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Full text of "The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade"

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^ AMERICAN ^ 



FIvORIST. 



A WEEKLY JOURNAL FOR THE TRADE. 



«- 



VOLUME X. 

s 



CHICAGO: 
AMERICAN FLORIST COMPANY. 

18 8 5. 



te J f-, ^ u 



CONTKNTS. 

Illustrations are indicated Ijy an * 



f] yyi 2> ir 



V, / ; / 



AbutUon Souvenir de Bonn 8^ 

Abutllon TexlUarlum bra 

Acalypha Mlltonlana 1U14 

Acalypha, treatment and propaga- 

tlon ■ *^^ 

Achillea ptarmlca 1181 

Aconltums • ;',o LSS 

Acre plot, how to lay out »" Ks 

Adenocalymna comosum 'oU 

Adenophora lllUflora odorata Uja 

•Adlantum cuneatum ;;; '.Im 

Adlantum Farleyenae 614 "bU 

Adlantum Hemsleyanum Jil) 

Adlantums, watering lloo 

Adieu, Mr. Herr says ij-f 

Advertising by the retailer tjUa 

Advertising, exhibition Ml 

Advertising lor the retailer t>M 

^thlonema grandltlorum 111^ 

Agrlmonla Enpatorla 1^1 

Agrlmonla odorata 'Jj« 

Agrostemma coronarla 1^ 

Alsel. fable by Sgg 

"Allen, Chas H «2 

Altemanthera, cuttings « 

Altemanthera, propagating Iga 

Althsea rosea 1*^ 

Alyssum alpestre IIW 

Alvssum saxatile compactum 

American chrysanthemum annual .--lUJ^ 

American Pomologlcal Society 698 

American Rose Society ?1t Sm 

American seeds abroad 594 byu 

American versus foreign glass 770 

Amomum 9f^ 

Among Chicago growers 1m 

Anchusas 11* 

Anemone sylvestrls i-Wa 

Annals of horticulture »li 

Answerst ) questions ^ 

Antennarla margarltacea Ijj" 

Anthemis tlnctorla ««» 

Anthracnose bjj 

•Authurlum Andreanum 11*6 

Aphorisms 78b 

April orchids 98 j 

Aquatics 81 

Aquatics, list of 8i 

Aqullegla canadensis 11** 

Aqullegla chrysantha 

Arabls albida ,^,^ 

•Aralia Chabrierll 1040 

Arenarla larlet folia 1181 

Armerla marltlma ■ llw 

•Arrangement of flowers., ,36, 138, 286, 423 
466, 509, 534, 659, 654, 811, 930. 1086. 

—•Artistic vases 423 

—•Basket of roses and spiraea lUb7 

— *Basketsof spring flowers 811 

—•Bowl of carnations 28o 

— *Broken column 36 

—"Centerpiece for buffet table 287 

— *Chrysanthemnm basltets 559 

— *Crosse8 of galax leaves 930 

—•Cross, standing 36 

—Funeral designs 3b 

— *Galax leaves, crosses of 930 

—Lettering ... 37 

—•Mantel decorations 465 

—•Orchids on corl£ bark 654 

-•Pillow •• 3b 

— •Kose baskets 138 631 

—•Table decorations f09 

—•Vase of spiriea and lilies 10-9 

Arrangement of retail plant 1326 

•Art in gardening, hints about. . .1109, 1159 
1254. 

ArumBggeri ..... 95, 

Asparagus and smilax IA'9 

Asparagus decumbens 1111 

Asparagus plumosus 681 

Asperuia odorata 1088 

Aspidistra lurida and amomum 935 

A^ter aiplnus 1135 

Aster Amellus bessarabicus 1303 

Asters, perennial 242 

Aster, Vick's branching 633 

Astilbe japonlca 496 

Astragalus hypoglottls 1278 

Atlantic City, recollections of lib 

Aucuba japonlca 243 



.1325 
.1.328 



Boiler, Incrustation of 

Boiler, distance below pipes 

Boltonla asteroides . . 

Bone dust for gladiolus and dahlias., m 

Bone meal &46 1357 

Book learning and practical expert- 

Bordeaux ml-xture ••■, . 680 

Boston 7, 46, 98. 140, 1-59, 178, 198, 230, 245 
269, 290, 311, 316. 378, 402, 426, 446, 474, 494 
617, 640, 665, 688, 614, 634, 658. 683, 732, 760 
T88, 336, 906. 938, 960, 990, l'^16, 1041, 1065 
108'J, 1113, 1138. 1165, 121!, 1234, 1268, 1286 

Boston and New York to Atlantic City 87 

Boston seed trade 46j 

Boston, spring plants in 81b 

Boston, the season In Ilf2 

Boston to Atlantic City gb 

Botanical gardens loajj 

Bougalnvlllea glabra Sanderlana 1«9 

• Bougalnvlllea Sanderlana 807 

Boy's story, the '010 

Budding and grafting '8^ 

Buffalo 52, 103. 188. 221, 268, 313, 378, 426. 447 
474, 600, 618, ,565, 636, 684, 707. 732, 764, 789 
880, 909, 963, 992, 1019, 1090, 1139. 1166, 1224 
12.36.1359.1306,1332. 

•Building retail place 132. 

Bulbous flowers 10o4 

Bulbs fur Easter 759 

Bulbs, salable sorts IJo 

Bulbs, watering 13b 



•Bag-flUIng machine 1338 

Baltimore 68, 128, 208, 324, 403, 432, 480, 518 
64«, 5ta, 692, 710, 746, 776. 789, 816, 9o8, 992 
1018, 11 43, 1100, 1261, 1307, 

•Banquet decoration 816 

•Bardolph, W. K. Harris as Ill 

•Basket of flowers 1139 

•Basket of roses and carnations 1113 

•Bassett & Washburn's greenhouses.. 165 

•neatly. 11. B .„... 113 

Bedding and pot plants around Chi- 
cago • 

'Bedding at Washington Park, Chi- 
cago 1278 

• Bedding plants at Washington 1232 

•Begcnia. a useful 731 

•Begonia diseases 117 

•Begonia Incamala 731 

Begonia Rajab 170 

Begonia Vernon, sowing lUb 

Belgium, commercial floriculture in, ,1282 

Berkshire Influstr>', a 12,57 

Bermuda Ijulhcomblne 714 

•Beiuiuda city garden 243 

'Beniiuda garden, oleander in 266 

'Bermuda house and garden 245 

■Bermuda lilv fleld 239 

Bermuda lilies, disease Of 682 

"Br-rmuda lilies, liarvesting 241 

Bermuda n(»tes 239 

Beniiuda, some vegetable productsof 730 

Bermud lans. a point for llg 

Bicycle of flowers 309 

Black spot b29 

■Bllglitof cho'santhemumB 26.3 

Blight of garden pinks 6 

Blight of sweet William 6 

Blight, rose leaf 6211 

Bocconla cordata 125ti 



Cactus. Mr. Isaac's imported 1318 

•Caladlum argyrltes 197 

Caladiumx. fancy 1329 

Cal. state floral society 1248 

(■alias 1304 

Callas, summer treatment 1086 

Cnllas, when to pot 310 

Campanulas IJfJ 

Campanula leaf spot 691 

Campanula pyraraidalis 1328 

Canna, a new yellow 244 

Canna Glolre de Motet 244 

Canna Koenlgin Charlotte ■■■,-,lii 

Cannas lU 1''62 

Cannas at Chicago 176 

Cannas at Cornell 223 

Cannas, cost of growing 445 

Cannas, lifting 19b 

Cannas, list and treatment 114 

Cannas, list for bedding 176 

Cannas, new 1161 

Cannas, starting ,. — 7oS 

Cannas, progress In ;;•„•■,•;;. ,2? 

Cannas, worms on lla, Ibb iio 

Caragana grandlflora 1U40 

Carnltlon Alaska 264, 308 936 

— Alegatlere ifj 

—American Flag 753 

—Andalusia 763 

—Anthony's Pink iA: ffi 

— Armazinda "^b 902 

-Astoria '53 

—Aurora 754 

—Battles, Grace ™ 

—Beauty of Oxford 754 

-Belle, La 754 

-BenHur 764 

— Bettlna 737 

—Blanche i?4 

-Blizzard 7a4 

—Bock's seedling 753 

— Boule de Neige i64 

— Bouton d'Or ..• "66 

-Bride of Brlescourt 264 727 

—Buttercup ^64 

—Carnegie, Mrs i67 

-Cartledge, Thos ...758 

-Clover, Kitty 346 727 

-Corsair 264 308 

-Cook, Minnie JJ'JS 

-Craig. Edna 767 1231 

— Creighton. Fred j6i 

—Crimson Coronet "• 7o7 

Crimson Sport 727 Si8 

Darling, Grace 767 

-Dawn 766 

—Daybreak 755 936 

—Dean, Maud 72b 

— Dorner, Fred 7d6 

-Dreer, W. F 755 

-Duhme. Mrs. C. H 93b 

—Duke of Orange 75b 

—Edelweiss ••; '56 

-Eldorado 34o 737 

-Eulalie 3|6 

-Fardon, Grace 765 

-Fisher. Mrs •■ 7o6 

-Fox, Delia S45 726 

—Freeman, J, R *66 

-Garfield, Pres '06 

-Oilbert, Lizzie bSO 

-Goldfinch '61; 

-Haettel. Lois J 75b 

—Hanks. Nancy 76b 

-Harrison, J, J 766 

-Hector 76b 

—Henderson. Peter 756 

-Hinsdale '«> 

-Hinze's White •;;• 76b 

-Hole, Dean '^M* 

-Hunt.M.A 71'5 

-lago J56 

—Jacqueminot ;,;a ,',sS 

.Jubflee 726 902 



-.Jupiter. 



316 



Keller. Helen 766 

— Kresken. Adelaide 766 

-Lady Emma •■■ 76(. 

-Little Gem ^'^ ^3 

-Lyone ■■: 346 

-Magnet 264 m 

—Mangold, Ferdinand 'j* 

-Mapledale .264 

—Marian 

—May Queen 

—Meteor 

—Moore, Miss 

—Myrtle 

—Nicholson 

-Old Gold 



— Feachblow 705 

-Philadelphia 757 

— Plerson, Emily '05 

— Pix'ey, Annie 758 

— Porsch. Louise '67 

—Princess Bonnie 346 

— Purite, La ^56 

— Sallng, Lena '2b 

-Scott, Wm 7.58 

-Seagull 768 

-Shaefer, Ellen 737 

—Stanley, Mrs, H, M 758 

—Storm King 72b 

—Sumner, Chas 753 

-Sunshine 727 

— Sweetbrier 'J8 

—Tidal Wave 768 

—Triumph 726 902 

—Uncle John - 490 

—Warder, Dr 345 

—Webb, Anna '5b 

-White Dove 758 

Carnations— Analysis of plants 113b 

— Answers to questions 5bl 

—Around Chicago 606 1277 

—Around Cincinnati 607 

—At Jersey City 285 

—At Kennett Square 264 

—At the Phlla show 40O 

—Benching young plants 400 

—Buds blasting 704 

—Bursting of tne calyx 470 

—Committee on novelties 1328 

—Copper and ammonia solution 561 

-Cuttings ,852 

—•Daybreak, house of 1 b^ 

-Disbudding 2b3 

—Dodge to catch trade, a 72S 

—In the fleld on Long Island 136 

—Improving stock 314 

—Lack of foliage on McGowan 56'2 

—Long Island growers 633 

—Moles Injuring 285 

— *Mrs. Fisher again - 

—•Mrs. Fisher, house of 2 

—New carnations, three 78o 

-New 13^ 

—New names. ^^^i 

—New varieties 34o 

—Nitrate of soda as stimulant 663 

—Nomenclature 261 

-Notes 2, 36, 88, 134, 174, 194. 214. 238, 263 
286, 30 -i, 344. 376, 400, 422, 444, 470, 490. 612 
536. 560. 68«. 606. 631. 656, 680 704, 726, 718 
784, 828. 878. 90J. 936, 966, 986. 1013, 1062 
1085, 1110, 1134, 1162, 1186, lilO, 1234, 1254 
1277, 1302, 13-28. 

—Packing ■122 

-•Packing flowers bUi 

-Profits 512 

—Progress in 31 

—Propagating In summer 1310 

—Puzzle, a 51. 

—Raising from seed 785 

—Red spider 561 

-Bust. ■470 

—Rust In Europe 1085 1110 

-•Seedlings at Boston 72j 

-Soil, preparing 286 

—Some new gL'8 

—Soot as fertilizer 8,8 

-Simulants 824 

—Straw In soil 2»5 

—•Supports 196 

-Syringing 194 661 

—Taking up and planting 89 

—Three new 903 

-Topping 3b 

—Troubles ™ 

-•Vases of 1 blooms at Boston i39 

-Watering 214 .01 

—Weak stemmed Portia 661 

—When to plant ■■■ 2b3 

Carnation society, American 60i bSb 

Carnation society, Chester county 238, 344 

Carnation soclety,meetlng....701, 725, 878 

Carnation society, prize list 1 '4 

Carnations, hardy Igl 

Carnations I have seen 753 

•Carpet bedding at Chicago 1278 

Cassia maryianclica. • ■ • • • •,:^- v^ • ™ "s" 
Catalogues received. . .10, 250, 600, 522, 691 

616, 610, 666, 712, 738, 768, 862, 844, 998, 1(;24 

1U98, 1196, 1288. 

Calananche ccerulea i;jgA 

Cattleya Ashtortlana ^ 

Cattleya Chloris ^6 

Cattleya Hardyana..., 194 

Cattleya hyb, Kienastlana ^sb 

Caution IW 

Cedar Rapids. Iowa U02 

Cemetery superintendents meet lo8 

Centaurea candidlBslma, sowing — 243 

•Centaurea, the Marguerite 13^ 

Centranthus ruber, llb- 

Cercls japonlca i™ 

Clielone Lyonl JJi" 

Chemical manures i^. 

8SfcroS?-4S,1r 118Vl3S;-i59: 17?,-i97; |o 
247, 268, ^88, 313, 346, 386, 403, 426, 448, 474 
600 617, 640, 564. 688, 613, 636. 6o9 684 706 
734 789 829. 880, 908, 938, 960 990, 1016, 1042 
lUbti, 1090. 1113. 1138. 1164, 1188, 121 •, 1231 
1360. 1385. 1310, 1333, 

•Chicago base ball team 1*1 

Chicago, bedding and pot plants 

around ^i'^ 

Chicago, cannas at i 'b 

Chicago carnation notes. . , i s' ' 

•Chicago, carpet bedding at l-'» 

Chicago, Easter flowers at 9(* 

Chicago, Easter plants at 833 

r},\i'nun i7prftnlums at I'b 

163 
1304 
1278 
,56 
866 
424 
489 
633 



Arlington 63» 



Chicago, geraniums at. 
Chicago growers, among, 
Chicago, plant trade in.. 

Chicago rose notes 

Clilcago to Atlantic City 

•China Astor. a 

Christmas crops 

Christmas rush, the 

Christmas tra'le, the 

Chrysanthemum— Agate, J J^J 

— Allamanda ?»? 

—Amaranth.. 



Arrlere 53&. 

—Baby Charles 538 

— *BigelowB- M 334 

—Bird. Lettie 638 

-Blrd.Sallle 538 

—Black. Miss Louise D. 334, 397, *444. 995 

-Bloodgood, Miss Helen 420,638 

-Bock, Be-ty 638 

— Bonnaffon, Major 362 

—Brigand 638 

-Bufiock, Mrs 262 

-CampbeU, Mrs. Jas,B 638 

-Challenge 3te 

— Chipeta 638 

-Cllfle, Mrs 305 

—Columbine .■• 633 

— Comley, Jas 420, *o82, 681 

— •Crystailna 334 

-Dalliedouze Eugene 261 

-Darlington* Mrs 334 

—Daybreak 283 

—Dean, Helen 638 

-De-n, Richard 398 

—Debutante, The 538 

—Domination 305 

— Dugdale, John 638 

— Durango 538 

-Bddy,Burt 334 

— Bgyption, The 633 

-Ellerslle 638 

—•Emerson. Mrs. H. W 334 

-Ermlnilda 262 

— Btolle de Lyon 420 

-Falconer, Jeannie 638 

—Fascination 262 

—Ferris, Dr, Randolf 638 

-Galbert, Mme. la Comtesse de 420 

-Gold Dust 334 

-Gold Fever 397,538 

—Golden Wedding 30) 

—Harris, Grace 638 

-Hatfield, Mrs, T. D 538 

—Hayes, Francis B 538 

—Her Majesty 638 

Hill, Mrs. E.G 261,284,306,306 

Hole, Dean 397,638 

Hurley, Mrs. Wm, H 638 

■Illuminator 262 

-lis. Mrs. J. Geo 262,305 

-Ivory 263 

— Jayne ,v.^ §84 

-Johnson. Miss M. M *283, 638 

— .Tones, Mrs. Jerome 2e2 

-Juno •,, 398 

— Kemble, Mrs, Wm, H 420, 63S 

— Kupferle, Rosa 638 

—Lafayette 335 

-Lager. Jno, B 282, •519,538. 

— La-nont, James 421 

—Laredo 306 

— Leroy. Ada H : 262 

-Lippincott, Mrs. C 261,306,3('6 

—Majestic 283 

-Marie Louise 262,305,3116 

—Mathews, Gov ; 431 

-Mayflower 262 

— Millbrook 334 

—Minerva 262 

— Molln, Mme, Chas. 420 

-•Murdock. Mrs.S.T 334 

-Mutual Friend 262 

-Nada the Lily 638 

— Neal, Mrs. J. B 638 

-Nemesis 283.638 

—Neva • 588 

-New bold. Miss Margaret 397, 638 

— Newltt Wm. G 262 

-New York 421,538 

-Nlveus 262,305 

—Oakland 334 

-Oakshade 397, {38 

— O'Farrell, Blma 538 

-Opal 538 

— "Palmer, Mrs. Potter 642 

— Pankoucke.M 420 

-Parker, Mrs. J W. Jr 282 

—Parker, Mrs. M. R 638 

—Parting Guest 538 

-Philadelphia 3C6, 334, •371, 638 

— oueen,The .••• 262 

-Sand, Mrs. W.H *334, 638 

-Reiman, H. W 3C7, 421, •444 

-Reynolds, Maud D 538 

— Klverside 638 

-•Romlg, Mrs. H, L 996 

-Sea Shell 263 

—St, Louis 638 

-Sinaioa ' 638 

-Smith, Edith 638 

-Smith, Pres. W. R 262 

-Spauldlng. M. B -.iV™- ?8' 

-Spauldlng, Miss G 420, 63S, 639 

— Sunderbmch, H, L 262 

-Sunrise 383,639 

—Sunshine 6g 

-Taylor. J. H « 

—Tippecanoe ■ ■ ■ • 639 

-Trotter, Mrs, Bdw. H • .397, 639 

-TrOT J H 283, '•619, 539 

-Uncle Sam" .681,988 

-Venus de Medeol 383, 639 

-Vivland-Morel 362, 305 

-Walz,Elia •••„ g^? 

-•Walz, Fred '"^•W[ 

-Wanlass g™ 

— Weller, Sam 639 

— Wentwoith. Mrs. Moses J. ...334, 639, 682 

-Whilldln. Mrs. J. G 262,306 

-White Cloud ^9 

-Whlte,J, H 30i 

— Widener,H. B 306 

— Wiedersheim, Mrs. T. H . 639 

—Yellow Queen 261 

Chrysanthemums 

— •Advertisinga show 681 

-Aphis 

—•Arrangement of 

—At Bmst Apmus's ,... 

-Big blooms, a few 

—Black fly 

-•Blight 

—Boston, awards at 

—Chemical manures 

—Chicago, awards at 

—Cincinnati, awards at 



213 
379 
305 
420 

860 

263 

, 282 

. 173 



—Committees for judging new 238 

—Committee on 30*; 

—*Comer at Chicago show 421 

—Correction of names 307 

—Crown buds 173 

—Cutting back 125t; 

—Cutting blooms 261 

—Evolution of the .- IU9 

—Exhibitions, thoughts on 420 

—Feeding 193,282 

-Foreign notes 539 

—For general use 31^8 

—Frozen 703 

-In boxes 262 

—In May.... 1094 

—In solid border 442 

-Interview, a chrysanthemum 281 

—Judging new 116, 134. 19;i 

—Judging the seedlings 283 

—Liquid manure ^47 

-List of varieties for commerce 32 

—Measuring flowers 4^3 

—Mildew 8B0 

-Names 414 

—National society .■ 87 

—National society awards 282 

-*New, at Philadelphia 371 

—Newer varieties at Chicago 343 

—New York, awards at 282 

-Notes October 23 306 

—Notes 1, 34, SB. 116, 173, 193,213,247,261.281 

—Notes on 261 

—Notes on newer 420 

— OnedozeB good 39i^ 

-Philadelphia, awards at 283 

—Pinching side shoots 213 

-Pink for trade use 314 

—Plants for 15 cents 44t 

—Plants for store trade 313 

—Pot plants 1328 

—Price of plants 213 

—Progress In 32 

—Quantity of stimulants 282 

— Qui pense 314 

— Keviewof varieties 337 

—Seed 708 

—Show at Toklo 'Si)2 

—Show judges 307 

—Solid beds and benches 281 

—Stimulants, quantity of 282 

—Stock plants, selection of 281 

— Taklngthe buds 34 

— Topdresslng lit; 

— *Two new 444 

— Tylnir 1.^04 

— * View at Toronto 443 

—Watering 88 

— Work of the C. S. of A 581 

Chrysanthemum decoration 309 

'Chrysanthemum house, Mr.Rawson's 399 

Chrysanthemum names. 539 

Chrysanthemum shows 

—Baltimore 366 

—*BaitImore. glimpse of show 395 

— * Boston 340 

— *Boston view at 367 

— *Chlcago 331, •372 

—Denver ...- 36^ 

—Frederick. Md. 394 

— Germantown, Pa.... 272 

—Hamilton, Ont 374 

— 'Indianapolis 341, 369 

—Kansas City. Mo 397 

— 1 oulsvilie, Ky 374 

—Milwaukee. Wis 396 

—Montreal 393 

—New Bedford. Mass 396 

—New Haven, Conn. 373 

—New Orleans, La 397 

—Newport. R 1 371 

— Oshkosh Wis 397 

— *Philadelphla 338 

— Philadeipnia, echoeeof the 391 

—"Philadelphia, views at 369 

— PIttsfleld Mass 342 

—Providence. R. 1 394 

—St Louis 3i2,365 

—St. Paul. Minn 420 

—San Krancl^co 373 

-Springfield. Mass 418 

—Toronto 417 

— U.Ion Hill. N. J 374 

—Wayne. Pa 312 

Chrysanthemum show.suggestlone for 133 
Chrysanthemum Society of America 

397.42J 

Chrysanthemum Society of America, 

awards 5;^S 

Chrysanthemum the 414 

Chryaanlhemum year book 680 

Chrysobactron Hookerl 1279 

Chrysobactron, hardiness of 1329 

Chrysoconia. hardiness of 1329 

Chrysocoma Llnosyrls 1279 

Chrysosteraroa tripterls 1276 

Chysis bractescens aurea 288 

CIssus discolor , 988 

Cincinnati 20 66. 119, 146, 160, 186, 198. 22i 
274, 290. 3v4, 412, 500 51S, 5i32, 566, 590, 620, 
6;W, 670.681. 718.742. 774 800.864.920.940, 
964. 1018. 1046. 1139. 1166, 1214. 1?3", 1285, 

Cinerarias for Easter 6'»7 

Classification and Inspection of plants 86 

Cleaning tiower pots 22 

Clematis Davldlana 1327 

•Clematis Jackmannl In Humboldt 

Park 1329 

Clematis recta 1182 

Clematis seeds, germinating £00 

Cleveland 10. 91, 130, 168, 222. 290, 618, 716. 
802. 978. 10J6. 1032, 1058, 1093. Ui^, 12C0, 
1213. 1287. 13' 9. 

Coelogyne Sanderlnna 89 

*Coi. Dan and Sir John 40 

Coleus. cost of growing 445 

Color of a flower, trua 812 

Color question, the 1192 

Colors .comparative, the relation to 

flowers 76 

Coming exhibitions 12, 92, 122, 1*2, 162 182. 

20^. 224. 2-18.202,284. 306. 
Commercial greenbouses being built 228 

Commercial greenhouses, recent 228 

Confessions oC an amateur ♦818,1142 

Construction on small place i:i26 

•Convenient retail establishment f'HA 

Convention of 1894, why successsfui. . 154 

Convention, the 48 

Coreopsis Ian ceolata 1181 

Cornell horticulture and floriculture 557 

Coronlllu varia 1230 

*Costa Rica, vegetation in, 755, 757. 759, 
785,787. 



Cost of growing coleus, etc 445 

Cost of maintaining small place 876 

Cost of rose growing lot 

Council Bluffs. Iowa 232 

Crape myrtle, the 11 8J 

Crawfish and aquatics 856 

Crawly story, a 1061 

Cucumber seed 406 

♦Cucumbers under glass 1038 

Cut flowers other than roses, etc 78 

Cut flowers, wholesaling 117 

Cuttings midsummer 136 

Cut worm, variegated 1C40 

Cycas revoluta 86) 

Cycas revoluta stems, starting 11J64 

C>clamen perslcum 470 

Cyclamens 310 

Cyclamens, temperature for 444 

Cyprlpedlum bellatulum eereglum... 194 

Cyprlpedlum Chamberlalnianum 401 

Cyprlpedlum H. Ballantlne 493 

Cyprlpedlum Isahellie 584 

Cyprlpedlum Jas. H. Veltch 286 

Cyprlpedlum niveum. treatment of ... :i5 

Cyprlpedlum Youngianum 310 

Cytisus for Easter 759 

Cytlsus. pruning 1014 

Cytisus scoparluB 1135 



Dahlias, bone dust for 768 

Dahlias not flowering 446 

Daphne cneorum 1088 

Davenport. Iowa 23'J 

♦Davison's violet hoase 877 

•Dawson. C.J 37-) 

Dean Hole, welcome to 375 

Deaths, recent 1024 

Decoration, an Inexpensive 12W 

•Decoration, a wedding 632 

Decoration, chrysanthemum 309 

Decoration day, hints for *1U1I 

Decoration for a class banquet 1040 

♦Decoration, wedding 267 

"Decorations at dinner, N. Y. Florists" 

Club t;;n 

Decorations at Washington 6C8, 632, 8l8, 

1043. 

♦Decorations for small banquet 816 

•Decorative plants at Chicago 419 

Decorative plants, seasonable work 

among 157 

Decorative plants, some good 242 

•Deliven' wagons, florists" 1161.1163,1165 

•Delivery wagon for large plants 1262 

Delphinium hybrldum 123') 

Dendroblum noblie, treatment of 35 

•Dendroblum Phaifenopsls Schroder- 

lanum 401 

Denver. 9, 381, 564. 638, 924, 1148, 1188, 1220, 

1296. 

Des Moines. Iowa 210, 408 

Detroit. Mich 232 

Dlanthus alplnus 1162 

Dlanthus arenarlus J.116'2 

Dlanthus caesiua 1136 

Dlanthus p umarlus 1162 

Dlctamnus f raxlneila 1112 

Dleflen bachla 988 

Digitalis purpurea 1182 

Dlsa nervosa 170 

Disappointed 778 

Doors, hanging outside 946 

Dracasna fragrans 730 

Dracaenas, propagating 987 

Dracffinas. repotting 988 

Dracocepbalum austrlacum 1256 

Dracocephalum Ruyschianum , 123 1 

Dreer's, notes from 252 

Dresden Hurt. Exhibition 9r2 

Dried mushrooms 1170 

Dutchess Co, (N. Y.) Hort. Society.... 574 
Duties, import 967 



•Early history of the S. A. F 1114. 1140 

Easter and the grower 1014 

•Easter basket of hybrid roses 1U17 

Easter flowers 751) 

Easter fiowers at Chicago 90*1 

Easter, Miles for. 852 

♦ICaeter plant arrangements 986 

Easter plants at Chicago 822 

♦Easter plants packing 874 

Easter preparations 875 

•Easter scenes In N. Y v;58 

Faster trade report 957 

Eats the tiower buds 2 

Education for florists 678 

Education in the business 705 

Eiectr'c light In greenhouses. . .. 49t; 

Electric light, effect on p'ants lt>; 

Elevation of our business, requlre- 



Fertlllzer for lawns 607 

Ficus elastlca 988 

Fire Insurance 906 

Fittonias 988 

Flatbush. carnations at 125 

Flat bush. In 934 

Flatbush Incident, a 760 

Floral bicycle 309 

•Floral carnival at Santa Barbara — 1066 

Floral cow. a 982 

Floral fashions In New York. ..655, 732. 986 

Floralville sketches 1189 

Florist and the press, the 820 

Florist s art. the 466 

Florists clubs. Influence of 441 

Florist of the future, the 1210 

Florists' protective association :i80 

Florists, wages of 995 

Florists" work outdoors 215 

Flowering and foliage plants for house 814 

Flowering shrubs at Washington 1040 

Flower of death, the 1130 

•Flowers at funeral of G.MesBeberg..ll37 

•Flower seller, Japanese 824 

Flying Dutchman, the iai4 

Foreign notes 68. m 170. 286, 302, 493, 496. 

528. 957, 982. 1087. 1192. 

Frost on the glass 759 

•Fumigating with carbon bl-sulphid. . 783 

•Funeral arrangement 1135 

*Funeral flowers of Pres. Carnot 5, 7 

Fungous diseases of ornamental 

plants fa'29 



Galllardla arlstata 1231 

Galega officinalis 1229 

Gait. Ont ... 19J. 326, 566, 1133 

Garden 1 ;ndscapes 584 

Gera' lum pratense ,1135 

Geraniums, a few good 63:^ 

Geraniums at Chicago 176 

Geraniums, cost of growing 445 

Geraniums, list for bedding 176 

Geraniums, progress In 33 

Geraniums, ten desirable beddera.... 33 
Germany, commercial floriculture In. 1282 

Geum atrosangulneum ...1163 

Glllenia trifollata 1162 

Ginkgo tree, the. 3 

Give the employees credit 530 

Gladiolus, bone dust for 768 

Gladiolus communii UfK 

G lass. American versus foreign 770 

Glass houses, construction and heat- 
ing 677 

Glazing 223 

Globularia trichosantha 1327 

♦Gloxinias 937 

•Goose flower, the 156 

Government seeds, selling : 1074 

Government seed shop, closing of 1338 

Grand Rapids, Mich 269. llLO. 1250.1344 

Grasshoppers eating cannas 223 

Grass seed, sowing 38 

Greeks, the 826 

Greenhouse building.. 146. 222, 3'JO. 390. 458 
500. 539, 968, 1034. 1166. 1338. 

Greenhouse construction 677 

•Greenhouse 50 feet wide 704 

♦Greenhouse 60x3C0 1093 

•Greenhouses. A. M. Heir's 175 

Greenhouses, insuring 89U 

Greenhouses, new 164. 778 

Grevlllea robusta, sowing 610, 1014 

Groton.MasB 524 

•Grotto a lovely 820 

•Group on the pier 137 

♦Group photograph at Atlantic City. . 135 
•Gymnogramme sehlzophylla glorl- 
osa 827 



1111 



mentsfor 

Elmlra, N. Y '.".'. 

England, commercial floriculture In 

Eplloblum rosmarlnlfoUum 

Equalizing tem peratu . e 

'Eilca Bothwelllana „^^ 

Erlgeron aurantlacus 116:j, 12;il 

Error In calculation, an Uin 

Erjnglum c<]elestlnum 1256 

Eurya latlfolla 243 

Evergreens, transplanting ;i8 

Evolution among plants 881 

Evolution of the chrysanthemum 109 

Exhibition advertising 284 

Exhibition at U. S Nurseries 310 

Exhibition, Dresden Hort 972 

Exochorda grandlflora 1040 

Express rates 458 

Exhibitions, recent 226 

Exhibition rules N. Y. florists' club. ..1262 
Express rates 252 



Fable by Alael 283 

Factors influencing health of plants 

under glass 930 

♦Falstaff, Burt Eddy as Ill 

Fern, a useful losii 

Fern notes ]015 

Ferns, collecting hardy 1257 

Ferns for ferneries 1304 

Ferns, potting ']015 

Ferns, sowing ioi5 

Ferns, transplanting ii)i5 

Fertilizers and their application 84 



Habenaria Susanme 3''2 

Ha?ma- thus Kalbreyerll 1182 

Hall association 1080 

Half-tone engravings 74U 

Hanging plants 679 

Hard wooded cutting 472 

Hardy flowers for September 4 

Hardy plants, forcing 218,240 

Hardy plants and shrubs, arrange- 
ment of 653 

Hardy plants, arranging 653 

Hardy shrubs, arranging 653 

Harrlsil, successive crops 19ti 

Hatboro. Pa 1294 

Health of plants under glass. Influ- 
ences on 930 

•Heater. Zirnglebel's coll 1018 

Heating and construction 677 

Heating. Improvements in 468 



Hyacinths, bedding 266 

•Hydrangea Otaksa "i014 

Hydrangeas, lifting 242 

Hydrangeas, starting for Easter 537 

Hymn to Jaggs 1263 

Hypericum Mosertanum 1256 



I 



Iberia sempervlrens 1088 

•Ice box. Mr. Geo. Stumpp's 1115 

Ice box for retail store 424 

•Idyls of the potting shed. 820 

Import duties 967 

Imported stock, care of 424 

Incrustation of boiler 866 

Indianapolis. 118, 148.198.314,482,576,829, 

993. 1167. 12^4. 

Industrial progress 27 

Influences on health of plants under 

glass 930 

Insuring greenhouses 890 

*In the swim 300 

Insecticide, kerosene as an 1034 

Interstate park, an 952,1024 

Iris angllca I23tt 

Iris. German nag 

Iris germanlca 1088 

Iris Kaempf erl i230 

Iron and slate 868 

Ivy, Kenllworth 679 



Jaggs as a Benedict 1044 

•Japanese flower seller 824 

Jasione perenne 1230 

Jersey City, carnations &% 285 

Judge says, the 1048, 1116 

Judges and exhibitions 3 

Ju glng a flower show, technicalities 

In-; 356 

Judging novelties 1334 



Kalmia. forcing 219 

Kansas City, Mo. 254, 276. 314, 350, 478, 574, 
626. 684, 748. 792, 832. 948. 

Kentucky Society of Florists 1311 

Kentu(;ky florists spring show 940 

Kerosene as an Insecticide 104 

Kew lectures, about the 611, 6;13 

Kew lectures again 678 



to 



. 308 



.1325 



^Heating, overhead 

Heating, single pipe 

Heating with crude oil , 

Heating with hot water overhead. 
Heating, changing from steam 

water 

Heating from steam engine 1325 

Healing, pipes required for 1325 

Heating questions 1.325 

Heating small place 1326 

Helenlum autumnale 1303 

HelenlumHoopeslI. 1235 

Hellanthemum mutablle 1231 

Hellanthus multlflorus 1256 

Hellopsls Pitcherlana 1256 

Hellanthus rlgldus 1302 

Hellanthus Solell d'Or ,1302 

Hemerocallls flava ...1136 

Herbaceous planting 216 

Herbaceous plant notes loas. 1111. 1134 
1162. 1181, 122J1. 125*;, 1278, 1302, i;i2:. 

♦Herr's greenhouses. A. M 175 

Heucliera sangulnea 1134 

•Hints about art in gardening. 1109 

•Hole. Rev. S.Reynolds 491 

Holyoke. Mass f.72. 1198 

Horticulture and floriculture at Cor- 
nell 557 

Hot water heating, changing to steam i;i25 

•Hot water under pressure lOity 

House decoration, foliage and flower- 
ing plants for 874 

Houston. Texas 204 

How it is done 1130 

How many men does it take 1186 

Hoya camosa fruiting. . 428 

•fluraboldt Park, bedding in 1337 



Lsello-Cattleya Broomfieldenals 170 

Lselio-Cattleya leucoglosaa 194 

Lap] lo-Cattleva Maynardl 89 

La?lio-CattleTlmora gg 

Lancaster. Pa '.', 'icgg 

Lantanas in bloom 6 

Lathyrus latlfoiius 1230 

Lawn, making and caring for i;7 

Leaf spot g29 

*Leaf spotof campanula 591 

Leaks, attention to 904 

Leaks, about ]0S7 

Leaks, about those ! 904 

Leaks, stop the... 884 

Lenox, Mass 462, U02, 1152,'l259 

Lenox Hort. Society show 137 

Leominster. Mass 626 

Leontopodlum alplnum I2i9 

Lilies for Easter [[[ 352 

Lilies, potting 1394 

LUIum aurat um .'." ' 'i256 

Llllum candldum ..1230 

LUIum Melpomene .1232 

Llllum Phllipplnense 380 

Llllum speclosum Melpomene 1256 

Llnarla dalmatica 1135 

Llnaria trlornlthophora 1256 

Llnum trlcynum , giQ 537 

Lobelia syphilitica 1328 

T.X3ndon. Ont 96,296 

♦Londale. Edwin 75 

Lotus cornlculatus 1112 

Louisville, Ky 670.969,1021,1215 

•Luculla gratlseima 679 

Luplnus polyphyllus II12 

Ljchnis alpestris 1135 

Lychnis alplna 1135 

Lychnis chalcedonica . .- 1183 

Lychnis flos-cucull plenlsslma, 1229 

Lyclmis f ulgens Sleboldll i;30 

♦Lyons exposition, planting at 215 

Lythrum roseum superbum 1279 



M 

♦Made up work §16 

Madison, roses at 266 

Malva moschata !!l230 

Managing 20.00J feet of glass 237 

♦Mantel decorations 4b"9, 471 

Manure from poultry yard 858 

Manure tank 173 

Manures, chemical 1190 

Marantas .'.*.*.'.*.' 988 

Mass. Hort. Society , J86 

Mass. Hort. Society, annual show 137 

Mass. Hort. Society, awards 157, 905 

Mass. Hort. Society rose and straw- 
berry show , 1212 

Mass. Hort. Society, spring show 879 

Mechanic Falls, Me 204 

Mealy bug again .'.' 44^^ 

Meaeunng glass surface 7I6 

Mignonette, disbudding 444 

Mignonette, sowing 1304 

Mildew, downy 629 

Mildew, powdery 629 

Milwaukee .^ 1294 

Minnesota florists annual outing '. 150 

MlacellaneouB seasonable hints, 37, 136, 
175, 196. 242, 266. 310. 424, 444, 637, eOC. 657 
679, 758, 13'J4, 1328. ' ' 

Montreal 178. 600, 762, 968, 1237 

Moles, destroying 486 

Moles, getting rid of £02 

Monarda didyma 1229 

Musa ensete fruiting 427 

Mushroom growers, a wrinkle for. . . .1318 



N 

NarclBsus. bedding. ,^ 

Nephrolepls davalloldes furcans luib 

New Brunswick notes ™. 

New London, Conn ii-n-ViiyS 

New Orleans ■^'''*'iQm 

New plants 'loVri™! 

NpwDort R I l^;iU. loll 

nIw? notes 10, 120, 199, 318, 320. 322, 358, 410, 

412 434. 43H. 419.476.601. 622. 69b. Mb, KO, 

668 70S 772. 944, 10 0. 1019, 1030. 1044, 10.i4. 

1106, 1118, li44, 1167, 1178, 1194, 1236, 1268, 

1274, 1298, 13M, 1332. 1316. 
Newton, Mass ™ 

rew \'^(TI^%^Y^i-\7B:mM m. 

aw. 288, 311 3«, 376, 400, 4M, 4ffi, 472, 494, 
614, 610 687, 612, 631, 658. 682^™=a,"2' ™- 
787 833 880 S09, 933, 959, 9C0, 101b, 1066, 
&, 1113 1137, 1164: 1212, 1231, 1258, 1385, 
1C06, 13SU 

*New Vork, Easter scenes In 

New York floral fashions ,.. 

»New Torkttorlsts' club ..... .,.,,.„ 

New York florists club, exhibition 
rules ^ • , 

New York, plant trade In 

New York seed trade 

New York, seed trade In 

*" Night watchman." a 

Night watchman, the 

Nitrate of soda • . 

Nomenclature committee work 

North Easton, Mass 



-Small spots on foliage. , 



958 



...1262 

827 

454 

1074 

311 

676 

445 

614 

....1083 

Notes by the way 1016, 1078 

Notes on novelties 'y'2 

Novelties i---;-v. ml 

Novelties, elfect on floriculture 901 

Novelties, notes on 'V'-> 

Novelties, judging. , ■ i; ■ ' ■ ;.Viiqk 

Nurserymen. American association of 119b 

Nurserymen, of Interest to — *5» 

Nurserymen, western wholesale l^io 



Rudbeckla hlrta 
Rudbeckla maxima 
Rust 



Parting Shot, a.....^ 1<3 "^ZlUDo'ts 

Passing of Jaggs, the..... ....■•••- ■••^ -small soots 

Patents recently granted 519, i.O, 99b, 
1120. 1338. ^ „., 

Pelargoniums for Easter. , bJ' 

Pelargoniums, new Callfomlan ifM* 

Pelargoniums, propagating .v. ofo 

Pelargoniums, repotting '■' '■ ?3S 

Pelargoniums, stock plants gb 

Pelargoniums, varieties tg*9 

Pennlsetum longlstylum sm 

Persecution, alleged 1J4; 

Petraa volublUs J™ 

Petunias from seed. ... .■..;.■• ■• • ■ ii,- ■ bua 

Philadelphia 8, 40, 139, 159, 179, 197. 232. 34b. 
268. 289, 312. 316, 3 1^ 40 ,420, 447. 473, 494, 
516 ,541,563,688.635.662,683 707. 731. 7bl,ig, 
85,3 881 908, 938, 964, 992 1016, 1012. M, 
1091, 1114, 1143, 1164, 1187, 1213, 123b, 1260, 
12S4, 1303, !:«1. , ^ ,,^ 

•Philadelphia florists gun club. . . . . -j}^ 

Philadelphia, exhibition echoes from 370 
Philadelphia, house plants In Sli 

•Philadelphia new Hort. hall... .... 4i3 

Philadelphia notes ■^■- -Wlb, 1331 

Philadelphia seed notes 10, 1098, 110 

Philadelphia supper, the , 340 

Phlox decussata '^ux 

Phlox suflrutlcosa i-™ 

Pinks, blight of ° 

Piping for rose house J' J 

•Pitcher & Manda's, views at Wl 

PUtosporum varlegatum .•■ ^ 

Ptttafleld Mass 13U oou 

Pittlburg 13, 339, 600, 991, 1021, 1063, 1213 

13,W. 1186,1308. , ^ ^ , ,„,„ ,.,,„ 

Plttaburgand Allegheny hotels,. 1340 1310 

Plalnfleld, N. J e,,m" 

I'lan for acre plot m- »"; 

•Plant arrangements, Easter 9»b 

Planttradeln Chicago........... •■ 1304 

Plants adapted for retail florists llbO 

Plants, evolution among 



30 
... 636 



-Thripson 2b4 

—To grow with carnations 9bb 

—Twelve varieties In one house 492 

—Ventilating and watering 1311 

—Ventilation of bouses 1^3 

WTatGrlDE. >■■••■• loUl 

•Rose garden'. Worid's Falr^ ........... .1182 

•Rose house, Slebrecht & Wadley s... 993 

Rose society, American ^' Hi 

Rose society, work for the .-wu 



1338 

1229 

629 



Saddle River, N. J. 

St. John, N. B 

St. Joseph. Mo — 



1-386 

...438, 954, 996,1069 
, 256 



Swalnsona ^21 

Swalnsonas 8(y 

•Swalnsona galeglfoUa alba ; va Ssl> 

Swalnsona, pink '68 8bi 

Swalnsona, propagating 3»a 

Sweet peas tor cut flowers 1*3° 

Sweet peas, reduced list of ^Jb 

Sweet peas under glass **| 

Sweet William, blight of „„o 

Syracuse, N. Y lg;0 

Syrlnga perslca laclnlata 104" 



"Table decorations at Chicago 511, 513, 515 



Nyack. N Y 



39J 



Nymphaja 



Robinsonl 1™ 



Plants for vases. 



679 



Ohltuary-Balnes. Thos 
— Bernardio, Camille. . . . 

—Brown, Thos. H 

— •Bergmann, G. R 

— •Chitty, H.E 

— Duane, John 
— Engel, Louis 



907 

768 

1262 

1019 

133J 

1189 

10' 



— Forsteiman, Ignatius 907 

— Gammage.J G 90 

— Gower. W. Hugh -u 

—Hunt, Mrs. M. A lo- 

-Jones, MorilsR 644 

—Kranz. Conrad li™ 

-•Martin, Thos, F lOf:^ 

— •Messeberg. Gus i "f 

— Mulr, Samuel "=" 

— Oger, Pierre Auguste J* 

— Peattle, John '% 

— Bobbins, B. A ™ 

—Scott, Jas. W 970 

— Sheppard, John A J" 

—Thomson, Wm M» 

— TruBaut, Charies 90j 

<E lothera glauca Frazeril ti;i 

■Oleander in Bermuda garden........ 3b5 

-imaha.Neb . 268,110 



Plantain the store trade 813 

Plant notes ™ 

Plant trade In New York «-l 

Plant trade, spring =.0 

Platvcodon grandlflorum iigi 

Podunk, parable, a ■«' 

Podunk parable, the lOlJ^ 

rolnsettlas ., ,^'" 

Polemonlum coeruleum joaa 

Polemonium reptans Jill 

Polygonum amplexloaule I'J 

Popp'es. Iceland 

Portland, Me 

Portldnd,Ore..... ^, 

Pot roses for spring sale i.lAWi 

Poughkeepsle, N. Y '" i^ 

Poultry yard, manure from 

Primroses, hardy "~ 

PrimulHS, potting 19» 

Private greenhouses, recent <S3,3 

Progress in roses gu 

Progress of a decade j' 

Providence. R 1 ''J..; 

Prudence vs. football 4b- 

•Pumpkins as a seed crop jW 

Pyrethrum roseum itb.- 



Omaha, Neb 

Onion seed situation . 

Ononis rotundlfoUa. 

Orarge, N. J 

•Orchid baskets 

•Orchid center piece. 



1316 
4(0 



St: Louis 8. 62. 198. 231, 246. 290. 313, 426, 449 
474. 6 0, 618. 565. 590. 644. 66). 684. 707. 7.1! 
806 898 962. 1022. 1 143. 1X9. 1092, 1126, 142 
1161, U74, 1188, 1215, 1237, 1238, 1281, 1308 
133.3. 

•St. Louis, group at picnic ■ • ■ 1333 

St. Paul 9 110. 126. 140, 160, 200, 250, 291, M 
403 448, 495. 578. 615, 644. 720, 736, 801, C22 
960:99i: 1043, 1076, 1092, 1128, 1141, 1168,1188 
191 's i*>iii 

San Francisco 310. 674, 1310, 1342 

San Francisco sweet pea show I3tt) 

San Jose. Cal ,■■••,•■;••■};.»• 

•Santa Barbara, floral carnival at. . . .lOMj 

Saponarla caucaslca 130- 

Saponaria ocymoldes Jill 

Saponarla omclnalls l«b 

Saratoga.N.Y .23^ 

Scablosa caucaslca t-3u 

Scale, anew 'l\ 

Scarborough and Tarrytown 54 

Scolopendrium vulgare - . .1086 

Seasonable work among decorative 

plants 1?' 

Seed advertising 1U.-U 

Seed distribution bl3 

Seed notes general 1218 

Seed purchase, government 714 

sled trade 14. 5). 94, 134. 114, IM 1S4, 226 
250, 272, 294. 318, 3o0, .382, 40B, 431, 45), 478 
600, 533, 646, 570, 694, 618. 642. 666. 768. 79b 
843; 888 916. 972, ICO), 1026, 1116, 1342, 1266 
12110 1333, 

Seed trade assoeiaiion J170 

Seed business, changes In J33» 



Tank, building around 

Tarlfl bill, the •••• 

Tarrytown and Scarborough. . 

Temperature, equalizing 

Testing station proposed, a.. .. 
Thallctrum aqulleglf oUum — 

Thermopsis fabacea, 

Thrips, white - 

Through American eyes 

•Ticket, a striking admission. 
Topeka. Kas. , 



222 

124 

64 

1256 



..1111 
..1162 
.. 2 
..1280 
.. 397 
.190 231 



Queens, carnations at. 



394 

1135 Rahway. N. J 

694, 1342 Reason why, the ■„;•'• 

. .659, 661 Recollections of Atlantic City. . 

732 Regulating pric?s 



Orchid culture and hybri'dizatiin 1157 *Reltieman, B. C 

Xpphlfi the omnipresent 1148 Reminders , ■ ■•■ f"'' ^"'*' i^Ji 

orchds a few notes about ..31 Removing whitewash from glass J279 



Orchids, a few notes about 

Orchids. April 

•Orchids at Toronto 

Orchids at W. S. Kimball s...., 
•Orchids, display at Brookllne 
•Orchidi. display at Chicago .. 

Orchids for Christmas 

Orchids for June 

Orchids for March 

Orchids for May ryi i „t 

Orchids from a commercial point oi 

view , , 1^ 

Orchids, hybridizing J158 

Orchids in Cincinnati lloj 

Orchids in January gj 



986 Reseda glauca. .. 

903 ■ ' ■ '-- 

986 
. 823 
. 376 
. 492 
.1133 
. 876 

1037 



Orchids in July. 



.1184 



... 572 
131 1166 
.... 116 

244 

113 

937, 1014, 1086 



1135 

, 6 9 



Retailer's window, the 

Retail trade, the..... = 

Rhaphlolepis japonica. «3 

Rhododendrons, transplanting,. .... . .13 '5 

Rochester. N. Y. 892, 918 952, 980. 991. 1023 
iSlwi. 1093, 1124, 1154, 1163, 1215, 1238 



1272, 12.33. 1311, 1340. 

Rose, American Beauty 

— CrlTDBon Rambler 

—Hole. Dean 

— Kaiserln 

—Meteor 

Morgan. Mrs. Pierpont 



Orchids now blooming 1033 

Orchids, purchasing »j 

Orchids, rare 'jj 

Orchids-three gems »!) 

Orchids, wornout ■ =' 

Ornamental plantB.fungusdlaeasesoJ b29 

•Orthezia. the greenhouse «;i 

Osmanthus IV/mi! ims 

Ottawa, Ont 124,696,1008 

•Overliead heating............... 3« 

Overhead heating with hot water ««■ 



... 874 
.... 463 
....1162 

1018 

.... 1089 

IMl 

877 

886 

38 

, 631,877 
157 



•Packing Easter plants 

Packing flowers for market. . . . 

Paionies. Chinese — 

-•Pieonia. discoloration or .... 

Paeonla tenullolia 

Painting 

Palm notes -• 

Palm seeds .value of fresh ... 

Palms in summer 

Palms, polling 

Pandanus, potting 

Pansles. covering In cold frame 340 

Pansles for winter blooming 13M 

Pansles. sowing .3' 

Pansy, double '■»*; 

Pansv seed, sowing {'U 

Papaver involucratum ijb.) 

Papaver crientale Jj™ 

Papaver pllosum l'™ 

Paper white for CbilBtmas 310 

Parable, a Todunk ■ »•" 

"Paris flower market, gllmpseof. 21i 

Paris, horticultural exhibition at )18b 

•Paris, parks of '^» 



.. . 308 
... 1013 
.... 375 
.... 286 
.... 286 
.... 683 

Slebrecht, Belle 631 101.1 

—1\ stout, Mme i* 

Roses around Chicago i- 

— •At Chicago show g';; 

-AtMadison *b 

—Beauties, black spot on *» 

-Bedding In Chicago 93J 

-Best method of growing ib 

-Best varieties i-- .™ 

-Black spot *■ S; 

Blind wood on teas 904 

•Brides, house of " 

Brides not doing well »* 

Chicago, list of bedders 830 

ClasMflcatlon ■"Vw-Va!' oS 

Club root 422, 78b, 9L4 

Coal ashes and roses 



Seed crops 1333 

Seed, Waterloo's garden Jii 

Seedman's qualifications, a. 883 

Seedsmen, reliable and otherwise 694 

Selaglnellas ■ 1182 

September, hardy flowers for 4 

Shading i Ob 850 

Shattered Idol, a JO 

Shooting at Pittsburg 1334 

•.-iebrechtct Wadley'snew rose house 993 

Sllene orientalls Ij* 

SUene quadrlauriculata 13<8 

Sllene Schaf ta I'gs 

Single pipe heating »™ 

Sioux Llty, Iowa............ 334 

Small place, cost of maintaining bjn 

Smllax and asparagus 1^!;9 

Smilax once again 93b 

Smllax, stringing 13b 

Snails and fern benches 44,5 

Snowball, propagating Japan. ••■•■■ 633 

Society of American Florists ibl 1168 

—Atlantic City convention 

—Bowling contest 

—Bowling contest scor s 

—•Bowling contest, prizes 

—•Bowling contest, snap shot at. .. 
—•Bowling match, first team prize 

—Bowling rules 

—Charter 

—Chicago to Pittsburg 

—Come to the convention. . 

-•Early history 

—Convention echoes 

—Convention notes 

—Convention program 

—Election of otlicers 

— Entertainer ents at the convention 
118. 

—•Exhibition hall, diagram of ..^ 

—Executive session at Pittsburg.. . i81 838 

—Final session 

—From far west to Pittsburg 

-Hotels at Atlantic City 

—Medals - 

-Pittsburg program 

—President's address 

—•Prizes for shooting tournament. 



jeO. 896, 912. 910, 976, 994, 1056, lOf. 111-5 
11V6. 1192. 1193. 12-23. 1237. 1292. 1307, 1^2, 

Trade report Easter^. ....•■• 9=' 

Trees and shrubs at Washington Ubl 

Truck, agreenhouse »™ 

Tuberoses, potting '<>jt 

Tulips, bedding ^ 

Tulips, boxing i'o 

U 

United States Nurseries, exhibition at 310 

Up-to-date florist, the 1020 

•Up to date small range of glass 1336 

Useful plants ns-i 



Valeriana officinalis 1'^ 

Vallev pips In cold storage 6M 

•Vase of outdoor flowers Jg>7 

•Vase of summer flowers igg 

Verbenas, sowing buy 

V entilate, why we 6i| 

Veronica Incana ^*J° 

Victoria regla rotting l«- 

View of Mr. Heacock's greenhouses . 85 

•View of R. Craig's greenhouses 116 

Viola cornuta lt{» 

•Violet California biu 

Violet culture, successful 

Violet. English. 

♦Violet, the English 

Violet house, a 

•Violet house. W. R. Davison s.. 

Violets 

Violets blue ■ .„ 

Violets, care and culture ox> 

Violets, culture of g'* 

Violets, double ™,i 

Violets in carnation house 1163 

Violets In pots 1'™ 

Violets, planting « 

Violets, potting '0J4 

Violets, lifting liK» 



.1136 
.1087 
,1280 
,. 877 
. 683 
, 484 



73 
,.1306 
.. 88 

. 31 
.. 103 

. 29 
.. 44 

;:::66i 732 

13'J6 

6 

.1114 1186 

87 

....... 33 

6 

83 

105 

28 



...1134 
... &) 



....1306 
.... 9 

. . . .130t; 

1263 

73 

109 



w 

wages again.. '^^b'w 

wTflffpR of florists '"*' '^" 

Walhlngton 2!o: 377. 483. 449. 486. 49.i. 664, 
1 02 taf, 703. 734, 74,3. 79S, 910, 965, lOlfi, 1012, 
1136,1172.1244.1261. 

Washington, bedding plants at 1«| 

Washington, decorations at^... »4o 

Washington, flowering shrubs at I04U 

Washington gleanings. ■ ■ ■ -■ ■:----.fii 
Washington, trees and shrubs at. . . .1164 
•■Water gardens at Clltton, N.J.. -■**»" 

Water hyacinth 

Waterloo's garden seed 

•Wedding decoration ........ ^ 

Wedding decoration, an elaborate. • ■ ■ 46b 

Westerly, R. 1. ■ JS 

Western wholesale nurserymen 13iU 

When to sow seeds. »» 

Whitewash, removing from glass. .. . .1«» 
WholCBallng cut flowers, best method 117 

Wholesale prices of flowers lau 

Why we ventilate ■ 2J- 

•Wide house, Mr. Swayne's i»4 

Wild flowers ,^ 

•Window decorations i«» 

Window displays. 



. 426 
. 972 
, 267 



- Sketchesof trade exhibition 107 

—Trade exhibition, awrdsat, 
—•View of convention hall — 
Society of Indiana Florists. . . . 

Sophro-Cattleya exlmla 

Soot 

Spergula plllfera -j-- ,,nc 

•Splrasa astllboldes florlbunda 1 3» 

^ .,,„„„ ....6.5J Splriea flllpendula plena JJw 

—Cuttings ■ y^n Q|;,rn^T Rnmholdtll 1163 

Cutworms In rose houses 612 |P™^°gS^°"""' 1181 

Damaged cuttings 1C!'.3 | Splrffia loo.iia. 



Shooting match 108 w'lnter-blooming P'«°'| ".,,-,;• ■gjo"™ <■ 

ShooUng match, rules ?^J ^°"!,'' ^T,"iSrt "ii,'» ' ' ' 1187 

secretafys report. . ,....,.,,,..„ " :S!;°2'^S.,f,'n' '^^■■■:::::: :::::::::: : uo 



... 106 
... 1 61 
... 302 
866 878 
1162 



—Dropping their buds 

—Dying off 

—Fertilizers for 

—For bedding 

— Grubs afTeclIng 

—Grubs In rose houses... . 
—Hybrids, treatment of.... 

—•In Denver 

—In pots ,•-••/,■•-,•••■ 

—Kaiserln turning black. . . 
—Leaves becoming sti.ky.. 
—Leaves turning pale ... 

-Limestone soil. 

—List of commercial sorts, 

— M ore worms 

—Nitrate of soda for 

—Notes 



658 
, 929 



Park, an Interstate... 



. 952 



Parksof Paris 120,i, 1231. 1233. 1235 



422 

194 

492 

1061 

709 

901 

10:i3 

1038 

80 

610 

174 

....1301 



::!!:"682lSplra;apalmata JJ81 

492 SpIriBU Ulmarla. ''^ 

" Sprigs from ihe spice bush ....l^3i 

Sprlngfleld, Mass 496, 665, 566, 624, 670, %i 
ll'.« 

Spring plants In Boston 

Spring plant trade ;,-••,■-:■ 

Spring show Mass Hort. Society 

Staphvlea Bumalda 

Staph vlea colchlca 

Steam engine, healing from , . . . . 
Steam heat, changing to hot water. 



-Wood. Elijah A. .... . .... ..... ■■■■ -ji; • Jjl" 

Worcester. Mass . 10. 10), 119, lb9, 184, 2)0, 
;i62 379,458,502,536, 598, 61o, 63b. 686. 708, 
744 776 798 844, 894 910, 941. 966, lOOl, 1022, 
1043 ioia: 1101. 11'32, 1162. 1170. 120!. 1215, 
V342, V3f/.. 1-292, l:«ll, ISJ'). 

•World's Fair rose garden UW 

Worm, a destructive ""J 

Worms attacking cannas !!» 

Worms, millipede ■■■,■■,•■;■• •■-,/«? 

• Wreath of sweet bay and violets. . . . 1091 



. 816 
. 825 
. 879 
.1040 
. 514 
.1325 
i;i25 



Stenactls specIosuB '^|jj 



13 



Stevia. . . 
•Stewart, W. J. 

Stimulants 

Stop the leaks. 



1 12 Store trade, plants In. 



. 113 

. 728 
. 884 
. 813 
196 



Yucca fllamentosa. 



-Papa Gentler on solid beds .- ~ i SJr.'.brfanThes Dyerlanus 

-Piping rose house lioi SuigSDs for a chrysanthemum 

=piSSu!5gV.utdooVs, Testpui fof: : : : : . i:i6 1 ■'-"' '■ •' 

—Pot plants for spring sale "ibi [ 



show „ 

Summer flowers, vase of. . 




AmBrica is "the Praw of ths IIessbU tbEre maij be mors comfort Hmidships, but ii/e are the Urst la touch Unknown Seas." 



Vol. X. 



CHICAGO AND NEW YORK, AUGUST 9, 1894. 



No. 323 



fiiiiii Ukwssm^im lFiL@i!3i!@ir 



■■'Copyright 1894, by American Florist Company. 
Entered as Second-Class Mail Matter. 

Published every Thttrsday by 

The American florist compaht. 

333 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 



Subscription, $1.00 a year. 



To Europe, J2.00. 



Address all communications to 

AMBRIOAN FLORIST COMPANY. 

P. O. Drawer 164, CHICAGO. 

Eastern Office : 67 Bromfleld St., Boston. 

This paper la a member of the Associated Trade 
Press and the Chicago Trade Press AsBOClatlon. 

The Tenth Annual Meeting 

OF THE 

SoGietu ot flmerican Florists 

WILL BE HELD AT 

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. , 

AUGUST 21. 22, 23 A 24, 1894-. 



Members may remit the annual dues (SvJ.OO) to the 
secretary prior to the meeting, thus avoiding the crowd 
and relieving the otBcers on the opening day. Badge 
for 1894 will be sent by mall to those who remit In 
advance of the meeting. 

Intending members can obtain any Information 
wanted by addressing the secretary. 



OFFICERS : 
J. T. ANTHONY. Chicago, president; Robert Kift. 
Philadelphia, vice-president: Wm. J. Stewart. ST 
Bromfleld St.. Boston. Mass., secretary. 



CONTENTS 



Chrysanthemums— Notes 1 

Carnations— Notes '1 

— House of Mrs. Fisher (illus) 2 

— Mrs. Fisher carnation again (illus) 2 

—Eats the flower buds 2 

The Ginkgo tree 3 

Judges and exhibitions 3 

Roses — Grubs . . 4 

Hardy flowers for September 4 

Wreath for funeral of Pres. Carnot (illus) . . . 5 

A serious blight of garden pinks 5 

Convention program 6 

Come to the convention 6 

Lantanas in bloom 6 

The catafalque in the pantheon (illus) ... 7 

Chicago 7 

Boston 7 

New York -8 

Philadelphia . . ... 8 

St. Louis 8 

Hotels at Atlantic City, N. J 9 

St. Paul, Minn 9 

Toronto 9 

Denver 9 

Cleveland 10 

News notes 10 

Chicago to Atlantic City 10 

Coming exhibitions 12 

The seed trade 14 

Worcester, Mass 16 

Pittsburg 18 

Cincinnati 20 

Cleaning flower pots 22 

New Orleans 22 




WiLKESBARRE, Pj* .— William M. E!- 
dridge died from heart disease Monday 
night, August 6. 



Notes. 

The grasshoppers are beginning to find 
their way into the houses, and will need 
looking after; they are great feeders and 
will eat the end out of a strong shoot 
very quickly. Hand picking is the best 
remedy that we know, but care must be 
taken in catching them or the shoots, 
which are now very soft and brittle, will 
be broken off. Take a trip through the 
houses occasionally after dark and see if 
there are any millers flying around. The 
catching of one of these insects when it 
makes its first appearance means the 
killing of hundreds, if not more, of grubs 
or worms that will make a fine late din- 
ner or breakfast of some succulent stem 
or bud later on. 

In our notes last week on requiring in- 
dividual blooms to be shown on 12 inches 
of stem we said that some other way 
might be found to improve the general 
appearance of our exhibitions. This re- 
quirement, if we are not mistaken, was 
first introduced in New York in the 
schedule of 1891, and was the outcome of 
the death of the board system the pre- 
vious year. It was then established, as 
we have been informed, for two reasons: 
first, to place all exhibitors on an equality 
and not let arrangement influence the 
opinionof the judges, and second, to show 
the flowers so that their bad as well as 
good qualities could be easily distin- 
guished; that is, if they had a "weak 
neck" or a long flower stalk to let the 
growers find it out. Now, this is all right 
as far as it goes, but it narrows the exhi- 
bition down to a few varieties (that are 
over and over repeated in the different 
stands) which have strong, stifi' stems, or 
to strictly commercial flowers, and conse- 
sequently discards many varieties that 
are very valuable in a large display. For 
instance, Kioto is one of the best exhibi- 
tion varieties that we have to-day, of 
beautiful color and form, and possessing 
that peculiar waxy lustre of its petal 
found in no other, but it has been dis- 
carded because it has a "weak neck" and 
a long flower stalk. The incurved vari- 
eties, where are they? They are nearly 
all weak necked, and if shown at all are 
relegated to some side table in order to 
make room for their larger and showier 
sisters. 

Now, the showing of blooms on long 
stems is wrong, except in seedlings, when 



the weak points of the bloom, if it has 
any, should be shown up, and in large 
vases of six or more of a variety. In the 
first place we do not believe our shows 
are intended for the exhibition of com- 
mercial varieties onlv, but to bring out 
all the classes and varieties possible. In 
the next place the growers are not the 
only ones to be considered, for it is the 
public that furnishes the funds that keep 
the shows agoing, and they little care 
whether a variety would be profitable or 
not to a grower, but are much more in- 
terested in the various forms and colors, 
and often visit the shows with the idea 
that they will see many varieties not 
placed on sale at the stores. If we keep 
on in the line in which we are now mov- 
ing we may before long lose their patron- 
age. At one of the large shows last year 
we overheard a lady remark to her com- 
panion as she went away that she had 
seen just as good flowers in the florists' 
windows on the street, and that they 
were much better arranged. It is hardly 
necessary to say that if that idea becomes 
general we shall have to hustle to keep 
our heads above water at our shows. 

One of the remedies seems to us to be a 
better arrangement of our blooms, and 
in order to procure this it does not seem 
to be advisable to hamper the exhibitor, 
but let him show his flower as he may 
like, and thereby bring out many ideas; 
possibly we shall strike an arrangement 
that will be just what we want, and no 
fear but that the others will immedia^-ely 
adopt it. It might also be advisable to 
offer a premium for t-he best arranged ex- 
hibit at the show, not containing less 
than eighteen blooms, or any other num- 
ber that may be deemed advisable. This 
prize to be offered not for a special ex- 
hibit, but to include all exhibits shown 
for other prizes. 

The best way that we have ever seen to 
stage chrysanthemum blooms is to show 
each flower in a bottle by itself. Before 
placing the blooms set into each bottle a 
spray of handsome chrysanthemum foli- 
age and replace it during the show if it 
wilts. Cut the stems of the front row so 
that the flowers will just stand clear of 
the bottle. Make the second just tall 
enough so that in lookinglevel across the 
table one half of the flower will show, 
and instead of placing them in straight 
lines set them between the blooms of the 
first row, leaving room enough between 
the blooms that they do not touch. Con- 
tinue on in this way to the back row, but 
do not have more than four rows if it can 
be helped. An exhibit, if arranged in this 
manner, with as much care as possible 
■being taken in the arrangement of colors, 
will amply repay for the time and atten- 
tion given, will improve the general effect 
wonderfully, and will attract the eyes of 
every visitor to the show. 

Elijah A. Wood. 

West Newton, Mass. 



2 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 9, 




To Prevent Rust. — Dissolve one pound of sul- 
phate of copper in two quarts ot ammonia in a 2- 
gallon jar. When dissolved add another quart of 
ammonia and stir well. [The liquid can be kept 
in this form for some time and used as needed.] 
Add a pint of this solution to a barrel of water and 
syringe the plants with a force-pump ever>' two 
weeks. And don't let the time for spraying pa.ss 
without attending to the operation. 



Carnation Notes. 
In looking ahead for next winter it may 
not be amiss to pive a thought or two to 
the rooted cutting business. It is no un- 
common thing to hear a grower say the 
only way to make money out of carna- 
tions is to sell from both ends, i. e., to sell 
the flowers and cuttings from the same 
plant. Possibly there may be few more 
dollars at the end of the season by follow- 
ing out this method, but I doubt it very 
much, for you can not grow as many or 
as good flowers on plants that are to be 
used for propagating (without injuring 
the health of the cuttings to some extent) 
as you can on plants that are handled for 
cut flowers only. This may seem like a 
contradictory statement, that you can 
not grow as good flowers on plants that 
are kept in good healthy condition for 
cuttings as you can on those grown ex- 
clusively for flowers, but it is a proven 
fact. To get the very best out of your 
plants in a cut flower way you must not 
lie hampered by looking out for a lot of 
good cuttings from the same plants. 

If I mistake not, the late Mr. Hunt in 
his book "How to grow cut flowers" 
brings out the point very strongly that 
to get rid of some of the diseases carna- 
tions seem heir to we will have to grow 
our stock plants in a more normal tem- 
perature than that of the forcing house, 
and if we want to keep up the health of 
our stock that is without a question the 
only way. To start into the selling of 
cuttings you should either erow separate 
stock lor taking the cuttings from or 
make flowers from your plants a second- 
ary matter. In this way you might get 
enough flowers to pay your coal bills, 
and possibly a bit more, which would 
help to bring the balance up on the credit 
side at the end of the season. In this as 
in everything else quality is what you 
will want to aim for, and unless you can 
send out good stock that will make good 
healthy plants if properly handled better 
send out none at all. 

The standard of quality for a rooted 
cutting to be satisfactory to the trade 
now is much higher than it was even 
three years ago. Competition has les- 
sened the price considerably and there is 
not a fortune in this business for any one 
man. Of course in this as in every- 
thing else those who send out extra 
good cuttings and deal squarely 
and honorably all the way through will 
get and hold a good paying trade, but if 
the ratio of increase in number of those 
who grow cuttings to sell is as great in 
the next five years as it has been in the 
past five it will be harder and harder to 
get a good trade. If a grower can get 
good stock within a hundred miles of his 
home he is not likely to send a thousand 
mile, for it, and frOm the present outlook 
this trade will become more localized 
every year. 

There is considerable expense connected 
with the cutting business that is some- 




HOUSE OF MRS. FISHER CARNATIONS [PHOTOGRAPHED FEB 1, 1894 ] 



times overlooked by those who contem- 
plate going into it. In the first place 
there are on a mode: ate estimate 3,500 
growers you will want to reach with 
your announcement. The best way with- 
out question is through the floricultural 
papers. That will cost you a little 
money; not so much, but still it is quite 
an item at the end of the year. The 
greatest expense comes in with the prep- 
aration and mailing of your price list, 
and taking everything together you will 
be very fortunate if you make sales 
enough to bring the cost of making them 
down to thirty per centof the net receipts. 
If a grower with two or three green- 
houses come to me for advice as to 
whether he can make more out of them 
by selling cuttings my reply always is 
"don't you believe it, stick to your flow- 
ers and be happy." The grower who has 
a good sized plant so that he can, devote 
a part of it to cuttings and a part to 
flowers, can by persistent advertising and 
constant attention to business get up a 
trade on cuttings that will pay fairly well 
in the course of a few years, but to start 
in with a small place where you have say 
not over a thousand plants of any one 
variety it is only a vexation and a worry. 
If you get an order for say 2,500 of a cer- 
tain variety you will have to injure your 
plants by taking too many cuttings off 
them to fill this order and smaller ones 
you may have, or else fill the order piece- 
meal or send it back, either of which is 
alike annoying both to yourself and the 
purchaser. I have been through this mill 
and know what I am talking about; not 
that I want to discourage any one in the 
business, but it is worth thinking about 
seriously before you attempt to grow 
cuttings lor sale and make money from 
both ends. Albert M. Herr. 



House of Mrs. Fisher Carnations. 

Referring to the discussion on the merits 
of Mrs. Fisher carnation Mr. Chas. Pom- 
mert of Greenfield, O., sends us the photo 
from which the accompanying engraving 
is made. The photo was taken February 
1 last, and Mr. Pommert writes that the 
house had been in full bloom since Septem- 
ber 1, 1893. The picture certainly speaks 
for itself and shows that the variety does 
well with Mr. P., whatever faults it may 
have developed elsewhere. 



Mrs. Fisher Carnation Again. 

Seeing so little in the Florist about 
the "Mrs. Fisher" carnation, I send 3 ou 
a photo of a house of that variety, which 
was taken on the 26th of June. They 
have been in bloom continuously since 
last October and with the exception oj a 
short time in May have yielded im- 
mensely. The house is 156 feet long, 24 
feet wide, three-quarter span with solid 
bed on south side and two benches, one 
higher than the other, so that the picture 
shows only a part of the two benches. 
The flowers do not show very much in 
the picture, but I am cutting from 1,200 
to 1,800 every day now, and shall con- 
tinue to do so until the house has to be 
made ready for next season's crop. 

Soil used by us is a light sandy loam 
from old pasture sod worked up with 
stable manure, and ashes and fertilizer 
applied before setting the plants. 

With us in this section, the "Mrs. 
Fisher" is the best and most profitable 
white carnation we can grow. 

Jerome Butterfield, 
Florist for Coolidge Bros. 

So. Sudbury, Mass. 



Eats the Flower Buds. 

An insect that is new to me has caused 
considerable damage this summer to my 
carnations and roses. In appearance and 
actions it very much resembles the com- 
mon thrips, but is nearly white in color. 
It does its work in the flower buds en- 
tirely, crawling into them as soon as the 
calyx begins to open, and feeds on the 
petals before they are exposed enough to 
show color, as well as after. The result 
is the outside petals have a rusty ap- 
pearance, as though they had been 
bruised, and sometimes are injured so as 
to dwarf their growth, thus injuring the 
development of the buds. Have any 
readers of the Florist been troubled with 
the same, and if so what remedy has 
proved effective? Inquirer. 



Do vou WANT Mr. Scott's seasonable 
hints for the year in book form, so that 
you can refer readily to his suggestions 
for any week in the year? You will find 
them in this form in our trade directory 
and reference book for 1894. Price $2.00. 



i8g4. 



The American Florist. 




HOUSE OF MRS. FISHER CARNATION AT SOUTH SUDBURY, MASS. 



The Ginkgo Tree. 

The ginkgo or maidenhair tree, Ginkgo 
biloba, formerly called Salisburia adianti- 
folia, is a monotypic genus, the species 
being a fine deciduous tree from China 
and Japan, belonging to the yew sub-or- 
der of coniferje, though no tree can appear 
less like a member of the pine family than 
the ginkgo. It is a fairly rapid grower, 
with a straight trunk clothed with a 
light gray bark; its leaves are alternate, 
fan-shaped or wedge-shaped with a broad 
apex notched or cut more or less deeply, 
frequently two lobed, thick and leathery, 
with fine longitudinal ribs, and of a light 
yellowish green color. The leaves are so 
like those of some maidenhair ferns (only 
much larger of course) that it is some- 
times called the maidenhair tree. It 
thrives thoroughly well in almost any 
garden soil. Louden recommends propa- 
gation by cuttings or layers, but we find 
it comes more readily from seed, as about 
90% of good fresh seed will germinate 
and make finer specimens than from either 
cuttings or layers. There is but one diffi- 
culty in securing the seed, that is the 
staminate and pistillate flowers are borne 
upon separate trees. The former are in 
slender catkins about I1/2 inches long, 
while the female flowers are either soli- 
tary or in small clusters at the end of the 
branches. The female flower, which con- 
sist only of a naked ovule, is seated in a 
small cup-like disk, this increases in size 
and coversthe baseof the ripe fruit, which 
is a globular or ovate nut. 

In its native countries the ginkgo at- 
tains a large size; Bunge mentions one 40 
feet in circumference, and still vigorous. 
There is a specimen in the Botanic Garden 
at Pisa 80 feet high. It is supposed that 
it was introduced into Europe from Japan 
by the Dutch. It has been up to a recent 
date a rare tree, though it is recorded as 
having been first planted in this country 
in 1784 by Mr. Alexander Hamilton, who 



lived at Woodlands, near Philadelphia; 
the trees are still standing, though the 
grounds have been converted into a rural 
cemetery, being 60 feet high, 3y2 in cir- 
cumference. There are some fine speci- 
mens in Boston Common, one of which 
was moved to its present site from a pri- 
vate garden in 1832. It is said that this 
tree was a well grown specimen in 1798, 
so it has attained a very respectable an- 
tiquity. 

This tree until recently has been but 
little cultivated. It will stand severe 
pruning, and can even be kept as a large 
bush if desired, though the subject of 
pruning street trees is one upon wh'ch 
there is diversity of opinions, our own 
Parking Commission being divided upon 
it. I think this tree preferable to several 
of the varieties now planted on our streets. 
It is excellent for narrow streets, owing 
to its upright habit, and possesses all 
other features which strongly recom- 
mend it as a city tree; it is always clean 
and is never infested with insects. The 
only objection any one could have to it 
is that the odor from the fruit when 
bruised is very disagreeable. Two small 
streets are now planted with this beau- 
tiful tree; they are handsome specimens. 
There is a row of them on either side of 
the drive from B street to the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, doing very nicely. 
There is a very old specimen on Analostan 
Island, near the old Naval Observatory, 
which was here in the days of General 
Mason, who owned that island, and 
whose gardener was the author of one of 
the earliest American books on gardening. 

The wood is of a ye'Iowish color with- 
out any resinous qualities, and iiseful as 
lumber, though the Chinese cultivate the 
tree mainly for its nuts, which are edible 
but insipid. Medicinal virtues are at- 
tributed to them, and they are considered 
essential, roasted or boiled, at entertain- 
ments. Reynolds. 



Judges and Exhibitions. 

Some weeks ago I read with very great 
interest the able remarks made by Messrs. 
Stewart, Ewing and Watson upon the 
one and three judge systems, also the 
sound and well worded criticism added 
by the editor of the Florist upon these 
opinions. I was sorry the subject was 
not ventilated still further, as I think ex- 
hibitions and judging one of the most im- 
portant subjects, and of vital interest to 
all in the trade. 

.America is not alone in its three judge 
system, as it is the invariable rule for the 
committee at English exhibitions to ap- 
point three judges, men of thorough 
practical ability, from difierent localities. 
However, it is of no use appointing either 
one or three judges if the schedule is not 
well gotten up and the details of the ex- 
hibition properly carried out. The ma- 
jority of the disappointments in this line 
are caused by the want of practical abil- 
ity and good management, resulting in 
disappointment to the public and finan- 
cial failure. 

Our summer exhibition in San Fran- 
cisco last year was a case in point. A 
committee of ladies undertook to manage 
the business details; they were prominent 
and energetic, but want of practical abil- 
ity stranded their best intentions. Each 
exhibitor was allowed to stage his entire 
exhibit together, irrespective of classes; 
hence the judges, three in number, had to 
hunt all over the hall to find the compet- 
ing exhibits. This show was very unsuc- 
cessful. 

To insure a successful show a public 
meeting should be called at least two 
months before the date set for it; discus- 
sion should be general, and a practical 
committee should be chosen to compile 
schedule and rules and to settle every de- 
tail. The prizes need not be large, just 
enough to insure competition, but there 
should be a handsome certificate ormedal 



The American Florist. 



Atig. p, 



with each prize, this being worth more 
than the mone3'. Each exhibit should be 
properly classified and staged by a cer- 
tain hour on the opening day. Everyone 
should leave the hall while the judgirg is 
in progress, the judges being accompanied 
by some one whose duty it is to fill in the 
certificates and place them where they 
belong as soon as theexhibits are judged, 
the exhibition not to be open to the pub- 
lic until the judging is over. 

I think it recessary that three practical 
men be appointed, two to do the judging, 
the third to le the referee if these two do 
not agree. Toe best music should be en- 
gaged and the show well advertised, 
members of the press receiving proper at- 
tention. The schedule should be carried 
out fully and impartially, without favor 
or preference, and if harmony and busi- 
ness principles go hand in hand there is 
no reason why the exhibition should not 
be a thorough success. 

San Francifc-). G. M. Str&tton. 




Grubs Affecting Roses. 

Ed. Am. Florist: — Noticing several 
articles lately regarding grubs on roses, 
and thinking perhaps the way our fore- 
man, Mr. Rosengreen, prepared for them 
might be of some benefit to others will 
state the facts. 

June 30th we completed a new house 
135x18 and put in the soil all but a part 
of a side bench, which we were unable to 
do on account of early quitting time on 
Saturdays of the day hands. Tv^o strings 
of lV2-inch steam pipe were connected up 
and steam started. As soon as work on 
dirt ceased the ventilators were closed 
down and steam turned on. For twenty- 
four hours the temperature was kept at 
100° for the night time and 150° to 170° 
daring the day. On Monday the balance 
ofthe soil was put in and glass shaded. 
During the next two or three days the 
house was planted. 

Up to the present time (August 2), of 
1,100 roses planted in the soil that was 
baked we have not lost a plant, but of 
200 planted in the soil put in afterwards 
have taken out 20 plants and on the 
roots of every one have found a large 
juicy white grub. In another house ofthe 
same size since completed and treated in 
the same way except that all the soil was 
baked we have not lost a single plant. 

In all the soil so treated have not been 
able to find any animal life. Some angle 
worms were found all shriveled up and 
could be broken like a piece of stick. 
Probably if balance of steam pipes had 
been connected and the temperature run 
above 200° it might have destroyed some 
ofthe seed in the soil. It surelv is an in- 
expensive way to get rid of the grub, and 
I trust some others may trv it and report 
as to their success. I. Shelby Crall. 



Do vou WANT the census statistics re- 
garding the florist, nursery and seed 
trades? You will find them in our trade 
dlrectorv and reference book for 1894. 
Price $2.00. 



Hardy Flowers for September. 

This month brings us to the last of the 
flowering trees, a variety of Aralia chi- 
nensis. Gordonia pubescens, and Lager- 
stroemia indica also assume the tree 
form, but not in this latitude. Neither 
are they reliably hardy north of Washing- 
ton, although both have stood for a 
series of years in southern New Jersey. 

The flowering shrubs are but a small 
company of "hangers on," which give 
distinct impressions of the waning powers 
of our northern climate. September is a 
transition month, and many of the trees 
and shrubs are already in a state of 
fruitage. In this stage the chief beauty 
of very many of them consists, and a col- 
lection could be most usefully planted for 
autumn eflFects. 

The herbaceous plants are among the 
most brilliant ofthe year, and I trust the 
florists ofthe country will make a feature 
of them, especially in such small townsas 
demand a general rather than a strictly 
greenhouse trade. I again urge anyone 
to plant large masses of a few well 
selected plants which flower simultane- 
ously, rather than little insignificant bits 
which flower promiscuously. There are 
methods of alternating the plants which 
flower in the various months, but none of 
them are to be compared for effectiveness 
with a seasonal display. 

TREES AND SHRUBS. 

Aralia chinensis varieties. 

Abelia rupestris (S). 

Baccharis halimilolia. 

Clethra tomentosa. 

Caryopleris mastacanthus. 

Clerodendron fragans, fl. pi. (S.) 

Daphne Cneorum. 

Gordonia pubescens. (S.) 

Hamamelis virginica. 

Hypericum patulum. 

Hydrangea paniculata. 

Lagerstroemia indica. (S.) 

Polygonum sachalinense. 

Potentilla fruticosa. 

Passiflora incarnata. (el.) 

Pueraria Thunbergiana. (cl.) 

Rose Gloire de Dijon, Dinsmore, La 
France, etc. 

Spirasa bullata. 

Desmodium penduliflorum is noted as 
continuing to flower during this month, 
and Corchorus japonicus, Rhodotypos 
kerrioides, and Foresteria ligustrina as 
giving flowers as late as September at 
the .north. Lycium chinense always 
flowers during September, and I do not 
remember to have seen it in fruit at this 
point. 

HERBACEOUS PLANTS. 

Achillea ptarmica, fl. pi. 

Aster Bessarabicus, A. grandiflorus, A. 
Novae AngliEe varieties, A. Townshendii, 
A. Lady Trtvellyan, etc. 

Aconitum autumnale, A. uncinatum. 

Allium mutabile, A. stellatum. 

Amsonia salicifolia,. 

Anemone japonica varieties. 

Anthemis tinctoria. 

Astilbejaponica autumnalis. 

Actea alba. 

Begonia Evansiana. (S. ) 

Boltonia latisquama, B. glastifolia. 

Crinum Powellii. (S.) 

Centaurea calocephala. 

Centranthus ruber. 

Colchicum autumnale, C. speciosum. 

Crocus sativus, C. speciosus, C. nudi- 
florus. 

Chrysanthemum sinense, pompons, 
Old Yellow, Timbale d' Argent and others. 

Chrysopsis Mariana. 

CheloneLvonii, C. obliqua. 

Clematis tubulosa, etc. 

Ceratostigma Larpentas. 



Cooperia Drummondii. 
Cnnila Mariana. 
Campanula carpathica. 
Delphinium belladonna, D. sinense 
varieties. 
Eulalias and other grasses. 
Eupatorium ageratoides, E. altissima, 
E. Frazerii, E. ccelesterium. 
Euphorbia coroUata. 
Echinacea purpurea. 
Funkia subcordata. 
Geranium Wallichianum. 
Gypsopbila repens. 
Gentiana angustifolia, G, alba, etc. 
Helianthus angu&tifolius, H. multi- 
florus, H.IjEtifiorus, H.orgyalis,H. Maxi- 
milianus, H. Miss Mellish. etc. 
Helenium autumnale. 
Hibiscus moscheutos, H. militaris. 
Kniphofia corallina, etc. 
Lobelia cardinalis, L. syphilitica, L. s, 
alba. 
Liatris elegans, L. graminifolia. 
Linum perenne. 
Lotus corniculatus. 
Papaver nudicaule. 
Pyrethrum uliginosnm. 
Phlox decussata varieties. 
Phygelius capensis. 
Polygonum vaccinifolium. 
Potentilla pyrenaica, P. erecta. 
Prosartes Hookerii. 
CEnothera missouriensis. 
Rhexia virginica. 
Ruellea celeosa. 
Rudbeckias. 

Salvia azurea, S. Greggii, S. prunel- 
loides, S. Pitcherii, etc. 

Sedum latifolia, S. Sieboldii, S. specta- 
bile. 

Silphium asperrimum, S. laciniatum, S. 
terebinthenaceum, etc. 
Silene Schaffta. 
Statice latifolia. 

Solidago rigida, S. Drummondii, etc. 
Spiranthes cernua. 
Stembergia lutea. 
Veronica longifolia, Y. subsessilis. 
Viola cornuta varieties. 
Some of these plants continue to flower 
all through October in the milder parts 
of the country; in some seasons indeed 
the asters, crocus, colchicums, chrysan- 
themums, kniphofias. Anemone japonica, 
Sternbergia lutea and ceratostigma 
(plumbago) have been noted as late as 
November. But from October through 
the fall to Christmas there is a quantity 
of trees and shrubs, both native and 
exotic, which are so remarkable for the 
beauty of their foliage and berries, that 
they are well worth the attention of the 
florists, upon whom in future no doubt 
very much ofthe garden grouping of the 
country will devolve. Possibly you may 
may find room to name a few of such. 

FOLIAGE AND BERRY BEARING PLANTS FOR 

AUTUMN. 

Acer cissifolium, A. japonicum, A. Nlk- 
kense, A. rubrum, A. saccharum, A. tar- 
taricum, A. Ginnala. 

Aralia spinosa. 

Andromeda (oxydendron) arborea. 

Ampelopsis virginica, A. Vietchii, A. 
heterophylla. 

Arctostaphyllos uva-ursa. 

Actinidia polygama. 

Akebia quinata. 

Baccharis halimifolia fcem. 

Berberis Thunbergii, B. Sieboldii, B. 
chinensis, B. amurense, B. Hokodata, B. 
vulgaris, B. aquifolia. 

Callicarpa purpurea. 

Cornus florida, C. paniculata, C. Mas 
varieties, C. sericea, C. Spathii, C. pubes- 
cens, C.sanguinea, C.stolonifera aurea. 

Cotoneaster vulgaris, C. laxiflora. 

Cocculus carolinianus. 



i8()4- 



The American Florist. 




WREATH SENT BY THE EMPEROR OF RUSSIA 

FLOWERS AT THE FUNERAL OP THE LATE PRESIDENT OF FRANCE. 



Chionanlhus virginicus. 

Cydonia japonica. 

Celastrus scandens. 

CratEegus coccinea, C. cordata, C. 
Oxyacantha, etc. 

Colutea species. 

Elteagrus species. 

Euonymus europseus varieties, E. atro- 
purpureus, E. japonicus-roseus, etc. 

Hedera chrysocarpa. (S.) 

Ilex opaca, I. Sieboldii, I. glabra, I. 
Iffivigata-lutea, I. verticillata. 

The European holly in some of its 
varieties stands well in S. Virginia, and 
some day perhaps a florist in that state 
will find leisure to produce hybrids be- 
tween them and Ilex opaca. 

Lindera Benzoin. 

Liquidamber styraciflua. 

Lonicera sempervirens. 

Lycium barbarum, etc. 

Leycesteria formosa. 

Magnolia glauca, M. hypoleuca, etc. 

Menispermum canadense. 

Mitchella repens. 

Nemopanthes canadense. 

Nyssa aquatica, etc. 

Pyrus arbutifolia, P. prunifolia aurea, 
r. melanocarpa, P. nigra, etc. 

Philodendron japonicum. 

Parrotia persica. 

Rhamnus frangula, R. carolinianus. 

Rosa rugosa, R. rubiginosa, R. grandi- 
flora, R. spinosissima picta, R. acicularis, 
R. cinnamomea, R. villosa. 

Rhus species. 

Symphoricarpus vulgaris. 



Symplucos crataegifolius. 

Sambucus racemosus. 

S planum Dulcamara. 

Smilax rotundifolia. 

Viburnum dentatum, V. dilatatura, V. 
lantana, V. lentago, V. acerifolium. 

Salix vitellina and its varieties, Bultzen- 
sis, rubra purpurea, etc. are well worth 
planting for winter. Let anyone once be- 
gin these special effects in their gardens, 
and they will always try to find material 
to enhance the beauty and value of their 
collections, and be sure to have imitators 
and admirers. The gardener and florist 
with a versatility of taste, and a general 
trade, will recognize such plants, (shrubs 
or trees) as his stock in trade, and appre- 
ciate the fact that the people delight in 
variety rather than monotony. He will 
know how largely upon him depends the 
future of the American "Rus in Urbe." 
He will study them one by one, and 
group them on his ground sometimes, 
even in a limited way, and as he does 
this artistically and harmoniously so 
will he create a demnnd for his stock and 
advertise it. James MacPherson. 



A Serious Blight of the Garden Pinks or 
Sweet Williams. 

A recent visit to a florist establishment 
brought to mind again the appearance of 
an old enemy, namely, the leaf blight of 
the pink or sweet william. This blight is 
quite characteristic in producing upon 
the foliage large, well defined, somewhat 



circular patches of an ashy brown color, 
which soon become dotted over with mi- 
nute blackish specks, all of which is evi- 
dent to the naked eye. These patches 
may be many in number, and as they 
grow become confluent, thus involving 
the whole leaf. In many cases the border 
of the speck takes on a purplish color, 
making the disease all the more conspicu- 
ous. As the leaves become thoroughly 
blighted they hang down upon the stem, 
but as the petiole clasps the stem the 
leaves readily fall away, thus giving the 
blighted plants a very unsightly appear- 
ance. 

The fungus (Septoria Dianthi, Desm.) 
is not confined to the leaves, but produces 
similar patches upon the stem of the 
plant, and in that way increases the 
amount of its destructive work. 

As this blight comes to its full estate 
about the time that the plants are 
through blooming it would seem as if it 
was not of any great account, but it 
must be borne in mind that this fungus is 
the same that is upon the carnation, an- 
other species of the genus Dianthus, and 
the spores which are produced in vast 
quantities upon the garden pinks may be 
the means of spreading the leaf blight to 
the carnations, which are usually grown 
in the same establishments with the pinks, 
so that it is necessary in order to keep 
one kind of ornamental plant free from 
disease to sometimes use measures for 
checking the same fungous growth upon 
some other plant which in itself does not 



6 



The American Florist. 



Aug. g, 



suff-r severely. It is interesting to note 
in ihis connection that the border of the 
spot varies greatly in the deepness of 
color; upon plants with pale bloom there 
is li tie or no reddening of the border, but 
upon those plants with purple, scarlet or 
deep pink bloom there is a corresponding 
presence of the same color in the spot bor- 
der. Tde same is true of the spots upon 
the stems; this difference in the color of 
the border of the spot is common to the 
carnation, and these likewise indicate the 
color of the bloom. 

Byron D. Halsted. 



Convention Program. 

COMMITTEE ON NOMENCLATURE. 

The Committee on Nomenclature will 
meet at the Committee Room, Morris 
Guards' Armory on Monday evening, 
August 20. Members having matters 
which they witl to have brought before 
this committee should send them at once 
to the chairman, Mr. John N. May, Sum- 
mit, N.J. 

The Executive Committee of the Society 
will also be in session on Monday evening 
at the same place. 

Tuesday, August 21, 1894.. 
First Day, Opening Session, p to 11:30 

o'clock, A. M. 

Address of welcome, by the Mayor of 
Atlantic City. 

R- sponse. 

President Anthonv's address. 

R. ports— Secretary and Treasurer, 
Standing Committees, Special Com- 
mittees. 

Miscellaneous business. 

Discussion of president's address. 

AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION. 

The following amendment to the Constitution is 
offered by Mr. H. B. Bealty: 

Insert in last clause of Article V the words any 
special or," so that it shall read: "Vacancies in 
the Executive Committee at any sprcial or annual 
meeting or in the list of Vice-Presidents at the 
annual meeting may be filled temporarily by the 
President during or previous to the first day ot 
the meeting and until such regular officers can 
act " 

PAYMENT OF DUES. 

Members can pay their annual dues at the Con- 
vention Hall previous to the opening of the morn- 
ing session, or at the close of that session, on the 
first day of the Convention. 

Those who choose to do so may remit the 
amount of their dues to the Secretary at any time 
previous to the date of the Convention. The So- 
ciety's badge and receipt will be sent in i eturn. 

N B -Accoiding to the By-Laws and custom ol 
the Society, any person becoming a member con- 
tinues a memhrr until he asks for a release, or is 
suspended for non-payment of dues. Members 
having once joined the Society are thus liable for 
successive annual dues unless they notify the Sec- 
retary of their desire to unlkdraiv frotn member- 
shit'. All arrearages must be paid. 

Any member desiring the suspension of this 
rule in his behalf should make application to the 
Executive Committee, who may make such abate- 
ment as they deem justifiable. 

First Day, Afternoon Session, 2:30 to 

$.30 o'clock. 

Essay, "Some requirements for the ele- 
vation of our business," W. H. Taplin, 
H"lmesburg, Pa. 

D scussion. 

Es'say, "Comparative colors in relation 
to flowers," (Illustrated), F. Schuyler 
Mathews, Boston, Mass. 

Dicussion. 

The question box. 

Wednesday, August 22, 1894. 
Second Day, Morning Session, 9 to 11:30 

o'clock. 

S lection of place of meeting for 1895. 

Nomination of officers. 

E-say, "The best methods of growing 
roses, and best varieties for present de- 
mands," John H. Taylor, Bayside, N. Y. 

Discussion. 



Essay, "Orchidsascommercial flowers," 
Wm. Mathews, Ucica, N. Y. 
Discussion. 

Essay, "Cannas," John T. Temple, 
Davenport, la. 
Discussion. 

Election of State Vice-Presidents by 
state delegations. 

Second Day. Afternoon Session, 2:30 to 
3:30 o'clock. . 

Estay, "The evolution of the chrysan- 
themum," (under the auspices of the 
Chrysanthemum Society 01 America), 
Grove P. Rawson, Elmira, N. Y. 
Discussion. 

Essav, "Successful violet culture," An- 
drew Washburn, Bloomington, 111. 
Discussion. 

Essay, "Aquatics," Wm. Tricker, Clif- 
ton, N.J. 
Discussion. 
The question box. 

The C tirysanthemum Society of America 
will hold its annual meeting at the close 
of the afternoon session. 

Thursday, August 23, 1894. 
T/iird Day, Morning Session, g to 11:30 



should communicate at once with the committee 
in charge of this feature. 

ENTERTAINMENTS 

On the fourth day, Friday August 24th, the 
members of the Society of American Florists will 
be the guests of the Florists' Club of Philadelphia. 
Full particulars of the programme for this day, 
alsT special arrangement for entertainment of the 
visiting ladies will be given at the opening session 
of the Convention. 

AUXILIARY SOCIETIES. 

The annual meeting of the American Rose So- 
ciety will be held on Tuesday evening. August 21, 
the Florists' Protective Association on "Wednesday 
evening, August 22 and the Telegraph Delivery 
Association on Thursday evening, August 23. 



o''clock. 

Election of officers. 

Essay, "The classification and inspec- 
tion of commercial plants," G. L. Grant, 
Chicago, III. 

Discussion. 

Eisav, "Fertilizers and their applica- 
tion," Robert Simpson, Cromwell, Conn. 

Discussion. 

The question box. 
Third Day, Afternoon Session, 230 to 

3:30 o'clock. 

Essay, "The value and importance of 
statistics, foreign and domestic," Benj. 
Durfee, Washington, D. C. 

Discussion. 

The balance of this session will be de- 
voted to miscellaneous business, the first 
in order being the report of the com- 
mittee appointed at the St. Louis meeting 
to consider the matter of fire insurance 
for greenhouses, of which Mr. E. H. 
Michel, of St. Louis, is chairman. 

The annual meeting of the Florists' 
Hail Association will be held at the close 
of this session. 

TRANSPORTATION. 
The Trunk Line Passenger Association, which 
represents all the railroads entering New York 
and Philadelphia, has, in response to the cus- 
tomary ppplication for reduced fares in favor 01 
members of the Society of American Florists at- 
tending the Convention at Atlantic City, decided 
that it will be impracticable to apply the usual 
reduction on the certificate plan, owing to the low 
summer excursion rates in operation to Atlantic 
City. It therefore becomes necessarj- for those 
members intending to go to the Convention to 
make early arrangements with the lines over 
which they shall travel, endeavoring to travel in 
as large companies as possible, as in this way the 
most favorable rates will be secured. Delegates 
from districts represented by a few only should 
communicate with those having cha ge o) the 
transportation from the most convenient large 
city or railroad center, and thus get the benefit of 
such low rates as may be secured from such 
points. 

RECEPTION. 
The chairmen of the various delegations en 
route to Atlantic City are requested to notify the 
chairman of the Reception Committee of the time 
of arrival of their trains, and members of that 
committee will be on hand to escort them to their 
hotels. 

THE TRADE EXHIBIT. 
The trade exhibition will be as heretofore a 
prominent feature. Every branch will be well 
represented. Very little room is left, and those 
desiring space who have not already secured it, 
should apply immediately to the supeiintendent 
of the exhibition, who will supply all information 
rtlative to arrangements, premiums, etc. 

THE BOWLING CONTEST. 
Th's will take place on the evenings of Wednes- 
day and Thursday. Intending competitors in the 
club contest or in the individual competition 



Come to the Convention 

B-J- THE BARO OF IvINGSESSING. 

Come to the convention by the seaside. 

And take a plunge into its restless tide; 

Come Irom your towns on the hot western plain. 

And rest for a time by the cool surging main. 

Come! seekers of wisdom and store your mind 
With knowledge of the most superior kind. 
That will flow from our greatest leading men, 
As they voice their works of the silent pen. 

Come! Ye bowlers, from all over the land. 
And in this the great test take a hand; 
A cup for each contest will be the stake, 
But he that wins must bowl a natural break. 

Come! Our master has sounded the call, 
To give instruction to we scholars all; 
An answer to this question he will give- 
Is it the eelworm or grower that shall live? 

Cora*"! hunters of pleasure, there's much in store; 
A sail on the ocean not far from shore. 
There is the merrv-go-round, safe to ride, 
But more pleasing 's the toboggan slide. 

Come to the convention by the seaside. 
Lassies will be there in need of a guide, 
Though many of them forty summers have seen. 
They will all label themselves "only sixteen." 



Lantanas in Bloom. 



The lantanas certainly possess more 
merit than is generally afforded them; 
they have at least one strong point in 
their favor, viz., their long period of flow- 
ering. When grown as standards they 
are very attractive. I saw some stand- 
ards the other day that were wintered in 
a structure that was kept at an interme- 
diate temperature, and they are no'w 
(outside) completely studded with their 
clusters of bright colored flowers. Though 
so attractive on the plant the strong 
smell that pervades the whole of them, 
especially when bruised, is against their 
being employed in a cut state, at all 
events where they will be closely inspected . 
One point especially noteworthy, with 
regard to the blooms of lantanas, is the 
great change of color which takes place 
after they have been open for a day or 
two; some will on opening be bright yel- 
low, which changes to deep pink. As one 
cluster will contain flowers in all stages 
of development the gradation in color is 
thus rendered the more pronounced. 

Lantanas are of the easiest possible 
culture, and strike root easily from soft 
wood cuttings. Let them run up to the 
height required, but the lateral shoots 
must be kept pinched out until it is at- 
tained, and then leave fiveor six growths 
at the top, which will require careful 
watching as regards pinching until fine 
heads are attained. These standards 
may be kept for years, and will form 
handsome specimens for the lawn. Red 
spider is vervapt to attack them, but fre- 
quent syringing will keep them in check. 
As regards varieties they are numerous; 
La Neige, white; Distinction, bright or- 
ange red; Magenta, purplish magenta; 
Pluie d'Or, fine light yellow, are all good. 

A. J. E. 

The American Florist and Gardening 
together to one address for $1.75. "Send 
orders to the American Florist Co. 



i8g4' 



The American Florist, 




THE CATAFALQUE IN THE PANTHEON. 

FLOWERS AT THE FUNERAL OF THE LATE PRESIDENT OP FRANCE. 



Chicago. 

Old Pluvius seems to hold a special 
spite against the good citizens of this 
town. All around us the hearts of our 
fellow men have been gladdened by copi- 
ous showers, but not a drop for Chicago. 
Or may be the rain god has taken offense 
at the persistency with which the weather 
clerk has predicted rain for this locality, 
and which evidently wasn't on the pro- 
gram. Meanwhile the drought continues 
and outdoor vegetation is suffering badly. 
The want of moisture at the roots is bad 
enough, but the effects of red spider is in 
many localities still worse and threaten 
to ruin violets and carnations unless re- 
lief comes speedily. The watering of out- 
door stock in dry seasons is regarded as 
of rather doubtful benefit to the plants 
by many growers, but be that as it may 
there is no doubt that red spider will be 
kept in check by svringing, which is evi- 
denced by the condition of the fields where 
the sprinkler is used freely. 

Market conditions are much the same 
as last week. There are quantities of 
good auratums and gladiolus coming in, 
which are in small demand however. 

At a meeting of the Florists' Club held 
last Thursday Mr. A. G. Prince was 
elected financial secr<tnry. A communi- 
cation from the Phil;id<"lphia Florists' 
Club extending an invitation to partici- 
pate in a prize shooting match to be held 



at Atlantic City at convention time was 
read and accepted bj' the club. 

Mr. Anton Then is adding two new 
greenhouses to his establishment near 
Bowmanville. Mr. Then is going into 
chrysanthemums quite extensively this 
year. Anumberof olants arebeinggrown 
for the coming exhibition which are look- 
ing fine. Several benches containing 
about 5,500 plants grown to single stem 
look remarkably thrifty and promise first 
class blooms. Mr. T. also has a small 
pond on his grounds in which he is exper- 
imenting with some hardy varieties of 
nympb£eas. The plants are doing nicely 
and next year the pond will be filled with 
the best varieties. 



Boston. 

Trade in cut flowers is unusually quiet 
here even for this time of the year. Local 
demands are very irregular and are con- 
fined mostly to funeral occasions, which 
are bound to occur whether times are 
good or bad. For the seaside resorts the 
customary calls are missing, and this de- 
partment of the wholesalers' business 
promises to be a failure for this year. 
The street boys even are no longer any 
help as an outlet for the surplus, as the 
city authorities have curtailed their priv- 
fleges again. This apparently does not 
help the local stores to any extent, for 
they are just as idle as they can be, and 



they could be no worse if there were five 
hundred boys in the street. 

Roses are, with a few exceptions, of mis- 
erable quality. Carnations are fair. 
There are a few longiflorum lilies coming 
in which sell at $8 per hundred, not abad 
price for the season. Sweet peas continue 
in oversupply, bringing in many instances 
not over 50 cents per thousand. Asters 
in all colors are abundant and cheap. 
Pink pond lilies, and in fact all fancy 
varieties of pond lilies, lack their former 
attractiveness apparently, and remain in 
the store windows until they close their 
petals permanently. 

It was a very happy party that went 
to Milton August 2 on invitation of Mr. 
Wm. J. Martin, the gardener, to visit the 
grounds of Mr. N. T. Kidder. The grand 
beds of hardy herbaceous plants never 
looked so well. Jackson Dawson was 
one of the party, which is equivalent to 
saying that the trip through the grounds 
was an educational one, and everyone 
came away with the feeling that he had 
learnt something. Mr. Martin has some 
promising chrysanthemums which ought 
to be able to give a good account of 
themselves by exhibition time. In the 
houses the stove plants are in their usual 
fine condition and a fine lot of ericas re- 
ceived especial praise. 

The display of aquatics at Horticult- 
ural Hall on August 4 was most attract- 
ive, Dr. R. H. Faunce and L. W. Goodell 



8 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 9, 



showing fine collections. Nelumbium 
Kermesina, from Dr. Faunce was greatly 
admired and his seedling Nymphaja odor- 
ata received a complimentary notice. 
Other interesting features of the exhibi- 
tion were the hardv phloxes from T. C. 
Thurlow, N. T. Kid'der, Rea Bros, and F. 
B. Hayes, Mr. Thurlow 's colkction be- 
ing remarkably fine, and extensive dis- 
plays of tuberous begonias, gloxinias, 
asters, gladioli, hardy herbaceous and 
native flowers. 

Atlantic City talk is in the air and the 
prospects are for a large and representa- 
tive delegation from this vicinity. The 
Boston party will go by the Fall River 
line on Sunday evening August 19, join- 
ing the New York delegation on special 
train from Jersey City. 

Mr. H. W. Gibbon of Hitchings & Co. 
was in town the past week. He has se- 
cured the contract to build a pretty 
range of palm and greenhouses for Mr. 
W. F. Burden at Newport. 

Mr. W. A. Burnham of Lord & Burn- 
ham was also in town. This firm has 
just completed some fine houses for E. B. 
Clapp at Dorchester. 



New York. 



Roses as they come to the market now 
show unmistakably the severe effects of 
the hot weather. The great bulk of those 
being received are very poor indeed. 
There is but little demand for them, good 
or bad, excepting in the case of American 
Beauty, which it good sells fairly well. 
Asters are very abundant and will soon 
apparently rival the sweet peas in their 
ability to get in everybody's way. 
Steamer orders are few and far between 
this year, and the retail florists are dis- 
consolate accordingly. 

There is rejoicing on Canal street, 
abundant smiling all over the city, and 
the sun shines brighter in New Jersey, for 
a young Mr. Weathered has put in an ap- 
pearance, and the illustrious lineage is 
now secure for another generation. 
Charlie can now go to Atlantic City, but 
he has grown in stature so that his old 
friends would scarcely recognize him. He 
would not change places now with any 
man on earth. 

Siebrecht & Wadley have just finished 
planting nine houses of their new rose. 
Belle Siebrecht. Mr. Siebrecht says that 
the principal trouble he finds with it is 
to keep the flower buds picked oflF. 

Alex. Burns has met with a sad be- 
reavement in the loss of his youngest 
daughter, aged 1 year, 9 months, who 
died on July 30 after a few weeks' illness. 



Philadelphia. 



There has been quite a change in the 
weather, which is much cooler. We sup- 
pose the fellows that watch the thermom- 
eter in Washington are about to take 
their vacation. At any rate the relief is 
great and it is to be hoped there will not 
be another hot wave until next summer. 
Heavy rains have also fallen and there is 
much to be thankful for. 

The summer trade is about as usual, 
with probably a little better business 
than common the past week on account 
ot funeral work that seemed to be pretty 
well distributed among all the stores. 

The "crape pullers" are becoming quite 
numerous. We would not be greatly sur- 
prised if they soon formed an organiza- 
tion to give them an air of respectability 
as it were. An advertisement appeared 
in a morning paper recently among the 
wants for a man to solicit orders for 



floral designs for funerals. We have seen 
some pieces sent out by these gentry that 
were very fair, but most of their work is 
atrocious, only the cheapest and poorest 
flowers are used, and when at all scarce 
cape flowers are substituted and form the 
bulk ot their stock in trade. 

There would seem to be plenty of flow- 
ers for all the business there is doing; in 
fact most of the time the growers are 
lucky if they sell out. Any extra demand, 
however, uses up the stock on hand in no 
time and then it is the dealer who does 
the hustling. Valley has been scarce since 
the hail storm at Newport, and but for 
Lukens, of Burlington, and Edwards, of 
Bridgeton, there would now be a dearth 
of this popular flower. Cold storage 
valley brought atone time in this market 
$12 per 100 and sold for $2 per dozen at 
retail. Now $4 per 100 is the wholesale 
price and it brings but $1 per dozen over 
the counter. 

In speaking to a grower recently he 
said the most expensive department of his 
place was the dump. What it cost him 
to keep this up every year would pay his 
coal bill. He believed in keeping his stock 
fresh, clean and up to date in variety and 
did not hesitate to put sick plants on the 
dump rather than nurse them, or discard 
old varieties for new ones if he saw merit 
in them. How often plants are seen occu- 
pying good table room that ought to be 
on the rubbish heap. It may seem like 
throwing money away, but greenhouse 
room is valuable and it is better to stop 
the loss at once and try to catch up on 
the next crop. 

There is quite a good deal more that 
might be said about the social part of 
the convention, but while the arrange- 
ments are nearly all perfected so much de- 
pends on the weather that it is not cer- 
tain just how everything will be carried 
out. 

There is one thing that will interest the 
bowlers, and that is that the alleys on 
which the match is to be played are to be 
made regulation. The pins are to stand 
twelve inches apart from center to center. 
The Phila. club will furnish a lot of balls 
in addition to those on the alleys, and 
other clubs can send what they choose, 
only none must be over 27 inches in cir- 
cumference. 

To the fishermen we would say that 
all kinds of the finny tribe are biting bet- 
ter than for several years past and good 
sport is the result. 

The meeting of the Florists' Club last 
Tuesday evening was a large and enthu- 
siastic one. Every chair was taken and 
every one seemed very much interested in 
the proceedings. The large attendance was 
partly owing to the near approach of the 
convention, but the fact that President 
Lonsdale was to read a paper entitled "A 
few notes about commercial orchids," 
was responsible for the greater part of the 
gathering. His paper w^as all that was 
expected of it, a very practical one, while 
at the same time it was instructive and 
entertaining. He was voted the thanks 
of the club and the paper was directed to 
be given to the committee on publication. 
The principal time of the meeting was 
taken up bv reports of the various com- 
mittees. Nearly all have their work up 
to date and are very enthusiastic over 
the outlook. 

John Burton, who has charge of the 
shooting match, isdoing all he can to get 
a team together to represent Philadelphia 
and is to have a lot of the boys up near 
his place on Friday next to try their hand 
and see what they can do. 

Mr. Westcott, of the bowling com- 
mittee, had all the prizes on exhibition 



and Ihcy were much admiicd. He thinks 
from the entries tnat he has received and 
from other clubs that are sure to be on 
hand that there will be at least ten clubs 
in the contest. He expects some fine 
scores to be made and thinks there will 
be many surprises. 

The entertainment committee report 
that the entertainment on the Iron Pier 
Friday evening will be of a social nature 
and everybody will be made to feel at 
home. 

A fine gavel and block was presented by 
the committee having this matter in 
charge. The gavel is of dogwood from 
the late Geo. W. Childs' place at Woot- 
ton, and the block from a piece of wood 
taken from the Michigan log cabin on 
same place. The gavel has three silver 
bands and together with the block makes 
a fine and useful ornament for the presi- 
dent's desk. 

There was a special meeting of the club 
called for August 14 to take any further 
action that might be necessary in conven- 
tion matters. 

There will be a very large delegation 
from this city, and it is hoped that the 
attendance at the convention will be 
larger than ever before. K. 



St. Louis. 



The welcome rain of last week has had 
the effect of livening things up wonder- 
fully and the change in temperature 
has been most marked, the nights being 
real cool, the glass going to 58° and 60° 
right along. Trade however, or what 
there is of it, remains the same, the only 
event of importance being the addition 
by Mr. Wm. Ellison of a wire work 
department to his wholesale cut flower 
store, this being something he has long 
contemplated. 

The bedding in Forest Park looks well, 
there being more of it this season than 
ever before, and it has been done with 
much greater taste. The indications are 
that it will be increased from year to 
year, as they are adding the present sea- 
son one 50 by 18 equal span house to 
the three they already have; the latest to 
be used for palms and the other large 
plants used during the summer in the out 
door work. 

The 21x96 foot, three-quarter span 
house, building at Shaw's Garden, has 
recently been completed; the finishing 
touches were delayed over a month ow- 
ing to the half inch slate of which the 
bench bottoms are made, being tied up in 
the strike on its way from the quarries in 
Pennsylvania. The house is built in three 
sections and so arranged that different 
temperatures can be maintained in each. 
Mr. Gurney expresses himself as being 
pleased with the work. 

Mr. Huckeof Belleville has also been 
troubled on account of the strike, his new 
lose house being finished with the excep- 
tion of the ventilating gears, which are 
somewhere between here andthefoundry. 

Julius Koenig is erecting an 18x80 foot 
three-quarter span house, in place of two 
smaller ones that have been torn down, 
he reports everything as jeing quiet in 
North St. Louis. 

Busch and Purzner, of Jefferson City, 
are erecting an 80x20 foot, three-quarter 
span house. It is to be heated with hot 
water under pressure. 

An indiscreet letter from one of our 
members to a fellow craftsman in Cincin- 
nati, and the unexpected use to which it 
was put, has rendered useless the work 
accomplished in securing reduced rates to 
the convention. At present all negotia- 
tions are declared off by the railroads. 



18^4' 



The American Florist. 



Hotels at Atlantic City, N. J. 



NAME. 

Albemarle, 

Amole. 

Aidmore, 

Baltiniore Villa, 

Belleview, 

Brevoort, 

By-the-Sea, 

Carlyle, 

Clifton, 

Edgewater, 

Castle mere, 

Ep worth, 

Glenville, 

Hewitt, 

Berkeley, 

Elberson, 

Hoffraan, 

Wellingtou. 

Wiltshire, 

Lehman, 

Lelande, 

Louella, 

Monterey, 

Ocean Villa. 

Paik Cottage. 

Raymond, 

Saratoga, 

Upton, 

Vinedole. 

Windsor, 

Fray more, 

Brighton, 

Dennis, 

Shelbume. 

Haddon Hall, 

Chalfonte, 

Kenilworth, 

United States, 

The Stratford, 



PROPRIETOR. 

C. E. Cope, 
Mrs. S. C. Amole, 
Mrs. Story, 
Mrs. Hallahan, 
Mrs. McClure, 
Mr. Nonis, 

Mrs. Hotine, 
Mrs. Cope, 
Miss Parkenson, 
Mrs. M. Muldune, 
M. M. Downs, 
Mrs. Hopkins, 
W. S. Ives, 
Bew Bros. 
Mrs. M. J. Eckert 
Mrs. Calloway, 
H. S. Milnur, 
E.L. Chandler & Co, 
Miss Lehman, 
S. Wagner, 
Mrs. Carver, 
E- K Newcomet. 
Mrs. Schernberger, 
M. B. Walker, 
Mrs. M. D. Evans, 
Mrs. S. A. Haines, 
Mrs. Fothergill, 
Mrs. Frambes, 
G. Waters & Son. 
W. W. Green & Co. 
F. Hensley & Son, 
Joseph Barton, 
J. W. Southwick, 
Leeds & Lippincott 
Mrs. Roberts & Son 
Mrs. Grubb, 
J. S. Davis, 
(European plan), 



SITUATION. 

Cor. Virginia & Pacific Aves. 
21 South. South Carolina Ave. 
166 South, Virginia Ave. 
120 South. Tennessee Ave. 
Ocean End New Jersey Ave. 
18 South, South Carolina Ave, 
Cor. Mass. & Pacific Ave. 
102 South, So. Carolina Ave. 
Cor. Atlantic & Conn. Aves 
123 South, So Carolina Ave. 
1U6 South. So. Carolina Ave. 
121 South. So. Caioliua Ave, 
South Tennessee Ave. 
29 South Pennsylvania Ave, 
Ocean End Kentucky Ave. 
Cor. Tenn. & Pacific Aves. 
South Pennsylvania Ave. 
South Kentucky Ave. 
. South Virginia Ave. 
1!4 Sou h Penna. Ave. 
Mass. Ave. and Ocean, 
138 South Tennessee Ave. 
Virginia Ave. Ocean End. 
So Carolina & Pacific. 
ia02 Pacific Ave. 
South Virginia Ave, 
South Carolina Ave. 
South Tennessee Ave. 
South Pennsylvania Ave. 
South Illinois Ave. 
South Illinois Ave. 
South Indiana Ave. 
South Micnigan Ave. 
South Michigan Ave. 
North Carolina Ave. 
, North Carolina Ave. 
Kentucky Ave. Beach End, 
Maryland & Pacific Aves. 
Beach End Kentucky Ave. 8150, «2 & 



CAPACITY. 


K-ATES PER WKEK. 


150 


88.00 to JI4.00 


40 


8.00 to 


12 00 


125 


8.00 to 


1200 


40 


8 00 to 


12 00 


100 


10.00 to 


15.00 


00 


S.OOto 


12.00 


50 


8,00 to 


12.00 


150 


SOU to 


12 00 


50 


8.00 to 


12.00 


50 


10.00 to 


12.00 


30 


8.00 to 


12 00 


40 


8.00 to 


1200 


100 


8.00 to 


12.00 


60 


10.00 to 


12.00 


150 


12.00 to 


18.00 


200 


10.00 to 


12.00 


200 


18.00 to 


20.00 


300 


15.00 to 


20.00 


150 


15.00 to 


25.00 


200 


15.00 to 


20.00 


160 


15 00 to 


25 00 


40 


8.00 to 


1200 


100 


12 00 to 


20 00 


60 


8.00 to 


12 00 


30 . 


9.00 to 


12.00 


75 


12 00 to 


18.00 


40 


10 00 to 


12.00 


50 


8 00 to 


12 00 


40 


8.00 to 


12.00 


250 


18 00 to 


30.00 


260 


18.00 to 


30.00 


300 


20.00 to 


as.oo 


500 


18.00 to 


30.00 


200 


18.00 to 


30.00 


250 


18 00 to 


30.00 


230 


18.00 to 


30.00 


150 


15.00 to 


20.00 


Special rate 


$2.50 & «3.« 


per day 


H 50, S2& $2.80 per day; 


Bo rooms 



who declare that nothing but full rates 
both ways will be sold. This decision 
came in the nature of a disagreeable sur- 
prise to a party of seven that had decided 
to leave on the 6tb, spending some time 
on the coast before the convention. As 
soon as it was found that the rates given 
were declared off the party dwindled to 
three. When it is understood that the 
falling through of negotiation costs each 
member attending the conventions $22. 50 
more than it otherwise would have done 
as well as placing the florists in the eyes 
of the railroad making the rate as un- 
trustworthy and not to be depended on 
the vigorous kick and severe comments 
heard trom all can be understood. It is 
extremely doubtful if any thing can be 
done in time to go to the convention and 
if bettei rates than those offv^red at 
present cannot be had it is extremely 
doubtful if there will be enough St. 
Louisans in Atlantic City to compose a 
bowling team. R. F. T. 



St. Paul, Minn. 



Every line of business here is dull, and 
the florists' especially so. In a retail way 
quite a good many flowers are used for 
funeral work, but outside of an occasional 
order in that line nothing whatever is 
selling. The growers especially are feel- 
ing glum, but as one of them recently 
remarked, "What can you expect when 
strikes, protracted drouth ard congres- 
sional dilly dally upset all calculations." 

Rose planting is completed and mums 
are well alone. Growers have taken ad- 
vantage of the dull season to get their 
houses in shape lor another season's busi- 
ness, and places visited are looking better 
than for several years past. 

In roses somefairMeteorand LaFrance 
are being cut. Kaiscrin retains its good 
qualities and with the increase in the size 
of the blossoms as the season advances 
promises to fulfill the predictions made 
for it, viz., the best white rose vet intro- 
duced forsummeriorcing. Some Beauties, 
new crop, are being cut, but the quality 
is poor. Sweet peas are nearly gone, the 
intense heat and drouth having ruined 
them. Gladioli are looking friirly well, 
though the spikes ai-e smaller thnn usual. 
In common with everything else they are 
suffering from the lack of rain. Carna- 



tions are standing the season well and 
forming good stools, though a good rain 
would be beneficial to them. Violets out- 
side are small but healthy. 

Vegetation throughout the city has 
suffered terribly. Shade trees are dying 
by the hundreds, while green lawns are a 
luxury. Our florist friends who are with- 
out city water feel the need of it more 
keenly than ever. Hydrangea paniculata 
is now in bloom and with its wealth of 
blossoms in long drooping clusters em- 
phasizes its worth more strongly than 
ever. As a late summer flowering shrub 
it stands without a peer in this section. 
Some fine clematis are also seen in full 
bloom, provingthat with proper care and 
protection they can be grown as success- 
fully here as in more favored localities. 

We regret to say that St. Paul will not 
be well represented, if at all, at the con- 
vention. This is to be deeply regretted, 
as many practical points and hints will 
undoubtedly be learned at the meeting. 

Brother Taplin in his very able article 
in your last issue hits the nail on the head 
in advising florists to organize and main- 
tain pricts. If we had more of such ser- 
mons daily it would be a benefit to the 
craft at large. Right here in these twin 
cities we have reaped some of the fruits 
of cut prices, and yet florists attributed 
poor sales, etc. to department stores. 
While it should be the aim of every grower 
to sell all his stock a little judicious ad- 
vertising in local papers and "bargain 
days" torsurp'uses would find everything 
sold at the end of the season and no very 
bad cut made at any time. 

We note but very few double white and 
pink hollyhocks and no summer grown 
Bermuda lilies. For funeral work these 
are verj' fine and should not be over- 
looked another season. With a little 
extra protection hollyhocks can be win- 
tered over nicely. Felix. 



Toronto. 



dener of the institution said he would at- 
tend and make satisfactory explanations, 
but as he did not turn up the meeting ad- 
journed after waiting for an hour not in 
the most amiable state of mind, and will 
probably interview the manager or di- 
rectors. At present this institution has 
only a small area of glass, but there is a 
rumor that it intends to put up much 
more. Some of the boys think there is 
nothing in the whole business worth 
kicking about, and others think that 
though it may be only a small matter 
now it might develop into a big affair if 
not nipped in the bud. 

Cattleya Dowiana is now flowering 
with Mr. Vair at Chestnut Park, and 
Cattleya chrysotoxa is blooming at the 
Normal Schools; the latter is a plant im- 
ported three years ago, and this is the 
first time it has shown bloom. It is not 
mentioned in Nicholson's Dictionary, but 
a colored plate of both may be seen in 
"Reichenbachia," if anyone is so fortu- 
nate as to be able to get access to that 
magnificent publication. Neither plates 
do justice to the originals, however; the 
purple in the original is much brighter 
and darker, and the veining finer and 
more distinct. 

Very pleasant weather now — not too 
hot, not too cold, now and then a shower, 
just right. E. 



There is some stir in florist circles over 
the alleged selling of plants and cut flow- 
ers by a public institution justoutsidethe 
ci*y at less than market prices. A com- 
mittee was appointed b? the G. and F. 
Association to inquire into the matter, 
and a meeting was held, which the gar- 



Denver. 

Business very dull. 

Ninety days until the chrysanthemum 
show. 

Everv one is complaining of grasshop- 
pers. They are eating up nearly all out- 
side crops. 

Foreman Beach, of MaufTs, wears a 
very satisfied smile when the subject of 
chrysanthemums is mentioned. 

It is reported that J. L. Miller Floral 
Company have something in the way of 
a surprise to spring on the boys at our 
next chrysanthemum show. 

The board of directors of the Denver 
Florist's Society have apportioned the 
prizes for the coming show. They have 
offered eight hundred dollars in all, be- 
sides numerous special premiums which 
have been offered by individuals. 

The Park Floral Company, 0. A. Wig- 
gam, president, John L. Russell, manager, 
have erected four 18x100 houses, and one 
11x100, on the ten acres recently leased 
by them from the Colorado State School 
Board. It is their intention to erect five 
more 11-foot houses in the near future. 

The Colfax Floral Company are erect- 
ing a chrysanthemum house 125x23, in 
addition to their already large plant. 

Harrison H. Given has completed re- 
building his rose houses at Lincoln and 
Alameda avenues, and has a large crop of 
roses and other cut flowers well under 
way for the coming season. 

Mr. A. M. Lewis, the manager of the 
Colfax Floral Company's store, is taking 
a short vacation at Evergreen, Colo., in 
the heart of the Rockies. He took four 
pounds of smoking tobacco, two cases of 
beer, a gallon of bottled hardware, four 
fish hooks, a loaf of bread, and a can of 
sardines with him, and announced his in- 
tention of depopulating Bear Creek of its 
finnyinhabitants; hence thelarge amount 
of "bait." Mrs. Lewis will endeavor to 
accommodate thelarge rush of patronage 
the store will have during his absence. 

Mr. C. J. Hurt, Harman, Colo., has 
completed a new range of greenhouses, 
7,000 square feet of glass in all, which 
will be devoted to raising choice cut flow- 
ers and bulb forcing. 



10 



The American Florist. 



Aug. p, 



A visit *-o Gallup's greenhouses at Uni- 
versity Park, shows a rtmark-<bly tine 
stand of roses. Mr. Adams, foreman of 
this place, makes aspecialty of Woottons, 
growinp them so perfect that they readily 
command ''Beauty" prices. Mr. Adams 
does not have a visible growth of speci- 
men chrysanthemums tor the show, hue 
made the remark to your correspoi dent 
that "it was not always necessarv to 
grow a lot of plants to grow to perfec- 
tion." There is a suspicion among the 
boys that Adwms keeps his best plants in 
the coal hole out of sight of visitors. 

Harrison H. Given has returned trom a 
short vacation at Deansbury, in PlHtte 
Canon, where he and his wife have been 
for several weeks past on account of Mr. 
Given's bad health. 

A visit to Wolhurst, Senator E. O. Wol- 
cott's Colorado home, at this time of the 
season, shows a sight not to be seen an ? 
place else in the west. A more coinplete 
experimental grounds could not be imag- 
ined. Mrs. Wolcott, who is an ardent 
admirer of all that is horticultural and 
floricu'tural, has spared no pnins or 
money in securing plants and shrubs from 
all quarters of the globe, and, with the 
able assistance of Superintendent John 
Berry, the result is that after three years 
growth the grounds present a scene to 
delight the eye of any admirer of the 
goddess Flora. 

Denver florists have requested your 
corrtsporident repeatedly to call the at- 
tention of the outside world to the fact 
that Denver already has four times as 
much glass devoted to growing cut tlow- 
ers, in proportion tothe numberof inhab- 
itants and tributary country, as any city 
in the United States. A large amount of 
glass that has been built in the last two 
years is paying poorly, if at all, and it is 
to discourage the investment, or the 
thought of investment, of eastern capital 
in the fiirist's business in this city that 
this item is wtitten. If any florist is 
thinking of Colorado, or Df-nver in par- 
ticular, as a field of new operation my 
advice is to look the grourd over person- 
allv before you decide to invest. 

The board of directors of the Denver 
Florists' Society are anxious to receive 
exhibits of cut chrysanthemums from 
growers in any portion nf the Umtf d 
States at their coming chrysanthemum 
show November 7. All such exhibits will 
be cared for and staged by the committee 
and the length of journey they have un- 
dergone will be taken into consideration 
in judging them for prizes. The prize 
taken last year by E. G. Hill & Co., of 
Richmond, Ind., for twenty-five be^t 
blooms, is offered again this season, and 
it is hoped that the competition for this 
particular prize will be close and that 
many entries will be made in this class, 
as the premium is well worth competing 
for, as Messrs. Hill & Co. will testifi . It 
is also hoped that the premium cup offered 
by Harrison H. Given for the best seed- 
ling chrysanthemum not exhibited before 
this season, will be liberally competed for. 
Any person desiring information as to 
our show will receive the same bv ad 
dressing Adam Kohankie,box 275, S 'uth 
Denver, Colo. H. H. G. 



turned a verdict in favor of Mr, Gooding 
for the lull amount. 

The writer paid a visit to the Cushman 
gladiolus farm this wetk. It is located 
in Euclid, , and is accessible by the elec- 
tric cars from this city. Therewere glad- 
iolus in all stages of growth, from the 
little infant to the greatgrandfather, and 
acres of thim in full flower. One lot of 
seedlings oi Mr. Cushman's own saving 
were exceedinjily fine and of great prom- 
ise, there being so many fine white, pink 
and yellow flowers among them. Mr. C. 
has secured space at the forthcoming con- 
vention and will make an exhibit of cut 
blooms. L- F. D. 




Cleveland. 



J. C. Goodinsr recently brought suit 
against Harry Gordon, prr'prietor of the 
Gordon Greenhouses, for $298 hack sal- 
ary. The defense claimed that while Mr. 
Gooding had charge of the houses stock 
so depreciated that the flowers grown 
vrould not bring first-class prices as they 
should in an open market. The jury re- 



DwiGHT, 111 — Aaron Good is starting 
in the Du>iness here. 

Watertown, Wis. — LoffHer Bros, are 
erecting a new house 10x80 for violets. 

Alliance, — Our season's trade was 
good. No cuts in prices and collections 
good. 

Elmira.N. Y.— L. a Lacharme is build- 
int 4 ><rcen houses, each 125 feet long, for 
growing cut flowers. 

Painesville, Ohio. — Wm. C. Werner 
has creciea three bou>es and entered the 
trade here as general retail florist. 

Cincinnati, 0. — The assignee of Chas. 
J. Jones, Jr.,ieports it doubtful if the gen- 
eral creditors will receive any dividend. 

Lake Geneva, Wis— The Button Bros, 
are together again and the firm name has 
been changed back to Button Bros. & 
Co., as it was before the change last 
month. 

Denver, Colo. — The Colfax Avenue 
Floral Co. is »dding two new equal span 
houses 25x125 for carnations, also 
Ungthening their propagating house by a 
25-f >ot addition. 

Sacramento, Cal — Spring plant trade 
was aooui 25% 'ess than last year. Col- 
lections more difficult. New florists that 
have started during the nast year are C. 
B. Strong & Co. and H. McWilliams. 

Peoria, 111.— The wife o* Mr. James C. 
Murray, the florist, died Julv 25, after 
many weeks of suffering. The funeral 
was held Friday, July 27. Mr. Murray 
has the sympathy of his many friends in 
the trade. 

Waterville, N. Y. — Stewart Ritchie 
for the last nine years with William 
O-borne, has bought a place at Newport, 
R. I., and will move there on the first of 
August. He will run a regular green- 
house bu-ini ss. 

Pittsburg — The third annual picnic of 
the Piilsburg and Al'egheny Florists' 
and Garder ers' Club wdl be held at Ross 
Grove August 9. The committee of ar- 
rangements is composed of Messrs. J. 
Barter, E. C. Reineman and E. C. Ludwig. 
A good time is assured. 

Readville, Mass.— Walter Butler has 
just added a new greenhouse 65x25, con- 
necting it with two others 100 feet long, 
also a boiler house with two s'ores over- 
head 32x16. He has built 1 200 running 
feet of tienches and will grow this season 
lilies, chrysanthemums, Jacqs and carna- 
tions. 

Denver, Colo — Edward W. Pike, well 
krown to horticulturists of Indiana and 
Illinois, died July 26 near this city from 



injuries resulting from a fall from his 
tuggy. Mr. Pike was 78 years of age 
and h?d lived in the neighborhood of Chi- 
cago for nearly 50 years. He was one of 
the pioneers in horticulture in the west. 

Louisville, Ky.— The florists of Louis- 
ville have decided to hold their fifth an- 
nual chrysanthemum show November 6 
to 10 inclusive. Although the prospects 
for financial success are not very flatter- 
ing it is to be hoped there will be no 
great loss. Full information may be had 
by addressing the secretary, Mr. H. 
Nanz, 582 Fourth avenue. 

Brooklyn. N Y.— Mr. Joseph Sormani, 
a young Dutch florist, who three years 
ago settled in Flatbush, after coming here 
from California, where he had charge of 
extensive vineyards, will shortly open a 
large floral establishment on Fort Ham- 
ilton avenue, near Greenwood Cemetery, 
in association with Mr. Emile Bunne- 
kamp, a Holland bulb importer. 

Saginaw, Mich., East Side.— The firm 
of A. Grohmann & Sons will htreafter be 
known as GrohiLann Bros. Tne two 
junior members of the old firm, Messrs. 
Edward A. and Albert A., compose the 
new firm. They are erecting three new 
houses 18x100 and one 18x50, also boiler 
house and dwelling at their newgrounds, 
3369 South Washington avenue, opposite 
Forest Lawn Cemetery. 

Springfield, Mo.— Mr. Rudolnh Koep- 
pen has sold out to Messrs. E. Koeppen 
and W. A. Stalev, who will continue the 
business under the firm name of Koeppen 
& S aley. They have torn down one old 
house and have added two new houses 
for roses, one for carnations and two for 
general plants. They will also have 
about 2,000 feet of glass on hotbeds the 
coming winter. Their place is at 1205 
to 1213 Boonville street. 



Chicago to Atlantic City. 

The Chicago Florist Club has secured a 
special low rate to the S. A. F. conven- 
tion at Atlantic City, over the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad. Train leaves Chicago at 
3 p. m. Sunday, August 19, passing over 
the Allegheny Mountains in daylight and 
reaching Atlantic City Monday evening. 
Florists in the west and northwest who 
wish to join the party are cordially 
invited to do so. Berthsmay be reserved 
and further information obtained by ad- 
dressing the chairman of the Chicago 
Club's committee, Mr. G. L. Grant, 322 
Dearborn street, Chicago. 



Catalogues Received. 

Chas. D. Ball, Holmesburg, Philadel- 
phia, Pa., palms, ferns and decorative 
plants; Mrs. T. B. Shepherd, Ventura, 
Cal., seeds, olants and bulbs; E Iwanger 
& Birry, Roi hester, N. Y., pot grown 
strawberries; Schlegel & Fottler, Boston, 
bulbs and supplies; W. Baylor Hartland, 
Cork, Ireland, dafi'odils; J. L. Dillon, 
Bloomsburg, Pa., roses; Peter Van Vclsen 
& Sons, Houtvaart, Holland, Lulbs; E. 
Y. Teas, Irvington, Ind., nursery stock. 



At the California Mid-Winter Inter- 
national Exposition, San Francisco, the 
Sunset Seed and Plant Co. were awarded 
gold medals for sweet pea seeds, sweet 
pea blossoms, ornamental and decorative 
plants, also for garden, field and flower 
seeds and horticultural requisites. 

Please mention the American Florist 
everv time you write to an advertiser. 



i8g4^ 



The American Florist. 



11 



SITUATIONS, WANTS, FOR SALE. 

Advertisements under this head will be Inserted at 
the rate of 10 cents a line (seven words) each inser- 
tion. Cash must accompany order. Plant advs. not 
admitted under this head. 

CJITUATIOX WANTED-By a flrst-class assistant: 
lO thoroutrhly competent; 4 years In commercial 
place East preferred iPhlladelplila). Address 

ASSISTANT, care American Florist. 

SITUATION WANTED- By a young man. 18 years, 
In or around greenhouses, b years' experience: 
good references. Address 

Florist, IiOH Blalr Ave.. Scranton, I'a. 

SITUATION WANTED— On or before Sept. 1. by 
competent florist as first assistant or to take 
charge. Bcht of rettrenees. For paitlcu'ars p. ease 
address with your terms to Fi.ukist. 

care Mr. Selby Myers St. Joseph. Mo. 

iJITUATlOX WANTED— By a young florl8f.»5 years 
O of age to take charge of a shipping depanment; 
thorougli knowledge in executing all kind of mail and 
express orders; first-class references Address 

U K. care American Florist. Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— By a practical gardener 
and florist: commercial or private place; ItJ years' 
experience In all branches; sober, reliable. Best ref- 
erences. Address Gardener. 

care John Locher, Frankly St., Guttenberg, N. J. 



SITUATION WANTED— By a young man. 20 years 
old; German, can speiik English; in commercial 
place: well up in roses, carnations, violets, stove and 
greenhduse plants. Flr^t-class references Address 
Berxhaiid Schkller. box 147. Soldiers" Home, 
Leavenwoith, Kan. 

SITUATION WANTED-By a competent German 
O florist; have had twenty years' experience in the 
business; good rose and general cut flower grower and 
plantsmari; also good decorator and designer. Will 
work on percentage or wages. Please state wages. 
Add^e^s A M. care American Floilst. 

SITUATION WANTKD— By gardener and florist, 
experienced in growing roses. CHrnations. violets 
and mushrooms fiT tlie trade; also (.-nrnpetent to grow 
general htock and taSe full chnrge of private or com- 
mercial place; age ;^2. abstainer, good references. 
State parilculars. with wages, etc.. to 

G. AND F.. care American Florist. 

SITUATION WANTED- A practical fioriet and gar- 
dener of executlveablllty and experience on hort- 
IcuUuraj mattt r. fully posted on all the routine and 
requisites of first-ciiiss commercial places, inside and 
outside matter, general pmpagation. including nur- 
sery stock, sueh as roses, shrubs, conifer, etc.; want 
situation accordingly: best references. Address 

PRACTICAL, care Am. Klorlbt. Chicago. 



ANTED— A second-hand boUer; must be In fair 
condition; state kind; must be ciieap. Address 
Lock Box F, Lake Geneva, Wis. 



W' 



WANTED— A reliable man to take wliolesale place 
on percentage near BaMiraore; a g«)0d chance. 
Address Bo.\ \Ti. Westminster, Md. 

WANTED— Greenhouse assistant, steady and relia 
ble. Slate experience, and wwges per month 
with board. GEO S. Beij>ing. Midd etown, N. Y. 

WANTED— Florist, reliable, sober, for roses and 
general stock. State terms and experience. 
J. T. WiM.iA.MsoN. Prop'rLa Hose uardens. 
Memphis, Tenn. 

WANTED To correspond with :i yourg man who Is 
a good decorator and designer, competent to fill 
position In a retail store. Address 

WESTEitN, care American Florist, Chicago. 

WANTED— A young man to as.slst In general fruit 
forcirigestablishment: must have been In green- 
houses before; one willing and obliging and wishing a 
steady place. Address 

FtntE.MAN. River View. Concord. Ma^s. 

WANTED— By experienced grower of roses, etc., 
well acquainted with all the requirements of 
retail and wholesale trade, wishes to take charge of 
commercial place for percentage of profits, or would 
like til lease, if on eapy terms. Address 

11 P. care American Florist. Chicago. 



lOR SALE CHEAP— Large second-hand florist's Ice 
Box, value about $75. Vai'ohans Seed Store. 
88 State Street, Chicago. 



F 



OK SALE OR RKNT-G eenhouse, 20UO square ft. 
glass. For particulars inquire of 

Theu Noehee. Green Bay. Wis. 

OR SALE-150(J feet -l-lntih p'pe-Hltchlngs. Price 
on application. P R. Ql'INLAN & Co.. 

'.H.H W. Genesee St.. Syracuse, N. Y. 



F 



OR S\LE OR RENT-lo.WO or 30.0tO square ft. of 
glass. For particulars Inquire of 

A. T. Jackson. Station X. Chicago. 



FOR SALE CHEAP— Large, new hard wood and 
glass florists Refrigerator. Used at World's Fair. 
Co8tf2oU. VAUGtiAN's Seed Store. 

14H & 1-18 West Washington St., Chicago. 

FOR SALE— In northeni Indiana, greenhouse plant 
of O.fUU feet of glass In greenhouses and sash. Wk 
acres land, good general slock t-f plants, rosef. carna- 
tions and chrysanthemums; greenhouses antl house 
lieated wltli steam. Indiana care Am Florist. 

FOR SALE-:i.;00 feet glass: sales up to date y-'.OOU 
cash: sales last year S-'J-ftUO cash. Division station 
on Union Pacific railroad; sugar factor\ and Union 
Pacific machine shops: city of in.iXiO: houses built two 
vears; heated by steam: well stocked. 

W. H. Jones. Grand Island. Neb. 



FOR SALE— On account of sickness, greenhouses of 
liOO feet of glass, heated by steam: all in good 
condition. Also dwelling house and ground, Good 
retail cut flower and bedding plant trade- ilO Inhab- 
itants: no other florist: three minutes to rallrond sta- 
tion: thirty minutes to Broad street station. Philadel- 
phia; S4 trains dally. Or. will sell greenhouses and 
give a lease on dwelling house and ground Ordy 
those meaning business need to applv for particulars. 
Address Kobert Craig, 

4tHh and Market Sts.. Phlla.. Pa. 

Woodbury greenhouses 

ARE STILL FOR RENT. 

If you are the right man. and mean business, 
you will receive extra iuduceiuents in renting the 
greenhouses. 

For description see American Florist for 
June. 

J. H. LUPTON. Woodbury, N. J. 

FOR SALE OR RENT. 

Two large greenhouses lU'i feet long by 18 feet wide, 
containing 5U0U feet of gla'-s: bulit two years ago. with 
all modern Improvements, by the late ,lohn P. Nitter- 
house. practical florist Greenhouses sltui. ted J^ mile 
from town: convenient to two rail oads. and stocked 
with roses, carnations, etc. Possession given Oct. 1st. 
For further partlcu ars address 

Mrs. S. J. Nitterhouse. W»ynesboF0. 

Franklin Co,, Pa. 

Greenhouses to Rent. 

At Moorestown, Burlington Co., New Jersey, 
nine miles from Philadelphia, on railroad, four 
houses, 10 000 feet of glass, two boilers. Sp endid 
opportunitv. 

JOS. T. SULLIVAN, Moorestown, N. J. 

For Sale or Rent. 

One of the largest and most successful plants in 
the State of Ohio, consisting of about .50,001) feet of 
glass, with three or six acres of fine land; houses 
all in the best of order, and as good as new; 
adapted to cut flowers. Reasons for selling, the 
increasing demand for the Standard Ventilating 
Machines demands more of tnv time than I can 
possibly give it and run the florist business. For 
particulars address 

E HIPi'ARD, Younijstown. Ohio. 

Wholesale and retail ornamental nursery 
and greenhouses, in the best residence city 
of Southern California. Fine business loca- 
tion and com lete stock, fixtures, etc. A 
rare opening for the right man with moder- 
ate capital. For particulars address 

"Califorma," care Am Florist. 

FOR SALE. 

Six (6) greenhouses, two hot water boilers, 
sbout 2000 feet 2-inch wrought iron pipe, 
valves, etc., lot of hotbed sash, frames, 
benches and about 35,000 tlower pots. The 
entire plant will be sold at a very low cash 
price, as the whole must be removed off the 
premises before Sept. 1st. For particulars 
address l. R. MLINN. Station C, Brooklyn. N. Y. 



ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 

Unli6[l SMiGS Hotel. 

special Rates to Florists: S2.50 (two in 
room), ^:j.00 single. 

FIKST-CLASS AProJNTMENT.S. 

Kng^age rooms in advance. 



SMILAX. 



SMILAX. 



Very strong, clean, healthy plants from 

2X-inch pots, $2.50 per ICO; 

$20.00 per 1000. 

Address J. G. BURROW, Fishkill, N. Y. 

Mentldn Amerlcnn Klojist. 

YOUNG PALMS FOR FLORISTS' USE 

CHE.Vl" TO M.VKE KOon. 

Size pots, neit-'ht Per 100 

Kentia Belmoreana :i-inch 13 to 1.') In. $20 (111 

Forsierlana. ... 3-Inch 12to:illln. il) 00-25.00 

Arera BHuerl ;Mncli l.sto241n. 2.^.00 

Seaforthlaeles-'ars :Hnch IS to 24 In. 20.00 

Pboenlx recllnata 3IdcIi S to 10 in. 20 OO 

Pandanusutllis 2^ln. StolOln. l.i.OO 

All stock Is In healthy condition and ready for 

slilfli g on. .'lU at 100 rates- 

MENDENHALL GREENHOUSES. Minneapolis, Minn. 

Mention American Florist. 



TJLAMERIGtN FLORIST GO.'S 

DIRECTORY 
REFERENCE BOOK 

FOR 1894 

CONTAINS THE FOLLOWING: 

1. The names and addresses of the Florists. Nur- 
serymen and Seedsmen of the United States 
and Canada, the exact branch o* the business 
each is engaged in being indicated. 
A separate list of firms that issue catalogues, 
the space devoted to each branch o' the busi- 
ness in each catalogue being also given. 
A li'-t of the names and addresses of superin- 
tendents of leading parks in the U. S. and 
Canada. 

A list of the principal cemeteries of America 
at which the arts of the landscape gardener 
and florist are used in beautifying the grounds. 
A complete, alphabetically arrauged list of 
Roses in commerce in America with class, 
habit of growth, date of introHuctiou. name 
of introducer, and brief, accurate descriptions 
of the flower of each. Synonyms are also 
plainly given. 

A complete, alphabetically arranged list of 
Chrysanthemums in commerce iu America, 
wnth class, and brief, accurate description of 
each. Synonyms are noted and varieties that 
are very popular with American giowers are 
designated by a star, and this year's intro- 
ductions by a dagger. 

A complete, alphabetically arranged list ot 
the Carnations in commerce in America, with 
name of introducer, date of introduction and 
brief, accurate description of each. 
Seasonable Hints for the year, arranged in 
weeks, written by Mr. William Scott, and 
covering every detail of a general florist busi- 
ness. This is decidedly the most valuable 
contribution to the literature of the trade ever 
published. It is written in a plain, practical 
way. by a man who knows what he is talking 
about. 

A historical sketch of the Society of American 
Florists from its organization to date, includ- 
ing officers for each year and lists of essays 
read at each meeting, with other information 
of interest. 

Asimil-r his'orical sketch of the American 
Association of Nurserymen. 
A simitar historical sketch of the American 
Carnation Society. 

A similar historical sketch of the American 
Seed Trade Association. 

Similar historical sketches of the Florists' 
Hail Association of America; of the National 
Chrysanthemum Society of America; of the 
Florists' Telegraph Delive y Association. 
A complete list of all National and Local 
Trade Organizations, with names and ad- 
dresses of principal oflScers, time and place 
of meetings, etc. 

Statistics of Commercial Floriculture in the 
U. S. from the la-t census. 
Statistics of the Nursery Industry in the U. S. 
from the last census. 

Statistics ot Seed Growing in the U. S. from 
the last census. 

A list of Leading Horticultural Societies, with 
name and address of the Secretary of each. 
Full information about Express and Postage 
rates on plants shrubs, trees, seeds and bulbs 

No fess than 270 pages of valuable reference 

matter in compact form, and all 

UP TO DATE. 



PRICE $2.00 POSTPAID. 



AMERICAN FLORIST CO., 



P, O. Dra'wer 164. 



CHICAGO. 



Greenhouse p'ant 7 miles from center of (_"liloai:o m 
one of its flnest suhurOs: S liouses .^Ixll, one ri»x20. 
Hoi water; estubltshed all-round ret ill trade; good 
winter ptock. Lone; house and ground lease, or will 
sell entire. A wreat bart;nln. Address 

Bo.x 1 . care American Florist. 

Smilax VUwxs i he.^p. 

Out of 2 and S-inch pots, also transplanted plants 
out of boxes. Never had as fiue and large stock 
before. Please state number you desire and I will 
give you the lowest prices. Safe delivery and 
best satisfaction guarantetrd with every --hipment. 
Sample order 10 cts. Terms strictly cash. 

Address CRED SCHNEIDER. Wholesale Florist. 

Wyoming: Co., ATIICA, N. Y. 



12 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 9, 



Subscription $1.00 a Year. To Europe, $2.00. 

Advertisements, lo Cents a Line, Agate; 

Inch, Si. 40; Column, S14.00. 

Cash with Order. 

No Special Position Guaranteed. 

Discounts, 6 times, 5 per cent: 13 times, 10 per cent; 

26 times. 20 per cent; 52 times, 30 per cent. 

No reduction made for large space. 



The Advertising Department of the American 
Florist is for Florists. Seedsmen, and dealers in 
wares pertaining to those lines ONLY. Please to 
remembe it. 

Orders for less than one-half inch space not accepted. 

Advertisements mustreachusby Monday to secure 
insertion in the issue for the following Thursday. 

Address THE AMERICAN FLORIST CO.. Chicago. 

Coming Exhibitions. 

Atlantic CiTr, N. J. —Trade exhibition Society 

of American Florists. G. C. Watson, Sup't oi 

exhibition, 1025 Arch St.. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lenox. Mass., Sept. 4-6. Annual exhilntion 

Lenox Hort. Society. A. H. Wiug^ett. Soc'y. 
Boston, Sept, 5-6. Annual exhibition of plants 

and flowers Mass. Hort. Society. 
Chicago, Nov. 3-11. Chrvsantheraum show Hort. 

Society of Chicago. " W. C. Egan, Sec'y, 620 

Dearborn Ave. 
Newport, R. I., Nov. 6-8. Chrysanthenuim show 

Newport Hort. Society. Alex MacLellan, 

Sec'y, Ruggles Ave. 
B08TOK, Nov. 6-9. Chrysanthoiuum show Mass. 

Hort. Society. Robt! Manning, Sec'y. Horti- 
cultural Hall. 
PiTTsFiELD, Mass., Nov. 6-9. Chrysanthemum 

show Berkshire County Gardeners' and Flo- 
rists' Club. W. M. 'Edwards, Sec'v. 103 

Howard St., Pittsfield. 
St. Louis, Mo., Nov. 6-9. Chrysanthemum show 

St. Louis Florists' Club. *E. Schray, Sec'y. 

4101 Pennsylvania Ave. 
Indianapolis. Ind., Nov. 6-10. Chrysanthemum 

show Society of Indiana Florists. W. G. Ber- 

terraann, Sec'y, 37 Massachusetts Ave. 
Philadelphia, Pa. ,Nov. 6-10. Chrysanthemum 

show Pennsylvania Hort. Society. 1). U. L. 

Farson, Sec'y, Horticultural Hall." Broad St. 
Louisville, Kt.. Nov. 6-10. Chrysanthi'mum 

show Louisville Florists. IT. Naiiz. Sec'y. 58:^ 

Fourth Ave. 
Denver, Colo., Nov. 7-10. Chrysanthemum show 

Denver Florists' Club. Adam Kohankie. Sec'v. 

L.B. 375, So. Denver. Colo. 
Providence, R. I., Nov. 8-10. Chrysanthemum 

show Rhode Island Hort. Society. C. \V. 

Smith, Sec'y, 61 Westminster St. 
Montreal, Nov. 12-14. Chrysanthemum show 

Montreal Gardeners' and Florists' Club. Fred 

Bennett, Sec'y, 62 AylmerSt. 
Baltimore. Nov. 12-17. Chrysanthemum show- 
Gardeners' Club of Baltimore. AVm. Mc- 

Roberts, Jr., Sec'y, 304 \V. Madison St. 
Worcester. Mass., Nov. 13-15. Chrysanthemum 

show Worcester County Hort. Society. Edw. 

W. Lincoln, Sec'y. 
Toronto, Ont., Nov.' . Chrysanthemum show 

Toronto Gardeners' and Florists' Ass'n. A. H. 

Ewing, Sec'y. 85 Carlton St. 
Springfield, M'ass.. Nov. . Chrysanthemum 

show Hampden County Hort. Society. W. F. 

Gale, Sec'y, 23 John St". 
Milwaukee, Wis., Nov. . Chrysanthemum 

show Milwaukee Florists' Club. A. Klokner, 

Sec'y, 219 Grand Ave. 
Hamilton, Ont., Nov. . Chrysanthemum 

show Hamilton Agric. Society. Walter H. 

Bruce. Sec'y. 
[Secretaries will confer a favor by supplvinir 
dates as soon as decided upon. We shall be 'gl.id 
to know of any further shows decided upon and 
not included in our lisl.even if exact date is tint 
yet deterinineil.J 



When writing our advertisers please 
use one of your printed business letter 
heads or enclose vour business card. 

OF 

Stockholders' Meeting. 

CHICAGO, August 4, 1894. 
Stockholders ol the American Florist Company: 

You are hereby notified that the annual meet- 
ing of the Stockhnlners of the American Florist 
Company will be held in Parlor 2)7, Hotel Dennis, 
Atlanlic City, N. J. Wednesday, August 22, 1891, 
at 8 o'c'ock ]'. M., for the purpose of electing di- 
rectors and officers lor the ensuing term, and for 
the transaction of such other business as may 
come before the meeting, 

J. C. VAUGHAN, Pres. 
G. L, GRANT, Sec'y. 



WHY WORRY! Where to get good Stock now, 

We Cnt Sally : 

10,000 ROSES 



OP* ^A.1^1^ 



AMERICAN BEAUTY, 
BRIDESMAID, 
LA FRANCE, 
KAISERIN, 
METEOR, 
PERLE. 



Leading Varieties. 

Carefully packed to ship to any part af the country. Special prices on large orders 

REINBERG BROS.. Wholesale Florists, 



SI ~WiXl>£»Sll. x^^^t^lll^U*?, 



OlIIC^^GO. 



EACH SUBJECT SHOWN IN 

Long's Florists' Photographs 

is a study in itself, and most worthy of being called such. 
Each was made up purposely with view of getting a good 
photograph — beautiful, artistic, perfect and practical. The 
endorsement given them by the craft demonstrates that suc- 
cess crowned the efforts exerted to supply an oft felt need. 
Catalogue free 

DANX B. LONG, FuhlizhBt, Buffalo, N. Y., 

CORBREY & McKELLAR, 



Wholesale and Commission Florists, 



Phone Main 4508. 64 & 66 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO. 

We are prepared to fill yonr orders with. First-Class Flowers. 
Give US a trial order. 

FOR DECORATING, ""eTuIl"" 

PLUMOSUS HAKUS. 

TO ?2 FEET LONG, SO CTS. 

Orders by mail, tele- 



ASPARAGUS 



CUT STRINQS s 

3 or small quautities to ai 

W. H. ELLIOTT, Brighton, Mass. 



Shipped in large or small quautities to auy part of the country, 
graph or telephone 




Hardy Cut Ferns, 

BOUQUET GREEN, 

Laurel and Green Festooning, Wreaths, Etc. 

SPHAGNUM MOSS IN ANY QUANTITY. 

H. E. HARTFORD, 18 Chapman Place, BOSTON. 



'mt 'PMRit moiNE nomR 

FOR CUTFLOmRS. 



MR BOX.tk 



FOLDING 
PAPER 
BOXES 
for CUT 
Flowers. 



Made fmiu lu-avv. Munllhi Unci 
ped tint, puckcil litul 



. Strawboard. 
a crate. 



Shlp- 



CHICAGO FOLDING BOX CO., 

Jackson & Clinton Sts.. CHICAGO. 

Telephone Main 4718. 

Cypems Alternifolius. 

3^-inch pots, per doz. 75c; per 100 f6 
2]4\nch pots, " 60c; " $A 
2-inch pots, " 40c; " $i 

NATHAN SMITH & SON, 

FLORAL DESIGSrS 

The Cut Flower Worker's Friend. Fine book 
of 160 pages. Send 93.50 for it, to 

J. HORACE McFARLAND, Harrlsburg, Pa. 



H. L. SUNDERBRUGH, 

Wholesale Florist 

4th and Walnut streets, 
dxiolxxxn.^'tl, 0« 

W. ELLISON 

WHOLESALE 

Cut Flowers I Florists' Supplies 

140Z PINE STREET, 
(Saccessor to ELLISUN & KUEHN), 

«»^ WHOLESALE ^€« 
I 



H22 yilSTE STE.Ka:T, 
A oomplete line of Wire Deglgiu. 



i8g4- 



The American Florist. 



13 



E. H. HUNT, 

Wholesale Plorist 

68 Lake Street, CHICAGO. 

WHOLESALE CUT FLOWERS. 

SEEDS, BUI.BS AND AI.I. 

FI.OBISTS' SUPFI.IES. 



Western Aeent for the GREAT AUTIPEST. 

KENNIGOTT BROS. GO. 

WHOLESALE GUT FLOWERS, 

and FLORISTS' SUPPLIES. 

34 <& 36 RANDOLPH STREET, 

CHIO-AOO. 

A. L. RANDAI.L, 

wiioi6sai6 Fiorisi 

126 Dearborn St., CHICAGO. 



Aeent for finest grades Waxed and Tissue Papers. 

J. B. DEAMUD&CO. 

WHOLESALE GUT FLOWERS, 

34 & 36 Randolph Street, 

Phone Main 22!. CHICAGO. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR AMERICAN BEAUTIES. 

Reinberg Bros. 
WHOLESALE CUT FLOWERS, 

a/ WABASH AVENUE, 

Telephone Main 4937. CHIOA-O-O. 

We are Headquarters for the leading varieties of 
Roses, for the summer. Send us a trial order. 

NILES CENTER FLORAL CO. 

Iiicorporated. 
WHOLE'^ALK GROWKKS OF 

CUT FLOWERS OF ALL KINDS 

and Dealers in FLORISTS' SUPPLIES. 

59 WABASH AVENUE, 

Second Floor. CHI'^aoo. 

WHOLESALE 
FLORISTS 

JOBBERS IN 
FLORISTS- 
SUPPLIES, 

METS, "^W.^~5i^ FLORISTS' 

BRIDES, ^^ ^O^-^N VASES. 

GONTIERS, 

CARNATIONS 

ALWAYS ON HAND. 

1 Music Hall Place, 

BOSTON, MASS. 

HORTlCniTnRAL ADCTIOMEERS. 

DAN'L B. LONG, 

WHOLESALE GUT FIOWERS. 

495 Washington St.. BUFFALO, N. Y. 
Shipping Oiidehs cauefullv attended to. 
OTHER SPECIALTIES: 

Florigts' Supplies, Wire DeHlens, Bulbs, 
Loug's Florists PliotograplislseelarKead. 
CataloRueB. Lists. Terms, etc., on application. 

Always mention the American Flo- 
rist when writing to advertisers. 




©VVRoPc*afe Marftet*. 

Cut Flowers. 

New York. Aug. 4. 

Roses 1.01J®3.00 

■• per lOOU S6.oa®»-lU.0O 

Beauty 3.00O13.0U 

Carnations 60® l.OU 

perlOOO $3.00@$o.00 

VaUey 3.00® 4.00 

HarrlBll 4.00® 6.00 

Sweet peas, per 100 bunches 50c@$1.00 

Smllax 6.00® 8.00 

AsparaKUs 25.00®35.00 

Adlantum "6® 100 

BOSTON. Aug. 4. 

Roses. Nlphetos, Gontler l.ixte 3.00 

Perle, Sunset 1.00® 3.00 

Bride, Mermet 2. On® SOU 

Carnations 26® .76 

narrlsll 6.00® 8.00 

Lily of the valley 4 00 

Sweet peas -10 

Asters 25® .oO 

Gladiolus 3.00® 4.00 

Adlantum 1-00 

Smllax 12.00®15.00 

Asparagus 60.00 

PHILADELPHIA. Aug. 4. 

Roaes.small „ ^_ 2.0O 

large teas 3.00® 4.00 

Beauties 8.CO®15.00 

Carnations 60® 1.60 

Valley ^* 

Smilax 10.00®12.00 

Asparagus ^ ^'1^ 

HarrlBll lilies 4.0O® 6.00 

Sweet peas „^^ -f^ 

Cornllower „--S?^.„-Si 

Cattleyas 3o.0u@40.00 

Adlantum '5® 1.00 

CHICAGO. Aug. 7. 

Roses, La France. Meteor 3.00® 4.(10 

Kalserin 3.00<s 4 00 

General assortment, per 1000. .f6@S10 

Carnations, long. ... ?^2 .IS 

fancies .... 1.60® 2.00 

HarrisU ^'•OO 

Candidum 1.00® 3.00 

St. louts, Aug 6. 

Roses, Perles. Nlphetos, Wootton 2.00® 3.00 

Bride. Mermet, Bridesmaids 2.00® 3.00 

Meteors 2.0(i® 3.U0 

La B'rance, Albany, Hoste 2.00® 3.0O 

• Beauty 5.00®15.00 

Sweetpeas 15® -2^ 

Carnations, long 60® .A 

short .50 

Adlantum , 1-25 

Hollyhocks, asters , -60 

Smilax lo.UO 

Ferns, common, per 1000 $1.25 

BUFFALO, Aug. 6. 

Roses. Beauties 10.00®15.00 

Mermet, Bride 3.0O® 4.00 

Perle.. 3.00 

■• Gontler, Hoste 3.00® 4.00 

Meteor 3.00® 4.00 

Carnations, long 75® 1.25 

short -60 

Auratum lilies 10.00®13.50 

LancUOlium lilies 6.00® 8.0O 

Gladiolus 500 

Sweet peas 20 

Valley 3.00 

Smilax I6.00@20.00 

Adlantum l-2o 

Asparagus 60.00 

GEORGE fl. SUTHERLAND, 

Successor to PECK & SUTHERLAND, 
Successors to WM. J. STEWART, 

Cut Flowersi Florists' Supplies 

67 Bromfield St., BOSTON, MASS. 

New England Agent lor the GREAT ANTIPEST. 

WELCH BROS., 
Wholesale Florists, 

NO. 2 BEACON STREET, 
^JearTremont St., BOSTON. MASS. 

CUT SMILAX. 

15 cents per String. 
JOSEPH E. BONSALL. 308 Garfield Ave.. Salem. 0, 

LAST CALL FOR ADYS. 

FOR OUR 

CONVENTION* NUMBER 

TO BB PUBLISHED 



FOR HIGH CLASS SUMMER TRADE. 

THE LEADING FAVORITES. 

American Beaut y, 
Meteor , 

La France . 

And all other desirable roses, grown espe- 
cially for suinmer shipping to sea- 
side and mountain resorts. 

BURNS & RAYNOR, 

49 West 281b St., NEW YORK. 

SPRING, SUMMER, 

AUTUMN, WINTER. 

In dull season and busy season. 
All the year round. 

Roses, Lily iftiyalley 

and all other choice stock 
can be obtained of 

THOS. YOUNG, Jr., 

20 West 24th St., NEW YORK. 

WALTER F. SHERIDAN, 

. WHOLESALE • 

32 West 30th Street. NEW YORK. 



Roses Shipped to all points. Price list on application. 

Mention Amencnn FlorlRt 

Edward C. Horan, 

34 W. 29th Street, NEW YORK, 

WHOLESALEj^ FLORIST. 

Careful Shipping to all parts of the country. 
Frice list on application. 

FRANK D. HUNTER, 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN 

C ut* F lowers . 

57 W. 30th St., NEW YORK. 

Mention American Florist. 

MILLANG BROS., 

Wholesale Florists, 

408 East 34th Street, 

Cut Flower Exchange, NEW YORK. 

THEO. ROEHRS, 

WHOLESALE 

FLORIST, 

111 WEST 30th STREET, 

NE\?V YORK CITY, 

EstabllBhed 1879 

SAMUEL S. PENNOCK, 

Wholesale Florist 

REAR OF 42 S. 16th STREET, 

Mention American Florist. 



14 



The American Florist. 



Aug. g, 



Hfie 3®®^ ilrac|e. 



AM. SEED TRADE ASSOCIATION. 

D. I. BUSHXELL. St. Louis, president; S. E. BRIGQS. 
Toronto. 1st vice-president; A. Ii »oN. 114 Chambers 
street, New York, secretary and treasurer. 



E. S. Weatherly, vice-president of 
the Sioux City Nursery and S;ird Co., left 
August 2 for a two months' trip to Eu- 
rope. 

G. Howard Shriver has sold his in- 
terest and retired irfva the fiim ot Z. De 
Forest Ely & Co. Mr. Z. De Forest Elv 
will conduct the business nn his own ac- 
count under the name of Z. De Forest Ely 
&Co. 

In the Botanical Gazette for June Mr. 
Ernest Walker of New Albany, Ind., has 
a paper on Richardia africana or "calla 
lily," in which he describes a monstrous 
inflorescence of an unusual character, 
explains the morphological structure of 
the inflorescence, and the manner in which 
the anthers discharge their pollen through 
the two chinks at the top of the anther. 



"HELEN KELLER" 

The new CHniatitni; i>ure white, deli- 
cately luarked with red. 

Price for well Rooted Cuttings: 

^i.OO per dozen; !H2 UO per 100; $25 00 per 250; 
$!»U tiu per lUUO. dLiu at lUuU rale. Orders may 
tie sent either to 



JOHN N, Mfly, 
Suiiiniit. N. .1. 



EDWIN LONSDftLE, 
< Im sfiuit Hill, t'hila. 



FRED. OORNER & SON, 

Carnation 
Growers, 

-».^LA FAYETTE, IND. 

CARNATIONS 

Rooted Cuttings a'l sold or planted 
out. Field plants for sale in the 

C3. J. JF»:ElJB'lWOC!It, 

The Pines. KENNETT SQUARE, Chester Co., PA. 

THE COTTAGE GARDENS, 

Queens, Long Island, N. Y. 

WHOLESALE CARNATIONS. 



T13ST13JI> 



eix-M.€X 



NEW CARNATIONS. 
FERNS. 

ELLIS. NORFOLK Co.. MASS. 

Carnatronsa Specialty 

Hooted Cuttlnjfs and Vountr Pliinleeolrt out. 
Nice Field-Grown I'lantH In Sept. Send for prices. 

GEO. HANCOCK & SON. Grand Haven, Mich. 



RNSTRlEMSCttNeiDeR.Altona,fla(iiburg 

^ -, •=>'?tt.^<'ENTS TOR U.S.AMERICA i CAMAOA. 



Mention the American Florist when 
ivrlting to advertisers on this page. 




Roman Hyacinths, 

11-12 ctm., per li 00 $9..50. 

Lilium Harrisii, 



7-9 iu., per 100 $5 CO. 

Freesias, best in the u. s. 

First quality, per 1000 $;3.2o. Mamtaoth, $8.00. 

Pansy "INTERXATIOXAL" New Seed, »oz $1501 ozsiooo 

S2,i?.^,: VAUGHAN'S SEED STORE 'Thicag'o."' 



Hylseboscti Broiners, 

OVERVEEN, near Hiarlen, UQILAND. 

Bulbs # Plants 

We are now prepared to quote lowest 
possible prices for next July, Aug- 
ust and September delivery. 

illustrated Wholesale Catalofrues on application. 

HULSEBOSCH BROS., 

ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 

Mention American Florist. 

ONION .i. 
SEED. ^^^ 

CROP 1894. 

,^^^^ Prices for New Crop 

"^^^^^— — made on Application. 

COX SEED AND PLANT CO. 

411, 413 & 415 Sangome Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

L. DELSRUYE-GARD3N, 

NURSERYMAN, 

LEDEBERG, GHENT, BELGIUM, 

begs to call special attention of the Ameri- 
can nursery trade to his splendid stock of 
plants grown for export in the fall, consist- 
ing chiefly of 

AZALEA INDICA, 

PALMS, and 

ARAUCARIA. 




Price list and ful 
cation. 



particulars on appli- 



GflTflLOGUE PRINTING. 
ELEGTROTYPING. 

Done with expert ability for Florists, 
Nurserymen, Seedsmen. Write to 

J. Horace McFarland Co. 

. . . HARKISHUKG. FS 

E.G. HILL & CO., 

wnoiesaie Florists 

RICHMOND. INDIANA. 



5,0003000 

FREESIAS 

Diiu CIQCT UAMD We will deliver Freesla Bulbs, 
DUynnol riHnUi aU charges for transportation 
paid, as follows: 

3-8 to 3-4 inch per 1000, $4.00 

1-4 to 5-8 inch per 1000. $3.00 

Liberal discount on larger lots. Send for our price list. 

Order NOW your Japan Bulbs. Longitlorum. Aura- 
turns, Rubrums. Albums, we are Heailquarters. 
Wearethe ONLY FIKSI In tbe U. 8. who guaran- 
tee^ou S'lU^D HULKS delivered. 

Address all communications to 

H. H. BERGER & CO.. 

(Established 1878.) SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



FOR SftLE. 



Now ready 
for delivery. 



BERMUD4 SPICE LILY |7 to9in.bulbs, «20 per 
Imp. Amaryllis Johnsonii. J 100; $170 per 1000. 
FREESIA REFR. ALBA, 5-16 in. in diam . ?2.50 per 
IdOOin lotsof oOOO. 
Seed $2 00 per lb. 
GLADIOLUS SHAKESPERt. 2'A to 3 inches in diam. 

$ti 00 per 100; FjUCC per lOUO. 
ZEPHYRANTHES ROS A. Marge bulbs, $2 per 

FL0RI8UNDA I 100;«l.iperlOOO 
AT4IV1ASC0, 81 per 100; «8 per 1000 
NERINE SARNIENSIS ). large Bowering bulbs, $8 
Guernsey Lily, i per 100. 

CALLA BULBS. -1 to 6 inches at crown. 87 per 100. 
Best van FRENCH CANNAS. $6 per 100; $40 per 1000. 
Above prices are for delivery In New York, thence 
by Express or otherwise at purchaser's coat. C. O. U. 
from unkQown parties. 

Columbia Farm, ST. tiEORGES, BERMUDA. 

Mention American Florist. 

for iiiiiiie<iiate delivery; 

FIRST QJALITY LILY Of the VALLEY, 

BKKLIN I'IfS, from cukl storaKf. 

C. H. JOOSTEN, 

;? Onenties Slip. NKW VOKK. 
IMPORTER OF BULBS AND PLANTS. 



WE SELL BULBS 


Special low prices tu 


Florists %* Dealers. 


WEEBER & DON, 

Seed Merchants and Growers. 
114 Chamhers Street. XEW YORK. 



FOR JBUJU^ 

See page 1175 Julv 5th number of the 
AMERICAN Florist. 

The Universal ^Qfjf„ qRANGE. N. J. 

Horticultural Establishment. 

Grevillea Rofiusia. 

3-inch pots, to to 15 inches high, per 

dozen Jl.on; per 100 JSOO 

2"4-inch pots, " 65c; " $4.00 

NATHAN SMITH & SON, 

ADRIAN. MICH. 



i8g4- 



The American Florist. 



15 



ZIRNGIEBEL GIANT PANSiES. 



Owing to favorable weather, have been magni- 
ficent this season. Never befoie have we ob- 
tained such size and colors; and as usual, wher- 
ever exhibited, have eclipsed everything else, re- 
ceiving also the most flattering testimonials from 
the leading florists and seedsmen all over the 
country. 

New seed ready now of both the Giant Market 
and Giant Fancy in trade packets of 2,000 and 500 
seeds respectively at one dollar each, with practi- 
cal directions for growing pansies. 



PLANTS READY 

GIANT MARKET 

GIANT FANCY 



NOW: 

$5.00 per 1000 
10.00 per 1000 

DENYS ZIRNGIEBEL, 

. . . NEEDHAM, MASS. 

PANSIES .. 

Every Grower Claims the Best. 

I am willing to have mine tested alongs'de 
of any in the market. Over a thousand florists 
used them last s-eason, were pleased with them 
and made money out of them. 

Between Sept. Ist and Dec. 1st I will have a 
MILLION or more plants to sell. They can not 
be offered in competition with cheap grown 
seed but quality considered, are remarkably 
cheap at the price. 
By Mail or Express, prepaid. 75c. per 100: by Express 
at your expense, $5.00 per 1000. Liberal dis- 
count will be allowed on large orders. 

An honest sample of the plants will be 
mailed you on receipt of en cents, and terms 
are absolutely cash in advance. 

ALBERT M. HERR, L. B. 496, Lancaster, Pa. 

Pansy* Seed. 

The JEXNING?^ .STRAI>.' of high grade Pansy 
Seed. New crop now ready. Saved v\Ith special care 
from only the very finest varieties and (warranted) 
flrBt-elasB in every respect. 

THE JENNINGS XX STRAIN. 
The cream of Pansies. Grand colors ml.ved. pkt., 
ISOUseed Jl.dU; 1 o/. J-S.liU. 

The JennlxiKB Strain, finest mixed, pkt. ¥1 OC about 
2500 seed ; luz. f'l.tW; ;iozM $15.00. N'o sRlm milk In this 
strain. (They are just as good as I can make 'emj. 
To my old patrons I would siiy they are a hlg improve- 
ment over last season— more Variety and Uner colors 
The best strain for florists either for winter bloom or 
spring sales; all large flowering. 

Black I>r Faust, finest pkt., 2o00 seed, Jl.OO 

Finest Vellow. black eye " " 1.00 

Pure White, t -e best " '• l.OO 

Victoria, bright red pkt . 1000 seed. 1.00 

All my own growth of 1894. Half pkts. of any of the 
above ^'c. Please send money orders or registered 
letter. Cash with order. Address 

E. B. JENNINGS, Wholesale Pansy Grower, 

Lock Box 2.')4. SOUTHPORT. CONN. 



Roemer's Superb Prize Pansies. 

The finest strain of Fansles In the World. 

Introducer and Grower of all the leading 
No velties. 

' CataloKiie free on application. 

[ FRED ROEMER, SEED GROWER, 
I uiiKULiNui K<;, fi^;KMA^^•. 



Pansies Worth Raising. 

THE KIND THA.T SELL ! ! 

NEW SEED, perfectly ripe. 

One parkage, 1-8 <»faii ouiH-e !8il.00 

Five packaKes 4.00 

I,arge quantities at special rates. Cash with order. 
CHRISTIAN SOLTAU. 

199 Grant Ave., .IKKSKY t;lTV, N. .r. 

EXTRA PANSY SEED. 

MAMMOTH SUNBEAM STRAIN. 

A grand colletnlun of ylant flowerlntr varieties, very 
large, of perfect form and choice colors; carefully 
selected: better seed plants this year than ever: re- 
ceive ver* high praise from my customers no finer 
Btraln offered anywhere: florists should sow of It. 

Trade pkt.. 500 seeds. 'JSc; :i pkts. tiOc; H pkts. $1.00. A 
pkt.of the new Monkey Kacepansvwhh everv Si order. 
JOHN F. HI I'P. Shirfinaiiatown. Pa. 

Please mention the American Flo 
RIST every time you write to an adver- 
tiser in these columns. 



DECORATIVE PLANTS. 

Special offer of varieties and sizes that ca.n be supplied in large ciuantities 
and are of exceptional good value. 



ARECA LUTESCENS. 

3 inch pots, 12 to to inche'^ liig^- 



$ 1.50 per dozen; S 12.00 per 100 
12.00 " 100.00 



6-inch pots. 24 inches high, 8 plants in a pot 

SPECIMEN PLANTS OF ARECA LUTESCENS. 

9-inch pots, single stems, fine plants for decorating, about 6 feet high. S 7.50 each 

9-inch pots, single stems, with several good side branches, about 6 feet high . . . 10.00 each 
12-inch pots, beautiful, perfect specimens in every respect, clean, well-fojmed plants 

of very good value. . . 15.00 each 

12-inch pots, a grand lot of busbv specimen plants, clean, well-growu stock in every 

respect a special lot of plants, about 7 feet high, at , . 20.00 each 

COCOS \A^EDDELLIANA. 

A grand lot of plauls, in 3-inch pots, well-grown, stocky and of good color, 12 to 15 
inches hip h ... 



Kentia Belmoreana. 

5-inch pots, 6 leaves, 24 inches high . - 
6-inch pots, 6 leaves, 24 to 'iO inches high. 

8-inch pots 6 to 7 leaves, 30 inches high . 
8 inch pots 6 to 7 leaves. 48 inches high 
9-inch pots, 6 to 7 leaves, 48 to 64 in high 
12-iDch pots, 7 leaves, 60 inches high. 

Kentia Forsteriana. 

3-inch pots, 4 leaves 1-5 inches high . . 
5-inch pots. 5 to 6 leaves, 24 to 30 in. high 
5-inch pots, 5 to 6 leaves. 30 to 36 in. high 
6-inch pots, 6 leaves, 36 inches high . . 



Per doz. 
. . Sl.i.l 

18,00 

Each 

. g 3,(10 

. . 5.00 

. . 7.50 

15.00 

Per doz. 
. .$250 
. . 12 00 
. . 15 00 
. . 18 00 
Each 
. 8 3 00 
. . 7..50 
. . 10,00 



$3.00 per dozen; 820.00 per 100 

Latania Borbonica. 

A grand lot of plants in o-inch pots, 4 to 5 leaves, 
readv to pot up, SSOOper 100. Per doz. 

6-inch pots, 24 inches high. $12.00 

7-inch pots, 21 to 30 inches high 15.00 

8-inch pots, 30 inches high. 18.00 

Pandanus Utilis. 

2;i-inch pots, fine stock for potting up, 75 cts. per 
dozen; 86 OO per 100; $.50,00 per 1000, 

Araucaria Excelsa. 

Largest stock in the country. Each 

5- inch pots, 3 tiers. 15 inches high $1.25 

6-inch pots, 4 tiers, 18 inches high . . . . 1 75 

6-inch pots, 4 tiers. 24 inches high 2.50 

7-inch pots, 5 tiers. 30 inches high .... 3.00 
8-inch pots, 6 to 7 tiers, 36 inches high .... 5.00 

Dracaena Braziliensis. 

A fine lot of this useful decorative variety, strong 
plants in 4-inch pots. 15 to IS inches high, at 
J2.U0 per dozen; $15.00 per 100. 



7-inch pots. 7 leaves, 42 inches high 
9-inch pots, 6 to 7 leaves, 60inches high 
12-inch pots, 6 to 7 leaves, 72 inches high 

For a complete li>t of Decorative Plants, such as Palms. Ferns, DracEnas, Cycas, 
Pandanus, etc., etc , refer to our Quarterly List, mailed on anplicition. Our stock this 
season is of exceptionally fine quality, and is complete as to assortment of sizes. 



714 Chestnut Street. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Prices Lower Than Ever. 

Ready for shipment from July to September. 

Calla AethJopica, fine dry roots in all sizes. 

Lit. Longiflorum. ready for shipment from October 
1st to March 15, 1895. 

Lil Auratum, Spec. Rubrum and Album. Etc. 

Iris Keempferi. in 100 choice varieties. 

Japanese Maples, in best varieties. 

Camellias, Paeonies, Tree Ferns. Raphis. C)icas 
Revoluta. supei b growing plants with fine foliage 
from 25 cents to $5 each; fresh imported stems, 
tnie long leaf variety, roots and leaves cut off, de- 
livered from March, 1895. 

For general Japanese stock apply to 

F. G-onzalez & Co., 

303 to 312 Wayne St., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Mention American Florist. 

PANSY SEED. 

NEW CROP NOW RE4DY. Very fine mixture of 
large flowering varieties and choice colors, espe- 
cially selected lor florists' use. 1 oz. $3.00. 

NEW GIANT PRIZE PANSY, finest strain in the 
market. 1 oz. $5 00 

Low prices on Liliura Harrisii. Longiflorum, 
Roman Hyacinths. Lily oJ the Valley, etc. 

Special low prices on Rustic Baskets. 

HERRMANN'S SEED STORE, 

473 EAST 34-TH STREET, 
Near Long Island Ferry, NEW YORK. 

PANDANUS UTlliS 

6-inch pots %S 00 per dozen 

5-inch pots 3 ' per dozen 

4inch pots 2. CO per dozen 

NATHAN SMITH & SON. 

When writing to any of the adver- 
tisers on this page please mention the 
American Florist. 



■) 







Tuberous 




Bej>onias v^i 

(GRIFFIN'S STRAIN.) 
Plants in bloom, all sizes, at lowest prices. 

OASIS NURSERY CO.. 

Thos. Griffin, Mgr. Westbury Station, L. I., N, Y. 

Mention American Florist 



Plants from last fall: these have a foundation and 
will begin to run strong at once. 82.50 per 100; 
S20 00 per 1000. 

CLEMATIS for Fall Delivery. 

Special prices at wholesale, on application. 
Splendid slock and assortment. 

F. A BALLER, Bloomingrton. 111. 

Please mention the American Flo- 
rist every time you write any of the 
advertisers on this page. 



16 



The American Florist 



Auo\ 



9. 



Worcester, Mass. 

On Thursday, July 26, the Horticult- 
ural Society held its weekly exhibition, 
and although there were many meritori- 
ous exhibits most of the interest centered 
on the sweet peas. The day preceding the 
show we were visited by a severe storm, 
and while the rain was very welcome we 
could have dispensed with the wind and 
hail, which spoilt a numberof exhibits in- 
tended for this show. A great improve- 
ment was noticeable in the display ot 
sweet peas, both as to the number of en- 
tries and the quality of the flowers; all the 
stands showed the results of careful cult- 
ure and selection. The first premium was 
awarded to F. A. Blake, second to H. A. 
Jones. F. J. Kinney had a splendid stand 
but unfortunately did not conform to the 
schedule and was barred out. 

There was also a good display of cut 
flowers. F. A. Blake captured another 
first. H. A. Jones a second. The display 
of Phlox Drummondi was very faircon- 
sidering the tun the rain had with it. 
Mrs. Milton Rand secured first; F. A. 
Blake, second. In the bouquet class there 
was a goodly number of entries, and 
although there was lacking the usual 
good taste displayed in the make up of 
the bouquets, they were above the 
average; in the amateur class F. A. Blake 
first; H. A. Jonps, second; florists, W. J. 
Wood first; Mrs. Thos. Ward, second. 
The display of hollyhocks was large, but 
not at all noteworthy; Mrs. F. H. Merri- 
field, first; J. A. Abbott, second. 

For August 2 there was a short sched- 
ule, but notwithstanding a good exhibi- 
tion that was well attended, the twenty 
vases of cut blooms, distinct varieties, 
was the chief attraction scheduled and 
brought out some splendid displays. F. 
A. B ake, first; A. A. Hixon, second. The 
amateurs had a good display of baskets 
made up in good taste; F. A. Blake, first; 
and Mrs. C. E. Brooks, second; fl >rists, 
Mrs. Thos. Ward, first; W. J. Wood, 
second. Several good stands of native 
flowers were shown that were both inter- 
esting and instructive. J. A. Abbott, first; 
Florence Watts, second. A A. Hixon had 
a splendid disp'ay of sweet peas, filling 
one hundred vases, and comprising forty- 
five standard varieties, and F. A.Blake 
showed a large numbef of seedling 
petunias that were very fine. 

We have had considerable rain during 
the last two weeks, and outside stuff" 
shows a marked improvement, carna- 
tions especially have picked up wonder- 
fully and most of our anxiety on account 
ol the drought has ended. Trade has been 
very fair, the bulk of it being funeral 
work. Sefdling. 



The Water Garden. 

Special and Hardy Water Lilies of all colors. 
VICTORIA REGIA AND V. RANDI. EURYALE FEROX. 

Nelumblums In variety. Hardy Ornamental plants, 
sub-aquatic plantt*. etc.. etc. Nymphsea Laydekerl 
rosea (awarded a Medal at World's Kalrt; most charm- 
ing of all the llAKDV Lilies; K* .so each. 

Other Columbian Novelties see catalofnie. 

WM. TRICKER & CO., Clifton, N. J. 

GHRYSftNTHEMUMS 

1000 IVOKV, *3.00 per 100. 

Also several thousand in variety, late propagated, 

iust the thing" for -I and 5-inch pot plants. 

List of varieties and prices on 

application. 

NATHAN SMITH & SON, Adrian, Mich. 

You will benefit the American Florist 
by mentioning it every time you write 
an advertiser in these columns. 




R oses for WinM F lowerin g. 

We still have fine stocks of the leading varieties. 

AMERICAN BEAUTY, 

KAISERIN AUGUSTA VICTORIA 

AND BRIDESMAID, 

*^trong plants. oiU of :>' -inch pots, ready for immediate 
planting, $12 OO per 100. 

METEOR, BRIDE, MERMET, MME. CUSIN, 
NIPHETOS, WOOTTON and PERLE, 

Strong plants, out of 3^-2-inch pots, ready for immediate 
planting. $9 Oo per 106. 



Silver Cup awarded us for Meteor Rosea, e-xhlblted 

at Madison Square Garden. ISl'i. for best 25 

Ked Koses of any variety. 



F. R. PIERSON COMPANY, 

Tarrylown-on-Hudson, N. Y. 



LAST CALL FOR ADVS. for our . . 




CONVENTION 
NUM 



TO BE 

PUBLISHED 



AUGUST 16. 



NO INCREASE IN RATES. 

Send copy to reach US not later than August 14. 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO. 

p. O. DRAWER J64. CHICAGO. 



ROOTED CUTTINGS 



COLEUS, 10 kinds by mail 60c per 100 

" 12 kinds by express. .84 -00 per 1000 
ALTERNANTHERA P. Major by 
mail 50c per 100 

CASH WITH ORDER. 

S. O. STREBY, 

Lock Box 77, 
UPPER SANDUSKY. OHIO. 

PALMS. 

150,000 of all the leading va- 
rieties. 

FERNS. 

50,000 of leading varieties. 

^^''-- GEORGE WITTBOLD, 

1708 N. HalstedSt., CHICAGO. 



VIOLETS POT GROWN. 

We have a fine stock of pot grown plants, from 
which experience teaches best results for quality 
and quantity of flowers can be had: 

MARIE LOUISE, SWANLEY WHITE, 
CZAR AND SCHOENBRUN, 

from 2-inch pots, $4.00 per lOO; $30.00 per 1000. 

Chrysanthemums. fuT.Se SfnTforst^e- 

stems, in 50 PRIZE WINNING SORTS, $1.00 per 100; 

$30.00 per 1000. 

We still have a few thousand 2;<; inch plants, 
strong, of WHITE LA FRANCE and AMERICAN PER- 
FECTION, at $-1 00 per 100; $:50.00 per 1000. 

Above are two ideal Roses, surpassirg most 
varieties in loveliness of shading, and surpass all 
without exception for durability in a cut state. 

ROSES in best commercial sorts, 2>4-inch strong, 
our selection. $20.00 per 1000. An enormous stock 
in other departments. 

For catalogue and estimates 

Address NANZ & NEUNER. 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 

I^Oft^E^JS. Good stock. 

AM. BEAUTY PLANTS, 4 inch $70.00 

BRIDESMAIDS, BRIDES, METEORS, 
PERLES, MERMETS, aU 4-inch $45.00 




TRY 



DREER'S 
Garden Seeds, 

Plants. Bulbs & Requisites. 

They are the best at the 
lowest prices. Trade List is- 
sued quarterly, mailed fre« 
to the trade only. 

HENRY A. DREEB, 
Philadelphia, Fa. 



Please mention the American Florist 
every time yoti ■write to an advertiser. 



BRANT & NGE, 

Fore-it <ileil. Ill 



AllDUESS 

or 



L. M. NOE, 



Madison* N. J. 



TO 



11 A C*t*t\ Per 10 lbs .SOc: 2.5 lbs $1 00; 
■D-'iV/V/ V .SO lbs $1.50; 100 Ibs$2.50. 
TkTTQjrp Extra fine, ptr UlO lbs. $5. 

^•' U W A ■ .^-Sample Free. 

Vaughan's Seed Store, ^6^' Chicago. 

THE GREAT ANTIPEST. 

For particular!** see next iveek. 

R. W. CARMAN, Gen-l Act.. 

391 AjmttT street FLCSHINO UpeentCo., N.Y. 
Mention American Florist. 



l8g4' 



The American Florist. 



17 



SURPLUS STOCK ROSES. 

I have a few thousand Roses lo close out cheap, 
for cash only. Stock clean and healthy. Bet- 
ter order quick they will not last long 
at these prices: 

MEBMETS. 2'4-lncli -cts 

BRIDES, 'iM-lnch 2>^ cts 

WHITE LA FRANCS. 2H-lnch Sets 

PBRLES. 2M-lnch, strong 3^ cts 

CHRISTINE DE NOUB, 2^-lnch Sets 

NIPHBTOS. 2M-lnoh 2}^ cts 

METEORS. 2)i-lnch Sets 

AM. BEAUTY. 2^i-inch .i cts 

MMB. TE8TOUT. 2!<i-inch .i cts 

K. A. VICTOltlA. 2J<-lnch Jets 

MAPLE HILL fOSE FARM, KOKOMO, IND. 



Surplus stock, clean and healthy. 

J'er 100 

1500 BRIDES, 4inch $8 00 

1000 BRIDES, 2>4-inch 5 00 

250 MERMETS, 2'4-inch 5 00 

500 BRIDESMAIDS, 3-inch S 00 

200 WATTEVILLES, 4-inch 8 00 

JOSEPH HEACOCK, 

JENKINTOWN, PA, 

I HAVE A FEW 

Thousand ROSES for winter blooming 
of the following^ varieties: 

MERMET, THE BRIDE, 

PERLE DES JARDINS, AMERICAN BEAUTY, 
BON SILENE, NIPHETOS, 

WATTEVILLE, METEOR, 

and WABAN. 

The above are from 3J^-inch pots, good, clean, 
healthy stock, which I offer at S6 00 per 100; $-1.5.00 
per lOdO. 

I also have a few thousand FERNS, as Adiantum 
cuneatum and Pteris serrulata, from -'J^-inch pots, 
at 83.00 per 100. 

JAMES HORAN, Bridgeport, Conn. 

American Beauty. 

Three thousand, in 3i/2"inch pots; 
extra fine stoclc, at |10.00 per 100. 

For sale, 1000 good, strong plants, including Mer- 
mets, Cusin, Wattevilles and Niphetos. 

p. R. QUINLAN & CO.. 

904 W. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1000 .MEK.MKTS, (iliO MIMIKTOS, 
1000 BRIDES, 150 TKSTOUTS. 

Ail from 2M2-lnch standard pots. These are In the 
very best of condition and ns large as a great deal of 
the stock shipped from a-inch pots. 

Per doz. 75c. ; per 100 $5.0u ; per 1000 $45.00. 
|y Samples free to intending purchasers. 

NATHAN SMITH & SON, 



Strong 
Field 
Grown 



■J>.,-ln. Ii puts. Per iOO I'erlOCO 

BRIDE Sa.oO $22.6U 

MERMET 2.50 22.50 

GONTIBB 2.60 22.60 

SOUPERT. 2.50 -22.50 

WHITE I>A FRANCE 2.75 24.00 

SUNSET. PERLE 2.80 25.00 

And all other standard varieties. 2J<. VA and 4>^-inch 
pots. Write for prices on what you need". 

TEUMS CASH WITH OUIiKR. 
THE NATIONAL, PLANT CO., Dayton, O. 



ROSES 



Better 
Than 
Imported 

15 ACRES OF HYBRID PERPETUAL, MOSS AND CLIMBING ROSES. 

Extra strong, bushy, well developed plants. No better 
in the world. Sure to please. 



General assortment of leading varieties, including- foUo-wing best forcing sorts: 

GENERAL JACQUEMINOT, MAGNA CHARTA. 
PAUL NEYRON, ULRICH BRUNNER, 

MRS. I. H. LAING, M. P. WILDER, 

PRINCE CAMILLE DE ROHAN. 

Special rates on early orders booked for coming FaU or Spring delivery. 

FULL ASSORTMENT HARDY PLANTS AND SHRUBS, BULBS, FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL 
TREES, SMALL FRUITS, GRAPE VINES, ETC. 

No trouble to sho-w stock or quote prices. Catalogues and Price Lists free. 



MERMETS 2-Inch, S3.60 per 100 

BRIDES 2-inch, 3.,W 

NIPHETOS -2-Inch, 3.50 " . 

PERLKS 2-inch, 3.50 

ALBANY 2-Inch, 3.60 " a 

W0OTTON8 2-inch, 3.60 • 

LA FRANCE 2-Inch. 3.60 

:^A.i-ci3i« xsieos., 

p. O. Box 72. KANSAS CITY, MO. 



40th YEAR. 



29 GREENHOUSES. 



1000 ACRES. 



THt STORRS & HARRISON GO., 

PAINESVILLE. OHIO. 



Roses. Roses. Roses. 

Perle, Niphetos, Mermet, Bride, Victoria, Meteor, La France, Albany, Gontier, 

White La France, Soupert and Bridesmaid, 2 1-2 inch pots, 

$5.00; 3-inch pots, $6.00 per hundred. 

AMERICAN BEAUTY, 2 1-2 inch, $6.00; 3-inch, $8.00 per hundred. 

THIS STOCK IS WELL GKOAVN AND IN FINE CONDITION. 

ESTATE OF M. A. HUNT, Terre Haute, Ind. 



40,000 FIRST QUALITY FORGING ROSES. 



READY FOR 
IMMEDIATE 

jUUU llliui yunki I ■ I WIIWII1W iiwwbwi planting. 

Fully equal to those sent out tlie last two years, and perfectly healthy in every respect. Only selected 

growth from aowering shoots used In propagating. ™-.r»^.,....^-»i 

GKN. JACQUEMINOT, KAISEKIN A. V. SOCV. DE WOOTTON, 

METEOK. ULBICH BRUNNER, BRIDESMAID, 

1,112,1 ^v, 3-Inch pots, n.OO per 100. 4-inch pots, $12.00 per IOO. 

PERLES, SUNSETS, BON SILENE, MERMETS, BRIDES, 

SAFRANO, MME. HOSTE, 3-lnch pots. JT.OO per 100. 4 inch pots, JiO.OO per 100. 



100,000 



Roses, H. P. Roses, Rhododendrons, Azalea mollis, Clematis, Hy- 

drangeas (bushy and tree form), Aucuba, Buxus, Acer in sorts, 

Viburnum plicatum, Dutchman's Pipe, Magnolias, etc. 

NOW READY TO GIVE THE LOWEST QUOTATIONS. 

-THE HORTICULTURAL COMPANY, BOSKOOP, HOLLAND. 



A -lUr-niS Tn A "KT ■DT» A TT»11"V' TESTOUT, K. A. VICTORIA, BRIDES- 
AIKLXiXCiIUaJM iSXlA.UXX, MAID, BRIDE, MERMET, ME-TEOR, 
PERLE, SUNSET, CUSIN, LA FRANCE, .S and 4-inch pots, prime stock, shipped at special flo- 
rists' rates. Packing light „ A C M^pRFAN I akpwnntt N I 

Write for prices, including delivery to your Express office. H, O, BiaUDLHH, LQncnuuu, n, J, 



Warranted first quality. Surplus stock from 
4-inch pots. Per 100 

PERLES $e00 

MERMETS 5 00 

BRIDES 5 00 

PAPA GONTIER a 00 

CASH WITH ORDER. 

JOHN WHITE, Waverly Place, Elizabeth, N. J. 

Mermets, Cusins Wattevilles, Hoste, Meteor and 

La France, $3.00 per 100. 
Strong Atnerican Beauties, $.5.00 per 100; $40.00 per 

1000. 500 at 1000 rates. 
*S"Special prices on quantity. Let me price your 

lists. Cash vrith order. 

West Forest Park, St. Louis, Mo. 



clean, healtliy »lock. 
MERMETS, BRIDES, SUNSETS, 

NIPHETOS, LA FRANCE, PERLES, 

MME. WATTEVILLE, BON SILENE. METEOR, 

PAPA GONTIER. 
S^trong plants, from :i-lnch pots. IN per 100; IT.S per 1000. 

WOOD BROTHERS, Fishkill, N. Y. 



strong, healthy planta, from 2. "^Hj and ,'i-inch p-Dta. 

price, K) 00, W.OO and K.UU per 100. 

PERLE, SUNSET. NIPHETOS, MERMET, BRIDE 

METEOR. WOOTTON, M. NIEL, LA 

FRANCE, AND ALBANY. 

Strong AM. BEAUTY, from 2-lnch pots, 11.00 per IOO. 

JOSEPH HEINL, Jacksonville, III. 



18 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 9, 



Pittsburg, Pa. 

The hot and dry weather still continues; 
no rain of any account since the 2nd of 
June. The stock grown outside is suflfer- 
ing badly. The asters and other annuals 
that were planted for cut flowers are 
burning badly and it is a question whether 
they will amount to anything. The hot 
spell has even affected indoor roses; they 
do not promise well this season so far. 

Trade for the past few weeks has been 
very dull, though the last week it has 
picked up some. The B. A. Elliott Co. 
report busintss the past week extra good 
for the times. Patterson & Bros, also 
have been very busy the last few days. 

F. Burki is expected home from Europe 
the coming week. 

Messrs. Lord & Burnham have com- 
menced tearing down the greenhouses 
erected two years ago, costing $27,000, 
fA Allegheny Cemetery and will rebuild 
the same with more suitable structures. 

The Florists' and Gardeners' Club will 
hold their annual picnic on the 9th at 
Ross Grove. Vacations and recreations 
are the order of the day. A. J. E. 



An Experienced Gardener. 

"Yes, it is true I do want a gardener, 
but have you ever had any experience?" 

"Yes, sir; I've read about gardens, an' 
I've worked in gardens." 

"What garden have you worked in?" 

"I was a sweeper in the Madison 
Square Garden, sir, during the horse 
show, sir." — Harper's Weekly. 

Last Call for Advs. 

FOR OUR 

CONVENTION 
NUMBER. 

TO BE PUBLISHED 

NO INCREASE IN RATES. 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO. 
P. O. Drawer 164. CHICA-CiO. 

PRIMROSES. 

Fine stocky plants, now ready for 3-inch pots. 

FLOWERS 

large, all fringed; brilliant colors. 

FIFTEEN SORTS. 

Price, for the single sorts per 100, $ 2.50 

■• per 1000, 20.00 

" double " . . per 100, 5 (lO 

Extra plants with every order to help pay express. 

HENRY S. RUPP & SONS. 

SIIIliKMAN^TOWN, ]>A. 

CELERY PLANTS 

WHITE PLUME. GIANT PASCAL, and 
GOLDEN SELF BLANCHING. 

Field-grown plants, $1-23 per 1000. 
The New PINK PLUME, transplanted plants, J3.50 
per 1000. Cash with order. 
Sample mailed free. 

C. M. GROSSMAN, Wolcottville, Ind. 

SMILAX PLANTS. 

l.'i.lXJO Btronn, lienHhy plants, from '.'!^-lnch pots, »2.00 
per 100; SI8.(ia per 1001). Sample free. Knfe delivery 
and Batlsfactlon Kuaranteed. 

Samuel J. Bunting. Elmwood Ave. & 68th St., Phila, 

"HAKU TIMES" PALM COI^bECTIONS. 

For cash with order we give 17 ;i and 4-ln. Palms for 
S3 (retfirlar price %i), and :-t4 for $5 (regular price 8=S). 
These comprise the best varieties, including Latanlas 
and Kentlas. 

WILLIAMS & SONS CO., ISatavla, 111. 




(Shekwood Hall Nueseey Co.) 



No. 427-9 Sansome Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 

HEADQUARTERS FOE 

CALIFORNIA -GROWN 
SWEET PEAS 

And other Flower Seeds. 

PACIFIC COAST 
TREE SEEDS JAPANESE 

And Nativii Bulbs. LILY BIILR^ 

And other Oriental Specialties. 

ONION SEED, PEAS, BEANS, ETC. 

Write for special contract prices. 



per 100 $4.U0; per 1000 $30.00 
2.50; " 20.00 



For CHOICE strains of 

FLORISTS' FLOWER SEEDS, BULBS, 
PALMS, ORCHIDS. FERNS, etc. 

See our Quarterly Trade Prioe-Llst, just published. 

PITCHER & MANDA, 

UNITED STATES NURSERIES, 
SHORT HILLS, N. J. 

3-inch pots. . 
2-inch pots. . 

ASPARAGUS TENUISSIMUS. 

;;-inch pots per doz. 75c; per 100 $6.00 

2-inch pots " 40c; " 3.00 

NATHAN SMITH & SON, Adrian, Mich. 

ASPARAGUS 'S'LZ 

Extra fine plants from 5-inch pots, 
J30.00 per 100. 
CMII AV from 2iX-inch pots, cut back, $2.00 
OlnlLMA, per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 

TERMS CASH, 

THEO. BOCK, Hamilton, O. 

5000 SMILAX 

to offer at $2 per 100. or $15 per 1000. 
Very strong, in 2i.l.-inch pots. 

HENRY A. NIEMEYER, 
noa State Street, ERIE, PA. 

Last Call for Advs. 

FOR OUR 

Convention Number 

to be published 
JVUGUS'T 10. 




Siebrecht&Wadley, 

ROSE BILL NURSERIES, 

NEW ROGHELLE, N. Y. 

Palms, 

ORCHIDS, 

Roses, 

a^rxd Pf©A?v I*la.n.-ts, 

FRESH DRACAENA CANES NOW READY. 

Mention American Florist. 

ORCHIDS OUR SPECIALTY. 

Tlie Best and Largest Stocit in the World. 
New & Rare Foliage & Flowering Plants. 

A grand selection for Stove, GreenhouBe and Con- 
eervatory 

SANDER, St. /I/bans, England. 

Our Mr. A. Dlmmock will be pleased to Interview 
buvers or reply to any communication addressed to 
him at 205 Greenwich St.. New York City. 

A FEW ORCHIDS ? 

They are Very Cheap. They are Ea8ilr 
Grown. They Sell Well. 

They always attract attention In store or greenhouse. 

BRACKCNRIDGE «, CO., 

304 W. Madixnn .St.. BALTIMORE, MD. 

Tobacco Dust. 

Per barrel (about 125 lbs.), jSa.SO. 
Sample free by mail. 

HERRMANN'S SEED STORE, 

413 East 34th Street, 
near Long Island Ferry, NEW YORK. 



i8g4. 



The American Florist. 



19 



Wm E. Harris 

extends a hearty invitation to tlie members 
of ttie S A. F. and tiieir friends, to call on 
him, on their way to or from Atlantic City, 
and inspect his new place of over sixty 
thousand square feet of glass; over nine 
thousand feet of it being polished pla'e. 
The only greenhouses i'l the world glazed 
with th s expensive glass. 

A well appomted place, with everything 
adapted to the profitable production of our 
stock in trade, is not the only thing of in- 
terest here. 

The clean, healthy growth of our plants 
is the admiraiion of many, especially the 
Rubbers. I hey are a wonder to all who 
have seen thein ! 1 have five houses full of 
this popular decorative plant, of all shapes 
and sizes, from a few inches to ten feet hiijh, 
many of them making natural breaks — thit 
is a plant producing many siae shoois with- 
out being topped. This is a mystery to 
many, why mine should do so, and others 
not. The way to learn is to be taught, 
so come and see nature at work. 

PUnts, like people, are often stunted and 
sickly in the mansion, while the hovel con- 
tains health and vigor. In my plant palaces, 
health universally abounds, as we allow no 
excess of high stimulants among our occu- 
pants. They must all live upon plain fare, 
and take plenty of pure, fresh air. 

Take train at Broad Street Station Penn. 
R. R. for 49lh Street Station. It is only ten 
minutes' ride to 49th Street Station, and ten 
minutes' walk to my place from 49th Street 
Station. 

Trains leave Broad Street Station as fol- 
lows: 6:49 — 8:16—10:46 am. 12:13—1:28 
—2:18—3:15—3:47—4:33 — 5:16 p, m. 

On Friday, August 24th and Saturday, 
August 25th, I will have a conveyance at 
49th Street Station at the arrival of each 
train to convey my guests over. After in- 
spection of my place, 1 will drive all who 
wish to see my friend Robert Craig. It is 
about a mile from here. 

Wm K. Harris. 

55th & Springfield Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 



LAST CALL FOR ADVS. 

CONVENTION 



FOR OUR 



^ 



NUMBER... 



TO BE PUBLISHED 

AUGUST 16. 

NO INCREASE IN RATES. 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO., 

P. O. Drawer im. CUKAfiO. 

August Riiiker & iions, 

136 & 138 W. 24lh St., Uqu, Vnrl/ 
P.O. station E. Hcff lUlK) 

Supply the Trade wilh 

Bulbs. Seeds and Requisites. 

PATENTC 

I Trade-Marks, Copyrights, Etc. ^^^ 

1 GHftNDLEE & MflGftULEY.vI/ 

Atlantic Building, WASHINQTON, D. C. 

When writmg to any of the advertisers 
on this page please mention the American 
Florist. 



Dimensions of tils Box : 

2*) Inches long by 18 Inches wide 

and 12 Inches high. 

Two sections. 




This wooden box nicely stained and varnished, 18x30x13, 
made in two sectiontii, one for each size letter, given away with first order of 5u0 letters. 

A. Rolker & Sons, New^ Vork. 

Marschuetz & Co., 36 N. 4tU St.. Phila., Pa. 

F. K. McAUister, 32 Dey -St., New York. 

A. D. Ferry & Co., 33 Warren St., Syracuse, 
New York. 

A. Herrmau. 415 E. 34tli St., New York. 

Krnst Kaumiann & Co., 113 N. 4th St., PhUa. 

H. Bayersdorfer & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

A. C. K»'ndal, 115 Ontario St., Cleveland, O. 

J. A. Simmers, Toronto, Ont., Agent for 
Canada. 

E. H. Hunt, 79 Lake St., Chicaffo, 111. 

Wisconsin Plow^er Exchange, 131 Mason St-, 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

H. Sunderbruch, 4th and Walnut Sts., Cin- 
cinnati, C>. 

T. W. Wood & Sons. 6th and Marshall Sts., 
Kichui nd, Va. 

Jas. Vii'k'fi Sons, Rochester, N. Y. 

C. A. Kuehn, il33 Pine St.. St. Louis, Mo. 

D. H. Long;, Hufi'alo, New Y'ork. 
C. F. Huntington & Co , Indi^inapolis, Ind. 
Z. l»e Fore-t Ely & Co., 1034 Market St., 

Philadelphia, pa. 
Portland -^eed Co., 17 1 3d St., Portland, Ore. 
A. Herman, 415 E. 34th St., New York. 
Geo A.Sutherland, 67 Hromfield St.. Boston. 
Welch Bros., No. lA Beacon St., Boston. 
N. F. McCarthy & Co., 1 Music HaU Place, 

Boston. 
These Letters are handled by all the Wholesalers In Boston. 



BOSTON FLORIST LETTER GO. 

Manulacturt THE BEST LETTERS IN THE MARKET. 

Sizes 1K-in and 2-in. 2.00 per 100. Patent 
fastener with each letter. 

ODR NEW SCRIPT LETTER, $i.00 per 100. 



N. P. McCarthy, l Addrett 13 Green St.. 
Treas. & Maogr. | Boston, Mass, 

Address all correspondence to 1 Music Hall Place. 



We have a oew FASTENER which we conBider 
ft decided aucceas. Any customera baTin? old atyie 
fasteners which they wish to exchange, can do so 
without addltlooal coat by wiitlnsr ua 



H. BAYEKSDORFER & CO., 

WHOLESALE 

FLORISTS' SUPPLIES ONLY, 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Onr new^ flataloene is now oat, &ee upoQ 
application. 

J. N. Struck & 6ro. 

manufacturers of 

• CYPRESS • 





It 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 

When writing mention the American' Fi.ortrt. 




il^l/^IIS 



183 MONROE .Street- 

•••CHICAGO' • • 



Always mention the American Flo- 
rist when writing to advertisers. 



iHflRSGHUETZ & 60., 

FloriSlS' SUDDI16S, 

23 & 25 N. 4th St., PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

Send for ratalnpaip -^ 

MEDftL flWSRDED. "^^ 

ERNST KAUFMANN& CO., 
Wholesale FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

No. 113 North 4th Street, 
Send for catalogue. PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



WHITE DOVES 

FOR F^LORISTS. 

Largest and flnest stock in the United 
States. Write for prices to 

S. J. RUSSELL, 

850 Montgomery St., Jersey City, N.J. 



Last Call for Advs. for our 

CONVENTION 
NUMBER . . . 

TO BE PUBLISHED 



SEBIRE^fic ^mS. 



J. CALVADOS. Fl',.^, , 




CCABEL a CO. P.O.BOX 920.NewYoih. "" 



Mention AmeiiCHn Florist. 



20 



The American Florist. 



Aug. p, 



Cincinnati. 

Echoes of the outing have about died 
away and the boys are all busy looking 
after water. The dry hot weather of the 
past few weeks has used up all the water 
in the ponds, and many florists are haul- 
ing from the creeks. Funeral work has 
been a little more plentiful during the 
past week, but business in general is 
quiet. 

S. G. Cobb of Covington, Ky., has sold 
his greenhouses to Wm.Ruddel andRob't 
Johnston. I understand these young 
men are not professionals in the business 
and have bought on speculation. 

G. Brunner's Sons of Price Hill are cut- 
ting some nice smilax. This firm had 
quite an experience with a herd of fifty 
cows one night last week; nothing would 
satisfy their appetites but the young car- 
nations; damage about twenty dollars, 
besides spoiling a good night's sleep. 

W. J. Gray is cutting some very good 
Brides, Mermets and Perles. Rumor says 
that this gentleman will open a commis- 
sion house in the city to dispose of his 
own stock. 

Our party for Atlantic City is steadily 
gaining ground; have had some trouble 
with the railroads in getting rates posi- 
tively, but think we will have same set- 
tled by Saturday, Aug. 4. 

W. C. Nolan left August 2 on the Niag- 
ara excursion for Rochester, N. Y,, on a 
few days' vacation. E. S. Johnston is 
camping out this week and trying to 
catch a few innocent little fish. George 
Magrie lost himself at the outing and did 
not return home for several days, but 
guess he had a date in Middleton. 

A petition was filed July 31 praying for 
the dissolution of the Huntsman Floral 
Co. of 37 and 39 West 4th street. The 
petitioners are Edward A. Tucker, who 
owns ninety shares of stock, and James 
Dillaby, who owns ten shares. The 
authorized capital is $10,000, the shares 
being $50 each. Only $7,900 of the stock 
has been issued. The incorporation is in- 
solvent and it is deemed to be for the best 
interests of creditors and stockholders 
that it should be wound up. The assets 
are about $900 and the liabilities are 
$5,519.67. The other stockholders are: 
Henrietta C. Huntsman, twenty shares; 
Frank Huntsman, six shares; Oakwood 
Rose Garden Company, ten shares; 
Michael Dumer, sixteen shares; and 0. 
F. Blackburn, D. D. Bramble and Her- 
man MuUer, two shares each. Wm. G. 
Roberts is counsel. 

Our visitors in the city this week were 
H. M. Altick of Dayton, O., and Fred 
Weltz of Leo. Weltz' sons, Wilmington,©. 

Supt. of Parks Warder has at last re- 
ceived sanction of the board of aldermen 
in his scheme to purchase a conservatory 
for the parks. Mr. Warder has done 
quite a good deal of bedding this season, 
and has been untiring in his efi'orts to 
beautify our parks, and so far has suc- 
ceeded admirably. G. 



New Catalogue (No. 4) 
containing over 1,000 Orna- 
mental Cuts for Florist's use, 
such as envelopes, letter 
heads, bill-heads, cards, 
advers., floral designs, etc., 
at from .30c. and upwards. 
Price of Catalogue 2.5 cts. 
(deducted from $1 order). 




A. BLANC, 

Engraver for Florists, 

PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



FBAfflS' COMBATED HOLD FAST GLAZING POIDTS, 




PATENT Al'PLlEIJ FOlt. 



SURPASS ALL OTHERS YET INTROOUCED IN THE 
MARKET FOR GLAZING GREENHOUSES. 
Manufactured by the NOVELTY POINT WORKS. Price 
50 Cents per box of 1000 Points. Can be sent by mail 
lor 13 cents in addition. Directions on each box. 

.DE FOREST ELY it CO Philadelphia, Pa. 

i\. BAYBRSDORFER & CO Philadelphia, Pa. 

MAKSCHIBTZ & CO Philadelphia. Pa. 

l'?]TEK HENDERSON & CO New York. 

WM. ELLIOTT i SONS New York. 

F. B. MCALLISTER New Y'ork. 

C. H. JOOSTEN New York. 

^VBBBER & DON New York. 

A. ROLKBR * SONS New York. 

SCHLEGBL & FOTTLBR Boston, Mass. 

JOHN C. MONINGER CO Chlcauo. lU. 

J. C. VAUGHAN Chicago, ni. 

HUNTINGTON SEED CO Indianapolis, Ind. 

J. A. SIMME RS Toronto, Can, 

J. N. STRUCK & BRO Louisville, Ky. 

HERMANN ROLKER, Room 3, 218 Fulton Street, NEW YORK. 

GKNERAL AGKNT FOR AlVIEKrCA AND EUROPK. 

Reduce Your Coal Bills. 

THE FURMAN BOILERS have a high reputation for 

Staunchness, Durability and Safety, and are 
GREA T COAL SA VERS. 

WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF GREENHOUSE HEATING 

Over 150 styles and sizes, for Steam and Hot 

Water; also a full line of Horizontal 

Steel Tubular lioilers. 

Let us make you an estimate free. Send for catalogue 

The HERENDEEN MANUFACTURING CO. 

Ho.ME Office and WORKS : 

39 Vine Street, GENEVA, N. Y. 

New ENGLAND Offite : 51 Oliver Street. Boston. Mass. 

New York Office : Taylor Building, 39 Cortlandt Street. New York City. 
WESTERN Office: 131 Lake Street. Chicago. 




ESTABU5HED 



1866. 






MANUFACTURED 



N. STEFFENS 



335 EAST 2P-T ST. 



NEW YORK. 



STANDARD FLOWER POTS. 

OAK HILL POTTERY CO., New Brighton, Pa. 

(Formerly D. C. SCOFIKLD & CO.) 

The same machinery, clay and workmen. The same smooth, 

porous, evenly burnt and well packed pots. Orders filled 

promptly. "Write for prices. 




Kvery tlorlsl, market jiardener.uwnerof lawn.prass- 
plat or tlower-bed. In fact everyone wlio haa a faucet 
ana hose should have the Klnnoy Pump {patent ap- 
plied f(ir) for applying liquid manure. funRicIdeB and 
Insecticides to plants. Feed your plants, fertilize your 
lawHH by using liquid manure. The cheapest, simplest 
and most scleutlflc spraying pump In nee. Sent pre- 
paid for S'-.rjU -spraying vnlve attachment 50c. Pump 
complete Si.OO. Send for circular. Address 

HOSE CONNECTION CO.. Kingston. Rhode Island. 

Only 29 Klngstons In the U. S. Get the state straight. 

"They are a good thing."' "A very valuable labor 
saving device."— W. N. Uudd, Sec'y Mt. Greenwood 
Cemetery Aseo.. III. 

"The most valuable labor saving Invention I ever 
used."— C. E. WELD, Rosllndale. Mass. 

When writing to any of the adver- 
tisers on this page please mention the 
American Florist. 



BE UP TO 

And get the BEST. 



DATE, 

This is it. 




The Champion Ventilating Apparatus. 

CHEAP. DURABLE. EFFICIENT. 
Circular telle the whole story. It Is free. 

AMERICAN ROAD MACHINE CO., 

KKNNKTT SgHABE, PA. 



Patented .lune 30, 1894. 

STRAPS 

WITH 

Unfolding Tight-Fasteners. 
FRANK L. MOORE, Chatham, N. J. 



Please mention the American Florist 
every time you write to an advertiser. 



i8g4. 



The American Florist. 



21 



LAST CALL FOR ADVS. 

.... FOR OUR 

CONVENTION 






NUMBER.... 



.... TO BE PUBLISHED 

AUGUST 16. 

NO INCREASE IN R ATES. 



Send copy to re ach us not later th an August 14. 

AMERICAN FLORIST COMPANY, 



P. O. DRAWER 164. 



CHICAGO. 



SEE HERE 



BROTHER 



FLORIST 



Aren't you tired going through your houses two or 
three times a day year after year and lifting your ven- 
tilating sash one at a time and propping them up with 
BtlekB or pote. with a chance of having sash blown ofl 
and broken glass to pay for ? If you are 





We have trot just the thlntrv* n nof i the NK'WEST 
and l$li,ST thing ( ut The Niw ]»eparture' for 
about half the coat of the old style, iend for 
Descriptive Catalogue to 

J. D. GflRMODy, EvansviJe, Ind. 



Send orders for . . . 
CLEAR CYPRESS 

Greenhouse Material 

from bottom of gutter up. 

Correspondence solicited. Estimates cheerfully 
furnished. 

LYMAN FELHEIM, ERIE, PA. 

Mention American Florist. 



WISH'NG TO INTRODUCE {."n^^nS'tral 

a good Ihing it is. we offer sample crates f. o. b. Detroit, 
which contains 51 5 inch, 24 G-inch, lil 7-inch, 20 8-inch, 
1() 10-inch and 15 12 inch, for 87.40 cash with order. This 
is the pi ice we sell by the 1000. 

Of the many testimonials that we receive we call your 
attention to the communications oftwoofthebest known 
expert PMorists iu this country: 

DETUOIT, July 19, 'U4. 
DETROIT FLOWER POT CO. 

Sirs:— We wish to say that we have used the Pans las 
made by you) for the past seven years, and find them very 
useful for many things, such as bulb forcing, window and 
table decorations, fern growing, and might say we find tbem 
almost indispensable around greenliouses and store. We 
tjrow a great many slntrle stem ■■mums" in them— one In a 
.Vlncli pan up to a dozen to tlfteen In a r2-lnch pan. and can- 
not recommend iliem too higlilv to florl»ta. 

Kespt yours. JNO. BRfclTMEYER & SONS. 

Bl'FFAHi. N. Y.. July 17. 'W. 
DETROIT FLOWER POT CO.. SiRS:-WIll mall you my order for Pans in a few days. Don't be afraid to 
niiikt* up a (rood ptock of them, for when the florists find out what a good tiling they are for bulbs, ferns, peed 
pins, etc . you will have ii grandrush for them. I use them for forcing ail bulbs, and find the H and IC-lnch 
yrand for Tulips. Romans. Narcissus. Daffodils. The 5. 'i and 7-lnch for Ferns. Freesias and Valley, and any of 
the sizes are t:<i0d for table or window decorations. I also find them a trrand thing for growing ""Muras ' to 
single stem flowers: an S. 10 or 12-lneh pan with frura 10 to *_'0 plants 1b a flne tiling. 

Respectfully yours. WM. SCOTT. 

Price List of Standard Flower Pots sent on application. 

DETROIT FLOWER POT MANUFACTORY, Huwara, wateh & Tmnefniii sis , Detroit. Mich, 

VICTORY I VICTORY! VICTORY! 

No repairs for 5 years, 
no chains to break 
as is the result with 
others. 

Opens Sash uniform on 
100 foot houses. A 
new device. 

Send (or Catalogue and Es- 
timates. 

GREENHOUSE BOILERS. 

We have in stock boilers ne-w and second-hand, suitable 
for heating Greenhouses. Prices Low. 

I^OXTE^OieOX^E^ «5te CO., 

143 & 145 N. Third street, PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



iHeonlv Certificate of Merit 
awarded for ventilating ap- 
paratus at the St. Louis 
Convention was to the 

POPULAR STANDARD 
VENTILATING MACHINE 

The florist's friend in 
working and prices. 




22 



The American Florist. 



Aug. p, 



Cleaning Flower Pots. 

In horticultural magazines there have 
appeared from time to time inquiries 
about pot washing machines. It seems 
that no machine capableof effectively per- 
forming such work has yet come into ex- 
istence. Washing large quantities of pots 
is out of the question unless it can be 
done rapidly and at a very small expense. 
Moreover the foreign matter on pots is 
not merely superficial, but more or less 
fills the pores. To attempt to remove it 
by mechanical means is soon found to 
grind away any kind of instrument that 
may be used, whether in the form of cloth, 
brush or steel scraper. It seems therefore 
unlikely that any effective pot washing 
machine will ever be devised. 

There are, however, always more than 
one way of reaching a given point. A 
cheap and thoroughly satisfactory 
method which the writer believes he is 
original in suggesting is to bury the pots 
in loose moist earth, humus, or rotted 
tanbark during a few weeks or through 
the summer. During this time the or- 
ganic matter on the sides and in the pores 
of the pots is decomposed, and at the end 
i.f the time they may be taken out and 
will be found to be almost like new pots. 

The pots should be piled up loosely and 
the light soil or mould worked well 
around them. The whole should then be 
watered thoroughly and from time to 
time as required to keep the humus damp, 
but not wet. A very slight degree of 
moisture promotes the decomposing pro- 
cess and makes it more thorough than 
too great a degree. Ernest Walker. 

New Albany, Ind. 



New Orleans. 

At the recent supper of the New Orleans 
Horticultural Society, reported on page 
1242 of our issue for July 26, the supper 
room was tastefully decorated with 
plants by Mr. H. Papworth, and a hand- 
some plateau of roses was contributed by 
Mr. J. H. Menard, while Abele Bros, sent 
two fine bunches of roses. Great credit is 
due the committee of arrangements, con- 
sisting of Messrs. Chas. Panter, J. H. 
M'-nard and C. W. Eichling. 

The "Souvenir toothpicks" were the 
gift of an honorary memberof the society. 
The "picks" were plant labels, upon 
which was printed "Souvenir toothpick, 
N. O. H. S., 1894." They caused much 
amu=pmrrt. 

Standard Flower Pots. 

10 per cent, off for cash with order. Special dis- 
count on large orders. We carry a large 
Block on hand of pood strong pots. 

PRICE LIST OF STANDARD FLOWER POTS. 

_I9i-lnch pots. perlOOU* li.UO Hnch pots, per 1000 J--".'. 00 



■I 



■i 
6 



a.25 
it. so 

4.U0 
5.00 
7.25 
K.OO 

13, SO 



per 100 



:e.ao 

60.00 
76.U0 
lO.OU 
15.00 
20.00 
40 00 
76.00 



Address HILFINGER BROS. POTTERY, 

.... FORT EDWARD, N. Y. 

AiiKUSt K(jlker A Sons. l:jt; & l;i8 W. 34th St., New Vork 
City. New Vork A^'onts. 




Evans' Improved GHflLLENGE 
Yenlilaling flpparalus. 

Write for Illustrated Catalogue. 

QUAKER CITY MACHINE WORKS, Richmond. Ind. 

LOCK THE DOOR BEFORE 
THE HORSE IS STOLEN 
DO IT NOW. 
JOHN G. ESLER, Sec'y, F. H. A., Saddle River, N. J 



HAIL 




ii 



Proottpyddlno" 

Chatham, N. Y., May 2b*, 1894. 
LOCKLAND LUMBER CO., 

l//\s.\r,v..— At two different times I have favored your firm with 
orders for your clear Cypress material, and I can truthfully say that 
I have always found it first-class and good measure. My order of 
last season included your Clipper Bar, with which I am very much 
pleased after the \*inter's use, as it makes a very snug, tight house, 
doing away with the use of the troublesome putty question; also 
mother — no small item — viz.: glass getting loose and sliding. 

Wishing vou much success, I am. 

Yours truly, R. E- SHUPHELT. 



GUTTER MaTERmii, RIiDGES, SfJSH, ETC. 
The finest CLEAR CYPRESS used. 



toi circulai'H and estimated ADDRESS 



LOGKLftND LUMBER GO. 



a 



Standard" Flower Pots. 



As manufactured by us have carried oflF highest honors wherever shown ano 
have stood the best test. They are used in all the leading floral establishments 
■n the United States. For prices address 

The Whilldin Potterv Companv, 

BRANCH WAREHOUSES: 713. T^S. 71? & 7^9 Wharton St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Randolph Ave. and Union St., Jersey City, N. J. 
Jackson Ave. and Pearson St., Long' Island City, L. I. 

STANDARD FLOWER POTS 

Every user of Flower Pots should correspond with us before 
purchasing elsewhere, our facilities are unequalled. 

A. H. HEWS & CO., N. Cambridge, Mass. 

Announcement to Florists. 

We desire to announce the dissolution of the firmof Sipfle Dopflfel & Co., and to introduce to the 
trade its successor, The Syracuse Pottery Co., which will be under the management of William Dopffel 
and Conrad Breitschwerth. The business will be conducted as heretofore, except on a larger scale to 
meet the growing demand for our goods. We have accordingly enlarged our plant and capacity, and 
with unsurpassed facilities are now prepared to fill the largest order on short notice. Our latest im- 
proved machines are turning out the best and most serviceable fl.ower pots in the market, and assuring 
you of our intention to lead in further improvements we solicit a continuance of your patronage in the 
belief that we can supply just what is needed at a price and in a manner satisfactory to all. 
Send for price list and samples and we know you will give us an order. 

403 North Salina Street, SYRACUSE, N. Y 



SYRACUSE POTTERY GO. 



STANDARD FLOWER POTS. 

OLD RELIABLE MAKE OF 

Write for Catalogue and Price List. 

PITTSBURGH CLAY MFG. CO. New Brighton, Pa. 

STANDARD FLOWER POTS. 

If you are going to the Convention please examing our Flower 

Pots while there. To those who are not going we would 

simply say, "send in your order for large pots early." 

THE PARMENTER MAN'FG CO., 




GREEN-HOUSE 

HEATING. 

MYERS & CO. 

15t8&l520S. 9thSt.. 

PHILADELPHIA. 

1 iSciKl for cHtaloKXie 

'^T^ and price list. 




GREENHOUSE HEATING 



AND VENTILATING. 

Superior Hot Water Boilers 
JOHN A. SCOLLAY, 

74 & 76 Myrtle Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
*S-Send for Catalogue. 



i8g4- 



The American Florist. 



23 



ESTABLISHED 1854. 

Qevine's Boiler Wohks. 

THE FLAT TOP TYPE 



Wrought Iron Hot Water Boilers. 




Capacity from 350 to 10.000 feet of four-inch pipe. 
Send for New List. 

FRANK DAN BLISH, Att'y, 

OFFICE, 69 DEARBORN ST., 

WORKS. 56th & WALLACE STREETS. 



TO 
TAKE 
PLACE 

OF 
WIND 
MILLS 



>»»<t>««»t««t-» 



HOT 

AIR 
PUMPING 
ENGINES 



A Windmill 

Is unreliable because it de 
pends upon the elements 
lor its power ; hydraulic 
rams also depend upon fav- 
orableconditionsand waste 
as much water as they se- 
cure. Steam pumps require 
skill and hand pumps de- 
mand labor and time. The 

DELAMATER-HID[R[R 
DE LAMATER-ERICSSON 

Hot-Air 
Pumping Engines 

are especially designed for 
pumping water, and from 
shallow streams or any 
kind of well. They are 
simple, safe and reliable, 
require no steam EBd have 
no valves. They require 
very little heat to operate 
them, and can be arranged 
for any kind of fuel. 
' Sendforillttstratedcatalogu€to 

THECEUMrERI CNWOnKS, 

87 South Finh At., 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 



IMPROVED GLAZING. 




GASSKB'S TATENT ZINC .JOINTS tor but 

tlnKKlass makes tfreeiihouaesalrand watertight: alBO 
prevents ehdlna and breakage frouj trust. Does not 
cost as mucli to heat a house glazed with the joints, 
thereby saving: onou((h In fuel to more than pay the 
additional cost of glazlnK. The leading Horlsts of the 
country are using them. Write for circulars with full 
particulars and price list. 

J. M, GASSER, Florist, 

KiiclicI Avenue, CLKVELANI>. «>. 

THE CHAMPION 

MomaiiGVeniiiatiOr. 

The cheapest, eaBleat to operate, and by far the 
best machine In the market. Don't buy a Venti- 
lator until you have seen my Illustrated deecrlptlve 
circular, which will be sent you free, (riving prices, etc. 
Also Champion SoU Pulverizer and SUter. 



Greenhouse Pipe and Fittings. 




Address, 
Box 114. 



SPRINGFIELD, O. 




Large quantities of our Pipe are in use in Grcin- 
bouses throughout the West, to any of which we 
refer as to its excellent quality. 

Pipe can be easily put together by any one, very 
little instruction being needed. 

GET THE BEST. 

Hot- Water Heating, in its Economy and Superi 
ority, will repay in a few seasons its cost. 
Mention American Florist. 

L. WULhh M^G. GO., 93 to 117 W. Lake Street, CHICAGO. 

WRITE FOR ILLUSTRATED CIRCULAR. 

H. M. HOOKER COMPANY, 

57 and 59 W. Randolph Street, CHICAGO. 

FOR GREENHOUSES . 

D. H. ROBERTS, 

159 and 161 S. Fifth Avenue, :ke;'\^7' ^V0I«K, 

NATURAL GAS MADE GLASS, 

FOR ROSE HOUSES, CONSERVATORIES, ETC., ETC. 

THOS. W. WEATHERED'S SONS, 

floniGuliural flrGtiliGCts and Hoi Water Engineers 

Send for Catalogue, enclosbig' 4 c«nt8 in fltamps* 

I^To. 2^^ Oanal St., JXEJW ^X'0I«K: OIT'X'. 

Kroeschell Bros. Co. i J^3^ ^iiis Miidew 

Greenhouse : Boiler, |%9j'w:rrr 

41 to 55 Erie St., CHICAGO. ^pgy^gpjL^ PRAPF [III^T 

aftgj^'^ Sold bjf Seedsmen. 




BoUerw iiiHde ul tlit- btjHt of luiiterlal. she!), flrebox 
Bheeta aiul heads of steel, water space all around 
{tront. Bides and back). Write for Information. 



When writing to any of the adver- 
tisers on this page please mention the 
American Florist. 



Crabb & Hunter, 

Florists & Fuel Oil Plant Contractors, 

Also Dealers in OIL BURNERS, and Agents for 

Snell's Hydranllc System of using Oil Tor Tuel 
purposes. No odor, and J^ to J^ cheaper than coal. 

509 Madison Ave.. GRAND RAPIDS. MICH. 

BySend for circular. . . . 



whicli is absolutely perfect for modern 
greenhouse construction. 

ROCK BOTTOM PRICES. 

Send for Estimates. Satisfaction Guaranteed 

REED GLASS CO.. 

6S Warren Street, and 46, 48 & SO College Place, 
NEW YORK CITY. 



^4 



The American Florist. 



Aug. p, 



Index to Advertisers. 



AbelCC&Co 14 19 

Adv. rates, etc X!. 

American Boiler Co lA 

Amertcan Klorlet Co 12 

American Road Ma- 
chine Co 20 

Baker BroM 17 

Bailer K A 15 

Bayersdorter H & Co. . . Ill 

BergerU H & Co 14 

Blanc A 2U 

BockTheo 18 

Bonsall.lOBE 13 

Boston IvClterCo Vi 

BrackenrldKe & Co 18 

Brant & Noe Ki 

Buntlnt; Sam'lJ 18 

Bums A liaynor 13 



Burrow .1 (; 

Carman It W 

(^armody .11* 

Chandlee & Macauley 
Cli'go Fokllnfi Bo.x Co 

Coles W W,.. 

('orbrey & McKellar... 
Cottage Gardens The. 
Co.\ Seed & I'lont Co. 
Crabb & Hunter... 

Deamud .! B & Co 

De Lamater Iron Wks 
Uelaruye-Cardon L... . 
Detroit Flower Pot 

Mnfry 

Devlne s Boiler Wks... 

DlllonJ L 17 

Domer Fred & Son 14 

DreerH A 15 18 

Elliott W U 12 

EMlBOn Wm 12 

Felhelm byman 21 

Flsber & Alrd 14 

Gasser J M 2:1 

Gonzalez F & Co 15 

Grossman C M 18 

Gumey Heater Co .. ..2-1 

Uall Assn 22 

Hammond Benj 23 

Hancock & Son 14 

Harris Wm K 19 

Hartford H E. 12 

Heacock Jos 17 

Uelnl .loseph 17 

Herendeen Mfg Co 20 

Herr Albert M 15 

Hermann's SeedStorelS 18 

Hews A 11 &Co 22 

Hllflnt-er Bros 22 

HIllEG &Co 14 

HlppardE 11 21 

HltehlnKS&Co 24 

Hooker H M Co 23 

Horan Bdw C 13 

Horan. lames 17 

Horticultural Co The.. .17 
Hose Connection Co. ...20 

Uulseboscli Bros 14 

HuntKII l.i 

Hunt M A Estate 17 

Hunter (•'rank D 13 

James K 11 14 

Jennings E B 15 

JooBten C H 14 

Kaufmann Ernst & Cell! 

Kennlcott Bros Co 13 

Kroeschetl Bros Co 23 

Kuehn C A 12 

Lockland Lumber Co.. .22 

ixing Dan'l B 12 13 

Ixjnsdale Edwin 14 

l.flrd & Burnham Co.... 24 



Lovegrove & Co 21 

Lupton John H ..11 

McCarthy N F & Co 13 

McFarland J H 12 

McFarland J H Co 14 

Mac Bean A 8 17 

Manda W A 14 

Manz J&Co 1H 

Marschuetz & Co Ill 

May Jno N 14 

Mendenhall Greenho's.ll 
Michel Pit & Bulb Co. .15 

MIIlangBros 13 

Monlnger Jno C 24 

Moore Frank L 20 

, Munn L R 11 

Myers&Co 22 

Nanz & Neuner . ...in 

National Plant Co 17 

Nlemi^yer H A IS 

Nlles Centre ['■loral Co. .13 
NItterhouse MrsS J.. ..11 
Oak Hill Pottery Co. . . .20 

Oasis Nursery Co 15 

Parmenter Mf g Co 22 

PennockCJ 14 

Pennock Sam'l S 13 

Plerson FRCo Itl 

Pitcher & Manda 18 

Pittsburg Clay Mfg Co. .22 
Quaker City Mc hw'ks. .22 

Qulnlan P R& Co 17 

KandallAL 13 

Reed Glass Co 23 

Relnberg Bros 12 13 

Relmschnelder Ernst. . .14 

RobertsDH 23 

Roehrs Theo 13 

Roemer Fred 15 

RolkerA* Sons 19 

Kolker Herman 20 

Rupp H S&Son 18 

Rupp J F 15 

RussellS J 19 

Sander &Co 18 

Schneider Fred 11 

Scollay Jno A 22 

Seblre P& Sons 19 

Sheridan W F 13 

Slebrecht & Wadley....l8 
Situations, wants, etc.. 11 
Smith Nath & Son. . . . 

12 14 15 16 17 18 

Soltau Christian 15 

Steflens N 20 

Storrs & Harrison Co. . .17 

Streby SO.... IB 

Struck J N & Bro 19 

Sullivan JosT 11 

Sunderbruch H L 12 

Sunset Seed & prtCo...l8 

Sutherland Geo A 13 

Syracuse Pottery Co 22 

Tesson R F 17 

Trlcker AVm & Co 16 

United States Hotel 11 

Vaughan J C 14 IB 

Weathereds Sons T W. .23 

Weeber & Don 14 

Welch Bros 13 

Whlimin Pot Co 22 

WhlteJohn 17 

Williams & Sons Co. ... 18 
WlttboldGeo IB 

woifBB -a 

WolflLMlgCo 23 

Wood Bros 17 

Young ThosJr 13 

ZImglebel D 16 



Convention Number. — We shall issue 
our annual Convention Number August 
16. Send copy for advs. at once. No 
increase in rates. 




r.l FAD I 

j\i.'is.s A./ii C(i| 




r G rccnhouse 

M 
A 

T 

E 

R 

I 

A 
L 

007 HflWiM ORHt: yl\/E..GfiicAOQ. IllJ 



SASH 
BARS 

ANY 
SHAPES SIZE 




■J^.^ 



HITCHINGS & CO. 

Horticultural Architects and Builders 

AND LARGEST MAXCFACTURERS OF 

GREENHOUSE HEATING#VENTILATING APPARATUS 




Conservatories, Greenhouses, Palm Houses, Etc., erected complete with 

our patent Iron Frame Construction. Plans and Estimates of 

cost and illustrated catalogues sent on application. 

^ 233 Mercer Street, NEW YORK. 

LORD & BURNHAM CO. 

Horticultural Architects and Builders, 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING ENGINEERS. 



W Flans and estimates furnished on application. 




targest builders of Greenhouse Structures. Six tiig^liest Awards at World's Fair. 
. . . SEND FOUR CENTS POSTAGE FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE, , . . 

LORD & BURNHAM CO,, IrvinElon-on-HnJson, H. Y. 

GREENHOUSE HEATING 

Is a branch of our business we have 
given very close study for a good many 
years, and can assure any one intending 
to employ Hot Water or Steam that we 
have the most modern system. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE. 

I 18 TYPES. 174 SIZES. 

ADAPTED TO ALL KINDS OF FUEL. 

American ^oi/er Company 

"ADVAXCE" (Trade Mark.) BOSTON: NEW YORK: CHICAGO: PORTLAN O, ORE. 
For Hot Water. 195 Ft. Hill Sqr. 94 Centre St. 84 Lake SI. 127 Sixth St. 





Gyrney 



Hot Water Heaters 
# Steam BoHers. 



^, UNEXCELLED FOR GREENHOUSE REQUIREMENTS. 



Send for G-reenltonse Catalogue. 

163 Franklin Street (Cor. Congress), 
BOSTON. MASS. 



/ acr..v'^ tJull.N'SuN & Co.. 71 John St., New York and vicinity. 
/ ?7. i'v' J!." = \ J. C. V. TllACUSEl.. 24(; Arch St., Phlla. and vicinity 



Gurney Double Crown Hot Water Heater. 



agencies; ;^-^ A.'(iHiKFiNG IBO.N Co.. 34 Dearborn St-. Chicago 
and Western States. 



fm Im^mmm 




@llif 




Jlmerica is ' 


I'r.B Prsw of ths L'ssse!; tr. 


-re msij bs more crmfort /in::dsh:;-s, t-:t ii 


■E ars 1 


r.s f.r=t io touch L'r.kr.:u.-n Esas." 


Vol. X. 


CHICAGO AND NEW YORK, AUGUST 16, 


1894. 


No. 324 



fiHiiE O^msms^M f^^m^i 



Copyright 1894, by American Florist Company. 
Entered as Second-Class Mail Matter. 

Published every Thuksday by 

THE American florist CoMPAirr. 

323 Dearborn Street, Clilcago. 



Subscription, 81.00 a year. 



To Europe, $2.00. 



Address all communications to 

AMERICAN FLORIST COMPANT. 

p. O. Drawer 164, CHICAGO. 

Eastern Office : 67 Bromfleld St., Kogton. 

This paper Is a member of the Associated Trade 
Press and the Chicago Trade Press Association. 

The Tenth Annual Meeting 

OP THE 

SoGietu ol flmerican Florists 

WILL BE HELD AT 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., 

AUGUST 21, 22, 23 <& 24-, 1894-. 



Members may remit the annual dues ($3.00) to the 
secretary prior to the meetlnR. thus avoiding the crowd 
and rellevlim the officers on the opening day. Badge 
for 1894 will be sent by mall to those who remit in 
advance of the meeting. 

Intending members can obtain any Information 
wanted by addressing the secretary. 



OFf^lCERS : 

J. T. ANTHONY. Chicago, president: ROBERT KIFT, 
Philadelphia, vice-president; Wm. J. STEWART, 67 
Bromfleld St., Boston. Mass., secretary. 



CONTENTS 



The progress of a decade 

— Industrial progress 

— Progress in roses 

— Progress in carnations . . . . 
— Progress in chrysanthemums . . . 

— Progress in cannas 

— Progress in geraniums - 

Convention notes 

Chrysanthemums — Notes. 

Orchids — A few notes about . . . 

Carnations— Notes 

Arrangement of flowers, X (Sillus) 

Miscellaneous seasonable hints. . . 

Palms in summer . 

New York 

Philadelphia . . . 

Chicago .... 

Rules governing bowling match . . 

Boston 

The seed trade 

Bufl^alo . . 

Tarrytown and Scarborough, N, Y. 
Chicago to Atlantic City . . . , 

Foreign notes .... 

St. Louis 

Toronto 

Cincinnati , 

Reply to F. P 

Baltimore 



58, 



.27 
.27 

30 
.31 

32 
.32 

. as 

.33 

31 

3-1 

36 

.36 

,S7 

.38 

39 

40 

.40 

. 44 

.46 

.."iO 

.52 

. 54 

56 

60 

62 

61 

66 

66 

68 



The HEADQUARTERS of the American 
Florist at the Convention will be at 
Hotel Dennis. 

Note change in arrangements for 
transportation from Chicago to Atlantic 
City on page 56. 



The Progress of a Decade. 

The convention of the Society of Amer- 
ican Florists at .Atlantic City will possess 
a special interest for all who have been 
loyal supporters of the organization from 
its inception as well as for those who 
have more recently become identified with 
it, from the fact that this meeting will be 
the tenth anniversary of the founding of 
the society. 

Floriculture and her allied industries 
have made great and rapid advances dur- 
ing the ten years just passed, and their 
progress and prosperity may be attrib- 
uted in no small degree to the well di- 
rected effort and beneficient influence 
exercised by this grand organization. In 
the following notes we have endeavored 
to give our readers a brief retrospective 
glance at the society 's history and achieve- 
ments and a review of the practical ad- 
vance made in a few of the more impor- 
tant lines of commercial floriculture dur- 
ing the decade over which the society's 
existence has extended. 

It was on the occasion of the annual 
meeting at Chicago of the "National 
Association of Nurserymen, Seedsmen, 
Florists and Kindred Interests," that the 
first steps were taken toward the organi- 
zation of the Society of American Florists. 
The date was June 19, 188-t. A number 
of gentlemen, some twenty or more, who 
were attending the convention, in accord- 
ance with a verbal understanding, met in 
one of the parlors of the Sherman House. 
The desirability of an independent na- 
tional organization of those engaged in 
floriculture was talked over and ways 
and means discussed, the result of the 
meeting being the selection of John Thorpe 
as president and E. G. Hill as secretary, 
and the appointment of a committee to 
issue an address to the florists of America. 
A strong point made in the address was 
the matter of protection from losses b" 
hail storms. Without this incentive it is 
extremely doubtful if the Society of Amer- 
ican Florists had been a reality for several 
years at least. 

The members present and most of those 
joining the first year in response to the 
call issued at this meeting paid as mem- 
bership fee the sum of $5. This sufficed 
to put the young organization on its feet 
and the funds were wisely expended in ad- 
vertising the society, its aims and possi- 
bilities among the florists of the land. 
This was not so easily accomplished in 
those days, for the trade papers now 
found so valuable a means of communica- 
tion were then unheard of and it required 
continued and persistent work on the 
part of the founders to accomplish what 
they did. But from the very first moment 
of the opening session at the Cincinnati 
convention en August 12, 1885, there 
could be no longer any doubt as to the 
future of the young organization. The 
enthusiasm of that meeting has never 
been excelled in any that have succeeded. 



The American Florist had its birth at 
the Cincinnati meeting, and all through 
the nine years that have passed it has 
been an earnest co worker with the 
natioral society in everything for the ma- 
terial and social elevation of the craft 
and may conscientiously claim a share 
with it in the great advancement which 
has been made. 

The great contests over the respective 
merits of steam and hot water heating, 
the pertinacity of the hail insurance ad- 
vocates in the face of indifterenee and 
direct opposition, the sharp personal en- 
counters of those early meetings are fresh 
in the memory of many. It was a new 
experience for the florists to get together 
and talk it out, and they took full advan- 
tage of it. 

In the years that have passed since then 
the Society of .American Florists has jus- 
tified all that was promised for it. The 
uniformity in sizes and shape of flower 
pots, the special postal rates on seeds and 
plants, reduced express charges on plant 
shipments, reform in plant nomenclature, 
the Florists' Hail Association, the Flo- 
rists' Protective Association, are all the 
direct result of well directed effort on the 
part of the Society of American Florists, 
while the numerous Florists' Clubs and 
other similar organizations owe their 
existence to the good example set and 
encouragement extended by the parent 
societ}'. 

Many of those who took active part in 
the early work of the society have been 
taken away by death, and the list of those 
whose names have thus been removed 
from the roll comprises many whose rep- 
utation is world wide. It is to the fact 
that the ver3' best men associated with 
floriculture have affiliated themselves 
with the Society of American Florists 
that its great influence and continued 
prosperity are due. The score of earnest 
workers have drawn to their support the 
very best brains in the profession until 
now, a thousand strong, the power for 
good centered in this organization is in- 
calculable. 

A glance at the program prepared for 
the meeting at Atlantic City, the suhjicts 
to be discussed and the men eminent in 
their various lines who are expected to 
participate, give promise of a meeting this 
decennial year which will be in every way 
worthy of the occasion. The number of 
new names presented for membership this 
year we are informed is unprecedented 
and every inch of available space in the 
exhibition hall was sold nearly a month 
ahead of the meeting. The Society of 
American Florists has every reason to 
feel proud of its position at the end of its 
first decade. 

industrial pkogress. 

Perhaps nothing can demonstrate more 
clearly the varietyand extent of themany 
industries which have come to be our 
auxiliaries, and the skill and ingenuity 



28 



The American Florist. 



Aug. i6, 



which have been expended on devices of 
value to floriculture, than a list and de- 
scription of the varied exhibits which are 
to be placed in order for our inspection at 
Atlantic City. By the kindness of the 
superintendent of the trade exhibition, 
Mr. Geo. C. Watson, we are enabled to 
present herewith a diagram of the hall 
with the location and space to be occupied 
by the exhibitors as described below. 

At the right on entering the first exhibit 
will be that of Benj. Chase, Jr., Derry, N. 
H., (No. 49) who will show a full assort- 
ment of pot and tree labels. 

On the right wall table next comes H. 
Bayersdorfer & Co., of Philadelphia, (No. 
45) manufacturers and importers of Flo- 
rists' Supplies, with a large display of 
new baskets, metal and porcelain designs 
and general supplies, many of them the 
result of Mr. Bayersdorfer's recent trip 
to Europe, and illustrating the latest 
ideas of the artistic tasteof the old world. 
Mr. Bayersdorfer staged a fine exhibit at 
the Cincinnati convention nine years ago 
and has never missed an exhibition since. 

Next in order (No. 40) comes Frank L. 
Moore, Chatham, N. J., who will show 
shipping trays for cut flowers introduced 
by him in 1887 and now extensively used 
by growers for the market. Also will be 
shown for the first time the Workeasy 
Strap Buckle, a most useful and ingenious 
contrivance which must be seen to be ap- 
preciated. 

Next the Snow Rustic Manufacturing 
Co., (No. 30) who will show rustic chairs, 
window boxes, plant stands, etc., includ- 
ing several novelties in the way of rustic 
work. 

No. 19 is Thomas Woodason, Philadel- 
phia, manufacturer of bellows for spray- 
ing liquid and dry insecticides. This is 
the first convention to which Mr. Wood- 
ason has sent his wares, but they are well 
and favorably known to the trade 
through the medium of the seed trade and 
supply men. 

Z. De Forest Ely & Co.. of Philadelphia, 
(No. 13) come next with a line of florists' 
bulbs and various supplies including some 
novelties recently patented. Mr. Ely's 
exhibits are always beautiful and in- 
structive. 

S. B. Arment (No. 51) will show grass 
receptacles for lafrn mowers. 

On the stage, right hand side, (No. 3) 
Major Bonnaffon, of Philadelphia, will 
show his detachable steel fence for farm, 
park, lawn or garden, easily put up or 
taken down and an excellent cheap trellis 
for sweet peas and other vines. Edwin 
Lonsdale, of Chestnut Hill, will have a 
display of plants "inside the fence." 

The center of the stage will be occupied 
by Hitchings & Co., of New York, (No. 
2) who will erect thereon a modern green- 
house for both private and commercial 
purposes, showing various styles of 
benches, ventilating, hot water boilers, 
etc., in connection with same. 

On the stage, left side, (No. 1) will be 
shown the device of the Chadborn-Ken- 
nedy Mfg. Co., known as the Chadborn 
automatic ventilator, which is intended 
to regulate the temperature in green- 
houses. Its motive power is water, this 
being undercontrol of a thermostat which 
is adjusted to any degree of heat desired 
in the houses. 

Adjoining this will be found Thos. 
Weathered 's Sons' exhibit of horticultural 
building, heating apparatus, etc., and the 
Quaker City Machine Co.'s display of 
their Challenge ventilating apparatus. 

In front of the stage, right corner, (No. 
8) will be seen the balanced ventilating 
apparatus of E. A. Ormsby, a most in- 
genious contrivance. 



Next to Mr. Ormsby comes B. S. 
Schmid, of Washington, (No. 7) who 
will show aquatics and gold fish. 

In the center in front of the stage (No. 
6) Wm. Tricker & Co., of Clifton, N. J., 
will make a beautiful display of aquatic 
plants in a large tank in which will be 
mcluded many new and choice nymphaeas, 
of the hardy and tender, day and night 
blooming species, lotus flowers, etc. 

To the left of Mr. Tricker (No. 5) will 
be located the Hose Connection Co., of 
Kingston, R. I., who will exhibit for the 
first time the Kinney pump, a simple and 
effective device for applying liquid manure 




1 1. 




1 17, 




I 21. 


16 










129. 


32 


;33 






37 








43 


>38, 


.--. 




47, 



49. 

"gun rack" 



ENTRANCE 

DIAGRAM OP EXHIBITION HALL AT THE OON- 
VENTION 



in the greenhouse or garden, also for 
spraying with fungicides and insecticides. 

Next comes E. Hippard, of Youngs- 
town, O., (No. 4) with the Standard ven- 
tilating apparatus. Those who did not 
attend the St. Louis convention have yet 
to see the new adjustable arm for this 
machine. The Standard ventilating ap- 
paratus was thought so well of last year 
at St. Louis as to be awarded a first-class 
certificate. 

Starting from the stage the first exhibit 
on the left hand wall space (No. 50) is 
the Wisconsin Flower Exchange, of Mil- 
waukee, who will show a set of their 
useful plant tubs, which supply a long 
felt want for something neat, durable 
acd cheap. 

Next is the exhibit of E. Kaufmann & 
Co., of Philadelphia, (No. 9) who will 
show a choice collection of florists' sup- 
plies. The display by this firm is always 
artistic and effective. 



A.H. Hews & Co., of North Cambridge, 
Mass., (No. 14) come next with a full 
assortment of standard flower pots, seed 
and fern pans, also a new line of jardi- 
nieres especially adapted to standard 
pots. 

Next come Edwards & Docker (No. 20) 
with folding flower boxes. The Cushman 
Gladiolus Co. (No. 33) who will show 
cut blooms of seedling gladioluses, and 
John N. May (No. 26) who will place on 
exhibition the new American rose Mrs. 
Whitney. 

Dan'l B. Long, of Buffalo, whose exhibit 
is next in order (No. 34) will require no 
introduction and a convention would not 
be complete without him. The system 
and order prevailing in the exhibitions of 
the society now are in no small degree 
the result of his abilities in that line exer- 
cised when he was a member of the exec- 
utive committee. He will show his spe- 
cialty, photographs of designs in cut 
flower work, with many additions and 
improvements since last year. 

A. Herrmann, manufacturer of metal 
designs at 412 East 34th street, New 
York, comes next (No. 41) with metal 
designs in variety and cycas leaves. 

A. Q. Wolf &Bro., of Dayton, O., (No. 
48) at the left of the entrance to hall will 
exhibit the Champion automatic venti- 
lators and Champion soil pulverizer and 
sifter, both valuable devices. 

The entire center table will be devoted 
to exhibits of plants. The first in order 
(No. 47) is Robt. Craig, of Philadelphia. 
Here will be a fine collection of palms and 
foliage plants, new cannas, outdoor 
grown crotons, etc. Mr. Craig was a 
pioneer in the use of crotons for bedding 
purposes and was one of the first to dem- 
onstrate their value for this purpose. 
His collection is very large and will be 
one of rare interest in this direction. A 
batch of the new Dahlia imbricata alba 
will also be shown by Mr. Craig. 

Passing down the right of center table, 
next to the Craig exhibit, will be the col- 
lection of palms and decorative plants 
from Chas. D. Ball, of Philadelphia, (No. 
38). Mr. Ball is one of the best known 
of the famous Philadelphia palm growers 
and his exhibit is sure to be an attractive 
one. 

Next (No. 33) comes Ellwanger & 
Barry, the prince of nursery firms, of 
Rochester, N. Y., who will show roses, 
perennial phloxes and other seasonable 
blooms. 

Adjoining Ellwanger & Barry will be 
Storrs & Harrison, of Painesville, 0., (No. 
29) who maybe expected to show a good 
assortment of plants in their special line. 
W. A. Manda, of South Orange, N. J., 
comes next (No. 21) with a display of 
novelties in foliage and flowering plants, 
orchids, bulbs, etc. Although Mr. Manda 
now makes his first bow as an exhibitor 
at the conventions he is no stranger to 
the trade personally and he is sure to re- 
ceive a hearty welcome. 

Next (No. 17) will come specimen plants 
of Mr. Lonsdale's favorite Swainsona 
galegifolia alba, a coming plant for flo- 
rists' use for cutting, profitable to handle 
and easy to grow. 

The end of center table facing the stage 
(No. 11) has been secured by the United 
States Nurseries, Short Hills, N. J., who 
will fill it with a display of palms and or- 
namental foliage plants in variety, as 
well as flowering plants, bromeliads, or- 
chids, seeds and bulbs. 

Passing up the left hand side of center 
table the next display will be that of 
Henry A. Dreer, Philadelphia, (No. 16) 
where may be found samples of the palms, 
ferns, araucarias and other decorative 



iSgf. 



The American Florist. 



29 




THE FIRST TEAM PRIZE IN THE BOWLING MATCH 



plants for which this house is famous, cut 
blooms of new cannas, phloxes, etc., also 
French and Dutch bulbs and florists' 
requisites. 

Adjoining H. A. Dreer will be found 
Siebrech: & Wadley, of New York , (No. 
32) who will be on hand with useful 
plants for fl irists' use, orchids and inter- 
esting new plants. 



L. B. Brague, of Hinsdale, Mass., (No. 
37) comes next and will show his special- 
ties, cut ferns, evergreens, moss and sup- 
plies of a similar nature. His place is up 
among the Berkshire Hills where these 
terns are found in great abundance and 
in fine quality. 

Between L. B. Brague and Robt. Craig 
will be found J. C. Vaughan, of Chicago 



and New York, (No. 43) who will mike 
an exhibit of splendid cannas, roses and 
other desirable olants for florists' trade. 
At the head of the table to the right of 
center (No. 44i A. Blanc & Co., of Phila- 
delphia, will display vases for florists' 
use and cacti in great variety, and it is 
safe to say that this will be found to be 
one of the most interesting spots in the 
exhibition. 

Next comes the J. Horace McFarland 
Co., of Harrisburg, Pa., (No. 39) who 
will show samples of catalogue work for 
florists as written, illustrated and printed 
at the "Mount Pleasant Printery." Ex- 
perts in catalogue work never fail to give 
unstinted praise to the technical skill of 
Mr. McFarland in his special line of hor- 
ticultural printing, a class of work which 
it is difficult to get done properly in an 
ordinary printing office. A part of Mr. 
McFarland 's exhibit will be an object 
lesson called "The evolution of a cata- 
logue page." 

J. E. Jeffords & Co., Philadelphia, (No. 
25) are next in line with a beautiful dis- 
play of jardinieres, vases and ferneries, 
which are now indispensable to the stock 
of every florist who does a retail business. 
Messrs. Jeff'ords & Co. have promised to 
make the most complete exhibition of this 
classol goodsevershownata convention. 
J. Arnot Penman (No. 22) will occupy 
the space next adjoining, and will offer 
for inspection Nicholson's great work. 
The Dictionary of Gardening, which is 
the standard authority on nomenclature 
adopted by the Society of American Flo- 
rists, also several other recentlv published 
horticultural works. 

Next to Mr. Penman comes the Powell 
Fertilizer and Chemical Co., (No. 18) who 
will make an interesting exhibit of fer- 
tilizers, fungicides, insecticides and other 
chemical products of value to plant 
growers. 

At the end of this table (No. 12) will be 
found the Pittsburg Clay Mfg. Co., of 
New Brighton, Pa., who will make a dis- 
play of standard flower pots and terra 
cotta lawn vases. The exhibit will be in 
charge of their popular representative, 
Mr. W. H. Elverson. 

At the upper end of table to left of cen- 
ter H. F. Michell (No. 46) will show 
bulbs, seeds and a full line of florists' 
necessities- 
Next in order is the bulb and seed dis- 
play of J. C. Vaughan, (No. 42) which 
has always been one of the most corn- 
plete and interesting features of the soci- 
ety exhibitions. 

The Parmenter Mfg. Co., of East Brook- 
field, Mass., (No. 36) are next with a full 
line of standard and fancy flower pots, 
jardinieres, seed and fern pans and garden 
vases. 

Next comes the Rose Mfg. Co.'s spe- 
cialty, sulpho-tobacco soap (No. 35). 

Just beyond will be The Whilldin Pot- 
tery Co.'s display of standard flower 
pots, seed pans, etc., (No. 31). Messrs. 
Whilldin date the period of their popu- 
larity with the florists to the time when 
they began to show their manufactures 
atthese annual conventions and advertise 
them in the American Florist. 

Adjoining the Whilldin exhibit will be 
that of J. R. Wotherspoon, (No. 28) who 
will show the Eureka fumigator, the 
Wotherspoon watering pots and other 
specialties. 

Next in order will come the Lockland 
Lumber Co., of Lockland, 0., (No. 24) 
long time exhibitors and both widely and 
favorably known for their specialty, 
which is cypress wood work for green- 
house roofs, gables, gutters, plates, etc. 
Just beyond will be S. A. Weller (No. 



30 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 1 6^ 



15) with jardinieres in a variety of styles 
and sizes, and at the end of the table will 
be found C. H. Joosten, of New York, 
(No. 10) who will show the Postite mag- 
azine bellows, hand and horse power, in 
practical operation, and will also have a 
line of forcing bulbs, azaleas, etc., and his 
special specialty, Fostite, the great 
remedy. 

Number 52 is H. G. Faust & Co., whose 
display will consist of bulbs, seeds and 
an assortment of sundries. 

Other exhibitors who came in late and 
will probably be found in the overflow 
exhibit in G. A. R. hall are Keller Bros., 
Norristown, Pa.; N. Steffens, maker of 
florists' wire work. New York city; Aug. 
F. Brabant, florists' pins, New York city; 
Worcester Wire Co., Worcester, Mass. 

PROGRESS IN ROSES. 

A well known rose grower, one of the 
most extensive as well as most successful 
in this country, on being asked to name a 
dozen of the best forcing teas, replied, 
"You can not find a dozen good teas." 
Considering the universal popularity of 
the rose, the time and industry which 
have been devoted to its improvement, 
and the countless number of varieties 
which have been introduced with ambi- 
tious titles and claims, this assertion, 
which is liable to stand uncontradicted, 
is significant as indicating the high stand- 
ard prevailing in the American market 
and the heavy odds against which intro- 
ducers of new varieties are forced to 
struggle. 

The main points required in a forcing 
rose under the present conditions are a 
good constitution and its accompani- 
ments, namely, vigorous and rapid 
growth, strong upright stem, good sub- 
stance, rich foliage, and immunity from 
disease; large flowers borne on single 
stems, with persistent petals of clean color 
and no tendency to turn purplish; suffi- 
cient doubleness of flower to prevent ex- 
posing the center when full blown, but 
not so double as to interfere with free and 
rapid development of blooms in mid-win- 
ter; long and steady season of blooming. 

The variety coming nearest to a com 
bination of all these good qualities is the 
American Beauty, which is undoubtedly 
the grandest forcing rose ever introduced 
and has no rival in the market to-day. It 
has steadily maintained its price better 
than any other variety and the demand 
for plants the present season has been 
greater than ever before. Not every one 
succeeds with the Beauty. Its stubborn- 
ness has been the cause of many a heart 
ache, and frequently in winter it puzzles 
those hitherto most successful in its cul- 
tivation, rewarding their care and atten- 
tion with unmarketable blooms and keen 
disappointment. As one prominent 
grower has remarked, "It's no trick to 
grow Beauty until you get the fire on; 
when the short days come, that's the 
test." The American Beauty can doubt- 
less be made better by careful selection of 
stock. One grower who has been at work 
on it for some time claims a great ad- 
vance in intensity of color. 

American Belle, the Beauty 's most prom- 
ising offshoot, is a good thing with its 
originator, and with some others, but it 
must be confessed that in some localities 
it has not grown freely and has not as 
strong a constitution as Beauty. It is 
more useful than Beauty on account of 
its color, which is charming and does not 
deteriorate after being cut. 

The Bride continues to be the foremost 
white rose and is rated by some growers 
as second to the American Beauty in de 



mand. One fault with it is the difficulty 
of getting any size to thebuds in summer. 
It is noticeable also that in some places 
the Bride about mid-winter will get sick 
and die. This trouble seems to be a mat- 
ter of soil, as in other localities under the 
same treatment it remains in full vigor 
until hot weather. 

The same difficulty in getting size in 
summer as noted in the Bride is also found 
with the Mermet. The Mermet has cer- 
tainly been interfered with to a consider- 
able extent by the Bridesmaid, which has 
the merit of constant rich color even 
through the dark days of winter when 
the Mermet gets pale and badly off' color. 
On the other hand the Mermet is charm- 
ing when the clear days of spring come 
and is unquestionably a little larger 
flower. The Bridesmaid has evidently 
come to stay and it will be interesting to 
note in the immediate future whether it 
will, as its most enthusiastic admirers 
claim, supplant the Mermet completely. 

Next to the American Beauty in value 
as a forcing rose stands the Meteor in the 
estimation of some of the largest growers 
to-day. Plants of this vaiiety have been 
in great demand during the past spring 
and it has now taken its position as the 
foremost red everbloomingrose. Aglance 
at the history of the Meteor will not be 
out of place here. It was so little thought 
of by its raiser, Mr. Henry Bennett, that 
he presented it to Mr. Evans, the pur- 
chaser of the Bennett, with the remark 
"that it might be some use in America 
but was of no use to him." It remained 
in Mr. Evans' hands for about eight 
years, he growing it with indifferent suc- 
cess, and all the slow Philadelphia people 
concluded that it was not a safe rose to 
handle. Finally an enterprising New 
York grower bought it out, stock plants 
and all. Experiments with it under differ- 
ent conditions soon developed what its 
special needs under cultivation were, and 
it has been such a success that it is now 
considered indispensable by all the leading 
growers. It is a mistake to condemn a 
rose too quickly. 

Mme. Hoste, although a very useful 
rose in its time, appears to be dropping 
out of favor, and the Kaiserin Augusta 
Victoria is likely to take its place. Hoste 
is valuable on account of its free bloom- 
ing qualities and its tltgant shape in mid- 
winter, but its season is short and as 
soon as the weather begins to get hot in 
spring it becomes poor. The Kaiserin on 
the contrary shows a decided improve- 
ment in hot weather and its season is 
much longer. There is some question as 
to its value in winter. In winter lime it 
is not nearly as good as Bride and it 
suffers in comparison also on account of 
being easily bruised, but when its long 
season is taken into account it is found a 
profitable rose to grow. Freedom from 
mildew is another very strong point in 
its favor. It is one of the easiest roses to 
grow and is wonderfully productive, 
throwing two blooms for every one Bride. 

Mme. Caroline Testout is a rose on 
which opinions varv as yet. The enor- 
mous demand for yourg plants the pres- 
ent season would indicate that it is in a 
fair wav to become an established fav- 
orite. It is significant that Testout is 
being grown to-day by men who at first 
condemned it. The success with it varies 
greatly in different places audit is evident 
that the growers do not all know how to 
handle it yet. Its color is the purest tone 
of pink; it is fn fact the only rose of the 
color in existence. It is a good grower 
and very free in soil that suits it. 

Mme. de Watteville is not as much 
grown as formerly excepting by a few 



New Yorkers who grow it superbly. 
Around Philadelphia it does not do first 
rate and they are inclined to drop it. 
But there is no color like it, its peculiar 
shading entitling it to the name of "the 
tulip rose," and it is not likely to begiven 
up by any one who can grow it well. , 

Mme. Cusin is another rose which has 
made its greatest record in New York. 
One merit is its remarkably long season. 
There is nothing to beat it for freedom of 
bloom and it is second to none as a win- 
ter rose. Its small size is against it as a 
permanent favorite and south of New 
York this defect is most apparent. 

Perle des Jardins still remains the best 
yellow. Unfortunately it gives too many 
poor and deformed flowers in winter and 
as a winter bloomer it has seen its day. 
Other yellows have been heralded as sure 
to take its place, but they have not done 
it. There is, however, very little demand 
for yellow roses as compared with a few 
years ago. Sunset is still a favorite with 
a good many. This rose varies very much 
in color, and by propagating only from 
the rich dark colored forms the strain 
might undoubtedly be improved greatly. 

A rose purporting to be a yellow Mer- 
met was sent out three years ago. En- 
terprising growers all bit at it and paid 
a good price for it, but it wouldn't flower 
and it wasn't yellow and proved an abso- 
lute failure. A yellow rose of Mermet 
type is a thing most desired in the rose 
world to-day. 

Niphetos is very little grown and were 
it not for its adaptability to certain spots 
where nothing else will do well, such as 
low front benches and odd corners, it 
would be grown still less. It is an excep- 
tionally free rose and if its flowers could 
be sold it would be a very profitable rose 
to grow, but the demand for long stiff 
stems has been a powerful factor against 
it and the uses to which its flowers can 
be put are few. 

Papa Gontier is another of the "has 
beens." It is too small for the prevailing 
taste and its season is too short. It is 
no good in fall and as soon as the weather 
gets warm in the spring it opens too 
quickly and is unsalable. Out of the large 
number of growers who planted Gontier 
a few years ago there can only be found 
now a couple or so in each of the large 
centers. 

A rose that has come into popularity 
and then gone out again within the past 
decade is the Wm. Francis Bennett. Red 
roses were more popular ten years ago 
than at present and the Bennett was 
hailed as a winner. It was welcomed as 
a relief from the exacting Jacq growers 
who had things all their own way on 
roses of this color up to that time. The 
Jacq growers watched it with suspicion 
and looked eagerly for evidences of weak- 
ness in it. Weak points soon appeared, 
for it was found to be a very poor grower. 
It is one of the freest roses ever produced 
and will bloom grandlv if it can only be 
induced to make wood, but this it seems 
to do only in occasional cases. 

Another rose that created a furor on its 
first appearance was Her Majesty. Al- 
though belonging in adifferent class from 
the other varieties here referred to, yet it 
may not be out of place to recall the sen- 
sation it made nine years ago when it 
was carried out to the Cincinnati conven- 
tion, a flower with an eight foot stem 
which was paraded up and down the hall 
and came to grief at an inopportune mo- 
ment by having its head snapped off 
against a car door. And those who put 
their money into it never got it back. 

The Puritan came very near being a 
good rose. It would come occasionally a 



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The American Florist. 



31 




SECOND TEAM PRIZE, INDIVIDUAL PRIZE 

PRIZES FOR THE BOWLING CONTEST. 



THIRD TEAM PRIZE. 



magnificent flower and would then charm 
anybody. But oftener it came green cen- 
tered and deformed. What a companion 
for Beauty it would have been had it 
come regularly as it did occasionally. 

In looking over the records of one of the 
most prominent growers for the New 
York market ten years ago it is interest- 
ing to read the names of the roses then 
being forced and the prices received. 
They were the Bon Silene and Safrano, 
old favorites now dropped completely 
out of sight; Mme. Joseph Schwartz, the 
so-called -'true tea Jacq" which proved 
good for nothing for forcing purposes; 
Cornelia Cook, supplanted by the Bride; 
Mme. Alex Bernet, too soft and not stem 
enough; Mme. Robert, productive but 
•with the fatal weak stem; Souv. de la 
Malmaison, no good for winter bloom; 
Douglas, a miserable flower; Dukeof Con- 
naught, hard to grow and scared out of 
existence by the Bennett; Souv. d'un Ami, 
another weak stem; La France, which is 
rapidly losing ground as a winter rose; 
MarechalNiel.Jacq, Perle, Niphetos and 
Mermet. What a havoc the decade has 
made in this list! Only two or three out 
of the whole lot can be fairly rated as 
market varieties to-day, and even these 
have started on the down grade. Still it 
is a question whether there is as much 
money in rose growing now as there was 
ten years ago. 

Two new roses, the Mrs. Whitney, put 
on the market this year, and the Belle 
Siebrecht, promised tor next year, the 
first an American, the second a trans- 
atlantic production, have their record 
yet to make. If they prove valuable in 
various locations and under different con- 
ditions the trade will quickly find it out, 
for there is still plenty of room for the 
right kind and there are vacancies yet 
waiting to be filled in the list of "a dozen 
good teas." 



PROGRESS IN CARNATIONS. 

Carnation growing in America has re- 
ceived a wonderful impetus within a few 
years. The few varieties generally culti- 
vated ten years ago have with one or two 
exceptions been forced to give way to 
new and better sorts, and the standard 
of quality has advanced rapidly to a 
point scarcely dreamed of by either the 
growers or the consumers of a decade 
ago. 

In those days the main ambition of a 
carnation grower was to get as many 
flowers as possible from a plant. That 
was the first requisite, and every other 
point was a secondary consideration. 
There was only a very limited demand 
for colored carnations, growing in quan- 
titv being confined principally to the 
white varieties, these being picked with- 
out stems, and their main use being in 
the making up of funeral designs. If a 
bloom chanced to come in with a stem on 
it, this was often snapped off and a piece 
of wire substituted. 

It was the custom to send carnations 
to the city stores, not under name but 
simply as white or colored, short or 
long. To this rule Grace Wilder was the 
only notable exception, it being the only 
viriety of its color, and that color a de- 
sirable one and on this account expected 
to realize a better price. 

Seedling growing was done in a hap- 
hazard way, and with no well defined 
ideal in view. Of the varieties introduced 
from 1881 to 1884-, Portia and Wilder 
are the only ones grown now to any 
amount, although Alegatierc, Andalusia, 
Fascination, Pres. Garfield, May Queen, 
and a few others were grown for a while 
to a sufficient extent to be entitled to be 
called market varieties. On looking over 
the shipping lists of a prominent grower 
for tte season of 1884, it appears that 
Snowdon was at the head of the list in 



quantity grown, and DeGraw, LaPurite, 
Edwardsii, Wilder, Philadelphia and 
Crimson King constituted the balance of 
the stock. 

From a large number of lists furnished 
by prominent cut flower growers as their 
selection of the best dozen carnations 
now on the market, it appears that 
Lizzie McGowan is the only variety upon 
which opinion is unanimous. The only 
other sorts whichcome anywhere near to 
a unanimous vote are Wm. Scott, Day- 
break, Helen Keller, Mme. Diaz Albertini, 
Buttercup, Tidal Wave, Silver Spray and 
Portia. Thos. Cartled^e, The Stuart, 
Bouton d'Or, Crimson Coronet, Ferdi- 
nand Mangold, Edna Craig, Uncle John, 
Puritan, Red Cross, Pomona, Salmon 
Queen, Mrs. Fisher, Grace Wilder, Anna 
Webb, Hinze's White and Sweetbrier 
comprise the balance of the aggregate se- 
lection, from which it would seem that 
with due allowance for varied conditions 
of soil and location, the catalogue of 
some four or five hundred varieties of 
carnations might with advantage be re- 
duced at least ninety per cent., while to 
give a list of even a dozen thoroughly 
tested varieties that fairly tneet present 
requirements is an impossibility. 

Quite a number of the varieties above 
enumerated have not been in cultivation 
sufficiently long to insure their perma- 
nency, and careful judges have learnt 
from experience that it is wise to go 
slowly in recommending unreservedly a 
new carnation. All indications point, 
however, to the probability that among 
the novelties disseminated during the 
past two years, and about to be dissemi- 
nated the coming season are several that 
are destined to supersede the whole list 
of older sorts. 

The nearest approach to the ideal car- 
nation in size and stem on the market to- 
day, is probably Mme. Diaz Albertini. Its 



32 



The American Florist. 



Aug. i6, 



fault from a grower's standpoint is that 
it does not produce flowers in sufficient 
quantity in the early part of the winter, 
being most prolific in the spring months. 
It is very probable that at no distant day 
we shall have carnations of all colors, 
with the stout erect stem, large sized 
and well formed flowers of Albertini, and 
constant bloomers. It has been stated 
in some quarters that the carnation of 
to-day is no larger in size than it was 
some few hundred years ago, but it must 
be borne in mind that the carnations in 
those days were the border carnations 
and only produced one crop of flowers a 
year. 

The progress in carnation culture in 
the past decade has not been confined to 
the production of better flowers. The 
improvement in methods of cultivation 
has been fully equal to the improvement 
made in the varieties. 

Ten years ago we knew practically 
nothing about the diseases of carnations, 
and now owing to the eflbrts of special- 
ists in fungoid diseases we have been 
brought into close contact with a num- 
ber of these enemies, which are peculiar 
to this branch of the Dianthus family, 
some of which, the at one time dreaded 
rust among the number, we can now suc- 
cessfully combat. 

The American Carnation Society has 
been organized within the past few years, 
and has been a wonderful help in the de- 
velopment of its patron flower in its dif- 
ferent phases, and no doubt we shall be 
able to chronicle greater improvements in 
the Divine Flower in the next than has 
been possible in the past decade. 

PROGRESS IN CRYSANTHEMUMS. 

^ The present popularity of the chrysan- 
themum dates back to the first set from 
Japan disseminated by H. Waterer in 
1885. Up to that time all the varieties 
in cultivation had been imported from 
England and France. The first American 
seedlings made their appearance in 1887. 
Of those that ever saw the market, the 
first were seeded by W. K. Harris. Since 
that time more has been done in the pro- 
duction and introducing of new varieties 
of chrysanthemums than in any other line. 

Ten years ago chrysanthemum shows 
were known only in Philadelphia and 
Boston. No disbudding was practiced, 
and in single blooms nothing over four 
inches in diameter was thought of, and 
the so-called exhibition plants were lank 
straggling specimens five to six feet tall, 
with the flowers all on top and most of 
the foliage in the same place. 

The points aimed at in chrysanthemum 
culture are flowers as nearly spherical in 
form as possible, with petals neither too 
coarse nor too fine, of good lasting qual- 
ity and strong individual self color, erect 
stem, and good foliage borne close up to 
the flower. 

Not all these qualities are to be found 
in any one variety. Some sorts have one 
or several of these good points sufficiently 
to entitle them to be regarded as stand- 
ards. For instance the standard of foli- 
age and stem is seen in Mrs. Jerome Jones, 
but in this variety the petal is too heavy, 
and the center of the flower not quite full 
enough. Ivory may be called the stand- 
ard of form of flower and texture of 
petal, but it lacks stem. The wiry stem 
of Widener is largely a matter of growth, 
and this variety will in the hands of an 
inexperienced person often come with a 
weak neck. Lasting quality depends 
much also upon cultivation. 

There is abundant room for advance- 
ment still, not only in the direction of 
more perfect varieties, but in the manner 
of staging at exhibitions. A recent sug 



gestion by Mr. E. A. Wood regarding the 
encouragement of efforts in the way of 
more artistic arrangement is in the right 
direction, and indicates a means whereby 
the popularity of chrysanthemum shows 
may be increased and perpetuated. 

We append lists of twenty-five chrvsan- 
themums selected and recommended by 
two of the leading chrysanthemum 
authorities in America as worthy to 
stand at the head of the list of useful 
commercial varieties, including early and 
late bloomers. 

List No. 1. 



"WHITE. 

Domination, 

Ivory. 

Mrs. Jerome Jones, 

W. G. Newett, 

The Queen. 

Niveus. 



RED. 

Geo. W. Clillds, 
Mrs. A. J. Drexel, 
CulllDKfordli. 

RRONZE. 

Hicks Arnold, 
Harry May. 



Miss Minnie Wanamaker, Coi. W. B. Smitli. 
Jos. H. White. YELLOW. 

PIXK. Golden Wedding, 

Harry Balsley, W. H. Lincoln, 

V. H. Hallock, Mrs. Cralge Llppiacott, 

Mermaid, H. E Widener. 

Eda Prass, Mrs. L. C. Madeira. 
RoBlyn, 
Vlvland Morel. 

List No. 2. 

WHITE. YELLOW. 

Miss Minnie Wanamaker. W. H. Lincoln. 

Ivory, H. E. Widener, 

Nlvens. FaBCination, 

The Queen. Eugene Dailledouze, 

Domination, Challenge, 

Mrs. Jerome Jones, Minerva. 

Mrs. F. Bergman. Major BonnaSon. 

Flora Hill. EED. 

pixK. George W. Chllds, 

President W. R. Smith, Robert Mclnnes. 
Maud Dean. Culllnglordi. 

W. N. Ruda, 
Mermaid, 
Harry Balsley, 
Mrs. E.G. till. 
Pink Pearl. 

PROGRESS IN CANNAS. 

In no line of floriculture has a greater 
or more popular advance been made in 
recent years than in that of flowering 
cannas. This race may truthfully be said 
to have been created wiihin the past de- 
cade, it being but four years since the 
Mme. Crozy was introduced. True, there 
were such varieties as Gen. Boulanger, 
Emily Le Clair and others several years 
before the Crozy made its appearance, 
but it was the Mme. Crozy that popu- 
larized the canna. It proves to have been 
worthy of the sensation it created, for 
notwithstanding the multitude of vari- 
eties that have followed it this variety 
undoubtedly stands to-day the best canna 
for bedding purposes, and in habit and 
form of flower has yet to be beaten. 

The enormous demand from this side of 
the water which followed the introd uction 
of the Mme. Crozy unfortunately proved 
too great a temptation for the French- 
men, and it was not long before scores of 
highly lauded varieties were hustled into 
the market heralded asgreat acquisitions, 
but proving in the majority of cases un- 
worthy and inferior. This evil became so 
apparent (our growers having already 
learned costly lessons in the same direc- 
tion with roses and chrysanthemums) 
that our importers have about stopped 
importing and their hopes are now cen- 
tered for the future on the results of home 
efforts, and it is confidently predicted 
that after the present year we shall have 
fine American varieties in abundance 
seeking for recognition, with the proba- 
bility that, as with chrysanthemums, our 
enterprising American hybridizers will 
soon set a pace which our European 
friends will find difficult to follow. 

To form an opinion regarding new 
cannas one should be with them all sum- 
mer and take the averages, for in a mis- 
cellaneous collection the list of best ap- 
pearing varieties would change every ten 
days. The excessively dry weather of 
the present season has been most unfav 
orable for cannas. Some sorts that grew 
eight feet in height last summer are under 



the changed conditions this season the 
veriest dwarfs. Hence it is impossible as 
yet to present a just estimate of the value 
of some of the newer varieties, although 
there are a few which give reason for the 
belief that they will prove valuable. 

Paul Siegrist, which is generally ad- 
mitted to be the best of last year's impor- 
tation and which made a most favorable 
impression at the World's Fair, appears 
as a very indifferent canna in most places 
this year. Some growers, however, still 
pin their faith to it and attribute its fail- 
ure to the dry weather, feeling confident 
that it will show up well towards fall. 

Next to Mme. Crozy the two cannas 
most highly esteemed are Alphonse Bou- 
vier and Charles Henderson. They are 
both exceedingly brilliant in color, the 
former being ahead in this respect. Bou- 
vier is also the best all round bedder in 
the market, but is inferior as a pot plant, 
while Henderson makes the ideal pot 
plant. 

Florence Vaughan is one of the best 
cannas in existence and stand* among 
the yellows where Chas. Henderson does 
among the reds. In substance of flower 
it stands at the head. 

Capt. P. de Suzzoni, although coming 
nearer to a yellow effect than Florence 
Vaughan, is not equal to that variety, 
being too tall and uneven in growth. 

J. D. Cabos, although a favorite with 
many and effective on account of its dark 
foliage, lacks solidity, a plant seldom 
throwing up more than three or four 
stalks, which do not stand upright on ac- 
count of lack of support. 

Van den Berg, Jr., is one out this year 
which looked indifferent early in the sea- 
son but now appears to better advan- 
tage. It is quite distinct in markings, 
yellow ground work speckled and blotched 
with red. 

Columbia, a new variety from Kramer 
& Son, is in some respects, notably size 
of flower, clearly in advance of all the 
dark red cannas. 

Other varieties which seem entitled to 
stand in the list of sorts worth growing 
are Comte Horace de Choiseul, which 
probably antedated Mme. Crozy, Pres. 
Carnot, also one of the older varieties, 
Pres. Chandon, distinct in color and 
nearest to pure orange, Comte de Bouch- 
ard, very similar to Florence Vaughan, 
the petals being a trifle flatter, Paul Mar- 
quant, distinct orange vermilion but 
rather too loose in the spike, Geoffroy St. 
Hilaire, grand for large effects, and 
Egandale, which is the best dark leaved 
bedding canna j'et introduced. 

Probably other varieties might be 
named which in certain locations have 
given equally good results, but the above 
fairly covers the various types, and cer- 
tainly anything which is not equal to 
those enumerated should be discarded. 

Konigin Charlotte, a German variety 
which will be on the market next year, is 
expected to prove a good one. Its main 
advance is in color. Another promising 
one which comes from Germany is Ger- 
mania, which is said to be similar to 
Crozy but a dwarfer grower and larger 
flower than that variety. The new vari- 
eties plainly indicate that hybridizers are 
working mainly from Mme. Crozy stock. 
It is a question whether this is the best 
course. 

The principal directions in which im- 
provement is needed are form and sub- 
stance of bloom. The flowers of existing 
varieties are too fragile and too easily 
injured by rain. There is an indication 
in some seedlings of a better development 
of the lower half of the flower and occa- 
sionally a suggestion of semi-doubleness. 



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The American Florist. 



33 




BODYWORK OF BROKEN COLUMN. 
ARRANGEMENT OF FLOWERS. 



Both of these tendencies are in the right 
dirtction. An advance along the same 
general lines followed in the improvement 
of the geranium during the past few years 
would seem to be the riE;ht move. 

PROGRESS IN GERANIUMS. 

The requisites of a first-class bedding 
geranium are: 

1. Suitable habit of growth, viz., 
dwarf and compact. 

2. Ability to stand our hot suns with- 
out burning. 

3. Large trusses, borne on long stiff 
footstalks. 

4. Clear distinct colors. 

The advance made in geraniums the 
past ten years has been quite marked, 
but necessarily slow, owing to the high 
quality of manv varieties possessed as 
far back as 1875 and 1880. The notice- 
able points of improvement are in habit 
of growth and increased size of the indi- 
vidual floret. 

The following list of ten best all round 
bedding geraniums, those which come 
nearest to the ideal, has been gi\en us by 



a leading authority on these plants. 
The varieties enumerated are selected 
from those that have been thoroughly 
tested, and not from the newer sorts that 
have been introduced during the past two 
years. 

TEN MOST DESIRABLE BEDDING GERA- 
NIUMS. 

Mrs. J. M. Gaar. (Single). Pure 
white. Dwarf compact growth, abund- 
ant in bloom. Equal to any scarlet. 

Alpine Beauty. (Double). Purewhite, 
large trusses, vigorous growth. Superior 
to all other double whites as a bedder. 

Beauty of Poitevine. (Semi-double). 
Salmon pink, dwarf, free blooming. A 
model bedder. 

Leonard Kelway. (Double). Afterthe 
style of S. A. Xutt, with larger pips and a 
few shades brighter in color. 

Lowell. (Single). A soft rich scarlet, 
very large truss, symmetrical habit. 

Le Contable. (Double). Rosy pink in 
color, dwarf compact growth. Very 
free. 

Mrs. E. G. Hill. (Semi- double). Rosy 



Very fine bedded. A striking 
Soft rose pink. 



salmon, 
variety. 

Centaur. (Double). 
Unsurpassed for bedding. 

Bruant. (Semi-double). A strong vig- 
orous grower, admirably adapted for ex- 
posed positions. 

W. A. Chalfont. (Single). A model in 
growth, large trusses, A No. 1. 



Convention Notes. 



RECEPTION COMMITTEE. 

The reception committee of the Phila- 
delphia Florists' Club respectfully ask 
that all delegates as soon as thev are 
comfortably situated in their hotels shall 
call at the convention hall and register, 
giving the hotel at which they are stop- 
ping. They will at the same time begiven 
the tickets and program of the social part 
of the convention. 

THE ladies' COMMITTEE. 

The ladies' committee are particularly 
anxious tofind out how many ladies there 
are, so they can provide sufficient cars to 
carry the party to Carisbrooke Inn, 
where their reception is to take place. 
The railroads are very much pushed at 
this, their busiest season, and asked the 
committee to give them all the noticethey 
could, as cars were very scarce. 

SPECIAL MEETING OF PHILA. CLUB. 

At the special meeting held last Tuesday 
evening the report of the committees 
showed that a great deal of work had 
been done and everything is in first-class 
shape. If the weather man will only favor 
us all will be well. 

THE SHOOTING MATCH. 

The committee on shooting match had 
on exhibition the prizes and they are 
beauties. The first team prize is a ster- 
ling silver loving cup with design repre- 
senting a seashore scene of sportsmen 
shooting at birds on the wing, the bot- 
tom of cup is washed by waves and a 
lighthouse is seen in the distance. The 
second prize is a smaller cup of sterling 
silver of much the samedesign asthefirst, 
there is no third prize. The teams are to 
consist of five men each instead of six as 
at first intended. 

There are three individual prizes for the 
highest scores. The first is a sterling 
silver flask which seems as necessary as 
a good gun on an expedition after game. 
The second prize is a pair of silver mounted 
opera glasses, and a silver corkscrew with 
a buckhorn handle is for the third best. 
The individual scores made in team 
shooting will have to come in competition 
with anyone else not on a team who de- 
sires to shoot. The committee thought 
it a pity to debar clubs who have not 
enough members present to make up a 
team and they will allow them to shoot 
as individuals for the individual prizes. 
The ordinary shooting rules govern in 
this contest and all persons taking part 
must be members of some regularly con- 
stituted organization of florists, all mem- 
bers of the Society of American Florists. 
The match will take place on the Iron 
Pier, which is 1,000 feet long by 50 feet 
wide, with a large pavilion on the extreme 
end which is to be used for the entertain- 
ment in the evening. 

THE BOWLING MATCH. 

Of the engravings presented in this issue 
the single vase is the first team prize, the 
largest pitcher and tray is the second 
team prize and the smaller pitcher goes 
to the team making the third best score. 
The small cup is of sterling silver and is 
the individual prize for the highest score 
n the two games. 



34 



The American Florist. 



Aug. i6, 



The prizes for the individual bowling 
contest are three diamond scarf pins 
valued at $20, $15 and $10. They will 
be useful souvenirs of the occasion. 

See page 44 for the rules that will gov- 
ern the contest. 

THE TRADE EXHIBIT. 

Superintendent Watson has secured the 
G. A. R. Hall, opposite the Odd-Fellows' 
Hall, for an overflow exhibit. The hall 
is 40x25 feet and he thinks he can now 
accotninodate all comers. See full de- 
scription under head of "Industrial Prog- 
ress" inour article entitled "The Progress 
of a Decade." 




Chrysanthemum Notes. 

Now comes the beginning of the trying 
times for the grower of exhibition blooms, 
for on the plants that were propagated 
early the first of the crown buds are be- 
ginning to form, and to "take" or not to 
"take" the buds is the question. The dif- 
ference between crown and terminal buds 
is already well known to the readers of 
the Florist, for in the very thorough 
paper read by Mr. Elmer D. Smith on 
chrysanthemum culture beforethe Society 
of American Florists last year at St. 
Louis, and published in the issue of the 
Florist dated August 10, 1893, these 
two buds and their capabilities were very 
fully discussed and illustrated. Our Eng- 
lish couiins, who strike the cuttings of 
some ot the varieties as early as Novem- 
ber and December, take the buds of a few 
of them as early as the first week of 
August, but the last week in August or 
the first week in September is plenty early 
enough for us to begin in this country. 
Some one may ask why; the reason that 
is generally given is that our autumns 
are bright and clear and sometimes quite 
warm, and the wood ripens much more 
easily and quickly than on the other side 
of the water. We find in referring to our 
diary of 1891 the following "Don't take 
any buds until after August 20," and this 
is underlined, so that no undue zeal or 
impatience shall lead us to the taking of 
buds prior to that date and thereby spoil- 
ing the bloom which could have been pro- 
duced, as we did in many cases that year. 

We have used the word "take" or 
"taking the bud" agreat many times, and 
perhaps it will be necessary to explain 
this to some of our readers. The exores- 
sion really means the selecting or leaving 
the bud and the taking away of the side 
shoots so that all the strength of the 
plant will go into the bud which is left. 
This must be done very carefully and as 
early in the growth of the bud as cossi- 
ble. In taking the buds we have always 
rubbed out the shoots with our fingers; 
some growers use a knife to cut them off 
with, but in our early efforts at growing 
the sharp blade would sometin^es slip and 
not only cut off the side growths but the 
bud itself. The early morning is uy far 
the best time to this, for the suc- 
culent growths are then full of sap 
and very brittle, and if just pushed out 
from the axil of the leaf Ijy the thumb or 
finger will break off very easily and with- 
out danger of doing damage. The plants 



must be looked over every morning after 
you begin to take the buds, for if the 
shoots around the crown bud are left, 
but for a short time, they will have 
sapped the strength from the bud, so that 
it will never make a good bloom, and 
will sometimes wither up and blast. 
Some growers leave one of the three 
shoots that always form around the 
crown bud for a few days, in order to see 
that the bud is all right and then nip it 
out, but if the bud looks deformed or does 
not grow, they rub it (the bud) out and 
depend upon the terminal bud which will 
set on the shoot retained. This is sim- 
ply done, in most cases, as a precaution- 
ary measure, and we would advise grow- 
ers who have had but little experience 
with crown buds to follow it when the 
bud is not discovered early, and the 
shoots have made quite a little growth 
above it. 

Keep the plants well tied up now, so 
that the stem will be as straight as pos- 
sible, for crooked stems decrease the value 
of the flowers, but don't tie so tightly as 
to choke the plant later on when the bud 
begins to swell and unfold. Tie very 
loosely now, for the stem will be fully 
double as large by the time the bloom is 
ready to cut. We have seen many a bloom 
that would have been good, spoiled by 
too tight tying, for the stringent into the 
outer bark before being observed by the 
grower, and when the liquid feeding be- 
gan the bloom was choked and did not 
get the full effects of it. 

This is the last time we shall have a 
chance to urge our readers to attend the 
meeting of the Chrysanthemum Society 
of America on Wednesday afternoon, 
August 22, at Atlantic City. We would 
like to see as large a number of the lovers 
of the Queen of Autumn as possible. Let 
us all meet with the one idea in view of 
making this society second to none of the 
auxiliary societies of the Society of 
American Florists, and if you have any- 
thing in your mind that you think the 
society ought to do don't be afraid to 
stand up and say it, for you will find the 
officers and members very approachable 
and willing to do anything that the mem- 
bers want done. So come every one that 
can, and give us the benefit of your ex- 
perience, however limited it may be, and 
acquire all the knowledge that you can in 
return. Elijah A. Wood. 

West Newton, Mass. 




A Few Notes About Orchids. 

[Read bv Edwin Lonsdalebcfoie the Florists' Club 
0/ Pfiilaid'lphia, August 7, iS(/^.] 

When, at the last meeting of the Flo- 
rists' Club, I requested to be excused for 
not having prepared a paper to be lead 
on this subject, giving as a reason that I 
did not have the time necessary, I felt 
then that I had abundance of time to, at 
least, make a creditable attempt to do 
justice to so fascinating and interesting a 
subject, to-night; but the nearer the time 
approached for the reading of the paper, 
the more difficult the task became. How- 
ever, I must do the best I can, feeble 
though the attempt will be. 

Orchids are slowly but surely taking 

their place among the popular flowers of 

I the day, as they are being called for more 



and more each season. To the leading 
and progressive florists in this and other 
cities is the credit largely due for this 
state of affairs, and the flower loving peo- 
ple are quick to appreciate the intrinsic 
merits of these aristocrats of the floral 
world. Cattleyas I believe to be the 
most popular orchid flower at the present 
time. Firstly, they have size, a great 
desideratum in the present status of our 
chosen profession. In colors, generally, 
they are pleasing, the forms are unique, 
and some have a delicate fragrance. And 
they may be had generally all the year 
round, that is to say, if the different 
species are selected with that end in view. 
Commencing with C. labiataautumnalis, 
which flowers in the fall, then C. Trianje 
and C.Percivaliana, both of which flower 
about the same time, but the flowers of 
the latter are much smaller, as a rule, 
than those of the Trianse. There is con- 
sequently no object that I can see in 
growing the Percivaliana, only perhaps on 
account of the brighter colors which some 
of the varieties possess and which may 
suit some tastes. C. Mossiae flowers in 
May and June, then comes C. Mendelii, 
and C. Gaskelliana in the order named, 
following each other for the summer 
months. It is understood, of course, that 
there is only a very limited demand for 
choice cattleya flowers in summer time, 
excepting at or near by summer resorts — 
mountains and seashore. 

The cypripedium is perhaps the best 
orchid for general use; especially does this 
apply to that best known species, insigne, 
which if rationally handled, blooms at 
the time of year when it is appreciated 
and very useful. December is the month 
in which it is generally in its glory, when 
it may be kept perfectly until the holidays 
— Christmas and New Year's. Some 
horticulturists have been heard to say 
"that it keeps almost too long." From 
our standpoint I do not believe that 
cypripediums can last too long. Tne com- 
plaint among flower buyers is generally 
the reverse of this. The cypripediums cer- 
tainly dispel the idea that all flowers are 
short-lived. This very lasting quality in 
some orchids endows them with a great 
mission in horticulture. The long keeping 
nature of the flowers attract inquiring 
minds closer to them on account of their 
great worth in this respect. "How is 
this?" they will meditate, "the beauties 
of a rose are faded in one night, whereas 
this orchid is perfect after it is two weeks 
old." And the more we can interest the 
people to think about horticulture, the 
happier they will be, and horticulture will 
in that way make friends. C. Harrisia- 
num isa hybrid, and Ibelieve thefirstthat 
was ever raised artificially under cultiva- 
tion. It is a cross between C. villosum 
and C. barbatum, and one of the freest 
bloomers among all cypripediums. C. 
Lawrenceanum is another good commer- 
cial variety, blooming in some instances 
three times in a year, and rarely failing 
to produce two crops. There were some 
doubts expressed by experts as to the ad- 
visability of buying this species for cut 
flowers when first introduced, because as 
they knowingly expressed themselves, "It 
blooms at the wrong time of the year." 
C. insigne was looked upon as the stand- 
ard orchid at that time, and when any- 
thing did not bloom at the same time of 
the year, they shooktbeir headsin doubt. 
Any orchid which produces its flowers 
during the months from the latter part of 
November until fune can generally be dis- 
posed of and in my humble opinion, it 
adds value to a variety if it blooms later 
in the season than is the natural bloom- 
ing time of C. insigne or C. Spicerianum, 



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The American Florist. 



35 




BROKEN COLUMN OOMPLBTtD. 
ARRANGEMENT OF FLOWERS 



and similar types, for thereby is the sea- 
son prolonged. 

The new Cypripedium Charlesworthii, 
from present indications, may prove an 
acquisition from a grower's standpoint, 
but whether its coloring and other dis- 
tinguishing characteristics will prove 
popular or not, remains to be seen. Very 
few blooms have been produced so far 
under cultivation. None to my know- 
ledge in this country, excepting from a 
plant or so belonging to H. E. Graves, 
Esq., Orange, N. J., under the fostering 
care of Robert M. Gray, gardener. I saw 
a batch not many days ago, whirh was 
imported last spring, and several flower 
scapes were prominent, so that we may 
reasonably expect to see some of this 
novelty in bloom within a Tery short 
time in this city. 

"Cypripedium niveum, though hardly 
a commercial variety for cut flowers, is 
nevertheless, one of the most delightful of 
all cypripediums when it is happy and in 
full flower, its elegant white flowers, 
sometimes speckled all over with tiny 
purple spots, being without equal in the 



genus. But it is a bad plant to manage 
in most collections, being more liable to 
the dreaded orchid disease known as 
'spot' than any of itscongeners. I am told 
by a friend who has seen it growing wild 
in the islands off the Malay Peninsula 
that it is always found growing on the 
face of limestone rocks not far from the 
sea, its roots nestling among the debris 
formed in little depressions in the rock, 
and its leaves exposed to full sunshine. It 
gets completely dried up for a portion of 
the year, but when the wet season returns 
it soon recovers and flowers profusely. 
No doubt we fail with this plant through 
growing it in the ordinary peat mixture 
in a moist, shaded house, and keeping it 
watered all the year round." So says Mr. 
W. Watson, London, England, in Garden 
and Forest, May 25, of the present year, 
and I believe that other cypripediums ol 
similar characteristics will be benefited b^- 
a similar course of treatment, as indi- 
cated. 

Some of the species of dendrobiums are 
also among the useful orchids which may 
be classed as desirable for cut flowers. D. 



nobile is one of the oldest and conse- 
quently best known, and though part of 
the pseudo-bulb has to be cut away to 
give satisfaction to the flower buyer, the 
planof carryingtwosets of plants, one to 
produce flowers this year, and the other 
the next, makes it less difficult to keep up 
the necessary supply than it would at 
first sight appear. The way this species 
of dendrobium is grown by one celebrated 
gardener in England whose success with 
it over there is marvelous, and is a revela- 
tion to some of us in America, is worth 
repeating. I cannot do better, therefore, 
than to give you word for word what the 
London Gardening World has to say 
about the way Mr. H. C. Princep grows 
this species: 

"The plant figured is 6 feet 3 inches 
through, but the largest of thepair meas- 
ures 8 feet in diameter. This, Mr. Princep 
informs us, was put into a larger basket 22 
inches square, while the one illustrated 
remains in the same basket as it was 
shown in two years ago. The one which 
wasputina larger basket grew a way very 
rapidly, and made growths from 3 feet to 
3 feet 6 inches in length, but owing to the 
house not being large enough for them to 
be staked in an upright position they 
were allowed to hang down, with the re- 
sult that they were not ripened up to the 
points, and consequently did not flower 
their full length. The other not being so 
strong had its growths placedupnearthe 
roof, so that they were thoroughly 
ripened, and flowered right up to their 
tips, thus showing the advantage of be- 
ing able to ripen them thoroughly. The 
plants were kept in a cool house during 
winter, in which the temperature ranged 
from 45 to 50 degrees. Most gardeners 
and florists know the value of this popu- 
lar old dendrobe, and many grow it re- 
markably well, but Mr. Princep certainly 
goes one better with it than any other 
grower of our acquaintance. He grows 
it largely in all sizes and in batches, so as 
to secure a long season of bloom, and 
cutting down is a sine qua non, for he 
uses them largely for room decoration, 
and may literally be said to gather them 
in sheaves, for he cuts down the stems their 
whole length and every year, a practice 
which but a few years ago would have been 
considered sheer madness, and we opine 
would be a dangerous experiment even 
now in the hands of a less skillful plants- 
man." Mr. Princep is head gardener at 
Buxted Park, Uckfield, Sussex, and is an 
old Enville man, and a friend of some of 
his old associates who are now in this 
country. We congratulate him on his 
great success, which is worthy our most 
ardent emulation. 

Well flowered plants in baskets from 6 
to 8 inches square would make very 
desirable Easter gifts, as they would re- 
main in good condition for some time in 
a comparatively cool room in a dwelling. 
D. formosum giganleum becomes a 
favorite wherever seen, its beautiful pure 
white flowers with yellow blotch on lip 
appeals to every one, but it is doubtful 
if it is profitable to grow, as so far with 
us it has degenerated under cultivation. 
D. Wardianum also has many admirers, 
but under our treatment it has the same 
fault as the last named, that of depreciat- 
ing in value the longer it is grown. The 
comparatively new D. Phalasnopsis is an 
ideal cut flower. It may be cut in gener- 
ous sprays from well grown plants, and 
its value to the grower is enhanced by 
the fact that it may be cut with a suffi- 
ciently long stem, without cutting the 
pseudo-bulb. 

Lielia anceps and some of the other 
species and varieties of Iffilia must not be 



36 



The American Florist. 



'ig- 



16, 



forgotten, as they do well in our climate 
with very little care. Some of our plants 
last year, that are growing in baskets 8 
or 9 inches square, had on them from 10 
to 14 spikes of bloom. They do not last 
quite as long alter being cut as some 
Other orchids do, but add variety, and 
are desirable on that account. 

One very important aspect of the orchid 
subject is the prices at which the flowers 
are sold. Orchids never should be allowed 
to become a cheap flower. There is a 
class of fastidious buyers who do not 
want flowers when they may be bought 
cheap. Orchids should be held in reserve 
for these patrons, and never should be 
put into the hands of the "fakir" or the 
"Greek." Some growers, I am afraid, 
judging from the prices at which they 
offer their products, are not fully aware 
of. the cost of production, nor do they 
allow sufficient margin for interest on 
first cost, and there are some in the retail 
business, I regret to have to say, who are 
continually "bearing" the prices of this 
and every other flower without any real 
advantage to anyone. The first cost of 
orchid plants is considerable, and had it 
been possible for me to have had the re- 
motest idea of what that cost to me 
would have been by this time, when my 
first orchid purchase was made, I never 
would have embarked in the enterprise, 
with the end in view of growing them for 
profit. 

There is a fascination about orchids 
which is almost irresistible; especially 
does this apply to an enthusiastic horti- 
culturist who grows plants and flowers 
as much for the love of them as for the 
prospective profits which he may hope to 
obtain. However, since they have by 
their own intrinsic worth, assisted by 
wide-awake florists, made themselves in- 
dispensable, let us all pull together to 
educate ourselves and the people to 
esteem them at their true value. 

And in conclusion, allow me to say 
that every legitimate efibrt be made by 
all of us to draw the people in closer com- 
munion with horticulture. When botany 
is taught svstematically in all our 
schools, public and private, and when 
the school boy or girl will pause 
long enough from their play to analyze a 
flower by the wayside, according to the 
latest lights in botany, then we may rea- 
sonably hope for a cessation of conflicts 
between capital and labor, and the ten- 
dencies towards anarchy be relegated to 
the past. 




To Prevent Rust. — Dissolve one pound of sul- 
phate of copper in two quarts of ammonia in a 2- 
gallon jar. When dissolved add another quart of 
ammonia and ?tir well. [The liquid can be kept 
in this form for some time and used as needed.] 
Add a pint of this solution to a barrel of water and 
syringe the plants with a force-pump every two 
weeks. And don't let the time for spraying pass 
without attending to the operation. 



Carnation Notes. 

An inquiry before me asks "When should 
carnations such as Portia, Silver Spray, 
etc. be topped last?" This will depend 
somewhat on how you top your carna- 
tions. I passed through a patch the 
other day where a large shears was used 
to top them with, and all the branches 



were cut down close to the plant, and 
with them of course went plenty of the foli- 
age. Topping them in this way they should 
not be gone over later than the first of 
August. I advocated some time back 
that only those shoots that were showing 
signs of going into bud should be cut out 
and even those should not be cut when 
very low on the plant. If this method 
has been followed they can be topped the 
day you plant them in. During August I 
go over my plants some three times, tak- 
ing off only those branches that are actu- 
ally showing buds. It is very hard in 
carnation culture to say "do this" or "do 
that," for so much depends on the condi- 
tion of the plants. Take a very large 
vigorous plant and it will be better to 
top it up to the 15th of August, and then 
when it is planted in cut off the buds. A 
smaller plant from which you will want 
to cut some flowers during September 
and early in October will not want much 
cutting back. 

Some growers do not cutback after the 
first of August, allowing their plants to 
get filled with buds before planting in, 
and they get along fairly well with them, 
but such plants are very much harder to 
start off nicely, and donot have the vigor 
afterward that a plant has which is not 
required to open flowers and recruit from 
the transplanting at the same time. 

I make it a rule and find it a good one 
to go over thefield ahead of diggers when 
planting in and trim the plants up a bit, 
taking out a branch here or there to put 
the plant into a nice neat shape, and cut- 
ting off all buds down to the first shoot 
next the bud. This does not take up very 
much time and makes quite a difference in 
the appearance of the house when planted . 
After this is done I next take a bunch of 
stakes and mark all those plants that are 
under size or that are not wanted inside 
from any cause. These smaller plants are 
left to stand until probably the first of 
October, as they grow very rapidly 
through September; then if there are any 
missing in the houses we have fairly good- 
stock to fill in jvith, and if there is any 
room left in the houses they are planted 
where they can be forced a bit and made 
use of in this manner, or they can be 
potted up and kept cool until spring, 
when they will make excellent plants for 
spring sales where there is trade that 
calls for them. 

It is not a day too soon to commence 
planting in, and after we get back from 
the convention we should get to work in 
earnest, especially if there are a number 
of houses to plant, for it does not pay to 
leave them till the last minute and then 
rush them in carelessly. Where there is 
only a house or two it is not quite so im- 
portant to start early, but the plants 
should all be housed by the 15th of Sep- 
tember to get the best results from them. 
Albert M. Herr. 



Arrangement of Flowers. 



FUNERAL DESIGNS OF A HIGHER CLASS. 

We will now consider funeral designs of 
a higher grade than tnose previously 
treated. These designs need not neces- 
sarily be expensive, but such a piece as 
the broken column shown in our first and 
second illustrations must of necessity be 
of some size in order to properly bring 
out the details of arrangement, and this 
brings up the cost, even when made, as 
this one is, of summer flowers, to a figure 
somewhat higher than the ordinary run. 

A column well arranged makes a fine 
piece, and the design is quite popular 



where expense is not so much an object. 
The larger the design the better the effect, 
provided the surroundings are in keeping 
with the size of the design. A 6-foot col- 
umn is all right for a church or hall, but 
would be out of place in a small room. 
On the other hand, as already stated, this 
design to be eff'ective should be not less 
than 2 feet in height. The design we show 
stands about 30 inches high, with a base 
12 inches in diameter for the frame. The 
flowers do not add much to the height 
when finished, but the base being ar- 
ranged loosely adds considerably to its 
size in the finished state. 

In mossing up this design we must be 
particularly careful to have the moss uni- 
formly firm. An inexperienced hand is 
apt to pack the moss too hard, particu- 
larly in the upright shaft, and the base 
again is apt to be left so loose as not to 
hold the picks firmly. The stemming of 
the material for this piece is in no wise 
different from what has already been 
treated. The arrangement is, however, 
somewhat different from those styles 
illustrated before, as will readily be seen. 
The column as seen in the first plate in 
its incomplete form only shows the ar- 
rangement of the solid base work for the 
shaft and the green in the base. In mak- 
ing up this piece we start with the up- 
right part, first laying on the ferns to 
serve as background for the garland of 
loose material to be arranged afterwards. 
The number of turns to give the garland 
around the column depends on its height. 
This being a rather small size it is passed 
around but once. The ferns are held in 
position by small wire staples before 
mentioned. When we have marked out 
the line the base flowers are inserted first 
around the sides of the proposed garland, 
which in width also depends on the size 
of the piece. In this instance white asters 
are used for body work, but many other 
flowers may serve equally well, particu- 
larly carnations, which latter are mainly 
used in winter. The flowers are placed 
closely together in order to form a smooth 
and even surface. 

For the top of the column, which shows 
the break, we might use a flower with 
some shade of color; purple asters were 
used here, but a number of diflerent things 
can be used with good effect, such as blue 
or purple pansies or violets when in 
season. 

This mode of blocking out the design 
as shown here is not always followed in 
detail by the various makers up. Many 
prefer to fill in the entire shaft with body 
flowers and then arrange the garland or 
spray over it. This is, however, a waste 
of material in the groundwork, as the 
material underneath the garland will be 
lost. 

The material to form the garland should 
be stemmed in length according to the 
sizeof design, but shouldin all casesstand 
well above the body flowers. Roses in 
various tints are effective for this work. 
These and sweet peas are probably the 
best at this season of the year. Lily of 
the valley, if to be had and the price of 
your piece warrants their use, are excel- 
lent, and for a particularly choice piece 
there is nothing richer than a spray of 
cattleyas. In the design under consider- 
ation we employed Bridesmaid roses with 
Adiantum cuneatum. 

The flowers in the base are quite long 
stemmed, set loosely, and consist of 
auratum lilies in the left hand corner and 
Testout roses on the right, with a group- 
ing of white sweet peas and Bride roses 
between. 
The cross which is shown in the third 



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The American Florist. 



37 




STANDING CROSS 
ARRANGEMENT OF FLOWERS. 



plate is treated in a similar way, and the 
same rules of procedure hold good as in 
the former. 

This piece is designed for front view 
only and the back is covered with green. 
This design stands about three feet high. 
The flowers forming the spray around the 
cross starting at the base are Blanche 
Ferry sweet peas with sprays of Aspar- 
agus plumosus. It is needless to add that 
the various other varieties can be used 
equally well. In the base, which is treated 
loosely, we have a few spikes of gladiolus 
of a light shade and white cosmos. 

LETTERING OF DESIGNS. 

While in a general way we deprecate 
the use of lettering on designs for the rea- 
son that nine times out of ten an other- 
wise handsome piece of work is injured 
and often simply ruined by these inscrip- 



tions, still we will probably never be able 
to do without it as long as the people de- 
mand it. But we should discourage the 
practice as much as possible and then 
confine ourselves to the least objectiona- 
ble forms. 

It matters but little what sort of mate- 
rial we use for the formation of letters. 
If made of natural flowers these will nec- 
essarily be so mutilated as to be scarcely 
recognizable by their best friend. The 
purple immortelle has been used for the 
purpose for many years, and is still pop- 
ular in many localities, although in late 
years chenille has come into use and is 
preferred by many. Still there is not 
much to choose between the two, as both 
materials form a good legible letter. The 
letters formed of natural flowers are not 
very much better as a rule; if the lettering 
is small there is difficulty in forming the 
letters so as to make them legible. 



In funeral work we have to confine our- 
selves to a comparatively few varieties of 
flowers, that is if the lettering is to be 
done on a white background. Violets in 
winter and forget-me-nots in summer are 
among the best. We shall speak of these 
and others later in connection with some 
design where this lettering might be em- 
ployed with propriety. Of course the 
lettering is not confined to funeral work 
alone, and for other occasions any color 
can be used; of this too we shall speak 
later. 

For the present we have confined our- 
selves to but one illustration, that of a 
pillow which shows the lettering in script 
on a background of white carnations. 
The letters are formed of purple chenille, 
which is readily bent in any desired form 
and fastened over the carnations by 
means of small wire staples. The style 
of the letters can be changed to suit the 
fancy, some preferring the block letter 
and others fancy script or some other 
form. 

A pillow is probably one of the very 
best designs to admit of lettering without 
detracting too much from its general ap- 
pearance, and for that reason it is gener- 
ally chosen for that purpose. There is 
little objection to a simple inscription on 
this design, such as a name or "Rest" or 
"At Rest," as this takes up but a small 
amount of space and allows ample room 
for displaying flowers to give a loose 
eSiect. 

The arrangement of a pillow differs in 
no material point from that of any other 
design already considered. The blocking 
off' of the form with a solid mass of body 
material, the same as forms the surface 
for the lettering, and then festooning 
over that, as practiced some years ago, 
is not much resorted to at the present 
day, where generally the material is ar- 
ranged loosely, surrounding the space for 
the lettering on a background of hardy 
ferns as shown in our illustration. An 
engraving of the finished design is also 
presented in this issue. 

The material employed consists of sweet 
peas, lavender in the right hand upper 
corner and white in the lower left; and 
Bride roses in the upper left and Mermets 
in the lower right, with a few auratum 
lilies beneath the lettering, the whole 
being interspersed with adiantum. 



Miscellaneous Seasonable Hints. 

For this latitude the middle of August 
is time enough and to spare for sowing 
pansy seed for your spring sales. An 
eminent grower, perhaps the best on this 
continent, has been kind enough to dis- 
seminate to all his friends and patrons 
the plan pursued by a renowned French 
grower. With all due respect to our 
friend in Massachusetts, I entirely disa- 
gree with the advice of the Frenchman. 
I have seen the plan tried by careful peo- 
ple this summer with very poor results. 
It is risky, to say the least, and there is 
no need of experiments. What the French, 
German or English do in such matters is 
no criterion to us; they can delegate a 
professor on pansies to examine the state 
of the seed bed three times a day, but we 
cannot. I have invariably got up all the 
seed I sowed by sowing in drills in an or- 
dinary frame. The drills are certainly 
slower than broadcast sowing, but what 
is $2 worth of labor when the seed 
costs $10 per ounce? Place a 2x4 scant- 
ling on edee at the back and front of the 
frame, and on those place heavily shaded 
sash. By this plan there is a current of 
air passing over the surface of the bed at 
all times. When the seeds have germin- 



38 



The American Florist. 



Atig. i6^ 



ated and are showing their first pair of 
leaves (cotyledons) you can spread the 
sash, and on dull and cloudy days re- 
move entirely. As the season advances 
it will be more congenial to the violet 
tribe, and two weeks after they show 
above ground the sash can be removed 
entirely. If the weather is very hot and 
dry in September, red spider is often 
troublesome to the young seedlings; a 
constant watchfulness against dryness 
and a horizontal syringing will keep this 
pest down. 

Now, right now, but no time lost, is 
the time to propagate the show pelargo- 
niums. Suppose you have the plants that 
were unsold in April and May, and you 
have kept them growing as you should, 
they will have now made a good growth, 
but be entirely out of flower. Cut them 
down to within two eyes of last years' 
growth; don't be afraid, you can scarcely 
cut them down too severely. The leading 
growth will perhaps root the sooner and 
make the ideal plant, but the cutting be- 
low that will make a good plant. It is 
much the safest to put the cuttings in 
sand and keep moderately moist. That 
is, they don't want to be saturated as a 
"mum" cutting does at this time of year, 
neither do they want to be allowed to 
get very dry. Too heavy a shade is not 
good for them. The old plants, unlike the 
zonal pelargoniums, our common gera- 
niums, are of the greatest value to you. 
After they have been cut down stand 
them on the bench and let them get dust 
dry, or only give them sufiicient watering 
to keep them from shriveling up. In a 
couple of weeks they will show signs of 
budding, and after they have made a 
slight growth, say half an inch or so 
from the old stem, then shake them out, 
leaving not a particle of the old ground 
on them. Pot them firmly back in a 
smaller pot than they flowered in, treat 
carefully for a few weeks, and you have 
the start of a fine plant. Although the 
so-called pelargonium is just as much a 
geranium as the common General Grant 
its cultivation is entirely different. 

There is a good deal of violet literature 
going the rounds just now, and perhaps 
those who are getting the best results are 
saying little. The advice I give is so sin- 
cere that it is what I do myself and have 
seen others do who are invariably suc- 
cessful with this capricious crop. If you 
have any good looking plants in the field, 
small but healthy, or better, if you have 
any in 2 or 3-inch pots that you have 
kept in a shady place up to date, plant 
them at once in the house they are to 
flower in. My experience is that the so- 
called violet disease (and it is a disease) 
makes its appearance in the early part of 
September, when the dews are heavy and 
the sun is bright. Why it should make 
its appearance at that time, I don't pre- 
tend to explain scientifically. There are 
some peculiar soils, and perhaps situa- 
tions where this trouble may not arise, but 
it is safest to have them housed at once. 
"The old theory that violets wanted sun- 
light is utterly exploded. Some of the 
best violets that were ever grown, were 
grown last year in houses at the rear of 
rose houses, where no direct ray of sun- 
light ever touched them from November 
until March. Some might say it is warm 
for violets now under glass; remember 
that a heavily shaded house with plenty 
of ventilation is actually cooler than it is 
outside, fully exposed to the sun, much 
cooler. Put on plenty of shade and keep 
well syringed. 

Now is the time to propagate your 
stock of alternanthera. Carpet bedding 
has received a set back this past year or 




PILLOW WITH LETTERING IN POSITION 
ARRANGEMENT OF FLOWERS 



two, but these brilliant little tropicals 
will never go out of fashion. Get some 
flats of convenient size, say 2 inches deep, 
have 1 inch of soil and 1 inch of sand on 
top, put the cuttings in thick and keep 
watered in a shady house. In a few 
weeks they will be well rooted, and long 
before cold weather will be stocky little 
plants, able to endure rough treatment 
during winter. This advice is particu- 
larly to be followed with the variety 
more difficult to grow and most valuable 
of all, paronychioides major, the bright 
scarlet. 

Although somewhat foreign to the 
florist business, I know many of you are 
asked to do a little "landscaping" in a 
small way, and perhaps you are not all 
aware that there is no better lime in the 
w hole year to sow grass seed lor a lawn 
than the end of August or very early in 
September. There is no doubt this is the 
best and surest time of all to sow for a 
lawn. 

While outside of our legitimate order of 
business, let me say that you are asked 
very often to supply some so-called ever- 
greens (properly conifers) for your cus- 
tomers. You can transplant them now 
or any where before the middle of Septem- 
ber with perfect safety. If done during 
this time there is no risk; if not conveni- 
ent to plant by that time, leave it alone 
until next May or June. Evergreens, unlike 
deciduous trees, want to be planted when 
their roots are active. 

It seems like telling a florist to keep 
good habits to say paint, but oh, don't 
spare paint brush and pot if you intend to 
continue in the business. One great ad- 
vantage of the butted glass and cap is 
that outside painting is entirely dis- 
pensed with, except for appearance sake, 
but with the old fashioned lapped glass 
you must paint to keep the water out, 
annually if possible, and a coat of paint 
inside makes, as far as the health of the 
plants is concerned, a new house. 

Wm. Scott. 



Palms in Summer. 

This class of plants suffers more from 
inattention in summer than anything 
else that is grown, and principally from 
lack of water. The palms are gross feed- 
ing plants, and when in growth like 
plenty of water. I would much sooner 
see a rose or chrysanthemum flagging 
from drouth than see a palm get dust dry 
at any time. These plants do not show 
the evil effects of dryness at once, they 
give evidence afterwards by the weakness 
of the young leaves, by the foliage turn- 
ing a sickly yellowish green, or by the 
tips of the pinnffi turning brown or dying. 

While I do not believe in overpotting 
palms if proper attention is paid to the 
watering they will do in much smaller 
pots than many put them in. If badly 
potbound shift, if not give a stimulant in 
the shape of weak manure water. Some 
of the palms, especially the phoenix, will 
get so root-bound as to raise the balls 
above the rim of the pots, and to keep 
them down requires a pot out of all pro- 
portion to the size of the plant. With 
these it is a good plan to stand the pot 
in a saucer, or to plunge the pots in sand 
or ashes to keep them from drying out. 
With arecas if allowed to get too dry 
they turn yellow and get an attack of red 
spider; the only cure for this is moisture 
at the roots and foliage. If it is a bad 
attack of this pest mix whale oil soap, 
sulphur and water and give the plants a 
good syringing with it. Let it stay on 
the foliage twenty-four hours and then 
syringe off with clean water; one applica- 
tion will generally effect a cure. 

Kentias.seaforthias andcocosare liable 
to thrips from the same conditions, and 
can be cured by careful fumigation and 
liberal syringings afterward. Palm 
houses should be shaded at this time of 
year, but not as heavily as many growers 
consider necessary; if proper attention is 
paid to watering they do not need as 
much shade as is oftentimes given them. 
The more air and light they get the more 



i8g4- 



The American Florist. 



39 




PILLOW COMPLETED. 
ARRANGEMENT OF FLOWERS 



hard knocks they will stand when used 
for decorating. They should be syringed 
morning and evening, and watered when 
dry. 

The finest palms I ever had were grown 
out of doors in summer; when shifted in 
June they were put outside under the 
shade of trees, and at the north side of 
some large buildings, where they were 
well shaded. I plunged them to the rim 
of the pots in coal ashes, and unless it 
rained they got a good syringing with 
the hose every day. The growth that 
they made was surprising, and the color 
of the foliage was perfect. The plants 
were clean, not an insect of any kind on 
them, and so hard that they stood the 
winter's work much better than those 
carried over in the houses. Palms are 
easily taken care of and easily grown, and 
with very little attention make good 
plants; in fact they are as easily grown 
as a geranium and are much less trouble 
than a house of roses. To grow them 
well all you need is good drainage in the 
pots, plenty of water at the roots, good 
syringing to keep the foliage clean, and if 
you get scale on the foliage clean it off 
with sponging, but if your plants are 
healthy and kept so you have no trouble 
keeping them clean. Jas. S. Taplin. 

Hackensack, N. J. 



New York. 



A spirit of discontent broods over that 
portion of this community whose busi- 
ness it is to raise roses for the cut flower 
market, likewise that portion whose un- 
happy lot it is to find customers for this 
stock in this dullest of dull seasons. No 
one can find fault with a man for feeling 
dejected when he sees his invoices come 
back with returns thereon which scarce 
pay for the express charges, but equally 
deserving of sympathy is the commission 
dealer who finds himself on a Saturday 
afternoon, after every store has closed 
and everybody who can afford it has 
gone outof town, with an express wagon 



load of roses heaped in upon him and the 
responsibility of turning it into money 
placed on his shoulders? 

The fact is, and it has been alluded to 
before in these columns, that there is en- 
tirely too much stock grown for the mid- 
summer demand. If it could be reduced 
by eighty or ninety per cent, the result 
would be a fair price for good material. 

Another discouraging feature of the sit- 
uation is the quality of the stock and the 
unaccountable and worse than useless at- 
tempt of some growers to make use of 
winter expedients in summer trade. 
Think of it. Five and six grades of 
American Beauty on the invoices, all 
carefully counted and measured, and the 
buds rated as second and medium grades 
would not compare in size or finish with 
a decent Gontier or Bon Silene. Just such 
stock is coming in by thousands daily, 
and what can be done with it? The 
stores don't want it, the Greeks turn it 
over and over until it is nearly worn out 
before they wi!l decide to touch it; there 
it is, you can't eat it; to what use can it 
be put? And so it comes that American 
Beauty is sold as low as fifty cents a hun- 
dred. 

Still, a limited number of really fine 
specimen blooms, and the number availa- 
ble is very limited, will sell for $15 per 
hundred. Every store can use a few of 
such daily. Roses of the more ordinary 
varieties go very slow, pink seeming to 
be for the time a most unpopular color. 
Among white roses Kaiserin Augusta 
Victoria seems to be a favorite; it is com- 
ing in in good shape, and its delicious 
perfume will carry it anywhere. 

Sweet peas and asters, which have been 
trying apparently to monopolize the 
"glut" department have been obliged to 
accept the company of the auratum lily, 
which now goes begging at $1.50 a 100. 
Over at Burns & Raynor's the walls and 
benches are being painted up and reno- 
vated generally, and it is an even struggle 
between the paint and several hundred 
auratums as to which will smell the 



strongest. More or less cleaning up, 
painting and varnishing is going on gen- 
erally, and the safest place for a visitor is 
a standing position in the middle of the 
floor. Any attempt to lean up against 
wall or post or to sit down on bench or 
table is apt to be rudely frustrated by a 
vigorous chorus "look out for paint." 

Reports from various watering places 
are not very encouraging. These resorts 
are well filled up, but the people are not 
buying flowers, and the hotel landlords 
are getting what money is being circu- 
lated. 

The absentees are beginning to return. 
Chas. Schwake got home on August 2 
and W. H. Siebrecht on August 8. These 
two gentlemen started off together and 
visited about half the European countries, 
enjoying themselves hugely. Winfried 
Rolker returned on steamer Columbia, 
Friday, August 10. 

On Thursday, August 9, the residence 
of Herman Rolker, corner Ocean avenue 
and Lincoln Road, Flatbush, was dam- 
aged by fire. The flames were fortunately 
confined to the garret and roof, but fur- 
niture suffered considerably from thecom- 
bined effects of water and the energetic 
efforts of Flatbush neighbors to save it 
by dumping it out of the windows. 

Warendorf is making extensive improve- 
ments in his store and when completed he 
will have one of the finest florist's win- 
dows on Broadway. 

There is some talk in the air of a mar- 
ket at the foot of West 14th street to 
rival the 34th street institution, but it is 
not likely to come to anything. 

The New Yort Tribune in a recent issue 
gave a very interesting and truthful 
description of the lily ponds of Wm. 
Tricker & Co. at Clifton. 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
New York Florists' Club was held on 
Monday evening, August 13th. The 
meeting was a large one and very earnest 
and harmonious. The various amend- 
ments to the by-laws proposed by the 
committee which has had that duty in 
charge were all adopted without dissent 
and the committee thanked and dis- 
charged. 

The transportation committee reported 
that a special train would convey the 
New York delegation to Atlantic City, 
leaving New York via the Philadelphia & 
Reading Railroad at about 10:30 o'clock 
Monday morning, August 20, and the 
delegations from New England and other 
northern points are expected to join the 
New York party. Stops will be made at 
Elizabethport and Red Bank, N. J., to take 
on those wishins to join at those points. 
Badges for members will be ready at 
Liberty Street Ferry before departure of 
train. 

The executivecommittee had been work- 
ing on the matter of holding a fallexhibi- 
tion and reported progress, a full report 
of details to be ready for next meeting. 
It is proposed to hold the exhibition on a 
somewhat limited plan, with premiums 
confined to the medals and certificates of 
the club. 

A communication from the Philadelphia 
Club asking that New York be represented 
at Atlantic City by a shooting team was 
received, but it is doubtful if such an 
arrangement can be made owing to lack 
of time. 

It being announced that a plan was on 
foot to nominate Edwin Lonsdale, of 
Philadelphia, for the nextpresident of the 
National Society, a motion was unani- 
mously carried pledging the full support 
of the New York members for that very 
popular gentleman. 

Mr. J. A. Evans, of the Quaker City 



40 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 1 6^ 



Machine Works, Richmond, Ind., was 
present and in response to a call made a 
few pleasant remarks. Another pleasing 
episode was the offering of expressions of 
congratulation by Mr. Morris to Treas- 
urer Weathered on the recent happy event 
in Mr. Weathered's family. There was 
unanimous approval expressed regarding 
Mr. Morris' remarks and Mr. Charlie re- 
sponded in cordial appreciation. 



Philadelphia, 



Robert Craig has been trying an exper- 
iment with crotons in pots. They are in 
a frame outside, plunged in old hops, and 
are looking very fine. While they do not 
grow as rapidly as in the house under 
glass, the growth made is sturdy and the 
plants have a more stocky appearance. 
They were taken from the house to the 
frarne into the direct sunlight and never 
shaded. Mr. Craig says he thinks they 
will make fine plants lor house decora- 
tion. Everything about his place is in 
apple pie order, several beds of choice 
varieties of cannas being a mass of bloom. 
He has erected a large slat house, which 
is filled with cycas, araucarias, aspidis- 
tras and like plants. This makes a useful 
annex and gives room to spread out the 
palms in the houses. Mr. Craig thinks 
this shelter will make a good place in 
which to winter roses. 

There is not much to say about busi- 
ness at this time, it is of the regulation 
summer sort, quite a lot to do one day 
and nothing the next. 

Thomas Fould's Brides and Mermets 
are a revelation; nothing like them has 
been seen at this season before, fine large 
buds, long stems and good foliage about 
describes them except the color of 
the Mermets, which is equal almost to 
that usually seen in the winter. They 
are from two year old plants. It would 
seem as if the market would take a few 
more Meteors; they are scarce and any 
demand worth the name compels the 
dealer to send to New York. Asters are 
now fine and sell fairly well; $1 per hun- 
dred is asked for the best. With the ex- 
ception of short whites, carnations are 
very poor; $1 is the outside price. 

It is now such a short time to the con- 
vention that every one is full of it, and a 
visitor to Phila. next week will find very 
few of the craft about, just enough to at- 
tend to the watering and see that the 
places don't get away. 

The entertainment committee paid a 
visit to Atlantic City Saturday last, and 
on returning announced everything to be 
in good shape. One of the A. C. papers 
announced that the S. A. P. would be 
there August 21st eight thousand strong. 
We don't know what the Phila. boys 
have been doing to give any one such an 
impression as this, probably a reporter 
has been talking to Superintendent Wat- 
son, and he has been telling them about 
his entries of exhibits. He is in a peck of 
trouble, having a week ago enough en- 
tries to fill every foot of floor, table and 
wall space, and at the rate they are still 
coming every mail he will need another 
just such hall. George is a great manip- 
ulator, and he may be able to find room 
enough and space to please everybody, 
but he has his hands full. There will be 
many more exhibits here than at any pre- 
vious convention, which shows that the 
trade are alive to the benefits that may 
be derived from such a representative 
gathering as attend the conventions of 
the S. A. F. 

An interesting place to visit will be the 
lighthouse, which is situated right in the 



N^ 




COLONEL DAN TAKES SIR JOHN FOR A SPIN BEHIND HIS "FAST" NAG. 



city. It is built of brick with a winding 
iron staircase inside up to the top, re- 
minding one of the Washington monu- 
ment on a small scale. Its view from the 
top is a grand one, and well worth the 
exertion it takes to get there. The build- 
ing is open to the public from 9 to 
12 a. m. 

At the trial shoot captained by John 
Burton near his place at Chestnut Hill, 
some great scores were made. Mr. Far- 
son tried for some larger game than blue 
rocks, and Mr. Battles had quite some 
trouble with his new fangled iron; it is up 
to date in every respect, but being new to 
him, it was a little bit too fast; he will be 
up with it by the next practice. All had 
a good time and were well pleased with 
their trip. 

The transportation committee have 
made arrangements with the Pennsyl- 
vania road to take the Phila. Club to 
Atlantic City on special train. They will 
leave Monday afternoon at 3 p.m. There 
is no reduction in the fare, which will be 
$1.75 for the round trip ticket good for 
ten days. 

LaRoche and Stahl have made a prop- 
osition to their creditors to pav their 
debt of $60,435.37 with $2,152.25, a 
pro rata of about SV2 per cent. The 
creditors do not take kindly to this offer, 
as it is reported that some claims have 
already been paid in full with stock which 
was supposed to have been sold for the 
benefit of all creditors. K. 



Chicago. 



See page 56 in this issue, under head 
of "Chicago to Atlantic City," notice of 
change in transportation arrangements 
to the convention. 

The market showed a slight improve- 
ment last week, mostly of a local nature. 
Shipping demand remains very slow, 
however, and little trade is done in this 
direction. 

The quality of stock is much improved 
all along the line. Beauties are coming 
in once more with fairly long stems; the 
best selected stock bring $1.50 a dozen, 
the bulk of the stock, however, goes at$l 
for fair, and the short of course at less. 



Testouts are fairly good, but in warm 
weather this rose is not the very best 
keeper. Bridesmaid is in good demand, 
while Mermet finds few buyers. Kaiserin 
has the call over the Bride, mainly on 
account of foliage, as in size of blooms 
there is little difference between the two. 
S >me real good Duchess are coming in 
which, on account probably of the in- 
different quality of La France, is meeting 
with good demand. The average quality 
of La France, by the way, hasn't been so 
poor for years as at present, though a 
light improvement may be noted. In red 
roses Meteor of course stands at the head. 
The quality, however, though fair leaves 
much to be desired. Perles are fair with 
small demand. 

The rainfall last week was but slight, 
but small favors are thankfully received. 
All outdoor stock was much benefited for 
a time at least, though a day or two of 
warm weather will take out of the ground 
the little moisure that has fallen. 

Carnations show a marked improve- 
ment. The demand also is a little more 
steady. Asters are coming in with a 
rush. The stock is fairly good but the 
demand is not equal to the supply; best 
quality sells at 50 cents a 100, but the 
bulk brings much less. In lilies we still 
note a fewscattering longi3orums. There 
are plenty of auratum, which go slow at 
75 cents to $1 a dozen; roseum and ru- 
brum at 60 cents. 

Sweet peas have taken a new lease of 
lite; some really fine flowers are sent in; 
these are quoted at 15 cents a 100 for the 
best Duality; in large lots, however, they 
mav be had at from 50 cents to $1 a 1000. 

The boys are waking up to the fact 
that the chrysanthemum show is not so 
far distant. There is an unusual interest 
taken this year as regards the Queen of 
Autumn. Quite a number of growers who 
have never before attempted to grow this 
flower by the most approved methods 
are taking a hand this year, and the com- 
ing contest bids fair to become extremely 
interesting. We have visited quite a 
number of establishments recently and in 
the majority of places we find the plants 
in very fine condition. The amount of 
[concluded on page 42.] 



i8g4- 



The American Florist. 



41 



"T^LL KOT^DS LET^D TO KI\/EI^T0H" 



VISIT 



DREER'S NURSERY 




to the Conven- 
tion will see by this map 
that all Atlantic city trains 
connect with Riverton by train or boat 
~^v We extend a 
cordial invitation 
to all delegates 
ind others inter- 
sted in the cult- 
are of Decorative 
Plants, Ferns, 

Cannas, Bulbs, 
Hardy Plants, 
Seed growing and 
other matters con- 
nected with the business, to visit Dreer's Nursery, at 
Riverton, New Jersey, and see one of the best commercial 
places in the country. Do not fail to see the stock of 
Seeds, Bulbs and Requisites contained in the four-story 

Seed Warehouse, 714 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. We 

are sure we can interest you in both places and make your call instructive and profitable. So much may be written about a 
place that leaves a disappointment in the memory of the visitor, after seeing it, that we are anxious to have our friends judge 
for themselves. 

Have your mail or packages sent to our care. Our representatives will be in attendance at our display in Morris Guards 
Armory, Atlantic City, during the Convention, to give all information regarding a visit to our establishments. 

Those who prefer may stop over in Riverton or Philadelphia going or coming, as best suits their convenience. For exam- 
ple:— Western and Southern Florists in passing through Philadelphia and arriving before 1.40 p. m. may take a train or boat, 

visit the Nursery and return in time to take a train after 4.00 o'clock for Atlantic 

City, arriving in time for supper. Northern and eastern Florists should buy their 
tickets via Philadelphia, stop over at Riverton on the way down {see New York 
time table), then take an afternoon train to Atlantic City. 
Time tables given herewi'h. 



RIVERTON TIME TABLE 

Pennsylvania R. R.-Amboy Div. 



Philad'a Trains 



Lv, Upr 
Ferry 
Market 
Street. 



Leave 

Riverton 

N.J. 



6.10a. m 

700 

7.20 

8.20 
10.80 
12.00 
n.OOp.m 

1.40 

2 30 

830 

4.00 

4.30 

5.00 

5.10 

5.80 

B.OO 

6.30 

7.30 
lO.CO 

11.45 



(•) Sat 
only 



Lv.N.Y. 

N.Y Div 



5.50a.m 
6.44 
7.22 
7.47 
8 17 
8.54 
9.03 
10.26 

12.02*p.m 
12.12 

1.31 

2.10 

3.i)0 

3.49 

5.1R 

6.1B 

6.51 

8.11 

9.52 
10.54 
12.21 



New York Trains 



S.OUa.m 

y.on 
11.00 

l.OOp.m 

2.10 

4.00 

5.00 

8.00 



Lv.lren 

ton 
Am. div. 



Lv. Kiv 

N.J.Am- 
boy Div. 



Distance 9 miles 
Time Im. Pliil.SOm 
" Camden 20m 
Fare Excur. 3Uc 



6.42a.m 

7.48 

8.53 
10.5S 
12 32p.m 

2.5S 

4.55 

5.56 

8.00 



9.25a. m 
11.10 
l.OSp.m 
2.53 
4.14 
5.20 
7.00 
9.55 



Lv.Tren 

N.Y. div 



Ar. Riv- 
ert'pN.J 



10.2Ba.m 
12.12p.m 

2.10 

3.49 

5.18 

6.16 

Sll 
10.54 



Arrive 
New Y'k 



7.44a. m, 9.23a. m 
9.10 10.43 
10.08 I II. 43 
12.14p.m 2.03p.m 



1.37 
4.10 
5.50 
6.55 
9.02 



3.23 
5..53 
7.23 
8.38 
10.38 



Excursion tickets N. Y. to 
Fhila.. via Broad st. stat'n 
or Market street lerry, are 
good to stop off at River 
tun, changing trains at 
iTrenton. Local faies to be 
paid to or from V\\ lad'a. 



COLUMBIA 
TWILIGHT AND 
JNO. A.WARNER 



ATLANTIC CITY TIME TABLE 



steamers 



Lv Chest 
nut st.wf. 
for River- 
ton 



7.30a.m 
*11.45 
2.(K)p.m 
3.00 
4.45 
6.00 



LvRiver 
ton for 
Philad'a 



8.00a.m 
8,45 
11.30 
3.1.= p.m 
5.00 
6.40 



* Saturday only at 

12.15 

Distance 9 miles 

Time 45 minutes 

Fare. Excur. 25c 



Pennsylvania Railroad 

Camden and Atlantic and New 
Jersej Division 



Leave 
Up'r fy 
Market 

Street 

S.lOa.m 

7.00 

9.30 

2.00p.m 

3.00 

4.00 

4 20 

5.00 

5.40 



Anne.x 

.Atlantic 

City 



6 40a.m 
8.r5 
10.55 
S.lSp.m 
4.20 
5.10 
5.40 
6.20 
6.55 



Leave 
Atlantic 

City 



•7.00a.m 

7.50 

»9.00 

•10.35 

3.00p.m 
*4.00 

5.30 

6 05 

7.55 

9.40 



Arrive 

Up'r I'y 
Market 
Street 



8.20a.m 

9.00 
10.30 
11.55 

4.25p.m 

5.25 

7.00 

8.05 

9.20 
1105 



•Connect at Cam 
den with Riverton 
trains 



Philadelphia & Reading Railroad 
Philadelphia and Atlantic City 



Leave Wal- 
nut Street 
wharf 



8.00 a.m 

9.00 
10.45 
•1.30p.m 

2.00 

3.00 

4.00 

4.30 

5.00 

.5.45 



.Arrive 

Atlantic 

City 



9.20a.m 
10.20 
12.10p.m 

2.50 

3.15 

4.20 

5.10 

5.45 

6.23 

7.00 



Leave 

Atlantic 

City 



6.20a.m 
7.00 
7.45 
9.00 
10.15 
3.30p.m 
4.30 
5.30 
7.30 
930 



Arrive 

Walnut St. 

wharf 



7.55a.m 

8.20 

8.55 
10.25 
1135 

4.45p.m 

5.50 

B.f5 

8.55 
10.55 



NOTE.— All boats and trains leaving Philadelphia for Atlantic City or R verton depart from Market, 
Chestnut or Walnut Street wharves— three minutes walk between each. 



42 



The American Florist. 



Aug, i6^ 



plants grown to single stem is at least 
double that of last year. We are pleased 
to note that the old hap-hazard, go-as- 
you-please way of growing the plants has 
been discarded by most of our growers, 
and the result will doubtless prove to be 
a much better quality of bloom this fall. 

At the last meeting of the Florist Club 
Messrs. J. B. Deamud, A. G. Prince and 
Walter Kreitling were appointed a com- 
mittee to formulate a plan for a summer 
outing of the club. The affair will prob- 
ably take the form of an excursion to 
some nearby point, at which features will 
be a bowling match, shooting match, 
base ball eame, etc. The ladies are to be 
included and it is the intention to make 
the affair a reunion of the members of the 
club and their families. 

R. C. Lange is preparing to build two 
houses, each 18x100, on Humboldt Ave. 
His address will be Station G, Chicago. 

Do YOU WANT a complete alphabetical 
list of carnations in commerce in America, 
with name of introducer, date of intro- 
duction and brief, accurate description of 
each? You will find such a list in our 
trade directory and reference book for 
1894. Price $2.00. 

Do YOU WANT a list of trade organiza- 
tions, both national and local, with names 
and addresses of principal officers, time 
and place of meetings and other informa- 
tion? You will find such a list in our trade 
directory and reference book for 1894. 
Price $2.00. 

Do YOU WANT a list of the leading cem- 
etery superintendents? You will find 
such a list in our new trade directory and 
reference book. 

You CAN never invest $2 to better ad- 
vantage than in a copy of our trade 
directorv and reference book. 

Always mention the American Flo- 
rist when writin;? to advertisers 

SITUATIONS. WANTS. FOR SALE , 

Advertisements under this bead will be Inserted at 
the rate of lU cents a line (seven words) each Inser- 
tion. Cash must accompany order. Plant advs. not 
ftdmttted under this head. 

SITUATION WANTED— By prnctical tiorlst. Ger- 
man, single, age 37; flrstrclass references. Address 
H P, care American Florist. 

SITUATION WANTED— Well up in grow Intr rosea' 
cut flowers and general stock: age 30; good refer 
ences. K G, care American Florist. 

SITUATION WANTED— By a man who has had 
charge of hot houses, as florist or general green- 
house man; can give first-class reference. AddrusH 
O P, care American Florist. 

SITUATION WANTED-By a young man 17 years 
old to learn the florist business; has some experi- 
ence in small greenhouse. 

James S. Fuv. Lltltz, Lancaster Co., Pa. 

SITUATION WANTED— By a good florist, experl 
enced In growing chrysanthemums, cut flowers and 
general stock: age W. married, no children. Address 
Florist. P. o., Bay Ridge, L. I., N. Y. 

QITUATION WANTED-By a young man, 18 years, 
lO in or around greenhouses, 5 years' experience: 
good references. Address 

Flouist, llU:i Blair Ave.. Scranton, Pa. 

SITUATION WANTED — Commercial or private; 
O age 82, single, American; 8 years' experience; good 
references. Near Chicago preferred. 

L<k;k Box 2ih, Oval City. Stark Co., Ohio. 

8ITUATION WANTED-By a joung German florist 
commercial or private, 13 years experience: sober 
and Indufctrlous. Address II. FLKiHCiiiiAtTKit, 
72nd St. and Stewart Ave., Bay Kldfje. N. Y. 

QITUATKiN WANTED-By a young Horlht; .'i years' 
lO experience In commercial place, as assistant; ex- 
pert potter, propagator, rose grower and mum trainer; 
good references. Woottc^n, care Am. Florist. 

CIITUATION WANTED-By a pracllral grower of 
O 12 years' experience. Well posted In uU branches. 
Has had charge of private and coramercliil place; 
best of recommendation. Please stat<3 particulars. 
(JKOWEU. care American Florist. 

SITUATION WANTED-By a married man, either 
commercial or private place: f! years" experience 
In growing roses, carnations, smllax and bedding 
plants; can lurnish good reference. Address 

H. W. Collins. Doylestown. Pa. 



SITUATION WANTED-By thorough experienced 
Vj and practical glazier and painter In a good firm; 
has good knowledge of carpentering and packing, and 
would fill up time in any capacity; state wages. 

D W. box 4(i. East Cleveland. Ohio. 

SITUATION WANTED-By young man of good 
habits, age 28. who has been in the greenhouse 
employment for the past 7 years; good worker, willing 
and obliging; a No. 1 greenhouse man. Address 

La France, care American Florist. 

QITUATION WANTED-By a young florist 25 years 
O of age to take charge of a shipping department; 
thorough knowledge in executing all kind of mail and 
express orders; flrst-ciass references. Address 

H R. care American Florist. Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED-By thorough practical gar- 
dener and florist. No. I rose grower: commerrlal 
or gentleman's private place; carnations, violets a 
specialty; best references. Address 

H. G.. P O. box 38. Brooklyn Village. Ohio. 

QITUATION WANTED-By a young married man, 
kj age 32, as grower of roses, carnations, chrysanthe- 
mums, palms and ferns, etc. ; can assume all responsi- 
bility If desired; 5 years In last place. Address 

Grower, 'Zm Adams St., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

SITUATION WANTED- Asforeman In commercial 
place, fifteen years' practical experience in the 
growing of roses, carnations, violets and the forcing 
of all kinds of bulbous stock; good references. Ad- 
dress Mac. care American Florist. 

SITUATION WANTED— By young man. 2 years' ex- 
perience on private place, also few months on 
commercial; can furnish references as to honesty, so- 
briety, etc.; commercial place preferred In Pa orN. J, 
G. C. S..23IN. Penn St., Allentown. Lehigh Co , Pa. 

SITUATION WANTED-By a practical florist, fully 
posted on all the requisites of commercial places. 
Including the nurseries, general propagation, etc ; 
wishes situation where executive ability and experi- 
ence Is required. For particulars address 

FLORAL, care American Florist. 

SITUATION WANTED-By a single man. age 2t;. a 
good all-round man. to take charge of a commer- 
cial place or city store, and If necessary can take 
charge of books and correspondence: southern states 
preferred; first class references fumtshtd. Address 
M. C, care The C. A. Dahl Co., Atlanta, Georgia. 

SITUATION WANTED-By gardener and fiorlst. 
experienced in growing roses, carnations, violets 
and mushrooms for the trade; also competent to grow 
general stock and take full charge of private or com- 
mercial place; age 82. abstainer, good references. 
State particulars, with wages, etc.. to 

G. AND F.. care American Florist. 

<^ITUATION WANTEI>-By a Scotchman as gar- 
yj dener and florist; will take entire charge of a gen- 
tleman's place; has been superintendent to J. B. Pace. 
Esq . of Richmond, Va., for the past 5 vears; am mar- 
ried, wife and one child, age :s3 years; will be obliged 
to any seedsman or florist If he can help me get a good 
situation. Address W. A. Forsyth, 

Supt. to J. B. Pace, Keswick, Albemarle Co.. Va. 

WANTED-Sept. Ist, practical florist; state experi- 
ence, wages, etc. Noack. Batavia, N. Y. 

ANTED— A second-hand boiler; must be in fair 
condition; state kind; must be cheap. Address 
Lock box F, Lake Geneva. Wis. 



w- 



WANTED-One No. l(j or 17 HItchlnas boiler, sec- 
ond hand; must be In good condition and cheap. 
C. W. De P.ll'W, New Albany, Ind. 



w 



ANTED— Catalogues and net prices on flower 
seeds, plants and berry plants. 

Patl & ScnAFEit, 5,50 E. 2nd St.. Alton, III. 



WANTED— A young man experienced In growing 
rosea, carnations and a general stock, also good 
designer and decorator; must have A No. 1 references 
and not afraid of work; one with a small capital pre- 
ferred: one capable uf taking entire charge. Chance 
of a lifetime for right man. Address 

Pal.ms, care American Florist, 



OR SALE CHEAP-Large second-hand florist's Ice 
Box, value about $75. Vaughan's Seed Store, 
88 State Street, Chicago. 

ORSALE— Double "Florida" steam boiler No. 63; 
good as new; a great bargain. Address 

A. S. BwiNCChllllcothe. Ohio. 

OR SALE OR RENT-(ireenhou8e. 20U0 square ft. 
glass. For particulars Inquire of 

TiiEci Noehle. Green Bay, Wis. 

OR SALE OR RENT-lo.UOO or 30,000 square ft. of 
glass. For particulars Inquire of 

A. T. Jackson, Station X, Chicago. 



FOR SALE CHEAP- A flrst-cIass florist business In 
a thriving town of 2;^,(jOO Inhabitants. For partic- 
ulars address Wisconsin, care Ara. Florist. 

FOR SALE CHEAP-Large. new hard wood and 
glass florists Refrigerator. Used at World's Fair, 
Costifei&O. VAiT(jnAN"s Seed Store, 

140 & 1-18 West Washington St., Chicago. 

IpOR SALE-No. 5 ScoUay boiler, used only 3 winters, 
' all In good condition; reason for selling, having 
put In -JU-horse steam boiler: price on applletitlon. 

J. E. FELTHOUSEN, Schenectady. N. Y. 

FOR SALE— In northern Indiana, greenhouse plant 
of &.fjUU feet of glass In greenliouses and sasfi. \U, 
acres land, good general stock of plants, roses, carna- 
tions and chrysanthemums; greenhouses and house 
heated with steam. Indiana care Am, Fiorlst. 



FOR S A LE— Residence and 28 acres of good land, 
near Lakewood, 1 mile from town of 5.000 Inhabi- 
tants, within easy access of Philadelphia and New 
York; well suited for a florist's business; no opposi- 
tion. Address Owner, box 103, Toms River. N. J. 

FOR SALE— On account of sickness, greenhouses of 
3500 feet of glass, heated by steam; all In good 
condition. Also dwelling house and ground. Good 
retail cut flower and bedding plant trade. tWJO Inhab- 
itants: no other florist: three minutes to railroad sta- 
tion ; thirty minutes to Broad street station. Philadel- 
phia; 34 trains dally. Or. wilt sell greenhouses and 
give a lease on dwelling house and ground. Only 
those meaning business need to apply for particulars. 
Address Robert Craig, 

4yth and Market Sts.. Phlla., Pa. 

FOR SALE— A flrst-ciass florist establishment that 
lias netted 30 per cent on the pi Ice asked for the 
place, and is still growing, can be made to pay twice 
that much; on account of poor health was unable to 
grow a sufficient stock to supply the demand. No op- 
position. In a weahhy and growing college citv with 
over 6,000 inhabitants. In central Missouri. Green- 
houses and everything new, with land 124 by 240 feet 
near the public square. Price only $4,800 If sold in the 
next ninety days. For more particulars write at once 
to E. H. Michel, 

Magnolia and Tower Grove Aves., St. Louis, Mo. 

Greenhouse plant 7 miles from center of Chicago In 
one of its finest suburbs; 3 houses SfJxU, one lS)x20. 
Hot water; established all-round retail trade; good 
winter stock. Long house and ground lease, or will 
sell entire. A great bargain. Address 

Box ic, care American Florist. 

FOR SALE OR RENT. 

Two large greenhouses 100 feet long by 18 feet wide. 
containing 5000 feet of glass: built two years ago. with 
all modern Improvements, bv the late John F. Nltter- 
house. practical florist. Greenhouses situated \^ mile 
from town; convenient to two railroads, and stocked 
with roses, carnations, etc. Possessloij given Oct. 1st. 
For further particulars address 

MRS. S. J, NiTTERHOUSE. WaynesbOFo, 

Franklin Co , Pa. 

For Sale or Rent. 

One of the largest and most successful plants in 
the State of Ohio, consistingof about 50,000 feet of 
glass, with three or six acres of fine laud; houses 
all in the best of order, and as good as new; 
adapted to cut flowers. Reasons for selling', the 
increasing demand for the Standard Ventilating 
Machines demands more of my time than I can 
possibly give it and run the florist business. For 
particulars address 

E. HIPPARD, Youngstown, Ohio. 

FOR SALE. 

Six (6) greenhouses, two hot water boilers, 
about 2000 feet 2-inch wrought iron pipe, 
valves, etc., lot of hotbed sash, frames, 
benches and about 35,000 flower pots. The 
entire plant will be sold at a very low cash 
price, as the whole must be removed oflf the 
premises before Sept. 1st. For particulars 
address l. R. MUNN, station C, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

FOR SALE. 

A VALUABLE 2S-ACRE FARM. WITH GREENHOUSE 

AND LARGE AND PROFITABLE TRADE 

ESTABLISHED. 

The residence of the late Mr. E- G. Bridge, dc^ 
lightfully situated on Washington St., in the city 
of Woburn. The buildings consist of a small two- 
story house of 6 rooms, with shed and storeroom 
connected; house is painted, blinded and in per- 
fect order, supplied with city water; good barn, 
with cellar, hennery, ice house, shed and silo 
buildings. 

FIRST-CLASS MODERN STYLE GREENHOUSE. 

12.5x20 feet, built in the most approved style, 
with large boiler and hot water connections, and 
the foundations ready for another large house. 

The grounds are stocked with 5,000 of the choic- 
est kinds of Pinks. Also Asters, Roses, Shrubs 
and Hardy Plants {for which there is large orders 
for future delivery), and the trade can be doubled 
n one year. The land is beautifully situated, 
commanding a large street frontage, suitable for 
building lots, and has fruits of all kinds, shade 
trees, and Electric Line to pass the property; a 
large amount of choice white ''Pinks" are being 
sold every day. 

OVER $3000 HAVE BEEN EXPENDED on the 
greenhou:^'s and Plants m order to make it the 
leading place of its class in the county. 

OwiuK to (he sudden death of the late owner, we 
offer this entire property tor $6,000. 

J. L. NASON & CO., 

21 School St., BOSTON, MASS. 



i8g4. 



The American Florist. 



43 



Wholesale and retail ornamental nursery 
and greenhouses, in the best residence city 
of Southern California. Fine business loca- 
tion and complete stock, fixtures, etc. A 
rare opening for the right man with moder- 
ate capital. For particulars address 

"California," care Am. Florist. 




iOHELL'S"' 

PRACTICAL 
CARNATION SUPPORT 



Don't fail to LOOK for Michell's 
PRACTICAL 

Carnation Supports 

at the Convention. 

23 inches. For short growing sorts. 

$3.00 per 100. $2;J.OO per 1000 

Lots, 2000, 22 00 
Lots, 5000, 21.00 
26 inches. For medium growing sorts. 

$3.25 per 100. $24.50 per 1000 

Lots, 2000, 23.50 
Lots, 5000, 22.50 

HENRY F. MICHELL, 

Grower and Importer of Highest Grade 

Flower and Veoeiable Seeds, 

BULBS, ETC.. 



Ileiirv V. Mlchfll. 
Kred. J. Mlchell 



1018 Market St., 

PHILADELPHIA. 



Surplus Stock 

FIELD-GROWN 

CARNATION PLANTS. 

PAUL F. LAU & CO., 
t2~,<>00 

Daybreak*""' McGowan 

Nice field-grown plants, ready Sept. 1st. 
Write for prices. 

FRED. SCHNEIDER, Wholesale Florist, 

Wyoming Co., ATTICA, N. Y. 

EXTRA PANSY SEED. 

MAMMOTH SUNBEAM STRAIN. 

A prand collCL-tlon ot Klant flowerint' vnrletiea. very 
larpe. of perfect form, and choice colors; carefully 
selcctert; better seed plants this year than ever: re- 
ceive very high praise from ray customers; no finer 
Blrain offered anywhere: florists should sow of it. 

Trade pkt.. TjOO seeds. l'5c; ;i pkts. iWc; (1 pbts. Jl.OO. A 
pkt.of thenew Monkev Face pansv with everv Jl order. 
JOHN F. KUl'P, Shiremanstown, Pa. 



THe Dorner Garnailons ! 

You can get the newest and 

Most Profitable Varieties 

. in Field Grown Plants 



OiVI«lVA.'MO:iVS^ 



THE COTTAGE GARDENS, 

QUEENS, LONG ISLAND. 

Owing to the moist climate and cool damp nights, due to nearness to the seashore, 
our Carnations are in extra fine condition and will prove profitable purchases. 



GflRNflTIONS ! 



40,000 

FIELD-GROWN 

ALL THE BEST VARIETIES. 

Standard Sorts, $5,00 to $10.00 per 100. 

GEO. HANCOCK & SON, 

GRAND HAVEN, MICH. 



"HELEN KELLER" 

The new Carnation; pure white, deli- 
cately marked with red- 

Price for well Rooted Cuttings: 

3i;i.00 per do/.en; a-12.U0 per 100; KS 00 per 250; 

$iH).00 per 1000. 500 at 1000 rate. Orders may 

be sent either tu 
JOHN N. MAY, EDWIN LONSDALE, 

Smnniit, N. .1. Chestnut Hill, Phila. 



W. R. Shelmire, 

AVONDALE, 

CARNATIONS 

A^D COLEUS. 

Two New Varieties of Carnations ready for 
introduction next Spring. 

BRIDESMAID, 

a pink of same sliade as its namesake 

tlie rose; and a deep crimson scarlet. 

No. 41, yet to be named. 

FBED. DOBNER & SON, Lafayette, Ind. 

25,000 FIELD GROWN 

CARNATIONS 

MRS. FISHER. SILVER SPRAY. 

LIZZIE McGOWAN. GRACE WILDER. 

TIDAL WAVE, MRS. F. MANGOLD. 

HECTOR. and FLORENCE. 

SO.OO per 100; $55.00 per 1000. 

P. E. RICHWAGEN, box .56, Montvale, Mass. 



CARNATIONS 

Rooted Cuttings all sold or planted 
out. Field plants for sale in the 

The Pines. KENNETT SQUARE. Chester Co.. PA. 

NEW CARNATIONS. 
FERNS. 

ELLIS. NORFOLK Co., MASS. 

CARNATIONS 

STRONG FIELD-GROWN PLANTS. 
SKPTEMBER DELIVERY. 

DAYBREAK $7.00 per 100 

SILVER SPRAY 5.00 

VIOLETS— MARIE LOUISE 4.00 " 

CRABB & HUNTER, Grand Rapids, Mich. 



CARNATION "BUTTERCUP" 

Strong and healthy plants, pot-grown, 
in ;j-inch pots. 

S8.00 PER 100. 476.00 Per 1000. 

EDWIN LONSDALE, 

CHESTNUT HILL, PHILADELPHIA. 



Please mention the American Florist 
every time yon write to an advertiser. 



44 



The American Florist. 



Aug. .<5, 



BOWLING RULES WHICH WILL GOVERN THE TOUR- 
NAMENT AT ATLANTIC CITY. 

1 — The game adopted to be played by clubs iu 
this tournameut shall be what is known as the 
American Ten Frame Game. 

2— There shall be a line drawn across the alleys 
sixty feet from the head or front pin. 

3— Any wooden ball may be used that does not 
exceed twenty-seven inches in circumference. 

4— The game shall consist of ten frames when, 
should the number of points be equal, the play 
shall be continued until a majority of points upon 
an equal number of frames shall be attained, 
which shall conclude the game. All strikes and 
spares made in the tenth frame shall be completed 
before leaving the alley and on same alley as 
made. 

6 — Players must play in regular rotation, and 
aiter the first inning no changes can be made, ex- 
cept with the consent of the Captains. 

6 — Players are to roll but a frame at a time, and 
to change allevs eveiy frame. 

7 — The Umpires shall take great care that the 
regulations respecting the balls, alleys and all 
rules of the game are strictly observed. They will 
be the judges of fair and unfair play, and shall de- 
termine all disputes and differences which may 
occurdurmg the game. They shall take special 
care to declare all foul balls immediatel}'^ upon 
their occurrence, unasked, in a distinct and audi- 
ble voice. 

8— Umpires shall be selected by the Captains of 
the respective clubs, and they shall perform all 
the duties in Rule 7, except recording the games, 
w^hich shall be done by scorers, one of whom 
shall be appointed by each of the contending 
clubs. 

9— No persons except the Captains shall be per- 
mitted to approach or speak with the Umpires, 
Scorers or players during the progress of the game, 
unless by special request oi the Umpires. 

10— A player must not step on or over the line in 
delivering the ball, nor after it has been delivered, 
until it leaves the alley. Any ball so delivered 
shall be deemed "foul." and the pins (if any made 
on such ball) shall be placed in the same positions 
as they were before the ball was rolled. It is also 
considered a foul ball if any part of the person 
should touch any part of the alley beyond the line 
before the ball leaves the alley. All foul balls 
shall count as balls rolled. 

11— Should any ball delivered leave the alley be- 
fore reaching the pins, or any ball rebound from 
the back cushion, the pins, it any, made on such 
balls shall not count, but must be placed in same 
position as they were before the ball was rolled. 
All such balls to count as balls rolled. 

12 — Persons to act as Judges shall be chosen, one 
by each Captain, who shall take their positions at 
the head of the alleys and see that the pins are 
properly set up, and that no one interferes with 
them in any way until the player is through roll- 
ing. They will immediately report to the Cap- 
tains any irregularities that they may notice dur- 
ing the progress of the game. 

13— The dead wood must be removed from the 
alley after each ball. Should a pin be displaced 
from the perpendicular and in such position that 
it falls on the removal of the dead wood it is to be 
counted as down. 

14 — Sufficient space shall be allotted to the par- 
ticipants in the game, to which none but members 
of the teams shall be admitted. 



St. JoHNSBURY, Vt.— A fi:reenhouse 100 
x40 feet is being erected here for Mr. T, 
N. Vail. 

Newburyport, Mass —J. J. Comley 
announces that he will give a large chrys- 
anthemum show in this city the coining 
fall. 

Bar Harbor, Me. — F. H. Moses has 
taken the large store adjoining that oc- 
cupied by hitn and is having the two 
thrown into one which will be the finest 
establishment east of Boston when com- 
pleted. 

Whenever you want anything per- 
taining to the trade, and do not find it 
offered in our advertising columns, write 
to us and we will take pleasure in assist- 
ing you to find what you want. 

Do YOU WANT detailed information about 
the organization and workings of the va- 
rious national trade organizations? You 
will find what you want in our trade di- 
rectorv and reference book for 1894. 
Price $2.00. 

Do YOU WANT a list of firmsinthetrade 
that issue catalogues, with key showing 
proportion of space given each branch of 
the trade in same? You will find such a 
list in our trade directory and reference 
book for 1894. Price $2.00. 



ESTABLISHED 1881. ^ 



FRANK D. HUNTER, 

57 West 30th Street, 



• • • 



HEADQUARTEBS FOR. 

ROSES. 
CARNATIONS 
VIOLETS . . . 



#> 



A.JVD 



If you have the 

RIGHT KIND E GOODS 

. . . you can sell them . . . 

You can get the right kind of goods at 
the RIGHT PRICE here. 

Try It) at once and uou will surGlu mm aoaln. 

FRESH CUT FLOWERS DAILY FROM THE BEST GROWERS. 



113 W. 30th STREET, NEW YORK CITY. 

UNITED STATES HOTEL, 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., 

■will be the Headquarters of 

KOFFMAN, "The Smilax King, 

During Convention week, where he will be glad to 
meet his friends to make arrangements for their supply 
of Smilax the coming season. 



SMILAX PLANTS. 

16,000 8tronK, healthy plants, from 2!^-lneh pots. Sa.OO 
per 100; S18.I10 per lOOll. Sample free. Safe delivery 
and aatlBfactlon guaranteed. 

Samuel J. Bunting, Elmwood Ave. & 58th St., Phila. 



You will benefit the American Florist 
by mentioning it every time you write 
an advertiser in these columns. 



i8g4' The American Florist. 45 

SUPREME COURT 



=OP^ 



FLORICULTURE. 

Filed this 20tli day of August, A. D. 1894, at 49 West 28th Street, 
city, county, and State of NeW York. 



SUBPOENA. 

COUNTY OF NEW YORK SS : 
State of New York. 

You and each of you are hereby commanded to appear in person before 

# IBURNS* &*RAYN0R^^ 

at 49 WEST 28th STREET, in said city, county, and State of New York, 
on or after the 20th day of August, A. D. 1894, between the hours of 8 a. m. and 6 p. m., 
to testify to the truth of their claim to be the 

Leading Wholesale Florists 

of the United States, quantity and quality considered, and there and then to place your 
orders for future shipments, or arrange for consignments to the parties aforesaid, and 
this you are in no wise to omit under no less a penalty than that of losing the personal 
attentions of the best firm in the trade to supply your future wants. 

Given under our hand and seal this Twentieth day of August, A. D. 1894. 




Burns & Raynor. 



IBojrs going: to and from tlie Conxrention 

ixio-de ^weloorMie, 



46 



The American Florist. 



A21S:. i6. 



Boston. 

To write news from Boston at present 
one must first manufacture it. There is 
nothing transpiring in the flower trade 
either interesting or edifying. There is an 
abundant stock of everything floral com- 
ing in, a specialty just now being white 
Japan lilies, which are abundant and sell 
well for funeral purposes, etc. 

The special meeting of the Gardeners' 
and Florists' Club on Thursday resulted 
in wise action and Boston will be repre- 
sented by a creditable bowling team and 
it is hoped a shooting team as well at the 
Atlantic City convention. 

The prospects are for a large and a 
merry delegation to the convention. 
Dirwanger from Portland who if not of 
the Boston crowd is yet always with 
them is going. Wairen ijwell has ordered 
a special set of harmonicas in all keys and 
Elijah Wood has been learning several 
new songs. The ladies will be out in 
goodly numbers and altogether a delight- 
ful trip is anticipated. 

The new city greenhouses which are 
now in process of construction will cover 
when completed an area of 16,760 feet of 
ground in addition to cold houses, pro- 
pagating house, etc. 



*^ M1LLANG BROS. ^ 

Can be found at the 34tii Street Flower Market, New York, 
every day from 5 o'clock a. m. 

Do not miss the opportunity to visit this great institution. 

We can show you 

ROSES 



Haverstraw, N. Y. — W, H. Hillerman, 
formerly of Salisbury, Md., has purchased 
the establishment of Chas.H. Zundel here 
and will continue the business. 

Davenport, Ia. — The new houses built 
this summer by F. L. Bills were one 
11x100 for chrysanthemums, onelOxlOO 
for carnations, one 11x100 for palms, 
and one 7x100 for violets. He has also 
rebuilt one house 18x60 and has put in 
city water, having had to carry it six 
blocks from the nearest connection with 
the mains. He now has a total of 20,000 
feet of glass all in good shape. The 
weather has been very dry here and every- 
thing outside is burned nearly to a crisp. 



Unexcelled in quality 
by any coming to the New York market. 

For supplying out-of-town customers our facilities and con- 
veniences are the very best. 

MILIvANG BROS., 

Cut Flower Exchange, 

408 East 34tii street, new York. 

Tie Pioneer Cut Flower Commissifln House 

^JAMES HART,^ 

117 W. 30TH STREET, NEW YORK CITY, 

Still at the Old Stand, and prepared to fill orders for shipment 

in any quantity. 

Careful Attention to Selection and Packing, 



An Exhibition Worth Seeing! 

ROSES BY THE THOUSAND!! 

All the Popular Varieties. Every morning from 9 to 1 1 o'clock. 

It will pay you well to call and see for yourself the 
quantities of roses handled daily in a busy New York 
Commission House. You will find us ready to greet old 
customers and glad to welcome the new. 



S3 V\r. 30-rM 



isrE:w^ ^^cz^FRp^ 



PANDANUS UTILIS 

6-inch pots $5.00 per dozen 

S-inch pots 3 0) per dozen 

4-inch pots 2.00 per dozen 

NATHAN SMITH &. SON. 



100,000 PANSIES 



BROWN'S SUPERB PflNSIES 

READY NOW FOR PLANTING. 

Grower of all the leading variety, the ne plus ultra in pansies. For size and form it seems hardly 
possible to produce anything more perfect and superfine (most light colors). 

By mail. 75c. per lOO ; \ I.iberal discount will be allowed on large orders. 

By express, 85 00 per 1000. i Cash with order. 

Peter Brown, 721 Marietta Avenue, LANCASTER, Pa. 



i8g4' The American Florist. 47 




As you pass through New York on your way 
to or from Atlantic City. 

American Beauties 

AND 

La France 

Are coming in now from the best growers. We 

would like to show you the stock 

and quote prices. 

flloU GH0I6E FLOWEI^S IN THEii^ SEASON SHIPPED AT Mfll^KET RATES. 

Walter F. Sheridan, 

32 West SOth Street, 

.... NEW YORK CITY. 



48 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 16^ 



Subscription $1.00 a Year. To Europe, $2.00. 

Advertisements, 10 Cents a Line, Agate; 

Inch, Si. 40; Column, 814.00. 

Cash with Order. 

No Special Position Guaranteed. 

Discounts, 6 times, 5 per cent; 13 times, 10 per cent; 

26 times. 20 per cent; 52 times, 30 per cent. 

No reduction made for large space. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦1 



The Advertising Department of the American 
FLORIST is for Florists, Seedsmen, and dealers in 
wares pertaining to those lines Onlt. Please to 
rememhe it. 

Orders for less tiian one-half Inch space not accepted. 

Advertisements must reach us by Monday to secure 
Insertion in the issue for the following Thursday. 

Address THE AMERICAN FLORIST CO., Chicago. 



THE CONVENTION. 

The tenth annual meeting of the Society 
of American Florists promises to be the 
largest and most valuable ever held by 
the society, in spite of the hard times. 
This indicates that the trade has confi- 
dence in the future and that the value of 
our national organization is fully appre- 
ciated. There will be important ques- 
tions to be passed upon at Atlantic City, 
but that they vyill be treated wisely and 
well none can doubt. 

And there will be recreation as well as 
work. The florists of the "City of Broth- 
erly Love" will be our hosts, and none 
know better than they how to care for 
their guests. 

While some hold that so much time de- 
voted to recreation detracts from the 
dignity of the society we are inclined to 
believe that this added feature has been 
an important factor in bringing out the 
large annual attendance which has done 
so much toward strengthening the society 
and given added importance to the labors 
of those who felt that work should be the 
only consideration. Certain it is that 
the society has accomplished more prac- 
tical work than any similar organization 
that has eschewed the entertainment 
feature. 

It is true there remains much to be 
done. There are live questions yet to be 
dealt with, and at this, our tenth meet- 
ing, several will receive the consideration 
to which they are entitled. 

DAN'L B. LONG, 

WttOLESflLE GUT FLOWERS, 

495 Washington St., BUFFALO. N. Y. 
Shipping Orders carefully attended to. 
OTHER SPECIAXTIES: 

Florists* Supplies, Wire DesigrnB* Bulbs, 
Long's Florists Photographs (see large ad. 
Catalotrues. Lists. Terms, etc.. on application. 

SAMUEL S. PENNOCK, 

Wholesale Florist 

REAR OF 42 S. 16th STREET, 

Mention American Florlet. 

CUT SMILAX. 

15 cents per String. 
JOSEPH E. BONSALL. 308 Garfield Ave.. Salem. 0. 

FLORAL DESIGNS 

The Cut Flower Worker's Friend. Fine txx>k 
of 160 pages. Send 93.60 for it, to 

J. HORACE McFARLAND, Harrlsburg, Pa. 



X HIGHEST AWARDS 



Cycas Leaves. 

VAUGHAN'S SEED STORE 



FRESH CUT 

each 75c. 



Antwerp World's Exhibition, 1894. 
Ghent International Flower Show, 1893. 



EDW. PYNAERT VAN-GEERT, 

(Founded 1816.) 

GHENT, BELGIUM, 

GROWER AND WHOLESALER OF 



EDITOR OF 

Revue de V HorlieuHure Beige et Etrangere, 



♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 



I raims, Azaleas, flraocarias, RuBBer Trees, | 



♦ 
♦ 



RHODODENDRONS, CAMELLIAS, ROSES, 

and a complete line of choice Hot House Plants, Gloxinias, Begonias. 

For prices, catalogues, etc. apply to 

AUG. RHOTERT, Sole Agent, 



♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

X 

♦ 
♦ 

p. O. Box 2250. 26 Barclay Street, NEW YORK. ♦ 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



The Florist is Notliing if not Progressiva. 

Kigiit years ago only lie hadn't attended many S. A. F. 
conventions. An ice box in regular use in a retail store 
was hardly known then. Now none is complete without. 
As incomplete too is a store now without a set of 

Long's Florists' Photographs, 

more recent of introduction than the ice box. In their way, 
however, as useful and necessary. Catalogue supplied by 

DANX B. LONG, Puhlisher, Buffalo, N. Y., 

WE ARE MAKING A SUMIVIER HIT! 

Try us on OtJ-t I<*'lo^wer's 

and see if we cannot substantiate our claim. 

Best) Stock for Least Money ! ^* 

*^ Remember our GHoice American Beauties ! 

n:ii: Carefully packed to ship to any part of the country. 



SI XV^toEisla 



OH:iOA.GtO. 



CORBREY & McKELLAR, 

Wholesale and Gommlsslon Florists, 



Phone Main 4508. 



64 & 66 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO. 



We are prepared to fiU your orders with. First-Class Flowers. 
Give us a trial order. 



Mention American Florist. 



NOTHING CAN 
EQUAL 



I18.S. 



Chicago. 



FOR DECORATING, 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS KAHUS. 

CUT STRINGS s to is feet long, so cts. 

Shipped in iarg:e or small quantities to any part of the country. Orders by mail, tele- 
craph or telephone. 

^ W. H. ELLIOTT, Brighton, Mass. 

Hardy Cut Ferns, 

BOUQUET GREEN, 

Laurel and Green Festooning, Wreaths, Etc. 

SPHAGNUM MOSS IN ANY QUANTITY. 

H. E. HARTFORD, 18 Chapman Place, BOSTON . 

MeniiuD Aojerlcao Klortsi. 




i8g4^ 



The American Florist. 



49 



E. H. HUNT. 

Wholesale Plorist 

68 Lake Street, CHICAGO. 

WHOLESALE GUT FLOWERS. 

SEEDS. BUI.BS AND AI.I. 

FI.ORISTS' STTFFI.IES. 



Western Aeent for tlie GREAT ANTIPEST. 

KENNIGOTT BROS. GO. 

WHOLESALE CUT FLOWERS, 

and FLORISTS' SUPPLIES. 

34 c£ 36 RANDOLPH STREET, 

CHXCAGJO. 

A. L. RANDALL, 

winoiesaie Fiona 

126 Dearborn St., CHICAGO. 



Airent for finest grades Waxed and Tissue Papers. 

J. B. DEAMUD&CO. 

WHOLESALE GUT FLOWERS, 

34 & 36 Randolph Street, 

Phone Main 221 CHICAGO. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR AMERICAN BEAUTIES. 

Reinberg Bros. 
WHOLESALE GUT FLOWERS, 

5/ WABASH AVENUE, 

Telephone Main -(937. CHICA-CiO. 

We are Headquarters for the leading varieties of 
Roses, lor the summer. Send us a trial order. 

NILES CENTER FLORAL CO. 

Incorporated. 
WHOLESALE GROWERS OF 

GUT FLOWERS OF ALL KINDS 

and Dealers in FLORISTS' SUPPLIES, 

59 WABASH AVENUE. 

Second Floor. CBII0.AC»0. 

WHOLESALE 
FLORISTS 

JOBBERS IN 
FLORISTS- 
SUPPLIES, 

METS, '^^^^^ — .a^ FLORISTS' 

BRIDES, ^^ ^0\"*s. VASES. 

GONTIERS, 

CARNATIONS, 

ALWAYS ON HAND 

-1 Music Hall Place, 

BOSTON, MASS. 

HORTICDLTDRAL ADCTIONEERS, 




' m PBilPIE FOLDINO FLOMR 
FOR CUT FLOWERS. 



BOX.m 

J 



FOLDING 
PAPER 
BOXES 
for CUT 
Flowers, 



Made from heavy. .Manilla lined, Strawboard. Ship- 
ped tlat. packed IIXJ In a crate. 

CHICAGO FOLDING BOX CO., 

Jackson & Clinton Sts., CHICAGO. 

TELErnoNE Main 471S. 



©V^fiofeAafe MarftcCA. 



Cut Flowers. 

New York. Aug. 11. 

Roses l.ou® 3.00 

■■ per lOOU R.OUOELO.OO 

Beauty 2.00@12.00 

CamatlonB. . ,60® 1. 00 

per 1000 S3.00@»5.00 

Valley 2.00® 4.00 

HarriBll 4.00® 6.00 

Auratum 1.50® 2.00 

Sweet peas, per lOU bunches 50c®tl.00 

Asters per lOO bunches 50®1.C0 

Smllax (i.OO® 8.00 

Asparagus 25.00(3)35.00 

Adiantum 75® 1.00 

Boston. Aug. 11. 

Roses. Nlphetoa, Gentler 1.00® 3.00 

Perle. Sunset 1.00® 3.00 

Bride, Mermet 2.00® 6.0O 

CamatlonB 25® .76 

Harrlsll C.UO® 8.00 

Lily of the valley 4 00 

Sweet peas, .10 

Asters 25® .50 

Gladiolus .... 1.00® 3.00 

White Japan lilies 2.00 

Adiantum 1 .00 

Smllax 12.00®I5.00 

Asparagus 50.00 

PHILADELPHLA, Aug. 11. 

Koses, small 2.00 

large teas 3.00® 4.00 

Beauties 8.00®16.OO 

Carnations 60® 1.50 

Valley 4.00 

Smllax 10.00®12 00 

Asparagus 50.00 

Harrlsll lilies 4.00® 6.00 

Sweet peas .50 

Cornllower 26® .60 

Cattleyas 3o.00®40.00 

Adiantum 75® 1.00 

Chicago, Aug. ii. 

Rosea. La France. Meteor 3.U)® 4.00 

Beauty S 00®15.00 

Kalserln 3.00® 4 OO 

General assortment, per 1000. .$6®*10 

Carnations, long 25® .60 

fancies 1.50@2.00 

Auratum lilies B.OO® 8 OO 

Asters .60 

Sweet Peas 10® .30 

ST. Loms, Aug. 13. 

Roses. Perles, Nlphetos, Wootton 2.00® 3.00 

Bride. Mermet. Bridesmaids .. 2.00® 3.00 

Meteors 2.00® 3.00 

La France, Albany, Hoste 2.00® 3.00 

Beauty 5.00®15.00 

Sweetpeas 15® .25 

Carnations. long 50® .75 

" short .50 

Adiantum 1.25 

Hollyhocks, asters .50 

BUFFALO, Aug. 13. 

Roses, Beauties 12.00@15.00 

Mermet. Bride 3.00® 4.00 

Gentler, Perle 3.00 

Cuain ,3.00 

Auratum lilies 10.00®12.00 

Liinclfollum lilies 8.00®10.00 

Carnations 75® 1 00 

Gladiolus 4.00® 5 00 

Sweet peas 20 

Valley 3.00 

Smllax 15.00@20.00 

GEORGE fl. SUTHERLAND. 

Successor to PECK & SUTHERLAND, 
Successors to WM. J. STEWART, 

Gut Flowersi Florists' SuppHes 

67 Bnomfield St., BOSTON, MASS. 

New England Agent for the GREAT ANTIPEST. 

H. L. SUNDERBRUGH, 

Wholesale Florist 

4th AND WALNUT STREETS, 

Cln.oixmet.'tl, O. 

W. ELLISON 

WHOLESALE 

Gut Flowers I Florists' Supplies 

I402 PINE STREET, 



(Successor to ELLISON & KUEHN), 

-$ii^ WHOLESALE ^€# 

1122 FiaSTE STH-EEIT, 
A complete line of Wire Deslgiu. 



FOR HIGH CLASS SUMMER TRADE. 

THE LEADING FAVORITES. 

American Beaut v. 
Meteor . 

La France . 

And all other desirable roses, grown espe- 
cially for summer shipping to sea- 
side and mountain resorts. 

BURNS & RAYNOR, 

49 West 28tb St., NEW YORK. 

SPRING, SUMMER, 

AUTUMN, WINTER. 

In dull season and busy season. 
All the year round. 

Roses, Lily Of tie ?alley 

and all other choice stock 
can be obtained of 

THOS. YOUNG, Jr., 

20 West 24th St., NEW YORK. 

WALTER F. SHERIDAN. 

• WHOLESALE • 

32 West 30th Street. HEW YORK. 



Roses Shipped to all points. Price list on application. 

Mention American Florist 

Edward C. Horan, 

34 W. 29th Street, NEW YORK. 

WHOLESSLE » FLORIST. 

Careful Shipping to all parts of the country. 
Price list on application. 

FRANK D. HUNTER, 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN 

C ut* F lowers . 

57 W. 30th St., MEW YORK. 

MILLANG BROS., 

Wholesale Florists, 

408 East 34th Street, 

Cut Flower Exchange, NEW YORK. 

THEO. ROEHBS, 

WHOLESALE 

FLORIST, 

111 West 30th street, 

NEW YORK CITY. 

Established 1879 

WELCH BROS., 
Wholesale Florists, 

wo. 2 BEACON STREET, 
NearTremontSt., BOSTON, MASS. 



50 



The American Florist. 



Aug. i6j 



Hfte ^eci. Urac^e. 



AM. SEED TRADE. ASSOCIATION. 

D. I. BUSHXELL, St. Louis, president; S. E, Briggs, 
Toronto. 1st vice-president; A. L. ooN. 114 Chambers 
street, New York, secretary and treasurer. 



Indications point to a scarcity of white 
Roman hyacinths. 

Mr. 'has. p. Braslan and wife sailed 
for Europe August 11. 

L. L. May & Co., at St. Paul, are add- 
ing 7,000 feet of new glass. 

Recent rains will undoubtedly be of 
much benefit to vine crops, late potatoes 
and late corn. 

Miss C. H. LiPPiNCOTTis adding atwo- 
story brick and stone store front to her 
Sixth street quarters. 

The passage of the Senate tariff bill 
places a duty of 10% on lily of the valley, 
palms, orchids and like forcing stock and 
apparently the same duty on all flower 
bulbs, whereas all of the above have been 
free goods under the McKinlej bill. The 
question now is when will the new bill 
take effect. 

Waterloo reports of August 7th are 
more discouraging than ever in regard to 
the corn crops. Vines are also suffering 
and very little fruit is set on them yet. 
There will not be much of a crop unless 
there is a change soon. The like has never 
been known for 35 years past, abundance 
of rain being more customary than a 
drouth. 



Do YOU WANT a list of the cemeteries of 
the country that use trees, shrubs and 
plants largely in the ornamentation of 
their grounds and that are apt to be 
large buyers of these and other horticul- 
tural supplies? You will find such a list 
in our trade directory and reference book 
forl894-. Price $2.00. 

Do YOU WANT a complete alphabetical 
list of chrysanthemums in commerce in 
America, with class, and brief, accurate 
description of each? You will find such a 
list in our trade directorv and reference 
book for 1894. Price $2.00. 



Watch this Space ! 

We will quote 
SOMETHING GOOD 
in the near future. 

We sell only to tlin trade 
at Wholesale Prices. 

Better not let your 
customers read your 
Florists' Trade Papers. 

S. O. STREBY, 

Lock Box 77» 
UPPER SANDUSKY. OHIO. 



WE SELL BULBS 



special luw prices to 



Florists % Dealers. 

WEEBER & DON, 

Secfl Mercliunts iinrl (JruwerM, 
114 Clianilx-rn Stri-et, NKW ^ ORK. 



ROSES at $2.50 per 100. 

W)l) BKIDKS. hue. '.".•inch |i..(b. KHIIJ MKUMICTS. 
ZJi'lnch puts. This Is Hne yciunR. henllhy ntock, i; to 10 
, IncheH hltfli. and very strong. (;:ib1i with order. 

.J. J. LA.MPKKT, .\enia, Ohio. 



August Rolker&Sons, 

136 & 138 West 24th St. New York City. 

Rolker's CHOICEST Strains of FI.OWER SEEDS. 

CAIiCEOI.&BIA hyb. ^randiflora. choicest English mixed @ $ .50 per trade pkt 

CINEBAKIa " " select Covent Garden, mixed .... @ .50 

CYCLAMEN Dame Blanche, pure white, very large flowering . . . . . @ .75 per 50 seeds 

' Excelsior, delicate blush, " " @ .75 

*' Crimson King", brilliant intense crimson " @ .75 " 

" Splendens ^randiflora, pure white, very choice (a' 1.00 for 100 seeds 

" •' " white with dark eye, very choice . . . ([i; .60 

" " " rose ((" .CO " 

" " " dark red . . ... . . Cfc .60 " 

PANSr, Bolker's Superior Mixture @ $5.00 per oz.; $1.50 per 'X oz.; $1.00 per Js oz. 

" Trimardeau, Improved Giant (a) 5.00 " 1.50 •' 1.00 

Bxig-not's " " @ 10.00 " 2 50 " 150 

Cassier's " " (a 6.00 " 1.50 " 1.00 

A Complete line of Florists' Supplies. 
FANCY BASKETS, PREPARED CYCAS LEAVES, metal designs 

FENSTER PAPPE. FIR TREE OIL. 

Gape Flowers, WME^A.T »H13iV"VE^S, Metal Fern Dishes. 

HEADQUARTERS for all varieties of FALL or EARLY SPRING BULBS. 

August Rolker & Sons, 



JVe^x^ "Vorlj:, 



136 & 138 West 24th St. 



JUST RECEIVED IN SUPERIOR QUALITY : 



Lilium Harrisii - 5-7 inches ; 

7-9 " 
Roman Hyacinths 13-15^ cm. 
Paper White Grandiflora 
French-grown Freesias, tJiffs, 
English Milltrack Mushroom Spawn 

FOR FALL DELIVERY : Dutch Hyacinths, Tulips, Narcissus, Crocus, Lily of the 
Valley, Roses, Azaleas, Japanese Lilium longitlorum, auratum, rubrum, prscox, 
album, etc. 

CHAS. SCHWAKE, 404 E. 34tli Street, NEW YORK. 



52.50 per 100; 
5.00 " 

275 " 

1.25 '; 
0.90 

per 
lb. 



$20.00 per 1000 
45.00 

25.00 " 

10.00 " 

6.00 

IOC 



per 
100 lbs. 



I 00 



Prices Lower Than Ever. 

Ready for shipment from July to September. 

Calla Aethiopica, fine dry roots in all sizes. 

Lil. Longlflorum.ready for shipment from October 
1st to March 15, 1895. 

Lil. Auratum. Spec. Rubrum and Album. Etc. 

Iris Kaempferi, in 100 choice varieties. 

Japanese Maples, in best varieties. 

Camellias, Paeonies, Tree Ferns. Raphis. Cycas 
Revoluta, superb growing plants with fine foliage 
from 25 cents to ^ each; fresh imported stems, 
true long leaf variety, roots and leaves cut off, de- 
livered from March, 1895. 

For general Japanese stock apply to 

F. Cronzalez & Co., 

303 to 312 Wayne St., SAN FRANCISCO, GAL. 

Mention American Florist, 

Cyperus Alternifolius. 

3^-inch pots, per doz. 75c; per 100 $6 
2yi-\nc\\ pots, " 60c; " $4 
2-inch pots, " 40c; " |3 

NATHAN SMITH & SON. 

Mention Amerleiin Florist. 

Smilax Plants Cheap. 

Out of 2 and 3-inch pots, also transplanted plants 
out of boxes. Never had as fine and large stock 
before. Please state number you desire and I will 
give you the lowest prices. Safe deliverv and 
best satisfaction guaranteed with every shipment. 
Sample order 10 cts. Terms strictly cash. 

Address FRED SCHNEIDER. Wholesale Florist, 

Wyoming: Co., ATTICA, N. Y. 




A I rial will convince you 

. . THAT . . 

SHEEP FERTILIZER 

Is what is wanted for 

ROSES, CHRYSANTHEMUMS, SMILAX, Etc. 

S;ini|)l'' sflil 1'ri'i- oil ;i |i|ilir;i 1 ji.n !)\ W rilJllL' l»> 

JOHN J. PETERS, Mfg.. 

39 BORDEN AVENUE, 

LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. 

When you write to any of the ad- 
vertisers in this paper ;jiease say that 
you saw the advertisement in the 
American Florist. 



i8g4- 



The American Florist. 



51 




BULBS FOR FLORISTS' USE. 

THE FINEST QUflLITY. 
THE MOST POrULflR PRICES. 
THE MOST LJBER HL TERMS. 

We ^WTaixt "X^OUI^ ^i-ade.- 



CATALOGUE FREE TO ALL ON APPLICATION. 



Z, DE FOREST EL.Y. 



SEND LIST OF YOUR \WANTS FOR SPECIAL PRICES. 



NOW READY. Per 100. Per 1000. 

LILIUM HARRISII, 5 to 7 $ 2.50 |2000 

7 to 9 5.00 45.00 

" " 8 to 9 6.00 50.00 

" " 9 to 11 10,00 90.00 

LILIUM CANDIDUM, Selected 2 50 22.00 

WHITE CALLA (Dry Bulbs) 6 00 50.00 

Extra selected 8 00 75.00 

Finest stock of DUTCH HYACINTHS, TULIPS, VON 



WOW READY. Per 100. 

WHITE ROMAN HYACINTHS, il x 12 Si.50 

12x 15 2.25 

PAPER WHITE NARCISSUS lOO 

" " Grandiflora 1.25 

FREESIA REFRACTA ALBA, Extra selected.. .75 
LILY OF VALLEY (our extra Berlin Pips now 
in cold storage and for immediate delivery). 1.50 



Per lOOO. 

$11.00 

20.00 

6.50 

9.00 

6.00 

12.00 



Address- 



P. 0. Box t176. Telephone 3415. 
Registered Cable Address, De Forest. Phila 



SION NARCISSUS, SPIRAEA, etc., ready in September. 

7 nP FflRF^T Fl Y £ Pfl wholesale growers and importers of 

Li Ul rUnCOl CLI Ot UUi) :Btilt»« f»iicl Florists' S«itii>i3lies 

1024 Market St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 




5,000.000 

FREESIAS 



We will deliver Freesia Bulbs. 
bll charges for traiisportailoD 



Buy FIRST HAND 

paid, as follows; 

3-8 to 3-4 inch per lOOO, $4.00 

1-4 to 5-8 inch per 1000, $3.00 

Liberal discount on Inrjjer lots. Send for our price list. 
Order NOW your Japan Bulbs, Ijonpitiorum. Aura- 
turns, Rubruras, Albums, \%'e are Ueailquarters. 
We are tlie ONLY FIKM in the U. S- who guaran 
tee you SoUM> ISULBS delivered. 
Address all communications to 

H. H. BERGER & CO.. 

(Established 1878.) SAN FRANCISCO. GAL. 



FOR S/\L&. 



Now ready 
for delivery. 



BERMU04 SPICE LILY | 7 to9in.bulbs,«M per 
Imp. Amaryllis Johnsonii, j lOO; $170 per 1000. 
FREESIA REFR. ALBA. 5-16 in. in diam, 82,50 per 
moo in lots of 5000. 
Seed. $2 00 per lb. 
GLADIOLUS SHAKESPERE. 2% to Z inches in diam. 

$li.00 per 100; S.5O.0C per 1000. 
ZEPHYRANTHES ROSf A. I large bulbs, VI per 

FLORIBUNDA f 100; »15 per 1000 
ATAMASCO. $1 per 100; 88 per 1000 
NERINE SARNIENSIS I. large flowering bulbs. $8 
Guern.se\' I.ily. ) per 100. 

CALLA BULBS, i to 6 inches at crown. 87 per 100. 
Best var. FRENCH CANNAS. 86 per 100; 840 per 1000. 
Above prices are for delivery In New York, thence 
by E.\pre88 or otliLTwlse at pureliaser's cost. CO. IJ. 
from unknown parties. 

Columbia Farm. ST. GEORGES. BERMUDA. 

.Mention American FlorlHl. 

GLARK BROTHERS. 

Manufacturers and Printers ol 

PAPER SEED BAGS 

of every description, except Lithographic Bags. 
61 ANN STREET. NEW YORK. 



Ram's Head Brand Fertilizer 
Clay's Fertilizer - 
Mushroom Spawn 
Raffia - - - - 



per bag $3.00 

per bag, 112 lbs., $6.25 

per 100 lbs. $8.00 

15c. per lb.; per 100 lbs. $12.00 



Lilium Harisii 



S to 7 $2 so; $22 00 

■-' .1 ' per 100 *^ '^ ' per 1000 *^ ^ ^ ^^ 
7 9 500; 45-00 

Hyacintbs, E Roman White per 100 $2.00; per 1000 $16.00 

Lilium Candidum Select Bulbs " $2.00 ; " $18.00 

WRITE FOR TRADE PRICE LIST. 

WM. ELLIOTT & SONS, 

m^ 54 and 56 Dey Street, NEW YORK. 



Hyl§6DosGli BrotHcrs, 

OVERVEEN, near Haarlem, HOLLAND. 

Bulbs m Plants 



We are now prepared to quote lowest 
possible prices for next July, Aug- 
ust and September delivery. 

Illustrated Wholesale Catalogues on application. 

HULSEBOSCH BROS., 

ENGLEWOOO, N. J. 

Mention Ajuerlcan Florist. 



ONION v^^ 
SEED. '^^ 



CROP 1894. 

Prices for New Crop 
'made on Application. 

COX SEED AND PLANT CO. 

411, 413 & 415 Sanaome Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Mention American Florist. 



52 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 1 6, 



Buffalo. 

Two weeks of high class horse trotting; 
hasjust closed, a game of ball (Rochester 
vs. Buffalo) is coming off on Thursday 
next, and then for Atlantic City with all 
its glorious opportunities for recreation 
both mentally, physically and "sport- 
ingly." With all this in the immediate 
past, present and future, there are only 
a very few of us old fellows who are giv- 
ing much thought to serious business. 
There is really not much to attend to in 
the selling way, but plenty for the green- 
house man to busy himself with. Very 
fair roses are now coming in from nearby 
towns. Carnations are very near their 
end. The dry weather is telling on sweet 
peas, and good ones are scarce. Asters 
are now filling a gap. Altogether there 
are sufficient flowers to meet all demands. 

It has been quite cool of late, too cool 
to make one feel jolly, but somanyevents 
of a sportial nature have enabled most of 
us to keep up our normal temperature. 
We hope to see a good strong delegation 
leave here for Atlantic City and think 
there will be more than have attended 
any other, still there won't be as many as 
should be. J. H. Rebstock prefers the 
Adirondack Mountains for a week; serve 
him right if he got lost in the primeval 
forest. But I am not attempting to ex- 
plain why Tom, Dick and Harry won't 
attend. Most of them are willing that a 
few should spend their time and money in 
the elevation of the business and they can 
later on reap the benefit. Prof. Cowell 
leaves this week for Brooklyn to attend 
the convention of the Am. Asso'n for Ad- 
vancement of Science, of which he is a 
prominent member. He will then advance 
himsell on to the Quaker City Sunday or 
Mondav. There are several here who are 
rfjoiced to see that a shooting tourna- 
ment at artificial birds is ontheprogram. 
We hope it will be in the hands of some 
one who thoroughly understands trap 
shooting. Two guns will go from here, 
so some must think they can shoot. 

I was a little premature in saying two 
weeks ago that our boys would go by 
the D. & L. road. We shall without 
doubt go by the Lehigh Valley. It ismuch 
the shortest route and no change of cars 
to Philadelphia. I wish I could announce 
now the hour, but no doubt the train 
which will carry the most will be that 
that leaves here on Monday 9:15 a. m. 
arriving in Philadelphia about 8 in the 
evening. That will give those fortunate 



enough to be there an opportunity for a 
good night's repose, more or less, and a 
chance to join the large delegation in the 
morning. To those who suffer with 
insomnia in strange hotels I would 
recommend that they retire early, screw 
down the gas low (but not quite extin- 
guished) and read and re-read the latest 
tffusion of the Bard of Kingsessing, 
"come to the convention." I tried it last 
night and on getting to the word lassies 
for the 7th time I was sound asleep. 

W. S. 



Grow Swainsona. 



The best and most profitable pure white flower 
grown. Takes the place of Roman hyacinths or 
lily of the valley, producing spikes of flowers from 
4 to t) inches long, in the greatest abundance the 
entire year — never out of bloom — lasting well 
when cut. 100 Swainsona will pay you three 
times as much as same space in best carnations. 
No florist should be without this most useful flower. 
After a trial it will be considered indispensable. 

EASY TO GROW. 

An exceplionally good and paying cut flower. 

Strong young plants, $1.00 per doz.; 

$6.00 per 100. 

Larger ones, $1.50 per doz.; $10 per 100. 

FAUST & BRO.. 

MERION STATION, P. R. R., PA. 

Mention American Florist. 



Our Specialties 

ROSES, $20 to |40 per lOOO, prepared for 

winter blooming. 
VIOLETS, sinijle and double, J30 per 1000. 
CHRYSANTHEMUMS, 50 prize winners, J30 

rer lOOO. 
BOUVAROIAS, leading sorts, |40 per 1000. 
GERANIUMS, single and double, best varie- 

iies in existence, per 100 $4.00. 
GRAND NEW VARIEGATED Abutilon, 
"ANDENKEN AN BONN," extra, «4 per 100. 
AMERICAN PERFECTION ROSE, 25 for$i. 

Try it and you will find that this Rose 

produces more flowers than any Rose in 

existence. Strong grower. 

Evervthing in stock and in quantities, and 
extra cheap this month. 

■\Vliolesale fatalcgue free to a I. 

Address |MANZ & NEUNER. 

LOUISVILLE. KY. 





EVERGREEN 

CUT FERNS 

ESPECIALLY FOR FLORISTS' USE 

...CO.™. $l'25 per Ihousand Ferns. 

IN LOTS OF 5,000 AND ITPWAKDS. «1.00 PER 1000. Ferns furnished the 

year round. Special attention j^lven to supplying the Wholesale Trade. 

BOUQUKT GKKKN For Holiday Trade. ¥2.00 per barrel (thirty pounds); or $(;.00 
per hundred pounds. Special reduction In express rates. 

SFH A<;NI.I>I iMOSS a specialty. Ijonp, clean fibre, dry or frreen, $1 per barrel, or six 
bbls. for it^i"). Write for lemis on larf:e lots. Terms casli.or fjoods will be sent C- 0. 1>. 

CHKI.ST.'VI As TKKKS. American White Spruce, much better shape and color than 
the Blue Spruce, also Balt<iim Kir from ;i to 30 feet hij^h. Special attention to sup- 
plying carload lotn. Wrltu tor iirlce llHt and terms. 

L. B. BRAGrUE, Hinsdale, Mass. 

City Stand During the Holidays: 47th St. and Lexington Ave.. HEW tOHK. 

MR. BRAGUE WILL BE AT THE CONVENTION EXHIBIT HALL. 

Far better and prettier than IVY LEAVES, and three times as cheap, 
is ^vhat all florists say who use 

Kelsey's New Southern Galax Leaves. 

SAMI'I.KS, GKKKN A.\I> ItHONZK, FRKK ISYIM.All.. 

HARLAN P. KELSEY, Highliiids Niirser), KAWANA, Nortli Carolina. 



mamerigan florist CO.'S 

DIRECTORY 
REFERENCE BOOK 

FOR 1894 

CONTAINS THE FOLLOWING : 

1. The names and addresses of the Florists, Nur- 
serymen and Seedsmen of the United States 
and Canada, the exact branch ot the business 
each is engaged in being indicated. 

2. A separate list of firms that issue catalogues, 
the space devoted to each branch of the busi- 
ness in each catalogue being also given. 
A list of the names and addresses of superin- 
tendents of leading parks in the U. S. and 
Canada. 

A list of the principal cemeteries of America 
at which the arts of the landscape gardener 
and florist are used in beautifying the grounds. 
A complete, alphabetically arranged list of 
Roses in commerce in America, with class, 
habit of growth, date of introduction, name 
of introducer, and brief, accurate descriptions 
of the flower of each. Synonyms are also 
plainly given. 

A complete, alphabetically arranged list of 
Chrysanthemums in commerce in America, 
with class, and brief, accurate descri;)tion of 
each. Synonyms are noted and varieties that 
are very popular with American growers are 
designated by a star, and this year's intro- 
ductions by a dagger. 

A complete, alphabetically arranged list ot 
the Carnations in commerce in America, with 
name of introducer, date of introduction and 
brief, accurate description of each. 
Seasonable Hints for the year, arranged in 
weeks, written by Mr. William Scott, and 
covering every detail of a general florist busi- 
ness. This is decidedly the most valuable 
contribution to the literature of the trade ever 
published. It is written in a plain, practical 
way, by a man who knows what he is talking 
about. 

A historical sketch of the Society of American 
Florists from its organization to date, includ- 
ing officers for each year and lists of essays 
read at each meeting, with other information 
ot interest. 

A similar historical sketch of the American 
Association of Nurserymen. 
A similar historical sketch of the American 
Carnation Society. 

A similar historical sketch of the American 
Seed Trade Association. 

Similar historical sketches of the Florists' 
Hail Association of America; of the National 
Chrysanthemum Society of America; of the 
Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association. 
A complete list of all National and Local 
Trade Organizations, with names and ad- 
dresses of principal officers, time and place 
of meetings, etc. 

Statistics of Commercial Floriculture in the 
U. S. from the la^-t census. 
Statistics of the Nursery Industry in the U. S. 
from the last census. 

Statistics of Seed Growing in the U. S. from 
the last census. 

A list of Leading Horticultural Societies, with 
name and address of the Secretary of each. 
Full information about Express and Postage 
rates on plants, shrubs, trees, seeds and bulbs 

No less than 270 pages of valuable reference 

matter in compact form, and ail 

UP TO DATE. 



PRICE $2.00 POSTPAID. 



AMERICAN FLORIST CO., 



p. O. Drawer 164. 



CHICAGO. 



Marie Louise Violets. 

Strnns crowns, pot i.rro\vn. free from diseiise. If 
you want good flowers i^et pot grown plants. 
S4.00 per in<): it.S0.00 per inon. 

GEO. H. BENEDICT, Yorkville, N. Y. 

NEPHROLEPIS EXALTATA. 

Fine plantn. in 2. H and -l-lncli pots. Prices 
iiH tow as the lowest. 

BURR OAKS NURSERY, SIBLEY, ILL. 

Always mentinn the Amercan Flo- 
rist u'It n Mf'-'t'np fr- iiH^'f*rtn.pr«^ 



i8g4. 



The American Florist. 



53 



GARDINER'S SELECTED BULBS 




Per too Per 1000 
Lilium Harrisii, 5 to 7 inche? $ 2.50 $22 00 



7 to 9 " 4.50 

9 to 11 " 10.00 

Lilium longiflorum, 5 to 7 inches 3.00 

7 to 9 " 5.50 

,. -,r*=- «' 9 to 11 " 11.00 

Early White Roman Hyacinths. 11 to 12 cent 1.50 

12 to 15 " 2.00 

Narcissus Von Sion, extra selected 2.00 

Paper White 1-00 

" '■ Grandiflora 1.25 

" Trumpet Mnjor 1-75 

" Double Roman 100 

" Chinese Sacred 5.25 

Calla Lily, large bulb? 7.50 

'• " extra large bulbs 9.00 

Freesia Refracta alba, selected 50 

" " " extra large 75 

Jonquils Campernelle 80 

Lily of the Valley, selected, 3 year old B-rlin Pips 1.00 

(Special prices for larger quantities.) 

Spiraea Japonica 3.50 

Send for Whoksale Price List of BULBS, SEEDS, Etc. 

New Crop Calceolaria, Cineraria, Cyclamen, Pansy and 
Seeds, finest strains. 

JOHN GARDINER & CO., 

IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS 

Seeds, Bulbs and Mushroom Spawn, 

631 Market street, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



42.00 

90.00 

25.00 

50.00 

100.00 

11.00 

18.00 

18.00 

8 00 

10.00 

15.00 

7.50 

47.50 

70.00 

85.00 

4.00 

6.00 

6.50 

8.50 

32.50 



Primula 



^li'iilinii Ami-riraii Florist. 





NOW READY; 



NARCISSUS, 
HARRISII, 
ROMANS, 
FREESIAS. 



OUR NEW PLANT TUB is on exhibition at the S. A. F. 

Convention. Don't fail to see it.. 



'WE^ :iVIiVK:E^ X:%riRK^ ^?V0I^K:. Discount-. 25 percent. oAF our list. 

Cut Flowers. Florists' Supplies. 

S®" Send for Catalogues and F'rice Lists. 

WISCONSIN FLOWER EXCHANGE, 

Box 87. -^^— ...^iviir^xATAUK^KK. -vsri^. 



Tobacco Dust. 



$2.50. 



Per barrel (about 125 lbs. 
Sample free by mail. 

HERRMANN'S SEED STORE, 

413 Kast 34tli Street, 
near Long Island Ferry, NEW YORK. 
Mention American Florist. 



GreviUea Kobusta. 

3-incli pots, 10 to 15 inches liiscli, per 

dozen jJl.OO; per 100 JS.OO 

2>^-inch pots, " 65c; " |4.00 

NATHAN SMITH & SON, 

ADRIAN. MICH. 

Mention American Florist. 




■«v DREER'S 

.GftRDEN StEDS, 

Plants, Bulbs & Requisites. 

They are tlie best at tlte 
lowest prices. Trade List is- 
sued quarterly, mailed free 
to tlie trade only. 

HENRY A. DREEB, 
Philadelphia, Fa. 



54 



The American Florts^ 



Au<r. /6, 



Tarry town and Scarborough, N. Y. 

When Tarry town is mentioned one in- 
voluntarily thinks of Pierson; to one in- 
terested in floriculture the two are insep- 
arable. This again recalls cannas, espe- 
cially to anyone who had the good for- 
tune to see the magnificent canna display 
at the World's Fair last summer. 

F. R. Pierson's place is not difficult to 
find. At this season of the year you can 
see it from afar, the beds of cannas loom- 
ing up in brilliant scarlet and gold, in the 
presence of whose glory the surrounding 
masses of shrubbery and herbaceous 
plants shrink almost into insignificance. 
What an object lesson these gorgeous 
clumps of Alphonse Bouvier, Charles 
Henderson, Florence Vaughan and Count 
Horace de Choiseul furnish to the people 
of Tarrytown. It will be strange indeed 
if every garden of any pretentious in the 
town does not boast a canna bed next 
year after such a practical demonstration 
of the possibilities of these plants. 

One of the showiest groups is that of a 
new variety, Sunshine, a seedling of Mr. 
Pierson's, whose effectiveness full5' justi- 
fies its name. It makes an excellent bed- 
der. The color is the glowing orange 
vermilion of Paul Marquant, but the 
flower is much larger and fuller. Two 
other seedlings inside the house attract 
much attention. One, Helen Gcfuld, is a 
combination of strong orange and yellow 
shading, which gives a wonderfully lumi- 
nous effect; the other. Golden Heart, is a 
deep, even scarlet, with no edging or 
marking, but a clear orange center, the 
flower being very full and possibly more 
nearly approaching the ideal form than 
anything yet introduced. Lemoine'snew 
yellow, Eldorado, is another variety that 
shows up particularly well. 

The five mile drive from Tarrytown to 
Scarborough, where the Pierson rose 
houses are located, is through a charm- 
ing country, the road running between 
magnificent private estates and overlook- 
ing the broad Hudson for most of thedis- 
tance. In the houses at Scarborough Mr. 
Pierson appears to have pretty well 
solved the problem of cheapness combined 
with durability. Each house as added 
year by year shows some improvement 
over its predecessor — some economy in 
heating or equipment, some advance in 
operating, a little more light, a little bet- 
ter ventilation— until in the mostrecently 
constructed house it would seem as 
though the extreme limi' of advancement 
had been reached. Mr. Pierson is not so 
convinced, however, and expresses the 
belief that the best houses of the present 
day will eventually be surpassed to the 
same extent as these surpass their prede- 
cessors of a few years back. 

100,000 young roses are raised here an- 
nually, of which 25,000 are required for 
h'>me planting; American Beauty and 
Meteor are the leading varieties. Kais- 
erin Augusta Victoria. Bridesmaid, Mine. 
Caroline Testout, Wootton, Perle and 
Bride are also grown, but in lesser quan- 
tities. Ten acres of ground outside are 
laid out in well kept nurseries for orna- 
mental, deciduous and evergreen trees 
and shrubs, miscellaneous hardy herba- 
ceous plants and bulbs, giving employ- 
ment to thirty-five or forty men. 



Please mention the American Florist 
every time vou write to an advertisers. 

Do vou WANT a copy of the rulings of 
the express companies about rates on 
shipments of plants and nursery stock? 
You will find full information in our trade 
directory and reference book for 1894. 
Price $2.00. 



DECORATIVE PLANTS. 

Special oifer of varieties and sizes that can be supplied in large quantities 
and are of exceptional good value 



. $ 1.50 per dozen; $ 12.00 per 100 
12.00 •■ 100.00 



ARECA LUTESCENS. 

.S-inch pots, 12 to 15 inches high. .... 

6-inch pots. 24 inches high, 3 plants in a pot . . 

SPECIMEN PLANTS OF ARECA LUTESCENS. 

9-inch pots, single stems, fine plants for decorating, about 6 feet high. $ 7.50 each 

fJ-inch pots, single stems, with several good side branches, about H leet high . . 10.00 each 

12-inch pots, beautiful, perfect specimens in every respect, clean, well-fo med plants 

of very good value. 15.00 each 

12-inch pots, a grand lot of bushv specimen plants, clean, wellgrowu stock in every 

respect, a special lot of plants, about 7 feet high, at . . . . 20.00 each 

COCOS \A/^EDDELLIANA. 

A grand lot of plants, in 3-iuch pots, well-grown, stocky and of good color, 12 to 15 
inches hip h ... ... . . 



Kentia Belmoreana. 

5-inch pots, 6 leaves, 24 inches high 
6-inch pots, 6 leaves, 24 to 30 inches high. 



Per doz. 

, . 815.1 

18.00 

Each 

, $ 3.00 

. 5.00 

. . 7.50 

15.00 



8-inch pots, 6 to 7 leaves, 30 inches high . 
8 inch pots 6 to 7 leaves, 48 inches high 
9-inch pots, 6 to 7 leaves, 48 to 54 in. high 
12-inch pots, 7 leaves, 60 inches high. 

Kentia Forsteriana. 

3-inch pots, 4 leaves 15 inches high S 2 50 

5-inch pots, 5 to 6 leaves, 24 to 30 in. high . . 12 00 
5-inch pots, 5 to 6 leaves, 30 to 3H in. high 
6-inch pots, 6 leaves. 36 inches high . . 



Per doz. 



7-inch pots. 7 leaves, 42 inches high 
9 inch pots, 6 to 7 leaves, 60iuches high 
12-inch pots, 6 to 7 leaves, 72 inches high. . 



15 00 
18 00 
Each 
8 3 CO 
7.50 
10.00 



$:i.00 per dozen; J20.00 per 100 

Latania Borbonica. 

A grand lot of plants in 3-inch pots, 4 to 5 leaves, 
ready to pot up, J8 (0 per lOO. Per doz. 
6-inch pots, 24 inches high. .... S12.00 
7-inch pots, 21 to 30 inches high .... 15.00 
8-inch pots, 30 inches high 18.00 

Pandanus Utilis. 

2^4 -inch pots, fine stock for potting up, 75 cts. per 
dozen; J6 00 per 100; SOO 00 per 1000. 

Araucaria Excelsa. 

Largest slock in the country. Each 

5 inch potv, 3 tieis, 15 inches high 81.25 

H-inch pots, 4 tiers, 18 inches high . . 1.75 

6-inch pots, 4 liers, 24 inches high ... 2.50 

7-inch pots. 5 tiers. 30 inches high .... 3.00 
8 inch pots, 6 to 7 liers, 36 inches high . . . . 5.00 

Dracaena Braziliensis. 

A fine lot of this useful decorative variety, strong 
plants in 4-iiich pols. 15 to IK inches high, at 
$2.U0 per dozen; S15.00 per 100. 



For a complete list of Decorative Plants, such as Palms. Ferns, DracKnas, Cycas, 
Pandanus, etc., etc., refer to our Quarterly List, mailed on application. Our stock this 
se?.son is of exceptionally fine quality, and is complete as to assortment of sizes. 



714 Chestnut Street, 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



THE WATER GARDENS. 

"«%. VICTORIA REGIA AND V. RANDU 
, NELUMBIUM SPECIOSUM (Egyptian Lotus); 

WATER LILIES, 

Hardy and Tropical in all colors, day and night blooming 
varieties. 

These are now most popular flowers, and we cordially 
invite your inspection of our 

EXHIBIT AT THE CONVENTION EXHIBITION. 




WM. TRICKER & CO.. 



.civii^TOPif, :iv. J. 



MEDALS AWARDED 



.............. CANNAS Columbia and Prima 

They are now in full bloom at our Greenhouses and should be seen by all. 

Those visiting the Convention can see sample plants at Robert Craig's, Philadelphia ; also 

ar F. R. Pierson & Co., Tarrytown, N. Y. 

I. N. KRAMER & SON, Cedar Rapids. Iowa. 



Tuberous 
Begonias 

(GRIFFIN'S STRAIN.) 

Plants in bloom, all sizes, at lowest prices. 

OASIS NURSERY CO. 

Thos. Griffin. Mgr. Westbury Station, L. I., 




N. Y. 



GHRYSflNTHEMUMS 

1000 IVOKV, #:J.00 per 100. 

Also several thousand in variety, late propagated, 

iust the thing for 4 and 5-inch pot plants. 

Ijst of varieties and prices on 

application. 

NATHAN SMITH & SON, Adrian, Mich. 



5,000 Richardiaalba maculata, 1 yr. strong. 
10,000 Hyacinthus candicans, 2 yrs , No. 1. 
10,000 Double Tiger Lily, No. 1, J20 per 1000. 

Lily elegans. No. 1. 
50,000 Lemoine's Hyb. Gladiolus, 25 named 
varieties. 

Peonies, 1 yr. transp. 25 named var. 

5,000 Cinnamon Vines, 1 & 2 yrs. 

5,000 Ipom^apaniculata, 1 &2yrs , strong, 

$50 rer 1000. 

Ipomsa paniculata, from pots, |25 per 1000. 

lpoma;a pandurata (Hardy Moonflower), 

transplanted. 
Wistaria magnifica, 1, 2 & 3 yrs , fine. 
100,000 Oxalis bulbs, 4 or 5 named sorts. 
Lists Free. E. Y. TEAS, Manager, 

IRVINGTON. IND., near Indianapolis. 
Mention American Florist 



i8g4. 



The American Florist. 



55 



OTo tlxe. 



KORISTS OF AMERICA. 

Most of you -viill go to Atlantic City to attend tlie Convention. Of course I shall be 
witli you as usual, with a small but interesting exhibit to show you, and with order book and 
pencil handy to write down your order for 

Bulbs, Choice Seeds, Palms, Orchids, 
Foliage, Flowering and Hardy Plants. 

Stop on your way home and inspect my New Bstablishment ; easily reached every few 
minutes from New York or Newark. 



W. A. MANDA, 



IV. J. 



ON EXHIBIT AT ATLANTIC CITY during Convention. 

IMPORTED BULBS, PLANTS AND FOSTITE, '^^t^.Zt.l;i'^:ri^tSs^^^^c^ 

cryptoganiic diseases of plants, fruits and vegetables. ALSO 

innQTCM'Q MAHATIMP DEI I flWQ "^""^^ ^"^ "^^""^ Vo-^tx, acknowledged the best implement in ex- 
JUUO I til O lYIHUALlIlL DlLLUYTOi istence for applying Fostite, Sulphur, Hellebore, Slug Shot, Grape 
Dust, London Purple, Paris Green, etc. to plants, vegetables, fruits and trees. 

POWDER IN MAGAZINE CANNOT CLOG. QUANTITY TO BE APPLIED CAN BE REGULATED AT WILL. 

|»-TIIE BELLOWS AVILL BE EXHIBITED IN WORKING ORDER DURING THE CONVENTION. 

C. H. JOOSTEN, 3 Coenties Slip, NEW YORK, 

IMPORTER OF BULBS, ROSES, ORNAMENTAL PLANTS, NURSERY AND FRUIT TREE STOCKS. 



.tV l^t-Xll r.,ii-»t? t>1r l^vtlljs*, t?to. fit riottorai O^isslo^ I^ri 



oe^ssi. 



ZIRN6IEBEL GIANT PANSIES. 



Owing to favorable weather, have been magni- 
ficent this season. Never befoie have we ob- 
tained such size and colors; and as usual, wher- 
ever exhibited, have eclipsed everything else, re- 
ceiving also the most flattering testimonials from 
the leading florists and seedsmen all over the 
country. 

New seed ready now of both the Giant Market 
and Giant Fancy in trade packets of 2.000 and 500 
seeds respectively at one dollar each, with practi- 
cal directions for growing pausies. 



PLANTS 

GIANT MARKET 
GIANT FANCY 



READY 



NOW: 

. S.5.G0 per 1000 
. 20,00 per 1000 



DENYS ZIRNGIEBEL, 

. . . NEEDHAM. MASS. 

jRoemer's ^upeib Prize Pansies. 

I Tlie tliR'st strain uf I'litisles In the World. 

t Introducer and Grower of all the leading 
J ' Novelties. 

!Catalot:uo free on iippllciitlon. 
FRED ROEMER, SEED GROWER, 
yiIEDLINHI'R(;, GEKMANV. 



Pansy* Seed. 

The tlKNNING?^ STKAIV of high ^rade Pansy 
Seed. New crop now ready. Saved with special care 
from only the very tlDest varieties and (warranted) 
flrst-clasB In every respect. 

THE JENNINGS XX STRAIN. 
The creara <»f Pansies. Grand colors mixed, pkt., 
150Useed.fi.UU: 1 oz *«.UU. 

The Jennings Strain, tinest mixed, pkt. $l.OC about 
25U0seed; 1 uz. $(;.00: ;iozs $1.5.00. No skim milk in this 
strain. iThey are just as good as I can make "emj. 
To my <^)ld patrons I would say they are a big improve- 
ment over last tieHson-inure variety and tlner colors 
The best strain for tlurlsts eltlier for winter bloom or 
spring sales; all large flowering. 

Black l)r Kaust. flneet pkt., 2i)00 seed, $1.00 

l-^nest Yellow, black eye .-... " ■■ 1.00 

I>ure White, tie best '• '• l.OU 

Victoria, bright red pkt. 1000 seed. l.OU 

All my own growth of IHUI. Half pkts. of any of the 
above 50c. Please send money orders or registered 
letter. Cash with order. Address 

E. B. JENNINGS. Wholesale Pansy Grower. 
Lock Box 254. SOUTUPOUT, CONN. 

Carl Schwanecke, 

OSCHERSLEBEN, GERMANY. 

Largest and oldest special cuhure of pan- 
sies; received premiums at all larue exhibi- 
tions, the last at Chicago in 1S9J; offers 
first-class pansy seed, especially Gassier, 
Trimardeaii and Bugnot, also all of the best 
older and newer kinds. 

Send 2 francs for Catalog'ne. 
Mentiou American Florist. 



PANSIES. . . 

Every Grower Claims the Best. 

I am williug to have mine tested alongside 
of any m the market. Over a thousand florists 
used them last season, were pleased with them 
and made money out of them. 

...^^Vi!,^° ®^P'- '^' *°<^ ^'^'^- 'st I will have a 
MILLION or more plants to sell. Thev can not 
be offered m competition with cheap grown 
seed, but quality considered, are remarkably 
cheap at the price. 
By Mail or Express, prepaid, 75c. per 100: by Express 
at your expense, $5.00 per 1000. Liberal dis- 
count will be allowed on large orders. 

An honest sample of the plants will be 
mailed you on receipt of len cents, and terms 
are absolutely cash in advance. 

ALBERT M. HERR, L. B. 496, Lancaster, Pa. 

PANSY SEED. 

NEW CROP NOW READY. Very fine mixture of 
large floweriug varieties and choice colors espe- 
cially selected lor florists' use. I oz. $3.00. ' 

NEW GIANT PRIZE PANSY, finest strain in the 
market. 1 oz. $5 00. 

Low prices on Lilium Harrisii, Longiflorum 
Roman Hyacinths, Lily ol the Valley, etc. 

Special low prices on Rustic Ba.skcts 

HERRMANN'S SEED STORE, 

473 EAST 34-TH Street, 

Near Long Island Kerry, NEW YORK. 



56 



The American Florist. 



Aug. J 6, 



Chicago to Atlantic City. 

It appearing that satisfactory connec- 
tions cannot be made at Philadelphia for 
Atlantic City on train leaving Chicago at 
3 p. m. it has been decided to take the 
train leaving at 11 a. m., Sunday, 
August 19. This train reaches Philadel- 
phia at 1:25 p. m. Monday and there are 
trains leaving Philadelphia for Atlantic 
Citv at 2 p. m., 3 p. m. and later up to 
5:40 p. m. The run to Atlantic City from 
Philadelphia takes 2y2 hours, so if the 2 
p. m. train is taken the party can be in 
Atlantic City at 4:30 p. m., in ample time 
for the various committee meetings Mon- 
day evening. As the last train for Atlan- 
tic City leaves at 5:40 p. m. and thetrain 
leaving Chicago at 3 p. m. doesnot reach 
Philadelphia till 7 p. m. next day, going 
by that train would necessitate staying 
over night in Philadelphia and taking an 
early morning train to Atlantic City, 
which would of course be very undesira- 
ble, hence the change. 

Those wishing to travel with the 
Chicago party will meet at the office of 
the American Florist, 322 Dearborn 
street, 3d fioor, between 9:00 and 10 a.m. 
Sunday, August 19, where the special 
rate tickets will be on saL'. The train 
leaves the Union Depot at 11 a.m. Berths 
may be reserved by addressing the chair- 
man of the Chicago Club'scommittee, Mr. 
G. L. Grant, 322 Dearborn street, 
Chicago. 



Boston to Atlantic City. 

The delegation from Boston to .Atlantic 
City will leave, via Fall River Line, on 
Sunday, August 19, at 7 p. m.,and return 
via same line on boat leaving New York 
on Saturday p. m., August 25. Tickets 
for this excursion can be procured of the 
undersigned at $11.25 for the round trip. 

Travel being very heavy at this time of 
the year a number of state rooms, at $1 
each, have been secured in advance, and 
will be assigned to applicants in order as 
received while they last. Earl y applica- 
tion is solicited, to the end that the great- 
est amount of comfort and pleasure may 
be secured for all. Address Wm. J. Stew- 
art, 67 Bromfield street, Boston, Mass. 

ROSE PLANTS. 

Per 100 Per 100 

Am. Beauty, 3-in J58.00 

Bridesmaid, " 8.00; 4-in., JSIO.OO 

K. A. Victoria ■' 8.00 " 10.00 

Mme. Testout " 8 00 

Mme. Hoste " 6.00 

La France, extra " 10.00 

The Bride, 3-in 6 00; 3>^-in., 8.00 

All fine, strong stock. 

BROWN & CANFIELD, Springfield, III. 

Mention American Florist. 

Fall Rose Plants. 

Fine large plants, from 4!4-inch pots, 
in all the standard varieties, $7.00 and 
S.S.OO per 100. 
REX BEGONIAS. 

Finest varieties, 3}^-in. pots, $4 per 100. 
THE NATIONAL PLANT CO., Dayton, Ohio. 

ROSES. ROSES. ROSES. 

SURPLUS STOCK CHEAP, consisting of Brides, 
Mermets, Meteor, Bon, Sal"rano, bouv. d'un Ami, 
Niphetos, Beauties and Perles. All first class 
stock from S and 4 in. pots. Price V) and 8" per 
100. Double White Primroses, ,S-in. pots, 80 per 
100; Adiantum Cuneatum, 85 per 100, 2;^-in. pots, 
etc , etc. Large assortment and low prices. Let 
us hear from you. HENBY SMITH, 

130 Monroe St., Grand KapIdH, Mleh. 



VAUGHAN'S 

INTERNATIONAL" Pansies. 

Put up, named and sold by us 
for th- past four years, from the 
best strains produced in Europe 
and America. 

It is generally admitted that we 
have had the iinest show of Pan- 
sies on the grounds of the World's 
Columbian E.xposition, and for 
these we received the only award 
lor mixed Pansies. 

No other firm is authorized to 
offer our Vaughan's International 
Mi.xture, and those using this 
name to sell other mixtures, are 
'imitators." The genuine can be 
had in our packages only. 

The new crop seed secured in 
Europe this season by one of our 
firm is now in our stores, and orders 
can be filled immediately from New 
York or Chicago. 
Trade pl<t. 50c: ' 8 oz. $1.50: 02. $10.00. 

Also 

VAUGHAN'S GIANT MIXTURE. J b oz. 60c; oz. $4.00 
TRIMARDEAU IMPROVED. ;< oz. 81 00; oz. $3.50 
CHICAGO PARKS BEDDING, oz. $1.00. 
Columbian, mixed, pkt. 1000 seeds, 50 cts. 

CYCLAMEN. Giant varieties, 60 seeds, 50 cts. 

PRIMULA. Vaughan's International, per pict. 250 seeds, 50 cts.; 1000 seeds, |1.25, 




CINERARIA. 



1-16 oz. $2.00. 



FORCING BULBS. 




WE AGAIN INVITE THE ATTENTION OF THE 
TRADE TO OUR FACILITIES FOR SUPPLYING 

ALL FLORIST'S BULBS IN SEASON. 
\ Our record for prompt delivery by special 
importation of each variety as it is ripened is 
admittedly a leading one. 

Please examine our Exhibit of Bulbs at 



I 

forcing Bulbs are now in store in New York and in Chicago. 



At lantic City. Our full supply of Romans, 
Hanisii, Freesias, Narcissus and such early 



DON'T BUT WITHOUT OUR FBICES. 



CROZY^S NEWEST CANNAS. 

We will show sixty kinds, including the twenty Crozy Seedlings exhibited 
at the World's Fair and under our control, six of which received World's 
Fair awards. 

B -'Sides these we have twenty-five or more seedlings grown from Hybrid- 
ized seed of the best named kinds. 

J. C. YAUGHAN, 



26 Barclay Street. 



p. O. Box 688. 



i8g4. 



The American Florist. 



57 



A GRAND NOVELTY. 






¥in 




-<^t 



.kr' 



^-^^'■' WoTlDEDPVL 

.J^iO¥ mm 



^'■'HT. 



■^&-''. 






■i-J^V'^i 



^:t^«Kt^^ 



li^^V-:' 



■^^ 



^^^v; 



(■/['■ 



sam. 'kr''5r- 






Hi 



ilmiii'^'' 



^ 



MogT QmmmdLt 



lATRODVCED 1/1 IXMAY TB^Rc. 

*"^Q0 Dlooms on one Shoor."" 

Copyrighted i8i,4, by EUwaiiger i: Barry. 

"The most beautiful hardy Rose of its kind introduced for many years."-Gar*.ers' Cbronide. London, England. 

likelvS^nml™^ri'"^^^w'?u^°^^^ >s "ot o"e of greater importance or 

likely to prove more valuable than 'Crimson Rambler.' "-Gnrdeners' Mngmine, London, England 

DESCRIPTIVE CIRCULAR AND HANDSOME COLORED PLATE FREE 

ELLWANGER & BARRY, 

MT, HOPE NURSERIES. «4th Year. leocliester, IV. "y. 



58 



The American Florist. 



Aug. i6^ 



Foreign Notes. 

At the horticultural examination of the 
Royal H Tticultural Society, held May 1, 
the list of candidates included many who 
were not gardeners, for example, a num- 
ber of teachers, both men and women, 
several clerks and mechanics, and one 
policeman! A good many women ap- 
peared among the candidates, the highest 
being eighth in the list. The questions of 
this* examination were chiefly relating to 
market gardening. 

Rhododendron Schlippenbachi is a 
Chinese variety recently introduced. It 
has something of the habit of R. sinensis 
(Azalea mollis) with large flowers, like 
Azalea indica. The flowers, open as an 
ordinary azalea, are three inches across, 
rosy lilac, spotted about the base with 
dark brown. There are often about six 
flowers in a cluster, making the plant 
very showy. It is a native of the wooded 
hills of Corea and Manchuria, and is a 
garden plant in Japan. 

Among novelties in sweet peas from 
Mr. Eckford are Salopian, an odd deep 
crimson veined with deep purple, and 
Countess of Po wis, brilliant rose carmine, 
very fragrant. These two varieties re- 
ceived certificates in London last month. 



We have received the "Botanical 
Guide to the Phipps Conservatories in 
Pittsburg and Allegheny City." It is a 
volume of 204 pages, freely illustrated, 
containing lists of the plants of different 
classes found in these conservatories. It 
is written in an interesting style, giving 
information regarding the different plants 
in a manner to interest the general 
public, for whose benefit itis designed. A. 
copious index of common and botanical 
names adds to its value; the only criti- 
cism to be offered is some laxness in the 
proofreading, resulting in errors in plant 
names. The account of the parks is very 
instructive, and the whole book is of 
more than local interest. 

Do YOU WANT the census statistics re- 
garding the florist, nursery and seed 
trades? You will find them in our trade 
directory and reference book lor 1894. 
Price $2.00. 

Do YOU WANT Mr. Scott's seasonable 
hints for the year in book form, so that 
you can refer readily to his suggestions 
for any week in the year? You will find 
them in this form in our trade directory 
'and reference book for 1894. Price $3.00. 



1.500 Meruiets, 3-in SI) 00 

200 Brides; 3 in 6 00 

600 Niphetos, 2^-in 4 00 

.500 Gontiers, 3-in 4 00 

100 Meteors, 3-in 5 00 

Good strong stock. 

POEHLMANN BROS., Morton Grove, III. 



ROSES! ROSES! 

For Immediate Planting. 

All the Leading Varieties 



irffC!ijXJi>inB-<3r T^Ei 



Brides and Mermefs, strong, healthy 

plants, from lyi-'inch pots, for winter 

llowering, $3 per 100; $25 per 1000. 

HIRAM E. WILSON, 

88 K. Main St., KOCIIKSSTKIJ, N. ^. 

R^Oa^-B^JS. Good stock. 

AM. BEAUTY PLANTS, 4-inch »70.00 

BRIDESMAIDS, BRIDES, METEORS, 
PERLES, MERMETS, all 4-inch 845.00 



Grand NEW One 



MRS. W. C. WHITNEY 

In 3 and 4 inch pots. Extra good strong plants to make 
room immediately. 25 per cent discount for cash. 



SUMMIT, NEW JERSEY. 



R oses for WMm F lowerin g. 

We still have fine stocks of the leading varieties, 

AMERICAN BEAUTY, 

KAISERIN AUGUSTA VICTORIA 

AND BRIDESMAID, 

strong plants, out of 3^^-inch pots, rc^dy for immediate 
planting, $12.00 per 100. 

METEOR, BRIDE, MERMET, MME. CUSIN, 
NIPHETOS, WOOTTON and PERLE, 

Strong plants, out of 3J^-inch pots, ready for immediate 
planting, $9.00 per 100. 




Silver Cup awarded us for Meteor Roses, exhibited 

at Madison Square Garden. IS'.iJ. fur best 25 

Bed Koses of any variety. 

Mention American Fionm 



F. R. PIERSON COMPANY, 

Tarrytown-on-Hudson, N. > 



SURPLUS ROSES! 

Gilt Edged Stock from 3yi inch pots. 

Meteor, Augusta Victoria, 

The Best Crimson $6.00 per 100 The Best White $6.00 per 100 

Florists desiring Roses for late planting will consult their best interest by 
giving this stock a trial. Terms cath with order. Address 

ROBERT SCOTT 8>2: SON, 

19th and Catherine Streets. PHILADELPHIA, Pa 



BRANT & NOE, 

Forest Glen, III. 



or 



L M. NOE, 

Mndiaon, N. J. 



lOOO HIEKMKTS, (illO NITHHTCS, 
lOOO r.HIDKS, 150 TESTOUT><. 

All Iroii] ■." .-imli standard pots. These are In the 
very be^t n[ condition and as large as a Kreat deal of 
the stock shipped from a-lnch pots. 

Per doz. 75c.; per 100 $5.0o; per 1000 $45.00. 
{^"Samples free to intending purchasers. 

NATHAN SMITH & SON. 



2Hi-lncli pots, Per 100 Per lOCO 

BBIDE J3.50 J22.5U 

MBRMKT 2.50 22.30 

lillNTlKR 2.60 22.60 

Slill'KliT. ., 2. SO 22..'j(l 

WlllTK LA FRANCE 2.76 24.00 

SUNSET. I'KRLB 2.SU 26.00 

And all other standard varlelleB.2>.i.. K^ and 4!^-lnch 
pots. Write for prices on what )on need. 

TEKMS CASH \\ ITIl OUDKIt. 

THE NATIONAI. PLANT CO., Dayton, O. 



Mermets, Cusins Wattevilles, Hoste, Meteor and 

La France, $.3.00 per 100. 
Strong American Beauties, $,').00 per ICO; 840.00 per 

1000. 500 at 1000 rates. 
*S-Special prices on quantity. Let me price your 

lists. Cash with order. 

West Forest Park, St. Louis, 310. 



MERMETS 2-lnch, $.1.60 per 100 

BRIDE!i 2-Inch, :f.60 

NIPHETOS 2-lnch. S.oO 

PERLES 2-lnch. 3.60 

ALBANY 2-inch, 3.60 

WOOTTONS 2-lnch. :).60 

LA FRANCE 2-lnch. 3.50 "CD 

p. O. Bo.\ 72. KANSAS CITY, MO. 



i8g4. 



The American Florist. 



59 



ROSES. 

Surplus stock, clean and healthy. 

Per 100 

1500 BRIDES, 4-inch |8 CO 

1000 BRIDES, 2^-inch 5 00 

250 MERMETS, 2"'i-inch 5 00 

500 BRIDESMAIDS, 3-inch 8 00 

200 WATTEVILLES, 4-inch 8 00 

JOSEPH HEACOCK, 

JENKINTOWN, PA. 

ROSES! 

3200 BRIDESMAIDS - - $5.00 

2000 BRIDES - - 4.00 

700 ALBANYS - 4,00 

All strong 3-inch slock. 

J. A. MERRIFIELD 

Assignee of J. T. ANTHONY, 

3425 Prairie Ave., GHIGflGO. 

SURPLUS STOCK ROSES. 

I have a few thousand Roses to close out cheap, 
for cash only. Stock clean and healthy. Bet- 
ter order quick they will not last long 
at these prices: 

MERMETS. 2M-inch acts 

BRIDES, 2H-lnch 2)^ cts 

WHITE LA KRANCR. 2K-lnch Sets 

PERLES. 2H;-lnch, strong 3H cts 

CHRISTINE DE NOUE, 2><-lnch Sets 

NIPHETOS. 2M-Ilich 2J^ctB 

METEORS, 2;.i-lnch Sets 

AM, BEAUTY, 2y-Inch 5 cts 

MME. TBSTOUT. 2l.(-inch ."i cts 

K, A, VICTORIA, 2^-nic]i J cts 

HAPLE HILL ROSE FARM, KOKOMO, IND. 

Mention American Florlat. 

I HAVE A FEW 

Thousand ROSES for winler blooming' 
of the following' varieties : 

MERMET, THE BRIDE, 

PERLE DES JARDINS, AMERICAN BEAUTY, 
BON SILENE, NIPHETOS, 

WATTEVILLE, METEOR, 

and WABAN. 

The above are from 35^-inch pots, good, clean, 
healthy stock, which I offer at 86.00 per 100; {J.5.00 
per lOdO. 

I also have a few thousand FERNS, as Adiantum 
cuneatum and Pteris serrulata, from 254-inch pots, 
at $3.00 per 100. 

JAMES HORAN, Bridgeport. Conn. 

Hybrid Perpetual Roses, 

Worked low on the Manettl Stock, offer the beat re- 
sults to the florlat, bluuiulng freely and giving plenty of 
cuttlnga for propagating quickly. Fine plants for sale 
by the lOU or lUuO. at low rates. 
Price Llsta to applicants. Address 

WILLIAM H. SPOONER, 

JAMAICA PLAIN, (Boston), MASS. 



Warranted first quality. Surplus stock from 
4-inch pots. Per 100 

PERLES $600 

MERMETS. . . 5 00 

BRIDES . 5 00 

PAPA GONTIER . , 5 00 

CASK WITH ORDER, 

JOHN WHITE, Waverly Place. Elizabeth. N. J. 
Mention American Klorlst, 



Strong^ 
Field 
Grown 



ROSES 



Better 
Than 
Imported 

15 ACRES OF HYBRID PERPETUAL, MOSS AND CLIMBING ROSES. 

Extra strong, bushy, well developed plants. No better 

Sure to please. 



in the world. 



General assortment of leading varieties, including following best forcing sorts: 

GENERAL JACQUEMINOT, MAGNA CHARTA, 

PAUL neyronT u I rich BRUNNER, 

MRS. 1. H. LAING. M. p. WILDER. 

PRINCE CAMILLE DE ROHAN. 

Special rates on early orders booked for coming Fall or Spring delivery. 

FULL ASSORTMENT HARDY PLANTS AND SHRUBS, BULBS, FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL 
TREES, SMALL FRUITS, GRAPE VINES, ETC. 

No trouble to show stock or quote prices. Catalogues and Price Lists free. 
40th YEAR. 29 GREENHOUSES. 1000 ACRES. 

THE STORRS & HARRISON CO.. 

PAINESVILLE3 OHIO. 



HEALTHY 



VIGOROUS 



LA FRANCE, MERMET, NIPHETOS, PAPA GONTIER, WATTEVILLE, BRIDE, CUSIN 

Strong Plants from 3-inch pots, $7.00 per 100. 

BRIDESMAID, PERLES, METEOR, SUNSET, TESTOUT, HOSTE, 

Strong from 3-incli pots, $8.00 per 100, 



HEALTHY 
PLANTS 



SWEETBRIER 
GRACE WILDER 
NEW JERSEY 
E. A. WOOD 
TIDAL WAVE 



PAPA GONTIER, from 3 1-2-inch pots, $10,00 per 100. 



STUART 
LAMBORN 
LIZZIE McGOWAN 
DAYBREAK 
PURDUE 



PURITAN 
UNCLE JOHN 
THOS, CARTLEDGE 
SPARTAN 
MRS. ELIZA REYNOLDS 



miCES OIsT jA.I=I=OIC.A.TIOIsr. 
SMILAX, Strong Plants. $2,50 per 100: $20.00 per 1000. Send for Price List, 



FIELD 
GROWN 



BLANCHE 

WM. SCOTT 

MRS. FISHER 

PORTIA 

B. K. BLISS 



WOOD BROTHERS 



Mention American Florist. 



nSHHILL, N. Y. 



Roses. Roses. Roses. 

Perle, Niphetos, Mermet, Bride, Victoria, Meteor, La France, Albany, Gontier, 

White La France, Soupert and Bridesmaid, 2 1-2 inch pots, 

^5.00; 3-inch pots, ^6,00 per hundred. 

AlViERICAN BEAUTY, 2 1-2 inch, ?6.00; 3-inch, ^8.00 per hundred. 

THIS STOCK IS WEI.T. (iKOWN ANU IN FINE CONDITION. 

ESTATE OF M. A. HUNT, Terre Haute, Ind. 



EADY FOR 
MMEDIATE 
PLANTING. 



40,000 FIRST QUALITY FORCING ROSES. ^> 

Fully eqiuil to those sent out the last two years, and perfectly healthy hi every respect. Only selected 
growth from flowering shoots used In propauatln,;. 
GKN. JACyUEMINOT, KAISEKIIS A. V. SOUV. DE WOOTTON, 

METEOR, ULRICH BRUNNEK, BRIDESMAID, 

3-Inch pots, $». 00 per 100. 4-lnch pots, JI2.00 perlOO. 

PERLES, SUNSETS, BON SILENE, MERMETS, BRIDES, 

SAFRANO, MME. HOSTE, 3-Inch pots. $T. 00 per 100. 4 Inch pots, f 10.00 per 100. 



100,000 



Roses, H. P. Roses, Rhododendrons, Azalea mollis, Clematis, Hy- 
drangeas (bushy and tree form), Aucuba, Buxus, Acer in sorts, 
Viburnum plicatum, Dutchman's Pipe, Magnolias, etc. 

NOW READY TO GIVE THE LOWEST OUOT.VTIONS. 

-THE HORTICUItURAL COMPANY, BOSKOOP, HOLLAND. 



A TVTT'TJ Tr* A "M" 'RT'ATT'PV testout, k. a. victoria, brides- 

J^i^M.It'DlXyj t^lM ,DXl,<l.UXX, MAID, BRIDE, MERMET, METEOR, 
PERLE, SUNSET, CUSIN, LA FRANCE, .'i and 4-inch pots, prime stock, shipped at special flo- 

>A^rite lor prices, including delivery to your E.\press office. A. 0, MdCbtAN, LdK6W00u, N.J. 



60 



The American Florist. 



Aug. i6^ 



Foreign Notes. 

Snow fell in the Alps July 15. 

A new and showy hybrid bertolonia is 
B. guttata var. Alfred Bleu, obtained from 
Van Houttei X rosea punctatissima. The 
leaves are deep bronzy green, ribbed and 
spotted with brilliant carmine. The orig- 
inator of this variety, M. Alfred Bleu, 
after whom it is named, is sending out a 
series of such hybrids, including some of 
great beauty and brilliancy of coloring. 

Sonerila Mrs. H. Walter is a hybrid ob- 
tained from orientalis X Hendersoni ele- 
gans. The leaves are large, ovate elliptic, 
olive green, thickly marked with round- 
ish silvery spots. It is very robust in 
habit and showy. 

A variegated form of Rubus japonicus 
has been recently introduced; it is similar 
in growth to the type, but the leaf is var- 
iously marked with white, or often entirely 
white with red ribs and petioles. It is a 
showy plant, the foliage suggesting a re- 
semblance to Vitis heterophylla. 

Cochlioda Noezliana is a handsome and 
distinct orchid recently introduced from 
Peru. In habit it is similar to an odon- 
toglossum; the scape is many-flowered, 
the color of the bloom being orange scar- 
let and very showy. The cochliodas, for- 
merly known as mesospinidiums, com- 
prise a small family of terrestrial or- 
chids, closely allied to odontoglossums. 

At the recent sale in London of the 
Pickering Lodge collection of orchids 
some of the prices realized were as fol- 
lows: Cattleya Mendeli var. Bluntii, 
$500; Sobralia xantholeuca alba, in 
flower, $220; Cattleya Gaskelliana alba, 
in flower, $190; C. crispum superbum, 
very fine, $260; Sobralia Lucasiana, a 
fine specimen, $230; several Odontoglos- 
sum vexillarium superbum, in flower, 
from $50 up; Dendrobium Statterianum, 
$100; Cypripedium Veitchii, $75. 



When writing our advertisers please 
use one of your printed business letter 
heads or enclose your business card. 



CALL AND SEE 

John Burton's 

PALMS 

While in Phiiadeipiiia. 



YOU MAY WANT SOME 
THIS WINTER. 



Take the train from lath and 
Market Street to Wyndmoor 
Station, Chestnut Hill. 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS 

stock phintH from fjill propauutlnK, Htron^,'. lieiiltUy 
plaiitM, (§> ryj cents. 

The Queen, Domination, Harry Baisley, 
Lincoln, Niveus, Craig Lippencott, 
Mrs. Robt. Craig. 
JOHN P. TONNER, Mont Clare, III. 




pLORISTS 



ATTENDING THE 



(CO NVENTION 



>^At ATLANTIC CITY. 

Should not fail to inspect our exhibit of 



F*la^ixt«s, ]Bxxll3«si9 E>to«, 



whicli represents the class of goods we send out. 

During the Convention we should be very pleased to receive from all Florists a 
personal inspection of our magnificent stock of Palms, Decorative Plants, Ferns, 
Foliage and Flowering Plants, Chrysanthemums, Hardy Herbaceous 
Plants, Seeds and Bulbs at our extensive Nurseries at 

SHORT HILLS, NEW JERSEY. 

Anyone, from a distance especially, after coming as far east as Atlantic City, should 
not miss this opportunity of seeing the best collection of Florists' stock in the country. 
All plants are clean and well grown, and in good, healthy condition. 

QUALITY, THE BEST . PRICES. THE LOWEST . 

Take Delaware, Lackawanna & Western R. R. from New York City, foot oi 
Christopher or Barclay Streets. 

UNITED STATES NURSERIES. Sluoa't Hills, JV. J. 

Paiiiis. Ferns and Foliage Plants. 

My stock is strong, clean and perfect; has been grown with great 

care, and will be sure to give satisfaction both to 

the grower and dealer. 

Parties coming to the Convention are invited to call and examine 

for themselves. Prices low. 

I am 30 minutes' ride from Broad Street depot, and 2 minutes' 

walk from station on the New York Division of 

the Penna. R. R. 

LEMUEL BALL, Wissinoming, Phila. 



ARECA LUTESCENS GENE^A^ruSEFUL PALM 

in conimerce. We have them in all sizes, and Prices to suit. See samples 
at the Trade Display in connection with ilie convention of the S. A. F. within the 
enclosure of the Bonnaffon Fence Exhibit. Look also for our samples of 
Swainsona, another sterling plant for the wide awake tlorist. 

rnU/IM inM^flAlE WVlVniHOOR station. PliUa .^t Ueaclln!; 
CUlVin LUnOUALt, K. U. froiiii;th\MnrkclSts. I'llll.V. 



Siebrecht & Wadley's 

COWVEHTION EXHIBIT . 

Samples 
Only . 

Palms, Dracaenas, Orchids, Ferns. 

-— NEW PLANTS. 

A. Farleyense Fern. 

S.OOO strong, healthy plants, 4-incli, 
|40 per 100; |350 per lOOO. 

I'. O, Box 72. KANSAS CITT, MO. 



NOVELTY. 

New, Semi-Double, Large 
Flowering 

WHITE MARGUERITE 

(ClLrysantlieuiuiu frutesoeiiH.) 

Size of flowers 4 inches in diameter, petals 
clear white, center yellow. 

PRICES FOR PLANTS FROM 2'r-INCH POTS, 
$2.50 PER DOZEN; $20 PER 100. 

Ready September I. Cash with order. 

GRflLLtRT & CO., Florists, 

COLMA, San Mateo Co.. CALIFORNIA. 

CUT SMILAX. 

I'erlUII 

f) 10 « f t. Btrlnus flO.OO 

STBONU SMILA.X PLANTS l.tU 

(JIANT AT.YSsrM, 2i«-lncli iwitij I. SO 

ROdTKIl I'lT'l'lNCS ..f GKUANU'.MS, etc . 1.00 
Semi l"i iirlcf Hat ol vtlaiita ami rOdted cultln;;s. 
WlKlLESAl.K Cl'l' FLOWERS. 

DENVER CITY NURSERIES, 
1'. O. ll".\2lll .SO. DENVEK, COLO. 

K. A. HAKXSEI.MAX, I'KUF. 



1 



i8g4- 



The American Florist. 



61 






Extends to the members of 
the S. A. F. a 

CORDIAL INVITATION 



H><k«JHUI 



to call on him at 



49tli and Market Streets, PHILADELPHIA, PA., 



Before or After the 




and 



lI>eooi:^«LtiAro 



Areca lutescens, Kentia Belmoreana, K. Forsteriana, Latania borbonica, Phoenix rupicola, P. 
reclinata and Cocos Weddeliana, are the best and most popular Palms. 1 have many thousands, in all 
sizes, besides some other kinds not quite so well known perhaps, yet good. Also other Decorative plants such 
as Ficus elastica, Pandanus utilis, P. Veitchii, Araucaria excelsa, Aspidistra, etc., etc. All are in 
elegant condition, and all are for sale at moderate prices. 1 guarantee perfect plants and good packing. 

SEPTEMBER AND OCTOBER ARE THE BEST MONTHS TO BUY IN . 

Members of the S. A. F. are Invited to inspect my stock of sample plants on Exhibit during the coming Con- 
vention, and are most cordially invited to visit my establishment en route to or from Atlantic City. 



HOLMESBURG, Philadelphia, PA. 



PRIMROSES. 

Fine stocky plants, uow ready for 3-iuch pots 

FLOWERS 

large, all friuged; brilliaut colors. 

FIFTEEN SORTS. 

Price, ror the single sorts . . . per 100. $ 2.50 

perlOOO, 20.00 

" double " , . per 100, 5.00 

Extra plants with every order to help pay express. 

HENRY S. RUPP & SONS, 

SHIKEMAN,STOWN, I'A. 

Always mention the American Flo- 
rist when writing to advertisers. 



DECORATIVE PLANTS. 

IT WILL PAY Florists attending the Convention, who use Decorative Plants to visit 
my nursery. I have a fine collection of Araucarias, Arecas, Latanias, Ficus, 
Kentias, Cocos, Cycas, Dracaenas, and many other useful and rare varieties, 
all in the best condition, and grown especially for decorative purposes. 

1204. CHESTNUT . STREET, . PHILADELPHIA. 

Mention American Florist. 



62 



The American Florist, 



Aug. i6^ 



St. Louis. 

The regular meeting of the Florists' 
Club occurred on the 9th, and was well 
attended, the election of officers for the 
ensuing year being the principal business 
to be transacted. 

Mr. Wells of the B. & 0. road was 
present and was sorry to say that the B. 
& 0. could make no rate for the club as a 
body as they had hoped to have done, 
owing to the matter having become 
known in railroad circles, and the rate 
formerly promised was declared off. 

The election of officers resulted in the 
re-election of AlexWaldbart for president, 
Frank Fillmore for vice-president, Emil 
Schray for secretary and John Young for 
treasurer. The board of trustees consists 
of C. A. Kuehn, J. J. Benecke and R. F. 
Tesson. The secretary's report showed 
the club to be in a healthy condition, hav- 
ing an active membership of 60; the 
treasurer's report was verv gratifying, 
a balance on hand of $259 40. 

After the election of officers a paper 
was read by Mr. Wors on the question of 
"wholesaling cut flowers" which caused 
considerable discussion. 

Before the close of the meeting all mem- 
bers that would attend the convention 
provided a reduced rate were secured were 
asked to make the fact known and Mr. 
Waldbart ran up a list of more than fif- 
teen possible attendants with which he 
will go to work and try and make rates. 
Those going will in all probability leave 
here on the morning of the 19th, going 
by way of Cincinnati, Washington and 
Philadelphia over the B. & 

A special prize was announced by Mr. 
Weber, to be offered at the chrysanthe- 
mum show for carnations and another 
one hinted at for roses. 

Mr. Harry Young and family left for 
the east on the 6th, expecting to spend 
some time on the coast before the open- 
ing at Atlantic City and were joined later 
in the week by Mr. Chas. Young and 
wife. 

Everything is very quiet, convention 
talk being about the only thing heard. 

R. F. T, 

"sSiToiST 

MKM) L'AL.MS. lii-alUiy, srnwii willjout illl.v slilil- 
uhmt or I'xtni liciit. just the size people mostlx 
buy. Hill bi' worth twice their cost in a short time. 
C'ociis Wediieliuiiii. from S'/.-inoh pots, 15 to 18 
inches hi^ih, 20 cents each. Latunia Borbonicji. 
Kentias, Coryphas, Phoenix, and Seaforthia 
Kle(.'ans. the latter 2 to 3 feet high, the former IS 
to -^4 inches, all in".5-inch pots. 30 to40 cents e,icli. 
I''crns and Dracaenas in great variety. Otnln-ii'' 
Orance, with or without fruit. Gardenias, with 
buds. Violets and a large variety of beddiiiK Ijas- 
kot. and ornamental plants, hardy and sreenhouse 
Climbers, perednials, herbaceous plnntsaiid orna- 
tiiental hardy Grasses, the Ijcst v;irii'tv of m-er- 
liliiomiuK Roses, etc. Send a Iriiil lisl of what \nii 
want and izet lowest itrici'^, 

IV. STUDER. 



936 F Street, 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



PATENTQ 

I Trade-Marks, Copyrights, Etc. ^^ ■ 

1 GHflNDLEE & MflGflULEy,vI/ 

Atlantic Building, WASHINQTOIT, D. C. 

MAMMOTH DOKMANT (SMILAX, K.IK) per 

hundred. $.%.tXI for the lot, cash. 

W. R. L. DWYER. New Petersburg. H ighland Co., 0. 

When writing to any of the advertisers 
on this page please mention the Americaw 
Florist. 




(SHEKWOOD H.1.LI. XuiaERY Co.) 



No. 427-9 Sansome Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

CALIFORNIA -GROWN 
SWEET PEAS 

And other Flower Seeds. 

PACIFIC COAST 
TREE SEEDS JAPANESE 

And Native Bulbs. LILY RULRS 

And other Oriental Specialties. 

ONION SEED, PEAS, BEANS, ETC. 

Write for special contract prices, 




Siebrecht&Wadley, 

ROSE BILL NURSERIES, 

NEW ROGHELLE, N. Y. 

Palms, 

ORCHIDS, 

Roses, 

FRESH DRACAENA CANES NOW READY. 

Mention American Florist. 

ORCHIDS OUR SPECIALTY. 

The Best and Largest Stock in the World. 
New & Rare Foliage &. Flowering Plants. 

A grrand selection for Slove, Greenhouse and Con- 
servatory 

SANDER, St. Albans, England. 

Our Mr. A. Dlramock will be pleased to Interview 
buyers or reply to any communication addressed to 
him at 2(J5 Greenwich St., New York City 

Plants from last fall; these have a foundation and 
will begin to run strong at once. 82.50 per 100; 
820.00 per 1000. 

CLEMATIS for Fall Delivery. 

special prices at wholesale, on application. 
Splendid .'-lock and assortment. 

F. A. BAIiLUR, Bloomington, 111. 

Srxtiilazs::, 



.'l-iiicli pots. . 
1^-inch pots. . 



per lOO $1,00; per 1000 $30.00 
2.00; " 20.00 



ASPARAGUS TENUISSIMUS. 

)'.-iuch pots per doz, 7.5c; per 100 J(i. 

iinch pots " 40c; " 3. 

NATHAN SMITH & SON, Adrian, Mich 




^^ I A 

2 ^^ Q 



t 

M 





1 



PALMS. 



150,000 of all the leading va- 
rieties. 

FERNS. 

50,000 of leading varieties. 

Address gEORQE WITTBOLD, 

1708 N. Halsted St., CHICAGO. 

E.G. HILL & CO., 

wtioi6sai6Fiorisi.§ 

RICHMOND. INDIANA. 

Mention the American Florist when 
writing to advertisers on this page. 



i8g4- 



The American Florist. 



63 




CHEAP 



^liyli^v^^,^^ 



^__9(B@(3S)(59(a6)(M>595g\ 



DOVES 



First quality $11.00 per doz. 

Second quality 10.00 " 

Third quality 9.00 " 

Write for catalogue containing 
15 tloral desijcis with loves. 



^ S. J. RUSSELL, 



8r50 Montgomery St., 
JERSEY CITY, N. J. 




■2;3)roQ(3Qg9(35.(j2)^SS<S'PS'.<29<^.'2S'2S)<S9.'SS'.?S'.'SS'<5S.'S 



Wm. K. Harris 

extends a hearty invitation to the members 
of the S. A. F. and their friends, to call on 
him, on their way to or from Atlantic City, 
and inspect his new place of over sixty 
thousand square feet of glass; over nine 
thousand feet of it being polished plate. 
The only greenhouses in the world glazed 
with this expensive glass. 

A well appointed place, with everything 
adapted to the profitable production of our 
stock in trade, is not the only thing of in- 
terest here. 

The clean, healthy growth of our plants 
is the admiration of many, especially the 
Rubbers. They are a wonder to all who 
have seen them ! 1 have five houses full of 
this popular decorative plant, of all shapes 
and sizes, from a few inches to ten feet high, 
many of them making natural breaks — that 
is a plant producing many side shoots with- 
out being topped. This is a mystery to 
many, why mine should do so, and others 
not. The way to learn is to be taught, 
so come and see nature at work, 
r Plants, like people, are often stunted and 
sickly in the mansion, while the hovel con- 
tains health and vigor. In my plant palaces, 
health universally abounds, as we allow no 
e.xcess of high stimulants among our occu- 
pants. They must all live upon plain fare, 
and take plenty of pure, fresh air. 

Take train at Broad Street Station Penn. 
R. R. for 49th Street Station. It is only ten 
minutes' ride to 49th Street Station, and ten 
minutes' walk to my place from 49th Street 
Station. 

Trains leave Broad Street Station as fol- 
lows: 6:49— 8:46— 10:46 a. m. 12:13—1:28 
—2:18—3:15—3:47—4:33—5:16 p. m. 

On Friday, August 24th and Saturday, 
August 25th, I will have a conveyance at 
49th Street Station at the arrival of each 
train to convey my guests over. After in- 
spection of my place, I will drive all who 
wish to see my friend Robert Craig. It is 
about a mile from here. 

Wm K. Harris. 

55th & Springfield Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 




.-■v-v-v'v-v-v^ 



Gardiner's Celebrated* 

English 

Mushroom Spawn. 

Fresh and Ee'.iable. 

S7 lii-T 100 lbs. 

Special price on larger 

quantitiea. 

Gardiner & Co., '/ 



Begonia Semperflorens Rosea. 

THE EVER-BLOOMING SORT. 

Is uiirivMlled as tlie best bedding plant, tfie best wintei- llowerinti, the best market and best selling 
plant we cnltivate to-day. We have hnndreds of it planted in full sun light, and nothing can surpass 
them in attrautiveness and beauty. It sells the whole year round and is preferred here to the best Aza- 
leas. We have sold many hundred in Auburn (6-in. pots), at 50 ets. to $1.00 each, and the demand is 
constantl.>- increasing. Ynu will lind this charming plant to give the greatest satisfaction and pleasure 
to your customers and greater profits by far to yoursi^lf than any plant now in cultivation, 

1 offer extra strong well rooted cuttings, and strong hush \- well Ijranched estabiislu'd plants, ready 
to move upwards, at the following reduced rates, till SEPTEMBER 30 ONLY and GUARANTEE the safe ar- 
rival of plants. Extra plants added, per E.xpress, cash with the ORDER. 

Rooted cuttings, line plants per 1000, ifS5 00 

:i'.j-inch pots, splendid branched plants 

2^.1 extra heavy plants, ready for 5 to 6 pots 

4-in. lie:iv\ ln-:inclied plants ready for 6 to 7-in. pots , 

.^-in. strong, blooming plants 

i;-in. ■■ ■■ ... 

7-in. splendid specimen, I foot diameter each, 

On receipt of ONE DOIiIiAB I will Express Sample of the 6 first named sizes. 

J. :RXvrvK^SOIV, IMoral JVvirsseries, 

Warranted the Genuine EVER-BLOOMING SPECIES. A-UBURN, N. Y. 





Ox press. 


Mil 


1. 


Kx press. Mail. 




Do 


een. 




Hundred. 


a.5 00 


$0 50 


IfO 


75 


m 00 $3 .50 


4.5 00 


1 00 


1 


2ft 


5 00 6 00 


50 00 


1 50 






6 00 


80 00 


2 00 

2 50 

3 00 






8 00 
13 00 
16 00 


50 


4 50 






40 00 



]'hiladelj»hia, ] 



ROSES#CHRYSANTHEMUMS 

PERLES, 4-inch, strong, $7.00 per 100 
MERMETS, 4-in. " 7.00 

The ai'uve are stronti plants, fmra 4-lncl! pots, 
not thrown !n 3-incli and sold for 4-inch. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS: perioo 

Golden Wedding and Good Gracious, 

2!--2-inch. stronj; plants $5.00 

Other choice cut flower varieties (a 3.00 

FERNS, Adiantum cuneatutn and other 
good varieties for cutting, from 
4-inch pots, ready to shift (V? 10,00 

REX BEGONIAS, 3-inch pots (a' 5 00 

EVENDEN BROS., 

Williamsport, Pa. 

YOUNG PALMS FOR FLORISTS' USE 

CHEAP TO M.\KE ROOM. 



Size pots. Height Per 100 

.... 3-lnch 12 to 1.5 In. *a) 0(1 

3-lnch 12 to 30 In. 20.00-25.00 

' 1.S to 24 In. 

IS to 24 In. 
8 to 10 In, 
8 to 10 In. 



Kentia Belmoreana 
Forsterlana, 

Areoa Bauerl :H-lnch 

Seaforthia elegans... 3-tnch 

l*lioenl.x recllnata :i-lnch 

Panflanus utllls 2^a-ln. 

All stuck Is In healthy condition and readv "for 

shifting f)n, ;>0 at 100 rates, 

MENDENHALL GREENHOUSES, Minneapolis. Minn. 



25.00 
20.00 
20.00 
15.00 



SMILAX. 



SMILAX. 



Very strong, clean, healthy plants from 

2>^-inch pots, $2.50 per ICO; 

120.00 per 1000. 

Address J. G. BURROW, Fishkill, N. Y. 




New Catalogue (No. 4) 
containing over 1.000 Orna- 
mental Cuts for Florist's use. 
such as envelopes, letter 
heads, bill-heads, cards, 
advers., floral designs, etc., 
at from 30c. and upwards. 
Price of Catalogue 25 cts. 
(deducted from SI order). 

A. BLANC, 

Engraver for Florists, 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Plants at Half Price. 

Fancy Caiadium, 2^-inch pots, at S^iS.OO per 1000. 

Cape- Jasmine, 2J4.inch pols, at S2o 00 per 1000. 

CyperusalteruifoIia,4-in pots. 7c; 5- in 9c; (i-in 12c. 

Anthcri'um vittatum var., 4-inch pots, 7c.; 5- 
inch, Jlc-; 6-iuch pots, 12c. 

Phr>'niuni, large plants, very cheap. 

Viuca var. and Ampelopsis Veitcnii, 2j4-inch. 
S-' 00 ptr 100. 

Large Pahns very cheap. Please address 
F. J. ULBRICHT. florist. P. O. box r)55, Annislon. Ala 

CELERY PLANTS 

WHITE PLUME, GIANT PASCAL, and 

GOLDEN SELF BLANCHING. 
Kield-grown plants, 81.25 per 1000. 

The New PINK PLUME, transplanted plants, $3.50 
per 1000, Cash with order. 
Sample mailed free. 

C. M. GROSSMAN, Wolcottville, Ind. 

Please mention the American Florist 
every time you write to an advertiser. 



64 



The American Florist. 



Aug. i6, 



Toronto. 

Since writing my last notes there has 
been no rain, and outdoor vegetation is 
getting a thirsty look about it. Small 
places can be kept green with the hose, 
but in the case of parks and public squares 
it is no easy matter, and in some cases an 
impossibility. Among the florists I hear 
of nothing actually suffering, but still a 
shower would be most acceptable. 

The annual picnic of the Gardeners' and 
Florists' Association, which was this year 
held at Victoria Park, on Wednesday, 
August 8, was quite a success, and though 
the excitement was at no time calculated 
to seriously injure ordinary people's 
nerves a very pleasant afternoon and 
evening was spent. Cricket, bowls and 
quoits occupied most of the afternoon, 
then there were children's races with lots 
of good toys for prizes, and in the evening 
the boys and girls who are expert on the 
light fantastic toe indulged themselves to 
their heart's content. Many took the 
electric cars home, but those who waited 
and took the boat back had the extra en- 
joyment of songs, music and the beautiful 
lake air. The weather though at one 
time threatening was most beautiful. 
Altogether the picnic was a great im- 
provement on last year's, and still there 
is room for further improvement; experi- 
ence in the management of these affairs is 
not gained in a day. 

The final prize list for the chrysanthe- 
mum show will probably be published 
early in September; the committee wants 
to make sure of as much money as possi- 
ble before finally deciding on the amount 
to be given as prizes. Two influential 
citizens are giving a good deal of their 
time towards getting a big subscription 
list, and it is likely that about $750 will 
be given, which is $200 more than last 
year. The committee seems to be fully 
alive to the necessity of doing more to- 
wards the decoration of the hall and the 
more artistic staging of the exhibits, so 
that the prospects for a really good show 
this year are bright. E. 



Wholesale Commission Florists. 

There w ill be a meeting of the whole- 
sale commission florists at Atlantic City 
for the purpose of organization immedi- 
ately after the afternoon session of the 
first day of the Convention. 

BOSTON FLORIST LETTER CO., 

13 Green Street, BOSTON, MASS. 
Address all correspondence to 1 Music Hall Place. 

Mamfactnre THE BEST LETTERS IN THE MARKET, 

sizes l>4-lnch and 2-lnch, J2.0O per lUO. Patent 

fastener with each letter. 

With orders for 500 letters we give away a nicely 

stained and varnished box. See cut In next 

week's American Florist. 

Our letter is handled by all the wholesalers In Boston . 

Agents: A. Rolker & Sons, New York; Marschuetz 
& Co.. 26 N. 4th Street, Philadelphia. Pa.; F. B. Mc- 
Allister, 22 l)ey St., N. Y.; Ernst Kaufmann & Co.. ll:i 
N. 4th St.. Philadelphia. Pa.; U. Bayersdorfer & Co., 
Philadelphia, Pa.; A. D. Perry & Co.. m Warren St.. 
Syracuse, N. Y.; A. C. Kendal, 116 Ontario St.. Cleve- 
land, O.; E. H. Hunt, T9 Lake St., Chlcauo; Wisconsin 
Flower ExchanKe, IHl Mason St.. Mllkwaukee, Wis.; 
H. Bunderbruch, 4th and Walnut Sts.. Cincinnati, O : 
T. W. Wood Si Sons, Hth and Marshall Sts. Richmond. 
Va.; Jas. Vlck's Sons, Rochester, N. Y.; Dan'l B. Ixjhk. 
BuUalo, N. Y.; C. A. Kuehn, St. UjuIb, Mo.; C. K. 
Huntlnf^ton k Co.. Indianapolis. Ind ; Z. I)e l-'oresl 
Kly & Co., 1024 Market St., Philadelphia. Pa.; Portland 
Seed Co., 171 "Jnd St., Portland, Orepon; A. Hermian. 
416 K.;Mth St., New York; (Jeo. A. Sutherland. i.7 lirom- 
flcld St . Boston; Welch Bros.. No. lA Beacon St.. Bos- 
ton; N. F. .Mc('arthy&Co., 1 Music Hall Place, Boston. 

.1. A. Simmers, ToronUi. Ont., AKent for Canada. 



World's 
Fair 



MEDSL AWARDED. 

ERNST KAUFMANN & CO., 
Wholesale FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

No. 1 1 3 North 4tli Street, 
Send for catalogue. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



BEFORE OR AFTER. 

On your way to or from the CONVENTION 

don't fail to call at our spacious 

stores and see our 

GRAND DISPLAY 

OF 

FLORISTS' SUPPLIES. 

For various reasons we make NO exhibit at the Convention, 
but will have a unique display of NOVELTIES at our stores, to 
whicli we most cordially invite you all, and where you can see 
all the latest Importations. We do not ask you to buy, but to 
stroll leisurely through our spacious stores, where obliging 
employes will be at your disposal. Don't fa,il to visit us. 

Yours Respectfully, 

MARSCHUETZ & CO. 

23 & 25 N. 4th St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Thousands of persons throug'hout America have the past thirteen years used 




TO X>ESTE,0"5r 

Currant and Cabbage Worms, Potato Bugs, Cucumber Fleas, Rose Lice, 
and Slugs, Lice on Cattle, Fowls, Etc. 

There is scarce a place of size but will be 
found some merchant who sells Slug Shot, 
and usually in connection with the seed trade. 
The Great Seed Dealers are the chief distribut- 
ors of Slug Shot, in all these years no case 
of harm from its use is known. Slug Shot 
stands to-day the most successful general in- 
secticide in the world for use on Vegetables, 
Fruits or Flowers. It is put up in various 
sized packages to suit all wants. We prepare 
all sorts of Insecticides and Fungicides for 
spraying or in powder. 

THRIP JUICE-For scale, Insects and Caterpillars. Used largely in Florida. 
SOLUTION OF COPPER— For Rot, Blight, Etc. 

GRAPE DUST -Powder for destroying Mildew on Roses and Gooseberries. 
SCROFULARIA— Routs Carpet Beetles. 

f you have trouble with Insects or Blights, write and we will try to help you. Send a 
postal for pamphlet to B. HAMMOND, TishkiU-on Hudson, N. Y. 

Sold by the Seed Dealers of America. 

FRflNGIS' METAL STEMMING rOINTS. 

Latest Device for Stemming Cut Plowers 
without Toothpicks and Wire. 

Will keep set pieces fresh longer, as flower 
stem is entered deep in the moist moss. Man- 
ufactured by the Novelty Point Works in 5 
j-izes, from ji to 1/2 inch in diameter. 




In riBc 



of K300 X^oixita 



SIZK No. 1 fiO cts. SIZK No. 3 «0 vtg. 

SIZE No. !i 70 <-ts. SIZK No. 4 . 90 cts. 

P..VTK.NTEN .U'l.Y lltl,,lS«. ''"'^^'^ '*"■ 5 (larRest). box of 850 points.. .33 cts. 

For sale by all leading Wholesale Seedsmen and Dealers in Floiists' Supplies. Samples of all five 
sizes for trial sent by mail, postpaid, on receipt of 10 cents. Address 

HERMANN ROLKER, Room 3, 218 Fulton Street, NEW YORK. 
<;knki!Ai. .\<;knt i'ok a^ikkica .vm) kihotk. 



When writing to any of the adver- 
tisers on this page please mention the 
American Florist. 



Please mention the American Flo- 
rist every time you write any of the 
advertisers on this page. 



1^94- 



The American Florist. 



65 



For Greenhouses, 



■-^ m f 1^ T rT> ± or (rreennoust 
1^ /A I rV^ I Conservatories 
Iil.lill Or any other 



OR PUTTY. 



any 
Structure. 



No Paint can be made too durable for the greenhouse 
none too handsome for the homestead. 
We make Paints BECAXTSE WE KITOW HOW, and have 
facilities to do it. We ship to all Railroad Stations and Boat 
I,andings without regard to distance, and will make prices laid 
down at your depot at fian^res which will pay you to patronize 
a cash market. 



HAMMOND'S PAINT AND SLUG SHOT WORKS, Fishkill-on-Hudson, N. Y. 



Some men who have used our Paint. If they be at this Convention, quiz them. 

WOOD BROS Fishkill, N. Y. 

J. G. BURROWS Fishkill, N. Y. 

HON. JOHN HOAG Sing Sing, N. Y. 

W. G. SALTFORD Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

JACOB MENDEL Nyack, N. Y. 

CHARLES ZUNDEL Haverstraw, N. Y. 

J. B. ZETTLER Canton, Ohio. 

SPY HILL CONSERVATORIES Fishkill Landing, N. Y. 

THOS. JONES Wappingers Falls, N. Y. 

BELDING FLORAL CO Middletown, N. Y. 

E- HAENTZE Fond du Lac, Wis. 

L. L. LOWDON Pittsfield, Mass. 

J. HENDERSON CO Flushing, N. Y. 

MYERS BROS Altoona, Pa. 

F. COPIN New Durham, N. J. 

H. M. BRADLEY Derby, Conn. 

J. H. IVES Danbury, Conn. 

H. H. RITTER Dayton, Ohio. 

GEORGE SALTFORD Rhinebeck, N. Y. 

W. C. LESTER Millbrook, N. Y. 

GEO. SCHDNEMAN Blue Point, N. Y. 

JOHN WHITE EUzabeth, N. T. 

G. PASTOR ...... Huntington, lud. 

AND SO ON. 



SEE HERE 



BROTHER 



FLORIST ! 



Aren't you tired golnp through your houses two or 
three times a day year after year and lifting yourven- 
tllatlnK Bash one at a time and propplnB them up with 
sticks or pot«. with a chance of having sash blown ofT 
anil lirc.kiMi (.'lass to pay lor 1 II you are 




We have gotjust the tlilug J'uu need, the NEWEST 
and BEST thing out. "The New Departure" for 
about half the cost of the old style, iend for 
Descriptive Catalogue to 

J. D. GftRMODY, Evansviile, Ind. 



USE 




Letters, Emblems 
and free sample. 



W.C.KRICK'S 

Florists' Letters, Etc. 

Medal Awarded at the 

World's Fair. 
And Highest Award 

Wherever Exhibited. 

These J..etters and 
Heslnns are made of 
the best Immortelles, 
wired on wood or meUil 
frames, having holes 
drilled In them to In- 
sert t o o t h p 1 c k a. by 
which they are fast- 
ened In the deslcn. 
(;lve thematrial. You 
will tliid these goods to 
be >tii|ierior to any In 
tlie nijirket. 

'Mnch Letters. $2.50 

per KM). 

(•ostage. 15 cts. per 100. 

For other styles of 
and Deslffns. send for catalogue 



W.C.KRICK, 1287 Broadway, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

For sale by all Florists' Supply Dealers. 

When writing to any of the adver- 
tisers on this page please mention the 
American Florist. 



Victory ! Victory ! Victory ! 



The only Certiricate of Merit 
awarded for ventilating ap- 
paratus at the St. Louis 
Convention was to the 

POPULAR STANDARD 
VENTILATING MACHINE 

The florist's friend in 
working and prices. 



N0.2 



No repairs for 5 years; 

no chains to break, 

as is the result with 

others. 
Opens Sash uniform on 

100 foot houses. A 

new device. 
Send lor Catalogue and Es- 
timates. 




E. HIPPARD, YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO. 

EXAMINE THE 

Ormsliy • Ventilating • System 

AT THE CONVENTION. 

E. A. ORMSBY, Melrose, Mass. 



"H.\KD TIMES" PALM COLLKCTION.S. 

Kor cash wltb order we «lve 17 8 and 4-ln. Palma for 
*:i )re{-'Hlar price $41. and \\\ for $.i (regular price fS). 
These comprise the besc varieties. Including I^ataolas 
and Kentlas. 

WILLIAM.S Si .SONS CO., Katavla, III. 



When writing to any of the adver- 
tisers on this page please mention the 
American Florist. 



ee 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 16^ 



Cincinnati. 

Hot and dry. Aug. 9 the thermometer 
stood at 97° in the shade and was inclined 
to go higher. Quite a number of our 
growers are busy hauling water and try- 
ing to keep their plants alive. Store 
trade has been quite good for the past 
week, several prominent people having 
died. The growers have been able to sell 
all the flowers they had. 

Karl Brown of Livingston's Sons, Co- 
lumbus, was in the city Tuesday. 

I notice that on August 8 the George 
H. Mellen Company of Springfield, O., 
was incorporated under the laws of Ohio: 
Seeds and plants; capital stock $25,000; 
incorporators, George H. Mellen, David 
N. Elder, Isaac W. Rodgers, JohnH. Rod- 
gers and Caleb Tuttle. Tuis company 
has bought the "Innisfallen Green- 
houses," formerly owned by Chas. A. 
Reeser. The above incorporators are all 
good business men and well fixed finan- 
cially. We wish them success. 

August 9 the writer had the pleasure of 
visiting Richmond, Ind. Mr. E. G. Hill 
had just returned from the wilds of Mich- 
igan and is much improved from the trip. 
Says he had lots of sport fishing, and his 
health certainly shows it. His chrysan- 
themums are doing nicely and if nothing 
happens they will have two orthree flow- 
ers in Richmond this fall. G. R. Gause & 
Co. are busy shifting and getting ready 
for fall trade. Beach & Co. were quite 
busy with funeral work, and I noticed 
some extra choice asters in one of their 
houses. 

I am sorry to say that the railway 
companies, after making us rates to At- 
lantic City, have withdrawn same and 
now say it will be impossible to do better 
than mileage, which is 2 cents per mile. 
This will considerably reduce our part v. 

G.' 



Reply to F. P. 

1. The leaves of purple beech have evi- 
dently been eaten by some beetle or grass- 
hopper, probably the latter. 

2. Nothing outside of handpicking can 
be done to remove the mealy bugs from a 
grapery at this season. Wait until the 
vine rods are dormant and then give a 
thorough cleaning. 

3. To prevent thegrapes fromcracking 
withhold water from the roots and see to 
your drainage. 



ATUNTIC CITY, N, J, 

United States Hotel. 

SPECIAL RATE TO FlORISTS 

$2.50 a day (two in a room) $'i single. 

FIRST-CLASS APPOINTMENTS 
AND CAFE. 

ENGAGIi: ROOMS IN AUVANCK. 

JOHN S. DAVIS. Prop. 



ratentc.l .liuie !;<>, 1K!)4. 

STRAPS 

wrr ir 

Unfolding Tight-Fasteners. 
FRANK L. MOORE, Chatham, N. J. 



Mention American Kldrlat 



^HE> on:A.iM:F»roiv 




AUTOMATIC VENTILATOR. 

The cheapest, easiest to operate and by far the best machine in the market. No 
shafting used in its construction. Don't buy a Ventilator until you have seen our 
illustrated descriptive cir:ular, which will be sent you free, giving prices, etc. Also 
Champion Soil Pulverizer and Sifter. Exhibited at Florist Convention. 



Address .A.. C^- WCDI_F^ cSt 13FRCZ)., 



o. 



WISHING lU INlRODUGt {."an^SwH 

a good, thing it is, we offer sample crates f. o. b. Detroit, 
which contain*^ 51 5-inch, 24 6-inch, 21 7-inch, 20 8-inch, 
16 lOiuch and 15 12 inch, for 87.-i0 cash with order. This 
is the piice we sell by the 1000. 

Of the many testimonials that we receive we call your 
attention to the communications of two of thebest known 
expert Florists in this country: 

Detroit, July 19, '94. 

fjETKOIT FLOWER POT CO. 

SiKsi— We wish to say that we have used the Pans (as 
made by you) for the past seven years, and tintl them very 
usetul for many thlnt:s, such as bulb forcing, window and 
lable decorations, fern growing, and mlglit say we find them 
almost indispensable around greenhouses and store. We 
t-Tow a great many single stem "mums" in them— one in a 
5-lnch pan up to a dozen to fifteen In a 12-inch pan, and can- 
not recommend them too highly to florists. 

Kespt yours, JNO. BRKITMEYER <S: SONS. 

Bl-FFALO. N. Y.. July 17. '94. 
DETROIT FLOWKK POT CO.. SiRS:— Will mall you my order for Pans in a few days. Don't be afraid to 
make up a good stock of them, for when the florists find out what a good thing they are for bulbs, ferns, seed 
puna, etc . you wilt have a grand rush for them. I use them for forcing all bulbs, and find the8 and lU-lnch 
grand for Tulips. Romans, Narcissus, Daffodils. The 5. f. and 7-inch for Ferns, Freeslas and Valley, and any of 
the sizes are good for table or window decorations. I also find them a grand thing for growing "Mums" to 
single stem flowers; an s. 10 or 12-inch pan with from 10 to '20 plants is a fine thing. 

Respectfully yours, WM. SCOTT. 

Price List of Standard Flower Pots sent on application. 

DETROIT FLOWER POT MANUFACTORY, Howard, waM & TMrteentuts , Detroit, Mich. 




The Annual Meeting 

—OF THE— 

Florists' Hail Association 

will be held atthe Convention Hall, Atlantic 
City, on Thursday afternoon, Aug. 23d, 1,S94. 
The headquarters of the Secretary while 
at Atlantic City will be at Convention Hall, 
where information concerning Hail Insur- 
ance will be cheerfully given. 

JOHN G. I:SI.X:R, Sec'y. 

Of \ QQ KOCK BOTTOM PRICES Send for 
injiloO. Estimate. Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

fl.XtXJX9 O-Xj^VSS CO., 
65 Warren St., and 46, 48 & 60 College Place, 

When writing to any of the advertisers 
on this page please mention the American 
Florist. 



BE UP TO DATE, 

And get the BEST. This is it. 




The Champion Ventilating Apparatus. 

CHEAP. DURABLE. EFFICIENT. 

Circular tells tlie wtiole storj'. It Is free. 

AMERICAN ROAD MACHINE CO., 

KiSNlVETT .SQUARE, FA. 

Mention American Klorlst. 



TO 



"D A r*r*r% per lO Ibs aOc; 25 lbs il.OU; 

.Diili Vl/W .50 lbs $1.,50; 100 lbs$2.,50. 

T^TTCSir" Kxtra fine, per 100 lbs. 85. 

■tJ U w X ■ «SrSample Free. 

Vaughan's Seed Store, m. Chicago, 



i8g4- 



The American Florist. 



67 



JOHN C. MONINGER CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Cypress = Building = Material 




FOR 




GREENHOUSES, ^ 

CLEAR 

ROSEHOUSESA'^?„?f 
^^ GONSERVflTORlES. 



\ SASH 
\ BARS 



We carry constantly a large and complete stock of 



ANY 
SHAPE £ SIZE. 



CIvKAR LOUISIANA CYPRBSS LUMBKR 

AND CAN FILL ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY. 

297 to 307 Hawthorne Avenue, CHICAGO, ILL. 



Sei-ica fox- Illt.xstr£»te«JL CtT^t-tiltJtst^ie-. 



LITTLE'S ANTIPEST. 

A 

Valuable Discovery of the 19ih Century. 

SILVER MEDAL AWARDED 

BT THE • 

CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR OF 1890. 

This preparation Is a sure destroyer ot 
the Scale, Wooly Aphis and Insect 

Pests of any and all descriptions. It may 
be as freely used in the conservatory, garden 
and greenhouse as in the orchard or vine- 
yard. It is non-poisonous and harmless to 
vegetation when diluted and used according 
to directions. It mixes instantly with cold 
water in any proportion. It is Safe, Sure 
and Cheap. No fruit grower or florist 
should be without it. 
Send for Circulars and Price Ziist. 

R. W. CARMAN, General Agent, 
291 AMITY Street, 
FLUSHINO, Queens, Co., N. T. 

J. N. Struck & Bro. 

Manufacturers ot 

• CYPRESS • 



2SM 






BONNAFFOI DETACHABLE STEEL FENCE. 

Please examine this fence at the 

CONVENTION EXHIBITION, 
Atlantic City. 

The Neatest, Cheapest, Most Durable 
fence for Farms, Gardens, Lawns, etc. 



mm 



^ 



^-^K||lJ^I |,/J^j1 |l^K 



\mm 



rvfD-^l 



mm 



MlM 








It 



LOUISVILLE. KY. 

When wrltltiK mention the American Florist. 




Mention Amerlcun Florist. 



GflTflLOGUE PRINTING. 
ELEGTROTYPING. 

Done with expert ability for Florists, 

Nurserymen, Seedsmen. Write to 

J. Horace McFarland Co. 

. . . HARRISBURG, VA 

When writing mention the A5IEH1CAX FLORIST. 



68 



The American Florist. 



Aug. i6^ 



Baltimore. 

A most unparalleled drouth is burning 
up out-door plants and destroying crops 
in this locality, makingthe gardener's life 
a burden of watering and syringing, and 
with all his efibrts, leaving him neither 
the velvety grass nor the brilliant flowers 
that are generally to be had with very 
little exertion. The market men are a 
cheery lot and a walk among them is 
good for the blues, as the writer found 
last Saturday at Lexington market. 
"Give me seventy-five cents and 1 
won't unload" said one. "I won't 
take less than five dollars for my 
chance" said another, and with chat 
and banter the awnings went up and really 
nice plants of asters, geraniums, begonias, 
ficus, cyperus and palms were set out to 
catch dimes of the passer by. It is a 
pleasure to see as good plants oifered in 
such a season as are to be seen now in 
our markets. 

One of our Israelitish cash bargain 
merchants has taken permanently to 
handling plants it appears, as he is still 
offering fern pans filled along with fifty 
dollar bicycles, ten cenf candy and three 
cent dry goods. 

The prospect of a large attendance of 
the club at Atlantic City is not very en- 
couragingjust now, probably many will 
make up their minds at the last moment 
and go. 

Mr. Hy. Wiedey is putting up a small 
greenhouse adjoining that built last year 
on the York road. 

Messrs. Samuel Feast &Sons are build- 
ing two roses houses each 100x20. 

Brackenridge & Co. have secured Mr. 
Jno. C. Lewis, for several years past with 
R. Scott & Sons, Philadelphia,, as man- 
ager for their "Rosebanks" place. M. 



r Ore enhousc ^ 




Standard Flower Pots. 

10 per cent, oti for cash with order. Special dis- 
count on lariie orders. We carry a large 
Block on hand of f;rood strong pots. 

PRICE LIST OF STANDARD FLOWER POTS. 

IWnch pots, per 1000 $22,110 

7 '• " :«.oo 

8 •• " 
SI 

10 " per 100 

11 



)M-lnch pots, per lOUO » S.OO 

2 ■' ■■ 3.26 
2« " '• 3.60 
iSi, •■ '• ■f.OO 

3 " " 6.00 
TAi " " 7.26 

4 " •• 11.00 

5 " " 13. SO 



60.00 
76.00 
10.00 
15.00 
20.00 
40.00 
75.00 



Address HILFINGER BROS. POTTERY, 

.... FORT EDWARD, N. Y. 

August Bolker & Sons. 13H & 1.38 W. 34tli St., New York 
City, New York Ajfents. 




TroolaPudding" 

Lexington, Ky., May 29, 1894. 
I^OCKLAND LUMBER CO., 

Gentlemen: — The last house for -which I ordered inaterial is com" 
pleted. Allow me to thauk you for the prompt manner in which 
you have always filled my orders and the good material you always 
send. I have been dealing with your firm tor the past ten years and 
have never had a complaint to enter, as you are always prompt and 
the material is Al. Respectfully, W. S. BELL. 



GUTTER MaTERiaL, RIE)GE5, SaSH, ETC. 
The finest CLEAR CYPRESS used. 

For circulars and estiixiates ADDRESS 

L06KLf\ND LUMBER GO. 

IL,ocl«:la.n<i, O. 



«« 



Standard" Flower Pots. 



As manufactured by us have carried oflf highest honors wherever shown and 
have stood the best test. They are used in all the leading floral establishmenta 
in the United States. For prices address 

The Whilldin Potterv Companv, 

BRANCH WAREHOUSES: 713, 715. 7^7 & 7^9 Whafton St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Randolph Ave. and Union St.» Jersey City, N. J. 
Jacl£8on Ave. and Pearson St., Lon^ Island City, L. I. 

STANDARD FLOWER POTS 

Every user of Flower Pots should correspond with us before 
purchasing elsewhere, our facilities are unequalled. 

A. H. HEWS & CO., N. Cambridge, Mass. 

Announcement to Florists. 

We desire to announce the dissolution of the firtnof Sipfle Dopffel & Co., andto introduce to the 
trade its successor. The Syracuse Pottery Co., which will be under the management of William Dopffel 
and Conrad Breitschwerth. The business will be conducted as heretofore, except on a larger scale to 
meet the growing demand for our goods. We have accordingly enlarged our plant and capacity, and 
with unsurpassed facilities are now prepared to fill the largest order on short notice. Our latest im- 
proved machines are turning out the best and most serviceable flower pots in the market, and assuring 
you of our intention to lead in further improvements we solicit a continuance of your patronage in the 
belief that we can supply just what is needed at a price and in a manner satisfactory to all. 
Send for price list anci samples and we know you will give us an order. 

OtM=MCH5« 

403 North Salina Street, SYRACUSE, N. Y 



SYRACUSE POTTERY CO. 



STANDARD FLOWER POTS. 

OLD RELIABLE MAKE OF 

Write for Catalogue and Price List. 

PITTSBURGH CLAY MFG. CO. New Brighton, Pa. 

STANDARD FLOWER POTS. 

If you are going to the Convention please examing our Flower 

Pots while there. To those who are not going we would 

simply say, "send in your order for large pots early." 

THE PARMENTER MAN'FG CO., 

STANDARD FLOWER POTS. 

OAK HILL POTTERY GO,, New Brighton, Pa, 

(Forin<Tl.v D. C. SCOFIKI.K & CO.) 

The same machinery, clay and workmen. The same smooth, 

porous, evenly burnt and well packed pots. Orders filled 

promptly. Write for prices. 



i8g4. 



The American Florist. 



69 




HOT-AIR 



WATER 

For Your 

CREEN HOUSE, 

ROSE HOUSE, 

NURSERY, 

Conservatory, Lawn, ' 
House,Carden, Stock 
orany other purpose. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue 

OF THE 

DELAMATER-RIDERANoPyiyiPII^G 
DeLAMATER-ERICSSON r«p|«p 

PUMPING ENGINE. 
ENGINE. 

Their operation ia so sinif-le and 
Eafe that a child can run them They 
TviU pump water from shallow 
streams or any k.ud of well. They 
can be arranged for any kind of fuel. 

Capacity 1.500 to 30.000 gallons 
of water a day, according to size. 

The De Lamater Iron Works, 

87 South Fifth Avenue. 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Kroeschell Bros. Co. 

Greenhouse % Boiler, 

41 to 55 Erie St., CHICAGO. 





Bnlt. r-^ iTiiul.'of the best of material, ehell. firebox 
eheet'' hkI li. it(tn ut steel, water space all arouncl 
(front, sides and back), wnt** for Information. 

IMPROVED GLAZING. 




GASSER'S PATENT ZINC JOINTS for but- 
ting plass makes greenhouses air and water tlRht; also 
prevents Blldlng and breakatre from frost. Does not 
cost as much to heat a house elazed with the joints, 
thereby njivlni^ enough In fuel to more than pay the 
additional cost of glazing. Tlie leading florists of the 
country are using them. Write for circulars with full 
particulars and price list. 

J. M, GASSBR, rLORIST, 

Euclid Avenue, CLEVELANH. O. 




Evans' Improved GttflLLENGE 
YenlllatinQ flpDaratus. 

Write for Illustrated Cataloj^e. 

QUAKER CITY MACHINE WORKS. Richmond. Ind. 

Send orders for . . . 
CLEAR CYPRESS 

Greenhouse Material 

from bottom of grutter up. 

Correspondence solicited. Estimates cheerfully 
furnished. 

LYMAN FELHEIM, ERIE, PA. 

Please mention the American Florist 
every time vou write to an advertiser. 



Greenhouse Pipe and Fittings. 




Large quantities of our Pipe are in use in Green- 
houses throughout the West, to any of which we 
refer as to its excellent quality. 

Pipe can be easily put together by any one, very 
little instruction being needed. 

GET THE BEST. 

Hot-Water Heating, in its Economy and Superi 
ority, will repay in a few seasons its cost. 
Mention American Florist. 

L. WOLFF MFG. CO., 93 to 117 W. Lake Street, CHICAGO. 

^VRTTE FOR H,I.USTKATED CTKCITLAK. 





Gurneu 



Hot Water Heaters 
# Steam Boilers. 



Gurney Double Crown Hot Water Heater. 



UNEXCELLED FOR GREENHOUSE REQUIREMENTS. 

Send for Greenhouse Catalogue. 
\K\ 163 Franklin Street (Cor. Congress). 

^^' BOSTON, MASS. 

"/ c..,rT,xT., ( Johnson & Co.. 71John St.. New York and vicinity. 
/ A^^J^o \ J. C. V. TUACHSEL. 24li Arch St.. Phlla. and vicinity. 
' AGENCIEb ^ ^ ^ GRIFFING lltON Cc. 34 Dearborn St., Chicago 
and Western States. 



H. M. HOOKER COMPANY, 

57 and 59 W, Randolph Street, CHICAGO. 

NfliijRflk Gas Mffi fi uflss. 

FOR GREENHOUSES . 




FOR WATER, AIR, STEAM, ACIDts 
OILS, LIQUORS, GAS, SUCTION, 

And for any and every purpose for which a hose 
can be applied. 
Sizes, ^-inch to 42 inches diameter. 
The making, vending or use of any Serviceable 
Armored Wire Bound Hose not of our manufac- 
ture is an infringement on one or more of our 



ARMQBEO 



eEBMn STEEL DALVWU2ED? ^ 

Patents. The rights secured to us render each Individual dealeror user responsible for such unlawful 
use with all the consequences thereof. For prices and discounts address WATERBURY RUBBER CO, 
Sole Mt'rs and Owners of all the Sphincter Grip A rmored Hose Patents, 49 Warren Street, New lO'X 
.1. C. VAUGHAN, Agent. CHICAGO. 

GREENHOUSE BOILERS. 

\A^e have in stock boilers new and second-hand, suitable 
for heating Greenhouses. Prices Low. 

143 &I145 N. Third Street, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Mention American Florist. 



HAIL 



LOCK THE DOOR BEFORE 
THE HORSE IS STOLEN 
DO IT NOW, 
JOHN G. ESLER, Sec'y. F. H. A.. Saddle River. N. J 



X3. IX. XlO^EIXll'S, 

159 & 161 South Fifth Ave.. New Tork. 

NATURAL GAS MADE GLASS, 

for RoBe HouseH* Conservatorlest etc.» etc. 



TO 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 16^ 



Index to Advtrtisers. 



Adv. rates, etc 48 

American Boiler Co 7U 

American Road Ma- 
chine Co 66 

Baker Bros 6861) 

Ball Chas D 61 

Ball Lemuel BO 

BallerF A ..63 

Bayersdorfer H & Co 

second cover page 

Benedict Geo H 62 

BergerUH&Co 61 

Blanc A lio 

BonsallJosE 48 

Boston Letter Co U 

BragueLB 52 

Brant&Noe 68 

Brown & Canfield 56 

Brown Peter 46 

Bunting Sam'lJ 44 

Burns & Raynor 45 49 

Burr Oaks Nursery — 52 

Burrow J G 63 

Burton .Tohn 60 

Carman U W 67 

Carmody J D 66 

Chadbom Kennedy MJg 

Co third cover page 

Chandlee & Macauley. -62 

Chase Benj "0 

Ch'go Folding Box Co. .49 

Clark Bros 51 

Coles WW 59 

Corbrey & McKellar 4S 

Cottage Gardens The.. .43 
Cox Seed & Plant Co... 51 

Crabb& Hunter 43 70 

Craig Robt 6167 

Deamud J B & Co 49 

De Lamater Iron Wks. .69 
Dover City Nurseries. . .60 
Detroit Flower Pot 

Mnfry CO 

Dillon J L 59 

Dorner Fred & Son 43 

DreerH A 41 53 64 

Dwyer WR L 62 

Elletson J 63 

Elliott WH 48 

Elliott Wm & Sons 61 

Ellison Wm 49 

Bllwanger & Barry .. 67 
Ely Z De Forest & Co.. 61 

Evenden Bros 63 

Faust & Bro 63 

Felhelm Lyman 69 

Fisher* AIrd 43 

Gardiner John & Co. 53 63 

Gasser J M 69 

Gonzalez F & Co 50 

Graham Hugh, 61 

Grallert & Co 60 

Grossman CM 63 

Gumey Heater Co . .69 

Hall Ass'n 66 69 

Hammond Ben] 64 66 

Hancock & Son 43 

Harris WmK 63 

Hart .lames i^t 

Hait M A 44 

HartfordHE 48 

Heaeock Jos 59 

Herr Albert M 56 

Hermann's SeedStore5355 

Hews AH & Co tiS 

Hllflnger Bros <8 

HillEG&Co 62 

Hlppard B 42 65 

Hltchings&Co 70 

Hooker H .M Co 69 

Horan Edw C 49 

Horan James 59 

Horticultural Co The.. .59 

HuiseboschBros 51 

HuntBH 49 

HuntM A Estate .59 

Hunter ►'rank D 44 49 

James RH 51 

Jennings E B 5.5 

JoOBten C H 65 

Kaufmann Ernst & Co. .64 

Kelsev Harlan P 52 

Kennlcolt Bros Co 49 

Koffman E 44 

Kramer I N & Son 54 

Krick WC 65 

Kroeschell Bros Co 69 

Kuehn C A 49 

Lampert J J 50 



Lau Paul F& Co 43 

Lockland Lumber Co.. .68 

Long Dan'l B 48 

Lonsdale Edwin 43 *MJ 

Lord & Bumham Co.. ..70 
Lovegrove k Qo . . .69 

McCarthy N F & Co 49 

McFarland J H 4S 

McFarland J H Co 67 

Mac Bean A S 59 

Manda W A 65 

ManzJ &Co 70 

Marschuetz & Co ..tU 

May Jno N 43 58 

Menrienhall Greenho'8.63 

MerrifleldJA 69 

Michel Pit & Bulb Co. .62 

Mlchell Henry i<- 43 

Mlllang Bros 46 49 

MonlngerJnoC 67 68 

Moore Frank L t»6 

Munn LR 42 

Nanz & Neuner 52 

Nason J L » Co 43 

National Plant Co. ..66 .58 
Nlies Centre Floral Co. .49 
MtterhouseMrsS J.. ..42 

Oak Hill Pottery Co i» 

Oasis Nursery Co 64 

Ormsby E A 65 

Parmenter Mfg Co 63 

PennockCJ. . 43 

Pennock Sam'l S 48 

Peters John J 60 

Plerson F R Co 68 and 

last cover page 

Pitcher* .Manda 60 

Pittsburg Clay MfgCo.. 68 

Poelhmann Bros 58 

QuakerCity Mc hW'ks. .69 

Randall AL 49 

Heed Glass Co 66 

Reed & Keller 67 

Rein berg Bros 48 49 

Rhotert August 48 

RichwagenP B 43 

Roberts DH 69 

Koehrs Ttieo 49 

Roemer Fred 66 

Rolker A & Sons 60 

Holker Herman 64 

RuppHS&Son 61 

Rupp J F 43 

KussellS J (« 

Sander&Co 62 

Schneider Fred 43 .50 

Schwake Cluis 60 

Schwanecke Carl 56 

Scollav Jno A 70 

Scott Robert & Son. ...68 

Shelmire WR 43 

Sheridan WF 47 49 

Siebreeht & Wadley.6U 62 
Situations, wants, etc.. 42 

Smith Henry 66 

Smith Nath &Son... 

46 50 63 64 J 

Spoouer Wm H 
Storrs &. Harrison Co 
Strebv S O.. 
Struck J N * Bro 

Studer N 

Sunderbruch H L 
Sunset Seed 4, PI t Co 
Sutherland Geo A 
Syracuse Pottery Co 
Teas B Y. . . . 
Teason R F.. 
Tonner John P 
Trlcker Wm V Co 
Uibriciit F J. 
United States Hotel 
Vaughan J C 48 5b 6t 



Waterbury Rubber Co 
Weathereds Sons T W 
Weeber & Don 
Welch Bros 
Whilldln Pot Co 
White John. 
Williams & Sons Co 
Wilson HE.. 
Wisconsin Flower E\ 
Wittbold Geo 
Wolf A (.1 & Bro 
Wolff LMlg Co 
Wood Bros.. 
Young John. 
Young Thos Jr 
Zimglebei D 




183 /AONROE .5TRECT- 
■•• CHICAGO- - ■ 



Crabb & Hunter, 

Florists & Fuel Oil Plant Contractors, 

Also Dealers in OIL BURNERS, and Agents for 
Snell's Hydraulic System of using Oil for fuel 
purposes. No odor , 3.n(\ ^ to J4 cheaper than coal. 

509 Madison Ave., GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

BSfSend for Circular. . . . 



HITCHINGS & CO. 

IBstabllsIiecl SO "renx-s. 

Horticultural Architects and Builders 

AND LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF 

GREENHOUSE HEATING^VENTILATING APPARATUS 




Conservatories, Greenhouses. Palm Houses, Etc , erected complete witli 

our patent Iron Frame Construction. Plans and Estimates of 

cost and illuslraled catalogues sent on application. 

^ 233 Mercer Street, NEW YORK. 

LORD & BURNHAM CO. 

Horticultural Architects and Builders, 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING ENGINEERS. 

ty Plans and estimates furnished on application 




I ii^tst ijtulders of Greenhouse stiuttures ^i\ liijjhest K\\ inls \t AVorld's Fair. 
. . . SEND FOUR CENTS POSTAGE FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. , . . 

LORD & BURHHUM Cfl„ IrvlilElon-oii-Hiiilson, N. Y. 

&^a_ GREENHOUSE HEATING 




"ADVANCE" (Trade Mark.) 
For Hot Water. 



Is a branch of our business ^ve have 
given very close study for a good many 
years, and can assure any one intending 
to employ Hot Water or Steam that we 
have the most modern system. 

WKITK FOK CATAI.OGCK. 

18 TYPES. 174 SIZES. 

ADAPTED TO ALL KINDS OF FUEL. 

J^mer/ca/2 toiler Company 

boston: newyork: Chicago: Portland, ore. 

195 Ft. Hill Sar. 94 Centre St. 84 Lake St. 127 Sixth St. 



THOS. W. WEATHERED'S SONS, 

iisrcom'OE.A.'XEX). 

Honiculiural flrcHiiecis and Hot Water Engineers 

Send for Catalogue, enclosijis 4 cents in stamps. 

JVo. S^-a Oanal St., I«EJW ^X-ORIC OIT'ST. 



SUPERIOR 

WOOD LABELS, 

FOR TREES AND PLANTS 

Promptly ftimiRlKMl I>y 

BENJ. CHASE, Derry, N. H. 

Don't fail to examine Exhibit at Atlantic City. 




GREENHOUSE HEATING 

AND VENTILATING, 

Superior Hot Water Boilers 
JOHN A. SCOLLAY, 

74 & 76 Myrtle Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
-WrSend for Catalogue. 




Mmsrica is 


"the Prow of the I/essel; there maij be mare onmfnrt /Jmidships, but we are the Rrst to touch Unknown Seas," 


Vol. X. 


CHICAGO AND NEW YORK, AUGUST 25, 1894. No. 325 



finsii Likw^mmm ^'mm^ 



Copyright 1894. by American Florist Company. 
Entered as Second-Class Mail Matter. 

Published every Thursday by 

The American Florist Compait?. 

323 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 



Subscription, $1.00 a year. 



To Europe, $2.00. 



Address all communications to 

AMERICAN FLORIST COMPANY. 

P. O. Drairer 164, CHICAGO. 

Eastern OfSce : 67 Bromfleld St.. ISoston. 

This paper Is a member of the Associated Trade 
Press and the Chicago Trade Press Association. 



CONTENTS 

The Atlantic City convention 73 

— Prtsideot's address 73 

— Secretary's report 74 

Edwin Lonsdale (portrait) 75 

Some requirements for the elevation of our 

business 75 

Comparative colors and their relation to flowers 7G 
Cut flowers other than roses, carnations and 

chrysanthemums 7S 

Best method of growing roses 78 

House of Brides (illus) ... ... 79 

Orchids from a commercial point of view. . . . 80 

Aquatics 81 

Successful violet culture 83 

Profitable winter blooming plants 83 

Fertilizers and their application 84 

General view of greenhouses (illus) 85 

Classification and inspection of plants 86 

Trade exhibition 86 

American Rose Society 87 

National Chrysanthemum Society 87 

Boston and New York to Atlantic City ... 87 

Convention echoes 87 

The bowling contest 88 

Chrysanthemums— Notes 88 

Carnations— Notes 88 

Orchids— Three gems 89 

Chicago 89 

Toronto 89 

St. Paul 90 

Obituary 90 

Cleveland 91 

Coming exhibitions 92 

Seed trade 94 

Loudon, Ont 96 

Boston 98 

Worcester, Mass 100 

Buflfalo 102 



The Atlantic City convention will be 
foinid pretty well covered by our reports 
in this issue, though reports of the enter- 
tainments of Friday are unavoidably left 
initil next week. It is safe to say our 
tenth anniversary saw one of the most 
interesting and instructive meetings we 
have yet experienced, and everything 
points to a long and prosperous career 
for our national society. 

MiLLiJROOK, N. Y.— A chrysanthemum 
show will be held here November 6-7. 
There will be exhibits of fruits, fJowei's 
and vegetables, in addition to the chrys- 
anthemums. 

Do YOU want a list of the leading cem- 
etery superintendents? You will find 
such a list in our new trade directory and 
reference book. 



The Atlantic City Convention. 

The opening session of the tenth annual 
convention was peculiarh' auspicious. It 
was an ideal morning, and the delegates, 
most of whom had arrived on the pre- 
vious daj', thoroughly refreshed by the 
bracing sea air, were in the best of spirits 
and ready to enter with zest into the ex- 
ercises before them. The hall was beau- 
tifullj' decorated with bunting and plants, 
and was well fiDed when at 10 a. m. 
President Lonsdale of the Florists' Club of 
Philadelphia mounted the platform and 
called the meeting to order, and presented 
Rev. C. C. Stewart of Easton, Pa., who 
offered a short prayer. Mr. Lonsdale 
then introduced Hon. F. P. Story, Mayor 
of Atlantic City, by whom the visitors 
were cordially welcomed. The maj'or ex- 
pressed the pleasure of the local authori- 
ties in e-xtending the freedom of the city 
to the representatives of a profession 
which was universalh' respected and ap- 
preciated. He hoped that all his hearers 
would be so well pleased with their visit 
that they would wish after going home 
to visit the place again. He mentioned, 
as an evidence of the orderly and exem- 
plary character of the city, the fact that 
while the number of its inhabitants on 
the previous Sunday had exceeded 200,000 
not a single arrest had been made by the 
comparatively diminutive police force of 
sixtj'. The mayor reiterated his welcome, 
and expressed the hope that genial skies 
and I'efreshing breezes would contribute 
to the enjoyment of the citj^'s guests. 

Mr. Wm. Scott of BufJalo made an ap- 
propriate response on behalf of the con- 
vention. He alluded to the wondrous 
growth and superior attractions of At- 
lantic City. Although the average sum- 
mer population was reported at 160,000 
the speaker said he had not heard of a 
single instance of disorder in this great 
seaside communit_v during the twenty- 
four hours since his arrival, nor had he 
yet discovered the presence of a single 
policeman. He complimented the mayor 
bj' suggesting that that official might 
reasonably be assumed to embody in his 
own personality the jiersuasive power 
and force of a hundred policemen. Eulo- 
gizing New Jersey as the banner state in 
the union in floriculture Mr. Scott ex- 
plained that within ten years that state 
had produced more roses, carnations, 
violets, and other flowers than all the 
rest of the .\merican continent. Up to a 
recent date it had contained the largest 
and most renowned floricultural estab- 
lishment. He then reviewed the ten years 
history of the S. A. F., with its annual 
meetings in the leading cities, and con- 
gratulated his hearers that they had found 
the ideal city for a convention in the sum- 
mer season. To the Philadelphia florists 
he said the S. A. F. was indebted for the 
pleasant meeting now being enjoyed. 
That city of loving brotherhood, not sat- 
isfied with the hospitality it had extended 



on the occasion of the second annual con- 
vention, which was held there, had re- 
peatedly insisted that the florists should 
again become their guests. He thought 
that Philadelphia was desirous of pla3'ing 
the host permanently. Concluding with 
expressing the thanks of the visitors for 
the mayor's welcome, he said his associ- 
ates w ould utilize to the utmost the op- 
portunities of recreation afforded by the 
freedom of the city now accorded. 

President .\nthony then read his address 
as follows: 

President Anthony's Address. 

Ladies and Gentleman: The year 
which has passed since our last meeting 
has been one of great depression in all 
lines of trade. The florist's business has 
felt the depression in trade, and has re- 
ceived its first check in its onward prog- 
ress. Let us hope the check is but tem- 
porary. 

In view of the fact of the dull times it 
affords me great pleasure to see so many 
members of the Society of American Flo- 
rists present at this meeting. Coming as 
they do from all parts of this country it 
augurs well for the future meetings of the 
society when an attendence of this size 
can be had in times like the present. 

The progress that has been made in 
ornamental horticulture in the short space 
of ten years since this society was organ- 
ized is truly marvelous. A comparison 
of the chrysanthemum show of last year 
with those of ten years ago will demon- 
strate the remarkable improvement that 
has been made in the cultivation of show 
flowers. The development of the chrys- 
anthemum has surpassed the expectation 
of the most enthusiastic cultivator of ten 
years ago. Though the material progress 
of these shows has been thus remarkable 
it is not more so than has been the in- 
crease in their numbers. Only a few years 
ago flower shows were held in less than a 
half dozen of our large cities. There are 
very few towns now of anyimportancein 
which a more or less pretentious flower 
show is not held. 

That the improvement of carnations 
has been nearly as great of the chrysan- 
themum everyone will admit who has 
seen the splendid display of that flower 
at the meetings of the Carnation Society. 
The great improvement in carnations 
that has been made in the last few years 
has been almost entirely by .American 
cultivators. The carnation as grown in 
this country differs so materially from 
those grown in Europe that those pro- 
duced here might be called carnations of 
American type. 

While the carnation and chrysanthe- 
mum growers have been making these 
gigantic strides towards the ideal chrys- 
anthemum and carnation, what have the 
rose growers of this country done to im 
prove that flower? It is true that w 



74 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 2S, 



have greatly improved our methods of 
cultivation of the rose for the production 
of bloom, and are enabled to producethem 
in large quantities andof a betterquality, 
leaving the production of varieties almost 
entirely to growers in other countries, 
where the climate is as different from ours 
as our methods of cultivation and uses to 
which we put the rose are different from 
those of the European growers. The 
result is that vast sums are paid every 
year for new roses, very few of which are 
ever heard of after the first trial. Let me 
ask the question, why can wenotproduce 
our own varieties of roses as we do car- 
nations and chrysanthemums? It is true 
that it takes a longer time to produce 
results with roses than with eithercarna- 
■tions or chrysanthemums, but would not 
the results when attained be worth the 
cost? This seems to me to be the most 
promising field for some enterprising rose 
grower. I believe the time will soon come 
when we shall have a class of roses of 
American origin especially suited to our 
climate and requirements. 

We had fondly hoped that the bill 
which is before congress, granting this 
society a national charter, would have 
passed before now. It is a matter of 
prime importance that a charter be pro- 
cured, and it is very desirable that we 
have a national charter, but if one should 
not be granted before this congress ad- 
journs I would recommend that a charter 
be secured from the District of Columbia 
or some one of the states. The Society of 
American Florists has been a homeless 
wanderer for ten years. The time has 
nowcomewhen we should secure a home, 
a suitable office should be procured for 
our secretary, where the books and papers 
of the society could be kept, and where 
periodicals and reports on subjects con- 
nected with horticulture could be col- 
lected, and in time a library. 

The secretary should receive such com- 
pensation for his services as would enable 
him to devote his whole time to the inter- 
ests of the society. Much of the work 
that is now intrusted to committees, such 
as the committee on statistics and nomen- 
clature, could either be done by the secre- 
tary, or thecommitteecouldbematerially 
assisted by him. There are innumerable 
ways that a paid officer could be of great 
benefit to the society. I would earnestly 
recommend that arrangements be made 
as speedily as possible to carry this 
recommendation into effect. The secre- 
tary and treasurer should be required to 
give a bond to the society for the faithful 
performance of their respective duties. 
This has not been done heretofore. 

What are to be the future relations be- 
tween this society and its numerous off- 
spring, the chrysanthemum, carnation 
and rose societies, should receive our 
serious consideration at this time. That 
the chrysanthemum and carnation socie- 
ties have done much good by imparting 
useful knowledge in the culture of their 
special favorites we all know, but could 
not this work be as well done by a sec- 
tion of this society as by a separate 
organization, on the principle that in 
union there is strength? I think the work 
of all the societies could be much better 
done by the Society of American Florists. 
It would certainly be more convenient to 
have one secretary's ofl[ice for all the 
societies than to have them scattered as 
they now are. 

It seems to me that the Society of 
American Florists can confer no greater 
benefit upon the profession than to pro- 
vide a means whereby the wheat may be 
separated from the chaff among the army 
of journeyman florists. I believe it can 



do this by establishing an examining 
board whose duty it shall be to examine 
florists, who may wish to avail them- 
selves of the privilege, granting certifi- 
cates setting forth the degree of profi- 
ciency possessed by each one examined. 
The examination might be oral or writ- 
ten, or a combination of both. The sub- 
jects touched upon would naturally be 
very diversified, but not more so than the 
florist's daily work. There should be a 
separate examination for each specialty; 
take for example the rose. The one sub- 
ject might be divided into numerous 
heads, say: 

a Propagation, 

/' General culture, 

c Insect enemies, 

d Fungus enemies, 

e Fertilizers and how to use them, 

/ Growing for flowers, 

£ Growing for plants, etc. 

A man, who, after wrestling with these 
inquiries, carried out to their fullest ex- 
tent, could show a first-class rose certifi- 
cate, would hardly need any other 
voucher, and one possessing rose, carna- 
tion and chrysanthemum certificates 
would not need any other evidence to 
prove himself a good all around grower 
of these flowers. The growing of general 
beddmg plants could be covered in an- 
other division, and of hardy plants in 
still another. Orchids too, and palms and 
like decorative plants should be provided 
for. In these days of specialties it is not 
necessary that a man should have a high 
percentage in every department. We 
already talk of rose growers, carnation 
growers, etc. If we know just what a 
man can do (where he is strong and 
where he is weak) selection for the work 
of most importance to the employer is 
simple. 

That some such plan would be equally 
to the advantage of the working florist 
and his employer no one can doubt, and 
that it would give our profession a higher 
standing in the eyes of the public is 
equally certain; people have a good deal 
of respect for organized effort in any 
form. When it is known that a florist, 
to be recognized as such, must pass a 
careful examination and receive a certifi- 
cate of proficiency people will conclude 
that they really occupy a higher plane 
than an agricultural laborer, with whom 
they are very often classed . 

As to employers, the granting of certifi- 
cates should greatly simplify their anxie- 
ties as regards help. Those who want 
good men, worthy of fair wages and fair 
treatment, will want men who hold cer- 
tificates; if they want cheap labor they 
must expect unskilled labor. Such a con- 
summation as this, likely both to elevate 
the position of the journeyman florist, 
and to lessen the anxieties of his em- 
ployer, is surely worth consideration. 
The adoption of such a plan of work 
would also surely strengthen the Society. 
It would bring to its annual meetings 
many journeymen anxious to secure cer- 
tificates from the examining board (which 
should be in session at each annual meet- 
ing), and certificates issued by it would 
magnify its importance as an organiza- 
tion of real practical benefit to the trade. 
Of course the examining boards should be 
composed of the best and most capable 
men in the society in the several divisions, 
and certificates awarded with the great- 
est caie. 



Discussion of the president's address 
followed. This was confined almost ex- 
clusively to thatfeatureof it which recom- 
mends the appointment by the society of 



an examining board, before whom young 
men shall be invited to appear for exam- 
ination as to their qualifications for the 
business, and that certificates shall be 
issued to applicants showing their degree 
of proficiency. Several speakers deemed 
the project impracticable, while others 
contended that the society would do well 
to make an effort to put the plan into ex- 
ecution, believing that good would result. 
No definite action was taken at the time. 
In the absence of Prof. Trelease of St. 
Louis, chairman of the Committee on 
Nomenclature, the report was read by 
Mr. May. 

Secretary Stewart's Report. 

The story of the meeting at St. Louis 
last year having been given in full detail 
in the printed report, it is hardly neces- 
sary to make more than a general allu- 
sion to it on this occasion. There are a 
few points however, to which we might 
profitably give a moment's attention. It 
had been expected that the World's Fair 
would prove a contributing attraction, 
it being the general opinion that the 
attendance of eastern members especially 
would be much larger on this account 
than would ordinarily be the case at a 
point so far west, but these expectations 
were not realized, and it transpired that 
the World's Fair, instead of enhancing 
our attendance, had the contrary effect. 
Not many of our craft could spare the 
time to visit both Convention and Fair, 
so they naturally chose the latter. 

Another drawback to last vear's 
attendance was the fear of hot weather; 
this happily proved to be unfounded, and 
whatever the ordinary St. Louis weather 
may be, we must give it credit for having 
treated us well on that occasion. 

These were the drawbacks. They were 
offset by many advantages which the 
visitors were not slow to appreciate, and 
which made the occasion one of the great- 
est enjoyment to all those who were 
present. Whether in visiting the far 
famed Shaw Botanical Gardens, riding 
through the beautiful avenues and parks 
of the city under the escort of our big 
hearted St. Louis brethren, listening to 
essays and discussions of more than the 
usual interest and value, or in meeting 
with the famous horticulturists from 
the Old World who honored us with their 
presence, the St. Louis Convention was a 
continual round of enjoyment both phy- 
sical and mental, and all felt at home, from 
the moment we listened to those eloquent 
words of welcome from St. Louis' gifted 
mayor until we took a last lingering look 
at the radient arches of the illuminated 
city. 

As in every instance where the attend- 
ance at a convention has been small the 
receipts for the year have been materially 
reduced. From present indications the 
falling off is only temporary, however, 
as a large majority of the members who 
failed to pay their dues last year are 
coming forward cheerfully and making 
their arrearages good, and there is no 
doubt that the present year will see our 
paid up membership list fully up to the 
maximum. The whole number of dues 
collected for 1893 up to August 19th, is 
607, and member of 1892 in arrears for 
1893 numbers 269, but these figures will 
change considerably for the better when 
the large number of arrearages paid up at 
this meeting are counted. 

Death has made \musual havoc in our 
ranks since we last met. Eleven of our 
members have been taken away, and in 
this number are included two who were 
among the Society's founders, and have 



i8g4. 



The American Florist. 



75 




Edwin Lonsdale 
President-elect society of American florists. 



always been faithful workers in its be- 
half. The list of deaths is as follows: 

N. Singler, Washing1:on Heights, 111., 
August 24, 1893. 

C. A. Dahl, Atlanta, Ga., September 
1893. 

Thomas Hudson, Northampton, Mass., 
September, 1893. 

H. A. Daacke, New York, N.Y., October, 
1893. 

J. R. Bather, Clinton, Iowa, November 
22, 1893. 

W. F. F. Murray, Atco, N.J. , November 
22, 1893. 

R. J. Halliday, Baltimore, Md., March 
11, 1894.. 

Harry C. Gass, Alleghany, Pa., March 
20, 1894, 

M. A. Hunt, Terre Haute, Ind., April 
23, 1894. 

L. Guerineau, Northampton, Mass., 
June 8, 1894. 

W. M. Eldridge, Wilkesbarre, Pa., 
August 6, 1894. 

The regular winter meeting of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee was held at Philadel- 
phia on February 13 and 14. The Philadel- 
phia brethren were kind and thoughtful 
as always. Many timeiy questions re- 
garding the Society's future policy and 
work were brought forward and earn- 
estly discussed, and the foundations laid 
for the very comprehensive program 
which is now before you. Among the 
more important matters considered were 
our relations with the Hail Association, 
the Chrysanthemum and Carnation So- 
cieties and other auxiliary organizations, 
the feasibility of devising some equitable 
and economical plan of greenhouse insur- 



ance against fire, the injury sustained by 
the trade through the shipment of lily 
blooms from Bermuda and the remedy 
therefor, the work of the Nomenclature 
Committee as well as that of the two 
special committees provided for at the St. 
Louis meeting, viz; on a standard List 
of Commercial Decorative Plants and 
Statistics of Exports and Imports. 
Requisite funds for the needs of these 
committees in their work were duly pro- 
vided for. 

The change in time for the sessions of 
this Convention, and substitution of 
afternoon for evening meetings was in 
accordance with the advice and request 
of Philadelphia members, who explained 
to the Committee that on account of the 
attractions and distractions peculiar to 
Atlantic City a fuller attendance at the 
meetings would thus be secured. 

The annual badges provided for the 
Society having been long regarded as 
inartistic and inappropriate it was 
decided to have a new die made, which 
while adhering to the old design of a rose 
leaf should be a more truthful representa- 
tion ol that object, and it is believed that 
the members generally will be pleased 
with the change. 

Resolutions in memory of the late Geo. 
W. Childs were drawn up by a special 
committee, and an engrossed copy pre- 
pared and sent to Mrs. Childs on behalf 
of the Society of American Florists. 

Your Secretary would respectfully be- 
speak for the noted specialists who are 
to address us, a full attendance of all our 
members at the meetings, a recognition 



to which these gentlemen are justly 
entitled. Note particularly the early hour 
at which the morning sessions open , and 
bear in mind that a full hall and prompt 
opening at the time named in the pro- 
gram will be due courtesy to the essay- 
ists, and will conduce to the pleasure of 
each and every individual by ensuring an 
early adjournment to the beach and its 
delights. 

The committee on a standard list of 
decorative plants sent in report, which 
was read. Certain instructions to the 
executive committee suggested in the re- 
port \vere ratified by a vote of the 
society. 

At the afternoon session Mr. W. H. 
Taplin of Holmesburg, Pa., read his essay 
on "Requirements forthe elevation of our 
business" as follows: 



Some Requirements for the Elevation of 
Our Business. 

BY W. H. TAPLIN. HOLMESBURG. THILA., PA. 

In considering the problem of the eleva- 
tion of our business, it will doubtless be 
remembered by many of those present 
that various phases of this subject have 
been very ably discussed by former essay- 
ists before this society, and it will there- 
fore not be necessary to enter into any 
lengthy explanations or arguments as to 
why the business needs elevating, the ad- 
mitted fact that there is room for im- 
provement being quite sufficient excuse 
for the present writing, and this same fact 
will in all probability furnish the oppor- 
tunity for much abler papers from other 
pens at future conventions of the Society 
of American Florists. 

We find from daily experience that the 
most successful men of business are the 
most systematic ones, those who pay the 
strictest attention to the details of or- 
ganization, and keep thoroughly posted 
in regard to any movements that tend 
towards the advancement of those inter- 
ests in which they are particularly con- 
cerned. Eternal vigilance, we are told, is 
the price of success, and this is nowhere 
more true than when applied to the busi- 
ness of a florist, a business in which the 
habit of close observation is of the first 
importance if we desire to keep our stock 
up to a given standard, and our business 
abreast with the times, for in this age of 
keen competition the man who hesitates 
is lost. 

Taking the figures of the last census as 
a basis, we can safely estimate that our 
business now represents an invested cap- 
ital of nearly forty millions of dollars, 
and an interest of such magnitude as this 
sum indicates certainly should have some 
standing among the industries of the 
country. But our methods must be such 
as to command respect in order to gain 
recognition from the business world in 
general, and one great requisite in this 
direction is the practice of more system 
in our housekeeping, if we may be per- 
mitted to use this term in reference to 
greenhouse work. The man who takes 
no account of stock, and does not know 
the result of his sales in any particular 
specialty for the past season, nor how 
those sales compare with the results of 
former seasons, can not expect to make 
much progress toward the elevation of 
his individual business, and w^ithout the 
efforts of individuals any movement on 
this line by organizations will naturally 
prove to be failures. In the opinion of 
the writer, systematic work, orderly ar- 
rangement and cleanliness are among the 
first requirements to be observed by the 



76 



The American Florist. 



Alio-, 

o 



25, 



grower of plants who feels interes*'ed in 
the elevation of his business, for on sys- 
tem depends his profits, on orderly ar- 
rangement and proper display of his stock 
depend most of his sales, and cleanliness 
is an essential to the best growth of most 
plants. A heavy crop of weeds, muddy 
walks, broken down benches, and a gen- 
erally unkempt appearance should not be 
accepted as indications of how busy we 
are, but rather as evidence that there is a 
screw loose in the management. This 
state of affairs, though not so prevalent 
now as it was a few years ago, is still 
too much in evidence in many establish- 
ments, and deserves a radical change, for 
if order is nature's first law we who prac- 
tice "an art which does mend Nature," 
as Shakespeare tells us, should surely 
strive to observe that law. 

Have a general cleaning up at proper 
intervals, keep walks, benches and all the 
surroundings of the houses neat and tidy, 
arrange the plants in the most attractive 
manner, and employ help enough to keep 
them in that condition. It is false econ- 
omy to worry along with an insufficient 
force of men, and we all know that the 
most efiicient and reliable help is the 
cheapest in the end, and in this connection 
it may be added that so far as mv expe- 
rience has gone, a proper proportion ot 
men to glass is about one man to each 
six thousand square feet of glass in an 
average establishment, unless the business 
includes much outdoor work or jobbing, 
and in the latter case an extra man or 
two may be needed during the busy sea- 
son at least. 

A systematic arrangement of the labor 
should also be made, lay appointing cer- 
tain men to attend to the routine work 
of watering, ventilating and firing of cer- 
tain houses (if the size of the place does 
not warrant the employment of a regular 
fireman), and these men to be held re- 
sponsible for the performance of these 
duties at the right time, for by this method 
the men become more interested in the 
welfare of the plants under their immedi- 
ate control, and will take some pride in 
keeping them in condition. 

But this idea of systematic work is not 
only applicable to the grower, for even 
among the retailers the lack of system is 
sometimes found, and dirty floors, dusty 
shelves and littered counters are some- 
times seen where we had been led to ex- 
pect aisthetic elegance. By the use of the 
above term I do not intend to signify 
velvet carpets, lace curtains and a bell- 
boy with large gilt buttons, but rather 
the idea that where choice and delicate 
flowers are exposed for sale cleanliness 
should prevail, and some effort be made 
in the direction of proper display and 
adornment. The retail florist can be, and 
really is in some cases, an educator of the 
public taste, but in order to attain such 
prominence hemust use business methods, 
and among these are courteous salespeo- 
ple, careful attention in the selection and 
packing of even a small order, prompt de- 
livery, and a regular system of book- 
keeping. A closer observance of these 
items would doubtless promote the in- 
terests of this branch of the trade to such 
a degree that many outstanding liabili- 
ties could be more promptly met, and 
thus much benefit accrue to the trade in 
general. But in order to make any of 
these suggested reforms operative the 
proprietor of the establishment must take 
the initiative, and with the adoption of 
certain regulations the habit of neatness 
and systematic work can be readily in- 
augurated among the men. 

These brief remarks in reference to a 
more thorough organization of individual 



establishments as a means of elevating 
our business, bring to mind the fact that 
there is another agency that we should 
encourage with the same end in view, 
namely, our national, state and local or- 
ganizations. It is unquestionably true 
that the Society of American Florists has 
accomplished good in bringing the mem- 
bers of the trade together and stimulating 
the exchange of ideas, for by no other 
means could such a representative gath- 
ering be brought together, and similar 
benefits, though in a more restricted de- 
gree, have been secured from the various 
florists' clubs and horticultural societies. 
These influences should be encouraged, 
lor they all tend toward the spread of 
knowledge of plants, flowers and garden- 
ing, and are thus agencies for the promo- 
tion and elevation of our business, and 
as such should receive our hearty sup- 
port. A tasty exhibit at a local exhibi- 
tion is a good card, and while there is not 
in all cases an immediate increase in trade 
from this source, yet it is one of the best 
opportunities ior the florist to display 
his talent and enterprise, and to create a 
good impression on the public mind. And 
still another requirement for the advance- 
ment of our business is for every member 
of the trade, whether employer or em- 
ployed, to secure as good a horticultural 
education as possible. I believe in a com- 
bination of practical experience and theo- 
retical knowledge, with the former pre- 
dominating, for while we sometimes note 
actual successes in the trade made by 
purely theoretical men, yet the weight of 
evidence is in favor of the man with ex- 
perience. 

One road to improvement in the matter 
of education will be found in encouraging 
the reading habit among the men in your 
employ, and if they decline to subscribe 
to one or more of the various horticult- 
ural periodicals it may prove a good in- 
vestment for the employer to make a few 
extra subscriptions each season and dis- 
tribute the papers among the men. 

And in conclusion let me add, that while 
the present condition of our business is 
not entirely discouraging, yet it seems 
that the more general adoption of the 
three points of (1) systematic work, (2) 
organization, and (3) education would 
tend to improve and elevate it, and with 
this suggestion I leave the subject to the 
wise consideration of the society. 

The discussion was participated in by 
Messrs. Seidewitz of Maryland, Ham- 
mond of New York, Spaulding of Con- 
necticut, and Storm of New Jersey. 

This was followed b}' the exceedingly 
interesting and instructive essay of Mr. 
F. Schuj'ler Mathews of Boston, who 
also gave practical illustrations by means 
of a chart and numerous sheets of colored 
papers, showing many minute variations 
in what are usually regarded as exactly 
similar shades of color. 



Comparative Colors and Their Relation 
to Flowers. 

Uy I". SCiirvI.Klt ."MATTIIEWS. ltt)STUN. 

One of the strongest elements of beauty 
in nature is her colors. As time goes on 
the people of our country show an in- 
creasing interest in pictures which are full 
of color. We are past the age when steel 
engravings were popular, and it is not 
probable that there will be any revival in 
this department of the engraver's art. 

How far the beauty of color in flowers 
has exerted an influence in this change 
from monochromatic to polychromatic 



art I am not prepared to say, but I believe 
flower colors have had more to do with 
this matter than we are prone to think. 
It is only within the past twenty years 
that the florists have put before the eyes 
of the public the magnificent pure reds of 
carnations and the glorious magentas of 
the cinerarias. What influence this must 
have had on the city people who do not 
possess garden plots it is noteasy to say; 
but that the florist through his flowers 
has been a potent factor in nurturing a 
love of color it is reasonable and wise to 
believe. 

But this growing fondness w^hich we in- 
dulge in for color sometimes outstrips 
our knowledge of its character. We have 
no reliable nomenclature of color tones, 
and we resort to nature at once for a 
color name which scientifically does not 
exist, as, for instance, peacock blue, 
cherry red, sulphur yellow, pea green, 
crushed raspberry and old gold. We go 
jumping about among natural objectsfor 
similitudes in color, and we do not locate 
our colors in the rainbow tints. 

I would like to call your attention 
therefore to colors as we may find them 
related to each other in the prismatic 
condition. I regret that pigment color, 
all I can refer to directly, is so dreadfully 
lacking in purity and brilliancy, but at 
the same time it must be borne in mind 
that color is color the world over, and 
there is no color in the prism which can- 
not be adequately represented by pigment 
color. 

The most remarkable thing about na- 
ture's colors, however, is their purity. 
Flowers possess the next best quality of 
color to that which we see in the rain- 
bow. I must refer to several splendid 
flowers which illustrate this truth per- 
fectly: Prince of Orange calendula, Por- 
tia carnation. Empress of India nastur- 
tium, Madame Crozy canna, lemon col- 
ored marigold (African), purple ciner- 
aria, violet blue morning glory and New 
Cardinal poppy. These flowers show 
the most extraordinary brilliancy in such 
colors as orange, pure red, vermilion, 
pure yellow, pure purple and violet. The 
pigments of the artist's paint box which 
go by the same names are not compara- 
ble with them. If I were to use bits of 
petals of different flowers and connect 
these together in imitation of the prism- 
atic colors I would have no difficulty in 
finding colors brilliant enough to match 
the rainbow. The color fire might be 
gone, but the color purity would remain. 
A dial with sixteen radiating colorsmade 
up of the flower petals could be completed 
with the exceptions of pure blue and pea- 
cock blue and green. These are colors 
which it would be extremely difficult, if 
not impossible, to find in Flora's world, 
i might specify the sixteen hues as fol- 
lows: 

Pure yellow — purple; 
Green yellow — magenta; 
Pea green — crimson; 
Emerald green — pure red; 
Peacock blue — scarlet; 
Pure blue — pure orange; 
Ultramarine blue — yellow orange; 
Violet — golden yellow. 
The colors as they are printed opposite 
to each other are what we term compli- 
mentary hues, that is they form a full 
and complete color when mixed together, 
which we call white. 

In bringing this subject before you of 
color for comparativeexamination I shall 
try to show how colors can be recognized 
in their individuaUty, and how we can 
avoid confusion in the use of color terms. 
It is of course a matter of education in 



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The American Florist. 



i i 



training the eye so it shall distinguish be- 
tween tints oi similar character; but pro- 
vided one is not deficient ia their color 
sense, so they are more or less color blind, 
it is not difficult to present a few simple 
colors in such a way that one may easily 
recognize them ever afterward. 

Scarlet is a red color which is charac- 
terized by a tincture of yellow. The 
ranunculus poppy gives us splendid scar- 
lets; the New Cardinal poppy, one which 
I may locate as having come to me from 
Mr. W. Atlee Burpee, is a scarlet flower 
with a minimum amount of yellow in its 
composition, and a most remarkable 
character of lightness and purity of tone. 
There is positively no ranunculus poppy 
which can give us the same color; and in- 
deed, I know of no other flower which 
will approach it in clearness of hue. I 
have long since analyzed the color of the 
Madame Crozy canna, and found it an 
incomparable scarlet; but the character 
of the color is entirely diflferent from that 
which we see in the poppy which I men- 
tion; it is heavy and has a surface bright- 
ness with no depth all. A very difierent 
flower is the King of Tom Thumbs nas- 
turtium; here is a fiery scarlet flower 
which I cannot copy with any pigmentin 
my paint box; you would smile at the 
brick dust appearance of my best scarlet 
vermilion beside the glorious imensity of 
this nasturtium's petal. A step further 
in intensity of color and you have the 
nasturtium Empress of India, a scarlet 
red of great depth, which I am also pow- 
erless to reproduce with my paints. 

So much for scarlet; but red in purity 
of tone it is not; this must be borne in 
mind. I have referred to the poppy fam- 
ily as possessing some splendid scarlets; I 
migbt as well include the nasturtium fam- 
ily, as it is capable of giving us scarlet in 
all iLs intensity and paleness. But the 
diflference between the two families as re- 
gards red is wide; poppies give us a pure 
red in a more or less dilute condition, but 
the nasturtiums are absolutely incapable 
of producing anything like red in purity 
of tone. It must not be supposed that 
the rose nasturtium is an exampleof pure 
red even in a qualifying degree; ihisflower 
is dilute red scarlet in color tone, so far 
removed from purity that there is about 
twenty per cent of yellow in its make-up. 

In the balsam and the phlox families 
there are no scarlet reds, and as far as 
my knowledge goes nothing which re- 
motely resembles them. Tne so-called 
scarlet Phlox Drummondii is a pure red 
flower with no trace of yellow in its com- 
position. I regret constantly the misuse 
of the color term scarlet; the seedsmen's 
catalogues are full of the word, when 
what is really meant is only a bright red 
color. I am glad to see that in the Cen- 
tury Dictionary, so recently published, 
the proper and scientifical definition of 
specific colors is given; the position of the 
colors in the spectrum is explained, and 
at once anyone may discover by experi- 
ment the individuality of a color of a cer- 
tain name. As an example of this one 
may find that scarlet is a red so near the 
yellow division of spectrum color that it 
is distinctively a yellow red and not a 
bright red. 

My salmon rose Phlox Drummondii 
has an ineffably pale pure red pink color 
with a suspicious yellow inclination; but 
after careful examination I have been 
forced to the conclusion that there is not 
a particle of yellow in the expanse of the 
dainty petals. What the seedsmen would 
undoubtedly call rose pink in color would 
be crimson pink. I have a lovely pure 
pink fli,wer among my Shirley poppies, 
but I have never seen a crimson pink or a 



pure crimson poppy in any variety of this 
flower. Crimson is too often a word 
loosely used; it does not mean dark red, 
that is maroon; it does not mean deep in- 
tense red, /Aa^ is pure red perhaps, or a 
red with some touch of yellow in its com- 
position; but it does mean a deep red near 
the blue division of the spectrum; and con- 
sequently crimson must be a blue red. I 
have crimson zinnias, sweet williams, pe- 
tunias and silenes, but I have no crimson 
poppies. 

I wish there was time enough for me to 
say many a good word for the too often 
despised color called magenta. But lean 
only say this: Not until the florists dis- 
covered the wonderfully deep colored cin- 
erarias and gavt them to us in a profu- 
sion of magnificent bloom did we under- 
stand how magnificent magenta could be. 
The artist who is a colorist and who 
could learn nothing more about purple 
reds at an exhibition of cinerarias would 
be dead to color influences indeed, and 
what is more, the florist who exhibited 
the flower would be proved the greater 
man as far as his jesthetic sensibilities are 
concerned. But I am sure that it is not 
the artists who are prejudiced against 
magenta. I could prove that by the recit- 
ation of half a dozen facts abaut as many 
famous artists. It remains, however, for 
the florist to persevere with his splendid 
magentas, until he he gains the \ictory 
over unreasonable prejudice and con- 
vinces the public by orchid and cineraria 
that purple red is a grand and dignified 
color above the disdain of those who de- 
light in unrefined and flashy scarlet gera- 
niums. 

Magenta is the contralto and baritone 
scale of the music of color; it is too rich 
and deep when seen in all its purity for 
any but colorists and lovers of color to 
understand. I be.ieve the florist has 
guaged the value of the hue in the pre- 
sentation of it in his glorious cinerarias, 
and evidently its rich and uncommon 
music struck his ear long before it had 
any effect upon the young ladies who 
like to paint wild roses and poppies. It 
is not always the smallest eat sand bluest 
eyes which distinguish the beautiful in 
manifold nature. 

As a representative orange flower I 
might point to the Prince of Orange cal- 
endula. But orange is a color easily rec- 
ognized by anyone; there is little chance 
of its being misnamed. It is only the 
orange reds which are confusing in their 
variety. There are orange red poppies; 
the scarlet runner is orange red, so are 
some of the geraniums and zinnias. 
Orange vermilion or orange scarlet are 
two names for the same color, either of 
which will do very well; but they are not 
so often used in the seedsmen's catalogue 
as they should be. 

Pure yellow is a color which in its 
exact tone is not so easily recognized. Sul- 
phur is a pale pure yellow. But sulphur 
colored flowers are not so very plentiful 
as the catalogues would persuade us to be- 
lieve. There is no sulphur jellow among 
calendulas, phloxes, nasturtiums or glad- 
ioli. The huffish tone of the Pearl nastur- 
tium israther strawcolor. Wild mustard 
in its paler tints is much nearer sulphur. 
The outside of buttercup petals is quite a 
pure yellow, but the shiny inside surface 
reflects the color to an intensity which 
approaches golden yellow. The wild 
evening primrose is quite a pure yel- 
low flower. Coreopsis is golden yel- 
low and never approaches a pure yel- 
low tone. The sunflower never shows 
a sulphur yellow, nor is there any 
rose I know of, not even excepting the 



beautiful yellow Scotch rose, which gives 
us an absolutely pure yellow. 

The true green is really what among 
our pigments in the paint box we call 
emerald green; this occurs rarely in na- 
ture and I cannot cite any instance of it 
worth mentioning, unless I refer to indi- 
rect color effects inspringtime landscapes. 
A green-blue or even a pure blue flower 
does not exist; one-half of the flowers 
called blue in the catalogues is not deserv- 
ing of the name. Such flowers we artists 
would employ purple paint to copy. I 
know of no blue aster. Bachelor's but- 
tons are pretty blue, so is wild chicory. 
But I would be compelled to use ultra- 
marine to truthfully cop^ either of these 
flowers. The blue of some of the Colvolv- 
ulus minor is charmingly bright and has 
little purple in its composition. The 
ultramarineof certain deep hued morning 
glories is rich and true to the color name. 

I am perfectly well aware of the fact 
that a florist or a seedsman must use color 
names generically, so to speak; so the 
blue aster and the yellow rose are admis- 
sible speaking of these in a general way; 
but it seems to me specifically the blue 
petunia, the sulphur nasturtium, calen- 
dula, balsam and phlox; the scarlet phlox 
and balsam, the sky blue aster, the crim- 
son poppy and the scarlet aster are non- 
existent. There is no art of the horticult- 
urist which will induce certain flower 
families to take on any positive color 
which is new to them. I think I am cor- 
rect in making this broad assertion. I 
allude to specific color, and I am surethat 
the nasturtium is incapable of absolutely 
pure yellow. 

The green petunia which I have raised 
with great success is a well named flower, 
although the best I can do is to show a 
specimen with only seventy per cent of 
the petal surface green, and this not emer- 
ald or true green, but the generic green. 
No one can possibly object to such a 
name, nor is there anything wrong in the 
name black scabiosa. These are both 
color names which are absolutely true to 
color effisct. But the scarlet balsam has 
no excuse for itself onany ground, for rea- 
sons which I have already stated. 

As regards the various tones of pink 
and red in roses I have only a word to 
say now. Already I have written much 
on this subject, which has appeared at 
different times in the American Florist. 
The pinks in roses are generally com- 
pounded colors, that is, they are made up 
of a variety of delicate tints which can 
only be readily distinguished under the 
microscope. There are pure pink roses 
and yellow pink roses. The comparative 
examination of the petals of roses with 
some of the annuals which I have just 
mentioned will locate the color of a cer- 
tain rose without mistake. The rose 
glories in deep crimson and in pale crim- 
son tints, but with scarlet it has nothing 
to do. 

The beautiful reds and pinks and yel- 
lows of carnations it would take toolong 
to describe here with an approach to jus- 
tice. I consider the carnation the prophet 
flower of pure and intense reds. The flower 
is weak in yellow color, but its pinks are 
incomparable in brilliancy. The Grace 
Wildcr's color is pure and even; not the 
best of my Shirley poppies nor any of my 
phloxes can stand beside it. The Portia's 
red is beyond the red of any other flower 
in mv garden exceptit be that of a certain 
gladiolus. 

Regarding the broken tones in flowers, 
I would like to call attention to several: 
The Heinnemann nasturtium, a golden 
brown; the Edward Otto nasturtium, a 
purplish brown; the Cyclobothra flava, 



78 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 25, 



a russet yellow daintily broken in tone. 
Then there are a number of maroon pink 
poppies in the ranunculus division, which 
I take great pride in growing; but I must 
complain that the seedsmen do not sepa- 
rate these from the swarms of scarletand 
rich red flowers which interfere with the 
£ESthetic tones of the maroon pink ones. 
So much interest was taken in the Louis 
Boehmer chrysanthemum, particularly 
with regard to its fine color, that I won- 
der the seedsmen do not make an cflbrt 
to group together these odd colored pop- 
pies and make it easy for amateur gar- 
deners to become well acquainted with 
them. The taste for esthetic color is 
growing, and the day will come when 
magentas, toned solferinos, plum purples 
and purple browns in their more delicate 
tints will be fully appreciated and ad- 
mired. 

But color is an infinite thing and its 
consideration here in connection with 
flowers must begreatly limited. I repeat 
that flower colors are so far beyond pip- 
ment colors in brilliancy, and their varia- 
tions are so innumerable, that it would 
take volumes to describe the differences 
and infinite patience to pursue the sufjert 
to a broad and profitable conclusion. We 
have yet to learn a great deal about color; 
not even the artist can fathom all its 
depths; certainly the best study of it is in 
the flower garden, and we owe to our fl >- 
rists, horticulturists and gardeners a 
great debt of gratitude for their revela- 
tions of the most magnificent colors the 
world has ever seen. It is not on the art- 
ist's canvas, but in the gardener's flower, 
that the greatest wealth of color may be 
seen. 

The essayist was greeted with applause, 
and at the conclusion of his paper was 
given an ovation. Votes of thanks were 
tendered Messrs. Mathews and Taplin for 
their papers. 

Under the head of the question box the 
relative advantages of the one judge and 
three judge system in horticultural exhi- 
bitions were presented by Messrs. Raw- 
son and Wood, both iavoring the latter 
system. 

Useful commercial cut flowers other 
than roses, carnations atid chrysanthe- 
mums was the theme of a question replied 
to by Mr. Scott of Buffalo, as follows: 



Cut Flowers Other Than Roses, Carna- 
tions and Chrysanthemums. 

\Atlsu'ryfd by Ji'tn, Scott.'] 

This question referred to me is in my 
thinking, a little ambiguous, but if it 
means what other flowers are there for 
the commercial florist to grow then the 
answer would be simple, but necessarily 
very lengthy, for it would include all the 
flowers that are sold in our greenhouses 
and gardens except the three above men- 
tioned. It can, I believe, be put down as 
an indisputable fact that the rose and 
carnation are the most important flow- 
ers, both commercially and any other 
way, but the chrysanthemum I should 
not place third. It has sprung within ten 
or twelve years, into great popularity, 
but its season at the most is short, and 
prices have taken a great tumble during 
the past few years. I must most decidedly 
place the violet in advance of the chrys- 
satithemum as a commercial flower, for 
the aggregate paid by our patrons during 
the year is far more than that paid for 
"mums," however large, gorgeous, and 
fantastic they may be. So we will have 
to call the violet the most important, 
after the rose and carnation. It is cer- 
tainly true that it would be impossible to 



run a retail trade without growing or 
keeping roses, carnations, and in their 
season chrj'santhemums, but here is a 
brief list ofother flowers used largely in 
our business. Even if only for varietj-'s 
sake they must be grown. 

First violets, of which I have already 
spoken. Second, lily of the valley; this 
little gem is asked for the year around by 
our best flower buyers, and if you are 
successful in forcing it and retarding it 
there cannot be any thing 3'ielding a larger 
percentage of profit. Third, tulips, nar- 
cissus and hyacinths; immense quantities 
of these have been forced during this last 
fifteen years, perhaps slightly overdone 
this last three or four years, yet they 
never can go entirely out of fashion, be- 
cause they can be had at a relatively 
cheap price, when roses to make an 
equal show would cost the purchaser 
three times the amount. Fourth, Harrisii 
and longiflortnn lilies; a continual succes- 
sion of these can be had from November 
to Juh', and are now in a general trade 
actualiv indispeneable. Fifth, Lilium 
lancifolium in variety and Lilium aura- 
tum are every summer coming more and 
more into use, and are now as indispen- 
sable in Jul}', August and September as 
the Harrisii afe in the earlier months. 
Sixth, mignonette is a very important 
crop and a pa3'ing one; man}' thousand 
feet of glass are devoted to its growth in 
winter and spring. Seventh, orchids, 
they may not be considered an absolute 
necessitj' to the general florist, but a col- 
lection composed of a dozen of the best 
species and varieties will well pay for the 
outia}', and where they are grown largely 
in any establishment there is a steady 
demand. "A story." Eighth, sweet peas 
are now forced by many, and in the 
months of March, April, May and June 
they are in great demand, and a paying 
crop. 

I will not attempt to enumerate many 
more, but likely enough I have forgotten 
more than one prominent and important 
flower to the retail florist; tiiere is a num- 
ber of flowers which enter into his busi- 
ness, and which you all know, and for a 
cheaper grade of custom you have to 
grow more or less of them. There is the 
zonal geranium, begonias, sweet alyssum, 
heliotrope, stevia, eupatorium, ten week 
stocks, pansies and many others familiar 
to you all. I had almost forgotten two 
important plants; the poinsettia with its 
brilliant bracts is one, in many cities they 
command a most remunerative price. 
The other is the old calla lih' which most 
of you can remember as long as you can 
any plant. 

If you are the fortunate possessor of a 
few acies of good land within driving dis- 
tance of a large town you can make a 
comfortable living with a few acres culti- 
vated to flowers. It is the natural and 
healthy way to exist, and in addition to 
the flowers you can keep a flock of chick- 
ens, cows, pigs, and ducks, some of whom 
will be producing a crop when you are 
sleeping. 

Mr. John N. May offered a resolution of 
condolence with the bereaved famih' of 
the late treasurer, M. A. Hunt, and suit- 
ably expressing the society's appreciation 
of the deceased, which was adopted by a 
rising vote. .\s a further mark of respect 
for the memory of the late treasurer an 
adjournment was ordered. 

Wednesday Morning Session. 
Pittsburg was unanimously selected as 
the ])lace of meeting for 1895. The nom- 
ination of officers resulted in the naming 



of the following: For president, Edwin 
Lonsdale of Philadelphia; Wm. Scott of 
Buffalo; for vice-president, E. C. Reine- 
man of Pittsburg; lor secretary, Wm. J. 
Stewart ot Boston; for treasurer, H. B. 
Beatty ofOil City, Pa. 

On motion of J. G. Esler of New Jersey 
the appointment of a committee of three 
was authorized to report to the next con- 
vention a plan for a closer union between 
the national society and the auxiliary 
societies. Mr. John H. Taylor then read 
his essay. 

-The Best Method of Growing Roses, / 
and the Best Varieties for Present 
Demands. 

BY JOHN H. TAYLOR. BAYSIBE, N. T. 

The growing of roses under glass has 
been so thoroughly discussed at our con- 
ventions in the past that I thought best 
to treat this subject somewhat broadly, 
and touch on certain points of culture, 
past and present, especially relating to 
the health of the rose. 

The tendency of growers during the 
past few years has been to disregard one 
of nature's laws, that of rest. All plants 
require a dormant or semi-dormant pe- 
riod, as is well known to horticulturists; 
but the system, at present pursued, that 
of constant forcing, has weakened the 
constitution of the rose. It is impossible 
to obtain a healthy cutting from plants 
whose vitality has been sapped year by 
year by over forcing or disease. 

Plants adapt themselves to changes of 
climate, treatment and locality, providing 
this occurs gradually and nature's laws 
are not transgressed. By judicious selec- 
tion and propagation a race of plants 
can be made healthier, more vigorous, 
and better adapted to the purpose in- 
tended. On the other hand, injudicious 
and over-propagation will, if continued, 
bring forth a race of weakly and sickly 
plants incapable of producing or repro- 
ducing. 

Littlejohn's methods of growing have 
been discarded for newer, and what is 
considered, better ones! Undoubtedly for 
a few years better financial results were 
obtained, but at a cost to the health and 
constitution of the plants. The old 
method was to grow the plants from 
good wood struck early in the fall, which 
would by spring produce strong vigorous 
plants in 6 or 8-inch pots. These would 
be plunged outside, thoroughly hardened, 
and brought into the house in August or 
September. They were then either planted 
or potted in 10 or 12-inch pots and al- 
lowed to flower, giving a fine crop by Oct. 
The finest lot of plants I think I have 
ever seen was at Mr. Haughouts in the 
month of August, 1883, plunged outside 
in 8-inch pots. They were Perle des 
jardins, averaging about 15 inches high 
with from six to eight strong, well 
ripened shoots, ready and anxious to 
flower. The house stood empty, but 
thoroughly cleaned, and the soil had just 
been put in the benches. 

There are probably few present who 
have not seen such plants, and remember 
when Madison, Summit and neighbor- 
hood was the Mecca of all rose growers. 
But this proved too slow and expensive 
for our advanced ideas, and the con- 
stantly increasing competition; so that 
the present method of planting in June or 
July, plants struck from our overforced 
stock, and having had no rest or ripening 
of the wood, has been generally practiced. 
The consequence has been a more or less 
general deoreciation in the strength of 
our plants,"and so many diseases attack 
them that a chemist is required to be con- 
stants on hand. 



j8g4. 



The American Florist. 



79 




A HOUSE OP BRIDES PHOTOORAPHBD LAST JANUARY. 

MR. JOSEPH HEACOCK'S GREENHOUSES AT WYNCOTE. PHILA.. PA. 



These facts impressed me several years 
ago, as I noticed a gradual weakening in 
the vigor of my plants. I decided not to 
propagate more than was required for 
my own use, to use nothing but the best 
wood, and also to rest my roses during 
the summer months. The result has been 
more than satisfactory, as my plants 
have shown year by year more stamina, 
and have been less subject to disease. 
The carnation men have already discov- 
ered their error, and a number ot growers 
are now propagating their stock from 
unforced plants. Diseases of all kinds are 
ever present, either in the shape of fungi 
or insects, and whenever a plant becomes 
weakened by improper treatment it is at 
once attacked. It is so well understood 
in animal life that a man who disobeys 
nature's laws succumbs shortly to the 
ever present disease, and yet we do not 
hesitate to treat our plants to so weaken 
their constitution that they are unable 
to withstand theattacksof their enemies. 

Having this object in view, namely, the 
production and growing of vigorous 
healthy stock, what are the best methods 
to pursue? 

To strike the cuttings in November and 
December plants should be carefully 
grown during the winter, and by March 
or April should be strong plants in 6-inch 
pots. They should then be given all the 
air possible inside or plunged outside, 
and kept on the dry side, thus giving a 
slight rest and ripening the wood. Plant- 
ing can be done in June or July. The 
plants should be handled so as to get 
thoroughly rooted in the bed or benches 
belore being allowed to flower. Plants 



thus treated should be strong dwarf 
bushes ready to flower as soon as allowed 
in the fall. The fall treatment of roses is 
of the utmost importance, as on that 
depends success or failure during the win- 
ter; for a rose once checked at this period 
will never recover sufficiently to pay dur- 
ing that season. Temperature at night 
or day during October and November can 
not be strictly adhered to, as the weather 
and judgment of the grower must regu- 
late what he considers best adapted to 
the welfare of the plant. 

Watering must also be very carefully 
looked after then, more so than at any 
other season; and it is a good rule to keep 
the plants a little too dry than too moist. 
More trouble is caused by careless or 
overwatering at this period than at any 
other. In fact the quality of the flower 
in the early fall should be secondary to 
the welfare of the plant. As a rule a 
higher night temperature should be main- 
tained than is conducive to the produc- 
tion of the best flowers. In other words, 
in September our nights frequently run as 
high as 70° or over, and the plants should 
be gradually accustomed to a lower tem- 
perature without checking their growth 
in the two following months. No abso- 
lute rule can be laid down, as different 
seasons require different treatment. Asa 
rule, however, a warm fall will require a 
higher night temperature than a cold one, 
owing to smaller amount of artificial 
heat needed. Once safely in December, 
the plants, with ordinary care and treat 
ment, should produce good results for the 
balance of the winter. 

The question of beds and benches is 



still a mooted one, both systems having 
their advocates. I am using both, but 
am not prepared to say which is the bet- 
ter one. With pipes run through the beds 
in stone ducts the soil in the beds can be 
kept at any required temperature. From 
experience I have found 75° about the 
best temperature. The hybrid teas seem 
to flower more freely and do not have the 
tendency to go dormant as when planted 
in benches. Another method, which is a 
combination of beds and benches, has 
given the best results, namely, to board 
the benches in and have separate pipes 
underneath forwarmingthe soiI,thepipes 
for heating the house being placed along 
the sides of the greenhouse, so that the 
warming of the soil can be done indepen- 
dently of heating the house. The advan- 
tage these beds have over benches is that 
of durability ; and I am satisfied as good re- 
sults can be obtained if properly handled. 

The question of carrying roses over one 
or more years has always been a favorite 
topic of discussion, and is still an inter- 
esting one. It has been my custom 
always to carry over about half my 
plants, and my experience has been that 
the old ones can be more depended on to 
do well than the young plants. 

The method pursued is to withhold 
water gradually, beginning the latter 
part of June, until the beds are quite dry; 
after that the house must be carefully 
watched to prevent the wood from shriv- 
eling; syringing should be done daily, and 
in very warm weather twice a day. 
Should signs of shriveling appear a slight 
watering must be given, but not enough 
to start the buds. By the middle cf 



80 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 25, 



August the plants will be ready to prune. 
All but the best wood should be removed, 
and the other shortened down to from 
six to eight inches from the bed. A thor- 
ougli watering should be given as soon as 
the cuts are healed, then remove all loose 
soil and give mulching of half soil and 
manure. Air, night and day, should be 
given until the foliage appears hard and 
dark green. I have a house of Brides 
treated this way which has been running 
five years, and is stronger and healthier 
this year than ever. The base of the stems 
will measure from one to two inches in 
diameter. I shall run it another year. 
Plants treated in this way havetheirfirst 
crop in October, which is as early as good 
flovyers can be obtained. This treatment 
gives the plant a period of activity and 
one of rest. The soil by being dried is 
sweetene4, and the fresh soil added gives 
all the necessary stimulus. 

Like all other horticultural operations, 
great care and judgment is required from 
the time of drying until the plants are 
once more growing vigorously. Too rapid 
drying or too rapid a start may cause 
absolute failure. 

The following figures taken from the 
production of 2,017 plantsofBridesshow 
the results of the above system: 
1st season, 1890-91, flowers cut 46,575 
2d " 1891-92, " " 77,231 
3d " 1892-93, " " 74,069 
4th " 1893-94, " " 94,409 



Total for four years 292,284 

Average per year 73,071 

The fourth year shows double the cut 
of the first year with young plants. 

In considering the best varieties to 
grow several questions must be con- 
sidered. 

The market requires as perfect a flower 
as can be produced; in fact, competition 
is so great that only the best can be sold 
to advantage. Color, size, foliage and 
keeping qualities all have to be consid- 
ered. Again, from a producer's stand- 
point a rose must be vigorous, floriferous 
and able to stand handling and trans- 
porting. So far very few roses among 
the thousands introduced possess this 
quality, although great advances have 
been made during the past years, and 
judging from the past few years even bet- 
ter varieties for forcing will soon be forth- 
coming. In fact a great field is open to 
the hybridizer in this country. 

The varieties to be had at present are 
the following: American Beauty, Svn. 
Mme. Ferd Jamain. Thisroseis probably 
the finest so far introduced. 
The Bride is the best white. 
Bridesmaid has superseded C. Mcrmet, 
and is the most satisfactory pink rose yet 
introduced. 

Meteor splendid in color but lacking in 
fragrance, and in cloudy weather has a 
tendency to come dark in color and de- 
formed in shape. 
A good red rose is badly needed. 
Perle des Jardins is still the best yellow, 
and in some localities one of the best of 
all teas. 

Mme. Hoste is remarkably prolific, and 
when well grown resembles in shape, size 
and color Cornelia Cook. A few can be 
profitably grown. 

Mme. Cusin has been badly hurt by the 
Bridesmaid, but still can be considered as 
a profitable rose to grow. 

Mme. de Watteville, although a beauti- 
ful flower and very productive, has proved 
such a poor keeper in a warm room that 
the public no longer ask for it. 

Kaiserin Augusta Victoria has proved 
for winter work a great disappointment, 
as it has a tendency to come green and 



keep poorly. In summer it is the best 
white introduced. 

Mme. Testout is still in doubt. The 
color is beautiful, but it is a poor keeper 
and shipper. 

Papa Gontier has been badly hurt by 
Meteor, and owing to its short season is 
now no longer profitable to grow. 

Mrs. Whitney is still to be tested. It 
promises well but lacks substance. A 
great future should be in store for this 
class, as it combines fragrance, color and 
productiveness. 

La France, except for summer work, 
can no longer be classed with the other 
good pinks. 

For all purposes thefollowing areprob- 
ably the best roses to grow: 

Pink, Bridesmaid. 

White The Bride. 

Red, Meteor. 

Yellow, Perle des Jardins. 

Deep pink, American Beauty. 

It would appear advisable to select the 
best one in each color than to grow sev- 
eral shades of any color. A still further 
advance towards more perfect flowers 
might be obtained by making a specialty 
of one or more roses, that owing to soil, 
treatment, or other causes, appear to 
flourish best in any one locality. For in- 
stance, Mr. Nash, of Clifton, is known 
principally as a Beauty grower; Mr. Pier- 
son, of Scarborough, as a noted grower of 
Meteors; Mr. E. Asmus, ofHoboken, as 
a very successful grower of Mme. Cusins, 
etc. 

This list might be considerable length- 
ened, but I have probably exhausted your 
patience even on the subject of the queen 
of flowers. 



After discussion by Messrs. Tesson, 
Maj', Simpson and Gasser Mr. Samuel 
Goldring, in the absence of Mr. Mathews, 
read his essay on "Orchids," asfollows: 

Orchids from a Commercial Point of View. 

BY WM. MATHEWS, UTICA. N. Y. 

When asked by our worthy secretary 
to prepare an essay on orchids from a 
commercial point of view the question 
flashed through my mind why so many 
people engaged in floriculture made ex- 
ceptions to the orchid, and at the same 
time attempted to grow so many trashy 
things that are much harder to grow and 
dispose of than the product of the orchids 
that are suitable for commerce. Go east 
or west, you can most generally find 
many poorly grown marantas,draccenas, 
crotons, etc., and a host of other things 
that are of no beauty or utility, unless 
very well grown, and to grow them well 
requires both skill and perseverence. 
Generally speaking, should a gardener 
ask the proprietor of many of the beauti- 
ful conservatories that can be found in 
almost every state of the union for a line 
of hothouse and greenhouse plants, no 
matter if they cost double the price of 
good orchids, there is no refusal. The 
plants are obtained and many of them 
are often useless and unfit for the position 
in which they are placed, and are much 
harder to bring to a state of perfection 
than a large percentage of the orchid fam- 
ily would be. Nevertheless, there seems 
to hang around the name of orchid a 
warning not to touch them, and a feeling 
pervades many otherwisegood gardeners 
that orchids are very troublesome and 
hard to grow, when in reality with a 
minimum amount of care they are the 
most reliable and easily grown stock that 
is embraced in the whole category of 
floriculture. 
Some orchidists will persist in saying 



that orchids for commercial purposes can 
be counted on the fingers of one's hand. 
To this dogma I emphatically say "No." 
Shou'd a grower confine himself to five 
species I am certain that in a few seasons 
he would find the grower who grew a 
good range of species and varieties would 
soon outdo him. The beauty of orchid 
flowers, I feelfreeto say, is muchincreased 
by grouping several varieties together; 
at the same time I do not decry a display 
of one variety, whether cattleva, odont- 
oglossum or phatenopsis. I do not 
know of any thing that appealsto a really 
artistic taste so much as a well arranged 
stage of orchids, intermixed with fine 
ferns, etc. Unfortunately many of the 
most beautiful orchids have very ordi- 
nary foliage; if the foliage of the orchid 
were as ornate as their bloom then they 
would be grand indeed. 

Commercially the orchid has scarcely 
gotten a foothold in this country yet, but 
the time I am sure is not far distant when 
they will stand commercially in America 
in as good a ratio as in European coun- 
tries, and there will then be few large 
decorati ye events where the orchid will 
not be present, not to the injury of other 
flowers, but to their benefit. If in a dec- 
oration one mantel is ordered banked 
with orchids the otherone mu?t necessar- 
ily be more gorgeously banked with other 
flowers by way of comparison. Then 
again, if you have a commercial stock of 
orrhids, you have always something to 
help you out. There are times, just like 
at the present writing, when your rose 
stock is "off crop,"carnations scarce; then 
you can fill the order with orchids, much 
to the pleasure of your customer and 
profit to yourself. There is anothergood 
feature, if you do not want to use the 
bloom you have out to-day they will be 
just as good one to three weeks hence. 
So it is very rarely you lose any orchid 
bloom even when you are consigning 
hundreds of once beautiful roses to the 
waste barrel. 

I have always found that when roses are 
very plentiful and cheap nobody wants 
them. What buyers there are in such 
times are looking around for some "tid- 
bits." This is another instance where 
the orchids will come into play to the 
pleasure and satisfaction of both florist 
and customer. 

Now I have no doubtthat you will con- 
sider it a bold assertion when I say that 
the orchid gives me less trouble than any 
other branch of floriculture I am eneaged 
in. In our rose houses we kept fire till 
about the 5th of June. In our orchid 
houses the fires were let out about the 
15th of April, and not started after- 
wards, removing a few plants, such as 
phalanopsis, a few dendrobes and things 
that required strong heat, to a palm 
house, where a gentle fire is kept during 
the summer. Experience has taught me 
that there are more orchids killed by cod- 
dling in a close atmosphere than by any- 
thing else. There is no plant that de- 
lights more in a fresh and pure atmos- 
phere. I never think of closing ventilat- 
ors, top or bottom, on my cattleya 
houses after about the 15th of April, ac- 
cording to season as to date, even if the 
temperature should go down to 48° or 
50° in the early morning, unless a strong 
cold wind should come up, then the ven- 
tilators are shut to prevent a cold biting 
draft going through the houses. 

I suppose, commercially speaking, the 
grand and main point at issue is the 
"great and almighty dollar" that is un- 
fortunately so dear to the hearts of most 
most of us, even if we are engaged in one 
of the most pleasurable occupations on 



i8g4- 



The American Florist. 



81 



earth. I will confess to the fact that the 
outlay for a large quantityof orchids will 
be large in comparison with roses, carna- 
tions, etc. At the same time it is a fact 
that a large quantity of orchids can be 
bought for a little money, but this grade 
of stock would be unprofitable and dis- 
appointing, for, although it is only a few 
years that the bloom of orchids have 
been on sale in public stores, yet it is re- 
markable how discriminating and esthetic 
are the tastes of American ladies in the 
purchase of those charming flowers. I 
have experienced this so much that I have 
concluded that a poor form or color of 
cattleya, odontoglossum, etc., shall no 
longer find a place in my collection, the 
order being that such stock be at once 
relegated to the waste heap. Id every 
importation there will be a certain per- 
centage of such useless varieties which 
would be dear in a gift. In orchids as in 
all other commodities those of a good 
quality are the cheaper, and I do not hes- 
itate to say that a collection of orchids, 
well selected and good healthy stock, will 
prove as lucrative as any other branch of 
floriculture, but I would strongly per- 
suade intending purchasers to buy good 
strong stock, whether from the woods, 
or already established plants. I am con- 
fident that at present prices no one need 
fear purchasing established stock. I 
think it will be cheaper for them if the 
the labor, anxiety and other contingencies 
are well considered. They will bring a 
quicker return than stuff from the woods 
with all the risks, and there are many. 
Thousands are imported yearly that have 
either been superheated or sea washed. 
If you should get a dose or two of this 
kind of medicine, as I have, it will tend 
to dampen the ardor for orchid culture, 
especially if it should happen at the com- 
mencement of your orchid career. I have 
bought cattleyas at fifty cents dry. I 
have bought the same varieties estab- 
lished at $5. Those at $5 brought the 
price of plant back and $2.50 profit in six 
months. The fifty-cent one was not at 
any time in two years worth more than 
a dollar, flower and all included. So I 
would strongly advise anyone commenc- 
ing orchid culture to get plants of the 
best quality obtainable, even if he did not 
get so many. I have lately had com- 
munications from collectors, and they say 
that it is impossible that orchids can be 
collected and sold as cheaply as at the 
present time, as they have to climb much 
higher up the mountains, which means 
additional expense. 

It is the opinion of lots of gardeners 
that orchids soon get worn out. That is 
very true, and we see the same condition 
in all branches of plant culture. Too 
often has it been my experience to see a 
once choice lot of orchids either steaming 
or frying in some out of the way corner 
without ever having been treated even to 
a pot washing. I have seen what were 
once fine specimens of cattleyas and van- 
das standing in the same pots and posi- 
tion year after year, potting material 
rotten, plants covered with scale, and 
those who have charge of such stock are 
the very fellowsthat cry "wolf and warn 
many intending purchasers to go light 
on orchids, and confidently advise and 
declare that the orchid is a hard one. I 
have a house of cattleyas that contains a 
number of plants once owned by the ven- 
erable Isaac Buchanan of Astoria, pur- 
chased about 1883, and which doubtless 
had been in his possession a number of 
years previously. Those plants are in 
perfectly healthy condition, and bear a 
fine crop of bloom annually. I have also 
plants from the late Dr. Wolcott's collec- 



tion, Mrs. Morgan's and others that 
have been in cultivation about 25 years. 
Those plants are to-day in fine, healthy 
condition. I think these few remarks are 
enough to show that orchids, if well es- 
tablished and kept in clean healthy condi- 
tion, are as safe and paying a stock as 
one can invest in; but improperly cared 
for and carelessly and negligently han- 
dled, they, like all kinds of choice plants 
(excepting none ) will prove a losing in- 
vestment; but I do claim that more of 
the orchid family will stand abuse and 
improper culture better than any other 
kind ot stock I am acquainted with. 

In conclusion I would say that it is a 
lamentable thing to see so many wealthy 
people living in luxurious homes sur- 
rounded by fine plant houses, the latter 
costing from $5,000 to $10,000, which 
do not contain $500 worth of choice 
plants of any kind. Often this is the 
fault of the man in charge, who is either 
too lazy or too ignorant to care for any- 
thing better than a few trashy common 
things, which, by the way, should be fur- 
nished by the local florist or plantsman. 
I have reference to such things as gera- 
niums, coleus, etc., etc. If we had better 
gardeners we should soon see more houses 
of choice stock that would be immensely 
gratifying to the proprietors of such 
places and at the same time create a de- 
mand, and encouragement would spring 
up all around that would be both benefi- 
cial and profitable to the trade, and a 
credit to this glorious country. 

It was discussed by Messrs. Lonsdale, 
Goldring and Anthony. 

Wednesday Afternoon Session. 

The afternoon session opened with the 
reading of the essay on "Cannas" by Mr. 
J. T. Temple of Davenport, Iowa, which 
was followed by a very interesting talk 
In' Mr. Grove P. Rawson of Elmira, X. 
Y., on "The evolution of the chrysanthe- 
mum." 

On conclusion of the address the appre- 
ciation of the members was expressed by 
a rising vote of thanks. This was fol- 
lowed by Mr. Tricker's paper on ".Aquat- 
ics" as follows: 



Aquatics. 

IIV W'.M. TKIClvEK, CLIFTON. X. J. 

This is a progressive age, and as flori- 
culture is making rapid strides it be- 
hooves every florist to keep abreast of 
the times. During the past decade much 
has been accomplished in our profession; 
many additions have been made to the 
list of useful plants for general decoration 
and for cut flowers; the increasing inter- 
est in the cultivation of the rose and car- 
nation has resulted in the formation of a 
carnation society, and later, a rose 
society; but no one dreamt ten years ago 
there would be a chrysanthemum society. 
The introduction of the chrysanthemum 
as a florist's flower was an innovation, 
and many considered it only fit for Chinese 
and Japs; but the stately Queen of 
Autumn is with usstill in all hersplendor. 
More can be said of the wondrous increase 
in the demand for palms, ferns, orna- 
mental and flowering plants for decora- 
tion, and what shall we say of the change 
in our public parks, gardens, and ceme- 
teries; tbe millions of plants grown 
annually for their embellishment, and for 
private gardens, from those of the million- 
aire to the small plot of the mechanic, 
how many millions more? This is a vast 
field for the florist, and floriculture knows 
no limit. 



Aquatic gardening is apparently in its 
infancy, though aquatics areas old as the 
hills, but this class of plants now com 
mands our attention. Aquatics are as- 
sociated with the history of the ancient 
Egyptians, where mention is first made 
of the Egyptian lotus, Nelumbium specio- 
sum; the worship of which was common 
with them. Sculptural representations 
of it are found among the ruins of Egyp- 
tian temples. It was not only known to 
the ancient Egyptians, but was common 
in olden times in East and West India, 
China, Japan, Persia, and Asiatic Russia. 
The Chinese have ever held it in sacred re- 
gard, but that character was not limited 
merely to ornamental purposes; the roots 
(or tubers) were used and still are as an 
article of diet. The American lotus, Nelum- 
bium luteum, was well known to the Indi- 
ans as an article of diet, but has of late 
been disregarded. Thisisa distinct species 
and must not be confounded with the 
Egyptian lotus nor Pharoah's locust, 
with which we have been so familiar this 
year. 

Nymphffias are also widely diffused, and 
are found in all parts of the world, each 
different country possessing species pecu- 
liarly its own. But of all the nymphteas 
no species can compare with Victoria 
regia, and although many species were 
known in England prior to the introduc- 
tion of the latter, the cultivation of 
aquatics received a stimulus thereby, 
which extended to the United States, the 
the effect of which is felt by us this day. 
The discovery of this wonderful plant 
by Mr. Bridges, an English traveler, in 
1845, created such an enthusiasm as 
nearly cost him his life. His first impulse 
was to obtain specimens of the flower, 
and he would have attempted to enter 
the water, but was warned by the Indians 
who accompanied him that the stream 
swarmed with alligators; happily for him 
and us he lived to express his wondrous 
amazement of his discovery; he success- 
fully carried to England the seed that 
produced the first plant, which became so 
famous. This was in the year 1849, when 
a tank was built expressly for the new 
plant in the great conservatory at Chats- 
worth, under the management of Mr. 
Paxton. 

It is interesting to note that there were 
progressive florists in the United States 
at this date, although neither rapid tran- 
sit nor ocean greyhounds were estab- 
lished, yet the result of such an achieve- 
ment in floriculture was not only known 
here, but a similar tank and greenhouse 
were constructed, and the Victoria regia 
was successfully grown by Mr. Caleb 
Cope, Philadelphia, in the year 1851. 
Considering the time when the Victoria 
flowered in England — November, 1849 — 
there was little time lost, and this act ex- 
hibited an enthusiasm and enterprise 
worthy of our day. The foregoing is the 
earliest record of aquatic gardening in 
this country. With the Victoria was also 
introduced Nelumbium speciosum. 

The construction of the Victoria tank 
and house was such as to stimu- 
late natural conditions. The Jwarm 
water and tropical atmosphere were 
not enough; the water had to be 
kept in motion; a water wheel was 
constructed for thispurpose, and a stream 
of water constantly flowed, which was 
conducted into a cistern or reservoir in 
the middle of the vegetable garden, which 
was used for watering in those days, be- 
fore city water hydrants and hose were 
thought of. In this cistern the Nelumbium 
speciosum was planted and was a great 
success. After this small aquariums and 
ponds were made out of doors by differ 



82 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 25, 



ent people and aquatics were more or 
less grown. 

It is sad to relate of this enterprising 
gentleman, as of many others since, that 
he died very shortly after this event, and 
that the glory and pride of this horticult- 
ural establishment thereafter departed. 
On this historical spot stands the Forrest 
Home for Aged Actors. 

Yet another, a pleasing feature in con- 
nection with this first Victoria in the 
United States, and which makes this 
event most interesting. We have to-day 
at the head of the Department of Parks 
in the capital of the Union, a man of 
singular ability, experience and judgment, 
who was an employe in the gardens of 
Mr. Caleb Cope when the first Victoria 
and lotus were grown. I refer to Mr. 
Geo. H. Brown. 

The state of Massachusetts appears to 
have been the next in order of date where 
the cultivation of the Victoria regia was 
engaged in; the earliest grower in that 
state being John Fisk Allen, of Salem, 
who on the 18th of June, 1883, exhibited 
a leaf of Victoria regia, four feet in diame- 
ter; on the 16th of July, one five and a 
half feet, and on the 4th of August, a 
flower, all at the rooms of the Mass. 
Hort. Society. Daniel Waldo Lincoln, of 
Worcester, was the next cultivator in 
Mass.; he had the Victoria soon after Mr. 
Allen, but the exact date is not known. 
The Victoria still led the way, and in the 
year 1856 it was grown in Cincinnati by 
Mr. George Pentland, gardener to Nich- 
olas Longworth, Esq., butits cultivation 
did not become general, and would not 
now under such expensive modes of 
culture. 

Attempts to cultivate Nelumbium speci- 
osum are reported prior to Mr. Cope's 
venture. In 1839 it is stated by Hovey 
that Nelumbium speciosum was natural- 
ized near Philadelphia, blooming abund- 
antly all summer, and growing in a 
shallow ditch where it covered the sur- 
face of the water with its broad peltate 
leaves and strong flower buds, which ex- 
panded in all the splendor of oriental 
magnificence. The report was discred- 
ited by the Boston boys, who contended 
it was nothing more than the American 
lotus. However, the archives of the 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society con- 
tain the folio wing report (if not destroyed 
by fire): At the meeting held February 
1840, the committee on distribution of 
seeds submitted their report, from which 
it appears two parcels of seed had been 
received; one from Calcutta, presented in 
1838 by Dyllwyn Parrish, contained 
among other things seed of Nelumbium 
speciosum and N. album, and Mr. R. 
Buist succeeded in raising plants of these 
species, which were considered very rare 
in this country, if indeed they existed ex- 
cept from these Calcutta seeds. 

From 1856 to 1876, very little was 
done in the way of aquatic gardening, 
but at the latter date Philadelphia was 
again to the front, and a plant of Victoria 
regia was a novel and attractive feature 
of the Centennial Exposition. About the 
year 1880, Mr. Sturtevant reintroduced 
Nelumbium speciosum, when it was 
planted in a pond near Bordentown, N.J. 
Here was the most successful attempt to 
naturalize this oriental species, which has 
astonished both the new and the old 
world. Mr. Sturtevant also succeeded in 
introducing several species of nymphjea, 
victoria and a full line of aquatic plants 
which were distributed to all parts of the 
United States. 

About the same time Mr. Samuel Hen- 
shaw, of West Brighton, Staten Island, 



established Nelumbium speciosum from 
seed sent from Japan by Dr. Hogg. In 
1880 Benjamin Grey, of Maiden, ex- 
hibited before the Mass. Hort. Society, 
Nymphsea Devoniensis, N. coerulea and 
N. dentata, receiving an award therefor. 

In 1883 Hovey & Co. and Mr. Grey ex- 
hibited nymphaea and in 1884N. S. Simp- 
kins, of Yarmouthport, entered the field. 

In 1886 aquatics were introduced into 
Central Park, New York. Nelumbium 
speciosum is there naturalized and is one 
of the most striking features of the park. 

In 1888 L. W. Goodell appeared on the 
scene with a tank of aquatic plants at 
the annual exhibition of the Mass. Hort, 
Society. A year later H. H. Hunnewell 
exhibited a collection. 

Amateurs now commenced the cultiva- 
tion of aquatics, and choice specimens 
were to be seen at Newport and in the 
neighborhood of Boston, Chicago and 
other cities. Mr. Chadwick, president of 
Chicago Horticultural Society, grew 
aquatics, which undoubtedly led to the 
introduction of these plants into Lincoln 
Park in 1888, then under the able man- 
agement of Supt. J. A. Pettigrew. The 
cultivation of Victoria regia, as well as 
all available nympbseas at that day has 
given Chicago and her parks a world- 
wide reputation. Other parks and gar- 
dens have introduced aquatics with sur- 
prising results, and to-day they are the 
most popular plants. The Victoria has 
been grown in the Botanic Garden, Wash- 
ington, D. C, and other southern states 
without artificial heat after planted out, 
and probably the first instance of such is 
recorded by the Wilmington, N. C, Mes- 
senger, when Dr. Bahnson, after several at- 
tempts, succeeded in flo wering the Victoria 
in the open at Salem, N. C. In mostcases 
it has been only a partial success when 
attempted to be grown without artificial 
heat; it must necessarily be late in the 
season before planting out or run the risk 
of losing all (as is the case thissummerat 
Washington). In many instances where 
steam power is used in factory, pump or 
for other purposes, the waste steam can 
be utilized for the heating of the tank, but 
the safest and best method is to have an 
independent heating system. 

The introduction of Victorias into our 
gardens and parks opened up a wide field 
for the general cultivation of tropical 
nymphasas, which has now become gen- 
eral in most of our public parks; also by 
a large proportion of the wealthier class 
who own and maintain beautiful grounds. 
A few enthusiastic amateurs who grew 
aquatics for pleasure and recreation have 
done more for the advancement of this 
now popular class of plants than all the 
public institutions in the country, and it 
may safely be said that in no other coun- 
try can such aquatic gardening be seen 
at the present day as in the United States. 

It England, where every known variety 
finds a home, few, if any, growers have 
venturedto cultivate the tender nymphasas 
save in aquatic houses; hence it is very 
difficult to compare the same or to know 
the species by description of plants grown 
under glass with less light and solar heat, 
as given. The plants here are more vigor- 
ous, have more substance, and the color 
of the flowers and foliage is intensified. 

Aquatics attracted the attention of 
foreign visitors at Chicago last summer, 
as well as many other visitors, and many 
received an object lesson which will be 
productive of good results. 

It is very no^iceable that, from very 
early date, in this as in all branches of 
horticulture, the true cultivator desired 



to improve, if possible, original species, 
and as a result the first hybrid nymphsea 
was effected by Mr. Paxton, gardener to 
the Duke of Devonshire, at Chatsworth, 
England, in 1850. After it came N. 
Kewensis. 

The first hybrid raised in this country 
originated with Mr. E. D. Sturtevant, 
and was named N. Sturtevantii; it is a 
flower of unsurpassed merit. M. B. 
Latour-Marliac surprised the world with 
his no less wonderful productions, which 
were exhibited at the Universal Exhibi- 
tion, Paris, in 1889. These have gained 
a world-wide reputation, and have given 
an impetus to the general cultivation of 
aquatics, especially of hardy nymphsas 
in Europe and largely in the United 
States. 

Among growers in the United States 
several natural hybrids have been effected 
by insects, which work is likely to be re- 
peated where aquatics are grown in large 
ponds. One of the best selections of such 
is Nymphffia odorataCaroliniana. I had 
the privilege last year of presenting before 
the public at Chicago some hybrids which 
were the progeny of carefully selected 
parents. These are quite distinct and 
desirable varieties. 

This assembly represents all the differ- 
ent phases of floriculture, cut flower and 
commission men, plant growers, whole- 
sale and retail, in all branches. There is 
a growing interest in floriculture. Parks 
and gardens are public factors in this line 
and florists must grow various kinds of 
plants to meet the ever increasing demand 
for the embellishment of the home, the 
flower garden, parks and cemeteries; and 
swamps, bogs, ponds, now unsightly and 
in some instances nuisances, are destined 
ere long to become veritable Edens. The 
time is come when people not possessing 
a natural piece of water conclude they 
must have some kind of a water garden, 
and artificial ponds, tanks, basins are 
made to accommodate these charming 
and interesting water nymphs. This par- 
ticular flora is represented at the present 
time by about fifty species, collected from 
all parts of the globe, and dybrids; also 
the Indian, Chinese and other lotus, and 
innumerable other aquatic plants. 

Among the hardy plants are classed all 
nelumbiums, nymphceas, including the 
native species N. odorata, N. o. gigantea, 
N. o.Caroliniana, N. o. rosea, N.tuberosa 
andN. t. rosea; also N. alba, N. a. candidis- 
sima, N. Candida, N. pygmasa, N.Marliacea 
rosea, N. M. albida, N. M. carnea, N. M. 
chromatella, N. Laydekeri rosea, N. 
odorata sulphurea, N. helvola. These are 
all perfectly hardy, and once established 
take care of themselves as do the native 
species. They embrace the soft and 
delicate shades in color from pure white, 
yellow, pink, deep rose, and produce 
charming scenery with their pleasing 
foliage and enchanting flowers, associated 
with numerous water loving plants as 
iris, spirtea, variegated rushes, acorus, 
reeds, arundo, bamboo, typha.sagittaria, 
hibiscus, ornamental grasses, etc. But 
we must not omit the most gorgeous 
varieties of water lilies from the tropics, 
the pale to deep blue, or royal purple, the 
carmine and crimson. These are as easy 
to grow in the open in summer as is a 
coleus, with unquestionably greater re- 
sults. The water garden is not complete 
without the Victoria regia, but at present 
this will not be extensively grown, 
though with a nominal outlay, or where 
a tank can be heated by the greenhouse 
plant, Victoria will be a wonderiul attrac- 
tion, and business men know what an 
attraction is worth. 



i894- 



The American Florist. 



83 



In Mr. Washbume's absence his paper 
on violets was read bv Mr. O'Mara. 



Successful Violet Culture. 

BY AXDREW WASHBURX, BLOOMINGTOX, ILL. 

This subject, of so much interest and 
importance to the members of this soci- 
ety, having been assigned to me for a re- 
ply, I have attempted with some hesi- 
tancy its consideration, mainly for the 
reason that others who grow violets 
successfully advocate quite different 
methods; therefore I shall speak only of 
the way in which we have found success. 

We propagate our plants by a division 
of the old stool, not laterthan the middle 
of February, using only vigoious off- 
shoots and discarding all plants having 
large and woodv like stems; put in 2 inch 
pots, and grow in a cool house under the 
same conditions we give the flowering 
plants (which will be named later) and 
when well rooted remove to cold frames, 
there to become hardened and ready to 
plant in the field as early in April as 
possible. 

We plant in the field in rows fifteen 
inches apart each way in good rich soil, 
and give frequent cultivation with the 
wheel hoe. During the summer the plants 
are kept free from weeds and all thin run- 
ners removed, care being taken not to re- 
move the new growing crowns, so that 
by fall there should be enough bud pro- 
ducing crowns around the original plant 
to make plants from five to eight inches 
in diameter. Violets should be planted 
on well drained land, and at no time 
should be allowed to flag for want of 
moisture, or their vitality will be impaired 
and the plants become an easy prey to 
disease. We have found it necessary dur- 
ing our past dry summers to irrigate our 
plants, and to this we attribute largely 
our success. 

The plants should be carefully lifted in 
September before danger of heavy frosts, 
care being taken that their roots be 
broken and exposed as little as possible, 
and planted in the houses in about six 
inches of good soil. This soil we prepare 
several months before it is wanted for 
use, and is composed of good loam and 
well rotted manure from the stables. 
After setting the plants should be thor- 
oughly watered and for several days fre- 
quently syringed. At this time a light 
shading on the glass will be beneficial. 
We have sometimes used a clay wash 
which will be removed by the first good 
rain. 

We have had the best success in houses 
about ten feet wide, runningeast and west 
with a wall in the center and tables on 
each side, built so as to bring the plants 
as near the glass as possible, and with 
provision for ample ventilation. The 
night temperature should be kept as near 
as may be at 40° to 45°, with a dav tem- 
perature of from 60° to 70°. Higher 
temperature will lessen the formation of 
buds and encourage a growth of foliage. 
In cold weather much care should be ex- 
ercised in watering, and the foliage should 
only be wet in the morning of clear sunny 
days; at other times, if needed, water 
only the ground between the plants. 
During the flowering season the plants 
should be kept free from runners, and all 
leaves removed that have passed their 
usefulness. 

By this method of culture our plants 
have given an average of thirty to forty 
good flowers from October to March. 

Of violet disease I am unable to speak, 
as we have never had it. Man in vigorous 
health is not susceptible to disease; good 



sanitary conditions are necessary to good 
health, and as with man so with plants, 
they will respond to like conditions, and 
given an abundance of pure air, water, 
cleanliness and suitable cultural methods 
may we not hope to escape violet disease 
and still have success in violet culture? 



Profitable Winter Blooming Plants. 
\Answered by W. K. Harris. '\ 

The question assifineri lo me lo answer 
is "Profitable winter blooming plants." 
The question is a broad one, and gives no 
specific meaning. I suppose the inquirer 
meant plants grown in pots for the pur- 
pose of decorating conservatories, win- 
dows and other places on festive occa- 
sions. The word "profitable," in this 
connection, means that plants can be 
disposed of for more than the cost of pro- 
duction; or to obtain for them how much 
more, is a question for each individual to 
decide for himself. I desire more than 
some of my brethren, and having my de- 
sire gratified, I am enabled to meet my 
obligations more promptly than many of 
my lellow craftsmen. 

From my standpoint of profit, thereare 
but tew varieties of flowering plants in 
pots that will pay to grow, and they 
must be grown in limited quantities. 
This branch of our business is on the 
wane. The demand has been growing 
less year after year for the past ten or 
twelve years. There was more demand 
fifteen or twenty years ago than there is 
to-day for winter blooming plants in 
pots. Under the cool shadows of such 
facts there is but little encouragement to 
foster or develop nature's beauty in form 
of blooming plants in pots: 

To brighten weary winter's gloom. 

And to scent its cold breath with the 
fragrance of June. 

The scene of this gloomy picture from 
one branch of our business lies in Phila- 
delphia, the place where I have watched 
and catered to this line of horticulture for 
the past twenty-seven years. (My re- 
marks refer to this locality only, not 
being acquainted with the demands of 
other markets.) I have grown nearly all 
of the popular plants of the day, and have 
introduced many novelties with some suc- 
cess, and many failures. I will not at- 
tempt to name or enumerate the many 
varieties of plants I have grown in the 
past, as I do not wish to take up too 
much of your time, nor to wander so far 
from the question, although it might be 
interesting to some. 

The following, I think, will be more or 
less profitable to grow. I will open the 
list with chrysanthemums, as the festive 
season opens with the advent of her 
queenly beauty. They are wanted in 
large quantities, but not as many as 
former years. Poinsettia and stevia are 
both good in limited quantities for Christ- 
mas. Carnations, in variety, are wanted, 
but do not grow them unless you can 
produce good plants in 6-inch pots full of 
buds and bloom for fifteen or twenty cents 
each; I can not. Begonia incamata ro- 
busia is the finest of all begonias when 
well done for the holidays. Begonia 
rubra is a finepotplant when well grown. 
Cyclamens and primulas are very popu- 
lar, but the former require some skill and 
much care to grow. Lilium Harrisii is in 
fair demand from Christmas to Easter. 
Azalea indica is the most popular of all 
winter blooming plants in pots from De- 
cember to May. Genista canariensis and 
racemosa in small quantities from the 1st 
of February to Easter. Ericas or heather, 
hyemalis, Wilmoreana and gracilis are 



the best of this extensive class of plants. 
Cineraria hybrid a is always wanted in 
goodly numbers. They make a big show 
on the florist's counter, but a very small 
one on the grower's ledger. Paris daisy 
(Chrysanthemum frutescens), is quite a 
favorite all winter. Mahernia odorata 
is admired for its fragrance, or its vulgar 
name "honey-bell," I know not which. 
Mignonette, heliotrope, violets, pansies, 
English primroses, hyacinths and nar- 
cissus are all wanted in limited quantities 
in the latter part of winter and early 
spring; but the price is so low for them, it 
is a question to me whether they are 
worth bothering with. Some years ago 
there was a good demand for this classof 
plants at fair prices, but they no longer 
seem to please the masses. 

The above is about all I can think of 
that would pay to grow in any consider- 
able quantities, although there are many 
other flowering plants that could be dis- 
posed of in moderate numbers, such as 
libonias, linums, and the many varieties 
of winter flowering begonias, etc. In 
fact, any plant that is pretty and showy 
will find some admirers, but not enough 
to make it an object of profit. We can 
not give correct advice to a grower what 
he should grow. One man may be able 
to grow a plant quicker and better than 
another can; therefore he could grow it 
cheaper, or make more money at the same 
price than his competitor. Hence the im- 
portance of self reliance upon self judg- 
ment. And again, I have ever found, he 
that is always giving advice himselt is 
most in need of that which he parts with 
so freely. One thought more, Mr. Presi- 
dent, and I am done. — 

Nature, like friends, will help the strong. 

Neither has much time for the weak, in 
life's busy throng; 

So work, and on yourself depend! 

Then nature kind will make yourself 
your dearest friend. 



Thursday Morning Session. 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS. 

The el ction of officers resulted in the 
election of Mr. Edwin Lonsdale for prea- 
ident; E C. Reineman, vice-president; W. 
J. Stewart, seer tary; H. B. Beattj', 
treasurer. The ballot forpresident stood: 
Lonsdale 135 and Scott 86. As soon as 
the ballot was announced Mr. Scott 
moved that the election be made xinani- 
raous, which was done. In response to a 
call for a speech Mr. Lonsdale said he 
had not anticipated such a weighty foe- 
man as Mr. Scott, and when he found 
that eentleman was in thefield he consid- 
er, d his own election so doubtful that he 
had not prepared any speech of impor- 
tance. Mr. Scott, in nsponse to a call, 
said he had yielded to the solicitation of 
others in becoming a candidate, and when 
he found the "Brave old Duke" was in 
the hands of his friends he was with diffi- 
culty kept from withdrawing. He added 
that in electing Mr. Lonsdale the society 
had selected one of the most worthy and 
amiable men in the country, and one who 
would honor the office. The friendliness 
of the contest for presidential honors was 
well illustrated by the charming sight 
presented on Wednesday afternoon of the 
two candidates promenading up the 
av nue arm in arm. 

The election of vice-president, secretary 
and treasurer was by unanimous vote, 
each officer-elect responding in a few 
words of thanks for the honor conferred. 

Mr. Simpson then read his essay as 
follows: 



84 



The American Florist. 



Aug- 25, 



Fertilizers and Their Application, 

BY MK. KOBT. SIMPSON, CROMWELL. fONX. 

I must ask you to be as patient as possi- 
ble this morning while jou listen to my 
very prosaic remarks. Devotees of the 
rose, the orchid, the chrysanthemum and 
the violet have charmed us as they have 
descanted on the beauty or sentiment of 
their favorite flowers, but you will all 
agree with me that my subject is not one 
which lends itself naturally to poetic 
utterance. The question of fertilizers, 
however, is one that interests every 
grower of plants and flowers, and if lean- 
not treat the subject from the standpoint 
of the chemist as well as that of a grower 
I can at least relate a little of my own 
experience. 

According to my observations a great 
many growers attach too little impor- 
tance to the quality of the soil, especially 
for roses, thinking to make up for any de- 
ficiency by a liberal application of man- 
ure. But can the necessary elements be 
supplied in this way? I should certainly 
answer in the negative. If it were possi- 
ble to get a soil sufficiently rich in all that 
is necessary for the proper development 
and sustenance of our greenhouse plants, 
without any addition of fertilizers, I 
would be only too glad to use it. Few of 
us, however, are fortunate enough to 
possess such a soil; one of the greatest 
mistakes, however, that a florist can 
make is to put up a range of greenhouses 
where the soil in the immediate vicinity is 
unsuited for greenhouse purposes. Noth- 
ing in the shape of large glass and model 
greenhouses, or even special treatment, 
can compensate for poor soil. The ques- 
tion then is, what can be considered the 
best soil for such crops as roses, carna- 
tions, chrysanthemums, etc? My choice 
would be two inches from the top of an 
old rich pasture, where the soil is inclined 
to be a heavy loam and the land is low 
enough to catch the deposit from the con- 
tinual washings, yet not low enough to 
be sour and wet; this cut in the spring as 
early as the land is dry and laid up with 
good cow manure of the previous season 
in thin layers in the proportion of four 
parts soil to one of manure; if the soil is 
naturally very rich less manure will an- 
swer, and if very poor a larger quantity 
should be used. Mr. Hunt, in his book, 
"How to grow cut flowers," strongly 
condemns the use of cow manure where 
the animals have been fed with slops 
from distilleries, claiming it to be as fatal 
to plants as the refined product is to man; 
if such is the case, beware! At any rate 
that from grain fed animals is so much 
stronger and better that whenever possi- 
ble it should be used. 

Horse manure I would never mix with 
the soil for rosesunder anyconsideration; 
it may when thoroughly decomposed be 
used as a top dressing, but its action in 
the soil is often pernicious in the extreme. 
1 have seen it fill the beds so full of white 
fungus, resembling mushroom spawn, 
until the whole thing was matted to- 
gether and smelled abominably; at other 
times toadstools would spring up so 
rank that there was danger of lifting the 
plants bodily out of the bench; it is need- 
less to say plants cannot thrive under 
such conditions. 

Sheep manure I consider one of the very 
best fertilizers we have, used eitherin liquid 
form or mixed with the soil at the time 
of planting; but I have never dared to 
mix it in the compost heap, for too much 
of it in one place is certain death to all 
vegetable life. I know of one large grower 
who declares he will never use another 
shovelful of it as long as the world stands; 



upon enquiring how much he mixed witn 
his soil 1 found he used somewhere about 
one part sheep manure and three parts 
soil. You won't be surprised his plants 
had thejaundice. We have proof of the 
powerfulness of sheep manure as a fertil- 
izer if we look at the crops of grain pro- 
duced by land that has been pastured 
with sheep. I know of nothing in the 
way of animal manure that can equal it 
as a crop producer, but we must use it 
cautiously; 200 pounds to a 100-foot 
house of roses or carnations will not be 
too much if it is pulverized and evenly 
mixed with the soil, or the same amount 
can be used as a top dressing. Having 
secured good soil and good manure and 
planted therein good plants the most 
natural thing in the world is that they 
should grow, providing of course that all 
other conditions are favorable. 

When we undertake to furnish food to 
a plant or a number of plants it is reason- 
able to suppose we will understand the 
particular requirements of the plants and 
the nature of the food we propose to sup 
ply; but I fear a great many of us will 
have to admit that our knowledge is very 
scant indeed. If we knew enough about 
the laws of chemistry to analyze our soils 
and determine what properties are lack- 
ing which are known to be essential to 
the complete development of certain 
plants, how much guessing and puzzling 
we might save ourselves, how many fail- 
ures and partial failures we could prevent; 
and for the young men of to-day there is 
no excuse for this ignorance; if we for the 
space of one year would devote the leisure 
time now trifled away to the study of 
chemistry as it relates to our business we 
would acquire sufficient knowledge to 
make us much happier and wiser men. 
Searching for information on this subject 
I addressed several inquiries to Prof. Hal- 
sted, who I believe is here this morning, 
and I do not hesitate to say he will be 
most happy to reply to any questions of 
a scientific nature bearing on our subject. 
My first question was "To properly de- 
velop such plants as roses, violets, carna- 
tions and chrysanthemums what chemi- 
cal properties should the soil possess?" 
Here is the answer: "The soil for grow- 
ing roses, carnations, violets, etc., should 
contain among the leading ingredients of 
plant food, potash, phosphoric acid and 
nitrogen, these three being the elements 
that are most usually absent, one or all, 
in a soil that is unfit for such plants.' In 
addition to these three substances there 
needs to be lime and a small amount of 
iron and other substances; but as these 
with rare exceptions are present in suffi- 
cient quantity nothing further need be 
said of them. Clay and sand make up 
the bulk of ordinary soil in connection 
with the decaying vegetable matter, and 
this latter furnishes nitrogen." Prof. 
Johnson, in his work "How crops feed" 
says practically the same as Prof. Hal- 
sted. Speaking of the relative importance 
of the different ingredients of the soil he 
says, "Those which like oxide of iron are 
rarely deficient, are for that reason less 
prominent among the factors of a crop; 
if any single substance, be it phosphoric 
acid or sulphuric acid or potash or mag- 
nesia, is lacking in a given soil at a cer- 
tain time that substance is then and for 
that soil the most important ingredient. 
From the point of view of natural abund- 
ance we may safely state that on the 
whole available nitrogen and phosphoric 
acid are the most important ingredients 
of the soil, and potash perhaps takes the 
next rank. These are most commonly the 
substances whose absence or deficiency 
impairs fertility, and are those which, 



when adOtd as fertilizers, produce the 
most frequent and remarkable increase of 
productiveness." These three ingredients 
then, nitrogen, phosphoric acid and pot- 
ash, are the most likely to be absent or 
deficient in our soil, and for that reason 
are to us the most important. 

How are we to discover their presence 
in the soil, and if not present howcan they 
be introduced? In reference to the above I 
asked these quesuons. "What elements 
of plant food are found in unleached 
wood ashes, in nitrate of soda, in sul- 
phate of ammonia, and in kainit"? And 
received this reply: "The leading food 
element in wood ashes is potash, but as 
it is the residue after the burning of a 
vegetable substance, it contains all of the 
mineral substances which the plant takes 
from the soil, and the list would be along 
one, including lime, magnesia, iron and 
not to forget phosphoric acid in combina- 
tion with lime and so on. Nitrate cf soda 
contains nitrogen in combination with 
sodium, and is a very satisfactory source 
of nitrogen: and applied in small quanti- 
ties the plant quickly responds to the 
nitrogen that is thus received. Sulphate 
of ammonia also contains nitrogen, and 
one of the elements of ammonia which is 
united with sulphuric acid. Kainit is a 
mixture of very many substances, as 
potash, common salt, sales of magnesia, 
and other substances." All theseelements 
or substances may be in the soil in snfl5- 
cient quantity at the time we fill our 
benches and plant our loses, etc., and as 
a result theplantsmake beautiful growth, 
but after a time we fancy they are not do- 
ing so well, they haven't the same vigor, 
the same beautiful glossy foliage, the 
flowers are not quite as large perhaps, 
and we think something is wrong; and so 
it is, the supply of food is giving out, the 
soil is being exhausted probably ten times 
as fast as it would be out of doors; the 
growth is much more rapid, and while it 
only rains once a week, or once a month 
in the garden or field, it rains every day 
in the greenhouse, washing down through 
the benches each time in solution all the 
different kinds of plant food. It has been 
proven that plant food is carried down in 
the water through the drains of well 
drained land, in quantity sufficient to 
mature a crop of grain; this being the 
case we can readily understand how im- 
poverished our soil in a greenhouse bench 
must become if the amount of food is not 
constantly added to. 

As a general thing when rose foliage 
has a pale, yellowish, sickly look, it is a 
sign the plants lack potash, in whichcase 
I should use wood ashes at the rate of 
one barrel to a 100 foot house of the 
regulation width. About a month ago 
we found a house of Perles planted forthe 
summer trade that had just this look, 
but after a liberal dose of wood ashes 
they are to-day as thrifty and well 
colored as could be desired. Fruit grow- 
ers claim that the "yellows" on peach 
trees can be overcome to a great extent 
by a liberal use of potash. 

Nitrogen, perhaps the most necessary 
food ingredient, is usually present in suf- 
ficient quantity I think where an abund- 
ance of manure is incorporated with the 
soil, but this is not always the case; and 
I have come to the conclusion that when 
plants in a greenhouse bench present a 
stunted appearance without any apparent 
cause, the roots being in a health state, 
and all other conditions being favorable, 
that the soil does not possess nitrogen in 
sufficient quantity, or else what it does 
contain is locked up and is not available 
for the use of the plant. I had an illustra- 
tion of this last fall in a house of Mermet 



i8g4- 



The American Florist. 



85 




GENERAL VIEW OF MR. HEACOCKS GREENHOUSES AT WYNCOTE. PA. 



and Bridesmaid roses. The house was 
not completed until sometime in August, 
hence was planted rather late, but the 
plants were large and vigorous, and the 
soil as far as we could tell fairly good; the 
house itself was all that could be desired, 
vet somehow the plants did not grow, 
but immediately after planting took on 
that hard look which none of us like to 
see. We waited as pitiently as possible 
until a little ahead of Christmas, and then 
concluded something must be done, or we 
would never cut enough to pay for heat- 
ing the house. We accordingly com- 
menced a systematic feeding from a couple 
of barrels brought into the house, using 
sulphate of ammonia and fresh cow 
manure one week, and alternating with 
nitrate of soda and sheep manure. The 
animal manure was used in very small 
quantities, and the salts at the rate n\ a 
3-inch pottul to a barrel of water. They 
were watered with one of these liquids 
once a week for about two months. The 
change was almost instantaneous, and 
was most remarkable; they at once began 
throwing up strongshoots from theroot, 
and while they never grew as large as 
some of the plants in the othtr houses, yet 
they produced large crops of flowers, the 
individual blooms were large, the foliage 
was perfect; the plants in fact became so 
strong and vigorous that we selected all 
our cuttings of those varieties from these 
same plants, in preference to any others 
on the place. This should be a sufficient 
reply to those who claim, that while 
nitrate of soda and similar fertilizers may 
stimulate a plant for a time, thev simply 
do so at the expense of the plant's consti- 
tution, being almost certain to produce 
a soft, unhealthy, unnatural growth. 

Some years ago I had a house of Mer- 
met roses which began to go back during 



the early winter, and it soon looked so 
disgraceful that we would have pulled 
out the plants if it had been possible to 
use the house for another crop, for they 
looked for all the world as if they were in 
the last stages of consumption. We 
debated for some time as to what we 
should do with them, and finally con- 
cluded to try the same experiment I have 
just mentioned, nitrate of soda and 
sulphate of ammonia. My employer had 
very little faith in them, but as he said, 
the roses were dying anyway, and if this 
new fangled stuff killed them outright 
there would be very little loss. The day 
after they had received the first dose, I 
took a look to see if they had improved 
any; vou can imagine how I felt, for there 
was hardly a leaf left on the plants. I 
thought we had fixed 'em sure, but we 
picked up the leaves and kept right on 
with the fertilizers, and strange as it may 
seem, before spring this was the best 
house of Mermets we had. 

I am fully aware when I speak of 
nitrate of soda, that some of you will 
shake your heads in disapproval; there 
have been cases of injury to plants, the 
result of its use (abuse I should say 1 and 
there will continue to be similar cases in 
all probability where care is not taken tn 
use only the safe quantity. I have used 
nitrate of soda for almost all kinds of 
greenhouse plants, and am not aware 
that it ever injured any one of them. 

A word about phosphoric acid; I can 
not tell you what symptoms are mani- 
fested by the plant when there is a defi- 
ciency of this ingredient in the soil , but as 
I have never heard or read of there being 
too much of it for the plants welfare, we 
are safe in furnishing a liberal supply. 
There is no question of its being a great 
factor in furnishing food to plants. Bone 



meal is one of the best sources of phos- 
phoric acid, yielding as it does from 20to 
25 per cent. I have in mind a farm which 
invariably produced wonderful crops; the 
only fertilizers used were barn yard man- 
ure, and for all root crops such as turnips, 
etc., a liberalsprinklingof half inch bones; 
this had been kept up for at least thirty 
years, and as there was a systematic ro- 
tation of crops each one fed more or less 
on the bone in the soil. It was not un- 
usual for a crop of oats to average 120 
bushels to the acre. There isdangerfrom 
bone meal in the greenhouse, however, if 
it has come in contact with acids; Mr. 
Hunt mentions having lost $2,000 worth 
of new roses at one time in this way. It 
behooves us then to make certain that 
our bone is absolutely pure. 

Lime is usually present in the soil in 
sufficient quantity, but an addition of 
this important ingredient to heavy or 
clavey soils is often very beneficial; itacts 
as an enricher, as a sweetener, as a pul- 
verizer, and as an insecticide, hence its 
value to the florist. I had a peculiar ex- 
perience this spring in the use of lime. 
Two benches of ferns planted out for cut- 
ting became infested with a black fungous 
growth which threatened the destruction 
of every plant; we scratched it off, but it 
grew again, and the plants got smaller 
daily, when it occurred to us to use air 
slacked lime as a top dressing; I was sure 
it would kill the fungus, and didn't know 
but it would kill the ferns too; but vie 
tried it, a good covering, over crowns 
and all, and strange to say that while it 
did not kill the parasite, only checkmg it, 
it started the ferns into active growth, 
and since then we have picked in large 
quantities the longest and finest adian- 
tums I have ever seen grown on a bench. 
It is hardly necessary to say I shall not 



86 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 25, 



be afraid to use lime on ferns in the 
future. 

Perhaps the most satisfactory and eco- 
nomical method of supplying food to such 
plants as roses and carnations during the 
winter and spring months is by means of 
liquid manure: I have a decided objection 
to laying manure on the benches as a 
top dressing in the late fall, or during 
winter, believing it to do more harm 
than good; it prevents evaporation and 
keeps the sun from the roots at the time 
when they are benefited the most by its 
direct action. I do not wish it under- 
stood that I dislike mulching at any and 
all seasons of the year, for I have regu- 
larly attended to this operation twice 
during the season with all tea roses, the 
first time in August, and the second 
about March; the first saves a great deal 
of watering and is entirely gone by No- 
vember, and the March mulching gives 
the roots new material to run in and also 
prevents severe drving out. Between 
these dates and in fact after the latter 
date I consider I'quid manure cheaper, 
cleaner in the house and more tffective; 
for ordinary purposes that made from 
animal manure is the safest and best; four 
pecks of cow or horse manure, two pecks 
of sheep manure, or one of hen droppings, 
is sufficient to make lOOgallons of liquid. 
I have known people who never thought 
liquid manure was strong enough, unless 
its odor was powerful enough to drive 
most people away from the house where 
it was being used; but this is against all 
reason and common sense, far better to 
use it weak and often; plants, like ani- 
mals, should be fed regularly if they need 
feeding at all, not gorged to-day and 
starved for a month. Their food also 
should be changed from time to time, so 
that what is not supplied in one form may 
be found in another. 

A word about the mode of applying 
liquid manure. The old method was to 
use barrels in the walks, and apply with 
the watering pot, and a beautiful job it 
is, crawling along a 12 inch walk with a 
3 gallon can in front of you. I have been 
there, perhaps some ot you have; with 
such a system the man who has charge of 
your houses is hardiv likely to remind you 
when the appointed day forgoing I hrough 
this performarce arrives, and I don't 
blame him. This old fashioned method 
may do where the place is very small, and 
can bardl_«- afford to put in anything very 
expensive, but where there is much glass 
something better and cheaper in labor 
should be devised. We have a system 
which works so nicely that I will try to 
describe it to you as britfly as possible. 

A large tank holding from 8,000 to 
10,000 gallons is built directly under the 
stable; I should mention the fact that 
there is a cellar under the building, and in 
this cellar is our tank, six feet deep, half 
above ground and half below; the drain- 
age and manure from six horses and two 
cows find their way into it through an 
opening in the floor, and this with a 
change to sheep manure, or nitrate of 
soda occasionally , gives us all the strength 
we require. By opening a valve the 
liquid flows by gravity into another tank 
which is connected with the steam pump. 
If the water should get too strong we 
dilute by starting up the clean water 
pump and running both at the same time. 
There is no carting of manure, very little 
mixing, and no disagreeable sights or 
smells for visitors. You will readily un- 
derstand the saving in labor over the 
barrel and watering pot system, when I 
say that six men with hose and one to 
run the pump can water everything in 
our greenhouses in half a day, whereas 



with the old method it would require 
seven men four full days to do the same 
work, costing just seven times as much, 
and not giving half the satisfaction. 

In conclusion I would say, that with 
fertilizers, as everything else, we must 
study, we must observe, we must experi- 
ment; nature's secrets are all locked to 
the indolent and indifferent, but to the 
man who will dig, who will search, who 
will explore, she will yield the key, and 
lay bare her hidden treasures. 

The essay was discussed by Messrs. 
Hammond, Taylor and May. 

Then followed the essay by Mr. Grant 
on the classification of stock, which fol- 
lows: 

The Classification and Inspection of Com- 
mercial Plants. 

BY G. L. GRANT, CHICAGO. 

The subject is entirely too large to 
cover in an essay of ordinary length, aLd 
I shall do no more than present the sev- 
eral main points for the consideration of 
the society. 

It will be admitted by all that the pres- 
ent description of plants by size of pot 
means little or nothing. We all know 
that the variation in quality among a 
large lot of 2y2-inch stuff is simply im- 
mense, and runs all the way from first- 
class to stock fit only for the rubbish 
heap. Can we devise a classification that 
will make it possible for the grower to 
intelligently offer his stock for sale and 
for the buyer to purchase with discrimi- 
nation when it is impossiWefor the latter 
to personally inspect it? 

Probably plants can not be so accur- 
ately classified as some other things, but 
we can beyond a shadow of a doubt de- 
vise a system that will be avast improve- 
ment upon the one at present in use. 

It seems to me that the number of per- 
fect, healthy leaves upon the plant will 
more nearly determine its actual value 
than any other one characteristic. I be- 
lieve we can come closer to an accurate 
classification than by this means, but 
this feature will be an essential point 
in any system that may be devised. 
Mind, I do not say merely the number of 
leaves alone, but the number oi perfect 
and healthy ones. The leaves may be 
either large or small and still meet the 
requirements. It is a botanical axiom 
that the number and condition of the 
leaves correspond to the number and con- 
dition of the roots in a normal plant. 
With diseased roots a plant can not pro- 
duce healthy leaves, and with diseased 
leaves it can not produce healthy roots. 
Are not then the number and condition of 
the leaves a true index of the value of the 
plant? 

Of course the size of the pot should also 
be considered. In classifying young tea 
roses I would say that a first-class plant 
in a 2V2 inchpotshould have not lessthan 
20 perfect, healthy leaflets; a second-class 
one not less than 15, and a third-class 
one not less than 10. It would be neces- 
sary to consider each class (f plants sep- 
arately of course, as a rule for one might 
not be just to another. It might even be 
necessarv to consider each variety separ- 
ately. Even doing this it would not be 
such a great amount of v/ork to cover 
the plants most commf)nly bought and 
sold through the medium of correspond- 
ence. 

I would suggest that a competent com- 
mittee be appointed to devise a system 
of classification on the line noted, and 
submit the same at the next annual meet- 
ing for the consideration of the society. 



I would suggest further that the com- 
mittee be requested to prepare a compre- 
hensive exhibit of commercial plants of 
the various classes, the same to be dis- 
played in the exhibition hall for the infor- 
mation and criticism of the members. 

Certain it is that we must make a seri- 
ous attempt to solve the problem of class- 
ification if the shipping trade is to con- 
tinue its growth. In the sharp competi- 
tion that now prevailsthereis a continual 
tendency toward lower quality in order 
to meet lower prices. Often the "cheap" 
plants would not be accepted as a gift if 
the actual quality was known to the 
buyer. I consider it the duty of this soci- 
ety to make it possible for the grower of 
really good stock to so offer it in his 
printed list or advertisen-ent that its 
value will appear and be appreciated, and 
for the buyer to be able to know what he 
is buying. 

Of the questions taken from the ques- 
tion box the "Advisabilitj- of flower mar- 
kets" was the only one responded to, Mr. 
Wm. Feast making a brief reply. 



The Trade Exhibition. 

The awards at the exhibition were as 
follows: 

florists' supplies. 

H. Bayersdorfer & Co., Philadelphia, 
certificate of merit for largest and best 
general collection of florists' supplies and 
fancy baskets. 

E. Kaulmann & Co., Philadelphia, hon- 
orable mention for display of fancy bas- 
kets, wheat sheaves and metal designs. 

Z. De Forest Ely & Co., Philadelphia, 
highly commended for general collection 
of florists' supplies. 

E. Steffens, New York, honorable men- 
tion for collection of wire designs. 

W. C. Krick. Brooklyn, N.Y., certificate 
of merit for collection of immortelle letters 
and designs. 

J. C. Meyer & Co., Boston, honorable 
mention for silkaline. 

A. Herrmann, New Y'ork, certificate of 
merit for large and complete collection of 
metallic designs. 

Whilldin Pottery Co., Philadelphia, cer- 
tificate of merit for largest and best col- 
lection of fancy jardinieres. 

S. A. Weller, Zanesville. Ohio, honorable 
mention for fancy jardinieres in artistic 
designs. 

A. Blanc & Co., Philadelphia, honora- 
ble mention for large collection of im- 
ported Japanese flower pots. 

Aug. Brabant, New York, certificate of 
merit for florists' pins. 

PLANTS. 

Robert Craig, Philadelphia, certificate 
of merit for collection of highly colored 
healthy outdoor grown crotons, and hon- 
orable mention for general collection of 
palms, ferns, etc. 

Edwin Lonsdale, Chestnut Hill, Phila- 
delphia, certificate of merit for finely 
grown specimens of Areca lutescens. 

Siebrecht & Wadley, New Rochelle, N. 
Y., honorable mention for collection of 
palms, ferns, orchids, and decorative 
plants. 

Henry A. Dreer, Philadelphia, certificate 
of merit for collection of fine grown 
palms and ferns. 

Pitcher & Manda, Short Hills, N. J., 
certificate of merit for collection of palms, 
ferns, orchids, and stove plants, also for 
Anthurium crvstallinum variegata. Stro- 
bilanthes Dyerianus from same firm was 
highly commended. 

W. A. Manda, South Orange, N. J., 



i8g4' 



The American Florist. 



87 



highly commended for a general collection 
of plants. 

Edw. A. Seidewitz, Annapolis, Md., 
highly commended for a general collection 
of plants. 

Charles D. Ball, Holmesburg, Philadel- 
phia, honorable mention for general col- 
lection of palms and decorative plants. 

F. R. Pierson Co., Tarrytown, N. Y., 
highly commended for general collection 
of palms and decorative plants. 

Storrs & Harrison Co., Painesville, O., 
honorable mention for collection of 
budded hybrid perpetual roses. 

BULBS AND SEEDS. 

J. C. Vaughan, Coicago, certificate of 
merit for a very cumpletedisplayof bulbs. 

Z. De Forest Ely & Co., Philadelphia, 
highly commended for Liliums Harrisii 
and candidum, freesia, Roman hyacinths, 
narcissus and callas. 

F. R. Pierson Co., Tarrytown, N. Y., 
highly commened for Roman hyacinths, 
narcissus, Liliums Harrisii and c indidum 
and collection of freesias. 

Pitcher & Manda, Short Hills, N. J., 
highly commended for callas, Liliums 
Harrisii, longiflnrum and candidum, 
Roman hyacinths, narcissus and freesias. 

Henry F. Michell, Philadelphia, highly 
commended for cineraria and primula 
seeds, Lilium Harrisii, callas, freesias and 
Roman hyacinths. 

Henry A. Dreer, Philadelphia, highly 
commended for neat exhibit of hyacinths 
and tulips. 

C. H. Joosten, New York, highly com- 
mended for Liliums candidum, Harrisii, 
and longiflorum, Ornithogalum arabicum, 
Roman hyacinths, narcissus, and callas. 

CUT FLOWERS. 

Cushman Gladiolus Co., Euclid, O , cer- 
tificate of merit (or collection of seedling 
gladiolus. 

W. Tricker & Co., Clifton, N. J., certifi- 
cate of merit for exhibit of aquatics. 

John N. May, Summit, N. }., honorable 
mention for new rose, Mrs. W. C. Whitney. 

E. S. Schmidt, Washington, D. C, a com- 
mendable exhibit of water lilies and lotus. 

Thomas Foulds, Gwynedd, Pa., honor- 
able mention for two vases of Mermet 
and Bride roses, unusually good for sum- 
mer. 

H. A. Dreer, Philadelphia, certificate of 
merit for collection of canna flowers. 

Henry Pfister, gardener at the White 
House, Washington, honorable mention 
for collection of water lilies. 

F. R. Pierson Co., Tarrytown, N. Y., 
honorable mention for large vase of 
Meteor roses. 

Pitcher & Manda, Short Hills, N. J., 
honorable mention forcol'ection of hardy 
herbaceous flowers. 

POTS AND GREENHOUSE APPLIANCES. 

A. H. Hews & Co., North Cambridge, 
Mass., ceii;ificate of merit for flowerpots. 

Whilldin Pottery Co., Philadelphia, 
honorable mention for flower pots. 

Parmenter MIg. Co., East Brookfield, 
Mass., highly commended for flower 
pots. 

Hitchings & Co., New York, certificate 
of merit for ventilating apparatus. 

E. Hippard, Youngstown, 0., honora- 
ble mention for ventilating apparatus. 

Quaker City Machine Co., Richmond, 
Ind., honorable mention for ventilating 
apparatus. 

E. A. Ormsby, Melrose, Mas?., honora- 
ble mention for ventilating system. 

Chadbourn-Kennedy Mfg. Co., Fish- 
kill, N. Y., honorable mention for auto- 
matic hydraulic ventilator. 

Hitchings & Co., New York, honorable 
mention for iron conservatory, also for 



greenhouse construction. Same firm, 
highly commended for greenhouse gutters. 

Lockland Lumber Co., Lockland, O., 
certificate of merit for greenhouses of 
cypress lumber. 

Powell Fertilizer and Chemical Co., 
Baltimore, highly commended for display 
of insecticides and plant food. 

Bonnaffon Steel Fence Co., Philadel- 
phia, certificate of merit for fence. 

Hose Conn ction Co., Kingston, R. L, 
certificate of merit for the Kinney pump, 
for the distribution of insecticides and 
manures. 

Rose Mfg. Co., Niagara Falls, N. Y., 
certificate of merit for tobacco soap. 

BOILERS A.\D HEATING APP.\RATUS. 

Herendecn M'fg Co., Geneva, N. Y., 
certificate of merit for display of boilers, 
their admirable construction and adapt- 
ability for the consumption of the smaller 
sizes of coal, they being the cheaper, and 
also their adaptability for either water 
or steam. 

Hitchings & Co., New York, honorable 
mention for exhibit of boilers, noting sim- 
plicity of construction and ease of opera- 
tion. 

Thomas Weathered's Sons, New York, 
highly commended for exhibit of models 
of their apparatus, showing improve- 
ment and ease of operation. 

MISCELLANEOUS EXHIBITS. 

Edwards & Docker, Phila., certificate 
of merit for paper folding boxes for cut 
flowers. 

D. B. Long, Buffalo, certificate of merit 
for photographs of floral arrangements. 

J. Horace McFarland Co., Harrisburg, 
Pa., highly commended for specimens of 
catalogue work. 

Frank L. Moore, Chatham, N. J., cer- 
tificate of merit for his Workeasy buckle 
for cut flower shippers. 

Thomas Woodason, Phila., certificate 
of merit for bellows for distributing in- 
secticides. 

C. H. Joosten, New Y'ork, honorable 
mention for bellows for disti ibuting in- 
sect powder. 

Benj. Chase, Derry, N. H., highly com- 
mended for labels aud plant stakes. 

Worcester Wire Co.. Worcester, Mass., 
certificate of merit for wire plant support, 
especially adapted forstakingcarnations. 
Same firm highl3' commended for cheap 
wire nipper. 

James R. Wotherspoon, Ph!la., highly 
commended for collection of well made 
watering pot? . 

Mr. McFarland made his promised in- 
teresting exhibit, but owing to unavoid- 
able causes he was detained at home and 
was unable to attend the convention. 



American Rose Society, 

At the annual metting of the .American 
Rose Society Tuesday evening there was 
much enthusiasm. All details about 
which there was difference of opinion 
have now been settled to the satisfaction 
of all. The work of the society will be 
pushed actively along. The officers elected 
for the ensuing 3'ear were Robt. Craig, 
president; John H. Taylor, vice-president; 
H. B. Beatty, secretary; John N. May, 
treasurer. The president will at once ap- 
point six members to act with the officers 
as an executive committee to carry for- 
ward the work laid out. 



National Chrysanthemum Society. 

.\t the meeting of the Chrj'santhcmum 
Society officers for the ensuing year were 
elected as follows: E. A. Wood, West 
Newton, Mass., president; E. ('.. Hill, 



Richmond, Ind., vice-president; Elmer D. 
Smith, Adrian, Mich., secretary; John N. 
May, Summit, N. J., treasurer. A motion 
was carried to appoint a committee of 
three members in the vicinity of the large 
centers to examine all new seedlings and 
sports submitted to their judgment. The 
flowers to be in the second season's trial, 
and not less than six blooms of any one 
variety to be sent to such committee. 



Boston and New York to Atlantic City. 

The magnificent new Fall River Line 
boat the Priscilla was on Sunday even- 
ing, August 19, the scene of one of those 
jolly occasions which are always assured 
when a party of florists and their ladies 
get together in one company. There have 
been larger delegations on previous occa- 
sions, but never a pleasanter one. It 
was a bright moonlight night, and the 
cool sea air was enjoyed to the fullest ex- 
tent, most of the party remaining out on 
deck until midnight, and indulging in an 
occasional song under the skillful leader- 
ship of Elijah Wood and Warren Ewell. 
The arrival in New York was signalized 
by one of those characteristic demon- 
strations on the part of the New York 
Florists' Club, which have on so many 
former occasions been experienced by the 
brethern passing through that hospitable 
city. As soon as the boat had touched 
the dock a committee of the New York 
Club, headed by President O'Mara, made 
irs appearance, and came aboard lugging 
enormous boxes and baskets of flowers 
and smilax, which were quickly arranged 
on the dining room tables, and the vis- 
itors were then invited to breakfast with 
the New York Club. Their comfort had 
been further provided for in the way of 
an Annex boat, which vyas ready to con- 
vey the party directly across the river to 
the Jersey Central R. R. from the Fall 
River Line dock. The company aboard 
the special train from New York to At- 
lantic City numbered about one hundred 
and fifty, including a goodly proportion 
of ladies. On the sides of the cars were 
banners bearing the inscription in large 
letters "New York Florists' Club, 1894," 
and the cars were all liberally decorated 
inside and out with gladiolus and hydran- 
geas, lilies and smilax, which had been 
generously contributed by members for 
this purpose. Two combination cars 
furnished abundant accommodations for 
those who had assumed the pleasant duty 
of providing refreshment for the inner 
man, and from the thoroughness of the 
arrangements and the lavish generosity 
displayed it was evident that the hand of 
a fine artist in this line was at the helm. 
The run to Atlantic City was made in 
about four hours, nothing happening to 
mar the full enjoyment of every minute, 
excepting a woeful accident to a portion 
of Koffman the smilax king's special sup- 
plies, but as this worthy exclaimed, 
"There was still plenty left." 



Convention Echoes. 



Overheard at the convention. "Who's 
that speaking now?" 

"That's X. He's for business all the 
time, but I never saw him doing any." 

Overheard on the Philadelphia train. 
"What do 1 know about horses? Say, 
look at here, let me tell you something 
right now. I bought that horse all alone. 
He cost me $125 and I sold him for $25. 
Matter with him? There's nothing the 
matter with him. A littlecramped in the 
leg, that was all. That's straight. I'll 
leave it to Paul if it ain't." 



88 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 2S, 



John Spaulding's remarks on the labor 
question, and on boys in particular, dur- 
ing the discussion of the president's ad- 
dress, brought down the house. The 
young old gentleman carries his eighty 
years with wonderful ease. To 
those complaining of their experiences 
with tramp gardeners he said: "When 
you have a good man treat him well, and 
you won't have so much experience with 
tramps." 

The essay by F. Schuyler Matthews 
was pronounced by all who heard it one 
of the finest things ever done at a florists' 
convention. H. A. Dreer kindly furnished 
all the flowers used by Mr. Matthews to 
illustrate his remarks. 

The Philadelphia Ledger had a special 
correspondent and typewriter in constant 
attendance at the convention. The 
Ledger knows what it is about. 

The delegates from Chicago and the 
northwest were delayed nearly four 
hours, being twice blocked by wrecked 
freight trains. 



The Bowling Contest. 

Buffalo won the Philadelphia Club cup 
for highest three games, the Spaulding 
cup and the Florists' Exchange banner 
for the highest score in first game. New 
York took second for highestthree games, 
Philadelphia third. Keppler of the New 
York team took first prize for the highest 
individual score in one game, and also 
first for highest score in three games. 
Leuly of New York took second for indi- 
vidual score in one game. See full record 
of scores below. 

PITTSBURG. 

1st 2nd 3rd Total 

Rememan 142 94- 125 361 

Bennett 121 108 116 345 

Oesterle 123 106 105 334 

Bieler 108 147 105 360 

Ludwig 102 93 112 307 

Burke 95 92 128 315 

Totals 691 640 691 2022 

W.4SHINGTON. 

A. Gude 99 123 126 348 

W. F. Gude 141 123 116 380 

J. R. Freeman 150 113 163 426 

G. W. Oliver 123 164 121 408 

W.F.King 137 118 134 389 

C.F.Hale 103 123 93 319 

Totals 753 764 753 2270 

BUFFALO. 

Mepsted 167 144 147 458 

P- Scott 149 147 161 457 

Geo. Asmus Ill 130 142 383 

H. Bunyard 112 118 156 386 

J. Kromerick 154 140 125 419 

W.Scott 154.142 140 436 

Totals 847 821 871 2539 

FL.\TBUSH. 

D. Y. Mellin 126 135 133 394 

G. Bergraann 162 128 119 409 

P- Riley 130 162 131 423 

A.Zeller 118 135 115 368 

S. Sweiser 98 130 149 377 

E. Dailledouzc 140 123 131 394 

Totals 774 813 778 2365 

PHILADKLPHIA. 

K. Kift 130 118 132 380 

G; Craig 130 137 166 433 

W.K.Harris 100 123 153 276 

Geo. Anderson 107 144 114 365 

F.Brown 155 139 145 439 

T.Kennedy 134 147 115 396 

Totals 756 808 825 2389 



SUMMIT, N. J. 

D. MacRorie 128 123 150 401 

H. Troy 83 92 89 264 

A. Caham 104 103 117 324 

H.J. Ueneman 95 118 116 329 

H.Jacobson 108 111 104 313 

E. Bourne 91 128 115 334 

Totals 609 674 691 1975 

NEW VORK. 

Leuly 153 171 134 458 

P. O'Mara 125 119 127 371 

Dihm 119 149 158 426 

T. Roehrs 132 109 119 360 

J. Manda 108 132 163 403 

Keppler 133 164 173 470 

Totals 770 844 874 2488 

ST. LOUIS. 

Tessou Ill 102 134 347 

W. Young 100 119 111 330 

Schray 114 144 112 370 

C. Young 125 112 127 364 

A. Waldbart 110 126 110 346 

H. Young 121 123 134 378 

Totals 681 726 728 2135 

BOSTON. 

T. A. Cox 136 98 142 376 

H. F. Lange 126 108 126 360 

W. Ewell 129 112 92 333 

E.Welsh 102 106 124 332 

W. A. Manda 138 116 16? 421 

P. Welsh 136 103 137 375 

Totals 766 643 788 2197 

CHICAGO. 

J. S. Wilson 95 113 112 320 

Burt Eddv 77 95 70 242 

J.T.Anthony 83 114 85 282 

J. C. Vaughan 91 87 98 276 

A. Newett.-. 61 90 115 266 

L.Schiller 105 105 101 311 

Totals 512 604 581 1697 



The Final Session. 

Thursday afternoon the proposed bj^- 
laws which defined more exactly the man- 
ner in which the funds of the society 
should be handled were adopted, having 
been previously read the lequired number 
of times. Mr. W. R. Smith explained the 
cause of the absence of Mr. Benj. Durfee 
of Washington, and the deferred essav on 
statistics will appear in the printed report 
when issued. The report of the commit- 
tee on fire insurance was accepted, and 
the coramitteecontinued. Mr. W. R. Smith 
of Washington announced that the bill 
providing for a charter forthe society had 
now been passed by Congress, and lacktd 
only a few formalities before becoming 
law. The announcement was received 
with applause, and a vote of thanks was 
given Mr. Smith for his efforts in securing 
the national charter. The report of the 
committee on final resolutions extended 
the thanks of ths societj' to the several 
committees of the Florists' Club of Phila- 
delphia, who had made the stay of the 
society so pleasant and profitable, men- 
tioning specially Chairman Ball of the 
Ladies' Committee, Chairman Westcott 
of the committee on Bowling Contest, 
Chairman Burton of the Committee on 
Shooting tournament, Mr. Craig for his 
efforts in preparing the yachting cruise 
and entertainment at the Iron Pier, Vice- 
President Kift for acting as general utilitj- 
man and helper to everybodj-, and to the 
Philadelphia Public Ledger for its excel- 
lent reports of the proceedings of the 
society from day to day. This closed the 
work of the convention. A full account 



of the various entertainments will appear 
in next issue. 




Chrysanthemum Notes. ' 

The houses of chrysanthemums will 
from now on demand more and more at- 
tention, and there will be a large number 
of small things to be attended to, each 
one not much in itself, but which in the 
aggregate will take a great deal of time. 
The other houses are also beginning to 
demand attention, and the plants out- 
doors will soon have to be brought in, 
so, if you can, it is better to arrange your 
time and give the chrysanthemum houses 
an hour or so in the early morning. This 
is the best time to water them, which 
will now be required every pli'asant morn- 
ing and on very warm days if the plants 
are in shallow benches perhaps again 
later in the day, but avoid watering in 
the evening, for you are very apt to lose 
some of the foliage where it is thick and 
heavy if the water stands on it over 
night. But it should never be forgotten 
that the chrysanthemum is a great feeder 
and at no time during its growth should 
it be allowed to become dry, and now, 
when it is carrying such a heavy growth 
of foliage and the tips are soft, especial 
care should be taken to prevent it firom 
wilting. 

A little time can be well spent every 
day looking carefully over the plants. 
The lower eyes will begin to open and 
send out shoots as soon as the plants be- 
gin to bud, and these should be rubbed 
out as soon as they make their appear- 
ance, so as to keep all the strength pos- 
sible in the top of the shoot. The plants 
must be kept well tied up, and it is a good 
idea to keep bunches of raffia or string 
hung up through the house, so that they 
will be within easy reach, and as you 
pass through you can stop and tie up any 
shoot that may need it. 

Elijah A. Wood. 

West Newton, Ma«s. 




To Prevent Rust.— Di.-sohe one pound of sul- 
phate of copper in two quarts ot ammonia iu a 2- 
gallon jar. When dissolved add another quart of 
ammonia and stir well. [The liquid can be kept 
in this form for some time and used as ueedecf.l 
Add a pint of this solution to a barrelof water and 
syringe the plants with a force-pump every two 
weeks. And don't let the time for spraying pass 
without attending to the operation. 



Carnation Notes. 

We are now in the midst of "planting 
in" the houses, and a few suggestions or 
rather reminders will be appropriate, even 
if they are rather antiquated. 

In taking up carnations there are a 
number of methods followed; some will 



i8g4- 



The American Florist. 



89 



take them with a ball of earth attached, 
others shake it all off, and some will sort 
of "divvy up" between the two extremes. 
Some growers prefer planting immedi- 
ately after a rain, others during a dry 
spell. Whichever one of these methods 
you have been the most successful with 
that is the one for you to use. My own 
experience is to plant in during a dry 
spell of weather, when the soil is just 
loose enough to fall off nicely without 
shaking it, and thus all the roots are pre- 
served without taking a large useless 
ball of earth into the houses. Where one 
does not have too many to plant it is 
best to wait until the weather is suitable, 
but for large growers it is not so impor- 
tant an item; at least not as important 
as to have them housed at the right time, 
for they can be handled in the houses ac- 
cording to their needs. If they have been 
planted during a rainy spell they will re- 
quire a heavier shading, and this left on 
a little longer than if planted during dry 
weather, when the plants are compara- 
tively harder and better fitted for trans- 
planting. 

For digging use a spading fork, not a 
shovel, as the digger is less likely to cut 
roots with a fork. Take boxes deep 
enough so that the plants when put in 
will stand up, and not hang over the 
sides to be all broken up in handling. The 
digger puts the plants into the boxes at 
once; these boxes are brought into the 
house, and the planters plant direct from 
them, thus avoiding handling the plants 
and getting them all full of soil and dirty 
looking; I have seen some ireshly planted 
houses that looked as if they never would 
get clean. 

The soil in the beds or benches, which- 
ever you use, should be nice and mellow 
but not too fine, for it is better to 
have it a little rough than so smooth and 
nice that it will pack solid the first wat- 
ering it gets. Have it moist but not wet; 
it should be in condition to plant either 
with the hand or a trowel; the latter is 
preferable to keep the plants clean. In 
planting make a good sized hole, so that 
you can spread the roots some; it is a 
mistake to crowd them into a small hole. 
See that they are not planted any deeper 
in the house than they were in the field, 
and press the soil moderately. Water 
according to their needs, being careful not 
to turn the soil into mud, as soil in that 
condition is almost sure death to car- 
nations. 

The houses should have a light shading 
while you are planting and for a week or 
two afterwards; any good shading that 
is not too hard to get off will answer for 
this. Syringe the plants once or twice a 
day, but not later than 1 or 2 o'clock in 
the afternoon, so that they will be dry by 
nightfall, and keep a sharp lookout for 
them xmtil well started; this is a critical 
period in the life of a forcing carnation, 
and there is no eve like your own for 
seeing that they get through it all right. 
Albert M. Herr. 




of a cross between Cattleya dolosa and 
Laeli:... Day ana; thus we have another 
gem where L. Dayana has played an im- 
portant part. The sepals and petals are 
light purple, two inches in length by 
three-quarters inch broad, equal, 
slightly recurved; lip open, three lobed, 
front lobe bright rosy purple with deeper 
veinings, crest and side lobes darker pur- 
ple; throat white slightly suffused; column 
white. Floweringin late July and August, 
twin flowered and lasting long in perfec- 
tion. Tnis plant must be grown in a 
basket hung well to the light in the 
shadiest and warmest part of the cat- 
tleya house. 

Lselio-Cattleya Timora. This rare hy- 
brid is the result of crossing Cattleya 
speciosissima with Ltelia Dayana, and the 
influence of Lalia Dayana is very mani- 
fest. The habit of plant is intermediate. 
It is one of the Veitchian gems, and has 
again proven the value of L. Dayana as a 
parent. The flowers areabout fourinches 
across; sepals and petals light rosy pur- 
ple; sepals two and a half inches by three- 
quarters inch wide, petals two and a half 
by one and a half broad, lip long, velvety 
purple, convolute; side lobes rich purple 
shaded; throat white slightly suffused 
rose, with two dark purple lines in the 
center. The habit of plant dwarf, of good 
constitution and flowers of great sub- 
stance, lasting long in good condition, 
flowering in July and August. It should 
be grown under same conditions as 
Maynardi. 

Coelogyne Sinderiana. A fine species 
recently introduced, being discovered by 
Forstermann while collecting for F. San- 
der in 1886. While the locality has not 
been divulged, no doubt it is an East 
Indian species. The plant is of robust 
habit; pseudo-bulbs over three inches 
long, ovate and slightly corrugated; 
leaves oblong, lanceolate, over twenty 
inches in length by three and a half in 
breadth; flower spikes produced with the 
young growth, twelve to fifteen inches 
long, arching, carrying about eight flow- 
ers over three and a half inches across; 
sepals and petals pure white; lip three 
lolled; the side lobes erect, crisped at the 
front margin, and streaked with reddish 
brown on inside; yellow blotch on front 
crisped part of lobes; intermediate lobe of 
lip acute, reflexed and undulate, with a 
rich lemon disc on which are raised six or 
seven fringed ochreous brown lines. 

This is indeed a fine introduction and a 
picturesque plant even out of flower, 
with its strikingly handsome foliage. 
Grown in a basket well up to the light it 
makes its growth immediately after the 
flower spikes are gone. It should have 
an intermediate temperature and an 
abundance of water at the roots while 
developing the bulbs, after which it should 
have a season of rest, but should not be 
allowed to become dry. The spikes will 
appear about June, when additional 
i water should be supplied to aid in devel 
oping the flowers, likewise the future 
growth of the plant. 

It is a pleasure to recommend this fine 
orchid, developing its flowers as it does 
in late July and August and lasting so 
long in perfection. It makes a grand 
companion to C. Sanderae.Cummingiand 
ocellata maxima, all of which are desir- 
able summer and autumn blooming 



Three Gems. 

Laslio-Cattleya Maynardi. This grand 
hybrid was introduced about two years 
ago by F. Sander & Co., and named in 
honor of their foreman. It is the result 



kinds. 
North Baston, Mass. 



Wm. Robinson. 



Chicago. 

The quality of stock is constantly im- 
proving, although the sudden drop of 
temperature at night from the heat of the 
day has caused more or less mildew. 
Beauties are coming in, in quite large 
quantities, but very few good flowers are 
left unsold. The smaller varieties how- 
ever, do not move as freely. Large quan- 
tities begin to arrive again from outside 
points; this stock suffersgreatly in transit 
at this season of the year, and its only 
mission seems to be to depress prices on 
fresh stock. Business continues to show 
a slowly improving aspect in local circles. 
Demand from outside points is very slow. 

The drouth first and now the grass- 
hoppers are making serious inroads on 
the carnation fields. Quite a number of 
growers are beginning to bench their 
stock, although the date is early this 
seems to be the best course to check this 
evil. Rust has made its appearance in a 
number of fields, and Silver Spray, the 
same as last year, appears to be the 
worst sufferer. Violets have made a 
rather poor growth, but are onthe whole 
fairly free from the disease so far. 

O. J. Friedman has again taken posses- 
sion of his store on the corner of Michigan 
avenue and Jackson street. The store 
fronts on both streets have been remod- 
eled. This in addition to new and hand- 
some furniture throughout makes the 
place a very attractive one. 

C. Paasch of 224 Clybourn avenue has 
bought out the establishment of Mr. 
Schindler of 39 Marion Place. 

Among recent visitors were Mr. F. R. 
Pierson of Tarrytown, N. Y., and Mr. 
Wm. Clark of Colorado Springs, Col. 



Crawfordsville, Ind. — Premiums to 
the value of about $150 will be awarded 
at the chrysanthemum show to be held 
next November. 



Toronto. 

It is doubtful if this city will send any 
representative to the S. A. F. convention 
at Atlantic City, a statement which I 
much regret having to make. Tbisis not 
from any lack of will, the spirit is willing 
(very much so) but is rather I expect ow- 
ing to the extremely stringent state of 
the money market just now. Thereiscon- 
siderable guessing as to who will be 
chosen for president for the coming year, 
and nearly all the guessers seem to light 
on a man residing about 50 miles from 
Toronto, one who is very popular in this 
part of the country. Nous verrons. 

The weather still keeps very dry, not a 
drop during this last week, leaves are fall- 
ing off some of the trees; the hose has to 
be kept going constantly, but after all a 
good rain could do more good in half an 
hour on an acre or two of grass than the 
hose would in two days. 

Serious opposition is threatened in the 
banana trade. The Normal School have a 
bunch with about five dozen very fine pods, 
and several other places about town are 
also raising them. It is proposed that a 
member of the association out of employ- 
ment should start a stall for the sale 
thereof, advertising them as follows 
"encourage home products" "Canadian 
grown," "Our own make" etc., etc. 

Harry Slight still holds the fort at 
his old stand on Yonge street, in spite of 
all reverses, I have been unable to get at 
how the business was worked. The lily 
ponds at the Central Prison and Reser- 
voir Park are now in their full glory and 
attract much attention. E. 



Winona, Minn.— W. E. Smith, who was 
formerly in the business here, has decided 
to enter the trade again, and is building 
on Main and Sarnia streets. His estab- 
lishment will be known as the Southside 
Greenhouse. 



90 



The American Florist. 



^^g' 25, 



St. Paul, Minn. 

Good flowers continue scarce and any 
sudden call for any considerable quantity, 
especially in white, finds everyone "sold 
out." Sales, however, have been light. 

The cut of roses is better both in qual- 
ity and quantity. Some very nice Perle, 
La France, Meteor, Kaiserin, Albany and 
Brides are seen. Asters are also coming 
into bloom and meet with ready sale at 
cheap prices. Sweet peas still are being 
offered, but unless a soaking rain comes 
soon they will dry up entirely. 

The flower beds at Como Park are now 
looking fine. Several larg;e beds of Mrs. 
Beardsley geraniums in full bloom bear 
witness to the excellecce of that most 
beautiful variety. The cannas are now 
in full bloom. Mme. Crozy, Florence 
Vaughan, Chas. Henderson, A. Bouvier 
and other large flowering varieties are 
among the most attractive plants to be 
seen. 

J. C. Fleischer & Son are tearing down 
their houses, closing out their stock and 
embarking in the poultry business Their 
friends in the trade wish them success in 
their venture. 

L. L. May & Co. have commenced the 
erection of three new houses, each 12x160 
feet in dimensions, to be built with the 
short span to the south. This will add 
some 7,000 square feet of glass to their 
range and give them one of the finest 
plants in the state. 

E. F. Lemke is putting the finishing 
touches to his new houses, he having 
added some 7,000 ieet of glass to his ex- 
tensive range. The new houses are well 
arranged and perfect in detail. Felix. 



Mr. W. Hugh Gower, widely known in 
the orchid world, died at Tooting, En- 
gland, July 30. Mr. Gower was a fre- 
quent contributor to English gardening 
literature, being an especial authority on 
orchids and tropical ferns. He was for a 
long time at the Royal Botanic Gardens, 
Kew; latterly with Messrs. Williams at 
HoUoway. Mr. Gower was in his 60th 
year. 

J. G. GAMMAGE. 

It is with the deepest feeling of regret 
that we report the death of Mr. J. G. 
Gammage, junior member of the firm of 
J. Gammage & Sons, London, Ont., who 
died at the family residence on August 5, 
at the age of 29. The deceased was of a 
studious disposition, and won many 
friends, who deeply regret his dfmise. The 
family have the sympathy of all in their 
sad bereavement. 



News Items. 



Subscribers a re requested to report to us any- 
thing of trade interest that may take place in their 
vicinity. Where they happen to be nearer to the 
following points notes may be forwarded to our 
correspondents there, the name and address of 
each being given oelow: 

New York and Boston.— W. J. Stewart, 67 
Bromfield St., Boston. 

Philadklphia.— Robert Kifl, 1725 Chestnut St. 

Chicago.— Office of publication. 

St. Lodis.— Robert K. Tesson, West Forest 
Park. 

Washington.— C. Leslie Reynolds, U. S. Bot- 
anic Garden. 

Toronto —A. H. Ewing. 8.5 Carlton St. 

Baltimorf,.— Wm. McRoberts, Jr., 301 W. Madi- 
son St. 

Buffalo. —Wm. Scott, 479 Main St. 

Pittsburg. — A. J. Hdmonds. \^ Dithridgc St. 

Denver.— H. H. Given, Cor. Lincoln and Ala- 
meda Sts. 

Milwaukee.— C. B. Whitnall, 4.1.S Milwaukee 
St. 

Cleveland.— L. F. Darnell, 101 Euclid Ave. 

Cincinnati — E. G. Gillett, 131 Walnuc St. 

Indianapolis — W. G. Bertermann, 37 Massa- 
chusetts Ave. 



Hail flssoGialion ReDort. 

SECRETARY'S REPORT. 

The Florists' Hail Association now consists of 
574 members in ^ood standing, and the risks in 
force on August 1st, 1894, are equivalent to a single 
risk upon 6.653,695 square feet of glass, divided as 
follows: On single strength glass". 2.218,169 square 
feet; on doiihlt^ strength. 3,163.388 square feet. 
Extra half, 74. :295 single and 17,443 double; extra 
whole. 408,045 single and 739,735 square feet of 
double strength glass. 

10.403 feet of single thick, and 1,666 feet of 
double thick was broken by hail during the past 
venr, being a trifle over one out of every 213 square 
feet of single, and one out of every '1.899 feet of 
double insured. 

Tlie total cash balance in the Treasurer's hands 
is $5,200.15; this, together with $3,000 in securities 
invested for the Reserve Fund, makes the total 
assets $8,300.15, against which there were no liabil- 
itips on August '1st, 1894. Of the cash balance, 
$4,560.60 belongs to the Assessment Fund, and 
$6:^9.55 to tht* Rfserve B'^und. 

Owing to the depletion of funds by the disas- 
trous losses of last year, it was necessary to levy 
the 5th assessment on May 1st, 1894, which, not- 
withstanding the prevailing business depression, 
was rt^sponded to by a greater percentage of mem- 
b<Ts ihan any previous assessment. The sudden 
dt-atli i>f Treasurer Hunt upon the eve of the levy 
of this assessment was especially unfortunate, but 
by prompt action on the part of the officers and 
directors, the business of the Association was 
transacted with trilling delay, thereby in an en- 
tirely unexpi'<'te<l manner "furnishing a perfect 
test "of the staljility of the Hail Association and 
the perfection of its methods. Your Secretary 
desires to tender his thanks to members for their 
patience and forbearance while order \vas being 
restored out of the chaos caused by the sudden de- 
mise of the late universally lamented Myron A. 
Hunt, The 5th assessment brought to the treas- 
ury of the Association $3,899.51. 

The expenditure for salaries, postage, expenses, 
stationery, etc. for the year is $569.62. The amount 
paid for'lossesis $715.77. When compared with 
the expenditures of $5,856.83 last year for glass 
broken, it will be seen that the members of the 
Florists' Hail Association have reason to congrat- 
ulate tliemselves upon their good fortune, which 
has not been shared by many florists who were not 
members of the asi^ociation. 

During the past year the Secretary has been able 
to l<jcate 55 hail storms in 20 different States, some 
being especially violent. 

At" the end of seven years the Florists' Hail 
Association has performed all that the most san- 
guine projectors claimed, and it is safe to siiy has 
fairlv earned the confidence reposed in it bv its 
members. JOHN G. ESLER. Secretary. 

TREASURERS REPORT. 

During the past year three persons have offici- 
ated as Treasurer, as will be seen by the following 
reports: 
Cash in hand, reported by J. C. 

Vnughan.last year . .$1,679.20 

Amount received bv .T. C. 

Vaughan to Sept. 17, 1893 163.99 

Salary as treas'r, J. C. Vaugh:in % 4.50 

Cash transferred to Treas, M. A. 

Hunt Kv Treas. .1. C. Vaughan 1.837.69 



Halance paid by McKean ct Co., 
for M. A. Hunt to J. G. Esler, 
Treasurer 



1.497.84 



$2,213.10 $2,213.10 



$1,842.19 



Am 

1.96 

1.00 

HOO 
4.00 
1.50 

5.00 
5.25 



$1,842.19 

Ciish in hand, received by M. A. 
Hunt fiom J. C. A'nughan . . $1,837.69 

Received by M. A. Hunt, from 
fees, new members, reinsurance 
a nd 6 months" interest on b'nds 375.41 

The following bills were paid bv 
M. A. Hunt: 

1{> jjrinting receipts . 

liy advertising annual mcelitig 
(.Vmerican Florist^ 

By advertising nnnual meeting 
"(Florists' Exchange) . . 

Hv advertising annual reports 
"(American Florist) 

IJy 500 certificates 

li\ 200 orders on treasurer . . 

\\\ membership in Protective As- 
sociation 

By 600 letterheads . . . 

By advertisement, I year, Amer- 
ican Florist . 25.48 

liv expenses of M. A. Hunt to 
Chicago ..... 9.00 

By stamped envelopes, printing 8.25 

Bv amount returned to Bradford 
"Rosery . :^.50 

liv filing certificate with See. of 
State of X. .1. . . . . 1.00 

Bv filiug record with See, of Slate 
'ofN..). . . 20.fH) 

By L.'iOOiippliealions H.25 

l{\' :id\ eri iseiiieiit. 6 months. W^- 
"risls" I'Xehange . , . 6.75 

B\ 650 a.ssessnieiil lilanks . . . . 4.00 

Bv IJXIOenVelopi'S 3.25 

Bv l.OUO .-ippliraiions 7.75 

By ICllis Bros . Keeue. N. H.. loss II 01 
B'v R. E. Nnci', Roversford. Pa., 

"loss 10.25 
Bv Henrv Krucke, St. Piiul, 

"Minn., loss , . . . 18.30 

By Fred Burki. Beilevue, Pa., loss 47.76 
Bv mortgage, reservi* I'und in- 

VeslUllMlt 500.(X) 



treasurer's statement fkoji mat 1st, 
receipts. 

Received from McKean it Co.. 
account of M. A. Hunt $1,497.84 

Received from McKean A Co., 
account of J. M. Jordan, being 
funds received by the president 516.90 

Received by treasurer for rein- 
surance . 9.94 

Received by treasurer from all 
other sources 4,241.00 

Total $6,265.68 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Paid Chapin Bros., Lincoln, Ne- 
braska, I6th street houses. . . \ 

Paid Chapin Bros., Lincoln, Ne- 
braska, Union College houses 

Paid Hackensack Republican, 
500 postal notices 

Paid expressage on treasurer's 
books and papers . . . 

Paid Stamm it Clare. Hutchin- 
son, Kans., loss 

Paid Emma Killenberger, Fort 
Dodge, Iowa, loss 

Paid Langdon &. Belt. Sterling, 
111, loss . . 

Paid P. M. Pennock, Charles- 
town, W. Va.. loss 

Paid expressage on blanks and 
treasurer's vouchers 

Paid J. C. Willis, East Roches- 
ter, O., loss 

Paid 500 proofs of loss . 

Paid 100 warrants . . 

Paid over remittance, amount re- 
turned . . 

Paid 1,000 envelopes. . . . 

Paid circulars . . 

Paid J. M. Jordan, president, ex- 
penses to Terre Haute, postage, 
expressage, etc. . . . 

Paid Sugust Mining, East St. 
Louis, loss 

Paid Ella Campbell Wilson. 
Cleveland. Ohio, loss . . 

Paid 150 note circulars 

Paid P. Hahman, Phila , loss 

Paid C. V. Evans. Kearney. Neb.. 
loss 

Paid J. P. Corn, Jr.. Lexington. 
Mo., loss 

Paid Chas. P. Mueller. Wichita. 
Kans , loss ... 

Paid S. D. Bradford. Colorado 
Springs, loss 

Paid Fred Ehrbarr, Cleveland. 
Ohio, loss . . ... 

Paid W. H. Culp &. Co., Wichita. 
Kans., loss 

Paid estate of M. A. Hunt, salary 
as treasurer 

Paid C E. Kern, Kansas City, 
Mo., loss 

Paid 500 letter circulars. 300 note 
circulars and 100 noteheads . . 

Paid Frank Luce, Ashtabula, O., 
loss . . ... . . 

Paid Mrs. S. E. Luther. Law- 
rence, Kans.. loss . . 

Paid J. S. ^Morris, Glen. Kan., loss 

Paid Steinhauser A Eagle. Pitts- 
burg. Kans., loss 

Paid Florists' Exchange, adver- 
tisement. 6 months . , . 

Paid Wm. Clark. Colorado 
Springs, Colo., loss , . 

Paid The Heite Floral Co.. Kan- 
sas City. Mo., loss 

Paid Jennie E. Keeling, Canton, 
ni.,loss ... 

Paid A. J. it S. M. McCarty, 
Canton. III.. loss ... 

Paid J. M, Jordan, salarv as pres- 
ident, 1894 . . 

Paid John G. Esler, salary as 
secretary. 1894 .... 

Paid John G. Esler, salary as 
treasurer. May 1st to August 
1st, 1894 ■ . . . . 

Paid John G. Esler. for postage. 
Sec. and Treas. .... 



1894. 



43.50 

35.60 

7.00 

1.45 

11.53 

16.74 

39.25 

6.70 

1.25 

27.45 
10.75 
1.50 



3.00 
.50 



18.10 

30.80 

18.19 
3.75 
11.07 

8.78 
45.38 

5.81 
43.60 
37.75 

4.50 

30.00 

5 8.37 

1400 

123.96 

4 58 
14.67 

4.69 

6.50 

7.30 

13.88 

4.00 

10.25 

30.00 

250.00 

12.50 

45.50 

$1,065.53 
$5,200.15 

$6,265.68 

The reserve rmid investment consists of: 
No. I. One 5 pel- cent Lake View bond for . $ 500 
No. 2. One 4 per cent City of Chicago bond 

for .... 500 

No. 3. Two 5 per cent County of DuPngf^ 

bond for $500 each I 000 

No. 4. One 414 per cent Village of Evanston 

bond for . . . -'OO 

No. 5. Ones percent mortgage note of Isa- 

bell Pearce. of Terre Haute. Ind. 500 

$3,000 
And 6 moMlhs" unenllected interest upon bonds 
Xos. 1. 3. 3 a nd 4. .\nd mortgage note. 

-lOIlN G. ESLER. Treasurer. 



Balauee in l>ank . 



i8g4' 



The American Florist. 



91 



Cleveland. 

The hot dry weather is of unusual dur- 
ation this summer and some stocks have 
shortened up considerable. Sweet peas 
are very poor where city water is not 
available. Graham & Son are cutting 
some very good pink and white with long 
stems. The asters coming in are good, 
bad and indifferent. Some growers report 
almost a total failure with this flower. 
But there is one flower that does thrive 
in the continued heat and drouth, the 
geranium beds never looked finer and are 
one mass of bloom. 

Notwithstanding the dullest season the 
florists have had in years there is consid- 
erable glass being added throughout the 
city. The Williams- Wilson Co., on Eddy 
Road, will add five additional houses, 
150x18. These new houses will be planted 
with roses, carnations and violets. One 
large bed of chrysanthemums out doors 
will have a house built over it and the 
plants left as they are. 

J. W.Heiser, East Cleveland village, has 
added five houses, one 30x100 for chrys- 
anthemums, two 18x100 for roses, 
another the same size for palms and dec- 
orative plants, and one 12x93 forviolets. 
They are also adding another large boiler. 
Mr. P. H. Moritz, who is in charge, was 
complaining of the scarcity of water, 
which will soon be remedied, as they are 
building a reservoir on the hill back 
of the houses with some two thou- 
sand barrels capacity. The glass used 
in the new houses is 18x24 and is 
from one of the World's Fair buildings. 
The sash that it came in has been sawed 
in equal lengths to make walks through 
the houses. 

Congratulations are in order. Charles 
Erhart, our popular Erie street florist, 
has taken unto himself a wife. He was 
married on the 15th inst., and took a 
bridal tour to Buff'alo, Niagara Falls and 
the East. .\Ithough Mr. Erhart is one of 
the junior members of the craft he has 
hosts of friends among the trade who will 
wish him much happiness. L. F. D. 



Danville, III.— John Willius, formerly 
with Frank B. Smith, has rented the 
greenhouses belonging to Nickolaus Ad- 
miral, and will carry on the business. 

South Have.\, Mich— The State Hor- 
ticultural Society will meet here August 
21-23. 

SITUATIONS. WANTS. FOR SALE . 

Advertisements under this head will be Inserted at 
tbe rate of 10 cents a line (seven words) each Inser- 
tion. Cash must accompany order. Plant advs. not 
admitted under this head. 

SITUATION WANTKD-By practical florist. Ger- 
man, slnKle, ase i(7: first class references. Address 
H 1*. care American Florlsl. 

SITUATION WANTKD— As florist, by married man. 
State waj-'es. Address 

J. Lee. (127 Oak St , Kalamazoo, Mich. 

SITUATION WANTED— Well up In irronlni: roses, 
cut flowers and general stock: age^lO; eood refer- 
ences. K G. care American Florist. 

SITUATION WANTED— iy florist: H years experl 
ence; private or commercial: age 20. Uest of ref- 
erences. K.MIL SMITH, TlW. E.Green St , IjOulsvllle, Ky. 

SITUATION WANTED— By Hrst class storeman; 
can take full cliarKe of saine; 1.) years" experience. 
Perfect decorator, designer and salesman. Address 
I>. Zl.MEULE, Sun Francisco. Cal. 

SITUATION WANTEI)-By a young man 17 years 
old to lenrn the florist business; has some experi- 
ence In small greenhouse. 

.lAMES S. Fuv, Lltltz, Lancaster Co.. Pa. 

SITUATION WANTED -By flnrlst; German: 10 
years' experience In growing roses, carnations, 
violets and mums. Best of references. Address 

E U S, care American 1? lorlst. Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED - Commercial or private: 
age 112, single, American: 8 years' experience; good 
references. Near Chicago preferred. 

Lock Bo.x 215, Oval City. Stark Co., Ohio. 



SITUATION WANTED— Ry competent. single florist 
and gardener; well posted. Please give full par- 
ticulars In answer. Address 

W.M. B. K., 7'2ll Spring Garden St., Phlla., Pa. 

SITUATION WANTED — By a flrst-class German 
gardener Sept. 1 : l*i years" experience. Either 
private or commercial place Address M S, 

care Mr. B.iettlcher 10-19 N. Clark St.. Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTEI>— As foreman on a commer- 
cial place, where a flrst-class wholesale or retail 
business Is done. Life experience In the trade. Ad- 
dress C M 1'35. care of A. Helen. 

Graceland Cemetery, Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— By a practical grower of 
12 years' experience. Well posted In all branches. 
Has had charge of private and commercial place; 
best of recommendation. Please state particulars. 
Gruwek, care American Florist. 

SITUATION WANTED— By thorough experienced 
and practical glazier and painter In a good firm; 
has good knowledge of carpentering and packing, and 
would flll up time In any capacity: state wages. 

D W, box 40, East Cleveland, Ohio. 

tllTUATION WANTED-By a young German florist, 
io commercial or private: 7 years* experience in forc- 
ing of butbs and growing of palms. Can furnish good 
reference. Address Rich. Koenk:. 

17 E. Washington St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

SITUATION WANTED— Bj young man with 8 years' 
experience in growing cut flowers and a general 
line of plants, t^rst-class designer and decorator. 
Best of references. Address 

C B K, ;117 N. Vermilion St., Danville, 111. 

SITl'ATU)N WANTED -"\'oimg man with some ex 
periencc in ureentiuuse and cut flower work would 
like to engage with flrst-class florist to advance further. 
Central or South preferred. Address 

ANXlot'S, care American Florist. Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— By Sept. 1st or 15th. by boy 
of 21. as bookkeeper and general assistant In 
greenhouse or store; also designer: acquainted with 
names, culture, etc. ; have had experience. Good ref 
erences. AdMrcss Bov, care American Florist. 

SITITATION WANTED— By a practical florist, fully 
posted on all the requisites of commeiclal places. 
Including the nurseries, general propagation, etc : 
wishes situation where executive ability and experi- 
ence is required. For particulars address 

FLOKAL, care American Florlsl, 

81TUAT10N WANTED-By a Scotchman as gar- 
dener nd florist: will take entire charge of a gen- 
tleman's place; has been superintendent to J. B. Pace, 
Esq , of Richmond, ^'a.. for the pa8t:J years; am mar- 
ried, wife and one child, age :-c^ years; will be obliged 
to any seedsman or florist If he can help me get a good 
situation. Address W. A. Forsyth, 

Supt. to .1. B. Pace, Keswick, Albemarle Co.. Va. 



W 



WANTED— Girdener and florist for private preen- 
iKuiae and yrounds. Address 

J. C. Eastox. La Crosse, Wis. 



W 



TANTED— One No. IH or IT THtchlnes boiler, sec- 
ond band; must be In pood condition and cheap. 
C. W. DE Pauw. New Albany. Ind. 



WANTED— A young man experienced in frrowlnp: 
roses, carnations and a general stock, also good 
desljiner and decorator; must have A No. 1 references 
and not afraid of work; one with a small capital pre- 
ferred; one capable ot taking entire charge. Chance 
of a llfetlnie for rigbt man. Address 

Palms, care American Florist. 



lOR SALE~TwoV*-sectlon Carmodv boilers, cheap. 
Geo. SurSTER, Elgin, 111. 

lOK SALE CHEAP— Large second-hand florist's Ice 
Box, value about J75. Vaughan's Seed Store, 
88 State Street, Chicago. 



F 



F 



OKSALE— Double "Florida" steam boiler No. SI; 
good as new; a great bargain. Address 

A. S. EwiNG, Chlllicothe. Ohio. 

]10U SALE OR RENT— (Tieenhouse, 2000 square ft. 
' glass. For particulars Inquire of 

Thko Noehi.e. Green Bny. Wis. 

OR SALE OR RENT-15.000 or 30.000 square ft. of 
glass. For particulars Inquire of 

A. T. Jackson. Station X, Chicago. 



FOR SALE CHEAP— A flrsl-clasa florist business In 
a thriving town of lii.OOO Inhabitants. Forpartic- 
ulars address Wisconsin, care Am. Florist. 

FOR SALB— No. 5 Scollay boiler. used only 3 winters, 
all In good conditl m; reason for st-Hlng. having 
put In 40-horse steam boiler: price on applicntlon. 

J. E. Kelthol'SEN. Schenectady. N. Y. 

FOR SALE CHEAP— Large, new hard wood and 
glass florists Refrigerator. Used at World's Fair. 
Price reduced to %\Vo. Vaughan's Seed stuue. 
Uti & M8 West Washington St., Chicago. 

tpoR SALE -Flower store with greenhouse: best 
' location In cllv: well established, in refined neiglt- 
borhood. Going out of city. Must sell at once. Ad- 
dress STOiiE. care American Florist. 

IpOH SALE Complete flie Am. Florist. It Vols. 5 
' bound and 1 binder; also 1 IL'-H. P. upright boiler. 
I.IHXI feet I-lnch pipe. -'Ouyxt; sashes. 1.200 lUxl2 lights of 
glass. WM. H. Baknks. 

Box 845. Independence. Kans. 

FOR SALE-In northern Indiana, greenhouse plant 
of 5.fi00 feet of glas^ in greenhouses and sash. \% 
acres land, good general »iuck of plants, roses, carna- 
tions and chryBunthcmums: greenhouses and house 
heated with steam. Indiana care Am i? lorlst. 



Greenhouse plant 7 miles from center of Chlcajgo In 
one of Us finest suburbs; 3 houses 5t;xll, one 120x20. 
Hot water; established all-round retail trade; good 
winter stock. Ix>ng house and ground lease, or wlU 
sell entire. A great bargain. Address 

Box 10. care American Florist. 

FOR SALE OR RENT. 

Two large greenhouses 100 feet long by IS feet wide. 
containing 5UUU feet of glass; built two years ago. with 
all modern Improvements, by the late John F. Nltter- 
house. practical florist. Greenhouses situated J^ mile 
from town; convenient to two railroads, and stocked 
with roses, carnations, etc. Possession given Oct. Ist. 
For further particulars address 

MRS. S.J. NiTTEKHOUSE. Waynesboro, 

Franklin Co., Pa. 

For Sale or Rent. 

One of the largest and most successful plants in 
the State of Ohio, consisting of about 50,000 feet of 
glass, with three or six acres of 5ne land; houses 
all in the best of order, and as good as new; 
adapted to cut flowers. Reasons for selling, the 
increasing demand for the Standard "Ventilating 
Machines demands more of mv time than I can 
possibly give it and run the florist business. For 
particulars address 

E. HIPPAKD, Younirstown, Ohio. 

FOR SALE. 

Six (6) greenhouses, two hot water boilers, 
about 2000 feet 2-inch wrought iron pipe, 
valves, etc, lot of hotbed sash, frames, 
benches and about 35,000 flower pots. The 
entire plant will be sold at a very low cash 
price, as the whole must be removed off the 
premises before Sept. 1st, For particulars 
address l. R. MUNN. station C, Brooklyn, N, Y. 

FRITZ KLEIN. 

Who can give me any information in regard to 
Fritz Klein, gardener, of Naurod, near Wies- 
baden, Germany? The last was heard of him at 
Boston in the year 1873; since then he was not 
heard of. Information about him will kindly be 
sent to. 

MR. F. SEULBERGER. Seedsman and Florist, 

509, 511 & 513 Seventh St., Oakland. Cal. 

FOR SALE. 

A VALUABLE 28-ACRE FARM, WITH GREENHOUSE 

AND LARGE AND PROFITABLE TRADE 

ESTABLISHED. 

The residence of the late Mr. E. G. Bridge, de- 
lightfully situated on Washington St., in the city 
of Woburn. The buildings consist of a small two- 
story house of ti rooms, with shed and storeroom 
connected; house is painted, blinded and in per- 
fect order, supplied with city water; good barn, 
with cellar, hennery, ice house, shed and silo 
buildings. 

FIRST-CLASS MODERN STYLE GREENHOUSE. 

12.5x20 feet, built in the most approved style, 
with large boiler and hot water connections, and 
the foundations ready for another large house. 

The grounds are stocked with 5,000 of the choic- 
est kinds of Pinks. Also Asters, Roses, Shrubs 
and Hardy Plants (for which there is large orders 
for future delivery), and the trade can be doubled 
n one year. The land is beautifully situated, 
commandi"g a large street frontage, suitable for 
building lots, and has fruits of all kinds, shade 
trees, and Electric Line to pass the property; a 
large amount of choice white "Pinks" are being 
sold every day. 

OVER $3000 HAVE BEEN EXPENDED on the 
greenhouses and Plants m order to make it the 
leading place of its class in the county. 

Owing to the sudden death of the late owner, we 
offer this entire property tor 56,000. 

J. L. NASON & CO., 

21 School St., BOSTON. MASS. 

FLORAL DESIGNS 

The Cut Flower Worker's Friend. Fine book 
of 160 pages. Send 93.60 for it, to 

J. HORACE McFARLAND, Harrlsburg, Pa. 

You will benetit the American Florist 
by mentioning it every time you write 
an advertiser in these columns. 



92 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 25, 



Subscription $1.00 a Year. To Europe, $2.00. 

Advertisements, 10 Cents a Line, Agate; 

Inch, 81.40; Column, 814.00. 

Cash with Order. 

No Special Position Guaranteed* 

Discounts. 6 times, 5 per cent; 13 times, 10 percent; 

26 times. 20 per cent; 52 times, 30 per cent. 

No reduction made for large space. 



The Advertising: Department of the American 
Florist is for Florists. Seedsmen, and dealers in 
wares pertaining to those lines Only. Please to 
remembe it. 

Orders for less than one-half inch space not accepted. 

Advertisements must reach us by Monday to secure 
insertion in the issue for the folluwing Thursday. 

Address THE AMERICAN FLORIST CO., Chicago. 



Coming Exhibitions. 

Atlantic City, N. J.— Trade exhibition Society 

of American Florists. G. C. Watson, Sup't of 

exhibition, 1025 Arch St.. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lenox, Mass.. Sept. 4-6. Annual exhibition 

Lenox Uort. Society. A. H. Wingett, Sec'y. 
Boston, Sept. 5-6. Annual exhibition of plants 

and flowers Mass. Hort. Society. 
Chicago, Nov. 3-11. Cbrysauthemum show Hort. 

Society of Chicago. * W. C. Egan, Sec'y, 620 

Dearborn Ave. 
Newport, R. L, Nov. 6-8. Chrysanthemum show 

Newport Hort. Society. Alex MacLellan, 

Sec'y, Ruggles Ave. 
Boston, Nov. 6-9. Chrysanthemum show Mass. 

Hort. Society. Robt. Manning, Sec'y, Horti- 
cultural Hall. 
PiTTSFiELD, Mass., Nov. 6-9. Chrysanthemum 

show Berkshire County Gardeners' and Flo- 
rists' Club. W. M. Edwards, Sec'v, 103 

Howard St., Pittsfield. 
St. Louis, Mo., Nov. 6-9. Chrysanthemum show 

St. Louis Florists' Club. E. Schray, Sec'y. 

4101 Pennsylvania Ave. 
Indianapolis, "Ind., Nov. 6-10. Chrysanthemum 

show Society of Indiana Florists. \V. G. Ber- 

termann, Sec'y, 37 Massachusetts Ave. 
Philadelphia, Pa. .Nov. 6-10. Chrysanthemum 

show Pennsylvania Hort. Society. D. D. L. 

Farson, Sec'y, Horticultural Hall, Broad St. 
Louisville, Ky.. Nov. 6-10. Chrysanthemum 

show Louisville Florists. H. Nanz. Sec'y, 582 

Fourth Ave. 
Denver, Colo., Nov. 7-10. Chrysanthemum show 

Denver Florists' Club. Adam Kohankie, Sec'y. 

L.B. 375, So. Denver, Colo. 
Providence, R. I., Nov. 8-10. Chrysanthemum 

show Rhode Island Hort. Society. C. \V. 

Smith, Sec'y, 61 Westminster St. 
Montreal, Nov. 12-14. Chrysanthemum show 

Montreal Gardeners' and Florists' Club. Fred 

Bennett, Sec'y. 62 AylmerSt. 
Baltimore, Nov. 12-17, Chrysanthemum show 

Gardeners' Club of Baltimore. Wni, Mc- 

Roberts, Jr., Sec'y, 304 \V. Madison St. 
Worcester, Mass., Nov. 13-15. Chrysanthemum 

show Worcester County Hort. Society. Edw. 

W. Lincoln, Sec'y. 
Toronto. Ont., Nov. 13-16. Chrysanthemum show 

Toronto Gardeners' and Florists' Ass'n. A. 11. 

Ewing. Sec'y, 85 Carlton St. 
Springfield, Mass., Nov, , Chrysanthemum 

show Hampden County Hort. Society. W. F. 

Gale, Sec'y, 23 John St. 
Milwaukee, Wis., Nov. . Chrysanthemum 

show Milwaukee F'lorists' Club. A. Klokner, 

Sec'y, 219 Grand Ave. 
Hamilton, Ont., Nov. . Chrysanthemum 

show Hamilton Agric. Society. Walter H. 

Bruce, Sec'y. 
[Secretaries will confer a favor by supplying 
dates us soon as decided upon. We shall be glad 
to know of any further shows decided upon and 
not included in our list, ovpu if exact date is not 
vet determined.] 



ROSES FOR FORCING. 

Extra strong 3-incli Brides, Mermets, Hostes 
and Perles Fine Bridesmaid and Beauty 
in 2!4-inch deep rose pots. All at 
|5.00 per 100 Honest sam- 
ples sent at same price. 

W. J. & M. S. VESEY, »» T!\?;"ra7nn;;.. 
Primula Chinensis. 

Fine, healthy plants, .S^-inch pots, best 
varieties. 88.00 per 100; 2}4-inch pots, $4.00 
per 100. 



Carnations. 



WE ARE MAKING A SUMMER HIT! 

Try us on Cxit: FT'io^wers 

and see if we cannot substantiate our claim. 

Best Stock for Least Aloneu ! ^* 

*Mp RememDer our Gtioice flnierican Beauties ! 

Carefully packed to ship to any part of the country. 



SI "VVeit3£i.sl-i. -A.-vean.vs.e, 



CHICA.OO. 



"It's easy to get a picture of a floral piece 
taken, and don't cost much either." 

This has been told us very many times. A trial shows 
quite different. The conceded perfection so notice- 
able in 

Long's Florists' Photographs 

was achieved only by wearisome, energetic attempts 
spread over a long period of efifort, and entailing much 
expense. Catalogue to be had of 

DANX B. LONG, FuUishBT, BnflFalo, N. Y., 

CORBREY & McKELLAR, 

Wholesale and Commission Florists, 

Phone Main 4508. 64 & 66 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO. 

We are prepared to fill your orders with. First-Class Flowers. 
Give us a trial order. 



NOTHING CAN 
EQUAL 



FOR DECORATING, 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS HAHUS. 

CUT STRINGS s to iz feet long, so cts. 

Shipped in larg^e or small quantities to any part of the country. Orders by mail, tele- 
erraph or telephone. 

W. H. ELLIOTT, Brighton, Mass. 

Hardy Cut Ferns, 

BOUQUET GREEN, 

Laurel and Green Festooning', Wreaths, Etc. 

SPHAGNUM MOSS IN ANY QUANTITY. 

H. E. HARTFORD, 18 Chapman Place, BOSTON. 




'm 'prairie' FOLDINEFLOmR BOX. 
fOR EUT FLOWERS. 



FOLDING 
PAPEK 
BOXES 
for GUT 
Mowers. 

Made ir.Jiu rn'itvv, Matillhi llra'd. Strawboard. Ship- 
ped fiat, packed llkj In a crate. 

CHICAGO FOLDING BOX CO., 

Jackson & Clinton Sts.. CHICAQO. 

Tei,e['hone Main 4718. 
Mention American Florist. 




Keady Scpteniljer: C.mce Wilder, $6 per 100; 
Daybreak, 87 per 100. Strong, heaUhy plants. 

W. A. BOCK, North Cambridge, Mass. 

When writing mention the American ("lorist. 




Mention American KlurUt 



H. L SUNDERBRUGH, 

Wholesale Florist 

4.TH AND Walnut Streets, 

W. ELLISON 

WHOLESALE 

Cut Flowers! Florists' Supplies 

14-02 PINE STREET. 
(Successor to ELXISON & KUEHN), 

^jt^ WHOLESALE ^€# 

1122 mTK STUEET, 

(S^. l^ot;i.l<s, AJ:o. 

A oomplete line of Wire Designs. 



j8g4. 



The American Florist. 



93 



E. H. HUNT, 

Wholesale Plorist 

68 Lake Street, CHICAGO. 

WHOLESALE CUT FLOWERS. 

SEEDS. BUI.BS ADD AI.I. 

FI.OBISTS' SUPPLIES. 



Western Aeent for the GREAT AJVTIPEST. 

KENNIGOTT BROS. GO. 

WHOLESALE QUT FLOWERS, 

and rLOmSTS' SUPPLIED. 

34- <£ 36 RANOOUPH STREET, 

CHICAGO. 

A. L. BANDALL, 

wiioi6sai6 Fiona 

126 Dearborn St., CHICAGO. 



Aeent for finest grades Waxed and Tissue Papers. 

J. B. DEAMUD&CO. 

WHOLESALE GUT FLOWERS, 

34 & 36 Randolph Street, 

PHONE M4IN 223. CHICAGO. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR AMERICAN BEAUTIES. 

Reinberg Bros. 
WHOLESALE CUT FLOWERS, 

5/ WABASH AVENUE, 

Telephone Main 4937. CM:IO.A.OO. 

We are Headquarters for the leading varieties of 
Roses, for the summer. Send us a trial order. 

NILES CENTER FLORAL CO. 

WHOLESALK GROWERS OF 

GUT FLOWERS OF ALL KINDS 

HEADOUARTERS FOR XIVULAX. 

Fine'crop now ready, per 100 $10 00: 
per dozen $1.50. 

59 WABASH AVENUE. 

Telephone Main 3.50.5. O MIO A.GrO. 

WHOLESALE 
FLORISTS 

JOBBERS IN 
FLORISTS' 
SUPPLIES, 

METS, ^^^'= — j< FLORISTS' 

BRIDES, ^^ «^ \^^ ^*SES- 

GONTIERS, 

CARNATIONS, 

ALWAYS ON HAND. 

1 Music Hall Place, 

BOSTON, MASS. 

HORTICULTDRAL ADCTIONEERS, 

DAN'L B. LONG3 

WHOLESALE GUT FLOWERS, 

495 Washington St.. BUFFALO, N. Y. 
Shipping Orders carefully attended to. 
OTHER SPECIALTIES: 

Florists' Supplies, Wire Desigrng, Bulbs, 
Long's Florists Photographs (see large ad. 
Catalogues. Lists. Terms, etc.. on application. 

Always mention the American Ro- 
rist when writing to advertisers. 




©Y^RofeAafe MarfteLa. 



Cut Flowers. 

New York. Aug. 18. 

Roses l.DU®3.00 

■■ perlOOO *5-'**®*l''-'" , nn«,i'> on 

" Beauty ^■2Sf'?SS 

Carnations ■: .60® 1.00 

perlOOO $3.00®$5.00 

Valley ^. I'SSt f-S?, 

Harrtsll f-§Sf 9m 

Auratum ;;,--.4iVnk'-*°® ^■'" 

Sweet peas, per 100 bunches 50c@$1.0O 

Asters per 100 bunches 50@1.00 ^. ^^ „ ^ 

Rmllax b.OO® G.UO 

A^^araCTS. -^-^^Z 

Adlantum 'O® 1-™ 

BOSTON. Aug. 18. 

Roses, Nlphetos. Gontler MS® 5ffi 

■■ Perle, Sunset J-OOf f,-^ 

Bride, Mermet ^'SS^ ''SV 

Carnations -25® ■'« 

Harrtsll 0.00® 8.00 

Lily of the valley * f' 

Sweet peas -'o 

Asters , ?^.,-S 

Gladiolus l-"*'®;'-?" 

White Japan lilies -O" 

Adlantum ,« nvs.Ann 

Smllax ^•''''®^-nS 

Asparagus ^-^ 

PHILADELPHIA, Aug. 18. 

Koses, small 2. 00 

large teas 3.00® 4.00 

•• BelStili. : '*?Sf'?S 

Carnations »*» J-gj] 

smiiax ■■'■.'.'.■.■.■.■.■:;!.".■!:.'!.''■■.■;. !.'!i;.'..".''-ii)-M'®i2'ai 

A flDB.rQ.dl8 ■•• • 0*-' ' ^^ 

Harrtsll Uiie's'.'.'.".'.'.'. 4.00® 6.00 

Sweet peas •"" 

Cornflower o-'S^'^ 

Cattleyas ^-S^-Sn 

Adlantum '°® ^■'■" 

CHICAGO, Aug. 21. 

Roses. La France. Meteor J-,'iif,--,'S 

•■ Beauty § ^'5Sn 

Kalserin o.OO® 4 00 

General assortment, per 1000. .f6®II0 

Carnations, long ■•?Slt-/nn 

fancies 1.50® i. 00 

Auratum lilies 6.W® 8 00 

Asters ■"" 

Sweet Peas 1"® ^ 

ST. Louis, Aug. 20. 

, 2.00® 3.00 

2.00® 3.00 

. 2.00® 3.0O 

. 3.00® 3.00 

6.00®16.00 

, .15® .25 

.50® .75 

.50 

1.26 

.50 

18. 



Roses, Perles, Nlphetos, Wootton, 

Bride, Mermet, Bridesmaids. 

Meteors 

La France, Albany, Hoste.. 

Beauty — 

Sweetpeas JJ» 

Carnations, long -SUC! 

" short 

Adlantum 

Hollyhocks, asters — 

BUFFALO, Aug. 

Roses, Beauties 'S-SSil'MS 

Mermet. Bride, 3.00® 4.00 

Perles f"» 

Gontler, Hoste -c^ Y'ffi 

Carnations onXf.o ff^ 

Auratum lilies I'S'??^ 

LunclioUum lilies (outdoor) 3.0O® o.oo 

Gladiolus -60 

Sweet peas ,, *i{ 

VaUey f-^" 

Asters ■ ]■'" 

Adlantum = rna,mM 

Smllax '^■'''®?n'm 

Asparagus ■ (xl.uu 

GEORGE ft. SUTttERLflND. 

Successor to PECK & SUTHERLAND. 
Successors to WM. J. STEWART. 

Cut Flowers! Florists' Supplies 

-VXTHOIvESA-rvE. 

67 Bromfield St., BOSTON, MASS. 

New England Age nt for the GREAT ANTIPEST. 

WELCH BROS., 
Wholesale Florists, 

wo. 2 BEACON STREET, 
Near Tremont St., BOSTON, MASS. 

CUT SMILAX. 

15 cents per String. 
JOSEPH E. BONSALL. 308 Garfield Ave., Salem, 0. 

TJ DIRECTORY 

For 1894 
IS NOW READY. 
Price $2.00. 
AMERICAN FLORIST CO. 



FOR HIGH CLASS SUMMER TRADE. 

THE LEADING FAVORITES. 

American Beaut y, 
Meteor , 

La France , 

KnA all other desirable roses, (jrown espe- 
cially tor summer shipping to sea- 
side and mountain resorts. 

BURNS & RAYNOR, 

49 West 28tb St., NEW YORK. 

SPRING, SUMMER, 

AUTUMN, WINTER. 

In dull season and busy season. 
All the year round. 

Roses, Lily if lYalley 

and all other choice stock 
can be obtained of 

THOS. YOUNG, Jr., 

20 West 24th St., NEW YORK. 

WALTER F. SttERIDflN, 

• WHOLESALE • 



32 West 30th Street MEW YORK. 



Roses Shipped to all points. Price list on appncation. 

Mention American Florist 

Edward C. Horan, 

34 W. 29th Street, NEW YORK, 

WHOLE8SLE1FLORI8T. 

Careful Shipping to all parts of the country. 
Frice list on application. 

FRANK D. HUNTER, 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN 

QuT* F lowers . 

57 W. 30th St., NEW YORK. 

Mention Anaerlcan Florist. 

MILLANG BROS., 

Wholesale Florists, 

408 East 34th Street, 

Cut Flower Excliange, NEW YORK. 

THEO. BOEHRS, 

WHOLESALE 

FLORIST, 

111 WEST 30th street. 

NE^?V YORK CITY. 

Established 1 879 

SAMCEl S. PENNOCK, 

Wholesale Florist 

REAR OF 42 S. 16th STREET, 

Mention American Florist. 



94 



The American Florist. 



^^g' 25, 



Hfte ^e,fik Urac^e. 



AM. SEED TRADE ASS0CIAT10^. 

D. I. BusHXELL, St. Louis, president; S. B. Brigqs, 
Toronto. 1st vice-president; A. L. UON, 114 Chambers 
street, New York, secretary and treasurer. 



Mr. Robert Boist is in Europe. 

Mr. John Buckbee was in Holland 
August Isc. 

Bulbs and seedsmen's trade displays 
•were well arranged at Atlantic City. 

The prices of mixed hyacinths have 
advanced in Holland. Tulips are still 
plenty. 

Western prices on onion sets seem to 
start in low. The eastern crop is reported 
a fair one. 

DuBUQDE, Iowa — W. A. Harkett is 
making extensive improvements on his 
place at Hill and W. 5th street. 

Mr. Wm. F. Dreer took an active part 
in the Atlantic City convention. Mr. Z. 
De Forest Ely also did good committee 
service. 

Elizabeth, N.J. — Henry Doe, iheoldest 
nurseryman and florist in Elizabeth, died 
at his home in that city August 12. Mr. 
Doe, who was 69 years old, had been en- 
gaged in the business for 49 years. He 
leaves a widow and five children. 

Smilax Plants ^ heap. 

Out of 2 and S-inch pots, also transplanted plants 
out of boxes. Never had as fine and large stock 
before. Please state number you desire and I will 
give you the lowest prices. Safe delivery and 
best satisfaction guaranteed with every shipment. 
Sample order 10 cts. Terms strictly cash. 

Address ^RED SCHNEIDER, Wholesale Florist, 

Wyoming Co., ATTICA, N.Y. 

Hybrid Gypripediums 

FOR SALE CHEAP. 

Good plants of C. Schroederje, C. Sedeni 
candidulum, C. amandum, C. lo, C. Har- 
risianum Pitcherianum, C. Melanophthal- 
mum, C. oenanthum, C. Prsestans, C. 
chlorops, and other choice varieties, 24 
plants. Will sell the lot CHEAP. 

Also 100 well colored Pandanus Veitchii, 
averaging about 10 in. |30. For partic- 
ulars, write 

JOS. NEWSHAM, 

care CHAS. EBLE, Florist, 

9 Barronne St., New Orleans, La. 



VAUGHAN'S 

INTERNATIONAL" Pansies. 



ROSES, 



Extra Cheap 

TO MAKE ROOM. 



From 3-inch 
pots, $5.00. 



We will offer for the NEXT FEW WEEKS some 
of the best Roses in cultivation. 

Sunsets, 

Niphetos, 

Duchess of Albany, 

La France, > ^^^^ 2>^-inch 

Soupert, I pots, $3.50. 

White La Franca, ^ ^ 

Brides, 

Gontiers, 

Meteor, 

Bridesmaid, 

Perles, 

Ulrlch Brunner, 

Am. Beauties, 2>^-in. |5.00; 3-in. $6 00 

Satisfaction guaranteed. Wholesale Catalogue 

^Address NANZ & NEUNER. 

LOUISVU-LE, KY. 

Always mention the American Flo- 
rist when writing to advertisers. 



Itivati 

\ 
i 




Put up, named and sold by us 
for the past four years, from the 
best strains produced in Europe 
and America. 

It is generally admitted that we 
have had the nnest show of Pan- 
sies on the grounds of the World's 
Columbian Exposition, and for 
these we received the only award 
for mixed Pansies. 

No other firm is authorized to 
offer our Vaughan's International 
Mixture, and those using this 
name to sell other mixtures, are 
"imitators." The genuine can be 
had in our packages only. 

The new crop seed secured in 
Europe this season by one of our 
firm is no w in our stores, and orders 
can be filled immediately from New 
York or Chicago. 
Trade pkt. 50c; H oz. $1.50; 02. $10.00. 

Also 

VAUGHAN'S GIANT MIXTURE. Js oz. 60c;oz.S1.00 
TRIMARDEAU IMPROVED, K oz. $100; oz. $3.50 
CHICAGO PARKS BEDDING, oz. Sl.OO. 



J. C. VAUGHAN, 



IVe^w" "iTorli:: 



26 Barcfay Street. 



P. O. Box 688. 



Mention American FloriBt. 




5,000,000 
FREESIAS 

Diiu CIDCT UAUn We wUl deliver Freesla Bulbs, 
DUjlinol nAnUi all charges for transportation 
paid, as follows: 

3-8 to 3-4 inch per 1000, $4.00 

1-4 to 5-8 inch per 1000, $3.00 

Liberal discount on larger lots. Send for our price list. 
Order NOW your Japan Bulbs, Longlllorum. Aura- 
tums. Rubrums, Albums, we are Headquarters. 
We are the ONLY FIRM In the U. S. who guaran- 
tee you SOUND BULBS delivered. 
Address all communlcailons to 

H. H. BERGER & CO.. 

(Established 1878.) SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Mention American Klorlsl. 



WE SELL BULBS 

Special low prices to 

Florists % Dealers. 

WEEBER & DON. 

Seed MerchantB and (Iroweri*. 
114 Chambers Street. NKW YOKK. 



HulS6DosGti Bromers, 

OVERVEEN, near Haarlem, HOLLAND. 

Bulbs m Plants 



We are now prepared to quote lowest 
possible prices for next July, Aug- 
ust and September delivery. 

Illustrated Wholesale Catalogues on application. 

HULSEBOSCfl BROS., 

ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 



YOUNG PALMS FOR FLORISTS' USE 

CHKAF TO MAKE ROOM. 

Size pots. Height. Per 100 

Kentia Belmoreana S-lncli 13 to l.") In. fJO OO 

Forsterlana 3-Inch 12 to 3U In. 20.0O-3.'>.00 

Areca Bauerl S-lnch 18to241n. 2.').0O 

Seaforthla elegans 3-Inch IS to 24 In. 20.00 

Phoenix recjinata 3-lnch 8 to 10 In. 20.00 

Pandanus utllls 2J^-ln. StolOln. L'j.OO 

All stuck Is In healthy condition and ready for 

shifting on. 50 at 100 rates. 

MENDENHALL GREENHOUSES. Minneapolis, Minn. 

When writing to any of the adver- 
tisers on this page please mention the 
American Florist. 



ONION 
SEED. 






CROP 1894. 

Prices for New Crop 
-made on Application. 

COX SEED AND PLANT CO. 

411, 413 & 415 SanBome .Street, 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

Do YOU WANT a complete alphabetical 
list of carnations in commerce in America, 
with name of introducer, date of intro- 
duction and brief, accurate description of 
each? You will find such a list in our 
trade directory and reference book for 
1894. Price $2.00. 



i8g4. 



The American Florist. 



95 



ZIRNGIEBEL GIANT PANSIES. 



Owing to favorable weather, have been magni- 
ficent this season. Never befoie have we ob- 
tained such size and colors; and as usual, wher- 
ever exhibited, have eclipsed everything else, re- 
ceiving also the most flattering testimonials from 
the leading florists and seedsmen all over the 
country. 

New seed ready now of both the Giant Market 
and Giant Fancy in trade packets of 2,000 and 500 
seeds respectively at one dollar each, with practi- 
cal directions for growing pansies. 



PLANTS 
GIANT MARKET 
GIANT FANCY 



READY NOW: 

. . $5.00 per 1000 
20.00 per 1000 



DENYS ZIRNGIEBEL, 

. . . NEEDHAM, MASS. 

PANSIES. . . 

Every Grower Claims the Best. 

I am willing to have mine tested alongside 
of any in the market. Over a thousand florists 
used them last season, were pleased with them 
and made money out of them. 

Between Sept. 1st and Dec. 1st I will have a 
MILLION or more plants to sell. They can not 
be offered in competition with cheap grown 
seed, but quality considered, are remarkably 
cheap at the price. 
By Mail or Express, prepaid, 75c. per 100: by Express 
at your expense, $5.00 per 1000. Liberal dis- 
count will be allowed on large orders. 

An honest sam^jle of the plants will be 
mailed you on receipt often cents, and terms 
are absolutely cash in advance. 

ALBERT M. HERR, L.B. 496, Lancaster, Pa. 



Pansy* Seed. 

The JENNINGS STRAIN of high grade Pansy 
Seed. New crop now ready. Saved with special care 
from only the very finest variellee and (warranted) 
first-class in every respect. 

THE JENNINGS XX STRAIN. 
The cream of PansieB. Grand colors mixed, pltt., 
1500 seed. $1 .IX): loz.i8.00. 

The Jennings Strain, finest mixed, pkt. $1.0C atwut 
2600 seed: 1 oz.$ti.OO: 3oz8-$lo.OO. No sttim mllli in this 
strain. (They are just as good as 1 can make 'em>. 
To my old patrons 1 would say they are a big improve- 
ment over last season— more variety and finer colors. 
The best strain for florists either for winter bloom or 
spring sales: all large flowering. 

Black I>r. Faust, finest pkt„ 2500 seed, $1.00 

Finest Yellow, black eye •' " 1.00 

P»ure White, the best " '■ 1.00 

Victoria, bright red pkt. 1000 seed, 1.00 

All my own growth of 1891. Half pkts. of any of the 
above 50c. Please send money orders or reiilstered 
letter. Cash with order. Address 

E. B. JENNINGS. Wholesale Pansy Grower. 
Lock Box 2.54. SOUTHPORT, CONN. 



Roemer's Superb Prize Pansies. 

The finest Htraln of Panstes In the World. 

Introducer and Grower of all the leading 
No velties. 

♦ Cataloifue free on application. 

♦ FRED ROEMER. SEED GROWER, 
\ gilKULINBUKG, GEKMANV. 

for iuiiuediate delivery: 

FIRST QUALITY LILY Of the VALLEY, 

MKKLIX I'IPS, from cold aloraKe. 

C. H. JOOSTEN. 

3 Coentles Slip, NKW YORK. 
IMPORTER OF BULBS AND PLANTS. 

EXTRA PANSY SEED. 

MAMMOTH SUNBEAM STRAIN. 

A grand collection of giant flowering varieties, very 
large, of perfect form, and choice colors; carefully 
selected; better seed plants this year than ever; re- 
ceive very high praise from my customers: no finer 
strain offered anywhere; florists should sow of it. 

Trade pkt., 500 seeds, :i5c: 'S pkta. tiOc; ti pkts. f 1.00. A 
pkt. of the new Monkey Face pansy with every II order. 
JOHN F. KUFP, Shiremanstown, Pa. 

Please mention the American Florist 
every time you write to an advertiser. 



DECORATIVE PLANTS. 

Special offer of varieties and sizes that can be supplied in large quantities 
and are of exceptional good value. 



. $ 1.50 per dozen; 8 12.00 per 100 
12.00 " 100.00 



ARECA LUTESCENS. 

3-inch pots, 12 to 15 inches high. . . 

6-inch pots, 24 inches high, 3 plants in a pot 

SPECIMEN PLANTS OF ARECA LUTESCENS. 

9-inch pots, single stems, fine plants for decorating, about 6 feet high 8 7.50 each 

9-inch pots, single stems, with several good side branches, about 6 feet high . . . 10.00 each 
12-inch pots, beautiful, perfect specimens in every respect, clean, v^ell-foimed plants 

of very good value. - 15.00 each 

12-inch pots, a grand lot of bushy specimen plants, clean, well-grown stock in every 

respect, a special lot of plants, about 7 feet high, at . . . . 20.00 each 

COCOS WEDDELLIANA. 

A grand lot of plants, in S-inch pots, well- grown, stocky and of good color, 12 to 15 

inches hi?h ... $3.00 per dozen; $20.00 per 100 

Latania Borbonica. 

A grand lot of plants in 3-inch pots, 4 to 5 leaves, 
ready to pot up, 88.00 per 100. Per doz. 

6-inch pots, ii inches high. 812.00 

7-inch pots, 2Uo 30 inches high .... 15.00 
8-inch pots, 30 inches high 18.00 

Pandanus Utilis. 

2^-inch pots, fine stock for potting up, 75 cts. per 
dozen; 86.00 per 100; 850.00 per 1000. 

Araucaria Excelsa. 

Largest stock in the country. Each 

5-inch pots. 3 tiers, 15 inches high $1.25 

6-inch pots, 4 tiers, 18 inches high .... 1.75 

6-inch pots, 4 tiers, 24 inches high 2.50 

7-inch pots, 5 tiers, 30 inches high .... 3.00 
8-inch pots, 6 to 7 tiers, 36 inches high .... 5.00 

Dracaena Braziliensis. 

A fine lot of this useful decorative variety, strong 
plants in 4-inch pots, 15 to 18 inches high, at 



Kentia Belmoreana. per doz. 

5-inch pots, 6 leaves, 24 inches high $15.C0 

6-inch pots, 6 leaves, 24 to 30 inches high. 



18.00 

Each 

$3.00 

5.00 

7.50 

15.00 



8-inch pots, 6 to 7 leaves, 30 inches high . 
8- inch pots, 6 to 7 leaves, 48 inches high 
9-inch pots, 6 to 7 leaves, 48 to 54 in. high 
12-inch pots, 7 leaves, 60 inches high. . . 

Kentia Forsteriana. per doz. 

3-inch pots, 4 leaves, 15 inches high 8 2.50 

5-inch pots, 5 to 6 leaves, 24 to 30 in. high . . 12.00 
5-inch pots, 5 to 6 leaves, 30 to 36 in. high . . 15.00 

6-inch pots, 6 leaves, 36 inches high 18 00 

Each 
7-inch pots. 7 leaves, 42 inches high $ 3.00 

9-inch pots, 6 to 7 leaves, 60inches high . 7.50 
12-inch pots, 6 to 7 leaves, 72 inches high. . . 10.00 



$2.00 per dozen; $15.00 per 100, 



h pt 

;$I; 



For a complete list of Decorative Plants, such as Palms, Ferns, Dracsnas, Cycas, 
Pandanus, etc., etc., refer to our Quarterly List, mailed on application. Our stock this 
season is of exceptionally fine quality, and is complete as to assortment of sizes. 



714 Chestnut Street, 



PHILADELPHIA^ PA. 



Prices Lower Than Ever. 

Ready for shipment from July to September. 

Calla Aethiopica. fine dry roots in all sizes. 

Lit. Longiflorum, ready for shipment from October 
1st to March 15, 1895. 

Lil. Auratum, Spec. Rubrum and Album. Etc. 

Iris Kaempferi, in 100 choice varieties. 

Japanese Maples, in best varieties. 

Camellias, Paeontes. Tree Ferns. Raphis, C)cas 
Revoluta, superb growing plants with fine foliage 
from 25 cents to ^ each; fresh imported stems, 
true long leaf variety, roots and leaves cut oflf, de- 
livered from March, 1895. 

For general Japanese stock apply to 

F. Gonzalez & Co., 

303 to 312 Wayne St.. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Mention American florist. 

PANSY SEED. 

NEW CROP NOW READY. Very fine mixture of 
large flowering varieties and choice colors, espe- 
cially selected for florists' use. 1 oz. $3.00. 

NEW GIANT PRIZE PANSY, finest strain ia the 
market. 1 oz. $5 00. 

Low prices on Lilium Harrisii, Longiflorum, 
Roman Hyacinths, Lily ol the Valley, etc. 

Special low prices on Rustic Baskets. 

HERRMANN'S SEED STORE, 

413 EAST 34-TH Street, 

Near Long Island Ferrj-, NEW YORK. 

FOR :BXjrv:B 

^lE*^C>TAJu 

See page 1175 July Sth number of the 
American Florist. 
"VV. A.. JWIA.Bfr>A., 

Horticu»u'ralts1abl!.hn,ent. SO^^H ORANGE. N. i. 

When writing to any of the adver- 
tisers on this page please mention the 
American Florist. 




=d 



t 

M 





f 



Tuberous ^^i^^. 
Begonias; 

(GRIFFINS STRAIN.) 
Plants in bloom, all sizes, at lowest prices. 

OASIS NURSERY CO.. 

Thos. Griffin. Mgr. Westbury Station. L. I.. N. Y. 

Plants from last fall; these have a foundation and 
will begin to run strong at once. $2.50 per 100; 
820.00 per 1000. 

CLEMATIS for Fall Dollvery. 

Special prices at wholesale, on application. 
Splendid stock and assortment. 

F. A. BAIiLEB, Bloomingrfcon, IlL 

When writing to any of the adver- 
tisers on this page please mention the 
American Horist. 



96 



The American Florist. 



Atig. 2S, 



London, Ont. 

A. G. Stephens, with J. Gammage & 
Sons, has bought some property, and will 
shortly build and start in business. 

Business is somewhat better than usuai 
at this season; what with dry weather 
and the grasshoppers outdoor stuff is be- 
coming short. Carnations are looking 
well considering the very unfavorable 
season. Chrysanthemums all around are 
in much better shape than usual; every 
one apparently making an extra effort. 

Mr. C. M. Greenway, late of Grand 
Rapids, Mich., will shortly open the store 
formerly occupied by J. Dilloway, who 
was recently sold out. 

W. R. Shelmire, 

AVONDALE, 

CARIVATIOIVIS 

AND COLEUS. 

25,000 FIELD GROWN 

CARNATIONS 

MRS. FISHER, SILVER SPRAY, 

LIZZIE McGOWAN. GRACE WILDER. 

TIDAL WAVE, MRS. F. MANGOLD. 

HECTOR, and FLORENCE, 

$6.00 per 100; $55.00 per 1000. 
P. E. RICHWAGEN, box 56, Montvale, Mass. 



"HELEN KELLER" 

I The new Carnation; pure white, deli- 
cately marked with red. 

I Price for well Rooted Cuttings: 

$3.00 per dozen; *12.00 per 100; $25 00 per 250; 

SVtO.OO per 1000. 500 at 1000 rate. Orders may 

be sent either to 
iJOftN N. Mfly, EDWIN LONSDALE, 

Summit, N. J. Chestnut Hill, Fhila. 



CARNATIONS |'|^^n 

E. G. Hill, Wm, Scott, Mrs. Reynolds, Silver 
Spray, Tidal Wave. Lizzie McGowau, Ben Hur, 
Mrae. Diaz Albertini, White Dove, Garfield, Lam- 
born, Portia, Edna Craig, Fred. Dorner, Daybreak, 
Golden Gate, Mrs. Fisher, White Wings, Hinze's 
White, Blanche, Purdue, Louise Porsch. and other 
sorts. Marie Louise Violets. Low prices on appli- 
cation JOSEPH HEINL, Jacksonville, III. 

Mention American FlorlBt. 

CARNATIONS 

Rooted Cuttings all sold or planted 
out. Field plants for sale in the 
fill 1^ 

The Pines. KENNETT SQUARE. Chester Co., PA. 

THE COTTAGE GARDENS, 

Queens, Long Island, N. 7. 

WHOLESALE CARNATIONS. 

NEW CARNATIONS. 
FERNS. 

ELLIS, NORFOLK Co.. MASS. 

Carnations a Specialty 

Hooted CuttlDKB and Younj; Plants sold out. 
Nlc« Field-Grown Plants In Sept. Send for prices. 
GEO. HANCOCK & SON, Grand Haven, Mich. 



R oses for WMm F lowerin g;. 

We still have fine stocks of the leading varieties. 

AMERICAN BEAUTY, 

KAISERIN AUGUSTA VICTORIA 

AND BRIDESMAID, 

btroDg plants, out of 3><-inch pots, ready for immediate 
planting, $12.00 per 100. 

METEOR, BRIDE, MERMET, MME. CUSIN, 
NIPHETOS, WOOTTON and PERLE, 

strong plants, out of 3^-inch pots, ready for immediate 
planting, $9.00 per 100. 

SllTerCupawarded us forMeteor Roses, exhibited 'i Mi riLnOUII UUIIirnlll) 

at Madison Square Garden, isaa. for best 25 Ta,.i.i«»«»«fn nn Mii<l«nn M V 

Bed Koses of any variety. TarrylOWn-on-tlUOSOn, N. T. 

Mnnttnn American l*'loriBt 




1000 MEKMETS, 6nO NIPHETOS, 
1000 BRIDES. 150 TESTOCTS. 

All from 2H-inch standard pots. These are In the 
very best of condition and as large as a great deal of 
the stock shipped from a-lnch pots. 

Per doz. 75c. : per 100 $5.0u ; per 1000 $45.00. 

C^ Samples free to intending purchasers. 

Pandanus Utilis. 

6-inch pots $5.00 per dozen 

5-inch pots 3.0D per dozen 

4 inch pots 2.00 per dozen 

Cyperus Alternifolius. 

i%-\nc\\ pots, per doz. 75c; per 100 $6 
2yi'mch pots, " 60c; " $4 
2-inch pots, " 40c; " $3 

Grevillea Robusta. 

3-ineh pots, 10 to 15 inches high, per 

dozen jSl.OO; per 100 J8 00 

2>^-inch pots, " 65c; " $4.00 

NATHAN SMITH & SON. 



J 



Watch this Space 

We will quote 
SOMETHING GOOD 
in the near future. 

We sell only to the trade 
at Wholesale Prices. 

Better not let your 
customers read your 
Florists' Trade Papers. 

S. O. STREBY, 

Lock Box 77, 
UPPER SANDUSKY. OHIO. 



ROSES SND GflRNKTIONS 

for Wint-^r :^loc»«ri-». 



MERMETS, 
PERLES, 



BRIDES, 
WATTEVILLE, 
and WABAN. 



BEAUTIES, 
METEOR, 



Clean, healthy stock, from 35^-inch pots, 86.00 
per 100; $45.00 per 1000. 

25,000 FIELD-GROWN CARNATIONS, fine, healthy 
stock. Send for list of varieties and prices. 

FERNS— Adiantum cuneatum, 2>^-inch pots, $3.00 

per 100; from 4-inch pots, S6.00 per 100. 
Ferns in fine assorted varieties, same price. 

JAMES HORAN, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Mention American Florist. 

NOVELTY. 

New, Semi-Double, Large 
Flowering 

WHITE MARGUERITE 

(Chrysantlieuium frutescenn.) 

Size of flowers 4 inches in diameter, petals 
clear white, center yellow. 

PRICES FOR PLANTS FROM 23i-INCH POTS, 
$2.50 PER DOZEN: $20 PER 100. 

Ready September 1. Cash with order. 

GRflLLtRT & GO., Florists, 

COLMA. San Mateo Co.. CALIFORNIA. 

The Water Garden. 

special and Hardy Wat«r Lilies of all colors. 
VICTORIA REGIA AND V. RANDI. EURYALE FEROX. 

Nelumblums In variety. Hardy Ornamental plants, 
sub-aquailc plants, etc.. etc. Nymphsea Laydekeii 
rosea (awarded a Medal at World's Fair); mostcharm- 
Ingof all the UAKDvLUlea; *2 50 each. 

Other Columbian Novelties see catalogue. 

WM. TRICKER & CO., Clifton, N. J. 

Mention American Florist 



100,000 PANSIES 



BROWN'S SUPERB PflNSIES 

READY NOW FOR PLANTING. 

Grower of all the leading variety, the ne plus ultra in pansies. For size and form it seems hardly 
possible to produce anything more perfect and superfine (most light colors). 

By mail, 75c. per 100 ; I Liberal discount will be allowed on large orders. 

By express, $5.00 per 1000. \ Cash with order. 

Peter Brown, 721 Marietta Avenue, LANCASTER, Pa. 

vi*»ntton American Florlit 



ESTABLISHED 



8 66. 







MANUFACTURED 



N. STEFFENS 

335 EA5T 2|V ST. NEW YORK. 



RN5TRlEMSCttNeiDeR,Altona;H3mburg 

^ ^ iOLt ACENTS FOR U.S.AMERICA & CANADA. 

C-C-ABEU 6c 0O.-e0X920 NtWYORK- 



ANTIPEST. 



THE GREAT 



For particulars, see next week. 

R. W. CARMAN, Gen'l Act.. 

asi AmltT Street. FIiDSHING, Qneeoi Ck>., N. X. 



i8g4' 



The American Florist. 



97 



ROSES! 

3200 BRIDESMAIDS - $5.00 

2000 BRIDES - - - 4.00 

700 ALBANYS - - - 4.00 

All strong 3-inch slock. 

J. A. MERRIFIELD 

Assignee of J. T. ANTHONY. 

3425 Prairie Ave., GHIGflGO. 

ROSES#CHRYSANTHEMUMS 

PERLES, 4-inch, strong, $7.00 per 100 
MERMETS, 4-in. " 7.00 " 

The above are strong plants, from 4-lnch pots, 
not KTOwn In 3-lnch and sold for 4-inch. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS: perioo 

Golden Wedding and Good Gracious, 

2^-inch, strong plants @! $5.00 

Other choice cut flower varieties @ 3.00 

FERNS, Adiantum cuneatum and other 
good varieties for cutting, from 
4-inch pots, ready to shift (iii lO.OO 

REX BEGONIAS, 3-inch pots @ 5.00 

EVENDEN BROS., 

Williamsport, Pa. 

ROSE PLANTS. 

Per 100 Per 100 

Am. Beauty, 3-in $8.00 

Bridesmaid, " 8.00; 4-in.. $10.00 

K. A. Victoria " S.OO " 10.00 

Mme. Testout" 8 00 

Mme. Hoste " 6.00 

La France, extra " lo.OO 

The Bride, 3-in 6.00; 3;^-in., 8.00 

All fine, strong stock. 

BROWN & CANFIELD, Springfield, III. 

Mention American Florist. 



ROSES. 



ROSES. ROSES. 



SURPLUS STOCK CHEAP, consisting of Brides, 
Mermets, Meteor. Bon, Safrano, Souv. d'un Ami, 
Niphetos, Beauties and Perles. All first-class 
stock from ;! and 4-iu. pots. Price J5 and 87 per 
100. Double White Primroses, .Sin. pots, 86 per 
100; Adiantum Cuneatum, $5 per 100. 2J<-in. pots, 
etc., etc. Large assortment and low prices. Let 
us hear from you. HENRY SMITH, 

130 Monroe .St., Grand Hapi(l8. Mich. 

Two New Varieties of Carnations ready for 
introduction next Spring. 

BRIDESMAID, 

a pink of same shade as its namesake 

the rose; and a deep crimson scarlet. 

No. 41, yet to be named. 

FBED. DOBNER & SOW. lafayette, Ind. 



_„,„„ SH-lnch pots. Per lUO Per lOCO 

BKIDE f.i.ijU $22 .S(J 

MKRMET ^lll •»io 

GONTIER ::;■ 250 22W 

SOUPKRT. 2 50 '^Vt 

WHITE LA FRANCE ! J.TS 24 UO 

SUNSET. PERLB 2 i-U 36 00 

And all other standard varieties. 2%. :sw and 4<<;-lnch 
pots. Write tor prices on wbatjou need. 

TERMS CA.SH WITH OKIJKU. 
THB NATIONAL PL ANT CO., Uaytoii, O. 

I^OiS^^S. Good Stock. 

AM. BEAUTY PLANTS, 4.inch $70.00 

BRIDESMAIDS, BRIDES, PERLES, 
MERMETS, all 3>^-inch $45.00 

ADDRESS 

BRANT & NOE, or L. M. NOE, 

Forest Glen, 111. Madison, N. J. 

Mention American Florist. 



Strong^ 
Field 
Grown 



ROSES 



Better 
Than 
Imported 

15 ACRES OF HYBRID PERPETUAL, MOSS AND CLIMBING ROSES. 

Extra strong, bushy, well developed plants. No better 

Sure to please. 



in the world. 



General assortment of leading- varieties, including- following best forcing sorts: 

GENERAL JACQUEMINOT, MAGNA CHARTA. 
PAUL NEYRON, ULRICH BRUNNER, 

MRS. I. H. LAING, M. P. WILDER. 

PRINCE CAMILLE DE ROHAN. 

Special rates on early orders booked for coming PaU or Spring delivery. 

FULL ASSORTMENT HARDY PLANTS AND SHRUBS, BULBS, FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL 
TREES, SMALL FRUITS, GRAPE VINES, ETC. 

No trouble to show stock or quote prices, Catalogues and Price Lists free. 



40th YEAR. 



29 GREENHOUSES. 



1000 ACRES. 



THE STORRS k HARRISON GO.. 

PAIIMESVILLE, OHIO. 



Roses. Roses. Roses. 

Perle, Niphetos, Mermet, Bride, Victoria, Meteor, La France, Albany, Gontier, 

White La France, Soupert and Bridesmaid, 2 1-2 inch pots, 

^5.00; 3-inch pots, $6.00 per hundred. 

AMERICAN BEAUTY, 2 1-2 inch, $6.00; 3-inch, $8.00 per hundred. 

THIS STOCK IS WELL GKOWN AND IN I'lNE CONDITION. 

ESTATE OF M. A. HUNT. Terre Haute, Ind. 



10,000 FIRST QUflUTY FORGIIHG ROSES. 

Fully equal to those sent out the last two years, and perfectly healthy In every respect. Only selected 
growth from Howerlug wood used for propagating. 

MFTF^Jr'* ^- ^- ^^^^.^' BRIDKSMAID, MIVIE. HOSTE, 

*'.S:.1,^'J.'?. SAFRANO, PEKLE, KRIUES. 

LA FRANCE. BON SILENE, MME. CUSIN, 

3-lnch pots. J."). 00 per 100. 4-Inch pots, JS.CO per 100. 



SUNSETS, 



I>II-'I-<0:Pff, :^loor5nst>v»re;, I»^. 



100,000 



Roses, H. P. Roses, Rhododendrons, Azalea mollis, Clematis, Hy- 
drangeas (bushy and tree form), Aucuba, Buxus, Acer in sorts. 
Viburnum plicatum, Dutchman's Pipe, Magnolias, etc. 

NOW KEADV TO GIVE THE LOWE.ST OIOT.VTIONS. 

-THE HORTICULTURAL COMPANY, BGSKOOP, HOLLAND. 



AMERICAN BEAUTY, Jl?i:!lf rei-tet, I CABNATIONS. 

Cusin. La Ki-.ince, strong, 4-lnch' plants. | All the New and old sorts. 

MARIE LOUISE VIOLETS, pot grown. :2?"PleaBe write for prices. 



Warranted first quality-. Surplus stock from 
4-inch pots. Per 100 

PERLES $600 

MERMETS 5 00 

BRIDES 5 00 

PAPA GONTIER 5 00 

CASH WITH ORDER. 

JOHN WHITE. Waverly Place. Elizabeth, N. J. 

Mention American Florist 

Mermets, Cusins Wattevilles, Hoste, Meteor and 

La France. $3.00 per 100. 
Strong American Beauties, t'j.OO per 100: 810.00 per 

1000. 500 at 1000 rates. 



*5*Special prices on quantity, 
lists. Cash with order. 



Let me price your 



s<.<=>^x;xi.'x< p. 'X'EiSsora', 

West Forest Park, St, Louis, Mo. 



Clean, tieallliy stutk. 
MERMETS. BRIDES. SUNSETS. 

NIPHETOS. LA FRANCE. PERLES. 

MME. WATTEVILLE. BON SILENE. METEOR. 

PAPA GONTIER. 
Strong plants, from 3-lnch pots. »>- per ICO: $7,1 per lOOO. 

WOOD BROTHERS, Fishkill, N. Y. 



Surplus stock; clean, healthy plants, from *2. 2i<. and 

."{-inch pots. 
I'ERLK SU.N'SET. NIHHETOS. BRIDE. MERMET. 
M. NIBL. AMERICAN BKAl TV. I,A FRANCK. 
ALBANY. THE OI'EE.N. MME. WATTE- 
VILLE, and (illLLOT. 
Fred. Dorner, Fred. Heinl and Victor Pelar- 
j^nniuuis. Samples free to Intending purchasers, 
and the very lowest prices on application. 

JOSEPH HEINL, JacksoiirUle, III- 



98 



The a mer ican F lori s r. 



^■big. 



^5, 



Boston. 

The weekly free exbibitions of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society are 
proving immensely popular this season. 
For the space of two hours it was almost 
impossible to move round the hall on 
Saturday, August 10, so great was the 
crowd. The special features of the show 
were a grand collection of sweet peas and 
single petunias from A. A. Hixon, of 
Worcester, sweet peas from Oswald 
Ralph, gardener to John P. Spaulding. 
callunas from Joseph Clark, an extensive 
display of gladioluses from J. Warren 
Clark, a group of Cattleya Gaskelliann 
from Benj. Grey, twelve immense blooms 
of Cereus triangularis from Harvard Bo- 
tanic Garden, perennial phloxes from Geo. 
Hollis, tuberous begonias from C. E. 
Weld, roses from F, B. Hayes, and native 
flowers from Mrs. P. D. Richards and 
others. The exhibit oi fruit and vegeta- 
bles was also far in advance of the aver- 
age and unsurpassed in quality. 

Part II of the transactions of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society for 
1893 has been received. It contains a 
complete list of piizes and gratuities 
awarded during the year and full reports 
of all the committees, and makes an inter- 
esting volume of 405 pages. 

An open letter addressed to the "Presi- 
dent and Fellows of Harvard College, the 
Overseers of Harvard University, and the 
Board of Visitors to the Botanic Garden 
of Harvard University," has been widelv 
circulated in this vicinity. The writer. 
Mr. John A. Allen, alleges discourtesy, in- 
competent management, and lack of bo 
tanical knowledge on the part of thof 
entrusted with the care of the Botanic 
Garden, and demands the appointment 
of a commission to make a thorough in- 
vestigation of the management of this 
institution. 



East Stroudsburg, Pa.— The green- 
houses and store of A. K. Savacool are in 
the hands of Frank Smith and Morton 
Decker, who held judgments against Sav- 
acool. 

Portland, Me.— E. J. Harmon found 
a man tryine to break open his safe on 
the night of August 6. The thief leaped 
out of n TvinHow and e«"canpd. 

PRIMROSES. 

Fine stocky plants, now ready for 3-inch pots. 

FLOWERS 

large, all fringed; brilliant colors. 

FIFTEEN SORTS. 

Price, for the single sorts .... per 100, $ 2.50 

perlOOO, 20.00 

double " . . per 100, .5 TO 

Extra plants with every order to help pay express. 

HENRY S. RUPP & SONS, 

SHIKKMANSTOWN, PA. 



SO 

5< 





(Sherwood Hall Nueseky Co.) 

No. 427-9 Sansome Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

CALIFORNIA -GROWN 
SWEET PEAS 

And other Flower Seeds. 

PACIFIC COAST 
TREE SEEDS JAPANESE 

And Nativi! Bulbs. I 11 Y BULBS 

And other Oriental Specialties. 

ONION SEED, PEAS, BEANS, ETC. 

Write for special contract prices. 



SURPLUS STOCK . . . 

^^LATANIAS 

10,000 Latanias in 2V2-inch pots, |6 00 per 

100; |5o.oo per 1000. 
20,000 Latanias in 3-inch pots, $12.00 per 

100; J90.C0 per 1000. 

GEORGE WITTBOLD. 

1708 N. Halsted St., CHICAGO, ILL. 

LILIUM GANDIDUM. 

FKENCH OR AMERICAN GROWN. 
Now Ready. LARGE BULBS. 

S2.!)0 per 100; 820.00 per 1000. 

PITCHER & WIANDA, 

UNITED STATES NURSERIES, 
SHORT HILLS, N. J. 

A. Farleyense Fern. 

S,000 strong, healthy plants, 4-inch, 
J40 per 100; |350 per lOOO. 



p. O. Box 72. 



KANSAS CITT, UO. 



SMILAX. 



SMILAX. 



Very strong, clean, healthy plants from 

2^-inch pots, JS2.50 per ICO; 

|20.00 per 1000. 

Samples free on recei|>t of 5 ots. 

Address J. G. BURROW, Fishklll, N. Y. 

August Riilker &, Sons, 

136 & 138 W. 24th SL, UnufYnrl^ 
P.O. Station E. HCff lUlK) 

Supply the Trade with 

Bulbs. S66ds and Requisites. 




Siebreciit&Wadley, 

ROSE BILL NURSERIES, 

NEW ROCHELLE, N. Y. 

Palms, 

ORCHIDS, 

Roses, 

FRESH DRACAENA CANES NOW READY. 

ORCHIDS OUR SPECIALTY. 

The Best and Largest Stock in the World. 
New & Rare Foliage & Flowering Plants. 

A grand selection for Stove, Greenhouse and Con- 
servatory 

SANDER, St. Albans, England. 

Our Mr. A. DImmock will be pleased to Interview 
buvers or reply to any communication addressed to 
him at 205 Greenwich St.. New York City. 

i>o ^voxj jk::n^o'w • • 

THAT YOU CAN GET 

20 CANE STAKES FOR I CENT 

A foot in length by simply using a sharp saw on 
a bundle ofour best. 

BRaCKENRIDGE &. CO., 

304 W. Mailisan St., HALTIMORK, MP. 

Tobacco Dust . 

Per barrel (about 125 lbs.), JS2.50. 
Sample free by mail. 

HERRMANN'S SEED STORE, 

413 Kast 34th street, 
near Long Island Ferry, NEW YORK. 

You CAN save money by printing your 
spring trade list in our columns. 



i8g4' 



The American Florist. 



99 



OINT TOP ^.GAI]V! 



At Atlantic City A CERTIFICATE OF MERIT 

For the Largest and Best general collection of 



FLORISTS' * SUPPLIES 

, AND FANCY BASKETS. 

The only Certificate awarded in this class. Who got it ? 

Why, BAYERSDORFER. 

l|^=*'We are about to issue a Catalogue of these new goods. Send for it. 

*"- H. BAYERSDORFER & CO. 

56 Norm 4111 street. rHILflD&LrHlfl. Pft. 



Carl Schwanecke, 

OSCHERSLEBEN, GERMANY. 

Largest and oldest special culture of pan- 
sies; received premiums at all large exhibi- 
tions, the last at Chicago in 1893; offers 
first-class pansy seed, especially Gassier, 
Trimardeau and Bugnot, also all of the best 
older and newer kinds. 

Send 2 francs for Catalog'ue. 
Mention American Florist. 

SPECIAL OFFER Of CYCAS PALMS 






OTHER PALMS. 



m., UT BO pw 100 Um. 



«i";ii:°S;.iVAUCHAN-S SEED STORE.,^,^<'iJ^^ 



GflTflUOGUE PRINTING. 
ELEGTROTYPING. 

Done with expert ability for Florists, 
Nurserymen, Seedsmen. Write to 

<t. Horace McFarland Co. 

. . HAKKISRHRO. P/1 

E.G. HILL & CO., 

wnoiesaie Florists 

RICHMOND, INDIANA. 



PALMS. 



150,000 of all the leading va- 
rieties. 

FERNS. 

50,000 of leading varieties. 
Address QEORGE WITTBOLD, 

1708 N. Halsted St., CHICAGO. 



"^ DREER'S 
Garden Seeds, 

Plants, Bulbs & Requisites. 

They are the best at the 
lowest prices. Trade List is- 
sued quarterly, mailed free 
to the trade only. 

HENRY A. DREER, 
Philadelphia, Fa. 



"B A rTTfc Per 10 lbs 50c; 25 lbs $1.(X); 

^■l^\J\J\f 501bs$1.50; 1001bs82.50. 

TITTCJ'P Extra fine, per 100 lbs. $5. 

J^ »* O X . .^-Sample Free. 

Vaughan's Seed Store, ^^ Chicago. 

SMILAX PLANTS. 

l.'t.OtK) Btront;. healthy plants, from 'l\^-\Xi(i\i pots. J2.00 
per lUO: ?I8.(lO per lUXI. Sample free. Safe delivery 
and satisfaction nuuranteed. 

Samuel J. Bunting. Elmwood Ave. & 58th St., Phila. 

**HAKD TIMES" PAL^I COLLKCTIONS. 

For cash with order we plve 17 3 and -l-ln. Palms for 
Si (regular price 34i. and \\\ for §.j (regular price i"S). 
These comprise the best varieties, Including Ijatanlns 
and Kentlas. 

WILLIAMS & SONS CO., Itatavia. III. 

Cycas Leaves. ■^■^eaTyl'c"^ 




TO 



VAUGHAN'S SEED STORE, 



Chicago. 



MflRSGtiUETZ & GO.. 

Florists' SuDDlies, 

23 & 25 N. 4th St.. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Send for ratglnpniP' -^». 

MEDAL BWflRDED. ""^^ 

ERNST KAUFMANN & CO., 
Wholesale FinRLST^VMIPPIJFK 

No. 113 North 4th Street, 
Send for catalogue. PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



WHITE DOVES 

FOR FL.ORISTS. 

Largest and finest stock tn the United 
States. Write for prices to 

S. J. RUSSELL, 

850 Montgomery St., Jersey City, N. J. 






I""-" C.C.ABEL a CO.P.O.B0X 920. NtwYoBPi. 



Mention American Florist. 

Please mention the American Flo- 
rist every time you write any of the 
advertisers on this page. 




100 



The American Florist, 



Aug. 25^ 



^A^o^cester, Mass. 

It is the same old story, good stuflf 
plentiful, sales poor, prices low. Very 
good asters are coining in in large quan- 
tities, the Comet is especially fine. We 
have been troubled this season with a 
small black beetle, which eats the buds 
and flowers, and the little fellow is gifted 
with a voracious appetite; hand picking 
seems to be the only remedy. 

Lange is cutting quantities of fine Nym- 
phaea rosea odorata, which sell fairly 
well for one dollar a dozen, and also some 
splendid Mermets. 

Gladiolus, salpiglossis and cut flowers 
were called for the exhibition of August 
16, but the gladiolus were postponed 
until August 30. The competition in the 
stands of cut flowers was very sharp, 
with a goodly lot of entries, and the 
quality of the stuff shown was excellent. 
Mrs. C. E. Brooks was awarded first and 
F. A. Blake second. There were also 
many fine stands of salpiglossis, which 
made a very attractive showing; for best 
stand, W.J. Wood first and H. B. Watts 
second. Mrs. A. A. Hixon exhibited a 
splendid table of petunias, among them 
,some good California Giants; H.A.Jones, 
Mrs. Thos. Ward, H. M. Chace and S. E. 
Fischer had very good displays of cut 
flowers, arranged in good taste. 

August 23 is the dateof the astershow. 
Seedling. 



PATENTC 

I Trade-Marks, Copyrights, Etc. ^^ ■ 

1 GHftNDLEE & MflG/\ULEy,V-/ 

Atlantic Building, WASHINGTON". D. C. 

Mention American Florist. 



Diiensions ol ttiis Box : 

26 Inches long by 18 Inches wide 

and 12 Inches hlRh. 

Two sections. 




BOSTON FLORIST LETTER GO. 

Manafactare THE BEST LETTERS IN THE MARKT, 



Sizes 1^-in. and 2-in. 2.00 per tOO. Patent 
lastener with each letter. 



This wooden box nicely stained and varnished, 18x30x12, 
made in two sections, one for each size letter, given away with .first order of 600 letters. 

.A.C3rZ]rVfl7S ■ 
A. Rollter & Sons, New York. 
Marscliuetz & Co., 25 If. 4th St., FhUa., Pa. 
F. K. McAllister, 23 Dey St., New York. 
A. D. Perry & Co., 33 Warren St., Syracuse, 

New York. 
A. Herrman, 415 E. 34th St., New York. 
Krnst Kautmann & Co., 113 N. 4th St., Phila. 
H. Bayersdorfer & Co., FhUadelphla, Pa. 
A. C. Kendal, 115 Ontario St., Cleveland, O. 
J. A, Simmers, Toronto, Ont., Agent for 

Canada. 
E. H. Hunt, 79 Lake St., Chicago, lU. 
Wisconsin Flower Exchange, 131 Alason St-, 

Milwaukee, Wis. 
H. Sunderbruch, 4th and Walnut Sts., Cin- 
cinnati, O. 
T. W. Wood & Sons, 6th and Marshall Sts., 

Richmond, Va. 
.las. Vick's Sons, Rochester, N. Y, 
C. A. Kuehn, 1132 Pine St., St. Louis, Mo. 
I>. «. Lone, Buflalo, New York. 
C. F. Huntingrton & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Z. De Forest Ely & Co., 1024 Market St., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Portland Seed Co., 171 2d St., Portland, Ore. 
A. Herman, 416 E. 34th St., New York. 
Geo. A. Sutherland, 67 Uromfieldst., Boston. 
Welcli Bros., No. lA Beacon St., Boston. 
N. F. McCarthy & Co., 1 Music Hall Place, 

Boston. 
all the Wholesalers In Boston. 



OCR NEW SCRIPT LETTER, $4.00 per 100. 



N. F. McCarthy, 

Treas. & Man^. 



Addreit 13 Green St.. 
Boston, Ma«s. 



Addreii all correipondence to 1 Music Hall Place. 



We fcave a new FASTENER which we consider 
a decided success. Any cnstomers having old style 
fasteners which they wish to exctaange. can do so 
without additional cost by wrltlntr us. 

These Letters are handled by 




FBANCIS' COEBDGATED HOLD FAST GLAZE POINTS, 

SURPASS ALL OTHERS YET INTRODUCED IN THE 
MARKET FOR GLAZING GREENHOUSES. 
Manufactured by the NOVELTY POINT WORKS. Price 
50 Cents per box of 1000 Points. Can be sent by mail 
lor 13 cents in addition. Directions on each box. 

v.. ni-; KOKEST ELY & CO Philadelphia, Pa. 

.(. BAVERSDORKBR & CO Philadelphia, Pa. 

MAKSI-llURTZ & CO Philadelphia. Pa. 

PETER HENDERSON & CO New York. 

WM. ELLIOTT & SONS New York. 

F. K. JlcALLlSTBR New York. 

C. 11 .lOOSTEN NewY'ork. 

WEEBBK & DON New York. 

A. ROLKBR & SONS New York. 

SCHLEGBL & EOTTLBR Boston, Mass. 

JOHN r. IIONINGBR CO Chicago, 111. 

J. C, VALCIIAN Chicago. HI. 

HLNTINCroN SEED CO Indianapolis, Ind. 

J. A. SIMMERS Toronto, Can. 

J. N. STRUCK & BRO Louisville, Ky. 

MANN ROLKER, Room 3, 218 Fulton Street, NEW YORK. 

GENERAL AGENT FOB AMERICA ANI> EUROPE. 



GREEN-HOUSE 

HEATING. 

MYERS & CO. 

1518 & 1520 S. 9th St., 

PHILADELPHIA. 

Send for catalogue 
and price list. 



When you write to any of the ad- 
vertisers in this paper please say that 
you saw the advertisement in the 
American Horist. 



J. N. Struck & Bro. 



Manufacturers of 



• CYPRESS • 

(ireenlioQse Material, 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 

I When writing mention the American Florist. 




GREENHOUSE HEATING 

AND VENTILATING. 

Superior Hot Water Boilers 
JOHN A. SCOLLAY. 

74 & 76 Myrtle Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

<S-Send for Catalogue. 
Mention American Florist 



Patented .June 36, 1894. 

STRAPS 

wrrH 

Unfolding Tight-Fasteners. 
FRANK L. MOORE, Cliatliam, N. J. 



Mention American Florist, 



When you write to any of the ad- 
vertisers in this paper please say that 
you saw the advertisement in the 
American Florist. 



i8g4' 



The American Florist. 



101 



Yen— Venti—Ventrlate. 

"■^ NEW DEPARTURE 




(MEAT SAW 



THE NEW DEPARTURE ON DUTY. 




-VENTILATING APPLIANCE 

Is the Best, Cheapest and most Powerful apparatus yet invented. 

THIS IS THK 

AMERICAN CHAMPION WATER HEATER, 

FOR GREENHOUSE HEATING BY HOT WATER SYSTEM. 

It is made by a Florist especially for Florists' use. It can be 

enlarged at any time more heat is needed, and it 

burns soft coal without clogging. 

8®" SEini FOR DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUES 




To 



EVANSVILLE. 



INDIANA. 




Evtry florist, miirket gardener, owner of lawn, ^ass- 
plat or tlower-bftl. In fact everyone who hna a faucet 
and hose should have the Kinney Pump (patent ap- 
plied for) for applying liquid manure, fungicides and 
insecticides to plants. Feed your plants, fertilize your 
lawns by using liquid manure. The cheapest, simplest 
and most scientific spraying pump In use. Sent pre- 
paid for S2.5U— spraying valve attachment 50c. Pump 
complete j;i.OO. Send for circular. Address 

HOSE CONNECTION CO.. Kingston. Rhode Island. 

Only 2y Klngstons In the U. S. (Jet the state straight. 

"They are a good thing." "A very valuable labor 
saving device."— W. N. RrDi>. Secy Mt. Greenwood 
Cemetery Asso.. 111. 

"The most vaUiable labor saving Invention I ever 
used."—*'. E. WKi.D. KosUndale. Mass. 

BE UP TO DATE. 

And get the BEST. This is it. 





Saved 



On 
Your 
Coal 
Bills. 

your Houses are Heated by a Furman BoHer. 

These Boilers have a high reputation, for Staunchness, 
Durability and Safety, and are Great Coal Savers. 

WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF GREENHOUSE HEATING. 

Over 150 styles and sizes, for Steam and Hot AVater: 

also a full line of Horizontal Steel 

Tubular lioilers. 

Let us make you an estimate Fkee. Send for Catalogiie. 

THE HERENDEEN MANUFACTURING CO. 

New Exglaxi) Office: M Oliver Street. Boston. Mass. 

Taylor Bid g, o'.l Cortlandt St.. N. y City. 
131 Lake Street. Chicago. 
■" ~ 38 Vine St., Geneva. N. Y. 



New York Office 
Westekn Office 
liuME Office .and Works: 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

VICTORY ! VICTORY I VICTORY I 




The Champion Ventilating Apparatus. 

CHEAP. DURABLE. EFFICIENT. 
Circular tells the whole story. It Is free. 

AMERICAN ROAD MACHINE CO., 

KENNETT SQUARE, PA. 



The only Certificate ol Merit 
awarded lor ventilating ap- 
paratus at the St. Louis 
Conventionwas to the 

POPULAR STANDARD 
VENTILATING MACHINE 

The florist's friend in 
working and prices. 




No repairs for 5 years, 
no chain s to break 
as is the result with 
others. 

Opens Sash uniform on 
100 foot houses. A 
new device. 

Send lor Catalogue and ES' 
timates. 



EJ. HH»r»A.iei>, "5ro*;m.g:e»t*>'wi:k, Olxlo. 



Mention American Florist. 



GREENHOUSE BOILERS. 

\A^e have in stock boilers new and second-hand, suitable 
for heating Greenhouses. Prices Low. 

I^OXTE^OR^O^V^E^ «& CO., 

143 fc'145 N. Third Street, PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

Mention American Florist. 



102 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 25^ 



Buffalo. 

On the eve of the convention there is 
little to be said. We are mostly absorbed 
in thinking about the briny ocean and the 
good time in store for those fortunate 
enough to attend, still there will be lots 
of absentees. Several causes account for 
this, outside of those who scarcely ever 
attend, and who merely stop at home 
from indifference. There will be more than 
one absent from the best of causes, no 
funds. Business has perhaps been as dull 
this week as any during the year, but I 
have not heard a particularly loud grunt 
on that account. 

The monthly meeting of the Florists' 
Club occurred at the residence of Mr. J. 
W. Constantine on August 14. There 
was a baker's dozen present and several 
things of local interest were vigorously 
discussed. Wm. Scott concluded the 
meeting with a paper which, if it had no 
other merit, deserved the attention of the 
members simply because it appealed to 
them to attend the national convention. 
He tried to impress on the members the 
great good our national society has done 
as well as the floricultural press, which 
he said never would haveexisted witnout 
our national society. 

The Rochester ball players arrived here 
on Thursday last about 12 noon. We 
believe they were all horticulturists if 
not florists. The game was played in 
Franklin Park, and the result was 25 to 
12 in favor of the Bisons. To the writer 
the game was most enjoyable, and he be- 
lieves it was to all participants. After 
the game was over, when we were about 
to begin, more than half of the Rochester 
gentlemen insisted that they must take 
an early train and take the train they 
did, but that did notstop 30or 40 young 
men going to the Parade House at 6 p.m. 
where soup, fish, turkey, etc. was in 
waiting. It would be folly to attempt to 
repeat all that was said. Mr. Fry of 
Rochester spoke finely for the Rochester 
men, as did several other of his towns- 
men. There was of course any amount 
of Buffalo talk. A Mr. Kendall of ttawa, 
Canada, added much to the enjoyment of 
the evening by several good stories told 
in more polished style. Mr. Kendall was 
elected an honorary member of the 
Rochester and Buffalo florist clubs. 

Harry Bunyard of Short Hills has been 
in town. W. S. 

Standard Flower Pots. 

10 per cent, off for cash with order. Special dis- 
count on large orders. We carry a large 
etock on hand of good strong pots, 

PRICE LIST OF STANDARD FLOWER POTS. 



l«-lnch pots, per IIXXI % 3.110 G-lnch pots, per lOOO $22. UO 

2 •• •' 3.25 7 " " ffi.OO 
2M " •• 3.60 8 •• " 6U.0O 
Vii ■• '• 4.00 9 •• •• 76.U0 

3 " " 6.00 10 " per 100 10.00 
3« ■■ •• 7.25 11 '■ •• 15.00 
< " •• y.OO 12 " •• 20.00 
6 •• " 13.80 14 " •■ 40.00 

16 ■' •• 75.00 


Address 


HILFINGER BROS. 


POTTERY, 






. . FORT EDWARD, N. Y. 


August Rolker & Sons, ISU & l:i8 W. 24th St., New York 
City, New York AKents. 




EVANS' IMPROVED 

Challenge 

Ventilating 

Apparatus 

Write fur Illustrated Catalogue. 

QUAKER CITY MACHINE WORKS, 
Rlchmoni;], Ind. 



HAIL 



LOCK THE DOOR BEFORE 
THE HORSE IS STOLEN 
DO IT NOW. 
JOHN 6. ESLER, Sec'y. F. H. A., Saddle River, N. J. 




KoKOMO, iND., May 19, 1891. 
LOCKLAND LUMBER CO., 

Gentlemen. — In reply to your favor of May 18th it gives me pleas- 
ure to state that the Cypress Greeuhouse material you furnished me 
to build my plant here of 12,000 feet of glass has given entire satisfac- 
tion. I have yet to see the first piece of lumber Irom your establish- 
ment with a knot or a bit of sap in it, it being perfectly clear. 

You have always treated me as a gentleman in a business way, 
and I shall take pleasure in giving you my future orders when in 
need of anything in your line. Very truly yours, 

W. w. COLES. 



GUTTER MSTERmL, RmGES, saSH, ETC. 
The finest CLEAR CTFKESS used. 



^>\V,J For circulars and estimates ADDRESS 



LOGKLflND LUMBER 60. 

ll,ool«:la^»a<a, O. 



it 



Standard" Flower Pots. 



As manufactured by us have carried oflF highest honors ■wherever shown and 
have stood the best test. They are used in all the leading floral establishmenta 
in the United States. For prices address 

The Whilldin Pottery Company, 

BRANCH WAREHOUSES: 713. T^S. T^? & 7^9 Wharton St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Randolph Ave. and Union St., Jersey City, X. J. 
Jackson Ave. and Pearson St., Long: Island City, L. I. 

STANDARD FLOWER POTS 

Every user of Flower Pots should correspond with us before 
purchasing elsewhere. Our facilities are unequaled. 

A. H. HEWS & CO., N. Cambridge, Mass. 

Announcement to Florists. 

We desire to announce the dissolution of the firm of Sipfle Dopffel & Co., and to introduce to the 
trade its successor, The Syracuse Pottery Co., which will be under the management of William Dopffel 
and Conrad Breitschwerth. The business will be conducted as heretofore, except on a larger scafc to 
meet the growing demand for our goods. We have accordingly enlarged our plant and capacity, and 
with unsurpassed facilities are now prepared to fill the largest order on short notice. Our latest im- 
proved machines are turning out the best and most serviceable flower pots in the market, and assuring 
you of our intention to lead in further improvements we solicit a continuance of your patronage in the 
belief that we can supply just what is needed at a price and in a manner satisfactory to all. 
Send for price list and samples and we know you will give us an order. 

OFMMCKt 

403 North Salina Street, SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



SYRACUSE POTTERY GO. 



STANDARD FLOWER POTS. 

OLD RELIABLE MAKE OF 

Write for Catalogue and Price List. 

PITTSBURGH CLAY MFG. CO. New Brighton, Pa. 

STANDARD FLOWER POTS. 

If you are going to the Convention please examing our Flower 

Pots while there. To those who are not going we would 

simply say, "send in your order for large pots early." 

THE PARMENTER MAN'FG CO., 

STANDARD FLOWER POTS. 

OAK HILL POTTERY CO., New Brighton, Pa, 

(Formerly D. C. SCOFIELD & CO.) 

The same machinery, clay and workmen. The same smooth, 

porous, evenly burnt and well packed pots. Orders filled 

promptly. Write for prices. 



i8g4- 



The American Florist. 



103 



ESTABLISHED 1854. 

Devine's Boiler Works. 

THE FLAT TOP TYPE 



Wrought Iron Hot Water Boilers. 




Capacity from 350 to 10.000 feet of four inch pipe. 
Send for New List. 

FRANK DAN BLISH, Att'y, 

OFFICE, 69 DEARBORN ST., 

WORKS, 56th & WALLACE STREETS, 



TO 
TAKE 
PLACE 

OF 
WIND 
MILLS 



HOT 

AIR 
PUMPING 
ENGINES 



JA Windmill 

t Is unreliable because it do- 
I, penda upon the elements 
i for its power ; hydraulic 
♦| rams also depend upon fav- 
i orableconditionsand waste 
J as much water as they se- 
cure. Steam pumps require 
skill and hand pumps de- 
mand labor and time. The 

DE LAMATER-RIDER OR 
DE LAMATER-ERICSSOH ' 

Hot-Air 
Pumping Engines 

are especially desig:ned for 
pumping water, and from 
shallow streams or any 
Itind of well. They are 
simple, safe and reliable, 
require no steam and have 
no valves. They require 
very little heat to operate 
them, and can be arranged 
for any kind of fuel. 
Sendforillustratedcaialogueto 

The DEL&MATER IRON WORKS, 

87 South Fiflh Av., 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 



liVIPROVED GLAZING. 




GASSER'S PATENT ZINC JOINTS for but- 
ting glass makes greenhouses alrand water tlKht; also 
prevents slldlnK and breakage from frost Does not 
coat as much to heat a house glazed with the joints, 
thereby saving enough in fuel to more than pay the 
additional cost of glazing. The leading florists of the 
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particulars and price list. 

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Euclid Avenue, CLEVELAND, O. 

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write an advertiser it\ thesa columns. 




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and 

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104 



The American Florist. 



^■^g' 25, 



Index to Advertisers. 



AbelCC&Co S6 99 

Adv. ratea. etc 92 

American Boiler Co.. . . 104 
American Road Ma- 
chine Co 101 

Baker Bros 98 

Bailer FA 95 

Bayersdorfer H & Co 94 

BergerHH&Co 94 

Blanc A 100 

Bock Tlieo 92 

Bonsall JosB 93 

Boston Letter Co lOO 

Brackenridge & Co 98 

Brant&Noe 97 

Brown & Canfleld 97 

Brown I'eter 96 

Bunting Sam'lJ 99 

Bums & Baynor 9i 

Bun-owJG 98 

Carman RW 96 

Cannody J D 101 

Chandlee & Macauley. 100 
Ch'go Folding Box Co. 92 
Corbrey AMcKellar.... 92 
Cottage Gardens The.. !* 
Cox Seed & Plant Co. . 94 

Crabb& Hunter 103 

Deamud J B & Co 93 

De Lamater Iron Wks 1U3 
Devlne'9 Boiler Wks.. .Wi 

Dillon J L 97 

Domer Fred & Son.... Hi 

DreerH A 95 99 

Elliott WH 92 

Ellison Wm 92 

Evenden Bros 8t 

Fisher &Alrd 90 

Gardiner John & Co... 92 

Gasser J M IO9 

Gonzalez F i Co Ua 

Grallert & Co 9b 

Gumey Heater Co . . 104 

HallAss'n 90 102 

Hammond Benj 303 

Hancock&Son 96 

Hartford HK fi 

Helnl Joseph * 9. 

Herendeen Mf g Co 101 

Herr Albert M 9o 

Hermann's Seed Store 

9a 98 

..102 

...102 



Hews A H & Co 
Hllflnger Bros. . 

HlUEG&Co "J 

HlppardB 91 101 

Hltchlngs&Co 104 

Hooker H M Co 11'3 

Horan Edw C 93 

Horan James 9*) 

Horticultural Co The. 9i 
Hose Connection Co. .101 

Hulsebosch Bros IH 

HuntEU 93 

Hunt MA Estate 9i 

Hunter Frank D 93 

Jennings B B 9o 

JoostenC H 95 

Kaufmann Ernst & Co. 99 

Kennlcott Bros Co 93 

Klein Fritz 91 

Kroeschell Bros Co ie3 

Kuehn C A 92 

L.ockland Lumber Co. .102 

Long Dan'lB 92 93 

Lonsdale Edwin S<J 

Lord& Burnham Co. .104 

Lovegrove & Co lOl 

McCarthy N F&Co.... 93 



91 



McFarland J H.... 
McFarland J H Co. 

Mac Bean A 8 97 

Manda W A 95 

Manz J&Co luo 

Marschuetz & Co 99 

May Jno N 9ii 

Mendenhall Greenho's i+4 
Merrtfleld J A.. . 97 

Michel Pit & Bulb Co. 90 

Mlllang Bros 93 

Monlnper Jno C lU4 

Moore Frank L lOO 

Munn LR 91 

Myers&Co ..lou 

Nanz & Neuner. . . . 94 

Nason J L& Co 91 

Natlon.aI Plant Co 97 

Newsham Jos 94 

Nlles Centre Floral Co. IW 
Nltterhoute Mrs S J. . . 91 
Oak Hill Pottery Co. .. .102 
Oasis Nursery Co 95 



.102 
. 9ti 



Parmenter Mfg Co. 

Pennock C J 

Pennock Sam'l S-.. 

Plerson V K Co '.Hi 

Pitcher & Manda 98 

Pittsburg Clay Mfg Co. 1U2 
QuakerCltyMc hW'ks.lua 

Randall AL 93 

ReedGlaesCo 103 

RelnbergBros 92 93 

Reiraschnelder Ernst.. 9ti 

Rlchwagen P B 9U 

Roberts D H 103 

Roehrs Theo 93 

Roemerbred 95 

Rolker A i Sons 98 

Rolker Herman 100 

Rupp H S &Son 9.'' 

Rupp J F 95 

HussellSJ 99 

Sander & Co 98 

Schneider Fred 94 

Schwanecke Carl 99 

Scoilay Jno A 100 

Seblre P & Sons 99 

Shelmlre W R 90 

Sheridan W F 93 

Slebrecht & Wadley. . . 9.S 
Situations, wants, etc.. 9) 

Smith Henry 97 

Smith Nath & Son 90 

Steffens N 90 

Storrs & Harrison Co. . 97 

Streby SO 9I'. 

StruckJN&Bro 100 

Sunderbruch H li 92 

Sunset Seed & Pl't Co.. 9S 

Sutherland Geo A 93 

Syracuse Pottery Co.. .102 

Tesson R F .. 97 

Trlcker Wm&Co 90 

Vaughan J C !M 99 

Vesey W J AM S '.2 

Weathereds Sons T W.103 

Weeber & Don 94 

Welch Bros 93 

White John 97 

Whilldin Pot Co 102 

WllkesMfgCo 98 

WUllama & Sons Co... 99 

WlttboldUeo 98 99 

Woit AOJiBro Wi 

WollIL Mfg Co 103 

Wood Bros 97 

Young Thos Jr 93 

ZIrngiebel D 95 



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RmErica is "the Prow of ths IIbsseI; thEre may be mnrE comfort Amidships, but u/e bte the first to touch Unknown Sees.' 



Vol. X. 



CHICAGO AND NEW YORK, SEPTEMBER 1, 1894. 



No. 326 



Copyright 1894, by American Florist Company. 
Entered as Second-Class Mail Matter. 

Published every Thursday by 

THE AMERICAN FLORIST COMPANY. 
323 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 



Subscription, $1.00 a year. 



To Europe, S2.00. 



Address all communications to 

AMERICAN FLORIST COMPANY, 

P. O. Drawer 164, CHICAGO. 

Eastern Office : 67 Bromfleld St.. Boston. 

This paper Is a member of the Associated Trade 
Press and the Chicago Trade Press Association. 

CONTENTS. 

Entertainments at the convention 105 

—Reception at Carisbrooke 105 

—Echoes oi the bowling match 105 

—The shooting match 106 

— The yachting cruise 106 

— The entertainment on the pier 108 

Partial view of convention hall (illns) , . . .106 
Sketches at the trade exhibition (illus). . . . 107 
A snap shot at the bowling contest (illus) . . . 108 
The shooting tournament prizes (illus) ... 109 
The evolution of the chr^-santhemum . . 109 

Messrs. Eddy and Harris as FalstafiT and Bar- 

dolph (illus) Ill 

E. C. Reiueman (portrait) 113 

W. J. Stewart (portrait) 113 

H. B. Beatty (portrait) 113 

Cannas . . 114 

Robt. Craig's greenhousfs, Philadelphia, (illus)115 

Recollections of Atlantic City 116 

Chrysanthemums— Notes 116 

— Judging new chrysanthemums 116 

Sowing pansy seed 116 

Begonia diseases (illus) 117 

Wholesaling cut flowers 117 

Worms attacking cannas 118 

Chicago . . 118 

Indianapolis 1J8 

Toronto .... . 119 

Cincinnati 119 

Worcester, Mass '. 119 

News notes 120 

Coming exhibitions 122 

The seed trade 124 

Ottawa, Canada 124 

St. Paul 126 

Baltimore ". 128 

Cleveland 130 

Pittsfield, Mass 130 



Louis Engel, the oldest florist in Can- 
ton, Ohio, died in that city very suddenly 
August 26. Mr. Engel was born in Han- 
over, Germany, in 1S21, settling in Mon- 
treal in IS*?. From Montreal he came 
to the States, finally settling in Canton 
in 1856, where he managed the green- 
houses belonging to H. Meyers, corner 
Plum and Ninth streets, until he bought 
out the business in 1861. 

Mr. Engel was greatly respected for his 
integrity and energy in business, and his 
establishment increased with the growth 
of the city. He leaves a widow and seven 
daughters. 

You CAN never invest $2 to better ad- 
vantage than in a copy of our trade 
directoiTT and reference book. 



Entertainments at the Convention. 

RECEPTION AT CARISBROOKE. 

One pleasant feature of the convention 
was the reception given to the ladies at 
Ventnor, a place about three miles below 
Atlantic City, at the fine hotel called 
"Carisbrooke Inn" (named for a famous 
bouse in England). A merry party 
boarded the special train at Tennessee 
avenue, which brought them to the place 
alter about 20 minutes' ride, where a 
pleasant entertainment had been pro- 
vided. It was more like a large family 
gathering than a meeting of trade ac- 
quaintances. The guests dispersed them- 
selves about the spacious porches and 
parlors, the musicians engaged soon 
making a lively background of sound for 
the rolling waters. Many of the friends 
enjoyed the beauties of the scenery frem 
the high pavilion, attached by a private 
boardwalk to the "Inn." From this ele- 
vation the view is particularly grand and 
imposing, for nothing obstructs the 
vision for miles and miles on every side, 
and right at the feet rolls the always 
moving, never monotonous ocean. Those 
ladies inclined to be sentimental sat down 
and murmured "What an ideal place to 
be courted in on moonlight nights, when 
no evening could be long enough," while 
others of more practical turn of mind de- 
scended to the boat houses beneath 
and soon emerged in the ever fascinating 
bathing costume with their admirers, de- 
termined to lose no opportunity for tak- 
ing the invigorating sea bath. In the 
meantime the parlors were filled to over- 
flowing with those who took their amuse- 
ment in still diflferent fashion, listening to 
the sweet strains of Mrs. Edwards' voice 
as she sung of the rejected lover being 
sent to "float out to sea." 

The inevitable "camera man" with his 
"look pleasant" now came upon the scene 
and the group that arranged itself about 
the porch rail and steps was particularly 
picturesque, with the noble castle-like 
building for a background, a copy of 
which will be found in this issue. Refresh- 
ments were served in the dining hall or 
parlors, as one preferred, and as the time 
drew near for the train to make the 
return trip all present expressed them- 
selves well pleased with the enjoyable 
visit and reception. 

ECHOES OF THE BOWLING MATCH. 

There have been bowling matches with- 
out number, but we doubt if there ever 
was a contest which created so much en- 
thusiasm or one in which so much interest 
was taken by the players and spectators 
alike. 

Bowling is a great game. There is no 
other indoor amusement in which so 
many players can take part at one time 
as ten pins; no matter how far behind 
one side may get they are liable by care- 
ful and lucky playing to get even with 
and pass their opponents, and this is one 



of the features of the game that makes it 
so popular. 

An audience ordinarily shows its appre- 
ciation of good or poor play in various 
ways, but in a ten pin match they go to 
extremes and these events are noted for 
the great din raised by the spectators. 
In this respect at least we feel safe in say- 
ing that this contest broke the record; it 
seemed for a time like a perfect pande- 
monium. Some one had procured a half 
dozen large tin horns, and as each seemed 
to be handled by a man with good lungs 
the noise was something frightful. But 
everything went; everybody was out for 
fun and all seemed to enjoy themselves 
hugely. 

The clubs did not roll as drawn, as it 
seemed very hard to get the teams to- 
gether on time. The first series of games 
was very exciting, the teams finishing in 
the following order: Buffalo l,Xew York 
2, Flatbush 3, Boston 4, Philadelphia 5, 
Washington 6, Pittsburg 7, St. Louis 8, 
Summit 9, Chicago 10. Between the sec- 
ond and sixth clubs there was but 17 
poinrs, while Buffalo led New York, the 
second club, 77 points. 

There was a great deal of speculation 
and talk of what was going to be done 
the next game. Buffalo's lead was a 
good one, but "She can't keep up the 
pace," "We've pulled out of worse holes 
than this," and other like remarks were 
heard in several little groups. It's good 
bowling, however, that wins games, and 
while New York, Philadelphia and Flat- 
bush improved considerably in their play- 
ing they did not bother Buffalo very 
much, and New York was the only club 
to pass them in this game, making 23 
more pins. Philadelphia started out in 
their second game like thoroughbreds, 
Anderson making three strikes and all 
the others doing well. In the first four 
frames they had scored 385 points, which 
gait, if they could have kept it up, would 
have given them 962 pins, enough to 
have landed the Spaulding Cup and first 
prize. As may be supposed, the Phila. 
contingent were very much in evidence at 
this time. Ifs and buts, however, like the 
balls that come exasperatinglynear mak- 
ing spares, don't win games, and at this 
juncture, for no good reason, Phila. went 
all to pieces and lost what chance they 
had for winning the Spaulding this year. 
First was won by Buffalo, with an aver- 
age of 139 pins to a man in the two 
games. 

It now began to look as if Buffalo was 
going to sweep the board; the first prize 
depended on the best score in the three 
games, and as they had a lead of 5-t 
points over their nearest competitor. 
New Y'ork, and were in good shape, their 
chances looked very bright. New Y'ork 
set a very fast pace, but Buffalo 
was equal to the occasion and put up 
their best game, S71, thus winning by 51 
pins, an average of l-tl points to a man 



106 



The American Florist. 



Sept. 



in the three games. They were congrat- 
ulated on all sides for their plucky rolling 
and well earned victory. 

Mr. Mepsted of their team was tied 
with Mr. Leuly of the New Yorks for sec- 
ond prize for best averafje score in all 
games, and when this was discovered 
Mr. Mepsted had gone home. The tie 
was rolled off with Mr. P. Scott of same 
team and won by Mr. Leuly by 9 pins, 
158 and 167 being the respective scores. 

The other individual prize for highest 
score in any one game was won by Mr. 
Keppler of the New Yorks, he makingl73 
in the last game. Mr. Keppler also won 
the sterling silver cup for the best score in 
the three games, making 470 points. 

Mr. Hale of the Washington Club, 
made a record, but for which no prize 
was offered; he made 3 fouls in one frame, 
thus losing each ball and counting 
nothing. 

Falstaff Eddy covered himself with 
glory by winning the leather medal with 
a total score of 242. His great weight 
was probably Coo much of a load for his 
team to carry, as they finished last with 
a score of 1697. 

It has been suggested that in future 
matches of this magnitude in point of 
numbers that all clubs that do not make 
700 in their first game drop out; this is 
only an average of about 116 to a man. 
By adopting this plan the contest would 
not be so long drawn out and so tiresome 
to players and spectators. Several have 
suggested this plan, which is objected to 
by others, as they say a good player 
might be in one of the teams dropped and 
he would have no chance at the individual 
prizes. 

George Anderson has an idea that each 
club should roll by themselves. He thinks 
that where there is a choice of alleys the 
lucky toss of the coin has considerable to 
do with winning the game. In this match 
the winner of the toss invariably took 
the number 3 and 4 alleys, they being the 
easiest to make scores on. He would 
start a club on No. 1 alley, then to 2, 3 
and 4, and back to No. 1, 2, 3 and 4, fin- 
ishing the game on No. 2. There would 
be very little confusion, and the scores 
could be kept more accurately. In this 
way each club would roll on all alleys 
alike and would be on the same foot- 
ing in this respect. 

There were many very ludicrous scenes 
during the progress of the match. Nearly 
every bowler has a different style in start- 
ing his ball, and then his attitude in watch- 
ing it until it strikes the pins, when he 
gives a little spring or sweeps his foot 
across the alley as if to help clear the 
board, or gradually raising one arm 
brings it down with a sudden stroke, or 
they make other movements which are 
neither ornamental or useful, but, like the 
noise of a wagon, it would seem as if they 
can't get along without them. 

Falstaff Eddy put a ball down the gut- 
ter, but which, striking an obstruction, 
glanced across the alley and made a 
strike. He was quite indignant when the 
judges made him roll at another set of 
pins. 

One of the Boston players got so ex- 
cited that he wore his necktie down the 
middle of his back. 

The following players passed the 400 
line in their three games: Kepoler 470, 
E. Leulv 458, Mr. Mepsted 458, *P. Scott 
457, L. Brown 439, W. Scott 436, G. 
Craig 433, J. R. Freeman 426, Mr. Dihm 
426, P. Riley 423, W. A. Manda 421, J. 
Kroomerick 419, G. Bergman 409, J. 
Manda 403 and J. McRorie 401. 

The individual tournament which was 
rolled on Friday morning had 26 entries. 




V 



V 



ws 










ki. 



IIIIIIIIM 



PARTIAL VIEW OF THE CONVENTION HALL AT ATLANTIC CITY. WITH THE 
SOCIETY IN SESSION. 



Robert Craig had almost to be dragged 
to the alleys to take part in this contest, 
as did George C. Watson, they both be- 
ing busy at the exhibition hall. They 
were rewarded for their trouble by win- 
ning the first and second prizes, while 
hard working John Westcott won the 
third. The scores were 166, 155 and 150. 
The scores of the other contestants follow : 

Peter McDonald 145 

John Walker 140 

Chades Kahltrt 136 

G. T. N. Cottam 128 

J. Jones 128 

J. P. Habermehl ....128 

P. Dailledouze 126 

W.Graham 125 

Julius Roehrs 123 

F. Keller 122 

A. Lutz 120 

C. Longinette 122 

G. McLean -. 115 

H. Bayersdorfer 116 

D. T. Connor 110 

E. Lonsdale 109 

F. Addleberger 106 

George Campbell 104 

J. M. Keller 95 

J. Dawson 91 

George Raucb 85 

Henry Siebrecht 83 

J. Goldring 59 

THE YACHTING CRUISE. 

Lovers of the salt water were given a 
rare treat in the sail from the inlet out to 
sea on Friday morning. The fleet com- 
prised about fifteen yachts, each carrying 
from twenty to twenty-five persons. The 
blue and white pennant of the Florists' 
Club of Philadelphia floated from each 
mast head, and the indefatigable mem- 
bers of the club committee worked like 
beavers. The only contrary factor was 
the wind, which persisted in blowing the 
wrong way, when it blew at all, but 
when the boats had finally got out past 
the bar plenty of wind was found and 
they flew along merrily. Musical talent 
was not wanting and this indispensable 
feature of the ideal boat ride received due 
attention. The boats returned to the 
wharf in time for the popular bathing 
hour. No seasick individuals were no- 
ticed, and a commendable bracing up on 
nautical phrases was perceptible in the 
general conversation during the rest of 
the day. 



THE SHOOTING MATCH. 

The shooting match was an innovation, 
and jumped at once into popularity. It 
passed off very pleasantly and we are 
glad to say without an accident, as was 
leared by some. A great deal of credit is 
due John Burton, who advanced the idea 
and carried it out to a successful con- 
clusion. 

The targets were clay pigeons, which 
were thrown from traps placed behind a 
wooden screen to protect the men who 
kept the traps filled. A rope led from 
each of the five traps, and as each contest- 
ant said "pull" a man hack of the gunners 
pulled a rope releasing the targets. No. 
1 trap threw to the right. No. 2 to the 
left, No. 3 straight away. No. 4 to the 
right and No. 5 to the left. Five men 
shot at one time, 5 rounds each; No. 1 
shot and then moved to No. 2 trap, and 
so on until each had shot five, when an- 
other team took their place. 

No man was allowed to load his gun 
until just as he was going to shoot, and 
after he had loaded he was not allowed 
to turn around until he had fired. Some 
of the men had never had a gun in their 
hand before, and there were three who 
shot at 25 pigeons and missed them all, 
and two dropped out after shooting 
awhile without any results. 

The first team prize was won by Phila- 
delphia, with a score of 64 out of 125. 
This is a beautiful sterling silver loving 
cup, appropriately embossed and en- 
graved. Second prize went to Buffalo, 
with a score of 43. P. Scott of the Buf- 
falo team won the third individual prize, 
a silvered buckhorn corkscrew. 

The first individual prize for the high- 
est score was won by Mr. B. Dorrance of 
the Philadelphia team. Mr. Burton and 
Mr. Dorrance shot a tie, each having a 
score of 19. In the shoot off at 10 birds 
each the score was as follows: 

Mr. Burton 1 110111110 

Mr. Dorrance 1 111111101 

The match between these two was very 
close and exciting. In their desire to see 
a further contest between these shots 
some applauded, when Mr. Dorrance 
missed his ninth bird, thus tieing Mr. 
Burton, who had missed his fourth. It 
was considered bad taste by some, but 
the sympathy is always with the loser 
when he is working hard for the goal, and 



i8g4. 



The American Florist. 



107 




108 



The American Florist. 



Sept, /, 



anything that brings him nearer is en- 
couraged. Mr. Burton, however, lost, as 
he missed the tenth, which Mr. Dorrance 
hit, making the score 9 to 8. 

Mr. Burton was very sorry that the 
individual shooting had to be declared 
off. Had the teams been ready at the 
appointed hour there would have been 
plenty of time for all. The match was 
called for 1 sharp, but it was 2 o'clock 
before enrugh men could be gotten to- 
gether to start. An hour was lost here, 
which would have been sufficient for the 
individual shooting. The first three 
scores would, however, have been very 
hard to beat. Following are the scores: 

PHILADELPHIA. BUFFALO. 

B Uorrance 19 Wm. Scott . . . 14 

r.Cartledge 7 P.Scott .16 

J. Burton 19 H. Bunyard . . 1 

B. Cartledge 12 C. Hewson . 5 

H. H. Battles . . 7 W. Bou6eld . . 7 



BOSTON. 

H, F. A. Lange . 
F. Madison . . 
Mr. Shea .... 
W. Ewell 
J. Dawson . 



NEW YORK. 

Theo, Roehrs . . 
G Bergraan . . . 
W. Griflfen .... 

N. Steffens 

A. Zeller 



64 

.10 
1 

. 2 
3 

. 1 



.5 
. 6 

. e 

. 5 


22 



SUMMIT. 

J. H. Troy . . . . 
Mr. Luther 

J. Manda . . . 

D. McRorie . . 

A. Capam . . . . 



CHICAGO. 

J. C. Vaughan . . 
G. L Grant 
J. T. Anthony . . 
L. Schiller . 



43 

. 1 

. 1 



4 

. 1 



J. T. Temple (did not 
shoot) — 

17 

PITTSBURG. 

E. C. Reineman ... 

A. W. Bennet . . 

G. Bufke 8 

G. Osterle 3 

C. Bieler 



ST. LOUIS. 

H. Young . . . 

R. F. Tesson 

W. Young . . . 

F C. Weber 

C. Young . . 

23 11 

The teams finished in the following 
order: 

Philadelphia 64 

RuflTalo 43 

St. Louis 23 

New York 22 

Chicago 17 

Boston 17 

Pittsburg 11 

Summit 7 

THE ENTERTAINMENT ON THE PIER. 

The final entertainment in the pavilion 
on the iron pier was a very pleasant clos- 
ing to the social features of the conven- 
tion. The committee had considerable 
trouble in carrying out their programme 
on account of the failure of a theatrical 
company, which had arranged to furnish 
first-class talent. The weather was all 
that could be desired, it being a most de- 
lightlul evening, and those who stayed 
to the hop saw the moon rise in great 
splendor. 

The exercises were opened with a few 
remarks by Mr. Robert Craig, who was 
glad to see that the members of the S. A. 
F. had not let the outside attractions in- 
terfere with the greater interests of the 
convention. He said that they would be 
sure of a warm welcome in Pittsburg 
next vear,and hoped to see there the larg- 
est attendance the society has ever had. 

The famous Levy, the great cornetist, 
now gave several solos, accompanied by 
the orchestra. His firit was "The 
Palms," and for an encore he gave the 
"Blue Bells of Scotland," then "Nearer, 
my God, to thee," and concluded with 
"Yankee Doodle" with variations. The ap- 
plause was loud and long, and his play- 
ing was one of the features of the evening. 

There was now some fine dancing by 
little girls and some singing and dancing 
by Irish comedians. 

Colored jubilee singers also rendered 
some plantation melodies, which were 
well received. 




A SNAP SHOT AT THE BOWLING CONTEST. 



Mr. Burt Eddy, whose appearance 
brought forth rounds of applause, recited 
"The old man dreams," by Oliver Wendell 
Holmes. Mr. Eddy made a capital old 
man, his acting and laughter being very 
good, but his performance was much in 
the nature of a pantomine, as he could be 
heard but a short distance from the stage. 
He recited the "Roll Call," by request of 
Jackson Dawson, in a very creditable 
manner. 

Mrs. T. Edwards, who sang so sweetly 
at Carisbrooke Inn, was called out of the 
audience and favored them with two 
lovely airs, singing for an encore the 
Slumber Song from "Princess Bonnie." 
Mrs. Edwards' refined manner and art- 
istic singing were much admired. 

At this time a recess was taken for 
refreshments, after which the scene from 
Henry the IV was now brought on 
the boards, with the following cast: 

Sir John Falstaff— Burt Eddy. 

Lieutenant Bardolph — W. K. Harris. 

The two Soldiers — Edwin Lonsdale, P. 
O'Mara. 

It did not take much "make-up" for 
Mr. Eddy to be ready to play the part of 
Falstaflf, nature having generously pro- 
vided him with that rotundity so needful 
and wbich in most cases has to be coun- 
terfeited. 

The Lieutenant Bardolph of Wm. K. 
Harris, for the first time on any stage, 
was a great effort. We cannot find 
words to do it justice. His appearance 
in this play was the feature of the even- 
ing. Nature had also fitted Mr. Harris 
for his part, being as economical with 
him as she was generous with Mr. Eddy. 

Mr. Harris is a talented man; he not 
only looked the character he essayed, but 
he acted it like a veteran. That limp! 
One would suppose he had been born 
with it and had limped all his life. As an 
instance of his versatility we will mention 
that when in Washington at the conven- 
tion, on the tally-ho ride to Cabin John, 
he took the horn from the man on the 
rear seat and blew it to such perfection 
that the professional looked at him with 
astonishment. 

We shall all have a chance next year to 
see him on the boards again, as Mr. J. D. 
Carmody has kindly oflfered to write a 
play in which he is to be the star. 

The soldiers in this play, Messrs. Edwin 
Lonsdale and P. O'Mara, are also to be 
commended for their good acting. Mr. 
O'Mara's fine voice was the first of the 



evening to be heard all over the pavilion, 
the acoustic properties of the building 
not being the best. 

Of the performance while these artists 
were on the stage we will say little, as it 
would be impossible to do it justice; it 
had to be seen to be appreciated. 

For an encore Duke Lonsdale came to 
the footlights and sang the "Brave old 
Duke of York" as only he can sing it, the 
entire audience joining in the chorus. 
This had to be repeated three times be- 
fore Mr. Lonsdale was allowed to go. 

The Great Scott being next called to 
the platform delivered one of his charac- 
teristic speeches. He complimented the 
Phila. boys, and saying that he had only 
missed one convention, had attended all 
the others, and, with all due respect to 
the other nine, this one took the cake. 
Although there was so much to see, busi- 
ness had not been neglected, the sessions 
being well attended and very interesting. 
Without the social features the attend- 
ance would not be nearly so large. These 
events as a rule came on the last day, 
making it a time of rest and recreation 
after the work had been done. The shoot- 
ing match was an innovation and he was 
glad to see it, as it was an event all could 
enjoy, the ladies as well asthe men. Buf- 
falo had shot into second place and his 
son had won an individual prize, a cork- 
screw, and said he would give it to his 
"dada," as he would use it most. 

He also praised Mr. Burton for his 
management of the whole affair. 

He now took three little boxes out of 
his pocket and said he had a very disa- 
greeable duty to perform. He had been 
asked to distribute three prizes, diamond 
pins, to three gentlemen who had won 
them in the individual bowling tourna- 
ment that morning. The idea that Rob- 
ert Craig had ever made a score 166, or 
that George C. Watson had ever been 
able to roll up 155, and to think that 
John Westcott should make 150! It was 
infamous; they must have bribed the boys 
to bunch the pins. Each man was a 
chairman of a committe, and this was 
the way they had rewarded themselves, 
making so much better scores than the 
other twenty-three bowlers. "Here," 
handing the first prize t o Mr. Craig, 
"take it, you don't deserve it"; to John 
Westcott, "you know you didn't make 
i*-; and to G. C. Watson, "won by fraud!" 
After the laughter aimd applause given 
Mr. Scott had died QUt ex-President Jor- 



i8g4. 



The American Florist. 



109 




First Team Pit 



First Tiidividital Pri 
Second !iidi7'idua! Prize. 



Second Team Priz 
Third Individual Prize. 



THE SHOOTING- TOURNAMENT PRIZES. 



dan of St. Louis was introduced, and 
among other remarks spoke of how he 
would like to see in print the records of 
the preliminary meeting at Chicago when 
the foundation for the present society 
was laid. He would like to see the rec- 
ords of that very important meeting, 
when some twenty men met in the Sher- 
man House in Chicago at eleven o'clock 
at night, after the session of the Nursery- 
men's convention had adjourned, and 
formed an organization out of which had 
grown this great society. He hoped that 
this would be prepared for next year's 
convention at Pittsburg. 

The entire cast now appeared on the 
stage and the audience joined them in 
singing "Auld Lang Syne." 

The chairs were then removed from the 
center of the floor and an hour given to 
tripping the light fantastic, with Mr. H. 
Bayersdorfer as floor manager, and this 
closed one of the most enjoyable conven- 
tions the society has ever held. K. 



The Evolution of the Chrysanthemum. 

BY OROVB p. RAWSON, ELMIRA, N. Y. 

{Address delivered before the Society of American 
Florists at Atlantic City, N.f.] 

If I had selected my own subject I 
should have preferred to address you 
on "Plant life about the Equator." I 
have had exceptional opportunities for 
study of natural history in South Amer- 
ica. Nature in the tropics is simply grand; 
I fancy I could have interested you. Veg- 
etable life is so exuberant and in such 
superabundance that a mere description 
of its varied species of palms, scandent 
and upright, the strange flowering trees, 
the wonderful varietyof vines, of shrubby 
and herbaceous character, the orchid in 
habitat, far prettier in its natural state 
amid natural surroundings than as grown 
under glass, not to mention the splendid 
fern growth, and floating islands of 
aquatics — I say a very common state- 
ment would command attention, as this 
field is so much of it unexplored country, 
being so difficult ot access. 

But enough— I must stick to my text, 
the string to my bow at this time is the 
chrysanthemum. All honor to the glori- 



ous flower, the Eldorado of the flower 
realm. Numerous friends and admirers 
always look forward to its annual visit 
and delight to do appropriate honors 
suited to the occasion. He comes as a 
conquering hero assured of festive wel- 
come. Many a feminine bosom flutters 
at the first sight of his curly golden locks, 
and she wears him over her heart, though 
it takes her last penny. "So swell, "don't 
jou know! The "mum" is decidedly a 
ladies' flower. These preliminary months 
are prophetic of future promise. Now is 
the time to put in our good work, and be 
not weary of well doing. By and by we 
may rest from our labors and enjoy the 
splendor of his regal presence. 

Chrysanthemums appear upon the scene 
with such eclat that old time favorites 
give way for the time being by mere force 
of circumstance, unable to cope with such 
prodigious displays of gorgeousness and 
brilliancy. What flower excels it in color 
effect? Its various tints and shadings 
are at times unique and again startling 
as to the ordinary rules of color harmony. 
As well get out your paint pot, and try 
to reproduce a glorious sunset sky, as to 
perfectly describe the colors of many 
chrysanthemums. Nature defies imita- 
tion when she gets down to business. 
When you want a yellow that is pure 
gold, a ruddy orange or lemon tint, am- 
ber, cream or buff, what flowercan so sat- 
isfy you as does the chrysanthemum? In 
this respect the"mum" is a peerless flower 
and unequaled. In its form and shape it 
is alike varied and interesting. 

It is said of some people, don't you 
know, that they "travel best on their 
shape." The chrysanthemum might well 
do so, besides it belongstothe "big four," 
roses, carnations, chrysanthemums, vio- 
lets. The orchid and lily claim they don't 
care for the combination. 

While chrysanthemums do not attract 
the furor of some few years past, and the 
public press is not so enthusiastic in its 
exaggerations, and the Hardy type is no 
longer a novelty, but nevertheless still 
attractive, and most people are more or 
less familiar with the "swelled" beads of 
some of the big fellows, yet all the same 
the chrysanthemum is no back number, 



nor will it ever be. It has come to stay. 

Ward McAllister's edict that it is now 
too common for the exclusive "four hun- 
dred" is worse for 'em than it is for it; 
and for anyone to utter such treason is a 
shameless affront to the entire chrysan- 
themum race. So much so that the 
poorest mum would feel dishonored to 
bear his name! No fears, though, but 
chrysanthemums will flourish when Ward 
himself is quite forgotten. "You can't 
sometimes most always tell what you 
least expect the most" — still I have no 
doubt the king will reign, whether sub- 
jects do him honor or no. Vive le roi 
Chrysanthemum! or dub the flower 
"Queen of Autumn" if you like! 

The chrysanthemum is more useful and 
popular to-day than ever before. We can 
not do without it, nor would we. It fills 
in a gap. It has its essential place that 
no other flower does or can occupy. 

The best word that you can say for a 
good aster bloom is that it resembles a 
'mum. 

Chrysanthemums usher in November 
with many a magnificent flower show 
and private exhibition that otherwise 
would not be. Florists and Flora's realm 
ought to be exceeding grateful and do 
homage to a flower that serves so grand 
a purpose. Here's to the health of Chrys. 
Chrysanthemum — whose shadow, may it 
never grow less, but enlarge! 

And I'm proud to say 

That I honor its sway 

In dull November weather; 

When it rules the day 

And is bright and gay 

As birds of tropic feather. 

I am still speaking of thegood qualities 
of chrysanthemums in general. I have 
not yet got around to its distinctive feat- 
ures of later development. There have 
been notable improvements in some new 
varieties, as well as heaps of rubbish 
palmed off on the public not worthy to 
have been disseminated, and this fact has 
lessened the general interest in new vari- 
eties not fully tested, or well medaled, 
certified and abundantly advertised; and 
many of these even have failed to become 
standard sorts, from one reason and an- 
other. For the good of the cause it is not 



110 



The American Florist. 



Sept. /, 



wise to have too many new kinds offered 
at a time. There isn't so much room at 
the top as there used to was. By all 
means let the new comers be distinct in 
some special feature, as well as up to the 
required standard in what we expect ol a 
good chrysanthemum. And don't patch 
out "sets" with one or two of doubtful 
value. We are already overstocked in 
this line. 

As a matter of fact, there are few con- 
noisseurs at the present time who are 
willing to pay a dollar or so for a 2-inch 
chrysanthemum whose merit, after all, is 
but a question of circumstance or lottery. 
There are so many — too many — good 
tested kinds as it is, that it is difficult in- 
deed to draw the line what to retain or 
discard. The whole chrysanthemum field 
has been pretty well plowed over of late, 
in that good, bad and indifferent sorts 
are alike covered up, some even buried 
alive that perhaps may be revived again 
in due time. 

No matter how many disappear or are 
trampled under the rank and file knows 
no loss. There are plenty of enlistments 
to fill up the gaps. Recruits from abroad 
and at home, from the east and from the 
west, a very cosmopolitan army, making 
a confusion of tongues! No wonder our 
chrysanthemum society demands regis- 
tration, and many of these foreigners re- 
quire naturalization papers! "Restricted 
emigration" is one of the topics of the 
day — why doesn't it apply to chrysan- 
themums? 

Just to sell over the counter, one need 
grow but comparatively few kinds, stand- 
ard sorts, white, yellow and pink mostly. 
But a large collection has itsown especial 
interest. Theenthusiastic chrysanthemist 
creates a special demand for his finestoct. 
Enthusiasm is no mean factor in the de- 
velopment of trade these days. It comes 
under the head of advantageous adver- 
tisement. 

As you all know, some varieties of 
"mums" you will find useful for one pur- 
pose and some for another. There are 
those to be grown in pots for exhibition 
to single stems, bush plants and stand- 
ards, as also for cut flowers. Amateurs 
and private gardeners occasionally train 
them into fantastic shapes, all well 
enough, if it please their fancy, and there 
is sufficient growth to hide the topmast, 
mainstays fore and aft, as well as the 
jib boom. The presence of sticks, wires, 
or supports of any kind, if at all promi- 
nent, considerably detracts from the nat- 
ural beauty of a specimen plant, no mat- 
ter how otherwise well grown. 

Let the Japanese grow a chrysanthemum 
bloom three feet across, as it is said they 
do (ray authority is H. Izawa), where is 
its beauty, when its thin petals have to 
be kept in place by a wire network sup- 
port ? Give me less flower and more sub- 
stance. 

Reminds me of a story in war time. A 
soldier home on a furlough noticed for 
the first time the ladies' new style of wear- 
ing their hair, when it was caught at the 
nape of the neck in a rather heavy net, 
the so-called "water-fall." "Why," said 
he. "have the women got so darned lazy, 
that they have to carry their hair in 
liags?" Really, we have not much usefor 
a chrysanthemum that can not stand 
alone on its own merits, causa sine qua 
non. 

I believe in evolution as to the chrysan- 
themum, the fittest will survive; that is 
my idea of evolution, pure and simple. 
As the saying goes, "You can't make a 
whistle out of a pig's tail," the iiialerial 
isn't suitable. The so-called connecting 
links between the animal and vegetable 



kingdom are at once separate and dis- 
tinct after all, whatever the supposed 
affinities may be. 

Four, five years ago anything most 
would pass muster that was a chrysan- 
themum. They were all of 'em quite too 
lovely for anything! Single ones that 
looked like daisies and smelled like vio- 
lets? Every style was lauded and praised, 
including the pin wheel, Catharine wheel, 
feather duster, water lily and "chalice" 
shaped flower, as were the anemones and 
pompons. No w, these classes are non est 
as to popular fa vor, and even the Japanese 
must have less feathers and more petals. 

However, w hen we become too critical 
we may lose the zest of complete enjoy- 
ment. I wonder if this incident is at all 
apropos. An Irish woman and her 
daughter came into my store lately to 
order a flower piece of some kind. The 
mother had her eye on something large 
and showy, when made up, plenty of this, 
and that, and so on. Tne girl remon- 
strated, suggesting a more simple ar- 
rangement, but was entirely squelched 
with Molly, it's meself that's doin' it, 
and I'm glad I haven't got an educated 
taste as the likes of you." Oh, it's not 
half bad. 

A musical critic is often so impressed 
with his own individual art that he quite 
lacks any appreciation of a brother artist. 
The "doctors" don't agree when it comes 
to judging chrysanthemums. Their rela- 
tive value will vary, much according to 
the experience and individual taste of A 
B C. One will condemn what another 
recommends, the difference of opinion 
being largely mere point of view. 

I will simply give my experience, and 
confess I do not know all about the sub- 
ject, nor do I ever expect to. There will 
always be something to learn in this line 
or any other, and the more you know 
only opens up new and greater possibil- 
ities for further attainment. Again there 
will always be different methods of ac- 
complishing the same results. 

For myself, I know that I can grow as 
good chrysanthemums as any I have ever 
seen on exhibition, with a high average 
of first quality bloom, and with but a 
very small percentage of plants failing to 
flower, or producing imperfect blooms. 
It is not my thought to go into detailed 
cultural directions, nor is it necessary — 
tha t ground waswell gone over last year in 
Elmer D. Smith's admirable essay "Bench 
grown chrysanthemums." 

I plant my first lot in solid beds about 
the first of July from 3 and 4-inch pots, 
good strong plants that have not become 
starved or woody. I would not want to 
plant them much earlier than this date, 
judging from my experience. With me, I 
get larger flowers, more substance and 
earlier in bloom, than if planted out in 
May or June. I stake nothing on the 
fact, as a rule, it is simply my experience. 

Those planted on benches for early and 
mid-season blooms are in place by the 
15th of July, while the late ones for De- 
cember flowers are not potted off from 
the propagating bench much before the 
last of the month, and planted in August. 
These late ones are all grown to single 
stems, one flower each from crown bud 
cuttings, lateral and terminal shoots, ac- 
cording to the variety. 

I use plenty of half rotted cow manure 
for compost, with stiffish sod turned over 
and stacked up the preceding spring. 
There is much more "move" to it than if 
piled up for two or three years, and is 
better for general planting of stock in- 
side, though not so good for potting pur- 
poses, a little too rough and coarse 
perhaps. 



While I use coke for drainage in the 
bottom of rose benches, with chrysanthe- 
mums I use manure instead, the "mum" 
being so much more voracious a feeder I 
prefer this course to using liquid; 1 only 
use liquid for pot plants. 

Give a chrysanthemum too much strong 
drink and he will suffer from "sour 
stomach," dyspepsia, and the wholeplant 
will appear to have a bad attack of jaun- 
dice. Use it, of course, as necessary, but 
there is danger of overfeeding. When mal- 
formed blooms stare you in the face you 
feel like using "cuss words." Stimulants 
ad libitum are as bad for "mums" as it is 
for the human species. In planting chrys- 
anthemums carefully select your young 
stock same as you would for roses; hard, 
woody or starved plants ought to be at 
a discount, even if they are new "mums," 
and is a waste of time and space. You 
need to be more particular with some va- 
rieties than others — especially those that 
make a thin wiry growth to start with, 
as Mrs. M. J. Thomas, Mrs. Robt. Craig, 
M. B. Spauldiog, H. Waterer, and the 
like. Healthy young stock of Golden 
Wedding grows quickly and vigorous, 
but if it once becomes "hard" its growth 
is stunted and it rusts badly. 

Mrs. Craige Lippincott will stand right 
still when stunted that way, or else put 
out new growth from the bottom that 
generally fails to bloom at all. 

Mrs. Geo. Bullock (Domination) acts 
much the same way. By the way, the 
former name is entitled to precedence. 
There are fewer chrysanthemums im- 
ported under number than of yore, conse- 
quently less confusion in names and syn- 
onyms. Examples are V. H. Hallock vs. 
Dawn, Mrs. Humphreys vs. Snowball, 
Nineveh vs. Charity, Bride of Roses vs. 
Wm. Tricker et al. Besides, our chrys- 
anthemum society registers the names of 
new aspirants to public favor, and the 
debutants are thus properly chaperoned. 
That's al! that saved us from having a 
baker's dozen Ruth Clevelands when the 
first baby put in an appearance at the 
White House. What about Esther? 
Quite a chapter could be written on 
histories of synonyms. Good Gracious, 
the sport of Princess of Chrysanthemums, 
is classed by many as synonymous with 
Princess, whereas the real article is a 
bona fide sport, distinct in habit, of better 
shape and color, and holding its big 
graceful flower quite erect. 

I have another sport, similar to Good 
Gracious in every way, except being pure 
white. I am waiting to see whether it is 
to be reliable or not. I wouldn't want it 
to be entailed with curvature of the spine, 
same as Princess. 

I had a yellow sport from L. Canning 
that showed up grandly last fall. Itgave 
a tremendous deep bloom of pure golden 
yellow, lasting a whole month on the 
plant. Habit dwarf and sturdy like the 
parent. Still, whether it will pan out 
satisfactory on further acquaintance is 
all guess work. Sports should be thor- 
oughly tested one or two seasons, same 
as we expect of seedlings. A good many 
seedling novelties that have shown 
up splendidly at exhibitions, receiving 
certificates and medals, have really 
proved utterly valueless. Some of our 
most desirable varieties originated as 
sports. Among the newer ones are Chas. 
Davis, from Vi viand-Morel; L'Enfant des 
deux Mondes, from Louis Boehmer; Clin- 
ton Chalfant from Jos. H. White; Kate 
Mursell from Robt. Bottomlyand others. 

Of the newer sorts, the very earliest 
ones are the most sought after. I venture 
to say that E. G. Hill & Co. have sold one 
hundred Mrs. E. G. Hill to one of Chal- 



i8g4. 



The American Florist. 



Ill 




BURT EDDY AS PALSTAPF W. K HARRIS AS BAHDOLPH 

PROM THE SCENE FROM HENRY IV PRESENTED AT THE ATLANTIC CITY S, A, F. ENTERTAINMENT. 



lenge for this very reason. By the first of 
October chrysanthemums are in demand 
and you are repeatedly asked "how soon 
■will they be ready?" The earliest flowers 
are quickly disposed of to good advan- 
tage, in time to use the allotted space to 
carnaiions or some other crop. 

As far as I am able to judge of the nov- 
elties ofifered last season, I consider the 
best very early sorts to be Mrs. E. G. 
Hill, Yellow Queen, Lady Plavfair, Clin- 
ton Chalfant and Thos. H. Brown. 
Doubtless there are others not so well 
advertised. These earliest sorts are over- 
stepping each other year by year, and are 
also of much betterquality than formerly. 
Let the good work go on. 

I do not mention Mrs. Craige Lippin- 
cott, as the merits of this excellent early 
yellow are sufficiently well known. It is 
a fine thing, as most of you are aware. 
The early French varieties of Delaux are 
of but moderate quality, and not enough 
substance to grow under glass. I state 
my own experience. Possiblj' there are 
exceptions, as the list is a very large one. 
Of the extreme late ones are Challenge, 
Laredo and Eiderdown, yellow, pink and 
■white. 



Eugene Dailledouze probably showed 
up to the best advantage of any one 
chrysanthemum offered last fall. It seems 
to be all right, and much is expected 
from it. 

M»j. Bonnaffon is another very good 
one indeed, and so is Minerva, of a rich 
bright yellow. Marie Louise is a graceful 
dainty white. 

Mutual Friend hasgood substance, and 
Mrs. J. Geo. lis is distinct and very dur- 
able as a cut flower, as was evidenced at 
the World's Fair chrysanthemum show. 
A. H. Fewkes pleased all who saw it at 
its best last year. It is confidently ex- 
pected to be on the front row along with 
the othergood yellows. Itis rather after 
the style of Minnie Wanamaker in build, 
and reminds me of Mrs. F. L. Ames, '93, 
also first class. 

Pitcher & Manda is distinct from con- 
trasting color. Other certified sorts are 
Achilles, pearl white, Fairview, crimson 
lake. Silver Cloud, white and salmon. 
White Rock and Inter Ocean. 

From over the water came the two 
sports, Chas. Davis and L'Enfant des 
deuxMondes ("The childof two worlds") 
is shortened by common consent to 



"White Boehmer," and the two seedling 
Keys, Mme. Edward (renamed) and 
M'lle Therese. This notable quartette 
were visitors at the World's Fair, and 
much admired. I don't think they had 
any cause to grumble fornot having been 
hospitably received. 

Varieties wanted lor exhibition pur- 
poses should be selected among the mid- 
season kinds, as at this time novelties, 
curiosities, monstrosities or anything out 
of the usual line in shape or color will at- 
tract attention that would otherwise be 
of doubtful value. 

Some good large disheveled and curled 
blooms of Bronze and Golden Dragon 
occasioned as much comment last fall as 
anything I grew, but of no other value 
aside from exhibition. 

The evolution of popular taste a la 
mode demands a full high rounded flower 
of good substance and pleasingcolor,and 
at the same time not stiff or rigid out- 
lines, as Golden Wedding, Emma Hitz- 
eroth, Mrs. Craige Lippincolt, The Queen, 
Mrs. Jerome Jones, G. W. Childs, I. R. 
Pitcher and others. Good foliage is an- 
other requisite in the general make-up of 
an ideal chrysanthemum. Wm. Falconer 



112 



The American Florist. 



Sept. 



and White Boehmer are very popular 
with the home trade, but do not ship 
well. Do you remember the advent of 
Mrs. Alpheus Hardy and the boom it was 
to chrysanthemums? No prima donna 
was ever half so much talked about either 
by word of mouth or through the public 
press. I saw it for the first time at Phil- 
adelphia on exhibition under a glass case. 
It proved as good a "drawing card" as 
an Egyptian mummy or a live mermaid. 
Golden Hair is claimed to be a worthy 
yellow, of this class, we have had nothing 
of any real value in this color, up to the 
present time. The numerous claimants 
were simply adventurers. 

Chrysanthemums are like certain ftuits, 
there is a great difference in their shipping 
qualities. Some of the very best straw- 
berries for near at home use will not bear 
carriage any distance, so it is with many 
chrysanthemums. The splendid blooms 
of Viviand-Morel, Niveus and others of 
similar build are better for the home 
market. Not that they lack substance, 
but are difficult to ship on account of 
their shape. These do not travel so well 
on their "shape" as do some others. 

Bryden Jr. and M. B. Spaulding are 
splendid yellows, representative of what 
"the golden flower" ought to be, rich 
color, large, full and shapely. 

Mrs. Robt. Craig and its "double" ex- 
cept in color — a light yellow — I refer to 
"Congo," introduced by Yoshiike, are 
both extra good. The blooms are very 
durable either cut or to remain on the 
plant. These are really hybrid in class, 
partaking of the breadth of petal and 
grandeur of build of the Japanese, with 
the spherical outline of the Chinese. 

Golden Gate, J. C. Vaughan and Chicago 
are very attractive blooms if cut before 
the eye becomes prominent. 

Col. W. B. Smith and Edward Hatch 
would both be grand if they could only 
hold their heads up. A little weakness in 
the stem is a bad fault in a chrysanthe- 
mum, and unfits them for general duty. 

Our fair English cousin Florence Davis 
has either a weak neck or else is too modest 
by half. A chrysanthemum with a weak 
stem is as bad off as a man without any 
liver — neither of 'em haven't got long to 
stay here, and it is pro bono publico. 

Chrysanthemum "The Queen" is the 
typical American girl, and fitted by nature 
and education to adorn the highest posi- 
tion. I admire the Grace Hill type, a 
rich blush incurve of remarkable sub- 
stance, though not entirely covering cen- 
ter; still with the incurved sorts the sug- 
gestion of an eye does not detract at all 
from the symmetryof the flower. Indeed, 
graceful outlines are often wanting in the 
densely doubles. Mermaid is of this type, 
but deeper color and quite covering the 
center. It is an all 'round variety. Good 
for cut flowers and for exhibition, also 
makes a good pot plant, though some 
authorities claim it a poor grower. 

Reflexed and recurved sorts should be 
full and double for the most part. This 
class has been much improved of late 
years, and we now have some superb va- 
rieties for exhibition and cut flowers. 
Jos. H. White is a distinct type and one 
of the most popular. Eda Prass, Niveus, 
Chas. Davis and Tuxedo are each repre- 
sentative. Tuxedo is the best amber or 
orange cut flowerto date, splendid keeper 
and shipper. 

I think W.W.Coles is prettierfor show- 
ing the eye than if it was more double. 
It has a most pleasing flower of partic- 
ularly bright color. There is nothing 
just like it. Individuality is as marked 
amongchrysantfaemums as in pansy faces. 
The one, so diveree in color and shape, 



other in striking variations of color and 
expression. 

To grow chrysanthemums well one 
needs to know their separate individual- 
ity, and like some people you know, im- 
prove on acquaintance. But a single va- 
riety affords material for a diffusive Eng- 
lish treatise. In our climate, under glass, 
chrysanthemums are much easier grown, 
and with less care and expense, than in 
England. Besides, we can grow them in 
half the time and by simpler methods. 
Let a novice read or study the elaborate 
English cultural directions and he would 
be ready to give up in despair. Experi- 
ence is always the best teacher, though 
sometimes it costs us pretty dear — "Le 
cout en oterla gout" the French say — the 
cost takes away the taste. 

Belle Poitevine is a beauty of the regu- 
larly incurved ball shape Chinese section. 
It is a very early sort and exceedingly 
useful for cutting. Makes the prettiest 
boutouniere of any chrysanthemum ex- 
tant in my opinion, and first-class for 
plateau work, with growing ferns bedded 
in the moss. (This is the proper way to 
use ferns for this purpose, be the flowers 
what they may). Belle Poitevine ismuch 
like Mrs. Geo. Rundle in general effect, 
easier grown and earlier is its distinctive 
feature. It is a grand keeper, as all kinds 
should be, selected for cut flowers. It is 
aggravating enough to have a flower go 
all to pieces almost as soon as cut, like 
Mrs. Langtry, L. Canning and Mabel 
Simpkins. In a short time these varieties 
resemble plucked geese, and eye each other 
askance — all "eye," in fact, in their de- 
nuded state. I grow Belle Poitevine 
largely, and Carrie Denny, of similar build, 
an early bright amber, that takes well 
with the home trade. 

Marguerite Graham is a later cut flower 
kind I think highly of. A shapely white, 
luminous with golden light. This has 
grand keeping qualities also. 

I greatly admire early Dr. Callandreau, 
of similar tint, as probably you do. The 
white and gold effect is much like some 
silks; in certain light one tone is promi- 
nent, that shifts to the other according 
to focus. 

You can't improve on Molly Bawn and 
Marie Louise, for a plateau of white with 
adiantum ferns. Try them in this way, 
and work out the same idea with young 
plants of croton andGrevillea robustafor 
yellow and bronze colored chrysanthe- 
mums. A plateau of chrysanthemums 
when well done is a thing of beauty, or it 
maybe coarse, crowded and bulky. Right 
here there's a chance for nice discrimina- 
tion, often blooms that look well in a 
tall vase are out of place in a plateau 
arrangement. 

American Beauty is a grand decorative 
flower, but in a hand bunch to carry does 
look stiff and awkward. A bull in a china 
shop is no more out of place than a big 
psonia in a lady's hair! Why can not 
chrysanthemums have special uses same 
as roses and other flowers? 

Ivory is still the best representative 
white chrysanthemum, all things con- 
sidered. I believe it scores the greatest 
sum total of good points. 

Wm. H. Lincoln occupies nearly as 
prominent a place among yellows. New 
varieties come and go without seemingly 
affecting their relative position. 

Mrs. M. W.Redfieldis an excellentearly 
pink reflexed cut flower kind, after the 
general style of Ivory. Try it. At the 
second chrysanthemum show in New 
York, as I remember, the best flower on 
exhibition was Troubadour, now little 
seen — therefore the judges would say 
"distanced." None that have come after 



equal its clear shade of old rose. Under 
artificial light its fine color is distinctively 
characteristic. 

We have a great many lilacs and ma- 
gentas that are dull and inharmonious. 
We have no use for 'em, that is to sell 
over the counter, or for "making up." 
Except for purposes of exhibition, the 
extra tall growing kinds will be discarded 
among commercial growers. Mrs. E: G. 
Hill is almost too tail for the shelf. What 
about Harry Balsley? Isn't it a beautiful 
thing? And V. H. Hallock is a waxy 
flower of perfect tint. Doubtless I grow 
some kinds I have found satisfactory that 
you may have discarded, and vice versa. 
I can grow my own "G. P. R." profitably, 
but I don't ask you to bother with it. 

There is no absolute standard of excel- 
lence, save in a general sense. We are all 
of the same opinion as to some special 
kinds being good all 'round varieties; 
aside from this judge and choose for your- 
self. There is no occasion for growing 
poor ones though. 

Robt. Bottomly or its synonym. Lady 
Lawrence, Pelican and Mrs. M.J. Thomas 
are particular favorites of mine. I would 
also mention Mrs. Humphreys (Snow- 
ball); snowball is the better descriptive 
appellation. Mrs. Humphreys is the 
name of Elmira's pioneer florist, now out 
of business. I well remember the late 
Peter Henderson's enthusiasm in speak- 
ing of this excellent cut flower variety. I 
still find it one of the most useful late 
kinds. Personally, I am fond of the 
bronzes. When I saw Comte de Germiny 
for the first time I thought it the most 
wonderful flower I had ever seen; and the 
first sight of Mrs. Wheeler produced an 
imoression I am not likely to forget. 

Hicks Arnold makes the best trained 
standard of any chrysanthemum that I 
am acquainted with, growth free and 
vigorous, and perfecting numerous good 
sized blooms. Pitcher & Manda have 
showed this up in fine form at several ex- 
hibitions. A large specimen shipped to 
Buffalo chrysanthemum show two jears 
ago arrived in splendid shape with hardly 
the loss of a single bloom, speaking well 
for its durability. Chrysanthemum 
plants in flower don't usually ship very 
satisfactorily. By the time they get 
through with the express company, what 
with bent or broken stems and damaged 
flowers, their ornate beauty is done for. 
Hicks Arnold is one of the very best 
bronzes for commercial use. Nearly all 
of the bronzes show to best advantage at 
night, under artificial light, then they are 
beaux and belles, the observed of all ob- 
servers, the cynosure of all eyes. H. F. 
Spaulding is exceedingly attractive in 
color as well as distinct in shape. It 
would come in under this general class, 
as would E. G. Hill, A. Swanson, Harry 
May, Alcazar, Baronald or Moseman, 
Mrs. J. T. Emlin, Prince Kamontski and 
Thos. Cartledge, comprising a fine lot. 

I regard Waban an exhibition flower 
par excellence. It has remarkable depth, 
quite full enough and of sufficient sub- 
stance for the purpose. It should be 
bench grown; is no pot plant. 

There are several of the older varieties 
that still hold their own, and are to be 
depended on for faithful steady work. 
Cut Puritan early and its lavender shad- 
ing is lovely. As a bush plant it is an 
"old soger," as are Beaute des Jardins, 
Mabel Douglas, Pere Delaux, Tokio, Cul- 
lingfordii. Source d'Or and others. Frank 
Wilcox used to be a favorite sort for bush 
plants, in habit all that could be desired, 
Ijut its flowers, profuse as they were, 
altogether too stiff and looking like im- 
mortelles. Juvena makes a ^ood "bush" 



i8g4- 



The American Florist. 



113 



pot plant. I would like to see its striking 
color duplicated in a large flower. As a 
rule these shades so quickly fade and lose 
their brilliancy. Grand Mogul is an ex- 
ample. 

Auriole is a halo of silvery yellow, un- 
like any other. Miss Mary Weightman 
is a feathery globular mass of bright gold. 




REINEMAN 



I 'icf-Picsidfitl elect of the Society of A merican 
Florists. 



also distinct, and Mrs. L. C. Madeira 
quite another type. 

Harn Ko's twisted incurve and its soft 
clear mauve tint is different from anj'- 
thing I know of. It is one of the very 
latest, and valuable on this account. H. 
Waterer is another good sort in demand 
for late cutting on account of its brilliant 
color. This variety is a little diiEcult to 
grow, but does well from late struck cut- 
tings. 

Yonitza and Miss Meredith are in use 
for late crop. Mountain of Snow is a 
regular mountain of erowth, but pro- 
duces a good flower on top. I saw a fine 
batch of this variety at John N. May's a 
few years ago. Jessica is by no means 
out of date for early large blooms, and 
Minnie Wanamaker is as stately as ever. 

I find Harry E. Widener and Edwin 
Molyneux rather inclined to be variable. 
Both these varieties, though introduced 
with a flourishof trumpets, are not nearly 
so much in demand as they were. Have 
they deteriorated? Curly yellow Yeddo 
is not half bad when well done, and the 
tangled golden shock of Mrs. I. C. Price 
charms the eye at once. Thos. C. Price 
is labeled "crushed strawberry," though 
it doesn't look at all "sat down upon," 
but is too stiff and solid an incurve. 

Le Tonquin is a reflexed type of flower, 
with crimped petals spirally twisting 
after the form of a cork screw of peculiar 
effect, while Ben d'Or is a veritable little 
bunch of yellow pine shavings. 

Marvel is as distinct in its contrasting 
color as Pitcher and Manda. When it was 
considered a novelty grand bush plants 
were shown at the Philadelphia exhibi- 
tions. At night no fair maid present 
had such a lovely pink and white com- 
plexion. 

Lillian Bird is still another type — good 
when well done. Its color is charming — 
nothing "off" about it— just the right 
tone. We sometimes grumble about the 
odd shades of many chrysanthemums as 
being of little value to the general florist. 
Take my word for it, they are "not in it" 
with sweet peas. Some of the "new" 
colors are simply "horrid." 

Mrs. D. D. L. Parson and Lizzie Cart- 
ledge are good samples of the greatly 
improved reflexed type. Mrs. Fottler is 
the best of its class and type. Its silvery 
shade of rosy lilac is a better tone of color 
than any of its numerous seedlings. At 
maturity its soft fleecy outlines the ladies 
term "fluffy," "Just look at that big 
fluffy flower," they say, "isn't it sweet!" 
Mrs. Irving Clark of the pseonia type is 
too coarse to suit me, but commands re- 



spect for its size, "big head and little in 
it" is what I say of it. 

W. N. Rudd is probably the best of the 
elks-horn type, and John H.Taylor rep- 
resents the reflexed /i/?(W(?a' flowers, white 
delicately shaded pink. There are sev- 
eral good ones of this class, all popular 
as cut flowers, 

Mrs. E. D. Adams is an exhibition va- 
riety of the "swirled" type, of huge size 
at its best. It was well advertised at the 
time of its debut. 

Mrs. J. G. Whilldin has been well re- 
ceived from the first. Pity Gloriosum has 
such a weak stem, otherwise there would 
still be room for it. Mrs. J. N. Gerard 
and Rohallion are struggling hard to 
hold their own with the new comers. 
Will they do it? Mandarin, an early In- 
dian red, resembling Tuxedo in shape, did 
well with me last year. I was surprised 
to find it so good. 

When Geo. W. Childs doesn't burn it is 
fine. What furor and interest it excited 
when it was first placed on exhibition at 
Orange, N. J. The rose Waban was also 
shown in excellent form at this time. I 
never saw it so good elsewhere. Strange 




WM J. STEWART 
Sect etai y t>f llir Society of Amci iciin Fioi ists. 



it should have so deteriorated! How do 
you account for it? 

Shasta, Mrs. W. K. Harris, Eldorado, 
Mrs. A. Carnegie and others are too diffi- 
cult to grow to be satisfactory. If weak 
stems must go weak growers will follow 
suit. As evolution unfolds its plans it is 
plain to be seen that only the fittest can 
hope to survive. 

What may we expect ten years hence? 
Will the standard varieties of to-day hold 
their own, or do some kinds deteriorate? 
It would almost seem so, judging from 
the past. What do you think about it? 

Tubiflorum, Ismail or Thistle, Golden 
Thread, Medusa, Val d'Or and Mme. 
Hoyslet are especial curiosities among 
the entire chrysanthemum family. The 
latter because it is the smallest of the 
tribe, but half an inch in diameter! 

Chrysanthemums do well in the south, 
the West Indies, and in South America, 
where the thermometer runs up to 160° 
in the sun. You meet with the Chinese 
section more than all the others, and there 
is no regular season of bloom. They go 
at it when they feel like it, and are in 
proper condition. 

The first chrysanthemum I remember 
to have seen was a magenta pompon 
'way back, when 1 was a little chap some 
thirty years ago. As I recall it now it 
was a shapely plant, full of flowers, stand- 
ing in a bow window of a friend's house. 
I noticed it in passing. I stopped, looked, 
went in and admired. Just to think of it! 
A plant like that in full bloom 'way into 
November! Florists were a rara avis in 
those days. A tea rose wlis a novelty, 
coleus almost unknown, no double gera- 
niums, palms seldom seen, and so on. 
Times have changed! Do you manage to 



keep your end up? progress, and not fall 
into slovenh' retrogression? As little 
orphant Annie says: 

"The gobble-uns 'II git you, 
Ef you 
Don't 

Watch 
Out!" 

Gradually I became used to seeing chrys- 
anthemums; and the rich yellows of the 
Chinese section began to show up here 
and there. Early in the seventies I grew 
Laciniatum for cut flowers. I thought it 
was an awfully pretty thing, and still 
think so, though it has been crowded to 
the wall by the big fellows that have come 
after and rule the day. Bulls and bears 
have the best of it now and control the 
market. Not much show for pompons 
and anemones! Both these classes resent 
the injustice of being placed so entirely in 
the background. 

M. Charles Lebocqz is the most violent 
in his vituperation, as he was the repre- 
sentative leader of this class. A fellow 
who has been "cock of the walk" doesn't 
enjoy being knocked from under, 'tisn't 
human nature, and please give chrysan- 
themums credit for having "feelins" as 
well. Thirty years have marked mar- 
velous changes in the old time artemisia 
— as it was called then. How long ago 
is it, some twelve years — 'Sl-'82 — since 
was introduced to America a set of im- 
ported "mums" — among them the Jap- 
anese varieties Gloriosum, Mme. Des- 
granges, LadyS elbourn, Mme. La Croix 
and Fantasie? Well, they were great, 
were they rot? The interest and enthu- 
siasm excited by these early adventurers, 
with John Thorpe at the helm, has worked 
wonders, and made "Uncle John", as some 
one has said, the godfather of the chrys- 
anthemum in America. 

In this connection I would mention the 
valuable service of H. Waterer as importer 
and introducer. I would not forget the 
obligations that are due the veteran W. 
K. Harris. I honor that man for his 
grand service to the "mum" as well as his 
knowledge and skill in other lines of the 




H. B. BEATTY. 
Tieasurci elect of lite Society of American Florists. 



florist's art. In the wake of these early 
beginnings a noble host have followed on. 
They are all representative men known 
to you all. I need not particularize. 
Thus was the success of the chrysanthe- 
mum assured by the painstaking study 
of practical workers, and improvement 
has been both steady and rapid to the 
present time. So thoroughly has the 
subject been entered into by these experts, 
reducing theory to practice in the matter 
of seeding and hybridization et al, that 
we have even discounted the Japs. Amer- 
ican chrysanthemums abroad are receiv- 
ing high honors, and the most distin- 
guished attention, same as our ladies 
always command. God bless 'em — the 
ladies! 

What improvement can be made re 
mains to be seen. Certainly not any- 
great stride as to quality, substance and 



114 



The American Florist, 



Sept. 



build of flower blooms, the standard sorts 
are really quite good enough in this re- 
spect, and habit and growth is about 
what it ought to be, sturdy and short 
jointed. There will doubtless be many 
new shades and tones of color, probably 
a much brighter red, possibly a blue (not 
dyed in the wool), and again distinctly 
striped and variegated kinds if you care 
for them. 

What size they will attain, too, is a 
matter of conjecture and speculation. 
The big Japanese sort referred to is quite 
single and not what we want. Let the 
good work go on, I say, but at the same 
time, attention growers. Look to your 
laurels. Don't attempt to gull either the 
unsophisticated public or the poor florist 
with anything inferior to what we al- 
ready have, or we'll cry out with the 
small boy "what ye givin us?" No, in- 
deed, it won't work, we have had enough 
of this sort of business along back. Let's 
stop it. 

But we will accept a Vigilant for out- 
side breezy water and white-caps, if she 
can hold on to her center-board, and 
award the cup to Britannia for inside 
work. There areVigilantsandBritannias 
among chrysanthemums, both good in 
their respective place, and excel under 
certain conditions either for cut flowers 
or exhibition. 

How old is the chrysanthemum? It is 
as old as the hills, ye flower ot the gods. 
Yet I have never been able to find out 
definitely — the Japs won't tell us for a 
fact, and the Chinese keep "mum." Any- 
way, it comes to stay, so what's the odds! 
It doesn't hardly do to rake up ancestors, 
rarely is it wise, we might unearth skel- 
etons and skeletons are not always dry 
bones, they sometimes have unsavory 
odors. Isn't it enough that it's the big- 
gest flower out, and likely to remain bo? 

As we have alreadvsaid,it is the flower 
— par excellence for decorations and gen- 
eral decorative work. Apropos the com- 
mon fault is over-crowding. 

I have one or two chrysanthemum 
"yarns" before I close. 

A customer came into my store last 
November when "mums" were in good 
display. "Veil, how you vas, mein Herr. 
My! shiminies! ain't dose nice ein grosse 
posy blumen," pointing to a vase of big 
fellows. "I vants ein sausage bokay vor 
mein bestest girl." "Asausagebouquet?" 
I thought a moment — "Ah! I suppose you 
refer to a corsage bouquet?" "Ya, dot 
ist so." "Well, one of these large blooms 
will be amply sufficient, I think." "I 
mind notings the price, Katrina ein shone 
fine fraulein, makes your eyes most vater, 
see 'er pooty vace. I dakes de vohl lot," 
and he did. 

Katrina must have been the bloom- 
ingest girl out mit her big "sausage" 
bouquet. 

I had an order for a church wedding, 
the bride's bouquet was a huge bunch of 
Ivory "mums," to be carried by a small 
boy as page. It was a comical sight to 
see the little chap stagger under his load. 
For once people forgot to look at the 
bride. 

A young minister, who was inclined to 
take love for a text, as parsons sometimes 
do, was courting a pretty girl, a musician 
to-wit. One day he took her a box of 
chrysanthemums, but she was not at 
home, so left them with Bridget, who 
passed them over to her mistress as 
"Christian anthems," that Rev. so and 
so had sent her, with his compliments. 
Without undoing the parcel she returned 
the same with a curt note "That she pre- 
ferred to select her own music." 

What's in a name? Anything that 



smells as sweet would be a rose! Shall it 
be plain "mum," chrysanthe, or chrysan- 
themum? 

Let me not entirely exhaust your pa- 
tience. I close with this toast: 

Here's to the health — a votre sante — 
of every American florist, man or woman, 
born of any nationality, so long as their 
feet are on American soil, American good 
will about them, and America's blue sky 
is over a\\— provided — that they pin their 
faith on the chrysanthemum. 



Cannas. 



BY J. T. TEMPLE. DAVENPORT. IOWA. 

{Read befoie ihe Society of Ayitericaii Florists at 
Atlantic Cilr,N. J.] 

A class of plants that is becoming very 
popular is the cannas. They are rapidly 
crowding the geranium for the first place 
in bedding plants; their beautiful and 
massive foliage stamps them as one of 
the best decorative plants for all pur- 
poses, especially for use in greenhouses, 
halls, dwellings, etc., while for the lawn, 
they are one of the most satisfactory 
plants grown, blooming from June until 
frost, rivaling the improved gladiolus in 
size of blossom, and the brilliancy of 
coloring of the various shades of red and 
yellow flowers. 

The name canna is, according to some 
authorities, derived from oana, the Celtic 
name for reed or cane. They are mostly 
natives of the Indies and South America. 
Thty are easily multiplied by seed and 
also by division of the roots. Of late 
years there has been agreatimprovement 
in color, size of blooms, and d warfness of 
habit of the plants; especially in the 
hybrid seedlings raised by Mr. Crozy of 
Lyons, France. Mr. Crozy is entitled to 
great credit for the improvement and 
introduction of the fine varieties as are 
called the Crozy cannas. 

A good many good seedlings are being 
raised in the United States, and there is 
no reason to doubt that with our fine 
climate and soil that we can produce 
finer varieties than are yet in commerce. 
After we have obtained the ideal pure 
yellow canna with large blossoms we 
should turn our attention to procuring a 
strain ol foliage cannas, with the beauti- 
ful colors and markings of the crotons 
and phrynium, and the elegant shadings 
and color of Dracaena terminalis; then 
the canna with its gorgeous flowers, and 
the size and elegant markings of foliage, 
would possess most every quality that 
the most fastidious would desire. It is 
feasible as we already have reddish and 
purple foliage in numerous cannas, and 
the yellow shade and some markings, as 
in Canna Breningsii. 

From the 1st to 15th of April wedivide 
and start the canna in the greenhouse, or 
in a mild hotbed, in 6 or 8 inches of soil, 
perferring the hotbed, as it seems more 
congenial to them, dividing into one or 
not more than two eyes to each piece. 
These make larger growth and foliage 
than if more eyes are left. When they 
have attained a growth of about a foot 
high, say about May 20 (with us), we 
plant out in open ground if the weather 
is suitable, if not we pot them until ready 
to plant out. In very windy situations 
it is best to plant them out as soon as 
the first leaf shows above the ground; 
they do not break oft" so easily, and are 
hardier and stronger than plants forced 
to a lengthy growth caused by starting 
them too early. To be effective the beds 
should not be too large. Wra. Robinson, 
in Sub-Tropical Gardenitig, truly says 
that enormous meaningless masses of 
them are things to avoid, and not to 
imitate. The best size of circular bed to 



plant the tallest varieties in is from 15 to 
20 ftet in diameter, made level (with very 
rich soil, one-fourth of good manure, not 
too fresh), a little below the surrounding 
surface, so that the water will not run ofi" 
as it would do if raised. If the bed is 
larger than 15 to 20 feet in diameter for 
the tallest variety it will look low and 
squatty, and if smaller it will look too 
high. A study of the height of the various 
sorts will prove a good guide for diameter 
of bed; the taller the variety, the greater 
the diameter, and vice versa for the 
smaller varieties. A proper planting for 
eiiect, whether for one or more seasons 
should be one of the main ideas of the 
thorough gardener, but as long as 
our profession is so truly empirical, 
so long will the general public re- 
gard the civil engineer with more favor 
or his opinions with more weight than 
those of the horticulturist. 

After they are planted we give them a 
good watering; then when they have 
started to grow rapidly, say about July 
1, we place the hose on the ground in 
centre of the canna bed, and letthe water 
run slowly all night. During the warm 
growing season they cannot have too 
much water at the roots. I do not advise 
watering the foliage in beds more than 
once a week when they are in bioom, as 
it spoils the flowers, rendering them un- 
sightlj' and making them fall off" much 
sooner than otherwise. Keep cutting the 
old flowers off" before forming seed and 
they will bloom continuously until frost. 

A well grown canna is an addition to 
any kind of architecture, and is suitable 
for planting at base or side of steps and 
porch. They are very effective planted in 
clumps or singly along walks in lawns, 
and are useful for screening unsightly 
views. A very handsome bed is one of 
all one color, say Chas. Henderson or A. 
Bouvier, with a border of some of the 
dwarf yellow varieties. In aneighboring 
terrace lawn the owner has planted 
clumpsof theimproved cannas (assorted) 
at the foot of three terraces, and the 
plants 5 to 6 feet apart. The effect is 
very pleasing, especially with the grass 
background. At the World's Fair, be- 
tween the Horticultural Hall and the 
greenhouses, were 2 novel round beds 
raised 8 to 12 feet, the mounds being 
made, so I was informed, from old boxes, 
manure and refuse sphagnum moss and 
soil from cleaning out the greenhouses 
and sheds. They were planted chiefly 
with Mme. Crozy cannas, yuccas, ricinus 
and smaller things to fill bare spots. Be- 
ing so high they were very effective and 
showed well John Thorpe's skill and the 
capability ot the canna as a decorative 
plant. 

They are easily grown from seed, 
blooming the first year. Soak the seed in 
warm water for 24 hours before planting 
and most all will come up. There are 
some good varieties raised this way (es- 
pecially from the newer sorts), and it 
should be encouraged, but my advice 
would be to throw them all on the rub- 
bish heap, unless they are decided and 
very distinct improvements on such vari- 
eties as Chas. Henderson, Alphonse 
Bouvier, Florence Vaughan, Capt de Suz- 
zoni, Mme. Crozy, Paul Marquant and 
other good varieties now in commerce. 
If you raise what you think is a new and 
good sort it would be better before dis- 
seminating to send bloom and plant to 
some canna expert, who grows in large 
quantities the improved sorts, so that 
they can make comparisons, say J. C. 
Vaughan in the west and Dean, Pierson 
or Dreer in the east. Or, better yet, start 
a canna society, auxiliary to the S. A. F., 



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The American Florist. 



115 




VIEW OP THE GREENHOUSES OP MR. ROBERT CRAIG, PHILADELPHIA. 



which would register and test all varie- 
ties before they were disseminated; it 
would save trouble in canna nomencla- 
ture. Some of our European brothers 
are very extravagant in descriptions of 
varieties which sometimes need a micro- 
scope to detect the slightest shade of dif- 
ference in color, as many of our importers 
of roses, geraniums, cannas, etc., know 
to their loss, so go slow until some other 
fellow has tested them. 

In propagating a new variety for dis- 
semination do not divide too often, as it 
weakens the stamina and the variety is 
often condemned, when it has been weak- 
ened by over propagation. When Mme. 
Crozy was first sent out I bought stock 
and commenced to divide, and did so uu- 
til the foliage was no wider than corn 
blades, and most of the last division had 
to be thrown away, for they never made 
good plants. 

Insects. — The canna is, for the size of its 
leaves, remarkably free from insect pests. 
I have only noticed red spider on plants 
this year that could not be reached by the 
hose, and on early planted stock a small 
white hairy worm (name unknown) 
which rolled up the leaves and cut holes 
in them, disfiguring them badly; the only 
remedy I know is to hand pick; I have 
not seen any of these latter insects since 
July 1 this year. 

Taking up.-The first day after frost I cut 
off most of the tops, leaving a few leaves 
on, then takeupand plant, without divid- 
ing, in boxes in sandy soil, then place in 
light cellar or under bench in greenhouse, 
care being taken to see that they are given 
only enough water to prevent drying up, 
and not enough to cause rot. If I have 
plenty of room we plant on greenhouse 
bench and keep growing all winter, and 
at Christmas and Easter the flowers pay 
for their keeping. 

Qualifications. — A good canna should 
possess good foliage, a sturdy habit, a 
large flower, composed of wide and not 
too long petals of good waxy substance, 
on a stalk rising well above the foliage, 
and a good bright color. The flowers on 
the stalks should not crowd one another 
too much and need not necessarily be up- 
right, as is the standard set by some, but 
may droop, as in the IridifoUa or Ehe- 
manni type; to some they are more erace- 
tul and beautiful than the upright type. 

For years I have been testing all the new 
varieties as thev were introduced. Some 



were extra fine, but many should not have 
been sent out; some had new shades and 
markings, but lacked substance and 
breadth of petals, etc. Some years a vari- 
ety would do especially well, and the 
next year a variety that was poor the 
previous season would take first place. 
Some plants of a variety do better in 
some locations than in others, planted at 
same time and given same treatment. 

The best 12 grown this year by me of 
the previous introductions are: 

Chas. Henderson.of its color (rich vivid 
crimson) the best canna to date; petals 
wide, not too much reflexed and of fair 
substance; very desirable planted singly, 
at side near foot of entrance steps to resi- 
dence, also good for beds of all one color. 

Florence Vaughan (the gem of all can- 
nas), color bright golden yellow, thickly 
spotted with bright crimson; petals 
broad, not too long, and of good sub- 
stance, flowers lasting well this dry sea- 
son. Very desirable planted in fame way 
and as a companion plant to Chas. Hen- 
derson. It is not quite as showy as Capt. 
P. de Suzzoni for a bed of yellow on ac- 
count of the large bright crimson spots 
neutralizing the golden yellow. I think 
it is the best type of canna to date and 
advise all to plant it. Your committee 
on nomenclature cannot have given to 
cannas the careful consideration which 
the prominence of this classwould justify. 
The variety Florence Vaughan was pur- 
chased and named by the introducer in 
this country in the fall of 1891, while 
Anton Barton, which that committee 
claim to be identical, was first offered as 
a trade novelty for the spring of 1893. 
A canna committee or society would pre- 
vent the circulation of such inaccuracies. 

Alphonse Bouvier, the brightest canna 
for bedding (richest crimson), and will 
always be in demand; makes grand mass 
beds; seems to have some Ehemanni 
blood it it, as when the second flower 
opens on the spike it spreads or droops, 
same as the IridifoUa type, and gives 
variety and style to this class of plants. 

Capitaine P. de Suzzoni is the best yel- 
low for planting in solid bed of one color; 
it is not a pure yellow, but a canary yel- 
low shade lightly spotted red so as to in- 
tensify the yellow shade. (Extra good.) 

Mme. Crozy keeps up the reputation of 
being the most free floweringof theCrozy 
type of cannas; too well known to de- 
scribe. No one loving cannas can do 



without it; it generally comes true raised 
from seed. 

Paul Marquant is another grand canna 
hard to beat, color salmon scarlet. 

This season the best dark or purple leaf 
variety is canna GeoftVoy St. Hilaire, a 
splendid variety for mass beds; flowers 
orange red. 

Another equally good purple leaf canna 
ir J. C, Vaughan, with larger and darker 
flowers than the preceding; an extra 
bloomer. 

J. D. Cabos and President Carnot are 
both good varieties that cannot be dis- 
pensed with, though J. D. Cabos fades 
out considerably this dry season. 

Count Horace de Choiseul is a variety 
giving satisfaction this year, though it 
has done poorly with me for the two last 
seasons. 

Mile, de Crullion should be planted for 
its odd shade of yellow, shading to terra 
cotta; it is a free bloomer. 

Everyone should have some plants of 
C. Ehemanni, with grand foliage and 
beautiful drooping carmine flowers on 
stray stalks, entirely different from other 
varieties. It is a gem when well grown. 
There are other good varieties, as Paul 
Bruant, Trocadero, H. Vilmorin, Egan- 
dale, that did well with me last year, but 
the above named are the best this year. 
Of the newest or later introductions that 
I am testing or have seen, the first one, 
Koenigin Charlotte, very brilliant scarlet 
with a broad band of golden yellow, 
flowers of good size and substance, 
petals not very broad; it will be- 
come very popular, a decided novelty. 
Paul Sigrist in color is an improvement 
on Mme. Crozy, but the flowers lack sub- 
stance and do not last well; it may im- 
prove with cultivation. 

Lemoine's Eldorado is a grand bloom- 
ing canna, color light j'ellow, good sized 
petals and good substance. 

Columbia, an Iowa raised seedling, 
raised by Kramer & Son, as seen at the 
Chicago Exposition, also in 1892 at 
Marion, is a magnificent variety; color 
bright red; flowers large, upright and sup- 
porting one another well on the stalk. 
Gives promise of being a standard sort in 
first class. Orange Perfection is another 
variety that I am testing this year, a 
dwarf; the color orange scarlet. I do 
not think much of it with this season's 
tri.-il. 

The following varieties, seedlings raised 



116 



The American Florist. 



Sept. 



by Mr. Crozy and under control of J. C. 
Vaughan, are extra good: My notes of 
varieties at the Chicago Fair show 103 
and M. Mesnier,107,Chicago,118,and 124 
not named, were extra in 1893; this sea- 
son they have kept up their high standing. 
No. 124 is in style and color of F. 
Vaughan, but larger flowers. Magnifi- 
cent, No. 116, P. J. Berckmans, 126, J. W. 
Elliott, and 127,Mme. A. Bouvier,are all 
good sorts; also 100, F. Guillord. An- 
other variety worthy of mention is Ad- 
miral Gervais. 

In the exhibition hatl at Atlantic City 
were three varieties that are identical, viz., 
Florence Vaughan, introduced 1892; An- 
ton Barton, introduced 1893; and Comte 
de Bouchard, 1894; it is not right for the 
French growers to do this, and this soci- 
ety should appoint a canna committee to 
devise a remedy. 

Recollections of Atlantic City. 

Your correspondent from Buffalo was 
away from home and knows little of 
what occurred, but found the beautiful 
city in the same place and everybody 
well. The few hours that have elapsed 
since his coming home have been spent in 
sweet revery of what he saw at the sea- 
shore, and particularly among the broth- 
erhood of florists, and here is what he 
recollects: 

That the convention of 1894 was a suc- 
cess in every way. The balmy breezes of 
old Neptune were a benefit to all. 

That you could eat more, drink more 
and retire later, and yet come up smiling 
in the morning beyond all expectations. 

That Grove P. Rawson's recitation on 
chrysanthemums reminded one of the 
Comanche war-whoop— "once to be heard 
to be remembered forever." It was a 
pyrotechnic display in words. Its deliv- 
ery has never been equalled in the history 
of the society. 

That the beads of perspiration on Burt 
Eddy's baldness after the impersonation 
of "Sir John" were the largest and purest 
up to date. 

That there was altogether too much 
flirting going on by alleged single men 
on the difierent hotel verandas. 

That there were fewer cases ot an ex- 
uberance of conviviality than the writer 
ever remembers on any similar occasion. 

That Little Woodie seemed to have de- 
creased in stature at least Vs of an inch, 
but had made up for all that in a remark- 
able amount of snap and ginger. 

That Jackson Dawson and Prof. Cowell 
wasted a good many valuable hours in 
hunting weeds in the New Jersey swamps, 
but from their gait and talk they seemed 
to have found something else. 

That it was a pity the members were 
so much scattered. Half a dozen men 
from a distant town were domiciled in 
four or five different places. 

That there was an unusually large at- 
tendance of the fair sex. This largely ac- 
counts for the remarkably decorous be- 
havior of the vast majority of the mem- 
bers. 

That the sights from the board walk 
were to a greenhorn something entirely 
novel and inspiring; allconceivableshapes 
and sizes were there, but so great was the 
variety that even oddities passed un- 
heeded. 

That the shooting was ably managed 
by Mr. J. Burton and was a very pleas- 
ant and exciting feature of the last day. 
The referee, Mr. C. D. Ball, was indisput- 
able; not a decision was questioned and 
harmony reigned supreme. 

That the candidates for the presidency 
were better friends after the election than 
before if possible. 



That New York and Philadelphia ut- 
terly ignored the existence of any other 
bowling team except the two and found 
that in bowling as in horse racing the un- 
expected often happens. Take warning 
from these young men and place more de- 
pendence on your veterans, even if they be 
counted "scrubs" at home. It's the vet- 
erans who will support the banner when 
it comes to public performance. 

That there is a little room in Buffalo 
adorned with three'silver cups and a beau- 
tiful banner, not to mention a corkscrew, 
for all of which we are devoutly thankful. 

That we shall try never to forget the 
great hospitality of the Philadelphia club 
in every way — solids, liquids, kind words 
and all included. 

And last, but not least,that John West- 
cott is without reserve the most whole- 
souled, happy, respected and influential 
manager that was ever put at the head 
of a bowling committee orany other com- 
mittee. 

Finally, when we can get a "mum" 2 
feet across with a stem of the similar di- 
mensions of the underpinning of W. K. 
Harris we will have the ideal flower, and 
now we hope to Kift ourselves in good 
order for Pittsburg. W. S. 




Chrysanthemum Notes. 

The plants for the last month have 
grown very strong, and where they are 
in shallow benches have probably filled 
the same with roots and have extracted 
the best part of the loam, and unless 
heavily manured at the start will need 
top dressing. A close watching of the 
plants will easily tell one whether this is 
needed or not, for if they begin to flag or 
the foliage begins to grow smaller it is 
exactly what they want. Top dressing 
at this time is far preferable to so early 
liquid manuring, and makes a splendid 
mulch for the roots that are near the top 
of the soil. 

If there wasn't bone enough worked 
into the compost give the soil a good 
dressingof flour of bone now and carefully 
scratch it in with a weeding hook. Care- 
fully here means with great care, for the 
roots are near the top and will be broken 
if this advice is not heeded. If the bone 
is not worked into the soil as soon as the 
water is turned on to it it will form a crust 
like plaster, and the plants will not get 
the immediate effect desired. Cover the 
bench then with a coating of manure. 
Cow manure is preferable, but don't use 
it too green; manure that has stood 
through the summer and been turned once 
or twice is just what you want. 

Some growers advise the taking off of 
some of the lower leaves, but we doubt 
the expediency of this, and fail to see any 
good reason for doing so, and if overdone 
and too many leaves taken off it will 
surely be detrimental to the growth of 
the plant. The leaves are the lungs of the 
plant; that is, they perform similar duties 
in the organization of the plant to the 
lungs in the human body, and the more 
leaves the plant can carry the better for 
its growth and product. So rather than 



to strip off the leaves we would much 
prefer to give the plants plenty of food 
and water and keep them on to help the 
plant finish its bloom. Of course if any 
of the leaves turn yellow or brown and 
lose their life, as they sometimes do when 
they grow very thick, we immediately re- 
move them. 

If an exceptionally fine looking crown 
bud now makes its appearance we would 
advise taking it, and tag it and make a 
note of it in the book, but we do not 
mean to advise the taking of all the buds 
of any variety yet. Just select one or 
two for an experiment, and trust the 
balance of the plants to a later bud which 
we know will give a good flower. But 
from these one or two of a variety you 
will know what the late August crown 
will produce. However, don't try any of 
the darker varieties, especially reds, for 
the crowns of these are practically worth- 
less anywhere, for the bud is so long in 
maturing that they fade and look washy 
when finished. E. A. Wood. 



Judging New Chrysanthemums. 

In the course of a correspondence with 
some of the leading raisers of new chrys- 
anthemums a mutual interchange of 
views on the subject of judging seedlings 
occurred, which induces me to give some 
views on the subject. 

All growers, raisers and dealers in new 
chrysanthemums agree that something 
should be done by the national committee 
towards the formation of a tribunal to 
which all new varieties seeking honors 
should be sent. This would simplify mat- 
ters enormously. The standing com- 
mittees of the various horticultural soci- 
eties are not fully competent to deal with 
so important a matter, and the result is 
a great number of new varieties, in many 
respects similar, and often inferior to 
those already in cultivation, are yearly 
thrown on the market. I would suggest 
this matter for the consideration of the S. 
A. F. at their next meeting at Pittsburg, 
and I herewith enclose my views on the 
subject: 

A committee of five experts of national 
reputation should be selected, represent- 
ing the florist (grower and retailer), the 
gardener (professional and amateur), 
and the flower artist. There should be 
three meetings about the 20th of October, 
the 5th and 20th of November, at some 
central city likeBuffalo. Some competent 
man should be selected to superintend the 
arrangement of the exhibits, and put up 
those received from growers who could 
not attend. T. D. Hatfield. 



Sowing Pansy Seed. 

In the article on sowing pansy seed in 
the convention number, I think that 
Brother Scott was rather promptin pass- 
ing judgment on the process of mulching 
the seed beds, as I recommend to my cus- 
tomers, and if he could see my seed beds 
now, he would surely concur in my opin- 
ion. Last season, in August, under that 
process, in open field, I sowed 8 ounces of 
seed broadcast, and in ten weeks' time 
had sold 78,000 young plants from these 
two beds, each iSO feet long by 3 wide. 
This season I got in about two pounds of 
seed the same way, in the open field, as 
where in the world could I have had 
frames and sashes enough to do it all? 

I used formerly, as Mr. Scott suggests, 
drill in the seed in frames, but at a con- 
siderable expense of time and labor, as 
young plants grown so thickly together 
will require immediate attention, or else 
damp off or get drawn up, while under 
the mulching process, sown broadcast 



i8g4. 



The American Florist. 



117 





Pig. 1. 
NEMATODES IN BEGONIA LEAF. 



Fig. 2. 
LEAF SPOT OF BEGONIA, 



and thickly in open field, the plants can 
stay and grow for months without inter- 
fering with each other, till either sold or 
transplanted, and are also more stocky 
and hardier than when grown in frames. 

Seed is sown and mulched, as I recom- 
mend, requiring no further care than an 
occasional watering, which we do with 
cur hose sprinklers, connecting with my 
large t ank , and removing them every hour. 
Such a watering over the mulch will not 
beat the ground hard and keepthe ground 
moist for several days; at the end of two 
weeks the seed will be up, when I remove 
half the mulch with a fork, to give air 
and light to the seedlings, and in another 
two weeks the balance of the mulch is 
removed off with a wooden rake, and 
with occasional weeding, is about all the 
work required. Perhaps I was not ex- 
plicit enough in my advice on sowing, as 
I do not cover the seed at all, only brush 
it in lightly before pressing in. I half sus- 
pect that in several cases our friends 
covered the seed too thickly, and it smoth- 
ered some. 

I have, on the whole, congratulated 
myself in getting to use such an effective 
and expeditious way of raising pansy 
seedlings. Denys Zirngiebel. 



Begonia Diseases. 



The samples of diseased begonia leaves 
forwarded to me from your correspond- 
ent did not arrive in good condition, and 
I am not fully able to state just what the 
trouble is. There aretwo leading rtiseases 
of the leaves of the begonias, and photo- 
graphs of thtse are sent you for the pur- 
poses of engraving, for these troubles are 
sufficiently abundant and distinct as to 
warrant space being given to them. 

The first and, so far as my experience 
goes, most abundant trouble is the one 
shown in leaf number 1. This, unsightly 
and ruined leaf illustrates the inroadsdue 
to microscopic worms known as nema- 
todes or eel- worms. They thrive in great 
numbers in the loose moist tissues of the 
begonias, and when in the leaf cause large 
irregular blotches, which after becoming 
brown and lifeless fall awayard cause the 
ragged appearance as seen in figure 1. 

Many other plants of the greenhouse 



and open ground are troubled with the 
nematodes. In many cases they are con- 
fined to the roots, when knots and galls 
are produced. These may be met with 
among violets and more particularly with 
hot house roses, where they are a serious 
pest. Truck crops, as tomatoes, radishes 
and the like also suffer from the nema- 
todes at the roots. Among plants that 
are affected with these microscopic worms 
in the foliage may be mentioned the co- 
leus, bouvardias and pelargoniums. 
Buried as they are within the substance 
of the leaf there is very little use of spray- 
ing the foliage, and all diseased parts 
should on the other hand be removed and 
destroyed. 

The second form of begonia disease is 
due to fungous parasites, there being sev- 
eral that cause a spotting of the leaf 
in a manner shown in figure 2. Often the 
spots will be small and numerous, and 
again they are few and broad in extent. 
These fungi are like other leaf spot fungi, 
some of which have been treated of in the 
Florist. They can be controlled with- 
out doubt to some extent at least by us- 
ing the standard fungicides as sprays 
upon the foliage. 

The leaves received from you were of 
the second group, but, as before stated, 
were not in a good condition to deter- 
mine the species of fungus that had done 
the mischief. Byron D. Halsted. 

New Brunswick, N. J. 



Best Method of Wholesaling Cut Flowers. 

[Read be/ore the St. Louis Floinls' Club hv .Mr. 
C. IV. Hors.] 

The subject of this essay requires very 
careful consideration, and I ask of you 
your indulgence, as I have to write about 
as much in reference to the retailer as I have 
the wholesaler, sincerely hoping to offend 
none. 

I will speak firstly in regard to what 
the grower should expect from the com- 
mission man or wholesaler. First and 
foremost, a square and honest deal, that 
is, that every dollar of sales made bj' the 
commission man should be rightfully 
turned in to the grower, and if he cannot 
make honest returns for 15' u let him 
charge more. I maintain that if the 



grower ships good flowers a good salary 
can be earned ot ISSi, but if he sends 
poor flowers he should pay the commis- 
sion man a salary for handling the same. 
In my experience I have always found it 
easy to get rid of good flowers and very 
difficult and discouraging to get rid of 
poor ones.. 

Now in regard to the market and price 
of cut flowers: Flowers should be sold 
first and foremost according to their 
quality, no matter whether the market is 
glutted or not. Secondly, flowers should 
be sold according to supply and demand, 
whether it be summer or winter. It may 
seem strange, but nevertheless it appears 
to me that good roses should command a 
good price in summer, first because roses, 
especially good ones, are very scarce, and 
as people don't buy flowers in summer 
unless they really need them a good price 
can be obtained. And as a more uniform 
price can be given in summer to the grow- 
er, he can afford to sell his flowers at 
Christmas time cheaper and prevent the 
greatest detriment to our business, the 
uncalled for high prices during the Christ- 
mas season. 

If the growers could obtain better prices 
from October to June, I mean a better 
average price, they would be satisfied 
with a less price at holiday time. To 
illustrate this 1 may mention that in con- 
versation with a large grower over these 
high prices at Christmas he offered me his 
whole cut of roses for the season, includ- 
ing Beauties, at 3 cents each, so accord- 
ing to his own figures he could make 
money at these prices. Of course I could 
not handle his flowers in this manner 
and do justice to my other growers. He 
said that the average price received for 
his roses compelled the high prices at 
Christmas. Let the retailer help the 
wholesaler and grower out by keeping 
up prices, and instead of lowering the flo- 
rists' business to a jobbing standard let 
him elevate it, being assisted by the 
grower, who would stride to grow only 
flowers of the finest grade, and whose 
maxim should be quality and not quan- 
tity. 

The grower should, as I said before, 
grow flowers of the finest grade, but let 
him be paid for his trouble, let him know 



118 



The American Florist. 



Sept. 



Ws flowers are sought after because they 
are superior and at the same time let him 
have a few dollars extra for his trouble. 
Let him also ship his flowers and pack 
them carefully, many a dollar being lost 
to the grower onaccountof careless pack- 
ing, and many a rose on account of not 
being cut at the right stage or having 
been kept too long before shipping. There 
is also a very foolish custom at holiday 
time of holding back flowers which could 
have been sold at good prices had they 
been shipped, and which when they arrive 
are in a worthless condition, a total loss 
to the grower and a big disappointment 
to the wholesaler and retailer. 

Now I propose to read what 1 believe 
to be the very best way for a wholesaler 
to treat his regular buyers. I don't think 
it is right for the wholesaler to favor one 
customer more than another, but there 
are certain circumstances which should 
be considered by the dealer in conjunction 
with his shippers and buyers. In certain 
cases the retailer should get certain privi- 
leges from the wholesaler, and I shall en- 
deavor to explain these privileges to the 
best of my ability, and trust that if there 
are parties present who do not agree 
with me they will get up and declare 
themselves when this essay comes up for 
discussion. 

Now in regard to these privileges which 
I think should be given by the wholesaler 
to his regular buyers: When a grower 
ships his flowers to a commission man he 
takes the entire risk, and a big risk at 
that. He has already grown these flow- 
ers, risk number one, and number two 
when he ships them to be sold. When a 
wholesaler has a buyer who buys daily a 
certain number of each kind, and who 
daily lays in a stock of flowers for his 
store, these flowers not being ordered per- 
haps, he, the buyer, then takes his place 
with the grower, that is, the grower with 
whom he shares the risk. The buyer not 
having the floweis ordered stands a risk 
of losing these flowers; these buyers 
should receive a percentage off the marked 
figure, in preference to the buyer who 
only purchases when he has an order or 
when he receives a message through the 
telephone. The latter class of buyers do 
not require to make the profits that the 
florist does who shares with the grower 
the risk and buys his flowers without 
having an order tor the same on his file. 

Then again a buyer who pays his bill 
every week without a murmur and who 
does not rf quire you to wear out your 
shoe leather ought to receive considera- 
tion from the wholesaler, and I know 
that my shippers would be perfectly will- 
ing to get a little less for a certain sale 
than a larger price for an uncertain one, 
especially when the grower receives a 
weekly settlement. 

Now there is another matter which 
concerns the wholesaler, grower and re- 
tailer—the selling of job lots, or in other 
words, the selling of poor flowers at re- 
duced prices, my opinion being that the 
selling of job lots hurts both the retailer 
and the grower. If flowers were grown 
for quality only there would not be that 
glut of flowers; it appears to me it wou'd 
be better to give away a few flowers 
rather than lower prices. But if this job- 
bing must be done let it beconfined to the 
fakirs and to parties who do not confine 
their sales to flowers alone. 

Let every reputable florist stand up for 
his business; let him not bring his trade 
down to the level it has gradually been 
working to; let the grower grow a fine 
grade of flowers, and let the retailer get 
a fair price for the same, and then there 
will be good times for the florists again. 



Why, to thinkof the energies of our flower 
loving growers, who have spent their 
lives in trying to beautify and improve 
by cultivation the work of nature, and 
then to see their work brought down and 
men who handle flowers care so little 
about it that they lower their standard 
by making sales of flowers at the level of 
other commodities. Let all the florists 
work together to elevate the trade, and 
by doing this they will help themselves 
and help the grower. 



Worms Attacking Cannas. 

We are very anxious to know if there is 
a remedy for the worms which are so 
very destructive to the beautiful foliage 
of our cannas. We notice two kinds. 
One is a small worm at first which is con- 
cealed under the edge of the leaf and 
which soon grows to be a very large 
worm. The other is apparently the cat- 
erpillar. Is there anything to destroy 
them ? J. M. Connelly. 

Charleston, S. C. 

The above inquiry was referred to Mr. 
F. R. Pierson, Tarrytown, N. Y., who 
replies as follows : 

"Your inquiry in reference to worms at 
hand. I have never known any kind of 
worm to attack foliage of cannas and 
cannot give you the information. It 
must be a caterpillar indigenous to the 
south, as nothing of the kind attacks 
cannas in this section, and have never 
seen the foliage marred in any way. 
From Mr. Connelly's description I should 
presume it was of the caterpillar order. 
Any insect that eats the leaves can be 
easily held in check by insecticides; would 
recommend Paris green or something of 
that nature." 



Chicago. 

Our handful of pilgrims to the conven- 
tion has returned in a most enthusiastic 
frame of mind. Every member is loud in 
his praises of eastern hospitality, and all 
are agreed to have had a most enjoyable 
trip, and a royal good time generally. 
This is rather tantahzing to the "staj'at- 
homes," and makes them feel more blue 
than ever. With the majority, as is well 
known, it was through no lack of interest 
which kept them at home, but with them 
it was simply Hobson's choice. The 
annual resolution regularly made, and as 
regularly broken soon after, is now on 
the program. To put by the sum of 50 
cents every day from now until the next 
convention day arrives seems an easy 
way of accumulating the necessary funds 
for the purpose. A number of the boys 
stick to this resolution religiously for three 
or four months, but alas, that is often the 
limit. 

The aquatics at Lincoln Park are look- 
ing very fine. The ponds as viewed at 
present are worth a visit from all lovers 
of this class of plants. That the display 
is appreciated by the general public is 
well demonstrated by the admiring thou- 
sands who daily throng this section of 
the park. The most showy varieties at 
present are Xymphaea D^voniensis, and 
several other red varieties, notably N. 
Sturtevantii and X. rubra. X.zarzibaren- 
sis azurea is also in fine bloom. N. gigan- 
tea shows but two open flowers, but 
these are superb. X. dentata and N. 
sculifalia are also in fine bloom. TheMar- 
liacea section is well represented, and 
all the plants are well flowered. The 
nelumbiums are still in bloom, but a trifle 
past their best. The two specimens of 
Victorias may be seen with an open flower 
apiece each day. 



The flower beds are now in fine shape. 
Among the most striking objects in this 
line is the gorgeous display of cannas. 
The perennial borders are brilliant with 
color, and never looked better. Phlox a 
little past, is still very showy, but among 
the most efiective at this season of the 
year are our own native prairie flowers. 
There is a large variety of them, notably 
such forms as helianthus, silphiums. 
Lobelia cardinalis, lythrus, asters and 
many others. It is rather amusing to 
listen to someof thecommentsmadeupon 
these flowers by some of the visitors. We 
noticed the other day a couple of gentle- 
men admiring a group of Lythrus superba. 
One of the gentlemen, a well known resi- 
dent of the north side (Lake View) was 
heard to make the remark: "What a re- 
markable plant! must be something new, 
as I have never seen it here before; looks 
to me like a tropical plant." Now this 
gentleman has resided in Lake View for 
many years, andhemightfindeventoday 
within a couple of blocks of his residence 
a number of vacant lots that are covered 
with this flower. But what might besaid 
of this lythrus equally applies to many 
other varieties. Ninety-nine native born 
Chicagoans will admire these flowers 
when seen grown in our parks, but when 
met growing wild in the fields will pass 
them by as common prairie weeds. 

The flower market is- very quiet, and 
prices rule at last week's quotation— qual- 
ity continues to improve. 

Harry Mann and bride, of Lansing, 
Mich., spent a few days in the city on 
their way to Honolulu, Hawaii, where 
they will make an extended visit. 



Indianapolis. 



The August meeting of the Indianapolis 
Florists' Club was held at the club rooms 
Wednesday, August 1. The attendance 
was good in anticipation of the superin- 
tendent of Crown Hill Cemetery, Mr. 
Chislett, being present. He did not come, 
however, but excused himself and invited 
a committee to meet him at the cemetery 
most any time. This proposition was 
accepted and the secretary instructed to 
call the committee together at a proper 
time. A memorial written by the ap- 
pointed committee, which was to report 
at this meeting, was presented and ac- 
cepted without a dissenting voice. It sets 
forth that it is not the purpose of the 
Florists' Club to fight against the pro- 
posed exclusion of flowers and plants at 
the cemetery from a pecuniary purpose, 
but principally for the fact that should 
the new rule be enforced the sentiment of 
the general public would be changed 
against flowers in parks and other places. 
Cemetery work in general is not profita- 
ble to manv florists, but they would not 
like to see flowers excluded from the cem- 
eteries. Many well pointed paragraphs 
were included in the memorial; the same 
will be handed to the trustees of Crown 
Hill Cemetery and also to the Ministerial 
Association of this city. As this impor- 
tant matter took up a good deal of time 
the meeting adjourned. 

Mr. Chas. Wheatcroft has added one 
house 88x18 for roses, and also has an- 
other house the same size under way. 

Welcome rain fell to the depth of two 
inches August 10, but it also brought 
along a fall of hail, but only in the west- 
ern part of this county; while quite 
heavy it did no damage. 

Mr. A. Wiegand reports having had a 
very pleasant time traveling through Cal- 
ifornia and the northwest. He thinks in 
general the greenhouse establishments he 



i8()4- 



The American Florist. 



119 



has visited are not up to the times; they 
should receive more attention. 

The writer returned from a pleasant 
two weeks' vacation to Elkhart Lake, 
Wis., a small but beautifully located lake 
encircled by a great variety of small and 
large evergreens and other trees. Arbor- 
vitas grows here in great abundance, 
some extra large specimens seemingly be- 
ing very old, and they certainly must be. 
Wild flowers, ferns and native varieties 
of orchids grow in abundance in the sur- 
rounding country; the drouth this sea- 
son there, however, has cut everything 
short and permits walks through the 
swamps on soft beds of sphagnum. 

The following appears at the head of 
many cut flower commission billheads: 

PLEASE NOTICE.— These flowers were fresh 
and CAKEFULLY PACKED to reach you in good 
CONDITION and shipped as directed on time. We 
are not responsible il they do not reach you on 
time, or in good condition as we do not regulate 
the RAILROADS Or the WE.\TiiER. A loss resulting 
from the above will not be enteitaiued by us. 

This does not seem to be just the thing; 
when one lot arrives in first-class shape 
another lot is shipped probably the next 
day under the same conditions as to 
weather, packing, etc., but comes in such 
poor shape that they fall to pieces or are 
black from handling. Does this not seem 
to suggest it is is old stock kept from the 
day before or longer? A retailer when 
charged by a customer with having deliv- 
ered shaky flowers in most cases can 
only replace flowers or money or lose the 
the customer. Of course there are excep- 
tions when complaints are too regular or 
when there is sign of fraud, 

A communication from Cleveland ap- 
peared in your issue of July 26 headed 
"Look out for him." The samefellow has 
worked his game successfully in this town, 
claiming to be the patentee and sole 
agent for the wooden hose coupling. He 
wanted to establish an agency in this 
city and state. From samples he carried 
with him he sold sevtral large bills to 
breweries and jobbing houses. He ex- 
pected the goods every day, but claimed 
on account of the strike he could not get 
them. The writer, knowing him to have 
sold these couplings for many years, and 
it really being a good selling article, be- 
lieved him and advanced him some cash 
and flowers: he also managed to get cash 
from a brewing company. Of course the 
hotel is loser also, but they have his 
trunks and belongings. He had a woman 
claiming to be his wife with him. His 
name is J. J. Vanjulay, is forty years old, 
weighs 142 pounds, about 5 feet 5 inches 
tall, sandy hair, darker bushy mustache, 
wears gold spectacles, rather inflamed 
eyes which he wipes frequently, talks con- 
siderably broken English with German 
accent, claims to have been very rich at 
one time in the old country, and knew 
every prominent florist in this country. 
The fellow should be run down. 

John Hartje, our young fisherman flo- 
rist, is adding a house 140x12, to be 
planted with his new carnations. 

It is proposed to change the name of 
the local club to the Indianapolis Flori- 
culture Society. 

The Indiana Horticultural Society held 
summer meeting and exhibition at New 
Amsterdam, Ind., on August 22 and 23. 

W. B. 



Toronto. 



Not a drop of rain yet. The drouth is 
getting serious, especially to those who 
are outside the city limits, and who can- 
not make water flow by just a simple 
twist of the wrist. But the nights are 
lengthening, the days are not overpower- 



ingly hot, and there are heavy dews, so 
that to speak figuratively "the wind is 
tempered for the shorn lamb." The beds 
in the parks and gardens don't appear to 
have suffered much yet, and are looking 
especially fane just now. Some large sub- 
tropical beds I saw in Reservoir Park to- 
day have grown most luxuriantly; they 
are tastefully planted and are remarkably 
effective. The deep ravine with wooded 
banks and gurgling streamlet make this 
park the most charming in the city, and 
Mr. Reeves, the superintendent, is increas- 
ing its beauty every year. 

The lily pond at the Central Prison 
grounds is a sight to behold and not for- 
get just now; the size. of the blooms is 
something immense, I am afraid to give 
dimensions. Victoria Randi is growing 
well and will flower if the weather keeps 
warm two or three weeks longer. 

The tuberous begonia beds at Exhibi- 
tion park are looking very well now, and 
are flowering freely. A bed of these is 
very pretty and effective when all the 
plants do well, but I doubt if they will 
ever be quite a success as a bedding plant 
in this climate. 

The Gardeners' and Florists' Associa- 
tion held its regular monthly meeting 
Tuesday, August 21; it wasnot very well 
attended. "Public Institutions" occupied 
most of the time, and it issafe to say that 
if the views of one or two of the members 
were followed out to their logical conclu- 
sion the association would soon be re- 
duced to its original fragments. Broader 
and more fraternal views will, however, 
no doubt prevail, and such a calamity 
need not be looked for. 

Mr. H. Slight is still at his old stand on 
Yonge street. How the business was 
arranged has not transpired as yet. 

As we cannot go to Atlantic City we 
are having as much fun as we can at 
home; another cricket match was played 
between the east and west end gardeners 
and florists at the Exhibition grounds, 
and those of the boys who went up there 
spent a most enjoyable afternoon. 

Trade is very, very quiet and what 
flowers are coming in cannot be called 
first-class; there will not be much doing 
until the frost comes. E. 



Cincinnati. 



The regular monthly meeting of the 
Cincinnati Florists' Society was not held 
this month, owing to the extremely warm 
weather and the absence of one or two of 
the officers, who are still out of the city. 

The long looked lor and much needed 
rain has come at last and has gladdened 
the hearts of the florists. A great deal of 
outdoor stuff has suffered for the want of 
water. We hope now the rain famine is 
a thing of the past. 

There has been no change in business. 
It is still dull, very dull, and were it not 
for funeral work there would be nothing 
going on at all. Roses have been more 
plentiful this week than for some time 
past, and the demand very light. More 
roses have been cut right here at home 
than could possibly be disposed of, and 
still outsiders are consigning stock to the 
wholesalers, and consequently the returns 
are very small. 

Mr. Chas. J. Getz has greatly improved 
his carnation bouses by putting in a new 
water system, which will save a great 
deal of work, water and hose. His car- 
nations are in excellent condition. 

Mr. John Lambert of Norwood has just 
completed four new houses 10x60. 

Mr. Max Rudolph of 12th street is re-' 
modeling his store. When it is completed 
it will be twice as large as his old one 



and will be one of the finest in the north 
end of the city. 

Nothing especially new to report re- 
garding the cut flower business of our 
city. August 28 about 1 p. m. the writer 
happened in at oneofour4thstreet stores 
and casually asked if the passing of the 
tariflf bill had caused any difference. The 
florist immediately spoke up and said, 
"You bet your life; I just took an order 
for an $S design." But taking the last 
three months into consideration the gen- 
eral report from our store men is that 
they have never passed through such a 
dull summer. 

The florists attending the S. A. P. con- 
vention at Atlantic City all returned Sun- 
day feeling good with the exception of 
Wm. Murphy, who was unwell on his 
return.' 

Richard Witterstaetter is building a 
new greenhouse 80x17, short span to the 
south, for the purpose of growing seed- 
ling carnations. Richard already has 
some prize winners, and more coming. 
Most of our carnation growers have com- 
menced lifting their carnations and get- 
ting ready for fall trade. The recent 
■rains have helped our florists out mate- 
riallv. 

Jas. R. Galdman and F. Howard Felter 
of Middletown, 0., are building four new 
greenhouses. They expect to grow a 
general retail stock. Onepeculiar feature 
of this firm is that tliev are both mutes. 

Mr. E. G. Hillof Richmond. called on us 
yesterday; his health is greatly improved, 
which his host of friends will be glad to 
know. G. 



Worcester, Mass. 



AntirrhinuiLS, German stocks and pinks 
(all kinds) was the schedule for the 
weekly exhibition August 9, and in these 
classes very fair displays were made. The 
premiums were awarded as follows: 

Antirrhinums— first, T. H. Record; sec- 
ond, F. A. Blake. German stocks— first, 
F. A. Blake; second J. A. Abbott. Pinks 
—first, S. H. Record; second, F. H. Merri- 
field. A. A. Hixon and H. A. Jones each 
showed a splendid table of sweet peas 
and F. A. Blake a vase of Lilium Harrisii 
that were very fine. Several good stands 
of cut flowers were exhibited, those shown 
by H. M. Chace, S. E. Fisher and S. H. 
Record being especially good. 

A. I/awrence brought up a rather queer 
freak, a fungus, weighing 8^4 pounds, 
which he found in a swamp. 

Trade runs along about the same; noth- 
ing very interesting to note. Weather 
cool and every thing suffering from drouth, 
carnations suffering most severely; chrys- 
anthemums looking well. 

The aster show August 23 was a suc- 
cess; good asters in all classes except the 
pompon, and enough entries to make it 
interesting; also good exhibits of gladio- 
lus ( Lemoine's hybrids) and perennial 
phlox. Following are the premiums 
awarded: 

Asters— Rose, first F. P. Alexander, second H. 
B. Watts; Comet, first J. A. Abbott, second Mrs. 
E. C. Brooks; Victoria, first F. P. Alexander, sec- 
ond C. E. Parker; Pompon, no first awarded, sec- 
ond T. H. Record; Truffaut. first Mrs. E. C. 
Brooks, second W. J. Wood; vase, one color, first 
H. F. A. Lange, second Mrs. Samuel Overend. 
Gladiolus, first H. B. Watts, second F. A. Blake; 
phlox, first Grace T. Johnson, second Mrs. Thomas 
Ward. 

Seedling. 



Whenever you want anything per- 
taining to the trade, and do not find it 
offered in our advertising columns, write 
to us and we will take pleasure in assist- 
ing you to find what you want. 



120 



The American Florist. 



Sept. /, 



Recoj^ Rofe^. 



Mr. E. V. Low, of Hugh Low & Co., 
London, will visit this country next 
month. 

Dunkirk, N. Y.— T. F. Van der Meulen 
is adding new glass for carnations and 
violets. 

Providence, R. I.— Edmond J. John- 
ston will continue the business of his 
father, the late Robert Johnston. 

Louisville, Ky.— C. Neuner, of Nanz & 
Neuner, left August 21 for California and 
Oregon, to be gone several months, 

HoPKiNToN, Mass.— W. & M. Cheney 
have purchased the florist business of L. 
L. Woolson and will remove it to Bare 
Hill. 

New York.— The firm of MilJang Bros., 
wholesale florists, has been dissolved by 
mutual consent, and the business will be 
continued by Mr. Frank Millang under 
his own name. 

Easton, Pa.— Wm. F. Keller has re- 
moved to 227 Northampton street, where 
he has more commodious and finer quar- 
ters. He now has a handsome salesroom, 
large basement, and an ar'ditional room 
for storage of supplies. 

Peoria, III.— Jos. M. Cole, who has 
been in business here for the last eight 
years, has sold his entire business to Cole 
Bros., who moved into his store on Au- 
gust 1 and have combined his with their 
extensive stock. Trade here these hot 
days is as dull as it can get; if it was not 
for a little funeral work the florists could 
close their stores. 

Hudson, Mich.— The dry hot weather 
has cooked everytbingexcept where water 
has been very freely used. Most of the 
beds in town have suffered, but a few are 
looking very fine. The recent cold weather, 
which ended in a frost that killed corn 
and potatoes on low ground, made us 
think that fall was coming:, but we have 
changed our minds now. C. H, Peck, our 
city florist, has purchased five acres of 
land just over the corporation line west 
of the city, and is now moving his entire 
greenhouses to his newlocation. He will 
add one new house of 1000 feet of glass, 
to his greenhouses, for carnations. The 
houses will all be heated by steam. 

SITUATIONS, WANTS. FOR SALE. 



AdvertlsementH under this head will be inserted at 
the rate of 10 cents a line (seven words) each inser- 
tion. Cash must accompany order. Plant advs. not 
admitted under this head. 

Situation VVANTED-Astloria. by married man. 
State wajjes. Address 

J. Lee. H2T Oak St . Kalamazoo. MItli. 

SITUATION WANTED-By a pood all round man; 
yj can take lull eharne: married, no children. Ad- 
dress A C B. care American Florist 

SITUATION WANTFI>-By first-class Hoil&t; Ger- 
man; in years' experience. Bent of references. 
Private or commercial place. 

FUANK Otto, Oconomowoc. Wis. 

^JITUATION WANT?:D-ey competent. hlnKletlorlst 
tj and tjurdener; well posted. Please kIvc full par- 
ticulars In unwwfr. Adoress 

Wm. B. K,. T'.'ti spring Garden St,. Phila,. Pa. 

SITUATION WANTED-By younji man: have had 
O .» years' experience in the trade; am sinylo: can 
furnish Kood references If desired. West ol the Mis- 
sissippi river preferred. Address 

Wi-:sT, care American Florist. 

urJ'I'ATloN WANTKO-By M-uMt'tJermnn gardener 
n with 8 yeiirs' exp-rtence in (iermanv and America, 
wishes a jjusltion wiiere he can lenrh llie EnKllHli 
iariKuaKC. Address .Iuhn Sen n em.. 

care Dr. Voje. Oconomowoc. Wis. 

SlTl'ATION WANTF>D-Hj younijiriuM with s years" 
experience in «rowin(ij cut flowers and a Kerieral 
line of plants. First-class deslKncr and decorator. 
Uest of references. Address 

C B K. 817 N. Vermilion St., Danville. III. 



QITUATION WANTED-By thorough, practical fiar- 
O dener and florist. No. 1 rose grower; commercial 
or gentleman's private place; carnations, violets a 
specialty: best references. Address 

H G. P. O. Box S8, Brooklyn Village. Ohio. 

SITUATION WANTED— By a young married man. 
age 32, as grower of roses, carnations, chrysanthe- 
mums, palms and ferns, etc. ; can assume all responsi- 
bility if desired; 5 years in last place. Address 

Grower. 38o Adams St.. Grand Rapids. Mich. 

SITUATION WANTED-By tiorist; age 24. German; 
O 9 years' experience In roses, carnations and choice 
cut flowers: a:so pot plants. Best of references. 
Please make known offer at once. Address 
FR. N. QriCKERT. care Selby Myers. St. Joseph, Mo. 

SITUATION WANTED-Mlddle of September by a 
_ German. 'iit. as greenhouse assistant; well up in 
growing cut flowers. Roses a specialty. Can lake 
charge of a small commercial place. East preferred 
(Philadelphia). Address BE. care Am. Florist. 

QITUATION WANTED— As foreman, by an expert 
kj in roses, carnaiions. violets, bulb forcing, etc. AI 
orchid, palm and fern grower. Thoroughly posted in 
all the different departments of the trade, in or out- 
door. Address Postoffice box 75, 

Short Hills. N.J. 

SITUATION WANTED— As foreman and grower in 
a medium tlzed commercial place, where cut 
flowers, stove and bedding plants are grown. Good 
references: 5 years in this country; speaks German 
and English. Address S, 

Short Hills Postoffice. N. J. 

QITUATION WANTED— As assistant in flrst-olass 
O wholesale or retail place, by young florist: H years' 
experience; good all-round flori»t: sober. Industrious, 
reliable, and not afraid to work. Al references. 
State wages. Address 

ASSISTANT, care American Florist. 

QITUATION WANTED-By practical flortst. li'ghly 
lO recommended, for experience and executive 
ability in the general requisites of commercial or pri- 
vate place, the nurseries, general propagation, etc., 
where such is needed. For particulars address 

Brooklyn, care American Florist. 

QITUATION WANTED-As assistant in greenhouses 
O or store, by young American, single: used lo flrst- 
c ass retail.trade. Experienced in general greenhouse 
work and management; practical, reliable worker. 
Good salesman. Abstainer. Good references. Ad- 
dress E P P. care American Florist. 

QITUATION WANTED-By a single man. age 'iti. a 
Vj good all-round man. to take charge of a commer- 
cial place or city store, and if necessary can take 
charge of books and correspondence; southern states 
preferred; fi st-ctass references furnished. Address 
M C. care The C A. Dahl Co , Atlanta, Georgia. 

QITUATION WANTED— By a young man OS working 
O foreman In a commercial place: quick, sober, and 
reliable; a good all-round man. where strict attention 
to business is appreciated. A good designer and 
maker-up for ctty store. If nece-sary can take cliarge 
of books and correspondence. Best of references fur- 
nished. Southern States preferred. Address with all 
particulars to Chas. Moss. 

•131 Mississippi Ave , Memphis. Tenn. 

TXTANTED— Girdener and florist for private green- 
\ T house and grounds. Address 

J. C. Easton, La Crosse, Wis. 

"WfANTED TO RENT— About 500U feet of glass In a 
) T good town west of Chicago. Address 

ACE, care American Florist, Chicago. 

WANTE D— At once, apslstant in private green- 
houses: German, with fome experience pre- 
ftrred. Salary $40 per month without board. Address 
H A. care American Florist. 

"\^TANTEI) In private phu-i-, u cai»al)h'. single man 
\y nf gni)(l iiiihits. to take rlmrge nf onnservatory, 
lawn and vegetable garden, (icrman preferred. Ad- 
dress Mrs. G. W. Barnes, 

2it3ii ColUngwood Ave.. Toledo, Ohio. 

ITT'ANTED- Sober, Industrious man, one who under- 
TT stands growing potato plants, etc . as well as 
flowers, and can take and execute orders as given 
willingly. Will make contract on shares or forsaiary. 
Write fully your expectations Address S S, 

care Frith \ Uangliom. Nashville. Tenn. 

TArANTED— A young man experienced in growing 
T T roses, carnations and a general stock, also good 
designer and decorator; must liave A No. 1 references 
and not afraid of work; one with a small capital pre- 
ferred: onecnpttbleot taking entire charge. Chance 
of a lifetime for right man. Address 

Pal.ms. care American Florist, 



F 



OR SALE CHEAP— Large second-hand florlBt'e Ice 
Box. value about $75. Vaitghax's Seed Store, 
88 State Street, Chicago. 

pOR SALE— Small tiorist husines In one of the best 
' locations of the South Side. Chleauo- Address 
A B. care American Florist. 



F 



OK SALB-Double "Florida" steam holler No. (W; 
good as new; a great bargain. Address 

A. S. Ewi.NC. Chllllcoilie. Ohio. 



■|i"'OR SALE OR RKNT-Geenliouse, 2t]llO square ft. 
Jj glass. For particulars Inquire ot 

TiiEo NoEHLE (ireen Bny. wis. 

FOR SALE CHEAP- A Hrst-clast florist business in 
a thriving town of 2;i.li00 Inliabltants For partic- 
ulars address WiSCiJNSiN, care Am. Florist. 

FOR SALE CHEAP— Large, new liard wood and 
glass florists Refrigerator. Used at World's Fair. 
Price reduced to $17.0. vaitohan's Seed Store, 
Ut; & us West Washington St.. ChlcaKO. 



FOR SALE— No. 5 Scollay boiler, used only 8 winters 
all In good condition; reason for selling, having 
put In 40-horse steam boiler: price on application. 

J. E. FELTHot'SEN. Sclienectady, N. Y. 

FOR SALE^Complete file Am. Flortst, 9 Vols., 5 
bound and 1 binder; also 1 lU-H. P. upright boiler. 
1.000 feet I-inch pipe.'JOU 8x6 sashes. 1,200 lUxI2 lights of 
glass. WM. n. BARNES. 

Box 843. Independence. Kans. 

FOR RENT— The premises occupied by the late R. 
J. Purvis, gardener and florist at Edgewater. Mr. 
Purvis lived there for 2U years, had built himself up a 
large and flourishing trade, which Is still open lo his 
successor, in one of the most flourishing and growing 
districts In Cook county, or perhaps in ihe State. For 
particulars Inquire of Robert Pi'RVis, 

10;io Ridge Ave., Edgewater, Cook Co.. 111. 



SEED TRADE. 

WANTED, for a San Francisco Seed House, a thor- 
oughly experienced counter man. with some knowl- 
edge of plants; willing to travel occasionally. Address 
stating age. experience, and salary expected. 

O. care American Florist. Chicago. 



Wholesale and retail ornamental nursery 
and greenhouses, in the best residence city 
of Southern California. Fine business loca- 
tion and complete stock, fixtures, etc. A 
rare opening for the right man with moder- 
ate capital For particulars address 

"California," care Am. Florist. 

FOR SALE. 

Six (6) greenhouses, two hot water boilers, 
sbout 2000 feet 2-inch wrought iron pipe, 
valves, etc., lot of hotbed sash, frames, 
benches and about 35,000 flower pots. The 
entire plant will be sold at a very low cash 
price, as the whole must be removed off the 
premises before Sept. 1st. For particulars 
address l. R. MUNN, Station C, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

FRITZ KLEIN. 

Who can give me any information in regard to 
Fritz Klein, gardener, of Naurod, near Wies- 
baden, Germany? The last was heard of him at 
Boston in the year 1873; since then he was not 
heard of. Information about him will kindly be 
sent to. 

MR. F. SEULBERGER. Seedsman and Florist. 

509. 511 & 513 Seventh St., Oakland, Cal. 

NOVELTY. 

New, Semi-Double, Large 
Flowering 

WHITE MARGUERITE 

(Clirysantlieuium frutescens.) 

Size of flowers 4 inches in diameter, petals 
clear white, center yellow. 

PRICES FOR PLANTS FROM 2'i-INCH POTS, 
$2.50 PER DOZEN; $20 PER 100. 

Ready September 1. Cash tvHh order. 

GRftLLtRT & GO., Florists, 

COLMA. San Mateo Co.. CALIFORNIA. 

Smilax Plants Cheap. 

Out of 2 and 3-inch pots, also transplanted plants 
out of boxes. Never had as fine and large stock 
before. Please state number you desire and I will 
give you the lowest prices. Safe delivery and 
best satisfaction guaranteed with every shipment. 
Sample order 10 cts. Terms strictly cash. 

Address FRED SCHNEIDER. Wholesale Florist. 

Wyoming Co., ATTICA, N. Y. 

YOUNG PALMS FOR FLORISTS' USE 

CHEAP TO MAKE KOOIVI. 

Size pots. UeiKlit. Per 100 

Kentla Belmoreann ii-lnch 12 to IS In. S?iO OO 

Korsterlana. ... :)-lnch 12 to 30 In. 20. 0(1-3.5. OO 

ArecllBiiueri H-lnch l.Sto341n. 2.'i.00 

Seaforthiii elBKans :Hncli 18 to 24 In. 20.00 

Pboenlx recltnutii ii-lnch S to 10 In. 20.00 

PanUiinua utllis 2M,-ln. StoIOln. l.'j.OO 

All stock Is In healthy condition and ready for 

shlftlnKon. .'.0 at 100 rates. 

MENDENHALL GREENHOUSES, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Always mention the American Flo- 
rist when writing to advertisers. 



i894- 



The American Florist. 



121 



1000 MKKMETS, 6n0 NIPHKTOS, 
1000 BRIDES, 160 TESTOUTS. 

AH from 2W-lncli standard pots. These are in the 
very best of condition and as large as a great deal of 
the stock shipped from 3-lnch pota. 

Per doz. 75c.: per 100 $5.0b: per 1000 $45.00. 

|3^SampIes free to intending purchasera. 

Pandanus Utilis. 

6-incli pots $5 00 per dozen 

5-inch pots 3 o i per dozen 

4-inch pots 2.00 per dozen 

Cyperus Alternifolius. 

3>4-\nch pots, per doz. 75c; per 100 |6 
2yi-mc\\ pots, " 60c; " $4 
2-inch pots, " 40c; " |3 

Grevillea Robusta. 

3-inch pots, 10 to 15 inches high, per 

dozen jSl.OO; per 100 18 00 

2^-inch pots, " 65c; " $4.00 

NATHAN SMITH & SON. 

DnOCO Extra Cheap 

KUOloi to make room. 

We will offer for the NEXT FEW WEEKS some 
of the best Roses in cultivation. 

Sunsets, \ 

Niphelos, m 

Duchess of Albany, ^ 
La France, I p , a^-inch 

Sru".""!^*' IT \ pots, $3 50. 

White La France, \^ v '^^ 

?'■'•'*»' / From 3-inch 

Bridesmaid, I 

Paries, « 

Uirich Brunner, * 

Am. Beauties, 2;^-in. |5.00; 3-in. $6.00. 

Satisfaction guaranteed. Wholesale Catalogue 
Free. 

Address NANZ & NEUNER. 

LOUISVILLE. KY. 

Watch this Space ! 

We wiii quote 
SOiWETHING GOOD 
in (he near future. 

We sell only to thn trade 
at Wholesale Prices. 

Better not let your 
customers read your 
Florists' Trade Papers. 

S. O. STREBY, 

Lock Box 77, 
UPPER SANDUSKY. OHIO. 

Mermets, Cusius Wattevilles, Hoste, Meteor and 

La France. $3.00 per 100. 
Strong American Beauties, $5.00 per 100; $40.00 per 

1000. 500 at 1000 rates. 
.fl^Special prices on quantity. Let me price your 

lists. Cash with order. 

West Forest Park, St. Louis. Mo. 

Hybrid Perpetual Roses, 

Worked low on the Manettl Stock, offer the ijest re- 
sults to the florist, blooming; freely and giving plenty of 
DuttlngB for propagating quickly. Fine plants for Bale 
by the lOU or lOOtl, at low rates. 
Price Ll8t8 to applicants. Address 

WILLIAM H. SPOONER, 

JAMAICA PLAIN, (Boston). MASS. 

Always mention the American Flo- 
rist when writing to advertisers. 




R oses for WMm F lowerin g. 

We still have fine stocks of the leading varieties, 

AMERICAN BEAUTY, 

KAISERIN AUGUSTA VICTORIA 

AND BRIDESMAID, 

strong plants, out of .3J<-inch pots, ready for immediate 
planting, $12. OO per 100. 

METEOR, BRIDE, MERMET, MME. CUSIN, 
NIPHETOS, WOOTTON and PERLE, 

Strong plants, out of SJ^s-inch pots, ready for immediate 
plautiug, $9.00 per 100. 

CupHwardedusforMeteorRosea.exhlblted il 111 riLriuUll UUIfirHlllj 

Madison Square Garden. 1892. for best 25 TAitB^uffnMan nn Unricnn M V 

Red Koses of any variety TarrylOWn-On-tluaSOn, II. T- 

Mentlon American Florist. 

Roses. Roses. Roses. 

Perle, Niphetos, Mermet, Bride, Victoria, Meteor, La France, Albany, Gontier, 

White La France, Soupert and Bridesmaid, 2 1-2 inch pots, 

§5.00; 3-inch pots, §6.00 per hundred. 

AMERICAN BEAUTY, 2 1-2 inch, §6.00; 3-inch, §8.00 per hundred. 

THIS STOCK IS WEI-L OROWX AND IN FINE CONDITION. 

ESTATE OF M. A. HUNT, Terre Haute, Ind. 

10,000 FIRST QUftLlTY FORGING ROSES. 



Silver 
at 



Fully eciual to those sent out the last two years, and perfectly healthy In every respect, 
growth from flowering wood used for propagating. 
KAISERIN A. V. MERMETS, BRIDESMAID, 

METEOR, SAFRANO, PERLE. _^ 

SUNSETS. LA FRANCE. BON SILENE, 

3-lnch pots, Sri.OO per 100. 4-lnch pots, fS.OO per 100. 



Only selected 

MME. HOSTE, 
BRIDES, 
MME. CUSIN, 



J. I^. II»IIvI-^03V, ;^lc»o«:»nst>v»rg:, r»«a. 



AMERICAN BEAUTY, Jlrl^lfSrel'^et, I CARNATIONS. ^ ,^ , 

Cusin, La France, strong, 4-tnch'plant8. I All the New and <ild sorts. 

MARIE LOUISE VIOLETS, pot grown. ;3"Plea8e write for prices. 



ROSES#CHRYSANTHEMUMS 

PERLES, 4-inch, strong, J7.00 per 100 
MERMETS, 4-in. " 7.00 

The atmve are strong plants, from 4-Inch pots, 
not thrown in 3-lnch and sold for 4-iuch. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS: perioo 

Golden Wedding and Good Gracious, 

2'4-inch, strong plants (a jfS.OO 

Other choice cut tlower varieties (a: 3.00 

FERNS, Adiantum ouneatum and other 
good varieties tor cutting, frorn 
4-inch pots, ready to shift (<(' 10.00 

REX BEGONIAS, 3-inch pots fi 5.00 

EVENDEN BROS. 3 

Williamsport, Pa. 



SUNSETS. 

PERLES. 

METEOR. 



Surplus stock; clean, lieaithy plants, from ■^. 'J'^ and 

;vlncli pots. 

PERLB. SUNSET. NlHUETdS. BRIDK. MERMET. 

M. NIEL. AMERICAN BKAVTV. LA FRANCE. 

ALBANY. THE ylEEN. MME. WATTE- 

VU.I.E. and GCILLOT 

Fred. Doriier, l^'red. Heinl and Victor Pelar- 

^foniums. Samples free to Intendhig purchasers. 

and the very lowest prices on application. 

JOSEPH HEINL, Jacksoiiville, IQ- 

Do vou WANT Mr. Scott's seasonable 
hints for the year in book form, so that 
you can refer readily to his suggestions 
for any week in the year? You will find 
them in this form in our trade directory 
and reference book for 1894. Price $2.00. 



clean, hcallliy stocii 
MERMETS. BRIDES. 

NIPHETOS. LA FRANCE, 

MME. WATTEVILLE. BON SILENE. 

PAPA GONTIER. 
Strong plants, from :Mnch pots. J>^ per lUi: $7.t per 1000. 

WOOD BROTHERS, Fishklll, N. Y. 



R08E8BNDGSRNSTI0N8 

MERMETS, BRIDES, BEAUTIES, 

PERLES, WATTEVILLE, METEOR, 

and WABAN. 

Clean, healthy stock, from 3^-inch pots, 86.00 

per 100; $45.00 per 1000. 

25.000 FIELD-GROWN CARNATIONS, fine, healthy 
stock. Send for list of varieties and prices. 

FERNS— Adiantum cunealum, 2i.^inch pots, $3.00 

per 100; from -l-inch pots. $6.00 per 100. 
Ferns in fine assorted varieties, same price. 

JAMES HORAN, Bridgeport, Conn. 



2'«,-lnch pots. Per 100 Per 1000 

BRIDE .'. K.5U m.m 

MERMET 3.&0 22.o0 

GONTIER 2.60 22.50 

SOUPERT 2.50 22.50 

WHITE LA FRANCE 2.75 24.00 

SUNSET. PERLE 2.S0 25.00 

And all other standard varieties. 2)^. m and 4i^-lncn 
pots. Write for prices on what you need. 

TEKMS CASH WITH URDEIl. 
THE NATIONAL PLANT CO., Daytou, O. 

leOSE^S. Good stock. 

AM. BEAUTY PLANTS, 4-inch $70.00 

BRIDESMAIDS, BRIDES, PERLES, 
MERMETS, a'l 3'4-inch $45.00 



BRANT & NOE, 

Forest Olon. ] 



or 



L. M. NOE, 

Madison. X. J. 



ROSES. 



ROSES. ROSES. 



SURPLUS STOCK CHEAP, consisting of Brides. 
Mermets. Meteor, Bon, Safrano, Souv. d'un Ami, 
Niphetos. Beauties and Perles. All first-class 
stock from 3 and 4-in. pots. Price $5 and 87 per 
100. Double White Primroses, 3-in. pots, $6 per 
100; Adiantum Ouneatum. 8-5 per lOO, 2;4-in. pots, 
etc , etc. Large assortment and low prices. Let 
us hear from you. HEHRT SMITH, 

130 Mouroe St., Grand Kapids. Mich. 



122 



The American Florist. 



Sept. 



Subscription $1.00 a Year. To Europe, $2.00. 

Advertisements, lo Cents a Line, Agate; 

Inch. Si. 40; Column, 514.00. 

Cash with Order. 

No Special Position Guaranteed. 

Discounts, 6 times, 5 per cent; 13 times, 10 percent; 

26 times. 20 per cent; 52 limes, 30 per cent. 

No reduction made for large space. 

The Advertising Department of the American 
FLOFtiST is for Florists. Seedsmen, and dealers in 
wares pertaining to those lines Only. Please to 
remembe it. 

Orders for less than one-half inch space not accepted. 

Advertisements must reach us by Monday to secure 
Insertion in the issue for the folluwiog Thursday. 

Address THE AMERICAN FLORIST CO., Chicago. 

Coming Exhibitions. 

Lenox. JIass.. Sept, 4-6. Annual exhibition 

Lenox Hort. Society. A. H. Wingett, Sec'y. 
Boston, Sept. 5-6. Annual exhibition of plants 

and flowers Mass. Hort. Society. 
Chicago, Nov. 3-11. Chrvsanthemura show Hort. 

Society of Chicago. " "\V. C. Egan, Sec'y, 630 

Dearborn Ave. 
Newport, R. I.. Nov. 6-8. Chrysanthemum show 

Newport Hort. Society. Alex MacLellan, 

Sec'y, Ruggles Ave. 
Boston, Nov. 6-9, Chrysanthemum show Mass. 

Hort. Societv. Robt. Manning, Sec'y, Horti- 
cultural Hall. 
PiTTsFiELD, Mass., Nov. 6-9. Chrysanthemum 

show lierkshire County Gardeners' and Flo- 
rists' Club. W. M. 'Edwards, Sec'y, 103 

Howard St., Pittsfield. 
St. Louis. Mo.. Nov. 6-9. Chrysanthemum show 

St. Louis Florists" Club. *E. Schray, Sec'y, 

4101 Pennsylvania Ave. 
Indianapolis. 'Ind., Nov. 6-10. Chrysanthemum 

show Society of Indiana Florists. W. G. Ber- 

lermann. Sec'y. 37 Massachusetts Ave. 
Philadelphia, Pa. ,Nov. 6-10. Chrysanthemum 

show Pennsylvania Hort. Society. D. D. L. 

Farson, Sec'y, Horticultural Hall,' Broad St. 
Louisville, Kt.. Nov. 6-10. Chrysanthemum 

show Louisville Florists. H. Nanz, Sec'y, 582 

Fourth Ave. 
Denver. Colo.. Nov. 7-10. Chrysanthemum show 

Denver Florists' Club. Adam Kohankie, Sec'y, 

L.B. 375, So. Denver, Colo. 
Providence. R. I., Nov. 8-10. Chrysanthemum 

show Rhode Island Hort. Society. C. \V. 

Smith, Sec'y, 61 Westminster St. 
Montreal, Nov. 12-14. Chrysanthemum 

Montreal Gardeners' and Florists' Club. 

Bennett, Sec'y, 62 AylmerSt. 
Baltimore, Nov. 12-17. Chrysanthemum 

Gardeners' Club of Baltimore. Wm, 

Roberts, Jr., Sec'y, 304 W. Madison St. 
Worcester, Mass., Nov. 13-15. Chrysanthemum 

show Worcester County Hort. Society. Edw, 

W. Lincoln, Sec'y. 
Toronto. Ont., Nov. 13-16. Chrysanthemum show 

Toronto Gardeners' and Florists' Ass'n. A. H. 

Ewing,. Sec'y, 85 Carlton St. 
Springfield, Mass.. Nov. . Chrysanthemum 

show Hampden County Hort. Society. W. F. 

Gale, Sec'y. 23 .John St. 
Milwaukee, Wis., Nov. . Chrysanthemum 

show Milwaukee Florists' Club. A. Klokner, 

Sec'y, 219 Grand Ave. 
Hamilton, Ont., Nov. . Chrysanthemum 

show Hamilton Agric. Society. Walter H. 

Bruce, Sec'y. 
[Secretaries will confer a favor by supplying 
dates as soon as decided upon. We shall be glad 
to know of any further shows decided upon and 
not included in our list, even if exact date is not 
yet determined.] 



show 
Fred 



show 
Mc- 



When writing our advertisers please 
use one of your printed business letter 
beads or enclose vour business card. 

Primula Chinensis. 

Fine, healthy plants, 3'y4-inch pots, best 
varieties, 88.00 per 100; 2>^-inch pots, $4.00 
per 100. 

Carnations. 



w. 



Ready September: Grace Wildf r, $6 per 100; 
Daybreak, 87 per 100. Strong, hea'thy plants. 

A. BOCK, North Cambridge, Mass. 



Cy 



cas Leaves. ^^^^,"75^"^ 



VAUGHAN'S SEED STORE, 



Chicago. 



FLORAL DESIGNS 

The Cut Flower Worker's Friend, Fine book 
of 160 pages. Send 93.60 for it, to 

J. HORACE McFARUND, Harrisburg, Pa. 



Florists that Handle the BEST STOCK get the Trade. 

Try us on Cut: I^^lo^w^ers 

and see if we cannot substantiate our claim. 

Best Stock lor Least Aloneu ! ^* 

*^ RemeniDer our Glioice fimerican Beauties ! 

Carefully packed to ship to any part of the country. 

i« EM ]v :b K^ i^ o :bi^ois.. 



SI "W^t>ei.slx .cV.^'-eiavx^, 



CmOA^GO. 



THE VARYING CRITICISMS MADE 
BY EXPERIENCED FLORISTS ON. 

LONG'S FLORISTS' PHOTOGRAPHS 

are amazing, and shows so thoroughly how differences of opinions 
exist. In the main, however, all agree as the facts justify, that 
they are artistic, beautiful, complete, practical, and cheap in price. 
Can more be expected, asked for, or wanted. Catalogue free. 

DAN'L B. LONG, TuhlishBt, BuflFalo, N. Y., 

CORBREY & McKELLAR, 

Wholesale and Commission Florists, 

Phone Main 4508. 64 & 66 Wdbash AvC, CHICAGO. 

We are prepared to fiU your orders with First-Class Flowers. 
Give us a trial order. 

FOR DECORATING, "".TuIl"" 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS MASUS. 

CUT STRINGS S T-O ra FEET LONG, SO CTS. 

Shipped in large or small quantities to any part of the country. Orders by mail, tele- 
erraph or telephone. 

W. H. ELLIOTT, Brighton, Mass. 

Hardy Cut Ferns, 

BOUQUET GREEN, 

Laurel and Green Festooning, Wreaths, Etc. 
SPHAGNUM MOSS IN ANY QUANTITY. 

H. E. HARTFORD, 18 Chapman Place, BOSTON. 





FOLDING 



^m 'PRAIRIE FDLOINB FLOHER £0>^ MPA P ER 
FDR CUT nOWERS. ^ BOXES 



for CUT 
Flowers. 



Made from Wiiter-prooled. Doulile Mnnlllii lined, 
Slrawboard. Shipped flat, packed lOU In a crate. 

CHICAGO FOLDING BOX CO., 

Jackson & Clinton Sts., CHICAGO. 

TELEPHONE MAIX 4T18. 

When writing mention the American Florist. 



Gardiner's Celebrated ]J 

English } 

Mushroom Spawn. ^ 

Fregh ind Selial:le. ^ 
J7 IKT 100 lbs. \ 

Special price on larger . 
quantities. j 

I John Gardiner & Co., / 
I'liiliidelphia, Pa. } 
^-•^ 
.Meullon Ainerlciin l-'lurlst. 




H. L. SUNDERBRUGH, 

Wholesale Florist 

4th and Walnut Streets, 

W. ELLISON 

WHOLESALE 

Gut Flowers I Florists' Supplies 

I402 PINE STREET, 
(Successor to ELLISON & KUEHN), 

*^ WHOLESALE ^Sj? 

1122 niTE STE-EET, 

tSt:. l^ouils, Ado. 

A oomplete line of Wire DeglKn** 



i8g4- 



The American Florist. 



123 



E. H. HUNT. 

WHOLESaiiEpLORIST 

88 Lake Street, CHICAGO. 

WHOLESALE CUT FLOWERS. 

SEEDS, BUI.BS AITD AI.I. 

ri.OBISTS' SUFFI.IEB. 



Western Aeent for the GKEAT ANTIPEST. 

KENNIGOTT BROS. GO. 

WHOLESALE GUT FLOWERS, 

and FLORISTS' SUPPLIES. 
34 cE 36 RANDOLPH STREET, 

A. L. RANDALL, 

wnoiesaie Fiorisi 

126 Dearborn St., CHICAGO. 



Afent for finest grades Waxed and Tissue Papers 

J. B. DEAMUD&CO. 

WHOLESALE GUT FLOWERS, 

34 & 36 Randolph Street, 

Phone Main L>2:!. CHICAGO. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR AMERICAN BEAUTIES. 

Reinberg Bros. 
WHOLESALE CUT FLOWERS, 

5/ WABASH AVENUE, 

Telephone Main 4937. CXHO.^GrO. 

We are Headciuarters lor the leading varieties of 
Roses, for the summer. Send us a trial order. 

NILES CENTER FLORAL CO. 

WHOLKS VI.E GROWKKS OF 

GUT FLOWERS OF ALL KINDS 

HE.4DOUAKTI5BS FOR SMir.AX. 

Flnc-crop n<iw ready, per 100 flO.OO: 
per dozen J1.5U. 

59 WABASH AVENUE. 

Telephone Main 3505. CMI0A.C3-0. 

WHOLESALE 
FLORISTS 

JOBBERS IN 
FLORISTS- 
SUPPLIES, 
FLORISTS' 
VASES. 




METS, 

BRIDES, 

GONTIERS, 

CARNATIONS, 

ALWAYS ON HAND. 

1 Music Hall Place, 

BOSTON, MASS. 

HORTICULTURAL AUCTIONEERS, 



DAN'L B. LONG3 

WHOLESALE GUT FLOWERS, 

495 Washington St.. BUFFALO, N. Y. 
Shipping Oudeus C.\uefully Attended to. 
OTHER .SPECI.VLTIES: 

Florists* Supplies, Wire Desigrns, Bulbs, 

liOug's Florists Pliotoj^raplis (see large ad. 

Catalogues, Lists. Terms, etc., on application. 

Always mention the American Flo- 
rist when writing to advertisers. 



©VVRoPeiiafe MarftctA. 



Cut Flowers. 

New York. Aug. 26. 

Rosea 1.01*3 3.00 

•• perlOOU «5.UU@ao.OO 

Beauty 2.00@12.00 

Carnations 60® 1.00 

perlOOO $3.00®S5.00 

Valley 2.00® 4.00 

Harrlsll 4.00® 6.00 

Auratum 1.50® 2.0O 

Sweet peas, per 100 bunches 50c@$1.00 

Asters per 100 bunches 50@1.C0 

Smllax fi.OO® 8.00 

Asparagus 25.0O®35.00 

Adlantum 75® 1.00 

Boston. Aug. 26. 

Roses, Nlphetos. Gontler 1.00® 3.00 

Perle. Sunset 1.00® 3.00 

Bride, Mermet 2.00® 6.00 

Carnations 25® .75 

Harrlsll ti.UO® 8.00 

Lily of the valley 4 00 

Sweet peas .10 

Asters 25® .50 

Gladiolus 1.00® 3.00 

White Japan lilies 2.00 

Adlantum „„ 1.00 

Smllai 12.00®15.00 

Asparagus 50.00 

PHILADBLPHIA, Aug. 26 

Koses, small 2.00 

large teas 3.00® 4. 00 

" Be.^utle8 8.CO®15.00 

Carnations 50® 1.60 

Vallev ''.OO 

Smllai''V.V.'.V l»-«'®J,rfS 

Asparagus r^J*f-m 

Harrlsll lilies 4.00® 6.00 

Sweet peas .50 

Corntlower 2a® .50 

Cattlevas 3D.gO®40.00 

Adlantum 5® 1.00 

CHICAGO, Aug. 28. 

Roses, La France. Meteor 3.00® 4.00 

Beauty 8.00®15.00 

Kalserin 3.00® 4,00 

General assortment, per 1000. .$5@$10 

Carnations, long .m® .60 

fancies 1.50® 2.00 

Auratum lilies 6.00® 8, CO 

Asters ,,_ -50 

Sweet Peas 10® .30 

St. Louis, Aug. 27. 

Roses, Perles. Nlphetos, Wootton 2.00® 3.00 

Bride. Mermet, Bridesmaids 2.00® 3.00 

■' Meteors 2.00® 3.00 

La France, Albany, Hoste 2.00® 3.0O 

•■ Beauty 5.00®15.og 

Sweetpeus 15® .2o 

Carnations, long 50® .lO 

short .50 

Adlantum * 1.25 

Hollyhocks, asters -50 

BUFFALO, Aug. 27. 

Roses, Beauties 10.00®15.00 

Mermet. Bride 4.00® 0.00 

Gontler. Perles 3.00® 4.00 

Meteors 4.00® 5.00 

Asters 50® .75 

Carnations 75® 1 .00 

Gladiolus 1.00® 3 00 

Valley 3,0(1 

Adlantum 1.23 

Smllax 'i'-O'^S-SS 

Asparagus 50.00 

GEORGE R. SUTHERLAND. 

Successor to PECK & SUTHERLAND, 
Successors to WM. J. STEWART, 

Gut Flowers! Florists' Supplies 

67 Bromfield St., BOSTON, MASS. 

New Engla nd Agent for the GREAT ANTIPEST. 

WELCH BROS., 
Wholesale Florists, 

NO. 2 BEACON STREET, 
Near Tremont St., BOSTON. MASS. 

CUT SMILAX. 

15 cents per String. 
JOSEPH E. BONSALL, 308 Garfield Ave., Salem. 0. 



iLE DIRECTORY 

For 1894 
IS NOW READY. ^ 
Price $2.00. 
AMERICAN FLORIST CO. 



FOR HIGH CLASS SUMMER TRADE. 

THE LEADING FAVORITES. 

American Beaut y, 
Meteor . 

La France . 

And all other desirable roses, grown espe- 
cially for summer shipping to sea- 
side and mountain resorts. 

BURNS & RAYNOR, 

49 West 28tb St., NEW YORK. 

SPRING3 SUMMER, 

AUTUMN3 WINTER. 

in dull season and busy season. 
All the year round. 

Roses, Lily ii tie Yallei 

and all other choice stock 
can be obtained of 

THOS. YOUNG, Jr., 

20 West 24th St., NEW YORK. 

WALTER F. SHERIDAN. 

. WHOLESALE • 

32 West 30th Street, NEW YORK. 



Roses Shipped to all points. Price list on application. 

Mention American Florist 

Edward C. Horan, 

34 W. 29th Street, NEW YORK, 

WHOLESALE ' FLORIST, 

Careful Shippuig to all parts of the country. 
Price list on applifiition, 

FRANK D. HUNTER, 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN 

Cuxi Flowers, 

57 W. 30th St., NEW YORK. 

Mention American Florist. 

FRANK MILLANG3 

(Successor to MILLANG BROS.) 

WHOLESALE FLORIST 

408 East 34th Street, 

Cut Flower Exchange, NEW YORK. 

THEO. ROEHRS, 

WHOLESALE 

FLORIST, 

111 West 30th street, 

NEW YORK CITY. 

EstabllBlied 1879 



SAMUEL S. PENNOCK, 

Wholesale Florist 

REAR OF 42 S. 16th STREET, 

Mention American Florist. 



124 



The American Florist. 



Sept. /, 



Ufie ^eeS Urac^c. 



AM. SEED TRADE ASSOCIATION. 

D. I. BrSHXELL. St. Txiuls. president: S. E. Briggs, 
Toronto. 1st vice-president : A. L. .ion. 111 Chambers 
street. New York, secretary and treasurer. 



The U. S. Dept. of Agriculture will use 
fifteen million seed bags the coming year. 

Visited NewYoek: — Lem Bowen, S. B. 
Dicks, Henry A. Salzer, E. Scbaettel. 

Prices on leadingforeign grown flower 
seeds are not yet fixed. 

Most stocks of imported vegetable 
seeds are likely to be in fairly good supply. 

The sweet coRNcrop is very uncertain. 

Tomato seed is not likely to be over 
plenty. 

Onion seed, according to latest Cali- 
fornia advices, will be 25 to 30 per cent 
less than was expected. 

Sweet pea seed of new crop is now 
coming forward from the Pacific coast 
growers. 

Extra early peas are proving of 
lighter yield than was first expected. 

Sweet corn will not be plentv. 

S. F. Leonard and W. A. Brotherton 
are making a trip through the east. 

Early orders for bulk seeds from 
Texas and other parts of the south arc 
quite satisfactory. 

The introduction of bag filling ma- 
chines is likely to further reduce the pres- 
ent low trade prices on packet seeds in 
large lots. 

Mr. E. Schaettel, representing Yil- 
morin-Andrieux & Co., of Paris, will 
visit the U. S. this month. 



The Tariff Bill. 



Paragraph of new tariff bill of interest 
to seedsmen and florists: 

Par. 611. Seeds: Anise, canary, caraway, car' 
dainom, coriander, cotton, croton, cummin, lennel' 
fenugreek, hemp, hoarhouud. mustard, rape. 
Saint John's bread or bene, sugar beet, mangel- 
wurzel, sorghum or sugar cane for seed, and all 
flower and grass seeds; bulbs and roots, not edi- 
ble; all the foregoing not specially provided for in 
this act free. 



Ottawa, Canada. 



There is not much news to be had here 
of interest to the craft, all the blue bloods 
are either at the coast or in Europe, 
spending the money they ought to have 
paid their florist, while the latter have to 
scratch along the best way they can. 
This is an awful citj' for credit; almost 
every failure in business is caused by it. 
There are few good flowers to be had, 
and less sold. Rain two or three times a 
week spoils most outdoor stuff. 

H. Parks has got his new house covered 
in and planted. A. French has added 
two houses 60x16 for roses. C. Scrim is 
putting up a house for retarding azaleas, 
etc. 

Can any of the craft tell us how to kill 
mushroom spawn in the lawn? On our 
water works grounds there is a bank full 
of it, which causes no end of trouble. 
People go there early in the morning and 
dig holes to get the buttons, and leave 
the soil as if a dozen hogs had been root- 



ing. 



Zero. 



The American Florist and Gardening 
together to one address for $1.75. Send 
orders to the American Florist Co. 



HIGHEST AWARD 
J^-ouB^BULBS 

at Atlantic City. 
DUTCH BULBS now AHRivmG. 



NEW YORK: 

26 Barclay Street. 



Fall Price List now ready. 

VAUGHAN'S SEED STORE 



146-148 W. Washington St., 

CHICAGO. 



100,000 PANSIES 



BROWN'S SUPERB FflNSlES 

READY NOW FOR PLANTING. 

Grower of ail the leading variety, the ne plus ultra in pansies. For size and form it seems hardly 
possible to produce anything more perfect and superfine (most light colors). 

By mail, 75c. per 100 ; f Liberal discount will be allowed on large orders. 

By express, $5.00 per 1000. i Cash with order. 

Peter Brown. 721 Marietta Avenue, LANCASTER, Pa. 

Hention American Florist. 




5.000.000 

FREESIAS 



We will deliver Freesla Bulbs, 
all charges for transportation 



Buy FIRST HAND 

paid, as follows: 

3-8 to 3-4 inch per 1000, $4.00 

1-4 to 5-8 inch per 1000, $3.00 

Liberal discount on larger lots. Send for our price list. 
Order NOAV your Japan Bulbs, Longiflorum. Aura- 
lums, Rubrums. Albums, we are Headquarters. 
We are the ONLY FIRM in the U. S. who guaran- 
tee you SOUND BULBS delivered. 
Address all communications to 

H. H. BERGER cS, CO., 

(Established 1878.) SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Mention American Florlet. 



WE SELL BULBS 

Special low prices tu 

Florists % Dealers. 

WEEBER & DON. 

Seed Merchants and (irowers. 
114 Chambers Street, NKW VOKK. 



Special Offer to American Trade. 
louis de smet. 

NURSERYMAN, GHENT, BELGIUM, 

OKFEH AS .SI'ECI.AI.TIES; 

Faliiis, Aza'ca iadica, AZAI.KA MOLLIS, 
budded, »G to *10 per 100: Araucaria 
excrelna (thousands), Hay Trees, Uegoiiias, 
Gloxinias. TltAUE J^isT on demand. 
English CurrfS|»undence 

The Water Garden. 

Special and Uardy Water Llllea of all colors. 
VICTORIA REGIA AND V. RANDI. EURYALE FEROX. 

Nelumblume In variety. Hardy Ornamental plants, 
Bub-aquatlc plants, etc.. etc. Nympha^a Jjaydekerl 
rosea (awarded a Medal at World's Kalr); muBlcbarm- 
Ingof all the Hakjjy Lilies; 5v! 5Ueach, 

Other Columbian Novelties see catalogue. 

WM. TRICKER & CO., Clifton, N. J. 

When you write to any of the ad- 
vertisers in this paper please say that 
you saw the advertisement in the 
American Florist. 



Hul86Do§cli Brottiers, 

OVERVEEN, near Haarlem, HOLLAND. 

Bulbs m Plants 

We are now prepared to quote lowest 
possible prices for next July, Aug- 
ust and September delivery. 

Illustrated Wholesale Catalogues on application. 

HULSEBOSCH BROS., 

ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 

ONION .,. 
SEED. ^^^ 

CROP 1894. 

.^^^^ Prices for New Crop 
^^^^^— — "made on Application. 

COX SEED AND PLANT CO. 

411, 413 & 415 Sansouie Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

LILY VALLEY. 

From cold storatje, finest quality, $7.00 per 1000 

LIL. LONGIFLORUM. 

0-7 Inches K.M per lOO; ¥i3.m per 1000 

BERMUDA FREESIAS. 

'4-lnch FJ.OO per 1000 

M. O. I=i»A.UST *; CO., 
64 & «() N. Kront Street, PHILA., PA. 

READY NOW. 

I'erluOPerlOOO 

LllluniHurriBll. 5-r Inches J2.60 120.00 

7-!) •■ 5.00 46.00 

Uoman Hyacinths, Vi-\^\<i cm 2 7.'> 25.00 

Paper White Grandiaora 1.26 lU.OO 

Kreiich ^rrown ^'reeslas. lar^'e bulbs CO 0.00 

KnK'Ilsh Mllltrack Mushroom Spawn, per lb. 10c; per 
100 lbs. »».Oli. 

CHAS. SCHWAKE. 

404 E. »4th Street, N£W YOKK. 



iSg4. 



The American Florist. 



125 



WANTED. 

5000 Chrysanthemums (pots) 
by November 20. . . . 

There must be at least 2000 Ivory 
among them, the balance a general 
assortment. 

SEND YOUR ESTIMATES IN NOW. 

All estimates must be in by Nov. 10th. 

S. MOUNT & CO. 3 

Box 68. ST. LOUIS, MO. 

PANSIES. .. 

Every Grower Claims the Best. 

I am willing to have mine tested alongside 
of any in the market. Over a thousand florists 
used them last season, were pleased with them 
and made money out of them. 

Between Sept. Ist and Dec. 1st I will have a 
MILLION or more plants to sell. They can not 
be oflTered in competition with cheap grown 
seed, but quality considered, are remarkably 
cheap at the price. 
By Mail or Express, prepaid. 75c. per 100: by Express 
at your expense. $5.00 per 1000. Liberal dis- 
count will be allowed on large orders. 

An honest sample of the plants will be 
mailed you on receipt often cents, and terms 
are absolutely cash in advance. 

ALBERT M. HERR, L.B. 496, Lancaster, Pa. 

Pansy* Seed. 

Ttie JENNING.> STRAIN of higii grade Pansy 
Seed. New crop now ready. Saved with special care 
from only the very finest varieties and (warranted) 
flrst-clftss In every respect. 

THE JENNINGS XX STRAIN. 
The cream of Pansies. Grand colors ml.xed. pkt., 
ISOUBeed.ll.UO; loz.8S.00. 

Tbe.Ienn!nKB Strain, finest mixed, pkt. %\M\ about 
25(W8eed: 1 uz. ff-.-tH); 8ozs ¥15.00. No sKim milk In this 
strain. (They are just as good as I can makeemj, 
To my old patrons 1 would say they are a big Improve- 
ment over lust season— more variety and liner colors 
The best strain for florists either for winter bloom or 
spring sales: all large flowering. 

Black Dr Kaust, finest pkt., 2500 seed. Jl.OO 

Mnest Tellow. black eve ■• " 1.00 

Pure White, tie beat '■ '■ l.OO 

Victoria, bright red pkt . 1000 seed. 1.00 

All my own growth of 1894. Half pkts. of any of the 
above 50c. Plense send money orders or registered 
letter. Cash with order. Address 

E. B. JENNINGS. Wholesale Pansy Grower. 

Lock Bo.\ 254. SOUTUPOItT, CONN. 

j Roemer's liuperb Prize Pansies. j 

I The Hiifst strain oi Pansies in tlie World. I 

♦ Introducer and Grower of all the leading f 
I No y el ties. j 

4 Catalogue free UN appHcatloii. 4 

I FRED ROEMER, SEED Grower, ^ 

I yiTKDLINBlTKG, GKKMAXV. \ 

for ininiedlate delivery: 

FIRST QUALITY LILY Of theVALLEY, 

HKKI.IN I'IPS, fron. tckl storace. 

C. H. JOOSTEN, 

3 Coenties Slip, NEW YOKK. 
IMPORTER OF BULBS AND PLANTS. 

EXTRA PANSY SEED. 

MAMMOTH SUNBEAM STRAIN. 

A grand collection of gtant flowering varieties, very 
large, of perfect form, and choice colors; carefullv 
selected : better seed plants this year than ever: re- 
ceive very high praise from my customers: nu finer 
Blraln offered anywhere; florists should sow of it. 

Trade pkt.. 600 seeds. 25c: \i pkts. f^Oc; tl pktg. 11.00. A 
pkt. of the new Monkey Kacepansv with every $1 order. 
JOHN F. KIPF, Shiremanstown. Pa. 

Pansies Worth Raising. 

Prepaid by mail ll.OOperlOO 

At your expense by express $o.(Xl per UKXI 

Extra quality new Seed, H ounce. ll.CO; 6 
packages. f4.00. Large quantities at special prices. 
Cash with order. 

CHUISTIAN SOLTAU, 

199 Grant Ave., JERSEY CITY, N. J. 



DECORATIVE PLANTS. 

Special offer of varieties and sizes that can be supplied in large quantities 
and are of exceptional good value. 



.$ 1.50 per dozen; S 12.00 per 100 
12.00 •■ 100.00 



ARECA LUTESCENS. 

.3-inch pots, V2 to 15 inches high. . . 

6-inch pots, 24 inches high, 3 plants in a pot 

SPECIMEN PLANTS OF ARECA LUTESCENS. 

il-inch pots, single stems, fine plants for decorating, about 6 feet high $ 7.50 each 

y-inch pots, single stems, with several good side branches, about 6 feet high . . . . 10.00 each 
12-inch pots, beautiful, perfect specimens in every respect, clean, well-formed plants 

of very good value. . 15.00 each 

12-inch pots, a grand lot of bushy specimen plants, clean, well-grown stock in every 

respect, a special lot of plants, about 7 feet high, at . . .... 20.00 each 

COCOS WEDDELLIANA. 

A grand lot of plants, in 3-inch pots, well-grown, stocky and of good color, 12 to 15 

inches hiph .... J3.00 per dozen; 820.00 per 100 

Kentia Belmoreana. perdoz. 

5-inch pots, 6 leaves, 24 inches high SIS.CO 

6-inch pots, 6 leaves, 24 to 30 inches high. . 18.00 

Each 
8-inch pots, 6 to 7 leaves, 30 inches high . . $ 3.00 
8 inch pots 6 to 7 leaves, 48 inches high . . 5.00 
9-inch pots. (> to 7 leaves, 48 to .54 in. high . . 7.50 
12-inch pots, 7 leaves, 60 inches high 15.00 

Kentia Forsteriana. per doz. 

3-inch pots, 4 leaves, 15 inches high $ 2.50 

5-inch pots, 5 to 6 leaves, 24 to 30 in. high . . 12.00 
5-inch pots, 5 to 6 leaves, 30 to 36 in. high . . 15.00 

6-inch pots, 6 leaves, 36 inches high 18 00 

Each 
7-iuch pots. 7 leaves, 42 inches high . S 3.00 

9-inch pots, 6 to 7 leaves, 60 inches high . . 7.50 
12-inch pots, 6 to 7 leaves, 72 inches high. . . 10.00 



Latania Borbonica. 

A grand lot of plants in 3-inch pots, 4 to 5 leaves, 
ready to pot up, 88.00 per 100. Per doz. 

6-inch pots, 24 inches high. 812.00 

7-inch pots, 24 to 30 inches high 15.00 

8-inch pots, 30 inches high 18.00 

Pandanus Utilis. 

2i/i'-inch pots, fine stock for potting up, 75 cts. per 
dozen; 86.00 per 100; 850.00 per 1000. 

Araucaria Excelsa. 

Largest slock in the country. Each 

5-inch pots, 3 tiers, 15 inches high 81.25 

6-inch pots, 4 tiers, 18 inches high 1.75 

6-inch pots, 4 tiers, 24 inches high 2.50 

7-inch pots. 5 tiers, 30 inches high .... 3.00 
8-iDCh pots. 6 to 7 tiers. 36 inches high .... 5.00 

Dracaena Braziliensis. 

A fine lot of this useful decorative variety, strong 
plants in 4-inch pots, 15 to 18 inches high, at 
$2.00 per dozen ; 815.00 per 100. 

For a complete list of Decorative Plants, such as Palms, Ferns, Dracsnas, Cycas, 
Pandanus, etc., etc., refer to our Quarterly List, mailed on application. Our stock this 
season is of e.xceptionally fine quality, and is complete as to assortment of sizes. 



714 Chestnut Street, 



PHILADELPHIA^ PA. 



Prices Lower Than Ever. 

Ready for sliipuieiit from July to September. 

Calla Aethiopica, fine dry roots in all sizes. 

Lil. Longiflorum, ready for shipment from October 
1st to March 15, 1895. 

Lil. Auratum, Spec. Rubrum and Album. Etc. 

Iris Kaempleri, in 100 choice varieties. 

Japanese Maples, in best varieties. 

Camellias, Paeonies, Tree Ferns. Raphis, Cycas 
Revoluta, superb growing plants with fine foliage 
from 25 cents to S5 each; fresh imported stems, 
true long leaf variety, roots and leaves cut off, de- 
livered from March, 1895. 

For general Japanese stock apply to 

F. Gonzalez & Co., 

303 to 312 Wayne St.. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

Mention American Florist. 

PANSY SEED. 

NEW CROP NOW READY. Very fine mixture of 
large flowering varieties and choice colors, espe- 
cially selected for florists' use. 1 oz. $3.00. 

NEW GIANT PRIZE PANSY, finest strain in the 
market. 1 oz. $5 00 

Low prices on Lilium Harrisii. Longiflorum, 
Roman Hyacinths. Lily ol the Valley, etc. 

Special low prices on Rustic Baskets, 

HERRMANN'S SEED STORE, 

413 EAST 34th Street, 

Near Long Island Ferry, NEW YORK. 

Choice Florist Seeds. 

Pansy, Calceolaria, Primula, Cineraria, 

L-holceat Ktraliih, at 2;"t and 50 cte. per trade packet. 

Specia. quotation on BULBS. 

SOUTH ORANGE. N. J. 



The Universal 
Horticultural Establishment. 



When writing to any of the adver- 
tisers on this page please mention the 
American Florist. 





t 

M 


f 



Tuberous 
Begonias 




(GRIFFINS STRAIN.) 

Plants in bloom, all sizes, at lowest prices. 

OASIS NURSERY CO.. 

Thos. Griffin. Mgr. Westbury Station. L. I.. N. Y. 

Plants from last fall; these have a foundation and 
will begin to run strong at once. $2.50 per 100; 
820.00 per 1000. 

CLEMATIS for Fall Dalivery. 

Special prices at wholesale, on application. 
Splendid stock and assortment. 

F. A. BAIiLXSR, Bloomingtou, HI. 

When writing to any of the adver- 
tisers on this page please mention the 
American Florist. 



126 



The American Florist. 



Sept. /, 



St. Paul, Minn. 

While the brethren were hurrying to At- 
lantic City or enjoying themselves in the 
surf, or attending the convention, we of 
the northwest were sweltering in the con- 
tinued heat and drouth. A week ago 
we had promise of copious showers, but 
they failed to appear, and we plod on in 
hope of having rain sometime. 

Trade continues in the same humdrum 
manner. There are always some orders, 
but the principal demand is for funeral 
work. Flowers are not abundant. Good 
roses especially are in good demand, but 
the supply is small. Sweet peas are nearly 
all gone. Asters are coming in, but are 
not in any particular demand. 

Everyone about town seems to be 
through with summer planting and wait- 
ing for fall trade to begin. More roses 
than usual have been planted by the lead- 
ing growers. H. Krinke has a fine house 
of roses, his first venture in that line. 
His place, though not large, is one of the 
best constructed and well keptin the city. 

Coal dealers are already putting in bids 
for another season's supply. Hard coal 
will be somewhat cheaper than for sev- 
eral years, while soft will remain at about 
the same figure as last year.- In this lati- 
tude coal is one of the largest items of ex- 
pense to the florist, and any reduction in 
cost per ton means quite a large sum by 
the end of the season. In a few weeks ac 
the longest night firing will be necessary 
and a few cold nights the past week al- 
most demanded fire. Some of the craft 
think they can save expense by delaying 
the night firing, but the inevitable result, 
mildewed and stunted stock, has been a 
powerful lesson. 

Roman hyacinths and paper white nar- 
cissus have already made their appear- 
ance and are planted for Christmas 
blooming. Bulbs of all kinds will not be 
planted very extensively this year. Some 
of the largest growers met with heavy 
losses last year. One in particular lost 
over six hundred dollars' worth. That, 
however, was caused bj- carelessness of 
employes. Sales last year of bulbous 
stock were very light. With the increased 
plant of roses and carnations this year it 
is doubtful if bulbous stock will be in any 
better demand than last. Roman hya- 
cinths are almost indispensableforiuneral 
work and are also in good demand for 
boxes for the country trade. 

Carnations planted outside have im- 
proved very much the past two weeks. 
Where they have received plenty of water 
they will be as good as the average sea- 
son. Quite a number of new varieties 
have been planted and we trust ere long 
to hear as much said in praise of our car- 
nations as oi our roses. We have no 
carnation specialists here, but we have 
good soil, good climate and a number of 
good common sense growers, who use 
their brains rather than their hands in 
producing healthy stocks and good 
blooms. 

The annual outing of the Minnesota 
florists was held at Wildwood Beach the 
16th. A goodly number from the Twin 
Cities was in attendance, and the day 
passed very pleasantly, with bathing, 
bowling, baseball, etc. Felix. 

NEW CARNATIONS. 
FERNS. 

ELLIS, NORFOLK Co., MASS. 

Mention American Klorlat. 




FITGHER&MflNDfl. 

AZALEAS. 



LL extensive and successful growers of Azaleas for 
market know that plants summered over one season 
in this country have everything to recommend them 
over newly imported stock. 

Our favorable climate ripens the wood more thoroughly, giving the plant 
an appearance which readily commands a higher price. The flowers are much 
more abundantly set and never lose their buds, which a percentage of the 
imported stock invariably do. They can also be delivered by freight early in 
September, when there is little or no danger of being hurt by frost in transit. 
We send out the best New York forcing varieties only, and all the plants have 
nice, shapely heads, profusely set with buds. 



GENISTAS. 



Our stock of this most desirable decora- 
tive plant is the finest and most extensive 
in the country. The plants are all in healthy condition, pot grown, and have 
fine, shapely trimmed heads, which add much to their value. 



IF YOU ARE A BUYER, OF ABOVE NAMED FX,ANTS SEND US A 
LIST OF THE QUANTITIES YOU USE FOR OUR ESTIMATE 
BEFORE ORDERING ELSEWHERE. 

UNITED STATES NURSERIES, SHORT HILLS, N. J. 

Mention American Florist. 



"HELEN KELLER" 

The ueAT Carnation; pure white, deli- 
cately marked witli red. 

Price for well Rooted Cuttings: 

Si. 00 per aozen: S12.U0 per 100; Ko 00 per 250; 
S'lo.OO perlOtlO. 500 at lOUO rate. Orders may 
be sent either to 



JOAN N. Mfly, 
Summit, N. .J. 



EDWIN LONSDALE, 
Chestnut Hill, PliUa. 



CARNATIONS ^'r^^^n. 

E. G. Hill, Wm. Scott, Mrs. Reynolds, Silver 
Spray. Tidal Wave. Lizzie McGowau. Ben Hur, 
Mme. Biaz Albertini, White Uove, Garfield. Lara- 
born, Portia, Edna Craig, Fred. Dorner, Daybreak, 
Golden Gate, Mrs. Fisher, White Wings, Hiuze's 
White, Blanche. Purdue, Louise Porsch, and other 
sorts. Marie Louise Violets. Low prices on appli- 
cation. JOSEPH HEINL, Jacksonville, III. 

Mention American Florist. 

CARNATIONS 

Rooted Cuttings all sold or planted 
out. Field plants for sale in the 
fall - 

The Pines. KENNETT SQUARE. Chester Co.. PA. 

Mention American Florist. 

THE COTTAGE GARDENS, 

l^ueens, Long Island, N. Y. 

WHOLESALE CARNATIONS. 

Carnations a Specialty 

Hooted CuttlnKs and Vouhk Plants sold out. 
Nice Field-Grown Plants In Sept. Send for prices. 

GEO. HANCOCK & SON. Grand Haven. Mich. 



Field-Grown 
Carnations. 

UNCLE JOHN S12.50perl00 

THE STUART... 13.50 " 

E. A. WOOD 12.60 " 

DIAZ ALBERTINI 12.30 " 

ELIZABETH REYNOLDS 7.00 " 

RICHMOND r.OO " 

DK. SMART 7.00 •' 

BLANCHE 7.C0 " 

Ready foi delivery September 15. 

TJSRM.S: Cash with order. 

F. DORNER & SON, La Fayette, Ind. 



CARNATION "BUTTERCUP" 

Strong and healthy plants, pot-grown, 
in 3-inch pots. 

SS.OO Per 100. $7S.OO Per 1000. 

EDWIN LONSDALE, 

CHESTNUT HILL, PHILADELPHIA. 



W. R. Shelmire, 

AVONDALE, 

Clieste'i' Co., r».A.. 

CARNATIONS 

A^p COLEUS. 

25,000 FIELD GROWN 

CARNATIONS 

Nice healthy stock of the standard tested sorts In 

the CariiHtion l)elt. 

MUST liK SOLD. Please send list of your wants to 

BENJ. CONNELL, '^»^^i'Si?,'i''a°K?/vE. pa. 

P. S.— Also fine field clumps of the peerless Violet 
Lady Uaine Campbell. 

Always mention the American Flo- 
rist when writing to advertisers. 



i8g4' 



The American Florist. 



127 



Siebrecltt&Wadley, 

^OZl BILL NURSERIES, 

NewRoghelle,N.Y. 

Palms, 
ORCHIDS, 

Roses, 

FRESH DRACAENA CANES NOW READY. 

SURPLUS STOCK . . . 

LATANIAS 




ler 



OF 

10,000 Latanias in 2n inch pots, $600 p 

100; 150.00 per 1000. 

20,000 Latanias in 3-inch pots, $12.00 per 

100; $90.00 per 1000. 

GEORGE WITTBOLD. 

1708 N. Halsted St., CHICAGO, ILL. 

PRIMROSES. 

Fine stocky plants, now ready for 3-inch pots. 

FLOWERS 

large, all fringed; brilliant colors. 

FIFTEEN SORTS. 

Price, for tlie single sorts . . . per 100, S 'i.50 

" perlOOO, 20.00 

double " ... per 100, 5 CO 

Extra plants with every order to help pay express. 

HENRY S. RUPP & SONS, 

SHIKEMANSTOWN, I'A. 

ORCHIDS OUR SPECIALTY. 

The Best and Largest Stock in the World. 
New &, Rare Foliage &, Flowering Plants. 

A grand selection fur Stove, (JreenhouHe and Con- 
servntory 

SANDER, St. Albans, England. 

Our Mr. A. Dlmmock will be pleased to Interview 
buvers or reply to any communication addressed to 
hlrii at 205 Oreenwlch St.. New York City. 

A. Farleyense Fern. 

8,000 strong, healthy plants, 4-incli, 
$40 per 100; $350 per 1000. 



p. O. Box 72. 



KANSAS CITY. MO. 



SMILAX. 



SMILAX. 



New York, 



Very strong, clean, healthy plants from 

2>^-inch pots, $2.50 per ICO; 

$20.00 per 1000. 

Samples free on ree^'ipt of /> ets. 

Address J. 6. BURROW, Fishklll, N. Y. 

August Rblker & Sons, 

136 & 138 W. 24lh St., Unui 

P.O. Station E. llClf iwin. 

Supply the Trade with 

Bulbs, Seeds and Requisites. 

E.G. HILL & CO., 

WiioiesaieFiorisis 

RICHMOND, INDIANA. 




(Sherwood IIali, Nubseky Co.) 



No. 427-9 Sansome Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

CALIFORNIA -GROWN 
SWEET PEAS 

And other Flower Seeds. 

PACIFIC COAST 
TREE SEEDS JAPANESE 

And Native Bulbs. I 11 Y BULBS 

And other Oriental Specialties. 

ONION SEED, PEAS, BEANS, ETC. 

Write for special contract prices. 



POT-GROWN 



NOW IS THE TIME AND THIS IS THE PLACE! 

100.000 READY. NO WAITING. 
CTRflUIRF R RIFQ. SiS per lOOO; 30 leading varieties. YOU GET "EM 
U\ IVnVlDLlVlVILe) K. and they make you quick money. 



TiSc30trost.K>-WTXy Tff. iT 



y^iT £LT\±GA. 



in GOOD 



LARGE Latania Borbonica 
ALSO 5 Kentia Belmoreana. 
5 Kentia Forsteriana. 

Must be cheap 

Bo.x 68. ST. LOUIS, MO. 

GflTflLOGUE PRINTING. 
ELEGTROTYPING. 

Done with expert ability for Florists 
Nurserymen, Seedsmen. Write to 

J. Horace McFarland Co. 

. . . IIARRI.SBCKG, VA 

Tobacco Dust. 

Per barrel (about 125 lbs.), S2.50. 
Sample free by mail. 

HERRMANN'S SEED STORE, 

413 East 34tli Street, 
near Long Island Ferry, NEW YORK. 

JULto Ut GlIltK, GHENT. BELGIUM, 

(fITerstothe trade only aood plums. 
W.mi Arnncarla c.\ce)Mi; laUlOO Azaleas Indlia; 'JO.IIUO 
Azaleas ni.illls; 151I.IXIU llet'i'Tilas anil (Ju.xlnln Dulhs. 
liest varieties; lOU.UOIl I'uliii.s. clean i.liints. all sizes: 
lU.UUU Sweet Bays, stuntlanls am! i,> ruiutdala. 
CASH WITU OUl>KU. 



PALMS. 

150,000 of all the leading v;i- 
rieties. 

FERNS. 

50,000 of leading varieties. 
Address QEQRGE WITTBOLD, 

1708 N. Halsted St., CHICAaO. 

Carl Schwanecke, 

OSCHERSLEBEN, GERMANY. 

Largest and oldest special cul ure of pan- 
sles; received premiums at all large exhibi- 
tions, the last at Chicago In 1893; otfers 
lirst-class pansy seed, especially Gassier, 
rrimardeau and Bugnot, also all of the best 
older and newer kinds. 

Send 2 francs for Cataloirne. 
Mention American Florist. 

TRY DREER'S 

GflRDtN SEE.DS, 

Plants. Bulbs & Requisite!. 

They are the best at the 
lowest prices. Trade List is- 
sued quarterly, mailed fre« 
to the trade only. 

HKNRY A. DREER, 
FhlladelphU, Fa. 

■■II.VKII TI.MES" FALM COI.bKCTIONS. 

I'ur cash with order we Klve 17 11 and A-\n. I'aluis for 
SI (rejiular price W). and :i4 for 9v> (regular price ys). 
These comprise the besi varieties. Including l.,atanlaB 
aud Kentlas. 

WILLIAMS & SONS CO., Batavia, lU. 




128 



The American Florist. 



Sept. 



Baltimore. 

In the western part of the city is an 
entire block surrounded by a brick wall 
ten feet high, over the top of which one 
catches glimpses of glass roofs, fruit and 
shade trees, and the upper stories of a 
great mansion with an enormous shaft 
or chimney of brick towering far above 
it. It is the residence of the late Thos. 
Winans, a man of such originality that 
when he had a house built for himself his 
own ideas dominated everything. The 
most striking instance is the huge brick 
chimney about six feet square inside, 
which connects with every room by large 
pipes and makes a perfect ventilation in 
every corner of it. The place was orig- 
inally surrounded by an ornamental iron 
fence, but the number of copies of Greek 
and Roman statues scattered about drew 
a protest from some of the neighbors 
which resulted in the wall. It would be 
hard to find a piece of ground of the same 
size better arranged. The stabling and 
sheds are along the east wall, and are so 
well screened by planting as to be almost 
invisible from the mansion, which is near 
the west wall. Along the north wall is a 
range of twelve ridge and furrow houses, 
each about fifteen by fifty feet. Each 
house stands on three brick arches run- 
ning lengthwise of it and with openings 
between the arches, the ends being closed 
by the foundation wall of the house. In 
the center arch the hot water pipes are 
laid and in the walk over them are grat- 
ings to let the heat into the house; by 
closing these gratings the heat is sent 
under the beeches through the side arches 
and all bottom or all top heat can be had 
with the greatest ease. Next to these 
comes a large lean-to palm house, empty 
now, but judging from the splendid speci- 
mens of seaforthia, cycas and latania 
grouped about, very full indeed in winter. 
The west wall is entirely taken up by 
lean-to graperies, the late ones showing 
luscious clusters of fruit. The apparent 
size of the ground is increased greatly by 
skillful planting, and as one saunters 
along, considering the numerous speci- 
mens of trees and shrubs, it is hard to be- 
lieve that all is included in the limits of 
one city block. A charming little shady 
dell near the center with a lakelet fed by 
the overflow from a small fish pond is a 
most attractive feature. Mr. John H. 
Ryan, the gardener in charge, was full of 
apologies for the place, but, though not 
kept in the extreme neatness prevailing in 
Mr. Winans' lifetime, it is still a very 
beautiful garden, and in chrysanthemum 
time will be even more so, judging from 
the grand lot of pot plants now com- 
ing on. 

Business in town is still extremely dull, 
sickness and death creating the chief de- 
mand for flowers, and for the time being 
the florist is in league with the doctor and 
the undertaker. 

The club had quite an interesting meet- 
ing Monday night. Among the questions 
discussed were "Can we hold a flower 
show in connection with the county fair?" 
A committee of five was appointed to 
inquire into the matter, and though too 
late for 1894 to see if arrangements can 
be made for 1895. 

"Are members pleased with the rule re- 
quiring exhibition plants to be single 
stem?" Quite a debate ensued, some 
claiming that single stem meant smaller 
plants and that would not please the 
public; others that the public taste should 
be cultivated into an appreciation of high 
culture. Mack. 



Please mention the American Florist 
every time you write to an advertiser. 



Superiority Recognized. 

A CERTIFICATE OF MERIT AWARDED TO A. 
HERRMANN, AT ATLANTIC CITY, FOR 

METAL FLOWER DESIGNS. 

A. llhfKKIMAi\i\) 408 E. 34ih street, JVEJVV ^^ORK. 

Quality Unexcelled. Prices Reasonable. Catalogues Free. 



BOSTON FLORIST LETTER CO., 

13 Green Street, BOSTON, MASS. 
Address all correspondence to 1 Music Hall Place. 

XmMm THE BEST LETTERS IH THE MARKET. 

sizes l!^-lnoh aDd 2-lDch, $2,00 per 100. Patent 

fastener with each letter. 

With orders for 500 letters we give away a nicely 

stained and varnished box. See cut In next 

weefs American Florist. 

Our letter Is handled by all the wholesalers In Boston. 

AGENTS: A. Rolker& Sons. New York; Marschuetz 
* Co.. 35 N. 4th Street, Philadelphia, Pa.; V. E. Mc- 
Allister, 22 Dey St.. N. T.; Ernst Kautmann & Co., 113 
N. 4th St, Philadelphia. Pa.; H. Bayersdorfer & Co., 
Philadelphia, Pa.: A. D. Perry & Co., Si Warren St., 
Syracuse, N. T.; A. C. Kendal. 115 Ontario St., Cleve- 
land, O.: E. H. Hunt. 79 Lake St., Chlcaeo: Wisconsin 
blower Exchange. VAX Mason St., Mllkwaukee, Wis.; 
H. Sunderbruch, 4th and Walnut Sts., Cincinnati, O.; 
T. W. Wood & Sons, t;th and Marshall Sts. Richmond. 
Va.; Jas. Vlck's Sons, Rochester, N. Y.; Dan'l B. Long, 
Buflalo, N. Y.: C. A. Kuehn, St Louis, Mo.; C. F. 
Huntington & Co., Indianapolis. Ind.; Z. De Forest 
Ely & Co., 1034 Market St., Philadelphia, Pa. ; Portland 
Seed Co.. 171 2nd St., Portland, Oregon; A. Herrman, 
415 E.S4th St.. New York; Geo. A. Sutherland, OT Brom- 
fleld St., Boston; Welch Bros.. No. lA Beacon St., Bos- 
ton ; N. F. McCarthy & Co., 1 Music Hall Place, Boston. 

J. A. Simmers, Toronto. Ont., Agent for Canada. 

H. BAYERSDOEFER & CO., 

WHOLESALE 

FLORISTS' SUPPLIES ONLY, 

PHILADEIiFHIAp FA. 

Onr new flataloene is now ont* free upon 
Application. 



MflRSGflUETZ & 60„ 

FlOriSlS' SUDDI16S, 

23 & 25 N. 4th St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
Send for Catalogue._^_^^^^^^ 



World's 
Pair. 



MEDAL AWARDED. 

ERNST KAUFMANN& CO., 

Wholesale FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

No. 113 North 4th Street, 
Send for catalogue. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



WHITE DOVES 

FOR F^LORISTS. 

Largest and finest stock In the United 
States. Write for prices to 

S. J. RUSSELL. 

850 Montgomery St., Jersey City. N.J. 




Patented .Mine 'JO, 1«!»4. 

STRAPS 

wiTn 

Unfolding Tight-Fasteners. 
FRANK L. MOORE, Chatham, N. J. 



Tl A r*r*C% P^"" '0 't's ^Oc: 2.5 lbs ll.OU; 
■DJSk,\j\j\J ,50 lbs 81..50; 100 lbs82..50. 
T^TTCS»P Extra fine, per 100 lbs. 8-5. 

■M-f U » i • «a-Sample Fkek. 

Vaughan's Seed Store, m Chicago. 



TO 



^^W.C.KRICK'S 

Florists' Letters, Etc. 

Medal Awarded at the 

World's Fair. 
And Highest Award 
Wherever Exhibited. 
These Jjetters and 
Designs are made of 
the best Immortelles, 
wired on wuod or metal 
fraiiien, liavlnt,' lioles 
drilled in them to in- 
sert tootli picks, by 
which tliey are fast- 
ened In tiie design, 
(iive themairial. You 
will find these goods to 
be superior to any In 
the market. 
2-lDcii Letters. $2.50 
per 100. 
[Postage. 15 cts. per lOU. 

For other styles of 

Letters, Emblems and Designs, send for catalogue 
and free sample. 

W.C.KRIGK, 1287 Broadway, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

For sale by all Florists' Supply Dealers, 






183 A\ONRpE Atrpet- 
• ■■ CHICXGO- • • 




Please mention the American Flo- 
rist every time you write any of the 
advertisers on this page. 



i8g4. 



The American Florist. 



129 





Valuable Discovery of the 19th Century. 

SILVER MEDAL AWARDED 

BY THE 

CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR OF 1890. 

This preparation Is a sure destroyer ot 
the Scale, Wooly Aphis and Insect 

Pests of any and all descriptions. It may 
be as freely used in the conservatory, garden 
and greenhouse as in the orchard or vine- 
yard. It is non-poisonous and harmless to 
vegetation when diluted and used according 
to directions. It mixes instantly with cold 
water in any proportion. It is Safe, Sure 
and Cheap. No fruit grower or florist 
should be without it. 
Send for Circulars and Frlce £lst. 

R. W. CARMAN, General Agent, 
291 AMITY Street, 
FI.USHINO, Queens, Co., N. T. 




J. N. Struck & Bro. 



Manufacturers ot 



CYPRESS 





ial, 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 

When wrltlnu mention the American Florist. 

BE UP TO DATE, 



And get the BEST. This is it. 




The Champion Ventilaiing Apparatus. 

CHEAP. DURABLE. EFFICIENT. 
Circular tells the whole Btnry. It l8 free. 

AMERICAN ROAD MACHINE CO.. 

KKNNETT SCJUAKE, 1"A. 

You will benefit the American Florist 
by mentioning it every time you write 
an advertiser in these columns. 



LORD & BURNHAM CO. 

Horticultural Architects and Builders, 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING ENGINEERS. 

tS' Plans and estimates furnished on application 




Largest builders of Greenhouse Structures. .Six highest Awards at World's Fair. 
. . . SEND POUft CENTS POSTAGE FOP ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. . . . 

LORD & BURNHUM CO., Irvlnglon-on-HuJson, H. Y. 

FRflNGlS' M&TflL STEMMING TOINTS. 

Latest Device for Stemming Cut Plowers 
without Toothpicks and Wire. 

Will keep set pieces fresh longer, as flower 
stem is entered deep in the moist moss. Man- 
ufactured by the Novelty Point Works in 5 
sizes, from yi to V2 inch in diameter. 




Patented July 11th, 181)8. 



XzK ^oaces c»f 1000 f*oixmts. 

SIZF. No. 1 60 cts. .SIZE No. 3 80 cts. 

SIZK No. 2 70 cts. SIZE No. 4 ... 90 cts. 

SIZE No. 5 (largest), box of 850 points.. .33 cts. 



For sale by all leading Wholesale Seedsmen and Dealers in Floiists' Supplies. Samples of all five 
sizes for trial sent by mail, postpaid, on receipt of 10 cents. Address 

HERMANN ROLKER, Room 3, 218 Fulton Street, NEW YORK. 

(iENKKAI, .AtiKNT FOK .VMKRICA .4ND KIIROFE. 



VICTORY! VICTORY! VICTORY! 



The only Certificate ot Merit 
awarded lor ventilating ap- 
paratus at tlie St. Louis I 
Convention was to tlie | 

POPULAR STANDARD | 

VENTILATING MACHINE I 

I 

The florist's friend in I 

working and prices. ] 




No repairs for 5 years, 
no chains to break 
as is the result with 
others. 

Opens Sash uniform on 
100 foot houses. A 
new device. 

Send lor Catalogue and Es- 
timates. 



E5. nir»F»AH:r>, "X'o^aaa.gsto'wrx, Oliio. 



Pat. 1882, '85, '86, 
90, '91. 



FOR WATER, AIR, STEAM, ACIIMir 
OILS, LIQUORS, GAS, SUCTION, 

And for any and every purpose for which a hose 

can be applied. 

Sizes, '/a-iach to 42 inches diameter. 

The making, vending or use of any Serviceable 

Armored Wire Bound Hose not of our manufac- 

ture is an infringement on one or more of our 

Patents. The rights secured to us render each individual dealer or user responsible for such unlawful 
use with all the consequences thereof. For prices and discounts address WATERBURY RUBBER C0< 
Sole MJ'rs and Owners of all the Sphincter Grip Armored Nose Patents, 49 Warren Street, New Yf"'' 
.T. C. VAUGHAN. Agent, CHICAGO. 




SERLNQ STEEL DALV 



IMPROVED GLAZING. 




GASSER'S PATENT ZINC JOINTS for bu^ 

ting class makes (rreenhousCB air and water tltrht; also 
prevents slldInK and breakace from frost. Does not 
CMBt as mucli to heat a house glazed with the Joints, 
thereby saving enough In fuel to more than pay the 
additional cost of glazing. The leading florists of the 
country are using them. Write for circulars with full 
particulars and price list. 

J. M. QASSER, Florist, 

Kuc-lid Avenue, CLEVELAND. O. 

You CAN save money by printing your 
spring trade list in our columns. 



THE CHAMPION 

flutomailc Ventilator. 

The cheapest, easiest to operate, and by far the 
oest machine In the market. I>on't buy a Venti- 
lator until you have seen my Illustrated descriptive 
circular, which will be sent you free, giving prices, etc. 
\Ibo Champion Soli Pulverizer and Sifter. 

Address A. Q. WOLF & BRO.. 
331 E. First Street: I>.VYTON, OHIO. 



GREENHOUSE HEATING 

AND VENTILATING. 

Superior Hot Water Boilers 
JOHN A. SCOLLAY, 

74&76 Myrtle Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
^B"Send for Catalogue. 




130 



The American Florist. 



Sept. 



Cleveland. 

The pilgrims returning from the sea- 
shore all report having a pleasant and 
profitable time. There were not many 
representatives from our city, there being 
only six all told. But we promise to do 
better next year, as the convention meets 
in our neighbor city. — Pittsburg. 

The carpet bedding in Monumental 
Square is looking as good as could be ex- 
pected under the circumstances, except 
the vases which adorn (?) the walks, they 
are an eyesore, and the G. A. R. designs, 
instead of being red, white, and blue, are 
red, white, and green, as the lobelia which 
was used for the latter color is out of 
bloom, and is one mass of foliage. Is 
there no better plant to use to represent 
one of our national colors? I thought I 
had found the very thing last year in 
Washington Park, Chicago; the design 
was a flag and the blue "field" was that 
desirable color we have been looking for, 
but on closer examination it was found 
to consist of small broken stones which 
had been dyed. 

Business is beginning slowly to pickup. 
There is considerable funeral work at 
times, and the orders for designs from 
outlying towns within a radius of 100 
miles is considerable. White flowers be- 
ing scarce at this time of year the average 
florist in small towns would rather send 
to a large city to have their work made 
up where there are greater facilities at all 
times of the year for turning out good 
work, than to stint his designs when 
flowers are scarce, and not give satisfac- 
tion to his customers. L. F. D. 



Pittsfield, Mass. 



A regular meeting of the Berkshire 
County Gardeners' and Florists' Club 
took place August 9 and was very largely 
attended. It proved to be a regular bug 
and insects meeting; the borers especially 
had a pretty hard time of it. Maples, 
mountain ash, larches and other trees are 
dying off here, the result of the attacks of 
these borers. 

A hearty vote of thanks was accorded 
the Lenox Horticultural Society for their 
generous entertainment on July 21. 

Those interested desiring copy of our 
annualreport and premium list for the 
coming year mav receive copy now on 
application. W. M. Edwards, Sec'y. 

Standard Flower Pots. 

10 per cent, off for cash with order. Special dis- 
count on laree orders. We carry a larjje 
stock on hand of Kood strong pots. 

PRICE LIST OF STANDARD FLOWER POTS. 



1^-lnch pots, per 1000 1 3.U0 

2 " •' 3.2.^ 
2M " •• 3.60 
2% •• '• 4.00 

3 " " 5.00 
m ■■ '• 7.25 

4 " •• il.OO 
6 ■• " 13.80 



Wnch pots, per 1000 122. UO 

7 " ■• X,.W 

8 ■• " 60.00 
(1 •■ ■• 75.U0 

10 •• perlOO 10.00 

11 '■ •• 15.00 

12 '• ■• 20.00 
14 ■• ■■ 40 no 
li; ■• ■• 75.00 

Address HILFINGER BROS. POTTERY, 

.... FORT EDWARD, N. Y. 

AUKUst Kolker & Sons. I3i; & 138 W. 24th St., New York 
City, New York AKonts. 



EVANS' IMPROVED 

Challenge 

Ventilating 

Apparatus 

Write fur IMuBtrtiUHl ("atuIuKue. 

QUAKER CITY MACHINE WORKS. 
KIchmoiMl, IimI. 




HAIL 



LOCK THE DOOR BEFORE 
THK IIORSK IS STOLEN 
DO IT NOW. 
JOHN G. ESLER, Sec'y. F. H. A., Saddle River, N. J 




TrootaPudilino" 

Woodstock, Ont., May 28, 1894. 
IvOCK[,AND LUMBER CO. 

f^/Vw/Zt-wt/^— I have had material from you for four houses, and 
all the material has been first-class. One hundred pieces 19 feet long- 
without the semblance of a knot ! Just think of it ! ! With overrun 
measure every time. I would be sorry if I could notg^et my material 
from you. Yours truly, ANGUS ROSE- 



GUTTER MHTERiaL, RIDGES, saSH, ETC. 
The finest CLEAR CYPRESS used. 
I I'ur circulai'R and estimates ADDBKSS 

LOGKLflND LUMBER 60. 



a 



Standard" Flower Pots. 

As manufactured by us have carried oflF highest honors wherever shown and 
have stood the best test. They are used in all the leading floral establishments 
in the United States. For prices address 

The Whilldin Pottery Company, 

BRANCH WAREHOUSES: 713. 715. 717 & 7^9 Wharton St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Randolph Ave. and Union St., Jersey City, X. J. 
Jackson Ave. and Pearson St., Long; Island City, L. I. 

STANDARD FLOWER POTS 

Every user of Flower Pots should correspond with us before 
purchasing elsewhere. Our facilities are unequaled. 

A. H. HEWS & CO., N. Cambridge, Mass. 

Announcement to Florists. 

Wedesire to announce the dissolution of the firmofSipfle Dopffel & Co., and to introduce to the 
trade its successor, The Syracuse Pottery Co., which will be under the management of William Dopffel 
and Conrad Breitschwerth. The business will be conducted as heretofore, except on a larger scale to 
meet the growing demand for our goods. We have accordingly enlarged our plant and capacity, and 
with unsurpassed facilities are now prepared to fill the largest order on short notice. Our latest im- 
proved machines are turning out the best and most serviceable flowerpots in the market, and assuring 
you of our intention to lead in further improvements we solicit a continuance of your patronage in the 
belief that we can supply just what is needed at a price and in a manner satisfactory to all. 
Send for price list and samples and we know you will give us an order. 



SYRACUSE POTTERY CO. 



403 North Salina Street, SYRACUSE, N. 



Y. 



STANDARD FLOWER POTS. 

OLD RELIABLE MAKE OF 

Write tor Catalogue and Price List. 

PITTSBURGH CLAY MFG. CO. New Brighton, Pa. 

STANDARD FLOWER POTS. 

If you are going to the Convention please examing our Flower 

Pots while there. To those who are not going we would 

simply say, "send in your order for large pots early." 

THE PARMENTER MAN'FG CO., 

STANDARD FLOWER POTS. 

OAK HILL POTTERY CO., New Brighton, Pa. 

(Formerly I). O. SCOFIELI) * CO.) 

The same machinery, clay and workmen. The same smooth, 

porous, evenly burnt and well packed pots. Orders filled 

promptly. Write for prices. 



i8g4. 



The American Florist. 



131 



SEE HERE 



Greenhouse Pipe and Fittings. 



BROTHER 



FLORIST 



Aren't you tired going through your houses two or 
three times a day year after year and lifting your ven- 
lllatlDg sash one at a time and cropping them up with 
BtlckB or pots, with a chance of having sash blown off 
and broken glass to pay for ? If you are 





HOT-AIR 



We have cot juRt the thine vou need the NEWTEST 
and IJtST thing out. ^ The New Departure for 
about half the cost of the old style. 3end for 
Descriptive Catalogue to 

J. D. GflRMOPy, Evansviile, Ind. 

WATER 

For Your 

GREEN HOUSE, 

ROSE HOUSE, 

NURSERY, 

Conservatory, Lawn, ' 
House, Garden, Stock 
orany other purpose. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue 

OF THE 

delamater-riderandP[J|Y|P||^Q 

DeLAMATER-ERICSSON pypmp 

PUMPING ENGINE. 
ENGINE. 

Their operation ie so simple and 
fiafe that a cbild can run them Tiiev 
■will pump water from shallow 
Btreams or any k.ud of well. Thev 
eanlearranKedfnranv kind of fuel. 

Capacity 1.600 to 30.000 gallons 
ol water a day. according to size. 

The De Lamater Iron Works, 

87 South Fifth Avenue. 
NEW YORK, IM. Y. 

Kroeschell Bros. Co. 

Greenhouse : Boiler, 

41 to 55 Erie St., CHICAGO. ' 





Boilers made of the heat of material, shell, firebox 
sheet* and headu of steel, water space all around 
(front, sides and back). Wrlt*^ for Information. 

You will benefit the American Flo- 
rist by mentioning it every time you 
write an advertiser in these columns 




Large quantities of our Pipe are in use in Green- 
houses throughout the West, to any of which we 
refer as to its excellent quality. 

Pipe can be easily put together by any one, very 
little instruction being needed. 

GET THE BEST. 

Hot-Water Heating, in its Econoiny and Superi 
ority, will repay in a few seasons its cost. 
Mention American Florist. 

L. WOLFF MFG. CO., 93 to 117 W. Lake Street, CHICAGO. 

WRITE FOR ILLUSTRATED CIRCULAR. 





Gumeii 



Hot Water Heaters 
# Steam Boilers. 



Gurney Double Crown Hot Water Heater. 



UNEXCELLED FOR GREENHOUSE REQUIREMENTS. 

Send for Greenhouse Catalogue. 
163 Franklin Street (Cor. Congress), 

BOSTON, MASS. 

oc-TTTvr. (Johnson & Co.. 71 John St.. New York and vicinity. 
4^yi,«,*^e \ J- C F. Trachsel. 246 Arch St., Phila. and vicinity. 
ACJi.M. ij!,& |t ^ ^ Griffing Ikon Co., 34 Dearborn St.. Chlcaeo 
and Western States. 



H. M. HOOKER COMPANY, 

57 and 59 W. Randolph Street, CNIGA60. 

FOR GREENHOUSES . 

■Write for latest pr-ioes.-^-'^.-^'^* 



THOS. W. WEATHERED'S SONS, 

flonicoliyrai flrcHiiecis and Hot Water Enolneers 

Send for Catalogue, enclosing 4 cents in stamps. 

I«o. S^^ Oaixal St., I^EJ-W -VORK: OIT^ST. 

GREENHOUSE BOILERS. 

We have in stock boilers new and second-hand, suitable 
for heating Greenhouses. Prices Low. 

r^ox^E^oi«oxrjE> «& CO., 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



143 & 145 N. Third Street, 



PATENTC 

I Trade-Marks, Copyrights, Etc. ^^^ 

I GHflNDLEE & GHflNDLEE.C/ 

KLECTKHAI. AND MEtH.^NUAI. E.XI'EItT?^. 

Coirespundence Sollcltefl. 



Atlantic Building, 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Crabb & Hunter, 

Florists & Fuel Oil Plant Contractors, 

Also Dealers in OIL BURNERS, and Agents lor 
Snell's Hydranllc System of using Oil for fuel 
purposes. No odor, and ]^t.o% cheaper than coal. 

509 Madison Ave.. GRAND RAPIDS. MICH. 

^"Send for Circular. . . . 



132 



The American Florist. 



Sept, /, 



Index to Advertisers. 



Adv. rates, etc 122 

American Boiler Co.. . . 132 
American Road Ma- 
chine Co 129 

Baker Bros 127 

BallerFA 12.5 

BaTersdorfer H & CoI28 

BerKerHH& Co 124 

Blanc A 128 

Bock W A 122 

Bonsall Jos E 123 

Boston Letter Co 128 

Brant&Noe 121 

Brown Peter 124 

Bums & Raynor.... ..123 

BurrowJG 127 

CarmanR W 129 

CarmodyJ D 131 

Chandlee & Chandlee. .131 
Ch'go Folding Box Co 122 

Connell Benj 12ti 

Corbrey & McKellar....l22 
Cottage Gardens The.. 126 
Cox Seed & Plant Co.. 124 

Crabb& Hunter 131 

Deamud JB&Co 123 

De Cock Jules 127 

De Lamater Iron Wks.131 

DeSmet Louis 124 

Dillon J L 121 

Domer Fred & Son 12B 

DreerH A 125 127 

Elliott WH 122 

Ellison Wm. 122 

EvendenBros 121 

FaustHG&Co 124 

Fisher &Alrd 12B 

Gardiner John 4 Co... 122 

Gasser JM ....129 

Gonzalez F & Co 12.5 

Grallert & Co 12U 

Gurney Healer Co . . . 131 

Hall Ass'n l:« 

Hancock & Son 12(1 

Hartford HE 122 

Helnl Joseph 121 12(1 

Herr Albert M 125 

Hermann's Seed Store 

125 127 128 

HewsAH&Co 130 

Hllflnger Bros 130 

HlllBG&Co 127 

HlppardE 129 

HItchlngs&Co 132 

Hooker H M Co 131 

Horan Edw C 123 

Horan James 121 

Hulsebosch Bros 124 

HuntEH 123 

Hunt M A Estate 121 

Hunter Frank D 123 

Jennings EB 125 

JoostenCH 125 

Kaufmann Ernst & Co. 12S 

Kennlcott Bros Co 123 

Klein Fritz 120 

Krlck WC 128 

Kroeschell Bros Co 131 

Kuehn C A 122 

Lockland Lumber Co. .1,30 

LongDan'lB 122 123 

Lonsdale Edwin 126 

Lord & Bumham Co.. 129 
Lovegrove & Co 131 



McCarthy N F & Co. . . .123 

McFarland J H 122 

McFarland J H Co 127 

Mac Bean A S 121 

MandaWA 125 

Manz J&Co 128 

Marschuetz k Co 128 

May Jno N 12li 

Mendenhall Greenho'8l20 
Michel Pit & Bulb Co. 126 

Mlllang Frank \%\ 

Monlnger Jno C 132 

Moore Frank L 128 

Mount s & Co 125 127 

Munn L R 120 

Nanz & Neuner . ..121 

National Plant Co 121 

Nlles Centre Floral Co. 123 
Oak Hill Pottery Co... .13U 

Oasis Nursery Co 125 

Pannenter Mfg Co 13U 

PennockCJ 12t) 

Pennock Sam'l S 123 

Plerson F R Co 121 

Pitcher A- .Manda 12t) 

Pittsburg ClayMfgCo.lM 
QuakerCltvMc hW'k8.130 

Randall AL 123 

Reed & Keller 128 

Reed Glass Co 132 

RelnbergBros 122 123 

RobertsDH ,....132 

Roehrs Theo 123 

Roemer Fred 125 

Rogers Nursery Co 127 

RolkerA& Sons 127 

Rolker Herman 129 

RuppHS&Son 127 

Rupp J F 125 

Russell S J 128 

Sander & Co 127 

Schneider Fred 120 

Schwake Chas 124 

Schwanecke Carl 127 

Scollay Jno A 129 

Shelmlre W R 126 

Sheridan W F 123 

Slebrecht k Wadley...l27 
Situations, wants, etc.. 120 

Smith Henry.. 121 

Smith Nath ,i Son 121 

Soltau Christian 125 

Spooner Wm H 121 

StrebySO ...121 

StruckJN&Bro 129 

Sunderbruch H L , 122 

Sunset Seed & Prt Co.. 127 

Sutherland Geo A 123 

Syracuse Pottery Co... 130 

Tesson R F 121 

Trleker Wm & Co 124 

Vaugh.an J C..1'22 124 128 
Waterbury Rubber Co. 129 
Weathereds Sons T W.131 

Weeber & Don 124 

Welch Bros 123 

Whllldln Pot Co 130 

WIIksMfgCo 129 

Williams & Sons Co... 127 

Wlttbold Geo 127 

Wolf AQ& Bro 129 

WolffLMfgCo 131 

Wood Bros 121 

Young Thos Jr 123 



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Vol. X. 



CHICAGO AND NEW YORK, SEPTEMBER 8, 1894. 



No. 327 



Copjmght 1894, by American Florist Company. 
Entered as Second-Class Mail Matter. 

Published every Saturday by 

THE American florist Compamy. 

388 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 



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Address all communications to 
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CONTENTS. 

Chrysanthemums— Suggestions for a show. . . 13:3 

— Judging new 134 

Ca -nations — Notes 134 

—In the field on Long Island 135 

Group photo at Carisbrooke (illus) 135 

Roses— Testout for outdoor planting 136 

Miscellaneous seasonable hints 136 

Group photo taken on pier (illus) 137 

Fall exhibition Mass. Hort. Society 137 

Lenox Mass., Hort. Society 137 

Arrangement of flowers XI (2 illus) 138 

Chicago 138 

Philadelphia 139 

New York 139 

Boston 140 

Toronto 140 

St. Paul, Minn 140 

Coming exhibitions 142 

The seed trade 144 

News notes . . 144 

Cincinnati 146 

Greenhouse building , 146 

Indianapolis .... 148 

Annual outing Minnesota Florists' Society . . 1.50 



COATESVILLE, Pa. — ^James Brown Jr. 
has completed his range of glass, which 
consists of three houses 16x100 with pack- 
ing shed 52x12. 

Lansing, Mich. — R. H. Mann, of the 
firm of R. Mann & Son, was married 
August 23, and has gone to Honolulu 
■where he will reside. 

Waukegan, III.— F. R. Clarke has 
bought a place here, and will go into the 
business as grower for the Chicago mar- 
ket. He will add to his present glass area. 

Paducah, Ky. — C. L. Brunson & Co. 
report a fair trade for last year, and that 
prospects are encouraging for this win- 
ter's business. They have just completed 
a house 125 feet long for chrysanthemums. 

Taylorville, III.— Fred Cook & Sons 
hive purchased the Taylorville Green- 
houses, owned by W. H. Kirkwood and 
M. B. Leach. Cook & Sons now have 
4,000 feet of glass, and expect soon to 
add another house, and put new boilers 
in the original plant. The establishment 
includes eight acres of land, which will 
be used for fruit and greenhouse supplies. 

Please mention the American Florist 
every time vou write to an advertiser. 




Suggestions for a Chrysanthemum Show. 

{Read be/ore the Toronto Gardeners^ and Flo- 
rists' Association by A. H. Ezving;.^ 

When I offered to write a paper on this 
subject I thought I was going to have a 
soft thing of it; but the further I got into 
the matter the more I saw that it was a 
bigger thing than it looked, and that it 
required a lot of thinking to get ideas 
straightened out into a comprehensible 
shape. I am afraid you may think this 
paper too long before I get through, but 
I assure you that I have endeavored to 
boil down the matter as much as possible. 

First I wish the members to under- 
stand that I do not claim all the follow- 
ing suggestions as being original. They 
are principally taken from the writings 
of those who have had experience in run- 
ning shows on the other side, which have 
been published from time to time in the 
horticultural papers, and from a discus- 
sion at the last meeting of the S. A. F. at 
St. Louis on horticultural exhibitions. I 
have picked out from them only what I 
thought would be beneficial for Toronto 
shows, blending them with what I have 
learned about the matter from my own 
experience. 

To begin with, I think it is of the great- 
est importance that we should endeavor 
to make our shows more artistic, I mean 
in the arrangement of exhibits and in the 
decoration of the hall. As we have them 
now they are simply a lot of plants and 
cut flowers stood in rows like regiments 
of soldiers, and we only show the skill of 
the gardener in raising fine plants and 
big blooms. A small group 15x6 feet and 
a mantel are the only things in which the 
public is shown what can be done in the 
way of floricultural decorating. This 
seems to me to be all wrong, and I am 
sure the public will think so too if it is 
not remedied soon. Our association con- 
tains all kinds of gardeners and florists, 
and the annual show of the association 
should give the public an exhibition of 
what can be done when a lot of the finest 
plants and blooms are brought together. 
There is no doubt but that the associa- 
tion contains members with plenty of 
good taste in decorating for artistic 
effect, and there should be some way of 
bringing it to the front at our shows. I 
take it that these shows are not held 
only for the purpose of making money 



for the association, nor for any of the 
individual members thereof, but also for 
the purpose of educating the public to a 
love for floriculture in all its branches, 
thereby advancing the profession and in- 
directly benefiting all engaged in it. Of 
course we want to make money enough 
every year to enable us to pay decent 
prizes and expenses, and if there is some 
over after that is done it gives us courage 
and the means to do more next year; but 
if something is not done to give more 
artistic effect to the whole show the 
public will soon say "Oh! it is the same 
old chestnut," and will get tired of it. 

It is, in my opinion (and I have not 
taken this from anybody else), a most 
important thing to get a first-class super- 
intendent in order to carry out the fore- 
going suggestion. I used to think that 
any active man with a voice like a fog 
horn and the schedule in his hand would 
do, but experience has taught me that 
these are not the only qualifications nec- 
essary. I think that the association 
should hang up an advertisement in the 
meeting room something like the fol- 
lowing: 

Wanted, for the chrysanthemum show 
of 1894, a competent man to act as 
superintendent. Must have experience 
and taste in decorating large halls; must 
be civil and obliging but must take no 
back chat from exhibitors; must be a 
hustler from the word go and able to do 
two days work before 12 o'clock noon on 
the first day of the show; must be able to 
lift palms in tubs weighing 500 pounds 
or more, and carry from two to four spec- 
imen plants at once without injury, or at 
least to tell the other fellows how to do 
it, and must be able to boss three or four 
helpers who think they know more than 
he does. $2.00 per day will be paid to a 
suitr^ble man. Apply to the chairman of 
the show committee, who will examine 
candidates as to their qualifications. 
Candidates must expect to be held up to 
general execration after the show is over. 

The chrysanthemum show committee 
should, I think, be composed of not more 
than three, and these three should be 
carefully chosen by the executive com- 
mittee. They should be the very best 
men of the "get there" breed that can be 
picked from the association, and must 
have time, or be able to make time, and 
be willing to make some little sacrifice in 
order to do the work. The executive 
committee is all very well to get up the 
prize list, and I think the recommenda- 
tion in its report to-night is a move in 
the right direction; but to do the work of 
the show it seems tome that a large com- 
mittee is too unwieldy and can't move 
quickly enough. 

Judicious advertising is one of the most 
important points in the success of a 
show, and the member of the committee 
who has this branch in charge should 
have had some previous experience in 



134 



The American Florist. 



Sept. <?, 



that line. I have an impression that our 
former shows have not been sufficiently 
advertised either in the papers or by 
posters or hand bills. A good many of 
the American clubs publish a souvenir 
and distribute a large number of them 
before the show, but this is a little ex- 
pensive, and I think it is doubtful whether 
the returns are large enough to make that 
kind of advertising advisable. 

Newspapers can do more for the success 
or failure of any undertaking in this 
country than any one thing, and their 
good will should be worked for by every 
possible means. Now ne^vspapers are 
not run just for the fun of the thing; they 
are business undertakings, and the pro- 
prietors are in it to make money; every 
inch of their space represents so much 
value to them. Therefore, I do not think 
we should expect too much of them unless 
we are as liberal with them as they are 
willing to be with us. Most of our To- 
ronto papers have in the past seemed to 
be quite willing to be liberal with us, and 
I quite believe that if we are more liberal 
with them than we have been, both with 
our advertising and complimentary 
tickets, they will do still better with us 
in the future. Depend upon it, we can't 
get along without the thorough good 
will of the press. The following is an ex- 
tract from a speech made by Mr. E. A. 
Seidewitz of Baltimore, at the St. Louis 
convention. 

I consider that liberal advertising is the main 
requisite of a successful flower show. Here, gen- 
tlemen, let me impress upon you one thing, and 
that is, never expect to get anything for nothing. 
It will not do to ^o to a newspaper and simply 
say: "We will give you news when you give us a 
description of our shows." We must take into 
consideration that space in a newspaper counts 
for so much money. We must not go to them and 
say: "You send j'Our reporter down, we will give 
you plenty of news." That is wrong. In Balti- 
more we go to a newspaper proprietor— Mr. Abell 
of the Sun, for instance— and say to him: "We 
wish to invest so much money in advertising." 
Well and good. Our ofifer is accepted, and the 
space to which we are entitled by the amount paid 
is given to us. We go to all the papers alike — it 
does not matter how small the paper, we believe 
we must go to all of them. When the show opens 
they send around their reporters; and I have seen 
those reporters work there the whole day, with 
the assistance of the committeemen, in preparing 
correct and creditable descriptions of the show. 
I may say that to the newspapers of Baltimore we 
owe our success financially: and I would like to 
impress upon you, gentlemen, that the newspaper 
in this country is indispensable in making the 
flower shows of America successful. 

Advertising by posters is another 
method that can not be neglected with- 
out loss; there should be a large, con- 
spicuous and attractive bill on every 
boarding in the city. If it pays the 
theaters to do so much of it it will pay 
us. Shop cards also do good and their 
cost is comparatively small. Bills on the 
street cars during the show I think do a 
lot of good also and pay well. Giving 
invitations to prominent people (as was 
done last year) and complimentary tick- 
ets, if done with discretion, may bealmost 
called a method of advertising, and does 
more good than those who do not see 
how things work may think. It puts the 
recipients of them in a good mind and 
predisposes them to favor the show, 
making them advertising mediums at 
once. 

There is another point on which I have 
changed my mind lately. I used not to 
believe in formal openings. Of course on 
these occasions there is a lot of humbug 
said and done, but if the lieutenant gov- 
ernor or the mayor does the business the 
papers are bound to give an account of 
it next day, and the show gets a lot of 
advertising; besides, perhaps, it gives a 
fashionable tone to the show which it 
otherwise would not get. Can we afford 
to lose this? 



As regards the price of admission, I 
don't see that it can be changed for the 
better. 25 cents catches every one, and 
I think we should let well alone on that 
point. The Chicago club at their 1892 
show tried 50 cents, and got as many 
people as the year before at 25 cents. 
That was very nice for the Chicago club, 
but I am sure that if we tried the same 
thing here we should get left. But our 
gate receipts certainly ought to be a great 
deal larger than they are. In Indianap- 
olis, with a population of 130,000, the 
gross receipts for the show in '92 were 
$3,400, with the admission 25 cents in 
the day time and 50 cents at night. To- 
ronto, with a population of over 200,000, 
could only scratch up to about $900 at 
last year's show, which was the best 
that has been held. So that it is evident 
that we have a big thing to work o« yet, 
and I believe that with proper manage- 
ment our show might be made the great 
fashionable event of the season, and if 
this can be done there is money in it not 
only for the association but for all in the 
profession. 

The subject is one of vital importance 
to the association; we might as well be 
dead as half dead; but when it is in our 
power to make this show a big thing and 
thereby benefit ourselves one and all, why 
let us get up and make it the liveliest kind 
of a show on record. I hope the members 
will discuss these few suggestions, espe- 
cially the possibility of making the show 
more artistic as a whole. 

Since writing the above there has been 
a good deal said about judges. Well! we 
as everybody knows favor the one judge 
plan, and have found it work very well 
and with less expense, less trouble, less 
kicking. The main points are to get thor- 
oughly good and expert judges of plants 
and cut flowers outside our own city, and 
change every year. 

Judging New Chrysanthemums. 

Ed. Am. Florist: — Your esteemed cor- 
respondent Mr. T. D. Hatfield brings up 
a very important matter relative to judg- 
ing chrysanthemums. It is in line with 
my own thought upon the subject, and 
hence would like to see eflforts made to 
have a representative exhibit of all the 
seedling chrysanthemums made at some 
intermediate city where the owners ot 
seedlings might send them for judgment. 
The plan outlined at Atlantic City by the 
National Chrysanthemum Society does 
not meet the requirements of the case; it 
proposes to appoint three experts in or 
at the differentcenters to pass upon those 
in the neighborhood or adjacent to the 
city or center where the committee hold 
forth. A far better plan would be to 
have a city situated like Buffalo or Pitts- 
burg where all the seedlings could be got 
together, at one or more stated times, 
and there have them judged compara- 
tively and on their merits. Something of 
this kind is so obviously necessary that 
it commends itself at once to the intelli- 
gence of those interested. 

Three or five judges might be selected, 
and let these judges work on the point 
system, the highest number of points 
noted to constitute an award of the first 
class, a given number of votes to consti- 
tute an award of merit of the second 
class. 

Complaint is made that examinations 
and decisions are made now on too lim- 
ited a line, in other words, that only va- 
rieties with stiff stems and monstrous 
flowers are considered. This could easily 
be remedied by making classes and defin- 
ing the attributes of varieties for entry in 
the diffierent classes. 



It does not necessarily follow that this 
competitive test shall be held in connec- 
tion with an exhibition or that a public 
show shall be had, but it would be ob- 
viously to the advantage of any club to 
have in connection with their own exhibit 
the exhibit of seedlings under the super- 
vision of the National Chrysanthemum 
Society. They certainly would prove an 
interesting feature of any exhibition and 
be a winning card in the way of a good 
adv. for the local show. 

Complaint is made on every hand of 
the enormous number of new varieties 
launched upon the market every year, 
varieties inferior to existing sorts, and 
which should never be sent out. The 
growers give as a pretext unpropitious 
dates of shows, judges all one sided in 
passing on varieties, examining every- 
thing presented from a narrow commer- 
cial view. Judges must be selected who 
hold the confidence and esteem of grower 
and buyer alike; caution will have to be 
exercised here, but there need be no 
trouble in getting judges who shall be 
eminently satisfactory to all concerned. 
If we as growers and raisers of new vari- 
eties ever expect to command confidence 
and enjoy the full fruition of our labors 
we must earnestly support a plan ap- 
proximating at least the plan outlined by 
Mr. Hatfield. European growers write 
that they would like to buy in quantity 
of our new varieties, but they are at a 
loss to know which are the best out of 
the one hundred or more varieties an- 
nually offered with such glowing de- 
scriptions. 

A good thorough testof this plan would 
not be so very expensive or difficult to 
arrange, and the writer firmly believes 
great good would come out of it. If 
nothing else come out of it it might ena- 
ble our genial and versatile friend Rawson 
to point out to the satisfaction of the 
judges the difference(?) between Princess 
of Chrysanthemums and Good Gracious. 

Undoubtedly there will be more new 
chrysanthemums this year claiming un- 
told merit than were ever presented be- 
fore, and why not arrange now to exam- 
ine the claimants and as the horsemen 
say — "See if she can trot."' This plan 
should be especially gratifying and wel- 
come to the owners of new varieties of 
merit, for an award under the circum- 
stances would mean an endorsement of a 
new variety that would have great pe- 
cuniary considerations accompanving it. 
E. G. Hill. 




To Prevent Rust.— Dissolve one pound of sul- 
phate of copper in two quarts of ammonia in a 2- 
gallon jar. When dissolved add another quart oi 
ammonia and stir well. [The liquid can be kept 
in this form for some time and used as needed.] 
Add a pint of this solution to a barrel of water and 
syriuge the plants with a force-pump every two 
weeks. And don't let the time for spraying pass 
without attending to the operation. 



Carnation Notes. 

If you have any plants in the field yet 
get them in as quickly as possible, unless 
they are quite small plants, when it may 
Le policy to leave them in the field until 
there is danger of a hard frost. A good 
hard frost is no serious injury to carna- 
tion plants that are intended for propa- 
gation and that will be grown in a tern- 



i8g4- 



The American Florist. 



135 




THE GROUP PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN AT CARISBROOKE INN, ATLANTIC CITY. 



perature of 40° to 45°; but it is quite an 
injury to plants that are to be E;rown in 
a temperature of 50^ to 60° for cut 
flowers. 

After the plants are started nicelv, if 
the shading has not been washed otF by 
rains, rather than let the plants suffer for 
want of sunshine wash it off yourself. 
About the quickest and cheapest way I 
have found is to take an ordinary scrub- 
bing brush with a handle and a boy at 
the end of the handle. If it happens to be 
very hot for a week or two yet as it often 
is in September it is best not to take 
all the shading off at once, but clean every 
other row, that is leaving one row with 
shading on and one clean. As soon as 
you safely can clean the entire house, lor 
the two best friends the carnation has 
are sunshine and air. 

As a rule while you are starting the 
carnations you are also starting a fine 
crop of weeds. If you do not stake as 
you plant do it as soon after as you can 
and you can then easily keep them clean, 
which is a very essential feature in carna- 
tion culture. Everything possible should 
be done to assist root development, and 
there is quite a perceptible difference be- 
tween beds that have the soil kept stirred 
occasionally and those that have not, the 
difference being decidedly in favor of stir- 
ring the soil. These may seem like unim- 
portantlittleitems,butit is justa number 
of such little things carefully looked after 
that make successful carnation growing. 
In stirring the soil do not cut into it deep 
enough to disturb the roots, and do not 
let some careless fellow get among your 
plants who will break them up and do 
more harm than good. 

It is a good plan to watch your em- 
ployes, and if you find you have a careless 
one on the place better get rid of him at 
once; such men may have a place to fill 
on this earth but it is not in a greenhouse 
full of carnations. I think I have said 
before that starting right is the key to 
future success, and to start right and 
keep right you must have employes who 
will carry out your instructions intelli- 
gently and carefully. 
Keep a sharp look out for green fly and 



do not let them get a start on you; a good 
clan is to close your houses about 6 
o'clock p. m. and give them a good smok- 
ing once a week. Leave the smoke until 
about 8 p. m. and then open up again for 
the night. Albert M. Here. 



Carnations in the Field on Long Island. 
FLATBUSH. 

with the peculiar retentive clay soil of 
Flatbush a dry season is more conducive to 
good results with field grown carnations 
than is a wet one. Hence it is that 
although this has been undoubtedly the 
dryest summer for forty years and the 
roads are knee deep in dry dust and the 
greenhouses effectually shaded with the 
same material, carnations as a rule are 
in excellent condition and sympathize not 
with the flocks of cackling geese and un- 
happy looking ducks which troop hither 
and thither all over the town searching 
disconsolately for a puddle in which to 
immerse their dust coated backs. 

Lizzie McGowan seems to be the only 
prominent variety which will not take to 
characteristic Flatbush soil. In only one 
place (Suydam's) has it done anything 
this season. Here the plants are as fine 
as ever were seen anywhere. With all 
the other growers it has been a pro- 
nounced failure. This is accounted for by 
the quality of the soil on the Suydam 
place, which is a rich friable loam and 
destitute of the clay which abounds all 
around it. This is the only establishment 
where any planting has been done in the 
houses yet, other growers waiting anx- 
iously for rain to loosen the hard packed 
soil so that the plants can be lifted with- 
out tearing the roots. Suydam is an 
example of good luck and industry com- 
bined, a combination hard to beat. They 
say that he gets up in the morning to see 
what time the sun rises and growls be- 
cause night comes so soon. 

None of the carnation growers are 
entirely free from rust, which seems to 
exist to a trifling extent on all varieties. 
Two sorts, however, are loaded with it. 
Silver Spray and Jacqueminot. This is 
much to be regretted in the case of the 



latter variety, which has otherwise made 
a splendid growth. Albertini has done 
well everywhere, and Puritan is fullv 
equal to last year. Baron de Rothschild 
(Bouton d'Or) looks good with its re- 
introducers, Dailledouze Bros., but at 
Messeburg's has made no growth at all. 
William Scott is fully up to expectations 
with everyone. Tidal Wave, The Stuart, 
Portia, Ferdinand Mangold and Annie 
Pixley have all done splendidlj'. Uncle 
John has made a big growth but shows 
traces of bacterial disease in some local- 
ities. Daybreak and Hinze's White are 
somewhat stunted in some lots, but in 
general are all right. Grace Wilder is 
simply immense with Bennett and Messe- 
berg, who plainly have good cause to still 
stand by this old favorite. 

QUEENS. 

At C. W. Ward's Cottage Garden estab- 
lishment there are five or six acres of 
carnations and the houses are being filled 
this week. Michigan, Wm. Scott, Al- 
bertini, E. A. Wood, Ferd. Mangold, 
Thos. Cartledge, Portia and Uncle John 
have all stood the drouth to perfection 
and are in excellent condition with little 
if any difference in size from last year, 
with the exception of Uncle John, which 
grew poorly last year but which is first- 
class in every respect this season. 

There has been trouble with red spider 
on some varieties. Daybreak suffering 
severely from this pest. Helen Keller up 
to two weeks ago, Mr. Ward states, 
looked first rate but just now it seems to 
be going backward. It is also badly 
affected with red spider. The Stuart is 
undersize as compared with last year but 
as a rule is in pretty good shape. Sweet- 
brier has done just about the same as 
The Stuart. 

Storm King has suffered quite severely 
from the dry weather, making only a 
small straggly growth, but being a late 
grower is expected to catch up somewhat 
in the houses. Buttercup stood only 
fairly well, also Edna Craig and Dr. 
Smart, and these varieties are all under- 
sized. As to McGowan it has done 
splendidly and better plants would be 



136 



The American Florist. 



Sept S, 



faard to find. Ada Byron has done pretty 
well, considerably better thanSweetbrier. 
The three novelties, Bridesmaid, Meteor 
and La France, have all made splendid 
growth. Mr. Ward has five new houses 
in process of erection, all with short side 
to the south. 

At Chas. H. Allen's the carnations are 
all housed. Uncle John made the best 
growth of all the varieties outside. Al- 
bertini, The Stuart and Wm. Scott all 
show the effects of the drouth badly , being 
as a rule scarcely more than one third 
size. Scott is nothing to what it ought 
to be and has been in former seasons. 
McGowan while small is of excellent color 
and appears much more healthy and vig- 
orous than it did last year. Mr. Allen is 
growing for pot plants a lot of Winter 
Cheer, an English variety, scarlet, which 
is in habit and constitution the ideal 
plant tor this purpose. 




Mme. Caroline Testout for Outdoor 
Planting. 

It will be good news to not a few ar- 
dent admirers of the Testout rose to learn 
that it is not only a profitable hothouse 
rose, but may be grown in the open air 
with success. From experiments which I 
have made with it I think it may be 
claimed to be perfectly hardy, and if such 
claim prove well founded a very valuable 
feature will be added to its already num- 
erous strong points. This claim of hard- 
iness it will be understood is for this 
locality only; but as our winters are 
severe enough to please an Esquimau it 
is to be presumed that it will prove hardy 
anywhere in this latitude. I will give in 
detail my experience with it as an out- 
door bloomer. 

Last year, being desirous of replanting 
my Testout bed with young stock, I was 
in somewhat of a quandary as to what 
to do with my old plants. The rose being 
a new variety and plants bringing a 
good figure, I disliked to discard them. 
Finally I hit upon the idea of planting 
them out of doors. The venture did not 
promise much in the way of success, but 
as I had the plants and ground space de- 
cided to try it any way, let the issue be 
what it might. 

Being at the height of an exceedingly 
dry summer the ground was of course in 
the very worst natural condition for 
planting. There had been no rainfall for 
over five weeks. These things considered 
we had to use unusual caution in trans- 
planting. A trench five inches deep was 
dug, to which the plants were taken 
singly, having been cut from the bed in 
squares and carried on spades to insure 
as much earth around them as possible. 
Being placed in the trench, water from 
the garden hose was turned on them and 
kept running during the entire process of 
transplanting, which occupied some little 
time. The plants and trench were thus 
completely saturated. When the plants 
were all in place the trench was filled with 
dry soil. This process was followed by 
muVcbing the entire bed with lightslrawy 
manure. Another heavy watering was 



given, which ended the experiment for 
the time. 

Early in March the plants were pruned 
to within six inches of the ground. They 
broke strong early in the month, and 
made a growth of some three or four 
inches, when a sudden freeze came and 
killed them down to the ground. In 
April they began to push stronger than 
before, and we were cutting very nice 
roses by May 25. They were in the very 
height of beauty from the 5th to the 20th 
of June. Some days we cut as many as 
200 roses, most of which were of perfect 
form and exquisite in color. There were 
about five hundred plants in this bed, and 
of this large number not a single one was 
winter-killed. 

I am satisfied that we can get as good 
roses outside as under glass provided the 
same attention were given. The bloom 
we got was quite as good and profuse as 
when the same plants were grown in the 
house, with the single exception that the 
stems were shorter. But this can be 
remedied I feel sure, provided the plants 
are watered and syringed as faithfully 
every day as when under glass culture. 
Visitors at my place constantly inquire 
whether the plants are watered from the 
hydrant directly, and express wonder 
that water so cold does not hurt them. 
The temperature of our city water as it 
comes from the mains is about 56° in the 
summer and the plants thrive under it 
famously. 

I think I am sate in saying that this bed 
of Testouts is the best and cheapest ad- 
vertisement I ever had for a home retail 
trade. Hundreds of people came to see 
it, many of whom left ordersfor from one 
to a dozen plants. I unreservedly advise 
my florist friends not to throw away any 
Testout plants, especially if they have a 
retail trade they care to retain and de- 
velop. Even though they do not get the 
desired long stem the roses will prove in- 
valuable in making up designs. 

We treated a few of the K. A. Victorias 
in the same manner with a like result. 
These two roses make a great team for 
outdoor planting and will, I think, in the 
near future be widely cultivated. We 
also experimented with the Wootton, 
securing as satisfactory an outcome. If 
I were to be confined to three roses for 
outdoor planting I would select Testout, 
Victoria and Wootton. W. W. Coles. 



Miscellaneous Seasonable Hints. 

The old pelargoniums that were cut 
down a month ago will now have made 
young breaks of half an inch or so. Shake 
every particle of earth fiom the roots and 
repot firmly in a smaller sized pot than 
they were previously growing in. A good 
slice can be taken off the ends of the roots. 
They will soon make young feedingroots, 
and these plants could, if you had the 
room, be made into grand specimens 5 or 
6 feet across. Perhaps you don't want 
to grow such large plants, but they will 
give you hundreds of cuttings in a month 
or two, which will make useful market 
plants by next May or June. The three 
pelargoniums I found to sell the best last 
season were Mr. R. Sandiford, white; Dr. 
Masters, crimson, and Mme. Thibaut, a 
beautiful soft pink. 

Never neglect to string up your smilax; 
much time and money is wasted by neg- 
lecting this operation at the right time, 
and don't use white string; whether it be 
common black thread , shoemaker's thread 
or silkaline it matters little so long as it 
is dark in color and hasn't to be removed 
when using the smilax. Pulling out the 
conspicuous white string is not only a 



tedious job, and occurs most times when 
you are in a hurry, but it breaks up the 
smilax and destroys much of the graceful- 
ness when used for decorations. 

Don't forget when you have your car- 
nation beds planted to plant along the 
edge a few plants of the double sweet 
alyssum and myosotis. The former little 
plant is most useful and will help you out 
many times when the demand for white 
flowers is brisk. I don't know the specific 
name of the myosotis that is grown in 
this locality, but it is a most useful plant, 
commencing to flower at Christmas and 
flowering profusely until June. I never 
could see that these plants, say 2 feet 
apart along a carnation bench, did the 
slightest harm to the carnations. They 
are therefor clear profit. 

If I had written any notes a week or 
two weeks ago I should have recom- 
mended you to put in several batches of 
cuttings. It is not late yet. Every 
healthy geranium cutting you can get 
hold of should be taken off at once. Pot- 
ting them firmly in 2 or 2V2-inch pots is 
just as good as the cutting bed, and they 
make sturdier plants. If you cut the 
plants down for the cuttings early in 
September and we don't get a killing 
frost early in October you will get an- 
other fine batch of cuttings, or the old 
plants will be in excellent order for lifting. 

If you don't have any large coleus in 
pots for stock, then put in a good batch 
of the leading varieties; they will make 
strong young plants before cold weather 
comes. The middle of the month is a 
good time to put in the cuttings of many 
common but useful plants, among them 
the ivy geraniums, vincas and Abutilon 
vexillarium. There are a few plants that 
you can multiply one hundred fold during 
the winter and spring, and therefore but 
a few dozen cuttings will be sufficient. I 
allude to such weeds as lophospermum, 
senecio (German ivy), Pilogyne suavis, 
etc. There are other plants of which it is 
more profitable to lift a few old plants 
and begin to propagate when you have 
more room. These are Salvia splendens, 
pyrethrum, the common white feverfew, 
lobelias, ageratums, achryranthes and 
others, and there are a few plants of which 
you should have a few in pots all sum- 
mer because they lift badly; heliotrope 
and lantana are among these. 

As this has been since early June one of 
+he dryest summers in my recollection, 
and where no irrigation has been resorted 
to when we do get the welcome rain, all 
our soft wooded plants will take a jump 
and be naturally soft and particularly 
liable to injury by a slight frost if we 
should get one at the end of the month. 
Don't leave all your tender plants out to 
be rushed in at the last moment. You 
will have callas, poinsettias, azaleas, ste- 
vias and other things plunged in frames. 
The poinsettias and callas will do better 
under glass now. The azaleas and ste- 
vias can be left out till the end of the 
month. 

Don't forget to water once a week at 
least the boxes of Roman* and other 
bulbs which you have outside covered 
with a few inches of soil. Thej' must be 
kept moist or no good root growth will 
go on, and the Harrisii lilies that are pot- 
ted and mulched outside must not be al- 
lowed to get very dry. At this moment 
the rain is falling in good style, and never 
did it seem to "fall from heaven upon the 
earth beneath" with such blessings as it 
does this morning. Wm. Scott. 



You can't afford to do business with- 
out a copy of our trade directory and 
reference book. 



i8g4- 



The American Florist. 



137 




THE GROUP PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN ON THE PIER AT ATLANTIC CITY AFTER THE SHOOTING MATCH. 



Fall Exhibition Mass. Hort. Society. 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Soci- 
ety opened its annual exhibition of plants 
and flowers on Wednesday, Sept. 5. 

In the upper hall were the grand groups 
of stove plants and ferns which have 
always been a leading featureof thisexhi- 
bition. While not as extensive as on 
some former occasions these displays 
were exceedingly good. The fancy cala- 
diums from N. T. Kidder have never been 
excelled here; the ferns from the same 
exhibitor were superb, and his whole col- 
lection of specimen foliage plants was 
without a flaw. In Dr. C. G. Weld's 
group the crotons and dracjenas were 
especially noticeable for their perfection 
of form and brilliancy of coloring. 

John L. Gardner's groupof stoveplants 
was also most creditable. In Mr. Gard- 
ner's exhibit of orchids were some well 
bloomed plants of Miltonia vexillaria, 
and among tho?e shown by Benj. Grey 
was a very fine form of Dendrobium for- 
mosum. 

Tuberous begonias, both plants and cut 
flowers, were shown in more than usual 
profusion, and some very good plants 
were staged by Dr. Weld, the Bussey In- 
stitution and E. S. Converse; a fine lot of 
blooms sent by the Oasis Nursery Com- 
pany unfortunately arrived in a some- 
what battered condition. 

David Allan showed a nice little group 
of jardiniere plants, and the Harvard Bo- 
tanic Garden sent a very interesting col- 
lection of sarracenias, among them being 
several lovely hybrids. 

The display oif cannas was by far the 
best ever seen here. R. & J. Farquhar, 
Robert Christie, David Fisher, J- Cowles 
and others showed extensive collections, 
embracing all the leading sorts, but the 
whole list of cannas must stand at a re- 
spectful distance in the presence of Mr. 
Cowles' seedling, Mr. Fairman Rogers; a 



plant in pot ard several vases of this 
peerless variety were shown. 

The aquatics, of which there were five 
tacks, were a leading attraction of the 
exhibition and were constantly sur- 
rounded by an admiring throng. They 
came from Daniel D. Lee, John Simpkins, 
L. W. Goodell and P. Bissett the latter 
sending all the way from Washington 
enormous blooms of a deep rose colored 
nymphjea, a cross between dentata and 
Sturcevanti. One of the most beautiful 
nympbjeas shown was the new Columbi- 
ana, which was in the collections of John 
Simpkins and L. W. Goodell. It is a glo- 
rious color. 

In the lower hall the show of cut flow- 
ers was superlatively good, something 
unexpected in view of the long spell of dry 
weather. 

The dahlias were very far in advance of 
any former display. Such perfection in 
form, size and color has never been seen 
here, and it came in the form of a big sur- 
prise. H. F. Burt's collection of named 
varieties was very extensive, and they 
were superb in every way, as were also 
tho^e from L. W. Snow,W. C. Winter, W. 
W. Rawson and John Parker. 

.\sters, although somewhat past their 
best season, were excellent. Nasturtiums, 
marigolds, pinks, zinnias and other gar- 
den flowers were shown in profusion. A 
great advance was noted in color and 
form of zinnia flowers, the tiny lilliput 
varieties being especially admired. 

Wild flowers from Mrs. P. D. Richards, 
the Misses Doran, G. H. Grinnell and L. 
H. Parker; and hardy perennials from Rea 
Brothers were as usual a great attrac- 
tion, and enthusiasts with note books in 
hand jostled each other here continually. 

Mr. J. W. Clarke showed a large collec- 
tion of hothouse grapes, among which 
were some well finished Alicante and 
Golden Hamburgh. 

An interesting and interested visitor 



was the always welcome Louis Menand, 
from Albany, accompanied by his daugh- 
ter. Other visitors were Alexander Mc- 
Clellan, J. Cowles and Robert Christie, 
from Newport, and George McWilliam, 
from Whitinsville. 

An interesting little diversion occurred 
when Elijah Wood made his appearance 
in the hall. He was captured and hustled 
into the library room, where he found a 
party of his society friends, headed by 
Mrs. E. M. Gill, who were there to present 
him with a nice little collection of silver 
table ware. The presentation remarks by 
Mr. Jos. H. Woodford were in the right 
strain, and little Woodie's reply was 
equally good. His only regret was that 
his newly acquired better half was not 
also there to share his pleasure. 

The list of premiums awarded at the 
exhibition will appear in next week's 
issue. 



Lenox, Mass., Horticultural Society. 

The Lenox Horticultural Society has 
every reason to be proud of its first exhi- 
bition. A more favorable or attractive 
spot for such an event than the acacia 
and maple shaded lawn on which the big 
tent was spread it would be hard to find, 
and certainly no finer compliment could 
be paid to the aggregation of expert 
growers which makes Lenox horticultur- 
ally famous than the stream of aristo- 
cratic visitors whose stylish equipages 
drew up in quick succession to the en- 
trance. The elite of the land were there, 
and they were enthusiastically appreci- 
ative. 

The arrangement of the groups of 
plants upon the grass was admirable. 
The main tent, one hundred feet long and 
fifty wide, was filled to the last available 
foot of space, and an annex tent had to 
be devoted to the display of fruit and veg- 
etables. 



138 



The American Florist. 



Sept. 8, 



A. H. Wingett and P. J. Donahue were 
the winners of the two first premiums for 
group of stove and greenhouse plants. 
The first prize, which was awarded to 
Mr. Wingett, was a silver cup offered 
by Thos. W. Weathered 's Sons. Noticea- 
ble in this collection were the anthuriums 
and specimen ferns. Mr. Donahue's Pan- 
danus Veitchii, ficuses and palms were 
very fine. The prizes for twelve stove 
plants went to A. P. Meredith, first, and 
J. F. Huss, second. Mr. Meredith's seed- 
ling anthuriums, crotons and Adiantum 
Farleyense were excellent, and his group 
of ferns, which took first prize in their 
class, would be hard to beat, all of them 
measuring from four to six feet across. 
He was also awarded first for specimen 
fern, six nepenthes and twenty-five plants 
of seedling gloxinias, Mr. Huss following 
second in the latter class. Mr. Huss was 
first with table decoration of plants, 
twenty-five tuberous begonias, collection 
of asters, lilies, cannas, gladioluses, pan- 
sies, annuals and herbaceous perennials, 
a fair amount of glory for one occasion. 

Mr. Wingett staged the only group in 
the class of flowering and ornamental 
plants, and it well merited the first pre- 
mium which was awarded to it. Double 
zinnias were shown by A. Hans, J. F. 
Huss and C. H. Russell, those belonging 
to Mr. Hans being remarkably fine. 
Other exhibitors who received honors 
were E. J. Norman, Martin Finaghty and 
W. M. Edwards. 

There were some very interesting and 
creditable exhibits of native plants, thofe 
shown by Miss Dana's school children 
and Master Thos. Campbell, a gardener's 
son twelve years of age, being especially 
good. J. F. Huss' group of garden annu- 
als was superb, the salpiglossis particu- 
larly attracting attention. From Wm. 
M. Edwards and Martin Finaghty came 
interesting collections of ornamental trees 
and shrubs, Mr. Finaghty also showing a 
good group of small conifers in pots. 

W. A. Manda showed a novelty in 
ferns, Adiantum capillus veneris imbri- 
cata, which in form and color closely re- 
sembles Farleyense. A certificate of merit 
was awarded to it. A choice group of 
novelties and rare plants came from 
Pitcher & Manda, and certificates of 
merit were awarded to Stenandrium Lin- 
denii, a pretty acquisition for jardinieres, 
and Cattleya chrysotoxa in this exhibit. 
Certificates were also awarded to A. H. 
Wingett and A. P. Meredith for seedling 
anthuriums, and to J. F. Huss for ana- 
tomical leaves. 

Of the fruit and vegetable display it is 
only necessary to say that it was super- 
latively good lor such a hard season as 
has been experienced, and the premiums 
were well distributed between the same 
growers who exhibited the plants. 

The Lenox Horticultural Society, al- 
though but eight months old, numbers 
eighty members already and evidently 
has a bright and useful future before it. 



Arrangement of Flowers. 

XI. 
ROSE BASKETS. 

The accompanying illustrations show 
two baskets of roses, made up loosely 
with long stemmed flowers. Both are 
handle baskets. The first is made up of 
Madame Testout, in the style much in 
demand at the present day. As often 
stated before there is a decided objection 
to wired roses, and many people will not 
have such under any circumstances. None 
of the roses in this or the second illustra- 
tion have a single supporting wire. The 
materials for such a basket must be 





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BOSE BASKET NO 1 
ARRANGEMENT OF FLOWERS. 



Strictly fresh and of good quality, else the 
flowers will droop quickly, and result in 
dissatisfaction. Extra care should be 
taken to imbed the stems well in the 
sphagnum. The roses being iongstemmed 
are best wired onto match sticks, as 
toothpicks are too short and weak to 
hold up the flowers. Avoid overcrowd- 
ing and use plenty of adiantum in the 
arrangement. The spray over the handle 
is formed of the same material, and may 
be varied to suit different tastes. 

Illustration No. 2 is composed of equal 
quantities of Duchess of Albany and 
Kaiserin Augusta Victoria. The shape 
of the basket is somewhat dift'erent, but 
the arrangement is practically the same 
as No. 1, 



Chicago. 

As the season advances the chrysanthe- 
mum question is forging to the front, 
and from now until November, all the 
boys interested (and who is not?) will 
put in their best work to come out on the 
top of the heap. That the mum hascome 
to stay is now admitted by the most 
sceptical; growers who ridiculed the so- 
called chrysanthemum fad unmercifully a 
few years ago have experienced a change 
of heart and are now into mums by the 
ten thousands. The suburbs, Western 
Springs, Hinsdale, Downer's Grove and 
Mount Greenwood, located southwest of 
the city, have always been to the front in 
this line. A visit to the three first named 
towns disclosed the fact that the boys in 
this section are right in it again. 

At the station at Hinsdale we weremet 
by our genial friend O. P. Bassett who 
acting the host and cicerone in his own 
inimitable way, first whirled us behind a 
spanking team over to the establishment 
of ]. C. Vaughan at Western Springs. 
Foreman Wilson received us cordially and 



tried to initiate us into the mystery of 
mum growing. If we didn't profit by the 
same, the fault is our own. We may ac- 
knowledge right here that our experience 
in growing mums is nil and for that 
same reason perhaps are led to think 
that we know a good plan^ when we see 
it. Take this for what it is worth; in our 
huml)le opinion the stock we found here 
looks exceedingly fine; the standards and 
other specimens promise to beat any 
former attempt at show plants. A fine 
lot of single stemmed fellows are grown 
in 6-inch pots. There are besides these 
three houses grown to single stem for 
cut flowers. Each one of the seven benches 
is treated in a different manneras anex- 
periment; for instance one bench was 
planted in soil and manure mixed 
together, another with two inches of 
manure at the bottom and soil on top, a 
third with pure bone meal mixed in, etc. 
There is little difference apparent si < far, 
all looking equally vigorous. In seed- 
lings we find two benches containing 
several thousand plants, from which 
something good can be expected. These 
seedlings are the pick of last year, grown 
as yet under numbers. 

We now drove back to Hinsdale; after 
first partaking of the gracious hospitality 
of Mrs. Bassett, we next inspected the 
mammoth establishment of our host. Of 
the excellent condition of the rose houses, 
as well as some valuable data of results, 
kindly furnished us by Mr. B. we shall 
speak more at length later on. In mums 
we find about 12,000 grown to single 
stem, as fine a lot of plants as were ever 
seen. The list includes all the best com- 
mercial sorts. One house of Domination 
attracted our particular attention; the 
plants are of such even height it looked 
as though they were clipped by a pair of 
shears. The show plants also look very 
fine and reflect great credit upon the able 



iSg4' 



The American Florist. 



139 



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ROSE BASKET NO 2. 
ARRAKGEMINT OP FLOWERS, 



foreman Mr. Benson. The single stem 
exhibition plants are grown in 7inch 
pots. 

Our next call was at Geo. Miller's. 
George was hard at work as usual. The 
place is now nearly in shape again, all 
but the boiler sheds, which are being 
built now. Mums will plav an important 
part at this establishment next fall. 
Twenty-five thousand plants are grown, 
mostly to single stem. The whole stock 
looks thrifty; the banner house we ven- 
ture to predict will be the one of Eugene 
Dailledouze which looks grand at present. 

We next took a spin over to Downer's 
Grove, to the establishment of our old 
veteran D. B. Fuller. Tolly Tommy Hop- 
kins is of course in charge. This isn't the 
first year that Tommy has demonstrated 
his knowledge of growing mums. .\s 
usual the stock looks fine. There are 
1700 plants on benches, these are grown 
to 3 and 4 blooms each. We noticed some 
very fine Viviand-Morel in particular. 

A few blocks away is the establishment 
of Mrs. Foot. Here too the mum is much 
in evidence; some 5000 plants are benched 
grown mostly to single stem, all looking 
well. 

There is little change in market condi- 
tions. Demand is still very limited, and 
as the supply, particularly in roses, is in- 
creasing fast, prices are very unsettled. 
Only fancy stock commands the top fig- 
ure of $3, the bulk goes for much less. 
Good Beauties, and there is some very 
fine stock now for this season of the Vear, 
bring from $1 to $1 .50 per dozen. J. B. 
Deamud & Co. handle some extra fine 
vallev, the best ever seen on our market 
at this season nf the year. This is grown 
by Bassett & Washburn. 

Mr, John Holmes, one of our oldest 



members in the trade, died last week. 
The deceased was well known as a mem- 
ber of the old firm of Brooker & Holmes, 
doing business for many years at 5818 
State street. 



Philadelphia. 

The boys are still talking about the 
convention when they happen to meet at 
the stores or in the club; the special feat- 
ures as they appeared to different minds 
are gone over and commented on, and 
discussions take place that should have 
been heard in the convention hall. The 
bowlers are turning over the details of 
the match, and that "Buffalo angle" is re- 
ceiving considerable attention. As com- 
pared with a "Philadelphia straight," 
the "straight" was not in it, but it still 
has its friends and mav take a corner off 
the angle at some future time. The shoot- 
ers as a matter of course are jubilant, and 
the bowlers have to take considerable 
chafl" at their hands. 

The state of things is quiet, very quiet; 
it is to be hoped that this is the final 
calm and very soon the storm of business 
will break loose in all its fury, and the 
more furious it becomes the better we will 
like it. To the average florist it would be 
a real pleasure at tUs time to be so tired 
out after a day's business that he could 
hardly get home. 

The outlook is promising, however. 
Mr. Eisele, of H. A. Dreet's, says that the 
past July and .August business has broken 
the record with them and they have been 
compelled to buy stock to fill orders. 
Kentias have sold particularly well, tak- 
ing preference to arecas. At their cilj' 
store they have had their show windows 
filled with a fine display of tomatoes 
nicely arranged in baskets and a large 



collection of canna flowers correctly 
named; these latter made a gorgeous 
show. 

Asters have been fine this season and 
all the stores have a few dozen pots just 
outside the door to make a little show 
and attract trade; they seem, however, 
to be more proficient in catching dusfr 
than customers. Cut asters are very 
plentiful and sell as a rule for 75 cents per 
hundred, the pots bringing $6 to $7 for 
the same quantity. Roses are now com- 
ing in in fine shape. Beauties are a good 
size and color, but the stems are not any 
too long. Kaiserin is in good shape, as 
is also La France. The other teas from 
roses for the winter crops are commencing 
to come and show up well, there being 
little or no mildew apparent. The colors 
of the various assortments present a 
darker tone than formerly, as the Meteor 
is to be now found in nearly every grow- 
er's collection. The prices range from $2 
to $4 for all but Beauties, for which $8 is 
asked. There has been quite a lot of fun- 
eral work lately, but it was mainly a 
harvest for the crape pulling fraternity, 
as they managed to intercept the com- 
mittees and got the cream of the business. 

The meeting of the Florists' Club last 
Tuesday evening was a very interesting 
one, reports of the various committees 
were listened to with great attention, 
and fhey were highlycommended fortheir 
work in making the various events so 
successful. A resolution was passed 
thanking the Public Ledger fortheir very 
complete recorts of the convention and 
particularly praising the work of Mrs. 
Starr, the lady who had charge and who 
worked so faithfully to get a correct ac- 
count of the proceedings. 

A vote of thanks was also given to Mr. 
Edwards of Atlantic City for his services 
and the loan of plants to decorate the 
convention hall, and to Mrs. Theodore 
Edwards of Bridgeton for her enjoyable 
singing, both at Carisbrooke and at the 
entertainment on the pier. 

Edwin Lonsdale exhibited three plants 
of Cypripedium Charlesworthii, each 
with one flower. It has more color than 
any other variety we have seen and will 
be a valued addition to most collections. 
Mr. Z. De Forest Ely also placed a vaseof 
dahlias on the desk, among which wtre 
some pretty varieties. The question 
selected for discussion at the next meet- 
ing was "How to manage 20,000 feet of 
glass." Mr. John Welsh Young was as- 
signed the subject, and will no doubt give 
the club a very interesting paper. Mr. 
Craig said that ot all the money spent in 
Atlantic City he thought the little that it 
cost to color Mr. Harris' nose was by far 
the best investment the club had made. 
It had brought Mr. Harris out in a new 
role and raised the standard of the club 
in the estimation of the visitors, as it 
gave them an idea of the talent we had. 
He said that Mr. Eddy said he had made 
a study of this play and that he had never 
seen Mr. Harris' part played to such per- 
fection before. 

The photos of the groups at Caris- 
brooke Inn an don the pier were shown and 
were pronounced excellent; they should 
be valuable souvenirs of the convention. 

Z. De Forest Ely has opened a wholesale 
commission branch in connection with his 
other business and is prepared to receive 
cut flowers on commission or orders to 
supply the same. K. 

New York. 
There is just a little indication of reviv- 
ing life in the cut flower trade. In roses, 
American Beauty, if strictly first-class, 
takes the lead and brings from fifteen tr> 



140 



The American Florist. 



Sept. 8, 



twenty cents. Small Beauties are to be 
had by the bushel at bushel price. Other 
roses are in general overstocked. From 
one to three and four cents are the ruling 
prices for small selected lots, but by far . 
the great bulk of the stock goes to the 
Greeks at five dollars a thousand. 

The only scarcity noted is in white car- 
nations. There is a demand for more 
than can be supplied and at prices double 
those received for colored varieties. 
Bridesmaid, Cusin and Perle roses are 
abundant and finely colored just now, 
but sell very slowly. Of the smaller roses 
none sell better than Kaiserin Augusta 
Victoria. Next to this comes Meteor. 

Most of the rose growers are praving 
for water. In some sections there is a 
veritable famine and unless speedy lelief 
comes there will be serious consequences. 
A new acquisition in the ranks of the 
rose growers is no less a personage than 
Mr. James Hart, famous as the first and 
only original cut flower commission man. 
Jim is growing some good stock over at 
his Madison houses and he consigns them 
to himself. That he will be satisfied with 
the return slips is to be hoped. "I'm 
always too easy and soft with them," 
says he. He's going to turn over a new 
leaf now and make himself the first victim 
of the new rules. 

The two inseparables, W. A. Manda 
and Charlie Weathered, have gone to the 
Lenox Horticultural Society's exhibition. 
Mr. Manda's new Adiantum capillus- 
veneris imbricata is one of the best intro- 
ductions of the season. 



Boston. 

There has never been a time when notes 
of news or interest were more difficult to 
pick up in this locality than just now. 
The convention is already somewhat of 
an old story, but it still does duty as the 
main subject of discussion and comment, 
and the unanimity of opinion regarding 
its merits is something remarkable. Un- 
favorable criticism positively does not 
exist and all who went pronounce it to 
have been the most enjoyable on record. 
Of business, with the exception of a fair 
run of funeral work, there is none. The 
summer trade with seaside and mountain 
resorts, which a few years ago stood 
Boston in such good stead, is not what 
it used to be and no longer makes any 
appreciable impression on the prevailing 
prices. At all these places local enterprise 
supplies largely the stock which formerly 
had to be obtained from distant sources, 
and it is only when specially fancy goods 
or unusual quantities are wanted that 
Boston reaps much benefit. 

The weather has been delightfully cool 
all through this section and rumors of 
light frosts in variouslocalities are heard. 
Tne eSecton the stock coming in has been 
favorable, particularly on roses. It is 
rarely that such clean well developed 
roses are seen in this market so early in 
the season. This superior quality is noted 
in all the standard varieties, but up to 
dateit seems tomakebut littleirapression 
on customers, unfortunately. 

The garden committee of the Massa- 
chusetts Horticultural Society, with a 
few friends, made a visit to the plum or- 
chards and vineyards of Georpe B. An- 
drews at Fitchburg, on August 29. Grape 
growing in the hard soil and severe dim ate 
of Massachusetts is something morethan 
p'av, and Mr. Andrews is entitled to the 
highest credit for what he has accom- 
plished by his perseverance and hard 
labor. The Delaware grapes are unpre- 
cedentedly fine this season, and the plum 
trees are a sight to behold. Mr. Andrews 



attributes much of his success to thor- 
ough spraying. The visitors were hos- 
pitably entertained and for once had all 
the plums they could eat. 

Elijah Wood, Boston's own "Little 
Woodie," IS about to leave us and go to 
the far west, and much sincere lamenta- 




tion IS beard. He will leave a vacancy 
that it will be impossible to fill. The 
hearty good wishes of a host of friends 
will follow him and his bride to their new 
western home, and Boston hereby sends 
greeting to the Denver brethren unani- 
mously recommending him to their con- 
fidence and friendship. 

The .\rnold Arboretum has acquired an 
additional tractof land seventj'-five acres 
in extent, formerly known as Whitney 
Hill. Superintendent Bennett of Schenley 
Park, Pittsburg, and his right bower, 
Mr. Burke, spent a couple of days here 
after the convention and found much to 
interest them in the Arnold Arboretum 
and Boston's new park system. 



poor. Walter Mott who was in the city 
the other day says that Canada was not 
represented at all; this is disgraceful! 

E. 



Toronto. 



"Canada's great fair," the Toronto In- 
dustrial Exhibition, is the big excitement 
for the two coming weeks, the 3rd to the 
15th of September. The flower show in 
connection therewith promises to be an 
exceptionally good one, especially in stove 
and greenhouse decorative plants. The 
tug of war will be on two sections, one 
for the best 75 plants distinct varieties, 
the other for the best arranged table 19 
feet by 16 feet. As it will be next to im- 
possible for one to show in the two sec- 
tions it is probable that the public insti- 
tutions will show in the former and the 
florists in the latter. This was the object 
of making the two sections as they are, 
1 he prizes for each are the same, viz., $60, 
$40, $30, $20, and are worth straining a 
point to obtain. Mr. C. Swift, of Roch- 
ester, is to be the judge of plants and it is 
rumored that he has engaged a bullet 
proof suit, the inventor of which is now 
in the city. Mr. Swift has, however, 
given great satisfaction at former shows 
here and I scarcely think that he will fiad 
the aforesaid suit necessary. 

The report of the weather bureau for 
the month of August is quite interesting 
readine: the total amount of rainfall was 
only .380, the second smallest in 55 years, 
and the mean temperature was 65.34-, a 
little lower than the average. 

Trade is likely to liven up a little during 
the exhibition, not because the visitors 
are at all flower buying people, but they 
bring money into the city and stir things 
up generally; business never really perma- 
nent! v begins for the season until the out- 
side flowers have been killed off, and that 
time is drawing very near now. 

The accounts of the proceedings and 
festivities indulged in by the members of 
the S. A. F. given by the American Flo- 
rist are enough to make those who were 
unfortunately unable to attend green 
with envy; what a mistake it is to be 



St. Paul, Minn. 



Trade is improving every day and is 
fully up to or ahead of the average of 
former years at this season. White flow- 
ers for funeral work and weddings are in 
the greatest demand. There is a good 
supply of white roses of fair quality, as 
well as of other colors. Sweet peas are 
nearlygone and asters areof poorquality 
owing to the drouth. We are still suffer- 
ing from the intense heat and drouth and 
the long delayed rain will not now be of 
much material assistance to the dead and 
dying vegetation when it does come. 

Some weeks since your scribe stated 
that the veteran J. C. Fleischer was retir- 
ing from the florist business. This was 
an error, and we are now advised by Mr. 
Fleischer that he contemplates building 
new houses and engaging in the business 
more extensively than ever. 

Mr. L. L. May has just returned from 
a short vacation spent at Mackinac Isl- 
and and in northern Michigan. While 
returning the train on which he was a 
passenger ran into a landslide near Glad- 
stone, Mich., overturning the car, which 
rolled down a forty foot embankment. 
Besides a general shaking up and a thor- 
ough scare there were no injuries sus- 
tained. 

Mrs. Garges,well and favorably known 
to the trade here as one of the best design 
makers in the northwest, has removed to 
Cincinnati, 0. 

Several weddings are announced for the 
near future and as society will soon re- 
sume its giddy whirl the early fall trade 
should be exceptionally good. Felix. 

SITUATIONS, WANTS. FOR SALE. 



Advertisements under this head will be Inserted at 
the rate of 10 cents a line (seven words) each Inser- 
tion. Cash must accompany order. Plant advs. not 
admitted under this head. 

SITUATION WANTED — As a mall or express 
packer, bv a single man; 4 Tears experience. Ad- 
dress C 11 SS, 

care American Florist. Chicago. 

SITUATION Wanted— As fireman by steady and 
O sober younK man who has good experience in both 
steam and tiot water. Address 

A B. care American Florist. 

C1ITUATI0N WANTED -By experienced orchid 
O grower and llorist. as worlilng foreman in good 
commercial or private place. Address 

J S. Box lo:). Tom's River, N. J. 

CJITUATION WANTED— By young man: abstainer. 
O energetic, as foreman or assistant: commercial or 
private : cut flowers, bedding, foliage plants and ferns. 
W. ,1. POTTEK, 838 Main St . Niagara Fails, N. Y, 

SITUATION WANTED— By experienced grower of 
all around Horlst stocii, and good maimer up of 
designs and decorations Migiit tal^e a place on the 
profit siiarlng principle. Address 

C. F, Eblex. Bedford, Pa. 

SITUATION WANTED — By reliable and steady 
young man of good habits, who has had T years' 
experience in general greenhouse worlt. .'steady place 
wanted. Willing and obliging, and not afraid of worit. 
Address E D. <:are American Florist. 

IJITUATION WANTED— Bv an Englishman as gar- 
io dener andtioilst; life experience. Best of refer 
onces. Married man. Please give particulars la 
answer. Address GARliENKK, 

123 Scovllle St.. West Cleveland, O. 

(Jl'l'UATION WANTED- By a single man; 4 years' 
O experience in growing roses and bulbs; or would 
go as assistant In a large place, (iood references. 
Address .1. Holland, 

Lakewood Greenhouses, Minneapolis. Minn. 



8 



lITUATION WANTBD-Mlddle of September by a 
»T German. 'ilt. as greenhouse assistant; well up In 
growing cut flowers. Roses a specialty. Can lake 
charge of a small comniercnil place. East preferred 
1 Philadelphia!. Address BE. care Am. Florist. 

SITUATION WANTKD— By a young man. as fore- 
O man or first assistant. Specialist In forcing roses. 
Sober. First-class references. Liberal wages wanted. 
Ple:ise state wages and other facts. Address U C, 
care Oarmen Coldes. tM Shelby St.. Indianapolis. lud. 



i8g4. 



The American Florist. 



141 



SITUATION \VANTEI>— As foreman, by an expert 
In roses, carnations, violets, bulb forclnK. etc. Al 
orchid, palm and fern grower. Thomuglily posted In 
all the different departments of the trade, in or out- 
door. Address Pcistoffice Box 75. 

Short Hills, N.J. 

SITUATION WANTED— As assistant In greenhouses 
or store, by young American, single: lised to flrst- 
c ass retaU;trade. P>.\perlenced In general greenhouse 
work and management; practical, reliable worker. 
Good salesman. Abstainer. Good references. Ad- 
dress E P P. care American Florist. 

SITUATION WANTED-By practical florist, highly 
recommended, for experience and executive 
ability in the general requisites of commercial or pri- 
vate place, the nurseries, general propagation, etc.. 
■where such is needed. For particulars address 

Brooklvx. care American Florist. 

"WrANTED— Will Mr. Emil Knoll please call at office 
> T of American Florist. '."11 Dearborn St. 

WANTED— At once, assistant In private green- 
houses: German, with fome experience pre- 
ferred. Salary WO per month without board. Address 
H A. care American Florist. 

WANTED— In private place, a capable, single man 
of good habits, to take charge of conservatory, 
lawn and vegetable garden. German preferred. Ad- 
dress Mks g. W. Barnes. 

2it3H Colllngwood Ave., Toledo, Ohio. 

WANTED— A young man experienced In growing 
roses, carnations and a general stock, also good 
designer and decorator: must liave A No. 1 references 
and not afraid of work; one with a small capital pre- 
ferred: one capable of taking entire charge. Chance 
of a lifetime fur right man. Address • 

Palms, care American Florist. 



f 



lOR SALE CHEAP-Large second-hand florist's Ice 
Box, value about J75. Vafghans Seeh Store, 
88 State Street. Chicago. 

OR SALE— Small florist buslnesln one of tlie best 
locations of the South Side. Chicago. Address 
A B. care American Florist. 



FOR SALE CHEAP— Aflrst-class florist business In 
a thriving town of 2;S.U00 Inhabitants. Forpartlc- 
ulars address WiSCoNSix, care Am. Florist. 

I^OR SALE OR RENT— Greenhouse and celery gar- 
' den. Good buslnef*3; no competition. A bargain 
on account of III health. Address 

W. .1. Olds Union City. Pa. 

FOR SALE— No. 5 Scoliay boiler, used only 3 winters 
all In good condition; reason for selling, having 
put in 4U-hor8e steam boiler: price on application. 

J. E. Felthousen. Schenectady, N. Y. 

FOR SALE CHEAP— Large, new hard wood and 
glass florists Refrigerator. Used at World's Fair, 
Price reduced to Jl7i">. Vaughan's Seed Store. 
I4ti & 14H West Washington St.. Chicago. 

FOR RENT OR LEASE-A small green liouse. good 
beater water works and sewer in; more land to 
build on. Good location. Address 

Paul. lOUS Washington Ave.. Racine, Wis. 

FOR SALE OR RENT— Greenhouses, either 15.0U0 
or iiO.UOU square feet of glass, stocked with best 
variety of roses. Or will take partner with fl,iJUU capi- 
tal. Address A. T. .Iacksox. atatioo X. Chicago. 

FOR SALE OR LEASE-Florist business in one of 
the finest cities and health resorts In Colorado; o 
greenhuuses, each 7.) by %) feet, also dwelling; all 
liented with steam, and well t*tocked with roses car- 
nations mums and violets. Trade wholesale and 
retail. Will sell stock and give long lease on the place, 
or will sell the whole place on easy terms. Reason for 
selling poor health. Address 
Victor Johnson, box si^, Colorado Springs. Colo. 

FOR SALE. 

Six (6) greenhouses, two hot water boilers, 
about 2000 feet 2-inch wrought iron pipe, 
valves, etc., lot of hotbed sash, frames, 
benches and about 35,000 flower pots. The 
entire plant will be sold at a very low cash 
price, as the whole must be removed off the 
premises before Sept. 1st. For particulars 
address l. R. MUNN, station C, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

FRITZ KLEIN. 

Who can give rae au3' infonnation in regard to 
Fritz Klein, gardener, of Naurod. near Wies- 
baden, Germany? The last was heard of him at 
Boston in the year 1873; since then he was not 
heard of. laforniation about him will kindly be 
sent io. 

MR. F. SEULBERGER. Seedsman and Florist. 

500. oil & 513 Seventh St., Oakland. Cal. 



130 ^VOU I-CIVOW • . 

THAT VOU CAN GET 

20 CANE STAKES FOR I GENT 

A foot in length by simply using a sharp saw on 
a bundle of our best. 

BRACKENRIDGE &. CO.. 



Roses. Roses. Roses. 

Perle, Niphetos, Mermet, Bride, Victoria, Meteor, La France, Albany, Gontier, 

White La France, Soupert and Bridesmaid, 2 1-2 inch pots, 

$5.00; 3-inch pots, $6.00 per hundred. 

AMERICAN BEAUTY, 2 1-2 inch, $6.00; 3-inch, $8.00 per hundred. 

THIS STOCK IS WELL GKOAVN ANO IN TINE CONDITION. 

ESTATE OF M. A. HUNT. Terre Haute, Ind. 

10,000 FIRST QUflLITY FORGING ROSES. 

Fully equal to those sent out the last two years, and perfectly healthy In every respect, Only selected 

growth from Howering wood used for propagating. 

KAISERIN A. V. MEKMKTS, BRIDESMAID, MME. HOSTE, 

METEoK, SAFKANO, PERLE, BRIDES, 

SUNSETS, LA FRANCE. BON SILENE, MME. CCSIN, 

3-lnch pots, Jo. 00 per 100. 4-lnch pots. fS.OO per 100. 



AMERICAN BEAUTY 

Cusin. LiR France, 
MAKIE LOUISE VIOLETS, pot {jrown 



Hridesmaid, 
% Kride, Merinet 

strong, 4-lnch plants. 



CAENATIONS. 

I All the New and Old sorts. 

JS^Please write for prices. 



looo 3iek:mets, 6 'o niphetos, 

1000 UKIDKS. 150TESTOUT>. 

All from a'o-lnch standard pots. These are In the 
very best of contlltluu and as larjie as a great deal of 
the stock shipped from i^-lnch pots. 

Perdoz. 75c.: per 100 $5.0 j; per 1000 $45.00. 

j^'Samples free to intending purchasers. , 

Pandanus Utilis. 

6-inch pots f5 00 per dozen 

5-inch pots 3 i per dozen 

4-inch pots 2.00 per dozen 

Cyperus Alternifolius. 

3j^-inch pots, per doz. 75c; per 100 J6 
2'^-\nch pots, "■ 60c; " $4 
2-inch pots, " 40c; " $3 

Grevillea Robusta. 

3-inch pots, 10 to l5 inches high, per 

dozen jSl.OO; per 100 $8.00 

2;^-inch pots, " 65c; " $4.00 

NATHAN SMITH & SON, 

.A.ir>r«i^^]V, AXIOM. 

clean, healthy stock 
MERMETS. BRIDES. SUNSETS. 

NIPHETOS, LA FRANCE. PERLES. 

MME. WATTEVILLE. BON SILENE. METEOR. 

PAPA GONTIER. 
Strong plants, from l^lnch pots. 5w per ILO; $75 per 1000. 

WOOD BROTHERS, Fishkill, N. Y. 
We offer Special Inducements in 

HOME GROWN 
Azaleas and Genistas. 

Seud us a list of j-our requireuieuts for our 
estimate betore ordering elsewhere. 

PITCHER & MANDA, Short Hills, N J. 



304 \V. MadUou St., 



BALTIMORE. MD. 



Warranted first quality. Surplus stock from 
4.inch pots. Per 100 

PERLES 1600 

MERMETS • ■ . . . 5 00 

BRIDES 5 00 

PAPA GONTIER 5 00 

CASH WITH ORDER. 

JOHN WHITE. Waverly Place. Elizabeth. N. J. 

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 

The arm of UHLMANN & HAISCH. of Memphis. 
Tenn., has been dissolved by mutual coi;sent, and 
is succeeded by K. UHLMANN, who will carry on 
the business of florist in all its branches, and who 
will endeavor to maintain the enviable reputation 
gained by the late firm for high artistic work, and 
for elegance and promptness in the execution of 
all orders. 



Watch this Space ! 

We will quote 
SOMETHING GOOD 
In the near future. 

We sell only to the trade 
at Wholesale Prices. 

Better not let your 
customers read your 
Florists' Trade Papers. 

S. O. STREBY, 

Lock Box 77, 
UPPER SANDUSKY, OHIO, 

ROSES AND GSRMTIONS 

MERMETS. BRIDES, BEAUTIES, 

PERLES, WATTEVILI.E, METEOR, 

and WABAN. 

Cleau, healthy stock, from 35^-inch pots, $6.00 

per 100; $45,00 per 1000. 

25.000 FIELD-GROWN CARNATIONS, fine, healthy 
stock. Seud for list of varieties and prices. 

FERNS— Adiantum cuneatum. 2!/2-inch pots, $:3.00 

per 100; from J-inch pots. S6.00 per 100. 
Ferns in fine assorted varieties, same price. 

JAMES HORAN, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Mention American Florist. 



2><,-lnch pots. Per 100 Per 1000 

BRIDE J2.50 S22.50 

MEKMET 3.50 32.30 

GONTIER 2.60 22.50 

SOUPERT. 2.50 32.50 

WHITE LA FRANCE 2.75 24.00 

SUNSET. PERLE 2. SO 35.00 

And all other standard varieties. 'iM. 3W and 4^-lnch 
pots. Write for prices on what you need". 

TERMS CASH WITH OKDEK. 
THE N.4TIONAL PL.4NT CO., Dayton. O. 

Mermets, Cusins Wattevilles, Hoste, Meteor and 

La France. $3.00 per 100. 
Strong American Beauties, $5.00 per 100; $40.00 per 

1000. 500 at 1000 rates. 
fl^Special prices on Quantity. Let me price your 

lists. Cash wiih oraer. 

fi.<:>^£:xi.*x* f*. ■x*£:ssorry 

TVest Forest Park, St. Louis, HIo. 

Surplus stock; cleiin. healthy plants, from 2. 3^ and 

;Mncll pots. 

PERLK. SUNSET. NIPHETOS. BRIDE. MERMET, 

M. NIKL. AMERICAN BKAUTV. LA FRANCE, 

ALBANY. THE (.HKEN. MME. WATTE- 

VUjLE. and GUILLOT. 

Fred. Doriier, Fred. Heinl and Victor l*elar- 

gouiums. Samples free to Intending purchasers. 

and the very lowest prices on application. 

.JOSKPH HEINL, JacksouviUe, III- 
When writing mention the AMEKiCAN Florist. 



142 



The American Florist. 



Sept. 8, 



Subscription $1.00 a Year. To Europe, $2.00. 

Advertisements, lo Cents a Line, Agate; 

Inch. Si. 40; Column, S14.00, 

Cash with Order. 

No Special Position Guaranteed. 

Discounts, 6 times, 5 per cent: 13 times, 10 percent; 

26 times, 20 per cent; 52 times. 30 per cent. 

No reduction made for large space. 



The Advertising Department of the American 
Florist is for Florists, Seedsmen, and dealers tn 
wares pertaining to those lines Only. Please to 
remember it. 

Orders for less than one-half inch space not accepted. 

Advertisements must reach us by %Yednesday to se- 
cure insertion in the issue for the following Saturday. 

Address THE AMERICAN FLORIST CO., Chicago. 



Coming Exhibitions. 

Chicago, Nov. 3-11. Chrvsanthemum show Hort. 

Society of Chicago. " W. C. Egan, Sec'y, 620 

Dearborn Ave. 
Newport, R. I.. Nov. 6-8. Chrj'santhemum show 

Newport Hort. Society. Ale.x JIacLellan, 

Sec'y, Ruggles Ave. 
Boston.' Nov. 6-9. Chrysanthemum show Mass. 

Hort. Society. Robt. Planning. Sec'y, Horti- 
cultural Hail. 
PiTTsFiELD, Mass., Nov. 6-9. Chrysanthemum 

show Berkshire County Gardeners' and Flo- 
rists' Club. W. JI. Edwards, Secy, 103 

Howard St., Pittsfleld. 
St. Louis. Mo.. Nov. 6-9. Chrvsanthemum show 

St. Louis Florists' Club. 'E. Schray, Secy, 

4101 Pennsylvania Ave. 
Indianapolis. Ind., Nov. 6-10. Chrysanthemum 

show Society of Indiana Florists. W. G. Bi-r- 

termann, Sec'y, 37 Massachusetts .Ave. 
Philadelphia, Pa. .Nov. 6-10. Chrvsanthemum 

show Pennsylvania Hort. Soeietv. D. D. L. 

Farson. Sec'y, Horticultural Hall.' Broad St. 
Louisville, Ki-., Nov. 6-10. (Jlirvsantheunim 

show Louisville Florists. H. Naiiz. Sec'y, 582 

Fourth .\ve. 
Denver. Colo.. Nov. 7-10. Chrvsanthemum sho\v 

Denver Florists' Club. .Adaiii Kohankie, Sec'y. 

L.B. 375, So. Denver. Colo. 
Providence. R. I.. Nov. 8-10. Chrvsanthemum 

show Rhode Island Hort. Society. C. W. 

Smith. Sec'y, 61 Westminster St. 
Montreal. Nov. 12-14. Chrvsanthemum show- 
Montreal Gardeners' and Florists' Club. Fred 

Bennett, Sec'y, 62 Aylmer St. 
Baltimore. Nov. 12-17. Chrvsanthemum show 

Gardeners' Club of Baltimore. Wm. Mc- 

RobiTts. .Jr., Secy. 304 \V. Madison St. 
Worcester, JIass., Nov. 13-15. Chrysanthemum 

show Worcester County Hort. Society. Edw. 

W. Lincoln, Sec'v. 
Toronto. Ont., Nov.'13-16. Chrvsanthemum show 

Toronto Gardeners' and Flohsts' Ass'n. .\. 11. 

Ewing, Sec'y, 85 Carlton St. 
Springfield, JIass.. Nov. . Chrvsanthemum 

show Hampden County Hort. Society. W F 

Gale. Sec'y, 23 .John St. 
Milwaukee:, Wis., Nov. . Chrvsanthemum 

show Milwaukee Florists' Club. "a. IvloUner, 

Sec'y, 219 Grand Ave. 
Hamilton. Ont.. Nov. . Chrvsanthemum 

show Hamilton .\gric. Societv. ' Walter H. 

Bruce. Sec'y. 

[Secretaries will confer a favor bv supplvinj; 
dates as soon as decided upon. We shall be 'gliiil 
to know of any further shows decided upon ami 
not included in onr list, even if exact date is not 
yet determined.] 



■We HAVE received from Mr. 'W. Baylor 
Hartland,of Cork, Ireland, an object that 
recently reached him under peculiar cir- 
cumstances. It was a large cork upon 
which had been written simply "Hart- 
land" and a U. S. 5 cent stamp attached. 
As the "package" reached its destination 
safely it is fair to assume that our post al 
clerks are not always dull, and the Amer- 
ican wag who perpetrated the joke will 
probably be pleased to know of its suc- 
cess. 

Do YOU WANT the census statistics re- 
garding the florist, nursery and seed 
trades? You will find them in our trade 
directory and reference book for 1894. 
Price $2.00. 

Part II of the transactio.ns of the 
Mass. Hort. Society for 1893 has been 
received by us. Among much useful mat- 
ter contained the report of the garden 
committee will be found specially sug- 
gestive. 




patent ,\pplied for. 



HE 



MNCIS' COEEDGATED iU) FAST GlAZfflG POINTS. 

SURPASS ALL OTHERS YET INTRODUCED IN THE 
MARKET FOR GLAZING GREENHOUSES. 
Manufactured by the NOVELTY POINT WORKS. Price 
50 Cents per box of 1000 Points. Can be sent by mail 
for 13 cents in addition. Directions on each box. 

A-GtEIVTSs 

Z. DE FOREST ELY i CO Philadelphia, Pa. 

• I. BAYERSUORKER & CO Philadelphia. Pa. 

MARSCHUETZ & CO Philadelphia. Pa. 

PETER HENDERSON & CO New York. 

WM. ELLIOTT ,t PONS NewY'ork. 

F. E. MCALLISTER New York. 

C. H JOOSTBN NewY'ork. 

WEEBER .t DON New Y'ork. 

A. ROLKER Ac SONS New York. 

SCHLEGEL i FOTTLER Boston. Mass. 

.lOHN C. MONINGBR CO Chlcaco. 111. 

J. C. YAUGHAN Chicago. Ul. 

HUNTINGTON SEED CO Indianapolis. Ind. 

J. A. SIMMEKS Toronto. Can. 

J. N. STRUCK & BRO Louisville, Ky. 

RMANN ROLKER, Room 3, 218 Fulton Street, NEW YORK. 

GKNERAL AGENT FOR AMERICA AND EUROPE. 

CORBREY & McKELLAR, 

Wholesale and Commission Florists, 

Phone Main 4508. 64 & 66 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO. 

We are prepared to fill your orders with Tirst-Class Flowers. 
Give us a trial order. 

FOR DECORATING, "".TuSl"" 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS SAISUS. 
CUT STRINGS s to 12 feet long, so cts. 

Shipped in large or suihII quantities to any part of the country. Orders by mail, tele- 
graph or telephone. 

W. H. ELLIOTT, Brighton, Mass. 

Hardy Cut Ferns, 

BOUQUET GREEN, 

Laurel and Green Festooning, Wreaths, Etc. 
SPHAGNUM MOSS IN ANY QUANTITY. 

H. E. HARTFORD, 18 Chapman Place, BOSTON. 




'm 'PRAIRIE' FOLOINSFLOmR BOX. 
FOR CUTfLOWERS. 




Millie Imiii \V;ilrr-|'i""l' 
Htrawtujurii. ^iilpptU tint. 



FOLDING 
PAPER 
BOXES 
for CUT 
Flowers. 

1. iinuhle Manilla lined, 
;ickud IIHJ In a crate. 

CHICAGO FOLDING BOX CO., 

Jackson & Clinton &ts., CHICAG-O. 

TELEPHONE Main 4T1S. 



Gardiner's Celebrated ^^ 

English 

Mushroom Spawn. 

7iesh and Sellable. 
S7 per 100 Ihs. 

Special price on larger 
quatttiticB. 

John Gardiner & Co., 
Philadelphia, Ta. 

k.'X. -v-v -V -v-v -vx. -x.-v->i 

Primula Chinensis. 

Fine, healthy plants, S!4-inch pots, best 
varieties, S8.00 per lOU; 2>4-ineh pots, $4.00 
per too. 




Carnations. 



w. 



Ready September: Grace Wilder, $6 per 100, 
Day break, 87 per 100. Strong. heaUhypl.Tiits. 

A. BOCK, North Cambridge, Mass. 



Cycas Leaves. 

VAUGHAN'S SEED STORE 



p. O. B(i.\ 



FRESH CUT 

each 75c. 

Chicago, 



FLORAL DESIGHS 

The Cut Flower Worker's Friend. Fine book 
of 160 pages. Send $3.50 for it, to 

J. HORACE McFARUND, Harrlsburg, Pa. 



H. L. SUNOERBRUGH, 

Wholesale Florist 

4th and Walnut Streets, 

W. ELLISON 

WHOLESALE 

Gut Flowers I Florists' Supplies 

7402 PINE STREET, 
— — — *(>SSt. JL'OXX.is, Ado. 

(Successor to ELLISON & KUEHN), 

i^^ WHOLESALE ^^4^ 



1122 FIITE STItEET, 

A oomplete line of Wire Desl^iu. 



Kew Catalogue (No. 4) 
containing over 1,000 Orna- 
mental Cuts for Florist's use, 
such as envelopes, letter 
heads, bill-heads, cards, 
advers., floral designs, etc., 
at from 30c. and upwards. 
Price of Catalogue 25 cts. 
(deducted from 81 order). 

A. BLANC, 

Engraver for Florists, 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 




l8g4- 



The American Florist. 



143 



E. H. HUNT, 

Wholesale Florist 

68 Lake Street, CHICAGO. 

WHOLESALE CUT FLOWERS. 

SEEDS. BTTIiBS AND AI.I. 

FI.ORISTS' SUFPI^IES. 



Western Aeent for the GREAT ANTIPEST. 

KENNICOTT BROS. GO. 

WHOLESALE GUT FLOWERS, 

and FLORISTS' SUPPLIES. 

34 & 36 RANDOLPH STREET, 

CH1CA.GO. 

A. L. RANDALL, 

wiiioi6sai6 Fiona 

126 Dearborn St., CHICAGO. 



Aeent for finest grades Waxed and Tissue Papers, 

J. B. DEAMUD&CO. 

WHOLESALE OUT FLOWERS, 

34 & 36 Randolph Street, 
PHONE M«N -:>. CHICAGO. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR AMERICAN BEAUTIES. 

Reinberg Bros. 
WHOLESALE CUT FLOWERS, 

3/ WABASH AVENUE, 

Telephone Main 4937. OHIO-A.O-0. 

We are Headquarters for the leading varieties of 
Roses, for the summer. Send us a trial order. 

NILES CENTER FLORAL CO. 

WH(>I.K>; AI.K GROWERS OF 

GUT FLOWERS OF ALL KINDS 

HEADQUARTERS FOR SMIT.AX. 

Fine crop nmv ready, per ICII JIO (rii; 
lier dozen $l.oti. 

59 WABASH AVENUE. 

Telephone Main :j505. CMIOA.GrO. 

WHOLESALE 
FLORISTS 

JOBBERS IN 
FLORISTS' 
SUPPLIES, 

METS, '^^^l -St^ FLORISTS' 

BRIDES, ^W ^^r^^>v VASES. 

GONTIERS, 

CARNATIONS, 

ALWAYS ON HAND 

1 Music Hall Place, 

BOSTON. MASS. 

HORTICniTnRAL ADCTIOSEERS, 

DAN'L B. LONG, 

WttOLESflLE GUT FLOWERS, 

495 Washington St.. BUFFALO, N. Y. 
Shipping Oki^eus carefully Attended to. 
OTHER SPECIALTIES: 

- Florists' Supplies, "Wire Desigrng, Bulbs, 
Long's Florists Photographs (see large ad. 
Catalogues. Lists. Terms, etc., on application. 

Always mention the American Flo- 
rist when writing to advertisers. 




©yftofc^afe MarfietA. 



Cut Flowers. 

New York. Sept. 4. 

Roses, averace stock 1.0u@ 3.0O 

Beauty 1.00® 6.0U 

• FIneselectea lO.OOaSO OO 

Meteor. Testout 2.00(8 4.00 

Kalserln 2.000 5 00 

Camatlcne.. colored 50® 1.00 

Asters. white. 75® 1.50 

finest blooms 1.00® 2.00 

Sweet peas - 05® .10 

VaUey 3.00 

Gladioli 100 

Smllax 8.00®10.00 

AsparaKUB 25.00®:j5.00 

Adiantum 76® 1.00 

BOSTON. Sept. 4. 

Roses 1.00® 3.00 

Camailons "5® 1.00 

Asters Si)® .:iT 

Gladiolus 1.00® 2.00 

.lapan lilies 2.00® 4.00 

Valley 3.110® 4.00 

Tuberoses 50® .?;) 

Stephanotls l-OU 

Adiantum 75® 1.00 

Smllax 12.0O®15.0O 

Asparagus 50. 00 

PHILADELPHLa , Sept. 4. 

Roses, small 2.00 

large teas 3.00® 4.00 

Beauties 8.00@15.00 

ramatlons 50® 1.50 

Valley „ 4.00 

Smllax 10.00®120O 

Asparagus 50.00 

Harrlall lilies 4.00® b.OO 

Astern ..■.'.•---■.■»-«.■.■■■*•. ...- ...... ,(0 

Cornflower!.'.'....".'.'.'..'...'.'.'.'.'.. 25® .50 

Cattlevas 35.0(i®40.00 

Adiantum 75® 1.00 

CHICAGO. Sept. I\. 

Roses. La France. Meteor 3. Ml® 4.00 

Beauty 8.00®I5.0O 

Kalserln 3.00® 4 00 

General assortment, per 1000. .$o®*10 

Carnations, long 25® .(iO 

fancies 1..50®2.00 

Auratum Ulles tl.OO© 8 CO 

Asters -^ 

Sweet Peas... 10® .30 

St. Lotris. Sept. P. 

Roses. Perles. Nlphetos. Wootton 2.00® 3.00 

Bride. Mermet. Bridesmaids 2.00® 3.00 

Meteors 2.00® 3.00 

LaFranee, Albany, Hoste 2.00® 3.00 

Beauty 5.00®15.no 

Sweetpeas 1,5® .25 

Carnations, long 50® .75 

short .50 

Adiantum 1.25 

Hollyhocks, asters .50 

BtTFFALO. Sept. 4. 

Roses. Beauties 10.aii@15.00 

Mermet. Bride. 4.00® B.OO 

Perles. Gontler. Hoste 3.00® 4.00 

Meteors 3.00® 5.0O 

Carnations 75® l.OO 

Asters .50 

Valley 3. 00 

Gladiolus 1.00® 3 00 

Adiantum 1.25 

Smllax 15.00® 20. 00 

Asparagus 50.00 

GEORGE fl. SUTHERLAND, 

Successor to PECK & SUTHERLAND. 
Successors to WM. J. STEWART. 

Cut Flowers! Florists' Supplies 

67 Bromfield St., BOSTON, MASS. 

New England Agent for the GREAT ANTIPEST. 
Mention American Florist. 

WELCH BROS., 
Wholesale Florists, 

wo. 2 BEACON STREET, 

Near Tremont SL> BOSTON, MASS. 

Mention American Florlht. 

CUT SMILAX. 

15 cents per String. 
JOSEPH E. BONSALL. 308 Garfield Ave.. Salem. 0. 



Kills Mildew 

and 

Fungus Growth. 

■What does? 




FOR HIGH GLASS SUMMER TRADE. 

THE LEADING FAVORITES. 

American Beaut y. 
Meteor , 

La France . 

Anii all other desirable roses, grown espe- 
cially tor suminer shipping to Sea- 
side and mountain resorts. 

BURNS & RAYNOR, 

49 West 28tb St., NEW YORK. 

SPRING, SUMMER. 

AUTUMN, WINTER. 

In dull season and busy season. 
All the year round. 

Roses, Lily "eMej 

and all other choice stock 
can be obtained of 

THOS. YOUNG, Jr., 

20 West 24th St., NEW YORK. 

WALTER F. SttERIDflN, 

. WHOLESALE • 

32 West 30ih Street. NEW YORK. 



GRAPE DUST. 



Sold by Seedsmen. 

Mention American Florist. 



Roses Shipped to all points. Price list on applicatiorii 

Mention American Florist 

Edward C. Horan, 

34 W. 29th Street, NEW YORK. 

WHOLESALE - FLORIST, 

Careful Shipping: to all parts of the country. 
I'lice list on application. 

FRANK D. HUNTER, 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN 

Cut* F lowers . 

57 W. 30th St., NEW YORK. 

Mention American Florist. 

FRANK MILLANG, 

(Successor to MILLANG BROS.) 

WHOLESALE FLORIST 

408 East 34th Street, 

Cut Flower Exchange. NEW YORK. 

THEO. ROEHRS, 

WHOLESALE 

FLORIST, 

111 West 30th street, 

NEW YORK CITY 

Established 1879 



SAMUEL S. PENNOCK, 

Wholesale Florist 

REAR OF 42 S. 16th STREET, 

Mention American Florist. 



144 



The American Florist. 



Sept. S, 



Jfie geesl Ura^e. 



AM. SEED TRADE ASSOCIATION. 

D. I. BrsHXELL, St. Louis, president: S. B. Briggs 
Toronto. Ist vlee-presldent: A. L. uuN. 114 Chambers 
Btreet, New York, secretary and treasurer. 



Freesias. — Well, the less said about 
them the better. There are millions of 
them. 

It is rumored that A. B. Cleveland was 
seriously injured in a mining accident, 
having had three ribs broken. 

Roman hyacinths of the large sizes, 
anything from 12 cm. up are scarce, and 
prices abroad have advanced sharply. 
Dutch hyacinths are not at all abundant 
in the foreign markets. They were offered 
very low early in the season, but the low 
offers have all been withdrawn. Stiffer 
prices are likely to prevail on these bulbs 
in the future as they have been selling 
below the actual cost of production and 
many growers are abandoning their cul- 
tivation. 

The seed business formerly conducted 
by Edward F. Dibble, at Honeoye Falls, 
N. Y., and the produce business of Frank 
P. Jobes of the same place, have been con- 
solidated under the laws of the State of 
New York, into the Edward F. Dibble 
Seed Go., with a paid up capital of 
$20,000, and is officered as follows: 
Edward F. Dibble, president; Frank P. 
Jobes, secretary and treasurer; and Ed- 
ward F. Dibble, Frank P. Jobes and Alex- 
ander M. Holden, directors. 

Japanese bulbs, longiflorum, auratum 
and the like are not likely to turn out as 
well as expected, owing to the drouth 
which has prevailed in that country as 
well as here. The bulbs are small sized 
in consequence. The tffect of the war 
upon the supply of Chinese sacred lily 
bulbs is not yet certain. A good many 
are already on the way. The Chinese in 
this country say that no more will be 
shipped, but "the heathen Chinee is pe- 
culiar" and all he says is not quite gospel. 
If he is telling the truth the department 
stores will have to suffer first. 



A Warning. 

Look out for a party calling h mself 
John R. Rolker, and falsely representing 
himself to be the son of Herman Rolker of 
New York, using his claim of relationship 
to get draits cashed. He was last heard 
of in St. Louis. 



Ware, Mass. — Harry A. Tucker was 
married on August 20 to Miss Lena 
Lovett. 

Easton, Pa.— J. P. Bauman has given 
up the florist business and sold out his 
stock to W. F. Keller. 

Queens. X. Y. — The greenhouses and 
other outbuildings on the premises of F. 
J. Lott were destroyed by fire on August 
18. Loss about $5,000. 

Newport, R. I.— The amount of $1,937 
was collected by subscription for the pur- 
pose of aiding florists whose property 
was so badly damaged by the great hail 
storm. 

Peabody, Mass.— John M. Ward, the 
well known florist, died here August 29, 
aged 58. Mr. Ward was a native of 
England, and went to St. John, N. B., 
some years ago, from there he settled in 
Peabody. He leaves a widow and several 
sons and daughters. 



HIGHEST AWARD 



TO OUR 



BULBS 



AT 

ATLANTIC CITY. 



DUTCH BULBS now in store. 

^^^^SS^^SSZS^^^^^^S^^SS TRADE LIST READY. 

PRIMULA CHINENSIS. 

.strong plants from 3-ineh pots. 

SINGLE white, red and PINK per 100, $4.00; per 1000, J35.00. 

DOUBLE WHITE and MIXED " «00; " 50.00. 



NEW YORK: 

26 Barclay Street. 



VAUGHAN'S SEED STORE 



146-148 W. Washington St., 

CHICAGO. 




s^oocooo 
FREESIAS 

Dim CiDCT UAUn We win deliver I'reesla Bulbs. 
DUyrinOl nAnUi bH cUarges for transportation 

paid, as follows: 

3-8 to 3-4 inch per 1000, $4.00 

1-4 to 5-8 inch per 1000, $3.00 

Liberal discount on larger lots. Send for our price list. 
Order NOW your Japan Bulbs, LonBlUorum, Aura- 
tums, Rubrums, Albums, ive are Headquarters. 
We are tbe ONLY FIRM In the U. 8. who guaran- 
tee you SOUND BULBS delivered. 
Address all communications to 

H. H. BERGER & CO., 

(Established 1878.) SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

of Colored and Natural 

IMMORTEULtS. 

Immortelle Wreaths of every dimension. 

JOSEPH DEPLIPPI, 

OLUOULES, far.. FRANCE. 

I do not All tbe orders containing less than 10110 
bunches. Prices reduced, and samples free by mail. 
English correspondence. 



WE SELL BULBS 



special low prices to 



Florists % Dealers. 

WEEBER & DON, 

Seed Merchants and (irowers. 
114 rhainl>eis Street. NKW VOKK. 



LILY VALLEY. 

From cold storajre. tlnest quality. $7. IK) per 1000 

LIL. LONGIFLORUM. 

.V7 Inches «..')Oper lUO; K>).UOper 1000 

BERMUDA FREESIAS. 

• j.lncu Ki.tO per 1000 

Ht. G. I^.A.UST .& OO., 
64 & fifi N. Fr ont Street. PHI LA.. PA. 

READY NOW. 

I'erldU Per 1000 

LUlum Harrlsll, .M Inches »2.60 KO.OO 

7-'.l '■ 5.00 4.J.0U 

Roman Hyacinths, 13-l.il<j cm 3 ra 26.00 

Paper White OrandlHora 1.* 10.00 

Krencli grown Freesias. large bulbs 1.0 h.OO 

English .Mllltrack Mushroom Spawn, per lb. 10c; per 
100 lbs. I«.UI. 

CHAS. SCHWAKE, 

404 E. 34th Street, NlOW YOKK. 

Special Offer to American Trade. 
louis de smet, 

NURSERYMAN, GHENT, BELGIUM, 
ori-Kn .\s si'KclAT.riEK: 
PiillliK. Aza'ea iDilIca, .VZALKA .MOLLIS, 
lin<l<leil, #U to »10 per 100: Araucaria 
exielsa (thonsands), Kay Trees, Begomas, 

GIOXiulaH. Tll.MJE LIST O.N DK.MANII. 

English Correspondence. 



Hul§6Doscli BroitiGrs, 

OVERVEEN, near Haarlem, HOLLAND. 

Bulbs m Plants 

We are now prepared to quote lowest 
possible prices for next July, Aug- 
ust and September delivery. 

Illustrated Wholesale Catalofjues on application. 

HULSEBOSCH BROS., 

ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 

ONION .u 
SEED. '^^ 

CROP 1894. 

_^^^^ Prices for New Crop 

"^^^^^— -made on Application. 

COX SEED AND PLANT CO. 

411, 413 & 415 Sansoine Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Ot,Tr rCe^v Ivist of 



and Autumn Sowing Seed is now ready, and 
will be mailed free to applicants. 

August Rolker & Sons 

Movu Ynrli i-'** ^^- ~* street. 

nen lUin, p. O. station E. 

for iiuniediate delivery: 

FIRST QUALITY LILY Of the VALLEY, 

BKKLIN PIPS, from cold storngo. 

C. H. JOOSTEN, 

3 CoentieB Slip, NEW YORK. 
IMPORTER OF BULB S AND PLANTS. 

The Water Garden. 

Special and Hardy Water Lilies of all colors. 
VICTORIA REGIA AND V. RANDI, EURYALE FEROX. 

Nelumbiums in variety, Hurdy Ornamental plants, 
sub-aquatic plants, etc.. etc. Nymphaja Laydekerl 
rosea (awarded a Medal at World's Fair) ; most charm- 
InKof all the IIAKDY Lilies; K! 511 each. 

Other Columbian Novelties see catalogue. 

WM. TRIC KER &. CO., Clifton, N. J. 

PRIMULA CHINKNSIS. fine plants with « to 10 
leaves, mixed varieties, 82.00 per 100. 
Cash with order. 
IH. & S. DYSINGEK, Albion, Mich. 



i8g4' 



The American Florist. 



145 




tn 


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J 

4> 


m 


I 


fS 


>-^ 


• 


V 


S^ 


1 


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^* 


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C3 



MUSHROOM SPAWN. 

NEW IMPORTATION OF SEPT. 8lh. Strictly 
Al, per 10 lbs. $1.^0; 100 lbs. SSOO. 

CANE STAKES. 

strong stock, in bundles of 2.50. Per 1000, 
$3.00; 2,000 for IIL-W. 

SPHAGNUM MOSS. 

Large bales, extra clean for florists' use. Per 
bale, $1.25; 6 bales for 86.00. 

BONE MEAL. 

Every bag warranted pure bone. Per bag 
of 200 lbs., 84.25; 1,000 lbs., 817.00. 

HORN SHAVINGS. 

Coarse; 25 lbs., 81 00; 100 lbs., 83.00. Fine; 
25 lbs., 81.25; 100 lbs., $3.50. 

Fall Bulb and Seed Catalogue now ready. 
Please send for one. 

W. W. BARNARD & CO., 

7Se B. KINZIE STREET, CHICAGO. 

NOVELTY. 

New, Semi-Double, Large 
Flowering 

WHITE MftRGUERITE 

(Chrysimtlieuiuiii irute.soens.) 

Size of flowers 4 inches in diameter, petals 
clear wliite, center yellow. 

PRICES FOR PLANTS FROM 2;;-INCH POTS. 
$2.50 PER DOZEN: $20 PER 100. 

Ready September 1. Cash with order. 

GRflLLE,RT & GO., Florists. 

COLMA. San Mateo Co.. CALIFORNIA. 

Tuberous 
Begonias 

(GRIFFINS STRAIN.) 
Plants in bloom, all sizes, at lowest prices. 

OASIS NURSERY CO., 

Thos. Griffin. Mgr. Westbury Station. L. I., N. Y. 

Plants from last fall; these have a foundation and 
will begin to nin strong at once. 82.50 per 100; 
820.00 per 1000. 

CLEMATIS for Fall Delivery. 

Special prices at wholesale, on application. 
Splendirl stock and assortment. 

F. A. BALIiER, Bloomingiiou, 111. 



ERN5Tl^lEMSCttNeiDeR;Altdna,Hafnburg 

« ., iOLt AOENTS FOR U.S.AMERIC* i CANADA. 



When writing to any of tlie adver- 
tisers on this page please mention the 
American Florist. 




SWAINSONA GALEGIFOLIA ALBA 1:^S:Z^X:TZ^. 

claim the credit of discovering its great merits, and pressing its e.xcellent qualities to 

the wide awake florists ot America 

Fine plants in bloom in 5-inch pots, at $5.00 per dozen. Send for a sample dozen, iu full bhmm, to 



Monev Order office. 
Station H. Phila 



EDWIN LONSDALE, *" 



KsrM 

PHI I 



T IULI,, 
.VDKI.I'HIA. 



100,000 PANSIES 



BROWN'S SUPERB PANSIES 

READY NOW FOB PLANTING. 

Grower of all the leading variety, the ne plus ultra in pansies. For size and form it seems hardly 
possible to produce anything more perfect and superfine (most light colors). 

By mail. 75c. per lOO ; I Liberal discount will be allowed on large orders. 

Freeljy expre&s, $5 OO per 1000.1 Cash with order. 

Peter BROWN3 721 Marietta Avenue, LANCASTER, Pa. 

Mention American FlQrtat 



Prices Lower Than Ever. 

Ready for shipment from July to September. 

Calla Aethiopica. fine dry roots in all sizes. 

Lil. Longiflorum. ready for shipment from October 
1st to March 15, 1895. 

Lil. Auratum, Spec. Rubrum and Album. Etc. 

Iris Kaempferi, in 100 choice varieties. 

Japanese Maples, in best varieties. 

Camellias, Paeonies, Tree Ferns. Raphis, C^cas 
Revoluta, superb growing plants with fine foliage 
from 25 cents to $5 each; fresh imported stems, 
true long leaf variety, roots and leaves cut off, de- 
livered from March, 1895. 

For general Japanese stock apply to 

F. Gonzalez & Co., 

303 to 312 Wayne St., SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

Mention American Florist. 

PANSY SEED. 

NEW CROP NOW READY. Ver^- fine mixture of 
large flowering varieties and choice colors, espe- 
cially selected for florists' use. 1 oz, $3.00. 

NEW GIANT PRIZE PANSY, finest strain in the 
market. 1 oz. $5 GO. 

Low prices on Lilium Harrisii, Longiflorum, 
Roman Hyacinths, Lily ol the Valley, etc. 

Special low prices on Rustic Baskets. 

HERRMANN'S SEED STORE, 

4/3 EAST 34-TH STREET, 

Near Long Island Ferry, NEW YORK. 

Mention American FlorlBt 

New, Rare and Beautiful Plants 

STROBII.ANTHES DYfRIANUS. This 
is the most valuable novelty which has been in- 
troduced for years. For bedding is superior to the 
finest coleus. Withstands hot sun aud dry 
weather better. 

A I^ar^'e Collection of Kare Hot House and Green- 
house Plants, carefully ^towd. at low rates. 

OKC'H 1 1).*^.— A very extensive stock; East Indian, 
Mexican. Central and South American, etc. 

KAKE ANI> HKAlITJFtll. KVEKGREENS, 
Ornamental Trees Shrubs, etc. 

P.l'.ONI KS.-A larKe collection of the tinest lo cul- 
tivation. Hardy Perennials, Phloxes. .Japanese Iris, 
Roses. Cleiniitls, etc. New and Standard Fruits, etc. 

|JS^Catalot,'ues on application 

JOHN SAUL, Washington, D. C. 

Choice Florist Seeds. 

Pansy, Calceolaria, Primula, Cineraria, 

choicest strulns, at 2.'i ;ind 50 cts. per trade packet. 

Specia. quotation on BULBS. 

SOUTH ORANGE. N. J. 



The Universal 
Horticultural Establishment, 



Smilax Plants Cheap. 

Out of 2 and 3-incli pots, also transplanted plants 
out of boxes. Never had as fine and large stock 
before. Please state number you desire and I will 
give you the lowest prices. Safe delivery aud 
best satisfaction guaranteed with every shipment. 
Sample order 10 cts. Terms strictly cash. 

Address FRED SCHNEIDER. Wholesale Florist. 

Wyoming: Co.. ATTICA, N. Y. 

BUTTERCUP CARNATION tUo8c 

PRIMROSES, assorted, 25^-iuch -Ic 

" .'^ inch 5c 

;^J4-iuch, strong .... 6c 
McCBEA & COLE, Battle Creek, Mich. 



PANSIES. . . 

Every Grower Claims the Best. 

I am willing to have mine tested alongside 
of any in the market. Over a thousand florists 
used them last season, were pleased with them 
and made money out of them. 

Between Sept. 1st and Dec. 1st I will have a 
MILLION or more plants to sell. They can not 
be offered in competition with cheap grown 
seed, but quality considered, are remarkably 
cheap at the price. 
By Mail or Express, prepaid, 75c. per 100: by Express 
at your expense, $5.00 per 1000. Liberal dis- 
count will be allowed on large orders. 

An honest sample of the plants will be 
mailed you on receipt often cents, and terms 
are absolutely cash in advance. 

ALBERT M. HERR, L. B. 496, Lancaster, Pa. 

Pansy* Seed, 

The JENXING?^ STKAIV of lilj^li ^'rade Pansy 
Seed. New crop now ready. Saved with speclalcare 
from only the very finest varieties and (warranted! 
first-class in every respect. 

THE JENNINGS XX STRAIN. 
The cream of Pansies. Grand colors mixed, pkt., 
150U seed. yi.l»0: 1 oz. 4*.UU. 

The Jennlnys Strain, finest mixed, pitt. $I.(iC about 
2500 seed; 1 oz. $o.0U; 3 ozs $15.00. No sKlm mllb In this 
strain. (They are just as good as I can make 'em). 
To my old patrons 1 would say they are a big Improve- 
ment over last season— more variety and finer colors. 
The best strain for florists either for winter bloom or 
spring sales; all large dowering. 

Black Dr. Faust, finest. pkt., ','500 seed, Jl. 00 

Finest Vellow. black eye " " 1.00 

Pure White, the best " '• 1.00 

Victoria, bright red pkt . 1000 seed, 1.00 

All my own growth of 1804. Half pkts. of any of the 
above 50c. Please send money orders or registered 
letter. Cash with order. Address 

E. B. JENNINGS, Wholesale Pansy Grower. 
Lock Box 2^4. SOUTHPOHT, CONN. 



iRoemer's Superb Prize Pansies. \ 
Tbe finest strain uf I^ansles in ttie World. I 

Introducer and Grower of all the leading t 
, Novelties. J 

!Catalot-'ue free on application. ♦ 

FRED ROEMER, SEED GROWER, I 
miKULIN|{lIK(i, GKK1>IAN> . \ 

Pansies Worth Raising. 

Prepaid by mall «1. (HI per 100 

At your expense by express $,'» uu per 1000 

Extra quHlity iiew .»»ep<l, "^ ounce. SI. CO; h 
packages. ^.liO Large (juantltles at special prices. 
Cash with order. 

CHRISTIAN SOLTAU, 

199 Grant Ave.. .lEUSEY CITY. N. J. 

EXTRA PANSY SEED. 

MAMMOTH SUNBEAM STRAIN. 

A grand collection of plant tlowerlnir varieties, very 
large, of perfect form, and choice colors: carefully 
selected: better seed plants this year than ever: re- 
ceive very high praise from ray customers: no finer 
strain offered anywhere: tlorlsts should sow of It. 

Trade pkt.. 6U0 seeds, 25c: ;i pkts. «lc: « puts. »1.00. A 
pkt. of the new Monkey Face pansy with every $1 order. 
JOHN F. Kl'PP, Shiremanstown, Pa. 



"D A fT*t\ Per 10 lbs .'SOc; 25 lbs $1.0U; 
DA.\j\j\I ,tO lbs 81.,iO; 100 lbsr.i.50. 

■f^TTCJ'P Extra fine, per 100 lbs. 85. 

U\JO ^m «»-Sample Free. 

Vauglian's Seed Store, m. Chicago. 



TO 



146 



The American Florist. 



Sept 8, 



Cincinnati. 

Business undoubtedly is on theincrease. 
Orders to the wholesale houses are begin- 
ning to come in, which shows that the 
smaller cities are awakening from their 
slumbers. Inquiries are also coming in 
asking for future stocks, and placing 
future orders. All this goes to show to 
we shall have a little business at least. 

Fred Walz arranged a golden wedding 
decoration September 4, using quite a 
number of Perle roses and yellow cannas 
in connection with palms. He also 
showed us some very good seedling car- 
nations; a variegated sort similar to J. J. 
Harrison is the best one I have seen Irom 
his collection. . 

On August 29, a harvest home festival 
was held at Cheviot, a small nearby 
town. These gatherings have been held 
for the last 30 years in some of the town 
ships in Ohio and Kentucky. They are 
something on the order of a county fair. 
The farmers, gardeners and florists bring 
their different products and exhibit same 
for premiums. Three of our enterprising 
florists competed, Adam Frank, J. T. 
Conger, and S. S. Jackson. Frank suc- 
ceeded in capturing the priz; for best 
bouquet, best floral design, best hanging 
basket, and best collection of cut flowers, 
while Conger won prize for the general 
display, best collection of geraniums, 
gladiolus, greenhouse plants and best 5 
varietiesof variegated plants. S. S.Jack- 
son got prize for bestcoUcction of dahlias. 
We have quite a number of growers of 
cut flowers in the small towns adjoining 
Cincinnati who have started up within 
the past three years; in fact since the 
commission houses have started. R. M. 
Walker of Oxford, 0., is one of these. He 
has six greenhouses, three of them 12Sx 
21 and three 70x20. One house and one 
half he has planted in carnations of the 
best sorts, and three and one-half houses 
planted in roses; consisting of American 
Beauty, Kaiserin Augusta Victoria, 
Testout, Bridesmaid, Brides, Mermets, 
Perles, Cusin, Woottons, etc. The re- 
remaining house is planted in chrysanthe- 
mums, and later will be used for forcing 
stock. Mr. W^alker has as his foreman 
and grower Henry Stocking from Mon- 
treal, Canada, and we expect to see some 
good stock from this place. 

Our visitors this week wereChas. Pom- 
ment of Greenfield, O., the Messrs. Fisher, 
and Mr. McKeller, wife and sister from 
Chillicothe. The latter were on their way 
to Chicago for a few week's visit. Mr. Mc- 
Keller is a great friend to the Niphetos 
rose and grows same to perfection. H. H. 
Ritter and family have returned home 
from Atlantic City and New York and is 
needless to say they erjoyed their trip. 

G. 



ARECA LUTESCENS GENErA^rJs^EFUL PALM 

in commerce. We have them in all sizes, and Prices to suit. 
CERTIFICATE OP KIEBIT was awarded for this sterling Decorative Plant 

at the convention held at Atlantic City, August, 1894. Send for price list. 

WYUDMOOR STATION. Ptllla. & Reading 



-EDWIN LONSDALE, 



R. R. from 12th & Market Sts.. HHIbA 



FIELD-GROWN 

CARiNATIONS. 



Greenhouse Building. 

PiTTSFiELD, Mass.— Jacob Raifstanger, 
house 104x18. 

DoYLESTOWN, Pa — Mrs. S. A. Walton, 
two new rose houses. 

Philadelphia. Pa. — Gillingham Bros, 
house 81x15 on S ilmon street. 

WoLLASTON, Mass. — Samuel Brown. 

JoH.NSTOWN, N. v.— P. M. Simmons on 
corner Market and Clinton streets. 

Babylo.n, N. Y.— C. L. Tappan. 



GRACE WILDER, 
TIDAL WAVE, 
WHITE WINGS. 
LIZZIE McGOWAN, 
ANNA WEBB, 

DAYBREAK, 1 

ALBERTINI, 

WM. SCOTT, 

SPARTAN, 

WESTERN PRIDE, 

DR. SMART, 

WABASH. 

MRS. REYNOLDS, 

RICHMOND, 

HELEN KELLER, 
BOUTON D'OR, 
UNCLE JOHN, 
THE STUART, 



$5.00 per 100. 



!00 per 100. 



Always meniion the American Flo- 
rist when writing to advertisers. 

Marie Louise Violets. 

5000 strong clumps, free from disease, for cash 

with order $.5.00 per 100; 840.00 per 1000. 
GEO. N. SAYLES, 40 Bradley St.. Watertown. N. Y. 



$15.00 per 100. 



READY FOR DELIVERY. 
J, A. MERRIFIELD 

Assignee ofJ. T. ANTHONY, 

3i25 Prairie Ave., CHICAGO. 



Field-Grown 
Carnations. 

LNCLE .lOHN »12.oOperlOO 

THE STUART '. 12.50 " 

E. A. WOOD 12.50 ■■ 

DIAZ ALBBRTINl 12.50 " 

ELIZABETH REYSOLDS TOU " 

RICHMOND T.OO '• 

DR. SMART T.UO " 

BLANCHE T.eO " 

Peariy fo delivery September 15. 

TEK>I>: Casli with order. 

F. DORNER & SON, La Fayette, Ind. 

Mention American Fltniet. 

W. R. Shelmire, 

AVONDALE, 

CARNATIONS 

AND COLEUS. 

25,000 FIELD GROWN 

CARNATIONS 

Nice healthy stock of the Rtundnrd tested eorts In 

the CMriiHtioii helt. 

3IIIST l5ES(>l,l». IMeuse send list of your wants to 

BENJ. CGNNELL, '^"\T'.!,'i.T'i™Kt7vK. ha. 

P. S.— Also fine field clumps of the peerless Violet 
I>ady Hume Cauipbell. 

Mpntlon Amerlnnn FIorlBt. 

FOB SALE CHEAP. 

A Lollection of about 250 Orchids including 

the f.. Iliiwini; : 

ANGRAECUMS. CATTLEYAS. COELOGYNES, CYPRI- 

PEDIUM INSIGNE. DENDROBIUMS. EPIDEN- 

DRUMS. L4ELIAS. ONCIOIUMS, ETC.. ETC. 
Some tine pieces of Ciiltleyii Sklnnerl, 2 to S feet In 
(llnmeter. For pilces a(l(lreB» 
ROBERT CURRIE. 304 27th St.. Milwaukee, Wis. 



GOOD FIELD PLANTS 

OF 

Sweetbrier 
Carnation . 

S15.00 PER 100. 

Other varieties on application. . . . 



EDW. SWAYNE, 

KENNETT SQUARE, PA. 



ICARNATION "BUTTERCUP" 

Strong and healthy plants, pot-grown, 
in 3-inch pots. 

\$8.00 Per 100. S7S.0O PBR 10OO. 

EDWIN LONSDALE, 

CHESTNUT HILL, PHILADELPHIA. 



TE^STE^D tmd 



NEW CARNATIONS. 
FERNS. 

ELLIS, NORFOLK Co.. MASS. 



"HELEN KELLER" 

The new Carnation; pure wliite, deli- 
cately luarkeii with red 

Price for healthy and strone field- grown 
plants, $8.00 per 100. 
Orders may be sent either to 
JOHN N. MAY, EDWIN LONSDALE, 

Suinniit. X. .T. Chestnut Hill, Fhila. 



CARNATIONS ^'r^^^n. 

E. G. Hill, Wm. Scott, Mrs. Reynolds, Silver 
Spray, Tidal Wave, Lizzie McGowan. Ben Hur, 
Mme. Diaz Albertini. White Hove, Garfield, Lam- 
born, Portia, EduaCraie, Fred Doruer, Daybreak, 
Golden Gate, Mrs Fisher. White Wings, Hinze's 
White, Blanche, Purdue, Louise Porsch, and other 
sorts. Marie Louise Violets, Low prices on appli- 
cation. JOSEPH HEINL, Jacksonville, III. 



CARNATIONS 

Rooted Cuttings all sold or planted 
out. Field plants for sale in the 
fill ^ 

c;. J. r»:E3vrffOC!Wt, 

The Pines. KENNETT SQUARE. Chester Co.. PA. 

Mention .Vnieriiiin Florist. 



THE COTTAGE GARDENS, 

Queens, Long Island, N. 7. 

WHOLESALE CARNATIONS. 



Carnations a Specialty 

Rooted Cuttlnns anil Yount' Plants sold out. 
Nice Field-Grown Plants In Sept. Send for prices. 
GEO. HANCOCK & SON. Grand Haven, Mich. 



i8g4' 



The American Florist. 



147 




Siebrecht&Wadley, 

rqze bill nurseries, 
New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Palms, 

ORCHIDS, 

Roses, 

and ^fe-w I*lant®, 

FRESH DRACAENA CANES WOW READY. 

SURPLUS STOCK . . . 

-^LATANIAS 

10,000 Latanias in 21,0-inch pots, JS5.00 per 
100; 150.00 per 1000. 

20,000 Latanias in 3-inch pots, $12.00 per 
100; J90.00 per 1000. 

GEORGE WITTBOLD, 



1708 N. Halsted St., 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



PRIMROSES. 

Fine stocky plants, now ready for 3-inch pots. 

FLOWERS 

large, all fringed; brilliant colors. 

FIFTEEN SORTS. 

Price, for the single sorts per 100. 8 2..50 

' perlOOO, 20.00 

double " ... per 100, ,5.00 

Extra plants with every order to help pay express. 

HENRY S. RUPP & SONS. 

SIIIKKM.VXSTOH'N, PA. 

ORCHIDS OUR SPECIALTY. 

The Best and Largest Stock in the World. 
New & Rare Foliage & Flowering Plants. 

A grand selection for btove, Greenhouse and Con- 
aervatory 

SANDER, St. A/bans, England. 

Our Mr. A. Dlmmock will be pleased to Interview 
buyers or reply to any communication addressed to 
mm at 2(15 Greenwich St., New York City. 



A. Farleyense Fern. 

8,000 Strong, healthy plants, 4-inch, 
|40 per 100; $350 per lOOO. 

p. O. Box 72. KANSAS CITY. MO. 



SMILAX. SMILAX. 

Very strong, clean, healthy plants from 

2}4-\nch pots, $2.50 per iCO; 

|20.00 per 1000. 

Samples free on receipt of 5 cts. 

Address J. G. BURROW, Fishklll, N. Y. 



August Riilker & Sons, 

136 & 138 W. 24lh St., Uaui VnrI/ 
P.O. station E. llSW TOlK, 

Supply the Trade with 

Bulbs, Seeds and Requisites. 

E.G. HILL & CO.. 

wiioiesaieFiorisis 

RICHMOND. INDIANA. 




(Sherwood H.iLL Nursery Co.) 



No. 427-9 Saxsome Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 



CALIFORNIA -GROWN 
SWEET PEAS 

And other Flower Seeds. 

PACIFIC COAST 
TREE SEEDS JAPANESE 

And Native Bulbs. I 11 V Rill DC 

And other Oriental Specialties. 

ONION SEED, PEAS, BEANS, etc. 

Write for special contract prices. 



POT-GROWN 

STRAWBERRIES I'M 



NOW IS THE TIME AND THIS IS THE PLACE ! 

lOO.OOO READY. NO WAITING. 

per 1000; 30 leading varieties. YOU GET 'EM 
and they make you quick money. 



Natural Gycas Leaves. 

(Sago Palms.) 

Specially prepared for us in the very 
best finish to retain for months their ap- 
pearance equal to fresh cut fronds. We 
are Headquarters, always have stock on 
hand and offer selected, perfect leaves ac- 
cordmg to size from 30 in. to 45 in. length 
at 40c, 45c, 50c, 60c and 75c each frond. 
Larger quantities at proportionate reduc- 
tion. 

August Rtjiker & Sons, 

Now Ynrlr 136 W. 24th street. 
11 Cn lUin, p. O. station ]•:. 



GflTflLOGUB PRINTING. 
ELEGTROTYPING. 

Done with expert ability for Florists, 
Nurserymen, Seedsmen. Write to 
J. Horace McFarland Co. 

- • • HARKISBUKG . PA 

Tobacco Dust . 

Per barrel (about 125 lbs.), $2.50. 
Sample free by mail. 

HERRMANN'S SEED STORE, 

413 Kast 34tli Street, 
near Long Island Ferry. NEW YORK. 

JULES DE COCK, o.%'ii^%%',%%^. 

Offers to the trade only good plants. 
10,000 Araucaria excelsa; 30.000 Azaleas Indlca: 20.000 
^^^^^''^J^.^^^^^'\}^];P^ Bef^onlas and Gloxlala BulbT 
}^«J„^arietles: 100,000 Palms, clean plants, all alzes 
lu.uuu sweet Bays, standiirds and pyramldals 
CASH WITH OKDEU. 



PALMS. 



150,000 of all the leading va- 
rieties. 



FERNS. 



50,000 of leading varieties. 
Address Q£ORGE WITTBOLD, 

1708 TS. Halsted St., CHICAGO. 

Carl Schwanecke, 

OSCHERSLEBEN, GERMANY. 

Largest and oldest special culture of pan- 
sies; received premiums at all large exhibi- 
tions, the last at Chicago in 1893; offers 
first-class pansy seed, especially Gassier, 
Trimardeau and Bugnot, also all of the best 
older and newer kinds. 

Send 2 francs for Catalog-ue. 
Mention American Florist. 



TRY 



DREER'S 
Garden Seeds, 

Plants. Bulbs & Requisites. 
They are the best at the 
lowest prices. Trade List is- 
sued quarterly, mailed free 
to the trade only. 
HENKY A. DREER, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

"HAKU TIMES" PALM COLLECTIONS. 

For cash with order we Klve IT :j and 4-ln, Palms for 
Kiregular price W). and :)4 for K (regular price J8|. 
these comprise the best varieties. Including Latanias 
and Eenttas. 

WILLIAMS Sc SONS CO., Batavia, lU. 




148 



The American Florist. 



Sejt. c?, 



Indianapolis. 

Since the openingof September business 
seems to improve. Several weddings are 
in view for this month and many in Octo 
ber. Many prominent people are return- 
ing from their summer outings; many 
more than usual have been camping out 
in tents in the neighborhood, showing 
that economy has to be used in many 
families. Suiely this has been the dullest 
summer to the florists in this city, and it 
seems in many other places; that accounts 
for the absence of many at the conven- 
tion. The reports from the bowling con- 
test has started our club members into 
considering a meeting for the permanent 
organization of a bowling club; the only 
trouble here is a suitable place. There is 
talk of building one of their own. 

John Heidenreich & Co. dissolved part- 
nership June 15. Mr. John Grande started 
a new place as reported previously, Mr. 
John Heidenreich continuing in the old 
place, having repaired and arranged the 
same in splendid shape. Firm name now 
is John Heidenreich. 

Bertermann Bros, have added one house 
92x15 for chrysanthemums and forcing 
lilies. 

Lorenz Schwartling, for some years 
owning the Woodlawn Greenhouses, has 
discontinued business. 

The writer would like to warn florists 
in prominent cities against aCapt.Ward, 
claiming to be very wealthy, seems to in- 
form himself of the names and habits of 
well-to-do citizens, and in thatwaycreate 
confidence. He claims to be intending to 
buy prominent buildings, etc. He says 
he buys hundreds of dollars worth of 
floweis to give away to his friends. Cin- 
cinnati has been a sufiferer from him. An 
article in the Cincinnati Enquirer put the 
writer on his guard and prevented him 
from getting a good round flower bill; 
when refused credit he grew abusive. He 
is tall, slim, dashing habit, southern ac- 
cent in his talk (Kentucky colonel style), 
wears slouch hat, claims to have been 
steamboat owner and captain. 

The whole committee for final arrange- 
ments for the chrysanthemum show to be 
held here by the state society will meet in 
this city September 11. All indications 
are that this year's exhibition will eclipse 
all others. More plants are being raised 
and the splendid premium list will fill the 
hall to overflowing. Many special feat- 
ures will be added, notably a grand rose 
display. W. B. 

Metal Designs 

just received from our factory in Paris, 
a rich assortment of the very latest 
styles of Metal Wreaths Crosses, Bou- 
quets, etc., tasteluUy decorated with 
porcelain (lowers; all at reasonable 
prices. 
Send for trial shipment, limiting cost, 
and leaving- assortment to yours truly, 

August Rdlker & Sons, 



New Yoik 



136 W. 24th Street. 

I'. O, station K. 






*■- CC.ABEL a CO.P.O.B0X 920J(iwYoi)«. 



Superiority Recognized. 

A CERTIFICATE OF MERIT A\A/'ARDED TO A. 
HERRMANN, AT ATLANTIC CITY, FOR 

METAL FLOWER DESIGNS. 

A. UJuKKMAlViVf 408 E. 34lh street, :iVEJVV TTOI^k:. 

Quality Unexcelled. Prices Reasonable. Catalogues Free. 



You did not go 



fc) 



TO THE 



Convention ? 

THAT IS WHERE YOU MADE 
A BIG MISTAKE. 

If you had gone you would 
then understand why the Cer- 
tificate was awarded to Bayers- 
dorfer's exhibit of Florists' 
Supplies, and why that section 
of the exhibition hall was 
crowded almost to suffocation 
with visitors and customers. 
The same quality of goods 
shown there is what we use to 
fill all our orders. 

Everything positively fresh, up to date, 
and at prices as low as you are paying 
for goods antiquated in style and shop- 
worn. 

Our new Catalogue will tell you all about 
new designs in 

BASKETS and METAL GOODS, 
WHEAT SHEAVES, DOVES, 
NOVELTIES in LETTERS 
and INSCRIPTIONS, 
CAPE FLOWERS and IMMORTELLES, 
CHENILLE, RIBBON, 
STEMMING WIRE, 

TINFOIL, TOOTHPICKS, 
Everything needed in a complete outfit. 



H. 



& 



\ 



S6 



IV. -itlx St., 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

WHOLESALi: ONLY -^^Sft*- 

MflRSCHUETZ & CO., 

Florists' SUDDli6S, 

23 & 25 N. 4th St., PHILADELPHIA. PA. 
Send for Catalogue.__^..^^^^ 



World's 
Fair. 



MEDSL SWARDED. 

ERNST KAUFMANN & CO., 
Wholesale FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

No. 113 North 4tli Street, 
Send for catalogfue. PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

Always mention the Amercan Flo- 
rist when writing: to advertisers. 




Every florist, market gardener, ownerof lawn.erass- 
plat oi flower-bed, In fact everyone who has a faucet 
ana hose slionid have the Kinney Pump (patent ap- 

f)lted for) for applying liquid manure, fungicides and 
Dsectlcldes to plants. Feed your plants, fertilize your 
lawns by using liquid manure. The cheapest, simplest 
and most scientific spraying pump In use. Sent pre- 
paid for J2 5U— spraying valve attachment 50c. Pump 
complete $;iOO. Send for circular. Address 

HOSE CONNECTION CO., Kingston. Rhode Island. 

Only 29 Kingstona In the U. S. Get the state straight. 

"They are a good thing." "A very valuable labor 
saving device."— W. N. Hudd. Sec'y Alt. Greenwood 
Cemetery Asso.. III. 

"The most valuable labor saving Invention 1 ever 
used."— C. E. Weld. Rosllndale. Mass. 




'Manz 

&^COMPANY-- 

WOODCNORAVINO A MALF-TONE PROCESS- 
ZINC ETCHING^*!. Jc 3t. W-\X PROCESS ■■ 
COPPER ETCHING \) ELECTROTYPING ■ ■■ 






183 A\ONRp& Street- 

• ■■ CHICAGO- • ■ 



WHITE DOVES 

FOR FLORISTS. 

Largest and finest stock In the United 
States. Write for prices to 




S. J. RUSSELL. 

850 Montgomery St.. Jersey City, N. J . 



ratented June 30, 1894. 

STRAPS 

Unfolding Tight-Fasteners. 
FRANK L. MOORE. Chatham, N. J. 




GREENHOUSE HEATING 



AND VENTILATING. 

Superior Hot Water Boilers 
JOHN A. SCOLLAY, 

74 & 76 Myrtle Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

«S~Send for Catalogue. 



Please mention the American Florist 
every time you write to an advertiser. 



i8g4. 



The American Florist. 



149 



ESTABI.ISHI:D 1854. 

Qevine's Boiler Works. 

THE FLAT TOP TYPE 

Wrought Iron Hot Water Boilers. 










Capacity from 350 to 10,000 feet of four-iuch pipe. 
Send for New List. 

FRANK DAN BLISH, Att'y, 

OFFICE, 69 DEARBORN ST., 
WORKS. 56th & WALLACE STREETS, 

• • • CHIC5A.OO. 




J. N, Struck & Bro. 

Manufacturers ot 

• CYPRESS • 





11 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 

When wrltlntr mention the American Florist. 

BE UP TO DATE, 



And get the BEST. This is it. 




The Champion Ventilating Apparatus. 

CHEAP. DURABLE. EFFICIENT. 
Circular tells the whole story. It Ib free. 

AMERICAN ROAD MACHINE CO., 

KENNETT SQUARE, FA. 



Bimeflsioiis oltnis Box: 

2ti Inches long by 18 Inches wide 

and 12 Inches hlftb. 

Two secttona. 




This w^ooden box nicely stained and Tamislied. 18x30x13, 
made in two sections, cue for each size letter, given away with first order of 500 letters. 

.A.Or£lZV«X*IS ■ 

A. Kolker & Sons, New Vork. 

Marschiietz & Co., 25 V. 4th St., PhUa., Pa. 

F. K. MoAilister, 23 Dey St., New York. 

A. D. Perry & Co., 33 Warren St., Syracuse, 
Ne^v York. 

A. Herruian. 415 E. 34th St., New York. 

1- rust Kauimanu & Co., 113 N. 4th St., Phila. 

II. Ifayersdorfer & Co., Philadelphia. Pa. 

A. C Kendal, 115 Ontario St., Cleveland, O. 

J. A. Siuinaers, Toronto, Out., Agent for 
Cauada. 

E. H. Hunt, 79 Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

Wisconsin Flower Exchange, 131 Mason St-, 
3Iii\vaukee, Wis. 

H. Suuderbruch, 4th and Walnut Sts., Cin- 
cinnati, <>. 

T. AV. Wood & Sons. 6th and Marshall Sts., 
Hichmnnd, A'a. 

.las. \"ick's Sons. Kooliester, N. Y. 

C. A. Kuehn. i 123 Pine St., St. Louis, Mo. 

D. H. Long, liuttklo, New Y'^ork. 
C. F. Huntington & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Z. I>e Forcht Ely & Co., 1034 Market St., 

I'liiladelphia, pa. 
Portland Seed Co., 171 3d St., Portland, Ore. 
A. Herman, 415 E. 34th St., New York. 
<;eo, A. SntherlHud, 67 HroinfieidSt., Boston. 
Welcli I5ros., No. lA ISeacon St., Boston. 
N. F. McCarthy & Co., 1 Music Hall Place, 

Boston. 
all the Wholesalers In Boston. 



BOSTON FLORIST LETTER GO. 

Mannfacture THE BEST LETTERS IS THE MARKET. 

Sizes tM-in. and 2-in. 2.00 per 100. Patent 
iaitener with each letter. 

OUR NEW SCRIPT LETTER, $4.00 per 100. 



N. F. McCARTHT, 

Treas. & Mangr. 



Addre.t 13 Green St.. 
Boston, Mass. 



Address all correspondence to 1 Music Hall Place. 



We have a new FA8TBNEK which we conBider 
a decided SQCcess. An7 cuBtomers having old style 
faBtenerB which they wlBb to exchange, can do bo 
without additional cost by writing ua. 

These Letters are handled by 



VICTORY ! VICTORY ! VICTORY ! 



The only Certificate ol Merit 
awarded lor ventilating ap- 
paratus at the St. Louis 
Convention was to the 

POPULAR STANDARD 
VENTILATIlMG MACHINE 

The florist's friend in 
working and prices. 




No repairs for 5 years, 
no chains to break 
as is the result with 
others. 

Opens Sash uniform on 
100 foot houses. A 
new device. 

Send lor Catalogue and ES' 
timates. 



Ej. mi»F»A.iei>, "iroxangrsto-wn, oiiio. 



Pat. 1882, '85, '86, 
" '90, '91. 




SFRlNa STEEL QALVANlZEfi: 



ARMORED 



FOR WATER, AIR, STEAM, ACIDfet, 
OILS, LIQUORS, GAS, SUCTION, 

And for any and every purpose for which a hose 
can be applied. 
Sizes, Vi-inch to 42 inches diameter. 
The making, vending or use of any Serviceable 
Armored Wire Bound Hose not of our manufac- 
ture is an infringement on one or more of our 
Patents. The rights secured to us render each Individual dealer or user responsible for such unlawful 
use with all the consequences thereof. For prices and discounts address WATERBURY RUBBER CO.. 
Sole Mt'rs and Owners of all the SphincUr Gnp Armored Hose PatenU, 49 Warren Street, New Vn.i- 
.T. cf. VAUGhAN, Aeent. CHICAGO. 

D. H. ROBERTS, 

159 and 161 S. Fifth Avenue, PTE^A^V ^VORK!, 

NATURAL GAS MADE GLASS, 

FOR ROSE HOUSES, CONSERVATORIES, ETC.. ETC. 



THE CHAMPION 

fluiomatic Ventilator. 

The cheapeet, easiest to operate, and by far the 
best machine In the market. Don't buy a Venti- 
lator until you have seen my Illustrated deecrtptlve 
circular, which will be sent you free, dvlng prlceB. etc. 
Also Champion 8oU Pulverizer and Stfter. 

Address A. Q. WOLF & BRO., 
:?3l E. First Street: OAYTON,