jW> iffij jfe?* ' 

: . ..- 



Pf/ZI » 



'»ny«kM 






— ^*^2£gX£SSZ 















BROWN AND TAN RUG CROCHETED FROM COTTON MATERIALS 



HOMEMADE RAG RUGS 



IS 



neither circular nor oval, as were most of 
the other rugs, but at each of the four 
corners several extra stitches had been 
added to each row crocheted, which 
gave the rug an oblong appearance. 
This rug was made of soft yellow-browns 
and tans. In dyeing materials, to be 
used for making rugs, she always added, 
she said, a small quantity of orange dye 
to the brown dye, and this caused them 
to have the warm yellow-brown tints, 
which we so greatly admired. She also 
said she had used a number of old, brown 
silk hose, contributed by her nieces, 
which, perhaps*, accounted for its being 
such a good-looking rug. 

These hooked rugs certainly were 
artistic, the two I think we admired more 
than others were crocheted from woolen 
materials in shades of warm red-browns 
and tan, harmoniously blended in an 




PINWHEEL DESIGN 



original design; in the center of one was 
a tan-colored, conventionalized swastika, 
with border composed of various shades 




CROCHETED RUG OF ANOTHER DESIGN 



16 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




"HIT OR MISS" RUG 

of brown. The other rug, also circular 
in shape, with a pinwheel design in the 
center, was of the darkest shade of brown. 
We learned this was not difficult to make; 
she first crocheted a circle, composed of 
two rows of dark brown rags; this circle 
was divided into quarters by placing a 
pin at each of the four sections, and 
crocheting stitches of the tan rags 
between; the second row contained two 
stitches of the brown beneath the one 
stitch of brown in the preceding row: 



the third row^contained three stitches of 
brown filled in between^with tan; then 
three rows^were crocheted, each row 
having only^three stitches of the brown, 
then an extra* stitch was added to the 
brown stitches on each succeeding row, 
each row having one more brown stitch 
than the one preceding, always the brown 
stitch was taken one stitch beyond the 
brown one in the preceding row, and not 
directly underneath the stitch in a former 
row, as will be seen in the cut. The 
brown, also tan rags, were not cut, each 
time a different color was used in the 
design, but the rags were carried along 
with the twine, carried from one design 
to another, and crocheted over both, 
when the rag of one shade was dropped, 
and the other taken up, this caused the 
rug to be much heavier and more durable; 
it was also much easier to carry out a 
design in this manner, than if the rags 
had been cut each time. 

We asked our aunt if she had ever 
fashioned a rug from silk rags. I had seen 
portieres made from them, but could _not 
say that I admired them, as they were so 
heavy looking; she then held up for my 
inspection a particularly pretty rug, 
fashioned from brightly colored strips of 




A SILK PRAYER RUG 



A JUNE CHRONICLE 



17 



silk, cut about one inch in width, and 
crocheted over twine, as were all her 
crocheted rugs; this rug, of no design, 
was, "Hit or Miss"; a deep border of 
plain black silk rags added to its attract- 
iveness. 

When asked whether she had ever 
knitted a rug, our aunt replied, "I am 
endeavoring to finish a rug knitted from 
silk scraps, which was commenced by 
my mother about forty-five years ago; I 
finished knitting the rug several years 
ago; it looks unfinished without a border, 
which I intend to knit and sew on to it, 
when I have the required amount of 
black silk necessary." On examination, 
the rug proved to have been made from 
very tiny pieces of bright-hued silk, quite 



too small to be used in any other manner, 
and it had the appearance of a bed of 
variegated flowers. When asked if the 
rug was difficult to make, she replied, 
"No, indeed, only rather tedious; as you 
see, the tiny scraps of various bright- 
hued silks, velvets and satins were cut 
about three and one-half inches long, 
and about one-half an inch wide. The 
ends of the silk scraps should always be 
cut slanting, or bias, never straight. All 
you will require, besides the silk scraps, 
will be a ball of common wrapping cord 
or twine; or save all white cord which 
comes tied around packages, as I do. 
Use this and two ordinary steel knitting 
needles, such as were used in old times 
for knitting stockings." 



A June Chronicle 

By May Baker Norman 



"The fashionable cant of nature worship is 
enough, almost, to seal a true worshiper's lips 
under a vow of everlasting silenced 

Bradford Torrey. 

THE idea that people love nature, 
but cannot find any time for it, 
without vacations and such lux- 
uries, is erroneous. 

For the most part, people could learn 
much, enjoy much of the outdoor world 
even amidst working days, and within 
city limits. There are always beautiful 
streets, where one may walk free of 
charge; parks are plentiful, and holidays 
and Sundays do come along occasionally. 
It is true, the city gives us nature de 
luxe, "hair in curl and feet in patent 
leather," while to get the more stalwart 
benefits we must have something more 
rugged. Yet trees and birds are no- 
where lovelier, or more easily approached 
than in city parks. 

The little Chronicle presented here is 
a true record of little outings about home, 
or observations at home; and the interest, 
or lack of interest which two children 



came to manifest in nature. The home 
is in the suburbs of a northern city. 

June 2. The children are in bed early, 
having exhausted themselves' tramping 
about hunting wild flowers for a birthday 
basket for Father. They have been 
getting ready for this celebration for two 
months, and I doubt if they will be able 
to assemble half the things they have 
made. 

A bobolink gave us a fine performance 
today — ■ "Gurgling in ecstasy," while two 
robins and a red-eyed vireo did their best 
to drown him out. It was a shame for 
him to have to contend with this trio, 
which, for pure noise, vim, and vigor, 
would be hard to excel. 

Our baby song sparrows were all ready 
for company when we looked in upon 
them this morning, being genteel in some 
new feathers, and sitting in two precise 
rows, two before, two behind, all facing 
the same way. They filled the nest com- 
pletely, and I should say they could keep 
each other warm. The small boy forgave 



IS 



AM KR I CAN COOKKRY 



them tor having looked so horrid at his 
rirst visit. He thinks now they may turn 
out to be birds. "I see they are getting 
wings," he said — doubtless remember- 
ing that at rirst they were all eyeballs and 
mouth-. We did not stay long, as two 
uneasy little parents were sitting upon a 
bush saying, "Trink," earnestly urging us 
to leave. 

June 7. In a little excursion to W. 
terday we visited a place, which is, I 
believe, the most rustic that can be 
reached by trolley from the city. An old 
mill stands in ambush among the trees, 
which border a fussy little stream. As 
we approached, I was mentally saying: 

"The mill has gone to decay, Ben Bolt, 
The rafters have crumbled in; 
And the quiet that crawls around the walls 
Takes the place of the olden din.*' 

But the antiquity was not so great as 
I anticipated. The rafters looked firm, 
and the wheel was not decayed — though 
it long since had ceased to turn. 

As w r e stood on the outside, a phcebe 
entered an upper window with something 
in his beak. This was an invitation to go 
in, and see what was doing, but we could 
not approach the upper part of the 
building, as there was neither stairs nor 
ladder. And the immense rafters did not 
look as if they ever intended to crumble 
in and expose to view the higher chambers. 
Just as I was wishing I had a boy big 
enough — and not too big — to scale the 
walls, a barn swallow darted in and took 
my attention. He carried food in his 
beak, but when he saw that there were 
visitors he preferred not to point the way 
to his nest. He circled round and round, 
and round and round. Or, perhaps, after 
all it was not he but she, for the com- 
panion appeared, also carrying food. 
Then they began an aerial performance, 
which continued till I was weary with 
watching. The ceiling was low, and they 
were close to our heads — steel blue, buff, 
chestnut, all glistening in the sunshine, 
which streamed through the paneless 
windows and the doorless doorways! 
With all this color in constant and rapid 



motion just above me, I confess I was 
hypnotized, and for all my attentions the 
children might have gone off, I fear, and 
fallen into the stream; but as I discov- 
ered later, they, too, were under the spell. 

At last — ■ it was such a relief — ■ one 
bird rested just an instant upon the little 
mudhouse on the rafter — ■, then his wings 
moved again, and the other bird went to 
the nest. The visit was incredibly brief, 
but they had disposed of the insects they 
had been all that time preserving. Then, 
after a little more circling, as if to get 
themselves in trim, or to reconnoiter a 
field about to be abandoned to the enemy, 
they vanished! 

It was over! The children drew a long, 
long breath and looked at me in open- 
eyed silence. I fancied they had had all 
the excitement they needed, and that the 
birds had, also, so we left, looked for 
violets a moment, and then started home. 

June 8. We are quite alert over a 
pair of bluebirds, who are "thinking 
about" occupying a box we put up for 
them. Rather, it appears that he is 
thinking about it, and that she is deter- 
mined to do something else. Close to 
the box, is a clothes-line post, with a tin 
can nailed to the top. It was put there 
for wrens. Every one who sees it laughs 
at the thought of any bird accepting such 
an abode. The doorway is a circle, one 
inch in diameter. The can has a punc- 
ture in the back for ventilation. The 
inside of it gets so hot that I do fear an 
occupant might be cooked. Moreover, 
Madame Bluebird cannot get into it — - 
but she wants, it. She dotes upon it, or 
pretends to just to vex her mate. She 
goes off and gets a bit of nesting material 
and sits on the tin can with it, as if she 
meant to deposit it there or nowhere. 
Verily, my dear lady, I fear you are a 
type of contrary femininity! I wonder 
if your lord does not think so, too, and 
tell you so! 

I used to imagine all bluebirds were 
angelic, but familiar acquaintance opens 
one's eyes to shortcomings. Perhaps, 
however, this bird is simply young and 



A JUNE CHRONICLE 



19 



giddy, and will some day settle down and 
make a good spouse. 

June 14. We are having a royal time 
watching some cedar waxwings. One 
was at the porch this morning, tugging 
at the cord which supports the woodbine. 
He pulled with might and main, but 
failed to get what he wanted, and it 
became our pleasant duty to supply him 
with a bunch of detached pieces of twine, 
of various colors. After dinner the 
children were playing on the veranda, and 
the small boy ran in — or rather tip-toed 
in — to tell me that, "The wingwax had 
come so close!" He put his hand to his 
chest, as if the bird's proximity had 
fairly taken his breath away. For an 
hour, thereafter, he kept coming in to 
repeat the story, and to beg me to come 
and see. 

This overset my resolution to do indoor 
work, so I took my sewing and went to 
the veranda. I was not seated when up 
came a "wingwax." He stopped for a 
moment upon the fence, and then came 
straight to the railing, two feet from me. 
I held my breath — but he was quickly 
gone with some strings. I put out a 
handful of hair-combings. In five min- 
utes it was gone. Another handful! 
That went, too. Bv this time thev had 
taken all the twine except the red and 
pink. The two birds came together, 
generally, one standing guard on the 
fence while the other captured the 
material. As I could see no difference in 
the two I cannot assert that the male 
made the female do all the work. I- can 
say of Lady Bluebird, that she has 
scorned to use materials which her 
demure companion made bold to present; 
but, then, she may not be a representative 
of her species. 

June 15. The waxwings continue to 
pull at the woodbine cord, specially 
desiring what is unattainable. They 
have taken the pink and red twine, also 
a bunch of cotton. The nest is in an 
apple tree, close by. and it is, at present, 
"a thing of shreds and patches. M Will 
they be able to loop up the loose ends, 



or have they greedily taken much more 
material than they can handle: 

How glorious the earth is at this time! 
The goldfinches are making us harry 
with their charming music. Daisies, but- 
tercups and clovers adorn the vacant lots, 
blue flags border the swampy places on 

Avenue: and the keen eyes of the 

children have discovered some ripe, wild 
strawberries. They picked some, which 
they afterward ate in such formal style, 
that they called the occasion: "Our little 
party." 

June 1". The waxwings have cea- 
to accept our bounty, and our intim. 
may be at an end forever. They fly ov 
the house with no hint that they ever 
stopped here. They keep very close 
together. Sometimes their wings almost 
touch. The upper air seems all too 
narrow a thoroughfare for them. I 
should never be aware of them, but for 
their faint little whispering notes. These 
birds make me think of deaf mutes, so 
isolated and silent. 

June 18. This has been a fine day — 
yet" I have no bird record. I had a 
narrow escape from learning something, 
but I escaped. A vireo. suspected to be 
a warbling vireo, was in the walnut tree 
near the dining room window. He 
obliged me by descending nearly to the 
level of the window, and I was expec- 
tantly watching, opera glasses in hand. 
I should make sure of him now — at 
last! Just as that hope was about to be 
fulfilled my small son began calling. 
"Mother." I did not answer. I thought 
he could wait a minute, but he could not. 
His call developed into a shout, and I 
was finally forced to say, '"Here, in the 
dining room." "Oh!" he said calmly, 
looking in, and then walking off in the 
other direction. He only wanted to 
know where I was. The vireo had 
departed. 

I followed the boy to see if he was con- 
templating any mischief — he was so 
concerned as to mv whereabouts! I 
found him on the back steps, troubling, 
he confes-e.h that he could not find 






AMERICAN COOKERY 



any place where he could get his shoes ' 
muddy. 

"Why do you want to get them 
muddy?" said I. 

"Well," he rejoined, "we've got that 
new foot scraper." 

June 20. I promised the children 
another visit to the swallows, and we had 
it today; the same weird experience! 
They are the only birds who ever quelled 
the children. They refused to look at a 
red-headed woodpecker the other day 
because they did not have time, and a 
flicker, with all his rich coloring, taking 
a dust bath in the sunny road, was 
observed verv casuallv. It is onlv the 
birds that come close which arouse 
them, 

We were standing today beside the 
little brook, and I was attempting to 
point out a nest in the distance, when the 
daughter said, "Ed rather look at that 
one right over your head." I stepped 
a-ide and glanced up. Yes, there was a 
nest two feet above me, and not only a 
sitting bird, but another bending over 
and feeding her. ' I never saw a prettier 
sight. They were cedar waxwings — 
totally unafraid! Their nest was a very 
proper, well-built affair, a great contrast 
to the one for which we had supplied 
material. 

June 26. We have had a quiet, happy 
Sunday, ending with an evening on the 
veranda. The children were permitted 
to sit up "late" to see the full moon. 
The}- were very much impressed by the 
grandeur of the heavens, together with 
their own importance in doing something 
unusual. The older child told many 
tales of times when she had seen the 
"whole moon," but the boy's experience 
had been mostly with "a piece of the 



moon." By the time we came in, a 
countless number of night's candles had 
been lighted; and the firmament declared, 
with eloquence, the glory of God. How 
calmly the mother birds must sit upon 
their eggs through a night like this! 
Just a short time ago we had a severe 
electrical storm. Were the birds afraid; 
I wondered. I have known the robins 
to sit through snow storms and long- 
continued rain without so much as a leaf 
to protect them. 

June 27. I have repressed a good deal 
of enthusiasm, lately, about a little nest, 
which we found in the park, which we 
have visited ten times, and about which 
I have jotted down all sorts of memo- 
randa. Who would believe I could ever 
get so birdy, and who would guess that 
a level-headed man would urge me on 
and on to worse insanity? Judging by 
the neat, pensile nest, and the song of the 
owner, I should have been content to 
name him — -"Red-eyed Yireo"; but my 
•companion could see no red eyes and was 
determined to have ocular evidence. 
We watched and waited, while the 
children made "a garden" under the nest 
tree, plowing it with sticks and sowing it 
with pebbles. That was one garden 
which had over-cultivation. 

At last a day arrived when the male 
bird forgot to sing, became repellent to 
all birds calling at his tree, and tireless in 
carrying food to the nest. By these signs 
we knew that "the eggs were made into 
babies." Then, the doubtful Thomas 
climbed the tree — the park policeman 
kindly remaining at a distance — and 
had the opportunity of looking direct 
into the face of the brave little vireo 
defender of the home. The verdict was: 
"Those eves are actuallv red." 



The Night Shall Be Day 



By day, a leaden sky 
Makes all things droop; 
By night, like fingers of fate, 
Across the moon, 



The black clouds drift; 
But faith lights her lamp, 
And hope's meteors 
Illume my way. 

Harriet H. d' Autre mont. 



The Heart of the House 

By Alice Margaret Ashton 



M 



Y gracious!" exclaimed Aunt 
Mary Preston, "when I heard 
you flying across the garden — 
with that letter and all in your hand — ■ 
but I guess, by your looks, it isn't bad 
news!" 

"0 Aunt Mary, you always do hit the 
nail on the head," gasped Janet Fane, 
sinking down upon the gay cushion in 
Aunt Mary's little kitchen rocker. "The 
letter was a delight, but it was the all that 
took my breath away! Look!" And she 
waved a slip of pink paper before Aunt 
Mary's bewildered face. 

"My gracious," said Aunt Mary again, 
when she had grasped and steadied the 
hand that held the rosy slip. "A check! 
Three hundred dollars! From your Aunt 
Margaret! Well, I swan!" 

"Isn't that sweet of her?" exulted 
Janet, deeply gratified by the succession 
of exclamations from her usually placid 
neighbor. "A belated wedding gift, she 
calls it. I'm to buy something for my 
house with it. 

"The instant I looked at that check I 
knew what I was going to get. A real, 
honest-to-goodness sofa for the living 
room. For that long, bare* space at the 
end of the room that nothing ever seems 
to fit or to fill. I can close my eyes and 
see it — soft and puffy and enticingly 
blue!" 

"My, my!" exclaimed Aunt Mary, 
admiringly. "That will set off your room 
dreadful fine. How times change, to be 
sure. I misdoubt if I had three hundred 
dollars' worth of bought stuff in my whole 
house when I was your age. And yet I 
thought — " 

"There is one condition," Janet 
explained, spreading the letter open on 
her knee, with fingers that still trembled 
from excitement. "I'm to write and tell 
her exactly what I get with my check 
and why. 



"I wonder — if there isn't 
string attached to my check, 



a sort of 
after all? 

Aunt Margaret is an exceedingly 'stringy' 
sort of person. If she thinks you are 
right, you are right; if she thinks other- 
wise, your case is simply hopeless! 

"I wonder — if three hundred dollars 
for a blue sofa to fill an empty space 
wouldn't look different in a letter to Aunt 
Margaret than it would in my living 
room? I love and respect the dear lady, 
and wish her to think well of my judg- 
ment. 

"Still — a bird in the hand! Oh, I do 
want that blue sofa, Aunt Marv Preston!" 

"Good land, now, don't I know?" sym- 
pathized the good lady, warmly. "Makes 
me think of the time I got ten dollars — 
unexpected. That would just have 
bought lace curtains for the three windows 
in my sitting room. The ones I had were 
ruffled muslin ones I'd made myself, and 
I considered them dreadfully common and 
out of date." 

"Did you get them?" Janet demanded, 
interested in spite of her own absorbing 
perplexity. 

"When I spoke to your Uncle Martin 
about it he said: 'Do as you please about 
it, of course. But I should say the cur- 
tains we've got are all right. Why 
don't you get a washing-machine? Wash- 
ing by hand is too hard for you — you 
are always half sick by the time you are 
through. If you had a machine, now, I 
could spare time to turn it for you of a 
morning, and the hardest part of your 
work would be done.' 

"I don't suppose I acted any too cheer- 
ful about it, but I got the washing- 
machine. We've never been without one 
since, and I've never had a washing- 
backache since that day!" 

"Washing is hard," muttered the 
young housekeeper, thoughtfully. "Some- 
times I hire ours done — but everything 



21 






AMERICAN COOKERY 



cost< so much, just to live! 1 low is one to 
tell what is best to do: Housekeepers — 

►ecially young housekeepers, do like 
nice things in the front of their house — 
■ curtains and blue sofas!" 

"They certainly do," agreed Aunt 
Mary, chuckling. "And it's right, too. 
Pleasant surroundings make us cheerful 
and happy and successful." 

"But how are we going to know where- 
to spend our money, when there isn't 
enough to cover everything — ■ lace cur- 
tains and washing-machines?" 

"I suppose that depends upon the 
woman. And where the real heart of 
her home is." 

"The heart of her home? Whatever 
do you mean, Aunt Mary?" 

"Why, I suppose it is true, same as it 
says in the Bible, that 'where your 
treasure is there will your heart be also.' 

"Some women, now, put all their 
treasure in the front part of their home. 
All their plans are for spending a delight- 
ful social evening; they never plan for 
the family breakfast next morning. 

; 'Your Uncle Martin always says, of 
such houses, that they have 'a Queen 
Anne front and a Mary Ann back!' He 
thinks that is dreadful cute, but I mis- 
trust he read it somewheres. What he 
means is that the front part is fine and 
stylish, but back in the kitchen-end any 
makeshift will do." 

Janet Fane sighed longingly. "Yet we 
do have to 'make shift,' most of us. And 
it is easier to 'cover it up' in the kitchen, 
say what you may!" 

''That's true. But there is another 
side to it," Aunt Mary observed, thought- 
fully. "It isn't so easy to keep the two 
'ends' of our house separate, as one might 
think. The back, especially, has a way 
of creeping forward, and giving us away. 

"Like this, I mean. After I'd put my 
ten dollars in a washing-machine in the 
kitchen, I had more time to spend in my 
sitting room, and I know I was more, 
cheerful and entertaining, spite of my 
plain curtains. 

"Works the other way, too, when a 



body carries it too far — ■ too many fine 
furnishings in front make the housewife 
tired and fretty caring for them." 

"That is true, I know," declared Janet. 
"My cousin Lucile has everything; her 
home is a dream. W T hen I saw it I 
thought: 'How wonderfully she can 
entertain.' But she can't, Aunt Mary! 
All she can do is to set forth her per- 
fectly good food, on her beautiful dishes, 
in her beautiful dining room. She's too 
tired, or perturbed, or something, to 
think of anything interesting to say. 

"So you think I'd better — " 

"I think you'd better take a little time 
to think it over. Isn't any time limit to 
Aunt Margaret's check, is there?" 

A month later Janet came over to read 
to Aunt Mary the momentous reply to 
Aunt Margaret. Very detailed and busi- 
nesslike was her description of the electric 
washing and ironing machines which the 
latter's check had procured. Very honest 
was the confession of her inclinings 
toward a blue sofa. 

"But I cannot be glad enough I made 
the choice I did," she finished. "My 
laundry work goes so easily, and so inex- 
pensively, instead of nearly killing or 
nearly bankrupting me, as in the past. 
Why, Aunt Margaret, I haven't been 
tired and touchy on a single Monday 
or Tuesday evening since I had those 
machines brought into the house on trial! 

"In a way I think they even compensate 
for the absence of the sofa. I have 
arranged my callers' chairs with their 
backs toward the 'unoccupied regions.' 
And I feel so young and larky, and look 
so fine in the fresh frocks I allow myself, 
now that their laundering doesn't seem 
like a calamity, that I feel certain my 
drawing room has acquired added 
attractions." 

At the end of her reading: "Well, that 
is done," she sighed. "I do hope she will 
approve of what I did." 

In less than a week she was back bear- 
ing an unopened reply. "Thought I 
might need a little moral support in read- 
ing it," she explained, whimsically, "Aunt 



AT MRS. MORRISON'S TABLE 



:. : 



Margaret can be rather subduing, e 
in a letter. 

"Listen here. "Dear Niece: I take 
pleasure in noting the use you have made 
of my little gift. I am proud to know 
that a niece of mine — and one brought 
up in the superficial way in which you 
were raised — should show so much 
sense. Lovingly. Aunt Margaret. P.S. 
I wouldn't worn,* about the sofa. A 



woman oi a - - - 

ge: in this worl 

I that perfectly fine Aunt 

Mar; : She liked what I did, after all. 

I feel giving you a - 3te of 

"I've noticed," bserved Aunt Mary, 

serenely, "thai . we do the se ible 

st always come out all 
right 



At Mrs. Morrison's Table 

Bv Ernest L. Thurston 



MRS. GEORGE MORRISON is an 
exceedingly popular ho ; Her 

invitations to lunch, supper, or 
dinner are rarely refused. Yet the com- 
pany is seldom large, nor are - c al lions 
a drawing card. Seldom is there more 
than one other guest. Often one finds 
oneself alone with the family — George 
and Mrs. George, and two most vigorous, 
active little youngsters. 

Moreover, Mrs. George does not enter- 
tain in her own home. There are reasons 
which have to do with help, or the lack 
of it; and with disturbance- resulting 
around evening mealtime, from childish 
energy, working itself off. in confined 
spaces. Pent-up explc s you know, 

are often disastrous in their effect . 
Nor is the entertainment provided 
hotel, or tea-room, or club. 

On some bright day there just go out 
over the wire — telephone invitations are 
exceedingly proper, you know — a I 
words like these: 

"Good morning, Mrs. Newton' I 
heard your husband had been called 
away on busines- You must be lonely. 
Won't you give us some genuine pleasure 
this evening by taking supper out 
with us?" 

Will Mrs. Newton: Why, the quick- 
ness of her response, and the deligh: in 
her voice say "yes" even more clearly 
than her tongue. 



"Splenc:^."* says Mrs. George. "Look 

for us to pick you up at five-thi: 

On the minute, t: is before the 

door. I: is not such a particularly :: 
and immaculate machine, for there are 
ches :: . rface the youngsters 

have not climbed over \ et it is com- 
fortable an i root "s .1 
good seat for the j ite the load 
of baske:-. pillow robes and other 
paraphernalia. Somehowthegoodtirr.fr. 
the old ca a ctr ~: in, have 
upon it a friendly, welcoming 
atmosphc Did home of a ha; 
family 

Acce g theii guest as one of them- 
seh ley are o~ b jr t ::e ; : short- 

cut countrywards In surpri g quick 
time they are pas sir. j : 

is The sui - sirii its 
hea:. The fragrant evening breeze 
already foretell ag the freshness of the 
country night. 

An hour out a: are u there M — 

wherever I at . be Pc 

liant 
hillt :?. wit :.:-:... e 

If the urns : / .. it 1 ns - ; . n a 

warm, pi 

shall 
spa:, g sam, that beck - most 
g . Here the 
[e to theii salts' c c Kit. P:s- 
sibi will fall in 



24 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



without danger (a trifle to them.) 

If there is a beautiful countryside rest 
spot, within a radius of thirty miles or so 
of their city home, that the Morrisons 
have not discovered, then it is safe to say 
no one else has done so. Almost always 
their choice is a surprise and a delight to 
their fortunate guest. 

The children at once range free, reduc- 
ing themselves to a comfortable weariness, 
while cultivating enormous appetites. 
George, meanwhile, is pulling out seat 
cushions, or possibly a folding chair or 
two, to form a family circle. It may be 
he simply spreads lap robes on the warm, 
dry ground. Just possibly — but it is 
doubtful, for the thing's too formal, you 
know — he has brought out that small 
folding canvas table. 

Meanwhile, Mrs. George and the 
guest, who is now no longer a guest, but 
simply one of them, have been burrowing 
into boxes and laying bare their con- 
tents. Appetites grow at the sight. 
The children, sensing coming events, 
draw near and get underfoot. 

If it has been verv hot, certain bottles 
disgorge chilled tea, or milk. A box, 
lined with water-soaked paper, yields 
fresh, crisp lettuce, as the basis for a 
simple salad. Sandwiches th«re are, 
with cool, sliced tongue, or homemade 
jelly. Possibly there are light, digestible 
cookies or cake. More likely there are 
berries or fruit. The home back-yard 
garden has contributed some of these 
things. It may be, however, that the 
berries represent roadside collections. 

For a special treat, there may appear, 
unexpectedly, from within its burlap 
wrappings, a freezer of homemade ice 
cream. It has been churned just before 
starting, and has kept firm in its ice 
jacket. 

If, perchance, the day turns cool — -or 
we have been mistaken, and this is an 
autumn trip, to enjoy the colorful foliage 
— there may be a nourishing soup, 
heated on the spot over a portable 
alcohol burner. There may be hot tea, 
or coffee, or warm milk. As an alter- 



nate for soup, there may be thin slices of 
toast, or thinner strips of bacon, prepared 
over the coals of a tiny camp fire. There 
is an art in preparing both, but George is 
an artist. 

Xot infrequently unplanned dishes 
appear at these meals, obtained at some 
farmhouse. What a list to choose from, 
according to the season! A ripe water- 
melon, cooled in the springhouse; toma- 
toes, warm and sweet, fresh from the 
plants; new apples, a basket of peaches, 
corn to roast at their own camp fire. 
Somehow, without effort, the menu is 
seldom tw r ice the same. 

The meal over, there is a quick clean- 
up. Surprisingly few r are the fragments 
left. Few also are the dishes that have 
to be carried home and cleaned. Indi- 
vidual paper cups, napkins, plates, paper 
wrappings, and all refuse are gathered 
and burned. Then the last sparks are 
tramped or watered out. There is a 
quick and easy stowage of what must go 
back. 

They relax and loaf until twilight. 
Hard upon that follows the restful 
return trip. The earth yields her finest 
perfumes, and the more pungent odors 
of tilled fields. The moon, perhaps, is 
rising in full splendor; or there is a falling 
crescent and a field of stars. The 
youngsters, succumbing to overpowering 
sleep, are dead to the world, curled up on 
robes or seat. Then the older folks have 
their quiet, friendly social hour. With 
rested nerves; with soul and body 
refreshed, all too soon they are home 
again. 

The automobile is charged by some 
with being a destroyer of the old, friendly, 
home-to-home visiting, even though it 
promotes a somewhat birdlike flitting 
from door to door. But the Morrisons 
have found it a means for the promotion 
of genuine hospitality. 

"Never in the old days, " says Mrs. 
George, "could we entertain so much, 
nor could we enjoy our company to the 
degree we do now. Our guests may, or 
may not, have their own cars, but they 



GOOSE LIVERS AND TRUFFLES 



25 



come to us just the same. It is the little, 
informal social intercourse that gives 
us joy. 

"A host of families go auto-lunching, 
or auto-suppering. Wasn't it three hun- 
dred and seventy-six you counted, George, 
in the park a few evenings ago? Yet 
too few have the informal guest habit. 



It's so simple a matter, too. Xo setting 
we could plan in our house can compare 
with that nature gives us. And out of 
doors the stilted restrictions, something 
of the narrowness of our prejudices, our 
baseless likes and dislikes, somehow, 
have no place. We are just plain, happy, 
friendly, congenial folks together." 




A PERIGORDIAX GOOSE FARM 

Goose Livers and Truffles 

The Classic Cuisine of the Old Frenxh Provinxe of Perigord 

By Blanche McManus 



AMERICA buys truffles and capers 
by way of Bordeaux, with little 
care as to where thev mav come 
from, whereas the truffles come from 
Perigord — at least as raw material, and 
capers come from the sunny kingdom of 
Old Provence. 

Among the old French provinces, 
which have left a noble heritage to French 
cookery, none ranks higher than that 



whose chief, at least best-known, ele- 
ments are truffles and pate de fois g- 
Old Perigord is a district greatly favored 
in a natural sense for the development 
of gastronomical delights. One might 
almost say that its cuisine was founded 
on a vegetarian regime, in that its nuts, 
mushrooms, cepes, and truffles are the 
almost universal ingredients of its cookery. 
To begin with, the soups of Perigord 






AMERICAN COOKERY 



arc oi the substantial, sinew -making kind, 
thick with all the legumes of the truck- 
garden, which here flourishes with a 
luxuriousness hardly known elsewhere in 
France. The grease of little pigs forms a 
notable ingredient, but it is of so delicate 
a hue and gout as to be indistinguishable 
from that of the richest butter. The 
soupe grasse is a genial, blood-warming 
pot-au-fru which knows no peer; when 
a fowl is added, as for the Sunday repast, 
it is a meal in itself, the traditional 
marmite, to which is sometimes added 
beef in little cubes. Another specious 
broth is the soupe a Voignon, onion soup 
of a pungent, aromatic odor which is 
stimulating and soul inspiring in spite of 
its humble make-up. 

With the famous goose-liver pate, as 
the chief of local specialties, there is the 
natural by-product of the viand of the 
goose, which is laid down in a species of 
conserve, boiled first and larded, so to 
say, with strips of black-brown truffles, 
ultimately sealed into pottery jars w r ith 
a flowing over of the leaf lard of little 
pigs. 

A great point is that the celebrated 
pate de foie gras is only such when made 
with goose livers, to the exclusion of those 
of ducks and even pigs, as is so frequently 



the case with the common article of com- 
merce, which is shipped from France to 
all the ports of the seven seas, nicely 
sealed in little tins with a jubilant goose, 
in natural colors, on the label — one 
wonders why jubilant. The real thing, 
however, never sees the interior of a 
soldered tin, but is housed in a rough 
pottery jar. It conserves itself better, 
to use a gallicism, and is considered the 
only legitimate manner of presentation, 
whereby all its elements of aroma and 
consistencv can be assured. Because of 
this cumbersome method of packing it 
is seldom seen in far-away markets. 

The distinction between goose and 
duck livers is plainly shown by the dia- 
gram, herewith. The livers are boiled 
with chestnuts added, onions, carrots, 
and white w r ine, and an addition of fatty 
bouillon, and a trifle of white flour to give 
the desired consistency, when the truffles 
are added, with often a glass of madeira, 
and the whole is left to "set" in the 
earthen jars or dishes, and ultimately 
sealed; thus preservation, without loss 
of any of the elements, may be assured 
for one, two, or even three years. 

The" unique element is unquestionablv 
the truffle, which Brillat-Savarin called 
the "black diamond of cookery." which, 





DUCK. 





t\>£jFJb 



GOOSJG 



3-^v 





C- AV. 



GOOSE LIVERS AND TRUFFLES 




\o •- 



if not exclusively a product of Perigord. 
is here only to be found in its super- 
excellence. 

Largely, the truffle is found buried at 
no great depth at the foot of oaks, limes, 
and chestnuts; it is also cultivated in 
artificially produced plantations. There 
is a number of varieties, those in their 
most savage state the best. The chemi- 
cal composition of the soil counts for 
much, the authentic Perigordian variety 
being the product of a red, ferriferous soil. 



A "mine" of this richesse usually suffices 
for exploitation during a quarter of a 
century in varying quantities and quali- 
ties, finally running out entirely, as a 
commercial proposition. 

The truffle is "hunted" in Perigord by 
means of a muzzled pig of the gentler sex. 
The porcine follows its own instincts, 
searching out the precious morsel where 
nature's endowment logically sugge-:- 
that it may be found, this endowment 
being that of the rive senses classed as the 




41 



THE TRAINED PIG TRUFFLE HUNTER OF PERIGORD 






AMERICAN COOKERY 



r smell. In general the pig does 
its own digging, sometimes aided by a 
baton, which its guardian carries. The 
m is also used for dissuading the pig 
from eating up its find, being invariably 
rewarded by a few grains of corn, other- 
wise, it loses interest in its work. 

The truffle commences its growth in 
mid-November, and comes to maturity 
before the period of heavy frosts, usually 
the last of December, freezing destroying 
the juice, or sap, which ir. may contain, 
and by the same argument utterly 
destroying the flavor. 

The truffle is seldom served as a sepa- 
rate plat, though sometimes, after first 
having been boiled, it is used as a garni- 
ture to cold viands, or as an accessory to 
the conventional hors (Tceuvre. 

At its best, in its most aesthetic presen- 
tation, the truffle is the accessory of the 



poulet au demi-deuil — the "half-mourn- 
ing fowl," which is boiled in a pot without 
other aromatics than the myriads of 
larded truffles thrust beneath its outer 
skin. This is the invariable piece de 
resistance of the accomplished French 
chef, from whatever region of the land of 
good cooks he may come. 

It is worth noting en passant that the 
genuine Perigordian cuisine carries along 
with it a specious sort of liqueur, as a 
digestive, first popularized by the monk- 
ish good-livers of other days, in the form 
of a distillation of lemon verbena in eau de 
vie du marc. From this one argues that 
pate de foie gras is not a plat for delicate 
stomachs, nor, indeed, are truffles. They 
do offer a delectable pleasure for the palate 
and as such are justly to be reckoned as 
among the best things of the table, with 
which France has endowed a hungry world . 




THE PERIGORDTAX TRUFFLE IX NATURAL STATE AND WITH CROSS SECTION 



A Simple Curtain Fixture 

By Callie S. Amberg 



WHO would think that adventure 
could be found in buying a cur- 
tain fixture? Not buying cur- 
tain fixtures for a new house, that might 
carry with it dreams of spacious windows 
and delightful draperies, designed with 
great care to fit them perfectly, but one 
solitary and insignificant brass con- 
trivance, meant to hold the end of a 
curtain rod, a small thing but needful. 



Perhaps, I shouldn't have found the 
shopping tour in the least a thing oi 
adventure if Clarice hadn't led it. 
Clarice is the very youngest house- 
keeper among my friends, and goes about 
her affairs with the youthful earnestness 
and energy, which, alas, most of us lose 
so soon in this benumbing world. 

It seems that the curtain rod in the 
guest room had fallen to the floor, with 



A SIMPLE CURTAIN FIXTURE 



29 



a startling crash, carrying its proudly 
ruffled muslin burden down to crumpled 
ignominy. Investigation showed that 
one of the seemingly trustworthy brass 
appointments had proved itself frail and 
unfit. It had snapped off in the middle. 
The oifending member was quickly 
removed from the window frame, to 
serve as a sample, the shopping expedi- 
tion planned, and very shortly executed. 

Bearing in hand the gently curved bit 
of shiny metal that one would naturally 
consider had already caused all possible 
trouble, Clarice and I went first to 
Sibley's. Now Sibley's is one*" of those 
hardware stores that seems to deal in 
everything, from kitchen ranges to cock- 
tail glasses. It vaunts one complete side, 
given over to hundreds of little drawers, 
whose fronts are decorated, for the 
illumination of all beholders, as to their 
contents, with picture hooks, screw eyes, 
hinges, and so on, ad infinitum. Y\ ith 
sweet firmness Clarice requested a twin 
to our sample. Would you believe it — 
not one of those abundant drawers con- 
tained any sort of curtain fixture. Sib- 
ley's did not carry them. Y\ e were 
politely directed to the department store 
next door. 

Clarice called this check upon the 
accomplishment of our purpose, "boring," 
and on we went, following out the sug- 
gestion of the mildly interested Sibley 
clerk. 

On the way we decided that what we 
wanted would be on the fourth floor, 
where we had often seen lamp shades and 
rugs displayed, and where we confidently 
expected to find a large selection of cur- 
tain appurtenances. We waited cheer- 
fully for the elevator and wedged our- 
selves in when it came. After a stop at 
each of the lower floors, and after being 
squeezed and prodded by our fellow pas- 
sengers as they moved on or off, bent on 
their own particular quests, we emerged 
on the fourth floor. How hopefully we 
advanced on the nearest clerk, only to 
find that this store, also, did not concern 
itself with the things we sought. Clarice 



commented upon this second venture as 
"stupid," and off we went for another try. 

Only a few doors away was a second 
department store, and this we entered 
with assurance. At the elevator Clarice 
scanned the store guide carefully, and, 
sure enough, found draperies, curtains, 
etc., listed. Sixth floor, up we went. 
The young man clerk greeted our sample 
fixture as an old friend. Ah! our hearts 
warmed to him, and we waited patiently 
while he ru imaged through several 
boxes. Out came elder brothers to our 
trouble-maker that looked exactly like 
him, except that they would have stood 
out two inches too far from the window 
casing; out came elaborate double affairs, 
with places for two rods to rest in; out 
came innumerable screw-on effects, but 
none of the small, simple and apparently 
rare breed that we must have. Clarice's 
cheeks flushed, rosily, and her eyes 
glinted intensely. She reached into the 
boxes and stirred about in them deter- 
minedly with unfortunately no good 
results. Ah! bane of all shoppers' lives! 
They "were out" of what we wanted. 

As I looked at Clarice and heard her 
mutter "annoying," I began to enjoy 
myself. I saw, by the set of her jaw, that 
the hunt was becoming a thing of life or 
death, and I felt that my luck would 
surely hold and the chase not end too 
abruptly. 

I will not drag you with us from depart- 
ment store to decorator, and back to 
department store. I will not tire your 
eyes with searching through the dozens 
of varieties of curtain rod holders that 
were exhibited for our pleasure. Suf- 
fice it to say that after the eighth store 
Clarice became utterly reckless, and fol- 
lowed the hesitating young lady, who was 
waiting upon us, into the sacred portals 
of the stock room, there to search through 
tiers of boxes, and discover several abso- 
lutely new species of our much-desired 
object — but, alas, no mate to our 
particular kind. 

With every trial Clarice's firm chin 
(Concluded on page 64) 






AMERICAN COOKERY 



AMERICAN COOKERY 

FORMERLY THE 

BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL 
MAGAZINE 

OF 
Culinary Science and Domestic Economics 

scription $1.50 per Year, Single CopiesISc 
Postage to Foreign Countries, 40c per Year 

TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The date stamped on the wrapper is the date 
on'which your subscription expires; it is. also, an 
acknowledgment that a subscription, or a renewal 
of the same, has been received. 

Please renew on receipt of the colored blank 
enclosed for this purpose. 

In sending notice to renew a subscription or 
change of address, please give the old address 
as well as the new. 

In referring to an original entry, we must know 
the name as it was formerly given, together with 
the Post-office, County, State, Post-office Box, 
or Street Number. 

Entered at Boston* Post-office as Second-class Matter 

Statement of the Ownership, Management, etc, required by 
the Act of Congress of Aug. 24, 1912, of the 

AMERICAN COOKERY, published monthly 
except Julv and September, at Boston, Mass., 
for April 1, 1922. 

Publishers 

Boston Cooking-School Magazine Co. 

221 Columbus Ave., Boston, Alass. 

Editor: Janet M. Hill 

Business Managers 

Bent. M. Hill and Robert B. Hill 

Owners 

Benj. M. Hill, Janet M. Hill, Robt. B. Hill 

Known bond or other security holders, None 



Sworn 
1922. 


to 


and 


subscribed 


before 


me this 


50th day of March, 






(Seal) 




H. B. 


BAILEY, 
Notary Public. 



THE SOUTH WIND 

There's wild joy when the North Winds blow 
In Winter's jolly time of snow. 

The East Wind's salty breath is free 
\\ ith chanteys from the open sea. 

The W est Wind murmurs, soft and shy, 
In Night's dark peace, Day's lullaby. 

But, ah! those sighs from Summer's mouth, 
That waft the first flowers from the South! 

Katharine Sawin Oakes. 



IN WAY OF SERVICE 

AMERICAN COOKERY aims to be 
helpful to housekeepers in every 
respect. We carry a list of the best books 
for the household, and advertisements of 
many of the latest and best utensils and 
appliances for this one purpose — con- 
venience and usefulness to the American 
housekeeper. Our complete annual index 
is to render the magazine of especial and 
permanent value. We know of no other 
culinary publication that provides a 
yearly index suitable for reference. We 
wish to hold our readers and patrons, and 
render them, ever, most efficient and con- 
tinued service. Hence, American Cook- 
ery is a special publication for special 
readers, viz., those who find pleasure and 
profit in its careful perusal and use, from 
month to month. 

As indicative of the worth and repute 
of the publication, often back numbers 
are called for, even entire volumes. We 
are prepared to furnish these. Our own 
cook books are comprehensive, instructive 
and reliable — something more than a 
compilation of recipes. \\ e furnish all 
these, as well as other books, included in 
our printed list of books on household 
economics — books we are glad to pro- 
vide for customers, though we do not 
publish them. 

A sample copy of American Cookery 
will be mailed, free, on request. A bank 
note, money order, personal check, or 
postage stamps are acceptable in pay- 
ment of subscriptions. Name and full 
address are most important. 

Recently we received a letter of inquiry 
from a woman in a southern state for a 
"Boston Cook Book," which, the writer 
said, had been published more than 
thirty years ago, and had been entirely 
worn out in her family. Evidently, 
this woman wanted, and was looking 
for a duplicate copy of "Mrs. Lincoln's 
Boston Cook Book." She knew what 
she wanted, had chosen wisely and well. 
We were glad to be able to fill the order. 
All orders for books on culinary subjects, 



EDITORIALS 



31 



and household economics will be promptly 
attended to. We are at your service. 

UNEMPLOYMENT 

THE existing evil of the day seems 
to be unemployment. Many people 
are not, it seems, inclined to work. 
They are looking for means of support to 
be given them, or want to be employed 
by the government. No worse condition 
can be conceived. The fewer people 
who are employed by governmental 
agencies, the better off are we all. The 
function of government is to protect life 
and property, t.o make opportunities for 
occupation as numerous and inviting as 
possible. An army of public officials is 
a burden, and a tax on the entire people. 
Every item, in a reduction of public 
expenditures, tends to reduce the cost of 
living, and helps everybody. 

The fact is undeniable, people should 
aspire to earn their own living, and not 
to work for the government. Employ- 
ment, by the government, should be 
regarded in the nature of a call. How 
few of us have a call, really, to teach, or 
preach, or rule. The order of the day is 
to get occupation, employment; shun 
governmental employment, accept the 
work that lies nearest at hand, and wait 
for calls to higher things. The amount 
of compensation one receives is of less 
consequence than the stability of occu- 
pation. 

For instance, who ever heard of a 
strike, that was prudent and economical, 
and, hence, justifiable, who ever read of a 
strike that did not result in loss to every- 
body concerned, and in gain to nobody? 

The striker, and especially the agitator 
of strikes, is a parasite, a mischief-maker, 
trying to live at the expense of other 
workers. Together with the, habitual 
loafer, he may well be dispensed with. 

TAXATION AND UNEMPLOYMENT 

EMPLOYMENT, or unemployment of 
productive labor is the direct result 
of industrial activity or inactivity. In 
other words, in order that men mav be 



able, at all times, to procure occupation 
and wages, economic progress, and the 
production of wealth must continue with- 
out interruption. Unfortunately, the 
economic history of this country records 
that industrial progress, and the produc- 
tion of wealth, are continually being 
interrupted by so-called "business depres- 
sions," always resulting in the closing of 
factories, curtailment in almost all lines 
of business, and the loss of employment, 
by thousands, of wage earners. To find 
the cause or causes of the present state of 
unemployment, it is, therefore, necessary 
to find the causes of the present business 
depression, because the latter is respon- 
sible for the former. 

It is impossible to fix the cause of a 
business depression upon one specific 
economic factor. It is common knowl- 
edge that the- factors are many and varied. 
There is one factor, however, which, in 
connection with the difficulty of doing 
business today, is uppermost in the 
minds of many men. This factor is the 
huge expenditures of the government, and 
the resulting heavy taxes. To quote 
from President Harding's formal invita- 
tion to the great powers, to take part in 
the recent conference at Washington, 
"Productive labor is staggering under an 
economic burden too heavy to be borne 
unless the present vast public expendi- 
tures are greatly reduced." 

Enormous and burdensome taxes 
shorten periods of prosperity, and prolong 
periods of depression, by taking from 
industry large sums of money, so that 
buying power and production are seriously 
curtailed. 

Let us consider the effect of heavy 
taxation upon the business activities of a 
man, who is the owner of a prosperous 
business, which produces, annually, a 
large surplus over his living expenses. 
What becomes of this surplus? Is it 
spent for luxuries, thus giving employ- 
ment to the people who manufacture the 
luxuries? Is it invested in other lines of 
business, through securities or otherwise, 
thus increasing, or keeping intact the 






AMERICAN COOKERY 



ilitics tor giving employment of that 
business? Or, is it used to expand his 
own business or preserve its life and 
efficiency? In any one of these three 
cases the money would be functioning for 
the benefit of industry. But, today, we 
all know that it is necessary for this man 
to give the government, all, or a large 
part of this surplus in payment of taxes. 
One of the elements that industry must 
have, in order to prosper, is liquid capital, 
and the effect of the loss of this surplus 
is, obviously, harmful and detrimental to 
its welfare. 

Unfortunately, large taxes are some- 
thing that the business man must look 
forward to for a long period of years. 
They must be used to pay for the waste 
of war, already incurred and represented 
by a large bonded debt. But it must be 
impressed upon the representatives of the 
people, that every unnecessary expendi- 
ture, by the government, is an added 
burden to industry, and every saving is a 
constructive factor, which tends to hasten 
the return of prosperity, and create 
employment for men now unable to 
obtain work and wages to support them- 
selves and their dependents. 

C. F. B. in Boston Herald. 

*'| TOW many people consider the ingre- 
JT1 dients of their food from a scientific 
point of view, or trouble about their 
proportions?" 

A nation's food habits are the outcome 
oi generations of- experiment and expe- 
rience/and in the long run approve them- 
selves as suited to the conditions — 
climatic and otherwise — under which it 
lives. In matters of food selection, vox 
populi, vox Dei. For, as experts dis- 
cover, the people's instinctive food inclina- 
tions are unconscious expressions of 
physiological needs, and have always a 
scientific justification. The man of science, 
the chemist and food expert — is a 
valuable guide and counsellor, but it is 
unnecessary that all should become 
amateur scientists; that way danger lies 
— the danger of faddtem. The Table. 



OUR YOUNG INTELLECTUALS 

OF them it has been well said: 
'They will embrace and call 
brother any man who is against the 
existing order, quite irrespective of 
whether he wishes 'the existing order re- 
placed by a philosophic anarchy or a 
Prussian despotism. Half of them still 
profess the muddle-headed belligerent 
individualism of the mid-nineteenth cen- 
tury, which went into bankruptcy be- 
cause it became identified with an irre- 
sponsible 'doing as one likes'. The 
reason that they don't get what they 
want is that they don't know what it is. 
Instead of exerting themselves to frame a 
coherent conception of the 'good life,' 
they waste themselves in puerile revolt 
for revolt's sake, in behalf of a freedom 
with no destination, in behalf of an in- 
dividuality without character. 



5) 



THE GARDEN DAY'S REWARD 

Toward the close of an April day, after 
some hours busily spent in performance of 
the duties that come all of a rush at this 
season to one who makes a garden, one 
experiences a sort of exhilaration of 
fatigue from the physical effort, the deep 
breathing, the soothing perspiration and 
the quickened circulation of the blood. 
The body and the mind are prepared for 
rest; the intellect is in a receptive mood, 
sensitive -to all the mellow notes of 
Nature's symphony; and the end of a 
perfect day is found in a twilight walk 
to the brow of a hill, while 

■'The shadows of the tallest pines stretch longer, 

ever longer, 
And the winds that waft their whispers grow 

damper now and cold; 
And the mists rise in the valleys, always 

stronger, always stronger; 
And the dark tips of the tree tops show against 

the sunset's gold. 
With a rustle of the forest and a fading of the 

light, 
And the silent calls and numerous of the swiftly 

falling night, 
And the hum of unseen voices as the wild things 

take their flight, 



The evening comes. 



— Robert Strain, Jr. 




Seasonable-and-Tested Recipes 

By Janet M. Hill ar.c Mary D. Cr.arr.'^rs 



I- 

A : i : . - ■ : : : - :' - : - ■ : 1 i : : : : : - : : i - ; ; - ; : - 
wiiere yeast a called for, use bread fioar; in 



Black Plum ^oup 



C 



lemon, three inches of stick cinnamon, 
three tables 7 ::.: e . : :: iurir. :r_e- 
:ei?r:-:r.:u! :: salt, mi ::.f-::_rr. i ::.•- 
spoonful :: vrj-.iie :f::r: Zr.r.r ;.: 
to a boil, then let simmer for half an hour. 
Strain, add the juice of the lemon, and 
serve hot with cheese baL: A light 
dicker, s:::^ r.i re :;:: iustsai :: 
tor in making the soup. 
To make the cheese balls, mix one cap 
of grated hard cheese with two table- 
spoonfuls of parmesan, one-fourth a 
?rccr.:u'. :: si.r mi i ..:: .f : t t 
Moisten with one beaten err. farm into 
balls as large as a hazelnut, roll in fine- 
sifted crumbs, and fry in deep fat. 
These may be put into the tureen with 
the soup, at time of service. 



:u.= :: 

:e'.r."\ 
: b : : k e z 

ucuii. 
:..ree r. 
::" bur: 



/ J : 


j.' i - 


— "1 * * ; _ 7 _ i 


. . . i - • 


i- - 


'.-'. 


:3 - 


lit ~ " _" i 


f : - " 




Chicken 


Pudding 






: 


- - JL 


---".=.- - 


:". i: 


- - 


': 7. 1 


. - 1 - 


:;:;.-■ 


:: 


- : - ; 


: - - - 


- - - - - 




- - _ 


* :: e 


: z :.~ 




- 


e . . ; : : 


. - • 


e : e : 




-■ . _ 


: u : : : e r 


_ - 




- - z. 



— -—- i 



Baked Fresh Strawberry Pudding 



— .?-.. 



34 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



bottom, with macaroons, pressed into 
the butter. Put into the lined dish a 
quart of ripe strawberries, hulled and 
sugared. Beat, until thick, the yolks 
of four eggs; add three-fourths a cup of 
sugar and beat again. Add the grated 
yellow rind of one lemon, and the juice 
of one-half. Fold into this mixture the 
beaten whites of two eggs, and pour the 
whole over the sugared berries. Oven- 
poach until the eggs are set. Beat the 
two remaining egg-whites stiff, and 
spread over the pudding. Sift fine, 
granulated sugar, rather freely, over the 
top, and return to the oven, or place 
under a gas flame, until the sugar is 
melted and slightly browned. 



chilled charlotte mould, holding three 
pints, standing in chopped ice. Upon 
this place the decorations of eggs, beets, 
and peas, and cover with more aspic. 
Dip other pieces of decoration in aspic, 
and set them against the chilled sides of 
the mould. Fill the mould, alternately, 
with thin slices of ham and breast of 
chicken and liquid aspic. Let stand in 
cold place several hours. To unmould, 
set the mould, an instant only, into warm 
water, letting the water come up on the 
outside to the height of the mixture on 
the inside. The water must not be 
warm enough to melt the jelly. Invert 
on a serving dish. This dish, decorated 
and uncut, is shown on preceding page. 




COLD SLICED MEAT IN ASPIC 



Cold Sliced Meat in Aspic 

Let two ounces of gelatine stand in one 
cup of cold water until the water has 
been absorbed, then pour on five cups of 
cleared consomme soup, heated to the 
boiling point. Have ready some cooked 
peas, figures cut from cold, hard-cooked 
eggs, and from beets. Let a few spoon- 



fuls of the aspic jelly become "set" 



in a 



Green Goose and Gooseberries 

After cleaning a green goose, of from 
four to six pounds in weight, truss for 
roasting the same as a full-grown goose, 
that is, by cutting off legs and wings at 
the first joint, pushing the legs up and 
close to the body, and inserting a skewer 
through the lower part under the bone 
and through the body. Similarly, the 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



35 



skewer goes beneath the 
wing bones and through 
the body. A green goose 
should not be stuffed, but 
well seasoned on the 
inside and rubbed with 
butter. Bake on the 
grate of a roasting-pan 
and with frequent bast- 
ing, for from forty-five 
minutes to an hour in a 
hot oven. Serve on a 
bed of watercress, with 
the following savory 
gooseberry custard: 

Cook, until tender, in 
one cup of rich stock, a 
quart of gooseberries, 
heads and tails first cut 
off. Press through a colander; add one- 
fourth a cup of sugar, one teaspoonful of 
white pepper or poultry seasoning, a dash 
of cayenne, and one-half a cup of butter. 
When the butter is melted, add one or two 
beaten eggs, or two to three yolks, and 
stir until these are barely set. Pass in 
a gravy boat with the goose. 

Baked Macaroni 

Cook three-fourths a cup of macaroni, 
broken in inch-lengths. Scald one cup of 
thin cream; stir into this two table- 
spoonfuls of butter and one-fourth a 
pound of cheese, grated or cut into very 
thin slices. When smooth add one- 
fourth a teaspoonful of salt, and half 
a teaspoonful of paprika and pour over 
the macaroni, which has been turned into 
a shallow baking-dish. Have ready a 




BAKED MACARONI 

scant cup of half-inch cubes of bread, 
fried delicately in a little butter. Sprinkle 
these over the macaroni. Serve very 
hot. 

Moulded Fish 

Separate one pound of cooked fish into 
flakes, and pound smooth in a chopping 
bowl with a pestle; add two raw eggs, 
unbeaten, and pound again until smooth; 
then, using the pestle, press the fish 
through a puree sieve. Beat two eggs, 
beaten light, very gradually through the 
fish; add one-half a teaspoonful of 
pepper, one teaspoonful of salt, one 
teaspoonful of onion juice, and one 
tablespoonful of lemon juice, and very 
gradually beat in two cups of thin cream. 
Butter a three-pint charlotte mould; 
cut truffles in desired shapes with vegeta- 




MOULDED FISH 



36 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



ble cutters, arrange shapes as decoration, 
drop melted butter on each bit of decora- 
tion, and set mould aside in a cool place 
until the butter, chilling, will hold the 
decoration in place. Turn in the pre- 
pared fish; set the mould on many folds 
of paper in a baking dish, surround with 
boiling water, and let cook without the 
water boiling until firm in the center. 
This recipe will serve sixteen people. 
Serve hot or cold with 

Hollandaise Sauce 

Cream one cup of butter; beat in the 
yolks of five eggs, one at a time; add 
one cup of boiling water, and stir and 
cook until the mixture thickens; remove 



with two tablespoonfuls of lemon juice, 
one-fourth a teaspoonful of salt and one- 
half a teaspoonful of paprika. 

Mackerel Vinaigrette 

Cook together for each mackerel one- 
fourth a cup of vinegar, one-half an 
onion, thin-sliced, six whole pepper- 
corns, three or four one-inch pieces of 
stick cinnamon, and one-half a teaspoon- 
ful of salt, for five minutes, closely 
covered. Insert the mackerel, turn it 
over in the vinegar, so that each side may 
be coated, then add boiling water barely 
to cover fish; replace saucepan lid, and 
let simmer ten to fifteen minutes, or 
until mackerel is done. Strain the 




PRUNE-AND-CREAM CHEESE SALAD 



from the fire and stir in four tablespoon- 
fuls of lemon juice, one-fourth a teaspoon- 
ful of pepper and one-half a teaspoonful 
of salt. 

Prune-and-Cream Cheese Salad 

On nests of lettuce arrange large, 
selected, cooked prunes, cut in halves. 
With buttered hands make balls of cream 
cheese; arrange the balls of cheese in the 
prunes; sprinkle sliced castana nuts over 
all. Serve with a salad dressing, made by 
beating one cup of heavy cream, flavored 



liquid; add one well-beaten egg, and the 
juice of one lemon, two tablespoonfuls of 
sugar, and one-fourth a cup of almonds 
or any other nuts, ground fine. Let 
cook, carefully stirring, until egg is set 
enough slightly to coat the spoon, then 
pour over the fish, sift fine-chopped 
parsley on the top, and garnish with 
slices of lemon. 

Potato-and-Herring Souffle 

Chop the meat of one cooked salt 
herring, and add to one pint of mashed 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



37 



potatoes. Season with 
one tablespoonful of 
melted butter, and one- 
half a teaspoonful of 
white pepper, and beat 
until very light and 
creamy, adding gradually 
one cup of medium heavy 
cream, and beating after 
each addition, until the 
whole is light. Beat two eggs with two 
teaspoonfuls of onion juice until extremely 
light; beat these into the potatoes, pour 
into a buttered baking dish, and bake in 
a quick oven until well puffed and brown. 

Raised Drop Cakes of Sour Cream 

Cream one-half a cup of butter; add 
one-fourth a cup of sugar, two beaten 
eggs, one cup of thick loppered cream, 
one yeast cake (or two for quick work) 
blended with not more than two table- 
spoonfuls of warm milk, and add to these 
three or more cups of flour. Stir all well 
together, and drop by teaspoonfuls on 
well-greased pans. Cover with cheese- 
cloth, and let stand in a warm place until 
light. Place a nut, a raisin, or a piece of 
dried fig in the center of each little cake, 
and bake in a hot oven for ten minutes. 
Brush over with sugar syrup, or with 
melted butter, sifted over with granu- 
lated sugar, and return to oven until tops 
are well browned. 




DATE BREAD 

Stuffed Eggs 

Cut six hard-cooked eggs in halves, 
crosswise. Remove yolks and arrange 
whites in pairs. Cream yolks with one 
teaspoonful and one-half of vinegar, 
one-half a teaspoonful of salt, one- 
fourth a teaspoonful of mustard, a dash 
of cayenne, and enough melted butter to 
make of consistency to shape into balls 
to refill whites. 

Date Bread 

Melt two tablespoonfuls of shortening 
in one cup of scalded milk and add one- 
half a teaspoonful of salt, one-fourth a 
cup of molasses and one cup of dates, 
cut in large pieces. Crumble one yeast 
cake and mix in one-fourth a cup of 
scalded milk, then add to the ingredients 
in the bowl; add three cups of whole 
wheat flour and one cup of white flour 
and mix to a dough, adding, meanwhile, as 
much white flour as is required. Knead 




STUFFED EGGS 



5> 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



the dough until smooth and elastic. 
When light shape into a loaf, and when 
again light bake one hour. 

Raisin Lemonade 

Chop one pound of seeded raisins; put 
into a stone jar with the thin-shaved rind 
of three lemons, the juice of the lemons, 
one pound of sugar, and four quarts of 
boiling water. Cover close, and let 
id in a cool place for a week, stirring 
twice ever\* day. Strain and bottle, 
keep on the ice until it is used. 

Raspberry Ice 

Boil two cups of water and one cup of 
sugar rapidly twenty minutes; add one 



berry sherbet; fill the center with the 
cream filling; fill the mould to over- 
flowing with pistachio ice cream; cover 
with waxed paper, and fit on cover tight. 
Pack in crushed ice and salt and let 
ud two hours. 

Yeast-Raised Oatm al Bread 

Heat one pint of mil.-: :st but not 

quite to boiling, and pour it over two 
cups of rolled oats, mixed with two tea- 
spoonfuls of salt, and one-fourth a cup of 
sugar. Mix well, and while still warm 
add two tablespoonfuls of shortening. 
Cover, and let the whole stand until 
lukewarm. Blend one yeast cake in a 
little water, and add to the mixture, also 







RASPBERRY BOMBE 



cup of raspberry juice, and the juice of 
half a lemon and freeze a? usual. 



c 



ream 



Filli 



ins 



Beat one-half a cup of cream, light; 
fold in the white of a small egg, beaten 
it, one-fourth a cup of sugar, and half 
a teaspoonful of vanilla. 

Bombe 

Line a three-pint melon mould, chilled, 
with pistachio ice cream to the depth of 
one inch; line the ice cream with rasp- 



add white flour, about four cups, or 
enough to knead to a soft dough. Let 
rise until double in bulk, knead again. 
i i vide into two loaves, place in greased 
pans, cover, and let rise again until double 
in bulk. Bake in a moderate oven from 
three-quarters to one hour. Water may 
be used instead of milk, or a mixture of 
milk and water. Xuts, r.iis:ns. or choppei 
figs or dates may be added if desired. 

Shrewsbury Cakes 
Cream one-half a cup of butter: 



SEASONABLE-AXD-TESTED RECIPES 



39 




gradually beat in one cup and one-half of 
sugar; add one egg and the yolk of 
another, beating mixture five minutes 
after the addition of eggs. Add one- 
half a cup of milk, alternately, with three 
cups of flour, sifted with two teaspoonfuls 
of baking powder, one-half a teaspoonful 
of cinnamon and one teaspoonful of 
nutmeg. Turn on to a floured board, 
roll into a sheet one-third an inch 
thick; cut with Shrewsbury cutter, and 
bake in well-buttered pans in a hot oven 
six minutes. 

Grape Juice Parfait 

Boil one-fourth a cup of sugar, and 
one-fourth a cup of grape juice until it 
threads; pour in a fine stream on the 
white of an egg, beating constantly. 



SHREWSBURY CAKE WITH CUTTER 

meanwhile. Beat occasionally while cool- 
ing. Beat one cup of cream, one-half a 



cup of grape juice, and the juice of one- 
half a lemon until very light and fold into 
the egg-mixture. Turn into a chilled 
brick mould, quart size, filling the mould 
to overflowing; cover with waxed paper. 
Bury in salt and crushed ice. one to two. 
Let stand three hours, repacking at the 
end of an hour and a half. When 
unmoulded sprinkle with chopped pis- 
tachio nuts and candied lilac buds. 

Strawberry Delight 
Vanilla Ice Cream 

Mix one quart of milk, one cup of 
cream, one cup of sugar, and one table- 
spoonful of vanilla into the can of a 
freezer. Crush one junket tablet; mix 




GRAPE JUICE PARFAIT 



40 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




STRAWBERRY DELIGHT 

with one tablespoonful of cold water, and 
stir into the mixture in the freezer; con- 
tinue to stir until the sugar is dissolved, 
then put the dasher in place and set the 
can on the back of the range until the 
mixture is heated to 90 deg. Fah. (luke- 
warm). When the mixture has jellied, 
set it into cold water to chill, then pack 
in the freezer; add salt and crushed ice 
and freeze. Fill parfait glasses two- 
thirds full of the vanilla ice cream; add 
one tablespoonful of fresh strawberries, 
crushed with sugar. Above the fruit 
heap whipped cream, and decorate each 
glass with a whole strawberry. 

Pistachio Ice Cream 

Make pistachio ice cream by adding 



sufficient green coloring to give the 
desired shade, and one teaspoonful of 
almond extract to the recipe for vanilla 
ice cream. 

Spun Sugar 

Boil one pound of sugar and half a 

cup of boiling water to 295 deg. Fah., 

or the crack stage* Wash down the 

grains of sugar thrown up on the sides of 

the saucepan by boiling. When cooked 

set the saucepan into a dish of cold water 

to arrest further cooking, then when 

cooled a little set into a dish of hot water. 

Have ready wooden sticks, fastened to 

the kitchen table about two feet apart, 

and projecting about two feet. Spread 

a clean paper on the floor beneath. Dip 

a sugar spinner into the cooked sugar 

and pass it round and round the sticks; 

the sugar will spin from each point of the 

spinner in a fine, thread-like cobweb. 

Repeat the dipping and spinning until 

a sufficient mass has been formed; then 

remove and shape into nests and wreaths. 

Glace of Apricots 

Peel and stone two pounds of apricots, 
saving the stems and a little bit at the 
blossom end. Put the fruit into a 
covered baking-dish, and bake until soft 
and pulpy. Meantime boil two pounds 
of sugar with two cups of water to the 




SPINNING SUGAR 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



41 



soft-ball stage, or 235 deg. Fah. Add the 
cooked apricots, which should be so soft 
as to mix with the syrup to a smooth 
paste. Continue to cook, constantly 
stirring, until the mixture is very thick, 
stiff, and smooth. Pour into a dish, and 
as soon as cool enough form into balls the 
shape of apricots; insert the stems and 
blossom ends, and lay on waxed paper in 
a cool place until dry. They should be 
transparent, or nearly so. 

Gooseberry Charlotte 

Boil, in a porcelain kettle, one pound 
and one-half of gooseberries, heads and 
tails cut off, and one pound and one-half 
of sugar until the berries are soft. Press 
all through a colander. Line a plain cir- 
cular mould with ladyfingers, or slices of 
sponge cake, or line it with light pie 
crust dough and bake. Pour in the 
cooked fruit mixture, and fit over it a 
circular slice of cake, or a baked cover of 
pastry. This cover should be well pressed 
down over the fruit. Let the whole become 
completely chilled, and at serving time in- 
vert on a platter, and pour over the whole 
a pint of soft custard, or a foamy strawberry 
sauce, made. by crushing together one cup, 
each, of fresh strawberries and one-half a 
cup of sugar, dropping in the unbeaten 
white of one egg, and beating vigorously 
until foamy, thick, and light-colored. 

Green Apricot Pie 

Cook a dozen or more green apricots 
in a shallow, covered pan, with one cup 
of water and one-half a cup of sugar, 
until soft. Have ready a pastry shell of 
good size, and well built up around the 
edges. Brush over the bottom while hot 
enough to coagulate it with the beaten 
yolk of one egg, then pour in the syrup 
from the apricots, and arrange the fruit 
in the pastry shell in the form of a 
pyramid. Make a meringue of the 
whites of one or two eggs, pile this over 
to cover the pyramid, sift fine, granu- 
lated sugar over it, and place in a moder- 
ate oven for five minutes to set and 
slightly brown. Serve while hot. 



Pickled Young Carrots 

The very small carrots picked to thin 
the beds may be pickled as follows: 
After cutting off the heads and tails 
measure two quarts of the roots, and add 
to one pint of vinegar, boiled with one 
cup of sugar and an ounce of mixed 
pickling spices tied in a bag. Let the 
carrots simmer in the sweet pickle for at 
least ten minutes after boiling has 
recommenced, or until they are very soft 
and tender, but have not lost their shape. 
Remove carefully into sterile jars and seal. 

Sweet Beet Preserve 

Remove tops, tails, and skin from 
young, red beets; weigh, and steam for 
half an hour or until soft. For every 
three pounds of beets allow one cup and 
one-half of strained honey, and two 
cups of sugar. Cut the cooked beets 
into strips, after draining (they should 
have lost much if not all color) ; add to 
preserving kettle containing the honey, 
and cook until honey boils. Add sugar, 
and continue cooking; add two table- 
spoonfuls of powdered ginger and one- 
fourth a pound of raisins, with the juice 
and grated rind of one or two lemons. 
Cook until beets become dark, then put 
into jars and seal. 

Red Beet Bouillon 

Scrape the outside skin from six beets, 
after washing and removing the green 
tops, slice the beets and put them 
through the food chopper, saving any 
liquor that may drop out. Add one 
quart of water, and stew the beets over 
a slow fire from one to two hours, accord- 
ing to the age of the beets. Keep up the 
quantity of water. Strain when soft; 
add a pint of white stock, the juice of two 
lemons, one-fourth a cup of sugar, two 
teaspoonfuls of salt, one-half a teaspoon- 
ful of white pepper, and return to the fire. 
Blend two tablespoonfuls of arrowroot 
in two tablespoonfuls of cold water; mix 
with a little of the bouillon, and add to 
the kettle, stirring until the whole boils. 



Seasonable Menus for Week in June 



< 

Q 

P 
■s. 



< 
O 



< 
Q 
xn 
W 
P 
H 



P 
H 
< 



Breakfast 

Rice Flakes and Raspberries, Thin Cream 

Broiled Haddock Sliced Tomatoes 

Toast Coffee 

Dinner 

Crown Roast of Lamb 

Potatoes Green Peas 

Grapefruit Salad Russian Dressing 

Macaroon Ice Cream Sponge Fingers 

Cafe Noir 

Supper 

Chicken-and-Ham Sandwiches 
Cold Rice Pudding with Raisins 



Iced Cocoa 



Crackers 



Breakfast 

Oranges 

Krumbles and Cream 

Toasted Breakfast Bacon 

Rice Muffins Coffee 

Luncheon 

Potato-and-Liver Saute 

Young Beets Swiss Chard 

Fruit Gelatine 

Milk or Buttermilk 

Dinner 

Mackerel Yinaigrette 

Baked Potatoes 

Hearts of Lettuce, Tomato Dressing 

Grapenuts Pudding, Thin Cream 

Coffee or Fruit Punch 



Breakfast 

Grapefruit 

Gluten Grits with Thin Cream 

Individual Omelets, Tomato Sauce 

Wheat Puffs Coffee 

Luncheon 

Red Beet Bouillon 

Meat-and-Potato Hash 

Raspberries and Cream One-Egg Cake 

Tea or Milk 

Dinner 

Broiled Smoked Ham Steaks 

Steamed Potatoes Beet Greens 

Sliced Fresh Pineapple Custard Sauce 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Baked Duchess Apples 

Cream of Wheat, Top Milk 

Salmon Fish Balls 

Crusty Currant Rolls Coffee 

Luncheon 

Creamed Chipped Beef 

Vegetable Hash 

Apple Sauce Layer Cake 

Tea or Milk 

Dinner 

Minute Sirloin Steak 

Steamed Potatoes Stuffed Tomatoes 

Green Apricot Pie 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Moulded Groats with Fruit Juice 

Ham-and-Potato Omelet 

Graham Toast Coffee 

Luncheon 

Broiled Salmon Trout Broiled Bananas 

Orange-and-Escarole Salad 
Sponge Cake Iced Tea 

Dinner 

Chicken Pudding 

Boiled Rice Baked Carrots 

Gooseberry Charlotte 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Fresh Berries 

Barley Crystals, Thin Cream 

Scrambled Eggs and Bacon Curls 

Twin Mountain Muffins Coffee 

Luncheon 

Puree of Green Peas 

Waldorf Salad French Rolls 

Lemon Meringue Pie 

Tea or Buttermilk 



Dinner 

Filets of Halibut, Egg Sauce 

Potatoes String Beans 

Baked Fresh Strawberry Pudding 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Ripe Plums 

Wheatena with Top Milk 

Fish-and-Potato Fritters 

Popovers Coffee 



Luncheon 

Clam Chowder with 

Cheese Crackers 

Sour Cream Drop Cakes 

Tea or Cocoa 



Dinner 

Cold Jellied Tongue on 

Bed of Cress 

Floury Potatoes Baked Beets 

Pineapple Water Ice 
Pound Cake Coffee 



42 



Seasonable Menus for Week in July 



Breakfast 

Oranges 

Puffed Wheat and Top Milk 

Soft Cooked Eggs 

Rice Pancakes 

Coffee 

Dinner 

Broiled Chicken with Olive Sauce 

Baked Potatoes Cauliflower 

Sauteed Sliced Cucumbers 

Raspberry Bavarian Cream 

Iced Coffee 

Supper 

Calf's Head Cheese 

Astrachan Apple Dumplings 

Oatmeal Cookies 

Grapejuice 



Breakfast 

Red Astrachan Apples 

Shredded Wheat with Milk 

Stewed Honeycomb Tripe 

Corn Cake 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Okra Gumbo 

Halibut Loaf 
Dutched Lettuce 

Jelly Roll 
Tea Fruit Punch 

Dinner 

Mixed Grill 

Escaloped Celery-and-Tomatoes 

Fruit Tapioca, Jelly Sauce 

Coffee 



3 

n 

> 



Breakfast 

Cantaloupe 

Barley Crystals 

Creamed Chipped Beef 

Graham Gems 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Savory Macaroni 

Peppergrass-and-Orange Salad 

Raisin Drop Cakes 

Buttermilk or Tea 

Dinner 

Brunswick Stew 

Creamed Young Onions 

Riced Potatoes 

Apricots Glace with Sponge Cake 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Sliced Peaches with Puffed Rice and Cream 

Pickled Lambs' Tongues 

Creamed Potatoes 

Bran Muffins 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Cauliflower au Gratin 

Nut-and-Apple Salad 

Fruit Shortcake 

Russian Tea 

Dinner 

Smoked Shoulder 

Steamed Potatoes Summer Cabbage 

Cornstarch Orange Pudding 

Coffee 



a 

O 

> 



Breakfast 

Currants, Red and White 

Cold Sliced Cream of Wheat with Cream 

Calves' Brains with Bacon 

Baker's Rolls, Reheated 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Turkish Pilaff 

Hearts of Lettuce Russian Dressing 

Lemon Sponge Pie 

Tea or Milk 

Dinner 

Spanish Omelet with Leeks 
Mashed Browned Potatoes 

String Beans 
Chocolate Ice Cream 

Black Coffee 



Breakfast 

Apricots 

Malt Breakfast Food, Top Milk 

Thin Sliced Cold Ham 

Hot Boiled Potato 

Baking Powder Biscuit 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Green Gage Plums 

Hominy with Thin Cream 

Poached Eggs on Toast 

Coffee 



Luncheon 

Nut Cream Soup 

Frizzled Dried Beef 

Apple Pudding 

Tea or Milk 



Dinner 

Bluefish, Baked and Stuffed 

Potato Puffs Artichokes, Creamed 

Caramel Custard 

Coffee 



o 

> 



Luncheon 


Dinner 


Deviled Clams 


Chicken Livers and Bacon 


Cress-and-Cheese Salad 


Browned Potatoes 


Jellied Apples 


Summer Squash 


Hermits 


French Pastries 


Tea or Milk 


Black Coffee 


43 






Second Table 

By Quincy Germaine 



PAT always appears with the robins, 
and like them he is welcome. There 
is no need to mention his nation- 
ality. That is inscribed upon his counte- 
nance. But, of the heart that pumps the 
blood up into that ruddy visage, I might 
mention many things. When the spring 
shall come that Pat no longer comes with 
the robins I shall close my house and 
depart to a hermit's cell, away from my 
friends and my garden, away even from 
Solomon and the boys. For without Pat 
I should have none of these, and it is only 
by his assistance I am convinced that I 
have kept them as long as I have. 

Solomon complains that I think more 
of Pat than I do of him. Perhaps I do 
for the brief interval that he is with us. 
Certainly I never pampered Solomon as I 
pamper Pat. Too much blueberry pie 
might injure Solomon's digestion, and 
raise the question of doctor's bills. I 
don't have to worry about that in Pat's 
case. With him I consider only what he 
likes. For him I buy the sort of steak we 
cannot afford during the other forty-nine 
weeks of the year, for him the heavy 
cream. About the same time I remember 
the rule by which old Maggie used to 
make beaten biscuit for my grandmother, 
the pancakes that Nellie used to assuage 
our childhood woes, likewise the popovers, 
that have been a standby in our family 
for generations. Incidentally, I recall 
how old Michael liked his potatoes 
smothered in onions, and that Terry, 
when he was not perched aloft, in the 
grandeur of Aunt Harriet's victoria, used 
to display an amazing fondness for the 
maple syrup which always came down 



from Cousin Euphemia's farm. Though 
that somewhat mythical cousin has gone 
to her reward, long since, the syrup con- 
tinues to reach my table every spring, 
and it was only a year ago that I found 
out, by devious questioning, the Celtic 
identity of the one who had been granted 
life-tenancy of the farm, though legally it 
had fallen to my sons. 

Out of the past there comes, every year, 
at housecleaning time, a procession of 
familiar figures to lighten the drudgery 
of the task. Visibly, only Pat is there, 
of course, but to me he is the inevitable 
last of a long line. The women of my 
family have been truly served, and service, 
such as we have offered thanks for many 
times, can neither be bought nor sold. 
As I am the last of my race on the distaff 
side, it is my private fear that with me 
the tradition dies. 

"How do you do it?" my neighbor asks. 

Alas, I know that what she really 
means is, "How do you foot the bills?" 
Nancy grew up in boarding school, and 
so missed out on countless little things. 

Tactlessly I referred to an incident she 
would have preferred to ignore. I mean 
that time when she stole Elfrida out of 
my kitchen, and lured her to her own, by 
means of an extra dollar and a half. 

"There were warmth and window 
draperies in her room at my house," I 
suggested, "and, furthermore, I never 
watered her coffee." 

"Absurd," said Nancy, tartly. "What 
did you get out of it for your pains?" 

"What pain I had was soothed when 
she came back to me. Since that episode 
I've understood the books of Selma Lager- 



44 



SECOND TABLE 



45 



lof, as I never should have otherwise." 

"I don't care for those foreign things," 
she ended what might have become 
unpleasant argument, then added, as an 
insult or an afterthought, I never have 
decided which, "anyhow she was immoral, 
I'm sure of that." 

"She must have been," I agreed, "to 
take care of both Solomon and Carp 
when I was in the hospital." 

That's the way with many of them — 
my mother's neighbors, my grandmother's 
and mine. We tell them, willingly 
enough, of how we "do it," and they do 
not understand. Many a little maxim 
have I heard from the lips of one or 
another that makes the situation clear, 
but three, perhaps, stand out most 
vividly. 

"A workman is as good as his tools," 
my grandmother used to say. In con- 
sequence, on the first of every January, 
she overhauled the contents of Maggie's 
cupboards and shelves, rigidly inspected 
every corner of range, boiler, and refrig- 
erator, replacing and repairing wherever 



necessarv. 

c 



'Never ask, of an untrained girl, what 
you cannot do yourself," was my mother's 
guiding principle. And, oh, the things 
she taught them! Just as she taught me 
— with all the driving force of a normal 
school training, superimposed on an 
inheritance of Supreme Court judges, and 
Colonial governors. 

"Look out for things before they 
happen," is the word that I shall be 
remembered by. It is only living up to 
this, I remind Solomon, when he says 
that I pamper Pat, or when he laughs too 
vehemently at some of my reminiscences. 

Surely, I may view, with dread, the 
prospect of future housecleanings without 
the aid of Pat. And, while his mighty 
arm whacks rugs and draperies, already 



immaculate from a winter of vacuum- 
cleaning, it seems as though the colors in 
the fabrics take on new life. What was 
monotonous before seems different, be- 
cause, through him I hear again, many 
long forgotten phrases, as my trusty, 
faithful procession marches up out of the 
past. To be sure, I did outgrow the 
need of Maggie's cookies and biscuit, just 
about the time that Aunt Harriet's 
victoria went into exile. Similarly, a 
little later, old Michael's fairy stories no 
longer appealed to a more sophisticated 
taste, and when Nellie dressed me for my 
cousin's "coming out," the mere idea of 
pancakes vanished on the wind. Not the 
separate performance of the individual 
matters, but the fact that he was always 
there, faithful to his task — that is the 
rock upon which I have built my house, 
while my neighbors', with foundations 
laid upon dollars or desire, are merely set 
upon the shifting sand. 

Perhaps you are like my neighbor, and 
think that I am too easy, or extravagant, 
or even a little mad. Solomon declares 
I am not extravagant, and that is his 
affair, not yours. Sometimes I am a 
little mad, because the rest of you cannot 
seem to enjoy the privileges that I have 
had. Oh, yes, I am easy. I know that, 
and admit it joyfully, and the reason is 
that that blessed procession, which began 
with Maggie, and ends with Pat, has 
made it possible. And when the time 
comes for me to be "gathered unto my 
fathers," like the patriarchs of old, I hope 
it can be arranged that I have a voice in 
my ultimate destination. My "fathers" 
and grandfathers, and all the rest of them 
can surely dispense with my company, 
hereafter, after having to endure it upon 
this earth. No, I don't care a bit about 
being gathered unto my ancestors. I 
want to be gathered unto Maggie and Pat. 



The Business of Home-Making 

THE first step in the business of home- a home furnished to suit the purse, as well 
making is to make an orderly home; as the taste of the home-makers. A home 



46 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



in which convenience, as well as beauty, 
is served, with no tawdry articles for 
show only. Each article put in the home, 
each article in each room, should be 
chosen because of a definite need for it. 
Time, and the gifts of well-meaning 
friends, supply sufficient non-essentials, 
as years go by. In fact, it becomes a 
part of every careful housekeeper's work 
to rid out these same dust-collecting "non- 
essentials" regularly. 

Supposing the home furnished for 
order, taste and utility, the next step is 
keeping it orderly and clean, without 
which there is little enjoyment in it. To 
accomplish this there must be a place for 
each thing, clothing as well, and then 
must come the daily picking up and 
putting things in their places. This 
applies to clothing, particularly, and the 
pieces of light furniture, often moved 
about for evening convenience to lights. 

In the daily care of rooms, bedrooms 
especially, I should use a sweeper or 
vacuum cleaner on the rugs following the 
use of a dry mop on the bare parts of the 
floor, with a quick dusting with an old 
silk or soft dust rag, often washed, and 
repeating this with each room, the house 
or apartment is soon in order. Of course, 
the thorough cleaning of a bathroom and 
kitchen requires more water, cleaners and 
labor. But even these are easily done, 
if care is taken to provide plenty of hot 
water and the proper things, such as a 
pail, good brush, soap, some cleaner, such 
as Gold Dust, with soft cloths and, per- 
haps, a mop. 

Definite days for the weekly cleaning 
are a good thing, and make for order, 
system and comfort in the home. Suffi- 
cient and efficient help, by the day or 
hour, in this special work, I find a real 
economy. It saves strength for other 
things, which cannot be turned over to 
others to do, it avoids unusual exposure 
often, saves a doctor's bill many times, 
and helps one to keep sweet tempered, 
because not too tired. 
i Too much can scarcely be said, in 
regard to having only essential things in 



the home, to simplify life and the daily 
housework. Each thing should serve 
either use or beauty, or, if possible, both. 
If not, it should be discarded. A waste 
basket in each bedroom helps greatly 
toward order. These should be emptied 
daily, and their contents burned up. 

The problem of the family washing, 
especially in winter, requires careful 
thought and planning, where it is not sent 
out to the laundry. I find that by send- 
ing all flat work out, the wearing clothes, 
done once in two weeks, can be dried in 
the laundry, together with the use of the 
hot radiators, and in this way my laun- 
dress does both the washing and ironing 
in one day. 

In the business of home-making there 
comes the question of repairs on a large 
scale, eventually, such as re-roofing, 
painting and redecorating. If these can 
be arranged for, to come at one time, it is 
an economy, as well as a satisfaction, to 
have it all over with at once, and have it 
all fresh looking at one time. Most 
firms that do decorating do painting as 
well, and dealing with one firm for both 
of these is good business. It is well to 
choose a good, reliable firm, and be 
guided, largely, in your choice of papers 
and paints, by them. It is their daily 
business to know about these things, 
while you give such your attention once, 
perhaps, in two or five years. They 
should know what colors last, also how to 
secure desired effects. 

Along with the business of making a 
home are the cares of such material things 
as screens, storm windows, keeping the 
basement clean, healthy, orderly and 
sightly. I remember hearing the "gas 
man" say, not so long ago, that he had 
to fairly climb over rubbish and dirt to 
reach many of the meters he had to 
"take," even in this fair suburb. It is a 
good idea to whitewash a basement, 
occasionally, keeping it orderly and well- 
swept up at all times, and not a repository 
for waste paper and other accumulations. 
The basement usually houses the screens 
in winter, the storm windows in summer, 



POSSIBILITIES OF THE SOUFFLE 



47 



though I have seen, with a great sense of 
discomfort at such lack of order and 
thrift, screens left in windows all winter 
long, to rust and wear out uselessly, 
beside being so unsightly out of season. 

The care of grounds calls for proper 
and careful attention, if one would have 
a pleasant and attractive home. Shrubs 
should be protected in the fall from the 
severe cold of winter, trees should be 
trimmed before the sap begins to rise. 
January is a good time for tree trimming. 
Grass and perennials, also, should have 
protection, such as straw or manure, or 



both. If these things are done at the 
proper time, and fences, where there are 
any, and gates looked after, together with 
walks, and at all times the papers and 
other litter kept picked up, such a home 
should show a cared-for appearance. It 
should gladden the eyes of the passer-by, 
as well as the owner, and make the busi- 
ness of home-making, instead of a burden, 
a very great joy. 

I know of no better way of being a good 
citizen, and a good American, than by 
making and keeping up a good home. 

S. S. M. 



Possibilities of the Souffle 

By Elsie Fjelstad Radder 



MEAT-SUBSTITUTE days." How 
we all hate them! I suppose it is 
because it takes us back to the war period, 
when it seemed an everlasting duty to 
look out for the "substitute" days. And 
the war and all its accompaniments are 
so passe, now. 

Three years ago meat-substitute day 
meant baked beans for lunch and maca- 
roni and cheese, or a fish dish for dinner. 
Now, we can make that day mean some- 
thing vastly different, if we but follow 
our innate desire for variety. 

Have you ever thought of the pos- 
sibilities of the souffle as "something 
different"? 

We do want to vary our dinner menus, 
and not have meat every day in the week. 
The souffle, made with eggs and milk, and 
a bit of vegetable or meat or cheese, is 
such a fitting dish for that day, when the 
mention of steak or chop or chicken 
doesn't sound real "mouth-watery" to 
us. Or, let the main part of your meal 
consist of soup. A souffle dessert, for 
which many delicious recipes follow, is a 
delightful finish for such a meal. One of 
the delightful things about the souffle is 
that it can be a "left-over" dish, too. A 
severe critic couldn't ever tell whether 
the meat or vegetable was first cooked an 



hour before or not; the souffle is tasty. 

Cheese Souffle is a good dish to try out 
on the family the first time. It is so easy 
to eat, that it makes a lasting impression, 
that paves the way for future souffles 
that might be indifferent. To make it: 
Melt two tablespoonfuls of butter, and 
stir in three tablespoonfuls of flour. 
Stir until it is well mixed. Then add one- 
half a cup of scalded milk. Add one-half 
a teaspoonful of salt, a little cayenne and 
one-fourth a cup of cheese, which has 
been grated. When the cheese has 
melted, remove from the fire. Add the 
beaten yolks of three eggs and allow the 
mixture to cool. In the meantime, beat 
until very stiff the whites of three eggs. 
Cut, or fold, the mixture into the whites, 
as you would mix an angel food cake, 
being careful to retain all of the air that 
you have beaten into the whites. Pour 
into a buttered baking dish/ and bake in 
a slow oven for twenty minutes. Souffles 
should be served immediately. 

Vegetable Souffle. This can be made 
with carrots, turnips, onions, peas, corn, 
or a mixture of two or more of them. 
Melt one-fourth a cup of fat; add one- 
fourth a cup of flour, one-third a cup of 
milk, and one-third a cup of water, in 
which the vegetables were cooked. Add 



48 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



one cup of cooked vegetable, which has 
been rubbed through a sieve, salt and 
pepper, and the beaten yolks of three 
eggs. When it has cooled, fold in the 
beaten whites of three eggs. Bake in a 
slow oven. 

Potato Souffle can be made the main 
dish in the meal, or it may be just a new 
way to serve an old stand-by. To make 
it, proceed as follows: Heat and beat 
together two cups of mashed potato, two 
tablespoonfuls of melted fat, and a 
seasoning of salt until it is the consistency 
of cream. Add six tablespoonfuls of 
milk, the beaten yolks of two eggs, and 
then fold the mixture into the stiff- 
beaten whites. Bake. The egg yolks 
may be omitted, but they add color. 

Lamb Souffle. Lamb is chosen for this 
souffle, but any tender meat may be used. 
Chicken makes a delicious souffle. Make 
a white sauce, using one cup of scalded 
milk, two tablespoonfuls of fat, and two 
tablespoonfuls of flour. Season with one 
teaspoonful of salt. Add two cups of 
cooked, chopped lamb, the beaten yolks 
of two eggs, and one-half a cup of bread 
crumbs. When this mixture has cooled, 
fold it into the beaten whites of two eggs 
and bake. 

Salmon Souffle is but one of several 
delicious dishes that can be made with 
fish. To make it melt two tablespoon- 
fuls of butter; add two tablespoonfuls of 
flour, one cup of milk, one cup of flaked 
salmon, the yolks of four eggs, and fold 
the mixture into the four beaten whites. 
By adding one-half a cup of corn meal, 
one heaping teaspoonful of baking powder 
and one-half a cup of shredded codfish, 
instead of the salmon, one can make a 
codfish souffle. Two cups of any kind of 
left-over fish, combined with one fine- 
chopped onion, parsley, one egg, one-half 
a cup of bread crumbs and the white 
sauce, used in salmon souffle, makes a 
delicious fish souffle. 

Bread Crumb Souffle. Here comes a 
surprise dish. No one could ever tell 
that this dessert is made from bread 
crumbs. Melt one-fourth a cup of butter; 



add one-half a cup of stale bread crumbs 
and cook until slightly browned, stirring 
all the while. Add one cup of milk and 
two tablespoonfuls of sugar. Add the 
unbeaten yolks of three eggs, and when 
the mixture is cool, fold it into the three 
egg-whites, beaten stiff. Flavor with 
vanilla. Place in buttered individual 
moulds, set in a pan of hot water, and 
bake in a slow oven until firm. Keep the 
water in the pan below the boiling point. 

Plain Egg Souffle calls for two table- 
spoonfuls of butter, two tablespoonfuls of 
flour, one cup of milk, one cup of cream, 
one teaspoonful of salt, a pinch of cayenne 
and four eggs. It is mixed in the same 
way as other souffles. 

Omelet Souffle is made by beating the 
yolks of two eggs until lemon colored; 
adding one-fourth a cup of confectioners' 
sugar, a few grains of salt, a teaspoonful 
of vanilla, and folding the mixture into 
the beaten whites of four eggs. Pile 
lightly on a buttered baking platter, and 
bake in a slow oven until firm. 

Prune Souffle. Soak one-half a pound 
of prunes over night in cold water. 
Cook until done, in the same water. 
Remove the stones of the prunes; add 
one cup of sugar, half a teaspoonful of 
cinnamon, one cup and one-fourth of 
boiling water, and let simmer a few 
minutes. Moisten one-third a cup of 
cornstarch with enough cold water to 
make it smooth; add to the prune mix- 
ture, and let cook five minutes. Flavor 
with one tablespoonful of lemon juice. 
Let cool; add one-half a cup of walnut 
meats, fold into the stiff-beaten whites of 
two eggs, pile in a mould; let chill and 
serve with cream. 

Chocolate Souffle is a very popular 
dessert. The recipe calls for two table- 
spoonfuls of butter, two tablespoonfuls 
of flour, three-fourths a cup of milk, one 
square and one-half of unsweetened 
chocolate, one-third a cup of sugar, two 
tablespoonfuls of hot water, three eggs, 
and one-half a teaspoonful of vanilla. 
Combine and bake in the usual way. 
This may be varied to make a mocha 



THE RAINBOW QUILT 



49 



souffle by increasing the butter one 
tablespoonful, reducing the milk to one- 
half a cup, and adding one-half a cup of 
boiled coffee, instead of the hot water. 

Nut Souffle. This may be made with 
either peanuts or chestnuts, which have 
been boiled until tender and mashed. 
Use one-fourth a cup of sugar, two table- 
spoonfuls of flour, one cup of nut puree, 
one-half a cup of milk, and the whites of 
three eggs. Cook everything together, 
except the egg-whites, for five minutes, 
stirring constantly. Let cool, and fold 
into the whites. Place in individual 
buttered moulds; set the moulds in a 
pan of hot water and bake, keeping the 
water below the boiling point. 

Fruit Souffle. This may be made with 
peach, quince or apricot pulp, three- 
fourths of a cup. Rub the fruit through 
a sieve, heat and sweeten. Beat the 
whites of three eggs, and add the fruit 
mixture, as you are beating rapidly. 
Add a few grains of salt and continue the 
beating. Turn into buttered, sugared 



moulds, set the moulds in hot water, and 
cook until they are firm to the touch of 
the finger. 

Coffee Souffle. Mix together one cup 
and one-half of boiled coffee, one-half a 
cup of milk, one-third a cup of sugar, and 
one tablespoonful of gelatine and cook 
in the top of a double boiler for a few 
minutes. Add one-third a cup more of 
sugar, a pinch of salt, and the yolks of 
two eggs, slightly beaten. Cook until 
it thickens. Cool. Fold into the beaten 
egg-whites. Mould, chill and serve with 
cream. 

Frozen Souffle. Mix together one cup 
and one-half of orange juice, one cup 
and one-half of sugar, two tablespoonfuls 
of lemon juice, and the yolks of five eggs. 
Cook, over boiling water, until it thickens. 
Then add one teaspoonful and one-half 
of gelatine, dissolved in three tablespoon- 
fuls of boiling water. Cool and freeze to 
a mush. Add the whip from two cups 
and one-half of cream. Continue the 
freezing. Nuts may be added. 



The Rainbow Quilt 



LIVES there a housekeeper who has 
not innumerable little rolls of wool 
left from Mary's, Jane's, or her own 
sweaters, and which she has tucked away, 
awaiting that glorious SOMETIME of 
the busy woman, that is as elusive as the 
bale of hay tied in front of the mule's 
nose to accelerate his speed? 

.The writer belongs to this class, opu- 
lent in materials and good intentions, but 
poor in time to execute. However, the 
pretty wool ends always drew me, and at 
last I started a quilt or afghan, which 
became so fascinating that it proved a 
restful pleasure, so that a hasty row, 
crocheted in the morning after breakfast, 
helped me think out the day's plans, 
while a cosy row, done in pleasing com- 
bination of color, proved a relaxation 
before the night's retirement. 

I began with one long chain stitch, 



which made a distance of about three 
yards, to be the length. Then I cro- 
cheted in long stitch, row after row, 
in varying shades, with every here and 
there a broad, dark row of a ripped-out 
black, or dark-hued sweater. The effect 
was stunning, and friends contributed a 
row of this or that shade until the quilt 
became almost a memory affair. If the 
wool was thin I doubled it, working from 
two balls. 

As a rule, I put a light shade between 
dark, and vice versa, though one's taste 
and sense of harmony in color can be one's 
guide. When about two yards wide the 
riot of color was edged with whatever 
shades the most remained of, and a more 
beautiful, glowing color scheme would be 
hard to find; besides which its woolly 
softness proved comforting for the auto* 
or hammock. e. m. g. 




Home Ideas 

and . 

Ivconomies 




Contributions to this department will be gladly received. Accepted items will be 

paid for at reasonable rates 

The Highly Important Shrimps of New Orleans 

By Grace McKinstry 



SURELY, the derogatory expression, 
"You poor, miserable little shrimp," 
could not have originated in New Orleans ! 
There the shrimp is pretty sizeable, if he 
comes from the Lake, especially, and as 
for being poor or miserable — ■ if we could 
become half as versatile, as useful, as 
dependable, and as beautiful and tasteful 
as this Crescent City celebrity, perhaps, 
we should be willing to be boiled, too. 
He and his companions come in vast 
numbers from the lake and the river, 
going in large, coffee-sacking bags, with 
no style at all, to every restaurant, hotel, 
and market in the city. But when he is 
boiled, and his shell picked off, he is 
ready to enter society as an aristocrat — 
rich, famous, appreciated, delightful in 
appearance, however he is dressed. New 
Orleans might possibly continue to exist 
if he failed to come, but it is difficult to 
see how. 

The northern housewife can get along 
perfectly well without shrimps, though on 
special occasions she may buy a small can 
of them to serve creamed, or as salad. 
But the Creole housewife, who knows 
dozens of ways to prepare shrimps, 
would hardly let a week pass without 
serving them in some form, and the 
restaurants have them every day. Boiled 
shrimps, on ice, take the place of raw 
oysters, many times, at the beginning of 
luncheon and dinner; they are brought in 
without having their delicate, trans- 
parent shells removed, and the guest 
"picks" and eats them daintily, deliber- 
ately, appreciatively. 



Evidently, it isn't as simple a matter to 
boil shrimps as to boil eggs. The Creole 
cook book says that river shrimp should 
be chosen, that lots of salt should be put 
into the pot of water, and pepper, celery, 
allspice, mace, cloves, thyme, parsley, 
bayleaf, cayenne, and a red pepper pod. 
That sounds more troublesome than raw 
oysters, surely, and perhaps the little 
restaurants and oyster-houses do not take 
quite so much pains. 

Most famous of all the Creole shrimp 
dishes are shrimp gumbo and shrimp 
jambalaya. The jambalaya causes one 
to remember that the Louisiana Creole 
may be a descendant of either French or 
Spanish settlers, for it was the Spanish 
cooks who invented it. Rice and shrimp 
were both easy to get; why not combine 
them? Why, certainly, if one ' com- 
menced by frying an onion, adding a little 
flour and some herbs, and some chili 
pepper. Then there must be tomatoes, 
and all this must simmer awhile. Then, 
if it were not Friday, one added plenty of 
good broth, then the large, boiled, lake 
shrimps, and then the rice, uncooked, and 
the boiling continued half an hour or so. 
But if the dish were for a fast day, one 
used oyster liquor or just water, and 
really had just as fine a dish, thick and 
pink, when the rice had taken up all the 
flavorsome juice. 

The Xew Orleans spelling-book is a 
highly practical little volume. It does 
not insist that the little Louisiana 
student must learn to spell Esquimau 
or igloo, but he must learn carnival, 



50 



HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES 



51 



•gumbo, okra, and the like, if he is to live 
in the Creole city. And gumbo is easy 
to spell and easy to eat. One can't 
make it in a hurry, though; there must 
be the browned onion and seasonings, 
the fried okra, the oyster liquor, and the 
boiled shrimp, put together in proper 
order to make the smoothest and richest 
•of soups. Isn't there rice in it? Cer- 
tainly; when the dish is done, a pretty 
little mound of hot, boiled rice is placed 
neatly at the side of the soup plate, or 
sent in separately, but never, never 
(warns. the cookbook), must one cook the 
rice in the gumbo. The reason is 
■obvious. Gumbo, according to Mr. 
Webster, is "okra soup." Soup, surely, 
has to have a certain amount of liquid, 
and if one cooked a lot of rice in the 
kettle, what would become of the broth 
part? The dish would turn into a 
jambalaya*. 

A sort of cousin to shrimp gumbo, is 
shrimp a la Creole. A pretty little rice 
mountain towers from its pink and red 
expanse. But it isn't a soup, it's a stew, 
and the tomato in it furnishes all the 
liquid there is. It contains the usual 
fried onion, celery, garlic, thyme, bay 
leaves, and pepper, and it is indescribably 
delicious. How insipid our creamed 
shrimp seems, in retrospect! 

In New Orleans, fried oysters are not 
toilsomely coated with egg, and rolled 
crackers, and egg and crackers again, 
before being dropped into hot lard. At 
least, not in most of the restaurants. 
They just roll the oysters around in 
yellow corn meal, and proceed to fry 
them. And shrimps are fried the same 
way, only, of course, they have to be 
boiled and shelled first, and perhaps wet 
with milk, or something to make the 
corn meal stick. And, if you want a 
fried shrimp sandwich, you will get two 
slices of toast, with a nice, hot filling of 
these fried shrimps, and you will wonder 
why people ever eat cold sandwiches. 
These sandwiches are, doubtless, small 
editions of the famous "loaves," those 
loaf-of-bread cases, hollowed out, buttered 



inside and toasted in the oven, then filled 
with fried oysters, shrimps, crabs, or 
frogs' legs. 

Baked shrimps? They are what one 
might call "scalloped," with layers of 
tomato, as well as bread crumbs. Shrimp 
pie? Grated bread crumbs, seasoned 
with spices and herbs, cayenne and salt, 
and moistened with — ■ white wine! Then 
mixed with boiled shrimps and baked. 
(Presumably, there is a substitute, now, 
for the white wine.) The pie is served 
with a tomato sauce, which contains 
shrimps, celery, oyster stock, and the 
usual bay leaf and other seasonings. 
Technically, this may be a Creole dish 
on fast days, but it doesn't suggest 
fasting. 

At the end of the Creole cook book's 
chapter on shrimps, after the salads, 
patties, shrimp cocktails, and the like, 
have been painstakingly explained, there 
is something altogether delightful to 
read about — a "shrimp bush." Here 
is enthusiastic recognition of the pink 
prettiness of the boiled shrimp. It is a 
Creole hors-d'oeuvre, and a table decora- 
tion at the same time. A pyramid 
effect is arranged with a cake stand, per- 
haps one with several tiers, and shrimps 
artistically intermingled with celery and 
asparagus tips and celery tops. "The 
effect of the pink against the green looks, 
for all the world, like a bush of green and 
red," says the cook book. Who could 
possibly think slightingly of a shrimp, in 
the presence of a masterpiece like this! 

The Chinese, everywhere, seem to dote 
on drying food. Dried bits of chicken 
and duck, eggs, a dozen or more years old, 
dried nuts and vegetables — ■ all these the 
Chinaman deals in wherever he has a 
provision store. But, in New Orleans, 
he has a particularly blissful time with 
dried shrimps. Sing Lee or Quong Foo 
is likely to have a large, wholesale store, 
whose front bears the sign, "Dealer in 
Dried Shrimps." Do these Louisiana 
dried shrimps go over to China, and com- 
bine with the perfectly cooked rice, there, 
to make some delectable dish, that is half- 



52 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



way between a chop suey and a shrimp a 
la Creole? One wonders. However, with 
the generous lake sending in large, fresh 
shrimps, continually, and the river fur- 
nishing us quantities of the more-delicate, 
smaller ones, there is likely to be only an 
academic interest in the shriveled-up, 
little shrimps in Sing Lee's glass jars. 
* * * 

Success in Making Custards 

WHO doesn't like a good custard? 
For warm weather they are the 
ideal dessert, but so many housewives have 
no luck making them, that they never try 
again, after having failed two or three 
times. The secret is in having the proper 
combinations of the several ingredients, 
and in combining them at the proper time. 
While the milk is heating over the fire, 
the yolks of the eggs should be beaten 
light and smooth, then, if other thickening 
is used, the cornstarch or the flour, as the 
case may be, should be added, and the 
mixture again beaten until creamy. Pour 
the milk, which should already have been 
brought to the boiling point, in a thin 
stream over the mixture, stirring con- 
stantly. Then return to the fire, and 
let it boil up well, just once. If you 
adopt this method you will have neither 
lumpy nor a curdled custard. Most 
cooks let them cook too long. This 
makes them tough. Many find the 
double-boiler method excellent. 
Here are a few new custards: 
Fig Custard. Take one pound of best 
cooking figs, four eggs, two large cups of 
milk, and one dessertspoonful of castor 
sugar. Wipe the figs with a damp cloth, 
and split them. Butter a plain mould, 
large enough to hold this quantity, and 
line it with the split figs. Arrange them 
with the seed sides outside. Chop up 
any that are left. Pour the milk, which 
has been brought to a boil, on to the 
beaten eggs and sugar, and some corn- 
starch flour, previously moistened in a 
little cold milk. Add the chopped figs, 
and pour very carefully into the mould. 



Cover with buttered paper, and steam 
gently until just firm. 

Popcorn Custard. Take one pint of 
milk, four tablespoonfuls of sugar, one 
tablespoonful of cornstarch, one egg, and 
vanilla flavoring to taste. Mix the sugar 
and cornstarch, then stir into it the egg y 
which has been well beaten, add the milk, 
and put in a double boiler, and boil until 
it thickens. When it is almost cold, add 
some tender popcorn, and serve cold. 

Pineapple Custard. To the beaten 
yolks of four eggs, add half a cup of sugar,, 
and the contents of one can of grated 
pineapple. Put this in small ramekins, 
place in a pan of warm water, set in the 
oven, and bake until the custard sets. 
Then put aside to cool. Whipped cream 
may be used, as a sauce, or the custard 
may be served plain. 

Orange Custard. Put one cup of orange 
juice, and the grated rind of two oranges, 
in a pint of boiling water; add the juice 
of one lemon, and a tablespoonful of 
grated lemon rind. Sweeten to taste. 
Boil for a few minutes, then stir in the 
yolks of four eggs that have been blended 
with two tablespoonfuls of cornstarch, 
and half a cup of milk. Stir this in, 
gradually, until the mixture is thick and 
creamy, then fold into this hot mixture 
the whites of four eggs, beaten stiff. 
Fill the mould with this, and set aside to 
cool. Garnish with bits of candied 
orange rind. 

Coffee Custard. Add to one cup of 
strong, cold coffee one cup of cream, four 
eggs, beaten slightly, and four table- 
spoonfuls of sugar. Put into small earth- 
enware cups, place in a shallow pan, with 
hot water around the cups, and bake in a 
moderate oven until the custard is firm. 
Serve ice cold with small cakes. 

Then, there are many other custards 
one can make: Cocoanut, gelatine, maple, 
banana, and custards, baked in ramekins, 
flavored with something you are fond of. 
Then frozen custard, which is made 
almost the same as ice cream. All these 
are delicious and wholesome. j. w. w. 



THIS department is for the benefit and free use of our subscribers. Questions relating to recipes, 
and those pertaining to culinary science and domestic economics in general, will be cheerfully 
answered by the editor. Communications for this department must reach us before the first of the 
month preceding that in which the answers are expected to appear. In letters requesting answers 
hy mail, please enclose address and stamped envelope. Address queries to Janet M. Hill, Editor. 
American Cookery, 221 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass. 



Query No. 4293. — "I should like to have a 
recipe for the Shrimp Salad in Salad Rolls 
mentioned on your Menu page for January." 

Shrimp Salad in Salad Rolls 

CUT into three or four pieces each of 
the shrimps in a pint can, mix with 
an equal volume of potato cubes, made 
from boiled potatoes, one cup of chopped 
celery, two teaspoonfuls of scraped onion, 
a few shreds of sweet pepper, and mix 
with any good salad dressing, preferably 
a cooked dressing or a mayonnaise. 
This quantity should fill six rolls. Choose 
all-over crusty rolls, about as large as a 
good-sized apple, cut a slice from the 
top to form a lid, scoop out the crumb 
from the under part, line with a lettuce 
leaf, and fill with the already prepared 
salad. Replace the lid, and serve on 
salad plates with a salad fork. The 
crusty shell is supposed to be eaten with 
the salad. 

The long, French rolls may be used 
similarly, and if preferred, the top may be 
left uncovered, except for a sprig of cress 
for decoration, or a stiff dressing piped 
on in some fancy pattern. Also, the 
shrimps alone may be used, allowing 
three or more to a portion, and these 
placed in the hollowed-out rolls, lined 
with lettuce and covered with dressing. 



Query No. 4294. — "Will you give me a list of 
Cooking Temperatures for the ordinary things 
we bake, like meat and bread, cakes and cus- 
tards? I know a great deal depends on the size 
of the joints and loaves, etc., and also on the 



shape of the pans in bread and cake making — 
all I want is some standard to go by. I seem to 
fail when I go by the readings of my oven 
thermometer." 

Oven Temperatures 

It is very difficult to give any tempera- 
tures with even approximate accuracy, 
owing to the very great differences called 
for by the size and shape of the joints of 
meat; the size, shape, and ingredients in 
cakes and breads; and further, by the 
position of the oven thermometer. For 
.the greatest accuracy the bulb of the 
thermometer should be as near the 
center of the oven as possible. However, 
we give the list of baking temperatures, 
as they commonly appear. 
For searing roast meats of all kinds, 500° F. 
For baking after the first ten or 

fifteen minutes 450° F. 

For baking biscuit 450° F. 

For pies 400° F. 

For bread -. . .350° F. 

For layer cakes 300° F. 

For custards 250° F. 

These appear in instructions by differ- 
ent persons in a different sequence, and 
different degrees are given for different 
operations. For instance, the tempera- 
ture for searing meat is often given as 
450 deg. F. This, too, depends on the 
size of the joint, for the larger the piece, 
the more the oven temperature will be 
reduced when it is put in, and the higher 
needs to be the initial temperature to 



53 



54 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



produce all-over searing. Pies are often 
baked at 500 deg. F., cakes at 350 deg. F. 
to 450 deg. F., depending on size, shape, 
and ingredients. Also, the initial temper- 
ature is, in most cases, at least fifty 
degrees higher than the temperature for 
the following part of the baking. Besides 
these changes, you will find a different 
flavor result from baking with gradually 
increasing, and gradually decreasing heat. 
The last word is far from said about 
temperatures for baking, but those we 
have given may be counted on to be 
helpful to the inexperienced cook, and 
will furnish her a basis of departure. 



Query Xo. 4295. — "I shall appreciate 
greatly the answers to the following questions: 
How long should Coffee Percolate? What is the 
best kind of Griddle for Pancakes? What is a 
good recipe for small Bran Cakes, such as are 
dropped from a spoon on a baking sheet?" 

How Long Should Coffee 
Percolate? 

From the form of the question we 
think one of the coffee percolators is used 
which goes on spraying a fountain of 
boiling water through the coffee for as 
long as the alcohol beneath is allowed to 
burn. In answer, we may say, let it 
percolate as long as you wish, within 
reasonable limits. The longer it per- 
colates, the stronger the coffee, but if the 
operation is carried too far, there will be 
a loss of the subtle aroma of the beverage. 
Perhaps five minutes would be a good 
length to experiment with. A one-time 
famous chef recommended ten minutes. 

Best Kind of Pancake Griddle 

So far as we know there is no best kind 
of griddle. It is a matter of individual 
preference. Griddles are made of iron, 
aluminum, enamel ware, and soapstone. 
The first two heat quickly, the third is 
slower to heat, and the fourth takes the 
longest time to get hot. Both iron and 
enamel ware need to be greased, some of 
the aluminum griddles can be used with- 
out greasing, and the soapstone should 
never be greased. The prettier-looking 
cakes are made on griddles that do not 



require greasing, but to grease the griddle 
makes the cakes tenderer. We think it 
would be well for you to experiment with 
the different kinds, if possible, and choose 
the one you like best. 

Bran Cookies 

Stir together an ounce of butter and 
half a cup of warm molasses, drop in two 
unbeaten eggs, and then beat the whole 
together thoroughly and vigorously. Mix 
half a cup of flour, one cup of bran, one- 
fourth a teaspoonful of baking soda, and 
one-half a teaspoonful of salt; stir these 
into the mixture of eggs, syrup, and 
butter, and drop by teaspoonfuls on 
greased paper, spread on a baking sheet. 
Bake in a moderate oven, for molasses 
easily burns. Chopped raisins may be 
added if vou like. 



Query Xo. 4296. — "Lately at the house of a 
friend I was served with a delicious French 
Dressing on a green salad. It was perfectly 
clear; it was thick, and, unlike the usual French 
Dressing, it did not separate. It was also a rich, 
red color. Can you suggest to me how such a 
dressing could be made?" 

Salad Dressing, French vs. Russian 

From your description of the dressing 
we know it could not be a French dressing, 
and we think it was possibly one of the 
kind called Russian. A properly made 
French dressing is never clear, it is a half- 
opaque gray, and about as thick as a light, 
or medium cream. Properly made, it 
should not separate, not at least during 
the time occupied by the salad course at 
a luncheon or dinner. To make it, the 
vinegar is added gradually to the oil, in 
the proportion of one-third as much as the 
volume of the oil, and the two are stirred 
together, after each addition of vinegar, 
until the mixture is grayish, and thick- 
ened, and on tasting it, neither the 
flavor of the oil, nor of the vinegar, can be 
discerned. A very little salt may be 
added to the oil before beginning to stir 
in the vinegar. The change in color, con- 
sistency, and blending of flavors, are the 
marks of the true French dressing. If" 
pepper be added, it will separate. 



a::?::::: :z:r. e 



Healthiul 

Reliable 

Economical 




* 



( 



^uiy- 



77^ 
housewife avoids 

_bstitutes, which maj 
contain alam* amd uses 

ROYAL 

BAKING 
POWDER 

AbsoiuieJy Pure 
Made from Cream < 



i%&. 



.■ 



\ 



-" 



: "' I " . 



e. ::: ~i ^rip-es 



": . 






56 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



A Russian dressing is either a tartare 
sauce, or a dressing made of sifted tomato 
or tomato paste, thickened by cooking 
with arrowroot, which will thicken, and 
yet leave the mixture transparent. Either 
oil or butter is used to enrich the dressing, 
and any desired flavoring. A pint of 
sifted tomato, from one-half to two- 
thirds a cup of oil or butter, from one 
to two tablespoonfuls of arrowroot, one 
teaspoonful of salt, two of sugar, one- 
half a teaspoonful, each, of pepper, and 
dry mustard, and one or two teaspoon- 
fuls of onion juice, all cooked like a white 
sauce, and allowed to get cold, will make 
a good dressing of a type called Russian. 



Query No. 4297. — "Can you tell me, please, 
why my White Cake, when whites of eggs only 
are used, is coarse-grained, dark, and a miserable 
failure?" 

We are sorry to say we think the reason 
must be that something is wrong with 
either the recipe, the method of making, 
or the baking. Unless we witnessed all 
three we could not say exactly where the 
fault lay. If you send us the recipe, ancl 
explain in detail your method of making 
the cake, we think perhaps we can tell you 
the cause of the trouble. Your query 
reached us without name or address. 



Query No. 4298. — "Are Coasters used for 
tumblers as much as formerly? Are plateau 
Mirrors used in table decoration to hold flower 
bowls or fern baskets? May Candles be burned 
at luncheon, or at six-o'clock dinner, when there 
is ample daylight? Is it old-fashioned for the 
host to serve the Plates at Dinner?" 

Use of Coasters 

We are told that this old fashion is 
being revived, but formerly coasters 
were correctly used only when the table 
was set without a cloth, or when, after 
dinner, the cloth was removed, and the 
ladies had retired to the drawing room. 
Coasters, then, facilitated the movement 
of decanters and glasses over the mahog- 
any, and were a protection to its polished 
surface. 

Use of Mirrors in Table Decoration 

Mirrors are often effectively used, when, 



with a border of moss or smilax, they are 
made to simulate a sheet of water. If 
covered with thin blue or green gauze 
the effect is more artistic. But a repeti- 
tion of this style of decoration is tiresome 
in its artificiality, and to us it seems that 
they should, only seldom, be used, and 
then their artistic treatment calls for 
skill. 

Candles at Luncheon or Dinner 

One of the fundamental differences 
between even the most elaborate, formal 
luncheon, and any dinner, is, that candles 
should never appear on the luncheon 
table unless there be necessity for artifi- 
cial light. Slender glasses, each holding 
a single flower, may be placed at each 
cover, as a substitute for the small 
candles used at dinner. These small 
candles, especially if pretty shades are 
used, are correct for a dinner by daylight 
that is not one of great formality. For 
a formal dinner the room is preferably 
darkened, for the sake of the becoming- 
ness of well-managed artificial lights. 

Should the Host Serve the 
Plates at Dinner? 

It is entirely proper for the host to 
serve the chief courses of the dinner from 
his place at the head of the table. This, 
called the English method of serving, is 
one of the recognized forms, and seems 
to be especially appropriate to small 
dinner parties. Where the dinner is of 
many courses the hostess may serve, 
though not necessarily, the soup, the 
salad, and the sweet course. 



Query No. 4299. — "I cannot make a moist 
Cake. What is the trouble? Mine become dry 
and tasteless in a day or two after they are made. 
Also, will you tell me what I can use in my 
Sherbets and Water Ices to give them 'body,' 
for my water ices do not stand up? Do you 
approve of the use of Paraffin in making the 
chocolate coating for dipped candies?" 

. To Make a Moist Cake 

The use of butter, rather than a butter 
substitute, of milk, rather than water, of 
syrup or molasses, or honey, rather than 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Jam and Jelly Recipes 
Not Found in any Cook Book 

Strawberry Jam: — Crush well in single layers 
about 2 quarts of ripe berries, using masher, and 
discarding all green parts. Measure 4 level cups 
of these and 7 Y level cups (3 Y lbs.) of sugar into 
large saucepan. Mix well; stir hard and con- 
stantly. Bring to vigorous boil and boil hard 

1 full minute, continually stirring. Take from 
fire, add Y bottle (scant Yi cup) of Certo, stirring 
in well. Let stand 5 minutes only, stirring occa- 
sionally, skim and pour quickly into sterilized 
glasses. 

For Raspberry Jam and Blackberry Jam fol- 
low above recipe for Strawberry Jam. 

Strawberry Jelly: — Thoroughly crush with 
masher about 2Yi quarts ripe berries. Put in 
jelly bag and strain out juice. Measure 3 cups 
of juice and &Y level cups (2% lbs.) of sugar into 
large saucepan, stir and bring to boil. At once 
add 1 bottle (scant cup) of Certo, stirring con- 
stantly. Continue to stir and bring again to 
hard boil for Y minute, stirring continually. 
Remove from fire, skim and pour quickly into 
sterilized glasses. 

For Raspberry Jelly and Blackberry Jelly 
follow above recipe for Strawberry Jelly. 

Currant Jelly: — Crush, thoroughly, about 
2Yi quarts of ripe fruit. Add Yi cup of water, 
stir until boiling, cover pan and simmer 10 
minutes. Place in jelly bag and strain out juice. 
Measure 4 cups of juice into large saucepan. 
Measure lYl level cups (3Y lbs.) of sugar in 
separate pan. Bring juice just to boil, and begin 
to add sugar slowly, with constant stirring, taking 
about 5 minutes to add all the sugar, and keeping 
juice nearly at the boil. Then bring to the boil, 
and at once add 1 bottle (scant cup) of Certo, 
stirring constantly. Continue to stir and bring 
again to a hard boil for Y minute, stirring con- 
stantly. Take from fire, let stand 1 minute, skim 
and pour quickly into sterilized glasses. 

Cherry Jelly: — Stem, pit, and thoroughly 
crush about 3 pounds ripe, sour cherries. Crush 

2 heaping tablespoonfuls of pits and add to 
cherries. Put in saucepan with Yi cup of water, 
stir until boiling, cover pan and simmer 10 
minutes. Place fruit in jelly bag and strain out 
juice. Measure 3 cups juice, %Yz level cups (2% 
lbs.) of sugar into large saucepan, stir and bring 
to boil. At once add 1 bottle (scant cup) of 
Certo, stirring continually. Continue to stir, 
bring again to hard boil for Yi minute, stirring 
constantly. Remove from fire, skim and pour 
quickly into glasses. 



•}• ■— • 



| Pectin Sales Co., Inc., 

452 East Ave., Rochester, N. Y. 

■ 

Enclosed is 35 cents for bottle of Certo, 
with recipe book, to be sent prepaid. 



i 



Name ... 
Address 



■ My grocer's name. 
His address 



* 




The New Way to Make Jam and Jelly 

One Minute Boiling Period — The Jelly 
Always "Jells' — Makes One-Half More 

Most Youthful, Inexperienced Housewives Now 
Making All Kinds of Jam and Jelly with 

Certo 

(Sure/ell) 

"Mother Natures Year Round Jell-Maker" 

By the new and simple Certo Process the deliciousness of 
the fully-ripened summer fruits can easily be converted to per- 
fect jams and jellies. The fruit juice always "jells," no tedious 
re-boilings, or wasted batches of fruit and sugar. The one- 
minute boiling period is great economy of fruit juices and 
retains color and fragrance of fresh fruit. With the fresh 
fruit season and moderately priced sugar, start your preserving 
the quick, easy, economical and sure Certo way. 



Certo is concentrated 
fruit pectin, now put up 
in practical form. It 
contains no gelatine or 
preservative. Warmly 
recommended by cook- 
ing experts and house- 
wives, who have used it 
as revolutionizing jam 
and jelly-making. 

You can get Certo at 
your grocers, with a 
copy of Book of Recipes. 
Or by parcel post, pre- 
paid, for 35 cents. 




As you and your 
friends will want Certo 
conveniently at hand, 
through the fruit season, 
kindly send us your 
grocer's name and ad- 
dress. Use coupon for 
convenience. 

Make a joy and pleas- 
ure of preserving time, 
and fill your shelves with 
healthful, delicious, 
home made jams and 
jellies. 



'»» ■ » " ■■ ■!!- 



PECTIN SALES CO., Inc., 452 East Ave., Rochester, N. Y. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

57 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



sugar, the use of buttermilk or sour cream, 
of fruit or fruit syrups, and the minimum 
amount of baking powder will tend to 
keep a cake moist. To ice the cake 
immediately, and to keep orange skins, 
raw potato parings, or a fruit jar, half 
rilled with water, in the cake-box, will 
also help to prevent the cake from drying 
out. 

To Give Body to Sherbets 
and Water Ices 

These can be made on the basis of a 
gelatine jelly, that is, enough hydrated 
and dissolved gelatine can be added to 
give what we think you mean by body. 
There should not be more gelatine than 
three-fourths enough to stiffen the mix- 
ture, provided you meant to make a jelly, 
instead of a frozen sweet. If the recipe 
for the corresponding jelly calls for four 
tablespoonfuls of gelatine, use not more 
than three to make the ice. To boil the 
sugar and water to a light syrup, instead 
of merely dissolving the sugar in the 




HOSE SUPPORTERS 



Equipped with our 
famous Oblong ALL- 
Rubber Button clasps, 
hold the stockings in 
place securely — and 
without injury to the 
most delicate silk 
fabric. 



Velvet Grip Hose Supporters 
For ALL the Family 

Are Sold Everywhere 
Made by the George Frost Company, Boston 




water, also helps to give smoothness and 
body. Beaten whites of eggs, or milk, 
or both, in a sherbet will also help. Or 
you could cook enough pure arrowroot in 
the water to thicken it slightly — ■ per- 
haps two teaspoonfuls to a cup of water, 
blending it with a little cold liquid, and 
stirring it into the boiling water over the 
fire until you get a smooth, mucilaginous 
paste. But it seems to us that if your 
"water ices do not stand up, this is due to 
lack of sufficient freezing, for a water ice 
will form a quite firm mass. 

The Use of Paraffin in Making 
Chocolate Coating 

We are sorry to say we do not like the 
thought of using paraffin in home candy- 
making. The exigencies of the commer- 
cial manufacture of candies often neces- 
sitates its use, but there should be no 
need for it in the home; and if we cannot 
be sure of the purity of ingredients in our 
home-cooked dishes, it seems to us there 
is nowhere else in the world where 
security may be counted on. 



Your Congressman will note this letter 
in Life with interest: "Dear Life: You 
recently published a letter, signed, 'Agric- 
ola,' asking whether your readers could 
tell him or her where he or she can get 
dandelion bulbs for home planting. I 
think I can help him or her out, for once 
I wrote to our representative in Wash- 
ington asking for some Country Gentle- 
man corn seed. After several years had 
elapsed, the seed arrived, and I planted 
it as directed. When spring came I 
found no traces of corn, but I raised a 
bumper crop of dandelions where the seed 
had been planted, and I sold them as 
spinach at a handsome profit. — F. 0. B." 



A bright office boy scored one on his 
employer the other day. The youngster 
had blundered over something, and the 
boss was giving him a lecture. "If I made 
mistakes like you I'd never be where I 
am," he concluded. "Yes, sir," replied 
the lad, promptly, "but if we were all like 
you you wouldn't be where you are, 
either." — Boston Transcript. 



Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
58 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




imOt-H-UL 




A Valuable Impression 

PLEASING impression upon customers is of value. You can create 
one and at the same time save your goods from damage by spreading 
sheets of TANGLEFOOT in your show windows, especially over Sunday. 

TANGLEFOOT w ^ then be at work for you and will not only catch 
the flies, but attract the attention of people who pass your store to 

your efforts to keep your stock clean and fresh. For 1922 TANGLEFOOT nas 

been considerably reduced in price. 

Remember TANGLEFOOT catches the germ as well as the fly, and that poisons, 

traps or powders cannot do it 








Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

59 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



DOMINANT 

NON-INFLAMMABLE 

Met-All Polish 

FOR ALL METALS 

No Acids Will Not Settle 

Will Not Evaporate 

Dominant does everything that any 
other metal polish will do and more 
than any one of them will 
do, and does it better and 
more quickly with less 
effort. 

By mail — Postage prepaid 

Half Pint Can 30c 
Pint Can - 50c 
Quart Can - 85c 




SAWYER CRYSTAL BLUE CO. 

88 Broad St., Boston, Mass. 




The So E-Z Cream Separator tOLESEE 

1-2 pint of CREAM from a quart bottle of milk 

leaving ] 1-2 pints of milk for other purposes. 

Just adjust it and pour off the CREAM. 

the milk remaining in the bottle. No 

Pumping. No Wasting. Easily Cleaned. 40 

cents cash with order or 50 cents C. O. D. 

only VL.Lf' Use it 30 days, if not SATISFIED we 

c — — will refund vour money. 

B. W. J. COMPANY, 1996 Indianola Ave., Columbus, Ohio 



"Free-Hand Cooking' ' 

Cook icithout recipes! A key to cookbooks, correct proportions, 
time, temperature; thickening, leavening, shortening, 105 fun- 
damental recipes. 40 p. book. 10 cents coin or stamps. 

>m. School of Home Economics, 803 E 58th Street, Chicago 




Just the Thing for the Hot Weather 

Gossom's Cream Soups (in Powdered Form) 
Pure, Wholesome, Delicious 

Quickly and 
Easily Prepar- 
ed. 

Simply add 
water and boil 
15 minutes and 

you have a delightful soup, of high food value and low 

cost. One 15 cent package makes 3 pints of soup. 

These soups do not deteriorate, so may be continually on 

hand and thus found most convenient. The contents 

also keep after opening. 

Split pea, Green pea, Lima, Celery, Black Bean, Clam 

Chowder, Onion and (Mushroom 25c). 

Sample sent prepaid on receipt of 20 cents, or one dozen for 

$1.75. 

For Sale by leading grocers 15 cents a package, 20 cents in 

far West. 

Manufactured bv 

B. F. Gossom, 692 Washington St., Brookline 46, Mass. 



New Books 



Foods of the Foreign-Born in Relation to 
Health. By Bertha M. Wood. 
Whitcomb & Barrows, Boston, MabS. 

The fact is physicians, nowadays, give 
less medicine to their patients than for- 
merly, and pay much more attention to 
hygienic diet and occupation, both as 
therapeutic agents in curing disease, and 
as factors in maintaining the individual 
in the best of health, and at a high level of 
efficiency. 

Thus the dietitian has entered the area 
of medical and public health service as 
an aid to- the physician, and an agent in 
the curing of disease and the maintenance 
of health. The spirit and purpose of 
this little volume is excellent. We are 
told this story: An Armenian store- 
keeper found a fellow countryman, a chef 
in a restaurant, who was suffering from 
indigestion. He said to him, "You come 
with me. I take you to the smartest 
woman you ever knew. She knows our 
foods; she tell you what to eat; you feel 
better." 

Thus the inspiration came to the 
writer and the purpose of the study, 
which resulted in the material enclosed 
here, was to compare the food of other 
peoples with that of the American in 
relation to health. The suggestions of the 
author will be helpful in many cases. 

Household Textiles. By Charlotte M. 
Gibbs. Whitcomb & Barrows, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

This is a second and revised edition of 
the work. Books on the subject of tex- 
tiles have been written, usually, from the 
manufacturer's point of view. It has 
been the purpose of the writer to bring 
together, in this book, the general facts 
of most interest to the consumer. Infor- 
mation has been gathered from many 
sources, from books, government reports, 
visits to factories, shops and museums. 
Suggestions and references, for a more 
extended study, have been given. It is 
hoped that the book may serve as a text 
in high school courses in textiles, and, 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

60 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



To Can 

Raspberries 

the easy Lorain way 

Grade the berries, 
rinse, stem, and pack 
in jars to % in. from 
top. Fill jar with 
boiling syrup made 
of 1 part sugar to 4 
parts water. Put 
scalded rubber in 
position and adjust 
lid loosely. Put jars 
in oven, set Lorain 
regulator at 250 deg. 
Forget the canning 
for one hour. Then 
remove jars and seal 
immediately. 



One easy turn of the 
'Lorain" red wheel gives 
you a choice of 44 measured 
and controlled oven heats 
for any kind of oven cook- 
ing or baking. 





Here's an easy way to 

can without "spending the summer in the kitchen 



n 



CANNING time is here. Does it begin for 
you a period of sizzling hot days spent 
over boiling kettles on a hot stove — 
days of exhausting work and worry? 

Not if you have a Lorain-equipped gas 
range! The Lorain Oven Heat Regulator 
offers you an easier, better way to can fruits 
and vegetables. You can stay out of the 
kitchen while Lorain watches the canning. 

Read the recipe and you'll see how simple 
and delightful Lorain Oven Canning is. Re- 
member, thousands of women have used the 
Lorain method successfully for seasons. 

When canned in their individual jars, 
fruits and vegetables keep their fresh-from- 
the-garden firmness, color and taste. 



By preventing inaccurate or varying oven 
heat, Lorain makes every baking successful. 
No more "unlucky" days. Lorain enables 
you to cook an entire meal at one time in 
the oven, without "pot-watching" It makes 
home canning easier and better. Own a 
Lorain-equipped range now! 

Wherever gas is used you'll find dealers 
who sell Lorain-equipped gas ranges. If you 
want to learn how to make canning a joy 
instead of a task, go to one of these dealers 
and ask him to demonstrate this method. 
He'll be glad to do it. If you want a copy of 
the Lorain Canning Chart which explains in 
detail how to can 37 different fruits and vege- 
tables, just fill in and mail attached coupon. 



Only these famous Qas Stoves are 
equipped with the Lorain" 

CLARK JEWEL- 

George M. Clark &. Co. Div., 

Chicago, 111. 
DANGLER- 

Dangler Stove Company Div., 

Cleveland, Ohio 
DIRECT ACTION- 

National Stove Company Div., 

Lorain, Ohio 
NEW PROCESS- 

New Process Stove Company 

Div., Cleveland, Ohio 
QUICK MEAL- 

Quick Meal Stove Company 

Div., St. Louis, Mo. 
RELIABLE- 

Reliable Stove Company Div., 

Cleveland, Ohio. 



AMERICAN STOVE 
COMPANY 

Largest makers of Gas Ranges in the World 

146 Chouteau Ave. 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 

We manufacture oil and coal stoves for use where 

gas is not available, but the "Lorain" 

cannot be used on these 




OVEN HEAT REGULATOR 



American Stove Company 

146 Chouteau Avenue 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Please send me free copy of 
'Lorain Oven Canning Chart". 

Name 



Address- 
City 



State 



(1922) 



Buy advertised^Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

61 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Veuve Chaffard 

Pure Olive Oil 

The Finest The 
World Produces 





Received direct 
from the Producers 

Bottled in France 
in honest bottles 

Full Quarts 
Full Pints 

Full Half-Pints 



S. S. PIERCE CO. 

BOSTON 





Marshmallow Sponge Cake 

Beat Seg 

gradualh: beat in 1 nip sugar and 1 teaspoo* 

vanilla. Beat until stiff and 

Mix 1 cup flnur. 1 level teaspoon baking 
powo • • and fold 

E 

laj - - ■ 

Filling and Frosting 

1 box Camp^re Marshmallows in 

pieces and heat in double boiler. Put 1 cup 

• in a saucepai 

. • . and boil without 

a long thread 

from tip of spoon. 

Add this slowly to 2 egg eaten until 

. instantly. Add 1 teaspoon 

vanilla and the marshmallow mixture. 
:tT nnrwi r j ri to 
I >e. 

Recipe printed on 

each package 



(CX&0P WH,T E 

Marshmallows 



Beautiful Recipe Book FREE 
Dept. A.. The Camp&re Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 



with supplementary reading, as an out- 
line for college work. 

The development of Textile Arts, from 
the earliest times, to the Arts and Crafts 
Movement of the present time, are 
herein briefly described and illustrated. 

A utrition and Growth in Children. By 
William R. P. Emerson, M.D. 
D. Appleton and Companv. New 
York. 

One-third of all the children in the 
L nited States are underweight or under- 
nourished or malnourished. This con- 
dition is limited to no locality, and to no 
social class. It is as prevalent in the 
N : rth as in the South, in the country as 
in the city, in the homes of the rich as in 
the slums. It is a condition baneful to 
the well-being of our children and danger- 
ous to the health of our future men and 
women. Malnutrition in children is now 
recognized as the greatest single problem 
affecting our national health. 

Dr. Emerson, nationally known as a 
pioneer in nutrition work, and the first to 
lay proper emphasis on the other im- 
portant factors besides diet, here offers to 
parents, teachers, social workers, and 
physicians the results of his rich and 
successful experience. In simple, prac- 
tical terms he describes the causes of mal- 
nutrition in growing children and shows 
how the condition may be detected. He 
describes fully the methods of cure, which 
involve problems of physical defects, 
fatigue, home control and health habits, 
as well as diet and food habits. Finally, 
he outlines a complete and practical 
nutrition program for the home, the 

.ool and the community. 

This is a thoroughly practical and 
scientific treatment of a subject of far- 
reaching importance. 

Quantity Cookery: Cooking and Menu 
Planning for Large Numbers. By 
Lenore Richards and Nola Treat. 
Little. Brown & Co., Boston. 

The aim of "Quantity Cookery" is to 
furnish tested recipes and practical help 
on the planning of menus to manage 



Buy a; 



Dods — Do not accept substitutes 
62 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




w s> 





plump, meaty 
~ ^reen Olives 



/^REEN olives are so firm, so 
^* plump and meaty that it's a 
delight just to bite into them. 

And how the salty, tangy flavor 
does tempt the appetite. You really 
get a craving for green olives. And 
then you have to have some. 

They're good for you, too ! The 
olive oil in them is healthful and 

<Spanisk 



nourishing. And green olives are 
the finest appetizers. They put a 
keen edge on lagging appetites. 

Dinners served by the most 
famous restaurateurs include green 
olives. They are delicious in salads 
and sandwiches. Use them as gar- 
nishes. Serve them at luncheons 
and dinners. Buy a bottle or two 
and enjoy them at dinner tonight. 

AMERICAN IMPORTERS 

of Spanish Green Olives 

200 Fifth Avenue, New York 



KEEN OLIVES 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

63 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



D? Prices 

Vanilla 




Look for 
Price's 
Tropikid 
on the 
label 



There is no better 
flavoring for cakes, 
puddings, custards, 
home-made ice-cream 
and candies than Price's 
Vanilla. It is pure and 
of balanced just-right 
strength. 

PRICE FLAVORING EXTRACT CO. 

"Experts in Flavor" 

Chicago, 111. 



A Dishwasher for $2. 

Keeps hands OHt of the water, no wiping of dishes, saves $ the 
time. Consists of special folding dishdrainer, special wire 
basket, 2 special long-handled brushes. Full directions for use. 
Sent prepaid for $2.50. Full refund if not satisfactory. 

An. Sohool of Home Economics, 803 E. 58th St., Chicago 

Save Your Stove! 

Rust Will Ruin It 
Stovoil Kills Rust 

Stovoil has one big job — to fight rust. 
It is not a "blacking" — it's a sure rust 
preventive. Unless you use Stovoil your 
stove will rust out long before it wears out. 

Stovoil is applied with a soft cloth. It 
withstands excessive heat. Use it on every 
metal surface in your home and especially 
stoves and ranges. It even works well on 
the interior of ovens. 

No smell — no stain. Won't soil hands. 
Nothing like it in existence. Your gas 
company uses and recommends Stovoil. 
If your dealer cannot supply you, send 50 
cents for a full-size bottle, which will last a 
year if properly used. Address Dept. 449, 
Superior Laboratories, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

pT^VO I Xj Sales Representatives Wanted 



both in the strictly commercial field of 
cafeterias, restaurants, hotels, tea-rooms, 
etc., and in the dining-rooms of schools, 
colleges, clubs, industrial plants, hospitals 
and institutions of various kinds. The 
book is also designed to serve as a text- 
book in the teaching of "large quantity" 
cookery. 

It contains lists of foods to be used and 
season charts. Suggestive and popular 
food combinations are worked out, and 
ways of utilizing left-over foods. Also 
there is a long list of garnishes and their 
purposes. Standard menus for a cafe- 
teria, for thirty days, are given, which are 
carefully arranged to avoid monotony, 
and with the idea that they can be 
repeated at the end of that time, with 
slight changes, in accordance with the 
seasons. The book includes sample menus 
for tea-rooms, serving not more than a 
hundred daily, those catering to from one 
hundred to six hundred daily, and those 
whose custom is greater than six hundred. 
Finally, there are over two hundred 
recipes, all of which have been thor- 
oughly tested over a number of years of 
practical use and classroom work. 

This book is one of the first of its kind. 



A Simple Curtain Fixture 

{Continued from page 29) 

became firmer, as also did her manner. 
She no longer apologized to me for taking 
me on "such a stupid shopping trip." 
She hustled me about brusquely and 
absent-mindedly, seeming, at most times, 
to forget me, and to appreciate my 
presence fully only when I became the 
recipient of dark glances expressing her 
disgust at the insufficiency of the shops. 
At last we had one more downtown pos- 
sibility, and I had visions of following 
Clarice into all the highways and byways 
of the outskirts of town, and perhaps at 
last going down to defeat. The prospect 
was distressing. As we sailed upward 
to the tenth floor I almost chuckled aloud 
to see how tensely Clarice was gazing off 
into space. It seemed to me that her 
whole energies were going into the 



Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
64 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Ripe Olives 

Contain 958 calories to the pound 



ALTHOUGH Ripe Olives 
_are a delicious and appetiz- 
ing relish, they are far more — 
they are a valuable food as well. 

They contain protein, fat or 
oil and have a fuel value of 958 
calories to the pound. In this 
last respect they compare with 
bread and exceed such foods as 
rice and potatoes. 

With 2 per cent of protein 
thev compare with boiled pota- 
toes and boiled rice and with 21 
per cent of fat or oil they pro- 
vide essential nourishment 
which many staples lack. 

Ripe Olives contain these 
food elements in a form that is 
easily digested and readily as- 
similated, which greatly in- 
creases their value. 



Ripe Olives fill an important 
place in menus. As a source of 
muscular energy, they are a very 
valuable supplement to other 
foods. 

California Ripe Olives, 
packed by the members of the 
California Olive Association, 
are fully ripened on the trees. 
They provide nourishment 
found in ample quantities only 
in the matured fruit — fruit in 
the state in which Nature makes 
it best to eat. 

They are processed and 
packed by the most advanced 
methods and are sterilized for 
forty minutes at a temperature 
of 240 degrees. 

California Ripe Olives are a 
delicious, nourishing and whole- 
some food. 



California Olive Association 

Los Angeles, California 
PACKER MEMBERS: 



A. Adams, Jr. 
Albers Olive Company 
American Olive Company 
California Growers Assn., Inc. 
California Packing Corporation 
C. M. Gifford & Sons 



Golden State Canneries 
Libby, McNeill and Libby 
Maywood Packing Company 
Mt. Ida Packing Company 
Old Mission Packing Corporation 
Sylmar Packing Corporation 



(Formerly Los Angeles Olive Growers Assn.) 

Wyandotte Olive Growers Association 



w®Mw&sm&sn®mEs m t^tte ^sao EaoBaao^irato iraBraioioio oaEarasaEa r^^r^^f^ 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

65 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




Perfect 
Sterilization 

A Perfect Seal 



A Perfect Seal is assured by using GOOD 
LUCK Jar Rubbers. Don't guess at sterili- 
zation periods — don't try to can without 

GOOD <§> LUCK 

JAR RUBBERS 

They come packed with Atlas E-Z Seal and other hicrh quality slass 
jars. They are sold at good grocery and hardware stores throughout 
the country. If your dealer cannot supply you, send 10c for sample 
dozen. For 6c in stamps we will mail you our book on "Cold Pack 
Cannins," with many excellent recipes. 

BOSTON WOVEN HOSE AND RUBBER CO. 

27 Hampshire Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Largest Manufacturers of Rubber Rings in the World 



and SAVE fhe JUICES 
Juplex Drip lesi Smokeless Broiler 

Broiling 

i9 the proper way to 
get full value from 
Steaks, Chops. 
Fowl, Bacon, Ham 
n etc. 

Don't Fry— BROIL 



THE products of the fry pan are a source of indi- 
gestion, with which most people are troubled 
The DUPLEX DRIPLESS BROILER positively 
overcomes this. 

Heretofore, there has been no convenient cooking utensil tor 
broiling without wasting the juices and smoking and greasim- 
the stove. The DUPLEX DRIPLESS BROILER will broil 
perfectly over any fire without one particle of the juice being 
wasted, or causing smoke, or soiling the stove. 

The DUPLEX DRIPLESS BROILER operates with a very 
low fire, the heat being drawn up and around the steak, chops 
etc., by action of the heat current around the tubular channel!) 
running to the majn trough. 

The DUPLEX DRIPLESS BROILER is a modern conven- 
ience for economical and scientific cooking, and a necessity in 
the kitchen. Made of cast aluminum and nicely finished. If 
you cannot buy this Broiler from your dealer, send us his 
name and $3.50 and we will send one, postpaid. 

Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded 

DUNDEE MFG. CO., Inc., 

Established 1888 



thought of our curtain fixture. Alrnc 
I could imagine' one being evolved frc 
her inner consciousness. But the elevat 
reached our floor too quickly. \ 
stepped off, and there right before 
stood a handsome glass counter fill 
with neat rows of brass, silver and bron 
brackets, all tagged and supplied wi 
numbers. Clarice leaned over the ca 
and straightened up with a deep breal 
"There it is," she said, triumphantly, 
the clerk, "number ten is what I war 
You have the only one in town." 1 
unsuspecting of her part in a big gar 
hunt, the clerk gave Clarice and me 
understand, in a most casual manni 
that the bits of hardware in the case we 
samples, and if she had run out of the 
in stock, the pieces that we saw we 
inviolable. Her search through her sh< 
of cardboard boxes was arrested 
Clarice uttered a declaration of war, in 
voice thrilling with pent-up feelin 
Her head was up and she gloried in havii 
an enemy to face. "If you haveij 
another like that sample, I'll have tj 
sample if I have to smash this glass a! 
take it." The girl eyed her with alaJ 
and hostility. Then she opened the la 
box of the lot. We all leaned forwaj 
breathlessly. Ah! under the hurrii 
twitchings of the clerk's hands the! 
emerged from its brown tissue pad 
wrappings the very image of the slendl 
brass fixture that Clarice had carried I 
all our search. What joy! Without actJ 
violence the hunt was over and we had wd 



19 Edinboro St., BOSTON 



"How John and Mary 

Live and Save 

on $35 a Week" 

THIS little story tells how a youl 
couple are getting ahead by plai 
ning the family spending and by "stretJ 
ing" the family dollars. 

If you depend on a weekly pay entw 
lope, this booklet will help you to lit' 
more comfortably, and save more monk 

The price of the booklet is 10 cents* 
it may be worth 310 to you. Send fori 
American School of Home Economic 
803 E. 58th Street, Chicago. Advk 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

66 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Canning Time 

is with us once again. The warm suns of June are ripening the 
small fruits and early vegetables, and the provident housewife will 
be taking advantage of nature's prodigality and commence storing 
for winter's use. In this connection 

Mrs. Rorer's 
Canning and Preserving 

with its wonderful recipes and clear-cut instructions will prove an 
excellent guide. It shows how to can and preserve fruits and 
vegetables; Marmalades, Jams, Fruit Butters and Jellies, Syrups, 
Catsups; Drying, Pickling, etc. 

Bound in cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 

During the summer and autumn months you will especially enjoy 
Mrs. Rorer's 

Ice Creams, Water Ices, etc. 

a book containing splendid recipes for the famous Philadelphia Ice 
Creams, Neapolitan Ice Creams, Water Ices, Frozen Puddings and 
Fruits, Sherbets, Sorbets, etc. 

Bound in cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 



The hot weather is a time of care in providing for the table. Here 
is where Mrs. Rorer's 

Hot Weather Dishes 

comes into play. A book that is full of refreshing, healthful and 
dainty dishes to tempt the appetite in hot weather. 

Bound in cloth, 75 cents; by mail, 80 cents 

For sale by Boston Cooking-School Magazine Co., and Bookstores, or 

ARNOLD & COMPANY, 420 Sansom Street, Philadelphia 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

67 



AMKRICAN COOKERY 



•^z 




\T [."IT —Nature's first food — is turned 
into an attractive, delicious dish 
that children and adults enjoy when it is made 
into Junket. 




% 



MADErifA MILK 

is wholesome milk in tasty dessert form. It is 
eaten slowly and enjoyed — hence it is the better 
way of serving milk. 

Send for our new Junket Recipe Book. 4c. in 
stamps will bring it with a sample of Junket 
Tablets. We will also include a sample of 
Junket Powder, flavored and sweetened, our newest 
preparation for making Junket. 

THE JUNKET FOLKS 
Little Falls, N. Y. 

Chr. Hansen's Canadian Laboratory, Toronto, Ont. 



Hildex Maple Products 

PURE AND FRESH 

The Queen of All Sweets 
tFor Gifts, Confections and Home Cookings 

For $1 .00 we will send you a box of HILDEX 
Maple Sugar and a book of maple recipes, or for 
$5.00 an assortment of our products, guaranteeing 
safe delivery and perfect satisfaction. 

W. K. DEXTER 

HILDRETH MAPLE SUGAR FARM 

SUGAR HILL, N. H. 



"Ten-Cent Meals' ' 

42 Meals -with receipts and directions ror preparing each. 48 pp. 10c 
Am. School of Home Economics, 803 E. 58th St., Chicago 



Angel Food Cake 



8 Inches Square, 5 Inches High 
Yon can be the beat cake maker in y our 
cfobortown. Yon can make the same Angel Food 
Cake and many other kinds that I make and sell at $3 a 
loaf-profit, $2, If you 

Learn the Osborn Cake Malting System 

H y methods are different. They are the result of twenty years 
•xperience aa a domestic science expert. My way is easy to learn. 
It never fails. I have taught thousands. „M me send yon fall 
particulars FREE. 

Mrs. Grace Osborn Dept. 145 Bay City, Mich. 



The Silver Lining ! 

A Soft Answer 

"I'm thankful," sighed Mrs. Meek, 
'that silver dollars are not used much." 

"How is that?" asked her inquisitive 
crony. 

"Well, when I ask John for a few 
dollars he always gets mad and throws 
them at me," was the Man of Wrath's 
wife's reply. — e. m. g. 

As reported by the United Press: "Mr. 
F. S. D. — , Cedar Rapids, la., passing 
through this city last night, en route on 
an automobile tour, lit a match to see if 
his gas tank was empty. It was not. 
Age, forty-seven. Cedar Rapids papers- 
please copy." 

There were callers at the house, and 
little Charles felt that he should con- 
tribute something to the conversation. 
"We've had chicken four times this week," 
he offered, politely. "Four chickens? 
What luxury!" exclaimed one of the 
visitors, smiling. "Oh, no," said Charlesjj 
"It was the same chicken." 

Harper's Magazine. 

Mrs. Stanton Coit, wife of the well- 
known ethical culturist, stood engrossed 
in conversation with Bernard Shaw, when 
suddenly she exclaimed: "Oh, look! There 
is my husband dancing; he has not done 
so for years." "Don't be alarmed," said 
Shaw, "he isn't dancing; that's the ethical 
culture movement." — Survey. 

Unity, says the following letter from 
the School Board at Lancaster, Ohio, 
dated 1828, "ought to be read by every- 
body at least once a year": "You are 
welcome to the use of the schoolhouse 
to debate all proper questions in; but 
such things as railroads and telegraph? 
are impossibilities and rank infidelity 
There is nothing in the Word of God aboui 
them. If God had designed that hi! 
intelligent creatures should travel at th< 
frightful speed of 15 miles an hour, b) 
steam, he would clearly have foretold i 
through His holy prophets. It is a devio 
of Satan to lead immortal souls down Xxf 
hell." 



H 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

68 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



What IS a BUDGET Anyhow? 



THRIFT Coupon 

Fill Out— T" ?r Out— Mail 

with $1.00 Money Order or Bill. Registered) 



I ou 

L 



You may get $500 
it of keeping this 
budget book 

Now read our 
Ad. Story 



; ] 



This one is a "Silent Partner" 
It helps you to save and HAVE ! 




This IS a PLAN 
not merely a BOOK! 
it's an aid to SAVING — 
a Silent PARTNER — 
it's the friend in need who 
HAS that $5 or $10 when 
you don't know WHERE to 
turn for it 



It is 

a way to 

S-A-V-E 



This Home Budget *Book 
has* been prepared to show 
you How to find out where the 
leaks in your use of your 
household money occur. — 
so that you can decide HOW 
to stop them. 

This book is a HOW BOOK— 
not a book of advice and wise 
sayings, but a complete plan 
which pays you in your busi- 
ness of homemaking, the same 
dividends that efficiency, ap- 
plied to business, has paid to 
many corporations. 



ave! 



■r. 








- 




U 




-o 












PQ 




>> 








= - 




: 


. 


— i- 




— : 




■ — • 








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- - 




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feU 








c ?■ 




-„ < 




— „ 




*£. - 




* 





Z- — 



- ■_ o 
V u — 

1 P 



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-3 



2 

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- -fcJ 



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HOW would you like to have a Silent Partner 
from whom you could borrow the "much- 
needed-Five-or-Ten-Dollars" that is so hard to 
get, sometimes, when you need it Most? Of 
course you'd like to have one! And here it is! 
Here is the Housewife's Silent Partner, — the 
"friend-in-need" 

"The Menter Plan of HOME BUDGETS 

— Not merely a book, but a 
complete PLAN; 

— Xot just ADVICE, but 
HOW to make ends meet; 

— Not a course in bookkeep- 
ing, but a CAREFULLY 
STUDIED OUT, con- 
sistent plan, which is the 
basis of HOW to save 
money, and HOW to save 
something to show for your 
INcome at the end of the 
year (just as a business 

. shows a dividend on ITS 
INcome, when the business 
is properly managed). 

You can HAVEthis Silent Partner working with you- 

helping you to avoid WORRY, helping you to HAVE some- 

tfc£&^ f f H back on '" and you also can Set some of the 
SXUUU.UO that will be distributed to those WHO use this book 
most diligently. 

How to get your share of the $5000 

is told in this book — which is sent postpaid for $1.00 

In the event of two or more persons tying for any of the prizes offered 



Order your copy of This Housewife's Silent 
Partner, today! 

It is mighty helpful, too, for single men and 
women, who do not seem to be able to save 
anything. 

It is a genuine FIRST AID to enjoying your 
IXcome. 

It is PRACTICAL THRIFT demonstrated! 

The sooner you get yours — 

The sooner you'll have a Savings Account. 

You can obtain your copy of the book at the 
following addresses, where wc demonstrate 
PRACTICAL THRIFT. 

Order Now! Postpaid $1.00 

The nearest approach to it sells for $2.50 

Address all orders to HOME OFFICE: 

Room 1421 467 Seventh Avenue New York City 

217 S. Anderson St. 615 Main St., 

Elwood, Ind. Buffalo. N. Y. 

501 Main St., ' Seneca St.. 

Evansville, Ind. Geneva, N. Y. 



1024 Calhoun St , 
Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

14 E. Wash'ton St., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

612 Wabash Ave., 
Terp.e Haute, Ind. 

525 N. Main St., 
Pueblo, Col. 

1539 Wei ton St., 
Denver, Col. 

147 Asylum St., 
Hartford, Conn. 

332 Main St., 
Springf'ld, Mass. 

45 W. 14th St.. and 
226 West 125th St.. 
New York. N. Y. 

435 Fulton St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

43 Court St., 
Binghamton.N. Y. 

119 N. Pearl St., 
Albany, N. Y. 



62 State St., 

Rochester. N. Y. 

431 S. Salina St., 

Syracuse. N. Y. 

13 Third St., 

Troy. NY. 

53 Franklin Sq., 

Utica, N. Y. 

39 S. Howard St., 

Akron, O. 

313 Monroe Ave.. 

Gr. Rapids, Mich. 

114 S. Franklin St., 

Saginaw, Mich. 

153 N. Main St., 

Wichita, Kansas 

1017 State St., 

Erie, Pa. 

1117 Market St., 

Wheeling, W. \ a. 

418 Minnesota St., 

St. Paul, Minn. 

418 Nicollet Ave., 

Minneapolis, 

Minn. 



853 Broad St., 
Newark, N. J. 

1224 Grand Ave., 
Kansas City, Mo. 

424 W. Market St., 
Louisville, Ky. 

200 S. Market Ave. 
Canton. O. 

230 North High St. 
Columbus. O. 

425 Euclid Ave.. 
Cleveland. O. 

33 S. Main St., 
Dayton, O. 

33 West High St., 
Springfield, O. 

212 Summit St., 
Toledo, O. 

231 W. Federal St., 

YOUNGSTOWN, O. 

423 N. Main St., 
Bloomington, III. 

320 West State St., 
Rockford, 111. 

515 N. S. Square, 
Springfield, III. 



each will receive the prize tied for. Contest closes Jan. 10, 1923. 

TEACHERS CF PRACTICAL 

THRIFT IN FORTY CITIES 

IN THE U. S. A. 

-\U1L: A BUDGET is simply a PLAN which reeulates the spending and saving of your INcome, so. that you can control your 
OUTgo and live on less than your EARNINGS. It helps you to accumulate money and open a savings account. 
Copright L-jr.. for Menter Co.. 1°?2 >j •.att-L-jr-'^ 




Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

69 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



TRUE BEAUTy 



dND POVEfe. TO FdSCINdTE 

come orvly witk Health. Bring out all 
Mother Nature's ckarms by usirxg a 
delicious,sTrer\gtk-givir\g malted food 

HENO 

to make r\ew red blood. 

Samples and booklet "Beauty and Health" sent 

free upon request. 
THOMPSON'S MflLXELD FOOD COMPANY 
dept 37 Vaukesha Viscorvsirv 



SERVICE TABLE WAGON 




Large Kroad Wide Table 
'lop — Removable Glass 
Service Tray — Double 
••rawer — Donble 
Handles — Large Deep 
Undersbelves — "Scien- 
tifically Silent" -Rubber 
Tired Swivel Wheels. 
A high grade piece of fur- 
niture surpassing any- 
thing yet attepip f ed for 
GENERAL UTILITY, 
ease of action, and abso- 
lute noiseless. iess. Write 
now for descriptive pam- 
phlet and dealer's name. 
COMBINATION PRODUCTS CO. 

)04JlanardBldg. Chicago 111. 



Home Cookie Bakei' 

Makes CooMeBaMngEasier 

Holds 16 cookies from 3J-inch 
cutter. Used in pairs, time and 
fuel are saved by having new batch 
ready for oven when baked cookies 
are removed. Bakers have no 
high sides or corners. Cookies 
are easily removed and bakers 
readily cleaned. Saves dish wash- 
ing. Simply wiping clean ke*ps 
the special surfaced sheet steel in 
good condition for baking. 
Equally useful for biscuits, rolls, toast, etc. Size 13$ inches 
by IS inches. Tested and approved by Good Housekeeping 
Institute. Send 75c for set of two in attractive carton. 
85c west of Rocky Mountains. 

Agents and Dealers Wanted 

HOME PRODUCTS CO., 1430 E. 49th St., Cleveland, 0. 





Roberts 
Lightning Mixer 

Baats Everything 

Beats eggs, whips cream, churns butter, mixes 
gravies, desserts and dressings, and does the 
work in a few seconds. Blends and mixes 
malted milk, powdered milk, baby foods and 
all drinks. 

Simple and Strong. Saves work — easy 
to clean. Most necessary household 
article. Used by 200,000 housewives 
and endorsed by leading household 
magazines. 
If your dealer does not carry this, we will send 
prepaid quart size $1.25, pint size 90c. Far 
West and South, quart $1.40, pint $1.00. 
Recipe book free with mixer. 

NATIONAL CO. Cambridge 39, boston, mass. 



The attention of the readers of 
American Cookery is called to the 
advertisement, on another page, of Domi- 
nant Met-All Polish. This polish is a 
most meritorious one and will be found 
unequalled for use on all metals. The 
Sawyer Crystal Blue Company will be 
pleased to communicate with those who 
care to act as agents for this useful 
household article. — Adv. 



"Home-Making as a Profession" 

HOME-MAKING is the greatest 
of all the professions — greatest 
in numbers and greatest in its 
influence on the individual and on society. 
All industry is conducted for the home, 
directly or indirectly, but the industries 
directly allied to the home are vastly 
important, as the food industries, clothing 
industries, etc. Study of home eco- 
nomics leads directly to many well paid 
vocations as well as to home efficiency. 

Since 1905 the American School of 
Home Economics has given home-study 
courses to over 30,000 housekeepers, 
teachers, and others. The special text- 
books have been used for class work in 
over 500 schools. 

Of late years, courses have been de- 
veloped fitting for many well paid posi- 
tions: — Institution Management, Tea 
Room and Lunchroom Management, 
Teaching of Domestic Science, Home 
Demonstrators, Dietitians, Nurses, Dress- 
making, "Cooking for Profit." Home- 
Makers' Courses : — Complete Home 
Economics, Household Engineering, Les- 
sons in Cooking, The Art of Spending. 

BULLETINS: Free-Hand Ccoking, 
Ten-cent Meals, Food Values, Family 
Finance, Art of Spending, Weekly Allow- 
ance Book, ioc. each. 

Details of any of the courses and in- 
teresting 80-page illustrated handbook, 
"The Profession of Home-Making" sent 
on request. American School of Home 
Economics, 803 E. 58th Street, Chicago. 

— Adv. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

70 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




c T$\j L%f?~s . c 7^riox 



June's Alaska Surprise 

(Something Entirely New ) 

IN writing these "talks" I have tried not to use superfluous adjectives, but for this month's 
new dessert it seems there is nothing that will quite describe it except to tell you that it 
is the best and most unusual dessert of the season. 

You will find it easy to make and the favorable comments that will be made when it is 
served (either when you are entertaining, or as a treat for the family) will please you. Its 
appearance is unique, and its flavor delicious. Here is the recipe. 

ALASKA SURPRISE 

Chocolate Mixture 
1 V6 envelopes Knox Sparkling Gelatine 3 Bquares unsweetened chocolate Few grains salt 

] 2 cup cold water 1 quart milk 1 teaspoonful vanilla 1 cup sugar 

Soak gelatine in cold water ten minutes. Melt chocolate, add sugar. Scald milk; add the soaked gelatine 
and when dissolved, the chocolate mixture and salt. Then add flavoring. Turn into melon mold, or square 
bread pan, first dipped in cold water, and chill. 

Cream Filling 
! /2 envelope Knox Sparkling Gelatine 1 pint heavy cream 1 teaspoonful vanilla 

% cup cold water % cup sugar 1 cup scalded milk 

Soak gelatine in cold water ten minutes and dissolve in hot milk: then add sugar. Set bowl containing mix- 
ture in pan of cold water and stir until mixture begins to thicken. Add cream, beaten until stiff, and flavoring. 

When chocolate mixture is very firm, remove enough of the center to make room for the Cream Filling, leaving 
walls about three-fourths inch thick. Fill with the cream mixture and replace chocolate mixture over the top. 
Chill. Fruit may be molded in the cream filling if desired. 

Note — Either one of the above recipes may be used as a dessert alone. Chocolate ice cream may be used in 
place of the chocolate mixture in which to mold the cream filling. 

FREE 

If you wish other recipes to serve when you entertain, as well as for everyday home meals, 
send for my free booklets "Dainty Desserts" and "Food Economy." Just enclose 4 cents in 
stamps to cover postage and mention your grocer's name. 

Any domestic science teacher may have sufficient gelatine for her class, if she will write me 
on school stationery, stating quantity and when needed. 




KNOX 

SPARKLING 

GELATINE 



KNQX 

5PARKLING 




GElatiNE 

CH4RUS BjSoXG£UT!NrC3;*C. 



Plain 

Sparkling Gelatine 

for genera! use 



107 Knox Ave. 



Johnstown, N. Y. 



Contains 

Lemon Flavoring 

No lemons required 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

71 



AMERICAN COOKERY 











Try Our 

Superfine 
Macaroni 



Ask Any Good Grocer 

PRINCE MACARONI MFG. CO 

207 Commercial Street, Boston 



Cream Whipping Made 
Easy and Inexpensive 

r! REMO- y ESCO 

Whips Thin Cream 

or Half Heavy Cream and Milk 

or Top of the Milk Bottle 

It whips up as easily as heavy cream 

and retains its stiffness. 

Every caterer and housekeeper 

wants CREMO-VESCO. 

Send for a bottle to-day. 



Housekeeper's size, 1£ oz., .30 prepaid 
Caterer's size, 16 oz., $1.00 " 

(With full directions) 



Cremo-Vesco Company 

631 EAST 23rd ST., BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Pacific Coast Agents. 
MILES MFG. CO., 949-951 E. 2nd St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



Vacation Joys 

» 

(Or the Song of the Put Put) 

When the sun is riding gaily 
On its northern summer tour, 

I lie we to the distant mountains, 
Where the put put's charms allure. 

There we put put o'er the waters, 

In a jolly, carefree way. 
And the put put's whims and fancies 

Make of work entrancing play. 

Just at daybreak, sunny mornings, 
Skim we o'er the glassy lake, 

On whose waters tinted shadows, 
Clear, sun-tipped reflections make. 

Dinner over, comes a yearning 
For the put put's rhythmic lay, 

As it rides the waves — and white caps 
Break above, in showers of spray. 

When the evening's mirrored shadows, 
O'er the silvered waters play — 

How we love to guide the put put, 
To the banjo's roundelay. 

Caroline L. Sumner. 



Cooking for Profit 

By Alice Bradley 

Principal, Miss Farmer's School of Cookery 
Cooking Editor, Woman's Home Companion 

IF YOU wish to earn money at home 
through home cooked food and 
catering — if you would like to own 
and conduct a food shop, candy kitchen, 
tea room, cafeteria or lunch room — if 
you wish to manage a profitable guest 
house or small hotel, you will be interest* d 
in this new correspondence course. 

It explains just how to prepare food, 
"good enough to sell"; just what to 
cook, with many choice recipes; how to 
establish a reputation and a constant 
profitable market; how to cater for all 
occasions, and tells in detail how to 
establish and conduct successful tea 
rooms, etc. — how to manage all focd 
service. 

The expense for equipment is little oi 
nothing at first, the correspondence 
instruction is under the personal direc- 
tion of Miss Bradley which assures your 
success, the fee for the course is very 
moderate and may be paid on easy 
terms. For full details write to American 
School of Home Economics, 803 E. 58th 
Street, Chicago. — Adv. 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

72 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




It Is Pure and Wholesome 

You are always certain of the absolute purity of Carnation- 
Milk. For it is rich country milk, from which part of the 
natural water content has been removed by evaporation, 
after which it is sealed in air-tight containers and sterilized. 
Use it in your home for every milk purpose. You will find 
it both economical and convenient. Let us send you our 
Cook Book. We will mail it free at your request. 

Carnation Milk Products Company 

463 Consumers Building, Chicago 563 Stuart Building, Seattle 



Carnation 



? ? 



From Contented Cows'' 

The label is red and 'white 




Milk 



Sold by Grocers Everywhere 

Carnation Milk Products Co. 

New York Chicago 

Aylmer, Ont. 



Seattle 



Cream Tapioca Pudding — \ l A cups water, % cup pearl 
tapio. -a, Yi cup Carnation Milk, H teaspoon salt, 3 tablespoons 
sugar , yi teaspoon vanilla, 2 eggs beaten separately. Soak tap- 
ioca one hour in enough cold water to cover. Cook in double 
boiler until transparent. Add sugar and salt to milk and egg 
yolks slightly beaten. Combine by pouring hot tapioca slowly 
on egg mixture, return to double boiler and cook until it 
thickens, then remove from fire and fold in whites of eggs 
be ten stiff. Add flavoring and chill. Serves six reople. 



Carnation Milk Toast — 1 M cups water. K cup Carnation 
Milk, }4 teaspoon ;alt. 1 tablespoon butter or substitute, 
bread cut in slices and toasted. Add the butter to the toasted 
bread. Heat the milk and add the salt. Pour over the 
toa-t and serve immediately. This recipe serves four people. 

Always thoroughly mix Carnation Milk and water. 

The Carnation Cook Kook contains more than 100 
tested, economical recipes. You will find many help- 
ful suggestions in it. It will be sent free at your request. 



Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
73 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Five Ways 

To Use 

Hay's Five Fruit 

As a Punch— Dilute with Tea or 
Lemonade, Plain in Carbonated 
water and plenty of ice. 

As a Cold Sauce — Pour over Va- 
nilla Ice Cream, Fruit Cups, 
Fritters or Cereals. 

As a Pudding Sauce — Add one 
cup boiling' water to one cup of 
FIVE FRUIT. 

As an Ice or Sherbet — 1 part to 
4 of water and freeze. 

As a Jelly or Mousse — 1 box of 
Gelatin, 1 pt. Water, 1 cup of 
FIVE FRUIT. Dissolve by 
heat then chill. 

The Pioneer Pun c/l— Originated in 1900 

If not at your grocer's, write to 
HAY'S FRUIT, JUICE CO., Portland ,|Maine 



SALAD 



cWrJ^rfH 



iOO recipes. Brief but complete 15c by mail. 100 Meat- 

tsas tecipes 15c 50 Sandwich redoes 15c All three 30c 

B. R. BRIGGS, 250 Madison St.. Brooklyn N. V 





high-grade bond paper, imprinted with your 
name and address. Neatly boxej only $> pre- 
paid West of Omaha lOci Write name and ad- 
dress p.ain.y . Y^,,.,,,, jfcfo^ (^ 1740 EJ* £. 



If you can secure a few new 
subscribers for 

AMERICAN COOKERY 
OR 

if you wish to purchase some of 
the latest and best Kitchen Fur- 
nishings and Cooking Novelties 

SEND 

for a copy of our 
"PREMIUM LIST" 



THE BOSTON COOKING SCHOOL 
MAGAZINE CO., Boston, Mass. 



"Household Helpers" 

IF YOU could engage an expert cook 
and an expert housekeeper for only 
10 cents a week, with no board or 
room, you would do it, wouldn't your 
Of course you would! Well, that is all 
our "Two Household Helpers" will 
cost you the first year — nothing there- 
after, for the rest of your life. 

Have you ever considered how much 
an hour a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a 
year is worth to you? Many workmen 
get SI an hour — surely your time is 
worth 30 cents an hour. We guarantee 
these "Helpers" to save you at least an 
hour a day, worth say $2.10 a week. 
Will you invest the 10 cents a week to gain 
$2 weekly? Send the coupon. 

And the value our "Helpers" give you 
in courage and inspiration, in peace of 
mind, in the satisfaction of progress, in 
health, happiness and the joy of living, — 
is above price. In mere dollars and cents, 
they will save their cost twelve times a 
year or more. Send the coupon. 

These helpers, "Lessons in Cooking" 
and "Household Engineering," were both 
prepared as home-study courses, and as 
such have been tried out and approved 
by thousands of our members. Thus 
they have the very highest recommenda- 
tion. Nevertheless we are willing to send 
them in book form, on a week's free trial 
in your own home. Send the coupon. 

In these difficult days you really cannot 
afford to be without our "Helpers." You 
owe it to yourself and family to give them 
a fair trial. You cannot realize what 
great help they will give you till you 
try them — and the trial costs you 
nothing! Send no money — send the cou- 
pon. 

American School of Home Economics. Chicaec 
FREE TRIAL FOR ONE WEEK 

A. S. H. E. — 803 E. 58th Street, Chicago.. 111. 

Send your two "HOUSEHOLD HELPERS," prepaid 
on a week's trial, in the De Luxe binding. If satisfactory, I 
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Reference 



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OYSTERS CLAMS 

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These delightful delicacies preserved with all 

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ALWAYS READY EASILY PREPARED 

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OYSTERS, small bottles, 30 cents each 
CLAMS, small bottles, 30 cents each 

Enjoy a bottle of each of these delicacies 

Money refunded if not satisfied 
Folder of information sent on request 

BISHOP-GIFFORD CO., Inc., Baldwin, L. I., N. Y- 



"The Art of Spending" 



Tells how to get more for your money — how to live better and 
save more! How to budget expenses and record them zvithou 
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AM. SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS, 803a E. 58th ST., CHICAGO 



Cookery Books 

by 
MRS. JANET McKENZIE HILL 

Reliable 

Easy to Follow 

Sure in Results 



Practical Cooking and Serving $2.50 

BfH . This is a complete manual of how to select, pre- 
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Cooking for Two 2.25 

Designed to give chiefly in simple and concise 
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Mrs. Hill's latest book. Practical, trust- 
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Modern methods of canning and jelly-making 
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The Up-to-Date Waitress 1.75 

A book giving the fullest and most valuable 
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The Boston Cooking School Magazine Co. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



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- Do not accept substitutes 
76 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




How Much Do YOU 

Spend For Cream? 

A St. Louis lady formerly purchased one quart oi milk 
and one-half pint of cream daily, and one pint of milk 
every other day. at a cost of $9 per month. 

Ever since she began using a Skimit she buys but 
two quarts of milk daily. 

From the two quarts. Skimit g - her one quart oi 
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KITCHEN CREAM SEPARATOR 



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AMERICAN COOKERY 



Experience has shown that the most satisfactory way 

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object for subscribers to secure new subscribers, we offer the following premiums: 
(^OIVDTTTON^ . Premiums are not given with a subscription or for a renewal, but only 
to present subscribers, for securing and sending to us new yearly sub- 
scriptions at $i.5o each. Under no circumstances are you entitled to a premium for or with 
your own subscription. The number of new subscriptions required to secure each pr^sr.ium is 
clearly stated below the description of each premium. 

Transportation is or is not paid as stated. 

INDIVIDUAL INITIAL JELLY MOULDS 

Serve Eggs, Fish and Meats in Aspic; 
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You cannot purchase them at the stores. 





This shows the jelly turned from the mould 

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44 



PATTY IRONS 



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tion. Cash Price 75 
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HEAVY TIN BORDER MOULD 

Imported, Round, 6 inch 

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Cash Price 75 cents. 



THE BOSTON COOKING SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO., Boston, Mass. 



SEND FOR COMPLETE PREMIUM LIST 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

78 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




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THE GUERNSEYYVARE COMPANY 

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Bu> ... is — Do not aca 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



clELL'O 



(Mwiicai c llUd Uawwui Ikwwt 



WHAT JELL-O IS 

IT is no longer necessary in our copy to tell 
you how convenient, how easy to make, 
how inexpensive, and how downright good 
Jell-O is. Everybody seems to know that. So 
we are going to set down a table here to show 
how near Jell-O is like the natural fruit Jelly 
that you make in your own home. 

Jell-O Fruit Jelly 



93 




Domestic Size 

makes one pint 



Sugar Vegetable Colo 


r Sugar Fruit Color 


Water Fruit Flavor 


Water Fruit Flavor 


Fruit Acid Gelatine 


Fruit Acid Pectin 



You will notice by this table that the great 
difference is that Jell-O contains gelatine 
while ordinary jelly contains pectin. 

Pectin is a substance contained in fruit juice. 
It is the element that causes the juice to "jell" 
when it has been cooked long enough. No 
particular claims are made for it as a food. 

Gelatine, on the other hand, causes Jell-O 
to "jell" and is besides a valuable food element. 
Its importance is indicated by its extensive use 
in hospitals and in the diet lists prescribed for 
almost all conditions. 

If you are particularly interested in these 
ingredients we suggest you write us for our 
complete Food Folder. 

Yet Jell-O does not pretend to be a substi- 
tute for a fruit jelly. It is not so sweet but that 
children may eat all they care for. The amount 
of fruit acid (from grapes) is just enough to be 
palatable. The colors and flavors are so nicely 
balanced and measured that it is always beau- 
tiful to look at and delightful to the taste. Best 
of 2W you'll like Jell-O after you have eaten it. 



Tine Genesee Pixre Food Compatiy 

Two Factories 

J3ridaebtzrgi Out 



LeRoyZr.Y. 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

80 



Voices of the Dawn 

Soft breaths of wind that gently pass, 

Sigh in the branches of a tree, 
And whisper in the tangled grass; 

The early droning of a bee, 
Shaking the dew from dripping wings 

Among the blossoms on the lawn; 
The sprightly chirp of waking things. 

These are the voices of the dawn. 

The falling of a loosened leaf, 

That seems loud where all is so still; 
A field-mouse rustling in a sheaf; 

The low of kine around the hill; 
A little tinkling waterfall, 

Whose bubbles gurgle and are gone; 
A skylark's song; a robin's call. 

These are the voices of the dawn. 

Clarence E. Flvnn. 



American Cookery 



VOL. XXVTT. 



AUGUST- SEPTEMBER, 1922 



NO. 2 



The Restoration of a Colonial Tavern 

By Harriet Sisson Gillespie 



AVERY delightful picture of the 
stage-coach relay-house, of Colo- 
nial days, has been preserved to 
us in the old Brookfield Tavern, recently 
removed from its original site, at Brook- 
held, Conn., to Danbury, eight miles away. 
George Ives, who purchased the relic, 
which, for more than two centuries, stood 
beside the old post road at Brookfield, 
first demolished the ancient structure, 
then reassembled the parts after its long 
journey. 

The work of removal was carried out 
with painstaking care. Each of the solid 
oak timbers was numbered, even to the 
studs, and the stones of the chimney and 
foundation photographed and marked, 
so that every stone lies in the same posi- 
tion it formerly did. As a result of the 
owner's careful supervision none of the 
quaint beauty of the old Tavern was lost, 
or its architectural features changed. 

Finally, Mr. Ives filled it with the 
furnishings of the period, and not a few 
of the pieces came from Colonial taverns 
long since passed and gone. The ancient 
structure follows the lines of the familiar 
"salt-box" type, of early days, so named 
from the fact that the roof slopes down 
to a one-story lean-to at the back, closely 
resembling the old-fashioned salt box, 
that was wont to hang beside the fire- 
place, in the Colonial kitchen. 

Simple of line and bare of ornamenta- 
tion, yet it fairly radiates good cheer. 
It is only when such a relic has been 
restored, and we view the past, in the 
light of the present, and compare the 
domestic equipment of the old-time 
tavern with that of the ubiquitous 



91 



kitchenette of today that we realize how 
very far we Americans have traveled from 
the hospitality of our forefathers. 

The Brookfield Tavern, like all the 
relay-houses, was the link between the 
settlers and the outside world. It was a 
social gathering place for the community, 
a rendezvous for the Colonists to con- 
sider important local questions, or to hear 
the gossip of the great city beyond. It 
was, also, a haven for pious church folk, 
both -before and after meeting, to obtain 
such liquid refreshment as would guard 
them from the danger of sitting in damp 
churches. 

The stage-coach routes, ;.|n Colonial 
days, were fairly numerous, but the 
towns were few and far between. . 'When 
the stage-coach route, between New York 
and Hartford, by way of Litchfield,; on 
which the Brookfield Tavern was located, 
was established by Congress, in 1792, 
there was only one ' house standing 
between it and Albany. 

As a public house of high repute, it 
took its part in the life of the community. 
During the Revolutionary War it is said 
to have sheltered General Washington, 
who, as Commander-in-Chief of the Army, 
was making a reconnaissance of British 
forces in the vicinity. It also lent its 
aid to General Putnam, and his com- 
mand, during that bitter winter encamp- 
ment in Redding. 

Jesse Benedict, the first proprietor of 
the Brookfield Tavern, was a popular and 
genial host, and the fame of his hostelry 
spread abroad. It was noted for its 
gastronomic delicacies, as well as its 
liquid refreshments, and it is easy to 



92 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



imagine with what joy the travelers 
greeted the sight of the familiar sign 
board, "At the Sign of the Black Horse," 
which, as in Colonial days, still swings 
before the entrance. 

The price of board at a public house in 
Colonial days varied from 31-50 to $2 a 
day, with a flat weekly rate of $10, and 
the abundance of foods served would 
stagger even the pampered hotel guest 
today, accustomed, as he is, to elaborate 
menus and exhaustive bills of fare. 
There were three meals a day, breakfast, 
dinner and tea. Dinner was usually 
served between 2 and 3, and tea at 7. 

The Brookfield Tavern has two en- 
trances in front. One at the left gave 
admission to the tiny entry, from which 
a narrow stairway rises and the tap-room 
opens. As may be imagined, the tap- 
room was the most important room in the 
house. It was always spacious and 
cheery, and had a huge fireplace, capable 
of holding great logs, in the depth of 



which the friendly loggerhead was thrust, 
ready to burn a mug of ale or flip for the 
expected or the unexpected visitor. 

The tap-room, at the Brookfield Tavern, 
is low ceiled, with a summer beam measur- 
ing 12 x 17 inches. Like many Colonial 
houses, of the day, the rooms were 
each treated in different colors. In this 
case the tap-room is done in a soft, lovely 
pink, that contrasts pleasingly with the 
native furniture of maple, hickory, pear 
wood, apple, ash and white pine. The 
bar, at the right of the great fireplace, 
with its quaint equipment of chimney 
furniture, seems small in comparison to 
the amount of liquid refreshment it fur- 
nished, and the necessarv accessories it 
held. 

A row of shelves holds many heavy 
glass beakers and wooden tankards, as 
well as a supply of such minor accessories 
as sugar sifters, nutmeg graters, copper 
flip heaters and toddy sticks. The most 
popular drink, in Colonial days, was flip, 




THE TAP-ROOM, AS IN COLONIAL DAYS 



RESTORATION OF A COLONIAL TAVERN 



93 




THE DINING ROOM, CABINET AND SIDEBOARD 



a distinctly American concoction, by the 
way. It was usually brewed in a pewter 
mug, an earthen pitcher, or a flip glass, 
which is a thick tumbler without handles. 
Some fine examples of flip glasses, holding 
between two and three quarts, are still to 
be found among "down East" families. 

Among the tap-room furnishings are 
many fine, old examples of early American 
furniture, very rare, and in some cases 
impossible to replace. There were quite 
as many articles furnished for the con- 
venience of the guests in Colonial days 
as in the modern hostelry today, albeit, 
they were often simple in style and crude 
in workmanship. Always, there was a 
desk at which a man could sign a note, or 
jot down memoranda, and always there 
were quill pens, sand and purple ink to 
use in the process. 

There is an Elder Brewster chair, of 
great dignity and charm, that once 
belonged to General Israel Putnam, and 
a fascinating writing arm Windsor, with 
a hoop-comb back. Fitted with two 
drawers for writing materials, one beneath 



the arm, and the other under the seat, 
with a comfy rush-bottomed stool for the 
feet, it afforded comfort enough for one to 
woo the muse under the most trying 
conditions. 

A couple of Governor Carver chairs, 
nearly two hundred years old, a folding 
gate-legged table, and a quaint oaken 
settle beside the hearth are other pieces 
noted. The most interesting of all to 
many will be the tap table, with rat-tail 
feet, which was commonly a part of 
tavern furnishings in Colonial days. 
The room is lighted with simple wrought 
iron fixtures, to hold tallow dips, and 
against the chimney breast hang two 
triple sconces, and over them the custom- 
ary fowling piece, which was always kept 
handy for use against the depredations of 
the Indians. 

The most delightful memories of Colo- 
nial davs are to be found in the old-time 
kitchen, which occupies the lean-to at the 
back. In the old-fashioned fireplace, 
with its smoky crane, the ancient kitchen 
utensils, hanging from pot hook and 



91 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



trammels, were used to prepare the 
delicious dishes for which the Colonial 
cook was famous. 

An old oaken dresser, filled with pewter 
and early Connecticut ware, is pictur- 
esquely suggestive of the hospitality of 
other days, as is, also, the unique collec- 
tion held there of schnapps bottles, in all 
sizes. There is a wine cellar, too, where 
mine host kept his supply of spiritous 
liquors, which were of a variety and kind 
to make the anti-prohibitionist of today 
green with envy. 

The dining room, to which access is had 
both from the kitchen and the entry, is a 
gracious apartment in Colonial yellow. 
The walls are covered with rare old 17th 
century paneling, and there is a quaint 
china cupboard recessed into the side 
wall, and furnished with doors, the upper 
part of which is glass and the lower 
paneled to match the walls. 

A charming old gate-legged table 
occupies the center of the room. There is 
a fine, old Heppelwhite sideboard, filled 
with antique silver, a set of Spanish 
fiddle-back chairs, and on the floor, a 



number of early American hooked rugs, 
of which Mr. Ives has a valuable collec- 
tion. In some of the rooms are home- 
spun carpets, made by the early settlers 
from the sheep raised on the farm, and 
with wool, colored by vegetable dyes 
made in the family. 

An interesting collection of stage- 
coach prints, or posters, hang on the walls, 
and in the hall is a quaint diagram, with 
the itinerary of all the stage-coa( h routes 
in the country, from "Passamaquody, 
Maine, to Sunbury, state of Georgia. " 
A number of bandanna souvenirs of the 
Washington, La Fayette, and the Ben- 
jamin Franklin variety, framed, also 
attracts the visitor. 

But, perhaps, the ancient ballroom, on 
the second floor, reached by the funny 
little stairway, that winds up in perilous 
fashion from the front door, holds the 
most precious of Colonial memories. One 
can almost hear the sound of the sleipii 
bells in the crisp, cold air, as the sleighs 
drove up before the Tavern door, and the 
young folks tumbled out of their fur 
robes, and made a dash for the cheerful 




QUAINT BEDROOM. FOUR POSTER, HIGH-BOY, BUREAU, ETC. 



TROPICAL MESSES 



95 



open fires and glow of welcome within. 

The wraps were removed in an upper 
chamber, which, with its high-post bed 
and quaint furniture, today, duplicates 
the furnishings of the older period. And 
one can see, in fancy, how the high-hung 
mirror, over the ancient dresser, flung 
back the reflections of the fair young 
Colonial belles, who prinked therein. 

The ballroom had a "spring" floor, 
highly waxed in the olden days, with a 
fiddler's gallery, and a huge fireplace, 
supplied by the great ten-foot chimney, 
with its five flues. The blazing logs must 
have lent a cheerful glow to the candle- 
lighted room, and shed a soft radiance 
over the brave young men and lovely 
women, as they took part in the dignified 
Minuet, or the more playful Money 
Musk. And at intermission there was 
the bountiful collation, always served at 
Colonial parties, when the guests, old 



and young, grew merry over the spiced 
punch, which the occasion demanded; 

It is hard to estimate the value from an 
historical viewpoint of this rare picture 
of life in old tavern days which Mr. Ives 
has preserved in the renaissance of the 
Brookfield Tavern. Not many of the 
old Colonial taverns are left, and such as 
remain are but shadows of their former 
selves. So that to have this interesting 
example, so delightfully restored for the 
benefit of those who love the Colonial, is 
as valuable as it is unusual. Except for 
the picturesque figures who trod the 
boards, there is nothing lacking, even to 
the original, old stage-coach, that plied 
the route between New York and Hart- 
ford, but fancy can easily visualize them 
and against this historic background 
build up a fabric that will live again, 
today, a faithful picture of tavern life in 
Colonial days. 



Tropical Messes 

By Jerome B. Barry 



SPEAKING as a mere man, it seems 
to me that the only thing that 
should be more laughter-provoking 
to a woman, than the sight of a bachelor 
trying to run a house by himself, is the 



sight of several bachelors engaged in the 
same sport. There is something pathetic 
about a lone man's queer makeshifts that 
is lost in the ridiculous when he becomes 
one of a crowd. Though an isolated 




A HILLSIDE VILLAGE OF TYPICAL NATIVE HUTS PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 



96 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



monkey often moves one with his gro- 
tesque caricature of the ineffable sadness 
and loneliness of a human soul, a barrel 
of monkeys has long been a synonym for 
.unadulterated fun. 

Take those same bachelors and put 
them in the most exotic of Uncle Sam's 
island possessions, among strange people 
and customs, and at the mercy of native 
cooks and servants, and thev offer a 
spectacle fit to move the household gods to 
laughter or to tears. 

Speaking of unadulterated fun, the 
trouble with the barrel, from the stand- 
point of the monkeys, is that the laughs 
are all on one side. Perhaps, in retro- 
spect, a simian with a sense of humor may 
coax up a wan smile, but at the time the 
whole business was far from comic. 

A twelve-month ago I returned from 
four years in the educational service of the 
Philippine Islands, and looking back now 
on a winter of milk and cereal, I can't 
remember a single burst of carefree 
laughter over the memories of goat meat 
and canned peaches. Five years ago I 
was a healthy, young animal, with 
omnivorous tastes; I firmlv believe that 



then I could have digested a bowl of 
stewed manicure scissors without more 
than two or three qualms. But all that 
has been changed. 

Milk and cereal is filling and nutritious, 
yet, as an exclusive diet for three or four 
months, it is lacking in an indefinable 
something. It ceases to thrill, and even 
becomes monotonous. At times I have 
found myself absent-mindedly lowing 
when the canary rattled his birdseed. 
Even now, as I prepare for a gastronomic 
debauch, by chipping a soft-boiled egg 
and puddling two soda crackers about in 
some warm milk, I feel that I am, as yet, 
only astride of the rim of the barrel, and 
shall have to wait until I am all the way 
over to the side lines, before I can fully 
appreciate the humorous side of my own 
experiences at bachelor housekeeping in 
the tropics. 

In Manila, of course, things are not at 
all bad. One can always put up at a 
hotel, and, what with fresh beef from 
Australia, and fresh vegetables, raised 
especially for marketing to the Americans 
in the capital, it is possible to live well — 
and expensively. 




CFNTRAL PLAZA IN A LARGE PROVINCIAL TOWN, ALBAY, PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 



TROPICAL MESSES 



97 



By far the greater number of us, 
though, were scattered through the 
islands, dwelling, usually, in the provin- 
cial capitals or other large municipalities. 
A town of twenty thousand natives may 
have an American population of thirty 
people or so. Some of these will be 
married couples, and some others hard- 
boiled old-timers, who prefer to herd 
alone. The younger fellows usually join 
forces, in groups of three or four, and 
form what are known as "messes," a 
word which connotes much more, in 
those parts, than the mere serving of food 
to a group. It is used, as well, of the 
house, itself, and of the collective mem- 
bers of the menage, and at various times 
might well be applied, without injustice, 
to the conditions prevailing within. 
The prospective messmates begin by 
hiring a house — not a bamboo shack 
with a fluffy roof, but an old Spanish 
house, such as abound near the central 
plaza of every large town, with a high 
stone foundation, for no one lives on the 
ground floor in the tropics, and living 
quarters in the frame, upper story. Then 
they hire a cook, and, at least, one house- 
boy, and then their troubles begin. 

No one who has not harangued a native 
servant for an hour, perspiring freely in 
his fervor, and yet knowing in his heart 
that all these ireful mandates and 
detailed instructions will be calmly 
ignored by the placid brown menial, can 
understand the resigned despair into 
which the helpless male of the species 
sinks after a glut of such encounters, con- 
tent to let the household get along by 
itself somehow, firing a servant when he 
grows unendurably lazy or becomes inso- 
lent, and hoping feebly that the next one 
will be no worse. That's the whole 
trouble, of course; the bachelor has just 
one remedy for every domestic ill — firing 
somebody — and like all panaceas the 
objection to it is not that it does not cure 
everything, but that it does not cure any- 
thing. However, he cannot train the 
boys to do better, for how can any one 
train any one else to do something of 



which he, himself, knows nothing? It 
doesn't sound reasonable. 

It is upon one's luck in getting good 
servants, then, especially a good cook, 
that the happiness of the household 
depends. The motto is, "Cherchez 
rhomme," for, nearly invariably, the 
chef is of the masculine persuasion. As 
he clop-clops about his rude kitchen, in 
heelless slippers, with his shirt tails gal- 
lantly flying free, outside his white 
trousers, the wood smoke, that goes 
wreathing up from the stove, to find its 
way out through the holes in the palm 
thatch, might well be the incense of heart- 
felt prayers, for much of the health and 
peace of mind of the white men is in his 
thin, brown hands. 

• Fortunate is the mess that secures 
one who has received his training at the 
hands of an American woman; to them 
shall be given delicate desserts, in which 
cocoanut cream plays a leading role, real 
honest-to-goodness pies (a man always 
thinks of desserts first, doesn't he?), 
beatific puddings, and a peculiarly succu- 
lent sort of custard that the Spaniards 
call leche flan. And they shall have 
salads — of luscious fruits and of strange 
vegetables, and even of young and tender 
bamboo shoots. But the picture is get- 
ting too rosy. These jewels are rare, and 
command princely salaries. Many of 
them get thirty pesos a month, which is 
about fifteen dollars, and I have known of 
one or two who received as much as twice 
that amount. And there are always the 
perquisites of the office. 

From such paragons one may run the 
gamut to placid good-for-nothings, whose 
sole accomplishments are boiling coffee, 
frying everything that will fit in a griddle, 
and opening cans enthusiastically. As a 
matter of fact, there is a tendency on the 
part of even good cooks, lacking intelli- 
gent supervision and direction, for in the 
bachelor mess it is seldom that any one 
has the knowledge or energy to attempt 
such things, to yield to the fatal lure of 
the soup and fruit can. Then the bills 
mount higher, as the zest goes out of the 



9S 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



chow, and there is trouble with the cook; 
perhaps he leaves. The dreary hunt for a 
decent successor follows, and all too often 
the last state of those men is worse than 
the first, and they gaze upon fricasseed 
chicken with anticipator^' nausea, and 
when they chew upon a bamboo salad they 
feel of their teeth and suspiciously count 
the chairs. 

The blame for much of this, of course, 
rests with the scarcity of good food in the 
provinces. The native of the lower class 
lives on rice, fish and boiled greens. 
There are few fresh vegetables, and those 
it is usually not safe to eat uncooked. 
Potatoes and onions are imported from 
Japan. 

The native beef is atrociously tough. 
The cook puts it on something hard and 
bangs it with a wooden club for half an 
hour or so; then he boils it for a long 
while, and after cutting it into liny pieces. 
fries and serves it as hamburg steak. 
For a festive occasion we once had a 
lovely, huge, imported beefsteak sent 
down from Manila on ice. The company 
were worked up to a heart-breaking pitch 
of expectancy when the time came for it 
to appear. No one had given the cocinero 
instructions for its preparation, however, 
and he had boiled it before frying. I 
never liked him after that. 

The native pork is much more appetiz- 
ing than the beef, which is undoubtedly 
the toughest meat in the world, but few 
Americans eat it, for the pigs run loose 
under the native houses amid the most 
unsanitary conditions. Goat meat some- 
times steals surreptitiously into the menu. 
It tastes no worse than the beef, but is 
very much tougher. As a result of all 
this, the staple meat is chicken. 
Omnipresent. Ubiquitous. Inevitable. 
Chicken is all of that. It is also stringy 
and resilient and totally unlike the tender 
fowl that memory treasures. Served in 
all guises — fricasseed, roasted, boiled, 
curried, minced — it becomes an obses- 
sion, an incubus and an object of loathing. 

One might think this restricted field of 
operations a sufficient handicap for any 



cook, but sometimes the cocinero is asked 
to do himself proud, not on a cooking 
range, but on a native stove, which is a 
large, shallow wooden box filled with clay 
and raised on legs. On it he kindles two 
or three little wood fires, over which the 
utensils are supported on iron tripods. 
\\ ith this equipment I have seen expert 
native cooks prepare delicious meals, 
even baking pies in an empty petroleum 
can by heaping live coals about it. 

Y\ hen I joined my first mess I became 
part owner of a cook, who turned out 
excellent provender as long as we hid 
the can-opener. He left us at the end of 
the year, for reasons to be stated here- 
after, and we sought a worthy successor in 
vain. Finally, in famished despair, we 
accepted a stubby, cofTee-colored candi- 
date with an impassive air. who claimed 
he had started to learn to cook. \\ e 
thought we might be able to give him 
some hints on American food. His name 
was Eutiquio, so we rechristened him 
Tern" and prepared for action. 

For six months we lived on hambu 
steak, boiled potatoes and canned fruit. 
He never learned to cook anything else. 
We couldn't even get him to fry the 
breakfast eggs right. He put them in a 
round-bottomed native skillet, floated 
them in grease and fried them until they 
were black and leather} - . First, we 
ordered and then besought him to give 
them just a mere touch, a hint of the fire. 
but in a day or two he would be back 
vulcanizing them again. 

Eutiquio left the house one morning, 
neck and neck with a plateful of macad- 
amized eggs, and we spent the day can- 
vassing town for a real cook. At la 
one of the missionaries bethought him 
a chap who had done quite a bit of cook- 
ing in bachelor messes, and we all took 
a trip to the bamboo hut, in which this 
Geronimo dwelt quite happily with sev- 
eral children, and a wife who did the 
washing for some of the upper-class 
families. He had not the slightest desire 
to enter the field of industry again, but 
since he was under some sort of obliga- 



TROPICAL MESSES 



99 



tion to Mr. Russell he yielded at last, and 
came along with us. 

Our meal that evening was watched for 
with avid eagerness, and a measure of 
doubtful fear. But when there appeared 
before us an appetizing broth, followed by 
delicious creamed chicken, candied sweet 
potatoes, some sort of boiled greens of 
mysterious origin, but most attractive 
taste, and a dainty cocoanut pudding, 
peace descended upon our souls, to 
remain for the rest of the year. 

Though the wages we paid our cooks 
seem ridiculously small, it must be remem- 
bered that they had other sources of 
revenue. Unless the cocinero was checked 
up carefully, the supplies had a habit of 
disappearing with startling swiftness, and 
the cash he was advanced, from day to 
day, for market purchases always was 
fully accounted for. A penny or two 
here or there was nothing to the "rich" 
Americans, and netted the poor cook a 
tidy little sum of pin money. One ex- 
pected this to be so, within reasonable 
bounds; and indeed a cook would become 
disgruntled and leave if he was entirely 
deprived of what he regarded as his 
commission. 

A most striking case was that of the 
cook for some American girls in Tarlac. 
By the way, of recent years quite a num- 
ber of young American women have been 
appointed to the Philippine teaching serv- 
ice, and they have taken the Islands quite 
by storm. 

The young ladies in question gave their 
man Friday but forty centavos a day, 
though a peso was considered remarkably 
low in other messes. He kept the table 
better supplied than any in town, how- 
ever, and, now and then, even produced a 
chicken. This astonished them at first, 
but they soon ceased to speculate about it, 
and often spoke of what a treasure Juan 
was and what a difference a little good 
management made. It horrified them to 
learn, eventually, that he made a practice 
of stealing everything and pocketing the 
forty centavos. They felt very sad over 
it. It is always depressing to find_out 



about such things and have to put an 
end to them. 

We parted from that first cook of ours, 
of whom I have spoken previously, 
because he came to conduct operations on 
too grandiose a scale. The supplies, par- 
ticularly the canned goods, disappeared at 
a rate that was, so to speak, uncanny. 
Yet each evening, after serving dinner, 
when he left for his home, he passed in 
full sight of us with his white camisa and 
trousers quite flat against his lank form. 
It took us several nights of sleuthing to 
discover that every evening, before leav- 
ing, he selected such things as struck his 
fancy, and loaded them into a large 
basket, which the houseboy lowered to 
him from the rear balcony when he had 
passed in review and was safe below. His 
wife, as we learned soon after, ran a little 
store; and if she sold the plunder at its 
market value, his total monthly earnings, 
according to our computations, were 
almost as much as those of any one of us. 
It seemed a shame to break up such a 
charming combination, but we bade him 
a regretful good-by. 

In after years, though, it would have 
taken much more than that to make us 
turn away a good cook. Nothing dis- 
qualified a boy who could place an appe- 
tizing meal on the table. Cleanliness 
was not even secondary. Geronimo, for 
example, had once been employed by the 
missionary's wife, who discharged him 
because she could not get him to abandon 
methods of which she disapproved. It 
was said that one day she found him 
polishing the pots and pans with a sock. 
Her sudden flood of anger astounded him 
for a moment; then a smile of compre- 
hension lighted his face. "It is all right, 
marm," he said. "It is my sock." 

I cannot vouch for the truth of this 
story, but I do know that the lady finally 
drove him forth when she came upon him 
separating, an egg by straining it through 
the fingers of a hand which had just 
assisted at the execution of a chicken. 

We, of the mess, never noticed any 
really bad lapses on the part of Geronimo. 



Henry Gets into Print! 

By Natalie S. Macintosh 



HEXRY has always been a com- 
fortable sort of husband. Easy 
running and steady as a three- 
hundred-and-sixty-rive day clock, but 
he certainly did give me a start the other 
evening, when he suddenly banged down 
the magazine he had been reading, and 
exclaimed, in a voice shaking with 
peevishness: 

"Gosh, if I couldn't write a better story 
than that, I'll eat my hat!" 

I didn't say anything. I was only 



thing. I certainly was exasperated, 
finally remarking that if I had wanted to 
spend my life in silence I could have 
gotten as much attention from an Egyp- 
tian mummy. My further remarks 
were to the effect that a woman marries 
for companionship. I will say this much 
for Henry, he was very patient. I don't 
know as he even defended himself. I 
declare I was really worried, and by the 
time Saturday came around, and the two 
o'clock train came in and no Henry, I had 



thinking that probably all the old, last- fully made up my mind that whatever 



season's hats were consumed by folks 
who were in the habit of making just such 
rash statements. Of course, I don't 
mean literally, though as far as I can see, 
some of the breakfast foods taste enough 
like ground-up straw hats to be really, 
truly them. Then, again, I figured that 
perhaps most of Henry's peevishness 
came, not so much from the disappointing 
story, as from the fact that he had come 
home that evening expecting a perfectly 
good bridge game, which hadn't mate- 
rialized. As for myself, I am not so good 
at bridge. There are lots of things I do 
better, and, besides, that is the only 
thing Henry and I disagree over. We 
can dance together beautifully, but as for 
playing bridge together, well, it just 
can't be done. 

So, as I said before, I really didn't pay 
much attention to Henry's remarks, 
though he sputtered about modern style 
and fool magazines until bedtime. Be- 
sides, I was pulling threads in some hand- 
kerchiefs I was making for the benefit 
sale of the Women's Club, and had to 
give the job my undivided attention. 

All the rest of the week I noticed Henry 
walking around as if he were seeing his 
Grandmother's ghost. He was so pre- 
occupied that I couldn't get him to say 
more than a word or two about any- 



had been worrying him had gotten him, 
and gotten him good. I was as jumpy 
as . an old tabby cat. Every time the 
'phone or doorbell rang I was sure it was 
news from the police station or the 
morgue. 

However, along about six o'clock, 
Henry came in. He was as chipper as a 
lark, and I knew at once that whatever 
had been worrying him had been dumped 
overboard. I can tell you I was some 
relieved. It isn't the nicest thing in the 
world to go through a suicide. I know 
people that have gone through such 
things, and I can tell you it is no joke. 
Then, too, it takes quite a spell of years 
to get used to a person's ways, and I 
can't say that, at my age, it would be 
the easiest thing to break in a new 
husband. 

But, the strangest thing about it all 
was that I couldn't, not by hints or any 
way, get a word out of Henry about what 
had been ailing him all week. 

Along about two weeks after that Henry 
came home one night with the same kind 
of a quiet spell on him. Only this time, 
after we had eaten our dinner, and were 
sitting in the living room, all comfortable 
and cosy, Henry sort of fished around 
in his coat pocket for a while, di\d then 
handed me a bunch of folded pape 



100 






HENRY GETS INTO PRINT 



101 



I could see he was kind of embarrassed. 
"What do you think of this, mother?" he 
said to me, shyly. 

"Think of what?" I said, surprised like, 
though I sensed at once what he had been 
up to, and I was so dumfounded that 
you could have knocked me over with a 
feather. I tell you, you can live with a 
man for forty-'leven years, and you won't 
know any more about him, in some ways, 
the last year than you did the first. 

Sure enough, Henry had written a 
story. It was a bully, good story, too. 
I started to read it, but I got to laughing. 
It was real funny. As good as any of 
these joke papers. Finally, Henry, he 
took the papers from me, and read the 
rest of it out to me. I laughed, and 
laughed. I had to admit it was a good 
story, from first to last. I don't suppose 
any one would have called it a marvel of 
literary style. (I got that line of talk 
from a writer fellow, who used to come 
and see us, and talk over his literary 
efforts with us.) But it was a sure cure 
for the blues. 

"What do you think of your little-old- 
last-year's husband, as a writer?" Henry 
asked me, laughing as hard as could be at 
his own stuff. 

"Pretty good," said I, "pretty good!" 

I don't know why I didn't think of 
asking Henry where he was going to send 
it. Now that I come to think of it, I 
don't believe that I really thought of his 
sending it anywhere, at all. I never have 
been much of a one to think of how 
stories got printed, or that people sold 
stuff like that. Anyway, it didn't matter 
a mite, for it seems that before Henry 
had brought his story home for me to 
read, he had fixed it all up, and sent it to 
an editor. Afterwards he told me that 
he wrote a letter, with it, and said he had 
been reading some of the stuff in that 
magazine, and thought he could do about 
as well, and so sent his story along. But 
I guess, if the truth were to leak out, 
Henry didn't write the letter quite that 
way. 

Just at this time there were lots of 



different things going on in our town, 
and Henry and me, we didn't get much 
time for reading or discussing much else 
than the various things we had been 
attending, and the people who had come 
to visit different friends of ours, so I 
guess it was nearly a month before I 
thought any more of Henry's literary 
efforts. 

Then, one. day, just as I was settled all 
comfortably for forty winks, Delia, my 
maid, came upstairs and said Mrs. 
Johnson was there to see me. I thought 
Delia looked at me rather queerly, but I 
am always imagining things about Delia, 
anyway. She's one of the very com- 
petent kind, used to running the folks 
where she stops. She hadn't been stop- 
ping with us for so very long, and I 
hadn't got used to all her ways. I didn't 
suppose I ever would, either, for I had 
about made up my mind that her ways 
and ours were too different to allow for 
much harmony, though I hadn't told her 
about that as yet. Well, I went down- 
stairs to see Mrs. Johnson. 

It didn't take me more than a minute 
to understand why Delia had looked at 
me so queerly. One glance at Mrs. 
Johnson, and I knew there was something 
wrong. Awfully wrong. And, that 
I was, somehow, connected with that 
lady's state of mind, I didn't have to 
guess. I just knew. Don't ask me how 
I knew. I knew — and that's all! 

I hardly had a chance to pass the time 
of day before she whipped out of her bag 
a magazine and thrust it under my nose. 
Then, in a voice that would have frozen 
the marrow in your bones, she demanded 
to know what in creation Henry Brown 
had meant by writing her up in a story. 

I tell you the truth, I liked to have 
died. There was that story that Henry 
had written, all printed as nicely as you 
please right in that magazine. And the 
pictures. Well, you can believe me or 
not, but there was one picture that 
looked enough like Mrs. Johnson to be 
her twin, only she didn't recognize it. 
That struck me as funny, but then Mrs. 



102 AMERICAN COOKERY 

Johnson thinks she is some looker, and Henry, he certainly has a way with him. 

this picture didn't natter her any. He soft-soaped those women, and the men, 

I couldn't say it was some other Henry too, until, at the end, every one was quite 

Brown, for there it was, in great big satisfied, and the town was feeling that 

black letters, it had quite a celebrity in its midst. 

"STORIES OF OUR TOWN" Only, by that time, the good of it had 

By HENRY PRICHARD BROWN gotten past Henry. He was wishing 

Now, there are hundreds of Henry that he had eaten his hat, instead of ever 

Browns, but not more than one or two attempting to write that story, 
with that combination of names. And Then, about the following week, he 

besides, after reading that story, nobody came home and handed me a check. It 

could very well mistake the town, or the was a good, big one. I never had any 

folks, provided they lived in it, or were idea such things brought in so much 

one of them. Not that poor Henry had money. If I had, I think I might have 

meant to do it, or had deliberately set out tried my hand at it long ago. And along 

to make fun of anybody. It was just with the check the editor had sent Henry 

that he had seen something funny in all a letter, saying that he would like to have 

those doings, and had just written it all some more stuff from his pen. 
out, just the same as if he was telling it to Wouldn't you have thought Henry 

some one. Funny, I hadn't thought of would have been real set up over that? 

it when he was reading it to me. But, Well, he wasn't! Not a mite. He acted 

when I read it over, sure enough, there as if he was downright tired of being a 

were dozens of people that I had known literary light, as it were. We used the 

for years, all woven into that story, just check for a vacation. Henry said he was 

the same as I weave pieces of old dresses glad to get away for a time. He said one- 

into my patchwork quilts. I couldn't half the town was sore at him, and the other 

say a word to Mrs. Johnson. I could half jealous. The man in the stationery 

see how she felt about it. It wasn't as if store said he was all sold out of pencils and 

Henry had said a lot of flattering things pads. Seems like everybody in town had 

about her. He hadn't. He couldn't, for taken to writing, though I haven't heard 

there isn't much like that that could be of any one getting into print, as yet. 
said about her. I was sorry, yet I I am wondering whether Henry is going 

couldn't help hoping two things, first, to go into this thing seriously. If so, 

that Henry wouldn't be sued for libel, I'm going to give him a typewriter for his 

and second, that, seeing herself as others birthday. I saw, in the back of that 

saw her might do Mrs. Johnson some magazine, where you could buy one for 

good. I don't know to this day w r hat I three dollars down, and three dollars a 

said to her, or how I got rid of her. month. Maybe, if I send the first three 

After she had gone several people dollars he would write another story and 

called up on the 'phone. One tells pay the rest of it out of that. Of course, 

another any bit of news there is in our he wouldn't be able to write about the 

town, and it had been spoken around that folks in our town. T don't think they 

Henry had gotten into print. Well, all would stand for any more stuff like that, 

that day and evening people were calling And I don't care how good Henry is at 

up and dropping in to see us. Some were explaining things away, it would take 

real pleased. Those that Henry had somebody a heap sight better than him to 

woven into the story in bright colors, explain away the next batch like that, 

but the faded ones, or the dark-colored Maybe, he could forego local fame and 

ones, they were fighty and sore. It write under some other name, or, if he 

wasn't, on the whole, the most enjoyable didn't want to do that, maybe, he could 

time in the world, only I will say for write about the folks in the next town. 



I Thank You! 

By Marie Clutter Loscalzo 



THE Lady Who Counts Her Pen- 
nies was at the linen counter 
yesterday, when I stopped to 
replenish the family towel supply. There 
were really remarkable values in table- 
cloths, on the bargain counter, but she 
made a wry face, and joined me, where I 
stood debating on whether I could manage 
with two dozen face towels, and a dozen 
bath. 

Did I say that she counts her pennies 
from necessity? 

It is quite evident, when one sees her, 
for the brave attempt to be modish on a 
small income is a light that cannot be 
hidden. Her cleaned gloves and turned 
suit are a livery in which we love her, 
though, for her kind heart is forever 
planning some pleasure for others. Yes! 
There is the secret of the saved pennies. 

The sunny smile, which usually is her 
greeting to us all, was missing, however, 
that day. Instead she looked almost 
cross. 

. "Don't look at me like that!" she said, 
irritably. 

"You think it is criminal to pass a 
bargain — but if you had undergone the 
slaps from fate, which I have this day 
smarted from, you'd not trouble yourself 
about a silly bargain! Oh, I know you 
prophesied it — but it came none the less 
hard, for all that! If I had only been a 
little bit selfish or sensible — ■ it would 
not have happened. I tell you, Marcia, 
I'll never, never, as long as I live, do 
without another thing to give some one 
else pleasure. Never!" 

I was tired, so I suggested tea and 
cakes, when the story could be unrolled 
for. my benefit. 

My proposal was accepted almost 
rapturously — ■ itself a novelty, for the 
Lady Who Counts Her Pennies has earned 
the . title of POLLYANNA, from her 



stubborn belief in the various bene- 
ficiaries who tag after her. 

"Tell me what happened to make you 
sensible? Did you lose your fund for 
giving the neighborhood children birth- 
days — " 

She almost sputtered, as she tried to 
swallow her tea and answer quickly. 

"Birthdays! Marcia! Don't ever 
mention birthdays to me again! You've 
never allowed me to give you anything 
on yours, and bless you for it. Birthdays ! 
Do you know, Marcia, three of my family 
had birthdays last week — and Dick's 
mother, too? And, then, you know I've 
tried so hard to brighten the lives of 
those less fortunate, about me — ■ really 
tried! And the janitor's little daughter 
was thirteen, and the baby two, and the 
fruit-stand man's little boy was six — ' 
such a bright child! Then the neighbor 
you met — Mrs. Link, took such pains 
to inform me that her birthday was 
Tuesday — and after all the things she 
has done for me — ■ yes, I know I have 
reciprocated — but Marcia — ■ she hinted 
so! And you know Helen Corbin's 
birthday was Friday — ■ even if she has 
everything, she was our friend at school — 
well, Marcia — ■ I simply hadn't money 
enough to pay the milk bill left the first of 
this week! 

"But that isn't the worst of it. I'd not 
have minded doing without everything — 
but do you know, from all those gifts, I 
received just two 'thank yous'? From 
Dick's mother, who sent a dear little 
note for the negligee I made her, and 
Aunt Ellen, who wrote at once that her 
knitting basket was exactly right — and 
'thank you.' 

• "What is the matter with people, any 
way, Marcia? You know when we were 
growing up we were taught to say, 
'thank you,' for every kindness or gift 



103 



- 



RY 



And notes muf . to 

the I gifts Hew well I remember 

mother's lecture to me when I thanked 

m for n. ri bracelet — c 

the hone! I never did that again! 

"But brother Sam's wife 'phoned me 
that the marmalade pot I sent her had 
arrived — and I shouldn't have bothe 
to send her one — she had two! How 
aid I know that? She never uses 
them, and was raving about the mar- 
malade jars at Heiter's the other day. 
And in the medley of a 'phone conversa- 
tion she neglected to thank me at all for 
what I couldn't afford to send her. And 
Cousin Julia — the one who is doing wel- 
fare work, sent me a begging card for one 
:: he: charities, ar.i :;-.vr. :r. ;:.e ccrr.er 
scribbled — 'Lamp receivech sec you soon.' 
That v.as .-hrsciuteiy ah. ar.ci I 

r.ere fcr that r: e:iai .:.~:.z 
t: rr.atch her har.gihgs ir. that ?r:::> ;- ^:: 
she has in the settlement house. Not 
have I seen her. When I do she will h 
forgotten all about thank 

"Then, there was the janitor's little 
girl. She always is dirty, always un- 
kempt, and her clothes look so rag-bag \ 
so I bought her a really good middy dres s . 
with a tie to match — but the mother 
never even told me if she received it. I 
was driven to ask if it had arrived. Yes, 
it hac the child liked it well enough, 

Jr. 

baby's clothes came, too — I had sent 
some little slips for the baby — but there 
was not one word of thanks Can't 
people pronounce the words 'thank you, 1 
ar.y r:.: Tr- 
ior Helen — you know she is such 
a =r::-ar.c-sra:". housekeeper, sc I ser.t 
her some lovely Madeira napkins — and 
if she received them, I've not heard of it. 
She must have — I sent them regi Bte red. 

'The little boy at the fruit stand did 
actually say, 'thank you, lady,' for the 
cheap toy I gave him. I wish I had 

en him something better, for gratitude 
deserves encouragement. 

4< Not that I want to be thanked, a, 

for thing — but it's the spirit. I 



- e wholly — and to ha - gift* so 

regarded — it hurti my belief in 
human nature. 

She paused to sip her tea, now cold. I 
beckoned the waiter to bring a fresh pot, 
and said a few things myself; Marcia had 
happened upon one of my hobbies. The 
nonchalant air the younger generation 
it ace 11 and sundry favors 

ts just due. without a word of acknowl- 
edgment, h -red me to wrath more 
than one 

I knew exactly how the Lacy Who 
„ : . ■ -- :-. -. : Pehhie- felt. I had seer, sc 
many children greedily snatch a proffered 
gift, and scurry ithout a word. I 

.:-. _ ; ee: _:; :.;;.;.; re:. :. ■.'.-:- . - - 
of course hardly acquired beneficen 
and even sneer at the giver. 

I recalled the sacrifices of a friend, who 
gave her only son a much better education 
than she could afford, and now hears him 
boast of his self-sue :ess. while she still 
pinches along on what she can earn her- 
e: ratitude is like faith — without 

rks, it is naught. 

T] :v Who Counts Her Pennies 

:aring at me. I found, on coming 
out ■::" :he reverie, which followed mv 
"lecture 

"You look as if you were going to 
:::'.„: ; e get it over — I must 

hurry home. It's Dick's birthday — " 

I laughed at her self-conscious pause. 

"The :u go again — Dick's birth- 

A a d will . ' t h a :. k you ,' do you 

; .::r:re : What have you bought for 



Oh. Dick: Of course, he will say 
thanks — don't you know I fell in love 
with Dick when he was ten and I was 
eight — for the he said, 'thank you,' 

when he pulled me out of a snow bank 
on Dobbins' Hill: I was too scared to 
anything — and so he said it for me. 
The old dear. Yes. I found a beautiful 
pipe for him — and some of his pet 
tobacc 

The dear I Who Counts Her Pt 

nies! Always polling people, always 
vorld of love on others — v. 



MAKING HARRY HAPPY 



105 



grab all she bestows and then hurt her 
tender heart by indifferent forgetting. 

How few the opportunities given her to 
say, "thank you"! 

And she is so grateful for the smallest 
kindness — even tiny gifts quite enrap- 
ture her. 

Certainly she is out of place in this 
business-like world, where the very 
children regard their acquaintances as 
possible assets, and never even think of 
thanks. 

It isn't a question of manners alone — 
but of ethics. 

Get all one can from all one can. That 
is the modern slogan. Thanks implies 
obligation. There isn't any, Master and 
Miss 1922 consider — on their part. 
There is only a due — to them. 

"Gimme" is slang, maybe, but it defines 
the modern attitude too well to be barred. 

"I thank you" is "old stuff" — there- 
fore condemned. 

Or would be if it were even thought of. 
It simply is "not there" in the present- 
day mind. 

I said something of this to my com- 
panion, as I often had done before, and 
she this time agreed with me. 



"I'm going to begin to train Junior 
right now — " (Junior is three months 
old!) 

"He shall know how to say, 'thanks,' 
and 'please,' and all the good, old respect- 
ful words. Yes — if I must spank them 
into him, he shall be taught them!" 

I laughed and hastily paid the bill to 
avoid an argument with her. 

We were threading our way out of the 
busy tea-room, when a girl ahead of us 
dropped her purse. An elderly lady, fol- 
lowing her, picked it up and handed it to 
the girl, who stared rudely into the flush- 
ing old face, and then wheeled away, 
without a word. 

Shame tingled all over me for the ill- 
bred act. 

For that is what it is — this neglect of 
common courtesies — ill-breeding and 
nothing else. 

But my companion was speaking to me 
as we stood waiting for the elevator to 
take us to a lower level, and her words 
were sweet in this uncivil day: 

"Thank you, Marcia, for the tea — 
and a chance to talk my cross-temper 
away. I feel worlds better already — 
thanks to you." 



Making Harry Happy 

By Ruth Fargo 



WHEN I married, like many an- 
other bride, my future spread 
before me all sparkling with 
radiant rose and gold; the running sands 
in my hourglass were made of star-dust; 
the sunshine dappled down upon perfect 
days from a perfect cobalt sky. I was 
inordinately happy — and maddeningly 
ignorant. Else how could things have 
happened that did happen ? — and so 
soon? 

Willingly had I abdicated a crown in 
the realm of Girlhood, gleefully had I 



accepted an ambassadorship in an un- 
known province: I became Keeper of the 
Sacred Hearth-Fire. But I did not know 
that the duties of that office are multiple, 
and many of them very prosaic. And, 
perhaps, none more prosaic than being 
the professional oiler of the matrimonial 
machinery. For such every successful 
wife must be. But this a bride so seldom 
knows; she does not realize that under all 
the fuss and feathers of outward phrase, 
be it "equal suffrage," "woman's rights," 
"the new woman," or what not, her work 



106 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



is much the same as was her grand- 
mother's — much the same in essential 
as has been every woman's since the time 
of the first Cave Man; all in spite of 
revolution in economic conditions, or 
evolution of the home. Whatever a 
wife may do, whatever her work may be, 
back of it all, and at the foundation of 
her happiness, lies the same small task — 
the oiling of the matrimonial machinery. 
It is no light work; it may not be slighted. 
For no set of machinery ever invented is 
quite so complicated or quite so much in 
need of eternal oil as the matrimonial. 
It means work, in season and out; and 
yet to many who are expert and wise the 
task sits so lightly upon their fair shoul- 
ders; has, indeed, come to be so integral a 
part of their every-day existence, that 
they quite forget to instruct the slim, 
wonder-eyed daughters who with pain 
and joy are trying to decipher the mes- 
sages of life. Too often, all thought 
seems centered on a pretty trousseau. 
Beyond that the little bride makes her 
own way — or comes to wreck — be- 
tween Scvlla and Charvbdis. For life is 
not made up of ''sugar and spice, and all 
things nice," according to the old jingle; 
it contains also "snips and snails, and 
puppy dogs' tails." Indeed, life is not 
made up at all of honeymoons any more 
than the years are made up of holidays. 
And, come to think about it sensibly, 
how tiresome an eternal holidav might 
be! 

If our daughters but realized this in 
time! If they did, I fancy they would 
come, bright-faced, to tackle their task — 
that of being the professional oiler of the 
matrimonial machinerv — ■ with a de- 
termination to succeed, like — well, like 
a man does if he "amounts to anything." 
When a man goes into business, takes up 
his life task, he is willing to work, and to 
wait, and to leave no stone unturned, if 
the turning leads on to success. Making 
a home for her mate is the life work of 
many a woman, and no trivial task is it 
to make the right kind of a home — a 
home for herself, her husband, their 



children. The man builds the house and 
brings to it his bride; he gives the keys of 
their happiness into her keeping and then 
he turns to his own work of "making a 
living," his faith in his young wife ab- 
solute. If our daughters just under- 
stood! If — ! Well, if they did the 
grist poured into the mills of the Divorce 
Gods would diminish with astonishing 
rapidity. . . . But too many of our 
girls do not know — till too late. Even 
instinct fails to come to their rescue, so 
coated over is it with romantic teaching, 
so encased is it with "story-book" 
thrills. The first time the young hus- 
band absently forgets a caress they weep 
till their eyelids are woefully red. It 
would be as absurd to cry because the 
violets are gone when an all summer of 
roses is just ahead. Married life, beyond 
the honeymoon, is one long summer of 
roses — think of it, little girl-wife! There 
are the thorns; but who remembers the 
thorns? There are also the beautiful 
roses — white, and yellow, and red; 
roses, roses, roses! 

"But Harry must do his part," pouts 
the pretty girl-bride. True. But some- 
times, from a pretty bride's viewpoint 
Harry's part is more than any one ordi- 
nary mortal man has ever been known to 
encompass. It embraces about every- 
thing from the remembering of a certain 
birthday date to sending home the canta- 
loupe for breakfast. . . . And busi- 
ness — oh, yes; business, of course' 
But that is incidental (according to many 
a bride); Harry is bound to succeed — 
Harry could not fail — therefore, Harry's 
main business in life is making little Mrs. 
Bride happy by giving her his undivided 
attention at any moment her whim may 
wish to claim such attention. Of course, 
Harry must make her happy! Did he 
not promise to make her the "happiest 
woman in the world"? Well, it is up to 
Harry to do it. . . . And, alas, per- 
haps Mother never happened to mention 
to her slim, wonder-eyed daughter that, 
by right of inheritance, she became when 
she married professional oiler of matri- 



MAKING HARRY HAPPY 



107 



monial machinery. . . . And so do 
the mills of the Divorce Gods grind 
merrily on! 

Happily, as a bride, I moved into the 
town where lived Aunt Harriot — by 
token of this fact the fates were very good 
to me; for few are the brides who are 
more ignorant than was I. "Half-way! 
I'll go half-way — not one inch mc: 
wailed I to sensible Aunt Harriot at the 
bitter end of one rose and gold day. And 
Aunt Harriot, sensible Aunt * Harriot, 
said to me: 

"It's a ticklish place to rind, my dear: a 
ticklish place to find. Half-way! I'd 
druther hunt for a needle in a haystack.'* 

Many's the time I've thought of it 
since, and many's the time I did not 
dare stop — for fear I might miss coming 
the full half-way. Half-way in a garden 
of roses! . . . "Dear heart, wander 
round and forget about half-way: you'll 
be happier so." That is what Aunt 
Harriot said to me at the miserable end 
of my rose and gold day. 

And then to make matters "sure, and 
doubly sure," going home on the street 
car, I managed to sit just back of Madam 
Grundy I did not mean to eavesdrop, 
but the things I heard were very good for 
me to hear. The things I heard were all 
about Harry and me — principally me. 
And the things I heard were not pre- 
destined to bolster up my self-conceit. 
For days after that I did some hard, 
sober thinking. And then > Fate fearing 
I might yet fail) out of my overcast sky. 
the inevitable, the unexpected, the im- 
possible was cast upon me. Harry had 
been hurt. It was at a fire. And in our 
little town many a man, as did my hus- 
band, belonged to a volunteer truck and 
ladder company. But to think that it 
was Harry — ! They brought him home 
to me, and it was days before I knew if 
he would live or die, days before he knew 
me. But in those long days all trace of 
bitterness was swept from my heart; I 
deliberately and forever turned my back 
upon any luring, lurking, mocking 
thought of Reno. The mills of the 



Divorce Gods were not for me; and 
"half-way'' became a place forgotten. 

Indeed, for eighteen months as the 
calendar marked time, I stepped into 
Harry's shoes. I became the bread- 
winner for the family; and long before 
the eighteen months were over, and 
Harry again took his place in the business 
world, I had learned that it takes a 
wondrous amount of mental concen- 
tration plus a-plenty of "plain leg-work" 
to earn the daily bread consumed by the 
average family. It is omething of a 
race to keep ahead of the butcher, the 
baker, and the candle-stick maker! It 
is strenuous business keeping enough in 
the bank to pay the bills. . . . Xo 
wonder, I often thought, in those weary 
days, that Harry forgot my birthday 
date — or the cantaloupes for break- 
fast! ... If every woman, once in a 
lifetime, could earn the pennies it takes 
to keep up an ordinary home, with an 
ordinary family, she would ever after 
spend the pennies "Harry" provided with 
scrupulous care and careful thought. I 
am not speaking so much of the wives of 
men of money, but of the wives of 
average American men, the men who do 
not gather to themselves great riches, the 
men who have comfortable incomes :: 
comfortably spent), and small amounts of 
surplus. And, perhaps, of all people 
these average American men and their 
wives make up the happiest class of folk 
on the face of the earth- The blueb 
sings by their doors. 

But during that eighteen months of 
labor, when I stood in Harry's shoes and 
in mine. I learned many things. (It 
happened that, going about in a wheel 
chair while bones and bruises hea'.: 
Harry could do much of my work at 
home, while I went to the office. And 
never once did my husband complain.) 
I came to realize that the average, ordi- 
nary mortal man comes home from his 
business at night quite frazzled out at 
the edges. If the Unexpected in the 
shape of friction — is not friction always 
unexpected ? — comes along, the man of 



108 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



the house is more apt to let off steam 
than to oil the creaks. And yet, if the 
valuable machinery of one's life is to be 
preserved from wreck, oil must be ap- 
plied. It is woman's work. It is her 
heritage. For some millions of genera- 
tions man has been busy with the 
"making a living"; and, if he ever knew, 
he seems quite to have forgotten how to 
play the part of Professional Oiler of 
Matrimonial Machinery. But — ! He 
makes a most admirable First Assistant. 
If only his girl-wife finds it out. 

As for me, I found it out none too soon. 
Sometimes, even yet, I shudder to think 
of what might have been, to think how 
nearly I came to missing life in my garden 
of roses, how nearly I came to missing 
the wholesome camaraderie of a big- 
hearted man — my Harry. I might have 
gone on through life, alone, missing home 
and love and childish hands; I might have 
been one of the devotees before the great 
Divorce God, yielding my pitiful bag of 
grist. What was it that really brought 
me to my senses? Was it Aunt Harriot? 
— or Madam Grundy ? — or was it the 
fire with its fearful results? . . . And 
yet, if I had but understood the diplo- 
matic duties of my post I might have 
been spared all those unhappy days that 
came treading upon the heels of my rose 
and gold honeymoon like Mephisto- 
phelian jabberwocks. Such a period of 
wrenching misery is no more necessary in 
the ordinary course of married life than 
is meningitis; yet so many young wives 
are struggling in its throes. Instead of 
applying needed oil, without ostenta- 



tion, they are searching for the "half- 
way" sign. Instead of finding what is 
wisest, what is best, for the happiness 
of all concerned, they are insisting upon 
their "rights," engulfed in tides of gall 
and wormwood, struggling with the 
anesthesia of mental meningitis. And 
all too often there is never an Aunt 
Harriot ! — or an overheard Madam 
Grundy! — or the fearful awakening by 
fire! . . . And the mills of the Di- 
vorce Gods grind merrily on I 

Sometimes I long to protest against the 
too-far swing of the pendulum — the 
pendulum of a woman's independence. 
For no two people are perfect, male or 
female; and no two people may live 
together without much of forbearance. 
Sometimes when I see the hard look 
coming into a young wife's eyes I know 
by that muted sign she is threading her 
way between Scylla and Charybdis; I 
long to reach out a helping hand, and 
may not. 

As for Harry and Harry's wife, we 
have come upon the safe heights where, 
according to all signs, we are to "live 
happily ever after." But, wisely, I 
know I shall always have need of an oil 
can — the matrimonial machinery is far 
too precious to run risk of rust. Nor, 
in caring for it, do I exhibit anything of 
squaw humility; I merely have due re- 
gard for a valuable plant, even as would 
my husband manage a million-dollared 
factory. And because of this the Blue- 
bird of Happiness sings daily by my door. 
My House of Love, the home of my heart, 
is rock-rooted, and "eternally shall stand.' 5 



Camp Cooking Fires 

By Ladd Plumley 



MANY camp cooks are experts, 
not in frying fish, making coffee, 
and all the rest, but in cooking 
themselves; and the great majority of 



camp-food searing places are a Spanish 
inquisition, but with the religious ele- 
ment left out. After the ordeal by fire 
the cook, judging from his or her face and 



CAMP COOKING FIRES 



109 



hands, would be a tempting morsel for a 
giant cannibal, who liked portions of his 
cooked human tidbit rawish, but well 
smoked in the places protected by 
clothing. 

Let us decide, in advance, what is the 
preferred object of a camp cooking fire. 
It is not for heat, or, in the evening, for 
an illumination of the camp, or a signal 
fire, to be seen from a distant mountain 
top. It is a cooking fire, and a petty 
blaze, hardly any blaze at all, will, if it be 
in the right place, bring coffee to the boil- 
ing point, and perform that magic on 
food which was invented, perhaps, by a 
granddaughter of Eve. Some invention 
that; and man has loved fire ever since, 
and most women have been slaves, since, 
throughout the centuries, to the arts con- 
jured by the ruddy flame. 

We might suppose that, having dealt 
through these centuries with fire, for his 
specific purposes, for forges and for the 
mechanical arts, generally, bits of heat 
on a horseshoe, or along the blade of a 
sword, that man, himself, would have 
mastered this hot slave, and that man 
would instinctively know what a camp 
cooking fire should be. Not so. On a 
camping trip, let the average male build 
a cooking fire, and his ambition leaps high. 
He builds a pillar of flame and smoke that 
will heat a frying pan to redness, unsolder 
the handles from all the utensils, and 
smoke the cook, first to the redolence of a 
finnan haddie, and then make a martyr of 
her, leaving out the chain and stake. 

I have attempted to rub in what a 
camp cooking fire should not be. It is 
so easy to build the wrong kind, and it is 
so tempting to build the wrong kind, and 
the wrong kind is so universally practiced 
in the woods, that too much rubbing in is 
impossible. 

The camp cooking fire should be petty. 
It should be comparatively smokeless, 
and it should consist, practically, of small 
separate fires for each utensil, or should 
be a fire so distributed that a small blaze 
is under each separate utensil. The 
kind of fire that a Daniel Boone would 



employ, when Indians were near, and if 
notice of smoke and blaze in cooking were 
advertised, your scalp-lock would no 
longer be a personal decoration. 

Good fuel for camp cookery can nearly 
always be gotten. If the camp is beside 
a stream or lake, there is generally drift- 
wood at the turns of the stream, or back 
from the shores of the lake. Select that 
which is well above the summer floodline, 
small pieces, which break with a snap. 

If drift be not at hand, select standing, 
dead saplings, and hanging, winter killed, 
dead branches of trees. Small stuff that 
gives notice of its dryness by its brittle- 
ness. For kindlings, nothing is better 
than the shaggy, outer curl of the bark 
of the birch. Birch whiskers, or curl, 
will burn even when wet. 

If the camp is not a one-night stand, 
and even if it is, and there is time enough 
before dark, build a "Nessmuk Camp 
Range." This is the most convenient 
camp cooking device that has ever been 
invented, and it is far and away more 
convenient for cooking in the open than 
camp sheet-iron cook stoves, and iron 
firedogs. Besides, there should be ethics 
in camp cookery, and, indeed, in all life 
in the open. The best chairs are fallen 
logs, as the best beds are beds of browse, 
and the only wall decorations noticeable 
are the greenery of the forest hangings. 
And a mossy carpet has hues that no 
Turkish rug-maker could ever conjure. 
So, in constructing a camp cooking 
device, the materials found in the woods 
should be employed. And the witch's 
gibbet for pots that are slung on chains, 
which is sometimes the choice of camp 
roasters of their own flesh, had best be 
left to the pages of Shakespeare. 

The "Nessmuk Camp Range" is noth- 
ing but a couple of four or five foot 
lengths of eight-inch green logs, even 
smaller logs will serve. Don't use birch, 
and beech is the best. Green birch burns 
too easily for use in the camp range. 
Flatten the tops of the logs slightly with 
a hatchet or an ax, and place the logs, side 
{Concluded on page 1.4.0) 



110 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



AMERICAN COOKERY 

FORMERLY THE 

BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL 
MAGAZINE 

OF 

Culinary Science and Domestic Economics 

Subscription $1.50 per Year, Single CopiesISc 
Postage to Foreign Countries, 40c per Year 

TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The date stamped on the wrapper is the date 
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Please renew on receipt of the colored blank 
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August ! 



August! August! we welcome thee 
With joyful hearts and gratitude! 

'Tis with elation 

We hail vacation 

And solitude! 

August! August! thy scorching rays 
Bid us make haste to mountain side — 

And at the dawning 

Of each fair morning 

Bless thee with pride. 

August! August! thy coat of tan 
And blush of health become us well — 

In fullest measure 

They bring us pleasure 

Unparallel! 

August! August! fair nature's queen 
Of passing months; each year anew 

We hail thee gladly — 

But alas! sadly 

Bid thee adieu! 

Caroline L. Sumner. 



RETURNING PROSPERITY 

CONTROVERSIES over the open- 
shop, tariffs, bonuses and subsidies 
are the main stumbling blocks to returning 
prosperity. Of the open-shop, and the 



policy of low tariff nothing derogatory 
can be said against them. They are 
propositions that deal with self-evident 
truths. 

It is a well-known fact, that organized 
labor was granted exorbitant wages as a 
war-time necessity. The munition makers 
and other employees of the government 
became the profiteers of the day, which 
they seem inclined to maintain. In the 
matter of deflation Samuel Gompers, 
president of the labor organization, at the 
outset, took the stand that, no matter 
what happened in other lines of industry, 
wages should not be reduced. His atti- 
tude was unjustified and wrong then, has 
continued to be the same, and is wrong 
now. If sacrifices are to be made they 
must be just and fair and universal in 
application. In America all class-dis- 
tinctions are to be avoided, special priv- 
ileges are intolerable, all legislation in 
favor of a few and to the detriment of 
many is unjust, unwise and provocative 
of unrest. Self-seeking does not fit well 
into the world's new scheme of social life 
and activity. Let us not overlook, or 
lose sight of our ideals, but so conduct our 
affairs at home, and act our part abroad, 
that the spirit of the Man of Peace may 
prevail in all parts of the earth. 

The signs of the time are propitious. 
The demand for labor on every hand is 
increasing. Strikes are uncalled for. 
The great call is for the resumption of 
business. Surely, at this time, a strike 
will react to the disadvantage of the 
employees. The great public, the con- 
sumer, should now receive some considera- 
tion; they want a fair, square deal. 

AGAINST EVERYTHING 

POLITICS aside, there is no denying 
the injury wrought by the prevailing 
attitude of chiding and stricture. Specific 
criticism aimed at proved and actually 
remediable abuses is one thing; mere 
grousing against everything in general is 
what damages and destroys. Nothing 
is more common than a sort of composite 
attitude of dissatisfaction, discontent, 



EDITORIALS 



111 



spleen and suspicion, which is nearly 
always divorced from constructive and 
practical working suggestions for im- 
provement. 

Those who are rich or in other respects 
fortunate too often look upon labor unions 
and their leaders, together with most 
workmen, domestic servants and em- 
ployees, generally, as robbers and loafers. 
Those whose work is manual look upon 
the rich and otherwise fortunate in 
exactly the same way. Inventors and 
others in search of capital regard the 
banks as thieves, and bankers quite often 
look upon those in search of capital as 
unbalanced cranks. Landlords and re- 
tailers are generally supposed to be prof- 
iteers. To those outside of it Wall Street 
is a den of iniquity. To the city man the 
farmer seems to be asking for special 
privileges, the farmer often sees every one 
else turned against him. Every one sus- 
pects every one else of raiding the public 
treasury in the form of tariffs, bonuses, 
subsidies or other special privileges. 

It would be possible to go on in this 
way indefinitely. Perhaps there will be 
more straight thinking, as the war recedes 
into the distance, and the hysterias that 
it set in motion are slowly calmed. Men- 
tal disturbances and economic fallacies 
were stimulated also by the business 
depression of 1920 and 1921. A more 
reasoning attitude may accompany a less 
disturbed business movement. But re- 
sponsibility for the carping, grousing 
attitude of mind cannot be wholly laid 
at the door of the war, or of the great 
economic movements over which the 
individual has no control. There is no 
such ready escape for any given man or 
woman. No one is exempt from the 
biting truth of this passage from A. S. M. 
Hutchinson's novel, "If Winter Comes": 
"She thought charity meant giving jelly 
and red flannel to the poor; she thought 
generosity meant giving money to some 
one; she thought selfishness meant, not 
giving money to some one. She had no 
idea that the only real charity is charity 
of mind, the only real generosity gener- 



osity of mind, and the only real selfish- 
ness selfishness of mind." 

From The Saturday Evening Post. 

STOP, LOOK, LISTEN 

IN the nation-wide discussion, regarding 
the 18th Amendment, it is well to keep 
in mind important facts, which are of 
vital importance, in order to arrive at 
correct conclusions. The opponents of 
prohibition declare that in adopting 
prohibition we departed from the prin- 
ciples upon which this Republic was 
founded, and introduced an entirely new 
principle into our methods of govern- 
ment. Let us examine this statement, 
and see if this charge is true. 

The Preamble to the Constitution says: 
"We the People of the United States, in 
order to form a more perfect Union, estab- 
lish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, 
provide for the common defence, promote 
the general Welfare, and secure the Bless- 
ings of Liberty to ourselves and our 
Posterity, do ordain and establish this 
Constitution for the United States of 
America." 

The history of the liquor traffic shows 
conclusively that the traffic has been 
everywhere the enemy of domestic tran- 
quility, and the foe of the general welfare. 
It has' obstructed justice, degraded our 
political life, destroyed family happiness, 
and filled our jails and criminal institutions 
with inmates. It has inflicted upon us 
burdens heavy and grievous to be borne. 
This being the case it was our bounden 
duty, in order to protect this nation, and 
to maintain the fundamental principles 
upon which the Republic was founded, to 
put all the powers of government against 
this enemy of the public welfare. So far, 
therefore, from introducing a new idea into 
government, we were simply using the 
powers which we had in order to remove a 
dangerous foe. In doing this we took a 
great forward step for the welfare of human- 
ity, and established this nation more firmly 
than ever upon the organic principles 
upon which it was founded. As stated 
by Bishop Lawrence in his admirable 



112 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



address to the Diocesan Convention of 
the Episcopal Church — • "The nation 
which has stopped drinking intoxicating 
liquors has thrown off one of the heaviest 
weights in the race for industrial leader- 
ship. And whether you or I, or any other 
citizen likes it or not, it is the plain duty 
of every citizen to respect and obey the 
law." 

Again — "The multitude of wives and 
husbands, too, and children that are the 
happier and healthier for prohibition, the 
decrease of numbers of arrests for 
drunkenness, of inmates of jails and poor- 
houses, the gratitude that goes up from 
thousands of homes, of the people of 
moderate means, and the well-to-do, that 
one or other member of the family has 
gone to work, is enough, one would think, 
to touch the heart of any one." 

Facts like these should stir us to 
action. With over thirty organizations 
working to repeal this beneficent law 
every loyal citizen should be on the alert. 
Demanding efficient enforcement, and up- 
holding the efforts of honest officials; we 
can, if w r e will, crush out the lawlessness 
which tends to anarchy, and move for- 
ward with long strides in the path of 
civic righteousness. 

Yours for enforced prohibition. 

J. B. L. 

THE TIME BUDGET 

BEFORE I discovered the magic secret 
of the time budget, my housekeeping 
drove me to despair. There was always 
a mob of duties clamoring for my attention 
at the same time, and not enough hours 
in the day for half of them, to say nothing 
of opportunity for needed rest and 
recreation. 

A magazine article opened my eyes to 
the possibilities of a definite plan for the 
housewife's working day. At once I 
adapted the suggested schedule to my 
particular needs and began to follow it. 
And what a transformation it worked! 

Formerly, on some days I would 
drudge, from morning till night, not even 
taking time to put on a fresh dress for 



evening, and again I would give up the 
unequal struggle and simply loaf through 
the day. Now, instead of either daw- 
dling along aimlessly, or desperately 
attacking every task I happened to think 
of, everything went by the clock. There 
was a definite time for getting breakfast, 
washing dishes, cleaning the kitchen, 
setting other rooms to rights, bedmaking, 
each day's special task, lunch, washing 
dishes, rest period, dressing for the after- 
noon, several hours for recreation, or 
congenial employment, dinner, and an 
outing or a restful evening at home. 

The daily time budget involves several 
other worry-saving methods. One is the 
children's schedule, by which the routine 
of their day is fitted into my plans. 
Another is the making of menus for a 
week at a time. The plan which con- 
tributes most to my own health and 
happiness is the weekly schedule, by 
which the various tasks necessary for the 
upkeep of the home are allotted to partic- 
ular days. I no longer bear the burden 
of all at once, but do each day's allow- 
ance — cleaning the kitchen, polishing 
the silver, or mending — and everything 
is kept in order with a minimum of worry 
and drudgery. 

The use of a time budget is a financial 
blessing as well. Supplies can be bought 
more economically for a week or a month, 
than if some one is sent in frantic haste 
for a can of something or other a few 
minutes before the meal. Then, too, the 
practice of economizing, in time, leads to 
a greater care in the expenditure of the 
household money. 

In my case the time budget has proved 
to be an undoubted success, and I am sure 
my family now enjoy my society more 
than when they used to find me dis- 
couraged, cross, and — I may as well 
admit it — untidy, at the end of a far 
from perfect day. H. S. S. 



Can you afford to be without American 
Cookery? Kindly renew your subscrip- 
tion promptly. 




GRAPE PUNCH 

Seasonable-and-Tested Recipes 

By Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 

IN ALL recipes where flour is used, unless otherwise stated, the flour is measured after sifting 
once. Where flour is measured by cups, the cup is filled with a spoon, and a level cupful is meant. 
A tablespoonful or a teaspoonful of any designated material is a LEVEL spoonful. In flour mixtures 
where yeast is called for, use bread flour; in all other flour mixtures, use cake or pastry flour. 



Cream of Mushroom Soup 

STEW a pint of mushrooms in stock 
or water, enough to cover, for an 
hour. Press through a colander, 
and prepare the following: Two ounces 
of softened butter, rubbed smooth with 
one-quarter a cup of flour; two teaspoon- 
fuls of salt, and one-half a teaspoonful of 
white pepper, mixing all to a smooth 
paste. Add this to a quart of hot milk, 
and stir over fire until the whole boils and 
makes a smooth, slightly thickened 
mixture. Add the mushrooms; pour 
into a tureen, and garnish with parsley. 

Puree of Cucumbers 

Cut in pieces three or four very large 
cucumbers, and let stew in a pint of veal 



stock with two tablespoonfuls of scraped 
onion until quite soft and tender. Press 
through a colander. Prepare the follow- 
ing foundation for the puree: Cook one- 
half an onion in three tablespoonfuls of 
butter until brown, then add six table- 
spoonfuls of flour, one teaspoonful of 
tomato catsup, one-half a teaspoonful of 
mixed, dried herbs, and two cups of well-' 
seasoned brown stock; then add the 
sifted cucumbers, and when the whole 
boils stir in two eggs, well beaten, with 
one-half a cup of cream. Stir rapidly 
over the fire for a moment until eggs are 
barely set, then pour into the tureen and 
serve with croutons. 

Savory Stewed Okra 

Cut tops and tails from one quart of 



113 



114 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



okra pods, and let cook for ten or fifteen 
minutes in a pint of veal or chicken stock. 
While cooking, melt two tablespoonfuls of 
butter on a hot pan; add the white part 
of a large leek, chopped, and one table- 
spoonful of minced parsley. Fry these 
brown; add two tablespoonfuls of 
chopped capers, two tablespoonfuls of 
tarragon (or plain) vinegar, and two 
dozen olives, stoned and chopped. Stir 
into the mixture two tablespoonfuls of 
flour, and add the whole to the saucepan 
containing the okra. Let cook for ten 
minutes, stirring once in a while, and 
shortly before serving add the contents 
of one small can of tomato paste. A 
pint of sifted canned tomatoes, cooked 
down until thick, may be substituted for 



Tongue in Aspic, Individual 

Let two ounces of gelatine stand in 
one-half a cup of cold water until the 
water has been absorbed, then pour on 
three cups of cleared consomme soup that 
has been heated to the boiling point. 
Cut cold, cooked tongue in small cubes. 
Have ready rings, cut from fresh uncooked 
celery; let a spoonful of the aspic become 
"set" in the bottom of a small cup; upon 
this arrange two rings of celery; cover 
with aspic, and follow by adding tongue- 
cubes and aspic until the cup is full. The 
recipe gives correct proportions for filling 
eight cups. To unmould, set the cups, 
an instant only, into warm (not hot) 
water, letting the water come on the out- 




TOXGUE IN ASPIC 



the paste. If the mixture is too thick, 
dilute with hot water, to the consistency 
of a drop batter. Add seasoning of salt 
and pepper, if necessary, and serve on hot, 
buttered toast, or in a vegetable dish with 
grated cheese on top. 

Grape Punch 

To one quart of grape juice add the 
juice of four lemons and six oranges, with 
one cup of sugar; when the sugar is dis- 
solved, add one quart of water and the 
rind of a large cucumber. Let chill on 
ice. 



side to the height of the mixture in the 
cups. Invert on serving dish. 

Roast Turkey Poult 

Choose a well-fattened young bird, 
weighing about four pounds. Truss the 
same as any fowl intended for roasting, 
except that the head of the poult is left 
on and tucked under the left wing. The 
feet are also kept on, the claws pared off, 
and the legs twisted under the back. 
Stuff with the following: Six ounces of 
stale bread, moistened with hot water, 
then squeezed dry, and seasoned with one- 



SEASOXABLE-AXD-TESTED RECIPES 



115 



fourth a cup of butter, 
one-half a teaspoonful of 
salt, one-half a teaspoon- 
ful of pepper, two tea- 
spoonfuls of onion juice, 
a tablespoonful of capers, 
and from one-half to one 
cup of fresh mushrooms, 
chopped. Bind with one 
beaten egg. Bake the 
bird on the rack of the 
roasting pan, basting 
every ten minutes, for 
one hour and one-half, 
or until cooked. Serve on a bed of cress 
on a large platter, and garnish with bacon 
curls and small sausages. 

Pike-Perch, Holland Style 

Scale and clean two good-sized fish, 
weighing about two pounds each, and 
place in fish kettle, on a bed of the follow- 
ing vegetables : One cup of grated carrots, 
one-half a cup of chopped celery, one 
chopped onion, and one-fourth a cup of 
fine-chopped parsley. Pour over the fish 
enough water or fish stock barely to 
cover, and let cook, slowly, for twenty 
minutes. Remove fish to hot platter, 
and add to sauce enough flour, blended 
with butter, to thicken — perhaps, four 
tablespoonfuls of each. Add, also, one- 
fourth a cup of chopped mushrooms, and 
two tablespoonfuls of vinegar or lemon 
juice. When sauce has boiled, pour over 




LAMB CHOPS. MAINTENON 

fish on platter, and garnish with browned 
potatoes and cress. 

Lamb Chops, Maintenon 
Maintenon Preparation 

Peel one medium-sized onion, cover 
with cold water, bring to the boiling 
point, and let cook four minutes; drain 
and dry on a cloth; slice the onion and 
let simmer in two tablespoonfuls of butter 
without taking color. When the butter 
is absorbed, add o.ie cup of strained 
chicken soup, and let simmer until the 
onion is tender and the liquid has evapor- 
ated; then press through a sieve. Melt 
one-fourth a cup of butter; in it cook one- 
half a cup of flour, half a teaspoonful of 
salt, and pepper to taste, then add the 
strained onion, water and milk, to make. 
in all, one cup and a third of liquid; stir 
until boiling; add one-fourth a pound of 




DEVILED LOBSTER 



116 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



fresh mushrooms, chopped and simmered 
two or three minutes in one tablespoonful 
of butter, and stir until the mixture boils 
again; add two egg-yolks, well beaten, 
and stir without boiling until the egg 
is set. 

Broil lamb chops on one side only. 
Set a rounding tablespoonful of Main- 
tenon Preparation on the cooked side of 
each chop; with a silver knife give the 
preparation a smooth, dome shape. 
Cover with cracker crumbs, stirred into 
melted butter. Cook in a rather hot oven 
eight minutes. Serve around a mound of 
fresh lima beans (canned beans may be 
used). 

Deviled Lobster 

Cut in cubes the meat from a two- 



French Fried Potatoes 

Pare potatoes of uniform size; cut each 
into quarters, lengthwise, and the quarters 
into halves or thirds, lengthwise. Let 
stand several hours in cold water; drain 
and dry on a cloth. Set to cook in hot 
fat, a few at a time. Use a basket. When 
soft turn from the basket upon hot tissue 
paper. When all are cooked soft, return 
them, a few at a time, to the heated fat, 
where they will quickly brown. Drain 
again on paper; sprinkle with salt and 
serve at once. 

Watermelon Sweet Pickle 

Cut away all pink pulp and thin green 
skin from watermelon rind. Cook in 
fresh boiling water until tender (about 




WATERMELON SWEET PICKLE 



pound lobster. Put three tablespoonfuls 
of butter into a saucepan; stir until 
melted and bubbling; add four table- 
spoonfuls of flour, one teaspoonful of salt, 
one-fourth a teaspoonful of mustard, one 
tablespoonful of lemon juice and a dash 
of cayenne; stir until thoroughly blended; 
pour on one cup and a half of milk, stir- 
ring constantly. Bring to boiling point, 
and let boil two minutes. Add the lobster 
meat and refill lobster body. Cover 
meat with buttered crumbs; place in pan 
in moderate oven and bake until crumbs 
are brown. Serve with 



three hours). For seven pounds of 
cooked rind make a syrup of five pounds 
of sugar, one pint of vinegar and one cup 
of water; let boil five minutes; skim and 
add two-thirds a cup of stick cinnamon 
and one-third a cup of whole cloves. 
Add rind and let simmer one-half hour. 
Store in a stone crock. 

Shaker Blueberry Shortcake 

Sift one quart of flour with one tea- 
spoonful of salt. Chop in four table- 
spoonfuls of butter; add two tablespoon- 
fuls of sugar, and mix to a soft dough with 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



117 



one cup and one-fourth 
of heavy sour cream, to 
which one teaspoonful 
of baking soda, dissolved 
in a little hot water, has 
been added, and also one 
egg. beaten very stiff. 
Handle the dough as 
little as possible in 
making; divide into two 
parts, and roll each to 
not more than three- 
fourths an inch thick. 
Grease a circularbaking 
tin, about two inches 
deep, and line it with one of the sheets of 
paste, buildingthe paste wellup around the 
sides. Fill with fresh blueberries, sweet- 
ened with one-fourth their volume of 
sugar, the sugar to be mixed with flour 
in the proportion of two tablespoonfuls of 
flour to a cup of sugar. Lay the second 
sheet over the top, trim the edges neatly, 
and bake in a rather hot oven. This 
cake should be eaten hot with butter and 
maple syrup. 

Stuffed Rose Apple Salad 

Scrape all seeds and some pulp from 
rose apples; stuff with celery, radishes, 
tomatoes and cucumbers, in equal parts, 
chopped fine and mixed with a small 
amount of French dressing. Two table- 
spoonfuls of stuffing is a liberal amount 
for each person. Arrange on lettuce 
leaves. 




STUFFED ROSE APPLE SALAD 

Praline 

Cook one cup of sugar to caramel; add 
half a pound of blanched and dried 
almonds (drying requires twenty-four 
hours). Let cook two minutes; turn 
upon a well-oiled marble slab, or agate 
plate, and let become cold. Chop in a 
wooden chopping bowl, and pass through 
a coarse sieve. Whatever will not pass 
through the sieve should be chopped 
again and sifted until the whole does pass 
through the sieve. Serve, sprinkled on 
vanilla ice cream. 

Lemon Mint Ice 

Bruise a good handful of fresh mint 
leaves — about as much as can be grasped 
in the hand — place in a bowl, and pour 
over them one cup of boiling water. Let 
them steep while the other ingredients 




PRALINE 



118 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



are being prepared. Hydrate two tea- 
spoonfuls of gelatine, and Jet dissolve in 
one-half a cup of hot water. Add the 
juice of three lemons and one large orange, 
one cup of sugar, and the water from the 
mint leaves, which should be squeezed as 
dry as possible. These quantities, when 
frozen, should yield about a quart of ice. 
A very little green vegetable coloring will 
greatly improve the tint. 

Pear, La Reine 

Arrange points of red. sweet pepper 
about a slice of canned pineapple. With 
a sharp-pointed knife remove the skin, 



cup. and fill the dish with alternate layers 
of ripe greengages, stoned and halved, 
and granulated sugar, allowing one-half 
a cup of sugar to every dozen greengages. 
Cover with a sheet of the paste, moisten- 
ing it at the edges, and pressing with a 
fork to ensure the adherence of the top 
crust with the lining of the dish. Care 
should be taken that the upper crust be 
free from hole?. Bake in a moderate 
oven for from forty to fifty minutes, and 
when done brush over the upper crust 
with some of the same preserve used in 
the lining, sift fine granulated sugar over 
this, and place under the gas flame, or on 




PEAR, LA REINE 



core and stem from a choice Bartlett pear; 
stuff the cavity with equal parts of 
chopped nuts and pineapple: decorate 
the top with cream cheese and a Bar-le- 
Duc currant. Set the pear on the slice of 
pineapple, and around the base of the 
r arrange small heart-leaves of lettuce, 
filled with cream cheese. 

Greengage Deep-Dish Pie 

Line a deep baking dish with a light, 
rich pie paste, and spread over it a layer 
of sifted apricot (or any preferred) pre- 
serve. In the center, invert a half-pint 



the upper shelf of the oven, until the sugar 
melts. Serve warm, with sweetened,, 
whipped cream. 

Lafayette Ginger Balls 

(Lafayetie-Marne Day. Sept. 6) 
Cream one-half a pound, each, of 
butter and sugar, and beat into this two 
cups of warmed molasses. Add two 
beaten eggs, one cup of sour cream, two 
teaspoonfuls of baking soda, dissolved in 
a little hot water, two tablespoonfuls, 
each, of powdered cloves and cinnamon,, 
two pounds and one-half of ground 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



119 



ginger, the juice of one 
orange and one lemon, 
and one pound and one- 
half of sifted flour. Beat 
all very thoroughly for 
at least five minutes, 
then pour into round 
moulds, like those used 
for popovers or gems, 
first greasing them, and 
bake in a moderate oven 
until well puffed up and 
firm to the touch. They 
may be iced with a little 
chocolate icing, if de- 
sired. 



Blackberry Shortcake 

Sift together four cups of pastry flour, 
six level teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
and one teaspoonful of salt; work in one- 
half a cup of shortening — add one cup 
of milk, a little at a time, mixing it in with 
a knife. Spread in two round cake tins; 
bake in a hot oven. Spread generously 
with butter; have washed and drained 
one quart of blackberries; spread between 
and on top of cake. Sprinkle with 
powdered sugar. 

Marcella Cups 

Cream two-thirds a cup of butter; beat 
in one cup of sugar; add four egg-yolks, 
beaten and combined with one table- 
spoonful of milk. Sift 
together one cup and 
one-half of flour, one 
teaspoonful of baking 
powder and one-fourth 
a teaspoonful of mace; 
add to first mixture; 
lastly, fold in four egg- 
whites, beaten stiff. 
Bake in small tins. 
Spread the sides of each 
cake with apricot jam 
and roll in shredded 
cocoanut. Through 
pastry bag and tube 
force a rosette of 




BLACKBERRY SHORTCAKE 

Vanilla Butter Frosting 

Cream one-half a cup of butter; beat 
in one cup and one-quarter of sifted con- 
fectioners' sugar; add one-half a teaspoon- 
ful of vanilla extract. Melt a little 
chocolate, to add at last to the remaining 
frosting that is used to make the little 
star on the top. 

Italian Tarts 



sieve, two 



Pass together, through a 
cups of pastry flour, and one-third a tea- 
spoonful of salt. With the tips of the 
fingers work into this mixture one-half a 
cup of shortening. When each little 
particle of fat is coated with flour, add, 
gradually, mixing meanwhile with a 




MARCELLA CUPS 



120 



AMERICAN COOKERY 







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ITALIAN' TARTS 

knife, enough cold water to make a paste 
that sticks together without adhering to 
the knife or bowl. Turn upon a board, 
lightly dredged with flour, then pat 
with the rolling-pin into a rectangular 
shape and roll out into a strip. Cream 
one-fourth a cup of butter, and spread 
butter on the paste; roll this up tight, like 
a jelly roll; stand on end; pat and roll 
out again; cut out round shapes, moisten 
edges with cold water and place on each 
round a narrow rim of paste. Bake tarts 
in a hot oven to a delicate brown. Beat 
the whites of two eggs dry, then, gradu- 
ally, beat in one-half a cup of granulated 
sugar. 

Use this meringue to fill centers of 
tarts and return to the oven to brown the 
meringue. Heat to the boiling point one- 
half a cup of raspberry jam; strain 



through a fine strainer; pour a teaspoon- 
ful in a fine stream over the top of each 
tart, and sprinkle with chopped walnuts 
and chopped blanched almonds. 

Italian Peach Sherbet 

Peel, stone, quarter, and press through 
a colander enough ripe, yellow peaches 
to fill a quart measure. Boil one pound 
of sugar in one cup of water, and add to 
the peaches with the juice of one-half a 
lemon. Mix with these the unbeaten 
whites of five eggs; put into the freezer, 
and turn until smooth and hard. This 
may be served in tall-stemmed glasses, 
garnished with jelly; or, it may be 
moulded in a melon mould, and decorated 
on turning out with chopped angelica, 
sprinkled over sweetened whipped cream. 

Peach Milk Sherbet 

Pare and slice and force through a 
sieve ten peaches; mix with the juice of 
two lemons, two cups of sugar and one 
quart of rich milk. Freeze as usual, 
using one-third salt and two-thirds ice. 
Serve in cups, and decorate each service 
with a large blackberry. 

Fruit Medley Conserve 

Pare and core two pounds of quinces, 
one pound and one-half of pears, and one- 
half a pound of sour green apples. Pare 
and remove seeds from two pounds of 




PEACH MILK SHERBET 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



121 



ripe peaches. Cut three lemons into 
slices and remove the seeds. Put the 
whole through the food chopper, chopping 
rather coarse. Weigh the mixture, and 
allow three-fourths its weight of sugar. 
Mix fruit and sugar and let stand over- 
night. Next day boil until the conserve 
is very thick, being careful it does not 
burn. Add one pound of nuts, ground 
fine in the nut-grinder, five minutes before 
removing from the fire. Pack in sterile 
jars and seal at once. 

Corn-and-Cabbage Pickle 

Boil a dozen ears of corn and cut ker- 
nels from cob, after they are cooked. 
Quarter and chop fine a six-pound head of 
white cabbage, sprinkle, liberally, with 
salt, and let stand. Heat three pints of 
vinegar with two tablespoonfuls of white 
mustard seed, two tablespoonfuls of 
turmeric, and one cup of brown sugar. 
Mix two tablespoonfuls of cornstarch 
with one tablespoonful of dry mustard, 
and blend to a paste with a very little 
water; add to the hot vinegar, and stir 
until slightly thickened. Add the corn 
and the shredded cabbage, drained from 
the salt water, with six fine-chopped green 
peppers. Cook for fifteen minutes, and 
seal in pint jars. Makes a delicious 
relish with cold meats. 

Fried Sandwiches of Eggplant 

Cut the eggplant into rather thin slices 
and fry as usual. When done, drain, and 
spread alternate slices with the following 
filling: For each slice allow the unbeaten 
yolk of one egg, mixed with as much 
grated hard cheese as will form a stiff 
paste, and seasoned very highly with salt 
and pepper, cayenne or paprika, and a 
little poultry seasoning. Press firmly 
together a slice of the plain fried egg- 
plant over each slice spread with stuffing; 
trim the edges neatly, dip in a batter, 
made by mixing two cups of flour with 
one-half a teaspoonful of salt, one tea- 
spoonful of baking powder, one cup of 



milk, two teaspoonfuls of melted butter, 
and the beaten whites of the eggs, left 
over from making the sandwich filling; 
saute on a hot, well-greased pan, or fry 
in deep fat. Serve hot with roast meat. 

Chocolate Cake 

1HAVE had so many people rave over my 
chocolate cake that I'm writing out, be- 
low, the recipe. It appeals to so many 
people, because the butter and sugar are 
not creamed, and it is very quickly made. 



1 cup sugar 
i cup butter 

1 square chocolate 

2 egg-yolks, beaten with 
\ cup milk 

1 cup flour 



2 teaspoonfuls baking 

powder 
Pinch salt 
2 egg-whites, beaten 

stiff 
1 teaspoonful vanilla 



Melt butter and chocolate, and stir 
into one cup of sugar; add egg-yolks, 
beaten with one-half cup of milk and flour, 
sifted together with baking powder and salt; 
add whites of eggs and vanilla. Bake in 
layer tins twelve minutes in hot oven. 

Frosting 

2 squares chocolate ) u . .» 

r, \ . r i * r melt together 

Butter size ol a walnut \ ° 

Add a little hot milk or water and con- 
fectioners' sugar until of right consistency 
to spread, vanilla to taste. a. c. b. 

Cantaloupe Pie 

THIS has been a great favorite with 
our family for many years, but I 
find so few people who have ever heard of 
it, I would like to pass it on. 

Line pie pan with rich pastry. Peel 
cantaloupe and remove seeds. Slice as 
you would apple, fill pastry shell, and 
dredge lightly with two tablespoonfuls of 
flour. Cover with sugar and dot plenti- 
fully with butter; sprinkle nutmeg and 
add two tablespoonfuls of water. Cover 
with pastry, set in hot oven for a few min- 
utes, then lower gas and let cook about 
forty-five minutes. The cantaloupe 
should be the small, sweet variety. 

j. m. s. 



Seasonable Menus for Week in August 



< 

P 



< 

Q 

C 



Q. 

w 
p 

H 



Q 

P 
H 

CO 



Breakfast 

Sliced Peaches and Cream 

Puffed Rice with Milk 

Summer Sausages 

Crumb Pancakes 

Coffee 

Dinner 

Roast Turkey Poult, Celery Sauce 
Sliced Sauteed Cooked HominyJ 
String Beans Individual Baked Alaskas 

Black Coffee 

Supper 

Creamed Lobster in Chafing Dish 

Toasted Pilot Crackers 

Blueberries and Cake 



Breakfast 

Grapes 

H-0 Oatmeal with Milk 

Creamed Potatoes with Minced Ham 

Berry Muffins 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Puree of Cucumbers 

Fish Croquettes 

Peaches and Blueberries 

Coffee Cake 

Tea or Milk 

Dinner 

Broiled Chicken with Parsley Sauce 

Steamed Rice 

Baked Tomatoes Stuffed with Mushrooms 

Lemon Mint Water Ice, Sponge Fingers 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Cream of Wheat with Sliced Apricots 

Breakfast Biscuits 

Smoked Herring and Potato Cakes 

Coffee 



Luncheon 

Turkey Hash 

Sliced Tomatoes and Cucumbers 

Currant Rolls 

Iced Tea 

Dinner 

English Mutton Chops 

Riced Potatoes 

Endive-and-Orange Salad 

Peach Tapioca 



Breakfast 

Blackberries 

Barley Crystals, Thin Cream 

Pickled Pigs' Feet Potatoes 

Whole Wheat Toast 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Lambs' Brains and Tongues 

Fried Apple Rings 

Rice Gems 

Fruit Punch Five o'Clock Cream Cakes 

Dinner 

Savory Meat Loaf 

Boiled Artichokes 

Baked Stuffed Cucumbers 

Sliced Apricots with Soft Custard 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Rockyford Melons 

Gluten Grits with Top Milk 

Egg Toast 

Coffee 



Luncheon 

Sliced Cold Beef's Tongue 

Potato Salad 

Blackberries and Cream 

Tea or Lemonade 

Dinner 

Pike Perch, Holland Style, Cucumber Sauce 

Roasted Sugar Corn Creamed Leeks 

Apricot Sherbet 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Baked Gravenstein Apples 

Malted Breakfast Food, Top Milk 

Codfish and Potatoes in White Sauce 

Virginia Spoon Bread 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Baked Clams and Corn 

Fruit Salad on Lettuce 

Kossuth Cakes 

Tea or Buttermilk 

Dinner 

Tomato Omelet 

Baked Potatoes 

Creamed Mushrooms and Onions 

Deep Dish Greengage Pie 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Moulded Pettijohn with 
Mulberries and Cream 

Brown-hashed Potato and 
Minced Ham 

Fig-and-Graham Muffins 

Coffee 



Luncheon 

Crab Pasties 

Orange Salad with 
Lettuce and Leeks 

Blackberry Pudding 
Tea or Milk 

122 



Dinner 

Broiled Club Steaks 

Mushroom Sauce 

Riced Potatoes 

Savory Stewed Okra 

Sifted Ripe Peaches with 

Whipped Cream 

Coffee 



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Seasonable Menus for Week in September 



Breakfast 

Cracked Wheat with Blueberries and Cream 

Rice Gems 

Smoked Herrings 

Coffee 

Dinner 

Roast Domestic Duck Celery Stuffing 

Browned Potatoes Lima Beans 

Italian Peach Sherbet 

Coffee 

Supper 

Escaloped Oysters 

Brown-Bread Toast 

Quince-and-Apple Compote 



Breakfast 

Bartlett Pears 

Cream of Wheat with Raisins, Milk 

Potato-and-Fish Hash 

Johnny Cake 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Broiled Oysters 

Succotash 

French Rolls 



Cocoa 



Fruit Punch 



Dinner 

Filet of Veal, Roast 

Steamed Potatoes 

Fried Sandwiches of Eggplant 

Shaker Blueberry Shortcake 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Casaba Melons 

Malt Breakfast Food, Milk 

Shirred Eggs Cress 

Oven Scones 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Cream-of-Mushroom Soup 

Apple-and-Nut Salad 

Squash Pie Cheese 

Tea or Milk 

Dinner 

Baked Shoulder of Lamb 

Corn-on-the-Cob Mashed Turnips 

Green Apple Tarts 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

White Malaga Grapes 

Bran Krumbles, Cream 

Meat Cakes Sliced Tomatoes 

Raised Oatmeal Muffins 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Jellied Veal 

Mashed Potatoes Celery Salad 

Butterscotch Pie 

Tea or Milk 

Dinner 

Pressed Corned Beef 

Stewed Corn Baked Parsnips 

Apple Snow Lady Fingers 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Damson Plums 

Ralston's Wheat Food, Top Milk 

Broiled Finnan Haddie 

Coffee Rolls 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Escaloped Lamb, Tomatoes, and Rice 

Date-and-Nut Bread 

Apple Pudding 

Tea or Milk 

Dinner 

Grilled Halibut Steak Gooseberry Sauce 

Baked Sweet Potatoes Stewed Tomatoes 

Macaroon Frozen Custard 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Steamed Prunes with Apple Sauce 

Gluten Grits, Cream 

Corn-and-Chopped Bacon Fritters 

Buttered Toast 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Deviled Eggs with Stewed Celery 

Raisin Bread 

Fruit Junket Cake 

Tea or Milk 

Dinner 

Steamed Haddock Tartare Sauce 

Jerusalem Artichokes in White Sauce 

Apple-and-Nut Salad 

Chocolate Bread Pudding, Strawberry Sauce 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Orange Juice 

H-0 Oatmeal, Top Milk 

Grilled Tripe and Bacon 

Fruit Popovers 

Coffee 



Luncheon 

Kedgeree of Fish 

Baked Squash 

Brown Betty 

Tea or Buttermilk 

123 



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Dinner 

Fricassee of Chicken and Corn. 

Broiled Sliced Carrots 

Macaroon Frozen Custard 

Coffee 




A Cape Ann Turkey Dinner 

By Alice E. Whitaker 



THE main feature of this old- 
fashioned dinner may be taken from 
either rather shallow salt water, or 
from the deep sea anywhere along the 
North Atlantic Coast, and it need not be 
especially from the catch off the Cape that 
gives it a title. It is the fish most eaten of 
any kind, as it is assuredly the most prolific, 
and has been known as a food as far back 
as history records the everyday life of 
man. By no means should the inferior 
haddock or hake be used in place of the 
genuine cod, which is held so important 
in New England history, that a repre- 
sentation of the fish has hung in an 
honored place for more than 170 years, as 
a memorial of the importance of cod 
fishery to the welfare of the Common- 
wealth. 

Our foremothers were fortunate in 
having whole salt cod at their command, 
yet it is traditional that it was some 
trouble to store the fish. If kept up- 
stairs, it became hard and shrivelled by 
the crystallization of salt on the surface. 
Down cellar, where the old-time house- 
wife kept such great stores of food, the 
fish absorbed dampness, and became 
sodden and unpleasant, hence, as a suc- 
cessful medium between these two places, 
the cellar-way was selected for hanging 
the several large fish that were always on 
hand to be made into many a good meal. 
At present codfish is cleaned, the bones 
are taken out, and it is split by machinery. 
Then it is made ready for salting or 
smoking. A fish is put into one end of a 
special machine, and a minute later it is 
finished for salting or smoking. 

For the dinner in question select a 



thick, solid piece of fish, and let it soak 
in plenty of cold water; if, by rare 
chance, you have a section with the skin 
left on, place it with the skin uppermost, 
otherwise the salt will collect on the skin, 
and the freshening will be but partially 
done. Change the water several times, 
at first, then let the fish stand ten or 
twelve hours. Drain and put into a 
kettle of cold water, set on the coolest 
part of the range, or over a gas flame 
turned down to a bead or an electric unit 
at low heat. Let stand until the water is 
hot, but not until it reaches the boiling 
point, for in that case the fish would be 
ruined. 

If a recipe directs you to boil salt cod- 
fish, discard it as written by one who has 
not the slightest idea of how to treat the 
noble fish that made the fortunes of 
many of our New England forefathers. 
Emphatically it is repeated that salt 
codfish must never be boiled. High 
temperature makes it hard, discolored 
and indigestible, but if the water be 
raised slowly to about 180 degrees, or 
rather hot to the finger used to test it, 
then the fish will be white, soft and 
gelatinous. In this state it is so easy to 
digest that it may be eaten by a con- 
valescent. 

Keep the water at the temperature 
indicated until a fork will pierce the fish 
readily, and by trial it can be separated 
easily into flakes. Drain it and lay 
unbroken in the center of a large platter. 
At either end of the fish arrange small 
red beets and yellow carrots; round the 
edge or at the sides place mealy, boiled 
potatoes. Never use onions or turnips, 



124 



WHAT TO EAT AND HOW TO MARKET 



125 



as latter-day cooks sometimes advise, 
through their ignorance of the delicacy of 
this dinner when prepared in traditional 
manner. Turn a white sauce, or milk 
gravy, as it used to be called, over the 
fish to cover it, then sprinkle on a few 
fine pork scraps. Although parsley had 
no place in Colonial cookery, it gives 
additional color, if a very little be fine- 
minced and sprinkled sparsely over the 
sauce, yet this is an unnecessary modern 
touch. Serve more sauce in a separate 
dish, also more pork scraps by them- 
selves in a heated dish. 

The good reason for serving the pork 
scraps is that the cod is a white fish, 
and deficient in fat, which is cheaply and 
tastily added in the little crisp bits of 
pork, prepared as follows: Cut slices of 
clear, fat salt pork into small cubes and 
spread on a plate set in the oven, or on a 
frying pan, set over very slow heat. 
Shake, occasionally, that all sides of the 



cubes may cook alike. When crisp, 
drain off the fat and serve in a little bowl. 

Plenty of gravy is one of the essentials 
of this dinner; make it with some of the 
fat from the pork, instead of using butter. 
The pork should have been cooked so 
slowly that the fat is clear and unscorched. 
Put one-quarter a cup of flour into four 
tablespoonfuls of clear fat, and when 
rubbed smooth add one pint of milk and 
let cook ten minutes. Add a little white 
pepper and salt slightly. 

This dinner, properly cooked and gar- 
nished, is a fine example of how tempting 
a "picture platter" can be made. In 
cold weather a baked Indian pudding is 
an appropriate dessert to follow. A real 
codfish dinner is also rightly balanced in 
food values, although such a consideration 
never entered the minds of housewives of 
long ago, who, as a rule, cooked what 
pleased the taste of their families, or seemed 
to give strength for the day's work. 



What to Eat and How to Market 

By Salena Sheets Martin 



AS a general principle the things that 
are in season should largely furnish 
our foodstuffs. This is true for 
, several reasons, chiefly, because the foods 
that are in season are ready for consump- 
tion, are in prime condition, and usually are 
cheaper than foodstuffs out of season. 
This is particularly true in the case of 
fruits and garden vegetables. 

In the case of raw fruits one not only is 
saved the price of the labor of putting it 
up in containers, but it is much healthier, 
and makes a stronger appeal to the 
appetite, besides furnishing to the body 
necessary chemical elements found only 
in fresh, uncooked fruits. 

With fruits one may begin with the 
citrous, oranges, grapefruits and lemons, 
in the winter months, followed by early 
strawberries, rhubarb, cherries, currants, 
gooseberries, raspberries, and black ber- 



ries, on into the season for ripe peaches, 
pears, plums and melons, with apples and 
bananas all the year around. 

Jams, jellies, preserves and conserves, 
with other knickknacks and sweets, are, of 
course, nice to have in the house to put on 
the table, now and then, "for company," 
but not for everyday use, if one is to 
retain a healthy, capable and willing 
stomach. 

What is true of fruits holds true in 
regard to fresh vegetables, which come 
directly from Mother Earth to the con- 
sumer, with the soil and almost the morn- 
ing dew on them. Who of us have not 
felt a renewal of energy with the eating of 
well-cooked early asparagus, young string 
beans, spinach, young beets, fresh green 
onions, and blushing young radishes? 
Why it "makes the mouth water" to 
think of them, even. 



126 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



And what delicious soups can be made 
from these same fresh vegetables, and 
what salads! A bit of lettuce, half of a 
ripe tomato, with a little oil, and one has 
an appetizing salad at once. Too much 
cannot be said in favor of the plentiful 
use of green salads, always provided that 
vinegar is used very sparingly. It is 
hard on the average person, without add- 
ing to nourishment. 

In regard to meats, I think we may con- 
sider them as somewhat in season and out 
of season. This is certainly true of 
oysters, and some fish and game. In 
general, fresh meats are more relished 
than canned and otherwise preserved 
kinds, and the fresh steak or roast 
undoubtedly imparts a greater stimulus, 
and that is usually what is sought after 
by those who eat meat. I will not say 
that fresh meat is less expensive than 
other meats, but in the long run, perhaps, 
it costs less for what it does. 

In marketing, especially in hot weather, 
the average housewife does more or less 
buying from the bakery. Just a word of 
personal experience in regard to bread 
buying. The crusty loaves, or rolls, are 
always to be selected, and no partially- 
baked or unbrowned loaf ever gets by. 
The well-baked breadstuffs of all kinds, 
even in pastry, are far better for good 
digestion. And fresh, hot bread — yeast 
bread, especially — is to be avoided. It 
is far better to use bread one day old. 
This, of course, does not apply to baking 
powder or soda biscuits. 

While speaking of foods, eating, and 
health, at this time of year, the ice-box or 



refrigerator comes in for its share of 
attention. Aside from the daily going 
over and arrangement of foods contained 
in it, it should have a good, thorough 
cleaning, with scalding of the pipes as 
often as it seems necessary, but always 
between the "puttings-in" of ice. The 
writer finds that filling it with one solid 
piece of ice — say one hundred pounds at 
once, if it will contain such a piece, is a 
real economy, rather than getting half or 
one-fourth that amount oftener, as the 
full box keeps the ice from melting rapidly. 
A number of thicknesses of newspaper 
over the ice adds to its endurance. 

A word about drinking water is not 
amiss just here. Iced water may seem 
very desirable when one is thirsty, but 
water without ice is far better for drinking 
purposes, as it does not so suddenly 
reduce the temperature of the stomach, 
and again one is not always sure of the 
purity of ice — it has been known to 
carry typhoid. A word to the wise, etc. 

As an aid in time-saving we suggest 
that a written list of things to be pur- 
chased helps both the shopkeeper, whose 
time is valuable, and the shopper, be- 
sides making sure that nothing essential 
for the day is forgotten. In cases where 
t-he housewife cannot go daily to market, 
perhaps on certain days she can arrange 
to go and buy the supplies for several 
days, especially laying in staples and 
things that can be kept in the ice-box. 
But the important thing is to make per- 
sonal inspection of the purchases. It 
pays financially and in general family 
satisfaction and good will. 



Summer Squash 

By Helen Bowen 



IS summer squash one of your favorite 
vegetables, or do you consider it a 
rather tasteless thing, to be used as 
Hobson's choice, but not to be hailed with 
joy? Or are you unfamiliar with the big 



glowing yellow crook-necks, the jolly little 
turbans or pin-cushions, or the long pale 
green English marrows? 

To our household all these, but chiefly 
the crook-necks, are a joy, alike in the 



SUMMER SQUASH 



127 



garden, the kitchen, the preserve-closet 
and the dining-room. 

Few vegetables repay so amply for 
the small amount of garden-plot, ferti- 
lizer and cultivation they require. They 
bear heavily through a long season, and 
do not, like so many vegetables, require 
to be cooked immediately after picking 
in order to catch the finest flavor. They 
are delicious when properly seasoned. 
They are also among the easiest 
vegetables to prepare for cooking or 
canning. 

"Canned summer squash! I never 
heard of it before," our friends some- 
times exclaim. Neither had we when we 
attempted it, in the first fine frenzy of 
war-time preserving. The big yellow 
things looked tempting. We could see 
no reason for not cutting them up and 
packing the pieces in jars, to be sterilized 
along with the jars of green beans. The 
results fully justified the experiment, and 
jars of squash and marrow are now regu- 
lar tenants of our shelves. A dozen 
jars may be got ready in the time it takes 
to prepare two or three of beans or peas or 
one of spinach. A quick scrub with a 
brush, removing the ends, and if the 
seeds are large, the core, cutting the rest 
into pieces of a size to fit into the jars, 
packing as many as possible in, pouring 
on salted water, sterilizing — and the 
thing is done. 

We serve the canned squash in the 
same ways as the fresh-cooked. It 
may be served plain with butter, or 
mashed, or scaloped with crumbs and 
cream sauce. We like to add to it, 
especially for scaloping, some parboiled 
green peppers or some cooked tomato, 
or both at once. Sometimes, indeed, we 
can these three vegetables in one jar 
to be ready to serve together. A cream- 
of-squash soup is delicate, a soup of 
squash and tomato with a flavoring of 
the water peppers have been parboiled 
in, is lively, and squash water and pulp 
may be added to almost any soup. A 
little celery salt is a good seasoning with 
squash. 



Mashed Squash 

Wash, cut off the stem and blossom 
ends, pare, cut in pieces, and boil or 
steam till tender. Season with salt, 
pepper and butter, and mash. A little 
celery salt may be used if liked. If 
canned squash is used, pare, heat, season 
and mash. One may put it through a 
strainer to remove skin and seeds. 

Plain Boiled Squash 

Prepare and cook as for mashing, but 
drain and serve in pieces with butter, 
salt and pepper. It need not be pared, 
as the skin usually cooks tender and is 
wholesome. 

Scaloped Squash 

Prepare and cook as above, paring or 
not as liked, or use canned squash. Put 
in a baking dish, cover with cream sauce, 
sprinkle crumbs over the top and bake. 
The cream sauce may be made with 
little or no milk, using the liquid from 
the squash, thickened with flour and 
butter, or butter substitute. A few pieces 
of parboiled green pepper or cooked 
tomato, or both, lend flavor and variety 
to this dish. 

Cream-of-Squash Soup 

Thicken some milk with flour and but- 
ter or a substitute; add gradually the 
water drained from the squash after 
cooking, and if wished, some of the 
squash pulp. Season with salt, pepper 
and celery salt. A very little water in 
which green peppers have been parboiled 
may be added, also some minced green 
pepper or parsley. 

Squash-and-Tomato Soup 

Heat together equal parts of squash 
water and tomato juice, season well, 
especially with salt, and add small bits 
of the squash and of the firmer part of 
cooked tomatoes. This light, gay and 
appetizing soup may be enhanced by 
minced parsley or green peppers. Some 
meat stock mav be used if desired. 



Some None-too-well-Understood Terms 

By Emma Gary Wallace 



a 



a 



SOME people hesitate to order an 
item on a bill-of-fare, because they 
are not quite sure what they will get, 
and, on the other hand, some luncheonette 
people hesitate to give food dishes their 
correct names, for fear they are not using 
professional terms correctly. 

Here are a few of the most frequently 
used terms, with the commonly accepted 
meanings: 

"Aspic" is a stiff, meat jelly, of savory 
flavor. Frequently cold tongue, pork, 
chicken, etc., are made into an attractive 
jellied dish, and are described, "En 
Aspic." 

"Au Gratin" means with browned 
crumbs, and applies to baked, scaloped, 
or roasted foods. 

'Agneau" means tender, young lamb. 

'A la, au, aux" all mean with, or 
prepared in a certain manner. 

" Allemande" implies in German style. 

"A la Americaine" — In American 
style. 

"Avena" — Composed of oats. 

"Ambrosia" — Food fit for the gods — 
a favorite name for delicate salads. 

"Bouchees" — A term describing small, 
thin patties or cakes, which just make 
about a mouthful. 

"Bonne Bouche" ■ — ■ A good-sized 
mouthful. 

"Baba," or "Baba cakes" — Small, 
sweet cakes, made of yeast dough, butter, 
sugar, eggs, raisins, and often almonds 
are added. When these are served hot 
with a hot sauce, they come under the 
head of Puddings. 

"Bisque" is a term applied to a soup 
made of shellfish. Its color is red. We 
have Lobster Bisque, Crawfish Bisque, 
and some others. A Vegetable Bisque, 
such as tomato, simulates these in color. 
The term Bisque is also applied to an 
ice cream, to which fine-chopped nuts or f 
crumbs of nut are addecfc 

128 



"Bouillon" is a clear soup, which is 
much stronger than a broth, but not so 
strong as a Consomme. 

"Boudins" are forms of sausage. 

" Blanchair" — Blanching by dipping 
first in hot water, and then in cold. 

"Bain-Marie" is literally a double 
boiler, or a vessel containing water, in 
which another vessel is placed to keep the 
contents hot. 

"Bannocks" are small, flat cakes of 
Scottish origin, baked on a griddle, and 
made of barley or oatmeal. Alfred the 
Great is credited with getting his ears 
boxed by a peasant woman because he 
let the Bannocks burn, which she had 
left him to watch. 

"Bards" are slices of pork or bacon, 
laid upon the breast of fowl or game when 
cooking, to season. 

"A la Bernaise" means in the style of 
the Swiss people. 

"Bechamel" is a sauce made with rich 
chicken stock and milk or cream. 

"Beignet" is a fritter. 

"Biscuit Glace" is a small cake of ice 
cream. 

"Blanquette" describes white meat in 
a rich, cream sauce. 

"Bceuf Braise" is braised beef. 

"Bceuf a la Jardiniere" is braised beef, 
served with an assortment of vegetables. 

"Bombe Glace" is ice cream of two 
kinds, or an ice cream and a water ice, 
moulded into some special shape. There 
is one soft of cream on the outside, and 
another used as a filling. 
+■ "Bouquet of Herbs" — Whenever these 
are Referred to, a sprig, each, is meant of 
thyme, savory, marjoram, and parsley. 
It is convenient to keep this mixed in a 
jar ready for use. They are often called 
Soup Herbs. 

, "A la Bourgeoise" — In regular family 
styve. 

"Canapes" are anything served on toast. 



SOME NONE-TOO-WELL-UNDERSTOOD TERMS 



129 



"Canelle" — Flavored with cinnamon. 

"Charcuterie" — A term describing dif- 
ferent kinds of sausages. 

"Croutons" — ■ Pieces of bread, cut like 
dice, or any other fancy shape, and either 
toasted or fried in butter. 

"Croustades" — Pieces of bread, cut 
much larger than Croutons, and toasted 
or fried in butter or cooking fat. These 
are used to serve minces of meat or 
creamed foods on. 

"Cafe Noir" — Black coffee. 

"Chutney" — An East Indian sweet 
relish. 

"Compotes" — ■ Fruits stewed in syrup, 
which are very rich, or are so prepared as 
to keep their original shape. 

"A la Creole" — Prepared with toma- 
toes; also used as descriptive of Creole 
or French-Spanish cookery. 

"Curry -powder" — A seasoning powder 
or condiment much valued in India, the 
principal ingredient of which is turmeric. 

"Courtbouillon" — This is sometimes 
written as one word, and sometimes as 
two. It is highly seasoned liquor, in 
which fish is cooked. It is also a term 
applied to rich fish stew. 



a 



De" or "d f " — Of. 

"Diab'e" — The devil. 

"Devilled" — Very highly seasoned. 

"Au Diable" — According to the devil's 
liking; and usually applied to hot, 
highly seasoned, fiery preparations of 
meat and sauces. 

"Dariole" — A good, everyday cus- 
tard pie. 

"Entree" — A side dish, served with 
the regular course at dinner. 

"Entremet" — Avery small side dish, 
usually of sweets or nuts, such as candied 
ginger, or blanched almonds. 

"Flan" — A custard. 

"Fondue" — A dish made of melted 
cheese and eggs, such as a Welsh Rabbit. 

"Fondant" — Sugar boiled and beaten 
to a creamy mass. 

"Frappe" — Semi-frozen. 

"Fricassee de Poulet" — Fricassee of 
chicken. 

"Granits" — Aromatic fruit waters, 



either frozen, or served in other ways. 

"Grille" — Broiled. 

"Glace" — Shiny, glossy, or iced over. 

"Gateau" — A cake. 

"Gelee" — Jelly. 

"Hoe cakes" — Southern cakes, made 
of white corn meal, salt and boiling water, 
and fried on a griddle. 

"Homard" — Lobster. 

"Hors d' (Euvre" — In reality a by- 
dish, or as we would say, a side dish; 
a digression. An accessory used to 
stimulate the appetite. 

"Hachis de Bceuf" — Beef hash. 

"Huitres Frites" — Fried oysters. 

"A la Italienne" — In Italian style. 

"A la Jardiniere" — According to the 
gardener's wife, or mixed vegetables from 
the garden. 

"Julienne" — Cut into very small strips. 

"Kirschwasser" — Liquor made from 
cherry juice. 

"Kuchen" — German for cake. 

"Lait" — Milk. 

"Laitue" — Lettuce. 

"Macaroni au Frontage" — Macaroni 
with cheese. 

"Macedoine" — A mixture of different 
kinds of vegetables. 

"Maitre d* Hotel" — According to the 
hotel steward. 

"Mango Pickles" — Sweet, stuffed, and 
pickled young melons and cucumbers. 

"Maraschino" — A rich cordial. 

"Matelots" — A rich fish stew, flavored 
with wine. 

"Meringue" — Whites of eggs, beaten 
to a stiff froth and flavored with sugar. 

"Meringuees" — Covered with a 
meringue. 

"Mayonnaise" — A rich dressing, 
mainly used for salads and made with 
eggs, oil, vinegar, or lemon juice, and 
such seasoning as may be desired. 

"Marinade" — A savory liquor of vine- 
gar and spices, in which beef or fish is 
soaked and cooked to make it tender 
and well flavored. 

"A la Mode" — After a common mode 
or fashion. 

{To be continued in October) 




Home Ideas 

and . 

Jtvconcmues 




Contributions to this department will be gladly received. 

paid for at reasonable rates 



Accepted items will be 



E 



What to Eat 

VERY meal should include fruit, raw 
or prepared. 

Eat bulky vegetables — lettuce, car- 
rots, asparagus, etc., with meat. 

Meat should be eaten sparingly. 

Sugar should be eaten in winter; it is 
a body heater. 

Beef is the most nutritious meat. 

Poultry and fish are preferred to other 
flesh. 

Eggs are better poached than fried. 
Better soft-boiled than hard. 

Whole wheat bread is better than 
white bread. 

Butter is the most digestible fat. 
-ilk is an important food, as well as 
drink. Children should have at least a 
quart a day. 

Laxative foods — prunes, figs, etc., are 
useful. 

Drink several quarts of water, daily. 
The body is two-thirds water, and seve 
pints are lost daily. 

A vegetable diet gives bulk; a meat 
diet, concentrated nutrition. While either 
one is individually deficient, the com- 
bination is very effective. 

When to Eat 

Do not eat between meals. Eat regu- 
larly, but when not hungry, eat sparingly. 

Do not eat after violent exercise. 

Do not eat when excited or fatigued. 

Eat sparingly on hot days. 

Do not eat within three hours of 
retiri' 

Do not exercise violently, or sleep after 
a meal. 

Eat regularly at - ed times. This 



accustoms the stomach to receive food 
at these times, and encourages proper 
digestion. 

Do not overeat; rather undereat, and 
leave the table unsatisfied than risk the 
danger that attends overeating. 

Animals seldom eat when ill. Instinct 
is a good judge. 

A normal, healthy person should be 
hungry at meal times. But if not 
hungry eat only a piece of fruit to retain 
the normal rhythm. A day fast often 
gives the digestive system a much- 
needed rest. A short walk, before break- 
fast, helps digestion, and aids bowel 
movement. 

How to Eat 

Masticate the food thoroughly. Eat 
slowly. Do not attempt to wash food 
down with some liquid. 

Do not eat too many foods at one 
meal. Dry, coarse food encourages mas- 
tication, which is an important aid to 
complete digestion. Include such food 
in every meal, if possible. Avoid the 
habit of dipping dry foods in liquid before 
eating. This destroys their value. Corn 
flakes, or similar food, should not be 
creamed until ready to be eaten. 

Never watch the clock while eating. 
If the time is short, rather cut down I 
quantity of the meal, and eat it slowly. 
Alilk should be drunk very slowly, to 
avoid curdling. 

Only pleasant subjects should be d 
cussed at the table. 

The dining room should have an 
atmosphere of quiet and leisure. 

Keep the teeth clean; brush them, 
thoroughly, after each meal. 



130 



HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES 



131 



What Not to Eat 

Avoid hot bread. Pork is the most 
indigestible of all meats. Rich pastries 
should be eaten only in moderation. 
Vinegar is a preservative, and retards 
digestion of food on which it is used. 

Avoid cold drinks after greasy foods. 
Avoid too many fried articles at one meal. 
Tea and coffee delay digestion. Drink 
sparingly at meals. Avoid ice water, or 
iced drinks. 

Abstain from foods that disagree. Eat 
condiments sparingly; mustard, pepper, 
often cause stomach catarrh. The crav- 
ing for sweets can be satisfied by naturally 
sweet fruits. 

Extremely hot or cold foods irritate the 
stomach lining, and may cause inflam- 
mation. Do not eat any food that seems 
to disagree with you, or cause discomfort. 

e. if. j. 

* $ ♦ 

The Spice of Life 

TO keep her husband interested and 
eternallv in love with her, a wife must 
vary her costumes, argues every woman. 
A simple blue gown, one evening, and a 
somewhat vampish green one the next, 
is what keeps hubby fascinated. 

Undoubtedly, that is true. But let me 
ask that same_jvoman how much thought 
she has given to the old adage, "The way 
to a man's heart is through his stomach." 
How often does she change her menus? 
Or, is it pork and beans every Saturday 
night in the year, and the proverbial stew 
of Sunday's left-over dinner every Mon- 
day night? Fish, of course, on Frida 
and always Wednesdays a delicatessen 
dinner, because she goes to piay bridge 
every Wednesday afternoon, so hasn't 
the time to prepare anything else. Not 
much chance for variety of diet there. 

Or, perhaps, she hasn't definite nights 
for definite things, but her range of recipe? 
is so narrow. I have seen the statement 
given as a fact, by those who have made 
a study of it, that the average woman, in 
an American home, uses less than thirty 



separate recipes. Think of it, when the 
number of cook books is legion, and the 
magazines and newspapers print, each 
week, more than two thousand recipes. 

Get out of your cooking rut: Give 
your family a change. Try adding, for 
instance, two new recipes a week to your 
menus. Even if you have your favorite 
way of making pie crust, and your special 
recipe for layer cake, experiment with a 
new one, once in a while. 

The culinary art is not behind the other 
arts in its progress. Benefit by it. A 
new dish is just as gratifying and alluring 
to your husband's palate, as a new dress 
is to his eye. Try it and see. And 
wouldn't it take the monotony out of 
planning three meals a day, for every day, 
for you, if you varied the menu with a 
new dish occasionally? h. f. t. 



* * * 



Serve Hominy Grits 

WHY not serve hominy grits at 
least once a week, for the sake of 
variety, to starchy vegetables? People 
in the North and West would do well to 
try this excellent Southern dish, which is 
very economical at present prices. Horn- 
grits result from grinding up whole, 
hulled hominy, from which the germ has 
been removed. In appearance the grains 
somewhat resemble small, broken rice, 
but when cooked the hominy retains the 
clean, nutty flavor of the corn, and lends 
itself well to use, as a starchy vegetable, 
with meat or other combinations. 

Relief organizations have used hominy 
grits with great success in Asia Minor and 
Europe, where it proved acceptable to 
thousands, in spite of the fact that it was 
unfamiliar food. 

The first step in preparing grits for the 
table is to boil them, like any other 
cereal. Of course, boiled hominy, in the 
form of grits, is frequently used for a 
breakfast food, or as a lunch or supper 
dish with a sweet sauce; its possibilities 
for dinner seem to be less familiar, except 
in the South. For each cup of hominy 
grits four to five cups of water is allow ed. 



132 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



This should be seasoned with two tea- 
spoonfuls of salt. The grits should be 
added slowly to the salted, boiling water, 
and cooked for ten minutes over the fire. 
Then the cooking should be continued for 
two hours in a double boiler, or finished 
overnight in the tireless cooker. 

The favorite combination of meat and 
grits, in the South, is "hog and hominy," 
which may be roast pork, fried pork 
chops or tenderloin, baked leg of pork, 
or fresh pork sausage, served with a gen- 
erous helping of plain boiled hominy grits. 
Some of the fat from the meat is mixed 
with the grits, in place of butter. Some- 
times the idea of "hog and hominy" may 
be stretched to include ham or bacon, and 
there is no reason why those who enjoy 
salt pork should not eat it with hominy 
grits, as a starchy vegetable. 

The uses for left-over, boiled hominy 
grits are innumerable. Grits are partic- 
ularly good if cut in slices, dipped in 
flour, and fried to a delicate brown. 
This can be served for breakfast, or in 
place of a dinner vegetable. When 
planned for use in this way, the warm, 
boiled hominy should be poured into a 
bread tin, or baking powder can, to mould 
it into a form, from which attractive 
rectangular or round slices can be cut. 
Fried hominy grits, with maple syrup, 
honey, or preserves, is a luncheon dish 
or dessert that may be compared with 
waffles in satisfaction to the palate. 

To vary ordinary muffins, a small 
quantity of cold, boiled hominy grits 
can be used instead of part of the flour. 
In making gems, with any cooked starchy 
cereal, it is necessary to have the batter 
stiffer than in all-wheat flour mixtures, 
since the cooked cereals contain a con- 
siderable proportion of water, j. w. w. 
* * * 

Stuffed Artichokes 

Trim six artichokes and cook in 
gently boiling water until the chokes can 
easily be removed. Make the following 
stuffing: Put through the food chopper 
one-half pound, each, of beef suet, 



breadcrumbs, veal (uncooked), and lean 
ham. Season with one teaspoonful, each, 
of salt, pepper, and poultry seasoning, 
two teaspoonfuls of onion juice, one heap- 
ing tablespoonful of chopped celery, and 
bind the whole with one beaten egg or 
two yolks. Fill the cavities of the arti- 
chokes; wind around them narrow strips 
of cheesecloth to keep them in shape, 
and steam for thirty minutes or until the 
filling is cooked. Place in the center of 
a hot platter, arrange a border of well- 
seasoned rice, spaghetti, or mashed potato 
around them, and pour over all a pint of 
slightly thickened, rich brown gravy. 

Crab Pasties 

Soften, in a porcelain saucepan, six 
tablespoonfuls of butter, and stir into it 
six tablespoonfuls of flour, one-half a 
teaspoonful of salt, and one-fourth a tea- 
spoonful of pepper. When blended, add 
one cup of milk, and one-half a cup of 
thin cream, and stir until very thick. 
Remove from fire, and add two teaspoon- 
fuls of anchovy paste, dissolved in a 
little hot water, and then mix in the meat 
from three large crabs. Have ready a 
mould, lined with a light paste; pour in 
the mixture, cover with a sheet of paste, 
and bake for thirty minutes. Or the 
mixture may be divided into six or more 
parts, and baked in individual crab shells. 

m. d. c. 



* 



* * 



Lamb Brains and Tongue 

Put on six lambs' tongues in boiling 
water to cover, and let cook over gentle 
heat until tender. Prepare six brains; tie 
them loosely in cheesecloth with one- 
fourth a cup of very fine-minced parsley, 
and let boil for fifteen minutes. Remove 
from fire, chop coarse, season with salt 
and pepper, and reheat in a pint of cream, 
or of white sauce. When the tongues are 
cooked, remove the outside skin, lay in 
the center of an oval platter, and slice 
crosswise with a sharp knife. Arrange 
the brains around them, and pile on the 
outside a border of young, green peas. 



THIS department is for the benefit and free use of our subscribers. Questions relating to recipes, 
and those pertaining to culinary science and domestic economics in general, will be cheerfully 
answered by the editor. Communications for this department must reach us before the first of the 
month preceding that in which the answers are expected to appear. In letters requesting answers 
by mail, please enclose address and stamped envelope. Address queries to Janet M. Hill, Editor. 
American Cookery, 221 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass. 



Query No. 4300. — "Will you please give me then the top is replaced, and the break is 
a recipe for Kossuth Cake?" not no ticeable. 

Kossuth Cakes 

SEVERAL of our subscribers have most 
kindly responded to our request for 
this recipe, asked for in April. The 
following incorporates their instructions. 
Kossuth Cakes, so called because they 
were served at a dinner given to General 
Kossuth, and were named for him, are 
made on the basis of a plain, rich sponge 
cake. The cake may be baked in the fol- 
lowing ways: (1) In the square tins, made 
for the purpose, and holding a dozen 
cakes, which should, each, be about three 
or three and one-half inches square, and 
when baked should be three and one-half 
inches high. (2) In muffin rings. (3) In 
muffin pans. (4) By forcing the sponge 
cake mixture through a pastry tube into 
good-sized circles, upon sheets of white 
paper, which have been thoroughly 
greased. After baking, the cakes are cut 
in halves, most of the soft inside is 
removed, and the cavities are filled with 
sweetened and flavored whipped cream, 
or with ice cream, especially strawberry. 
The two parts are then put together, and 
the top is iced with chocolate icing. 
This icing should not be too sweet. 
Sometimes the cakes are covered entirely 
with the chocolate icing. Or the top may 
be iced after cutting it off, the bottom 
part is scooped out, and the filling is put 
in when the cakes are about to be served; 



Query No. 4301. — ''I should very much like 
a recipe for a Chocolate Bavarian Cream made 
without eggs." 

Chocolate Bavarian Cream, 
Without Eggs 

Scrape one ounce of chocolate; add 
two tablespoonfuls of sugar and one 
tablespoonful of water, and melt over hot 
water until smooth and glossy. Stir in, 
gradually, one cup of hot milk, and place 
directly over fire until the whole boils, 
keeping it stirred. Have ready one 
ounce of gelatine, soaked in one cup of 
cold milk, and when this is thoroughly 
hydrated add to the boiling milk and 
chocolate, together with one-half a cup 
of sugar. Pour into a large bowl, set 
into a pan of ice water, and beat until it is 
thick and creamy; then add one pint of 
whipped cream. This last should be the 
heavy cream that whips to a close, thick 
froth. 



Query No. 4302. — "Can you furnish me with 
a recipe for English Chutney? Are green 
tomatoes used in this?" 

English Chutney 

Properly speaking, a chutney or chutnee 
is a pickle made in British India, whose 
basis is mangoes, or some other tropical 
fruit. In America green tomatoes are 
used, perhaps they are also used in Eng- 
land, but the English recipes, in our file, 



133 



134 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



call for either green gooseberries or 
apples. 

Weigh two pounds of green goose- 
berries, or green apples, cored, but not 
pared, and cut in rather small pieces. 
Cook in one pint of vinegar until the 
whole is reduced to a soft pulp. Add the 
following: One ounce, each, of fine- 
chopped green pepper and fine-chopped 
garlic; two ounces of shallots, also fine- 
chopped; one ounce of ground ginger, 
two ounces of salt, one-fourth a pound of 
mustard seed, one-fourth a pound of 
tamarinds, three-fourths a pound of 
seeded raisins, chopped, and one pound 
of sugar. Stir the whole thoroughly, and 
allow to stand on the back of the stove 
for three days, stirring once in a w r hile. 
This used to be easy to do in the days of 
the coal or wood stoves, but if either is 
lacking in your kitchen, the mixture may 
be simmered down to a thick mass, then 
placed in the fireless cooker to ripen for 
twenty-four hours, reheating the stones 
every eight hours. Bottle in small 
bottles, and do not use for at least two 
months. It is better at the end of a year, 
and keeps in excellent condition for two 
years or longer. 



Query No. 4303. — "I should like to know 
how to Store Butter for use during the winter 
months, and to be sure it will not become rancid. 
I have been told that the June butter is the best 
for keeping purposes. Is this the case?" 

How to Store Butter for Winter 

Let us first say that the belief that June 
butter is the best for storage rests on 
tradition, handed down from our Old 
Country foremothers. In the British 
Isles the June butter is of especially fine 
quality, since both the weather and the 
herbage are at their best, at this time, for 
butter-making. Here, in the United 
States, the months of June, July, and 
August mean hot weather and fly time, 
consequently inferior butter to that made 
a month or so earlier or later. 

Butter, for winter storage, should be 
made of the freshest possible cream, 



since that made of soured cream will con- 
tain small granules of casein, impossible 
to wash out, and these readily putrify. 
We have been told that the butter made 
for use in our navy, where it may have to 
be kept for year-long voyages, is made of 
sweet cream, pasteurized for thirty min- 
utes at 145 deg. Fah., then cooled to 50 
deg. Fah., and kept at this point for three 
hours before churning. After churning 
the butter is washed until the water shows 
absolutely no milky appearance (this is 
a very important point), then it is salted 
to taste, but no excess of salt is used, and 
is packed in tins. For home use it could 
be made into pound prints, wrapped in 
waxed paper, put into a sterile jar, and the 
jar filled with brine, strong enough to 
float an egg. A weighted plate should be 
used to keep the butter under the brine. 
Or the butter may be packed directly into 
the jar, covered with a sterilized cloth, 
dipped in brine, and dairy salt strewn 
over the cloth to the depth of one-half an 
inch. Store in a cool cellar. 

To clarify the butter by melting at a 
low heat, then straining off the clear part 
into sterile jars, and when cold sifting over 
the top a thin layer of salt, will keep 
butter almost indefinitely, but its flavor 
will be lost. It is good for cooking, sauce- 
making, etc., and if, instead of adding 
salt, 'the clarified butter be mixed while 
warm with an ounce of honey to each 
pound of butter, it is excellent for use in 
making cakes and sweet dishes. 



Query No. 4304. — "Will you please give me 
some recipes for the French Pastries, such as are 
served in tea-rooms:" 

French Pastries 

We often tell persons who ask us for 
recipes for French pastry, that we can no 
more give recipes for these dainties than 
a milliner can give a recipe for trimming a 
hat. When a woman wants to trim a 
hat she looks in the windows, copies a 
hat she likes, or combines ideas from sev- 
eral hats, or strikes out something new 
and original. This is exactly the pro- 



QUERIES AND ANSWERS 



135 



cedure to be employed by the woman who 
wishes to make French pastry. 

Some of these dainties are nothing but 
highly decorated small cakes. Some of 
them are cakes with the inside scooped 
out, and filled with preserved fruit, or 
some kind of cake filling, or a gelatine 
jelly, or a creamed mixture. Others are 
little patty, or pastry, shells, usually with 
a small round of cake fitted into the 
bottom, to serve as a kind of absorbent 
pad (to absorb excess of moisture from the 
filling), and over this a spoonful of rich 
jam, or a preserved apricot or plum or 
peach. Others, again, seem to be made 
of thin slices of different kinds of cake, 
held together by jelly or jam, the out- 
sides coated with fruit syrup and dusted 
with fine-chopped nuts, and the tops 
decorated with candied fruit, inserted in a 
pretty colored icing. But whatever the 
style chosen, the outside of the cakelet, 
or patty, or whatever it may be, is as 
highly decorated as possible with chopped 
nuts, frostings of different colors, piped 
through very fine pastry tubes; or pre- 
served fruit, covered with a glaze. This 
is made by boiling down the syrup from 
the fruit used, or from any other fruit, 
or boiling down a plain syrup, to the 
"feather" stage, which is 232 deg. Fah., 
or just short of the soft-ball stage. A 
little of this is used to cover the fruit. 
Fruit or nuts so glazed will turn cloudy 
in damp weather, if let stand too long. 

To make French pastries is fascinating 
work, and all that is needed is a variety 
of odds and ends of cake, fruit, etc., to 
work with; a deft hand at manipulation, 
and a delight in making things look 
pretty. 

Query No. 4305. — "Will you kindly publish, 
in your magazine, a rule for a Creamy Rice 
Pudding (Poor Man's Pudding) that can be 
made without eggs?" 

Creamy Rice Pudding 
(Poor Man's Pudding) 

Add one-half a cup of well-washed rice, 
soaked overnight in cold water, to one 
quart of cold milk in a baking dish. 



Place in a cool oven, not more than 220 
deg. Fah., and stir every fifteen or twenty 
minutes to keep the rice grains from 
settling to the bottom, or packing 
together in lumps. After the mixture 
has cooked for an hour, add one-half a 
cup of sugar, mixed with three-fourths a 
teaspoonful of salt and one-half a grated 
nutmeg; stir to dissolve the sugar and 
salt, and continue to bake at a low 
temperature for two or more hours 
longer. As a scum forms on the surface 
of the milk, this should be loosened from 
the edges of the baking-dish with a spoon 
and turned down into the body of the 
pudding, and this process should be 
repeated until the rice is thoroughly 
cooked, when the scum may remain to 
become delicately brown. It is the con- 
stant turning down of the scum before 
it hardens or browns too much that gives 
the pudding the creamy consistency. 
The slower the cooking, the richer and 
creamier will be the pudding. The pud- 
ding is cooked when a single grain of the 
rice, pressed between finger and thumb, 
shows no "bone" or hard inside part, but 
is found to be uniformly soft. One-half a 
cup of seeded raisins, added at the same 
time as the sugar, improves this pudding 
very much. Since rice differs a good deal 
in its absorptive power, additional milk 
may have to be added, if the pudding is 
too stiff before the rice is cooked. This 
may be added cold, and stirred in as 
needed. The consistency of the pudding, 
when done, should be that of heavy cream. 
A good deal of care is needed in making 
this simple dish, which, when properly 
done, is exceedingly delicious. 



Query No. 4306. — "I should like to know 
whether a Fruit Butter can be made from pump- 
kins, similar to Apple Butter. I have never seen 
a recipe for this; can you give me one?" 

Pumpkin Butter 

Pare the pumpkin, remove seeds, and 
cut up into pieces of convenient size. 
Measure, and for every four quarts of 
pumpkin pieces allow four pounds of 



136 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



sugar, six lemons, sliced thin, and one 
pound of seeded raisins. Cook the whole 
directly over the fire for an hour, adding 
a little water if necessary, stirring fre- 
quently, and being very careful not to 
burn the mixture. After the pumpkin 
has been cooked to a pulp, set the kettle 
at the side of the range, where the con- 
tents may simmer until thick. If it be 
desired to have the butter quite smooth, 
the sliced lemons should be tied loosely in 
coarse netting, and removed before the 
butter is stored in jars. The jars should 
be sterile, and the covers air-tight. 

If the pieces of pumpkin are first 
cooked in vinegar, one cup to four quarts 
of the pieces, and a cheesecloth spice-bag, 
containing an ounce, each, of bruised 
whole cloves, cinnamon, and mace, is put 
into the kettle during cooking, and 
allowed to remain until it has colored the 
mixture, the butter will keep without 
covering the jar, if stored in a cool place. 
The sugar and lemons should be added 
after the pumpkin has cooked for thirty 
minutes in the vinegar. Squash may be 
similarly preserved. 

Mint-Flavored Apple Jelly 

In response to an invitation to readers 
to let us have, for the benefit of a sub- 
scriber, who inquired how this could best 
be made, their own methods of adding 
flavoring, we have received many answers. 
A digest of these follows. (1) Apples 
that do not redden when ripe are recom- 
mended by most readers, such as Fall 
Pippins, Rhode Island Greenings, or 
Porter, since these will yield a light- 
colored jelly; but two persons specify 
crab apples. (2) Fresh mint leaves are 
washed, wiped dry, and put into the 
bottom of the jelly glass before pouring in 
the jelly, using more or fewer leaves as the 
flavor is desired more or less pronounced. 
Or boil with the fruit juice a market-size 
bunch of mint (a bunch at least an inch 
and one-half around the stems), for each 
four quarts of fruit juice, adding, also, 
the juice of one lemon, since this serves to 



bring out the mint flavor. The mint may 
be bruised, and tied in netting; or 
lowered into the fruit juice in a wire 
basket; or first pounded in a mortar. 
Boil for ten minutes, or until the jelly is 
flavored to taste. (3) Most of our 
readers add a very little green vegetable 
coloring the last thing, for this will give a 
lovely, clear green, while the green from 
the mint, alone, will be cloudy. Yet 
some say no coloring should be added. 



Fish-and-Tomato Combinations 

SOME people find fish rather tasteless, 
especially such kinds as cod and 
haddock, and are much more ready to eat 
it if it is served with an appetizing sauce, 
or is used in combination with something 
of a more piquant flavor. There are a 
number of ways of using tomato with fish, 
which may be fitted into the family menu 
easily. Some of them make use of even 
very small quantities of left-over fish. 

Baked Fish with Baked Tomatoes 

Prepare haddock, halibut, mackerel or 
any fish suitable for baking, and place in a 
large baking pan. Surround with whole 
tomatoes that have been cored, and the 
cavities filled with a little minced onion, 
salt and pepper. Bake till done and 
serve together on a platter. 

Baked Fish with Tomato Sauce 

Make a tomato sauce by stewing 
tomatoes with a little onion and celery, 
season well with salt and paprika, strain, 
and pour over boiled fish. Canned 
tomatoes may be used, or canned tomato 
soup, which will not require the onion, 
or other seasoning. The same sauce may 
be used with fried or baked fish. 

Fish-and-Tomato Hash 

Cold cooked fish may be freed from 
skin and bones, flaked, mixed with 
tomato sauce, and browned in a frying 
pan. h. b. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Healthful 

Reliable 

Economical 



« 



Bk y 






The prudent 

housewife avoids 

substitutes, which may 

contain alum, and uses 

ROYAL 

BAKING 
POWDER 

\ 

Absolutely Pure **g£ 

Made from Cream of Tartar A 
^ derived from grapes. 



lyp 



m 



s. 



.sO, 






Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

137 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



New Books 



Plays for School and Camp. By Katha- 
rine Lord. Little, Brown & Co., 
Boston. 

All the plays in this book were pre- 
pared by the author to meet some de- 
mand, either by a definite group, or for a 
special event, and were developed for the 
occasion, the time, and the place. Thus 
there is an outdoor play for a girls' camp 
— "The Raven Man," which gives an 
opportunity for the girls to show their 
skill in water sports; "Buried Treasure," 
an outdoor play for boys; "Kris Kringle 
Makes a Flight," a Christmas play, 
featuring Christmas carols and tableaux 
for the Sunday School; "Goldilocks and 
the Three Bears," an old story, with a 
new ending; "The Pied Piper," a version 
of the old story which is especially suited 
for boys, and "The Honorable Miss," 
which shows the picturesque setting of 
Japanese home life, and the reverence for 
age that is so carefully taught to the 
children of Japan. 

Two of these six plays have had pro- 
fessional production in the Cohan and 
Harris Theatre, New York, but they, as 
well as the other four, are well within the 
scope of the average boy and girl in 
school or club or church or settlement. 

This is a plain statement of the contents 
and purport of the volume. It provides 
fit and suitable means of giving choice 
and high-grade entertainments in school 
and camp. 

Homemaking Simplified. By Bertha 
Streeter. Harper & Brothers, New 
York. 
This is an attractive and readable book, 
a perusal of which may be of great inter- 
est and profit to the prospective bride or 
young housekeeper; even the expe- 
rienced housekeeper may derive benefit 
thereby. To simplify and make house- 
work easier is the theme. Surely time- 
saving devices of all sorts are commenda- 
ble; to take the possible drudgery out of 



routine tasks is ever desirable. To sim- 
plify our tasks and regard them all as a 
pleasure is better still. There is time and 
place for everything. The problems of 
the household are numerous. The so- 
called labor-saving devices are well worth 
examining and considering. They cost 
money, they must be run by some one, 
and they must be kept clean and sanitary. 
All these things must be considered, and, 
after all, in the average home, there is the 
actual cooking, the actual cleaning, the 
actual planning and the real work to be 
done. The lot of the housewife is no 
sinecure. By all means, let us learn how 
to eliminate and simplify and make work 
easy. It is in keeping with the tendency 
of the day. In this way lie progress and 
reform. 



National Home Economic 
Association 

AT least five hundred delegates, from 
all parts of the United States and 
Canada, are expected to attend the fifteenth 
annual convention of the National Home 
Economics Association, to be held at the 
Oregon Agricultural College, Corvallis, 
August 1-5, as shown by letters coming 
in to the office of the dean of home eco- 
nomics at the college. 

A wealth of material is offered in the 
program sections of special interest to 
teachers, home-makers, business women, 
institutional workers, extension special- 
ists, vocational instructors, research work- 
ers, and social service workers. 

The work is divided into general ses- 
sions for all delegates, and into various 
sections of interest to different groups, 
such as foods and nutrition, health, home 
management, clothing and textiles, home- 
making, institutional management, exten- 
sion, education, and science. 

Delegations will be met as they arrive 
in Portland, July 31, by local organiza- 
tions and entertained for the day with a 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

138 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




Grape Jam — Use about 3 lbs. fully rip- 
ened grapes. Wash, stem, and separate 
skins from pulp, halving the skins. Sim- 
mer pulp 5 minutes in covered saucepan 
and remove seeds by screening through 
sieve. Crush skins with wooden masher 
and mix with screened pulp. Add £ 
cup water, stir until boiling and simmer 
slowly 5 hour in closely covered sauce- 
pan. Measure 4 level cups (2 lbs.) 
cooked fruit into large kettle, adding, if 
necessary, enough water to the fourth 
cup to make it level full. Add ~I\ lev- 
eled cups (3j lbs.) sugar and mix well. 
Stir mixture hard and constantly and 
bring to a vigorous boil over the hottest 
fire. Boil hard 1 minute, stirring con- 
tinually. Take from fire, add \ bottle 
(scant \ cup) Certo, and stir it in well. 
Skim and pour quickly. 

Plum Jam — Use fully ripened fruit for 
finest flavor; slice, pit and crush well 
about 2 qts. or 2\ lbs. of plums. Meas- 
ure 4 level cups (2 lbs.) crushed fruit 
and \ cup water into large kettle, stir 
until boiling, cover kettle and simmer 
15 minutes. Add 1\ level cups (3J 
lbs.) sugar and mix well. Stir hard and 
constantly and bring to vigorous boil 
over hottest fire. Boil hard 1 minute 
with continual stirring. Take from fire, 
add 5 bottle (scant \ cup) Certo and 
stir in well. Skim and pour quickly into 
sterilized glasses. This makes 10 half- 
pound glasses of jam. 

Quince Jelly — Remove core, blossom, 
and stem ends from about \\ quarts, 
or 2j pounds, ripe fruit. Put through 
food cutter, or chop very fine. Add 4 
cups water and simmer in covered pan 
15 minutes. Place fruit in jelly bag and 
squeeze out juice. Measure 1\ leveled 
cups (3j lbs.) sugar and 4 cups (2 lbs.) 
juice into large saucepan, stir and bring 
to a boil. At once add 5 bottle (scant 
5 cup) Certo, stirring constantly. Con- 
tinue to stir and bring again to a hard 
boil over the hottest fire for one-half 
minute, stirring continually. Remove 
from fire, let stand 1 minute, skim and 
pour quickly. 

Important: Best way to seal jams and 
jellies in open glasses. Cover while hot 
with thin coat hot paraffin. Next day 
add tablespoonful hot paraffin 
to seal cracks around edge 
formed by shrinkage 
1 cooling. 



One Minute's Boiling 

Makes Perfect Jam and Jelly 

From All Fruits 

New Certo Process Easy, Sure, Economical 



w 



Hf4^ 



__ 'It doesn't pay to make 

£"^^ jam and jelly" has been 
the plaint of many house- 
wives. Fruit and sugar were 
wasted by the old, uncertain, 
long-boiling process, which re- 
duced the amount of juice and 
the real fruit taste and color. 
Sometimes then the fruit 
wouldn't "jell" and hour? of 
work in a hot kitchen resulted 
in failure or poor quality pro- 
duct. 



Today by the sure, short- 
boiling Certo Process, so simple 
a school girl can do it, the fruit 
juice always "jells," the one 
minute boiling period produces 
one-half more jam or jelly (for 
practically no juice is boiled 
away) and preserves the de- 
licious taste and color of ripe fruit. 
Success is certain; no wonder 
that in about one year Certo has 
revived the almost forgotten art 
of home jam and jelly making. 



Certo is Mother Nature's jell-maker, now practical and usable for home use. A 
pure, concentrated fruir pectin, containing no gelatine or preservative, Certo 
is highly recommended by cooking experts. 



This is the Time to Fill Your Preserve Shelves 
With Seasonable Jams and Jellies 

There is still plenty of fresh fruit. Get a bottle of Certo p.nd free 
book of nearly 100 recipes from grocer or druggist today. If you 
can't find Certo Hear home, send us 35c and we will promptly for- 
ward a bottle (parcel post) prepaid. Kindly include your grocer's 
name and address and we will arrange to have him carry Certo for 

convenience of you and your friends. Certo jams and jellies 

have perfect keeping qualities. 



ERTO 

(Sure/ell) 



Pectin Sales Co., Inc. 

382 East Avenue 
Rochester - N. Y. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

139 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



drive around the "Rose City" and a 
tour of the Columbia River highway, 
including a luncheon and dinner. The 
Multnomah Hotel will be the delegation 
headquarters during the stay in Portland. 

The three dormitories of the college will 
be open for the guests who attend the 
convention, thus alleviating worry over 
hotel accommodations. They will house, 
between them, at least 478 persons, and 
are equipped with modern conveniences 
for the comfort of visitors. 

Many speakers and authors of national 
and international fame have been secured 
as lecturers for the convention. 



S. K. Ratcliffe, of the Manchester 
Guardian, who returned from a speaking 
tour in the middle West, recently, in 
which he followed immediately on the 
heels of Mrs. Asquith, was asked whether 
he considered his much-talked-of com- 
patriot had made a hit in the West. 
"Well," he replied, "I didn't notice any 
inclination among western mothers to 
name their babies Margot." 




HOSE SUPPORTERS 



Equipped with our 
famous Oblong ALL- 
Rubber Button clasps, 
hold the stockings in 
place securely — and 
without injury to the 
most delicate silk 
fabric. 



Velvet Grip Hose Supporters 
For ALL the Family 

Are Sold Everywhere 
Made by the George Frost Company, Boston 




Camp-Cooking Fires 

(Continued from page 109) 

by side, a few inches apart. Secure them 
in this position from rolling with flat 
stones at the ends. Raise the front log 
an inch from the ground with flat stones, 
thus providing draft for the fire. 

Build the cooking fire of dry pieces of 
fuel, placed between the logs. Coffee 
pot, frying pan, potato pan, and any other 
utensils stand on the top of the range. 
The heat is just where it ought to be, 
under the pots and pans, and any required 
degree of heat can be had. If the fuel is 
dry, there is a very minimum of smoke. 
The cook's face need not rival the sunset 
skies, and she, or he, need not hold the 
handle of a frying pan in a charring hand. 
If it be a she, she can sit on a log near the 
range and do her "tatting," if it is ortho- 
dox for the modern she to do "tatting," 
meantime watching, at times, the auto-, 
matics of the efficient camp cooking 
range. If the cook is a he, he can smoke 
his pipe, idle away his time, as camping 
males so love to do. 

Because of the nature of wood, logs, in 
time, will burn away. Hence, where the 
camp is a permanent camp, a range can 
be constructed of flat stones. Such a 
stone range should follow the general 
lines of the log range. Thus, you will 
have a narrow and longish, stone trench, 
shallow in depth, and provided with a 
few apertures at the bottom for draft. 
But do not select stones from under any 
water, or where the cracks of the stones 
are likely to contain water. When such 
stones are heated, the water, and very 
naturally, turns to steam; and a bom- 
bardment of pieces of heated stone is 
unpleasant, and, besides, may overturn 
the coffee pot at a critical moment. 

Very likely these two forms .of camp 
range go back to the beginnings of effi- 
cient outdoor cookery. The advantages 
of both must be apparent to any one who 
has wrestled with the difficulties of an 
ordinary woods fire, and the attempt to 
fry fish, make coffee, and, perhaps, bake 
frying-pan bread, bringing all to the 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

140 



ADVERTISEMENTS 







fcR*«lDRAPlB,«IC»LU.i*. 




A Valuable Impression 

PLEASING impression upon customers is of value. You can create 
one and at the same time save your goods from damage by spreading 
sheets of TANGLEFOOT i n your show windows, especially over Sunday. 

TANGLEFOOT W *H then be at work for you and will not only catch 
the flies, but attract the attention of people who pass your store^to 

your efforts to keep your stock clean and fresh. For 1922 TANGLEFOOT nas 

been considerably reduced in price. 

Remember TANGLEFOOT catches the germ as well as the fly, and that poisons, 

traps or powders cannot do it 




Examine This Emblem 

It represents the Rice Leaders of 
The World Association 

MANUFACTURERS can become members of 
this association only by invitation and they 
cannot be invited except they have achieved 
success through faithful adherence to right busi- 
ness principles. 

We count it an honor that we have received this 
coveted invitation and are now members of this 
association and have the right to use its emblem. 

White House Coffee 



BY INVITATION 
MEMBER OF 




NEW YORK. U.S.A., 



and White House Teas 



amply comply with the association's "quality" requirements- 
PRODUCT OF QUALITY, TRUTHFULLY REPRESENTED 
of these goods never changes, never varies, and there is 

NONE BETTER AT ANY PRICE. Ask Your Dealer 

DWINELL-WRIGHT COMPANY 



"AN HONEST 
' The quality 



Principal Coffee Roasters 
BOSTON CHICAGO 






Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

141 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




If she 

were your child 

would you let strangers feed her? 

OF COURSE NOT ! You would select 
her food yourself. 

And yet — when you order just "oats' 
or "oatmeal" are you not depending upon 
strangers? "H-O 'Hornby's Oats is an 
old and trusted friend. 

It is thoroughly steam-cooked in closed 
kettles. The steam-cooking dextrinizes the 
starch and saves the stomach hours of 
work — that's what makes H-O different. 

Slow toasting over coal fires gives that 
delicious H-O flavor. 

H-O is light and creamy, each flake by it- 
self, and it never cooks up sticky and pasty. 

H-O digests better and is more nourish- 
ing. Every home can afford H-O. Health 
is cheap at any price. 



THE 



H-O CEREAL COMPANY, 
BUFFALO. N. Y.. AND AYR. CANADA 



In. 



Also Makers of 
Force Wheat Flakes and Presto Self-Rising Flour 



OATS 



Steam Coded 
/&' HEALTH 



Pan Toasted 
FLAVOR 



■ 



camp table at the same time. With the 
ordinary camp cooking fire this is hope- 
less; while, with a camp range, it is 
almost as easy as by the means of a' 
kitchen gas stove. 

Somebody may ask — but what does 
the camp cook do when it rains? For the 
petty fires in a camp range are very 
easily put out by a heavy rain. Generally 
in a forest it is possible to find a big 
fallen tree, from under which broad strips 
of damp bark can be pealed. A four- 
foot high sloping shelter, of sapling pole 
supports, and the damp bark, can easily 
be constructed. The front of the shelter 
should project far enough over the range 
to protect the cooking fire from the 
direct rain. And the cook, of course, 
can be protected with rubber or mack- 
intosh coat. Even an umbrella can 
easily be managed while cooking on one 
of the ranges which have been described. 

Second-Class Mail 

In these late years the way of the pub- 
lisher has been hard, indeed, almost well- 
nigh impassable. What with the price 
of paper and the cost of labor, together 
with steady increase in the cost of trans- 
portation by second-class mail, the burden 
of the publisher has become excessive, 
too grievous to be borne. Of course, 
from sheer necessity, some part of this 
extraordinary expense has been passed 
over to the public, and thus all have been 
made to suffer unfairly, but this does not 
help out the situation. What are our 
legislators thinking of? What do they 
mean? People are growing restless; they 
are demanding relief from the excessive 
burden of taxation. Where can a begin- 
ning be made better than in reducing 
transportation charges, and in cutting 
down the cost of second-class mail? 

"Hope deferred maketh the heart sick." 
All are anxious to resume business, to see 
a speedy return of prosperity. Self- 
seeking is out of place. Xo idler, every- 
body at work is the need of the hour. 
Reduce, reduce expenditures; build up, 
build up industries; in short, action with 
a single eye, on the part of our legislators, 
to the common weal, is called for. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

142 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



1UATA 



^\yjjjj^j m ijjjjjjjjj[jjjjjjjjjjjjjjj^j[j,v 





°^GETABl£ Y 

C£ »ITfl!NS 7.8% VEGETABLE f* T 

2S.S7. TOTAL SOLIDS 
T HE HEBE COMPA^ 

(kn ^S-. UUCAGO-SEAnU^- 5 ' 1 



ar# best 
cooked with HEBE 

SUMMER'S most welcome sign is the tender, green, succulent 
new vegetables fresh from the garden. Everybody likes 
them and the change is refreshing to the most jaded appetite. 

Vegetables are at their best cooked with a white sauce 
(thickened). You can make a delicious white sauce with Hebe 
— and economical, too. For lima beans, carrots, string beans, 
Swiss chard, spinach, turnips, cabbage, etc., use this recipe: 

Put vegetables on in an uncovered vessel, cover with boiling 
water and cook until tender, adding water if necessary. Add 
flavoring and season to taste, and to each quart of vegetable 
stock add y 2 cup of Hebe undiluted and thickening made of one 
tablespoon flour rubbed smooth in cold water. Boil ten minutes. 

For new potatoes, onions, cauliflower, etc., make the white 
sauce separately and pour over just before serving. In cooking, 
Hebe moistens, shortens and enriches. To the teacher of cookery, 
Hebe is a happy "find." It is economical, improves the flavor 
and adds food value to the meal. 

Ask your grocer for Hebe — the cooking liquid. It is pure 
skimmed milk evaporated to double strength enriched with vege- 
table fat. Use it in all your cooking and baking from thick soups 
and meat stews to salad dressings and desserts. Send for the free 
Hebe recipe book. x\ddress 2815 Consumers Bldg., Chicago. 




Chicago 



THE HEBE COMPANY 

New York 



Seattle 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

143 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Veuve Chaffard 

Pure Olive Oil 

The Finest The 
World Produces 




Received direct 
from the Producers 

Bottled in France 
in honest bottles 

Full Quarts 
Full Pints 

Full Half-Pints 



S. S. PIERCE CO. 

BOSTON 



f — Domestic Science — ^ 

Home-Study Courses 

Food, health, housekeeping, clothing, children, 

For Homemakers and Mothers; professional 
courses for Teachers, Dietitians, Institution 
Managers, Demonstrators, Nurses, Tea Room 
Managers, Caterers, "Cooking for Profit," etc. 

"The Profession of Home-making," 100 
page handbook, free. Bulletins: "Free-hand 
Cooking," "Food Values," "Ten-Cent Meals," 
"Family Finance," "Art of Spending" — 10c ea, 

American School of Home Economics 
(Chartered in 1905) 803 E. 58th St., Chicago, 111 



J 




Just the Thing for the Hot Weather 

Gossom's Cream Soups (in Powdered Form) 

Pure, Wholesome, Delicious 

Quickly and 
Easily Prepar- 
ed. 

Simply add 
water and boil 
15 minutes and 

you have a delightful soup, of high food value and low 

co9t. One 15 cent package makes 3 pints of soup. 

These soups do not deteriorate, so may be continually on 

hand and thus found most convenient. The contents 

also keep after opening. 

Split pea, Green pea, Lima, Celery, Black Bean, Clam 

Chowder, Onion and (Mushroom 25c). 

Sample sent prepaid on receipt of 20 cents, or one dozen for 

$1.75. 

For Sale by leading grocers 15 cents a package, 20 cents in 

far West. 

Manufactured by 

B. F. Gossom, 692 Washington St., Brookline 46, Mass. 



The Silver Lining 

Competition 

"I love griddle-cakes," said Betty, 
"Yum, yum!" cried little Sue; 

"I'll beat you," challenged Esther, 
"I may eat twenty-two." 

Clara Seaman Chase. 



Are you tired of "weeks"? The 
United Presbyterian wants another. We 
vote "Aye." "We are ready to banish 
'Clean-up-the-Yard' week, and 'Black- 
the-Stove' week, and 'Ragbag-and-Tag' 
week, and suggest a national observance 
of 'Mind-Your-Own-Business' week. W T e 
feel sure our suggestion, if given wide 
publicity, would meet with instant and 
enthusiastic response on the part of 
millions of harassed, weary, patient, long- 
suffering mortals who were trying to get 
their legitimate tasks in life accom- 
plished, despite people whose whole occu- 
pation in life seems to be minding other 
people's business." 

"Home Cooking," reads a sign in one 
of those New York delicatessen stores 
that are the haven and refuge of the tired 
apartment-dweller. "That's what my 
husband likes," remarked one of these 
housewives as she was purchasing the 
family dinner, while a reporter stood by. 

The Outlook. 

During sermon time the other day a 
baby began to cry, and its mother carried 
it toward the door. "Stop!" said the 
minister. "The baby's not disturbing 
me." The mother turned toward the 
pulpit, and made the audible remark: 
"Oh, 'e ain't, ain't 'e? But you're a 
disturbin' of 'im!" — British Weekly. 

A young graduate in law wrote to a 
prominent practitioner in Dallas, Tex., 
to inquire what chance there was in that 
section. "I am a Republican in politics.," 
he wrote, "and an honest lawyer." In 
few days he received this reply: "If you 
are a Republican, the game laws here 
will protect you, and if you are an honest 
lawyer, you will have no competition." 

This bit comes from a source unknown: 
Aline and her brother attended a birth- 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

144 






ADVERTISEMENTS 



lti^WVWWWWWWM i *i^i^ 



California Ripe 



Olives 



Are Fully Ripened on the Tree 



CALIFORNIA Ripe 
Olives are matured as 
nature intends them to be. In 
this tree-ripened state they 
provide valuable nourishment 
in the largest quantity. 

With their protein, fat and 
carbohydrate content and 
their fuel value of 958 cal- 
ories to the pound, they are 
far more than a condiment; 
they are, in fact, a food. 

In protein, with 2 per cent, 
they almost equal boiled rice 
and boiled potatoes. 

In fat or oil content, with 
21 per cent, they provide a 
valuable element which many 
staples lack, while in calories 

California Oliv 

Los Angeles, 

PACKER M 
A. Adams, Jr. ( 

Albers Olive Company 
American Olive Company 
California Growers Assn., Inc. 
California Packing Corporation 
C. M. Gifford & Sons 

Wyandotte Olive Gi 



to the pound, they compare 
with bread and exceed boiled 
rice and boiled potatoes. 

Ripe Olives are easily di- 
gested and readily assimi- 
lated. They provide an excel 
lent source of musci 
ergy and 
regul 





• ■. .\- ■"■■■■■ r •..■"•■* 

'■*".•■'*.•.'.■-■'■' 





Buy advertised Goods — 



fKlll 

HUNK ' 






AMERICAN COOKERY 



GOOD ® LUCK 

JAR RUBBERS 

come packed with Atlas E. Z. Seal and Good 
Luck Jars, Ball Ideal and Eclipse Jars, Schram 
Ever Seal and Acme Jars. They are sold by 
good grocery and hardware stores throughout 
the country. Look for the Good Luck name 

on rubbers when 
buying fruit jars. 

If your dealer cannot 
supply you, send 10 
cts. for sample dozen. 
For 6 cts. in stamps 
we will mail you our 
book on Cold Pack 
Canning, containing 
many novel and ex- 
cellent recipes. 




BBER CO. 

e, Mass. 



9WE 



■"■•■ 






m 



m 



&$* 



■ 



M& 



m. i 



SHB 



us 



m 



^ ■'.. 



v.- - 



*€r 






day party of a playmate. Ice cream,! 
cake, and lemonade were served. Thd 
boy asked his hostess for a glass of water! 
"Drink your lemonade," Aline said, inter! 
rupting. "I don't want lemonade. I 
want water," said the boy, looking plead! 
ingly at his hostess. "Don't be sillyl 
Drink your lemonade," said Aline. "It'l 
just like water." 

A stranger in town said, "Mister, cail 
you tell me where the churches of thl 
town are located?" The wag replied! 
"The synagogue is next to the bank; thl 
Episcopalian is over by the theatre; thl 
Presbyterian is within two doors of thl 
cold storage; the Baptist is down by thl 
river; the Methodist is next door to thl 
gas plant." By deduction, we would find 
the Community Church next to the Towl 
Hall and the Unitarian Church opposite 
the High School. 

A summer boarder in one of the town! 
on the Cape noticed a native who sat 
every morning on the same dry goods box,J 
smoking a corncob pipe, and otherwise 
displaying an unmistakable aptitude for 
leisure. Finally the boarder asked him 
what his business was. The smoker 
slowly moved his pipe, and drawled! 
"Wa-al, I get up in the mornin' and feed 
the horse, then I eat breakfast. After 
dinner I feed the horse and pig agin, and 
take a drive. At night, I have to feed the 
critters agin; but when winter comes, 
kill the pig and rest." 

Youth's Companion. 



"How John and Mary 

Live and Save 

on $35 a Week" 

THIS little story tells how a youn 
couple are getting ahead by plan 
ning the family spending and by "stretch 
ing" the family dollars. 

If you depend on a weekly pay enve 
lope, this booklet will help you to liv 
more comfortably, and save more mone$ 

The price of the booklet is 10 cents - 
it may be worth ?10 to you. Send for i 
American School of Home Economic 
803 E. 58th Street, Chicago. Adv. 






Do not accept substitutes 
46 



M 



:•■-,- 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




em a 




anker 




rst 




- 



EPICURES recognize green 
olives as the finest of ap- 
petizers. The reason is obvious. 

For to think about green 
olives is to want some. And the 
more you think, the more you 
want them. 

You just get hungry for green 
olives. Your taste craves the 
delicious tang of the salty olive 
flavor. You want to bite into 
the firm, meaty fruit. 

Eat a lot of them. They're 



good for you — and for children, 
too. The olive oil in them is 
healthful and nourishing. Green 
olives put an edge on jaded 
appetites, and make your meals 
taste better. 

You can make delicious sand- 
wiches with green olives. Use 
them in salads — and for gar- 
nishes. Keep a bottle or two on 
your shelves for the impromptu 
luncheon. Buy some green olives 
today. Your family will appre- 
ciate them. 



AMERICAN IMPORTERS of Spanish Green Olives 

^0^ - 200 Fifth Avenue, New York 

Spanish 

GREEN OLIVES 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

147 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




MADE wit h MILK 



a 



Milk" means nourishment 
and "Junket" means Milk 
in a dainty, delicious form, 
so attractive to children 
and. grownups. 

Send for our new Junket Recipe Book. 4c. in 
stamps will bring it with a sample of Junket 
Tablets. We will also include a sample of Junke 
Powder, flavored and sweetened, our newest 
preparation for making Junket. 

THE JUNKET FOLKS 
Little Falls, N. Y. 

Chr. Hansen's Canadian Laboratory, Toronto, Ont. 



CANNED FRUIT JAR GUMMED LABELS 

288 Assorted Varieties for I Rp Post- 



Hollenback Press, No. 2, Columbus, Ohio 



paid 



The So E-Z Cream Separator Ji^sss 

1-2 pint of CREAM from a quart bottle of milk 
leaving 1 1-2 pints of milk for other purposes. 
Just adjust it and pour off the CREAM, 
the milk remaining in the bottle. No 
Pumping. No Wasting. Easily Cleaned. 40 
cents cash with order or 50 cents C. O. D. 
Use it 30 days, if not SATISFIED we 
will refund your money. 
B. W. J. COMPANY, 1996 Indianola Ave., Columbus, Ohio 




QUARTS 
ONLY 



Sell Your Snap Shots at $5.00 Each 



Kodak prints needed by 25,000 publishers 
pay. We teach you how and where to sell. 



Make vacations 
Write WALHA- 
MORE INSTITUTE, LAFAYETTE BUILDING, PHILA- 
DELPHIA, PA. 



"Ten-Cent Meals" 

42. Meals with receipts and directions ror preparing each. 48 pp. 10c 
Am. School of Home Economics, 803 E. 58th St., Chicago 



Angel Food Cake 



8 Inches Square, 5 Inches High 

Yon can be the best cake maker in y oar 
dab or town. You can make the same Angel Food 
Cake and many other kinds that I make and sell at $3 a 
loaf-profit, $2, If you 

Learn the Osborn Cake Making System 

Mr methods are different. They are the result of twenty year* 
experience as a domestic science expert. My way is easy to learn 
It never fails. I have taught thousands. L'it me send you foil 



particulars FREE. 
Kirs. Grace Osborn 



Dept. 147 



Bay City, Midi* 



The Strong, Silent Man 

Tall, heavily built, with deep-set eyes, a 
prominent jaw, and slow but deliberate 
of speech. There you have the typical 
strong, silent man, to look at. 

The impressions he makes on you are 
subtle. You can tell he has an iron will 
and a relentless determination to get 
what he wants in spite of every obstacle 
in his way. Note the tightly compressed 
lips. He is a born fighter. It is in his 
bearing. But he would give up his life 
for his friend, without even telling his 
wife about it beforehand. He would be 
as steady as a rock in a crisis. 

The great strength of the strong, silent 
man is his weakness; he has an enormous 
respect for women, and a heart that melts 
at the sight of a weeping child. 

Before you are aware of it you are 
weaving a story round him. He is ob- 
viously a devoted son; but it is possible 
that until he has learned to understand 
his wife or, rather, she has learned to 
understand him, he would make an over- 
bearing husband. Consider the beetling 
brows. 

But that is a pathetic wistfulness about 
the strong, silent man. He will marry 
late, and, until then, lead a lonely life, 
in spite of his many friends. His greatest 
wish is to spend the winter evenings 
sitting by the anthracite stove, watching 
his wife darn his socks. He makes 
enormous holes in them. But it is some 
time before he finds a fitting partner, 
and so this wish is destined to remain un- 
fulfilled until he is approaching middle 
age. And if he should make a mistake 
and find himself darning her stockings 
instead — ■ that is to say, if he should 
marry a stronger and more talkative 
woman — But, of course, he never makes 
mistakes. 

That is the story you will weave round 
the strong, silent man. But you will dis- 
cover if you get to know him better that 
things are not wholly what they seem. 
The silence that has so intrigued your 
imagination is only one of his many 
moods. At times he unbends. When 
that happens he not only talks, but 
jabbers. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do 

148 



not accept substitutes 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



One easy turn of the 
"Lorain" red wheel gives 
you a choice of 44 measured 
and controlled oven heats 
for any kind of oven cook- 
ing or baking. 




^> 

To can 

TOM A TOES 

the easy Lorain way 

Select solid ones, scald 
long enough to loosen 
skins. Dip in cold 
water, core and peel. 
Pack whole, to within 
Kinch from top of jar. 
Add no water. Add 1 
teaspoon salt ( for 
quart). Place scalded 
rubbers in position. 
Ajust lids loosely. Put 
jars in oven. Set Lorain 
wheel at 250 degrees. 
Forget them for one 
hour, while you rest. 
Remove jars from oven 
and seal tightly when 
alarm clock rings. 



Let Your Canning Do Itself While You Enjoy 
Leisure Hours A way from the Kitchen 



I 



T'S altogether too hot during these tor- 
rid days to can fruits and vegetables the 
old-fashioned way. 

Come out of the kitchen— let the Lorain Oven 
Heat Regulator watch your canning during 
your absence. It's the new Lorain Way. 

For example, take tomatoes. Usually canned 
tomatoes are little more than a pulpy mess, 
with none of the firmness, and little of the 
color and flavor of the fresh vegetable. But 
when they are canned the Lorain Way they 
are firm enough for salads. However neither 
words nor pictures can describe the fresh- 
tasting deliciousness of fruits and vegetables 



canned by this new method. And the 
method is so simple a child can understand 
it. Read the recipe above. That shows you 
how simple it really is. 

Thousands upon thousands of women have 
successfully used the Lorain Way for several 
seasons, while Lorain-equipped Gas Ranges 
are used for canning demonstrations and 
all other baking operations in over 300 
leading colleges and schools. 

If you'd like a copy of the famous Lorain 
Oven Canning Chart which tells how to 
can 37 different fruits and vegetables, just 
fill in and mail the attached coupon. 



Only these famous Qas Stoves are 

equipped uith the "Lorain" 
CLARK JEWEL- . 

George M. Clark ck Co. Div., 

Chicago, 111. 
DANGLER- 

Dangler Stove Company Div., 

Cleveland, Ohio 
DIRECT ACTION- 

National Stove Company Div., 

Lorain, Ohio 
NEW PROCESS- 

New Process Stove Company 

Div., Cleveland, Ohio 
QUICK MEAL- 

Quick Meal Stove Company 

Div., St. Louis, Mo. 
RELIABLE- 

Reliable Stove Company Div., 

Cleveland, Ohio. 



AMERICAN STOVE 
COMPANY 

Largest makers of Gas Ranges in the World 

148 Chouteau Ave. 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 

We manufacture oil and coal stoves for use where 

gas is not available, but the "Lorain Regulator" 

cannot be used on these 




OVEN HEAT REGULATOR 



American Stove Company 
148 Chouteau Avenue 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Please send me free copy of 
Lorain Oven Canning C/w 



Kame — 
Address- 



C 



itv ■ 



State- 



Check your favorite stove: 
Clark Jewel New Process 
Dangler Quick Meal 

Direct Action Reliable 

(1922) 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



\ 



X 







The New Wagner 
"Puritan" Tea Kettle 

Anew addition to the Wagner 
Cast Aluminum Tea Kettles — 
another exclusive, distinctive design 
— with all of the standard Wagner 
qualities. 




"From Generation to Generation" 

The "Puritan" makes the Wagner line of 
Tea Kettles complete. It enables our 
dealers to retain the leadership in being 
able to offer a new Wagner creation. It 
supplements the popular Colonial, the 
beautiful Grand Prize, and the good 
Sidney. 

This "Puritan" design is entirely new in 
conception, and proves again that the 
Wagner craftsmen are always in the lead 
in creating new ideas of beauty and charm. 
Automatic lid, and all the other superior- 
ities to be found only in Wagner Cast 
Aluminum Tea Kettles. 

Write for booklet 

The Wagner Manufacturing Company 

74 Fair Street, Sidney, Ohio 

Makers of the "World's Finest Cooking 
Utensils" 



You immediately lose the illusion of his 
mental strength, and though he appears 
physically strong he never takes any ex- 
ercise. Losing also that illusion, you re- 
adjust your ideas, and begin to find that 
he is both clumsy and stupid. You had 
endowed him with qualities he doesn't 
possess. 

He is neither strong nor silent. He is a 
big stiff! 



"Home-Making as a Profession" 

HOME-MAKING is the greatest 
of all the professions — greatest 
in numbers and greatest in its 
influence on the individual and on society. 
All industry is conducted for the home, 
directly or indirectly, but the industries 
directly allied to the home are vastly 
important, as the food industries, clothing 
industries, etc. Study of home eco- 
nomics leads directly to many well paid 
vocations as well as to home efficiency. 

Since 1905 the American School of 
riome Economics has given home-study 
courses to over 30,000 housekeepers, 
teachers, and others. The special text- 
books have been used for class work in 
over 500 schools. 

Of late years, courses have been de- 
veloped fitting for many well paid posi- 
tions: — Institution Management, Tea 
Room and Lunchroom Management, 
Teaching of Domestic Science, Home 
Demonstrators, Dietitians, Nurses, Dress- 
making, "Cooking for Profit. ,, Home- 
Makers' Courses : — Complete Home 
Economics, Household Engineering, Les- 
sons in Cooking, The Art of Spending. 
' BULLETINS: Free-Hand Cooking, 
Ten-cent Meals, Food Values, Family 
Finance, Art of Spending, Weekly Allow- 
ance Book, ioc. each. 

Details of any of the courses and in- 
teresting 80-page illustrated handbook, 
"The Profession of Home-Making" sent 
on request. American School of Home 
Economics, 803 E. 58th Street, Chicago. 

— Adv. 



. 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

150 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



What $1.00 will do 



Dollars are not to be parted with recklessly these days. 
One wants to be sure of 100 cents' worth of value for each 
dollar spent. If the housewife intends to do any canning 
and preserving this season, one dollar can be wisely spent 
on a copy of 

Mrs. Rorer's 
Canning and Preserving 

a book that is brimming over with choice recipes for 
putting up fruits and vegetables, making jellies, jams, 
marmalades, fruit butters, syrups, catsups, etc. The best 
of it is you cannot make mistakes. 

Cloth bound, 31.00; by mail, 31.10 



Mrs. Rorer's popular cookery books contain the dominant idea 
of helpfulness. Being a practical cook and housewife, she 
knows from actual experience just what the needs of the aver- 
age housekeeper are and how to meet them. Hers is a 
sympathetic attitude. There are a number of her books on 
various topics. A catalogue for the asking. Here are a few: 



Mrs. Rorer's New Cook Book 

Cloth, illus., $2.59; by mail, $2.70 

Philadelphia Cook Book 

Cloth, $1.50; by mail, $1.65 

Vegetable Cookery and Meat 
Substitutes 

Cloth, $1.50; by mail, $1.65 

Diet for the Sick 

Cloth, $2.00; by mail, $2.15 

Key to Simple Cookery 

Cloth, $1.25; by mail, $1.49 

Every Day Menu Book 

Cloth, $1.50; by mail, $1.65 



My Best 250 Recipes 

Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 

Ice Creams, Water Ices, etc. 

Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 

New Salads 

Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 

Dainties 

Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 

Cakes, Icings and Fillings 

Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 

Home Candy Making 

Cloth, 75 cts.; by mail, 80 cts. 



For sale by Boston Cooking-School Magazine Co., Department Stores and Book Stores, or 

ARNOLD & COMPANY, 420 Sansom Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

151 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



The Ceaseless Process 
of Rust 

Day and night, never ending, the destruc- 
tive process of rust goes on, slowly but 
surely spelling ruin to kitchen stove and 
fixtures, window fastenings, metal fittings 
— something. Steam and natural dampness 
in the air make it an unceasing action. 
The time to Stop it is NOW! 

Stovoil will stop rust and give metal sur- 
faces a new, smooth, satin appearance. Has 
no odor, no stain, is quickly applied — can 
even be used inside an oven. One bottle 
should last a whole year. Your gas com- 
pany uses and endorses it. Domestic 
science laboratories approve it. Has no 
competitor for results. If your dealer 
cannot supply, send 50 cents for full-size 
bottle. Satisfaction or money back. Stop 
rust — get Stovoil. Address Dept. 450, 
Superior Laboratories, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

§T*0^0 1 1^ Sales Representatives Wanted 



Cream Whipping Made 
Easy and Inexpensive 

n REMo- y Esco 

Whips Thin Cream 

or Half Heavy Cream and Milk 

or Top of the Milk Bottle 

It whips up as easily as heavy cream 

and retains its stiffness. 

Every caterer and housekeeper 

wants CREMO-VESCO. 

Send for a bottle to-day. 



Housekeeper's size, \\ oz., .30 prepaid 
Caterer's size, 16 oz., $1.00 " 

(With full directions) 



Cremo-Vesco CoMPAiNY 

631 EAST 23rd ST., BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Pacific Coast Agents-. 
MILES MFG. CO., 949-951 E. 2nd St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



September Days! 

September Days, thy sunsets rare, 
And autumn echoes in the air, 
Thrill us with joy to be a part 
Of God's earth kingdom! In the heart 
There lives of skepticism — none! 

September Days — thy perfumes sweet, 
And harvest gatherings complete, 
Are proofs of loyalty and power, 
Incessant toil each passing hour, — 
And token this — "a duty done." 

September Days — each year anew 
God proves through thee that it is true 
We live in deeds, not years alone, 
And we shall glean what we have sown — 
Then may we claim — "a victory won." 

Caroline L. Sumner. 



A village newspaper contains this ref- 
erence to the local hospital achievements: 
"Our esteemed fellow citizen Abner Brown 
will go to the hospital tomorrow to be 
operated on for appendicitis. He will 
leave a wife and two children." 



Cooking for Profit 

By Alice Bradley 

Principal, Miss Farmer's School of Cookery 
Cooking Editor, Woman's Home Companion 

IF YOU wish to earn money at home 
through home cooked food and 
catering — if you would like to own 
and conduct a food shop, candy kitchen, 
tea room, cafeteria or lunch room — if 
you wish to manage a profitable guest 
house or small hotel, you will be interested 
in this new correspondence course. 

It explains just how to prepare food, 
"good enough to sell"; just what to 
cook, with many choice recipes; how to 
establish a reputation and a constant 
profitable market; how to cater for all 
occasions, and tells in detail how to 
establish and conduct successful tea 
rooms, etc. — how to manage all foe d 
service. 

The expense for equipment is little or 
nothing at first, the correspondence 
instruction is under the personal direc- 
tion of Miss Bradley which assures your 
success, the fee for the course is very 
moderate and may be paid on easy 
terms. For full details write to American 
School of Home Economics, 803 E. 58th 
Street, Chicago. — Adv. 



Buy advertised Goods — 'Do not accept substitutes 

152 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



H 








For cooking, just add water 

Carnation Milk is much richer than whole milk because 
part of the water has been taken away by evaporation. For 
cooking, therefore, add an equal part of water to the 
Carnation you use and you will have milk of normal rich- 
ness. If you want thinner milk, all you have to do is increase 
the amount of water. Use Carnation just as it comes from 
the container, or slightly diluted, for creaming coffee, fruits 
and cereals. Buy Carnation Milk regularly from your 
grocer. It is economical, convenient and absolutely 
pure. Send today for the Carnation Cook Book. 

Carnation Milk Products Company 

458 Consumers Building, Chicago 558 Stuart Building, Seattle 



Carnation 

''From Contented Cows' 9 

The label is red and white 




Milk 



Sold by Grocers Everywhere 

Carnation Milk Products Co. 

Chicago New York 

Seattle Aylmer, Ont. 



Milk Sherbet— \ l A cups water, l^cups Carnation Milk, 
yi cup sugar, 3 tbsp. lemon juice, 1 egg white. Add the 
sugar to the milk and stir until the sugar is melted. Add 
lemon juice gradually to the milk and stir constantly to 
prevent curdling of the milk. Put in freezer and freeze. 



When half frozen add the stiffly beaten white of one egg. 
Use three parts ice and one part salt in freezing. This 
recipe will make one quart, enough to serve six people. 
There are many other recipes as good as this in the 
Carnation Recipe Book. Send for it. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

153 



AMKRICAN COOKERY 



Five Ways 

To Use 

Hay's Five Fruit 

As a Punch — Dilute with Tea or 
Lemonade, Plain in Carbonated 
water and plenty of ice. 

As a Cold Sauce — Pour over Va- 
nilla Ice Cream, Fruit Cups, 
Fritters or Cereals. 

As a Pudding Sauce — Add one 
cup boiling water to one cup of 
FIVE FRUIT. 

As an Ice or Sherbet — 1 part to 
4 of water and freeze. 

As a Jelly or Mousse — 1 box of 
Gelatin, 1 pt. Water, 1 cup of 
FIVE FRUIT. Dissolve by 
heat then chill. 

The Pioneer Punch— Originated in 1900 

If not at your grocer's, write to 
HAY'S FRUIT JUICE CO., Portland, Maiie 



SALAD SECRETS 



300 recipes • trie/ but complete, 15c by mail. 100 Meat- 
■•** -recipes 15c 50 Sandwich ^edpes 15c All three 30c 
B. R. BRIGGS, 250 Madison St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Shakeless Cellars 

A Housewife's Delight 

t. SANITARY - AIRTIGHT * 

% ORNAMENTAL «° 




SILVER PLATED 

A SPLENDID 

GIFT 
SUGGESTION 



$1 



A SET 
Post Paid 




YEDELL & ZURN 

Cherry Av 2. & 4th St., Jamaica, L.I., N.Y. 



Stories,Poems,Essays,Plays Wanted 

We teach you how to write; where and when to sell. Pub- 
lication of vour work guaranteed by new method. WALHA- 
MORE INSTITUTE, DEPT. J, LAFAYETTE BUILDING, 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

"The Art of Spending" 



TelU how to get more for your money — how to live better and 
•save more! How to budget expenses and record them without 
household accounts. 24 pp. illustrated, 10 cents 

AM. SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS, 813a E 58th ST.. ^Hr.flGO 



"Household Helpers" 

IF YOU could engage an expert cook 
and an expert housekeeper for only 
10 cents a week, with no board or 
room, you would do it, wouldn't you? 
Of course you would! Well, that is all 
our 'Two Household Helpers" will 
cost you the first year — nothing there- 
after, for the rest of your life. 

Have you ever considered how much 
an hour a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a 
year is worth to you? Many workmen 
get $\ an hour — surely your time is 
worth 30 cents an hour. We guarantee 
these "Helpers" to save you at least an 
hour a day, worth say $2.10 a week. 
Will you invest the 10 cents a week to gain 
32 weekly? Send the coupon. 

And the value our "Helpers" give you 
in courage and inspiration, in peace of 
mind, in the satisfaction of progress, in 
health, happiness and the joy of living, — 
is above price. In mere dollars and cents 
they will save their cost twelve times a 
year or more. Send the coupon. 

These helpers, "Lessons in Cooking" 
and "Household Engineering," were both 
prepared as home-study courses, and as 
such have been tried out and approved 
by thousands of our members. Thus 
they have the very highest recommenda- 
tion. Nevertheless we are willing to send 
them in book form, on a week's free trial 
in your own home. Send the coupon. 

In these difficult days you really cannot 
afford to be without our "Helpers." You 
owe it to yourself and family to give them 
a fair trial. You cannot realize what 
great help they will give you till you 
try them — and the trial costs you 
nothing! Send no money — send the cou- 
pon. 

American School of Home Economics, Chicago. 
FREE TRIAL FOR ONE WEEK 

A. S. H. E. — 803 E. 58th Street, Chicago, 111. 

Send your two "HOUSEHOLD HELPERS," prepaid 
on a week's trial, in the De Luxe binding. If satisfactory, I 
will send you $5 in full payment (OR) 50 cents and $1 per 
month for five months. Otherwise I will return one or 
both books in seven day9. (Regular mail price $3.14 each.) t 

Name and 

Address 

Reference 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

154 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



D? Price 5 



Look ior 
Price's 
Tropikid 
on the 
labei. 




Vanilla 



PRICE'S Vanilla is more 
than pure, more than deli- 
cious, more than just the 
proper strength! It is the ex- 
pert blending of all three! 

Only the finest vanilla beans 
are used in making Price's 
Vanilla. And when Price's 
comes to you, it is a delicious, 
full-flavored extract of bal- 
anced just-right strength — 
neither weak nor too strong! 

Specify "Price's" to your 
grocer. Don't take a substitute. 

Write for our book of 
recipes, "Delicious Desserts 
and Candies." It is free. 



PRICE FLAVORING EXTRACT CO. 



Experts in Flavor" 



Chicago, 111. 




\ i 




Enjoy the Luxury of Plenty of Cream 
at No Extra Cost 

Without lots of cream, the relish and flavor of cereals, 
berries and beverages is not fully obtained. But at present 
prices, sufficient bottled cream for all the family ha s he* 
a rare luxury, 

SKIMII^ 
all to enjoy 
creasing the 
quickly 
muss or f <J 

Money 
for whole 
erous supj 
family. 

Just low 
ing), and ci 
tible, easily 
and approve 
MSney ba< 
Special offe 

SKIMIT 



Buy advertised Goods — 




AMERICAN COOKERY 




1 j cup shortening 
1 cup molasses 
1 egg 

1 cup sour milk 

2 ' 3 cups flour 
1 , teaspoons 

soda 



1 teaspoon salt 
1 teaspoon ginger 
1 teaspoon cinna- 
mon 
^i teaspoon cloves 
'% box Campfire 
marshmallows 



Melt shortening, add molasses, egg 
well beaten, sour milk and flour mixed 
and sifted with soda, salt, ginger, cin- 
namon and cloves. Beat vigorously 
and bake in greased and floured muffin 
pans. Remove from pans, take off top 
part way, put two Campfire marsh- 
mallows, each separated in halves, in 
the opening and serve hot. 

Recipe printed on 
each package 



Marshmallows 



Beautiful Recipe Book FREE 
Dept. A, The Campfire Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 



B£ 



Trade Mark Registered. 

Gluten Flour 

40% GLUTEN 



Guaranteed to comply in all respects to 
standard requirements of U. S. Dept. of 
Agriculture. 
%? V^ r ^' Manufactured by 

^J%r FARWELL & RHINES 
SJQ^ Walertown,N.Y. 




ie-Hand C^okin 



> • 



WtQ 



34* 



%** 



m 



£g 



S# 



m 






H 



■■■-■ 



->■■■ 



ff« 



sSi 



m 



: ,-,■ 



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«*K*f® 







am 

5» 



SERVICE TABLE WAGON 




Laiff Ki-oad Wide Table 
Top — Kemovable Glass 
Service Tray — Double 
!» rawer — Doable 
Handles — Large Deep 
Undersbelves — "Scien- 
tifically Silent" -Rubber 
Tired Swivel Wheels. 
A high grade piece of fur- 
niture surpassing any- 
thing yet attempted for 
GENERAL UTILITY, 
ease of action, and abso- 
lute noiseless. iess. Write 
now for descriptive pam- 
phlet and dealer's name. 
COMBINATION PRODUCTS CO. 

5041 Conird Bide. Chicagi, II!. J 



Help! Help!! Help!! 

Our two new household helpers on 7 days' free trial! They sa*i 
you at least an hour a day, worth at only 30 cents an hoi 
$2.10 a week. Cost only the 10 cents a week for a year. Sei 
postcard for details of these "helpers," our two new home-stu<' 
courses, "Household Engineering" and "Lessons in Cooking," no, 
in^book form; OR SEND £5.00 in full payment. Regular pil 
£oT28. Full refund if not satisfactory. 

AM. SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS, 803a E. 58th STREET, CHICA6 



■ m 

Hnl 

! I 



OYSTERS CLAMS 

DEHYDRATED 

These delightful delicacies preserved with all 

their salt water flavor 

ALWAYS READY EASILY PREPARED 

In powder form so that but ten minutes in hot water or 
milk makes them ready to serve. An oyster stew or 
broth; clam stew, bouillon and chowder always in the 
kitchen ready for instant use. Packed in bottles that 
make a quart of stew and in larger bottles that make 8 
quarts. 

OYSTERS, small bottles, 30 cents each 
CLAMS, small bottles, 30 cents each 

Enjoy a bottle of each of these delicacies 

Money refunded if not satisfied 
Folder of information sent on request 

BISHOP-GIFFORD CO., Inc., Baldwin, L I., N. Y- 



If you can secure a few new 
subscribers for 

AMERICAN COOKERY! 
OR 

if you wish to purchase some of 
the latest and best Kitchen Fur- 
nishings and Cooking Novelties 

send 

for a copy of our 
"PREMIUM LIST" 






HE BOSTON COOKING SCHOOL 
MAGAZINE CO., Boston, Mass. 



o not accept substitutes 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




>r Pickling 

STICKNEY & POOR'S 

WHOLE MIXED SPICES 



Results 

To get the best results this year with your pickling 
you need the best whole mixed spices obtainable. For 
over a century Stickney & Poor has been putting up spices 
for New England Housewives. These spices are pure and 
of full strength, and are the best spices to be obtained in 
the world's spice market. They come to you packed in 
convenient packages. All Stickney & Poors spices are 
packed in our own clean, sanitary mill. 

Why not try S & P Whole Mixed Spices this year for 
your pickling'* 

A Suggestion 

STICKNEY & POOR'S WHOLE SPICES 
IN WINDOW FRONT PACKAGES 

This is a modern and convenient package that is very popular 
with the housewife as it enables her to see just what she is buying 
through the little isinglass window in the front. It is so much better 
than buying the old way, sight unseen. 

Your co-operating servant, 

"MUSTARDPOT" 




STICKNEY & POOR SPICE COMPANY 

The Only Manufacturers of Pure Mustard in the New England States 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

157 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Experience has shown that the most satisfactory way 

to enlarge the subscription list of American Cookery is through its present subscri- 
bers, who personally can vouch for the value of the publication. To make it an 
object for subscribers to secure new subscribers, we offer the following premiums: 
(^ONnTTTTON^ . Premiums are not given with a subscription or for a renewal, but only 

— — — i— — - ^^^^— to present subscribers, for securing and sending to us new yearly sub- 
scriptions at $i.5o each. Under no circumstances are you entitled to a premium for or with 
your own subscription. The number of new subscriptions required to secure each prsniium is 
clearly stated below the description of each premium. 

Transportation is or is not paid as stated. 

INDIVIDUAL INITIAL JELLY MOULDS 

Serve Eggs, Fish and Meats in Aspic; 
Coffee and Fruit Jelly; Pudding and other 
desserts with your initial letter raised on 
the top. Latest and daintiest novelty for 
the up-to-date hostess. To remove jelly 
take a needle and run it around inside of 
mould, then immerse in warm water; jelly 
will then come out in perfect condition. 

Be the first in your town to have these. 

You cannot purchase them at the stores. 





This shows the jelly turned from the mould 

Set of six (6), any initial, sent postpaid for (1) new subscription. 



This shows mould 
(upside down) 



Cash Price 75 cents. 



"PATTY IRONS" 




As illustrated, are used to make dainty, flaky 
pates or timbales; delicate pastry cups for serv- 
ing hot or frozen dainties, creamed vegetables, 
salads, shell fish, ices, etc. Each set comes 
securely packed in an attractive box with recipes 
and full directions for use. Sent, postpaid, for 
two (2) new subscriptions. Cash Price $1.50. 



SILVER'S 

SURE CUT 

FRENCH FRIED 
POTATO CUTTER 

One of the most 
modern and efficient 
kitchen helps ever in- 
vented. A big labor 
and time saver. 



FRENCH ROLL BREAD PAN 




Open 
End 



Best quality blued steel. Six inches wide by 
13 long. One pan sent, prepaid, for one (1) new 
subscription. Cash Price 75 cents. 

SEAMLESS VIENNA BREAD PAN 




Sent, prepaid, for 
one (1) new subscrip- 
tion. Cash Price 75 
cents. 




Two of these pans sent, postpaid, for one (1) 
new subscription. Cash Price 75 cents for two 
pans. 







HEAVY TIN BORDER MOULD 

Imported, Round, 6 inch 

Sent, prepaid, for one (1) new subscription. 
Cash Price 75 cents. 



BOSTON COOKING SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO., Boston, Mass. 



SEND FOR COMPLETE PREMIUM LIST 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

158 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



A SET OF THREE 
STEEL DRAWN MOULDS 




For Jellies, Puddings, 
Custards, Etc. 

Are so shaped that the contents readily 
come out in perfect condition. These 
moulds ordinarily sell for 25 cents pint 
size, 40 cents pint and a half, and €0 cents 
for quart size. 

We have combined the three sizes into a 
set, and will send a set (either oval or 
round but not assorted shapes), prepaid, 
as premium for one (1) new subscription, 
or Cash Price, 75 cents. 




Turk's 

Head 

Mould 

Tin— 
2 quarts 



For making Baba, Cakes, or tny purpose that 
a mould can be used for. 

Sent, prepaid, for one (1) n?w subscription or 
Cash Price, 75 cents. 





FRENCH 
BUTTER 
CURLER 

Unique and 
Convenient 



The easiest way to serve butterT Full direc- 
tions with each curler. 

Sent, postpaid, for one (1) new subscription, 
or Cash Price, 75 cents. 



CROQUETTE 
MOULDS 

For Shanine Croquettes 

Hinged on one 
side and with wire 
rod fastener in the 
other, oval and dia- 
mond shaped. Three moulds sent, prepaid, for 
one (1) new subscription, or Cash Price. 75 cents. 

HEART SHAPED CAKE MOULD 

Very heavy tin. Well made s 
with hanger. Seven inches 
either way. Sent, prepaid, 
for two (2) new subscriptions, 
or Cash Price, $1.50. 





LADY FINGER PAN 

Six moulds on a base. Each mould 4^ inches 
by 1| inches. Extra heavy tin. Nicely made. 
Sent postpaid, for two (2) new subscriptions or 
Cash Price, $1.50. 




ROTARY 
MINCING 
KNIFE 



Nickel plated. Ten revolving cutters. Effect- 
ually chops parsley, mint, onions, vegetables, etc., 
and the shield frees the knives from the materials 
being cut. 

Sent, prepaid, for one (1) new subscription, or 
Cash Price, 75 cents. 




Pie collars, cups, chop frills and skewers, all 
made of paper. Just the thing to make your 
dishes look handsome. Bake in cups made of 
paper, no greasing. One hundred cups, 20 frills, 
20 skewers and 2 pie collars, all sent for one (1) 
new subscription, or Cash Price, 75 cents. 



GOLDEN ROD CAKE PAN 




tt For "Waldorf Triangles," "Golden Rod Cake," 
"Orange Slice Cake" and many other fancy cakes. 
Substantially made of the best tin. Sent postpaid, for 
one (1) new subscription, or Cash Price, 75 cents for 
two pans. 



THE BOSTON COOKING SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO., Boston, Mass. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

159 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




The Greatest School 

in the World 
The best teacher 
The finest possible pupils 
A fascinating lesson— 

how to make up 

Jell- 

^America's Most JamousDessert" 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

160 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



x%L+*>m 




"SHO' DAT'S DE PAPAH AH WANTS" 

Painted by Edtv. V Brewer j or Cream of Wheat Company. Copyright iqi6 by Cream of Wheat Company. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

161 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Vol. XXVII OCTOBER, 1922 No. 3 



CONTENTS FOR OCTOBER page 

REALITY Harriet d'Autremont 169 

THE VALUE OF PANELING Mary H. Northend 171 

HOUSEKEEPING HEARTS Alice M. Ashton 176 

EMERGING FROM AN EMERGENCY .... Flora Swetnam 178 

SIMPLE CAMP COOKING Zahrah E. Preble 180 

WITHOUT HAVEN Arthur W. Peach 182 

A SURPRISE DINNER Lois Goodwin Greer 183 

HOW THE OTHER HALF LIVES . . . Edna Townsley Pinkley 186 

CONCERNING LUNCH Jean O. Smith 187 

CONSIDER THE LILIES Agnes Louise Dean 188 

EDITORIALS 190-192 

SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES (Illustrated with half- 
tone engravings of prepared dishes) 

Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 193-201 

MENUS FOR WEEK IN OCTOBER 202 

MENUS FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS 203 

THE GOOD COOK Caroline Rosenthal 204 

CAN OPENING, BY A CAN OPENER 208 

FLOWER PICTURES L. L. R. 209 

HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES: — New Ways with Spinach - 
Southern Sweet Potatoes — Value of Keeping an Expense Account 

- A Menu for 65,000 Children at 31-95 a month — Is It Possible? 211 

QUERIES AND ANSWERS 215 

THE SILVER LINING 226 



$1.50 A YEAR Published Ten Times a Year 15c A Copy fo*T 




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Copyright 1922, by 

THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO. 
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162 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



WHEN IT RAINS — IT POURS 





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iS^igCAKES OR HARDENS. 



Morton's 

F REE RUNNING 

Salt 



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SINCE almost every food you prepare requires salt, 
you may as well use the best and save both time 
and money. A majority of cooks use Morton's — for 
the convenience of the salt itself, the package it comes 
in, and its exceptional purity and economy. 

Morton's is the best of the many salts we produce. 
It is refined again and again, then crystallized as cubes 
so that when it rains it pours. 

The handy package keeps out dirt and moisture, 
thereby preventing the formation of lumps common 
to bag salt. 

You'll like Morton's — keep it 
on the table and in the kitchen 

Morton Salt Company 

CHICAGO 



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163 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



INDEX FOR OCTOBER 



Can Opening, by a Can Opener 

Concerning Lunch 

Consider the Lilies 

Editorials 

Emerging from an Emergency 

Flower Pictures 

Good Cook, The 

Home Ideas and Economies 

Housekeeping Hearts 

How the Other Half Lives 

Menus 

Reality 

Silver Lining, The 

Simple Camp Cooking . 

Surprise Dinner, A 

Value of Paneling, The . 

Without Haven 



PAGE 

208 
187 
188 

190-192 
178 
209 
204 
211 
176 
186 

202, 203 
169 
226 
180 
183 
171 
182 



Bananas, Baked ..... 
Beef, Sliced Filet of, with Mushroom Sauce 

111. 

Biscuits, Baking Powder. 111. 

Black Bass with Tomato 

Bread, Raised Corn 

Bread, Tea. 111. . 

Cake, Harrison 

Cake, Praline. 111. 

Chops, French, with Pineapple. Ill 

Chop Suey. 111. 

Chowder, Maryland Fish 

Cookies, Filled. 111. 

Carrots, Moulded . 

Duck and Oysters, Savory Stew of Domestic 

Eggplant, Baked .... 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 

. 194 



194 

197 
195 
201 
199 
197 
198 
195 
196 
196 
200 
200 
193 
194 



Fritters, Apple. 111. . . . . 

Ginger Balls, Lafayette . 

Gingerbreads, School Lunch 

Ice Cream, Maple, with Pecan Meats. Ill 

Marmalade, Citrous Fruits-and-Pineapple 

Ollycoeks, Dutch 

Pie, One-Crust Apple. 111. 

Potage Blanc aux Noix . 

Pudding, Apple Custard 

Pudding, Jewel .... 

Ragout, Beef Kidney 

Salad, Florida. 111. 

Sausage, Baked in Biscuits. 111. 

Soup, Anglo-Indian Mulligatawny . 

Veal, Frigadel of 



QUERIES AND ANSWERS 



Apples, to Redden in Cooking 

Cherry Olives 

Chicken Loaf 

Hors d'Oeuvres 

Ice Cream Cones, Homemade 

Pimientoes, To Keep after Jar Is Opened 



218 Pudding, Marshmallow . 

218 Scallions and Leeks, Ways of Using 

216 Soda with Chocolate, Molasses and Bakinj 

215 Powder ..... 
214 Syrup, Pancake, of Sugar and Water 

216 Toast, Cinnamon .... 



199 
201 
198 
200 
200 
201 
197 
193 
199 
198 
194 
196 
195 
192 
195 



214 
214 

216 
216 
214 



We want representatives everywhere to take subscriptions for 
American Cookery. We have an attractive proposition to make 
those who will canvass their town; also to those who will secure a 
few names among their friends and acquaintances. Write us today. 

AMERICAN COOKERY - BOSTON, MASS. 



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164 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




lot c Rqast 
\ Dinner 

-with 

Guldens 



Where is the man who fails to do justice to a 
dinner like this? Tender, savory beef roasted 
to perfection in a deep iron pot, potatoes rich 
and brown, ripe yellow carrots, turnips, peas, 
and juicy onions stuck with cloves. As a 
crowning touch — a generous dash of Gulden's 
Mustard. Gulden's is the condiment supreme, 
a mustard of unequalled quality. It is a special 
blend of imported and American-grown mus- 
tard seeds ground exceedingly fine, pure grain 
vinegar, and certain other spices that give to 
Gulden's the flavor which is so particularly its 
own. It is a delicious, tantalizing flavor that 
puts an edge on appetite. Gulden's is bottled 
without preservatives of any kind, and because 
of its purity keeps fresh to the last spoonful in 
the round glass jar. At better grocery and 
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READY • TO • USE 



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165 



J 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Books on Household Economics 



THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE COMPANY presents the following as a 
list of representative works on household economics. Any of the books will be sent postpaid 
upon receipt of price. 

Special rates made to schools, clubs and persons wishing a number of books. Write for quota- 
tion on the list of books you wish. We carry a very large stock of these books. One order to us 
saves effort and express charges. Prices subject to change without notice. 



A Guide to Laundry Work. Chambers. $1.00 
Allen, The, Treatment of Diabetes. 

Hill and Eckman 1. 

American Cook Book. Mrs. J. M. Hill 1. 
American Meat Cutting Charts. Beef, 

veal, pork, lamb — 4 charts, mounted on 

cloth and rollers 10. 

American Salad Book. M. DeLoup. . . . 1. 
Around the World Cook Book. Barroll 2. 
Art and Economy in Home Decorations. 

Priestman 1. 

Art of Home Candy- Making (with ther- 
mometer, dipping wire, etc.) 3. 

Art of Right Living. Richards 

Bacteria, Yeasts and Molds in the 

Home. H. W. Conn 1. 

Better Meals for Less Money. Greene 1, 
Book of Entrees. Mrs Janet M. Hill ... 2. 
Boston Cook Book. Mary J. Lincoln . . 2. 
Boston Cooking-School Cook Book. 

Fannie M. Farmer 2. 

Bread and Bread-Making. Mrs. Rorer . 
Breakfasts, Luncheons and Dinners. 

Chambers 1 

Bright Ideas for Entertaining. Linscott 
Business, The, of the Household. Taber 2, 
Cakes, Icings and Fillings. Mrs. Rorer 1, 
Cakes, Pastry and Dessert Dishes. Janet 

^ M. Hill 2, 

Camp Cookery. Kephart 1 

Candies and Bonbons. Neil 1 

Candy Cook Book. Alice Bradley 1 

Canning and Preserving. Mrs. Rorer. . 1, 
Canning, Preserving and Jelly Making. 

Hill 1.75 

Canning, Preserving and Pickling. 

Marion H. Neil 150 

Care and Feeding of Children. L. E. 

Holt, M.D 1.25 

Catering for Special Occasions. Farmer 1.50 
Century Cook Book. Mary Ronald. .... 3.00 
Chafing-Dish Possibilities. Farmer. . . . 1.50 
Chemistry in Daily Life. Lassar-Cohn . . 2.75 
Chemistry of Cookery. W. Mattieu 

Williams 2.25 

Chemistry of Cooking and Cleaning. 

Richards and Elliot 1.00 

Chemistry of Familiar Things. Sadtler 2.50 
Chemistry of Food and Nutrition. 

Sherman 2.10 

Chinese Cook Book, The, Shin Wong Chan 1 .75 
Cleaning and Renovating. R. G. Osman 1.20 
Clothing, Choice, Care, Cost. Woolman 2.00 

Clothing for Women. L. I. Baldt 2.50 

Cook Book for Nurses. Sarah C. Hill . . .90 
Cooking for Profit. Alice Bradley. . .... 3.00 

Cooking foi Two. Mrs. Janet M. Hill 2.25 
Costume Design and Home Planning. 

Izor 1-50 



75 
50 



00 
50 
50 

50 

75 
50 

48 
,50 
00 
25 

50 
75 

.25 
90 
.50 
00 

.00 

.50 
.50 
.75 
.00 



Course in Household Arts. Duff $1. 

Dainties. Mrs. Rorer 1. 

Diet for the Sick. Mrs. Rorer 2. 

Diet in Relation to Age and Activity. 

Thompson 

Dishes and Beverages of the Old South. 

McCulloch- Williams 1. 

Domestic Art in Women's Education. 

Cooley 1. 

Domestic Service. Lucy M. Salmon... 2. 

Dust and Its Dangers. Pruden 1. 

Easy Entertaining. Benton 1. 

Economical Cookery. Marion Harris 

Neil m 2. 

Elementary Home Economics. Mat 

thews . 1. 

Elements of the Theory and Practice of 

Cookery. Williams and Fisher 1. 

Encyclopaedia of Foods and Beverages. 10 

Epicurean, Ranhofer's 10 

Equipment for Teaching Domestic 

Science. Kinne 

Etiquette of New York Today. Learned 1 

Etiquette of Today. Ordway 1 

European and American Cuisine. 

Lemcke 4 

Every Day Menu Book. Mrs. Rorer .... 1 

Expert Waitress. A. F. Springsteed 1 

Feeding the Family. Rose 2 

Fireless Cook Book 1 

First Principles of Nursing. Anne R. 

Manning 1 

Fish Cookery. Spencer and Cobb 2 

Food and Cookery for the Sick and Con- 
valescent. Fannie M. Farmer 2 
Food Facts for the Home Maker. 

Harvey - 

Food and Feeding. Sir Henry Thompson 1 

Food and Flavor. Finck 3. 

Foods and Household Management. 

Kinne and Cooley 1. 

Food and Nutrition. Bevier and Ushir 1. 

Food Products. Sherman 2. 

Food and Sanitation. Forester and 

Wigley • • 1 

Food and the Principles of Dietetics. 

Hutchinson • • • 5 

Food for the Worker. Stern and Spitz. 1. 
Food Materials and Their Adultera- 
tions. Richards 1 

Food Study. Wellman 1 

Food Values. Locke 2 

Foods and Their Adulterations. Wiley 6 
Franco-American Cookery Book. D61iee 5 
Fuels of the Household. Marian White 
Furnishing a Modest Home. Daniels 1 
Furnishing the Home of Good Taste. 

Throop m 4 

Garments for Girls. Schmit 1 



30 
00 
00 

75 

50 

50 

25 
25 
50 

00 

40 

40 
00 

.00 

80 
60 
25 

00 

5C 
,35 
40 

,75 

25 
.00 



2.50 

50 
25 
00 

40 
00 
40 

40 

00 
00 

00 
10 



» 

00 
75 
25 



50 
50 



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166 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Golden Rule Cook Book (600 Recipes for 

Meatless Dishes). Sharpe $2.50 

Handbook of Home Economics. Flagg .90 
Handbook of Hospitality for Town and 

Country. Florence H. Hall 1.75 

Handbook of Invalid Cooking. Mary A . 

Boland 2.50 

Handbook on Sanitation. G. M. Price, 

M.D 1.50 

Health and Longevity Through Ra- 
tional Diet. Larand 3.00 

Healthful Farm House, The. JJocia. . . .60 
Home and Community Hygiene. 

Broadhurst 2.50 

Home Candy Making. Mrs. Rorer 75 

Home Economics. Maria Parloa 2.00 

Home Economics Movement 75 

Home Labor Saving Devices and How 

To Make Them. Scott 1.25 

Home Furnishing. Hunter 2.50 

Home Nursing. Harrison 1.50 

Home Problems from a New Standpoint 1.00 
Home Science Cook Book. Anna Bar- 
rows and Mary J. Lincoln 1.25 

Hot Weather Dishes. Mrs. Rorer 75 

House Furnishing and Decoration. 

McClure and Eberlein 2.50 

House Sanitation. Talbot 80 

Housewifery. Balderston 2.50 

Household Bacteriology. Buchanan. . . 2.75 
Household Economics. Helen Campbell 1.75 
Household Engineering. Christine Fred- 
erick 2.50 

Household Physics. Alfred M. Butler. . 1.50 

Household Textiles. Gibbs 1.50 

Housekeeper's Handy Book. Baxter. . . 2.00 
How to Cook in Casserole Dishes. Neil 1 50 
How to Cook for the Sick and Convales- 
cent. H. V. S. Sachse 2.00 

How to Feed Children. Hogan 1.25 

How to Use a Chafing Dish. Mrs. Rorer .75 
Ice Cream, Water Ices, etc. Rorer . . 1 00 
Inside the House of Good Taste. Wright 2.50 
Institution Recipes. Emma Smedley. . 3.00 

Interior Decorations. Parsons 4.00 

International Cook Book. Filippini. . . 2.00 
Key to Simple Cookery. Mrs. Rorer. . . 1.25 

King's, Caroline, Cook Book 2.00 

Kitchen Companion. Parloa 2.50 

Kitchenette Cookery. Anna M. East. . . 1.35 
Laboratory Handbook of Dietetics. Rose 1.50 
Lessons in Cooking Through Prepara- 
tion of Meals 2.50 

Lessons in Elementary Cooking. Mary 

C. Jones 1.25 

Like Mother Used to Make. Herrick. . 1.50 

Luncheons. Mary Ronald 2.00 

A cook's picture book; 200 illustrations 

Made-over Dishes. Mrs. Rorer 75 

Many Ways for Cooking Eggs. Mrs. 

Rorer 75 

Marketing and Housework Manual. 

S. Agnes Donham 2.00 

Mrs. Allen's Cook Book. Ida C. Bailey 

Allen 2.00 

More Recipes for Fifty. Smith 2.00 

My Best 250 Recipes. Mrs. Rorer 1.00 



New Book of Cookery, A. Farmer $2.50 

New Hostess of Today. Larned 1.75 

New Salads. Mrs. Rorer 1.00 

Nursing, Its Principles and Practice. 

Isabels and Robb 2.00 

Nutrition of a Household. Brewster. . . 2.00 

Nutrition of Man. Chittenden 5.00 

Philadelphia Cook Book. Mrs. Rorer. . 1.50 
Planning and Furnishing the House. 

Quinn 1.35 

Practical Book of Furnishing the Small 

House and Apartment. Holloway. . . 6.50 
Practical Cooking and Serving. Mrs. 

Janet M. Hill 2.50 

Practical Dietetics. Gilman Thompson 8.00 
Practical Dietetics with Reference to 

Diet in Disease. Patte 2.50 

Practical Food Economy. Alice Gitchell 

Kirk 1.35 

Practical Homemaking. Kittredge 1.00 

Practical Points in Nursing. Emily A. 

M. Stoney 2.00 

Principles of Chemistry Applied to the 

Household. Rowley and Farrell 1.50 

Principles of Food Preparation. Mary 

D. Chambers 1.40 

Principles of Human Nutrition. Jordan 2.00 
Quantity Cookery. Richards and Treat. 2.00 
Recipes and Menus for Fifty. Frances 

Lowe Smith 2.00 

Rorer's (Mrs.) New Cook Book 2.50 

Salads, Sandwiches, and Chafing Dish 

Dainties. Mrs. Janet M. Hill 2.00 

Sandwiches. Mrs. Rorer 75 

Sanitation in Daily Life. Richards 60 

School Feeding. Bryant 1.75 

School Lunch, The. Smedley 3.00 

Selection and Preparation of Food. 

Brevier and Meter 75 

Shelter and Clothing. Kinne and Cooley 1.40 

Something Different Dish. Neil 75 

Source, Chemistry and Use of Food 

Products. Bailey 2.50 

Spending the Family Income. Donham 1.75 

Story of Germ Life. H. W Conn 1.00 

Successful Canning. Powell 2.50 

Successful Family Life on the Moderate 

Income. Abel 2.00 

Table Service. Allen 1.75 

Textiles. Woolman and McGowan 2.60 

The House in Good Taste. Elsie 

de Wolfe 4.00 

The New Housekeeping. Christine Fred- 
erick 1 .75 

The Party Book. Fales and Northend. . 3.00 

The St. Francis Cook Book 5.00 

The Story of Textiles 5.00 

The Up-to-Date Waitress. Mrs. Janet 

M. Hill 1.75 

The Woman Who Spends. Bertha J. 

Richardson 1.00 

Till the Doctor Comes and How to Help 

Him 1 00 

Vegetable Cookery and Meat Sub- 
stitutes. Mrs Rorer 1.50 

Virginia Cookery-Book. Smith 1.75 

Vitamines. Benj. Harrow 2.50 



Address All Orders: THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO., Boston, Mass. 



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AMERICAN COOKERY 




Plain facts about an 
old friend 



— an old friend who makes your cleaning easier 
and saves you time and money. 

Old Dutch Cleanser is a natural, soft, flat, flaky sub- 
stance and contains not a bit of hard, harsh, jagged 
grit. 

Old Dutch cannot tear and rut surfaces and allow dirt 
to be ground in. Every cleaning with Old Dutch 
makes the next job that much easier. Your sinks, 
tubs, pots, pans, aluminum, enamel ware and glass 
are safe. Old Dutch takes up the dirt without injur- 
ing the surface. 

Old Dutch contains no lye or acids. 

Lye and acids injure household things and roughen 
your hands. Also they dissolve and go to waste. In 
Old Dutch every particle cleans and cleans safely. 

So no matter how hard the cleaning job — or how 
particular — your old friend, Old Dutch, gives you 
greatest cleaning value for your money and makes 
your work much easier. 



A little 
Old Dutch 
goes a long way 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

168 



Reality 



It sounds like a wail, 
It sounds like a moan, 
This voice of the wind 
I hear when alone. 
A black, murky cloud 
'Tween sky and earth lies. 
Rain falls like great tears 
From nature's sad eyes. 

Yet, really, I know 
A song the wind sings; 
It tells of full sails, 
That home my ship bring, 
I know that the cloud 
Will soon drift away; 
I know that the rain 
Makes glad the hot day; 
I know Good is here, 
Whatever doth seem; 
All's well with the world, 
Whatever we dream. 

Harriet H. d' ' Autremont. 



American Cookery 



VOL. XXYII 



OCTOBER, 1922 

"The Value of Paneling" 

By Mary Harrod Northend 



NO. 3 



IT is curious what an intermittent 
vogue paneling has had in our 
countrv. Not onlv has it been for 
centuries an accepted and highly de- 
veloped form of interior wall covering 
and decoration, but it has no real peer, 
taking everything into consideration, 
yet, time and again, paneling has lost 
its hold, gone out of fashion and inferior 
modes have replaced it for a while. It 
remains a curious fact, although we are 
used to it in every branch of the fine arts, 
yet one is continually surprised to learn 
that such and such a good habit or cus- 
tom, once discovered, has not been 
strictly adhered to forever afterward. 

The custom of paneling is best ex- 
emplified in Colonial architecture, the 
ever fertile field of those who would seek 
the best in domestic architecture. It 
has often been said that the early Amer- 
ican architects put their best efforts into 
doorways, mantels, and staircases. This 
really gives an erroneous impression. 
Even a superficial study of examples 
reveals the greatest interest and most 
patient study of interior wall surfaces, 
quite as painstaking as that expended 
on other features and with results fully 
as charming. 

It was a natural development that with 
staircases occupying so much of the 
architect's attention, he should wish 
them to be in entirely proper setting, and 
therefore he seems to have lavished 
especial attention on hall-paneling. So 
it is in the early hallways its most ingen- 
ious manifestations occur. 

However, a trip through delightful, old 
houses reveals an extensive use of panel- 



ing in dining and living rooms, also. But 
probably that which was designed, and 
worked out in conjunction with fireplaces 
and mantels offers as much charm as 
anything else in Colonial mansions. 

One must not lose sight of the alterna- 
tives to paneling that confronted both 
home-builders and architects, in those 
olden days, and even more in this ad- 
vanced day, when commercial substitutes 
for plaster and wood fill pages of adver- 
tising. It is ever a case of elimination, 
anyway, and it must be the fact that 
there is no accounting for tastes that 
allows a choice, for instance, of the 
familiar baseboard, picture moulding and 
cornice as a substitute. To be sure this 




PAXF.LF.D HALLWAY 



171 



172 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



permits the use of papers, damasks, 
linens and so forth as wall coverings, and, 
in some cases, great beauty is achieved in 
their combination, yet the domain of 
paneling remains unsullied by com- 
parison; and right here let it not be 
missed that this substitute is a form of 
interior decoration and not one of 
architectural style by which you can 
chiefly affect the apparent size of the 
room — and that is the main point of 
the development of this article. I sup- 
pose the only raison d'etre, based on 
architectural canons, at least, for the 
baseboard, picture-moulding, cornice plan 
is its supposed reliance on the classic 
column as resolved into its elements of 
base, column, and capital. 

A second alternative to paneling was 
and is the wainscot, which in its best 
form approaches paneling, as far as it 
goes, at least, which is usually half or 
three-quarters up the walls of the room. 




THE PICTURE ON THE WALL WAS ORIGINALLY A FIRE SCREEN 



In its simplest form it is a series of strips 
of wood bound at the bottom and the 
top with a runner, so to speak, the inter- 
vening spaces between the strips being 
filled or decorated to taste. And how 
well we remember the chopped up, or 
chopped off look the majority of wain- 
scoted rooms have! The size of a room 
is almost always adversely affected by it. 
No; paneling still holds its own and for 
many reasons. One that used to have 
more force than it has now was, the 
prevalence and cheapness of wood, es- 
pecially soft wood that lent itself easily 
to white paint or enamel. This was a 
particularly practical New England-like 
reason. But perhaps without knowing 
it they were striking at one of the prin- 
ciples of art, the use in beautiful forms 
of the materials at hand. Another 
reason with a strong appeal was the 
durability of wood paneling. Yet an- 
other reason with a touch of the romantic 

in it was the fact 
that the Colo- 
nial builders sim- 
ply knew how to 
handle interior 
woodwork be- 
cause, if they 
were not all act- 
ually shipbuild- 
ers, they had the 
shipbuilders' 
tradition i n 

woodwork. 
After all, are not 
these the real 
reasons why 
Colonial archi- 
tecture, based, 
to begin with, 
on classic forms, 
turned out to be 
so thoroughly 
good ? 

The ship- 
building tradi- 
tion has passed 
away. Much of 
the fine old wood 



PANELING 



173 



is scarce, but fortunately 
there is enough for those 
who wish paneling in 
their homes through the 
dictates of good taste 
and choice. Why? Be- 
cause, in the long run, 
it is the most economical, 
durable and beautiful 
wall-finish there is. Once 
in, it lasts forever, 
whereas any textile or 
paper has to be con- 
stantly renewed. The 
range in cost is extremely 
interesting because soft 
woods, painted, stained, 
or enameled, are com- 
paratively cheap and 
one can have all 
grades of hard wood 
up to mahogany, Cir- 
cassian walnut and the 
like. But it is in the 
field of its artistic values 
that most remains to be 
said. 

In hallways and rooms the four walls 
are the predominating feature, the floor 
being second and the ceiling third. 
Therefore, what happens to the walls is of 
great importance. You can make or 
break a room, so to speak, in your treat- 
ment of its walls. Few realize how 
certain a measure of an architect's 
ability the walls of a room may be. 
Take fenestration alone. The double 
problem of outward appearance and 
inside light tests the best of architects. 
Add to these successful paneling and one 
gets a slight idea of the importance of 
interior wall surfaces, from the point of 
view of design. And it is from this point 
of view that the layman as well as the 
architect must regard the question. 
However, it is well to remind the layman 
that he is very apt to give first thought to 
the color of a room. True to the history 
of mankind, color-sense is first developed 
and practiced and most of us never get 
beyond that. But, strange as it may 




ANOTHER PANELED HALLWAY 

seem, it is the design of the wall surface 
that is going to give pleasure in a room, 
first of all, and not the color as it may 
appear. 

A moment's reflection or the examina- 
tion of photographs will show how great 
may be the variety of design. Series 
of squares, squares and rectangles, equal 
rectangles alone, wide and narrow rec- 
tangles, broad, or broad and narrow 
surfaces with panel mouldings — these 
are suggestions. 

A broad panel surface at one end of a 
room will likely balance another at the 
opposite end. In other words, there must 
be a feeling of rhythm, to borrow a musical 
term that suits exactly, a certain swing, 
a harmony between the related parts. 

The charm in successful wood paneling 
is in direct ratio with the skill required to 
produce it. I say this lest it be thought 
an easy matter. It is a subtle thing and 
depends not so much on the training a 
man may acquire as on a natural sense 



174 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




PANELING OF DARK WOOD 

of proportion in his artistic makeup. It 
goes deeper than just the knowledge that 
light, airy paneling in a heavy, dark, 
richly furnished library, for instance, 
will be out of place. A certain kind of 
simple paneling would be quite proper in 
such a room and that is where the 
subtlety comes in. After all, it comes 
right down to the old formula, namely, 
that for artistic results, that is, useful- 
ness and beauty going hand in hand, 
expert direction is indispensable. 

Now it is precisely this finer feeling 
which becomes a tool in the artist's 
hands enabling him deliberately to create 
practically what effect he will, in spite 
of the size of the room, by judicious 
paneling. This idea will be developed 
a little with illustrations. 

It is commonly supposed that a small 
hall, living-room, library, or bed-chamber, 
if paneled at all, must have small panels. 
And the opposite in large rooms. Very 
artistic rooms are very often thus de- 
signed, but there is no obligation in- 
volved. However, the conclusions must 
not be jumped at that a contrary practice 
is the advisable thing, namely, a large 



room with small panels and a small one 
with large. Yet, this has been done 
successfully. But there seems to be a 
middle course bv the use of which, other 
things being equal, the apparent size of a 
room may be regulated at will. An 
unusually high room, the other dimension 
of which will probably be in accord, can 
positively be reduced in height, visually 
speaking, by a plan of horizontal panel- 
ing of medium scale. A very long, old- 
fashioned "parlor" can actually be made 
to seem shorter by breaking up the long 
horizontal lines by vertical ones, not too 
many, or the law of sequence will make 
it appear like a railroad track tipped up 
on one side. Likewise a low room can be 
given a feeling of added height by the use 
of vertical paneling. 

Let us examine the illustrations 
(not shown here.) 

The dining-room would show ex- 
cellently a method of treatment to make 
a room of large dimensions appear 
medium in size. A design employing 
small squares was adopted and carried 
out even in the glass of the windows and 
French doors. The windows break the 
height, additionally, and the dark wood 
— ■ it might equally have been mahogany, 
walnut, rosewood or a stained wood — in 
squares reduces the length of the room. 
There is an interesting play of light and 
shadow here that makes for a noticeable 
quality of texture also. This comes, 
largely, from a clever manipulation of 
light and dark spaces. 

The drawing room with its gilt mirror 
is a striking instance of how dignity and 
an impression of size may be caught 
by elaborate woodwork. Boiserie, the 
French call it. This is a good example 
of such and resembles the interiors 
brought bodily from Europe for use in 
American homes. Rectangular, vertical 
panels, groups of pilasters, mouldings 
and a handsome cornice give a feeling of 
size and grandeur that is unmistakable. 
And yet the room is not a large one. The 
white plaster ceiling plays an important 
role in this regard, adding height, whereas 



PANELING 



175 



ceiling of the panel color would have 
smed almost to shorten the pilasters. 
White paneling in low relief is a large 
:tor in producing the spaciousness in 
other dining-room. There is a pleas- 
y sequence of panel shapes all around 
e walls, the only break being over 
e mantel. The very monotony makes 
r breadth and the relief is so low that 
e greatest simplicity results. It is 
lined, perfectly in scale, unobjection- 
le as paneling. The trouble with the 
Dm lies elsewhere, but that would be a 
>ression. 

The value of plain paneled wall sur- 
:es is surely exemplified in the view of 
e living-room where a melange of 
riods, shapes, colors, contrast so vividly 
th the clear wall spaces — -although the 
3m is chock full of objects of art and 
lerwise, the eye picks out at once the 



clean, straightforward panels, quiet, 
dignified, restful, giving to the room any 
sense of space or amplitude it possesses. 
Considering the kind of room it is, the 
long, vertical panels interrupted by the 
mirror and console table seem to be the 
wrong choice of furnishing. Either of 
two alternatives would have been better. 
The panels could have been twice as 
wide. That would have given an effect 
of breadth needed in a room with so high 
a ceiling. Or, the panels might have 
been broken into the proportion of thirds 
or two-thirds below and one above, 
either of which devices would have acted 
favorably on the extreme height of the 
room. In other words, the scale seems 
to be off in this case. There is poor 
proportion, no subtlety. The ceiling 
with its rafters at great intervals only 
makes matters worse. 




PANELING AS SHOWN IN DINING ROOM 



Housekeeping Hearts 

By Alice Margaret Ashton 



IT was one of those misty, mizzly 
mornings as unwelcomely familiar 
to the housewife of Oregon as to her 
sister on Cape Cod. One of those morn- 
ings when bureau drawers stick and 
icing refuses to "set" and the kitchen 
chimney is refractory. 

"A morning when there simply isn't 
any use in pretending you're happy any 
more," Janet Fane assured herself, as 
she hurried through the clinging wetness 
from her own back door to Aunt Mary's 
hospitable kitchen porch. 

Stooping impatiently to remove her 
rubbers, this disgruntled young person 
was stricken into sudden immovability. 
Through the closed door came unmistak- 
able sounds of pleasant activity. An 
egg-beater whirred briskly. There was 
energetic beating with a spoon in an 
earthen mixing-bowl. Then a low;voice 
lifted itself softly in song. 

"Must I be carried to the skies on 
flowery beds of ease?" caroled the voice, 
blithely. Aunt Mary was singing. 

Janet straightened up, and, with a 
familiar tattoo on its panels, opened the 
door before Aunt Mary could leave her 
work to answer it. 

"Why, morning, Janet," cried the little 
old lady delightedly. "I'm right glad 
you stepped over. I can't see over to 
your place this morning, on account of 
this fog, and it didn't seem right not to 
know what you was doing along." 

"Well, I haven't been singing," an- 
swered Janet Fane, accusingly. "How 
can you sing on such a morning as this, 
Aunt Mary?" 

"Why, I was enjoying the morning — 
sort of," acknowledged Aunt Mary. 
"Kind of shut-in and cosy it seems, like 
a big snowstorm always does." 

"And you're making something spe- 
cially good for dinner! And I'll bet you 

176 



gave Uncle Martin cream-toast for 1 
breakfast!" 

Aunt Mary laughed merrily. "As 
fact, I did," she admitted. "Mar 
came in to call me, looking as doleful as 
owl. 'Fog so thick I'll need a compass 
navigate the back-yard,' he said, 
feel dreadful sort of down, this mornii 
Mary. Don't seem as if I'd relish pi 
ridge, no way.' 

' 'You just brighten up the fire goo 
I told him, 'and I'll make you soi 
cream-toast.' He is as bad as a ch 
about being uneasy on stormy days, 
have to feed him extra. I'm making 
dried cherry pudding for his dinner." 

With a chuckle, Aunt Mary return 
to her mixing. Looking about the roc 
Janet had to admit that it, someho 
radiated cheer and happiness in spite 
the fog and mist that hung like a blani 
before the windows. The serene, lit 
lady, with her gay, cretonne aprc 
The red geraniums, flaunting on t 
window-sills. The gleaming, yelk 
bowls. The soft purring of the shin! 
stove. 

"I'd just like to know," she demand* 
"how some people acquire the gift 
being happy all the time, while otl 
people are not very happy even on nil 
sunshiny mornings! 

"Now don't you dare preach to n 
Aunt Mary Preston! I know I ought 
be happy. I know I wouldn't really 
back to the office, if I could. I know 
love Allan and my home more th 
anything else. And I know I am n 
very happy — not gay, and light-heartt 
and singy! And there are lots mc 
women like me. I wonder why?' 

Aunt Mary plumped the pudding-b 
into the steaming, gurgling kettle. S 
rinsed and dried her hands and brush 
the possibility of flour from the gayness 



HOUSEKEEPING HEARTS 



177 



her apron. Then she sat, companion- 
ably, in the other little kitchen rocker. 
"I hoped, maybe by this time, now 
you've learned to keep house so nice and 
all — " 

"That's just it. At first, when I did 
not know how very well, there was 
something to learn and it was interesting. 
Now, thanks to my cooking-school train- 
ing and your help and my 'trade journals,' 
keeping house offers few difficulties. 
And I can't seem to get up any en- 
thusiasm about planning a meal that will 
be eaten and gone in an hour. Or about 
washing dishes, that will have to be 
washed twice again before I go to bed. 
I can't seem to sing and act larky, when 
I cannot see anything to be larky about. 

"But you think it is fun to have foggy 
mornings, and to pamper Uncle Martin 
with cream-toast and cherry pudding! 
And it is fun — here. But it wouldn't 
be, over in my kitchen — it would be just 
foggy, and dark, and steamy! I'd give 
a good deal to know why." 

"Well, now, it is kind of queer," Aunt 
Mary admitted. "I don't know why 
it is so, but I've noticed it time and again. 
One housewife just naturally seems happy 
over her work and another one just 
naturally doesn't. 

"You might suppose education would 
help, but I do not see as it necessarily 
does. There's my niece, Elsie — ■ college 
graduate, cooking-school graduate, post- 
domestic science course. I never did see 
the beat of her housekeeping. Latest 
appliances, latest ideas, just like clock- 
work everything runs. But you'd ought 
to see Elsie! When she buttons on her 
big apron to attack the morning work she 
looks as grim and stern as a warrior. She 
never draws a long or happy breath until 
the work is done. And, since housework 
isn't very often ever really finished, I 
guess likely her happy breaths aren't 
very frequent. 

"She's going to stick to it because her 
Puritan conscience reminds her that she 
prepared for just this and married a poor 
young man for love. But, I swan, I don't 



believe either of them are getting much 
enjoyment or comfort out of it! 

"Now with me, you might say I didn't 
know any better than to be happy over 
simple, childish things like fog and 
cream-toast and cherry pudding for 
Martin when he makes port after his 
back-yard cruise! But it isn't ignorance 
or simple tastes that make it, either. 

"My sister Ruth, now. She had no 
more training than I did and probably no 
great additional intellect, yet I doubt if 
she ever went into her kitchen without a 
sigh. She always felt injured with life 
because she had to cook her own meals. 
And fussed because the stove had to be 
blacked and the cistern pump was noisy. 
T was intended for better things,' she 
used to tell me, indignantly." 

"Perhaps broadmindedness is what a 
housekeeper needs," suggested Janet. 
"I am sure you — •" 

"That makes me think of my old neigh- 
bor, Maria Bennett. She earned more 
money than any man in our village. 
You'd never suppose she could get so 
much — though some of the things she 
wrote were beautiful! But she was 
never so happy as when the cook left and 
she had to quit her writing-work and get 
into the kitchen and take care of her 
family. 'Twasn't just play, either. I 
knew her well when she did all her own 
work and you never saw any one happier. 

"But the intelligence theory doesn't 
hold good because one of the happiest 
housekeepers I ever knew was a little 
French peasant woman without educa- 
tion and of rather limited intellect. Her 
kitchen was a dream of sweetness and 
cheer. No time or care was too great to 
make her cake a success, but a failure 
hurt her pride as a housekeeper. 

"I cannot quite explain it. Sometimes 
I think that the happy housekeeper is the 
one who takes real pride and joy in her 
work. Not just washing the dishe3 be- 
cause they have got to be washed. And 
making a cake because it 'helps out' at 
supper. But setting out to have the 
shiningest dishes and the best cake be- 



178 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



cause they are hers and for her family. 
Loving her work, I guess I'm trying to 
say." 

There came a little silence broken only 
by the gurgling of the kettle and the soft 
creak of Aunt Mary's little rocker. 

"That's it, Aunt Mary," Janet said, 
suddenly. "Loving is what does it. 
See this kitchen — it looks loved, with 
the perky geraniums and the yellow 
bowls and the cushioned chairs. Mine 
looks like a jail, and that is what it feels 
like when I am in it! 

"I'm going home and get dinner and 
I'm going to love getting it — for Allan 
and me!" 

"Get something he likes, special," 
advised Aunt Mary, confidently. "Just 



do that a few stormy days, and see if you 
do not both feel more cheerful." She 
stood at the door while her caller adjusted 
her rubbers. 

"I'd be proud to have you take this 
geranium home with you," she offered, 
holding forth a healthy blossoming plant, 
in its brown pot. "And if you'll slip 
over just before you sit down I'd like 
for you to have part of the cherry 
pudding — I forgot to divide the recipe, as 
I should do since Martin and I are alone." 

"I shall love the geranium, dearest 
lady," Janet cried, gratefully. "And 
I shall be happy indeed to 'slip over.' " 

And, marked by the bobbing of the gay 
blossoms, she sped happily back through 
the fog to her deserted kitchen. 



Emerging from an Emergency 

By Flora Swetnam 



EDITH BYERS hung up the re- 
ceiver and sat down in despair. 
She had been a housekeeper for 
the space of two months, and an emer- 
gency was nothing short of tragic. Her 
nearest neighbor, Mrs. Treadway, en- 
tered at this moment. 

"Goodness, Edith," she exclaimed, 
playfully, "you act like a star tragedy 
player." 

"I feel like one — a tragedy, I mean. 
Harold has just telephoned that his old 
college chum is to be here to luncheon. 
I want to cry." 

"That isn't so bad, after all." 

"You'd change your mind if you had 
inside information. This is what one 
gets for living away out here. There 
isn't even time to order anything and 
get it prepared after it gets here. There 
simply isn't a thing I can do. I think I 
shall run away." 

"Don't. Just let me help you. I 
rather enjoy coming up against a propo- 
sition like this to test my executive 
abilitv." 



"Oh, if you only would help me! But 
you couldn't. Nobody can make some- 
thing out of nothing." 

"Don't make such sweeping state- 
ments. Wait till you see what we can do. 
My luncheon is already prepared — ■ 
almost, and I can stay with you till the 
very last minute. Have you plentv of 
bread?" 

"I believe I have," replied Edith, a 
little more hopefully, as she led the way 
to the pantry. 

"I always think I can face anything if 
I have plenty of bread," said Mrs. 
Treadway. "See about that first." 

"r have three loaves," announced 
Edith after a hasty survey. 

"Well, then, this is no tragedy. Bring 
out all the other things and let's put our 
wits to work." 

Edith brought out a large piece of cake, 
four apples, half a chicken in a ragged 
and somewhat disreputable state, three 
eggs, two or three stalks of celery, a can 
of milk, a lemon, a piece of cheese, and 
one banana. 



EMERGING FROM AN EMERGENCY 



179 



"There it is," she said, "and not 
enough of any of it to pay to fool with 
it." 

"You are mistaken," Mrs. Treadway 
assured her. "If we can't rig up a 
decent luncheon for three out of all this, 
we don't deserve anything." 

"Just command," said Edith with a 
most resigned air, "and I'll execute if it's 
within my power." 

"First, then, let's consider the dessert." 

"Where is it to come from?" mourned 
Edith. 

"Just watch me awhile and see. In 
the meantime, you go to paring those 
apples." 

"But what shall I do with them?" 

"Make them into a salad." 

"Oh, Kate, we can't. There isn't a 
spoonful of salad dressing in the house." 

"That needn't trouble us an instant," 
declared Kate. "I'll make some the first 
thing so it can get cold. Light up this 
minute and start some water to heating." 

She broke an egg into a pan, beat it, 
added a heaping tablespoonful of flour, 
a pinch of salt and a spoonful of sugar. 
Then, when the water was boiling, 
poured it in, a little at a time, till the 
mixture was of the right consistency. 
She kept up the stirring till it was well 
cooked and removed it from the flame. 
She found the grater and grated a small 
portion of the lemon peel into it. Then 
she squeezed the juice of the lemon into a 
cup, removed the seeds and poured it into 
the mixture, beating it well. 

"Now why?" asked Edith. 

"It makes a much better dressing if 
the lemon juice is not cooked," explained 
Kate. 

"I'll remember that," promised Edith. 
"These apples are peeled and chopped. 
What next?" 

"Chop the celery into it. And say, 
have you any nuts?" 

"No," answered Edith, searching, 
"but I've just found three boiled po- 
tatoes." 

"Good! Bring them and chop them in 
with the apples and celery." * 



"Now this begins to look like a decent T 
sized dish of salad," said Edith. "You 
don't know Harold's appetite." 

"Now I shall make that dessert while 
the dressing is cooling," observed Kate, 
as she broke the other two eggs, reserving 
the white of one. "With one egg^ one 
yolk, and one can of milk, I shall make, a 
boiled custard. You go to mincing that 
chicken." 

She worked as she talked, and before 
long she removed it from the stove. 
Then she divided the cake into three, 
putting each piece into a dessert dish. 
Over this she poured the custard. Next 
she beat the white quickly, and, when 
ready to add the sugar, she sliced the 
banana into it and whipped it till stiff. 
Edith's eyes were growing round, as she 
watched each dish topped off with this. 

"Well," she exclaimed, "wonders will 



never cease. 



5? 



"1 



How do you like it?" inquired Kate. 
It's beautiful and I'm sure it's good." 
'You must tell me what they say about 
it. Is that chicken ready?" 

"Just finished. What next?" 

"Put about one-third of it into an- 
other bowl, chop the cheese into it, 
pour some salad dressing in, mix it 
thoroughly and make into sandwiches." 

"Um-m, I know that'll be good. And 
the other?" 

"We'll pour into it what milk I didn't 
use, put some bread crumbs and some 
pepper in and make them into croquettes 
and fry till a golden brown." 

"Oh, that will be fine. You have, 
helped me so much." 

"I'll hustle up and make the sand-^ 
wiches," said Kate, "and then I'll go. 
I know you can easily finish, and my own 
man is coming for luncheon." 

"I'll bless you when I die," declared 
Edith. 

"That's consoling," laughed Kate. 
"I'm coming back the minute they're 
gone, to see how it worked." 

"Do! I'll be glad to tell you." 

Kate went, and : Edith set the table 
with her prettiest glass and silver and 



180 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



then stood back to view the result. She 
felt that she would not be in the least 
ashamed for Harold's friend to see it. 
She finished frying the croquettes to a 
delicate brown and placed them on the 
table just in time to go forward and meet 
their visitor. 

"I know this was a little sudden, 
wifey," Harold whispered, "but I simply 
had to have old John." 

"Oh, it's perfectly all right," assured 
Edith. 

Then they went into that luncheon and, 
ibeforeitwasover, Edith was more grateful 
to Kate than ever, for her guest praised 
everything highly and complimented 



Harold on his choice in marrying. 

"I tell you, my wife is some cook," 
said Harold, proudly. 

"I believe it," John replied, heartily. 

They went, and left a happy bride be- 
hind them. She sat down at once to 
write down the history of that luncheon 
and save the recipes, and was still at it 
when Kate came in to hear the result. 
She told her all about it, and added: 

"When Harold comes home, the honor 
shall be to whom honor is due, but, 
really, Kate, I just couldn't tell John. 
Now, could I?" 

"Of course not," agreed Kate. "You 
didn't need to." 



Simple Camp Cookery 

By Zahrah E. Preble 



TOO often camp cooking degenerates 
into the frying-pan type, where 
bacon or meat, or occasional fish, are 
burned, rather than cooked, and heavy 
flapjacks and very strong coffee form 
the main dishes of meal after meal. This 
sort of food, under ordinary conditions of 
life, would ruin the best digestion existing, 
but fortunately, the out-door life and 
strenuous exercise of most camping 
counteracts the ill effect. 

However, if one will give a little thought 
to the subject, when preparing to take the 
camping trip, and then follow out some of 
the suggestions in this article, he will find 
that a varied menu can be had with little 
trouble, and still less experience in cook- 
ing. These recipes are all tried and true, 
and made over an open camp-fire. 

Bread is a very essential food at most 
times. However, bread, such as the 
average city or country dweller knows it, 
is not procurable in the heart of the woods, 
or in mountains, miles from habitation 
and railroads. It is too bulky and perish- 
able to pack, except in the unmade state 
of raw flour. There are very few ama- 



teur camp cooks who know how, and can 
make good bread over a camp-fire. So, 
unless you have time to try it out first, it 
would, perhaps, be wiser to substitute 
other starchy and nutritious foods, which 
are more certain of successful preparation. 

There are several already-prepared pan- 
cake, or flapjack flours that can be pur- 
chased in easily packed cartons. These 
require only the addition of water, accord- 
ing to directions on the box, and plenty 
of bacon or other fat in a frying-pan, and 
can be made quite successfully on a hot, 
flat stone, which has been greased. As 
these mixtures are made of good wheat, or 
buckwheat, flours they contain all the 
essential elements of bread, and if the 
batter be not made too stiff, and the cakes 
are spread thin when cooking, they brown 
nice and crisp, instead of being soggy and 
uncooked in the middle. 

Another good and compact food for 
transportation, and which contains the 
necessary starch to offset the heavy 
protein of the game and fish, which other- 
wise forms too great a part of camp diet 
(if you are successful), is spaghetti, 



SIMPLE CAMP COOKERY 



181 



broken into small bits to make a more 
compact package. This is better than 
macaroni, as it cooks more quickly. 
Rice is, also, an excellent food, as it 
occupies small space in packing, and 
swells in cooking, so that one cup of the 
raw material will develop into three cups 
of cooked food. Yellow cornmeal affords 
another welcome variety. Add to these 
staples several pounds of American cheese, 
some small cans of tomato sauce, and 
either dry onions, or a tube of onion 
flavoring paste. These will give enough 
variety to the camp dishes to make it 
worth while to pack them. The inevita- 
ble side of fat bacon is necessary, as it 
gives both food and fat in which to fry 
fish and meat and pancakes. A can of 
lard may, also, supplement the bacon. 
But the starchy side of the diet list must 
not be neglected; the following recipes 
will, perhaps, help to provide that variety, 
which will make camp cooking a joy 
instead of a dread. 

The question of kettles comes next. If 
the party is a large one, two galvanized 
buckets, one slightly smaller than the 
other, so as to fit easily inside, with a 
cover for the larger one; a large and a 
small frying-pan, and a good-sized coffee 
pot will be needed. For a small outfit, 
get a bucket for carrying water, and a flat, 
large-bottomed kettle with cover, and 
bail, rather than a handle. A stove 
poker, with non-heatable handle, a long- 
handled spoon and three-pronged fork, 
and a can opener, are quite necessary. 
The poker is to lift the kettle and coffee 
pot from the fire, without burning fingers. 

Even over a properly built camp-fire, 
one can toast his face most uncomfortably, 
unless his spoons and turning fork have 
extra long handles. Another pretty trick 
is to carry a corn-popper, if possible. It 
makes a wonderful toaster, if you are 
where you can get real bread. And made 
with a detachable, or metal, handle it is 
fine for roasting ears of corn or potatoes, 
when those delicacies are obtainable. 

A small fire is always better than a 
large one. And a thick bed of hot coals 



will cook more evenly and without smoke. 
The. best way is to build a fire of small 
wood in a trench about eight inches deep y 
and long enough to accommodate the 
kettle, frying-pan and coffee pot, and 
vary its width with flat stones, so that the 
above-mentioned kettles will be able to 
rest on level ground, or stones on either 
side, with an air-space, of from an inch to 
two inches between the bottom of the pans 
and the top of the red-hot coals. Make 
your fire first, and keep it well fed with 
small sticks until it is a solid mass of coals. 

In the meantime, prepare your food. 
Start water to heating in the larger 
bucket, with the cover on, so that smoke 
and sparks from the fire will not fall into 
it, and have the other bucket full of water 
and handy for emergencies. By the 
time the water is hot enough to add to it 
your spaghetti or rice, the fire will be 
down to smokeless coals. 

Always use boiling water, with a 
level teaspoonful of salt, for each quart, 
when cooking either rice, spaghetti, or 
cornmeal over a camp-fire. 

1 . Plain Rice 

Rice cooks best in plenty of boiling 
water, salted, so that each grain can move 
freely in the water until it is done. But 
that means that the rice will have to be 
skimmed out of the water, or the water 
poured off it. It should boil at least 
twenty minutes. Cooking beyond that 
time makes it mushy and too soft. 

The other way of cooking rice is to 
measure carefully three cups of water to 
one of washed rice; the water, of 
course, to be boiling before putting in the 
rice. Care has to be taken, then, to keep 
the rice from burning before it is quite 
done, and constant stirring is necessary, 
over a camp-fire, during the last few 
minutes, when the rice absorbs the water. 
This makes the rice a bit mushy, but none 
the less delicious. 

2. Rice Mulligan 

Cut into small pieces two or three 
slices of bacon and any meat scraps left 



182 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



from a previous meal. Also slice a large 
onion. (If using onion flavoring, put a 
generous amount into the wet mixture.) 
Fry the bacon and onions until browned, 
and throw into the pan two cups of dry 
rice, and brown slightly, stirring to keep 
from burning, for about three minutes. 
Have ready a little over one quart of 
salted, boiling water. Add the rice and 
bacon and onions or flavoring. Add the 
meat scraps, although if there are none, 
the bacon will do. When the rice has 
boiled about ten minutes, add, gradually, 
one quart can of tomatoes, and let cook 
for at least fifteen minutes longer. This 
amount will serve several hungry people, 
and with a cup of coffee will make an 
adequate meal in itself. 

3. Rice Duff 

Three cups of water, one large can of 
condensed milk, and a half-teaspoonful of 
salt. Bring to a boil, and add one cup 
and a half of dry rice, half a package of 
seeded raisins, and half a cup of sugar. 
Let boil until rice is thoroughly cooked. 

4. Italian Spaghetti 

The proportions of one cup of broken 
spaghetti to two and one-half of boiling, 
salted water is about right for cooking 
over a camp-fire, as all such dishes have 
to be a bit wetter, in order to keep from 
sticking, or burning, unless constant 
stirring prevents disaster, after the water 
is well absorbed. If they dry out before 
thoroughly cooked, add a little water. 
It takes at least half an hour of steady 
boiling to cook spaghetti sufficiently, and 
perhaps more if your fire burns low. 

Add one sliced onion or onion flavoring, 
and one small can of hot tomato sauce, 
while cooking. When this is done, take 



from fire, and add, stirring into the 
mixture, a cup of grated or thin-sliced 
cheese. 

5. Spaghetti Fry 

Boil plain spaghetti in salted water, and 
when cooked, drain, and fry in bacon fat, 
and serve with crisp slices of bacon. If 
eggs are available they make a fine addi- 
tion to this, either fried or poached. 

6. Plain Corn Meal Mush 

One cup of yellow corn meal to two cups 
of boiling, salted water. Let boil until 
thick, about half an hour. Serve with 
milk, or with butter and sugar. Care 
must be taken to stir briskly when put- 
ting the meal into the water, or it will 
lump. And it needs occasional stirring 
while cooking. 

Cold mush can be sliced and fried in 
bacon fat or lard, and is especially nice 
with a little cheese sprinkled over the 
fried slices, or with syrup or melted sugar. 

7. Fake Tamale 

One quart of boiling salted water. Two 
cups of yellow corn meal. One table- 
spoonful of butter or bacon fat. One 
small can of hot tomato sauce, and any 
meat which the camp affords, cut in 
small pieces, and cooked separately or 
previously. Stir the corn meal into the 
water carefully, to prevent lumping, and 
let it begin to thicken. Then add the 
meat, and butter or fat. Onion flavoring 
will improve this; or garlic. Heat the 
tomato sauce in a small frying-pan, and 
add a tablespoonful of flour, mixed with a 
like amount of water, and thicken the 
tomato into a gravy. Serve the corn 
meal on the plates with the hot tomato 
sauce poured over it. 



Without Haven 



With homing sails by winds caressed 
The flocking fisher boats return 

To quiet harbors hushed with peace 

Where clustered cottage homelights burn. 



Lord of the homelights, pity him 
Whose beaten sails go never down 

In some still harbor of the years 

Beside some friendly, home-lit town! 

Arthur Wallace Peach. 



"A Surprise Dinner 

By Lois Goodwin Greer 



BEFORE a crackling open fire sat 
Janet, knitting away at a little 
red mitten, and barricaded behind 
the proverbial daily paper was Jimmie, 
her husband, so absorbed in the perusal 
of the world's escapades, that Janet spoke 
the second time before he heard her. 

"Jimmie! I have spoken twice — are 
you asleep?" she exclaimed, laughingly. 

"Asleep: Xo. of course not!" pro- 
tested Jimmie, laying aside his paper. 
"Pardon, Janet, what were you saying?" 

"I was saying that I have an idea." 

"An idea!" in mock incredulity. "No, 
not really, Janet?" 

"Yes, Jimmie, really — • and I have 
been thinking — " 

"Thinking!" broke in Jimmie. 
"Janet — " 

"You wretch," retorted Janet, before 
he could finish. "Stop your nonsense 
and listen to what I am trying to say." 

\\ hereupon Jimmie promptly subsided. 

"As I said — I've been thinking," with 
a merry twinkle in her eyes, "that we see 
too little of our good neighbors. These 
short, winter days are filled to over- 
flowing with farm activities, home duties 
and the care of the children, and when 
evening comes we are too prone to bask 
before our open fire, and let the world 
whizz by. And, out here on this farm, 
we do not see even an order team from 
the stores." 

Jimmie glanced up quickly, but Janet 
hastened on. 

"You and I are not the only ones, in 
fact, I can name eight or nine couples, 
within a radius of a mile from this farm, 
who, I'll wager, have not left their fire- 
sides once within the last month, for a bit 
of fun and frolic, and Jimmie, for no 
reason in the world, except that the 
effort has seemed too great for the amount 
of pleasure to be derived. We are getting 



into ruts, and we are traveling in them 
so constantly, that, by and by, Jimmie, 
we shall get an awful spill." 

She paused, but not long enough to 
give Jimmie a chance to speak. 

"A little plan came to my mind today 
which will give us an opportunity to get 
together for a good time, yet won't tax 
any of us, to any great extent, and we will 
come home refreshed and ready for 
another day's work." 

Outside, the wind howled, as only a 
Vermont wind can howl, and driving sleet 
and snow beat against the window panes. 

Jimmie turned toward the window 
apprehensively. 

"Yes, I know it's a bad night," Janet 
spoke his thoughts, "and this is only one 
of many which we have, but the sun 
usually shines the following day, as it, 
undoubtedly, will tomorrow, and the 
snow will glisten and gleam in the sun- 
light — and, for one of those tomorrows, 
my plan is designed." 

Jimmie settled himself more comforta- 
bly, and lighted his pipe saying: 

"All right, Janet. What does thou pro- 
pose?" 

"Just this," explained Janet, as she 
answered him with a smile, "that we all 
give a Surprise Dinner!" 

"Heavens, Janet!" exploded Jimmie. 
"I thought you said your plan would not 
tax any of us, and now you say 'all of 
us,' ' coming to an upright position. 

"And I mean all of us," persisted 
Janet. "Suppose we choose nine couples 
— ■ that means eighteen people. If we 
were to have a dinner party there isn't a 
dining room in the village large enough 
to seat so many people, and then, 
again, such a party would mean hours of 
cooking." 

Jimmie nodded understandingly. 

"However," continued Janet, "if each 



is: 



184 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



course is taken care of by two people you 
can readily see that we can have a very 
elaborate menu with a minimum amount 
of effort — and if each course can be kept 
a profound secret — -just think what fun 
it will be!" 

"Fun? I should say so!" heartily 
accorded Jimmie, who was now all enthu- 
siasm, and eager to learn more of Janet's 
idea. And so forthwith they were over 
their heads in plans and details of the 
proposition, which resulted in Janet 
spending an hour at the telephone, the 
following morning, calling the various ones, 
who she knew would be most interested. 

Alice Bronson was delighted with the 
idea, and promptly offerfcd, in fact, 
insisted that her house should be used 
as the base for operations, and declared 
that she would furnish rolls and coffee — 
whether or no. 

Each person whom Janet approached 
was so enthusiastic that they were eager 
to do more than she suggested, but it was 
finally arranged that each separate course 
should be taken care of by two women 
alone; that it should be prepared at 
home, and that the silver and china, for 
each course, should be furnished by those 
in charge. Lastly, it was agreed that the 
utmost secrecy should be observed con- 
cerning the menu. 

Friday evening, when Mrs. Bronson's 
guests began to arrive, they found five 
card tables placed side by side in the 
living room, forming a long, narrow 
table, with nine chairs on each side, and 
extending nearly the whole length of the 
comfortable, little room — the only cov- 
ering upon them being regulation green 
denim card-table covers. 

In the kitchen there was great bustle 
and much — oh, very much excitement. 
Hampers and boxes, queer and exceed- 
ingly mysterious-looking packages were 
being smuggled into the room, the con- 
tents of which were either lately from the 
ice box, or piping hot from the oven, and 
giving forth appetizing odors. Many an 
inquisitive nose was properly snapped or 
completely snubbed. 



Promptly, at seven o'clock, each person 
was given a piece of paper with a number 
upon it (the men the odd, and the women 
the even numbers), and requested to find 
their places at the long, narrow, impro- 
vised table in the living room, where they 
found corresponding numbers. They were 
then instructed as to the procedure of the 
dinner. Each person was to pass to the 
dining room, procure an individual tray, 
which he, or she, must retain during the 
entire dinner, and upon which each course 
would be placed, assisting themselves, 
which in its respective order would be 
placed upon the dining room table, with 
suitable silver, china, etc., by those serv- 
ing it — then return to the living room, 
where the dinner would be eaten. 

A merrier, more jovial party cannot be 
conceived, and as each course was served, 
louder and longer were the acclamations 
of surprise and delight. 

Imagine, then, for yourself, a chilled 
grapefruit cocktail, served in self shells, 
and topped with a spoonful of bar-le-duc 
strawberries, as the appetizer, followed 
by creamed chicken, en casserole (coun- 
try-raised and corn-fed spring chicken, 
and thick, yellow cream, fresh from one's 
own herd of Jersey cows), Saratoga chips, 
home-made, and deliciously crisp and 
hot; green peas, which Hannah picked in 
her kitchen garden, shelled in the cool of 
the evening on the back porch, and canned 
the following morning. Dutch-cheese 
balls, garnished with paprika, a sprig of 
parsley, and a clove for the stem — all so 
perfectly done that to look at it one was 
not sure if it were an apple or cheese; 
hot rolls, which simply melted in one's 
mouth, they were so light and fluffy, and 
butter fresh and sweet, which Susan had 
churned that very morning; tiny pickled 
beets, and wee cucumber pickles, as 
relishes — all from the home garden. 

And, then, a fine, old, pressed glass 
dish, with a brilliant jellied tomato salad, 
on a crisp bed of lettuce leaves, which 
was as delicious as its appearance was 
tempting. 

The last course, a smooth, creamy 



A SURPRISE DINNER 



185 



chocolate ice cream, and angel cake — 
that most ddectable of all cakes, and fit, 
indeed, for the very angels — and with 
this course a cup of Alice Bronson's 
excellent coffee. 

"Janet," exclaimed Mark Andrews, as 
he placed his cup upon his tray, "Jimmie 
says that your pretty, little head is full 
of more ideas, just as delightful and 
practical as this has been." 

"Jimmie is very flattering," answered 
Janet, as she blew Jimmie a kiss from her 
finger tips. "I am glad that you all 
liked this idea, and it has been fun, 
hasn't it? And not much work for any 
one of us, either." 

"Work? No!" Every one spoke at 



once 



'With each person packing away their 
own china and silver, as it has come from 
the table," spoke up Alice Benson, "and 
no pots or pans to be washed in the 
kitchen, I shall not know there has been 
a party in the house when you have all 
gone." 

Turning to Janet, "If you know of any- 
thing else which we can do as easily as 
this — do tell it, Janet." 

"Everything cannot be as easy as this, 
you know, but there are other things 
which we can do which will be a pleasure 
— ■ and there is something which the men 
can execute without any of our help." 

"Tell us! Tell us!" 

"Some other time, if you want it, but 
not tonight," with a shake of her head. 

"Want it?" chorused seventeen voices. 
'You'll see how soon. Mistress Janet." 

Recipes Used for the Surprise 
Dinner 

Hannah's Creamed Chicken ex 
Casserole 

Melt two tablespoonfuls of butter in a 
double boiler, in it cook three tablespoon- 
fuls of flour, until well blended, then add, 



gradually, two cups of cream and two 
cups of chicken stock, half a teaspoonful 
of salt, and a dash of nutmeg; stir until 
the sauce is smooth. Stir into the hot 
sauce the well-beaten yolks of three eggs, 
and when thoroughly set add the diced 
meat of a large chicken (or the white meat 
from two small ones). Allow to simmer 
until the chicken is well heated through. 
Serve in a casserole dish, and garnish the 
top with rings of hard-boiled eggs. 

Tomato Jelly Salad 

To one can of stewed-and-strained 
tomatoes add one teaspoonful, each, of 
salt and powdered sugar, and two-thirds 
a box of gelatine, which ha$ been soaked 
fifteen minutes in one-half a cup of cold 
water. Pour into a mould and let chill. 
Just before serving place on a bed of 
lettuce leaves, and garnish with mayon- 
naise dressing. A bit of onion may be 
added while the tomatoes are stewing, if 
one prefers. 

Chocolate Ice Cream 

Put four squares of chocolate in a 
double boiler, and allow to melt with a 
little less than a quart of milk. When 
dissolved add two cups of sugar and stir. 
Take off the stove and beat with an egg 
beater. Whip one quart of cream, until 
stiff; add one tablespoonful of vanilla. 
When both are cold, combine and freeze. 
This will make one gallon of cream, and 
is very smooth and creamy. 



Hot Things Hot, Cold Things Cold 

If comfort you would give your whole household, 
Serve hot things hot, and cold things cold. 
The lukewarm habit to none is fair, 
It soaks into the system too much "don't care," 
Lowering the standard of day to day life, 
Leading to discontent, depression, and strife. 
So, mothers, look well to the household ways, 
Thus winning your family's unending praise, 
By heeding the injunction given of old, 
Have hot things hot, and cold things cold. 

Aunt Jovful. 




How the Other Half Lives 

By Edna Townsley Pinkley 



CAN you conceive of it? One hun- 
dred and ten degrees in the shade 
and the proverbial sixty miles 
from — ■ well, not exactly a lemon, but 
from fresh fruit, fresh vegetables, fresh 
meat and all the dear, delightful things 
we take for granted in the summer time 
"back home." Eagerly I read "Sister 
Mary's Kitchen" in the daily from the 
city, eagerly I scan each new magazine, 
"Hints for Hbt Weather," "Cold Dishes 
for Hot Days," "Menus for Warm 
Weather." Ah! here we are! "Use 
plenty of fresh milk" — ■ from the can. 
"Steaks and chops better than roasts" 
— ■ "Use fish freely" — ■ a fish would have 
to carry a canteen to get within a hundred 
miles of here! ."Frozen dainties" — we 
feel that the story must have originated 
out here, in which the old lady listens 
credulously to her returned son's stories 
of mermaids, fairies and so on, and when 
he mentions artificial ice exclaims, "Now 
I done knows you're a-lyin'; the good 
Lord Himself couldn't make ice in the 
summer time!" 

How do we manage? In the first 
place, we are not too proud to take 
lessons in management from our native 
neighbors, the Indians and Mexicans 
(greaser, not Spanish). We built our 
house, not, as many newcomers do, 
despising the lowly 'dobe and brush 
shade, of lumber, but of 'dobe, copying 
as nearly as possible the coolest Indian 
house we knew, with screen porches added 
for sanitation. Our most comfortable 
spot, however, is not in our dirt- roofed 
living room, nor in one of our spacious 
screen porches, but out under our 
ramada, or ivah-throhp, as the Indians 
say it. This is an open shed with the 
roof formed of willow poles, sahuaro ribs 
and arrow weed or bata mote, supported 
on crotched mesquite posts. Ours is 



about forty by twenty feet. This is 
unfloored, but the ground beneath is 
wet down morning and evening. Against 
the center post of this, in the deepest 
shade, but so placed that the breeze will 
strike it all day long, is our next joy, the 
water olla (oya), a large, porous earthen- 
ware jar of Indian manufacture. This 
we fill with water each evening, and next 
day, when well water tastes like dish 
water, this water will be cool and thirst- 
quenching. 

Still under the ramada, but more in the 
background as befits its lowly mission in 
life, is our cooler, or ice-less ice-box. 
This is a skeleton cupboard covered with 
several layers of burlap (old grain sacks. 
if one must be truthful), with a pan of 
water on top from which hang flannel 
cloths which siphon out the water all 
day and keep the burlap wet and the 
food in the cooler in edible condition. 

Our beds, which in summer are bare 
canvas cots, are outside, and by early 
rising, late retiring and a long siesta — 
or attempt at one — in a darkened room, 
by working the bathroom overtime, so 
we wear through, day by day, the long, 
hot months. No one can pretend that 
it is a joy, though most men attempt to, 
but the life can be made endurable, if 
not enjoyable. 

What do we eat? We have a menu 
that would give a dietitian nervous 
prostration just by reading it. We eat 
what we can instead of what we should, 
and at that, if a pun be allowed, we have 
nothing to can. All our cooking we 
try to do before the heat of the day- 
settles down, but I insist on my family 
having two meals a day with some hot 
dish, to avoid the indigestion which is 
sure to follow a too steady cold diet. 

Even bread will not keep more than a 
day or two, so a couple of bakings a 



186 



HOW THE OTHER HALF LIVES 



187 



week of bread, white, raisin, brown, 
rolls and what not, must be padded with 
hot breads for breakfast and often 
constitute the hot dish for the mid-day 
meal. We ring the changes on the 
staples: potatoes, rice, onions, eggs, 
not too much canned goods, and, strange 
to say, beans. Salad dressing is always 
on hand and used ad libitum. I make the 
boiled kind, as it makes a more sub- 
stantial supper salad. 

It seems strange that beans should be 
used and enjoyed in such hot weather, 
but once a week or so when it seems as 
though no one will ever want to eat again, 
but only to drink — drink — drink — 
water, lemonade, sassafras, water, cold 
tea, water, cold coffee, water and yet 



more water, — then, I say, I serve a dish 
of beans, frijoles, teparies, limas, or, 
not often, navies, with an onion, and 
some bacon and a bit of chili, and the 
family eats like a gang of greaser sheep 
herders. 

Once or twice in the summer we take 
our lives in our hands and drive the 
long, hot miles to the city, whence we 
come home with all the vegetables in the 
market, a hunk of fresh meat and a chunk 
of ice under wet burlap in the back of the 
wagon. After an orgy of these with its 
resultant indigestion, we again revert to 
type and live the somnolent, dolce-far- 
niente, manana e maiiana life of our 
neighbors, living each day as it draws 
the endless summer to its close. 



Concerning Lunch 

By Jean O. Smith 



FAR from being what so many people 
consider it, merely a "filler-in," or 
a "tide-me-over," lunch is really 
a- very* critical meal, and plays an im- 
portant part in making the world go 
round smoothly and effectively. In busi- 
ness, in school, in the home, the success 
of the afternoon work depends largely on 
the mid-day meal. If the effect of an 
indigestible snack were limited to the 
one who took it, the result would not be 
so serious, but it spreads like the ever 
widening circle of ripples from a pebble 
dropped in a pond. Many a tired 
stenographer, herself having had only a 
cup of tea and a roll, has wished most 
fervently that the "Boss" had eaten 
something else than strawberry short- 
cake and lemon pie. Crotchety tempers, 
sarcastic humor, and jarred nerves can 
very often be traced back to an insuffi- 
cient or dyspeptic lunch. Chocolate 
eclair and coffee, baked beans and rice 
pudding, raisin pie and ice-cream soda, 
these are some of the common atrocities 
committed in the name of luncheon. 

Each of the daily three meals has its 
distinctive part to play in the health. 



wealth, and happiness of mankind. Lunch 
coming, as it does, in between breakfast 
and dinner, and being less rigid in outline 
than they, should be a supplement to 
them, a variable measure to keep the 
balance true. Dinner. is recognized as 
the substantial meal of the day, and as 
such comes at its close, when dull care 
is laid aside and the full enjoyment of 
the food realized. If breakfast has been 
a regular meal, with fruit, cereal, meat 
or egg, toast and coffee, a large lunch is 
not so necessary; in this instance, a 
simple, but nutritious, one of salad and 
dessert would be sufficient. But, in 
the majority of cases, breakfast consists 
of fruit and coffee, stimulating the 
nerves, rather than energizing the body. 
Then a good, wholesome, appetizing, 
satisfying lunch is essential to sustain the 
physical, as well as the mental, efficiency. 
The lunch hour comes at the very 
busiest part of the day. If the body did 
not absolutely demand refreshment, the 
mind would not admit the necessity, or 
concede the time in which to obtain it. 
Two controlling factors of the individual 
are at loggerheads; therefore, the food 



188 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



must be attractive to wean the one 
from its abstraction and sufficiently 
nourishing to satisfy the other — -yet. 
not of such quality or quantity as to 
satiate either and make it difficult to 
resume the interrupted work of the 
morning. 

The lack of a definite, set form as a 
euiding principle, and the freedom and 
variety of choice in foods add to the 
difficulties of having a proper lunch. 
There is apt to be too much of one kind 
of food and not enough, or none, of 
another. It is not the number of courses 
that makes a meal seem large or heavy, 
but the combination of foods which 
causes that uncomfortable feeling. Baked 
macaroni and blancmange pudding make 
a most unfortunate lunch, as do also 
shirred eggs and boiled custard, or bean 
soup, scalloped potato and rice pudding. 
Individually any one of these dishes is 
splendid, but ocurring thus the effect is 
disastrous. Xot only is there no contrast 
in color or flavor to relieve the monotony, 
but one-sided meals such as these are 
more difficult to digest. The organisms 
were made to handle the several kinds of 
food simultaneously, and they work to 
much better advantage when treated 
accordingly. 

A well-balanced meal may consist of 
one course, but it is more usual to have 
two or three. A tasty, well-seasoned 
soup makes an excellent beginning, be- 
cause it is an appetizer as well as a 
stimulant. Cream soups, in addition, 
are very nutritious and their food value 
must be considered in respect to the rest 
of the meal. The main course or 



luncheon-dish may be hot or cold, at 
casserole or a salad, complicated or 
simple, containing all the food elements 
or only one, it doesn't matter; what does 
matter is, that, whichever it be, the 
dessert supplement it and offer a contrast 
in color, texture and quantity, so that 
the meal as a whole is well proportioned 
and attractive. 

There are just as many kinds and 
variations of lunches as there are people- 
to eat them, and moods, conditions, and 
weather to prompt them. The first 
mild spring days usually inspire a meal 
including a clear soup — ■ bouillon, or 
consomme — poached egg on spinach, 
and a fruit jelly with 'ice-cream. It is 
light, refreshing, and nourishing. A cold, 
chilly day demands something spicy,, 
highly seasoned, filling, but not heavy.. 
A cold winter's day lunch should be 
steaming, savory, and satisfying. On a 
hot summer day, mind and body cry out 
for a cold lunch; iced bouillon, Waldorf 
salad, fresh fruit, rolls, and iced coffee- 
will not only still the hunger pangs but 
act as a sedative for the heat.. In the- 
fall a rather substantial casserole dish 
and baked or stewed fruit would be 
appropriate. The close, enervating day 
will tolerate only that which is bright, 
piquant, appealing to the eye, and to the- 
half-dormant appetite; a gay-colored, 
crisp salad, and fresh fruit will probably 
fill the bill. A dull, rainy day suggests- 
a meal both attractive in color, and 
satisfying in quantity, such as cream ol 
tomato soup, chicken timbales with eg{ 
sauce and green peas, and a dessert ol 
fruit souffle. 



Consider the Lilies 

By Agnes Louise Dean 



IX church this morning my eyes glued 
themselves to the work of the flower 
committee. Crowded under the low 
shelter which the reading desk affords was 
the loveliest weigelia you ever saw. Its 



pattern of starry flowers rifted with greei 
leaves was as if a miniature tree of pin! 
hawthorn had wandered in from ai 
English hedgerow. 

Sprays and branches from flowering: 



CONSIDER THE LILIES 



189 



shrubs are delightful to work with, as I 
"know from happy experience in my own 
flower pantry. They hold their charm 
of design as so often cut flowers do not, 
when unfortunately arranged. With a 
few judicious cuttings from spirea, or 
forsythia, or dogwood you can do almost 
anything, and look upon your work and 
take., credit for a perfection of beauty 
which depends almost wholly on the 
shrub itself. 

But no shrub could survive the in- 
dignity done by the flower committee to 
the exquisite pink weigela today. Like 
a large white bone button on a brocaded 
gown stood out the receptacle in which 
its stems were thrust. A nubbly china 
thing with gold bosses on its gleaming 
curves, it advertised itself as a plump, 
collateral relative of what, in the marble- 
topped washstand era, was the ac- 
customed repository of the toothbrush. 
A most uncompromising whiteness which 
not even beauty of line could justify — ■ 
and we all know there is nothing about 
the toothbrush holder to remind us of a 
Grecian urn! 

So, instead of listening to the sermon, 
I composed this sermonette. 

Devoted members of all flower com- 
mittees! It is difficult to speak any- 
thing but praise of your efforts. You 
secure on the basis of the slenderest of 
budgets flowers to grace the church for 
fifty-two Sundays in the year. You 
honor the festivals of Christmas and 
Easter with days of willing toil. Yet 
is it enough for you to sacrifice your 
early Sabbath leisure, to stretch the 
feeble allotment of funds, to beg for 
gracious Madonna lilies, and to scout 
about the parish gardens for Children's 
Day, if when you get your flowers all you 
are going to provide them in the way of 
a setting is something which holds water? 
Can you not do better by them than 
that? It does matter what you put 
your flowers into. The flower container 
must be in the picture, also. 

A ritualistic church has its conven- 
tional altar brasses which are harmonious 



with candlesticks and altar cloths. 
Appropriate flower holders can, likewise, 
be found for church interiors where 
greater latitude of arrangement is per- 
mitted. 

For the sort of platform which I faced 
today I can imagine a low stand on either 
side, supporting in a well-shaped bowl 
of dull bronze a tree-like grouping of 
the same pink weigelia. The Japanese, 
who so admirably understand keeping 
the feeling of growth, provide us with 
various perforated holders for standard 
effects. 

Flower containers need not cost much 
money, but they well repay a little 
thought and more discrimination. One 
has only to pass counters of "vases" in 
the stores to realize how many tasteless 
things are on the market. 

To members of flower committees who 
find the church receptacles for flowers 
unsuitable or inadequate, let me recom- 
mend browsing around in shops of 
civilizations elder than ours. From the 
Orient come lovely pottery things, 
curved like a great lotus leaf. In color 
they are sometimes jade, or smoke blue, 
or leaf brown. In size they are big 
enough to mean something in the softened 
light of a large church. There are, also, 
to be had shapely and tall bronzes, as 
well as high-shouldered coppers with 
subdued lights, if the appropriation will 
allow of their purchase. Less costly, and 
in their way equally beautiful, are 
cylinder-shaped beakers of clear glass 
such as laboratories use. These come 
in all sizes, and give good support for 
the uncertain stems of roses and provide 
security and plenty of water to top-heavy 
peonies. A column of light-filled water 
is a beautiful and symbolic thing in 
itself, and submerged stalks and foliage 
frostily apparent in its cool depths are 
twice lovely. 

I should like to show the treasures of 

my flower pantry shelves to any hearers 

who are still listening, as evidence of my 

good faith. I have been practicing for 

(Continued on page 220) 



1 



190 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



AMERICAN COOKERY 

FORMERLY THE 

BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL 
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OF 

Culinary Science and Domestic Economics 

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Entered at Boston Post-office as Second-class Matter 



THE POTTER 

Watch the potter at his wheel, 

Busy working day by day. 
In your heart do you not feel 

"Tis his mind that moulds the clay? 

Watch yourself the whole day through, 
Working where your work is wrought, 

Is this idea to you new, 

That you're moulded by your thought; 

Thought, the worker; self, the clay! 

God the Potter is alway. 
He a perfect Thought outlined, 

Hold this model in your mind. 

Harriet H. a" Autre mo ni. 



JUSTICE AND A LIVING WAGE 

MUCH is being written and said, of 
late, about justice and a living 
wage, especially by the leaders of organ- 
ized labor. Surely, justice is what we 
all, majorities as well as minorities, want 
here on earth, but what about our inalien- 
able rights of life, liberty and pursuit of 
happiness? To secure these is the chief 
function of government. But under 
existing conditions is life made secure? 
Is liberty to act and acquire free and 



untrammeled? Is freedom in the pur- 
suit of happiness everywhere prevalent? 
And yet ours is a representative govern- 
ment wherein a majority of the people 
must make and execute the laws of the 
land. "We expect, from the authority of 
government, from the enactment and 
enforcement of laws, from the operation 
of political establishment, protection for 
life and liberty, guaranties of the right to 
live in reasonable comfort, the right to 
escape disaster. What we see now is a 
threat of collapse of all those guaranties." 

Now has any one ever fixed upon and 
set up a standard of a living wage? 
Never, for it is manifestly impossible. 
The editor of the Saturday Evening Post 
well puts the matter of wages something 
as follows: 

"There are millions of standards of 
living. There are millions of different 
wage levels where people either do or do 
not live well. It is a personal affair with 
each individual. Learned professors may 
decide upon a certain figure as a proper 
wage, but the workman may deliberately 
choose to support only himself through 
life, or he may choose to support a dozen 
people. In reality each worker chooses 
his own standard. 

"To a considerable extent wages are 
smaller than they would be except for the 
industrial incapacity of the individual. 
He or she is poorly trained, and is rarely 
guided toward the most suitable voca- 
tion. There is a world of ignorance and 
unfitness. Immigration creates a low- 
lying, helpless group, easy to exploit. 
The lure of the city draws in hordes of 
people out of their natural and suitable 
habitat. Wages depend upon education, 
training, health, skill of management — 
upon a score of conditions which must be 
improved and are being improved. 

"What governs the payment of wages 
has been discussed to the last degree of 
technicality for hundreds of years by 
nearly all writers on serious subjects. 
Each economist has a theory more or less 
his own. The close-fisted employer, the 
ardent unionite and the out-and-out 



EDITORIALS 



191 



socialist — their ideas differ, of course, 
but that is only the beginning of the 
divergence. One principle, however, 
which does not govern wages is the moral 
desert of the recipient. People are not 
paid according to the beauty of their 
character, or because they work hard. 
They are not paid with the idea of pen- 
sioning them off or making them com- 
fortable and happy. 

"Roughly speaking, wages depend on 
the value of the services to those who 
receive them. Fundamentally, wages de- 
pend upon production, and what the 
workers, as a whole, receive in the way of 
wages is a measure of their share of the 
total production." 

Wide-spread prosperity is dependent 
upon the production and distribution of 
commodities. Our industries must flour- 
ish, that our people may be contented and 
happy. 

ON TARIFF LEGISLATION 

THE present prospect of high-tariff 
legislation seems inauspicious. If 
we must have a tariff law, we favor the 
lowest rates that can be submitted. We 
claim to desire to help the nations of the 
earth in the struggle to recuperate from 
the calamity of war. How can we do this 
more easily and better than by increas- 
ing our production, and making the 
exchange of commodities as free and easy 
as possible? 

We want to trade in the markets of 
the world, and at reasonable prices for 
all commercial products. Legislation in 
favor of a few, and at the expense of the 
many, is intolerable. A high tariff is the 
source of untold corruption and iniquity 
ungainsaid. Selfishness and greed merely 
unite, in its characterization, while jus- 
tice and righteousness have no place to 
figure at all. "Chief among the causes of 
war is the barrier to trade, set up by 
customs tariffs. We must take our 
choice, freedom of trade and peace or 
protection and war." 

Certainly, in the discussions of tariffs, 
no suggestion or mention is made of the 



Golden Rule. "All things whatsoever ye 
would that men should do to you, do ye 
even so to them." In these seventeen 
words a lawyer claims, recently, to have 
found the spirit of the whole modern law. 
He found that, "the Golden Rule is more 
than a precept of religion, or a precept of 
moral conduct, or rather that, being truly 
such a precept, it applied to all transac- 
tions in life. Like all legal maxims, 
ancient and modern, it expressed the 
general principles of a rule of law." 

Granted that money must be provided, 
somehow, for governmental purposes, if 
the method by tariff be chosen, let the 
tariff rates be low. We favor a gradual, 
but decided, revision of the tariff sched- 
ules, to allow time for adjustment. At 
the same time let us try to observe, and 
put into practice in national and social 
affairs, the precept of the Golden Rule. 

ENGLAND AND PROHIBITION 

THE English have no use for the 
forthcoming visit of Pussyfoot John- 
son. They want no part of prohibition 
in the country. Their own temperance 
movements are thought good enough, 
because, for the most part, they have no 
bigoted ideas. The main plank of these 
is the reform of the public house, and the 
obliteration of the drinking den. "We 
would welcome Mr. Johnson," they say, 
"if he came on a campaign, for, say, the 
hospitals, a revival of trade, or some- 
thing of that sort; for prohibition we do 
not want him." 

Our advice to Pussyfoot would be to 
stay on this side of the "herring pond," 
and leave our English friends alone. All 
propaganda is out of order; no form of it 
is likely to be received in kindly spirit. 
Englishmen are sticklers for points. Let 
the Englishman hold to his beer and wine 
drinking; let him continue, at enormous 
cost, to support courts and jails; let him 
continue to pay vast sums for old-age 
pensions and disabled workers, all chiefly 
for the maintenance of an inefficient 
laboring class. If he so elects, should we 
be envious? America has, voluntarily, 



192 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



accepted prohibition; it is the law of the 
land. She will stick to what she has 
already gained, thereby, and try to find 
ways and means to perpetuate the reform. 
The wonder will be, in a generation or 
two, that the opposite condition ever 
existed. Why was it tolerated so long? 

ENGLISH COOKERY 

" r T**0 Dine Properly" — which is the 
-I end of every man's desire — is the 
text of a discourse addressed to readers of 
an evening paper, by a popular novelist. 
It is not, he says, a question of money. 
He has "eaten in France and Italy simple 
dishes fit to set before a king, within 
reach of the slenderest purse." No such 
happy accident appears to have be'allen 
him in his native land. Its food is "a 
national disaster"; he despairs of forty 
millions of his compatriots, who will go on 
eating tasteless soup, sodden fish, tough 
and overdone meat, flabby vegetables, and 
sodden puddings till they die, and they 
will die all the sooner in consequence. It 
is an appalling prospect, and how is it to 
be averted? 



He has not, apparently, any present 
help to give us, but in the dim and distant 
future he has a vision of a Ministry of the 
Kitchen, presided over by some super- 
chef, yet unborn, who will prescribe 
menus for all, according to their several 
conditions, to tamper with which will 
entail a minimum of ten days without the 
option. Labor members are doing their 
best to familiarize us with the idea of 
nationalized railways, mines, land, etc., 
but if it come to nationalizing our dinners, 
Heaven help us, the last shred of the 
Briton's imagined freedom will have 
disappeared. 



It is characteristic of the superior per- 
son never to have a good word for English 
food or English cookery, which is unfortu- 
nate, because any good that might be 
done by intelligent criticism is nullified 
by indiscriminate abuse. It is, more- 
over, open to doubt whether these dia- 



tribes are to be taken at their face value, 
or whether they merely indicate a pose. 
There is a story told of George Augustus 
Sala, who, returning from Paris, whence 
he had been despatching a series of 
articles lauding the French cuisine, betook 
himself to the "Cheshire Cheese." "Wil- 
liam," he said to the old waiter, "I have 
had nothing to eat for three months. 
For God's sake get me a point steak." 

The TV ble. 



w 



MARION HARLAND 

HEN Mrs. Mary Virginia Ter- 
hune, "Marion Harland," died at 
her home in New York recently, religious, 
as well as other household publications, 
lost a prolific and valuable contributor. 
She was ninety years of age, and pub- 
lished her first article at the age of 
fourteen. 



With no desire to prejudice or advise 
any one in the choice of books, we feel 
constrained to say that of the numerous 
cook books now on the market none are 
more complete and reliable than are those 
that bear the name of the editor of 
American Cookery. 



THE AFTERMATH 

About the rooms of our quiet flat 

There's a strangely jumbled air 
As though a rollicking young cyclone 

Had shaken its pinions there; 
Curious objects are strewn about 

In a wild and reckless way; 
The chairs are covered with bread-and-jam 

The Baby was here today. 

A cripple for life is Grandpa's watch; 

It never again will go; 
And Grandma's glasses are out of gear, 

Disabled in lens and bow; 
Fragments of china and battered books 

Tell tales of a merry fray; 
The things are lost that we prized the most 

The Baby was here today. 

But Grandpa's smile is wistfully soft, 

And deep in Grandmother's eyes 
A light, like that of the eventide, 

In a mist of crystal lies. 
The old folks dream of their faded youth, 

Far back in an olden May; 
An angel-presence has touched their souls — 

The Baby was here today. 

Harriet Whitney Symonds. 










CHOP SUEY (See page 196) 
i 

Seasonable-and-Tested Recipes 

By Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 

IN ALL recipes where flour is used, unless otherwise stated, the flour is measured after sifting 
once. Where flour is measured by cups, the cup is filled with a spoon, and a level cupful is meant. 
A tablespoonful or a teaspoonful of any designated material is a LEVEL spoonful. In flour mixtures 
where yeast is called for, use bread flour; in all other flour mixtures, use cake or pastry flour. 



Anglo-Indian Mulligatawny 
Soup 

PUT six small white onions through 
the food chopper, after peeling, and 
fry on pan in a very little butter 
until delicately browned; add to soup 
kettle containing two quarts of stock; 
add one clove of garlic, and one four- 
pound chicken, cut into pieces and quickly 
browned on the outside in a broiler over 
a clear, hot fire. Let the whole simmer 
until the chicken is cooked, then add a 
quarter of a pound of lean, cooked ham, 
cut into small dice, and two tablespoon- 
fuls of curry powder rubbed smooth in a 
little water. One ounce of sweet almonds, 
blanched and ground fine, and one or two 
tablespoonfuls of chopped sweet pickles, 
is the last addition — more seasoning is 
put in if it is needed, and the whole is 
poured into a tureen and served with 
boiled rice. This dish is something 
between a soup and a stew. 



Savory Stew of Domestic 
Duck and Oysters 

Cut up the duck, after cleaning, into 
pieces as for fricassee. Mix three tea- 
spoonfuls of salt, one of pepper, and one- 
half a teaspoonful, each, of celery salt and 
summer savory, and with this mixture 
rub each piece of the duck. Lay the 
pieces in the stew-pot and let stand 
thirty minutes. Add one cup of water or 
stock, one-half a cup of vinegar, three 
whole cloves and four allspice berries; 
cover, and let stew until the duck meat is 
tender. Lift out the pieces; have a pan 
ready with six teablespoonfuls of butter 
heated very hot; brown the duck in this, 
and lay on a hot platter in the warming 
oven; add four tablespoonfuls of flour to 
the butter in the pan, add from one-half 
to one pint of oysters to the liquid in the 
stew-pot, and when the gills of the oysters 
separate and crinkle stir in the butter and 
flour; add one tablespoonful of onion 
193 



194 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



juice, and let the whole boil up once, then 
pour over the duck on the platter, and 
garnish with red jelly and stoned olives. 

Potage Blanc aux Noix 

(French White Soup) 
Heat one quart of clear, jellied veal 
stock, and. while melting heat in a small 
saucepan two cups of thin cream mixed 
with the grated yellow rind of one lemon. 
When the stock is hot pour in the cream 
gradually, and keep stirring gently. 
Have ready, mixed, three tablespoonfuls 
of flour, one teaspoonful of white pepper, 
one-half a teaspoonful of powdered mace, 
blend these with four tablespoonfuls of 
softened butter; add to the liquid in the 
soup kettle, and stir until the whole 



throughout and nicely browned. Sprinkle 
with grated cheese before serving, and 
pour a thick tomato sauce around it on 
the platter. 

Beef Kidney Ragout 

Cut into inch pieces two beef kidneys, 
roll in flour, and brown in hot fat. Add 
to two quarts of canned tomatoes, or raw 
tomatoes sliced. Season with salt, pepper 
to taste, and one sweet, green, chopped, 
pepper. Let the whole simmer over a 
very slow fire for two hours, or it may 
cook for four hours in a fireless cooker. 
If cooked over the fire it will need the 
addition of a little hot water, from time to 
time, to prevent burning, but the toma- 
toes have to be cooked down rather thick. 




SLICED FILET OF BEEF WITH MUSHROOM SAUCE 



boils; add salt if necessary; and, lastly, 
a quarter a pound of almonds, blanched 
and pounded to a smooth paste — or 
three ounces of marzipan may be sub- 
stituted. Stir, before serving, until the 
almonds are mixed with the soup. 

Baked Egg-Plant 

Cut a large egg-plant in quarters, and 
let soak in cold, strong, salted water for 
an hour. Drain, and with a sharp knife 
make parallel incisions in the rind, cutting 
well through it in criss-cross fashion, 
making lozenges about an inch across. 
Lay the pieces, rind side up, on the rack of 
a dripping pan, sprinkle with salt and 
pepper, dot with bits of butter, and bake 
in a slow oven until the vegetable is soft 



Shortly before serving add a few fresh 
mushrooms, if these are available. Build 
up a border of hot, cooked rice around a 
serving dish, and when the ragout is done 
pour it into the center. 

Sliced Filet of Beef with 
Mushroom Sauce 

With small skewers fasten four slices 
of salt pork to the upper surface of a 
rump filet of beef weighing between two 
and three pounds; sprinkle with salt; 
dredge with flour, and bake in a hot oven 
one hour. Slice the filet; arrange on a 
hot platter; pour over the slices 

Mushroom Sauce 

Peel mushroom caps, break them in 



SEASOXABLE-AXD-TESTED RECIPES 



195 



pieces and saute in two 
tablespoonfuls of butter 
until the moisture evap- 
orates; add brown stock 
to. cover and let simmer 
twenty minutes. Add to 
two cups of brown sauce 
and let cook very gently 
five minutes. 

With the dressed slices 
of filet, serve turnips, 
carrots and 

Baked Bananas 

Pull down a section of 
banana skin, then loosen 
±e pulp from the rest of the skin, remove 

11 coarse threads and replace the fruit in 
ts original position in the skin. Set the 
>ananas in a pan into the oven to cook 

ntil the skin is blackened and the pulp 

! Soft. 

French Chops with Pineapple 

Rib lamb chops, which have the bone 
hortened and scraped clean of meat 
early to the t 'eye , ' or kernel, are known 
3 French chops. Arrange chops on a 
ell-oiled broiler and broil over a clear 
re; place paper frills over bones. Serve 
ith slices of pineapple browned by saute- 
ig in butter. 

Sausages Baked in Biscuits 

Sift together three times, three cups of 
:istry flour, six teaspoonfuls of baking 
pwder and one-half a teaspoonful of salt; 
ork in two tablespoonfuls of lard; add 

ree-fourths a cup of milk, a little at a 
me. Knead the dough on a floured 




FRENCH CHOPS WITH PINEAPPLE 



board; pat with the rolling pin and roll 
into a sheet about one-third of an inch 
thick: cut out in rounds with a saucer. 
On each round of dough place a sausage; 
fold the edges together like a turnover 
and fasten with toothpicks. Bake 
twenty-five minutes in a moderate oven. 

Frigadel of Veal 

Put two or three pounds of veal through 
the food chopper; season with two or 
three teaspoonfuls of salt, one teaspoonful 
of pepper, and one-half a cup of chopped 
raisins. Pour a cup of boiling water over 
four slices of stale bread, drain, press out 
as much of the water as possible, and while 
warm mix with the bread one-fourth a 
cup of butter, then combine the bread and 
seasoned meat. Bind the mixture with 
two well-beaten eggs; form into a flat, 
oval cake, lay in the bottom of a greased 
dripping pan, pour a little gravy, stock, 
or water around it, and bake in a rather 
slow oven for two hours, basting occa- 




SAUSAGES BAKED IX BISCL'ITS 



196 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



sionally, and adding, from time to time, 
some more hot water. Serve hot with 
bacon curls and fried slices of apple, or it 
may be allowed to become cold and 
sliced for a luncheon dish. 

Black Bass with Tomato 

Sift one quart of tomatoes, canned or 
fresh; add two tablespoonfuls of scraped 
onion, cooked until brown in three- 
fourths a cup of olive oil, and let the 
whole simmer for thirty minutes. Add 
one four-pound bass, cut in thick slices, 
and allow to stew very slowly for an hour, 
or until fish is done. Lift out the pieces 
on to a warm dish; blend with a little of 
the tomatoes four tablespoonfuls of flour, 
one-half a teaspoonful of black pepper, 
and two teaspoonfuls of salt; add these 



Over these place in succession anothe; 
pound of fish, similarly cut into chunk: 
and sprinkled w T ith the same seasonings ir 
the same amounts, then oysters, butter 
and crackers, as before. One-fourth c 
pound of salt pork or bacon may be addec 
if desired. Cover the kettle close, anc 
let stew for half an hour, adding a little 
more water, if the mixture is too dry 
Before serving pour over the whole one- 
half a cup of cream, first heated. 

This dish, which is claimed to be th( 
genuine chowder or stew of fish, is servec 
on dinner plates and eaten with a fork 
Rice or potatoes are served with it. 

Florida Salad 

To one cup of apple sauce add one 
tablespoonful of orange-juice; use to fil 




FLORIDA SALAD 



to the kettle, and stir until the mixture 
boils. Pour over the fish, and sprinkle all 
with one-fourth a cup of fine-chopped 
parsley. 

Maryland Fish Chowder 

Put into the chowder pot one-half a 
cup of water; add one thin-sliced onion, 
one pound of haddock or codfish, cut into 
chunks and sprinkled with one teaspoon- 
ful and one-half of salt, one-fourth a 
teaspoonful of black pepper, one-fourth 
a teaspoonful of ground mace, and one- 
sixth a teaspoonful of cayenne. Add one 
cup of solid oysters, two tablespoonfuls of 
butter, divided into little bits, or melted, 
and one-fourth a pound of water crackers. 



six bananas that have been scraped and 
shaped like long boats; arrange on lettuce 
leaves; pipe with whipped cream and 
decorate the end of each banana boat 
w T ith a Maraschino cherry. 

Chop Suey 

Cut tender fresh pork (lean) and 
chicken into very thin pieces an inch and a 
half long and half an inch wide. Saute 
these in fat tried out of fresh pork. Have 
ready half as much (in bulk), or more, of 
celery, cut, transversely, in inch lengths, 
and an onion cut in small pieces. To the 
browned meat add the celery and onion, 
cover the whole with boiling water and 
let simmer until nearlv tender. Ther 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



197 



add peeled mushrooms 
few or many, according 
to taste, sauteed in thefat 
from which the meat was 
taken. For a quart of 
material stir a level table- 
spoonful of cornstarch 
with cold water to make 
a liquid paste, then stir 
into the hot mixture. 
Continue stirring until 
the mixture boils, then 
add two tablespoonfulsof 
molasses, a teaspoonfulof 
salt and a tablespoonful 
of China soy. 

Baking-Powder Biscuits 

Sift together two cups of pastry flour, 
four level teaspoonfuls of baking powder 
and one-half a teaspoonful of salt; work in 
three tablespoonfuls of lard with two 
knives; add one-half a cupof milkorwater, 
a little at a time, mixing it in with a 
knife. The dough should be as soft as 
can be handled. Turn the dough upon 
a floured board, turn it with the knife to 
coat with flour, then knead slightly; pat 
with the rolling pin and roll into a sheet 
about three-fourths of an inch thick; 
cut into rounds; bake fifteen to twenty 
minutes. Serve hot after splitting and 
spreading each biscuit with 

Honey, Swiss Style 

Beat together two ounces of honey 
(one small jar), two tablespoonfuls of 
softened butter and two 
tablespoonfuls of heavy 
cream. 

One-Crust Apple Pie 

Sift together one cupof 
flour and one-fourth a 
teaspoonful of salt; with 
a knife or tips of the 
fingers work in four table- 
spoonfuls of lard; then, 
adding cold water a few 
drops at a time; with a 
knife stir the mixture to 
a paste. Turn the paste 




BAKING-POWDER BISCUIT, WITH HONEY, SWISS STYLE 



onto a board lightly dredged with flour, 
then pat it lightly with the rolling pin 
and roll into a square sheet. With a 
knife dot over the paste with butter until 
a tablespoonful is used; roll up paste like 
a jelly roll; set upon one end; paT and 
roll out to size of pie-plate. Put no 
under crust in the plate, but fill with 
slices of apple; add sugar; sprinkle with 
nutmeg; cover with paste. Bake twenty- 
five minutes in a moderate oven. When 
cooked invert on a serving plate; pour 
whipped-and-sweetened cream above the 
apples. 

Harrison Cake 

Cream one cup of butter until light and 
white, and add three cups of brown sugar, 
one cup of dark molasses, the beaten 
yolks of four eggs, one tablespoonful of 
ground mace, one of cloves, three of 




ONE-CRUST APPLE PIE 



198 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



cinnamon, and two of allspice. Beat all 
well together, then add, alternately, five 
cups of flour, sifted with three teaspoon- 
fuls of baking powder, and one cup of 
milk, with, lastly, the stiff-beaten whites 
of the four eggs. It should be a thick, 
but not too stiff batter, and enough liquid 
should be used to get just this consistency. 
Lastly, add two pounds of seeded raisins, 
separated and plumped in the oven, and 
one-half a pound of well-cleaned currants. 
Divide into two loaf-pans, first greased 
and floured, and before baking insert 
into each of the cakes one-fourth a pound 
of citron, very fine-sliced. Bake care- 
fully, with gradually increasing heat. 



Praline Cake 

Cream one-half cup of butter, beat in 
one cup of sugar, eight egg-yolks beaten 
light, and, alternately, one-half a cup of 
milk and one cup and three-fourths of 
flour sifted with four teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder; bake in three layer-cake 
pans. 

Boil one-half a cup of water and one cup 
and a half of sugar until the sugar 
thermometer registers 240 degrees F.; 
pour in a fine stream, beating meanwhile, 
upon the whites of two eggs, beaten dry. 

Stir one-half cup of brown sugar over 
a quick fire until it melts and becomes 




PRALINE CAKE 



Jewel Pudding 

Soak a cup of pearl tapioca overnight 
in a pint of water; add in the morning 
another cup of water, in which the pared- 
off yellow rind of a lemon has been boiled, 
and cook in a double boiler until the 
tapioca is clear. Add the juice of one 
lemon, and a cup of rich red currant 
jelly, and let remain in the double boiler 
until the jelly is melted. Then add one- 
half a cup of sugar, or enough to sweeten 
to taste; pour into a deep glass dish, let 
cool, set on ice for two or three hours 
before serving, and garnish with thick 
whipped cream, sweetened, slightly fla- 
vored with nutmeg, and decorate the 
cream with pieces of red and yellow jelly 
and strips of angelica. 



an amber-tinted syrup. Nothing is added 
to the sugar and the stirring must be 
constant. Have ready and stir into this 
caramel two ounces of shelled almonds 
that have been blanched, shredded and 
browned slightly in the oven. Turn upon 
an oiled marble, or agate plate, and let 
become cold. Crush to a powder by 
forcing through the food chopper, using 
the finest knife. Spread the white frostl 
ing between the layers and over the top 
and sides of the cake, sprinkling the 
frosting generously with the praline or. 
caramelized almonds. 



School Lunch Hard Gingerbread 

Warm a quart of molasses, and let di 
solve in it a. pound of butter; add two 
cups of sugar, four tablesrJoonfuls 



ls 



SEASOXABLE-AXD-TESTED RECIPES 



199 



ground ginger, two teaspoonfuls of baking 
soda, dissolved in a little water, and then 
add flour enough to make a stiff dough. 
The dough must be stiff, and it must be 
mixed and worked and pounded with 
strong and enduring arms. Xow roll 
one-fourth an inch thick, cut with a 
jagging-cutter into oblong cakes six by 
three inches, and bake in a quick oven, 
looking out for burning, and store in a tin 
box with sheets of paraffin paper between. 
Half the quantity may be made for a 
small family of school children. The 
help of the father may be needed in the 
mixing of the dough, for success depends 
on its being very thoroughly worked. 

Rich, Apple Custard Pudding 

Line a large pudding dish with a thin- 
rolled, light pie paste. Arrange in the 
dish six sour apples, first pared, cored, 
and steamed until they are tender, but 
have not % lost their shape. Fill their 
cavities with stoned raisins, bits of 
candied peel, candied ginger, and over 
these add sugar enough to fill the chinks. 
Grate over the apples one-half a large 
nutmeg and the yellow rind of a lemon. 
Xow cream one cup of butter; add one 
cup of sugar, six beaten eggs, and one cup 
of hot milk. Cook, stirring meanwhile, 
over hot water until the mixture creams 
the spoon; pour over the apples in the 
baking-dish; bake thirty minutes, or until 
the custard is cooked, and sift crushed and 
powdered macaroons over the top. 

Apple Fritters 

Sift together one cup and one-third of 




APPLE FRITTERS 

flour, one teaspoonful and a half of baking 
powder and one-fourth a teaspoonful of 
salt. Beat one egg; add two-thirds a cup 
of milk and stir into the dry ingredients. 
Pare, core and cut two sour apples into 
small bits and stir these into the batter. 
Drop, by tablespoonfuls, into deep fat, 
and fry to a delicate brown. Sprinkle 
with powdered sugar. 

Tea Braid 

Add one yeast cake to one-fourth a cup 
of scalded milk which has been allowed to 
cool until lukewarm; as soon as blended, 
add one-half a cup of flour, beat and let 
rise one-half hour; add one-fourth a cup of 
melted butter, one-half a cup of sugar, one 
egg, beaten, one-eighth a teaspoonful of 
salt, one cup of scalded-and-cooled milk, 
and flour to make a dough to knead 
(between two and one-half and three 
cups); knead thoroughly and set aside in a 
warm place to rise. When light and 
doubled in bulk divide into three pieces 
of equal size, and roll and stretch these 
pieces into uniform length; then braid. 
Place in a buttered dripping pan; cover 
and let rise in a warm temperature; 




TEA BRATD 



200 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




FILLED COOKIES 



brush over with yolk of egg, beaten and 
diluted with cold water; sprinkle with 
blanched-and-chopped almonds and bake 
one-half an hour. 

Filled Cookies 

Cream one-half a cup of butter, beat in 
one cup of sugar, two eggs beaten light, 
two tablespoonfuls of milk, two cups and 
one-half of flour sifted with two tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder. Mix, using 
more flour if necessary, to make a dough 
that can be handled; let chill and roll into 
a thin sheet; cut out with a round cutter; 
bake in a hot oven to a light straw color. 

Moisten one tablespoonful of corn- 
starch in a little cold water and stir into 
one-half a cup of boiling water; let boil 
two minutes, then cook over hot water 
(double boiler) ten minutes; add one tea- 
spoonful of butter and one cup of sugar; 
remove from fire; beat in at once the 
yolks of two eggs. When blended, stir in 
the juice of half a lemon; let chill; spread 
one generous teaspoonful in the center of 
one-half the cookies; in the remaining 
cookies make openings, using a thimble, 
and place these above the cookies that 
have been spread with the lemon filling. 



Maple Ice Cream with Pecan 
Meats 

Beat the yolks of four eggs; add one 
cup and one-half of maple syrup; turn 
into a double boiler and cook over hot 
water until beginning to thicken; add one 
pint of heavy cream and one-fourth a pound 
of pecan nut meats chopped fine. Freeze, 
using one part salt to three parts ice. 

Citrous Fruits and Pineapple 
Marmalade 

Put through the food chopper two small 
oranges, two small lemons, and one large 
grapefruit, after first dividing in fourths 
or eighths and removing the seeds. 
Measure, and add three times the volume 
of water. Add a quart can of shredded 
pineapple; let heat very slowly to boil- 
ing, and stand overnight in the fireless 
cooker, or covered in a warm place. In 
the morning add four pounds of sugar, and 
cook from one to two hours, or until the 
mixture jells, then pour into glasses. 
This marmalade is a pretty amber color. 

Moulded Carrots 

Scrape two pounds of carrots; remove 




■■■■■ 



MAPLE ICE CREAM WITH PECAN MEATS 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



201 



tops and tails, cut in quarters, length- 
wise, and cook (or steam) until they are 
very soft, almost mushy. Add while hot, 
after draining and mashing, one cup of 
heavy cream, three tablespoonfuls of 
butter, two teaspoonfuls of salt, a pinch 
of cayenne, or one-half a teaspoonful of 
paprika, two teaspoonfuls of onion 
juice, and one or two beaten eggs. Put 
the mixture in a well-greased dish, and 
bake in a slow oven until hot throughout. 
Unmould on a platter, and garnish with 
fine-chopped parsley on top, and sprigs of 
parsley around the edge. 

Dutch Ollycoeks 

Cream one cup of butter; add one cup 
and one-half of sugar, and beat the 
mixture until white and light. Add, 
alternately, one pint of milk, to which the 
beaten yolks of six eggs have been added, 
and flour enough to make a thick batter. 
Beat in the stiff-beaten whites of the 
eggs, and by means of sifting and mixing 
add enough flour to make a soft dough. 
It may take three or more pints of flour in 
all. Roll half an inch thick, cut in 
rounds three inches and one-half in 
diameter, place in the centers of each 
round four or five raisins, dipped in 
melted currant jelly, and sprinkled with 
cinnamon; draw up the edges around the 
fruit, moisten, and pinch closely together, 
and fry in deep fat like doughnuts. Dust 
with powdered sugar, and use hot or cold. 
They will keep for a good while in a 
stone jar. 

Raised Cornmeal Bread 

Measure three-fourths a cup of yellow 
cornmeal; mix with one tablespoonful of 
sugar, one teaspoonful and one-half of 
salt, and add to the mixture one table- 
spoonful of shortening. Pour over the 
•whole one cup and one-fourth of rich 



milk, and stir all together; heat over the 
fire to boiling point, stirring carefully, 
then cook in a double boiler for twenty 
minutes. Let cool to lukewarm; add one- 
fourth a cake of compressed yeast, blended 
with one-fourth a cup of water; and mix 
into the batter, one-third at a time, two 
cups and one-fourth of flour. This should 
make a very stiff dough, which must be 
thoroughly kneaded. The stiffness of 
the dough, and the very thorough knead- 
ing are essential to success, otherwise the 
loaf, when baked, will be coarse and 
moist. Let rise until double in bulk; 
then knead again, shape into one large 
loaf or two small, and let rise in 
greased-and-floured pans until the bulk is 
again doubled, and somewhat more than 
doubled, for the bread will not rise after 
being put into the oven. Bake for three- 
quarters to one hour. One-half a cup of 
chopped prunes may be added during the 
first kneading if desired. 

Lafayette Ginger Balls 

(Lafayette-Marne Day, September 6) 
Cream one-half a pound, each, of 
butter and sugar, and beat into this two 
cups of warmed molasses. Add two 
beaten eggs, one cup of sour cream, two 
teaspoonfuls of baking-soda, dissolved in 
a little hot water, two tablespoonfuls, 
each, of powdered cloves anr 1 cinnamon, 
two tablespoonfuls and one-half of ground 
ginger, the juice of one orange and one 
lemon, and one pound and one-half of 
sifted flour. Beat all very thoroughly for 
at least five minutes, then pour into round 
moulds, like those used for pop-overs or 
gems, first greasing them, and bake in a 
moderate oven until well puffed up and 
firm to the touch. They may be iced 
with a little chocolate icing if desired. 

{Reprinted to correct manifest error in quantity 
of ginger ingredient — Editor. ) 




Seasonable Menus for Week in October 



< 

X 



< 

O 



< 

Q 
in 
W 
& 
H 



a 

H 



Breakfast 

Stewed Pears with Corn Flakes 

Bacon Omelet 

Graham Toast 

Coffee 

Dinner 

Crown of Lamb with Saratoga Potatoes 

and Peas 

Boiled Lima Beans 

Apple-and-Lettuce Salad 

Jewel Pudding 

Black Coffee 

Supper 

Oyster Rabbit 

Dutch Ollycoeks 

Buttermilk 



Breakfast 

Casaba Melon 

Cream of Wheat with Figs, Thin Cream 

Smoked Bloaters Steamed Potatoes 

Graham Puffs 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Anglo-Indian Mulligatawny Soup 

Cheese-and-Potato Croquettes 

Orange Salad 

Raisin Buns 

Tea or Milk 

Dinner 

Savory Stew of Domestic Duck and Oysters 

Candied Sweet Potatoes 

Boiled Rice 

Lemon Pie 

Coffee 



3 

o 

x 

o 
> 



Breakfast 

Oranges 

Malted Breakfast Food, Milk 

Meat Cakes with Sliced Tomatoes 

Baker's Rolls, Crisped in Oven 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Stuffed Pork Tenderloin 

Apple Sauce 

Boiled Hominy 

Steamed Figs with Cream 

Tea or Milk 

Dinner 

Planked Veal Cutlets 

Boiled Potatoes 

Tinabales of Spinach and Egg 

Raisin Gingerbread and Whipped Cream 



Breakfast 

Grapefruit 

Gluten Grits, Cream 

Duck-and-Sweet Potato Hash 

Wholewheat Muffins 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Tomato Omelet 

Riced Potatoes 

Chopped Olives and Celery with French 

Dressing 

Harrison Cake 

Tea or Milk 

Dinner 

Casserole of Beef Shank, Onions, and Potatoes 

Jellied Beets 

Marshmallow Pudding 

Coffee 



x 



> 
Hi 



Breakfast 

Grapes 

Rolled Oats, Rich Milk 

Ham-and-Liver Sauteed 

Raised Date Bread 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Frigadel of Veal 

Cress-and-Cream Cheese Salad 

Sliced Oranges with Soft Custard 

Fruit Cookies 

Tea or Milk 

Dinner 

Beef Kidney Ragout 

Baked White Potatoes 

Moulded Carrots 

Hearts of Lettuce with Russian Dressing 

Tutti-Frutti Ice Cream 



Breakfast 

Stewed Seckel Pears 

Yellow Cornmeal Mush, Top Milk 

Broiled Salmon Steaks 

Dry Toast with Marmalade 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Potage Blanc aux Xoix 

Baked Eggplant 

Tomato Salad 

Grapes 

Tea or Milk 

Dinner 

Black Bass with Tomato 

Hot Cabbage Slaw 

Mashed Potatoes 

Rich Apple Custard Pudding 

Coffee 









Breakfast 

Oranges 

Barley Crystals, Top Milk 

Lamb Chops with Rashers 

of Bacon 

Creamed Potatoes 

Steamed Brown Bread 

Coffee 



Luncheon 

Maryland Fish Chowder 

Apple Salad in Salad Rolls 

Cinnamon Tovtst 

Tea or Milk 

202 



Dinner 

Meat-and-Potato Pie 

Moulded Carrots 

Bailed Greens 

Chocolate Cream Pie 

with Melted Quince Jellj 

Coffee 



Menus for Special Occasions in October 

BASKET LUNCHES FOR GRAMMAR SCHOOL 

I 

Sliced Veal Loaf with Hearts of Lettuce 

Raisin Bread and Butter 

Jellied Apple 

Hot Cocoa in Thermos Bottle 

II 

Chicken-and-Ham Sandwich Boston Brown Bread 

Cup Custard Orange 

Milk Water Thin Crackers 

III 

Small Mould of Jellied Meat 

Crusty Rolls, Buttered 

Few Sticks of Celery 

Grapes 

Hot Malted Milk in Thermos Bottle 

IV 

Individual Meat-and-Potato Pie 

Quince Jelly and Graham Bread Sandwich 

Nuts and Raisins 

Fruitade, cold 



Hot Chicken Soup in Thermos Bottle 

Cold, Broiled Oysters-and-Lettuce Sandwiches 

Raisin Gingerbread 

Apples 



HALLOWE'EN DINNER 

Black Bean Soup Croutons 

Fish Timbales Sliced Cucumbers 

Parker House Rolls 



Roast Long Island Duckling Jelly Sauce 

Stewed Okra Candied Sweet Potatoes Creamed Celery 

Chocolate Ice Cream, moulded in witch form 
Lady Fingers Coffee 

Nuts Apples Grapes 



OCTOBER COMPANY LUNCHEON 

Jellied Chicken Bouillon 
Saltines 



Timbales of Flounder, Hollandaise Sauce 

Pickled Limes 

Crusty Rolls 

Radish Roses Curled Celery Salted Pecans 

Crown-of-Veal Chops 
Rice Croquettes Spinach with Egg Baked Tomatoes. 

Salad of Ripe Olives and Cream Cheese in Apple Cups 
Green Mayonnaise Dressing Saltines 

Baked Winter Pears, Lemon Sauce 

Bisque Ice Cream Rasin Pound Cake 

Coffee 



Bonbons Candied Ginger 

203 



The Good Cook 

By Caroline Rosenthal 



Dinner Time. 
Dining-room in the home of 
John Clerky, in a little, suburban 
town, where he bought a small house, 
with a garden, hoping to enjoy fresh 
vegetables daily. 

John (somewhat impatiently, to his 
wife, Lillian, as he stops reading his 
newspaper) : Are we ever going to have 
supper, Lillian? 

Lillian (angrily, as she removes her 
hat and coat) : You haven't married a 
cook! Let me get my things off. Every- 
thing will be ready in a minute — ■ 

(She leaves the room, going into the 
kitchen, while John, resignedly, resumes 
reading his newspaper. Almost immedi- 
ately, Lillian returns, carrying a large 
kitchen tray containing "delicacies" from 
the delicatessen store: potato salad, 
tomato with mayonnaise, can of sardines, 
can of salmon, potato chips, Uneeda 
biscuits, rolls and coffee.) 

John (drily, as Lillian places this "all 
ready prepared" meal on the table) : I 
see that you are right — I didn't marry a 
cook — I married a can-opener! 

And thus started the usual evening 
battle, which makes the life of John 
Clerky anything but pleasant; and at 
thirty-five years of age he is an old 
•dyspeptic, taking all kinds of pills and 
enemata and spending a large part of his 
income for doctors and medicines. 

Poor John Clerky is getting worse 
every day, and finally is told that he has 
an ulcer of the stomach and is advised 
to consult a surgeon. The surgeon, 
having uncommonly good sense, ques- 
tions him about his mode of living, what 



and how he eats; after a thorough ex- 
amination, says: "Yes, Mr. John Clerky, 
you have an ulcer — a big one, but it is 
not in your stomach, vet — it is in vour 
home — your wife!" 

■ 

Dinner Time. 

Dining-room in the home of Jack 
Clerky, John's brother, who lives in an 
apartment in Manhattan. 

Jack Clerky sits in the dining-room, 
reading his newspaper, sniffs, and calls: 

Emily, when do we eat? This smell 
of rosemarine makes me hungry! 

Emily (from the kitchen) : In a few 
minutes, dear, everything will be ready. 

(Jack sniffs again, satisfied; resumes 
reading his newspaper as the perfume of 
rosemarine blended with roast lamb 
diffuses into the little dining-room. A 
cheerful, neat woman brings in a steam- 
ing platter containing well-cooked roast 
lamb, with golden-brown potatoes, onions 
and toast, which she places before Jack 
as he draws up to the table. He starts to 
serve as his wife leaves the room and 
returns with delicious looking French 
toast and tea.) 

Jack: Gee, it smells good and looks 
good. 

And the two start chatting happily and 
make cheerful plans as to how they will 
spend the evening. At thirty-seven Jack 
Clerkv is healthv, looks well and enjovs 
life. 

Does Mrs. Jack Clerky slave in order 
to prepare a good meal for her husband, 
or is she extravagant? No, all in all, 
she spends less money than Mrs. John 
Clerky and the actual work of preparing 



!04 



THE GOOD COOK 



205 



her dinner consumes about half an hour. 

Why should not every woman be like 
Mrs. Jack Clerky and, without drudgery 
and without being extravagant, prepare 
an attractive, healthful, inexpensive din- 
ner? 

With this series of articles we aim to 
make more women like Mrs. Jack 
Clerky, bearing in mind always the im- 
portance of pleasing the taste, serving 
food attractively, and of cheerful sur- 
roundings, and to offset the tendency of 
the woman of today to become a "can- 
opener" or a restaurant habitue. 

Restaurants, which are run for profit, 
will never be good substitutes for the 
good, well-prepared family dinner, and 
although we hear a great deal about 
modern views on how to eat and what to 
eat, so much so that a new science — ■ 
Dietetics — has been created, we still 
believe that the good cook is the best 
dietitian and constitutes one of the most 
important elements of health and happi- 
ness. 

The proper preparation and cooking of 
food is of great importance; it aims to 
retain and to develop the natural aroma 
and flavor of the foodstuffs and make 
them more absorbable. Hunger may 
be purely physiological, but appetite 
is a more complex phenomena and to 
make our highly civilized man and 
woman enjoy food we need tempting 
dishes. Appetite is the desire or in- 
clination to eat and the mere sight or 
smell of food or the memory of appetizing 
food awakens an appetite for it. 

Some points in the art of preparing and 
serving food are essential. One of the 
greatest mistakes is the tendency to be 
too scientific; by this we do not mean that 
science should be disregarded, but we do 
mean that the so-called science should not 
forget that people have been eating for 
thousands of years and that there are 
peculiarities of human races and in- 
dividuals which science does not explain 
and science is far from having spoken 
the last word about dietetics. What is 
considered the scientific application of 



some principle, today, if applied a year 
from now, may be found to be so wrong 
as to be considered almost criminal. If 
we should go back only a few years and 
reason scientifically, as the scientists of 
those days were reasoning, people would 
think that we are trying to make a 
mockery of science. However, we shall 
return to the point of the scientific diets 
advised in the past to show that history 
should teach us not to be # too scientifi- 
cally positive nowadays, and, for the 
present, we will give some examples of 
scientific uncertainty of the present day. 
Alcohol is considered by some scientists to 
be dangerous to life, to impair digestion, 
and what not; other scientists think that 
alcohol is not harmful, in fact, they 
think it is even necessary. In everyday 
life, in every climate, and in every 
country, we see people who are bright — 
possibly geniuses — - healthful, have lived 
a long life and yet used alcohol to an 
extent that would be called not moder- 
ate, while others, who were equally 
bright — ■ possibly geniuses — healthful, 
and lived a long life, were completely 
abstemious. 

Another example: If we should take to 
China an American woman, born and 
reared in America, and make her live on 
the food on which a Chinese woman of 
the same station in life lives in China, her 
health would be impaired; maybe some 
of the food would even prove poisonous; 
the same thing would happen to a Chinese 
woman brought to America and forced to 
live on the food to which the American 
woman is accustomed. The Chinese 
food, which gives health and strength to 
the Chinese woman, is dangerous to the 
American; the American food, which 
gives health and strength to the American 
woman, is harmful to the Chinese. Can 
any one state that the Chinese or Ameri- 
can food is improperly prepared or im- 
properly selected? No, we have to 
think of the difference created by thou- 
sands of years of adaptation; not simply 
of calories, vitamines, etc. We have to 
realize that thousands of vears have 



206 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



created special conditions by which each 
race adapts itself to certain kinds of 
food and we see how unscientific it would 
be to simply speak of calories and 
vitamines. 

Speaking of calories, food should not 
be prepared exclusively with the idea of 
how many calories we introduce into our 
stomachs, but mainly how many calories 
that peculiar foodstuff will produce when 
introduced into each individual's system. 
Let us take a practical example: 

Two eggs — ■ a raw egg and a soft or 
hard-boiled egg — 'both contain the same 
amount of calories. The raw egg may 
be thought to contain, in addition, some 
vitamines which would be destroyed in 
the soft or hard-boiled egg, or the action 
of which would be lessened by the 
process of boiling. A raw egg is not ab- 
sorbed as completely as a boiled egg, be- 
cause it is passed out of the stomach and 
through the intestine much more quickly 
than the boiled egg, and its constituents 
are not completely prepared for digestion 
so that only a portion of that is absorbed, 
while the boiled egg remains longer in the 
stomach and its constituents are more 
thoroughly prepared for digestion, so 
that a boiled egg is more nourishing than 
a raw egg. 

Another instance: An ordinary butter 
cake, let us suppose, contains enough 
grain to produce one hundred calories, 
the same amount as a piece of bread or 
toast containing the same amount of 
wheat. What the system absorbs and 
assimilates by the introduction of the 
one hundred calories contained in the 
toast, or bread, is much more than what 
the system assimilates, if the same wheat 
is introduced in the form of butter 
cakes, because, being practically all 
unassimilable dough, a great portion is 
eliminated instead of being assimilated. 

Vitamines and digestibility of food. 
Everybody has read so much about 
vitamines that it might be well to give a 
practical idea of what should be under- 
stood by this term. Vitamines are so 
called because scientists do not reallv 



know what they are and gave the general 
word of vitamines — ■ that is, substances 
necessary to life — as the savage made 
a god of lightning and of earthquakes, 
because he did not understand them. 
Vitamines, however, are thought to be 
substances that are absolutely indis- 
pensable to maintain life, that is, if the 
foodstuffs are deprived of vitamines they 
cannot maintain life. We wish to call 
the attention of readers to this fact, 
because it is in such a strong contrast to 
what the scientists of only a few years ago 
used to state when the calorie theory 
was brought forward and people were 
fed scientifically only on the theory that 
so many calories were necessary. The 
dream of the scientist of those days was 
to find the minimum amount of foodstuff 
that would give the required calories, the 
ideal being small pills made out of some 
chemicals, which would supply all the 
necessary calories and abolish the "use- 
less stomach and the more useless 
intestine" with their unpleasant func- 
tions. We insist on this point because 
at the beginning we stated that we can- 
not be ultra-scientific in the preparation 
of food, but we have to cling to customs 
and habits created by centuries of adapta- 
tions, harmonizing them with scientifi- 
cally proven facts. To come back to 
vitamines, what are they? As Doctor 
Soresi explained so plainly in one of his 
brilliant lectures, vitamines can be com- 
pared to kindling (wood, matches, paper, 
etc.) used to start a fire; the ordinary 
foodstuff can be compared to hard coal or 
big logs. One could have all the hard 
coal or logs but would be unable to raise 
a single calorie out of the huge mountain 
of coal unless he had some kindling to 
start the fire. And this applies to food- 
stuffs also. Unless in the foodstuff there 
is present some matter that can start the 
fire, the foodstuff cannot be utilized by 
the system. The vitamines are the 
kindling necessary to start the fire. At 
least, this is the present-day opinion, 
which, however, is not accepted by all 
scientists and we would not be surprise( 






THE GOOD COOK 



207 



to see the whole theory of vitamines 
crumble to pieces or only a small part of 
it accepted later as really scientific. 

Digestibility. It is often said that 
some foodstuff is very digestible, while 
other foodstuff is indigestible, and on this 
reasoning some foodstuffs are discarded 
completely or partially, while others are 
in great demand. The consequence of 
this reasoning is that people who eat only 
"digestible food" are not very healthy and 
strong. How can this be explained? 
The words "digestible" and "indigestible" 
do not mean that a certain kind of food 
can be digested while another cannot be 
digested; generally speaking it is only a 
sensation that people feel after eating 
different foodstuffs. "Let us again take 
the example of a raw and a boiled egg. 
Every one will say that a raw egg can be 
digested more easily than a boiled egg, 
whether taken plain or prepared as an 
eggnog. It is not that the raw egg is 
more digestible; it is that the raw egg 
passes out of the stomach and through 
the intestine much more quickly than the 
boiled egg, giving a feeling of lightness, 
which does not mean, however, that the 
whole egg has been digested completely, 
as said before. 

Digestion is a very complex act, which 
does not limit itself to the stomach, but 
starts in the stomach and is continued 
down the twenty-four feet of intestine 
that constitute the intestinal tract. How- 
ever, the stomach is the only part of the 
gastro-intestinal tract, which gives, gen- 
erally speaking, a sensation of being full 
or empty, so that people attribute the 
feeling of digestibility, or not, to the con- 
dition of emptiness or fulness of their 
stomach. Naturally, the so-called in- 
digestible foodstuff is the foodstuff that 
remains longer in the stomach, where it is 
elaborated and prepared for further 
digestion. Let us take this as an ex- 
ample: A person introduces into the 
stomach a pound of water, of milk, or of 
meat. The pound of water will give 
practically no sensation at all, because in 
a comparatively few minutes it leaves the 



stomach, which, therefore, gives the 
sensation of emptiness; the pound of 
milk has to undergo certain changes in 
the stomach and will remain in it a 
longer time, therefore giving a more 
marked sensation of fulness than water; 
the pound of meat gives a terrible sensa- 
tion of fulness, because it requires 
many hours before it passes from the 
stomach into the intestine, besides the 
fact that during the time that the meat 
had to remain in the stomach a great 
amount of fluid has to be secreted by the 
stomach itself, gas forms, the conse- 
quence being a feeling of fulness giving 
rise, perhaps, to a feeling of indigestion 
which might be so severe as to require 
relief. All this does not mean that the 
water is more digestible than the meat, 
or that the meat is indigestible. It 
means that the amount of meat put in 
the stomach was excessive, because meat, 
in order to be absorbed and digested, re- 
quires a lengthy process while fluids are 
passed out of the stomach very rapidly, 
only the solid parts of any fluid, as, for 
instance, of the milk, remaining in the 
stomach a longer time. Naturally this 
solid part is very small when compared 
to the whole amount of the milk intro- 
duced. If the same amount of meat, 
corresponding to the solid part of the 
milk, had been introduced into the 
stomach, the meat would not have given 
rise to any unpleasant feeling or sensa- 
tion of fulness. If we could compare the 
function of the gastro-intestinal tract to 
something very ordinary and common in 
life, we could compare it to a furnace. 
Each furnace has to use a special kind of 
fuel, and after the special kind of fuel is 
selected that fuel has to be put in the 
furnace in certain quantities; the fire in 
the best furnace may be smothered com- 
pletely by overfilling, or by putting in 
coal or logs that are too large. More- 
over, on a cold winter's day, a furnace will 
require more coal than on a hot summer's 
day. The same thing happens with the 
stomach. 

(Continued in November 



Can Opening 

By a Can Opener 



LIKE millions of other families, we 
live from can to mouth. Some- 
times it is from choice, but more 
often it is from necessity. Our country 
cousins, with their farms and truckgardens, 
can put up enough vegetables and fruits in 
the summer to last them well through the 
winter, but the vegetables the city 
dweller is able to raise in his window 
box would not exactly overfeed him. So 
during the winter, when fresh vegetables 
are unobtainable or obtainable only at 
exorbitant prices, we eat our fresh 
vegetables from the can and enjoy them 
very well, thank you. As for fruits, 
they taste mighty good out of a can, 
when they cannot be bought in the mar- 
ket. As a matter of fact, there are many 
canned vegetables and fruits that taste 
better than the fresh articles. They are 
more savory and appetizing. 

Then, too, what modern city house- 
keeper but has her emergency shelf of 
canned goods, all ready for the unexpected 
guest or for the day when she is unable 
or unwilling to go to market? 

But while we all, more or less, eat 
canned goods, who OPENS the cans? 
That is the most important part of all. 
In the majority of cases it is the woman, 
the so-called weaker sex, who needs must 
brandish her tried and untrue can- 
opener and prepare to break down the 
defense, or, in other words, break open 
the tin. It is the female of the species 
who must, perforce, develop a muscle in 
her good right arm in order to success- 
fully do battle with the intricacies of the 
tin can. 

The opening of a tin can is, assuredly, 
a man-sized job, but how many canning 
companies realize that fact? If they do 
realize it, why, then, is the opening of a 
tin can made such a hard task? Why 
is it almost an impossibility to open a 
can without cutting one's hands with the 



sharp can edges or dull can-openers, be- 
sides running the risk of blood poisoning? 
Then, there are one's frocks. Why ruin 
a perfectly good frock, neatly apron- 
covered though it be, because a can. 
with which one is wrestling, slips from 
one's grasp and whirls across the room, 
distributing its contents on the floor, the 
four walls, and, yes, even the ceiling? 
Why cannot some wide-awake fortune- 
hunter invent a can for safely canning 
canned stuff, said can to be made easy of 
access, with a fool-proof opening device? 

The writer, in her experience with 
cans and can-opening, has noticed one 
type of can that is practically self- 
opening. It is a tin in which jam is put 
up. It has a smooth, flat cover, around 
the edge of which is a band which fastens 
it to the can. At one end of the band is 
a little prong. To open the can a fork is 
placed under the prong and the band is 
simply pulled away from the can. The 
cover comes off clean and easy, and the 
contents are firm and unbroken. This 
is a very simple method and is no hard- 
ship at all. Take, by contrast, the can 
in which asparagus or tomatoes are put 
up. This can seems to be of a heavier 
quality than the tin in which con- 
densed milk is canned and, naturally, 
the heavier the tin, the more difficult 
the task of opening the can. 

Can-opening is the bane of the house- 
keeper's existence. Personally, I'd 
rather tackle a mound of dishes to be 
washed, than open two or three cans. It 
is with fear and trembling that I approach 
a can to be opened. There's many a 
slip 'twixt the can and the can-opener, 
and the slips usually slip in the direction 
of the person directing the attack. It 
usually requires several blows to make 
a dent in the can. Then comes the job 
of enlarging the dent to a hole, then 
making the hole large enough so that the 



208 



FLOWER PICTURES 



209 



contents may be removed. Altogether, it 
is far from being a pleasurable operation. 
It is manual labor, slippery labor, and 
labor that women would gladly forego. 

So, you canning experts, bring on a 
safe and sane can, with an easily removed 



cover, and help us to preserve our dis- 
positions in serenity and our lily-white 
hands unmarred. A gold mine awaits 
the inventor of such a can, also the ever- 
lasting gratitude of The Can Openers. 

A. M. 



Flower Pictures 



IN arranging my flowers to beautify 
the various rooms in the home, I 
try to make pictures of the effects, and 
not merely a bouquet. For instance, a 
bunch of yellow and orange marigolds 
looked their best against our rough, 
brown, living-room paper, and so were 
always placed near the wall. 

The lovely cosmos looked dainty in 
the center of the dining table, and here 
1 arranged the tints and shades of one 
predominating color only. Thus, one 
vase would hold lavender, violet, purple, 
and a deep red that caught some purple, 
too. Putting the lighter tints in the 
center, and graduating the colors till the 
deeper shades were at the edge, made a 
wonderful, satisfying picture. 

Pansies look their prettiest when 
placed in a low dish with the variations 
of one color gathered together, or, else, 
the paler colors in one dish and the darker 
shades in another. 

A green bowl against gray wall paper, 
placed on a dark mantel, and full of 
nasturtiums, caused pleased exclama- 
tions from our guests. 

Our dahlias blossomed in a profusion of 
colors and brightened our quiet rooms 
through many weeks. I liked to take one 
large, red and yellow dahlia for the center 
of the vase and build around it, adding 
yellow, orange, plain red and red tipped 
with yellow, and it made a rich effect. 
Using other central colors, I built around 
them in the same way. I found that 
a pink and white gladiolus, tipped with 
almost a purple, seemed most beautiful in 
the middle of a bunch of pinky-purple 
dahlias. 

In the case of white flowers, I liked to 



add one vivid, glowing, colored flower to 
give contrast, and then fringe them with 
a delicate green of fern or leaves. 

To make pictures, of the flowers we 
place in our rooms, means to study the 
color of the wall paper near which the 
flowers are to be placed, and see that the 
vase is suitable for the kind and color of 
the flowers. For instance, carnations 
look lovely in a cut-glass vase, but mari- 
golds and sturdier flowers look better in 
pottery or plain vases. If one has not 
proper vases on hand, it is possible to 
save pickle jars and jam bottles with 
straight, graceful shapes, and paint these 
green or yellow, and almost any flower 
looks well in a vase of these colors. 
Pitchers are often very good for large 
groups of flowers, and every year, when 
lilac time comes again, I get out my 
old-fashioned glass water pitcher, of a 
color that is neither pink, purple nor 
red, but a bit of all three, and when 
filled with lavender and purple lilacs the 
glass catches the reflections and gladdens 
us. One day, I had an armful of jonquils 
given me and could not find anything 
large enough to hold them until I took 
the tall, straight, clear-glass water pitcher, 
with its generous, wide mouth, and the 
cheery jonquils looked quite at home. 

Celia Thaxter spent hours in her big 
living room, arranging her beloved 
flowers in some such way as I have out- 
lined, choosing carefully the right place 
for each vasefuL and making poetry and 
pictures from her exquisite choice of 
colors, until her flowers blessed the 
heart and refreshed the eves of all who 
came. In a small way we, also, can add 
thus to the beautv of life. L. L. r. 




Home Ideas 

_ N and 

L/Conomxes 




Contributions to this department will be gladly received. 

paid for at reasonable rates 



Accepted items will be 



New Ways With Spinach 
— And Others 

IT is an axiom among housewives that 
no dish, however popular, should 
make its appearance too frequently — 
on the same principle as Solomon's in- 
junction to "withdraw thy foot from thy 
neighbor's house, lest he weary of thee 
and so hate thee." But most of us sin oc- 
casionally, as I did when I found myself 
in a land where I could buy, all through 
the winter, beautiful, crisp spinach, at 
from six to nine cents a pound. At 
first we reveled in it, and then suddenly 
found our enthusiasm waning; but spin- 
ach is too valuable a winter food to be 
given up for a whim and I set myself to 
find some new combinations which would 
give us back our old enjoyment, along 
with the iron and salts which our systems 
needed. Here are some of them. 

There are the old ways which every- 
body knows, chopped and served hot with 
butter and vinegar, and hard-boiled eggs, 
for a change, or cold, with salad dressing. 

Then, there are the Continental ways. 
I steamed mine or cooked it in its own 
juice, but the French cook boils her 
spinach for five minutes or so, runs cold 
water over it and then "accommodates" 
it in various ways; sometimes she runs 
it through a sieve, reheats it in a little of 
the juice, and serves it as a thick puree; 
a better method is to chop it, slightly, 
put it into a pan with a good-sized piece 
of butter, sprinkle a spoonful of flour and 
a bit of the juice from the cooking over 
it, stirring gently till it thickens, then 
serving with triangles of bread fried in 
butter; another way — ■ not too popular in 
our family — is to add to the above a 



spoonful of sugar, and an egg beaten with 
a little milk. Sometimes, a grating of 
nutmeg is added. 

In my experimenting, I found that a 
very small change of flavor makes an 
ordinary dish of spinach something quite 
different. A spoonful of very fine- 
chopped onion, added to the usual butter 
and vinegar, was one of the favorites; 
shallots are more delicate and were much 
liked. 

Instead of the butter, I sometimes add 
a slice of bacon, fried crisp and chopped, 
with a bit of the fat. Whenever we have 
boiled ham, I save some of the salty 
broth for use in reheating spinach; in 
this case I use no vinegar. This is a 
favorite dish, the ham flavor seeming to 
have a special affinity for spinach. 

Cold spinach, served as a salad and 
surrounded by a circle of cold, sliced 
tongue, makes a hearty and delicious 
supper dish. 



White, dry beans, cooked with mutton 
are a good combination; and here is an- 
other way with beans: 

Cook white winter beans until nearly 
done, but not too soft. Put a large 
spoonful of butter into a skillet, add a 
thin-sliced onion, and when it is soft stir 
in a spoonful of flour and let it brown; 
add some of the water in which the beans 
were cooked, a bit of thyme and bay- 
leaf, and let cook till it thickens like a 
gravy. Add the beans and let simmer very 
gently for twenty minutes or a half-hour. 



Beets are seldom found on the markets 
in the raw state, as it takes too much fuel 
to cook them according to French 
methods; they are put into a very hot 



210 






HOME IDEAS AXD ECONOMIES 



211 



oven and baked for several hours, al- 
lowed to cool and then baked again the 
following day. The outside is like char- 
coal, and the flesh is verv dark and ex- 
ceedingly sweet, the juice being like a 
thick syrup. They are baked in great 
quantities and retailed by the pound, to 
be used in salads — mostly in connection 
with endive or corn-salad. 



Cauliflower Loaf is a very delicate 

dish and is made as follows: Cook the 

cauliflower until tender and divide into 

quite small bits; make a rather thick 

white sauce and add to it four eggs, the 

whites being beaten stiff and added by 

folding in; put into a buttered mould and 

let steam until firm, and serve with a 

white sauce. Leeks are used in the same 

way and are served at very elegant 

dinners. g. c. h. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Southern Sweet Potatoes 

THE sweet potato was once looked 
upon as a perishable commodity 
of the South, which was hard to keep or 
ship, and was grown only on a small 
scale, principally for home consumption. 
It is now rapidly increasing in importance 
as a food crop, since modern curing 
plants and storage houses have come into 
use. For this reason, there is no reason 
why the sweet potato should not be used 
as commonly as the Irish potato, which 
we use in some form on the table practi- 
cally every day in the year. 

The Southern cook has long been an 
adept in the art of properly preparing 
sweet potatoes in a great variety of ways. 
The following recipes are old favorites, 
that are tried and true, and are given in 
the hope that they may serve a useful 
purpose, for both old friends and new, 
of this palatable and wholesome food. 

Southern Style Sweet Potatoes 

Scrub and pare one-half dozen sweet 
potatoes, cut them into halves, length- 
wise. Put three tablespoonfuls of sugar 
in a frying pan, and, when hot, add the 



potatoes. When potatoes are brown, 
add enough boiling water to cover the 
bottom of the frying pan. Cover and 
cook slowly until the potatoes are tender. 
The water should be nearly all evapor- 
ated when the potatoes are cooked, and 
what remains may be poured over the 
potatoes as a sauce for serving. 

Baked Sweet Potatoes 

Probablv, bakine is the most whole- 
some way of cooking sweet potatoes, as 
some sweetness is lost when they are 
steamed and boiled. Choose smooth, 
medium-sized potatoes, wash them and 
place in a pan. Before putting in the 
oven, brush butter or bacon drippings 
over the top of the potatoes, and cover 
with another pan. Bake until quite 
soft, and serve hot with butter. 

Glazed Sweet Potatoes 

Boil the potatoes until done, but not 
soft. Remove skins and cut potatoes into 
strips; moisten with cream, sprinkle with 
sugar, dot over with butter and bake in a 
shallow pan. Fine served with roast meat. 

Candied Sweet Potatoes 

A favorite Southern dish. Select six 
medium-sized sweet potatoes, and cook 
until just soft in boiling water; cool and 
peel. Slice in quarters and put in layers 
in a baking dish, not packing too closely. 
Make a thin syrup of one cup of brown 
sugar, one cup of hot water, one table- 
spoonful of lemon juice or vinegar, a 
teaspoonful, each, of cinnamon and 
salt, and three tablespoonfuls of butter. 
Pour over the potatoes, put in a moderate 
oven and bake until the potatoes are clear 
and somewhat gummy. Raisins may be 
added while baking, or marshmallows 
just a few minutes before taking from the 

oven. s. L. s. 

^ ~¥ % 

The Value of Keeping an 
Expense Account 

F one is of an analytical turn of mind, 
household account-keeping is fas- 



i 



212 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



cinating, even if ways of reducing ex- 
penses are not its chief purpose. When 
the year's sums have been totaled up you 
look back through the pages of monthly 
sums. Here you find November, per- 
chance, with a total of only $169.42 and 
just preceding it is the larger monthly 
expense of $289.01. Why the big dif- 
ference? you ask. To be sure, there's 
that insurance policy that falls due in the 
earlier month; also, looking under the 
medical expense column, you find a 
dental bill of $40. Again you turn the 
pages. Why the big total in August? 
Plain as day, the solution stands out 
under the Fuel and Light column. 
That's the month in which you ordered 
your year's coal supply. What about 
the large receipts in June? A notation 
in close writing informs you that it was 
then you parted with Charms, your big 
Airedale. 

Fascinating as the analysis is, in our 
family, account-keeping has a further 
purpose than the amusement of seeing 
how the figures total up and the why and 
the wherefore of the large or the small 
expense or returns. There's a real effort 
to make every dollar reach as far as 
possible and to pile up the savings with 
the definite aim of house-building. 

Account-keeping became a habit with 
me in college days, when a personal ex- 
pense record was a part of a course in 
problems in home economics. I carried 
the habit over into my business career, 
and when I took up the duties of house- 
keeping it had become such a decided 
part of my make-up that I suggested to 
Jack that we keep account of our house- 
hold expenses. 

"Why, yes, dear, if you keep the ac- 
counts," Jack acquiesced, sweetly, but in 
a tone of doubt that clearly showed he 
regarded the plan as one of woman's 
whims to which a newlywed husband 
should give consent. 

The second year of our married life has 
just closed and last night, as I turned the 
pages of the account book and pointed 
out to Jack its value, showing that I 



could now figure on quite a definite 
amount for groceries and that I knew at 
once what expenses we must meet during 
certain months, he remarked, "And no 
doubt that will be even more valuable 
when we get in our new home and must 
figure on our monthly payments for home 
building." (For the house is coming 
in part on the monthly payment plan.) 

A perusal of last year's and the pre- 
ceding year's accounts shows gratifyingly 
that the food bills for the two years are 
almost the same, although there is now 
a little girl in our family. This does not 
mean that there has been less to eat, but 
that I have bought more wisely. The 
laundry bill shows that I have had less 
help in this part of my work. There has 
been a reduction in the dry-goods bill, 
which has caused us no real hardship, and 
the corners have been trimmed more 
closely in other respects. All of this 
has come as a result of keeping tab on the 
expenses. 

Here are the totals as they read for the 
year: 
Rent (including water bill) ... .$570.99 

Food 631.27 

Dry goods and personal expense . . 276. 1 1 

Fuel and light 166.00 

Labor and services 21.70' 

Physician and medicine 197.01 

Furniture and furnishings 152.57' 

Books, stationery 38.98 

Charities and church 55.26 

Laundry 38.65 

Amusement, clubs 61.41 

Insurance, taxes 192.17 

Gifts and loans 56.23 

Incidental 70.77 

Investment 800.00 

Total $3,329.12 

Although my husband's noon meals 
and car fares are estimated, the account 
has been so accurately kept that it lacks- 
only $2 of balancing with the receipts. 

b. g. s. 

* * * 

Note contrast in item that follows. 

— Editor.. 



HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES 



213 



A Menu For 65,000 Children at 
$1.95 a Month. Is It Possible? 

IT is strenuous enough to have one set 
of children to care for. Every mother 
knows that. No sooner is one meal 
planned and cooked, than it is time to 
begin thinking about the next. 

What would the busy housewife of 
America do if she had to feed 65,000 
children? And not only feed them, but 
plan a diet that would build them up 
from ghastly little living skeletons into 
normal, lively youngsters, with plump 
cheeks and bright eyes. Added to her 
troubles, she must remember that there 
are at least a hundred thousand more 
youngsters starving, whom there is not 
enough money to aid, so the diet must be 
planned to cost the fewest possible 
pennies, — for pennies mean lives. 

That is the problem which confronted 
the expert dietitian to whom was given 
the task of planning the meals for 65,000 
children in the orphanages of the Near 
East Relief in Armenia, Anatolia, etc. 
The American organization, chartered 
by Congress to help the distress of the 
Levant, is saving these orphans from 
starvation and bringing them up to be 
useful citizens. It feeds them, clothes 
them, and teaches them trades and 
handicrafts, a sort of instruction which 
they take to like ducks to water, being 
naturally industrious and skillful with 
their hands. 

But, alas for the unfortunates who have 
to keep house for such a sizable family! 
Aside from the fact that one must do the 
cooking by wholesale, there is the 
weighty question of what to cook. So 
this problem was turned over to the 
expert dietitian. And she promptly 
planned a scientifically correct diet, by 
which the children could be well-nour- 
ished at a cost for each of just 31.95 a 
month. 

This is her bill-of-fare: For breakfast, 



every morning, bread and cocoa; for 
supper every night, bread, with either 
corn grits and apricots, or rice and 
apricots, or sweetened tea and raisins or 
nuts. For dinner there is more variety: 
every noon, bread, and every noon, 
onions, with either beans and oil, or 
carrots, cabbage, corn grits and oil, or, 
twice a week, actually meat and po- 
tatoes! 

It does not sound like a very exciting 
menu, certainly. Some American chil- 
dren might turn up their fastidious little 
noses at it. But it tastes mighty good 
to these youngsters, who, before they 
were taken into the orphanages, were 
living on the grim edge of starvation, 
keeping the spark of life in them by 
gnawing roots or grass or scraps of 
refuse. And, what is more, the orphans 
nourish exceedingly on it, changing from 
the wan-faced, apathetic, little old men 
and women that they were when first 
taken in, to youngsters so plump, and 
healthy, and full of noise and laughter 
that it would do your heart good to see 
them. 

The only people with any reason to 
complain are the cooks, who are given no 
chance to show their skill with elaborate 
dishes. And even in Armenia, where 
servants come running for the asking, 
delighted with a chance for self-support, 
even there cooks seldom object very 
strenuously that their work is not 

difficult enough! n. e. r. 

* * * 

Baked Corn and Sweet Potatoes 

Slice down six large ears fresh-boiled 
corn, and cut in dice three large, fresh- 
boiled sweet potatoes. Mix these with 
one pint of hot, rich, cream sauce, well 
seasoned. Pour into baking dish, 
sprinkle with bread crumbs and grated 
cheese and brown in the oven. Serve 
hot. This is an excellent main dish for 
luncheon or supper. a. x. m. 



THIS department is for the benefit and free use of our subscribers. Questions relating to recipes, 
and those pertaining to culinary science and domestic economics in general, will be cheerfully 
answered by the editor. Communications for this department must reach us before the first of the 
month preceding that in which the answers are expected to appear. In letters requesting answers 
by mail, please enclose address and stamped envelope. Address queries to Janet M. Hill, Editor. 
American Cookery, 221 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass; 



Query No. 4307. — "Can you give me direc- 
tions for making Ice Cream Cones at home?" 

Homemade Ice Cream Cones 

While we cannot give you the recipe for 
the factory-made cones, we can give you 
instructions for making a home-cooked 
substitute. Roll half sheets of stiff note 
paper, or cut oblongs of stiff paper, meas- 
uring six and one-half by five inches, or 
of very much smaller size, into cones, 
twisting each tight at the bottom, so that 
it will hold its shape. Stuff them with 
soft tissue paper, or crumpled paper 
napkins, or cotton wool, to keep the cones 
from collapsing. Make a plain dough, 
such as you use for hard cookies — the 
dough for ginger snaps might be used — 
cut this into oblongs nearly the size of the 
p?per sheets, then divide the oblongs by 
catting into bias edged halves, and fit 
these around the cones, moistening the 
edges and pressing them together. Bake 
lying on their sides in a hot oven. Or the 
dough may be cut into strips three- 
fourths of an inch wide, and these wound 
around the cones, beginning at the wider 
part and winding towards the narrow end, 
the edges to be moistened and pressed 
flat with the fingers. These cones may 
be. filled with ice cream after they have 
cooled from the oven, or narrow lines of 
frosting may be applied to them by means 
of a pastry tube, or the smaller ones may 
be dipped into fondant, either white or 
colored, before filling with the cream. 



Query Xo. 4308. — "I have eaten many kinds 
of Cinnamon Toast, good and bad. What is the 
right way to make it? How can Scallions or 
Leeks be served otherwise than in a salad? How 
can they be combined with other foods? Is it 
possible to mix milk with vinegar for a salad 
dressing without curdling of the mixture?" 

Cinnamon Toast 

Our way of making Cinnamon Toast — 
which we by no means claim to be the 
only right way — is to toast the slices of 
bread as usual, butter them while hot, 
and then spread over the buttered surface 
a mixture of one part of cinnamon to 
four of sugar, and place the slices in the 
oven or under a gas-flame, until the 
butter sizzles up through the sugar. An- 
other way to make it is to toast only one 
side of the bread, then butter the other 
side rather thickly, and dust the sugar and 
cinnamon mixture over the buttered sur- 
face smoothing it into the butter with pres- 
sure of the knife-blade. Then set the slices, 
buttered side up, in the oven or under the 
gas-flame, until the butter first boils up, 
and later turns a pretty brown. 

Ways of Using Scallions 
and Leeks 

Scallions and leeks can be boiled and 
served in a cream sauce. They are very 
good when combined with escalloped 
tomatoes, potatoes, or fish; with boiled 
greens; with apple sauce, when served as 
a vegetable with pork; with squash and 
other vegetables. 



214 



QUERIES AND ANSWERS 



215 



Milk in S&lad Dressing 

We have never used a mixture of milk 
and vinegar alone to make a salad dress- 
ing, but we have added vinegar to a 
dressing made on a milk basis as follows: 
Blend together four tablespoonfuls of 
flour with one-fourth a teaspoonful, each, 
of salt, mustard, and white pepper, and 
four tablespoonfuls of softened butter. 
Dissolve one tablespoonful of sugar in one 
cup of warm milk; add the flour and 
butter mixture, and stir over fire until 
thick, and until boiling begins. To get 
it smooth at this stage requires careful 
and constant stirring. Add, gradually, 
three-eighths to one-half a cup of vinegar, 
keeping up the stirring, then add two 
well-beaten eggs, and cook until eggs are 
barely set. Beat for awhile until the 
mixture cools somewhat, first setting the 
saucepan into a pan of ice water. 



Query No. 4309. — "I bought some Marsh- 
mallow Pudding at one of our stores in this town 
some time ago. It was very light and fluffy, 
pink in- color, and decorated with whipped 
cream. Can you tell me how it was made?" 

Marshmallow Pudding 

It is not possible for us to tell, or even 
to hazard a guess, regarding a recipe for 
pudding you describe as fluffy and pink, 
for many puddings may be described in 
this way. But we give below two or three 
recipes for marshmallow pudding, all of 
which are good, and, we think, at least two 
of them are novelties. 

I 

Boil one cup and one-half of sugar with 
one-half a cup of water to the soft-ball 
stage, 238 to 240 deg. Fah. Have ready 
one-fourth a pound of marshmallows, 
melted in a double boiler with a table- 
spoonful of water, after first being cut 
into quarters. Mix this with two table- 
spoonfuls of very thick, rich syrup from 
preserved strawberries; add to the syrup, 
and pour the mixture on to the stiff- 
beaten whites of two eggs, beating all the 
while. Continue to beat until it piles up 



stiff. Serve with unsweetened, whipped 
cream. This pudding should retain its 
shape and not run. 

II 

Melt one-half a pound of cut-up marsh- 
mallows with two tablespoonfuls of water 
as directed above. Meantime prepare 
one pint of either orange or lemon-flav- 
ored gelatine jelly, or a raspberry, straw- 
berry, or red currant jelly may be made 
if the pink tint is especially desired. 
While the gelatine is still liquid, add the 
dissolved marshmallows, place the bowl 
in a pan of ice water, and beat vigorously 
with a large Dover beater until the whole 
is thick and fluffy. Pile into glasses, and 
chill before serving. 

Ill 

Into a large mixing-bowl measure one 
cup of sifted strawberry jam, break into it 
the unbeaten whites of two eggs, add one- 
fourth a pound of melted marshmallows, 
and beat the whole until the mixture may 
be piled up without falling. Chill quickly, 
and serve at once. 



Query No. 4310. — "Kindly tell me exactly 
what are Hors d'Oeuvres, and how they should 
be served and eaten. I also want to know how to 
make a syrup from brown sugar for use on pan- 
cakes; I want to know the right proportions and 
how long it should be cooked. Third, I wish a 
recipe for Chicken Loaf." 

Hors d'Oeuvres 

This phrase means something which is 
not part of any regular course at a dinner, 
but is served by itself, yet is not counted 
as one of the courses. The term is 
applied to the varied little relishes which 
appear on the table in pretty dishes, and 
may almost be regarded as part of the 
decoration, for in hints on table decora- 
tion there are usually instructions on how 
to arrange them. These pretty dishes 
contain radishes, olives, salted nuts, bits 
of candied ginger — all sorts of dainty 
"eats." Their service is used to fill the 
gap between the removal of one course 
and the serving of the next, and thus 
occupy the waiting time in a pleasant 



216 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



manner. Usually the dishes are offered 
by one guest to another, and thus passed 
around. The hostess will always give 
the signal by asking the guest at her right 
to pass her one of the dishes. She will 
help herself, offer it to him, and then pass 
it on at her left. This will be the signal 
for the other guests to begin offering the 
hors d'oeuvres to one another, and it 
tends to ease and informality. But at 
very stiff and formal dinners, where the 
number of guests is large, the waitress 
will take one of the dishes from the table, 
place it on a small tray, covered with a 
doiley, and offer it at the left of each 
guest. Since hors d'oeuvres of this kind 
are always "finger foods," they will be 
taken from the dishes with the fingers and 
eaten from the fingers. The debris, such 
as stones from olives, will go on the serv- 
ice plate, or in less formal meals on the 
bread-and-butter plate. 

Pancake Syrup of Sugar and Water 

Measure two cups of sugar and one 
cup and one-half of water, and boil for 
five minutes, counting the time after 
boiling has commenced. The proportions 
given will yield two cups of syrup. Or a 
quart of water and a pound of sugar, 
boiled for twenty minutes, will yield two 
cups and one-half of syrup. It may be 
flavored with lemon juice, etc., after it 
has cooled. 

Chicken Loaf 

Use the proportions for any meat or 
fish loaf, substituting chopped chicken. 
The general rule for a meat, fish, nut, or 
bean loaf calls for one pint of chopped 
meat, either raw or cooked, or a mixture 
of the two; one pint of stale bread, soaked 
in hot water or stock, and the super- 
fluous liquid pressed out, or a cup of 
bread and a cup of mashed potatoes; 
seasoning of one teaspoonful of salt and 
one-half a teaspoonful of pepper, and one 
or two beaten eggs to bind the mixture. 
Shape into a loaf, and bake, or pack into 
a well-greased pan, and bake. When the 
meat is very lean, such as veal, chopped 



bacon fat may be added. Any mixture 
of different meats may be used, and a 
little over or under the given proportions 
makes no great difference. Other season- 
ings, such as onion juice, chopped celery, 
mushrooms, capers, etc., may be added at 
discretion. These loaves do not call for 
an inflexible rule in the proportions of 
ingredients. The housewife enjoys a 
delightful liberty in their making, and can 
think up original combinations and new 
seasonings at will, thus making loaves 
with a touch of difference from those of 
her neighbor. , 

Query No. 4311. — "Why is Soda used so 
much in recipes for chocolate cakes, cookies, etc.? 
Baking powder and soda are used in some 
recipes, and why is this? Why is soda used with 
molasses? 

Is there any way to keep Pimentoes from 
spoiling after they are opened? I find they 
spoil very quickly if they cannot be used in a 
day or two, and I should like to know how they 
may be kept." 

Reasons for Using Soda with 

Chocolate, Molasses, and 

Baking Powder 

There is a small amount of acid present 
in the fat of chocolate, and a little soda 
will neutralize this, and will, some persons 
think, improve the flavor of the cake, 
etc. In molasses there is quite an appre- 
ciable amount of the well-known formic 
acid, and the combination of soda with 
this will serve, to some degree, as a 
leaven, besides removing the taste of the 
formic acid. Soda and baking powder 
are used in the same recipe when there is 
not enough acid present in some other 
ingredient — for instance, sour milk or 
sour cream — to provide a sufficient 
evolution of carbon dioxide to furnish a 
leaven, therefore, baking powder is used 
to help out. 

Pimientoes, to Keep After 
Jar Is Opened 

You might try a brief re-processing, 
leaving the pimientoes right in the jars 
and proceeding as for cold process for five 
or ten minutes. Or you could, of course, 
add salt to the jars, or vinegar, or even 



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217 



AMERICAN ' COOKERY 



convert the pimientoes into a sweet 
pickle. If kept in the cold, or in the 
refrigerator, they ought to keep reasona- 
bly well, for as long as an ordinary 
family might take to consume the jarful. 



Query Xo. 4312 — "How can I make Cherry 
Olives:'- 

Cherry Olives 

We have seen as many as three differ- 
ent forms of a so-called Cherry Olive, or 
Cherry Mock Olive. (1) Green olives 
with the stones removed, stuffed with 
maraschino cherries, or the cherries 
stuffed with stoned olives, in something 
like acorn shape. (2) Ripe olives, dipped 
into red frosting. (3) Ripe cherries, 
packed into jars with two teaspoonfuls of 
salt to each jar, the jars then filled with a 
mixture of equal parts of water and 
vinegar. No cooking is needed, but the 
cherries are not ready for use for three or 
four weeks. 



Query Xo. 4313. — "Will you please inform 
me how I can Cook Apples so that they redden a 
rich, deep red? Is coloring matter used, and if 
so will you tell me what kind, and how to use it?" 

To Redden Apples in Cooking 

Choose apples that yield a red jelly; 
slice them, and pack into a glass or 
earthen baking-dish that can be covered, 
using sugar to taste, but not too much, for 
a good deal of sweetness will be developed 
in the cooking. Now bake in a very slow 
oven, and for a long, long time. Summon 
your patience, and bake, and bake, and 
bake until the apples are a rich, trans- 
lucent, jewel-like red. They may, then, 
be served hot, or allowed to cool, and then 
unmoulded and the mould decorated with 
whipped cream. The red astrachan apple, 
the Mcintosh red, and others which make 
a red jelly will give good results, but it 
takes some practice to get the time and 
temperature right. Yes, artificial color- 
ing, such as cochineal, is sometimes used, 
but we do not like the effect so well; we 
miss the translucencv and the rich flavor 



that comes from the long, long cooking. 

Query No. 4314 — "Please describe a Southern 
Barbecue." 



Southern Barbecue 

(From a Subscriber in Fort Smith, 

Arkansas) 

WE often entertain from twenty to 
twenty-four friends at our subur- 
ban home in the South, at a barbecue. 
For this number a pit is dug on our back 
porch, four feet long by two deep and two 
and one-half wide. The bottom and 
sides of this pit are lined with bricks, the 
ends are left open so that the coals may 
be pulled out if necessary. The side walls 
come over the top of the pit, thus forming 
a hold for the broiler. Our broiler is 
simply a piece of metal lath, that is cut 
the length and width of the pit. The 
fire, which of course is of wood, is started 
at four o'clock, so that by six it may be a 
bed of coals. Then the guests begin to 
arrive, and we wait until the first guests 
assemble before we start the barbecue, so 
that all may take part in the cooking. 
This takes about an hour; we serve infor- 
mally on the lawn, so everything must 
be cooked and eaten before dark over- 
takes us. 

Our barbecues consist of chicken, 
broiling or frying size, thick sirloin steaks, 
chops, and roasts of lamb or mutton. 
The chickens are prepared the day before, 
allowing the smaller ones to remain whole, 
but the larger ones are halved. The 
secret of the barbecue is the sauce with 
which the meat is constantly basted. I 
make this in my kitchen about thirty 
minutes before barbecueing begins, and 
take it, steaming hot, to the pit. Each 
piece of meat is dipped into the sauce 
before being put on the broiler, and with 
an improvised mop wrapped around the 
end of a long stick, each piece is basted 
every minute with the sauce until done. 

A kitchen fork is wired on the end of 
another long stick, and with this the meat 
is turned and re-turned, that it may be 
thoroughly saturated with the sauce. 
Here is where everybody works, espe- 
cially the gentlemen of the party, as it is 
a very hot operation, and each takes his 
or her turn in turning and swabbing the 
meat. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

218 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



* t * * I R X I 1 1 X l « 



tlilXIMll 



X ft * * *. - 




ITS 50 SIMPLE' 




cJELL-0 

^America's most famous dessert 



THE great merit of Jell-O is that it is 
always ready. It is made as easily as 
a cup of tea is brewed. Write for a free 
booklet describing a wide variety of uses. 

7kc Genesee Pure Food Company. LeRoy, New York 

Canadian factory at Bridfeburo; Ontario. 



■ t ■» « Mini 



Ruv advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 

91Q 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



The following is the sauce, a very hot 
one with the pepper and condiments 
mentioned. For eighteen chickens there 
will be needed: 



1 ounce Worcestershire 

sauce 
1 ounce Tabasco sauce 
1 ounce Chili powder 
1 ounce black pepper 
1 ounce paprika 
1 clove of garlic 
1 medium onion 



2 pounds butter 

1 cup vinegar 

5 gallon water 

1 kitchen spoonful of 

dry mustard 
1 teaspoonful of red 

pepper 
1 ounce of sugar 
1 ounce of salt 

All these are boiled slowly in a large 
preserving kettle for thirty minutes. 

Doesn't this sound fierce? But the 
sauce must be hot to be good, and here is 
the secret why barbecueing is so deli- 
ciouslv different from any other kind of 
broiling known. 

\\ ith the meats we usually serve corn 
on the cob, boiled in the kitchen. We 
have sometimes roasted it in the coals by 
the pit, but we found it too "messy" to 
eat in that way. We also serve cottage 
cheese, potato salad, tomatoes, sliced with 
green peppers and white onions, hot rolls, 
buttermilk, sweet milk, near beer, water- 




HOSE SUPPORTERS 



Equipped with our 
famous Oblong ALL- 
Rubber Button clasps, 
hold the stockings in 
place securely — and 
without injury to the 
most delicate silk 
fabric. 



Velvet Grip Hose Supporters 
For ALL the Family 

Are Sold Everywhere 
Made by the George Frost Company, Boston 




melons, and cantaloupes. Everything is 
delightfully informal, served from tables 
on the lawn in self-service fashion, the 
guests sitting on the grass, or chairs, or 
anywhere they choose, and the silver, 
dishes, and other food being brought out 
as the barbecue nears completion. 



Consider the Lilies 

{Continued from page 180) 

years and am preaching for the first time. 

Many of my flower containers are too 
small and intimate for church-going. 
They are single rose holders of plain, 
thin glass, for desk' or bureau. Or 
small, plate-like dishes with a moonstone 
luster on which a tiny group of gold- 
hearted crocus may transplant their 
hardihood. Or gray Chinese rice bowls 
lined with turquoise, in which two 
stalks of Florentine iris love to poise 
themselves before the dim hall mirror. 
Or precious gilded crystal as old-fashioned 
as the lark-spur presently to riot over 
their demurely banded brims. Or silver 
chalices in which impetuous nasturtiums 
may slake their fires. Or strange-shaped 
blue Canton, bringing ships and birds 
and turrets to gaze on the delicate 
pirouettings of Shirley poppies. All 
these are well-beloved objects awaiting 
their season and their flower mates 
again. The lower shelf has two Canti- 
gali water jars which cool the porch with 
green maple boughs in July and warm 
the hall with gold ones in October. 
Also, certain straight-sided, brownly 
tarnished copper pots around which 
repousse Damascus camels march for- 
ever, until the challenge of tiger-lilies 
calls them into service once more. 

But I perceive myself now on dangerous 
ground, and bring my little sermon to a 
swift, "Finally, my dear committees !" 
It will be a disastrous boomerang if my 
words have searched your hearts, exposed 
your poverties, roused your enthusiasms 
for better things wherewith to garnish 
the Lord's house to this end that presently 
. . . ah, the dreaded voice of the devil 
telephone, subdued to a wheedling croon, 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

220 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




Eatmor 
Cranberries 



X MMWUMU 



immm 



The Finest Relish with Beef 
as well as Poultry 

Nature's own condiment — the tonic tang of health- 
giving cranberries gives zest to the appetite, and a 
piquant flavor to meats — hot or cold. 

When cooked with pot-roast or cheaper cuts of 
meats cranberries make the meat tender and de- 
licious. (See recipe folder for this and other recipes.) 

8 lbs. cranberries and 2% lbs. of sugar make 10 tumblers of 
beautiful clear jelly. Try this recipe: — 

Cranberry Jelly 

Cook until soft the desired quantity of cranberries with lh pints of 
water for each two quarts of berries. Strain the juice through a 
jelly bag. 

Measure the juice and heat it to the boiling point. Add one cup 
of sugar for every two cups of juice; stir until the sugar is dis- 
solved; boil briskly for five minutes; skim, and pour into glass 
tumblers, porcelain or crockery molds. 

Always cook cranberries in porcelain-lined, en- 
ameled or aluminum utensils. 

# # 

A recipe folder, containing many ways to use and 
preserve cranberries, *will be sent free on request. 

For quality and economy specify "Eatmor" Cranberriet 
American Cranberjy Exchange, 90 West Broadway, New York City 





Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

221 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




(Do oatmeals differ 

as widely as flowers ? 

YOU wouldn't telephone your florist and 
say: "Send me a dozen flowers." 

Yet that is almost the same as asking 
your grocer to send you "a package of 
oats." There is as much difference be- 
tween different brands of oats as between 
daisies and roses. 

Slow toasting in the old-fashioned way 
over coal fires makes H-0 golden brown in 
color and gives that delicious H-0 aroma 
and flavor, and — 

Steam-cooking under high pressure 
breaks down the starch cells and dextrin- 
izes the starch, making H-0 digestible and 
nourishing— that's why it is different 
from ordinary priced oats. 

H-0 digests better, makes children 
healthy and strong, and is perfect food for 
every one. 

THE H-0 CEREAL COMPANY, Inc. 
Buffalo, N.Y., and Ayr, Canada 



Packed in new improved label-wrapped 
and corner-sealed package 




Steam Cooked 
/^HEALTH 



OATS 



Pan Toasted 
/-FLAVOF 



shall be heard saying, "Our feelings 
weren't hurt a bit, not the least little 
bit by your splendid article. You are 
absolutely right. Now couldn't we bor- 
row some of your flower vases? If we 
send over for them ourselves? They 
sound exactly what we need, and you 
seem so delightfully interested." 

Nay, nay, beloved committees! For 
the prosperity of your pilgrim souls, 
pray work out your own salvations. 



55 



Omelet 
— Ome- 






pies, or 



None-too-well-Understood Terms 

{Continued from Aug.-Sept.) 

"Mironton"— Cold, boiled meat, which 
has been hashed up and warmed over, 
and is being served in pleasing form. 
"Marrons" — Chestnuts. 
"Menu" — A bill of fare. 
"Moru" — Salt cod. 
"Neige" — ■ Snow. 
"A la Neige" — ■ Like snow. 
"Noel" — Christmas. 
"Noir" — Black. 
"Omelette aux Fines Herbs" 
with fine, savory herbs. 

"Omelette aux Champignons 
let with mushrooms. 

"Pate" — 'A batter, a dough. 
"Pates" — Small individual 
patties of fish, meat, or fruits. 

"Creme Panachees" — Variegated ic 
cream. 

"Poulet" — A chicken. 
"A la poulette" — Something to which 
eggs have been added. 
"Pain" — Bread. 

"Panade" — Bread and milk, cooked t 
a smooth paste. 

"Pate de Fois Gras" — A rich paste/ 
made of fat geese livers. 

"Praline" — A Creole sweet, made of 
pecan nuts and sugar, or cocoanut and 
sugar. 

"Piment" — Pepper. 

"Piquante" — A highly flavored sauce. 

"Pommes" — Apples. 

"Pommes de Terre" — Potatoes. 

"Potage" — Soup. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitute 

222 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




<r By <^\frs. c $\rio?c 



3 tart apples 

Yi. cup nut meats 



"For the jovial season when grapes abound 
And mellow apples strew the ground." 

THE other day I happened to be at the opening exercises of one of our district schools. It 
was a pretty rite — this welcoming of the "season of mists and mellow fruitfulness." And 
as one gingham-clad youngster stood up to "say her piece" about grapes and apples, I thought 
to myself: 

"They have appropriate exercises to commemorate the season at the schools, why not co- 
operate with the mothers of these children and suggest to them recipes of appropriate and 
seasonable things to eat at home. And so, I suggest two dishes — a Dessert and a Salad — 
especially good for October — one made from grapes and the other of apples and celery, and in 
my books you will find many more recipes." 

GRAPE JUICE SOUFFLE 

1 envelope Knox Sparkling Gelatine I pint grape juice, sweetened % cup heavy_cream 

1 tablespoonful lemon juice Whites of four eggs 

Soak gelatine in grape and lemon juice ten minutes, then heat in double boiler until gelatine has dissolved. Strain 
into bowl set in saucepan containing ice water, and when mixture begins to thicken, fold in whites of eggs beaten 
until stiff. Half fill individual mold, first dipped in cold water, with mixture. To remainder add cream, beaten 
until stiff. Fill molds with cream mixture, and chill. Remove from molds to serving dish, and garnish with 
whipped cream (sweetened and flavored with vanilla.) 

LUNCHEON SALAD 

1 envelope Knox Sparkling Gelatine Yi. cup lemon juice 

1 cup cold water Yi cup sugar 

\Yi cups boiling water 1 cup celery, cut in small pieces 

Soak gelatine in cold water five minutes, and dissolve in boiling water. Add lemon juice and sugar. When mixture 

begins to stiffen, add apples, sliced in small pieces, chopped celery and broken nut meats. Turn into mold, first 

dipped in cold water, and chill. Accompany with mayonnaise dressing. This mixture may be served in cases 

made from bright red apples. 

OTHER SEASONABLE RECIPES — FREE 

My books "Dainty Desserts" and "Food Economy" contain hundreds of very remarkable recipes for all kinds of 
meat and fish molds, relishes, salads, desserts, candies and invalid dishes. Write for them, enclosing 4c in stamps 
to cover postage and mention your grocer's name. 

Any domestic science teacher may have sufficient gelatine for her class, if she will write me on school stationery, 
stating quantkv and when needed. 

KNOX 

SPARKLING 

GELATINE 



KNOX 



cpARKLlMQ 



N? 






KNOX 

SPARKLING 



GElatiN_ 

3L^LJjuu^. , B.-,:rnr>.- y 



Plain 

Sparkling Gelatine 

for general use 







GELATINE 



•i 



107 Knox Ave. 



Johnstown, N. Y. 



Contains 

Lemon Flavoring. 

Ao lemons required 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

223 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Veuve Chaffard 

Pure Olive Oil 

The Finest The 
World Produces 




Received direct 
from the Producers 

Bottled in France 
in honest bottles 

Full Quarts 
Full Pints 

Full Half-Pints 



S. S. PIERCE CO. 

BOSTON 



/^—Domestic Science-^ 

Home-Study Courses 

Food, health, housekeeping, clothing, children, 

For Homemakers and Mothers; professional 
courses for Teachers, Dietitians, Institution 
Managers, Demonstrators, Nurses, Tea Room 
Managers, Caterers, "Cooking for Profit," etc. 

"The Profession of Home-making," 100 
page handbook, free. Bulletins: "Free-hand 
Cooking," "Food Values," "Ten-Cent Meals," 
"Family Finance," "Art of Spending" — 10c ea, 

American School of Home Economics 

(Chartered in 1905) 830 E. 58th St., Chicago, 111. 



v^ 



J 



OYSTERS CLAMS 

DEHYDRATED 

All who like Oysters and Clams are 

sure to enjoy these 

The full, rich oyster and clam flavor in always ready, 

convenient form. Oyster stew, broth, puree. Clam 

stew, broth, bouillon, chowder. Cost, lYi cents a plate. 

Packed in small trial bottles making quart of stew. 

OYSTERS, trial bottle 30c, prepaid 

CLAMS, trial bottle 30c, prepaid 

Money gladly refunded if not satisfied. Economical 
plus quality and ready to serve in ten minutes. 

Not sold in stores 

BISHOP-GIFFORD CO., Inc., Baldwin, LI., N. Y. 



"Poulets Sautes" — Fried chicken. 

"A la Plaque" — A flat baking pan or 
griddle, upon which foods are baked. 
Thus, Pan Bread, or Pain a la Plaque. 

"Quenelles" — Either meat, liver, fish, 
or potatoes chopped, highly seasoned, 
rolled into balls, cooked and served as a 
garnish. 

"Quenes de Bceuf" — Ox tails. 

"Ragout" — A rich stew or dish of 
meat or poultry, usually made with 
vegetables — potatoes, green peas, truffles, 
mushrooms, etc., and highly seasoned. 

"Remoulade" — A salad dressing which 
differs from mayonnaise, in that the eggs 
are -hard boiled, and the yolks beaten in a 
mortar, with the spices and vinegar. 

"Rechauffes" — ■ Re-heated, or warmed- 
over dishes. 

"Removes" — The main dishes of the 
meal. 

"Rissoles" — Mint-seasoned fish, or 
meat, rolled in batter and fried. 

"Roux" — ■ A mixture of flour and fat, 
cooked togther and used as a foundation 
for a thick sauce. 

"Roti" — A roast. 

"Ris de Veau" — Sweetbreads. 

"Salade de Laitue" — A salad of lettuce. 

"Salade de Legumes" — A salad of 
vegetables. 

"Selli de Venaison" — A saddle of 
venison. 

"Souffle" — Puffed up. Very light. 

"Sucres" — Sweets. 

"Salmi" — A rich soup, usually of 
game. 

"Saute" — To fry and toss. 

"Tarte" — A pie. 

"Tarte aux Pommes" — Apple pie. 

"Timbale" — Cooked in a mould. 

"Vol-au-vent" — ■ A dish made of 
chicken, meat, or fish, baked in rich 
puff paste in the form of a small tart. 



Professor: "Can you tell me who suc-j 
ceeded Edward VI?" 

Student: "Mary." 

Professor: "And who followed Mary?" 

Student (absent-mindedly): "Her little 
lamb." — ■ Exchange. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

224 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




A New Recipe for 
Coconut Fudge 

Three cups sugar (preferably 
1 j cups each light brown and 
white), If cups milk, 2 squares 
grated chocolate, pinch of soda. 
Boil (stirring constantly) until 
a small quantity dropped in cold 
water forms a firm mass. Set 
aside until bottom of pan is cold 
to the touch, then add teaspoon 
of vanilla and butter the size of 
a walnut. Beat until creamy , add- 
ing one can Baker's Coconut. 
Continue beating until thick, 
turn into a buttered pan and cut 
into squares before it hardens. 

(If Baker's Coconut in the blue 
can is used, thoroughly press out 
the milk and add to it enough 
sweet milk to make \\ cups.) 



(Hurry up with that 
coconut fudge!" 

Real home-made candy with all its buttery rich- 
ness is made more tempting by using Baker's fresh, 
ripe coconut. The coconut adds its own delicate 
flavor — a flavor that everybody knows and likes. 

Baker's Coconut in cans is the only ready-to-use 
coconut in which the natural moisture is retained. 
All the wholesome goodness which Nature stores in 
the coconut — the goodness of the luxuriant, tropic 
sunshine — comes to you in the Baker can. 
THE FRANKLIN BAKER COMPANY, Philadelphia 





NUT 



In Baker's blue can In Baker's yellow can — In Baker's blue card- 
— the pure, fresh, the pure, fresh, white board container — the 
white meat of select- meats of selected coco- dry shredded meat of 
ed coconuts grated nuts shredded and selected coconuts, care- 
and sealed up in the sweetened: sealed up fully prepared for 
wholesome, natural while still moist with those who still prefer 
coconut milk. its own wholesome, the old- fashioned, 

natural juices. sugar-cured kind. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

225 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Spanish 

GREEN 
OLIVE S 




The liking that 

grows and grows 

and grows 

YOU like green olives. Think about 
them, and your liking grows to a 
genuine longing for some of the plump, 
meaty fruit. 

You want to taste the tangy flavor that 
is just salty enough to be delicious. Your 
desire grows until you just have to have 
some. For when your appetite demands 
green olives, nothing will satisfy it ex- 
cept green olives. 

They're good for you! And for chil- 
dren, too. The olive oil in them is health- 
ful and nourishing. Serve them often. 
There is no better appetizer. 

Green olives make wonderful salads 
and sandwiches — and garnishes. Keep 
a bottle or two on your pantry shelves. 
The formal dinner is incomplete without 
green olives. Buy a bottle or two today 
for the enjoyment of the whole family. 

AMERICAN IMPORTERS 

of Spanish Green Olives 
200 Fifth Avenue, New York 



The Silver Lining 

Joe's Ambition 

Joe is in the fourth grade, and recently 
his teacher decided to try to find out the 
effect of her lessons in ethics; so she 
called for compositions from her pupils 
telling what they hoped to do in life when 
they grew up. Joe's composition read: 

"W hen I grow up I want to be a police- 
man or a soldier or a cowboy. When I 
am a policeman I'll arrest everybody. 
When I'm a soldier I'll fight the whole 
world, and when I'm a cowboy I'll lasso 
all the people. When I get through with 
these jobs, I want to be an engineer so I 
can run over everybody. They will say I 
am a very desperate man." 



Applicant: "I've called in answer to 
that advertisement of your'n for a 'andy 
man, sir." 

Employer: "Well, what qualifications 
have your" 

Applicant: "I live next door, sir." 
London Weekly Telegraph. 



In an art gallery two women were 
standing in front of Millet's famous pic- 
ture, "The Sower." "I wonder what 
kind of grain he is sowing?" said one 
woman. "Why, millet, of course," re- 
plied her companion. "Don't you see 
the name in the corner?" 

Boston Transcript. 



"How John and Mary 

Live and Save 

on $35 a Week" 

THIS little story tells how a young 
couple are getting ahead by plan- 
ning the family spending and by "stretch- 
ing" the family dollars. 

If you depend on a weekly pay enve- 
lope, this booklet will help you to live 
more comfortably, and save more money. 

The price of the booklet is 10 cents — 
it may be worth $10 to you. Send for it. 
American School of Home Economics, 
830 E. 58th Street, Chicago. Adv. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

226 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




44 



It is Both Economical and Pure" 

The purity of Carnation Milk is beyond question. 
It is the product of fine herds that graze on the 
finest pasture lands of this country. Part of the 
water is removed by evaporation, then the milk is 
hermetically sealed in containers and sterilized. Car- 
nation keeps sweet longer than ordinary milk and 
because it is richer, it goes farther. Therefore it is 
the most economical for every purpose. Send today 
for the Carnation Cook Book containing more than 
one hundred tested recipes. 

Carnation Milk Products Company 

1058 Consumers Building, Chicago 1158 Stuart Building, Seattle 



Carnation 



x^nation^ 



rt 



From Contented Cows 



>i 



The label is red and white 




Milk 



Sold by Grocers Everywhere 

Carnation Milk Products Co. 

New York Chicago 

Seattle Aylmer, Ont. 



Custard Sauce— The yolks of 3 eggs, 1)4 cupfuls water, 2 /$ cup- 
ful Carnation Milk, l /i teaspoonful salt, 2 tablespoonfuls 
sugar, yi teaspoonful vanilla. Scald the milk, diluted with 
water; beat egg yolks slightly; add sugar, salt and scalded 
milk, stirring constantly. Cook in double boiler, stirring until 



the mixture thickens and a coating is formed on the spoon. 

Strain, add vanilla and chill. Delicious served with any 

fruit. 

There are many other recipes as good as this in the 

Carnation Recipe Book. Send for it. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

227 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




FUDGE 

SALLY'S 

WAY 



My SALLY SWEET Candy 
Thermometer tells just how long 
to cook fudge to make it rich and 
creamy. I'll tell you just how 
to make fudge and a lot of other 
delicious candies and frostings 
too, if you will send your name 
and address to Sallv Sweet, care of 

WILDER-PIKE THERMOMETER CO. 

TROY, N. Y. 
Makers of Thermometers for every purpose 



GOOD ® LUCK 

JAR RUBBERS 

come packed with Atlas E. Z. Seal and Good 
Luck Jars, Ball Ideal and Eclipse Jars, Schram 
Ever Seal and Acme Jars. They are sold by 
good grocery and hardware stores throughout 
the country. Look for the Good Luck name 

on rubbers when 
buying fruit jars. 

If your dealer cannot 
supply you, send 10 
cts. for sample dozen. 
For 6 cts. in stamps 
we will mail you our 
book on Cold Pack 
Canning, containing 
many novel and ex- 
cellent recipes. 




BOSTON WOVEN HOSE & RUBBER CO. 

27 Hampshire Street Cambridge, Mass. 



Making Sure 

A colored boy walked into a drug 
store and asked permission to use the 
telephone; then he called up a Mr. Jones. 
"Is this you, Mistah Jones?" he presently 
asked. 

Evidently the answer was, "Yes." 

"Well, Mistah Jones, I saw yo' ad in 
de paper de other day and yo' wanted a 
colored boy. Did yo' get one?" 

Again the obvious answer was, "Yes." 

"Is he givin' perfect satisfaction?" 

"Yes." 

"Well, Mistah Jones, providen this 
colored boy don't give perfect satisfac- 
tion, yo' call me at 504." 

The boy then hung up and started out, 
and the druggist, who had overheard, 
remarked: "You didn't do any good, 
did you?" 

"Yes, sah," came the reply. "Ise dat 
colored boy what's working down there. 
Ise jest checking up to see how I stand." 

Ex-President Taft told at a literary 
dinner the story about a colored man. 
"A colored man," he said, "knocked at 
Mrs. Brown's back door and asked for 
work. 'What's your name?' Mrs. Brown 
asked, for she liked the man's looks. 
'Mah name's Poe, Ma'm,' he answered. 
'Poe, eh?' said Mrs. Brown. T suppose 
some of your family once worked for 
Edgar Allan Poe — did they?' The col- 
ored man's eyes bulged, and he struck 
himself a resounding whack on the chest. 
'Why, Ma'm, he said, 'Ah is Edgar Allan 
Poe.' St. Thomas Times Journal. 

In an age in which we specialize — or 
are lost — the following should be noted: 
When business is sick and in need of a 
remedy, we normalize. If there are 
wounded veterans to be cared for, we 
hospitalize. When a worthy cause needs 
to have new life put into it, we revitalize. 
If we have goods to sell, we merchandise. 
Furthermore, government bureaucracies 
are never broken up. They are decen- 
tralized. Large institutions no longer 
divide their labors. They are depart- 
mentalized. New York is not mis-gov- 
erned, only Hylanized. And as for our 



Buy advertised Goods — Do 

228 



not accept substitutes 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




To bake 
cake without 
ever a failure 



Recipe-CAKE 
4 eggs 

1 cup powdered sugar 

2 tbsp. lemon juice 

1 tsp. grated lemon rind 
% cup bread flour 
l l 4 tsp. baking Powder 
Yt tsp. salt 

Makes 3 layers, 7 inches in 
diameter. Serves 12 



Beat yolks of eg-gs thoroughly, 
add sugar gradually, beating 
well after each addition. Add 
lemon juice and rind and beat 
again. Mix flour, baking pow- 
der and salt, and sift together 
twice. Sift into egg mixture 
and beat three minutes. Fold in 
egg whites which have been 
beaten until stiff. 

Bake 30 Min. at 325° 



Recipe-ICING 

2 cups sugar 
M cup boiling water 
2 egg wh ites 
Yi tsp. vanilla 
pink coloring 
Makes filling and 
frosting sufficient for 
a 3 layer cake. 8 inches 
in diameter 



Dissolve sugar in boiling water, boil 
until the candy thermometer regis- 
ters 238 degrees, or until a soft ball 
is formed when the syrup is tried in 
cold water. Pour very slowly onto 
egg whites which have been beaten 
until stiff. Add vanilla and coloring 
to make a very pale pink. Beat 
until sfff enough to hold shape. 
Spread between layers and on top 
of cake. 



These recipes specially prepared for American Stoie Company fco> Modern Priscilla Proving Plant 



To banish baking worries forever, thousands upon 
thousands of housewives have discarded their old 
cooking stoves and have bought Lorain-equipped 
Gas Ranges that bake any kind of cakeper/ect/y — 
every time. 



Wherever gas is used you'll find dealers who'll be 
glad to demonstrate a Lorain-equipped Gas Range 
to you. You'll recognize these wonderful stoves 
at a glance by the brilliant red wheel. Mail us the 
coupon and we'll send you an interesting booklet. 



Only these famous Qas Stot.es are 

equipped unh the 'Lorain" 
CLARK JEVVEL- 

George M. Clark &. Co. Div., 

Chicago, 111. 
DANGLER- 

Dangler Stove Company Div., 

Cleveland, Ohio 
DIRECT ACTION- 

National Stove Company Div., 

Lorain, Ohio 
NEW PROCESS- 

New Process Stove Company 

Div., Cleveland, Ohio 
QUICK MEAL- 

Quick Meal Stove Company 

Div., St. Louis, Mo. 
RELIABLE- 

Reliahle Stove Company Dh ., 

Cleve'and, Ohio. 



AMERICAN STOVE 
COMPANY 

Largest makers of Gas Ranges in the World 

1410 Chouteau Ave. 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 

H e manufacture oil and coal stoves for use where 

gas is not available, but the "Lorain Regulator" 

cannot be used on these 




OVEN HEAT REGULATOR 



American Stove Company 

1410 Chouteau Avenue 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Please send me free copy of 
your latest booklet. 

Name 



Address- 
City 



State- 



Check your favorite stove: 
Clark Jewel New Process 
Dangler Quick Meal 

Direct Action Reliable 

(1922) 



Buv advertised Good- 



- Do not accept substitutes 
229 



AMERICAN COOKERY 






Dr Prices 




Vanilla 



Look for 
Price's 
Tropikiil 
on the 
label. 



USE Price's Vanilla. 
Price's is true, deliciously 
mellow and of balanced, just- 
right strength, neither weak 
nor too strong. Ask for 
Price's at your grocer's — 
don't accept an imitation. 

t PRICE FLAVORING EXTRACT CO. 
'Experts in Flavor" Chicago, 111. 




Home Cookie Bakers 

Make Cookie Baking Easier 




SET OF 2 
$1.00 

These handy bakers hold a lot of cookies and do 
a dandy job of baking. Used m pairs, time and fuel are saved 
by having new batch ready for oven when baked cookies are 
removed. Bakers have no high sides nor corners. Cookies 
are easily removed and bakers readily cleaned. Save dish- 
washing. Simply wiping clean keeps the special surfaced iron 
sheets in perfect condition for baking. Equally useful for 
biscuits, rolls, toast, etc. Size 13)4 by 15 inches. Approved 
by Priscilla Proving Plant and Good Housekeeping Institute. 
Send SI. 00 for set of two in attractive carton, postpaid. 
Agents and dealers wanted 

HOME PRODUCTS CO. 1430 E. 49th St., Cleveland, 



Help! Help!! Help!!! 

Our two new household helpers on 7 days' free trial! They save 
you at least an hour a day, worth at only 30 cents an hour, 
£2.10 a week. Cost only the 10 cents a week for a year. Send 
postcard for details of these "helpers," our two new home-study 
courses, "Household Engineering" and "Lessons in Cooking," now 
in book form; OR SEND $5.00 in full payment. Regular price 
$6.28. Full refund if not satisfactory. 

AM. SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS, 830 E 58th STREET CHICA6( 

POMPEIAN 
OLIVE OIL 

Sold Everywhere 



own precious selves, we have given up 
indulging in periodic moments of soul- 
searching reflection. We go and get 
ourselves psychoanalyzed. Xot even the 
spirits of the departed can escape. No 
longer do they appear. They material- 
ize. Truly, the ize seem to have it, here 
and hereafter. Life. 

" 1 ou remember that lot you sold me? 
\ ou remember vou said it was within 
sight of the car 'line?" "Yes." "Well 
do I have to furnish my own binoculars?" 

Nashville Tennessea n . 



"Home-Making as a Profession" 

HOME-MAKING is the greatest 
of all the professions — greatest 
in numbers and greatest in its 
influence on the individual and on society. 
All industry is conducted for the home, 
directlv or indirectlv, but the industries 
directly allied to the home are vastly 
important, as the food industries, clothing 
industries, etc. Study of home eco- 
nomics leads directly to many well paid 
vocations as well as to home efficiency. 

Since 1905 the American School of 
Home Economics has given home-study 
courses to over 30.000 housekeepers, 
teachers, and others. The special text- 
books have been used for class work in 
over 500 schools. 

Of late years, courses have been de- 
veloped fitting for man}' well paid posi- 
tions: — 'Institution Management, Tea 
Room and Lunchroom Management, 
Teaching of Domestic Science, Home 
Demonstrators, Dietitians, Nurses, Dress- 
making, "Cooking for Profit." Home- 
Makers' Courses : — Complete Home 
Economics, Household Engineering, Les- 
sons in Cooking, The Art of Spending. 

BULLETINS: Free-Hand Cooking, 
Ten-cent Meals, Food Values, Family 
Finance, Art of Spending, Weekly Allow- 
ance Book, ioc each. 

Details of anv of the courses and inter- 
esting 80-page illustrated handbook, 
"The Profession of Home-Making" sent 
on request. American School of Home 
Economics, 830 E. 58th Street, Chicago 

— Adv 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

230 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




\ 



School 

'ook 









Ji0iie 



Are You Using this Latest Edition of 
America's Leading Cook Book? 

THE BOSTON COOKING- 
SCHOOL COOK BOOK 

By FANNIE MERRITT FARMER 

In addition to its fund of general information, this latest 
edition contains 2,117 recipes, all of which have been tested 
at Miss Farmer's School of Cookery, together with 
additional chapters on the Cold-Pack Method of Canning, 
on the Drying of Fruits and Vegetables, and on Food Values. 
This volume also contains the correct proportions of food, tables of measurements 
and weights, time-tables for cooking, menus, and hints to young housekeepers. 

"Good Housekeeping" Magazine says: 

" 'The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book' is one of the volumes to which good house- 
wives pin their faith on account of its accuracy, its economy, its clear, concise teachings, and 
its vast number of new recipes." 

656 pages 122 illustrations $2.50 net 




NEW REVISED EDITION 



THE UP-TO-DATE WAITRESS 



By Janet McKenzie Hill 

Author of "Cooking for Two" 

The usefulness of this guide to what may be called good service for waitresses 
has been attested by its continued popularity. But since "The Up-to-Date 
Waitress" was first published in 1905 there have been so many changes in what 
constitutes good service that a thorough revision of the text has now seemed 
advisable. Those who use this new edition will find the book up-to-date in every 
respect. Much new material has been added, including two chapters on beverages, 
and there are a number of new illustrations. Illustrated. $1.75 net 



Make Money at Home, Learn the Candy Business 



THE CANDY COOK BOOK B y Alice Bradley 

Principal of Miss Farmer's School of Cookery 

This book offers a complete and well-illustrated guide to home candy making, 
containing over 300 recipes for every sort of candy that can be made in the home 
kitchen without special machinery. The recipes are very wholesome, entirely 
practical, and the directions are so clear that the veriest amateur may be confident 
of obtaining toothsome results. Illustrated. $1.75 net 

For Sale at all Booksellers, or of the Publishers 

Our Catalogue of Books on Cooking and Serving will be mailed free on request 

LITTLE, BROWN & COMPANY, 34 BEACON ST., BOSTON 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

231 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



A Home GASH REGISTER 

for 50c. 

here's what every housewife wants — a way to have 
money for everyday necessities, and to budget 
household 'xpense without a lot of bookkeeping. 



*Y#T SAVINGS 



HOUSEHOLD 

RE*T«4otk«iK«»<c«l 



& 37° 



FOOD 



16% CLOTHES 



5% HEALTH 



6% 



AMUSEMENT 



ADVANCEMENT 



21 



MISCELLANEOUS 



^SURPLUS PAYMENT 

OF OLD DEBTS 

PUf each amount you TAKE 

Susie 
Savit's 

Put & Take 
Cash 

Register 



Susie Savit's 
Put and Take 

CASH 
REGISTER 

for the Home 

Registry applied for 

~This is only a~ 
rough idea of 
it, full size is 
4 inches wide 
by 9 inches 
long. 

Substantially 
made, guar- 
anteed to give 
at least one 
_year's service.^ 



(j.w 



Copyright 
Lindau, Jr.,N. V, 
1922 



Tt's very simple. When 
vou get your weekly 
allowance you put 10c 
out of each #1 in No. 1 
SAVINGS. 

You put whatever one- 
quarter of your month's 
rent amounts to in No. 2. 
In No. 3 you put the 
money for the Baker — 
Butcher — Iceman, etc. 

And in No. 4 you put 16c 
of each dollar to be ap- 
plied to your dressing 
account. 

In No. 5 you put 5c of 
each dollar each week to 
be used when you need a 
Doctor or Dentist or 
when you need anything 
from the Druggist. And 
so on. 



This is the way to keep 
accounts without being 
an accountant. 

Order yours today, 
price 50c. postpaid — 
two for a dollar. Send 
money order, silver or 
stamps. 

If it's not worth the price 
to you after you've used it 
for thirty days — mail it 
back and I'll return your 
Soc. 

If you send a dollar for 
two, Susie Savit will send 
you a chart that has 
helped over 20,000 house- 
wives open savings ac- 
counts. The chart alone 
costs 50c, so that vou 
get $1.50 for $1.00 if you 
send vour order now. 



Address SUSIE SAVIT 

Suite 1404 

469 Seventh Avenue, New York City 

Agents — Retail Dealers — Bankers — Church Associations and 
Newspaper circulation departments. Write for special offer. 



Mary: "I wonder why Joshua never 
repeated his experiment of making the 
sun stand still." 

Cary: "Politics, I suppose; the farmers 
are so down on daylight saving." 

Judge. 

Subscribe to American Cookery for 
one year and prove its worth. 



Miss Bradley's New Course a 
Great Success 

COOKING for Profit, Catering and 
Food Service Management, the 
new home-study course by Miss 
Alice Bradley, Principal of Miss Farmer's 
School of Cookery, has met with wide 
demand and appreciation. 

Hundreds of women who need to make 
money, without neglect of their home 
duties, now enjoy a steady and increasing 
income from the sale of home-cooked 
food, cake making and catering. 

Others have learned just how to con- 
duct a food shop, candy kitchen, tea room, 
cafeteria or lunchroom, or how to manage 
a guest house or small hotel with big 
profits. 

Through this fascinating course they 
have received expert knowledge — ■ how to 
prepare food "good enough to sell," just 
what to cook with many choice recipes, 
how to gain a reputation and constant 
profitable market, how to cater for all 
occasions, and full details of all food serv- 
ice management. Also they have been 
given the courage and inspiration to push 
ahead into creative work that increases 
their value to the world and to themselves. 

In "Cooking for Profit," it is possible 
and usually advisable, to begin simply 
with little or no expense for equipment 
and develop one of the many lines into a 
large and lucrative business. 

The correspondence instruction on the 
course is under the personal direction of 
Miss Bradley which gives assurance of 
success; the fee is very moderate, and 
may be paid on easy terms. You are 
invited to write for full details to American 
School of Home Economics, 830 E. 58th 
Street, Chicago. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

232 



ADVERTISEMENTS 





Make sure the Seasoning 
You Buy bears this 
Trade Mark of Quality 

STICKNEY & POOR'S 

POULTRY SEASONING 

is a combination of fresh, fragrant spices scien- 
tifically blended that gives an added relish to fish, 
fowl and meats of various kinds. 

Turkey Stickney & Poor's Poultry Seasoning is recognized 

Stuffing ky the New England housewife as the best and 

most dependable seasoning for turkey stuffing. 

Spiced The favorite breakfast dish in many New England 

Homemade homes is spicy homemade sausage. 

Sausage S & P Poultry Seasoning gives just the right flavor. 

To be certain of getting dependable Poultry Seasoning ask your 
grocer for Stickney & Poor's. 

HAVE YOU TRIED 
Stickney & Poor's Stickney & Poor's 

"Extra Fine" Prepared 

Mustard — or Mustard? 

Your Grocer Carries Them! 

Your co-operating servant, 

"MUSTARDPOT" 




i 



STICKNEY & POOR SPICE COMPANY 

wsTARDssncB ,8,s " ,Ceotur y Old— Century Honored- 1922 



BOSTON and HALIFAX 



The Only Manufacturers of Pure Mustard in the New England States 




SEAS0KNBFUT0MIO 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

233 



AMERICAN" COOKERY 



Five Ways 

To Use 

Hay's Five Fruit 

As a Punch — Dilute with Tea or 
Lemonade, Plain in Carbonated 
water and plenty of ice. 

As a Cold Sauce — Pour over Va- 
nilla Ice Cream, Fruit Cups, 
Fritters or Cereals. 

As a Pudding Sauce — Add one 
cup boiling' water to one cup of 
FIVE FRUIT. 

As an Ice or Sherbet — 1 part to 
4 of water and freeze. 

As a Jelly or Mousse — 1 box of 
Gelatin, 1 pt. Water, 1 cup of 
FIVE FRUIT. Dissolve by 
heat then chill. 

The Pioneer Punch— Originated in 1900 

If not at your grocer's, write to 
HAY'S FRUIT JUICE CO., Portland, Maine 



SALAD 



gntiir]=*^ 



:CC recipes < 1 rief but complete, 15c by mail. 100 Meat- 
use .redoes 15c 50 Sandwich recipes 15c All three 30c 
B. R. BRIGGS, 250 Madison St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

"The Art of Spending" 

Tells how to get more for your money — how to live better and 
save more! How to budget expenses and record them without 
household accounts. 24 pp. illustrated, io cents. 

AM. SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS. 830 E. 58th ST., CHICAGO 

"Sally" 

Sally was a pretty girl, but in spite of this 
she was a wall-flower at parties. When men 
were asked why they didn't dance with her, 
they just said, '"Sally don't dress like the 
other girls. When I dance with her, I feel 
like apologizing for her clothes." 

Then, one day, a married sister told her of 
this. 

Ten weeks later, at a house dance, Sally was so prettily 
dressed, and so attractive that she danced every dance and 
received several invitations. 

\N hen asked what she had done, Sally astonished her friends 
by saying, "Why, I made that gown myself. Otherwise, I 
could not afford to have it. I took up the Franklin Institute 
system, and after ten weeks' fascinating spare time work, I can 
now design and make my own gowns, waists, skirts, and suits. 
I am now making an evening dress for mother." 

Over 13,000 women and girls have, like Sally, learned Dress 
Designing and Making at home, and are much better dressed 
at one third the former cost. Sign and mail the following 
coupon at once. This two-cent stamp may save you hundreds 
of dollars and make you better dressed than ever. 

FRANKLIN INSTITUTE 

Dept. H 045 Rochester, N. Y. 

Send me free sample lessons and full information about your 
Dress Designing, Dressmaking Course. 



Name 

Address 




Household Help Wanted? 

YOU can have the assistance of an 
expert cook and an expert house- 
keeper, with no expense for room 
and board, for only 10 cents a week! 
That is all our two "Household Help- 
ers" will cost you the first year — nothing 
thereafter for the rest of your life! Send 
the coupon. 

These Helpers will save one-fourth your 
time — one-tenth your money — all your 
worry. Many workmen get $1 an hour 
— surely your time is worth 30 cents an 
hour. We guarantee these Helpers to 
save you at least an hour a day, worth say 
32.10 a week. Will you invest 10 cents 
a week to gain $2 weekly? Send the 
coupon. 

And the value our "Helpers" give you 
in courage and inspiration, in peace of 
mind, in the satisfaction of progress, in 
health, happiness and the joy of living — 
is above price. In mere dollars and cents, 
they will save their cost twelve times a 
year or more. Send the coupon. 

These helpers, "Lessons in Cooking" 
and "Household Engineering" were both 
prepared as home-study courses, and as 
such have been tried out and approved by 
thousands of our members. Thus they 
have the very highest recommendation. 
Mrs. R. says, "I have reduced time and 
energy expended one-half, and have only 
just begun!" We will gladly send these 
Helpers in book form, on a week's free 
trial in your own home. Send the 
coupon. 

You really cannot afford to be without 

these Helpers. As you cannot realize 

what great help they will give you till you 

try them, you are cordially invited to send 

for them — • and the free trial will cost you 

nothing! Send no money — - send the 

coupon. 

American School of Home Economics, Chicago. 

FREE TRIAL FOR ONE WEEK 

A. S. H. E. — 830 E. 58th Street, Chicago, 111. 

Send your two "HOUSEHOLD HELPERS," prepaid 
on a week's trial, in the De Luxe binding. If satisfactory, I 
will send you $5 in full payment (OR) 50 cents and $1 per 
month for five months. Otherwise I will return one or 
both books in seven days. (Regular mail price $3.14 each.) 

Xame and 

Address 

Reference 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

234 






ADVERTISEMENTS 





Saves Its Cost Every Fortnight 

Stop buying expensive bottled cream! Use SKIMIT, the 
simple kitchen cream separator, to remove all the Dure, 
rich cream from bottled whole milk. 

You then need order no bottled cream, and only a pint 
more whole milk than formerly. This will save the cost 
of a pint of milk per day, or about $1 every fortnight. 



SKIMIT will give you as much cream as you bought 
before — richer cream, too — and will also give you more 
milk for cooking and other purposes. 

The saving will pay for SKIMIT in two weeks, after 
which vou will save about 82 every month. 

To operate SKIMIT, just lower to cream line of bottled milk, lift 
plunger once (no pumping), and cream is quickly siphoned off with- 
out disturbing milk. Indestructible, easily cleaned and sterilized, 
practical and dependable. Tested and approved by cooking author- 
ities.- Thousands in satisfactory use. Money-back guarantee. 
Polished, $1; nickeled, $2, postpaid. Makes a charming gift for 
bride or friend. Special offer to dealers and agents. 

SKIMIT MFG. COMPANY, 319 High Ave., Oskaloosa, Iowa 




KITCHEN CREAM SEPARATOR 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

' 215 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




PAPER TABLE DECORATIONS and LIBERTY PAPER BAKING CUPS 

Needed by Every Housekeeper and Hostess 

NO PANS TO WASH "BAKE IN THE CUP" REQUIRE NO GREASE 

Cups Require No Greasing, Can Be Used in Regular Muffin Tins or On Cooky Sheet, in Roasting 

Pan or Any Flat Tin. SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY OFFER $1.00 POSTPAID 

Containing: Liberty Baking Cits. 1 Pkg. (125) Tea Cake Size. 1 Pkg. (100) Muffin or Cup Cake Size. 

20 Chop Frills, to decorate chops, chicken legs, etc. 20 Skewers to decorate croquettes, planked steaks, 

etc. 2 Pie Collars, to be used on deep dish pies, 

puddings, planked steaks, etc., and 36 Round 

Paper Lace D'oyleys. 

All the Above Packed in One Box Sent to You 

Postpaid Upon Receipt of One Dollar 
Address Agents Wanted 

WILLIAM W. BEVAN CO. 

54 Hi_h Street Boston, Mass. 




Cream Whipping Made 
Easy and Inexpensive 

r! REMO- y ESCO 

Whips Thin Cream 

or Half Heavy Cream and Milk 

or Top of the Milk Bottle 

1 1 whips up as easily as heavy cream 

and retains its stiffness. 

Every caterer and housekeeper 

wants CREMO-VESCO. 

Send for a bottle to-day. 



Housekeeper's size, !£ oz., .30 prepaid 
Caterer's size, 16 oz., $1.00 " 

(With full directions) 



Cremo-Vesco Company 

631 EAST 23rd ST., BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Pacific Coast Agents-. 
MILES MFG. CO., 949-951 E. 2nd St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



"Free-Hand Cooking 1 ' 

Cook Without recipes! A key to cookbooks, correct proportions, 
time, temperature; thickening, leavening, shortening, 105 fun- 
damental recipes. 40 p. book. 10 cents coin or stamps. 

Am. School of Hom»» Economics. 830 E 58*h Street. Chicago 



Angel Food Cake 



8 Inches Square, S Inches High 

You can be the best cake maker in your 
club or town. You can make the same Angel Food 
Cake and many other kinds that I make and sell at $3 a 
Soaf-profit, $2, If you 

Learn the Osborn Cake Making System 

•»' methods are different. They are the result of twenty Tet» 
,(!,«rience as a domestic science expert. My way is easy to lr» 
i0 mever falls. I have taught thousands,. .->t lie send you fu 
-. sfljtlculara FREE. 

v-» Grace Osborn Dept. 1410 8ay City. Mi. 



Trade Mark Registered, 

Gluten Floor 

40% GLUTEN 

Guaranteed to comply in all respects to 

standard requirements of U. S. Dept. of 

Agriculture. 

Manufactured by 

FARWELL & R NINES 

Walertown, N. Y. 



"Ten-Cent Meals" 

V2 Meals with receipts and directions ror preparing each. 48 pp. 10c. 
Am. School of Home Economics, 830 E. 58th St., Chicago 




THE products of the fry pan are a source of indi- 
gestion, with which most people are troubled. 
The DUPLEX DRIPLESS BROILER positively 
jvercomes this. 

Heretofore, there has been no convenient cooking utensil for 

broiling without wasting the juices and smoking and greasing 

he stove. The DUPLEX DRIPLESS BROILER will broil 

perfectly over any fire without one particle of the juice being 

vaster!, or causing smoke, or soiling the stove. 

The DUPLEX DRIPLESS BROILER operates with a very 
ow fire, the heat being drawn up and around the steak, chops, 
•tc, by action of the heat current around the tubular channels 
unning to the main trough. 

The DUPLEX DRIPLESS BROILER is a modern conven- 
ence for economical and scientific cooking, and a necessity in 
the kitchen. Made of cast aluminum and nicely finished. If 
rou cannot buy this Broiler from your dealer, send us his 
lame and $3.50 and we will send one, postpaid. 

Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded 

DUNDEE MFG. CO., Inc., 19 Edinboro St., BOSTON 

Established 1888 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

236 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Coffee has become the great 

NATIONAL BEVERAGE 

of this most progressive nation in the world. 

m 








a ,*us.<*«mto:h« 



COFFEE 



FWm ^b5^N-CH!( 



by its immense nation- %—- L 

wide distribution and by <%% _ 7y 

its universal use by peo- 0^4 

pie who are really doing jfJJJj 

things has had its share 

in this great national development. 

WHITE HOUSE TEAS are the preference 
of people everywhere who know good teas. 
" f makes the price seem low. In 
lb. sealed canisters. 

DWINELL-WRIGHT COMPANY 

Principal Coffee Roasters BOSTON — CHICAGO 



Lightens work — Brightens your kitchen 




NATIONAL GLENWOOD WEEK — October 7 -i t 



The ^tv 

Gold Medal Glenwood 

Although this model occupies less space than 
many single-fuel stoves it has all the capabil- 
ities of two complete ranges. Packed into its 
four- foot width are two separate gas ovens — 
for broiling and baking — and a large coal 
oven, five burners for gas and four covers for 
coal. Its combined capacity is tremendous. 
The finish is a pearl-grey porcelain enamel that 
wipes clean instantly. If you take pride in your kitch- 
en you'll appreciate the good looks and the splendid 
ability of the Gold Medal Glenwood. 

Free 'Booklet a P*lp. 152 on request 

WEIR STOVE COMPANY, Taunton, Mass. 




Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

237 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Experience has shown that the most satisfactory way 

to enlarge the subscription list of American Cookery is through its present subscri- 
bers, who personally can vouch for the value of the publication. To make it an 
object for subscribers to secure new subscribers, we offer the following premiums: 
fONDTTTONTS . Premiums are not given with a subscription or for a renewal, but only 

— — — — — i— — — — to present subscribers, for securing and sending to us new yearly sub- 
scriptions at $i.5o each. Under no circumstances are you entitled to a premium for or with 
your own subscription. The number of new subscriptions required to secure each pr^?r.ium is 
clearly stated below the description of each premium. 

Transportation is or is not paid as stated. 

INDIVIDUAL INITIAL JELLY MOULDS 

Serve Eggs, Fish and Meats in Aspic; 
Coffee and Fruit Jelly; Pudding and other 
desserts with your initial letter raised on 
the top. Latest and daintiest novelty for 
the up-to-date hostess. To remove jelly 
take a needle and run it around inside of 
mould, then immerse in warm water; jelly 
will then come out in perfect condition. 

Be the first in your town to have these. 

You cannot purchase them at the stores. 





This shows the jelly turned from the mould 

Set of six (6), any initial, sent postpaid for (1) new subscription 



This shows mould 
(upside down) 



Cash Price 75 cents. 



"PATTY IRONS" 




As illustrated, are used to make dainty, flaky 
pates or timbales; delicate pastry cups for serv- 
ing hot or frozen dainties, creamed vegetables, 
salads, shell fish, ices, etc. Each set comes 
securely packed in an attractive box with recipes 
and full directions for use. Sent, postpaid, for 
two (2) new subscriptions. Cash Price $1.50. 



SILVER'S 

SURE CUT 

FRENCH FRIED 
POTATO CUTTER 

One of the most 
modern and efficient 
kitchen helps ever in- 
vented. A big labor 
and time saver. 



FRENCH ROLL BREAD PAN 




Open 
End 



Best quality blued steel. Six inches wide by 
13 long. One pan sent, prepaid, for one (1) new 
subscription. Cash Price 75 cents. 

SEAMLESS VIENNA BREAD PAN 




Sent, prepaid, for 
one (1) new subscrip- 
tion. Cash Price 75 
cents. 




Two of these pans sent, postpaid, for one (1) 
new subscription. Cash Price 75 cents for two 
pans. 




HEAVY TIN BORDER MOULD 

Imported, Round, 6 inch 

Sent, prepaid, for one (1) new subscription. 
Cash Price 75 cents. 



THE BOSTON COOKING SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO., Boston, Mass. 



SEND FOR COMPLETE PREMIUM LIST 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

25S 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



REAL VERMONT**) 5Q 
MAPLE SMMtf>X GAL 

DIRECT FROM 
FRANKLIN COUNTY PRODUCERS 



Everybody likes the tempting flavor of 
pure Vermont maple syrup and sugar 
and this is your opportunity to get the 
pick of Vermont's crop — direct from 
producers! 

BANKER'S BOND SYRUP 

No. 1 grade, packed under supervision of 

an officer of Welden National Bazik. 

1 gal., or 4 qt. cans, $2.50 gal. 

EXTRA SPECIAL MAPLE SUGAR 

A treat to eat: better anil more wholesome 

than candy: wrapped in foil. 

2 oi. cakes individual lb. boxes) $ .50 

Pound cakes (5 lbs. to box) 2.00 

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AMERICAN COOKERY 



Consider 

Did you ever stop to consider the vast amount 
of brain work, the years of study, the practical 
testing of the thousands of recipes, the inven- 
tive genius, that go to make up a good reliable 
cook book ? Think of several hundreds of 
pages representing the best years of a woman's 
life, and recall that it can all be purchased for 
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is just such a book. The author has personally invented her 
own recipes, measured and weighed them, and tested them 
by cooking them into dead certainties. Marvelous, isn't it ? 

The book contains over 700 pages, 1500 recipes, 128 illustra- 
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preliminary work and various household affairs. Any one can 
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It is bound in cloth, $2.50; by mail, $2.70 



Mrs. Rorer's Canning and Preserving 

Tells how to can and preserve fruits and vegetables; Marmalades, Jams, Fruit 
Butters and Jellies, Syrups, Catsups; Drying, Pickling, etc. 

Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 

Mrs. Rorer's Ice Creams, Water Ices, etc. 

Philadelphia and Neapolitan Ice Creams, Water Ices, Frozen Puddings and Fruits, 
Sherbets, Sorbets, Sauces, etc. Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 

Mrs. Rorer's Dainties 

Contains Appetizers, Canapes, Vegetable and Fruit Cocktails, Cakes, Candies, 
Creamed Fruits, Desserts, Frozen Puddings, etc. Cloth, $1.00; by mail, $1.10 



For sale by Boston Cooking-School Magazine Co., Department Stores and Book Stores, or 

ARNOLD & COMPANY, 420 Sansom St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



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The Secret 

about the popularity of Mrs. Rorer's Cook- 
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Cloth, $2.50; by mail, $2.70 



Home Candy Making 

contains recipes for Cream Confections, Mixed Confections, Fudge, Chocolate 
Chips and Tablets, Nut Glaces, Caramels, Fresh Fruits with Cream, Sugar 
Drops, Mint Tablets, Fruit Glaces, Molasses Candies, Taffy, Sea Foam, 
Salt Water Taffy, Peanut Brittle, Turkish Delight, Panoche, and lots of 
other delightful sweets. 

Cloth, 75 cents; by mail, 80 cents 



Key to Simple Cookery 

A cook book on an entirely new plan. Mrs. Rorer shows clearly how to use 
one recipe as a basis for many dishes, and how to substitute one ingredient 
for another without disturbing the perfect balance of a recipe. It is full of 
choice new recipes, illustrated, showing the proper layout of the kitchen, and 
the tools for everyday work. 

Cloth, $1.25; by mail, $1.40 

For sale by all Bookstores and Department Stores, or 

ARNOLD & COMPANY, 420 Sansom St., Philadelphia 



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AMERICAN COOKERY 



Vol. XXVII 



NOVEMBER, 1922 



No. 4 



CONTENTS FOR NOVEMBER page 

WHY NOT BULBS: 111 Eliza St. Pierre 251 

THE HOME AS AX ABIDING PLACE . . . Myra W. Jarrell 256 

A~BIRD IX THE HAXD Alice M. Ashton 259 

BUDGETIXG TIME Elizabeth M. Wright 261 

THOUGHTS FOR THE KITCHEX Florence F 263 

HOW DOES YOUR HOUSE LOOK FROM THE STREET: 

Elizabeth X. Simmonds 264 

THE EXGLISH PORK-PIE Mabel Bowler 265 

FIRST AID FOR GENEVIVE A. Borden Stevens 268 

EDITORIALS 270 

SEASOXABLE-AXD-TESTED RECIPES. Illustrated with half- 
tone engravings of prepared dishe- 

Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 273 

MENUS FOR WEEK IX NOVEMBER 281 

MENUS FOR SPECIAL OCCASIOXS 282 

THE GOOD COOK Caroline Rosenthal 283 

AX ULTRA MODERX THANKSGIVING DIXXER 

Janet Young Norton 286 

DECORATING THE THANKSGIVING TABLE Julia W. Wolfe 288 

A XEW SUNDAY DIXXER MENU . . . Anna Frances Tessier 289 

HOME IDEAS AXD ECONOMIES: — Party Pies — Grapefruit — 
Mv. How Good! — Oysters — Southern Corn Bread Recipes — 

Household Nuggets 290 

QUERIES AXD ANSWERS 294 

XEW BOOKS 300 

THE SILVER LINING 306 




jT-^O 



$1.50 A YEAR Published Ten Times a Year 13c A Copy { ^S^\ 
Fateiga pottage 40c additional 
Entered at Boston r I second-class matter 

Copyright 1922, by 

THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO. 
Pope Bldg., 221 Columbus Ave., Boston 17, Mass. 




Please "Penew on Receipt of Colored Blank Enclosed for that Purpose 

242 



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<"»ier 



CoohB°J. k 



fimie 



Your Thanksgiving Dinner will be an assured success 
if you use this latest edition of 

THE BOSTON COOKING- 
SCHOOL COOK BOOK 

By FANNIE MERRITT FARMER 

In addition to its fund of general information, this latest 
edition contains 2,117 recipes, all of which have been tested 
at Miss Farmer's Boston Cooking-School, together with 
additional chapters on the Cold-Pack Method of Canning, 
on the Drying of Fruits and Vegetables, and on Food Values. 
This volume also contains the correct proportions of food, tables of measurements 
and weights, time-tables for cooking, menus, and hints to young housekeepers. 

Good Housekeeping 79 Magazine says: 

" 'The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book' is one of the volumes to which good house- 
wives pin their faith on account of its accuracy, its economy, its clear, concise teachings, and 
its vast number of new recipes." 

656 pages 122 illustrations $2.50 net 




a 



NEW REVISED EDITION 



THE UP-TO-DATE WAITRESS 



By Janet McKenzie Hill 

Author of "Cooking for Two** 



The usefulness of this guide to what may be called good service for waitresses 
has been attested by its continued popularity. But since "The Up-to-Date 
Waitress" was first published in 1905 there have been so many changes in what 
constitutes good service that a thorough revision of the text has now seemed 
advisable. Those who use this new edition will find the book up-to-date in every 
respect. Much new material has been added, including two chapters on beverages, 
and there are a number of new illustrations. Illustrated. $1.75 net 



Make Money at Home, Learn the Candy Business 



THE CANDY COOK BOOK 



By Alice Bradley 

Principal of Miss Farmer's School of Cookery 



This book offers a complete and well-illustrated guide to home candy making, 
containing over 300 recipes for every sort of candy that can be made in the home 
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of obtaining toothsome results. Illustrated. $1.75 net 

For Sale at all Booksellers, or of the Publishers 

Our Catalogue of Books on Cooking and Serving will be mailed free on request 

LITTLE, BROWN & COMPANY, 34 BEACON ST., BOSTON 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

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AMERICAN COOKERY 



INDEX FOR NOVEMBER 



Bird in the Hand, A 

Budgeting Time .... 

Decorating the Thanksgiving Table 

Editorials .... 

English Pork-Pie. The . 

First Aid for Genevive 

Good Cook, The . 

Home as an Abiding Place, The 

Home Ideas and Economies . 

How Does Your House Look from the Street: 

Menus .... 

New Books .... 

New Sunday Dinner Menu, A 

Silver Lining, The 

Thoughts for the Kitchen 

Ultra Modern Thanksgiving Dinner. An 

Why Not Bulbs: .... 



PAGE 

259 
261 

288 
270 
265 
268 
283 
256 
290 
264 
281, 282 
300 
289 
306 
263 
286 
251 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



111. 



Artichokes, Puree of Jerusalem 

Bread, Brown. 111. 

Bread. Rye .... 

Buns, Raised Fruit 

Cake, Thanksgiving. 

Carrots, Compote of 

Carrots, Fricassee of 

Chowder, Clam. 111. 

Drumsticks. Mock Turkey 

Duck. Roast, Olive Stuffed, with Mackina 

Island Sauce .... 
Haddock. Scotch Fashion 
[elly. Cider. Ill 



273 
279 
279 
277 
278 
279 
279 
274 
276 

274 
276 
278 



Jelly, Cranberry, in Moulds. I 1. 

Molasses Hurry-Ups 

Oysters, Scalloped. 111. 

Parsnip Balls 

Pears, Farci of 

Pie, Squash. 111. . 

Potatoes, Blue Ridge Sweet, in Casserole 

Sablefish Steaks, Thermidor of 

Salad, Cabbage. 111. 

Sauce, Mackinac Island . 

Soup, Squash-and-Tomato 

Turkey Prepared for Roasting. 111. 



QUERIES AND ANSWERS 



Cakes, Streak at Bottom 
Cake. Lightning .... 
Consomme. Cloudy 
Corn. Softening of Canned 
Dishes, How to Serve and Remove at 
Meal 



294 
296 
294 
291 



Jelly, Reboiling Mouldy 

Pie, Elderberry 

Sauce, To Make Velvety Cream 

Torte, Almond 



280 
278 
274 
275 
279 
277 
279 
280 
277 
274 
273 
275 



295 
296 
295 
296 



296 Yeast, How Make with a Starter and without 295 



We want representatives everywhere to take subscriptions for 
American Cookery. We have an attractive proposition to make 
those who will canvass their town; also to those who will secure a 
few names among their friends and acquaintances. Write us today. 

AMERICAN COOKERY - BOSTON, MASS. 



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ADVERTISEMENTS 




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Established 1867 



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AMERICAN COOKERY 



Books on Household Economics 

THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE COMPANY presents the following as a 
list of representative works on household economics. Any of the books will be sent postpaid 
upon receipt of price. 

Special rates made to schools, clubs and persons wishing a number of books. Write for quota- 
tion on the list of books you wish. We carry a very large stock of these books. One order to us 
saves effort and express charges. Prices subject to change without notice. 



A Guide to Laundry Work. Chambers. $1.00 
Allen, The, Treatment of Diabetes. 

Hill and Eckman 1.75 

American Cook Book. Mrs. J. M. Hill 1.50 
American Meat Cutting Charts. Beef, 

veal, pork, lamb — 4 charts, mounted on 

cloth and rollers 10.00 

American Salad Book. M. DeLoup. . . . 1.50 
Around the World Cook Book. Barroll 2.50 
Art and Economy in Home Decorations. 

Priestman 1.50 

Art of Home Candy- Making (with ther- 
mometer, dipping wire, etc.) 3.75 

Art of Right Living. Richards 50 

Bacteria, Yeasts and Molds in the 

Home. H. W. Conn 1.48 

Better Meals for Less Money. Greene 1.50 
Book of Entrees. Mrs. Janet M. Hill . . . 2.00 
Boston Cook Book. Mary J. Lincoln. . 2.25 
Boston Cooking-School Cook Book. 

Fannie M. Farmer 2.50 

Bread and Bread-Making. Mrs. Rorer . .75 
Breakfasts, Luncheons and Dinners. 

Chambers 1.25 

Bright Ideas for Entertaining. Linscott .90 
Business, The, of the Household. Taber 2.50 
Cakes, Icings and Fillings. Mrs. Rorer 1.00 
Cakes, Pastry and Dessert Dishes. Janet 

^ M. Hill 2.00 

Camp Cookery. Kephart 1.50 

Candies and Bonbons. Neil 1.50 

Candy Cook Book. Alice Bradley 1.75 

Canning and Preserving. Mrs. Rorer. . 1.00 
Canning, Preserving and Jelly Making. 

Hill 1-75 

Canning, Preserving and Pickling. 

Marion H. Neil 1-50 

Care and Feeding of Children. L. E. 

Holt, M.D 1.25 

Catering for Special Occasions. Farmer 1.50 

Century Cook Book. Mary Ronald 3.00 

Chafing-Dish Possibilities. Farmer.... 1.50 
Chemistry in Daily Life. Lassar-Cohn . . 2.75 
Chemistry of Cookery. W. Mattieu 

Williams 2.25 

Chemistry of Cooking and Cleaning. 

Richards and Elliot 1.00 

Chemistry of Familiar Things. Sadtler 2.50 
Chemistry of Food and Nutrition. 

Sherman 2.10 

Chinese Cook Book, The, Shin Wong Chan 1 .75 
Cleaning and Renovating. E. G. Osman 1.20 
Clothing, Choice, Care, Cost. Woolman 2.00 

Clothing for Women. L. I. Baldt 2.50 

Cook Book for Nurses. Sarah C. Hill . . . . 90 

Cooking for Profit. Alice Bradley 3.00 

Cooking foi Two. Mrs. Janet M.Hill. . 2.25 
Costume Design and Home Planning. 

Izor 1-50 



Course in Household Arts. Duff $1.30 

Dainties. Mrs. Rorer 1.00 

Diet for the Sick. Mrs. Rorer 2.00 

Diet in Relation to Age and Activity. 

Thompson 75 

Dishes and Beverages of the Old South. 

McCulloch- Williams 1.50 

Domestic Art in Women's Education. 

Cooley 1.50 

Domestic Service. Lucy M. Salmon... 2.25 

Dust and Its Dangers. Pruden 1.25 

Easy Entertaining. Benton 1.50 

Economical Cookery. Marion Harris 

^ Neil 2.00 

Elementary Home Economics. Mat- 
thews 1.40 

Elements of the Theory and Practice of 

Cookery. Williams and Fisher 1.40 

Encyclopaedia of Foods and Beverages. 10.00 

Epicurean, Ranhofer's 10.00 

Equipment for Teaching Domestic 

Science. Kinne 80 

Etiquette of New York Today. Learned 1.60 

Etiquette of Today. Ordway 1.25 

European and American Cuisine. 

Lemcke 4.00 

Every Day Menu Book. Mrs. Rorer.... 1.5C 

Expert Waitress. A. F. Springsteed 1.35 

Feeding the Family. Rose 2.40 

Fireless Cook Book 1,75 

First Principles of Nursing. Anne R. 

Manning 1-25 

Fish Cookery. Spencer and Cobb 2.00 

Food and Cookery for the Sick and Con- 
valescent. Fannie M. Farmer 2.50 

Food Facts for the Home Maker. 

Harvey 2.50 

Food and Feeding. Sir Henry Thompson 1.25 

Food and Flavor. Finck 3.00 

Foods and Household Management. 

Kinne and Cooley 1-40 

Food and Nutrition. Bevier and Ushir 1.00 

Food Products. Sherman 2.40 

Food and Sanitation. Forester and 

Wigley 1-40 

Food and the Principles of Dietetics. 

Hutchinson 5.00 

Food for the Worker. Stern and Spitz. 1.00 
Food Materials and Their Adultera- 
tions. Richards 1-00 

Food Study. Wellman 1.10 

Food Values. Locke 2.00 

Foods and Their Adulterations. Wiley 6.00 
Franco-American Cookery Book. Deliee 5.00 
Fuels of the Household. Marian White .75 
Furnishing a Modest Home. Daniels 1.25 
Furnishing the Home of Good Taste. 

Throop 4 50 

Garments for Girls. Schmit 



\ 



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Golden Rule Cook Book (600 Recipes for 

Meatless Dishes). Sharpe $2.50 

Handbook of Home Economics. Flagg .90 
Handbook of Hospitality for Town and 

Country- Florence H. Hall 1.75 

Handbook of Invalid Cooking. Mary A. 

Boland 2.50 

Handbook on Sanitation. G. M. Price, 

M.D.... 1-50 

Health and Longevity Through Ra- 
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Healthful Farm House, The. Dodd ... .60 
Home and Community Hygiene. 

Broadhurst 2.50 

Home Candy Making. Mrs Rorer 75 

Home Economics. Maria Parloa 2.00 

Home Economics Movement 75 

Home Labor Saving Devices and How 

To Make Them. Scott 1.25 

Home Furnishing. Hunter 2.50 

Home Nursing. Harrison 1.50 

Home Problems from a New Standpoint 1.00 
Home Science Cook Book. Anna Bar- 
rows and Mary J. Lincoln 1.25 

Hot Weather Dishes. Mrs. Rorer. ..... .75 

House Furnishing and Decoration. 

McClure and Eberlein 2.50 

House Sanitation. Talbot 80 

Housewifery. Balderston 2.50 

Household Bacteriology. Buchanan... 2.75 
Household Economics. Helen Campbell 1.75 
Household Engineering. Christine Fred- 
erick 2.50 

Household Physics. Alfred M. Butler. . 1.50 

Household Textiles. Gibbs 1.50 

Housekeeper's Handy Book. Baxter. . . 2.00 
How to Cook in Casserole Dishes. Neil 1 50 
How to Cook for the Sick and Convales- 
cent. H. V. S. Sachse 2.00 

How to Feed Children. Hogan 1.25 

How to Use a Chafing Dish. Mrs Rorer .75 
Ice Cream, Water Ices, etc. Rorer . . 1.00 
Inside the House of Good Taste. Wright 2.50 
Institution Recipes. Emma Smedley.. 3.00 

Interior Decorations. Parsons 4.00 

International Cook Book. Filippini. . . 2.00 
Key to Simple Cookery. Mrs. Rorer. . . 1.25 

King's, Caroline, Cook Book 2.00 

Kitchen Companion. Parloa 2. 50 

Kitchenette Cookery. Anna M. East. . . 1.35 
Laboratory Handbook of Dietetics. Rose 1.50 
Lessons in Cooking Through Prepara- 
tion of Meals 2.50 

Lessons in Elementary Cooking. Mary 

C.Jones 1.25 

Like Mother Used to Make. Herrick. . 1.50 

Luncheons. Mary Ronald 2.00 

A cook's picture book; 200 illustrations 

Made-over Dishes. Mrs. Rorer 75 

Many Ways for Cooking Eggs. Mrs. 

Rorer -75 

Marketing and Housework Manual. 

S. Agnes Donham 2.00 

Mrs. Allen's Cook Book. Ida C. Bailey 

Allen 2.00 

More Recipes for Fifty. Smith 2.00 

My Best 250 Recipes. Mrs. Rorer 1.00 



New Book of Cookery. A. Farmer $2.50 

New Hostess of Today. Lamed 1.75 

New Salads. Mrs. Rorer 1.00 

Nursing, Its Principles and Practice. 

Isabels and Robb 2.00 

Nutrition of a Household. Brewster. . . 2.00 

Nutrition of Man. Chittenden 5.00 

Philadelphia Cook Book. Mrs. Rorer. . 1.50 
Planning and Furnishing the House. 

Quinn 1.35 

Practical Book of Furnishing the Small 

House and Apartment. Holloway. . . 6.50 
Practical Cooking and Serving. Mrs. 

Janet M. Hill 2.50 

Practical Dietetics. Gilman Thompson 8.00 
Practical Dietetics with Reference to 

Diet in Disease. Patte 2.50 

Practical Food Economy. Alice Gitchell 

Kirk 1.35 

Practical Homemaking. Kittredge 1.00 

Practical Points in Nursing. Emily A. 

M. Stoney 2.00 

Principles of Chemistry Applied to the 

Household. Rowley and Farrell 1.50 

Principles of Food Preparation. Mary 

D. Chambers 1.40 

Principles of Human Nutrition. Jordan 2.00 
Quantity Cookery. Richards and Treat. 2.00 
Recipes and Menus for Fifty. Frances 

Lowe Smith 2.00 

Rorer's (Mrs.) New Cook Book 2.50 

Salads, Sandwiches, and Chafing Dish 

Dainties. Mrs. Janet M. Hill 2.00 

Sandwiches. Mrs. Rorer 75 

Sanitation in Daily Life. Richards 60 

School Feeding. Bryant 1.75 

School Lunch, The. Smedley 3.00 

Selection and Preparation of Food. 

Brevier and Meter 75 

Shelter and Clothing. Kinne and Cooley 1.40 

Something Different Dish. Xeil 75 

Source, Chemistry and Use of Food 

Products. Bailey 2.50 

Spending the Family Income. Donham 1.75 

Story of Germ Life. H. W Conn 1.00 

Successful Canning. Powell 2.50 

Successful Family Life on the Moderate 

Income. Abel 2.00 

Table Service. Allen 1.75 

Textiles. Woolman and McGowan 2.60 

The House in Good Taste. Elsie 

de Wolfe 4.00 

The New Housekeeping. Christine Fred- 
erick 1 .75 

The Party Book. Fales and Northend. . 3.00 

The St. Francis Cook Book 5.00 

The Story of Textiles 5.00 

The Up-to-Date Waitress. Mrs. Janet 

M. Hill 1.75 

The Woman Who Spends. Bertha J. 

Richardson 1.00 

Till the Doctor Comes and How to Help 

Him 100 

Vegetable Cookery and Meat Sub- 
stitutes. Mrs. Rorer 1.50 

Virginia Cookery-Book. Smith 1.75 

Vitamines. Benj. Harrow 2.50 



Address All Orders: THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO., Boston, Mass. 



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AMERICAN" COOKERY 



g>uggesrtiong for Cfjrtetmag (gifts 

WOULD not many of your friends to whom you will make Christmas Gifts 
be more pleased with a year's subscription to AMERICAN COOKERY 
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The magazine will be of practical use to the recipient 365 days in the year 
and a constant and pleasant reminder of the 
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To make this gift more complete, we will 
send the December number so as to be received 
the day before Christmas, together with a card 
reading as per cut herewith. 

This card is printed in two colors on heavy 
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S-t^i^KS 9i HiiiM*M A 



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subscriptions at SI. 50 each. Ask for it when sending your order. 

Practical and Useful Cookery Books 

By MRS. JANET M. HILL, Editor of American Cookery 

AMERICAN COOK BOOK $1.50 

This cook book deals with the matter in hand in a simple, concise manner, mainly with the 
cheaper food products. A cosmopolitan cook book. Illustrated. 

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Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 





Fruit Supreme 

Select choice, fresh fruit of all varieties obtainable. 
Slice, using care to remove all skins, stones, seeds. 
membranes, etc.: for example, each section of orange 
must be freed from the thin membranous skin in which 
it grows. Chill the prepared fruit; arrange in fruit 
cocktail glasses with maraschino syrup. A maraschino 
cherry is placed on the very top of each service. 

Vanderbilt Salad 

For each service set a slice of pineapple, fresh or 
canned, on two or three heart-leaves of lettuce; on 
the pineapple set two sections, each, of grapefruit and 
orange (free of all membrane), to leave an open space 
in the center: fill this with match-like pieces of crisp 
Belgian endive: above set a teaspoonful of whipped 
cream, and sprinkle the cream with chopped nuts. 
Add a few grains of salt to the cream before whipping. 




z 



z 






A 



mencan 



Cook 



VOL. XXVII 



ery 



NOVEMBER, 1922 



NO. 4 



Why Not Bulbs? 

By Eliza St. Pierre 



DO you raise bulbs for your winter 
garden? They are easy to grow, 
and to see them in bloom is to 
know that you have added something 
worth while to the beauty of earth. Also, 
they are charming and inexpensive gifts, 
so by all means raise them. 

To begin at the beginning: The first 
requisite is soil, and for this almost any 
moderately good garden soil will do, 
remembering, how r ever, that bulbs do not 
like manure and that, if you are so mis- 
guided as to use fresh manure, you will 
probably have no blossoms. Bone meal 
is good fertilizer for bulbs, it can be 
bought at any hardware store for about 
seven cents a pound, and that quantity is 
enough for a bushel basket of soil. \\ oods 
earth, sometimes called leaf mould, is also 
excellent, giving the soil the loose, porous 
texture in which bulbs thrive. This may 
be had of the florist, but it is much more 
fun to get it yourself, and your quest 
offers a perfectly legitimate excuse (if 
you need one) to get into the w r oods. 
Once there, you wonder why you don't 
come oftener. How still it is! And how 
far away seem the noise and bustle of 
the city! Yet there is sound a-plenty 
here, for there is a w r hir at your very feet, 
as a partridge rises from a thick clump of 
bracken; a gray squirrel may take excep- 
tion to your infringing on his right of 
eminent domain, and lose no time in tell- 
ing you so; a brown bunny may cross 
your path, stopping at safe distance to 
watch you, while far above the wind 
through the pines brings the song of the 
sea. And what was that streak of red 
and patter of feet, which came and went 



in the same breath? There is an appre- 
ciable moment after the event before you 
can collect your wits and know that a 
fox flashed by on the forest floor. Yes, 
on every side there are sound and life, as 
you fill your basket with the dark, fibrous 
soil that has been accumulating for years, 
storing up the richness that will help to 
fill your windows with blossoms this 
winter. Perhaps, you will be fortunate 
enough to bring home some sprays of 
bittersweet, with its red and yellow 
berries, that will brighten a dark corner 
all through the winter. Or you may find 
rolls of birch bark, where some big tree 




WHY NOT USE BULBS HERE? 



251 



252 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



has been cut, and these make a wonderful, 
crackling, yellow flame in the old fireplace. 
You see, leaf mould is not the only thing 
you may bring home from the woods. 
You may bring, in various kinds, as much 
treasure trove as you can carry. And, 
best of all, if you are the right sort, you 
will bring back a very different person 
from the one you fared forth with — oh, 
a much more lightsome, likable, livable 
body! Try it and see! 

Now that vou have soil, leaf mould 
and bone meal, mix thoroughly, adding a 
little sand, if the mixture seems heavy. 
It is well, if one wishes, to make a little 
bed of sand on which to set the bulb, but 
whether you do this or not, be sure that 
the lower part of the pot has a layer of 
sand over the bits of broken crockery in 
the bottom. This insures good drainage. 
Bulbs should be set well up in the pot, or 
pan, and covered with about an inch of 
earth. Shake gently to settle, water 
generously and put away in a cool, dark 
place, not forgetting to label each pot, 



that you may know which ones to bring 
into the light first. Easter or Bermuda 
lilies should be set well down in the pot, 
and the soil added gradually, as the roots 
that support the stalk grow. 

While bulbs will make satisfactory 
root growth in any cool, dark place, as a 
cellar, or well-ventilated closet, the ideal 
treatment is to store them out of doors. 
Make a trench about a foot deep, and as 
long as desired, in two or three inches of 
coal ashes, and on this set your pots and 
boxes of bulbs, as close together as may 
be, filling in and covering with soil, taking 
care to round the top slightly, that it may 
shed the water. This may be done in 
September or October, or even as late as 
November. When the ground freezes 
protect your improvised root cellar with 
straw or leaves, to the depth of three or 
four inches, otherwise the ground may 
freeze so hard that you cannot get your 
bulbs out. It will take from six to eight 
weeks for the bulbs to make satisfactory 
root growth; at the end of that time, dig 




MARGARET DELAND'S WRITING-ROOM. BULBS ARE EVERYWHERE 



WHY NOT BULBS? 



253 




MRS. GARDNER M. LANE'S SUN-ROOM 



out a pot and see if it is ready to force 
into blooming. If top growth has started, 
it may be brought into a cool, light room, 
taking care not to subject it at once to 
direct sunlight or to artificial heat. 
Remember it has been in outer darkness, 
and must be accustomed, by degrees, to 
light and warmth. When the foliage is 
well grown, sturdy and of good color, 
they are ready to bring into flower, but 
do not, at any time, give them too much 
heat. Growth may be restrained or 
hastened by giving them less heat or 
more, as the occasion requires. If you 
want a succession of bloom, choose the 
early and late varieties, and also bring 
them out of the darkness at intervals. In 
this way you may have blossoms from 
December until April. 

If one does not care for the work 
involved in thus growing bulbs, they may 
be grown in water. The well-known 
Chinese lily needs only to be put in a 



dish of water, the bulbs supported by 
pebbles, placed in the dark for a few days, 
and then brought into a moderately warm, 
light room, where it will bloom in about 
a month. Hyacinths do well in the 
regulation, dark, hyacinth glasses, taking 
care that the water comes only just to the 
bulb. Set in a dark place, roots will form 
in about ten days or two weeks, after 
which they may be brought into the 
light, but not put in the window until the 
foliage is well grown. 

Bulbs may be grown in almost any- 
thing that insures drainage, though 
eight-inch pans are perhaps as satis- 
factory as anything. Most of us, how- 
ever, have a surplus of five and six-inch 
pots, and these may be used perfectly 
well. A five-inch pot will accommodate, 
comfortably, either three Roman hya- 
cinth bulbs, four paper white narcissus, 
eight freesias, or four tulips of average 
size. If the bulbs are large, plant one 



254 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




IN THORNDIKE CONSERVATORY 



in a five or six-inch pot, if convenient. 

In buying hyacinths remember that 
the Romans are invaluable for early 
forcing. When potted late in August, 
or early in September, to allow ample 
time for making strong root growth, they 
may blossom by the end of November. 
Their flowers are smaller and more grace- 
ful than the Dutch blossoms, but the blue 
and pink are not as generally satisfactory 
as the white. The miniature or Dutch- 
Romans, as they are sometimes called, 
are the Dutch bulbs in small sizes and it 
is worth remembering that they are 
less expensive than the Roman bulbs, and 
may be depended upon for bloom from 
January until April. 

In planting tulips six or seven may be 
put in a seven-inch pan, or for a more 
royal display put ten in an eight-inch pan. 
If one wishes to help along root growth 
and proper development, it is permissible 
to break the skin at the base of the bulb 
at the time of planting. There is an 
almost endless variety of these splendid 
flowers, and if one is to plant any number, 



it is well to consult a bulb catalog, or, 
better yet, get the advice of a reliable 
grower. 

If you raise bulbs at all, you will want 
as many narcissus as you have room for, 
besides a goodly number to give away. 
Among the large trumpet varieties are 
the Trumpet Major, the Empress and 
Emperor, Golden, Spur, and Princeps; 
Stella Superba is excellent for late pot 
culture, while the Poeticus Ornatus and 
Paper White Grandiflora are standbys for 
the indoor garden. 

Crocuses are not as much grown as 
they should be, for what is more like a 
bit of real springtime indoors than a pot 
of these cheerful little blossoms, the 
yellow ones veritable cups of sunshine, 
while the white ones and purple are as 
lovely in their way? 

Unlike the other bulbs, freesias do not 
require darkness for root growth, but may 
be put into the light immediately upon 
potting. The bulbs are small and ten of 
them may easily be put into a six-inch 
pot. They are equally satisfactory for 



WHY NOT BULBS? 



255 



growing or cutting, and surely there is no 
more lovely spring nosegay than a bunch 
of freesias and daffodils set in a simple 
basket. It brings with it the very spirit 
of out of doors. 

Oxalis, that somewhat old-fashioned 
plant, is always a joy and may be 
depended upon to bloom all winter. 
Three or four bulbs in a hanging pot will 
be a constant delight, with their delicate, 
lacy foliage, and the starry blossoms of 
either pink, white or buttercup yellow. 

The arrangement of flowers in the 
house is apt to be more or less of a ques- 
tion, in these days of apartment life, and 
not too abundant window space. If one 
has group windows, an attractive and 
easily-cared-for arrangement is a wooden 
shelf or tray the length of the windows, 
supported by a simple upright, plain or 
fluted. This tray may be filled with 
gravel or rottenstone, and the pots set 
therein. This eliminates all trouble of 
saucers and permits of generous watering 
and spraying, with no attendant danger 
of injuring carpets or rugs. The shelf 
may be as wide as space permits, or only 
the width of the window. Or it may take 
the form of a box instead of a shelf, being 
entirely independent of the sill. 

If one lacks room for this plan, the 
window sill, itself, may be widened, or, 
when this is not practical, plants may be 
put in a stand, and a wrought iron brazier, 
from across the sea, serves this purpose 
delightfully. Though here shown with a 
mixed planting it is lovely filled with 
pure white hyacinths, or, if one wants to 
lighten up a dark corner, red and gold 
tulips make a gorgeous display in it. 
While it is true that flowers are beautiful 
anywhere, it is equally true that their 
beauty may be doubled by effective 
setting. Yet, sometimes, the happiest 
effects come quite by chance, as when we 
put some Olympia roses, whose stems were 
broken, into a brilliant old copper pan. 
The glinting lights of the copper and the 
pale pink of the roses made a surprisingly 
beautiful combination. 

Assuming that you want to set your 




DELFT OR OLD-TIME BOWL 

pot of flowering bulbs into something, the 
question of a container has its impor- 
tance. This receptacle should either be 
entirely inconspicuous, or else it should 
simply enhance the beauty of the flow- 
ers. One that shrieks its own charms 
ought not to be affronted by the presence 




HYACINTHS T\" OLD TUREEN 



256 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



of rivals in the shape of upstart bulbs. 
The container properly does for the bulb 
what a frame does for a picture — gives 
it a setting and a presentation. That 



done, all is done, and no more should be 
thought of the matter. An overdressed 
person is scarcely more offensive than an 
over-contained bulb. 




IN EDWARD ROSS HOUSE. WHY NOT BULBS IN WINDOW BOX: 



The Home as an Abiding Place 

By Myra Williams Jarrell 

Letter from Mrs. Nat Kinsley to Mrs. John Broom 



Champaign, 111., 
September 15, 1922. 

AS always, dearest Esther, your 
reproaches are deserved. But 
when I tell you the reason for my 
delay in replying to your nice, long letter, 
with all the news about the children and 
John, you will forgive me, I am sure. 

I have been at the mercy of real estate 
people for the past month. Yes, Nat and 



I finally decided that the only way to beat 
the rent hog was to buy something of our 
own. If you have ever endured the 
agony — but of course you have not, you 
lucky woman, with your inherited house 
and furnishings — what if John's first 
wife did plan and direct it? — of trying 
to find something distinctive in the way 
of an abode, with precious little of this 
world's goods to buy it with — you will 



THE HOME AS AN ABIDING PLACE 



257 



know what the past month has been 
to me. 

I know that I was the despair of all the 
men who took me to look at houses. Nat 
says that only my gray hairs protected me 
from scandal, as I was eternally gadding 
off with some man in a Ford. Nat, as 
usual, bless his dear heart, was willing to 
leave all but the final adjustment to me. 
I was hard to please — exceedingly so. 
I know that the real estate men, who were, 
of course, familiar with our circumstances, 
wondered why beggars should be choosers. 

I knew what I wanted. I wanted some- 
thing that would look like Kinsley's. 
But I couldn't explain to them. All I 
could do was to act airy and say, "No, this 
will not do at all!" 

You, dear Esther, sharer of all my joys 
and sorrows since we were curly-haired 
and pig-tailed children, reciting, "Abou 
Ben Adhem," in school, know how I used 
to envy the little girls whom I saw in 
moving wagons, that were piled high with 
household belongings tied in with stout 
ropes. 

They seemed to mock me, those chil- 
dren, who were always tow-headed. I 
felt cheated, somehow, because I had 
never known the fun of moving — ■ of 
exploring new houses — not then — ■ 

Instead, I said my prayers at night in 
the same room through all those child- 
hood years. The same stars peeped in at 
the same window when I was a tiny tot; 
when my legs and arms shot out of my 
dresses; when my curls were knotted up 
and my skirts lengthened; when I first 
became selfconscious in the presence of 
the other sex. 

But since my marriage, the exigencies 
of business and other things, as you 
know, have given me the experience I 
missed in my childhood. 

I have watched my possessions, as 
they were piled into moving trucks; I 
have seen them boxed and crated, and 
loaded on a railroad train; I have looked 
after them with straining eyes, as the 
storage house has swallowed them up — 
those mutely eloquent reminders of days 



when my family circle jwas unbroken. 

And now we have come to the end of 
the long, long trail. Having indulged in 
reminiscence, I will now proceed to tell 
you about our new-old house. 

The hunt finally simmered down to 
two. One was an old house, but I 
wanted it very badly. I thought that my 
heart would break if I could not have it. 
The other was a sensible buy. Any one 
with reason would have preferred it. 
The trouble is, that I am not a reasonable 
person. But why tell you this? 

Do you remember how you and I were 
discussing the fact that houses have 
atmosphere, the last time I visited you, 
and how John laughed at us both for our 
notions? 

The Greens, who owned and had lived, 
for a quarter of a century, in the sensible 
house (no, it was not the old house; the 
old one was built forty years ago), are, 
like the house, good, honest, and sub- 
stantial. They are people who work with 
their hands, and who say their prayers 
with one-half of their minds on the 
tomatoes that must be canned, and the 
sponge that must be set for bread; the 
best people in the world, understand. I 
am not criticizing them — ■ heaven forbid! 
I wish I were also utilitarian, but unfortu- 
nately, the Lord fashioned me differently. 

The house is finished — complete; sat- 
isfied with itself; respecting its own virtu- 
ous qualities, as of course it should; 
without imagination. It turns up its 
nose at visionary folks; does not believe 
in fairies; wonders what books were 
made for. 

But the other house — ah, that is 
different. I never knew the Wingers, 
the people who had lived there for years, 
but finally moved to California, leaving 
the house in the hands of agents to sell. 
But I am sure that their books were well 
thumbed. I am convinced that they 
put ideals before dollars. They were 
probably impracticable, but they got a 
keener joy out of life than if they had 
not been. 

The house broods over the college 



258 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



campus; it has dreams too sweet to put 
into words; it has vision and imagination; 
it would feel that it was all dressed up 
for a party if furnished with books. 

It's a queer, shabby little place, but I 
can see us, and our few possessions, fit 
into it as if it had always belonged to us 
and we to it. I'm sure it wouldn't resent 
us, nor find fault with me, if I wanted to 
let the dishes wait while I ran into the 
library to write a story. 

The other house would sit in judgment 
on me. I would be driven, day in and 
day out, to do the material things which 
would keep and still be waiting for me, 
while the lovely, whimsical, illusive bit 
of imagery that invited my pen would 
slip out of the window if I didn't catch 
it when it wanted to be caught. 

So we have decided on the dear, old 
place. Our friends and well-wishers — 
you know that sort we have with us 
always — ■ advised strongly against it. 
They put forward many excellent reasons 
why we should take the other house. 
From a business point of view — from 
a purely speculative point of view — 
they were entirely right. 

But it happened that we are not buying 
for speculation. I am like the woman 
who inherited a house from a relative, and 
was congratulated upon having a home at 
last. "Why, I have always had a home," 
she gently corrected the congratulater, 
"but I have never had a house to keep it 
in before." 

So now Nat and I want a place to keep 
our home in till the end of time for us; a 
place for the children and grandchildren 
to come to. And we want what we want. 
We are the ones who are to live in it, not 
our advisers. 

I couldn't tell them, but I can whisper 
to you, that had they been too strong for 
us, and had we yielded, as we have so 
many times in less important considera- 
tions, because we knew that we were not 
practical, and that they knew that we 
were not practical, arrd that we knew that 
they knew that we were not; had we, 
then, weakly given in on this larger 



proposition, and allowed our friends to 
decide for us where we should live, I can 
just see myself and that house! 

We would have led a cat and dog life. 
It would have turned up its nose at me, 
and I should have stuck out my tongue 
at it, and there you are! 

However, we stood firm; rather, I did. 
Nat was inclined to follow the line of 
least resistance, but I said to him: a Nat 
Kinsley, I have said nothing when you 
have let our friends and well-wishers 
name the children, decide what college 
we should send them to, and what doctor 
or method of treatment we should employ 
when they were ill; I have been a dutiful 
wife in the matter of following your lead 
in letting them tell us where we should 
spend our vacation, and what car, if any, 
we should buy. I have stood by in 
silence while you have agreed with them 
as to what should be planted in our 
garden, and when we should lay in our 
winter supply of coal. But, I will be 
doggoned if I will let them pick the house 
I am to spend the remainder of my 
days in!" 

That was strong language for me, 
Esther, as you know; and it shocked Nat 
into standing by me when I made the 
decision to buy the house, the atmosphere 
of which suited me down to the ground. 

When you come to visit me — ■ as you 
surely must after we are all settled — 
you will know just what I mean. I'm 
sure you will love the dear old thing as 
much as I do and understand why I 
chose it. 

This has been a long letter, and not a 
word in it except about "me and my 
house." But, if you'll come across with 
another one about your own doings — I 
loved that about John attempting to 
discipline the twins! — ■ I'll try to broaden 
out next time, and tell you all the neigh- 
borhood gossip; that is — if my house 
will let me gossip. Somehow, there's a 
sort of dignity about it which makes me 
feel that I'd be ashamed to gossip. Maybe 
it won't care if it's the harmless sort. 
Give my love to John — you don't 



A BIRD IN THE HAND 



259 



mind, do you — particularly as Nat just 
now looked up over his spectacles and 
said to tell you he sends love? 

Also, give my love to the twins. I 



can't realize that they are ready for high 
school. Do write soon. 

Ever fondly, 

Marian. 



A Bird in the Hand 

By Alice Margaret Ashton 



SMALL matters, perhaps. But, how 
burdensome they can become. 
Linda Cunningham, perched on 
a stool beside her kitchen table, did look 
small and inexperienced and felt even 
more small and inexperienced than she 
looked. The book, containing the house- 
hold accounts, over which she was por- 
ing, appeared both small and amateurish. 
And the salary, which she was endeavor- 
ing, with so much mental agony, to suc- 
cessfully budget — ah, well, that salary 
was actually the smallest part of the 
whole! 

"I tell you, it can't be done!" 

Linda smote the unoffending table with 
her firm, young fist. "It's like those 
puzzles, where they put twelve travelers 
into ten rooms, and everv one has a room 
to himself — 'Sounds fine on paper, but 
just you try doing it with real rooms and 
tired and exacting traveler-persons! 

"Experts and articles say we can budget 
a small salary and save money! We 
thought we could live, at least, on Henry's 
salary! But, all the juggling of figures 
in the world will not make it actually 
work! 

"If we eat and pay the rent we go with- 
out clothes — ■ well, of course — " she 
giggled, rather hysterically. 

"A pretty time to be laughing," she 
admonished herself severely. "It's not 
a laughing matter. I'm sick of having to 
tell Henry I borrowed the recreation 
money to pay for the coal. What 
appalls me is the fact that there must be 
thousands of other young couples strug- 
gling along just as we are — ■ or worse. 
What if we were sick? What if — oh, 
I don't know what to do!" 



But Linda did know what to do and 
she did it. 

She did exactly what she always did 
when her experience or her courage or her 
baking powder gave out. Across her 
scrap of a back lawn, through the rose- 
hedge, her course lay straight to Grandma 
Westlake's. 

"That you, Linda?" called Grandma's 
cheery voice, as she opened the side door. 
"Come in here by the fire. Grandpa has 
gone down to visit a spell with some of his 
old cronies. I've browsed here, by the 
fire, until I declare for it I was getting 
lonesome. Men do not seem to get so 
house-bound as women do, as they get 
older. It's real kind of you to run in — •" 

"Kind? When I always come bearing 
a burden? What do you suppose I 
should have done for the past year if it 
hadn't been for you ? If Henry Cunning- 
ham only knew what you have saved 



urn. 



Grandma Westlake chuckled appre- 
ciatively. "Oh, well, we all have to 
learn — ■ one way and another. What's 
been troubling you today, special?" 

"It's this thing." Linda drew the 
inconspicuous account-book from beneath 
her arm, and dropped it contemptuously 
in her lap. 

"It's a budget, isn't it?" questioned 
Grandma Westlake, eyeing the small book 
rather distrustfully. "I'm afraid I can- 
not help you any about such new-fangled 
ideas as budgets — though I mistrust 
they are a fine thing for young folks. 

"Why, I never even liked to jot down 
expenses in a book, but I did it for a good 
many years because it helps a sight to see 
right in black and white what you've 



260 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



spent your money for. But a budget, 
now!" Grandma shook her white head 
dubiously. 

A disagreeable wind outside rattled at 
the shutters and fanned the fire to a 
livelier glow. Looking thoughtfully about 
the familiar place, Linda realized anew 
the fine, dependable comfort of it. Real 
prosperity spoke from every angle. The 
sofa, grown old enough now to add to its 
value, had undeniably been a noble piece, 
even in its beginning. The rugs were deep 
and warm, the chairs ample and inviting 

"Grandma," said Linda, presently, 
"I'm just driven to distraction with 
living expenses. I thought if there was 
any way out you could show me. But — 
I don't know! Did you and Grandpa 
have a good salary right at the start?" 

"My land, no, child! Why, we had to 
scrimp like everything. We have never 
had what you'd call a very big income. 
We've lived along comfortable and laid 
by enough to care for us in our old age, 
and that's about all you can say for 
Grandpa and me!" 

"And yet you have done all this," 
and Linda waved her hand expressively 
at the surrounding comforts. 

"Course we didn't do this all at once," 
Grandma reminded, smilingly. "We've 
been most of our lives getting our home 
together — one or two things a year, 
likely. The trouble with you young 
people — ■ and we were all that way once 
— ■ you want to have, right at the begin- 
ning, what we have worked a lifetime 
to get." 

"I may have been that way once," 
Linda admitted, ruefully. "But not any 
more. I'd be satisfied now if I could 
just pay the 'butcher, the baker, and the 
candlestick maker.' 

"If you got along on a small salary, and 
made it do and even got ahead a little, 
you must remember how you did it. 
You must have had rules you went by." 

Grandma Westlake rocked gently and 
gazed thoughtfully into the fire. 

"Well, there's keeping a list of expenses, 
same as we spoke of. Your budget is fine, 



I make no doubt. But a list of just 
exactly how you spend every cent of your 
money for a month is what I call food for 
thought! I cured myself of a sight of 
foolishness that wav. 

J 

"When I was short of money to buy 
what sugar I needed, and I looked back 
and noticed how I had spent some of my 
money that month, I wasn't liable to for- 
get it right away. 

"Wasn't any time, scarcely, when, if I 
was tempted to fritter away a dollar, I 
stopped more to keep the silly record out 
of my accounts, than to keep the money 
in my pocket! 

"Another kind of rule I've had that 
has helped is 'to do my best with what I 
have.' Be slow about getting something 



new. 

tt 



Now, take right in your kitchen. 
Use what you already have, before you 
buy too much new. It is so easy to over- 
look your canned fruit and buy oranges. 
A little patch of garden truck will help 
one housewife twice as much as it will 
another. One of them plans every meal 
to see how much of it she can get out of 
her garden, while the other gets whatever 
comes handiest. It is very easy to let 
the tomatoes get overripe, and the peas 
too old, but it means money right out of 
your pocket if you do. 

"Don't buy steak for dinner, if you can 
make what is left of yesterday's roast 
answer the purpose satisfactorily. Don't 
cut the new loaf until the old is utilized. 
This needn't mean poor meals, either. 
Where is the sense in wasting bread, 
already paid for, and spending money for 
more bread? Better use the bread 
already on hand, and use the money for 
olives or cheese or a bottle of cream. 

"Same wav with clothes. Manv and 
many is the time I have fixed over things 
for common and saved enough to buy a 
really good gown or suit. 

"I remember the year I wanted a sofa, 
but had to furnish another bedroom and 
hadn't money for both, 

"First, I set out to make the most of 
what I already had. I was surprised to 



BUDGETING TIME 



261 



find I could get together suitable 'pieces' 
enough for my complete bedroom fur- 
nishings. Then, I painted them all to 
match — ■ a sort of French gray the color 
was. They looked real good, too. 

"I needed a carpet, so I hunted through 
my storeroom, and with what rags I had, 
and what mother helped out, I had a 
ri^ht pretty carpet. 

"Time I got round, about all I had to 
buy was springs and mattress, and I got 
real good ones — ■ they're the main things 
about bedroom furnishings, anyway. And 
I had quite a nice little sum saved toward 
my sofa-fund. 

"Gets to be kind of a game after a 
while. See how far you can go toward 
preparing the next meal without buying 
or 'opening' anything new. See how far 
you can get toward completing your 
summer wardrobe without buying new 



material. Then, when you do get round 
to get something, you'll have money to 
get something good. 

"Use things up as you go. Things left 
over and forgotten are generally spoiled, 
whether it is cold, boiled potatoes, or a 
wool skirt. 

"Many is the garment that has useful 
and artistic possibilities, when hung away, 
that is perfectly useless five years later. 
Don't buy so many new things that you 
cannot use up the old while they are 
reasonably presentable." 

"My goodness," cried Linda. "My 
goodness, Grandma Westlake, I've 
thought of a dozen things I thought I 
had to buy that I do believe to goodness — 

"It's just exactly like a bird in the hand 
being — " 

" 'Worth two in the bush,' any time," 
finished Grandma, emphatically. 



Budgeting Time 

By Elizabeth M. Wright 



FREQUENTLY people ask me how 
I do it; and now I am going to tell 
you. I do it by budgeting my 
time. 

I have always been cosmopolitan; and 
realizing this, more and more, as I grew 
older, I began to wonder how I was ever 
going to find time to do all the delightful 
things there were in the world to do. I 
liked to read, to sew, to cook, to talk, to 
walk, to play golf and bridge. I loved 
music and writing, and I didn't want to 
give up any of them. As I got deeper and 
deeper into things, through my manifold 
desires, I was afraid of either getting so 
absorbed in one of them that I would 
become one sided, or so addicted to all of 
them that I wouldn't have any sides at 
all, and would, gradually, assume the 
shape and character of a rolling stone and 
gather nothing. I thought it over, and 
decided that at least the rolling stone 
acquires a fine polish, even if it doesn't 



stay put long enough to become a corner 
stone, and I cast my lot, accordingly, in 
favor of the wider field of action. 

The years kept on adding more new and 
delightful things to do; and my children, 
not reckoning the difference in age, 
counted upon my co-operation in every- 
thing. At one time in my life I held a 
position as librarian in one of our biggest 
libraries. It was then I learned the value 
of minutes. Working at the profession of 
cataloguing books, I began to realize the 
value of cataloguing one's time and 
resources. It was an invaluable lesson. 
I decided that an immediate time budget 
was necessary in order to make twenty- 
four go into twenty-four without leaving 
a deficit. 

Of course every schedule should be 
elastic. If not, it will soon lack inspira- 
tion and develop into nothing but a rut, 
but one can be systematic and saving of 
the minutes, without any danger of this. 



262 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



At eight o'clock we have breakfast. 
"Pretty late," some will say; but one is 
privileged to have it earlier if he likes it 
so; for my part I don't. During break- 
fast, and for awhile afterwards, if it con- 
tains anything especially interesting, I 
read the morning paper. Then I go to 
the kitchen, look through the larder to see 
what can, or should, be utilized, plan and 
order the meals for the day and sometimes 
make a salad, a dessert, or a cake. In 
the kitchen I have, fastened to the 
kitchen cabinet, a schedule of work for 
the maid. Every day's work is carefully 
outlined so that she never has to ask what 
to do next, and it goes on systematically 
with no waste of time and no confusion. 
When the day's schedule is finished, she is 
entitled to the leisure time remaining, so 
if she cares to get an early start and work 
fast, she is the one who benefits by it. 

I next go to my desk and write for two 
hours, sometimes longer, but never less; 
then I practice for an hour or an hour and 
a half, for I am a member of a Music Club, 
and the president of a Writer's Club. It 
is now lunch time, one o'clock. If there 
happen to be a few moments left, I read, 
usually a magazine. 

After luncheon I rest for half an hour, 
absolutely relaxed, with my eyes closed, 
and my mind as blank as my expression. 
Then I sew, or mend, or embroider, or 
write letters or manuscripts, or practice 
on the piano, or study or read something; 
depending upon what seems the most 
necessary or most alluring. There is 
where the elasticity comes in, for why not 
do, as nearly as possible, the thing you 
want to do? It is freedom that we all 
crave, and we could all have lots more of 
it if we planned our daily lives with more 
intelligence. Nothing cramped ever grew 
or flourished abundantly. 

At half past four I dress up. I don't 
want you to infer that I haven't been 
dressed all this time; for I believe in good- 
looking, if inexpensive, house dresses. I 
have three of blue-checked gingham with 
white collars and cuffs, made in one 
piece, that cost a dollar and a quarter, 



each, for I made them myself; and they 
are becoming even if I have not the dimen- 
sions of a flag pole. When I "dress up" 
at four-thirty I feel, and look, fresh all 
over, then I do any variety of things, 
according to demand or desire. Some- 
times a picture show, or a call, or a book. 
or a walk, or game of cards; and when my 
husband comes home I am ready for 
dinner at six-thirty, and a long, delight- 
ful evening afterwards, retiring any time 
between ten-thirty and eleven-thirty. 
These are also bad hours, some may say: 
but freedom, remember, and if I find my 
magazine or book absorbs, I sit up later, 
or if I get sleepy, I go to bed earlier; and 
there you are — "taking things always 
by the smooth handles." 

I vary this schedule often, but always 
get into the twenty-four hours the things 
I have told you. Sometimes I play golf 
or walk in the morning, then I write and 
practice in the afternoon, and perhaps 
the next day I switch about again to 
straighten things out or to make up for 
too much play time. Or something may 
come up to compel a change of schedule 
for a few days. For instance, I had a call 
the other morning for a thousand-word 
article at once, so I put other things aside, 
for the time being, as that was of pri- 
mary importance, and tackled it imme- 
diately, with the result that it was out of 
my system before I had a chance to think 
whether I wante4 to do it or not. 

One thing I never do is work in the 
evening. I frequently play on the piano 
because my husband likes it, but it is for 
recreation and not practice. I always 
keep a work basket in the living room, an 
ornamental one; and when friends drop 
in just to talk, I pick up some sewing. It 
is astonishing the amount of sewing, or 
embroidering, one gets done in this way. 
Then we have a small circle who meet at 
our house one evening a week to read. 
We usually read drama; each person 
taking a character and reading that part. 
Sometimes we change to short stories and 
spend an evening with Kipling, Steven- 
son, Josef Conrad, Leonard Merrick, or 



THOUGHTS FOR THE KITCHEN 



263 



some other favorite. We, also, have a 
dramatic club, which holds rehearsals at 
our house, which is happily adapted to 
this purpose, having large rooms. Then 
we have musicals, community meetings, 
open meetings of our Writers' Club at 
different times throughout the year. 

During two years of the war, I had no 
servant at all, and, in addition to cooking 



and housework, had charge of the enter- 
tainments at camp. I never could have 
kept it up without a systematic budgeting 
of my time. It is the same principle as 
that of taking care of the pennies. Try 
keeping track of the sixty minutes in an 
hour sometime, and see what you can get 
out of it. You will be astonished to find 
how far an hour can go. 



Thoughts for the Kitchen 

By Florence Fields 



HOW fortunate is the woman who 
has an attractive view from her 
kitchen window. As she stands 
at her sink preparing the food, or washing 
the dishes, she lifts her eyes to a bit of 
nature outside, while her thoughts are 
called away from the homely task, and 
she receives an inspiration. 

A western friend has an inspiring view 
of the beautiful, snow-capped Mt. Hood — ■ 
an old, faithful, unchanging guardian of 
the passing years — from above her 
kitchen sink. Hers is a vienv which 
recalls the statement of the Psalmist of 
old, "I will lift up mine eyes unto the 
hills, from which cometh my strength." 

We cannot all have mountains, or 
other scenic views from our kitchen 
windows, to inspire us, or all have attrac- 
tive back yards, or flower gardens to 
cheer us and rest our eyes. Then let us 
strive to make the interior view of our 
kitchen as pleasant and helpful as possible. 

We often spend more hours of the day 
in the kitchen than in any room of the 
house. Then should we not spend more 
thought to make our work there as 
pleasant and easy as possible? 

Some of our architects and builders 
are spending much thought on the mod- 
ern kitchen, the aim being to make it 
beautiful as well as convenient and sani- 
tary, with fresh air, sunshine, well- 
placed artificial lights and a pleasing 
color scheme to suit the individual taste. 

Yellow is the most cheerful color, but 



let us strive to make the result so attrac- 
tive that we will glory in our achievement, 
and enjoy the many hours spent there. 
Perhaps even the man of the house will 
enjoy sitting down and chatting to us as 
we work, and it is more than likely that 
"the neighbor who runs in the back way" 
will remain so long her dinner will suffer 
for it. 

The kitchen is to each of us an indivi- 
dual problem, for ninty-two per cent of 
women do all their own work, and a 
rule that applies to one will not apply to 
all. The results that we produce there 
are all-important, as they affect the 
health and happiness of our family. 

Whether our room be old-fashioned or 
modern — ■ and few kitchens are strictly 
modern — whether it be large or small — 
it is not the size of the room, but the 
arrangement that counts — ■ let us aim to 
make it cheerful and convenient, giving 
much attention to the furnishing, aiming 
for usefulness, as well as beauty. Let us 
have every convenience to save time and 
labor, but not one useless article. 

If our kitchen is not a modern one — 
not all modern kitchens are attractive, 
many look too much like a laboratory — 
and if our cabinet, cupboard, and sink 
are not grouped near the stove, as they 
should be, then we should use every step- 
saving device we can obtain to conserve 
our energy. 

If there is not the proper kitchen cup- 
board, holding the working materials for 



264 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



preparing the meal, thus requiring many 
trips back and forth to the pantry, several 
feet distant, then the table should be 
fitted with ball-bearing rollers, making it 
easily moved to the pantry door, equipped 
with all the articles needed in the cooking 
and rolled back to the stove or sink, where 
the process can be finished with few steps. 

When preparing cookies or doughnuts, 
the table can be drawn up close to the 
oven, where they can be transferred back 
and forth with little effort. The table 
will again save steps, when the dishes are 
brought in from the dining room. They 
are scraped and stacked on it, then it is 
rolled to the right of the sink, where they 
are ready for the pan. It, also, receives 
the clean dishes, then is rolled back to the 
pantry or cupboard, where they are 
stored. 

Many cooks do not use the kitchen tray 
enough. If the ice-box is across the 
room, or on the back porch — as many 
of them are — take the tray to the ice- 
box and load it with what is needed in 
the cooking, and place it on the table near 
you. When through with these articles 
they can be carried back to the ice-box at 
one time, thus saving steps, as well as 
ice, for each time the refrigerator door is 
opened a rush of warm air enters that 
lowers the temperature several degrees. 

Again the tray is used in trips to the 



dining room — ■ unless a wheel tray is 
owned — being loaded at the ice-box with 
all the articles needed on the table. 
Another indispensable piece of furniture 
is the folding ladder-stool, used for many 
purposes, and which enables one to sit 
while doing many things. 

If the time comes when the women 
design and manufacture our kitchen 
utensils, we may have an improvement 
in looks and usefulness. Why do we 
leave it to men to make for us left- 
handed skillets and pans, and other 
awkward articles? 

W T ho is there that has not worked out 
some of her best ideas and formed exten- 
sive plans while her hands were busy with 
kitchen work? Some of you have com- 
posed poetry there, outlined your speech 
for the club, or committed the words to 
your new song. You found your mind 
and hands worked in unison. 

Then let our motto for the kitchen be 
efficiency, convenience, and cheerfulness. 
The one who allows her kitchen to take 
too much of her time and vitality is 
robbing her family, as well as herself, of 
the happiness and comfort she should 
produce in other departments of her 
home, for the managing of a home, and 
the care of a family is a profession, and 
all the wisdom we can acquire is needed 
for the success of our undertaking. 



How Does Your House Look from the Street? 

By Elizabeth X. Simmonds 



WE have all met the type of 
woman who regards, in the glass, 
her appearance only as seen 
from the front, and gives not a thought to 
the effect she presents from the back. 
She has her fellow in the woman who 
cares only for the effect of the interior of 
her rooms, and concerns herself not at all 
about the lookof her house from the street. 
Walk along almost any of our residen- 
tial streets, and vou will notice what I 



mean. Each floor of the house boasts 
curtains or window shades of a different 
hue, and very often the shades are 
crooked, and the curtains dingy. If one 
espies a vase or a statue on a table, one 
can glimpse only a portion of it. The 
front door bears no relation, in tint, to 
any of the hangings discernible, and its 
door furniture, by which I mean bell- 
push, letterbox fitment, and key plate, 
are of a design and craftsmanship often 



THE ENGLISH PORK-PIE 



265 



beneath contempt. It is almost as if the 
owner cherished a secret contempt against 
the passerby. Compare such a house as 
this with one of which the owner has been 
alive to its decorative possibilities. Here 
the curtains, though they may vary, as 
to material, will yet display the same tone 
and color throughout. It may be that 
the parlor shows inner curtains of filet 
net in it; that the dining room curtains 
are but lined with it, and that it only 
appears in its full entirety in the bed- 
room. Still at every window the one 
tone will be visible, giving character and 
distinction to the whole. 

This tone it will be, which will influence 
that of the door. Say that the curtain 
tint is a light biscuit shade, this will give 
an infinitude of possibilities to the door 
paint — sapphire blue, lacquer red. sage 
green, all being attractive alternatives 
employable. Or, if a deeper tint, such 
as russet brown or Wedgewood blue, be 
chosen for the windows, the door paint 
may well be selected to match. 

When I see the beautiful and imagina- 
tive work, which is produced by metal 
workers, in regard to door furniture, I 
often marvel that its adoption is not more 
general among those who are able to 
afford themselves the pleasure of sub- 
stituting good, original work for poor and 
machine-made. At various Arts and 
Crafts Exhibitions I have seen knockers 
designed after mythological dragons, after 
the human figure, after clusters of natural 
flower forms; bells, in all manner of 
fantastic fashions, and letterboxes, that 
almost made one feel inclined to post 
oneself. And vet the demand for such 



things has scarcely, as yet, been aroused. 
If householders would realize the value of 
the first impression made on a visitor, 
while waiting to be admitted, I am sure 
the metal worker's products would be 
more greatly in demand. 

In many houses of the larger type an 
unduly unwelcoming air is imparted to 
the portico, by reason of the fact that its 
excessive width gives it a forbidding air. 
A couple of large tubs, painted in some 
pleasing shade of green or brown, and 
holding a shrub or oleander, would do 
much to add to the attractiveness of this 
portion of the house. Window boxes are 
also cheerful, and give an air 01 home- 
liness to the place. So many houses, 
especially in the large cities, are either 
stiff and dreary looking, from the outside, 
or else give the impression that the tenant 
is untidy. 

How many unattractive-looking houses 
one sees, as one goes to and from 
business or shopping — houses, that a 
li tie care would transform into places of 
beauty and homeliness, which would 
cheer the eyes of the passerby. It 
housewives would only realize the impres- 
sion the appearance of their house gives 
from the street, I am sure that many 
would devote more time and thought to 
the exterior. 

It is wonderful how the display of taste 
in one house, in a street, will swiftly open 
the eyes of the other householders to their 
shortcomings. You may be the means 
of revolutionizing the aspect of an entire 
row of houses by having been the first to 
give thought to the appearance of yours 
from the street. 



"The English Pork-Pie 

By Mabel Bowler 



»» 



THERE is no more delicious addi- 
tion to the cold lunch, than a 
correctly made and properly 
baked English Pork-Pie. The greatest 
epicure, unless he is a victim of chronic 
indigestion, could not fail to enjoy it. 



Some of the boys who visited England 
during the war will remember these 
pork-pies, although at that time they were 
very expensive. 

Before the war, when pork was cheap 
and the other ingredients proportionately 



266 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



so, these pies could be purchased any- 
where in England for twenty cents a 
pound, but even up to last year, they 
could not be bought for less than sixty- 
: cents a pound, and. at that, the 
quality was not of pre-war excellence. 

Few people make their own pork-pies 

England, because the butchers usually 

rialize. and are experts, in this particular 

branch of the bu : although people 

living in the country, who kill their own 

pigs at Christmas time, are the exception. 

Living in the country when a little girl, 
I remember standing on a footstool at the 
kitchen table and watching my grand- 
mother making them. And nobody 
could make pork-pies, or cakes, or any- 
thing, like grandmother could! 

L nconsciously. I must have learned 
her secret and remembered it. Sixteen 
years ago I came to this country and 
found I could not buy the real thing. 
I first tried to make them myself, and 
from the first trial, although not so 
perfect as practice has since made them, 
they were a decided success. 

Occasionally, I give one away to 
particular friends, and it is they who are 
responsible for this article. They a; - 
predate them so much, and have so 
often urged me to make them for sale and 
promised me regular orders at my own 
price, that, although I am not able to 
undertake such a venture, perhaps there 
are many other women who could and 
would, and I can assure any such, that 
they would find it a very lucrative way 
of earning money on the side. 

Just imagine a light lunch-room, where 
these pies, made as they may be made, 
were on the menu every day, served with 
tea or coffee and light rolls. I have no 
hesitation in predicting that such a 
"special" would be a continual draw — 
always providing the same standard of 
excellence were consistently maintained. 

Some time before the war the price of 
pork went up, but now that everything in 
that line is so much cheaper, I feel sure 
that the recipe will be generally ap- 
preciated. 



In regard to the pork, the loin is the 
best cut. although, if expense be a con- 
sideration, the shoulder can be used with 
almost equally good results. 

Before cutting it up, or mincing 
cut off the fat from the top side to about 
half an inch in thickness, otherwise you 
will have too large a proportion of fat 
for your lean. 

The ingredients are as follow 

For the filling: 2 lbs. loin or shoulder 

of pork. 

For the jelly: 2 small pigs feet. 

For the crust: 4 cups of flour 

4 level spoonfuls of 

baking-powder 
2 level teaspoonfuls of 

salt 
2 cups of lard 
1 cup of water 
Juice of half a lemon 
The yolk of one egg. 

Remove the meat from the bone and 
either cut it up into very small pieces 
(size of a small dice), or put it through 
the largest holes of your mincing ma- 
chine. 

Some professionals claim that the 
latter process is detrimental to the flavor 
of the meat, but if so, it is so little that 
I have been unable to discriminate 
between the two. 

Xow, place the bones in a deep sauce- 
pan with the pig's feet, just cover with 
water and allow to simmer until the meat 
is ready to fall off the bones. The stock 
is the jelly you pour into the pies after 
they are baked, and it should be kept 
warm. 

The pig's feet can be served as a 
separate dish, either hot. with sauce, or 
cold, with vinegar. 

To every cup of cut-up pork — fairly 
well packed — add one-fourth of a cup of 
cold water, one level (small) teaspoonful, 
each, of salt and pepper. Mix well. 
You may prefer a little more or less 
seasoning — this is a matter of taste. 

Xow make the paste. Mix the flour, 
salt and baking powder together in the 
ordinarv way. and work into it half the 



THE ENGLISH PORK-PIE 



267 



lard. Dissolve the rest of the lard in the 
hot water; add lemon juice and beaten 
yolk of egg. Mix well, and knead for a 
few minutes as you would when making 
shortbread. Keep it warm while using 
it, otherwise you will find a difficulty in 
moulding it, and it will crack and let out 
the gravy. 

Now, take a half-pint cream bottle, 
a small jam jar, or a pint sealer, according 
to the size of pie you wish to make, and 
flour the outside well. Beginners should 
try making small pies, first, as large ones 
are more difficult to handle. 

Take a lump of dough, taking care to 
judge the right size, press the jar into the 
center of it and mould it around the jar, 
as in Fig. 3, to about half an inch in 
thickness, flouring well inside as you 
mould. Be sure to choose a jar with a 
smooth bottom, or the crust will break. 
It is possible you can buy a wooden 
mould to answer this purpose — ■ like a 
potato-masher with a short handle. 

Remove the jar or mould carefully, 
and fill the shape with meat to half an 
inch from the top. Moisten the edges, 
and cover with a smaller round of paste. 
Press the edges well together, brush over 
with the beaten white of egg, and pierce a 
hole in the center with a steel — I make 
two holes in a large pie. See illustration 1 . 
Decorate as in illustrations 4 and 5. 

The above is the professional way, but 
sometimes, however careful an amateur 



may be in moulding the crust, it will 
crack in the baking and the gravy will 
run out; and if you lose the gravy and 
the warm stock that is afterwards poured 
in, you take away the cream. I have 
lost it myself many a time, and the 
family always resents the fact. So, in 
order to insure absolute success, I 
recommend amateurs to make the pies at 
first in very small square, or round tins, 
with loose bottoms, in which case you 
merely line the tin with paste. But you 
must see that all your joins are made 
gravy-proof. See illustration 2. 

The baking is very important; in- 
sufficiently baked pies are very injurious. 

Put them into a hot oven, at first. 
When beginning to brown, gradually 
reduce the heat. They should be a rich, 
golden-brown when taken from the oven. 
A small pie, weighing about a pound, will 
require an hour, at least, a large one two 
hours. There are many details that 
experience only can decide. 

When you take them from the oven, 
clear the holes, and pour in as much 
stock (jelly) as the pie will hold. If 
baked in tins, do not remove until 
quite cold, as the jelly must have time to 
set. You may use very small pies not 
weighing half a pound the same day, but 
a larger pie should not be cut until the 
following day. 

The quantities given will make four 
small or two large pies. 



First Aid for Genevive 

By A. Borden Stevens 



IT is a long time since I thought of 
"Topsy." Topsy, in "Uncle Tom's 
Cabin," you know, who "jus' growed." 
I wouldn't have remembered her just 
from reading about it, except that mother 
was always comparing a little maid she 
had when I was growing up to "Topsy." 
So, now I am married, with a home of my 
own, and a baby, another maid, who 
looked just like "Topsy," walked into 
my kitchen. 

Only her name wasn't Topsy; it was 
Genevive, and she was taller than Topsy. 
But she was black, with fuzzy wool all 
over her head, and she looked as though 
she "jus' growed," and hadn't known when 
to stop — like a fairy bean-stalk. 

When I advertised I told what I 
could pay, for I didn't want to talk to a 
lot of cooks who expected fancy wages. 
Jack is getting a good salary for a young 
man; but now there is baby, and such a 
lot of things to do with money, besides 
saving a little for his education, by and 
by. So I named a very modest sum, 
and asked for a maid to come in mornings 
to clean up. I did feel as though I could 
do the rest myself. 

If Genevive had not had her apron 
with her, and such a good reference from 
people who knew her mother, I don't 
believe I should have let her in; but we 
had had a party the night before, and what 
with putting baby to bed, and being very 
tired, I left the dishes, and had to use a 
whole new set for breakfast. 

You know how you feel after a party — 
not a bit like working, and there were all 
those extra dishes, and the morning work, 
besides baby's bath and the bottles to 
fix, and dinner at twelve, because Jack 
had to take a trip out of town on the one 
o'clock train that afternoon. So any 
sort of a maid looked good. 

She came to the front door, and said 
she had come to work. I felt a little shy, 



although she was ten years younger than 
I, a mere child, after all. But she looked 
so queer, and yet she wasn't a bit bashful, 
but had the air of a spoilt child who was 
sure everybody would be good to her. 

She walked right in, and I could see she 
was used to front doors and to pianos, for 
she spied that first thing, and said, 
"You got a nice house; I wisht I lived 
in it." 

I remembered that it was best to be a 
little distant with those who are to serve 
you, so I pretended not to hear, and led 
the way to the kitchen. The sight of all 
those dishes did not trouble her a bit- 
She put her apron on in a capable way r 
and I went upstairs to wash the baby. 
Pretty soon I began to dream that I was 
in one of those restaurants where the 
machinery is all on the outside, and you 
hear it clatter. My dishes are not like 
that, you know. They aren't the kind 
you can throw around any old way. 
Why, most of them were wedding pres- 
ents, and Jack and I have been so careful 
of them! 

I did not dare to go to look. I just 
washed the baby all over again, I was so 
flustered, and he was so indignant that he- 
cried loud enough to bring me to myself. 

Then, Genevive called at the foot of 
the stairs, in a voice that made me jump r 
"What'll I do next, Ma'am?" 

I stuck the baby into bed with his 
bottle, and hurried to the kitchen. The 
dishes were all right, but they were all 
stacked in the middle of the kitchen table. 
I didn't dare to have her touch them 
again, so I took her upstairs to make the 
beds. 

"I jus' love to make beds," she cried, 
so I left her to do it, and what do you 
think? She made them up with only one 
sheet, and with the spread tucked in at 
the head instead of the foot! I didn't 
know there were so many things you 



268 



FIRST AID FOR GENEVIVE 



269 



could do wrong to a bed! When I told 
her about it, she looked astonished. 

"Every white-folks house where I goes, 
they put two sheets on the baids!" 
Evidently in Genevive's circle, two sheets 
were a wicked waste. 

I wanted to write to mother, so I went 
into the sitting room where my desk is, 
while Genevive dusted the parlor. Soon 
I heard the musical stein that Uncle Will 
gave us. You know, when you lift it, it 
plays a tune, from a little music-box 
inside. I didn't pay any attention. 
Mother used to say that it was not best 
to be always at a servant, but to wait 
awhile after the event to explain what 
you wished changed. I could see Gene- 
vive through the crack in the door, and 
she had the best time, taking it up and 
dusting it until it ran down. 

Then she turned it over to investigate 
the works, and, really, I think mother 
would feel I was excusable to interfere, 
for it was an heirloom sort of a thing, 
and nobody wanted it broken. Then, 
too, sometimes when baby is fussy^ 
nothing else keeps him so quiet as the 
tinkling music from that stein. 

While I was about it, I asked Genevive 
not to meddle with things, but to do her 
work as quickly as possible. She didn't 
seem to mind at all, but said, "Yes'm," 
quite cheerfully, and then hummed a tune 
while she finished the parlor. Jack 
wouldn't like that, but you can't find 
fault with a girl for being happy, can 
you? Jack says it is not necessary to be 
happy out loud, but I am not sure. 

Jack's study is a little bit of .a room; 
he keeps his books there, and his easiest 
chair, and of course, since he takes care of 
baby sometimes in the late afternoon, 
when I go out, he has a few picture books 
to try to distract him with when he is 
teething. 

Genevive was a long time in the study. 
I^hated to interfere; mother says that 
servants do best if you trust them, and 
let them proceed in their own way, pro- 
vided it is a good way. In my mind, 



between writing sentences to mother, I 
rehearsed all the motions of dusting that 
could be done in Jack's study. I even 
went over the floor, although I knew she 
would never think of that. So, finally, I 
got up boldly, for of course nobody likes 
people tiptoeing slyly to peep at them, 
and walked in as though I had come for 
something. On the threshold I stopped 
short. There was Genevive curled up in 
Jack's chair, her fuzzy head bent over an 
A. B. C. picture book! 

She didn't look at all disconcerted 
when she saw me, but I'm afraid I 
showed I was surprised. 

"Why, Genevive!" I exclaimed. "This 
isn't dusting. I don't want you to touch 
things in the rooms except to clean them." 

She smiled up at me, and said, "It's 
real interestin', it is." 

So I couldn't scold any more. It 
seems she has never worked out before, 
and she is a petted child at home, even 
though they are in simple circumstances; 
and, do you know, she is earning money 
because she wants to buy a camera to 
take when the girl scouts go on their 
hikes! I don't believe mother knows 
much about that kind of a servant. At 
any rate, she didn't teach me. I wrote 
her all about it, and each step in the day, 
and asked her for detailed directions, as 
to how to deal with a trusting soul who 
felt more like a visitor than like a worker, 
but would make a fine worker if she were 
trained. 

Then Genevive came to say she was 
through, and to ask when she should 
come again. Not if she should come 
again, you notice! 

This was Tuesday; I counted up on 
my fingers, and realized that I would not 
hear from mother before Thursday, by 
return mail. I told her to come Friday, 
and begin her week then. She looked 
sort of disappointed, but I just had to 
have some expert advice in the matter, 
and although I don't ever keep things 
from Jack, there are bits about this sit- 
uation that he would not understand. 



270 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



AMERICAN COOKERY 

FORMERLY THE 

BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL 

MAGAZINE 

OF 

Culinary Science and Domestic Economics 

Subscription $1.50 per Year, Single Copies15c 
Postage to Foreign Countries, 40c per Year 

TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The date stamped on the wrapper is the date 
on which your subscription expires; it is, also, an 
acknowledgment that a subscription, or a renewal 
of the same, has been received. 

Please renew on receipt of the colored blank 
enclosed for this purpose. 

In sending notice to renew a subscription or 
change of address, please give the old address 
as well as the new. 

In referring to an original entry, we must know 
the name as it was formerly given, together with 
the Post-office, County, State, Post-office Box, 
or Street Number. 

Entered at Boston Post-office as Second-class Matter 

Statement of the Ownership, Management, etc., required by 
the Act of Congress of Aug. 24, 1912, of the 

AMERICAN COOKERY, published monthly 
except Julv and September, at Boston, Mass., 
for October 1, 1922. 

Publishers 

Boston Cooking-School Magazine Co. 

221 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Editor: Janet M. Hill 

Business Managers 

Bent. M. Hill and Robert B. Hill 

Owners 

Bent. M. Hill, Janet M. Hill, Robt. B. Hill 

Known bond or other security holders, None 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 23rd day of September* 
1922. 



(Seal) 



A. W. BLAKE, 

Notary Public. 



WE THANK THEE, LORD ! 

We thank thee, Lord, with grateful hearts 

For each day's watchful care, 
For bounties more than we deserve, 

And friendship's ties. Our prayer 
Would compass, this Thanksgiving Day, 

Thy children far and near, 
Imbue them with thy blessing! Grant 

Them happiness and cheer. 
When twilight shadows gently fall 

About us, Lord, we pray 
That thou wilt give us strength to do 

Thy will from day to day! 

Caroline L. Sumner. 



REDUCTION IN SECOND-CLASS 
POSTAL RATES 

OF course, we favor this reduction 
now. The public has waited long 
and patiently for some relief in this mat- 
ter, but as yet without avail. The 
injury inflicted by the postal rates of our 
revenue law is already very great; in 
many cases relief will come like a pardon 
after execution. "The power to tax is 
the power to destroy," said Chief Justice 
John Marshall. "But, because Congress 
has the power to tax newspapers and 
periodicals out of business is no argument 
for the use of that power. Oppressive 
taxation is a most effective method of 
destroying the press, whose freedom is 
guaranteed in the Constitution." We 
favor always a reduction in taxation; we 
favor, also, a reduction in expenditures. 
The two things must go along together. 
When and where are we to begin? Let 
us begin now and extend the process all 
along the line. 

Likewise, we approve of the late veto 
of bonus legislation. In his message to 
Congress our President gave good and 
sufficient reasons for his action. One 
cannot go about anywhere and catch a 
glimpse of what our government is doing, 
and is planning to do, for the disabled and 
shell-shocked soldier without being over- 
whelmed and filled with amazement. 
The undertaking is stupendous and far- 
reaching. Any so-called compensation 
act at present is ill-timed and ill-con- 
ceived. The first need of the ex-service 
man is to get back into the regular busi- 
ness of life; his reward is safe and secure. 
The desire to shirk any just obligation on 
the part of the public does not exist. 

RIGHT AND RESPONSIBILITY 

FOR many years the head of organized 
labor has been preaching the right jto 
strike, the right of collective bargaining, 
but the corresponding responsibility that 
goes along with the organized strike seems 
to have been entirely ignored. No doubt 
one has a perfect right to quit work at 



EDITORIALS 



271 



pleasure, but has one the right to compel 
his neighbor to quit work, also? Now, it 
seems to us, if anything be morally and 
everlastingly right, it is the open shop, 
the right to work at will and without let 
or hindrance. We want the inalienable 
rights guaranteed to us by the law of the 
land. 

Of what use are constitutions and laws 
today? Are they simply to be knocked 
and evaded? Our forefathers designed 
the Constitution for no such purpose. 

"These are its general principles; and 
they are challenged today. When we 
come to concrete principles, the challenge 
grows more angry. The right to labor, 
the right of a man to earn his own living 
— can others combine against it? If not, 
can they be enjoined, prevented before- 
hand, not punished afterward? The 
right to freely assemble — is not a meet- 
ing of union men to discuss a strike pro- 
tected by this principle? The right to 
freedom in trade — ■ is it not infringed by 
combinations of capital to sell or to with- 
hold, to limit output, to require exclusive 
contracts? Stated more broadly, is not 
a combination, whether of labor or capital, 
constitutionally unlawful? Class legis- 
lation — is it forbidden under our Con- 
stitution? If so, may we legislate special 
privileges or protections' to farmers, to 
manual laborers, for negroes, for women? 
Freedom of contract — may a legislature 
compel a man to work only five hours a 
day who wants to work ten? May it say 
what his wage shall be? May it prohibit 
a higher reward for excellence? Freedom 
of speech — when Daugherty gets an 
injunction forbidding strikers to talk, 
does he infringe this? Freedom of the 
press — when the leader of the Miners' 
Union posts, or a newspaper prints, an 
article urging that 'scabs' be treated as 
common strike-breakers, is he protected 
by this?" 

For instance, under the conditions of 
life that now prevail, we are entitled to 
easy access to fuel and the transportation 
of commodities, at reasonable rates. 
Why are we held up by unjust restrictions 



and deprived of these, the most common 
necessities of life? A right carries with 
it a responsibility. Communism has 
never worked in practice, or been justi- 
fied on earth; and it never will be justi- 
fied, for there are ever those who will not 
work, yet they expect to share, freely, in 
the products of the earth. The respon- 
sibility for the present existing state of 
affairs must rest somewhere; we want to 
see it placed exactly where it belongs. If 
we must suffer, we want to know why we 
are suffering. At least, let us have that 
much of consolation. 

CONSERVING THAT DOLLAR 

ONLY two cents, or three, as the case 
may be, for an extra, unread daily 
paper/but that two or three cents makes 
a very snowball of itself, and in no time 
becomes a dollar, spent for what? For 
waste paper crammed on the dumb- 
waiter. 

Don't neglect the news of the day, but 
no house-mistress has the time to read 
more than one paper. Choose the one 
best suited to the taste, and save the 
once-wasted pennies to buy a copy of a 
good magazine. Or add it to that saving 
account. 



The pictures on the packages of dried 
fruits and cereals are pretty, aren't they? 
And the eggs put up in neat cartons are 
so much more attractive than the heaps 
of white and brown ones in the bins. So 
one orders the good-looking things and 
pays a third again as much — for art 
that ends in the garbage can. Why not 
try the bulk groceries? Alany times 
they are much better, and always they 
are cheaper, for the manufacturers natur- 
ally cannot give away all that art! 
The buyer pays for it, of course. Take 
your art on a dollar bill! 



Was the lighting-bill simply frightful 
last month? And have a careless family 
utterly refused to consider the current 
and how it runs away with the dollars? 
Do they roam happily from room to 



272 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



room and leave all the lights flaring? 
Then, save that dollar by setting a 
"fine" table in a conspicuous place. So 
much for leaving one light on, so much for 
two — and have a receptacle handy to 
collect those fines. A sugar-bowl is 
suggestive. The lighting-bill will auto- 
matically pay itself the first month. 
After that, economy will become the 
smart thing, in the matter of lighting — 
when the family sees the joke is on them. 



She is a dainty little French girl, being 
brought up as only a French girl can be, 
to be womanly, neat — • and saving. 
She comes, sometimes, to be helped in 
puzzling arithmetic problems, and she 
brings with her as "scratch-paper," 
smoothly folded sheets of wrapping 
paper. Other children, whose parents 
are in poorer circumstances, use pad- 
paper, for which they pay, these times, 
high prices, but little Louisette solves her 
examples on what is thrown away by 
others. She solves more than examples. 
Real thrift is in using everything — ■ 
one's brain, too, in seeing economy. 



The white and brown egg question is a 
matter of geography, as well as fancy. 
Boston people prefer brown eggs — ■ and 
New Yorkers imagine an egg must be 
snow-white. The money that is wasted 
in those fancies would start savings 
accounts in numerous banks. Forget 
the fads and save the dollars. Isn't part 
of the "best" egg and butter fad sheer 
"brag"? It is so satisfying to one's self- 
esteem to say, in a louder voice than 
necessary, "Two dozen of the best, 
white eggs, and a pound of your best 
butter." And then pay half again as 
much for the purchase as the customer 
next in line who takes "eggs" and 
"butter," without qualifications — and, 
sometimes, the articles come from the 
same receptacles! 



her. And a shampoo is such a luxury. 
Luxury is right! Next time, say, "Get 
thee behind me," and shampoo that 
crowning glory yourself. It can be done 
— ■ even if time is limited. And time 
need not be limited if it is budgeted, 
as the hours should be, in an age when 
the minutes, even, are dollars. Turn 
part of your recreation hour into the 
shampoo — ■ read that story which has 
waited so long, while the tresses dry, 
and do some of that relaxing which be- 
longs to every day. Then pop that saved 
dollar into the bank. 



Do you adore sweets? And can't 
pass a candy shop without going in? 
Do French pastries intrigue your soul? 
Perhaps your family demands a daily 
ration of sweets? And have you ever 
counted the cost? A certain amount of 
sweet is necessary to the bodily well- 
being, but pure sweet. And it should 
not be gained at the expense of other 
things. If you are a housewife, make 
your own sweets. "Roll your own," 
when it comes to pastries and cakes. 
Spread your artistic soul over the top of 
cookies and tarts, and learn to fashion 
tempting candies. 

1 ou can save more than a dollar — 
it's surprising how many dollars will go 
into the savings from this one economy. 
Besides the w r holesome cleanliness of the 
homemade sweets, their added richness 
will give a very great saving, as less will 
be eaten. m. l. 



Every woman loves — ■ simply loves — 
a beauty shop. Even if she eschews 
make-up, the lure of the hair-dresser gets 



THE EVENING PRIMROSE 

Where winds the roadway to the forest's shade, 

And tawny fields their barren bosoms bare, 
I wandered while the fires of sunset played, 

And sped the day with roses in her hair. 
'Twas then I found the ashes of a home; 

A ruin fringed with matted sedge and weed, 
Where every ghostly dream of life had flown, 

Leaving this record, dim, for me to read. 
No bird song broke the silence of the hour; 

No sound of children's laughter rippled sweet, 
But there I found a solitary flower, 

That shone like burnished gold beneath my 
feet. 
Ah, tiny evening primrose, drenched in dew, 

I know God loved this spot — because of you! 

R. R. Grtcnzcood. 




THANKSGIVING VEGETABLES 



Seasonable-and-Tested Recipes 

By Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 

IN ALL recipes where flour is used, unless otherwise stated, the flour is measured after sifting 
once. Where flour is measured by cups, the cup is filled with a spoon, and a level cupful is meant. 
A tablespoonful or a teaspoonful of any designated material is a LEVEL spoonful. In flour mixtures 
where yeast is called for, use bread flour; in all other flour mixtures, use cake or pastry flour. 



New England Thanksgiving Dinner 

Menu 

Toasted Crackers Clam Chowder 

Roast Turkey, Bread Stuffing 



Pickles 



Mashed Turnips 

Succotash 
Squash 

Boston Brown Bread 
Pumpkin Pie 



Scalloped Oysters 
Mashed Potatoes 
Celery 



Squash Pie 
Cheese 



Cider Jelly, Whipped Cream 
Fruit 



Boiled Onions 
Cabbage Salad 
Cranberry Jelly 

Rye Bread 

Apple Pie 

Thanksgiving Cake 
Coffee 



Squash-and-Tomato Soup 

SIFT together two cups of cooked 
squash and a pint of canned tomato. 
Cook together two tablespoonfuls 
of butter and two tablespoonfuls of flour; 
add two slices of onion, and when slightly 
browned stir in two cups of milk, and let 
cook until thickened. Add the sifted 
squash and tomato, season with salt to 
taste, white pepper, and celery salt, and 
stir the whole until it boils. Stock may 
be used instead of milk. Garnish with 
cheese balls, made by mixing grated 

273 



cheese with an equal quantity of fine 
crumbs, moistening with beaten egg, 
forming into small balls, and frying in 
deep fat until brown. 

Puree of Jerusalem Artichokes 

Wash, pare, and slice two pounds of 
Jerusalem artichokes, and let cook in the 
bottom of a soup kettle with two ounces 
of butter and one-fourth a pound of 
breakfast bacon, fine-chopped. Allow 
about ten minutes for the cooking, 
stirring once in a while to avoid burning, 
and keeping the kettle over a rather hot 



274 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



lire. Add two cups of water, and con- 
tinue to cook until the artichokes are 
quite soft. Press the whole through a 
colander, and return to the kettle with 
seasoning of two bayleaves, one-half a 
teaspoonful of pepper, one-fourth a tea- 
spoonful of cayenne, and four table- 
spoonfuls of flour to thicken. Stir over 
fire until boiling begins, then add one 
quart of stock, salt to taste; let the whole 
boil up once, and add a cup of cream 
before pouring into the tureen. 



a teaspoonful of salt and half a teaspoon- 
ful of pepper. When the potatoes are 
tender, add three cups of scalded milk 
and the clams. 

Scalloped Oysters 

Stir one cup of bread crumbs (center of 
loaf), and one cup of cracker crumbs into 
one-half a cup of melted butter; sprinkle 
the bottom of a buttered baking dish with 
crumbs, then place on these a layer of 
cleaned oysters, and dust with salt and 



I 




COVER FOR FIRST COURSE — CLAM CHOWDER 



Clam Chowder 

Add a cup of cold water to a solid quart 
of clams. Pick over carefully, rinsing in 
the water and removing bits of shell. 
Strain the water and clam liquor through 
two folds of cheesecloth. Let heat to the 
boiling point, and in it scald the clams. 
Skim out the clams and keep them hot. 
Try out the fat from a thin slice of salt 
pork, cut in bits, and in it cook a small 
onion, cut in thin slices, without browning 
the onion. Add one-third a cup of flour. 
Let cook until frothy, then, gradually, 
add the clam liquor, and, when the mix- 
ture boils, strain it over one pint of sliced 
potatoes, parboiled five minutes, and 
blanched by rinsing in cold water. Add 



pepper. Add, alternately, oysters and 
crumbs until one quart of oysters has 
been used, and bake in a hot oven twenty 
minutes. If preferred, this preparation 
may be baked in scallop shells. 

Olive-Stuffed Roast Duck with 
Mackinac Island Sauce 

Prepare a pint of mashed potatoes, 
using plenty of seasoning, also one-half a 
teaspoonful of any kind of dried herbs 
except sage. Mix with the dressing one 
cup of stoned and chopped olives, and 
one-half a cup of breakfast bacon, broiled 
and chopped. Fill with this the interior 
of a good-sized young domestic duck, and 
truss for roasting. Lay thin slices of 
bacon over the breast, and let cook in a 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



275 



moderate oven, basting 
every fifteen minutes, for 
from three-quarters to 
one hour. Serve with 
the following sauce. 

Mackinac Island 
Sauce 

Put through the meat 
chopper six ounces of 
breakfast bacon, and let 
cook on a hot pan with 
one chopped onion until 
the fat is tried out from 
the bacon and the onion 
is slightly browned. Strain off the flavored 
fat, and blend with it six tablespoonfuls of 
flour and one-fourth a teaspoonful of white 
pepper. Heat in the pan in which the 
bacon was cooked one cup of stock, and 
melt in this one-half a cup of apple or 
currant jelly. Add the bacon fat, thickened 
with flour, and stir until the whole boils. 
Lastly, add the juice of one lemon, and 
• pour at once into a sauce-boat. The sauce 
should be about as thick as a cake batter. 

Roast Turkey 

Wash, wipe and dry the turkey thor- 
oughly inside and out. Mix together 
four cups of bread crumbs, one-half a cup 
of melted butter, one-half a teaspoonful 
of salt, one-half a teaspoonful of pepper, 




SCALLOPED OYSTERS 

and one teaspoonful of spiced poultry 
seasoning. With this stuffing fill the 
turkey and sew opening together firm. 
With a strong string fasten the legs close 
to the body with a slipnoose, leaving the 
knot on the back; fasten the wings to the 
body with a second slipnoose, formed from 
the same string; bring the string around 
over the neck, across the breast and tie 
into the second loop. Rub with salt, 
dredge with flour, and bake three hours in 
a double roaster. A moderate heat is 
required. 

Mashed Parsnip Balls 

Trim and scrape two or three large 
parsnips, cut in eighths, lengthwise, and let 
cook in boiling, salted water until tender. 




TURKEY, PREPARED FOR ROASTING 



276 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Drain, mash smooth with two tablespoon- 
fuls of cream or milk, two tablespoonfuls 
of butter, one teaspoonful of salt, and 
one-half a teaspoonful of pepper, mashing 
in the saucepan in which the parsnips 
were cooked, and stirring the mixture 
over the lire until hot through. Remove 
from heat, stir in very quickly one beaten 
egg. and set away to cool. Shape into 
balls one-inch in diameter; dip in beaten 
egg. then in fine-sifted crumbs, place in a 
frying basket, and let cook in hot fat until 
brown on the outside. Pile in pyramid 
form on a dish, with fine-chopped parsley 
sprinkled over them. 



the saucepan should be large enough to 
admit of their being placed over the 
bottom, without one overlying another 
— cover close and let cook twentv minutes, 
turning the pieces once during cooking. 
Arrange the fish in the center of a hot 
platt&fc surround with mealy, steamed 
potatoes, and pour the sauce from the fish 
kettle over the potatoes. Garnish each 
piece of fish with a slice of lemon. 

Mock Turkey Drumsticks 

Measure one cup, each, of sifted, baked 
parsnips, sifted, baked beans, stale crumbs, 
rolled and sifted, and mashed potatoes. 




To carve a turkey, insert the carving fork at the highest point of the breast- 
bone; first cut off leg and second joint on the side farthest from you; cut off the 
wing on the same side; then remove the leg and second joint and wing on the other 
side. Then, without removing the fork, cut thin slices lengthwise of the breast, 
first upon one side and then upon the other. 



Haddock, Scotch Fashion 

Choose a good-sized haddock, weighing 
three or four pounds. Clean, remove 
head and tail, and cut into six pieces. In 
the bottom of a large saucepan melt three- 
fourths a cup of butter; add two fine- 
chopped onions, two tablespoonfuls, each, 
of Worcestershire sauce and tomato 
ketchup, and one tablespoonful of vinegar. 
Stir all together, lay in the pieces of fish — 



Season with one to two tablespoonfuls of 
peanut butter, one tablespoonful of onion 
juice, two teaspoonfuls of salt, one of 
white pepper, and one of celery seed, and 
knead all into a dough, binding with one 
very stiff-beaten egg. The dough should 
be stiff enough to hold its shape, if not, 
more of the dry ingredients should be 
added. Divide into six parts, and mould 
with the fingers around strips of rather 
large-size macaroni, six or seven inches 



SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES 



277 




CABBAGE SALAD 



long. Brush over with melted butter, 
mixed with equal parts of peanut butter, 
place on the rack of a roasting pan, and 
bake until brown, basting with the butter 
and peanut butter to which a little hot 
water may be added. Place paper frills 
around the ends of the macaroni sticks, 
and arrange the whole around a mound of 
mashed potatoes on a platter. 

Cabbage Salad 

Cut a handsome head of cabbage in 
halves; cut out and shred the centers of 
the shells thus formed; let chill thor- 
oughly; mix the shredded cabbage with 
French dressing and pile lightly in the 
cabbage shells. 

Squash Pie 

(Company Size) 

Cream six tablespoonfuls of butter and 
beat in one-half a cup of sugar; beat three 



eggs and beat in another half-cup of 
sugar; then beat the two mixtures to- 
gether. Add three-fourths a teaspoon- 
ful of salt, three-fourths a teaspoonful of 
nutmeg, one cup and one-half of cooked- 
and-sifted squash, and one cup and one- 
half of rich milk. Bake in a large plate, 
lined as for custard pie. 

Raised Fruit Buns 

Scrape two good-sized potatoes, and let 
boil in a pint of water until soft. Drain, 
saving the water; put potatoes into a 
mixing-bowl; add two ounces of butter 
and one-half a pound of sugar, mashing 
and mixing the whole thoroughly to- 
gether, so that the hot potatoes may 
melt the butter and sugar. In one cup 
of the potato water blend one com- 
pressed yeast cake; add two cups of 
flour, sifted with one teaspoonful of salt, 
and enough milk to make a rather thick 




SQUASH PIE 



278 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



batter. Cover, and let rise in a warm 
place until double in bulk. When risen, 
add one cup, each, of floured raisins and 
currants, with addition of flour enough to 
make a very thick batter; drop into 
greased muffin pans of large size; let rise 
again until light, and bake in a hot oven. 
These buns may be eaten either hot or 
cold, with butter. 

Molasses Hurry-Ups 

Put two tablespoonfuls of softened 
butter into a mixing-bowl; add one cup of 
molasses, and one teaspoonful of baking 
soda, dissolved in a tablespoonful of 
hot water. Stir until it foams, then 



add two beaten eggs, and when this mix- 
ture is thoroughly blended add it to the 
yeast mixture. Cover; set in a warm 
place and let rise six hours. Cream one 
cup of lard with one cup and one-half of 
sugar; add one beaten egg^ one teaspoon- 
ful of nutmeg, one teaspoonful of cinna- 
mon, one teaspoonful of salt, and the 
grated rind of one lemon; add to the 
raised mixture. Let rise, again, over 
night. In the morning add one cup and 
one-half of raisins, one cup of citron, cut 
in very thin slices, and two tablespoonfuls 
of lemon juice. Beat thoroughly; pour 
into tube cake-pans; let rise to double in 
bulk and bake in a moderate oven one 




THANKSGIVING CAKE 



have ready two cups and one-half of flour, 
sifted with one-half a teaspoonful of salt, 
and one teaspoonful, each, of ground 
ginger, cloves, and cinnamon. Mix 
quickly and thoroughly, and bake for 
twenty minutes in greased gem-pans, in a 
moderate oven. A half-cup, or more, of 
seeded raisins, chopped dates or figs, or 
blueberries, makes excellent molasses 
fruit cakes for the school lunch box. 

Thanksgiving Cake 

Scald four cups of milk; when luke- 
warm add one yeast cake (softened in a 
little of the milk), and eight cups and one- 
half of flour; mix thoroughly. Cream 
one cup of butter with two cups of sugar; 



hour. This recipe makes six small cakes, 
or one very large cake, and two. baked in 
bread-pans. Frost with old-fashioned 
sugar icing. 

Cider Jelly 

Soften one-half a package of gelatine 
in one-half a cup of cold water; add one 
cup of sugar, and when dissolved, and 
cooled somewhat, add three cups of cider. 
Turn into a mould and let stand in a cool 
place twenty-four hours. Unmould and 
surround with whipped cream. 

Rye Bread 

Soften a yeast cake in one-half a cup of 
lukewarm water. To two cups of scalded 



SEASONABLE-AXD-TESTED RECIPES 



279 



milk add one-third a cup of sugar, one- 
third a cup of shortening, and one tea- 
spoonful of salt. When lukewarm, add 
the yeast, three cups of rye flour, and 
about three cups of wheat flour; mix to 
a dough; knead until smooth and elastic. 
Use white flour for kneading. Cover, and 
when light, shape for two brick loaf-pans. 
When light again, bake about one hour. 

Brown Bread 

Sift together one cup of corn meal, one 
cup of rye meal, one cup of graham flour, 
one teaspoonful of salt, and two teaspoon- 
fuls of soda. Add one pint of thick sour 
milk and two-thirds a cup of molasses: 
beat thoroughly and turn into a buttered 
mould. Let steam three hours. 

Fricassee of Carrots 

Select young carrots of similar size, 
sufficient to make one pound; trim and 
lightly scrape them. Heat one-fourth a 
cup of olive oil with one tablespoonful of 
scraped onion in a pan, and when the 
onion begins to change color, add the 
carrots, and let cook for ten minutes, 
keeping them turned so that they shall be 
evenly browned. Add to the pan three 
tablespoonfuls of flour, stir smooth, then 
add one cup, each, of brown stock and 
sifted tomato pulp. Let simmer slowly 
for ten to fifteen minutes, or until carrots 
;:re quite soft, stirring carefully. Serve 
in the center of a border of rice on a hot 
platter. 

Farci of Pears 

Cook one-half a cup of rice in a pint of 
half-milk and half-water until soft, and 
add three tablespoonfuls of sugar. Let 
cook, and stuff with the rice the cavities 
of pears, halved and cored, and mould the 
rice to simulate the missing half of the 
pear. Then roll the pears in very line 
crumbs, dip in beaten egg, roll again in 
crumbs, and fry in deep fat until a light 
brown. Drain, insert a bit of cinnamon 
stick in each to make a stem, and arrange 
on a pretty dish on a bed of fresh leaves. 
Canned pears, well drained from the 





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CIDER JELLY WITH WHIPPED CREAM 

syrup, may be successfully used for this 
dish. 

Compote of Carrots and 
Dried Fruit 

Boil together for ten minutes two cups 
of sugar and a pint of water. Add three 
cups of carrot cubes, previously browned 
on a hot pan in a little butter. Cook until 
carrots are tender, then add one-half a 
cup, each, of seeded raisins, chopped figs. 
and prunes, previously soaked overnight 
in cold water and stoned. Cook the 
whole for fifteen minutes longer, then 
turn into a casserole and place in a hot 
oven until the top begins to brown. 
Before serving squeeze over the whole, the 
juice of one large lemon. 

Blue Ridge Sweet Potatoes 
in Casserole 

Pare one pound and one-half of sweet 
potatoes, cut in half-inch slices, and cook 
until brown on both sides on a hot pan in 
a mixture of four tablespoonfuls of butter 




RYE AND BROWN BREAD 



280 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




CRANBERRY JELLY IN INDIVIDUAL MOULDS 



and two of molasses. When well browmed 
on the outside, but not more than half- 
cooked, remove to a two-quart casserole; 
arrange in layers, seasoning each layer 
with bits of green pepper, pieces of mush- 
room, chopped ham, or any other left- 
over scraps of savory foods. Add to the 
butter and molasses in the pan three or 
four tablespoonfuls of flour (add more 
butter if there is not enough left to make 
a paste with the flour), rub the two 
smooth, and add, by degrees, two cups of 
rich, well-seasoned brown stock. Stir 
until it boils; pour over the sliced sw r eet 
potatoes in the casserole, cover, and let cook 
in a moderate oven for thirty minutes. 

Cranberry Jelly 

Cook one quart of cranberries in a cup 
of water over a hot fire about five min- 
utes, or until the berries burst. With a 
wooden pestle press the pulp through a 
coarse sieve; add a pint of sugar and stir 
until the sugar is dissolved; then pour 



into cups to cool. The sauce will not 
jelly if boiled after the sugar is added. 

Thermidor of Sablefish Steaks 

Broil the steaks over a hot fire until 
browned on the outside, but not more than 
half-cooked. Finish cooking by placing 
them in a hot pan containing, already 
made, the following sauce. Blend two 
tablespoonfuls of flour with two table- 
spoonfuls of softened butter. Add one 
pint of milk or fish stock, one teaspoonful 
of salt, two teaspoonfuls of onion juice, 
one-half of one green pepper, fine- 
chopped, one tablespoonful of minced 
parsley, and from one-half to one tea- 
spoonful of tabasco sauce. Turn the 
steaks while cooking in this mixture, and 
when done pour it over them on the 
platter. Cayenne may be substituted 
for the tabasco, using not more than half 
the quantity. Any kind of fish steaks 
may be cooked in this w r ay, so may small 
fish like smelts or flat fish like flounders. 





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THANKSGIVING CENTERPIECE 



Seasonable Menus for Week in Novemb 



er 



a 

P 
•n 



< 



W 

P 



P 
H 

V2 



Breakfast 

Steamed Figs with Post Toasties and Cream 

Soft-Cooked Eggs 

French Rolls 

Coffee 

Dinner 

Olive-Stuffed Roast Duck with 

Mackinac Island Sauce 

Boiled Potatoes Creamed Celery 

Pineapple Mousse 

Coffee 

Supper 

Pigs-in-Blankets on Toast 

Sliced Oranges and Bananas 

Cocoa and Cake 



Breakfast 

Malt Breakfast Food, Top Milk 

Chicken Livers Sauteed with Apples 

Emergency Biscuit 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Fried Scallops 

French Fried Potatoes 

Green Lettuce Salad 

Chocolate Eclairs 

Tea or Milk 

Dinner 



Beef a la Mode 
Steamed Potatoes 

Queen of Puddings 
Coffee 



Apple Salad 



Breakfast 

Baked Greening Apples 

Cream of Wheat, Milk 

Browned Meat Hash Corn Muffins 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Squash-and-Tomato Soup 

Milk Toast with Grated Cheese 

Jelly Doughnuts 

Tea or Milk 

Dinner 

Picnic Ham, Boiled 

Escalloped Cabbage-and-Tomato 

Rice Balls 

Farci of Pears, Jelly Sauce 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Grapes 

Rolled Oats, Top Milk 

Fritters of Corn and Chopped Meat 

Potato Biscuit, Yeast-Raised 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Puree of Jerusalem Artichokes 
Creamed Smoked Salmon 
Spiced Pears Hermits 

Tea or Milk 

Dinner 

Pork Tenderloin 

Mashed Potatoes and Turnips 

Pumpkin Pie 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Oranges 
Gluten Grits, Thin Cream 



Ham Omelet 



Date Bread 



Coffee 



Luncheon 



Deviled Mushrooms 

Baked Potatoes 

Cinnamon Waffles with Syrup 

Tea or Milk 



Dinner 

Haddock, Scotch Fashion 

Tomato-and-Pepper Salad 

Caramel Custard 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Orange Juice 
Indian Meal Mush 
Broiled Bloaters 

Coffee 



Pancakes 



Luncheon 

Souffle of Salt Fish 
Baked*Squash 
Lemon Jelly, Cheese Wafers 
Tea or Milk 

Dinner 

Baked Bluefish, Celery Stuffing 

Griddled Sweet Potatoes 

Compote of Carrots and Dried Fruit 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Sliced Broiled Apples 

Rye Flakes, Cream 

Poached Eggs on 

Sliced Boston Brown Bread 

Coffee 



Luncheon 

Baked-Bean Loaf 

Tomato Sauce 

Coleslaw 

Apple Sauce 

Raised Fruit Buns 

Tea or Milk 

281 



Dinner 

Mutton Cutlets 

Currant Jelly Sauce 

Browned Potatoes 

Mashed Parsnip Balls 

Baked Indian Pudding 

Coffee 



3 

a 

H 
w 

a 
> 



H 

ft 

a 

a 
> 



> 



Menus for Special Occasions in November 

i 

A THANKSGIVING DINNER OF GAME 

Salpicon of Apples in Spiced Jelly 

Hare Soup 

Radishes Bread Fingers Celery 

Filet of Soles Olives Pickled Melon Rind 



Roast Venison Orange Sauce 

Blue Ridge Sweet Potatoes 

Spinach Stuffed Peppers 

White Grape Juice 

Cranberry Granite 

Wild Duck-and-Celery Salad in Cucumber Boats 
Cheese Wafers 



Cabinet Pudding 
Frozen Mince Alaska 



Turkish Coffee 
Candied Ginger Nuts and Raisins 



II 
A VEGETARIAN THANKSGIVING DINNER 

Canapes of Sweet Pepper and Cream Cheese 

Lentil Soup with Sliced Hard-Boiled Eggs 

Curled Celery Oysterettes Pimolas 

Butter-Bean Cutlets Tomato Sauce 



Mock Turkey Drumsticks on Mound of Sweet Potatoes 
Cranberry Jelly Stewed Celery Grilled Oyster Plant 

Apple-and-Pecan Salad, Russian Dressing 
Bent Crackers 



Ginger Pudding Pumpkin Pie 

Tutti-Frutti Ice Cream 

Pound Cake 



Sweet Cider Cup 
Fruit Bonbons 

III 
THANKSGIVING DINNER OF ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT 

IN THE RHINELAND 

/From the Amaroc News, November 24, 1921) 

Cream of Celery Soup 

Crackers 

Mixed Sweet Pickles Ripe Olives 

Home-Grown Celery Pickled Onions 

Roast Turkey 

Cranberry Sauce Giblet Gravy 

Chestnut Dressing 

Roast Pork Apple Sauce 

Stringless Beans Candied Yams 

Creamed Peas Mashed Potatoes 



English Plum Pudding, Brandy Sauce 

Mince Pie Apple Pie 

Fruit Cake Cher y P eserves Nut Cake 

Mixed Chocolates 



Coffee Cocoa 

Cigarettes 

282 



- v *-M udrX 



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The Good Cook 

By Caroline Rosenthal 

(Continued from October) 



THE foodstuff must be of a certain 
kind and given in a certain amount 
that should not smother the 
stomach. During very cold weather the 
system will require more foodstuff in order 
to keep up the calories of the body, just as 
a house requires more heat to balance the 
cold atmosphere surrounding the house, 
and the stomach will be able to elaborate 
a greater amount of foodstuff without the 
slightest inconvenience to the person, 
than it would on a hot summer's day. 
The stomach — the furnace of the human 
body — has a wonderful regulating sys- 
tem, more perfect than any devised by 
human mind, and that is why the diet of 
the Eskimo must be different from the diet 
of the man living in the tropics, and that 
is why, in summertime, our diet must 
be different as to quantity and quality 
from what it is during the winter months. 
Quantity of Foodstuff. If there is a 
subject that is puzzling, it is the quan- 
tity of foodstuff that is required by 
different individuals. Xo one can give 
any definite rule. It is a question of 
studying and understanding oneself and 
refraining from any exaggeration. \\ hen 
we think that Cornaro, at the age of 
eighty, was ruling Venice at the time 
when Venice was the most powerful 
republic of the Middle Ages, and his diet 
consisted of one egg, a few biscuits and a 
glass of wine during the twenty-four 
hours, we would like to know how all the 
theories of calories, of vitamines, etc., 
could be applied in his case. How this 
man, who was one of the most intelligent 



men of his age, could live, be healthy, and 
do the great amount of hard and re- 
sponsible work, at such an advanced age, 
on such a simple diet, would be a scientific 
puzzle, if we did not take into consider- 
ation the fact that each individual has 
peculiarities of his own in regard to 
amount and quality of food required by 
his system. 

The Secret of Good Cooking 

Foodstuff is seldom eaten alone. Con- 
diments of some kind are added or differ- 
ent foodstuffs combined to form a com- 
pound dish. Each of the different ele- 
ments of either foodstuffs or condiments 
used has some special feature, some will 
be nourishing, some will be only flavor- 
ing and some will be both nourishing and 
flavoring. The secret of good cooking 
is to blend the different elements to- 
gether so that the compound is some- 
thing different from each of the elements 
used, and so thoroughly blended as to give 
nourishment and have especially good 
taste. To give an example of how the 
blending has to be done, we will compare 
good cooking to a foundry. Different 
chemicals are put in the melting pot; 
when they are brought to the proper heat 
and worked out, the result may be a 
brilliant metal, or clear glass, which in no 
way resembles any of the chemicals used 
in its conception. The same thing should 
be done with cooking. 

While traveling in Europe, we tasted a 
wonderful dish called "risotto," which is 
made essentiallv of rice, and we were sur- 



283 



284 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



prised to learn that quite an amount 
of onions was used in its preparation, 
yet the onions could not be tasted. How- 
ever, later, on another occasion, we asked 
for the same dish, which, to every one of 
our party, was practically uneatable be- 
cause of the strong flavor of fried onions. 
Since, the writer learned how to prepare 
this delightful dish, the secret of which is 
to combine onions fried in butter with 
bouillon, possibly mushrooms and Par- 
mesan cheese, the whole colored with 
saffron, so as to make one of the most 
delightful and healthful dishes that we 
have ever tasted. (Recipe given below.) 

Xaturally. one has to think when 
blending different ingredients that the 
one with a very strong flavor will pre- 
dominate and kill all the others so that a 
judicious selection of ingredients is nec- 
essary. Some ingredients do not blend 
together. Xobody would think of serv- 
ing spinach with onions; the delicate 
flavor of the spinach would be killed by 
the strong flavor of the onions. 

Another secret of good cooking is that 
compound dishes must be carefully 
watched and tasted at intervals. It is 
a great mistake to put something on the 
Are or in the oven and then completely 
forget about it. 

Cooking is an art, and, after general 
rules are given, each one puts some in- 
dividual touches in the art of cooking. 
as is done in every other art. 

Xaturally. all principles will be better 
explained when we deal with each dish. 

The Proper Cooking of Vegetables 

Many vegetables can be eaten raw; 
others are eaten cooked. Generally 
speaking. some of the most important 
elements of the vegetables are poured 
down the sink with the water in which the 
foods are cooked or are passed off into 
atmosphere in the steam. W here is 
the wisdom and economy in cooking all 
of the natural salts out of food, and then 
buying artificial salts with which to re- 
place them? The natural flavor, salt 
and minerals contained in vegetables 



make the vegetables so important — we 
would say, indispensable in our diet. 
Practically all vegetables contain a great 
amount of water, some reaching over 
90 per cent of their volumes and can 
be practically all cooked without adding 
water to them. If vegetables are cooked 
in this manner, all the minerals and 
flavoring extract will be preserved and 
assimilated by the person eating vege- 
tables so prepared, not only enabling one 
to prepare a more tasteful dish but. also, 
one that is more wholesome and nourish- 
ing. \\ e insist on this point because 
nowadays some scientists begin to believe 
that what is important is, not so much the 
so-called vitamines. but the mineral 
substances and the flavoring extract con- 
tained in the vegetables, themselves. 
Many vegetables contain some minerals 
that are indispensable to the human body, 
such as. calcium, phosphorus, iron, mag- 
nesium, etc.. which, when diluted in the 
water generally used for boiling vege- 
tables, are thrown in the sink and 
thus are wasted. \\ e must remember, 
however, that the amount of water con- 
tained in vegetables is not sufficient 
to cook them thoroughly, if such water 
be allowed to evaporate. Evaporation of 
the water can be prevented in many 
ways: the- simplest one, however, is 
the following: The pot, in which the 
vegetables are cooked, is covered with 
a dish containing water: the heat 
developed in the pot will make the 
water contained in the dish evaporate 
and so preserve the natural water con- 
tained in the vegetable. It is most 
essential to remember that the tic 

under the pot must be very Ion just 

sufficient to keep the pot boiling, be- 
cause, if the Are is too strong, there will 
be such a rapid evaporation of the water 
contained in the pot that, naturally, 
whatever is in the pot will stick and 
burn. Anyone preparing vegetables in 
the manner described will experience one 
of the most agreeable surprises: it will 
seem as if he was tasting' new vegetables 
never before tasted, so different is the 



THE GOOD COOK 



285 



flavor of vegetables prepared in this 
manner from the vegetables prepared by 
soaking in a great amount of water. 

How to prepare green peas: 

To about each pound of green peas, 
put in the pot an inch square of butter 
(sweet butter preferred), half a slice of 
bacon, chopped fine, half a medium- 
sized onion, also chopped fine, one 
tablespoonful of water, and then add the 
peas. Cover pot. Let cook on a very 
slow fire. After about twenty minutes 
add enough salt to flavor, and serve. 
There will be just enough juice in 
the pot, when the peas are cooked, 
to make them most appetizing and not 
dry. 

Spinach: 

Wash the spinach thoroughly, so as to 
remove all the sand generally attached 
to it; squeeze, so as to get out the ex- 
cessive water; put in a pot, without any 
water whatsoever, let cook slowly and turn 
frequently with a spoon. When cooked, 
it can be allowed to cool and prepared as 
puree; or an excellent manner of preparing 
it is to put some butter in a frying pan, 
then add the spinach, with sufficient salt 
to flavor to taste. Heat on hot fire, 
turning constantly for about four or five 
minutes. It might please also to add, 
to spinach prepared in this manner, a 
few seedless raisins, which have been 
well soaked in hot water previously. 
Spinach, cooked as above and fine- 
chopped, is, also, excellent prepared as an 
omelet. Beat eggs, add salt, then add 
the cooked, chopped spinach; beat to- 
gether; put some butter in the frying pan 
and when well warmed pour in the 
beaten mixture of eggs and spinach and 
prepare as an omelet. 

Carrots: 

Scrape and cut carrots in small slices. 
Put about three or four tablespoonfuls of 
water and an inch square of butter in the 
kettle; add sliced carrots, cover as 
before and let cook very slowlv. If 
young carrots, from three-fourths to one 
hour is sufficient, but, if older carrots, 
it might require a longer time and it is 



then advisable to add a little more water, 
as some evaporation takes place. 

Note: All vegetables should be cooked 
without salting at the beginning. Add 
salt only to flavor to taste when prac- 
tically cooked. 

Risotto (Milanese style): 

First, prepare some fresh bouillon 
(not stock bouillon): bouillon that has 
no grease and is well flavored with soup 
greens; keep it warm beside the pot in 
which the rice is to be cooked. 

Ingredients: 34 lb. of butter (sweet 
butter preferred), a good-sized onion, 
chopped fine, 2 handfuls of rice, for each 
person, fresh bouillon (as above). Par- 
mesan cheese, grated, about % lb., 
saffron to color. (If desired, a few 
dried mushrooms, when cleaned and 
soaked in water.) 

Manner of preparation: Put butter in 
pot; after it is fried and melted, add the 
onion (chopped), keep on stirring until 
onion takes a light yellow, golden color, 
and be careful not to burn onion; add the 
rice without washing; stir for about 10 or 
15 seconds, so as to blend well the rice, 
onions and butter. Add 1 cup of bouillon 
and keep on stirring gently. If mush- 
rooms are desired, thev are added at this 
moment, after having been chopped ffne. 
Bouillon is added, frorrutime-to time, so as 
to keep enough li'c\id to allo\v the rice to 
boil. Xaturallv,* v the rice has to be 

J 7 

stirred, from time to time, otherwise it 
might stick. Keep on adding bouillon 
until the rice is cooked to suit individual 
taste — some prefer rice somewhat hard, 
as in Milan, others prefer it a little 
better done. But stop adding the bouil- 
lon when rice is practically cooked, be- 
cause there should be no excess of liquid. 
At this moment, add the saffron, which 
should first be dissolved in a little 
bouillon. Stir; add grated Parmesan 
cheese; stir a few seconds more, and 
serve. 

This dish is practically a meal in itself, 
or, if desired, it can be used in a small 
quantity as a side dish. If any is left, 
it is excellent, the next day, warmed 



286 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



either in a double boiler or in a frying 
pan, to which a little butter is added. 
It is so delicious the next day that some 
prepare more than desired in order to 
prepare it the next day, as above, or as 
croquettes. 

Note: We state that rice should not 
be washed when used in this dish, and we 
wish to add that it is useless to wash 
the rice before boiling, because rice is 
clean and, in addition, boiling kills any 
germs that people suspect are contained 
in rice. 

If people would chew their food as 



well as they chew the rag," there would 
be less stomach trouble. 

In forthcoming articles, we shall dis- 
cuss the following topics, besides giving 
special recipes and answering any and all 
questions received in regard thereto: 

How to prepare a well-balanced meal. 

Food, according to ages, to condition of 
health, or disease and to climate. 

Some scientific mistakes about food. 

Ancient foodstuffs. 

Ancient meals. 

Raw and cooked food. 

Prejudices about food. 



An Ultra Modern Thanksgiving Dinner 

By Jeannette Young Norton 



NEW ENGLAND, and the old- 
fashioned Thanksgiving dinner, 
has had its day, and its revivals 
have done it to death; why not try a 
modern dinner this year, and an ultra 
modern one at that, and see what it does 
to the reminiscent traditioners of the 
family? There are a lot of new things 
and new ways of doing old things that 
might just as well be making their own 
history, and this is a good place to "start 
something." 

Begin by setting the table with one of 
the dainty embroidered sets, or the 
Bohemian long and cross-runner sets, 
with napkins to match, that have cast the 
heavy, formal damask cloth into outer 
darkness for the time being. Lay flat 
silver enough for only three of the modern 
five courses. For this occasion use a 
fruit bowl, or basket, for a centerpiece, 
with real fruit in it, selecting that which 
is as colorful as possible, to suggest the 
bounteous harvest for which we are 
giving thanks. At either side of the 
fruit basket set a candy jar, and beyond 
the jars, at either end of the long table, 
place one of the modern relish-dishes 
containing as many kinds as there are 
dishes to hold them. A water and cider 



glass are the only ones prohibition has 
left to us, so place them as usual at the 
head of the two knives. The modern 
service plate is one of the new papier- 
mache variety, having a delicate colored 
border peeping out from the lace paper 
doily. On this plate stands the dainty 
fluted paper, jellied bouillon cup, and 
beside it, in a wee paper case, is the hors- 
d'oeuvre, or canape, of the meal. Or if 
raw oysters or clams are served on the 
half shell, they circle the bouillon cup and 
are served without ice; previously chilled 
and dipped in the usual sauce they are 
very attractive served in this new way. 
This course removed, the dishes and all 
but the little forks go into the discard. 
The fish follows in ramekins of paper on 
a smaller paper plate and again there is 
nothing but the forks to wash; the butter 
plates and spreaders remain through the 
four courses. 

Then comes a very modern plate 
course, the largest plates being used, and 
not necessarily those of the sectional 
type. There is a generous slice of 
stuffed and boned turkey, placed on a 
thin slice of delicately baked ham, a 
small mould of cranberry jelly, candied 
sweet and mashed white potatoes, 



AN ULTRA MODERN THANKSGIVING DINNER 



287 



creamed cauliflower, and a baked onion. 
Gravy with the giblets chopped through 
it, celery, and hot raised biscuit are the 
only things passed with this course. A 
perfect dinner with no confusion, no dis- 
tressing antics of an amateur carver, with 
his frenzied efforts to remember who 
likes light and who the dark meat, while 
the bird, its bare knees lifted heavenward, 
awaits dismemberment. No wonder the 
Chinese never allow this thing to be done 
in public. The plate service does away 
with all the side dishes, and the presence 
of a waitress at one's elbow constantly, 
interrupting the even flow of conversation. 

The plate course is followed by a chosen 
delectable salad served on the paper 
plates, covered with the lace paper 
doilies, with the crackers and cheese, 
cheese balls or straws on the side. Again 
there is only the fork to salvage and wash. 
The plum pudding or pies follow, accom- 
panied by excellent coffee, on the fancy 
papier-mache plates, and this leaves only 
the plate course, plates, cups, saucers, and 
flat ware to wash, a big dinner with but 
the least possible trouble in serving and 
scarcely any dishes to do. 

The great advantage of the boned 
turkey, besides being easy and exact to 
carve, is that after it is prepared, with the 
sinews drawn from the legs, it may be 
boned, stuffed with any of the favorite 
stuffings, onion and sage, oyster, chestnut, 
or potato, the legs, wings and neck 
drawn inside and perfectly trussed. Then 
when the bird is roasted it carves per- 
fectly without a bit of waste, and all the 
bones and trimmings are available for 
the soup stock. A very sharp knife, in 
expert hands, makes a perfect job of the 
carving. 

Individual jellies save waste, dishes 
and extra service. Vegetables prepared 
and perfectly seasoned are easily served 
in exact quantities and without extra 



dishes and service. Salads are always 
prettier served individually than in the old- 
fashioned salad bowl. Second helpings 
havelongsincebeenout of date, and in bad 
form, so why the extra serving dishes? 

Some one may say, but I like my plum, 
suet or cabinet pudding whole, but it is 
not served that way nowadays at the 
modern table; individual portions are 
much more attractive and save the 
trouble of serving it on the table when 
there are a number to be served. Even 
the sauce comes on the pudding. If pie, 
mince or pumpkin, is used, then a piece 
of each makes a portion, not an old- 
fashioned "cut" of pie, but both pieces 
forming a three-inch wedge. Strange to 
say, a dinner, individually served, costs 
less in proportion than one served in the 
old way, for everything is divided 
equally without haste and embarrass- 
ment and no waste results. The turkey 
hash is just as big a possibility, but all 
there is to do for it is to chop the left- 
over, and moisten it with the gravy, 
which will flavor and thicken it just right. 

In marketing for this dinner the house- 
keeper knows just where she stands, for 
she is catering for so many portions with 
just a little bit extra in case of an acci- 
dent. Modern dinners do not allow of 
extra guests, generally. If it is to be a 
tomato salad, then one for each portion 
is needed, each pie cuts into eight narrow 
pieces, one ham boiled, baked and care- 
fully carved goes a great way feeding 
many guests, and so on down the line. 

A dinner given along these ultra 
modern lines will be attractive, good to 
eat, less expensive than in the old way; 
is easily served, and far more pleasure to 
give and attend than one of the laborious, 
old-fashioned kind that tradition has 
dogged our footsteps with ever since the 
passengers of the "Mayflower" gathered 
their first harvest in the new world. 




Decorating the Thanksgiving Table 

By Julia W. Wolfe 



GOOD cheer is added to the Thanks- 
giving feast if a little time and 
thought are given to the decora- 
tion of the table. To the fastidious taste 
the crude colors, and vivid effects obtained 
by a too great use of tissue paper and 
cheap, ready-made favors, have an any- 
thing but pleasing effect, while by the 
expenditure of even less money a really 
artistic decoration is often achieved. 

It is well to bear in mind the significance 
of the feast we are celebrating, its ancient 
origin, as well as the season of the year in 
which it falls, for whose abundant crops 
and fruits we are truly thankful. There- 
fore, anything significant of Colonial 
days, the time of the Indians, or the 
season of plenty is especially appropriate. 

If you are the possessor of a genuine 
Indian basket, nothing makes a more 
suitable container for a variety of fruits, 
which, owing to their rich and glowing 
colors, are highly decorative and equally 
appropriate. The basket, piled high with 
oranges, red apples, golden pears, etc., 
is colorful and attractive, and with the 
additional trimmings of autumn leaves, 
makes a charming centerpiece. 

Or a small pumpkin can be cut in halves 
and hollowed out, using one-half to hold 
the fruit; decorate with autumn leaves. 
Grapes go well here. 

If you live near woods, fill a large, glass 
bowl with oak leaves, sprinkling among 
them sprays of bittersweet, branches of 
dogwood berries, or anything that has 
color. It should not be high, and the 
arrangement of the leaves should entirely 
conceal the bowl if possible. 

Golden brown chrysanthemums are 
best, but have the disadvantage of form- 
ing too high a centerpiece, which is never 
good for the dinner table; but by using a 
low silver bowl, and a perforated holder, 
this may be partially obviated. Cut the 
stems as short as possible, and arrange the 



flowers en masse, using a great many. 
A horn of plenty, overflowing with 
luscious fruits, while not very original, is 
always appropriate for the Thanksgiving 
table. Crystal drop candlesticks are 
especially suitable for the table, too. 

Correct Usage of the Fork 

DO not grasp the fork as if it were a 
garden spade. On the other hand, 
avoid the manner of the overdainty folk, 
who hold the fork gingerly between the 
first finger and thumb, with the other 
fingers curled in mid-air. Strike a happy 
medium. 

The tendencv, nowadavs, is to eat 
everything that one can with the fork. 
Ice cream is preferably eaten with a fork, 
and for this reason it should be served in 
as solid a form as possible. 

In eating salad only the fork should be 
used, never the knife. It is permissible 
to cut the leaves of the lettuce, or other 
green, with the side of the fork, if they are 
served whole. 

When you have finished with a course, 
the knife and fork, prongs up, should 
be laid across the right side of the plate. 
This should, also, be the position of the 
knife and fork when passing the plate for a 
second helping of meat at a family dinner. 

The fork should never be used to mash 
or mix food together. To mash potatoes 
or other vegetables in this way, so that 
they will better mix with the meat gravy. 
is in extremely bad form, as is also the 
habit of using the knife as an assistance 
in loading food on the fork. 

Peas should be eaten with a fork, 
not with a spoon, and they should be 
pierced up with the tines of the fork, not 
scooped up. 

In many boarding schools, where table 
manners are taught, the pupils are told 
never to use the fork in the right hand, 
but to reserve that hand solelv for the use 



288 



A NEW SUNDAY DINNER MENU 



289 



of a knife or spoon. However, this is 
difficult for most persons, and in this 
country many well-bred persons do use 



the fork in the right hand. This is per- 
fectly permissible, so long as they do not 
use the fork as though it were a shovel. 



A New Sunday Dinner Menu 

By D. Anna Frances Tessier 



Menu 

Plateau Francais 

(French Dish) 

Whole Tomato Salad 

Rolls 

Blancmange Pudding 

Chocolate Cookies 

Tea Fruit Punch 

1. Plateau Francais. Take a medium- 
sized cooking pan and lay at the bottom 
four or five slices of boiled ham; then 
cover with potato slices (slice po- 
tatoes about one-eighth an inch thick), 
until the pan is three-fourths full; then 
pour in milk, not quite covering the 
potatoes. Cook for one hour in very 
hot oven. Serve hot. 

2. Whole Tomato Salad. Put ripe 
tomatoes (as many as you wish) into 
refrigerator until cold; then hollow out 
with a knife, cutting the tops off level; 
cut some cold celery very tine, and add 
chopped olives; mix this with the follow- 
ing dressing; 

2 tablespoonfuls of French's Cream 
Salad mustard; 3 tablespoonfuls of sweet 
cream; 1 tablespoonful of sugar. After 
mixing this dressing with the celery and 
olives, fill tomatoes and serve cold on 
lettuce leaves. 

Rolls. Sift one cup of flour (bread) 
and one teaspoonful of salt into mixing 
bowl. Take one cup of milk; add a little 
to the flour to mix smqoth. Drop in one 
egg (unbeaten), then beat for two 



minutes, adding balance of milk. Pour 
into very hot, buttered roll pans, or 
cups, and bake thirty-five or forty 
minutes in a moderately hot oven. 

Pudding. Boil a few seconds one cup 
and one-half of milk in a double-boiler; 
add one-half a cup of sugar. Mix six 
tablespoonfuls of cornstarch with one-half 
a cup of milk; add to the boiling milk, 
stir all the time, until thick; let cook ten 
minutes; add one-half a teaspoonful of 
vanilla extract. Then put a layer of jam 
(any kind) at the bottom of a glass dish. 
When the pudding is cold, pour on to jam 
and sprinkle with shredded cocoanut. 

Chocolate Cookies. Cream one-half a 
cup of butter; add one cup of sugar 
(brown sugar), one egg, one-half a cup of 
sour milk, two ounces of chocolate, 
melted over hot water. Sift one cup and 
one-half of flour with one-half a tea- 
spoonful of soda; add one-half a cup of 
chopped walnut meats. Mix well and 
drop with a teaspoon on buttered pans. 
Bake in moderate oven. 

Tea Fruit Punch. Make one quart of 
strong tea; add sugar to hot tea. Make 
one quart of lemonade with six lemons 
and four oranges. Cut the oranges into 
small pieces and cut, also, five slices of 
pineapple into small pieces; one small 
bottle of Maraschino cherries and one- 
half a pound of Malaga grapes; sweeten 
to taste. Serve ice cold. 





Home Ideas 

and , 

tyconomies 




Contributions to this department will be gladly received. Accepted items will be 

paid for at reasonable rates 



Party Pies 

ALOLIA POP pie is quite an orna- 
ment to a young folk's party, and is 
a feast to the eye. as well as to the palate. 
To make it, bake any kind of a layer cake 
in two round tins, putting the layers 
together with marshmallow or frosting or 
jam. and frosting the top in gay pink or 
yellow. Around the edge of the pie 
place lollypops. with the sticks in the pie 
to make them stand up straight. Each 
lollypop should be dressed in tissue or 
crepe, of bright colors, to resemble a doll, 
and the round candy part of the lollypop 
should have a piece of plain white paper, 
lightly pasted over the wax paper and a 
face drawn, or painted, on it. When com- 
pleted, the pie seems to have a row of 
ladies or children walking around the 
edge. Of course, if the faces or figures 
can be made to look funny it will make 
the party all the merrier. 

Another lollypop pie that causes great 
fun has the edge surrounded by chocolate 
lollypops that come wrapped in bright 
silver and gold paper, and have a tiny 
balloon attached to them with an elastic. 
If each guest is given a lollypop, then the 
balloons are blown and games played 
with them. 

A birthday pie can be made attractive 
by using maraschino cherries for decora- 
tions. Small bottles of these are not 
expensive, and when cut in tiny pieces 
they go a long way. The child's name 
can be outlined by the pieces of the 
cherries, and the date put on. also, while 
a fancy border of the bright red is 
effective. If the pie is frosted in white, 
the cherries show up better and give a 
delightful flavor to the frostine. 



A thankful pie seems appropriate to 
Thanksgiving, though it can be used at 
Christmas, or at any party where little 
favors or gifts are to be given. A big. 
round piece of brown wrapping paper 
should be lightly crayoned to represent 
the top of a pie, the usual slits cut in the 
crust, and heavier marks made at the 
edge. Place this on a large plate, and 
pin to another plain piece of paper, sup- 
posed to be the lower crust. In the pie 
have little packages, which can be easily 
slipped out between the places where the 
crusts are pinned together. When the 
pie comes to the table the packages give 
it a nice, nobbly look, just like a tooth- 
some apple pie. At one Thanksgiving 
time I had this pie, and for each guest I 
had a little gift of home cooking, such as a 
small loaf of fresh bread, a round frosted 
cake, a jar of jelly, some nut bread, and 
for the children, at the table, there were 
tiny boxes of fudge, cookies baked in 
animal shapes, and popcorn balls. 

Served as the last course at a party 
table. any of these pies look especially 
attractive, are appropriate to the occasion, 
and provide that element of surprise and 
fun that adds to the success of the party. 

L. L. R. 

* * * 

Grapefruit 

HOW often you have heard people say 
that the grapefruit is a cross be- 
tween an orange and a lemon. This is 
a misnomer. Grapefruit is a distinct 
fruit. 

Grapefruit or pomelo, as it is sometime.-, 
called, was no doubt first brought u 
Florida by the early Spanish settlers in 
the first part of the sixteenth century. 



2°0 



HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES 



291 



The word "grapefruit" comes from the 
fact that the fruits are grown in clusters 
of several fruits, each. 

Though the fruit is less hardy than the 
sweet orange, it gradually became widely 
disseminated in the warmer parts of 
Florida. However, it was not until some 
time during the eighties that the fruit 
began to be regarded as having commer- 
cial possibilities. Some time between 
1880 and 1885, th% first pomelos were 
shipped out of the state. 

While Florida produces by far the 
larger portion of the commercial output 
of this fruit, a few hundred cars of it are 
now grown each year in California, with 
the quantity gradually increasing, and 
a small production, consumed for the 
most part locally, in one or two other 
states. 

Perhaps there is no other fruit as 
popular as a breakfast adjunct as the 
grapefruit. This, no doubt, is because of 
the refreshing acidity which it possesses. 
However, the "bitter taste,' r a liking for 
which "comes naturally," or is easily 
acquired by many people, makes this 
fruit unpopular in the estimation of not 
a few. 

Though the pomelo trees in Florida 
were all seedlings, until after the com- 
mercial aspects began to take form, and 
even now the fruit of many of the old 
seedling trees is marketed, no up-to-date 
grower would now think of planting trees 
grown from seed. The only way he can 
obtain a grove that will produce fruit of 
the desired characteristics — season of 
ripening, freedom from seeds (seeds vary 
from none to many in different varieties), 
flavor, agreeable combination of acids, 
sugars, and the "bitter taste," and 
quality in other respects — is to plant 
budded trees of the variety or varieties 
known to possess these characteristics in 
a pleasing degree. 

The tree is fifteen or twenty feet high, 
with a round top and thick, dark green 
leaves. The yield, under favorable con- 
ditions, may be as high as five hundred 
boxes to the acre — about five boxes to a 



tree — but the best groves average not 
over two boxes to a tree. ,\. c. n. 



My, How Good! 
Emergency Refreshments 

A POPULAR hostess, who likes to be 
prepared to serve light refreshments, 
if her friends happen in unexpectedly, 
recently told me how r she always manages 
to have something dainty and appetizing 
to serve, with just the right flavoring for 
everything, with very little additional 
cost. Of course, she keeps an emergency 
shelf — every one does nowadays — but 
her method of stocking her shelf was an 
innovation. Instead of stocking it with 
high-priced articles, she really had a most 
complete line, and none of it had cost her 
an extra penny. First she showed me 
her stock of meats for hearty sandwiches. 
Here she had small cans of boneless 
chicken, which she assured me was in 
realitv left-overs, from which she had 
taken the bones and stewed in a little of 
the stock or gravy, and canned. This 
chicken, with the addition of French or 
mayonnaise dressing, with a little celery, 
cress or parsley, will make sandwiches 
for an entire entertainment. There was 
a can of pork sausage, which originally 
was four or five croquettes, left from a 
company meal. These had been placed 
in a small can and heated lard poured 
over. When the lard was removed, they, 
with some dressing, together with a small 
amount of mushrooms, made another 
delicious sandwich, or meat salad. 

Farther down on the same shelf she 
had cubes of sugar, which she rubbed on 
the cut surface of a lemon, and placed 
them in a jar with a handful of lemon 
drops, which the children failed to con- 
sume, and were to provide flavoring for 
tea. There were also cubes of sugar, 
rubbed on fresh oranges until saturated 
with the fruit juice, and put away to be 
used when there were no fresh oranges in 
the house. And so it went, a jar of 
orange marmalade, one of peach jam, 
made from sugared peaches left from 






AMERICAN COOKERY 



dinner, a jar of apple butter, made from 
apples too sour to b* ed raw. A jar 

of pickled cabbage, made from the cab- 
bage which was too large to be used up 
before it spoiled. Several jars of candied 
cherries, made when cherries were plenti- 
ful. Other jars of candied pineapple. 
grapes, strawberr nd almost even' 

i of fruit had been used in this manner. 
I also noticed a jar labeled "Mints," and 
was informed that this was made from 
fresh mint, which was brought from the 
camping trip. Just the fresh leaves 
placed between layers of sugar, and will 
be kept fresh until needed. 

"Too much trouble." you say. Not a 
bit of it. if one really wishes to econoir. 
I: cot- not take over two minutes to 
sprinkle sugar over fruit, place it on oiled 
paper, and place in the sunshine at an 
open window. Her hints have the advan- 
tage of working both summer and winter, 
for one has nearly as many left-overs in 
winter as in summer. : b. h. 

* * X 

R for Oysters 

UM— M!" tember is here, and 

now for oyster- . The v iter lov- 
are eagerly anticipating a regular feast, 
and heartily in sympathy with the small 
boy who declared that August should be 
Orgust, in order that he might feast 
earlier. 

These delicious shellfish should appeal 
to even* housewife, for the ease with 
which they may be prepared and the 
variety of " in which they may be 

served. 

I: ;r are purchased in the shell, be 

sure that the shell is tightly closed, for if 
it is open the fish is dead and unfit for 
If out of the shells, be sure the 
dealer is reliable, and that the fish are 
well iced. 

And now for some of the delicious 
dishes that may be prepared from the 
oyster. First, of course, ill come broiled 
oysters, and, as some may not under- 
d the art of properly broiling them, 
the recipe folio 



Broiled Oysters 

Dry the oysters in a clean napkin. 
Sprinkle with salt and pepper, and 
place in a wire broiler. They may be 
broiled over the flame, if wood or coal be 
used, or in the broiling oven with gas, but 
in any case turn them often. They will 
require from five to seven minutes to be 
"just right." 

Then there are sure to be those who, 
like 'em fried, and while many will h 
their own best way, I will give mine for 
those who may wish a reliable recipe to 
go by. 

Fried Oysters 

Dip the well-dried oysters in the yolk 
of an egg. to which seasoning has be 
added. Then roll in yellow corn meal 
to which a pinch of baking powder has 
been added. Place in frying basket and 
: in deep fat. Drain and sen'e. piping 
hot, with the usual accompaniment of 

D 

These two ways of sening the eve- 
delicious ovster are the. most universallv 
used. But the housewife, who has had 
them broiled and fried a few times, will 
be looking for other fields to conquer. 
And if she tries some of the following 
orite recipes from Oic Dixie she will 
no longer hear the "same-old-thing _: 

Deviled Oysters 

Wipe oysters dr for frying. Lay- 

in a flat dish, and cover with a mixture of 
melted butter, pepper sauce, lemon juice 
and salt. Let them lie for ten minutes, 
turning several times. Remove from 
mixture, roll in cracker crumbs, then in 
beater, egg, then in the crumbs again, 
in deep fat, as for fried oysters. 
These have a delicious tang that calls 
for more, so prepare plenty. 

Fricasseed Oysters 

Take a slice of raw ham and cut into 
small pie Put in a saucepan with 

one cup of broth, the liquor from a quart 
of oysters, one small onion, chopped fine. 



HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES 



293 



a little parsley and pepper. Let simmer 
twenty minutes, boiling rapidly for the 
last two. Skim, and add one table- 
spoonful of cornstarch, mixed smooth 
with one-half cup of milk. Stir, and when 
it begins to boil add one quart of oysters 
and two tablespoonfuls of butter. Let it 
come to a boil again and remove oysters, 
placing in a deep baking dish. Add a 
well-beaten egg to the broth, pour over 
the oysters and bake for fifteen minutes. 

Oyster Fritters 

Drain off liquor from the oysters, boil 
a few minutes, skim and add to it a cup 
of milk, two eggs, salt and pepper and 
flour to make a batter. Have a frying 
kettle ready and drop the mixture by 
spoonfuls into the hot fat, taking up one 
oyster with each spoonful of batter. 

j. H. T. 
* * * 

Southern Corn Bread Recipes 
Hoe Cake 

1 pint, sifted corn meal 1 teaspoonful salt 

Mix meal and salt. Add enough 
scalding water to make a mush. Allow 
to cool until it can be handled, then put 
it in a hot, greased griddle, and pat it out 
until your cake is one inch thick. Invert 
a pan over it, lower the gas, and cook one 
hour. Fifteen minutes before it is done, 
remove the cover, and turn the cake over. 
Do not replace the cover. 



process of browning, butter three times. 
Spoon Egg Bread 



Johnny Cake 



1 pint buttermilk 
1 teaspoonful salt 



Scant teaspoonful 
soda 



1 teaspoonful melted lard 

Dissolve the soda in the buttermilk. 
Add salt and melted lard. Sift in 
enough meal to make a dough. Grease a 
bread pan, turn the dough into it and 
press out into a sheet three-fourths of an 
inch thick. Bake in a medium oven 
until thoroughly done, but not brown. 
Remove from the oven and brush the top 
of the cake carefully with melted butter. 
Return to the oven, and during the 



1 pint buttermilk 
1 scant teaspoonful 

soda 
1 large tablespoonful 



[arc 



2 eggs 

1 teaspoonful salt 
Meal to mix 



Beat the eggs slightly. Dissolve the 
soda in the buttermilk, and mix with the 
eggs; add the salt • and melted lard. 
Sift in enough meal — ■ about a pint — ■ to 
make a stiff batter. Pour into a greased 
pudding dish and bake in a moderate 
oven. Send to the table in the same dish 
and serve with a spoon. Eaten hot with 
plenty of butter, it is delicious, l. j. s. 
* * * 

Household Nuggets 

I don't know what I am going to do. 
Our house is simply overrun with 
mice, and now, since we haven't a cat, I 
can't get rid of them. Oh! Yes, I've used 
various kinds of mouse traps, but I can't 
catch a single one that way. I've tried 
putting all kinds of cheese in the traps, 
and even bits of smoked meat, which 
some one told me about, but nothing 
seems to work." 

"I have a solution for you," said Grace, 
to her friend. "I suppose you are dis- 
couraged with using mouse traps, but, 
to satisfy me, do give this a trial tonight, 
and see if it doesn't work. Put a kernel 
of corn in your mouse trap and see if you 
don't have a mouse in its place in the 
morning." 

And she did! 

Some people make such splendid pie 
crusts, but you have never been very suc- 
cessful with it. What is their secret, you 
wonder. Have you ever tried putting a 
little ice water in your pie crust? Do you 
make just enough crust for one pie, or do 
you make enough for two or three at a 
time? If it isn't your habit, try doing 
that next time, and see if you don't notice 
that the pies made from the crust, which 
has been made a few days, are the better. 

H. F. T. 



THIS department is for the benefit and free use of our subscribers. Questions relating to recipes, 
and those pertaining to culinary science and domestic economics in general, will be cheerfully 
answered by the editor. Communications for this department must reach us before the first of the 
month preceding that in which the answers are expected to appear. In letters requesting answers 
by mail, please enclose address and stamped envelope. Address queries to Janet M. Hill, Editor. 
American Cookery, 221 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass. 



Query No. 4315. — "Sometimes the Loaf 
Cakes made by one of my friends, who is an 
accomplished cake-maker, have lately shown a 
tendency to develop a raw streak near the 
bottom, though they are brown on both top and 
bottom, shrunken from the sides of the pan, and 
respond to the toothpick and finger-pressure 
test. How is this accounted for?" 

Raw Streak at Bottom of Cakes 

The three common reasons for a 
raw streak at the bottom of a cake are: 
(1) The batter may be too deep in the 
pan, and its weight may prevent the part 
most heavily weighted down, at the 
bottom, from rising. (2) The oven may 
be too hot at the bottom, and the crust 
immediately formed would then act as a 
non-conductor of heat to the part just 
above it. (3) The batter may not be 
light enough, either because of insufficient 
beating, or lack of enough leavening 
agent, or excess of shortening. 



Query No. 4316. — "One or two jars of 
Canned Corn, which I put up by the cold pack 
method, have softened, that is, the corn has 
become soft, though it is perfectly sweet. In all 
the other jars the corn has remained crisp, and 
since all were treated alike I am at a loss to 
account for two jars softening. Is there danger 
in the use of the softened corn?" 

Softening of Canned Corn 
Cold Packed 

When a quantity of anything is canned 
in a number of jars, and when, in some of 
these jars, the substance behaves differ- 
ently from that in the rest, it is surely a 



sign that conditions have not been the 
same in every jar. 

Perhaps a mixture of old and new jars 
was used, or old and new rubbers, or 
lids. Perhaps different things had, pre- 
viously, been canned in some of the jars, 
and the sterilization was not complete. 
Perhaps a finger was inserted in some of 
the jars, or the end of a dish-towel, and 
not in others. Perhaps some, of them 
were longer exposed to the air, after 
sterilization, and germs entered. But 
one thing is sure, there was something 
wrong in either the jars or the corn. 

As to the use of the corn, we are not 
sure. Corn is a chancey thing, if it be 
imperfectly canned. If we were in doubt, 
we would boil the corn for at least five 
minutes before using it, and then we 
would try some on the chickens before we 
partook of any. It may be all right, but 
we would not take a chance. 



Query No. 4317. — "Why is Consomme 
sometimes so brilliantly clear and sparkling, and 
sometimes dull and cloudy? Is it necessary to 
beat a Cream Sauce to make it smooth and 
velvety? Can Mouldy Jelly be made all right 
by re-boiling it, without change of flavor?" 

Cloudy Consomme 

Too much bone in the soup meat will 
make the consomme cloudy, from some of 
its lime being boiled out and held in sus- 
pension or partial solution in the soup. 
This often happens, if the bones are those 
of young meat. Also, too long cooking 



294 



QUERIES AND ANSWERS 



295 



will extract some of the lime from the 
bones present, even when there are only 
a few. Certain vegetables, too, notably 
the roots, or vegetables containing starch, 
will cloud the soup. 

The true and original consomme was 
made by cooking meat, a pound to a 
quart of water, without bones, then 
straining and clearing the soup, and using 
this again in the proportion of a pint to 
a pound of new and different meat, again 
without bones, and once more straining 
and clearing. The flavor depended on 
the variety of meats used, including 
poultry and game. This double extract 
of meats was thought to be the con- 
summate art of soup-making, and the 
name "consomme" was applied to it. 
The name is now given to any clear soup. 

To brown the outside of the meat 
before putting it in the soup kettle will 
help to give clearness and a good color 
and flavor. The use of the real cara- 
melized sugar does the same. 

To Make a Velvety Cream Sauce 

If cold liquid be used from the start in 
making the sauce, it will be of more vel- 
vety texture. It will, also, need longer 
and more patient stirring. This, and the 
use of what the French call a roux, either 
brown or white, will ensure a sauce of 
smooth and velvety texture. If the 
sauce has to be beaten, or — • worse — 
strained, it is a sign lumps formed during 
the cooking and these methods were 
employed to get rid of them. To allow 
a cream sauce to lump, while cooking, is 
unpardonable. 

Re-Boiling Mouldy Jelly 

Yes, you can get rid of the moulds by 
re-boiling the jelly, but at the cost of 
much, if not all, of the flavor. Most 
jelly is over-cooked, with consequent loss 
of flavor, and when re-boiled you had 
better convert it into a spiced jelly by 
adding cinnamon or cloves, or flavor it 
with lemon or mint to make it piquant. 

Query No. 4318. — "Will you kindly let me 
know how to make mv own veast.'" 



Homemade Yeast 

i 

It is long since we used homemade 
yeast, and we cannot tell you, from per- 
sonal experience, anything about the 
recipes we send for it, but they were given 
to us by persons who always make their 
own yeast, and have found both success- 
ful. It seems to us that the climate 
affects the making of yeast, and the kind 
used successfully in a cool region does not 
work well in a warm climate. Both these 
recipes came from a cool country. 

Yeast Made with a Starter 

To two quarts of boiling water add a 
heaping cup of fresh-picked hops, or two 
ounces of dried hops, tied in coarse 
cheesecloth. Add two pared potatoes, 
and let cook thirty minutes. Remove the 
potatoes and mash them with three 
tablespoonfuls of flour, two tablespoonfuls 
of brown sugar, and two tablespoonfuls of 
salt. When all are well mixed add the 
water from the kettle containing the bag 
of hops, squeezing out the liquid from the 
bag. Stir the whole up, and when luke- 
warm add one yeastcake, blended in a 
little cold water for a starter. Or you 
can add a cup of yeast, already made by 
this process, as a starter for the next 
brewing. Bottle when cold and keep in 
a cool place. One cup of the mixture is 
equal to a cake of yeast. 

Yeast Made without a Starter 

Boil two ounces of dried hops for an 
hour in a gallon of water. Remove the 
kettle from the fire, and let stand until 
cool. Strain out the hops, and pour the 
liquid, a little at a time, over a pound of 
sifted flour, in a large bowl, stirring well 
to make a smooth paste, quite free from 
lumps. Add one cup of sugar, two table- 
spoonfuls of ground ginger, and one 
tablespoonful of salt. Cover the bowl 
with a cloth, and keep in a warm place for 
a couple of days, or until fermentation is 
started. Then add six mashed potatoes; 
let stand one day longer, put into bottles, 
cork very secure, and store in a cool cellar, 



296 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



or in a well. This yeast will keep for 
months, and there will be no flavor of the 
finger. 



Query No. 4319. — "Please give me a recipe 
for Elderberry Pie; and will you also tell me how 
to make Almond Torte, and how to make a cake 
that I believe is called Lightning Cake? This 
has the whites of the eggs piled on top, and the 
whole is baked at the same time, giving a finished 
cake at one operation." 

Elderberry Pie 

Remove the stems from the berries, and 
allow a pint of berries to a - pie, and three- 
fourths a cup of sugar, very thoroughly 
mixed with one tablespoonful and one-half 
of flour and one-half a teaspoonful of salt. 
Put all in a bowl, and add the well- 
beaten yolks of two eggs and one table- 
spoonful of lemon juice. Mix until the 
berries are coated with egg, then turn 
into a pie plate lined with a good crust, 
place a sheet of oiled paper over the top, 
and bake in not too hot an oven until the 
berries are tender. Cover with a mer- 
ingue, made of the whites of the two eggs, 
and brown the meringue before serving. 
Or you can use one whole beaten egg to 
mix with the berries, omit the meringue, 
and cover the top with pastry. Canned 
elderberries may be used for a pie, 
omitting most, or all, of the sugar. 

Almond Torte 

Beat six eggs as stiff as possible. They 
must be fresh, and the beating has to be 
long and vigorous. Grind, very fine, a 
mixture of four ounces of sweet almonds 
and one-half an ounce of bitter, mix these 
with three-fourths a cup of sugar, and 
gradually add to the stiff-beaten eggs, 
meantime continuing to beat. Next sift 
over the mixture, a turn of the sifter at a 
time, six ounces of flour, meantime beat- 
ing constantly. Lastly, add, a very little 
at a time, one-half a cup of butter, 
melted, but not hot, and mixed with the 
grated yellow rind of a small lemon. 
While adding the butter the beating must 
be continued as before. Bake in a pan 
lined with greased paper, and not more 
than half-filled, in a slow oven. Cover 



the top of the cake with greased paper 
until it is well risen, then remove to let 
the cake brown. An hour in a slow oven 
may be allowed for baking. 

Lightning Cake 

We think you must be mistaken about 
this, for we do not know of any cake that 
is baked with the whites of the eggs on 
top. They would coagulate at a com- 
paratively low temperature and become 
quite tough, and would act as a non- 
conductor, by preventing access of the 
heat to the cake. We give, however, a 
recipe for the cake which is called, for no 
reason we can see, Lightning Cake. 

Cream, until light and white, one cup 
of butter, and gradually beat in one cup 
of fine granulated sugar. Add the grated 
yellow rind of one lemon, and three very 
stiff-beaten eggs. Lastly, add two cups 
of flour, sifted with one-half a teaspoon- 
ful of baking powder, and beat for 
twenty minutes. Spread an inch thick in 
greased and floured pans, sprinkle with 
granulated sugar, chopped nuts, and 
cinnamon, and bake. Cut into squares 
when cold. 



Query No. 4320. — "In our family there has 
been a disagreement about how to Serve and 
Remove dishes at a meal. Will you be the 
umpire, and let me know from which side dishes 
should be served and removed?" 

How to Serve and Remove 
Dishes at a Meal 

All dishes that are served to individuals 
at a meal, such as soup, meat, coffee, etc., 
are served, or placed, from the right of the 
person seated. This is an invariable 
rule. All dishes or foods, which are 
offered from a platter or tray, such as the 
croutons to go with the soup, sometimes 
the vegetables, or sauces to go with the 
meat, etc. — we mean dishes which are 
offered in bulk, and from which the per- 
son seated helps himself at his own 
pleasure, or refuses at his pleasure — - 
are offered at the left of the one seated, 
so that he may conveniently use the right 
hand in helping himself. This is, also. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Healthful 

Reliable 

Economical 



Q 



;rj*@ 



©■ 



g&r£ 



P* 



sKj* ■ 



r#i 



77i£ prudent 

housewife avoids 

substitutes, which may 

contain alum, and uses 

ROYAL 

BAKING 
POWDER 

Absolutely Pure 

Made from Cream of Tartar, \ 
< derived from grapes. 



\ 



W:<:- 






$<^Z> 



V& : . 



<V 






Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

297 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



an invariable rule. How to remove 
dishes depends on which way will be most 
convenient to the guests. Sometimes it 
will be from the right, sometimes from the 
left — if from the right it will be done 
with the right hand, and if from the left, 
with the left. For the convenience of 
both guest and waitress, the removing is 
preferably done from the outside of the 
person seated. Thus, where two are 
seated at each side of the table, the 
removing will be done from the right of 
one and the left of the other, rather than 
from between the two. But whether 
removing or serving, the hand of the 
waitress, which corresponds to the side 
of the guest by which she stands, will 
always be the hand to be used. The 
reason for this will be obvious if experi- 
ment is made of removing a dish from the 
left of the person by means of the right 
hand of the waitress — or vice versa. 



Query No. 4321. — "Lately in baking my 
Angel Cakes I find if I use temperature directed, 
which is 325 deg. from start to finish, that the 
results are not as good as I should wish. The 
grain of the cake is less even, and I do not think 
it rises quite so high. Yet it is more convenient 
to bake it at the same temperature than to keep 
watching the cake and increasing or decreasing 
the heat as I used to do." 

Temperature for Baking 
Angel Cakes 

Personally, we do not make Angel 
Cakes except under compulsion, for we 
don't think they taste good; but when 
we do, we put the cake into an oven so 
cool that it feels barely warmer than the 
air outside, and we let it rise to its full 
height, as the oven gradually gets hotter, 
then if necessary we put on a final spurt of 
heat at the end, the temperature never 
exceeding 340 deg. Fah. We proceed in 
the same way, that is, beginning the cook- 
ing in a cool oven, and allowing the heat, 
gradually, to increase, in baking all mix- 
tures raised by the air held in beaten egg, 
such as sponge cake, eclairs, popovers, 
and so forth. It is true that the use of 
one temperature, from start to finish, is 
much more convenient, it means freedom 



of mind, and tranquility, as well as light- 
ness of heart. These are of more value 
than lightness of the cake. But you will 
find that all the labor-saving devices 
give inferior results in the finished product 
to the old methods, where both hand and 
brain had to work. You don't get the 
same flavor from meat put through the 
chopper that your grandmother did, who 
used the wooden chopping-bowl, the 
sharp knife, and brains, in her chopping. 
We save our brains for, maybe, better 
things, and grind our meat. So you may, 
at your choice, let your cake be in the 
A-minus, rather than the A-plus class, 
and feel carefree, while it bakes without 
strain on your nerves. 

Pork Tenderloin Hot-Pot 

Split, lengthwise, or cut in slices, one 
pound and one-half of pork tenderloin. 
Grease lightly the bottom of a shallow 
saucepan, and fit into it the pieces of 
meat. Brown on both sides over a hot 
fire, then add one cup and one-half of j 
sifted tomato pulp, one chopped onion, 
six mushrooms, one-half of one green 
pepper, fine-chopped, and one teaspoonful 
of kitchen bouquet, or poultry seasoning. 
Cover saucepan, and let cook slowly for j 
three-quarters of an hour. Fifteen min-J 
utes before removing from fire add one 
teaspoonful of salt and 6ne-half a teaspoon- 1 
ful of pepper. Serve on large platter, j 
surrounded by a border of potatoes and 
turnips, mashed together in equal parts. 

Wet Deviled Mushrooms 



Season a quart of fresh field mush- 
rooms with two teaspoonfuls of salt and 
one-half a teaspoonful of pepper, and 
chop into small pieces with a chopping- 
knife. Mix with two cups of fine, sifted 
bread-crumbs. Into one cup of cream or 
rich milk stir two beaten eggs; add a 
dash of cayenne and one tablespoonful 
of onion juice. Mix with the mushrooms 
and crumbs, flavor with a little Worces- 
tershire sauce if desired, put the mix- 
ture into a well-greased baking-dish, cover, 
and bake until brown on top. 






Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

298 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



SSSSHSSCyn^^ 




e Olives 



Are More Than a Condiment 
They Are a Food 



RIPE Olives are a deli- 
cious, appetizing condi- 
ment, but thev are far more 
than this — they are a nourish- 
ing food as well. 

They contain protein, fat 
and carbohydrate and have a 
fuel value of 958 calories to 
the pound. 

With 2 per cent of protein, 
they contain almost as much 
as boiled rice and boiled pota- 
toes, and with 21 per cent of 
fat or oil they provide valu- 
able nourishment which many 
staples lack. 

In calories to the pound 
they compare with bread 
which has 1215, and exceed 
boiled rice and boiled pota- 
toes. 

Ripe Olives are easily di- 
gested and readily assimi- 



lated. Because of their value 
as a source of muscular energy 
they are an important supple- 
ment to other foods and be- 
long in menus regularly. 

California Ripe Olives, 
packed by members of the 
California Olive Association, 
are fully ripened on the trees. 
They are matured as nature 
intends them to be and in this 
state provide the essential 
nourishment in largest quan- 
tities. 

They are processed by the 
most advanced methods and 
sterilized at a temperature of 
240 degrees Fahrenheit for 
forty minutes. 

Ripe Olives are a delicious, 
nourishing and wholesome 
food. 



California Olive Association 



Los Angeles, California 
PACKER MEMBERS: 



A. Adams, Jr. 
Albers Olive Company 
American Olive Company 
California Growers Assn., Inc. 
California Packing Corporation 
C. M. Gifford & Sons 



Golden State Canneries 
Libby, McNeill and Libby 
Maywood Packing Company 
Mt. Ida Packing Company 
Old Mission Packing Corporation 
Sylmar Packing Corporation 

(Formerly Los Angeles Olive Growers Assn.) 

Wyandotte Olive Growers Association 



wrBirnwfwrfi^^ 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

299 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



New Books 



Cooking for Profit. By Alice Bradley. 
American School of Home Eco- 
nomics, Chicago, 111. 

Cooking has become a profession. 
The successful caterer is much in demand. 
In the home, in the school, in institutions 
and establishments everywhere, how 
much depends on Food Service. 

People are fond of eating, and many 
are willing to pay for well-cooked food. 
Good cookery, then, is the first essential 
to success in all lines of food service. 
Many a woman, today, enjoys a good 
income because she was in the first place 
a good cook. Catering in every line of 
service has become a calling or profession 
— ■ a leading and highly profitable busi- 
ness. The qualifications essential for 
success, the necessary equipment, the 
methods used — in short, the ways and 
means to successful catering, all are set 
forth in this handy volume. In the 
home, in the tea room, in institutions, in 




HOSE SUPPORTERS 



Equipped with our 
famous Oblong ALL- 
Rubber Button clasps, 
hold the stockings in 
place securely — and 
without injury to the 
most delicate silk 
fabric. 



Velvet Grip Hose Supporters 
For ALL the Family 

Are Sold Everywhere 
Made by the George Frost Company, Boston 




. 



cafeterias and lunch rooms, wherever 
cooking is done with an eye to profit, the 
book should be of especial interest. 

What Shall We Have to Eat? By Jennie 
E. Burdick. The University So- 
ciety, New York. 
This claims to be a practical plan foil 
choosing the right foods for every occa- 
sion. At the same time "the balanced 
meal" and planning combinations of foods 
is not overlooked. For instance, "What 
shall we have for breakfast?" Then fol- 
lows a full list of fruits, cereals, entrees, 
and beverages to choose from and adapt 
to our own special needs. In like manner 
are treated the other meals of the dayj 
and also ^special occasions, as, "What] 
shall we take on a picnic?" or "What shall, 
I serve at my party?" etc. The book] 
holds a time table for cooking, some 
worth-while hints on marketing, setting 
the table, etc. By use of this handy little 
volume many a housewife may be guided 
in her trying problem of selecting food 
for the daily meals. 

The French Chef in Private American 
Families. By Xavier Raskin. Rand 
McNally & Company, 536 S. Clark 
Street, Chicago. 

Let the author, in his preface, state hisJ 
own case. 

Cookery is an art, the resulting product 
of centuries of experience. The French 
cooks who have migrated to the United 
States, as well as cooks from other parts of 
the world, have brought to this country 
the experience that they have acquired at 
home, and their best recipes have become 
so familiar to the American people, that, 
today, combined with the American 
recipes, they form the ordinary menus of 
clubs, hotels and private families. 

This book is intended for private 
families, and there are very few recipes in 
it which the average housekeeper will not 
find within her means and experience. 

The author has aimed to render his 
work complete by giving, besides the 






Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

300 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



^Magic Book 




Over 50 styles and sizes 
of stoves and ranges. 
Get our prices on beau- 
new designs, blue and 
gray porcelain enamel com- 
bination coal and gas ranges. 



tiful 



A Kalamazoo 

TS&S? Direct to You" 



Mail a Postal Today 

for your copy of the new Kalamazoo Catalog. 
Shows true-life illustrations of wonderful new de- 
signs in blue and gray porcelain enamel ranges — 
finest heating stoves — new style Kalamazoo Furn- 
ace. See for yourself how you can save by getting 
wholesale factory price. Why spend what others 
save? Mail a postal now! Also get our low prices 
on furniture, kitchen cabinets, sewing machines, 
washing machines, dishes, aluminum ware, etc. 

Ask for Catalog 

KALAMAZOO STOVE COMPANY 

Kalamazoo, Michigan 



Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
301 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




'Do you choose her oatmeal 
as carefully as heir milk ? 

YOU wouldn't think of giving your 
baby "any old" milk. 

But when you say, " I want a package 
of 'oats,'" aren't you forgetting that 
there is a great difference in oats? 

H-O (Hornby's Oats) is steam- 
cooked, breaking down the starch-cells 
and dextrinizing the starch, thus making 
H-O digestible and nourishing and dif- 
ferent from ordinary priced oats. 

Pan- toasting over deep coal fires 
makes H-O golden-brown in color and 
gives that delicious H-O flavor. 

Every home can afford H-O. Health 
is cheap at any price. 

• THE H-O CEREAL COMPANY, Inc. 
Buffalo, N.Y., and Ayr, Canada 

Also Makers of 

FORCE Whole Wheat Flakes 
PRESTO Self-Rising Flour 





jStea)n Cooked 

HEALTH 



Pan Toasted 
/<» FLAVOR 



H-O is packed in new improved label-wrapped and corner-sealed package 



French formulas and French methods of 
cooking, all recipes as they were required 
in the American private families and clubs 
where he has worked. All mav be util- 
ized by the professional as well as the 
inexperienced cook, although to the novice 
a study of the fundamental articles, 
"Methods of Cooking," etc., is rec- 
ommended. 

Care has been taken to explain each 
recipe clearly and the rules that apper- 
tain to them. Often suggestions are made 
as to how to substitute materials when 
articles called for are not on hand, and 
the practical, economical use of left-overs 
is treated at length. 

This is a complete cook book of no 
ordinary class and quality. For daily 
use, for frequent reference, for consulta- 
tion on exceptional occasions, it should be 
acceptable in many American families. 

Home Economics in Schools. By Agnes 
K. Hanna. Whitcomb and Bar- 
rows, Boston. 

"This book is planned primarily as a 
text book for students in special methods 
courses in home economics in colleges and 
normal schools. In addition it should 
be valuable to experienced teachers, as it 
contains discussions of many of the 
practical teaching problems that they 
meet in their daily work, as well as a more 
general study of the purposes and results 
of home economics teaching. 

"It is expected that students who use 
this book shall have completed courses in 
foods, clothing, shelter, household man- 
agement, etc., so that they may have a 
knowledge of the different aspects of these 
subjects, and of the technical problems of 
each type of work. It is presumed, 
furthermore, that students have had 
education courses which gave them the 
elements of educational methods, prin- 
ciples, and administration." 

Manifestly this book is for teachers 
and students of domestic science. It 
deals with outlines and courses of study, 
with aims and methods of teaching home 
economics. In character and quality 
the book is comprehensive and instructive. 



Buv advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

302 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




c Jjy <^Mrs . c J\tjo?c 



<< 



Surprise Them" on Thanksgiving 



HERE is a new way of serving cranberries for Thanksgiving. It is so 
luscious and fluffy that I am sure, whenever served, it will be a most 
pleasing surprise. 

It is easily made and a delightful accompaniment to turkey or chicken. I am 
giving the recipe below, and suggest you clip it out so it will not be forgotten. 

CRANBERRY FRAPPE 

Yi envelope Knox Sparkling Gelatine 3 cups boiling water 1 quart cranberries 

1 cup cold water 2 x /i cups sugar 4 tablespoonfuls lemon juice 

Soak gelatine in cold water five minutes. Cook cranberries in boiling water until soft; then force through a 
puree strainer. Add soaked gelatine, sugar and lemon juice, and freeze. 

Here, too, is a recipe for a delicious Thanksgiving dessert : 



1 tablespoonful lemon juice 
Macaroons or chopped nuts 
Pinch of salt 



MARSHMALLOW PUDDING 

Yi envelope Knox Sparkling Gelatine 1 cup sugar 

x /i cup cold water Whites of three eggs 

Yx cup boiling water 1 V£ teaspoonfuls vanilla 

Soak gelatine in cold water five minutes, dissolve in boiling water, add sugar and as soon as dissolved set bowl 
containing mixture in pan of ice water; then add whites of eggs (well beaten) and flavoring; beat all together 
until mixture thickens. Turn into shallow pan, first dipped in cold water, and let stand until thoroughly chilled. 
Remove from pan and cut in pieces the size and shape of marshmallows; roll in macaroons, which have been dried 
and rolled, or in chopped nuts. Serve with plain or whipped cream. Mixture may be divided, flavoring half 
with lemon and whipping two squares melted chocolate into the other. 

Other suggestions for Thanksgiving Desserts and Salads are — Nut Frappe, Marshmallow 
Cream, Angel Parfait, Pineapple Mousse, Chocolate Sponge, Royal Pudding, Orange Trifle, 
Perfection Salad, Luncheon Salad, Jewel Salad, Fruit Salad Supreme. 

These and many other recipes are found in my books, "Dainty Desserts" and "Food 
Economy." Sent free for 4c. postage and your grocer's name. 

Any domestic science teacher may have sufficient gelatine for her class, if she 
will write me on school stationery, stating quantity and when needed. 

KNOX 

SPARKLING 

GELATINE 

107 Knox Avenue - Johnstown, N. Y. 





KNOX 

SPARKLING 




GElatiNE 



CHARIES B.K.MOX GEIATINI CO :»: 



Plain 

Sparkling Gelatine 

f or general use 



I 



Same Sparkling Gelatine 

with lemon flavoring in 

separate envelope 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

303 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Veuve Chaffard 

Pure Olive Oil 

The Finest The 
World Produces 




Received direct 
from the Producers 

Bottled in France 
in honest bottles 

s 

Full Quarts 
Full Pints 

Full Half-Pints 



S. S. PIERCE CO. 

BOSTON 



f — Domestic Science— *\ 

Home-Study Courses 

Food, health, housekeeping, clothing, children, 

For Homemakers and Mothers; professional 
courses for Teachers, Dietitians, Institution 
Managers, Demonstrators, Nurses, Tea Room 
Managers, Caterers, "Cooking for Profit," etc. 

"The Profession of Home-making," 100 
page handbook, free. Bulletins: "Free-hand 
Cooking," "Food Values," "Ten-Cent Meals," 
"Family Finance," "Art of Spending" — 10c ea. 

American School of Home Economics 

(Chartered in 1905) 830 E. 58th St., Chicago, 111. 



v.: 



J 



OYSTERS CLAMS 

DEHYDRATED 

All who like Oysters and Clams are 

sure to enjoy these 

The full, rich oyster and clam flavor in always ready, 

convenient form. Oyster stew, broth, puree. Clam 

■tew, broth, bouillon, chowder. Cost, 7H cents a plate. 

Packed in small trial bottles making quart of stew. 

OYSTERS, trial bottle 30c, prepaid 

CLAMS, trial bottle 30c, prepaid 

Money gladly refunded if not satisfied. Economical 
plus quality and ready to serve in ten minutes. 

Not sold in stores 

BISHOP-GIFFORD CO., Inc., Baldwin, L. I , N. Y. 



For study in household management, in 
vocational and liberal education the work 
is excellent, and to be commended. 



We wish to invite the attention of 
readers to the merits of "Practical Cook- 
ing and Serving" by the Editor of 
American Cookery. 

This book is very comprehensive and 
complete. It is very reliable and trust- 
worthy. It is pre-eminently adapted to 
satisfy the wants of those women who 
wish to learn how to cook — ■ the whys and 
wherefores of the art — and then put 
their knowledge into actual practice. 
The book is always and in every respect 
commendable. It carries numerous illus- 
trations of dishes all prepared in the 
author's own kitchen; everything, in fact, 
that makes a complete kitchen companion. 
In making up lists of books for school or 
home include always "Practical Cooking 
and Serving." The Reviewer. 



Housewives throughout the country, 
especially those frequenting the finer 
hotels, have become familiar with the use 
of Rose Apples, in salads, as cups for 
salads and dressings, and as garnish and 
relish with dishes of fish, meat, etc. But 
how many know this bright, smooth, 
little, red ball — half fruit, half vegetable, 
was originated by a woman ? 

Twelve years ago Mrs. Anna Kehoe, 
of Clay County, Indiana, while growing 
mangoes, discovered a mutation, from 
which, by cross breeding, selection and 
cultivation she developed this product, 
which she named Rose Apples. 

Mrs. Kehoe says that when the muta- 
tion was first discovered it was very small, 
but distinctive in shape, and of a fine, 
nutty, aromatic flavor. Her efforts have 
been chiefly devoted to increasing its 
size, its tenderness and thickness of flesh, 
while maintaining its flavor, shape, and 
color. Also up to that time no pepper 
had ever been packed without peeling, so 
another problem was to learn to can them 
whole. This she has succeeded in doing 
so well that she has them in tin eight 
years old, without noticeable change in 
flavor, texture, or color. Adv. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

304 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




\HomeJor Jhanksgiving 
andSnothefs cooking! 




COCONUT PUMPKIN PIE 
Put one pint mashed, stewed pumpkin 
in which three tablespoonfuls of butter 
have been melted, into a bowl and add one 
pint milk (if Baker's blue can coconut is 
used, add the coconut milk to the sweet 
milk to make one pint), one-half teaspoon- 
ful, each, ground mace, cinnamon, and all- 
spice. Mix all well together and add one 
cup of sugar and one can Baker's Coconut. 
Then beat four eggs well and add to mix- 
ture. Line the pie pans and bake the 
under crust. Fill with the mixture and 
bake in a quick oven for half .an hour. 
When cold, sprinkle lightly with white 
powdered sugar. This quantity will make 
three pies. 



Mother's plans for a pantry full of holiday 
good things will surely include a big, white, 
coconut cake, rich with home-made goodness. 
And the Thanksgiving pumpkin will have a 
rich, new flavor because this year it's to be a 
coconut pumpkin pie. 

The tender, juicy meat of the ripe coconut, 
which BAKER has sealed in an air-tight can, 
ready for instant use, adds the distinctive flavor 
to the old-time cakes and pies, the puddings 
and candies Mother makes. Moist and sweet, 
it is a pleasing addition to salads, a delicate 
finish to baked apples and can be used in an 
endless variety of nutritious, appetizing dishes. 

Send for New Recipe Book 

THE FRANKLIN BAKER COMPANY, Philadelphia 





NPT 



In Baker's blue can In Baker's yellow can — 
— the pure, fresh, the pure, fresh, white 
meats of selected coco- 
nuts shredded and 



white meat of select- 
ed coconuts grated 



and sealed up in the sweetened: sealed 
wholesome, natural while still moist wi 



coconut milk. 



its own wholesome, 
natural juices. 



In Baker's blue card- 
board container — the 
dry shredded meat of 
selected coconuts, care- 
fully prepared for 
those who still prefer 
the old- fashioned, 
sugar-cured kind. 



Buy advertised Goods 



— Do not accept substitutes 
305 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Spanish 

GREEN OLIVES 




^ywjust crave 

GREEN OLIVES 



NO dinner is as good without green 
olives. No formal dinner is com- 
plete without them. 

You just get a longing to taste the 
tangy, salty flavor of green olives. And 
nothing but green olives will satisfy 
that longing. 

Eat all you want. They're good for 
you. The olive oil in green olives is 
wholesome and healthful for children 
and grown-ups alike. 

You can serve green olives in many 
ways. In salads and sandwiches — as 
garnishes — and as an appetizer. Green 
olives perk up lagging appetites. 

Keep a bottle or two on your shelves. 
Green olives are a delightful treat at 
luncheon or dinner. Serve them to your 
family today. 

AMERICAN IMPORTERS 

of Spanish Green Olives 

200 Fifth Avenue, New York City 



The Silver Lining 

The Book 

There are books of life and loving, 

Making us feel sad or gay; 
We read books so philosophic 

That they almost turn us gray; 
There's the novel, so exciting, 

When 'tis done — we wish for more — 
And the "monthly payment" history, 

Which we in the attic store — 
We buy magazines of fashion, 

Telling us just how to look, 
But when folks are "good and hungry" 

Nothing beats the old COOK BOOK! 
Elsie Fowler {Mrs. M. M.) 



The golfing novice, after disturbing 
much turf, turned for reassurance to his 
caddie and said, "I have a brother in 
Australia who plays this game awfully 



well." "Well, carry on, sir," was the 
dry reply, "you'll soon dig him up." 

London Post. 



An old woman was recovering from a 
long illness, propped up in an easy chair, 
with a sweet-faced parish visitor sitting 
beside her. This was a newspaper pic- 
ture. Beneath the picture was this con- 
versation r "And was your husband good 
and kind to you during your long illness?" 
asked the visitor. "Oh, yes! He was so 
good and kind he was more like a friend 
than a husband." 



Out in Wyoming a train ran over the 
cow of a Swede farmer named Ole Olesen. 

m 

The claim-adjuster went out to thejiome 



"How John and Mary 

Live and Save 

on $35 a Week" 

THIS little story tells how a young 
couple are getting ahead by plan- 
ning the family spending and by "stretch- 
ing" the family dollars. 

If you depend on a weekly pay enve- 
lope, this booklet will help you to live 
more comfortably, and save more money. 

The price of the booklet is 10 cent* — 
it may be worth £10 to you. Send for it. 
American School of Home Economics, 
830 E. 58th Street, Chicago. Adv. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

306 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Cooking Utensils Must Be CLEAN 

For quick results on 
all metalware use 

SAPOLIO 

Cleans ■ Scours - Polishes 




Large cake 
No waste 



Sole 

Manufacturers Enoch Morgan's Sons Co., New York, U. S. A. 




■DdQi inrnnrnorzornri nr~n 



BROIL— DON'T FRY 




The products of the fry pan are a source of 
indigestion with all of its attendant evils. 
The Duplex Dripless, Smokeless Broiler over- 
comes these. 

Approved by Good Housekeeping, Modern 
Priscilla, and numerous physicians. 

Used on gas, oil, electric or coal ranges. 

Made of cast aluminum, nicely finished. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. If you cannot get 
one from your dealer, send his name and $3.50 
and we will send you one, post-paid. 

DUNDEE MFG. CO., Inc. 

17 Edinboro Street Boston, Mass. 



CRULLERS 




"You want to make 'em nice and 
crisp and brown like mine. Well, 
here's my secret — I use my Mrs. 
Spratt Thermometer — I cook my 
crullers in deep fat to 500° on a good 
hot fire. Jack can't get enough of 
'em. 

"Why don't you send for my little 
grandchild's booklet, 'Sally Sweet's 
Own Recipes'? It tells all about 
me and all my family." Write to 
Mrs. Spratt, care of 

WILDER-PIKE THERMOMETER CO., Troy, N. Y. 

Makers of Accurate Thermometers since i860 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

307 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



D? Prices 

Vanilla 




NEXT time you're baking, try 
Price's Vanilla. And just 
notice the difference! You will 
like the mellow, delicious flavor 
of Price's. And you will appre- 
ciate its purity and balanced, 
just-right strength, neither weak 
nor too strong. 

Cakes, puddings, cookies, tarts, 
candies, home-made ice-cream 
— all will be made more deli- 
cious with Price's 
Vanilla! Ask for 
"Price's" at your 
grocer's — and just 
try it. Write for 
our little book of 
recipes — "Deli- 
cious Desserts and 
Candies." It is free. 

PRICE FLAVORING 
EXTRACT CO. 

** Experts in Flavor** 
CHICAGO ILLINOIS 




Look for 
Price's 
Tropikid 
on the 
label. 




of Ole to adjust the claim likely to be 
made by Ole for the loss of his cow. 
"Well, Mr. Olesen," said the claim-ad- 
juster, "I came out to see you about your 
cow being killed on our track. What are 
you expecting to do about it?" "Veil," 
said Ole, stolidly, "I ban a poor man, an' 
I cannot do much because I ban so poor, 
but I will try to pay you five dollars." 

Judge. 

"Good actions," said the pretty Sunday 
school teacher, "are the lovely flowers. 
Bad ones are the weeds. Now can any 
little boy or girl tell me the difference 
between^flowers and weeds?" "Weeds," 
said little Louis, who for many days had 
been struggling manfully with the sorrel 
found in his mother's garden, "are the 
plants^that want to grow, and flowers are 
the ones^that don't." 

Country Gentleman. 



A Chinaman was asked if there were 
good doctors in China. "Good doctors!" 
he exclaimed. "China have best doctors 
in world. Hang Chang one good doctor; 
he great; save life to me." "You don't 
say so! How was that?" "Me velly 
bad," t he said. "Me callee Dr. Han Kon. 
Give some medicine. Get velly, velly ill. 
Me callee Dr. San Sing. Give more 
medicine. Me glow worse — go die. 
Blimeby callee Dr. Hang Chang. He 
got no time; no come. Save life." 

Tit-Bits. 



Tommy and Ethel were walking home 
from Sunday school and discussing their 
Scripture lesson. "Well," said Tommy, 
"which of the Ten Commandments did 
Adam break when he ate the apple?" 
"He didn't break any," replied Ethel 
decisively. "What do you mean? Why 
not?" asked Tommy. " 'Cause there 
weren't anv then," answered the little 
girl. London Answers. 

On his return to England from a visit 
to the United States, Matthew Arnold 
called on Mrs. Procter, the mother of 
"Barry Conwall." The lady was old, 
but not too old to be witty. He expected 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

308 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




No Salad is Perfect 

Without Rose Apples 



ANEW sweet pepper used as salad 
cups, garnishes, etc. Beautiful 
red — rich, nutty flavor — crisp 
— tender — melting — juicy. 

AY hen next dining in a leading cafe 
ask that vour salad be served in Rose 
Apples. Over eight hundred hotels are 
serving them. 

Call for them in your fancy grocery. 
If not on sale we will ship you, charges 
prepaid East of Denver, two low No. 2 

KEHOE PRESERVING COMPANY 



tins upon receipt of $1.03. Each can 
Contains eight Rose Apples. 

If not satisfied your money will be 
refunded upon request. 

A new book of recipes prepared by 
the famous Southern CookandLecturer, 
Mrs. Betty Lyles Wilson of Nashville, 
Tenn., in every package, or sent free 
on request. Please give us the names 
of a few leading fancy grocers in your 
town or near you. 

TERRE HAUTE, INDIANA 



^j^^.w^».,w~»>^^.~»«~»..«i .,«,m»j»i>t»t*«Jj; 



i. iin"*'TiA ■)||"""-'""| " ■ i!ni'«UVii"n1Jlj)iiW 



For Tender Juicy Roasts 



THE 
1 



WAGNER DRIP- 
DROP ROASTER in Cast 
Aluminum — or Cast Iron means 
better roasts and stews, because 
it has all the goodness of the 
heavy old-fashioned Dutch Oven 
— combined with a wonderful self- 
basting feature. Fowl and meats 
of all kinds are cooked thoroughly , 
without danger of quick scorching. 
Ask your dealer. Write for 
leaflet No. 74 

THE WAGNER MFG. CO. 

Fair Ave., Sidney, Ohio 





* 4 h', 

i I il * J 

1 / < J 



Buy advertised Goods 



- Do not accept substitutes 
309 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



For real economy 
you need two kinds 
of flour 



The very best flour for bread may be the 
poorest for cake. Instead of a bready, porous 
texture, really good cake must be tender, 
delicate and soft in consistency. Swans 
Down Cake Flour gives even the plainest 
cake such a fine-grained, feathery lightness, 
it practically guarantees perfect success every 
time you bake. 

But, perhaps, you have not used it for all 
your cakes, because you supposed anything 
as fine as 




Preferred by Housewives for 28years 

must be expensive. As a matter of fact, 
Swans Down, in the average cake, costs 
only 3^ cents more than the same amount of 
bread flour. By enabling you to use simpler, 
less expensive recipes it often saves even more 
than that small sum, and yet gives you far 
more delicious cake. 

Experienced cake makers consider the use 
of Swans Down Cake Flour one of the most 
worth-while economies they can practice. 

As you know, Swans Down is the purest 
kind of soft, winter wheat flour — there's 
nothing in it but wheat — no drying corn- 
starch. It gives 
just as wonderful 
results in biscuits, 
waffles, and all 
kinds of pastries 
as it does in cake. 




Swans Down 










IGLEHEART BROS. 

Established 1856 

Evansville, Ind. 

Manufacturers also of 
Instant Swans Down, 
a ready-mixed cake 
batter in dry form, 
the only product of its 
kind made with Swans 
Down Cake Flour. 



FREE — Success Cake Making Chart. Sign and return 
this coupon if you would like to receive complete instruc- 
tions for rheasuring, mixing, and baking cake — especially 
sponge and angel food cakes. (A great help for use in 
domestic science classes as well as in. the home kitchen* 

Name 

Street Address 

Town ; State 



to be asked his opinion of America; 
instead, she asked what was AmericaY 
opinion of him. "Well," Arnold replied, 
"they said that my clothes didn't fit andi 
that I was very conceited." To which 
the lady made response, "Matthew, I 
think they were mistaken about the 
clothes." Atlantic Monthly. 



The Professor: 



'Let us take the 



example of the busy ant. He is busy all 
the time. He works all day and every 
day. Then what happens?" 

The Bright One: "He gits stepped on." 



* 'Home-Making as a Profession" 

HOME-MAKING is the greatest 
of all the professions — greatest 
in numbers and greatest in its 
influence on the individual and on society. 
All industry is conducted for the home, 
directly or indirectly, but the industries 
directly allied to the home are vastly 
important, as the food industries, clothing 
industries, etc. Study of home eco- 
nomics leads directly to many well paid 
vocations as well as to home efficiency. 

Since 1905 the American School of 
Home Economics has given home-study 
courses to over 30,000 housekeepers, 
teachers, and others. The special text- 
books have been used for class work in 
over 500 schools. 

Of late years, courses have been de- 
veloped fitting for many well paid posi- 
tions: — Institution Management, Tea 
Room and Lunchroom Alanagement, 
Teaching of Domestic Science, Home 
Demonstrators, Dietitians, Nurses, Dress- 
making, "Cooking for Profit." Home- 
Makers' Courses : — Complete Home 
Economics, Household Engineering, Les- 
sons in Cooking, The Art of Spending. 

BULLETINS: Free-Hand Cooking, 
Ten-cent Meals, Food Values, Family 
Finance, Art of Spending, Weekly Allow- 
ance Book, ioc each. 

Details of any of the courses and inter- 
esting 80-page illustrated handbook, 
"The Profession of Home-Making" sent 
on request. American School of Home 
Economics, 830 E. 58th Street, Chicago. 

— Adv. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

310 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




PAPER TABLE DECORATIONS and LIBERTY PAPER BAKING CUPS 

Needed by Every Housekeeper and Hostess 

NO PANS TO WASH "BAKE IN THE CUP" REQUIRE NO GREASE 

Cups Require No Greasing, Can Be Used in Regular Muffin Tins or On Cooky Sheet, in Roasting 

Pan or Any Flat Tin. SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY OFFER $1.00 POSTPAID 

Containing: Liberty Baking Ccps. 1 Pkg. (125) Tea Cake Size. 1 Pkg. (100) Muffin or Cup Cake Size. 

20 Chop Frills, to decorate chops, chicken legs, etc. 20 Skewers to decorate croquettes, planked steaks, 

etc. 2 Pie Collars, to be used on deep dish pies, 

puddings, planked steaks, etc., and 36 Round 

Paper Lace D'oyleys. 

All the Above Packed in One Box Sent to You 

Postpaid Upon Receipt of One Dollar 
Address Agents Wanted 

WILLIAM W. BEVAN CO. 

54 High Street Boston, Mass. 




Cream Whipping Made 
Easy and Inexpensive 

r! REMO- y ESCO 

Whips Thin Cream 

or Half Heavy Cream and Milk 

or Top of the Milk Bottle 

It whips up as easily as heavy cream 

and retains its stiffness. 

Every caterer and housekeeper 

wants CREMO-VESCO. 

Send for a bottle to-day. 

Housekeeper's size, \\ oz., .30 prepaid 
Caterer's size, 16 oz., $1.00 " 

(With full directions) 



Cremo-Vesco Company 

•31 EAST 23rd ST., BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Pacific Coast Agents. 
MILES MFG. CO., 949-951 E. 2nd St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



"Free-Hand Cooking' ' 

C*ck teHhout recipes! A key to cookbooks, correct proportions, 
time, temperature; thickening, leavening, shortening, 105 fun- 
damental recipes. 40 p. book. 10 cents coin or stamps. 

Am. School of Home Economics, 830 E, 58th Street, Chicago 




8 Inches Square, S Inches High 

You can be the best cake maker in your 
club or town. You can make the same Angel Food 
Cake and many other kinds that I make and sell at $3 a 
loaf-profit, $2, If you 

Learn the Osborn Cake Making System 

■y methods are different. They are th« result of twenty year* 
•xperience as a domestic science expert. My way is easy to learn 
It never fails. I have taught thousands. L-st me send you foil 
particulars FREE. 

Mrs. Grace Osborn Dept. 1411 Bay City, rV^ch. 



Trade Mark Registered. 

Gluten Floor 

40% GLUTEN 

Guaranteed to comply in all respects to 

Standard requirements of U. S. Dept. of 

Agriculture. 

Manufactured, by 

FAR WELL & RHINES 

Water town, N. Y. 



"Ten-Cent Meals" 

42 Meals with receipts and directions ror preparing each. 48 pp. 10c- 

Am. School of Home Economics, 830 E. 58th St., Chicago 



1 



Edeson Radio Phones ■ 

Adustable Diaphragm Clearance 



Wt guarantee satisfaction, or your money 
refunded. The adjustment feature places our 
phones on a par with the world's greatest makes. 
Our sales plan eliminates dealer's piolits and 
losses from bad accounts, hence the low price. 
Better phones cannot be made. Immediate 
deliveries. Double 3000 Ohm sets. $3.98; 1500 
' Ohm single set. $2.50. Circular free. 



Edeson Phone Co, 6 Bead St„Dept 1 5 Bos 




The So E-Z Cream Separator zliL&TZfi 

1-2 pint of CREAM from a quart bottle of milk 

leaving "1 1-2 pints of milk for other purposes. 

Just adjust it and pour off the CREAM. 

,the milk remaining in the bottle. No 

Pumping. No Wasting. Easily Cleaned. 40 

cents cash with order or 50 cents C. O. D. 

om-ly \*- *f rse tt 30 da - vs « if not SATISFIED we 

^- — will refund your monev. 

B. W. J. COMPANY, 1996 Indianola Ave., Columbus, Ohio 



SEQVICE TABLE WAGON 





Large Kroad Wide Table 
Top — KemoTable Glass 
Service Tray — Double 
Drawer — Double 
Handles — Large Deep 
1'iiiliTslif Ives — "Srien- 
tifirally Silent*' -Rubber 
Tired Swivel Wheels. 
A high grade piece of fur- 
niture surpassing any- 
thing yet attempted for 
GENERAL UTILITY, 
ease of action, and abso- 
lute noiseless. less. Write 
now for descriptive pam- 
phlet and dealer's name. 
COMBINATION PRODUCTS CO. 

S04JCmrdBUg. Chicigi. III. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

311 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



POMPE1AN 
OLIVE OIL 

Sold Everywhere 

Help! Help!! Help!!! 

Our two new household helpers on 7 days' free trial! They save 
you at least an hour a day, worth at only 30 cents an hour, 
<2.10 a week. Cost only the 10 cents a week for a year. Send 
postcard for details of these "helpers," our two new home-study 
courses, "Household Engineering" and "Lessons in Cooking," now 
in book form; OR SEND $5.00 in full payment. Regular price 
$6.28. Full refund if not satisfactory. 

AM. SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS, 830 E. 58th STREET, CHICAGO 



E C Z E M A 

IS ONLY SKIN DEEP 



and can be instantly relieved and quickly 
nealed by the use of CRAXOLEN'E, the suc- 
cessful cranberry cream treatment for stub- 
born skin troubles. At drug stores, 35c and 
$1.00, or write for Free Test Treatment to 
Cranolene Company, Dept. £3 Girard, Kansas 




A FRENCH CHEF MrS 

able, appetizing, nourishing dishes, for which 
the French cook is famed, served on your own 
table — sauces and salads, sautes and entrees, 
crisp rolls and fancy breads, pastries and con- 
fections. Hundreds of recipes, representing the 
experience and artistry of M. Xaviy Raskin, 
chef par excellence, clearly set forth in a book 
of 700 pages — "The Fbench Chef in Private 

American Families," postpaid 85.00. 

RAND McNALLY & CO., 536 S. Clark St., Chicago. 



—EAT — - 

Skinners 

The Superior Macaroni 



Beats Everything 



ROBERTS LIGHTNING MIXER 

Beats eggs, whips cream, churns butter, 
mixes dressings in a few seconds. Blends 
and mixes malted milk, powdered milk, 
baby foods, and all drinks. ^ ^^i 

If your dealer does not carry this, we 
will send, prepaid, quart size $1.25, pint Jg"* 
size 90 cents. Far West and South, quart §~ 
$1.40, pint $1. ^Recipe ibook free^with | = 



mixer. 



*A 



NATIONAL COMPANY?'^** § = 



Cambridge 39, 



Boston, Mass. 



• 1 i 1 =* ZM 



6 S hlnm S MIXER 



.Aline and her brother attended a birth- 
day party of a playmate. Ice cream, 
cake, and lemonade were served. The 
boy asked his hostess for a glass of water. 
"Drink your lemonade," Aline said, 
interrupting. "I don't want lemonade. 
I want water," said the boy. "Don't be 
silly. Drink your lemonade," said Aline. 
"It's just like water." 



Miss Bradley's New Course a 
Great Success 

COOKING for Profit, Catering and 
Food Service Management, the 
new home-study course by Miss 
Alice Bradley, Principal of Miss Farmer's 
School of Cookery, has met with wide 
demand and appreciation. 

Hundreds of women who need to make 
money, without neglect of their home 
duties, now enjoy a steady and increasing 
income from the sale of home-cooked 
food, cake making and catering. 

Others have learned just how to con- 
duct a food shop, candy kitchen, tea room, 
cafeteria or lunchroom, or how to manage 
a guest house or small hotel with big 
profits. 

Through this fascinating course they 
have received expert knowledge — how to 
prepare food "good enough to sell," just 
what to cook with many choice recipes, 
how to gain a reputation and constant 
profitable market, how to cater for all 
occasions, and full details of all food serv- 
ice management. Also they have been 
given the courage and inspiration to push 
ahead into creative work that increases 
their value to the world and to themselves. 

In "Cooking for Profit," it is possible 
and usually advisable, to begin simply 
with little or no expense for equipment 
and develop one of the many lines into a 
large and lucrative business. 

The correspondence instruction on the 
course is under the personal direction of 
Miss Bradley which gives assurance of 
success; the fee is very moderate, and 
may be paid on easy terms. You are 
invited to write for full details to American 
School of Home Economics, 830 E. 58th 
Street, Chicago. 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

312 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



3J5E 



H 




iS 



TTT 



TTT" 



I 1 I T T TI I T 



TTX 



TTT 



ZQd 



LLLli 



_ 




& 





Stickney & Poor's 

"Extra Fine" 

Mustard 

can always be identified by this 

"Mustardpot" Trade Mark 

on the handy red, yellow and blue can. 
Learn to look for this Trade Mark 

whenever you are purchasing Mustards, 
Spices, Seasonings and Flavorings. It is your assurance 
of getting honest goods at an honest price. 

Order by Name. Say, "Stickney & Poor's." 
Your co-operating servant, 

"MUSTARDPOT" 

Look for the Name "STICKNEY & POOR" on all your spices and flavorings 




STICIINEY & POOR SPICE COMPANY 

wsTAtts-sngs Ms-Century OW-Centnry Honor** -1922 g^,^^ 

BOSTON and HALIFAX 

The Only Manufacturers of Pure Mustards in the New England States 



vk 



|||[ jilllllllllM 

lUlllr v »»» Ml nrinir nr ' in i n UlllllllLlll 



r 3X 



£ 



m 



:xq\- 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

313 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Five Ways 

To Use 

Hay's Five Fruit 

As a Punch — Dilute with Tea or 
Lemonade, Plain in Carbonated 
water and plenty of ice. 

As a Cold Sauce — Pour over Va- 
nilla Ice Cream, Fruit Cups, 
Fritters or Cereals. 

As a Pudding Sauce — Add one 
cup boiling water to one cup of 
FIVE FRUIT. 

As an Ice or Sherbet — 1 part to 
4 of water and freeze. 

As a Jelly or Mousse — 1 box of 
Gelatin, 1 pt. Water, 1 cup of 
FIVE FRUIT. Dissolve by 
heat then chill. 

The Pioneer Punch— Originated in 1900 

If not at your grocer's, write to 
HAY'S FRUIT JUICE CO., Portland, Maine 



SALAD SECRETS 



JOG recipes < Brie/ but complete. 15c by mail. 100 Meat- 

twcjrecipes 15c 50 Sandwich redoes 15c All three 30c 

B. R. BRIGGS, 250 Madison St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



"The Art of Spending" 

T«Hi how to get more for your money — how to live better and 
•ave more! How to budget expenses and record them without 
household accounts. 24 pp. illustrated, io cents. 

AM. SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS, 830 E. 58th ST., CHICAGO 



COOK BOOK. 



A practical and 
reliable guide to 
everyday cookery. 

Instructions given to prepare all kinds of pies, jellies, puddings, 

soups, meats, fish, etc. Price 30c. 

HUEBNER CO., 1865 N. Halsted Street, Chicago, 111. 



Tea Room For Sale 

Established Tea Room in University town. 
House of fifteen rooms on the Campus, also 
on State Road. Rental of extra rooms pays 
all overhead including rent, light, heat, etc. 
Cheap maid service and student help for 
board. An excellent opportunity for one with 
sons to educate. 

Address TEA ROOM 

Care AMERICAN COOKERY, Boston, Mass. 



Household Help Wanted? 

YOU can have the assistance of an 
expert cook and an expert house- 
keeper, with no expense for room 
and board, for only 10 cents a week! 
That is all our two "Household Help- 
ers" will cost you the first year — nothing 
thereafter for the rest of your life! Send 
the coupon. 

These Helpers will save one-fourth your 
time — one-tenth your money — all your 
worry. Many workmen get 31 an hour 
— surely your time is worth 30 cents an 
hour. We guarantee these Helpers to 
save you at least an hour a day, worth say 
32.10 a week. Will you invest 10 cents 
a week to gain $2 weekly? Send the 
coupon. 

And the value our "Helpers" give you 
in courage and inspiration, in peace of 
mind, in the satisfaction of progress, in 
health, happiness and the joy of living — 
is above price. In mere dollars and cents, 
they will save their cost twelve times a 
year or more. Send the coupon. 

These helpers, "Lessons in Cooking" 
and "Household Engineering" were both 
prepared as home-study courses, and as 
such have been tried out and approved by 
thousands of our members. Thus they 
have the very highest recommendation. 
Mrs. R. says, "I have reduced time and 
energy expended one-half, and have only 
just begun!" We will gladly send these 
Helpers in book form, on a week's free 
trial in your own home. Send the 
coupon. 

You really cannot afford to be without 

these Helpers. As you cannot realize 

what great help they will give you till you 

try them, you are cordially invited to sertd 

for them — and the free trial will cost you 

nothing! Send no money - — send the 

coupon. 

American School of Home Economics, Chicago. 

FREE TRIAL FOR ONE WEEK 

A. S. H. E. — 830 E. 58th Street, Chicago. 111. 

Send your two "HOUSEHOLD HELPERS." prepaid 
on a week's trial, in the De Luxe binding. If satisfactory, I 
will send you $5 in full payment (OR) 50 cents and $1 per 
month for five months. Otherwise I will return one or 
both books in seven days. (Regular mail price $3.14 each.) 

Name and 

Address 

Reference 



Buy advertised Goods — Do not accept substitutes 

314 



ADVERTI SEMENTS 



SEND FOR THIS TODAY 




DELICIOUS f\ At 



ONEY 



90 



ftllClOUSHOKf 

^hampuin valley 

fol OF VERMONT 

'^ MARELDO APIARIES jg£ 

middleburY Jj£ 

VERMONT Mm 

wiim 





Post Prepaid Within 4th Zone 
Different and better than any 
other honey you ever tasted. 
Produced in the famous 
Champlain Valley of Ver- 
mont — produced, graded and 
packed by specialists of many 
years' experience. 

NATURE'S PUREST AND 
MOST DELICIOUS SPREAD 
Try it on hot biscuits, waffles, wheat 
cakes, buckwheats, cereal and 
French toast. The first taste will 
whet your appetite for more. Ap- 
proved by Pnscilla Proving Plant- 
recognized pure food authorities. 
Send for a Trial 3 lb. can today. 
Keeps perfectly till last drop is 
used. Better still, get your friends 
and neighbors to club in with you 
and benefit from lower prices on 
larger quantities. Check or Money 
Order should accompany order. 

MARELDO APIARIES 
Dept. A. C. Middlebury, Vt. 



"METALBRITE" 3SS&» 

Cleans, polishes and preserves silver, "brass, 
gold, nickel, aluminum, etc. 

35c size mailed for 25c. TRY IT! 

CHAS. J. GEIS Woodhaven, N. Y. 




MADE»WfA MILK 

The wonderful little Junket 
Tablet changes Milk into a 
delicate, delicious dessert that 
is both wholesome and so 
enjoyable. 

Can be flavored and 
adorned with whipped 
cream, berries, etc., ac- 
cording to a wide variety 
of recipes. 

Send for our new Junket Recipe 
Book; 4 cents in stamps will bring 
it with a sample of Junket Tablets. 
We will also include a sample of 
Junket Powder, fla- 
vored and sweetened, 
our newest preparation 
for making Junket. 

THE 

JUNKET 

FOLKS 

Little Falls 
New York 

Chr. Han- 
sen's Cana- 
dian Labor- 
atory 
Toronto, 
Ont. 



/"' 




BREAKFASTS, LUNCHEONS and DINNERS 

By MARY D. CHAMBERS 

Should be in every home. It treats in detail the three meals a day. in their several varieties, from 
the light family aftair to the formal and company function. Appropriate menus are given for each 
occasion. The well-balanced diet is kept constantly in view. Table china, glass and silver, and 
table linen, all are described and illustrated. In short, how to plan, how to serve and how to behave 
at these meals, is the author's motive in writing the book. This motive has been clearly and admir- 
ably well carried out. Table etiquette might well be the subtitle of the volume. 
Cloth, 150 pages We will send this book postpaid on receipt of price, $1.25 Illustrated, $1.25 net 



THE BOSTON COOKING SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO., 



Boston, Mass. 





T 



Dehydrated 

Fruits $ Vegetables, 

— mean far more appetizing and 
healthful food variety with less 
time spent in the kitchen. 

No Cleaning — No Peeling 
No Slicing — Just re- fresh 
and cook. 

cpivn T wo cents today for the Free 
or.ni/ King - S Fruit and vegetable 

Cook Book — a revelation in 
fruit and vegetable cookery. 

KINGS FOOD PRODUCTS COMPANY 

PORTLAND. OREGON 
I 



S end 2 5 ^ To-da v- for- Thi 
JONDER CREAM WHI 
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"KEEPING WATCH" 



nted by Edw. V . Brewer for Cream of Wheat Company 



Copyright IQ22 bv Cream of Wheat Company 



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AMERICAN COOKERY 



Vol. XXVII DECEMBER, 1922 No. 5 



CONTENTS FOR DECEMBER page 

STEAK, PLANKED, PARKER HOUSE STYLE. Ill 329 

BUNGALOWS OF THE RIVIERA. 111. . . . Blanche McManus 331 
The Cabanon, the Adaptation of the Modern Bungalow in South- 
ern France 
CLOSETS FOR EVERY PART OF THE HOUSE. 111. 

Eliza St. Pierre 335 

THE AWAKENING OF AUNT LODIE .... Mary Allen Clarke 338 
(A One-Act Playlet) 

FANS • . E. L. Thurston 342 

HANDY WITH A HAMMER Ida R. Fargo 343 

STRETCHING THAT SALARY Marie C Loscalzo 345 

THE CHRISTMAS CLOSET Harriet W. Symonds 347 

EDITORIALS 350-2 

SEASONABLE-AND-TESTED RECIPES. (Illustrated with half- 
tone engravings of prepared dishes) 

Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 353-60 

MENUS FOR A WEEK IN DECEMBER . . . . 361 

MENUS FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS IN DECEMBER 362 

EVERY WOMAN HER OWN CATERER Corinne C Sanquist 363 

BRAINS AND FOOD J. E. Hearn, Biochemist 364 

THE ART OF BEING READY . . . Elisabeth X. Simmonds 366 

APPLES AND SOAP Bertha C Ely 367 

A NEW YEAR'S SOCIAL Ella S. Bowles 368 

JANUARY, A NEW YEAR'S DAY F. C. A. 369 

THE FIRST SNOW Helen Cowles LeCron 370 

HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES : — In a Genuine, not a Bar Har- 
bor, Cottage — A Winter Beefsteak Fry — 'For the Children's 
Evening Meal — Hot Dogs and Potato Salad — Painted Furniture 

— 'Ah Lee, the Faithful 371 

QUERIES AND ANSWERS 375 

NEW BOOKS 380 

THE SILVER LINING 384 



ff^jR^X $1-50 A YEAR Published Ten Times a Year 15c A Copy 

Foreign postage 40c additional 

Entered at Boston post-office as second-class matter 
Copyright 1922, by 

THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL MAGAZINE CO. 
Pope Bldg., 221 Columbus Ave., Boston 17, Mass. 



Please Renew on Receipt of Colored Blank Enclosed for that Purpose 

322 





ADVERTISEMENTS 



WHEN IT RAINS — IT POURS 




Start her right 

"\ yfORE than a million critical cooks use 
-*»▼■*■ Morton's Salt day by day, year in year 
out. Here's why : 

It's a pure salt many times refined so that noth- 
ing may impair its vigorous, stimulating flavor. 

It's economical ; a little goes a long way. And 
no waste ; salt rarely lumps or cakes in the 
package. 

It's convenient. Even when it rams it pours 
because its crystals are cube shaped; they re' 
sist moisture — tumble off one another. 

MORTON SALT COMPANY 

CHICAGO 



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AMERICAN COOKERY 



INDEX FOR DECEMBER 



Apples and Soap . 

Art of Being Ready, The 

Awakening of Aunt Lodie, The 

Brains and Food . 

Bungalows of the Riviera 

Christmas Closet, The . 

Closets for Every Part of the House 

Editorials .... 

Every Woman Her Own Caterer 

Fans ..... 

First Snow, The . 

Handy with a Hammer 

Home Ideas and Economies . 

January, a New Year's Day . 

Menus 

New Books . 

New Year's Social, A 

Queries and Answers 

Silver Lining, The 

Steak, Planked, Parker House Style 

Stretching That Salary 



PAGE 

367 
366 
338 
364 
331 
347 
335 
350-2 
363 
342 
370 
343 
371 
369 
361-62 
380 
368 
375 
384 
329 
345 



SEASONABLE- AND -TESTED RECIPES 



Bread, Carolina Corn 

Cake, Christmas Honey, Gateau de Noel 

Cakes, Christmas. 111. . 

Cakes, Cocoanut Drop . 

Cauliflower, Mashed 

Cheese-and-Cracker Luncheon Dish 

Doughnuts, Small Chocolate, for Tea. Ill 

Eggs in Eggplant 

Hens, Guinea, in Casserole. 111. 

Peas, with Pork Tongue and Beets. 111. 

Pie, English Game 

Pie, Mutton and Apple . 

Pie, Sweet Cider .... 



353 
360 
360 
359 
354 
359 
359 
356 
354 
357 
356 
357 
359 



Potatoes with Ham, Candied Sweet. 111. 
Pudding, Hungarian Christmas. 111. 
Pudding, Nesselrode, with Sauce. 111. 
Pumpkin and Parmesan 
Salad, Winter. 111. 
Scallops, Scalloped 
Soup. Quince-and-Apple 
Soup, Veal with Brains . 
Sprouts, Brussels, with Cream Sauce. Ill 
Stew, Virginia Brunswick 
Sweetbreads, with Orange Sauce. 111. 
Tartlette, Christmas Citron 



356 
358 
358 
355 
357 
356 
353 
353 
355 
353 
355 
360 



QUERIES AND ANSWERS 



Cake, Fruit, Loss of Weight in Baking 
Chocolate, Milk .... 
Cocktails, Novelties in 



375 Cookery, Fancy Dishes for 

376 Definitions, WVnted 

376 Pie, Brown Topped Pumpkin 



378 
375 
375 



We want representatives everywhere to take subscriptions for 
American Cookery. We have an attractive proposition to make 
those who w r ill canvass their town; also to those who will secure a 
few names among their friends and acquaintances. Write us todav. 

AMERICAN COOKERY - BOSTON, MASS. 



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^Bak§d 
Spare -ribs 
with 
Gulden s 



A dish to make a hungry man beam with joy ! 
Meaty, tender young spareribs, lightly breaded 
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is a delicious, tantalizing flavor that puts an 
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READY - TO • USE 



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s\ y> the Home, for Mother, Sister, Sweetheart, let 
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Whatever the cleaning job— 
Old Dutch does it more economically 



Old Dutch is trained for economy. Nature made 
its soft, flat particles to be the ideal all-round 
cleanser. 

Every flaky particle works — erases the dirt — 

doesn't scratch or injure surfaces. Their very shape 
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Planked Steak, Parker House Style 

The steak should be cut about an inch and a 
quarter thick. Wipe carefully with a damp cloth. 
Have ready a hot broiler, well oiled or rubbed 
over with a bit of fat. Cook the steak over the 
coals about eight minutes, turning four or five 
times. Set the steak on a hot plank. Pipe hot 
mashed potato around the edge of the plank. 
Set four cooked onions on the steak. Brush over 
the edges of the potato and the onions with the 
yolk of an egg, beaten and diluted with a little 
milk, and set the plank into a hot oven, to brown 
and reheat the potato, brown the edges of the 
onions, and finish cooking the steak. Remove 
from the oven. Set four parboiled, green peppers, 
stuffed with chestnut puree, at one end of the 
steak, and pour over a brown mushroom sauce. 
Serve at once. 



A 



merican 



Cook 



VOL. XXVII 



ery 



DECEMBER, 1922 



NO. 5 



Bungalows of the Riviera 

The Cabanon, a Southern French Adaptation of the Modern Bungalow 

By Blanche McManus 



AS for the bungalow pur sang on the 
French Riviera, there isn't any 
such thing. The cabanon, not in 
its "old French" dictionary meaning, but 
according to popular acceptation in 
southern France, where, sometimes, 
dependent upon geography, it is a 
cabanon, and sometimes a bastide, has a 
very real and charming existence for 
those who live with it, hand-in-hand, as 
it were. 

America has all manner of summer and 
winter camps, mountain shacks and 
beach cottages, log cabins — palatial and 
otherwise, bungalows, and even tent 
colonies and modernized abandoned farm- 
houses, but nothing which, in the least, 
resembles the southern France cabanon 
any more than it resembles its neigh- 
boring, gorgeous Riviera villas, or than 
the bastide of the Pyrenees is kin to the 
natal chateau of Henry of Navarre. 

For this reason there may be an idea in 
the cabanon for America, remembering 
first, last, and all time, that the cabanon 
in its most usual form is but a temporary 
repair, where one may go — a sort of self- 
contained den, apart from the main 
establishment, usually far away even from 
the center of an agglomerate population. 
It might be called an al fresco summer- 
house, where one might seek and find 
solitude; it might, otherwise, become a 
sort of imitation Trianon, where one 
might hold a little court of kindred spirits 
on picnic lines. 

All along the north slopes of the Pyre- 
nees in southern France are bastides; all 
along the Mediterranean Coast of France, 

331 



from the Spanish to the Italian frontieis 
are cabanons. Architecturally they are 
much alike, a small cubicle of a house — 
always of stone, stuccoed inside and out. 
and tiled with red or green on the roof, 
usually of but a single room, with, per- 
haps, an embryo lean-to at one side, and 
invariably with a wide, nagged, or tiled. 
terrasse before the door, this terrace, 
balustraded and shaded adequately by 
cypress, olive, or almond trees, perhaps h 
scraggy pine, less frequently with a 
feather-duster palm, a much overrated 
tree, when it comes to shade. 

Every town dweller of the south of 
France, particularly along the Mediter- 
ranean Coast, east and west from Mar- 
seilles, has his suburban cabanon in the 
hills overlooking the sea, or on some 
picturesque calanque, such as Mistral 
wrote of in "Mireille," close parents of 
Capri's "Blue Grotto." 

These architectural trifles, often set in 
the midst of a few square rods of land, 
planted with vines and fig tree, become 
at once a tiny rural property, with all the 
attributes of a farm, except live stock, the 
most lively things ever seen about a 
cabanon being a pair, or a small flock, of 
cooing doves. 

The cabanon serves the bourgeoisie of 
the towns as an excuse for a day in the 
country, where they may still be "at 
home" — "chez eux" as they have it, 
the word home being unknown in the 
French language — ■ and free from the 
banality of the hotel or restaurant, when 
it comes time to think of the inner man. 
Here is where the picnic idea is evolved, 



332 



AMERICAN COOKERY 






except that, instead of grassing it, or 
sitting about on cold rocks or prickly pine 
needles, you may lounge in a comfortable 
wicker chair and eat fresh-prepared hot 
food in place of a dubious cold collation, 
intermingled with sticks and straws, and 
drinking tepidity from a thermos bottle 
which has gone awry. 

Sometimes, but seldom, a cabanon may 
rise to two stories, and become actually 
livable for some- 
thing more than 
a round of the 
clock. Always it 
is of the genre 
fantastique, with a 
curiously scal- 
loped facade, im- 
promptu bal- 
conies and unex- 
pected windows. 
A peculiarity is 
there is never a 
window on the 
north, because of 
the whirlwind 
effects of the icy 
gales, which, in- 
termittently, de- 
scend the Rhone 
Valley. 

The cabanon 
orientates itself to 
climatic and mete- 
orologic condi- 
tions. Its very 
simplicity lends to 
this. The contre- 
partie is that it 




A FISHERMAN'S ROCOCO BUNGALOW 



local stone-cutter and mason for the 
veriest auxiliary aid when needed. 

The cabanon once "enclosed and cov- 
ered," as is the French phrase — walled 
and roofed, as we would have it — to be 
really a replica of the best of its kind, 
requires a liberal admixture of paint, the 
more and the thicker, and the more fre- 
quently the cabanon may be deluged with 
it the more in its genre it is. Chromatics 

are the keynote, 
after the simple 
Euclidian lines of 
i t s construction 
are taken into 
account. Here is 
where individual- 
ity comes in — 
personality, occa- 
sionally real 
genius of a most 
forward kind. 

Topsy - turvy 
rainbow effects 
predominate, and 
here in this ver- 
dant southland 
the motifs of gay 
colored cabanons 
punctuate the 
landscape in a 
manner unique 
in all the world. 
The impressionist 
painters, whether 
cubists, like 

Picabia, or poin- 
tillists, like Signac 
are here obliged 



always faces the south, and because of to leave nothing to the imagination, 
this, in this brilliant southland, for the Their palettes are all set. 



greater part of the day, even in winter, 
the "Chimney of Good King Rene" 
serves a practical purpose, as legend tells 
us it served the court of the Bien Roi in 
the days when Old Provence was the 
Royaume du Soleil. 

Almost any architect novice could 
design a cabanon; most owners of cabanons 
design them themselves; many actually 
build them, enlisting the services of the 



Following the suggestiveness of this 
preamble here comes the "actuality." If 
the experience offers any encouragement 
to any one for going and doing likewise — 
acclimating the idea, so to say, there is 
little doubt but that the American-made 
cabanon will be as much of an improve- 
ment upon its French brother, as the 
French cabanon of today is an improve- 
ment upon the prison cell to which the 



THE CABANON OF SOUTHERN FRANCE 



333 



word iirstapplied and from which it springs. 

Don't ask why, or when, the trans- 
formed application took place. The 
southern French do this sort of thing 
spontaneously and spasmodically; they 
do as they please, and care no more today 
for Paris styles in hats or dwellings, than 
they did in the old days when the "Rouges 
du Midi" set out for the north "to 
capture Capet and his castle." Castles 
mean nothing to a meridional; a cabanon 
is quite sufficient in spite of its ancestry. 

Here is the actual experience of a 
friend, an experience at which we 
assisted from birth of the idea to the 
christening, the hanging of the crane. 

Title deeds to about an acre of ground 
had been acquired and paid for, at the 
rate of three francs a square metre — -at 
after-war exchange rates of the moment 
not more than twenty cents a square yard. 

With the land came a mellow, rusty, 
half-ruined cabanon of other days, a 



group of gnarled old olive trees, over 
whose hoary heads several centuries had 
brushed their wings, and two tall 
cypresses, like index fingers pointing 
upward. There were also a few scatter- 
ing fig and almond trees. The plot was 
dotted over with a number of big, gray 
boulders, interspersed with fuzzy bunches 
of wild thyme, lavender, mint and rose- 
mary, over whose perfumed masses 
flitted clouds of tiny white butterflies. 

The combination was both ideal and 
practical for constructing a "leisure 
moment" house. The cabanon was orig- 
inally built of the intailored stones of the 
hillside, summarily stuccoed inside and 
out. The roof was of tiles, bleached to 
soft rose and creamy tints by many suns, 
the tiles undulating picturesquely over a 
none-too-straight ridgepole. 

The interior was full of fascinating pos- 
sibilities — and nothing else. The ground 
floor — an immense, single room, with 




THE SUNNY SIDE OF THE CABANON 



534 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




¥ 







- 









,J Sj&&f#* $g& 



> ■ ; r*l- 

■ ■ ■ ' r -* 



^-^Sl 







THE CLASSIC CABANON 



another sort of appendix leading from one 
end. By a rare chance the cabanon was 
of two stories. The low ceiling of this 
room within a room supported a broad 
balcop--, which was suggestive of the 
sous-pu/it of our Latin Quarter studio. 
The balcony was arrived at by a rambling 
>. airway, clinging to the bare wall, and 
itself fashioned according to no formula 
we had ever seen before. Each step was 
of broad red tiles, stripped with wood, and 
turned at a different angle from the one 
before or after, requiring not a little 
agility, and much practice, to successfully 
negotiate. 

It should be mentioned that at the rear, 
through a great arched portal, was a 
lean-to hangar, which, as a utility wing of 
some purport in its infancy, was obviously 
destined to be transformed into a garage. 

Various cosmopolite workmen were 
gathered together, a Spaniard for digging 
in the ground and the heavy masonry, 
an Italian for the stuccoing and the 
plastering, a necessitous Russian who 
hewed great stones in halves, and a 
Moroccan handy man, a sort of debris 



left high and dry on the shores of France. 
as the aftermath of war withdrew. Amid 
much guzzling of red wine, of munching 
bread and sausage and garlic (which com- 
bination seems to be Europeanally inter- 
national), and a continual rolling and 
smoking of cigarettes, a sort of thirty 
per cent efficiency of labor was achieved, 
as compared with what we had planned. 
But it was done well, at least sufficiently 
well, to show that primitive, rather than 
futurist, labor had left its loving brush 
and hammer marks. 

A supply of rosy red and yellow tile? 
were had from the wreck of a near-by 
monastery, and from a local antique shop 
we bought a few yards of oak railings, 
carved after the crude Provencal manner, 
and these replaced the plain, iron rampf 
of the stair and the balcony. It was not 
so much a question of period — that 
over abused phrase — as it was of appro- 
priateness in the addition of our furnish- 
ings; if anything, primitiveness was our 
watchword. 

What visible wood there was in the 
(Continut'd on page 34S) 



Closets for Every Part of the House 

By Eliza St. Pierre 



MERE man even now has little 
idea of the value the closet plays 
in the orderliness, and the gen- 
eral seemliness of a house. I knew one 
man who built a sizeable house without 
a single closet in it. Though he was an 
exception, the man builder as a rule still 
needs the advice and insistence of a 
woman to guide him in the matter of the 
provision and the placing of closets and 
cupboards. 

The fine old Colonial houses used 
nook, alcove, and corner for convenient, 



and, at the same time, ornamental cup- 
board and closet. But there followed a 
period when the house builder, planning 
with fewer nooks, alcoves, and chimney 
corners, failed to make proper provision 
for cupboard and closet. Many of us 
remember that ugliness of a generation 
back, the closetless, cluttered hall, where 
a visitor's first impression, on entering the 
house, was of a medley of hats, the sight 
and odor of a medley of rubbers. Thank- 
ful we should be for the changing of that 
fashion. A hall, the welcoming place. 




A CLOSET FULL OF SLIPPERS 

335 



336 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



should be inviting and attractive. Here 
one should put one's best foot forward, 
to insure that things unsightly do not 
collect. Second, it is necessary that 
some sort of a closet be quickly available, 
exits and entrances being hasty, as a rule; 
a place for wraps, hats, sticks, and um- 
brellas must be at hand. Hall closets are 
of various kinds. An unusual sort was 
devised by one clever housewife. On 
either side of her front door she had built 
a closet, just a foot deep and two feet 
wide, but seven feet high. At the bottom 
were drawers for the collection of the 
family rubbers, at the top were shelves 
for outing caps and hats. In between 
was space for golf bags, canes, umbrellas, 
even room for several heavy wraps. One 
visions her hall cleared, free, and yet with 
those last things needed before setting 
forth for the street easily available. 

We jump from the front of the house to 
the rear, to the culinary department, and 
the survey of needs here. A kitchen can 



be, and should be, an attractive place, 
not a catch-all for the house in general. 
To arrive at this goal the first thing 
needed is a tool closet — as much a part of 
the housewife's requirements, if she is to 
present an orderly establishment, and a 
place kept in repair, as is a tool box to 
motor car or garage. 

How can one cook happily — or cleanly 
— in a kitchen where mops, brooms, floor 
cloth, scrub bucket and brush are in 
evidence and in the way? There should 
be no excuse for keeping to this bad 
custom. 

A sort of wardrobe may be built in a 
kitchen. Or a tool cupboard built in a 
back porch near the kitchen door is both 
convenient and allows of outdoor venti- 
lation, and this is now seen frequently in 
city apartment buildings. It takes up 
but little space, should be painted in 
accord with its surroundings, can be 
either unobtrusive, or where space is 
precious, and a porch has to do double 




FOR HANGING CLOTHES WITH SHELF FOR SHOES 



CLOSETS FOR EVERY PART OF THE HOUSE 



337 



service, can be made part of a scheme 
of porch decoration. But, however 
treated, the tool closet is as essential 
as the hall closet in the obtaining of 
orderliness and neatness. 

Some rhyming lines used to help me 
"carry on," as a child, when put to some 
difficult task. I may not remember the 
lines exactly, nor the title exactly, but the 
verses dealt with the perfect housewife: 

"You can tell her by her cellar, 
By the way she keeps her brooms, 
Or by peeping at the keeping 
Of her back and unused rooms." 

And "the way she keeps her brooms" 
appealed to me as most significant. 

The California bungalow, built to 
catch the eye of the tourist, finds the 
prospective tenant pleased with the 
ironing-board closet, a narrow and shallow 
closet, just large enough for its purpose. 
One opens the door, lets down the sup- 
port at the narrow end of the board, and 
lo, with a minimum of effort all is ready 
for the iron to be heated and the task of 
pressing done with neatness and dispatch. 

Bedroom closets we have now, as a 
matter of course. Perhaps, the one word 
to say about them, in the present shortage 
of house-room, is as to the economizing of 
space. We can learn here of the shops 
who sell us our suits and gowns, a peep 
at their long, narrow closets disclose how 
many clothes can be hung in a limited 
space. Short, metal bars, not so long as 
the shelves of a shallow closet are wide, 
are made curving upward towards the 
end, and here flattened so as to allow of 
fastening to the shelves. A few of these 
afford space for a number of hangers, for 
a variety and array of apparel. These 
bars must be fastened at right angles to 
the door of the closet, allowing more 



clothes to be hung thereon, and the door 
to be shut without mussing the garments. 
It is well to use at least three bars, in 
order to hang coats, skirts and gowns, 
each in their particular class. 

Shoes on the floor are bad for shoes and 
for the housemaid's temper. There is 
the shoe closet, a series of narrow shelves, 
climbing like a ladder — there is the 
elongated stool-like shelf, that uses only 
four or five inches from the floor, and that 
can be moved from closet to closet. 
There are long, low, built-in drawers 
dedicated to shoes. Anything to keep 
them clean and out of the way. 

The linen closet may have a word or 
two said concerning it, in the way of 
emphasis of oft-repeated direction. Some 
ventilation is necessary to keep the linen 
from yellowing, and, of course, it is fine, 
if the closet can be so ^ laced as to let the 
sunshine occasionally pour into it. It is 
not uncommon, now, to set aside a por- 
tion of the sewing room for the linen 
closet, and this is in many respects a 
happy arrangement. 

The bathroom can be kept orderly, 
only, if there be in it a cupboard, drawer 
or shelf, or happily all three. Even in 
America there is not a bathroom to every 
individual, and that this room, used in 
common, be kept neat and trim, there 
must be provided tuck-a-way places for 
each one's array of bathroom belongings. 
If space allow, between wall and tub, a 
rack may be set here for tub-cloth, and a 
white painted box for scrubbing equip- 
ment — ■ another tool closet, but on a very 
small scale. 

The provisions suggested above are 
not made merely from "finical taste." 
but in the interest of keeping our rooms 
clear and more easily cared for. 




The Awakening of Aunt Lodie 

(A One-act Playlet) 
By Mary Allen Clarke 



SCENE 

A Comfortable Living Room in the Christy 
Home. 

CHARACTERS 

Aunt Lodie — A Near-sighted Spinster, Fanatic 

on the Fine Arts. 
Mary Lee Christy — A Domestic Science 

Senior at Pradley. 
Mr. Marshall -- Aunt Lodie's "find." 
Peggy Loomis 
Dale Wright 
Joanne Doty 
Bea Baker 



I 



Classmates of Mary Lee. 



N 



Aunt Lodie (sitting alone in the living 
room, reads aloud from a huge book): 

*"0 art has remained more consis- 
tently in favor with the artist 
and the public than Van Dyck' 

— Oh! how comforting it is to find some 
one who can feel with me about such a 
g-r-e-a-t master — Van Dyck surely 
possessed the true appreciation of Art. 
He surely did! I wonder if he were sur- 
rounded, as I am, by people who did not 
appreciate his passion for Art divine." 

(Mary Lee enters hurriedly, drops an 
armful of books on the table and sinks 
limply into a chair.) 

Mary Lee (with dramatic dejection-) 
"Oh, Aunt Lodie, there's a tragedy in our 
midst! Unless I work like a fiend 
between now and next Friday, I am a 
ruined woman!" 

Aunt (perplexed): "Ruined woman? 

— fiend — tragedy?" (light dawns.) "Oh! 
a new picture at the Art Museum." 

(Mary Lee sighs and shakes her head 
hopelessly.) 

Mary Lee (sitting up suddenly) : "Aunt 
Lodie, do you suppose you could lay aside 
that pesky catalogue for a few minutes, 
and listen, intelligently, to what I have to 
say?" 

Aunt (severely): "Mary Lee, your dis- 
respectful reference to my beloved cata- 
logue is unpardonable." (Then, pleasantly) : 



"But I should dearly love to hear about 
the new picture." 

Mary Lee: "Oh! Aunt, it isn't a 
picture at all. It's my final dinner. 
You see, before we graduate, each girl 
in the class must plan, cook and serve a 
scientifically arranged dinner to the 
faculty. There are sixteen girls in the 
class. This afternoon we drew lots to 
decide our turns, and, of course, I was the 
goat and drew first!" (When Mary Lee 
says "goat" Aunt Lodie throws up her 
hands, opens her mouth, but subsides with- 
out saying anything) "That means that 
a week from today I take my revenge on 
the faculty." 

Aunt Lodie (very much stirred up): 
"Such nonsense as you choose to spend 
your time on! To think my niece stoops 
to anything so plebian and prosaic — so 
utterly common as to study cooking. 
Now, if you would just study some of the 
g-r-e-a-t masterpieces of some of the 
g-r-e-a-t artists, you would be aspiring to 
something truly like what a niece of 
Eloda Mar shield Christy ought to know! 
The very words Domestic Science — 
yes, and Manual Training, too — ■ make 
my artistic nerve tingle!" 

Mary Lee: "But, Aunt — " 

Aunt Lodie (arising): "Enough! I 
have no patience, no patience I say, with 
any one who will spend a whole week 
planning a dinner that takes only fifteen 
minutes to eat!" 

(Exit Aunt Lodie, disdainfully.) 

(Mary Lee watches her aunt depart^ 
then draws her chair up to the table, opens 
her books and writes as she speaks.) 

Mary Lee (slowly): "Now, let's see. 
Proteids, Carbo-hydrates, and Fats. And 
those abominable heat calories and vita- 
mines. Do you suppose I'll ever get 
them systematically arranged?" 



338 



THE AWAKENING OF AUNT LODIE 



339 



{Enter Dale, Peggy, Joanne, and Bea, 
all chattering vivaciously.) 

Mary Lee: "Greetings!" 

Dale {with affected sadness, to Mary 
Lee): "My dear, we are here to condole 
with you!" 

Bea: "You certainly have my sym- 
pathy." 

Joanne: "Oh, Mary Lee, aren't you 
nearly pe-trified?" 

Mary Lee: "Petrified? That doesn't 
half express it! You don't realize how 
terrible it is. You know, Mother is 
away, and Aunt Lodie is so engrossed in 
reading her art catalogue, and going to the 
Art Museum, that she's worse than no 
help at all!" 

Dale: "Mary Lee, here's a happy 
thought. It really doesn't matter what 
you feed them — ■ just so your calories are 
proportioned correctly. For you know 
Miss Chalmers' long suit is heat calories." 

Bea: "But, Dale, Professor Marshall 
probably never heard of heat calories, 
but he does like good eats." 

Mary Lee: "And there's Miss Davis. 
If the New York Times would open a 
department on 'Do's and Don't's of Table 
Service', all the critics in America would 
choose Miss Davis as the most eligible 
editor for that department!" 

Peggy: "Oh! cheer up, Mary Lee! 
One would think we were planning your 
funeral instead of a mere dinner. Here's 
my food chart. I brought it over because 
I knew it would help heaps. I'll put it 
here, on your desk." 

Mary Lee: "You are a cheering soul, 
Peg. Let's all forget the dire calamity 
for a while and sing." 

{Girls group informally around the 
piano. After a song or two Dale does a 
short fancy dance, near the end of which 
Aunt Lodie appears.) 

Aunt Lodie {reading aloud from the 
art catalogue) : " 'The renown of the 
works created during the preceding two 
centuries by the Italian Renaissance — '" 
{Sees the girls.) "My dears, such levity is 
beyond me! Now, here is something 
really worth while." {Re-reads.) "'The 



renown of the works created during the 
preceding two centuries by the Italian 
Renaissance — ' " {suddenly spies food chart 
— drops her book, adjusts her lorgnette, as 
she strides toward the chart, peering at it 
intently). "Ah, I can hardly believe my 
eyes ! It can't be — it must be — ■ yes, it 
really is. Mary Lee, where did this, 
precious treasure come from?" 

Mary Lee: "It's Peggy's." 

{All the girls exchange amazed glances, 
and look at Aunt Lodie with mystified 
expressions, but as Aunt Lodie proceeds 
they realize her mistake, and try vainly to 
suppress their merriment.) 

Aunt Lodie: "My soul has yearned for 
a genuine conception of Art, divine. 
Now, at last, a real cubist painting. How 
sublimely fascinating! It certainly de- 
serves concentrated study." {She leaves 
the room slowly, holding the chart at a 
distance, and gazing intently at it through 
her lorgnette.) 

Bea {after the merriment subsides): 
"Poor, deluded woman. It would have 
been a shame to enlighten her." 

Mary Lee {sarcastically): "If you 
showed Aunt Lodie a shoulder of veal, do 
you suppose she'd think it a futurist bust 
of Lincoln?" 

Joanne: "Ladies, your attention for a 
few minutes. Allow me to give you a 
cubist's interpretation of Dale's dance." 
{Joanne imitates all the figures of Dale's 
dance, except that she does it stiff-kneed and 
stiff-armed — - the very essence of grace- 
lessness, at the end of which Aunt Lodie 
appears.) 

Aunt Lodie: "I've just been reading 
Emerson's Essay on Art, and he says — " 

Girls {in chorus) : "Oh ! we really must be 
going!" {Exeunt, calling back farewells.) 

Mary Lee: "And I really must get to 
work on my dinner." 

{Aunt Lodie watches Mary Lee settle 
herself at work, shakes her head sadly, then 
resumes her reading, but not aloud.) 

Mary Lee: "Proteids, Carbohydrates 
and Fats — •" 

{Enter Rembrandt* bearing triumphantly 
a small bookshelf in the making.) 



340 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Mary Lee: "Oh! Brandt, how per- 
fectly adorable!" 

Aunt Lodie: "Mary Lee, I have 
reminded you many times before that 
your brother's name is Rembrandt. Rem- 
brandt, duly bestowed upon him by his 
artistic aunt, and kindly do not so com- 
pletely debauch the name of the g-r-e-a-t 
artist, whose name he bears, by calling 
him that atrocious nickname!" 

{Loses herself again in the ponderous 
volume.) 

Mary Lee: "Oh, Bran — "(claps her 
hand over her mouth, then, mischievously): 
"Rem — brandt, is it finished?" 

Rembrandt: "Not yet, Van Dyck, 
but just wait until I massage it a few times 
with this paint brush, and maybe it won't 
make the rest of that exhibit look sick." 

(Rembrandt begins to varnish and whistles 
a popular air.) 

(Aunt Lodie sniffs.) 

Aunt Lodie (aside) : "I declare I lose 
myself so completely in this Art, divine, 
that I actually smell the paint" (sniffs 
again). "H'm — smells just like an art 
gallery." 

Mary* Lee (sniffs and nods toward her 
aunt) : "Well, this room certainly has the 
atmosphere all right." 

Rembrandt: "Maybe this won't make 
Professor Marshall sit up and take 
notice." 

Aunt Lodie (aside): "Marshall? 
Marshall?" (Aloud): "Oh, I met a most 
interesting man yesterday on my way 
to the Art Museum — a true gentleman 
of the old school. As I got off the car I 
dropped my catalogue and a gentleman 
very gallantly picked it up for me. Of 
course, we walked over to the Art Gallery 
together; and his understanding and 
appreciation were such a comfort! Oh, 
Rembrandt! If you could have ambitions 
and ideals such as I know his must be! 
He's coming this afternoon." (Aside): 
'Won't Mary Lee and Rembrandt be 
impressed?" (Aloud): "And we'd so like 
to have you accompany us to the Art 
Museum. You, too, Mary Lee." 

Rembrandt (looking at Mary Lee, 



speaks very sarcastically): "Oh, we'd just 
love to go." 

Aunt Lodie (not getting the sarcasm): 
"Ah, Rembrandt, I'm so glad to see there 
are still faint hopes of your becoming a 
credit to the name you possess!" 

(Resumes reading.) 

Mary Lee (mournfully): 

" 'Art is long and time is fleeting, 

So let's avoid this boresome meeting.' " 

Rembrandt: "All right, sis, let's beat 
it now. An art fanatic couldn't make a 
hit with me if he fell out of a balloon right 
on my back!" 

Mary Lee (as they leave): "One soul 
stirred with the passion of Art, divine, is 
a nuisance, but two would be a menace." 
(Exeunt both.) 

(Mr. Marshall, a scholarly looking, 
middle-aged man, enters). 

Mr. Marshall: "Ah, my dear Miss 
Christy, it is indeed a pleasure to find 
you alone!" 

(Aunt Lodie rises, beams on him, then 
at the book she has been reading.) 

Aunt Lodie: "Not alone, Mr. Mar- 
shall, but being most delightfully enter- 
tained by Van Dyck. And you shall 
join our party." 

Aunt Lodie (after both are seated): 
Now. Mr. Marshall, what is your un- 
biased opinion of Van Dyck as a painter 
of aristocracy?" 

Mr. Marshall (aside): "Jove! that's 
a deep one. I fear I'm in for it, but I'll 
have to make a stab at it." 

(Coughs, sits up very straight, starts to 
speak, but stops to adjust his collar, then 
his coat, but finally proceeds.) 

Mr. Marshall (haltingly) : " Well-er-er, 
you know — well, the fact is — you see 
— Oh! Van Dyck. Yes, I always have 
thought him a jolly good painter, but now 
(fervently) with you as my guide I'm sure 
I'll be able to know and feel his very 
divine genius!" 

Miss Christy: "Oh, Mr. Marshall, 
you flatter me, I fear." (Aside): "But it 
is a satisfaction to be appreciated." ( Then, 
earnestly, to Mr. Marshall) : "You see, Mr. 
Marshall, my pursuit of Art, divine, has 



a 



THE AWAKENING OF AUNT LODIE 



341 



not been altogether a bed of roses. My 
niece lowers herself by spending her 
time in the study of Domestic Science! 
Don't the very words Domestic Science 
jar your artistic nerve? And my nephew 
really finds pleasure in Manual Training, 
which I absolutely abhor!" 

(At the mention of Manual Training, 
Mr. Marshall looks aghast and excited, but 
calms down as Aunt Lodie proceeds.) 

Aunt Lodie: "But why burden you 
with my troubles? Mr. Marshall, I have 
a rare treat in store for you!" 

Mr. Marshall (aside): "I do hope 
it's mince pie." (His face falls as Aunt 
Lodie proceeds.) 

Aunt Lodie (ardently): "It's a real 
cubists' painting! Art, divine, in its 
truest sense!!" 

(Hands Mr. Marshall the food chart.) 

(Mr. Marshall looks at it half heartedly 
at first, then gazes at it intently for a few 
minutes, then roars with laughter.) 

Mr. Marshall: "A cubist painting? 
— ■ Why, my dear woman, there's some- 
thing to this. It's a food chart!!" 

(Aunt Lodie takes it from him — looks 
at it intently through her lorgnette for a few 
seconds — ■ sighs as she puts it down.) 

Aunt Lodie: "Well, I suppose I must 
admit I'm beaten." 

(Rembrandt and Mary Lee enter, talking 
gayly — Stop suddenly when they see 
Mr. Marshall^ 

Mary Lee: "Professor Marshall!" 

Rembrandt: "Greetings, Professor. 
Hadn't any idea you two were ac- 
quainted." 

Aunt Lodie (with aloofness) : "And, so 
you have met my nephew, Mr. Marshall?" 

Professor Marshall: "Yes (slowly), 
but I didn't know Brandt was your 
nephew. You see I'm Manual Training 
instructor at Pradley and Brandt is my 
star pupil." 



Aunt Lodie (very much agitated) : "Not 
Professor Marshall?" 

Professor Marshall: "Yes, guilty; 
my dear Miss Christy, I fear I owe you an 
explanation. That afternoon we met I 
was on my way to the woods back of the 
Art Museum, to look for a peculiar 
variety of walnut. I had never been to 
the Art gallery before, but I saw, at once, 
your ability as a guide and instructor, 
and took advantage of it. I am, now, 
keenly interested in the great masters, 
but, Miss Christy — I do fear that my 
interest in their fair admirer is more con- 
suming. Will you forgive my little 
deception?" 

Aunt Lodie (hesitatingly): "Oh! But 
how — " 

Professor Marshall: "My dear, 
can't we think with Emerson, 'Beauty 
must come back to the useful arts, and 
the distinction between the fine and the 
useful arts be forgotten. If history were 
truly told, if life were nobly spent, it 
would be no longer easy or possible to 
distinguish the one from the other.' 

Aunt Lodie (pacified): "Oh, Emerson 
is always sublime!" 

Brandt (to Mary Lee): "The plot 
thickens. I predict the early reformation 
of Aunt Lodie." 

Mary Lee: "How can I put my mind 
on anything 'so commonplace and prosaic 
— ■ so utterly common as a dinner,' when 
there's so much romance in the air?" 

Aunt Lodie (exuberantly): "Oh, Mary 
Lee, I'm sure Professor Marshall will 
help you with your dinner. He thinks 
there's really something to a food chart!" 

Rembrandt: "Aunt Lodie, my book- 
shelves are finished. Don't you and 
Professor Marshall want to inspect 
them?" 

Aunt Lodie: "Oh! Rem— Oh! 
Brandt, we'd just love to!" 




Fans 

By E. L. Thurston 



A GREAT life-happening was com- 
ing to dainty Molly Browning. 
She was going to marry Tom 
Eastwick. And Tom was going to take 
her away to a distant city. 

"Of course, it's a big change for her," 
declared Eileen Noble, with a laugh that 
was just a little forced. "Tom is so big 
himself." 

Tom was large — tall, broad-shoul- 
dered, clean-cut, noticeable in any com- 
pany. Also, he was clear-eyed, wholesome, 
jolly, and considerate, and very much in 
love. The girls of Molly's circle, who 
adored her, all liked him — ■ which spoke 
well for him. 

"It's almost as much a change for us," 
mourned Sally Osborne. "She's the very 
heart of our circle. When she's gone 
we'll just be a ring, a circle with the 
center gone." 

The girls had seen it coming — of 
course they had. They had watched, 
with mingled feelings, the unfolding of a 
pretty courtship — ■ so much of it as they 
were privileged to see. And to them 
after her own mother, Molly had brought 
her girlish confidences when the moment- 
ous question was asked and answered. 

"Underneath, in spite of our loss, we 
are glad for them," said Eileen. "But 
Molly belongs to us yet, and before 
'showers,' and farewell luncheons fill the 
days, we must have her just to ourselves 
— ■ and soon. There must be some token 
from us, too, for her to take away." 

"Luncheon, and a gift," suggested 
Dorothy Anderson. "The gift must be 
something that she very, very much 
wants." 

"What, Dot?" It was a chorus. 

"That we must discover without her 
knowing it." 

It took time and delicate approaches, 
for Molly's nimble wit could see through 
the ordinary indirect question. There 



were conferences with her mother, too. 
But, finally, it was the unanimous decision 
of the conspirators that Molly desired — 
had long desired — ■ an ostrich fan of a 
certain delicate pink. 

"Splendid," declared Dorothy, "and 
appropriate. There are movie fans and 
baseball fans, but we're Molly and Tom 
fans. It's a symbol. So now, plan it 
out." 

Two weeks later Molly came as guest 
of her intimate girl friends to a luncheon 
at Dorothy's home. There were nine to 
greet her, and, a few moments later, to 
escort her ceremoniously to the darkened 
dining room. 

Only three of the girls — those closest 
to the bride-elect — actually had carried 
out the arrangements, so the others 
joined with Molly in exclamations of 
pleasure and delight, as the portieres were 
drawn aside. 

From the center of the chandeliers 
hung vivid-colored open fans, catching 
and reflecting the lights. Each wall 
light was similarly shaded. Even the 
candles on the table carried miniature 
fans on their shades. 

There was an exquisite centerpiece of 
lilies-of-the-valley. Any flower scheme 
might have been used, but these were 
plentiful, and Molly loved them. A 
tiny, inexpensive glass basket stood at 
each place, holding fan-shaped sprays of 
the same delicate flower. To the handle 
of each was tied, with a ribbon bow, a 
tiny Japanese fan, for later use as a hair 
ornament. 

The place cards were pretty, inexpen- 
sive fans. Each was partially closed, so 
as to hold, concealed, a paper cap, a favor 
and a "fortune." 

Possibly the novelty of the setting, the 
brightly worded fortunes, and all that 
girlish tongues had to say, would have 
made the edible part of the affair a secon- 



342 



HANDY WITH A HAMMER 



343 



dary matter, whatever its appeal to the 
palate, were it not for the fact that the 
"fan" scheme continued through its 
courses. 

The lamb chops, for example, in their 
paper frills, arrived on the chop dish, 
arranged in fan shape. The potatoes and 
muffins put forward no special claim to 
attention, except by their perfection, but 
the fan appeared again in the shape of the 
jelly moulds, and in the arrangement of 
asparagus, celery and olives. The salad 
appeared in the form of a half-ring of 
pineapple on lettuce with fan-sticks of 
white cherries. 

And the dessert? Yes, the dessert fol- 
lowed true to form. It consisted of fruit 
shortcake, cut fan-shape, with a piping of 
whipped cream to represent the fan- 
sticks. 

And, after all, Molly hadn't guessed. 
When, with the coffee, the real fan of the 
occasion was presented, in its dainty 
gift box, she opened it in wonder and 
surprise. 

One swift glance she sent around the 
circle, so sweet and so grateful, no words 
of thanks were needed to show what it 
meant to her. Then her head went down 
beneath the plumes for a moment, as if to 
hide the rising color in her cheeks. Or 
was it to hide the tell-tale moisture in her 



bright eyes? The girls were very dear 
to her. 

There followed, after a little, what 
Dorothy called a "fanning bee." The 
overcome little girl, who occupied the 
place of the guest of honor, was called on 
first. It was a trembling, hesitating little 
speech, not like the usual out-pouring 
of the ready-tongued Molly. But, it 
met the occasion. Then each, in turn, 
was called upon to say something in 
mock advice, or warning, or in more 
serious vein, touching on what their 
times together had meant. 

Even then it wasn't all over. Sud- 
denly, from beneath the table, a palm-leaf 
fan appeared. Of course, Tom must have 
his souvenir. So, with the fountain pen 
provided, each one inscribed her name 
and a brief message of good will and 
congratulation. The finished "product" 
was turned over to Molly. 

When, after an hour in the cozy living 
room, the time came to go, the other girls 
tried to form a fan-shaped group to send 
off Mollv. It didn't work. She broke 
up that formation in her first impetuous 
rush, as she came downstairs. Tom was 
all right. Yes, she was very, very happy. 
But, after all, the girls, the girls she had 
grown up with, had a very big place in 
her heart, all their own. 



Handy with a Hammer 

By Ida R. Fargo 



I HAPPENED to marry a man who 
is handy with a hammer, and I am 
not sure that Fate could bring one 
any better fortune than that. If one 
must have a hobby — and one must, to be 
happy in life — nothing can be better 
than something which will busy one's 
fingers, especially for a man who earns 
his bread and butter by the exercise of 
his brain. 

You see, my husband is a teacher. 
For a time he wrote A.B. after his name, 
and then there was added an A.M., 



presently to be dropped for the intriguing 
Ph.D. But, now, methinks, my merry 
mate has stopped fooling with fascinating 
letters. 

But, sometimes, during a soothing 
hour, when I chance to glance over those 
pregnant symbols, and consider the con-' 
stant application it took to attain them, 
I vainly imagine my man must be some 
one of utmost importance. Not so. 
Indeed, a popular ladies' magazine, not 
so long ago, published an article entitled, 
"The Woman Who Married FAILURE." 



344 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



Well, that woman must be me — at least 
I must be one of her. For the FAILURE 
was a teacher, Professor So-and-So, of 
Such-and-Such School, and, according 
to the very words of the article, he was 
from the viewpoint of the teacher's wife a 
most unusually successful professor. But 
so much depends on viewpoint! 

Be that as it may. My husband is a 
teacher. Just a plain, ordinary, every- 
day teacher — and could there be more 
of him, the schools of our land would not 
be so lacking! Now, work, school work, 
lasts but nine months out of the twelve, 
or perhaps ten; that is, for the average 
teacher. A superintendent, mayhap, 
stretches his "job" to last a bit longer. 
But vacation comes, so long a vacation 
for a busy man that it needs to be spelled 
with capitals. 

"I wish teachers taught twelve months 
of the year," fulminates my husband. 
"I'd like a vacation like most men get. 
Teachers are too long idle." 

But if school kept twelve months in a 
year, there might be another country 
heard from; viz., the Youth of the 
Land. 

So my husband, as do others who 
teach, must needs find another vocation, 
a supplementary "job," for even teachers 
cannot hibernate during summer months, 
and the weekly bills keep piling upward! 
And yet this wished-for job, to last but 
a short time, and to come just when one 
needs it, is not an easy thing to find. (Is 
this one reason, I wonder, why so many 
teachers drop by the wayside, and why 
schools go scurrying around to find some 
one to properly look after the advance- 
ment of our embryonic citizens?) So it 
happened that my husband began doing 
the next thing at hand. And that led to 
his odd occupation — a summertime odd- 
jobs man! 

It was rather unorthodox. Perhaps 
the village was a bit shocked, just at first, 
but now that they have become accus- 
tomed to the fact, I think they rather 
like it. Do you know, for small jobs, it 
is remarkably and increasingly difficult 



to find any one who is handy with a 
hammer; who can and will tackle the 
small task; who can and will straighten 
up a lop-sided cupboard, a tumbled-down 
teeter-board, a decrepit fruit shelf? Oh, 
but many's the housewife who knows all 
about it, trying to get along with the little 
things undone, because the "Handy Man 
of the House" doesn't have the extra 
hours necessary to do the things to be 
done! The baby's sand pile is strewn 
all over the yard, because nobody can 
bother to nail together the box case it 
needs; the swing board is broken, and 
the back steps are on their last legs; the 
attic would be so comfortable if only 
some one could put in a window! — and 
the crimson rambler crawls in shame 
because the happy Garden Girl cannot 
build the trellis it ought to climb on — 
she tried once and designedly pounded 
her thumb! Oh, but there are such a 
lot of things for an odd-jobs man to do!- — 
can you not think of several which you, 
your very own self, would like to have 
done? Especially by a man who is 
handy with a hammer? . . . You can? 
. . . Well, it is just like that in our 
village. People found out that "The 
Professor" would put up a stove pipe, or 
repair a stable, fit a key to a broken lock, 
or a handle to a hoe — ■ and now he 
doesn't repine because vacations are too 
long. He has all he can do. I tell him 
that he is growing spoiled, that he simply 
loves to "tinker," that his hobby takes as 
much thought as his real life work. 

Oh, but I scold and I sputter! Yes, 
there are times when I do just that! 

But my non-clamorous mate, with a 
merry twinkle in his eye, informs me: 

"Do you not remember, my dear, that 
the Imps have work a-plenty for idle 
hands to do?" 

So I hush, and be still. My husband is 
busy, and he is happy. What more 
could I ask? . . . To be sure, some 
people seem to think he is putting aside 
his dignity to do odd-jobs work. They 
want to excuse him — they want to 
apologize for his overalls. But most have 



STRETCHING THAT SALARY 



345 



learned, as have even I, that my husband 
has the happy ability of making whatever 
he does dignified. He has never "lost 
caste'' by being the odd-jobs man. He 
makes hosts of friends, he meets all kinds 
of people, he has learned to be a "good 
mixer," he has added a new store to his 
already rich fund of humor; come night he 
is never without an interesting tale of the 
day's work to tell; he is finding Adventure, 
and variety — the spice of life; and he is 
thoroughly in love with his hobby, just 
being the odd-jobs man! 

But, then, isn't one always happy when 



riding one's hobby? It is a ride one takes 
at one's own sweet will, and it takes one 
down that runaway road that leads back 
to Youth. 

"I was fixing Hiram Haypenny's barn 
door this morning," begins my husband, 
"and I couldn't help remembering — !" 
And then we laugh together over some 
incident of long ago. 

Yea, verily; I married a mate unknown 
to Fame or Fortune. But he is handy 
with a hammer! I am content, sure 
that Fate could have brought me no 
better luck than that! 



Stretching That Salary 

By Marie C. Loscalzo 



MY husband says that the one 
thing which makes me perfectly 
happy is having reason to go to 
the bank — to the receiving teller's 
window. 

He is more than a little right, too. 

So, when the first salary cut came, in 
the eary part of 1921, and there was no 
more occasion for me to make that 
joyous journey, with my little brown 
book, naturally, I began to look about 
me, and take stock of circumstances. 

I was still doing that when the second 
cut came, and then before long I had to 
go to the bank — to the wrong window — 
the paying teller's. 

On my way home that day, with that 
first withdrawal in my purse, I resolved 
that that salary was going to be stretched 
until the ends met — ■ or else a "piece" 
would be set in. 

As it turned out, both were done. 

Fortunately, my husband realized that 
the dull times were both serious and 
likely to be long, and he entered into the 
spirit of making the best of matters with 
courage — even lightheartedness. 

And we needed all there was of both, 
before we saw those ends meeting 
comfortably! 

First, we sat down and decided what 
to do without — what was not a neces- 



sity to life and liberty — yes — and hap- 
piness. We kept that. 

Rent — that was our mountain, so we 
looked carefully into the situation to see 
if it would pay us to move. One friend 
— a millionaire, by the way — said that 
we must move to cheaper quarters — ■ it 
was preposterous for us to pay forty 
dollars a month! We found that the 
country home he "ordered" would cost 
us more than forty dollars a month by the 
time commutation and fuel were added to 
the rent. As for cheaper rent in the city, 
basement rooms or cold-water tenements 
were the onlv alternative. 

I said I would rent one of our four 
rooms, and we would make a living room 
of the dining room. That worked admir- 
ably. The superintendent's wife sent us 
a charming young lady, who sold insur- 
ance all day, and only occupied her room 
at night. That was ten dollars a week to 
the good, and only a little inconvenience. 

Then next came our pleasure-budget. 
We had been accustomed to attending a 
movie once or twice a week, and some- 
times taking in a moderate-priced play 
down town. We enjoyed lectures and 
concerts, too. 

We decided that we could live six 
months, or even more, without seeing so 
many pictures, and as for music, it would 



346 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



do us both good to practice some of our 
old favorites. Our young lady roomer, 
it turned out, had a pleasant voice, and 
was also a finished pianist. Our sweet- 
toned upright was astonished to find 
itself again one of the family, and we have 
gained, instead of lost, by giving up so 
much random amusement. We still take 
in a good lecture, however. 

Third, came clothes. My husband 
likes to feel well-dressed. So do I. But 
we found that cleaning and pressing — 
and "think-so" — ■ made several things 
wearable which we had discarded as 
"through." 

He found that a cheap, "kool-cloth" 
suit for summer shop-wear saved his 
better clothes, and I discovered that soap- 
dyes were effectual disguises for some 
more-than-last-summer frocks. 

And when his straw hat grew sallow, 
he did not take it to the cleaning-baron 
around the corner. Instead, I bought 
ten cents' worth of oxalic acid crystals, 
and cleaned it myself. There are other 
cleaners as good, some of which cost 
more, and have that identical basis. 

And I learned to patch. That's it — 
PATCH. Our grandmothers did it. It 
was part of every girl's education in those 
pioneer days which strengthened the 
nation. One has no idea how fascinating 
it can become, either — laying the patch 
so carefully, setting the stitches as fine as 
the fabric itself. Patching stretched out 
the undergarment budget this year, until 
I really feel like keeping up the good 
work in very gratitude. 

And the shoe question we solved by 
not being slaves to style. The radical 
changes left us indifferent. My pumps 
were not short-vamped, and husband's 
comfortable low-cuts were not "brogues," 
but at least we were not wearing them 
out tramping to the bank to draw out our 
painfully saved balance. 

Now, fourth, comes Food. Something 
I don't believe in skimping on. But 
there is wasteful extravagance under the 
guise of plenty, too. I am well versed 
in the health-balances. I know what the 



body needs, and our bodies got it. And 
yet we did not spend as much as we had 
been doing. I set a mark of one-third 
off on food, and I kept within it by 
watching the markets, and personally 
buying every ounce we ate. Moreover, I 
interested my neighbors, and we became 
a sort of Economy Club, sending out 
"S.O.S.'s," wheneverwe sighted a bargain. 

Another food law I laid down was — 
"Nothing out of season." And one more 
was, "No frills." Strawberries are good in 
June, but in December apples are better. 
Plain cake is an enjoyable dessert, but a 
heavily decorated one is not one bit more 
wholesome, and the decoration is half- 
wasted before it is eaten. 

Stewed fruit is far better than expen- 
sive pie — ■ if one's taste is not perverted. 

And French pastries, "store-ice-cream," 
and bottled fruit syrups are crimes of 
extravagance for a family to buy on any- 
thing less than five thousand a year. 

We eliminated all soda-fountain orgies. 
I made ice cream every Sunday, at home. 
We had the delicious fruit juices that I 
bottled myself, and, as for French pastry, 
my husband says that my drop cakes are 
superior to any tombstone he ever bought 
in a shop. 

Rent, amusements, clothes and food. 
Those are the things we had up on the 
green-carpet to be stretched to capacity. 
Rent was taken care of by taking the 
roomer; amusements were practically 
annihilated; clothes were literally stretched 
to cover an ugly situation; food was 
made to declare itself plain American, for 
high-thinking. 

We did not alter our charity budget, 
for we have always set one-tenth aside 
for the Lord. Sometimes it goes direct 
to the church, and again some case of our 
personal knowledge takes a good share. 

Saving had to come out of the budget, 
temporarily. We hope to get it back 
soon, especially if that salary goes back 
to normal. 

I have not mentioned the sum of the 
salary, it was so small — only thirty a 
week. 



THE CHRISTMAS CLOSET 



347 



I did not mention, either, that I did 
many little, what I call odd jobs, to 
help out. 

For example: I do crochet-bead em- 
broidery, which I learned from a thrifty 
little French neighbor. Although I work 
at home, the dollars make a pleasant pile 
at the end of the month. And when the 
■embroidery "season" is "out," I have even 
been saleswoman in a specialty shop. 
That was perfectly fascinating work! 
And not hard. And, then, once I "filled 
in" when one of the morning papers con- 
ducted a contest which flooded its office 
with entries from ambitious prize-wishers. 
I did the clerical work, and found out how 
dramatic even stodgy situations may be 
— ■ underneath. 

Thus — with all helping — ■ for my 
husband found extra bits of work for his 



evenings — we have weathered the gale 
— so far. 

It has been not too easy to lack engag- 
ingness. New hats intrigue me, and 
husband is a baseball fan. But I like 
the color of the old straw bonnet, and I 
notice the local ball team stirs him to 
quite a pitch of enthusiasm — ■ viewed, as 
it plays in a vacant lot. 

It will be such fun to have things again, 
too. 

And there will be no strings of debt to 
snip off our daily living when the salary 
once more becomes elastic. That is the 
very best part of the game we have 
played in stretching the pay envelope. 

Remember Mr. Micawber's advice? 
Believe me it is the whole of Life — that 
living within one's income, no matter 
how narrow. 



The Christmas Closet 

By Harriet Whitney Symonds 



O 



H, how the days do hustle along," 
lamented Mrs. Pinkley, pulling 
her rocker closer to sister-in- 
law Dora's living-room grate fire. "Here's 
December right at the gate, and I haven't 
done a sift of Christmas shopping yet!" 

"I thought you made a fine, new reso- 
lution last year, after the snarl you got 
into, to 'shop early and avoid the rush,' 
this time," commented Dora, plunging 
valiantly into the darning basket after 
another sock. 

"So I did. I said I would do my 
shopping in September, and I even made 
a list of the things I decided to buy. 
But I lost the list and couldn't remember 
what the things were; and it got late 
before I realized it. Time just goes 
tearing along, no matter how busy one is." 

"I've noticed that," observed Dora. 
"The old gentleman never stops and sits 
amiably down with his knitting so that 
belated housekeepers can catch up in 
their work. It's up to them not to let 



him get by, in the first place. But 
there's no use preaching to you, Beth; 
you're a 'putter-off,' and you'll do just 
the same this year as you always do — 
hold on to a comfortable, vague idea that 
you can manage it somehow, until two 
days before Christmas — " 

"And then the situation'll hop up at 
me all of a sudden," admitted Mrs. 
Pinkley, ruefully; "and I'll leave the 
breakfast dishes in the pan, pull my best 
coat on over my house gown and rush to 
town. And I'll get squashed in a crowd 
and have to grab things right and left, 
as I get a chance at them, until I'm clean 
exhausted, and the gifts I succeed in 
buying will be misfits that won't please 
anybody; and I'll forget the most impor- 
tant ones — "' 

"That's just about the way I usually 
wind up," contributed Mrs. Camp, 
spreading her partly finished wild-rose 
crocheted yoke over her knee for inspec- 
tion. "Christmas shopping is trying at 



348 AMERICAN COOKERY 

the best. But what I dread most of all "I never throw it away," said Dora. 

is the tying up of the gifts and getting "I pick the knots out of the ribbons and 

them ready for delivering or mailing. It iron them at my leisure; and all the 

always takes twice as long as I think it smooth, untorn pieces of tissue I fold 

will, and even if I have shopped early, carefully, or roll; then I put them all into 

rounding up the various articles from the a box, and into my Christmas closet they 

different hiding places I've poked them go. Every pretty box that comes along, 

into, and recollecting who was to get I save. It's surprising how well these 

which, is a nerve-frazzling process." odds and ends fit into the general scheme 

"I'll say it is," sighed Mrs. Pinkley; when one is doing up Christmas packages 

"and I get so tired and desperate with it and finds one's stock running a bit short." 

all that I'm as likely as not to mix my "I always discover some little tag-end 

packages and discover too late that I've packages to do up just when my ribbon 

sent my old bachelor uncle a giddy white has given out, and it's too late to get 

apron and mailed a nice pipe to Mr. more," confessed Mrs. Pinkley. 

Pinkley's widowed sister." "That's the starting point of my 

"You never have any tales of woe to closet," went on Dora, attacking a 

tell, Dora," observed Mrs. Camp. "How ragged sock toe with great determination;, 

do you manage the gift business?" "and when I lay in my new supply of 

"The only secret is — a Christmas tissue and ribbon, which I do very early, 

closet," said Dora, oracularly. I take into account what I have on 

"What kind of a contraption is that?" hand, 

inquired Mrs. Pinkley. "So, now, having my Christmas closet 

"My particular one is a certain little always ready, I keep my eyes open all the 
cubby hole — a triangular closet in a year, and whenever I run across some- 
corner of my bedroom. But you could thing in the stores that would be nice for 
contrive one out of a washstand, a com- a present, I pounce on it and stow it away, 
partment in a chiffonier, or even a big, tagged with the name of the one it is 
roomy drawer. The main point is that designed for. This makes my regular 
it must be kept absolutely sacred to the Christmas shopping much easier, and I 
one purpose." usually get through the bulk of it in 

"It sounds interesting; do tell us how early fall." 

you work it," requested Mrs. Camp. "Small wonder, then, that you can sit 

"Well, in a way, I begin a whole year back and darn socks at your ease now, 

ahead. Don't we all know what 'picking while the rest of us are almost daffy with 

up' the day after Christmas means, with worry," commented Mrs. Camp. "Well, 

its aftermath of tangled ribbons and gilt Mrs. Price, your Christmas closet strikes 

cord and tissue paper that come off the me as a splendid shopping-made-easy 

gifts our friends send us?" plan." 



Bungalows of the Riviera 

(Continued from page 334.) 

construction was thinly oiled and rubbed, than the Romans ever thought of; at 

The interior stucco and plaster, as is least, more so than the samples we are 

appropriate to all Mediterranean coun- shown in museums and architectural 

tries, was left white, with here and there works, which only goes to show how these 

inserted mosaic panels, set with the tiny same ideas can be adapted to a cabanon, 

multicolored pebbles of the seashore, in if one would actually embellish it without 

designs something far more primitive the anachronism of interpolated alle- 



BUNGALOWS OF THE RIVIERA 



349 



gories. Our homemade mosaics and 
their surrounding boiseries were a decided 
success. Simplicity throughout! 

The floors were of thick, big, square, 
dull-red tiles, astiqued and frotted with a 
solution of beeswax, turpentine and 
cochineal, which came, in time, to be 
almost as durable as if of solid glaze. 
How much more an "O-Cedar" might 
have added to it I have no means of 
knowing. The local basket-maker sup- 
plied four or five of the straw rounds, 
which he wove annually for the olive oil 
presses, and which served, alternately, as 
mats or cushions. 

As for the furniture, it was kept as far 
as possible in the Provencal style, that of 
the days of Romance, before Grand 
Rapids was ever heard of. Some of it 
was old, and some was made on the spot 
by a neighboring wood-worker, crudely, 
simply, but serving its purpose excel- 
lently well, a gate-leg table, for which we 
drew him a model, for instance. 

The masterpiece of this museum of 
Provencal furniture, if you can call it 
such, was the panetier. or wall-suspended 
bread cupboard, with spindly grilled 
front and decorative steel lock and hinges; 
and its accompanying mixing trough 
beneath, all of walnut, fumed with the 
smoke of ages. A big armoire, which may 
have been Provencal, or may have been 
Burgundian, was the biggest of these 
accessories. The usual chairs, tables, 
chests of drawers and simple couch beds 
completed the livable furnishings, leaving 
only the fireplace, which was to be cook- 
stove as well, since baked meats were to 
be banished from the menu of this 
cabanon rest-house, to be accounted for. 

It was installed according to the best of 
classic tradition of the country. Of 
brick and tiles, it was raised a foot or 
more above the level of the floor, but not 
so high as to prevent its heat radiating 
out over the room, when needed on cold 
winter nights. This was at first incon- 
venient for the ordinary cooking proc- 
esses, but it proved to be a habit readily 
acquired and later thought little of. One 



end was raised to the height of the ordi- 
nary range, but consisted only of a series 
of little, grated depressions in the tiled 
surface, into which a braise of charcoal 
was kept in order to "hold fire" to such 
dishes as were in preparation, and for 
which a place could not be found before 
the blazing olive or briar roots, or the 
big, flaming braize of grapevine stems, 
which furnished the quickest of quick 
fires for roasting little birds or a wild 
boar steak, which the communal game- 
keeper used to bring from time to time. 

There was, of course, a clock-work spit 
for the rotis of guinea-hen, becasse, or 
young turkey, and an ancient broiler, on 
which the red mullets, soles and dorades 
might be grilled over a braize of grape- 
vine stems, the almost supreme method 
of cookery with a flavor peculiarly its 
own — sur une braise de sarmentes, the 
French of it is, and is indigenous to the 
south of France. 

What crockery there was was all from 
th? potteries of Vallauris, from the paper- 
thin bottomed casseroles and jugs to the 
great orange, blue, or green platters, and 
still crude and rough colored plates and 
cups and saucers. A few more preten- 
tious pieces of this same Vallauris pot- 
tery, a blue porcelain frog for the pool 
before the door, orange and green Aladdin- 
like oil jars for the laurier roses and a 
dwarf palm within, furnished the acces- 
sory embellishments. 

A conventional fountain was replaced 
with an ancient well-head, which one did 
not have to go to Venice or Florence for, 
but found in a local farmyard, being used 
as a drinking trough for live stock. 
Twenty francs gave possession, and a 
bullock cart brought it to the cabanon at 
a cost four times as great. Inert things 
seem not to have gone up in price, but 
even the hire of anything animate has 
soared like the lark. 

Following classic cabanon fashion was 

painted in the peak of the gable — "Beau 

Soleil," with the following motto beneath, 

in the Provencal tongue — lou soleu mi 

fa canta — "the sunshine makes me sing/' 



350 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



AMERICAN COOKERY 

FORMERLY THE 

BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL 
MAGAZINE 

OF 

Culinary Science and Domestic Economics 

Subscription $1.50 per Year, Single Copies15c 
Postage to Foreign Countries, 40c per Year 

TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The date stamped on the wrapper is the date 
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of the same, has been received. 

Please renew on receipt of the colored blank 
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In sending notice to renew a subscription or 
change of address, please give the old address 
as well as the new. 

In referring to an original entry, we must know 
the name as it was formerly given, together with 
the Post-office, County, State, Post-office Box. 
or Street Number. 

Entered at Boston- Post-office as Second-class Matter 



ANOTHER DAY 

God Almighty, hear our prayer, 
Guide us through another day, 
Keep our minds discreet and fair, 
And our tongues from guile, we pray. 
We would scorn the tempter's snare, 
Greeting with a smile each care, 
And the laws of right obey, 
'Til night ends another day. 

God Almighty, may Thy will 
Guard us when at work or play. 
May our souls respond and thrill 
With a faith we cannot stay. 
Through the night hours, dark and still, 
Show us Thy accepted way, 
So we may life's task fulfill 
As we greet another day. 

Caroline L. Sumner. 



PRUDENCE AXD WISDOM 

ECONOMY and simplicity are the 
leading topics of American Cook- 
ery. To simplify the ways of living is 
attracting the attention of people, of all 
classes, everywhere. In every part of 
the country, the small house or the 
bungalow, with larger outdoor space, is 
more and more in evidence. This mav 
result from necessity or desire; at any 



rate, the day of the large, spacious family 
house, it seems, is passing. "Give the 
other fellow a chance" is the sentiment of 
the times. Life in crowded tenements is 
unwholesome, unsafe and destructive to 
morals and character — a menace to 
society and the state. 

Science has discovered the germs that 
threaten wholesome living on every hand. 
Unnatural and denatured food, and, in 
consequence, malnutrition, are the cause 
of many of the ills that affect human life. 
These things have become common 
knowledge. The modern housewife should 
be alert to her responsibilities. Her call- 
ing is one of no secondary importance; 
the successful management of a home calls 
even for professional skill. Prudence 
and wisdom are essential attributes to the 
achievement of the simple life. In these 
days of scientific research and expanding 
knowledge, can the intelligent housewife 
afford to be without the American Cook- 
ery in her kitchen: 

ECONOMY AND THRIFT 



"r|A\ E your pennies, work eight hours 
k3 a day, write down how you spend 
every penny you receive, make a budget 
at the beginning of each year, and live 
within your budget, and don't run an 
automobile unless you can afford it." 

This was the burden of advice given 
recently to the Young Men's Bible Class 
of the Park Avenue Baptist Church, by 
John D. Rockefeller, Jr. 

"The best way to make money is to 
save it," he declared. 

"Four Fundamentals of Good Citizen- 
ship," was his topic. Here thev are: 

"Work. 

"Practice economy and thrift. 

"Show respect for authority and law. 

"Show reverence for things that are 
sacred and holy." 

THE LESSON OF THE DAY 

WE are confident that the present 
administration is doing its best to 
achieve for the highest welfare of human- 
ity, not only in this country, but in other 



EDITORIALS 



351 



parts of the earth. Its purpose is just. 

We have faith in the integrity and 
character of our government. Honest in 
purpose, lofty in aspiration, the efforts of 
our legally chosen executive are worthy 
of support. Nothing human is perfect 
or infallible. Let us get together and 
push forward and upward for betterment 
and not "knock" and criticize any and 
every attempt to adjust matters aright, 
and to improve the condition of affairs. 
In the way of progress, time is an im- 
portant factor. 

We believe in steady, healthy growth 
and prosperity, rather than in radical 
revolution. We have no inclination to 
look backward or in the opposite direction 
for help or relief from troubles. Consola- 
tion does not lie that way. Reformation 
must come from within the body politic. 
Let us strive unitedly to build up and 
increase the intelligence of the people and 
cheerfully look forward and hope for 
things that "eye hath not seen nor ear 
heard," in the future. This is the month 
for messages of good cheer and well wish- 
ing for the peoples of the earth. May 
peace and prosperity be the happy lot of 
all mankind. 

CLASS LEGISLATION 

AGAIN a high protective tariff law 
bids fair to bring a great political 
organization to utter defeat and ruin. 
The public will not stand for high tariff 
or class legislation. They demand a right 
about face and return to lower rates of 
living and consequent relief from the 
excessive burden of taxation. Will our 
legislators ever learn that promises must 
be kept and justice practiced in the 
administration of government? Class 
legislation, laws passed for the benefit of 
a few and at the expense of the many are 
intolerable. 

For instance, under the new tariff the 
price of paper already has advanced, not- 
withstanding, as is well known, in the 
past few years the paper makers have 
prospered and grown immensely rich; 
indeed, they have amassed fortunes 



almost incredible. Now, why should the 
paper maker be longer favored, protected 
and enriched by special legislation at the 
expense of the general public welfare? 
It is an outrage on righteous law-making. 
This is only a single instance in case of 
many of like import. 

A tariff law, anyhow, is unfair and 
unjust, a source of infinite corruption and 
wrong-doing — an unwise method of 
raising revenue. That a tariff be justi- 
fiable at all, it must affect all parties and 
all classes alike. It cannot be made a 
party measure; for taxes must be adjusted 
evenly and fairly upon all, and be borne 
equitably by the whole mass of the 
people. This is not the case with our 
present tariff. Comparatively few people 
are protected and benefited thereby. 
The rich are constantly growing richer, 
while the masses must look out for 
themselves. 

American Cookery would ever ap- 
prove of just and righteous conduct of 
affairs. It would ever condemn a policy 
or procedure that merits severe rebuke. 

WHAT'S WRONG WITH THE 
WORLD? 

IT would be well if those who are hon- 
estly seeking to cure the ills of society 
would first find out what is the basic 
ailment. 

The front pages of newspapers are 
replete with accounts of burglary, of 
murder, of suicide, of charges of corrup- 
tion in high places. These are but the 
most obvious symptoms of the social dis- 
order. But group them all together; 
analyze and study them, and what do you 
find to be the basic trouble? 

It is, we believe, "pleasure madness." 
Too many people have lost their anchor- 
age to religion or the home or whatever it 
was that once restrained them, and have 
gone absolutely insane on the subject of 
"a good time." They are unable to be 
content with the pleasures that can be 
reached by honorable means. Passion 
drives them to break every law, human or 
divine, that stands in their way. No 



352 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



matter what it may be that they have set 
their desires upon — whether money or 
political success, or illicit love, or the 
destruction of a rival — they go to it as 
if there were nothing else in the world to 
consider. Only when they have com- 
mitted some irreparable wrong do they 
discover the truth — that pleasure-mad- 
ness bears no more resemblance to hap- 
piness than black does to white. 

Pleasure-madness is the disease. The 
learning of self-restraint, in the schools, 
the churches and the homes, is the only 
kaown remedy. The Traveler. 

THE NATURE OF WEALTH 

THE Soviets of Russia have seized the 
priceless imperial diadems of the 
former Czar, the oldest and most valua- 
ble diamonds in the world, and even the 
treasures of a vast and ancient church. 
But what tawdry toys are these, with the 
agricultural, industrial, transportation 
and fiduciary institutions of Bolshevism 
a failure, and the people of Russia, as a 
consequence, sunk in poverty, hunger, 
filth and despair! 

No government ever owned as much on 
paper as the Soviets. No other govern- 
ment has gone to such fantastic lengths 
in nationalization. It has seized every- 
thing, but finds it has nothing. The reali- 
ties of national wealth and welfare have 
somehow been lost in the process. The 
attempt to make an empty sack stand on 
end was sure to fail. 

After all, the chief reason for a critical 
attitude toward communistic and gov- 
ernment-ownership projects lies in an 
understanding of the real motive behind 
them. It is not primarily constructive, 
but is substantially nothing but a desire 
to pass the buck, a confession of failure. 
To make any institution, whether highly 
individualistic or communistic, work 
properly, not to mention perfectly, is an 
achievement of extraordinary magnitude 
and difficulty. Communism and govern- 
ment ownership rest upon a helpless desire 
to shift the responsibility for this task 
from the individuals who must, under any 



system, carry them to no one in particular. 
From the Saturday Evening Post. 

Communism or socialism, one and the 
same thing, from whatever source it be 
derived, is to be utterly condemned. It 
has never worked, and never will work 
this side of heaven. Mankind is not so 
constituted. A so-called Golden Age 
exists only in the imagination of an ideal- 
ist. Evolution, or the upward trend of 
the human race, is a mighty long and slow 
process. 

LOOKING FORWARD 

We wish to invite the attention of our 
readers to the season of the year and the 
appeal of American Cookery to their 
kindly consideration. We desire to im- 
prove this publication, to increase its cir- 
culation and enlarge its influence. As a 
special publication we cater to a special 
constituency for whom nothing is too 
good. The relation of food to health is 
becoming more and more a matter of 
importance. In selecting gifts for your 
friends do not forget to make good use of 
American Cookery. 



THE ABIDING 

Of scattered petals, one by one 
Across a garden flung, 
Not even June's bright art can make 
A rose with beauty hung. 

And who with mystic touch can brinp 
From silence deep and long, 
From broken harp, from hushed lips, 
A loved, but vanished song? 

The roses of our days become 

The fragrance of the past; 

Our hours are like the songs, so sweet 

Their music cannot last. 

But every petal drifting down 
The garden of the years 
Shall be, dear heart, a memory 
Untouched by doubt or fears. 

And every song whose cadence sweet 
To endless peace departs 
Shall leave till life and love are done, 
Its echoes in our hearts! 

Arthur Wallace Prac 




SANTA CLAUS OR CHRISTMAS MELON" 



Seasonable-and-Tested Recipes 

By Janet M. Hill and Mary D. Chambers 

IN ALL recipes where flour is used, unless otherwise stated, the flour is measured after sifting 
once. Where flour is measured by cups, the cup is filled with a spoon, and a level cupful is meant. 
A tablespoonful or a teaspoonful of any designated material is a LEVEL spoonful. In flour mixtures 
where yeast is called for, use bread flour; in all other flour mixtures, use cake or pastry flour. 



Quince-and-Apple Soup 

PUT through the food chopper enough 
of cored, but not pared, apples and 
quinces, in equal parts, to measure 
two cups. Cook in three pints of water. 
Sift through colander, return to saucepan, 
add one-half a cup of sugar, mixed with 
three tablespoonfuls of arrowroot and 
one-fourth of one grated nutmeg. Stir 
until the soup boils; add, the last thing, 
the juice of one large lemon. Serve cold 
in glass soup plates, garnished with spoon- 
fuls of heavy whipped cream. 

Carolina Corn Bread 

Sift one cup and one-half of white 
bread flour with one teaspoonful of salt 
and four teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 
Mix with one cup of the rather coarse- 
ground white corn meal, used for spoon- 
bread and other Southern breads. Warm 
one-fourth a cup of molasses, and stir 
into it two tablespoonfuls of butter or 
lard. Add one stifT-beaten egg, and one 
cup and one-half of warm milk. Stir into 
this the mixture of dry ingredients, and 



beat hard for five minutes. Pour at once 
into well-greased pans to a height of not 
more than one inch and one-half, and 
bake in a hot oven for thirty to forty 
minutes, protecting the top with paper, 
if there is danger of scorching. 

Veal Soup with Brains 

Cook one pair of calves' brains and press 
through a colander. Sift with them, 
through the colander, two large boiled 
onions. Heat in a saucepan six table- 
spoonfuls of butter; add the sifted brains 
and onions, and stir over fire until the 
ingredients turn slightly brown. Sift 
over the mixture four tablespoonfuls of 
flour; stir, and add, gradually, three 
pints of veal stock, with seasoning to 
taste; stir the whole until it boils. Re- 
move from fire, and add quickly onebeaten 
egg, mixed with one-half a cup of cream; 
whisk all together, and serve garnished 
with fried rings of either green apples or 
cucumbers. 

Virginian Brunswick Stew 

For the genuine Brunswick stew a 



353 



354 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



couple of squirrels are needed, but it may 
be made by using rabbits, hares, or the 
dark meat of chicken. From three to 
four pounds of whatever meat is chosen 
will be needed. Cut the meat into 
pieces the size of an egg. put into a stew- 
pan, and cover with cold water or stock. 
Bring quickly to a boil, and then let 
simmer for fifteen minutes. Add the fol- 
lowing: Six large tomatoes, sliced; one 
cup of sliced okra pods; three large white 
potatoes, cut in one-inch dice; four 
sweet peppers, chopped; two cups of 
lima beans; one root of celery, cut in 



salted water twentv minutes, or until 
done. Lift out carefully, arrange in a 
shallow casserole, preferably of oval shape, 
and sprinkle thick with grated Parmesan 
or other hard cheese. Have readv the 
following sauce: Cook together, similarly 
to a white sauce, two tablespoonfuls of 
flour, two tablespoonfuls of butter, one 
cup of stock or milk, and seasoning to 
taste, and when thick and smooth add 
one beaten egg and the juice of one-half 
a lemon. Pour while hot over the cauli- 
flower; add another layer of cheese, cover 
this with fine, sifted crumbs, and set 




GUINEA HEN'S EN CASSEROLE 



small pieces; and seasoning of salt, 
pepper, and celery salt to taste. Cover, 
and let cook until meat can easily be 
removed from bones, if wild meat be 
used — if chicken, until meat is tender. 
Twenty minutes before removing from 
fire add three ears of sweet corn, cut in 
halves, and let steam until soft. Just 
before serving thicken the stew with four 
tablespoonfuls of butter, worked into two 
tablespoonfuls of flour. Care should be 
taken that the liquid does not boil away 
in cooking. 

Masked Cauliflower 

Choose two firm, symmetrical heads of 
cauliflower, and trim so that they will 
stand on their bases. Cook in boiling, 



under the gas flame, or on the top shelf of 
the oven until the crumbs are lightly 
browned. Serve hot from the casserole. 



H 



G 



>1< 



Guinea nens en casserole 

Slice an onion and part of a carrot 
into an earthen dish; put in two stalks of 
celery and four thin slices of salt pork, 
lay in two guinea hens, weighing not over 
three pounds, each, sprinkle with salt 
and pepper; place over the hens a few 
more slices of onion and carrot, one 
stalk of celery and three slices of salt 
pork; cover and let cook very gently 
three hours, basting often with hot fat. 
The heat of the oven should be uniform 
the whole time, but very moderate. 
Notice that no water is added. 



SEASONABLE-AXD-TESTED RECIPES 



355 



Pumpkin and Parmesan 

Slice a pumpkin or squash; 
remove seeds and skin, and cut 
into triangles. Let steam until 
tender, then brown in butter on 
hot frying-pan. Arrange in 
layers in a baking-dish or cas- 
serole, with Parmesan, or any 
preferred hard cheese, sifted 
over each layer, barely enough 
to cover. Pour over the whole 
the butter left in the pan, cover the top 
with a layer one-fourth an inch thick of 
cheese mixed with buttered crumbs, and 
let bake until the crumbs are brown. 

Brussels Sprouts with 
Cream Sauce 

Boil one quart of Brussels sprouts in 
two quarts of salted water about fifteen 
minutes, or until tender. Let drain, 
then arrange in a serving dish with 

Cream Sauce 

Melt two tablespoonfuls of butter in a 
small saucepan, set directly over the fire; 
add two tablespoonfuls of flour, one- 
fourth a teaspoonful of pepper and one- 
fourth a teaspoonful of salt; stir until 
frothy throughout, then add one cup of 
thin cream and stir constantlv until the 
mixture is smooth, thick and boiling. 




SWEETBREADS WITH ORANGE SAUCE 



Sweetbreads with Orange Sauce 

Let a pair of sweetbreads soak in cold, 
running water for twenty minutes; pui 
over the fire in plenty of cold water; heat 
the water very gradually to the boiling 
point, then let simmer about twenty 
minutes; drain and let stand in cold 
water until cold; remove unedible por- 
tions, but keep the sweetbreads whole. 
Set on a rack in a dripping pan, sprinkle 
with salt and pepper, pour over the 
juice of one orange, and bake in a mod- 
erate oven twenty minutes. Serve with 

Hot Orange Sauce 

Cut the peel of one orange into shred> 
and cover with boiling water; let cook 
five minutes and drain. To the blanchec 
peel add one-half a cup of beef juice, 
three-fourths a cup of brown sauce, the 



^t^ff^^ .4 















BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH CREAM SAUCE 



356 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



juice of two oranges, the juice of one 
lemon, one-fourth a teaspoonful of salt, 
one-fourth a teaspoonful of cayenne, and 
stir until hot; then serve. The brown 
sauce is made with browned butter, 
thickened with flour, and brown stock, 
used as a liquid. 

Candied Sweet Potatoes 
with Ham 

In a hot frying pan brown a slice of 
ham; in the pan with the ham put 
halves of cold, boiled sweet potatoes, cut 
lengthwise; over all pour one cup of 
maple syrup. Reduce heat, let simmer 
very gently three-quarters of an hour, 
and serve. 



English Game Pie 
A Christmas Dish 

Line a deep earthen baking-dish with a 
good crust. Sear the outside of a steak 
and lay in the bottom. Over this arrange 
pieces of venison, moose, or other game, 
or small birds divided in halves. Chop 
three or four chicken livers, or the livers 
of the birds, if these are used for the pie; 
add an equal quantity of chopped bacon, 
and twice as much moistened crumbs, 
season highly with salt, pepper, and 
poultry seasoning; bind with a beaten 
egg, form into balls, and put these, here 
and there, through the pieces of game. 
Over all lav thin slices of bacon. Cover 




CANDIED SWEET POTATOES WITH HAM 



Eggs in Eggplant 

Select three small eggplants, and cut 
•each in halves, lengthwise. Scoop out 
the seeds, and cook until soft in salted 
water, or steam. Drain quickly; drop 
into the cavity of each one raw egg, and 
return to steamer until the white of the 
€gg is delicately poached. Have ready 
the following mixture: One cup of 
sifted tomatoes, one cup of breadcrumbs, 
three slices of breakfast bacon, line- 
chopped, and seasoned to taste. Heat 
this mixture in a saucepan, then spread 
over the eggs in the eggplant nests, and 
put the whole under the gas flame, or on 
the top rack of a hot oven until the 
dressing is delicately browned. 



with a light crust, and bake in a moderate 
oven for an hour, or more, depending on 
the size of the pie. Fifteen minutes 
before serving pour in through a hole in 
the crust a pint or more of high-seasoned 
stock. Brush the crust with beaten egg. 
and decorate with cubes of stiff jelly before 
sending to the table. 

Scalloped Scallops 

Grease, thickly, six deep scallop shells, 
dip these into fine sifted crumbs, and 
shake off the loose crumbs. Cut up into 
quarters one pint of scallops, and mix 
with them two-thirds a cup of sifted 
crumbs, thoroughly blended with three 
tablespoonfuls of melted butter, one-half 
a teaspoonful of salt, one-fourth a tea- 



SEASOXABLE-AXD-TESTED RECIPES 



357 



spoonful of paprika, and three 
tablespoonfuls of extremely fine- 
minced fresh parsley. Add one 
well-beaten egg, and fill the 
shells with the mixture. Bake 
for half an hour, or until well- 
browned on top. Serve with a 
spoonful of Tartare sauce or 
Russian dressing on the top of 
each shell. 

Peas Served with Fresh 
Pork Tongue and Beets 

Wash and cleanse thoroughly 
a fresh pork tongue and let boil 
in salted water until tender. When done, 
remove to a platter and into the stock put 
new or canned peas. Let them cook thus 
until done; then thicken with flour, mixed 
smooth with sweet cream, until of gravy 
consistency, letting all boil up together 
well. Pour the gravy and peas about the 
tongue and serve warm. The beets 
should be cooked the dav before and let 
stand over night in * sweet, spicy vine- 
gar. This makes a most appetizing, and 
spring-like, dinner. 

Mutton-and-Apple Pie 

(English) 

The original recipe calls for two pounds 
of chops, cut from the neck of mutton, 
with the superfluous fat removed, and six 
or eight greening apples, cored, pared, 
and sliced. A baking-dish or casserole is 
well greased, and a layer of apple slices 
laid on the bottom. Over these 
a mixture of two tablespoonfuls 
of sugar, mixed with one-fourth 
a teaspoonful of ground allspice 
is sifted. A layer of chops, 
seasoned with salt and pepper 
to taste, and two tablespoonfuls 
of very fine-minced onion are 
then added, and so on; apples 
and chops, each with its dis- 
tinctive seasoning, are added 
until all are used up, or the dish 
is almost filled. Over the top a 
crust of a rich biscuit dough is 
fitted, after rolling to one-fourth 




PEAS WITH PORK TONGUE AND BEETS 

an inch in thickness. One-half a cup of 
meat gravy or water may be added before 
the crust goes on, and two tablespoonfuls 
of vinegar should be mixed with this, unless 
the apples are decidedly sour. Bake in 
a slow oven for from one to one hour and 
one-half. Slices from the leg, or chops 
from the loin, make an extra good pie. 

Winter Salad 

On heart leaves of lettuce arrange halves 
of canned peaches, surround by grapefruit 
sections, and fill with celery, cut in bits and 
mixed with chopped pecan nut meats. 
Beat, until firm throughout, one-half a cup 
of heavy cream with one-half a teaspoonful 
of paprika, one-fourth a teaspoonful of salt, 
two tablespoonfuls of lemon juice. Place 
a tablespoonful of this beaten cream 
above the filling in each half-peach, and 
decorate with a candied cherrv- 







«w<<V^ 


& 


^"O* 


&^ 



WINTER SALAD 



358 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




HUNGARIAN CHRISTMAS PUDDING 



Hungarian Christmas Pudding 

Make a sponge of one cake of yeast, 
one-half a cup of scalded milk and three- 
fourths a cup of flour and set aside to 
become light. Put three cups and one- 
fourth of bread flour into a mixing bowl; 
add one cup of butter, softened, but not 
melted, one tablespoonful of sugar, one- 
fourth a teaspoonful of salt, and eight 
eggs, one at a time, and continue beating 
until the mixture is very smooth. Add 
the yeast sponge to the egg-mixture, 
beating until again smooth; then add 
one cup of fruit, Sultana raisins, candied 
fruit, etc., cut in bits. Butter a Turk's 
head mould and half fill with the mixture. 
Let rise nearly to the top, then bake 
forty minutes. When cold, decorate 



with candied cherries and bits of citron. 
Add one-half a tablespoonful of gelatine, 
softened in two tablespoonfuls of cold 
water, to a pint of syrup from a quart can 
of apricots, made hot; when the gelatine 
is dissolved, let the mixture cool and 
thicken, then pour over the pudding to 
make a glaze. 

Nesselrode Pudding 

Cook until tender twenty large French 
chestnuts (peeled and blanched), in 
sugar and water (half and half) to cover. 
Add water, occasionally, as the cooking 
requires two hours. Cut six of the 
chestnuts into small pieces and press the 
rest through a sieve. In Maraschino 
syrup let soak one-half a cup of candied 
fruit, one-quarter a cup of Sultana raisins, 
and the small pieces of chestnuts. Cook 
the yolks of four eggs and one-half a cup 
of sugar, beaten together, in one pint of 
scalded cream. When this is cold, partly 
freeze, then add one cup of cream, 
whipped, and finish freezing; beat in the 
fruit and nuts, drained from the syrup, 
and pack in any three-pint mould; press 
the cover in place over a piece of wrapping 
paper and let stand in ice and salt one 
hour. Serve with whipped cream or 

Sauce for Nesselrode Pudding 

Beat the yolks of three eggs until 
thick; add three tablespoonfuls of pow- 
dered sugar and beat again. Stir over 




NESSELRODE PUDDING 



SEASONABLE-AXD-TESTED RECIPES 



359 



the fire in a double boiler until the mix- 
ture thickens a little. Then pour into a 
cold dish and beat until it is cold, light, 
and creamy. Flavor to suit the taste; 
then mix in lightly one cup and one-half of 
cream, whipped to a dry, stiff froth. 

Sweet Cider Pie 

Mix three-fourths a cup of sugar with 
one-half a teaspoonful of ground cinna- 
mon or nutmeg, and six tablespoonfuls of 
arrowroot, until the whole is thoroughly 
blended. Put on to heat, in an agate 
saucepan, one pint of sweet cider, and 
when hot, but not boiling, add the sugar 
mixture all at once, and stir vigorously 
until the whole is very thick. Remove 
from fire; add one tablespoonful of lemon 
juice, and pour into a pie-plate, lined with 
a thin, light crust. Arrange strips of 
pastry, basket-wise, over the top, and let 
bake until the crust is brown. Or the 
pie may be left open-faced, and covered 
with a meringue after baking. Do not 
serve until cold. 

Cocoanut Drop Cakes 

Sift together one cup of powdered sugar, 
with four tablespoonfuls of cornstarch. 
Beat the whites of three eggs until they 
stand up, then, gradually, beat in the 
sugar and cornstarch, adding at the 
bottom, a little at a time, and beating in 
and up, as in making meringue. Now 
beat in one cup or more of very fine- 
ground cocoanut; drop by spoonfuls on 
buttered paper on a baking sheet, and 
let bake, at first using a high temperature 
until cakes have set, then decreasing the 
heat and continuing the baking 
until cakes are delicately 
browned and firm to the touch. 

Chocolate Doughnuts 
for Tea 

Sift together three cups of 
sifted pastry flour, two teaspoon- 
fuls of baking powder, one-half 
a teaspoonful of salt, one-fourth 
a teaspoonful of mace, and one- 
fourth a teaspoonful of soda. 




A TASTY LUNCHEON DISH 

To one egg and the yolk of another, beaten 
light, add one-half a cup of sugar, one 
tablespoonful of melted butter, one-half 
a cup of fresh-mashed potato and three- 
eighths a cup of rich, sour milk; mix all 
together, then stir into the dry ingre- 
dients. When thoroughly mixed stir in 
two tablespoonfuls of melted chocolate. 
Take a little of the dough on a floured 
board, knead slightly, pat and roll into a 
sheet one-fourth an inch thick and cut 
out dough with a very small cutter. 
Fry in hot fat, sprinkle with powdered 
sugar. 

Luncheon Dish of Cheese and 
Crackers 

If you want a real tasty, good little 
luncheon dish, fill fancy-shaped crackers 
(bought) with fresh, sweet cottage 
cheese, well seasoned, and top with a 
cube of apple jelly. Serve with celery 
garnish as a relish either with tea, coffee, 
or milk. 

Christmas Cakes 

Cream two-thirds a cup of butter; beat 



^ r^i^mt^ 




' 


^» * «^w*» 


t»j L ^B « I 


<£*+ \ 


^ 


I 



CHOCOLATE DOUGHNUTS FOR TEA 



360 



AMERICAN COOKERY 




CHRISTMAS CAKES 

in one cup of sugar; add the yolks of 
four eggs, beaten light, one tablespoonful 
of milk, one cup and one-half of flour, 
sifted with one teaspoonful of baking 
powder, and one-half a teaspoonful of nut- 
meg, and the whites of four eggs, beaten 
dry. Bake in small tins. This recipe 
makes one dozen little cakes. Frost with 
confectioner's sugar frosting; decorate 
with small red candies. 

Christmas Citron Tartlettes 

Make a soft custard of one pint of thin 
cream, three beaten eggs, and six table- 
spoonfuls of sugar. Pour, when cold, 
into six patty shesll, and pile on the top 
of each a spoonful of thick whipped 
cream, tinted pink with a couple of drops 
of cochineal. Decorate with green mints, 



or candied mint leaves, and arrange on a 
dish bordered with holly. 

Gateau de Noel 

(Christmas Honey Cake, French) 

Tie loosely, in a bag of very thin 
muslin, one ounce, each, of whole cloves 
and stick cinnamon, bruising them with 
a mallet until the juice of the cloves stains 
the bag. Put into three-fourths a cup of 
honey in a porcelain saucepan; add one 
cup and one-half of sugar, and heat until 
the sugar is dissolved and the mixture is 
flavored with spice. Remove from fire, 
and add while warm one-half a cup of 
butter; eight ounces of sweet almonds, 
and one ounce of bitter, both blanched 
and ground fine; and four ounces of 
candied peel, mixed and chopped. Mix 
all; then add two well-beaten eggs; and 
about three cups of flour, sifted with three 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder, and one- 
half a teaspoonful of salt. There should 
be flour enough to knead into a very soft 
dough, as soft as can be handled, there- 
fore the amount may be reduced, or 
added to, according to the brand used. 
Roll to an inch thick, cut in circular 
shape, and bake in a moderate oven. 
Cover when cold with a white icing, sur- 
round at the edges with a border of 
candied angelica and candied cherries, 
and form in the center a golden star made 
of gilt comfits. 




CHRISTMAS DESSERT 



Seasonable Menus for Week in December 



Breakfast 

• 

Northern Spy Apples 

Yellow Cornmeal Mush, Top Milk 

Creamed Chipped Beef 

Potato Scones 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Scrambled Eggs-and-Tomato 

Endive Salad 

One-Egg Cake 

Tea or Milk 

Dinner 

Roast Loin of Lamb, Brown Gravy 

Baked Potatoes Masked Cauliflower 

Sweet Cider Pie 

Coffee 



Breakfast 

Stewed Prunes with Gluten Grits, Top Milk 

Sausages and Fried Apple Rings 

Buckwheat Cakes 

Coffee 

Luncheon 

Eggs in Eggplant 

Celery Salad 

Lemon Jelly Sugar Cookies 

Tea or Milk 

Dinner 

Baked Stuffed Sea Bass, Piquant Sauce 

Italian Spaghetti 

Boiled Leeks in Butter Sauce 

Creamy Rice Pudding with Raisins 

Coffee 





Breakfast 


Breakfast 






Grapefruit 


Oranges 






Shredded Wheat, Hot Milk 


Malt Breakfast Food, Milk 






Raisin Bread 


Poached Eggs on Graham Toast 






Grilled Liver and Bacon 
Coffee 


Coffee 






Luncheon 


3 


>* 
<< 


Dinner 


Quince-and-Apple Soup 


Q 


Casserole of Veal and Ham 


Oyster-and-Celery Salad 


2 


fc 


Baked Sweet Potatoes Stewed Tomatoes 


Nut Chocolate Cake 


C/2 


P 


Apricot Tarts 


Tea or Milk 


o 


C/2 


Coffee 




> 






Dinner 


Ki 




Supper 


Virginia Brunswick Stew 






Oyster Stew, Small Pilot Crackers 


Coleslaw 






Cinnamon Toast 


Compote of Mcintosh Apples 






Grapes 


Whipped Cream 






Cocoa 


Coffee 






Breakfast 


Breakfast 






Cream of Wheat with 

Steamed Figs and Cream 

Rice-and-Meat Cakes 

Sour Cream Muffins 

Coffee 


Malaga Grapes 

Barley Crystals with Honey and Thin Cream 

Hashed Veal-and-Ham 

Crumb Pancakes 

Coffee 




<3 


Luncheon 


Luncheon 






Veal Soup with Brains, Cheese Balls 




a 


Banana-and-Orange Salad 


Milk Toast with Grated Cheese 


to 


O 


Chocolate Fruit Buns 


Scallop of Pumpkin and Parmesan 


(J2 

O 
> 


£ 


Tea or Milk 


Cocoanut Drop Cakes 






Tea or Milk 


K! 




Dinner 








Pork Chops 


Dinner 






Steamed White Potatoes 


Mutton-and-Apple Pie 






Apples Stewed with White Onions 


Mashed Potatoes Parsnips Sauteed 






Jellied Pears 


Filled Cookies 






Coffee 1 


Coffee 





*1 

l-H 

> 



Breakfast 

Canned Pears 

Roman Meal with Cream 

Codfish Balls Date Bread 

Coffee 



Luncheon 

Scalloped Scallops 
Tomato Salad 
Dutch Apple Cake 
Tea or Milk 

361 



Dinner 

Braised Pigeons 

Browned Sweet Potatoes 

Riced Carrots 

Grapefruit and Sultana Pudding 

Coffee 



Menus for Special Occasions in December 



i 

HOLIDAY DINNER 

Cocktail of Caviare Balls in Aspic 



Red Beet Bouillon 
Toasted Bread Fingers 



Olives Radishes 



Fish-and-Potato Puffs Cress and Cucumbers 

Crusty Rolls 



English Game Pie 

Stewed Celery Prune-Stuffed Sweet Potatoes 

Crystallized Ginger Cheese-Filled Dates 

Lemon Egg-Nogg 



Orange-and-Fig Salad in^Red Apple Shells on Green Lettuce Leaves 

Bent Crackers 



Deep-Dish Cherry Pie 
Frozen Plum Pudding 



Coffee 
Nuts Bonbons 



II 
HOLIDAY SUPPERS 

1 

Deviled Drumsticks 

Baked Potatoes 

Buttered Toast Cocoa 

Mcintosh Reds 

2 

Venison Steaks, Jelly Sauce 
Moulded Rice Baked Parsnip > 

Sweet Cider Jelly, Custard Sauc^ 
Shandy 'Gaff , Christmas Cake 



III 
ENGLISH KETTLEDRUM, OR INFORMAL HIGH TEA 

Broiled Oysters with Bacon, on Brown-Bread Toast 
Grilled Potatoes 



Roasted Squabs on Bed of Cress 
Stuffed Tomatoes Savory Rice 

French Rolls 



Waffles with Butter and Honey 



Tea or Chocolate 

362 




Every Woman Her Own Caterer 

By Corinne Campbell Sanquist 



I HAVE a friend who is a caterer. 
She gets perfectly enormous prices 
for serving perfectly splendiferous 
luncheons, banquets, and refreshments 
for afternoon and evening parties for folks 
who can afford to pay for them. 

She is a marvellous manager. That is 
what makes her such a popular caterer. 
Most of her things are cooked at her own 
house and brought to the place where 
they are to be served in fireless cookers 



Sweet Potatoes in Apples Asparagus on Toast 
Hot Rolls Jelly 

Fruit Salad in Aspic Rings 

Bomb Glace Cakes 

Coffee 

The soup can be made in the morning 
and left in the pan in which it is to be 
reheated. Or one of the many canned 
soups can be substituted for it. I 
always buy the breadsticks and rolls and 
heat them in the oven. The cutlets and 
aspic rings can be made the day before. 



and steamers. One day I got to thinking The fruit is cut up that morning. The 



what a valuable possession some of her 
menus would be to the woman who has no 
maid. You could use them for company 
dinners, and have most every bit of the 
work done beforehand. So when she 
asked me what I wanted for Christmas 
last year, I told her some of her simplest 
menus, that I could cook and serve 
myself. She gave me a little card index 
with four menus in it, all the recipes, and 
the directions for cooking and serving, 
and I consider that box one of my greatest 
household assets. I have cooked and 
served all four of the menus, over and 
over again, and almost everything on 
them can be prepared the day before or 
early in the morning, and steamed up in a 
jiffy. They have taken the drudgery out 
of entertaining for me. It is the standing 
in the hot kitchen for hours, then having 
to look pretty and happy, that most 
women hate! 

The first one is the one that I have 
found to be the most popular, but it is not 
the easiest to serve. It is 



Oyster Soup, Bread Sticks Olives Celery 

Chicken Cutlets 



apples are steamed the day before, the 
insides scooped out, they are filled with 
mashed and well-seasoned sweet potatoes, 
and heated in the oven when needed. I 
always stick a little leaf into each one 
before serving, as directed. For the 
dessert, buy strawberry ice-cream, and 
line a melon mould with it. Fill the 
center with sweetened, whipped cream 
and pack in salt and ice. 

This can be served as either an elabor- 
ate luncheon or dinner. 

The second menu is the easiest one to 

get ready, I find. 

Cream-of-Corn Soup, Crackers Olives Celery 

Breaded Veal Cutlets Browned Potatoes 

Creamed Peas 

Green Gage Jam Hot Rolls 

Tomato, Cucumber-and-Lettuce Salad 

Cheese Crackers 

Vanilla Ice Cream, with Crushed Strawberries 

Cake 
Coffee 

The corn soup can be made the after- 
noon before. The cutlets can be fried 
early in the morning, and reheated in the 
hot oven, so there is no smell of hot fat in 
the house when the guests arrive. The 
boiled potatoes will brown while they are 



363 



364 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



heating. The peas are creamed and 
placed in the steamer. The salad is 
ready, and the ice-cream, cake and rolls 
can all be bought if you want to do it. 

The third menu is the one I use often- 
est, when there are men, because they 
love the pork birds so much. 

Grapefruit and Pineapple in Grapefruit Shells 

Pork Birds Candied Sweet Potatoes 

Spinach Mould with Mushroom Sau e 

Hot Rolls Preserves 

Spring Salad 

Caramel Ice Cream Cake 

Coffee 

The fruit is cut up the afternoon before. 
The shells are prepared and put into cold 
water, so they won't discolor. The popu- 
lar pork birds are simply slices of pork 
steak cut thin, spread with dressing, 
rolled up and fastened with a toothpick 
and fried. The spinach is cooked the 
day before, put into a ring mould, and 
reheated in the steamer. The spring 
salad is hard-boiled eggs, filled with the 
tiniest of French peas and chopped 
carrots. The yolks are taken out of the 
smallest hole one can make. This doesn't 
show when the eggs are placed on the 
lettuce. The mushroom sauce is poured 
•over the spinach mould on a platter, and 
the yolks are grated over it just before it 
is brought on. I find it is such a help to 
have the meat all ready cooked, and only 
taking a few minutes to heat up. Then 
the things that are keeping hot in the 
steamer do not have to be watched, as 
they would if they were in separate stew- 
pans on the stove. 

The last menu is my usual luncheon 

menu. 

Fruit in Season 

Lobster Newburg French Fried Potatoes 

Asparagus on Toast 

Spiced Pears Hot Rolls 



Tomato in Aspic Salad, with Cucumbers 

Peach Melba Cakes 

Coffee 

The charing dish service is very easy 
for a woman with no maid. The French 
fried potatoes are fried and drained in 
the morning and crisped in the hot oven, 
then salted. The ice-cream is simply 
vanilla ice-cream served in a half of a 
large canned peach with some of the 
syrup, boiled down thick, poured over it. 
I usually bake tiny cakes, when I bake 
them at home, put them in little paper 
cases, and ice with very soft, thick icing. 
It is these little touches which my friend 
the caterer taught me which lend "class" 
to the meal. The icing should match the 
color-scheme of the decorations. The 
little leaf that is stuck into the apple filled 
with the sweet potato can be bought at 
any big confectioner's. The thickened 
peach syrup can be colored a delicate 
pink with vegetable coloring. The spring 
salad can have a tiny downy yellow 
chicken perched at one side of the plate, 
or a jonquil may be laid on the plate. 
Once you have served one of these menus 
you will realize how very easy they are 
to prepare. And they are so good that 
they can be served a great many times 
before one gets tired. They can be 
changed about, too, if one wants to. 
Really one doesn't entertain often enough, 
when one wants to serve really company 
menus like these, to have them get 
monotonous. 

But best of all is the fact that they can 
be gotten ready, then you can get a nice, 
long rest, and be as fresh and cool as a 
cucumber, when your guests arrive, and 
not hot and tired from basting the roast, 
making gravy and mashing potatoes 
just a few seconds before they get there. 






Brains and Food 

By J. E. Hearn, Biochemist 



EVERYBODY knows what the artist 
said when asked what he mixed his 
paints with — a very, very old saw. 



Literally brains, calves' brains, for 
instance, are a wholesome dish. But let 
us, at once, repudiate the notion that 






BRAINS AND FOOD 



365 



foods, in order to be nourishing, must be 
unpleasant. The contrary is the fact. 

Foods must be pleasant to increase the 
flow of digestive fluids. 

If pleasantness were all, however, there 
would be no need of thought. 

That there is need of thought our nature 
cries aloud through all her symptoms. 

That modern malaise sometimes attrib- 
uted to civilization, sometimes to pes- 
simistic philosophy, is often due to 
monotonous breakfasts. 

There are, at present, two kinds of cook 
extant. Down with them both: The 
monotonous dietitian and the plain cook. 

A good cook should be a composite of 
E. V. McCollum, and some one of those 
European genuises who can make indiges- 
tible viands salubrious. 

There is no educational institution 
prepared to give us such a product. Any 
college degree held by him is worthless. 
He must educate himself. A society of 
gastronomists should be organized for 
the purpose of suitably awarding good 
cooks when they appear. 

In the days before every field was open 
to them, women were wont to complain of 
the narrowness of their lives. There was 
even then a career for them. What came 
of it? Plain and unintelligent cooking — 
to supply the plain and unintelligent 
demands of husbands and brothers. 

One often hears an undernourished and 
appetiteless person remark that Ameri- 
cans eat too much. They eat too much 
in proportion to the nutriment they 
receive. They receive too little nutri- 
ment in proportion to the material they 
consume. There are many who eat too 
little. Indoor overwork of a monotonous 
character does not produce appetite, and 
why eat if one is not hungry? 

If you are fat, you eat too much in 
proportion to your activity, or you exer- 
cise too little in proportion to your 
ingestion. 

There are people to whom the value of 
food is unknown. One such person, 
reduced to his last dime, will buy five 
cents' worth of rolls (a bulky, but incom- 



plete food), and a five-cent package of 
cigarettes. His sister, reduced to her 
last dollar, let us say, will spend ten 
cents for cake and ninety cents for a 
patent medicine for her nerves. 

No man is superior to his stomach. 
Hard doctrine for the idealists and no 
truer than proverbs generally. A chain 
is no stronger than its weakest link, we 
say, although we know that a chain may 
be incomparably stronger than a weak 
link, from which it has been separated. 
In like manner, a man divorced from his 
stomach may feel a superiority to the 
discarded organ. No mediumistic com- 
munications reliably inform us. The dic- 
tum that no man is superior to his stom- 
ach has reference to conditions among the 
living. 

Throughout the phylogenetic history of 
man the main purpose of exertion has 
been to maintain life. This has involved 
combat with enemies, or flight, and the 
quest of food and mates. 

To those with high conceptions of pur- 
posefulness a life with such a principal 
purpose may seem on a low plane. But 
if a life cannot maintain itself, it cannot 
well hope for the exalted concerns of pur- 
posefulness. Biologic needs are as insis- 
tent upon modern man as upon his 
progenitors. 

Our early ancestors used bulky and 
unrefined food, a great deal of which 
could not be digested. The undigested 
part accumulated in the large intestine, 
which was about as well adapted for such 
storage as if it had been made for that 
purpose. 

We moderns have less use for our thirty 
feet of food-canal, and it is often the seat 
of disease. On the principle that the 
devil finds work for the idle, we must put 
that great length of tubing to some use. 
The bulkiness needed may be very satis- 
factorily supplied with spinach and other 
leafy vegetables. 

Auto-suggestion plays a part in the 
effect of foods upon the organism. 

The official censors of the digestive 
tract are smell and taste. They are not 



366 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



likely to be fired and replaced, but their 
services may be reinforced by knowledge. 
When we know that a dish is wholesome, 
we may be sensible enough to cultivate 
a liking for it. 

We eat for nourishment, to satisfy the 
craving for food. We dine for pleasure, 
to enjoy the flavor of food. 

For civilized people, not only eating, 
but dining is a necessary luxury. 

Attention should not always be focused 
on nourishment. 

Dining has become a social and esthetic 
custom, in which the nutritional ele- 



ment is subordinated to the pleasurable- 
This is as it should be. Foods should 
be properly selected and prepared, but 
when the dining hour arrives the occasion 
should be enjoyed for its own sake. 

The final caution may be in the phrases 
of the psychologist Joseph Jastrow: 
"The restraint of a prescribed diet at 
times defeats its end by the added atten- 
tion, and the sense of injury attaching to 
deprivation, which it invites. Judicious 
neglect is often the better rule for the 
introspectively disposed" (hypochon- 
driacs). 



The Art of Being Ready 

By Elisabeth X. Simmonds 



THE advent of unexpected company 
sometimes assumes an aspect which 
is almost tragic to the hostess, and to set 
on the table a luncheon, both dainty and 
appetizing, at such a time, is a real test of a 
housekeeper's poise and clear-headedness. 

To begin with, it is absolutely essential 
to have orderly habits, so that one can 
place one's hand on anything at a mo- 
ment's notice. It is well to be prepared 
with emergency food supplies on the 
pantry shelf, and to "have clean napery 
for a luncheon ready in the sideboard 
drawer, protected by a sheet of white 
paper. Table napkins for six should be 
folded and placed within the folds of the 
tablecloth. 

In the sideboard, glass and silver, well 
polished, also knives and forks, etc., 
should be ready for a luncheon. It is a 
good plan to make a list of all that will 
certainly be wanted, and to have ready 
as many things as possible. 

Before coming to the all-important 
question of how to feed unexpected com- 
pany, I would like to say a word about the 
rooms in which the guests will be received. 
The dining room and . parlor should be 
always tidy and dusted. If, for any 
reason, there is a day in which these 
rooms do not receive proper attention, 



one may be sure that out of sheer con- 
trariness visitors will arrive, and among 
them will be a woman of critical eye, if 
not an unkind tongue. A hostess, to be 
at her ease, must have the consciousness 
that her surroundings do her credit. 
How can she entertain a guest whose eyes 
fix themselves on the dust of the piano? 

If without a maid, the hostess herself 
answers the ring at the door. It follows 
that she must always look presentable 
no matter what housework she may be 
called away from. This can be done. 

One should always wear clean and 
attractive house dresses. A soiled or 
torn house dress is an abomination. It 
is a good plan to wear a housekeeper's 
apron, as this completely envelops one, 
and saves one's dress from stains and 
dirt; and, if company comes, it can be 
slipped off in a minute. A cap, or a bit 
of old veiling pinned on the hair will keep 
all dust from the hair and keep it smooth 
as well. It is also wise to wear mitts to 
work in; these can be made of good bed 
ticking. This material is so strong that 
it withstands hard usage. It washes 
easily, too. Nearly all bought working 
gloves wear out directly; and bought 
mitts are nearly as bad, though not quite. 

Now, as to the store cupboard. Of 



THE ART OF BEING READY 



367 



course, it may chance that one has "things 
going," that will make a luncheon for 
unexpected guests; but one must not 
take chances. There must be, in glasses 
or tins', something to fall back upon. 
Canned soups, fish, chicken, tongue, 
preserves, jelly, pickles, sweet wafers, 
plain crackers, a jar of good salad dress- 
ing, a can of sardines, whole anchovies, 
several cans of fruit and vegetables, all 
these should be included on the emergency 
shelf. 

Now, when without maids, and unex- 
pected visitors come to luncheon, it is a 
good plan to serve only cold things, as 
then everything can be put on the table 
at once. A piece of cold ham, served 
with tongue, helps an impromptu lunch- 
eon very much. Cheese straws are an 
excellent thing to keep on the emergency 
shelf. They are always liked and easy 
to make; they will keep well for weeks if 
put in an air-tight tin. 

The tongue and the ham can be put 
on the table; an entree dish, with stuffed 
olives; another with alternate sardine 
and anchovy, each on a finger of toast — 
a sprinkle of Parmesan on the anchovy, 
and a little fine-chopped caper on the 
sardine. A fancy dish with cake, and a 
bowl of canned or fresh fruit, will make an 
attractive luncheon. 

It is well when making pies to have 
one in reserve as an emergency extra; 
they keep quite fresh for two or three days. 



Salad helps to decorate the table. It 
is a good plan to have salad material 
always on hand. It can be washed 
early in the day and placed in a cool 
place. Then it has only to be cut and 
mixed, if required at short notice. 

Too much stress cannot be laid on 
preparedness. Not only must a hostess 
have, in her cupboard store and larder, 
the wherewithal to furnish a suddenly 
called for meal, but she must know 
exactly where to lay her hand upon all 
she may want. There must be no hasty 
rubbing up of table silver and knives, no 
flurried hunt for a can-opener or cork- 
screw. No mustard to make, no salt 
cellars to fill. Everything that can pos- 
sibly be ready on the emergency shelf 
should be there. 

One last word about the reception of 
unexpected company. Because unex- 
pected they should be the more warmly 
welcomed. For the guest to be chilled at 
the first greeting, nothing afterwards 
compensates. The hearty greeting, "Come 
right in!" when a guest presents him- 
self, creates a pleasant atmosphere at 
once. 

With orderly habits, and a little com- 
mon sense it should be quite easy for any 
one to produce a luncheon or a tea with- 
out warning. With these two magic 
wands, coupled with the power of keeping 
on, there need be nothing apalling in the 
arrival of unexpected company. 



Apples and Soap 

By Bertha Comins Ely 



IN southern New Hampshire, not far 
from the state line, is a beautiful sec- 
tion of country. Here are prosperous 
farms, having large barns to store the hay 
grown on the smooth acres. Apple trees, 
now weighed to the ground with big 
scarlet fruit, stand in rows on other acres. 

Stopping to inquire my way, recently, 
I exclaimed in admiration. 

"Well," the farmer answered, proudly 



"you ought to see our Mcintosh Reds. 
They are the size of a quart measure." 

I not only saw them, a little farther on, 
where a wayside table displayed them, 
but I bit into a beauty. I chatted with 
the energetic, rosy girls in charge, and real- 
ized that attractive womanhood matured 
there, also. The girls looked so exactly 
alike, I stared openly. 

"Oh, we're twins," one said, under- 



368 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



«i 



»i 



standing my amazement, "I'm Lura, and 
my sister is Lucina. We are hoping to go 
to college, and the pennies help, you 
know." 

I looked across the velvety village green 
to the shining white schoolhouse opposite. 
Then my eye wandered to the comforta- 
ble, roomy farmhouse near by. Old-fash- 
ioned flowers were in the garden bordering 
the vegetables. 

'Here is thrift," I thought. 
'Won't you come to the house?" 
Lucina invited. "Perhaps you would 
like to see my jelly, too. I've tried a 
tutti-frutti. I used the different fruits as 
♦ they ripened." It had a delicious flavor, 
and I promptly gave an order. 

Lucina smiled thankfully, and Lura 
directed my attention to her morning's 
work. 

"What is it?" I asked. "It looks like 
big squares of divinity fudge." 

"It's soap, and it floats and softens the 
hands, too. See the lather it makes!" 

My hands were sticky from the apple, 
so I tested the soap, gladly. "Do you 
sell this, too?" I inquired. 

"Oh, yes! By the dozen cakes, and 
the recipe with them." 

"Do tell me about it," I entreated. 

"We have summer boarders, and there 
is always so much fat or grease, from one 
source or another, that we wanted to get 
a profit from it. Of course, we keep the 
chicken fat for cookies and muffins, it is 
so much more economical than using 
butter. Other kinds we clarify." 

"Do you use mutton and corned beef 
fats?" I inquired, for my housekeeping 
conscience was often troubled. 

'Every kind is in this lot, even the 



• • i 



grease from lamb chops and a boiled ham." 
"Good gracious!" I exclaimed, and 
immediately bought a dozen cakes and 
read the recipe: 

5 lbs. grease 

1 small can potash — 

the eighteen-cent 

size 
3 pints water 
\ cup borax 



\ cup salsoda 
\ cup ammonia 
A handful of sugar 
\ oz. oil of lavender 
flowers 



lir 



"i 



'Sugar! What's that for?" I questioned. 
'To make the lather," Lura explained. 
'Please tell me just how you mix the 
ingredients." 

Very willingly Lura responded: "After 
clarifying my fats, and making them as 
pure and sweet as possible, I strain them 
into a tin pail, then put that away in a 
cool place. I never let any fat or grease 
get old, but care for it every few days — 
just when I have any. As soon as five 
pounds have accumulated I make the 
soap. I place the pail, holding the grease, 
on the back of the stove, until the con- 
tents are soft, then empty it into a large 
agate pan, a dish-pan will do. I stir the 
potash into the grease, using a long- 
handled wooden stick, to prevent being 
burned with the mixture. I add the 
borax, salsoda, ammonia, and sugar to the 
water, and stir well, adding this mixture 
to the grease and potash one. I keep 
stirring until the soap is the consistency of 
fudge, adding the oil of lavender just 
before pouring the mass into a large 
dripping pan, lined with a clean, white 
cloth. As it sets I cut into large squares." 

"It looks good enough to eat," I 
exclaimed enthusiastically, "and I shall 
try the recipe as soon as possible." 

I thanked the twins and drove away, 
amid wishes for good luck. 



A New Year's Social 



'Ring out, wild bells, to the wild sky, 
The flying cloud, the frosty light: 
The year is dying in the night; 

Ring out, wild bells, and let him die." 



T 



HIS verse was neatly written on 
white cards, and sent out to the mem- 



By Ella Shannon Bowles 

bers of the Young People's Society a few 
days before New Year. On the reverse 
sides of the cards were designated the 
time and place of the social. 

The hall was decorated with the green- 
ery left from Christmas, and streamers of 



A NEW YEAR'S SOCIAL 



369 



white crepe paper. In the very front of 
the room was hung a white poster, with 
this inscription printed in red, "WEL- 
COME TO THE NEW YEAR," and 
similar posters with, "TIME AND 
TIDE WAIT FOR NO MAN," "TEM- 
PUS FUGIT," "NAE MAN CAN 
TETHER TIME OR TIDE," and 
"TIME ROLLS HIS CEASELESS 
COURSE" were placed in conspicuous 
positions. Bells were suspended every- 
where, small bells, large bells, and paper 
bells. 

Paper and pencils were passed and each 
guest was asked to write a resolution for 
the New Year and drop it into a basket. 
Small squares of paper had been prepared, 
some were left blank and some bore 
numbers from 1 to 36. The papers were 
passed in a hat, and the persons drawing 
the first twelve numbers were asked to 
step forward. They were told that an 
old Scotch idea is that if a book is opened 
at random on New Year's Eve, and a 
verse selected at random, the sentiment 
will come true in the course of the 
year. A book containing a varied col- 
lection of poetry was used, and no matter 
how nonsensical the sentiment selected, 
the person choosing it was told that it 
must be interpreted and accepted as final. 
The owners of the numbers from 13 to 24 
were then invited to try their luck at 
entertaining the company. Small glasses 
such as are used in timing boiling eggs 
were passed them, and each contestant 
was required to perform some "stunt" 
for the amusement of the others, for such 



a length of time as it took the sand in his 
glass to run from one end to the other. 
This resulted in songs, a piano solo, 
stories and recitations. Numbers 25 
to 36 were blindfolded, and a lighted 
candle was moved directly in front of 
each one of them. At a signal each was 
allowed one trial at blowing out the 
candle. Those succeeding were told that 
they would extinguish those sins, which 
their resolutions had promised to over- 
come. At the conclusion of the candle- 
blowing stunt, the resolutions dropped 
into the basket were read by the chairman 
of the entertainment committee. 

The games were followed by a program. 
Tennyson's "Death of the Old Year" 
was charmingly read, and the popular 
sketch, "The Bachelor's Reverie," was 
presented by a young man and a number 
of pretty girls. After this came some 
music by the orchestra of the society, and 
then a drill by twelve children, dressed 
to represent the months of the year. 
They were led on the stage by Old Father 
Time, who stationed himself in the center 
of the stage as the months marched 
around him. Suddenly a bell began to 
toll, and a little boy, dressed in white, to 
represent the New Year, came running 
from the wings and led Old Father Time 
away. He returned with a young lady, 
dressed to personify "The Guiding Spirit 
of the New Year," and the program was 
completed by her recitation of, "Ring 
Out, Wild Bells," to piano and bell 
accompaniment. (That the social was 
a success need not be added.) 



January 

New Year's Day, January 1 

'I stand upon the threshold of two years, 
And backward look, and forward strain my 
eyes." 



THE degree to which New Year's Day 
is now celebrated varies in different 
sections of the country, being in some a 
legal holiday and a day of elaborate 
entertaining, while in others it is practi- 



Anonymous. 

cally ignored and there is "business as 
usual." 

However, this was one of the first 
festival days of which we have any 
record, the ancient Teutonic tribes cele- 



370 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



brating the change of season from summer 
to winter as the beginning of a new year, 
observing it with great feasting. When 
these tribes adopted Christianity they 
naturally celebrated St. Martin's Day, 
the eleventh of November, as their New 
Year's Feast. When they changed to the 
Roman calendar, which began the year 
with January, they observed the tradi- 
tional Martinmas customs on January 1. 
A fat goose was essential to this feast. 
"Unblessed the house that has not a 
goose to eat that night." "Then people 
roast fat geese, all the world rejoicing." 

The idea of trimming houses and 
churches with greens, at this time, comes 
from the Romans, as the branches of 
trees were believed to bring good luck 
throughout the year. In England and 
Scotland, it was very common to carry 
gifts when one made a call on New Year's 
Day. It was always a day of great 
hospitality. 

The custom of making New Year's 
calls was brought to New York by the 
Dutch, and is still kept up to some extent. 
It is very natural to wish to drink to the 
health of one's friends at the beginning of 
a new year, but fortunately the drunken- 
ness and carousing that formerly marked 



New Year's Eve have largely passed away 
and we now wish one another a "Happy 
New Year" just as fervently as of old, 
though less boistrously. 

Surely the beginning of a new year is a 
day peculiarly adapted for family cele- 
brations. The color scheme most appro- 
priate is that of the Christmas season — 
the red and green of the holly, which 
brings good luck. The bell is often used 
as a symbol of the New Year. "Ring out 
the old — Ring in the new." Place 
cards could be made from red cardboard, 
cut in the shape of a bell, with perhaps a 
New Year's quotation written on each 
card beside the person's name. For a 
centerpiece, a low, clear glass dish with 
holly arranged in it, set between red 
candles in glass candlesticks, is simple and 
decorative. 

Menu 

Halves of Grapefruit with Cherries 

or 

Stock Tomato Soup 

Roast Goose 

Browned Sweet Potatoes Creamed Onions 

Apple Sauce Celery and Olives 

Rolls 

Strawberry Jello Riced, with Whipped Cream 

Little Cakes 

Coffee 

F. C. A. 



The First Snow 



Along in November there comes (they'll 

remember, 
Who used to be boys long ago) 
A day of delight when the landscape turns white! 
The day of the very first snow! 
You laugh and you shout, as you hurry about; 
Your nose and your fingers turn red; 
And nothing's so real as the joy that you feel 
On the day when you take out your sled! 



The air is a curtain of white, and you're certain 

That no one can see you, and still 

They hear you, you know, as they rush through 

the snow, 
And drag all the sleds to the hill! 
"I'm coming!" you shout at the top. "So look out ! 
It's soft, but I'm going ahead!" 
Oh, nothing's so real as the joy that you feel 
On the day when you take out your sled! 



They talk of warm sands in the tropical lands, — 

Fair places of joy and delight, 

Where snow is unknown, and the summer alone 

Is ruler, and never takes flight. 

No winter? How sad for the lass or the lad 

Who lives there! 'Twould fill me with dread! 

For nothing's more real than the joy that you feel 

On the day that you take out your sled! 

Helen Cowles Le Cron. 




Home Ideas 

and . 

JL/Concmues 




Contributions to this department will be gladly received. 

paid for at reasonable rates 



Accepted items will be 



In a Genuine, Not a Bar 
Harbor, "Cottage" 

RECENTLY I happened to come 
across an instructive article in an 
English household paper, on Cottage 
Cookery. It was written in the pre- 
historic epoch "before the war," and made 
me wonder that when the war came Eng- 
land found any military resources among 
her laborers, for it was almost incredible 
that any agricultural working man would 
stay in that country overnight. Very 
evidently the "roast beef of Old England," 
and all those savory sausages and mashed 
potato, steaming puddings and punch, 
and huge slabs of bread and cheese, over 
which Dickens gloats so affectionately, 
even the amber stream of tea, which pours 
through the pages of later fiction, were, 
at that time, only attainable by the 
"nobility and gentry." 

A benevolent lady who conducted a 
mothers' meeting offered a prize — the 
amount was not stated, but let us hope it 
was a substantial one — to the mother 
"suggesting the best dinner for four per- 
sons, father, mother and two schoolboys, 
at the cost of one shilling," or, in our 
money, a quarter. Any person of expe- 
rience will at once observe that the 
specification of "two schoolboys" makes 
the number to be fed out of this thrifty 
allowance equal to at least six ordinary 
persons. 

The problem of providing a hot and 
nourishing dinner for such a family for 
a quarter would, it would seem, daunt any 
but the dauntless. But, alas! so manv, 
and so satisfactory, were the answers that 
the prize had to be divided among five of 



equal merit, leaving, we fear, very little 
to any of them. Some were deterred by 
the simplicity of the problem. They said 
that there was too much money for four, 
"if it had been for ten now, I would have 
tried," said one courageous soul. 

Of the menus proposed the piece de 
resistance in most instances was "suet 
dumpling." I must own that this luxury 
is to me an unfamiliar one, but it is evi- 
dently reasonably economical, for a com- 
petitor advises making the dumplings 
with "the fat skimmed off after boiling 
two pennyworth of bones." 

One of the competitors, the wife of a 
laborer, had to find rent, food, and cloth- 
ing for herself, her husband and six 
children out of twelve shillings a week, or 
three dollars. "I can make a good 
dinner," she said, "for the eight of us for 
sixpence," and added, "I wish I always 
had sixpence to spend for it." For all of 
these women an oven was an undreamed- 
of luxury, a saucepan and a frying-pan 
constituted their complete batterie de 
cuisine, for instead of a convenient range, 
or stove, a cottage kitchen offers only one 
open and often smoky fire for cooking the 
food, warming the house and boiling the 
clothes. Nor are these f-.milies con- 
sidered as destitute objects of benevo- 
lence. The men were laborers, but were 
supposed to be supporting their families, 
though often the mother, besides her 
family cares, earned, in various laborious 
ways, a little addition to his wage of 
twelve shillings a week. This income 
was earned by out-of-door work, well 
known to be conducive to a good appetite. 
Go around eighteen holes of your golf 
links in an afternoon, and then see if the 



371 



372 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



"skimmings of tuppen'orth of bones" 
would make a satisfying dinner, even if 
you didn't have to share it with your 
family! 

A convincing instance of the improvi- 
dence of many of the working classes 
may be quoted. One man received from 
the farmer who employed him a present 
of a dozen large cauliflowers, each the 
size of a quarter-peck measure. The 
next day the farmer asked him if they 
were good. "Yes, sir," was the answer, 
"I wish I had some more tonight." 

"Why, surely you have not finished 
them all?" 

"Yes, sir. She biled 'em and I ate 'em 
for my supper." 

One can but sympathize with his feeling 
that one crowded hour of glorious satiety 
were worth an age of family dinners at six 
for a quarter! e. e. 



* 



A Winter Beefsteak Fry 

IF you were among the fortunate ones 
who summered in the Rockies, possibly 
you were more fortunate still, and enjoyed 
more than one outing of the sort that is 
called, in the West, a Beefsteak Fry — 
potatoes baked in the coals of a camp 
fire, eaten with salt and a little butter, 
and tasting as no potatoes ever tasted 
before; a smoke-blackened pot of coffee, 
served clear, in ridiculously large tin cups 
which proved to be not nearly so large as 
they appear, after one had taken the 
first sip; and the "grand prize" of all, 
the steak, cooked over the fire, served 
between the halves of those large, round, 
flat baker's buns, and tasting like nothing 
so much as more and MORE; not to 
mention the accessories, which might be 
anything or everything from pickles to 
cookies. 

Now that winter has closed down. 
Beefsteak Fries are only tantalizing 
memories to the great majority of those 
who enjoyed their privilege during the 
vacation time; but, to the initiate few, 
they are still reckoned among the appe- 
tite-producing possibilities, even though 



the scenery part must be left to the 
imagination. 

This is the modus operandi. First, 
order plenty of steak and plenty of those 
same round, flat baker's buns (remember 
how much food disappeared that last 
night on Pike's Peak), and pickles and 
things. Get potatoes as near uniform 
size as possible, scrub them, and place 
them to bake just inside the furnace door. 
They may get a little smoky, but they~ 
will have the same wonderful flavor as 
those cooked in a camp fire, not to men- 
tion the saving in gas. 

Tie your coffee in a cheesecloth bag and 
let boil just three minutes. To clear,, 
throw in a very little cold water just before 
serving in last summer's tin cups. 

The steak is the biggest secret of alL 
It was told to me by an old hunter, and 
since I learned how, none of our family 
will eat steak cooked in any other way. 
Take a thick skillet and heat it very hot. 
Sprinkle salt thinly over the bottom and 
clap on the steak which has previously 
had every bit of fat carefully removed. 
Cook quickly and serve between the buns 
which should have been split beforehand. 
This method is less trouble than a broil 
and produces even a better flavor. 

I might mention that baked beans can 

be cooked just inside the furnace door in 

the same manner as potatoes with an 

even greater saving on the gas bill. 

g. l. s. 
* * * 

For the Children's Evening Meal 

HOW many of us mothers are hard put 
to it for just the right food for Betty 
and Jack and Bobby's tea. Since I have 
learned how to make the old-fashioned 
dish beloved of our grandmothers, that 
problem has largely settled itself in our 
home. 

Cottage cheese is one of the things that 
may not be thrown together "any old 
way." If made according to the follow- 
ing method, results will be one hundred 
per cent good. I put a quart, more or 
less, of milk into an old-fashioned glass 



HOME IDEAS AND ECONOMIES 



373 



pitcher which always sits on my kitchen 
table, and leave it here a day and a night. 
By the morning of the second day the 
milk has thickened. (In winter we get 
a summer temperature on the back of the 
range.) We boil about three quarts of 
water in an aluminum pan (I suppose 
any kind of pan would do, but I am be- 
ing very explicit, for I want your result 
perfect), pour the clabber into it. 
This pan is left undisturbed until the 
contents is cold — sometimes all day. 
Then into a wire berry sieve it is all 
poured, and cold water run through the 
curd until it is thoroughly washed. 
With a spoon the mass is pressed until 
the water is out of it. Snowy curd is put 
into a bowl and placed in the refrigerator. 
For tea, sweet cream and salt to taste 
are added, mixed well — ■ and we have a 
dish fit for the gods. It is so unnecessary 
to allow the curd to hang around in a 
bag and drain. The cottage cheese 
habit is a good one to get. We believe it 
is our most nutritious dish, and, best of 
all, the children would eat it three times 
a day. I have decided that the secret of 
the fresh, delicious flavor is that it never 
touches cloth, is always removed from the 
sieve immediately, and is so thoroughly 
washed with clear, running water. 

A. G. M. 

* * * 

Hot Dogs and Potato Salad 

LET me repeat for you a conversa- 
tion which I really couldn't help 
"listening in" on at a restaurant the other 
day. 

"Hot dogs and potato salad. Gee, 
Bill, don't sit next to me and eat that 
stuff." 

"What's the matter, Jack? It is good 
enough grub for my lunch — what's 
wrong with it?" 

: 'Tell me, Bill, does Peg ever give you 
hot dogs and potato salad for dinner?" 

"Of course not. You don't suppose 
Peg would put a dish like that before me 
for a real dinner. But man, why ask such 
a question?" 



"When I tell you that I've had hot 
dogs and potato salad served to me 
regularly at least two nights a week for 
months now, perhaps you will understand 
why the very sight of such a dish is sick- 
ening to me. At least, at lunch time, I 
want to get away from it." 

"What's happened to Grace? When I 
used to be around to your house so often, 
that first year you were married, Grace 
used to serve mighty fine dinners. I've 
bragged about her cooking to a lot of the 
boys." 

"Sure, those were the good, happy 
days, Bill. But it is all different now. 
Grace has the bridge craze. Goes out to 
bridge parties nearly every afternoon, so 
hasn't time to cook a dinner. She just 
runs around to the delicatessen shop half 
an hour before I get home, and ten min- 
utes after my arrival my dinner is served. 
If ever I complain of growing tired of such 
grub she says something about not marry- 
ing me to be a cook, or that she needs 
social life as much as I need food. But, 
I'm a cad to talk about it to you, Bill. 
Forget what I've said. It was just that 
dish of frankfurters and potato salad that 
was too much for me." 

Think it over, wives! 

^r *t* *f* 

Painted Furniture 

1HAD dinner in a charming tea-room 
the other evening. Would you know 
one of the secrets of the charm of the 
place? It was its painted furniture. 

Old tables, some, perhaps, real antiques, 
and others plain old kitchen tables, had 
been painted various colors — ■ green, 
blue, orange, gray, and purple. Plain, 
every-day kitchen chairs were painted to 
match the tables. The effect was quaint- 
picturesque and charming. 

The possibilities in a pot of paint are 
limitless. 

Perhaps you have some porch furniture 
that looks real shabby after the wear of a 
season or two. Don't dispose of it. 
Get some paint and transform it. 

Was it natural color? Why not try 



374 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



painting it green and black? Paint the 
body of the chairs or table green, with 
just a touch of black here and there. 
Another combination that sounds a bit 
garish, but is most effective, is gray with 
a touch of red. Varied and charming are 
the colors one can combine. And what a 
fascinating and satisfying task it would 
prove, don't you think? 

Perhaps you haven't porch furniture, 
but you have some*old bedroom furni- 
ture that you have been thinking of dis- 
carding. Why not paint it? Painted 
bedroom furniture is quite the vogue 
today. A soft gray is most effective in a 
room with rose colored draperies. Or 
have you always wanted white furniture 
in that sunny, warm spare room of yours? 
Let a few cans of paint and a few hours' 
work give you your wish by transforming 
that shabby, old bedroom set into one of 
spotless white. h. f. t. 

* * * 

Ah Lee, the Faithful 

DOUBTLESS many a Chinese has 
served as well in many a kitchen, 
and been as faithful to the family whose 
food he prepared. Perhaps there is a 
little halo about Ah Lee, because he 
belonged to such a happy period of our 
lives: that year in golden California. 

We were served by two of these 
Orientals, still wedded to their pigtails. 
Those shiny pigtails I Ah Lee kept his 
immaculate with lemons. 

Ah Lee overheard us, the night father 
fell ill. 

"We must move him to the south 
room, in the morning," we concluded. 
"It will have to be cleaned first, but we 
can do it after breakfast." 

In the morning, Ah Lee beckoned mys- 
teriously to us, leading the way to a 
shining south room, where his soft-shod 
feet had trotted back and forth in prepa- 
ration while the household slept. 

"Ah Lee prepare a turkey for Master," 
he said, ingratiatingly. 

"But father cannot eat a turkey, Ah 
Lee!" 



"He eat my turkey, — you see." He 
unfolded a napkin and disclosed a little 
bird, boned, stuffed, and browned to a 
turn. He watched, beaming, while the 
patient ate it all. 

When a cousin came all the way from 
New York for a visit, we were not at 
home. Ah Lee guarded the door. 

"Not come in," he said. 

"But I am of the family," our cousin 
replied, amused and irritated. 

"I do not know. You not come in." 

We found our guest straying by the 
callas near the fountain. He was the 
first to commend the distressed Ah Lee 
for faithfulness. 

Silently, the soft shoes padded about 
the house, doing our bidding. Eagerly 
Ah Lee begged to accompany us when we 
turned eastward once more. We left 
him there, in the setting to which he be- 
longed. How could we subject him to the 
cold and dangers of another climate 
and conditions? We shall never for- 
get him, but we left him there among the 
lilies of his adopted land. a. b. s. 

* * * 

There are a few "happy habits" that 
have helped me to keep the home attrac- 
tive at all times with a minimum expendi- 
ture of time and strength. The first 
thing after breakfast I go through the 
rooms, putting articles in place, gathering 
soiled clothes, making each room neat and 
ready for the day's work, and freshening 
the flowers. 

I never continue work, when I begin to 
get nervous or overtired. It does not pay 
me to do it. I keep a magazine handy 
and when my nerves tighten or my feet 
ache, I go into another room and read for 
ten or fifteen minutes. This relaxes my 
body and refreshes my mind so that I go 
back to work with renewed vigor. 

The last thing at night I go through the 
house again, replacing books, finding lost 
articles, straightening furniture, and giv- 
ing the home a sort of mother touch, so it 
has a pleasant, welcoming air for the new 
day. won. 






THIS department is for the benefit and free use of our subscribers. Questions relating to recipes, 
and those pertaining to culinary science and domestic economics in general, will be cheerfully 
answered by the editor. Communications for this department must reach us before the first of the 
month preceding that in which the answers are expected to appear. In letters requesting answers 
by mail, please enclose address and stamped envelope. Address queries to Janet M. Hill, Editor. 
American Cookery, 221 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass. 



Query No. 4322. — "Does Fruit Cake weigh 
the same before baking and after it is baked? 
What type of pan is best, also the size, for cakes 
weighing one and two pounds each?" 

Loss of Weight in Baking 
Fruit Cake 

FRUIT CAKE loses weight in baking 
to the extent of from one to two 
ounces in a pound. The loss of weight 
isless,ifthecakebesteamed before baking; 
the loss is also less in large cakes, and more in 
proportion in small ones where a greater 
surface is exposed to evaporation. 

We should think that an ordinary bread 
pan, of small size, would be good to bake 
a two-pound fruit cake in; and a small 
circular cake pan for the one-pound size. 



Query No. 4323. — "Please tell me why my 
Squash and Pumpkin Pies do not brown on top? 
The crust gets nicely browned, but the filling 
will not, and I like to see a well-browned shiny 
top on this kind of pie." 

Brown-Topped Pumpkin Pies 

We agree with you in greatly preferring 
a good, brown top to the anaemic kind so 
often seen. Do you use milk in your 
pumpkin pies ? This helps to brown them 
better than water, on account of its sugar- 
of-milk and fat content. Molasses, in- 
stead of sugar, will produce a much better 
brown. One or two spoonfuls of butter, 
added to the sifted pulp of the pumpkin 
or squash — ■ real butter, and not a sub- 
stitute — will also help to brown the 
top, but you had better not use this 



unless you put eggs in your pie. If these 
recommendations fail, then sift over the 
top of the pie a little very fine granulated 
sugar, and you will be sure to have a well- 
brfcwned crust. Sifted over the pie the 
last thing, and placed under the gas- 
flame, it will make a crispy crust; put on 
before going into the oven, and let cook 
with the pie, the sugar will dissolve before 
browning, and will be softer. 



Query No. 4324. — "Will you please give me 
definitions for the following terms: (1) Domestic 
Science. (2) Domestic Art. (3) Household Econ- 
omy. (4) Household Management. (5) House- 
hold Engineering. (6) Household Administra- 
tion. (7) Home Economics." 

Definitions Wanted 

We find that these terms are variously 
defined, sometimes they all are taken to 
mean pretty much the same thing, some- 
times the distinctions are quite arbitrary, 
and neither included nor connoted in the 
common significance of the word. We 
are glad to define them as they appear to 
us to be distinguished one from another. 

Domestic Science. The application of 
scientific methods of thought and work 
to the problems of the house, or to house- 
hold problems. 

Domestic Art. The application to the 
house, in its exterior and interior, of the 
artistic principles of form and color, also, 
of materials used. Building, decorating, 
tinting, and furnishing are all included, 
also — but properly by no means chiefly 
— artistic clothing. The term is very 



375 



376 



AMERICAN COOKERY 



much of a misnomer when applied to 
work in plain sewing. 

Household Economy. Following the 
Greek word from which "economy" is 
derived, this means the "running" of the 
entire household, with regard to division 
of labor, expenditure of income, provision 
of food, care in sickness, and provision of 
amusement and recreation. In our mod- 
ern use of the term, a careful thrift is 
connoted. 

Household Management. The direction 
.and care of the household, as in the fore- 
going, but not necessarily with any impli- 
cation of thrift. The house of a million- 
aire can be "managed" without much 
thought of the cost. 

Household Engineering. Here we have 
a more mechanical ordering of the house. 
Both "economy" and "management" 
seem to us to include the human element 
in all its phases, as co-dwellers in the 
house. "Engineering" appears to con- 
sider the human element only as a means 
to an end, the end of the mechanical 
ordering of the dwelling. 

Household Administration. This 
includes both the economy, and also 
the management and engineering — ■ but, 
as though it were done by a ruler who 
sits aloft and directs the activities with- 
out either sharing them, or giving his 
heart to them. He does it all with 
brains, like the administrator of an estate. 
At least, it sounds like that to us. 

Home Economics. The new word, 
"home," in this term, introduces an 
ethical and even spiritual element which 
all the others lack. It signifies economics, 
as under definition (3), but with one whole 
eye on higher, rather than material 
values. It means running the house with 
common sense, but also with uncommon 
sense, and always subordinating the com- 
mon to the uncommon. This means that 
the spirit of the home will be the first and 
chiefest, and most important thing to be 
considered, and will always come before 
the mere care of the house. 



Query No. 4325. — "Can you suggest some- 



thing new for a Cocktail for a gentlemen's 
dinner?" 

Novelties in Cocktails 

Cocktails are somewhat like French 
Pastries, in that there are no hard and 
fast rules for them, but one may use her 
imagination and judgment in combining 
ingredients. We have seen large olives, 
either ripe or green, stoned, stuffed with 
anchovies, or anchovy paste, mixed with 
buttered crumbs, then placed, from three 
to five, in each cocktail glass, and the 
sauce used for oyster cocktail poured 
over them. This is made of sifted 
tomato, flavored with Tabasco and other 
seasonings. 

Another odd cocktail is made of small, 
round, ripe-red tomatoe