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Full text of "The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade"



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OF THE 




MASSACHUSETTS 

AGRICULTURAL 

COLLEGE 

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SOURC E _k-olle /^.e ^tu-Taas.. 

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ffhis book may be kept out 

TWO WEEKS 

only, and is subject to a fine of TWO 
CENTS a day thereafter. It will be due on 
the day indicated below. 

WAY F> ions 



The 






^< AMERICAN m 



FIvORIST. 



=ji? 



A WEEKLY JOURNAL FOR THE TRADE. 



VOLUME XVI. 



CHICAGO: 
AMERICAN FLORIST COMPANY. 

1901. 



^ V I G 



Ad:ims Express Co, a card to the.. 862 
■AdiantuTU cuneatum, a plant of. .1550 

Adiantum house, aphis in 1450 

Advance and progress of horticult- 
ure in the past centur\ 821 

Advertising, alleged fraudulent... 733 
Albany, N. Y.608. 614. 6t,0. TOi, 740, 768 
8C6, 816. 880. 912, 9!ii, 1010, I0S6, 1092 
IHO 1165, 1266, 1295, 1368, U93. 1434 
1449, 1483, 1636, 1685. 1619, 1694, 1714 
American Association of Nursery- 
men 1526,1626, n6£8, 1686 

American Bulb Co. c>>artered 1740 

American Carnation Society, the.. 126 

—Awards, the 988 

— ^Baltimore convention, the 985 

—Banquet, the 10^9 

— Department of registration. .233. 382 
414, .'J70, 600. 660, 694, 726. 758, T9D, 830 
S92. 958. 
— Essay, Peter Fisher's., 



*Essay, Prof. Wood's 990 

—Gleanings, by W. P. Craig 1069 

— Permanent fund, subscribers to.ll67 

^♦President Bertermann 985 

— President's address 987 

— Programme of Baltimore meet- 
ing 8-24 

—Secretary's report 988 

— "Those present 989 

-Treasurer's report 988 



Illustrations are 

Bloomsburg. Pa 692, ITOk 

"IJonnaffon" }70 

Borers in trees and shrubs 3i!6 

Boston.. 3, 30 180. 202, 238, 2f8, 286, 315 
348, 379 412. 443, 4.S3. 538, 667, 697 
6-27, 66H, (188. 736. 7.55. 788, 8i8. 860, 89.' 
9;l. 956 993. 1038, 1077, 1115, 1162, 1333 
1272, 1311, 1345. 1379. 1416 1447. H81 
1516 1553, 1584, 1617, 1647, 1675. 1703 
1731. 1759 178S. 

'* boston fern, growing the 477 

Boston, spring exhibition at 1147 

Boston through Quaker City spec- 
tacles 158n 

*Boston, dedicatory exhibition at 1679 
1613. 

i*Boston history, a bit of 1611 

j Boston, a Saturday show at 154 

*Boulevard planting in Chicago... 786 
I *Bouquet of carnations, bridal .... 1610 

*Houquet of green, a casket 1782 

,„„„! Bradford. Pa 381, 15i'4 

'x??! Brantford, Out 1165 



Briarcliff school of horticulture. . . 1484 

Bridgeport, Conn 390. 1138 

Bright -'^pot next year, a 1651 

Browallia speciosa major 156 

*Buettnei-, Emil 473 

Buffalo... 50. U8, 188. 2)8, 3M. 318, 402 
445. 586, 618, 692, 788, 878, 923, 1039 
1077, 1196, 1246, 1-290, 1317, 1450, 1482 
1532, 1585, 1616, 1645, 1677, 17iJ4, 1732 
7.^9 1787. 



— 'Vice-President Lemon 1032 1 Buffalo, accommodations at.. 1318, 1760 



American Dahlia Society 34 

American floriculture, retrospec- 
tive and prospective 131 

American Nurserymen's Protec- 
tive Association 1626 

American Park and Outdoor Art 

Association 1674 

American Pomological Society. . . 1714 
American Rose Society, the.. 726, 996 
1032, lf83, 

—Department of registration 486 

— Scale of points 345 

— Second annua! meeting and 

exhibition 1145. *1231 

American Seed Trade Association. 1560 
1624, »18E6, 

Angleworms, a cure for 1678 

Annandale rose show, the 1675 

Anlhuriums, the 1698 

•Antirrhinum, a New Brunswick.. 200 

Apple the prince of fruits 1C79 

•Aquatic gardening in Boston 

parks 1730 

Aquatics and their winter protec- 
tion 438 

'♦Aquatics in District of Columbia. 238 
Aquatics, midsummer notes on — 56 
Aquatics, notes on 951 1476 1611.1754 
Arboriculture, iDternational soci- 
ety of 1562 

*Areca Ilsemanni 1643 

Are you going 1444 

'''Asparagus decumbens 8 24 

Asparagus, failure with cardon, . 1518 
Asparagus Spiengeri, variegated 
form of 376 



Buffalo. hoteUof 16,50 

^Buffalo, the convention city 1785 

Buffalo to New "^'ork 6 

•Buffalo's great fair, at 1729 

Bulb contract, the government. . . . 1524 
Bulb industry in England, the... .1547 

Bulb trade, the French 1172 

Bulbous stock, period of forcing.. 1081 

Bulbs, Carolina 1643 

Bulbs, cold storage for 44 

Bulbs, planting spring flowering.. 405 



Cactus curiosity, a 1^48 

♦Calceolaria integri folia 17l0 

♦Califoruian flower show 441 

Camden N.J 1142,1526,1662 

♦Campanula isophvlla Ma}"ii 58 

Canadian Horticultural Associa- 
tion 6«, 158, 1650, 1678, 1788 

Candytuft for Easter 1036 

Canna, garden history of 1269 

Cannas, the season's work among. 439 
Carnation. — 

— *.4donis 7.i2 

— 'Cressbrook Ill- 

— *Dcrolliy 75. 

— *Egypt 1U3 

—♦Guardian Angel 62 

— ♦Iloosier Maid; 918 

— ♦Ine, Mrs. Leopold 1031 

— ♦Lawson, Mrs. Thos. W 14ii 

— ♦Lorna Iu33 

—♦Nelson, Mrs. E. A 1032 

—♦Norway 93P 



Aspect, the beat }5J§ -*Queen i.oui^.'.'.'.W.W'.V.'.'.'.'.W'. 787 

Atlanta. Ga. . ■••••■■•: ••••■■ ••■■I6'6! Carnation blooms, treatment for.. 318 



Auctions, English horticultural.. 22' 

Augusta. Ga 766 

Aurora, III 668. 1294 

Autumn bloomers, desirable 1562 

Azaleas in America, growing 1697 

"►A'/alea Iveryana 1671 

♦.\2aleas, multi-grafted 1698 



Babylon, L. 1 695 

Baltimore 22, 100, 342. 334, 362, 430 

462. 850 891. 97J, 1U54, 1134, 1202, 1260 
1358, 1424, 1149, 1182, 170i. 

Baltimore hotels of 924 

•Bamboo, the 254 

Bamboos, the hardiest 870 

•Bangor flower show, a 754 

Bangor, Me 96J 

Banquet to President O'Mara 782 

Barrle, Ont 12(8 

Bay City, Mich «0«, 1275 

Bay trees 1618 

•Kays, pyramid 1343 

Bavside, jottings at 1032 — Keepiu 

Bedding, plants for formal 1669 

Begonia Dui-hartlei 1702 

Begonia Gloire de Lorraine.. '*656, 1074 

♦1152, 1110. 
•Begonia Gloire de Lorraine, 

house of 689 

•Begonia Gloire de Lorraine for 

Chicago market 690 

Begonia Gloire de Lorraine, prop- 
agation of 204 

•Begonia E. G. Hill 256 

Begonias in England 955 

Belleville, 111... 1688 

Bellevue, Pa 1392 

Belvidere, III 1660 

•Bench support, a simple 66 

Bennett, Pa 413 

•Berckmans, Robert C 1858 

*Bert»rraann, John 1410 

♦ Bertermann, Wra, G 990 

Birmingham, Ala 693 

Uloomington, III 552 



410, 4SX, 480. 

Carnation raisers, to 691 

Carnation show, the Pan-Ameri- 
can 1442 

Carnation, the improvement of the 170 
Carnations:- 

— American in England 630 

— •Armazindy sport, a house of. . .l'6o 

—Artificial pollination 1371 

—♦At Sing Sing, N. Y 5»5 

—Benching 1753, 1781 

— Clearing out the houses 1475 

— Connecticut cultural method, a. 787 

—Cuttings and their treatment 723 

—Diseased 653 

— Earl> feeding and root develop- 
ment 2?6 

— ♦Evanston, house of 1073 

— Field culture, truisms of 1548 

—Field planting, preparations for 1159 

-Hybridizing.. 752, 1030 

— ♦In health and disease 99i) 

Injury tu blooms 768 

quality 856 



indicated by an ♦ 

— Various varieties, results with.. 918 

—Watering 1032 

—White, a good 1476 

—♦White, a new 918 

—White Cloud, a word for 888 

—White Mrs. BraJt 1418 

♦Carpet bedding ad\ertisement, a. 6?t5 

Catalogue difficulties 1592 

♦Cattleya labiata, seven- flowered 

spike of 1642 

♦Cattleya x Thayeriana 1445 

♦Ceiastrus, notes on 1412 

Celosia pyramidalia 65 

Cement, fire proof 1237 

Cemeteries, new 1691, 1743 

Cemeteries, notes nf the 1686 

Centaurea iraperialis 1546 

♦Centaurea, the native American. .1644 
Census statistics of floriculture, . . 388 
♦Central Park, New York, mall in 27 

Cereus, the n'ght blooming 136 

Changes of two decades, the 1375 

Chatt4noo2a, Tenn 780 

Lhestnut Hill, Pa. .687, 812, 10-22, 12351 
1691. 1 
Chicaso..!, 31.67, 136, 174,203. 231, 259 
•386, 316, 347, 380. 412, 444, 481, 536 568 
598, 628, 6'>6, 688, 725, 766, 788, 8-27, ,s-'0 1 
891 922 956. 994, 1037, 1076, 1115. 1163 
1234, 1274, 1312, 1344, 1380, 1416, 14461 
1480,1515, 1.551, 1582, 1616,1616, 1676 
1703, 1730. 1768, 1786. 
♦Chicago Florists' Club at River- 
side 1783 

Chicago Florists' Club, carnation 

show of 855 

Chicago flower show, the 631 

Chicago to Buffalo 1706, 1734 

Chicago to New York 5 

♦Chicago, wholesaling cut flow- 
ers in 314 

♦Christmas bouquet, a 857 

♦Christmas plants in New York... 783 

Christmas tree trade, the 736 

Chrysanthemum: — 

— Appleton, Col. D ♦533, 104(1 

— ♦Boehmer, Louis 476 

-♦Brutus 564 

—•Chamberlain, Mrs. W. B 723 

—♦Chestnut Hill 723 

—♦Eaton, Timothy 761 

—♦Gold Smith 623 

—♦Golden Trophy 475 

-♦Hayes, F. B..' 687 

— *Iyorv B66 

— *No. 22 6 '3 

—♦Omega , 688 

— ♦Ritson, Mrs 688 

—•Smith. Mrs. Elmer D 623 

-♦Vanariva 6tV2 

— ♦Zampa 723 

Chrysanthemum from accnimis- 

sion man's standpoint, the 475 

Chrysanthemum growing, practi 

cal 477 

ihrysanttemum shows, the profit 



Latest facts about new 621 

—Mrs. Lawson and Genevieve 

Lord 1706 

—Lawson in England 733 

—New, the 686 

—October treatment 375 

—Planting in the field 1308 

— Results of a peculiar season 479 

—Scott or Joost 888 

— Seedling 1118 

— Solid beds versus benches 69 

—Special fertilizers for 566 

—Spring treatment for plants in- 
doors 1343 

— Stem rot, its causes and reme- 
dies 653 

—The Marijuis. success with 1476 

— Toppinf^ plants in field 1610 

— Tri_'atmenl for younc plants HiS 

—Up to date 374 

— Varieties of 1900, experiences 
with 949 



of : 630 

Chrysanthemum Society of Amer- 
ica 125 

—Committees to examine seed- 
lings 310. 4'9j 

— Commilteps, work of the 409, 44<3l 

486. f38. F70. 600.630. 

—President Herrincton on the 3r9 

— Review of work ol' 7'^2 

—Scale of points 446 

Chrysanthemum su.t, an English. 1700 
Chrysanthemums: — 

— *At Mrs. B. p. Cheney's 474 

—For home market ' 1 651 

— French judging scale 1276 

—Gulf coast notes f9 

—In Fugland 888 

—* Jottings 687 

— *New 56t!, 622, 722 

— *Pompon 594 

—Renaming 1(80 

—Seasonable notes 1671, 1728 

—Specimen plants 309, f36 

—Sports 726 

—Standard 660 

—Treatment for Timothy Eaton.. 1671 

—Troubles 694 

— *Under cheese cloth shading 44t 

—Weeping 726 

♦Churchyard planting 1344 

Cincinnati. .434. 445^ 487. 550. 669. 601 

(546. 668. 838, 9.i7, Um, 1094, 1117. 1216 
1256,1328, 1358.1406. 1417, 1462, 1483 
1568, 1634, 1617, 1648,1716,1760,1772 
1800. 
^Clematis and its failings, the.... 282 

Clenlatis disease, the 40 

*CleniiLtis indivisa in New Zea- 
land 56 

♦Clematis Jackroani 283 

Clematis, rambling jottings on the 580 

Clematis, the 226 

Clematis, the cutting back of the. 326 

Clematis for pot culture 61 

Cleveland 38. 250, 298. 400. 458 659 

734. 1194, 1320, 1392, 1616, 1677, 1704 
1734, 1768. 1790. 
Coal report of Chicago Florists' 

Club 31 

♦Ccologyne criatata 144i 

Coleus, the blue 1161 

♦Coleus thyrsoideus 1550 



Colorado, flower show in 228 

Columbus. O. , -.693. 848, 940. IC78, 1302 
1315. 1392, 1449, 1500, 1572, 16:}2, 1692 
1704. 1796. 

*Com!ei,, James -...1670 

Competition, encouraging ruinous 1514 

Complaint, a 1484 

Conifers as rain gauges 13i4 

Connersville, Ind 368 

♦Conservatory while you wait, a.. 1114 

Convention, the New York *121 

—American floriculture, an essay. 131 

—Awards, special 166 

—Between the acts 128 

—Carnation, the improvement of 

the, an essay 170 

— Committees^ reports of I^ 

—^Convention photograph, the 167 

— ^Decorations, the 168 

— Election of olTicers 126 

—Exhibition, the horticultural 

126, *I69 

— Floral decoration, an essay 168 

— *Greenhouse construction, an 

essay 138 

— Imprpssious of the 184 

— ♦Kasting. AVm. F., vice-presi- 
dent-elect 124 

—Musings 166 

— *OMar:(, Patrick, president- 
elect 123 

-President Woods address 122 

—President's reception 125 

— Rose, the, an essay 133 

—Secretary, report of the 124 

— Trade exhibit, judges of the 124 

—Trade exhibit, the.^ 126 

—Treasurer, report of the 135 

— Welfare of the society, an essay 165 
♦Convention city, a ramble in the. 25 

Convention hall, the 32 

Conveniion tips 32 

Conventiouites, a hint to 6, 42, 60 

Conventions at expositions 2. 28 

*Cod1 rooms for florists' use 62 

♦Corner pi<-ce for a casket 1378 

Cosmos under glass 656 

Council IJJufEs, la 1617 

Crai^. a chat with 255 

♦Craig & Son's shirt waist brigade 199 

Crematory, a garden 1788 

Crossing and hybridizing 752 

♦Crotonsas house plants 1510 

*C otoiis, exhibition 255 

^Crystal Palace. London 29 

Cut flower packages 228 

♦Cuthbertson, William 4 

♦Cycas revolula in bloom 1699 

♦Cyclamens at University of Illi- 
nois ". 1374 

♦Cyclamens for seed, growing 1548 

♦Cyjjripedium Charlesworihii x 

Spicerianum 889 

♦^ypripedium Leeanum 1730 

♦Cypripedium >' Mrs. Chas. Can- 
ham 856 

♦Cyrtomium falcatum 1306 

D 

DatTodils, forcing 660 

Dahlia not-s E8. 1577 

Dahlias, a little talk about 253 

Dahl ias at Boston 282 

Dahlias, keeping dwarf 375 

Dahlias, pot rooi 11*75 

Dallas, Tex 1370, 1448 

Danish horticultural chronology.. U34 

♦Dean, Richard .."... 4 

Deceptive preparations 376 

Decoration, floral 168 

^De Longpre, Paul, flower studies 

by 1231. 1270 

♦Dendrobium nobile 11.3, 1444 

♦Dendrobium Phahrnopsis 1442 

Denver 100. 260, 302, 360, 396, 766, 908 
1004. 1042. 1733. 

DesMoin?s. Li , 320, 518 

Detroit.. .5, 214, 259, 485.584,599,631 
743. 957. 1164, 1338, 1428. 1617, 1648 
1759. 

Dielytra. the 854 

♦Diiiimock, Alfred 565 

Disclaimer, a 694 

"Doing us— good" 1046 

Doronicums 116 

♦Douglas nursery, at the 76 

D aca^nas and oth« r foliage plants 14' 9 

Dracaenas, diseased 1276 

♦Dracaena indivisa in New Zea- 
land 55 

Dutch and their bulbs, the 1G86 

Dutchess County Horticultural 
Society, annual dinner o«f 952 

E 

Electric light in greenhouses 60O 

Electric shock plants 1610 

Elizabeth, N. J 1102 

♦Eliwanger. George 1342 

Elm leaf beetle, the 1426 

Elmira. N Y 466. 1132 

English exhibitions, notes of.I376, 1613 
1612. 

English horticultural notes 442 

Erie. Pa 1434 

Ethics, a question of 446 

Eucharis Amazonica, culture of. .1036 



*Euphorbia jacquinaeflora I5ft0 

Evansville, Ind 1R62 

'Evergreens at the Pan- American 1703 

■•Ewell, Warren s 3 

Eiact information wanted I34H 

Eshibitions, coming. .260, £H8, 31S, 3K3 

J15, 4Ji;, 1734. 
Exhibiiions, the: — 

— Andover, Mass f34 

— Baltimore f3J 

—•Boston 473 

—Chestnut Hill. Pa S33 

—♦Chicago 489 

— CoId-Spring-on-Hudson, N. Y.. 6B4 

— Denver 532 

—Hartford , Conn 475 

— Houston, Tex 564 

— Indianapolis E32 

—Madison. N. J 533 

— Manchester, Mass 565 

— Mt. Kisoo. N. Y 665 

—Newport, R. 1 663 

— Oceanic, N. .1 665 

—Orange, N.J 664 

— 'Philadelphia 529 

— Poughkeepsle, N. Y 530 

-Providence, R. I f 6 J 

—St. Louis 561 

— Tarrylown, N. Y 634 

—Toronto 474 

-— Waco.Tei 663 



Fall River, Mass.. 364, 1333, 1428, I48J 

li85. 
*Fernery at Lincoln Park, Chi- 
cago 1071 

*Pern grotto at Chestnut Hill, Pa 114H 

Ferns, the best conimercisil Itt71 

Fertilizers a question of 1518 

Ficus elastica, propagation of 348 

*Fir3t to last, from 3iO 

Fires, some recent 694 

♦Fisher. Peter 987 

Flatbush, a peep at 254 

Florists' clubs, meetings of 1705 

Florists' Hail Association I2b 

Flowering plants for Memorial 

day 318, 348 414 

Flowers, the mission of 1728 

Flushing. N. Y 3 6 

Foliage plants, notes on 1510 

Forest City echoes 1E64, 1596 

Franklin, Pa 1S84, 1417 

Fteesi*, a pink If 86 

Freight decision, a 1791 

Fremont. Neb 1062 

Fr nch spelling, some 758, 830 

Fruit, the fatal bloom on 1562 

Fuel, to reduce the cost of 570 

Fumigating, best methods of 1376 

1414. 1443 1614. 

*Funeral design, a German 131 

*Funeral piece, a hot weather 1783 



Galveston tragedy, the 288 

Galveston subscription, the 382 

Galveston, Tex.. ..260, 712, 772, 836, 976 

GSTdeoer's reverie, a .". 798 

Gas leaks in greenhouse 1450 

Geraniums, diseased 1554 

Geraniums, bedding 103.i 

Geraniums, unhealthy 1277 

Gerbera Jameson! *133 1578 

Gibson City, III Iil4 

Glass, the price of 830. 862, li 80 

Glazing a carnation bouse 1484 

*GraceIand Cemetery, Chicago, 

views in 377, 378. 1479 

Grafting, modern 964 

Grand Rapids. Mich 90, 1588 

Greenfield .Mass 1636 

Greenhouses, plan for 1554 

Greenhouse construction, iron vs. 

wood in 885 

Greenhouse construction, what I 

think I know about 128 

Greenhouses, summer work in the 57 
*Qros8e Pointe Farms, orchid 

houses at 1443 

Growing, making a start at 137 



*Haerens liros.. establishment of.. 1166 

"■Halifas, parks of 1369 

Harrisburg, Pa 693 

"Harrison. Orlando 144 

Harrisii, trouble with 1518 

Hanford, Conn. .1250, 1288, 1356, 1430 
I60O. 

*Hauswirth family, the 532 

-•Heacock's delivery wagon 720 

Heating: — 

—Boiler, a coil 1788 

—Boiler and steam traps 1 785 

—Boiler, capacity of 204. 348, 148t 

—Boiler and piping 382, 414, 1678 

—Boilers, elevating 142 

— Coals, relative value of If 40 

— Canadian house, piping a 1484 

—Carnation house, a 1555, 16 

— Changing pipes 758 

— Connecting main pipes 1 

-Connecting pine witn heater 659 

—Directions, a divergence of 2HU 

—Flue, a long 790 

—Flue, with a 378 

—Flues, dirty 7o8 

—Hues to hot water, from 892, 1485 



— Flow pipe, elevating the 1118 

—Flows, a question of 414 

— Galvanised versus wrought pipe l?'8rt 
— In zero weather 7o8 

— Main size of hot water 204 

— Ne\v ran ^e. a 165' 

— Packing joints 758 

— ^-Pipe supoi^rt, LoDsdalws 374 

—Piping.. 348.630. 958. 1118, 1878, 1731 

— Piping a small housi* 958 

— Pipine for hot water or steam. . . 414 

—Plan for 414 

— Preservation of pipe 790 

—Problems 1118. 1382 

— Return pipes, size of 135 

— Returning water to boiler 348 

— Rose house 1314 

— Troubles with steam boiler 1418 

— win boilers 1276 

Helpful reminders 98.200 261 

Herbaceous plant notes. .199, 1373, 14/7 

1670. 
UerbacPous plants, autumn work 

among 405 

Hi rbaceoiis plants for florists. .283, 8;3 
Herbaceous plants in the Cats- 
kills 1766. 1783 

Herbaceous plants, the tweh-e t est 954 

996, 10-4J, 1152. 1236, 1314. 134!. 
Herbaceous subjecis for late plant- 
ing 171 

*Hidalgoa Wercklei 1476 

Hide returned, that 2 4 

Hillsdale, Mich 1126 

Holly bough, the 694 

Holly, the trade in 7 8 

Horticultural education 1878 

Horticultural societies, too many.. 660 

*Hunnewell, H. H 161 1 

*Hydrangi-as as pot plants 2'^8 

•Hydrangea culture 171 

Hydrocyanic acid gas 1705 

Hydrocyanic gas in violet houses.. 723 
Hygrometer, the 888 



Ice, the cost of 204 

Illinois State Agricultural College 1366 

1494. 
Improvement Associations, na- 
tional league o' 1594 

•Inaugural ball decorations .1147, USb 
1273. 

In'liana florists, meeting of 785 

Ind anapolis. .2 3, 287, :B36. 461 6li9. 9;4 
1164, 1286, 1448, 1538, 1,598, 1705, 1802. 
•Indians gathering green in Wis- 
consin 696 

Insecticides, trials of 9^3 

Inventories for florists.225, 281, 343. 373 

•Iris Sus ana 13' 

Iron gutter, advantages of the 919 

Irrigation in California, nursery.. I 

Is it possible? 1418 

•Italian garden at Auburndale, 
Mass 1 159 



Jacksonville, 111 394 

Jamestown, N. Y 997 

•Jansen's, show roim at 23? 

Japanese lloral decorative art 1550 

•Jardinieres of plants shown at 

Frankfort 34 

•Judges of Chicago exhibition 473 



Kaflir corn in Kansas 171: 

Kalamazoo, Mich.. . 14. 6'9, 1102, 1296 

Kansas City 300, 776, 980, 1184, 1254 

•Kasting, Wm. F 121 

•Keitsoh, Charles H 1110 

•Kennicott, Flint 

Knoxville. Tenn 485 

Kreitling bombards crape chasers. 754 

•Kreitling, Miss Annie 530 

•Krick's Pan-American exhibit. . .1784 



Landscaping as a part of the flo- 
rists' business 1478 

•Langjahr, A. H 854 

•Lawson mcJal. the 990 

•Leaders, two European 585 

Leonard insuraLce cases, the. .666, 700 
1684. 

•Lettuce industry in Ohio 1378 

Lettuce roots decay 1418 

Lilies for Christmas and Easter. .. 1 

Lilies, forcing 1166 

Lilies, hot treatment for 958 

•Lilium auratum, a huge 594 

Lilium longitlorum, late planted.. 1644 

•Lily disease, the Bermuda 952 

Lily of the valley for forcing 1158 

Lime and manure, mixing 600, 83u 

Lincoln, Neb..'i74, 676, 693, 760, 894, 936 
1014, 1048, 1196, 1286, 1354, 142U, 1492 
1536. 1574, 1668. 

Little Rock, Ark , 

London 284,345, 598 

London, Out.. 744, 1165, 1324, 17i,4, 1748 

1776. 
Longiflorum exportations, Japan- 
ese 666 

•Long- stemmed flowers, device to 

hold 344 

Los Angeles 182, 220, 599 

*Los Angeles. President and Mrs. 
McKinley at 1582 



Louisville. . . .212, 289. 366, 546, 742, 1016 
1C90, 1117. 1631. 1733. 

Lowell, Mass.. 708, 768, 802, 874. 944, 974 
in06 1140, 1165, 1275, 1322, I3'.i2, 1530 
1802. 1630. 1649. 1718. 1736, 1804. 

L\"nn and thereabouts 13 

M 

■'McAdaiiis. Andrew 473 

Madison, N. J 757,844, 1198 

Madison, to be seen at 107 

Madison, Wis Iii39 

Manchester, Mas> 18, 206 

Manchester, N. H 757 

Mansfield, O 693, 1312 

Manual labor l^V 

Mnrion, Ind 893 

• Massachusetts Horticultural So- 
ciety 1612 

*Mathison, Fred. R 718 

-'Mav. John N 473 

*Meehau, Thomas 1146 

Meetini/s of florists' clubs.. 349 487. 6i9 
693 727. 796. 861, 1079, 1119. 1417. 1553 
1687, 1879. 

Melon louse, the 1354 

Melon, the Rocky Ford 1794 

Meridian, Miss 893 

Mignonette, fragrant 68 

Mignonette, pot culture of 1161 

Mild climate, houses for 1418 

•Miltonias at Boston 1615 

Milwaukee. .317, 420, 674 696, 998, 1106 

1220, 1347. 
Milwaukee after 1902 convention.. 1760 
Minneapolis.. 6Ki) 691.744.776 810.876 
90O, 938, 9i9, 1024. 1066. 11 4. 1117, 1200 
1-363, 1292, 1334, 1347, 1396, 1417, 1449 
1483, 1526, I56<, 1683, 1616, 1649, 188J 
1708, 1746, 1759. 

Mobile, Ala 708, 804 

Moisture, greeo house 1 158 

Montana, prosperity strikes 1075 

Montgomery, Ala 413 

Mont'eal...".272. 691.770, 829.9:23. 1018 
1038, 1274 1364, 1492, 1652, 1796. 

•Mount Eqmont 55 

Moving \avie trees. . . .*702, 766, 838, 986 
1U48, *1413. 

Muncie. Ind 926 

Mushroom growing in cellars 736 

Mushroom houses, frogs in 631 

Musings of a fool 1143 

•Muskmelons, a house of 1^52 

Mustard and cress 1310 

N 



Nashville.... 2^ 248, 433,518, 7Ji, 1026 
1218. 1464. 

•Nelumblum Shiroman 229 

•Nephrolepis Washingtonieusis. . . .624 
954. 

*Ni phrolepis Wittboldii 65 

Newark, N. J 564 

Newark, O 5t6. 1 98 

New Bedford. Mass i:^ 

New Castle boom the Hj72 

New Castle, Ind 138, 1664 

New England park superintend- 
ents 232. 1725 

New Haven, Conn.. 48, 218, 278, 332, 426 

498, 616. 878, 800. 
New Jersey Floricultural Society. 

annual oinner of 920 

New Orleans. .34, 162, 428, 558, 590, 691 

764, 906, 1286, 1517, 1798. 
•New plants. Win. Duckham on.. 1642 

Newport rose show, the 17 

New York....8, 30, 66, 173.204,229, 257 
285, 314 346, b78, 411. 443, 483, 536,66' 
596, 627, 657, 687, 724, 755, 788, 828, 859 
889 921, 955, 99J, 1037, 1075, 1114, 1163 
1232, 1272, 1311, 1346, 1378, 1415, 1445 
1481, 1516, 1652, 1,584, 1614, 1616, 1675 
1716, 1732. 1758, 1787. 
•New York Florists' Club, conven- 
tion home of 1785 

New York hotels 8 

•New Zealand, plant life in 55 

♦Niasara Falls, nurserymen at 1658 

Nicotine, syringing with 382 

N itrate of soda for lawns 1348 

•Northrup. Jesse E 1656 

Notes in passing 1444 

Novelties, about 92 

•Nugent, John B 1070 

Nurserymen meet, western whole- 
sale 702 

Nurserymen's Mutual Protective 

Association 1626 

Nurserv trade, the spring 14.^8 

•Nympho.-a "Best Red" 1478 

Nvmpna:?a Capensis and N. cceru- 

lea 1034 

•Nymphaja ccerulea and N. scuti- 

tolla 886 

Nymphiea Proebeli 1034 



Obituary: — 

—Alexander, Robert , 892 

— Atkinson, Robert A ,.,,^.. 1,555 

—Austin, Thomas C ....,,.,... 415 

—Ball, Peter , 1619 

— Barrows, James 1431 

—Bell, John P 1081 

—Beverly, W. L 996 

—Bliss, George C 6 

— *Breck, C. II. B 6 

—Brown, M. T. F 1651 



Brydon, John 1382 

-Buckley, Henry P 1707 

-Cameron, Andre« 447 

-CameroQ, Mrs. Robert 1348 

-Carey, Patri3k 831 

-Carmody, Mrs. .1. D 1419 

—Chase, Leverett M 1511 

•Cleveland, Horace W. S 661 

Coles, Mrs. W. W 1485 

■Converse. Mrs. A. S 1277 

■Cornu, Maxime 1382 

■Cosgrove. P 349 

■Cowing, Walter 1349 

— Crall. Isaacs 997 

Crowley, Philip 791 

Cashing. N. H 1419 

Davis, Dean 831 

—Davis, Lucius I) 539 

-Dellert, Frederick 447 

Eoinann. Karl 791 

Fairbrother. Fred. A 1587 

— Fanoourt, William 1619 

feenev. John 1237 

Fish, b. T 1451 

Frost. Mrs. James 1419 

— Galbraith. Wm 1761 

•Galvin. John U40 

■Garland. Soloman 1619 

Gaskill.Geo. W 23S 

Glover. Edwin J 727 

Gregory, Mrs. B. F 174 

Haeflfner. Henry ' 996 

■Hammond. William 892 

■Harris, John H 1237 

—Henry, James 349 

— Hogan, Harvey J 926 

—Hunt. Lawrence B 1679 

—Ingram, Mrs. Chas 1619 

-JeH'rey, John A 349 

— Johnson, Samuel G 447 

— Kearney, Harry M 769 

— KinneaV, John 1761 

— Laing, John 176 

—Langlois. Fatter A. B 69 

— Lawes. Sir John B 205 

— Leavitt, Herbert F 1519, *1646 

— Lewis, E. L' 996 

— Liederley, Berman W 639 

—Lines C 1' 1519 

— Longworth, Wm 996 

— Lucking. Edward 759 

— Lueger, Otto 1555 

— Lundberg, Frederick 892 

— Lyon. Harrison A 415 

— Meiiand, Louis 69 

— Milli-r, George F 1081 

—Miller, Henry 539 

—Miller, W. E 1789 

—Mitchell, Arthur L 1651 

—Mitchell, John 6 

—Myers. Mrs. Lydia 892 

— Morns, J. F 1382 

— Oatman, Clark 926 

— *I>almer, W. J., Sr 695 

—Pierce, Wm 1081 

—Porter. Chares H 1217 

—Power, C. S 1237 

— Pridmore, Mrs. J. O 727 

— Pynaert, Edward 539 

—Robinson. James 935 

— Rohrer, Abram D 1315 

— Saunders, Sir Edwin 1277 

-•Saunders, William 232 

— *Sohiller, Berman 1485 

— Schiader, C 925 

— Scrivner, Charles 759 

— Shafl', Joseph 1587 

— Sloan, Mrs. James 892 

— Smith- Caringion, Richard 1(J40 

—Smith, Thomas 1618 

— Stookdale, Joseph P 1U40 

— Thompson, John 1485 

—Thorpe, Mrs. John 1619 

— Veitch, Archibald 892 

— *Veltch, Robert 1040 

—Vestal, Frank 1555 

— *Walz, Fred. S 791 

—Ware. Thomas S 1679 

—Wendell, T. C 205 

—White, Charles W.... 1789 

— Willey. J. L 174 

—Williams, Thomas A 769 

—Wolf, Julius, Sr 1237 

—Woodward, D.ivid R 1237 

— Worden. Schuyler 892 

—Wright, David S 661 

— Xavier, Henry 1679 

—Yates. David G 89 

Oceanic, N. J 135 

Odontoglossum crispum in Bel- 
gium 686 

Oh! WillisN 136 

•Olmsted, Frederick Law 1160 

•Olmsted Park, Boston : 1 161 

Omaha. . .266, 636, 1138, 1336, 1534, 1685 
1762. 

•O'Mara, Patrick ...123, 473 

Onion growing 1330 

Onion sets 74 

Orange, N. J 231,370, 1136, 1448 

•Orchids and their treatment. ....,1441 

•Orchids, bouquet of 127 

•Orchids in birch bark receptacle. 950 
Orchids, seasonable notes on,. .... 593 
Ottawa, Ont ,..1360 

P 

Packing and shipping cut Bowers. 437 
•Packing chrysanthemum blooips 476 

Paeouia growers, to ...j.*i.l5l8 

•PsBonla in the west, the 1674 

•Palmer 4.V Son, cup awarded 1272 



?. 30^5 ^f 



Palm culture in Itelgium 567 

Palms, injured foliape of — liTti 

Palms, troublea with lf>54 

•''Pan-Araeriottiirup and vase, Ihe.]756 
Pan-AmericaD Exoosition. s), 172, 23'i 

^^82. 627. 822. *8 8. 1073. 1342, 13^8 

H7fi. 1578 1626, *l645, ^1673. *i7jl 

>^I7i9. *1757, ■■M785. 
Pan-American floral exhibitions.. 1450 
*P>tn- American, horticulture at 

the 1673 

*Pandauu9Sanderii ....886, 911 

Pansy culture in northeru states, 257 

Paris 201. 313, S94, 1271 i 

Paris exposition, jurors at the 74 

Parks, in Chicago 1048 

Park improvements 1686 

Parks, news of new 1742 

P;irk walks, cinders for 1281 

Pwstimps, our: — 

— *Bowl'>r8, chiff of the 146 

—Bowlers, toth« 42 

— *Chicago felicitates herself 214 

—Chicago's laurels 184 

— Chicago visits Milwaukee 902 

— lODvention contest, th« New 

York 146 

—Convention trophies 78, 1798 

— Dinner wagers at ISoston, pay- 
ing 328 

— Friday night bowlers win 7o4 

—Gunners' contest atNew Yors.. 146 

—New York defeats Flatbush 1770 

—New York matters 184 

—Outing of New York Florists' 

Club 1741 

—Philadelphia visits Trenton 968 

— Syracuse visits Utica 1128 

— Tournament, echoes of the New 
York 184 

— Utica visits Syracuse 968 

—With Philadelphia gunners. .456, E8i 

80O, 1286, 1160. 
Paterson, N. J. .778, SlH. 1400, 1419, 1574 

♦Paulownia im peri alia 734 

Pawtucket R.I 1483 

Pea louse, the destructive 836 

Pennsylvania Horiicultural Soci- 
ety 216. 1549. 1786 

Peoria, 111.. ..48 234, 317. 4i6, U66, 1126 

Pepper's Hrolitlc tomato 38 

Perennials, propagating hardy 917 

Perennial, what is a hardy?. ..' 168 

*Pernet, Joseph 34i 

Perversity of human nature, the.. 1314 

Petoskey. Mich 46 

* Petunia, Howard's Star 201 

Phil A. Delphia 1382 

Philadelphia.. -.4, 30. 66. 173. 202,230 1 
258. 2X7,316. 358. 379. 411, 4*4, 481,548 
568, 698. 628, 659, 689. 756 788 826 86 1 1 
890. 921. 9eH 934, IC38, 1077, 1116. 1163 \ 
1235. 1273, 1313, 1346. 12H0, 1417, 1481 ' 
1517, 1552, 1F84, 1617. 1647, 1677. 1704 '. 
1732. 1759. 17H7. 
_'hiladelphia farmers' institute... 82? 

♦Philadelphia spring show 1231 

*I'h\llocactus Deutsche Kaiserm. 416 
*Pierson Company's Pan-Ameri- 
can exhibits ". 17-^5 

*Pieser, E. K 691 

*Picser, G. H 691 

•Pieraon Commnyacup 440 

Pittsburg ..670 757 829, 861. 902. 923 
995. 109H, ir>. 1174, 1285, l.iK), 1313 
1402, 1447. 1494. 1642, 1564, 1592, 1632 
1647, 17:^0. 

Plant breeding 1155 

Plant grower, work of the 341, 4Hj 

781. 9"i0. 1157. 

Plant introducers, notice to 260 

Plant noies 1609 

Plant notes, English 19h, 1730 

Plants, a succession of 782 

Plants for baskets and pans 626 

♦Plants for design work 1477 

♦Rjants for florists, two desirable.. 1U35 
♦Plants of easy culture an har- 
monious arrangement of 625 

Plants, profitable wioter blooming 4( 6 

Plant smen, in the world of 344 

♦Plath, H 1726 

♦Poehlmann gre* nhouses. the 953 

Poins^ttias, to follow 145( 

Port Chest'-r. N. Y 194, 738 

Portland, Ore 1436 

♦Poster, the Chicago 4H8 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y 1275 

Prices ton low 165(t 

♦Primula obconica grandiilora 1307 

♦Primulas, two new 1678 

♦Priies of Horticultural Society of 

Chicago 439 

Progress, evidences of 1526 

Protest, a .Tapanese 964 

Providence, R. I...I6, 152,276, 669, 864 
1606, 17i5. 1733. 

Pruning trees and shrubs 1410 

♦Paychrometer, the. 1230 

Publications received 63 J, 759 

Pyrethrum "The Pearl" 348 

Q 

•Queen Victoria's acknowledge- 
ment of the receipt of t^'ueen of 
Edgely roses 858 

Quincy, 111 384, 768,1224 

R 

Racine, Wis 1264 

*Raffi» about I7o2 



Railroad fares for Canadians 32 

Railroad grei-nhouse has come to 

stay.... 1168 

*R;iinbow Ci'y, rambles in ihe 17U1 

R<d spider, experiences with .1156 

Renaming sports, ethics of . . , £70, 6 

Retailer, it's up to the 44S 

Retail Nurserymen's Protective 

Association 1626 

Retarding plants, Rochford's sys- j 

tem of. 654 

Reward— Stolen : 174 

Richmond, Ind 1078 I 

Right for right's sake 53 1 

Ro*d and w^lk-cleaning niachioR 1702' 

Rochet tor. N. Y 746, I64H 

♦Rochester, seedsnaen at I6ri6 

* Rockery, a greeuhnu e 918 

♦Rosarian, a noted French 34 J 

Rose: — 

—♦Flush o' Dawn 407 

— ^Ivor*. White Golden Gate 1150 

-♦Marquise Litta. 1151 

— *Pink Pearl 57 

— *Quepn of Edgely 443. f63. 7:1 

— Ruberr. Scott 685, *1.7<i 

— ♦Sno»*nak.' 227 

— *Soleil d'Or 37o 

Rose and its future, the 1511 

Rose, the 133 

Roses:— 

— American Iieauty. growing 172 

—American Beauty, short stem- 

ned 1070 

— Itat'kward Bride and lUidesmaid 8^8 
-Best, the. 4«6 

— Klind wood, shriveling of 686 

— Buds coming gret-n I,7d 

— *CrimsoQ Ramblers at the Pan- 
American 1755 

—Culture of Perle des .Tardins 1611 

— Dis-ased brides and Brides- 
maids 60 

—Dying off 6H6 

—Eel worms in benches 1113 

— Field grown for th^ trade 1611 

—General remarks anent 11.53 

—Golden Gate and Queen of 

Edgely 1672 

— 'njur--d Brides 414 

—Judging new l;7't 

— Kaiserm at Kokomo 736 

—Liberty 409, 1154 

— Liberty temperature for 1040 

—Mid season notes 685 

— Nhw viirift es of merit 1109 

— Not'S on garden 134 1 

—Pink Pt-arl. hardiness of 260 

— Queen of Fdgely 127i5 

— tjueen of Edgely in England — 824 

-Regulating the crop ?82 

—Shading 173 

Solid beds. Bride and Brides- 
maid in 1C70 

— *Souvenirdu Pres. Carnot lour 

years in solid bed 1414 

—Stocks for grafting 1509, 1594 

—Trouble with Bride and Brides- 
maid 8-8 

— Two-vear-old plants 1618 

— Ud to date 197 

—Watering 204 

— Wet weather varieties 1672 

— ♦Wild roses in Boston park- 
ways . 1P13 

Rudbeckia Golden Glow 289 

Rudd ratiocinates some more 411 

Russian florist's view, a 1675 



Saginaw, Mich,. 638 

Salt Lake City 659, 1362 1468, 1498 

1666. 

♦Sander cup, the 408 

♦Sandt'r, Fred 565 

"Sander's Orchid Guide" 176 < 

San Diego. Cal 190 

San Francisco.. 8;9, 892, 8S»5, 1130. 1275 

1346, 1398. 1520, 1570. 1596, 1648, 1732 

1789. 
San Jo3e scale In New York, .1576. 1796 
San .Tose scale, plants subject to 

attack of 296 

San .Jose scale, regulations re- 
garding 356 

Sap, the flow of 1390 

♦Sargent, Prof. C. s 1611 

Scranton. Pa 692. 1052. 1100, 1204 

♦Schultz. Jacob, establishment of 626 
♦Schwerin, Edw., wrecked houses 

of 824 

Scott of Buffalo, Mr 82 

♦Scott, Wm..., 146 

Seattle, Wash 114. 48") 

Seed contract, the government 

7t0. 1456 

Seed crop reports, July 10 1740 

Seed crops at Waterloo, Neb 294 

Seed crops, California 1684 

Seed crops, European 1766 

Seed crops, French 324, 1242 

Seed distribution, let Sec'y Wilson 

explain 13fi4 

Seed distribution, Morton decries.1282 
Seed, government lettuce proves 

onion 1456 

Seed, gratuitous 1524 

Seed harvest, the 38H 

Seed notes. California 636 



Seed outlook at Santa Clara 1283 

Seed shipments, delay in radish . 1"^83 

Serd shop, the government 666, 700 

73 J, 764 
Seed traae at Rockford. the mail. .1560 

Seed trade of 19 j|, the 1388 

s ed trade, the mail 1002 

Seedlings, no'es on raising' H8ii 

Seef^s and temperature 96 

Seeds are gruwn, wheTt- 1712, 1766 

Seeds, elf aniog melon 17 '2 

Seeds, destroyiu-^' )nsecis in 732 

Seeds, free Ji 46 

Seeds, government. ... . 1388. *1424 ihG ) 

Scefis in Wi&f-onsiM, Iree 1681 

Seeds, nortt ern 118 

ceedsroanasM P.. Scottish-Can- 
adian 732 

Seedsmen protest, wholesale 8*6 

Shaded greenhouse use fcr a 1554 

Sharon, Pa 612 

*Sheridan, Waiter F 658 

^Shrubbery for forcing 410 

♦Shrubs in ccmel'^ries, the li.e of.. 376 

Sidney. 614 

Sioux City, U 494 

SraihiT, temperature for 1080 

♦Smi'h, Wm. R 147?^ 

Snails, trouble with 1237 

50C ety of American Florists. 32 

— Alhliated societies, the tfuestion 
of 15t9. 1545. 1618 

— Annual report, the 570 

— Constimtion adopted under 

natioual charter 1473 

— *ConventioD. the New York 121 

— Departra-nt of plant registra- 

t on.. . .68, l.?6. 26t, 318, 382, 414. 446 

570, 66P, 694 790. 924, 104O. 15H6, 1760 
—Executive committee meeting. . . 924 

1110. 
— Sr-eting to members 830 

— Incorpcration bill, the 86 J 

—♦Medal, history of the 54 

— National charter achieved at 
last 1(80. 1236 

— Preliminary convention bulletin 1726 

— State vice-presidents H92 

— Transportaiioii to Buffalo 1678 

Soil troubles 1 8i 

Solauum VVendlandii 1074 

South A f rican floriculture 17" 

Sou h Bend. Ind 616 

♦South Park Floral Co., guests of 

the nil 

Southern growers, among 1377 

Sow bugs or wood lice 1734 

♦Spir^a Gladstone 1270 

♦Spiraea w ashiugton 1271 

Sprigs from the spice bush 719 

Spriogfield, 111 1164 

Springfield. Mhss,..,556 838 lf62, 1142 
l':61. 1396, 1468, 1538. 1.^8), 16l9. 

Springfield. 356 

^Spruce, the pendulous blue 1161 

SI m rot, the fungus of 1415 

•stephanotis floribunda 1074 

St..Ioseph, Mo 5HH. 1448, 1562 

St. Louis 5,40,78, 150.186.210, 231 

259, 287, 317 381, 445, 484 .Sii7, F69, 6|4 
629, 659, 690. 736 8l6. 828 861 91U, 922 
995. W?s IC78, 1117. 1163, 125S, U74 
1313, 1346. 1381. 14.8. 1466. 1482. 154iJ 
1553. 1585. 1647, 1679. 1761, 1790. 
Stfcks. St eding for double Mowrrs.1124 
S ore: — 

— *Amling, E. C, Chicago 3'5 

— *Clarke Bros., Portland, Ore.... H88 

— *Daniels A Fisher, Denver 1477 

—♦Mann, Alex. Jr., San Krancisco,15H 

— ♦Stumpp, Geo. M.. New York 78i 

— *Walabart. Geo.. S'. Louis, Mo.. 1376 
St. Paul. ..16'J, 356, 7.4, 8.6, 1060,1432 
15K4, 1778. 

Suit, that novel 1277 

Sunllnwers, hybrid 1618 

Sweet Peas, an English telection 38 
Sweet pea conference, English , . 2. +28 
♦sweet Pea Cream of Brockbamp- 

ton 3 

sweet pea Cupid l?7l 

Sweet pea notes 952, 1236, 1641 

Sweet pea show. Pan American. .1161 
17v6. 

Sweet peas In pots 256, lfi9H 

Sweet ptas, the classification of. 56, 310 
♦Swf'et peas, the cultivation of — 342 

Sweet pea troubles 1706 

Syracuse. N. Y 212, 1060, 1079, 1248 

1300, 1326, 1894, 1426. 1470. 1502, 1566 

T 

♦Tabl'* decoration, a handsome. ... 823 

Tarrytown. N. Y 319. 774,923, ll98 

12T^, 1438, 1634 1675. 

♦Taylor. John H 1154 

Temperature indicator 414. 486 

Terre Haute. Ind 1212 

♦Thalictrum acquilegifolium 1234 

Thermostats, greenhouse 996 

Titlin. O 692, 1312 

Top»'ka, Kans 1806 

Toronto.. 454. 484. 589 F69. 618,629. 661 
690 757. 812, 840, 868. 9^4, 98!, 1014 
1058, 1106. 1116, 1210, 1S98, 1366. 141)4 
1449, 1506, 1528, 1655, 1617. 1648, 1722 
1733. 1774. 

♦Trade history, a bit of 691 

Trade, the Christmas 717, 749,784 



Trade, the Easter 13 5. 1343 

TraCe exhibit, emries for the Buf- 
falo 17i8. I7£6. 1783 

Tree seeds, about 422 

Trees, the effect of electric light 

rn K88 

TribuUtions of the retail florist... 830 

Troy, N. Y 74'). H46. 1192 

♦Tulip Couronne d'Or 1233 

Twenty-five cents on the dollar. . . 32 

U 

Unfair competition 836 

UtiCft, N. Y 381, 1402, 1449, 1482 

V 

Vancouver. B. ('... 1275 

♦■ Variety, th«.' spice of life" 1757 

♦Vase, the i ' ara ceineiery 1344 

Ventilation, greenhouse 227 

Verbena culture 996 

Verbenas, proparation of 392 

Vesey greenhouse benches, the... 79 t 

♦Viburnum macrocef halu o 1547 

Vilmorins t-mployes. outing of 1794 

Vines, note.s en hardv 481 

Violet culture 1034 

Violet growing, a Canadian meth- 
od of 7.54 

Violet industry. Rhinebecks 198 

Violet runners 66f) 

Vioiet. spot disease of the 623 

Vtolets, growing good 1374 

Violets showing green centers 996 

* Violets under maple 376 

W 

Waban coTSt-rvatories. interest at. 441 

*Walk.-r. John 198 

Ward heirs go to law 830 

Warranty case, an orchid 1788 

Washington. ,is 40,1^2,222,244,287 
338. 39«, 413, 4?i2, 492, ft69, 641, 682, 710 
738. 77>, K08, 848 88!. 914,942.978, 1012 
ir64 1078. 1117. 1165, 1275 1332,1360 
1384, 1449. 1483. 1.'^17, 1553. 1602,1617 
1688, 17.5, 1736. 1787. 

Waterbury Conn 814 

Water garden and its surround- 
ings, the 1229 

Water gardens, Dawson on 1413 

Water ^r^ssure 1118 

Water tank and boiler 46 

Water lank, pressure from 348 

Watertown, N. V 972 

♦Wedding decoration, thesharpea- 

Clemson 1075 

♦Wetland. Peter 1072 

Welfare of the s A. F.. the 165 

West is burning up ,t^e 1788 

We«t<'ott R"d and Gun Club, house 

warming of the 1699 

Western Seedsmen's Association. 1624 

West Hoboken, N.J 693 

Wheeling. W. Vn 464 

When in doubt send flowers 65 

White lly, the 6^ 

White-grub deformed buds 959 

Whitewash, adhesive 318 

Wholesale and retail floristi, rela- 
tions of 1073 

Wholesale rose g'owing, experi- 
ences of 6>5 

Whoh'saleSeed Merchant! Leaguel6*4 

Wichita, Kans 1252 

Wilkesbarre, Pa 17 7 

Williamsport. Pa 330 

Wilmington. Del 693 

Wireworms, to banish 1236 1R47 

Wistarias in pots , 176i 

With the growers: - 

Rassett A Washburn. Hinsdale.. 867 

— Budlong. .T. A.. Chicago, III 2 

—Chicago Carnation Co., Joli^t, 

111 *I35, 723 

— *Flordl Exchange. 'Edgely. 442. 1727 

—May, .Tohn N.. Summit. N. J.... 955 

♦Piers* n F. R. Co . Tarrvtown. 535 

♦Reinbere. Peter Chicaeo, III. .. 60 

- ♦South Park Floral Co., New 

Castle, lid 479 

-♦Wilcox. J. F.. Council Blutrs. 1112 

♦Wittbold. George 810 

♦Witterstaetter, Richard 750 

Women florists, our 1086 

♦Wood, Albert F 990 

Worcester, Mass. ...88. 1164, 1390, 1596 
1624. 169') 1705, 1768. 

Wounds in trees, covering 708 

♦Wreath, a dahlia 1158 

♦Wreath, a mixed 765 

♦Wreath, an ivy 1511 

♦ Wreath of funeral flowers, a 718 

♦Wreath on an easel, a 284. 855 

♦Wreatlis. &<>me unusual and 

effective 310 



Y 

Yearbook of the Department of 

Agri.-ultur'- 1586 

♦Young. John 166 

♦Young. Mr. and Mrs 409 

Youngstown.O..... 413, 650, 1347 

*YuccEfs. the 480 



wmmm *Wumm 




Rmerica is "the Prow of the UbssbI; there may be mare namfart Jlmidsbips, but we are the Srst ta touch Unknown Seas,' 



Vol. XVI. 



CHICAQO AND NEW YORK, AUGUST 4, 1900. 



No. 635. 



1Fi!i!ii i^m^mmm ^ajsmm-j 



Copyright 1900, by American Florist Company. 
Entered as Second-Class Mail Matter. 

Published every Saturday by 

AMERICAN FLORIST COMPANY, 

334 Dearborn St., Chicago. 
Eastern Office: 67 Bromfield St., Boston. 

Subscription, 11.00 a year. To Europe, 12.00. 

SubBcriptions accepted only from the trade. 

SOCIETY OF AMERICAN FLORISTS AND 
ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURISTS. 

OrpicBRS — E. M. Wood, Naticlj, Mass., presi- 
dent; P. R. PiEBSON, Tarrytown, N. Y., vice- 
president: Wm. J. Stewart, 67 Bromfield St., 
Boston, Mass., secretary; H. B. Bkattt, Oil City, 
Pa., treasurer. The sixteenth annual meeting 
will be held at New York, August 81 to 24, 1900. 



AMERICAN ROSE SOCIETY. 

Annual meeting at New York, 1901. Leonard 
Babbon, 136 Liberty St., New York, secretary. 



THE AMERICAN CARNATION SOCIETY. 

Annual convention at Baltimore, February, 
1901. ALBEBT M. Herb, Lancaster, Pa., secretary. 



CHRYSANTHEMUM SOCIETY OF AMERICA. 

Annual meeting at New York, August, 1900. 
Elmer D. Smith, Adrian, Mich, secretary. 

THIS ISSUE 28 PAGES WITH COVER. 



CONTENTS. 

Lilies for Christmas and Easter 1 

The sweet pea conference 2 

Conventions at expositions 2 

With the growers — .T. A. Budlong, Chicago, 111. 2 

Sweet pea Cream of Brookhampton (illus.) 3 

Boston 3 

Inception of the sweet pea conference (illus.) . . 4 

Philadelphia 4 

Chicago 4 

Detroit , 5 

St. Louis 5 

Ch icago to New York 5 

A hint to oonventionitea 6 

Bullalo tci New York 6 

Xew York hotels 6 

Cat;Llogues received fi 

Obituary— John Mitchell 6 

—George C. Bliss 6 

— C. H. B. Breck (portrait) H 

New York 8 

The seed trade 12 

I^ynn iind thereabouts 12 

The nursery trade 14 

— Kalamazoo, Mich 14 

Our pastimes— At St. Louis 16 

—At New York 16 

—At Detroit 16 

— At Chicago 16 

Providence 16 

Washington 18 

Manchester, Mass 18 

Nashville 20 

Baltimore 22 



Lilies for Christmas and Easter. 

As this is the period at which growers 
begin to receive their consignments of 
lily bulbs for Christmas and Easter 
flowering, a few remarks on these plants 
will not be out of place. Current report 
has it that this year's stock of bulbs is 
arriving in better condition than hereto- 
fore, owing to the fact that the growers 
in Bermuda are awakening to a realizing 
sense of the difficulties which have 
attended the forcing of their bulbs in 
recent seasons and also, I suppose, to the 
fact that the government has taken a 
hand in the matter and is assisting in 
checking the lily disease. That the bulb 
growers are exercising greater care is 
good news, but we shall, of course, await 
the flowering season before fully accept- 
ing the roseate reports. However, I am 
sure we shall be more than satisfied if the 
present predictions prove true. Some of 
our most extensive dealers last year 
guaranteed that not over five per cent 
of their bulbs should show disease, and 
while some of them were compelled to 
make good their guarantees, the practice 
has become more general this season and 
is certainly encouraging after the heavy 
percentage of loss in the past few years. 

But two of the many lilies now in culti- 
vation are grown for winter flowering, 
mainly because these are the ones which 
do best under glass and are most in 
demand for decorative work, white lilies 
being largely required for this purpose. 
The two alluded to are Lilium longi- 
florum and L. candidum. The last men- 
tioned is sometimes called the annuncia- 
tion lily. It is yet grown to some extent 
by certain florists, mainly for decorative 
work, as it is well adapted to floral 
designs. Home grown bulbs are much 
to be preferred to those which are 
imported, as there is always danger of 
their heating in transit. Then, too, 
vegetation in this climate is much more 
rapid than in Europe and consequently 
home grown bulbs have had a longer 
period of rest than those from abroad 
and come into bloom much sooner after 
being brought into heat. 

The Ijest way to handle L. candidum is 
to pot the bulbs as soon as they can be 
obtained, in 6- inch pots or larger, accord- 
ing to the size of the bulb. Use a rich 
loam but avoid fresh manures, as they 
are detrimental. Plunge the pots to the 
rims in ashes, or some material of this 
kind, and leave them outdoors in frames, 
where they will get plenty of air and 
light. Growth will soon commence and 
then the plants may be watered freely 



until freezing weather comes. Then cover 
the frames with sash or shutters, using a 
great deal of care to hold the plants in 
the proper condition for moving into the 
house as required. They can be brought 
in at any time after having a short rest, 
but January 1 will probably be as early 
as one would care to start them for suc- 
cession. Grow them on in a cool house, 
where they can have plenty of light and 
air, as if overheated or crowded they will 
become weak, spindly and a prey to 
insects. They will come into bloom in 
about ten weeks if kept as nearly as 
possible in a temperature of 60° by day 
and 40° at night. 

Lilium longiflorum eximium was first 
introduced to the florists of this country 
by Wm. K. Harris, the widely known 
and popular president of the Florists' 
Club of Philadelphia, by whose name it 
is generally known. The bulbs are grown 
in Bermuda and complete their growth 
before October. The earliness of the 
Bermuda lilies is very important as they 
will perfect their flowers in the green- 
house fully six weeks earlier than those 
which come from the north. 

In the cultivation of L. Harrisii I find 
the best plan is to pot them up as soon 
as the bulbs are received, this being 
generally about August 1 or a little 
later. It would be a hard matter to give 
a formula for soil which would be avail- 
able in all locations, but suffice it to 
say that almost any good loam will 
answer the purpose if enriched by liberal 
quantities of well decomposed cow 
manure or bone meal. Bulbs between 
four and five inches in circumference 
should be put in 6-inch pots. Smaller 
bulbs will do well in 5-inch pots. None 
but the extra large bulbs forced for 
exhibition purposes will require larger 
than <Sinch pots. I have found it unsatis- 
factory to plant more than one bulb in a 
pot, for they very rarely expand all at 
the same time and customers do not care 
to buy plants with many unopen buds. 
It is one of the peculiar characteristics 
of this lily that, no matter how carefully 
you grade the bulbs, applying the same 
treatment to all, there will be a marked 
difference in their blooming period. 

Do not pot the bulbs too firmly or set 
them more than half an inch below the 
rim of the pot, which may be plunged 
outside in ashes or soil with a covering 
of one or two inches of the same material 
to prevent evaporation, for the bulbs 
must be kept moist and cool. It is also 
necessary to exclude light and air, else 
the leaf action will commence before the 
bulbs have formed roots and this is 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 4, 



highly undesirable. If an active growth 
has commenced, the bulbs may be 
brought into the greenhouse at any time 
during September and forced for early 
blooming, but after having been started 
along they should never be allowed to 
receive a check and an even temperature, 
careful watering and a free circulation of 
air must be provided to obtain the best 
results. After growth is fairly started, a 
temperature of from 70° to 80° by day 
and 3 0° lower at night has proven best 
with me. 

I have found small bulbs invariably the 
best to force for Christmas flowering 
where the stalks are to be cut for 
decorative uses. It does not take so 
long to bring these bulbs into flower as 
it does larger ones, and they are the only 
stock which can be depended on for this 
purpose. The temperature given plants 
for Christmas flowering should be at 
least 5° higher than is required where a 
longer time is allowed. Lilium longi- 
florum requires about the same treat- 
ment as I have outlined for L. Harrisii, 
but it is later in coming into bloom. The 
flowers are smaller but more enduring 
than those of L. Harrisii and will be 
much better if the plants are grown in a 
temperature about 10° below that given 
the latter variety. Bermuda grown 
longifiorums come into bloom quicker 
than Dutch bulbs because they are 
ripened earlier, but I find the Dutch stock 
preferable because of the low, compact 
character of the plants, their equal flori- 
ferousness and the fact that they will 
last long after Harrisii has made its 
exit. In fact, longiflorums may be had 
almost the whole year around and the 
writer has often had them up to 
August 1 as good as any lilies were at 
Easter. 

My experience has been that if growers 
will only take care of lilies as they do 
other stock, and see to it that the potting 
is properly done and the plants brought 
in from outside at the proper time — 
before they become spindly— staged 
promptly and given the desired tempera- 
ture from start to finish, that they are 
not overcrowded but given enough room 
to breathe, with a fair proportion of 
good fresh air, I think the large per- 
centage of diseased lilies will be materially 
decreased. The writer the past season 
had only one hundred diseased lilies out 
of 5000 plants. Some others I know of 
had just as good success, while I know 
of many who had not more than 200 
healthy lilies out of the same number of 
plants. 1 attribute this to overcrowding 
and an uneven temperature. Extra care 
must be taken of the lilies if one expects 
to make a success of them. 

C. H. RONEY. 



The Sweet Pea Conference. 

This is written upon the eve of the 
sweet pea show and conference, when 
everything tends to show that this will 
be a most important event. There will 
undoubtedly be plenty of work for the 
judges, and for the classification com- 
mittee. If this latter work is done thor- 
oughly, which I believe will be the case, 
it will greatly assist all those interested 
in the culture of this flower, for those 
who have no opportunity to inspect 
large collections will be able to select the 
best and most distinct varieties without 
going in for a large number of sorts. 
That the judges will be busy may be 
inferred from the fact that 3600 vases 
will be required for the exhibits in the com- 
petitive classes. The secretary writes 
ine that there will be an average of from 



ten to fifteen entries in every class and, 
in addition to this, a large number have 
applied for spaces for non-competitive 
exhibits. The work of classification will 
be left until Saturday morning, when the 
whole of the executive commitee will 
work with the assistance of several other 
specialists. One great advantage in 
holding this important show at the 
Crystal Palace is that there will be no 
limit to space and all provision is being 
made that the exhibits may be staged in 
the best possible manner. 

The visit to Hurst & Son's trial 
grounds was a great success, the sweet 
peas being in splendid condition. 
Upwards of 200 samples were on view 
and after going carefully through them 
from forty to fifty were selected as being 
worthy of the highest number of marks. 




THE LATE CHARLES H. B. BRECK. (SEE PAGE 6.) 



but as this list may be revised after see- 
ing other varieties at the show, I will 
not send it with these notes. In addition 
to the committee a number of other 
friends joined in the trip to the trial 
grounds, Sir W. P. Treolar, the presi- 
dent, being among them. H. 



Conventions at Expositions, 

WM. MURPHY, CINCINNATI, O. 

I should think that an exposition would 
be a great inducement for the trade to 
attend the S. A. F. convention, if they 
were held in the same city; it certainly 
would be in my case. 

GBO. E. FANCOURT, WILKESBARRB, PA. 

1 am decidedly in favor of holding our 
conventions in exposition cities. Both 
being educational institutions, they have 
an affinity and members at long dis- 
tances will be more likely to respond to 
the double inducement. Particularly will 
this be the case if this year's convention 
decides to meet in Buffalo in 1901, as the 
horticultural exhibition at the Pan- 
American will be a special feature. I 
predict a large addition to the member- 
ship of the S. A. F. by going to Buffalo 
in 1901. 

C. W. WARD, QUEENS, N. Y. 

I will briefly state what, in my opinion, 
are the disadvantages to the S. A. F. in 



holding its convention in a city when an 
exposition is in progress. The first would 
be the difficulty of getting proper hotel 
accommodations; second, the probable, 
advance in hotel rates which the mem- 
bers would have to pay; third, some dis- 
traction from the attendance of the daily 
meetings. The advantages would be 
quite large to the individual members. 
In the first instance, it would enable the 
attending members to kill two birds with 
one stone; that is, attending the annual 
convention as well as seeing the exposi- 
tion, and probably quite a number of 
distant florists would attend under these 
circumstances who would not attend 
under ordinary conditions, and probably 
the society would gain some few members 
upon that account. I do not think that 
the holding of the convention in the city 
would prevent or destroy the interest of 
the local florists, and we would proba- 
bly get as many additional members 
from the locality where the convention 
was held as if no exposition was held 
there at the same time. The members 
of the society would also reap another 
advantage, and here I would suggest 
that we refer to holding the S. A. F. 
convention in the city of Buffalo next 
year, when the Pan-American Expo- 
sition will be in progress. This latter 
advantage would be the opportunity 
that the different members of the society 
would have of visiting and observing the 
horticultural display which will be held 
in connection with the exposition. This, 
I think, on the whole, would be a mate- 
rial advantage to every member who is 
interested in that sort of work. Taking 
into consideration the advantages and 
disadvantages, I think that there would 
not be any serious disadvantage to the 
society itself and that the advantages to 
the individual members would be suffi- 
ciently large to counterbalance any 
slight disadvantage that might accrue 
to the S. A. F. as an organization. 



WITH THE GROWERS. 

J. A. BUDLONG, CHICAGO, ILL. 

Out at Bowmanville they have just 
finished planting a pretty fair sized rose 
house; it is 175x300 and £ man in one 
corner cannot make a man in the farther 
corner hear, even if he shout his loudest. 
Although there is no partition wall in 
this house, it is, of course, really seven 
houses, three of the structures having 
been put up in lS;i9 and four added this 
summer. The sash bars are twelve feet 
on the south side of the ridges, fourteen 
on the north. A. Dietsch & Co. furnished 
the material, principally California cedar, 
which would have been used throughout 
had it been obtainable at the moment. 
Mr. Budlong thinks this lumber cheaper 
than cypress, although it costs more. Of 
course Adam Schillo supplied the posts 
and bench material for the big house, as 
he is the favorite lumberman for all the 
big growers north of town. 

All the middle benches in this big house 
are planted with Beauties and the out- 
side benches with Brides and Brides- 
maids. Mr. Budlong has increased his 
planting of each variety grown this year 
and has doubled on Meteor, finding that 
it is a most profitable crop. He keeps a 
careful count of cut and sales and knows 
just what money every bench brings him. 
Incidentally it may be mentioned that 
Bride and Bridesmaid pay him better 
than Beauty, although he has equal cult- 
ural success with the latter. 

Mr. Budlong now has 115,000 square 
feet of glass and is benchingquite a lot of 
Golden Gate arid Liberty. He has always 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



3 



been a conservative in the matter of nevr 
sorts but has in mind the protection of 
his business in plants. This year's sales 
of young stock were just double those 
of a year ago, which means a tremendous 
increase, and he aims to be able to supply 
all the leading forcing roses in any 
desired quantity, a feature of this year's 
transactions being that very few of the 
orders were for small lots. 

The Budlong establishment is heated 
by steam from a battery of four boilers 
which is shortly to undergo considerable 
improvement. Two new boilers of large 
capacity are to take the places of two 
which are to be withdrawn irom the 
battery, one to go to the second-hand 
men, the other to be used under high 
pressure to run the pumps and the smoke 
consumer. This smoke consumer is a 
new thing. It is operated on what is 
known as the steam jet principle, a thin 
sheet of steam under pressure serving to. 
drive the smoke down into the fire, with 
the result that the products of combus- 
tion are almost invisible as they pass 
out of the chimney. Of course a smoke 
consumer entails expense but Mr. Bud- 
long thinks it increases the capacity of 
the boilers twenty-five per cent, aside 
from its cleanliness. One of the interest- 
ing new things about the place is the 
steam flue-cleaner invented by A. H. 
Budlong, upon which he expects to pro- 
cure a patent. This is a movable appa- 
ratus operating at the back of the flues, 
forcing a quarter-inch stream of steam 
through the flues with such force that ten 
seconds serves to clean a row thoroughly 
and a minute serves to go through ail 
the flues in the boiler. 

Mr. Budlong tried a new coal last win- 
ter, with the result that he has contracted 
with Hull & Co. for forty carloads, 
which he expects to carry him through 
the winter. It was in zero weather in 
January when Mr. Budlong got in his 
first car of this coal, which is known as 
Thacker Splint, and he was running all 
four boilers to their limit. As soon as 
he began using the new supply the fire- 
man dropped one boiler, finding that 
three would do the work, and this season 
Mr. Budlong expects the same number 
of tons of coal he used last season to 
carry him through, with 30,000 feet of 
glass added to the range; he thinks the 
Thacker coal makes just that much hot- 
ter fire. He says that its other advant- 
ages are that there are no lumps to 
break, that it burns up clean, with little 
ashes and no clinkers, and does not 
slack; in a word, that it is the best and 
strongest steam coal he has yet found. 
It is mined in West Virginia and laid 
down in Chicago costs a little more than 
block. 

Boston. 

BUSINESS SHOWS DECIDED IMPROVEMENT. 
—SEASHORE DEMAND INCREASING.— GOOD 
BOSBS NOW OBTAINABLE. — THE SATUR- 
DAY SHOW AT HORTICDLTURAL HALL- 
RAIN OF GREAT BENEFIT TO ODTDOOR 
MATERIAL. — BLOOMING SHRUBS AT THE 
ARNOLD ARBORETUM.— A VISIT TO MAL- 
DEN. 

Business is decidedly better this week 
and it appears that the excessively dull 
spell that has held sway during the 
greater part of July has about run itself 
out. The summer resorts are beginning 
to be heard from in a timid sort of way. 
For the demand that may reasonably be 
expected from this source for a few weeks 
to come, there is a fair variety of flowers 
available and qualities are as good as 
could be expected at this season. Roses 
are greatly improved, the cut from 




SWEET PEA CREAM OF BROCKHAMPTON, GROWN IN POT BY H. J. JONES, OF 

LEWI8HAM, ENGLAND. 



early planted stock now beginning to 
assert itself; the buds are of nice color 
but lacking strength of stem as yet. 
American Beauty is obtainable in a great 
variety of grades, bringing good average 
figures in the market when of good qual- 
ity. Carnations have shortened up con- 
siderably and asters are coming in heav- 
ier each day, prices tending rapidly 
downward. Lily of the valley is in just 
about sufficient supply for the demand 
and remains unchanged in price. 

The refreshing rain of last week did an 
immense amount of good to the parched 
vegetation in this section. This season 
has been unusually dry and the long 
continued hot spells have had a very 
severe effect on lawns, trees, shrubs and 
garden plants, especially on recent plan- 
tations and where gravelly soil abounds. 
In the parks there is little to be seen in 
the way of flowers just now but the lack 
is compensated for in part by the berry- 
bearing shrubs, some of which are quite 
bright. A suggestion to those who 
would like to have continuous flower 
effect in their shrubberies may be had by 
visiting the Arnold Arboretum, where, 
at present, there ate several species of 
clethras, the early flowering Hydrangea 



paniculata, Spiraa Douglasii, S. Men- 
ziesii and others of that type, several 
hypericums and potentillas, Robinia his- 
pida and Stuartias now blooming and 
Gordonia Altamaha is nearly in flower, 
so that with this list it is possible to fill 
in this period "between hay and grass" 
with bright color if one so desires. And 
the "smoke tree" is always lovely at this 
season. 

On Thursday, July 26, the committees 
of the horticultural society visited, on 
invitation, the greenhouses and grounds 
of the Converse estate, at Maiden, where 
D. F. Roy reigns supreme. The grape 
houses, three in number, in different 
stages of growth, were found to be in 
superb condition. In the conservatory 
was seen a fine collection of stove plants 
and Rex begonias of prize quality. Espe- 
cially impressive was a house full of 
tuberous begonias, splendid specimens in 
full bloom. The chrysanthemums looked 
promising and the outdoor departments, 
including the farm, were acknowledged 
to be fully up to the past record. A 
bountiful dinner was enjoyed at Mr. 
Roy's residence, the table being beauti- 
fully decorated with tuberous begonias 
and adiantums by Mrs. Roy, whose abil- 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 4, 



ities in this direction were enthusiastic- 
ally recognized. 

The exhibition of Saturday, July 28, 
lacked the usual interest, there being 
nothing particularly striking shown, 
although the displays of herbaceous gar- 
den flowers, wild flowers, etc., especially 
phloxes, were quite full and creditable. 
Phloxes were shown in named varieties 
by Rea Bros., W. J. Clemsen and George 
Hollis. Blue Hill Nursery was repre- 
sented by an excellent collection of her- 
baceous perennials. Wm. J. Martin 
showed several flower heads of Hsman- 
thus Katharinae, the odd looking umbels 
of densely packed, salmon flowers, with 
their long, orange-vermilion stamens, 
attracting much curious attention. 

The news of the sad affair at Ocean 
City, in which Edwin Lonsdale's two 
daughters lost their lives, has filled us all 
with deepest sadness. No man is more 
beloved in the Boston trade than genial, 
big-hearted Ned, and he and Mrs. Lons- 
dale have sincerest sympathy of a host 
of sorrowing friends. 

John Gilson, for many years city sales- 
man for E. M. Wood & Co., died Thurs- 
day, August 2, at Natick. 

H. H. Hunnewell, of Wellesley, Mass., 
was ninety years of age last Monday. 

"laggs" has arrived in Boston. 

In town: H. S. DeForest, New York; J. 
R. Fotheringham, Tarrytown, N. Y. 



Philadelphia. 

SAD AFFAIH AT THE SEASHORE. — EDWIN 
LONSDALE'S TWO DAUGHTERS DROWNED 
WHILE BATHING. — TWO COMPANIONS 
MEET A LIKE FATE.— TRADE UNITES 
IN EXTENDING SYMPATHY.— WESTCOTT 
BUYS A FARM. — BUSINESS FAIH. 

A most destressing accident which has 
thrown a gloom over the entire com- 
munity in and out of the trade, occurred 
last Tuesday at Ocean City, N. J, when 
Jennie Lee Lonsdale and Sarah Burton 
Lonsdale, the two youngest daughters of 
Edwin Lonsdale, were drowned in the 
surf while bathing. Mrs. S. Mendelson 
Meehan, wife of S. M. Meehan, of the 
firm of Thos. Meehan & Sons, nursery- 
men of this city, was also one of the 
party in danger, which consisted alto- 
gether of six persons, Mrs. Meehan, 
the two Misses Lonsdale, the Misses 
Virginia and Elsie Lowe and their 
brother, C. W. Lowe, a boy twelve years 
old. All the company were guests of 
Mrs. Meehan and had gone down to the 
beach at a point near their cottage. The 
entire ocean front of this resort is noted 
for its flat, hard surface and freedom 
from currents, and it was considered just 
as safe there as four or five blocks farther 
up the beach, where the majority of 
residents bathe. The waves were running 
rather strong but not at all dangerously. 
It is said that all the ladies were practic- 
ing floating and before they realized the 
danger were carried beyond their depth. 
They then struggled to return. The 
young boy and Mrs. Meehan, who could 
swim a little, managed to keep them- 
selves afloat until lifeguards from up the 
beach, who were attracted by their ciies 
of distress, arrived in time to save them. 
The guards immediately swam out to 
the Misses Lonsdale, who were still 
floating, but whose forms were now 
inanimate, and managed by the aid of 
lines and life bouys to get them to shore. 
Doctors who were present in the crowd 

fathered by this time at once tried every 
nown method of resuscitation and for a 
time with promise of success, but after 
working for over two hours without 
procuring any signs of life they were 




WILLIAM CUTHBERTSON AND RICHARD DEAN.- 
CONFERENCE AT KELVEDON, ESSEX, 



-INCEPTION OF THE SWEET PEA 
ENGLAND, JULY, 1899. 



reluctantly compelled to announce there 
was no hope and that the vital spark had 
fled. The bodies of the Misses Lowe were 
recovered about two hours afterwards. 
The bodies were brought home on 
Wednesday. Miss Annie Lonsdale, the 
eldest and now only remaining daughter, 
had decided not to bathe that day, 
remaining at the cottage, and by so doing 
probably escaped a like fate. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lonsdale have the heart- 
felt sympathy of the entire trade in the 
terrible bereavement which has befallen 
them. The young ladies, aged, Jennie 21 
and Sarah 19, were great favorites, and 
took an active part in social matters and 
in the church work of theirneighborhood. 

John Westcott has purchased a farm 
containing some 200 acres, at Waretown, 
N. J. It has about a half mile of frontage 
on Barnegat Bay. The commodious 
homestead, Mr. Westcott says, will make 
a fine club house and during the fishing 
and gunning season he expects next year 
to see many of the boys who enjoy these 
sports and who are willing to join the 
club for the time and partake of its 
hospitality. 

Business is good for the season. Pen- 
nock Bros, say that this is the most 
prosperous summer they have experienced 
for a long time. Cut flowers are scarce, 
that is, good ones are. Some Beauties 
are being sent in from houses planted for 



early cutting and the flowers are quite 
good. 

Jos. Kift & Son have dissolved partner- 
ship. The business will be continued at 
the old stand under the old firm name by 
Robert Kift. K. 



Chicago. 

FIGURES KOR JULY SHOW SALES AHEAD OF 
LAST YEAR. — PRESENT STATE OF THE 
MARKET —SUPPLY NO GREATER THAN 
THE DEMAND FOR STAPLES —SMILAX 
GROWERS TAKE HOPE.— CARNATIONS 
ALREADY IN THE HOUSES AT HINSDALE. 
— HEFFRON GOES TO m'KBLLAR & WIN- 
TERSON's. — VARIOUS ITEMS OF PERSONAL 
DOINGS. 

Midsummer has arrived and the dullest 
season of the year, but it seems to local 
wholesalers as though we are just at the 
beginning of the heated term, for July 
was very good all along the line. To be 
surt, July business was but a fraction of 
that of June but compared with last 
year it was very satisfactory. There has 
been very little stock in the market and 
no considerable over-supply of any item 
except sweet peas, so that prices have 
been fairly well maintained. This week 
has been the most quiet of the season and 
the stocks of garden flowers are very 
generally rather more than are required, 



i^oo. 



The American Florist, 



but there are none too many roses and 
carnations, although supplies ol both are 
on the increase. Asters and gladioli are 
the bulk of the stock in all the houses. 
There are a few dahlias and Rudbeckia 
Golden Glow is in, selling slowly at 15 
cents per bunch of twenty- five. 

To some of the growers it will be good 
news that the smilax market shows 
signs of stiffening up a bit. One of the 
big growers has been cleaning out a 
smilax house, preparatory to planting 
it with something else, and has put 
10,000 strings on the market in the last 
few weeks, with the result that prices 
have gone away down. This lot is about 
at an end but several other growers who 
have been holding back their cut as much 
as possible will now begin shipping, so 
that no great improvement is to be 
anticipated lust yet. 

Bassett & Washburn have finished 
benching their carnations and have 
54,000 plants safely housed. They say 
that this has been one of the best grow- 
ing seasons ever known out Hinsdale 
way and that the carnations are now as 
large plants as they had in September of 
last year. 

City Passenger Agent Vosburg, of the 
Lake Shore, reports that many inquiries 
are being received for details in regard to 
the New Vork trip, and that the pros- 
pects are bright for a big crowd. He has 
advices from Cleveland which indicate 
that a good party will board the train 
there. 

Walter Heffron has taken charge of the 
cut flower department at McKellar & 
*V\'interson's. Business with this firm has 
been so heavy in the past few months 
that both partners have been under a 
considerable strain and greatly in need of 
competent assistance. 

Kennicott Bros. Co. will shortly be 
resplendent in a new coat of white which 
is being applied to their premises this 
week. Nearly all the wholesalers have 
spruced up a bit. 

Henry C. Rowe, who is with John C. 
Schubert & Co., and A. I. Simmons are 
planning to attend the convention. 

J. B. Deamud, with his wife and family, 
left this week to spend a short vacation 
at Paw Paw Lake, Mich. 

Miss Jessie Ludlow, of Vaughan's Seed 
Store, has gone to St. Paul, Minn., for a 
two week's vacation. 

M. E. McCourt has purchased the 
business of John Peterson, comer Walton 
place and Rush street. 
* John Broad has opened a store at 616 
N. Wells street, and is fitting it with the 
latest improvements. 

John Leach, who has recently been 
with Mangel, is returning to the employ 
of C. A. Samuelson. 

E. C. Amling and Albert Amling are 
entertaining a brother and his family 
from Milwaukee. 

Out at Desplaines, Warren Garland is 
building two up-to-date houses, each 
17x250. 

Mrs. John P. Tonner is reported to be 
quite ill. 

Detroit. 

DOINGS AT THE CLUB MEETING.— ELECTION 
OF OFFICERS. — THE ROUTE TO THE CON- 
VENTION.— BOWLING TEAM SELECTED.— 
TRADE AHEAD OF THE SUPPLY. 

The annual election of our club took 
place Wednesday evening, resulting in the 
choice of the following officers: President, 
Geo. A. Rackham; vice-president, F. H. 
Beard; treasurer, B. Schroeter; secretary, 
Geo. W. Davis. The newly elected offi- 
cers will be installed the first Wednesday 
in September. The committee appointed 



some time ago to perfect a plan of 
CO operative purchase of coal, reported 
their failure to accomplish anything of 
advantage, as most of the large coal 
dealers were slow to quote prices except 
to a committee fully empowered to sign 
contracts and become responsible tor 
each individual consumer. This plan 
seemed impracticable and the matter was 
for the present abandoned. The route 
to New York was finally determined 
upon. The party will be iuUy thirty in 
number and will leave Detroit Sunday, 
August 19, at 4:25 p. m., via Michigan 
Central and New York Central railroads, 
arriving at Albany at 6:25 Monday 
morning, there taking the Hudson River 
boat at 8:30 for an all day ride down 
the Rhine of America, arriving at Des- 
brosses street. New York, at 6:30 p. m. 
Most of the party will stop at the Mur- 
ray Hill Hotel, where accommodations 
will be secured in advance. The follow- 
ing bowlers were selected to enter the 
contest at New York, and though they 
modestly declined it, the club insisted 
upon defraying the expense of their trip. 
Philip Breitmeyer, A. Ferguson, John 
Dunn, Fred. Pantke, Frank Holznagle 
and F. H. Beard are the ones who will 
bring back the emblems of victory; they 
have practiced hard, are enthusiastic 
and sanguine of success. 

Trade is fairly good, indeed much bet- 
ter than the necessary stock to supply 
it. Roses are very scarce and carnations 
are little in evidence and poor in quality. 
Asters are beginning to come in and the 
quality is good though many growers 
are complaining of losing plants by what 
is called the stem rot; the frequent rains 
we have had seem to have increased the 
damage from this cause, which is becom- 
ing more widespread year after year. 

John Carey, of Mt. Clemens, is build- 
ing a house 28x140, using 16x16 glass, 
lapped. It will be planted with carna- 
tions. J. F. S. 



He will go as far north as St. Paul on 
the boat. 

The Eden Floral Co., on Finney avenue 
has closed up and the store they occupied 
is for rent. M. 



St. Louis. 



PLANS FOE CONVENTION TRIP. — TRADE 
LIGHT. — FUNERAL WORK THE SOLE 
RELIANCE.— DOINGS OF THE RETAILERS. 

The rate secured from here to the con- 
vention in New York is the uniform fare 
and a third. It is thought to-day that 
all those who attend will travel over the 
Vandalia, which is only $2 more for the 
round trip than the Big Four. The 
tickets will be good for four days in New 
Y'ork city, with the privilege of a ten-day 
stop off at Philadelphia, Baltimore or 
Washington on the return trip. J. W. 
Kunz, who had the matter in charge, 
thinks there will be ten persons going 
from here. 

Trade this week is rather light. Some 
stock is very scarce, but asters and 
white carnations ate plentiful. Funeral 
work is about all there is doing. St. 
Louis is unfortunate in that it is not 
situated, like several other large cities of 
its class, where a seashore or other sum- 
mer resort trade is available. But we 
get our share in many other ways, so 
must rest content until the fall festivities 
begin. 

All that remains of George Waldbarth's 
floral establishment on Grand avenue is 
his refrigerator. He is at present located 
in the Woman's Exchange, two doors 
south of his former place, where he will 
remain until August 15, when he expects 
to move back into his old place, with a 
very much improved stand in all respects. 

Fred. S. Plant, with wife and father, 
has left for a vacation trip up the river 
to cover a period of two weeks or more. 



Chicago to New York. 

The Chicago Florists' Club Committee 
on Transportation to the New York 
Convention of the Society of American 
Florists to be held August 21, 22, 23 
and 24, has arranged with the Lake 
Shore and Michigan Southern Railway 
for a special train, which will be vesti- 
buled and will contain as many Pullman 
sleepers as may be necessary, a buftet 
smoking car, a dining car and a day 
coach. 

The running time of this train will be 
as follows: 

Leave Chicago - 3:00 p. m. Sunday, August 19. 
Arrive Niagara Fulls 7;30a,iii. Monday, August 20. 
Leave Niagara Falls9:30a. m. Monday, .\uijust20. 
Leave Buffalo - - I0:20a. m. Monday, AugustSO. 
Arrive New Yorl; - 9:00 p. m. Monday, August 20. 
(Grand Central .Station.) 

The railroad fare for the round trip will 
be $26 70 on the certificate plan. The 
sleeping-car fare will be $5 for a double 
berth to New York. But if sleeper accom- 
modations are desired to Buffalo only, 
sleeper tickets from Chicago to Buffalo 
may be had for $3 and the remainder of 
the distance traveled in the day coach. 

At Niagara Falls an hour will be 
devoted to a trip around the Gorge Route 
Electric Line, which on the American side 
runs for miles below the falls along the 
rapids, whirlpool, etc. Special trolley cars 
will await the arrival of our special train. 
Those not wishing to take the trip 
through the gorge can devote their time 
to seeing the falls in any way they desire. 

Returning from New York the members 
of the party have the option of returning 
by all rail route, or of taking the boat as 
far as Albany. And as a daylight ride up 
the Hudson is an exceedingly enjoyable 
trip the majority will no doubt take 
advantage of it. 

The boat leaves New York, foot of Des- 
brosses street, at 8:40 a. m. daily, reach- 
ing Albany at 6:10 p. m. A westbound 
train leaves Albany at 10 p. m., which 
arrives at Chicago at 9 p. m. next day. 
To any preferring the lake trip Buflaloto 
Cleveland the privilege of taking the 
C. & B. Transit Co.'s boat is afforded. 

Berths may be reserved in the special 
sleepers by addressing L. F. Vosburgh, 
City Passenger and Ticket Agent, Lake 
Shore and Michigan Southern Railway, 
180 Clark street, Chicago, who will also 
supply any other information. Railroad 
tickets and certificates may be had at 
the above address or at the Lake Shore 
Station, Van Buren street. 

In reserving berths be careful to state 
whether you wish a berth to New Y'ork 
or to Buffalo only, and mention that you 
desire to travel in the Florists' Special 
Train. 

By vote of the Chicago Florists' Club 
the Committee was instructed to invite 
all florists in the west to travel with the 
Chicago party and to share the advan- 
tages secured by the committee. We 
shall be pleased to have your company 
on this trip. The New Y'ork convention 
promises to be a memorable one, and 
every florist who can possibly do so 
should go. 

Please make your berth reservation as 
early as possible. 

G. L. Grant, 

W. N. RUDD, 

Walter Kreitling, 
Transportation Committee. 
Chicago Florists' Club. 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 4, 



Subscription, »1.00 a year. To Europe, 12.00. 

Subscriptions accepted only from those 

in the trade. 

Advertisements on all except cover pages, 

10 Cents a Line, Agate; Sl.OO per inch. 

Cash with Order. 

No Special Position Guaranteed. 

Discounts are allowed, only on consecutive inser- 
tions as follows— 6 times, Speroent; IStimes, 
10 per cent, 26 times, 20 per cent; 
52 times, 30 per cent. 
Cover space sold only on yearly contract at 
11 00 per inch, net, in the case of the two 
front pages, regular discounts ap- 
plying only to the bacli pages. 
The Advertising Department of the Amebicah 
Florist is for Florists, Seedsmen and Nurserymen 
and dealers in wares pertaining to those lines on/y. 
Orders lor less than one-half inch space not accepted. 
Advertisements must reach us by Wednesday to 
secure insertion in the issue for the following 
Saturday. Address 

APMERICAN FLORIST CO.. OHICAQO. 



Secure your railroad berths and 
hotels for that New York trip. 

The new varieties of Clematis coccinea 
are worthily gaining in favor. 

Mention is made in a recent issue of 
the Gardeners' Magazine of a sweet pea 
spike bearing seven flowers. The variety 
was Mrs. Fitzgerald. 

W. Watson, of the Kew Botanic Gar- 
den, London, Eng., says of Dreer's new 
Nymphtea William Falconer: "I call it a 
first-rate nympha-a." 

We join in the expressions of sympathy 
which come from all quarters for Mr. 
and Mrs. Edwin Lonsdale, of Chestnut 
Hill, Pa., in the recent loss of their two 
daughters by drowning. 

Florist Ads. Are All Right. 

A.M. FlobistCo :— Enclosed please find 
draft to pay for our recent advertisement. 
Florist ads. are all right; yon will hear 
from us in the future. Frey & Fbey. 

Lincoln, Neb., July 21. 

Greenhotise Building. 

Bridgeton, N. J.— R. Smith, one green- 
house. 

Adams, Mass. — T. D. Brown, one 
house. , „. 

Cromwell, Conn.— A. N. Pierson, one 

house. . „ , . o 

Milwaukee, Wis. — Emil Schmitz & 
Sons, two houses. 

Bay City, Mich.— Boehnnger Bros., 
addition to range. 

Newark, N. J.- A. G. Jones, range of 
houses. _ 

Concord, N. H. —Manchester Street 
Greenhouses, one house. 

New Bedford, Mass.— Thos.N. Stetson, 
one house. 

Uexter, Me— C. H. Hayden,one house. 

Avon, Mass.— T. G. Thrasher, one 

house. „ „ , J 

Litchfield, Me.— Lapham & Packard, 

one house. 

Albert Lea, Minn.— P. Clausen & Son, 
two carnation houses 20x4-5. 

Beloit, Wis.— J. Rindfleisch, carnation 
house 20x50. 

Lincoln, Neb.— Frey & Frey, range of 
eight houses. 

Knoxville, Tenn.— C. W. Crouch, house 
22x125; one 18x100. 



ful thought to bringing up to date or 
down to date their best thoughts on 
improving the working methods in build- 
ing, in growing and in selection of the 
kinds to grow. It takes deliberation and 
consultation to bring wisdom out of 
these everchanging matters, changes 
which take place so gradually and imper- 
ceptibly as to remain unnoticed except 
by the close observer or by him who 
keeps a daily or weekly table of results 
in dollars. Let us not drive all our best 
enthusiasm down those alley lines with 
the balls, but keep some for other 
thoughts and talk them all'over freely at 
the business sessions. W. 



Buffalo to New York. 

While we are assured of a good delega- 
tion from our city to the convention it 
will, from various causes, be unlikely 
that we shall all travel by one route. 
The N. Y. C. & H. R. R., the Erie, the 
Delaware & Lackawanna and the Lehigh 
Valley all have evening trains which 
reach New York about 7 a. m., and all 
give the one-third rate on return on the 
certificate plan. The fare and a third on 
the New York Central is $12 33. On the 
other roads it is $10.70. Obtain your 
tictets a few hours in advance as it takes 
time for the agent to fill out the certifi- 
cate. 

The Chicago delegation have chartered 
a special train and have kindly invited 
the Buflfalo delegates to join them. There 
will be a day coach attached to the train 
which will leave Buffalo at 10 a. m. 
Mon'lay, August 20, arriving in New 
York at 9 p. m. Anyone wishing to join 
the Chicago party will please notify 
William Scott, Main and Balcom streets, 
not later than Friday, August 17. 
Signed, Dan'l B. Long, 

Wm. Scott, Committee. 



A Hint to Conventionites. 
Ed. .\u. Florist:—! suppose the bowl- 
ing boys, as well as others about start- 
ing for, and later when on the way to, the 
convention have given a few hours' care- 



New York Hotels. 

At the request of Walter F. Sheridan, 
chairman of the reception committee, we 
herewith present a list of the hotels of 
New York for the information of those 
who will attend the approaching conven- 
tion of the Society of American Florists: 

ErnopEAN PLAN. Rates Miles to 

per day. Hall. 

Savov, 59th St. and 5th av t2 00 1 

Nctherland, 69th st. and 5lh av. . . . 2 00 1 

Melropole, Broadway and 42d st... 1 00 Vt 

St. Cloud, Broadway and 42d St.... 150 % 

Miiuhuttan. Madison av. anil 42d st. 2 00 'b 

Marlborough, B'dwny and 37th st. 1 50 '4 

Murray Hill, Park av. and 40th st. 1 50 's 

Grand Union, Park av. and 42d st 1 00 near 

Imperial. Broadway and 32d st — 1 50 % 

Grand, Broadway and 31st st 1 50 % 

Victoria, 5th av. and 27th st 150 'a 

Ashland, 4th av. and 25th st 100 % 

Continental. Broadway and 20th St. 1 00 I'a 

Union Square, Union sq. and 15th 1 00 VA 

Everett, Union sq. and 17tli st 150 IH 

St. Denis, Broadway and llth St.. 1 00 IJ, 
Cosmopolitan, \V. Broadway and 

Chambers 100 3 

Aster House, Broadway opp. Gen- 
eral P. O I 00 3 

Holland House, 5th av. and 30th st. 2 00 % 

AMERICAN AND EUROI'EAN PLAN. 

Am. Eutop. Miles. 

Mays, 50 West 28th st »l 50 $150 % 

Broad wav Central, Broadway 

opp. iiond 2 50 1 00 2 

AMERICAN PLAN. 

Per day. Miles. 
Fifth Avi'nue, Bth av. and 23rd st — (5 00 1 

Sturtevant, Broadway and 28th st. . . 2 50 7« 

Visiting members may have rooms 
reserved at any of the above hotels by 
applying direct, or through the chairman 
of the hotel committee, S. S. Butterfield, 
P. O. Box 1697, New York, specifying 
grade of accommodation desired. Most 
New York hotels are conducted on the 
European plan. 



Catalogues and Cut Flower Price Lists 
Received. 

Gurney Heater Manfg. Co., Boston, 
Mass., heating apparatus; Herr& Wulle, 
Naples, Italy, bulbs and seeds; Wm. T. 
Dittnier, Canton, Mo., small fruits; 
Plant Seed Co., St. Louis, Mo., roots; J. 
M. Thorburn & Co., New York, N. Y , 
wholesale trade list of bulbs; C. C Poll- 
worth Co., Milwaukee. Wis., price list 
cut flowers; Ernst Reimschneider, Altona- 
Hamburg, Germany, plants, bulbs, 
flower seeds; Clovena Nurseries, New 
Y'ork, N. Y'., wholesale price list seeds 
and plants. 



OBITUARY. 

[OHN MITCHELL. 

John Mitchell, who has been for some 
time engaged in the greenhouse business 
on Town Hill, New London, Conn., died 
on the morning of July 23, in the 71st 
year of his age. He leaves a widow, one 
son and a daughter. 

GEORGE C. BLISS. 

George C. Bliss died at New Bedford, 
Mass,, July 22, after a brief illness, 
apoplexy being the cause of his demise. 
Mr. Bliss was born in New Bedford, forty- 
six years ago and, after completing the 
course in the public schools, he went to 
work for his grandfather, the late Wm. 
Howard, one of the first to engage in 
business as a florist in that section. 
Eventually Mr. Bliss came into control 
of Mr. Howard's business and he has 
been identified with the trade all his life. 
At one time he was city forester. 

C. H. n. BRECK. 

Charles Henry Bass Breck, the vener- 
able head of the Joseph Breck & Sons 
Corporation, of Boston, died at Newton, 
Mass., on August 1. Mr. Breck was an 
octogenarian and one of the eighth gen- 
eration of Brecks in America, being 
directly descended from Edward Breck, 
who came from England in 1635. Bom 
at Pepperell, Mass., the family some 
years later removed to Lancaster, where 
the son received his education in the 
academy of the town. He showed an 
aptitude for business early in life, and as 
an assistant to his father, developed 
steadily and rapidly. He became a part- 
ner in the New England Agricultural 
Warehouse and Seed Store in 1850, and 
has been the senior member and head of 
this firm since the death of his father in 
1873, and during this half century of his 
connection with it, the business has 
developed into one of the most prominent 
in the United States. In 1893, after hav- 
ing absorbed several minor concerns, 
Joseph Breck & Sons bought the stock 
and business of Parker & Wood and 
combined the plants of the two houses, 
incorporating under the statutes of Mas- 
sachusetts as the Joseph Breck & Sons 
Corporation, with Charles H. B. Breck 
as president; his sons, Charles H. Breck 
and Joseph F. Breck, respectively treas- 
urer and secretary; Edward O. Hatch, 
general manager, and Archibald Smith, 
manager of the seed department. Mr. 
Breck's long life was filled with many 
activities other than those of his busi- 
ness. He was for several years a select- 
man of Brighton and a member of 
its school board for six terms; after 
annexation he was a member of the Bos- 
ton board of aldermen and a member of 
some of its most important committees. 
Mr. Breck was one of the first and firm- 
est advocates of the Metropolitan Park 



tgoo. 



The American Florist. 



System and was a vice-president of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society. 
He had been a Mason lor more than half 
a century. Recently he had resigned 
some of his connections, notably a direc- 
torship in the Metropolitan National 
Bank, in favor of his son, C. H. Breok. 
Since the destruction of their homestead 
by fire, April 19. 1S96, Mr. and Mrs. 
Breck had resided with their only 
daughter, Mrs. Willard G. Brackett, at 
Newton. Mr. Breck's portrait appears 
on page 2 of this issue. 



SITUATIONS. WANTS FOR SALE, 

AdTorusemeDU uuder laio oead wlli Du tuoerted al 
the rate of 10 cents a line laeveD words) each Inaer- 
tlon. Cash musl aooompanj order. Plant adrs. not 
Admitted QDder this head. 

BJrery paid subscriber to the Ambkican Florist 
for the year IHOO la entitled to a flve-Une want adv. 
(BltaatlonBODiy free to be naed at any time dttrlnji 
tbe Tear. 

SITUATION WANTED-By a rellflble florist as 
foreman or to take charife; llfellmj experience! 
Engllflh married. C K. caro Am. Fluilst. 

SITUATION WANTED-By experienced mushroom 
grower; would like inslebt into floriculture. Neat 
clever workman and thorough manager 

W. I AR3iSTRONa, Streator, 111. 

SITUATION WANTED-Prlvate place, by florist 
and gaiilener: U years' experience In greenhuuae, 
fruits. Teeetables. etc. Good references. Address 
Gardener. P. O Lakevlew Station. Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— By rose grower having 
long experience. In cummerclal place: capable of 
taking charge. Scandinavian, age 3L Bestofrefei- 
ences. Chhistlax Johnsox. Natlck, Mass. 

SITUATION WANTBD—By practical and trust 
worthy florlet as working foreman; 15 years' 
experience in cut floweret anii general assortment of 
plants, single, best ref. Ad N M. care Am Florist. 

SITUATION WANTED-By a flr^-t class cut flower 
firower and propagator of all plants for wholesale 
placa; a ^'ood worker; 30 years' experience; American, 
marr.ed, small family. Best of references Address 
C B. care American Florist. 

SITUATION WANTED— By a practical grower of 
rosea, carnations, 'mums, ferns and general bed- 
ding stock; capable to take charge. Good references. 
East preferred. Address E 8. 

care A. Young, 138 Colton St., Sprlngtleid, Maes. 

SITUATION WANTED— As foreman, by a tirst class 
grower' of roses and cut fl .were; general plants- 
man; single, age 33 A flrat-claas place wanted. Beat 
of references. Open for engageme t now or later. 
Address Grower, care American Florist. 

SITUATION WANTED-By a thoroughly practical 
gardener and tlorlat, 25 yearn' experience with 
roses, carnations violets and seneral line of plants; 
good designer and decorator, not afraid of work, A 
No. 1 refereccea. married, one child, age 40. For par- 
ticulars pleas*^ address Gardexsb. 
No. 70 South Ave., Poughkeep^le, N. Y. 



W 



ANTED— 800 feet of 4-lDoli cast Iron hot water 
pipe and BttlnKs. Mrs. H. jalteson, 

Peteraburg. HI. 



w 



ANTED— Address of Louis Truxler, a practical 
and ornamental florlBt 

Thos B. bull, Bakersfleld, Cal 



WANTED— Wrought pipe H to 2J^, caat 4 and 6. 
muat be In good condition. 

VOL. PUQH, Bowling Green, Mo. 

WANTED— Good, quick propagator; one who can 
act as assistant to foreman of large place- 
Address V, care American Florist, Chicago. 

ANTED— A young man with experience, to work 
In floral store. Address 

WOODLAND Park Floral Co., 
806 2d Ave., Seattle, Wash. 



ANTED— Florist, single. German, to grow cut 
flowers and general greenhouse stock. Address 
Sagixaw Greexhodsk, 1317 N. Michigan Ave., 
Saginaw, W. S-, Mien. 



W 



W 



WANTED— For foreman, a man who understands 
growing roses, carnations and vluleta, who can 
take cnarge of eev^ral men. Address 

Salter Bros., Rochester, N. Y. 

TXT ANTED— A young man with experience in grow- 
VV log camationa and general greenhouae work. 
Send references and w. ges with boaid Address 

The City iiREENHLUuES, Newton, Iowa. 

WANTED AT ONCE— A good florist to grow roses, 
mums, carnations and general bedalng stuff. 
Must be good propagator State experience and ref- 
erences. H. P. CAMPBELL. Shamokln, Pa. 

WANTED— A sober, ateady man, to grow roses, 
'mums and bedding plants, who can make de- 
signs If necessary, take care of 5Ij0j square ft. of glass 
wi.h one helper. Chas. LiXDACHibR. Canton, O. 

WANTED AT ONCE— A young man with some 
expurlencd lo greenhouse work; muat be willing 
to make blmsjif generally aaelui State wages ex- 
pected with board. Address 

Wm. a SMiTd, Box Iti, Lakewood, Cleveland. O. 



WANTED- Young man, single, who understands 
the care of carnations, 'mums and general trop- 
ICdl plants, ferns, etc , on amdll commercial place 
n ar city. Wages $8.00 per week, room and board. 
Address P J S, o re American Flortat. 

WANTED— A young man to learn the flonat busi- 
ness ou commeiclal place of 6000 fe*-t of glass. 
M u' t be of good appearance and have fair education. 
Won' make a slave of you. Will pay good wages and 
board. Address 

MBS. A. L. Myers, Bluflfton. Ind. 

Ji'Oa SALE Oi RKNT-Slx greenhoupes. dwelling, 
' sheds. Bargain. W. L. ^ixx. White Hall 111. 



F 



OR RENT— Four greenhouses 14x71, with office 
21x23, with ruoms. Call nt 

1114 School St., Chicago. 

f'OR SALE— One No Va Hltchlnue hot water boiler 
In good condltioo; new grate bars; J75 00. 

MRS H. Salvesox, Petersburg III. 

FOR SALE— Free fuel, 5000 feet glafs Great chance 
for florists or gardenera. Only $500 caah. Account 
alckneas Write quick. E ree Fuel, care Am. Florlat. 

FOR SALE— Greenhouse containing tJ.O.O feet of 
glass with house and barn In connection. Every- 
thing In good condlton and well atocKed. One-fourth 
cash, balance time. Fred plaggb, Elgin, 111. 

FOR SALE— At reasonable price, four greenhouses 
^Ith btock. heated by ateam. near four ceni'^ter- 
les; no oppualtlon. Electric cars pass the office. 
Reason for selling, age. Address Ixdeaxa. 

Care American Fiorlat. 

FOR SALE— Rare chance to a reliable grower and 
greenhouse man. In city of 20 00J, half Interest 
In established buslneas. 5G00 feet of glass, hot water. 
Have other business Floe opportunity. 

E F C, care American Florist. 

FOR SALE-Leaae atock etc. of place of dO Ofeet 
of glass In Chicago su burb all In good condition 
Stock first claas and more tnan is needed. Will aell 
very cheap; c*ieh wanted. Reason for leaving am 
going to Europe. Addresa J D 

care American Florist Chicago. 

SALESMAN WANTED 

For our Florist and Retail Department. 
Ttioroughly experienced in Flower Seeds 
and Bulbs. Apply by letter. 

W. W. RAWSON & CO.. 

13 & 13 FaneuU Hall Sq., BOSTON. MASS. 

Any Good, Reliable EIrm 

Wanting a first-class foreman, one who is 
up in cut flowers and plants, apply to me. 
I have sold my place and the change throws 
my foreman out of employment. 

THE E. HIPPARD CO., Youngstown, Ohio. 



Two Pirst°Clius Rose Qrowers. 
GOOD Wages to Proper Parties. 

SOUTH PARK FLORAL CO.. 

NEW CASTLE. IND. 

TO RENT. 

In a town of flfteen thousand population, 
eight miles from Boston, ou rauin street, 
electric cars puss the door; four green- 
houses, heated by steam, thirty thousand 
feet laud. Dwelling house can be used for 
two families. Good retail trade. Apply to 

P. WELCH, 15 Province St., Boston, Mass. 

FOR SALE. 

A florist establishment for sale, consisting of 
13,000 square feet of glass, in good condition. 
Heated by steam; in the city limits, located in a 
city of 18,000 inhabitants on the Mississippi river 
in Iowa, with several acres of land and dwelling 
house; must sell soon ou account of old age. For 
further particulars address 

L C K, care American Florist. 



FOR SALE 



With 10 Year Lease, 

One of the best placei 
in Chicago. 

This is a rare opportunity; if you have 
some cash, talk it over witti me. 

T. J. CORBREY. 

I4Q9-I4II W. Madison St., CHICAGO. 



FOR SALE 



Thirteen (13) Green- 
houses, situated in 
city of Allegheny. Pa., 
containing t we n ty- 
three thousand (23,000) stiuare feet of glass. All 
steam heated nud in good running order. Will 
sell houses at low price and lease dwelling and 
laud, or will sell entire plant, i'ossession imme- 
diately. Addresa 

1. M. REEVES. Wirreil. 0. 

FOR SALE. 

Fixtures and good will of Al Cut Flower 
Store in Chicago. Buyer should have cash 
and be able to run a first-class place. 

Inquire of J. C. VAUGHAN. 

FOR SALE 

240 acres of land on Isthmus of Tehaunte- 
pec, state of Vera Cruz, Mexico. For full 
particulars write 

ROLAND HUGHES. 

846 New York Life BIdg. KANSAS CITY, MO. 

For Sale. 

Oakland, Cal.: an elegant piece of property, 160 
feer. front by 145 ftet deep. Ten minutes' ride 
from the center of the city. Three large green- 
houses, each 116 t, by 35 ft., well stocked. Ele- 
gant cottage of 7 rooms. Gas fixtures and all 
conveniences. Owner compelled by circumstan 
ces to go to Alaska gold fields and must si-U 
q^uickly. Cost $7,000. Will sell< at great reduc- 
tion. AVrite for price. 

Any of the above named properties is a fine bar- 
gain, and those desiring to purchase will do well 
to communicate with us. These are only a few of 
the properties that we have for sale and leasing. 

SMITN & SMITH, 

P 0. Box 869. 345 Sixth Ave , PITTSBURG. PA. 

For Sale. 

GREENHOUSE 
PROPERTY ^ 

At Nyacfc, N. Y. A plot 220x125 
feet, on which arc four Rosehouses, 
)00xt8x6, each house heated by a 
No. 16 Hitchings Boiler; and seven 
houses, each about 64x11 ft, heated 
by flues. This property will be 
sold cheap to quick cash buyer. 

HITCHINGS & CO., 

233 Mercer St. NEW YORK. 



NOTICE 

STOCKHOLDERS' MEETINQ. 

CHICAGO, July 21, 1900. 
stockholders of the American Florist Comoany: 

You are hereby notified that the annual meeting 
of the Stockholders of the American Florist Com- 
pany will be held in the Murray Hill Hotel, New 
York, N. Y., Wednesday, August 22, 1900, at 3 
o'clock p. at., for the purpose of electing directors 
and officers for the ensuing term, and for the 
transaction of such other business as may come 
before the meeting. 

F. R PIERSON, Pres. 

M. BARKER, Sec'y. 

Always mention the 

American Florist 

when wiitinK advertiser s 



8 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 4, 



New York. 

THB PAST WEEK THE DULLEST ON BECOBD. 
—NO BOSES AND NOT MANY CARNATIONS. 

Last week was about the quietest of 
the season as far as business was con- 
cerned and was exceeded in this respect 
by nothing in past years, even for July. 
But little stock of any sort is being 
received at the wholesale markets, roses 
being especially noticeable for the small 
shipments. Of carnations there are a few 
more coming in and the normal supply 
of lily of the valley appears daily. Asters 
are plentiful and very low priced and the 
demand for them amounts to practically 
nothing. 

Wausau. Wis —Chris. Lund reports 
trade good, with the call lor carnations 
so good that he is adding a house for 
them. 

Wbo!?5ale power/\arK?fe 

Cincinnati, Aug. 2. 

Roses, Bride a.OCo 3. CO 

Bridesmaid 2.O0«. 3.00 

Meieor 3.«0(" 4 0) 

Perle 2.00@ 3.C0 

Carnations J5(<' 1. 00 

fancy l-50(« 2.00 

Gladioli 200t' 4.00 

Stock.* 3«0 

Sweat peas i™^' ■;-° 

Tuberoses „„ 3.00 

As'ers I<»<" '-SO 

Smilas 13 50 

Adiantum 1™ 

Common frrns • 1^ 

Asparagus 50.00 

St. Louis, Aug. 2. 

Roses, Bride, Briilemaid 2.nr(». 4.00 

Meteor 2.00(" 4.00 

Perle ^ 2.00 

Carnations, common ^'" 1 00 

Smilas 12.50 

I. Adiantum 60(" 1.00 

Tuberoses 4.00w 5.00 

Gladioli . •■■ 2.00(n 4.00 

Asters l.OOl" 2 00 

MiLWADKBE, Aug. 2. 

Roses, Beauty, med. per doz. 1 50'" 2.00 
■■ " short •■ .=iO(" 1 00 

Bride, Bridesmaid 3.00@ 4.00 

Meteor 4 00<" 5.00 

Kaiserin 4.00*" 6.O0 

Carnations, ordinary 1.00 

fancy 2 OO 

Auratum lilies 15.00 

Adiantum 75(" l.OO 

Common ferns .25 

Gladioli 4.00& 5 00 

Asters ■ 50(.> 1.00 

Smilax 15. OO 

.\sparagus 65.00 

Galax leavis .20 

Sweet peas .15 

I'lTTSBUHO, Aug. 2. 

Roses, Beauty, fancy 20. 0C(" 25.00 

extra lO.OOc 15 00 

No. 1 5.0f(" 8.00 

•• " culls 2.001" 4.00 

Bride, Bridesmaid 2.00w e oo 

•' Meteor 2.00(" I! 00 

Perle 2.00(" 6.00 

Cusin 2.00(" 4.00 

Carnations, ordinary 51 (" 1.00 

fancy 1.60(" 2.00 

Lily of the valley 2.0C(" 4.00 

Sweetpeas H'" ..50 

Daisies 2S(" 1.00 

Smilas 12.5r(" 15 ,00 

Gladioli 4.00(./ 6.0O 

Adiantum 7.5(« 1.00 

Asparagu- 35. 01 ("50.00 

■' Sprengerii .■ 26w .35 

Dagger terns per lOOO, 2.00 

Asters l-OCi" 3.00 

Denver, Aug. 1. 

Koses, Beauty, select 12 50(" 20.00 

ordinary 4.00(" 8. CO 

Bride, Bridesmaid 3.001" 4 00 

Meteor 5.00(" 6.00 

Perle, Wootton 3.00'" 5.00 

Carnations, ordinary l.OCf" 1.50 

" fancy 15'.'" 2 50 

Lily of the valley 4 00 

(■alias 12.50 

Harrisii 12.60 

Sweet peas 150' .25 

Asters 2.0-.'" 4.00 

Asparagut 60 00 

Smilas 18.00 

Ferns .30 



Everything in the 

CUT FLOWER 

line. 



and a 
complete line of 



WIRE WORK, 

the kind 
that will give satisfaction. 

FLORISTS' SUPPLIES. 



HOLTON & HUNKEL CO., 



p. O. Box 103. 



IVIll■*^?-^«J»l«Le^^, 'Wis. 



Wb«n wntlntf mention tlie American FlorlBl 



CUT FLOWERS. 

. ^ ^ . Shipping orders receive prompt 
and careful attention. 

C. C. POLLWORTH CO., Milwaukee, Wis. 



Please Mention American Florist. 



PITTSBURG GUT FLOWER GO., Ltd, 

PITTSBURG, 



504 
Liberty Street, 



ALL 
FLOWERS 

IN 
SEASON. 



FA. 



GALAX LEAVES, Brilliant Bronze or Green, $1.50 per 1000. 

KANCV FKRN, DAGGER FEKN, Etc., at market pilees. 

HARRY A BUNYARD. - 42 west 2Sth street, new YORK. 



NEW CROP 

'■,«\ii 




N(.)W READY, 50 cts. per 1000. LAUREL FES- 
TOONING, 4c to Oo p'T yard. Best Koods always. 

CROWL FERN CO., Millington, Mass. 

It is not much trouble to mention the 
AuBRiCAN Florist when corresponding 
with an advertiser. 



Bronze Galax Leaves 

$1.25 per 1000. swir'- 

Try a s:ira|>l(' FIFTY for tpu cents in stamps, 
delivered FREE. 

AMERICAN ROSE CO., Washingtin, D. C. 
I PAY EXPRESS or POSTAGE on my 

Bronze Galax Leaves 

and tlpliver anywhere in U. S. for ONE DOLLAR 
FIFTr per iOOO. Writi- lor p:irticnlars. 

ULIUN ALIEN DEXTER, Washington, D. C. 



AN 



Indispensable Adjunct 






n O a successful wholesale business is an up-to-date, 
y accurate, complete Trade Directory. Such a 
book, 3S7 pag:es, containing the name and 
address of every florist, nurseryman and seedsman 
in America, new list of private gardeners and horti- 
cultural supply concerns and much other informa- 
tion will be mailed from this office on receipt of $2. 



AMERICAN FLORIST CO. ; 

324 Dearborn St., CHICAQO, ILL. \ 



TO 

m 



TO 



jgoo. 



The American Florist. 



9 



Roses 




ALL 
FLOWERS 

IN 
SEASON 



Carnations 



i 



When you want them. 
As you like them. 



E. C. AMLING, 

Wholesale Cut Flowers, 
32-34-36 Randolph St. CHICAGO. 




ggga^Sei* 



McKellar £ Winterson's 

Modern Supply House. 




Send for Prices on all Supplies. 
Clearance Sale Now On. 

Give us your order now together with your needs in 
OUT FLOWERS. 



0. McKELLAR & WINTERSON, wA^is^n' I've.. CHICAGO. 



WIETOR BROS. 

"'"ir.%.. Cut Flowers 



All te'PEraph anrt telephone orders 
given prompt attention. 

51 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO. 



WEILAND AND-RISCH 



I We are large Growers and I 
(Shippers of CUT FLOWERS] 



WHOLESALE FLORISTS 



GEO. REINBERG, 

Wholesale Grower of Cut Flowers. 

BEAUTIES, ROSES, CARNATIONS. 

All Stock at lowest market rates. Send in your 
orders. 

51 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO, ILL. 

Seen by New Firms: 

AMERICAN FLORIST ADVTS. 



Wbol^ale power/arK^ 

CnnAGo, Aug. 3. 
Roses, Beauty, extra long siems 3 ro 

31 inch •■ 2.50 

24 •■ ■• 2.0U 

20 ■• •• 1.50 

Ift " " 1.55 

13 '■ ■• 1.00 

8 •■ " .75 

Bririe, Bndesmaiil 3. CO®. 5.00 

Perle 3 Ou® 6.U0 

Meteor 3.01® 5.00 

La France 4. Of® 5.00 

Golden Gate 6 CO® 8.00 

Liberty 6.00(« 8.00 

Carnations 75(a> lOU 

fancy 1.50 

Lily of the valley 3 00® 5.00 

Mignonette 2.00(6 6.00 

Sweet peas .10 

Adianium 50@ 1.00 

Comiiion ferns .15 

Pancy ftrns .20 

Sinila.\ 8.C0@I2.aO 

Asparagus 50.00 




64 WABASH AVE 
CHICAGO 

8. TC Cor Wabash Ave. and Randolph St. 

Say: "Saw it in the Flokist." 



E. H. Hunt 

THE "OLD RELIABLE" FOR 



WHOLESALE- 




cm FLOWERS 

Hunt's Flowers 
Go Everywhere 

76 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO. 



PETER REINBERG, 

Grower and Wholesaler of Cut Flowers. 

500.000 FEET OF GLASS. 
Headguarters for American Beauty. 

Carnations, Blooms and Cuttings. 

51 Wabash Ave., - CHICAGO, ILL. 



J. B. DEAMUD, 

Wholesale 
Commission Florist, 

51 Wabash Ave., GHIGflGO. 



Bassett&Washburn 

76 & 78 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO. 

Cut Flowers 



Wkoleaale Dealers and 
Growers of 



GREENHOUSES: HINSDALE, ILL. 



A. L RANDALL ^ 

Wholesale Florist 

Don't Forget that we are at 4 Wash* 
ingfton St., Chicago. 

Write for ipeolal gaotatlonB on large orders. 



WHOLKSALB 

GROWER OF ROSES. 



DEAUSB IB 

CUT FLOWERS. 



J. A. BUDLONG, 

37-39 Randolph Street. CHICAQO. ILL 

Mention the American Florist. 

Benthey & Co. 

F. F. BENTHEY, Manager, 

Wholesale Commission Florist 

41 Randolph Street, CHICAGO. 

y<^Conaignment8 solicited 

l. e. PRINCE & CO. 

Wholesale Gut Flowers 

AND FLORISTS' SUPPLIES. 

^KsnU tor tlie Hinsdale Rose Co. Speolal ktMBUos 
paid to shipping orden. 

76 & 78 Wabash Avenue, 

Telephone Main 3208^ OHiOAQ». 

Please mention the American Florist. 



10 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 4, 



samoei s. Fennock. 



Whol esale Florist , 

1612-14-16-18 Ludlow Street PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

cirmiliT^^ 



WELCH BROS., Proprietors. 



"""*""■ "»~1', .„«'„»« tor FREYSTEDTS' Immortelle Letters and Emblems, 
HOTICE:— WELCH BROS., sole Agents tor ^^^H^.^^l^^^^,^, S4.00 per 100. 



Block Letters, $2.00 per 



THE NEW ENGLAND HEADQUARTERS FOR THE BEST GRADE OF FLOWERS 



AT ALL SEASONS OF THE YEAR. 




8,000,000 

Hardy Cut Ferns 

Now Is your time to buv at 4Cc 
oer thC'ueand In tive or tea 
th usand lots, 60c per Ihoas- 
andforleBs. SpbasnumMoss. 
5Cc per bhl ; botjquot Green 
40 per pound. Laurel BoplDH, 
UliOoer tOyaids AM ordclB 
by mall or despatch promptly 
alter ded to 

THOMAS COLLINS, 



, . r- ii . * 1 Woodroffe & Bernheimer, 

WhOl^ale pOWer/\arK^ wholesale Florists 



Hinsdale. 



Mass. 



SSfiSSSSSffSSSWSSSSB! 



Carnation Blooms 

Id Unlimited Quantities 

SHIPPED TO ALL POINTS. 



Chicago Carnation Co., ff"' 



Geo. A. Sutherland, °<or.. 

WHOLESALE DEPOT FOR 

All Florists' Supplies, 



Price lists mailed. 



67 BROMFIELD ST. 
BOSTON, MASS. 



Wholesale Florists, 

Always on Hand: 

CARNATIONS, 

BRIDESMAIDS. 

BRIDES. 



}' 



/7 JOBBERS IN 

^FLORISTS' 

SUPPLIES 

FLORISTS' VASES. 

Horticultural Auctioneers. 
84 Hawley Street. BOSTON. 




Ro.es Tea"""""""".".'. .''"'■-• 1 -CO® l-^O 
Roses, lea.. 2.00® 4.00 

.. Reautv eUrk'.". 10.10® 1.5. 00 

„ .. ^•firsts!.: 6.00@10.00 

Carnations ; V. ; :;;■.; i .mI 1 '.50 

u,yoftbe^^e^:;-::: .^^^^,^^ 

Asparagus iiS.IOWlS.CO 

Sm.'l''^. .P0(" .75 

Adiantum ^^ ^ 

Sweet peas ""'=' 

-•■•T- =:."■: ':;::';K3 

culls I*'® 2.00 

•• Bride, Bridesmaid, Meteor. .60(a> S.OO 

,. uvtrn. o.UlM" Ti.\}^ 

■ ■ Kai^erin . 6.l'<<" 8.00 

■ katserin j ^^ 

Carnations..... o ,|i|.„ 4 00 

Lily of the valley 3;,,' 75 

Asters yg,,, iQ 

sweet peas g'.iooio'.oo 

^""1"^ 50.00 

.•\sparapus 20 

"Lndvt!rrt°GVpsophiia."eto.''.i6@.i5 per bunch 



1604. LUDLOW STREET. 
Phone 1-43 69-A PHILADELPHIA. 
Consignments Solicited. 



SHIPPING LIBELS f^' 

■ .Cut Flowers 




Printed in two colors on gummed 
paper; your card, etc., in black and 
fcaf adopted by the S. A. F- i" red. 
Very attractive. Price per 50U.8.;.oo: 
per 1000, J4.&0. Send for samples.. 



Fe 



Roses, Carnations, and all kinds of 
Seasonable Flowers In Stock. 

WM. F. KASTING, "^^1^. 

481 Washington St., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Also Dealer In Florists' Supplies & Wire Designs. 



LEO. NIESSEN, 

Wholesale Florist, 

N W. COR. I3TH AND FILBERT STREETS, 

^ofgi'oT/^iHD. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Co Mignments ol Choice Valley and Ro»et tolicited. 

Geo. M. Moss, 

WHOLESALE FLORIST, 

32 South 17th Street, PHILADELPHIA. P*. 

Long Distance Phone 1-41-26 D. 

Coniignmenti ol Roiei. Carnationt, Violett toliclHd. 

CHAS. B. STAHL 

Wholesale Florist, 

17 S. 11th St , Te lephone 63-6». PHIIADELPHIA. 

Orders by mall, telegraph or telephone will 

receive prompt attention. 

Consignments of good stock gollolted. 



EUaRO Of THIS lEAF, POSTPAID, $1.25. 

American Florist Co., 

^ CHICAQO. 



It is good business policy 
to mention the 



...AMERICAN flORIST 



whPD you wit** tn an ftdvflrtiger. 



C. A. KUEHN, 
Wholesale Florist, 

1122 PINE STREET. 

Mr LOUIS, MO. 

^-A complete line of Wire UcBJgns. 

H.G.BERNING 

Wholesale florist, 

SUCCESSOR TO 

5T. LOUIS CUT FLOWER CO.... 

1322 Pine St., ST. LOUIS, MO 



...GEO. M. KELLOGG... 

'■"<'"' i"„Tewe.i: Cut Flowers 

Give us an order and we will please you. 

Our Greenhouiet at PLEASANT HILL. MO. 
Our Store, 906 Grand Ave., KANSAS CIH. MO. 

^-LONS DISTANCB 'PHO ITE AT BITHER FLAOB 

JOHN B. FERGUSON, 

Wholesale Florist, 

5515 Fifth Ave, PITTSBURG, PA- 

Long Dibtancb 'Prone '3985. 

Consignments of Roses, Carnations and Violets. 
Solicited. 



The Cincinnati 
Cut Flower Co., 

..wainut^st.. WHOLESALE FLORISTS. 

Consignments Solicited. 
Special Attention Given to Shipping Orders. 



J. M. COHEN, Florist, 

22 Chapman Place, BOSTON, MASS. 



CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



11 



TOP GRADE 

Carnations 



BEAUTIES, 
BRIDES. 
BRIDESMAIDS, 
METEORS. 



lL,Wry o« tlie 'V alley. 



JOHN I. RAYNOR, 



49 West 28th Street, 

NEW YORK. 



TelephoDe No. 1998 Madison Square. 



YOUNG & NUGENT, 

Wholesale Commission riorlsts. 






JUNE SPECIALTIES. 

Telephone 2065 Madison Sqr. 42 WeSt 28tll St., NEW YORK CITY. 



THOMAS YOUKG, Jr. 

Wholesale Florist , 

Vew Telephone So. 1803 ICadison Square. 

43 West 28th St., NEW YORK. 

WILLIAM GHORMLEY, 

Wholesale Commission Florist, 

57 W. 281h. St , NEW YORK CITY. 

Special attention given 

to Sbipping Orders. lelephone 2200 Mddison Square. 

Consignments Solicited. 



JOHN YOUNG, 

ROSES, CARNATIONS, VALLEY 

and all other choice out flower stock. 
51 W. 28th Street, NEW YORK. 

New Telephone No. 1905 Madison Square. 
Price lUt on application. 

pliase mention the Americayi Florist -when writitig. 

THE RECOGNIZED HEADQUARTERS IN 
NEW YORK CITY FOR 

Violets % Carnations. 

OROWCRS and BUYERS make a note of this. It 
will be to your advantage. 

WM. H. GUNTHER, 

.... 30 West 29th Street. 

Raw Telepbone No. 551 Madlaon Square. 

Please Mention the American Florist. 

FRANK MILLANG. 

CUT FLOWERS, 

WHOLESALE COMMISSION, 

408 E. 34th Stra*t, 

Out Flowar Exchange. NEW YORK. 

Telephone 399 BladUon Square. 

N. Y. GUT FLOWER EXCHANGE 

404-412 E. 34th St. Near Ferry. 
Open for Cut Flower Salea at 6 o'clock 
Bverr Momluff 

DESIRABLE WALL SPACE TO RENT 
FOR ADVERTISING 

JOHN DONALDSON, Secretary. 

Plesae Mention The American Florist. 

MOORE, HENTZ & NASH, 

Wholesale Cnmmlssion Florists, 

119 and 121 W. 23d St.. 

NEW YORK CITY. 
Telephone 733— 18th. 
Choicest Stock tjhipped on a Commleslon. 



At rooms of N. Y. 
Cut Flower Co. 



Choice Caroations 



Choice Roses .^Jt 



Traendly & Scheock 

NEW YORK CITY 

New Telephone No. 270 Madison Sq. 

38 W. 28th Street Cut Flower Exchange 

Wbol^ale power/\arK^ 



New York, Aug. 1. 

Eosfs, Beauty, select 15. 00(" 20.00 

medium 4.00m' 6. "0 

culls SOffji 2 CO 

Bridesmaid, Bride, Meteor .ZU'i 1.00 
select. 3 CO(a! 4.00 

Carnations 50('( 1.50 

Lily or the valley S.OOt" 2.50 

Sweet peas per 100 bunches 1.00^13. 50 

Harrisii 4 00® 6.00 

Cattleyas 20. 00 .. 33 .00 

Gladioli l.OOiai 1 50 

Asters ZUq' .75 

Smila.\ 8,00(" 12.00 

Asparagus 25. OOc 35.00 

Spreogerii. perdoz. bun. .76(1*1.00 

Adiuntum 26%- .50 

Buffalo, Aug. 2. 

Roses, Beauty 10.00w20 00 

Bride, Bridesmaid, Meteor 3.00m 7.00 

Kuiserin 6.00 

Caroiitions LOOM 1.50 

Lily of the valley 3.00@ 4.00 

Sweet peas per doz. bunches .30C«' .75 

A uratum lilies 10.00m12.50 

Roseum " 4. COM 6.00 

G'adioli 2. COM 4.00 

Asiers 1.00® 2.00 

Smilax 15. COfo 20.00 

Adiaiitum LOOM 1.25 

Hardv Terns, Galas leaves 20'" .25 

.\sparagus 50.00(975.10 

MILLANG & CO. 

Commission Florists 

48 West 29th Step NEW YORK. 

New Telephone No. 1304 Madtson Square. 
Capable, experienced. Consignments solicited. 



The New York GUT Flower Go. 

119 and 121 West 23d Street, 

112 and 114 West 24th Street, 

Taiaphons733-l8th. NEW YORK. 

CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. 

Spscial Attention Given to Shipping Ordert 

WALTER F. SHERIDAN, 

^9^orMa'^ir^r Wholesale Florist. 

39 W. 28th St., NEW YORK. 



ROSES SHIPPED 

to all polute. 



Price List on 
Application 



Ford Bros... 

oeae Wholesale Florists 

111 West 30th Street NEW YORK. 

Conwgnments Solicited. Phone, 157 Madison Sq. 

Julius Lang 

S3 West aoth Street. NEW YORK. 

ROSES. CARNATIONS. VALLEY. 

CHOICE SUMMER STOCK. 

Tblephonk 280 Madison SqtiARE. 

There Are Buyers 

For all kinds of good stock 
advertised in 

THE AMERICAN FLORIST 



J.K.ALLEN'S 



POPULAR WHOI»ESALE 
CUT FLOWER HOUSE 



At the new address, 106 West 28th St., New York City, draws the crowd. Consignments carefully handled 
and well sold. Excellent facilities. J- ,^ J- J- Telephone 197 MadUon Square. 



EDW. C. HORAN. 

4.7 WEST 28th ST., 
Madison Square, .....NEW YORK. 

CUT F LOWERft AT W HOLESALE. 



12 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 4^ 



The gEBD TRat>E. 



AMERICAN SEED TRADE ASSOCIATION. 

AlBERT MCCULLOUGH. PreS.; V. W. BOLGIANO, 

Vlce-PreB.: 8. 1'. Willard, Wetherafleia. Conn, 
Beo'y and Treas. 

J. E. NoRTHRUP, of Minneapolis, has 
gone to the Pacific coast with his son 
and daughter. 

Chinese riot complications have 
advanced price of tea and may affect hor- 
ticultural exportations. 

Adam Currie, of Currie Bros., Mil- 
waukee, and Mrs. Currie have been at 
The Dells of Wisconsin. 

The directors of the Wholesale Seed 
Merchants' League will meetatthe Astor 
House, New York, August 8. 

The Springfield Seed Co , Springfield, 
Mo., has been incorporated with 
increased capital for the purpose of 
extending their business. 

OUB obituary column this week con- 
tains notice of the death of Charles H B. 
Breck, of the firm of Joseph Breck& Sons, 
of Boston, Mass., and a portrait appears 
on page 2. 

The pea louse is reported making 
havoc in the Manitowoc pea district. 
Newspaper reports say 1,000 pea pickers 
left the fields because the vermin swarm 
in their faces. 

Erfurt.— The prospects for tlower 
seed crops were very poor up to the mid- 
dle of July on account of the continual 
w^et and cold weather, inducing a growth 
of weeds which choked the plants. The 
weather then changed for the better and 
in consequence the appearance of the 
crops improved. 



Lynn and Thereabouts. 

General repairs teem to be the order of 
the day and there is a little building in 
progress. Smith & Dolanski,a newfirra, 
Mr. Dolanski having been with Blaney 
at Swampscott, are putting up a carna- 
tion houselSxlOO; at Maiden, Kaulbach 
& Son are building two houses 20x100 
and at Saugus A Rhodes is adding a 
house 20x75. 

J. M. Ward & Co., at Peabody, are 
doing a nice business. Mr. Ward has a 
happy faculty of having the right stock 
at the right moment; in other words is 
"Johnnie on the spot." He is only one 
of the florists in this neighborhood upon 
whom it is a pleasure to call. 

There is some talk of the convention 
but I hardly think the attendance will be 
very large from this .section. Among 
those who will go are H T. Conant, of 
Salem, and William and James Miller, of 
Lynn. 

At Salem Wm. Wake has everything in 
apple-pie order at his new range of glass 
built last year and Mrs. J. M. julyn is as 
busy as ever 

A recent copious rain has put outdoor 
stock in very fair condition. 

S. M. Gould, of Lynn, is in Nova Scotia 
for his health. Tap. 



Menominee, Mich.— L. Zechetto has 
received another importation of palms 
and ferns. 

Richfield Springs, N. V. — The Misses 
Bolton have opened their flower store in 
the Arcade. 

Mblrose Highlands, Mass.— J. Walsh 
& Son are adding another house 35x90, 
making ten in their range. 



JOHNSON & STOKES' GIANT KINGLY PANSIES. 

We have searched the world to t:el this slriiin \\\\ to its present standard o^ perfection, :ind it is now 
pronounced by our custoineri as unrivalled in si/.e, sul:>stance of Ilower and richness of color. 
Trade pkt., 60c; i-i-oz., «1.25; oz., $-.W. FRESH SMILAX »£»■ D —Per oz., 25u; per pound, »2.50. 

ALLEGHENY DOUBLE FRINGED HOLLYHOCK.— Our Floracroft Strain. Trade pkt., 25c- 'j oz. pkt., 
."iOc; per oz., 81.51). CINERIBI*.— James' Giant Strain, per pkt., 25c; !• trade pkt. 60c; tr. pkt., $1. 

CALCEOLARIA.— .Tames' Giant strain, per pkt., 25c; trade pkt.. 60c. 

We are ready to book orders for White Romans, Freesias, Callas, Paper White Narcissus, etc. 

JOHNSON & STOKES, Seedsmen, 217 and 219 Market St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



■ « ig: 



FRESH FERN SPORES.^ 



WE ARE HEADQUARTERS— Extra lartre package of fresh Spores. suHicieut for 3000 plants, 
with full cultural directions, postpaid for JI.OO. 

EMERSON C. McFADDEN, U. S. Exotic Nurseries, SHORT HILLS, N. J. 




CALIFORNIA 

Calla Bulbs 

Through our F.xchange 
Sales with best Pacific 
Coast growers of these 
roots we are able to 
deliver choice, care- 
fully cured and evenly 
graded roots at closest 
growing prices. 

FIRST SIZE. I'j to \V,-\\\. 

diam., doz. 76o; 10015.00. 
SELECT mtol 14-in.dnim., 

doz. $1.25; 100»7.00. 
EXTRA SELECT. 2to2M-in. 

dianl., doz. $1.50; 10ii$9.00. 



EARLY DELIVERY means much. Gettins; 
bulbs when you want them is e\erythins. 



these 
Late 



surpluses -It hair pric 



' not b,.rL'ains. 



VAUGHAN'S SEED STORE. 

NEW VO^K: CHICAGO: 

14 Barclay St. 84-86 RandoiDh St. 

Flea^e mention the Amryirn*' P'n.tst when wfttmg. 

Chrysanthemums. 

Now IMhe time to plant them WeolTer extra 
tl"e. vl,iorou8 planlB from 2 and 2^i-ln. P'»t8. 
Kverybody ilhee them They are bo sironKand 
htiHllny that they purprlee all of our new cus- 
tomers; «.»iir old customerB. of oourse, always 
know what to expect, but even they occaslon- 
all> tell us that <mr stock la Kettlng better all 
the time. Following la a partial list: 



EARLY. Per 100 

Ivorv J3.C0 

M. Henderson .... 3.00 

Geo. S. Kalb 3.00 

Merrv Monarch... .3.00 

Willowbrook 4.00 

M. de Montmort... 3.00 
Mrs. J Whilldin.. 3.00 

John K. Shaw 5.00 

Goldeu Trophy.... 3 00 
Glory ot the Pacillo 3.00 



MIOSEASON. Per 100 

Major ltonnafron..$3.00 

Wm. Simpson 3.II0 

V. Morel 3.00 

G. W. Childs 4.00 

11. W. Longfellow 3.U0 
Mrs. Murdock .... 3.00 
Mrs. T. L. Park... fi.OO 

Black Hawk 4.(J0 

Mrs. C. H. Pierce. 3.00 
Mrs. II. Robinson. 3.00 

Niveus 3.00 

LATE. Per 100 

Xapova Ct-OO 

.Xeno' ti.OO 

Adula 3.00 

Harry Balsley .... 3.00 
Mrs. Baer 8 00 



LATE. Per 100 

Mrs. ,J. Jones W 00 

Liberty 4.00 

Merry Xmas 4 00 

Autumn Glorv — 3.00 

E. Dailledouz'e.... 4.00 

Golden WeddiUL'.. 4.00 

In addition to the above we have a larKe list of new and 

other leading standard sorts. Hend tur complete list. 

H. WEBER & SONS, Oakland, Hd. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

IPAEONIASI 



♦ 
♦ 



Our Specialty. 



^ We sirow the'U on a m'-st extensive scale ^ 

^ and in great variety. At the Paris E.\po- ^ 

^ sitioM this year \v wer'- awarded ^ 

J First Prizi> for General Collection, J 

X First Prize lor Novelties. T 



I A. DESSERT, i*!? !'^"' "^ 



♦ 

CHENONCE*UX, FRANCE. « 

♦ (lATALOOI-ES AND PltKKH ClURKNT VUV.K ♦ 

♦ <'N Al'l'I.IeATlON. ♦ 

♦ ♦ 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦»♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Please mention the Avict tcan h'lornf when tvriting. 



ESTABLISHED 1802 




S 



SEEDS 

We have still left some fresh seeds of 
the following Palms in line condition; 

KENTIA FORSTERIANA. per 1(00, $4 CO; 5000 to 
10 000 at $3 50; 10,000 and over at 13.00. 

Also CYCAS REV0LUT4 STEMS in assorted 
sizes. 3 lbs. to 12 lbs., at $8.00 per 100 lbs., 
while unsold. 

J.M.THORBURN&CO. 

(late of IS John Street) 

36 CORTLANDT STREET. NEW YORK 



Die Bindekunst 



Einzige Special Zeitschrift der 

Welt fur BLUMENBINDEREI. 

Probenummern umsonst. 
Abonnement 10 M. jahrlich. 

J. OLBERTZ, Bindekunst Verlag, 

ERFURT. DEUTSCHLAND. 

NOTICE. 

*\Ve are now ready to give you LOWEST 
eslim.-ites for FIRST-eliiss stock nf 

Freesias, Harrisii. Callas Romans Paper White Nar- 
cissus. Hyacinths, Tulips. Van Sions, Japan 
Longiflorum, Azaleas, Etc. 

Send us list uud we will give fltivires. Address 
H. H. BERGER & CO., (Kst 78) 47 Barclay St . N.Y. 

Please mcnlion the Amencati Fiorist when wntinp 

FRUir AND FLOWER PLATES 

Seed Packeti and Supplies ol all kinds for 
NURSERYMEN, FLORISTS and SEEDSMEN 

SKITID B'OR. E>R,ICE LIST. 

Stock Cuts. 100. per square Inoh. mn^ravlnK by all 
processes PrtntluK and LlthographlnK. Illustrated 
CalalOKues a specialty. 

VREDENBUR6 & CO., Rochester, N. Y. 

GARDENING 

This 1b the paper to recommend to your 
customers, the leading bortioultural 

Journal in America for amateurs 

•2.00 Per Year. Sample Copies Free. 

Liberal terms to florists who take sabsorlptlons. 

THE GARDENING CO. M°"°n Bid,. CHICAGO. 



rgoo. 



The American Florist. 



13 



miiiiiiiiiHimiiii 



New York 
Convention 
...Number 



^ Us 

^ T 



-t^^jj^y-^-^L^ys- 



AUGUST 18, 1900. 



Ji> 



The Special Issues of the AMERICAN FLORIST liave 
become famous as mucli for their technical, artistic and liter- 
ary excellence as for their business bringing powers. In no 
one of these essentials will the New York Convention Num- 
^ ber, representative as it will be of the spirit whicb will make 
% this the greatest Convention in the history of the S. A. F., fall 
^ one jot below its predecessors. 

Copies of this number will be mailed tbrougbout tlie United 
States and Canada to every person in the trade whose busi- 
ness is worthy of consideration, also to leading foreign houses. 

Advertisements in body pages will be taken at our ordinary 
rates, namely $i.oo per inch, $30.00 per page of thirty 
inches, with the usual discount on time contracts. 

Advertisements on second, third and fourth Special Cover 
Pages (printed on heavy toned paper), $30.00 per page, net. 



.» ... * 
^ QC10 ^ 

tiflj T tifij 



American Florist Company, 

324 Dearborn St., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 

t^^ t^^ t^^ 

H^In order that you may be given the best possible position and display 

PLEASE MAIL YOUR ADVERTISEMENT NOW. 



'mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm^mmmmmmmm^ 



14 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 4, 



Thes Nursery Tmi^e. 



AM. ASSOCIATION OF NURSERYMEN. 

Theo J. Smith, Pres.; N. W. Halk, VIce-PreB. 
SIOBGI C. 8IA0KB. Bochester. N. Y., Secy. 



There was a shortage of field grown 
roses in the south this year as a result of 
the severe freeze in February. 

S. H. Linton states that there will be 
more trees planted in the north half of 
Missouri this fall than in any previous 
season. 

The European horsechestnut,.Ksculus 
Hippocastanum, and its variety, alba 
flore pleno, are rapidly gaining in popu- 
larity as lawn and street trees. 

The p. J. Berckmans, Co., of Augusta, 
Ga., reports that a law has recently been 
passed prohibiting the importation of 
nursery stock into Cape Colony from the 
United States. This step they under- 
stand to have resulted from the agita- 
tion of South African nurserymen, whose 
trade was suflering because of the com- 
petition of American firms, one of the 
principal shippers to South Africa being 
the Berckmans Company. 

H. C. Ibish, of the Missouri Botanical 
Garden, St. Louis, has undertaken a 
study of the peach, with the view of 
compiling a catalogue with full descrip- 
tions of all the varieties grown in .Amer- 
ica. To this end he requests growers to 
send him three or four ripe specimens of 
each variety, together with a twig, a few 
leaves and a concise history and descrip- 
tion of the tree and a statement of the 
success or failure of the variety for the 
past few years. 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 

The Kalamazoo Nursery and Floral 
Company, recently incorporated, is 
starting in to grow everything in the 
horticultural line except fruit and shade 
trees. The capital stock is $10,000, paid 
in, and the stockholders are Chas. A, 
Maxson, C. A. Krill, Judge J. M. Davis, 
E. J. Phelps and W. C. Cook. Each gen- 
tleman except Mr. Phelps, who is presi- 
dent of the Kalamazoo National Bank, 
is provided with an ofiice in the new 
organization, Mr. Cook being the man- 
ager. For the past six months he has 
been foreman for Irvine & Sons at Bay 
City, before that being manager for the 
Dunkley Floral Company here. The 
company has secured twenty-eight acres 
of land on North West street, just inside 
the city limits, and has contracted for 
four greenhouses 10x100 for miscellane- 
ous stock. It is the intention to shortly 
erect a range for cut flowers. 

The Central Michigan Nursery Com- 
pany held its semi-annual stockholders' 
meeting July 13 and its reports showed 
a successful season. The officers elected 
were J. N. Stearns, president; E. D. Fos- 
ter, vice-president; C. A. Maxson, gen- 
eral manager; C A. Krill, stcretary, and 
W. B. North and Orla Richardson, direc- 
tors. 

Lapeer, Mich — W. II. Watson is this 
season adding to his range between 
;JO,00() and 40,000 feet of glass, doubling 
his facilities and making his establish- 
ment one of the largest in eastern Michi- 
gan. 

loi.A, Ka.ns —Mrs. George Waite, from 
Emporia, is going into business here, 
building two houses 20x60. A L. Har- 
man is adding two houses 20x8.t and 
one 20x70, with boiler pit and reception 
room. 




Choicest Fruit and Ornamental Trees. 

Shrubs, Plants, Bulbs, Seeds. 40 Acres Hardy Roses. 44 Greenhouses 



of Palms, Everbloominjc Roses, Ficus, Ferns, Etc. 
solicited. Catalogue Free. 47 Years. 1000 Acres. 



Correspondence 



THE STORRS & HARRISON CO., Painesville, O. 



Send lor our Price List We have a flue stock, 
for fall delivery, of 



Clematis, f,j;'„gf- 

fine 
assortment. 



Field Grown Roses, 
Flowering Shrubs, 
Ornamental Trees, Conifers. 

To avoid disappointment, order now a supply of 

ROSE-STOCKS FOR GRAFTING. 

(Prices delivered in this country). Rosa Manetti. 
$12 per 1000. Rosa Polyanlha, «8 per 1000. Kosa 
Laxa (Froebeli). $8.50 per ItOO. The stocks most 
largely used by European growers for graftins 
tea roses. 

Our representiitive, Mr. J. Austin Shaw, will be 
at the Convention and will be pleased to quote 
prices upon anv wants in our line. 

JACKSON & PERKINS CO., llZ'^Toru. 





A LL the best sorts, 
tender and hardy. 




FIELD 


OROWN, 


Our solicitor will 




visit you and make 


OWN 


prices, regardless of 


ROOT 


wherd you live or 




quantity you want, if 


nnoco 


you will drop us a 


KUoto 


card at once. 


llwVkV 


Tlie Howland Nursery Co. 




1 OS Aiicpres. ('h1. 





7ena,oTHEM00N 

Company 

For f Trees, Shrubs, Vines, 
Your I and Small Fruits. 

Deacrlptlve IllUHtniteil Catalogue Free. 

THE WM. H. MOON CO., 
- Morrisville, Pa. 

Large Elms, 

O e tine siieciinen Elm trees to 9-inch 
^9 caliper, 25 to 40 feel high, with well 
developed heads. Have been several times 
transplaiited and will lift with excellent 
roots and balls of earth, Send for price list. 

SAMUEL C. MOON, """"K^d..). PA 

Please mention the American Florii,i 7vhen ivriling. 

Orchids! ^ 

Arrived frc-sh from th^ woods in fine condition: 
Laeiiu anceps, i . autumnal s. L. Crispa. I . fUva, 
L grandis tenebrosa, L Ptrrinii.Oncidium Vari- 
co»um Rosersii, Cattleya Percivaliidna and C. 
Mossiae. 

LAGEK & HURRELL, •*"*•""• ^ ' 



Orchid Growers and Importers. 

PUasc mention the AnU) lean FioyiU when wntiun. 

POSTON FERN," and 8-in. piins Jliand $15 per do/.. 
GERANIUMS. S,,A. Null ami others, 3-ili.,$4 per 100. 
NEP. COROATA COMPACTA, 3 in .l.'i.OO per 100; 6. 

in., .W).C0 per 100. 
ASPARAUUS PLUMOSUS. i!/,-in., »t per 100, $40 

per 1000. ASPARAGUS SPRENGERII, ■i.Vi-\XK.\\, 

$4.00 per 100; fliO 00 per ICOu. 
SMIlAX. ininsplant.ed, heavy, 60c per 100. 



Cash Plka8K. 



Carl Hagenbu'rger, 



V9. Mentor 



That Can't Be Had Klsewltere. 

Such as New Kalanchoe Fiammes. New incarvllleaB, 
New Campanula MlrablllB, New Buddielae. New Deut- 
zlaB, Mr t'eter Barr b New White i.upln, Tho Grand 
New Salvia Glory of SiuttRart. The Edelweiss In 
bloom, N«w KuelllaB. Now ulblacus, New BeKOnlaB 
New OannaB. 'iUO New I).ihllaa, New TreaBuro Vine, 
New Shamrock Pea Send (ore ataluKueof Novelties 
Always In guanilty — AspurnKiiB 8prenKerl, Bustun 
Fern. Baby Pilinrose, EdeiwdiBs, Fern Balls, al low- 
est prices 

A. BX.ANC & CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pleai,e mention the A metiran Florist lohen 2vt iting 



BUY NOW 

PROPAOATINO STOCK for Next Year. 

In. pots Uoz. 100 
New Hibiscus. Peachblow, double 

pink flowers 2^4 »1.0O J8.0O 

New Aueratum, Stella Gurney, 

dwarfblue 2<A .75 5. GO 

New Salvia, St. Louis, extra large 

flower spikes 2ii So 5.00 

New Silver- Leaved Geranium, 

Wm. LangKUth, dbl. red flower, 2H 1 50 10. DO 

AcalyphaSanden eheuilleplantlS 1.00 6.00 

New Rose. Evertireen Gem. strong, 3 1.00 8.00 

New Rambler Rose, Helene 2;4 1-00 8 00 

BOSTON FERNS, We have the largest 
and finest stock in the West. .\ll well-grown, 
bushy plants in all sizes. Write for prices. 

Vaughan's Seed Store, 



CHICAGO, 

84-86 Randolph St. 



NEW YORK, 

■ 4 Barclay St. 



JOSEPH HEACOCK, 

WYNCOTE. PA. 

GROWER ARECA LITESCENS, 
«f KEMIA BELMOREANA, 



_PnOENIX RIIPICOLA. 



DRACAENA INDIVISA and VINCA VARIFGATA 

Per 100 

4-in. pot Draca?nas (fine stocky plants) 110. OO 

2^ " Vinca Variegata Vines 2.50 

Plants " " " from flats.. 1.50 

2V4-inch Coleus, Crimson Versohatfeltii. Golden 

Queen and mixed colors, $2.00 per 100. 

Cash With Order or C. O. U. 
WM. A. CLARK & SON. 59 State St., Watertown. N. Y 



IN BEST 
..VARIETIES 



SPECIALTIES 

ROSES, from 3-lnota pota. 

CARNATIONS, toi all dellverT. 
CHRVSANTHEMUMS. 
SMILAX. 

Prioeilow. Send for list. VIOLETS. 

WOOD BROTHERS. FISHKILI-. A/, Y. 

Edward B. Jackson, 

WHOLESALE FLORIST. 

Hardy Herbaceous Plants Only. 

In any quantity, for the least money 

STAMFORD. - CONN. 

Asparagus Plumosus 

Fine S-in. Stock. $5.00 per hundred 



CASH 
WITH 
ORDER 

Fine 3-in. Stock. $2.50 per hundred. PLEASE. 



==Smilax== 



VAN WERT OREENHOISES, 



.VAN WEKT, t.lIIO. 



Imperial Violets, 

Longest stem"*, largest flowers, darkest in color 
Ai stock, Bne large plants, J6.00 per 100, $l5.U. per 
1000. 

M. LOUISE, LADY CAMPBELL, 

|-3,50 per ICO, or «0,00 per lOOO. 

Cash With Oiideu, Please. 

VAN AKEN BROS., Coldwaler, Mich. 

A good adv, in a good paper will bring 
good retami. 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



15 



DREER'S SPECIAL OFFER OF PALMS. 



The sizes enumerated b"low are of special 
good value, in fine condition and certain to 
give entire satisfaction. 




KENTIA FORSTERIANA. 



Inch 
pois. 


No. of 
Leaves. 


Height. 


Per doz. 


Per 100 


Per 1000 


2« 


3 


8-in. 


tl.50 


$12.00 


$100 00 


8 


3 to 4 


12 •• 


2.50 


20.00 


180.00 


4 


4 to 5 


IS " 


4..^) 


35. CO 




i) 


5 


15 to 18 " 


6 00 
Each. 


50.(0 
Dozen. 




6 


5 


24 to 28 " 


$1.00 


.$12.00 




fi 


5 to 6 


30 " 


1.25 


15.00 




6 


6 


28 to 32 " 


1.60 


18.00 




(i 


6 to 7 


30 to 36 " 


2.0O 


24.00 




7 


6 


36 to 42 " 


2.50 


30.00 





Kentia Belmoreana. 
ARECA LUTE8CENS. 

A fine, clean, thrifty lot of this populur graceful variety. 

Lioz. I'OO 

2X-in. pots, 1 plant in a pot, 6 to 8-in. high, $ 1.00 t 6.0O 

3 " 2 ' 10 to 12 " 1 2.1 10 00 

4 " 3 12 to 15 '■ 3 00 25.00 

6 " 3 " " " 24 ■• 12.00 100.00 



Inch 
pots. 

2M 

3 

4 

5 

6 
6 
6 



No of 
Leaves. 

3 to 4 

4 to 5 

5 to 6 

5 to 6 

6 

6 to 7 
6 to 7 



KENTIA BELMOREANA. 



Height. 

8-ii 

10 to 12 • 

IS • 

18 • 

24 • 
26 to 28 • 
28 to 30 ■ 



Per doz. Per 100 Per 1000 



I. $1.50 

3. GO 
4.50 
light 7.50 
Each. 
$1.25 
1.50 
2.00 



$12.00 
26.00 
35.00 
60.00 

Dozen. 

$15.00 
18 00 
24.00 



$100.00 
200.00 



^ ^. ,,COrOS WEDDELIANA. 

Indispensable in filling Pern Dishes, Jardinieres, or for 
decorative purposes where a speciallv graceful plant is 
required. Per doz.. Per 100 

2!'i-in. pots. 4 to .=i-inches high,$l .26 $10.00 
3 " 8 to 10 •■ 2.011 15.00 

.5- inch pots, 4 plants in pot, 18-inches high, 75o each; 
$9.00 per dozen. 

COCUS PLUMOSUR. 

2;4-inch pols $1.00 per doz., % 8.00 per 100. 

3 '• 1.25 " 10.00 

, . ^ , ARECA BAUERI. 

S-inch pots, 2 plants in :i pot, 18-inches high, 75o each; 
$7.5J per dozen. 

CALAMUS INTERMEDIUS- 
A pretty deconitive species with darK green foliage, 
the stems of which are clothed with long dark spines. 
5 incli pots, 15 inches high. $1.00 each. 

CARiOTA URENS. (Fish Tall Palm) 
2>i-inch pots $1.00 per doz., $ 8.00 per IfO 

3 " " 1.25 ■' 10. CO 

4 " " 2.60 " 20.00 

_ . ^ CARVOTA «OBOLirERA. 

2)i-inc.h pols. $1.00 per dozen. $8.00 per 100; 3-inch 
pots, $1.25 per dozen. $10.U0 per ICO. 

LATANIA BORBONICA. 



Inch 
pols. 

2« 

3 

4 



No. of 

Leaves. 

3 

4 to 5 

4 to 5 



H.ight. 



Per doz. Per 100 Per 1000 



$ .60 $ 5.00 $40. fO 
1.00 8.01) 75.00 

12tol5-in. 2.50 20.00 

. , LIVISTONA ROTUNDIFOLIA. 

2-inoh pots $1.25 per dozen; $ 8,00 per 100 

3 •■ ■• 2. CO " 15. CO 

PHCENIX RUPICOLA. 
This variety is always scarce; we offer a limited lot of 
finely developed plants. 

2-iiich pots $1 no per dozen; $ 8.00 per lOO 

3 " 1.25 •• 10.00 

4 •• 3 50 " 25.00 

Finely characterized Hpecitnens as below; 

6-mch pots, ISiucheshigh $1 SOeacli. 

8 •■ 24 to 26 ■• ■■ 2.50 ■' 

9 " 3J ■• '■ 3.50 " 

PHCENIX RECLINATA. 
3- inch pots $ .75 per dozen; % 6 ro per 100 

3 ■• I. no • 8.00 

4 •• 3 OJ •■ 25 00 



Large 

Decorative Plants 

of Kentias. 



We have a lar^e stock of 
li^lmorenna and Forsttri- 
ana in both sinide and 
mad"' up Plants, the most 
of them growin? in lipht 
wooden tubs 12, 15 ;ind 18 
inches in diameter, which 
can be supplied in excel- 
lent value at $7.50, 810 00, 
$12.50, llS.fiO, $20.00.135.00, 
$30.00, J35.0J and 150.00 
each. 

The smaller sizes from 
$7.50 to $20.00 are some- 
what damaged in the foli- 
age but for decorative pur- 
poses they are the best 
value we ever offered. 



For a complete list of 
Palms, Ferns and other 
Seasonable Stock, see 
our current Wholesale 
Catalogue. 



HENRY A. DREER, 



Chestnut Street, 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



For 

Immediate 

Shipment. 



AAA Stock 

CYCLAMEN PERSICUM SPLENDENS GIGANTEUM- 

Finest strain in the world. Now ready to 
ship; a splendid stock of plants in four true 
colors, red. white, pink, and white with car- 
mine eye, from 2^-inch pots, $5. CO per iQj; 
$40.00 per 1000: from 3-inoh poi5, $7.C0 per 
100, $65 00 per 1000. 250 at the 1000 rate. 

SPECIAL OTFER. CINERARIA HY8RI0A MAXIMA 
GRANDIFLORA and Maxima Granniflora Nana. 

strain superb in every way, iran^uhinied from 
fiats, strong plants, $1.50 per 100: $12.50 per 
1000. 250 at the 1000 rate. 
CHINESE PRIMROSE^, (ready Aug. ISI.h) in the 
finest market varieties, including ti.ue, double 
white and red, from 2^-4- iu. pots, $i..SO per 100. 

ALL STOCK GUARANTEED A No. I. 

PAUL MADER, East StroudsbJig, Pa. 



Geranium 
America... 



The QUEEN of 
all Geraiiiijiiis 

Corr*.' :ind see. 
3000 plants in full 
hl"i jm. Good, 
strougst'jck plants 
Irom 4-inch pots, 

$2.50 per doz. $20.00 ner IQO. 
HENRY CICnnOLZ. florist. Waynesboro, Pa. 



VIOLETS 



From pots, Al stock, free 
Irom disease; Lady Camp- 
bell, M. Louise aud Karquhar, »2.f)0 per Il.O. $20 
per 1000. Kew Imperial, t3 per KO, (25 per 1000. 
ROSES, tine plants of Me eor and I'erle. from 3-in. 
pots, at $4 per 100; alio 3-in. lind s and Jlaids 
same price. 

3O0 bushy SMILAX PLANTS at H.50 per 100. 

CRABB & HUNTER, Grand Rapids, Mich. 



PRIMROSES. 

IMPROVED CHINESE, ready for 3-inch pots. Well known throughout the United States and 
Canada as the tlnest laree llowe-ing Irinsed va-ieties grown. SINGLES, named, .$'2.00 per 100, $17.00 
per 1000; DOUBLE, named. $3 50 per 100. E.xtras aoded liberally to heip pay expressage. PRIM- 
ROSE SEcL/ of Ijest 15 varietes, single and double, nii.ved, 500 seeds, $1.00; halt pkt.,50c. 

GIANT PANSY SEED 

The very best mammoth varieties, no liner ever offered; all the seed plants critically selected. SOW 
TH« BEST. Packet, 3nu0 seeds, %\M: halt-pKt. 50c. A packet of the grand new Dwarf Forget- 
Me-Not "Blue Beauty" added to eV'-ry seed order. Strictly cash prices. 



THE HUME OF 
PBIMKOSBS. 



JOHN F. RUPP, Shiremanstown, Pa. 



C3i-4ir^] 



50,000 finest large flowering fringed 1000, $18.00; Per 100, $2.00 

Obconica grand., fimbriata. rosea and Forbesi " 2.00 

Acnaraniic ' Sorengerii $3.00 per lOU Pansy Seed, large flowering, 

Asparagus ^ pi„nj.„„5 4 qq ., = ^^^^^^ $4 fj^ 

Cinerarias, August 20 $2.00 per 100. 



CASH PLEASE. 



JOS. H. Cl^NINGHAM, Delaware, 0. 

THE AMERICAN FLORIST'S 



COLOR CHART 

li now aooepted b« ibe standard In preparing ooio 

detorfptlons, by many forel§7i honses ai 

well as In America. 

PRICE 15 CENTS POSTPAID. 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO.. 322 Deirborn St. Chicago 



Cinerarias. 



Superb s'rain, large 
plants in Mats, reaay 
lor 2-ln. pots, JI.50 per 
100. Cyclamen, 3-iu , rt'ady lor4-in , $4.0u per 100. 
roleus newest fancy colors, large plants from 
lUts, $100 per lOiJ. rieliotrop**. deld grown, toe 
best dark blue. larye p ants lull of cutiiogs. $1.25 
per dozdn, 8IU 00 per K"'. 
Sain*l Whitton, 11-17 Cray Av., Utica, N. Y. 

[Hease mention the American Floftst when lurittng. 



16 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 4^ 



Our PasTiMBs 



Announcements of coming contests or other 
events of interest to our bowling, shooting and 
oyoling readers are solicited ana will be given 
place in this column. 

Address all correspondence for this department 
to Wm. J. Stewart, 67 Bromfleld St., Boston, Mass. ; 
Eobt. Kin, 1725 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa.; 
or to the American Florist Co., 324 Dearborn St., 
Ohioago, 111. 



At St. Louis. 

The practice roll at the meeting July 
30 is recorded as follows: 

Plaver Ist 2d 3d 4t,h Av 

KuehnT 16V 149 170 155 160 

Weber 163 J44 91 Vi\ 

Young 136 16t 97 131 

Benelie Ii4 118 152 119 136 

Shaw 96 115 149 133 la3 

M. 



At New York. 

Attendance at the alleys on July 30 
was very light, most of the accustomed 
bowlers being away, getting in trim for 
the coming S. A. F. contest. Scores were 
recorded as follows: 

Player 1st 2d 3d 4th 5th 

Steffens 110 126 183 Hi 137 

Siebenheller 104 )37 133 158 168 

Traendly 132 218 133 

Manda 160 115 158 161 178 

Roehrs 158 137 118 147 219 



At Detroit. 

The following is the record made on the 
alleys July 30; 

Player 1st ad 3d 4th Av 

Scribner 198 198 

Panlke 157 16S 171 171 167 

Breitmever I'l 169 152 138 155 

Holznagle 171 135 133 157 149 

Floweroay 134 180 140 148 

Beard 145 154 167 107 141 

Davis 165 122 145 123 139 

Dunn 113 148 142 131 133 

Pickworth 140 162 151 VM 126 

Watson 113 113 i:ii 136 121 

Sullivao 113 129 K9 116 117 

Tavlor 99 I'JO 97 136 113 

Brown 102 113 liO 126 li" 

Flammcr 98 WK 

J. F. «■ 

At Chicago. 

The following is the score made Friday 

evening, July 27, by contestants for 
places on the convention team: 

Player 1st 2d 3d Av 

Fred StollfTV 134 322 15< 171 

John l)c-gnan 158 171 176 168 

P. .1. Hauswirth 195 146 1.5H 160 

E. F. WiDterson 1.58 133 144 145 

.T.S.Wilson 126 156 i:« 140 

Walter Kri.tling 127 133 1.58 137 

Chiis. liallutT 114 128 120 12l 

The team now stands: Asmus, Win- 
terson, Degan, Hauswirth, George Stol- 
lery and either Fred. Stollery or Chas. 
Balluft' 

At the last meeting those who "also 
bowled" were: 

Player 1st 2d 31 

Savage i;6 163 167 

M. Bloy IIW 143 130 

Schweigert 1.35 111 

Wilson Tiplady 121 85 

John Ki-iirdon 92 107 

A. Lange 98 94 

Harry Bals ey 112 



Providence. 

DROUGHT ENDANGBBS OUTDOOR STOCK. — 
MEETING OF THE CLUB — PARTY OF 
TWENTY FOR CONVENTION. — AN OUTING. 

The long continued absence of rain has 
caused much uneasiness among the grow- 
ers of field stock. Red spider on carna- 
tions in the field is not a desirable object. 
Asters have suffered very much, except on 
low or heavy soil. The excessive hot 
spell has made a scarcity in good roses 
as well as other stock for funeral flow- 



ers. Reports about town are that busi- 
ness is very quiet. 

At the recent meeting of the Florists' 
and Gardeners' Club of Rhode Island, a 
committee was chosen to secure state- 
rooms for the members of the club who 
will go to the convention. About twenty 
have already signified their intention of 
attending. President Hockey read a 
verv interesting essay on fern spores. 

By invitation of President Hockey the 
members of the club, their families and 
friends indulged in a basket picnic on the 
spacious grounds about his place. It 
was an ideal place for an outing. Games 
and music were provided as well as all 
kinds of refreshments. The fronts of the 
greenhouses were very prettily decorated 
with fancy lanterns of very unique design. 
Little Rhody. 



Minneapolis, Minn.— John Monson is 
preparing to invest $4,000 in a new 
ratine of houses, five 16x150 and one 
30x50. He will also build a two-story 
office, packing room and boiler house. 



FOR SALE 



Large Palms 

jn iLxrelient 
Condition. 

As they are too large for our conserva- 
tory, w'e ofTiT them at a very low price. 

One Areca LuteSCenS, height 17 feet, speci- 
men plant. 

Two Kentia Belmoreana, height 8 feet, speci- 
men plants. 

One Latania Borbonica, height lo feet, lo feet 

diameter in crown, specimen plant. 

Two Seaforthia Elegans, height 12 feet, vry 

fine pl;int-. 

Two Oreodoxa Regia. h.ight 13 and 14 feet. 

Write for particulars and prices to 

Youmans Bros.' Conservatory, 

G. A. Seli.enthin. Florist. WINONA. MINN. 

A Point 

Worth Knowing. 

At the NEW YORK HOTEL you 
are but two minutes' walk from the 
Exhibition Building. Large, light 
and well-ventilated rooms, one dollar 
per day and upward. Popular priced 
Restaurant. Special rates to Florists. 
Write earlv for accommodations. 

E. H. N1E5, Mgr. 

THE MIRRAY HILL HOTEL 

Park Ave.. 40lh and 41st Sts.. 

NEW YORK. 

▼ T 

One block from Grand Central Station. 

Two blocks from the S. A. F. Conven- 
tion Hall. 

AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN 
PLAN. 
Coolest Hotel in the city, at special rates 
for S. A. F. Members. 

Baggage transferred to and from Grand 
Central Station FREE OF CHAi<GE. 

I5U0 N. Gordata Gompacta, 

In 2-in. Pots, Strong Plants, at 
$3.00 per Mundred. 

Also Strong Plants from Bench, at 
$2.00 t>er Hundred. 

CHAS. SCHWEIGERT, Niles Center, III. 



Bay 
Trees 



Grand Pyramids, 

Dense and Dark Foliage. 
Exhibition Plants, 

The Finest In Trade. 

Height with tub, fifteen feet; diam- 
eter at the base, six feet. Solid 
new tubs, 28x28 inches. 

Price per Pair, $50. 

With packing, duty, freight free at 
New York, Philadelphia, Boston, 

Price per Pair, $80. 

To be had twenty-four pairs, all 
alike. 
Also fifty pairs twelve feet high, 

$30 to $50 per Pair. 

Cash or good references with 
order required. 

DE SMET FRERES, 

The Nurseries* 

Ghent, (Belgium). 



Herr's= = 



ALWAYS 
THE 
BEST 
AND 



Pansies I5Ir\" 

. YEAR. 

They sell thr-uiselves. Try 100 as an experiment. 
Plants only, and ready October 1st to January 1st. 

FiiEE HY Mail, 

75c per 100, 250 for $1.50; 500 for $2.50. 
By Express at Your Expense $4 per 1000. 

ALBERT M. HERR 

LANCASTER, PA. 

Chrysanthemums. 

5000 IVORY, 
1000 MIVIE. r. BEROMANN. 



$3 per 100, 



$25 per 1000. 



Also many other varieties 
in limtted quantity. ^ i^ 



N ATHAN SMITH & SON, Adrian, mjch. 

GOLDEN GATE. 

200 Golden Gate Rose Plants, 

3-inch, $3.00 per JOO. 

Fiist-Class btock. 



FRED J. KING, 



Ottawa, III. 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



17 



NEW CROP PANSY SEED. 

Vaughan's International IVIixture. 




This mixture is a combination of as many separate colors, tvpes, blendings and unique 
kinds as can be found in the world. It has been made up and so'ld by us for ten years, and 
has been improved upon every year, until now it cannot be beaten. Every florist knows 
^';^ughan's International Mixture. Price, per oz., $10.00; 'bOZ.,$1.50; trade packet, 50c. 

Vaughan's Giant Mixture. 

Thi< mixture is made up specially for those whose trade dem.inds larue flowers. It con- 
tains all the separate colors of Giant Tnmardeau, the Giant Bugnot and Gassier and other 
special strains which cannot be had any othtr way. Price per oz., $1.00; ^a-oz., 60c- 
trade packet, 25c. 

GIANT TRinARDEAU.— Mixed, per oz., $1.00; \'„ oz., aOc; trade packet, lOc. 
CHICAGO PARKS BEDDING —Mixed, per oz., $1.00. % oz., 30c; trade packet, lOc. 
j^"Send for our "liOOK FOR FLORISTS" for list of separate colors of pansics. 

MIGNONETTE "BISMARCK."— Our Machet has a very good reputation, and is the best 
This new sort |s animprovcment on it, both in color and size of flower. 



strain in existence 

and we want every florist to try it. Pkt. 15c, 



'4 oz. ,50c. 



NEW CROP. 



ASPARAGUS SPRBNGERII.— 50c per 100; $4.50 per 1000 

seeds. 
SMII.AX.— New crop, trade pkt., 10c; oz., 30c. 



CYCLAME\ PERSICU W GIGANTEUn —This seed is grown for us by an expert in Europe. 
We have taken his entire crop for the past four years, and find it to be the finest strain we have 
ever seen. 100 seeds 

GlOANTEUn ALBUn.— Mont Blanc, pure white 75' 

DEEP CRIMSON.— Very large '75 

R.JSA VON MARIENTHAL.— Splendid pink '!..'. 75 

WHITE, CARMINE EVE 75 

GIANT FLOWEKED SORT*.- Best mixed y^ oz., $1 50- 50 



100 seeds. 1000 seeds. 
$5.00 



5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
4.50 



CHICAGO. 
84-S6 RANDOLPH STREET. 



VAUGHAN^S SEED STORE, 



NEW YORK, 
14 BARCLAY STREET. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 

♦ 



I 



♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 



LAST CALL 




^ 



Don't miss the oppoitunity to display 
your horticultural goods, plants, seeds, 
supplies and knick knacks at the 



Greatest Convention and 
Exhibition of the S. A. L 

To be held in New York August 21 to 24. 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦< 



FOR SPACE AND 
TERMS, 
APPLY AT 
ONCE TO THE 
MANAGER, 



John P. Cleary, 



60 Vesey St., 

N.Y. 

CITY.5t 



>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



KENNICOTT BROS. CO., 



Wholesale Commission Florists. 



WRITE FOR SPECIAL QUOTATIONS ON 
WIRE WORK DURING SUMMER MONTHS. 



OM1CA.OO. 



I riQU QTQ KinDl oXer if unsold on 
I IIUJ QIU rillUf receipt of order. 

100 1000 

2100 Bridesmaid in4 -in. pots J4. 00 $35.00 

1000 " "3H " 4.00 35 00 

1720 " "3 " 3.00 25.00 

500 " "2 " 2.00 20.00 

300 Brides "4 " 4.00 35.00 

200 " "3V4 " 4 00 35.00 

SOD " "3 " 3.00 35.00 

1200 " "2 " 2.00 20 00 

3000 Meteors "3 " 2. .50 25.00 



100 
.500 Mme. Chatenav. ..in 4 -in. pots $4.00 
100 '■ " "... , "3 " 2.00 

125 Mme. Cusine "4 " 3.50 

250 Lady Dorothea.... "4 " 4.00 

150 •• " "2Ji " 2 50 

2000 Golden Gate " 2i,i " 2 50 

700 Maid of Honor ■'4 " 3.00 

700 •• '■ " "2^ " 2 00 

500 Brides and Maids in 3 and 4-in pots, 
are carried over stock; they are good 
offer them at 112.00 per 1000. 



1000 



These 
We 



Latania B-rbonica 3-in. pots, $ 6.00 per 100 

Areca Lutescens 4 " 20.00 " 

Cocos Weddeliana... .. ..3 ** 12.00 " 

Aspnrairus Sprengerii 6 " 25.00 " 

....4 " 8.00 

....3 " 6.00 

....2 " 3.00 

Ficus Elastica, O-in. pots 75c to $1.50 each. 

Boston Fern, 8-in. pots. ...$25 00 to $35.00 per 100 
Plan s ara vigorous and unusually fine. Will be 
carefully packed, and we guarantee them to be right 
in every respect. 



LAKEVIEW ROSE GARDENS. Jamestown, n. y. 



Rose Plants I 

300 Mi-tei.r 3'/2-in., per lOO, 

200 Bride 3H " 

200 " 3!4 " 

1000 Beauties 3 " 

100 Pres. Carnot 4 

100 Perles 3 " '■ 4.00 

BROWN & CANriELD, Springfield, III. 



Perfect 
Condition 

$5.00 
6.00 
4.00 
6,00 
7.00 



Schmidt's PansiesNtrc-rVn-?!; 

rendy: DO matter 
what .vou pay, you cannot get a better BtralQ; M 
ounce, tl,:i5: i.<. ounce. 12 00; one ounce. $4 00. 

J. C. SCHMIDT, BfllSTOl.. PA. 



TRADE EXPAN8IONI8T8- 

American Florist Advertisements. 



liose I*la.n.1:s. 

First, class, healthy Plants. To close out 
we quote the following low priceu : 

600 Heauties 3-inoh, $4.00 per 100 

1000 Perles 3 " 3.00 

1000 Meteors 3 " 3.00 

800 Bridesmaids 3 " 3.00 " 

400 Bride* 3 " 3.00 " 

A. G. PRINCE & CO., 76 & 78 Wabash Av.,Cliicago. 



18 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 4^ 



Washington. 

DOINGS AT THE AMERICAN ROSE COMPANY'S 
PLACE —LARGE PLANTINGS. — LEISSLKR 
REBUILDING. — TO THE CONVENTION. 

The American Rose Co. have finished 
planting their roses They have planted 
lour more houses of Ivory, and one house 
of the Hungarian yellow rose, also a few 
benches of a new pink rose for the third 
year's trial. Among other things they 
have a few hundreds of a dark sport of 
Mme. A. Chatenay. In all they have 
planted about 40,000 roses. They will 
plant only about 15,000 chrysanthe- 
mums this year. Their large carnation 
house is planted with tuberoses, which 
are doing well and they expect a good 
crop of flowers from them by the time 
they need the house tor carnations. 

George A. Leissler is rebuilding two 
houses 18x100, which will be used for 
ferns and palms. They will be heated by 
hot water, the other house being heated 
by steam. He has two houses planted 
with roses. Brides, Bridesmaids and 
Golden Gates. His Boston and other 
small terns are very promising and car- 
nations outdoors are looking fine. 

As most of the growers are through 
planting and getting things shaped up 
in general, quite a number are going to 
New York to the convention, I think at 
least twelve. P. G. 



Manchester, Mass. 



The first sweet pea show ever held in 
Manchester was given last Friday even- 
ing by the North Shore Horticultural 
Society. The display was large and 
elegantly arranged and the prizes were 
worthily won. At the meeting on that 
evening eight new members were taken 
in and a liberal donation was received 
from some of the admiring shore resi- 
dents. The subject for discussion at the 
meeting of this week is "Pine Tree 
Borers," a paper on that subject being 
promised by Secretary T. W. Head. 



Ellsworth, Mb. — Miss M. A. Clark 
has purchased the Button greenhouses 
and will remove them to her own estab- 
lishment. 

Carlinville, III.— Browne Bros, are 
remodeling their range of glass and add- 
ing one house for carnations, the demand 
for this flower having exceeded the sup- 
ply last season. 

GOOD ROSES 

NOT SURPLUS. 

1000 Maids, Itrides and Meteors, large, strong 3-in. 
slock, J4.00 per 100. Very choice Perles, S5.U0 per 
100. This stoei< is worth more money, and ia large 
enough for late planting. 

W. H. 6ULLETT & SONS, Lincoln, Illinois. 

CARNATIONS! 

F. Dorner & Sons Co., 

■^ LA FAYETTE. IND. 

Please mention the American Florist ivhen 7vriting, 



WM. MURPHY 

Wholesale Carnation Grower 

station F.aNUNNAII, OHIO. 



25,000 Carnations 25,000 



FIELD GROWN PLANTS OF THE FOLLOWING VARIETIES : 



1 



15,f03 Flor* Hill $ 5.00 per 100 

4,0UO Wnite Cloud 8.00 

1 000 Mrs. Bradt 10.00 

1,000 G. H. Crane 10.00 

1.000 Mc.Gowan 4.00 



2.000 EMora-lo 4.00 per 100 

1,000 Wm. Scott 4.00 

1,000 Davbreak .5.00 

500 tmily Pierson 4.00 



These Plants are all in first-class condition, Rood size and healttiy stock. 
Write me if you are in need of a large quant. ty. 

CHAS. CHADWICK, ipckBoxii. Grand Rapids, Mich. 



A Rose 
Bargain. 



We offer the following price 
inducement to clear the bal- 
ance of our stock at once : 

5000 METEORS, Km. aoe; 

4000 BRIDES. ""^"au^aT^rade 

All 2'^-inch Stock, $20 per 1000, 
$135 for the lot. Speak quick 
If you want them all. 

J. A. BUDLONG, 

37.39 Randolph St., 
CHICAbO 



Choice Pot Plants, Ic Each 

We wish to give our customers the ben- 
(■rltof very low prices for a short time. 

Qeranlums* the choicest, most desirable varie- 
ties 10 be had, true to name, Bruanti (best semi- 
double scarlet), S. A. Nutt, Athlete, White Svi'au, 
La Favorite, Mrs. J. M. Garr (best sinple white), 
Beaute Poitevine, Amencan Wonder, Mrs. E. G. 
Hill, Mme. Bruant and others, $2.00 per 100, strong 
2>4-in-; Rose Geraniums and Mme. Salleroi, Ic 
each, strong 2-ln. 

Petunia*, double fringed, in full bloom, Hen- 
derson's and Dreer's latest superb sets, strong 2-in. 
Ic each; really worth $l.<X>per doz. 

Fuchsias, choiceBt sorts, strong 2-in.. $1.50 per 
100; line 4-in., full bloom, at 6c; 2^4 and 3-in. at 2c. 

Coleus, elegant named varieties, all beauties, 
Ir earh, strong 2 and 2V4-ih- 

Ageratum. Princess Pauline (latest blue), 
strong 2-iu., Ic. 

Salvias, Ic. 

AMers, Giant Comet (true) in pure white 
and lavender, pink and white, strong 2-in., Ic. 
Plant in bench, they'll pay. 

Roses, fancy extra select Brides, Perles and 
Maids, 3-in., 4c; the same in 2H-in. pots, includ- 
ing Meteor, 3c; Kaiserin, Wootton, Golden Gate, 
Belle Siebrecht. strong SVi-in., 4c. 

Smllax. extra strong, 2-in., as fine as you could 
wish, $1.50 per 100, 112.50 per 1000. 
Cash With Ordek. 

SOUTH SIDE f LORAL CO., Springfield, 111. 

Bride and Bridesmaid, slron^ 3-iu., $5.00 per 100. 

Marie Louise, strong field grown, $2.50 per 100. 

From field; Scott, Meteor, Victor, Mrs. Jas. Dean, 
Whit*' Cloud. Flora Hill, etc., at market prices. 

E. M. & H. N. HOFFMAN, Elmlra, N. Y. 

L^l CARNATIONS 

Orders booked now for fall delivery. 

GEO. HANCOCK & SON, Grand Haven, Mich. 



Brides $3.00 

Maids 3.00 

Cloth. Soupert.. . 3.00 

Meteor 3.00 

Am. Beauty 



2i4-inch. 
Per 100 Per 1000 



$25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25,00 



3-inch. 
PerlO'l Per 1000 
$5.00 $45.00 



5.00 
5.00 
8,00 



45.60 
45.00 
75.00 



Per 100 Per lOOO 
Mixed Jardiniere Ferns, mostly 

pteris varieties $3.00 $25.00 

Asparagus Sprengerii, 214-in 4.0O 35.00 

Plumosus. " 6.00 55.00 

Adiantum Farleyense, fine stock, 6-in. pots, 50c each 

Per 100 

Smilax. 3-inch t 4 00 

Dracaena Terminalis, 4-iuch 15.00 

Phoenix Canariensis, elegant stock, 4!^ to 5- 

inch 20.00 

Chamaerops Excelsa, 5-inch 26.(10 

4 " 20.00 

J. B. HEI55, 

DAYTON. O. 
ASSORTED FERNS, 

In flats, ready for potting, $'J,00 per flat, 

BOSTON TERNS, 

Ready for 3-in, pots, $6.00 per 100; 4-in., 
$15.00 per 100; 5-6-in.. »20.00-$25.00per 100, 
Also fine plants in 5-6-in, pots, now ready 
for a shift, in pans or large pots, $3500 per 
100, $4 50 per doz. This is exceptionally 
good value. 

Asparagus Plumosus Nanus, 3-in., estra 

fine, $*(,00 per 100. 
Asparagus Sprengerii. 2-in., $6,00 per 100, 
Kenlia Belmoreana. 2i~-in, pots, $10.00 per 
100; 4 inch, $40.00 per 100, Large plants, 
$1.60, 11.75, $2.00, $2,50, $3.00, up to $6,00. 

Send for Particulars. 

BOBBINK & ATKINS 

RUTHERFORD, N. J. 



Ptfase mention the American Florist when writing. 

ACALYPHA SANDERI 

2!4-inch pots, 18.00 per 100. 

UrilHSOn KSniDlBri ane lot ^ SeM plams 
for winter forcing. 

The C0N4RD & JONES COMPANY, 

Carnations « 'S' 

Field Qrown, Heavy and Stocky. 

TRIUMPH, MRS. JOOST, ARGYLE, MELBA, 
GLACIER, FLORA HILL, $5.00 PER HUNDRED 

JOY & SON, Nashville, Tenn. 

We like to have jou tell our advei^sera 
that yon read our paper 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



19 



Roses for Florists 

OUR Rose Plants are all grown for the 
trade. We do not grow cut flowers. 
Such plants, we claim, are well worth more 
money than ordinary surplus stock. 

Our Roses are all shifted from 2-inch 

pots and equal to most stock usually sold 

as 3-inch. 2>^-in., 2%-\n., 

per 100 per 100 

American Beauty »6.oo J12.00 

Brides 3.oo 8.00 

Bridesmaids 3.co s 00 

Perles 3.5o 9 co 

Kaiserin 4.00 10 00 

Meteor 3.oo 7.00 

Wootton S.oo 

Golden Gate, 2-in 3.oo 

Sunset 4.00 10.00 

Bedding Roses, in 2-in. pots, strong stock, 
in variety, |2.50 per 100, $20 per iOOO. 

Vaughan's Seed Store, 

CHICAGO, NEW YORK, 

84-86 Randolph St. 14 Barclay St. 



ROSE PLANTS 



{ METEOR 



I 

: 

♦ 
♦ 



BRIDESMAID 1 

RDinF \- ^'°™ ^'4 and 3-in. pots, 

■''""„ f PerlOO,}3,03; IOOO, $25.00. 
LA FRANCE 

PERLES J 

AMERICAN BEAUTY, 3-inoh pots, per 100, 
jiD.Oil; per 1000, $45.00'. 

AMERICAN BEAUTY and LA FRANCE, 

busht^s headed in open ground, per 
100. J2.50; per 1000, 120.00. 

The above is all clean, strong stock, ready 
for planting, no better to be had. 



Miiiiuuiiiiiimitiittiiiitmntituituitiiiiiiitiiii iiiiumiiuui iiniiiiimaaiiaiimtttOOf 



I GEORGE REINBERG, 

X 51 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO, 

▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼ WW wvv^ 

Please mention the A mertcan Florist when mrtting. 

Special Rose Plants 

GROWN FOR OUR OWN USE. 

ISOO Brides 
600 IBrldestaaald 
300 Ikleteor 
100 .Beavtt^r 

Alto Surplus Plants 

Choice Chrysanthomums. 

Write for prices. 

J II IS ICC CD Wholesale Grower of 
■ nil UROOCIIy Cut Flowers, 

Euclid Ave., CLEVELAND, O. 

|~j £^ ^ J^ ^ Strong and Healthy, 

Y\\ W^^V^^^^ From SH-in. pots. 

_^ $5 PER 100. 

Perles, Brides and Maids. 

H. E. WILSON, 134 Hayward Pk., 

Rochester, N. Y. 

Cyperus Umbrella Plants 

Fine, extra strong 2-in. pots, $2.00 per 100. 

Globe Greenhouses, 53rd. Adams and Jackson St , 

Austin, III. 



10,000 American Beauty Plants, 

FINE STOCK, FROM 3-iN. POTS, 

$5.00 per J 00 ^ $40.00 per J 000. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Kaiserin, 3-inch pots $4 00 $35.00 

Golden Gate, 2V2-inch pots 4.00 35.00 

Bridesmaid, Perle, Meteor, ,'!-inch pots 4 00 35.00 



PETER REINBERG, 



51 Wabash Ave., 

CHICAGO. 



ilfTTnnnTTTTTTfTTTTTTTTTnTTnTTnTTtTTTTTnnnnTTTTTTTTmmi »H !»! HH t» m »»T»!»T»TTTTTTTT ^ 



40,000 FIRST QUALITY FORCING ROSES. 



READY FOR 

IMMEDIATE 
PLANTING. 



Fully equal to those sent out the last eight years, flrstcla's and perfectly healthv In every respect 
Only selected growtn from flowerlnc shoots used In propawatlog. 



AMERICAN BEAUTY, METEOR. KAISERIN. SAFRANO, BRIDESMAID. 

BON SILENE, PERLES, MAID OF HONOR. BRIDE. 

3-Inch pots. S7.00 per 100. 4-lnch pou, SIO.OO per 100. 

GRAFTED ROSES. 



Maid of Honor, Coldnn Gate. 3^-Inch pots, tIS.OO per ion. 

Liberty, 4-Irch pots. J8 00 per dozen, fifty plants for $24.00. 



AHERICAN BEAUTY, four-inch, selected. $15.00 per 100. LIBERTY, four-inch 175 00 per 100 
MAID, BRIDE, PERLB, 3ys-lnch, J8 00; 4-inch, #10.00. Also SUNSET, METEOR. MORGAN MEB. 
MET, LaFRANCE, NIPHETOS, KAISERIN. aOLDEN GATE, MAID OF HONOR, QRAFTED 
BRIDE, IJ20.00 per 100, large 4-in. ASPARAGUS PLUnOSUS, all sizes. MARIE LOUISE VIOLETS 

'*""-'^^- A. S. MacBEAN. lakewood. n. j. 

A I Grafted bSISids Meteor Roses 



4-inch S15 per 100; 2;i-inch $9 per 100. 
METEORS, 4-inch, $8; 3-inch. J6; 21/2-inch, $4. 
PERLES, SUNSETS. 4-inch, $8; 3-iuch, $6. 

CHRIS. HANSEN, SL Paul, Minn. 

Cut Flowers Shipped Always on Time. 

Flfase mention the A mertcan Florist whetl writing. 

TO CLOSE OUT. 

6OD American Btautles, 3Vi-in., $5 00 per 100, or 

$20.00 for the .500. 
2000 Kaiserin. 2000 Golden Gate, 2000 Bridesmaid, 

1000 Meteor, 500 Garrett, 600 Bride, 600 Perle, 

600 Mermet, 3 and 3Vi-in., $3.00 per 100, or 

125.00 per 1000. 
These are Fine Plants. Cash With Order. 

MRS. J. W. CROUCH. Chattanooga, Tenn. 

CLEAN. HEALTHY 

PLANTS. 

FROM 3-INCH POTS. 

American Beauty and Kaiserin $6. 00 per 100 

Perle and LaFrance 5.00 " 

Meteor, Albany, Sunset, Golden Gate, 

Bride, Bridesmaid, Wootton 4.00 " 

Perle, Suiset, LaFrance, Bride, 
Bridesmaid, Meteor, KaisiTin and 
Golden Gate, from 2-inch pots 2 50 " 

JOSEPH HEINL, Jacic«onviHe, 111. 

BARGAIN in PERLES 

We have 2,000 STRONG 3-IN. PERLES 

in superb growth, beautiful plants, worth $6.00 
per 100. To sell them quick we make the price 
$5.00 PERIOD. Great stcck for early bloom. 

W. H. 6ULLETT & SONS. - LINCOLN. ILLINOIS. 



METEOR. 3i4-inch pots. 



Per 100 Per 1000 
$4.00 $37.50 



ROSES 



Potted and repotted four times. These plants 
are visorous and unusually fine. Packed to safely 
ship any distance. 

BRtNT & NOE, Forest Glen, Chicago, III. 

SEE last week's ad and make 
us an offer on what 
you want. 

GEO. A. KUHL, Pekin, 111. 

60,000 Feet of Class. 



I ROBT. CRAIG & SON 

in 

jgil and Novelties in Decorative Plants. 

i^ Market and 49th Street. PHILADELPHIA PA. 



Roses, Palms f 



Allen's Deliance, seed from selected spikes, 25c per 

pkt., $1.00 per ounce. 

J. C. SCHMIDT, BRISTOL, PA. 



Per 100 

■ • ■ I ■ '^^ ^a^ti^m ^^# == 
300 Brides, 2!4-in., $2.50; 250 Maids. 2H-in. 
$2.50; 100 Belle Siebrecht. 2!4-in., 12.50; 100 Kais- 
erin, 2V4-in., $2 ,50; 50 Wootton, 2!4-in., $2 50. 
■ BEQONIA REX, in good assortment, 400 in 2H 
and 3-in., $3.00 per 100; 100 3H-in., $8.00 per 100. 
SMILAX, 200 2H-in., per 100, $2.00. 

ISAAC MILES. OSHKOSH. wis. 

Please mention the American Florist -when writing 

BRIDES and MAIDS 

In sYz-incA Ibis. 

$2.50 per 100 - - $20 per 1000 
JOHN MONO, 

Rogers Park, CHICAGO. 

Please mention the American Florist wfi^n wrUing. 

ROSES 4- 

J 800 Brides, 1, . >,. ,^ 
300 Maids, P-*"" 54 per 100 

CASH WITH ORDER, PLEASE. 

ALBERT F. AMLIN6. Maywood, III. 

Please mrniion the A merican Florist wheii writing. 



BOSTON FERN 

L. n. POSTER, 45 King St., Dorchester, Mass. 



SPECIALTY. 



20 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 4, 



Nashville. 

JOY & SON INCOEPOBATE— MEMBEBS OF 
THE FIBM — BUSINESS DULL AND STOCK 
SCABCE. — HYDRANGEAS IN FUNERAL 
WORK. 

Joy & Son have taken out articles of 
incorporation under the name of the Joy 
& Son Company. The incorporators are 
Thomas S. Joy, Thomas C. Joy, Paul 
Sloan, Calvin B. Harrison and David P. 
Wrenne. Business will be conducted at 
the same store, 606 Church street. The 
parties interested are all enterprising 
men and will push the business for all it 
is worth. They have a large garden and 
ample greenhouse space and have been 
very successful in rose culture and in 
growing all flowers usual to a general 
floral business. 

Business is at a standstill but growers 
are utilizing the time in making prepara- 
tions for the next season'strade. Chrys- 
anthemums are looking well and roses 
give a rare promise of excellence for the 
future. But few roses are being cut and 
when there is an extra demand, as there 
is occasionally for funerals, enough to 
supply the call are ordered in. 

The hardy hydrangea is in perfection 
just now. A pall made by one of the 
florists last week was almost covered 
with handsome bunches of hydrangeas 
caught with white ribbon. The effect 
was very pleasing and novel. 

M. C. DORRIS. 



Minneapolis, Minn.— Fred. Busch is 
rebuilding a number of his greenhouses 
and mushroom sheds. 

No. Adams, Mass— Growers of sweet 
peas in this vicinity are suffering because 
of the greenfly which is devouring their 
vines. 

Sabula, Ia.— W. B. Lovell, who has 
recently returned from a tour of old 
Mexico, has presented Ellisonian Insti- 
tute, Maquoketa, with a set of seventy- 
two photographs of Mexican scenery, 
snapshots taken by himself on his 
journey. 

Indianapolis, Ind. — Francis Smith, of 
Richmond, Ind., has purchased the prop- 
erty of Mrs. E. H. Poole, occupied and 
operated by Baur & Smith. The invest- 
ment was made to permit that firm to 
improve and add to the range of glass as 
the business demands. 

100,000 FERNS 
IN FLATS 

At One Cent. 

Good, hardy plants in flats, twelve best 
market sorts. If pott<*d now in small 
pots worth five times the money in a w^-ek 
or two. Safe arrival guaranteed, and 
liberal count. 

$10 per 1000 bv Express. Sample 
100 Mailed for $1.25. 

I'teris Cretica Alba, P. 'I'remula, P. Sul- 
cata. P. Hastata, P. Adiactoides, P. 
Longifolia. Adiantura, Lomaria, Lygo- 
dium, Nephrodiura. Cristatum, Blechnura, 
Selaginelfas, etc., etc. Post orders Wash- 
ington. 

JOHN n. LEY, Good Hope, D. C. 



BEGONIA GLOIREDELORRAINEI 

Plants from 2-iuoh pots, 

$2 50 per dozen; $17.50 per hundred. 

EDWIN LONSDALE, | 

Wyndmoor, 

Montgomery Co.. Pa. 



Money Order Olllcc, 

Cheitnut Hill, 
Sta. H. Philadelphia. 



^"iiiiiHiiiimiiiiiiiHimtmmimiiiimimtiiiimiiiiiiiiK^^^^ 



Going 

to the 

Convention 



If sc, your trip will not be 
complete without a visit to 



M. RICE & CO. 




LEADING 

FLORISTS' 

SUPPLY 

HOUSE 

IN AMERICA, 



Who extend a CORDIAL INVITATION to 
ALL FLORISTS to the use of our facilities 
and to make our place their HEADQUAR- 
TERS whtle in Philadelphia. ^ ^ jt S ^ 



YOURS VERY TRULY. 

No. 918 filbert Street, PHILADELPIIIA, PA. 




TO CLEAN UP 



Per 100 
$1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.60 
1.50 
1.50 



5,000 Geraniums, mixed 2J^ in. 

1,000 Red Vernon 2« 

1,000 Erfordi 2>i 

2,000 licfionias, mi.v^d 2H 

1,000 Fuchsias, mixed 2)i 

2,000 Salvias 2!4 

The Morris Floral Co., 

Asparagus Plumosus Nanus. 

TRANSPLANTED seedling plants for July and 
August delivery, ready for 2y4-in. pots, at 
$.■5.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000; 500 at thousand 
rates, (free delivery). 

Cash With Order, Plkask. 



THE MOWER 

THAT will KILL ALL THL WLEDS IN YOUR UWNS. 
It you keep the weeds cut so they do not go to 
seed, and cut your grass without breaking the 
small feeders of roots, the grass will become thick 
and weeds will disanpear. Ihe Clipper will do rt. 
ys^Send f- r ■■ -- «ud prices. 



R. ASMUS, 



New Durham, N. J. 



FLORISTS' ORCHIDS 



The Finest and Largest Stock 

in the world. 

C AlinFI) ST. ALBANS, ENGLAND and 
O/milLK BRUGES, BELGIUM. 

Send for List of Commercial Varieties. 

A. DIMMOCK, Agent, 60 Vesey St., N. Y. 
500.000 CELERY PLANTS. 

strong transplanted plants, 25o a 100. $2.00 a 1000. 
Good seedliuiis, 2 inches high, 25i; a lOllO; by mail 
10 per I'.ent more. W. Plume, G. Pascal. B. Mar- 
liet. Golden S. IJlanching and Dwarf Red. 

8MILAX. strong, from 2 and g'/a-inoh pots, 
$1.00 a 100, $9.00 a 1000. 

Cash With Order Please. Samplb lOo. 

R. KILBOURN, Clinton, N. Y. 

Beauties. Sprengerll. 

AM. BEAUTY ROSES, t'ood, a-inch, $6.00 

per 100. 
ASPARAGUS SPRENGERII. strong plants, 

ready for 3-ineh pots, $5.00 per 100, $45.00 

per 1000. 

Robert f . Tcsson, rXu?.'." Mr""- 




CLIPPER LAWN MOWER CO., '^"-■^;g^r"' 

CELERY AND CABBAGE. 

CELERY. Pink Plume (extra strong), Golden 
S<*ir lt|jnii.'.hiuti, Giunt Pascal. Golden Heart. New 
Rose and »>th«r varieties, 15c per 100, $1.00 per 
1000, 18.50 per 10,000. 

CABBAGE H. Succession, Second Early, 
Premium Flut Dutch. Late Drumhead, Drumhead 
Savov and other varieties, 15c per 100, 81.00 per 
1000, '$8. 50 per 10,000. 

KALE. Dwiirf, Green, Curled. Scotch, same 
price as Cabbage. If any of the above plants by 
mail, add 10c per 100. 

Cash With Order. 

R. VINCENT, Jr., & SON, White Marsh, Md. 

Adjustable Vase Holders 

No. 1 — Brasfl, nlokled, 4 feet Iodk. >> olasps to eaoh rod. 
Price complete (with preen or white tumblera) 12.26. 
Price complete (with jrreen or white cornucopia vases) 
12 50. No. 2.— Heavy 4 ft. rod brassed and nickeled, 
with three clasps for 5 to »>ln. pots, each, $1 .76. 

Klft'B patent rubber capped Flower Tubea* ^-tn. 
diameter, per 100, 13.60. 

JOSEPH KIFT A SON, Florists, 
1T2S Cheatnat St. PhlladelptaU. Fenn. 



KIFT'S 

PATENT 



OUR DIRECTORY FOR 1900 WILL BE MAILED TO YOU -«1 
PROMPTLY UPON APPLICATION. PRICE. TWO DOLLARS.-«ll 



tgoo. 



The American Florist. 



21 



Boston Florist Letter Go. 

MANTTPACrnKKKS Olf 

FLORISTS' LETTERS. 




Ll-i in ._lett1rF1 

This wooden box nicely stained and vazs 
nlBhed, 18x30x13 made In tvo sections* one 
for each size letter, given away with first 
order of 500 letters. 

Block Letters, 1 ii or 2-lnch size, per 100, KXX). 
Script Lietters, $4. Faatenerwttb each letter orword. 
Used by leading florlBts everywhere and for sale b; 
an wholesale florists and supply dealers. 

N. F. McCarthy, Treas. and Manager, 
84 Hawley St., BOSTON, MASS. 

H. BAYERSDORFER & GO. 

Cyoas Wraaths, Moss Wreaths, Fernaries 

and Jardinierea, Wheat Sheaves 

and Immortelles. 

New Catalogue of all FLORISTS' SCPPLIBS on 
applloatlOD. Br~For the trade only. 

H. BAYERSDORFER & GO. 

60, 62, 64 ind 66 N. 4th St.. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

A. HERRMANN, 

Cape Flowers, au. oolobs; 
Cycas Leaves, Metal Designs, 
Ain> All Florists' Sapplles. 

Send for Prioei. 
404-4I2 Cast 34th St.. NEW YOKK. 

John Conley&Son, 

Manufacturers ot 
2 AND 4 DOMINICK STREET. 

Raw Cycas Leaves. 

See last week's Florist for prices, etc. 

UVA GRASSES, undyed $5.50 per 100 

BIRCH BARK for plant boxes 7c per lb. 

GALAX LEAVES, new crop 75c per 1 COO 

All kinds of PALM LEAVES, already prepared or 
dried for preparing purposes. 

FLORIDA NATURAL PRODUCTS CO., 
P. 0. Box 273. Indianapolis. Ind. 

Sigmund Geller, '^l^^^t^vr' 
Kr^h^'^S Florists' Supplies, 

Braids for American Manufacture. 

Metal Goods, Moss-Wreathes, Cape Flowers, 
Immortells, Chenille, Tinfoil, Doves, Baskets, 
Sheaves, Vases, Jardinieres, Ferndishes, 
Novelties, etc. 
108 W. 88th St., near 6th Ave., NEW YORK. 



HEADQUARTERS 



COCOA FIBRE. 
SHEEP MANURE. 
BONE all grades, 
IMPORTED SOOT. 



SPHAGNUM aad 
GREEN MOSS. 
RUSTIC WORK, all kinds, 
CLAY'S FERTILIZER. 



DUNNE & CO., ItZ'it New York. 

HORTICULTURAL SUPPLIES. 



I™ Regan Printing House 

CATALOGUES 



NIRSERY 

SEED 

FLORISTS 



87-91 Plymotjth Place, 
j»> jt CHICA.GOj»>j» 



ESTABUSHED 
1666 



EMIL^STEFFEItS> 



SUCC.ro N.STEFFENS. 
AHOSTEFTEKSBROS. 




kk 



PLANT CULTURE" 



By GEORGE W. OLIVER- 

Now Keady for Delivery. 



A Working Handbook of Every-day Practice for the Florist, Gardener and Nurseryman 



And all who grow plants and flowers in the greenhouse or garden. Contains separate chapters on all 

branches of the work. 

llrpages. PricG $1.00 by Mail Postpaid. o7tVuU'refp'a"e=!'''^*'°"'"'^'*''"'""^ 

or send for complete circular to THE FLORISTS' EXCHftNGE, P. 0. Box 1697, New York. 



Vail's New Plant Stake 



Cut cut of well-seasoned lumber, 

straight grained, M inch square; a 

decided improvement over the cane or 

Cut any length desired; always ready for use; 3 ft. at $1 50 per 1000, Z% ft. at $2.00 

4 ft. at 12.50 per 1000; 4V4 ft. at $3.00 per 1000; F. O. B. Indianapolis. Remember 



bamboo, 
per 1000; 
the freight la cheaper than on cane stakes, 

THE VAIL SEED 



CO., Indianapolis, Indiana. 



"NICOMITE" 

(PATENT) 

Vapor Insecticide 

r»owr>EFe. 

No labor required. Harmless to 
bloom and foliage. A certain killer of 

ALL GREENHOUSE BUGS. 

SOLD BY SEEDSMEN. 

The Tobacco Warehousing and Trading Co., 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



Ad- 
dress 



THE 
KINNEY 
PUMP. 

For applying 
Liquid 

Manure it 

^^^ ] has no equal! 

Sent prepaid 
for $2.50. 

Without spray- 
ing valve $2.00. 

The HOSE CONNECTION CO-^'^gsTON, 







'^arti^^eituiii 




1 



The most widely oiroulated German gardening 
Journal, treating of all departments of horticulture 
and floriculture. Numerous eminent correspond- 
ents in all parts of the world. An advertising 
medium of the highest class. 

Moller^s Deutsche Gartner Zeitung is published 
weekly and richly illustrated. Subscription $3.00 
per Annum, including postage. Sample copies free. 

I 

FOR INSURANCE AGAINST 
DAMAGE BY HAIL, Address 

JOHN Q. ESLER, Sec'y F. H. A., 

SADDLE RIVER, N. J 



% 



ItBurns 



3 CIA 



The most convenient way 
of applying an insecticide 
ever yet devised. No pans 
required -No heating of 
irons-No trouble-Cannot 
injure the most sensitive 
blooms-Very effect;ive. 
Price 60(t per box of 12 
rolls. M\ dealers sell it! 



5kabcura Dip Co. >^ 

St. Louis — Chicago. 




LIQUID PLANT FOOD 

For Greenhouse Cultivating. 

EASTERN CHEMICAL COMPANY, 
Cb icago Office : 620 Atlantic Ave., Boston. 

H. K. Snider. Suite 423, 260 Clark St. 



Holds Class 
Firmly 

See the Point -W 
The ^'an Reyper Per- 
fect GlAslnc i*«lnU are 

the best. Mo riebtB or 
lefts. Boi of 10(10 pointa 
75 cents, postpaid. 
IIF.NKT A. DREER, 
714 Che.tBQt Ut.,Phir.., r.. 




Always 



mention the American Flor- 
ist when you order stoclcJ* 



22 



The American Florist 



Aug. 4, 



Baltimore. 

BEDDING AT PATTERSON PARK. — CUT 
FLOWER TRADE CONFINED TO FUNERAL 
WORK. — RAIN BREAKS THE DROUGHT. — 
VARIOUS NOTES. 

In spite of the adverse season, some of 
the most beautiful bedding seen in years 
is on view in the squares and parks. To 
mention all the worthy ones would be 
impossible, but a large carpet bed near 
the mansion at Patterson Park and the 
croton beds at the same place are cer- 
tainly gems. This being the first season 
in which the whole bedding of the city is 
under control of the park board and its 
officials, some confusion was to have 
been expected, owing to the great extent 
and variety of the work, but, if there 
was any hitch it is not apparent in the 
results, and Mr. Seybold and his assist- 
ants deserve high praise for their work. 

The growers have been favored at last 
by a rainfall which was enough to put 
an end to the drought which has held all 
vegetation at a standstill. Every one is 
hard at it, getting his houses in shape, 
planting and repairing. Mr. Anderson, 
ofthe old firm of Madsen & Anderson, 
now in business for himself, has erected 
two rose houses, 12x100 and 20x100 
respectively. 

Trade in cut flowers continues slow 
but the supply is slow, too. so matters 
are not so unevenly balanced as is usual 
at this season. Funeral work continues 
to be the standby and those dealers 
whose specialty runs in this direction are 
the busiest people in town. White flow- 
ers are in steady demand and are a sure 
sale at remunerative prices. 

Notice is published of the dissolution of 
the partnership of Fischer & Ekas, Henry 
Fischer continuing the business. 

E. A. Seidewitz, of Annapolis, iserecting 
a range of houses at Arlington, near this 
city. Mack. 

Mitchell, S. D. — E. C. Newbury has 
his roses, carnations and chrysanthe- 
mums all planted and doing better than 
ever before. He looks for a big trade. 
Mitchell, and in fact the whole of South 
Dakota, is growing rapidly. 

Newport, R. 1.— Hitchings & Co. are 
building for E. J. Berwind a fine range of 
houses as follows: Palm house, 25x80; 
rose house, plant house, carnation house, 
stove house and vinery, each 20x34-; 
peach house, 25x25; propagating and 
fern houses, and service building 25x25. 




STEAM COAL 

rOR FLORISTS. 

Chicago, April 7ih, 1900. 
HULL & COMPANY, 74 and 75 Traders' Building, Chicago, III , 

Gentlemen:— In reference to my opinion of your THACKER SPLINT COAL, 
will say I am v.ry well pleased with it and think it is superior to any Coal of the 
splint grades we have yet used. Burns free, making an intense heat with very few 
ashes; no clinkers, and has the lasting quality of all high-grade Coal. I certainly 
consider It a very economical Coal to burn. 

Yours very truly, J. A. BUDLONO, Wholesale Florist. 

Write us for price on single carload orders or season contract, delivered 
at any point in the United States. 'Phone Har. 960. 



I 



i HULL & COMPANY, 

»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦ 



74 & 75 TRADERS BUILDING, 



w w w w vwwwvvw~~~~~ ▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼ 

Mease mention the American Florist 7vhen writing. 



GALVANIZED STEEL 



f Wire Rose Stakes 






Stralg:ht or Looped 
and Pointed. 



The Modol Extension 

Garnatien Support. 

Lancaster. Pa., June 17, '99. 
Mr. Tuekon Parker, 

Brooklyn. N. Y.: 
DearSir.— Your Model Carnation 
Support is all right in every way, 
and will no doubt be considered 
as necessary as good plants with 
growers when better known. ( 
consider it the best In the market, 
and if your other Specialties are 
as good, they should make another 
addition to the money makers oT 
1900. Very Respectfully. 

Albert M. Herr. 

Samples and Prices on 
Application to 

THE MODEL 
PLANT STAKE CO.. 

336 North 9tb Street, 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Gardeners' Chronicle. 

A Weekly Illustrated Journal. 

BSTABLIBHID 1841. 

The "OABDBNEBB' CHRONICLB" tau been roR 
07IB Firrr Tiabs thi Liasing joctrnai. ot Iti 
olaii. It has aotileved tblB poalUon beoaaae, wblle 
■peolally deTotlnti U«elf to Buppljln^ tbe dally reqnlre- 
menta of Kardenen of all olaasefl. mnch of the Infor- 
mation fornlstaed 1b of mob general and permanent 
Talae. that tbe 'QARDHNfiBB' CHBONICLH" ll 
looked np to as the 8TANDA£id authoritt on the 
•nbjeota of wblcb It treat*. 

Babeorlptlon to the United BUtee, %i.K per rear. 
Elemlttanoee to be made payable to B. Q. COVB. 

OFTioi:— 

41 Wellington St., Coven Qarden. London, England. 



CYCLONE SPRAY PUMP 

THB GBKAT INBKCT KxTEBMI- 

MATOR. Sprays as fine as mlBt. Just 
the thlDK for Koses, Palms, Pota- 
toes, Tobacco, Small Fruits, Hen- 
Roosts, etc. All tin, 50c. ; all ™ , .. 

polished copper. 1100. Cneh with Order. Weighs 
boied, about 5 pounds. Buyer pays express. 
STEVENS & CO., 107 Chambers St., N.V. City. 

Let the advertiser know that you take 
the Florist. Then he'll know how he 
came to get your order. 





THE NEW 

Standard 

Ventilating 

Machines. 

Always reliable. 

Self-oiling. 

Four Styles. 

All warranted first- 
class. 

Send for catalogue and 
see what first-class flo- 
rists are tising. 

THE 

E. HIPPARD CO., 

YOUNGSTOWN, 0. 




■JJL^^I^ 


Invalid Appliance Co., 


lUlUEjB^ci^PWtflkill. 


MANUFACTURBBS OP 


'I^P^^ 


COLUMBIA PLANT TUBS 


■^^y^iSr 


Th. kIM IBa< «.« (Jl.l«l. ■ 


T^^P» 


11 yODf srcTlfiman dixeo'l hoodk Urnn, 
order of Di dlmL 


■hHiiIb^H 


FAOTOPy AND OFFICII 


^KfUB« 


ISO-lOO VtOOl* «T., ONIOAOO. 



Red Standard Pots. 

CORRECT SIZE. 
SUPERIOR QUALITY. 



Write for price list. 



6. HENNEGKE 60.. 



MILWAUKEE, 
WIS. 



FLOWER POTS 



ALL KINDS. 



A SPECIALTY 



STANDARD POTS 

Liat and SAMPLES FREE. 
BWAHN'8 POTTERY MF'G CO., 

P. O. Box 78, Minneapolii, Minn. 

Please menlion the A merican Florist when un itmg. 

A LL Nurierymen, Seedtmen and FlorUti wlih- 
ing to do buiioeii with Europe ihould lend 



(or tbe . 



"Horticultural Advertiser" 

Tlili ll the Brltith T»de Paper, being read weekly 
by all Horticultural traderi; It ll alio taken by 
over 1000 o( tbe beit Continental houaei. Annual 
■nbioriptlon to oover ooit of pottage 76 oenti. 
AdilrMi IDITORB OF THB " H. A." 
Ohilwail Nuraarlaa - Matla, Inslantf. 



rgoo. 



The American Florist. 



23 




BRANCH 

mREHOVSE 

Jersey (mf.KJ^ "1'n^ ciphm 

• lP/<Gl 5lAND(nY, H.Y. 'Y^' 



^CTORY. 
713-719 

Wharton 
• St.- 




The Bottomless Pot 

510RE ESPECIALLY FOR VIOLET 

AND CARNATION CCLTORE, 
ALSO 

THOSE BED POTS 

"Standards." 

Azalea Pots, Fern Pots, Bulb Pans. 



DETROIT FLOWER POT M'F'Y, 
Established 1853. DETROIT. MICH. 

P. (). Address, 490 Howard St. 
HARRY BALSLtY, Traveling Representlitive. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing 

STANDARD FLOWER POTS! 

Packed in small crates, easy to handle. 



Price per crate 
UOO 3-ln. pou In crate, 14. S8 
1600 2X" " 6.25 

1600 2S" " B.OO 

1000 3 " " 5W 

800 SH" " 6.80 

600 4 " " 4.60 

320 6 " " 4.61 

I<4 6 •' " 3. IB 



Price per orate 
120 7-ln. pots In orate, 14.20 
BO 8 " " 3.00 

48 9 " ■ 3,60 

48 10 " " 4.80 

24 11 •• " 3.60 

24 12 " " 4.80 

1214 " " 4.80 

16 " " 4. 6" 



■ Seed pan", same p^lce as pots. Send for price list of 
Cylinders for Cat Flowers, Hanglnff Baskets. Lawn 
Vases, etc. 10 per cent off for caeb with ord^ r. 

HILFINQER BROS. POTTERY, 

OK.... FORT EDWARD, N. V. 

AnauRT BOLKIB A Sons. New Tork Agenu 

FiS niT BTRIBT. N»W TORK CTTT 

KELLER BROS., 



213-16-17-19-21-23 Peari St.. 
NORRISTOWN. PA. 



Manufacturers of Standard Flower Pots, red in 
color, equal to the best on the market; are 16 
miles from Philadelphia, best of railroad connec- 
tions. We give special attention to mail orders and 
make special sizes to order in quantities. A 
postal mil bring prices and discounts. 
hfase menlion the American Florist when wriltng. 




W^tcr Every Day in the Year for 
Flowers and Lawns when 

RIDER or ERICSSON 

HOT AIR PUMPS 

are tised. Nearly 25,000 sold during the past 

twenty-five years. 
Send to nearest office for Catalogue "A 3." 

RIDER-ERICSSON ENGINE CO. 

SS Cortlandt Street, Sew York, Teniente-Re« 71 ^^ Iiake Street, Chicag'o. 

339 Franklin Street, Boston. Havana Cuba ° *0 H. 7th Street, Philadelphia. 

692 Oral? Street. Montreal, P. Q '■"•'•' 22 A, Pitt Street, Sidney, N. S. W. 




''MAGHlNERYaj'j SUPPLIES aiBlRGAjiLEBlCES 

We have the largest machinery depot on earth. We secure our machinery from 
the various buildings and plants that we are constantly buying. We purchased The 
World's Fair, The Omaha Exposition, The Chicago Post-Office and numerous other 
noted structures. Our facilities for rebuilding machinery are unsurpassed. We 
cover all our sales with binding guarantees. BOILERS FROM $25 UP. ENGINES 
FROM $35 UP. STEAM PUMPS FROM $15 UP ■ etc., etc 

We also carrj' a complete stock of general supplies, such as 
BELTING, SHAFTING. MANGERS, PULLEYS, IRON 
PiPE, V ALVESarid FITTINGS, IRON ROOFING, HARD- 
WARE. PLUMBING MATERIAL, etc. Cut this 
ad. out and we \' 'll send vou Free our 250 page 
Catalogue No. * We are cnvt.intly bu ving- 

Jf/\\ '\''''^^'j^'\ 1^^ J entire stocks at Sheriffs and Recei\ers Sales. 

M b^ a WiVJ CHICAGO HOUSE WRECKING CO. 

West 3Sth and Iron Streets, - CHICAGO. 

A -/ /III I I \ V \ \ 



CYPRESS '^^c'^^^'Z...^ 










theGORTON SIDE FEED BOILER 

Is specially constructed so that it will maintain a steady 
fire all night without attention, which is a very 
important item to be considered in select- 
ing; a greenhouse boiler. 

^^Send for Catalogue and investigate for yourself. 



'GORTON & LIOGERWOOD CO., 



NEW YORK. 



Valley Gutter and 
Drip Conductor, 54c 
per fnot Without 
brip COEductor. 40c 
per foot. 




Jennings Bros., 



GREENnOlSE 
DESIGNERS.,. 
& BUILDERS. 

Mfrs of and dealers In Cre^nhouse Specialties, 

Patent Iron Bench Frame Fittings, 
Improved Cast iron Gutters and Plates. 
send for Jgp„ j„g5 Bf55_ ^ ?j.igdelphia. Pa. 



Catalogue 
When writing please mention American Florist 




GEO. KELLER & SON, 

MANUIAOTUBKES 0» 

Flower Pots. 

Before bnylng write for prices. 

361-363 Herndon Street 
near Wrlghtwood Are., 

CHICAGO. ILL. 



Standard.?* J- 

FLOWER 



Pot5 



If your ereenhouBea are within 500 miles of 
the Cftpitol, write us; wc can save you money. 

W. H. ERNEST, 



28th and M SIreeti N. E. 



WASHINSTON. D. C. 



24 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 4, 



Index to Advertisers. 



AdTertlBlng Batei 

Allen J K 11 

Amerlcsn I10MC0...8 II 

Amllnii Albert F 19 

Amllng K 9 

ABmUB R 2(1 

Barnard W W & Co.. I 

Baur 8 Alfred I 

BaMett & WaBhburn ... 9 
Bayersdorf er H * Co. . 21 

Benthey *Co 9 

Berger H H 4 Co 12 

Berning H Q 10 

BlodekuDBt Die 12 

Blano A & Co 14 

BobblnX 4 AUlns is 

BoBton Letter Co 21 

Brant &Noe 19 

Brown Peter 11 

Brown & Oanfleld 17 

BndlongJ A 9 18 

BonyardH A.......... 8 

Burpee W Atlee 4 Co. 11 

CarmodyJ n IV 

Chadwlck Chas 18 

Cbloago t:amallon Co. 10 
Chicago Hooae Wreck- 
ing Co 23 

Cincinnati CntFloCo. 10 
Clark Wm A 4 Bon.. 14 

Cleary John P 17 

Clipper Lawn Mower 

Co 

Cohen J M 

Collins ThoB 

Conard & JoneB Co. . . 
Conley John 4 Son... 

Cottage Gardens 

Crabb & Hunter 

Craig Robt & Son 19 

Crouch Mrs J W 19 

Crowl Fern Co....^... S 
Cunningham Jos H. .. 15 
Cunningham D O 

Glass Co Ill 

Deamud J B 9 

De Smet Freres 16 

Dessert A 12 

Detroit Flo'r Pot Wks. 23 
De.vter Lillian Allen., s 
Dickinson Co Albert.. H 

Dletech A4 Co IV 

Dillon J L 19 

Domer Fred&Sons Co. 18 

DreerH A 16 21 

Dnnne 4 Co 21 

Bastem Chemical Co. . 21 

Blchholz Conrad II 

BIcbholi Henry l.i 

Ernest W H 23 

Ferguson John B 10 

Flnley Lawn Bake Co. 24 
Florida Nat Prod CO .. 21 
Florists' Exchange .... 21 

Ford Bros 11 

Foster Lucius H 19 

Gardeners Chronicle. . 7.' 

Gardening Co The 12 

Garland Geo M Ill 

Oasser J M 19 

Geller SIgmund 2l 

Ghormley Wm 11 

Gibbons H W Il' 

GIblln 4 Co Ill 

Globe G'^eenhouseB ... I'.i 
Gorton & Lldgerwood , 2:1 
Gullett 4 tonB W a 18 I'.i 

Gtinther Wm H II 

Gumey Heater Co 2i 

llagenbureer Carl 14 

Hall Ass'n -I 

Hancock (>eo 4 Son ... 18 

Hansen Chris r.» 

Heacock Joseph 14 

Helnl Jos I'.I 

Helsa J B 18 

Hennecke C Co 22 

Herendeen Mfg Co — IV 

Herr AlbertM 16 

Herrmann A 21 

Hews A H 4 Co 2:1 

Hliflnger Bros 2:i 

HIIIB O 4 Co I 

HIppard K 20 

Ultcnings 4 Co IV 

Hotliiian B M 4 U N. 18 
Helton 4 Hunkel Co. . 8 

Hooker UM Co Ill 

lloran Edw C 11 

Hort AdT ti 

Hose Connection Co.. 21 
Howland Nursery Co. . 14 

Hull 4 Co 22 

Hunt B U 9 

Inralld Appliance Co. 22 
Jackson 4 PerklnB Co. 14 

Jacksun V, B 14 

Jacobs a 4 Hons IV 

Jennings K B II 



Jennings Bros., 
.tohnson 4 Stokes.. 

Joy 4 Son 

Kasting W F 

Keller Bros 

Keller Geo 4 Son.... 

Kellogg Geo M 

Kennioott Bros Co. . 
Klft Job 4 Bon... 



Kllboum R 20 

King Fred J 16 

KroescbeUBroi Co.. ..IV 

KuehnC A 10 

KuhlGeo A 19 

Lager 4 Hurrell 14 

Laker'w Rose Garden. 17 

Lang JulluB 11 

Ley John H 21 

Lookland Lum Co 22 

Long DB II 

LouBdale Edwin 20 

Lord4Bumham Co... IV 

Lucas J 4 Go 24 

Lynch W B 9 

McCarthy 4 Co N F. . 10 
McColgan 4Co Jas... II 

McFadden E C 12 

MoKellar 4 Wlntorson 9 

MacBean AS I'.i 

Mader Paul 16 

Meyer John C 4 Co ... II 
Miles Isaac 19 



MlUang 4 Co. 

MlUang Frank 

Model Plant Stake Co 
Muller's Gartner Zel- 

tung 

Monlnger J CCo 

Montana Fertilizer Co 

Moon Samuel C 14 

Moon Wm H 14 

Moore, Hentz 4NaBb.. 11 

Morris Floral Co 20 

Moss Geo M 10 

MunoJobn 19 

Murphy Wm 18 

Murray HIU Hotel.... 16 

Myers 4 Co 24 

New York Hotel 16 

Nlessen Leo 10 

N Y Cut Flower Bx. . . 11 
N T Cut Flower Co.... 11 
Pederson-B jergaard J II 

Pennock Bam l S 10 

Pierce F O Co IV 

Pittsburg Cut Flo Co. . 8 

PoUworth CCCo 8 

Prince AG4 Co 9 17 

QuakerClty Mo hWk». Ill 

BandaU A L 9 

Baynor J 1 11 

Reed Glass 4Palnt Co 1 iT 
Elegan Printing House 21 

Betoberg Geo 9 I'.i 

Rein berg Peter 9 I'.i 

Ketzer Walt«r4 Co... 1 

ttlceM4Co '20 

Rlder-ErlcBsonBng Co 23 

Rodgers Alex II 

Roiker A46onB II 

Rose Mfg Co II 

Rupp John F l.'» 

Sander 4 Co '2J 

Schlllo Adam IV 

Schmidt J C 17 19 

Hchwelgert Chas 16 

Scotiey John A Ill 

Snerldan W F 11 

Slebrecht 4 Bon 1 

Situations 4 WanM. ... 7 

BkabcuraDIp Co 21 

Smith Nath4D0n 16 

Soltau C 11 

South Side Floral Co 18 

Stahl Chas B 10 

Stearns Lumber Co — HI 

Steffens Kmll 21 

Stevens 4 Co 22 

Sloolhofl n A 4 Co . II 
StorrB 4 Harrison Co. 14 

Sutherland Geo A 1u 

Bwahn PotteryMfgCo . '-'".' 

Tesson Robt F 'iu 

Thorbum J M 4 Co. 1'-' 
Tobacco Warenoufllng 

and Trading Co 21 

Traendly 4 Schenck... II 

Vail Seed Co 21 

Van Aken Bros 14 

Van Wert Greenh es . 14 
Vaughan's Seed SUire 

:..12 14 17 I'.I I 

VIck'B Sons Jas 11 

Vincent 4 Son '.'0 

Vredenburg 4 Co 12 

Wabash BR H 

WaUonGC II 

Weatbered'B Sons 

Thos W Ill 

Weber H 4 Bout 12 

Weeber 4 Don I' 

Wetland 4 Rlsch 'i 

Welch BroB lu 

Whilldin Pot Co 23 

Whitton Samuel 16 

WIetor Bros •■> 

Wilson H E 19 

WIttbold The Geo Co. 1 

Wood Bros 11 

WoodroSe 4 Bem- 

helmer 10 

Wredell 11 

Youmans Bros Hi 

Toung Jno II 

Tonng 4 Nugent 11 

Young Thos Jr II 

ZIrnglebel n 11 





BOILERS 



Something that th*' florist can rely upon and know that they 
t will give satisfaction. The greatest results obtained 

from a minimum consumption of luel. 



GURNEY "400 SERIES" 

HOT WATER HEATER 



We manufacture Boilers capable of heating any size Greenhouse. 
RELIABLE-DURABLE-ECONOMICAL. 

SEND FOR (IREENUOUgE CATALdOUE AND PRICE LIST. 

GURNEY HEATER MFG. GO. 



NEW YORK ciTT BitAN(U : 74 Franklin St. Cor. Arch. 

Ill Filth Ave., cor I8th St. BOSTON. MASS. 

Western Selllns Agents, JAMES B. CLOW & SONS, SI3S-334 Lake St., Chlcaeo, lU. 




[xclusively 

A GREENHOUSE HEATER! 

SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE WORK. 
EASY TO ERECT; SIMPLE IN OPER- 
ATION; ECONOMICAL AS TO 
CONSUMPTION OF FUEL. 
Send for Catalogue and latest prices. 

MYERS 8z: CO., 



1514-1520 So 9lh St., 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



CKptablishkd 1849.) 



nnley Rotary Lawn Rake, 



Something New. 




Papa! Ws can K.\kk \ nvi^ I.awn." 



THIS IS A CUT 
SHOWING THE 

FINLEY 

LAWN 

RAKE 

IN OPERATION 



The mower and reaper 
Hticceeded the scythe; the 
t hresher succeeded the 
rifill — but never until now 
huH a machine been ia- 
vHnted to take the place 
• 'f the antiquated hand 
rake The machine haa 
arrived. This Is It. YOU 
NBKD IT. 



A THOROUGHLY durable and reliable machine, to follow the lawn mower. It takes up all 
the grass, either long or short; twigs, leaves and sraull loose litter of any kind, stones in- 
cluded, that a HAND rake would not touch. A man can rake three times as fast as with a hand 
rake. {3^A CHILD can run it. 

Just the thing to Qght crab grass. Send fop Particulars. 

It will save its cost in 60 days on any good lawn. 

^FINLEY LAWN RAKE CO., 

I PRICE $12 OO. JOLIET. ILLINOIS. 

When writing mention American Florist. 



^^0%0^ ' 



'^0^mmm^mf 



#^»^> %# ^^M^^I^I^I 



KEY TO CSES 



OF GLASS. 

Sezid £ox* It. 

JOHN LUCAS & CO., Philadelphia.; 



^#»^^>^>^M»^i^>#»#»#^# » ^>^i#' 




RmBrica. is "tba Prnw of ths UbssbI; there may be mare comfort Rmidships, but we are the £rst ta touch Unknou/a Seas," 



Vol. XVI. 



CHICAQO AND NEW YORK. AUGUST ii. 1900. 



No. 636. 



fsm ^mi^mim lF(L@Lei!gir 



Copyrieht 1900, by American Florist Company. 
Entered as Second-Class Mail Matter. 

Published eveet Saturday bt 
AMERICAN FLORIST COMPANY. 

334 Dearborn St., Chicago. 
Eastern Office: 67 Bromfleld St., Boston. 

Subscription, 11.00 a year. To Europe, $2.00. 

Subscriptions accepted only from the trade. 

SOCIETY OP AMERICAN FLORISTS AND 
ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURISTS. 

OmcERS— E. M. Wood, Natick, Mass., presi- 
dent; P. K. P1BK8ON, Tarrytown, N. Y., vice- 
president: Wm. J. Stewabt, 67 Bromfleld St., 
Boston, Mass., secretary; H. B. Beattt, Oil City, 
Pa., treasurer. The sixteenth annual meeting 
will be held at New York, August 21 to 24, 1900. 



AMERICAN ROSE SOCIETY. 

Annual meeting at New York, 1901. Leonabd 
Babbon, 136 Liberty St., New York, secretary. 



THE AMERICAN CARNATION SOCIETY. 

Annual convention at Baltimore, February, 
1901. ALBEBT M. Hbbb, Lancaster, Pa., secretary. 



CHRYSANTHEMUM SOCIETY OF AMERICA. 

Annual meeting at New York, August, 1900. 
Elueb D. Smith, Adrian, Mich, secretary. 

THIS ISSUE 32 PAGES WIIH COVER. 



CONTENTS. 

A ramble in the convention city 25 

The mall in Central Park, New York (illus.).. ..27 

The English sweet p^a conference (illus.) 28 

Conventions at expositions 28 

New York 30 

Boston 30 

Philadelphia 30 

Chicago 31 

Coal report of Chicago Florists' Club 31 

Twenty- Ave cents on the dollar 32 

Railroad fares fo"* Canadians 32 

Mr. Scott of Buffalo 32 

Soci^-ty of American Florists 32 

Convention tips 3i 

Th" convention hall 32 

Buffalo to New York 32 

Chicago to New York 3'J 

The seed trade 38 

^Pepper's Prolific tomato 3H 

— An English selection of sweet peas 38 

Cleveland 38 

The nursery trade 10 

— The cl mails disease 40 

Washington 40 

Our pastimes— At Chicago 42 

—At Boston 42 

—At Detroit 42 

—At FlBtbmh 42 

—At Philadelphia 42 

—At New York -. 42 

— To the bowlers 42 

A hint to conveutionltes 42 

New York hotels 42 

Cold St' rage for bulbs 44 

Water tank and boiler 46 

Peoria 48 

Buffalo 50 



A Ramble in the Convention City. 

The chief city of the western world in 
population, wealth and commerce opens 
ior the second time her hospitable doors to 
our great national horticultural organiza- 
tion. Apart from the generous welcome 
extended by her citizens, the lavish 
entertainment provided by the local 
representatives of our profession and the 
favoring wave of prosperity which has 
come to the S. A. F., the vast metropolis 
presents irresistible allurements that are 
certain to draw to the convention of 
1900 an unprecedented number of visi- 
tors. To see New York is a laudable 
ambition entertained by every American 
and, to those to whom her busy streets 
are familiar from frequent visits, she still 
presents exclusive charms, for, be the 
visitor a staid Philadelphian, cultured 
Bnstonian, hustling Chicagoan or a 
"dyed in the wool" exponent of the 
peculiar claims for precedence of any 
other city on the continent, yet he is 
forced to acknowledge that there is, and 
always will be, but one New York. 

New York was settled by the Dutch in 
the year 1614. The territory now 
included in New York state was 
known as New Netherlands, and the 
little town located with such wise fore- 
sight on the seaward end ol Manhattan 
Island was given the name of New Ams- 
terdam. But the English had their eye 
on this promising colony and the claim 
of the Dutch to its ownership was soon 
in dispute, with the result that Charles 

II made a grant of it to his brother, the 
Duke of York, and in 165-t sent a strong 
force against it. The Dutch, being unpre- 
pared lor resistance, submitted as grace- 
fully as possible under the circumstances 
— a course strongly contrasting with that 
being pursued by their countrymen in 
South Africa at the present time under a 
like stress — and the name was then 
changed to New York. Whether the 
Duke of York above referred to was the 
particular individual who is said to have 
marched his men "up to the top of the 
hill and marched them d iwn again" is 
not clear, but the time came, a century 
later, when the English, who had so 
triumphantly climbed this western hill, 
were forced, in their turn, to march 
down again. To celebrate the Declara- 
tion o) Independence the statue of George 

III was toppled over by the people, the 
metal of which it was wrought was 
melted into bullets foruse on hismsijesty's 
subjects, and, although the name of 
New York was still allowed to stand, 
many of the local appellations of streets 



and buildings were changed to accord 
better with the democratic tastes of the 
victors. 

In its earlier days the town, now 
grown to a metropolis of 3,500,000 
inhabitants, and exceeded in population 
by London alone among all the cities of 
the world, occupied only the southern 
ex'remity of Manhattan Island, at the 
union of the waters of the North or 
Hudson and East rivers, and it is in this 
"down town" district that the visitor 
will find most of the interesting historic 
spots of New York. The streets here are 
narrow, crooked and inconvenient, but 
full of excitement and interest, and, not- 
withstanding the wondrous growth of 
the city northward to the end of the 
island ten miles away and many miles 
beyond, yet this district remains still the 
center of commercial activity. A multi- 
tude of "sky-scrapers" look down from 
lofty heights upon ancient landmarks 
and the diminutive remnants of once- 
ambitious architecture, each of them 
harboring, during business hours, enough 
people to populate a goodly sized town. 

At the extreme southern point, looking 
seaward, is the oldest park in the city, 
twenty-one acres in extent, known as the 
Battery. In former times the homes of 
the aristocratic inhabitants fringed this 
territory as they now do Fifth avenue 
and Central Park. In Battery Park is 
old Castle Garden, once the landing place 
in America for millions of foreigners, now 
an aquarium and well worth a visit. 
Looking out toward the ocean is seen 
Bedloe's Island, on which, rearing its 
great torch 300 feet above the water, is 
the gigantic statue of Liberty Enlighten- 
ing the World; on the left is Castle 
William with the Borough of Brooklyn 
and Long Island shore beyond, and, on 
the right Staten Island and the New 
Jersey coast. A little distance north of 
the Battery is Bowling Green. Originally 
a tr> aty ground with the Indians, it was 
in 1732 laid out as a public square. It is 
now surrounded by exchanges, consu- 
lates and steamship offices and marks 
the beginning of Broadway, the great 
business artery of the American continent. 

From this point Broadway takes its 
course northward past many spots of 
historic interest, lined on either side with 
lofty commercial buildings, its pavement 
a maze of moving vehicles of every des- 
cription, its sidewalks trodden daily by 
men whose names are familiar in politics, 
commerce, finance and literature the 
world over. The cross streets westward 
lead to the water front of the North 
River, where are the piers of the ocean 



26 



The American Florist. 



Aug. II, 



sound steamers and Hudson river 
boats and the numerous ferries that 
convey the traveller to and from the 
many railroad terminals at Jersey City, 
Hoboken and Weehawken, and the piers 
of the great ocean steamship lines across 
on the Jersey side. On the east of Broad- 
way the streets lead to the Brooklyn 
bridge and various boat landings on the 
East river, to ferries to Brooklyn, the 
Navy Yard and Long Island City, and 
Blackwell's Island, where are located the 
city penal and pauper institutions. 
Others eastward lead to labyrinths of 
crooked ways where one may easily get 
lost — not geographically only, but in the 
strange surroundings of whole sections 
populated exclusively by Hebrews, Ger- 
mans, Italians or Chinese, where the 
English language is seldom heard and 
little is seen that is familiar to American 
eyes. 

Broadway does not proceed far before 
its history is interwoven with that of the 
beginnings of the flower business. In his 
address to the S A. F. at the time of its 
former visit to New York, John N. May 
referred to the time when, about the year 
1840, Isaac Buchanan, one of the pioneer 
florists, carried his stock every day in a 
large basket and sold it at the comer of 
Broadway and Wall street and consid- 
ered a business of $2 or $3 a good day's 
work. Directly opposite this comer on 
Broadway stands famous Trinity church, 
and a little farther along, at the corner 
of Vesey street, is old St. Paul's, sur- 
rounded by its quaint old burial ground, 
and within which is shown the pew once 
occupied by George Washington, with 
his initialsinscribed thereon. This corner, 
too, figures in the early history of our 
business, according to N. P. Willis, who, 
in his romantic "Open Air Musings in the 
City," published in 1849, tells of watch- 
ing from his window on Broadway, 
opposite St. Paul's, the flower merchants 
about 12 o'clock daily, setting their pots 
of roses and geraniums along the iron 
fence. 

The flower business has changed in 
many respects since then and the florist 
who should open up shop at noon now- 
adays wouldn't last long. The lapse of 
time has not been able to obliterate the 
floral prominence of Vesey street, for at 
stated intervals Cleary's auction room is 
the Mecca of the plant buyers, and there 
are numerous curbstone stands in that 
vicinity where marvelous floral novelties 
are displayed for the especial benefit of 
the prudent customer who prefers to buy 
bargains at the street stands rather than 
be ''robbed" by the wicked store florists! 
Here he has been buying for years, and, 
as there is "a new fool born every 
minute," will probably continue to buy 
for all time, the "Royal Japanese Parlor 
Flower, thirty-six hues and colors on one 
stem and blooms in twenty-one days," 
the "Singuillum Singuillis," the "Yellow 
Jac((," the blue dahlia and the "English 
Tuba Rugosa," which may be a currant 
bush that will bearflowers like a gloxinia 
or any other old thing to suit tastes that 
are fastidious. If you find time during 
convention week go down there and see 
the fun. 

In this neighborhood are Cortlandt, 
Dey, Barclay and Chambers streets, fre- 
quented by seedsmen and florists, their 
mention recalling to readers of the 
advertising columns of the Aiierican 
Florist such names j sThorburn, Rolker, 
Vaughan, Berger, Suzuki & lida and 
Weeber & Don. At the junction of Park 
Kow, on the east side of Broadway, is 
the postofSce, and just beyond is the 
City Hall Park, eight acres in extent, 



where a few months ago the formal 
beginning of the excavation for the great 
rapid transit subway was made with 
appropriate ceremonies. Here are the 
City Hall and County Court House and 
adjoining is Printing House Square, 
where are located the offices of the big 
daily newspapers. 

From the Battery to the convention 
hall is a distance of four miles. Three- 
quarters of this length up Broadway 
brings us to Twenty-third street, at the 
intersection of Fifth avenue, where the 
splendid Dewey Arch stands, and Madison 
Square, an open space of six acres just 
across which can be seen the towers of 
Madison Square Garden, where the New 
York Florists' Club held a number of 
successful exhibitions a few years ago. 
Here begins the famous "tenderloin" dis- 
trict, and here, too, may be said to com- 
mence the florist trade section of the city, 
for, while a few fine establishments ate 
below Twenty-third street, the great 
majority of the retailers and all the 
wholesalers are located above. What 
becomes of all the enormous product of 
the vast ranges of greenhouses that 
cluster all about the neighboring dis- 
tricts, in every New Jersey town, on 
Long Island, away up the Hudson river 
and along the shores of the Sound, is 
something beyond the comprehension 
even of those handling the flowers as 
they come to the city daily. In no other 
city in the world are so many green- 
house flowers marketed, the quantity 
passing through the hands of the whole- 
sale dealers during the busy season being 
almost incredible, and the system govern- 
ing the traffic has, with the rivalry of a 
score of dealers and the alertness and 
scrutiny of hundreds of enterprising 
growers, been ground down to a very 
fine edge. 

August, the convention month, is not 
a favorable time to see any business 
going on at these wholesale marts, but 
the visitors will make no mistake in call- 
ing, and those who do so will find that 
nobody understands better the science of 
making a brother florist feel at home 
than does the typical New York whole- 
saler. On Twenty-third street, near 
Sixth avenue, is the salesroom of the 
New Y'ork Cut Flower Company, and at 
the same location are Moore, Hentz & 
Nash. The rest of the wholesale estab- 
lishments are on West Twenty-eighth, 
Twenty-ninth and Thirtieth streets, 
mainly in the blocks between Sixth 
avenue and Broadway. On Twenty- 
eighth street are Sheridan, Thos. Young, 
Jr., Horan, Kaynor, John Young, Ghorm- 
ley, Bradsbaw, J. K. Allen, Young & 
Nugent, Bunyard and Traendly & 
Schenck, also Geller's supply house. On 
Twenty-ninth street are Millang, Hart, 
Gunther and others. Among those on 
Thirtieth street are Lang and Ford Bros, 
and Dunne & Co.'s supply house. Also 
worthy of a call is the Exchange at East 
Thirty-fourth street, near the ferry to 
Long Island City. Frank Millang does 
business here, and overhead is Herrmann's 
supply establishment. A visitor in New 
York, even having but one day to spend 
in the city, would do well to begin the 
day at 'Thirty-fourth street market. 
Here he will see troops of men, women, 
boys and girls, all nationalities, barter- 
ing, bantering, joking, scolding and push- 
ing with Bohemian freedom, some on 
urgent business, and others there only 
because it has become a habit with them. 
To see it, however, one must get there 
by () a. m., for by 8 a. m. it is all over for 
the day. 
The American Florist Company's 



Directory enumerates 230 florists in New 
York city proper. Adding 375 in Brook- 
lyn, Long Island City and other annexed 
territory gives a total of over 600. In 
the city stores all classes are found, from 
the palatial Broadway or Fifth avenue 
establishment down through successive 
gradations to the little "hole-in-the-wall" 
stand. As with the wholesalers, so with 
the retailers, little is going on in August 
and little effort is made at decorative 
efiect or display of nice stock, it being 
deemed sufficient to keep the place clean 
and cool and something green in the 
windows. Of street peddlers there are 
many hundreds, mostly Greeks. Just at 
present fruit peddling or su-nptuons 
idleness is the pursuit of the majority of 
them. The Greek as a flower hawker is 
essentially a New York institution. His 
first appearance as a participant in the 
florist trade was looked upon with 
uneasy jealousy by the existing retailers, 
but long association has bred indiffer- 
ence and now he has access to the same 
markets and the same material as the 
most aristocratic retailer and actually 
consumes, in the aggregate, such a large 
proportion of the gross cut of flowers 
that no review of New York market con- 
ditions is complete without taking him 
into consideration. He evidently has 
the support of the masses, otherwise he 
could not dispose of the vast quantity of 
stock he buys. With the retailer he has 
come to be regarded as one of the evils that 
cannot be cured — hence must be endured. 
To the wholesaler he is at certain sea- 
sons a godsend — at other times an intol- 
erable nuisance. To the grower he is an 
inspiration, and many a thousand feet of 
glass in the vicinity of Ntw York is 
directly due to his existence and the con- 
fidence that he is capable of assimilating 
a surplus of any dimensions. Whether 
the business at large would have been 
better off without him, whether different 
methods on the part of the retailer 
might not have solved the surplus prob- 
lem and made the street fakir superfluous 
— these are pertinent questions, but their 
consideration does not belong to this 
article. Grower or retailer, take a look 
at the Greek when you are in town; con- 
sider his ways and think whether you 
would like to transplant some of him to 
your own bailiwick. 

Greater New York has nearly 7,000 
acres of parks. Of the many scattered 
reservations of varying area which are 
included in this total, Pelham Bay Park 
contains 1,750 acres. Van Cortlandt 
Park 1,132 acres and Bronx Park 662 
acres. These are all located in the 
recently annexed Borough of the Bronx. 
In Bronx Park, in a space reserved for 
the New Y'ork Zoological Society, is a 
splendid collection of animals on exhibi- 
tion and in another section are the 
grounds and just completed greenhouses 
of the New York Botanical Garden which, 
no doubt, will be visited by most of the 
S. A. F. tourists. In Van Cortlandt 
Park are fine links which are patronized 
by the golf enthusiasts of the city. 
Pelham Park has a water frontage of 
seven miles on Long Island Sound and 
Pelham Bay. 

Best known of New York's pleasure 
grounds is Central Park. It contains 
862 acres — thirty years ago a waste of 
swamps, ledges and rubbish heaps, now 
a paradise of beautiful drives, lakes and 
forests, a world-famous triumph of the 
landscape gardener's art, extending from 
Fifty-ninth street to One Hundred and 
Tenth street, a distance of two and one 
half miles, with a width of over half a 
mile. There are nine miles of roads, six 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



27 




THE MALL IN CENTRAL PARK, NEW YORK. 



miles of bridle paths and thirty miles of 
walks, and within its borders have been 
planted over half a million trees and 
shrubs. Here are located the American 
Museum of Natural History, the Metro- 
politan Museum of Art and a fine 
menagerie. That most interesting relic 
of antiquity, Cleopatra's Xeedle, may 
also be seen in Central Park. This 
obelisk, which was presented to the city 
in 1877 by the khedive of Egypt, is of 
granite, seventy feet high and weighs 
200 tons. It is covered with hiero- 
glyphics which, however, are being rap- 
idly obliterated under the disintegrating 
influence of the rigorous climate. Its 
age is given as o,500 years, it having 
been made during the time when the 
Israelites were enslaved in Egypt. 

Prospect Park in the Borough of 
Brooklyn has an area of 526 acres and is 
accounted one of the finest examples of 
landscape gardening "in this country. It 
is an ideal resort for the people of a great 
city, combining utility and beauty in the 
highest degree. In its plantations are 
many specimens of native and foreign 
trees. 

Riverside Park extends a distance of 
three miles, from West Seventy-second 
street to West One Hundred and Thirti- 
eth street, along a high bluff overlooking 
the beautiful Hudson river. Here is the 
tomb of General Grant, and from the 
broad driveway which runs the entire 
length of the park a grand view of the 
palisades on the Jersey shore is aft'orded. 
Scattered throughout the city are a 
great number of smaller parks and 
squares, and more are contemplated, 
especially in the overcrowded sections of 



the city, where a bit of greensward and 
trees is of inestimable comfort to the 
children of the poor. 

New York in summer provides endless 
entertainment for those who from neces- 
sity or on pleasure bent, tarry within 
her gates. Trolley cars, ferry boats, 
elevated railroads and excursion steam- 
ers all are available by day or night to 
reach pleasure resorts of every descrip- 
tion. Coney Island, Brighton Beach, 
Manhattan Beach, Far Rockaway, Long 
Beach, Glen Island, Long Branch and 
many other less noted seaside resorts 
are within easy and comfortable access, 
and in the heart of the city are theatres, 
roof gardens and concert halls in abund- 
ance. It is to be hoped, however, that 
these and numberless other attractions 
of the great city will be omitted from the 
itinerary of the S. A. F. visitors until 
after the sessions of the convention are 
concluded and then the enjoyment of 
them will be all the greater because of 
the consciousness of duty well done. 

No visitor to New York should go 
away without taking a good look at 
Fifth avenue. Stage coaches run contin- 
uously from its beginning at Washington 
Squareas far as Eighty-ninth street, and 
the top of one of those omnibuses is an 
excellent observation place. In the sum- 
mer we shall miss the thousands of pleas- 
ure equipages the throngs of fashionably 
attired people, the beauty and life which 
Fifth avenue presents at other sea- 
sons, the equal of which can be seen 
nowhere else in America, but there are 
the fine club houses, magnificent churches 
and hotels and the palatial homes of 
multi-millionaires, merchant princes and 



noted families, fringing the avenue all 
along and presenting a wonderful pan- 
orama. 

We would like to take our readers out 
into the surrounding country and intro- 
duce them to some of the big establish- 
ments from whence come the enormous 
supplies of flowers and plants and other 
material for the New York wholesale mar- 
kets, and to their owners, many of whom 
are, indeed, already long and favorably 
known to the thousands who consult the 
reading and advertising pages of the 
American Flokist, to the great rose 
growing districts of Madison, Summit 
and Chatham, whose shipments daily 
amount to hundreds of boxes of roses; 
to Hoboken, New Durham and Ruther- 
ford, where may be seen acres of glass 
devoted to palms, roses, chrysanthe- 
mums, carnations and lilies; to Jersey 
City, Newark and the Oranges, where 
floriculture has planted its roots deeply 
and thrives on every side; to fertile Flat- 
bush, long thehomeof a coterie of florists 
as hospitable as they are skillful and 
prosperous; to Bayside and Flushing, 
long famed in rose and carnation lore, 
and neighboring Queens with its acres of 
geraniums, cannas and carnations; to 
College Point and White»tone, the heath 
growers' paradise; to Long Island City, 
Woodside, Elmhurst, Babylon and scores 
of other Long Island points where green- 
houses meet us at every turn; to New 
Rochelle, known everywhere, and away 
up the Hudson river to the famed violet 
growing districts of Poughkeepsie, High- 
land and Rhinebeck. Interesting, indeed, 
would it all be and the time devoted to 
such a tour of inspection would prove 



28 



The American Florist. 



Aug. ii< 



not only interesting but vastly profit- 
able. Those who can possibly prolong 
their stay a few days beyond the conven- 
tion time will find in this great commu- 
nity of prosperous florists a cordial wel- 
come and the useful information acquired 
will be not the least of the many benefits 
gained thiough attending the memorable 
convention of 1900. 

At the corner of Twentv-seventh street 
and Broadway, in Elks Hall, is the head- 
quarters of the New York Florists' Club. 
The beneficent influences of a horticult- 
ural society which are enjoyed in her 
sister cities are lacking in New York, 
although the love and appreciation of 
horticulture is no less here than else- 
where, as is evidenced in her fine public 
parks and cemeteries and the countless 
beautiful private estates that adorn the 
suburban districts and in the lavish pat- 
ronage bestowed upon her florists of 
every grade. The peculiar topography 
of greater New York is not favorable to 
concentration of sympathy or efi'ort and 
is a formidable barrier to frequent meet- 
ings and effectual co-operation. Realiz- 
ing the refractory conditions that have 
ever confronted the New York Florists' 
Club we are in a better position to fully 
appreciate the fidelity of purpose and 
self sacrificing effort that have been freely 
drawn upon to bring about the harmony 
and system shown in every little detail 
of the preparations for this great event 
in New York's floricultural history. 
From localities remote, reaching the club 
room only at much inconvenience, regard- 
less of storm or heat, these men, the 
names of many of whom are well known 
from the Atlantic to the Pacific and far 
beyond have come together and labored 
with but one end in view. Old misunder- 
standings have been forgotten, disturb- 
ers who have sought to excite jealousies 
between private and commercial men 
have been brushed aside and so they 
have stood together, shoulder to shoul- 
der — manly men in a manly effort for the 
honor of New York and the pleasure of 
their brother florists and gardeners from 
all over the country. If the convention 
is not the grandest horticultural event of 
the century in America, if the exhibition 
is not in every wpy unprecedentedly 
great, if every detail of the occasion doe's 
not go like clockwork and if every visitor 
to New York does not have the most 
enjoyable time in his or her life it will not 
be the fault of our friends and hosts, the 
oflicers and committees of the New York 
Florists' Club. 



The English Sweet Pea Conference. 

The promoters of the sweet pea show 
and conference at London, July 20 and 
21, commemorating the two-hundredth 
anniversary of the introduction of the 
sweet pea into England, have every 
reason to be satisfied with the fruits of 
their labors. It was unfortunate that 
the weather should have been so excess- 
ively hot for the week previous to and 
during the show. Nevertheless, sweet 
peas of better quality were never seen or 
in anything like such quantities. There 
were nearly 700 entries, and these did 
not include the large trade exhibits, 
which were, perhaps, the most import- 
ant feature of theshow, the large number 
of varieties included in these affording 
ufieful material for the classification 
committee. The exhibits of decorations 
and designs made of sweet peas sufft-red 
considerably from the excessive heat, 
although everv thing possible was done 
to keep up moisture, and many of the 
light designa were hopelessly withered 



before the judging was done. This 
occurred more particularly in the light, 
airy arrangement known as shower 
bouquets, thus showing conclusively 
that sweet peas are not adapted for this 
kind of work. In the more solid arrange- 
ments the flowers kept better, and some 
of the funeral arrangements were very 
good, a broken column, an erect cross 
with a good base, a book, a harp, and 
others, being well done. In some of the 
baskets and vases the flowers stood up 
well. The light arrangements for dinner 
tables were very pretty when first done, 
but the second day they were entirely 
withered up. 

The committee on classification met on 
Saturday morning, but was unable to 
complete its report. The gentlemen found 
much difficulty from the fact that some 
varieties were too much withered to serve 
their purDose. It was arranged to divide 
them up into groups, but it was rather 
difficult to come to a definite arrange- 
ment of colors. After some discussion it 
was decided to divide them as follows: 
White, blush, pink, rose, mauve, blue, 
purple, lavender, carmine, maroon, crim- 
son, yellow or buff, picotee edged, white 
ground fancies, yellow or buff ground 
fancies, red or rose flakes, purple or 
maroon flakes, crimson flakes, red or 
rose bicolors and salmon or orange selfs. 

It will be seen from the following list 
of awards made for distinct types and 
colors how difficult it is to decide which 
are actually the best, for in several 
instances the prizes went to three differ- 
erent varieties where there were several 
exhibitors staging the same variety as 
the one taking first prize. In the classes 
referred to the awards were as follows: 

In the class for one bunch of any dark 
variety, maroon, deep bronze or purple, 
first place was given to Black Knight, 
second to Stanley, third to Boreatton 
and fourth to Shahzada. 

In the class for pink varieties first place 
was given to Lovely, second to Kathe- 
rineTracey, third to Lovely. 

In the class for any pink variety first 
place was given to Lord Kenyon, second 
to Mrs. Dugdale, third to Royal Rose 
and fourth to Oriental. It will be seen 
that the varieties shown in this class 
differ considerably in shades of color. 

In class sixteen first went to Salopian, 
second to Mars and third to Firefly, but 
in most collections Mars was certainly 
the finest of the above named. 

In the class for erect standard varieties 
first went to Mrs. Dugdale, second and 
third toTriumph, but ordinarily Triumph 
is the finest type of this class. 

In the class for hooded standards first 
went to the Countess of Lathom, second 
to F. A. Hinton and third to Lady Grisel 
Hamilton, but the last named the com- 
mittee selected as the best type of a 
hooded variety. 

In the class for deep blue or violet first 
place was awarded to Duke of West- 
minster, second to Black Knight and 
third to Navy Blue. 

In the class for yellow or primrose 
varieties first was given to Queen Victoria 
and second and third to Mrs Eckford. 

In the class for pale blue, mauve or 
lavender sorts first was given to Lady 
Grisel Hamilton and second and third 
also went to that variety. 

In the class for white varieties all three 
prizes went to Sadie Burpee. 

In the class for blush or ffesh-color 
first went to Venus and second to Mrs. 
Fitzgerald. 

In the class for dark striped or flaked 
sorts first went to America and second 
to Princess of Wales. 



In the class for light striped or flaked 
varieties first was given to Pink Friar 
and second to Princess of Wales. 

By the awards in the last two classes 
it will be seen how difficult it will be to 
divide the various types. I think the 
objects of the committee would have 
been better realized if the flesh to deep 
red shades, and mauve to purple colors 
had been classed together. Or it would 
have been better still if the judges had 
selected the best examples of the various 
types from the large collections, and in 
addition to the prize for the general col- 
lection given a separate prize for 
the best example of each specified 
type. It will be sufficient to say 
of the collections that in all classes there 
were a number of competitors, and in 
many very fine blooms were seen, but no 
varieties distinct from those noted in the 
trade exhibiis. Although there were 
several entries for Burpee's Bush and 
Cupid varieties there was only one 
exhibitor who came forward, and the 
plants staged were hardly commendable. 

In the class for .American varieties the 
first prize collection included some good 
examples of Sadie Burpee, Aurora, Navy 
Blue, Boreatton and others. Of the trade 
exhibits five were considered worthy of 
gold medals. They were those of Messrs 
Hurst & Sons, who staged a very large 
collection of cut blooms, including all the 
standard varieties; H. J. Jones, whose 
group consisted of a large number of 
varieties grown in pots, and about 100 
distinct varieties of cut blooms; Eckford 
& Sons, the chief feature of whose large 
collection of cut blooms were such new 
varieties as Jeannie Gordon, Miss Wil- 
mott. Honorable Mrs. E. Kenyon nnd 
Coccinea; Dobbie & Co., whose collec- 
tion consisted of a large number of varie- 
ties, all of superb quality, Mrs. Joseph 
Chamberlain, Oriental and Triumph 
being very conspicuous; and Cannell & 
Sons, who had a large collection of cut 
blooms and some plants in pots, of the 
latter the Cupids being; very good, and 
of the cut blooms Lottie Hutchins, 
Aurora, Blushing Beauty, Celestial and 
Othello were very fine. H. 

Conventions at Expositions. 
I am inclined to the opinion that the 
holding of the S. A. F. convention in an 
exposition city will result to the benefit 
of the society, secure a larger attendance, 
incite more interest and be productive of 
more general good than if the meeting 
were held in another locality. The 
degree of success with which any educa- 
tional convention meets is, in a measure, 
indicated by the size of its membership 
list. If the S. A. F. meets in Buffalo in 
1901, a large attendance is at once 
assured, and there are large numbers of 
florists all over the country who have 
never attended an S. A. F. meeting and 
who, if once in attendance, and seeing 
the great advantages such an organiza- 
tion offers to its members, may become 
permanent members. These would at- 
tend at Buffalo simply because they 
could, while at the exposition, at the 
same time take intheconvention. Again, 
if the meeting is held elsewhere, it will 
fall below its usual attendance because 
many of the members will go to the 
exposition and can afford only one trip 
that summer. The meetings should not 
suffer, as a programme should be gotten 
up, so attractive, so entertaining as to 
command a full attendance. Would it 
not be policy for Chicago to withdraw 
her claim for 1901 under promise that 
she can haye the convention in 1902? 
Geo F. Crabb. 



tgoo. 



The American Florist. 



29 




30 



The American Florist. 



Aug. II, 



. New York. 

STATE OF THE MARKET. — SUPPLY BOTH 
LIGHT AND OF INFERIOR QUALITY. — 
DEMAND FOR BEAUTIES AND FUNERAL 
FLOWERS. — LAST DETAILS OF CONVEN- 
TION PREPARATIONS. 

Flower receipts in this market are very 
light, which is very fortunate for every- 
body interested, as there is no demand 
worthy of the name, and the quality of 
whatever rose stock comes in is of the 
lowest grade. Growers are beginning to 
cut from the new plants, and so the most 
of the material is short-stemmed and the 
warm weather has the buds fully blown 
out before they reach the city. The ash 
barrel fills up rapidly these days, in con- 
sequence, as the Greeks have practically 
abandoned the local flower market for 
the present and are doing business at 
Coney Island in any line that seems 
remunerative. American Beauties would 
sell well if available in good quality, but 
it is not possible to find many such. 
Even the Brooklyn hustlers, who manage 
to stir up some trade, as a rule, when 
nobody else can find it, are playing to 
very slow music just now. At the retail 
stores, and some wholesalers', house- 
cleaning is in order, so that everything 
shall look its best when the S. A. F. 
visitors are in town. Asters are abund- 
ant. Lily of the valley, owing to recent 
extra funeral work, is selling better this 
week. 

On next Monday, August 13, will be 
held the last regular meeting of the Flo- 
rists' Club previous to the convention. 
Final details of all preparations will be 
adjusted and it is very important that 
every member of the club be present on 
this occasion. 

Manager Cleary reports a heavy 
demand for space in the trade exposition 
during the past week, over 10,000 feet of 
floor space having already been assigned. 

Visitors in town: D. D. L. Farson and 
Walter Mott, Philadelphia. 



Boston. 

ASSURANCES OF A LARGE CONVENTION EEP- 
EESENTATION. — MEMBERS WILL TRAVEL 
BY VARIOUS ROUTES. — ANOTHER GOOD 
SATURDAY EXHIBITION. — TRADE VERY 
QUIET. — THE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 
APPOINTS VARIOUS COMMITTEES. — BE- 
GONIAS AND FERNS IN DEMAND. 

It Is now assured that the attendance 
at New York from this section will be 
very large. Inciuiry among those who 
are intending to go discloses a consider- 
able variety of preferences as to route, 
and there being no less than nine differ- 
ent boat and all-rail routes it is probable 
that the parties will be pretty well dis- 
tributed, according to convenience or 
fancy. The tare from Boston, all-rail, is 
$5 going and $1.67 returning; on all 
boat lines, excepting the "cut-rate" line 
from Providence, it is $ t going and $1.33 
returning for all passengers who get a 
certificate from the ticket agent at the 
time they purchase going ticket. Those 
intending to go via boat are advised to 
engage their staterooms immediately. 
Out of town members who wish may 
engage accommodations through their 
local ticket agent by purchasing a 
through ticket, or Secretary W. J. 
Stewart will be glad to attend to any 
commission of this kind at any Boston 
railroad office on request of any member 
of the society, the latter specifying the 
route preferred. 

There was another showy display of 
garden flowers at Horticultural Hall on 
Saturday, August 4. The hall was com- 



fortably filled with exhibits. It was 
prize day for annuals and the premiums 
went to Mrs. J. L. Gardner, Mrs. E. M. 
Gill and E. C. Lewis. Fine collections of 
herbaceous plants, lilies, sweet peas, etc., 
were made by Blue Hill Nursery, Rea 
Bros., W. J. Clemsen and E. A. Weeks. 
H. A. Clinkaberry was given a certificate 
of merit for Cypripedium Clinkaberry- 
anum (Curtisii X Philipinensis). Hot 
house grapes from Miss E. J. Clark, John 
Ash gardener, were superb. 

At the meeting of the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society, on August 4, a 
committee on revision of constitution 
and bylaws was appointed consisting of 
Hon. F. H. Appleton, W. J. Stewart, 
Prof. C. S. Sargent, Augustus P. Loring 
and Dr. H. P. Wolcott. A nominating 
committee for officers for the ensuing 
year was also appointed as follows: 
W. C. Bavliss, C.G. Jenks, C. W. Parker, 
Arthur Hunnewell, C. Minot Weld and 
W. H. Eustis. W. C. Strong, C. B. Travis 
and J. H. Woodford were appointed to 
prepare resolutions on the death of C. H. 
B. Breck. 

Thos. Roland has proved himself a 
veritable wizard at growing Begonia 
Gloire de Lorraine. He has one house in 
which are many thousands of young 
plants, but they are nearly all ordered 
in advance and the demand for this 
beautiful winter plant seems insatiable. 
There is no empty or unproductive space 
at this thrifty Nahant establishment. 
Every house is made to do full time. 
First a crop of candytuft, then tomatoes 
and afterwards violets is the programme 
for one house this year. 

A cruise through the retail florists' 
stores of the city discloses little doing 
except an occasional funeral piece, which 
all are glad to make for any price they 
can get. At the wholesalers it is likewise 
very dull, but the receipts are quite light 
and the burden of carrying the stock is 
consecjuently lessened. Country buyers 
are seen occasionally and they are exceed- 
ingly welcome. 

L. H. Foster reports himself about 
50,000 behind on orders for Boston fern 
and is building three large houses so as 
catch up. It pays to grow "the true 
variety." 

.Mbe'rt Bloom, one of the Welch Bros, 
hustling clerks, is blooming in the rural 
surroundings of New Hampshire and 
Maine for two weeks. 

Welch Bros, are having their establish- 
ment repainted and renovated through- 
out. 

W. W. Edgar is building a 150-foot 
addition to his big palm house. 



Philadelphia. 

HEAT TAKES THE LIFE OUT OF TRADE. — 
MONTHLY MEETING OF THE CLUB.— 
EXCELLENT PAPER ON COOL ROOMS FOR 
FLORISTS. — RESOLUTIONS OF SYMPATHY. 
— JOHN WALKER GETS A SILVER WATER 
SERVICE. — SPEECHES AND SONGS. — ANEW 
DEPARTURE.— BUYER FOE THE TRADE. 

It is red hot with us again and shirt 
waist men are again seen upon the 
streets. Things are quiet. Stock is of 
about the same quality as last week, but 
a little more plentiful;' prices are about 
the same. 

The August meeting of the Florists' 
Club was held last Tuesday evening and, 
considering the weather, was quite well 
attended. The essay committee were 
bright in this selection of a subject, 
"Modern Cooling Rooms for Florists' 
Use." It seemed that after Mr. Geiger, 
the essayist, had his various plans posted 



up, the temperature of the room fell sev- 
eral degrees and when he began to read 
his paper it became quite cool. The 
essay, which, with the sketches, will 
appear in next week's issue, is a most 
valuable one and should be interesting 
to all large growers and dealers in cut 
flowers. The most modern ideas are 
described in such away that even he who 
runs may read and understand. Mr. 
Geiger's paper, like everything else he 
does, was well prepared and finished and 
gives a very clear idea of the various 
systems in vogue. In the ensuing discus- 
sion it was said that to prevent the wilt- 
ing of flowers sometimes noticed in the 
bottom of the ice box or cool room, it is 
well to have shallow pans of water 
there, which keep more moisture in the 
atmosphere. Mr. Geiger mentioned an 
interesting fact, saying that when the 
box at the Floral Exchange nurseries at 
Edgely fell below the freezing point, as 
it did in the extreme cold weather once 
or twice last winter, they placed a lot 
of ice in the bunker, when the tempera- 
ture at once rose several degrees. He 
said he was unable to account for this 
phenomenon. At the conclusion of the 
discussion Mr. Geiger was voted the 
thanks of the club for his very excellent 
paper. 

The following resolution was adopted 
by a standing vote: 

Resolved, That the secretary be 
instructed to send a letter to Mr. Lons- 
dale expressing the feeling of heartfelt 
sympathy which animates every member 
of the club in the sad bereavement which 
he has sustained in the loss of his two 
daughters. The circumstances attending 
this sad affair were so particularly dis- 
tressing, the young ladies were so often 
with us in our hours of relaxation at the 
club, that all feel a deep sense of personal 
loss, as if the stroke had fallen on their 
own family circle, and feel that a double 
measure of their tender regard and sym- 
pathy is due and is hereby extended to 
Mr. Lonsdale and his sorrowing family. 

On Saturday last John Walker, who 
has recently purchased the Hippard 
place at Youngstown, Ohio, and who 
will take possession of the same about 
the first of September, was given a testi- 
monial by his fellow employes of Robert 
Craig & Son, where he has held the posi- 
tion of foreman for so many years. All 
the employes, some forty-five in number, 
were gathered in the large potting shed, 
where, in a speech well suited to the occa- 
sion, Mr. Cavanaugh presented him with 
a magnificent silver water pitcher and 
cups, the whole mounted on a silver 
stand. Mr. Walker received the present 
with heartfelt thanks. Mr. Pearce, who 
goes with Mr. Walker, was also the 
recipient of a fine pipe and a very large 
box of tobacco. There was an abund- 
ance of refreshments, which were enjoyed 
by all present. Addresses were made by 
Mr. Craig, who also sang several songs, 
and W. B. Smith, an ex-mayor of the 
city, who was very humorous. Other 
speeches and songs enlivened the next 
two hours, and the party dispersed 
after many wishes to Mr. Walker and 
his good wife for success in their new 
home. 

W. E. McKissick, Jr., for the past seven 
years with S. S. Pennock,has announced 
himself as "buyer for the trade." This 
does not necessarily imply that he has 
started a purchasing agency for cut 
flowers, as previously reported in one of 
the trade papers, but that during the 
coming season he will be the representa- 
tive in this market of several large out- 



49UO. 



The American Florist. 



31 



of-town firms. He will purchase stock, 
inspect packing, etc., and look out for 
their entire interests in this city and its 
suburbs. At the present time he is 
located on a small scale at 40 N. Seventh 
street, but rumor says that he will open 
an office in the heart of the commission 
district ere many moons, where he will 
be thoroughly equipped with telegraph 
and long distance telephone connections 
and all paraphernalia necessary in giving 
his patrons the best service in every par- 
ticular. 

The club, or as many of them as can, 
will go to New York on a special train 
leaving Broad Street Station at 4:02 
Monday afternoon, August 20. The 
cars will be especially decorated. All 
del<'gates coming by way of this city are 
requested to arrive as early in the day 
as possible and partake of the hospitality 
of the Philadelphia club and join them on 
their special train for the balance of the 
w^ay. K. 



Chicago. 

HIGH TEMPERATURES PLAY HAVOC WITH 
THE FLORIST BUSINESS. — HBAT TOO 
INTENSE FOR LABOR IN THE GREEN- 
HOUSES. — STOCK DETERIORATES AS 
TRADE FALLS OFF.— ORCHIDS COMING 
FROM ENGLAND. — ACTIVITY AT WIETOR's. 
—VARIOUS NOTES. 

Nine persons died of the heat in Chi- 
cago on Monday, six on Tuesday, and 
the torridity has not yet appreciably 
abated. Need anything further be said 
of trade conditions? The temperature of 
the greenhouses has stood at fever heat 
for almost a week and it has been a 
physical impossibility for the growers to 
work as usual. Stock which was begin- 
ning to show material improvement has 
retrograded fearfully and, moreover, the 
heat is forcing the buds out at a rate 
uncalled for by the existing demand. 
There were many good roses last week 
but Kaiserin is about the only thing 
which is not overcome by the heat. The 
condition is particularly unfortunate 
because of the crop ot short Beauties 
which is just now making its appear- 
ance. Nearly all the Beauty growers are 
now getting a cut from young plants 
and the market is overloaded with short 
material, which will neither sell nor keep. 
Medium length Beauties are not so plen- 
tilul and move more freely but there is 
no demand for the few three-foot buds 
which are coming in. The cut of carna- 
tions irom plants in the field is increas- 
ing and some very fair stock is coming 
in, as most of the local growers have had 
good luck with their fields this season. 
There are still the usual quantities of 
asters, gladioli and other garden flowers, 
and they move slowly. However, it is 
generally predicted that a few days of 
cool weather will liven things up again. 

H. S. Skjoldager, gardener for E. G. 
Uihlein, and his family are expected home 
in a few days from Denmark, where they 
attended the golden wedding of Mr. 
Skjoldager's parents, who are enjoying 
perfect health. Enroute home Mr. Skjol- 
dager visited Sander & Co., at St. 
Albans, England, for the purpose of 
securing some rare orchids to add to 
Mr. Uihlein's collection. 

Learning that a number of florists 
have misinterpreted a circular issued by 
a certain railroad, the Chicago Florists' 
Club's transportation committee wishes 
it stated that by whatever railroad a 
florist travels to New York he must leave 
New York on or before August 28 in 
order to secure the reduced rate return- 
ing. 



At Wietor Brothers' they are hustling 
upon their big range of new houses and 
planting them with carnations as fast as 
ready. Their plants in the field have 
made strong growth and they are 
anxious to get them housed. The build- 
ings are nearly completed. 

Otto Wittbold will be one of the Chi- 
cago party at the New York convention 
and George Wittbold, the venerable head 
of the firm, whom everybody likes, is 
talking of surprising his friends by par- 
ticipating in the excursion. 

George Reinberg is sending in a big cut 
of roses, from 8,000 to 10,000 a day, 
and during reasonable weather the qual- 
ities are excellent. He has three houses 
of old Beauties which were given a rest 
and transplanted and which are now 
giving splendid results. 

Those who intend to join the Chicago 
party for the S. A. F. convention should, 
at the earliest possible moment consult 
Mr. Vosburgh, of the L. S. & M. S. Rail- 
way, 180 Clark street, with regard to 
transportation and berths. 

W. E. Lynch is busy repainting the 
interior of his establishment and means 
to have his place in the best possible 
shape for a large trade next season. 

George Reinberg was one of the recep- 
tion committee appointed to attend 
William Jennings Bryan during his visit 
to Chicago on Tuesday. 

Walter Retzer has been at Powers 
Lake, Wis., for rest and recuperation, his 
health not having been up to grade in 
the Isst few weeks. 

E. Wienhoeber will be one of the conven- 
tion party and, as usual, one meeting 
Wienhoeber will find Emil Buettner not 
far distant. 

At A. L. Randall's there are still some 
very lair roses in spite of the heat, com- 
ing in from Bowmanville growers. 

There is a fine display of gladioli at 
Vaughan's Seed Store, from the firm's 
grounds at Western Springs, 111. 

George F. Crabb and Henry Smith, of 
Grand Rapids, will accompany the Chi- 
cago party to the convention. 

W. J. Smyth and Mrs. Smyth are 
enroute down the St. Lawrence to New 
York for the convention. 

Weiland & Risch, not to be outdone by 
anyone, are busy redecorating their store. 

Among last week's visitors was Mrs. 
W. T. Hempstead, of Bloomington, 111. 

Visitors: H. V. Hunkel, of Milwaukee, 
Wis.; W. A. Reiman, of Vincennes. Ind.; 
F.J. King. Ottawa, 111. 



Coat Report of Chicago Florists' Club. 

The committee on purchase of coal has 
been ofl^ered by firms which they believe 
to be reliable, the following prices: 

Strictly Lower-vein Brazil Block, for 
the season ending April 1, 1901, $2.45. 

Hocking Valley Coal, for the season 
ending April 1, 1901: Domestic Lump, 
$2.80; Steam Lump, $2.70; Mine Run, 
$2.65; Steam Nut, $2.30. 

Central Illinois Coal, mined on Illinois 
Central R. R., a very good grade: 
Domestic Lump, immediate delivery, 
$1.90, season contract, $2.00; Steam 
Lump, immediate delivery, $1.80, season 
contract, $1.90; Egg Coal, immediate 
deUvery, $2.00, season contract, $2.10; 
Nut Coal, immediate delivery, $1.70, 
season contract, $1.80. 

On the above lUinoiscoals $3 switching 
charges per car can be paid by the 
shipper at the above prices. 

Streator Lump, present price at 
Chicago, $2.00, at mines, $1.80; cannot 
make season contract. 



Wilmington & Spring Valley, present 
price ai mines: Standard Lump, $2.15- 
Chunk, $2.25. 

No season contract can be made on 
Wilmington coal but special prices can 
be made for season contracts on Spring 
Valley coal. 

Pocahontas Coal, (smokeless). Mine 
Run, for present delivery, $3.35. Season 
contract cannot be made, but it is not 
probable that prices will go higher. 

New River (smokeless), Mine Run, 
present delivery, $3.25. Cannot con- 
tract for season. 

Thacker Splint, West Virginia, Steam 
Lump, for season ending April 1, 1901, 
$3.05. 

Henriette Smokeless, run of mine, sea- 
son ending April 1, 1901, $3.50. 

The above prices are based on delivery 
on the cars at Chicago. Some florists 
may be so located that a reduction can 
be obtained by saving on freight charges. 
In other cases the conditions may be 
such as to increase the prices somevvhat. 
In case the railroads lower the freight 
rates from mines, these prices will be 
lowered to correspond, but no increase 
will be made on the prices given on sea- 
son contract. Any florist or market 
gardener who is interested will be placed 
in communication with the persons mak- 
ing these oflers on application to W. N. 
Rudd, Room 1002, 185 Dearborn street, 
Chicago. 

I feel warranted in recommending that 
florists using less than 1,000 tons should 
buy the Lower- vein Brazil Block unless 
freight rates and shipping charges should 
strongly favor some other coal. Much 
of the so-called Lower- vein Brazil Block 
in the market is mixed with Upper-vein, 
which is a cheaper coal. We are assured 
of being furnished with genuine article at 
the above price. Of course, those employ- 
ing expert firemen day and night may be 
able to use the cheaper coals profitably. 

Having no authority to contract or 
buy, the committee has been unable to 
deal direct with the mines, and undoubt- 
edly has not obtained as low prices as it 
could have done could it have assumed 
the purchase of even 15,000 of the 25,000 
tons listed with it. It is hoped that a 
beginning may be made this year and 
that all will buy through the committee 
who can, as the purchase of a large 
quantity this year will make it easier 
next year to obtain concessions. 
Respectfully submitted, 

W. N. RuDD, Chairman. 



Oswego, N. Y.— D. A. Northrop has 
sold his establishment to Patrick Camp- 
bell, of New Y'ork. 

Lenox, Mass.— Mrs. John O'Brien died 
on Sunday, July 29, after a short illness. 
Besides her husband she leaves several 
children. 

Barnard Crossing, N. Y.— Ruestow & 
Wendt have purchased the business of 
the late Frank S. Payne and will conduct 
it along the same general lines. 

Jamestown, N. Y.— John H. Meyers, of 
New Brighton, Pa., was a recent visitor 
at the Lake View Rose Garden, investing 
largely in palms, ferns and other plants. 

Minneapolis, Minn.— C. A. Smith has 
sold his real estate, greenhouses and 
stock to L. S. Donaldson, proprietor of 
one of the largest department stores in 
the northwest. Mr. Donaldson's floral 
department has been a large buyer in the 
local and metropolitan markets and it is 
understood that he will improve and 
enlarge the Smith place and grow much 
of his supply hereafter. 



32 



The American Florist. 



Aug. II, 



Subscription, 11.00 a year. To Europe, 13.00. 

Subscriptions accepted only from those 

in the trade. 

Advertisements on all except cover pages, 

10 Cents a Line, Agate; 11.00 per inch. 

Cash with Order. 

No Special Position Guaranteed. 

Discounts are allowed, only on consecutive inser- 
tions, as follows — 6 times, 5 percent; 13 times, 
10 per cent, 26 times, 20 per cent; 
52 times, 30 per cent. 
Cover space sold only on yearly contract at 
tl.OOper inch, net, in the case of the two 
front pages, regular discounts ap- 
plying only to the back pages. 
The Advertising Department of the Amsbican 
Florist is for Florists, Seedsmen and Nurserymen 
and dealers in wares pertaining to those lines on/y. 
Orders lor less than one-hall inch space not accepted. 

Advertisements must reach us by Wednesday to 
secure insertion in the issue for the following 
Saturday. Address 

AME RICAN FLORIST CO.. CHICAGO. 

Secdbe your railroad berths and 
hotels for that New York trip. 

All convention visitors are requested 
to add the letters "S. A. F." after their 
names on the hotel registers. 

The annual convention of the Cana- 
dian Horticultural Association will be 
held at Montreal next week, August 16 
and 17. For programme see our issue of 
July 14, page 1506. 

Twenty-five Cents on the Dollar. 

The failure of W. A. McFadden, of 
Rosebank, Cincinnati, has been con- 
sidered at two meetings ol the creditors 
and apparently a settlement may be made 
on the basis of 25 cents on the dollar. 

Events like this suggest more and 
more that the tradesman paying 
regularly 100 cents on the dollar should 
at some place and on some day get 
recompense. 



Railroad Fares for Canadians. 

Eastern delegates to the Canadian 
Horticultural Association's convention 
at Montreal, August 16 and 17, can get 
single fare round trip rates if there are 
more than ten from any station on the 
Intercolonial Railway. Get a certificate 
at the station of departure, stating that 
you have paid single first class fare to 
Montreal, get the same signed by the 
secretary at the convention, present it 
at the Montreal ticket office before 
August 20, and you will be given a free 
ticket home. A. H. Ewing, Sec'y. 



Mr. Scott of Buffalo. 



Our attention has just been called to 
the fact that in a recent number of a 
journal which we never read Mr. Scott 
has taken occasion to make some very 
caustic comments on the recently pub- 
lished expressions of opinion, in this 
paper, on the question of holding conven- 
tions in exposition cities. 

We have always regarded the various 
gentlemen whose names were signed to the 
communications in question as earnest, 
honest and representative members of 
the trade. Mr. Scott sees fit to char- 
acterize these gentlemen as "bilious" or 
"warped" or "actuated by the narrow 
view that some other town (except 
Buffalo) would save them car fare." 

As unprejudiced and disinterested 
friends we desire to state to Mr. Scott 
that no cause, however meritorious, was 
ever advanced by calling names or 
imputing unworthy motives to its 
opponents. 



Society of American Florists. 

"Ueae Sir:— Enclosed please find $3 for S. A. F. 
dues. I wish to profit by experience gained at 
Detroit and save valuable time, as I thint; there 
will be a grand rush at New York on the first day 
of the convention." 

The writer of the above is one of a 
large number of wise men who are pay- 
ing initiation or dues and securing their 
badges in advance. Why do you not do 
likewise? Do it now and insure your 
own comfort on the opening day. If you 
paid dues for 1899, send $3; if you did 
not pay dues for 1899, send $5 and 
certificate with badge will be sent by 
return mail. W.J. Stewart, Sec'y, 
67 Bromfield street, Boston, Mass. 



Convention Tips. 

Pack up for New York. 

We want you with us. 

Five dollars for membership in the 
S. A. F. for 1900. A good investment. 

The man who goes to the conventions 
escapes dry rot. 

The exhibition will be a "corker," more 
valuable to an enterprising florist than 
two World's Fairs. 

Are you still undecided? You'll make 
a big mistake if you stay away; yon'U 
make no mistake if you go. 

Be sure to bring your 1900 badge and 
membership certificate with you, and 
don't forget to get your railroad certi- 
ficate from the ticket agent when you 
buy your ticket for New York. 

The Convention Hall. 

The building known as the Grand Cen- 
tral Palace or Industrial Building, where 
the New York convention will be held, is 
located on Lexington avenue and occu- 
pies the entire block between Forty- 
third and Forty-fourth streets. Lexing- 
ton avenue cars pass the door. This 
line runs on Broadway all the way up 
to Twenty-third street, where it switches 
off to Lexington avenue. The Third 
avenue cars which start from the post- 
ofEce are convenient to reach the conven- 
tion hall, as they pass within one block 
of it. Passengers on Sixth avenue sur- 
face cars can transfer east either at 
Twenty-eighth or Thirty-fourth streets 
and then transfer north on the Lexing- 
ton avenue car. One or the other of the 
above mentioned routes will be available 
for most of the visitors arriving via 
down town Jerries. Passengers arriving 
at Twenty-third street ferries should 
take Twenty-third street cross-town car 
and transfer to Lexington avenue car 
going north, and those arriving at Forty- 
second street ferry are carried within one 
block of the convention hall by the 
Forty-second street cross-town cars. 
Passengers on New York Central or New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R. are 
delivered at the Grand Central station, a 
block and a half from the convention 
hall. 

Buffalo to New York. 

While we are assured of a good delega- 
tion from our city to the convention it 
will, from various causes, be unlikely 
that we shall all travel by one route. 
The N. Y. C. & H. R. R., the Erie, the 
Delaware & Lackawanna and the Lehigh 
Valley all have evening trains which 
reach New York about 7 a. m., and all 
give the one-third rate on return on the 
certificate plan. The fare and a third on 
the New York Central is $12 33. On the 
other roads it is $10.70. Obtain your 
tickets a few hours in advance as it takes 
time for the agent to fill out the certifi- 
, cate. 



The Chicago delegation have chartered 
a special train and have kindly invited 
the Buffalo delegates to join them. There 
will be a day coach attached to the train 
which will leave Buffalo at 10 a. m. 
Monday, August 20, arriving in New 
York at 9 p. m. Anyone wishing to join 
the Chicago party will please notify 
William Scott, Main and Balcom streets, 
not later than Friday, August 17. 
Signed, Dan'l B. Long, 

Wm. Scott, Committee. 



Chicago to New York. 

The Chicago Florists' Club Committee 
on Transportation to the New York 
Convention of the Society of American 
Florists to be held August 21, 22, 23 
and 24, has arranged with the Lake 
Shore and Michigan Southern Railway 
for a special train, which will be vesti- 
buled and will contain as many Pullman 
sleepers as may be necessary, a buffet 
smoking car, a dining car and a day 
coach. 

The running time of this train will be 
as follows: 

Leave Chicago - 3:00 p. m. Sunday, August 19. 
Arrive Niagara Falls 7:30a.m. Monday, August 20. 
Leave Niagara Falls9:30a. m. Monday, ,\ueust20. 
Leave Butfalo - - 10:20 a. m. Monday. August 20. 
Arrive New York - 9:00 p. m. Monday, August 20. 
(Grand Central Station.) 

The railroad fare tor the round trip will 
be $26.70 on the certificate plan. The 
sleeping-car fare will be $5 for a double 
berth to New Y'ork. But if sleeper accom- 
modations are desired to Buffalo only, 
sleeper tickets from Chicago to Buffalo 
may be had for $3 and the remainder of 
the distance traveled in the day coach. 

At Niagara Falls an hour will be 
devoted to a trip around the Gorge Route 
Electric Line, which on the American side 
runs for miles below the falls along the 
rapids, whirlpool, etc. Special trolley cars 
will await the arrival of our special train. 
Those not wishing to take the trip 
through the gorge can devote their time 
to seeing the falls in any way they desire. 

Returning from New York the members 
of the party have the option of returning 
by all rail route, or of taking the boat as 
far as Albany. And as a daylight ride up 
the Hudson is an exceedingly enjoyable 
trip the majority will no doubt take 
advantage of it. 

The boat leaves New York, foot of Des- 
brosses street, at 8:40 a. m. daily, reach- 
ing Albany at 6:10 p. m. A westbound 
train leaves Albany at 10 p. m., which 
arrives at Chicago at 9 p. m. next day. 
To any preferring the lake trip Bufialoto 
Cleveland the privilege of taking the 
C. & B. Transit Co.'s boat is afi'orded. 

Berths may be reserved in the special 
sleepers by addressing L. F. Vosburgh, 
City Passenger and Ticket Agent, Lake 
Shore and Michigan Southern Railway, 
180 Clark street, Chicago, who will also 
supply any other information. Railroad 
tickets and certificates may be had at 
the above address or at the station. 

By vote of the Chicago Florists' Club 
the Committee was instructed to invite 
all florists in the west to travel with the 
Chicago party and to share the advan- 
tages secured by the committee. We 
shall be pleased to have your company 
on this trip. The New York convention 
promises to be a memorable one, and 
every florist who can possibly do so 
should go. 

Please make your berth reservation as 
early as possible. 

G. L. Grant, 

W. N. RCDD, 

Walter Kreitung, 
Transportation Committee. 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



33 



SITUATIONS. WANTS FOR SALE, 

SITUATION WANTED— As manager or head gar- 
dener on private estate; good all-around man; 
German, married, do ctalldrea. Best of references. 
Address C N C, care American Florist. 

SITUATION WANTBD-By a flrct class cut flower 
grower and propagator of all plants forwholesaie 
place; a tjood worker; 30 years' experience; American, 
marr.ed, small family. Best of references Address 
C B. care American Florist. 

SITUATION WANTED— As foreman; successful 
grower of cut fluwersaT'd plants; capable of tak- 
ing cbarge; ^irgle; ageSS; 21 years' experience. Ref- 
erences. Address E H K. 

27 Rerkwlth Ave.. Cleveland, O. 

SITUATION WANTKD-Bva cotnpeteni grower In 
any line: married no children: want permanent 
place rather than hlga wages Good r^^ferences. 
Address Curt Koehler, 

5S5 Broadway Kxtenslon. Dubuque, la. 

SITUATION WANTBD-By a practical grower of 
roses, carnations, 'mums, ferns and general bed- 
ding stock; capable to take charge. Good references. 
East preferred. Address E B. 

care A Young, 13S Colton St., Sprlngfleid, Maps. 

SITUATION WANTED— As foreman, by a tlrst class 
grower of roses and cut tl wers; general plants- 
man: single, age 33 A Srst-class place wanted. Best 
of references. Open for engageme t now or later. 
Address Grower, care American Florist. 

SITUATION WANTBD-By a young man. 25 years 
Old; with gooQ experience In roses, carnations 
and general g eenhouse plants. First-class references 
from Kuijland. Holland and Germany. Steady p'ace 
wanted. Address Y B, care American Fl jrist, 

SITUATION WANTED- As foreman by a flrst-class 
growar of ro&es, carnations, 'mums, violets and 
decorative ptnnts and forcer of bults. Only a flrst- 
class place where good wages are given. Good refer- 
ences. D P N, 249 N Tenth St , Phlladelpha. Pa 

SITUATION WANTED— By a thoroughly practical 
gardener and florist; Scotch; 13 years in this coun- 
try and VI years In the old country in some of the 
best places there. Can do landscape wurk. Good 
general gardener on private place; am a Christian; 
married, three children; aged 4). Address 

W S, Box 34, Montague, Mich. 

SITUATION WANTBD-By a thoroughly practical 
gardener and florist, 25 years' experience with 
roses, carnations violets and general line of plants: 
good designer and decorator, not afraid of work. A 
No. 1 references, married, one child, age 40. For par- 
ticulars pleas» address Gabdkxeb. 
No. 70 South Ave . Poughkeepble, N. Y. 

ANTED— Address of Louis Truiler, a practical 
and ornamental florist 

Thos B. Buxl, Bakerafleld, Cal 



W 



WANTED— The address of Wm Lyons, formerly 
of Richmond. Va He will nnd it to his advan- 
tage to send It to C T. care American Florist. 

WANTffiD— Florist, flrst-class rose or carnation 
grower (latter preferred) State references and 
wages expected. H Date Estatb. Brampton, Ont. 

WANTED— An Al man to grow roses, carnations, 
'mums and general florist stock, to take charge 
of place on shares or for wages: single man preferred. 
8end references For lull naiticutars Address 

C F Elley, Baker City, Oregon 

WANTED— An up-to-date rose grower, to take 
charge of a block of houses at a large commer 
clal place, where a good grower only Is wanted. 
Wages t3.j.C0 and board, or J50.00 without board. 
Address S T, care American Florist. 



F 



OR SALE OS RBNT-Slx greenhoueeB. dwelling, 
sbedB. Bargain. W. L. Winn. White Hall 111. 



F 
F 



lOR RENT— Four greenhouses 11x71, with oflSce 
21x23. with rooms. Call at 

1144 School St.. Chicago. 

lOR SALE— Four hundred feet second-hand 41nch 
pipe and fittings: good condition- Address 

H. J. Teufkl. Bok20o. Evanaton, 111. 



FOR SALE— Steam heat free; water works, green- 
house with piping, cheap. Bargain for torlfty 
florist. Address Box 198. Bowling Green, Mo. 

FOR BALK— Free fuel. 5000 feet glass. Great chance 
for florists or gardeners. Only $500 cash. Account 
sickness. Write quick. BkbeFuel, care Am. Florist. 

FOR SALE— Greenhouse containing ti.O^O feet of 
glass with house and bam In connection. Every- 
thing In good condlton and well stocked. One-fourth 
cash, balance time. Fred Plaqoe, EUln, III. 

FOR SALE— Lease stock etc. of place of 50 feet 
of glass In Chicago suburb all In good condition 
Stock first class and more than Is needed. Will sell 
very cheap; cash wanted. Reason for leaving, am 
going to Europe. Address J D. 

care American Florist Chicago. 

WANTED. 

COMPETENT, RELIABLE FOREMA N 

for greenhouses. Must be well versed in 
growing roses, carnations and a general linf 
of plants, and experienced in managint^ 
men. Salary at the rate of $1000 per year. 
Married man preferred. Address with ref- 
erences, stating age and experience, 
L. L. MAY & CO., 8T. PAUL, MINN. 



Salesman Wanted. 

By large seed house, an energetic 
salesman acquainted with garden 
seed trade in Central Western 
States. Address at once with full 
information. 
SALESMAN, care Am. Flofi at. Chicago. 

SALESMAN WANTED 

For our Florist and Retail Department. 
Thoroughly experienced in Flower Seeds 
and Bulbs. Apply by letter. 

W. W. RAWSON & CO., 

13 & 13 Faueull HaU Sq., BOSTON, MASS. 

Any Good, Reliable Firm 

Wanting a first-class foreman, one who is 
up in cut flowers and plants, apply to me. 
1 have sold my place and the change throws 
my foreman out of employment. 

THE E. HIPPARD CO., Youngstown, Ohio. 

WANTED.... 

A Carmody hot water boiler 
or sections, with return floe. 

C. C. WONNEMAN, Mexico, Mo. 

One Greenhouse, 125x20 feet ; also office, 
dwelling and twelve city lots adjoining, for 
a term of years. Established 1888; oppo- 
site St. Michae.'s Cemetery. 

W. H. SCHEURER, 

633 Flush ngr Ave., AST ORIA. N. V. 

TO RENT. 

In a town of fifteen thousand population, 
eight miles from Boston, on main street, 
electric cars pass the door; four green- 
houses, heated by steam, thirty thousand 
feet land. Dwelling house can be used for 
two families. Good retail trade. Apply to 

P. WELCH, 15 Province St., Boston, Mass. 

For Sale or Rent 

Two Grpenhouses, ?ood four-room Dwelling 
House, Citv Water, Telephone, good Trade, town 
of 4000. 

Two hundred and fifty dollars will buy Stock, 
and will rent for eight dollars per month. 

C. H. HOLLIED, Horton, Kansas. 

FOR SALE. 

A florist establishment for sale, consisting of 
18,000 square feet of glass, in good condition. 
Heated by steam: in the city limits, located in a 
city of 18.000 inhabitants on the Mississippi river 
in Iowa, with several acres of land and dwelling 
house; must sell soon on account of old age. For 
further particulars address 

L C K, care American Florist. 



With 10 Year Lease, 

One of the best places 
in Chicago. 



FOR SALE 



This is a rare opportunity; if you have 
some cash, talk it over with me. 

T. J. CORBREY, 

I409-I4II W. Madison St., CHICAGO. 



FOR SALE 



Thirteen (13) Green- 
houses, situated in 
city of Allegheny, Pa., 
containing t we nty- 
three thousand (23.000) square feet of glass. All 
steam heated and in good running order. Will 
sell houses at low price and lease dwelling and 
land, or will sell entire plant. Possession imme- 
diately. Address . .. ^ _ 

J. M. REEVES, Warren. 0. 



FOR SALE 

240 acres of land on Isthmus of Teiiaunte- 
pec, state of Vera Cruz, Mexico. For full 
particulars write 

ROLAND HUGHES. 

846 New York Life BIdg. KANSAS CITY. MO. 

For Sale. 

Oakland, Cal.; an elegant piece of property, 160 
feet front by 145 feet deep. Ten minutes' ride 
from the center of the city. Three large green- 
houses, each 116 t. by 25 ft., well stocked. Ele- 
gant cottage of 7 rooms. Gas fixtures and all 
conveniences. Owner compelled by circumstan 
ces to go to Alaska gold fields and must sell 
q^uickly. CostS7,000. Will sell at great reduc- 
tion. Write for price. 

Any of the above named properties is a fine bar- 
gain, and those desiring to purchase will do well 
to communicate with us. These are only a few of 
the properties that we have for sale and leasing. 

SMITH & SMITH, 

p. 0. Box 869. 345 Sixth Ave.. PITTSBURG. PA. 

For Sale. 

GREENHOUSE 
PROPERTY ^ 

At Nyack, N. Y. A plot 220xJ25 
feet, on which are four Rosehouses, 
J0OxJ8x6, each house heated by a 
No. 16 Hitchingfs Boiler; and seven 
houses, each about 64xJI ft, heated 
by flues. This property will be 
sold cheap to quick cash buyer. 



HITCHINGS & CO. 



233 Mercer St. 



NEW YORK. 



NOTICE 

OF 

STOCKHOLDERS' MEETINQ. 

CHICAGO, July 21, 1900. 
stockholders of the American Florist Comoany: 

You are hereby notlQed that the annual meeting 
of the Stockholders of the American Florist Com- 
pany will be held in the Murray Hill Hotel, New 
York, N. Y., Wednesday, August 22, 1900, at 3 
o'clock p. M., for the purpose of electing directors 
and officers for the ensuing term, and for the 
transaction of such other business as may come 
before the meeting. 

F. R, PIERSON, Pres. 

M. BARKER, Sec'y. 



I If you want to get | 
the want you want 



% to get you want to % 

ift — '^ — (p 

% get your want adv. % 

I into next Saturday's | 

% great Convention | 

% Number ^ ^ at oe | 

It is Good Business Policy to Mention the 
American Florist when you Write to an 
Advertiseb. 



34 



The American Florist. 



Aug. II, 



New Orleans. 

HORTICULTURALISTS ELECT NEW OFFI- 
CERS. — FUNERAL DESIGNS FOR POLICE- 
MEN. 

At the last meeting of the Horticult- 
ural Society the following officers were 
elected to serve the ensuing year: Paul 
Abele, president; Chas. Eble, vice-presi- 
dent; John Eblin, treasurer; Dan. New- 
sham, secretary. 

Business is very dull now. Hotweather 
makes flowers very scarce, hardly enough 
to fill up designs, for which there was 
quite a call last week, the majority for 
the funerals of the policemen who lost 
their lives in the recent riots. 

Repairing houses and hotbeds is what 
keeps us busy just now. M. M. L. 

Akron, O.— In the recent hail storm 
S. W. Pike lost 800 lights of glass. 

Vbol^ale power/arKjfe 

ClXlIXNATI, Aug. 9. 

Roses, Bride 2.00(5 3.00 

Bridesmaid 2.O0(" 3.00 

Meteor 3.001" 4 01) 

Perle 2,00(:i 3.(0 

Carnations "5'" 1-00 

fancv 1.50(" 3.00 

Gladioli " S.OOt- 4.00 

Stocks _ 200 

Sweat ]>ea8 15<5 .25 

Tuberoses 3.00 

Aslera 1.00(3 2.00 

Lilies— Album and Rubrum 4.00('j 5.00 

Smilax 12.50 

Adiantum 1-00 

Common ferns .15 

Asparagus 50.00 

St. Louis, Aug. 9. 

Roses, Bride, Bridemaid 2.00(nt 4.00 

Meteor Z.OOto 4.00 

Carnations, common 75(3 1. 00 

Smilax 12..=io 

Adiantum 60(3' 1 .00 

Tuberoses 4.00(" 6.00 

Asters 75(" 2.00 

Milwaukee, Aug. 9. 
Roses, Beauty, med. per doz. 1 50(n2.00 
" " short " .50('i| 00 

Bride, Bridesmaid 3.00(3)4.00 

Meteor 4 00(" 5.00 

Kaiserin 4.00(" 6.00 

Carnations, ordinary 1.00 

fancy 2 00 

Auratum lilies 15.00 

Ailiantum Til" 1.00 

Common ferns .25 

Gladioli 4.00fn; 5 00 

Asters 50(3 1.00 

Smilax 15.00 

Asparagus 65.00 

Galax leaves .20 

Sweet peas .15 

PITTSBCRO, Aug. 9. 

Roses, Beauty, fancy SO. 0C(" 25.00 

extra 10.00(" 15 00 

No. 1 5.00(" 8.00 

culls 2.00('i 4.00 

Bride, Bridesmaid 2.00(" 6 00 

" Meteor 2.00(.' 6 00 

Perle 3.00(" 4.0O 

" Cusin 3,00(" 4.00 

Carnations, ordinary 50(" 1.00 

fancy I.0O(" 1.5o 

Lily of the valley 2.00(3i 4.00 

Sweet peas I0(3t .50 

Daisies 26(./ 1.00 

Smilax 12.50(" 15 00 

Gladioli 2.00(3 4.00 

Adiantum 75«" 1.00 

Asparagus 35.0C(a50.00 

" Sprengepii 26(3' .35 

Dagger ferns per 1000, 2.00 

Asters l.OO® 3.00 

Dbsver, Aug. 8. 

Roses, Beauty, select 12 50(" 20 , 00 

ordinary 4,0()(" 8.00 

" Bride, Bridesmaid 3.00("' 6.00 

" Meteor 5.00(«. 6.00 

Perle, Wootton S.OOci' 5.00 

Carnations, ordinary 1.00(«' 1.50 

fancy.." 1.5t(si 2.60 

Lily of the valley 4.00 

Callas 12.50 

Harrlsii 12.60 

Sweet peas 15(o' .20 

Asters 2.a(« 4.00 

Asparagus 60 . OO 

Smilax 15. aO(" 18.00 

Kerns .30 



Everything in the 

CUT FLOWER 

line. 



and a 
complete line of 



WIRE WORK, 

the kind 
that will gfive satisfaction. 

FLORISTS' SUPPLIES. 



HOLTON & HUNKEL CO., 



p. O. Box 103. 



Adi:U-W^ub:^^« 'Wis. 



When writing mention the American Flonat. 



CUT FLOWERS. 



c. c 



•* * * * Shipping orders receive prompt 
and careful attention. 

POLLWORTH CO., Milwaukee, Wis. 



Please Mention American Florist. 



PITTSBURG CUT FLOWER CO., Ltd. 



504 
Liberty Street, 



ALL 
FLOWERS 

IN 
SEASON. 



FITTSBUBG, 
PA. 



GALAX LEAVES, Brilliant Bronze or Green, $1.50 per 1000. 

FANCY FERN, DAGGER FERN, Ktc. at market prices. 

HARRY A. BUNYARD. - 42 west 28th strfet. new YORK. 



Bronze Galax Leaves 

$1.25 per 1000, ra'Sir"- 

Try a siimt''*' FIFTY for t^n cents in stamps, 
(If^livert'd FREE. 

AMERION ROSE CO., Washington. P. C. 
I PAY EXPRESS or POSTAGE on tny 

Bronze Galax Leaves 

audilflivoranvwhere in IT. S. for ONE DOLLAR 
FIFTY per 1000. Write for imrtiouliirs. 

LILLIAN ALLEN DEXTER, Washington. D. C. 



SHIPPING LIBELS '^ 

• -Cut Flowers 

Printed in two colors on gummed 
paper; your card, etc., in black and 
leaf adopted by the S. A. F. in red. 
Very attractive. Price per 500, $2.85; 
per 1000, $4.50. Send for samples 

ELECmO or THIS LEAF, POSTPAID, $t.2S. 

American Florist Co., 

4i^_ CHICAQO. 






«; 



AN 



Indispensable Adjunct 



n O a successful wholesale business is an up-to-date, 
J[ accurate, complete Trade Directory. Such a 
book, 387 pages, containing the name and 
address of every florist, nurseryman and seedsman 
in America, new list of private gardeners and horti- 
cultural supply concerns and much other informa- 
tion will be mailed from this office on receipt of $2. 



AMERICAN FLORIST CO. 

324 Dearborn St., CHICAQO, ILL. 



fgoo. 



The American Florist. 



35 



Roses 



ALL 
FLOWERS 

IN 
SEASON 



Carnations 



When you want them. 
As you like them. 



E. C. AMLING, 

Wholesale Cut Flowers, 
32-34-36 Randolph St. CHICAGO. 



McKellar £ Winterson's 

Modern Supply House. 




Send for Prices on all Supplies. 
Clearance Sale Now On. 

Give us your order now together with your needs in 
CUT FLOWERS. 



McKELLAR & WINTERSON, waIVs^h' I've.. CHICAGO. 

isssgggggggggggggggggggggggggsgd 



WIETOR BROS. 

"'a;;,... Cut Flowers 

All teletn'aph and telephone orders 
given prompt attention. 

51 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO. 



WEILAKD AND-RISCM 



I We are large Growers and I 
■ shippers of CUT FLOWERS] 



WHOLESALE FLORISTS 



GEO. REINBERG, 

Wholesale Grower of Cut Flowers. 

BEAUTIES, ROSES, CARNATIONS. 

All Stock at lowest market rates. Send io your 
orders. 

B1 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO, ILL. 

Seen by New Firms: 

AMERICAN FLORIST ADVTS. 



Wbol^ale flower/\arH^ 



Chicago. Aug. 10. 
Roses, Beauty, extra long stems 
30 inch 
24 •• 
20 •• 
15 " 
" 12 '• 
8 " 

JJride, Bridesmaid 

Perle 


3.00 

2.50 

2.00 

1.50 

1.25 

1.00 

.75 

. 2.00(51 4.00 

.. 2 00® 4.00 

.. 2.00® 4.00 


La France 

Golden Gate 

Liberty 

Carnations 

fancy 

Lily of the valley 

Mignonette 

Sweet peas 






.. 2.00«!i 4.00 

. 4 00@ 6.00 

. 4.00(" 6.00 

.75 

1.00 

. 3.00® 5.00 

. 2.00(.', 6.00 

.10 

.. .50® 1.00 








15 








.20 








. 8 00@12 00 








50 on 




8. K. Cor. Wabash Ave. 


^64 WABASH AVE. 
CHICAGO 

and Randolph 3t. 



Say: "Saw it in the Florist.' 



E. H. Hunt 

THE "OLD RELIABLE" FOR 



WHOLESALE- 



CUT FLOWERS 

Hunt's Flowers 
Qo Everywhere 

76 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO. 



PETER REINBERG, 

Grower and Wholesaler of Cut Flowers. 

500,000 FEET OF GLASS. 

Haadquarters for American Beauty. 

Carnations, Blooms and Cuttinsa. 

51 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO, ILL. 



J. B. DEAMUD, 

Wholesale 
Commission Florist, 

51 Wabash Ave., GHIGftGO. 



Bassett&Washburn 

76 & 78 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO. 

Cut Flowers 



Wholesale Dealers and 
Growers of 



GREENHOUSES: HINSDALE, ILL. 



A. L RANDALL ^ 

Wholesale Florist 

Don't Forget that we are at 4 Wash* 
ington St., Chicago. 

write for ipeol&l qaotstloni on large ordsn. 



WHOUSSAUS 

GROWER OF ROSES. 



CUT FLOWERS. 



J. A. BDDLONG, 

37-39 Randolph Street. CHICAGO. ILL 

Mention the American Florist. 

Benthey & Co, 

F. F. BENTHEY, Manager, 

Wholesale Commission Florist 

41 Randolph Street CHICAGO. 



■Consignments solicited.. 



t. G. PRINCE & CO. 

Wholesale Gut Flowers 

AND FLORISTS' SUPPLIES. 

AgenU for the Hinsdale Rose Co. Speolsl attsnUoi 

paid to shipping orders. 

76 & 78 Wabash Avenue, 

Telephone Main 3208. CHI0A09. 

Please mention the American Florist. 



36 



The American Florist. 



Aug. II, 



Samuel %. PennooK. 



Wholesale Florist, 



1612-14-16-18 Ludlow Street, 



.PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



AM. BEAUTIES AND VALLEY OUR SPECIALTIES. 

DURING THE SUalMER WE WILL BE OPEN FROU 7:30 A. M. TO 6;00 P. M. 



CITY HALL CUT FLOWER MARKET, ' """"ToS^S'i;! '^^. '"•'*' 



WELCH BROS., Proprietors. 

— WELCH BROS., Sole Agents for FREYSTEDTS' Imr 

Script Letters. 

THE NEW ENGLAND HEADQUARTERS FOR THE BEST GRADE OF FLOWERS AT ALL SEASONS OF THE YEAR 



NOTICE: — WELCH BROS., Sole Agents for FREYSTEDTS' Immortelle Letters and Emblems. Block Letters, S2.00 per 

Script Letters. S4.00 per 100. 



Carnation Blooms 

Id Unlimited Quantities 

SHIPPED TO ALL POINTS. 



Chicago Carnation Co., \^ 



JOLIET, 



Boston 
Flowers. 



Geo. A. Sutherland 

WHOLESALE DEPOT FOR 

All Florists' Supplies, 

67 BROMFIELO ST.. 
Price lists mBiled. BOSTON. MASS. 



Wholesale Florists, 

Always on Hand: 

CARNATIONS. 

BRIDESMAIDS. 

BRIDES. 



} 



-f 



S' 




^ 



JOBBERS IN 



FLORISTS' 

SUPPLIES 

FLORISTS' VASES. 

Horticultural Auctioneers. 
84 Hawley Street. BOSTON. 



The American Florist Company's 

DIRECTORY 

Contains the names and addresses t»f all the Flo- 
rists, Seedsmen and Nurserymen in the United 
States and Canada. Price $a.oo. 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO., 
324 Dearborn Street. Chioaso, U. S. A. 



Circulation 



which 



Circulates 



The actual paid circulation of the 
American Florist is, we believe, the 
largest in its class. The contents 
are of real present value and are 
preserved for reference. Advertisers 
who use regularly our columns estal>- 
lish permanent business with the best 
trade in the United States. 



Wbol^ale [lower/\arKgfe 

Philadelphia, Aug. 8. 

Hoses, Tea I.CO(a 1.50 

" extra 2.00® 4. Oil 

Beauty, extra 10.iO@l5.00 

firsts 5.00® 8.00 

Carnations M)@ 75 

fane? 1.00@ 1.50 

Lily of the valley 2. COW 4.00 

Gladiolus 2 001" 3 00 

Tuberoses S.Olw 5.00 

Asters 50(n 1. 00 

Asparagus 25.00@50 00 

Smilax iO.IO@15.(0 

Adiantum fOfs' .75 

Sweet peas 2U(0 .30 

Boston, Aug 8 

Roses, Beauty, extra 15.00@20.00 

'■ " medium 4 fi0@ 6.00 

culls l.Ou® 2.f;0 

Bride, Bridesmaid, Meteor. .50® 3 00 

extra 3.0(iw 5 00 

Kaiserin «.li(i(.i 8.0O 

Carnations .Wm 1.00 

Lily of the valley 2.i)0S}i 4.00 

Asters ( 3i(n: .75 

Sweet peas 05(n .10 

Smiliix 8.1.0® 10. 00 

Asparagus 50.t;0 

Hiirdy ferns .20 

Candytuft, Gypsophila, etc. .10®. 15 per bunch 



GIVE 

US 

A 

TRIAL,|' 

WE 

CAN 

PLEASE 

YOU. 



HEADQUARTER 
. ^txN YORK 



Roses, Carnations, and all kinds of 
Seasonable Flowers in Stock. 

Wholesale Com- 
mission Florist, 
481 Washington St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Also Dealer In Florists' Supplies ,% Wire Designs. 



WM. F. KASTING, 



C. A. KUEHN, 
Wholesale Florist, 

1122 PINE STREET, 

— LOUIS, MO. 

^^A complete line of Wire Deni^ns. 

H.G.BERNING 

Wholesale florist, 

SUCCESSOR TO 

*T. LOUIS CUT FLOWER CO.... 

1322 Pine St., ST. LOUIS, MO. 



Woodroffe & Bernheimer, 
Wholesale Florists 

1604. LUDLOW STREET, 
•Phone 1-42^-A. PHILADELPHIA. 

OnnHlernmentfl Snllctted. 

LEO. NIESSEN, 

Wholesale Florist, 

N. W. COR. tSTH AND FILBERT STREETS, 

"'?lB°o'r/^'?iH D. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Consignments of Choice Valley and Rotei tolicitad. 

Geo. M. Moss, 

WHOLESALE FLORIST, 

32 South 17th Street. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Ix>nK Distance Phone l-41-2ts D. 



Consignments ol Roses. Carnations, Violets sollolted. 

CHAS. B. STAHL 

Wholesale Florist, 

17 S. 11th St., Telephon e 63- 64, PHILADELPHIA. 

Orders by mall, teleffrapta or telephone will 
receive prompt attention. 

GODBlfoimentB of good etook sollolted. 

...GEO. M. KELLOGG... 

'"""•i"nTe"w°e'.i: Cut Flowcrs 

Give us an order and we will please you. 

Our Greenhouses at PLEASANT HILL, MO. 
Our Store. 906 Grand Ave.. KANSAS CITY, MO. 

^ir"L0Ne DIBTANCB 'PHONB AT BITOEB PLAOB 

JOHN B. FERGUSON, 

Wholesale Florist, 

6515 Fifth Ave, PITTSBURGp PA. 

Long Distance 'Phone 2985. 



Consignments of Roses, Carnations and Violets. 
Solicited. 

The Cincinnati 
Cut Flower Co., 

--SSVro. WHOLESALE FLORISTS. 

Consignments Solicited. 
Special Attention Given to Shipping Orders. 



J. M. COHEN, Florist, 



CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. 



22 Chapman Place, BOSTCN, MASS. 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



37 



BEAUTIES, 
BRIDES. 
BRIDESIMAIDS, 
METEORS. 



TOP GRADE 

Carnations 

JOHN I. RAYNOR, '" Xfv!; '^S%k. 

TMephone No. 199X Madison Square. 

YOUNG & NUGENT, 

WHOLPSALE FLORISTS ij' Xi?=l2«''LStr«t, 

^^^^^^^^^^^__^__^_^^^^^^^^^__ NEW YORK. 

Crowe & Co. Special Prize Haids. 

Superb Roses, Leadioe Varieties. Cho ce Carnations and Rare Novelties. 
Summer Shipping a Specialty. 

TELEPHONE 2065 MADISON SQUARE. 



TIIOMAS YOUNG, Jr. 

Wholesale Florist , 

New Telephone Ho. 1803 Madison Sqaare. 

43 West 28th St.. NEW YORK. 

WILLIAM GHORMLEY, 

Wholesale Commission Florist, 



Special attention given 
to Shipping Onlers. 



57 W. 28lh. St., NEW YORK CITY. 

lelephone 2200 Midison Square. 



-Consignments Solicited.- 



JOHN YOUNG, 

80SES, CARNATIONS, VALLEY 

ud all other choice out flower stock. 
51 W. 28th Street, NEW YORK. 

New Telephone No. 1905 Madison Square. 
Price list on appllcatloo. 

f^ase mention the American Florist when writing. 

THK RECOCNIZED HEADQUARTERS IN 
NEW YORK CITY FOR 

Violets % Carnations. 

ilOWERS and BUYERS make a note of this. It 
will be to your advantage. 

WM. H. GUNTHER. 

. ; . . 30 West 29th Street. 

Rvw Telephone No. 651 Madison 8qaare. 

Please Mention the American Florist. 

FRANK MILLANG. 

CUT FLOWERS, 

WHOLESALE COMMISSION, 

408 E. 34th Strsat, 

Cut Flower Exchinge. NEW YORK. 

Telephone 299 MadlBon Square. 

N. Y. GUT FLOWER EXCHANGE 

404-412 E. 34th St. Near Ferry. 
Open for Cnt Flower Sales at 6 o'clock 
Brery Morning 

DESIRABLE WALL SPACE TO RENT 
FOR ADVERTISING. 

JOHN DONALDSON, Secretary. 

Please Mention Tbe American Florist. 

MOORE, HENTZ & NASH, 

Wholesale Cominlsslon Florists, 



Choice Carnations 



Clioice Roses Jt .ft 



At rooms of N. Y. 
Cut Flower Co. 



119 and 121 W. 23d St., 

NEW YORK CITY. 
Telephone 733— 18th. 
Choicest Stock Shipped on a Commission. 



Traeodly & Schenck 

NEW YORK arv 

New Telephone No. 270 Madison Sq. 

M W. 28th Street Cut Flower Exchange 

Wbol^ale flower/larl^ 



N'Ew York, Aug. 8. 

Rosi's, Beauty, select 20. OOlS 30.00 

medium 4.(j0(gj 6.00 

culls 50(a 2.00 

Bridesmaid, Bride, Meteor .ibw 1.00 
select. 3 00(3' 4.00 

Carnations 50'" 1.50 

Lily of the valley 2.00(" 3.00 

Swi'et peas per 100 bunches 1.00(n2.50 

Harrisii 4 00(u 6.00 

Cattleyas 20. 00m 33.00 

Gladioli l.OOw; 1 50 

Asters 40fti; .50 

Smilax .■ 8.00'!' 12.00 

Asparagus 25. 00(" 35.00 

Sprengerii, perdoz. bun. .76(nl.00 
Adiantum 25((i' .50 

Buffalo, Aug. 9. 

Roses. Beauty 10.00(<i 20 00 

Bride, Bridesmaid, Meteor 3.00(n 7.00 

Kaiserin 6.00 

Carnations 1 .00 

Lily of the valley 3.00(a» 4.0O 

Sweet peas per doz. bunches .ZOCa^ .75 

Aural um lilies 10,00@12.50 

Roseum '• 4.f0'<' 6.00 

Gl:idioli 2.0OW 3.00 

Asiers 1.00(01 2.00 

Smilax 15.00(1120.00 

Adiantum, 1.0C(" 1.25 

Hardy ferns, Galax leaves 20(" .25 

.Asparagus 50.00(975.10 



MILLANG & CO. 

Gommisslon Florists 

48 W«st 2ath St., NEW YORK. 

New Telephone No. 1304 Madison Square. 
Capable, experienced. Consignments solicited. 



TheNewYork GUT Flower CD. 

119 and 121 West 23d Street, 

112 and 114 West 24th Street, 

Telephone 733-18lh. NEW YORK. 

CONSIONMENTS SOLICITED. 

Special Atlsntion Given to Shipping Order*. 

WALTER F. SHERIDAN, 

^9oiKfst"iq^° Wholesale Florist. 

39 W. 28th St., NEW YORK. 



ROSES SHIPPED 

to all points. 



Price liist on 
Application 



ford Bros... 

ocot Wholesale Floristg 

III West 30th street NEW YORK. 

Coniignmentt Solicited. 'Phone. 157 Madison Sq. 

Julius Lang 

S3 West 30th Street, NEW YORK. 
ROSES. CARNATIONS. VALLEY. 

CHOICE SUMMER STOCK. 

Telephone 280 Madison Square 

S. J. LIMPRECni, 

Wlioiesale Gommission Florist 

and FLORISTS' SUPPLIES. 

Also ell kinds of Greens for Decorations. 

119 West 30th Street. IMFU/ VODK 

relepnuce U38 Madison Square. I'L" I Ultn. 

Consignments Solicited. 

Do not forget to say "saw your ad. in 
the American Florist" when corre- 
sponding with advertisers 



J.K.ALLEN'S 



POPULAR WHOI s ESALE 
CUT FLOWER HOUSE 



At the new address, 106 West 28th St., New York City, draws the crowd. Consignments carefully handled 
and well sold. Excellent facilities. ^ ^ ^ ^ Telephone 197 Madimon Square. 

EDW. C. HORAN, 



47 WEST 28th ST. 



Tel. 421 
Madison Square, 



.NEW YORK. 



CUT F LOWERS AT W HOLESALE. 



38 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 



//. 



The ^EBiD TRsiijb. 



AMERICAN SEBD TRADE ASSOCIATION. 

AiBKRT McCULLorGH, Prea. ; F. W. Bolgiano, 
Vlce-PreB.; 8. F. WniLARD, Wetherafleld, Conn.. 
Seo'y and Treae. 



The large sizes of Harrisii lily bulbs 
are reported scarce, also longiflorutns. 

The European demand for American 
flax seed shows some improvement of 
late. 

Beans in some sections have been 
allovyed to go to seed by gardeners -who 
preferred to do so rather than accept the 
market price for green beans. 

Erfdrt, Geemany, July 24.— The pansy 
seed crop appears to turn out very short 
on account of the unfavorable weather 
last spring and the early part of summer. 

Holland bulbs are reported a good 
average crop this year. The late spring, 
however, has delayed maturity and 
delivery will be from eight to ten days 
later than usual in consequence. 

Onion seed of some kinds is short in 
California crops, while in other fields the 
same sorts have done much better. On 
the whole there will probably be enough 
to go around. Onion bulbs for next 
year's seeding are stiflf in price. 

Boston, Mass. — A meeting of the seed 
trade of this city was held at the office 
of W. W. Rawson & Co., on August 2, 
to take action on the death of C. H. B. 
Breck. Resolutions were adopted and 
arrangements for a full representation of 
the trade at the funeral were made. 

Qubdlinburg, Germany, July 25.— 
The crop of pansy seeds is short up to 
the present on account of the cold, wet 
spring, which retarded growth. Sweet 
peas are very promising now, so that a 
good crop may safely be expected. The 
prospects on the whole for a good flower 
and vegetable seed crop are not bad. The 
weather from the beginning of July was 
very favorable. In the case of such plants 
as wallflowers and myosotis, the yield 
will be very short. The rutabaga and 
tnmip seed crops are also likely to be 
short. 



Pepper's Prolific Tomato. 

One mile from the railroad station at 
Jenkintown, Pa., is the residence of John 
W. Pepper. Being interested in tomatoes 
and the forcing of fruits and vegetables 
in general, I took this walk, when in 
Jenkintown recently, to see Pepper's 
Prolific tomato and compare it at its 
home with specimens which I had seen at 
George C. Watson's store in Philadel- 
phia. 1 was much pleased with the spa- 
cious grounds, gardens and forcing 
department, through which I was shown 
by the gardener in charge, Wm. Robert- 
son. 

In regard to the tomato in which my 
interest centered, I must say that it was 
a pleasant surprise to see the well-grown 
and trained plants loaded with immense 
bunches of bright red fruit. It is the 
most prolific bearer I have ever seen. 
The bunches each had from eight to six- 
teen well developed fruits, about 2i2VL' 
inches in size, a beautiful color, excellent 
flavor, flesh firm and with no hard core. 

In 1888 I sent out the Lorillard 
tomato, the best forcing seeding I had 
raised in si.x years of crossing. It is a 
cross of Perfection and Acme. I only 
wish I might have had Pepper's Prolific 
at that date, as I feel sure that it can be 



used as a parent to bring out the ideal 
tomato, a tomato which will set fruit 
under glass in December, January and 
February, the bad months to set fruit in 
owing to the poor sunlight. Pepper's 
Prolific will set fruit at all seasons, Mr. 
Robertson assures me. 

The ideal tomato must set good crops, 
the color must be bright red, the flesh 
firm and with no hard core; the shape 
must be good, the size about 2x3 inches. 
I suggest using the Frogmore and 
Lorillard as parents to bring forth the 
ideal tomato. I havefound, after twelve 
years with the Lorillard, that it will 
thrive under glass or out of doors. 

John G. Gardner. 



An Enelish Selection of Sweet Peas. 

The following is a list selected by the 
Gardeners' Chronicle from an assortment 
of 200 varieties grown side by side for 
classification purposes at the trial 
grounds of Hurst & Son, Kelvedon, 
Essex: 

Orange — Gorgeous, one of the best, and 
Lady Mary Currie. 

Yellow to white — Mrs. Eckford, Lottie 
Hutchins, Sir George White and Sadie 
Burpee. 

Deep red or maroon blues, etc. — Mars, 
Captivation, Navy Blue, Othello, Prin- 
cess of Wales, Emily Eckford and Lady 
Grisel Hamilton. 



Rose colored varieties — Royal Rose, 
Triumph, Countess of Lathom, Coronet, 
Lovely, America, Earliest of All, Prince 
of Wales, Prince Edward of York and 
Chancellor. 



Cleveland. 

FOREST CITY TO BE WELL REPRESENTED 
AT NEW YORK.— NO PARTY ARRANGE- 
MENT. 

Convention talk is all the go just now, 
and from present indications the Forest 
city will be fairly well represented in New 
York. The bowling team is hard at it at 
every opportunity, and we all hope it 
will be heard from when it faces the other 
fellows on the alleys far, far away. 
Judging from present indications there 
will be no special arrangements for the 
pilgrims, as the fare and a third rate 
seems to be the only thing attainable. 
Those who are going will therefore con- 
sult only their personal convenience and 
their private business affairs in making 
their arrangements. A few have already 
started; others will not go until the last 
possible moment. 

There is but little business going on at 
present excepting fuueral work, which 
keeps things from utter stagnation. The 
growers are replanting or overhauling 
the houses. 

A. H. Graham returned lately from a 
short vacation in the east. A. 



JOHNSON & STOKES' GIANT KINGLY PANSIES. 

We have searched the world to get this strain up to its present standard of perfection, and it is now 
pronounced by our customers as unrivalled in size, substance of flower and richness of color. 
Trade pkt.. 60c; "i-oz.. «1,25; oz.. JS.OO. FRESH SMILAX SEED— Per oz., 25o; per pound, 12.60. 

ALLEGHENr DOUBLE FRINGED HOLLYHOCK.— Our Floracroft Strain. Trade pkt., 25c: H oz. pkt., 
.SOc; per oz., $1.50. CINERARIA.— James' Giant Strain, per pkt., 25c; !4 trade pkt. 60o; tr. pkt., $1. 

CALCEOLARIA.— .Tames' Giant strain, per pkt., '25c; trade pkt.. fiOc. 

We are ready to book orders for White Romans, Freesias, Callas, Paper White Narcissus, etc. 

JOHNSON & STOKES, Seedsmen, 217 and 219 Market St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



FRESH FERN SPORES.^ 



WE ARE HEADQUARTERS— Estralar^e packap;e of fresh Spores, sufficient for 3000 plants, 
with full cultural directions, postpaid for $1.00. 

EMERSON C. McFADDEN. U. S. Exotic Nurseries, SHORT HILLS, N. J. 



CALIFORNIA 

Galla Bulbs 

Through our F.xchange 
Sales with best Pacific 
Coast growers of these 
roots we are able to 
deliver choice, care- 
fully cured and evenly 
graded roots at closest 
growing prices. 

FIRST SIZE, V4 to IW-in. 

diam., doz.. 7Bc; 100 J5.00. 
SELECT. 1 K to I=4-in. diam., 

doz. $1.35; 100»7.00. 
EXTRA SELECT. 2to2V4-in. 

diam., doz. JL.'iO; 100 $9.00. 

EARLY DELIVERY means much. Getting these 
liulbs when you want them is everything. Late 
surpluses at half price are not bLrgains. 

VAUGHAN'S SEED STORE, 




NEW VORK: 

14 Barclay St. 



CHICAGO: 
84-86 RandoiDh St. 



NOTICE. 

■We are now ready to give you LOWEST 
estimates for P^IRST-class stock of 

Freesias, Harrisii. Callas. Romans Paper White Nar- 
cissus, Hyacinths. Tulips. Van Sions. Japan 
Longiflorum, Azaleas, Etc. 
Send us list and we will give figures. Address 
H. H. BERGER & CO., (Est. '78) 47 Barclay St . N.Y. 

A good adv. in a good paper will bring 
good retumi, 



ESTABLISHED 1802 



T 




'S 



SEEDS 



We have still left some fresh seeds of 
the following Palms in fine condition; 

KENTIA FORSTERIANA. per 1000, $4.00; 5000 to 
10,000 at $3.,TO; 10,000 and over at $3.00. 

Also CYCAS REVOLUTA STEMS in assorted 
sizes. 3 lbs. to 12 lbs., at $8.00 per 100 lbs., 
while unsold. 

J.M.THORBURN&CO. 

(late of IS John Street) 

36 CORTLANOT STREET. NEW VORK 



FRUIT AND FLOWER PLATES 

Seed Packets and Supplies of all kinds for 
NURSERYMEN, FLORISTS and SEEDSMEN 

SS]Sri3 Iff^OIi* FltlOE XjXST. 
Stock Cuts. lOo. per square Incb. BnfJcravlDK by all 
prooeBsea. PrlDtlnKand LlthoffraphlnK. lUustrated 
Oat&lo^es a specialty. 

VREDENBUR6 & CO., Rochester, N. Y. 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



39 



Before 

Thursday 

Noon... 



\ 



ADVERTISEMENTS for the an- 
, nual Convention Number of the 
American Florist should reach 
this office before noon on Thursday, 
August 16, to insure good display. 

The New York Number will eclipse 
all previous special issues of the Amer- 
ican Florist both in the value of its 
special features, its typographical ex- 
cellence, its circulation and its business 
bringing power. 

The Advertising Rates for this 
issue will not be increased. %\ will 
buy an inch, $ J will buy a column 
and $30 will buy a page. Those who 
are advertising on time contracts will 
receive the contract discount upon in- 
creased space. 



AMERICAN FLORIST CO., 

324 Dearborn St., Chicago. 




40 



7^ HE American Florist. 



Aug. II, 



The (:lURSE5RY TRsije. 



AU. ASSOCIATION OF NURSERYMEN. 

Thko. J. Smith. Pres.: N. W. Hale, Vlce-Pre§. 
SIOBOK C. 8SA0KB. Rochester. N. T.. Secy. 



W. E. Wellington, of Toronto, is con- 
vinced that the usual conditions make 
fall planting preferable to spring plant- 
ing for most items of nursery stock. 

At a recent meeting of the Southern 
Nurserymen's Association resolutions 
were adopted endorsing the Federal 
inspection bill and urging all southern 
states to appoint entomologists. 

Dr. W. Seward Wbbb, the millionaire 
railroad manager, has the credit of the 
largest job of tree planting on record, 
having set out over 200,000 trees, prin- 
cipally white and Scotch pines, on his 
farm in Vermont. 

The Canadian customs officials have 
issued notices that nursery stock from 
the United States will be admitted this 
fall and next spring upon the same terms 
as early in this year. The exact dates 
have not yet been announced but it will 
be while the plants are dormant. 



The Qematis Disease. 

Ed. Am. Florist:— The disputed ques- 
tion as to who struck Billy Patterson 
remains as yet unsolved; so, too, does 
the more vital one of the clematis dis- 
ease. I do not think that the mode of 
procedure advoc ited by Mr. Koster, the 
cutting back each spring of all growth 
above the crown of the plant, would be 
successful in the end. My experience 
with this most beautiful class of climbers 
is that the result of the disease manifests 
itself, in the main, on stems two years 
old; shoots seldom die back the first year. 
Now, such being the case, the cutting 
back of all growth in the spring would 
eradicate all diseased stems and the 
growth of the season following would 
show but a small percentage of disease. 
Were this cutting back annually followed 
up for a number of years, it might have 
a tendency to eradicate the disease, but 
would it not so weaken the plant as to 
make it worthless? Could it stand the 
strain of being forced to break into new 
growth each recurring spring? 

Mr. Koster is a grower, a man of inter- 
national repute. He grows for the tnide. 
Plants of the clematis are sent out gen- 
erally when two and three years oM. 
His main stock of marketable clematises 
was cut back last spring and the new 
growth will be in good shape this fall 
when the plants are taken up and packed 
for shipment. These plants, being young 
and vigorous, and having undergone but 
two such severe cuttings back, are in 
good form, but how will they be thenext 
season and the following if not cutback? 
If cut back, how long will the plant 
stand it? 

A. G. Jackraan, of the famous English 
firm of Geo. Jackman & Son, lately deliv- 
ered an address in London on the clema- 
tis. He discards all the theories regard- 
ing the disease hitherto promulgated, 
and says he is of the opinion that it is 
mainly due to loss of constitution through 
over-propagation. Let us hope he is 
right, and his opinion certainly com- 
mands respect. Novelties of various 
kinds in the plant line are often weak 
and diseased from excessive propagation, 
but in time become strong and healthy. 
There have been two departures in the 
hybridization of the clematis that seem 
to carry us away from the disease. It is 



probably caused by the rugged blood of 
one of the parents. First came C. integ- 
rif olia var. Durandi, being a cross between 
C. integrifolia and the Chinese C. lanu- 
ginosa. This is a cross between a non- 
climbing bush species and a climbing 
form. 

Within a few years Geo. Jackman & 
Son have succeeded in producing a cross 
between the large flowered hybrids and 
the species C. Viorna var. coccinea, secur- 
ing a robust, free flowering vine of most 
exquisite beauty, with many varied 
forms and colors. I have flowered them 
for three seasons and each year the 
plants grow stronger, flowering from the 
middle of July until frost sets in. 

Fortunately for those Americans who 
dislike to import plants on account of 
the bother of getting them through the 
customs house, Jackman's coccinea 
hybrids may be obtained in this country 
of H. A. Dreer. It is a singular fact that 
these two classes of clematises most 
free from the disease have been obtained 
from species or varieties quite distinct in 
some important traits. C. Durandi is a 
cross between a climbing vine and a her- 
baceous perennial of bush form, and 
Jackman's hybrids are from varieties 
producing a woody stem and C. coccinea, 
which has a herbaceous stem that dies 
back in the fall. W. C. Egan. 



'Washins^ton. 
what the growers are planting.— 

many roses have been benched. 

Minder Bros, have planted one house 
of roses. La France, Bridesmaid, Pres. 
Camot, Golden Gate, Perle, Wootton 
and Kaiserin; also two houses of chrys- 
anthemums, about 8,000 in all. Their 
ferns and Ficus elastica are looking fine. 

David Saunders is adding seventy-five 



feet to his violet house, makin git 11x150, 
the length of his carnation house. His 
carnations and bedding plant stock are 
in good shape. 

J. Louis Loose has ten houses of roses 
planted, American Beauty, Brides and 
Bridesmaids, and one house of Liberty. 
He has about 100 each of the varieties 
named grafted and will give them a care- 
ful test; at present they look very fine 
Next week they will start housing their 
carnations, of which they have quite a 
number. 

J. H. Small & Sons have two houses 
planted with chrysanthemums, some in 
solid beds, but most on benches, and a 
number of specimen plants in pots, in all 
about 14,000. Palms and ficuses are in 
fine condition. They have a lot of ferns, 
among them Lastrea Capensis, which is 
one of best half-hardv ferns grown. 

' P.O. 

St. Louis. 

The extreme hot weather of the past 
few days has had a very bad effect on 
flowers, causing them to come into 
market too much open and otherwise 
injured in quality. There has been plenty 
oi stock of the kind which is at present 
in season but the demand is nothing to 
speak of. 

A. Ringier, representing Barnard & Co., 
Chicago, is a visitor in town. 

The bowlers did not meet this week on 
account of the heat. M. 



Macomb, III.— S. T. Danley is increas- 
ing his establishment just fifty per cent 
by adding two houses 10x55. He will 
use the new structures for pansies and 
violets. Mr. Danley expects to have 
100,000 pansy plants for fall sales. He 
will grow the Lawson carnation this 
year. 



Choicest Fruit and Ornamental Trees. 




Shrubs, Plants, Bulbs, Seeds. 40 Acres Hardy Roses, 
of Palms, Kverbloominjf Roses. Ficus, Ferns, Etc, 
solicited. Catalogue Free. 47 Years, louo Acres. 



44 Greenhouses 
Correspondence 



THE STORRS & HARRISON CO., Painesville, O. 



Send lor our Price List We have a fine stuck, 
for fall aplivi-ry. of 

Field Grown Roses, Clematis, V,".t^- 
Flowering Shrubs, »7oriment. 
Ornamental Trees, Conifers. 

To avoid disappointiiieni, order now u supply of 

ROSE-STOCKS FOR GRAFTING. 

(Prices delivered in this country). Rosa Manetti, 
$12 per 1000. Rosa Polyaniha, |8 per lOOO. Rosa 
Laxa (Froebeli), $850 per ItOO. The stocks most 
largely used by European growers for tjrafting 
t»^a roses. 

Our representative, Mr. J. Austin Shaw, will be 
at the Convention and will be pleased to (juote 
prices upon any wants in our line. 

JACKSON & PERKINS CO., g:rYoVk. 

Cemetery Work. 

Plans rande and executed or laid out prelimi- 
nary to and ready for convenient use. Methods 
modern; prnding, draining and irrigating when 
desired. Landscape and surveys, specialties. 

B. F. HATHEWAY. 

19 Relay Place, STAMFORD, CONN. 

Strawberry Plants. 



^ 



100,000 Pot Crown Plants. 
New and Old Varieties. 
Send for Circular. 



JAS. MCC0L6AN & CO.. """"'^T'""" 



WRITE US 

For prices un the following Everblooming Roses 
in 4-iu. pots, healthy and well grown. Bride, 
Bridesinaid. Golden Gate, Kaiserin Augusta, La 
France, Meteor. Mrae. Caroline Testout. Perle des 
.Jardins. Papa Gontier. Safrano, President Carnot, 
Muriel Graham, Souv. de Wootton, by the hundred. 

Maplb AVB. HOOPES, BRO. a THOMAS, 
NrRSBRiEs West Cne^ e'. Pa. 

'se..,.mBMOOJS 

Company 

For f Trees, Shrubs, Vines, 
Your I and Small Fruits. 

Descriptive Illuatmted i'ataloKiie Free. 

THE WM. H. MOON CO.. 

. MoprisviHe. Pa. 

Large Elms. 

OE dne specimen Elm trees 6 to 9-inch 
«0 caliper, 25 to 40 feet high, with well 
developed heads. Have been several times 
transplanted and will lift with excellent 
roots and balls of earth. Send for price list. 

SAMUEL C. MOON, '"""'K.^60.,. PA. 

Please nimtion the American Eloriit ivhen wnling. 

It your 

Business Methods 

are right yon can make a profit 
on an advertisement here. 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



41 



One-Half Million Ferns 

Our stock of FERNS this season is larger and in better 
shape than ever, while the assortment is the best we ever 
oflered. 

Now is a good time to lay in a supply for fall and 
winter use; the plants are all open frame grown and are 
well hardened, and in prime condition to ship. 

Special Low Prices on Ferns in lots of 2000 or more. 



NEPHROLEPIS EXALTATA BOSTONIENSIS 

(BoHton Sword Fern.) 

We have a fine stock of tliis most popular variety. 

2Ji-inch pots 75c per dozen; $ 5.00 per 103; $40.00 per lOCO 

7-mch pots J9.00 '* 75.00 



Per 100 


Pit 1000 


t 5.00 


J40.00 


12.00 




12.00 




15.00 




4.00 




4.50 


30.00 


6.00 


50.00 


3.50 


30.00 


15.00 




4.00 


35.00 


4.00 


3i.00 


5.00 


50.00 


15.00 




70.00 




4.00 


35.00 


15.00 




5.00 




15.00 




5.00 


40.00 


5.00 




3. BO 


30.00 


10. OO 




15 00 




5.00 




8 00 




5.00 


40.00 


12.00 




8.00 




8.00 




4.00 


35.00 


6.00 




4 00 


35.00 


4 00 


35.00 


5.(0 


40.00 


15.00 




4 00 


35.00 


10. CO 




15 00 




6.00 




5.00 









NePHROLEPIS EXAl.TATA BOSTONIENSIS — BOSTON SwOBD FERN. 



Lastrea Aristata Variegata 

Chrysoioba 

OpaVa 

Lomaria Ciliata 

Gibba , 

Lygodium Scandens 



General Collection of Fine Ferns 

Inch pots 

Adiantum .Emulum 2 

Aneicense 3 

Bausei 3 

Capihus-Veneris Manesii 4 

CoQcinnum 2 

Cuneatum 2 

3 

Variegatum 2 

»4 

Grandiceps 2 

Decorum 2 

Formo^um 2 

Farlej ense 3 

5 

Gracillimum 2 

4 

Lfgranji 2 

5 

Bellum 2 

Muiidulum 2 

Pubbscens 2 

Rhomboideum 3 

4 

Khodophyilum 2 

3 

Wiepandi 2 

4 

Atsophila Australia 2H 

Asplenium Obtusilobum 3 

Blechnum Occidentale 2^ 

Rubrura 3 

Cyrtomium Falcatum 2K 

Fonunci 2^ 

Caryotidium 2J4 

Davallia Fijiensis Plumosa 3 

Stric a 2Vi 

Dictyogramma Japonica 3 

Japonica Variepala 3 

Dickionii Autarctica 1% 

Gymnogiamma Sulphurpa 2"4 

For a full line of DECORATI%'E PLANTS and other SEASONABLE .STOCK see oar current yCARTERLT TRADE LIST, of which a 

copy will be mailed on application, if you have failed to receive one. 

iHUlfoflAH Florists attnnding the Convention in Ni-w Yorlc are cordially invited to visit our establishment at Riverton. N. .1. Our 
HIVIlHllUlla representatives will be found in Convention Hall, and will gladly give information as to the best way to reach Riverton. 

HENRY A. DREER, "i-i™- Philadelphia, Pa. 



Dicbotomum 

Microlepia Hispida 

Nephroleois Pectinata 

Nephrodium Hertipes 

Niph bolus Lingua 

Onychium Japonicum 

Plat»ioma B'ttlcata 

Polypodium Aureum 

PolyMichum Coreaceum 

Sfiusum 

Pterit Adiantoides 

Argyra?a 

Cretica Albo Lineata 

" Mayii 

" Magnifica 

" Wimsetti 

Drinkwalerl 

Hastata 

Interuata 

Leptophylla 

Ouvrardii 

Serruiata 

Voluta 

sieboldi 

Palmata 

Sitolobiura ctcutariura. 

Selaf^inella Emiliana... 
MIXED FERNS. '>ur selection. 



pots 


Per 100 


Per lOCO 


2I4 


$4.00 


J35 00 


'IH 


4.00 


35.00 


■ISi 


4.00 


35 00 


V4 


4 00 


35.00 


2'., 


4.00 


35.00 


2', 


6.00 




4 


15.00 




3 


10.00 




3 


6.00 




5 


15.00 




2'.| 


4.00 


35.00 


4 


15.00 




2H 


4 00 


35 CO 


2H 


5.00 


40 00 


2H 


4 0) 


35.00 


'IM 


6.00 


50.00 


tH 


5.00 


40.00 


•i.H 


3 00 


25 00 


2M 


3.50 


30. CO 


2V, 


3.50 


30. CO 


2'i 


6 00 


50.00 


2M 


3.50 


35,00 


2H 


4.00 


35.00 


2M 


4 00 


35.00 


2H 


3.50 


30.00 


2'.) 


3.60 


30.00 


2*4 


3.50 


30.00 


2', 


3.50 


30.00 


2Vf 


3.00 


25.00 


2H 


3.50 


30.00 


2M 


3.50 


30 00 


2H 


3..'i0 


30 00 


2H 


6.00 




2 


3.50 


30.00 


2>„f 


3.00 


25.00 


3 


6.00 


50 09 



For 

Immediate 

Shipment. 



XXX Stock 

CYCLAMEN PERSICUM SPLENDENS GIGANTEUM- 

Finest strain in the world. Now ready to 
ship; a splendid stock of plants in four true 
colors, red, white, pinlv, and white with car- 
mine eye, from 2^-inch pots, $5.00 per 100; 
S40.00 per 1000: from 3-inch pots, $7.00 per 
100, $65 00 per 1000. 250 at the 1000 rate. 

SPECIAL OFFER. CINERARIA HY8RI0A MAXIMA 
GRANDIFLORA and Maxima GranOiflora Nana. 

strain superb in every way, transplanted from 
Hats, strong plants, $1.50 per 100; $12.60 per 
1000- 250 "at the 1000 rate . 
CHINESE PRIMROSES, (ready Aug. 1.5th) in the 
finest marl^et varieties, including blue, double 
white and red, from 25^-in. pots," $2. 50 per 100. 

ALL STOCK GUARANTEED A No. I. 

PAUL MADER, East Stroudsbjrg, Pa. 

Schmidt's PansiesN?r-p'"n7:^ 

reedy; no mattf r 
what you pay, you csnnot Ket a better strain; '4 
ounce, tl. 2d; I-^ ounce, 12 CO; oue ounce. $4 iij 

J. C. SCHMIDT, BRISTOL, PA. 



OHHLu PRIMROSES 

50,000 finest large flowering fringed 1000, $17.00; Per 100, $2.00 

Obconica grand., fimbriata, rosea and Forbesi " 2.00 

Obconica t'rauditlora and rosea, readv Sept 1st. 

Acn3r;iniic I Sprengerii $3.00 per 100 Pansy Seed, large flowering, 

asparagus ^ piumosus 4.00 " ounce, $4.00 

Cinerarias, August 20 $2.00 per 100. 

JOS. N. ClNNINGtlA^, Delaware, 0. 



CASH PLEASE. 



THE AMERICAN FLORIST'S 

COLOR CHART 

It now accepted a« ihe atandsrd in prep&nng oolo 

detorlptlonB, by many foreign houses aa 

well as In America. 

PRICE 15 CENTS POSTPAID. 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO., 322 Dearborn St. Chicago 



Cinerarias. 



Superb strain, large 
plants in flats, ready 
for 2-in. pots, 81.50 per 
100. Cyclamen. 3-in., ready for 4-ln., $4.0U per 100. 
Coleus. uewest fancy colors, large plants from 
flats, $1 00 per 100. Heliotrope, field grown, tne 
best dark blue, large plants full of cuttings, $1.25 
per dozen. $10 00 per 100. 
Sam*i Whitton, 13-17 Cray Av., Utica, N. Y. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 



42 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 11^ 



Our PasTiMEs 



Announcements of coming contests or other 
eyents of interest to our bowling, shooting and 
cycling readers are solicited and will be given 
place in this column. 

Address all correspondence for this department 
to Wm. J. Stewart, 67 Bromfield St., Boston, Mass.; 
Robt. Sift, 1725 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa.; 
or to the American Florist Co., 324 Dearborn St., 
Ohioago. 111. 



At Chicago. 

The following scores were made in 

practice on Friday evening, Augtast 3, 

Degnan bowling with his left hand 
because of a sore thumb on the other: 

Player 1st 2d 3d 4th 5th 6th 7th 

Winterson 208 190 m 178 r43 148 118 

Balluff 152 138 164 137 139 123 111 

Kreitling 120 186 129 153 115 172 99 

F. Stollery 142 153 137 160 167 126 201 

Hauswirth 184 126 140 130 142 161 157 

Shaw 117 117 108 109 

Degnan 52 51 140 



At Boston. 

On Friday evening, August 3, the bowl- 
ing enthusiasts were electrified by the 
performance of Wm. Martin, who made a 
score of 220 in his second game. If he had 
saved that for New York he would have 
become a bigger man than either Mc- 
Kinley or Bryan. 

Player l3t 2d 3d 4th 

F.J.Norton 142 152 133 125 

Bough 96 122 148 

Kough.Jr 85 115 119 102 

Martin 117 330 154 124 

Hannan 181 155 123 117 



At Detroit. 

The score at the practice game on 
August 6 shows that Detroit will be in 
the running at New York later in the 
month: 

Player Ist 2d 3d 4th Av 

Breitmeyer 181 2:52 161 193 186 

Wstson 162 169 140 148 155 

Holznagle 151 121 188 149 162 

Dunn 163 165 115 168 150 

Pick-worth 168 152 143 129 148 

Pantke 104 129 188 143 141 

Beard 119 143 171 116 137 

Taylor 133 134 143 133 136 

Davis 138 115 155 131 i:K 

Flowerday 110 153 130 131 

Sullivan I.=i8 117 103 95 lis 

Shaw 96 99 107 106 102 

J. F. S. 



At Flatbush. 

There was a full attendance at the 
games last Thursday evening. Riley let 
himself loose on the last round just to 
see what would happen and a score of 
224 to his credit was the result. There 
were a number of other good scores 
reached, as the following tables will 
show: 

Player 1st 2d 3d 

Raynor 141 131 148 

E. Dailledouze 163 116 129 

P Daillcdouze 180 166 128 

Thennis 107 134 125 

Schmutz 160 130 146 

Riley 114 1.53 224 

Wocker 133 157 150 

A. ZelliT 162 165 15K 

H. Dailledouze 143 94 127 

Schmutz, .Ir 130 191 115 

Le Moult 95 73 

C. Zeller 112 

Lani;)nbr 109 



At Philadelphia. 

The fourth and last of the matches on 
outside alleys was played last Monday 
evening, the final game being bowled on 
the North Broad street alleys. Each 
match was played on a different alley 
and, as the prize was a place on the con- 
vention team, the entire contest was 
almost as nerve testing as the national 



tournament games. The following are 
the total scores of the twelve games in 
the order in which the men finished: 

Plaver Player 

Moss." 1896 Baker 1578 

Anderson 1795 Watson 1565 

Walker 1700 Kitt 1541 

Connor 1691 Gibson (six games). 761 

Harris 1684 \Vestcott(sis games) 755 

The first eight men constitute the 
team and substitutes. The average of 
the first six men in the twelve games is 
1431^2. This is about fifteen pins less to 
a game than their collective average 
would be on our own alleys and shows 
what a diSerence strange alleys make to 
some bowlers. There will now be a 
match or two between the convention 
team and a picked six from the associate 
members, who will try to draw them out 
a little. K. 

At New York. 

On Monday evening, August 6, scores 

were made at the bowling club as fol- 
lows: 

Player 1st 2d 3d 4th 5th 

Traendly Ill 145 128 132 113 

Siebenheller 106 124 133 163 131 

Roehrs 173 117 147 156 155 

Donaldson 116 191 187 140 195 

Thielman 135 213 146 195 

Manda 159-128 133 165 

P.L.Walters 129 104 112 

Burns 135 

O'Mara 152 

As the great event for which all have 
been preparing is now at hand, the fol- 
lowing records and averages made by 
the New Y'ork bowlers for the months of 
June and July will be interesting: 

Player Points Games Average 

Traendly 2856 20 143 

Schenck 1739 13 146 

O'Mara 1828 13 1.53 

Roehrs 2346 17 Vii 

T. .1. Lang 2603 17 15;! 

Kurus...: 3253 24 136 

Thielman 1840 12 153 

Manda 3111 22 141 

Marshall 2310 15 154 



To the Bowlers. 



As Mr. Schenck, of the New York Flo- 
rists' Club's bowlingcommittee, is quoted 
in last issue of the Florists' Exchange as 
saying that he could not reply to the ques- 
tion asked him several times, apparently 
by would-be contestants, as to whether 
any entrance fee would be required for the 
national tournament, I think it best to 
again state that as far as the National 
Florists' Bowling League is concerned 
there is no fee of any kind except for the 
sweepstake prizes, which, of course, are 
only open to the clubs which contributed 
to this fund. It cannot be determined 
just how the fund is to be divided or 
prizes purchased with the money until 
the representatives of the contributing 
clubs get together in New York, as the 
league committee has not been able to 
get sufficient data to enable them to go 
ahead in the matter. Robert Kift, 
President N. F. B. L. 



A Hint to Conventionites. 

Ed. Am. Florist:— The comments of 
"W." in your issue of August 4 are 
timely. The bowling is all right when 
it is arranged for, as at New York, so as 
not to conflict with the work of the con- 
vention. No one who does not enjoy 
those things is compelled to attend the 
contests, much less to enter into them. 
Business and pleasure is a winning com- 
bination to play, but too much pleasure 
is, of course, bad for business. It has 
seemed to me — I venture the opinion with 
fear and trembling — that some few of 
those cups and other trophies for the 
bowling contests, which have been men- 



tioned so constantly in the past weeks, 
might well have been given for contests 
more strictly horticultural. It wouldn't 
have made any difference you know, 
really, if one or two of the boys didn't 
get a prize. W. N. Rodd. 

The "hint to conventionites" is so 
practical that it strikes at the very 
heart of the work of the ' 'conventionites, " 
but it seems to me that the writer of a 
good thought should never be ashamed 
of his name; "W" is nothing except a 
letter down near the end of the alphabet. 
His finger, too, is directed to the bowlers 
and indicates that those who are develop- 
ing their muscle and perfecting them- 
selves in rolling might possibly exhaust 
their vital forces before they reach the 
convention, and then, being spent balls, 
as it were, have little influence in setting 
up wise thoughts and suggestions when 
they should be most needed. It is the 
bowlers, practically or figuratively, who 
are the best workers, the best thinkers, 
and who achieve the best results. I 
approve the suggestions of "W." I have 
always endeavored to encourage 
thoughts upon improvement in the 
methods of building, in growing and 
the cultivation of taste and judgment 
in the selection of what to grow. I have 
tried to study the building from the 
foundation, the plant from seed, and to 
have ideas of my own, but there is never 
a time when I cannot be benefited by 
the consensus of opinion, the accumula- 
tion of ideas, and the practical sugges- 
tions which originate with the thinkers 
of our organization, whether they be 
bowlers, delvers, experimenters or ama- 
teurs. I love the art, and I believe that 
there is not one, in the society or out of 
it, engaged in it who does not regard it 
with a certain amount of aflection and 
fascination, as well for the pleasure it 
afiords as for the profits which result 
from it. Wm. F. Gddb. 



New York Hotels. 

At the request of Walter F. Sheridan, 
chairman of the reception committee, we 
herewith present a list of the hotels of 
New York for the information of those 
who will attend the approaching conven- 
tion of the Society of American Florists: 

EUROPEAN PLAN. Rates Miles to 

per day. Hall. 

Savov, 69th St. and 5th av $2 00 1 

Netherland, 69th st. and 5th av. . . . 2 00 1 

Metropole, Broadway and 42d at... 1 00 V% 

St. Cloud, Broadway and 42d St.... 1 50 H 

Miinhattan, Madison av. and 42d St. 2 00 ^ 

Marlboroutih, B'dway and 37th St. 1 50 ^ 

Murray Hill, Park av. and 40th st. 1 50 M 

Grand Union, Park av. and 42d St.. 100 near 

Imperial. Broadway and 32d st. . . . 1 50 % 

Grand, Broadway and 31st st 1 50 \ 

Victoria, 5th av. and 27th st 1 50 % 

Ashland, 4th av. and 26th st 100 % 

Continental. Broadway and 20th St. 1 00 Ub 

Union Suuare, Union sq. and 16th 1 00 VVi 

Everett, Union S(i. and 17th st 1 50 IH 

St. Denis, Itroadway and 11th st.. 1 10 1?8 
Cosmopolitan, W. Broadway and 

Chambers 1 00 3 

Astor House, Broadway opp. Gen- 
eral P. 1 00 3 

Holland House, 5th av. and 30th st. 2 00 \ 

AMEIIICAN AND EUBOI'EAN PLAN. 

Am. Europ. Miles. 

May's, 50 West 28th st $1 50 $1 60 'ii 

Broadway Central, Broadway 

opp. Bond 2 60 1 00 2 

I'la/a, 68th, 69tli and 5th Av. 5 00 2 00 1 

AMERICAN PLAN. Per duy. Miles. 

Fifth Avenue, 6th av. and 23rd st |6 00 1 

Stunevant, Broadway and 28th st. . . 2 50 li 

Visiting members may have rooms 
reserved at any of the above hotels by 
applying direct, or through the chairman 
of the hotel committee, S. S. Butterfield, 
P. O. Box 1G97, New York, specifying 
grade of accommodation desired. 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



43 



NEW CROP PANSY SEED. 

"^^^mXX^ Vaughan's International Mixture. 

v\t li w I 1 / \^ll!l 11 FV This mixture is a combination of as many separate colors, types, blendings and unique 

4u\\fc. U / I I ii\ ^llllMw^ '' J' n\ kinds as can be found in the world. It has been m:ide up and sold by us for ten years, and 

'^\ '^W^'^l^l(yfci,lV,\i//|j . luHK^/ \ ^^^ been improved upon every year, until now it cannot be beaten. Every florist knows 

|K/ ^t^iilu^-i.ilF^'W^ K Vaughan's International Mixture". Price, per oz., $10.00; ^8oz.,$1.50; trade packet, 50c. 

^^m^m'^ \1iJJM Vaughan's Giant Mixture. 

raB^Mltk vor 'M^i^ m^^^^' ^ W This mixture is made up spen.ially for those whose trade demands lart^e flowers. It con- 

:^0;^^9|^Nnnl i|||HHHiJR^^'^[/ Y tains all the separate colors of Giant Trimardeau, the Giant Bugnot and Gassier and other 

kJ^SHI^BnHBi l^jJ^g^^^Q^^^r' _/ speuial strains which cannot be had any othtr way. Price per oz., $4.00; Jg-oz., 60c; 

=\ trade packet. 25c. 

Zl aiANT TRinARDEAU.— Mixed, per oz., $1.00; \^ oz., 20c; trade packet, 10c. 

^ CHICAGO PARKS BEDDING.— Mixed, per oz., $1.00. H oz., 30c; trade packet, 10c. 

^ l^~S<-iid for our "BOOK FOR FLORISTS" for list of separate colors of pansies. 

: ( MIGNONETTE *'BISMARCK.'*~Our Machet has a very good reputation, and is the best 

^J strain in existence. This new sort is an improvement on it, both in color and size of flower, 

^/ and we want every florist to try it. Pkt. I5c. ; M oz. 50c. 

NEW CROP. 

BSSVNjjwrarv X CYCLAMEN PERSICUW OlOANTEUn —This seed is grown for us by an expert in Europe. 

'(r'W/^I^MV^\^y Wv^S^^/ We have taken his entire crop for the past four years, and tind it to be the finest strain we have 

• — . /fiU u'[\ \ \ ^v^ ever seen. 100 seeds. 1000 seeds. 

VJi. — '--'^ — -_^ aiOANTeun ALBUn.— Mont Blanc, pure white 75 $5.00 

ASPARAGUS SPRfcNQERII.-Suc per 100; 14.50 p.r lOOO »E|P CR'MSON^-\>^ry hi^ge^.^.^;^^^^^^ .75 5.00 

seeds. WHITE CARMINE EYE 75 5 00 

SMILAX.-New crop, trade pl;t., 10c; oz., 30c. QIANT FLOWERED SORTS.-BesrmVied'.'.'.'.::".'.'.'."""'.'. ■.;::;;; oi.'.'jiiso'; iso 4:50 

84-86 RANDOLPH STREET. V AUQHAlM O O C C LJ O I UKCj 14 BARCLAY STREET. 

KENNICOTT BROS. CO., 

Wholesale Commission Florists. 




WRITE FOR SPECIAL QUOTATIONS ON 
WIRE WORK DURING SUMMER MONTHS. 



^2 and -i-* BJ. I2a.xidolx>]a. St., 
OHICA.OO. 



None belter. We 
I offer if unsold on 
I receipt of order, 

100 1000 



They are Fine 

lUU 

2100 Bridesmaid in 4 -in. pots .$4.00 $35.00 

1000 " "3!4 " 4.00 35 00 

1720 " "3 " 3.00 25.00 

600 " "2 " 2.0-) 20.00 

300 Brides "4 " 4.00 35.00 

200 '• ■'S'A " 4 00 35.00 

3500 ■• "3 " 3.00 25.00 

1200 ■' "2 '• 2.00 20.00 

3000 Meteors "3 " 2.50 25.00 



lOO 1000 
500 Mme. Chatenay. ..in 4 -in. pots $4.00 
lOO " " ...."2 ■• 2. CO 

125 Mme. Cusine "4 " 3.50 

250 Lady Dorothea.... "4 " 4.00 

150 ■• " "2H " 2 50 

2000 Golden Gale "2H " 2.50 25.00 

700 Maid of Honor "4 " 3.00 

700 "2K " 2 00 

50O0 Brides and Maids in 3 and 4-in pots. These 
are carried over stock; they are good. We 
olTer them at 112.00 per 1000. 



Latania Borbonica 3-in. pots, $12.00 per 100 

Areua Lutescens 4 " 20.00 

Cocos Weddeliana 3 " 12.00 

-Vsparagus Sprengerii 6 " 25.00 

....4 '■ 8.00 

....3 " 6.00 

....2 " 3.00 

Picus Elastica, O-in. pots 75c to $1 .50 each. 

Boston Fern, 8-in. pots. .. .$35.00 to $35.00 per 100 
Plan's are vigorous and unusually fine. Will be 
earrfuliy paclied. and we guarantee them to be right 
in every respect. 



LAKEVIEW ROSE GARDENS. Jamestown, n. y. 



Gardeners' Chronicle. 

A Weekly Illustrated Journal. 

BBTABLISHID 1841. 

The "OABOBNBIBB' CHBONICLB" bu been FOB 
Omi FUTT TIABS TH« LIASING JOrTBNAL Of Iti 

olau. It has aobleved this position beoause, wblle 
ipealally devoting Itself to supplying the dsUy reqnlre- 
ments of gardeners of all olasaefl, mnob of tne mfor- 
nuitlon fnmlflhed Is of suob general and permanent 
Talne, that the 'QARDBNBBS' CHBONICLB" li 
looked np to as the standabd authohitt on tbe 
rabjeota of which It treat*. 

anbtorlptlon to tbe United SUtei, M.ao pw Ttu. 
Bamlttuioes to be made payable to B. Q. COvB. 

Otticii:— 
41 Welllnalon St., Coven Qarden. London. England. 

Carnations *« S'' 

Field Grown, Heavy and Stocky. 

TRIUMPH, MRS. JOOST, ARGYLE, MELBA, 
GLACIER, FLORA HILL, $5.00 PER HUNDRED 

JOY & SON, Nashville, Tenn. 

Always mention the 



American Florist 



when writing advertiieri. 



ASSORTED FERNS, 

In flats, ready for potting, $2.00 per flat. 

BOSTON FERNS, 

Ready for 3-in. pots, $6.00 per 100; 4-in., 
$15.00 per 100; 5-6-in.. $20.00-125.00 per 100. 
Also fine plants in 5 6-in. pots, now ready 
for a shift, in pans or large pots, $35.00 per 
100, $4.50 per doz. This is exceptionally 
good value. 

3 Asparagus Plumosus Nanus, 3-in., extra 
5 fine, $8.00 per 100. 

5 Asparagus Sprengerii. 2-in., $6.00 per 100. 

3 Kentia Belmoreana. 2'i-in. pots, $10.00 per 
3 100; 4-inch, $40.00 per 100. Large plants, 
S $1.50, $1.75, ,ii2.00, $2.50, $3 00, up to $5.00. 

^ Send for Particulars. 

I BOBBINK & ATKINS 

I RUTHERrORD, N. J. 

ACALYPHA SANDERI 

2H-inoh pots, $8.00 per 100. 

CrlniSOn nBHIUlGri ane Yot ot^AeldVants 
for winter forcing. 

The CONARD & JONES COMPANY, 



100,000 FERNS 
IN FLATS 



At One Cent. 

Good, hardy plants in flats, twelve best 
market sorts. It potted now in small 
pots worth five times the money in a weelc 
or two. Safe arrival guaranteed, and 
liberal count. 



$10 per 1000 by Express. 
100 Mailed for $1.25. 



Sample 



Pteris Cretica Alba, P. Tremula, P. Sul- 
cata, P. Hastata, P. Adiantoides, P. 
Longifolia, Adiantum, Lomaria, Lygo- 
dium, Nephrodium, Cristatum, Blechnum, 
Selaginellas, etc., etc. Post orders Wash- 
ington. 

JOHN n. LEY, Good Hope, D. C. 



Geranium 
America... 

$2.50 per doz. 



The QUEEN of 

all Geraniums 

Come and see. 
3000 plants in .""ull 
bloom. Good, 
stronfi stock plants 
from 4-inch pots, 

$20.00 oer 100. 



HENRY EICnnOLZ, riorist, Waynesboro, Pa. 

An advertiser feels better when he 
knows he is getting direct returns for his 
money. Mention the Aubeican Florist. 



44 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 11^ 



Cold Storage for Bulbs. 

Ed. Am. Florist: — Please inform me of 
the best way to build a cold storage 
house for bulbs. Inqdiher. 

I regret to say that I am not able to 
answer above query, as I have no cold 
storage house for my bulbs, but put them 
outside in the old fashioned way. I have 
a piece of ground convenient to the green- 
houses plowed and harrowed and then 
make beds about six feet wide and about 
six feet deep by throwing the soil out on 
each side. The beds are then filled with flat 
boxes containing compost into which the 
bulbs are planted, and then the fine soil 
that was removed to make the beds is 
put back over the bulbs. They are then 
given a thorough soaking vrith water to 
keep them moist, but before they are 
watered the beds are also covered with a 
few inches of hay. Nothing more is done 
to the beds until the latter part of 
November or the fore part of December, 
when more covering is added, to prevent 
the bulbs being frosted. A. N. Piehson. 

A question, practically the same as 
above, was asked at the Providence, 
R. I., convention of the Society of Ameri- 
can Florists, August, 1897, to which 
Wm. Scott, of Buflalo, N. Y., replied as 
follows: "I cannot by any means be 
considered a very large grower of bulbs. 
I am forcing possibly 50,000 or 60,000 
tulips and hyacinths in a year. Living, 
as I do, in a northern climate, that of 
Buflalo, where it is liable to freeze as hard 
almost as anywhere, I have never found 
a better storage house than out-of doors. 
Dutch hyacinths, I consider, should be in 
a cold frame, and I like them to be 
covered with glass and on a dry bottom 
so that they may not get soaked with 
the rain. Tulips I have tried in a cellar, 
but I have never found them as successful 
as those I have boxed, put on the surface 
of the ground in boxes. We cover them 
with two inches of earth, after thorough 
watering, and leavetheminthat position 
until severe weather is due. \Ve then 
cover them with five or six inches of litter 
or manure from the stable, or some such 
material, or leaves; and with the help of 
the snow we do not find any difficulty in 
getting them in. I have found that the 
quality of the flowers that are forced is 
so much superior to those that have been 
in a root house or a cellar that it pays 
to adopt the plan, even if it is a little 
labor to get in the boxes. Sometimes, 
however, the manure in the soil that 
covers the bulbs is frozen, but the manure 
you can always get oflT; and if you have 
to take into your greenhouse for twenty- 
four hours the two or three inches of soil 
that covers them, until it is melted, it 
even pays then. My idea of a root house 
or bulb house would be a common frame 
building, and I thought once of con- 
structing one. I would have the sides so 
that they would be perfectly open and 
would have the air coming in until the 
very last moment when hard winter set 
in. That would be my idea of a bulb 
house. But you will find that the rain 
we get, the natural element outside, is so 
beneficial to the bulbs that they aregain- 
ing strength all the time. It is a natural 
condition for them to be frozen. Where 
do you put a tulip bulb? If you plant it 
in November to look beautiful in the 
flower garden in May, where is it? Why, 
out in the flower garden to be frozen 
hard, and that is where your forcing 
bulbs should be. So that, to answer this 
question, so far as my opinion is con- 
cerned, I say I would build no root house 
at all, but would have half an acre of 
good open ground." 



25,000 Carnations 25,000 



FIELD GROWN PLANTS OP THE POLLOWINQ VARIETIES : 



15,000 Flora Hill $ 5.00 per 100 

4,000 White Cloud 8.00 

1.000 Mrs. Bradt 10.00 

1,000 G. H. Crane 10.00 

1,000 MuGowan 4.00 



2,000 Eldorado 4.00 per 100 

1,000 Wm. Scott 4.00 

1,000 Davbreak 5.00 

500 Emily Pierson „.. 4.00 " 



These Plants are all in first-class condition, Kood size and healthy stock. 
Write me if you are in need of a large quantity. 

CHAS. CHADWICK, tocfcBoxn. Qrand Rapids, Mich. 



A Rose 
Bargain. 



Brides $3.00 

Maids 3.00 

Cloth. Soupert.... 3.00 

Meteor 3.00 

Am. Beauty 



2!4-inch. 
Per lOU Per 1000 



(25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 



3-inch. 
Per 100 Per 1000 
$5.00 $45.00 



5.00 
5.00 
8.00 



45.00 
45.00 
75.00 



We offer the following price 
inducement to clear the bal- 
ance of our stock at once : 



5000 METEORS, Extra ane; 
usual grade. 



4000 BRIDES, ""'"""^ 



All 2^-inch Stock, $20 per 1000, 
$135 for the lot. Speak quick 
if you want them all. 

J. A. BUDLONQ, 

37.39 Randolph St., 
CHICAGO 



Please mention the Amencan Florist when ii'titing. 

'^L CARNATIONS 

Orders boolved now for fall delivery. 

GEO. HANCOCK & SON. Grand Haven! Mich. 



Pet 100 Per 1000 
Mixed Jardiniere Ferns, mostly 

pteris varieties $3.00 $25.00 

Asparagus Sprengerii, 2H-m 4.0O 35.00 

Plumosus. " 6.00 55.00 

Adiantum Farleyense, line stock, 6-in. pots, 50c each 

Per 100 

Smilax. 3-inch $4 00 

Dracaena Terminalit, 4-incb 15.00 

Phoenix Canariensis, elegant stock, 4K to 5- 

inoh 20.00 

Chamaerops Excelsa, 5-inch 25.00 

4 ■• 20.00 

J. B. HEISS, 

DAYTON. O. 

First. class, healthy Plants- To close out 
we quote the followins low prices: 

600 Heauties 3-inch, $4 00 per 100 

1000 Perles 3 ■' 3.00 

1000 MeieorB 3 " 3.00 

800 Kridesmaids 3 '■ 3,00 

400 Brides 3 " 3.00 " 

A. 0. PRINCE & CO. . 76 & 78 Wabash Av.,Chicago. 



r ▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼! 



ELECTROS 



T,. 



For Catalogue Purposes. 



^E have a large assortment of strictly 
high-class halftones of which we 
can supply electros suitable for cata- 
logue illustration. If you need 
anything in this way, state your requirements 
and we will submit proofs of the illustrations 
in stock. Our collection includes the leading 

ANNUALS POT PLANTS 

BIENNIALS FLORISTS' FLOWERS 

HARDY PERENNIALS TREES AND SHRUBS 

Also PARK AND QARDEN SCENERY. 




PRICE FOR CASH ONLY 15 CENTS PER SQUARE INCH. 



The AMEPacAN Florist Co. 

324 Dearborn Street, CHICAGO, ILL, ^ 



igoo^ 



The American Florist. 



45 



Roses for Florists 

OUR Rose Plants are all grown for the 
trade. We do not grow cut flowers. 
Such plants, we claim, are well worth more 
money than ordinary surplus stock. 

Our Roses are all shifted from 2-inch 

pots and equal to most stock usually sold 

as 3-inch. 2^-in., 3^-in., 

per 100 per 100 

American Beauty l6.oo $12.00 

Brides 3.oo s.oo 

Bridesmaids 3.0O S.oo 

Perles 3.50 9.oo 

Kaiserin 4.00 10 00 

Meteor 3.00 7.oo 

Wootton S.oo 

Golden Gate, 2-in 3.oo 

Sunset 4.00 lo.oo 

Bedding Roses, in 2-in. pots, strong stock, 
in variety, |2.50 per lOO, $20 per 1000. 

Vaughan's Seed Store, 

CHICAGO, NEW YORK, 

84-86 Randolph St. 14 Barclay St. 

♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

* 60,000 FIELD-OROWN * 

Carnation Plants 

^ Argyle, Flora Hill, 

♦ Pingree, Triumph, 
Tidal Wave, Scott, 2 
Evelina, MoGowan, J 
Gold Nugget, Armazindy, ^ 

Per 100 M.OO; per 1000 J35.00. 

4 ROSE PLANTS. 

♦ METEOR ^ „ „ 

T RDinFCUjiin I From 2H and 3-m. pots, 

T Sn He I Per 100, »3.00; 1000, $25.00. 

♦ dkIUl J 

T AMERICAN BEAUTY, 3-inoh pots, per 100, 

^ J5.00; per 1000, $45.00. 

I GEORGE REINBERG, 

I 51 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO. « 

Bride and Bridesmaid, strong 3-in., $5.00 per 100. 

Marie Louise, strong field grown, $2.50 per 100. 

From field; Scott, Meteor, Victor, Mrs. Jas. Dean, 
White Cloud, Flora Hill, etc., at market prices. 

E. M. & H. N. HOFFMAN, Elmira, N. Y. 



WM. MURPHY 

Wholesale Carnation Grower 



station F, CINUNNAn, OHIO. 



' ROBT. CRAIG & SON ^ 

Roses, Palms ] 



w 

^ and Novelties in Decorative Plants. 

Q^ Market and 49th Street, PHILADELPHIA PA. 



We like to have you tell otir advertisers 
that yon read onr paper 



tttiiitiiiiuttititiiitttititiiintituuitiiiiniitmitiiimmiiimtititmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiMt'' 

10,000 American Beauty Plants, I 

I FINE STOCK, FROM 3-iN. POTS, C 

j $5.00 per J 00 ^ $40.00 per 1000. I 

Per 100 Per 1000 fe 

Kaiserin, 3-inch pots $4 00 $35.00 fc 

Golden Gate, 2V2-inch pots 4.00 35.00 E 

Bridesmaid, Perle, Meteor, 3-inch pots 4 00 35.00 F 



PETER REINBERG, 



51 Wabash Ave., 

CHICAGO. 



i)»ITn!TfTITTTTTnnTITTTTnfT»TTTTT!miTTTTfff»Hf!»!!»??»!»»?l!1H!T?!ffT?!»T»fTfT»nn!TIT!TnnTTTTniB 



REDUCED PRICES 
TO CLOSE OUT. 



FIRST QUALITY FORGING ROSES. 

Fully equal to those sent out the last eight years, first-class and perfectly healthy In every respect 
Only selected growth from flowering shoots used In propagating. 

AMERICAN BEAUTY, METEOR, KAISERIN, SAFRANO, BRIDESMAID, 

BON SILENE, PERLES, MAID OF HONOR, BRIDE. 

3-lnch pots, 16 00 per 100. 4-lnoh pots, %% 00 per 100. 

CRIFTPn RnCFC Maid of Honor, Qoldnn Gate, »W-lnch pots. tl5.00 per 100. 

unHriCU nuOLO, Liberty, l-lneh pots, *S OU per dozen, flfty plant* for $24.00. 



i>rt,t,oi«. 



:bi:^oo]vis:bxji*g^, r»A.. 



STI^ONG SELECT 3-INGH I^OSES. 

In the finest possible shape to plant. Per 100. Per 1000 

10,000 MAIDS and BRIDES $4.00 $35.00 

3,000 PERLES, extra good 5.00 45.00 

400 BEAUTIES 5.00 

In ijrowin!? condition; sure to give you satisfaction and make you money. 

W. H. GULLETT & SONS, Rose Growers, LINCOLN. ILL. 

AHERICAN BEAUTY, four-inch, selected, $15.00 per 100. LIBERTY, four-inch $75.00 per 100 
MAID, BRIDE, PERLB, 3y,-inch, $8 00; 4-inch, $10.00. Also SUNSET, JVIETEOR, MORQAN MER- 
MBT. LaFRANCE, NIHHETOS, KAISERIN, GOLDEN GATE, MAID OF HONOR, ORAFTBD 
BRIDE, $20.00 per 100, large 4 in. ASPARAGUS PLUnOSUS, all sizes. MARIE LOUISE VIOLETS 

^f<^^^^^- A. S. MacBEAN. lakewood. n. j. 



Carnations... 

Plant them early. Extra strong, healthy 
plants READY NOW, of the following 
standard sorts: 

Mrs. Bredt, Mary Wood, White Cloud, Triumph, 
Daybreak, Scott. Mayor Pingree. Jubilee, Flora 
Hill, Empress, $S 00 per 100; $40.00 per 1000. 

LAMPRECHT BRO^, Ashland, 0. 

TO CLOSE OUT. 

500 American Beauties 2^-in., $5 00 per 100, or 

$20.00 for the 500. 
2000 Kaiserin, 2000 Golden Gate, 2000 Bridesmaid, 

1000 Meteor, 500 Garrett, 500 Bride, 500 Perle, 

500 Mermet, 3 and 3^-in., $3.00 per 100, or 

$25.00 per 1000. 
These are Fine Plants. Cash With Order. 

MRS. J. W. CROUCH, Ciiattanooga, Tenn. 

CLEAN. HEALTHY 

PLANTS. 

FROM 3-INCH POTS. 

American Beauty and Kaiserin $6. 00 per 100 

Perle and LaFrance 5.00 " 

Meteor, Albany, Sunset, Golden Gate, 

Bride, Bridesmaid, Wootton 4.00 ■' 

Perle, Suiset, LaFrance, Bride, 
Bridesmaid, Meteor, Kaiserin and 
Golden Gate, from 2-inoh pots 2 60 

JOSEPH HEINL, Jacksonville, III. 

Surplus Stock Roses, 



ROSES 



175 PERLES 
2S0 BRIDES 
300 MAIDS 
100 METEORS 



Flrst=Class, 
strong 3-inch, 
$4 per 100. 



LEROY L. LAMBORN, Alliance, O. 

Allen's Defiance, seed from selected spilies, 25o per 

pkt,, $1.00 per ounce. 

J. C. SCHMIDT, BRISTOL, PA. 



Meteor Roses 



Per 100 Per 1000 
.$4.00 $37.50 



METEOR. 3^-inch pots. 

Potted and repotted four times. These plants 
are vigorous and unusually fine. Pacl^ed to safely 
ship any distance. 

BRANT & NOE, Forest Glen, Chicago, III. 



Cheap 



WE STILL HAVE 
TO CLOSE OLT 

2500 Maids, 2H-in.. 500 La France, 2V4-in., 

1000 Perlet. 2i/2-in., 1O0O Meteors. 3-in.. 

500 Am. Beauties, 2-! sin., 600 Kaiserin, 2-in. 
Boston Ferns now ready tor 5 and 6-in, pots. 

WRITE FOR pmcEs. Goo. A, KuM, Poliln, III. 

ROSES ^ 

1800 Brides, \, . «. .^^ 
300 Maids, |3-m.,$4per JOO 

CASH WITH ORDER, PLEASE. 

ALBERT F. AMLINS, Maywood, III. 

CARNATIONS! 

F. Dorner & Sons Co., 

LA FAYETTE, IND. 



Please mention the American Florist when : 



riling. 



BOSTON FERN ,^ii„. 

L, 11. FOSTER, 45 King St., Dorchester, Mass. 



46 



The American Florist. 



Aug. II, 



Water Tank and Boiler. 

Ed. Am. Florist:— Will a tank 6x8 
feet, elevated twenty ieet, supply water 
power sufficient to syringe roses? What 
size of pipe should be used to conduct 
water to laucet? We use a No. 16 Hitch- 
ings hot water boiler, and would like to 
know the best method of heating the 
water in tank from same to 50°? The 
tank is in a bam forty feet distant from 
boiler. Would also like to know whether 
this boiler will maintain a temperature 
of 50° to 60° in two houses 25x90 feet. 
Subscriber. 

If the bottom of the tank is twenty feet 
above the floor of the greenhouse, the 
pressure will answer for syringing, 
although an elevation of fifteen or 
twenty feet more would give a much bet- 
ter pressure. One-inch pipe is desirable 
for distributing the water, but in small 
houses •'' 4-inch answers very well. The 
pipe leading from the tank should be at 
least 1-inch, and if more than two lines 
of hose are to be used at one time, it will 
be well to make it I'i-inch. The simplest 
method of taking the chill from the 
water is to draw a small amount from 
the heating pipes. Use the water tank as 
the expansion pipe, connecting it to a 
return near the heater. If there is any 
danger that the tank or connecting pipe 
will freeze a vent pipe should be run from 
one of the flow pipes to a height above 
the top of the tank. Connection should 
then be made between the cold water 
pipes and one of the flow hot water 
pipes and, by means of valves upon both 
pipes, the temperature can be controled 
the same as for a bath tub. Of course, 
heating pipes could be run to the tank or 
a water heater could be placed in the 
greenhouse. To heat the houses to 60°, 
a boiler should be rated for about 2400 
square feet of radiation. This is about 
one-third more than the actual radiation. 

L. R. T. 



Petosky, Mich. 

The weather has been very warm for 
this section, 84° in shade for four days, 
and the resorters are complaining about 
the warmth. A week ago it was the 
reverse, but the human family is never 
satisfied. However, our sweet peas, 
which are our main summer crop, are 
fine these warm days. Although they 
were two weeks behind time in bloom- 
ing on account of the rains, they 
cannot now be beaten; stems fourteen to 
sixteen inches long, three and four blooms 
on a stem, and our muck soil produces 
the most gorgeous colors in the country. 
The resorters are shipping boxes of 
them daily to friends at home in almost 
every state in the Union. S. J. Long has 
four houses now, having just finished a 
new one 18x90. Mr. Long is ill at pres- 
ent with nervous prostration, and Mrs. 
Long is kept busy these days. 



Providencb, R. 1. — The annual exhibi- 
tion of the Rhode Island Horticultural 
Society has been scheduled for September 
18 to 20 and the chrysanthemum show 
for November 14 to 16. Prizes in the 
two exhibitions aggregate about $600. 

...FOR SALE... 

1000 SPRENGERII PLANIS. ^W-ineh pots, very 
ni.-.', bushy Plunts, :,l 14.00 p.-r 100. Also 

2000 SMILAX, 2-inch puts, at 11.00 pnr lOo. 

Ciish with nrd'T. or will excliaiiEe for Palms, s>i'-h 
as Lataiii.'i iind Kentia H'-lraoreanu. 

E. J. BOLANZ J- Akron, O. 

Ptease mention the A merican Florist when ijurtting. 



BUY NOW 

PROPAGATING STOCK for Next Year. 

In. pots Doz. 100 
New Hibiscus, Peachblow, double 

pink flowers 2« Jl.OO {8.00 

New Ageratum, Stella Gurney, 

dwarfblue 2% .75 6.00 

New Salvia, St. Louis, extra large 

flower spikes 2i4 ."5 5.00 

New Silver- Leaved Geranium, 

Wm. Langguth, dbl. red flower, Z<A 1-50 10. OO 

AcalyphaSanden chenille plant) 3 1.00 6.00 

New Rose, Evergreen Gem. strong, 2 1.00 8.00 

New Rambler Rose, Helene 2'/4 1.00 8.00 

BOSTON FERNS. We have the largest 
and finest stock in the West. All well-grown, 
bushy plants in all sizes. Write for prices. 

Vaughan's Seed Store, 

CHICAQO, NEW YORK, 

84-86 Randolph St. 14 Barclay St. 

GOOD ROSES 

NOT SURPLUS. 

10,000 Maids, ISrides and Meteors, large, strong 3-in. 
stock, $4.00 per 100. Very choice Perles, $5.00 per 
100. This stock is worth more money, and is large 
enough for late planting. 

W. H. GULLETT & SONS, Lincoln, Illinois. 

SPECIALTIES — 

Ptoses, from 3-lnota poM. 

CARNATIONS, for aU dellTerr. 
CHRV8ANTHEMUM8. 
SMILAX. 
PnoMlow. SendforUit. VIOLETS. 

WOOD BROTHERS, FISHKILL. N. Y. 

Edward B. Jackson, 

WHOLESALE FLORIST. 

Hardy Herbaceous Plants Only. 

In any quantity, for the least money. 

STAMFORD. - CONN. 

oe New York ^ 
Convention Number, 

Of thf AMERICAN FLORIST, AUG. 18. 

It Will Be a "Winner. 
Send In your Advertisement NOW. 

Orchids! «»~ 

Arrived fn*sh from the woods in fin*- condition: 
Laelia anceps. L. autumnalis. L. Crispa. L. flava. 
L. grandis tenebrosa, L. Perrinii, Oncidium Vari- 
cotum Rogersii. Cattleya Percivalliana and C. 
Mossiae. 

LAGER & HURRELL, ^*'*"' "■ •■• 

Orchid Qrow*rs and Importers. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 

Tliat Can't Be Had Elsewliere. 

Such as New Kalanchoe Flammea. New Incarvllleas, 
New Campanula Mlrabllie, New Buddlelas. New Deutr 
zlaB, Mr. l*eler Barr b New White l-upln. The Grand 
New Salvia Glory of Stuttgart. The Kdelwelas In 
bloom. New RuelllaH. New illblBCue. New BeRonlae. 
New Cannas, 300 New DahllaB, New Treasure Vine, 
New Shamrock Pea. Send forCataloKueof Noveltlea. 
Alwaya In quantity— AaparaKUS Sprengerl, Boston 
Fern. Baby Primrose, Edelweiss, Fern Balls, at low- 
est prices. 
A. BItANC & CO., FhUadelphia. Fa. 

Imperial Violets, 

Longest siems, largest llowers, darkest in color 
Al stock, Bne large plants, »5.00 per 100,$»5.0« per 
1000. 

M. LOUISE, LADY CAMPBELL, 

12.50 per lOO, or 120.00 per 1000. 

Cash With Order, Please. 

VAN AKEN BROS., Coldwator, Mich. 



Chrysanthemums. 

Now l8 the time to plant them. We offer extra 
floe, vigorous plants from 2 und 2H.ln. pnta. 
Everybody llhes them. They are so scrooK and 
healthy that they surprise all of our new cus- 
tomers: onr old customers, of course, always 
know what to expect, but even they occasion- 
ally telt us that our stock Is KettlnK better all 
the time. Following Is a partTal list: 



EARLY. 

Ivory 

M. Henderson .. 
Geo. S. Kalb .... 
Merry Monarch . 



PerlOO 
,.(3.00 
. 3.00 
. 3.00 
3.00 



Willowbrook 4.00 

M. de Montmort.. . 3.00 
Mrs. J. Whilldin.. 3.00 

JohnK. Shaw 5.00 

Golden Trophy.... 3.00 
Glory or the PaciUc 3.00 



MIOSEASON. Per 100 

Major Honnaflon. ,$3.00 

Wm. Simpson 3.00 

•V. Morel 3.00 

G. W. Childs 4.00 

H. W. Longfellow 3.00 

Mrs. Murdock 3.00 

Mrs. T. L. Park. . . 6.00 

Black Hawk 4.00 

Mrs. C. H. Pierce. 3.00 
Mrs. H. Robinson. 3.00 

Niveus 3.00 

LATE. Per 100 

Nagoya 6.00 

Xeno 6.00 

Adula 3.00 

Harry Balsley .... 3.00 
Mrs. Baer 8.00 



LATE. Per 100 

Mrs. J. Jones $4.00 

Liberty 4.00 

Merry Xmas 4.00 

Autumn Glorv.... 3.00 

E. Dailledouze.... 4.00 

Golden Wedding.. 4.00 

In add Itlon to the above we have a large list of new and 

other leading standard sorts. Bend for complete list. 

M. WEBER & SONS, Oakland, Hd. 

Please mention the American Florist -when ivriling. 

Die Bindekunst 

Einzige Special Zeitschrift der 

Welt fur BLUMENBINDEREI. 

Probenummern umsonst. 
Abonnemcnt JO M. jahrlich. 

J. OLBERTZ, Bindekunst Verlag, 

ERFURT, DEUTSCHLAND. 

CHRYSANTHEMLMS. ^^ ^X^ 

for planting, $2 per 100; 26 at 100 rate. Mme. 
Uergraann, Golden Hair, Niv(.'U3, Mrs. L. C. Made- 
ria. Pres. Smith, Mrs. Jeromt; Jones, Harry May, 
Ivory, Pink Ivory, Yellow Fellow, Vi viand-Morel, 
Wanainjiker, Hurry Hurrell, Yanoma, Glory of 
the Pacific, W. H. Lincoln, Domination, Evange- 
line, Helen Blondgood, (iolden Wedding, Mrs. H. 
Robinson, White Swan, Autumn Glory, Queen, 
Eugene Dailledouze, Clara Goodman, Lady Fitz, 
Merry Christmas. Cash with order or satisfac- 
tory reference. JOHN J. ARNOLD, Homer, N. Y. 
Please mention the American Florist when writing. 

10,000 Glirysanthemums. 

Thrifty, young plants, from 2j^-in. 
pots. To close out, $2.50 per 100; 
$20.00 per 1000. List of varieties 
on application. 

Nathan Smith & Son, Adrian, Mich. 

Please ni'-nfitiTi the Ame> ica7i Florist when Wf itjng. 

GARDENING 

This is the paper to recommend to your 
ouBtomers, the leading horticultural 

Journal in America for amateurs 

•2kOO Per Year. Sample Copies Free. 

Liberal terms to florists who take subscriptions. 

THE 6ARDENIN6 CO. mq"'" ^ut. CHICAGO. 



THS 

EMERSON 

Price postpaid 
75 CENTS. 
I Address 
I Amerecan Florist Co. 

CHICAGO. 







-OPV^ 



i«Tea7 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



47 



Sago Palms! 

Fine Plants in all sizes. Well 
grown, and perfect leaves. One of 
the best summer and fall plants for 
retailiQK. They run from five to 
twelve leaves, in small size pots 
that can be shifted and save freight 



5 to 


7 leaves, 


$ 6.00 per dozen. 


7 to 


9 leaves. 


9.00 per dozen. 


9 to 


12 leaves. 


15 00 per dozen. 



Can be sent safely by freight. 
Cash please. Satisfaction guaranteed. 

Cyperus Alternifolius, 

3-iDch. tine well-grown. 
$5.00 per 100. 

Jasmine Qrandiflora, 

\'eTy fine for cut llowers— always 
in bloom— 4-in. pots, strong phints, 
$1.50 per dozen. 

CRITCH ELL'S, 

CIHCIirKATI, o. m 

Boston Ferns. 

FINE PLANTS 

From bench, ready for i> in. pots, $3.00 per djz. 
From 2-in. pots, $4 00 per 10J. 

DAVIS BROTrlERS, 

MORRISON^ ILL. 



CAREFULLY 
PACKET). 



For FaU 
Delivery <^ 

Two Sizes. 

Prices on 
Application. 



VINCA.... 
VARIEGATA 
....VINES 

WM. A CLARK & SON, 69 State St.. Watertown, N. Y 

JOSEPH HEACOCK, 

WYNCOTE. PA. 

GHowtR ARECA LITESCENS, 
"^ KENTIA BELMOREANA, 

PHOENIX RIPICOLA. 

Asparagus Plumosus 

Fine 3-in. Stock, $5.00 per hundred. 

==Smnax== 



CASH 
WITH 



OR DER 

Fine 3-in. Stock, $2.50 per hundred. pleASE^ 

VAN WERT GREENHOUSES, 

VAN WERT, OHIO. 

TTTrf^X X"!*© From pots, Al stock, free 
W ±\JXmXm X » from disease: Ladv Camp- 
bell, M. Louise and Farqubar, 12.50 per 100. $20 
per 1000. New Imperial, $3 per 100, |25 per 1000. 

ROSESt fine plants of Meieor and Perle. from 3-in. 
pots, at $3 per 100, or $25 per 1000; also 3-incli 
Brides and Maids same price. 

300 bushy SMILAX PLANTS at 11. 50 per 100. 

CRABB & HUNTER, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

BOSTON FERN. " and 8-in. pans $12 and $15 per doz. 
GERANIUMS, S 'A. Nuttand others, 3-in., $4 per 100. 
NEP.CORDATA COMPACTA, 3-in., $5.00 per 100; 6- 

in.. $20.C0 per 100. 
ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS. 2V4-in.. $5 per 100, $40 

per 1000. ASPARAGUS SPRENGERII. 2H-inch, 

$4.00 per 100; $30.00 per IQOO. 
SMILAX, transplanted, heavy, 50c per 100. 



Cabh Plsabe, 



Carl Hagenburger, 



W. mentor 
UHlo. 



PRIMROSES. 

IMPROVED CHINESE, readv for 3-inch pots. Well known throughout the United States and 
Canada as the linest large llowe-ing Iringed vafieties grown. SINGLES, named, $2.00 per 100, $17.00 
per 1000; DOUBLE, named. $3 50 par 100. Extras added liberally to help pay expressage. PRIM- 
POSE SE&D of best 15 varieties, single and double, mixed, 500 seeds. $1.00; half pkt.,50c. 

GIANT PANSY SEED. 

The very best mammoth varieties, no finer ever offered; all the seed plants critically selected. SOW 
TH* BEST. Packet, 3500 seeds, $1.00; half-pfct.. 50c. A packet of the grand new Dwarf Forget- 
Me-Not "Blue Beauty" added to every seed order. Strictly cash prices. 



THE HOME OF 
FRIIVI ROSES. 



JOHN F. RUPP, Shiremanstown, Pa. 



NEW YORK 
CONVENTION 
NUMBER... 



Of the American Florist, 
August Is. 

It Will Be a Winner. 

Send Your Advertisement NOW. 



BOSTON FERNS 
...A SPECIALTY. 

N. EXALTATA BOSTONIENSIS, small plants, 
$5.00 per 100 or $40.00 per thousand: large plants, 
$6.00 to $0 00 per hundred; taken from the bench. 

ARAUCARIA EXCELSA. 14 to 16-in, high, 4 to 
5 tiers, 6-iu. pots, $1.00 and $1,25 each; 20 to 24-in. 
high. 5 to 6 tiers, 6-in. pots, $1.50 each. Larger 
sizJe $2.00 and $2.50 each. 

RUBBER PLANTS, 12 to 15-in high, $4.00 per 
do?..; 20 to 24-in. high, $6.00 per doz. 

WM.A.BOCK,N. Cambridge, Mass. 

Unknown correspondents will send cash with 
o ders. Connected with Telephone. 

Please tnentton the Ameficau /''toml when wriling. 

Per 100 
ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS NANUS, 

Fine >oung plants $5.00 

BEGONIA REX. 

strong, S-inch pot plants, in good assort- 
ment 6.00 

CYPERUS ALTERNIFOLIUS, 

2M-inch p^ts 3.00 

CYCLAMEN, 

Drv bulbs, finest strain, mixed fi.OO 

CAREX JAPONICA VARIEGATA, 

An excellent d"'ij;orative grass. Extra 
strong plants from 3'/^ pots 5.00 

NEPHROLEPIS CORDIFOLIA, 

214-ineh pots 3.00 

SMILAX, Field-grown, strong clumps 3 00 

Extra heavy 5.00 

NATHAN SMITH & SON, Adrian Mich. 

— S8S =^- 

Extra fine Asparagus Plumosus Nanus, from 3-inch 
pots, $6.60 per 100. 

80 Asparagus Tenuissimus. fine bushy 3 inch speci- 
mens at $5 00 per lOu. 

250Ageralum Stella Gurnev, bushy 2'.;-in. plants, 
full of healthy cuttings. $:t 00 per lOU. 

400 Smilax. ready for planting, from 2-in. pots. 

60c. per 100. Satisfaction or rioney Back. 

J. T. ELLIS, Box 340, Griffin, Ga. 

1500 N. Gordata Gompacta, 

In 2-in. Pots, Strong Plants, at 
$3.00 per Hundred. 

Also Strong Plants from Bench, at 
$2.00 per Hundred. 

CHA8. SCHWEIGERT, Niles Center, III. 

Remember ns to our advei^iaers. 



For Ten Days Only! 

100,000 Dl ants for sale at half 
orice and less to make room. 

Roses— 20,000 strictly Al plants, 3!4 and 4-in. 
(big fellows). Bride, Perle, Meteor, Maid and 
Goldpn (.ialf. onl\ 4c; worth lOc. The same in VA 
and 3 in., only 3c; cheap at 6c. 

Smilax— 15.000 double extra, guaranteed as good 
as you ever planted, $1.00 per 100, $10.00 per lOOO; 
as many as you want. 

Geraniums— 10,000 Bruanti (dbl. scarlet) and S. 
A. Nutt. tbe two best selling Geraniums of the 
ag*-; Rose Geraniums and 10,000 other leading 
bedders; strong 2^ and 3-in.. only 11.50 per 100. 
Bi^ar in mind ibis is only th<- pri<;e of Rooted Cut- 
tings, and you can't buy thL'in for double that in 
a month. 

Dbl. Fringed Petunias and Coleus — In superb 
collection. Ageratum Pnncss Pauline and 
White Lady, only Ic. 

Fuchsias— Strong 4-in., $1.00 per doz. ; 2 and 2!^- 
in.. $1.51) per 100. 

Calla Bulbs— Strong 8 and lOc size for 5c. 
Cash With Order. 

SOUTH SIDE FLORAL CO., Springfield, III. 

A Point 

Worth Knowing. 

At the NEW YORK HOTEL you 
are but two minutes' walk from the 
Exhibition Building. Large, light 
and well-ventilated rooms, one dollar 
per day and upward. Popular priced 
Restaurant. Special rates to Florists. 
Write early for accommodations. 

E. H. NIES, Mgr. 

THE MURRAY NILL nOTEL 

Park Ave.. 40lh and 41st Stt., 

NEW YORK. 



One block from Grand Central Station. 

Two blocks from the S. A. F. Conven- 
tion Hall. 

AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN 
PLAN. 
Coolest Hotel in the city, at special rates 
for S. A. F. Members. 

Baggage transferred to and from Grand 
Central Station FREE OF CHARGE. 



Herr's== 



ALWAYS 
THE 
BEST 

Pansies w^^"" 

YEAR. 

They Bell themselves. Try 100 as an experiment. 
Plants only, and ready October 1st to January lat. 

Free ht Mail, 

75c per 100, 250 for $1.50; 500 for $2.50. 
By Express at Your Expense $4 per 1000. 

ALBERT M. HERR 

LANCASTER, PA. 



48 



The American Florist. 



Aug. tt, 



Peoria, 

DOINGS IN THE SECOND CITY OF ILLINOIS. 
— GROWEKS HAVE THINGS IN GOOD 
SHAPE. — EETAILEKS BUNCHED. 

J. C. Murray has his new houses 
finished and planted. There are two 
structures, 25x100 mostly in American 
Beauties, and one house, particularly, is 
very good. Of tea roses there are two 
houses 20x100, all in charge of O. M. 
Bourdy, formerly with the South Park 
Floral Co., of New Castle. Mr. Murray 
has 10,000 carnation plants which he is 
beginning to bench. Genevieve Lord is 
very early, the plants are full size and 
flowering freely. 

Geo. A. Kuhl has moved across the 
street and Murray is now at 403 Main 
street, so that all the retail stores are 
in one block and on the same side of the 
street, which is not only neighborly but 
enlivening. 

Cole Brothers have everything in excel- 
lent form about their place, but particu- 
larly Nelson Cole's race horse, which 
recently added a purse of $500 to his 
numerous winnings. 

Trade is dull, as is usual in August, 
and the material is of the ordinary sum- 
mer character. There are some lilies and 
a few good roses. Peorian. 



New Haven. 

TRADE CONFINED TO FUNERAL WORK.— 
little' MATERIAL AVAILABLE. — JOT- 
TINGS. 

Trade has been rather quiet here for 
the last two weeks, except for a few 
small funeral orders, which is all that is 
expected for the next six weeks. Roses, 
both Brides and Bridesmaids, are very 
small and of poor color. Carnations 
are scarce and sweet peas were badly 
burned during the dry spell, so that all 
we are receiving is a few early asters. 
Pierson, of Cromwell, sent in some very 
fine Liberty buds during July. 

Joe Hoogkirk, clerk for S. H. Moore, 
has returned from Litchfield, where he 
spent two weeks' vacation. 

Everyone is talking of the S. A. F. con- 
vention and there should be a good 
showing from New Haven. 

Fred. Horn, of Woodward avenue, is 
putting up a violet house 15x100. 

John H. Slocombe has finished his new 
carnation house 28x146. G. H. 



CoLDWATER, MiCH— D. Vogtis making 
a specialty of roses and is building two 
houses 18x80 to accommodate increased 
plantings. 

Madison, N. J.— The fifth annual exhi- 
bition of the Morris County Gardeners' 
and Florists' Society will be held at the 
Assembly Rooms November 7 and 8. 
Schedules may be had of Secretary Chas. 
H. Atkins. 

ADIANTUM FARLEYENSE 

3-in. Pots, Ready for a Shift, 

j^ao.oo r»©r loo. 

WM. W. EDGAR, Waverley, Mass. 



BEGONIA GLOIRE DE LORRAINE 

rittiits fri>ni '2-inrh pots, 

$2 50 per dozen; $17.50 per hundred. 

EDWIN LONSDALE, 

Wyndmoor, 

Montgomery Co., Pa. 



Monuy Order Office 

Cheitnut Hill, 
Sta. H, Philadelphia. 



^yWWyW^WWl/WlAMWWl/WWyWlA/VWtflA/WlAMA^^ 



Going 

to the 

Convention 



If so, your trip wiil not be 
complete without a visit to 



M. RICE & CO. 




LEADING 

FLORISTS' 

SUPPLY 

HOUSE 

IN AMERICA, 



Who extend a CORDIAL INVITATION to 
ALL FLORISTS to the use of our facilities 
and to make our place their HEADQUAR- 
TERS while in Philadelphia, jt ^ ^ Jt Jt 



YOURS VERY TRULY, 

No. 918 nibert Street, PHILADELPHIA, PA. | 



:ivi. 



TO CLEAN UP 

Per 100 

S.OOO Geraniums, mixed 2>.< in.. $I.BO 

1,000 Red Vernon 2M " .. 1.50 

1,000 Erfordi 2« " . . 1 .50 

2,000 Begonias, mix 3d 2M " .. 1.50 

1,000 Fuchsias, mixed 2H " .. 1.50 

i.OOO Salvias 2% " .. 1.50 

The Morris Floral Co., 

Asparagus Plumosus Nanus. 

TRANSPIiANTED seedling plants for July and 
August delivery, ready for 2S4-in. pots, at 
J3.00 per 100, 125. do per iOOO; 500 at thousand 
rates, (free delivery). 

Cash With Order, Please. 



THE MOWER 

THAT will KILL ALL THE WEEDS IN YOUR LAWNS. 
If you keep the weeds cut so they do not go to 
seed, and cut your grass without breaking the 
small feeders of roots, the grass will become thick 
and weeds will disappear. The Clipper will do it. 
^^Send for cii-ciilars and prices. 



R. ASMUS, 



New Durham, N. J. 



FLORISTS' ORCHIDS 

The Finest and Largest Stooli 

in the world. 

ST. ALBANS, ENGLAND and 
BRUGES, BELGIUM. 

Send for List of Commercial Varieties. 

A. DIMMOCK, Agent, 60 Vesey St., N. Y. 




SANDER 



500,000 Celery Plants ^prn';f:d'p;rt; 

25o a 100, $2 u 1000; by mail 10 per cent more. W . 
Plume. G. Pascal, H. Market, (iolden S. Blanching 
and Dwarf Red. Write tor price on large lots. 
Do not confound these plants wilh cheap ones 
pulled up where they were sown. Try some of 
ours and see the dilTerence. Good seedlings, 2 in. 
high. 25c a 1000. Cash Please. Samples 10c. 
R. KILBOURN. Cllnlon, N. Y. 

Beauties. Sprengerli. 



..1, 



$6.00 



AM. BEAU1Y ROSES. 

Ijer 10(1. 
ASPARAGUS SPRENGERII. strong plants, 
ready tor 3-incb pots, $5.00 per 100, 145.00 
per 1000. 

Robert f. Tesson, TlJ".%o"''' 



CLIPPER LAWN MOWER CO.. ''°--;?^r"- 

CELERY AND CABBAGE. 

CELERY. Pink Plume and New Kosi- (extra 
stroi g), Giant Pascal, Boston Market, White 
Plume and other varieties, 15c per 100, $1.00 per 
1000, $8.50 per 10,000. 

CABBAGE H. Succession, Second Early. 
Premium Flat Dutch, Late Drumhead, Drumhead 
Savov and other varieties, 15c per 100, $1.00 per 
1000, *$8. 50 per 10.000. 

KALE Dwarf, Green, Curled, Scotch, same 
price as Cabbage. If any of the above plants by 
mail, add 10c per 100. 

Casu With Ordek. 

R. VINCENT, Jr., & SON, White Marsh, Md. 

Adjustable Vase Holders 

No. 1 — Braas. nlckled. 4 feet lon^r. ts clasps to each rod. 
Price complete (with tireen or white tumblers) 12.25. 
Price complete (with ffreen or white cornucopia yases) 
12 50. No.2.— lleavy 4 ft. rod brassed and nickeled, 
with three clasps for 5 to t'An pots, each, tl.75. 

Klffs patent rubber capped Flower Tubes, H-ln. 
diameter, per 100, tU.bO. 

JOSEPH KIFT A SON, Florists, 
172n Clhestnnt St. Phlladelphln. Penn. 



IFT'8 

PATENT 



OUR DIRECTORY FOR 1900 WILL BE MAILED TO YOU -«| 
PROMPTLY UPON APPLICATION. PRICE, TWO DOLLARS.-«l 



tgoo. 



The American Florist. 



49 



Boston Florist Lettor Go. 

MANUPACTTURIBS OF 

FLORI8T8' LETTERS. 




This wooden box nicely stained and vais 
nlshedt 18x30x13 made In two sectionSf one 
for each size letter, g^ven away with first 
order of 500 letters. 

Block Letters. 1 1^ or 2-lnch size, per 100. t2.00. 
Script Letters. $4. Fastener with each letter OPword. 
Used by leadlnR florlsta everywhere and for i&le bj 
all wholesale florists and supplj dealers. 

N, F. McCarthy, Trcas, and Managetj 
84 Hawley St., BOSTON, MASS. 

H. BAYERSDORFER & GO. 

Cyoas Wreaths, Moss Wreaths, Ferneries 

and Jardinieres, Wheat Sheaves 

and Immortelles. 

New C»t«logne ot all FLORISTS' SUPPLIHS on 
ftPPllOAtlon. ^^For the trade only. 

H. BAYERSDORFER & CO. 

60. 62, 64 and 66 N. 4th St.. PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

A. HERRMANN. 

Cape Flowers, *"• oolobs; 
Cycas Leaves, Metal Designs, 
AHD All Florists' Supplies. 

Send for Prloei. 
404-412 East S4th St., NEW YORK. 

John Conley & Son, 

Manufacturers of 
2 AND 4 DOMINICK STREET, 

Raw Cycas Leaves. 

See last week's Florist for prices, etc. 

UVA GRASSES, undyed $6. SO per 100 

BIRCH BARK for plant boxes 7o per lb. 

GALAX LEAVES, new crop 75c per ICOO 

All kinds ot PALM LEAVES, already pri'pared or 
dried for preparing: purposei. 

FLORIDA NATURAL PRODUCTS CO.. 
P. 0. Box 273, Indianapolis. Ind. 

Sigmund Geller, 'si^.^t'^vr' 
K^h^'^S Florists' Supplies, 

Bfaids lor American Manufacture. 

Metal Goods. Moss-Wreathes, Cape Flowers, 
Immortells, Chenille, Tinfoil, Doves, Baskets, 
Sheaves, Vases, Jardinieres, Femdishes, 
Novelties, etc. 
108 \V. 88th St.. near 6tli Ave., NEW YORK. 



HEADQUARTERS 



COCOA FIBRE. 
SHEEP MANURE. 
BONE all grades. 
IMPORTED SOOT. 



SPHAGNUM and 
GREEN MOSS. 
RUSTIC WORK, allkinds, 
CLAYS FERTILIZER. 



DUNNE & CO., M^'^it New York. 

HORTICULTURAL SUPPLIES. 



!D2 Regan Printing House 

CATALOGUES 



NURSERY 

SEED 

FLORISTS 



87-9J Plymooth Place, 
> jt jt CHICAGOj» jt j» 



It Win he a Winner! 



^i^'4 



NEW YORK CONVENTION NUNBER 



■itf 



OF THE AMERICAN FLORIST, AUGUST 18. 

Send Your Advertisement NOW. 



\ PURE RAW BONE MEAL ^"^ "P especially for our trade. [ 
trvni. nftffW UUIlb mtHk For Roses and Carnationst 
I nothing equals it. Use it on Chrysanthemums and you will win the prize j 

!I at your flower show for the best bloom. 10 pounds, 40c; 25 pounds, 75c; I 
50 pounds, ;?1.25; 100 pounds, $2.00; 1 Bag, 200 pounds, $3.75. \ 
. THE VAIL SEED CO., Indianapolis, Ind. | 



4i 



PLANT CULTURE" .»r 



GEOPGE W. OLIVER. 

»w KeHdy for Ijelivery. 
A Working Handbook of Eveiy-day Practice for the Florist. Gardener and Nurseryman 

And all who grow plants and flowers in the greenhouse or garden. Contains separate chapters on all 



branches of the work 

, Price $1.00 by Mail Postpaid. 

or send for complete circular to THE FLORISTS' EXCHANGE, P. 0. Box 1697, New York 



l2mo 

193 Pages, 



For full description see advt. in July 38th issue 
of thi.s paper, page 1572. 



at 



at 



Glass For Sale 

100 Boxes 16x24 double strength "A" at 
$2.50 per box. 

150 Boxes 16x24 single strength "A" 
glass at $2.00 per box. 

125 boxes 10x12 double strength "A 
$1.75 per box. 

160 boxes 8x10 double strength "A 
J1.60 per box. 

The prices are good as long as the glass 

lasts. It is all well packed and will 

be guaranteed to be in good 

condition. Address 

QUEEN CITY WRECKING CO., 

Frontand Broadway Ms.. CINCINNATI, O. 

NIKOTEIN 

IT COSTS ^ CENTS FOR EACH 600 FEET OF 
-S FLOOR SPACE «. 



r DOES NOT INJURE THE MOST SENSITIVE 1 
' PLANTS- ENDORSED BY PROMINENT FIIMISTS-' 
USED FOR FUHICATION OR SPRAYINC INDOORS OR 
OUT - 200 LBS. OF TOBACCO III ONE PINT Of DIKOlfCN 
1 501D BY SEEDSMEN CIRCULAR FREE-/ 

I 5KABCURA DIP CC- CHICAGO- ^ 



<^uicKLY Does it. 'w 



mm 



REED & KELLER, 

Manufactarers piofists' DeSigHS. 

teJlin'"' Florists' Supplies. 

122 W. 25th St., NEW YORK CITY. 



! 



FOR INSURANCE AGAINST 
DAMAGE BY HAIL, Address 

JOHN O. ESLER, Sac'y F. H. A., 

SADDLE RIVER, N. J 



Always 



mention the American Flor- 
ist when you order stock.J* 



"NICOMITE" 

(PATENT) 

Vapor Insecticide 

No labor required. Harmless to 
bloom and foIiag;e. A certain killer of 

ALL GREENHOUSE BUGS. 

SOLD BY SEEDSMEN. 

The Tobacco Warehousing and Trading Co., 

LOUISVILLE. KY. 




LIQUID PLANT FOOD 

For Greenhouse Cultivating. 

EASTERN CHEMICAL COMPANY, 

Ch icago OfBce : 620 Atlantic Ave., Boston. 

H. K. Snider, Suite 423, 260 Clark St. 




Qartns^eituiKJ^ 



The most widely circulated Gerniaii gardening 
Journal, treating of all departments of hortioultute 
and floriculture. Numerous eminent oorreapond- 
enti in all parts of the world. An advertiiing 
medium of the highest class. 

Moller's Deutsche Gartner Zeitung is published 
weekly and riohlv illustrated. Subscription 13.00 
per annum, including postage. Sample oopiei.free. 



udwidMbller -Trfur h 



THE KINNEY PUMP. 

For applylnti liquid manure It has no equal. Sent pre- 
paid for n.50. Without tprarlng Tslre. 13.00. 

Tbi Hmi CaDBsotlrn Ct.. KlagiUi, R. I. 



60 



The American Florist. 



Aug. II, 



Buffalo. 

WEATHER SATISFACTORY BUT TRADE 19 
SLOW. — GOOD REPRESENTATION ASSURED 
AT NEW YORK.— NOTES AND VISITORS. 

With good weather and enough rain to 
make it pleasant, things are moving along 
slowly. The death of a prominent city 
official gave Palmer, Adams and others 
a good lot of funeral work for Sunday. 
Active preparations are being made for the 
journey to New York, and it will take all 
the silver-tongued orators of other cities 
combined to head off Buftalo in the effort 
for the S. A. F. meeting of 1901. The 
people want to come to Buffalo, and we 
want them. 

The bowlers had their usnal game last 
week and the scores were good. Other 
teams at New York will have to hustle 
as there is new wood in the Buffalo team. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Kasting have 
returned from Crystal Beach. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Anderson are at 
Muskoka Lake. 

Michael Bloy is again at Wm. Scott's. 

Recent visitors were: E. E. Pieser, of 
Kennicott Bros. Co., Chicago; Mr. 
Meredith, of the London Floral Com- 
pany, London, Ont , and Mr. Thielow, 
manager of the Henry A. Drear Company, 
Philadelphia. W. A. 



Tarrytown, N. Y.— At the last meet- 
ing of the Tarrytown Horticultural 
Society C. P. Johnstone, Wm Hyland 
and Albert Griswold were elected to 
membership and John Boschard made a 
fine showing of French gladioli. Wm. 
Scott and James Withers addressed the 
society. 

Tewkesbury, Mass. — The fellow- 
townsmen of M. A. Patten, with their 
ladies, surprised Mr. and Mrs. Patten on 
the evening of August 3, by invading 
their home in a body and presenting 
them with an elegant silver tea service. 
The occasion was the twenty-fifth anni- 
versary of the wedding of Mr. and Mrs. 
Patten. The affair was a complete sur- 
prise to the recipients. Every florist 
who knows Mr. Patten will heartily sec- 
ond the kind wishes extended to him and 
his life partner for many years of happi- 
ness and prosperity. 




r 



STEAM COAL 



rOR FLORISTS . 

Chicago, April 7th, 1900. 
HULL & COMPANY, 74 and 75 Traders' Building, Chicago, 111., 

GENTLEMEN:— In reference to my opinion of your TtlACKER .SPLINT COAL, 
will say 1 am viry well pleased with it and think it is superior to any Coal of the 
splint grades we have yet used. Burns free, making an intense heat with very few 
ashes; no clinkers, and has the lasting quality of all high-grade Coal. I certainly 
consider it a very economical Coal to burn. 

Yours very truly, J. A. BUDLONG, Wholesale Florist. 

Write us for price on single carload orders or season contract, delivered 
at any point in the United States. 'Phone Har. 960. 



U 



HULL & COMPANY, 



74 & 75 TRADERS BUILDING, 



GALVANIZED STEEL 

Wire Rose Stakes 

straight or Looped 
and Pointed. 



The Model Extension 

Carnation Support. 

Lancaster. Pa., June 17, '99. 
Mr. Theron Parker, 

Brooklyn. N. Y.; 
Dear Sir.— V our Model Carnation 
Support is all right in every way, 
and will no doubt be considered 
as necessary as good plants with 
growers when better known. [ 
consider it the best in the market, 
and if your other Specialties are 
as good, they should make another 
addition to the money makers of 
1900. Very Respectfully, 

Albert M. Herr. 

Samples and Prices on 
Application to 

THE MODEL 
PLANT STAKE CO.. 

226 North 9th Street, 

BROOKLYN. N. Y. 



K2. 



FLOWER POTS 



ALL KINDS. 



A SPECIAin 



STANDARD POTS 

Lilt and SAMPLES PRBB. 
BWAHN'8 POTTERY MF'G CO., 

P. O. Box 78, Minneapolis. Minn. 

ALL Nunerymuo, Seedimen and Floriiti wish- 
ing to do builneii with Earope should send 
(01 the . 



ii 



Horticultural Advertiser" 



Tbii It the ^ritiih Trade Paper, being read weekly 
by all Horticultural traders; It it alio taken by 
over 1000 of the best Continental houiei. Annual 
lubioription to cover oott of pottage 75 oentt. 

Addreti EDITORS OF THE " H. A»*> 
O illw»ll NurserittB - N«ttB, Cnsland. 




THE NEW 

Standard 

Ventilating 

Macliines. 

Alwiiys reliable. 

Self-oiling. 

Four Styles. 

All warranted first- 
class. 

Send for catalogue and 
see what first-class flo- 
rists are using. 

THE 

E. HIPPARD CO., 

YOUNGSTOWN, 0. 





Invalid Appliance Co., 

MANUPACTURBRS OP 

COLUMBIA PLANT TUBS 



KELLER BROS., 

-_ 2l.l.l5.l7.lfl.gl.g3 Peari St., 

NORRISTOWN, PA. 

Manufacturers of Standard Flower Pots, red in 
color, equal to the best on the market; are 16 
miles from Philadelphia, best of railroad connec- 
tions. We give special attention to mail orders and 
make sjjecial sizes to order in quantities. A 
postal will brine prices and discounts. 

Red standard Pots. 

CORRECT SIZE. 
SUPERIOR QUALITY. 

Writt' fur price list. 

6.tiENNE6KEG0..""^^1s"'^"^- 



If You Have Stock To Sell... 

the best way to make that lact known to the trade is by regtilar 
advertisina in nrg * . w-^t • a_ 

GJTeitatriai. ...THe Americaii Florist. 



BUGS 0. ASTERS 



KILLED 
BY USING 



SLUG SHOT 



SOLD BY 
SEEDSMEN 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



51 




WIllLLDINPfllTmCO. 




•PtIlLADELPHIA'PA 




BRANCH WAREH0U5L S: j iVn^ia'^^d'cUy"! N. Y. 




:HHEWS^1 

~*i«ii«lliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiyiiiU 

k A PRE? 



The Bottomless Pot 

MORE ESPECIALLY FOR VIOLET 

AND CARNATION CULTDRE, 
ALSO 

THOSE BED POTS 

"Standards." 

Azalea Pots, Fern Pots, Bulb Pans. 



DETROIT FLOWER POT M'F'Y. 
Eitablishe(H853. DETROIT, MICH. 

P. O. Address, 490 Howard St. 
HARRY BAISLEY, Traveling Representative. 

Please mention the American Florist when -writing 

STANDARD FLOWER POTS! 

Packed in small crates, easy to handle. 

Price per orate I Price per crate 

- ~ 120 7-ln.pot> In crate, (4.20 

• " 8.00 

3.60 
4.80 
3.60 
" 4.80 

4.80 

_... _ " 4.60 

""Seed pans, same price as pots. Send for price list of 
Cylinders for Cut Flowe'-s. HanglDsr Basbets, Lawn 
Vases, etc, lu per cent off for cash with ordtr. 

HILFINaER BROS. POTTERY, 

OR.... FORT EDWARD, N. V. 

ACQUIT BOLEIB A SONS, New TorM Agent* 

S8 T>WT HTKWT W*W "VOHK <UTV. 

We've thousands of readers and hun- 
dreds of advertisers. Bach helps the other. 



1600 2-ln. pou In crate. 14.88 


120 7- 


1600 2M " 
1600 3S " 


5.26 


60 8 


B.OO 


48 9 


1000 3 ■• 


6 00 


48 10 


800 3>< " 


6.80 


24U 


600 4 " 


4.60 


24 12 


3206 " 


4.61 


1214 


144 6 " 


3-16 


618 




Water Every Day in the Year for 
Flowers and Lawns when 

RIDER or ERICSSON 

HOT AIB PUMPS 

are used. Nearly 25,000 sold during the past 

twenty-five years. 
Send to nearest office for Catalogue "A 3." 

RIDER-ERICSSON ENGINE CO. 




28 Cortlandt Street, B'ew York. Teniente-Rey 71 
239 Franklin Street, Boston. Havana Cuba 

692 Craig- Street, Montreal, P. Q. 



86 Iiake Street, Chlcag-o. 

40 IT. 7t]i Street, Philadelphia. 

22 A. Pitt Street, Sidner, N. S. W. 



C? 



MACHINERY and SUPPLIES at bargain prices 

We have the lai-gest machinery depot on earth. We secure our machinery from 
the various buildings and plants that we are ctmstantly buying. We purchased The 
World's Fair, The Omaha Exposition, The Chicago Post.Office and numerous other 
noted .structures. Our facilities for rebuildini; machinery are unsurpassed. We 
cover all our sales with binding guarantees. BOILERS FROM $25 UP. ENGINES 
FROM $35 UP. STEAM PUMPS FROM $15 UP • etc., etc. 

We alsncarrva cmnplete st<H:k of <reneral supplies, such as 
BELTING," SHAFTING, HANGERS, PULLEYS, IRON 
PIPE, VALVESand FITTINGS, IRON ROOFING, HARD- 
WARE, PLUMBING MATERIAL, etc. Cut this 
ad. out and we wMl send j-ou Free our 250 page 
Catalogue No. ^ We are constantly buying- 
entire stocks at Sheriffs and Receivers Sales. 

CHICAGO HOUSE WRECKING CO. 

West 3Sth and Iron streets, - CHICAGO. 



Ck 




.' I ( ! 



^ \ \ \ 




CYPRESS ■&o^cMA^oo.r 



'^^C^^i 



John G. 







mWS^wscmX 



III TO 125 Blackha wm St. 



MONINGER Co. ^"^-^iTcT^^"^^^ 




theGORTON SIDE FEED BOILER 

Is specially constructed so that it will maintain a steady 
fire all night without attention, which is a very 
important item to be considered in select- 
ing; a greenhouse boiler. 

^^Send for Catalogue and investigate for yourself. 

GORTON & LIDGERWOOD CO., 



NEW YORK. 



Valley Gutter and 
Drip Conductor, 64c 
per f- ot Without 
lirlp Conductor. 40c 
per foot. 




Jennings Bros., 



GREfNHOUSE 
DESIGNtRS.,. 
& BUILDERS. 

Mfrs of and dealers In Cre^nhouae Specialties, 

Patent Iron Bsnch Frame Fittings, 
Improved Cast iron Gutters and Plates, 
send for Jgppjpgj g^jj^ ^ gl.'b^delphU. Pa. 



Cata ogue 
When writinsr please mention American Florist. 




GEO. KELLER & SON, 

uAinjrAOTTmiBs or 

Flower Pots. 

Before baying write for price. 
361-363 Herndon Street 
near Wrightwood Ave., 

CHICAGO. ILL. 



Standard.?* j^ 

FLOWER 



Pots 



If your ^reenbouaes are within 500 miles of 
the Capitol, write us; we can save you money. 

W. H. ERNEST, 



28th and M StraeU N. E. 



WASHINarON, 0. C. 



52 



The American Florist. 



Aug. II, 



Index to Advertisers. 



AdvertlBlng BaMt .... 32 

AUen J K 3T 

Amerloao Bo«eOo..34 1< 

Anillni! Albert F <5 

Aaiiiiiu "t * ™ 

Arnold JobD J ib 

Asmus R „ i, •• ■*? 
Barnard W W & Co.. i 
B,ur 8 Alfred . . I 

B«9Beu& Wiehburn... 3u 
Bsyersdort er a 4 Co. . 19 

Ben they * Co 3.^ 

Berger U H * Co 38 

Bernlng U O :* 

Blndekunst Die 10 

Blano A & Co f 

Bock Wm A «J 

Bulanz B 3...... * 

Bost.w uotier Co 4a 

BrantiNoe *■ 

Brown Peter 11 

BnaionK J A ■» 4; 

Bunyard HA ..•••■• ^f 
Burpee W Ati<<e*Co li 
California Nursery Co 11 

Carmodt ^\ 

Chadwlck Cbas... ... 44 

CnioaKo ottiiiaHon Co 3o 
Cbloago Houoe Wreck 

Ing Co • ■■... ;l. 

Clnolnnatl Cut Flo Co. .» 
Clark Wm A & Sod.. 4. 
Clipper Lawn Mower 

Co ?J 

Cohen J M 5^ 

Conard 4 Jones Co . . . 43 
ComeyJjhn 1 Son.... 49 

Cottage Gardens I 

Crabb 4 .luntor 47 

Craig Robl & Son 45 

Crttcheiis ..■■■■ 47 

Crouch Mrs J W.. ... 45 
CuuD.ngham Jos H .. 41 
Cunningham D O 

'4la»8Co llj 

HavlB Bros « 

ueamnd J B. .... ,^ . Ji 
Drtro't Pi"'r Pot W ks. 51 
De\ter LI llan Allen . 34 
Diukinaou Ou Albert.. I 

Dletech A& Co IV 

Dliioi. J L ■ 45 

Domer Pred&Sons Co 4j 

Dreer HA 41 52 

Dunne » Co .■.•••. li* 
BjBstern r'hemlcal Co. . 49 

Edgar W W 4S 

Blchholz Conrad II 

Kl ■■!■ ' Henry H 

KUIbJ T 4, 

Brueai W H . ..51 

ferguson John B ■» 

Unley UiwnrtakeCo 5i 
FlondH Nat ''rod Co .. 49 
Florists' Exchange — 49 

For J Bros 37 

Foster LinoiDB H 45 

Gardeners Chrunlole. . 4:1 
Gardening Co The... . 4(i 

Garland Geo M Ill 

Ooller SIgmund 49 

Ghormlej Wm 37 

Gibbons n w I< 

Glblin 4 Co Ill 

Gorton & Lldgerwood 5i 
Onllelt * 'ons W d 45 4H 

G'lntbcr Wm H 37 

Gumey Heater Co -52 

Uagenoarger Carl 47 

Hall Ass'n 9 

Hammond Benj 5 

Hancoc.. G«o 4 Son . 41 

Httbaway B f 40 

Beacock Joseph 47 

Heliil Jos 4.5 

Belss J B 44 

Henre^ke C Co 6U 

Herendeen Mfg Co — IV 

Herr Alberts! 47 

Herrmann A 49 

Hews A B 4 Co 51 

H' fliger Bros 01 

Hill B O 4 Co I 

HIppard K .50 

HIto Ings & Co IV 

Hoffman K M 4 U N. 45 
Hoituu 4 Bunkel Co.. 31 
Hooker H M I o ...111 
Ho p a Bru 4 Thomas 4'' 

Huran Kdw C 37 

Hort AdT 5 

Hose Connection Co.. 49 

Hull 4 Co .511 

Hunt K H :i.5 

Invalid Appliance Co. 5u 
Jackson 4 PerklnsCo. 4(1 

Jackson K B Ill 

Jaco'.B H 4 Ions IV 

Jennings U B 11 

Jennings Bros 61 

.lohrs >n 4 Stokea 38 

Joy 4 Son li 

hasting 1 V 3ti 

Keller Bros 5i 

K"llerOeo4 Sin 51 

Kellogg Geo M 3« 

Ke 1' looti Bros "o 43 



•rifl Jos 4 Son 48 

KUbourn R 48 

r •moheii Bros Co IV 

Ku»hnC A 36 

Kuhl Geo A 41) 

Lager t Hurrell 46 

Lakev'w Ruse Garden. 43 

Lamb Tn ..eroyL 45 

Lamprecht B 15 

i.ai'g JUilUB 37 

Ley John H 13 

LImprechtSJ 37 



Ljuualand LumCo 

Long D B 

Lonsdale Bdwln. . . . 
Lord & Burnham Co . 

Lucas J 4 00 

Lynch W B 

Mr'-anhv * Co N F. 
BdcCjlgan & Co Jas .. 



. 5) 
. II 

48 
.IV 
. 52 
. 35 
. 36 
. Ill 



uur'aaden ui C 38 

MoK' liar * WInterson 36 
MacBean AS 15 



Uadbr Paul. 

Meyer John C 4 Co ... 1 1 

Mlllang 4 Co 37 

Mlllang Frank . 37 

Modnl Plant Stake Co . Su 
Poller's Gartner Zel 

tung 49 

Monlnger JCCo. 51 

Monta n Fertilizer Co. II 

Moon Samuel C 10 

Moon Wm O. 41) 

Moore. Hentz 4NaBh. . 37 

Morris FloralCo 48 

V1..SB Geo M 36 

Murphy Wm — 45 

Murray Hill Hotel .. 47 

Myers 4 Co 52 

New York Hotel i! 

NlesBen Leo 36 

N r Cut Flower Sx. 37 
N I Cut Fli we- Co.... 37 

Pennock Sam 19 36 

Pierce F O Co IV 

PlttsourgCni Flo Co.. 31 
1 oUworth CCCo . 34 
Prince A 4 Co 36 44 
OuakerClt» M'«hwi<,. in 
Queen City Wrecking 

00 49 

RaudaU A L 35 

Uaynor J 1 37 

teed Gla>s 4Pali» Co I 

Reed A Keller 49 

HeganPnntlnnHons" 49 

deTnberg Geo 35 45 

Rein bertr Peier — 35 45 
Hetzer Walter 4 Co . . i 
JMm m & Co .48 

Rlder-BncssonEng Co 51 

Rodders Alex 11 

Koiker A 4 Buns 11 

Rose Mfg Co.... II 

Rupp John F 47 

Sander 4 Co 4S 

Sohlllo Adam IV 

Schmidt J C ll 45 

CDwelgert Chas.... 47 

ScoUey John A IH 

Sheridan w F 3; 

Slebrechi & Son I 

8llnatlons4 Wanu.... 3:1 
Skabcura Dip Co.. 49 

Sm.ih Nath 4 Son . .46 17 

8)ltau C .. II 

South Side Floral Co 17 

•Itahl Chas H 36 

Stearns Lumber Co ..111 
Slootboff U A 4 CO .. II 
Storrs 4 Harrison Co. 40 
Sniheriand Geo A.. .. :16 
Swahn PotteryMfgCo . 50 

Tesson Kobt F 48 

ThorbumJ M 4 Co. 38 
Tobaooo WareDODBiug 

and Trading Co 19 

Traendly 4 8ohenok... :i7 

Vail Seed Co 49 

^an A ken Bros 46 

Van Wert Greenh'es . 47 
Vaughar'B Seed store 

38 43 45 46 1 

Vlok's SouB Jas 11 

Vincent 4 Son 48 

Vredenburg 4 Co 38 

WabHsh RR I 

WatsonG C 11 

Weathered'B Sons 

ThoB W HI 

Webe' II 4 Soni 46 

Weeber 4 Hon |i 

Welland * Rlsoh 35 

Welch Bros 36 

Whllldln Pot fo 51 

Whltton Samuel 41 

WlBlor Bros .35 

Wlttbold The Geo Co. I 

iVtMid BroB 16 

Woodrolle 4 Bem- 

helmer 36 

Wrede H 1' 

Young Jno 37 

9 <unB 4 Nudent 37 

Young ThoBjr :i7 

Zlrnglebel D H 



WINDOWa'^d-PLATE 

GLASS 

JOHN LUCAS&CO.PHILA. 



When corresponding with advertisert 
mention the Ambbican Plobist, 





BOILERS 

Something that thi- florist can rely upim and know that they 

will give satisfaction. The l:^^att'st results obtained 

from a minimum consumption n[ luel. 

We manufacture Boilers capable of heating any size Greenhouse. 

RELIABLE-DURABLE-ECONOMICAL. 

SEND Fcit UKEENUODSK CATAI.nGUK AND PRICE LIST. 

GURNEY HEATER MFG. GO. 

NEW vouK ciTT BKANcH : 74 Franklin St. Cor. Arch, 

111 Fifth Ave . cor I8lh St. BOSTON, MASS. 

Western SeUing Agents, JA!IIE8 B. CLOW « SONS, SSS-S34 Lake St., Chicago, III. 

Please tnrntion iht' American Florist when ic itmg. 



GURNEY -400 SERIES' 

HOT WATER HEATER. 




Exclusively 

A GREENHOUSE HEATER! 

SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE WORK. 

EASY TO ERECT; SIMPLE IN OPER- 

ATION; ECONOMICAL AS TO 

CONSUMPTION OF FUEL. 

Send for Catalogue and latest prices. 

MYERS 8z: CO., 

1514-1520 So. 91h St., ■ PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

(F-8TABLI8HBD 1R49.) 



I rinley Rotary Lawn Rake. 



Something New. 




Pai'a: W'b Can Rake Your Lawn. 



THIS IS A CUT 
SHOWING THE 

FINLEY 

LAWN 

RAKE 

IN OPERATION 



The mower and reaper 
succeeded t^e BC*' he; the 
thresher suceeedfd the 
dall— but nfver unt'l now 
has a machine been In- 
vPDied to take the olacp 
'•f the antiquated hand 
rake The machine h^s 
arrived. This la U. YOD 
NEED IT. 



A THOROUGHLY durable and reliable machine, to follow the lawn mower. It takes up all 
the t^rass, either long or short; twigs, leaves and smnll loose litter of any kind, stones in- 
cluded, that a HAND rake would not touch. A man can rake three times as fast as with ahand 
rake. |^"A CHILD can run it. 

Just the thine to flght crab (jrass. Send fOP PaPtiCUlaPS. 
It will save its cost in 60 days on any Koud lawn. 

^FINLEY LAWN RAKE CO., 

I PRICE $12 00. JOLIET. ILLINOIS. 



New York 
Convention 
Number ^ 



OJ the.... 

A Af ERIC AN 
FLORIST, 

A uguat i8. 

It Will Be a Winner. 



Send Your Advertisement NOW. 



Holds Class 
Firmly 

See the Point 49* 



The Vaa Uejper Per- 
fect eiaslnK Point* are 

the best. No rights or 



lefts. Box of l(NiO points 
7b cents, postpaid. 
HENRY A. DKREK. 

714 CbrttDDt Nt.. Phil*., Pa. 




Please mention the American Florist to our advertisers. 



iTiK IMwmmM iFiLiiOfir 




Rmerica is "the Prou/ at the I/bssbI; thEre may be mare comfort JJmidships, but ws are tha £rst to touch Unknown Seas." 



Vol. XVI. 



CHICAQO AND NEW YORK, AUGUST 18, 1900. 



No. 637. 



Copyrisht 1900, by American Florist Company. 
Entered as Second-Class Mail Matter. 

Published evert Saturday by 
AMERICAN FLORIST COMPANY, 

334 Dearborn St., Chlcoco. 
Baatern Office: 67 Bromfleld St., Boston. 

Subscription, 11.00 a year. To Europe, $2.00. 

Subscriptions accepted only from the trade. 

SOCIETY OF AMERICAN FLORISTS AND 
ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURISTS. 
OPP1CEB9 — E. M. Wood, Natick, Mass., presi- 
dent; F. R. PiEBSON, Tarrytown, N. Y., vice- 
g resident; Wm. J. Stewabt, 67 Bromfleld St., 
oston, Mass., secretary; H. B. Beatty, Oil City, 
Pa., treasurer. The sixteenth annual meeting 
will be held at New York, August 21 to 24, 1900. 

AMERICAN ROSE SOCIETY. 

Annual meeting at New York, 1901. Leonabd 
Babbon, 136 Liberty St., New York, secretary. 



THE AMERICAN CARNATION SOCIETY. 

Annual convention at Baltimore, February, 
1901. Albsbt M. Hebb, Lancaster, Pa., secretary. 



CHRYSANTHEMUM SOCIETY OF AMERICA. 

Annual meeting at New York, August, 1900. 
Elmsb D. Smith, Adrian, Mich, secretary. 

New York Hotels. 

At the request of Walter F. Sheridan, 
chairman oi the reception committee, we 
herewith present a list of the hotels of 
New York for the information of those 
who will attend the approaching conven- 
tion of the Society of American Florists: 

EUROPEAN PLAN. Rates Miles to 

per day. Hall. 

Savov, 59th St. and 5th av $2 00 1 

Netherland, 69th st. and 5th av 2 00 1 

Melropole, Broadway and 42d st... 1 OO Vz 

St. Cloud, Broadway and 42d St.... I 50 V4 

Mi^nhattan, Madison av. anil 42d St. 2 00 ^a 

Marlboroui;h, B'dway and 37th St. 1 50 Vi 

Murray Hill. Park av. and 40th st. 1 50 Jg 

Grand'Union, Park av. and42d St.. 1 00 near 

Imperial. Broadway and 32d St. . . . 1 50 %. 

Grand, Broadwav and 3Ist st 150 % 

Victoria, 5th av. 'and 27th st 150 'a 

Ashland, 4th av. and 25th st 100 % 

Continental, Broadway and 20th St. 1 00 Ua 

Union Square, Union sq. and 15th 1 00 1^4 

Everett, Union sq. and 17th st 1 50 IH 

St. Denis. Broadway and 11th St.. 1 tO IJi 
Cosmopolitan, \\ . Broadway and 

Chambers 100 3 

Astor House, Broadway opp. Gen- 
eral P. 1 00 3 

Holland House, 5th av. and 30th st. 2 00 % 

AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN PLAK. 

Am. Europ. bliles. 

May's, 50 West 28th st 1150 $150 % 

Broadway Central, Broadway 

opp. Bond 2 50 100 2 

Plaza, 68th, 59th and 6th Av. 5 00 2 00 1 

AMERICAN PLAN. Per day. Miles. 
Fifth Avenue, 5th av. and 23rd st. . . .|5 00 1 

Stunevant, Broadway and 28th st . . 2 50 Ti 



Right for Right's Sake. 

According to the veracious calendar of 
Puddenhead Wilson it is easier to do 
right than make a maxim. However 
that may be, there's certainly great 
diversity in the way some maxims are 
applied. We say "Honesty is the best 
policy," but the man who is honest only 
because ot the policy of it is but indiffer- 
ent honest, and would, according to that 
logic, be dishonest if that were the best 
policy. Then, again, there's "Do as you 
would be done by," a very different 
maxim in the positive than in the nega- 
tive, and many are willing to do a bad 
thing to others because they think 
others are just as likely to do a 
bad thing to them. The Confucian 
or, we may say, negative sense is "Do not 
do unto others what you would not like 
to have them do unto you.'' The posi- 
tive or Christian philosophy goes further 
and says "Love thy neighboras thyself," 
or, put in another way, "Do unto others 
as you would have them do to you, and 
do it first." 

Thus a proper idea of what the Golden 
Rule is becomes necessary when we con- 
sider how deficient in logic the average 
human being is unless he puts himself 
through a course of hard thinking, which 
he is usually averse to doing, because, 
like Corporal Shiach, "it makes him 
sweat." I am a firm believer in the idea 
that most men are good at heart, and 
their wrong doing is mostly caused by 
their inabihty to think correctly — that 
is, logically. 

All this leads up to the question of 
whether the next convention should go 
to Chicago or Buff'alo. We should con- 
sider what it is right to do, and do it for 
right's sake. Do not be honest because 
it is good policy, but he honest because 
it is honest and you could not be any- 
thing else if you tried. Do right for right's 
sake, as you would be honest for honesty's 
sake. Do not say let's go to Chicago 
because you like Mr. Rudd. Do not, on 
the other hand, make up your mind to 
Bufialo because of your friendly feeling 
for Mr. Scott. To my mind the only 
point to be decided is whether either 
place has a right to the next convention. 

As far as I have been able to make out, 
Buflfalo does not care anything about the 
convention except as an adjunct to her 
world's fair. That, of course, is largely 
selfish and not at all a convincing reason. 
On the other hand Chicago seems to be 
sincere in desiring the convention for the 
convention's sake, and as it is a longtime 
since the society met there, I think she 



has a right to be considered ahead of 
Buffalo. In other words, how would 
you decide if Buffalo had no world's fair, 
did not ask you to come, and Chicago 
sent you a cordial invitation? 

Let us see how the rotation of locali- 
ties stands according to the records: 



.1893 



Cincinnati 1885 St. Louis 

Philadelphia 1886 Atlantic City 1894 

Chicago 1887 Pittsburg 1895 

Nfw York 1888 Cleveland 1896 

Bullalo 1889 Providence 1897 

Boston 1890 Omaha 1898 

Toronto 1891 Detroit 1899 

Washington 1892 New Yurk 1900 

If Chicago gets it in 1901 fourteen 
years will have elapsed since she had it 
before, which seems a reasonable wait 
for the second largest city in the country. 
To be quite fair this (1900) should have 
been Chicago's year ifwehadheld strictly 
to rotation. As Chicago gave place 
gracefully to New York last year she 
seems, therefore, to have a double claim 
for just consideration this time. 

The idea of giving each large horticul- 
tural center a periodical visit is a good 
one and has borne excellent fruit, as the 
present vitality ot the sixteen-year-old 
society testifies. If some other city 
develojjs enough interest in horticulture 
and wishes the convention it should be 
added to the list, all other claims being 
equal. But to add merely because it has 
a world's fair and an eloquent advance 
agent, as was the case with Omaha, for 
instance, is, to say the least, doubtful 
wisdom. It sounds like the familiar soup 
story. The keeper of the soup shop, 
according to this tale, "socked" his cus- 
tomer a large round dollar for a plate of 
particularly thin and watery bouillon. 
On the said customer making a mUd 
remonstrance he was told that that was 
the correct charge, and that althoueh it 
might appear a little high he would 
excuse it because the house really needed 
the money. The world's fair "because" 
sounds just about as reasonable as that 
to an outsider. 

The right of Baltimore, for instance, 
to a visit from the society is disputed by 
no one. She is important enough horti- 
culturall^, and if the trade there were to 
go the right way about it they could 
beat both Chicago and Buffalo this year. 
Only once, I believe, did Baltimore ask 
for the S. A. F. meeting, and, on the face 
of it, even this looked like a one-man 
invitation and was worded in a manner 
which, though well meant, offended 
many earnest workers for the welfare of 
the society, and so the ancient and 
beautiful city of Baltimore has never yet 



54 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 18, 



had a visit from the S. A. F. during the 
sixteen years of its existence. Whether 
she will ever have deoends, in the first 
instance, on Baltimoreherselt. Personally 
1 would be glad to see the trade there 
wake up, as, unlike the unkind critics I 
have often heard, I consider Baltimore 
well worth visiting horticulturally, and 
the florists there compare favorably with 
those of any other horticultural center 
of equal size. There is no doubt what- 
ever but that they could rise to the 
occasion in magnificent style if they once 
made up their minds to that effect. 

When I say this, I do not refer particu- 
larly to local entertainment in the way of 
eating, drinking and other recreations. 
That should always be given second 
place to horticultural interests. The 
best flower growing establishments, 
both commercial and private; the public 
parks and conservatories, the flower 
shops, the nurseries, the best landscapes, 
all these things are interesting to S. A. F. 
visitors and should not be lost sight of. 
The visitors can always get some good 
points wherever they go, and the largest 
possible opportunity should be set before 
them. Entertainment committees are 
prone to devote themselves too much to 
providing an eating and making merry, 
rolling ten pins, shooting and gallivant- 
ing around sort of programme. While 
that is all right in its place, it should not 
predominate. The visitors desire first of 
all to attend the business sessions of a 
convention, secondly to become familiar 
with local horticultural matters, and, if 
there be any time left, to enjoy a good 
dinner or a game of ten pins. Is there 
anything in that to scare Baltimore or 
any other horticultural center? I trow 
not. 

Speaking of recreation reminds me that 
some one was hitting at our friend, the 



don't know their man. John Westcott 
is not only a grower, but he was a 
retailer, too, a quarter of a century or 
more, and any one who spends an hotir 
or two in his company at conventions 
will find out, it he cares to, whether John 
has any ideas outside of recreation. 

That, however, is wandering somewhat 
from the text. Let us return to our 
onions. The latest advocate of Bufialo, 
1 observe, brings forward the plea that 
to have a good attendance at the con- 
vention Buffalo is the only place, because 
people cannot afford to go to both expo- 
sition and convention if in different cities. 
That is asserting a good deal without 
any special effort in the way of demon- 
stration. An assertion is not a demon- 
stration by any means. The eastern 
florists should not find it so very diflBcult 
to stop off at Buffalo a day or so in going 
to or coming from Chicago, if they wished 
especially to see the exhibition. The 
florists of the west would not be put to 
any inconvenience if they went to the 
exhibition at Buffalo after first having 
attended the convention in Chicago. As 
for the south, that section of the country 
is relatively unimportant from the green- 
housemen's standpoint, on account of 
its favored climate, and would not count 
much in an argument for or against either 
place. 

Again, this same advocate says the 
world's fair city "would secure a larger 
attendance and incite more interest," but 
why it would do so he does not state. 
One would naturally think that this 
counter attraction would detract rather 
than add to the interest in the conven- 
tion. That was the idea that made the 
society go to St. Louis rather than to 
Chicago the Columbian Exposition year. 
He further says "the degree of success ot 
a society is in a measure indicated by its 







THE S. A. F. MEDAL. 



Commodore, in a recent issue. Since 
then others have followed this up in a 
tone that seems to me more serious than 
the occasion warrants. Ifaclose observer 
of events during the past ten years were 
to be asked what one influence outside 
ot the officers did most to make the con- 
ventions a success I am sure a large 
majority would answer "John Westcott." 
His motto, "It you are to keep school 
you must have the scholars," is sound 
sense, his idea being to get the crowd 
there by all the wiles which his generous 
and sport loving heart could suggest to 
his shrewd and practical mind. But if 
any one has run away with the idea that 
our Commodore thinks that the recrea- 
tion matter is anything more than a 
means to an end,' let him dismiss the 
notion forever from his thoughts. They 



membership list," as if quantity rather 
than quality should be the true measure of 
success. It is true, however, that the 
membership list indicates success if it be 
representative of the best men in the 
trade from all sections of the country, 
but such men do not require the induce- 
ment of a world's fair trip to make them 
join theS. A.F. Ifit had there never would 
have been any S A. F. 

This gentleman then winds up his 
unsupported assertions and assumptions 
with this: "Would it not begood policy 
for Chicago to withdraw her claim for 
1901 under promise that she can have 
the convention in 1902?" That's a pretty 
good one! Hope Chicago will appreciate 
this naive effort to console her with a 
promise ot last year's snow. How can 
1900 legislate tor 1902? On the same 



basis we might elect our president and 
other officers for 1902 also. 

I am glad Buffalo wants the conven- 
tion. I would like to see every city 
wanting it. But I think Chicago has 
the best motive and the best right this 
year. Chicago doesn't want it as a tail 
to a world's fair kite, and we must not 
forget that we once chivvied her out of it 
just because she had a world's fair. I 
believe the convention would be a success 
at either place in 1901. But that is not 
the point. Let us do right it the heavens 
fall. That's what wins in the long run. 
Policy never had a ghost of a show with 
right since the world began, and never 
will have, and Buffalo needn't worry. 
Her world's fair is an assured success 
without the convention, and it will be a 
respite to her hustling citizens ot the 
florist trade to take a week off for 
Chicago in 1901. G. C. Watson. 



History of the S. A. F. Medal. 

At the meeting of the executive com- 
mittee in Washington, D. C, January 12, 
1892, the subject of a suitable medal for 
award by the society was discussed and 
Messrs. Manda, Hunt, Falconer and 
Hoitt were appointed a sub committee 
to formulate a plan and report later. 
This committee reported on the after- 
noon of the following day, recommend- 
ing the adoption of three medal, sof gold, 
silver and bronze, to be awarded to the 
originators of new hybrids or varieties 
raised from seed, or the discovery and 
inttoduction of new species or varieties 
raised from seed, or the discovery and 
introduction of new species or varieties 
that are decided improvements over 
existing kinds, the awards to be made 
in accordance with the following rules: 

"No award shall be made for any 
plant that has not been grown at least 
two years in this country and exhibited 
at least twice before some recognized 
horticultural society, where it shall have 
received a first-class endorsement in 
writing by said society. Further, that 
it have the endorsement in writing of 
three members of the executive commit- 
tee before it shall be considered by the 
full executive board, and then only shall 
such award be made by a two-thirds 
vote of the committee, such species or 
variety to be shown in plant form and 
cut state where practicable. Not more 
than one medal shall be awarded in each 
class, and not more than three in all in 
each year." 

At the meeting ot the executive com- 
mittee at St. Louis, Mo., on January 
17, 1893, the subject was again brought 
before the executive committee, with the 
result that a special committee consist- 
ing of Messrs. Manda, Hunt, Trelease 
and Hoitt was constituted with full 
power to adopt designs and procure dies 
for medals as previously recommended. 
At the convention in St. Louis in August 
following, Mr. Manda reported to the 
society on behalf of this committee. He 
s:ated that the committee had prepared 
a die for the medals, but unfortunately 
it had been broken in the hardening pro- 
cess and that ft would be two or three 
weeks before another die would be ready. 
Mr. Manda had proofs of the design 
with him, which were examined by many 
members and universally approved. 

At the next meeting of the executive 
committee, held in Philadelphia, Pa., 
February 13, 1894, a vote was passed 
instructing the secretary to have one 
medal of gold and three each of silver 
and bronze struck off for the society's 



rgoo. 



The American Florist. 



55 




MT. EQMONT, NEW ZEALAND. 



use. This was done, and in the pro- 
gramme for the convention at Atlantic 
City in August of that year, announce- 
ment was made of the offer of these 
medals by the society under the rules as 
previously adopted by the executive com- 
mittee; but no entries were made in com- 
petition therefor. A similar announce- 
ment was made in the programme for 
the' Pittsburg convention the following 
year, but also without result. 

It appearing that on account of the 
stringency of the rules governing the 
competition, or for some similar reason, 
members were disinclined to enter into 
competition, the question of offerirg the 
medals under more liberal conditions 
was discussed at the executive commit- 
tee meeting in Providence, R. I., March, 
1897, with the result that six medals cf 
silver and six of bronze were set apart to 
be competed for in accordance with 
the recommendations of the local 
clubs of Newport and Providence at the 
convention in Providence the following 
August. The result of this offer was the 
award of silver medals at Providence as 
follows: 

To Oakes Ames, of North Easton, 
Mass., for display of aquatic flowers; to 
Swan Point Cemetery, Providence, for 
collection of conifers; to Swan Point 
Cemetery, Providence, for American 
grown rhododendrons and azaleas. And 
bronze medals to H. A. Dreer, Philadel- 
phia, for display of aquatic flowers; to 
Sam. W. Lewis, Olneyville, R. I., for a 
collection of conifers; to W. A. Manda, of 
South Orange, N. J., for collection of 
fancy caladiums, and to Alex. McLellan, 
Newport, R. I., for a group of rare green- 
house plants. At the convention in 
Omaha the following year, the medals 
were again offered for special exhibits 
and silver medals were awarded to Geo. 
Gibbs, Orcas, Washington, for American 
grown bulbs and to D. B. Long, Buflalo, 
N. Y., for floral photographic designs. 

By vote of the executive committee 
twelve silver and twelve bronze medals 
are in the hands of the New York Florists' 
Club's exhibition committee to be com 
peted for at the horticultural exhibition 
in connection with the convention at the 
Grand Central Palace and they will, no 
doubt, be worthily awarded. The design 
for the medals was drawn by the promi- 
nent artist and flower painter. Miss 
Ellen Robbins, who is a cousin of H. H. 
Hunnewell, of Wellesley, Mass. Its 
artistic beauty is a subject of frequent 
admiring comment 



Plant Life of New Zealand. 

New Zealand has aptly been termed 
'"the wonderland of the earth" and this 
oroud title has been earned by its scenes 
of unrivalled grandeur. Its volcanos, 
hot lakes, boiling mud holes andgevsers. 
Its fjords, which rival those of Norway, 
and its Alps and glaciers, which chal- 
lenge comparison with those of Switzer- 
land. These beautiful islands may also 
claim the title on account of the beauty 
and diversity of plant life, embracing the 
immense kauri forests and the impene- 
trable jungles of ferns and palms which 
fringe the river banks of the North 
Island. 

Tree ferns, principally Dicksonia Antar- 
tica, cyatheas and alsophilas, abound 
everywhere, sometimes attaining a height 
of eighty feet. The Maoris used to eat 
the pulp of the stems and the trunks of 
these ferns are often utilized by pioneer 
settlers to build huts, just as log cabins 
were built in the early days of America. 

New Zealand has 130 different species 
of indigenous ferns and lycopods, which 
grow luxuriantly in the semi-dark bush. 
In some districts Adiantum Cunning- 
hami covers the ground to a height of 



two or three feet for miles and is so 
dense that special scythes are manufac- 
tured for the purpose of clearing the land 
of it. Through the jungles, especially up 
the reaches of the Wanganni river, which 
has a world-wide reputation tor the 
beauty of its scenery, are many fine spec- 
imens of the ringed nekan palm, Areca 
sapida, thirty and forty feet high, the 
fronds of which are used by the natives 
to thatch their huts. The straight stems 
of the aralias furnished the natives with 
spears, which were hardened with 
fire at the tip and dipped in a poisonous 
solution to make a wound fatal. 

The bush is extremely interesting; here 
a lordly kauri 200 feet high and forty 
feet in girth, rears its stately head high 
above the forest, its growth unchecked 
by the hundreds of cupplejacks that reach 
and twine around the lower branches or 
the orchids and other parasitic plants 
which cling to its trunk. In the gloom 
beneath, dractenas, aralias, doodias, 
lomarias, davallias, adiantums, hibis- 
cuses, etc., grow in an impenetrable 
mass and enjoy summer weather the 
year around. Miles of swampv ground is 
covered with theNewZealandflax, Phor- 
mium tenax, which grows densely ten 
and twelve feet high, and the writer 
remembers being lost for several hours 
in one of these flax swamps. This flax is 
thrashed and exported in large quanti- 
ties for making rope. The Maoris make 
their nets and baskets with its strands 
and collect the large quantities of honey 
contained in its flowers with calabashes. 

In dryer districts the cabbage palm, 
Dracana Australis, is found m great 
numbers, many of the trees being over 
100 years old, gnarled and twisted and 
in some cases are enveloped by the native 
ioomitas and clematis. Throughout New 
Zealand the plains and plateaus are ren- 
dered beautiful by the plumes of the 
pampas grass, Arundo Australis, called 
by the Maoris the "Toi Toi," which 
grows in great profusion. 

Some very fine private grounds are to 
be found in the neighborhood of Auck- 
land. Camellias, hydrangeas, boronias 
and countless varieties of flowers and 
shrubs bloom in the borders in exquisite 
profusion and the outhouses and veran- 
das are festooned with Bougainvilleas 




FLOWERS AND FOLIAGE OF DRAC/ENA (OORDYLINE) INDIVI8A IN NEW ZEALAND. 



56 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 



j8 



and Plumbago Capensis. In the orchard, 
oranges, lemons, citrons, bananas, etc., 
grow with ordinary fruits and an aquatic 
garden of great beauty usually adorns 
one corner of the grounds. 

The South Island is not so rich in plant 
life, although the Kentia Canterburyana 
is found there, but for all that is beauti- 
ful, all that is impressive in the vegetable 
kingdom, visit the home of the plant that 
blooms and grows underground and the 
edible boiling mud spring — the North 
Island of New Zealand. J. H. McH. 



Midsummer Notes on Aquatics. 

August is the banner month for aqua- 
tics, for when many beds of flowers are 
suffering from heat and drought, water 
lilies are in their element, and one turns 
from the parched and heated ground to 
the verdant green of the ponds, with the 
dainty lilies of all hues, fragrant, cooling 
and refreshing. Some of the hardy nym- 
phaeas are nearing the end of their season, 
but as they decrease the tropical lilies 
increase in number, size and brilliancy of 
color, and will continue on until the end. 
The nelumbiums are admired for their 
gigantic foliage and flowers as they are 
now to be seen in all their oriental 
splendor. As this is the season when we 
can spend a few days, combining pleasure 
and business and attend the convention, 
no better time can be found to visit 
different grounds and make compari- 
sons and notes. 

The general work in and around a 
large water garden at this season of the 
year is to keep the grass mown, the 
ponds filled with water, the few dead 
leaves picked ofi, and, in natural ponds, 
a few perennial weeds pulled out. The 
hoeing, cultivating and other laborious 
work is outside the water garden. 
Ponds that are still under construction 
may yet be planted with such occupants 
as hardy nymph;L-as, but this work 
should be completed at an early date. 
Nymphsas planted during August will 
become established before fall and will 
start early in the spring and escape a 
check and delay in flowering which 
spring-planted stock receives more or 
less. 

Where seed is not wanted the dead 
flowers should be picked from such 
varieties as produce seed; it saves the 
plants much energj- and, again, if the 
seed is ripened and should be deposited 
in the pond, the result will be a host of 
seedlings that in most cases will be no 
better than weeds, in fact worse in the 
case of some hybrids, as the seedlings 
seldom come true and the young plants 
will be more vigorous and would soon 
supplant the original variety. Where 
seedlings are now in evidence it will be 
better to weed them out unless they 
show especially marked variation in 
foliage or have already shown a distinct 
flower. Nothing is worth saving as 
seedlings unless of a species, and true, or 
from selected flowers carefully hybri- 
dized. No better time than the present 
will be found to examine all plants and 
be positive that they are true to name, 
and where there has crept in a plant by 
accident, or otherwise, see that such is 
rightly named, or, better still, planted 
in the right place or group. 

Where a(|uatics are grown in tubs 
many will now teel the benefit of frecjuent 
waterings of liquid manure: or fertilizer 
may be put in the tubs previous to filling 
up with water. Nelumbiums, especially, 
need it; they should not be suffered to 
become starved or take on a sickly 
yellow-green hue of foliage, or their 



flowering is at an end for the season. 
These plants will bear heavy stimulants, 
but begin with moderately weak appli- 
cations, adding stronger doses after- 
ward. 

Where Euryale ferox has established 
itself, plants should not be allowed to 
crowd each other, but thin them out 
early. This also applies to Victoria 
Trickeri. The euryale is very subject to 
attacks of cercospora, and after two or 
three days of warm, humid weather look 
out for spot. If not checked at once it 
will soon spread to every plant in the 
pond, with serious result. Leaves so 
affected will shrivel up with the first 
bright, sunny day and the leaves soon 
die, badly crippling the plant, reducing 
the size and number of leaves and flowers. 
The only remedy is Bordeaux mixture in 
any of its forms, but use it diluted fifty 



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CLEMATIS INDIVISA IN NEW ZEALAND. 



per cent, that ia, as per formula or direc- 
tions given for most plants. 

An excellent formula is five pounds of 
sulphate of copper and three pounds of 
caustic potash. Dissolve the copper and 
potash in separate wooden pails, then 
mix and add fifty gallons of water. As 
the caustic potash varies considerably in 
strength it will be necessary to test it 
before general application ; dilu te as above 
stated and use it on a few leaves first. 
The spraying should be done with a fine 
spray nozzle, in the afternoon after the 
flowers are closed, and the effect will be 
magical. In the test case, if the Bordeaux 
mixture is too strong the leaves will 
appear scalded in spots on the surface. 
As fifty gallons of Bordeaux mixture will 
be more than is required in most cases, 
unless there is need of such in other 
departments, a smaller quantity may be 
made, but it retains its strength a con- 
siderable time. The ammoniacal solution 
is also very effective and convenient to 
handle, especially where but few plants 



are grown. This can be purchased of 
dealers, ready for use; the same caution 
about using it too strong is necessary 
here; whatever the directions may say, 
be careful. The water should only be 
light blue in color. Experience alone will 
decide the proper proportions. 

Where aphides are in evidence, either 
on nymphtcas, nelumbiums or Victorias, 
the safest and surest remedy, and by no 
means afiecting the plants, as is often the 
case with insecticides, is to see that a 
colony or two of lady bugs are in evi- 
dence. If not at hand, hunt some up and 
see that they settle where wanted; there 
will be no need to worry about the black 
flies; they will soon disappear and the 
plants will be clean and healthy. 

Wm. Teickeh. 



The Classification of Sweet Peas. 

As stated in a previous letter, it was 
the intention of the classification com- 
mittee at the recent sweet pea conference 
to make a selection of the best types of 
the various shades of color on the morn- 
ing of the second day of the show, but, 
as so many varieties had curled up, 
owing to the excessive heat and dry 
atmosphere, it was impossible to carry 
out this object. I believe most of the 
best and decided types will be found in 
those selected from Hurst & Sons' collec- 
tion and I shall append a list of the sorts 
which were adjudged the most distinct. 
I also give a list of those which have 
received awards from the Royal Horti- 
cultural Society. 

Eckford's Bronze Prince appears to be 
the first to receive distinction, a first- 
class certificate being awarded it on 
August S, 1SS2. In 1883 first-class cer- 
tificates were awarded for Orange Prince, 
Eckford; Carmine Rose, Hurst; Invinci- 
ble, carmine, Laxton; Invincible, striped. 
Carter; and Blue-edged, Carter. It was 
not until 18S9 that another award was 
made. In July of that year Mr. Eckford 
exhibited a collection to which an award 
of merit was given for the strain. Mr. 
Walker also received a similar award. I 
may here mention that between the above 
dates a change was made in the name of 
the recognition bestowed, the award of 
merit being the highest distinction 
accorded to florists' varieties, unless a 
distinct hybrid; consequently the award 
of merit is equal to the former first-class 
certificate. In 1890 Dorothy Tennant 
and Stanley received that distinction, 
both being from Eckford. In 1891 Lady 
Penzance, Mrs. Eckford and Venus, and 
in 1892 Lady Beaconsfield, all from Eck- 
ford, were honored, and since that date 
the following have been adjudged wor- 
thy of the same distinction: Aurora, 
Blanche Burpee, Countess Cadogan, 
Countess of Powes, Cupid, Eliza Eck- 
ford, Emily Henderson, Golden Gate, 
Lady Grisel Hamilton, Lady Mary 
Currie, Mars, Prince Edward of York, 
Queen Victoria, Salopian and The Belle. 

It will be seen from the above that the 
floral committee of the R. H. S. does not 
debar the hooded varieties. Lady Grisel 
Hamilton be'ng one of the most decided 
of that type, though in discussing this 
point at the conference it was decided 
not to recognize hooded varieties as a 
separate class, the hood practically 
being considered a deformity. The list 
selected by the classification committee 
will also be found to include some hooded 
varieties and they certainly should be 
distinguished in some way from the 
upright standard varieties, so that those 
objecting to them could avoid including 
them in their selections. 



rgoo. 



The American Florist. 



57 



The list of varieties selected from the 
collection of Hurst & Sons is as follows: 



Oriental 
Gorgeous 
Chancellor 
Lady Mary Currie 
Prince Edward of York 
Prince of Wales 
Her Majesty 
Colonist 
Splendor 
Mars 
Salopian 
Captivation 
Fashion 

Dorothy Tennant 
Black Knight 
Shahzada 
Duke of Clarence 
Captain of the Blues 
Countess Cadogan 
Emily Eckford 
Princess of \Vales 



Eraily Henderson 
Blanche Burpee 
Sadie Burpee 
Sensation 
Mrs. Eckford 
Queen Victoria 
Coquette 
Lemon Queen 
Hon. F. Bouverie 
Lady Skelmersdale 
Mrs.'Gl.idstone 
Prima Donna 
Royal Rose 
Mrs. Dugdale 
Triumph 
Little Dorrit 
Blanche Ferrv 
Earliest of All 
America 
Pink Friar 
Coronet 
Countess of Powes 

It will be seen that this list, though 
rather a long one, does not include all 
that deserve notice. Lovely, which took 
a first prize and was very conspicuous in 
many collections, is one example, and of 
newer varieties, Snowdrift, Cream of 
Brockhampton and Wideawake may 
prove valuable. Baden Powell, by the 
same raiser, Foster, seems too much like 
America. Stanley is left out in tavor of 
Black Knight, but I should strongly rec- 
ommend Stanley for pot culture. Duchess 
of Westminster and Maid of Honor may 
have been included in the selection from 
Hurst & Sons' but they are not marked 
in my list. H. 



New Rose Pink Pearl. 

This latest of W. A. Manda's hybrids 
is a very beautiful rose and has received 
high honors wherever exhibited. It is a 
cross between Wichuraiana and Meteor. 
The buds are salmon pink, changing to 
clear pink when fully expanded, the flow- 
ers being much larger than those of 
either of the parents. 



Summer Work in the Greenhouses. 

That the early summer is a busy season 
in the greenhouses is a remark that has 
long ago lost its novelty, and, with the 
experience gained in successive years, 
many of us make good resolutions at 
the beginning of the season that we will 
so arrange and plan our work that the 
worst of it shall be completed by the 
Fourth of July, and that the remainder 
shall be well in hand before convention 
time. But then there is a certain house 
or range of houses that needs rebuilding, 
or a boiler that cannot be relied upon 
for another winter, and possibly some 
piping to be altered or added to, and 
then the material does not arrive on 
time; thus delay sometimes follows delay 
and that anticipated vacation period 
slowly vanishes into thin air. 

It would be easy to accumulate material 
lor all these repair jobs if we only knew 
beforehand just what would be required, 
but it often happens that the tearing out 
of an old bench discloses the fact that 
many of the posts that carry the side 
walls are rotten and must be replaced if 
a collapse is to be avoided when that 
heavy snow comes next winter. Of 
course such a state of aflfairs does not 
often confront those happy growers who 
possess brick-walled houses, with iron 
plates and frames, or iron gutters set 
upon iron posts, and iron-framed benches 
with slate or tile bottoms. 

Such things as these are like a good 
suit of clothes, in being very nice to have, 
but there are, unfortunately, many men 
who are unable to have the best in cloth- 
ing, and there are likewise many growers 




MANDAS NEW HYBRID ROSE PINK PEARL. 



in our business who have not capital 
enough to build houses at the rate of 
$25 to $30 per running foot in length. 
These growers are fully capable of appre- 
ciating the beauty and utility of a first- 
class, modern greenhouse, but to them it 
is "out of sight" in more ways than one. 
But this state of affairs may not always 
exist, and sometime in the happy future 
the structural iron trust maybe dissolved 
and the poor but honest grower be 
enabled to buy for a reasonable price some 
of those new iron gutters that are to be 
rolled out in lengths of twenty feet. 

In the meantime certain repairs must 
be made, and for the walls of a wooden 
house I prefer to use good red cedar 
posts, those of southern growth prefer- 
ably, the red cedar being much easier to 
work than locust, besides being more 
readily procured in even sizes, and also 
being among the most durable of woods. 
Plates and gutters may be made from 
either cypress or yellow pine, though it 
becomes more difficult each year to get 
prime yellow pine plank that is free from 
sap and season cracks. And when used 
for a plate or for the bottom of a gutter 
a badly seasoned, cracked yellow pine 
plank is liable to give trouble no matter 
how carefully it may be puttied and 
painted. 

For the better preservation of the wood 



it is preferable to have as little of the 
plate exposed to the weather as possible, 
this being managed by keeping the larger 
portion or long slope of the angular 
plate within the house, and then carry- 
ing the glass down as far as convenient 
toward the eaves. After this patching of 
the woodwork there is more or less paint- 
ing and re- glazing to be done, and in this 
department the very best material is 
likely to prove the cheapest in the end, 
for there is no class of work that is more 
trying to poor putty and poor paint 
than to be used on a greenhouse roof, 
where it is not only exposed to all the 
force of the elements on the exterior of 
the house, but inside is also tested by a 
continual exposure to warmth and mois- 
ture. 

Wooden benches are a continual expense 
and source of annoyance, though a 
majority still use them on account of the 
small first cost, the framework of scant- 
ling and the flooring of hemlock or Vir- 
ginia pine boards, it being a matter of 
doubt as to which wood is most durable. 
The average life or period of usefulness 
for a bench of this description floored 
with boards one inch thick, of good, 
sound hemlock, is three to three and a 
half years, whenusedfor pot plants only, 
and if only used for small stock we some- 
times have them last four years. These 



58 



The American Florist. 



Aug. iS, 



benches have a heavy coat of whitewash 
when built, and last rather better if the 
framework is also given a good coat of 
of the same material before the flooring 
is laid. 

Some growers maintain that 2-inch 
plank is more satisfactory for flooring 
benches, and possibly if the benches are 
to be used for planting out roses, carna- 
tions or chrysanthemums this may be 
correct, but for growing pot plants it 
seems doubtful if there would be enough 
difference in the lasting qualities of the 
2-inch stuff to cover the difference in 
price, and the first cost of lumber is a 
very considerable item now, ordinary 
hemlock costing nearly fifty per cent 
more than it did a year or two ago. 

For heating pipes, of course we all use 
black iron, this radiating heat much 
more freely than is done by gal- 
vanized pipe, but for the water supply 
through the houses galvanized piping is 
superior from the fact that it is less 
likely to fill up with rust, and thus wears 
much longer. In laying water pipes, or 
repairing them, it is good practice to 
have them out in the open just as much 
as possible, in order that any leakage 
may be at once detected, and also to 
have gate valves in various places so 
that one house or range of houses may 
be cut off at any time it is necessary to 
make repairs. If it should be found 



necessary to bury a water pipe, do not 
cover it up with coal ashes, the latter 
material being more corrosive toward 
iron pipe than ordinary earth is. 

While these repairs are being made to 
the houses the stock of pot plants par- 
ticularly must be kept in order, for this 
is the season in which we hope to trans- 
form the half dollar plant into the dollar 
specimen, a process that may readily be 
accomplished with some species between 
the first of June and the first of October, 
providing the plants are not neglected 
during the repair campaign. Fortun- 
ately many of the useful foliage plants 
may be handled advantageously in 
frames outdoors at this season, though 
I prefer not to put such tender subjects 
outside before the middle of [une unless 
they are well established in their pots. 

Araucarias do better in the open air, 
with protection from lull sunshine, a 
lath shelter serving the purpose best, 
while the ever popular Ficus elastica 
grows well in the full sunshine, forming 
tough leaves with those reddish midribs 
that are so attractive, these outdoor 
grown plants being more enduring for 
house decoration than those that have 
always been grown under glass. Many 
of the dracasnas and crotons grow 
remarkably well under frame culture 
during the summer, though needing fre- 
quent syringing in dry, hot weather, this 




method of culture not being noted here 
as a novelty, from the fact that it was 
practiced with considerable success in 
the vicinity of Boston fully twenty years 
ago. 

And, speaking of Boston, reminds us 
that the Boston nephrolepis may also be 
grown out in the frame, in a rich open 
soil and moderately shaded, but, like 
all other ferns that are given the same 
treatment during the summer months, 
this one must not be neglected in the 
matter of watering. But possibly the 
most of your readers have all these minor 
matters in good shape and properly 
arranged for the summer, and in that 
case they will be more interested in the 
problem of transportation as applied to 
trains and routes that shall land them 
to New York on or before the morning of 
August 21. HW. H. Taplin. 



Campanula Isophylla Mayii. 

The accompanying illustrations show 
anew plant. Campanula isophylla Mayii, 
which is said to possess much merit for 
pot and hanging basket culture. It is 
introduced by H. B. May, of Upper 
Edmonton, London, England. The 
flowers are of a light blue shade and 
produced very freely. This novelty was 
given an award of merit by the Royal 
Horticultural Society of England. 



Dahlia Notes. 



CAMPANULA ISOPHYLLA MAYII AS A POT PLANT. 



The present season, in many sections, 
has been marked by extreme drought 
and heat, conditions which are distinctly 
unfavorable to the dahlia grower, and it 
becomes desirable to use all possible 
means to counteract them. The natural 
impulse is to resort to the use of water. 
To be of value, enough should be applied 
to saturate the ground three or four 
inches deep, and to do this takes time, 
labor and a large quantity of water. In 
a drv time a heavy rain of some duration 
will often leave the earth quite dry a 
little "vay below the surface and afew min- 
utes' sprinkling from the hose cannot be 
expected to accomplish more. A mere sur- 
face application will pass into the atmos- 
phere before it has had time to accom- 
plish anything beyond a temporary cool- 
ing of the ground. Even when the appli- 
cation is thorough, it can be much more 
effectively employed in connection with 
a mulch as referred to later. When the 
area is extensive, the use of water 
becomes impracticable without a regular 
irrigating plant. 

Two methods based upon practically 
the same foundation can be employed 
under all circumstances and will be 
always productive of benefit. Keeping 
the surface of the soil thoroughly stirred 
to the depth of two or three inches pre- 
vents evaporation from the lower levels 
and retains for the use of the plants that 
moisture already present. This treat- 
ment presumes that there has been regu- 
lar and thorough previous cultivation. 
To break up and pulverize ground which 
had been allowed to become dry, hard 
and compact, might be a remedy as bad 
as the disease. 

The other method is to cover the sur- 
face of the ground three or four inches 
deep with straw or similar material. 
Manure from the stable serves a good 
purpose and supplies plant food as well 
as protection. Such a mulch keeps the 
ground cool and moist, both desirable 
conditions. The sun's heat does not 
penetrate it and the persistence of moist- 
ure beneath it, even in the hottest and 
dryest weather, is surprising. Moreover, 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



59 



the soil beneath does not pack and har- 
den but remains in fine condition with- 
out cultivation. Light showers pass 
through to the surface of the earth below 
and the moisture is retained there; if 
artificial watering is resorted to, half 
the usual amount will produce thorough 
saturation and there is the least possible 
loss from evaporation. H. F. Bdrt. 



CARNATIONS. 

SOLID BEDS VERSUS BENCHES. 

Ed. Am. Flobist:— I should be pleased 
to read of Mr. Herr's experience with 
the standard and newer carnations 
grown on solid beds. What sorts will 
do best in solid beds? What sorts will 
do equally well in solid beds or benches? 
What sorts will do best on benches? It 
is to be understood that the houses are 
modem, well heated, with large glass 
and well ventilated. M. E. 

Solid beds will not produce as many 
flowers as benches in most cases and 
sometimes the solid bed will be from five 
per cent to fifty per cent behind the bench, 
this difference in results being largely due 
to soil, sometimes to culture and fre- 
quently to the variety. 

Where the construction of solid beds 
■will entail considerable expense, benches 
might as well be built, as results are more 
sure. Where a solid bed can be made, 
the same as I make mine, by simply set- 
ting up six-inch boards on the solid 
ground, for sides, and filling in four 
inches of soil for planting, the difference 
in cost of benches over this system of 
solid beds is quite enough to make a loss 
of ten per cent of flowers less than the 
original extra cost and maintenance of 
the benches. With most varieties I have 
found that my cut will not vary more 
than ten per cent in favor of the benches. - 

My soil has naturally good drainage 
and this makes the watering of solid 
beds an easy job, whereas, with a stiff 
subsoil, it becomes quite an art; it also 
h 18 much to do with my success with the 
solid bed system and if it were not for the 
natural advantages that 1 have I sup- 
pose that I would be using benches. 

To a beginner I would advise the bench 
system for the larger part of the estab- 
lishment and a thorough trial of the solid 
bed system under the same conditions, 
keeping a careful record of results and 
cost of production. It is of this latter 
item that most of us gain wrong conclu- 
sions, as we too often look only to 
apparent results, whereas the difference 
in cost often entirely reverses the general 
results. 

Last winter I visited a grower who had 
a solid bed of Triumph and in the same 
house some on benches. The difference 
between them was fully seventy-five per 
cent in favor of the bench at that date 
and later on, by the look of the plants, I 
suppose the difference was at least fifty 
per cent in favor of the soil bed. Here is 
where many growers run against a snag. 
I often do it, myself, with a new variety. 
The habits of the variety must be well 
known to get good results from solid 
beds and it must be grown accordingly. 
There is so much difference in results in 
different soils that it would be folly to 
attempt to lay down any rules to be 
followed. 

It is almost impossible to arbitrarily 
select certain varieties for benches and 
certain others for solid beds, on account 
of this great difference in results in 
different soils, but one rule can be 
followed with pretty sure results and 




CAMPANULA ISOPHYLLA MAYM AS A BASKET PLANT. 



that is to plant on benches all varie- 
ties that are inclined to be late in com- 
ing into full bloom and also any varieties 
that are inclined to run more to foliage 
than to flowers. Such varieties as come 
into bloom quickly and are pretty free 
with their flowers can be planted on 
solid beds with an assurance of pretty 
good results and, if everything is just 
right, there ought to be a few more 
dollars from the solid beds than from the 
same varieties in benches, as the flowers 
ought to be better in quality and stem, 
with much less expense in the way of 
feeding and petting them up, and the 
season of good flowers in the spring runs 
considerably later than with a bench. 

There is another point against the 
solid bed, and that is the fact that you 
cannot force the flowers for a certain 
date without doing the plants serious 
injury, and this makes the success of a 
Christmas crop entirely a matter of 
knowledge of the variety and how to 
handle it. Here, again, comes the differ- 
ence in soils as an obstacle to giving 
advice, but a little study will soon 
enable you to know just how to top the 
plants to get a big crop in for a certain 
date and it is in the topping that the 
whole secret lies. 

The fact that carnations in solid beds 
cannot be forced to any extent without 



permarent injury to the plants makes 
them, in my estimation, better stock for 
propagation than plants grown in 
benches, as their growth is more natural 
and consequently more healthful. 

Albert M. Hebr. 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

GULF COAST NOTES. 

The chrysanthemum grower in this 
part of the world has had an object les- 
son this season. For years it has been 
preached to him to avoid planting in flat 
ground; to use raised beds as a safe- 
guard against heavy rains. Since May 
28 we have had scarcely a day without 
rain; some days a foot of it. The conse- 
quence is, where the plants are not dead 
they have that yellow, sickly look which 
I have found well described by calling it 
indigestion. They look as a man feels 
with that complaint. Of course some 
few growers have planted properly, with 
ample drainage, and the plants look 
fairly well, but they are soft and suffer- 
ing terribly from the sudden change to 
dry and torrid days. Summing up, I 
should say that the outlook for choice 
chrysanthemums in the extreme south 
this fall is not promising. 

Where the plants have suffered in this 



GO 



The American Florist. 



Aug. i8, 



wav I have found it beneficial to scratch 
the' surface of the beds with a fine rake 
and give a good coating of soot. Where 
the soil seems to be very slow in drying 
out equal parts ot air- slaked lime and 
scot have given good and quick results. 
The treatment ot the plants with us from 
now until flowering time is much the 
same as that advised by our fnends far- 
ther north. I would suggest, however, 
to keep shy of liquid chemicals, and even 
liquid manures of every kind. A good 
mulching will give ample nourishment 
through the process of watering, and the 
strength will be sufficiently out of it not 
to efi'ect the flowers when they come. 
Even this mulching should not be given 
to the reds and dark colors. _ 

It is a common thing to hear of Fisher s 
Torch, Childs, Black Hawk and such 
colors being "scorched by the sun. 
Avoid too much nourishment after tiep- 
tember 1 and the sunburn will not occur. 
Some of the chemicals are death to the 
colors of the lighter shades of pmk. 1 
have used sulphate of ammonia and 
nitrate of soda on Mrs. Hill, Glory of 
Pacific and ViviandMoreland they came 
immaculate white. Of course the chem- 
icals were assisted by shade, which is 
absolutely necessary to any kind of sue- 

cess. 

It must be remembered that long after 
our friends north of us are warming 
their houses at night, our plants are 
burning up with tropical heat. Our 
average first frost is about November 15. 



they are exceedingly troublesome to 
roses, violets, etc., when planted in the 
open ground which has been so frozen. 
That the ordinary greenhouse tempera- 
ture and treatment is very conducive to 
the welfare of eel worms is amply demon- 
strated all over the country, and the only 
safe method of prevention is to stenlize 
the compost thoroughly before using any 
of it. W. N. Rudd gave a detailed 
description of how this can be done in 
Vol. 13, page 1483, of this paper. 

John N. May. 



Ed. 



A Hint to Conventionitcs. 

Am. Florist:— In your issue of 



August 4 appeared a short, sensible, well 
written article signed "W" and headed 
"A Hint to Conventionites." In it the 
writer expressed a hope that the bowlers 
about attending the convention had 
given a few hours' thought to improved 
methods in building, in growing, etc , 



a little fun or recreation when business 
is done will brighten everybody up. 

The fact that there has never been more 
than one day for bowling, and that held 
after the session was finished, is answer 
enough to the suggestion that perhaps 
we have been neglecting more serious 
and important affairs in our devotion to 
the good old game, and "pushing our 
best enthusiasm down the alleys with 
theballs." Iohn Westcott. 



ROSES. 

DISEASED BRIDES AND BRIDESMAIDS. 

Ed. Am. Florist:— I have been greatly 
troubled by club root in my rose houses, 
the Brides and Bridesmaids being th^ 
greatest sufferers. The roots thicken at 
the extreme ends and then the foliage 
assumes the sicklv, yellow appearance 
which is familiar to most rose growers. 
What is the cause of club root? Has the 
soil of certain localities anythmg to do 
with it? What is the best method of pre- 
vention and cure? W.J. 

After all the discussion in the horticult- 
ural press it seems remarkable that there 
should be ignorance as to the cause of 
club root. Eel worms are at the bottom 
of the trouble. These are very small 
worms which under a strong glass very 
closely resemble the common eel. These 
worms are much more abundant in some 
soils than in others, but, judging from 
reports from nearly every section of the 
country they must have greatly increased 
in number is the last few years. In many 
sections of the country where the ordi- 
nary monthly or bedding roses would 
have made fine, large bushes in one sea- 
son twenty years ago, they now grow 
hardly at all and at best are very little 
larger at the end of the season than when 
planted in the spring. Many of the 
plants may die and all the trouble is due 
to the effect these little worms haveupon 
the root action. In bulletin No. 55 
issued by the Hatch Experiment Station, 
of the Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege, in 1S98, a very exhaustive descrip- 
tion is given of various methods for 
destroying these pests, but there is orie 
statement which seems to me a little 
inconsistent (see page 61) where it is 
stated that the nematodes and their eggs 
are destroyed by severe freezing. It that 
were the case why do they inflict such 
damage in the open air on plants in parts 
of the country where the frost penetrates 
four or five feet deep. During winter 




PETER HEINBERG. 



and further said, "let us not drive all our 
enthusiasm down the alley lines with the 
balls, but keep some for other thoughts 
and other uses." ,. , ^ 

Being isomewhatof abowling devotee, 
I was struck very forcibly with our 
unknown friend's remarks. Having been 
associated with and a close observer of 
the men who follow the game, I know 
that thev, as a rule, are the busy and 
successful ones, not the laggards. They 
give time, thought and care to their 
business, being equally as enthusiastic 
over it as over their play, knowing from 
the teachings of the game that to make 
many strikes in business or on the alleys 
it is necessary to give thought, care and 
attention to the same. 

The great point about this bowling or 
other n creation at the conventions is 
that it brings the crowd together and 
furnishes a chance to meet one another 
and talk over just such business prob- 
lems as "W" refers to. I have got many 
a pointer myself in these side talks, and 
I suppose 1 must have given some to the 
others in the same way. I do not place 
recreation at conventions first on the 
list except as a means to an end. The first 
thing to be considered is the regular busi- 
ness of the society, secondly such points 
of horticultural interest as the locality 
furnishes, and if any spare time remains 



WITH THE GROWERS. 

peter REINBERG, CHICAGO, ILL. 

It isn't often that a florist visits 
Chicago and doesn't go out to Rein- 
bergs'; certainly the sights there are 
worththetrip. If Prof. Galloway, vvho 
is being told that his recently published 
estimates of the extent of commercia 
floriculture in the United States fall 
short of the mark, had recently inspected 
the Reinberg establishments he might 
have been sufficiently impressed to have 
doubted the accuracy of his own figures, 
for let it be recorded that the Reinberg 
brothers own far more glass than is 
exposed to the elements at any other one 
spot in America and that Peter Reinberg 
individually has more rose and carna- 
tion plants on his benches than are to be 
found in any other floricultural establish- 
ment in the world. 

Those who have not enjoyed Mr. 
Reinberg's hospitality can hardly reahze 
the extent of over 600,000 square feet of 
glass, or almost fourteen acres. It seems 
incredible that one man's investment 
just for the glass alone, at the current 
rates per box, amounts to over $40,000. 
Who, unacquainted with this one grow- 
er's range, would suppose that to keep it 
warm in winter thirty-two boilers would 
be required, twenty-four supplying hot 
water and eight making steam? In these 
thirty-two boilers Mr. Reinberg expects 
to next winter burn about 6,000 tons of 
Pocahontas coal, upon which the lowest 
price yet quoted is that announced 
by the Chicago Florists' Club's com- 
mittee, $3.35 per ton. On the place 
there are the equivalent of eighty 300- 
foot houses, each twenty-six feet wide, 
and in the houses there are seventy-two 
miles of heating pipe; those who have 
recently bought 4inch pipe can reckon 
the investment there. There are 184 of 
Evans' ventilators in the houses, sixteen 
of which are new this year and are 
equipped with Garland's iron gutter. 
There are fifty men regulariy employed 
under foreman George ColUns. Is it any 
wonder that such a mammoth place 
turns out a supply of stock which practi- 
cally imposes no limit on the selling 
department, which is entrusted to the 
management of A. C. Spencer? 

The figures as to the plantings give 

something of an idea as to what sort of 

a cut there will be from these houses this 

winter. < )f Beauties 40,000 plants have 

been benched. There are 17,01)1) young 

plants of Bride and 6,000 which have 

been rested for three or four weeks and 

cut back for a fresh start. There are 

18 ()0<i young plants of Bridesmaid and 

<) 000 which will be carried another year. 

Of Meteor there are 15,000, ot Golden 

Gate 14,000, of Liberty 6,000, and a few 

hundred plants of Mrae. Testout have 

been benched, Mr. Reinberg believing 

that there is a limited demand for this 

rose at prices which will make it pay, 

and, by the way, he says it costs twice 

as much to grow Testout well as it does 

for Bride or Bridesmaid. He also says 



tgoo. 



The American Florist. 



61 




PARTIAL VIEW OF PETER REINBERQ'S GREENHOUSE ESTABLISHMENT AT SUMMERDALE, ILL. 



that Meteor is an expensive rose to grow 
as he finds that the section of Meteor 
houses consumes nearly double the coal 
required for sections which may be kept 
10° cooler. Last year Mr. Reinberg was 
about the only local grower of Golden 
Gate; he had 4,000 plants. This year he 
has benched 14,000, which shows what 
he thinks of it. All his roses are healthy 
and strong but the grafted plants of 
Liberty are quite a step in advance of 
the own root stock. 

Mr. Reinberg's carnation field, a moist, 
friable soil, has contained 300,000 plants 
this season, and the stock is very vigor- 
ous. He has already benched a great 
many thousands and intends to house 
140,000 altogether, as against 60,000 
last year. He has dozens of varieties in 
the field to keep up the assortment for 
his trade in cuttings and plants, which 
is an important part of his business, but 
his principal varieties for cut flowers, 
aside from such new sorts as The Mar- 
quis, Mrs. Lawson. Genevieve Lord, 
Ethel Crocker and Peru, will be Mrs. 
Joost, Triumph, Evanston, G. H. Crane, 
Cerise Queen, America, Flora Hill, White 
Cloud, Armazindy and Mrs. Bradt. Mr. 
Reinberg thinks Mrs. Joost the best 
money maker of the lot and has benched 
it heavily. Last season he tried 500 of 
the bottomless pots for carnations and 
his experience was so similar to that of 
Fred. Dorner, published in a recent issue, 
that he has 0,000 of the pots on hand 
for this year's use. 

One of the things which Mr. Reinberg 
shows every visitor is a new red carna- 
tion of which he expects great things. It 
is an unnamed sort which originated in 
1807 with Leopold Ine, at the National 
Bohemian Cemetery. The flower some- 
what resembles G. H. Crane in color and 
form but the size, while not small, is not 
large. However, Mr. Reinberg says he 
can cut three blooms to one from Crane 
or America. Mr. Ine has been sending it 
to a local commission house where it has 
sold right along with the high priced 
reds. The stock has now been worked 
up to s,000 plants and Mr. Reinberg will 
grow them and put the cuttings on the 
market next year. In the meantime he is 
looking for a catchy good name for it. 

The accompanying illustration of Mr. 
Reinberg's range of glass at Summer- 
dale is from a photograph taken before 
this year's addition of 150,000 feet was 



built adjoining the houses in the fore- 
ground. This picture does, however, 
aft'ord a partial view of George Rein- 
berg's glass, which adjoins his brother's 
on the west. In the range which Mr. 
Reinberg put up this year he was enabled, 
by the use of the iron gutter, to secure 
four benches as against three by his 
former method of construction and the 
arrangement of gutters is such that the 
water is carried off with the greatest 
posssible expedition. 

*-••-♦- 

Clematises for Pot Culture. 

There are few hardy plants which are 
better adapted for early spring flowering 
in pots than are some of the varieties of 
the patens type. These flower from the 
previous year's growths, and when 
ripened off early in the autumn, they 
require very little forcing to have them 
in flower early in March. From one- 
year-old plants to large specimens may 
be grown, according to the accommoda- 
tion that can be given. Where vines are 
started early in the year, there is no bet- 
ter place for starting the clematises, and 
as the flowers begin to open they may 
be removed to a cooler house. With 
good treatment, the same plants will 
last in good condition for fully a fort- 
night, and by starting a few plants and 
adding to them from time to time, a 
succession may be kept up throughout 
the spring. Greenfly is sometimes trouble- 
some, but if fumigated before they are 
started there will not be much risk of 
further trouble before they are in flower. 

The large specimens often seen at 
exhibitions are very beautiful, and show 
what can be done with these hardy 
plants in pots; but I think the younger 
plants are even more effective, and well 
adapted for grouping with other plants, 
there being few flowering plants of the 
same shades of color. One-year-old 
plants may be grown on single sticks, 
say about three and one-half to four feet 
high, and older ones should have three 
or four sticks tied together at the tops, 
and the growths wound around; the tall 
plants are more effective than those 
trained around broad, balloon-shaped 
trellises. The same plants may be used 
for several seasons but they should be 
well cared for after they have done flow- 
ering and should be trained as they 
advance in growth, for after the wood 
is ripened it is very brittle. If repotted 



after they have done flowering they will 
not require any further potting until the 
following season. After potting they 
may be kept under glass until we are 
quite free from frost and cold winds. 
During the summer and autumn they 
will make better growths in the open 
than they will under glass. 

The clematises are easily propagated 
by grafting. The earlier in the year this 
can be done the better. When large 
quantities are grown, one-year-old seed- 
lings of C. Vitalba are used as stocks; 
but where only a limited number of 
plants are wanted, roots can be taken 
from the plants that provide the scions 
(or grafts); it is the soft young wood 
that is used— the root may be split, and 
the graft cut of a wedge-shape After 
grafting they should be potted, keeping 
the union just below the soil. It plunged 
where there is a good bottom heat and a 
rather cool surface, they will soon unite 
and should be removed as soon as they 
begin to start into growth; it left only a 
few days too long, they will make long, 
spindly growth, which it is most desira- 
ble to avoid. After removing them to a 
cooler house, they may require a little 
shade for a few days; but after they are 
hardened off a little, they should be fully 
exposed to the sun. After they have 
made a good start they may be potted 
on into 5-inch pots; using a good, rich, 
loamy compost. Plenty of light and air 
will ensure short-jointed growths, which 
will flower well the following season. 
They should remain in the open until 
well ripened off in the autumn but those 
intended for early flowering should be 
protected from severe frosts. It is also 
advisable to avoid excessive moisture at 
the roots. 

Of the varieties belonging to the type 
referred to above, Albert Victor, Miss 
Bateman, Mrs. Quilter, Sir Garnet 
Wolsely, etc., are good examples.— 
Gardeners' Chronicle. 



OwATONNA, Minn.— Lord & Johnson 
are erecting a new house in which they 
propose to grow the standard carnations 
and try a few novelties. 

Paxton, III.— Victor A. Johnson has 
bought an interest in the Paxton Green- 
houses, and his partner, Andrew Peter- 
son, has purchased and taken charge of 
the only greenhouse estabUshment at 
Hoopeston. 



62 



The American Florist. 



Aug. i8. 



Cool Rooms for Florists' Use. 

\A paper read before the Fioristi' Club, of Phila- 
delphia, by H. C. Geiger, of the F'.oral Exchani^e, 
Philadelphia. \ 

In opening a discussion as to "the best 
methods of building cool rooms for flor- 
ists' use," we are launching our boat 
upon a comparatively unknown sea; for 
while much space in our trade journals 
has been devoted to the important sub- 
ject ol the heating of our houses for the 
production of fine flowers, but little, so 
far, has been printed about the best mode 
of caring for the product. Much depends 
upon the cutting and packing of flowers 
in order that they may reach the hands 
of the retailer and his customer in good 
order, but it is equally important that 
the storage room, in which the cut bloom 
is kept until shipment, should be built in 
as perfect a manner as can be devised. 

The subject divides itself into two 
departments, that of the retail store and 
that of the grower; and though the use 
of the words "cooling rooms" seems to 
imply that this paper should refer chiefly 
to what is needed by the grower, let me 
say a word, in passing, about the retail 
store. Unhappily we have not as yet in 
practical use any other than the one 
designation for "ice box" — a name that 
is chilling and rather repellant in many 
ways. The great advance in our profes- 
sion and the critical taste of our custom- 
ers make it quite essential that a hand- 
some flower case shall be the chief attrac- 
tion of every store. I have in mind what 
is, to my taste, the ideal store — one in 
which all the fixtures are of white mar- 
ble, the walls of white tiles and the ceil- 
ing colored in pale nile green, pink and 
silver. In this store the flower case is of 
white marble, lined with white tiles and 
is large enough for a sahsman to walk 
into it. But as such a box is beyond the 
means of most florists, let us consider 
one of more modest pretensions. 

"Many men, many minds," but it 
seems to me we can all concur in one 
thing, that the practical cooling box 
should be of plain but good design out- 
side, should have several compartments 
for displaying flowers and at least one 
large compartment for keeping stock, not 
to be visible. The glass doors must be of 
double glass with an air space between, 
the glass to be hermetically set, else 
moisture will collect between the panes. 
Many fine cases are mirror-lined but to 
my taste white tiles are preferable, as 
the}' show the flowers to better advan- 
tage and are free from the objection to 
the mirrors, of clouding in time. 

I cannot better illustrate my meaning 
than by describing a handsome case 
which was built in our city last summer 
and has given good service. It is of oak, 
four feet wide, sixteen feet long and 
about nine feet over all in height. It is 
divided into three show compartments 
separated by plates of glass, and has a 
fourth compartment closed from view by 
a mirror door. The rear wall is lined 
with mirrors, the ceiling and floor of 
white marble. Under each compartment 
is a deep drawer, zinc-lined, used for 
greens. This drawer receives its cool air 
from the compartment over it by means 
of some holes pierced in the marble floor. 
There are three ice chambers on the top, 
and the ice is put in from above. The 
lighting of this box is efiective. The 
electric globe is placed in the vent for hot 
air along the front; and while it sheds a 
glow over the whole box, it also serves 
to make an upward draught for the 
warm air to the ice chamber. The tem- 
perature of this case is, in summer, 50", 
with one and a half tons of ice weekly; 



and in winter 45°, using one ton of ice 
weekly. 

In passing to the second part I have 
several plans to offer you, which have 
the merit of having been tried and found 
successful and some of which are simple 
enough to build from by any handy man. 
Though very careful in every statement 
made here, I am only an amateur in this 
line, my sole experience having been 
obtained in the building of the successful 
room at Edgely. In building a cooling 
case or a larger cooling room, it will be 
money saved if the matter is placed in 
the hands of an expert builder, one who 
has studied the subject carefully, for, if 
the box is not built in accordance with 
scientific principles, it will be a source of 
constant expense and annoyance. 

A very effective cool room now in 
operation in Chicago is similar to a root 
house, no ice being used. The details 
have been kindly furnished by Kennicott 
Bros. Co. They are as follows: Size, 
thirty-four feet long, eleven and one-half 
feet wide and seven and one-half feet high; 
cost, $800. The walls are of stone, 
twenty-four inches thick and cemented on 
both sides to keep out the frost. The 
walls are stripped with lx2-inch strips, 
and the floor and ceiling with 2x4-inch 
strips; the spaces filled with asbestos; 
two layers of strong building paper put 



on and then the inside boarding. The 
walls come twelve inches above ground 
and have a window on each side, six 
inches high and thirty inches long, so 
that two or more windows can be 
opened to allow circulation of air. The 
windows must not be opened on the side 
on which the wind is blowing, as dust 
will come in. By watching this room 
you can keep roses for from one to three 
weeks in winter and from four to eight 
days in warmer weather. The room is 
in service from October 1 to June 1, when 
recourse is had to regular ice-boxes. If 
this room is entered direct from out- 
doors, a storm door must be built and 
the outside door must always be shut 
before the inner one is opened. This plan 
seems to recommend itself for its simplic- 
ity. Doubtless many growers have a 
cellar that could be turned into such a 
room without much expense. 

Now, we will turn our attention to the 
plan of a room which has been caring for 
the cut of some 50,000 feet of glass, 
devoted to roses alone, near Philadelphia, 
and is recommended for its simplicity. 
The size of the finished room is about 
8x12 feet and eight feet high. The side 
walls have 3x4 studs, put the three-inch 
way, then a lining of one-inch boards, 
the space between filled with powdered 
charcoal, one ton being used. Next 




•DETAIL PLAN2- 

SCALE 1/2 IN. 
PLAN OF A COOLING ROOM IN USE NEAR PHILADELPHIA. 



I goo. 



The American Florist. 



63 




DETAILS or PLAN 3. 

SCALE l/i.x. 



DETAIL SKETCH OF COOLING ROOM OF THE FLORAL EXCHANGE, EDGELY, PA. 



comes, on each side, an air space of one 
inch; then a lining of boards; another 
one-inch air space and a final lining of 
boards inside; then on the outside the 
drop siding, making a wall thirteen 
inchesthick over all, with four air spaces, 
each one lined with building paper, sides 
as well as ceiling, and six linings of 
boards. The ceiling is made in a similar 
way except that the rafters are six inches 
deep, giving a six-inch space to be filled 
with charcoal. The ceiling is made to 
have a slight rise and two one-inch pipes 
are run through the ceiling, at the high- 
est point, to allow escape of hot air. 
These pipes have a metal cap in the cool 
room, to control the outlet. The floor is 
of cement, with a link of terra cotta pipe, 
set upright, with the bell of the pipe flush 
with the floor. At the bottom of the pipe, 
which is three feet long, is a French drain, 
so that surplus water can be disposed of 
without carrying it out. 

The ice bunker is made large enough to 
receive cakes of artificial ice, is lined with 
galvanized iron and runs the entire length 
of the box, where the drip runs off in an 
iron pipe to a small barrel, from which 
an overflow pipe runs outside. This 
bunker, into which the ice is put from 
outside, works well; but it seams feasible 
to assume that it would give off' more 
cold air if openings were made on the 
sides low down, the only opening at 
present being all along the top, which 
must do duty as an escape for cold air 
and an intake of warmer air. This box 
was always quite dry when seen by me, 
and the flowers sold from it speak for 
themselves. The owner offers the sug- 
gestion that an air-loft with a shingle 
roof be built over it to keep off the sun 
and to give air circulation. The ice bill 
is $2 per week in summer and $1 in fall; 
and often there is none in winter. The 
room is entered from the packing shed; 
the door is made as thick as the walls 
and rebated in regular refrigerator style. 
I am not able to give the cost of this box, 



but any carpenter can supply the figures, 
as it is of simple construction. 

A letter just to hand from the owner of 
the box contains the following: "While 
any carpenter can build this box, it is a 
broad question with us whether it would 
not be economy, in the first place, to 
employ a practical refrigerator builder; in 
other words, while the expense at the 
first off-start might be greater, would 
there not be economy, in the long run, by 
the saving in the consumption of ice and 
the consequent less expenditure on that 
item? It takes practical knowledge to 
build cooling rooms for roses as well as it 
does to grow roses." All of which agrees 
with my remark in a foregoing part of 
this paper. 

In constructing the cooling room which 
we find very successful at the nurseries of 
the Floral Exchange, Edgely, we had at 
hand an icehouse 14x18 feet, adjoining 
our packing room, which we used as a 
basis. We first stripped the stone walls 
with 2x3-inch strips, then put on two 
linings of one-inch boards and four layers 
of heavy paper, the inside lining being of 
poplar. The sub-ceiling had four linings 
of boards and four layers of paper. It is 
important to let the paper lap around 
the corners of the box and to use a 
quarter-round bead to cover the joint 
after the lining is up. The floor had a 
bed of ashes, then three inches of granu- 
lated cork, in which were laid the sleepers 
to receive the yellow pine flooring. This 
plan was adopted by the builder, owing 
to the damp nature of our ground at 
that point. One small window, double 
glazed, opens to the north. The ice 
bunker, well designed for its purpose, 
runs across the center of the box, the ice 
being put in from the outside. The size 
of the bunker is five feet wide overall, 
three feet nine inches high and twelve 
feet long, holding two tons of artificial 
ice. Cold air is emitted from the lowest 
point and also from six openings, one 
and a half inches wide, running the whole 



length of both sides of the bunker. The 
warm air strikes the covered sides' of the 
bunker and finds its way to the top. For 
fuller explanation see detail sketch. The 
drain is run off in a metal pipe covered 
with wood to avoid moisture. Overhead 
we have an air loft three feet high, with 
openings on three sides and a vent in the 
roof. The racks for the shelving are 
made of three-quarter-inch pipe, and the 
shelves are of poplar, this being the best 
wood to use for all inside work. 

The size of the room is fourteen feet 
long, twelve feet wide and ten feet high. 
We can put in it 10,000 roses at onetime 
if necessary. We have tested the keeping 
quality, with the result that roses kept 
for two weeks, provided they were not 
sprinkled before they were placed in the 
room. The temperature varies from 50° 
with an outside temperature of 97°, to 
45° in winter. In extreme weather, when 
the thermometer was 10° above, the 
temperature got as low as 28°, as we 
were running the room without any ice 
at all; but upon our placing some ice in 
the bunker, the temperature rose to 42° 
and we had no further trouble. The 
weekly requirement is two tons in sum- 
mer and one-half ton in winter, but from 
this same supply we get all the ice that 
is used in packing roses for shipment. 
This room is free from moisture, and one 
can light a match on any part of it. Its 
cost was $300, this being only for the 
interior work, as the walls and roof were 
already in place. Letters patent cover 
the design of the bunker used in this 
room. Any one wishing to use it will 
please address the Thackara Refrigerator 
Co., Philadelphia. 

At Hinsdale, 111., we may study what 
has been called "the best cooling room in 
the west." The details have been kindlv 
furnished by Bassett & Washburn, who 
write that the house was designed for 
them by the general superintendent of 
the Armour Refrigerating Company and 
that he has spent much time in perfecting 



64 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 1 8 



the plans for it. This is a large aflair, 
being fifty leet long, twenty-four feet 
wide and twenty-eight feet high from 
basement floor to the eaves. It cost, a 
few years ago, $1,500, but Bassett & 
Washburn think it could not be dupli- 
cated now for less than $2,500. The 
size is larger than is needed by most of 
us, but the construction can be applied 
to smaller houses. The basement, of 
stone, is eight feet high, and the walls 
are cemented on both sides. The floor is 
four feet below the ground level, is made 
of cement and drained by two 3-inch 
drains. Two small double-glazed win- 
dows give light. The upper walls are 
built as foils. The uprights are made of 
2x6 inch joists, sheathed on the outside 
with 1-inch boards; with then a layer of 
heavy wax paper, on which are nailed 
1x2 inch strips, to form an air space and 
to take the drop siding. On the inside 
first comes the sheathing of 1-inch boards 
against the studs, then a layer of best 
1-inch hair felt, fastened in place by 1x2- 
inch strips and covered with a layer of 
wax paper. Over this comes the last 
line of 1-inch sheathing boards, on which 
are nailed 2x2-inch strips to keep the ice 
from bruising the lining, making a wall 
thirteen inches thick, exclusive of the 
2x2-inch strips. A sub-ceiling ( details 
not sent) separates the ice chamber from 
the air loft, which has a high pitch, shin- 
gle roof with vents in the ends and two 
in the peak. The frame sides above the 
stone basement are twenty feet high to 
the eaves, and on one side is provided a 
door through which ice may be put in. 
The house will hold 150 tons, but ordi- 
narily only 125 tons are put in; and 
when once filled the house is not re-opened 
until the next year's supply is secured. 

The cooling of the flower room is 
accomplished in this way. Beams4-xl2 
inches, placed eight inches apart, run 
across the ceiling, to support the weight 
of ice above. A zinc floor is then laid 
over the beams, covering the entire space, 
wi th a " V-shaped" gutter formed bet ween 
each beam. In this gutter is collected 
the drip from the ice-chamber, cooling by 
contact the air of the storage room. 
During warm weather moisture forms on 
the gutter, caused by the frequent open- 
ing of the door to bring flowers in. This 
has been overcome by making small gut- 
ters of wood under the zinc, to catch the 
drip, which is slight at any time and only 
occurs in hot weather. All drips are col- 
lected in closed drains and run outside. 
On the zinc floor of the ice-chamber are 
placed 2x4 inch joists, six inches apart, 
to receive the ice and protect the zinc 
floor from injury. Warm air vents run 
independently from the ceiling of the 
flower room to outdoors to remove 
warm air. What moisture is needed is 
obtained from the pots of water in which 
flowers are placed. Bassett & Wash- 
burn recommend that a large vestibule 
be built in front of the door to the cool 
room, to prevent the rush of hot air 
every time the door is opened. It is also 
an excellent place in which to keep carna- 
tions, lilies of the valley, sweet peas, vio- 
lets and Harrisii lilies, by hanging a cur- 
tain in front of them to keep the air off. 
While this house was costly to build, the 
owners write that they would not be 
without it for ten times its cost and if it 
gives them the same comfort that ours 
gives us, we can very easily believe 
them. 

Many of us hope that the day of ice is 
passing away and that we may find it 
to our advantage to put ammonia plants 
in large places. I am indebted to Samuel 
S. Pennock for the following description 



of his successful plant, and beg to read 
his letter in full. 

"The cost of plant,including compressor, 
electric motor, condenser, belting, shaft- 
ing, piping, cooling tank, small outfit for 
making fifty pounds of ice daily, placing 
all machinery, piping, etc., in position, 
also including insulation of two rooms, 
each twenty-one feet long, ten feet wide 
and eleven feet high, with shelving and 
two patent doors, was about $2,700, 
not including the outside wall of the 
building. Each room gives us about 450 
square feet of shelving area. The tem- 
perature is kept at about 50° in summer 
and at 40° to 45° in winter. When the 
thermometer outside is 40° or less, the 
machine does not have to run, as we 
open the windows and admit the cold 
air from outside. The windows are 
tripple-glazed and have an adjustment 
of "daylight" prisms to give service in 
the day and save electric light. During 
warm weather the machine has to be run 
about four to five hours a day, at a cost 
of 30 cents an hour. Of course if the 
doors are being opened and shut with 



unusual fre(|uency, then the machine has 
to be run longer. The running of the 
machine re(|uires very little time and 
attention, any careful, level-headed man 
being able to run it. Ten to fifteen dol- 
lars' worth of ammonia is needed in a 
year. 

"Our system is the direct expansion 
ammonia system, which is preferable in 
small plants, and was installed by the 
Remington Machine Co., of Wilmington, 
Del. We have been very much pleased 
with the results so far, for, besides being 
a great help and convenience to us in our 
business, it is much cheaper in cooling a 
space of the same size than with ice, and 
gives a more satisfactory air. The air is 
drier, and for carnations there is no com- 
parison, as it keeps them two or three 
times as well. The rooms are so arranged 
that one may walk in. They have a tier 
of shelves around the sides and a tier in 
the middle with alleyways between, 
access being had to every part. The 
pipes are all overhead, with drip pans 
underneath to carry off the water when 
the frost on the pipes melts. The cold 




•DETAIL PLAN 4- • 
SCALE l'/2lN. 

DESIGN OF BASSETT & WASHBURN'S COOL HOUSE AT HINSDALE, ILL. 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



65 



air opening runs down the center of the 
room, and the warm air intakes on the 
sides. The cold storage people are very 
particular to have the room well insu- 
lated, and in ours the insulation, which 
was pat in by the Ridgway Co., consists 
of the following: First, a coat of asphalt 
paint on the brick walls; then a 2-inch 
space filled with ground cork; then two 
's-inch yellow pine boards, tongued and 
grooved, with layers of brown building 
paper between them. Next come five 
layers of paper with lA-inch air space 
between each; then two more "s-inch 
boards, t. and g. yellow pine, with two 
layers of paper. The floor rests on brick 
arches coated with asphalt, then a good 
layer of locomotive brieze, finished oft" 
with a layer of cement. The cooling 
apparatus is directly under the floor. 
The entrance door (made by Stephenson, 
of Chester, Pa.,) is very satisfactory, as 
it does not bind and the latch works 
easily with one hand." 

The letter of Mr. Pennock is surely to 
the point and I recognize that we are 
all indebted to him for the most valuable 
part of this paper. 

In conclusion I would like to call your 
attention to an article that is worth a 
trial by those of you who are troubled 
with damp air in your cool rooms. It is 
a preparation of the Pennsylvania Salt 
Manufacturing Co., which can be had at 
groceries and drug stores at a cost of 25 
cents a package, and is named "Humid- 
ine." My attention was called to it by 
one of our wholesale dealers, who had 
tried it for two months with the result 
that his box was perfectly dry and he 
could then keep carnations and sweet 
peas where formerly the drip and moist- 
ure in the box were quite detrimental to 
them. One package was enough for two 
months in a box 4x10 feet. 



Celosia Pyramidalis. 



Get a good strain of Celosia pyramid- 
alis of either the crimson or yellosr 
variety, and you will find them most use- 
ful for the conservatory, bedding, or as 
market plants for decorations. During 
the last week I have used a number of 
plants of the crimson variety for three 
successive decorations and they came 
home looking none the worse for their 
outing. Unfortunately they come in a 
little late for the season when such 
material is most in demand, but they 
compensate for this by the fact that they 
last such a long time, and when trade is 
intermittent this is a decided advantage, 
for they will brighten the store and may 
be depended upon for any emergency. 

Now with regard to their culture; the 
seeds should be sown early in February, 
the young plants to be grown on in heat 
and as close to the glass as possible. 
They should be kept in the small pots 
until the flower spikes show, when they 
may be potted on, using good, rich com- 
post and potting firmly. They may be 
kept in heat until the feathery spikes of 
the inflorescence are well developed, after 
which they may be exposed to cooler 
treatment or planted out. Fully exposed 
to all the light and sun the crimson 
variety will be very bright and the same 
plants will last in good condition well 
on through the autumn. Plants with the 
feathery portion well developed and few 
flowers last much longer than those upon 
which the real flowers are plentiful. A 
liberal supply of manure when the pots 
are filled with roots will materially aid 
in the development of the flower beads. 

H. 




NEPHROLEPIS WITTBOLDM. 



■Wittbolds' Nephrolepis. 

The George Wittbold Company will 
next month begin the distribution of 
plants of the fern which they have regis- 
tered with the Society of American Flo- 
rists as Nephrolepis Wittboldii and to 
which reference has b<en made in these 
columns from time to time during the 
past three years. It was in 1897 that 
the parent plant of their stock appeared 
in a bench of the Boston fern. It was so 
distinct that it was set aside, but little 
attention was paid to it for a year or so; 
then the patronymic of the firm was 
attached to it and its ultimate introduc- 
tion to the trade decided upon. It is a 
rapid, robust grower and the stock now 
numbers more than 4,000 plants. The 
illustration shows the general character 
of the plant. The Wittbolds claim for it 
all the merits of the Boston fern, with 
added grace and fronds three times the 
width of those of equal length on the 
Boston fern. The convolutions of the 
pinnae are one of its distinctive charac- 
teristics. 



When in Doubt— Send Flowers. 

"When in doubt, lead flowers"— such 
would seem to be the cardinal rule in the 
social game. The flower, in fact, has 
come to be an established factor in the 
economy of society— an important part 
of its subsidiary coinage, so to speak. 
It congratulates, it condoles, it acknowl- 
edges; therefore its uses and misuses and 
abuses are well worth a moment's con- 
sideration. 

In Mr. Aldrich's well-known verses 
three roses, plucked from the same bush 
(or sold over the same counter — for the 
blight of "business" is upon the whole 
floral kingdom), meet three diverse des- 
tinies. What would have been the fate 
of a fourth? Would it have withered in 
the hot, vitiated air of a ballroom, or 
frozen during a late November constitu- 
tional from house to office, or— worst of 
all— have been forced to adorn the tri- 



umph of some alderman-elect? For the 
flower has finally been pushed into poli- 
tics; it cooperates with other flowers to 
compose "tributes." May the very 
excesses that have followed its advent 
into the municipal council chamber lead 
us back presently to the region of sense 
and propriety! When the chaste hands 
of Alderman Hooligan's supporters 
"brin^ lilies" to celebrate the return of 
the crime-broker- in-chief to his honored 
post, or when Alderman Casey's 
"Indians" jubilate over the success of 
toughness by means of a seven-foot chief- 
tain done, tomahawk and all, in red 
carnations— then, surel3' the pathway 
tovvard reform should invite us, nor 
invite us in vain. 

Essentially the carnation Indian is no 
worse than the "broken column" or the 
"wedding bell;" theresults form the same 
idea pushed a little further, and denote a 
like perversity of thought and a like 
falsity of taste. Let us banish the incon- 
gruous, which is often only another word 
for the over-ingenious. In the case of 
flowers, a little right feeling is worth all 
the ingenuity and "appropriateness" in 
the world. Let us revolt from the rule 
of the professional florist, whose taste is 
usually as bad as that of the professional 
hairdresser, and whose virtuosity, when 
allowed its way unchecked, is as far- 
fetched and intolerable. 

And along with incongruity, let us 
banish lavishness. Mass, bulk, mixture, 
pressure— all these are death to the 
flower. Try, with the Japanese, to con- 
sider the flower as an individual, and 
treat it with the sentiment that an indi- 
vidual may inspire; nobody can care tor a 
mob — not even a mob done up in a flounce 
of lace paper. If a bouquet is really 
imperative, then let it follow the slow 
suavity of an andante; between a scram- 
ble of sound and a jumble of color there 
is but little choice. Avoid both. Give 
each note, each flower its chance. In 
brief, the flower asks of us only what the 
material employed in every art and 
metier may ask from the shaping and 



G6 



The American Florist. 



Aug. J 8, 



directing hand. The rules are but two — 
moderation and harmony. "Do not 
heap us up, do not join us together; such 
excess is vulgar. Do not wire us on 
toothpicks and force us into the simili- 
tude of all the 'appropriate' objects to 
be encountered in the heavens above or 
in the earth beneath; such misplaced and 
misjudged ingenuity is heinous — a stout 
negation of any claim to taste, to senti- 
ment, to respect for nature's finest han- 
diwork." — Saturday Evening Post. 



A Simple Bench Support. 

The accompanying illustration shows 
a simple device which John D. Twombly 
is using as a bench support at Winches- 
ter, Mass. It is just a rough casting 
made to fit down over the end of a piece 
of pipe; it just sits on and is not screwed. 
The upper part is fitted to hold up a 
cross pipe of the same size. This sug- 
gests a good use to which old, discarded 
pipe may be put, one of its best features 
being that it can be taken apart in a 
moment. 



Canadian Horticultural Association. 

The third annual convention of the S. 
A. F. of the Dominion was convened at 
Natural History Hall, Montreal, Can., 
on Thursday, August 16, the acting- 
mayor of the city delivering an address 
of welcome in the unavoidable absence 
of Mayor Prefontaine. The convention 
was a success from the moment of coming 
to order, the attendance being satisfac- 
tory and the interest very much alive. 

The welcome to the city was responded 
to by F. C. Miller, of Toronto, who was 
followed by President James McKenna, 
who made bis annual address. Secretary 
A. H. Ewing presented his annual report, 
in which he related the work of the 
Association during its brief career, and 
particularly since the Ottawa convention 
a year ago, and Treasurer John H. Dun- 
lop reported upon the financial condition 
of the organization, which has $36.50 in 
the bank. 

A resolution of condolence was adopted 
and ordered sent to the family of the late 
first vice-president of the society, H. Dale, 
of Brampton. A resolution was adopted 
requesting the federal government to 
have Canada represented at the Pan- 
American Exposition in 1901. 

The evening session on Thursday was 
opened by the president, who introduced 
Dr. Campbell, who spoke a few words in 
favorofwild flowers. S. S. Bain, of Mon- 
treal, read his paper, "The Advantages of 
Organization in Our Business," and J. H. 
Dunlop, of Toronto, discussed "koses 
lIp-to-Date." G. Robinson, president of 
the Montreal Gardeners' and Florists' 
Club, addressed the association on the 
subject, "How to Make a Private Place 
Most Attractive." Each paper was 
followed by a lively discussion. 

The second day's session of the society 
was favored by very fine weather and 
showed increased attendance. The essay 
of Prof James Fletcher came by mail 
and was read by H. Simmers; it was 
followed by a lively discussion of insecti- 
cides and plant diseases. T. Manton, of 
Eglinton was then heard on the subject 
of "Herbaceous Plants," and made his 
remarks decidedly interesting. A gentle- 
man from Nova Scotia talked on condi- 
tions in his district, and then the ques- 
tion of wages for greenhouse employes 
came up for discussion. S. S. Bain, J. H. 
Dunlop and others spoke and Wm. Scott, 
of Buffalo, contributed not a little to 
this and other debates. 



Wm. Gammage, who is some times 
called the father of the Canadian Horti- 
cultural Association, invited the society 
to meet at London next year, and the 
vote in favor was unanimous. 

The various recreative features of the 
programme were conducted as planned 
and the convention was pronounced by 
far the best in the history of the organi- 
zation. G. V. 



New York. 

ROUSING MEETING OF THE FLORISTS' CLUB. 
— CONVENTION PRELIMINARIES PRO- 
NOUNCED COMPLETE. — ORATORY AND 
MUSIC AMID SMOKE. — BUSINESS CONTIN- 
UES AT THE USUAL SUMMER LEVEL. — 
NOTES. 

The meeting of the Florists' Club on 
Monday evening, August 13, was a 
rouser. Nearly seventy-five members 
were present and if the S. A. F. conven- 
tion should confer no other benefit on 
New York than making possible the har- 
monious, fraternal atmosphere that per- 
vaded this club meeting it has in this 
alone paid well for all the effort and 
anxiety involved in the preparations. As 
to business, most of what was done was 
in connection with the final details of 
convention preparations, and, as bj' the 




DEVICE FOR BENCH SUPPORTS. 



time this meets the eye of our readers the 
machinery of the big event will have 
almost commenced to move, further 
account of this feature is not necessary, 
more than to say that there is no lack of 
either money or enthusiasm and no hitch 
of any kind in the arrangements now 
perfected to make this an event in every 
respect worthy of New York and her 
honored guest. 

A letter was received from Superintend- 
ent Scott of the Pan-American Exposi- 
tion offering to all who should apply, 
diagrams and complete information 
relative to the horticultural department 
of the exposition. J. N. May was 
appointed a committee to express in the 
form of a club resolution the sympathy 
extended by every member to Edwin 
Lonsdale and lamily in the sad bereave- 
ment that has recently overtaken them. 
Daly Bros, exhibited their beautiful pink 
sport from Geranium Contract, named 
I'aunpeck, and a favorable report on 
same was made by the exhibition com- 
mittee. 

All regular business having been at- 
tended to the meeting resolved itself into 



a "smoker" under the care of theenter- 
tainment committee. John Westcott, 
of Philadelphia, responded to a call for a 
speech by saying that after seeing the 
scores made at New York that afternoon 
his faith in Philadelphia's ability to cap- 
ture all the convention trophies had been 
rudely shaken. Sam'l Henshaw, just 
returned from Europe, gave an entertain- 
ing account of his visit to the Crystal 
Palace rose show and the sweet pea exhi- 
bition at London, also a very guarded 
narrative of what he saw in Paris. 
Harry May, home from Richmond, Ind., 
on a visit, endorsed the advice of the late 
Horace Greely and told why he liked the 
west better than the east. Mr. Philcox, 
late of St. Louis, Mr. Atkins, fresh from 
a foreign trip, and others were drawn 
upon for pleasant remarks, and Messrs. 
Plumb, Cleai-y, Butterfield, Wallace, 
Stewart, Le Moult, Schmutz, Bimie and 
Herrington contributed with great suc- 
cess to the musical department of the 
affair. A talk on the Chinese question 
by Alderman Morris and a dance by Mr. 
Hogan were received with unbounded 
enthusiasm. Altogether it was a royal 
good time. 

Business continues at the regulation 
summer notch and very little worthy of 
record has transpired during the week. 
A hail storm on Sunday afternoon took 
some of the Long Islanders by surprise, 
smashing glass more or less severely 
about Woodside, but that was nothing 
compared to the astonishment created 
by the tour of a certain Fifth avenue 
florist through Twenty-eighth street one 
morning this week endeavoring to get a 
$60 check cashed. It might as well have 
been $60,000, the Twenty-eighth street 
people say. 

Dunne & Co., who have come to be 
strong factors in the sheep manure mar- 
ket, have just installed a mill at their 
factory with capacity for pulverizing 
fifty tons a day. 

Lena Hart's store on Madison avenue 
was burned out on Friday, August 10, 



Philadelphia. 

TRADE CUT DOWN BY EXTREME HEAT.— 
SOME GOOD STOCK AVAILABLE BUT 
PRICES ARE LOW.— MINGEY LEAVES THE 
PARKS.— MICHELL'S NEW STOEB.— FINE 
PALMS AT HASRIS'.— OTHER NOTES. 

As the hot weather continues, and the 
glass now registers 100° or over in the 
shade daily, it certainly has a quieting 
effect on business. Things now seem to 
be at the lowest ebb. The peddlers who 
go the rounds every morning have a 
tired, dejected look that comes from the 
oft repeated remark, "No; nothing 
to-day." As a consequence, prices are 
away down. Very fine Kaiserins are 
offered at $2 per hundred by these gen- 
try, as good in fact, as the commission 
man from his ice box demands $4 to $5 
for. There are more of them about now, 
as the summer houses all appear to be in 
full crop. Some very fair LaFrance are 
seen; the color is better and the few 
inches of extra stem they have attained 
make a great difference in their appear- 
ance; $3 to $4 per hundred is high. 
Adolph Fahrenwold is sending some very 
fair new crop Beauties to S. S. Pennock. 
Hydrangea paniculata is in and is a 
great help to the white design artists. 
Asters are getting scarcer, particularly 
white stock. 

Thomas Mingey, who has had charge 
of Horticultural Hall and grounds in 
Fairmount Park for the past twenty-five 
years, has resigned. Mr. Mingey has 



tgoo. 



The American Florist. 



67 



displayed great ability in the manage- 
ment oi this portion of the park grounds 
and conservatories. The bedding about 
Horticultural Hall has always been 
attractive and often unique. The city 
press has frequently commented favor- 
ably in its editorial columns on its 
appearance and the long, depressed 
flower bed or plateau at the west end of 
the hall has almost a world-wide reputa- 
tion. All this has been kept up under his 
supervision and untiring attention, ae 
the appropriations have been often, if 
not always, very meager for the mainte- 
nance of this portion of the work. Here 
is an opportunity ior a public pleasure 
ground or large private estate to get a 
good superintendent, as Mr. Mingey , who 
is just now in the prime of life, with the 
knowledge derived from such long expe- 
rience, is open for such a position. 

Henry F. Michell has the alterations to 
his warehouse and storerooms, 1018 
Market street, well under way. When 
finished there will be a fine basement 
20x190 and five floors each of the same 
dimensions. A freight elevator at the 
rear and an electric passenger lift in the 
center will make all but the top floor, 
which is reserved for grass seeds, avail- 
able ior wholesale and retail business. 
It is a great improvement and when 
finished will certainly make a grand 
store, which we will take pleasure in 
further describing. 

As convention week draws near, time 
seems to fly and the day of departure 
will surely find some with work still t 
do before they can get away. Th^; 
greater number of the delegates will go 
Tuesday afternoon, but there are many 
who say that Tuesday morning will suit 
them better. When they do all getaway 
there will hardly be a corporal's guard 
left to make up the funeral designs and 
attend to the watering. It should cer- 
tainly be the banner visiting delegation. 

W. K. Harris has of late years been 
making a specialty of specimen decora- 
tive plants. The particular stars of his 
collection this season are some $75 
arecas. They are certainly dandies and 
well worth the figure, and more, to any- 
one desiring such fine stock. Boston 
ferns are now favorites and divide inter- 
est with the rubbers. "Wm. K." was 
quite a while finding out the Boston fern 
but he now has it in all sizes and whole 
houses full of each. 

The Floral Exchange trophy, the 
Queen of Edgely cup, together with the 
Detroit cup, have been displayed in Pen- 
nock Bros.' window the present week. 
They make a fine show and attract con- 
siderable attention from the passers by. 

K. 



Chicaeo. 

STATB OF THE MAHKET.— COOL, RAINY 
WEATHER SUCCEEDSTHEHEATEDTEBM. 
— STOCK GRADUALLY BECOVEEING. — 
GOOD FLOWERS SELL WELL. — SURPLUS 
OF OUTDOOR MATERIAL. — WHAT GROW- 
ERS AND BUILDERS ARE DOING. —VISITORS 
FROM AFA,R.— NOTES HERE AND THERE. 

Things are a little better this week but 
Chicago has not yet fully recovered from 
the heat of the preceding period. In 
those eight scorching days before rain 
fell forty -four people died of the heat and 
the total death record of the city reached 
the unprecedented total of 577. Of course 
there was no trade so long as the high 
temperature held, not even funeral work 
despite the many deaths, for they were 
largely among the poorest class. With 
the first cool Breath business picked up. 



and it has been increasing ever since, but 
stock has suffered so greatly under the 
fierce rays of the sun that there was 
nothing left to do business with. A fetv 
days of reasonable summer weather have 
served in a measure to restore normal 
conditions but there are now too few 
good roses and carnations and too many 
that are distinctly bad. The demand for 
short Beauties is more nearly up to the 
supply but low prices still rule. The 
general average of all sales is also low 
because of the fact that very little ca-i be 
done with the indiflerent material which 
predominates. Sweet peas pre not so 
plentiful but asters, gladioli and other 
summer flowers are still too many, cheap 
and slow sale. Of asters, particularly, 
the overstock is decided. There is con- 
siderable good stock but a great deal 
more that is almost unsalable at any 
price. It is facetiously related that some 
of the retailers who are occasionally 
favored with funeral orders now procure 
their material by standing in the door 
of some wholesaler's singing "Annie 
Rooney" or "Two Little Girls in Blue" 
until they have accumulated the required 
number of bouquets of asters, which 
doesn't take long but isn't always pleas- 
ant, for frequently some of the stock is 
pretty old. 

The Wittbold Company is in the midst 
of a very considerable improvement to 
their place. They have added a long, 
high show house on the Buckingham 
place side, to the east of the store, and 
have built two houses in the rear, each 
house equipped with five benches, one of 
them being elevated, over the center 
aisle. This elevated bench has also been 
put in all the old houses which would 
allow it, and thereby they have gained 
the bench room of another house. Anew 
boiler is being put in, a 60-foot stack is 
in course of erection and various other 
improvements are under way. 

B. J. Blameuser, of 718 Wells street, 
married Josephine Gerbel a few months 
ago and the sea of matrimony has been 
so rough of late that last week he caused 
Josephine to be confined in the Detention 
Hospital, but Dr. Hunter, of that insti- 
tution, after four days of her society, 
decided that she was not insane and 
induced Mr. Blameuser to withdraw the 
charge, with the result that his wife is 
now at the home of her relatives. 

As an indication of the prevalent feel- 
ing of prosperity, it may be cited that 
the Moninger Company has this year 
built more greenhouses than during any 
similar period in its history and is now 
greatly rushed, so busy, in fact, that 
their Mr. Rupp will miss the convention 
for the first time in years. 

U. J. Virgin, one of the leading members 
of the trade in the south, came up from 
New Orleans on Monday, taking advan- 
tage of the merchants' excursion which 
brought so many southerners to Chicago. 
He was enroute to the convention and 
will be here again for a few days on his 
way home. 

H. Schiller's new conservatory on West 
Madison street, will be a great improve- 
ment over the old place, being one of the 
best in the city, and will put him in a 
position to do a big business there next 
season. 

The Art Floral Co. has rented the J. B. 
Seward place. Forty-seventh street "and 
Greenwood avenue, for a term of years 
and the managers contemplate building 
a store and range of greenhouses. 

Mrs. E. H. Hunt returned this week 
from the lake resort at which she has 
been resting. At the same time C. M. 
Dickinson resumed the cares of business. 



John Brod, who bought the Schiller 
greenhouses at Niles Center, now has 
two stores in town, having opened one 
at 616 Wells street and purchased R. 
Kitzinger's place at 867 Milwaukee ave- 
nue. 

C. L. Washburn's family is summering 
near Muskegon, Mich., with a party of 
Hinsdale people, and Mr. Washburn goes 
over nearly every week to spend Sunday 
and perhaps a few other days. 

George M. Garland, whose iron gutters 
are a feature of nearly all important 
greenhouse establishments in the west, 
will attend the convention and exhibit 
his specialty. 

A. L. Randall is still at St. Joseph, 
Mich., where he went early in July, and 
is feeling foot loose and fancy free, with 
C. H. Fisk assuming the cares of the 
business. 

John Blanck, at 160.Forty-third street, 
has renovated his establishment and is 
now resplendent in a new dress of white 
paint. He had a good season and expects 
another. 

S. Garland, father of the iron gutter 
man will attend the convention. He was 
a western grower long before the war, 
when the population of Chicago was 
30,000. 

Daniel Branch has two big sago palms 
in front of his place on Indiana avenue, 
a sign which he who runs may read that 
an up-to-date flower business is close at 
hand. 

Out at Washington Park Fred. Kanst 
has the geraniums and cannas in most 
attractive form. The latter advanced 
rapidly in the recent hot weather. 

Walter Retzer is busy repairing the 
two high pressure boilers which heat 
his place and getting things into shape 
for a cold winter. 

W. L. Palinsky is building a new and 
modern store at 66 Palmer avenue, with 
a palm house 18x75. 

Vaughan's Seed Store-and W. W. Bar- 
nard & Co. are now showing fine lines of 
seasonable bulbs. 

McKellar & Winterson have just 
received a carload of fine new designs in 
metal wreaths. 

E. Hobbs, out on Indiana avenue, is 
remodeling and modernizing part of his 
glass. 

Mrs. Horton, of Bassett & Washburn's, 
leaves to-day for two weeks in Colorado. 

Visitors: Albert Haish,of the Memphis 
Floral Co., Memphis, Tenn.; Wm. N. 
Campbell, secretary of the Park Nursery 
Co., Pasadena, Cal.; Emil Glauber, of 
Glauber & Webb, Denver; Chas. Siegk, 
Joliet, III.; H. C. Peterson, Lake Geneva, 
Wis. 



Westboro, Mass. — Arthur George has 
purchased the greenhouse on the Bngham 
estate and will remove it to his own 
place. 

Milwaukee, Wis.— John Mender has 
just installed aFurman boiler, purchased 
through Riemer & Radmer, who are 
working the greenhouse trade thor- 
oughly. 

Bangor, Me.— Bangor's floral parade 
on August 9 was very successful. Many 
of the carriages, especially those decorated 
by Carl Beers, received favorable mention 
from the press and people. Among the 
many elaborate decorations the six-horse 
coach occupied by the Tarratine Club and 
decorated in yellow and white, proved 
very attractive. The float owned by 
Louis Kirstein, representing Real Estate, 
was very artistic. 



68 



The American Florist, 



Aug. i8. 




Subscription, 11.00 a year. To Europe, 12.00. 

Subscriptions accepted only from those 

in the trade. 

Advertisements on all except cover pages, 

10 Cents a Line, Agate; $1.00 per incn. 

Cash with Order. 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO.. CHICAGO. 

THIS ISSUE 76 PAGES WITH COVERS. 



CONTENTS. 

New York hotels 53 

Right for right's sake 63 

History of thi' S. A. F. medal (illus.) 64 

Plant life of New Zealand (illus.) 55 

^lidsummer notes on aq uatics 56 

The calssification of sweet peas 66 

New rose Pink Pearl (illus.) 57 

Summer work in the greenhouses 57 

Campanula isophylla Mayii (illus.) 58 

Dahlia notes 58 

< 'arnations— Solid beds versus benches .59 

Chrysanthemums — Gulf coast notes 59 

Roses — Diseased Brides and Bridesmaids 60 

A hint to convcntionites 60 

AVith the growers— Peter Relnberg, Chicago, 

111., (illus.) 60 

Clematises for pot culture 61 

Cool rooms for florists' use (illus.) 6'J 

Celosia pyramidalis 65 

Wittbolds' nephrolepis (illus.) 65 

When in doubt— send rtower.s 65 

A simple bench support (illus.) 66 

Canadian Horticultural Association 66 

New York 66 

Philadelphia 66 

Chicago 67 

Fragrant mignonette 68 

Society of American Florists 68 

The white fly 68 

Greenhouse "building 68 

Obituary— Father Langlois 69 

— Louis Menatid 69 

—David G. Yates 69 

The seed trade 74 

— Onion sets 74 

Juries at the Paris Exposition 74 

The nursery trade 76 

—At the Douglas nurseries (illus.) 76 

Our pastimes— At Detroit 78 

—At Flatbush 78 

— At Philadelphia 78 

— At Chicago 78 

—At New 'York 78 

— Convention trophies 78 

St. Louis 78 

'I'he Pan-American Exposition 80 

Worcester, Mass 88 

Grand Rapids W 

About novelties 9:2 

Seeds and temperature 96 

Helpful reijiinders 98 

Denver 100 

Baltimore 100 

Washington 102 

Buffalo 108 

Seattle 114 

Doronie.ums 116 

Northern seeds 118 



There has been a slight re(3uction in 
the price of double strength glass, except 
on greenhouse sizes. 

All convention visitors are requested 
to add the letters "S. A. F." after their 
names on the hotel registers. 

The price of iron pipe, which has been 
soaring, is again within reach of a man 
with a moderately long pocketbook. 

There may be some delay in starting 
the glass factories September 1 because 
of a difficulty over the question of wages. 

Michael Winandy, the veteran green- 
house builder, says that by the use of 
iron gutters he can save ten per cent in 
the cost of construction. 

There will be a supply of New York 
souvenir postal cards at the American 
Florist stand in the convention exhibi- 
tion hall. Ask the man for one. 

The American Florist Company's 
Directory supplies the only complete 
list of florists, nurserymen and seedsmen 
of America. It is invaluable to whole- 
salers. 

The first session of the New York con- 
vention of the S. A. F. will be called to 
order at 9:30 a. m., Tuesday, August 21, 
instead of at 10:30 as announced in the 
preliminary programme. 

Genistas plunged outside should be 
partially lifted two or three weeks before 
taking in and the overlapping roots cut 
about one-half, thus inducing the plants 
to make fibrous roots in the pot and 
guarding against a sudden check in tak- 
ing them in. 

The next issue of the American 
Florist will contain a complete report 
of what cannot fail to be the greatest 
convention of the S. A. F. It will be a 
particularly valuable advertising me- 
dium. Send copy at once. 

In view of the present scarcity of large 
sizes of Easter lily bulbs, renewed inter- 
est attaches to the illustrated article 
showing what Robert Craig & Son 
accomplished in 1899 by planting three 
5-7's in a 6-inch pot. The article 
appeared on page 14(3 of the American 
Florist for September 2, 1899. 

The late Benjamin Cant, the famous 
English rose grower, who died at Col- 
chester recently, made his first great hit 
with roses in 1853, when he secured 
Oloire de Dijon, Jules Margottin and 
General Jacqueminot. In the course of 
his life he won 2080 silver cups, pieces of 
plate and first prizes for roses. 



Fragrant Mignonette. 

Ed. Am. Florist:— Please state which 
variety of mignonette is the most fra- 
grant? Size of spikes is a secondary con- 
sideration. H. N. 

The most fragrant mignonette, all 
things considered,is the true Miles' Hybrid 
Spiral, but there are several factors 
which afl'ect the fragrance of mignonette 
and if it is grown under unfavorable condi- 
tions, the odor is very materially dam- 
aged. To produce the sweet, refreshing 
fragrance it should be grown cool, with 
an abundance of air in all favorable 
weather, and when cut and put in water 
it should never be allowed to stay in the 
same water over twelve hours, but should 
be changed at least twice daily, cutting a 
small piece off the bottom of the stem 
each time the water is changed. Then 
mignonette can be kept sweet in an ordi- 
nary dwelling room temperature for six 
or eight days. John N. May. 



Society of American Florists. 

DEPARTMENT OF PLANT VEGISTRATION. 

The Geo. Wittbold Co., Chicago, 111., 
registers Nephrolepis Wittboldii, origin- 
ated in 1897. Fronds two and one-half to 
three feet long and ten to twelve inches 
wide; pinna; undulating or wavy in all 
growths; texture leathery. 

Wm. J. Stewart, Sec'y. 



The White Fly. 



Ed. Am. Florist: — I am troubled with 
a white fly in the greenhouses during the 
winter months and wish to know of a 
remedy. Unlike many other greenhouse 
pests, this one flies. It seems to favor the 
heliotrope, tomato and cucumber. It is 
very plentiful toward the latter part of 
spring and hard to destroy. Tobacco 
smoke appears to have no effect on it and 
I have used slug shot, tobacco dust end 
fir tree oil without success. About a 
month ago I cleaned out one house and 
gave it a thorough fumigation with sul- 
phur; but now I find a few of the pests 
are making their appearance again. 

W. D. T. 

There is only one sure remedy for the 
white fly that infests tomatoes, etc. It 
is the X 1 all fumigating compound. This 
is costly apparently, but not really. Try 
a sample 2-ounce bottle and use according 
to directions. It will kill all aphides, 
thrips and mealy bugs. E. O. Orpet. 



Greenhouse Building. 

Blackington, Mass.— Geo. H. Phelps, 
one house. 

Westboro, Mass. — A. H. Brown, two 
houses. 

Westerly, R. I — S.J. Renter, six bouses. 

No. Beverly, Mass. — C. Morrissey, one 
house. 

Newport, R. I.— E. J. Berwind, range 
oi houses. 

Lynn, Mass — Smith & Dolanski; car- 
nation house 18x100. 

Minneapolis, Minn. — John Monson, 
five houses 16x150, one 30x50. 

Maiden, Mass — Ed. Kaulback & Son, 
two houses 20x100. 

Des Plaines, 111.— Warren Garland, two 
houses 27x250. 

Melrose Highlands, Mass.— J. Walsh 
& Son, house 35x90. 

Saugus, Mass. — A. Rhodes, house 
20x75. 

Lapeer, Mich. — W. H. Watson, range 
of 30,000 feet. 

Waukesha, Wis.— Andrew Butchart, 
one house. 

Coldwater, Mich.— D. Vogt, two houses 
18x80. 

Carlinville, 111.— Browne Bros., one 
carnation house. 

lola, Kans. — Mrs. Geo. Waite, two 
houses 20x60. A. L. Harmon, two 
houses 20x85, one 20x70. 

Wausau, Wis. — Chris. Lund, carnation 
house 20x50. 

Arlington, Md. — E. A. Seidewitz, range 
of houses. 

Danvers Centre, Mass. — B. F. Arnold, 
violet house 25x60. 

Washington, D. C— Geo. A. Leissler, 
two houses 18x100. 

Osvatonna, Minn.— Lord & Johnson, 
carnation house 10x100. 

Rossville, 111. — Jos. Culbert, house 
16x106; one 16x80. 

Sudbury, Mass. — Geo. Hemingway, 
one house. 

New Haven, Conn. — F. G. Horn, violet 
house 15x100. 

Albany, N. Y. — L. Menand, house 
24-xlOO. 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



69 



OBITUARY. 

FATHER LANGLOIS. 

Father A. B. Langlois, an authority on 
Louisiana botany, died at Martinsville, 
La., August 1, aged sixty-nine. 

LOUIS MENAND. 

Louis Menand, the veteran florist of 
Albany, N. Y., died at his home August 
15, aged 93. The late Mr. Menand's 
name is quite familiar to our readers, 
more especially on account of his auto- 
biographical notes which appeared in 
these columns some years ago. Mr. 
Menand's entire life was devoted to hor- 
ticulture. He was a native of Burgundy, 
France, and arrived in this country Sep- 
tember 7, 1837. 

DAVID G. VAXES. 

David G. Yates, a prominent nursery- 
man of Germantown, Philadelphia, died 
suddenly at Holland Springs, Maine, on 
Saturday, August 11, in his 64th year. 
The nursery was formerly conducted by 
Miller & Yates. Charles Miller, who is 
landscape gardener of Fairmount Park, 
sold out some years ago to Mr. Yates, 
who has since conducted the business 
under the firm name of David G. Yates & 
Co., although he was the sole owner. 



Brampton, Ont.— It is estimated that 
the Henry Dale estate is worth $55,000, 
of that sum $15,000 being in personal 
property. 

Springfield, O. — McGregor Bros, have 
incorporated with $50,000 capital stock. 
The incorporators are Frank, David, 
Harold, Roy and Allan McGregor. 

SITUATIONS. WANTS FOR SALE. 



Adrertlsementfl under tills head will be Inserted at 
the rate of 10 oenta a line (seven words) each Inser- 
tiOn. Cash mnst acoompany order. Plant adTS. not 
admitted under this head. 

Byerypald subscriber to the AMIKIOAS FLORUIT 
tor the year HOC Is entitled to a flve-Une want abv 
(altuatloni only) free to be oied at any time dnrlnt 
the year. 

SITUATION WANTED— By reliable all-around gar- 
dener and tlorlsti 12 years with orchids; English; 
worker. Address Florist, care Am Florist. 

SITUATION WANTED-By a sober, Industrious 
man. as experienced tlorlst and gardener. I prefer 
a small place. Address W H.caie Am. Florist. 

SITUATION WANTED— As manager or head gar- 
dener on private estate; good all-around man; 
German, married, no children. Best of references. 
Address C N C, care American Florlat. 

SITUATION WANTED — As foreman; (uccessful 
growerof cut flowers ard plants; capable of tak- 
ing charge; single; age 38; 21 years' experience. Ref- 
erences. Address B H E. 

2" Betkwlih Are., Cleveland, O. 

y ITUATION WANTED— As foreman, by a nrst class 
O grower of roses and cut fl ,wers; general plants- 
man; single, age 33 A first class place wanted. Best 
of references. Open for engagement now or later. 
Address Growbb, care American Florist. 

SITUATION WANTED— As foreman by a first class 
grower of roses, carnations, "mums, violets and 
decorative plsnts and forcer of bulLs. Only a flrat- 
clasB place where good wages are given. Good refer- 
ences. D P N, 24'.) N TenthSt , Phlladelpha, Pa 

ANTED— Man as assistant In carnation and rose 
houses. Call or write Geo. Beinber?. 
301 Balmoral Ave Chicago, III. 



w 



w 



ANTED— Address of Louis Tnixler, a practical 
and ornamental tiortst 

Thus B. Bull, Bakersfleld, Cal 



WANTEIV-Florlst for roses and Reneral stock. 
State wages wlh board, and send references. 
Address I. L. PiLLSBURv. GalesburK, 111. 

WANTED— The address of Wm Lyons, formerly 
of Rlcbmond, Va He will find It to his advan- 
taK9 to send tt to C T, care American Florist. 

WANTED— Reliable, competent man. Fine roses, 
'Mums, etc. Also assistant. Address 
J.T. WILLIAMSON. LaRose Gardens. Memph Is. Teno. 

WANTED— AsBlBtant rose grower and wlDlrg to do 
general tfreenbouBe work. Stiite wages wanted. 
References required. Addresu John hkud, 

;i4y w. North Ave , Chlcdgo. 



WANTED— Mnn who UDderstands general green- 
house work on small commercial place near 
city. Ten dollars per week and room. Call or write 
Room 15 Tribune Building, Chicago. 

WANTED An experienced gardener, must under- 
stand growing I'ernB, palms and all decorative 
plants and good bedding stutt. Address 
ART Floral Cu.. Xt07 Cottage Grove Av., Chicago. 

WANTED- A competent man to grow rosea, carna- 
tions and general greenhouse stock, to take 
charge and work. State wages wanted. Send refer- 
ences. Address M Q, oare Ameilcan Florist. 

WANTED— A girl of good appearance for flowM 
store, forty mlJes from Chicago. Board with 
employer. State experience If any and wages wanted. 
Good home and steady employment. Addrees 

E B, care American F.orlst. 

WANTED— A helper with experience, to propagate 
and do general greenhouse work ; married man 
preferred, must be siilctly temperate. State wages 
expected with house and coal furolshed. Address 
The MORRIS FLORAL Co , MorrlB. 111. 

WANTED— *n up-to-date rose grower, to take 
charge of a block of houses at a large commer 
clal place, where a good grower only Is wanted. 
Wages 135.00 and board, or S50.00 without board. 
Address 8 T, care American Florist, 

WANTED— A tlorlBt who can grow roses, carna- 
tions, 'muma and general greenhouse stutT; 
muat be a good worker: none other need apniy. State 
wages and reference: gocd salary to right party. 
Address J F M care American Florist. 

WANTED Man with some knowledge of general 
greenhouse work, to take charge or assist 
owner In small trreenhouse. State age, If any experi- 
ence, wages with or without board, etc References 
required. Lock Bo.y: 219, Sterling, Kansas. 



lOB SALE Oa RENT— Six greenhouses, dwelling, 
sheds. Bargain. W. L. Winn, White Hall III. 



F 



F 



OB SALE— Pots, from 21^ to Scinch Big bargain. 
Address Mrs. Bockelmann, White Hall, 111 



F 



OR RENT— Four greenhouses 14x71, with ofBce 
21x23, With rooms. Call at 

1144 School St., Chicago. 

FOB SALE- Free fuel, 5000 feet glass. Great ohanoe 
for florists or gardeners. Only $500 cash. Account 
sickness. Write quick. Free Fuel, care Am. Florist. 

FOR SALE— Extra good secondhand 3-Inch pipe at 
tk;. per fooi ; also Pome 4-lrch; secure Itwcllelt 
lasts. Address W. U. Salter, Rochester. N. Y. 

FOR SALE—Steam heat free, greenhouse with pip- 
ing, water works. Splendid chance for right 
party. Account lady unable to tend it. Address 
Miss Elizabeth Johnson, Bowling Green, Mo. 

FOR SALE— Entire or one-half Interest in a good 
business. Growing city of 20,0(0. Hot water; 5.000 
feet of glass. Most excellent opening to reliable per- 
fton. Must sell soon. B B A. care Am. Florist. 

FOR SALE -Lease stock etc. of place of 50 ( feet 
of glass In Chicago suburb all In good condition 
Stockflrst class and more than is needed. Will sell 
very cheap; caeh wanted. Reason for leaving am 
going to Europe. Address J D 

care American Florist Chicago. 

SALESMAN WANTED 

In our Flower Seed Department. Must be 
thoroughly familiar with Flower Seeds and 
Bulbs. Also acquainted with the Floristi' 
trade. 

W. W RAWSON & CO., Seedsmen, 

13 £ 13 FaneuU Hall Sq., BOSTON, MASS. 

A Foreman... 

To grow good Roses and Carnations. 
Married man, with small family; 
must be a steady man and a good 
worker to grow for retail store. 

M. J. LYNCH. Poyghkeepsie, N. Y. 

For Sale. 

200 boxes 10x12 and 10x14 A double 
thick glass at |3.00 per box F. O. B. Chicago 
or J2.80 on place not boxed. 

GEO. REINBERG. 



aoi Balmoral Ave., 



CHICAGO ILL. 



TO RENT. 

In a town of fifteen thou3"'nd population, 
fight miles from Boston, on main street, 
electric cars pass the door; four green- 
houses, heatea by steam, thirty thousand 
feet land. Dwelling house can be used for 
two fiimilies. Good retail trade. Apply to 

P. WELCH, 15 Province St., Boston, Mass. 



FOR SALE. 

A florist ostahlishraent for sale, consisting of 
13,000 square feet ol" glass, in good condition. 
Heated by bteani; in the city limits, located in a 
city of 18.000 inhabitants on the Mississippi river 
in Iowa, with several acres of land and dwelling 
house; must sell soon on account of old age. For 
further particulars address 

L C K, care American Florist. 



With 10 Year Lease, 

One of the best places 
in Chicago. 



FOR SALE 



This is a rare opportunity; if you have 
some cash, talk it over with me. 

T. J. CORBREY, 

I409-I4II W. Madison St., CHICAGO. 

FOR SALE 

240 acres of land on Isthmus of Tehaunte- 
pec, state of Vera Cruz, Mexico. For full 
particulars write 

ROLAND HUGHES. 

846 New York Life BIdg. KANSAS CITY, MO. 

For Sale. 

Oakland, Cal.; an elegant piece of property, 160 
feet front by 145 feet deep. Ten minutes' ride 
from the center of the city. Three large green- 
houses, each 116 t. by 25 ft., well stocked. Ele- 
gant cottage of 7 rooms. Gas fixtures and all 
conveniences. Owner compelled by circumstan 
ces to go to Alaska gold fields and must sell 
q^uickly. Cost $7,000. Will sell at great reduc- 
tion. Write for price. 

Any of the above named properties is a fine bar- 
gain, and those desiring to purchase will do well 
to communicate with us. These are only a few of 
the properties that we have for sale and leasing. 

SMITH & SMITH, 

p. 0. Box 869. 345 Sixth Ave., PITTSBURG. PA. 

For Sale. 

GREENHOUSE 
PROPERTY ^ 

At Nyack, N. Y. A plot 220x125 
feet, on which are four Rosehouses^ 
l00x(8x6, each house heated by a 
No. J 6 Hitchingfs Boiler ; and seven 
houses, each about 64xJJ ft, heated 
by flues. This property will be 
sold cheap to quick cash buyer. 

HITCHIN6S & CO., 

233 Mercer St. NEW YORK. 

NOTICK 



STOCKHOLDERS' MEETINO. 

CHICAGO, July 21, 19:0. 

Stockholders of the American Florist Comgany: 

You are hereby notifled that the annual lueeting 
of the Stockbolders of the American Florist Com- 
pany will be held in the Murray Hill Hotel, New 
York, N. v., WedneEday, August 22, 1900, at 3 
o'clock p. M., for the purpose of electing directors 
and officers for the ensuing term, and for the 
transaction of such other business as may come 
before the meet.ng. 

F. R PIERSON, Pres. 

M. BARKER, Seo'y. 

If you write to any ad veiiiser anywhere 
mention the paper in which you saw the 
ad. Both publisher and advertiser will 
like you better for it. 



70 



The American Florist. 



Aug. i8. 



Wboj^ale flower/arK^ 

Cincinnati, Aug. 16. 

Roses, Bride 2.00(" 3.00 

Bridesmaid 2.00(<i 3.00 

Meteor 3.00(" 4. CO 

Perle 2.00(ti' 3. CO 

Carnations 75«' 1.00 

fancy 1.50(<' 2.00 

Gladioli 2.0O(<! 4.00 

Tuberoses 3.00 

Asters 75e 1.50 

Lilies— Album and Rubrum 4.00y 5.00 

Smilax 12.50 

Adiantum 1.00 

Common ferns .15 

Asparagus 50.00 

St. Louis, Aug. 16. 

Roses, Bride, Bridemaid 2.00fe 4.00 

Beauty, 10 to 15 inch stems 4.00(u' 6.00 

" Perle 2.00 

" Meteor 2.00W 4.00 

Carnations, common 75(<i 1.00 

Smilax 12.50 

Adiantum 6»iai 1.00 

Tuberoses 3.00((i 5.00 

Asters 75(a 1 .50 

MiLWAUKBE, Aug. 16. 

Roses, Beauty, long, per doz. 1.50((?2.00 
t " " med •• .50<!il 00 

Bride, Bridesmaid 3.00@ 4.00 

•' Meteor 4.00('i 5.00 

Kaiserin 4.00(" 6.00 

Golden Gate 4.00 

Carnations, ordinary 1. 00 

fancy 2 00 

Auratum lilies 15.00 

Adiantum 75(u 1.00 

Common ferns .25 

Gladioli 2.00to 3 00 

Asters 50(" 1.00 

Smila.x 15.00 

Asparagus 65.00 

Galax leaves .20 

Sweet peas .15 

PiTTSBUKG, Aug. 16. 

Roses, Beauty, fancy 20. 0C(" 25.00 

" " extra lO.OOw 15 00 

" " No. 1 5.00(" 8.00 

" " culls 2.00«' 4.00 

Bride, Bridesmaid 2.00w 6.00 

" Meteor 2.00(.i 00 

Perle 2.0OW 4.00 

Cusin 2.001.1 4.00 

■ Carnations, ordinary SOm 1.00 

fancy LOOM 1.5(1 

Lily of the valley 2.00i.i 4.uO 

Sweet peas lOin .25 

Daisies 25(.. 1.00 

Smilax 12.50m 15.00 

Gladioli l.OOi'i 3 00 

Adiantum 75('i 1.00 

Asparagus 35.0C(.i .50.00 

" Spreugerii 26('_i .35 

Dagger ferns per 1000, 2.00 

Asters 50(ai 2.00 

Denver, Aug. 15. 

Roses, Beauty, select 12 SOdi'SioOO 

" " ordinary 4.00(at 8.00 

" Bride, Bridesmaid 3.00('i 5.00 

" Meteor 5.OO1.1 6.00 

" Perle, Wootton a.OOdi 5.00 

Carnations, ordinary l.OOii" 2.00 

fancy 2.0C(ii. 2 50 

Lily of the valli-y 4.00 

Callas 1 2 . 50 

Harrlsii 12.50 

Sweet peas 2Wii .30 

Asters 2.0U" 4.00 

Asparagus 60 00 

Smilax 15. 00m 18.00 

Ferns .30 



SHIPPING UBELS ^■ 

-Cut Flowers 

Printed in two colors on gummed 

fiaper; your card, etc., in blaclc and 
eaf adopted by the S. A. F. in red. 
Very attractive. Price per 500,42.85; 
per 1000, $4.60. Send for samples 

CUCTRO or THIS UAf, POSTPAID, SI.25. 

American Florist Co., 

^^^_ CHICAGO. 



'w:M ^-^"l t -m.-r- riaest Quality. 
X:M.C>AX^r» Any Quantity. 

Write us lor prices delivered at your door. 

CALDWELL The WOODSMAN CO. Inc., Evergreen. Ala. 



Everything: in the 

GUT FLOWER 

line. 




WIRE WORK, 

the kind 
that will give satisfaction. 



FLORISTS' SUPPLIES. 



HOLTON & HUNKEL CO., 



JVlll^w^tja-lc^^* Wis* 



When writing mention the American Klortei. 




LARGEST DEALERS IN 



Hardy Cut Ferns 

Make special offer of 50c per 1000. 

Send for simples of Laurel Festooning, ^c to 6c a yard. Always on hand Princess 
Pine, Galax Leaves, and Xmas Trees in tfieir seasons. We make a specialty of Laurel 
Wreaths for Xmas. Send for samples of all goods wanted. 

GROWL FERN CO., Millington, Mass. 



TELEGRAPH OFFICE, NEW SALEM, MASS. 



CUT FLOWERS. 



^^^ %^^ t^^ ^^^ 



Shipping orders receive prompt 



and careful attention. 

C. C. POLLWORTH CO., Milwaukee, Wis. 



Please Mention American t<"lorl8t. 



PITTSBURG GUT FLOWER GO., Ltd. 



504 
Liberty Street, 



ALL 
FLOWERS 

IN 
SEASON. 



PITTSBURG, 
PA. 



GALAX LEAVES, Brilliant Bronze or Green, $1.50 per 1000. 

FANCY FERN, DAGGER FERN, Etc., at market prices. 

HARRY A BUNYARD. - 42 west 28th street, new york. 



Bronze Galax Leaves 

$1,25 per 1000, S';irir'" 

Try a sjiinpli' FIFTY for tpii cents in stamps, 
deliven-d FREE. 

AMERICAN ROSE CO., Washington, P. C. 
I PAY EXPRESS or POSTAGE on my 

Bronze Galax Leaves 

and dilivcranvwhiTP in U. S. for ONE DOLLAR 
FIFTY per 1000. Writf for piirticuliirs. 

IIILIAN ALIEN DEXTER, Washington, 0. C. 

Hardy Cut Ferns. 

Mos»^s, Laufl, lloiHiUf't Kvergrei-n in l-'estoon- 
iu^', Wrt^atlis or bulk: Hemlock and Spruce 
bf'ui;hs for cemetery use. Special prices to 
the trade. Trust toraeet our old customers 
;ind friends at S. A. F. cunvi-ntion. Address 
all letters and orders to 

H. J. SMITH, HINSDALE, MASS. 



Galax Leaves. 

J. L. BANNER & CO., 

MONTEZUMA, N. C. 

Southern Wild Smilax. 

NEW CROP NOW READV. 

Caldwell The Woodsman Co. Inc. 

Also J. B. DEAMUD, CHICAGO, ILL, 

L. J. KRESHOVER, New York, N. Y., 
M. RICE & CO., Philadelphia, Pa., 
THE VAIL SEED CO., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Alabama Wild Smilax. 

I will be prepared to (111 uny size order of 
Smilnx, in fact all kinds of Decorative Goods 
after September 1. My poods ^o everywhere 
and please everybody. Write for my descrip- 
tive circular, it's free to all buyers, florists of 
the United States and Canada. 

J. e. BARROW, Red Level Station; Ala. 



jgoo. 



The American Florist. 



71 



WEI L AMD -AND RISCH 



GROWERS and SHIPPERS, 



59 WABASH AVE. 



CHICAGO. 



tg 



8? 



Am. Beauties. 


Per dozen. 


24-36-inch.... 


$2. 00 to $3.00 


15-24 •• 


1.00 to 2.00 


8-12 " 


50 to 1.00 




Per 100. 


Liberty 


$3. CO to $4.00 


Meteor 


3.00 to 4.00 


Golden Gate 


3.00 to 6.00 




3.00 to 6.00 


Bride 


a.OOto 4.00 




2.00to 4.00 


La^ran.e 


2.00to 5 00 


Perle 


2.00to 4.00 



CARNUIO^S. 

We grow all the new and standard 
varieties. Select, $1.00 to J1.50 per 
100. Ordinary, 75c to $1.00 per 100. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Lilies, Orchids, Valley, Bulbous 
Stock, Smilax, Asparagus, Adian- 
tuin, Gulax Leaves, Wild Smilax 
and Ferns, at the very lowest market 
prices. 



0<H 



S35 

^r-, 



Prices subject to change without notice. 
WHEN YOU OROEK OF US YOU ORDER DIRECT. 




WHOLESALE FLORISTS 



McKellar £ Winterson's 

Modern Supply House. 




Send for Prices on all Supplies. 
Clearance Sale Now On. 

Give us your order now together with your needs in 
CUT FLOWERS. 



McKELLAR & WINTERSON, wa^Vs'h' I've.. 



CHICAGO. 



WIETOR BROS. 

"S:t.,Cut Flowers 

All telegraph and telephone orders 
given prompt attention. 

51 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO. 


Wbol^ale [lower/arK^ 

Chicago, Aug. 17. 
Roses, Beauty, extra long stems 3.00 
30 inch " 3.50 
24 •■ " 2.00 
20 " " 1.50 
15 " " 1.25 


HOLLY BRANCHES 

and EVERGREENS. 


8 " " :75 

Uride, Bridesmaid 2.00® 4.00 

Perle 2 00® 4.00 






We are packers and shippers of l^est Eastern 
Shore Holly, and can supply the florists with any 
quantity. Will be pleased to quote you on your 


Golden Gate 4 00® 6.00 

Liberty 4.00® 6.00 

Carnations 75 


wants and take your order to be shipped in season. 
FARMERS & PLANTERS CO., 

SALISBURY. IVID. 


fancy I.OO 

Lily of the valley 3.00® 5.00 

Mignonette 2.00® 6.00 

Sweet peas "' ,10 


Wanted at Once 










"FLORISTS" to send to us for their 


Asparagus 50 00 




supply of Cut Flowers. Most careful 
attention given to shipping orders. 
Order what you want — we have it. 
Cnttlngr 2.000 Beauties dally. 
GEO. REINBER6, 61 Wabash A«e.. CHICAGO. 

Seen by New Firms: 


8. K. Cor. Wabaah Ave. and lUndolphSt. 


AMERICAN nORIST ADVTS. 


Say: "Saw it in the Florist." 



NWVMWyV 



E. H. Hunt 

THE "OLD RELIABLE" FOR 

WHOLESALE- 



Hunt'5 Flowers 
Oo Everywhere 

76 Wabash 4ve., CHICAGO. 



PETER REINBERG, 

Grower and Wholesaler of Cut Flowers. 

600.000 FEET OF GLASS. 
Headquarters for American Beauty. 

Carnations, Blooms and Cuttings. 



51 Wabash Ave., 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



J. B. DEAMUD, 

Wholesale 
Commission Florist, 

51 Wabash Ave., GHlGflGO. 



Bassett&Washburn 

76 & 78 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO. 



Wbole«ale Dealers and 
Growers of 



Cut Flowers 



GREENHOUSES: HINSDALE, ILL. 



A. L RANDALL ^ 

Wholesale Florist 

Don't Forget that we are at 4 Wash- 
Ington St., Chicago. 

write for ipeolal gnotatloni on large orders. 



WHOI.EeAI,S 

GROWER OF ROSES. 



DBAI.XB □( 

CUT FLOWERS 



J. A. BUDLONG, 

37-39 Randolph Street, CHICAaO, ILL 

Mention the American Florist. 

Benthey & Co. 

F. F. BENTHEY, Manager, 

Wholesale Commission Florist 

41 Randolph Street CHICAGO. 



"CoDBignmentB solicited.. 



1. Q. PRINCE & CO. 

Wlioiesale Cut Flowers 

AND FLORISTS' SUPPLIES. 

Asanti for the Hlnadale Rose Co. Special attanlloi 

paid to shipping orders. 

76 & 78 Wabash Avenue, 
Telephone Main 3208. OHIOAQ0. 

Please mention the Americ an Florist. 



72 



The American Florist. 



Aug. i8, 



Samuel %. PennoGK. 



Wholesale Florist , 

1612-14-16-18 Ludlow Street PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

AM. BEAUTIES AND VALLEY OUR SPECIALTIES. 

DURING THE SCMMEK WE WILL BE OPEN FROU 7:30 A. M. TO 6:00 P. M. 

CITY HALL CUT FLOWER MARKET. » """""rj^S^" li'2^1' ^"•"' 



WELCH BROS., Proprietors. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



NOTICE: — WELCH BROS., Sole Agents for FREVSTEDTS' Immortelle Letters and Emblems. Block Lettersi S2.00 per 

Script Letters, S4.00 per 100. 

THE NEW ENGLAND HEADQUARTERS FOR THE BEST GRADE OF FLOWERS AT ALL SEASONS OF THE YEAR. 



FLORISTS^**^ 

IF you have made any change in your firm 
* name or address, please send us your 
corrected business card so that you may be 
properly listed in next year's edition of our 
directory. Send also particulars of any 
additions you may have made to your estab- 
lishment, either greenhouses or land. 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO.. 324 Dearborn St., Chicago. 



Geo. A. Sutherland 



Boston 
Flowers. 



WHOLESALE DEPOT FOR 

All Florists' Supplies, 



Price lists mailed. 



67 BHOMFIELD ST., 
BOSTON, MASS. 



Wholesale Florists, y jobbers in 
^A^^FLORISTS' 

^' SUPPLIES 



Always on Hand: 

CARNATIONS. 
BRIDESMAIDS 
BRIDES. 



}' 



FLORISTS' VASES. 

Horticultural Auctioneers. 
84 Hawley Street, BOSTON. 



The American Florist Company's 

DIRECTORY 

Contains the names and addresses of all the Flo- 
rists, Seedsmen and Nurserymen in the United 
States and Canada. Price $a.oo. 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO., 
324 Dearborn Street. Chioaso, U. 8. A. 



Circulation 

which 

Circulates 



The actual paid circulation of the 
American Florist is, we believe, the 
largest in its class. The contents 
are of real present value and are 
preserved for reference. Advertisers 
who use regularly our columns estab- 
lish permanent business with the best 
trade in the United States. 



Wbol^ale power/arl^ 

Philadelphia, Aug. 15. 

Roses, Tea 1.00@ 2.00 

" e.\tra 3.00® 5.00 

" Beauty, extra 10.(0@15.00 

firsts 5.00® 8.00 

Carnations 50® . 75 

fancy 1.00(<»1.50 

Lily of the v:tlley 3.C0w 4.00 

Gladiolus 3 00 

Tuberoses 3.00«< 5.00 

Asters 50w 1.00 

Asparagus 25. 00«i 50,00 

Smilax 10. DOM 15. CO 

Adiantum 50(^f .75 

Sweet peas 20® .30 

Boston, Aug. 15. 

Roses, Beauty, extra 15.00@20.C0 

" medium 4.00® 6.00 

" culls 1.00® 2.00 

Bride, Bridesmaid, Meteor. .60® 3.00 

extra S.OOi" 5.1X) 

Kaiserln B.OOw 8.00 

Carnations 50(" 1.00 

Lily of the valley 2,00''.i 4,00 

Asters 35(" .75 

.Sweet peas 05(a .10 

Smilax 8. 00® 10. 00 

Asparagus 50.00 

H!irdy tiTns .20 

Candytuft, G\ psopliila. ftc. . 10(fii.I5 per buiieli 



Headquarter^ 

^CVN YORK 



GIVE 

US 

A 

TRIAL.!' 

WE 

CAN 

PLEASE 

YOU. 



Roses, Carnations, and all kinds of 
Seasonable Flowers in Stock. 

Ilfll C VACTIIIR Wholesale Com- 
If nil ri rnOlinU) mission Florist, 

481 Washington St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Also Dealer In Florists' Buppltea & Wire Designs. 



C. A. KUEHN, 
Wholesale Florist, 

1122 PINE STREET. 

fc ST. LOUIS, MO. 

^F*A complete line of Wire Deal^^ng. 

H.G.BERNING 

Wholesale riorist, 

SUCCESSOR TO 

5T. LOUIS CUT FLOWER CO.... 

J 322 Pine St., ST. LOUIS, MO. 



Woodroffe & Bernheimer, 
Wholesale Florists 

1604 LUDLOW STREET. 
Phone 1-42^69-A. PHILADELPHIA. 

Consignments Solicited. 

LEO. NIESSEN, 

Wholesale Florist, 

N. W. COR. I3TH AND FILBERT STREETS, 

'^'??J'JS*£J'^94 D. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

ConsignmenU of Choice Valley and Roses (elicited. 

Geo. M. Moss, 

WHOLESALE FLORIST, 

32 South 17th Street, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Long Distance Phone 1-41-2U D. 



Consignments ol Roses, Carnations, Violets solicited. 

CHAS. B. STAHL 

Wholesale Florist, 

!7 S. nth St.. Tele phone 63-64. PHILADELPIIIA. 

Orden by mall, telegraph or telephone will 
reoetve prompt attention. 

GODBlfrnments of frood etook sollolted. 

...GEO. M. KELLOGG... 

'•'•"SSTe'w'e'.i: Cut Flowers 

Give U8 an order and we will please you. 

Our Greenhouiet at PLEASANT HILL, MO. 
Our Store, 906 Grand Ave., KANSAS CITY. MO. 

%9 LONO DISTANCE 'PHONB AT EITHER FLAOB 

JOHN B. FERGUSON, 

Wholesale riorlst, 

651B Fifth Ave, PITTSBURG, PA. 

Long Distakck 'Phonb 2985. 



Consignments of Roses, Carnations and Violets. 

Solicited. 

The Cincinnati 
Gut Flower Co., 



WHOLESALE FLORISTS. 



416 Walnut St., 

CINCINNATI, 0. 

Consignments Solicited. 
Special Attention Given to Shipping Orders. 



J. M. COHEN, Florist, 



CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. 



22 Chapman Place, BCSTCN, MASS. 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



73 



TOP GRADE 

Carnations 



BEAUTIES, 
BRIDES, 
BRIDESMAIDS, 
METEORS. 



t,ll3r O* tla© Va.ll©y. 



JOHN I. RAYNOR, 



49 West 28th Street, 

NEW YORK. 



Telephone No. 1998 Madison Square. 



YOUNG & NUGENT, 



WHOLESALE FLORISTS 



West 28th Street, 
NEW YORK. 



Crowe & Co. Special Prize Haids, 

Superb Roses, Leading Varieties. Cho ce Carnations and Rare Novelties. 
Summer Shipping a Specialty, 

TELEPHONE 206S MADISON SQUARE. 



THOMAS YOUNG, Jr. 

Wholesale Florist ^ 

New Telephone So. 1803 Madison Square. 

43 West 28th St., NEW YORK. 

WILLIAM GHORMLEY, 

Wholesale Commission Florist, 



Special attention siven 
to Shipping Orders. 



57 W. 28lh. St., NEW YORK CITY. 

Telephone 2200 Madison Square. 

-Consignments Solicited. • 



JOHN YOUNG, 

ROSES, CARNATIONS, VALLEY 

ud all other choice out flower stock. 
51 W. 28th Street, NEW YORK. 

New Telephone No. 1905 Madison Square. 
Price 11^ on application. 

Ptgasf merttwn the .4 merican Florist when writing. 

THE RECOGNIZED HEADQUARTERS IN 
NEW YORK CITY FOR 

Violets % Carnations. 

•■OWERS and BUYERS make a note of this. It 
will be to your advantage. 

WM. H. GUNTHER. 

. : . . 30 West 29th Street. 

New Telephone No. 561 Madison Square. 

Please Mention the American Florist. 

FRANK MILLANG, 

CUT FLOWERS, 

WHOLESALE COMMISSION, 

408 E. 34th Street, 

Cut Flower Exchange. NEW YORK. 

Telephone 299 Madison Square. 

N. Y. GUT FLOWER EXCHANGE 

404-412 E. 34th St. NearPerrir. 
Open for Cot Flower Sales at 6 o'clock 
■very MomlnE 

DESIRABLE WALL SPACE TO RENT 
FOR ADVERTISING. 

JOHN DONALDSON, Secretary. 

Please Mention The American Florist. 

MOORE, I1ENTZ & NASIl, 

Wholesale Commission Florists, 

119 and 121 W. 23d St., 

NEW YORK CITY. 
Telephone 733— I8th. 
Choicest Stock Shipped on a Commission. 



At rooms of N. Y. 
Cut Flower Co. 



Choice Carnations 



Choice Roses Jt jt 



Traendly & Schenck 

NEW YORK QTY 

New Telephone No. 270 Madison Sq. 

IS W. 28th Street Cut Flower Exchange 

Wbol^^ale [lower/arK^ 



New York, Aug. 15. 

Roses, Beauty, select 20.00f(j30.00 

" •' medium 4.00(as 6.1)0 

culls 60@ 2 00 

" Bridesmaid, Bride, Meteor .2D(n 1.00 
select. 3.C0fe^ 4.00 

Carnations t)0(o 1.50 

Lily of the valley 2 00(n 3.00 

Swi'et peas per 100 bunches LOOM 2.50 

Harrisii 4 00(S 6.00 

Cattleyas 20. C0('j 33.00 

Gliidioli l.OU® 1 50 

Asters ICffi .50 

Smilax 8.00('i 12.00 

Asparagus 25. 00(" 35.00 

Sprengerii, perdoz. bun. .75("1.00 

Adiitntum 2f(rt .50 

Buffalo, Aug 16. 

Roses, Beauty 10.0f(S70 00 

liride, Bridesmaid, Meteor 3.00(ai 7.00 

K.-iiserin 6.00 

Car rations 1.00 

Lily of the valley 3.00® 4.00 

Sweet peas per doz. bunches .SOfo'' .75 

A uratum lilies 10 OOfo 12.50 

Roseum " 4.f0(« 6. (JO 

G adioli 2.00(n 3.0U 

Asters 1.00® 2.00 

Smilax 15. OOw 20.00 

Adiantum l.OCc 1.25 

Hardy ferns, Galax leaves 20(" .25 

Aspara<rus 50.00{©75.tO 



MILLANG & CO. 

Commission Florists 

48 Wost 29th St., NEW YORK. 

New Telephone No. 1304 Madison Square. 
Capable, experienced. Consignments solicited. 



The New York GUT Flower Co. 

119 and 121 West 23d Street, 

112 and 114 West 24th Street, 

Telephone 733-18th. NEW YORK. 

CONSIONMENTS SOLICITED. 

Special Attention 6ivsn to Shipping Ordert. 

WALTER F. SHERIDAN, 
'^soiifs-n-i^ Wholesale Florist. 

39 W. 28th St., NEW YORK. 



ROSES SHIPPED 

to all points. 



Price List on 
Application 



Ford Bros... 

oe at Wholesale Floristg 

III West 30th street NEW YORK. 

Coniignmentt Solicited. 'Phone, 157 Madison Sq. 

Julius Lang 

53 West 30th Street, NEW YORK. 

ROSES. CARNATIONS. VALLEY. 

CHOICE SUMMER STOCK. 

Telephone 280 Madibon Square 

S. J. LiMPRCCHL 

Wliol6sal6 Goniniission Florist 

and FLORISTS' SUPPLIES. 

Also all kinds of Greens for Decorations. 

119 West 30th Street. MFW \(\Oti 

x'elepnuLe 14:!S Madison Square. I'Uff lOnn. 
Consigrnnients Solicited. 

Do not forget to say "saw your ad. in 
the American Florist" when corre- 
sponding with advertisers 



J. K. ALLEN'S 



POPULAR WHOLESALE 
CUT FLOWER HOUSE 



At the new address, 106 West 28th St., New York City, draws the crowd. Consignments carefully handled 
and well sold. Excellent facilities. J- J- J- J- Telephone 197 Madison Square. 

EDW. C. HORAN, 



47 WEST 28th ST.. 

Tel. 421 

Madison Square, , 



NEW YORK. 



Cyj F LOWERS AI W HOLESALE. 



74 



The American Florist, 



Aug, i8, 



The gEED TRat)B- 



AMERICAN SEED TRADE ASSOCIATION. 

AtBKHT MCCULLOrGH. PreS.i V. W. BOLGIANO, 

Vlce-Pres .: 8. V. Wlllard, Wethersflem, Conn , 
Seo' J and Treas. 



Tuberose bulb growers report the 
crop looking well to date but badly in 
ne°d of rain. 

Arthfr M. Kirby, of the Peter Hen- 
derson Co., New York, has been visiting 
seed farms in Qaedlinburg. 

L. A. BuDLONG Company succeeds L. A. 
Budlong, grower of pickle products, 
onion sets, etc., Winnemac Station, Chi- 
cago. 

Charles A. Heath, of the Albert 
Dickinson Co., Chicago, has returned 
from a two months' trip to Europe and 
the Paris Exposition. 

O.NION sets are being rapidly harvested 
around Chicago. .\s a rule the sets 
average large and quite a percentage 
will screen out when run through a 
linch mesh. 



Ciion Sets. 



There was this year an increased acre- 
age ot onion sets over that of last year 
in the vicinity of Chicago. The yield is 
fair but the quality impaired by being 
generally too large. 

All things considered, the probabilities 
are that there will be less merchantable 
sets harvested than last year at Chicago. 

In Oaio and Kentucky the same condi- 
tions exist. In the west and northwest 
the crop is less in quantity and rather 
better in quality. 



Turori at tile Paris Fxposition. 

"Can you tell me," inquired the Ameri- 
can, "what that company of people is 
doing in that flower bed?" 

The speaker stood in front of the 
chateau de I'Eau on the Champ de-Mars, 
and she waved an umbrella in the direc- 
tion of the Eiffel tower as she spoke. I 
followed her gesture and saw a group of 
ten or twelve men skipping nimbly about 
smelling violently of this bush and that 
and following each spell of sniffing with a 
periodof impetuous writing in small note 
books. They seemed both to smell and 
write at the command of a leader, dis- 
tinguished in the flower bed by the 
unusual dexterity of his skipping. 

"Madam," I said, with the awe in my 
voice that I felt in my heart, "that is a 

ju""?-" 

As I spoke the company in question 

darted forward, made a final plunge at 

an inoffensive rosebush, and, collectively, 

departed. The man whose flowers had 

just been examined bowed and scraped 

nis visitors out of hearing. I would leave 

any duty at any time to see any jury 

walk past. The members go in martial 

order and if they could only be provided 

an accompaniment of music the warlike 

spirit would be complete. There is 

always a captain and some brother or 

sister for rear guard. Everything is done 

in a body; united action is a juror's 

watchword; all he waits is his captain's 

command to trip up to the nearest wall, 

peck lightly at this tapestry or that, and 

then to inscribe in his notebook for weal 

or woe that exile's fate. One peculiarity 

I have noticed in juries is that there is 

always one lame member, one whose eyes 

trouble him, and a third whose hearing 



is bad. The result is that there is always 
somebody behind the main body of the 
procession, another whose affliction 
necessitates his coming directly in con- 
tact with the object for award, and 
another who must needs call for a repeti- 
tion of any orders given by his leader. 
Juries are international organizations. 
Orientals, still clad in their foreign habili- 
ments, walk arm in arm with well-fed 
Englishmen, talkative A-nericans, studi- 
ous Germans and bewhiskeied Frenchmen 
united for the moment in a common 
effort to select the best from an imposing 
display of canned peaches. 

When it comes to clocks every jurop 
has to listen to every clock tick and wind 
them all, and when there are cuckoos 
pass judgment on the ((uality of the bird. 
The importance of a juror's task is never 
more fully recognized than when one sees 
him discourage an occasional exhibitor. 
A certain air of finality is the external 
manifestation of a juror's unspoken con- 
clusion. 

"Not on our list." 

The whole jury system, as employed 
for exposition awards, is briefly sum- 



marized as follows: Feel always, eat if 
possible, look as a last resource. In the 
educational departments the third 
method is universally practiced. I am 
certain no more impossible subjects either 
for touch or taste have ever been pre- 
sented to the human race than one may 
meet in those terrible buildings devoted 
to monographs on education and to the 
school census.— /ess/e Trimble in the 
Cliicago Record. 



Shibemanstown, Pa.— John F. Rupp 
has bought a lot on Locust street of A. 
Sheaffer and will enlarge his facilities. 

Ann Arbor, Mich.— James Goodhue 
anticipates a good fall season. He has 
benched 2,000 chrysanthemums and the 
plants are unusually fine. 

Wabash, Ind.— Alonzo Ulsh, proprie- 
tor of the Vernon street greenhouse, has 
leased E. T. Overman's greenhouses 
and will have charge of the business of 
both. Mr. Overman, who is chairman 
of the prohibition county central com- 
mittee, will devote all his time to the 
campaign. 



JOHNSON «& STOKES' GIANT KINGLY PANSIES. 

\Vi' have searched the world to k*"' this strain up to its present standard of perfection, and it is now 
pronounced by our customers as unrivalled in size, substance of flower and richness of color. 
Tr^de pkt.. SOc; H-ov... «1.26; oz., $-.00. FRESH SMILAX SEED —Per oz., 25c; per pound, 12.50. 

ALLEGHENY DOUBLE FRINGEO HOLLYHOCK.— Our Floracroft Strain. Trade pkt., 25c; H oz. pkt., 
.=>'Jc; fwr oz., $1,511. CINERARIA.- James' Giant Strain, per pkt., 25o; Vi trade pkt. 60c; tr. pkt., $1. 

CALCEOLARIA.— James' Giant strain, per pkt., 25o; trade pkt.. 6Uc. 

We arc ri'aJy to book orders tor White Romans, Freesias, Callas, Paper White Narcissus, etc. 

JOHNSON & STOKES, Seedsmen, 217 and 219 Market St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

-^FRESH FERN SPORES.^ 

WE ARE HEADQUARTERS— Extra large package of fresh Spores, sufiiolent for 3000 plant!, 
with full cultural directions, postpaid for Jl.OO. 

EMERSON C. McFADDEN. U. S. Exotic Nurseries, SHORT HiLLS, N. J. 



CALIFORNIA 

Calla Bulbs 

Through our F.xchange 
Sales with best Pacific 
Coast growers of these 
roots we are able to 
deliver choice, care- 
fully cured and evenly 
graded roots at closest 
growing prices. 

FIRST SIZE, Hi to 1^4-in. 

diam., doz. 7,=>c; 100$5.00. 
SELECT, m to l^^-in. diam., 

do/,. $1.35; 100»7.00. 
EXTRA SELECT. 2to'2V4-in. 

iliam.,d07.. *1..50; 100$9.00. 

EARLY DELIVERY means much. Gettinj; these 
bulbs when you want them is everythini;. Late 
surpluses .-it halt prici' are not bi.rKalns. 

VAUGHAN'S SEED STORE, 




NEW YORK: 
14 Barclay St. 



CHICAGO: 
84-86 RandoiDh St. 



F.-JEQUENT IMPORTATIONS OF 
BEST GRADE OF 

English Mushroom Spawn 

J. J. STYKR, 

-Concordvllle, Pa. 



MAPLESHADE 
COLLECTION. 



Lent: estahlishf'd: iinexc«ll<'d; inftoy sp'-cii^s, 
liom*' 11 [id iniport'^d. Bulbs, cut llowers, 
hybridized scd; pvi*rytliin2 in my line, and 
(.he best of t'V»*rythint;. Illustrated circular 
ri*ady soon. Send "for it aud place your orders 
in season 

WILBUR A. CHRISTY, Kinsman, O. 



GLADIOLI. 



ESTABLISHED 1802 




SEEDS 



We have still left some fresh seeds of 
the following Palms in fine condition: 

KENTIA FORSTERIANA, per 1000, $4.00; 5000 to 
10,000 at $3.50; 10,000 and over ftt 13.00. 

Also CYCAS REVOLUTA STEMS in assorted 
sizes. 3 lbs. to 12 lbs., at $8.00 per 100 lbs., 
while unsold. 

J.MTHORBURN&CO. 

(Late of IS John Street) 

36 CORTLANDT STREET. NEW VORI 



Bulbs! Bulbs!! 

EXCELSIOR PEARL TUBEROSE 
and CALADIUM ESCULENTUM. 
Fine crop for 1900. 

JNO. F. GROOM & BRO , Growers, 

MAGNOLIA. N. C. 



American Florist Advertisements 
Pay Advertisers. 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



75 



Now is the Time 



To make arrangements with us for your supply of cut flowers for the 
season of J 900-1 90 1. A large part of our business is along the lines 
of just such arrangements as we should like to make with you, arrange- 
ments which call for regular, all-season shipments of such material as 
you require. We are able to hold trade of this character season after 
season because we have the stock to meet all requirements, including the 
cuts of such growers as the South Park Floral Co., of New Castle, 
Ind.; E. Q. Hill & Co., and Mrs. E. T. Graves, of Richmond, Ind., 
and others whose stock is unexcelled in this or any other market. We 
not only have the right kind of stock, but we handle it right, pack it 
right, and bill it right. In fact, if there is anything about our methods 
which isn't right, we promptly make it right. We seldom fail to satisfy 
a customer. ^^^«m^^^^^ 



u 



Just a Word to the Growers 

Before making arrangements with any wholesaler to handle 
your cut next season, it will be to your interest to see us. We 
can convince you that we are the ones best equipped to make your 
stock pay you. Our store is the largest, best lighted, best venti- 
lated and most centrally located in Chicago. We have an estab- 
lished business — have handled, are handling, shall handle, large 
quantities of flowers to good advantage, bUt WC can handle morc. 
It is not necessary to say anything about payment, for since we 
started, four years ago, we have paid every grower every cent we 
owed him every week. We have all the capital we need to keep 
this up. Write to us, or better yet, come to see us about what 
we can do for you. 

E. C. AMLING. 

Wholesale Cut Flowers^ 
32-34-36 Randolph St., OHICA.OO, 



^ 



76 



The American Florist. 



Aug. t8, 



The I^ursery Tmi^k. 

AM. ASSOCIATION OF NURSERYMEN. 

Thko. J. Smith, Pres.; N. W. Halk, Vloe-PreB.i 
8IOBOI C. 8BAGIB, RocheBter, N, Y., Seo'y. 



The big eastern nurserymen are find- 
ing the west and northwest profitable 
fields for cultivation. 

The Storrs & Harrison Co., Paines- 
ville, 0., reports a prospect for an 
unusually heavy lall trade. 

Nurserymen in the Rochester and 
other centers are booking numerous 
orders for fall exportation to Canada. 

This season's abundant fruit crops 
and the reasonable prices generally pre- 
vailing should prove something ot a 
stimulant to planting. 

The Smith & Powell Co., Syracuse, N. 
Y., have sold their greenhouses and 
flower business to P. R. Quinlan, but will 
continue the nursery business. 



At the Douglas Nursery. 

The name of the late Robert Douglas is 
probably more widely known among 
planters for effect than is that of any 
other westerner, as it is safe to say, and 
certainly not undeserved praise, that no 
other nurseryman has had such a potent 
influence in encouraging the planting of 
coniferous trees in the Mississippi and 
upper Missouri valleys. Robert Douglas 
was the pioneer in the work of educating 
the public to a knowledge of the beauty 
and desirability of conifers. Beginning, 
as he did, at Wankegan, 111., in 1S48 his 
knowledge of his subject was obtained 
at first hand. As a co-worker with 
Parry, Engelmann and Sargent he will 
long be remembered, but his greatest 
fame will doubtless rest upon the fact 
.that he was the introducer and popular- 
izer of the Colorado blue spruce, that 
gem of the Rockies. 

At the Douglas nurseries pines, spruces 
and firs are grown by the million. Here 
the first thing that strikes one's eye is the 
amount of ground covered by the tall 
screens under which a man may walk 
with comfort and examine the myriad 




WHERE THE "TRANSPLANTS" ARE GROWN. 



little seedling pines at ease. The seed 
beds are usually eight to ten feet wide, 
separated from one another only by a 
narrow walk in which are planted the 
posts supporting the cross pieces, which 
in turn hold up the brush and branches 
used for shading material. It is desira- 
ble that these screens should be situated 
on high ground and well drained situa- 
tions, as low, damp grounds encourage 
the development of fungi which are 
fatal to the young seedlings. The little 
trees go from beneath the high screens to 
other beds in the field, where they are 
pricked out a few inches apart and where 
they are shaded by lath screens. These 
screens are supported by short posts 
which brings them only a few inches 
from the top of the plants. This system 
gives the plants partial sunlight and 
assists them in becoming inured to out- 
door conditions. From the beds the 
plants go into nursery rows, and then 
follows a system of annual root pruning 




WHERE THE SEED IS PLANTED, THE YOUNQ SEEDLINGS BEING MULCHED WITH 
PRAIRIE HAY THE FIRST WINTER. 



which has for its object the development 
of a good system of roots. 

In the case of those conifers which vary 
considerably in color and the value of 
which depends upon deepness or purity of 
color, as, for instance, the Colorado blue 
spruce, Engelmann's spruce and concolor 
fir, the work of selecting the best speci- 
mens begins when the young plants are set 
out in the nursery row. It is here that 
their characteristic tints are shown and 
the profit of growing these specimens will 
largely depend upon the percentage of 
blue specimens secured. This, in turn, 
depends upon the type of tree from 
which the seed was collected. Careful 
collectors can insure a grower a much 
larger percentage of "blue" spruce than 
one will obtain from the ordinary com- 
mercial grade of seed. 

The Douglas nurseries in the past have 
been almost exclusively growers of coni- 
ferous trees. The demand of recent years, 
however, has induced the present pro- 
prietors to extend very considerably the 
area devoted to ornamental shrubs and 
that branch of the nursery is being 
rapidly developed. 

On the Douglas home grounds are some 
noble conifers, including the original 
Colorado blue spruce, to bear evidence of 
Robert Douglas' skill. It is doubtful if 
at any other place are there as large, as 
old or as well developed specimens of the 
blue spruce, Douglas fir, hemlock and 
and Norway spruce. 

— -^--^-^ 

Saginaw, Mich.— C. L. Roeser, princi- 
pal stockholder of the Roeser Implement 
and Seed Co., has assumed the interests 
of the other stockholders and is now sole 
proprietor of the business. 

Providence, R. I.— The Rhode Island 
Horticultural Society has issued its 
schedule of prizes for its September and 
November exhibitions. Copies may be 
had by addressing the secretary, C. W. 
Smith, 61 Westminster street. 

Toronto, Ont. — While the recent exhi- 
bition of the Toronto Horticultural 
Society was largely an affair of amateurs, 
several well known growers were repre- 
sented. W. H. Groff, of Simcoe, had a 
splendid display of gladioli, and the Dale 
Estate, Dunlop and Steele & Briggs 
showed roses, carnations and sweet 
peas. 



I goo. 



The American Florist, 



77 



SEASON 1 900- 1 90 1. 



CAPITAL. . $10,000.00 



^H ^M t^ 



To the Grower: 



Wc want to call attention to our large increase in trade, and are contracting more help and 
boilding more counter surface to handle our increase. Still, with all, we want "new growers," but we want 
them to begin with the dull season or at the opening of the season, September 1st to October 1st. 

A few facts: Shippers who expect best returns ought to SHIP US, for we have a business of long 
standihg and trade built up. We pay all growers each week with statements, no matter how much we have to 
trust out. Having capital we can afford to carry accounts in the interest of the producer. 

All we ask is a season's trial, and we can PROVE we can do by you as good and a little better than 
you have been doing, and, as above stated, the "CASH" each week. Come in and see us; have a talk, and 
we will convince you that if you are to change Brokers, we are open to handle all No. J stock we can get this 

season. 

Yours respectfully. 



Kennicott Bros. Co., 



FLINT KENNICOTT, President. 

G. H. PIESER, Secretary. 

ED. E. PIESER, Treasurer and Gen'l Manager. 

L. P. KELLY, Salesman. 

STEVE MINON, Salesman. 

VM. P. KYLE, Foreman. 

GEO. R. SCOTT, Packer. 

G. H. PIESER, Jr., Packer. 

Errand-boys and wire-workers. 

Please mention American Florist when writing. 



42 and 44 Randolph Street, 
Chicago. 



IF 
YOU 



Don't Buy Cut flowers From Us, 

WE sell to tlie house you DO buy from, so indirectly we sell to you. If you don't 
want it that way, send US your orders direct and WE will save you their 

profit. Our Beauties, Kalscrins, Meteors, Perles and field-Grown Carnations are the best 

that come to this market. We will have a large stock right along and hope you 
will add your name to the list of customers this season. We will serve you promptly 
with good stock and no "cinch" prices so prevalent on so-called shipping orders. Two 
shipments daily from our greenhouses: 8 a. m. and 2 p. m. We cut from 7,000 
to 10,000 daily. All stock carefully selected for shipping. No charge for P. & D. 

GEORGE REINBERG, 51 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO, ILL. 



TEIiEGBAFH CODE 

OP THE 

AM. SEED TRADE ASSOCIATION 

In either stiff or flexible oorer. asdbiss obdibs to 
AMERICAN FLORIST CO., CHICAGO. 




Choicest Fruit and Ornamental Trees. 

Shrubs, Plants, Bulbs. Seeds. 40 Acres Hardy Roses. 44 Greenhouses 
of Palms, Everblooming Roses, Ficus, Ferns, Etc, Correspondence 
solicited. Catalogue Free. 47 Years. 1000 Acres. 

THE STORRS & HARRISON CO., Painesville, O. 



78 



The American Florist. 



Aug. i8, 



Our Psstimes 



Announoementi of coming contests or other 
•Tenti of interest to our bowline, shooting and 
OTOling readers are solicited and will be given 
place in this column. 

Address all correspondence for this department 
to Wm. J. Stewart, 67 Bromfleld St., Boston, Mass. ; 
Bobt. Kift, 1725 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa.; 
or to the American Florist Co., 324 Dearborn St., 
Obio&go, 111. 



At Detroit. 

Phil Breitmeyer promises to be the star 
of the New York contest if he keeps up 
the work he has been doing in the last 
few practice games. On Monday evening, 
August 13, he made 257 and followed it 
with 226. 

Player 1st 2d 3d 4th 5th 

Breitmever 257 228 173 145 149 

Pantke 181 172 193 118 

Beard 157 176 156 151 137 

Holznagle 185 192 146 145 156 

Ferguson 166 146 145 165 

Watson 148 138 146 128 

Taylor 184 125 117 

Davis 135 143 181 

Plckworth 160 122 100 

Hupprick 100 108 

Flowerday 98 135 

Sullivan.: 147 152 

J. F. S. 



At Flatbush. 

Thursday evening, August 9, was a 
hot one but the convention is close at 
hand and the heat doesn't count when 
half a dozen silver cups are waiting for 
an owner. Louis Schmutz made the rec- 
ord score tor the evening aud won a pot 
thereby, which he put safely away with 
the consoling remark that a few more 
like it would come in mighty handy next 
week when he meets his friends from Bos- 
ton and the west. Scores as follows: 

Player 1st 2d 3d 4th 

Mellis 165 123 

E. DaiUedouze 130 132 

A. Zeller 126 112 

Schmutz 115 164 188 160 

Riley 165 128 158 135 

Raynor 149 131 171 148 

Werner 94 92 

H. Dallledouze 161 99 

C. Zeller 98 105 101 127 

Schmutz, Jr 131 95 120 133 

Wocker 130 121 89 102 

Flatbush is not given to boasting, but 
on Tuesday night, last, there was joy in 
the old town; Zeller's oranges took on 
a more golden hue, the rubbers at 
Schmutz's took another stretch and 
Dailledouzes' carnations seemed ready 
to dance— all on account of the promis- 
ing scores rolled up on that occasion at 
the Palace alleys in Brooklyn. These 
are new alleys and very tint, and it was 
the first appearance on them of the 
Flatbush aggregation. The same pace 
kept up next week will land Flatbush on 
very comfortable ground. Here are the 
figures: 

Player 1st 2d 3d 

Raynor 165 143 136 

Mellis 148 150 181 

Zeller 161 153 158 

Dallledouze, E 170 137 143 

Schmutz 159 176 137 

Dallledouze, P 157 131 139 

Riley 132 149 178 

Stewart 125 1.52 138 

Traendly 165 146 

Donlan 123 139 



At Philadelphia. 



The long drawn out contest for places 
on the team remains undecided, as at a 
meeting of the bowling club George Moss 
was elected captain of the team and given 
full power to select the men whom he 
thought would do the best. A team of 
associate members, with two exceptions 
was selected to try out a team of con- 



vention bowlers last Friday night, with 
the following result: 

FLORISTS. 

Player 1st 2d 3d total 

Moss 173 177 140 490 

Connor 122 171 146 439 

Harris 175 138 129 442 

Westcott 129 127 136 392 

Baker 124 167 134 425 

Walker 168 188 150 506 

Team totals 891 968 835 2694 

A990CIATBB. 

Player 1st 2d 3d total 

Allen 174 142 148 464 

Mooney 201 149 159 509 

Starr 148 126 134 408 

Kift 127 155 163 445 

Peterson .....169 162 123 464 

Watson 112 132 135 379 

Team totals 931 866 862 2659 

K. 



At Chicago. 

Following are the scores made August 
10: 

Player 1st 2d 3d 4th 5th 6th 7th 

Winterson 203 151 213 190 143 

Degnan 186 135 164 187 136 188 141 

Balluff 165 120 209 160 172 128 171 

Heirrou I6S 110 94 183 133 

Asmus 123 193 199 186 



At New York. 

The final regular meeting of the bowling 
club previous to the convention took 
place on Monday afternoon, August 13. 
Quite an enthusiastic crowd was present, 
including John Westcott, who had come 
over from Philadelphia to help adjust, on 
behalf of the Florists' National Bowling 
League, the final details of the prize 
schedule and general arrangements for 
the convention tournament. Scores 
were made as follows: 

Player 1st 2d 3d 4th 

Roehrs 129 175 122 

Siebenheller I39 153 123 79 

Burns 126 169 147 185 

Tratndlv 194 169 157 137 

Thielmann 126 154 194 136 

Stewart 96 114 166 83 

Manda 159 165 155 

Troy 100 135 134 

Schmutz 119 113 

O'Mara 172 145 

Siebrecht 118 144 

Le Moult 132 126 

Lungjahr 103 91 

Marshall 116 108 

Butterfleld 95 

Donlan 108 



Convention Trophies. 

We take pleasure in presenting here- 
with the list of valuable cups and other 
trophies offered for competition at the 
grand bowling tournament to be held at 
.New York city in connection with the 
convention of the S. A. F. The contest, 
for which not less than twelve teams are 
entered, will take place on Friday, 
August 24-, at the Palace alleys. One 
Hundred and Twenty-fifth street and 
Third avenue, beginning a 9 a.m. Teams 
must consist of six men each and each 
individual must be a member of S. A. F. 
in good standing for the year 1900. The 
Edmund M. Wood and Queen of Edgely 
cups are Florists' National Bowling 
League trophies and all clubs competing 
for these prizes must become members of 
this national association. All entries of 
teams for the tournament must be made 
not less than forty-eight hours before the 
hour set for the opening of the contest. 
Entries should be made with the chair- 
man of the New York Florists' Club's 
committee on sports, Theo. Roehrs, +94 
East One Hundred and Seventj'-sixth 
street. New York city. As indicated 
below, the ladies will also be given an 
opportunity to win some pretty souven- 
irs of the great event. 



LIST OF TEAM TROPHIES. 

The Lord .^ Burnham cup. to the club making 
the highest total in three games. 

The Hitchings A Co. cup, to the club making 
the highest score in the third game. 

The Queen of Edgely trophy, to the club mak- 
ing the highest total score in the first and second 
games. 

The Edmund M. Wood cup. to the club making 
the highest total score in three games. 

The Detioit trophy, to the club making the 
highest score in any one game. 

All the above must be won twice to become per- 
manent property. 

INDIVIDUAL PRIZES IN TEAM CONTESTS. 

Silver cup, donated by Theo. J. Lang, New 
York, to the man making the highest average in 
three games. 

Silver cup, donated by Traendly & Schenck, 
New York, to the man making the highest score 
in any of the team games. 

Gold medals, donated by Theo. Roehrs, New 
York, to man making second high average and 
to man making third high average. 

Gold mounted fountain pen, donated by J. K. 
Allen, New York, to man making greatest num- 
ber ol strikes. 

Box of cigars, donated by F. Brinkama, Sixth 
avenue and Fifty-seventh street. New York, to 
man making greatest number of spares. 

PRIZES FOR INDIVIDUAL GAMES. 

Open to all members of the S. A. F. not taking 
part in the team bowling. 

Gold medal, donated by John I. Raynor, New 
York, for highest score. 

Silk umbrella, donated by Walter F. Sheridan, 
New York, for second highest score. 

Cigar case, donated by Fitzgerald & Hammond, 
New York, for third highest score. 

LADIES BOWLING PRIZES. 

Elegant bronze vase, donated by Cleary & Co., 
New York. 

Beautiful jardiniere, donated by A. H. Hews & 
Co.. North Cambridge, Mass. 

Dozen photographs, cabinet size, donated by 
Dana, Broadway and Twenty-eighth street. New 
York. 



St. Louis. 
HOT WEATHER CONTINUES AND BUSINESS 
IS (jUIET.— STOCK POOR. — USUAL QUAN- 
TITIES OF OUTDOOR MATERIAL.— NOTES. 

Business is quiet. The hot weather is 
still with us and is having a bad effect 
on trade as well as on stock. Roses 
arrive in very poor shape and go to 
pieces almost before they get into the 
retailers' hands. Some few Beauties 
arrive, but they do not amount to much 
in either (juantity or quality. Very few 
gladioli are consigned, but asters, tuber- 
oses and carnations are in ^average 
receipt for this season. 

The Koenig Floral Company filed an 
application for incorporation on August 
8. The capital stock is $2,000, paid up. 
Otto C. and John L. Koenig have nine 
shares each, and Katie M. and Amanda 
Koenig have one share each. 

The Vale of Cashmere Company, 
located in the Odeon, is often required to 
satisfy the curiosity of its customers as 
regards its name. Mr. Gibbon has 
selected a name that is original and a 
good advertisement. 

Fred. S. Plant returned home Tuesday 
from a boat trip to St. Paul. M. 



RossviLLE, III —James Culbert is 
building two houses, called for by his 
increasing trade. The new structures 
will give him 3,000 additional feet of 
space. 

KoKOMO, Ind.— W. W. Coles has been 
entertaining his brother-in-law, J. 0. 
Graham, of Little Falls, N. Y., another of 
the men who knowhowtogrowKaiserin 
to perfection. 

Minneapolis, Minn.— A young fellow 
named Fred. Chassis has been sentenced 
to ninety days in jail for defrauding 
Mendenhall of stock. His game was to 
order cut flowers by telephone in the 
names of Mendenhall's customers and 
then cull for them, representing himself as 
a messenger. He carried it a bit too far. 



I goo. 



The American Florist. 



79 



Gut Flowers. 

THE LARGEST GROWER 



IN THE WORLD, 



600,000 

SQUARE 

FEET 

OF 

GLASS. 

^* ^w ^* 




WANTS your trade this year. Every rose or carnation 
we ship is cut on the day of shipment. Why 
should you buy flowers which are a day or two 
old when shipped, when we can furnish a better grade and 
perfectly fresh stock at the same price ? Our customers get 
all the flowers they want when other wholesalers are refus- 
ing orders. We have all the good varieties of roses and 
carnations in quantity, including this year's introductions. 



10,000 American Beauty Plants, 

FINE STOCK, FROM 3-IN. POTS, 

$5.00 per 100 ^ $40.00 per J 000. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Kalserin, 3-inch pots $4.00 $35.00 

Golden Gate, 2y2-inch pots 4.00 35.00 

Bridesmaid, Meteor, 3-inch pots 4 00 35.00 

150,000 Carnation Plants. 

Strong, healthy, field- grown plants ready for delivery 
the first week in September. Write for prices. 




51 

Wabash Avenue, 

CHICAGO. 




80 



The American Florist. 



Aug. i8. 



The Pan-American Exposition. 

On entering the grounds from Elm- 
wood avenue the first place I visited vras 
the service building, vrhich is completed 
and occupied by the various officers of 
the administration. The grounds are all 
planted with handsome shade trees and 
many fine groups of hardy shrubs. 
Around the buildings are flower beds 
with all the various climbers running up 
on wire. The beds are filled up with 
hardy perennials, with a few beds of 
heliotropes, vincas, fuchsias, etc. The 
lawns are well kept up by using plenty 
of water. The seeded is much better 
than the sodded lawn. 

They have the exhibitors' grounds laid 
out and well seeded. The many beds are 
all prepared, ready for planting entries 
this fall or early in the spring. A num- 
ber of beds are planted with roses, 
hydrangeas and phloxes. There will be 
a great many more planted later, with 
bulbs and hardy stock. They are taking 
good care of the stock and it is growing 
finely. They are planting all the aquatic 
plants of all the native and cultivated 
sorts up and down to the canal, and it 
will be a great sight when they are in 
good growing condition. The canal will 
soon be ready to let the water in, as they 
are putting fine gravel in the bottom to 
keep the water clear. 

At the propagating houses there is a 
large force of men at work. Many thou 
sands of plants are now ready for this 
fall's planting, such as hardy perennials; 
many of these will be kept in cool frames 
till early in the spring and the tender 
plants will all be kept in the greenhouses. 
They also have many thousands of vines 
in boxes which are making a fine growth. 
I saw a large bed of Vinca minor, about 
50,000, ready for planting as background 
for the beds, in the spring. 

The buildings are all go wing along fast 
and it looks as if everything will be com- 
pleted in time. X. 

PANSIES gglJiik 

SEED as: USUAL. 

3-18th ounce, $1.00. I ounce, $4.00. 

CHR. SOLTAU. 

199 Crant Ave.. JEK8EY CITY. M. J. 

STRONG FIELD-GROWN PLANTS OF 

Farqunar Violets. 

Free from disease of any kiD<!. 
$() 00 per KK); $50,00 per 1000, 

JOHN McFARUNa, North Easton, Mass. 

Asparagus Sprengerii. 

Jinch, strong J5.00 per 100 

2-inch, strong 3.00 per 100 

From flats 2.00 per ICO 

M, J. COVENTRY, Ft. Scolt, Kans. 

Bride and Bridesmaid, strouK 3-in., $5.00 per 100. 
Marie Louise, strong Deld grown, $2.50 per lOO. 

oa.:rjva.t lo p* s 

From field; Scott, Meteor. \'ictor, Mrs. .las. Uean, 
White Cloud, Flora Hill, etc., at market prices. 

E. M. & H. N. HOFFMAN. Elmira, N. Y. 

THE KINNEY PUMP. 

For ftpplrlnK Uqnld manure It h&i no equal. Sent pre- 
paid for I3.W. Wltboat ipraTlng Talre, 13.00. 

Th« Hmi CtQitotltD Ci., KligitM, R. I. 



AN INVITATION 

Is extended to all Florists, Nurserymen and others interested, to visit our 

Nurseries. We grow 

Ornamental Trees, Shrubs, Vines I Herbaceous Plants 

and have one of the most extensive collections in the U. S. 
Our ottlce and a part of our nurseries are situated in Germantown, about 
one hour's ride from the center of the city of Philadelphia. If visitors will tele- 
phone us (No. 9411 A) before leaving the city, we can give instructions how 
to reach the nurseries and will have a carriage at the station to meet them. 

Our THOMAS B. MEEHAN will represent the firm at the Convention 
and will be glad to give any information desired. 

Thomas Meehan & Sons, 

NURSERYMEN AND LANDSCAPE ENGINEERS, 
GERMANTOWN, Philadelphia, PA. 

Please mention the Ainerican Florist when writing, 

IF YOU NEED fine, healthy stock of 

Kentia Belmoreana or Forsteriana, Arecas, Dracaenas in 
variety, Boston Ferns or Asparagus plumosus, write to 

MERION GREENHOUSES3 



I. I^A-UST, 

MANAGER, 



F'A.. 



m^ CAULIFLOWER m 

Gives In fait the ver\ bpst reaalts. 

Extra Early DWARF ERFURT 
and Earliest DWARF SNOWBALL, 

the iiiosf profitable two sorts for forcing, true to 
name and first <|ii:ility. Own home grown seed. 

C3il)D9«g^6, DANISH BALLHEAD. 
For prices, sampi sand further information, address 

CARL FRISENETTE. 

Seed Grower, 
COPENHAGEN, V. 

Please mention the American Florist when zvfilzng. 



H. Wrede, 

LUNEBURG, GERMANY 




PANSY SEED. 



150 First Prizes, the highest awards 
Chicago 1893, and Hamburg 1897. 
lUOO »ee(l§, fluest uilxed. 2Sc 
1 oz. " " '• «12 35 

^F~Prlce List on application. Cash with order. 
PIt-aiC mrntwH the American Florist when zvrittng. 



ROOT PRUNED 

[vcrgrccns, 

FOR AUTUMN PLANTING. 
FINELY ROOTED. 

.woo NORWAY SPRUCE, 314 to 5 feet. 

.StOO HEMLOCK SPRUCE, 3 feet and over, very 
bushy, compact and fine. 

25,000 RETINOSI'ORAS in variety, from 1 to 6 ft. 

COLORADO BLUE and ORIENTAL SPRUCE, 
PINES and ARBORVIT.ES in great varietv; 
in good condition for transplanting either in 
lawns, parks or cemeteries. LARGE SPECI- 
MENS for immediate effect. 

SMALL EVERGREENS and EVERGREEN 
SHRUBS for window boxes a specialty. 

The SUCCESS with which our root pruned Ever- 
greens have been moved is PRO\'ERBIAL. 
FAILURES seldom cccur. A pi'rsonal inspec- 
tion is invited. 

The Wm. H. MOON CO. 

Glenwood Nurseries, & 702 Stephen Girard BIdg . 
MORRISVlLLE. PA. PHILA. PA. 

60 Miles from New York City. 
30 Miles from Philadelphia. 



AN 



Indispensable Adjunct 



n O a successful wholesale business is an up-to-date, 
I accurate, complete Trade Directory. Such a 
book, 387 pages, containing the name and 
address of every florist, nurseryman and seedsman 
in America, new list of private gardeners and horti- 
cultural supply concerns and much other informa- 
tion will be mailed from this office on receipt of $2. 



% 






AMERICAN FLORIST CO. 

334 Dearborn St., CHICAQO, ILL. 



fR 






igoo. 



The American Florist. 



81 



Are You Looking... 

For Summer Material t hat will Please Your Customers? 

We can supply you with anything that can be supplied in the New York market, carefully 
selected and packed so that it will open up in good condition. 

Roses in all Varieties, especially 

American Beauty and Met eor. 

Lily of the Valley is very fine. 

Growers for wholesale market visiting New York during Convention week will find a 
cordial welcome at No. 49, and some useful information as to how to realize best results 
from their product during the coming season. 



^O W. SStlx street. 



iVE^WT ^^oick:. 



a^vtjm:. j. ajlooi^e^ 



TELEPHONE 



Choice No. 1 Stock of all kinds 
in season, constantly on hand 
and shipped at the shortest 
notice. Consignments of first- 
class flowers solicited. 



•Wholesale Florist, 



36 S. 16th St , PHILADELPHIA. 






%^ 



ROEMER'S I 
Superh Prize Pansies I 



The finest strain of Pansies 
in the World 

INTRODUCER AND GROWER OF ALL THE 
LEADING NOVELTIES. 

Highest Award Inter. Exhibition at Ham- 
burg, 1897. Catalogue free on application. 

Fred. Roemer, 



^ Seed Grower. QUEDLINBURG. GERMANY. ^ 



PANSIES 



ZirngiebeFs 

Giant Market and Fancy 

Are still the leaders for size and colors. 

Trade packaees at one dollar each, either strain, 
with full directions how to sow and cultivate with 
every package. New crop seed after July 1st. 

DENYS ZIRNGIEBEL, Needham, Mass. 

GARDENING 

Thla is the paper to recommend to your 
oustomers, the leading horticultural 

journal in America for amateurs 

•2iOO Per Year. Sample Copies Free. 

Liberal terms to florlstB who take sntworlptlonB. 

THE GARDENING GO. wnon Bid,. CHICAGO. 



Mignonette Seed. 

FOR PRESENT SOWING. 

My own selection which is conceded to be the finest | 
Mignonette in the market, producing large 
compact heads with good foliage, 
of a pleasing light color. 



PER PACKET 25 CENTS. 



PER OUNCE $3.00. 



JOHN N. MAY, Summit, N.J. 



ti^i^yi^^^^i^ 



t^irase tncntion the American Florist when ivriciux 



NEXT CENTURY'S BUSINESS 

can be started now by advertising in this journal. Don't delay in 
commencing next year's business. The best orders are placed early 

TRY THIS pLf""" " THE AMERICAN FLORIST 



82 



The American Florist. 



Aug. r8. 



■itaiiiiitiitiiiUUiiitUiiiiiiiiiiiumiiiiitiiuuitAiitiUiitiiiiiiii iiUiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiuuuAt itUAiAiitaituititmiitttitiHiitiiittiititnmutiitf 



Midsummer Beauties 



KAISERIN AND CARNOT ROSES, 

Lily of the Valley, Orchids, Choice Ferns 

and Fancy Cut Flower Stocks 

not procurable elsewhere can be obtained from 

THOMAS YOUNG, JR., 



Shipments made to distant points 
during August, with entire safety. 
Telephone 1803 Madison Sq. ^ 



43 West 28th St., 

NEW YORK CITY. 



McKellar dc Winterson 

Wholesale Dealers in Everything for Florists. 



CUT FLOWERS AND PLANTS. 

I'er 100 

Heanties, Ions Ifmoo to *25.00 

medium lo.oo to 15.00 

•' short ti.ooto 8.0(1 

Brides. Maids :i.00 to S.OO 

PerlCR and Meteors 3.00 to f>MO 

Carnations 1.00 to 1.50 

Asters, good 50 to I.(M) 

fancy 1.00 to 1.50 

Gladioli -J.OOto 3.00 

Valley 3.00 to 5.00 

Sweet I'eas 10 to .25 

Mlies S.OOto 10.00 

Adiantnm 50 to 1.00 

Common Ferns per 1000, Ifl.iHl 

Smilax per d07.., *l.00 to I.M 

Asparagus " .s.oo tn K.oo 

Full line of Field Grown Carnation Plants to offer. 



SEEDS AND BULBS. 

('alias, select, Xhi to l^-ln. diam., per 100...$5.oo 

IH to 1% " •' .. . 7.()0 

" •* 'J to 2H " " . . . fl 00 

Bermuda Freesias, %-in. and iip.'pcTHJOiJ .5.50 

>^ " " ■■ .... 6.50 

Harrisil Ijilies, l.onuitlorii ni. Roman H\tu'in1hs. 
Taper Whitus. Frires on applirutioii. 

All Dutch Bulbs in Season. 

Trade jikt. 

Pansy Seed. Florists' liest, oz., $8.00 $o.2.t 

Cyclamen, (J i ant. Flowered 50 

Calceolaria, Finest Mixture 50 

Cineraria. Choicest Mixture 50 

Gloxinia Hyiirida. Choicest Mixture 50 

Primnlii (ibconica. (;hoicest Mixture 50 

All Seeds and Bulbs in Season. 



SUPPLIES, ETC., ETC. 

Sphagnum, burlap bales, ea. SI. 00; 6 for .15.00 

wire pressed " .75; 6 for 4.0O 

Tobacco Stems, fresh. 200 lbs. for 1.50 

Preserved Cyciis Leaves, ass't. per 100 15.00 

Cape Flowers, white, per lb 85 

colored. " 1.50 

Tissue Paper, manilla, per ream 45 

white. ■• 1.00 

Wbx '■ manilla. " 1.40 

white. ■' 2.00 

Doves, first quality, ea. $1.00; per doz 10.00 

second " .85; " 9.00 

Rubber Aprons, ea, $I..50; per doz 15.00 

Full stock of all Supplies, including Ribbons, 
Tin Foil, Toothpicks. Baskets, \\'heat Sheaves, 
Houquet F*ins, Immortelles, Flower \'ases,. Jardi- 
nieres, Artilicial Palms, etc. 

Send for Complete Catalogue. 



Selling Agents for Glass, Building Material, Boilers, Putty, Mastica, Paints, Oils, 
Sod Crushers, White Lead, Walker's Fertilizers, Imperial Liquid 

Fertilizers, Insecticides, Etc. 



45, 47, 49 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO, ILL. 



rgoo. 



The American Florist. 



83 



Paper White 

flraodiflora 

...Calla Bulbs... 

Early French 

Von Sion 



Fern Balls 



London Market 

Valley 



"White Star Brand," the best selection of Grandiflora 
type of Narcissus offered to the trade, and florists to whom 
we have supplied same in past seasons will have no other. 
They arj strong growing, free blooming and show little of the 
tendency to come "blind" as does the "grandiflora" usually 
supplied. Please order early. 



Our Specialty, GROWN for us by Experienced Flor- 
ists, dug only when well ripened and cured in the shade. 
They are as free from disease as possible. First deliv- 
eries now ready. The stock can be carried in fair shape 
dormant and can often supply good, sound roots until 
December. Write for prices and samples. We carry large 
stocks. 



Under proper treatment these can be forced for Christ- 
mas. A valuable addition to the holiday list of cut flowers 
and should pay big. These have been successfully forced for 
two years past. Per 1000, $16.00. 



This Japanese novelty is a good seller and a money 

maker. If you have not done so, try them. liasily grown, 

sell quick. The demand has exceeded the supply every 
season. Order 100 of our agent. 



This selection of choicest Hamburg pips has not only 
been kept good by us but improved, and we shall deliver 
this Autumn (season permitting) the handsomest, evenly 
selected lot of quick forcing, large pips ever oflered. 



jVaughan'si 
i Forcing i 
Bulbs 1 



i 



Our Bulb 
Samples on the 
Convention 
Hall Tables 
have not been 
"picked for 
the occasion." 



Our Growers promise 
that they are only 
a fair representation of 
the general stock. 



ALL FLORISTS' BULBS IN SEASON. 



PANSIES 

Vaughan's "International." 

Received the only reward for Mised PansieR at the Worlds Fair. It if today belter aod more com- 
plete than ever. It contains the cream of the stock of ten Pansy specialists. There is no b'-rier mix- 
ture in existence, as all the florists who saw or used it can li-U you. Price, per iiz.. $10 00; 54 oz., $5.00; 
Xoz., 12.50; ", oz..$1.50; trade pkt., SCc. 

Vaughan's "Giant Mixture." 

This mixture is speciall}' made up by us from all of the aljove separate colors of Giant Trimardeau 
the Giant Bu^not and Cassier and several special strains which cannot bf had any other way. If your 
trade demands large flowers there is no b'-tter mixture. Price, per oz., $4.00; H oz., $1.00; 'g oz., 60c: 
trade pkt., 35c. 

Giant White, Giant Yellow, Giant Beaconsfleld, Giant Striped. Giaut Emperor William, Giant 
Paris Market; each, per trade pkt., 15c. 

Vaughan's Premium Pansies Mixed. 

Embraces all the varieties of the Fancy German sorts. We have sold this mixture for the past 
fifteen years and it has given general satisfaction. Per pkt., 25c; 'a oz., 80c; Vi oz., $3.00; oz., $5.50. 

CHICAGO PARKS BEDDING PANSIES, •'Choice iVIIxed, -In many colors. Pkt., 10c; M-oz , 30c; oz., 
$1.00; 4 oz. for $3.00. 

NIoxir Dgnexr i«M a c<-»rr«i«»«'»"~'*'° entirely new class of Pansies, of vigorous growth and 
PieW fansy iViaSLcrpieCc exceedingly large foliage. The flowers are of enormous size, 
and the edges of the petals crinkled and wavy to give the' flower the appearance of being double. The 
color.s are rich velvety brown, red, copper and maroon. A decided acqui>ition. Trade pkt., 350 seeds, 
25c; 3 pkts. for 6.5c 

Cyclamen, Qiant Flowered. Vaughan's Columbian Cinerarias. 

We have an extra flnc strain of this grand ' This mixture is this year liner and inore com- 

raarket plant. Tnsurpassed for size of bloom and Plete than ever 1 his ts a mixture of the finest 

variety of colors. 250 seeds at lOOO rate English, French and (.erman strains: the flowers 

100 1000 *^^ ^^^y large, from 7 to 9 inches m circumfer- 

seeds seeds ence and in the most brilliant colors. Per trade 

MoM Blanc, pure white $.76' $5.00 ' pkt., about 1000 seeds. 60o; 3 pkts for $1.25. 

Deep Crimson, very large 75 5.00 Cineraria Hybrida, large flowering mixed, trade 

Rom von Marienthal. pink 75 5.00 pkt.. 25<;. 

White, Carmine Eye 75 5.00 Cineraria, large flowering double mixed, trade 

Glint Flomered Sorts, best mixed, pkt., 50c. 

Jb oz., .fl.50 50 4.50 Cineraria, large (lowering dbl. white, t. pkt, 50c. 

10 per cent special cash dlsconnt ou orders over fi for Flotrer Seeds 
if the cash is enclosed. 



Gloxinia, Vaughan's Mixture. 

This mixture is made up by ourselves from the 
choicest spotted, tigered, edged, raarbl*'d and 
splashed sorts of the upright and horizontal type. 
Trade pkt., 1000 seeds, 50<-; 3 pkts tor $1.25. 
Asparagus Sprengerii, 50c per 100; ^.50 per 1000 

seeds. 
1 milax, new crop, trade pkt , 10c: oz., 30c. 

Chater's Prize Hollyhocks. 

Our seed of this has been saved from the finest 
and largest double Mowers only and will produce 
flowers extremely double and in the best, bright- 
est and most distinct colors. 

Sow now 
Double Pure White, '4 oz . 25c; 1 oz.. $1.00; trade 

pkt.. 10.-. 
Double Yellow, Pink. Purple, Red. Rose, Salmon, 

Crimson, each, '^ oz., 25c; 1 oz , 75c; trade 

pkt., 10c. 
Chater's Prize Hollyhocks, double mixed, '4 oz., 

25c; 1 oz., $1.00; trade pkt , 10c. 

Bellis, or Double Daisy. 

Mammoth Mixed and Mammoth White, each, trade 

pkt.. 25c: 1-lti-oz., 50c. 
Snowball, double wtiite; Longlellow, double pink; 

each, trade pkt.. 15<-. 
Foiget-Me-Not, Victoria, trade pkt., 10c; per "loz. 

25c. 

Sweet Peas. 

Extra Early Blanche Ferry, pink and white, jj lb.. 

lO.-; ill.. 30c; 5 lbs.. $1.35. 
Bl nche Ferry '4 lb., 10c; lb., 30c; 6 lbs.. 11.35. 
Emily Henderson, white, "4 lb., 12c; lb., 40c: 5 lbs., 

$1.50. 
Earl est 01 All, pink and white; M lb., 15c; lb., 

50c. 
New Countess lavender, U lb.. 10c; lb., 30c. 
But'erfly, white and lavender, I-4 lb.. 12c; lb., 35c. 
Salopian, best red: H lb.. 15c: lb., .50c. 
Vaughan's Florists' Mixture, consists of above and 

others; M lb.. 1.5c: lb., 40j. 

Vaughan's International Primula 
Mixture. 

This mixture is composed of the most salable 
colors of Single Flowering Chinese Primulas, the 
best whites, pinks and reds with a sprinkling of 
other colors, enough to give a largi.' variety of 
colors, the most important shades predominating. 
Price lor International Mixture, pkt. of 350 seeds, 
50c: 5 pkts., 1750 seeds, $2.00; per 1-16 oz., $2.50. 



CHICAGO: 

84-86 Randolph St. 



mmm $[ed store 



NEW YORK: 
14 Barclay Street. 



84 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 18^ 



One-Half Million Ferns 

Our stock of FERNS this season is larger and in better 
shape than ever, while the assortment is the best we ever 
oflered. 

Now is a good time to lay in a supply for fall and 
winter use ; the plants are all open frame grown and are 
well hardened, and in prime condition to ship. 

Special Low Prices on Ferns in lots of 2000 or more. 



NEPHROLEPIS EXALTATA BOSTONIENSIS 

(Boston Sword Fern.) 

We have a fine stock of this most popular variety. 

2Ji-inch pots 75c per dozen; $ 5.00 per lOJ; $40.00 per 10:0 

7-inch pots t9.00 " 75.00 



General Collection of Fine Ferns 



Adiantum vEmulum 

Anpitense 

Bausei 

Capilius-Veneris Manesii. 

Concinnum 

Cuneatum 



Decorum . 
Formosum . . . 
Farleyense . . 

GracilUmum. 

Li'grandi 



Variegatum . 
Grandiceps.. 



Bellum 

Mundulum 

Pubescens 

Rliomboideum. . 

Rhodophyllura . 



Wiegandi 2 

4 

2M 

3 

2« 

3 

-iH 

2M 

2)4 

3 

2K 



Alsophila Australia 

Asplenium Obtusilobum — 
Blechnum Occidentale 

Rubrura 

Cyrtomium Falcatum 

Fortuaei 

Ciiryolidium 

Davallii Fijiensis Pluinosa. 

Stric.a 

DJctyogramma Japonica — 

.JapoDicu Variegata.. 

Dickionia Antarctica 

Gymnogramma Sulphur^a. .. 



Inch pots Per 100 

2 15.00 

12.00 
12.00 
15.00 
4.00 
4.50 
6.00 
3.50 
15.00 
4.00 
4.00 
5.00 
15.00 
70.00 
4.00 
15.00 
5.00 
15.00 
5.00 
5.00 
3.50 
10.00 
15 OO 
5.00 
8.00 
5.00 
12.00 
8.00 

8.ro 

4.00 
6.00 
4 00 
4.00 
5. CO 
15.00 
4 00 
10. OO 
15.00 
6.00 
5.00 



•er lOCO 
t40.00 



30.00 
50.00 
30.00 

35.00 
35.00 
50.00 



35.00 



40. CO 
30.00 



40.00 



35,00 

35.00 
35.00 
40.00 

35.00 



2H 




Lastre^ Aristata \'ariegata . 

Chrysoioba 

Opaea 

Lomaria Ciliata 

Gibba 

Lygodium Scandens 



Dicbotomum 

Microlepia Hispida 

Nephrolepis Pectioata 

Nephrodium Hertipes 

Niphobolus Lingua 

Onychium .luponicum 

Platyloma Falrata 

Polypadium Aureum 

Polyitichum Coreaeeum 

Setosum 

Pterii Adiantoides 

Argyr:!'* 

Cretica Albo Lineata 

" Mayii 

" Magnitica 

" Wimsetti 

Drinkwateri 

Hastata 

Interuata 

Leptophylla 

Ouvrardii 

Serruiata 

Voluta 

.Sieboldi 

Palmata 

Sitolobiuni cicutariura. 

Selaginella Erailiana. .. 
MIXED FERNS, our selection. 



pots 


Per 100 


Per 1000 


2H 


$4.00 


$35.00 


2H 


4.00 


35.00 


2H 


4.00 


35.00 


2H 


4.00 


35.00 


2',( 


4.00 


35.00 


2M 


6.00 




4 


15.00 




3 


10,00 




3 


6.00 




5 


15.00 






4.00 


35.00 


4 


15.00 




2M 


4.00 


35.00 


2M 


5.00 


40.00 


2^ 


4.00 


35.00 


2W 


6.00 


50.00 


•m 


5.00 


40,00 


2M 


3 no 


26.00 


2M 


3.50 


30.00 


2H 


3.50 


30.00 


2') 


6.00 


50.00 


ZH 


3.50 


35,00 


2¥ 


4.00 


35.00 


2H 


4.00 


35.00 


2H 


3.50 


30.00 


2H 


3.60 


30.00 


2M 


3.50 


30.00 


2M 


3.50 


30.00 


2H 


3.00 


25.00 


2H 


3.50 


30.00 


2H 


3.50 


30.00 


2« 


3.60 


30 00 


2H 


6.00 




2 


3. ,50 


30.00 


2H 


3.00 


25.00 


3 


6.00 


50.00 



For a full line of DECORATIVE PLANTS and other SEASONABLE STOCK gee onr cnrrent OUARTERLY TRADE LIST, of which a 

copy wlU be mailed on application. If you have failed to receive one. 

Inwilaiinn Florists atti'nding the Convention in New York are cordially invited to visit our establishment at Riverton, N. .1. Our 
in VllflllUlli representatives will be found in Convention Hall, and will gladly give information as to the best way to reach Riverton. 

HENRY A. DREER, -sH- Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pteasp mentiim the Ame>ican Florist ii'hen wfitmg. 



None belter. We 
■ otier if unsold on 
I receipt of order. 



100 



They are Fine 



2100 Bridesmaid in 4 -in. pots $4.00 

1000 " "ZVi " 4.00 

1720 " "3 " 3.00 

500 " "2 •' 5.00 

300 Brides "4 " 4.00 

300 '■ -'3)4 " 4 00 

3500 '■ "3 " 3.00 

1200 " "2 ■' 2.00 

3000 Meteors "3 " 2.50 



1000 
$35.00 
35 00 
25.00 
20.00 
35.00 
35.00 
25 00 
20.00 
26.00 



100 lOOO 
.500 Mme. Chatenay. ..in4 -in. pots $4.00 

100 " " "2 " 2.00 

125 Mme. Cusine "4 " 3.50 

2.50 Lady Dorothea.... '■4 " 4.00 

150 " " ••2ii " 2 .50 

2000 Golden Gate "2'.i " 2.50 25.00 

700 Maid of Honor "4 " 3.00 

700 "2X '• 2 00 

5000 Brides and Maids in 3 and 4-in pots. These 
are carried over stock; they are good. We 
offer them at 112.00 per 1000. 



Latania Borbonica 3-in. 

Areca Lutescens 4 

(.'ocos Weddeliana 3 

.Asparagus Sprengerii — 6 

" " 4 

,...3 



. pots, $12.00 per 100 
20.00 
12,00 
25.00 
8.00 
6.00 
3.00 

V^icus Elastica. 6 in. pots 7oc to $1.50 each. 

Boston Fern. 8-in. pots . , . . $25 CO to $35,00 per 100 
Plan's are vigorous and unusually fine. Will be 
carefully packed, and we guarantee them to be right 
in every respect. 



LAKEVIEW ROSE GARDENS, jamestown. n. y. 



10,000 Chrysanthemums. 

Thrifty, young plants, from 2X^-in. 
pots. To close out, |2.50 per 100; 
$20.00 per 1000. List of varieties 
on application. 

Nathan Smith & Son, Adrian, Mich. 

Plcaic mentCon the Amey ican Florist when writing. 



Geranium 
America... 

$2.50 per do2. 



The QUEEN of 

all Geroniums. 

Conie and see, 
3000 plants in full 
lil'ioni. Good. 
strong stock plants 
from 4-inch pots, 

$20.00 per 100. 



HENRY EICnnOLZ, Florist, Waynesboro, Pa. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 



IN BEST 
....VARIETIES 



SPECIALTIES 

(V08E8t from 3>lnoh pots. 

CARNATIONS, tor all dellrerr. 
CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 
SMILAX. 

Prtoeilow. B«ndforUit. VIOLETS. 

WOOD BROTHERS, FISHKILL. N. V. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 85 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



♦ 



WHILE AT THE CONVENTION 

....DO NOT.... 

Buy Palms and Ferns 



X 

♦ 
♦ 

! 

X 



X 

♦ 



UNTIL YOU HAVE SEEN OUR 



MR. WALTER RETZER 



WHENEVER IN NEED OF THIS CLASS 
OF STOCK DO NOT PLACE YOUR 
ORDER UNTIL YOU HAVE WRITTEN TO 
US. WE ARE OFFERING EXCELLENT 
VALUES :::::::::::::::::: 



♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦<^»**»**»*»*****»*»» 



Walter Rctzcr & Co., 

Wholesale Growers of PALMS, 
FERNS and RUBBER PLANTS. 



2045-59 Clarendon Ave., (North Halsted St.) 

Chicago. III. 



86 



The American Florist. 




MR. OTTO WITTBOLD, representinq the 



Aug. i8^ 



Established 
1857. 



GEORGE WITTBOLD CO., 

PALMS AND FERNS 



....Ox-o-wex-s o* 



Will be at the Convention with samples, in the trade exhibition, of our new Nephrolepis Wittboldii, for which he will book 

orders for the first delivery of stock. Also for the following: 



Size Height Character Price 



Variety. Pot 

ABECA LTTTESCENS, 3 pi. in pot, S'i-in. 

IiATANIA BOBBONICA 2 

3 

3^ ■' 

4 

5 

6 

" 9 

KEN'TIA.BEI.MOBE&ITA 3 " 

3 

4 •' 

., 5 

5 •■ 

6 

7 

8 

KENTIA FOBSTEBIAITA 3 

3H •■ 

4 

t 5 " 

5 ■■ 



Inches 

6 8 

8- 8 

8-10 

12-15 

16-18 

16-22 

21-30 

30-36 

6- 8 

8-10 

10-12 

12-15 

18-20 

24 26 

31 40 

40-44 

8 10 

10-12 

10-12 

12-15 

18-20 



Leaves 
6- 9 



3- 4 
5- 7 
8- 9 

4- S 
4- 5 
4- 5 

3- 4 
3 5 

4- 6 
4- 5 
4- 6 



3- 4 
3- 4 
3- 4 



Each Do/,. 

.... }i2.00 

60 

.... 1.25 
.... 1.60 
3.00 
5.(0 
9.00 
30. CO 
2.00 
3.00 
3.fiO 
7.20 
12.00 
18.00 
27.00 
36.00 
2.00 
3.00 
3.R0 
7.20 
12.00 



t .25 

.50 

.75 

2.50 

.20 

.25 

.30 

.60 

1.00 

1.50 

2.25 

3.00 



.30 

.BO 

1.00 



Variety. 
Kentla Forsteriaua Continued. 



Size Height Character Price 
Pot Inches Leaves Each Doz. 



" " 4 pliiuts in pot, 

ABAUCAEIA EXCEI.SA, strong, 



FHCEITIX BECLIITATA.... 
ASFIDISTBA I.UBIDA ... 
SANSEVIBBA JAV. VAB. 



ASFAB F. ITAHTTS, nice plants. 

SFBENQEBII 

" " strong .. 



4 

5 

.10 

. 5 
2 

. 3 
. 4 
. 2 

. 5 
. 4 



24-28 
48.50 
50-58 
60-75 



40-45 
15-20 



6- 8 



1.50 
2.25 
3.25 
8.00 
.75 

i.oo 

1.25 

3.50 

.50 



18.00 
27.00 
39.00 



9.00 
12.00 
15.00 



6.00 

.60 

1.25 

2.00 

50 

.50 

3.0O 

2.00 



PTEBIB SEBBUIiATA 'rom 2-inch pots, per dozen, (0 50 

CBISTATA, •■ 2 50 

CBET. AIiBO-LIir " 2 .50 

CTBTOUIUU FAIiCATUU " 2 .50 



BUSINESS ADVERTISEMENTS. 

Advertisements are too often used. Not 
only as a medium to sell our goods but the 
one who buys tiiem. As I never sell those 
I sell to, I use this medium to induce all 
that 1 possibly can, to stop off at Philadel- 
phia (either going to or returning from tlie 
Convention of the S. A. F. O. H. in New 
York), to inspect my greenhouse plant. 

For up-to-date appointment, it is one 
of the best in America. It consists of over 
nine thousand feet of plate glass, and fifty- 
five thousand feet of the best greenhouse 
glass. However it is not tothe structure of 
my place (which is interesting to many), 
that I invite close scrutiny, but the magnifi- 
cence of the stock. 

Such stock is only possible to be grown 
in fine houses, and nurtured with skillful 
hands. As we have long been noted as the 
best Rubber (Ficus Elastica) growers in the 
world, it is almost needless to say that 
many thousands are here, showing our 
noted skill. Areca Lutescens which for 
beauty and grace are the peer of all palms, 
we have them in majestic form, towering 
from ten to fifteen feet high, and corpulent. 
Boston Ferns (Nephrolepis Exaltata Bos- 
toniensis), have captured much of our 
attention this year, and our three houses of 
them show the care of a specialist. Pan- 
danus Veitchii and Pandanus Utilis we have 
in quantities in the best of condition. 
Dracienas in varieties and many other 
decorative plants. 

It was not my purpose in this letter to 
give a full list of what I grow, but to invite 
you to come and see; then you will say 
that, "One-half has not been told." 

Take car marked 49. h and Chester Ave. 
on Walnut street and ride to 49th and 
Chester avenue. y^ ^ HAKRIS, 

SSth St. and Springfield Ave.. Philadelphia, fa. 



AT THE CONVENTION EXHI- 

WE CALL ATTENTION bition. we have a most 

Tfl nilR pyHIRiT flF COMPLETE and extensive 

CtUDICC nC DllUe COLLECTION AT OUR NURS- 

oAMrLbo Ur rALMo, eries, which you are cor- 

CROTONS, ETC., dially invited to call 

AND EXAMINE. 

ROBERT CRAIG & SON, 

49lh and Market SIreots, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Attention S. A. F. 

If you want a fine lot of 
Fancy Leaved Caladiums, 
Latanias, Phcenix, Cannas, 
Gardenias, Olea Fragrans 
and Azaleas, write os for 
prices. 

P. J. BERCKMANS CO., 

AUGUSTA. GA. 

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE. 

3-incli Bruanti Geranium, 3c; 2J4-iDch Begonia 
Dew Drop, 2!^c, 3-inch, 4c; SH-inch Marearit:i' 
Bt'gonia, 2i4o. 3-inch, 4c; 3-inch White Welto- 
inensis Hegonia, 4c; 3-inch Coccinea Bei^onia, 4c: 
2-inch Umbrella Plants, 2V^c. Cash offer or will 
exchnnt^H for Primroses. Ferns or Palms. They 
iifj all tiuf- plants. Guarantee satisfaction or 
iiinuev refuiidetl 

J. W. TATSS, Springfield, Ohio. 



100,000 FERNS 
IN FLATS - - - - 

At One Cent. 

Good, hardy plants in flats, twelve best 
market sorts. If potted now in small 
pots worth five times the money in a week 
or two. Safe arrival guaranteed, and 
liberal count. 

$10 per 1000 by Express. Sample 
100 Mailed for $1.25. 

Pteris Cretica Alba, P. Tremula, P. Sul- 
cata, P. Hastata, P. Adiantoides, P. 
Lougi folia, Adiantum, Lomaria, Lygo- 
dium, Nephrodium, Cristatum, Blechuum, 
Selaginelfas, etc., etc. Post orders Wash- 
ington. 

JOHN It. LEY, Good Hope, D. C. 

^riole^t«». 

BIG BARGAIN. 20,C00 Marie Louise; 
5,000 Swanley White, not a blemish of 
disease, grand plants, $IS per 1000. 

LINDSAY, The Florist, 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



rgoo. 



The American Florist. 



87 



THE 



^se Hill cN^rseries 



30 Minutes from Grand Central "Depot, 
42dSt., by N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 



cHem RocheUe, N. Y. 



Our Carriages tuill 
meet all trains. .'. 
All members of the 
S. A. F. attending 
the Contention are 
cordially in'vited. 
E-veryone interested 
in Floriculture 
should see Rose 
Hill Nurseries. .' . 
There is no other 
place like it in the 
country. 




WHAT THE ROSE HILL 
NURSERIES GROW 



Palms — Every Commercial Variety, in Quan- 
tities. 

Orchids — All Leading Varieties for Cut Flowers 

Ferns — From smallest Jardiniere Ferns to larg- 
est Tree Ferns. 

Stove Plants — All the Valuable Sorts fat Decor- 
ative Purposes. 

Neiv Plants of Merit. 

Dracaenas — All the Best Decorative Varieties. 

Crotons — The Best Collection in the Trade. 

Greenhouse Plants — All the Useful Kinds. 

Roses — For Outdoor Planting. 

Greenhouse and Hardy Out-Door Vines — -/// 
Leading Sorts. 

Nepenthes — Pitcher Plants. 
Hardy Herbaceous and Perennial Plants. 
Shrubs — All J'arieties — Ornamental and Flow- 
ering. 
Conifers — Evergreens, etc, in Great Variety. 
Aquatic Plants^ Lfardy and Tropical. 
Bay Trees — All Forms and Sizes. 
Box Trees — Standard and Pyramid Forms. 



STAGES FOR "ROSE HILL NURSERIES WILL MEET THE 9 and W O'CLOCK 
TRAINS IN THE MORNING AND THE 2 O'CLOCK TRAIN IN THE AFTERNOON, 
FROM GRAND CENTRAL DEPOT, AT NEW ROCHELLE STATION, EVERY DAY 
DURING THE CONVENTION. 



SIEBRECHT & SON, Proprietors 



88 



The American Florist. 



Aug. i8, 



Worcester. 

VARIOUS CONDITIONS IN EASTERN MASSA- 
CHUSETTS.— DRY WEATHER RETARDS 
CARNATIONS. 

After a month of unusually dry and 
exceedingly hot weather, we are experi- 
encing a week of almost steady rain and 
the thermometer has dropped from the 
vicinity of 100° to 60°. Although the 
sudden change in temperature is almost 
too much of a good thing, the rain is 
badly needed and will be of great benefit 
to various crops in the field. Carnations, 
especially, were sadly in need of rain and 
are not nearly as large as at this time 
last year. Of the newer varieties Crocker 
has made the best growth, closely fol- 
lowed by The Marquis and Mrs. Lawson. 
Crane has snfiered severely from stem rot 
in many localities and Bradt has also 
been affected. No one in this vicinity 
has begun housing carnations yet, but 
the houses are being repaired and gotten 
in condition and another week will prob- 
ably see lifting in full swing. Roses are 
in fine condition and Liberty looks very 
promising. Chrysanthemums are com- 
ing along nicely and the number planted 
is t qual to last year. 

H. F. A. Lange and C. C. Lange will 
attend the convention and are the only 
delegates from here of whom I have 
heard. Lange is finishing a new house 
27x150, cement walls and 10x16 butted 
glass. 

H. A. Cook, of Shrewsbury, is not sat- 
isfied with his water supply and will 
sink an artesian well and put in a steam 
pump. A. H. L. 



St. Paul, Minn.— James Souden, for 
the past eight years general manager of 
the greenhouse department of L. L. May 
& Co., will enter the employ of L. S. 
Donaldson, of Minneapolis, in a similar 
capacity, Mr. Donaldson having pur- 
chased the establishment of the C. A. 
Smith Floral Co. 

Continued to Sept. 1st. 

100,000 DiAntd for sale at half 
Drice and less to make room. 

Roses— 20,000 strictly Al plants, 8V4 and 4-in. 
(big fellowfl). Bride, Perle, Meteor, Maid and 
Golden Gate, only 4c; worth 10c. The sarae In 2V4 
and 3 in., only S*'; cheap iit 6c. 

Sm Ha X— 15.000 double extra, jruaranteed as good 
as you ever planted, $1.00 per 100, 110.00 per lOOO; 
as many as you want. 

Oeranlums— 10,000 Bruantl (dbl. scarlet) and S. 
A. Nutt, the two best selling Geraniums of the 
ag*-: Ro.se Geraniums and lO,00(t other leadintr 
bedders; strong 2^ and 3-in., only 81.50 per 100. 
Bear in mmd this is only the price of Rooted Cut- 
tings, and you cunt buy them for d<)uble that in 
a month. 

Dbl. Fringed Petunias and Coleus— In superb 
collection. AEeratum I'rinci-ss Pauline and 
White Lady, only Ic. 

Fuchsias— Strong 4-in.. ll.O) per doz. ; 2 and 2V4- 
in.. $1.50 per 100. 

Calla Bulbs — Strong 8 and 10c si/e for 5c. 
Cash With Ordku 

SOUTN SIDE FLORAL CO.. Springfield. III. 



♦♦♦»»»♦»»♦»»»♦♦»♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

^ ELECTROS... 4 ^ 

for Catalogue Purposes. 

WE have a large assortment of 
strictly high-class halftones of 
which we can supply electros suitable 
for catalogue illustration. If you need 
anything in this way, state your re- 
quirements and we will submit froofs 
of the illustrations in stock 
Price lor cash only 16 cents per square inch. 

4 THE AMERICAN FLORIST CO., 4 

324 Dearborn St.. CHICAGO. 



JOHN YOUNG 

SI West SSth Street, 

NEW YORK CITY, 

Offers B^^l" Gfe^€k& 

AMERICAN BEAUTIES, 
LILY OF THE VALLEY 
^ND CARNATIONS. 

All Specially Grown for Summer Demand. 



S. \. r. VISITORS INVITED TO CALL. 



4 



>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 



J. B. DEAMUD, 

Wholesale Carnations, 



Valley. 



Roses, Violets. 
Orclilds and lums 



IN SUSON. 



Florist, f 



51 WABASH AVENUE, 
CHICAGO. 



Consignments of Good Stock Solicited. 

First-class FERNS, $J.OO per J 000, always on hand. 



» ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ i 



For 

Immediate 

Shipment. 



AXX Stock 

CYCLAIMEN PERSICUM SPLENDENS GIGANTEUM- 

Finest strata in the world. Now ready to 
ship; a splendid stock of plants in four true 
colors, red. white, pink, and white with car- 
mine eye, from 2!4-inch pots, $5.00 per 100: 
$40.00 per 1000: from 3-inch pots, $7.00 per 
100, (65 00 per 1000. 250 at the 1000 rate. 

SPECIAL OFFER. CINERARIA HYBRIDA MAXIMA 
GRANDIFLORA and Maxima Grandiflora Nana. 

strain supert) in every way, transpliiiitcd from 
Hats, stroni; plants, St. BO per 100: $12.50 per 
1000. 350 at the 1000 rate. 
CHINESE PRIMROSES, (ready Aug. l.^th) in the 
finest market varieties, includinf; blue, double 
white and red. from 2!<-in. pots, $2.50 per 100. 

ALL STOCK GUARANTEED A No. I. 

PAUL MADER, East Stroudsburg, Pa. 



Gardeners' Chronicle. 

A Weekly llluftrated Journal. 

SBTABLIBHU) 1541. 

The "GABDBN1IB8' CHBONICI.B" tau been FOB 
owB Firrr ykarb thb Liadino journal of lu 
olaii. It has aohleved this position t>eoaaBe, while 
■peolaliy devotlnK lt«elf to sapplylngtbe dally reaalre- 
mentfl of Kardenera of ail olassee. mnoh of tne Infor- 
mation famished Ib of saoh seneral and permanent 
Talne, that the 'QARDBNBBB' CH BONICUl" ll 
looked np to as the standard authoritt on the 
■nbjeota of whloh It treats. 

Babaortptlon to the United BUtea, M. 30 per T*ar. 
Bamlttanoea to be made payable to B. Q. COVB. 

0»»I0I;— 
41 Welllnglon SI., Co«»n Garden, London, England. 



OUR DIRECTORY FOR 1900 WILL BE MAILED TO YOU - 
PROMPTLY UPON APPLICATION. PRICE, TWO DOLLARS.- 



I 
I 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 89 



% Tacts Which ^peak for Themselves % 

^ RECORD MADE BY 3 

I THE QUEEM I 
I or EDGEEY I 



WINNER OF niGMBST HONORS WHEREVER SHOWN 

ORIGINATED FOUR YEARS AGO AS A SPORT OF AMERICAN BEAUTY AT THE 
NURSERIES OF THE FLORAL EXCHANGE, Inc., EDGELY, PENNSYLVANIA 



MARCH 27, 1900, Exhibited Pirst Time, 
Rose Show, Eden Musee, . . . New Yori< 
GDRTIFIGATB OF MERIT 



April 3, 1900, Report of Judges, Phila. Florists' Club 

WE ARE CONVINCED THAT THIS VARIETY IS A VALUABLE ADDITION TO THE LIST 
OF FORCING ROSES , BEING IN EVERY RESPECT, EXCEPT COLOR, THE EXACT 
COUNTERPART OF THE AMERICAN BEAUTY. THE COLOR IS A BEAUTIFUL, BRIGHT 
PINK, WHICH IS GOOD, EVEN IN THE FULL FLOWERS. THE FRAGRANCE IS ALSO 
AS FINE AS THAT OF BEAUTY , AND THE EXHIBITED BLOOMS SHOWED 
REMARKABLE VIGOR . 

SIGNED: ROBT. KIFT, JOS. HEACOCK, WM. MUNROE. 



April 17, 1900, SILVER MEDAL awarded by Penna. Horticultural Soc. 
May 5, 1900, SILVER MEDAL awarded by Mass. Horticultural Soc 
May 9, 1900, SILVER MEDAL awarded by the American Institute, N. Y. 



i Plants Ready for Distribution ^b^jj^^^ ^ % 



SEND FOR BOOKLET TO 

Or to 



The Floral Exchange, Inc» % 



JX ROBT. CRAIG & SON, Eaitem Agts , 

X^ 49,h and Market Streets, Philadelphia. 335 JVforth Sixth Street, PHILADELPHIA, PA. :3 

S^ E. G. HILL & CO., Western Agts., "i:^ 

» Richmond, Indiana. ' 'J 

^iiiiiUiiiiiiiiiuaiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiUiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiUiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiUiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu^ 



90 



The American Florist. 



Aug. j8, 



Grand Rapids. 

LITTLE ACTIVITY EXCEPT IN THE BUILD 
ING LINE. — BYEEYBODY ADDING NEW 
GLASS. 

It is hot as blazes and there isn't any 
business. The summer resorts are in full 
blast and so are the building operations. 
Nearly everyone is building or has built 
this season and a great many are not 
only adding to their glass but are remod- 
eling old houses. The following now 
have constructions under way, although 
some oi them have been previously 
reported as contemplated. 

Henry Smith is adding a new violet 
house and is rebuilding two old struct- 
ures into one large house. Eli Cross is 
adding two houses to his range for violet 
growing. Crabb & Hunter are adding 
two violet houses and are rebuilding three 
small houses into one large one for roses. 
Mulic Brothers are also converting two 
small structures into one modem one. 
Freyling & Mendalls are building a new 
rose house, James Schols is putting up 
a house lor general stock and the Grand 
Rapids Floral Company is adding two 
houses. Hill & Pohlmann are building 
three violet houses and Charles Chad- 
wick is putting up 40,000 feet of glass, 
mostly for carnations. It looks as 
though Grand Rapids' output would be 
materially increased this year, doesn't it? 

G. F. C. 



Elkhart, Ind.— A. H. DuBois, of the 
Elkhart Floral Co., and John Sutlif, of 
Hill's Greenhouses, are on a bicycle trip 
to the home ot the former at Peoria, 111. 



i60,000 

FIELD-GROWN 

Carnation Plants 



Argyle, 
Pingree, 
Tidal Wave, 
Evelina, 
Gold Nugget, 



Flora Hill, 

Triumph, 

Scott, 

McGowan, 

Armazindy, 



IVr 100 $4.00; per 1000 135,00. 

ROSE PLANTS. 
METEOR 1 ^ ,, , , 

RDinFCMlin I ^''"m 2'/, iinil 3-iu. pots, 
DKIUEMM/IIU y Per 100, 13.00; 1000, $28.00. 

BRIDE ) 

AMERICAN BEAUTY, 3 inch pots, per loo, 

$5.0(1; per 1000, J45.O0. 

GEORGE REINBERG, 



C 



51 Wabash Ave. 



CHICAGO. 



►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 



Cheap 



WE STILL HAVE 
TO CLOSE OIT 

2BO0 Maids. 'iM-nx.. 50O La France, 2V4-i" , 

1000 Perlei. 2'i-in., lOOO Meteori. 3-iD.. 

600 Am. Beaulies,2->.iD., 500 Kaiterin, 2 in. 
Boston Ferns now ready for 5 and 6.in pots. 

wn.TE FPU I'K.cKs. Geo. A. Kuhl. Pekin III. 

ROSES ^ 

CAyU WITH OllDKIt, ri.KAHE. 

ALBERT F. AMLING, Maywood, III. 



^iMMMMMMmMMHWMMMMHiV^ 



Genevieve 



con- 



ANOTHER year's trial 

vinces us that it is not 
only a worthy successor to Wm. 

LP Scott, but far superior to that 
i 1 1 1 11 k^^ % variety in every way. In short 
If ^\ ^J \^'^ ^ it is the finest pink Carnation 
— p to date, all things considered. 

% "We offer a limited number of 
field grown plants as follows: 

FIRST SIZE, $12. oo per loo 

SECOND SIZE, $10.00 per loo 

Also a few other varieties. Write for prices, etc. Delivery Sept. 1st. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

H. WEBER & SONS, Oakland, Md. 



25,000 Carnations 25,000 



FIELD GROWN PLANTS OF THE FOLLOWINQ VARIETIES : 



1.5,000 Flora Hill $ 5.00 per 100 

4,000 White Cloud 8.0O 

1.000 Mrs. Bradt 10. OO 

1,000 G. H. Crane 10 00 " 

1,000 McGowan 4.00 



3,000 Eldorado 4.00 per 100 

1,000 Wm. Scott 4.00 " 

1,000 Daybreak 5.00 " 

500 Emily Pierson 4. CO " 



These Plants are all in first-class condition, sood size and healthy stock. 
Write me if you are in need of a large quantity. 



CHAS. CHADWICK, 'qc^boxm. Grand Rapids, Mich. 



CARNATION PLANTS FOR SALE. 

25,000 Carnations at $3.50 to $5.00 per 100; $28. to |38.00 per 1000. Flora Hill, McGowan, 
White Daybreak, Scolt, Cerese Queen, Victor, Eldorado and others. 

STEAIVl PIPE WANTED. 

I will take in exchange for Carnation Plants, 8 to 1200 feet of 1-inch and 3-inch, and 
150 feet of 4-inch new or second-hand Steam Pipe. State price and condition. 

W. H. WATSON, Lapeer, IMichigan. 



Carnations ^ ZIk' 

Field Qrown, Heavy and Stocky. 

TIUUMPH, MRS. .lOOST, ARGYLE, MELBA, 
GLACIER, FLORA HILL, J.5.00 PER HUNDRED 

JOY & SON, Nashville, Tenn. 


rr r\r\f\ FIELD GROWN 
^3\J\J\J CARNATIONS. 

We have the following varietios in excellent 
shape for shipment: PinKree, Triumph, Evelina, 
Flora Hill, America, Gold Nugget, J. A. Newbv, 
McHurnev, Armazindy. Crane, liradt, Daybreak, 
I'lc. Write for prices before placing your order. 

W. W. COLES, Kokomo, Ind. 






^!i;^"^ CARNATIONS 

WITH PLENTV OF ROOTS. 

Send for prices of thirty-five best new 
and standard varieties. 

GEO. HANCOCK & SON, 


WM. MURPHY 

Wholesale Carnation Grower 

station f, CINUNNAri, OHIO. 






Schmidt's Pansies NercT^p^On^"!, 

WVIIIIIIMI ■ ••"•■•• re-dy; no matter 
what you pay, you onnrot net a hetter strain ; li 
ounce, tl.^&; Mi ounce, 12 00; one ounce, (4 00. 

J. C. SCHMIDT, BRISTOL. PA. 


Carnations. ^*«\;^w«. 

Now riiady for plnuting in. Strong stock. 
DANA R. HERRON, Olean, N. Y. 



J 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



91 



^MMMMMMHiMiMiMiMJ4^^MM^i^MMiWMMMMMMH^ 



Extra 
Fine 



Held Grown Carnations 



4000 GENEVIEVE LORD - 
2400 CHICAGO 

250 MRS. JAS. DEAN 
2000 GEN. MACEO 

200 GEN. GOMEZ - 

800 JOHN YOUNG 
5000 MRS. FRANCES JOOST 

250 ARGYLE 
5000 ARMAZINDY 
7000 EVELINA 
8000 \A^ILLIAM SCOTT 

900 FLORA HILL 



Per 100 


Per 1000 


$10.00 


$75.00 


- 7-50 


60.00 


5.00 




- 8.00 


60.00 


8.00 




6.00 


50.00 


5.00 


40.00 


4.00 




4.00 


30.00 


4.00 


30.00 


4.00 


30.00 


4.00 


30.00 



Blooms of all leading varieties, including Mrs. Thos. W. Lawson and The 

Marquis, unlimited quantity, shipped direct 

after September J 5. 

CASH MUST ACCOMPANY ORDER. 

CHICAGO CARNATION CO.. joliet. ill. 




•V,-\/-y.— \/-V,H-V— ^,« 



I In regard to the coming Pink Carnation 






@ 



IRENE 



® 



^ 



See GEORGE F. CRABB, 

of Crabb 8z Hunter, Grand Rapids, Mich., 
at the New York Convention 



I 



L^£41£-J ^ £4 ' C4^O0t I Ct 



CARNATIONS! 

F. Corner & Sons Co., 

^ ^LA FAYETTE, IND. 

Please mention the A merica n Florist when w* iting. 

ADADftAIII ^ buvea few hundred Held 
DAnUHIIIi u^rowQ c.'irnation plauLs At 
Snap Bargain. I '>r prices and varieties address 

W J.MILLER 403 E. Water St.. PONTIAC, ILL 

Please mention the American Florist ivhen luniing. 



Bit, PRIMROSES 

50,000 finest large flowering fringed 1000, $17.00; Per 100, $2.00 

Obconica grand., fimbriata, rosea and Forbesi " 2.00 

Obcoiiica grandiflora and rospa, ready Sept 1st.. 

Asoaraous ' Sprengerii $3.00 per 100 Pansy Seed, large flowering, 

» 1 Plumosus 4.00 " otjnce, $4.00 

Cinerarias, August 20 $2.00 per 100. 

JOS. H. CINNINGHAM, Delaware, 0. 



CASH PLEASE. 



92 



The American Florist. 



Aug. i8, 



About Novelties. 

The love of novelty is inherent in human 
nature. Nevr drinks and amusements 
have their voRue if a test proves satisfac- 
tory; new styles in dress may be seen and 
examined, but how hidden behind the 
insidious description in printer's ink is 
the true character of the plant novelty 
grown from seed? How true to the allur- 
ing description of the catalogue will be 
the product of the tiny seed that costs so 
much? Only time will tell. Novelties 
produce more disappointment and, 
again, more pleasure than all the balance 
of the catalogue. Ninety per cent of 
them are failures, yet the other ten per 
cent more than make up for the disap- 
pointment of the majority. 

This year has produced three good 
novelties, two in the seed line and one 
among tuberous plants. The new "mina- 
tnre double sunflower" is worthy the 
occupancy of any garden. In the flower 
the center is quite double, two inches in 
diameter and composed of a multitude 
of small, narrow, yellow petals, while 
the outer ray petals are broad and an 
inch in length. The flowers are borne on 
long stems, last well and are quite dec- 
orative. 

Next comes the pink ostrich-feather 
aster, a good companion to the white 
form introduced a few years ago. To 
the lover ot dahlias who has not grown 
the new cactus variety, Aegir, there is 
new pleasure ahead. It is an early 
bloomer and a good grower. The flow- 
ers are some four inches in diameter. It 
is aptly described as follows: "An entirely 
new and distinct form in cactus dahlias. 
The petals are tubular or quilled, twisted 
and arranged in the most fantastic yet 
regular form; color a rich, warm cardinal 
scarlet. " In this case the writer could not 
draw upon his imagination, as the flower 
itself exceeds in beauty anything words 
could express. W. C. E. 

Asparagus Plumosus 

Fine 3-in. Slock. $6.00 per hundred 

CASH 
WITH 
ORDER 
Fine 3-in. Stock, $2.S0 per hundred. pLEASE. 



REDUCED PRICES 
TO CLOSE OUT. 



==Smilax== 



VAN WERT GREENHOLSES, 



.VAN WERT, OHIO. 



^TX/>T T"¥^Ck From pots, AI stock, free 
V XV Jif Xl JL O from disease; Lady Cainp- 

b«-Il. M. Louise and Farquhar, $2.50 per 100. ^ 

per 1000. New Imperial, 13 per 100, |25 per 1000. 
ROSES, line plants of Meieor and PtTle, from 3-in. 

pots, at $3 per 100, or $25 pi-r 1000; iilso 3-incli 

Brides and Maids same price. 
300 bushy SMILAX PLANTS at H.50 per 100. 

CRABB & HUNTER, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

BOSTON FERN," and 8-in. puns JlSand $1B per do/.. 
GERANIUMS, S.'A.Nuttand others, .■)-iu.,»4 per 100. 
NEP. CORDATACOMPACTA, 3 in , J.S.00 per 100; fi- 

in., 120.00 p.T 100. 
ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS, JH-in., ».S per lOO, $40 

p< r 1000. ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI). 3>4-inch, 

$4.00 per 100; 130.00 per 1000. 
SMILAX, transplanted, heavy, 50u piir 100. 



Cabh Please. 



Carl Hagenburger, 



W. Mentor 
Ohio. 



SPECIALTIES 



For Fall 
Delivery. 

VINCA MINOR and MA )OR. 

TUBEROSES— Pearl and Single Variesated. 

CALADIUM ESCULENTUM. 

25,000 .\rbor Vlt:is from IH-in. to 5 ft. Dionaea 

Mutcipula. and all nativf' hot; plants. 
IF intkbestf:d. write to 

JAMEiJ M. LAMB. Fayetteville. N C. 

Allen's Defiance. se«d Tf^nn sf|(M-i,t?(l spikes, ^5c per 

pki., ^!|.00 per ounci'. 

vl. C. SCHMIDT, BRISTOL, PA- 



FIRST QUALITY FORGING ROSES. 

Fully equal to those sent out the last elpht years, flrst-cla-^s and perfectly healthy In every respect. 
Only selected Krowtb from llowerInK shoots used In propanatlog. 

AMERICAN BEAUTY, METEOR. KAI8ERIN. SAFRANO, BRIDESMAID, 

BON SILENE, PERLES, MAID OF HONOR. BRIDE. 

:i-lnch pots. K 00 per 100. 4-Inch pots, tn OO per 100. 



GRAFTED ROSES. 

J. I-,. i3irvi*oi«. 



Maid of Honor, Co1d«n Gate, 3^-lnch pots. tl6 00 per 100. 

Liberty, 41nch pots, $8 00 per dozen, fifty plants tor «24.00. 



:^ivOoa«®:i3tri*Ci, i»a.. 



STRONG SELECT 3-1N6H ROSES. 



Special prii-e to sell, StrouR enough to bloom soon. Will make you money. Pi'r 100 

lo.ooo Maids and brides $4.00 



2H-inch, 3-inch. 

Per lOU Per 1000 Per 100 Per 1000 

Brides $3,00 835,00 $5,00 $15,00 

Maids 3,00 35.00 

Cloth. Soupert. 3,00 25.00 5.00 45.00 

Meteor 3.00 26,00 5.00 45.00 

Am. Beauty 8.00 75.00 



Pit lUOO 

$35.00 

3,ooo PERLES, 5.00 45.00 

j:^=Xhis stock is well worth $t>.00. We t.'uarantee it to give s:itisl:ietion. 

W. H. GULLETT & SONS, Rose Growers. LINCOLN. ILL. 

AHERICAN BEAUTY, four-inch, selected. $15.00 per lOO. LIBERTY, four-inch, J75.00 per 100 
iVlAID, BRIDE, PERLE, SM-inch, »8 00; 4-inch, IIO.OO. Also SUNSET, METEOR, iVIOROAN, MER- 
MET, LaFRANCE, NiPHETOS, KAISERIN, GOLDEN GATE, MAID OF HONOR, ORAFTBD 
BRIDE, «20.UO per 100, large 4-in. ASPARAGUS PLUnOSUS, all sizes. MARIE LOUISE VIOLETS, 
!*MILAX. A. S. MacBEAN. LAKEWOOD. N. J. 

NEW SEEDLING ROSE 

WINNIE DAVIS. 

'L'his '„'rand rose should be ixrown by every 
llorist as a pot plant, or for forcing, being a cross 
between Kaiserin Aug. Victoria and Belle Sie- 
brecht. Color, apricot pink, shading to a llesh 
tint; odor ot a most delicious ripe fruit. Shape 
being oblong and well formed, when fully open 
resembling a sunburst, whicli is most strikingand 
beautiful. A very free and vigorous growt-r and 
bloomer. Color never changes in dark weather 
like most colored roses. Magnificent light green 
glossy foliuge. Strong thrifty plants, 2>4-in. pots, 
$5.00 per doz.; $25.00 per 100. 

JASMINES. 

.Jasmiiiums: Maid of Orleans, Grand Duke, 
Grandillora. Sambac or Arabian, Revolution, 
strong thnftv plants, ."i-inch pots, $6 00 per 100. 

Address ^U & NEUNER. 

582 Fonrth Ave., I.OUISVII.I.E, KY. 

TO CLOSE OUT. I^ose F»lants. 

BOB American Beauties 2H-in., 15 00 per 100, or 

J20,00 for the ,^00, 
30OO Kaiserin, 2000 Golden Gale, 2000 Bridesmaid, 

lOOO Mi'ieor, 500 Garrett, 500 Hride, 500 Perle, 

500 Mcrmet, 3 and 3(4-ln., $:),00 per 100, or 

125,00 per 1000, 
These are Fine Plants. Cash With Order. 

MRS. J. W. CROUCH, Chattanooga, Tenn. 



Per 100 Per 1000 
Mixed Jardiniere Ferns, mostly 

pteris varieties $3.00 $25,00 

Asparagus Sprengerii, 2Vi-in 4.0O 35.00 

Plumosus, •• 6.00 55.00 

Adiantum Farleyense, fine stock, 6-in. pots, 50c each 

Per 100 

Smilax. 3-inch t 4 00 

Dracaena Terminalis, 4-inch 15.00 

Phoenix Canariensis, elegant stock, 4H to 5- 

iuch 20.00 

Chamaerops Excelsa, .5-inch 25.10 

4 " 20.00 

J. B. HEISS, 

DAYTON. O. 



ROSES 



CLEAN. HEALTHY 

PLAN IS, 

FROM 3-INCH POTS. 

American Beauty and Kaiserin $6.00 per 100 

Perle and LaPrance 6,00 " 

Meteor, Albany, Sunset. Golden Gate, 

llridc, Bridesmaid, Wootton 4,00 " 

Perlf, Suiset, LaPrance, Uride, 
Kridi-sni.'iid, Meteor. Kai6*Tin and 
Golih'u Gate, from 3-inch pots 3 50 " 

JOSEPH HEINL, Jacksonville, III. 

ROSE PLANTS. 

in Perfect Condition; A Good Bargain to iUalte Room, 

Per 100 I Per 100 

Met.'or, 3!4-in $3,50 | Brides, 3-in $3.00 

liriih's,3'/2 and 4-in, 4.00 I Perles.V Maids 3.in, 3.00 
Uraiities, 3-iu 3,50 | B.iiuities,3i4-4-in, 5.00 

BROWN & GANFIELD. 

SP WINCFIELD. - ILLINOIS. 

FRUIT AND FLOWER PLATES 

Seed Packets and Supplies ol all kinds lor 
NURSERYMEN, FLORISTS and SEEDSMEN 

SB33Sr33 arOK. FK.IOB} XiIST. 
Btook Cat», lOo. per square Inch. BntrravlnR by all 
prooessea. PrlntlnKand Llthofrraphlng. Illustrated 
OfttalOKueH a spectalty. 

VREDENBURG & CO., Rochester, N. Y. 



Firot. class, healthy Plants. To close out 
we quote the following low pricet. ; 

500 Beauties 3-iucli, $4 00 per 100 

1000 Perle s 3 ■ 3.00 

1000 Meteors 3 '■ 3.00 

800 Bridesmaids 3 " 3.00 

400 Brides 3 " 3.00 

A.G PRINCE & CO , 76 & 78 Wabash Av.,Chicago. 

3,000 Meteor Plants. 

3^-inch pots per 100, $3.00; p<T 1000, 
$35.00. Big. strong and in primp condi- 
tion. Altboiigh the season is well advanced 
with these plants there is a reasonable 
chance of success. 

BRANT & NOE, Forest Glen, Chicago, III. 

Surplus Roses. 

175 BRIDES 4-inch, good stock at 
t3.50 per hundred or J5.50 for the lot. 

JOS. M. SMELY. 
A.*;irorei, - 111. 

ImproTed Strain. 1900 Crop. 

Cyclamen Persicum Giganteum 

Whitf with red eye, dark red, pink (light and 
(lark). 100 seeds, 80c; 1000 seeds, $7.00. Montblanc. 
|ture white, very fine and fragrant, 100 seeds, $1.00; 
1000 seeds. f8.00. 500 at 1000 rate. Above seeds 
just arrived from Germany. Guaranteed Al. Try 
tlicm. Terms <'ash. 

CONRAD tICHHOL/. Box 1036. Warren. Pa. 

Please yneutinn (fn- Ami > it an Flunst -ivhen wytlin^. 



TELL THEM WHERE YOU SAW THE AD. 



I goo. 



The American Florist, 



93 



BEGONIA GLOIRE DE LORRAINE 



LARGEST STOCK IN THE COUNTRY 




BEGONIA GLOIRE^DE LORRAINE. 
Specimen Christmas Plant fi^m wliich Our Stock is Propagated. 

Per 100. Per 1000. 

Oltnypia J12.00 

Genevieve Lord 12.00 

The Marquis 1"00 

Ethel Crocker 10.00 

Morning Glory SOO I'S.OO 

Flora HiU Sport 1000 

RedBradt 8.00 75.00 

Mrs. James Dean *'00 50.00 

White Cloud 600 50.00 



... IN PERFECT HEALTH 

This is one of the most striking plants that 
has been introduced for many years. The 
habit of the plant is compact and dwarf, 
making handsome specimens 14 inches in 
height and breadth. Its chief attraction is 
its extreme floriferousness, the entire upper 
part of the plant being literally covered with 
its brilliant, clear, pink flowers to such an 
extent that the foliage is usually hidden. It 
has been grown extensively around Boston, 
New York and Philadelphia, and brought in 
in splendid shape for Christmas sales, and 
the entire stock grown was sold at prices 
ranging from |2.50 to |4.00 each, wholesale, 
the same plants retailing at from |5.00 to 
110.00 each. It promises to be more exten- 
sively grown than ever for that purpose and 
is undoubtedly one of the most useful Christ- 
mas plants now in existence. 

PRICE 

For fine strong plants, September and 
October delivery, from 

Per do/. Per 100. Per 1000. 

lYz inch pots $2.50 $17.50 $175.00 
3K inch pots 4.00 30.00 

We shall have a fine stock of plants in 5 and 
() inch pots, in full flower for Christmas and 
Easier. Prices upon application. 

Field-Grown ♦ . . ♦ 
Carnation Plants 

The stock of field-grown Carnations which 
we offer for sale this season is in especially 
good condition. The plants have been grown 
upon good soil; the season has been favor- 
able, and we have been less afflicted with 
plant diseases of all descriptions than at any 
period heretofore in the history of our Car- 
nation growing. We invite attention to our 
price list below, and would be pleased to 
have intending purchasers call and examine 
the stock. Having a large stock of plants 
and every facility for packing and shipping 
promptly, we can fill all orders on the short- 
est possible notice. 

Per 100. 
G. H. Crane, extra selected | 8.00 

2nd size 6.00 

Gen. Maceo, extra size 8.00 

2nd size 5.00 

Gen. Gomez, 1st " 7.00 

2nd " 5.00 

Mrs. G. M. Bradt, extra selected 8 00 

2nd size 6.00 

Wm. Scott 5.00 

L. McGowan 5 .00 



Per 1000. 


175.00 


50.00 


75.00 


40.00 


60.00 


40.00 


75.00 


40.00 


40.00 



^GERANIUMS: 



STRONG STOCK FROM 2>i INCH POTS 



Granville, Mme. Buchner, Eulalia, Countess de Harcourt, 
per 100 $3 

Caesar, Kleber, Modesty, Miss F. Perkins, Mars, Rena 
Bazin, Marvel, Mme. Jaulin, H. de Parville, S. A. 
Nutt, Mrs. J. M. Gaar, H. Dauthenay, per 100 4 

Jno. Doyle, Mme. Goyeux, Paul Barre, Gertrude Pearson, 
Olivia, per 100 " 



La Fayette, Dr. Despres, M. Canovas, Nydea.H. Charron, 
Mark Twain, Pierre LeBrun, per 100 6 

Richelieu, J. B. Varrone, Daumier, Cerise, Jno. P. Cleary, 
Pasteur, Crabbe, per 100 8 



50 

,00 
.00 
.00 
.00 



Jean Viaud, Mme. Charratte, La Fraicheur, M. H. Til- 
maut, Mary Pelton, De La Vigne, Rudyard Kipling, 
Malgache, Ryecroft Pride, Andrew Lang, Mme Car- 
not, per 100 flO.OO 

Chateaubriand, Barbary Hope, Mme. J. Cibiel, per 100.. . 15.00 

Asparagus Sprengerii andPlumosus Nanus, per 100 5.00 

per 1000 40.00 

Delphinium Formosum, CoreopsisGiantFlowered, Sweet 

Williams, per 100 8.00 

Incarvillea Delavajii, per 100 10.00 



THE COTTAGE GARDENS 



C. W. WARD, Manager. 



QUEENS, LONG ISLAND 



94 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 1 8 



•♦««o««**««««*«*««««««**««««««*»**«««««««*«««»««««««««««««*«««o««««««««««««o«««*«« 




SPECIAL OFFER 

Micheirs Giant Strains 



OF... 



Per 
trade pkt. 



Per 'i 
trade pkt. 



Cineraria $1.00 

Primula Sinensis J. 00 
Calceolaria 1. 00 

Pansy GUm Exhibition, 1. 00 

Per \ Oz. $J.50i $5.00 Per O2. 
ALSO ALL OTHER CHOICE SEEDS. 



$0.60 
.60 
.60 
.50 



Send for our Wholesale Catalogue, now ready. 
Write us for special quotations on large orders. 



Don't 
Forget 

that you can always 
procure the very best 

SEEDS 



AND- 



BULBS 

and receive prompt 
attention and square 
dealing at the new :: 

Seed Store 



OF 



HENRY F. 
MICHELL 



SEEDS, PLANTS, ^ 
BULBS, HORTICUL 
TURAL SUPPLIES, 
I0J8 MARKET ST. 
PHILADELPHIA ::: 




TELEPHONE 
3-55 43 A 



MR. FREDK. J. MICHELL AND OTTO ROBOLD WILL REPRESENT THE 
ABOVE FIRM AT THE CONVENTION AND WILL USE THEIR BEST 
EFFORTS TO ENTERTAIN ALL FLORISTS AND GARDENERS. 



Henry F. Michell. 
Fred, J. Michell. 



IP Vnil PI FA^F J^^^ a moment, to tell you that my 
II lUIJ I LL/loL^ Stock contains the best the Phila- 

delphia market affords in Cut 

Flowers. My personal attention given to all orders. Con- 
signments of first-class Stock solicited. 

GEORGE M. MOSS, Wholesale Florist, 

TELEPHONE No. 30 South 17th. St., PHILADELPHIA. 




The'.most widely circulated German gardening 
]uarn&i, treating uf &11 department! ot burtloulturc 
and floriculture. Numerous eminent oorreipond- 
•nti In all parts of the world. A.n advertiiing 
medium of the hlgbeit olasa. 

Holler'! Deutsche Gartner Zeltung l! publl!hed 
weekly and richly Illustrated. Sub!oriptlon 13.00 
per annum, Including po!tage. Sample cople! free. 

Tujwi6l/^IIer -T3ur h 



aniitiiiiiiuiiiiitnitttatiiiittiiiitiiiiiiitiiii iiiiitiiuiiitiiiiiiuuminiiiiiAm iniiAiiiiiiiiiie 

I NEW CROP SEEDS READY FOR SOWING NOW, IN TRADE PACKETS. 

3 Paniiet. Koerner's Giant Standard, the leadini; large flowering mixture on record, ^a o-l. 81 ; 

5 trade pkt. 50c. Koerner's Giant Private Stock Pansy Mixture, this strain contains all the Tancies 
und novelties, somethint; for privati' customers, 50c. Giant Fire IJlotch, one ol the best French 
strains of odd markings. 25c. Lord Beaconsfleld, blackish purple, yellow and white, each sepa- 
ratf, giant flowerings, 'i^c. Belles or Double Daisy. Snow Ball, best white, 16c.: best pink, IBc.; 

best mixed, 10c. Canterbury Belli Cup and saucer, mixed, lOc.; double mixed. 10c. ; single P 

mixed, lOc. Cineraria. Koerner's Prize Taker, dwarf large flow<'ring t-xtrii select strain. If P 

you want something fancy in i-inerarias don't fail to try these. 26c. Cyclamen Perticum Gigan- E 

ieum. Giant White, red. pink and white with n-d i-ye, each si'parate, per 100 seeds, 75c. Giant C 

3 splendid mixed per 100. *)0c; 25 at 100 rate. Ferns. Fn'sh spores, Australian Tree Fern, 25c. All P 

3 kinds mixed, my own saving. 25c. Forget-me-not. The best hardy and everbloomer. 15c. Holly- fc 

3 hock. Extra choice double all colors mixed, 15c. Palm Seeds. Latania Horbonica, Phi»Dix, ^ 

* Reclinata and Washlngtonia Fllifera or Weeping I'alra, each separate or all ml.xed, fresh seeds t 

3 P'TlOO, $1. Poppies. Oriental and Iceland, each IQc. Wallflower. Single mixed, 10c; double P 

3 mixed, IfSc. Aquilegia. Doidde, single ami loni.' spurred. ;l11 kinds inixi-d, 10c. Cash with P 

3 OHDER .LEASE. H. W. ROERNER, 1175 Kiiinickinnic Ave., MILWAUKEE, WIS. £ 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



95 




THE TRUE BOSTON FERN 

All our Boston Ferns are pot-grown, bushy plants, well fur- 
nished with fronds from the pot up, and cannot be compared 
with the cheap, long-drawn-up, lifted stock from the bench. 
A sample shipment will convince you of our superior stock. 
Runners from bench, short and stocky (w, $ .04 



2i 


inch pot plants 


A 


inch " 


4 


inch " " 


5 


inch " " . 


6 


inch pans " 


I 


inch " " 


8 


inch " " 


Q 







inch " " . 


2 


inch " " . 



.Cm 

.® 

.C<<\ 
.Or. 

.Or. 
.0( 
.Or. 



.06 

.12 

.25 

.50 

.75 
1.00 
1.50 

2.00 to $2. .50 
,^.00 to ,V50 
4.00 to 5.00 



Nephrolepis Washingtoniensis 

5 inch pots each, 30c.; doz., |3.00; 100, it20.00. 

PALMS 

Areca Lutescens per doz. per loo. 

,3 inch pots, 12 inches high fl.50 f 10.00 

4 inch pots, 3 plants inapot, bushy stock 18 

inches high 6.00 40.00 

Kentia Belmoreana doz. 

4 inch pots, 12-15 inches high, 5-6 leaves J 5.00 



6-8 
5-6 
8-10 



heavy 



0.00 
15.00 
very bushy. . 24.00 



, 4 leaves | 5.00 

5 " 9.00 

5-6 " 11.00 

5-6 " 15.00 

,5-6 " each, J2. 00 
Per doz. 



. 22.00 
Per 100. 



#8.00 



5 " " 1.5-18 

5 " " 22-24 

6 " " 24-26 

Kentia Forsteriana 

4 inch pots, 15-18 inches high 

5 " " 24 " 

6 " " 30 " 

6 ■' " 36 " 
(, " " 40 " 

Latania Borbonica 

3 inch pots, 10-12 incheshigh, showing char- 
acter leaves fl .00 

4 inch pots, 2-3 character leaves 3.00 

5 " " 4 " " 5.tX) 

Phoenix Caaariensis 

7 inch pots, 24-30 inches high, bushy, each #2.00 

8 " " 36 ' " 2.50 

Ficus Elastica, the Large-leaved Rubber 

We have a large stock of this popular plant and offer good 
value. Per doz. Per 100. 

5 inch pots, 18 inches high, perfect plants. . S5.00 #40.00 

6 " "24 " " 9.00 60.00 

CtllCAGO, 

S4-S6 Randolph St. 



Asparagus Sprengerii 

2i inch, extra strong, per 100 |4.00 

3" " 5.00 

4 ■• " " " 8.00 

Asparagus Plumosus Nanus 

Extra choice stock, 2i inch pots, per 100 5.00 

' 3" " " " 8.00 

4 " " ■' 12.00 

Acalypha Sanderi Per doz. Penoo. 

Strong plants from 4 inch pots, in bloom. . . .#1 .00 #7.00 
Ageratum Stella Gurney, new dwarf blue 

3 inch pots 75 5.00 

Hibiscus Peachblow, double pink flowers 

3 inch pots 1 .00 8.00 

NEW HARDY ROSE- Princess of Naples 

A cross between Capt. Christy and La France. Same habit of 
growth as American Beauty; flowers as large as Capt. Christy 
and color of La France. A grand rose for pot sales in early 
spring. 

Strong 3 inch stock per doz.. #1.50; per 100, #10.00 

CARNATIONS, FIELD=GROWN. First Size Plants 



10O 

Chicago or Red Mrs. G. M. 

Bradt $ 7.50 

Ethel Crocker, Pink 12.00 

Gen. Gomez, Crimson 8.00 

Genevieve Lord, Pink 12.00 

Melba, Pink 5.00 

Mrs. Thos. W. Lawson', Pink 15.00 

Marquis, Best Pink 12.00 

Mrs. Bradt. Variegated 8.00 

Mrs. yppencott. Pink 12.00 

Olympia, Variegated 14.00 



100 

4.00 
5.00 
4.00 
4.00 
5.00 



Wm. Scott, Pink 

Mrs. F. Joost. Pink 

Tidal Wave, Carmine 

Mary Wood, White 

Mrs. Jas. Dean, Pink 

Morning Glory. Daybreak 

Shade 10.00 

Armazindy, Variegated 4.00 

White Cloud, White 8.00 

Estelle, Scarlet 12.00 

Maud Adams, Pink 4.00 



Wholesale Jobbing 

."Agents Dallidouze 

Brothers', 



NEW 
CARNATION 



666 



Book 
Orders Now 



GERANIUM JEAN VIAUD— (Bruant). 

The erandest Pink. C.eranium of them all. Stocky growth; incessant 
bloomer; flowers of largest size, in immense trusses. Flowers are semi- 
double, on order of Beaute Poitevine; color is exquisite light rose. We 
have a large amount of stock planted out of doors and offer strong young 
plants from 2-inch pots ready October 15th. 

Price, per doz., $1.25; per 100, $10.00. 

IMPORTED JAPANESE FERN BALLS. 

Florists will find a ready sale for these either Dormant or in Leaf. 
The supply last year was not equal to the demand. Ready In December- 
Order Now. Price, each, 50c; doz.. $4.00; 100, $30.00. 

Write for prices un large quantities. 



VAUGHAN'S SEED STORE, 



NEW YORK, 
14 Barclay Street. 



96 



The American Florist. 



Aug. i8. 



Seeds and Temperature. 

The experiments conducted by Mons. 
E. Schrebaux in relation to the deerree of 
heat seeds will endure without injury to 
germinative power, to which reference 
was made last week, naturally leads to 
the query as to whether any severe tests 
have been applied to seeds for the pur- 
pose of determining in what temperature 
they will keep longest aud best. I 
have been surprised this season to find 
wrinkled peas and dwarf French beans, 
kept in a very dry room and in an aver- 
age temperature of 50° and simply in 
canvas bags for two years, gave first- 
rate growth; so good, indeed, as to lead 
to the impression that a further storage 
of a year would have done them no 
harm. Still, in the keeping of seeds so 
very much depends on thorough matura- 
tion, and the warm season of 1898 con- 
tributed to that end thoroughly, as also 
did last season. It may not be generally 
known that consignments of seeds sent 
to India, Africa and other hot climates 
are subjected to considerable warmth 
first.— (terminal in Journal of Horiicnlt- 



Bi.ooMiNGTON, III.— F. A. Balleris rus- 
ticating at Hancock, Mich., for a couple 
of weeks. 

Milwaukee, Wis.— G. Volk is not find- 
ing the way through bankruptcy par- 
ticularly smooth. His wife, his custo- 
mers and the trustee are all claiming the 
right to portions of his stock and the 
matter seems sadly involved. 



ATTENTIONS. A. F. 

If you watit a fine lot of 
Fancy Leaved Caladiams, 
Latanias, Plioen ix, Cannas, 
Gardenias, Olea Fragrans 
and Azaleas, write us for 
prices* ^ j* .^ j* •^ «S" •J* 

P. J. Berckmans Co., ^"ir'^' 



Send lor our Price Litt. We have a line stock, 
for fall di-livHry, of 

Field Grown Roses, Clematis, f.^^'ng"!' 
Flowering Shrubs, »7oriment. 
Ornamental Trees, Conifers. 

To avoiii liisappointinent, order now ii supply of 

ROSE-STOCKS FOR GRAfTING. 

(I'rices delivered In this country). Rosa Manelti. 
$12 per 1000. Roia Polyanlha. |H per KIOO. Hosa 
Laxa (Froebeli). J* SO per ROD. The stocks most 
largely used by European growers tor j-'raftini; 
tea roses. 

Our representative, Mr. J. Austin Shaw, will be 
at the' OoBvention and will be pleased to quote 
prices upon any wants in our line. 

JACKSON & PERKINS CO., ZZ"tu. 



FIELD 
GROWN, 

OWN 
ROOT 

ROSES 



A LL the best sorts, 
•'^ tender a nd hardy. 
Our solicitor will 
visit you and make 
prices, regardless of 
where you live or 
quantity you want, if 
you will drop us a 
card at once. 

The Howland Nursery Co. 
l.ori Angeles, Cal. 




I^^^f^^^^^^l 



I 



Fruit Trees — standards for orcliards; dwarfs for 
gardens. Small Fruits — all kinds, including grapes. 
Ornamental Trees, Evergreens and Shrubs — for 

the embellisliment of public and private grounds, of large 
and small extent, parks, cemeteries, etc. Shade Trees 
for avenues and streets. Hardy Roses; the finest col- 
lection in this country of large two-year-old plants for 
immediate effect. Hardy Plants, Climbers, etc. 

Our new catalogue, carefully revised, beautifully illustrated with half- 
tone engravings, with cover of exquisite design, contains accurate and 
trustworthy descriptions of the most valuable varieties in cultivation, and 
is replete with practical hints indispensable to planters. Although pre- 
pared at great expense, it will be sent free to our regular customers; to 
others, on receipt of ten cents. 

ELLWANGER & BARRY, JficKKrr- 

Estahlislied 00 Tears. 



SEND FOR TRADE LIST NOW READY, OF 

Tree and Shrub Seeds, Tree Seedlings, Etc 

J. H. H. BOYD, Gage, Sequatchie Co., Tenn. 




MICTION 

SALE OF TREES! 

September 26th, 1900. 
ENTIRE STOCK OF TREES 

Growing on forty acres, com- 
prising principally rare Ever- 
green Trees, Shade Trees, and 
other ornamental stock. Auc- 
tion Catalogue ready ir two 

weeks 

Chas. B. Hornor & Son 

MOUNT HOLLY. N. J. 

Waukegan Nurseries. 

TREES and 

ORNAMENTAL 

SHRUBS. 

Evergreens a Specialty. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 

R. DOUGLAS' SONS, Waukegan, III. 



Large Flowering In twenty best varieties. 

$2 per Doz , $15 per 100. 

In eight best varieties, market sorts, 

$1.50 per Doz, $10 per 100. 

Red Jacket Gooseberries, 

Large, deep red, very healthy, strong 
grower, wonderfully productive, best 
Gooseberry out; strong young plants 

SOc per doz., $3 per 100. 

F. A. BALLER, Bloomington, III. 

WRITE US 

For prices on thi- following Everbloomin^ Roses 
in 4-in. pots. Iiealthy auil well grown. Bride, 
Hridesmilid, Gnjdeu Gnia, Kuiserin Augusta, La 
France, Mi-teor, Mine, f'aroline Testout, Perle des 
.lardins, I'apa Gontier. Salrauo, l*resident Carnot, 
Muriel Grtihani, Sou v. de Wootti'n. by the liiindred. 

MaplbAve HOOPE8, BRO. A THOMAS, 

Ni'KSBRiEs Weet Chet'e'', Pa. 

St. Fiacre Nurseries, 

MEIRrLBEKE. GHENT BELGIUM. 

A CAROON de LICHTBUER, ESQ., Mgr. 

Special culture, very cheap: Azalea Indica, 
Mollis, Begonia, Palms, Laurus Nobils (Bay 
Tree), Rhododendron, Gloxinia. Exportation. 

Large Elms. 

rtC line specimen Elm trees 6 to 9-inch 
M^ caliper, 26 to 40 feet high, with well 
developed heads. Have Ipeen several times 
transplanted and will lift with excellent 
roots and halls uf earth. Send for price list. 

SAMUEL Ci MOON, "^^^llucVi^io.). pa. 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



97 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦4 



»♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦»«♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦ 



ASSORTED FERNS IN FLATS 



Ready for Potting, S2.00 per Flat. 6 Leading Varieties. 

If you are in the market for FERNS, this is the most advantageous way to buy stock at little cost. 
110 clumps of small plants which can be divided into i to 5 plants. 



Bach flat contains 



♦ 




BOSTON FERN. 

Azaleas 

WILL 

ARRIVE 

SHORTLY 

We have inspected our stock grown 
by the Syndicate of Belgium Growers 
this summer, and find it is the finest 
we have ever had. 

The varieties are the most popular 
for American trade and consist of the 
following: 

Prof. Wolters, Bernard Andre Alba, 
Empress of India, Niobe, Schryveri- 



BOSTON PERNS . . . 

Ready for 3 in. pots, Jn.OO per 100; ready for 4 in. pots,' #15.00 per 100; 
for 5 and 6 in. pots, f20.00 and 525.UO per 1(10. Extra fine plants in 5 and 
oin. pots now ready for a shift into pans or pots, |,35.00 per 100; J4.50 
per doz. This is exceptionally good value. 

ASPARAGUS PUUMOSUS NANUS ... 
3 in. pots, extra fine, $8.00 per 100. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERII ... 

3 in. pots, Jo. 00 per 100. 

KBNTIA BBbMORBANA AND FORSTBRIANA 

2;2 in. pots, 110.00 per 100; 4 in. pots, |40.00 per 1(10; o to 7 in. pots, 

51.50, f 1.75, f2.00, $1.00 up to «5.(.)0 each. 

UARGB DBGORATIVB PUANTS OF KBNTIAS 

We have stock of BelmoreanaandForsteriana in large specimens,both in 
single and made up plants, at f 10.00, |12.50, |15.00 and |25.00 each. 




ana, Simon Mardner, Vervjcneana, 
Dr. Moore, Van der Cruyssen, Em- 
press de Brezil, Deutsche Perle, etc. 





PRICES 


F. O. 


B. NEW YORK CITY 






Per doz. Per 100. 


10-12 inch 


es in diam. 


f 4.50 f 35.00 


12-14 " 




6.00 45.00 


14-lb ■• 




7.50 55.00 


16-18 " 




12.00 40.00 


18-20 " 




25.00 200.00 


20-24 " 




36.00 300.00 



Special Prices on Large 
Quantities. 



AZALEAS. 



Place at once your Fall 
Import orders for Palms 

The Syndicate of Belgium Growers 

have an especially fine lot of Kentlas, Latanias, Cocos, 
Araucarlas, Phoenix, Bay Trees, etc. .\sk for our special 
Import prices. 

We are Headquarters for Bulbs 

Write for our Special Low Price List 

Don't Fail to Visit Us While Attending the Gon- 
ventlon. We are 20 minutes from New York City Hall. Take the Erie 
R. R., Chambers or 23rd Str. Ferry, or the Electric Cars from Hoboken, 
which pass our nursery. Christopher or Barclay Str. Ferry. 

Bobbink Sc Atkins 

Wholesale Florists and Nurserymen 

RUTHBRrORD, - rSOW JERSEY 
««♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«< 




PALMS. 
>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



98 



The American Florist. 



Aug i8. 



Helpful Reminders. 

Palms, draca?nas, crotons and panda- 
nuses should all be cleaned and shifted by 
now and should be in a shaded house. 
The best shading I have ever found is 
what is known as Aurora C sheeting, 
tacked up by first putting the tack 
through a wooden label to prevent the 
head of the tack tearing through the cot- 
ton cloth. The fancy-leaved caladiums 
should be in the same house and so should 
the torenias, but without the shading, 
for summer and fall decorations. Such 
plants do nicely together during summer. 
The house should be syringed frequently 
in the walks during hot weather, but, 
although it should be well ventilated, 
avoid strong, continuous draughts. 

In a similar house should be the old 
plants of Begonia incamata, shifted and 
ready to make fine specimens for Christ- 
mas. Here, also, you should have your 
plants of Begonia Gloire de Lorraine and 
your potted cuttings of poinsettias and 
"Euphorbia Jacquitifeflora. Space the 
plants properly and look to the drainage 
•f every pot. Do not allow wilting. You 
can make larger poinsettia heads, and 
with less labor, by planting in the open 
bench but bracts grown in this way 
require more care to prevent wilting 
when cut and storekeepers prefer the 
plants in pots, as they maybe kept longer 
and are frequently sold that way. 

You have probably examined the list 
of geraniums and determined with which 
to stock up for next spring. It is vvell to 
plant your propagating stock inside 
where it will keep growing continuously 
while you make cuttings. In making up 
your list be careful not to discard any 
variety merely because it is old, but 
because there is something better. 

You should not neglect training a num- 
ber of plants of Clematis paniculata on 
strings for cut flower trade in the autumn ; 
they make beautiful strings and pay bet- 
ter than sweet peas; if cut and placed in 
water over night they handle well. 

C. B. W. 



PANSIES 

THE JENNINGS STRAIN of Show and Fancy Pansies. 
New Crop Seed Now Ready. 

My 1900 strain is of the highest stiuidard .md can- 
not be excelled by any. Finest mixed. 2500 seeds, 
11.00; Vj-oz., »2..W; oz., 15.00. Yellow, white, blue 
and black, in sepcrate colors. 50c per pkt.. post- 
paid by mail. Small Pansy Plants, 60c per 100 by 
mail. Cash with order. 

E. B. JENNINGS, The^laeet Pansies, 
Lock Box 294. 80UTHP0RT. CONN. 

Ptease mention the American Florist when writing 



SEED 



PANSIES 



SEED 



ROEMER'S SUPERB PRIZE PANSIES. 

Improved strain, new crop ready now, (my own 
growinj;). This new mixture is saved from the 
very finest selected plants from uU leading novel- 
ties of art colors; without doubt Ihc finest strain 
in the market today. 
Mixed, per packet of 3000 seeds. $1.00; H 07... 
1.50; V4 0Z., 12.50; 1 oz., IJS.OO. Cash with order. 
Plants Ready September )6lh. 

PETER BROWN, Lancaster, Pa. 

arower of Extra Fine Paniles. 



One Million Oxalis, 

In 4 choice bedding variilies, .50i' to .tl.2.T 
per 1000. 
White Amaryllli (Ismene Calathina) stroDE. Gladi- 
oli, extra fine Hybrids. Childiii. Lemolnei 
and Gandivensit. Hi'- finest inixliire I have 
ever seen. Alsn i-hoiee named varieties. 

E. Y. TEAS, Graon's Fork, Ind. 

Pleaie mention the American Flornt when writing. 



The 



Ford Oxalis. 



This rarest winter blooming bulb of 
the century, introduced by us in 1895 
and known by various fancy names, mav 
be had of Henry A. Dreer, TheStorrs& 
Harrison. Co., The Good & Reese Co., 
and a few others. No white or lavenders 
to ofl^er this year. This Oxalis naturally 
blooms from September to March, 
hence should be planted very early. 
Other specialties: Cacti from Pacific 
Islands and Lower California, Sinilax 
seed, Mina Lohata, Heliotrope, Nastur- 
tium, etc. 



*r 



The Ford Tropical Nursery, 

L M. FORD, Manager, SAN DIEGO, CAL. 

Established the Pioneer Nursery of Northwest 
in 1850 at St. Paul, Minn. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

JAPANESE 
FERN BALLS 

Many thousands sold last sea- 
son. Now is the time to place 
importation orders. Write for 
special prices for December 
delivery 

JAMES VICK'S SONS, 

ROCHESTER. N. Y. 

Please mention the American Florist when ivnlins:. 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

PAEONUSl 



Our Specialty. 



A. DESSERT, 



We iirow them on a most extensi\e scale 
and in great variety. At tlie Paris Expo 
sition this year we were awarded 

First Prize lor General Collection. 
First Prize lor Noveltiet. 

Horticultur- 
ist... . 

CHENONCE*U.X, FRANCE. 

► ('ATALOOVE8 AND PitlrES ClRBENT FllKE i 

► ON Api'Lication. a 

►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦< 



ALWAYS 

THE 

BEST 

AND 

BETTER 

EVERY 

YEAR. 



Herr's = = 
Pansies 



Tliey sell tlieinselveg. 'I'r> 100:13 an e\p'Tii[ient. 

Plants only, and ready October 1st to January lit. 

KuEE iiY Mail, 

75c per 100, 250 for $1.50; 500 for $2 50. 
By Express at Your Expense $4 per 1000. 

ALBERT M. HERR 

LANCASTER, PA. 

Catalogue Illustrations. 

We sell Electros of the fine illttstra- 
tions used in the Ambbican Flobist 
at 15 cts. per square inch. Send 
list of your needs to 

THE AMERICAN FLORIST CO. 



1^ 



EDWARD 6. 
JACKSON 

Wholesale 
Florist 



m 



m 



HARDY, 
HERBACEOUS 
PLANTS ONLY 



In any quantity t^ 
for the least money 



STAVirORD, CONN. 



m 

w 

w 
w 

m 
m 

w 

w 

w 
w 



<* 
m 



m 



UNIQUE COLLECTION OF 

Border Plants, Bulbs, Etc. 

One of the best collections In Europe. 

SLrontr plants. True to name. Moderate prices. 
Catalogues tree 

PERRY'S HARDY PLANT FARM, 

Winchmo e Hi I, LONDON. N., England. 

NOTICE. 

'\Ve are now ready to give you LOWEST 
estimates for KlRST-class stock of 
Freesias, Harrisii.Callas. Romans Paper White Nar- 
cissus, Hyacinths, Tulips, Van Sions, Japan 
Longiflorum, Azaleas, Etc. 
Send us list and we will give flijures. Address 
H. H. BERGER & CO.. (Kst 7H) 47 Barclay St .N.Y. 

A good adv. in a good paper will bring 
good retomi. 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 99 



EXTRAORDINARY TRADE SALE 



Morticultural Auctioneers, 

WILL SELL ON THE PREMISES OF 

The Rose Hill Nurseries 

NEW ROCHELLE, N. Y., 

By order of Messrs. Siebrecht & Son, Proprietors, 

40,000 Palms, 
5,000 Stove and Greenhouse Plants, 
10,000 Ferns, 

and several thousand other valuable decorative plants, 

Including a Superb Collection of Commercial Orchids 



Monday and Tuesday, August 27 and 28, 

AT 1 1 O'CLOCK SHARP EACH DAY. 

Stages at New Rochelle Station will meet the trains leaving at '» and lU o'clock from 
Grand Central Depot, 42d Street. 

Every member of the S. A. F. who is interested in valuable decorative plants should not 
fail to avail himself of this rare opportunity. 

Lunch will be served in large building adjoining the Greenhouses. 

For Catalogue and other information apply to the Auctioneers, 

CLEARY ^ CO. - - 60 Vesey St., IM. Y. 



100 



The American Florist. 



Aug. i8. 



Denver. 

GOOD SHOW ASSURED FOE NOVEMBER. — 
WELL KNOWN FIRMS PROMISE EXHIBITS. 

At the meeting of the newly formed 
Florists' Club on August 3 it was shown 
that there is every assurance of success 
for the big flower show to be held in the 
large pavillion at City Park, November 
7, 8 and 9. Not only chrysanthemums, 
but the choicest of other flowers as well, 
will be there. Among the eastern firms 
which have already promised exhibits, 
are Nathan Smith & Son, of Adrian, 
Mich.; the Chicago Carnation Company, 
of Joliet, 111 ; E. G. Hill & Co., of Rich- 
mond, Ind ; Fred. Dorner & Sons Co., of 
Lafayette, Ind ; Dailledouze Bros., of 
Flatbush, L. 1.; C. W. Ward, of Queens, 
L. I., and J. F. Wilcox, of Council Bluffs, 
la. The Lawson carnation will be shown 
for the first time in Denver and many 
other novelties will arouse the local 
interest. 

Baltimore. 

SCHEME FOR A BIG, ALL-SUMMER HORTI- 
CULTURAL EXHIBITION. — MOSS IS BUILD- 
ING. 

A number of prominent florists, nur- 
serymen and landscape gardeners of Bal- 
timore are considering the advisability 
of holding a general horticultural exhibi- 
tion in this city, to continue from the 
early part of May until the close of 
November, 1901. The project is at pres- 
ent in an embryonic stage of develop- 
ment. Theodore Eckhardt is the spokes- 
man for those in the scheme, which con- 
templates the use of Electric Park. 

I. H. Moss is building three houses to 
cover a total area of 48x202 feet. 

Mack. 

Good Strong Stock. 

Per 100 

5,000 Mi.xed Geraniums, 2M-in..$ 1.50 

2,000 Named Gininiums 2H " .. 3.00 

5,006 Chinese Primroses, white, red, 

pmk and blue Z'i " .. 2.00 

2,000 Begonias, mix 3d 2J< " .. 1.50 

1,000 Red Vernon 2M " .. 150 

l.OOOErfordi iH " ■■ 1-50 

1,000 Asparagus Sprengerii 3 " .. 6 00 

500 Nice Rex Begonias, mixed 4 " .. 10.00 

Calla Bulbs m " .. 7.00 

Mixed Ferns, strong plants 4 '* .. 10.00 

Pansy Sei'd, Giant and Fancy mixed, per nz. 4,00 

The Morris Floral Co., 

Please mention the American Florist 7uhen ivt itin^. 

Asparagus Plumosus Nanus. 

TRANSPLANTED seedling plants for July and 
August delivery, ready for 2i4-in. pots, at 
83.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000; 500 at thousand 
rates, (free delivery). 

Cash With Order, Pleabk. 

R. ASMUS, Now Durham, N. J. 

FLORISTS' ORCHIDS 

The Finest and Largest Stock 

in the world. 

CAIinFD ST. ALBANS, ENGLAND and 
O/IIIIILK BRUGES, BELGIUM. 

Send for List of Commercial Varieties. 

A. DIMMOCK, Agent, 60 Vesey St., N. Y. 

Beauties. Sprengerli. 

AM. BEAUTY ROSES, t-'ood, H-ioch, 16.00 

per 100. 
ASPARAGUS SPRENGERII. strong plants. 

ready for 3-incli pots. $5.00 per 100, 145.00 

per 1000. 

Robert P. Tesson, ^,!"L'o^u?,'.'"iJ,r.''"'- 




BRUNS' LILY OF THE VALLEY. 



New Pips ready in November; stock will be 
exceptionally fine. Write for prices. 
FANCY CUT VALLEY ALWAYS ON HAND. 



H. N. BRUNS, 



Importer and Grower of ItlGH GRADE 
Lily of the Valley, 
690 West Van Buren Street, CHICAGO. 



Taplin 



V Patent Double Action DASIor 
^ Clay and Slack Burning DUIIt/l 



SPECIALTIES IN PLANTS. 

CYPRIPEDIUM INSIGNE in all sizes. 

COELOGYNE CRISTATA in all sizes. 

AZALEAS, Specimens from four to ten feet high. 
ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS, four and five-inch pots. 

NERINES and BELLADONNA LILIES, large flowering bulbs. 
DOUBLE WHITE PRIMULAS, three and four inch pots, ready in 
September and October. 

S. TAPLIN, Florist and Nurseryman, 

Fori street West, DETROIT, MICH. 



PRIMROSES. 

IMPROVED CHINESE, rendy for 3-inch pots. Well known throuKliout the United States and 
Ciiniiil;! iis llie llncst large llnwering tringcd varieties i;rown. SINGLES, named, $2.00 per 100, $17.00 
)iiT 1000; DOUBLE, niimi'd. $.■! 50 perr lOO. Extras added liljer;Ulv to hrip pav e.xpressage. PRIM- 
ROSE SEED of b^'St 15 v.irieties. single and double, mixed, 500 seeds, Jl.OO"; halt pkt., 50o. 

GIANT PANSY SEED. 

The very best mammotli variities, no liner ever olTered; all the seed jilanls critically selected. SOW 
TH« BEST. Packet, 3500 seeds. Jl.OO; half-pkt.. 50c. A packet n[ the grand new Dwarf Forget- 
Me-Not "Itlue Iti'auty" added to everv seed order, .'strictly cash prices. 



THB HOME OF 
PKIMK08ES. 



JOHN F. RUPP, Shiremanstown, Pa. 



Orchids ! «^ 

Arrived Ire.sh from the woods in fine condition: 
Lxlia anceps, L. autumnalis. L. Crispa, L. flava, 
L. grandis tenebtosa, L. Perrinii, Oncidium Vari- 
cotum Rogersii, Cattleya Percivalliana and C. 
MosslcB. 

LAGER & HURRELL, s^mm't. "■ -i- 

Orchid Growers and Importers. 

That Can't Be Had KUewhere. 

Buoh as New Kalanchoe Flammea. New Incarvllleas, 
New Campanula Mlrabllts, New BuddlelaB. New I)eut- 
zlae. Mr. Peter Barr a New White bupln, The Grand 
New Salvia Glory of Stuttgart. The Edelweiss In 
bloom, New Ruelllas. New HlblBCua, New HeKonlaa, 
New Cannae, 200 New Dahlias, New Treasure Vine. 
New Shamrock Pea. Send forCalaloKueof Novelties. 
Always In quantity— AsparaKUS Sprengerl. Boston 
Fern. Baby Primrose. Edelweiss, Fern Balls, at low- 
est prices. 
A. BLANC & CO., Fhiladelphia, Fa. 



CHRYSANTHEMIMS. ?J-1^r:Xof^ 

for planting', $2 per 100; 25 at 100 rate. Mmo. 
Itertimann. Goldnn Hair, Nivi'U3, Mrs. L. C. Made- 
ria, Prcs. Smith. Mrs. .lerom*' Jones, Harry May, 
Ivory, Pmk Ivory, Yellow Ft-llow, Viviand-Morel. 
Wananiaker, Harry Ilurroll, Yanoma. Glory of 
the Pacific. W. H. Lincoln. Domination, Evange- 
line, Helen Bloodgood, Goldea Wedding, Mrs. H. 
Robinson. White Swan, Autumn Glory, Queen, 
Eugene Dailledouze, Clara Goodman, Lady Fitz, 
Mprry Christmas. Cash with order or satisfac- 
tory reference. JOHN J. ARNOLD. Homer. N Y. 



VINCA.... 
VARIEGATA 

FIELD GROWN, VlllLo 

WM. A. CLARK & SON. 59 Stale St., Waterlown, N. Y. 

Plcasf mctition thf Amfrican Florist when jvriiing. 



For FaU 
Delivery Jt 

Two Sizes. 

Prices on ] 

Application. 



rpoo. 



The American Florist. 



101 



S)cleoate6 to tbc Convention 



who can make it convenient to visit my establishment either before or after 

the meeting are hereby cordially invited to do so. My collection of 

palms is as healthy and vigorous as good and careful culture 

can make them, the Arecas and Kentias being 

especially fine. There are also many other 

features that I think will interest 

members of the craft and 

make their visit 

pleasant and 

profitable. 



Take Steam Cars at Reading Terminal Station, 12th and Market Streets, Philadelphia, get 
ticket for Chcltcn Hills or Jenkintown. Over fifty trains each way daily. Nursery but a few 
minutes' walk from either station. Cordially yours, 



5osepb IDeacock 



Wholesale Rose and palm Grower 



Wpncote, pa. 



BEGOINIA 

LIGHT PIINK 

LORRAINE 



There is an honest difference of opinion as to preference 
in the two shades of pink in the original Lorraine and its 
Light Pink sport — about equally divided, I believe — the ladies 
generally favoring the more delicate shade, whereas the 
sterner sex lean towards the higher color. 
But when the two varieties are sufficiently plentiful to be grown side by side in most greenhouse es- 
tablishments, there can be but one opinion as to which of the two has the better or stronger constitution, 
and that will be without a doubt LIGHT PINK LORRAINE. This is said without a moment's hesitation, 
based upon my own experience with the two varieties growing side by side here. 

Its most important value as a plant for the home, however, is its superior lasting qualities, which 
the following unsolicited letter from the well-known firm of Pennock Brothers, Philadelphia, fully verifies: 

MR. EDWIN LONSDALE. Philadelphia, December 26, 1S99. 

Dear Sir; 

We wish to tell you how much we are pleased with the sport from Begonia Gloire de Lorraine having delicate pink 
flowers which you sold us. It is of value not only for the exquisite color and largeness of its flowers, but what is of even more importance than 
these qualifications to the retailer is its lasting qualities. 

In decorating our window last week, two of these plants were put in amongst a number of the original Lorraine, and while the plants of 
the older Lorraine lost their flowers badly, the sport is today in as good shape as when put in, and in decorating yesterday they were 
again used. 

Our customers seemed to like it also, for they were the first to sell, and had we known these two were in the window, they could have 
been sold many times over. 

Thinking you would be interested in knowing how well it has done with us, we are. Yours very truly, 

(Signed), PENNOCK BROTHERS. 

STOCK LIMITED. ORDERS WILL BE FILLED IN STRICT ROTATION AS RECEIVED. 

Healthy Plants in 2,'+ Inch Pots, 50 cents each; $5.00 per dozen; $40.00 per hundred. 



Money Order Office, 
Chestnut Hill, PHILADELPHIA 

(Station H.) 



EDWIN LONSDALE, 

WYNDMOOR P. O., 

Near Philadelphia, Pa. 



N. B. — We have not changed our location, but the United States Post-Office authorities have made 
a change in our Post-Office facilities. 



102 



The American Florist. 



Aug. i8, 



Washington. 

TRADE ODIET AND SUPPLY ADEQUATE.— 
WHATTHE GROWERS ARE PLANTING.— 
ROSES ALL llENCHED. 

Trade is very quiet and the supply of 
stock is equal to all demands. Outdoor 
flowers are not so plentitul, owing to 
dry weather. 

J. R. Freeman has four houses of roses 
planted. One is filled with Bridesmaid, 
about 1700 plants, and the other three 
are occupied by Beauty, Bride, Golden 
Gate, Perle and a few Liberty, also a 
bench of a white sport of Merruet. La 
France and Kaiserin planted in solid 
beds for summer blooming are doing 
very well. Cyclamens are coming on 
nicely. Carnations are held back some- 
what by dry weather. 

Clark Brothers have foui houses 
planted with roses, American Beauty, 
La France, Kaiserin, Brides, Bridesmaid, 
Carnot, Sunset, Wootton, Duchess of 
Albanv, in all about '.1,000 plants. They 
have also benched about 4,000 chrysan- 
themums. 

Norton Bros., Brightwood, D. C, have 
built a new house for carnations and 
violets, 18x96, heated by hot water. 

A. Gude & Brother have finished plant- 
ing their new range of six houses, having 
benched 20,000 rose plants, including all 
the usual sorts. P- *^- 



Geneva, III.— C. J. Reardon, who has 
been with W. P. Harvey, has gone to 
Calumet, Mich., to take charge of the 
new commercial establishment of A. E. 
Lutey. 

Sandy Hill, N. Y.— John L. Watkins 
& Son have their place of 5,000 feet of 
glass in first-class condition and are pre- 
paring for a heavy fall trade, which they 
confidently expect. 

Sandusky, O.— The greenhouse and 
stock of J. C. Gooding, who recently 
filed a petition in bankruptcy, have been 
sold to D. J. Mackey, who will repair 
the place and put a competent florist in 
charge. 

Boston Ferns. 

LARGE STOCK. FINE PLANTS. 

Per 100S';,-inch,|4.00; 4-inch, 110.00; 6-incli,$2i).00 

NEPHROLEPIS CORDATA COMPACTA. 

Pit lC0 2'/j-inch $3.C0; l-in.-h, JH.OO. 

H. KADEX, Gainesville, Texas. 

100 ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS 

4-inch pots, $10.00 per hundred. 
100 PINK HYDRANGEA OTAKSA, 

3-inch pots, J5.00 per hundred. 

C. G. HANZ, Owensboro, Ky. 

Now is Your Chance. 

MUST BE SOLD FOR WANT OF ROOM. 

500 Asparagus plumosus nanus roots from 
bed, extra large, will divide well, (" $3.00 
per doz., as long as they last. Order now. 

Bunch and string Asparagus, 30c. (asb pleuse. 

C. L MARSHALL, 67 Merrimack St.. Lowell, Mass. 

Cyclamen Persicum Gipnteum 

from stMMi of select plants of iny own prow- 
int;; fine plants in 3^-inch pots reaJy for 
u shift, 5 cts. eiich. Will i-xclian^*; for a 
limited quuntity of Kurns and IJt't^onius. 

W. J. ENQLE, care L. Coy, 

Xeni« Ave. and Dover St., DAYTON, 0. 



PALMS 



FERNS 



Fine Stock, 



Prices to Please, 



Iiow Express Rates. 



PALMS.. 



No, of Inches 
■ Leaves. High 

Liiluuia Korbouica 4 to 6 15 to 18 

KentiiL ForsterianjL 4 to 6 18 to 34 

3to4 18to20 

3to4 12tol8 

Belmoreana 4 to 6 15 to 18 

ex.rafine 5 to 6 12 to 18 

3 to 4 12 to 15 

Areca Lutescens 3 to 5 18 to 24 

3to4 IStolb 

Pbu'iux Caoariensis 4 to 6 U to 15 

3to4 lOtoia 

Paudanus Dtilis 15 to 18 

•• 10tol2 

Livistoua Rot undi folia 



Size of 

jar. 
6- inch 
Ci •• 

5 ■• 

4 " 

6 •■ 

5 " 
4 " 

6 ■■ 

4 " 

5 ■' 
4 " 

6 " 
3 " 

..4 " 



FERNS.... 

Nephrolepis Davallioides Furcans 7 to 8 

" " " 4 

" Cordula Compacta 3 

Adiautum Cuueutum 3 



Per 
do/. 
Jl^.^iO 
8..W 
6.00 
4.0O 
10. OO 
7.50 
4.00 
5.00 
3.00 
5.00 
2.50 
(> 00 
1.50 
3.25 
5.00 



3.00 

1.00 

.70 

.65 



Per 
100. 
*60.00 
70.00 
50.00 
33.00 
90.00 
60.00 
35.00 
45.00 
28.00 
35.00 
20.00 
50.00 
10.00 
25.00 
40.00 



20.00 
10.00 
5 00 
5.00 



Soliciting a share of your patronage, I am. Yours respectfully. 



Bockford Seed Farms, 
Forest City Greenhouses. 



H. W. BUCKBEE, 



ROCKFORD, 
ILL... 



'^iSSSiiilliMJili-Miiiiiiiili-ii^'lVi''''-'''''^ 

Attention S. A. F. 



a 



K 



If vou want a fine lot of Fancy Leaved 
Caladiums, Latanias, Phoenix, Cannas, 
Gardenias, Olea Fragrans and Azaleas, 

write us for prices. 

P. J. BERGKMANS CO., Augusta, Ga. 



w 



^T^TTTTrTTTT'T 



TV}Twmmmmwmm&sm^ 



; JT?rS8S»!7^'rT1!®M5S 



Sago Palms! 

Fine Plants in all .sizes. Well 
•rrown, nnd perfect leaves. One of 
thf best summer and fall plants for 
retailing. Thev run from five to 
twelve leaves, in small si/e pots 
that can be shifted and save freight 



5 to 
7 to 
9 to 


7 leaves, 
9 leaves, 
12 leaves. 


$ 6.00 per dozen. 
9.00 per dozen. 
15 00 per dozen. 



Oan be sent safely by frei^jht. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. 

Cyperus Alternifolius, 

3-incb, llnr wi-ll-Rrowii, $5 per lOO. 

Jasmine Qrandiflora, 

\'riy fine for cut llowers— always 
in blooiii — 4- ill. pots, stronji plants, 
%\.m pt-r tlo/.-n. 

Ficus Elastica, X^^!^ 

pots, 3H to 4 feet liijjli, Sl.OO eacli. 

Latania Borbonica,^,;^; 

Ntock witli character leaves. 18-in. hii;h, 
JIH per 100. need shifting' to f> or (i-in<'.h. 

Cash With Oudek, Pi.kask. 

CRITCH ELL'S, 

CINCINITATI. O. 

BOSTON FERN- 

•iV,-\n. pots. »5,00 pt-i- 100; 3-ii]. 18.00 pvt 100. 

Crimson Rambler. rr^XidVu^^: 

f(ir winter forcing- 

The C0N4RD & JONES COMPANY, 



Bay 
Trees 



Grand Pyramids, 

Dense and Dark Foliage. 
Exhibition Plants, 

The Finest in Trade. 

Height with tub, fifteen feet; diatn- 
eter at tlie base, six feet. Solid 
new tubs, 28x28 inches. 

Price per Pair, $50. 

with packing, duty, freight free at 
New York, Philadelphia, Boston, 

Price per Pair, $80. 

To be had twenty-four pairs, all 
alike. 
Also fifty pairs twelve feet high, 

$30 to $50 per Pair. 

Cash or good references with 
order reijuired. 

DE SMET FRERES, 

Ihe Nurseries* 

Cjhent, (Belgium). 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



103 



>Ab WAh >'*k wAk wAk. ^Ak, •'Ak. .>Air, >'«if. .^Ait yijt .]>#ir .«fc^ 















make a note 



TO 



make It Vour 
Business ^ * 

... to examine the 
specialties wliicli we shall 
exhibit at the New York 
Convention. 





TOKINABl VASBS 









# ^Japanese Vases of these we are the only large import- 
-'*' _^^-^^_i^^^^-^^ ^.^—^—^-^ ers for florists' use. They are attract- 



# 



ive, very strong and low priced. We have a great variety of sizes and 
styles. Especially adapted for store use and for cut flower displays in 
exhibitions. 



^ 



4t 



# 



tSP 



.>«>. 

^ 



# 



# 



jtAj*. 




VIOUBT VASES 






IVIctal Designs from Germany. Novel in make-up] and 
^^^^^^^ ^^.^— ^^— — comparing favorably in price with any ever 
offered in the American market. 

A full line of Wheat Sheaves, Cycas Leaves, and general standard 
goods and novelties in horticultural supplies. 

In connection with our display will be a complete exhibit of the 
specialties made by the Boston Florists' Letter Co. 

We know we can interest you and we know we can save you 
money on your supplies. 



N. F. McCarthy & company 

• * • IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS IN PEORISTS' GOODS • • • 

84 Hawley Street^— BOSTON, MASS. 






4t 

■•.♦!•■ 



# 



# 



••»,•■ 



■»♦.•■ 
•»♦•■ 



104 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 18. 




WORK DELIVERED 
WHEN ORDERED.^J*J«J« 



DAY and NIGHT 
PRESSROOnS... 



CAPACITY: 
TWENTY TONS OF 
PAPER A DAY. 
FORMS CALLED FOR 
AND DELIVERED. 



NURSERY AND SEED 
CATALOGUES 



87=89=91 

PLYHOUTH PLACE 
CHICAGO 

Book, Job § News 
Printers.... 

THE BEST 

EDITION and PAMPHLET 
BINDERY ^ ^ ^ oe 



TO BE FOUND IN THE 
UNITED STATES. 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



105 



lXw!«t55i«5i«i5Ci^iJ5iJS'<iK^ 



IT WILL TICKLE YOU" 



I 



S3 

I 
i 

h 

% 

i 

ii 

i 






1=) 



1^ 



3J 







To see the results obtained from our NEW PROCESS 

"THE PARAGON PRINTING PLATES." 

CHICAGO ENGRAVING CO., 

Engravers by all Processes, 
300-306 Dearborn Street, CHICAGO. 



i 



335;is?;3K!^?g;K!5j;r^5S!S3^j:s:i^-5^ 



106 The American Florist. Aug. ,s, \ 

The American Florist Company's 



TRADE DIRECTORY 



IS THE OMY PIBIICATION WHICH GIVES 

Complete lists of the Florists, Nurserymen 

and Seedsmen of the United States and 

Canada, corrected annually and 

arrangfed both alphabeti= 

cally and by states 

and towns. 



NEW FEATURES 

Added in the edition for 1900 are lists of the gardeners or 

superintendents of private estates, experiment station 

horticulturists, landscape architects and 

horticultural supply concerns. 



THIS INDISPENSABLE VOLUME OF 387 PAGES, BOUND <t _ ^^ 
IN BOARDS, IS DELIVERED POSTPAID ON RECEIPT OF ^-^•yiyj* 



m 

i 
i 

m 



i 



AMERICAN FLORIST CO. 

324 Dearborn Street, CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 



rgoo. 



The American Florist. 



107 




mkK 5<?HMiDy- 



OPEN HOUSE 




On Wednesday Afternoon, August 22 



this establishment will be elegantly decorated 
in honor of the visit of the S. A. F. to New 
York, and the Splendid New Show Roovts 
will be thrown open for inspection. All are 
invited to come to view the new creations in 
hig-h-class decorative goods and see the remark- 
able progress made in American Basket Work. 
There is plenty of room for all who come and 

Everybody will be Welcome 




ED. JANSEN, 112 to 116 W. 18th St., New York 



108 



The American Florist. 



Aug. i8, 



Buffalo. 

ANNUAL OUTING OK THE FLORISTS' CLUB. 
— ONLY DRAWBACK THE ABSENCE OF 
CERTAIN FACTIONS. — WINNERS OF THE 
CONTESTS. 

( )n Wednesday of last week our annual 
outing was attended by about seventy- 
five, but the absence of" some is onex- 
plaitied. I think that at least one day 
in the year should be given over to all as 
a day together. The games were looked 
after by E. Bruecker and W. H. Grever. 
The ball game was the feature, between 
Scott's employes and the other florists. 
After an exciting five innings in which 
many funny things occurred, the game 
was won by the All Scotts, 1.5 to 5. The 
hop, skip and jump waswon by D. Scott, 
W. Grever, second. The 100-yard race 
was won by W. Grever, S. Reichert, sec- 
ond. The fat men's race was won by 
Wm. Scott, the married men's race by 
W. F. Kasting and the three-legged race 
by Grever and Reichert. Joe Speidel, of 
Palmer's, won the delivery boys' race. 
The bicycle race was a good'one and was 
won by E. Bruecker, Grever second. At 
the end of the contests we repaired to the 
Bedell House for supper, followed by 
dancing. 

The weather has been very hot for the 
past week, making it almost impossible 
for florists to work. Sunday there was 
a decided change, a fall of at least 20°. 
but it is now very warm again. 

The delegation for New York is making 
all preparations and a good crowd is 
sure now. W. A. 



Minneapolis, Minn. — Miss H. B. 
Whitted has been making some telling 
improvements in her store at 409 Nicollet 
avenue, including the addition of a very 
fine refrigerator. 

CELERY AND CABBAGE. 

CELERY. I'ink riunif and New Rosi- (extra 
St roue). Giant Pascul, Koston Market, White 
Plume and other varieties, 15c per 100, $1.00 per 
1000, $8.50 per 10,000. 

CABBAGE H. Succession, Second Early, 
Premium Fliit Dutch, Late Drumhead, Drumhead 
Savuy and other varieties, 15c per 100, 81.00 per 
1000. $8.50 per 10.000. 

KALE Dwarf, Green, Curled. Scotch, same 
price as Ciibbage. If any of the above plants by 
mail, add 10c per 100. 

Cash With Order. 

R. VINCENT, Jr., & SON, White Marsh, Md. 

Boston Ferns. 

FINE PLANTS 

From bench, ready for fviii. pots. $3.00 per d02. 
From 2-iii. pots, $4 00 per tOi). 

DAVIS BROThERS, 

MORRISON. ILL. 

1500 N. Gordata Compacta, 

In 2-in. P ota, Strong Plants, at 
S3.00 per Hundred. 

Also Strong Plants from Bench, at 
$2.00 per Hundred. 

CHAS. SCHWEIGERT, Niles Center, III. 

ADIANTUM FARLEYENSE 

3-in. Pots, Ready for a Shift, 

j^ao.oo r»er loo. 

WM. W. EDQAR, Wawerley, Mass. 



CABEFl LLV 
PACKED. 



WILL YOU ATTEND 
THE CONVENTION ? 

Then don't fail to see us! Our MR. P. BEKKOWITZ, happy and 
affable as ever, with his assistants, will be there to wait on you ! 
His maxim : No trouble to show goods; no pain to answer 
questions. 

INEXT, RUN OVER TO PHIUDEIPHIA; it will pay you to inspect 
in its Lnabridged Magnitude, our Latest Comprehensive Importation 

and Own Manufacture. Your friend — call him "Old Harry" for 
short (but don't confound him) — has just returned from his 
annual buying tour of Europe; he will show you what he 
acquired for you at the Paris Exhibition and other European 
centers; it cannot be excelled. 

COME OVER! BRING YOUR FRIENDS ALONG! We will take care of yon 
and your comfort. Our hospitalities are at your call, also the 
^ facilities of our store and office. 

H. BAYERSDORFER & GOm ^Kil^d^iiir 

3 p. S. Remember NEW YORK OUR EXHIBIT ONLY. Our STORE and | 

3 WAREHOUSES are in PHILADELPHIA— The OLDEST, LARGEST and MOST p 

3 PROGRESSIVE FLORISTS' SUPPLY HOUSE in AMERICA. |: 

DUNNE & CO. I 

Have something interesting to show to S. A. F. visitors, g 
in the line of Rustic Settees, Fences and General Horticul- | 
tural Sundries 

This establishment is now the main headquarters in the 
East for 

PURE SHEEP MANURE 

And all users of this indispensable Fertilizer are especially 
invited to call and be shown the difference between this 
absolutely pure article and much of the stuff usually 
sold as Sheep Manure. We are in a position to quote 
lowest figures per pound, per ton, or per car load. 



DUNNE & CO.. 



54 West 30th St , NEW YORK. 



BOSTON FERN 

L. It. rOSTFR, 45 King St.. Dorchester, Mass. 



SPECIALTY. 



BOSTON FERNS 
...A SPECIALTY. 

N. EXALTATA BOSTONIENSIS, sniaW plants, 
t.S.OO perlOOor $40.00 per thousand; large plants, 
16.00 to $50.00 per liuiidri-d; taken frum Ihebencli. 

ARAUCARIA EXCELSA. 14 to 16-in. high, 4 to 
.=) tiers, 6-ln. pot.s, $1.00 and $1.26cacli; 20 l6 24-in. 
hii;h. 5 to 6 tiers, 6-ln. pots, $1.50 each. Larger 
>i/,e $2.00 and $2.50 each. 

RUBBER PLANTS. 12 to IB-in. high, $4.00 per 
do/..; 20 to 24-in. hit;h, $6.0fl p'-r doz. 

WM. A. BOCK, N. Cambridge, Mass. 

Unknown r.orrespondents will send cash with 
nrdors. Connected with Telephone. 



Per 100 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS NANUS, 

Fine young plants $5.00 

BEGONIA REX, 

Stroiitr, 3-inoh pot plants, in good assort- 
ment 6.00 

CYPERUS ALTERNIFOLIUS, 

2!i-inoh iiots 3.00 

CyCLAMEN, 

\)T\ bulljs. finest struiD, mixed fi.OO 

CAREX JA^ONICA VARIEGATA, 

An excfllent dn-orative tjrass. I'^xtra 
stnnig plunts from "J'/i pots 5.00 

NEPHROLEPiS CORDIFOLIA, 

2',2-inL-h pots 3.00 

SMILAX, Field-grown, strong clumps 3.00 

Extra heavv 5.00 

NATHAN SMITH & SON, Adrian Mich. 



Please mention the American Florist to our advertisers. 



tgoo. 



The American Florist. 



109 



THE BOTTOMLESS POT 



[PATENTED] 



=MORE ESPECIALLY FOR^ 



Violet and Carnation Culture 



Read Fred Domer's experience as set forth on page 1553 of the issue of 
THE AMERICAN FLORIST for July 28, J900 :: :: :: :: :: 



=ALSO= 



Those Red Pots 

"STANDARDS" 

AZALEA POTS, FERN POTS, BULB PANS 

Detroit Flower Pot Manufactory 

^ 490 Howard St,/ Detroit, Mich, 



., ^. .. ESTABLISHED 1853 

1^ HARRY BALSLEY, Traveling Representative 




...Without a Donbt... 

We have the finest line of Pots, Bulb Pans, Azalea or V^ 
Pots, Jardiniere Pots, Hanging Baskets and Lawn Vases 
for Florists* use that you have ever seen. 

All Florists 

Are invited to inspect our exhibit at the S. A. F. Con- 
vention and secure samples and prices. 

THE IONIA POTTERY CO., 

9 IONIA. MICH. 



BRANCH WAREHOUSES: ^ Lon%Und City"! N. Y. 

Universal Insectlcidt 

For Flowen, Tresi 
■ and Animals. 

Reoommended &nd in nie 
bj the foremoit floriiti &nd 
ourterymen in the land. 
For Sals it the Send Storu. 

ROSE MFG. GO. 

NUaARA FALLS. N. Y. 

Do not hide year light nnder a bnthel. 
Tell the people what yon have for tale. 





''Everlasting Label" 



The newest aud best glass label holder on the market to 
label Trees, Rose Hushes, Shrubs, Plants and Flowers: for 
use in garden and conservatory. Endorsed by Peter Hen- 
derson <fc Co., John Lewis Childs and other leading' florists. In use in public parks of Chicai^o. St. Paul. 
"White House" Conservatory (Washington) and elsewh'-re. Write lor sample to patentee and 
manufacturer. W. W. DODGE. BURLINGTON. lOWA. 

[PJJRE RAW BONE HJEALliiir^HiE] 

♦ nothing equals it. Use it on Chrysantiiemums and you will win the prize J 
I at your flower show for the best bloom. 10 pounds, 40c; 25 pounds, 75c; i 
I 50 pounds, Hl.25; 100 pounds, g2.00; 1 Bag, 200 pounds, $3.75. ! 

1.-.. .■■»«■■. .>>>'^T^™^ Y^'K*^^° CO., Indianapolis, Ind. | 



110 



The American Florist. 



Aug. /S, 




KIFT'S PATENT 



ADJUSTABLE VASE HOLDERS 

No. 1 — Brass, nickled, 4 feet long six clasps to each rod. 

Price complete (with green or white tumblers) $2.25 

Price complete (with green or white cornucopia vases) 2.50 

No. 2— Heavy four foot rod brassed and nickeled, with three clasps for 5 to 

6-inch pots each 1.75 

^ KIFT'S PATENT 

RUBBER CAPPED FLOWER TUBES. * 

(As per illustration), 4 inches long, ' »-inch diameter, per 100, $3.50. 

Both of the above are indispensable to the decorator. In use and highly recommended by the principal retai' 

stores. Send for illustrated circular. 



SEE EXHIBIT 
AT THE CONVENTION. 



ROBERT KIFT, Florist, 



.1725 Chestnut St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



A Point 

Worth Knowing. 

At the NEW YORK HOTEL you 
are but two minutes' walk from the 
Exhibition Building. Large, light 
and well-ventilated rooms, one dollar 
per day and upward. Popular priced 
Restaurant. Special rates to Florists. 
Write early for accommodations. 

E. H. NIE5, Mgr. 

THE MURRAY HILL HOTEL 

Park Ave., 40lli and 41st Sti., 

NEW YORK. 

T ▼ 

One block from Grand Central Station. 

Two blocks from the S. A. F. Conven- 
tion Hall. 

AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN 
PLAN. 
Coolest Hotel in the city, at special rates 
for S. A. F. Members. 

Baggage transferred to and from Grand 
Central Station FREE OF CHARGE. 

Die Bindekunst 

Einzige Special Zeitschrift der 

Welt fur BLUMENBINDEREI. 

Probenummern umsonst. 
Abonnement 10 M. jahrlich. 

J. OLBERTZ, Bindekunst Verlag, 

ERFURT. DEUTSCHLAND. 



STRONG TRANS- 
PLANTED •'lants 



Celery Plants. 

20c .iHXl. $1 50 :ilOOOibyr]]:i(l 10 |.irci>iit niorn. \V. 
riumr,, G. Pascal, li. Market, (iolden S. Ulaiichint; 
imd Dwarf Red. Write for price on large lots. 
Do not <:onf(>und tht'se plants with cheap ones 
pulled up whf^ri! they were sown. Try some of 
ours and see the difTcrenci-. Good seedi'ings, 2-in. 
hiL'ii,2Sc.i 1000. Cash Pi-KAsE. Samples 10c. 



R. KILBOURN, 



Clinton, N. Y. 



^itM^M)MiiMVMMiWiM^tiitM*VmimNWWiiVmiMMHWHfm^ 



WE ARE READY 



For the coming SEASON with the most COMPLETE 

and COnPREHENSIVE LINE of FLORISTS' 

SUPPLIES to be found In America. 



Ueing one of the largest Importers and Manufacturers of Florist's 

Supplies, we invite every Florist to step in and see our stock, if at all 
possible, or write to us for our baiuisome new lUustr.-iteil Catiilo^ue, 
which will be found complete iind up to date. A fi*w of our specialties 
are, Imported Cycas Leaves (dull and i;lazed). our famous Wheat 
Sheaves. Immortelles, Cupe Flowers (all colors), Novelties in Fancy ami 
Plant Baskets for every occasion; Pot ('overs. Pedestals, and everything 
ih;it is iii'eded Ijy the trade will lie found at "Headquarters." 



M. RICE & CO., 



IMPORTERS AND 

MANUFACTURERS. 



918 nibert Street, 

PHIIADEIPHIA, PA. 




SiGMUND GELLER 

Importer and Mir. ol 

Florists' Supplies 

Complete Slock - New Goods New Illustrated 

Catalogue Now Reaay. Send for it. 
108 W. 28tn 8t , neareth Av., NEW YORK. 

Imported Prepared 

CYCAS LEAVES 

LOWEST FKICEB. 

RECEIVING REGULAR SHIPMENTS. 

Florida Natural Products Co., 

p. O. Box 3T:i, IndlaDapollH, Ind. 



1 



I 



CYCLONE SPRAY PUMP 

THU GEKAT INSBPT KXTIKMT- 

NATOR. SpraysaBflne asmlet. Just 
the thing for Roses. Palm-, Pota- 
toes, Tobacco, Small FrulM, Uen- 
KooBts, etc. All tin, 5nc. ; all .,-.,. 

polished copper. H («i. Ois* iciiri Order. Weighs 
hoxed, about 5 pounds. Puyer pays express. 
STEVENS & CO., 107 Chambers SI. ,N.Y. City. 

John Conley & Son, 

manufacturers ot 
2 AND 4 DOMINICK STREET, 

-Bfe-w "Vorlc:. 



If You Have Stock To Sell... 

the best way to make that tact known to the trade is by regalar 

Gj^eitlffi^^ °« " ...The American Florist, 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



Ill 



mifssssim^s^^is^^immim^i^sEimiimmifstiSfi^i/^^ 



a 



Colxiixxlbia Txilb^ 

FOR PLANTS AND TREES. 

£3 



§ 




With or without 

carriers, 

as desired. 



Made in 5 sizes 
of the 



best of Cypress, g 



"THE TUB THAT LASTS FOREVER." 

Every Seedsman and Florist who catalogued these Tubs last season made money on them. They are sellers. Don't forget it 

1S0=160 Yedder Street, 
CHICAGO. 



ManufacM By TiiB InvaHd AppliancB Co., 



t 



SPECIAL Machinery lowers cost. That's where we 
save. Not on material. 

Our factory is equipped with machinery especially 
adapted to this business. 

Special facilities for special work. 
These backed by experience and a thorough knowl- 
edge of material enable us to give you the very best at a 

reasonable price. 



CVPfiESS '^o^cMA^'^I...^ 




wsmi 



(JOHN C. lllTOieSBLACKHAV/KST. 

MONINGER €0. "''IZI"^?.''^/''"- 



We can give you 
much better value 
than your local 
mill. 



! 



FOR INSURANCE AGAINST 
DAMAGE BY HAIL, Address 

JOHN Q. ESLER, Sac'y F. H. A., 

SADDLE RIVER, N. J 



SM{LAX STRINGING Made Ea>y by the use ol 

MEYER Green SILKALINE 

JUST THE SHADE OF THE FOLIAQE. 

Samples and prices free. 

JOHN C. MEYER <C CO., 
80-84 Kingston St. BOSTON, MASS. 

For Bale bj leading FlorlBta. 



A New Uuialogue entiiied 

Flowers and Floral Designs. 

Twelve pages and handsome cover. 

Shows forty-one arrangements, with prices. 

For agents' use, or promoting out-of-town trade. 

Sample, 40c In Stamps. Circular Free. 

DAN'L B. LONG, Publisher, BUFFALO- 



112 



The American Florist. 



Aug. i8, 



NO MATTER WHAT KIND OF STOCK YOU MAY GROW I 



Roses, Carnations, Lilies, 'Mums, Ferns, Palms, or what not 



''ROSE LEAF 

EXTRACT OF TOBACCO INSECTICIDE 



ff 



WILL SAVE YOU MONEY 

As compared with other remedies, a practical test will cer- 
tainly' convince you that "Rose Leaf" is the Best and 

Db« Br«BM tho f^hoSinAct General Insecticide on the market. For sale by 

"j rcll LIIC VIICdptSSL all seedsmen. For free booklet write to 

THE KENTUCKY TOBACCO PRODUCT CO., 

^ I Successors to Louisville Spirit Cured Tob. Co. ■ • ■ • Louisville. KVa 

atuiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiitiiitniiituiiiuiiiiiititittttiiiiiiiitiiiinuitititiiiiiitiiiitimiiititiiititititiiituuiiiiititiniHuimiitiiiitittiiiiiiiiiv' 



A. HERRMANN, 






Manufacturer 
of 



Floral Metal Designs. 
Florists' Supplies. 

404-406-408-410-412 East 34th Street, NEW YORK. 



Importer of and 
Dealer in 



Will be pleased to have you call at my establishment, during your presence at the Convention, i 

WRITE FOR MY NEW CATALOGUE. | 

3f»TITT!T?»T!TnnTTTTTTT»TTnTTnTTTTTTVTmrrm »f?T»TnTf»MTTTTTTTTTTTnnn»»nnTT»Tf!T?Hn»ITHf!flllUI"fTITnVIH!?T»f?HfTTT»fTfT»TT»»»??l»H TTTTTTTT* 



THE MOWER 

THAT will KILL ALL 1HL WLCDS IN YOUR LAWNS. 
If you kefp the weeds cut so they <\v not S" '" 
seed, and cut your griiss withoui breakinfi the 
sraall feeders of roots, the grass will become thick 
and wet'ds will disappear. The Clipper will do Jt. 
^^6end for circulars and prices. 




CLIPPER LAWN MOWfcR CO., """jg^r"- 

It is not much trouble to mention the 
AuBBJCAN Florist when corresponding 
with aa advertiser. 



Boston Florist Letter Go. 

MAKUyACTURKES OF 

FLORI8T8' LETTERSn 




This wooden box nicely stained and var« 
Dl0be4l> 18x30x12 made In two sectlonSf one 
for each eize letter, given away with flrat 
order of 500 letters. 

Block Letters. 1 H or S-tnch size, per 100. $2.00. 
Bcrlpt Ijettera, $4. Fastener with each letter or word. 
Used by le&dlDK florlBte everywhere and for uUe bj 
bJI wholesale flonst^ and supply dealers. 

N. F, McCarthy, Trcas. and Managcft 

84 HawlAy St.. BOSTON, MA8«. 

GHAS. W. JACOB & ALLISON, 

IMPORTERS. 

66 Pine Street, NEW YORK. 

CAPE FLOWERS, RAFFIA, HELLEBORE, 
Dalmatian Insect Powder, Etc. 

Write us for Samples iiod Prices. 



FLORISTS' 

innnorielleLetters.Elc. 

\fledal Awarded at the 

World's Fair 
and Highest Award 
Wherever Exhibited. 
These Letters and 
Destgns are made uf 
the best Immortelles, 
wired on wood or metal 
frumes, havloK holes 
drilled In them to In- 
sert toothpicks, by 
which they are fast- 
ened In the deBl»;n . 
Give them a trial. You 
will find these ^(oods to 
be superior to any In 
the market. 
Mnch Letters. f2.50 
per 100. 
Pustage. 15 ct8. per 100. 
For other styles of letters, Kmblems and Oealtfns 
send for catalot;ue. Beiore purchasinK send for free 
sample and fcataloaue, and compare with any other 
letter on the market. 

For sate by all Florists' Supply Dealers. 
SAWPLES AT THE COHVfcWTIQM. 

THE AMERICAN FLORIST'S 

COLOR CHART 

li now accepted as the standard In preparlnff oolo 
deaorlptlons, by many forelRn houses »• 

well as In Amerraa. 
PRICE IB CENTS POSTPAID. 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO.. 322 Dearborn St. Chicago 




tgoo. 



The American Florist. 



113 




TSeHot CorTJer 



Mr. Editurs 

I rite to tcl yo that bi meanz of 
the new Submarine boat — The 
Holland — what goes down under 
the ochen I have been enabled to 
send a Kargo uv me Greenhouse 
contrapshins tew a place where 
they are much needed. 

My f rend Jules Verne had charge 

of the cargo and showed Boss chap 

tew put the apperatus up AN OLD NICK 

so tickled with the wa it worked he sent 

this letter uve recommendashun wat u c 



SHOEL CENTER, Infernal Regions. 
My Dear Carmody: 

In return for your kindness in sending your appliances I have extended your leave of absence 
indefinitely. My subjects unite in universal praise of your VENTILATING APPARATUS, in fact 
when the ventilation is on they hover around your CHAMPION BOILER, and the kids spend most 
of their time swinging on the gates hung with your EVERLASTING HINGES. 

Gratefully your friend, BEELZEBUB. 



To my Floris Frenz — I wil sa dont wate till you go where it is hoter before you uze my 
fixins but send tew me for a Kata-a-log wat tels u awl about em. 

Me name is J. D. CAB MOD Y, an I live in Evansville, Ind., close to 
Posey Kounty. 

ESTABLISHED 1859. 

THOS. W. WEATHERED'S SONS, 

fiorticultural Jlrcbltects and Builders 

and manufacturers of Greennouse Heating aitu Ventilating Ppparatus. 

WINNERS OF THE HIGHEST AWARD— At the World's Fair, The Dean Gold Medal ; Certificate of Merit, Society American 
Florists, and the Silver Medal for 1S9S of the N. Y. Florists' Club; Madison Square Garden, for the best Amateur Greenhouse. 

CONSERVATORIES, GREENHOUSES, Etc., erected complete of our patent Iron Frame construction, or of Wood and Iron 
combined, or Wood alone. Hot Bed Sash, Frames, etc. 

TheWeathered Conical Boiler, Seven Sizes, ^„^ 

Weathered Patent Improved Sectional Boiler 




FOR WATER OR STEAM HEATING 

ABSOLUTELY SECTIONAL IN EVERY PART. 



A Few Points Claimed for this Boiler; 

Simplicity of construction. Sectional headers. 

Maximum vertical circulation. Sectional ash-pit. 



Smoke-box on front or back. 

Rapidity of water circulation. 

Easily cleaned in every part. 



Direct or indirect draft. Minimum friction. 

Grates on level with fire-door opening. 
Greatest amount of Boiler surface exposed to radiant heat. 

Heatinx surfaces so arranged in fire-box that the hot gases must strike every part be- 
fore entering the combustion chamber. 
Each section is complete in itself, and can, if broken, be replaced very quickly, as it 
is only necessary to take out the bolts in the flanges, when the damaged section can 
be taken out and a new one put iu. Should it not be convenient to put in a new 
section the header can be plugged and the broken section left in place until a more 
convenient time, and this can be done with less trouble and expense than with 
i«99 yx^^>^^. »ec,..ou.i View. ^ny other sectional boiler in the market. 

"We I*elfer to the following named parties who have lately purchased and are using our Sectional Boiler : 
E. M. Wood & Co., Natick, Mass. R. i:. Shufelt, Chatham, N. V. (ieo. Pick, West Hobokeii, N. J. David Deau, Astoria, N, Y. 

A. E Aldrett, Morrison, 111. A. Urunner, Lyons Farms, N. J. W. G. Muller, Lyonsav., Newark, N. J. J. W. Miller, Craighead, Pa. 

H. C. Patthey, IJayshore, N. Y. N. V. Zoological Gardens. John Scott. Flatbush, lirooklyu, N.Y. Ditzeiibcrger Bros., Bay Ridge, N. Y. 

Gro. Schubert, West Hoboken, N. J. Keiip St. GreeiihuusLS, isrooklyn, N. Y. 

Send four cents for Catalogue, (ireeuliouse Constriictfon or (>reenliou8e IfeaUngf. 

FACTORY, 196 to 240 Orient Ave., Jersey City, N. J. OFFICE, 46 and 48 Marion St. (New Elm St.) New York. 



114 



The American Florist. 



Aug. i8, 



Seattle 

STATE OF TRADE AND CONDITION OF STOCK 
IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST. — FIRST 
THOROUGH TRIAL OF NEW CARNATIONS 
IN WASHINGTON. 

There is very little business being done 
in the flower trade in thiscity at present, 
except an occasional funeral order. There 
is a scarcity of all kinds of flowers. We 
are having lots oftrouble with cut worms 
out here, outside stock, both flowers and 
vegetables, having been completely 
stripped of blooms and foliage. Most 
growers have had lots of trouble with 
them on the carnations outside and 
chrysanthemums and other plants in the 
greenhouse. The retail stores in this city 
are not kept up to the usual standard 
found in places of this size throughout 
the eastern and middle states, very little 
eflort being made to attract custom. 
There seems to be agreatdeal of jealousy 
among the craft here, and some of them 
claim that eastern methods and cultural 
hints as laid down by the trade 
papers will not work here, but we fail to 
see it that way, for when we get to that 
state where we can not learn a little 
from the other fellow it is time to shut 
up shop. This is the first year that the 
new kinds of carnations will be given a 
trial in this part of the country. The 
only varieties of recent introduction 
grown before were Flora Hill and prob- 
ably 100 plants of G. H. Crane. 

The Washington Floral Company has 
nearly 10,000 plants of the newest kinds, 
including G. H. Crane, Mrs. Bradt, 
America, Glacier, Peru, The Marquis, 
Olympia, Mrs. Lawson, Cerise Oueen, 
Genevieve Lord, Ethel Crocker and Gen. 
Maceo. Most of them are looking well, 
notably Genevieve Lord, G. H. Crane, 
Cerise Queen, Glacier and The Marquis. 
They have just completedahouse 30x110 
three- quarter-span. 

.\11 of the growers around this city 
plant tomatoes in the houses when the 
violets and carnations are nearly done 
in the spring, and reap a good harvest 
from them during June and July, a great 
number being shipped to Alaska, mostly 
in the green state. Olyhpia. 

Glass For Sale 

100 Boxes 16x24 double strength "A" at 
$2.50 per box. 

150 Boxes 16x24 single strength "A" 
glass at f2.00 per box. 

125 boxes 10x12 double strength "A" at 
$1.75 per box. 

160 boxes 8x10 double strength "A" at 
|1.60 per box. 

The prices are sood as long as the glass 

lasts. It is all well packed and will 

be guaranteed to be in good 

condition. Address 

QIIEEN CITY WRECKING CO., 



Front and Broadway 5ts.. 



CINCINNATI, O. 




Sheep Manure. 

I>ry, pulveri/rd, in <MLr lots, 

^iS^ $h iio p(_T toil. Dry, but uot 
pulverr/cd. |4 00 per ton. In natunil or erceu 
Stat)', $1.50 p'T ton: f. o. b. cars. Kirkhmd, III. 

AIHHtE'JS 

MONTANA FERTILIZER CO.. Elgin. III.. U- S. A. 

Toronto and Return $12.40. 

On ;i.-C"iJiii lit ih'- 'I 'iiontu IC\ position, ttin 
\\ abiish Ko;i(J will sell <^\cursi<iu tickets Iroin 
Chicago, Aiit,'i]st. 25 to 28, fttont; faro for tlie round 
trip as abovir. Tickfts will be '_'Of>U to return 
N'avini^ Toronto u<>i I:itiT Ihan Septf-mbcr 10. 
Kust Ihroui^h seivi'-r. I'or further particulai-s, 
writi- F. A. PALMER. A. G. P. A., or call at C;)ty 
'ricK<"t <.>lTi(U*, 1(7 Adams Street, < 'hit-ago. 



KTo-w le^^ciy for T>^X^-vG>vy» 

PLANT CULTURE 

HITHERTO ADVERTISED AS "COMMERCIAL PLANTS/' 



By George W. Oliver, Propagator t" the U. S. liotanic Garden. Washington, I>. C, and late of 
th*' Royal Itotanic Garden, Edinburgh. 

A Working Hand Book of Every-day Practice for the Horist, Gardener and Nurseryman aud aii 

those who intend to grow plants and Howers. in the greenhouse or jxarden. as a means of obtaining a 
livelihood. Each and every article is written in concise, simple laugiiagf, and pmbodies wholly and 
solely the experii'nces rf the writer. Th*i plants dealt with not only comprise all those which are com- 
monly handled by the trade, but include numerous deserving varietiL-s not so fully known. Chapters 
are given on 

Stove and Greenhouse Plants, Bedding Plants, Vase and Basket Plants, Vines, Hardy and 

Tender, Bulbous Plants, Ornamental Grasses, Water Pfants— Aquatics. Ferns 

and Lycopods, Hardy Perennial Plants, Hardy 3hrubs; 

Also a lengthy chapter of General Dirt'ct'ons. including Propagation— Seeds, Grafting, Budding, 
Layering, Hybridization, Potting Plants, Soil. Mulching, and Wate-ing. Concluded by a very com- 
plete index to all subjects mentioned. This reliable cultural book has been gotten up for use, not 
ornament, there'ore the price has been fixed at a iigure within the reach of all, while it contains more 
real practcal information for those for whom it is intended than is to be found in much more preten- 
tious works costing ten and twenty tinges as much money. Strongly bound in buckram to stand rough 
handling and plenty of it. 

12 mo., 193 Pages, Price $1.00, by mail, postpaid. 

THE FLORISTS' EXCHANGE. P. 0. BOX (697, NEW YORK. 

steel Wire nam staKes. 

24 inches long;, $ 5,00 per thousand; $ .75 per hundred. 
36 inches long, 7.00 per " .85 per " 

48 inches long, 8.50 per " J. 00 per " 

60 inches long, J0.50 per " t.25 per " 

TERHS CASH WITH ORDER. ADV. WILL NOT APPEAR AGAIN. 



H. F. LITTLEFIELD, 



Worcester, Mass. 



"NICOMITE" 

(PATENT) 

Vapor Insecticide 

No labor required. Harmless to 
bloom and foliage. A certain killerof 

ALL GREENHOUSE BUGS. 

SOLD BY SEEDSMEN. 
The Tobacco Warehousing and Trading Co.. 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



KBiinis 




LIQUID PLANT FOOD 

For Greenhouse Cultivating. 

EASTERN CHEMICAL COMPANY, 
Chicago Ofllce: 620 Atlantic Ave., Boston. 

H. K. Snider, Suite 423, 200 Clarii St. 



.If your.. 



Business Methods 

are right you can make a profit 
on an advertisement here. 



."--o a\ 



The most convenient wa.v 
of applying an insecticide 
ever yet devised. No pans 
required -No heating of 
jrons-No Irouble-Cannot 
injure the most sensitive 
blooms-Very erfcci^ive. 
Price O0<J: per box of J2 
rolls. All dealers sell it! 



Skabcura Dip Co. r'i 

St. Louis, ^ — Chicago. 



"Viola'' 

LARGEST HORTICULTURAL ADVERTIS- 
ING PAPER FOR THE SCANDI- 
NAVIAN COUNTRIES. 



rOREION SUBSCRIPTION, 
50c PER YEAR. 



W'rili' I'nr Sinnple ('.optes lo 

SWEDISH <iARDENIN(i OFFICES, 

6, Regeringsgatan, STOCKHOLM. 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



115 



^Mimmm 



^immmmmiiiimmimimiiiii^ 



Order Your Boiler Now 



DO NOT PIT IT Off ANY LONGER 



READ WHAT SOME WELL-KNOWN 
FLORISTS SAY ABOUT THE 

KROESGHELL BOILER. 



PuRCELLViLLE, Va., December 5, 1899. 
Kroeschell Bros. Co. : I write to state that 
the No. 12 Boiler we bought of you last summer is 
taking care of 30,000 ieet of glass with great ease. 
Last nightthe temperature outside stood at 20° with 
the wind blowing a gale, but the night fireman main- 
tained an even temperature with but very little 
draught, and I believe it will give us all the heat we 
need in the coldest weather. The boiler is all and 
more than you claim for it and is entirely satisfactory 
in every respect. A. B. Davis & Son. 

W. S. Davis, Mgr. 

BOWMANVILLE, ILL,, April 10, 1900. 

Kroeschell Bros. Co : The Boiler I bought of 
you is supplying 11,000 feet of 4-inch pipe and would 
easily supply 12,000 feet. It heats a section of five 
houses, or 35,000 feet of g'.ass, 60° or more if needed, 
and I have found the boiler perfectly satisfactory in 
every respect. H. Bauske. 

Milwaukee, Wis., April 11, 1900. 
Kroeschell Bros. Co. : We did not get the No. 
6 Boiler we ordered of you ; you could not make it on 
account of the strike in your shop. Am very sorry 
we did not get it, as yours are the best Boiers made. 
We have one No. 5, bought almost five years ago, 
and we heat four houses 12x150 feet with it, or 
almost 3,200 feet of 4 inch pipe. When we are in 
need of another Boiler we shall buy yours. 

Aug. Burmeister Co. 



Chicago, III., April 13, 1900. 
Kroeschell Bros. Co.: I can say that the two 
No. 12 Boilers we purchased of you last year proved 
very satisfactory, indeed, heating our Rose Section 
of 50,000 square feet easily. What would another 
Boiler cost, only built two feet longer, for delivery 
this fall? An early reply will oblige. 

Weil AND & Risch. 

Chicago, III., April 14, 1900. 
Kroeschell Bros. Co.: In reply to your inquiry 
I would say that the last Boiler you sold to us is 
giving the same uniform satisfaction afforded by the 
other three, purchased six years ago. Your Boilers 
seem built for the purpose of causing water to boil, 
with economy in the use of coal. As our Mr. Louis 
M. Noe, of Madison, N. J., has this week placed an 
order for one of your No. 11 Boilers, further com- 
ment is unnecessary. Brant & Noe. 

Chicago, III., April 13, 1900. 
Kroeschell Bros. Co : Your Greenhouse Hot 
Water Boiler No. 3 is beyond question the best boiler 
made. It is taking care of 2,250 feet of 4-inch pipe 
with ease and I am going to build this season 
another house lSxll2 which I expect to heat with 
the same Boiler. There are a number of different 
kinds of boilers made and we have had some of them 
in use, but they will not do the work your Boiler 
does. Should any florists want information as to 
what your Boilers will do, please send them to me. 

Frank J. Fink. 



KROESCHELL BROS. CO. 

Greenhouse Boiler, 



29 to 59 Erie St , CHICAGO. 





If you will let us know 
how much space you 
want to heat we will 
give you lowest price 

on a GENUINE 

KROESCHELL BOILER 

for your purpose. 



Boilers made of the best nf n aterlal, shell, flrehox 
sheets and heads of eteet water space all aroand 
(front, Bides and back). Write tor Information. 



fmmmmmmmmmmmmmmfmmmmmfm 



116 



The American Florist. 



Aug. i8, 



Doronicums. 

For making abright display and as cut 
flowers.these hardy herbaceous perennials 
take a high place. The several species met 
with in gardens bear yellow flowers, and 
the only distinctive characteristics are in 
the habit of growth and size of flowers. D. 
plantagineum is perhaps the most stately 
species. D. plantagineum excelsum is 
also excellent, and difiers but little from 
the type, except in growing more 
robustly. The flower stems of this spe- 
cies attain to a height of four and one- 
half feet in good soil. D. Austriacum is 
a dwarfer species, rarely exceeding two 
feet in height; andD. Caucasicum belongs 
to this group. Doronicums may be 
lifted from the border, potted and forced. 
The potting may take place late in Octo- 
ber or in November, and the plants 
placed in cold frames until put into the 
forcing house in January, They must be 
very gradually forced into growth, or 
the flowers will lack substance and will 
not last long after being removed from 
the plants and placed in water. Good 
flowers are produced in March, at which 
season they form a welcome addition to 
other forced flowers. 

Doronicums will thrive in almost any 
kind of soil; and flowering is long con- 
tinued if water be afforded plentifully in 
dry weather. If division of the clumps is 
practiced annually, the stems are fewer, 
and the individual blooms larger than 
when the plants are left in the soil 
undisturbed for three or four years.— 
Gardeners' Cbroniele. 



YouNGSTOWN, O. — E. Hippard will be 
at the convention next week. 

Danvebs, Mass.— E. & C. Woodman 
are busily engaged in repairing their 
establishment and bringing the glass 
strictly up to date. 

So. Manchester, Conn.— The annual 
exhibition of the Connecticut Horticult- 
ural Society will be held here on Septem- 
ber 11 to 13. Premium lists can be 
obtained from L. H. Mead, secretary, 
Hartford. 




HEWS^v 

iE"«iii*iiiiili«i«ii iiiiliUiliiilillliilliUiiill'i 

KTcr 




BEST TREE TUB. made from 
Louisiana Cypr ss. strong 
and durable. 

SIZE. TOP. DKKP. 

No. 1 13-in. 11-in. 

No. 2 15 in. 14-in. 

No. 3 18-in. 16;/, 

No. 4 21-in. IS'/s 

No. 5 24-in. 21-in. 

Union Manufacturing Co., 

TOLKUO, o. 




Water Every Day in the Year for 
Flowers and Lawns when 

RIDER or ERICSSON 

HOT AIR PUMPS 

are used. Nearly 25,000 sold during the past 

twenty-five years. 
Send to nearest office for Catalogue "A 3." 

RIDER-ERICSSON ENGINE CO. 

29 Cortlandt Street, B'ew Tork. Teniente-Rev 71 ^^ I,ake Street, Chicago. 

239 FranUln Street, Boston. Havana Cuba ' ^O IT. 7th Street, Philadelphia. 

692 Crater Street, Montreal, P. Q. ' 22 A. Pitt Street, Sidney, N. S. W. 




GALVANIZED STEEL 

Wire Rose Stakes 

straight or Looped 
and Pointed. 



The Model Extension 

Carnation Support. 

Lancaster, Pa., June 17, '99. 
Mr. Theron Parker, 

Brooklyn. N. Y.: 
Dear Sir. — Your Model Carnation 
2 Support is all rifjht in every way, 

^ and will no doubt be considered 

as necessary as good plants with 
growers wHen better known. [ 
UJ consider it the bt'St in the market, 

^ and if your other Specialties are 

as good, they should make another 
addition to the money makers of 
1900. Very Respectfully. 

Albert M. Herr. 

Samples and Prices on 
Application to 

THE MODEL 
PLANT STAKE CO.. 

226 North 9th Street, 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



FLOWER POTS 



ALL KINDS. 



SPECIALTY 



STANDARD POTS ' 

List and SAMPLES PRBB. 
SWAHN'8 POTTERY MF'G CO. 

P. O. Box 78, Minneapolis. Minn. 



GEO. KELLER & SON, 

MANIWAOTUBIES OF 

Flower Pots. 

Before bnylng write for prices- 
361-363 Herndon Street 
near Wrtghtwood Ave., 

CHICAGO. II.L. 



ALL Nurserymen, Seedsmen und Florists wish- 
ing to do business with Europe should send 
tor the . 




"Horticultural Advertiser" 

Thii li the Brltiih Trade Paper, beine read weekl; 
by all Horticultural traderi; it ii alio taken by 
over 1000 of the beit Continental bouiei. Annual 
lubioription to cover ooit of postage 75 oenti. 

Addreii EDITORS OF THE ** H. A.** 

ChllwAll Nurs«r)«a - N*ttB, Ensiand. 

Always mention the 

American Florist 

when writing advertiiers. 




THE NEW 

Standard 

Ventilating 

Macliines. 

Always reliable. 

Self-oiling. 

Four Styles. 

All warranted first- 
class. 

Send for catalogue and 
see what first-class flo- 
rists are using. 

THE 

E. HIPPARD CO., 

YOUNGSTOWN. 0. 




STANDARD FLOWER POTS! 

Packed in small crates, easy to handle. 



Price per orate 
IMO 3-ln. poU In orate, $4.88 
1600 2M" " 6.26 

1600 28" " tJ.OO 

100O3 " " 6 00 

8003J4" " 5: 

6004 " " 4.60 

330 6 " " 4.61 

144 6 " " 3.16 



Price per orate 
120 7-ln. pots In orate, 14. r' 



tiO 8 " " 3.00 

48 9 " ■■ 3.60 

4810 " " 4.80 

24 11 •' " 3.60 

24 12 " " 4.80 

1214 " " 4.80 

_ 816 " " 4.60 

nSeed pans, same price as pota. Send for price list of 
Cylinders for Cut Flowers, HanKlnp Baskets, Lawn 
Vases, etc. 10 per cent off for cash with order. 

HILFINQER BROS. POTTERY, 

OR.... FORT EDWARD, N. V. 

ACQUIT BOLKIB * SONS, New Tork Agenu 

52 DIT STRUT. NIW YORK TrTT 

KELLER BROS., 

^ 213-15.17-19.21-23 Peari St.. 

NORRISTOWN, PA. 

Manufacturers of Standard Flower Pota, red in 
color, equal to the best on the market; are 16 
miles from Philadelphia, best of railroad connec- 
tions. We give special attention to mail orders and 
make special sizes to order in quantities. A 
postal will brine prices and discounts. 

Red Standard Pots. 

CORRECT SIZE. 
SUPERIOR QUALITY. 

Write for price list. 

6.tiENNE6KEC0..""^^l5".^"^ 

Standard.?' .?» 

FLOWER 



Pots 



If your greenhouses are within 500 miles of 
the Capitol, write us ; we can save you money 



W ® 1 A o 
28lh and M Streets N. 



ERNEST, 

E. WASHINerON. 



D C 



BIGS ON ASTERS 



KILLED 
BY USING 



SLUG SilOT 



SOLD BY 
SEEDSMEN 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



117 



W£i!^s^sf^mf^'msiBfifssS:-Mf^j^S!-<^ssssssiri 



1900 








Doric Seamless Tubular 
Steam Boiler. 

Sectional View. 




Doric Hot Water Heater. 




Hot Water Heaters 

Steam Boilers==Radiators 





Ourney "400 Series" 
Steam Boiler. 



Gurney Bright Idea Hot water Heater. 

Sectional View. 



Their long continued use by the leading Greenhouse 
men in the country is undeniable evi- 
dence of their superiority. 

RELIABLE-DURABLE^ECONOMICAL 

We manufacture Boilers capable of heat- 
ing any size Greenhouse 

Send for Special Greenhou;^e Price List. 

Free Upon Application. 





Bright Idea Steam Boiler-PERSPEcnvE view. 



Jacket Hot Water Heater. 



Defiance 
Hot Water Heater. 



GURNEY HEATER MFQ. CO., 

74 rranklln St., cor. Arch, BOSTON, MASS. 



NEW YORK BRANCH: JJJ Fifth Ave.. Cor. 18th St., Constable BuUdine, New York Citv. 
WESTERN SELLING AGENTS: James B. Clow & Sons, 222-224 Lake St., Chicago, lU. 



»ggH5SBg«ggMggg»»a»8gsyaaeBBs^si 



fssBXBg^^&srjiav.ia'jsr.'i/ssss^^ 




118 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 18^ 



Norlhern Seeds. 

A fact that has been fully established 
in recent years is that a species extend- 
ing over a wide geographical range varies 
in handiness. The box elder of the south 
winter-kills at the north; the red cedar 
of the south is short- lived and tender at 
the north; the same is true of the ash, 
elm and other trees. That prince of tree 
planters, the late Robert Douglas, proved 
this fact with various trees, and also 
that the evergreens from the Pacific 
slope of the Rocky Mountains were not 
as hardy as the same species from the 
east side of the mountains. The propo- 
sition has not been fully demonstrated 
for all species, but there are certainly 
instances enough to show that it is a 
general law. In Russia the government 
observes very carefully this rule in all its 
extended work of tree planting, as they 
have found the Scotch pine, Norway 
spruce and other trees from the moist 
climate of western Europe short lived 
and tender on the dry steppes of Russia, 
while the same species as found in North- 
ern Siberia proved perfectly hardy. — 
N. E. Hansen belore the American Asso- 
ciation of Nurserymen. 



Owosso, Mich. — H. B. Deal is building 
a fine little office structure adjoining his 
greenhouses on east Comstock street. 

New Brighton, Pa.— T. W. Richards, 
who has conducted greenhouses here for 
many years, has closed out his business. 

Benton Harbor, Mich. — Mrs. Charles 
Carlson, wife of the proprietor of the 
Morton Hill Greenhouses, died July 31, 
after a long illness. She was 61 years of 
age. 




D. 0. Cunningham 



.Glass Co., 



PITTSBURG, PA. 



TANK WINDOW GL4SS. 
HOT-nOlSE GLASS A SPECIALTY. 



▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼ ▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼ w ▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼ ▼▼▼ 

STEAM COAL 

FOB FLORISTS . 

Chicago, April 7ih, 1900. 
HULL & COMPANY, 74 and 75 Traders' Building, Chicago, 111 , 

GENTLEMEN:— In reference to my opinion of your THACKER .SPLINT COAL, 
will say I am v£ry well pleased with it and think it is superior to any Coal of the 
splint grades we have yet used. Burns free, making an intense heat with very few 
ashes; no clinkers, and has the lasting quality of all high-grade Coal. 1 certainly 
consider it a very economical Coal to burn. 

Yours very truly, J. A. BUDLONG, Wholesale Florist. 



Write us for price on single carload orders or season contract, delivered 
at any point in the United States. 'Phone Har. 960. 



IZ 



HULL & COMPANY, 



74 & 75 TRADERS BUILDING, 

-OHICiVGO. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦••♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^ 




J ■ ■ I rl C > ■ I 



SGOLLAY BOILER 



FOR 

Greenhouse Heating, Etc. 

HOT WATER OR STEAM. 

Farminqton, Conn.. March 9, 1896. 
"The Invincible Boiler you placed io my Carna- 
tion houses has given ^reat satisfaction. I die 
not have to run the boiler hard even when the 
thermometer stood 18" below zero. It has proved 
'Invincible' in every respect." 

HneH Chksnbt, Florist. 



I 



SEND STAMP FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICE LIST. 
Estimates Cheerfully Qiven. 



JOHN A. SCOLLAY. 

'INVINCIBLE." 74 and 76 Myrtle Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

please tncndon the Ametican Fl'^rist when luriting. 




GREENHOUSE GLASS 



m 



OUR SJPEC MALTY, I 

LHRCE STOCK «^ ^ ^ ^ -^ PROMPT SHIPMENT. : 

,%^>'Parelinseeii0ilPD)ty.Pjint5jrustesEI(.! 

|2^^ WRITE rOR. LATEST PRICES. J^ 



MAGHlNERYajid SUPPLIES at URMUIPRICES 



1:^ 



We have the lar^'est machinery depc it on earth. We secure our machinery from 
the various buildings and plants that we are constantly buying'. We purchased The 
World's Fair, The Omaha Exposition, The Chicago Post-Office and ninnerous other 
noted structures. Our facilities for rebuildini; macliinery are unsurpassed. We 
c .ver all our sales with bindint; i,'uarantees. BOILERS FROM $25 UP. ENGINES 

FROM $35 UP. STEAM PUMPS FROM $15 UP - etc., etc. 

We also carry a couinl.-io stock of trcin-ral supplies, such as 
BELTING. SHAFTING, HANGERS. PULLEYS, IRON 
PIPE, VALVESand FITTINGS, IRON ROOFING, HARD- 
WARE, PLUMBING MATERIAL, etc. Cut this 
ad.i.utanrt »e will send yim Free "ur 2S0 page 
Catalogue No. ■•''. We are cniistantly buyiufr 
^■lUire st<»ks at Sheriffs and Receivers Sales. 

CHICAGO HOUSE WRECKING CO. 

West JSth and Iron streets, - t.HICAGO. 




^ -^ / / / / L 



^ \ \ N 




igoo. 



The American Florist. 



119 



PROFIT IS CERTAIN... 




In the prudent and thorough heating of a greenhouse as much as in large 
sales of stock. If a florist is burdened by an "unnecessary annual tax of from 

$50 TO $100 

For fuel and extra labor he must work much harder in order to make up this 
unnecessary tax out of the profits of his business. We know from our past 
experience that there is no unnecessary tax for fuel and labor when our boil- 
ers are used, because they are made after careful examination of the reas- 
ons why other boilers have failed and their construction avoids the defects 
shown. No one has bought 

OUR BOILERS 

That ever regretted it and thousands have bought and look back at the cost 
as the best investment they ever made. 

SEE WHAT 

This florist says: 

C. HUMFELD, Clay Center, Kansas, ,Iuly 19th, 1900. I purchased a 
No. 70 Standard Sectional Hot Water Boiler from you in August, 1898, and I 
do not remember that I ever wrote you anything about it. In corresponding 
with me you told me that other parties that had purchased your boilers in 
some cases paid S50 00 more for your boiler than they could have gotten 
other boilers of same capacity. I wish to say that I am one of them, as I 
paid $50.00 more for your boiler than I would have had to pay for another 
make. I am not sorry for it as I now see the difference in price is more than 
made up by the difference in value. I can speak from experience, as I have 
two other good sectional boilers, but yours is a terror. I have 2000 feet of 
two-inch pipe, 1340 square feet of radiation hung to the 70 boiler and I have 
my expansion tank about forty feet away from the boiler and still it gets so 
hot that it wants much more radiation, so I am going to have it heat another 
house 20xlC0, or 1600 feet of 1 '4-inch pipe, or 688 feet of radiation, so that the 
total radiation will be 19Z8 square feet, but I think the boiler can heat it eas- 
ily. I know I have never crowded it and if we would it would throw all the 
water out of the line of pipes. That boiler is all right and anybody that 
wants to know about it, refer them to me. 

OUR GREENHOUSE CATALOGUE 

Is free, and we are in business to give information about our boilers and 
heating greenhouses, and solicit correspondence. 

WE CAN MAKE 

Prices delivered at any station, so that a florist knows exactly what the cost 
will be of a boiler delivered. 



Mention American Florisl. 



GIBLIN & CO., Utica, N. Y. 



We are Supplying 



TWTATERIAL for extensions for some of the best-known growers 
^ [ in tlie country, men who would not have "cheap" lumber, whose 
first requirement is quality. 

Let us give an estimate on your contemplated houses; the figures 
will be so low they'll surprise you. Then we'll tell you where you can 
see samples of our work; it will be so good it will please you. 

A. DIETSCH & CO., 

615-621 Sheffield Ave., CHICAGO. § 
California Red Cedar and Louisiana Cypress. | 




LVANS* IMPROVED 

V£MmAnjic\ 

APPAMAFUS \ 

WRITt fOR ILLU5rRATtO ■-AIALOGUE 

QUAKF/t arrmcHMfWiixi 



Hiiro's A. Sia.^f>! 

In a lot of g;ilvani/ed Roie Stakes. Save mouey by 
writing McLENEGAN BROS.. Reading. Pa. 




Jennings Bros., 



GREENHOUSE 
DESIGNERS... 
& BUILDERS. 

Mfr« ot and dealers In Creonhouse Specialties. 



Patent Iron Banch Frame Fittings, 
Improved Cast iron Gutters and Plates. 

Send for 

Cata'OKue 



Jennings Bros.. 



OIney, 
PliU>«delphIa, Pa. 



PLACE YOUB NAME. 



and vour specialties before the purchasing florists ot the entire country 



by advertising in 

■■KO HDVT. MOW. 



THE AMERICAN FLORIST. 



120 



The American Florist, 



Aug. r8, 



Index to Advertisen. 



AQTeniBlDii Batea iSi 

Allen J K >,••_„ S 

AmllDK Albert F '.10 

Amtlnu K C '5 

Arnold John J I(j0 

Asmua R MO 

Bailer FA ••> 

Banner J L <0 

Barnard W W & Co.. I 

Barrow J G "0 

B>ur S Alfred I 

KaaBett& WaBhbum... ill 
B jyersdorfer u & Co. . 103 

«enthej4Co „ 71 

Berckmana P JCo 86 % 102 

uerger H H * Co 98 

Bemlng H G. '^ 

BlDdekonat Die 110 

Banc A & Co 100 

BobbtnR & AtUns '.^ 

Beck Wni A 108 

Boston lietter Co 112 

Boyd J H U 96 

Brant&Noe ?2 

Brill FranclB H 

Brown Peter 98 

Brown & Canfleld g 

UrunaH W 100 

bucibee H W 102 

Bndlong J A "1 

Bunyard n A 

Rurpee W A^tleo * ffl. II 
Caldwell the Woods- 
man Co ;0 

California Nuraery Co U 

Carmody J D 113 

Chadwick Chas 'M 

Chicago ijamation Co. 91 
Chicago Bngravlng Co. 105 
Chicago House wreck- 
ing Co l>i 

Chrlaly Wilbur A 4 

ijloolunati uulFloCo. ii 
Clark Wm A * 8on..lU1 

Clearyi Co 91' 

Clipper Lawn Mower 

Co 112 

Cjhen J M . 72 

Coles W W 9j 

Conard & Junes wj — 1 2 
Coniey John a Son — 110 
Cottage QHrdens — 94 I 

Coventry M J 8 

Crabb & Uunl«r 91 92 

Craig Robl& Son 86 

rrltchell'B 1(2 

Croom John F & Bro "4 

Croucb Mrs .T W 9i 

Crowl Fern Co . , 10 

cnnnlngham Jos H .. 91 
Cunningham D O 

iJlaes Co 1 8 

DavlB Bros l08 

ueamnd J B 7i 88 

Detroit Flo'r Pot W ks Ili9 1 
De LIchtbuer A Cardon 96 ; 

De Smet Frerea 102 

D<_'3Bert A 98 

De.xter I.llllan Allen.. 70 
Diccinson Co Albert., li 

Dleucb A& Co 119 

ilUon .1 L, 92 

Dodge W W 109 

liomer tTed&Sons Co. 9 

Douglas' Sons K 911 

UreerU A 84 120 

Unnne « Co 108 

BaBt«rn rhemlcal Co. . 1 14 

Edgar W W lUi 

Blchholi Conrad 92 

Ulohnulz Henrv 84 

EllwanBcA iiarry — '.to 

Bngle W J 112 

Krnest W U . .116 

Farmers' aud Planters' 

Co 71 

Ferguson John B 72 

Flnley Lawn Rake Co 12- 
Florida Nat Prod Co ..llli 

Floral Exchange ^9 

Florists' Exchange 114 

Ford Bros 73 

FordL M 98 

Foster LuolDS H 108 

Fox & Fox r^O 

Frlsenette Carl Hi 

Uardeners i^bronlde. . 88 

Gardening Co The 81 

Oarland Geo M Ill 

Oeller Slgmund I lu 

Ghormley Wm 7d 

Gibbons R W \'l 

Glblln & Co 119 

Gorton & Lldgerwood IV 



Qullett & 3ona W H... 92 

Gantber Wm H 73 

Qumey Heater Co 117 

Hagenbnrgei Carl 92 

Ball Aasn Ill 

Hammond Ben] 116 

Hancoch Geo & don . ',iO 

Uarrla Wm K 86 

Heacock Joseph loi 

HelnlJos 92 

Belss J B 92 

Hennecke C Co 116 

Herendeen Mfg Co — IV 

Herr Albert M 9S 

HerrmaTin A 112 

Herron Dana B 9J 

news A ii A Co 116 

flllflnger Bros 116 

HUIE O & Co I 

HIppard K. 116 

Hltchlnga & Co 

4th Special cover IV 
Hoffman B M & H N. SO 
Uolton A Hunkel Co. . 7i) 

Hooker HM Co 118 

Hoopes, Bro& Thomas 96 
Horun Bdw C .73 

Homor ChaB B & Son 9J 

uort Adv 116 

Hose Connection Co.. 8J 
Howland Nursery Co. . '^ 

Hull & Co lis 

Hunt E H 71 11 

Invalid Appliance Co. Ill 

Ionia Potttrr Co 109 

Jackson* PerklnsCo. 96 

Jackaon B B '.ts 

Jacob & Alllaon U2 

Jacobs a & sona IV 

Janaen Ed 107 

Jennlnga B B 9S 

Jeimings Bros 119 

lohnson & Stokes 74 

Joosten C U 11 

Joy* Son , 96 

KadenH 102 

oaetlng W V '- 

Keller Bros Ii6 

Keller Geo & Son 116 

Kellogg GeoM |2 

Kempe Jaa 11 

KeuMcutl nroa . "7 

KentuokyTobProdCo.112 

Klft Kobdrt 110 

KIIDonrn R Ho 

Krick WC 11- 

.\roesobe" Br..5 oo ..115 

Kuemer H W 94 

Knelm C A 72 

KuhlGeo A 9j 

Lager A Hurrell . . . li«l 
Lakev'w Rose Garden. M 

Lamb JasM 92 

Lang JuMQS 73 

Ley John U 86 

LlmprechtS J 73 

Lindsay the Florist — 86 

LltilefleldllF 114 

Luckland Luml.o..ll8 IV 

Long D B HI 

Lonsdale Bdwln 101 

Lord & Burnham Co . . 

2d Special cover IV 

Lnoas j di. oo 12u 

Lynch W HI 71 

McCarthy & Co N F.. 

72 1113 

MoFadden EC 74 

McFar. and John 80 

MaK«llar & WlnMJSon 

71 S2 

McLeuegan Broa Ii9 

MacBaau A S 9: 

Mader Paul 8.S 

Marahall <' L 102 

May Jobn N 81 

Meeban Thos & rtuns. . SO 
Merlon Greenhouses... 8U 
Mever Jubo u <« Co ...lu 

Mlchell Henry F 91 

Mtuang & Co VA 

MUlang Frank 73 

vlUer W J 91 

Model Plant Stake Co .116 
Moller's Gartner Zel 

tung 94 

MonlngerJCCo Ill 

Montana Fertilizer Co 114 
Moon Samuel C ......96 

Moon Wm U sj 

Moore Wm J 81 

Moore, Uentz &Nasb.. 7l 
Morris FloralCo.... 013 

Moss Geo M 72 94 

Murpby Wm, . 9J 



DONT PAINT 

until you have seen our sample cards. 
They ■will help you. Drop us a postal 
pnd ■we'll mail them to you. JOHN 
LUCAS & CO., Philadelphia, New 
York and Chicago. 



: Holds Class 
j Firmly 

< See the Point 49" 

i The \ BD Keyper I'cr- 

< fret dllazlnr Point* ara 

< the beat. No rigbta or 
J lefts. Box of \wb points 
! 76 cents, postpaid. 

< HENBT A. DRF.F.K, 

i 714 Cheataat 8t., Phllft.,ra. 




Murray Bill Hotel ..110 

Myers k Co 126 

Nanz CO 102 

Nan/. & Nenner 92 

New York Hotel 110 

Nlessen Leo 72 

Noenne \ Hoepker II 

N Y Cut riowoi BiX. 7.1 
N Y Cnt EHowe"- Co.... 73 
Pennock flam'l S . . 72 
Perry's Hardy Plant 

Farm 98 

Pierce F O Co IV 

Pittsburg Cm Flo Co. . 70 
Pollworth CCCo .. 70 

Prince AG* Co 71 92 

OuakerCltv Wo bwi„.ii8 
Queen city Wrecking 

Co 114 

KandaU A L 71 

Eaynor J 1 73 8i 

BeedQlaea iPalnt i^o 1211 
Regan Printing Hous« 104 
Relnberg Geo. . . , 71 77 9 1 

Rein be "-i? Peter 7i 79 

RetzerWalteriCo . So I 

Rice M &Co 110 

Rlder-ErlcaaonSng Co 116 

Rodsera Alex il 

Koemer Fred 81 

Rolker A&Sons II 

Rose Mfg CO 109 

Bupp John F HO 

Sander 4 Co 103 

Schlllo Adam IV 

Schmidt J C 90 92 

Bchwelgert Chas... 101 

HcoUey John A IS 

Sheridan W F 73 

Blebrecht & Son .. ..87 I 
Situations & Wanu> ... 69 

Skabcura Dip Co 114 

Smely Jos H 92 

Smllh U J 70 

Smith Nath * xnr &4 103 
Smurthwalte Pro Co . II 

Soltau C .. fO 

South Side Floral Co 88 



Stahl Cbas n 72 

Btearna Lum ber Co 1 20 

Slevena & Co 110 

Stevena Geo 

3d Special cover 
Stootholl U A 4 i-u . II 
Slnrrs & Harrison Co. 77 
Slyer J J 74 

, Suiherlana Geo A 72 

Swahn PotteryMf gCo .116 

TapUn S 100 

Teas E Y '.« 

Tesaon Bobt F 110 

Thorbum J M 4 Co. 74 

I Tobacco Warehousing 

I and Trading Co 114 

Traendly & Hchenok .. 73 
Union Mfg Co 116 

1 Vail Seed Co 109 

Van Wert Greenh'es . 92 
Vaughan^B Seed store 

I 74 83 'J5 I 

Vlcks Sons Jaa 93 

Vincent 4 Son Ii8 

.lola 114 

Vredenburg i Co 92 

Wabash BR 114 

Watson OC II 

Watson W H 93 

Weathered'B Sons 

Thoa W 113 

Weber H 4 8on» 80 

Weeber 4 Don II 

, Wetland 4 Blsch 71 

Welch Bros a 

! Whllldln Pot Co 1C9 

Wletor Bros .. 71 

Wlttbold The Geo Co 86 I 

i wood Bros 84 

Woodroffe 4 Bem- 

helmer 72 

WredeH SO 

Yates J W 86 

Young Jno 73 88 

Young 4 Nngenf . . 73 
Young Thoa Jr .. ...73 S2 
Zlmglebel D 81 



Let the advertiser know that you take 
the Florist. Then he'll know how he 
came to get vour order. 



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limerica is ■'iiie truw oi inu Uessei; there may be mars caminrt Umidships, but we are the Urst ta touch Unknown Seas,' 



Vol. X^ I 



CHICAQO AND NEW YORK AUGUST 25, 1900. 



No. 638. 



ITLlillE /Ai^JflSilii^lH iFiL@@l!@7 



Copyr^l 
Er 



^ht 1900, by American Florist Company, 
iitered as Second-Class Mail Matter. 

Published evert Saturday bt 

AMERICAN FLORIST COMPANY, 

334 Dearborn 5t., Chlcafi^o. 
Bastern Office: 67 Bromfield St., Boston. 

Subscription, 11.00 a year. To Europe, J2.00. 

Subscriptions accepted only from the trade. 

SOCIETY OF AMERICAN FLORISTS AND 
ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURISTS. 

OFFICBR8 — E. M. Wood, Natick, Mass., presi- 
dent; F. R. PiERSoN, Tarrytown, N. Y., vice- 
president; Wm. J. Stewart, 67 Bromfleld St., 
Boston, Mass., secretary; H. B. Bbattt, Oil City, 
Pa., treasurer. The seventeenth annual meeting 
will be held at BulTalo. Ausust, IfiOl. 

Officeks-elect (tobe instal ed January 1.1901) 
Patrick O'Mura, New York, president;' W. F. 
Kasting, Buffalo, vice-president; secretary and 
treasurer as before. 



AMERICAN ROSE SOCIETY. 

Annual meeting at New York, 1901. Leonard 
Barron, 136 Liberty St., New York, secretary. 



THE AMERICAN CARNATION SOCIETY. 

Annual convention at Baltimore, February, 
1901. ALBERT M. Herr, Lancaster, Pa., Secretary. 



CHRYSANTHEMUM SOCIETY OF AMERICA. 

Annual ui«'eting:it Buffalo, August, 1901. Edwin 
Lonsdale, Chestnut Uill, Pa., secretary. 

THIS ISSUE 48 PAGES WITH COVER. 



CONTENTS. 

The New York conveu'ion 121 

—President Wood's address 122 

— President-elect Patrick O'Mura (portrait). . ,123 

—Judges of the trade exhibits 124 

—Report of the secretary 124 

—Vice-president-elect William F. Kasting 

(portrait) 124 

—Report of the treasurer 125 

—Reports of committees 125 

—Florists* Hail Association 125 

—The president's reception 125 

—Wednesday's proceedings 125 

—The Chrysanthemum Society ot America, . , .125 

—The American Carnation Society 126 

—Wednesday Mvening's programme 126 

—Thursday's procefdings 126 

—The horticultural exhibition 126 

—The trade exhibit 126 

Hand bomiuet of orchids (illus.) 127 

Between the acts ; 128 

What I think I know about greenhouse 

construction (illus.) 128 

Funeral design (illus.) 131 

Gerbera Jamesonii (illus,) 133 

The rose 133 

With the growers — Chicago Carnation Co., 

Joliet, 111., (illus.) 135 

O! Willis N 136 

Chicago 136 

Making a start at growing 137 

The seed trade 142 

The nursery trade 144 

— Orlando Harrison (portrait) 144 

Our pastimt-s — The uunners' contest 146 

—The chiff of the bowlers f portrait) 146 

—The bowling contest at New York 146 



^^^^^p^^^^j^^^'^.^^^'ii^^'^'^^t^'^i^^'^s.^'i^^'^i. w^wCi^ 



THE NEW YORK CONVENTION. 



i 



The sixteenth annual convention of the 
Society of American Florists has passed 
into history vastly to the credit ol the 
New York Florists' Club, without doubt 
far eclipsing the successes which have 
attended its predecessors. Not only was 
the attendance larger than heretofore 
but the interest was keen from start to 
finish. There presentation included the 
whole country, several of the most dis- 
tant states sending leading men of the 
trade, and the arrangements for Enter- 
tainment were faultless. The committee 
of the local club has labored long and 
painstakingly that the machinery of the 
great meeting should move without a 
jar and the testimony of the visitors is 
unanimous in approval of their work. 
It should be ample reward. 

The trade and horticultural exhibitions 
were particularly valuable, being remark- 
able for theircompletenessatidthe superb 
quality of much of the stock shown. 
Those who sought pecuniary reward in 
nearly every case found it in the consid- 
erable amount of business transacted in 
the exhibition hall and in the acquaint- 
ances formed, which will surely result in 
commercial transactions in the future. 

Grand Central Palace proved to be per- 
fectly adapted to the requirements of 
the occasion and left little to be desired 
in the way of a meeting place. The ses- 
sions of the society and the exhibitions 
were accommodated all upon the ground 
floor and the arrangement afiforded the 
committee on decoration an opportunity 
to display their skill, of which they took 
complete advantage. 

President Patrick O'Mara, of the New 
York Florists' Club, inaugurated the 
convention at 9:30 a. m., Tuesday, 
August 21, by cordially greeting the 
visiting delegates and assuring them of 
a fulfilment of the promises of hospitable 
and kindly treatment on the part of the 
New York brethren. 

An address of welcome was then 
delivered by the Acting Mayor of the 
city, Hon. Randolph B. Guggenheimer. 
He spoke of the florists' association as one 
the growth and prosperity of which had 
always been closely identified with that of 
the Empire state, and of the fact that 
eleven years had elapsed since its last 
annual meeting in the metropolis, when it 



:.^....^J 



exhibited the perfection of horticulture 
and of nature's wonderland of flowers. 
He said the length of this interval was 
the only ground of complaint against 
the association, and he trusted that the 
interval of absence following the present 
meeting would be materially less. 

After referring to the pride of New 
Yorkers in the marvelous growth and 
prosperity of the city, to.day the gate- 
way to the wealthiest, because the most 
productive, country in the world, and a 
city which, in a few years, will be the 
greatest upon earth in wealth, area and 
population, he continued: 

"That is our manifest destiny. We 
face the rising sun of promise and pros- 
perity and turn our backs upon nothing 
American. But our great houses of 
trade, our public buildings and splendid 
residences, in fact every home in our 
enlarged city, would be sordid and 
unlovely but for the touch of the land- 
scape gardener in unexpected places and 
the unpainted loveliness of God's flowers 
— the sweetest things that breath on 
earth and which have no souls to recog- 
nize their shy but imperial beauty. 
Ladies and gentlemen, such art as yours 
is universal. It is like the air or the 
sunshine; it cannot be confined to 
the gardens and conservatories of 
the rich. It glorifies our public parks 
with such natural loveliness that 
the little children from the tenements, 
who play there in the sunshine, learn 
imperishable lessons of form and color 
from the exquisite growths of nature 
that exult everywhere in their spring 
and summer pride. It beautifies the 
windows and rooms of all who love the 
odorous handiwork of nature, and trans- 
forms many a poorly furnished home into 
a place of delight. Therefore I welcome 
you to this city because the art which 
you represent appeals to the heart and 
imagination of every man, woman and 
child in this community." 

Edgar Sanders, of Chicago, responded 
on behalf of the society. He expressed 
appreciation of the generous reception of 
the visitors and of the magnificent trade 
exhibit in the adjoining hall. 

Edmund M. Wood, of Natick, Mass., 
president of the S. A. F., upon taking the 
chair, delivered 9, formal address. 



122 



The American Florist. 



Aug 25, 



President Wood's Address, 

After one of those tactful and graceful 
oratorical preludes tor which he is so 
well known, President Wood addressed 
himself directly to the greatest needs of 
the society, speaking in part as follows: 
This society has contributed much to 
educate the florist to more comprehen- 
sive ideas and methods, a forerunner of 
commercial integrity and honor. It has 
raised the industry from a plodding, 
grovelling one, to the dignity of an art 
and to the equal of any commercial or 
manufacturing interest. It will compare 
favorably with mercantile or banking 
establishments, requiring the highest 
skill, executive ability and knowledge of 
the government of men. The florist, the 
horiculturist of to-day, is a man who by 
nature is a restless, changeful being. 
Were this otherwise, there would be no 
advance in floriculture or horticulture. 
He is tired of much of the old and is fond 
of the new things, new methods with 
brilliant effects — consequently he wants 
immediate results. We can safely pro- 
phesy that, as time goes on, he will 
become more and more of an interrogator 
and do more and more of his own think- 
ing. 

How little people think! This was 
expressed by a prominent gentleman at a 
public dinner in this city, when he 
exclaimed: " There are not 200 people in 
New York city who think." This, how- 
ever, is a pessimistic view. We come 
here, many of us or all of us, thoughtless 
o< what we can best do to promote the 
welfare of the society. We come for a 
good time. Now, I do not object to a 
good time myself, and I infer from your 
iridescent faces that you do not. Per- 
haps we are not unlike the two boys who 
were saying their prayers together. One 
started to say the Lord's Prayer and 
when he said: "Give us this day our 
daily bread," the other nudged him and 
whispered: "We've hpd bread long 
enough — ask Him for pie." 

The age is intense; it is active in all 
pursuits; its people are more sensitive 
and independent in thought, and it 
appears to me that some method must 
be devised to prevent the society from 
disintegrating into different organiza- 
tions through devotees and lovers of 
special flowers by such action as shall 
provide all that they hope to receive from 
outside organizations. Unless this is 
done, it is not unlikely that we may 
address ourselves to diminished audi- 
ences, if not diminished members of the 
society. 

What are the causes and what are the 
remedies? First, the society is not strong 
enough financially. This is the most 
serious cause. It can do little or nothing 
for its members to carry out their wishes, 
either by money or by exhibits or by 
premiums. It would be far better for 
the Society of American Florists, if the 
devoted followers of special flowers con- 
tributed such sums of money as they 
now contribute or deem necessary for 
special exhibits, to a general fund to be 
under the auspices and direction of this 
society. These could be known by such 
names as the Chrysanthemum fund, the 
Carnation fund or such fund as any par- 
ticular contributor or contributors may 
designate for their special flower. 

Every enthusiast in his love for a 
special flower, wants a special organiza- 
tion. These societies never would have 
been organized but for the necessity of 
having means to develop, improve and 
advance the claims of their favorite 
flower. It seems to have been thought a 



necessity, if these flowers were to be 
improved, at the present time. I have 
the honor to be a life member of one of 
these societies, the American Rose Society, 
for my heart is in the rose. Yet I do not 
approve of these special societies if it be 
possible to care for them in this organi- 
zation. 

The instinctive and universal taste of 
mankind selects flowers for the expres- 
sion of its finest sympathies and the 
universal heart of man blesses flowers. 
How much more is this sentiment 
developed in his favorite flower, the love 
for which burns with increasing brilli- 
ancy and strength. How difficult to hold 
incheckthe outside action which he takes 
to advance and improve its beauty and 
its variety, when the parent society is 
powerless to assist. 

How sad the spectacle which many of 
you witnessed of the bold enthusiast for 
his favorite flower, the rose, taking pos- 
session of this society s meeting at Detroit 
and appealing to its members to become 
subscribers for life membership, when the 
Society of American Florists was in need 
of funds itself. Not the faintest effort 
was made to obtain subscribers for this 
society at that meeting, and yet it is hard 
to blame the enthusiasts of rose culture. 
The remedy for it is to put money in thy 
purse and expend it freely for the general 
good. 

There are other remedies. First, by 
organizing the society into an associa- 
tion, national, if possible, otherwise 
under state laws with power to hold 
property. Second, encourage auxiliary 
societies in every city and large town in 
the country, which shall obtain their 
charters from the parent society and for 
which they shall pay a certain sum per 
capita, at the time of organization and 
annually thereafter according to the num- 
bers and strength of the society. By this 
plan the society will be continually grow- 
ing financially stronger and in time will 
be able to co-operate with the auxiliary 
society. It would be advisable to have 
a committee to investigate this proposi- 
tion and report at the next annual con- 
vention. Third, by organizing the 
co-operative department of purchase and 
distribution into a corpoiation, which 
takes nothing from you but gives you 
money for good fellowship. What then 
is, or ought to be our purpose? To 
CO operate in anything connected with 
our profession that benefits the greatest 
number. To co-operate for the diffusion 
of knowledge of floriculture and horti- 
culture and the happiness of our members, 
and for the benefit and happiness of man- 
kind. But if we cast a retrospective 
glance, do we not see that most that has 
been done has been largely for self- 
interest. 

Has the purpose been broad enough, 
and if so, have we performed the duties 
which that purpose imposes? Of the 
great number of florists and horticultur- 
ists and those intimately connected with 
us by trade, have we as members more 
than a small percentage? If our society 
were sufficiently attractive and beneficial, 
as it ought to be, we should have thous- 
ands join our standard, instead of hun- 
dreds. Our membership should be more 
active, more energetic, take greater inter- 
est in the society and band together for 
the common good. 

Our exchequer appears to have had 
hard sledding, uphill and on bare ground 
at that. Some process should be devised 
by those who have the welfare of the 
society at heart and who feel the respons- 
ibility which it carries with it, by which 
money shall flow continuously into our 



treasury with some assurance to those 
who desire to promote and advance the 
claims of their special flowers within the 
society, that it will be done. We are not 
facing as we ought, the problems which 
this purpose demands of us. 

Our members should be constantly 
thoughtful and active for the society in 
obtaining new members, soliciting every 
one who trades with them to become a 
member of the society, following the 
example set by that distinguished horti- 
culturist, C- M. Hovey, of Boston, when 
he was trying to build up and extend the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society. 
He and his superintendent and clerks solic- 
ited every person who came to his nur- 
series or greenhouses to become a mem- 
ber of that society. In this manner, I 
became a member at the age of 24. We 
ought to be more resolute, definite and 
not, Micawber-like, "waiting for some- 
thing to turn up." 

You have seen the co-operative depart- 
ment of purchase installed. Many of you 
have heard the discussions and know the 
object, the purpose recommended to the 
committee appointed by the convention 
in Detroit; their report was read at the 
convention; it was printed with the other 
doings and sayings upon co-operation. 
The purpose was stated clearly and the 
convention believed in the object to be 
obtained by co-operation. The vote at 
that meeting was that the executive 
committee of the Society of American 
Florists, in their individual capacity, and ^ 
without involving this society in any ^ 
way whatsoever, should organize the 
corporation, as suggested by the commit- 
tee. It was the sense of that convention 
at Detroit, in my judgment, that thecor- 
poration should have been organized, m- 
without involving the society, but since 
then, at the meetingof the executive com- 
mittee, it was the opinion of a majority 
of the committee that the society did not 
give sufficient sanction for the organiza- 
tion of a corporation, and so voted to 
continue the co-operative purchase 
department, as it then existed, until the 
meeting of this convention. These sev- 
eral suggestions and recommendations 
are worthy of your consideration. 

As an illustration of the remarkable 
growth of floriculture and horticulture, 
we may instance the great west, where 
in some localities it has increased in pop- 
ulation in twenty years, 400 per cent. 
The increase of glass in the same time 
for floriculture and horticulture, is over 
1100 per cent. No one could have fore- 
seen this enormous and phenomenal 
growth. We here see some food for 
co-operation. Should we obtain all the 
parties who erected the glass, as members 
of this society, and a profit of 25 cents a 
box for Jilass, it would net a sum of over 
hundreds of thousands of dollars. This 
for only one branch of industry. We can 
scarcely comprehend the magnitude of 
the uses of glass for floriculture and horti- 
culture. Add to the society's members 
those interested in floriculture and 
horticulture and it is impossible to esti- 
mate the magnitude of the growth and 
the wonderful impetus it would give the 
society. It is said there is a lesson, 
which even co-operation should learn; it 
has taught us all through nature, as well 
as in political and commercial combina- 
tions; the race which rests, and seeks the 
happiness of the hermit crab, very speed- 
ily decays. It is only in conquest over 
difficulties as they arise day by day that 
the solution lies. If co-operation is not 
to die out, or be choked, it must spread 
itself wider and wider. It affords the 
world all the advantages of competition, 



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The American Florist. 



123 




PATRICK O MAR*, PRESIDENT-ELECT OF THE SOCIETY OF AMERICAN FLORISTS. 



while it avoids the cruelties which arise 
from an uncontrolled and unbridled mon- 
opoly. The achievements have been so 
great in the past, the morality of it so 
suited to the individualistic temper of the 
Anglo-Saxon race, that we cannot doubt 
the result, if only co-operators will earn- 
estly work. With opponents so active, 
it is evident the assiduous propagation 
of co-operative principles is necessary. 

I will trouble you again with a few sta- 
tistics to remind you what co-operation 
has done in England and Wales. Up to 
and including 1893, total sales, $2,995,- 
530,380: net profits, $256,080,345. To 
1895 bv the last report inclusive, $4,070,- 
547,775; net profits, $360,075,120. The 
Leicester Co-operative Society, hosiery 
manufacturers, commenced in 1887 with 
a capital of only $150; by December, 
1898, the capital had increased to 
$204 855. 

I sincerely hope that you have exam- 
ined into the merits of co-operation car- 
ried on by a corporation, so that the 
decision here rendered at this convention, 
when the subject comes up for action, 
may be voted upon intelligently. 

Co-operation ought to be continued by 
the corporation, with competent officials 
to manage it. To-day all mankind, as 
never before, is interested in co-operation, 
to avoid being crushed body and soul by 
the colossal trusts. When co-operation 
is fully installed in the different industries 
it will sound the death-knell of trusts. 
Co-operation here will still require the 
parental, patient and fostering care of its 



friends, and of those who breathed into 
it the breath of life and have nursed it 
since its birth. 

Our society had in its treasury, Jan- 
uary 1, 1900, $855.55 and a life member- 
ship fund of $585, this amount after six- 
teen years of association. Does this sum 
seem sufficient and satisfying for all the 
efforts that have been made for sixteen 
years of labor? It pales in comparison 
with the association of the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society, organized in the 
year 1829, when floriculture and horti- 
culture were in their infancy, obtaining 
250 members the first year and increased 
to 500 members in the year 1845, with 
$53,000 in its treasury. This, too, when 
floriculture and horticulture had hardly 
begun ttj climb to the great proportions 
to which they have grown. They have 
nearly a million dollars to-day. What 
plausible answer can we make in our 
defense, that we have not accomplished 
more, when the country is teeming with 
people and wealth, to which the years 
from 1829 to 1845 bear no comparison? 
They established a home. We should 
have one, second to no other horticult- 
ural building in the world. Can we have 
it? Most assuredly, if we will it, and 
make it a labor of love. A home which 
shall bring the society an income, with 
an experimental station in some sub- 
urban district, where everything in flori- 
culture and horticulture can be tested 
and tried, from which we all would 
receive a great benefit. 

This home should be a place where any 



member can come; it should be the Mecca 
of the florist, where he can seek and give 
information; a place for the diffusion of 
knowledge. I believe the first home of 
the society should be in the city of 
Greater New York, it being to- day nearly 
the center of advanced floriculture and 
horticulture and which during the life of 
some members here will increase to 10, 
000,000 inhabitants. When this shall 
be accomplished, and is on the road to 
success, it will be time to consider other 
cities, where it may establish a home. 

For sixteen years we have had uncer- 
tain existence, and until the society has a 
local home, a house it can call its own, 
its advance will be fitful and uncertain. 
With a local home, I believe the society 
will gain largely in permanency and 
membership. It will take upon itself a 
new lease of youth and vigor, and its 
usefulness will be felt in all parts of the 
country. Every department of floricul- 
ture and horticulture should here be wel- 
comed and find here a congenial atmos- 
phere. We should aid and encourage the 
science connected with our art, that we 
may better appreciate the elevating and 
purifying influence derived from a better 
and more advanced knowledge, which it 
is possible for us to obtain in no other 
manner. 

This is the age of rapid progress and 
development, the accumulation of wealth 
with means to gratify our tastes for the 
beautiful. It should be our aim to lead 
in floriculture and horticulture and to 
mold public sentiment in our art. We 
should stimulate it so that it would fur- 
ther embellish and adorn our homes, our 
private grounds, our public parks and 
buildings. We have an unparalleled 
country, with unequaled natural advan- 
tages and we ought to be able to give 
those seeking information, the most 
advanced and particular ideas, so that 
each and every member of our society 
would be better equipped to carry for- 
ward this profession and under the most 
favorable methods. Such are some of 
the possibilities stretched out before ns, 
and to their accomplishment, we should 
be inspired by a common purpose. We 
should allow neither discord nor differ- 
ence of opinion to weaken our efforts, but 
work together harmoniously and unit- 
edly, that we may be recognized in the 
community as a powerful influence in 
every branch of our profession. 

The recommendation of the president 
in relation to a home for the society has 
been considered by a committee consist- 
ing of Messrs O' Mara, Rudd and Cart- 
ledge, who will make a special report to 
you on the subject. 

It has been suggested that the past 
presidents of the society be made honor- 
ary members. If you deem it wise to 
consider this question, it would be well 
to fix the status of such honorary mem- 
bers. 

The interest developed in some of the 
manly sports connected with our society 
is encouraging. Anything which is uplift- 
ing, which brings more of us together at 
our convention, is welcome, and, if t wenty 
or more clubs organized for manly sports 
will come to our next convention we 
will give them all encouragement and a 
hearty welcome. 

The increasing demand for plants, both 
foliage and flowering, is no doubt due to 
a taste for something more permanent in 
homes than cut flowers. An erroneous 
idea has gone abroad that cut flowers at 
some seasons of the year are exorbitantly 
high, but an . analysis of the prices for 
the year will show that the average is 
lower to-day than the grower ought to 



124 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 2s, 



receive. Adverse criticism is occasionally 
made, vrhich is heralded abroad by the 
newspapers and periodicals, that extrav- 
agant prices for flowers are charged by 
the growers for the holidays. 

These criticisms are madeby those who 
know little or nothing regarding the 
cost of cut flowers. It is the one season 
of the year in which the grower hopes to 
receive a remuneration for his efforts. 
He is obliged, oftentimes, to lose a crop 
of flowers for which he received nothing, 
in order that he may obtain the desired 
crop for the holidays, when there is a 
great demand for them. Did he not do 
this, not over half the flowers could be 
offered for sale in the holidays. The high 
prices which we hear of are only for the 
few flowers which are called exhibition 
flowers. If the grower depended for his 
income upon this class of his product, 
there would not be a foot of commercial 
glass in existence for the growth of cut 
flowers. It is to the vast volume of 
second, third and fourth class flowers, 
and that demand which comes from the 
middle as well as the poorer class of peo- 
ple, who never pay high prices for them, 
that the grower, and in a large measure 
the florist, depends for his success. Those 
who want, and will have, the very finest 
of flowers, selecting only the most perfect 
in form, foliage, size and coloring, and 
who are thoroughly conversant with 
these qualities, are willing, as thy ought 
to be, to pay the price which is demanded 
for them. 

Wild flowers, beautiful children of the 
woods and fields, is there not a future for 
them in the greenhouse? If made a spec- 
ialty, would they not find a welcome and 
a place in every home? Here is another 
opportunity for youth to seize and 
develop. 

In his peroration Mr. Wood spoke of 
the growth of our industry and empha- 
sized his belief in its possibilities and in 
co-operation. 

Judges of the Trade Exhibits. 

The following were appointed to make 
awards on the exhibits in the trade 
exhibition: 

Plants — Herman Lips, J.Francis Huss, 
Robert Hunnick. 

Cut Flowers— W. J. Smythe, J. N. 
Champion, A. Gude. 

Boilers, etc.— Alexander Montgomery, 
F. H. Dressel, John Coombs. 

Greenhouse appliances, etc.— W. W. 
Edgar, A. Wiegand, W. W. Coles. 

Florists' supplies — F. C. Weber, August 
Gaedeke, Philip Breitmeyer. 

Bulbs and seeds — Wm. Plumb, E. Wein- 
hoeber. John Bertermann. 

Report of the Secretary. 

Mh. PRESroENT AND MEMBERS:— One 

year ago we met at Detroit under cir- 
cumstances peculiarly encouraging. Con- 
fidence and stability had returned to the 
business interests of our land, we had 
the advantage of a popular city centrally 
located, and it was not unexpected that 
the convention of 189'.» was most success- 
ful in all resoects and the results highly 
gratifying to those intrusted with the 
management of the society's affairs. The 
usual full official report, a 168-page 
volume, was published in the fall and 
mailed to every member, and a detailed 
account of the proceedings at Detroit 
having also been widely disseminated 
throughout the trade papers at the time, 
it is not necessary now to make any 
extended report of that event. Among 
the strong features of the meeting were 
the fine trade exhibition, in which some 



sixty firms were represented; the inter- 
esting papers presented and discussed, 
especially those on rose house pests, by 
Edmund M. Wood on hybridizing carna- 
tions, by C. W. Ward; and on the develop- 
ment of public patronage, by J. F. Sul- 
livan; the very practical report of the 
work of our legislative committee, the 
spirited discussion on the subject of 
co-operative purchase, the unstinted 
hospitality of the Detroit people, the 
splendid illuminations in honor of our 
visit and the large number of flattering 
invitations received for the next conven- 
tion. We accepted the invitation from 
the New York Florists' Club, seconded 
by the fighting governor and Mayor 
Van Wyck, and here we are. 

The annual meeting of the executive 
committee was held in New York city on 
January 16, 17 and IS, 1900, all the 
members of the committee being present 
except one. Besides the usual conven- 
tion preliminaries many other important 




Vice-Pres. 



WM- F- KASTING. 

i-lect of Society of American Florists. 



subjects closely connected with the 
society's welfare were considered with 
careful deliberation, among them the 
organization for co-operative purchase 
of greenhouse supplies. The committee, 
feeling that, in a matter involving so 
heavy a responsibility, the s.-)ciety's 
wishes were not indicated with sufficient 
clearness in the vote of instructions 
passed at Detroit, finally left the plan 
undetermined, and the subject will again 
be brought before the society at this con- 
vention. 

It being announced that the New York 
Florists' Club proposed holding a horti- 
cultural exhibition in connection with 
this convention, the committee voted to 
appropriate twelve silver and twelve 
bronze medals for distribution thereat, 
under the direction of the New York 
Florists' Club. It was decided that the 
department of nomenclature supervision 
might now be transferred from the care 
of a special committee to a regular 
botanist, and Dr. N. L. Britton of the 
New York Botanical Garden was 
appointed accordingly to this office. 
Sub-committees were constituted to 
investigate and report to this convention 
on the matters of society incorporation 
and a permanent society home. 



The department of plant registration 
has moved along acceptably since last 
report. It has been the means of adding 
several very influential names to our per- 
manent membership list, its provisions 
are willingly complied with, it pays well 
and is evidently approved by those who 
have had occasion to avail themselves of 
its advantages. The registrations in this 
department since our last meeting were 
as follows: 

August 25, 1899, by Lager & Hurrell, 
Summit, N, J., Cattleya gigas atropur- 
purea and Cattleya Hardy ana Robbiana. 

September 18, 1899, by Peter Hender- 
son & Co., New York, Canna Governor 
Roosevelt. 

September 21, 1899, by W. E. Hall. 
Clyde, Ohio, Geranium Little Pink and 
Gernnium Cljde. 

September 21, 1899, by M. H. Walsh, 
Woods Holl, Mass., Rose J. S. Fay. 

November 1, 18U9, by D. Carmichael, 
Wellesley, Mass., Carnation Eleanor 
Ames and Carnation Mav Whitney. 

November 13, 1S99, by Conard & Jones 
Co., West Grove, Pa., Canna Olympia. 

November 17, 1899, by Alex. Mac- 
Lellan, Newport, R. I., Chrysanthemum 
\'ictoria. 

December 4, 1899, by Robert Mont- 
gomery, Wellesley, Mass., Rose Mrs. 
Oliver Ames. 

December 26, 1899, by Benj. Dorrance, 
Wilkesbarre, Pa., Rose Sara Nesbitt. 

February 1, 1900, by Conard & Jones 
Co., West Grove, Pa., Rose New Century. 

March 5, 1900, by C. Warburton, Fall 
River, Mass., Carnation Creesbrook. 

March 7, 1900, by C. H. Gerbig, Archi- 
bald, Pa., Geranium A. N. Gerbig. 

March 13, 1900, by Lager & Hurrell, 
Summit, N. J., Cattleya Trianse Nettie 
Martin. 

April 2, 1900, by Nathan Smith & Son, 
Adrian, Mich., Canna The Express. 

April 2, 1900, by Lager & Hurrell, 
Summit, N. J., Cattleya Trianje auran- 
tiaca and C. Trians Fairy Queen. 

April 5, 1900, by the Floral Exchange 
Co., Philadelphia, Pa., Rose Queen of 
Edgely. 

April 16, 1900, by J. H. Dunlop, 
Toronto, Ontario, Rose Lady Dorothea. 

April 20, 1900, by Lager &: Hurrell, 
Summit, N. J., Cattleya labiata Mrs. W. 
C. Squier. 

June 2, 1900, by Richard Gardner, 
Newport, R. I., Canna Bobs. 

July 15, 1900, by Arthur Griffin, New- 
port, R. I., melons. Griffin's Hybrid and 
Sea Verge. 

July 15, 1900, by M. H. Walsh, Woods 
Holl, Mass., Rose Sweetheart and Rose 
Debutante. 

August 9, 1900, by Geo. Wittbold, 
Chicago, III., Nephrolepis Wittboldii. 

A number of purchases of glass and 



rubber hose have been made for parties 
applying through the department of 
co-operative purchase, a trifling com- 



mission being added in each case, the 
profits therefrom being devoted to 
stationery, postage and other expenses 
incurred in the department. 

The secretary's experience during 
another year strengthens the favorable 
opinion previously expressed regarding 
the system of membership assessments 
now in operation, and there seems no 
room for improvement in this depart- 
ment. The number of individuals who 
paid in 1898, but not in 1899, and have 
therefore been dtopped from the member- 
ship roll is forty-six and the number of 
resignations two. The full number of 
members recorded as paid up for 1899 is 
553, inclusive of twenty-six life members, 
a net gain of 119 over the previous year. 



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The American Florist. 



125 



The new names added to the list of mem- 
bers in 1899 numbered 148; one each 
from California, Colorado, Connecticut, 
Georgia, Iowa, Louisiana, Maryland, 
Montana, Tennessee and Texas; two 
each from Kentucky, Massachusetts, 
Minnesota, New Jersey, Rhode Island 
and Wisconsin; four from Canada, six 
from Missouri, seven from Indiana, 
seventeen from Michigan, nineteen from 
Illinois twenty- one from New York, 
twenty-five from Pennsylvania, and 
twenty-seven from Ohio. Since our last 
meeting three members have died: Alfred 
Henderson, September 5, 1899; J. M. 
Jordan, February 4, 1900; Harry Dale, 
July 15, 1900. 

The list of plant introductions in 
America, published in the annual report 
for 1899, described 189 new things. This 
included twenty carnations, seven roses, 
five cannas, twenty dahlias, fifty eight 
chrysanthemums, eight sweet peas, 
twenty-five geraniums and forty-six 
miscellaneous. The list of canna intro- 
ductions fell off very heavily from the 
previous year. 

We had hopes of securing for this con- 
vention a lower excursion rate for our 
members than the usual fare and one- 
third, but all efforts in that direction 
were futile. It is gratifying, however, to 
know that the concession this time 
extends over practically the entire 
country, and further, that our organiza- 
tion enjoys the good will of the trans- 
portation authorities in the fullest sense, 
no instance of the misuse by our mem- 
bers of their special privileges having yet 
been recorded. 

From a territory so strong horticul- 
turally as that in which we meet this 
year, large additions to our membership 
are naturally expected. The confident 
spirit of the times, so well evidenced in 
the substantial gains made at Detroit, is 
still with us and early in the year it 
became apparent in the secretary's office 
that New York's convention would be a 
record breaker. It is our proud privilege 
now to rejoice that the period of reaction, 
the days of depression and uncertainty 
are, at least, behind us and that once 
more our honored society is on the high 
road of prosperity. 

The continued cordial co-operation and 
cheerful assistance which the secretary 
has received during the year from the 
members is not the least among the 
factors in the society's prosperity, and 
he takes this opportunity to acknowledge 
the same with grateful appreciation. 

Wm. J. Stewart. 



Report of the Treasurer 

Treasurer H. B. Beatty, of Oil City, Pa., 
presented his annual report showing a 
balance in the society's favor of 
$1,247.58. 

Reports of Coounittees. 

P. O'Mara, chairman of the committee 
on legislation, made a report showing 
that nothing had been accomplished at 
Washington or Albany, but that an 
important concession had been obtained 
from Canada, by which greenhouse- grown 
roses, imported in leaf, are admitted as 
greenhouse stock. The committee com- 
plained of the difficulty in gettingcongress 
and the legislatures to appreciate the 
diflerence between nursery stock and 
florists' stock. 

President Wood made a verbal report 
for the co-operative purchase committee. 
He said that, at a meeting of the execu- 
tive committee, he reported a charter and 



by-laws for the proposed corporation, 
but the charter was rather too broad. 
He then suggested limiting it to the pur- 
chase of glass, pipe, hose, paints and oils. 
After a long discussion the opinion seemed 
to prevail that the Detroit convention 
had not given sufficient sanction for the 
organization of the corporation, and it 
was voted to continue the purchase 
department, though a number of the 
committee were willing to take stock in 
the new concern. He added that it would 
be unfortunate not to have a corpora- 
tion, as he believed it would be a benefit 
to every member who availed himself of 
the purchase department, and that the 
department would have to be organized 
into a corporation in some form if it was 
to be continued. On motion the subject 
was made a special order for Wednesday 
morning. 

II. B. Beatty, chairman of the com- 
mittee on incorporation of the S. A. F., 
reported as follows: 

The necessity of incorporating the 
Society of American Florists and giving 
it a legal existence is so obvious as not to 
require mention at this time. No progress 
has been made toward acquiring a 
national charter, and it does not appear 
to your committee that further effort in 
that direction is advisable. After investi- 
gating more or less fully the incorpora- 
tion laws of the various states, your 
committee finds that the laws of the 
state of Indiana are so broad and so 
liberal that this society can be incor- 
porated under them without changing 
materially its present constitution and 
by-laws or altering its present methods 
of work. We therefore recommend the 
appointment of a committee of three 
with power to incorporate the Society of 
American Florists, it being understood 
that before final action on their part, 
full details shall have been submitted to 
the members of the executive committee 
of this society, and have been approved 
in writing by three-fourths of the mem- 
bers of said committee. The thanks of 
your committee are due to Mr. W. J. 
Vesey, of Fort Wayne, Ind., for legal 
advice kindly and freely given. 

The committee's recommendations 
were concurred in without objection. 

Mr. O'Mara, for the committee to pro- 
cure a home or permanent headquarters 
for the S. A. F., reported that, as the 
members had not had a chance to meet 
and consult upon plans or select a par- 
ticular city, not having a fund for travel- 
ing expenses, they had done nothing. He 
stated that it was their intention, how- 
ever, to hold a meeting during the present 
convention and try to outline some plan 
upon which action might be taken at 
the next convention. He gave notice 
that a further report would be made, 
probably on Thursday morning. 

At this point, 11:30 o'clock a. m., 
having disposed of miscellaneous busi- 
ness, the convention took a recess until 
evening. 

Florists' Hail Association. 

The annual meeting of the Florists' 
Hail Association of America was held on 
Tuesday. Secretary J. G. Esler reported 
that on August 1, 1900, the 934 mem- 
bers insured an aggregate area of glass of 
13,025,702 square feet. The total 
receipts for the year were $10,999 14; 
disbursements $8,510.58, of which $5,- 
570.42 was for losses, $1,600 for invest- 
ments and $1,340.16 for expenses. The 
cash balance on hand is $5,896 57. The 
total reserve fund is $7,526.87. During 
the year the society paid for 56,452 



square feet of single thick glass and 
18,104 scjuare feet of double thick. 

The choice of officers resulted in the 
re-election of the former staflf: J. C. 
Vaughan, president; E. G. Hill, vice-presi- 
dent; J. G. Esler, secretary; A. M. Herr, 
treasurer; Stephen D. Horan, Wm. F. 
Dreer, Jos. Heacock, directors. 



The President's Reception. 

At the president's reception Tuesday 
evening the convention hall was thronged 
with a brilliant assemblage, composed 
largely of ladies in attendance upon the 
convention. Nearly all present availed 
themselves of the opportunity to shake 
hands with President Wood and indulge 
in a social chat with that courteous gen- 
tleman. The afiair was under the 
auspices of the New York Florists' Club. 

At nine p. m. a lecture on "Floral Dec- 
orations" was delivered by Robert Kift, 
of Philadelphia, who supplemented his 
discourse with a series of stereopticon 
views, showing the beautiful effects made 
by combinations of flowers and foliage 
in church and house decorations. Among 
these were reproductions of the notable 
displays of recent years, including the 
Vanderbilt-Marlborough and Vanderbilt- 
Belmont wedding decorations and spec- 
tacles in the White House in connection 
with presidential inaugurations. 

A vaudeville entertainment concluded 
the programme for the day. 

Wednesday's Proceedings. 

At the second day's session, after the 
reading of the reports of judges on exhib- 
its, the matter of a co-operative purchase 
corporation was taken up. President 
Wood again advocated the creation of 
the corporation. A brief discussion 
developed that no report on the matter 
had been made by the executive commit- 
tee, to which it was referred at last year's 
convention, and therefore action now 
would be premature. The subject was 
then tabled. 

Greenhouse construction was then con- 
sidered in an illustrated paper by J. D. 
Carmody, which appears elsewhere in 
this issue, and for which a vote of thanks 
was tempered. 

The rivalry between Chicago and Buf- 
falo tor the honor of entertaining the 
society next year developed a strong fol- 
lowing for both cities. Edgar Sanders 
and W. N. Rudd championed the claims 
of Chicago, but the drift of sentiment 
was in favor of Buffalo, and upon Mr. 
Rudd's motion the choice of the latter 
city was made unanimous. 

The proposed constitutional amend- 
ment to strike out of the title of the soci- 
ety the words "Ornamental Horticultur- 
ists" was defeated. The vote was fifty- 
nine yeas to forty-six nays, less than the 
required two-thirds in the affirmative. 

The balloting for nomination of officers 
occupied the remainder of the morning. 

The Chrysanthemum Society of America. 

The chrysanthemum society met on 
Wednesday and adopted a report by its 
secretary, Elmer D. Smith, enumerating 
the varieties certificated last year. A 
twenty-dollar cup was voted to be 
awarded for the best ten blooms of either 
new or old varieties shown at the Chicago 
exhibition this fall, also a twenty-five 
dollar prize for the Paris Exposition. A 
balance of $81 on hand was reported. 
Officers were elected as follows: President, 
A. Herrington, Madison, N. J.; vice-presi- 
dent, Eugene Dailledonze, Flatbush, N. 
Y., secretary, Edwin Lonsdale, Chestnut 



126 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 25, 



Hill, Pa.; treasurer, John N. May, Sum- 
mit, N, J. 

The American Carnation Society. 

The carnation society met Wednesday 
afternoon with Ex-president Nicholson in 
the chair, and arranged aprogrammefor 
the Baltimore meeting of next year. 
This includes essays on hybridizing by 
Peter Fisher and John Cook, the latter 
of Baltimore; also a talk by Prof Woods, 
of the Department of Agriculture, Wash- 
ington, on his recent investigations of 
the carnation, and one by E. G. Hill on 
carnations abroad, as seen by him in his 
recent travels. Additional papers are 
expected, treating of the methods of 
taking cuttings, how to cut and pack 
flowers and possibly on cool rooms for 
storing carnations. 

■Wednesday Evening's Programme, 

The evening session opened with an 
address by Proi. B. T Galloway, of the 
Department of Agriculture, which appears 
elsewhere in this ifrsue. 

Prof. N L Britton concluded the day 
with a lecture descriptive of the New York 
Botanical Garden, which was fully illus- 
trated with a series ot excellent stereop- 
ticon views. 

Thursday's Proceedings. 

At Thursday's session the committee 
that had reported in favor of securing an 
incorporation under the laws of Indiana 
withdrew its report and a new commit- 
tee was created to renew the eflort to get 
a national charter. It was stated that 
there was now a fair prospect that the 
efibrt would be successful. 

Lawrence Cotter's proposed amend- 
ment to the by-laws requiring nomina- 
tions of officers to be made orally and 
elections to be by a majority of all the 
votes cast, was adopted. 

THE ELECTION OF OFFICERS. 

Patrick O'Mara, of New York, was 
elected president, and William F. Kast- 
ing, of Buffalo, vice-president. Secretary 
Stewart and Treasurer Beatty were 
re-elected. 

A resolution proposed by Messrs. Kift 
and Roehrs was adopted, creating a com- 
mittee on sports, to be appointed at the 
executive committee meeting in the con- 
vention city, to take full charge of all 
bowling, shooting and other contests, 
and to so arrange that these shall not 
interfere with the regular work of the 
convention. 

Papers by William Frarer, of Buxton, 
Md., urging a large attendance at the 
Baltimore carnation meeting in 1901, 
and by William Weber, of Oakland, Md., 
on the improvement of the carnation, 
were read. 

In connection with a paper read by 
Robert Craig, a discussion took place 
upon making some provision for experi- 
ments in sub-watering. Itwasintimated 
that a practical test would be made at 
Purdue" University, Lafayette, Ind. 

The necessity for establishing a perma- 
nent home or headcjuarters for the soci- 
ety was also urged by Messrs. Dean and 
May. 

After the reading of a paper on the 
rose, by E. 0. Hill, the convention 
adjourned. 

The afternoon was devoted to an 
excursion to Glen Island, upon the invi- 
tation of the local club. On the return 
trip in the evening. President Wood was 
presented with a fine gold watch and 
chain, the gift of the S. A. F. Robert 



Craig, who made the presentation, com- 
plimented the recipient and spoke in 
acknowledgement of the kindly atten- 
tions of the local club, which had made the 
visit of the florists a most delightful one. 
President Wood made a fitting response 
and all present joined in the refrain 
"He's a Jolly Good Fellow." 



The Horticuhural Exhibition. 

The exhibition hall was made particu- 
larly attractive to members and visitors 
by the large display of specimen plants 
shown from private conservatories, 
through the enterprise of the New York 
Florists' Club. The beauty and perfec- 
tion of this feature was a marvel to 
many and far superior to any exhibition 
yet "given under the auspices ot the 
S. A. F. Amongthem, perhaps the largest 
display, was that from the H McK. 
Twombly estate at Madison, N J. This 
collection of palms at the end of the hall 
was awarded first prize. In this group 
a pair of royal and fish-tail palms, very 
large, were quite conspicuous, surrounded 
by dracsenas, crotons and kentias. A 
specimen kentia here took first prize; this 
plant has twenty-three beautiful leaves 
and measures twelve feet high This 
gardener also took second prize for three 
distinct varieties of ferns, with Aspidium 
Capense, Asplenium nidus avis, with its 
beautiful, wide leaves, and Davallia 
Fijiensis plumosa. Other prizes to this 
grower were first on specimen cycas, 
second for six dracjenas and first on six 
specimen palms, including one Pinanga 
Kuheii, something of a novelty. 

James Dowlen, gardener for H. L. 
Tyrrell, Seabright, N. J , was awarded 
first for group of 100 square feet of ferns, 
a beautiful lot, among which was a fine 
Gymnogramma Peruviana agrophylea, 
quite silvery in appearance; a splendid 
Davallia Moreana and a beautiful lot of 
Adiantum Farleyense. A large table of 
fancy caladiums won second prize. A 
group of foliage plants of 100 square 
feet, containing beautiful anthuriums, 
crotons, dieffenbachias and draca-nas 
drew third prize. 

To H. Nichols, gardener for J. B. 
Travers, Yonkers, N. Y., was awarded 
first prize for specimen fern, an Adiantum 
Farleyense three feet in diameter; also 
first for three best specimens, three dis- 
tinct varieties; first for group of 100 
square feet of flowering and foliage 
plants, which was principally anthuriums 
and crotons; the group was, however, 
very attractive and perfect in every 
detail. Mr. Nichols also had a vase of 
Hydrangea paniculata blooms that were 
eight inches in diameter. 

The second prize on specimen palm was 
awarded to Wm. Rennie, gardener for 
Mrs. Charles Pratt, Brooklyn, N. Y., for 
a large and perfect phoenix; this grower 
also took second prize for specimen fern. 
G. H. Hale, gardener for E. D. Adams, 
Seabright, N.J, exhibited six specimen 
ferns, distinct varieties, which were 
superb, taking first prize. His Davallia 
Fijiensis plumosa' took third as a single 
specimen, and his group of foliage plants 
took second prize; this was arranged in 
a circular form on the floor, a trifle 
crowded but the perfection and coloring 
of the individual plants was remarkable. 
His group of fancy caladiums was a 
revelation to many, winning first prize, 
as did his specimen croton and Acalypha 
Sanderi. 

Wm. Duckham, gardener for D. W. 
James, of Madison, N. J., exhibited twelve 
Btove and greenhouse plants which won 



first prize. He had a beautiful display of 
fancy caladiums and his six dracaenas 
won first prize, as did his specimen 
dracsena, his group of foliage plants and 
his collection of new and rare plants. 

Edw. Wolz, gardener for E. W. Bliss, 
of Brooklyn, took second on six speci- 
men ferns, third for six specimen dracsnas, 
third for Rex begonias and his group of 
foliage plants won second prize. He also 
had a large show of coleus. 

D. F. Roy, gardener for E. S. Converse, 
Maiden, Mass., had some Rex begonia 
varieties which won a second prize. 

John Bushard, gardener for G. E. 
Dickinson, Irvington, N. Y., was first for 
collection of cannas. 

A specimen Asparagus Sprecgerii three 
and one-half feet in diameter from L. 
Stem, Irvington, was awarded first prize. 
A. K. Petit, gardener at the New York 
Deaf and Dumb Institute, took first on 
begonias. 

Perhaps the most tastefully arranged 
exhibit was that of Samuel Thorn, a 
pond of aquatics with palms, ferns, 
hydrangeas, etc., arranged to form a 
setting for the pond. A large Cissus 
discolor was particularly noticeable. 

A fine group from J. H. Trey contained 

the only bamboos which were exhibited. 

A. L. Marshall, gardener for J. B. 

Dutcher, Pawling, N. Y., took first prize 

for six cannas. 

P. Reiley, gardener for Wm. Brown, 
Buckley, N. Y., had twelve specimen 
crotons, winning first prize. 

Everyone had a word of commendation 
for the grapes. The exhibit winning first 
prize contained one bunch of Barberosa 
weighing nine and one quarter pounds, 
grown by John Esch, gardener for Miss 
E. ). Clarke, Pomfret Center, Conn. The 
winner of the second prize was Wm. 
Scott, gardener for Jos. Eastman, Tarry- 
town, N. Y. 

Trade Exhibit. 

The special committee appointed to 
bestow the handsome cup oflered by 
Sander & Co., St. Albans, England, for 
the most creditable exhibit, awarded it 
to Julius Roehrs, Carlton Hill, N. J. 

The followingwere the trade exhibitors 
and their specialties: 

Bobbink & Atkins, Rutherford, N. J., 
complete collection of evergreens in tubs, 
small ferns and Eurya latifolia variegata. 

Geo. Wittbold Co., Chicago, 111., dis- 
play of Nephrolepis Wittboldii. 

Julius Roehrs, Carlton Hill, N. J., large 
display including a beautiful lot of orchids 
in bloom, ferns and palms in variety. 

Siebrecht & Son, New York, large dis- 
play of palms, orchids in bloom, varie- 
gated pineapples, anthuriums, etc. 

Robert Craig & Son, Philadelphia, large 
display of choice crotons, the neatness of 
the labeling of which was commendable; 
also Begonia Gloire de Lorraine and a 
good assortment of palms. 

The Floral Exchange, Philadelphia, 
cut blooms of Queen of Edgely. 

Henry A. Dreer, Philadelphia, complete 
line of ferns and palms. 

Cottage Gardens, Queens, N. Y., a good 
display of geraniums, cannas, small terns 
and Begonia Gloire de Lorraine. 

J. M. Keller, Brooklyn, cattleyas and 
dracasnas. 

J. A. Peterson, Cincinnati, very fine 
display of Pandanus Veitchi and Adian- 
tum Farleyense. 

John B. Cowell, Bufialo, hybrid dra- 
ccnas. 

Frederick H. Dressell, Weehawken, N. J., 
Dracaena Lindenii and Boston ferns. 



rpoo. 



The American Florist. 



127 




HAND BOUQUET OF ORCHIDS, SURROUNDED BY OTHER EXHIBITS, AT THE EXHIBITION 
OF FLORAL ARRANGEMENTS, FRANKFORT, GERMANY, JUNE 22-24, 1900. 



Hiram T. Jones, Elizabeth, N. J., ever- 
greens in tubs. 

Clucas & Boddington Co., New York, 
bulbs and palms in variety. 

P. Ouwerkerk, Jersey City, evergreensin 
baskets. 

Lager & Hurrell, Summit, N. J., orchids 
and requisites. 

John Lewis Childs, Floral Park, N. \., 
large display of cut gladioli and peren- 
nials. 

John Peed & Sons, London, England, 
large display ot caladiums. 

C. H. Joosten, New York, bulbs, field 
grown rose plants and small palms. 

Thomas Roland, Nahant, Mass., 
Begonia Gloire de Lorraine. 

A. B. Howard & Son, Belchertown, 
Mass., attractive display of Star petunias 
and dwarf zinnias. 

Daly Brothers, New Durham, N. J., a 
new pink geranium called Paunpeck. 

Lemuel Ball, Philadelphia, palms, dra- 
csenas and pandanuses. 

A. Rolker & Sons, New York, small 
ferns, palms, supplies, etc. 



Arthur Cowie, Berlin, N. Y., fine display 
of cut gladioli; a variety most admired 
was White Lady, pure white. 

R. Dryer, Woodside, L. L, display o( 
mammoth cyclamens, palms, ferns, etc. 

Elizabeth Nursery Co., Elizabeth, N. J., 
evergreens, perennials, shrubbery and 
trees. 

Vaughan's Seed Store, Chicago, Boston 
ferns, Dutch, French and Bermuda bulbs. 

Bobbink & Atkins, Rutherford, N. J., 
Dutch bulbs, kentias, Boston ferns and 
Hasselt pottery, new and unique in color 
and design. 

Alex. Klokner, Milwaukee, plant and 
flower vase. 

Stumpp & Walter Co., New York, 
bulbs, mushroom sprawn and horticul- 
tural supplies. 

Isaac Hicks & Son, Westbury Station, 
N. Y., collection of photographs showing 
their contrivances for moving large trees. 

Dayton Fruit Tree Label Co., Dayton, 
O., display of label samples. 

Schloss Bros., New York, ribbons. 



W. J. Cowie, Berlin, N. Y., device for 
wiling flowers for designs. 

Sultar Disinfectant Co., New York, 
insecticides. 

New Jersey Moss and Peat Co., moss, 
etc. 

B. Hammond, Fishkill, N. Y., paint, 
slug shot, etc. 

W. A Manda, South Orange, N. J., 
photographs of special plants. 

Ed. Jan.sen, New Y'ork, baskets, etc. 

Wm". J. Elliott & Sous, New York, bulbs, 
palms and horticultural supplies. 

Peter Henderson & Co., New York, 
complete and attractive display of plants 
and horticu tatal supplies. 

J. M. Thorburn & Co., New York, 
excellent display of seeds, etc. 

H. Bayersdorfer & Co., Philadelphia, 
florists' .supplies of all kinds. 

W. C Krick, Brooklyn, immortelle let- 
ters, etc. 

Henry Bird, Newark, recently illus- 
trated pot. 

Robert Kift, Philadelphia, vase holders 
and flower tubes. 

A. Herrmann, New York, florists' sup- 
plies of all kinds. 

S. J. Limprecht, New York, baskets, 
sheaves, etc. 

N. F. McCarthy cSc Co., Boston, sheaves, 
metal wreaths, hose couplings and Japan 
vases. 

Boston Florists' Letter Co., Boston, 
immortelle letters. 

Whilldin Pottery Co., Philadelphia, 
pots and hose couplings. 

Detroit Flower Pot Mfg., Detroit, 
pots. 

A. H. Hews & Co., North Cambridge, 
Mass., pots, vases and pans. 

W. F. Kasting, Buffalo, sod cutter and 
soil pulverizer. 

Rustic Construction Co., New York, 
rustic work, baskets, etc. 

Ionia Potterv Co., Ionia, Mich., pots. 

W. C. Heller '& Co., Montclair, N. J., 
seed cases. 

Jennings Bros., Philadelphia, iron gut- 
ter, bench fittings, etc. 

Gorton & Lidgerwood, New York, 
a side-feed boiler. 

White Enamel Refrigerator Co., St. 
Paul, refrigerator for florists. 

Lord & Burnham Co., Irvington, N. 
Y., model for greenhouse construction, 
heating apparatus, etc. 

Geo. M. Garland, Des Plaines, III., pat- 
ent iron gutter. 

L. Wertheimber & Co., New York, 
jardinieres, prepared cycas leaves and 
moss. 

Emil Steffens, New York, wire work. 

Conard & Jones Co., West Grove, Pa., 
cut cannas. 

Hilfinger Bros., Fort Edward, N. Y., 
pots. 

Reed & Keller, New York, florists' sup- 
plies. 

Quaker City Machine W'ks., Richmond, 
Ind., ventilators. 

Sigmund Geller, New York, florists' 
supplies. 

E. Hippard, Youngstown, O., ventila- 
tors. 

Lehman Bros., New York, wagon heat- 
ers. 

H. W, Gibbons, New Y'ork, sectional 
cast iron boilers. 

John A. ScoUay, Brooklyn, cast iron 
boilers. 

The Herendeen M'fg Co., New York, 
the Furman boiler. 

Stevens & Co., New York, sprayers. 

Wm. H. Kay, New York, boilers, wind 
mill, pipe, etc. 

Thomas W. Weathered's Sons, New 
York, cast iron boilers, iron gutter, etc. 

Hitchings & Co., New York, cast iron 



128 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 25, 



boilers, greenhouse construction, etc. 

Wm. H. Moon Co., MorrisviUe, Pa., 
evergreens in pots. 

A. C. Oelschig, Savannah, Ga., rubber 
plants and Araucaria Cookii. 

Storrs & Harrison Co., Painesville, O., 
field grown roses. 

Ives Kromskop Company, Philadel- 
phia, a system of preparina colored slides 
ot flowers or plants by a system of color 
photography. 

Daniel B. Long, Buffalo, floral photo- 
graphs and stationery. 

J. G. & A. Esler, Saddle River, N. J., 
rubber hose. 

Several publishing houses showed a 
variety of horticultural literature. 



Between the Acts. 



Follow New York's lead. 

Genial Ned Lonsdale was missed. 

The seedsmen's exhibits were numerous 
and remarkably good. 

George Watson didn't like that kind of 
capitulation. There were others. 

Lawrence Cotter received a comrade's 
cordial greeting from many old friends. 

Visitors to Ed. Jansen's were unstinted 
in their praise of the hospitality shown. 

Sprengerii sandwiches and smilax 
dances are the latest products of 
of Chicago genius. 

While some visitors rested in Little 
Germany, others saw the Phillipinos or 
the elephant, but all were well pleased. 

Two" successive tie votes for the oflice 
of vice-president will hardly be perpe- 
trated again in the history of the society. 

Good places for many men and all good 
men in those places was the rule with the 
committeemen of the New York Florists' 
Club. 

The society members remain orna- 
mental horticulturists in name as well 
as in fact, at least so says Ex-president 
Gude. 

The white Indians of the Chicago 
bowling team chafed under the captain's 
restraint, but remained good boys and 
sate bowlers. 

Hail Secretary Esler never ceases to be 
a hale fellow well met. Though repeat- 
edly losing parts of his anatomy the 
remainder seems to improve. 

The Glen Island ride and the enjoyable 
occasion there has buried that twelve 
years' old memory of Captain Lynch's 
pirate steamer, Long Branch, deep in 
oblivious wave. 

There has never been a convention 
when visitors were so sure of the mistake 
made by absentees as in this one at New 
York. Makeup your mind now to attend 
the next at Buftalo. 

No little credit for the exhibition was 
due to the private gardeners and their 
active co operation. The last day was 
a good one for the many commercial men 
who complained of lack of business the 
first days. 

What I Think I Know About Greenhouse 
Construction. 

IIY .1. D. CABMODY, EVA.N8VILLE, IND. 

\Read before the Society of American Florists 
at the Ne-.L' York Convenlioti. \ 

To attain the best results in any branch 
of industry the best methods must be 
employed. Especially is this true of plant 
culture under glass. Never until good 
houses were constructed was it possible 
to grow such roses and carnations as 
now gladden the eyes of mortals and 
make the business of floriculture a finan- 
cial success. Bntit took mtny years to , 



attain the perfection in plant houses 
which enables the florist to produce 
these perfect flowers. 

Those of us on whom time has carved 
fantastic wrinkles and ornamented with 
silver locks can well remember the make- 
shifts and dugouts, heated by brick flues, 
that were once dignified by the name of 
greenhouses. They bear the same rela- 
tion to the present commercial houses 
that the stage coaches of that day do to 
the present palace railroad cars. The 
progress of transformation was exceed- 
ingly slow from the fact that not every- 
one who has the requisite ability to grow 
good flowers possesses also the mechani- 
cal genius to plan and build a structure 
especially adapted to their best develop- 
ment. .4nd it was only when the florist 
and mechanic combined their eff^orts, 
resulting in greenhouse building becom- 
ing a special industry, that perfection in 
floriculture under glass was approached. 

Be it understood, I am not writing 
this article for those who are able to 
employ the specialist to place the house 
in position ready for occupancy, but 
rather for those of moderate means who 
go in the business of growing flowers for 
the love of them and with a desire, if 
successful, to make a living by their 
production. I desire also to assist the 
vegetable grower to put a roof of glass 
over his lettuce and cauliflower and 
relieve him from the inconvenience of the 



price too high but you may be sure as a 
rule the improvements you put on the 
ground will not reduce the value. If the 
ground selected is on the outskirts of the 
city, as it should be, in a short time the 
city will build out beyond the location 
and the price will go higher rather than 
lower. I know of many florists who by 
the sale of their greenhouse property 
late in lile were able to retire with a 
competency, making more out ot the rise 
in real estate than they saved in a'l those 
years of labor by the sale of plants and 
flowers. 

I would not advise anyone to build in 
a city, among high buildings or near 
smoky factories. A leaking gas main 
will in a few hours ruin a house full of 
plants. The writer has experienced loss 
in this way. In an atmosphere of dust 
and smoke good flowers cannot be 
grown. Locate your house so that it 
cannot be shaded by anything, and if 
you have several houses locate them so 
they no not shade each other. Nothing 
is so desirable in growing cut flowers as 
clean glass and sunshine. In drawing 
your ground plans study convenience in 
getting your fuel dropped from the 
wagon directly beside your heat gener- 
ator. Do not have a deep cellar for your 
boiler or fire-place, as it makes it incon- 
venient to get the ashes away. J 

On the character of the plants intended fl 
to be cultivated largely depends the plan 



ti "ll-l 


OFFICE 




WORM SHEDS 


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'AIM HOUSF. JO K 100 6 




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GROUN 


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GREEN .HOUSE PLANT. 



SKETCH SHOWING COMPLETED ESTABLISHMENT. 



cold frame and hotbeds which are now 
rapidly giving way to plant houses. 

The ordinary village carpenter has not 
the first correct idea as to the construc- 
tion of a plant house, but if furnished a 
few sectional drawings and watched by 
the gardener who has seen or read up on 
such structures, a great many mistakes 
can be avoided, and greenhouses can be 
put up by home labor and out of home 
material, and the proprietor, by doing a 
share of the work, can save not a little of 
the expense. At the present time, thanks 
to machinery, the sash and sashbars can 
be obtained from the factories fully as 
cheap and in better shape and 1 would 
advise to patronize greenhouse builders 
to that extent. 

The first thing to have in building a 
greenhouse is the ground to put it on, 
and right here let me say if possible have 
a deed for the ground before you com- 
mence building. You may think the 



of the houses, and by all means settle on 
a plan and have a complete drawing of 
same, both ground plan and sectional, 
before commencing the work. Most 
persons starting in this business expect 
to increase their range from time to time 
as occasion demands. Therefore the 
first house should be located so that it 
can be enlarged or built beside of and 
remain as part of the plant without 
remodeling. If it is desired to grow 
principally bedding plants at the start I 
would recommend the houses to stand 
with the length north and south. 

The first thing to build in starting a 
greenhouse is a shed not less than fifteen 
feet wide and as long as the plant house 
is in width; this will furnish a work-shop 
and shelter to keep the new lumber dry 
and a place to paint the material before 
it is put up. I will now call your atten- 
tion to this diagram as a ground plan of 
a range ot houses I would build were I 



igoG. 



The American Florist. 



129 



uap 




DETAILS OF GUTTER AND GABLE 



to embark in business to grow a general 
assortment of plants and cue flowers 
and had an open piece of ground. Here 
we have the first shed located along the 
north side of the plant, with a range of 
five glazed houses opening into it from 
the south. These houses are 1 1x100 feet 
each. 

Now we will suppose the plant as you 
see it here 'aid out represents several 
years ot moderately successful labor of 
the new beginner who years ago bar- 
gained for one or two acres of ground in 
the suburbs of the thrivin^city of Posey- 
ville, Posey county, Indiana. He had 
worked in a grocery store for several 
years and handled flowers for the 
proprietor, who sold them for a florist on 
commission. By handling these he got a 
liking for them and finally decided to go 
into the business, though having little 
money but a good deal ot good sense, the 
first vear he built fifty feet of houses 
Nos. 1 and 2 and the potting shed across 
the end as a beginning. He bought sash 
and rafters ready made from the planing 
mill and with the help of a carpenter for 
a few days put the houses up, doing the 
glazing and most of the work himself. 
Not having the price of a boiler and pipe 
he resorted to the cheaper method of 
brick flues under the benches for the first 
year. 

Having good success, the next year he 
builds fifty feet more on each house and 
gets a few sections of a cast-iron boiler 
and pipes to heat by water. I recom- 
mend water heating for small places, 
especially as it requires less attention 
and holds heat longer than steam. The 
third year he builds house No. 3 and 
increases the size of the boiler by adding 
more sections, and so on each year he 
adds more plant space, until, finding a 
greater demand for cut flowers, a differ- 
ent style of house is needed, also a differ- 
ent aspect, as good roses and carnations 
require more sun. A house for their 
growth should be so located as to 
get all the sun rays possible, so he 
changes the houses to stand east and 
west and No. 1, 20xl0ii, with a shed 
to cover the entrance is his next labor. 

Providence in the shape of industry, 
economy and good management favor- 
ing him, he finally has this plant com- 
plete without the loss of a single house 
by mistake of location or error in con- 
struction, a thing that seldom occurs 
with new beginners. 

Having completed the plant the new 
beginner will proceed to explain some of 
the whys and wherefores ot the con- 
struction. He built two fifty-foot houses 



at first instead of one of 100 feet because 
having to use flues to heat with they 
give better satisfaction than were they 
100 feet long. The houses are eleven feet 
wide to allow a walk of three feet in the 
center, with four-foot side benches. The 
walks in most single houses are only two 
feet, which is too narrow for comfort 
and convenience. The shed should not 
be less than fifteen feet wide, the roof not 
high and nearly flat, with a tin or tar 
paper covering; sixteen-foot boards will 
make the roof. The shed is at the north, 
first, not to shade the houses and, 
secondly, to protect from cold northerly 
winds. The ofiice is put at the corner as 
nearest to the thoroughfare, the cut 
flower room in the rear of the office for 
convenience. 

Having laid out our ground plans we 
will now proceed to construct our houses. 
The first step after building the shed is to 
set the posts for the side walls. These 
should be set not more than six feet 
apart; four feet would be better, and of 
material least suljject to decay. I have 
found red cedar best of all woods. I 
have also used catalpa, chestnut, locust 
and heart of white oak with good 
results. If the posts are charred on the 
lower end when they go into the ground 
it will add many years to their existence 
or if, after the posthole is half filled with 
earth, properly rammed, the rest is 
finished to the ground level with a grout 
of one part water lime cement and three 
parts sand and gravel it will save from 
rot for many years. The ingredients 
should be mixed dry and wet up in 
batches for each posthole; this cement 
will also keep the posts firm in position. 

After the posts are set in a line and the 
cement is hardened, if cement is used. 



which is highly recommended, measure 
up from the ground-level about four feet 
on the middle post and from three to six 
inches lower at one end and the same 
space higher at the other, so as to give 
the gutter a pitch ot from six to twelve 
inches in 100 feet, toward the end where 
you wish the water discharged; then 
stretch a line tight and tack on two 
horizontal lines of very straight boards 
to conform with this line, one on the out 
and one on the inside of the line ot posts. 
Then saw the tops off the posts just at the 
topof these boards; these strips forma 
rest tor the saw and are a gauge to cut 
by. They also stiffen the posts so they 
do not work loose and get out of line in 
the sawing. Now, on top of the posts, 
spike on the bottom of your gutter. The 
best lumber should be used here, and be 
sure there are no sappy places in it. 
Clear cypress is good, but if the red 
wood ot California can be obtained it is 
more durable, though in the absence of 
either, white pine free from sap, if kept 
painted, will last many years. We will 
call your attention to this drawing 
which shows a style of gutter which 
gives me the best satisfaction. This is a 
cross section sketch with the dimensions 
as follows: 

Full width of gutter bottom, twelve 
inches; thickness when dressed, one and 
seven-eighths inches; gutter sides, one 
and three-quarter inches; space between, 
seven inches; depth inside, three inches; 
bevel top edge the same as the sash bar, 
the lower end of which is tacked on top 
of gutter sides, and the space between 
the sash bars is filled with a block on top 
of which the lower light of the glass will 
rest. We prefer to have the sash bar lie 
on top of the gutter rather than be 
tacked to the side, as many do, from the 
fact that this way is stronger and the 
bar will last longer. Furthermore the 
drip water will run outside the house 
through the grooves in the sash bars. 
No, it will not let in the cold air, for when 
freezing this small apperture will close up 
with the ice. Sash bars tacked to the 
side of the gutter have nothing but the 
small nails and the narrow one-half-inch 
parting between the glass to hold the 
lower end up. Again, the water of con- 
densation running down keeps the end 
of the bar wet and the nails will rust out 
and the bars soon get rotten. Vou will 
notice the bottom of the gutter is philis- 
tered out to receive the side pieces which 
are spiked on from the side and also from 
below, while the outside edge is left 
standing, which forms a gutter to catch 
drip and conduct same out along the 
main gutter. We show an outside wall 
and water table, also valley gutter tor 
the latter. We deem it best to spike on 
cross heads of plank two inches thick by 



SIDE VIEW GREENHOUSE STRUCTURE 



























1 


I 






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SHOWING ARRANGEMENT OF RAFTERS AND SASH. 



130 



The American Florist. 



^ug. 25^ 



six inches or eight inches wide to better 
support the wide gutter. The diSerently 
constructed outside wall will not need 
this extra member. If desired the outer 
wall can be made with gutter omitting 
the narrow gutter shown in the other 
sketch. 

The side walls should be constructed 
with two thicknesses of board lumber 
with tar paper between. The inside lum- 
ber may be of common rough boards 
while the outside should be of dressed 
flooring, tongue edge up, or, what is bet- 
ter, what is called ship-lap lumber, as 
shown in the sketch. Good weather- 
board, the same as used on frame houses, 
may be used when other material is not 
obtainable. If it is desired to make a 
nice finish, stamped sheet iron represent- 
ing brick work may be used. This should 
be well painted inside and out and fre- 
quently coated outside to prevent rust- 
ing. In fact, paint is a good thing to 
have about a greenhouse and every joint 
in constructing should be painted before 
putting together and each year some 
portions, particularly the gutter, should 
be looked after with a view to painting 
if needed. 

We now call your attention to the 
gable construction. You vrill observe the 
top of the ridgepole is just flush with 
the top of the sash bars or rafters and 
comes to a ridge in the center, conform- 
ing on both sides to the pitch of the 
house. The ventilating sash rests on top 
of the sash bars, or rafter, as the case 
may be, and the top rail is shaped to 
conform to the slope of the opposite side 
of the house. Now, on top of the sash is 
spiked or screwed a cap piece as shown, 
which shuts over the ridgepole, making 
the joint air and water tight when the 
sash is closed. The sash is hinged at the 
bottom to a tapered block shown here 
and elsewhere of the same thickness as 
the sash, and spiked or screwed on to the 
sashbars or rafters close up against the 
lower edge of sash. 

The next sketch shows a full side view 
of a section of a well built eleven-foot 
house. Each member is drawn full size, 
but the length and space between them 
is half size to reduce the size •i the 
drawing. 

In a house of this size we prefer to use 
glass twelve or fourteen inches wide, and 
every fifth sash bar is of extra size. These 
are the same thickness as the others but 
two inches wide and extend from the 
gutter to the ridge pole. Between these 
sash bars or rafters is fitted in a cross 
piece and the lighter sash bars, one and 
one-quarter inches wide, extend only 
from the gutter to this header, leaving 
an open space when the sashes are lifted. 
In a house twenty feet wide and larger 
I would use a rafter 2x4 to every filth 
row of glass, in the same manner as here 
shown. The joints between the sash will 
come over this rafter. 

My reasons are that this plan makes 
a much stronger house than to have all 
the sashbars extend to the ridge pole, 
and it is no more expensive, for the 
material in the sashbar that in other 
plants is hid under the sash will more 
than pay for the extra size of the rafters. 
Again, you have the full space of the 
open sash for ventilation and less 
shadow. Where the sashbars are long, I 
bore an inch hole through these rafters 
where support to the bars is needed and 
run a three-quarter-inch pipe through 
the length of the house; this stiffens the 
whole structure and supports the sag of 
the bars better than a wooden purlin. 

I advise the center posts to be of one 



and one-half-inch pipe, as looking 
neater and being more lasting. One 
every ten or twelve feet is sufficient, but 
never be without them if the house is 
more than eleven feet wide and even in 
this size it is a good plan to set up every 
twenty- five feet a three- quarter-inch pipe 
each side of the wiilk under the heavy 
sashbar; or better, bend the pipe into an 
arch and let the ridgepole rest on the 
center of the arch. If iron pipe is not 
obtainable use 3x3 oak or cedar posts. 
All posts should rest on a firm founda- 
tion like a flat stone, or a square of 
artificial stone made by digging a shallow 
excavation at the desired place in the 
ground and filling it with water lime 
cement, gravel and sand, the same as 
used in setting the posts. Set a spike up 
endways in the center of this concrete 
and when solid the spike will serve to 
hold the bottom of the post in position, 
be it iron or wood. If of wood bore a 
hole in the bottom of the post and set 
it over the nail. 

The outward pressure of the roof on 
the sides of the building is very great and 



tion that shows poor economy in doing 
without the much needed apparatus. 

You will observe in the ground plan of 
the plant I have some of the twenty-foot 
houses constructed with the long slope 
to the north. I have done so because it 
is the only way to avoid one house shad- 
ing the other, when high houses stand 
east and west and are close together. 
This plan of building is recommended by 
some of the best florists in this country, 
who grow cut flowers of superior 
quality. My own experience is limited, 
but I am willing to be guided by such 
men as Fred. Dorner, C. W. Ward, George 
Miller and many others who give their 
testimony in favor of this method. 

Now as to the better way to put in 
glass, but or lap, I have proof that it 
largely depends on the pitch of the roof. 
If steep, say for instance on the short- 
span-to-the-south side, but the glass and 
lap it on the long and flatter slope. As 
to details of puttying or not puttying, 
caps over the sash bars to hold the glass 
in, or no caps, we will leave everyone to 
decide for himself. There are some 



BENCH CONSTRUCTION 



1 



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NO. 2. 




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CEMeNT Ml/f 





SKETCH SHOWINQ TWO STYLES OF BENCH CONSTRUCTION. 



without center support the ridgepole 
will in time sag down, and the sides 
bulge out. We advocate ventilating sash 
about three feet deep up and down the 
roof, hinged at the bottom, and continu- 
ous, being bound together at the top as 
shown in the illustration, for several 
reasons: First, in union there is strength. 
Secondly, it gives ventilation without 
draft from side currents that blow in 
when single sash is used. Thirdly, when 
hinged at the bottom they are easier 
raised as there is less weight on the 
lifting appliance. 

In houses running east and west the 
sash should be located on the south side, 
because when open the sun will still shine 
through the glass instead of directly on 
the plant, which is a great advantage 
when the house is shaded. If the house 
stands north and south put the sash on 
the west side. If the sash opens at the 
bottom cold winds and scorching sun 
rays have direct access to the plants 
when the sash is open. Without an 
appliance of some sort that will lift a 
number of sashes with one operation, 
continuous sash cannot be used, but 
whether sashes are single or continuous, 
I contend that there is nothing about a 
greenhouse more useful or which pays 
for itself quicker than a ventilating 
appliance. To open and close sashes by 
hand, one at a time, is a tiresome and 
vexatious labor and takes much time 
that could be better employed. With a 
machine, air will be given and taken off 
when needed, and not put ofi^ on account 
of lack of time, and at all times the sashes 
are secure from being blown open or off 
the house, resulting in expensive destruc- 



few things in building benches that are 
worth noticing. If you are putting side 
benches in a narrow house, with narrow 
center path, put together your benches 
as shown in this sketch. Here notice the 
front post sits back about six inches 
from the face of the bench; the face board 
is nailed to the end of the bed piece and 
the bottom board. After bottom is on, 
a right ansle bracket two inches thick is 
spiked down over every bed piece and the 
too of the face board is nailed thereto. 
This prevents the top of the face board 
from warping out of shape. Always 
make the bench frames independent of 
the side of the house. Some make the 
gutter posts answer the place of one 
bench post by spiking the bed piece to it. 
This helps to rot out the posts and 
damages the building. If the walk is 
three feet wide make the bench frames as 
shown in the second illustration. 

The object in setting the front leg back 
is to give more room in the walk so a 
box or barrow may pass without 
obstruction. When there is room I deem 
the second plan better, as the front leg 
extends above the bottom boards and 
makes a support for the face boards. An 
occasional brace should be put in to 
stiffen a line of benches and it is gener- 
ally economy to use good lumber in 
benches. I have found a coat of water 
line cement applied every season inside 
the bench to be a great preserver of the 
wood and it also keeps sow bugs away. 
Mix cement with water and apply with 
a whitewash brush. The bottom boards 
should never be more than six inches 
wide and if used for planting in, 3-inch 
slats one-half inch apart are better. 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



131 



One of the best evidences of a thrifty 
gardener or successful florist is a neat, 
well-kept greenhouse, the walks of which 
are a very important part. Wet and 
muddy walks should not be tolerated 
and need not be when, by adopting the 
following directions, good pathways 
may be had at a small outlay of money 
and labor. First level the walk and on 
each side lay a line of 2x4-inch scantling; 
fill in between with cinders and coal ashes 
saved from the winter's firing; pack 
down until within one inch or one and 
one-half inches of the top of the scantling; 
fill the remaining space with a mixture 
of one part water lime cement and three 
parts sand or sifted coal ashes; wet up 
into a stiff mortar; round up in center 
and smooth off with a trowel, using a 
thin layer of dry cement on top; sprinkle 
with water while slicking over. This 
walk will last as long as the house and 
be a joy for a life time. 

I would not advise to build houses of 
any width between eleven and twenty 
feet, say twelve, fourteen, sixteen or 
eighteen feet, for the reason that any 
size over eleven feet will require two 
walks to properly care for the plants. 
Having these two walks it is a waste of 
glass if all the bench room possible to 
reach comfortably is not provided along 
these walks. A four-foot bench is as wide 
as the average man can properly reach 
over and is about the proper width. Now 
in a twenty-foot house there should be 
eight feet of bench room in the center and 
four feet on each side and with two 
walks, each two feet wide, making a 
total of twenty feet in the clear, and less 
will not be economical. 

Greenhouses like other buildings are 
each year subject to changes and differ- 
ent methods of construction. Some are 
improvements while others may not be. 
We now have iron frames, iron gutters, 
iron pipe benches, with tile or slate bot- 
toms; all of which are good in their way 
if one has the money to buy them, but 
the poor man will always commence 
business in wooden structures and for 
this class I have penned these instructions 
and if they benefit or aid any fellow- 
being I am fully rewarded for the labor 
spent. 



American Floriculture Retrospective and 
Prospective. 

BY PBOF. B. T. GALLOWAT. WASHINGTON, D. C. 

[Read before the Society of A merican Florists at 
the New York Convention.^ 

It is sixteen years since the Society of 
American Florists was organized, and 
during this comparatively short period 
changes have taken place which viewed 
collectively have had a marked effect on 
the welfare of every member. The daily 
happenings in our lives, whether it be at 
home or in business, come to us in such a 
way as to make little conscious impres- 
sion. They nevertheless mold us and 
direct us, and for this reason it is wise to 
pause once in awhile and look back on 
the aggregate results in order to be able 
to more intelligently ^uide our future 
course. With this object in view we 
invite your attention to some of the 
more important events of the past cen- 
tury as affecting the development of the 
florists' business, hoping that such a 
review, brief as it must necessarily be, 
will help toward a better understanding 
of what must be done in the future to 
keep floriculture in the front rank of hor- 
ticultural pursuits. 

A hundred years ago floriculture as we 
now understand it was practically 
unknown in this country. Here an^ 




FUNERAL DESIGN, SHOWING USE OF SILVER BRAID. AT THE EXHIBITION OF FLORAL 
ARRANQEMENT8, FRANKFORT, GERMANY, JUNE 22-24, 1900. 



there were pioneers, who in addition to 
following various horticultural pursuits, 
paid some attention to the cultivation of 
flowers. The early work, however, was 
carried on more for the purpose of grati- 
fying a love for the beautiful than to reap 
pecuniary benefit. From the earliest 
times gardening has been a favorite pas- 
time, and long before there was anything 
like a commercial tendency to the work, 
interest was kept up in it through an 
inherent desire to come into contact with 
nature. 

Naturally the beginning of the work 
here was associated with the develop- 
ment of certain cities. The greater part 
of the wealth of the country was col- 
lected at such places, and better oppor- 
tunities were thus afforded for the devel- 
opment of such an industry as the one we 
have under consideration. The city of 
Philadelphia was early favored in this 
respect, and for this reason and also on 
account of itscomparatively mildclimate 
it attracted gardeners and others inter- 



ested in horticultural work from all 
parts of the world. Boston and New 
York were also early centers of floricul- 
tural work, and many of the first pio. 
neers made their start at these places. 

The rigorous climate of the New World 
necessanly required that special atten- 
tion be given to the use of glass houses 
for the growth of many plants, and thus 
was early set in motion the forces which 
have had so much to do with the success- 
ful growth of the work here. The early 
greenhouses were necessarily crude 
affairs, but they served their purpose and 
were the links which made better work 
possible. In most cases only the sides 
and ends of the greenhouses were of 
glass, the glass being in very small panes 
set in heavy frames of wood. Heating 
was for the most part effected by means 
of hot air carried into or through the 
houses by bricks or other similardevices. 
Such were the majority of houses erected 
up to about 1825, when there began to 
appear a more marked interest in archi- 



132 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 25, 



tectural effects and improvements in 
other directions. The demand for plants, 
flowers, and seeds was rapidly increasing 
at this time, largely owing to the more 
settled condition of the country, which 
afiorded men of wealth an opportunity 
to turn their attention to the beautilying 
of home grounds and public parks. 

Throughout the development of flori- 
culture and other branches of horticult- 
ure in this country, home adornment, or 
amateur work, preceded the commercial. 
It is a fact that wherever the cultivation 
of flowers as a means to the adornment 
of a home or to public parks and other 
places is encouraged there soon arises a 
sufficient demaid for flowers to warrant 
the investment of money in growing 
them for commercial purposes. Horti- 
cultural societies and other allied organ- 
izations hpve therefore played an impor- 
tant part in the development of commer- 
cial work. It is often through their 
eSorts that interest is aroused and stim- 
ulated, until eventually a whole commu- 
nity feels the benefit. 

The early development of floriculture 
is so intimately connected with other 
horticultural industries, such as the sell- 
ing of seeds, plants and flowers, that it 
is difficult to separate one branch from 
the other and follow the development of 
any one alone. The selling of the seed 
was naturally an early- established indus- 
try, but years elapsed before the seed 
seller found it worth while to handle 
flowers. By 1840, however, there was 
considerable demand not only for flowers, 
but for plants, and to meet this numer- 
ous establishments sprang up at various 
places. Thus we read in one of the cur- 
rent horticultural journals that "Boston 
and vicinity is making considerable prog- 
ress in floriculture. The establishment 
of a public garden in connection with a 
conservatory is having a tendency to 
difi'use a taste for plants." At this time 
(1840) there were a number of impor- 
tant establishments near Boston, New 
York and Philadelphia, and there were 
considerable areas of glass, devoted 
largely to the growing of camellias, aza- 
leas, rhododendrons, fuchsias, pelargoni- 
ums, and to some extent roses. 

The introduction at about this time of 
hot water into greenhouse construction 
gave a decided impetus to the work, and 
progress along many lines was rapid. 
For the next ten years floriculture flour- 
ished. The rose was rapidly coming 
into use and the cut flower business was 
growing. In 1852 ahorticultural writer 
in Hovey's Magazine says: "Many estab- 
lishments containing greenhouses and 
forcing beds, more especially for the pro- 
duction of flowers tor bouquets, have 
sprung up in the upper part of New York 
city." Reference is made to Mr. T. Dun- 
lap, of Harlem, and the immense quan- 
tity of flowers, particularly roses and 
violets, that he grew for his New York 
store on Broadway. In another place it 
is mentioned as a matter worthy of note 
that one store in New York had disposed 
of several hundred dollars' worth of 
plants and flowers during the holiday 
trade. 

By 1860 the business had developed 
considerable importance. Stores in a 
number of cities were beginning to more 
and more make plants and cut flowers a 
specialty. The rose continued to grow 
rapidly in importance, and various bulb- 
ous plants, such as gladiolus, Japan 
lilies, etc., were receiving marked atten- 
tion. Greenhouse construction had kept 
pace with other improvements, and com- 
paratively well-lighted, well-heated, and 
well ventilated structures were taking 



the place of sash roof houses, in which 
wood predominated and good light and 
proper heat were out of the question. 
By this time the rose as a flower for 
bouquets and other purposes was begfin- 
ning to supersede the camellia. Little 
attention was given to growing the rose, 
however, as a distinct crop. As a rule it 
was found in houses with other plants, 
the varieties grown being La Marque, 
Bon Silene and one or two others, and 
these were planted about in odd places, 
either in the ground or in pots, the flow- 
ers being utilized whenever they were 
marketable. 

At the breaking out of the Civil War 
horticultural work was in a large meas- 
ure checked and matters remained pretty 
much at a standstill until about 1870, at 
which time there were several thousand 
florists in the Uuited States. The carna- 
tion began to receive attention about 
this time, owing to several importations 
made into the United States from Europe. 
Up to this period all the work had been 
carried on with little reference to special- 
ization. It was the common practice to 
grow many different kinds of plants in 
the same house, and not only were the 
crops grown for the plants themselves, 
but were also forced for cut flowers. 
With the increasing demand for both 
plants and flowers, which began to be 
especially noticeable between 1873 and 
1875, came the necessity for giving more 
particular attention to individual crops. 
Thus commenced the first movement 
leading to specialization. From this 
time on the progress of the work was 
rapid, but as the events have all taken 
place within our memories it is unneces- 
sary to dwell upon them in detail here. 
Suffice it to recall the era of plant grow- 
ing, which lasted for a few years and 
was followed by a rush to get into the 
cut flower business. Many of the large 
plant establishments were modified so as 
to be able to give their entire time to the 
cut flower business. The rose received 
special attention, and there followed a 
rapid development in growing this crop. 
Solid beds gave place to benches, and 
special forms of houses were developed 
as best suited to the needs of the crop. 
The carnation was a close second to the 
rose in the matter of importance, and a 
history of its development would make 
an interesting paper in itself. The same 
is true of the violet, which in the early 
days was grown almost exclusively in 
frames, but owing to keen competition 
the frames were soon found inadequate 
and sunken pits were substituted. From 
the sunken pit was gradually evolved 
the modern violet house found at the 
present time. 

Gradually the general gardener is dis- 
appearing and the specialist is taking 
his place. The carnationist, the rose 
grower and the violet grower find it 
necessary to devote their entire attention 
to their respective crops if the best results 
are to be attained. 

With these various changes came the 
establishment of large retail stores and 
commission houses, all so organized as 
to be able to handle the great quantities 
of flowers and plants produced by the 
growers themselves. The importance 
and need for organization brought into 
being this society and the demand for 
closer union developed the trade journals 
—small at first, but growing and waxing 
strong as the years pass by. 

A careful survey of the field at the pres- 
ent time leads us to believe that there 
are now in the United States between 
9,000 and 10,000 establishments engaged 
in the growing and selling of plants and 



flowers in a commercial way. There are, 
in addition, many hundreds and perhaps 
thousands of individuals scattered over 
the country who sell small quantities of 
flowers and plants either at their own 
homes or at other places, but these can 
hardly be regarded as conducting com- 
mercial establishments, although the 
aggregate amount of glass they control 
is no doubt considerable. In order to 
get a satisfactory basis for the figures 
which follow, we have tried to reach 
every commercial florist in the United 
States and to obtain from them data on 
the amount of glass controlled, kind of 
crops grown, etc., as would enable us to 
draw reliable conclusions in regard to 
the present status of floriculture. This 
work has been supplemented by personal 
studies and observations in many sec- 
tions, and as a result information has 
been secured which is believed to be reli- 
able as far as it is possible to make it at 
the present time. At best, however, it 
must be understood that the figures 
given are tentative, and with the carry- 
ing out of more thorough plans, for 
which the present work opens the way, 
they may be materially changed. , 

The total area of glass in the United 
States is estimated at from 22,500,000 
to 30,000,000 square feet, the largest 
number of square feet being found in the ■ 
states of New York, Illinois, Pennsylva- ■ 
nia, Massachusetts, Ohio and New Jer- ■ 
sey, in the order named. New York is 
accredited with 1,200 establishments 
and 4,500,000 square feet of glass; Illi- 
nois with 800 establishments and 4,230,- 
000 square feet of glass; Pennsylvania 
with about 900 establishments and 
4,000,000 square feet of glass. The 
development of the business has been 
more rapid in Illinois, principally in the 
vicinity of Chicago, than anywhere else, 
and if present conditions continue it will 
be only a lew years when Illinois as a 
state and Chicago as a city will lead the 
country in the amount of stock grown 
and handled. On the basis of 22,500,000 
square feet of glass, the following esti- 
mates have been made and published in 
the last Yearbook of the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture: 

"The estimated value of the establish- 
ments in this country, including houses, 
boilers and all fixtures, is placed at 50 
cents for each square foot of glass, or 
$11,250,000 in all. The income of the 
producer will average 50 cents per square 
foot annually, or $11,250,000, and 
double that amount when viewed from 
the standpoint of the retailer. Consid- 
ering the ma':ter from the retailer's 
standpoint, therefore, the total value of 'J 
the annual output is $22,500,000, or $1 I 
for each square foot of glass. 

"It is estimated that the retail value of 
cut flowers sold annually is $12,500,000, 
the estimated apportionment of this sum 
being: 

Roses $ti,000,000 

Carnatinns 4,000,000 

Violets 750,000 

Chrysanlhi-mums 500,000 

Miscellaneous flowers, including lilies, 
etc 1,250,000 

"Estimating the average retail value 
of roses, carnations and violets at $G, $4 
and $1 per hundred, respectively, the 
total number of each sold annually, based 
on the above values, would be: 

Roses 100,000,000 

Carnations 100,000,000 

V iolets 75,000,000 

Total . . , 275,000,000 

"The retail value of the plants sold is 
placed at $10,000,000. Taking the plant 
trade as a whole and the country in the 



tgoo. 



The American Florist. 



133 



aggregate, the average- sized pot used is 
estimated to be Sinches, and the average 
retail price 10 cents per pot. This means 
that there are no less than 100,000,000 
plants sold every year. 

To handle this business in its entirety 
requires probably an average of not 
less than one man lor every 1,500 
square feet of glass, or 15,000 men 
in all. Fifteen hundred square feet 
of glass per man may seem like a lowr 
estimate, and such is the case when con- 
sidering commercial establishments of 
any size. The larger the area of glass, 
other things beingequal,the moresquare 
jeet one man can handle. As a matter of 
fact, some of the large rose-growing 
establishments do not employ more than 
one man for each 10,000 square feet. 
Large carnation establishments will run 
about the same as roses, while violets, 
owing to the great amount of work 
involved in cleaning the plants and pick- 
ing the flowers, average higher. It is the 
many thousand small establishments 
that increase the amount of labor 
required." 

It may not be out of place now to 
briefly point out some of the lines along 
which floriculture seems likely to develop 
during the coming years I think all will 
agree that much is yet to be accom- 
plished in the way of improving business 
methods in conducting this work. We 
have been especially struck with this fact 
in our efforts to get data which would 
be of value in connection with the figures 
already quoted. The producer of plants, 
be he farmer, fruit grower, or florist, as a 
rule does not consider it necessary to 
apply to his work the ordinary practices 
followed in the world of business. The 
reasons for this become apparent on con- 
sidering the position in which the plant 
grower is placed with reference to the 
manufacturer and storekeeper. The 
grower of plants is at all times required 
to assume great risks— in fact the risks 
are so great as a rule as to preclude any- 
thing in the nature of mathematical pre- 
cision in the matter of calculating profit 
and loss. It must be said, however, that 
this statement does not hold true so 
strongly in greenhouse work as it does 
in outside horticultural pursuits. With 
the increased facilities forgrowingplants 
under glass and the specialization that is 
rapidly coming about, the risks are 
becoming less at the same time competi- 
tion is becoming more keen. It behooves 
every man, therefore, who is looking for- 
ward to obtaining the highest success in 
his work to adopt every honorable 
means to increase production and 
decrease expenses. This can be done 
only by the closest attention to business 
methods, leading first of all to a thor- 
ough knowledge of every detail as to the 
cost of production. We have found it 
almost impossible to get any authentic 
figures upon the last-named subject. 
Very few men know what it actually 
costs to produce stock, as no systematic 
attempts are made to obtain facts in 
regard to this matter. As to the cost of 
houses and other equipment, there is as 
a rule very little available information 
on hand. 

These statements are not made in a 
spirit of criticism, but are brought out 
simply to call attention to a matter 
which will undoubtedly disappear with 
the improvements going on in all direc- 
tions in connection with this work. We 
have no doubt that much could be accom- 
plished in this direction by thorough 
organization of the florists throughout 
the country, for at present only a small 
per cent belong to anything in the nature 



of an organization. It would seem of 
the highest importance, therefore, to put 
forth every effort in the matter of not 
only strengthening this society, but devel- 
oping local and special organizations 
which would have for their object not 
only the improvement of the members, 
but the encouragement of all lines of hor- 
ticultural work in their respective com- 
munities. 

We have already pointed out the 
importance of horticultural societies in 
the early development of this work, and 
suggested that what was true of them at 
that time holds true of such organiza- 
tions now. The societies can arouse an 
interest in floriculture by meetings, exhi- 
bitions and in other ways, which will be 
felt by those who are looking to the com- 
mercial aspect of the case. We believe 
that this society could do avast amount 
of good by encouraging the organization 
of florists' clubs and local organizations 
everywhere, not with a view of making 




GERBERA JAMESONM. 



them in any \7ay tributary, but on the 
other hand to have them develop as 
strong independent bodies along general 
lines, which the Society of American Flo- 
rists could in its present position direct. 
Such organizations could do much 
toward the establishment of public parks 
and the general adornment of the home. 
The great work that is under way in the 
city of New York is a sample of what 
might be done on a smaller scale in other 
places and what will no doubt finally 
result in benefit not only to the people as 
a whole, but to the florists in particular 
in the matter of bringing about a greater 
love for flowers and an appreciation of 
what they stand for in everyday life. I 
refer to the establishment of the New York 
Botanical Garden and the efforts being 
made to bring this enterprise in touch 
with horticultural interests along broad 
lines. 

In the future the tendency will undoubt- 
edly be to specialize more and more. 
This will be made necessary by the 
growth of competition, requiring the 
very highest products of the soil. With 



greater specialization will come closer 
attention to every detail of the business 
and a higher appreciation of many little 
things which are now allowed to pass as 
a matter of course. The Society of Amer- 
ican Florists can do much to shape this 
work, and we trust it may long survive 
to carry it on. 



Gerbera Jamesonii. 



Gerbera Jamesonii is a very fine com- 
posite from a certain district in South 
Africa, the name of which I don't recall, 
and is locally known as that district's 
daisy. The resemblance to the daisy is 
very striking, so far as the flowers are 
concerned, but the likeness ceases there, 
for the leaves are lyrate, or dandelion- 
like, somewhat coarse and sparsely pro- 
duced. 

We are indebted to Max Leichtlin, of 
Baden-Baden, Germany, for this plant, 
he having introduced it and four or five 
years ago forwarded a plant to his friend. 
Prof. C. S. Sargent, of Brookline, Mass., 
accompanying it with a letter in which 
he described the plant as Deing one of the 
finest composites ever introduced. He 
stated that it was slow to increase and 
extremely difficult to get it to seed, and 
this, I believe, is the experience of those 
who have had the handling and care of 
this plant in this country; hence its rarity. 

I do not, however, believe that these 
conditions will always prevail; I think 
that with prudent perseverance it can be 
made to seed, at least comparatively 
freely. The only hope of making this 
plant more useful than it has hitherti> 
been lies in raising seedlings, in order to 
evolve a greater freedom of bloom. 

Gerbera Jamesonii must remain, for the 
time being, the especial pet and jewel of 
the enthusiastic amateur, at least until 
the "art which mends nature" has exerted 
its influence. The plant requires the pro- 
tection of a cool greenhouse in winter or 
may be carried in a good cold frame, 
from which frost and dampness are 
excluded. Planted in the open ground in 
the early part of May or the later days 
of April, it will soon begin to send up its 
dazzling, vermilion flowers, exquisitely 
graceful and finely poised on strong stems 
from fourteen to twenty inches high. 
Only from two to three flowers are open 
at a time on a good-sized plant. This 
latter peculiarity is the chief ground for 
the complaints of the grumblers, but as 
these two or three flowers keep coming 
along all summer and each individual 
flower will remain perfect for from six to 
ten days under the blazing sun, the plant 
is almost always in flower and is a sub- 
ject worthy of considerable painstaking. 
Kennbth Finlayson. 



The Rose. 



BY E. G. HILL, RICHMOND, IND. 

yRead in opening the discussion on the rose at 
the New York Convention of the Society of 
American Florists.] 

My nomination to this function, I 
believe, is at the instance of the members 
of the Rose Society of America. I con- 
sider it a double honor to be thus chosen 
and permitted the privilege of opening 
this particular discussion before our 
national society. As time is precious 
what 1 say must necessarily be brief. 

The rose as grown in American gardens, 
and the same flower as cultivated under 
our American forcing methods, are two 
quite distinct phases of this important 
subject. 

In order that the rose may rise to its 
proper place in American gardens— a 
place similar to that which it holds on 



134 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 25, 



the continent of Europe and in England 
— it is absolutely necessary that it may 
be freed from the dread fungus disease 
known as "black spot," which so cripples 
it in America, but which is practically 
unknown across the water. It is to be 
sincerely hoped that some heroic remedy, 
or some preventive measure, may be 
found which is as yet unknown to 
practical rosegrowers. By rose growers 
I mean both amateurs and professionals. 

The rose as seen and grown in Europe 
is quite difl'erent from its development in 
this country. Abroad you may see roses 
at every turn, in every dooryard, grow- 
ing in the healthiest and most luxurious 
fashion. These same varieties growing 
in our northern states, in all save a few 
favored localities, look like mere ghosts 
of their prototypes in Europe. This is 
noted by all who have had an oppor- 
tunity to compare growths as seen on 
the two continents. 

I hold that in order to popularize the 
rose, and to give it the supreme place 
that it deserves in our gardens, a remedy 
must be found for the fungus growth 
referred to, and which has played with 
such destructive force upon our rose 
stocks. When I was a young man I well 
remember with what vigor and luxuriance 
old varieties like Malmaison, Giant of 
Battles, Mme. Laffay, Bourbon Queen, 
and a host of others, grew and flourished; 
but it is no longer so. Even these old 
varieties, at the present day, are only 
shadows of their former selves. If this 
remedy cannot be found which shall 
restore our outdoor roses to perfect 
vigor, then we must breed a new race 
that shall prove immune from the dread 
disease. This same disease was not 
many years since a serious menace to 



our indoor-grown forcing roses, but at 
the present time where black spot is 
prevalent it is generally conceded to be 
due to incorrect culture and improper 
methods. 

This is the situation as now presented, 
whether we relish the fact or not. We 
may ask in all seriousness, what has 
caused this remarkable deterioration in 
the growth and vigor of our garden roses? 
Are our indoor- propagated roses respon- 
sible for a lack of vitality sufficient to 
withstand the disease? Are our under- 
glass methods of propagation respon- 
sible for the enfeebling of the rose? Your 
speaker waits for an answer. 

What we want in this country are 
varieties of roses that shall flourish and 
bloom as do La France, Mme. Testout, 
Mme. Jules Grolez, L'Innocence, Presi- 
dent Carnot and the like, in Prance and 
England. 

If it is necessary to breed a distinct 
class of roses for our country, whither 
shall we turn — to what section of the 
family shall we look for the sturdy 
parents? In the rugosa section notable 
advance has been made by European 
raisers and possibly we may find varie- 
ties adapted to American climatic con- 
ditions along this line as the work pro- 
gresses. In the section of rugosa hybrids 
we have Mme. Georges Bruant, Blanc 
Double du Courbet, Souv. Pierre Cochet, 
and I noted in the garden of Victor 
Lemoine, two sorts, the result of cross- 
ing tea varieties with rugosa. One of 
these was a beautiful bright pink in color, 
and M. Emile Lemoine stated that it 
flowered continuously; the other quite 
as attractive but blooming only once a 
year. 

In the garden of Mr. P. Lambert, of 



Trier, of Soupert & Netting, of Luxem- 
burg, as well as in many others of both 
commercial and private rosarians this 
work of experiment in the rugosa section 
progresses, and something of note in 
beauty, vigor and hardiness is sure to 
develop, and it may be that we are just 
on the eve of having placed in our hands 
a class, a set, a type which shall prove 
the nucleus of a new race that shall 
inaugurate a new era in the cultivation 
of roses in our gardens. In this connec- 
tion we must not forget the two novel 
developments of M. Bruant, Fee Opal 
and Rosa Belle; these were obtained 
from crosses of the tea section with the 
old variety. Fortune's Yellow. I saw 
them in bloom and am glad to testify 
that they were strikingly beautiful. 

Probably the most noteworthy result 
of these recent experiments is M. Jh. 
Pemet's Soleil d' Or, which was obtained 
by crossing the Persian Yellow and the 
H. P. Antoine Ducher. This variety is 
distinct enough to merit the type name 
of Pemettiana as bestowed upon it by 
the raiser. 

While recognizing the good work of 
our friends across the water, we must 
not forget to commend also the efforts of 
our own hybridizers, who are also experi- 
menting on the Une of the hardier types, 
Messrs. Walsh, Manda, Dawson and 
others. 

A more wide-spread effort in this par- 
ticular line of work should be inaugurated 
over our own country; we need more 
ramblers, equaling the Crimson and in 
different tints and colors; these can cer- 
tainly be had by proper and systematic 
eff'ort. 

To sum up: We must make an earnest 
effort to either free our roses used for 







.-■CLiH. 




"Ill "\\ 



GROUND PLAN FOR RANGE OF IRON HOUSES TO BE ERECTED FOR THE OHIOAQO CARNATION 00., JOUIET, IlLL. 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



135 




SHOWING SHADE LINE AT NOON ON THE SHORTEST DAY IN THE YEAR. 



garden purposes from the blighting effects 
of black fungus or we must, with intelli- 
gence and energy, seek to form and build 
up a new race of roses by crossing the 
hardier species with our present highly 
developed tea and hybrid tea varieties. 
American hybridists must keep in mind 
the hardy, vigorous characteristics 
required by varieties that are to suc- 
ceed in our climate, nor stay their efforts 
until the newtypeis produced; the reward 
will be ample. 

Regarding new sorts for forcing pur- 
poses; we need new colors in forcing 
varieties — say like Gen. Jacq , or Rodo- 
canachi, or a variety with the tint and 
fragrance of a Marechal Niel combined 
with the fine practical qualities of Bride 
or Bridesmaid; a fortune awaits the pro- 
ducer of such arose, and if you will allow 
prophecy, I will venture to predict that 
within a very few years we shall have 
roses rivaling American Beauty, Bride and 
Bridesmaid, but covering a good range of 
color. The speaker has no knowledge 
of such undisseminated novelties being 
in existence at the present moment, but 
with the number of workers in the field, 
and the crying need of such varieties 
apparent to every rose-forcer, they are 
certainly among the probabilities. 

In conclusion: I believe that the Ameri- 
can Rose Society will prove the instru- 
ment that shall revolutionize the status 
of the rose, and that will make plain to 
the rose-grower, professional and ama- 
teur, the needs of the rose from our 
American standpoint, and with this hope 
in view, may I not ask — and urge — that 
you give to this young and growing 
society your name and your helpful 
encouragement and support. 

WITH THE GROWERS. 

CHICAGO CARNATION CO., |OLIET, ILL. 

Progress is the order of the day with 
the Chicago Carnation Company, out at 
Joliet, 111 Two new houses, each 22x200 
feet, have been added this season to the 
range of wooden structures established 
about two years ago and work has been 
well begun on an entirely new and distinct 
range of modem iron houses. The old 
range now contains 57,200 square feet of 
glass. 

The new range when completed will 
consist of eight greenhouses each 30x300 
feet and a service building 39x105 feet. 
The plans have been furnished by Lord & 
Bumham. This firm will also put up 
the iron greenhouses, leaving the con- 
structive work on the service build- 
ing to a local contractor. The service 
building and one of the iron houses will 



be completed this season, other iron 
greenhouses to be added as they are 
needed. Lord & Bumham's expert 
mechanics are now on the ground and 
the house will be completed and planted 
in short order. The plans of the range 
herewith reproduced will afford a better 
idea of its character and completeness 
than the most elaborate description. 

The greenhouses will be of the latest 
style in every particular, running east 
and west; they will be fifteen feet four 
inches apart. The houses will be con- 
nected with the service building by a cor- 
ridor running through the middle of each. 
Under this corridor will be a tunnel, six 
feet wide and five feet deep, for the heat- 
ing mains. The tunnel will be covered 
with a sectional board walk so that 
leakages and other derangements may be 
repaired in the least possible time with a 
minimum of labor and expense. Hot 
water will be the heating medium, the 
houses being fitted with 2-inch wrought 
iron pipe. Ventilation will be continu- 
ous on both sides of the ridge. Lord & 
Bumham's latest improved ventilator, 
lifting in fifty-foot sections, being 
employed. The roof will be glazed with 
16x24 double thick A glass, with thirty- 
inch panes for the side and ventilators. 
Each house will contain four benches 
five feet wide with path around the sides. 

The service building will be the finest 
ever constructed for similar purposes. 
The cellar, with walls two feet thick, 
of Joliet limestone, is fourteen feet deep. 
A partition wall eighteen inches thick 
divides the cellar into two parts, the 
smaller of which (16x39 feet) will be 
used for keeping cut flowers, and the 
larger one lor coal storage and a battery 
of sixiLord & Bumham sectionalcastiron 
boilers. The capacity is such that an 
entire winter's supply of coal can be put 
away in this cellar. Over the cellar, and 
separated from it by a fire-proof floor, 
arrangements are made for commodious 
offices and workrooms. This upper part 
of the building will be finished in brick, 
with a slate roof. At one end will be a 
brick smoke stack sixty feet high. Rail- 
road switches have been introduced and 
so contrived that coal can be shoveled 
from the cars direct to the cellar chutes 
of both the old and new plants. Another 
noteworthy new feature here is a liquid 
manure tank with concrete walls and 
situated at such an elevation as to 
readily supply both greenhouse ranges. 
The walls are eighteen inches thick and 
the tank 12x22 feet and six feet deep. 
The tank is divided into two compart- 
ments of equal size, one for manure and 
the other for the liquid, which escapes 



from the manure compartment through 
an opening in the partition wall, where 
It filters through straw, which leaves no 
sediment to accumulate in the pipes. 
There will be a liquid manure faucet in 
each house, connected with the tank by 
mains, and the tank will be covered with 
a brick shed, heated to prevent the liquid 
from freezing. 

These and many other improvements 
now in progress indicate that J. D. 
Thompson, the manager of the concern, 
has a thorough belief in the future of the 
carnation, for it should be remembered 
that this entire establishment is devoted 
to carnations exclusively. Mr. Thomp- 
son has given the carnation only a very 
few years of study, but in all his planning 
and operations he has displayed shrewd- 
ness and judgment worthy of a veteran, 
and his enterprise is strictly in line with 
the progressive spirit of the times. 

The stock has all been grown in the 
field this year. Some 40,000 plants, of 
the best up-to-date sorts, will be benched. 
Planting in the old range is already com- 
pleted, the new iron house being reserved 
for seedlings. No cuttings will be taken 
from the flowering plants during the 
coming season, one house in the old 
plant being devoted to stock for propa- 
gation, t 
■*-'-¥■ 

Oceanic, N. T. 

A very well attended meeting of the 
Monmouth County Horticultural Society 
was held on August 17. It was decided 
to have a chrysanthemum show at Red 
Bank in the town hall on November 9, 
10 and 11. A communication from the 
Pan-American Exposition was read and 
after a lively discussion, on motion of 
Robt. Murphy, seconded byRobt. Beaty, 
a legislative committee was appointed to 
attend to the matter at once. B. 



Size of Return Pipes. 

Ed. Am. Florist:— I have a house 1 2x32 
in which there are two 2-inch flows and 
fourteen lV2-inch returns; another house 
is 30x75 and has three 2-inch flows and 
sixteen 1-inch returns. The returns all 
enter the boiler through Ii4-Jnch pipe. 
Is this pipe large enough to carry back 
the condensed steam? If not, what size 
should it be? E. C. N. 

The main return should be 2-inch. 

L. R. T. 

ExBTBR, N. H.— Geo. W. Hilliard has 
just completed the eighteenth house in 
his range of rose conservatories. Busi- 
ness is good with him. 



136 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 2S, 



Subscription, 11.00 & year. To Europe, 12.00. 

Subscriptions accepted only from those 

in the trade. 

Advertisements on all except cover pages, 

10 Cents a Line, Agate; 11.00 per inch. 

Cash with Order. 

No Special Position Guaranteed. 
Discounts are allowed, only on consecutive inser- 
tions, as follows— « times, 5 percent; IStimes, 
10 per cent, 26 times, 20 per cent; 
52 times, 30 per cent. 
Cover space sold only on yearly contract at 
11.00 per inch, net, in the case of the two 
front pages, regular discounts ap- 
plying only to the back pages. 

The Advertising Department of the American 
Florist is tor Florists, Seedsmen and Nurserymen 
and dealers in wares pertaining to those lines only. 

Order! lor less than one-hall inch space not accepted. 

Advertisements must reach us by Wednesday to 
secure insertion in the issue for the following 
Saturday. Address 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO.. CHICAGO. 



Don't waste the water; buy some hose 
menders — serviceable menders are cheap. 

Pabk Commissioner David F. Day, of 
Buffalo, died at his homeearlythis week. 
He was a prominent botanist and horti- 
culturist. 

The sixteenth annual meeting of the 
Society of American Florists has set such 
a mark lor manysidedness and, withal, of 
such proportions on every side, that it 
may well be doubted if the next ten years 
will see its equal. The New York Florists' 
Club has created an expression of horti- 
cultural conditions to date that is 
jfrandly creditable to the city. New 
York has shown that with her greatness, 
she is not oblivious to the country and 
her distant friends. She has taken pride 
in showing how well and how completely 
she covers horticulture within her own 
bounds and her florists have made great 
sacri6ce of time and labor in doing so. 
Be it recorded to their lasting credit. 



Society of American Florists. 

DEPARTMENT OF PLANT EEGISTSATION. 

N. Studer, Anacostia, D. C, registers 
Nephrolepis Washingtoniensis erecta, a 
seedling originated in Anacostia four 
years ago. Fronds thick and leathery 
with metallic lustre, five feet and 
upwards in length and twelve inches or 
more in width. Habit upright. 

Nephrolepis Washingtoniensis pendula. 
Seedling originated in Anacostia about 
four years ago. Fronds thick and leath- 
ery with metallic lustre, five feet and 
upwards in length and twelve inches or 
more in width, with dark biownish mid- 
rib. Habit drooping. 

Wm. J. Stewart, Sec'y. 



Greenhotise Building. 

New York, N. Y.— J. W. Van Ostrand, 
one house. 

Exeter, N. H. — G. W. Hilliard, one rose 
house. 

Beverly, Mass.— C. A. Morrisey, range 
of houses. 

Portland, Me.— R. C. Fuller, one house. 

W. Babylon, N. Y.— Muncey & Albin, 
violet house 10x112. 

Newark, N. I.— E. Elsum, one house. 

Barre, Vt. — A. Emslie, carnation house, 
15x50. 

Hartford, Conn.— J as. Young, two 
houses. 

Kirkwood, Mo.— Wm. Winters, two 
carnation houses. 

Amsterdam, N. Y.— J. C. Hatcher, two 
houses. 

Dorchester, Mass. — Wm. Hannon's 
Sons two houses. 



The Night Blooming Cereus. 

Art thou ashamed of thy poor parents' grace. 

And envy those of richer birth. 

And higher caste; 

That thou doest not the searching sunlight fucc 

As humbler flora of the earth 

Th.ll briedy last? 

Or art thou conscious of thy Maker's power 

To penetrate the film of night 

From heaven on high. 

And stand in thine own chastity a flower, 

Designed alone for His delight. 

Not man's rude eye':' 

F. P. D. 



Oh! Willis N. 
The biggest bluff on record; Chicago's 
bid for the convention. Loved but was 
lured away; Willis N. Rudd. 1900, the 
year of the great flop. A gift enterprise; 
Rudd to Buffalo. Benedict Arnold 
respectable in comparison. Wouldn't it 
jar yon? Oh, no! Even Scott and Kast- 
ing were struck dumb. They could 
hardly summon strength enough to ring 
the Buffalo bells. Chicago had a walk- 
over but was sold out, for what? The 
Lord only knows! A captain. Nail the 
flag to the mast head and sink with colors 
flying; rot. An arrangement among 
gentlemen is the modern method; con- 
temporary kisses rather than the plaudits 
of posterity; dear, dear; how have the 
mighty fallen! 0, Willis N. O! Willis N. 
But clay thou wert, and badly baked, 
and battered all and shattered all thy 
friends bemdan thy woeful state. 

Geo. C. Watson. 



Chicago. 

state of the market — reasonable 

SUMMER demand AND LITTLE S JRPLUS 
STOCK. — OFF TO THE CONVENTION. — 
SPECIAL TRAIN CARRIES GOODLY DELE- 
GATION. — NAMES OF THOSE IN THE 
PARTY. — MANY FROM OUT OF TOWN 
ACCEPT INVITATION TO JOIN CHICAGO 
CLUB. — VARIOUS ITEMS. 

Trade has been pretty fair this week, 
all things considered. At the beginning 
of the period stock got another setback 
because of the extremely hot weather, 
but qualities are again on the up grade. 
Good roses are short of the demand but 
of Beauties there are a plentj' except in 
the medium lengths. The supply of short 
Beauties is so great that they are being 
(|uite largely used in funeral work. The 
recent rains have damaged the outdoor 
carnations and the asters but both items 
are in ample supply and every day 
showing improvement. The smilax sup- 
ply has shortened up and prices are 
stiffening somewhat. 

The Chicago party, convention bound, 
started out in fine style at three o'clock 
on Sunday afternoon. The special train, 
in charge of City Passenger Agent Yos- 
burgh, was splendidly appointed and con- 
sisted of three sleepers, a dining and a 
buffet car, the decoration of which was 
due to the skill of Messrs. Winterson, 
Balluff, Kreitling and Darby, the local 
wholesalers donating the stock. With 
a well stocked larder and good fellow- 
ship prevailing, the trip was most enjoy- 
able, one of the features of the first after- 
noon being the musical programme 
participated in by Messrs. Asmus, Balluff, 
Kreitling and Winterson. On the train 
when it pulled out were: Mr. and Mrs. 
Peter Reinberg, Mr. and Mrs. E F. Win- 
terson, W. H. Kidwell, Mr. and Mrs. 
W. N. Rudd, J. W. Erringer, Mrs. L. 
Melms, Harry Smythe, Mr. and Mrs. G. 
E. Pieser, Luke Collins, N. J. Wietor, 
Edgar Sanders, M. Barker, J.C. Vaughan, 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Kreitling, Misses 
Annie and Mary McDonald, Chas. Bal- 
luft", A. Jurgens and his son, Adam 
Zender, John Degnan, Geo. Asmus, Walter 



Retzer, N Schmitz, J. S. Wilson, George 
Wittbold, Otto Wittbold, G. L. Grant, of 
Chicago; Arthur Bather and Miss Jessie 
B .ther, Clinton, la.; Mr. and Mrs. J. F. 
Wilcox, Council Bluffs, la.; Mr. and Mrs. 
J. D. Thompson, Joliet, 111.; E A. Beven, 
Evergreen, Ala ; J. B. .\mphlett, Ionia, 
Mich.; S. Garland and Geo. M. Garland, 
Des Plaines, III.: O. L. Beard, Dixon, 111.; 
A S Swanson, St. Paul; J. A. Valentine, 
Denver; J. C. Puestow, Oshkosh, Wis ; 
Geo. Weiland, Evanston, 111.; C. E. 
Finley, Joliet, 111.; Mr. and Mrs. Geo. 
M. Kellogg, Pleasant Hill, Mo ; A. T. 
Erwin, Ames, la.; E. W. McLellan, San 
Francisco; Alex. Klokner, Wm. Edlefsen, 
C. C. PoUworth, N. Zweifle and C. B. 
Whitnall, Milwaukee: E. Haentze, Fon 
du Lac. John Muir, of Chicago, joined 
the party at Buffalo. Others who were 
picked up enroute were: Geo. F. Crabb, 
Grand Rapids; Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Bul- 
lock, Elkhart, Ind.; Mr. and Mrs. Geo. 
Pastor, Huntington, Ind.; Lewis Ulrich, 
Tifiin, O.; F. J. Knecht, Fort Wayne, 
Ind.; C. B. Derthick, Ionia, Mich.; H. R. 
Carlton, Willoughby, 0. In addition to 
these, Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Kennedy and 
Herman Hunkel, of Milwaukee; U. J. 
Virgin, of New Orleans; Mr. and Mrs. 
A. L. Vaughan and Mr. and Mrs. W. J. 
Smythe preceded the special train, intend- 
ing to join the party at the convention. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Deamud are spend- 
ing the month of August at their summer 
home at Paw Paw Lake, Mich. They 
will not return until the first week in 
September, when their son must resume 
his duties at school. Mrs. Deamud's 
mother, Mrs. H. H. Wilder, who has 
been at Paw Paw for a week, has 
returned home. 

H. N. Bruns is contemplating a flying 
visit to Hamburg, whence he expects to 
receive nearly a half million lily of the 
valley pips this fall. He was over last 
year and bought 350,000 pips, which is 
probably more than any western grower 
forced. He has a brother who is 
accounted a good grower at Hamburg. 

Bassett & Washburn report that the 
new rose, Liberty, has taken very well 
with their trade. It has turned out a 
good shipper, they say, and those of 
their customers who have tried it prefer 
it to Meteor. This firm has alread3^ 
potted up about 40,000 Harrisii and 
longifloTum bulbs. 

The New York correspondents for the 
Chicago morning papers reported the 
election of officers for the Hail Associa- 
tion as being that of the Society of 
American Florists and the city editor of 
at least one influential journal seized the 
opportunity to run Mr. Vaughan's 
portrait. 

George M. Garland's iron gutter busi- 
ness has run into hundreds of tons this 
year and he is planningto build a furnace 
at Des Plains and do his own casting. 
He has also decided to devote his whole 
attention to the gutter business, aban- 
doning contracting and greenhouse build 
ing. 

Calla growers made good money on 
the blooms they shipped to this market 
last season and there is a brisk demand 
for bulbs this fall. McKellar & Winter- 
son got in 8,000 from California one day 
this week. 

It is understood that John N. May and 
Patrick O'Mara will be judges at the 
next chrysanthemum exhibition of the 
Horticultural Society of Chicago. 

Visitors: E. S. Thompson, South 
Haven, Mich.; C.R.Panter, New Orleans; 
J. P. Coen, Jr., Lexington, Mo.; J. G. 
Robinson, Waukesha, Wis.; Geo.Souster, 
Elgin, 111. 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



137 



Making a Start at Growing. 

Ed. Am. Florist: — Please inform me 
through your paper as to how many 
square feet of glass would be necessary 
for a successful start in growing carna- 
tions exclusively for the wholesale mar- 
ket. Sdbsceibek. 

This matter depends almost altogether 
on the experience, knowledge, business 
ability and willingness to "hustle" of the 
person who proposes to start the busi- 
ness. If he has knowledge and experi- 
ence sufficient to assure him of success, 
he will be a better judge than anyone 
else, how small a place he can make a 
living and a small profit from. If he has 
not practical knowledge, he will have to 
buy and pay for it, before success comes. 
While he is acquiring his education, the 
smaller the place which he conducts the 
less expensive will the education be. 

W. N. R. 

In successfully growing carnations 
exclusively for the wholesale market 
there are a number of points to be taken 
into consideration. The first necessity 
is to have the capital to put up modern 
houses. In growing for the wholesale 
market you will have to compete with 
carnations grown in such houses, and 
while a little money might be made from 
carnations grown in the old style, 
cheaper house there is more chance of 
your stock being unable to find a good 
market than there is of finding one. To 
build these modern houses on entirely 
borrowed capital makes too much of a 
load for the beginner to carry, as they 
cost considerable and unavoidable 
reverses may happen to the stock and 
both capital and labor be lost. 

If the heating is arranged so as to 
avoid the necessity of employing a night 
fireman, a good start might be made with 
5,000 feet of glass in one modern house, 
or, at the outside, two houses, but this 
amount of glass would leave a very 
small margin for profit and should be 
added to as rapidly as possible. 

To employ a night man, and he is 
almost essential to success, there should 
not be less than 10,000 feet of glass and 
as much more as possible up to double 
that amount, as a start; the latter figure 
would be quite enough, and after the 
first season's experience the business 
would either expand of itself or prove 
quite enough of an investment if it turned 
out a failure. 

Locate as near as possible to a market 
that will consume good carnations, so 
that they can be taken to market in a 
very short time and with as little hand- 
ling as possible. You will find yourself 
at a great disadvantage if located any 
distance from your market and profits 
will be almost if not altogether cut in 
two. Albert M. Hkrr. 



Phovidence, R. I.— Farquhar Macrae 
is preparing to add considerably to his 
range of glass. 

SITUATIONS. WANTS FOR SALE. 

AdTenlBementa ander UilB head will be Inserted at 
the rate of 10 centa a line (Beren vordB) each Inser- 
tion. Cash most aooompany order. Plant adrs. not 
admitted nnder this head. 

BTery paid Bnbaorlber to the amikioan Flokibt 
for the year 1900 Is entitled to a flve-llne want adv. 
(Bltnatlons only) free to he osed at any time dorlnii 
the year. 

SITCATION WANTBD-By reliable all-around gar- 
dener and florist; 12 years with orchids; EniiMsh: 
worker. Address Florist, care Am. Florist. 

SITUATION WANTBD-By a sober, Industrious 
man. an experienced tlorlBtand gardener. 1 prefer 
a small place. Addreis W H. care Am. Florist. 

SITUATION WANTED— As working foreman, by 
a flrst-ciass grower of general stock. Good 
designer and decorator. ABB. 

care American Florist, Ch'.cago. 



SITUATION WANTBD-By young man for general 
greenhouse work: age 2J; three years' experience. 
Best of references Address 

Chas. E Izoh. Logansport. Ind. 

SITUATION WANTED— As manRger or head gar- 
dener on private estate; good all-around man; 
German, married, no children. Best of references. 
Address C N C. care American Florist. 

SITUATION WANTED— By well-experienced florist 
and g'rdener. able to msnage greerlnuses. 
park*, fruit, vegetables, etc ; middle age, married, no 
children. Private place preferred Best references. 
Address EM. I9H Surf ct., Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— As foreman . by a Urst class 
grower of roses and cut fl wers; general plants- 
man: single, age ;I3 A flrst-class place wanted. Best 
of references. Open for engagement now or later. 
Address GROWER, care American Florist. 



ANTED— A good, all-around grower. For partic- 
ulars addrf SB BF.^S & Swoboda, Omaha, Neb. 



w 



w 



ANTED— AddreaB of Loula Truxler, a practical 
and ornamental florist 

TH08 B. Bull, Bakersfleld. Cal 



WANTED- A florist to grow carnatlins and general 
stock. 8tate wages war^ted with board. Ad- 
dress J. W. ENSWEILEK, 5325 Morgan St.. Chicago. 

WANTED— Reliable, competent man. Fine roses, 
'Mums. f>ic. Also aaslstant. .Address 
J. T. Williamson. LaRose Gardenp. Memphis. Tenn. 

WANTED— A. good grower of roses, carna Ions; 
oversee and help Id growing general stock; 
none but a sober and good worker need apply. State 
wages. MUNCiB Floral Co . Muncle, Ind. 

WANTED— A good second-hand Florida or No. 8 
Furman boiler; and offer for sale a good second- 
hand No. U HllchlnfiB bolter, cheap for cash by 
THKAKK F. Van der jtiEULEN, Dunkirk. N T. 



F 



OB SALE Oi RENT— Six greenhouBes, dwelling, 
shedB. Bargain. W. L. «MNN, White Hall HI. 



F 



OR SALE-Pots.fromSi^toSH-lnch Big bargain. 
Address Mrs. bockklmann. White Hall. tU. 



FOR SALE— Free fuel, 5000 feet glass. Oreat chance 
for florists or gardeners. Only £500 cash. Account 
sickness Write quick. Free Fuel, care Am. Florist. 

FOR SALK— Extra good second-hand 3-lDCh pipe at 
()C. per foot ; also Pome 4'lrch; secure It wolle It 
lasts. Address W. H. Salter, Rochester, N Y. 

FOR SALE— Second-hand greenhouse bDlIer; flrat- 
claas condition; will heat 4500 feet. Cheap If 
taken at once. 8 M & B W. 

131 and 133 W. Superior St., Chicago . 

FOR RENT— Owing to advancing years. I have 
decided to reot out my seven greenhouaep, dwell- 
ing house and store. Excellent location, good trade. 
B. Haas. 181H Vinton, Omaha. Neb. 

FOR SALE— Entire or one-half Interest In a good 
buelnese Growing city of 20.i>( Hot water; 5,000 
feet of glass. Most excellent opening to reliable per- 
son. Must sell BOon. B B A. care Am. Florlai. 

FOR SALE— Lpase stock etc of place of 50' feet 
of glasR In Chicago suburb all In sood condition 
Stock first class and more than is needed. Will sell 
very cheap; caph wanted. Reason for 'eaving am 
going to Europe. Address J D 

care American Florist Chicago. 

FOR SALE— One 15 H P. return flue eftlonary 
boiler, suitable for steam or hoi water. $75. One 
return bend coll bijller, 1^-1 ch pipe. $25: on board 
carB here. Boilers in Al condition; have only been 
used one winter. Address 

Geo. Stafflinger, Sprlngvllle, N Y. 

SALESMAN WANTED 

In our Flower Seed Department. Must be 
thoroughly familiar wiih Flower Seeds and 
Bulbs. Also acquainted with the Floristi' 
trade. 

W. W RAWSON & CO., Seedsmen. 

13 & 13 Faneull Hall Sq., BOSTON. MASS. 



FOR SALE OR RENT 

Greenhouse, 5000 feet of glass, steam heating, 
Market Garden Ten Acres, six-room Dwelling, 
Burn, etc.. adjoining; thriving town of 3000, on 
St. Joe and Grand sland Ry. 

H. SCHMALZL, Marysville, Kans. 

FOR SALE. 

A florist establishment for sale, consisting of 
13,000 square ft'et of glass, in good condition. 
Heated by steam; in the city limits, located in a 
city of 18.000 inhabitants on the Mississippi river 
in Iowa, with s(*vt.^ral acres of land and dwelling 
house; must sell soon on account of old age. For 
further particulars addrt-'ss 

L C K, care American PloHst. 



FOR SALE 



With 10 Year Lease, 

One o! the best placet 
in Chicago. 

Thisisarareopportunity;if you have 
some cash, talk it over with me. 

T. J. CORBREY, 

I409-I4II W. Madison St., CHICAGO. 

FOR SALE 

240 acres of land on Isthmus of Tehaunte- 
pec, state of Vera Cruz, Mexico. For full 
particulars write 

ROLAND HUGHES. 

846 New York Life BIdg. KANSAS CITY, MO. 

For Sale. 

Oakland, Cal.: an elegant piece of property, 160 
feet, front by 145 feet deep. Ten minutes' ride 
from tbf center of the city. Three large green- 
houses, each 116 t. by 25 ft., well stocked. Ele- 
gant cottage of 7 rooms. Gas fixtures and all 
conveniences. Owner compelled by circumst'in 
cea to go to Alaska gold fields and must sel! 
q^uickly. Cost $7,000. Will sell at great reduc- 
tion. Write for price. 

Any of the above named properties is a fine bar- 
gain, and those desiring to purchase will do well 
to communicate with us. These are only a few of 
the properties that we have for sale and leasing. 

SMITH & SMITH, 

P 0. Box 869. 345 Sixth Ave.. PITTSBURG. PA. 

For Sale. 

GREENHOUSE 
PROPERTY ^ 

At Nyack, N. Y. A plot 220xJ25 
feet> on which arc four Rosehouses, 
J 00x18x6, each house heated by a 
No. J 6 Hitchings Boiler ; and seven 
houses, each about 64x1 J ft, heated 
by flues. This property will be 
sold cheap to quick cash buyer. 



HITCHINGS & CO. 



233 Mercer St. 



NEW YORK. 



BEAUTIFUL ESTATE 
& FLORIST BUSINESS, 

EXETER, N. H. 

To be sold at auction, on the premises, WEDNES- 
DAY, Sept. 5. at 10:30 a. m. {if rainy, the next 
fair day), unless previously sold at private sale. 
An ideal home or investment. Don't lose this 
chant-e. About 50 ucrt-s fine tillage land fronting 
on Portsmouth Ave.; large I2-roora dwelling, hot 
water heat, slate roof, etc.; large slate roof barn, 
carriage house and carpentef shop, all conv^n- 
ienily and attractively arranged. Live stock, 
hay, wagons, carriages, all working tools and 
appliances, and many personal household effects. 
An extensive and profitable florist business — 
wholesale growing — long established, included; 
practit.-ally no competition, 15,000 square feet of 
glass, si-\ large greenhouses, grand soil; sales lim- 
ited by production only; 5 minutes from business 
district, electric and steam cars near; adjoins 
compact part of the town; deliehtfully situated; 
town famous for its beauty, refinement and rare 
educational advantages: Rye, Hampton and Salis- 
bury beaches in easy distances and with electric 
connections; property should be seen to be appre- 
ciated; inspection may be made at any time; 
present owner to retire from business and remove 
from town; $500 cash deposit at sale, balance on 
easy terms. Descriptive and illustrated booklet 
mailed upon request. Address 

HAYES ESTATE, Exeter, N. H. 

It is Good Business Policy to Mention thb 
A&TERicAN Florist when tou Wbite to an 
Advertiser. 



138 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 25, 



New Castle, Ind. 

The South Park Floral Company is 
now cutting about 1,000 short Beauties 
each day and has a fine prospect ahead 
for winter, as the glass is up-to-date and 
the plants in fine shape at present. They 
will shortly commence cutting Brides, 
Bridesmaids and Perles. 

Meyer Heller is at the New York con- 
vention this week. 

Recent visitors were: E. G. Hill and 
Mrs. E. T. Graves, of Richmond; Will 
Gerlach, of Cincinnati. 



Lawrence, Mass. — Chas. E. Wingate 
suffered the fracture of his right leg by 
being thrown from his bicycle on the 
night of August 15. 



Wbo!?5aIe flower/\arK?fe 



Cincinnati. Aug. 23. 

Rosea, Beautv e.OOdilO.OO 

Br.de.' 2.00(« 3.(0 

Bridesmaid 2.0n(" 3 00 

Meteor 2.H0(" 4 OH 

Perle 2.00(5' 3.fO 

Carnations 75t' 1.00 

fancy I.SO 

Gladioli ' 2 OOt' 4.00 

Tuberoses 3.00 

As'er.. 75ti 1.50 

Lilies— \lbum and Rubnim 4.00(" 5.00 

Lilyof the valley 4.00 

Smilas 12.50 

Adiantum 1.00 

Coinnion f*-rns .15 

Asparagus 50,00 

St. Louis, Aug. 23. 

Roses. Bride. Bridemaid 2.nr(ro 4.00 

Beautv, lu to 15 inch stems 4.00((i 6.00 

Perle.'. 2 00 

Meteor 2.0nf" 4 00 

Carnations, common 75(" l.OO 

Smilax 12.50 

Adiantum 60t> 1.00 

Tuberoses 3.00fa 5.00 

Asters 75(n 1.60 

Milwaukee, Aug. 23. 
Roses, Beauty, long, per doz. 1 50("2.00 
med ■■ .50(" 1 00 

'• Bride, Bridesmaid 3.006' 4.00 

Meieor 4 00(.r 5.00 

Kuiserin 4.00(<i 6.00 

Golden Gate 4.U0 

Carnations, ordinary 1 00 

fancy 2 00 

Auratum lilies 15.00 

Adiantum TitH 1.00 

Common ferns .25 

Gladioli 2.00<n. 3 00 

Asters 50(.' 1.00 

Smila.x 15.00 

Asparagus 65.00 

Galax leav. s .20 

Sweet peas .15 

Pittsburg, Aug. 23. 

Roses, Beauty, fancy 20.0C'"2.=i.OO 

e.\tra lO.OOc 15 00 

No. 1 5.O0(" 8.00 

culls 2.00W 4.00 

Bride, Bridesmaid 2.00w 6 00 

Meteor 2.00(" 6 00 

" Perle 2.00m 4.00 

Cusin i.OOwi 4.00 

Carnations, ordinary 5U(" 1.00 

fancy l.OOftil.SO 

Lily of the valley 2.00r" 4.00 

Sweet peas lOW' .25 

Smilax 12. SOw 15.00 

Gladioli 1.00(" 3 OU 

Adiantum "iUm 1.00 

Asparagus 35,0Cft'J50.00 

Sprengerii 25("i .35 

Dagger ferns per 1000, 2.00 

Asters sow 2.00 

Denver, Aug. 22. 

Roses, Beauty, select 12 60('i 20.00 

ordinary 4.00('i' 8.00 

Bride, Bridesmaid S.OOw 5.00 

Meteor 5.0O("i 6.00 

" Perle, Wootton S.OOw- 5.00 

Carnations, ordinary I.00(" 1.50 

fancy 2.O1C11 2.50 

Lily of the valh'y 4.00 

Cartas 1 2 50 

Harrlsii 12.50 

Sweet peas 20'" .30 

Asters 2.00W 3.00 

Galax Leaves .20 

Asparag'is 60.00 

Smilax 10.00 

Ferns .30 



Everything; in the 

GUT FLOWER 

line. 



and a 
complete line of 



WIRE WORK, 

the kind 
that will give satisfaction. 

FLORISTS' SUPPLIES. 



HOLTON & HUNKEL CO., 



p. O. Box 103. 



AJ:il-w^<-:tlz^e>^, wis. 



wnen wntinu mention tne Amenoan Florist 



CUT FLOWERS. 



<^" t^' 9^^ t^^ 



Shipping: orders receive prompt 



and careful attention. 

C. C. POLLWORTH CO., Milwaukee, Wis. 



Please Mention American Klorlst. 



PITTSBURG GUT FLOWER GO., Ltd. 



504 
Liberty Street, 



ALL 
FLOWERS 

IN 
SEASON. 



FITTSBUBG, 
FA. 



GALAX LEAVES, Brilliant Bronze or Green, $1.50 per 1000. 

FANCY FERN, DAGGER FKKN, Etc., at market prices. 

HARRY A BUNYARD, - 42 west 28th street, new york. 



Bronze Galax Leaves 

$l.25perl000, F^wsif- 

'Irv II s;ini]ii>- FIFTY tor u ii cents in stamps, 
.Ieliver.nl FREE. 

AMERICAN ROSE CO.. Washingtan, P. C. 
I PAY EXPRESS or P0STA6E on my 

Bronze Galax Leaves 

and .lflivpran\ wlu-ri- in I'. .S. fc.r ONE DOLLAR 
FIFTY per 1000. Writ'' for partiouhirs. 

LILLUN ALIEN DEXTER, Washington, D. C. 



Galax Leaves. 

J. L. BANNER & CO., 

MONTEZUMA, N. C. 

Southern Wild Smilax. 

NtW CROP NOW READY. 

Caldwell The Woodsman Co. inc. 

Also J B. DEAMUD. CHICAGO, ILL, 

L. J. KRESHOVER, New York, N. Y., 
M. RICE & CO , Philadelphia, Pa., 
THEVAIL SEED CO., Indianapolis, Ind. 




Indispensable Adjunct 



«s 



n O a successful wholesale business is an up-to-date, 
y accurate, complete Trade Directory. Such a 
book, 387 pages, containing the name and 
address of every florist, nurseryman and seedsman 
in America, new list of private gardeners and horti- 
cultural supply concerns and much other informa- 
tion will be mailed from this office on receipt of $2. 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO. 

334 Dearborn St., CHICAQO, ILL. 



m 
w 

m 
m 
w 

m 



Jigoo. 



The American Florist. 



139 



It Is 

Always 



OUR AIM 



To Give 
Satisfaction. 




\A/E are equipped to give our patrons 
improved service during the ap- 
proaching season. We have increased 
supplies of the very best stock in the 
market and we are in search of more 
of the right kind of buyers. If you 
want good stock write to us. 

E. C. AMLING, 






32-34 36 Randolph Strett, 

CHICAGO. 



:<2isie<2«eisisSge@g8ggeggSgggSg®^=iSggggfe5sie:eieiEi; 



McKellar £ Winterson's 

Modern Supply House. 




Send for Prices on all Supplies. | 
Clearance Sale Now On. 

Give]us your order now together with your needs in 
CUT FLOWERS. 



McKELLAR & WINTERSON, 



11. 



45-47-49 
WABASH AVE. 



CHICIGO. 



WIETOR BROS. 



Wholesale 
Growers 



of Cut Flowers 



All teleerapb and telephone orders 
given prompt attention. 

51 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO. 



WEILAKD-AND-RISCH 



I We are large Growers and I 
IShlppers of CUT FLOWERS) 



WHOLESALE FLORISTS 



Wanted at Once 

"FLORlSTi" to send to us for their 
supply of Cut Flowers. Most carefui 
attention given to shipping orders. 
Order what you want — we have it. 
Cutting 2,000 Beauties dally. 
GEO. REINBERG, si Wabash Ave.. CHICAGO. 

Seen by New Firms: 

AMERICAN riORIST ADVTS. 



Wbol^ale power/\arl^ 



CmcAG<», Aug. 24. 
Roses, Beauty, extra long stems 



3 00 
2.60 
2.00 
1.50 
1.25 
1.00 
.75 



30 inch 
24 •■ 
20 ■■ 
15 ■• 
12 ' 
8 " 

Bride, Bridesmaid 2.C0(ai 4.00 

Perle 2 OUfei 4.00 

Meteor 2.01 @ 4.00 

La France 2.0f (S' 4 00 

Golden Gate 4 00® 6.00 

Liberty 4 OOfe 6.00 

Carnjitions ,75 

fancy l.co 

Lily of the valley 3 00® 5.00 

-■Vdiantum 5u@ l.OU 

Common ferns .15 

F'aucy ftrna .20 

Smilax 8.CO@I2.CO 

Asparasua 60.00 

Ivy leaves, per 100 A') 




i WABA3H AVE. 
CHICAGO 

a. R Oor WnbKSh ato and Rardolph 3t 

Sav "Saw it in the Flobist." 



E. H. Hunt 

THE "OLD RELIABLE" FOR 



WHOLESALE- 



CUT FLOWERS 

Hunt's Flowers 
Qo Everywhere 

76 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO. 



PETER REINBERG, 

Grower and Wholesaler of Cut Flowers. 

600.000 FEET OF GLASS. 
Headquarters for American Beauty. 

Carnations, Blooms and Cuttings. 



51 Wabash Ave., 



CHICAGO, ILL 



J. B. DEAMUD, 

Wholesale 
Commission Florist, 

51 Wabash Ave., GHIGflGO. 



Bassett&Washburn 

76 & 78 Wabash Ave.. CltlCAGO. 



Wholesale Dealers asd 
Growers of 



Cut Flowers 



CREENHOUSES: HINSDALE, ILL. 



A. L RANDALL ^ 

Wholesale Florist 

Don't Forget that we are at 4 Well- 
ington St., Chicago. 

write for flpeclal qnotatlonft or l&rfrft order. 



WHOLESALE 

GROWER OF ROSES. 



DEAl^B in 

CUT FLOWERS 



J. A. BUDLONG, 

37-39 Randolph Street. CHICAGO. ILL 

Mention the American Flonat. 

Benthey & Co. 

F. F. BENTHEY, Manager, 

Wholesale Commission FiorisI 

41 Randolph Street CHICAGO. 

|3F~Con8iKnmeutB solicited 

A. G. PRINCE & CO. 

Wholesale 6ui Flowers 

AND FLORISTS' SUPPLIES. 

Ajients for the Hinsdale Hose Co. Bpeolml aiieoiioi 
paid to shipping orders. 

76 & 78 Wabaah Avenue, 

Telephone Main 3208. CH lOAQ*. 

Piease mention the American Florist. 



140 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 25 



Samuel I. Ywmi, 



Wholesale Florist. 



1612-14-16-18 Ludlow Street, 



.PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



AM. BEAUTIES AND VALLEY OUR SPECIALTIES. 

DCKING THE SUMMER WE WILL. BE OPEN FROM 7:30 A. M. TO 6:00 P. M. 

CITY HALL CUT FLOWER MARKET, ' ""ToK Si^'sl* '*'•'•' 

WELCH BROS., Proprietors. 

NOTICE: — WELCH BROS., Sole Agents for FREYSTEDTS' Immortelle Letters and Emblems. Block Letters, S2.00 per 

Script Letters. S4.00 per 100. 

THE NEW ENGLAND HEADQUARTERS FOR THE BEST GRADE OF FLOWERS AT ALL SEASONS OF THE YEAR 



FLORISTS< 



IF you have made any change in your firm 
* name or address, please send us your 
corrected business card so that you may be 

Sroperly listed in next year's edition ot our 
irectory. Send also particulars of any 
additions you may have made to your estab- 
lishment, either greenhouses or land. 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO.. 324 Dearborn St.. Chicago. 

Geo. A. Sutherland, no^rs. 

WHOLESALE DEPOT FOR 

All Florists' Supplies, 



Price lists mailed. 



67 BROMFIELD ST.. 
BOSTON. MASS. 



Wholesale Florists, 

Always on Hand: / 

CARNATIONS, ^ I 

BRIDESMAIDS. /^ff^ 
BRIDES. - '^ 11^ 



}■ 



j7 JOBBERS IN 

^^FLORISTS' 

'i^\ SUPPLIES 

FLORISTS' VASES. 

Horticultural Auctioneers. 

84 Hawley Street. BOSTON. 



The American Florist Company's 

DIRECTORY 

Contains the names and addresses of all the Flo- 
rists, Seedsmen and Nurserymen in the United 
States and Canadu. Price $3.00. 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO., 
324 Dearborn Street. Chioago. U. S. A. 



Circulation 



which 



Circulates 



The actual paid circulation of the 
American Florist is, we believe, the 
largest in its class. The contents 
are of real present value and are 
preserved for reference. Advertisers 
who use regularly our columns estab- 
lish permanent business with the best 
trade in the United States. 



Wbol^ale power/\arK^ 

Philadelphia, Aug. 22. 

Roses, Tea 1.0O(g> 2.00 

" extra 3.00® 4. Ou 

Beauty, extra 15.10(3120.00 

firsts 8.00@12.00 

Carnations ftO(flt 75 

fancy l.OOfii 1.50 

Lily of the valley 2.00® 4.00 

Gladiolus 3 00 

Tuberoses 3.00 

Asters 50('i' 1. 00 

Asparagus 25.00W50 00 

Smilax lO.fOW'lS.CO 

Adiantum hOOi' 1.00 

Sweet peas 2U® .30 

Boston, Aug 22 

Roses, Beauty, extra 15 00@20.00 

medium 4 no@ 6.00 

culls 1.0u(§ 2. no 

Bride, Bridesraaid, Meteor. .50(5) I) 00 

extra 3.0IW 5 110 

Kaiserin 6.(i(l(« 8.00 

Carualioiis 50(" 1.00 

Lily of the valley 2.005;' 4.00 

Asters S'~((f .75 

Sweet peas 05((i .10 

Smilax 8.U0(»)I0.00 

Asparagus 50.00 

Hardy ferns .20 

C:iud>turt. Gj'psophila, etc. .10(3*. 15 perbunch 



HEADQUARTER 

^IVfSTER** 
^tNN YORK 



GIVE 

US 

A 

TRIAL.I' 

WE 

CAN 

PLEASE 

YOU. 



Roses, Carnations, and all kinds of 
Seasonable Flowers in Stock. 

Ilfll C VICTIUft Wholesale Com- 

Iinii Ti nndlinU) mission Plorlst. 

481 Washington St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Also Dealer In Florlste' Supplies & Wire Designs. 



C. A. KUEHN, 

Wholesale Florist, 

1122 PINE STREET, 

— ST. LOUIS, MO. 

|3^A cumplete line of Wire DeHlgus. 

H.G.BERNING 

Wholesale riorlst, 

SUCCESSOR TO 

iT. LOUIS CUT FLOWER CO.... 

J322 Pine St., ST. LOUIS, MO. 



Woodroffe & Bernheimer, 
Wholesale Florists 

1604 LUDLOW STREET. 
■Phone 1-42^69-A. PHILADELPHI* 

Cnnftle'nrnont-fl Mi>l|r|t#»rt 

LEO. NIESSEN, 

Wholesale Florist, 

N. W. COR. I3TH AND FILBERT STREETS, 

'^'??B°JS5"^'Si«D. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Consignment! ol Choice Valley and Reset tolicitwt. 

Geo. M. Moss, 

WHOLESALE FLORIST, 

32 South 17th Street. PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

Long Dlitanoe Phone 1-41-38 D. 



Consignments ol Roses. Carnations, Violets sollolletf. 

CHAS. B. STAHL 

Wholesale Florist, 

17 S. nth St.. Tel ephone 63-64. PHILADELPIIiA. 

Orders b; mall, telegraph or telephone wlU 
receive prompt attention. 

Consignments of good stock solicited. 

...GEO. M. KELLOGG... 

'"'"'iSTe"w°e'.i: Cut Flowers 

Qive us an order and we will please you. 

Our Greenhouses at PLEASANT HILL. MO. 
Our Store. 906 Grand Ave.. KANSAS CITY, MO. 

|^"L0N6 DISTANCE 'PHONB AT EITHER PLAOB 

JOHN B. FERGUSON. 

Wholesale Florist, 

5515 Fifth Ave, PITTSBURQ, PA. 

Long Distance 'Phone 2985. 



Consignments of Roses, Carnations and Violets. 
Solicited. 

The Cincinnati 
Cut Flower Co., 

S^lSto. WHOLESALE FLORISTS. 

Consignments Solicited. 
Special Attention Given to Shipping Orders. 



J. M. COHEN, Florist, 



CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. 



22 Cliapman Place, BOSTON, MASS. 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



141 



TOP GRADE 

Carnations 



BEAUTIES, 
BRIDES. 
BRIDESMAIDS, 
METEORS 



I^ily o* tlxe ^Va^lXey. 



JOHN I. RAYNOR, 



49 West 28th Street, 

NEW YORK. 



Telephone No. 1998 Madison Square. 



YOUNG & NUGENT, 

WHOL«=SaLE FLORISTS HE^^V^A'k^""'' 
Crowe & Co. Special Prize flaids. 

Superb Roses, LeadiQg Varieties. Cho ce Carnations and Rare Novelties. 
Summer Shipping a Specialty. 

TELEPHONE 20eS MADISON SQUARE. 



THOMAS YOUNG, Jr. 

Wholesale Florist , 

Sevr Telephone No. 1803 Madison Bqnare. 

43 West 28th St., NEW YORK. 

WILLIAM GHORMLEY, 

Wholesale Commission Florist, 



Special attention given 
to Shipping Orders. 



57 W. 28lh St., NEW YORK CITY. 

Telephone 2200 Madison Square. 

-Consignments Solicited. 



JOHN YOUNG, 

ROSES, CARNATIONS, VALLEY 

aod all other choice cut flower stock. 
51 W. 28th Street, NEW YORK. 

New Telephone No. 1905 Madison Square. 
Price list on application. 

FUase mgntion the American Florist when writing. 

THE RECOGNIZED HEADQUARTERS IN 
NEW YORK CITY FOR 

Violets % Carnations. 

•nWERS aad BUYERS make a note of this. It 
will be to your advantage. 

WM. H. GUNTHER^ 

30 West 29th Street 

Hew Telephone No. 561 Madison Square. 

Please Mention the American Florist. 

FRANK MILLANG. 

CUT FLOWERS, 

WHOLESALE COMMISSION, 

408 E. 34lh Street, 

Cut Flower Exchange. NEW YORK. 

Telephone 299 Madison Square. 

N. Y. CUT FLOWER EXCHANGE 

404-412 E. 34th St. Near Ferry. 
Open for Cut Flower Salee at 6 o'clock 
■Srery Momlne 

DESIRABLE WALL SPACE TO RENT 
FOR ADVERTISING. 

JOHN DONALDSON, Secretary. 

Please Mention The Amerloan Florist. 

MOORE, tlENTZ & NASH, 

Wholesale Commission Florists, 



At rooms ot N. Y. 
Cut Flower Co. 



119 and 121 W. 23d St.. 

NEW YORK CITY. 
Telephone 733— 18th. 
CholccBt Stock Shipped on a Commission. 



Choice Caroations 



Choice Roses Jf Jt 



Traendly & Schenck 

NEW YORK CITY 

New Telephone No. 270 Madison Sq. 

18 W. 28th Street Cut Flower Exchaage 

Wbol^ale [fower/arK^ 



New York, Aug. 22. 

Roses, Beauty, select 20.00f530.00 

medium 4.00(96.00 

culls S0(5 3.00 

Bridesmaid, Bride, Meteor .25f'i 1.00 
select. 3 OOfei 4.00 

Carnations 50fS 1.50 

Lilv of the valley 2 OOta 3.00 

Sweet peas per 100 bunches I.00(j2.50 

Harnsii 4 OOto 6.00 

CatUeyas 20 no@33.00 

Gladioli 1.00® 1 50 

Asters lOd' .50 

Smilas 8.00(n 12.00 

Asparagus 25. OOte 35.00 

Sprengerii, perdoz. bun. .Tfw 1.00 

Adiantum 25(a .50 

BrFF.\i.o, Aug 23. 

Roses. Beauty lO.OOC^IO 00 

Bride, Bridesmaid, Meteor 3.00® 7.00 

'• Kaiserin 6.00 

Caroations 1.00 

Lily of tl e valley S.OO® 4.00 

Sweet pe:is oer doz. bunches .30@ .75 

Auratumlilies 10 00(512.50 

Roseum ■• 4.C0O1 6.00 

Gadioli 2.0O(.3 3.00 

Asiers 1.00(<!J 2.00 

Smilas 15.0003 20.00 

Adiantum 1.0C(» 1.25 

Hardy ferns, Galax leaves 20(ij .25 

Asparagus 50.00®75.CO 

MILLANG & CO. 

Commission Florists 

48 West 29th St., NEW YORK. 

New Telephone No. 1304 Madison Square. 
Capable, experienced. Consignments solicited. 



TheNewYork GUT Flower Go. 

119 and 121 West 23d Street, 

112 and 114 West 24th Street, 

ralephona733-l8th. NEW YORK. 

CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. 

Special Attention Civen to Shipping Orders 

WALTER F. SHERIDAN, 

^i^is^i^fsrir Wholesale Florist. 

39 W. 28th St., NEW YORK. 



ROSES SHIPPED 

to all points. 



Price I ist on 
Application 



ford Bros... 

uit at Wholesale Floriste 

in West 30th street NEW YORIL 

Consignments Solicited Phone. 157 Madison Sq. 

Julius Lang 

S3 West 30th Street, NEW YORK. 

ROSES. CARNATIONS. VALLEY. 

CHOICE SUMMER STOCK. 

Telephone 280 Madison Square 

S. J. LIMPRCCHT, 

Wliol6sal6 rommlssion Florist 

and FLORISTS' SUPPLIES. 

Also all kinds of Greens for Decorations. 

119 West 30th Sfeet. NFW YflllK 

Telepn..ije !4:« Mad son Square. I'L" 1 um». 
i oiisigniuents Solicited. 

Do not forget to say "saw your ad. in 
the American Florist" when corre- 
sponding with advertisers 



J.K.ALLEN'S 



POPULAR WHOI i ESALE 
CUT FLOWER HOUSE 



At the new address, J06 West 28th St., New York City, draws the crowd. Consignments carefully handled 
and weU sold. ExceUent facilities. J- J- J- J- Telephone 197 Madison Square. 



EDW. C. HORAN. 



47 WEST 28th ST. 



Tel. 421 
Madison Square, 



NEW YORK. 

CUT F LOWERS AI W HOLESALE. 



142 



The American Florist, 



Aug. as 



The gBED T^aiJE- 



AMERICAN SEED TRADE ASSOCIATION. 

ALBERT MCCULLOUGH, PTeB.; F. W. BOLGIANO, 

VIce-Pres.: 8. V. Willard, Wethersfleld, Conn., 
Seo'y and Treas. 



S. B. 'Dicks, representing Cooper, 
Taber & Co., London, arrived at New 
York on the Lucania, August IS. 

Naples, Italy. — Seed crops in general 
are not satisfactory at all as regards 
vegetables. Cauliflower is very bad and 
onions very short, hardly enough to fill 
contract orders. Lettuces and tomatoes 
are very bad, the latter on account of 
mildew. It is yet too early to say as to 
the condition of leeks. 

Wood, Stubbs & Co., Louisville, write 
that the acreage of onion sets planted in 
Kentucky this year was larger than ever 
before, but the majority of crops of sets 
are very much smaller than last year on 
account of the sets being smaller in size. 
The quality generally is first-class and it 
is only very rarely that any of the crops 
have grown too large in size. Taking 
the crop on the whole, they believe it is 
the best that has been produced in years, 
both in quality and quantity. 

S. M. Pease, of the Cleveland Seed Co., 
Cape Vincent, New York, reports the 
yield of peas as very light, both of early 
and late sorts; vines short, pods short 
and not well filled; many glassy, lifeless 
peas caused by excessive hot weather, 
necessitating great expense in hand pick- 
ing. He does not think there will be over 
fifty per cent to seventy per cent of 
an average yield. Earlies lighter than 
late. Beans are going to be very disap- 
pointing, the last two weeks having been 
very unfavorable. Scarcity of peas and 
beans seems to be assured for the coming 
season. 

The crop of Long Island cabbage seed 
which, in the early part of the season, 
promised a full yield, has in many 
instances partially failed. The season 
was favorable up to July 1, when the 
ground had become very dry and the 
fields sustained a severe attack from the 
cabbage aphis. As a result all fields 
planted on light soil have ripened up pre- 
maturely and have produced only about 
one-third of what might otherwise have 
been expected. On the whole the crop, 
while not a failure by any means, has 
been rather disappointing and is not suf- 
ficient for the demand. 



Elevating Boilers. 

Ed. Am. Florist:— My greenhouses are 
heated by steam and are in good work- 
ing order, but I wish to raise the boilers 
thirty inches and would like to know 
whether it will also be necessary to raise 
the pipes in the houses? M. 

This depends largely upon the present 
height of the coils above the water level 
of the boiler. While a distance of three 
or four feet is desirable, two feet will be 
fairly satisfactory, and if there is a dis- 
tance of four and one-half or five feet 
between the lower ends of the coils and 
the water level in the boiler as now 
located the change proposed could be 
made if theie are reasons that make it 
desirable. L. R. T. 



Baltimore, Md.— The board of awards 
on August 17 divided the contract for 
plants needed by the park board between 
F. G. Burger and E. A. Seidewitz. 



PRIMROSES. 

IMPROVED CHINESE, ready for 3-incli pots. Well known throuKbout the United States and 
Oaniida as the finest large llowepinK Iringed varieties ^rown. SINGLES* named, $2. (JO per lOlJ, $17.00 
pfT 1000; DOUBLE, named. $3 50 per 100. Extras added liberally to help pay expressage. PRIM- 
ROSE SE&D of best 15 varieties, single and double, mixed, 500 seeds, $1.00; half pkt.,50c. 

CINERARIAS. 

Finest large flowering: d\v:irl v:iiiHti.'-, inived, rH:iily for 3's. 82.00 jier 100. 

GIANT PANSY SEED 

The very best mammoth varieties, no finer ever offered: all the seed plants critically selected. SOW 
TH* BEST. Packet, 3500 seeds, $1.00; half-pst.. 50c. A packet of the grand new Uwarf Forget- 
Me-Not "Blue Beauty" added to every seed order. Strictly cash prices. 

PKm*KosEs*^^ JOHN F. RUPP, Shiremanstown, Pa. 

CHINESE.... PPl m PO<sF<s 

50,000 finest large flowering fringed 1000, $15 00; Per 100, $1.75 

Obconica grand., fimbriata, rosea and Forbesi " 2.00 

Obconica uraDdillora and rosea, ready Sept 1st. 

.5.-_,„,,. I Sprengerii $3.00 per 100 Pansy "Seed, large flowering, 

Asparagus ^ pjumosus 4.00 " ounce, $4.00 

Cinerarias, August 20 $2 00 per 100. 

JOS. tl.ClNNINGtlAM, Delaware, 0. 



CASH PLEASE. 



JOHNSON & STOKES' QlANT KINGLY PaNSIES. 

We have searched the world to set this strain up to its present standard of perTection. and it is now 
pronounced bv our customers as unrivalled in size, substance of flower and richness of color. 
Tr..de pkt., 60c; 'ri-oi... «1.25; o/,.. $-.00. FRESH SMILAX SEtD —Per oz„ 25o; per pound, 12.50. 

ALLEGHENY DOUBLE FRINGED HOLLYHOCK.— Our Floracroft Strain. Trade pkt., 2oc: \i o/.. pkt., 
.SOc; per oz., $1.5U. CINERARIA.— James' Giant Strain, per pkt., 25c: !i trade pkt. 60o; tr. pkt., $1. 

CALCEOLARIA.— James' Giant strain, per pkt.. 26c: trade pkt.. 80o. 

We are ready to book orders for Wliite Romans, Freesias, Callas. Paper White Narcissus, etc. 

JOHNSON & STOKES, Seedsmen, 217 and 219 Market St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



^FRESH FERN SPORES.^^^ 

WE ARE HEADQUARTERS— E.\tra large package of fresh Spores, sufficient for 3000 plants, 
with full cultural directions, postpaid for $1.00. 

EMERSON C. McFADDEN. U. S. Exotic Nurseries, SHORT HILLS. N. J 



CALIFORNIA 

Galla Bulbs 

Through our F.xchange 
Sales with best Pacific 
Coast growers of these 
roots we are able to 
deliver choice, care- 
fully cured and evenly 
graded roots at closest 
growing prices. 

FIRST SIZE. I'i to m-in. 

diam., doz. 7.6c; 100*5.00. 
SELECT. 1^ to Pj-in.dinm., 

doz. $1.25: 100*7.00. 
EXTRA SELECT, 3to2W-in. 

diam., doz. $1.60; 100 $9.00. 

EARLY DELIVERY means much. Gettlni; these 
bulbs when you want them is everything. Late 

surpluses :it hnir price .■ire not b;.rt:ains. 

VAUGHAN'S SEED STORE, 




NEW YORK: 

14 Barclay St. 



CHICAGO: 
84-86 RandolDh St. 



FREQUENT IMPORTATIONS OF 
BEST GRADE OF 

English Mushroom Spawn 

J. J. STYJER, 

^ Concordwille, Pa. 



GLADIOLI. 



lAPLESH*OE 
COl-l_fcC*lON. 



Loni_' estiiblishi'd: unexcelhMi; many sjuM-.it's, 
liomi- iind imported. Uulbs. cut llowera, 
hybridized s<'--d; everythiii? in my liiu', and 
the- best of evfvythini:. lllustrdted circular 
r'Hfiy soon. S'-iid lor ii und place ytjur orders 
in seuson 



WILBUR A. CHRISTY, Kinsman, O. 



ESTABLISHED 1802 




'S 



SEEDS 

We have still left some fresh seeds of 
the following Palms in fine condition: 

KENTIA FORSTERIANA, per 1000, $4.00: 5000 to 
10,000 at %-i.hO; 10,000 and over at $3.00. 

Also CYCAS REVOLUTA STEMS in assorted 
sizes. 3 lbs. to 12 lbs., at $8.00 per 100 lbs., 
while unsold. 

J.MTHORBURN&CO. 

(Late of IS John Street) 

36 CORTLANDT STREET. NEW YORK 



Bulbs! Bulbs!! 

EXCELSIOR PEARL TUBEROSE 
and CALADIUM ESCULENTUM. 
Fin<: crop for i9jO. 

JNO. F. CROOM & BRO , Crowers, 

MAGNOLIA, N. C. 



American riorist Advertisements 
Pay Advertisers. 



/poo. 



The American Florist. 



143 



SEASON 1900- 1 90 1. 



CAPITAL. . $10,000.00 



vM «^ v^e 



To the Grower : 



We want to call attention to our large increase in trade, and are contracting more help and 
building more counter surface to handle our increase. Still, with all, we want "new growers," but we want 
them to begin with the dull season or at the opening of the season, September Jst to October Jst. 

A few facts: Shippers who expect best returns ought to SHIP US, for we have a business of long 
standing and trade built up We pay all growers each week with statements, no matter how much we have to 
trust out. Having capital we can afford to carry accounts in the interest of the producer. 

All we ask is a season's trial, and we can PROVE we can do by you as good and a littk better than 
you have been doing, and, as above stated, the " CASH " each week. Come in and see us ; have a talk, and 
we will convince you that if you are to change Brokers, we are open to handle all No. J stock we can get this 



season. 

FLINT KENNICOTT, President. 

G. H. PIESER, Secretary. 

ED. E. PIESER, Treasurer and Gen'l Manager. 

L. P. KELLY, Salesman, 

STEVE MINON, Salesman. 

WM. P. KYLE, Foreman. 

GEO. R. SCOTT, Packer. 

G. H. PIESER, Jr., Packer. 

Errand-boys and wire-workers. 



Yours respectfully, 

Kennicott Bros. Co., 



42 and 44 Randolph Street, 
Chicago. 



SOUTH PARK nORAL CO. 




•Jb 


:: NEW CASTLE, INDIANA :: 


rj? 




Growers of the FINEST American 
Beauties, Brides and Bridesmaids 
coming to the Chicago Market :: :: 


We Consign to E. C. AMLING, 32 RANDOLPH ST., CHICAGO. 



If YOl PLEASE, 



Jus a moment to tell you that my 
Stock contains the be^t the Phila- 
=^==^====- delphia market affords in Cut 
Flowers. My personal attention given to all orders. Con- 
signments of first-class Stock solicited. 

GEOROE M. MOSS, Wholesale Florist, 



TELEPHONE 



No. 32 South 17tli. St., PHILADELPHIA. 



14A 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 25, 



The Nursery TRat^E. 



VM. ASSOCIATION OF NURSERYMEN. 

Thko J. Smith, Pres.; N. W. Hale, Vlce-Pres. 
(i BOBOK C. SSAQEB, Bocbester. N. Y.. Seo'y. 



P. J. Berckmans was recently elected 
president of the Georgia State Horticul- 
tural Society. 

The horticultural department of Cor- 
nell University has secured the services of 
Prof. John Craig, of Ames, Iowa. 

The Jackson & Perkins Co., Newark, 
N. Y., is investigat'ng the value of evap- 
orated sewage from cities as a fertilizer. 



Orlando Harrison. 



The business manager of the big nur- 
series of J. G. Harrison & Sons is Hon. 
Orlando Harrison. Mayor of Berlin, Md., 
and one of the younjj, active workers in 




ORLANDO HARRISON. 



the ranks ol the American Association of 
Nurserymen Mr Harrison was bom in 
Sussex county, Delaware, thirty-three 
years ago. In 1884 the family moved to 
Berlin, where the father and sons have 
since grown nursery stock, starting in a 
small way but making a specialty of 
peach trees, strawberry plants and 
asparagus roots; recently they have gone 
extensively into apple and pear trees. 
Beginning with one farm of 170 acres 
they now own six of the choicest tracts 
in the vicinity and their annual list of 
budded peach trees exceeds any in the 
country. Mr. Harrison is a student of 
modern conditions and, although San 
Jose scale has never been found in his 
county, he was one of the first in the 
country to adopt fumigation with cyan- 
ide and is one ol the staunchest advo- 
cates of inspection, not political farce 
but real, conscientious, protective inspec- 
tion by an untrammelled man who 
knows a scale from a tumble bug. Aside 
from the manifold requirements of the 
practice of horticulture Mr. Harrison has 
the time to be mayor of his city, vice- 
president of a bank, a director of a build- 
ing and loan association, a loving hus- 
band and an indulgent father. 



Wheaton, 111.— a. T. Peterson 
building a new greenhouse. 



SEND FOR TRADE LIST N W READY, OF 

Tree and Shrub Seeds, Tree Seedlings, Etc. 

J. H. H. BOYD, Gage, Sequatchie Co., Tenn. 



*'PI ANT Pill Tllt?F" By GEORGE W OLIVER. 

I L/ %1 ^ I V> V/ L 1 \J ■> 1^ *<"'»' «e«<ly for Delivery. 

A Working Handbook of Every-day Practice lor the Florist, Gardener and Nurseryman 
Aud all who grow plants and flowers in the greenhouse or garden. Contains separate chapters on all 

branches of the work. 
Ilmo, DrinA (l 0(1 hu Moil Dnotnolrl For full description see advt. in Aug. 18th issue 

193 Pages, rllUC Ol>UU Uj iVIdil rUoipdlUi or this paper, page 114. 

or send for complet.- circular to TH" FLORISTS' EXCHANGE. P. 0. Box 1697, Nc V Yo'k 

Choicest Fruit and Ornamental Trees. 

Shrubs, Plants, Bulbs. Seeds. 40 Acres Hardy Roses. 44 Greenhouses 
of Palms, Everblooming Roses, Ficus, Ferns. Etc. Correspondence 
solicited. Catalogue Free. 47 Years. 1000 Acres. 

THE STORRS & HARRISON CO., Painesville, O. 




SOnETHINQ NEW in 

Lquis Gauthier SIrawberry 

LINE. 

Recommended by French Horticultural 
Congress, also by seve al expert florists as 
one of the most useful plants in this line. 

Its fruit is immensely lari;e, bearing fruit 
all the time ; delicious, fine flavor. Have 
a small quantiiy left ; as long as they last 
you can have them for |I0 00 per dozen. 

Also beautiful ROSE BUSHES from 
20c to $100.00 per bush. 

A good, practical, experienced florist of 
years' experience seeks a permanent position 
as florist, who at present is employed by a 
first-class nursery. 

Address, in both cases, 

Alex Goboczy, Box 221, Painesville, 0. 

Send lor our Price tist We have a flue stock, 
for fall delivery, of 



Clematis, ftJ^'ng"!"- 

fine 
assorlment. 



Field Grown Roses, 
Flowering Slirubs, 
Ornamental Trees, Conifers. 

To avoid disappointment, order now a supply of 

ROSE-STOCKS TOR GRArTING. 

(Prices delivered in this country). Rosa Manetti. 
112 per 1000. Rosa Polyanha. «8 per 1000. Kosa 
Laxa (Froebeli). $8.5U per KOO. Tht* stocks most 
largely used by European growers for Kraftin;^ 
tea roses. 

Our reprehentative, Mr. J. Austin Shaw, will be 
at the Convention and will be pleased to quote 
prices upon any wants in our line. 



JACKSON & PERKINS CO., 



Newark, 
New York. 



WRITE US 

For prices on tb<' following Kverbloomint; Roses 
in 1 in. pots, healthy and well grown. Uride, 
Bridesmaid. Golden Giite, Kaiserin Aut;untn., La 
France, Meteor. Mnie. Caroline TesLout, Perle des 
Jiirdina. Papa Gontier. Safrano, President Carnot, 
Muriel Graham, Sou v. de Wootton, by the hundred. 

Maple Ave HOOPES, BRO. A THOMAS, 
NritSKRiEs West Che-tte , Pa. 

Collected Seedlings. 

Am. Lindrn, Am. Heech. Sugar Miiple. fccarlot 
Maple, Magnolia acuminata Magnolia tripetehi, 
Whitrt Flowering Dogwood. Yellow Wood, Leather 
Wood, Spice Wood, Sweet Gum, Tulip Poplar. 
Red Bud, Water Beech, Hackberrv. Please ask 
for prices on uU kinds of Tree and Shrub Seeds 
ami Seedlings. 

TAYLOR PERRY, JR., & CO , Rolefa, Tenn. 

It Is good business policy ^ ^ •£ 
to mention the •^•^•^ 

....American Florist 

when you write to an advertlaei 



ROOT PRUNED 

Fvcrgrccns, 

FOR AUTUMN PLANTING. 
FINELY ROOTED. 

5000 NORWAY SPRUCE, 3»4 to 5 feet. 

5C00 HEMLOCK SPRUCE, 3 feet and over, very 
bushy, compact and fine. 

25.000 RETINOSPORAS in variety, from 1 to 6 ft. 

COLORAUO BLUE and ORIENTAL SPRUCE, 
PINES and ARBORVIT^ES in great variety; 
in good condition for transplanting either in 
lawns, parks or cemeteries. LARGE SPECI- 
MENS for immediate effect. 

SMALL EVERGREENS and EVERGREEN 
SHRUBS for window boxes a specialty. 

The SUCCESS with which our root pruned Ever- 
greens have been moved is PROVERBIAL. 
FAILURES seldom Cfcur. A personal inspec- 
tion is invited. 

The Wm. H. MOON CO. 

Glenwood Nurseries, & 702 Stephen Girard BIdg , 
MORRISVIlLE, PA. PHILA., PA. 

«0 Miles from New York City. 
30 Miles from Philadelphia. 

^/f'fl.v^ mention the American Florist when writing. 




^artnfi ^eitui\ ($^ 

The most widely circulated German gardening 
juuruai, treating u£ ail departments of hortlouituto 
&nd floriculture. Numerous eminent oorrespond- 
euts in all parts of the world. An advertising 
medium of the highest class. 

MoUer's Deutsche Gartner Zeitung is published 
weekly and richly illustrated. Subscription $3.00 
per annum, inoluding postage. Sample oopiesfree. 

Large Elms. 

n e tine specimen Elm trees 6 to 9-inch 
^%3 caliper, 25 to 40 feet high, with well 
developed heads. Have been several times 
transplanted and will lift with excellent 
roots and balls of earth. Send for price list. 

SAMUEL C. MOON, """"S^d..). PA. 

A New Catalogue entitled 

Flowers and Floral Designs. 

Twelve pages and handsome cover. 

Shows forty-one arrangements, with prices. 

For agents' use, or promoting out-of-town trade. 

Sample* 40c In Stamps. Clronlar Free* 

DANX B. LONG, Publisher, BUFFALO- 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



145 



>♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦» 

♦ 

♦ 



PALMS 



Boston Ferns 



WHENEVER IN NEED OF THIS CLASS 
OF STOCK DO NOT PLACE YOUR 
ORDER UNTIL YOU HAVE WRITTEN TO 
US. WE ARE OFFERING EXCELLENT 
VALUES :::::::::::::::::: 



Walter Rctzer & Co., 

Wholesale Growers of PALMS, 
FERNS and RUBBER PLANTS. 



2045-59 Clarendon Ave , ( North Halsted St. ) 

Chicago. III. 



♦ 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 



14L> 



The American Florist. 



A^g- 25y 



Our PasTiMBs 



Announcements of coming contests or other 
events of interest to our bowUnz, shooting and 
3V0ling readers are solicited ana will be given 
place in this column. 

Address all correspondence for this department 
to Wm. J. Stewart, 67 Bromfleld St., Boston, Mass. ; 
Robt. Kift, 1725 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa.; 
or to the American Florist Co., 324 Dearborn St., 
Chicago, 111. 



The Chief of the Bowlers. 

At the meeting of the Florists' National 
Bowling League, Wm. Scott, of Buffalo, 
was chosen to the presidency, succeeding 
Robert Kift, of Philadelphia. Mr. Scott 
is so well known that comment on his 
qualifications for the position is quite 
unnecessary. Most of our readers will 
recognize the likeness of the accompany- 
ing portrait. 



The Gunners' Contest. 

On Thursday afternoon the gunners' 
contest brought out four teams, making 
scores as follows: Philadelphia, 92; Buf- 
falo, 57; Cleveland, 53; New York, 33. 
Following are the individual scores: 

PHILADELPHIA. 

Wm. K. Harris 17 Geo Anderson 16 

A. B. Cartledge 17 John Burton 16 

E. Reid : 17 W. H. Tapliii 9 

BUFFAiO. 

\V. Beard 19 W.Webber 8 

Wm. Scott 10 T. B. Braik 7 

W.B.Scott 9 W. P. Hasting li 

CLEVELAND. 

T. Meehan 12 Adam Graham 9 

.7no Burns 11 J. Warnekc (; 

H. M. Alteck 11 G. A. Rackham I 



NEW YORK. 

F. H. Steffeiis 13 Theo. Roehrs 4 

G. Schuliheis 7 U. Y. Mellis 3 

W. J. Elliott 5 L. Schmutz 1 



The Bowliog Contest at New York. 

Not only did Buffalo capture the con- 
vention of 1901. but she won in the 
bowling contest, taking first place in the 
warmest battle ever waged on the alleys 
at an S. A. F. convention. The arrange- 
ments for "bowling day" were as com- 
plete as were those tor any other period 
of convention week and the fact that the 
Palace Bowling Alleys, One Hundred and 
Twenty-fifth street and Third avenue, 
were thronged by wildly enthusiastic, 
vociferous representatives of the various 
cities which had entered teams did not 
interfere in the least with the precision 
with which the great match was con- 
ducted, although the bedlam of voices 
served to send more than one player "up 
in the air" at critical moments. 

There were eleven teams present, 
girded for thefray,andout of the thunder 
of the rolling balls, the crashing pins, 
came many surprises, such, for instance 
as when Kasting, of Buffalo, put up 22S. 
Chicago started out to win and made 
the high score in the first game, 924., but, 
just as in the contest for the convention 
of next year, but for a different reason, 
she was compelled to retire in favor of 
the city with the bison trade mark. 

It was a great contest from start to 
finish and interest and enthusiasm ran 
high. The Philadelphia redoubtables 
upheld their record for the first game, 
but then it looked like as though every 
bit of silverware was bound Chicago- 
ward. It was the thirdgame which told 
the story; Buffalo, 1021; Chicago, 887. 
Buffalo gets the Lord & Burnham, the 
Hitchings and the Wood cups and the 
Detroit trophy. Chicago must be con- 



tent with the Queen of Edgely vase. 
Kasting gets the cream of the individual 
trophies. 

The following are the complete scores 
for the contest: 

BDFFALO. 

Player ' 1st 2d 3d Total 

A.B.Scott 89 161 143 383 

McClure 126 133 133 391 

Kasting 181 175 228 584 

Braik 176 118 168 462 

Webber 150 167 202 509 

Wm. Scott 152 147 147 446 

Team totals 873 8811021 2775 

CHICAGO. 

Player 1st 2d 3d Total 

G. StoiKTV 177 152 152 481 

F. Stollery 178 149 112 439 

Hauswirth 122 145 145 412 

Des;nan 126 167 150 443 

Winterson 118 152 181 451 

Asinus 203 153 147 503 

Te.am totals 924 918 887 2729 




WM. SCOTT. 

Pri'sident Naliooal Florists' Bowling Li'Ht^iie. 



MEW TOBK. 

Player 1st 2d 3d Total 

OMara 13i 138 150 423 

Traendly Ir9 143 134 436 

iMiin.la 145 141 132 418 

Roehrs 160 18.1 100 495 

F.hrlman i44 161 175 480 

Lang 143 130 169 442 

Team totals 876 898 920 2694 

FLAT BfSa. 

Player 1st 2d ;!d Tot;il 

Mellis 139 177 160 466 

Zeller 127 145 157 429 

Schrautz 129 179 116 424 

Rayuor 146 105 167 478 

Dallledouze 13t 146 150 429 

Rik-y •. 149 129 189 467 

Teamtotals 824 940 929 2693 

BALTIMORE. 

Player 1st 2d 3d Total 

Richmond.... 125 213 136 474 

lioone 134 189 1.64 477 

l.i-hr 147 IfcS 98 400 

Webber 152 169 136 447 

Kinder 104 118 2(j7 429 

Seybold 154 132 151 437 

Teamtotals 816 966 882 2664 

PHILADELPHIA. 

Player 1st 2d 3d Total 

Moss 165 109 122 386 

Connor 149 141 167 4o7 

Harris 143 167 125 435 

Anderson 132 165 110 407 

Habermehl 143 107 131 381 

Walker 185 143 165 493 

Teamtotals 907 83> 820 2669 



Player 1st 2d 3d Ti.tal 

Breitmeyer 156 160 i:?4 440 

Pantke 144 120 142 406 

Beard 145 99 164 398 

Dunn 167 132 132 431 

Ferguson 132 115 159 406 

Ilolznagel 127 144 153 424 

Teamtotals 871 760 874 2505 

PITTSBUIIG. 

Player 1st 2d 3d Total 

J. W. Ludwig 167 141 126 434 

E. C. Ludwig 165 139 129 433 

Xeff 125 198 103 416 

Loew 120 167 no 407 

Baldinger 85 123 152 360 

Sohrenbush 151 126 82 359- 

Teamtotals 813 894 702 240» 

WILWAUKEE. 

Player 1st 2d 3d Total 

PoUwolth 139 120 128 387 

Edlersen 168 142 103 413 

Zwei el 128 103 142 371 

Klokner 162 166 124 452 

Kennedy 106 136 117 358 

Hunkel 156 117 142 415 

Teamtotals 857 783 756 2396 

CLEVELAND. 

Plaver 1st 2d 3d Total 

Eadii-.; 135 156 163 444 

A.Graham 85 107 131 323 

H.Hart 97 125 97 319 

Cusliinan 100 149 141 390 

B.Hart 106 167 113 386 

(J.Graham 169 159 159 487 

Teamtotals 692 863 794 2349 

BOSTON. 

Player 1st 

Foster 109 112 

Fletcher 115 

Martin 84 

ISutterworth 71 

Mnlloy 78 

Sutherland 138 

Teamtotals 695 636 653 1884 

INDIVIDUAL GAMES. 

Following are the scores compiled by 
those outbide the great bowling battle of 
the day: 

Pla\er Score Player Score 

I). .1. Scott 181 Gilkinson 126 

Wilcox 177 liurns 125 

Kilt 169 Lans-'jahr 113 

siebenheller 165 Shaw Ill 

lionaldson 169 UallulT HI 

I.. C. Watson 147 Long 100 

Hnvatt 144 Siephens 97 

Keiihn 135 Kohlert 93 

K.Watson 128 Dirme 85 

Phillips 127 Krick 60 

THE ladies' contest. 

There were three trophies and three 
contestants in the ladies' section. Here 
are the scores: 

Score 



2d 


3d Total 


112 


74 


295 


117 


98 


330 


102 


126 


312 


80 


92 


243 


101 


101 


280 


124 


162 


424 



I 'layer 
Miss Eastman.. 
^Irs. W'intersoQ, 
^Irs. Langliilir. 



.81 



LIST OF THE TROPHIES. 

The following is a list of the prizes for 
which the bowlers battled: 

LIST OF TEAM TROPHIES. 

The Lord ."^ Burnham cup, to the club making 
the highest total in three games. 

The Hitchings A Co. cup, to the club making 
the highest score in the third game. 

The Queen or Edge.y trophy, to the club mak- 
ing the highest total score in the first and second 
games. 

The Edmund M. Wood cup, to the club making 
the highest total score in three games. 

The Detioit trophy, to the club making the 
highest score in any one game. 

All the above must be won twice to become per- 
manent property. 

INDIVIDUAL PRIZES IN TEAM CONTESTS. 

Silver cup, donated by Theo. J. Lang, New 
York, to the man making the highest average in 
three games 

Silver cup, donated by Traendly & Schenck, 
New Yoik, to the man making the highest score 
in any of the team games. 

Gold medals, donated by Theo. Roehrs, New 
Yo.k, to man making second high average and 
to man making third high average. 

Gold mounted fountain pen. donated by J. K. 
Allen, New York, to man making greatest num- 
ber ot strikes. 

Box of cigars, donated by F. Brinkama, Sixth 
avenue and P^ifty seventh street. New Yurk. to 
man making greatest number of spares. 



jgoo. 



The American Florist. 



i-fc? 



PRIZES FOR INDIVIDUAL GAMES. 

Open to all members of the S. A. F. not taking 
part in the team bowlinjr. 

Gold medal, donated by John I. Raynor, New 
York, for highest score. 

Silk umbrella, donated by Walter F. Sheridan, 
New York, fr second highest score. 

Cigar case, donated by Fitzgerald & Hammond, 
New York, for third highest score. 

LADIES BOWLING PRIZES. 

Eleeant bronze vase, donated by Cleary & Co., 
New York 

Beautiful jardiniere, donated by A, II. Hews & 
Co., North Cambridge, Mass. 

Dozen photographs, cabinet size, donated by 
Dana, Broadway and Twenty-eighth street. New 
York . 

$4.00 CHICAGO TO FT WAYNE, IND. 

and return via Nickel PlateRoad,Septtmber 
9th to 12th inclusive, account National 
Encampment Union Veteran Legion. 
Tickets good returning to and including 
September I8th, 1900. Three through daily 
trains from Chicago, at convenient hours. 
Chicago Passenger Station, Van Buren St. 
and Pacific Ave., on Elevated loop. For fur- 
ther particulars address John Y. Calahan, 
Gen'l Agent, 111 Adams St., Chicago. 35. 

EXCURSION TO FORT WAYNE, IND., 

and return, via Nickel Plate Road, at rate of 
$4.00 for the round trip account National 
Encampment Union Veteran Legion. 
Tickets on sale September 9th to 12th in- 
clusive, with return limit of September tSth, 
1900, and will be available on any of our 
three daily trains from Chicago at 10:35 a. 
m., 2:30 p. m. and 10:30 p. m., respectively. 
Vestibuled sleeping cars and first-class 
service in every respect. Chicago Passen- 
ger Station, Van Buren St. and Pacific Ave., 
on Elevated loop. City Ticket Ofiice, 111 
Adams St., Chicago, Write John \. Cala- 
han, Genl. Agt., Ill Adams St , Chicago, 
for further information, or 'Phone Central 
2057. 34. 



CARNATIONS 

Field Grown MARQUIS 

First, $15.00 Second, $10.00 
I. E. MARQllSa, Syracuse, N.Y. 



VIOLETS, 



Field grown, $5.00. 

Dbl. white Primroses, 
4-in., |io.oo. Cyclamen, good, |6.00. 
Sword Ferns, 3 varieties, 4-in., $10.00. 
Dbl. white Bouvardia, 3-in., $5.00. 
McCraa & Colo. Battle Creek, Mich. 

Tell f-hem ■sphere vnn bawt the nH 



i ELECTROS 



For Catalogue Purposes. 



] E have a large assortment of strictly 
high-class halftones of which we 
can supply electros suitable for cata- 
logue illustration. If you need 
anything in this way, state your requirements 
and we will submit proofs of the illustrations 
in stock. Our collection includes the leading 

ANNUALS POT PLANTS 

BIENNIALS FLORISTS' FLOWERS 

HARDY PERENNIALS TREES AND SHRUBS 

Also PARK AND GARDEN SCENERY. 




PRICE FOR CASH ONLY 15 CENTS PER SQUARE INCH. 



The American Florist Co. 

324 Dearborn Street, CHICAGO, ILL. ^ 

▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼ V ▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼»•▼▼» 



McKellar ^ Winterson 

Wholesale Dealers in Everything for Florists. 



CUT FLOWERS AND PLANTS. 

Per UK) 

Beauties, long $20.00 to %ih.m 

medium 10.00 to 15.00 

short S.OOto 8.011 

Brides. Maids 3.00 to .'i.OO 

Perles and Meteors 3.00 to S.OO 

Carnations l.(M) to l.SO 

Asters, good .w to 1.00 

fancy 1.00 to l.SO 

Gladioli 2.00 to 3.00 

Valley S.OOto S.OO 

Lilies S.OOto 10.(X) 

Ivy Leaves 40 

Adiantum 50 to 1.00 

Common Ferns per 1000, $1.00 

Smllax per doz., $1.00 to 1.50 

Asparagus " S.OOto 6.U0 

Full line of Field Grown Carnation Plants to offer. 



SEEDS AND BULBS. 

Callas, select, X'^i to 1^-in. diam., per 100.,. $.5.00 
l'/2 to V/i " •■ .. . 7,00 

3 t0 2V5 " •• ... 9 00 

Bermuda Freesias, ?4-in. and up, per 1000 S..50 

H " ■• " .... 6.50 

Harrisii Lilies, I.ongiflorum, Roman Hyacinths, 
Paper Whites. Prices on application. 

All Dutch Bulbs in Season. 

Trade pkt. 

Pansy Seed, Florists' Best, oz,, $8,00 $0.25 

Cyclamen, Giant Flowered ,50 

Calceolaria, Finest Mixture 50 

Cineraria, Choicest Jlixture 50 

Gloxinia Hybrlda, Choicest Mixture 50 

Primula Obconica, Choicest Mixture 50 

All Seeds and Bulbs in Season. 



SUPPLIES, ETC., ETC. 

Sphagnum, burlap Ijales, ea, $1.00; 6 for $5,00 

" wire pressed " .75; 6 for 4.00 

Tobacco Stems, fresh, 200 lbs, for 1.50 

Preserved Cycas Leaves, ass't, per 100 15,00 

Cape Flowers, white, per lb 85 

colored, " i.so 

Tissue Paper, manilla, per ream 45 

white. •■ 1,00 

Wax •• manilla, " 1,40 

white, " 3,00 

Doves, first quality, ea, $1.00; per doz 10.00 

second ■• ,85; " 9,00 

Rubber Aprons, ea, $1,50; per doz 1,5,00 

Full stockof all Supplies, including Ribbons, 
Tin Foil, Toothpicli.s, Baskets, Wheat Sheaves, 
Bouquet Pins, Immortelles, Flower Vases, .Jardi- 
nieres, Artilicial Palms, etc. 

Send for Complete Catalogrue. 



Selling Agents for Glass, Building Material, Boilers, Putty, Mastica, Paints, Oils, 
Sod Crushers, White Lead, Walker's Fertilizers, Imperial Liquid 

Fertilizers, Insecticides, Etc. 



45, 47, 49 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO, ILL. 



148 The American Florist. Aug. 25, 



'(*_J,Y\^iJiY^^ 



The American Florist Company's 

TRADE DIR[CTORY 



IS THE ONLY PlBLICATIO^ WHICH GIVES 

Complete lists of the Florists, Nurserymen 

and Seedsmen of the United States and 

Canada, corrected annually and 

arrangfed both alphabeti= 

cally and by states 

and towns. 



NEW FEATURES 

Added in the edition for 1900 are lists of the gardeners or 

superintendents of private estates, experiment station 

horticulturists, landscape architects and 

horticultural supply concerns. 



THIS INDISPENSABLE VOLUME OF 387 PAGES, BOUND d? _ „^ 
IN BOARDS, IS DELIVERED POSTPAID ON RECEIPT OF •P-*»^Vi» 



AMERICAN FLORIST CO. 

324 Dearborn Street, CHICAGO, ILL., U S. A. 



raK5ae3gSSQKirai55J!iSl!^^SaiS2^^^raiSiS3^^®aiS3^^i 



Mfflii^^^g^^^^^^^E^^iM^E^t^f^f^ESiE^ffiS^t^ffi^ESS^SSES^Ba 



I goo. 



The American Florist. 



149 



One-Half Million Ferns 

Our stock of FERNS this season is larger and in better 
shape than ever, while the assortment is the best we ever 
ofiered. 

Now is a good time to lay in a supply for fall and 
winter use; the plants are all open frame grown and are 
well hardened, and in prime condition to ship. 

Special Low Prices on Ferns in lots of 2000 or more. 






NEPHROLEPIS EXALTATA BOSTONIENSIS 

(BoHton Sword Fern.) 

We have a fine stock of this most popular variety. 

2W-inch pots 75c per dozi-n; % 5.00 per 100; $40.00 per lOCO 

7-inch pots $9.00 " 75.00 



General Collection of Fine Ferns 



Inch pots 



Adiantum -Emulum 

Aneitense 

Bausei 

Capilius-Veneris Manesii. 

Concinnum 

Cuneatum 



Decorum . 
Formosum ... 
Farleyense . . 

Gracillimum. 

Legrandi 



Variegatum . 
Grandiceps.. 



Bellum 

Mundulum 

Pubescena 

Rhomboideum. . 

Rhodophyllum . 



Per 100 
I 5.00 
12.00 
12.00 
16.00 
4.00 
4.50 
6.00 
3.50 
15.00 
4.00 
4.00 
5.00 
15.00 
70.00 
4.00 
15.00 
5.00 
15.00 
5.00 
5.00 
3. BO 
10.00 
15 00 
5.00 
8.00 
5.00 
12.00 
8.00 

8.ro 

4.00 
6.00 
4 00 
4.00 
5. CO 
16.00 
. 4 00 
10.00 
15 00 
6.00 
5.00 



Per 1000 
$40.00 



30.00 
50. OU 
30.00 

35.00 
35.00 
50.00 



35.00 



40.00 
30.00 



40.00 




mmrnm 



Nephrglepis Kxaltata lin 



-LJu^roN SwoKD Fern. 



Inch 



Lastrea Aristata Variegata 

Chrysoioba 

Opa"'_-a , 

Lomaria Ciliata 

Gibba 

Lygodium Scandens 



Wiepandi 2 

4 

Alsophila Australis 2J4 

Asplenium Obtusilobum — 3 

Blechnum Occidentale 2J^ 4.00 35.00 

Rubrum 3 6.00 

Cyrtomium Falcatum 2l< 4 00 35.00 

Fortunei 2>4 4.00 35.00 

Caryotidium 2!* 5. CO 40.00 

Davallia Fijiensis Plumosa 3 15.00 

Stric a 2« . 4 00 35.00 

Dictyogramma Japonica 3 

Japonica Variegata 3 

DIckFonia Antarctica 2M 

Gymnogramma Sulphun-a 2>4 

For a full line of DECOKATIVE PLANTS and other SEASONABLE: STOCK see oar carrent QUARTERLY TRADE LIST, of which a 

copy will be mailed on applicattoni if you have f.iiled to receive one. 

Inif lta4l AM Florists attending the Convpution in Nfw York are cordially invited to visit our establishment at Riverton, N. .J. Our 
inVll9llUl1i re preventatives vpili be found in Coavention Hall, and will gladly give information as to the best way to reach Riverton. 

HENRY A. DREER, -•^.-t Philadephia, Pa. 

Please mention the Ametican Florist luhen writing. 



Dichotomum 

Microlepia Hispida 

Nephrolepis Peotinata 

Nephrodium Hertipes 

Niph ibolus Lingua 

Onychium Japonicum 

Platyloma Falcata 

Polypodium Aureum 

Polyttichum Coreaceum 

Setosum 

Plerif Adiantoides 

Argyrrt'a 

Cretica Albo Lineata. .. 

" Mayii 

" Magnifica 

" Wimsetti 

Drinkwaleri 

Hastata 

Interuata 

Leptophylla 

Ouvrardii 

Serruiata 

Voluta 

Sieboldi 

Palmata 

Sitolobiurn cicutarium. 

Selaginella Emiliana. .. 
MIXfD FERNS, our selection. 



pots 

2H 
2M 
2S< 

2« 

2'4 

4 

3 

3 

5 

2M 

4 

2H 
2H 
2H 

ZH 
2M 
2« 
2« 
2« 
2« 
2K 
2« 
2« 
2« 
2« 
2« 
2« 

2« 

2« 
2 

2y 
3 



Per 100 

$4.00 

4.00 

4.00 

4 00 

4.00 

6.00 

15.00 

10.00 

6.00 

15.00 

4.00 

16.00 

4 00 

5.00 

4.00 

6.00 

5.0O 

3 00 
3.50 
3.50 
6.00 
3.50 
4.00 

4 00 
3.50 
3.60 
3.60 
3.50 
3.00 
3.50 
3.50 
3.f0 
6.00 
3 50 
3.00 
6.00 



Per 1000 
$35.00 
35.00 
35.00 
35.00 
35.00 



36.00 

35.00 
40.00 
35.00 
50.00 
40.00 
25.00 
30.00 
30.00 
50.00 
35.00 
35.00 
35.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 
25.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30 00 

3d. 00 
i5.00 
50 00 



TU>.. «... P:«* N^ne belter. We 

I nOU QTQ ^inOl o«er i< unsold on 

I IICj (lie rillU; receipt of order. 

100 1000 

2100 Bridesmaid in4 -in. pots 14.00 .$35.00 

1000 " "3^4 " 4.00 35 00 

1720 " "3 " 3.00 25.00 

50O " "2 " 2.0) 20.00 

300 Brides "4 " 4.00 35.00 

200 •' "SK " 4 OO 35.00 

3600 '• "3 •' 3.00 25.00 

1200 •• "2 " 2.00 30.00 

3000 Meteors "3 " 2.50 26.00 



100 lOOO 
.500 Mme. Chatenay. ..in 4 -in. pots $4.00 
lOO " " ....'■2 " 2.00 

125 Mme. Cusine "4 " 3 50 

250 Lady Dorothea "4 " 4.00 

150 •■ " "Hi " 2 50 

2000 Golden Gate " 2)i '• 2 50 25.00 

700 Maid of Honor "4 " 3.00 

700 '■2X " 3 00 

500J Brides and Maids in 3 and 4-in pots. These 
are carded over stock; they are good. We 
offer them at 113.00 per 1000. 



Latania B-rbonica 3-in. pots, $12.00 per 100 

Areca Lutescens 4 " 20.00 

Cooos Weddeliana 3 " 12.00 

Asparagus Sprengeri! 6 " 25.00 •' 

...A '• 8.0U 

....3 " 6.00 

....2 " 3 00 '• 

Ficus Elastica. 6 in. pots 75c to $1.50 each. 

Boston Fern, 8-in. pots.... $25 f to $36.00 per 100 
Plan s are vigorous and unusually fine. Will be 
carf fuly packed, and we guarantee them to be right 
in everv respect 



LAKEVIEW ROSE GARDENS. JAMESTOWN. N. Y. 



Boston Ferns. 

LARGE STOC«. FINE PLANTS. 

Per 1002'.-inch, $4.00; 4- inch, 110.00; 6-inch. 125.00 

NEPHROLEPiS CORDATA COMPACTA. 

Per 10O2!^-inch $3.C0; 4-inch, J8.00. 

H. KADEN, Gainesville, Texas. 



Geranium 
America... 

$2.50 per doz. 



The QUEEN of 

all Geraniums 

Come and see. 
3000 plants in full 
bloom. Good, 
strong stock plants 
from 4-inch pots, 

$20.00 oer 100. 



HENRY EICnnOLZ, Florist, Waynesboro, Pa. 



Please mentuin the American Florist when wtiting Ptease mention the American Florist when writing. 



IN BEST 
..VARIETIES 



SPECIALTIES 

ROSES, from Mnoli poti. 

CARNATIONS, tor sU dellTerr. 
CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 
8MILAX. 

PnoMlow. Bend for Hit. VIOLETS. 

M/OOO BROTHERS. FISHKIUL. N. Y. 

Ptease mention the American Florist when writings 



150 



The American Florist. 



Aug. i?5 



St. Louis. 

WEATHER AND CROPS. — SOME GOOD ROSES 
OBTAINABLE. — THE TRADE ROSTER CUT 
DOWN. 

As far as has been reported, no com- 
ments worthy of note can be made 
regarding state of business this week. 
The thermometer still keeps well up to 
100° and we have had no rain for about 
four weeks. A drive through Forest 
Park on Sunday found the flower beds 
in very good condition in consideration 
of the weather, but the grass in many 
parts of the park is almost completely 
burned out. This is also the case with a 
large number of our city lawns. 

An occasional lot of vincas is seen 
among the retailers. Roses are in very 
bad shape but some good Kaiserins and 
Meteors are obtainable. Beauties are 
scarce and of course, with very small 
stems. Gladioli are about done for. 
Tuberoses hold up quite well, both in 
receipts and demand. The bulk of the 
carnations seen are scarcely worthy of 
their name, and asters are taken in pref- 
erence to them. 

A. Siegel, who previously occupied a 
stand in the WoUf- Wilson drug store, has 
vacated for the summer months. 

The Art Floral Company, located on 
Morgan street, near Taylor avenue, has 
gone out of business. M. 

Westerly, R. I. — S. J. Renter's plans 
include the erection of 20,000 feet of 
glass this season. 

Spencer, Mass. — A. W. Hoyle was 
held up by two highwaymen on the 
night of August -t. A man has been 
arrested in Charleston, charged with 
being the assailant and has been identi- 
fied by Mr. Hoyle. 

American Beauty Plants, 

riNE, CLEAN STOCK, rifn"? V.x^. 

Fnim \i to 1.5-iD. high $ 7.00 pt-r 100 

From 15 to20-in. high 10.00 per 100 

JOHN WAIZ, 523 Central Pk., Rochester, N. Y. 

WE STILL HAVE CViC>^€\t\ 
TO CLOSE OIT wllCdp 

2500 Maids. 2H-in.. 500 La France, 2H-in., 

1000 Perlet. a^-in., 1O0O Meteor*. 3-in., 

600 Am. Beauties, 2->2in., bOO Kaiserin, 2-in. 
Boston Ferns now reudy for 5 and 6.in i)ots. 

WRITE F..K phicks. Gbo. A. Kutil, Pekifl III. 

ROSES ^ 

CASH WITH (HtDEIt, TLEASE. 

ALBERT F. AMLIN6, Maywoid, III. 

3,000 Meteor Plants. 

;iV4-iiich pots per 100. 83.00; p«'r 1000. 
$35.00. Big. strouti and in prime condi- 
tion. Although the season is well advanced 
with these plants there is a reasonable 
i'hance of succesa. 

BRANT & NOE, Forest Glen, Chicago, III. 
ROSFS 'tIS?i.""^^"^ 

■ AV/WJL^VJ FROM 3-INCH POTS. 

American Beauty and Kaiserin Ifi.OOperlOO 

Perle and LaFrance 5.00 

Meteor, Albany. Sunset. Golden Gate, 

Bride, Bridesmaid. Wootton 4.00 •' 

Perle, Suiset. LaFrance, Bridp. 
Bridesmaid, Meteor. Kaiterin and 
Golden Gate, from 2- inch pots 2 50 " 

JOSEPH HEINL, Jacksonville, ill. 



a.iiitiA mtiiit iiiiiiituuumiitiiiAii>.A^.iA»limili.»i..iiiiiinniiiliitiHiltitiiilliitltitltitUie 



10,000 American Beauty Plants, f 

FINE STOCK, FROM 3-lN. POTS, 

$5.00 per J 00 ^ $40.00 per 1000. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Kalserln, 3-inch pots $4 00 $35.00 

Golden Date, 2y2-inch pots 4.00. 35.00 

Bridesmaid, Meteor, 3-inch pots 4 00 35.00 



150,000 Carnation Plants. 



Strong, healthy, field- grown plants ready for delivery 
the first week in September. Write for prices. 



PETER REINBER6, 



51 Wabash Ave., 

CHICAGO. 



TO CLOSE OUT. 



arrnmTTmTmrmTTmmmnmmnimmfmmTTmTTmmnTTTmTTmmTTmmmTTmTTnTis 

FIRST QUALITY FORGING ROSES. """""■ '""" 

Fulfy equal to those sent out the last eight years, flrstclass and perfectly healihv In every respect. 
Only eelected growth from flowerlnii: shoots used In propauatlog. 

AMERICAN BEAUTY, METEOR. KAISERIN. SAFRANO, BRIDESMAID, 

BON SILENE, PERLES, MAID OF HONOR, BRIDE. 

3-lnoh pots, J5 00 per 100. 4-lnch pots. $8 00 per 100. 

ODICTCn DnCCC Maid of Honor, Coldnn Gate, 3i.i-lncb pots, 115.00 per lon. 

UnAriCU nUoCo. Liberty, Much pots, $SOU per dozen, afty plants for $24.00. 

STRONG SELECT 3INGH ROSES. 

special price to sell. Strong.' emiueh to bloom soon. Will make you money. Per 100 Per 1000 

10,000 MAIDS and BRIDES $4.00 $35.00 

3,000 PERLES, 5.00 45.00 

*^'- This stoi'k is well worth %^ 00. We iiuanintee it to give satisfaction. 

W. H. GULLETT & SONS. Rose Growers. LINCOLN, ill. 

AHERICAN BB»UTY, four-ini-h, sel-cted. IflS.OO per 100. LIBERTY, four inch, 175.00 per lOO. 
MAID. BRIDE, PERLE, SUNSET, METEOR, MORQAN, MEKMET, LaFRANCE, NIPHETOS, 
KAISERIN, OOLUEN GATE, MAID OF HONOR, S-in.. J5.(X) p.-r lOU; S'j-in., $7.00; 4-in.. 18.00. 
GRAFTED BRIDE, HiJO.on per lOii. li-iiicli. MARIE LOUISE VIOLETS, from iVi and 3-inch pots, $2.50 
l,.»;iUOperUU; $J5.00 to JSO.O.l per lOOO. A. S. MacBEAN. LAKEWOOD, N. J. 



2V4-inch. 
Per 100 Per 1000 

Brides $3.00 (25.00 

Maids 3.00 25.00 

Cloth. Soupert... 3.00 25.00 

Meteor 3.00 26.00 

Am. Beauty 



3-inch. 
Per 100 Per 1000 
$5.00 $45.00 



5.00 
6.00 
8.00 



45.00 
45.00 
75.00 



NEW SEEDLING ROSE 

WINNIE DAVIS. 

This Kranil rose should be t:ro\vn by every 
florist as a pot plant, or for forcing, being a cross 
between Kaiserin Aug. Victoria and Belle Sie- 
breciht. Color, apricot pink, shading tn a Mesh 
tint; odor of a most del cious ripe Iruit. Shape 
being oblong and well formed, when fully open 
resembling a sunburst, which is most striking and 
beautiful. A very free and vigorous grower and 
bloomer. Colcr never changes in dar'C weather 
like most colored roses. Magnificent light green 
glossy foliage. Strong thrifty plants, 2i4-in. pots, 
$6.00 per do/.; $26.00 per 100. 

JASMINES. 

.Jasniinums: Maid of Orleans, Grand Duke, 
Grand iflora, Sambac or Arabian, Revolution, 
strong thrifty plants, 3-inch pots, J6 00 per 100. 

Address ^ANZ & NEUNER. 

582 Fourth Ave , IiOUIBVCI^I^E, KY. 

TO CLOSE OUT. 

603 tmerican Beauties 2yi-ln., $6 00 per 100, or 

$30.00 for the .SOO. 
2000 Kaiserin, 2000 Golden Gate, 2000 Bridesmaid, 

1000 Meteor, 500 Garrett, 600 liriUe, 500 Perle, 

500 Mermet, 3 and 3H-in., $3. GO per 100, or 

125.00 per 1000. 
These are Fine Plants. Cash With Order. 

MRS. J, W, CROUCH. Chattanooga, Tenn. A. G. PRINCE & CO ,76 & 78 Wabash Av.,Ch)cago. 
TELL THEM WHERE YOU SAW THE AD. 



Per 100 Per 1000 
Mixed Jardiniere Ferns, mostly 

pteris viirii'ties $3.00 $25.00 

Asparagus Sprengefii, 2y2-iu 4.00 36.00 

Plumosus, " 6.00 65.00 

Adiantum Farleyense, fine stock, e-in. pots, 50c each 

Per 100 

Smilax. 3-inch $4 00 

Dracaena Terminalis, 4-inch 15.00 

Phoenix Canariensis, elegant stock, 4M to 5- 

inch 20.00 

Chamaerops Excelsa, 6-inch 25.00 

4 " 20.00 

J. B. HEI55, 

DAYTON. O. 

Please mention the A merican Florist when wt ittng 

I^ose I*la.n.1:s, 

Firf*t. class, healttiy Plants To close out 
we quote trie following low prices: 

500 lie&uties 3-inoh, $4.00 per 100 

lOCO Perles S ' 3.00 

1000 Meteors 3 '• 3.00 

800 Bridesmaids 3 " 3.00 " 

400 Brides 3 " 3.00 



ipoo. 



The American Florist. 



161 




THE TRUE BOSTON FERN 

All our Boston Ferns are pot-grown, bushy plants, well fur- 
nished with fronds from the pot up, and cannot be compared 
with the cheap, long-drawn-up, lifted stock from the bench. 
A sample shipment will convince you of our superior stock. 

Runners from bench, short and stocky @ f .04 

.06 
.12 
.25 
.50 
.75 
1.00 
.@ 1.50 
.fni 2.00 to 12.50 
.fS', ,^.00 to ,5.50 
.(«> 4.00 to 5.00 



1\ inch pot plants. 

3 inch " " . 

4 inch " " ■ 

5 inch " " . 

6 inch pans " 

7 inch ■' " . 

8 inch " " . 
'I inch " " . 
inch " " . 
2 inch " " . 



.(Si 



Ficus Elastica, the Large-leaved Rubber 

We have a large stock of this popular plant and offer good 
value. Perdoz. Per lOO. 

5 inch pots, 18 inches high, perfect plants. . |5.00 |40.00 

6 " " 24 " " 9.00 60.00 

Asparagus Sprengerii 

lii inch, extra strong, per 100 f4.00 

,5" " " " " 5.00 

4 ■' " " " 8.00 

Asparagus Plumosus Nanus 

Extra choice stock, '11 inch pots, per 100 5.00 

3' " " " 8.00 

" " 4 " " " 12.00 



Wholesale Jobbing NEV^ 

Agents Dallidouze ^ . r» ., « -r I /-v M 
Brothers, CARNATION 



666 



Book 
Orders Now 



cmcftGo, 

84-86 Randolph St. 



VAUGHAN'S SEED STORE, 



INEW YORK. 
14 Barclay Street. 



CAREFULLY 
PACKED. 



Boston Ferns. 

FINE PLANTS 

From bench, ready for 6-in. pots, $3.00 per doz. 
From 2-iD. pots, $4.00 per 100. 

DAVIS BROTHERS, 

MORRISON. ILL. 

Please mention the American Florist when "friling. 

1500 N. Gordata Gompacta, 

In 2-in. Pots. Strong Plants, at 
$3.00 per Hundred. 

Ako Strong Plante from Bench, at 
$2.00 per Hundred, 

CHAS. SCHWEIGERT, Niles Center, III. 

ADIANTUM FARLEYENSE 

3-in. Pots, Ready for a Shift, 

^ao.oo r»©r loo. 

«M. W. EDGAR, Waverley, Mass. 

BOSTON FERN ..Ecr.LTv. 

L. 11. FOSTER, 45 King St., Dorcliester, Mass, 



PALMS 



FERNS 



Fine Stock, 



Prices to Please, 



Iiow Express Bates. 



PALMS 



No. of Inches Size of 
Leaves. High jar. 

Latania Borbonica 4 to 6 15tol8 6-inch 

Kentia Forsteriana 4 to 6 18 to 24 ti " 

3to4 18to20 5 " 

3to4 12tol8 4 " 

" Belmoreana 4 to 6 15 to 18 6 " 

e.viraflne .'i to 6 12 to 18 5 " 

3to4 121^)15 4 " 

An^ca Lutescens 3 to 5 18 to 24 6 " 

3to4 12tolb 4 '■ 

Phu-nix Canariensis 4 to 6 litolS 5 " 

2to4 10tol2 4 " 

Pandunus Utilis 15 to 18 6 " 

■' 10tol2 3 " 

Livistoua Rotundifolia 4 " 



FERNS.... 

Nephrolt'pis DavalUoiiles Furcans 7 to 



" Cordata Compacta. 
Adiantum Cuneatum 



Per 

doz. 

$fi.50 
8.50 
6.00 
4,00 

10.00 
7.50 
4.00 
5.00 
3.00 
5.00 
2., SO 
6 UO 
1.50" 
3.25 
5.00 



3.00 

1.00 

.70 

.65 



Per 
100. 
$60.00 
70.00 
50.00 
33.00 
90.00 
60.00 
35.00 
45.00 
28.00 
35.00 
20.00 
50.00 
10.00 
25.00 
40.00 



20.00 
10.00 
5 00 
5.00 



Soliciting a share of your patronage, 1 am. Yours respectfully. 



Bockford Seed Farms, 
Forest City Greenhonses. 



H. W. BUCKBEE, 



ROCKFORD, 
ILL.... 



If You Have Stock To Sell... 

the best way to make that fact known to the trade is by regtilar 
advertising in 
Give it a trial. 



...The American Florist. 



152 



The American Florist. 



Aug- 25, 



Providence. 

VETERAN FLORIST RETIRES IN FAVOR OF 
ONE WHO HAS GROWN UP IN THE BUSI- 
NESS. — VARIOUS NOTES. 

Walter S. Hogg has sold his business 
to Theo. R. Peterson, but the stand will 
still be known as The Hogg Greenhouses. 
Mr. Hogg has been in the business on 
Benefit street since the :?ear 1S66, and 
will be missed for his genial manner and 
kindly feeling toward the craft. Mr. 
Peterson, his successor, is a gentleman 
well liked and follows closely in his 
predecessor's wake. He has been with 
Mr. Hogg since he was a lad and has 
worked his way on to the proprietor- 
ship ol the business. 

Many growers have begun to house 
their carnations that they may receive a 
suHicient supply of water to invite 
growth. 

There are plenty of flowers except real 
good roses lor funeral work. Every- 
thing is burning up ior want of rain. 

Mr. Butcher is rebuilding two of his 
houses and making a general overhaul- 
ing. , 

The aster beetles have come to town and 
their annual banquet has begun. 

Timothy O'Connor is about again and 
attending to business as usual. 

Little Rhody. 



Merrimac, Mass. — L. Whittier, of 
Merrimacport, has purchased the green- 
house of Chas. Davis, who is soon to 
leave town. 

Dayton. O.— Mr. Matthews, of the 
Dayton Floral Co., says the prospects 
for fall warrant him in adding two new 
houses and installing another boiler. 

Good Strong Stock. 

I'er 100 

5,000 Mixed Geraniums 2J4 '."•■* '-^ 

2,000 Named GiTaaiums .as^i ' •• --00 

5,000 Chinese Primroses, white, red, 

pink and blue ~\i ^^ ■ -"U 

2 000 Begonias, mix 3d 2X " .. 1.50 

1,000 Red Vernon V4. ■■ -50 

l.OOOErtordi 2H ,, •• 1-50 

1,000 Asparagus Sprengem. ........ .3 .. e IH) 

500 Nice Rex Begonias, mixed.. ..4 .. 10.110 

Calla Bulbs 1V4 ;; .■ <00 

Mixed Ferns, strong plants .4 .. 10. UU 

Tansy Sei-d, Giant and Fancy mixi'd, per nz. 4.0U 

The Morris Floral Co., 

Pleaic mention the Americ an Floriit when luttthi!;- 

Asparagus Plumosus Nanus. 

TRANSPLANTED seedling plants for July and 
August delivery, ready for 2V4-in. pots, at 
Ki.OO per 100, J25.(i0 per 1000; 500 at thousand 
rates, (tree delivery). 

Cash With Obdkr, Plkase. 

R. ASMUS, M ew Durham, M. J. 

FLORISTS' ORCHIDS 

The Finest and Largest Stock 

in the world. 

C AUnFD ST. ALBANS, ENGLAND and 
oAIiUlK BRUGES, BELGIUM. 

Send for List of Commercial Varieties. 

A. DIMMOCK, Agent, 60 Ve8ey St., N. Y. 

BIG BARGAIN. 20,COO Marie Louise; 
5,000 Swanley White, not a blemish of 
disease, grand plants, $l5 per 1000. 

LINDSAY, The Florist, 

BIRMINGHAM. ALA. 



100,000 Carnation Plants. 



WHITE VARIETIES 

Flor.T Hill $5 00 per 100 

White Cloud 7 00 

Evi-lina 6.00 

Lizzie McGowan . 4.00 

Mary Wood 4 00 

John \'oung .'i.OO 

YELLOW VARIETIES 

Eldorado 4.00 

M;ivor Pingree — 5.00 " 



PINK VARIETIES 

Daybreak 4.00 per 100 

Mrs. P Joost 5.0O 

Albertina 5.00 

Argyle 5.00 

Triumpli 5. (JO 

CRIMSON VARIETIES 

Gen. Gomez 8.00 

Empress 5.00 



RED VARIETIES 

G. H. Crane 8.00 per ICO 

.lull lee li.OU 

lion Ton 5,00 

YELLOW VARIFQ^TED 

.Manila 5 OO 

VARIEGATED VARIETIES 

Helen Keller 5,rin 

Annaz ndy 5.00 " 



JVI'y 



/ WOULD BE PLEASED 10 RECEIVE YOUR ORDER. 



Rockford Seed Farmg, 
Forest City Greenhouses, 



H. W. BUGKBEE, ^ 



ROCKFORD, 



25,000 Carnations 25,000 



FIELD GROWN PLANTS OF THE FOLLOWING VARIETIES : 



! 



15,000 
4,000 
1000 
1,000 
1.000 



Flora Hill % 5.00 per 100 

White Cloud 8.00 

Mrs. Bradt 10.00 

G. H, Crane 10 00 

McGowan 4.00 " 



2,000 Eldorado 4.00 per 100 

1,000 Wm. Scott 4,00 

1.000 Daybreak 5.00 

500 Emily Pierson 4. CO " 



These Plants are all in first-class condition, Kood size and healthy stock. 
Write me if you are In need of a large quantity. 

CHAS. CHADWICK, tocfcB..ii. Grand Rapids, Mich. 



CARNATION PLANTS FOR SALE. 

25,coo Carnations at |3. 50 to $5 00 per 103; $28 to |3S.oo per lOOO Flora Hill, McGowan, 
White Daybreak, Scott, Cerese Queen, Victor, Eldorado and others. 

STEAIVl PIPE WANTED. 

1 will take in exchange for Carnation Plants, 800 to 1200 feet of 1-inch to 3-inch, and 
150 feet of 4-inch new or second-hand Steam Pipe. State price and condition. 

W. H. WATSON. Lapeer, Michigan. 



Herr's = = 
Pansies 



ALWAYS 

THE 

BEST 

AND 

BETTER 

EVERY 

YEAR. 



They sell themselves. Try 100 as an experiuient. 
Plants only, and ready October 1st to January 1st. 

FuEE BY Mail, 

75c per 100, 250 for $1.50; 500 for $2.50. 
By Express at Your Expense, $4 per 1000. 



PANSIES 

THE JENNINGS STRAIN of Show and Fancy Pansies. 
New Crop Seed Now Ready. 

My 1900 strain is of the highest standard and can- 
not iDe excelled by any. Finest mixed. 2.500 seeds, 
(1.00; Vi-oz,, $2..50: oz., 1,5.00. Yellow, white, blue 
and black, in seperate colors, 50c per pkt., post- 
paid by mail. Small Pansy Plants, 60c per 100 by 
mail. Cash with order. 

L. D. JlNNINuSi The Floeet FausieB, 



Lock Box 254. 



SOUTHPORT, CONN. 



ALBERT M. HERR Pansy Plants, 

I A Mr* ACTED DA •' 



LANCASTER. PA. 



Marie Louise Violets 

CLEAN, HEALTHY. POT GROWN PLANTS, 

$4 00 per 100 J- $30.00 per 1000 
L. I. MAY & COMPANY. ST. PAll. MINN. 
STRONG FIELD-GROWN PLANTS OF 

FarQiinar vioieis. 

Free from disease of any kind. 
$6.00 per 100; JM.OO piT 1000. 

JOHN McFARLAND, North Easton, Mass. \ crabb & hunter, Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Please mention the American Florist to our advertisers. 



^ ROEMER'S SUPERB PRIZE ^ 
■^ STRAIN, READY SEPT. 15. "^ 

Per 100,6!ie; per2ij0, $I..SO; per 500, «2.2r). l-'ree by 

mail, liv expres-^i, 2000 for $7,00, 3000 

foril0,00. Cash will] order. 

SEED ALL SOLD. 

PETER BROWN, Lancaster, Pa. 

Qrower of the Finest Pansies. 

XTT/\T X'fC! l''rom pots, Al stock, free 
V XVXlXlXO from disease; Ladv Camp- 
hell, M, Louise and Faniuhar, »2.fS0 per lOO, ji20 
I)er 1000. New Imperial, »3 per 100, 12.^ per 1000. 
3-inch, $4 per 100 »:i5 per 1000; Imperial, ?f> per 
100; $15 per 1000, Field-grown same rates. 
ROSES, line plants of Meieor and Perle. from 3-in. 
pots, at $3 per 100, or $;J.i per 1000; also 3-inch 
Uridts aTid Maids same price. 



rgoo. 



The American Florist. 



153 



Is^field Grown Carnations I 



4000 

2400 

250 

2000 

200 

800 

5000 

250 

5000 

7000 

8000 

900 



GENEVIEVE LORD - 

CHICAGO 

MRS. JAS. DEAN 

GEN. MACEO 

GEN. GOMEZ - 

JOHN YOUNG 

MRS. FRANCES JOOST 

ARGYLE 

ARMAZINDY 

EVELINA 

\A^ILLIAM SCOTT 

FLORA HILL 



^er 100 


Per 1000 


$10.00 


$75.00 


7-50 


60.00 


5.00 




8.00 


60.00 


8.00 




6.00 


50.00 


5.00 


40.00 


4.00 




4.00 


30.00 


4.00 


30.00 


4.00 


30 00 


4.00 


30.00 



"mi 



Blooms of all leading varieties, including Mrs. Thos. W. Lawson and The 

Marquis, unlimited quantity, shipped direct 

after September 15. 

CASH MUST ACCOMPANY ORDER. 

CHICAGO CARNATION CO.. jolietill. 



2ML0 CARNATIONS ^im 

EXTRA FINE, FIELD CROWN. 

P.r 100 

FLOR.V HILL t 5.00 

WHITE CLOUD 6.00 

DAYHKEAK 4 00 

\VM. SCOTT 4 00 

MARQULS 12.00 

G. H. CRANE 8. CO 

GEN. GOMEZ 8 00 

MRS. URAUT 8 00 

GOLD NUGGET 6.0O 

TRIUMPH 4.00 

VICTOR 4.00 

W. A. WETTLIN. HornellsvHIe, N. Y. 

CELERY AND CABBAGE. 

CELERY. Pink Plume and New Rosi- (extra 
stroiig). Giant Pascal, Boston Market, White 
Plume and other varieties, 15c per 100, jl.OO per 
1000, »8.50 per 10,000. 

CABBAGE H. Succession, Second Early, 
Premium Flat Dutch. Late Drumhead. Drumhead 
Savoy and other varieties, 15c per 100, $1.00 per 
1000, 18.50 per 10.000. 

KALE. Dwarf, Green, Curled, Scotch, same 
price as Cabbage. If any of the above plants by 
mail, add 10c per 100. 

Cash With Obdeb. 

R. VINCENT, Jr., & SON, White Marsh, Md. 

JUr CARNATIONS 

WITH PLENTY OF ROOTS. 

Send for prices of thirty-five best new 
and standard varieties. 

BEO. HANCOCK & SON, 



<3irK*«fcZlcl 



[ci.'vexi* 



A nBQI^B III I have a few hundred field 
DAllUAIIIi HrowD carnation pUuts At 
Snap Bargain. For prices and varieties uddress 
W J. MILLER. 403 E. Water St., PONTIAC, ILL. 



GENEVIEVE 
..LORD.. 



A NOTHER year's trial convinces us that it is 
** not only a worthy succp^sor to Win Scott, 
but far superior to that variety in every way. In 
short it is ihe finest pink Cariiati<m to date, nil 
tliini^s cons di-red. We offer a limitHd numbpf oi" 
field grown plants as follows: First iiz4. $12.00 
per 100: second size. $10.00 per 100. Also a few 
other vars. Write for pric<'S, etc Delivery Sept. I. 

It. WEBER & SONS, Oakland. Md. 



FIELD 
GROWN 



CARNATIONS 

Daybreak, Mc'iowan, .Scott, Flora Hill. .lubilei'. 
Crane, etc. Write for prices. Healthy plants. 

«,,, 1,,_. Xutt, Favorite, lieaute Poitevine.dbl. 

DelaniUniS Grant, c-tc, 2!4-in. pots, .$3 50 per lOO. 

RICHARD INSALL, West Moorestown, N. J. 

FIELD CARNATIONS. 

strong. Clean and Healthy Plants 
at Low Prices. 

Daybreak, Scott, Triumph, Empress, Jubilee, 
Pingree, Hill, at J5.00 per 100, $40.00 per 1000. 

Marv Wo"d and White Cloud, at $6 00 ptT 100- 
$50.00 per lOOO. 

LAWPRECHT BROS., A«hland, O. 

FIELD GROWN 

CARNATIONS 

Want 450 I-i/.zie McGowan in exchange 
for Daybreak, Flora Hill. Genesseeor Por- 
tia. Above for sale, with Tidal Wave and 
Silver Spray. 

GEO. SOUSTER. elgin. ill. 



CARNATIONS. 

Field Grown Plants. 



F. DORNER & SONS CO., 

LA FAYETTE, IND. 

Send for Price List. 



5,000 



FIELD GROWN 
CARNATIONS. 

We have the following varieties in excellent 
shape for shipment: Pin<.'ree, Triumph, Evelina, 
Flora Hill, America, Gold Nutjget, .J. A. Newby, 
Mclturney, Armazindy, Crane, liradt, !>:iybreaK, 
etc. Write for prices* before placint; \ our order. 

W. W. COLES, Kokomo, Ind. 



WM. MURPHY 

Wholesale Carnation Grower 

station F, CINaNNAII, OHIO. 



For Sale Field Carnations 

300 ETHEL CROCKER, fine large plants, at 
.$10 00 per 100. Als.. 200 ARGYLE and 200 FLORA 
HILL, at $3.00 per 100. Address 

E. F. OVERMAN, Wabash, Ind. 

A good adv. in a good paper will bring 
good retnmt, 



164 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 25, 



A Saturday Show at Boston. 

The exliibition of the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society, on Saturday, 
August IS, was of sufScient extent and 
importance to be located in the larger 
upper hall, lower Horticultural Hall 
being assigned for the exclusive use of 
the exhibits of fungus by the Micological 
Society, which, by the way, seemed to 
attract nearly as many admirers as did 
the flowers and fruits. It was the special 
day for aquatic flowers and the disiilay 
of nymphaeas, nelumbiums, sedges, papy- 
rus, etc., from Oakes Ames, R. M. Grey, 
gardener, was exceedingly beautiful. 
Superb specimens of the lace plant, 
Ouvirandra fenestralis, were shown by 
E. S. Converse, D. F. Roy, gardener, and 
Mrs. J. L. Gardner, Wm. Thatcher, gar- 
dener. Mr. Roy also showed a fine plant 
of Cabomba aqnatica. Asters were also 
a specialty, being staged in large num- 
bers. Those shown by Mrs. J. L. Gard- 
ner were remarkable for their variety of 
color and uniformity. N. F. Comley and 
E. S. Converse were also well represented. 
J. Warren Clark won first, prize as in for- 
mer years, in all the gladiolus classes but 
was pushed pretty close by a new com- 
petitor, E. J. Shayler, who showed some 
decidedly novel colors, among which 
were several striking hybrid seedlings of 
G. papileo major. Paul R. Blackmur 
also had a number of the newest Nancea- 
nus varieties on exhibition. John Lewis 
Childs filled a long table with named 
varieties of Gladiolus Childsii and received 
honorable mention for Tritoma Pfitzeri. 
Phloxes from Geo. Hollis and dahlias 
from W. C. Winter wereol the usual high 
quality produced by these well known 
specialists and the Blue Hill Nursery 
again staged a magnificent lot of hardy 
herbaceous flowers. Three seedling can- 
nas from Wm. Stone were favorably com- 
mented upon for their rich colors. 

Bloomington, III.— W. T. Hempstead 
reports business lair since the recent 
great fire and thinks that the million- 
dollar loss will have no very disastrous 
effect on trade next winter. 

BOSTON FERN. 

SM-iQ- pots, 45.00 per 100; 3-in. 18.00 per 100. 

We will have an extra 

fine lot of field plants 

for winter forcing. 

The CONARD & JONES COMPANY, 

Beauties. Sprengerii. 

«M. BEAUTY ROSES. Knod, 3-incli, JO.OO 

per 10(1. 
ASPARAGUS SPRENGERII. strong plants, 

ready tor 3-incli pots, $5.00 per 100, 14.5.00 

per 1000. 

Robert r. Tesson, ^XurMr"" 

CClGI^y FISjULS. planted Hants 

20c nlOO. $1 50 a 1000; by mail 10 piTcentmori'. VV. 
I'luroe, G. Pasi;al, Ti. Market, Golden .S. BlanclilnK 
iind Dwarf Red. Write for price un large lots. 
1)0 not confound these plants with cheap ones 
p\illed up where they were sown. Try some of 
ours and see the difference. Good seedlings, 2-in. 
hiKlc, i5c ii 1000. Cash Please. Saniph-s 10c. 

R. KILBOURN. Clinlon. N. Y. 



Crimson Rambler, 






ROBT. CRAIG & SON 

Roses, Palms f 

S and Novelties in Decorative Plants. 

4 Marketand 49th Street, PHILADELPHIA PA. 



♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

160,000 

♦ FIELD-GROWN 

Carnation Plants I 

^ Argyle, Flora Hill, % 

PIngree, Triumph, ♦ 

Tidal Wave, Scott, X 

Evelina, McGowan, * 

Gold Nugget, Artnazindy, « 

I'er 100 $3.50; per 1000 J30.00. 

X ROSE PLANTS. 

▼ oninFCUAin I From 2y« and 3-in. pots, 
i bKIUtSMAlU >■ p,.r 100,13.00; 1000, $25.00. 

i BRIDE J 

X AMERICAN BEAUTY, 3-inoh pots, per 100, 
X $5.00; per lOOO, $45.00. 

I GEORGE REINBERG, 

t 51 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO, ^ 

Per too 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS NANUS, 

Fine younc; plauts $5.00 

BEGONIA REX. 

strong, 3-inch pot plants, in good assort- 
ment 6.00 

CYPERUS ALTERNIFOLIUS, 

2Ji-iuch pDts 3.00 

CYCLAMEN, 

Drv bulbs, finest strain, mixed fi.OO 

CAREX JAPONICA VARIEGATA, 

An excellent docorative grass. Kstra 
strong plants from 2^ pots 5.00 

NEPHROLEPIS CORDIFOLIA, 

2U-in<'h pots 3.00 

SMILAX, Fii-hl-Brown, stroiiK clumps 3.00 

E.\tra heavy 5.00 

NATHAN SMITH &, SON, Adrian Mich. 

Die Bindeitunst 

Einzige Special Zeitschrift der 

Welt fur BLUMENBINDEREI. 

Probcnutnmern umsonst. 
Abonnement 10 M. jahrlich. 

J. OLBERTZ, BIndekunst Verlag, 

ERFURT, DEUTSCHLAND. 

I™ Regan Printing House 

NLRSERY 

SEED 

FLORISTS 



CATALOGUES 



87-91 Plymooth Place, 

QARDENINQ 

This 1b the paper to recommend to your 
oustomers, the leading horticultural 

Journal in America for amateurs 

•2»00 Per Year. Sample Copies Free. 

Liberal termj to florlBts who take Bubsorlptloni. 

THE GARDENING CO. 1*0221^!^ CHICA60. 

An advertiser feels better when he 
knows he is getting direct returns for his 
money. Mention the Ambbican Florist. 



flower Seeds. 

Oloxinia, Vaughan's Mixture. 

This mixture is nmd<' np by ourselves from the 
choicest spottt'd. tigered, edged, mar)>led and 
splashed sorts of the uprii;ht. and horizontal typf. 
Trade pkt., loOO se.-ds, 50c; 3 pkMs for $1.25. 
Asparagus Sprengerii, 60c per 100; $4.50 per 1000 

steeds. 
Smliax, new crop, trade pkt., 10c; oz., 30c. 

Chater's Prize Hollyhocks. 

Our seed of this has been saved from the finest 
and largest double Mowers only and will produce 
(lowers extremely double and in the best, bright- 
est and most distinct colors. 

Sow now 
Double Pure White, '4 o/... 25c; 1 07.., $1.00; trade 

pkt, 10<-. 
Double Yellow, Pink, Purple, Red, Roie, Salmon, 

Crimson, each, '4 oz., 25<'; 1 o/.., 75c; trade 

pkt., 10c. 
Chalet's Prize Hollyhock!, double mixed, !i oz., 

25c; 1 o/.., $1.00; trade pkt., 10c. 

Bellis, or Double Daisy. 

Mammoth Mixed and Mammoth White, each, trade 

pkt.. 25c; l-l()-oz., 50c. 
Snowball, double white; LongleMow, double pink; 

each, trade pkt., 15".'. 
Forget-Me-Not, Victoria, trade pkt., 10c; per a oz., 

2.=>c. 

Cyclamen, Qiant Flowered. 

We have an extra fine strain of this grand 
market plant. Unsurpassed for size of bloom and 
variety of colors. 250 seeds at 1000 rate 

100 1000 

seeds, seeds. 

Mont Blanc, pure white $ .75 $5.00 

Deep Crimson, very large 75 5.00 

Rosa von Marienthal, pink 75 5.00 

White, Carmine Eye 7.t 5.00 

Giant Flowered Sorts, best mixed, 

!» oz., JL.'iO .SO 4.50 

10 per rent apecial cash discount ou orders 

over Sl'^ for Flower Seeds if the 

cash is enclosed. 

Vaughan's Seed Store, 

CHICAGO, NEW YORK, 

84-86 Randolph St. 14 Barclay St. 



raster Time 

via the WABASH 



CONTINENTAL L^^ai'^Z?^': 

T TlV/m^'Pri ited leavesChicajio at 12:40 
1-*11V11 1 m A J uoon. and arrives New 
York 3:15 und Boston 5:20 the following after- 
noon. Through sleepers to both points. 



TYTAT5 AOTT Spend the evening at 



home or at the theatre, 



MIDNIGHT FLYER ^^.ica^o 
TO ST. LOUIS lV,'Z'-rn 

St. Louis before 8:00 o'cloclc next morning. 
Try this popular train. 



CITY TICKET OFPICE. 

97 Adams Street, CHICAQO. 



Gardeners' Chronicle. 

A Weekly Illustrated Journal. 

B8TABLISHID ISU. 

The "GABDBNBBB' CIIKONICLB" has been »0B 
GTBB niTT YBAKS THB LIADING JOURNAL Of lU 

olftH. It has aohleved thli poiltlon beosnse, while 
ipeolallr devotlnR Itself to sapplylnRthe dally reqnlre- 
mentl of Kardenera of all olasses, mnob of the fnfor- 
matlon furnished Is of sooh general and permanent 
T»lne, that the OAHDBNBBS' CUKOlSlCLH" II 
looked np to as the standard actthobitt on ttat 
■abjeots of which It treata. 

Bubsorlption to the United autat, M. 90 per nu 
Bamlttanoei to be made payable to B. (3. COvB. 

OrnoBi— 
41 Walllngton SI., Cs«*n Oardan, London, England. 



fgoo. 



The American Florist. 



155 



For 

Immediate 
Shipment. 



XXX stock 

CYCLAMEN PERSICUM SPLENDENS GIGANTEUM- 

Finest strain in the world, in four \t\iv colofN; 

11 splendid stock of plants fmm 2V4-in. pots, 

15.00 per 100. 140.00 per 1000; from 3-in. pots, 

$7.00 per ICO. $60.00 per 1000. 
CHINESE PRIMROSES— ( fringed ) ainsle and 

double, in the finest marl^et varieties; from 2M- 

in. pots, »?.50 per 100. 
BE60NIA REX— (rooted cuttings) in 15 vars. mixed, 

81. 50; assorted, $3.00 per 100. 
CINERARIAS— hyb. ra:iximagrandi flora nana, from 

Hats, $1.50 per 100; from 2!.4in. pots, $2.50 per 100, 

$20.00 per 1000. 
CARNATIONS— (fleUl grown) strong, healthy plants; 

Daybreak, Wui. Seott. McGowan, White Cloud, 

first size $4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000; second 

size $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000. 
260 plants of any of tlie above at the 1000 rate. 
ALL STOCK GUARANTEED A No. I. 

PAUL MADER, East Stroudsburg, Pa. 

100,000 FERNS 
IN PLATS 

At One Cent. 

Good, hardy phtnts in flats, twelve best 
market sorts. If potted now in small 
pots worth five times the money in a woeic 
or two. Safe arrival guaranteed, and 
liberal count. 

$10 per 1000 by Express. Sample 
100 Mailed for $1.25. 

Pteris Cretica Alba, P. Tremula, P. Sul- 
cata, P. Hastata, P. Adiantoides, P. 
Longifolia. Adiantum, Lomaria, Lygo- 
dium, Nephrodium, Cristatum, Blechnuro, 
Selaginellas, etc., etc. Post orders Wash- 
ington. 

JOHN H. LEY, Good Hope, P. C. 

Orchids ! ^ 

Arrived fresh from the woods in fine condition: 
Lselia anceps, L. autumnalis. L. Crispa. L. flava, 
L. grandis tenebrosa, L. Perrinii, Oncidium Vari- 
coium Rogenii, Cattleya Percivalliana and C. 
Mossiae. 

LAGER & HURRELL, ^^*"t- ^- -»• 

Orchid Qrow.ri and Importers. 

I«0'VE5 UNTIES IN fJUA.IVTS 

That Can't Be Had Elsewhere. 

Buch as New Kalanchoo Flammea. New Incarvllleaa, 
NewCampanulaMlraWhB, New Buddlelss, New Deui- 
zlas. Mr Hater Barr b New White Lupin, The Grand 
New Salvia Glory of Stuttgart, The KdelwelBs in 
bloom, New Buelllas, New HlblscuB, New Begonias. 
New CannsB, 200 New Dahlias, New Treasure Vine, 
New Shamrock Pea Send for Catalogue of Novelties 
Alws;s In qoantlty— Aspnragas Sprengerl, Boston 
Fern. Baby Primrose, Edelweiss, Fern ualla, at low- 
est prices. 

A. BLANC & CO., FhiladelpMa, Fa. 



VINCA.... 
VARIEGATA 
VINES 



For FaU 
Delivery J* 

Two Sizes. 

Prices on 
Application. 



FIELD GROWN. 
WM. A. CLARK «■ SON. 69 State St.. Watertown. N. Y. 

BOSTON FERN, 7 and 8-in. pans 112 and JI5 per doz. 
GERANIUMS, S.'A. Nutt and others, 3-in.. $4 per 100. 
NEP. COROATA COMPACTA, 3 in , $5.00 per 100; 6- 

in., JM.OO per 100. 
ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS, 2V4-in., J5 per 100, $40 

per 1000. ASPARAGUS SPRENGERII. 2/,-inch, 

$4.00 per 100; 130 00 per lOOO. 
SMILAX, transplanted, heavy, 50c per 100. 



Cash Please. 



Carl Hagenburger, 



^V. Mentor 
niilo. 



BEGONIA GLOIRE DE LORRAINE 

plants from 2-inch pots, 

$2,50 per dozen; $17.50 per hundred. 

Money Order Office, EDWIN LONSUALC, 

Chettnut Hill, Wyndmoor. 

Sta. H, Philadelphia. Montgomery Co., Pa. 



• WW .,-^-i -■,__. Pinest Quality. 
mTM-KJ M.M.^r • Any Quantity. 

Write us for prices delivered at your door. 

CALDWELL The WOODSMAN CO. Inc., Evergreen. Ala. 



NEW M:«vmamaUa OAnrI MAY'S 



CROP 



Mignonette Seed. 



GIANT 



(GrsClSEJVMOUSE; CiI«OW-lV.) 

A special strain of this well-known variety, grown and selected for us by an expert florist. 

The seed is saved from only perfect spikes all grown under glass. 

PRICE, 25C per trade pkt.: $1.00 per M ounce; $1.75 per ounce. 

ENGLISH MUSHROOM SPAWN. i)#"New Importation Just Raceivod.-'et 

Price, per pound, 15c.; 10 lbs. $1.00; 2!i lbs. $3.00; 100 lbs. $7.50. Special prices on larger lots. 

FRENCH MUSHROOM SPAWN.— Put up in boxes of 3 lbs. each. Price, per box, 75o. If by mail, $1.00. 
The same loose, per lb. 35c.; by mail 45(^ 

VAUGHAN'S SEED STORE, .„,o..: 

14 Barclay Street. 



CHICAGO 
84-86 Randolph Street 




ASSORTED TERNS, 

In flats, ready for potting, $J.OO per Hat, 

BOSTON TERNS, 

Ready tor 3-in. pots, $6.00 per 100; 4-in., 
S15.00 per 100; 5-6-in.. »20.00- .$25.00 per 100. 
Also fine plants in 5-6-in. pots, now ready 
for a shift, in pans or large pots, 135 00 per 
100. $4 50 per doz. This is exceptionally 
good value. 

Asparagus Plumosus Nanui, 3-iD., extra 
Hue. $8.00 per 100. 

Asparagus Sprengerii. 2-in., $6.00 per 100. 

Kentia Belmoreana. 2',;-in. pots, $10.00 per 
100: 4-inoh, $40.00 per 100. Large plants, 
$1.50, $1.75, $3.00, $2.50, $3 00, up to $5.00. 

Send for Particulars. 

BOBBINK & ATKINS 

i RUTnERfORD, N. J. 

BOSTON FERNS 
...A SPECIALTY. 

N. EXALT ATA BOSTONIENSIS, small plants, 
$5.00 per 100 or $40.00 per thousand; large plants, 
$6.00 to $iO 00 per hundred; taken from the bench. 

ARAUCARIA EXCELSA. 14 to 16-in high, 4 to 
5 tiers, 6-in. pols, $1.U0 and $1.25 eucli; 20 to 24-in. 
high. 5 to 6 tiers, 6-in. pots, $I.5U each. Larger 
size $2.00 and $2.50 each. 

RUBBER PLANTS, 12 to 15-in. high, $4.00 per 
doz. ; 20 to 24-in. high, $6.00 per doz. 

WM.A. BOCK, N. Cambridge, Mass. 

Unknown correspondents will sfiid cash with 
orders. Connected with Telephone. 

JOSEPH HEACOCK, 

WYNCOTE. PA. 

ARECA LITESCENS, 
KEMIA BELMOREANA, 
PHOENIX RIPICOLA. 

Asparagus Plumosus 

Fine 3-in. Stock, $5.00 per hundred. 

==SmUax== 



GROWtR 
...Of... 



CASH 
WITH 

Fine 3-in. Stock, $2.60 per hundred. pleASE. 

VAN WERT OREENHOISES, 

VAN WERT, OHIO. 



Edward B. Jackson, 

WHOLESALE FLORIST. 



Hardy Herbaceous Plants Only. 

In any quantity, for the least money. 

STAMFORD. - CONN. 



Sago Palmsl 

Fine Plants in all sizes. Well 
grown, and perfect leaves. One of 
the best summer and fall plants for 
retailiag. They run from five to 
twelve leaves, in small size pots 
that can be shifted and save freight 



5 to 
7 to 
9 10 


7 leaves, 
9 leaves, 
12 Itaves, 


$ 6.00 per dozen. 
9.00 per Dozen. 
15 00 per dozen. 



Can be sent safely by freight. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. 

Cyperus Alternifolius, 

3-inch, tine well-grown. |5 per 100. 

Jasmine Grandiflora, 

Ve'y fine for cut llowers— always 
in bioom— 4-in. pots, strong plants, 
81.50 per dozen. 

Ficus Elastica, X^ltin 

pots, 314 to 4 feet high, $1.00 each. 

Latania Borbonica,^;": 

stock with character leaves, l8-in. high, 
818 per luO, i^eed shifting to 5 or 6-inch. 

Cash With Orijer, Pleabe. 

CRITCH ELL'S, 

W CINCINNATI, O. 

Sggggggggggggggg 

Hease mention the Aynerican Florist when wrtting. 

Continued to Sept. 1st. 

100,000 nipnts for sale at half 
Drice and leas to make room. 

Roses— 20,000 strictly Al plants. 3i4 and 4-in. 
(big fellows). Bride, Perle, Meteor, Maid and 
Golden Gate, only 4c: worth lOc. The same in 3H 
and 3-in., only 3c; cheap at 6c. 

Smilax— 15.000 double e.\tra, guaranteed as good 
as you ever planted. $1.00 per 100, 810.00 per 1000; 
us many as you want. 

Geraniums— 10,000 Bruanti (dbl. scarlet) and S. 
A. Nutt, the two best selling Geraniums of the 
agf: Rose Geraniums and 10,000 other leading 
bedders; strong 2i4 and 3-in., only 81. .50 per 100. 
Bear in mind this is only th»' price of Rooted Cut- 
tings, and you can't buy tht'in for double that in 
a month. 

Dbl. Fringed Petunias and Coleus — In superb 
collection. Ageratum Princess Pauline and 
White Lady, only Ic. 

Fuchsias— Strong 4-in. , 81.00 per doz. ; 2 and 214- 
in., 81.50 per 100. 

Calle Bulbs— Strong 8 and 10c size for 5c. 
Cash With Order. 

SOUTH SIDE riORAL CO., Springfield, III. 

Asparaps Sprengerii. 

3-inch, strong $5.00 per 100 

2-inch, strong 3.00 per 100 

From flats 2.00 per 100 

M. J. COVENTRY, Ft. Scott, Kans. 



156 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 25, 



Browallia Spcciosa Major. 

This plant is known to a good many 
gardeners. It thrives in an intermediate 
house during the winter months, and 
cuttings struck in heat in April, when 
they strike freely, grow best during the 
summer months in the greenhouse or a 
cold frame. The plant is liable to infes- 
tation by thrips when grown on dry 
stages, and at this season (July) it should 
be frequently syringed and the shoots 
topped. There are but few flowers which 
give us such bright blue color in the win- 
ter season, and for this reason the plant 
is a useful one. — Gardeners' Chronicle. 



Iron Mountain, Mich.— C. B. Whit- 
nall, of Milwaukee, Wis., has an order to 
submit plans for a .'iO-acre cemetery. 
Two parks are also under consideration. 
The natural beauty of the country will 
aid much to make these very attractive. 

Boston Florist Letter GOi 

aLiNTTACTURBRS OP 

FLORISTS' LETTERS. 



This wooden box nicely statned aod vai> 
niBhed, 18x30x12 made in two sectionsi one 
for each 8lze letter, glyen away with first 
order of 500 letters. 

Block Letters. 1 ^^ or 2-lnch elze. per 100, f2.00. 
Script Letters. $4. Fastener with each letter or word. 
tJaed by leading fiortstB everywhere and for »&le by 
Ml wholesale flurlBts and supply dealers. 

N. F. McCarthy, Trcas. and Mana^fef^ 
84 Hawley St., BOSTON, JJMASS^ 

"'"patent Adjustable Vase Holders 

No. 1 —Brass, nlckled, i feet Iohk. H clasps to each rod. 
Price complete (with preen or white tumblers) 12.23 
Price complete (with ifreen or white cornucopia vases) 
12 60. No. 2.~Ueavy 4 ft. rod brassed and nickelud. 
with three clasps for 5 to frln pots. each. 11.76 

Klft's patent rubber capped Flower Tubes, ^-tn. 
diameter, per lUO. 13 50. 

ROBERT KIFT, Florist, 
172K OiMtnnt «t. Plillad«*lphla. P#»nn. 

SiGMUND (jELLER 

Importer and Mir. ol 

Florists' Supplies 

Complete Stock - New Goods New Illustrated 

Catalogue Now Reaoy. bend for it. 
108 W. 2Btn St , near6th Av.. NEW YORK. 

Imported Prepared 

GYGAS LEAVES 

LOWEST PRICES 

RECEIVING REGULAR SHIPMENTS, 

Florida Natural Products Co , 

1*. O. Kox '^1:',, liidi^uHpoliN, liid. 

Universal InsecticidB 

For Flowerfli Trees 
and Anliuiklfl. 

Recommended and in aie 
by the foremost floriati and 
nurserymen in the land. 
For Sale at the Seed Stores. 

ROSE MFG. GO. 

NIAGARA FALLS. N. Y. 




I PURE RAW BONE MEAL Z'^S'^,Z^^^ 

♦ nothing equals if. Use it on Chrysanthemums and you will win the prize J 
I at your flower show for the best bloom. 10 pounds, 40c; 25 pounds, 75c; * 
I 50 pounds, gl. 25; 100 pounds, $2.00; 1 Bag, 200 pounds, $3.75. | 

THE VAIL SEED CO., Indianapolis, Ind. \ 

"Everlasting 
Label'' 




Tlie newest 

and best 

e 1 a s a label 

holder on the market 

to label Trees. Rr>se 

liushes, Shrubs. Plants and 



Mowers 



ardeii and i 



■I'VMtory. Kndorsed by Pet<T Hen- 
derson tt Co., John Lewis Chi ids and other h'adiu^ liorists. In use in publi"-, parks ol Chicat:o. St. Paul. 
•Wnitf House" Conservatory (\V:ishin^ton) and elsewhrre. Write for sampli' to patentee and 
nianuf:i.turer. W. W, DODGE, BURLINGTON^ lOWA. 





THE 
KINNEY 
PUMP. 

For applying 
Liquid 
Manure it 

lias no equal! 

Sent prepaid 
for $2.50. 
Without spray- 
ing valve $2.00. 

The HOSE CONNECTION CO.^'^gsr- 



H. BAYERSDORFER & GO. 

Cyoas Wreaths, Moss Wreaths, Ferneriea 

and Jardinieres, Wheat Sheaves 

and Immortelles. 

New Catalogue of all FLORISTS 8UPPLIBB on 

AppMoatlon. fMTFor the trade only. 

H. BAYERSDORFER & CO. 

60, 52. 54 and 56 N. 4th St.. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

A. HERRMANN. 

Cape flowers, a^l colors; 
Cycas Leaves, Metal Designs, 
A»D All Florists' Sopplles. 

Send tor Prioei. 
404-412 East 34th St., NEW YORK. 

John Conley &Soo, 

niHnufacturerH ot 
2 AND 4. DOMINICK STREET. 

REED & KELLER, 

Manufactarers pjorists' DeSlgHS. 

teeVs'r"" Florists' Supplies. 

122 W. 25th St., NEW YORK CITY. 

\ Sheep Manure. 

.J Dry, piilveri/.i'd, in car lota, 
- $H 00 per Ion. Dry. but not 
piilvt^n/.ed. 14.00 j}er ton. In D.iturai or green 
bl:Ll«-, $1.50 per ton; f. o. h. cars, Kirkhmd, III. 

AHDRESS 

MONTANA FERTILIZER CO.. Elgin. III.. U.S.A. 




"NICOMITE" 

(PATENT) 

Vapor Insecticide 

No labor required. Harmless to 
bloom and foliage. A certain killer of 

ALL GREENHOUSE BUGS. 

SOLD BY SEEDSMEN. 
The Tobacco Warehousing and Trading Co., 

LOUISVILLE. KY. 




LIQUID PLANT FOOD 

For Greenhouse Cultivating. 

EASTERN CHEMICAL COMPANY, 

Cb icago O ffice : 620 Atlantic Ave., Boston. 

H. K. Snider, Suite 423, 260 Claris St. 



pg -^ »>• m-m-^^mh-*¥m-m.^tPi)mmm^ 



iHIKOTEEN 

IT COSTS 4 CENTS FOR EACH 600 FEET OF 
-7 FLOOR SPACE ?• 



DOES NOT INJURE THE MOST SENSITIVE 
i ,W PUNTS- ENDORSED BY PROMINENT FlOQlSTS- 
$1,r USED FOR FUMItATION OR SPRAYINC INDOORS OR 



i 



SOID BY SEEBSMtN CIRCULAR fREE- 

SKABCURA DIPCO.CtllCAGO. 



. 1 

<lOICKLY DOES IT. W W, 







wmM 



SMILAX STRINGING Made Easy by Ihe use ol 

MEVER Green SILKALINE 

JUST THE SHADE OF THE FOLIAQE. 

8!inii>lcs iind prict'3 frt'f. 

JOHN C. MEYER.* CO., 
80-84 Kingiton St. BOSTON, MASS. 

For flnle b7 leartlnu Florlntji. 



BIOS OH ASTERS 



KILLED 
BY USING 



SLIG SHOT 



SOLD BY 
SEEDSMEN 



tgoo. 



The American Florist. 



157 




FOLLOWING 

arc only a few 
.... of our 

SPECIALTIES AND 
NOVELTIES : 



Violet Cords and Tassek 
BASKETS 

Fancy nnd Plain 

IMMORTELLES 

all colors 

ENAMELLED, CELLU- 
LOID and WILLOW 
POT COVERS 

MOSS WREATHS 

ENAMELLED .^ ^ 

PEDESTALS 

ARTIFICIAL and WAX 

FLOWERS and LEAVES 

DOVES 

SAGO or 

CYCAS PALM LEAVES 

METAL DESIGNS 

DRIED GRASSES 

CHENILLE 

ADJUSTABLE POT COVERS 

Our famous unparalleled 

"WHEAT SHEAVES" 

Flat and Standing 

Crimped Paper POT COVERS 

in the newest shades 



Every riorist will Need Our Goods. 

There are None Better-They will Make 

Vou Money. 

We take this opportunity to again call your 
attention to the real live fact that we are 
Importers and Manufacturers of 

FLORISTS' Supplies 



''Second to None" 



IF YOUR NAME 



Does not already appear on our books, 
there must be something wrong, so 
send for our new Illustrated Catalogue, for terms and conditions, and 
to further convince you of the just treatment yi)u will receive from us, 
make inquiries of any of our numerous customers ; we will then feel 
confident of your patronage. 



M. RICE & CO. 

918 Filbert Street, 
PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 



. 



We most cordially invite inspection and comparison of our 
UNEXCELLED STOCK. 

QUOTATIONS CHEERFULLY GIVEN. 

Write for our new Fall Catalogue, and "RED STICKER," 
used by everyone. 



158 



The American Florist. 



Aug 25 



Canadian Horticultural Association. 

The closing session of the recent con- 
vention of the Canadian Horticultural 
Association was devoted to the discus- 
sion of some very interesting papers. 
They vrere: "Violets." by Wtn. Fendley, 
Brampton; "Commercial Orchids," by 
J. Goodier, Toronto; "Carnations up-to- 
date," by Wm. Gammage, London; 
"Heating and \'entilating," by R. W. 
King, ot Toronto, who described the 
systems in use at the H. Dale estate. 

The officers for the coming year are as 
follows: President, J. H. Dunlop, 
Toronto; first vice-president, J. Bennett, 
Montreal; second vice-president, G. W. 
Rennie, London; secretary, A. H. E wing, 
Berlin; treasurer, H. Simmers, Toronto; 
executive committee, for three years, G. 
Robinson, C. G. Knott, W. Gammage; two 
years, J. Wilshire, C. Scrim, J. Graham 
one year, W. Muston, H.Johnston and F. 
C. Miller. 

Saturday's banquet was a "corker;" 
fine menu, good songs and the toast list 
endless. We enjoyed many fine speeches, 
all praising the association. G. V. 

STANDARD FLOWER POTS! 

Paoked in small crates, easy to handle. 



Price per orate 
UOO 2-ln. pou In orate, 14.88 
1600 2J<" " 6.26 

1600 28" " B.OO 

1000 3 " " 5 00 

8003H" •' 6;; 

600 4 " " 4.60 

3206 " " 4.61 

144 6 " " 3.16 



Price per orate 
120 7-ln.potalnoTate,|4.20 
60 8 " " 3.00 

48 « " • 3.60 

4810 " " 4.80 

24U •' " 3.60 

24 12 " " 4.80 

1214 " " 4.80 

616 " " 4.60 



nSeed panM, same price as pots. Bend for price list of 
Cylinders for Cut Flowers, Ilanglng Baskets, Lawn 
Vases, etc. 10 per cent off for casb with order. 

HILFINBER BROS. POTTERY, 

OR.... FORT EDWARD, N. V. 

ACSUIT BOLKIB A SONS, New York Agenii 

52 niT STBIIT. NJW TOBK CFTT 

KELLER BROS., 



213-1B-17-19-21-23 Peari St.. 
"NORRISTOWN. PA. 



Manufacturers of Standard Flower Pots, red in 
color, equal to the best on the market; are 16 
miles from Philadelphia, best of railroad connec- 
tions. We give special attention to mail orders and 
make special sizes to order in quantities. A 
postal will brine prices and disnounts. 

Red Standard Pots. 

CORRECT SIZE. 
SUPERIOR QUALITY. 



Writi- fitr price list. 



C. ttENNEGKE GO.. 



MILWAUKEE. 
WIS. 



Standards^ j^ 

FLOWER 



Pots 



If your ereenhouses are within 500 miles of 
the Capitol, write us; we can save you money 

W. H. ERNEST. 



28th end M Slrnntt N. E 



WASHINaTON. D C. 



FLOWER POTS 



ALL KINDS. 



STANDARD POTS 



« SPECIALni 



List and SAMPLES PRBB 
BWAHN-8 POTTERY MF'G CO. 

P. O. Box 78, Minneapolis, Minn. 




GEO. KELLER & SON, 

HANUPACTTTRIBfl OF 

Flower Pols. 

Before buying write (or prices 

361-363 Herndon Street 
near Wrlghtwood Ave., 

CHICAOO. ILL. 



DUNNE & CO. 

Have something interesting to show to S. A. F. visitors, 
in the line of Rustic Settees, Fences and General Horticul- 
tural Sundries 

This establishment is now the main headquarters in the 
East for 

PURE SHEEP MANURE 

And all users of this indispensable Fertilizer are especially 
invited to call and be shown the difference between this 
absolutely pure article and much of the stuff usually 
sold as Sheep Manure. We are in a position to quote 
lowest figures per pound, per ton, or per car load. 



DUNNE & CO., 



I 54 West 30th St , NEW YORK. 




WtllLLDIN POTTEKYCO. 




.rPHlLADELPHlA-PA- 



BRANCH WAREHOUSES: ] if.'o'n'lUan'd'atV! N. V. 

please mentjon Che American Florist 7vhen irrt'linj::. 




Please menlion the Amgrican Florist 7v/ien ivtiling. 



THE MOWER 

THAT will KILL ALL THE WttDS IN YOUR UWNS. 

■ If you keep the weeds cut so they do not go to 
seed, and cut your gmss without breaking the 
small feeders of roots, the grass will become thick 
and weeds will disappear. The Clipper will do It. 
^P~Send for circulars and prices. 




CLIPPER LAWN MOWER CO., ^°"r.r"' 

The Bottomless Pot 

MORE EflPKCIALLT FOR VIOLET 

AND CARNATION CULTURE, 
ALSO 

THOSE BED POTS 

"Standards." 

Azalea Pots, Fern Pots, Bulb Pans. 



DETROIT FLOWER POT M'F'Y, 

Established (853. DETROIT. MICH. 

P. O. Address, 490 Howard St. 
HARRY BALSLtY, Traveling Representative. 

Please menUon the A mericati Florist when 7vriting 




Invalid Appliance Co., 
COLUM^rPUNT TUBS 



Please mention the American florist when writing. 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



159 



PROFIT 



Mention American FJorist. 



CERTAIN... 

In the prudent and thorough heating of a greenhouse as much as in larg*' 
sales of stock. If a florist is burdened by an unnecessary annual tax of from 

$50 TO $100 

For fuel and extra labor he must work much harder in order to make up this 
unnecessary tax out of the profits of his business. \Ve know from our past 
experience that there is no unnecessary tax for fuel and labor when our boil- 
ers are used, because they arw made after careful examination of the reas- 
ons why other boilers have failed and their construction avoids the defects 
shown. No one has bought 

OUR BOILERS 

That ever regretted it and thousands have bought and look back :it the cost 
as the best investment they ever made. 

SEE WHAT 

C. HUMFELD. Clay Center. Kansas, July 19th, 1900. says: "I purchased a 
No. 70 Standard Sectional Hot Water Boiler from you in August, 1898, and I 
do not remember that I ever wrote you anything about it. In corresponding 
with me you told me that other parties that had purchased your boilers in 
some cases paid $50 00 more for your boiler than they could have gotten 
other boilers of same capacity. I wish to say that I am one of them, as I 
paid $50.00 more for your boiler than I would have hud to pay for another 
make. I am not sorry for it as I now see the difference in price is more than 
made up by the d-fference in value. I can speak from experience, as 1 have 
two other good sectional boilers, but yours is a terror. I have 20i'0 feet of 
two-inch pipe. 1240 square feet of radiation hung to the 70 boiler and I have 
my expansion tank about forty feet away from the boiler and still it gets so 
hot that it wants much more r»diatiou. &o I am going to have it heat another 
house 20x1(0, orl60u feet of lL4-inch pipe, or 688 feet of radiation, so that the 
total radiation will be I9J8 square ft-et, but I think the boiler can heat it eas- 
ily. I know I have never crowded it and if we would it would throw all the 
water out of the line of pipes That boiler Is all right and anybody thai 
wants to know about it, refer them to me." 

OUR GREENHOUSE CATALOGUE 

Is free, and we are in business to give information about our boilers auil 
heating greenhouses, and solicit c<.trrespondence. 

WE CAN MAKE 

Prices delivered at any station, so that a tlorist knows exactly what the eosl 
will be of a boiler delivered. 

GIBLIN & CO., Utica, N. Y. 




THIS IS THE HEATER, 



AND THIS IS WHAT THEY SAY OF IT. 




pH^ 1 SpaaiaK!). 




F'ATEBSON PLANK ROAD. 



Messbh. Tuoh. VV. Weathkkku'b So»9, 

46 and 48 Marion Street, New York, N. Y. : 

Gentlemen— I am highly gratified with the results I have obtained from your Sectional Boiler 
which you put in for me last October. Although you would only guarantee the six sections to 
heat 1630 feet of 4-in. pipe, I attached it to over 1,800 feet. It did it so well that I put on about 
300 feet more, making in all 2,100 feet, and I am positive that I can add more to it. It is the 
best 1 have ever seen and a great coal saver. I have to keep the fire door open all the time. 

I would be pleased to have anyone call and see it. Yours truly, 



.''■"jearee -^^c-^<^^^'7r 



Wt. RbFER to the iollowing named parties who have lately purchased and are using our Sectional Boiler: 



K VI. Wood & Co., Natick, Mass. 
Uavid Dean, Astoria, N. X. 
Wm. G. MuUer, Lyons Ave., Newark, N. J. 
N. Y. Zoological Gardens. 
Geo. Schubert, West Hoboken, N. J. 

Citabllshed 
1859. 



E. E. Shufelt, Chatham, N. Y. 
A. E. Aldrett, Morrison, 111. 
J. W. Miller, Craighead, Pa. 
John Si'ott, Flatbush, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Keap St. Greenhouses, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Geo. Fick, West Hoboken, N. J. 
A. Brunner, Lyons Farms, N. J. 
H. C. Palthey, Bayshore, N. Y. 
Ditzenberger Bros., Bay Ridge, N. Y. 



THOS. W. WEATHERED'S SONS, 



HORTICULTURAL ARCIIITECTS AND BUILDERS, 

Mlrs. ot Hot Water and Steam Heaters. 46 Marion St., NEW YORK. 



ALL Nurierymen, Seedimen and Floriiti wlib- 
Ing to do buiineii with Eoiope ihouid lend 
tot the 



ii 



Horticultural Advertiser" 

Thii li the British Trade Paper, being read weekly 
by all Horticultural tiaderi; it it alto taken by 
over 1000 of the beit Continental houtei. Annual 
lubicriptlon to cover ooit of postage 75 oenti. 

AddreM EDITORS OF THE " H. A.'* 
Chii*«*M ■iur«Mr<*t% « N*tta. Enaland. 

Always mention the 

American Florist 

whan wilttng advertlien. 




theGORTON SIDE FEED BOILER 

Is specially constructed so that it will maintain a steady 
fire all night withotit attention, which is a very 
important item to be considered in select- 
ing a greenhouse boiler. 

EP~Send for Catalogue and Investigate for yourseU. 

GORTON & LID6ERW00D CO., «« Se^^^VSSK.^*- 



160 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 25, 



St. Paul. 

TRADE DULL AND STOCK GENERALLY 
RATHER POOR — I"[ELD GROWN CARNA- 
TIONS IN EXCELLENT FORM. — ANNUAL 
OUTING. — VARIOUS NOTES OF INTEREST. 

The intense heat of the present month 
has had a depressing effect on trade in 
all lines except funeral work. The only 
really choice flowers now being cut are 
asters, which are improving daily in 
quality. Some very nice bench grown 
flowers are being cut and the outside 
crop seems better than usual this season. 
Roses are poor owing to the heat, Car- 
nots being the best of any. Good Beau- 
ties are a very scarce article. Carnations 
are scarce, though a few good Flora Hill 
are brought in. This seems to be an ideal 
summer sort. Gladioli and other outside 
flowers are on the wane, owing to the 
heat. 

Filling benches with the mercury from 
100° upward has been a very hot task, 
but most all rose stock is planted, and 
the growers are only waiting for cooler 
weather to transplant carnations. These 
have made an excellent growth in the 
field and are in tip top condition for lift- 
ing. Of the newer varieties. Crane will 
be planted the most extensively, while 
White Cloud will to a certain extent sup- 
plant Flora Hill and Evelina. Daybreak 
retains its prestige and is still hard to 
beat in its class. .\ few of the newest are 
seen here and there, such as Lawson, 
The Marquis, Ethel Crocker, Maceo, 
etc. 

Our florists' picnic was held at Lake 
Park, a most beautiful spot on the shores 
of the gem of all waters, Lake Minne- 
tonka. Minneapolis captured most of 
the prizes. E. Nagel, the veteran bowler, 
proved his fleetness of foot by winning 
the fat men's race. Oluf Olson easily 
won the fifty-yard dash. Mr. Will won 
the boat race handily. In base ball and 
the tug of war St. Paul was too many 
for Minneapolis and won both contests 
easily. A most enjoyable part of the 
programme was the singing of Chris. 
Bussj aeger. 

Mr. Scott and his Boston fern are now 
doing the Twin Cities. A. Currie, of 
Milwaukee, passed through the city a 
few days since. 

Jas. Sonden and L. S. Donaldson made 
a flying trip to Chicago last week, look- 
ing up new stock. Felix. 



A GOO D AD. 

A STORE PAINTED WITH 

LUCAS PAINT. 

IT PRESERVES IT BEAUTIFIES 

IT WILL CATCH THE EYE 



i Holds Class 
Firmly 

See the Point 49* 



Tke V» Ke 
rest eiu 

tha best. 



IPt-F P 

No rlfrbts or 



^ fcot OlKBlnr i'«liii» are 

I. No rig: 
lefta. Box of I^HlDpoiiita 



] 76 centB, poatpaid. 

< BENKY A. DKF.EH. 

i 714 Chrttant 8t.. Phllk., Pi 





LVANS IMPROVED 

APPAMAFUS \ 

WOirt fOB iLLUSrRATLO --AlALOCur 

QUAXfn c/rrMACHmmjm. 

^ ^ Jt M- ■» HILMMOND, INU 




Water Every Day in the Year for 
Flowers and Lawns when 

RIDER or ERICSSON 

HOT AIR PUMPS 

are used. Nearly 25,000 sold during the past 
-^ twenty-five years. 

Send to nearest office for Catalogue "A 3." 

RIDER-ERIGSSON ENGINE GO. 

28 Cortlandt Street, Hew York. Teniente-Rev 71 ^^ Iiabe Street, Chicago. 

239 Franklin Street, Boston. Havana Huha ' 40 TX. 7th Street, Philadelphia. 

692 Oral? Street. Montreal, P. Q. ' " 22 A. Pitt Street, Sidney, N. S. W. 




II 




mmmmmm 



tlOnN L. iiitoibsblackhavkSt. 



s aos^aBasBasaaao aa aBaBaaag^ aasaoosasssssaasssQssssssoos 




^EASY 



It's easy to use because the prloctple 
Is ritfbt A boy c-in operate It. 

It's easy to put up because of Its ex- 
treme simplicity. 

Us easy to buy because the price ia 
reasonable 

THE CHAMPION VENTILATING APPARATUS 

("aialunue Is free- A postal with your 
name and address seoures It. Address 

OOOX^II^C^e: l^ESO^., Florists. 
So. Su<lbur.v* Mass. 



QQQQQQQQQQQQQiQSQQQQQQQQSQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQSQQQQQQQQQQQQ 



VallPY (iuiter and 
iAM„ Conductor. 54c 
f. ot Without 
nductor. 




Jennings Bros., 



GREENnOUSE 
DESIGNERS... 
& BUILDERS. 

Mfra of and dealers in Greenhouse Specialtiest 

Patent iron Bencli Frame Fittings, 
Improved Cast iron Gutters and Plates. 

C'stalosue jGIHlllIgS BrOS.. Fh°lf/delphla, F». 





GALVANIZED STEEL 




^ THE NEW Jjt, 


i 


f Wire Rose Stakes ' 


% 


fF Standard f 


' 


e 


straight or Looped 
■nd Pointed. 


o 
o 
m 




Ventilating 




a. 


— AI.90— 


r- 




Machines, x^i. 




CO 


The Modal Extension 


> 






, 


■a 


Carnation Support. 


z 


J 


Always reliable. \Ay 




a. 
o 
o 


Lancaster, Pa., ,lune IT, '99. 
Mr. Theron Parker, 


CO 

H 




Self-oiling. >s!»^ 
Four Styles. 






Brooklyn. N. Y.: 


> 




All warranted first- 




UJ 


DearSir.—YourModel Carnation 










< 


Support is nil right in every way, 
and will no doubt be considered 


ai 




Send for catalogue and 




CA 


as necessary as good plants wiltl 


T 




see what first-class flo- 






growers when better known. I 


r" 




rists are using. 






consider it the best In the market. 










t/i 


and if vour orhtT Specialties are 






THE 




— 1 


as good, they should make another 
Hdditum to the money makers of 
I9O0. Very Respectfully. 

Albsrt M. Herr. 


CO 




E. HIPPARD CO., 




UJ 


Q. 


■^S; 


YOUNGSTOWN, 0. -^ 


* 


e 


Samples and Prices on 


B 


PUa^e mftttiott [hf Amrtica^i Furi^i ivhfiti ii'titinn 


UJ 

X 


Application to 

THE MODEL | 




H^\.I1^! 




PLANT STAKE CO.. 


Is 


FOR INSURANCE AGAINST 








DAMAGE BY HAIL, Address 




336 North 9th Street, 








BROOKLYN, N.Y. 




JOHN 8. ESLER, Sae'y F. H. A., 


PI,-, 


,\i' mention (hf American Florist ivhen 7v*it 


ing. 




SADDLE RIVER, N. J 





tgoo. 



The American Florist. 



161 



GARLAND'S IRON GUHER 




Saves Labor 



Makes Money 



...PARTIES., 
CONTEMPLATING 



USING 



IRON GUTTERS 



Will do well to note the following; extract of oatent No. 616,781, Issued to George M. Garland; and are hereby cautioned against 

making use of the same without my consent: 

"At the end of each member of the gutter, a downwardly-extending: flange is formed, adapted to engage 
with the inner or lower ends of the roof-beams, but the flanges arc of sufficient width to extend below the roof- 
beams, and at their lower ends upwardly and outwardly extending members are produced, forming auxiliary 
gutters, which serve as drip-conductors and act to carry off the condensations of steam from the glass of the 
roof. The nails, screws, or other fastening devices arc passed through the drop flanges and into the lower ends 
of the roof beams, so that these fastening devices for connecting the valley-gutter to the roof structure are below 
the weather-faces of the valley-gutter and consequently the weather-faces of the valley -gutter need not be 
perforated insuring against leakage." 



^^ 



'^<^^^^ 




/, 




^/ Des Plaines, 111. 




Mr. Editur: 

I rite to tel yo that bi meanz of 
the new Submarine boat — The 
Holland— what goes down under 
the ochen I have been enabled to 
send a Kargo uv mi Greenhouse 
contrapshins tew a place where 
they are much needed. 

My frend Jules Verne had charge 
of the cargo and showed the Boss 
chap how tew put the apperatus up an Old Nick 
was so tickled with the wa it worked he sent 
me this letter uve recommendashun wat u c 
belo 



SHOEL CENTER, Infernal Regions. 

My Dear Carmody: 

In return for your kindness in sending your appliances I have extended your leave of absence 
indefinitely. My subjects unite in universal praise of your VENTILATING APPARATUS, in fact 
when the ventilation is on they hover around your CHAMPION BOILER, and the kids spend most 
of their time swinging on the gates hung with your EVERLASTING HINGES. 

Gratefully your friend, BEELZEBUB. 



To my Floris Frenz — I wil sa dent wate till you go where it is hoter before you uze my 
fixins but send tew me for a Kata-a-log wat tels u awl about em. 

Mi name is J. D. CABMODT, an I live in Evansville, Ind., klose to 
Posey Kounty. 



PleAse mention AmerloBn Florlat wben writing. 



162 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 2s, 



New Orleans. 

HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY SHOWS SIGNS OF 
INCREASED ACTIVITY. — DOINGS AND 
SIGHTS AT AUDUBON PARK. 

During the hot months our horticult- 
ural society ordinarily takes a vacation 
but there was a good attendance and 
not a little interest in the August meet- 
ing. Our newly elected president, Paul 
Abele, is setting to work to add new life 
to the society and to that end has invited 
us to hold our next meeting at his resi- 
dence. The society will remove its regu- 
lar meeting place from Royal street to 
St. Charles street, near Canal. 

The other day I called upon Edward 
Baker, superintendent of Audubon Park, 
and found him making hay. He was 
cutting the second crop and said he 
expected to get three mowings off of the 
same tract this season. This shows how 
productive our soil is. They have a 
splendid horticultural building in this 
park. It is 600 feet long and 120 feet 
wide; the nave is 100x186; the height is 
forty-six feet and to the top of the tower 
186 feet. Among the things to be seen 
here is an Acrocomia Mexicana forty feet 
high, an attalea thirty-five feet high, a 
Latania Borbonica forty feet high and 
many other fine plants. The park is in 
j^ood hands and the work of permanent 
improvement, planned by the Olmsteds, 
of Brookline, Mass., is well under way. 

M. M. L. 



Milwaukee, Wis. — B. Heyden has 
installed one of Riemer & Radmer's boil- 
ers, the Furman, for hot water. 




CYPRESS 

IS MUCH M »RB DURMIX^HAN PINE. 

TOES 
SASH BARS 

u» To^Jt «ET •xJUEMBTH ontWfGER 

fREENHOUS 



AND( 



: SUiUliN* MATERIAL, ji 



:ifi 



S»ri\f»ranrWvttnt»i'BaeH 
"CYPRESS LUMBER/Mt^USES." 

Send po^Vu rSfetitt) 6re4<^hou 8yC?yular. 

Ne><^ivOTH^»sT«N£0ass' ^ 



L-U-..-W-..-t->— »_«..«> 



J 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦»• 

STEAM COAL 

FOB FLORISTS . 

Chicago, April 7ih, 1900. 
HULL & COMPANY, 74 and 75 Tradeis' Building, Chicago, III, 

Gentlemen:— In reference to my opinion of your THACKER SPLINT COAL, 
will say I am v.ry well pleased with it and think it is superior to any Coal of the 
splint grades we have yet used. Burns free, making an intense htat with very few 
ashes; no clinkers, and has the lasting quality of all high-grade Coal. I certainly 
consider it a very economical Coal to burn. 

Yours very truly, J. A. BUDLONG. Wholesale Florist. 

Write us for price on single carload orders or season contract, delivered 
at any point in the United States. *Phone Har. 960. 



HULL & COMPANY, 




74 & 75 TRADERS BUILDING, 

-CHICA.OO. 



I ■ ■ rri £■■• 

SGOLLAY BOILER 

FOR 

Greenhouse Heating, Etc. 

HOT WATER OR STEAM. 

Farmikgton, Conn., March 9, 1896. 
"The Invincible Boiler you placed in my Carna 
tion houses has given ^reat satisfaction. I die 
not have to run the boiler hard even when the 
thermometer stood 18° below zero. It has proved 
'Invincible* in every respect." 

HueH CHE8NBT, Flofisi. 



SEND STAMP FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICE LIST, 
estimates Cheerfully Given. 



•INVINCIBLE.' 



JOHN A. SGOLLAY, 

74 and 76 Myrtle Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Ptea^e men t ton iheAmenca*' Fl-'-nsi when ii-t iting. 



m 






j^lB^lS-^^lirtsTtrfoTgttTg^lc^ 



^ 




I 



GREENHOUSE GLASS 



OUR SREGMJkLTY. ' I 



I LflRCC STOCKS ^ «. .^ ^ PROMPT SHIPMENT. . 

/'^^§';'PareLinseeilOIIPutty.Pjint5,Brusliesft(.! 



^ 



WRITE FOR. LATEST PRICES. 



^ 



H>P.HIMFBYa.d.SIIPPIIFS,t BtRMIN PRICES 



i:^ 



We have the laiijest machinery (.1epi..' Oi"^ earth. We secure our machinery from 
(lie varitius builitiiiKS and plants'that we .ire '-onstaiitly Iniyini;. We purchased The 
World's Fair, The Omaha Exposition, The Chicago PostOfficc aiul numenms other 
III itcd structures. Our tacililies tur relniiktim; macliinerv are unsurpassed. We 
c .ver all our sales with binding nuaranUes. BOILERS FROM $25 UP. ENGINES 

FROM $35 UP. STEAM PUMPS FROM $15 UP - etc., etc. 

\Vl' als.ic.irrv a c.inipliti' st.vU i>l t'l-iu-ial .supplies, such as 

belting; shaptino, hainoers, pulleys, iron 

PIPE,VALVE5andFITTlNQS,lRONROOFINa, HARD- 
WARE, PLUMBING MATERIAL, etc. Cut this 
ad. out and wewniseiul you Free our 2S0 page 
CatalogueNo. 'T ■ We are constantly huvini; 
entire str^ks at Sheriffs and Receivers Sales. 

CHICAGO HOUSE WRECKING CO. 

West 3.Sth and Iron ."Streets, - <.HICAO() 




^y / I I I \ \ L 



N N 




rgoo. 



The American Florist. 



163 



Hitchings 8 Go. 



ESTABLISHED 1844. 



HORTICULTURAL ARCHITECTS AND BmiDERS. 

ROSE HOUSES, PALM HOUSES AND CONSERVATORIES ERECTED COMPLETE "WITH 
OUR PATENT IRON FRAME CONSTRUCTION. 

....STRUCTURAL MATERIAL FURNISHED READY FOR ERECTION.... 




The above cut represents the new horticultural buildings in the Botanical Gardens, Bronx Park, New York, just erected 

by Hitchings & Co. These great glass houses are without doubt the most f legant buildings of their kind in the 

world, and when completed will be among the largest. They are the best examples extant of modern 

greenhouse construction, the entire frame being made of iron and steel, thus permitting the use of 

very light wood work, producing strong and light structures with very little shade. 

Manufacturers of Greenhouse Heating and Ventilating Apparatus. 




HOT WATER 

BOILERS 

FOR 

GREENHOUSE 
HEATING. 

6 Patterns, 30 Sizes. 



A'^m^ 




Our Weil-Known Corrugated Fire Box Boiler. 



Our New Sectional Tubular Boiler. 

PERFECT SASH RAISING APPARATUS. 

Hitchings & Co., 

send 5c for Illustrated catalogue. 333 McrCCr St., NEW YORK CITY. 



164 



The American Florist. 



Aug. 2s, 



Index to Advertisers. 



AdTertlilng Bstei 1% 

Allen J K 141 

Ameiio&n Boae no. .138 II 

AmllDK Albert F 16n 

Amllng K C 139 

AgmUB R 153 

Banner J L 138 

Barnard W W & Co. . 1 

Baur 8 Alfred I 

BaBBett& Washburn.. .139 
Bayersdorter H 4 Co. .15ti 

Benthey &Co 139 

Berger H H A Co 142 

Bemlng H Q 1*0 

BlDdekunat Die lot 

Blano A & Co 156 

Bobblnk & Atklnl 155 

Bock Wm A 155 

Boston L/etter Co 15B 

Boyd J e U 144 

Brant &Noe IfU 

Brill Francis II 

Brown Peter 152 

BrunsH N U 

BuckbeeH W 151 162 

BadlongJ A 139 

Bnnyard n A 138 

Bamee W Atlee & Co. II 
Caldwell the Woods- 
man Co 138 155 

CalHornla Nursery Co 11 

CarmodyJ n 161 

Chadwlck Chas 152 

Chicago carnation Co. 

.._. 163 

Chicago House Wreck- 

IngCo 162 

Cbrlsly Wilbur A 142 

Clnolnaatl cut Flo Co . 14 1 
Clark Wm A & Son. .166 
Clipper Lawn Mower 

Co 168 

Cohen J M 140 

Coles WW 153 

Conard & Jones Uo — 154 

CoDiey John & Son 16t> 

CoolldKe Bros 160 

Cottage Gardens I 

Coventry M J 156 

Crabb * Hunter 162 

Craig Robt& Son 164 

CrltoheH's 166 

Crouch Mrs J W 160 

Cunningham Jos H...112 
Cunningham D O 

Glass Co IV 

Davis Bros 151 

Ueamud J B 139 

Detroit Flo'r Pot W'ks. 158 
De Ijichtbuer A Cardon II 
Dexter Lillian Allen.. 1S8 
DIcKlnson Co Albert. . 1 1 

Dletach A& Co 161 

niiion .1 L 150 

Dodge W W 166 

Oomer Fred&Sons Co 1.53 

Dreer H A 148 160 

Dunne * Co 168 

Elastem Chemical Co. .156 

Edgar W W 151 

Blchholz Conrad II 

Elobholx Henry 149 

Kmest W H l.vs 

Ferguson John B 140 

Flnley Lawn Bake Co 161 
Florida Nat Prod Co . . 1.56 

Florists BxcliaDge 144 

Ford Bros . 141 

Foster Lnolus II 151 

Qardenera Chronicle. . lot 

QardenlngCo The 1^4 

Oarland Geo M 161 

Geller Slgmund 166 

Qhormlev Wm 141 

Gibbons H W \1 

GIblln 4 Co 159 

Gobloczy Ale.v 144 

Gorton & Lldgerwood . 1.59 
Gnllett 4 sons W H. . . Ull 

Ganther Wm II HI 

Gumey Ileator Co — 164 
Uagen burger Carl — 155 

Ball Ass'n 16 1 

Hammond Benj 1.5f; 

Hancock Geo 4 Son . . . 16:t 

Heaoock Joseph 156 

Helnl Jos 15(] 

Heiss J B 160 

Hennecke C Co 158 

Herendeen Mfg Co — IV 

Herr Albert M. 142 

Herrmann A '156 

Hews AHA Co 158 

Hi'flnger Bros 168 

Hill E O 4 Co 1 

Hlppard B IBj 

HlfohlngsiCo.... 163 IV 
Helton & Uunkel Co. .138 

Booker H M Co Iti2 

Hoopes, Bro4Tbomasl44 

Horan Kdw C 141 

Hort Adv 1,9 

Hose Connection C0..U6 

Hull 4 Co 162 

Hunt B U 139 

Insall Richard 15:i 

Invalid Appliance Co. 1.58 
Jackson 4 Perkins Co. 144 

Jackson B B 155 

JaoobsS* dons IV 

Jennings B B 163 

Jennings Bros I>'i0 

'ohnson 4 Stokes 142 

KadeoH 149 

Hasting W F 1411 

Keller Bros U8 

Keller Geo 4 Son 1.58 

Kellogg Geo M 140 

Kennioott Bros Co 143 



141 
.153 
.140 
.141 
, IV 
.138 

1* 



Klft Robert 15(i 

Ktlboum B 154 

Kroesoheli Bros Co IV 

KuehnC A 140 

Knhl Geo A 1.6-) 

Lager 4 Hurrell 155 

Lakev'w Rose Garden. 149 

Lamprecht Bros 153 

Lang Julius 141 

Ley John H 156 

LlmprechtSJ I4l 

Lindsay the Florist. . . .162 

Lockland Lum Co 162 

LongDB 1J4 

Lonsdale Edwin 156 

Lord & Bumham Co . . 

Ill IV 

Lucas J 4 Go Ill) 

Lynch WB 139 

McCarthy * Co N F. . 14il 

McCrea 4 Cole 147 

Moradden U C 142 

McFarland John 152 

UcKellar 4 WInieraon 

139 147 

MacBean AS 1:0 

Mader Panl 166 

Marqulsee L B 147 

May L L4 Co 15J 

Meyer John C 4 Co . . .156 

Mlllang 4 Co 14; 

MUlangFrank 141 

viller WJ 15:1 

Model PlantStake Co .1611 
Moller's Gartner Zel 

tung 144 

Monlnger J CCo.... 16ii 
Montana Fertilizer Co 156 

Moon Samuel C 144 

Moon Wm H 144 

Moore, Hentz 4Na8b. .Ill 
Morris Floral Co... 152 

Moss Geo M 140 143 

Murphy Wm 153 

Myers 4 Co 164 

Nanz & Neun«»r 160 

Nickle Plate K R 147 

NIesaen Leo ... ..141 

Noenne A: lloepker II 

N Y Cut u^lowor JIX.. 141 
N Y CntFirwer Co... 

Overman E F 

Pennook Sam'l a 
Perry Taylor & Co... 

Meroe F O Co 

PItUbnrg Cut Flo Co. 
Pollworth C C Co 
Prince AG4 Co. ..139 15) 
QnakerClty Mo hWa«.160 

BandaU A L 139 

Baynor J 1 141 

BeedGlaPs 4Palnt Co IV 

Reed .V Keller 156 

Began rtlntlngHons" 154 

Belnberg Geo 139 U4 

BelnberE Peter.... 139 I5ii 
Beuer Walter 4 Co 116 I 

nice M & Go 157 

RIder-BrlcssonBng Co nai 

Bodsers Alex II 

Roiker A4 Sons II 

Rose Mfg to 166 

Rupp John F 112 

Sander 4 Co 12 

Sohlllo Adam IV 

Schmidt J C 142 II 

^cbwelgert Chas.... 161 

Scoliey John A 162 

Sheridan W F Ill 

Slebrecht & Son I 

Situations « Wanu. . . 137 

Skabcura Dip Co lotj 

Smith Nath » Hor . l[,^ 
Smurthwalte Pro Co . II 

Soltau C II 

SouslerGeo 1.5.3 

Sjuth Park rioral Co 113 
South side Floral Co 1.5;5 

Stahl Chas B H" 

Stearns Lumber Co 162 

Btoothoff II A4 Co .. 11 
Storrs 4 Harrison Co 144 

Slyer J J 142 

Sntberland Geo A Ilii 

Swahn PotteryMfgCo . l.is 

Tesson Robt F I. it 

Thurbum J M 4 Co. 142 
Tobacco Warehousing 

and Trading Co I.i'i 

Traendly 4 sohenok...l41 

Vail Sped Co 116 

Van Wert Greenhes. .1.56 
Vaughans Heed Store 

142 152 164 1:56 I 

VIcks sons Jas II 

Vincent 4 Son 163 

Vredenburg 4 Co II 

Wabash RR 15» 

Walz John 1.50 

Watson <4 C 11 

WaMon W U 162 

Weathered 'B Sons 

Thos W 169 

Weber 1 1 4 Bonj 16:; 

Weeber 4 Don II 

Welland 4 Klsch 139 

Welch Bros 140 

Wettlln W A 163 

Whilldin Pot Co 169 

WIetor Bros 139 

WIttbold The Geo Co. . . I 

Wood Bros 149 

Woodrofle 4 Bem- 

belmer 140 

Wrede II II 

Young Jno HI 

Young 4 Nuffent 141 

Young Thos Jr 141 

ZIrnglebel D 11 



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Mmerica is "the Praw af the I/bssbI; there man be mors comfort Rmidships, but we are the Erst to touch Unknown Seas." 



Vol. XVI. 



CHICAQO AND NEW YORK. SEPTEMBER i, 1900. 



No. 639. 



Copyright 1900, by American Florist Company. 
Entered as Second-Class Mail Matter. 

Published etebt Satubdat by 

AMERICAN FLORIST COMPANY, 

334 Dearborn St., Chlcafo. 
Baitern Office: 67 Bromfleld St., Boston. 

Subscription, 11.00 a year. To Europe, 12.00. 

Subscriptions accepted only from the trade. 

SOCIETY OF AMERICAN FLORISTS AND 
ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURISTS. 

OppiCEKB — E. M. Wood, Natick, Mass., presi- 
dent; F. R. P1ER8ON, Tarrytown, N. Y., vice- 
president; Wm. J. Stewart, 67 Bromfleld St., 
Boston, Mass., secretary; H. B. Beattt, Oil City, 
Pa., treasurer. The seventeenth annual meeting 
will be held at BulTalo, August, 1901. 

Officers-elect {to be instulled January 1. 190!) 
Patrick 0'M;Lr:i, New York, president;" W. F. 
Kastiug, Buffalo, vice-president; secretary and 
treasurer as before. 



AMERICAN ROSE SOCIETY. 

Annual meeting at New York, 1901. Leonard 
Barron, 136 Liberty St., New York, secretary. 



THE AMERICAN CARNATION SOCIETY. 

Annual convention at Baltimore, February, 
1901. ALBERT M. Hbrr, Lancaster, Pa., Secretary. 



CHRYSANTHEMUM SOCIETY OF AMERICA. 

.\nuual meeting :it BulTalo, August, 1901. Edwin 
Lonsdiile, Cliestnut Hill, Pa., secretary. 

THIS ISSUE 36 PACES WITH COVER. 



conte:^ts. 

The welfare of the S. A. F 165 

After the convention (illus.) 166 

Convention musings 166 

Special awards at New York 166 

The S. A. F. at Glen Island (illus.) 167 

The exhibition and decorations (illus.) 168 

What is a hardy perennial? 168 

Floral decorations 168 

The improvement f if the carnation 170 

Hydrangea culture (illus.) 171 

Hardy lierbaceous subjects for late planttnti. .171 

Pan- American notes 172 

OrigiDal ideas in lloral arrangement (illus. )172 

Roses— Growing American Beauty 172 

— Shading rose houses 173 

SewY.irk 173 

Philadelphia 1 V3 

Reward— Stolen 174 

Greenhouse building 174 

Chicago 174 

Obituary— J. L. Willey 174 

—Mrs. B. F. Gregory 174 

— John Laing 175 

The seed trade 180 

Boston 180 

The nursery trade 182 

Los Angeles 182 

Our pastimes— Chicago's laurels 184 

— New York matters 184 

—Overheard and otherwise among returning 

pilgrims ]184 

—Echoes of the New York tournament 184 

Impressions of the convention 184 

St. Louis 186 

Buffalo 188 

The propagation of verbenas 192 



The Welfire of the S. A. F. 

[An address by Robert Craig, of Philadelphia, 
before the Society of A mericau Florists at the New 
York Coriz'entiou,] 

I have been appointed to open a dis- 
cussion on "The Welfare of the National 
Society," and, while I am fully aware 
that, in view of the larxe amount of work 
to be done in a very short time, such dis- 
cussion must necessarily be brief, I think 
it well that we should hear the views of 
the members on this most important 
question. We all appreciate now that 
our society has been and will continue to 
be a jireat educational force; that it has 
stimulated and developed floriculture 
along many lines and it is quite proper 
that we ■ should consider at this, the 
largest and most important meeting we 
have ever held, how we may improve the 
workings of the society itself, which has 
done so much for us all. 

We are impressed with the fact that 
the society is at this time stronger than 
it has ever been before, and we are 
delighted with the evidences of the many 
warm and powerful friends the society 
has here in the metropolis of our country. 
On every hand we see evidences of their 
earnest and capable work. We have the 
greatest trade exhibit we have ever had, 
and the finest exhibition and the New 
York Florists' Club has given us a 
delightful and valuable souvenir book, 
particularly interesting in its history of 
floriculture in its earlier stages in the 
vicinity of New York, as well as in the 
forcible facts presented relative to its 
present status — truly a marvelous devel- 
opment. The editor of this work 
deserves our gratitude and praise, as 
do all those who have so ably assisted 
him. The book is worthy of the great 
city it represents and will long be 
treasured as a memento of this great 
meeting. As long as we have such 
workers as our New York friends have 
proven themselves to be, the welfare of 
the society is assured. 

I find it difKcult to suggest any new 
features likely to be of benefit to the 
society. Its management has been in 
the hands of many of the most capable 
men in the country, and their time and 
thought has been freely given to it. Its 
annual reports show that we have had 
at our yearly meetings valuable essays 
on cultural methods, on building and 
heating greenhouses, and on almost 
everything pertaining to the business, 
by practical men who had given these 
problems much study, as well as scientific 
papers from college professors and other 



specialists on plant diseases, insecticides 
and fertilizers, which contained informa- 
tion which the practical florist had 
neither the time nor the necessary 
apparatus to obtain for himself. I do 
not hesitate to say that these annual 
reports constitute the most valuable 
business library a florist can use. 

I think, then fore, we should do well to 
continue working along much the same 
lines as heretofore, cultivating closer and 
more cordial relations between the 
government experimental stations and 
the botanical departments of our great 
colleges, both of which have shown 
repeatedly a disposition to aid us in 
every possible way. I understand there 
will be a proposition at this convention 
from Purdue I'niversity, Lafayette Ind., 
for this society to appropriate a small 
sum of money for experiments in sub- 
watering, the result to be reported at 
our next meeting. I hope this society 
may do this and also earnestly consider 
all like propositions which may come 
before it. It might perhaps be well for 
the society to hold a meeting and exhibi- 
tion during Lent forthe purpose of show- 
ing particularly cut flowers and novelties 
in plants at a more favorable time than 
is the month of August, which is a very 
unfavorable time for a meeting, having 
for its only advantage the fact that it is 
the vacation time of the year, when 
florists can best afford the time to attend. 
But an exhibition in winter or early 
spring would be very attractive and 
would undoubtedly be well attended. 

Another feature already established 
which deserves encouragement is that of 
life membership. I can think of nothing 
which would more greatly benefit the 
society than an increase of the life mem- 
bership list. It has been wisely determ- 
ined that the money received from life 
members shall be invested permanently, 
the interest therefrom only being avail- 
able to the use of the society, so that in 
becoming a life member one may feel that 
even after being removed by death his 
subscription will continue to benefit the 
society. We should have at least 1,000 
members in a country like this, and could 
have that many if the present members 
would take hold of this matter in the 
right spirit. I hope the younger mem- 
bers of the society will take a greater 
interest. We need the vigor and enthus- 
iasm that belongs to youth, and there is 
no way by which a young man can 
benefit himself more, as well as the 
society, than by taking an active part in 
the proceeding and by studving the 



166 



The American Florist. 



Sept. 



problems which concern us all, and thus 
qualifying himself to take part in the 
proceedings. Every man should do what 
he can, on the Baconian principle that 
"cTery man isa debtor to his profession." 



After the Convention. 
Here we have the popular secretary of 
the New York Florists' Club, enjoying a 
well earned rest after the labors incident 
to the convention. Mr. Young was one 
of the hard workers, and the many friends 
who benefited by his zeal and courtesy 
will not begrudge him a holiday now, 
tor when there was work to be done he 
was always found on the ground floor 
and never "up a tree.' 



Convention Musings. 

Since arriving home from the great 
convention I've been meditating. They 
say that meditating is a lazy man's job. 
Perhaps it is, but the man who went to 
New York last week and made an effort 
to take in everything offered between 
Tuesday morning and Friday night and 
does not feel lazy this week must be con- 
structed of steel. Yes, I confess, I'm 
glad to get home and am satisfied that 
my trip has furnished me food for profit- 
able thinking for the coming twelve- 
month. If asked what impressed me 
most strongly at New York, I would 
unhesitatingly answer, the wonderful 
system, the perfect organization, the 
punctuality and order pervading every 
feature of the convention proceedings 
and the exhibition, every detail of the 
work of the New York Florists' Club, at 
Glen Island, at Prospect Park, every- 
where and always. Equally impressive 
was the object lesson of the great com- 
bined exhibition. Between the two 
grand sections, trade and amateur, only 
emulation as to which should bring to 
New Y'ork and to American horticulture 
the greatest honor. And this is the very 
thing that we have been told, number- 
less times, could never be brought about 
in New York. Never before has the fra- 
ternal idea been so fully demonstrated; 
the patience and good nature of the 
exhibition managers in their trying 
duties cannot be too highly commended; 
the courtesy and liberality of the man- 
agers of the building will never be for- 
gotten. 

The most valuable innovation, to my 
mind, was the establishment of a press 
bureau. This feature worked so success- 
fully that its adoption as a regular 
adjunct of future conventions is inevit- 
able. Another commendable improve- 
ment over past conditions was the 
division of the duties of the secretary's 
office among several capable assistants. 
The bureau of information filled a long- 
felt want and the scheme of numbering 
the Glen Island dinner tickets so that the 
holder knew just when he would be 
served worked to perfection. The enter- 
prise displayed in the make up of the 
beautiful souvenir book merited the 
highest praise. 

I am told that the exhibitors in the 
trade exhibition were remarkably suc- 
cessful in disposing of their displays and 
in the taking of orders for future deliv- 
ery. The claim of unprecedented success 
ia freely made by all and this department 
of the annual meeting is today stronger 
than ever. The secretary's report shows 
that the department of plant registra- 
tion has already demonstrated its indis- 
oensable value; the thoroughness of the 
legislative committee's report astonishes 
U8 with its suggestion of the society's 
power; the assurance of bright prospects 



for the acquirement of the long-sought 
national charter fills us with new aspira- 
tions, and the cordiality and recognition 
bestowed upon our organization by 
state and civic authorities, by the metro- 
politan press and the Agricultural 
Department of the national government 
awakens us to possibilities of future 
influence and usefulness far beyond our 
most sanguine anticipations. Truly the 
New York convention was an "eye 
opener," and if there are any grumblers 
they are doing their grumbling "under 
their breath." 

As to New York itself, emotions con- 
flict. "Closed for the summer" gave a 
somewhat dispiriting look to the amuse- 
ment centers that, in their season, turn 
midnight in the metropolis into noonday. 
Even the Bowery was deserted. But 
Coney Island was very much alive and 
everybody had to see it and the roof gar- 
den furnished cool and refreshing recrea- 
tion even if not of the highest grade of 
talent. For the country visitor there 




JOHN YOUNQ. 

SPcriHary New York Florists' Club. 



were some surprises and ideals were 
rudely shattered in many instances. To 
see old-fashioned horse cars preambulat- 
ing the streets of the metropolis still, 
makes the rural cousin open his eyes in 
wonder. I boarded a Broadway car the 
first morning I was in town;hadto jump 
for it as the conductor struck the bell to 
go ahead before my foot was firmly on 
the step. His insolent "step Hvely," was 
still rankling in my bosom when I noticed 
that he was chewing gum. A glance 
over the passengers disclosed three girls 
working their jaws vigorously in the 
same employment. I had supposed gum 
chewing to be confined to rustics. A 
young lady sitting beside me had, from 
all appearances, been having a fearful 
tussel with the mosquitoes the night 
before. From her conversation with a 
friend I learned she came from Long 
Island. Thus did I find out that all the 
mosquitoes are not quartered in Jer- 
sey. But New York street cars have one 
redeeming quality in the free transfer 
system. The rest of the country might 
take lessons here to advantage. 

To return to the convention; the 
absence of inclination to discuss the 



papers was noted by many and regret 
expressed over the change. Oh! for one 
day of the good old times when halt a 
dozen eager disputants clamored "Mr. 
Chairman!" for prior possession of the 
floor and the roof shook in response to 
impassioned oratory. Now it is all decor- 
ous committee reporting. I observed 
that the state vice-presidents have not 
yet reached a proper appreciation of the 
dignity of the office they hold. Only three 
were on hand to report at the designated 
hour. The secretary toldmethat quite a 
number of them had handed in written 
reports, expecting somebody to read them 
forthem, however. The vote to pass these 
over and merely print them in the annual 
proceedings was just what they deserved. 



Special Awards at New York, 

.\t the trade exhibit at the New York 
convention the judges bestowed a number 
of S. A. F. certificates of merit and 
accorded special mention to a number 
of exhibits, as follows: 

CUT BLOOMS. 

Arthur Cowie, Meadow Vale Farm, 
Berlin, N. Y., certificate of merit for col- 
lection of hybrid gladioli; special mention 
for Gladiolus White Lady. 

Floral Exchange, Philadelphia, certifi- 
cate of merit for its new rose, Queen of 
Edgely. 

Henry A. Dreer, Philadelphia, certifi- 
cate of merit for collection of nymphaeas; 
special mention for two seedlings, Nym- 
pbaea Gloriosa and N. Mrs. C. W. Ward. 

PLANTS. 

Robert Craig & Son, Philadelphia, cer- 
tificate of merit for crotons: certificate of 
merit for specimen Boston fern. 

Cottage Gardens, Queens, N. Y., certi- 
ficate of merit for new geranium, Little, 
Pink. 

Bobbtnk & Atkins, Rutherford, N. J., 
certificate of merit for hardy evergreens; 
certificate of merit for Eurya latifolia. 

H. Dryer, Woodside, L. I., certificate of 
merit for cyclamen. 

John F. Cowie, Berlin, N Y., certificate 
of merit for hybrid draciEuas. 

Siebrecht & Son, New Roehelle, N. Y., 
special mention for palms and decorative 
plants. 

FLORISTS' SUPPLIES. 

White Ivnamel Refrigerator Co., St. 
Paul, special mention for ice box. 

A. H. Hews & Co.. North Cambridge, 
Mass., special mention for earthenware 
urns. 

W. C. Heller & Co., Montclair, N. J., 
special mention for mice proof seed cases. 

Bobbink & Atkins, Rutherford, N. J., 
special mention for Hasselt pottery. 

A. Herrmann, New York, special men- 
tion for metal designs in baskets. 

H. Bayersdorfer & Co., Philadelphia, 
special mention for complete collection 
of supplies. 

W. C. Krick, Brooklyn, special mention 
for immortelle emblems. 

N. F. McCarthy & Co., Boston, special 
mention for florists' vases and letters. 

Excelsior Plant Co., New York, special 
mention for jardinieres and plant stands. 

Eniil SteflTens, New York, special men- 
tion for wire designs. 

Reed & Keller, New York, special men- 
tion for designs, vases, baskets, etc. 

Sigmund Geller,New York, special men- 
tion for wheat sheaves and French 
baskets. 



Lord & Bumham, Irvin^ton, N. \'., 
certificate of merit for sectional boiler; 
honorable mention for Improved No. 5. 



tgoo. 



The American Florist. 



167 



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168 



The American Florist. 



Sept. /, 



Herendeen Manufacturing Company, 
Geneva, N. Y., certificate of ment for 
New Model Furman boiler. 

H. W. Gibbons, New York, special men- 
tion for standard steam or hot water 
boiler. 

Wtn. H. Kay, New York, honorable 
mention for two styles of hot water 
boilers. 

John A. ScoUay, New York, special 
mention for hot water boiler and for 
patent pipe joint. 

Thos. W. Weathered's Sons, New York, 
special mention for sectional hot water 
boiler. 

Hitchings & Co., special mention for 
cast iron tubular sectional boiler. 

Gorton & Lidgerwood, New York, 
honorable mention for magazine steam 
boiler. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Finley Lawn Rake Co., Joliet, 111., cer- 
tificate of merit for rotary lawn rake. 

Rustic Construction Co., New York, 
certificate of merit for display of rustic 
work. 

Robert Kift, Philadelphia, specijl men- 
tion for patent vase holders and flower 
tubes. 

D. B. Long, Buffalo, special mention 
for photographs and advertising novel- 
ties. 

W. H. Kay, New York, special recom- 
mendation for display of garden hose. 

The Sultare Co., New York, especial 
recommendation for display of insecti- 
cides, etc. 

N. P. McCarthy & Co., Boston, com- 
pliments for method of displaying hose 
menders, couplings, etc. 



The Exhibition and Decorations. 

At no time in the history of the S. A. P. 
has the local club of the convention city 
been ol such importance as at this last 
gathering of the century. One feature of 
great profit and enjoyment was the 
horticultural exhibition, the work of 
gardeners for various private estates. 
It was a revelation to many and a source 
of much pleasure to all. The engraving 
gives but an idea of the individual 
beauty of each exhibit and magnitude of 
the whole. The exhibition occupied the 
central portion of the building, while the 
trade exhibit extended under the gallery 
on each side and covered a large area at 



the rear. This was much more extensive 
than usual. 

The feature which at once awakened 
UB to the generous good will and hospi- 
tality of the New York club was the elab- 
orate and beautiful decoration of the 
audience room. The engraving here 
shown gives but a faint idea of the mag- 
nitude of the undertaking, the entire 
ceiling being covered with oak branches 
with the foliage hanging down in its 
natural position, the many pillars being 
covered with vines and decorated, some 
with gladioli, some with hydrangeas and 
grasses, giving the eff?ct of a forest of 
oak trees with the trunks covered with 
growths of vines and flowers. Around 
the walls were large palms and laurels, 
with several panels decorated profusely 
with tritomas. All the flowers were 
preserved by glasses of water made 
invisible by foliage. Only those who saw 
the decoration can appreciate the untir- 
ing eSort and skill which the work 
required. C. B. W. 

What Is a Hardy Perennial? 

The decision of the judges at the horti- 
cultural exhibition in connection with 
the recent convention of the S A. P. 
opens the way to a wide discussion on 
the subject, what is meant by "hardy 
perennial?" The points in question are 
these: The schedule called for a collection 
of hardy perennials and bulbous plants 
ol not more than twenty-five species. 
Two of the exhibitors were disqualified, 
because one had in his collection a vase 
of Clematis paniculata, the other a vase 
of Desmodium penduliflorum. I venture 
to asservate that there is not a single 
florist or gardener in this country who 
ever before heard that these plants were 
not perennials and there is no question 
of their hardiness in the vicinity of New 
York. 

On my calling the attention of the 
manager of the exhibition to the matter 
I was informed that it was herbaceous 
perennials that were meant by the sched- 
ule, although it did not say so, and the 
judges gave that decision. This state- 
ment was confirmed to me later on by 
one of the judges, who said that on the 
advice of the manager as to what was 
meant in the schedule, they gave that 
decision. Now, had the judges any 
right to give that decision without con- 



sulting other members of the committee? 
Was not the manager himself a compet- 
itor of the class in question? 

When I asked what these plants were, 
if not herbaceous, I was informed that 
Clematis paniculata was a climbing 
shrub and Desmodium penduliflorum a 
shrub. Who ever saw Desmodium pen- 
duliflorum not being herbaceous? True, 
the stems are rather hard-wooded, still 
not any more so than Hibiscus Crimson 
Eye, and I noticed a vase of this plant in 
the collection of the winner of the first 
prize. 

A plant, the writer is aware, was 
widely distributed both in Europe and 
America as Desmodium penduliflorum.but 
this was not a desmodium at all, but 
Lespedeza bicolor, and, moreover, it was 
the true desmodium that was in the col- 
lection in question. Lespedeza bicolor is 
a shrub. That Clematis paniculata is 
not herbaceous is doubtful. It certainly 
is herbaceous for the first two or three 
years after planting. 

As before stated the schedule reads 
"collection of hardy perennials and bulb- 
ous plants." If the manager and judges 
interpreted it to mean hardy herbaceous 
perennials why did they not also inter- 
pret it as hardy bulbous plants? Are 
gladioli hardy? A vase of these was 
in the first prize collection. It would be 
well for societies in getting up schedules 
for exhibitions to state plainly what is 
meant, for the good old days when a 
spade was a spade are of the long ago. 
John W. Duncan. 



Floral Decoration. 



in- ROBERT KIFT, OF PHILADBLPHI4. 

\An illustrated lecture read be/ore the Society oj 
American Florists at the New Yorii Convention.^ 

The ti^le of my paper covers the whole 
field of floral arrangement, the principal 
divisions of which are church, house and 
table decorations. Any one of these 
could be but touched upon in the limited 
time at my disposal. I shall consider 
them, therefore, in the broad sense, as in 
the views which I have collected, exam- 
ples of all classes of decorative work will 
be found. We read of the splendors of 
ancient Roman and Egyptian banquets, 
where flowers were said to have been so 
lavishly used; unfortunately I have no 
photographic views of these to ofleryou, 
and it may be that newspaper reporters 




THE LAVISH DEOORATION OF THE AUDIENCE ROOM WAS A FEATURE OF THE NEW YORK CONVENTION. 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



169 




A GLIMPSE OF THE BEAUTIES OF THE NEW YORK HORTICULTURAL EXHIBITION. 



were also abroad in the land, then as 
now. While we may not hope to rival 
these celebrated fetes for some time to 
come, there is no doubt that the use of 
plants and flowers in decorations at all 
social functions is rapidly becoming more 
general. Large private entertainments 
or balls are now given by individuals, 
that for lavish display far exceed the for- 
mer united efforts of the entire "four 
hundred." Wedding festivities are also, 
if possible, made greater society events, 
and at times tax the resources of the 
florist to the utmost. 

Perhaps the greatest factor for the 
increasing recurrence of these elaborate 
displays is the occasional "carte blanche" 
order that, falling into good hands, is 
carried out with judgment and discre- 
tion, thereby producing a floral efiect 
that delights all and encourages other 
patrons to even greater efforts when the 
occasion arises. On the other hand, 
money expended for flowers is too oiten 
considered wasted or of least moment. 
Editorials, even, have been written in 
the daily press, deploring the extrava- 
gant and senseless waste for such lavish- 
raent of flowers upon these occasions. 
The reverse is the case, however, as the 
delicacies and the music, considered so 
absolutely essential, are soon forgotten, 
while the decorations, greatly admired 
at the time, make a deep and lasting 
impression. 

When an architect plans a house be 
sees in his mind's eye just how every 
room will look before a line is drawn. 
The floral decorator should be able to do 
the same with his work. A look over 
the ground and a study of the color 
effects of the furnishings and permanent 
ornamentations will show him just where 
the special features that he has in his 
mind can be displayed to the best advan- 
tage. 

Every arrangement of flowers or 
plants, be it ever so small, should have 
some little touch to distinguish it, some 
individuality. Every room should have 
a point to which special attention 
is given so that on account of its novel 



or tasteful arrangement it attracts atten- 
tion. It is these special features that call 
forth admiration; they make a lasting 
impression that is carried away; they 
are the life of the work. 

Every decorator should provide him- 
self with neat wooden and wicker pedes- 
tals of various heights. Iron stands, 
some adjustable and fitted with tipping 
devices to hold a plant securely on its 
side, are also useful. Pot covers in good 
assortment of sizes are indispensable. 
All the above, except a few for special 
occasions, should be painted a foliage 
green, as it is the plants that add beauty 
and grace; the covers and pedestals are 
merely accessories, and should be con- 
cealed as much as possible. Tall flower 
vases for chrysanthemums or American 
Beauty roses are almost a necessity. 
These can now be had in silvered wicker 
with zinc lining, not better than glass 
but much more lasting. 

If the order calling for a honse decora- 
tion is elaborate, have a base of opera- 
tions; put your boxes in the laundry or 
other cool room in the basement and 
work from there; this confines the litter 
mostly to one place and keeps the stock 
in better form. The foliage and flowers 
for each room should be selected and 
boxed separately from a list previously 
made out, showing the different points 
where each lot is to be used, which, when 
ticked off, makes the order complete. 
This should follow with all plants, 
pedestals, pot covers, vases and other 
accessories, which when checked again, 
insures the safe return of all that have 
gone out and means a great saving in 
the course of a season's work. 

Those of the trade who make a spe- 
cialty of large decorations soon become 
more than mere florists and appropriate 
the word decorator. They also add to 
their force upholsterers, carpenters and 
electricians, and are obliged before long 
to hire storage room for the properties 
that accumulate and which, by re arrang- 
ing, can be irtilized time and time again. 
I must also speak of the kneeling stool or 
Prie Dieu. Some form of this useful arti- 



cle should be found in every decorator's 
stock, it being indispensable at a house 
wedding and is also often an essential 
feature at the church. 

Within the past twelve to fifteen yeais 
the decorator has called to his aid the 
evergreens of the wo .ids. Laurel branches 
and wreathing made of their sprays were 
first used, then that grand southern vine, 
the wild smilax, was introduced by A. C. 
Belschig, of Savannah, Georgia, in 1888. 
I have an interesting letter from Cald- 
well, the Woodsman, who, while he does 
not claim to be the original smilax man, 
is without doubt the genius who found 
out its commercial value and, having 
faith, devoted his whole time to collect- 
ing and getting it before the public. He 
invented the light packing case and 
obtained special express rates, so that 
now it can be had in almost any city of 
the Union and Canada during its season, 
and he thinks the entire output of last 
season would probably reach over 3,500 
cases. Palm leaves and crowns, as well 
as leucothoe sprays and galax leaves are 
also used extensively. Wild smilax 
adapts itself to almost any kind of wall 
or suspended form of decoration; each 
spray seems as if especially selected for 
arranging over this picture or mirror, or 
over that doorway, as the case may be. 
The only danger lies in its too promis- 
cuous use, as then its naturally irregular 
and graceful form is lost in the mass of 
foliage. 

I could describe a number of beautiful 
effects made by combinations of flowers 
and foliage, but think you will be able 
to get a better idea from the pictures 
about to be thrown upon the screen, 
nearly all of which have one or more 
features to commend them. 

I will only say, try and let your indi- 
viduality show in the work; do not rest 
satisfied with something that any one 
who had the material on hand could do. 
The mere setting a few plants about in 
the corners, crowding some ferns together 
on the mantle and hanging strings of 
smilax in which a few carnations have 
been wired, will not build up a reputa- 



170 



The American Florist. 



Sept. 



tion. Customers rarely know what is 
required, they expect the florist to have 
ideas, they look to him to tell them what 
they should have, the rest being merely 
a question of price. 

In conclusion, I believe that one of the 
most important elements in a decora- 
tion is to be on time. Many an other- 
wise faultless job is spoiled from lack of 
time in which to carry out all that was 
promised. What should have been a 
brilliant victory, so to speak, was turned 
into defeat, the florists retreating in con- 
fusion through the rear door while the 
guests were entering the front. There 
should be time, indeed, for a final inspec- 
tion and, if necessary, a touch here and 
there, that, while not in the contract, 
adds much to the work and leaves noth- 
ing to be desired. Then what a satis- 
faction there is in going about with the 
host and hostess and hearing from them 
that they are well pleased and that 
everything is exceedingly satisfactory. 
\ou may be very tired but you go away 
from their presence with a light heart 
and feeling of gratification that amply 
repays for all your efforts. 



The Improvement of the Carnation. 

BY WILLIAM WBBER, OAKLAND, Mn. 

I Read before the Society of American Florists at 
the New York Convent ion.^ 

When we contrast the carnation of 
to-day with the carnation of fifteen years 
ago, we behold a difference so vast that, 
had it been foretold at that time, the 
would-be prophet would have been made 
light of. Ver^ naturally we all expect to 
advance continuously, but at that time 
we scarcely thought we would accom- 
plish more in fifteen years than had been 
done in the preceding fifty. Yet when we 
look at the world in general, we are, 
after all, forced to admit that we have 
merely done what could naturally be 
expected. Had we not made such strides 
we would not deserve to be called pro- 
gressive, or equal in animation with the 
spirit which pervades all other branches 
of industry. 

I am charged with the mission of tell- 
ing you the story of "The Improvement 
of the Carnation." The whole story, 
while very simple, would be of such 
length as to prove irksome did I attempt 
to tell it to you in detail as it occurs to 
me; I will, therefore, be as brief as possi- 
ble, leaving the hundred and one little 
things which always form a part of the 
whole to your imagination. 

Improved methods of culture standout 



in bold relief as being the most import- 
ant item of our subject. How different 
are the methods we use now when 
compared to those of a decade or more 
back. We house our plants now from 
six to eight weeks earlier than we used 
to do. Then we merely tried to eet them 
all in before damaging frosts should 
arrive. The result was usually very 
large plants, with an abundance of 
shoots. Leaving out the winter culture 
in the greenhouse, and presuming they 
were to be grown in their natural way, 
these large plants were good subjects to 
winter over, and produce an abundance 
of flowers the following year; in other 
words, they were ready for their winter's 
sleep. 

What happens when large plants are 
planted late in the season is this. The 
time left for them to become established 
on the benches is decidedly too short. 
It will take two weeks in September or 
October to accomplish what one week in 
July or August would do in the way of 
filling the soil with roots. When this is 
accomplished, the plants are ready for 
work, and not before. 

The product of a poorly, or partially 
established plant cannot approach per- 
fection. When we plant late there is no 
time for thorough establishment to take 
place and the result will, in nearly every 
case, be a large crop of medium grade 
flowers at best. And where the culture 
is indiflerent, quantity as well as quality 
will be inferior. 

The merits of early planting are not as 
fully recognized as they should be. Early 
planting is one of the bulwarks of the 
present high standard the carnation of 
to-day enjoys. The reason is very sim- 
ple. When we plant in July and August 
we are giving the plants ample time to 
become thoroughly established before the 
days are so short, and there is conse- 
quently less light to help them along. 
Then we have our plants in good work- 
ing condition and the camationist can 
commence feeding his plants judiciously, 
and with the exactitude and nicety of 
one who thoroughly understands this 
subject. 

Early planting may mean a few less 
flowers, but this will be more than made 
up in the better quality and greater 
length of stem than could be expected 
from the late planted stock. 

A careful study of our soil, what itcon- 
tains and what it lacks; what constitutes 
plant food, and how plants feed, are 
matters which demand the fullest consid- 



eration. We cannot hope to accomplish 
anything of real value unless we work 
along these lines. 

The grower who will stop trying to do 
as well this year as he did last year, and 
instead make a systematic effort to each 
year eclipse last year's record, will soon 
be in line with the best growers in the 
land. What we need is to stop guessing 
and become so infused with our task that 
we will soon have all the ideas of our 
own we can manage and put to the test. 
In this manner each one working along 
his particular line of thought will evolve 
some points, perhaps, which his neighbor 
in the field may not, and in this way help 
to contribute to the store of knowledge 
which is being steadily collected and 
which will doubtless be preserved in his- 
tory. 

As soon as we learn to depend on our- 
selves, we begin forthwith to improve. 
What matters it if we do make a few 
mistakes? Is there any one here who 
hasn't made them? I believe not. They 
simply serve to guide us in our work and 
teach us the value of proceeding with our 
eyes open, to never experiment on a scale 
so large that the failure of the experiment 
would swamp us. If we manage it care- 
fully the results will inspire us with a 
confidence known only to those who 
thoroughly understand their calling; be 
he florist, engineer, merchant, soldier, or 
what not, it is all the same. 

Great as has been the improvement of 
the carnation in recent years, all indica- 
tions point to a still greater improve- 
ment in the near future. No small factor 
is the modern houses which are being 
built. One would think that we had 
nearly reached the limit in perfect green- 
house construction, but each year shows 
some little defect and a way to overcome 
it. The palatial houses now used form 
one of the greatest contrasts to the 
methods of a few years back, and no 
small portion of the carnations' improve- 
ment is directly due to this one thing. 

Everybody knows the absolute neces- 
sity of careful selection of stock, and 
doubly so in theselectionof cuttings, and 
their proper care, so that I can say noth- 
ing new along this line. One of the evils 
of to-day is a tendency to "bite off' more 
than we can chew;" it is poor policy and 
would better be abandoned, as it means 
only a loss of reputation and money. 

I have thus far said nothing of the 
seedhng man, the hybridist. Certainly 
a very large slice of the credit and the 
honor the carnation now enjoys is due to 




A GROUP OF FLORISTS AT GLEN ISLAND, NEW YORK, AUGUST 23, 1900. 



igoo. 



The American Florist. 



171 



his efforts. We are wont to kick and to 
cuff him for the indiflerent and poor vari- 
eties he has burdened us with, but through 
it all shines the fact that he is a most 
deserving fellow and has labored hard 
for the advancement of the carnation. 

We have passed the era when any 
medium-good variety may be dissem- 
inated. We now expect some special 
feature in a new candidate for honor. 
Hybridists understand this fact very 
well and we are promised some sensa- 
tions at our annual meeting in Baltimore 
next February. 

There is only one real, practical stand- 
ard by which we can judge a carnation, 
and that is its ability to make money for 
the grower. It would be unfair to seed- 
ling raisers did we intimate that this fact 
is not always kept in view. We cannot 
expect to scale the ladder at a single 
bound, and must therefore be content 
with a gradual ascent. 

The foregoing, I believe, will cover in 
general the practical part of the improve- 
ment of the carnation, but there is 
another side to be seen, another force to 
be reckoned with. The various trade 
journals must come in for their share, 
and so must the different florists' clubs 
and societies which give exhibitions from 
time to time and award prizes, thereby 
stimulating interest as well as a friendly 
rivalry. 

It must be admitted, however, that 
the greatest of these forces is that biggest 
and proudest baby of the S. A. F., the 
American Carnation Society. The mother 
society may well feel proud of her off- 
spring. We are accomplishing in a sys- 
tematic way things which would be 
impossible were not the American Car- 
nauon Society in existence. This organ- 
ization brings together annually the car- 
nation lovers from all parts of the coun- 
try. That these meetings and exhibi- 
tions accomplish great things must not 
be doubted for an instant. 

The practical fruits which resulted 
from the great advertising the carnation 
received as a result of the deal which 
made the Lawson carnation the property 
of Mr. Thos. W. Lawson, was largely 
brought about by the carnation society. 
If there had been no carnation society 
there would have been no Lawson fund, 
and likewise no Lawson medals. That 
interest in the society on this account 
has increased a hundred fold is certainly 
true. Mr. Lawson has been a potent 
factor in the advancement of the carna- 
tion and the beautiful flower which bears 
his wife's name is a fitting example of 
the up todate carnation. 

To sum up every detail, and give due 
credit to each for the part played by it in 
bringing the carnation to its present 
standard, would make a long story. I 
will leave this for you, and believe that 
you agree with me that the small as well 
as the large items are necessary to com- 
plete the list, the whole forming one grand 
pyramid. 

A glance at the future is always inter- 
esting. During the next ten years we 
may expect many great changes in the 
cultivation of the carnation. Perhaps 
even a revolution. Prof. Arthur and 
others have started us to experimenting 
with sub-watering, the ultimate success 
of which would be fraught with incalcu- 
lable benefit to the grower, and at the 
same time reduce very largely the labor 
connected with the" daily care of the 
plants. The principle of sub- watering is 
all right and out of the experimenting 
now going on some good must certainly 
come. That a good many failures are 




HOUSE OF HYDRANGEAS GROWN BY ALEX. CLARK, OF ERIE, PA. 



being met with in these experiments is 
very natural. We cannot hope to be suc- 
cessful to any great degree at the very 
outset. We must first become thoroughly 
familiar with the idea and the principles 
of sub-watering, and the effect under 
varying conditions it has upon the plants 
before we will be in a position to reap 
the benefits of our experiments. 

A few years ago when indoor culture 
was first suggested for carnations the 
idea was received in anything but a 
favorable light. In spite of this, how- 
ever, we have been gradually drifting 
towards indoor culture. Many now 
house their plants as early as the first 
week in July. Thus halt the distance 
between outdoor and indoor culture has 
been traversed. Whether the remaining 
distance between the two systems will 
be covered remains to be seen. 

One of the most important matters in 
connection with indoor culture is thor- 
ough ventilation. When we have mas- 
tered this fully we may expect good 
results from indoor culture. What the 
hybridist will bring forth in the near 
future is always interesting to conjecture. 
There must be some law or system in 
nature regarding color, etc., and possibly 
by degrees, study, work and practice, 
these secrets might be gradually unfolded 
to us. At any rate we know that these 
things will not come to us unless we 
make some effort. 



Hydrangea Culture. 



The hydrangeas shown in the illustra- 
tions were grown from cuttings propa- 
gated in March, 1899. When well rooted 
they were potted in 2^-inch pots. The 
tips were pinched out once before the 
plants were set in the field, which was 
about June 1. After planting out they 
were stopped once more. The season 
was very dry and no artificial watering 
was given and they were often wilted; 
the result was a short growth, thor- 
oughly ripened. Early in October the 
plants were lifted into 6-inch, 7-inch and 
s inch pots. The soil was one-third well 
rotted manure and a considerable por- 
tion of the roots were cut off to allow as 
much soil as possible in the pots, into 
which the plants were set firmly. They 
were wintered in a house where the tem- 
nerature was seldom higher that 40°. 
Early in March the plants were moved 



into a temperature of 55° and after they 
had started well they were given several 
applications of liquid fertilizer. They 
came in just right for Memorial day and 
sold out clean. Alexander Clark. 



Hardy Herbaceous Subjects for Late Planting. 

It seems strange that more herbaceous 
plants are not planted during the latter 
half of August and the first half of Sep- 
tember. All the spring and early summer 
flowering species and varieties, with very 
few exceptions, plant well at this time of 
year and make a fine show of bloom the 
next flowering season. If the planting is 
put off until spring, and it happens to be 
dry, the show is next to nothing in com- 
parison. 

If the place for planting happens to be 
where water cannot be given freely, it is 
better to wait until the first soaking 
rain afttr August 15. If, however, water 
can be given freely, any time after August 
1 is good. We have town water supply 
and continue planting herbaceous sub- 
jects from April 1 till hard frost. It is 
not, however, advisable, to plant any- 
thing with evergreen foliage much after 
September 15, as such plants do not bear 
covering until the ground is frozen solid, 
and would not make enough root to 
prevent heaving if a few hard frosts 
should come early and be followed by 
mild weather. 

It is safe to cover everything about the 
end of December, or before if the ground 
is frozen solid. We generally plant the 
most dormant plants first, such as the 
phloxes and paeonies, and leave those 
with evergreen foliage, such as Phlox 
subulata, Iberis correaefoha and Lychnis 
flos-cuculi till last. When we can, we 
cover the last mentioned families with 
boards nailed together. Evergreen 
boughs and long straw are also good. 
The covering of such hardy plants as the 
phloxes and pteonies is only absolutely 
necessary with fresh-planted stock, but 
we find Iberis correaetolia and Lychnis 
flos-cuculi are better covered, the latter 
because the roots are so brittle that 
freezing and thawing breaks them and 
the (ormer because the foliage burns 
badly in February and March. 

Quite a number of herbaceous plants 
do not bear being packed long in hot 
weather, so should be shipped by express. 
After the middle of September it is gener- 



1T2 



The American Florist. 



Sept. I, 



ally safe to have plants shipped by freight. 
After September 15 Phlox decussata and 
P. suftruticosacan be planted and a week 
or two later the heleniums, helianthuses, 
psonies, rudbeckias, spincas, etc. 

For August and early September plant- 
ing we can recommend the following: 
Achilleas, alyssums, anchusas, anemones, 
anthemises, aquilegias, armerias, cam- 
panulas, centaureas, cerastiums, coreop- 
sises, delphiniums, dianthuses, dicentras, 
gypsophilas, Helenium Boulanderii.heme- 
rocallises, iberises, lupinuses, lychnises, 
Mertensia Virginica, monardas, myoso- 
tises, Oenotheras, papavers, pentstem- 
ons, phloxes, primulas, pyrethrums, 
Spirffiafilipendulafl.pl., and Viola cor- 
nuta. There are many others, but those 
mentioned are the most in demand and 
will make a good show from spring until 
the end of June or middle of July. 

Massachusetts. R. N. 



Pan-American Notes. 

The weather for the past month has 
been rather drj' on the whole, yet it has 
been verj- favorable for the development 
of the ground. But few hours have been 
lost since the opening of spring on 
account of wet weather. Since my last 
notes a great deal of finishing has been 
done to that portion of the ground lying 
south, east and west of the Mirror lakes. 
Many acres near the Elmwood avenue 
entrance are now in a most complete 
state. Flower beds are prepared and the 
grass, the sowing of which has been going 
on every day this summer, now gives this 
portion of the grounds a most finished 
and beautiful appearance. The rapidity 
and luxuriance with which the grass 
grows has been a revelation to our citi- 
zens and all visitors. Rudolph Ulrichhas 
a large staff of men constantly seeding, 
and another gang continually following 
with the hose, and their labor is well 
rewarded. People who doubted that the 
immense amount of work could be done 
and thelargeexpanse of territory could be 
finished, now feel assured t-^at there will 
be no difiiculty in getting all of the 
ground in order by the opening day. 

The sunken gardens in front of ihe Hor- 
ticulture and Government buildings 
respectively are excavated. The fancy 
garden on each side of the large basin, 
known as the Cascades, is now surfaced 
and the banks will soon be green. This 
is in the very centerof thebuildingregion. 
The bottoms of the canal and lakes have 
been covered with two inches of broken 
lime stone, which insures their being 
what their name implies, "mirrorlakes," 
and not muddy pieces of water. 

The United States government is mak- 
ing a large display of ornamental and 
economic grasses that are useful and 
hardy in this latitude. Several of our 
leading seed houses have secured plots of 
ground varying from one-eighth to one- 
half an acre and are having them seeded 
and will ornament with flower beds. 

At the south border of the Mirror lakes 
and also in the many inlets and bays on 
both sides of the fore court and grand 
approach are planted 1,400 nympheas, 
with a few groups of nelumbiums. Clay 
banks, or dams have been made to retain 
eighteen inches of water for the accom- 
modation of these aquatics. They are 
the exhibit of Henry A. Dreer, of Phila- 
delphia, and if in one area would cover 
about an acre and a half of water. They 
must make a magnificent appearance 
from the banks on both sides of the lake. 
They are already making good growth, 
which assures .a magnificent display for 
next year. 



Work is progressing finely on all build- 
ings. The Propylaea, the most northern 
direction of the grounds, is nearly com- 
pleted. The Ellectricity building, Agricul- 
ture building, Graphic Arts, Forestry and 
Mines, I'nited States government build- 
ing, all are going up. The two largest 
buildings, which are the Machinery and 
Transportation and Manufacturers and 
Liberal Arts, each 350x500 feet, will 
soon be roofed in. 

A remarkable feature of this exposition 
is the immense interest and confidence 
displayed by the leading amusement peo- 
ple of the world. It is a fact that the 
amusement, or midway features, will 
entail a larger outlay of money than the 
whole of the exposition at Omaha cost. 
To accommodate the many remarkable 
novelties that will be exhibited they will 
now occupy the ground to the south of 
the mall and extending south below the 
Horticulture building. Many of these 
attractions and features of amusement 
are to be on a most expensive scale, and 
this is at the risk of the concessionaires. 
It shows what confidence they have in 
the prospective attendance. 

The half-million dollar art gallerj', the 
gift of J. J. Albright, is going up rapidly. 
This is situated in the park proper, over- 
looking the lake. The New York state 



building is also in the park at the north- 
east corner and is also being rapidly 
built. A magnificent new boat house 
and refectory will be built in the park 
proper and a new bridge spanning the 
lake between the north bay and the large 
bay, at a cost of $50,000. These are 
permanent improvements. 

Beautiful as the grounds of the Pan- 
.\merican Exposition now appear, the 
visitor can form but little idea of what it 
will be, because there is at present a high 
board fence separating the acquired 
ground for the exposition proper from 
park. When that is torn down and the 
100 acres of the beautiful park scenery is 
then part of the whole, it will be seen 
what an immense advantage it is to have 
the park a part of the exposition. 

WiLLi.\M Scott. 



ROSES. 

GROWING AMERICAN BEAUTY. 

Ed. Am. Florist: — I am agood grower 
of most varieties of roses, but have never 
had charge of American Beauties. Some 
growing here are eighteen inches high. 
Had I better stop them or let them go on 
till the buds are half grown? They are 
making nice plants only on stems. Do 




NEW AND ORIGINAL IDEAS IN FLORAL ARRANGEMENT AT THE EXHIBITION AT FRANK 
FORT, GERMANY, JUNE 22-24, 1900. 



I 

i 



/poo. 



The American Florist. 



173 



they need to be kept hotter than Brides? 
Should they be kept cool after they have 
made their growth? I want them for 
the holidays. J. B. R. 

This grower should pinch out his 
American Beauty buds as soon as they 
are well formed, but do not cut any 
young foliage away; encourage them to 
make all the growth they can. As the 
main crop is wanted for the holidays, the 
buds can all or practically all of them be 
picked ofl' till November. If any shoots 
show a tendency to run into long growth 
before setting a bud, they should be tied 
down to induce them to break the lower 
eyes. If really first quality flowers are 
wanted the plants should not be subjected 
to atrmperature higher than 58° at night 
after the hot weather is past and all the 
air possible should be given on every 
favorable occasioc. The plants should be 
kept growing freely and should never be 
checked, either from want of water or a 
sudden change ot temperature. If black 
spot should appear, a very little fire heat 
at night, just enough to expel the damp- 
ness, should be applied and some air left 
on all night at the same time. This will 
prevent the plants becoming weak. 

John N. May. 

shading rose houses. 

Ed. Am. Florist:— I wish to ask you 
how to shade rose houses; what months 
in summer the shading will be of benefit? 
I have roses in houses running both east 
and west and north and south, and 
plants in solid beds as well as in benches. 

G. S. S. 

This correspondent does not state in 
what part of the country he is located, 
so that it is impossible to give a satis- 
factory answer to his question. If he is 
located south of Mason and Dixon's line 
it may be advisable to give a light shad- 
ing to his rose houses during extreme 
hot weather. If he is in the north shad- 
ing will do more harm than good, unless 
it may be to save the flowers for summer 
use. In that case, also, a very light 
shading may be serviceable. This can 
put on vfith a syringe or with a long- 
handled brush. Mix whiting with half 
skimmed milk and half water, so that it 
will obscure the strong sun rays. If to 
be applied with a syringe the solution 
should be strained through a piece of 
very fine netting. It should be kept con- 
stantly stirred, otherwise the whiting 
soon settles to the bottom. If milk can 
not be had, a little salt added to the 
water will make the shading adhere to 
the glass for several weeks. 

If a more permanent shading is required 
take enough white lead to make a pail 
of kerosene or naptha look like thin milk 
and bv adding a small quantity of 
emerald gieen ground in oil it will give 
a slightly green shade to the glass, which 
is not so objectionable as clear white. 
This mixture should be applied with a 
brush and will stay on the glass till frost 
comes, but if the roses are required for 
winter use only, shading is not necessary; 
in fact it is an evil, as it makes the plants 
produce weak, soft growth rather than 
strong, sturdy wood. John N. May. 



Hancock, Mich.— A. M. York is add- 
ng about 2,000 feet to his range of 
glass here. 

Shbeveport, La.— R. H. Stanley has 
opened a flower store in a part of the 
building occupied by Schlenker, the con- 
i ectioner. 



New York. 

MATTERS HAVE QUIETED DOWN. — HOST OF 
VISITORS HAS DEPARTED, — ST ATE OF THE 
MARKET.— GROWERS DO BUSINESS. 

Things are quieting down nicely and 
the convention has passed into his- 
tory, the last Straggler of the visiting 
throngs having now taken his departure. 
The unanimous testimony of our guests 
as to our success in pleasing them is 
exceedingly gratifying and since they are 
happy we are doubly so. Although the 
days are already upon us when the 
absent local people, customers and flo- 
rists, are supposed to begin to "return 
to their knitting," there is as yet little to 
indicate their coming and nothing except 
the usual August stillness is discernible 
on the business horizon. Flowers are 
coming in to the wholesale markets in 
the customary quantities for the season, 
gradually increasing and gradually 
improving, also. Roses grow better as 
the plants gain strength and the boxes 
when opened in the morning will soon 
disclose something to admire. Asters are 
excellent, the Semple type predominating 
now and leaving no room for the com- 
mon, small flowered sorts which are 
practically unsalable when the better 
classes are obtainable. Lily of the val- 
ley is very fine and entitled to a better 
fate than the very small and uncertain 
demand makes unavoidable. Ot course 
of decorative flowers, such as sunflowers, 
hydrangeas and Japan lilies, there is an 
abundance, but unfortunately, decorative 
affairs of the necessary magnitude are 
conspicuously absent and the showy 
blossoms might better be left to brighten 
the landscape than sent to New York to 
overflow the rubbish carts. 

Twenty-eighth street has resumed its 
wonted aspect. Take the wholesale flo- 
rists out of the block between Broadway 
and Sixth avenue and there is not much 
left. What was left was, hovrever, very 
lonely and disconsolate during conven- 
tion week, when the headquarters of the 
talent was removed to the vicinity of the 
Grand Central Palace. "Carriages to 
meet all trains" was the rule at all the 
suburban establishments. Many visitors 
were received during and since the con- 
vention by the giowers whose fame has 
spread far out and some profitable busi- 
ness was done by those who had any- 
thing good to sell. 

Ehmann & Bock will open a store on, 
September 15, at 2112 Broadway. 



Philadelphia. 

QUAKER CITY BOYS VASTLY PLEASED 
WITH THEIR NEW YORK EXPERIENCES. — 
OUTING FEATURES PARTICULARLY AT- 
TRACTIVE. — GUNNERS MORE SUCCESSFUL 
THAN THE BOWLERS.— PERSONAL DOINGS. 

We are all at home again after having 
spent a most delightful week in New 
York. It is hard to say which feature we 
enjoyed the most. The first surprise was 
the beautifully decorated convention hall. 
What a happy thought; all about us a 
leafy bower, the intense green relieved by 
tritomas, gladioli and hydrangeas. Mr. 
Bunyard and others of the committee 
worked hard and produced a really beau- 
tiful and original eflect. The carriage 
drives were delightful. That through 
Greenwood Cemetery and Prospect Park 
was a revelation to most of the particip- 
ants. The cemetery is most beautiful; 
there is not a barren spot anywhere, the 
well kept drives winding about and 
revealing new vistas and landscapes as 
the party proceeded, calling forth words 



of commendation from everyone. The 
lawns were particularly well kept and 
the numerous lakes at the foot of the 
slopes added wonderfully to the beauty 
of the scene. There are many fine speci- 
men trees that, standing out by them- 
selves or grouped symmetrically, add 
much to the landscape. Prospect Park 
is an example of what a public pleasure 
ground should be. There were also exam- 
ples of fine bedding which showed that 
this feature was not forgotten. Thecom- 
mittee, Messrs. Langjahr. Sheridan, Ray- 
nor, Mellis and others, were very solici- 
tous for the welfare of their guests and 
everything possible was done to make 
the trip successful. It was an afternoon 
long to be remembered. 

The trip to Glen Island rounded up tlfc 
pleasure outings in a fitting climax. 
What a beautiful place Glen Island is, 
how orderly and yet no one felt the least 
constraint. Anyone having a half day 
of leisure while in New York should 
certainly visit this lovely isle. Ed. Jan- 
sen's reception was all right. Mr. and 
Mrs. Jansen made everybody feel at home. 
This new store, stocked as it is, ranks at 
the head and the decorations were fine. 

Our Florists' Club's shooting represen- 
tatives did fairly well, winning the Lock- 
land trophy and the prize for high indi- 
vidual score, that going to John Burton. 
The bowlers are, however, a sadly dis- 
appointed lot. They had troubles of 
their own and they weighed heavily 
enough to aflect their score disastrously. 
It's too early to say any thing about next 
year but we think they will recover in 
time to be in the line of battle at Bufialo, 
when the sfruggle is on again. 

We hear that the hail storm of August 
18, destroyed nearly every pane of glass 
in the conservatories at Wootton, the 
residence of Geo. W. Childs Drexel, at 
Bryn Mawr, Pa., and almost ruined the 
specimen ferns for which Mr. Long has 
made the place famous. The same storm 
played havoc with a crop of melons 
owned by J. G. Gardner. They were just 
ready for market and were beaten to a 
pulp. The loss is $500. 

John Walker left us for good last Thurs- 
day. We were very sorry to say good 
bye, but as he is leaving under such bright 
auspices we are all glad for the prospects 
which lie before him and hope their 
promises will be fulfilled. He carried 
away only the very best wishes for his 
success in his new field. 

On Wednesday, October 3, John P. 
Cleary will conduct a public sale of the 
stock of the Stoke Pogis Nurseries, Villa 
Nova, Pa., which the agent, George C. 
Watson, ot this city, announces will be 
closed out to settle the estate. The 
nursery boasts some splendid stock. 

A. Lincoln Brown, who has secured a 
good position in Cleveland, is, we under- 
stand, lookingupa house there and Phila- 
delphia is soon to lose a most charming 
young lady. They say Isaac Kennedy 
is much pleased with the west. 

Robert Craig says he did splendidly at 
the convention and since, with returning 
visitors; others were also benefited, 
notably Bayersdorfer & Co. and M. 
Rice & Co., who took large orders. 

Business is dull and flowers are plenti- 
ful; $3 to $5 is asked for the best teas, 
while $1 to $1.50 per dozen is the price 
for Beauties. K. 



Montreal, Can. — The Montreal Gar- 
deners' and Florists' Club will hold its 
annual chrysanthemum show in Windsor 
Hall, November 6 to 8. W. H. Horobin, 
130 Tupper street, is secretary. 



174 



The American Florist. 



Sept. 



Subscription, $1.00 a year. To Europe, $2.00. 
Subscriptions accepted only from those 
in the trade. 
Advertisements on all except cover pages, 
10 Cents a Line, Agate; $1.00 per inch. 
Cash with Order. 
No Special Position Guaranteed. 
Discounts are allowed, only on consecutive inser- 
tions, as follows — 6 times, 5 per cent; 13 times, 
10 per cent. 26 times, 20 per cent; 
52 times, 30 per cent. 
Cover space sold only on yearly contract at 
$1.00 per inch, net, in the case of the two 
front pages, regular discounts ap- 
plying only to the bacli pages. 

The Advertising Department of the Astbrican 
Florist is for Florists, Seedsmen and Nurserymen 
and dealers in wares pertaining to those lines only. 

Order! for less than one-half inch space not accepted. 

Advertisements must reach us by Wednesday to 
secure insertion in the issue for the following 
Saturday. Address 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO.. CHICAGO. 



Peefumeey is now made from sweet 
pea flowers grown by Eckford, the Eng- 
lish specialist. 

A FEW plants of the Lawson carnation 
have found their way to England and 
are the objects of much favorable com- 
ment. 

Max Leichtlin speaks of Campanula 
rupestris as a worthy companion to C. 
mirabilis and states that it does well in 
a sandy loam. 

This is the day the window glass fac- 
tories are scheduled to begin the season's 
operations but labor conditions are not 
favorable and seem to indicate advanc- 
ing prices. 

The sixty-ninth annual fair of the 
American Institute will be held at the 
Berkeley Lyceum building, New York, 
September 2.' to 27. Jas. W. Withershas 
charge of the section for flowers and 
plants. 

European growers of Begonia Gloire 
de Lorraine are in some instances meet- 
ing with good success in propagating 
from leaves, the principal difficulty being 
in the damping olTof the cuttings. 

Clejiatis paniculata has suffered 
lately by being eaten at the ground line 
by a little insect, the same, or at least 
quite similar to those which have 
destroyed aster plants for several years. 

The National Florists' Board of Trade 
has just issued its August and September 
supplement to the July credit and 
information list. This supplement con- 
tains 883 changes and 12.") new names, 
making a total on the list of .'!,0G2. 

THEf oUowing hail storms have recently 
been reported: At Meyerstown, I'a. ; 
Perry, la.; Strasburg, Pa.; Frankfort, 
Ind.; Beardstown, III.; Wheatland Mills, 
Pa., and Pearl Kiver, N. Y. Hail insur- 
ance is looking up in those sections. 

James Veitch & Sons have been given 
the first-class certificate of the Royal 
Horticultural Society for a nepenthes, 
the result of crossing N. Dicksoniana and 
N. Mixta, which is remarkableforthe size 
of the pitcher. They have named the 
variety for Sir Thiseleton Dyer. 

The usefulness of Tamarix Africanus 
as decorative material was demonstrated 
at the Glen Island dinner to theS. A. F., 
where it was used in the archways 
between two dining rooms. Its gray- 
green, feathery foliage with pinkish blos- 
soms and lasting qualities were far supe- 
rior to any asparagus for such work at 
this season. 



Reward — Stolen ! 

A libi'rul rt'wanl will be paid for one hide, miss- 
ing; since a week ago. A bluidy Scot named 
Watson is known to have bfen in the vicinity 
carrying: :i scalping knife immediately laefore tin* 
aforesaid hide was missed. 

Address W. N. E., 

Mount Greeuwocd, III. 

[This should have more properly been 
inserted in the advertising columns, but 
the gentleman was in such an evident 
state of distress that we felt it necessary 
to give it the widest possible publicity. 
—Ed.] 



Greenhouse Building. 

Rochester, N. V.— J. B. Kellar Sons, 
house 20x100. 

Sioux City, la.— J. C. Rennison, two 
houses. 

Monticello, la.— C. L. Van Meter, 
house 22x50. 

Indianapolis, Ind. — S. A. Fletcher, one 
house. 

Farmer City, 111.— John McDonald, one 
house. 

Seattle, Wash.— Washington Floral 
Co., violet house 30x110. 

Chicago, 111. — W. L. Palinsky, house 
18x75. 

Baltimore, Md. — I. H. Moss, three 
houses. 

Delaware, O.— Jos. Cunningham, one 
house. 

St. Louis, Mo. — Otto G. Koenig, one 
house. 

Dayton, 0.— Dayton Floral Co , two 
houses. 

Monongahela, Pa.— I. S. Crall, three 
houses 18x100, one 18x80. 

Mt. Clemens, Mich.— John Gary, house 
28x14-0. 

Macomb, 111.— S. T. Danley, two houses 
10x55. 

Williamsport, Pa. — Evenden Bros., 
carnation house 52x265. 

Dorchester, Mass. — L. H. Foster, three 
houses each 120 feet long. 

Manchester, Mass. — W. F. Spry, house 
20x150. 

Shamokin, Pa. — Hugh Campbell, two 
houses. 



Chicago. 

STATE OF THE MARKET. — TRADE GOOD 
CONSIDERING ALL CONDITIONS. — GREAT 
PARADE INCONVENIENCES WHOLESALERS 
ON TUESDAY. — CON VENTIONITES RETURN- 
ING. — PERSONAL DOINGS OF INTEREST.— 
MANY VISITORS IN TOWN. 

Trade has been very satisfactory in 
Chicago this week, considering all things. 
The city has been so full of strangers 
that many lines of retail business have 
suffered, and on Tuesday, the day the 
great G. A. R. parade formed in the cut 
flower district, the streets were so 
thronged that the express companies 
made no eflort to deliver or collect ship- 
ments between the hours of about 9 a. 
m. and 4 p. m , so that things were in a 
very uncertain state for that day and 
much inconvenience resulted. Receipts 
continue light and in some lines barely 
sufficient for the demand. The Beauty 
growers are cutting increasing quantities 
of short stock; with most of them the 
qualities are excellent and the stems 
steadily lengthening. Of tea roses the 
supply is decidedly inadecjuate. The few 
really first-class flowers are only suffi- 
cient to whet the appetites of the buyers, 
but only a very small proportion of the 
cut is first-class. Out-door carnations 
are selling well and, in the cases of those 
growers who disbud the blooms in the 
field, the stock is good and brings fair 
prices. Even asters have ceased to be in 



any considerable oversupply; of course 
the recent rains, followed by hot suns 
have injured all outdoor flowers more or 
less. W. N. Rudd and Klehm's Nurseries 
are each sending in good hydrangea 
trusses, those of the former being partic- 
ularly tine. 

Nearly all of those who went to the 
convention are at home from New York 
and there is not a word other than praise 
spoken for that historic gathering and 
the hospitality of the New York Florists' 
Club. The exhibition is invariably pro- 
nounced unrivaled. 

Michael Cullen, formerly shipping 
clerk at Vaughan's, who a few weeks 
ago was so badly burned by an accident 
at Moxley's butterine factory that his 
life was despaired of, is reported on the 
road to recovery. 

J. D. Thompson, of the Chicago Carna- 
tion Co., has gone for ten days' hunting 
in the Adirondacks and they say that 
his new gun and khaki suit are dreams 
of beauty. 

W. A. Peterson, the nurseryman, has 
returned from a six weeks' trip through 
the east, visiting leading nurseries and 
prominent private estates. 

Mrs. J. C. Vaughan and Leonard 
Vaughan have returned from Europe, 
arriving August 26 at New York. 

Most of the wholesalers will keep open 
until 6:30 p. m., beginning Monday, Sep- 
tember 3. 

J. D. Hartshorne and George Stollery 
have reached home from their trip to 
Europe. 

G. E. Pieser saw what Fitzsimmons 
did to Sharkey the other evening in New 
York. 

Wm. Kyle and wife are visiting at Mr. 
Kyle's old home at Kalamazoo, Mich. 

There have been a great many visitors 
in town this week, called principally by 
the G. A. R. encampment and the low 
fares offered for the occasion. Among the 
visitors were: S. Alfred Baur, Erie, Pa.; 
Chas. P. Mueller, Wichita, Kans.; Messrs. 
Sonnenschmidt & Junge, IndianapoHs; 
W. A. Musson, Mogadore, O.; Victor 
Wayman & wife, Madison, Wis.; H. A. 
Schuermann, St. Louis; Al