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Full text of "The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade"

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LIBRARY 



OF THE 




MASSACHUSETTS 

AGRICULTURAL 

COLLEGE 

NO. '2.(iA5:L-_DATE.5"--J3-0-S: 



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DEPT. 



The 



■»!<• 
■^n- 



m AM BR I CAN m 



FIvORIST 



A WEEKLY JOURNAL FOR THE TRADE. 



VOLUME XXII. 



CHICAGO: 

AMERICAN FLORIST COMPANY. 
ieo4. 



H wn i ~r 



The American Florist. 



« 



«- 



ATor^u^dK x:2c:ii. 



* 



-*? 



January 30, 1904, to July 23, 1904. 



vear 



20S 
358 
302 
303 
-358- 



Agriculture, department of, . 

Atom- ■NVY:.'73,'l5i:'mV'iiJ'356", 437 
SM 5:i8 593, 685. 807, 843, 860, 972, 1042 

Alvin.Tex ■••-. ^ »'"' 

Araericiin Carnation Society: — 

—Convention ■. ■ '^o 

—Department of registration i- 

83, 123, 164, 739. 
—Detroit convention notes........ itn 

—Detroit, thirteenth annual meet- 

ing at, March 2-3, 1904 201 

Banquet, the •. ;=' 

Chicago gets next convention.. . m 

*General view ot exhibits 2Ud 

»Hartshorne's vase of Fiancee... 207 

*Hin'svaseot Adonis 20b 

Miscellaneous exhibits ^"' 

Notes ;.••••• *' 

♦Prominent men at convention. . 211 

Repori nf thr judges 

Resolutions, linal ■• ••• 

»Roses shown by Peter Reinberg 

Thursday morning session 

Trip to Mt. Clemens :,-^ ,.,, 

Visitors, the .....207,258 

Wednesday evening session 201 

—Exhibition premium list • m 

— *Harmoniehall. Detroit, scene ot 

1904 convention :;•■".■ 

-*Hartshorne, James, President- 

elect *^^' 

— Herr's. Secretary, report. 205 

—President Rackham's address . 30d 
♦Anderson's, S. A. .Buffalo, N. Y., 

before and after Easter 512, 613 

♦Angraecum Sanderianum «5i 

Aquatics, notes on.,. b9& 

Arahis iilliida llore pleno.... .... .. 814 

»\rec;is. liou.,c of at A. Leuthy & 

Co.-s. Roslindale, Mass 263 

*.Erides Fieldingii 8»3 

Asburv Park. N. J ■• '%% 

Asparagus plumosusinrose house. ?,» 
*Asters.l»il "f grown by Charles A. 

Horn, H.'l.-Mii. Mont 590 

•Aster, new. Miss Kate Lock. l-M 

♦Azaleas at Alex. B. Garden s, 

Washington. D. C ■•• 661 

Azaleas, forcing, kept over for __ 
Christmas ''* 



Baltimore.. 48. 108. 131, 170, 316.366, 330 
386 435, 479. 518. .5.57, 593, 637, 664, 700 
744^ 7B1, 818, 8.50, 886, 932, 956, 989, 1031 
♦ Bay trees, i.n;int, at Julius Roehrs, 

Rutherford, X. J 882 

Bedding plant trade reports, spring 

of 1904. 920,9,58 

Beginners, notes for 9i4 

♦Begonia Gloire de Lorraine at 

Southboro, Mass 4 

Boston. .47. 91, 130. 170, 216, 320, 386 
435, 479. 518. 5.57, 592, 636, 664, 700, 744 
781, 818. 851, 886. 989, 1031. 
Boston horticulture, varied views 

of 8« 

♦Bougainvillea Sanderiana at W. 
K. Harris', Philadelphia, April 

1903 

Box bushes, transplanting 

♦Breitmeyer, Philip 

Brick dust, suit caused by 

British trade topics 6, 6'24. 661, 733, 778 

883, 986. 103-2. 
Buffalo Florists' Club, carnation 

night 168 

Buffalo, N. Y...'20, 58, 171. •288, 41'2, 436 

519, 593, 674, 745, 792. Kil, 970, 1043. 
Bulbs, flowering, at W. H. Sie- 

brecht's 213 

Bulb records, forcing for 1903-1904 

in New Y'ork . 694 

Butte, Mont .... 684,959 

♦Buying seeds, one of the earliest 
signs of spring 33 



IllTiBtratlons are indicated by an * 

Cinoinriali !>. 7H. 1-3. 198. ?40, 280. 354 

387. 4H1. 53K. 1)38, 6HK. K51.887, 923, 1038 
♦Cineraria sO-llala. itri/.e. at Pliihi- 

delphia exhibition, March, 1901 383 
♦Cinerarias at Boston exhibition, 

March. 1904 430 

City Gardens Association, AVash- 

iiigton, D C .• 384 

Civic duties, our craftsmen's, 

paper bv Theodore Wirth 425 

(■|>'inalis.'\ l.ir niarkft ... 660 

Cli'Velaiid.SH, 62. 190, '234, 387, 346, 387 

436, 494, 633, 576, 665, 732, 781, 873, 92J 

968, 1021. 
♦Coal, paper by Prof. H. Hassel- 

bring 5.52 

Coleuses, two good 1018 

Columl)Us, O, 38, 110, 344, 353, 490, 519 

629. 902. 1000. 
♦Conklin's, George, Grandville, 

Mich., greenhouses at high water 472 
♦Conservatory of Percival Roberts. 

Jr., at Narbeth, Pa 43 

Conservatories, filling 42 

♦Cook. .Vnthonv. Baltimore, Md. , . 658 

♦Cook, Jolm, of lialliniore. , 610 

Corn canning, sidt- lines to .WH 

♦Country estate, a beautiful 1017 

♦Crvptoineria Japonica, grown as 

pot plant by Jackson & Perkins. 314 



167 

323 

.. 311 

990 



Callas, drying off bench i 

Call.as, soft rot of 1' 

Camellia buds, unopened ... 126 

Canadian Hort. Assn. executive 

committee meeting 310 

Canadian Hort. Assn., annual con- 
vention 

♦Candytuft, house of at \Vm. Sims', 
Cliftondale, Mass 698 



"'arnation: — 

-♦Adiuiis, Hill's vase of at Detroit 

convention 206 

— .\dvice to exhibitors 83 

—Benches, iron bottom. 958 

-♦Bride, Tlie. John N. May's, .308 309 
— ♦Burki, Fred, at John Murchie's, 

Sharon. Pa 738 739 

-♦Cardinal.. '204 

—Caring for young i>lauts 381 433 

— (Jare of young plants indoors ,,.. 878 

—Care of young [ilants in field 775 

— *Carual'inns and bulbs at Boston 

exhibition, March, 19(M 4'39 

—Carnations at Cottage Gardens 164 

♦258, '259. *'260. 
—Carnation men, three prominent 
(C. W. Ward, Fred. Dorner, R. 

W. Witterslaeflcr) 305 

—Comments on Detroit convention 305 

—Cultural ri'iniiiders 83,381 

— Dispciisin^^ with steam heat 263 

-Early |. Lulling 1016 

— *l'',nrliaiiir<-ss and Fiancee, 

blooms of. compared 313, 213 

—Enchantress, the "sleepy' . . .738. 775 
—Exhibiting carnations, paper by 

William Scott 2.59 

—♦Fiancee. Hartshorne's vase of 

at Detroit convention 207 

—General notes . . 381. 633 

— ♦H.'iynes, John E., J. E. Hayues' 

new carnation 6'23, 6?5 

—Heating carnation houses 433 

— *Hinsdale, Judge, C. W. Ward's 

new 259,306 

—Housing the field plants 

— ♦Ideal dark [jink seedling No. 

.564, C. \V. Ward's 250 

— ♦Indoor culture, paper by Peter 

Fisher, 550 

— Kokomo, Ind 307 

— *Lawson. Mrs., at Livingston 

Seed Oo.'s. Columbus. Ohio.", 165 
— ♦Lawson. Mrs. Thos., house of at 

W. W. Coles' 307 

— Layering carnations 1017 

— Local exhibitions pay 93 

— ♦Model carnation house, Robert 
Craig & Sons', built by Lord &, 

Burnham. 551 

— Notes on ]irop.agating 44 

— IVitIos carnation discarded.... 666 

— I'lantiug nul .\oung stock 633 

— Pn'jiariug for new stock 432 

— ♦Queen Louise in Connecticut... 623 
636. 

— Raising seedlings 132 

—♦Richmond Gem, B. K. & B. 

Floral Co.'s 514 

—Show at Toronto, Ont 306 

—Soil, pn'iMiriiiu' the 476 

— Soil changing iu .-arnation house 1017 

— .Solid beds versus benches 737 

— Spring work 585 

— ♦Starot Bethlehem, J. E. Hayne 

new carnation 623. 624 

Stem rot and its probable causes, 

p.iper by Peter Fisher 87 

■Too much nitrate of soda — 388 
■♦Wolcott, Gov., at Livingston 

Seed Co., Columbus, O 165 

♦Ward's seedling carnations, 

group of 260 

Catalogues received, l^, 368, 366, 666 

♦Cattleya MossiEe, a fine 694 

Cliattaiiooga, Tenn 33 

Chicago.. 9. 48. 89, 129, 169, 215, 365, 318 
385, 481, 478, 516, 566, 590, 6i5, 663, 699 
743, 779, 817, 8)9, 884, 931, 954, 988, lOM 
Chicago, a visit to, by W. W. Coles 428 
Chicago Florist Club's exhibition. 124 
Chico. Cal., experiment station at. 816 
Chrysanthemum : — 
— Chicago show premium list., . 

—Comment 133 

— Europe, short notes from 

— ♦Golden Chain in mass 3 

— Show pl:ints, handling young ... 878 
— Show clirysanthemums, housing 740 

— Housing i-oung plants 810 

— Late blooming 50 

— Marquis de Pins 85 

—Mulch for exhibition stock 1014 

—Pulling cuttings into pots 585 

— »Sanla claus 123 

Clir\ sanihcnium Society of America : — 

— liosiou gi'ts 1901 meeting 1 

— Pri'Miiuius for Boston exposition 438 

— Sjiecial prize offer 783 

—White Maud Dean 702 



Dahlia propagation 309 

Diiisies for spring, sowing 9.58 

♦Dale estate, greenhouses of, 

Brampton, Out 3 

Davenport, la,. ..152, 267, 574, 680, 874 
♦Decoration day at national capital 77j 
777, 778. 

Deutzia gracilis, forcing 581 

♦Deutzia Lemolnei at W. K. Har- 
ris'. Philadelphia. April, 190! . 16' 
Detroit.... 58, 131,410,494,628,724, 819 
1010. 



Diooii edule 
♦Dorner, Fred. 
Durham, N. Y. 



702 
205 
800 



Florh-ullure, thought 515 

♦Flowcrday, Robert 211 

l-'lower i>ot machine, compost 630> 

♦ Freesias, field of. iu California.. . 710 

Fri'esias, growing 668 

Freni'h llorists have hard time .... 622 

French growers, Russian war hurts 51.?- 

G 



♦Galega Hartlaudi 

Galvin & Co , Thomas, Boston, 

Mass,, store of 

♦Gammage, William '. .. 

Gardeners' club, a model, (Dobbs 
ferry, N, \' ) 51 1 



695 



£03: 
211 



from September to 



Earthworms, to destroy '■ 1'26 

Easter trade, the ' 470, 614 

Edelweiss, culture of the ,323. :«2, 630 
830. 

♦Elk made of plants, an 847 

Elmira, N.Y 410 

English market plants 166 

♦Erica Cavendishiana, grown by 

Louis Dupuy, Whiestone. N. \'.. 384 
European horticulture, from Ger- 
man trade ]>apers 137, 1040 

Kuroi)ean seed report 364 

Example for, by W. N Riidd 558 

Exhibition of novelties, rules gov- 
erning 168 

Exhibitions, management of, 

paper by W, N. Rudd 208 

Exhibitions: — 

— ♦American Carnation Society's 
exhibition at Detroit, March 2-3, 

1904 . 205 

— ♦.\merican Rose Society and 
Penn, Hort, Society's exposition 
at I'liiliidclpliia, March. 1904 375, 430 
—Chicago Fl.irist Club's, Febru- 
ary, 19UI. 124 

—Chicago show premium list 739 

—Coming exhibitions 782, 820, 852 

888. 959. 990. 
—Turin, Italy, international show 

at . I 

— Lenox, Mass.. spring show at. 938. 940 
—•.Mass. Hort, Society, JIarch, 1904 426 
—Mass. Hort. Society rose and 

strawberrv show 925 

— ♦Newport'Hort Society rose and 

strawberry show 986, 98' 

—Peony society's show, American. 815 
■Tarrytown, N. Y., spring show 

at.... 881 

Toronto, Ont., carnation show at 306 



♦Farquhar's group at Boston exhi- 
bition, March, 1904 nv 

♦Fern house at A. Leuthy & Co.'s, 
Roslindale, Mass 263 

Ficus elastica cuttings 214 

♦ Fleischer's, G,, new store, Pueblo, 
Col 816 



Gardenias 

March. ... 43J 

Gardenias, shipping 313; 

Gardening, railroad so 

Gardens and greenhouses, prizes 

for 814 

Gardens, two eastern 6j9 

♦Genista, a prize, at Philadelphia 

exposition, March. 1904 :i83: 

Geranium buds dry off 783 

♦Geranium Telegraph, new 9m 

♦Gladioli. Groffs hybrid 313: 

♦Gladiolus, the, paper by Arthur 

t'owee 313 

Glass nniking. window, paper bv 

M. (;. Holding ..;.....". 46 

Glass market, the window 372, 8'30 

Grand Rapids, Mich 481. 838' 

♦Greenhouse, a model, Robt. Craig 

* Sons 55i> 

Greenhouse and dwelling, to heat 433 

9.58. 
Greenhouse and store heating .... ?88. 

Greenhouses, best direction for 741 

Greenhouse liuildilig .,48.372 437 5.54 

623,658.714,814,848.931,969, 
Gre<'nhouses. building tureka, 

paper by J, S, Dillon ...' 38> 

Greenhouse cimstruetion and heat- 
ing, paper by Robert W King. ,. 12r 
Greenhouse construction, recent 

jiaper by Lyman IS Crow.. . 551 

♦Greenhouse frame, patent metal, 

ll:irr\ Siini)son's 551 

Greenhouse heating. . .126, 218, 288, 332: 

368. 383. 482. 8-30. ' 
♦Greenhouse heating at National 
.Soldiers' Home, Washington, 810 811 
812, 

Greenhouse, how to build 1015 

Greenhouse, ideal tedding plant, , 703 

Greenhouse leaf tyer 587 

Greenhouse, piping for 84.126 388: 

815, &5-3. 

Greenhouse, putty needed for 731 

fjreenhouse repairs 101s 

Grec.nhouse with south exposure.. 433: 

♦Greening, C, W.. and wife 1033- 

♦Grenell. W. H . second vice-presi- 
dent American .Seed Trade .Asso- 
ciation . 93; 

♦Gutters, merits of iron, bv George 

M.Garland ". 550 

Growers, with the: — 
— ♦.\iidri', .lolin K, . Doylestowii, Pa 1015 
— .\sehmann. Godfrey, Philadel- 
phia, Pa 313 

— At Short Hills, L.I 429- 

— *liudlong & .Son Co.. .!. A.. 

Auburn. R. I 283 

— (.'iiolidge Bros . South .Sudburv, 

Jlass ... ", 430. 

— *Dupuy, Louis, Whitestone. N. 
Y.. Hydrangea azurea as grown 

by. for Easter .... 312 

—Eaton, H. N., .South Sudburv, 

Mass . 43i'. ^432 

—♦Edgar, W. W., Waverly, Mass. 312 
— ♦Essex Greenhouses, North Olm- 
sted. O 44, 45 

—♦Garden, Alex. B., Washington, 

1>. C .....660' 

-Herr, Albert M 1015 

—♦Leuthy, A. & Co,, Roslindale, 

Mass 262 

— ♦Lewis'. \\', L., carnation house, 

Marlboro, Mass 84 

— ♦Peckham, S. S., Falrhaven, 

Mass 135 

— Reinterg, George, Chicago, III , . 920- 
— Renter's. S. J., Westerly, R I , 429 
—♦Roehrs, Julius, Rutherford, N. J 883 
— ♦Schullheis', A., College Point. 

L, I . Easier plants at 312 

— Siebrecht's. W. H., Astoria, N.Y. 3l:t 



— *Sims, William. Cliftondale. 

Mass 698 

— *Von Boeselager, August, Mt. 

Clemens, Mich. . — 164 

— Weiland. Peter, XewCnstle. Ind. 775 
— *Wvlaud, John L., De Haven, Pa. 45 



Hail 775 

Hail Association, Florists' 924 

Hartford. Conn. .. . ■... ^6. 234 

Has it ever occurred to vou? paper 

by Louis Ullrich. Titlin. O ....'.. 358 
*Hauswirth. Phil, family, five gen- 
erations of the, Chicago 741 

Heating a water tank 783 

♦Helenium Jiutumnale 433 

*Holden, L, K.. residence of, Glen- 

ville, O 305 

Honolulu ... .... 356 

Horticultural Science, Society for 4 
*Hunnewell, H. H , triennial pre- 
mium 427 

*nvdriiiigeas at W. K Harris', 

Philadel hia, Ap'il. 1903 ... 166 

♦Hydrangea azurea as grown for 
Easter bv Louis Dupuv, AVhite- 

stone. N.Y " 312 

Hydrangeas for Decoration day — 12 
*Hvdrangeas in Japanese garden, 
World's fair 984 



Indiana, a tour in central 588 

Indianapolis ..11, 171, 282, 481, 628, 807 

Ionia, Mich 794 

Irises, a field of. at P. S. Peterson 

it Son's, Chicago . 846 

Iris Kaempferi. . ,' 888 



Jacksonville. Fla 686 

"Job." in reply to 630 

Joliet, 111 ■ 639 



Kansas City. Mo 171.417, 76 

•Kentias at Geo. Wittbold Co.'s, 

Chicago IT 

Kentucky prices . . 1013 

♦Kuhl's establishment, Geo. A.. 

Pekin, 111 .588 



Lffilio-Cattleya Dr. Scliiffman i 

Lansing, Mich. . 464 

Legal decision, important 782 

Leiter. the late Levi Z 853 

Lenox, Mass... 33, 58, 113, 368, 437. 968 

Lewis and Clark exposition 594 

*LiIac. Dutch, a discouraging sam- 
ple of 511 

Lilies, cold storage for 12 

*Lilium giganteum grown from 

seed. — 6 

Liliura HarFisli. how to force 433 

Lilium Harrisii. late in forcing. .. 438 

Lily of the valley, forcing 589 

*Lily, Japanese "longiflorum multi- 
floVum. as grown by Samuel 

Pearce. Chicago 310 

Little Neck, L. I 110 

London, auction bulb sales in .... 9i 

London, England, news 158 

London, Out .^74 

Los Angeles, Cal 358, 957 

Louisiana Horticultural Society. . 314 
Louisville. ...63, 416, 437, 738, 806. 819 
851.887.970, 999. 1029. 

Lowell. Mass 10.*. 298,417, 437. 481 

519, 686. 745, 830, 864, 997. 



♦Magnolia manicata 697 

♦Mangold Ferdinand 1014 

Market gardening: — 

— Ideal vegetable nouse 777 

—Notes 167,777,952 

— Piping vegetable house 777 

—Puff ball culture 953 

Massachusetts flower growers' 

meeting , 746 

♦Maps. Hort. Society 426, 9iid 

♦May, L. L , vice.president Ameri- 
can Seed Trade Association 932 

♦McCarthy, N. F. tS: Co., Montrose, 

Mass , rose house of 589,622 

McMahon, the late John J 703 

♦Mcpherson, Alexander, superin- 
tendent of grounds and green- 
bouses National Soldiers' Home, 

Washington 810,815 

Milwaukee, Wis.. ..58. 49, 105, 148, 244 

414, 481. 6J8, 737, 796, 874, 960, 1036. 
Minneapolis. Minn.. ..3>, 144, 198, 254 
296, 368, 387, 806. 

Moline, 111 957 

Montreal 49, 356 910 



♦Narcissi at Alex. B. Garden's, 

Washington, D. C ., 661 

Nephrolepis Piersoni sporting back 163 
New Bedford, Mass.. ..30, 143, 180, 267 
387, 570, 737, 989. 

New Castle. Ind 13], 819 

New England notes 516, 888. 958 

New Haven County Hort. Society. 431 
New Haven. Conn. , 1032 



New Jersey Floricultural Society. 86 
♦Newlands. Senator Francis G.,'of 

Nevada. .. f)»<^ 

New Orleans. La 180. 437. 550. 746 

Newport. R I . .414. 437, 500. 570, .578 

639. 665, 726, 745, 801, 819, 860. 92J, 957 

986. 
New York 9, 47, 90. 130. 169, 316, 266 

318, 385, 435, 477. 517, .=i5;i, 591. 626. 663 

P9&..74i, 783, 817, 849. 884, 921, 934, 987 

1019. 
New York Florist Club's annual 

dinner 167 

New York Florist Club's outing 921 

953. *953, ♦lOOi. *1003. 

New York horticulturists meet 663 

♦New York market, proposed... 

New York to St. Louis , 

Norfolk, Va, 



660 

888 

680 

.26, 580 



North Adams, Mass .... 

Notes by the way 878 

Nursery trade: — 

—American PomologicaL Society 

report. '. 492 

— *Apple, alleged seedless 899 

— Boston park news. 1032 

— Browntail moth, itch of the 968 

—Canadian Horticultural Ass'n... 230 

—Cincinnati parks .. - 756 

—Convention of park superintend- 
ents 863 

— Cornell school of landscape gar- 
dening 756 

—Effects of a severe winter 5*^8 

— Huntsville. Ala., news 182 

— Japanese maples, grafting 3 2 

— -Topliu, Mo . news 276 

—Linden leaves, diseased 899 

—New England laws, good . . 968 

—Notes . 22. 60, 103, 142. 183. 230, 278 

33!. 398. 448. 493. 530. fi68, mi. 640. 676 

713. 756. 794. 830, 8(J3, 934, 968. 1000 

10^3, 

—Park and Outdoor Art Associa 

tion 862 

-Park news 676. 794 

—Park system, fine 604 

—Pa rk work a t Boston 712 

-Pennsylvania Nurserymen's As 

stK'iation 
— ♦Picea pungens Kcsteri, at J. H. 
. Troy's, New Rochelle, N. Y.. 676 

—Portland's invitation to nursery 

men. . . . 676 

— Ketiiil men organize at Rochester 398 
— Shreveport. La . news. ..,.. 604 

—Thinning tree and shrubbery 

plantations 676 

—♦Thuya obtusa nana, a rare spec- 
imen 713 

—Timely comment 794 

—Transplanting growing trees at 

night ". R30 

—Tree pests lOOO 

— Waterbury, Conn,, notes 794 

—Winter's "effect on trees and 

shrubs in Chicago. 756 

— Wortliless trees sent west 530 

Nurserymen, American Association 

of: — 
—Convention, twenty-ninth an- 
nual, at Atlanta. Ga" .. 898 
Mr. Kirk Patrick's response to 

address of welcome 9M 

♦Nurserymen at convention 918 

Nur?,''rymrn see Georgia peaches 934 

Till IN.- jm-s.-nt 898 

AW'lcoiiiitig song, a 898 

O 

Ob tuarv: — 

— ♦Agne'w. Hugh C. 887, 896 

— Bowen, Edgar J 388 

—♦Buckbee. Theodore E .820, 838 

— Burgess. William A .. 49 

—♦Butler, Edward 98i, 9-7 

— Dunn, Clarence A 91 

— Esclienbach , Charles 438 

—♦Evans, Charles. li 

— Fnncourt. George E 438, ♦470 

—Fischer, Christian 701 

—♦Foster, Lucius H 810, 8;0 

—Gauges. Philip 91, ♦! ^2 

— Geisendortf. Harry 438 

— Giberson. C A 701 

— Gipson, George 172 

— *Grilbotzer, Frederick 887, 918 

— ♦Hoopes, Joslah 81 

— Hopkins, Leroy 49 

— *Huster, George 550, 557 

—Jennings, Kinsey M 853 

—Kellogg. R. M...'. 218 

Kennedy, Alexander 133 

— Kimlierle, AVilliam A. 629 

— Klingbiel, Mrs. Emma 132 

— ♦Kreitling, Walter 218 

—Lewis, Eli B 91 

— Liggett, Joseph 49 

— Lozier, Isaac W '72 

— Magill, Joseph 91 

—Manda. Joseph 173 

Merritt, Robert M 593 

Morton. John 593 

Mott . James 557 

♦Schmitt, August 810, 821 

—Schumann, Prof. Carl 438 

Smith, Thomas 820 

— Supoit, Francis 483 

Thinnis, Jacob 482 

Thompson. William 49 

—Thornton. Charles M 91 

Thvne, Robert 593 



— Walpole. F. A 701 

— * Weber. Henrv II 

—Woodford. Joseph H 1021 

—Wright, James A 557 

—♦Young. John 622, 629 

Oceanic. N. J.. . 38. 108, 154, 416, 570 
♦Odontoglossum crispum, paper bv 

E O, Orpet ' 16! 

Omaha 2^.498,805 

♦Oncidiums. honse of. at Stanley. 
' Ashtou vS: Co 's, Southgate, Lon- 
don. Eng .... 477 

Oncidium tigrinum unguiculatum 438 
Oneidium varicosum . . 630 

Open letter, to Chief Tavlof, 

World's Fair '.,,.. 888 

—Reply to 958 

Orange, N. J 298, 684, 9iW 



♦Page, Charles N , president Amer- 
ican Si'i'd Trade Association .... 932 
Palms and ftTos:- 

— Adiautum Croweanum 102? 

— Cycads, the treatment of 657 

— Fancy ferns 43 

— t-ern notes, sundry 586 

—Fern spores and seedlings 2 

— Fumigatiug ferns 482 

— Jubea spectabilis 696 

— Latanias 41 

— *Nephrolepis Piersoni Improved 950 

—♦Nephrolepis Scottii 42 

—Notes, seasonable ,81, 163 

— Palm Dotes. sundry 475 

— *Phoenix Canarieiisis .658. 6.59 

—Potting ard spring cleaning 307 

—Potting ofl:" seedling ferns 846 

-Rt'juveuating decorators' stock., 949 

— Sowing early palm seeds 815 

—Spring treatment of palms 513 

-Spring work 773 

— Uncommon palms, some. 983 

— Variega'ed palms and ferns. 213 

Palm house exterior and interior. 

National Soldiers' Home, Wash- 
ington, D. C .... 814 

♦Palm house, large, at A. Leuthy 

A Co 's, Roslindale, Mass. 263 

♦Pansy bed bv Peter Brown, Syra- 
cuse, N. Y.. at World's Fair 952 
Park and Outdoor Art Association 594 
♦Park Floral Co.'s store, 'Denver. 

Col., interior and exterior views. 587 
Parks:— 
— ♦East Rock park. New Haven, 

Conn., view in. 879 

—♦Edge wood Park. New Haven. 

Conn , views in i 

—Park Superintendents, American 
Association of, annual meeting. 879 
♦Egerton, Wm S .president-elect 879 
— ♦Washingtan. D. C, parks of ... 310 
—♦West Rock Park, New Haven, 

Conn , view in..- 879 

Pastimes, our: — 

—At Baltimore 62, 33', 400 

—At Chicago.... ?4, 63, 104, 144. 280. 314 
4^0, 494. 531, 570, fOd, 643, 678, 714, 758 
796, 833. 8'54, 889, 936, 970, 1003. 1034 

—At Detroit 714 

—At Jamestown, N. Y 280, .''34 

—At Madison. N.J 6 '6 

—At New York "4.62.104, 144. 184 

280. 400, 450. 494, 533. 606, 64.', 7^8. 796 
864. 

—At Omaha. Neb. 334 

—At Philadelphia 104. 400, ?32. 643 

796. 8o4. 889. 936. 970, 1003, 1034. 

—At St. Louis 63.'l0l, 184, 678, 714 

758. 796, 833. 

—At Washington 678, 1002 

—♦Battles'. H H., employes' base 

ball team, Philadelphia' 1002 

— Bowling among the ancients ... 23i 

— Cartledges yacht Marguerite 714 

— +Kramer Tri-City cup.- 678 

— *New York Florist Club's out- 
ing, races at 1003 

—Scores of 1903 1034 

— ♦St. Louis club's ladies' bowling 

team. 678 

—Twin-City Florist Club's picnic. 1034 
— Waretow'n Rod and Gun Club, 
extract from log of, June 24, 1901 936 

Patchogue, N Y i78 

Peat, substitute for steam coal ... 317 
♦Pelicano, Frank, successful San 

Francisco dealer. 774, 779 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Soci- 
ety.." 796 

Peony, the:— 

—Exhibition, New York 815 

—Field of peonies at G, H. Wild's, 

Sarcoxie, Mo .... 984 

— Meriam. Dr , on peonies 984 

— *P3eonia lutea franchet 471 

— Peeonia lutea 981 

— Popularizing the peony, paper by 

George C Watson 472 

—Society, The American Peony, 

iDCorporated . 9.58, 968, 815 

—♦Peonies at P. S. Peterson A- 

Son's, Chicago 846 

Philadelphia ....10, 47.90, 130, 170, 216 
266, 318, 435. 478, 518. 556, 591. 636. 663 
700, 744, 780, 819. 850. 885, 722, 955, 988 
1020. 

Philadelphia gleanings 813 

Pittsburg... 10. 63. 171", 267. 387, 464. 480 
520. 593, 628, 663, 886, 924, 958, 1000 
1024. 



, 885 

' 779 

477 

89 

?65 

477 



Plant notes: — 

— Cannas 84 

— Cvtisus 84 

—Gladioli 84 

— Lemon vertjenas 3 

—Propagating 3 

—Seeds g 

— Smilax 84 

-Verbenas 84 

♦Primula Buttercup, W. K. Har- 
ris' new.. 309 

♦Prjmula Kewensis, grown by J. 

A'eitch A: Sods ." 308 

Pueblo, Col ... 60, 768 

Purchasers' risk 990 

Putty, poor, cjiuse of suit 594 



♦Rackham. George 2II 

♦Raphis humilis lu Botanic Garden 

Washington 475 

Reading, Pa. 573 

♦Reinberg. Peter, Chicago 318 

Retail trade: — 

—Anti-frost solution 318 

—Bridal flowers 779 

— *Cattl<'y:i Schrotlerte 555 

— *Cliurch d<M-(ir.iiiun f r docora- 

tioQ puriios.'s. by Z D Blacki- 

sloni-. W.i.shiuL'tou, D. C 591 

— *( 'It 'M' land w fiiiiing, a g 

— *r.)ufed(T:ae Ihi'j: on easel. ..'. 129 
— (.'rane-Higiubo lium wedding 

decora tioDS .. T 818 

—Decoration day trade sifi 

—*DesigLS, royal floral ioi9 

— Dinner decoratio s, novel 169 

— Dinner decorations, unique. . .. a85 
—♦Floral arraogements at Dussel 

dorf , Germa ny 884, 

—♦Floral harp by Frank Pelicano' 

San Francisco, Cal. 

— tloral mulf 

—♦Georgia coat of arms 

— +IIanna funeral, designs for 

— Helpful hints 

—Hints on liouse decoration .'.' 

— Hoagland-Godfrey wedding dec- 
oration 590 

— *Home wedding decoration!"a ' 
simple, by Sniith A Fetters, 

Cleveland. 319 

—Memorial day ggg 

—♦New delivery wagon of Grimni 

cV Gorley, St. Louis, Mo 84 

— Xotes 129, 477, 590, 698. 779, 1019 

^-Orange blossoms 743 

—Pointers for suburban florist..., 

—♦Red roses and white lilac , 

—♦Standing shield. . , 

— *Striking vase arrangement ..... 
— Twombly wedding decoration. . , 

—♦Violet vase, a unique , 

— ♦Washii gtou. 1) C,, weddinj 
decoration. :i, by J. R Freeman 

— Wt'ddinii decoration by A. Beg- 
crow. Xi'\v:irk, N. J ...' 743 

— *\V.Ml(lini: (iiH-oration by Charles 

O. Horn. Helena, Mont. 517 

—♦Whitney funeral, flowers :it ... 89 

—Window boxes in London 697 

— Window decoration. ]0i9 

— *Wrt.Mth, a handsome 9.54. 9fyn 

Rhine beck, N. Y.. a visit to 314 

Richmond, Ind 151.184 296 

Rock ford. Ill .. .' 24O 

Rosarinns, (,'ongress of French 

Roses: — 

—About La Detroit 

-♦American Beauty at Peter Wei 

land's. New Castle, Ind. , .. 

—American Beauty, carried-over.. 

— American Beautv, growins. 

—American Rose Society, by Pres- 
ident Alex Montgomery. ' 
—American Rose Society, by W. 

N. Rudd .' * 322 

— *At Detroit show, roses shown 

by Peter Reinberg 

-♦Bride roses in second year at J. 

A. Budlong it Son Co.'s 

—♦Bridesmaid in first year at J. A. 

Budlong A Sou Co 's' . . .. 
— *t_'a,rdinal, at Philadelphia expo- 
sition 37g 

—Customs decision on roses, new. 5.t8 
-Cuttiuii?,. rooted rose, dutiable . 746 
— *i>\v;irf rrlmson R:inil)ler. new 388 
— *Eucliauiress jit Philadelphia 

exposition. 377 

— *Etoile de France, new rose.. . 881 
—Garden, a notable rose, Elizabeth 

Park, Hartford. Conn 

—♦General McArthur 
—♦Golden Gate. Robert Simpson's, 
at the Philadelphia exhibition .. 
Grower and his problems, rose, 

paper by Robert Simpson 3"i 

House, rose, of N. F. McCarthy 

ct Co , Montrose, Mass, 589, 633 

♦Ivory and Golden Gate at Alex. • 

B. Gardens, Washing on, D. C. 661 
Jamin vs. Jamain, American 

Beauty's original name 268 

♦La Detroit at Philadelphia expo- 
sition 430 

La France, origin of 853 

♦Lil)erty. how to produce good, 
paper by Adolph Fahrenwold.... 2!4 
♦Liberty roses at Adolph Fahren- 

wold's. Hillside. Pa 38( 

Mildew Q-m 



55 

f85 
46 

555 

169 
849 



594 

165 

774 
852 
631 

558 

. 666 



361 
361 



847 
378 



431 



<d / jJ. A^ / 



—♦Mildred (irunt. ii'-w II. T. rose, 
lit Newport show 

— *Mme I'liiiteiijiy. . . - 

— Oraug*'. X- .T.. rose night at 

— Pale foliage, care for 

— Pot roses. . . 

— Red. red rose, that, by Edwin 
Lonsdale 

— Roots, diseased 

— ♦Roses at Peter Reinberg's 

— Rose cutiinas in cellar 

—Roses for hardy gardens, paper 
by L. A. Martin . ... . 

— *Rose houses, new. at Fahrcn- 
wold's. Hillside, Pa 

—♦Seedlings No '15 and 150. new 
roses, by Jolin Cook 

— ♦Shellem's new rose. 

—Soil. ehan^Mig. for roses 

— *rncle John 

— ♦Walsh's hybrid ramblers, Bos- 
ton exhibition. Mandi. 1904.. 

— Watering and ventilation 

Rose Society, the American: — 

— .\nnual nieeting, programme — 

— Kxhibition premium list issued . 

— *Fifth annual meeting and exhi- 
bition, Philadelphia 

—♦Philadelphia exposition, im- 
\ reisions of 

—Prizes, spscial, accepted. . 

♦Rudd. Willis N 



Saffron flowers 953 

St. Joseph, Mo 4(>1 

St. Louis . II. 48.91. 130, 170, 396, 627 

664. 700. 744. 78)». 818. 1021. 
St Paul. . . .32. 60. 148, 246. 370, 536, 678 

864. 1029 

San Dii-iio. Cal 114. 153 

S.Mi KiMiK-is.-o. . 410, 782. K52, 923, 1002 

Schonllx.jird. a model 888 

♦Schroeter. Hrnno 211 

Scotland's international exhibition 594 
♦Scott fern, huuse of. just previous 

to Easter. 554 

♦Scott, William 211 

Seed trade, the;— 

— Adulteraticn of seeds 100 

—Adulterated seeds 896 

— Algerian sweet peas 828 

— Bag tilling machine suit 710 

— Bean, new whit** garden B^6 

—British seed trade notes 566, 71 

793. 828. 
— ijuekbee-losscorapromjspd.. — 180 
-^Biickbee's new' " wareho'use. 

Rockford, 111 20 

— Bulljs held to be roots 754 

—Cabbage, new late from Rnssia . 4-98 

—California seed crops . 896 

— Canadian seed growers organize. 89< 
— rCatiUogues should state +riues.,. 79: 
— ♦Cauliflower seed in Deunvifk, 

grooving...... . . S '-— 330 

—Charged trucking conditions .... 228 
— Congressional garden seeds 



Congressional si-edsmen 792. 896 

Connecticut seed croi) prospects. 490 
— Contract wilh farmer not binding 338 

Cnrn. sweet 5(56 

Cox Seed Company not injured. 446 
Crambe Tartarica, a new veg- 
etable %6 

■Eastern onion sets scarce. ... 490 

lOuropean see<l report 264. 602 

■Example, a timely 330 

-Free roosters . IHO 

♦Fret'sias, field of. in Ciilifonda 710 

— Fren.-li bulb -Top 1030 

Fn-n.-h bull) situation. . 638.828. 933 

French seed crops . 638 

Government garden seeds re- 
turned. 566 
Government seeds branch oflice . 267 
Imjort values of seeds nud bulbs 14ii 

—Ivy and mustard, to destroy 754 

Judge rules for seedsmen 33 ' 

Kciil ubk\ crop reports 966 

Law harassf's importers 674 

Mailing catalogues 966. 9t*8 

Manif stly ridiculous 4*<0 

—More sweet corn contracts 490 

— Mushroom spawn purchasers, to 566 
—New York notes. . 446. 896. 966. 988 
—Notes . 3 ■. 58. 1 0. 14 . 228. 276. 330 
Swe, 446, 490. 528. 566, 6 2. 638, 674, 710 
754. 792. ^28. t-eo. 896. 933. 966. 998, 1O30 
— Not statesmcu but seedsmen ... 14 

—Onion seed surplus — 6 3 

—Onion set supply and market ... 140 

— Patent sui .important 528 

—Peas, disease of 793 

—Potatoes 896 

-Potatoes from Canada 966 

— Potato, new Truguay Irish 710 

—Potato, new white . .* 1U30 

—Pr« test, a California. . 20 

— ♦Rockv ?'ord melon seeds 998 

-San l''fancis<-o notes.... 528.638. 754 

— Santii Clara. Cal.. notes 100 

—♦Smith, Archibald .. 860 

-Spanish catalogues in Brazil 180 

—Spring trade, the, 1904.. . 933, 966 

— Tariff manipulation 674 

— Warrant v. legal seed 528 

— Waterloo, Neb., notes 638, 896 

—World's Fair, seedsmen at. .. . 638 
—Yon Yonson on U S. seeds 1030 

Seed Trade Association, .\raerican: — 
—Executive committee meeting ... 20 
—Convention, programme of St. 

Louis 754 

—Convention, twentv-ninth an- 
nual, at St Louis 897 

♦Grenell. W. H., second vice- 
president 93; 

Ideal in seed growing, the. paper 

bv W. W Tracy 917 

*Mav. L. L.. first vice-president. 933 
*PaL't'. Charles N., president.... 932 
♦Scpilsnien at Shaw's garden ..v 91& 

Those present 897,932 

Shading and t^utty 630 

Shamrock folklore, some 135 

♦Shamrock, the, in pots 126 



♦ShulwelKV Graver. Fargn. N. D., 
>tore of 

♦Siebrecht A Son's Fifth nvenne 
store. New York. Easter decora- 
tive group in ■ 

♦Simjson, Harry, j atentee of 
greeidiMUse frame. 

Slaughter house wastage 

Sinilax house, profit in a. 

Smilax. new myrtle-leaved 

■ociety of American Florists: — 
-<'onstitutioii, amendmi'nt to. 

—Department of plant n-u'l^tration 
173. 333. 520. 630. 8HK. 990. 1022. 



551 
364 
213 

848 

1023 

r3 



Executive committee mteting at 
St L' uis. . ... 3r4 

Executive committee meeting 

called 133 

♦Kxhibition hall at St. Louis. 

Mo . liiasram of. 740 

Outside view . 920 

-Exhibition roles, revised trade. 81 

-Exhibitors, important to 1022 

•St. Louis convention &90 

Object of the society 990 

Payingdues. ...". 990 

Preliminary programme 990 

Trade exliibition 990 

Transportatir)u 990 

Solanum capstcastrum 812 

♦Soldit-rs' Hume. National. Wash- 
ington 813. 813. 814. 8In 

South Framiugham. Mass 34 

Sparrow, a discussion on the .... 6 

Spi Wane. Wash - . - 72 

Sprinytield. Mass 12. 110.286. 494 

Springfield. Mo 456 

Steam heating battery . 888 

Stem rot and its probable causes. 

paper bv Peter Fisher 87 

♦Stone. Prof. George E 302 

Streator. Ill 957 

♦Suburban home, a beautiful. L. 

E. Holden. Glenville, O 3^4 

Suit for plant injury by gas H88 

♦Sullivan. John F 311 

Sweet peas do not flower 164. 333 

Sweet peas, paper bv Percv ^^'ate^er 7 
Syracuse. N. Y. . 171. 246. 352. 436. 819 
"887. 960, 993. 1039. 



Tacoma, Wash 804 

Tarry town Ilorticultvir.il Society 45 

168.536. 688. 832. 881. 

Tar water. ' 

Taxes on plants; paving i 

Toronto..ll6. 184.217. 383. 346. 420. ■ 

532. 640. 731. 796. 873. 933. 973, 1003 

♦Transformation, a remarkable 513 

Travelers' notes 776 

Traveler's note book, 311 

Tucson. Ariz 358 

Tulips with long stems 13 

U 

U. S. Department of Agriculture 

notes 1013 

rtica. N. Y 243 



V 

Vegelablc tlber. new 702 

♦N'egetables. inipr nemenls in 

paper by J. Otto Thilow 3 6 

\'egetables indoors:^ 
— ♦Cucunilwrs at Davis Bros.*, Mor- 
rison. Ill 434 

—Cucumljers for forcing 87 

— Cuci.mber forcing house, a 4'34 

— Cyaniding under glass :W4 

—Mushroom spawn 315 

—Notes 87. 167, 315. 3M. 434 

Yilmorin monument, the 746 

VJnca vines, keeping-over. ifnH 

Violet:— 

—Growing violets, paper by ]■] G 

Pierce ;...... 474 

^♦Marie Louise at Adam Laub A 

Sons. Hughsonville. N. Y 86 

— Piping for violet house 388 

— Propagation of violets 363 

—♦Structures for violets 8(j 

—Trust, the violet. Verses 315 

♦Ward. (.'. W. 2'S 

*Washington Botanic Garden notes 473 

474. 475. 
Washinston. 1). C...lfl, 49. 113. 150, 170 

317. 267. 386. 436. 480. 519. 579. 592. 627 

665. 701, 745. 781. 818. 851. KHfJ. 932. 956 

1021. 
♦Washington. D. »_'.. parks .and 

general view of 311 

Water supply.. 264 

•Watson. Robert 211 

We and our field, paper by Wm. J. 

Stewart .. 87 

Weeds, chemical extermination of 924 

White flv. the 725 

Wichita. Kan 730 

Wilkesbarre. Pa 437 

Wistarias for Easter. 50 

♦ Witterstaetter. Richard 2C5 

♦Wittbold Co.'s, George. Chicago, 

kentias at the 127 

Worcester, Mass ...73.91.244.386. 498 

732. 803. 842. 933. 
World's Fair:— 

— *Bridge over lagoon 815 

—♦California horticulture exhibit. 816 
—Exhibition schedule. 951 

— Flower show rules and regula- 
tions 952 

—♦French building and gardens... 817 
-♦Hydrangeas in Japanese garden 084 
— *Japauese gardem . 985" 

—Notes. 632: 660. 697, 741, 777. 813. 848 

883. 950. 983. 
—♦Pansy bed. by Peter lirown, 

Lancaster. Pa 952 

—Schedule for floral exhibits 697 

— ♦Sunljen garden, Liberal Arts 

building. Mining Palace and U. 

S. government building 983 



fi!E I^ME RICAN 





RmErica. is "tbE Fraw of the ITbsseIi thers may be mare comfort UmiJships, but we are the Erst to touch Unknawa Seas," 



Vol. XXII. 



CHICAQO AND NEW YORK, JANUARY 30, 1904. 



No. 817. 



f LHIIE ^esmtSDiii^ lFlL@@l!g7 



NiNBTBKNTH YbAE. 

Copyright 1904, by American Florist Company 
Entered as Second-Class Mail Matter. 

PUBLIBBSD BVBRT SATUBDAT BY 

AMERICAN FLORIST COMPANY, 

334 Dearborn St., Chicago. 
Batftern Office: 42 W. aStb St., New ^ ork. 

Subscription, $1.00 a year. To Europe, |2 00. 

Subscriptions accepted only from the trade. 

Volumes half-yearly from August, 1901. 

SOCIETY OF AMERICAN FLORISTS AND 
ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURISTS. 

Officbrs— John Btjbton, Philadelphia, Pa., 
president; C. C. Pollwobth, MilwauKee, Wis., 
vice-president; Wm. J. Stkwart, 79 Milk Street, 
Boston, Mass., secretary; H. B. Beatty, Oil City, 
Pa., treasurer. 

Oppicers-elbct— Philip Brkitmbyeb, presi- 
dent; J. J. Bkttbkb, vice-president; secretary and 
treasurer as before. Twentieth annual meeting 
at St. Louis, Mo., August, 1904. 



THE AMERICAN CARNATION SOCIETY. 

Annual convention at Detroit, Mich., March 2, 
1904. Albert M. Hebr, Lancaster, Pa. , secretary. 



AMERICAN ROSE SOCIETY. 

Annual meeting and exhibition, Philadelphia, 
March, 1904. Leonard Barron, 136 Liberty St., 
New York, secretary. 



CHRYSANTHEMUM SOCIETY OF AMERICA. 

Annual convention and exhibition, November, 
1904. Fred H. Lemon, Richmond, Ind., secretary. 

THIS ISSUE 44 PAGES WITH COVER. 



COJVT£/^TS. 

Chrysanthemums— C. S. A 1 

—Short notes from Europe 1 

—Golden Chain in vase (illus.) 3 

Greenhouses of the Dale Estate (illus.) 2 

Palms and ferns— Fern spores and seedlings. 3 

Plant notes 3 

Society for Horticultural Science. 4 

Gloire de Lorraine at Southborough (illus.) 4 

Notes and comments— Ants in i.^reenhouses b 

Lilium fiiganteum (illus.) '. G 

Uritish trade topics 6 

A discussion on the sparrow 6 

Sweet peas 7 

The retail trade — Hints on house decoration . 8 

—A Cleveland wedding decoration (illus.) 8 

New York 

Chicago 9 

Philadelphia 10 

Washington 10 

Pittsburg.. ]0 

St. Louis ]| 

Indianapol's ] 1 

Obituary— Henry Weber (portrait) 11 

— Chas. Evans (portrait) 11 

The seed trade— A California protest 20 

—Buck bee's new warehouse (illus.) 30 

— American Seed Trade Association. ; 30 

The nursery trade 22 

Our pastimes 34 

So. Framingham, Mass 34 

Cleveland -. 28 

Milwaukee 28 

St. Paul , 33 

Minneapolis 32 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS 



Chrysanthemum Society of America. 

The Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society has invited the Chrysanthetnvim 
Society of America to hold its next 
annual convention and exhibition in 
Horticultural Hall, Boston, November 3, 
4, 5 and 6, 1904, in conjunction with 
that society. This invitation has been 
unanimously accepted by the executive 
b'oard of the society. 

An invitation was also received from 
the American Institute to repeat the suc- 
cess ot last fall in New York, and 
although the officers and executive com- 
mittee fully appreciate the kindness of 
the American Institute in extending this 
invitation, they feel it will be for the 
good ot the society to change the loca- 
tion every year if possible. We are 
expecting next November the greatest 
show ever held, and every effort will be 
put forth to accomplish thjs result. 

Fred. H. Lemon, Sec'y. 

Short Notes from Europe. 

W. Wells, the well known grower of 
chrysanthemums at Earlswood, Redhill, 
Surrey, England, is announcing the pub- 
lication of a new and revised edition of 
his book on the chrysanthemum. Mr. 
Wells is one of the ablest trade growers 
in England and his experience is an exten- 
sive one. In recent years he has been 
instrumental in bringing to the notice of 
the British public all the best of the colo- 
nial raised varieties, especially those from 
the seed bed of T. W. Pockett, of Mel- 
bourne, Australia. The book should be 
ready by the time these notes appear. 

The N. C. S. show held for the first 
time at the Crystal palace was, in spite 
of a bad season, decidedly encouraging, 
although the change of locality and the 
problem of reduced finances made a some- 
what decided impress on the general 
extent of the show and the number of 
the exhibits. This was more particularly 
noticeable to those of its members who 
had just returned from the Paris chrys- 
anthemum show which was truly a mag- 
nificent one. 

Competition in chrysanthemums is 
becoming keener every year. Raisers and 
exhibitors are vying with one another 
for supremacy and already (January 2) 
most of the English importers and trade 
growers are announcing the publication 
of their list of novelties. These comprise 
many interesting sorts raised by English 



grovyers and others from colonial and 
continental sources. 

Of the French growers Ernest Calvat is 
first in the field with his catalogue of 
novelties. Most of these are grand 
examples of show flowers quite up to his 
usual style, and are a lot selected from 
those of his seedlings that were awarded 
the highest number of points for first- 
class certificates at Paris, Lille, Grenoble 
and Lyons. We specially recommend to 
the notice of American cultivators Alli- 
ance, Souvenir de Victorine Calvat, 
Mile. Anna Debono, Femina, Comtesse 
de Grailley, Gabriel Martin, Mme. Mar- 
guerite de Mons, Mme. R. Oberthur, 
Joseph Paquet, Mme. E. Rosette and 
Marquise Visconti-Venosta (not theolder 
variety of Marquis which is already well 
known.) 

American growers of the popular 
flower who can read French would find 
much interesting matter in "Le Chrysan- 
theme," the official organ of the French 
Chrysanthemum Society. One dollar a 
year covers the cost and there are gener- 
ally seven or eight numbers published 
during the twelve months. Philippe 
Rivoire, 16 rue d'Algerie, Lyons, is the 
secretary. 

A little shilling handbook on the culture 
of the chrysanthemum has just been pub- 
lished by Messrs. Collingridge, of the 
City Press, Aldersgate street, London, 
E. C. It is entitled "Chrysanthemums 
and How to Grow them for Exhibition." 
It is illustrated and contains a stopping 
and timing table. 

Speaking of cultural treaties, mention 
ought to be made of an Italian book on 
the golden flower recently published by 
the T'nione Tipografico-Editrice of Turin. 
It is one of the few worthy of the name 
ofbookforit contains upwards of 270 
pages of printed matter, is illustrated 
with figures in black and white and also 
several in color. The author is Dario 
Formilli, ot Rome, who deals with the 
flower in a most comprehensive manner. 
Briefly stated the book deals with the 
history, description, classification, bibli- 
ography and culture from every point of 
view. Lists of varieties for various pur- 
poses are given and a descriptive list of 
the best varieties. The price is 5 francs. 
Growers who are interested in diseases 
and insect pests would do well to procure 
Dr. ChifBot's "Maladies et Parasites du 
Chrysantheme" together with the col- 
ored chart issued with it. 

The French N. C. S. has undertaken the 
issue of a catalogue of varieties actually 
known to be in cultivation in France and 
also a color chart for the purpose of 



The American Florist. 



Jan. 



facilitating the description of the colors 
of the dowers about which there is often 
so much dispute. These two publica- 
tions promise to be a boon to those 
engaged in literary work. F. 

Golden Chain In Mass. 

The accompanying illustration shows 
the efllect produced by arranging plants 
ol Chrysanthemum Golden Chain in 
mass. We find it valuable when used to 
screen an unsightly corner or doorway 
in the store during a show. The flowers 
are small, the rays a rich golden yellow, 
with a darker center. The leaves are 
small, the whole being borne on long 
slender, almost trailing stems. When 
cut the blooms would no doubt prove of 
some value, especially when made up 
with Asparagus Sprengeri into a loose 
bouquet. F. K. B. 



PALMS AND FERNS. 



Fern Spores and Seedlings. 

The process of sowing fern spores has 
been described many times, but yet some 
of the essential points may bear review 
briefly, for the season of early sowing is 
now with us. Some clean Ginch pots, or 
preferably new pots, are filled to three- 
fourths their depth with drainage mate- 
rial, either broken pots or cinders will 
answer, then the pots are filled to within 
about one-hall inch of the top with fine, 
prepared soil which has been sterilized, 
and pressed down firmly and smoothly. 
The seed pots should then be given a 
thorough watering and allowed to drain 
for at least two hours before sowing, the 
fine duct-like spores being sprinkled 
thinly and evenly on the surface of the 
soil, and the pots being at once set away 
in the propagating house, and preferably 
plunged in sand or fine ashes in a propa- 
gating frame, where the atmospheric 
conditions may be controlled to a great 
extent. 

This is very necessary from the fact 
that it is better for the moisture of the 
soil to be preserved, from the first water- 
ing up to the time the sporelings appear, 
without further watering if possible, it 
being impossible to water the seed pots 
overhead without washing the spores off. 
But at the same time it should be remem- 
bered that too dry a soil will result in 
absolute failure to germinate the fern 
spores, and this requires close watching 



on the part ot the grower during the 
periods of strong firing that we are likely 
to experience at this season. Keeping 
the plunging material moist between the 
pots will usually avoid trouble. in this 
respect, but in caseany of the pots should 
be found dry they may be watered from 
the bottom by standing them in a bucket 
or pan containing four or five inches of 
water and leaving them there until thor- 
oughly wetted. 

The frame in which the seed pots are 
placed should be kept close during the 
day, but ventilated to some extent at 
night to avoid the drip from condensed 
moisture on the glass.This drip is more 
troublesome in some houses than in oth- 
ers and as an extra precaution some 
growers cover the seed pots with panes 
of glass. These are tilted slightly to one 
side for the drainage of their own drip, 
and protect the spores from washing out 
with the drip from the sash above them. 
One ot the advantages from the use of 
sterilized soil for fern spores is that the 
seeds of weeds in the soil are destroyed, a 
crop of weeds in the seed pots being 
highly objectionable from the fact that it 
is difficult to remove them without dis- 
turbing a number of the tiny fern pro- 
thalli or sporelings at the same time. 
Trouble is sometimes found in the seed 
pots in the form of a tiny white worm 
about one-fourth of an inch long, of the 
origin of which I am in doubt, though 
believing it to be one form of a small 
insect that sometimes appears among 
the spores before they are sown. 

This worm burrows about just under 
the seedling ferns, loosening them from 
the surface of the soil, and also making the 
soil so loose that it is more difficult for the 
delicate root hairs that are first formed 
from the prothallus to attach themselves 
to the soil. The most eflective treatment 
I have used for this insect is to fumigate 
the propagating frame with tobacco 
stems, using a home-made fumigating 
outfit for the purpose, the arrangement 
consisting of a good sized tin can for a 
fumigating pot, this being covered with 
a large funnel and a piece of iron pipe 
one inch in diameter fitted on the funnel 
and reaching from that point into the 
frame. This apparatus cost practically 
nothing, being made from old material, 
but by its use a frame thirty to forty feet 
long could be well filled with smoke in a 
very short time, and by watching the fire 
so as to avoid any blazing of the tobacco 
stems the smoke could be kept cool 
enough to prevent injury to the seedling 
ferns. 



But the fumigation of such tender sul)- 
jects must always be done cautiously^ and 
it is much better to give two or three 
light applications than to scorch the 
ferns with too strong a dose. As would 
seem natural, the strong growing ferns 
usually germinate the soonest, and such 
as Pteris argyra:a, P. quadriaurita and 
P. tremula will show signs of germina- 
tion in little more than a week, that faint 
green tint on the surface of the soil, that 
would seem to the beginner like a coating 
of green scum, showing to the fern grower 
that the first step toward a stock of 
young ferns is being made; and as the 
proth.illi begin to throw up the first 
frond a watch should be kept for snads. 
These pests have a wonderful appetite 
for young fern fronds, and will mow off 
every frond from the surface of a 6- inch 
pot of seedlings in a night or two. 

Pricking off the seedlings in small 
patches or colonies onto the surface of 
other pots or pans that have been filled 
with drainage material and fine soil in 
much the same manner as the original 
pots, will be the next operation, this 
being frequently done just about the time 
the sporelings begin to make their first 
frond. This last is a very tedious opera- 
tion, and is likely to make a man wonder 
how large a margin of profit there ought 
to be in fern growing in order to cover 
the outlay of time and patience that has 
been made during the early stages of the 
game. But tedious though it be, yet the 
raising of ferns from spores is c|uite a 
fascinating part of the florists' work, 
though it is quite within the bounds of 
probability that many of the smaller 
growers and dealers can purchase their 
stock of young ferns from one of the fern 
specialists for less money than they can 
raise them themselves. Prices are not 
very high for the ordinary trade species 
of iferns, and it is a good thing for the 
grower to stop long enough to reckon up 
the cost of the stock he is growing from 
time to time, and if it is found that the 
proverbial dollar per square foot return 
from his glass is easier to get by buying 
young stock than by raising it from seed, 
then it would appear the part of wisdom 
to let the other fellow do the growing 
and to become a plant merchant. 

Some few of the smaller growing tree 
ferns are found in trade collections at 
times, among theniBlechnumBrasiliense, 
Loraaria gibba and Lomaria ciliata, and 
also Dicksonia antarctica, the latter being 
perhaps the best among those four. But 
all these young tree ferns are rather ten- 
der in foliage, and especially so if they 




GREENHOUSES OF THE DALE ESTATE, BRAMPTON, ONTARIO. 



igo4. 



The American Florist. 



have been grown a little too soft by 
being potted in very light soil and kept 
too warm, the latter condition also 
favoring the attacks of insects, of which 
thrips and scale are the most trouble- 
some. As one cannot fumigate these 
ferns very severely without injuring the 
foliage, it becomes necessary to use 
another method to dispose of the thrips, 
this being to dip the plants in a rather 
weak solution of rose leal extract or 
some similar preparation, and then to 
lay the plants down to avoid the extract 
running down into the roots. It is also 
less injurious to these or any tender 
plants if they are protected from strong 
light by covering them with papers after 
the dioping for about twenty-four hours. 
W. H. Taplin. 



PLANT NOTES. 



For Week of January 30. 

Seeds. — The seeds of different annuals 
for the spring trade should be sown as 
soon as possible. Lobelia, centaurea, 
gymnocarpa, salvia, Kenilworth ivy, ten- 
week stocks, and others, are sown now. 
Early sown stock will make good 4 inch 
plants with three or four large spikes to 
the plant, if the first bud is pinched out. 
Another sowing may be made later on 
for 3-inch pots. As soon as the first buds 
begin to develop, and the single ones can 
be distinguished from the double, they 
are separated and the single ones are dis- 
carded. A batch of petunias may also be 
sown now, with another lot to follow 
about the first of March. Sow only dou- 
ble varieties, for half of these will come 
single anyhow, which will provide plenty 
of the latter. Dracaena indivisa should 
also be sown now for next year's stock. 
Growing them along outside during the 
summer, either planted out in a frame 
where thev can be watered, or in pots 
the year round, they will make fine 4 and 
5-inch stock by this time next year. 
Place the seed boxes on a light bench, in 
a moderately warm house, and keep the 
soil moist and shaded from the sun to 
prevent baking until the seed commences 
to germinate. Mice are sometimes trou- 
blesome pests around the seed boxes; a 
little strychnine or arsenic mixed with 
oat meal, made into a paste, will soon 
dispose of them. 

Lemon Verbenas.— Old stock plants of 
lemon verbenas and lantanas, which are 
now in a state of partial dormancy in a 
cool house, should be started up by 
applying a little more heat. It they were 
grown in pots during the previous sum- 
mer, they will need a shift to a larger 
pot; in this case, renew some of the top 
soil, and repot in good rich soil. In a 
Jew weeks a lot of cuttings will be ready, 
which root easily in the sand, and will 
make fine 3-inch stock for the spring 
trade. The stock plants of lemon ver- 
bena should be grown in pots the year 
through. Some growers prefer to plant 
them out during the summer, but lifting 
checks them too much, and they start 
into growth too late in the season to 
make useful cuttings. They are decidu- 
ous, but if grown in pots they will start 
up early and produce abundance of soft 
growth in plenty time for propagating 
for spring. Anthericums should also be 
shifted to a size larger pot and started to 
growing in a moderately cool house. 
Plants in 4 and 5-inch pots will make 
gopd stock for vases and veranda boxes. 
Ciittings taken now for next season will 
root easily in the sand. 
Propa^'aJ/'/i^.— Every square foot of the 




CHRYSANTHEMUM GOLD N CHAIN AT THE MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN. 



propagating bench should now be pressed 
into service. Cuttings of heliotrope, 
ageratums, lobelia, swainsonia, and 
dozens of other plants for the spring 
trade should be inserted into the sand 
without delay. Coleus and alternanthe- 
ras, however, need not be propagated for 
another five weeks for bedding. The 
north side bench of a house, where the 
temperature is kept at approximately 
55° at night, is a good place to propa- 
gate. A mild bottom heat will facilitate 
rooting, and this can easily be obtained 
by tacking a piece of muslin or canvas 
along the front edge of the bench, letting 
it reach the ground. If the sand is kept 
at a temperature 5° higher than the sur- 
rounding air, it is quite sufficient. The 
bench should be thoroughly whitewashed 
before putting in the sand, which must 
be absolutely clean for every fresh lot of 
cuttings. If plenty of sand is obtainable, 
it had better be changed for every lot; 
especially so, if fungus was present in the 
preceding lot. Shade them from the 
sun's rays several hours each day with 
cheese cloth shades or newspapers, and 
keep the sand well watered so long as a 
strong bottom heat is maintained. 
Sprinkle the cuttings at least once a day 
an hour or so before the shade is put ou. 



As the sun grows stronger a light wash 
on the glass overhead may become neces- 
sary. Air-slaked lime blown from the 
bellows every evening, beginning at one 
end of the house and walking backwards 
to the other end, making a light mist 
throughout the house, will keep the air 
pure and sweet, and will also hold fungus 
in check. Propagating is at once the 
simplest, the most interesting, and one 
of the most important part of the busi- 
ness, and should be placed in charge of a 
capable man with nimble fingers who is 
interested in keeping up the stock. 
Allowing everyone to take a hand at it 
with no one directly responsible too 
often results in neglect; and neglect for 
even a few hours at a critical time will 
ruin a whole bench of cuttings. G. 



Albuquerque, N. M. — Kindly warn 
the trade against Hobart Kruger, who 
claims to have worked recently for 
Becker Brothers, Fort Worth, Tex. He 
worked a few days for me and on Decem- 
ber 22 forged three checks for $10 each, 
passed them on local business men, and 
skipped. He is about 42 years old, very 
round shouldered and speaks with a 
marked German accent. B. H. IvES. 



The a mer i ca n Fl orist. 



/ 



an. 



Society for Horticultural Science. 

Supplementing the report of the St. 
Louis meeting of the Society for Horti- 
cultural Science published in our issue of 
January 2'.\, we give herewith some 
opinions on other matters of interest to 
our readers. 

Dr. H.J. Webber, of tlie United States 
Department of Agriculture, told of work 
which the department has uudertalien in 
breeding strains of tobacco especially 
adapted for growing under cloth. In 
the department's work in growing 
tobacco under shade a serious difficulty 
has been met with, in that the varieties 
thus grown produce but a small percent- 
age ot the wide leaves desired in wrapper 
tobacco, although the same varieties as 
grown in the open produce perhaps 
eighty-five per cent of such leaves. The 
department is trying to breed a strain 
that shall be free from this defect. Dr. 
Webber also told of his well known experi- 
ments in breeding hardy oranges. By 
hybridizing a common cultivated variety 
of orange and the hardy trifoliate a new 
race of fruit has been obtained which has 
been named the citrange. These are 
strictly new creations, there being pre- 
viously nothing in existence like them. 
Unfortunately the fruits are rather sour, 
but perhaps this objection can be over- 
come by later breeding. Another of the 
department's creations is the Tangelo, or 
kid-glove grape fruit, which was pro- 
duced by hybridizing the Tangerine 
orange and the pomelo or grape fruit. 
This fruit is not so sour as the grape 
and the peculiar flavor of the grape fruit 
is not so much in evidence. The rind can 
be separated from the fruit, and the seg- 
ments can be separated from each other, 
as in the case of the Tangerine orange. 
These hardy races of citrus fruits extend 
the range of citrus culture perhaps 200 
miles furrher north, and Dr. Webber 
prophesies that in the course of the next 



ten or fifteen years we shall have hardy 
edible oranges. 

Prof. S. A. lieach, of the New York 
experiment station, Geneva, spoke of 
some correlations between the size and 
specific gravity ot the grape seed and its 
germination and the vigor of the result- 
ing seedling. It was found that the seeds 
from large Ijerries produced much the 
more vigorous seedlings than do seeds of 
the same size from small berries. Among 
seeds from berries of like size, the larger 
ones produced much the more vigorous 
seedlings and give by far the greatest per- 
centage of germination. The smaller 
seeds do not germinate at all. Among 
seeds of the same size the denser ones 
give a much higher percentage of germi- 
nation and produced more vigorous 
plants than do those less dense. Seeds of 
low specific gravity do not germinate at 
all, irrespective of size. Prof. Beach called 
special attention to the importance of 
using seeds of known parentage in investi- 
gations on the breeding of plants. In 
conformity with this point he used in 
those investigations only seeds from self- 
fertilized flowers. 

V. A. Clark, also of the New York 
experiment station, Geneva, described a 
method of separating seeds into a series 
varying according to their density, using 
a series of uniformly varying salt solu- 
tions for this purpose. It was shown 
that in the cases of many seeds percent- 
age of germination is quite definitely 
correlated with the specific gravity of the 
seed; also that with the larger part of 
agricultural plants the seeds of highest 
specific gravity produced the most vigor- 
ous plants. It was shown also that 
in these same cases the seeds of lowest 
specific gravity either do not germinate 
at all or else only scatteringly. Inter- 
mediate between seeds of low and o( high 
specific gravity is a range in which seeds 
produce less vigorous plants. In the 
cases of many seeds these three ranges 



can be somewhat definitely delimited. 
One practical application of the method 
promises to be the fixing with greater 
certainty the proportion of seeds which 
should be discarded in cleaning seeds with 
a fanning mill. 

By the application of the method, the 
percentage of germination in a sample of 
low germinability, as in the case of egg 
plant seed, can be much increased. C. 

Glolre de Lorraine at Southborougfh, Mass. 

Plant growers can safely record as one 
of the lessons of the recent holidays that 
Lorraine begonia is still in its infancy so 
far as its sale as a holiday plant is con- 
cerned. The quantity that will be called 
for each year, as people come to realize 
its eminent qualifications as an easy and 
satisfactory house plant and as growers 
come to understand the knacks of special 
treatment necessary for its cultivation in 
quantity at popular prices, is certain far 
to surpass the present facilities for its 
production. 

The accompanying ' illustration shows 
a house of Lorraine as grown in sus- 
pended baskets and pans by Alex. Ogg, 
gardener for J. Montgomery Sears at 
Southborough, Mass. The plant lends 
itself most gracefully to this manner of 
growth and, where a grower aims to 
make the most of his available space, 
bench room for other flowering and foli- 
age stock is not encroached upon. Mr. 
Ogg took the cuttings from which these 
plants were grown, on May 1. The 
plants were shifted into 8-inch pans 
August 1 and put on shelves around the 
rose house in full sun facing the south. 
They were given liquid stimulant daily 
for three months and were then sus- 
pended from the sash bars in a tempera- 
ture of 55° at night and 65° during the 
day. Out of three hundred plants, over 
one hundred measured thirty to thirty- 
six inches through, the rest measuring 
from twenty-four to thirty inches. 




BEGONIA GLOIRE DE LORRAINE AT SOUTHBOROUGH, MASS. 



Tgo4. 



The American Florist. 



Notes and Comments. 

In a recent issue of our New York con- 
temporary, under the head of "The 
Christening of a Rose," "Spectator" 
falls into error when he refers to The 
Puritan as of American origin. This is 
an error. Although the stock of this rose 
was first disseminated generally in 
America by the B. A. Elliott Company 
of Pittsburg, I believe the stock was 
purchased from C. F. Evans, of Rowland- 
ville, Philadelphia, who had secured the 
original stock from the late Henry 
Bennett, of England, who is supposed 
to have been the raiser. I am not quite 
sure on this point, because I believe Mr. 
Bennett sometimes purchased seedling 
roses and sports for distribution which 
he had not raised. Meteor came from 
Mr. Bennett. It was understood at that 
time that it had been "thrown in" to 
Mr. Evans when some of his purchases 
were made from Mr. Bennett. Most 
persons who were identified with flori- 
culture and horticulture about that time 
will recall the varieties raised by Mr. 
Bennett and which went through the 
hands of Mr. Evans, to- wit: William F. 
Bennett, Her Majesty, The Puritan, The 
Meteor, Mrs. John Laing, and possibly 
some others the names of which 1 cannot 
at this time recall. Her Majesty was 
disseminated jointly by C. F. Evans and 
Craig & Brother. (Robert and George 
Craig composed the firm at that time.) 
The other roses mentioned by "Spectator' ' 
as of American origin, The Bride, Brides- 
maid and The Queen, are sports. The 
Bride and Bridesmaid were bud varia- 
tions from the French rose Catherine 
Mermet. The Queen was a white sport 
from the pink variety. Souvenir d'un 
Ami. The Queen of Edgely, a pink sport 
from the darker colored American Beauty, 
is sometimes abbreviated into Queen, but 
more often it is called iust Edgely, and 
should not the original name of American 
Beauty be Mnie. Ferdinand Jamin and 
not Jamain? Some authorities so give it. 
If we would write history let it be 
accurate. 

I am glad to see John Thorpe take to 
the peony arena. He could disentangle 
a lot of faulty nomenclature. His experi- 
ence with the peony, dating back to 
before 1860, shows that his knowledge 
is not superficial but comes from the 
basement up. Mr. Thorpe's experience 
that a variety with a given number 
coming from Japan this year mav not be 
the same variety next year will be echoed 
and re-echoed from many quarters of the 
globe. In the meantime let us get 
together and make a determined effort to 
straighten out these unsettled peony 
matters. 

ANTS IN GREENHOUSES. 

It is generally understood that ants do 
no injury to plant life in greenhouses, but 
they do something which is equally as 
bad if not worse. They protect and 
encourage the increase of insects which 
injure plants. So far as I have read ento- 
mologists, in referring to plant lice that 
the ants protect and secure food from, 
the aphides, I believe are meant; but in 
greenhouses it will bo found that where 
these little ants are busy we will surely 
find either mealy bugs or scale insects on 
some of the plants near, which are not so 
easily gotten rid of as are the aphis. It 
is quite a difficult matter to get rid of 
ants in greenhouses when once they have 
secured a foothold. I saw a plan in 
operation at Mrs. G. B. Wilson's orchid 
growing establishment in West Philadel- 
phia where Alphonse Pericat is superin- 
tendent, that for simplicit;y and effective- 




LILIUM GIGANTEUM FROM SEED. 



ness beat anything I had ever seen before. 
I noticed, some vials here and there 
among the pots and on inquiry found 
they contained sweet oil and were used 
as traps to catch ants. There were very 
few of these industrious little insects in 
the vials because most of them had been 
already caught. 

We have some ants in our greenhouses 
and I decided to try this simple remedy. 
We had no sweet oil, so tried olive oil in 
two small medicine bottles and in four or 
five hours I found thousands of these 



insects in the two bottles, dead in the oil. 
So far as I know this is the least trouble 
and the most effective way of ridding a 
place of ants I have yet seen or heard of. 
Molasses might be equally as effective in 
place of the oil, but is not so readily 
handled. 

CANNAS. 

When looking through the trialgrounds 
of H. A. Dreer, with J. D. Eisele last 
summer at Riverton, three of the orchid 
cannas were compared, namely, Penrsyl- 
yapig,, Miss Kate Gray andj King Hum- 



The American Florist. 



Jan. JO, 



bert, and the last named variety seemed 
superior to either of the others. It would 
be interesting to know how the above 
compares with the impressions made by 
the same varieties under different climatic 
and differ^t soil conditions. 

Edwin Lonsdale. 



Lilium Glganteum From Seed. 

The illustration on page 5 shows 
a flowering plant of Lilium giganteum 
from seed sown in 1891, the bulb flower- 
ing in 1902. Mr. Fischer, of the Boston 
park department, who raised it, says that 
it was at first planted in a sunny situa- 
tion, where it did not thrive, but when 
transferred to a partially shady place it 
did very well. Mr. Fischer states that 
he found the bulb perfectly hardy at Bos- 
ton, with a covering of leaves during 
winter. It grew to a height of six feet, 
but will probably attain a greater height 
under encouragement, as Nicholson gives 
the growth of this species as from four to 
ten feet. The seed requires a year in 
which to germinate. 



British Trade Topics. 

The traders on this side have now had 
time to make a retrospect. Comparisons 
with previous years are not favorable to 

1903. The abnormal rain proved disas- 
trous to all branches of horticulture; 
trade depression, following the South 
African war, made its impact felt. 
Retrenchment in many households meant 
the sacrifice of floral adornment, which 
comes under the heading of luxuries, 
with a resultant injury to the trade. 
There is no lack of activity in the prepa- 
ration made to meet the demands of 

1904. It may prove of interest if I allude 
to some of the novelties which are being 
introduced this year. 

R. Veitch & Son, a leading West of 
England firm of nurserymen, besides add- 
ing to their list of vegetable seeds, have 
a new single petunia. Lord Courtenay, 
which is of a medium size, of a bright rosy 
pink, and has blooms which stand well. 
They also have a new gaillardia, Veitch's 
Compact strain— a useful perennial for 
bed or border — and a fine marguerite, 
The Shasta, a pure white bloom, borne 
on a lengthy stalk. 

J. Cheal & Sons, of the Lowfield Nur- 
series, Crawley, Sussex, are noted exhi- 
bitors of dahlias, their singles being 
especially good. Their new introduc- 
tions this year comprise the following 
singles: Princess of Wales — a good exhibi- 
tion variety, with finely formed blooms 
of a delicate soft pink, shaded with 
mauve — and Darkness, a rich dark, 
maroon crimson, which has received an 
award of merit from the Royal Horti- 
cultural Society. Among the cactus sec- 
tion Queen is Hkely to be popular. This 
is of an attractive primrose yellow, 
shading off to pink at the florets. 

W. J. (Jodfrcy, of the Nurseries, Ex- 
mouth, who has won numerous honors 
at the autumn shows, has several new 
chrysanthemums of his own raising. 
These comprise Devonshire Hero, rich 
golden-yellow; Geo. W. Matthew, soft 
amber-yellow, with abase of cinnamon- 
red; and The Captain, deep crimson, with 
a bronze reverse. 

The seedsmen, as usual, are well to the 
fore in oflering their latest iniroductions. 
Harrison & Sons, of Leicester, have a 
tomato, with the original title, Justthe- 
thing — a cross between Holmes' Supreme 
and Dobbies' Champion. Chas. Sharpe& 
Company, Ltd.,of Heaford, Lincolnshire, 
have a new manicrop pea, Sharpe's Aris- 



tocrat, and an improved monarch pea 
which have received awards from the 
Royal Horticultural Society. Cooper, 
Taber & Company of 90 Southwark 
street, London, have a new pea, Riven- 
hall Wonder, which is an improvement 
on Witham Wonder, but owing to the 
excessive dampness last year the crop 
was seriously damaged, and it has been 
found impossible to supply any seed. 
The firm will put down a large acreage 
^ihis year to satisfy the many demands 
which have been received. Sutton & 
Sons, the king's seedsmen, Reading, are 
making a leading line of their new late 
potato. Discovery, the result of a cross 
made at their trial grounds in 1898. 
Trials made have shown the tuber to 
possess exceptional cropping and disease 
resisting powers, and it has been in great 
demand at 15 shillings a pound. W. W. 
Johnson & Son, Ltd., of Boston, Lincoln- 
shire, have placed on the market six new 
sweet peas which will prove a valuable 
addition to this increasingly popular 
subject. 

The year 1903 will be noteworthy for 
the record prices made for seed potatoes 
of new varieties. Sales were actually 
effected at figures which turned out to 
be three times the weight of the tubers in 
gold. The wide-spread loss caused by 
the virulent disease among the potatoes 
has emphasized the need of securing a 
disease-resisting tuber to take the places 
of some of the old, worn-out sorts. From 
the first introduction into commerce 
Northern Star has made i^ood prices. A 
member of the firm of Isaac Poad & Sons, 
seed merchants, York, today told me 
they have made trials of this variety and 
it yielded from fifteen to twenty tons an 
acre, besides being a splendid disease 
resister. Alexander Findlay, a Scotch 
raiser, has scored another triumph with 
this potato. He has another new one. 
El Dorado, which has made sensational 
prices. In fact these have eclipsed all 
other prices paid for the humble tuber. 
At the Smithfield show in London in 
December, several pounds of El Dorado 
were sold at tl50 a pound. Since then 
Poad & Sons and E. W. King & Sons of 
Coggeshall, have obtained ,£1(>0 per 
pound for the tuber. Mr. Findlay holds 
forty-two cwts. of this precious potato 
which he is keeping for planting this 
year, and two of his friends have eleven 
pounds. Orders are being booked for 
supplying the seed in 1905. and high 
prices are ruling. El Dorado has the 
same parents as Northern Star, Victoria 
and Dan. Victoria was one parent of 
Champion, Magnum Bonum and many 
others brought into commerce in the last 
thirty years. The tubers are more kidney 
shaped than Northern Star. The flesh is 
white and the flavor by an expert is 
described as of "a full chestnut flavor." 
It stood the trials well last season, estab- 
lishing its claim to be a thorough dis- 
ease- resister. 

That greater attention is being paid 
to potato raising in great Britain is 
attested by the formation of a National 
Potato Society. It is intended to organ- 
ize trials to ascertain the best varieties, 
and these experiments will be kept free 
from any trade influence. An advisory 
committee of trade members will, how- 
ever, deal with any commercial questions 
which maj' arise. Lord Rosebery, as a 
farmer, not as a politician, was elected 
president. 

My closing note must be a mournful 
one, for I have to record with sincere 
regret the demise of two leading men in 
the horticultural world whose careers 
have ended while they were still in active 



manhood. I refer to J. C. Fidler and W. 
Home. Mr. Fidler was the head of an 
important seed warehouse at Reading. 
For many years he devoted attention to 
the raising of new varieties, and he 
brought out several manicrop sorts 
which became popular and profitable. 
He built up an immense home and colo- 
nial trade. The average out-put of 
potatoes from November to April, includ- 
ing seed and ware, is about 300 tons a 
week. The South African market has 
been extensively supplied by the firm. 
Mr. Home was the head of the firm of 
Home & Sons, nurserymen and fruit 
growers, of Clifie, near Rochester. Mr. 
Ilorne was a specialist in dealing with 
orchard pests, and he introduced the 
Charles Ross apple and other well known 
fruits. From his farm and nurseries of 
250 acres fruit trees were sent to Amer- 
ica, Canada, New Zealand, and in fact all 
parts of the world. An auction sale was 
held twice a year, when thousands of 
trees were distributed. 



A Discussion on the Sparrow. 

At the Farmers' Institute meeting in 
Philadelphia. January 19, a discussion 
arose on the sparrow. Professor Menges 
voiced the popular feeling of aversion 
and blamed the sparrow for being noisy, 
dirty, pugnacious, and over prolific. He 
accused him of eating grain instead of 
weeds and insects, of driving other and 
more useful birds away from the haunts 
of men. In short, he had nothing good 
to say of the sparrow. 

G. C. Watson tried to put in a word 
on the other side of the ijuestion and 
mentioned that W. N. Craig before the 
Gardeners' and I'lorists' Club of Boston 
some five years ago had stated that from 
personal observation he knew sparrows 
destroyed immense numbers of tussock 
moths, gooseberry and currant worms, 
cabbage worms, grubs of various sorts, 
larvs of canker-worm and green aphis. 
He said he had numberless times exam- 
ined the crops of young nestlings and 
found them in nearly all cases filled with 
insects. In answer to the claim that they 
destroy the buds on our fruit and shade 
trees he said he had made close observa- 
tion in his home city, a place of 30,000 
inhabitants, where sparrows swarmed 
and he had failed to find any evidence of 
the destruction claimed. 

The same authority wrote Mr. Watson 
under date of January 18, I'JO-i, that he 
had seen no cause to change his opinion 
of the sparrow's usefulness. He said it 
was being charged that the sparrow was 
driving away other song birds from the 
towns but he was (juite sure that elec- 
tric cars and other noisy vehicles were 
the real culprits in driving the more 
timid song-birds to solitary surround- 
ings. He referred to the original object 
in introducing the sparrow to America, 
namely to abate the canker-worm pest. 
He succeeded well but the howl went up 
when the useful little fellow showed a 
natural desire for a change from the ever- 
lasting hairy caterpillar to an occasional 
meal of fruit or grain. 

Other testimony introduced by Mr. 
Watson was that of Prof John Craig, of 
Cornell University, who wrote under date 
of January 15, that in his opinion an 
impartial jury after weighing the find- 
ings for and against the sparrow would 
have to declare in his favor. He did not 
believe the sparrow was multiplying out 
of proportion in the older parts of the 
country. The domains of this bird are 
gradually widening but in the regions ol 
his first visitations Prof Craig had not 
observed that there were more than there 



1904- 



Th E American Florist. 



were a few years ago. Dr. Reed, of the 
zoological department of Cornell agreed 
with Professor Craig. Dr. Reed is a close 
observer of birds and his opinion in this 
matter ought to be considered of great 
weight. Geo. C. Watson. 



Sweet Peas.* 

Lfiiper by I'orc.v WiitPri-r. prcsenti'd iit Dahvicli 
Ellg.. JanuMl-y ni, 19IW,J 

Although most of the papilionaceous 
flowers are adapted to cross-fertilization, 
the sweet pea invariably fertilizes itself. 
Hence had not the specialists for years 
been artificially crossing it. we should 
have had very few varieties to-day. In 
fact. It had taken something like 180 
years for the two or three kinds which 
were mtroduced about the year 1700 to 
increase to the six or seven varieties 
that were known in the year 1S79 when 
1 believe. Mi-. Bckford first began to 
interest himself in them. Some years 
ater Mr. Burpee, of Philadelphia, in- 
troduced many of the Eekford varie- 
ties into America, where sweet pea 
erowing- has since become a gi-eat in- 
dustry. 

The success of the bi-centenary exhi- 
bition in 1900, was so encouraging that 
we now have many nurserymen giving 
special attention to producing new vari- 
eties, and improving existing ones They 
are doing most valuable work, for it is 
this continual crossing and selecting 
which has not only produced the bewil- 
dering number of shades of color we 
now have, but has also greatly increased 
the vigor ot the plant, the texture and 
size of the llower, and has also been the 
niean.s of making the plant more produc- 
tive ot bloom. 

Many believe that the sweet pea has 
been brought to such perfection that 
there is scarcely any room left for fur- 
ther improvement. This was the opinion 
e.xpressed by several members of the bi- 
centenary committee, when it was sug- 
gested that a national society should be 
formed to encourage and improve the 
cultivation of this popular tlower I 
doubt It a society would e\-er have been 
started had I not eonvened a meeting for 
that purpose, as it was in consequence 
of tluit meeting, the bi-centenary com- 
mittee formed the present society. 

?wt«'; Ti'' "c? ■'°"'" 'h'^' the Nation;il 
bweet Pea Society would be more popu- 
lar were the amateur better repre- 
sented. The last show held at Earl's 
Court was tar in advance of the two 
previous exhibitions, although at the 
s.ame time very badly attended. 

Though many people may think the 
sweet pea too insignificant a fiower to 
need a national society to look after its 
interests, yet it is more than probable 
that many have never seen it in its 
present high state of cultivation, and 
can therefore have no idea of the won- 
ders that will probably be revealed in 
Its advancement during the next few 
years. At present its chief qualities are 
fragrance, variety of color. length of 
stem, abundance of bloom, lightness 
gracefulness and cheapness. It also 
travels well, lasts well, can be made 
to grow in almost any soil or situation 
and Mowers for months. Notwithstand- 
ing all these qualifications, there is 
plenty of room for improvement in form 
variety of form, staying properties iii 
the color, and further fixing. 

There are already two good forms, the 
bold upright standard of Black Knight 
and the hooded standard and wings of 
which Lady Grisel Hamilton is a good 
example. Then we have every degree of 
hooding between these two. which to mv 
mind IS not desirable. There are al«" 
the erect and reflexing standard, of 
which Countes'^ Spencer is an example 
and one or two varieties which are 
picotee edged. I hope to see in the near 
Ju 'i'"''.^^"'^''^ ^" improvement in these 
that they may need a class to them- 
selvei5. There was one variety named 
Snapdragon, sent out by a firm in Phila- 
delphia, very much resembling that fa- 
miliar flower, and having for its chief 
quality a long, stout stem, but the trade 
here took a dislike to it. I admit that 
It was no t an acquisition as presented, 

»While there is much information in 
this paper of interest to all readers it 
.^hould be remembered that the cultural 
dn-ections refer to the English climate.— 
Kd. 



but with constant perseverance it might 
have resulted in a new type. Some vari- 
eties have a tendency to become double, 
but I think in this respect they are like 
the cineraria; the flowers lose their 
charm and will therefore never become 
popular. 

When the Cupid, or dwarf variety, was 
first introduced, it was disliked on ac- 
count of the shedding of its buds. I 
think this defect was caused by over- 
watering, for coming from the liot, dry 
climate of California, where it was pro- 
duced, it required less moisture, and the 
fact that it does exceedingly well upon 
rockwork goes far to prove this. It is 
grown much more freely in America than 
here, can now be had in almost anv 
shade of color, and will no doubt in time 
become popular. Again we have the 
bush variety, which is a cross between 
the old style and Cupid. When this 
class is more improved and there is - 
greater variety of color, it will be very 
welcome to those who experience a diffi'- 
culty in procuring the tall boughs now 
neces.sary [in training]. 

As regards the improvement of form, 
the wings should overlap the keel, form- 
ing a conical center to the flower. This 
would not only improve its appearance 
but be a further protection to the pollen' 
and consequently there would be -less 
risk of the variety getting accidentally 
crossed. As to other forms, thev might 
be fimbriated, scalloped, crested and 
hirsute. Too much importance has been 
given to the question of more flowers 
being produced upon a single stem 
Even now in the case ot fours some- 
times, either the first bloom is over or 
the top one is not fully developed 
Where a decorative effect is wanted a 
few buds can always be added. 

1 do not propose to enter into all the 
little details of cultivation, as most of 
these are known to you. and if not they 
may be found in the catalogues of the 
sweet pea specialists, but I certainly 
recommend early planting, as it is so 
necessary that the plants should take 
good hold of the ground before making 
vine, and they will only do so in cool 
weather. 1 find from notes taken last 
year, that my plants only grew two 
inches between April 20 and May 2,1. 
when they were only six inches high' 
but all that time they were making root' 
We were then favored with some good 
glowing weather, and by .June 1 they 
measured 13i/. inches; bv the 7th 2'Vi 
inches; .and by the 15tii, :;,sy™ inches" 
thus having grown 221/. inches "in twen- 
ty-one days, and making vine in some 
cases three-fourths of an inch broad 
They would not have made this rapid, 
strong growth had they not been thor- 
oughly well rooted. 

It is very essential that the ground 
should be deeply trenched, and this 
should be done some time before plant- 
ing in order that it mav settle down 
firmly. Many maJce a rule of changing 
the ground each year, but I think it is 
quite unnecessary. When I paid a visit 
to the best known sweet pea nursery- 
man in 1900. I found the peas had been 
grown for years upon the same ground 
his plan being to alter the position of 
the rows, and their direction each sea- 
son, so that with the exception of a 
very small percentage the plants did 
not occupy the same spot but once in 
four years. 

Again when I was in the Midlands 
last year. I was invited to look over the 
sweet pea farm of a very successful 
nurseryman, and was astonished by his 
stating that he had planted some of the 
peas as nearly as possible upon the 
same spot they had occupied the vear 
previous. His opinion is that the ge'rms 
or bacteria which feed the roots directly 
with nitrogen are already in the soil 
prepared to go on with their work, it 
only being necessary to replace the 
phosphates, potash, etc.. that the previ- 
ous crop had consumed. I can only add 
that the plants gave excellent results, 
bearing some of the finest blooms I have 
seen during the past season. It is of 
course very necessary to change the 
seed occasionally when growing upon the 
same ground. 

The hoe is far superior to the water- 
ing pot; it lets the air and warmth into 
the soil and also keeps the moisture that 
is there from evaporating. If the sur- 
face is constantly hoed very little water- 
ing at the roots will be required in an 
ordinary season, but the plants will be 
greatly benefited by syringing over the 
foliage on warm nights when there is 



an absence of dew. In a dry season the 
sweet pea can be grown to a greatei' 
state of perfection if the plants are six 
or eight inches below the surface, the 
fertilizing manures being well below 
that, rhey should be gradually earthed 
up until the surface is nearly .level 
using the top spit, which should be free 
Irom manures, as a mulch. We are 
often told that the pea makes a very 
shallow root, ;but in 1901— which waV 
an exceptionally favorable season— I 
found the roots had gone down as far 
as, the ground had been trenched, that 
being a good three feet. ,In wet seasons 
the plants do better nearer the surface 
as the bacteria do not work at any 
depth in cold wet soil. * 

The cause of the seed not gerriiinating 
IS sometimes attributable to its being 
sown too deep in heavy wet ground 
Another cause of failure is owing to the 
incrustation of the soil, the young seed- 
ling having insufficient strength to push 
its way through. Natural manures are 
preferable to artificial, especially , in a 
liquid form, when the plants are making 
rapid growth. Nitrate of soda given 
veiT sparingly as soon as the i^ants 
show through will greatly benefit them ' 
but It should not be used in cold, n"t 
weather. . vici. 

nZ^^ following are the best varieties in 
the order given: 

„2^*'i"v°°,!;°'*'>' Eekford, Blanche Bur- 
pee, Sadie Burpee. 

Pale yellow— Hon. Mrs. Kenvon, Lady 
Ormsby Gore, Mrs. Eekford - 

Orange—Miss Willmott. Lady Marie 
Curne. Gorgeous. "larie 

Blush---Duchess of Sutherland. 

^f Tofr""^ Donna. Lovely, Countess 
oi Lathom. 

Scarlet— Scarlet Gem (new). 

^&imson-King Edward VII. Salopian, 

Cerise— Coccinea. 

Rose or carmin(^Lord Rosebery, Prince 
of Wales, Lord Kenyon, Her Majesty 
Clarence "^ Westminster, Duke of 

Magenta— Captivation, Calypso 

Maroon— Black linight, Othello. 

Blue— Nav-y Blue. Captain of the 
Blues. Emily Eekford. 

Mauve-Dorothy Tennant. Admiration. 

Lavender-Lady Grisel Hamilton, Coun- 
less ot Radnor, Lady Nina Balfour. 

Bicolor— Triumph. Pi-ince Edward of 
lork, Jennie Gordon. 

Striped or flaked— America. Gaiety 
Senator. Mrs. Chamberlain. -'"''r.N. 

wfod"*"^'~"^°"''' Hutchins, Gracie Green- 

Ec^k'fri.^G^iiirG^fi:^ °^ «°"°'-' L°«- 

Sadie Burpee is a hooded variety and 
therefore should not be exhibited under 

f hnvri;'Jl'' ■"''"' ?" ^'■'''^■' standard as 
I ha\e often seen it shown. Scarlet Gem- 
is a great acquisition, it being very 

S'fn^«';iwH"' *'^^e°l°>■ its name Implies 
than anything yet sent out. but it mav 

"°' '"l* .f^^'™-, ^'ith a few fiddist.== a?t^ 
? tfi"' It, only bears two flowers upon 
a stem, although, for my part. I prefei' 
two good flowers to four poor ines 
Gorgeous must be shaded, otherwise the 

Navy Blue is grown from seed I ob- 
tained direct from America in 1899 when 
It was flrst sent out, and is very superio"- 
Th'^fV®''."'"'^!^ Srown in thi.s country 
The best eighteen varieties that ha\-e 
been well established are- ■ 

Dorothy Eekford. Hon. Mrs. Kenvon 
Navy Blue. Dorothy Tennant. Prince of 
Wales, Lord Kenyon. Blanche Bu%ee 
Prima Donna or Lovely, Lady Grisel 
Hamilton, Miss Willmott, Trium'ph Saf- 
opian. King Edward VII., Coc'cinta 

idward'^Jf^rn l"^""/ H.oseb'ery^°Prrn^e 
li-nward of York. America. 

If a striped one is not required grow 

Captain of the Blues, or Bolton's Rnk 

instead of America. Countess Spi^ cer 

and Mrs. Knights Smith are two new 

f sen? out'fh-<?"°"^' '"'""t tha°t wi?^ 
oe sent out this year, and should he 
grown by all. Robert Bolton We -ton 
Carnforth and Marchioness of Chofmon: 
deley are four varieties I saw shown 

fl.f^llj;iii%|^-^??^f>Si"^^«ie 
excluding frost, and placing five seeds hi 
a 6-inch I then renTove them to a ?o d 
frame about the first week in Mareh 

i-een '^ S"'' t ^f"^ *""^^ '" the pots fa 

Keep the plants erect. After the fir^t 
week in April, as soon as the ground^l 
In good condition, I plant them o2t by 



The American Florist. 



Jan. JO, 



the open. Under this treatment they 
generaily show tne nrst buus aoout the 
beginning of June. I think these dates 
are roughly right for my district, as 
self-sown seed comes to bud just about 
that time in an ordinary season, but 
mine Is a particularly cold and late situ- 
ation. 

In favorable positions seed may be 
sown in the open ground late in the au- 
tumn, and if they escape the slugs the 
plants will be very strong, and give a 
greater quantity of blooms. Ten to 
twenty degrees of frost in the winter 
does not mjure them. The sweet pea 
under good cultivation has very few ene- 
mies. The smg is troublesome in the 
early stage, and sometimes the tomtit 
attacks lae howers and seed pods. I 
have known it to strip off one side ot 
the pod and take the center ot each seed 
almost as soon as they were formed. 
Aphis is rarely seen upon healthy plants, 
but after a spell of unseasonable 
weather, a washing with some insecti- 
oide Is advisable as soon as the con- 
ditions for growing are again favorable. 
Some growers have been complaining ot 
a fungus disease called Ascochyta pisi, 
or pea spot, which most likely is caused 
by overwatering and sourness ot the 

'' one of the most perplexing problems, 
in regar>. to sweet peas, is their not 
coming true, and this is much more 
prevalent in the newer varieties. Ihe 
reason may be that as they have now 
become so popular, and tne demand lor 
new varieties is so much greater, they 
are sent out before they have had time 
to become properly fixea. 1 say mis be- 
cause I find tnat seeds sent out by the 
same firm come true In some gardens 
and quite the reverse in others, and 1 
conclude that where they come true the 
conditions happened to be much the 
same as existed where the seed was 
produced. This, however, will never be 
Corrected while the present competition 
exists, and new varieties are sent out 
at such ridiculously low prices m com- 
parison to the vast amount of skill and 
patience needed in raising them. lo 
.some extent it may be accounted lor 
by the tomtit tearing the buds open and 
exposing the pistil, or it is possible that 
a variety of bee — Bombus muscorum — is 
more prevalent now than formerly. I 
saw it busily at work upon two occa- 
sions, once in 1901 and again m lauJ, 
both days being very hot and bright. 

The great naturalist, Charles Darwin, 
mentions this bee .under the heading 
Pisum sativum. He says; "I have ob- 
served the flowers for the last thirty 
years, and in all this time have only 
thrice seen bees of the proper kind at 
work (one of them being Bombus mus- 
corum), such as were sufficiently power- 
ful to depress the keel, so as to get the 
undersides of their bodies dusted with 
pollen. These bees visited several flow- 
ers, and could hardly have failed to 
cross-fertilize them. Hive bees and 
other small kinds sometimes collect 
poUen from old and already fertilized 
flowers, but this is of no account. The 
rarity of the visits of efficient bees to 
this exotic plant is, I believe, the chief 
cause of the varieties so seldom inter- 
crossing." _„„^ ^ ^ , 

W. Early, in Nature, 1872, states he 
once saw a bee visiting the flowers of 
Lathyrus odoratus and supposed that on 
that occasion they would be intercrossed. 
The bee (Bombus muscorum) alights 
upon the keel in such a position that in 
pressing it down the hairy side of the 
style — that is. the left side as you look 
at the flower — always comes in contact 
with its body whilst in the act of ex- 
tracting the nectar from the base of the 
wings. I have seen many other varieties 
of bees, including the bumble bee. taking 
nectar, but they always work between 
the wing and the .standard, and are 
quite impartial as to which side they 
enter. , . ,. 

The production of improved varieties 
and new forms must remain largely in 
the hands of the trade, but there may 
be a few amateurs enthusiastic enough 
to work at it, in which case it would be 
better to work by selection rather than 
by hybridizing, unless they have plenty 
of space at their disposal, as a large 
number ot trials are necessary. There 
are advantages and disadvantages in hy- 
bridizing and crossing sweet peas as com- 
pared with other plants. For instance, 
a new chrysanthemum, once obtained, 
can be increased by bud propagation 
Without further trouble; but the sweet 



pea. being an annual, and therefore only 
capable of reproduction by seed, requires 
to be grown some years under the same 
conditions until it becomes fixed. When 
this has once been attained, it has an 
advantage over many other annuals on 
account of its being a plant that is self- 
fertilizing and resists cross-fertilizing. It 
is also capable of reproducing itself for 
many years without the least deteriora- 
tion, whereas the chrysanthemum is very 
often impaired in quality and constitution 
in a few years. As an instance of this, 
that glorious variety. Sunflower — sent out 
in 18S8 — ceased to exist some years ago. 
Therefore, those who give their time to 
improving sweet peas have the satisfac- 
tion of knowing that although their work 
takes much longer to complete, the result 
of their labor will long outlive the work 
of bud propagation. 

The following few examples will show 
how necessary it is to fix a variety be- 
fore it is sent out. On August 4. 1901, I 
crossed Coccinea with Salopian (Coccinea 
being the seed-bearing plant), and pro- 
duced an improved Prince of Wales, which 
I showed, amongst others, at the Drill 
Hall. July 8. 1902. Out of five seeds sown 
of this variety I got — in 1903— an Improved 
Coccinea. finer in flower, and much more 
robust in habit than the original has ever 
grown with me. The other four plants 
came true, but not so good as in the 
previous year. I also crossed on the same 
date Firefly with Sadie Burpee, the result 
being a fine, bold flower, good, erect 
standard, and long, stout stem. The col- 
or, however, was not good, it being dull 
purple, with a much darker purple edge. 
The seed was black, and I exhibited the 
flower at Holland Park, July 25, 1902. 
Three— AM. FLORIST. Greenlee 

Out of three seeds of this variety two 
came true, and one a perfect white Fire- 
fly, having the reflexed standard and short 
stem characteristic of that variety, but 
taking the color of Sadie Burpee both in 
the flower and seed. The seed changed to 
fawn; or, as it is called in the trade, 
white. On July 21, 1901, I crossed Othello 
with Royal Rose, which resulted in a 
flower between Duke of Westminster and 
Black Knight, and it was from this va- 
riety that 1 raised the scarlet one shown 
at the Temple last year. Again Duke of 
Westminster crossed with Miss Wllmott 
gave an Improved Duke of Westminster 
in 1902. but resulted in 1903 in three 
shades of pink. 

A large number of crosses result in 
shades of purple, and many others result, 
after the second generation, in anything 
and everything but a resemblance to 
either of their grandparents or the flrst 
offspring. Yet in some instances the seed 
has always come true each year, but until 
they have been grown upon the same 
ground for six or seven years. I doubt if 
they would do so grown elsewhere and 
under other conditions. As the anthers 
of the sweet pea shed their pollen before 
the flower expands, it is necessary to 
emasculate the female, or seed-bearing 
parent, just before the pollen is free. I 
have found the stigma in the best stage 
to take the pollen of the male parent two 
days later. The work of hydridizing and 
crossing should be done under glass, oth- 
erwise the operator must be prepared for 
a large number of failures, especially in 
a season such as W'e have just expe- 
rienced. 

It is curious that although the pods set 
so much more freely under glass, yet, so 
far as my experience shows, the seed 
lacks the germinating power of that 
grown outside. It is possible that this is 
owing to the seed being overripe. In 
a trial of sixty seeds in twenty varieties 
harvested under glass and sown November 
22, 1903, only thlrty-flve had germinated 
December 13. whereas of sixty seeds in 
twenty varieties harvested outside — and 
in such an unfavorable season — and sown 
upon the same date, flfty-flve had germi- 
nated December 13, that being three 
weeks in each case. Another trial upon 
the same dates of 1902 and 1903 seed re- 
sulted in twenty-nine seeds germinating 
out of thirty in each case. This tends 
to show that the germinating powers were 
not impaired by keeping. A fortnight 
later I made a trial of 1901 seed, raising 
twenty-eight plants out of thirty seeds, 
but I think the seed requires to be kept 
in a very dry place with an even tempera- 
ture, or the result will be otherwise. 

It is a mistake always to select the 
largest seed, as I have found that small 
and medium sized seed germinate better 
and gives just as good results as excep- 
tionally fine seed in point of size. Minute, 



deformed seed often germinate freely, al- 
though the plants are usually very weak 
to start with, and it is quite possible that 
amongst .these may be found the improve- 
ment that is wanted. 

Now. in conclusion, remember — • 
The deeper you trench. 

The finer the pea; 
The thinner you sow. 

The stronger they'll be. 
Keep using the hoe. 

And take it from me: 
The more blossom cut. 
'i'he more you will s'-e. 



THE RETAIL TRADE 



A Cleveland Wedding; Decoration. 

In the decoratiotis for theTod-McBride 
nuptials at St. Paul's church, Cleveland, 
January 14, Easter lilies and American 
Beauty roses were used. On each side of 
the altar were tall banks of palms, and 
back of these large electric lights (such as 
are used on suburban cars). Intermin- 
gled with the palms were tall standards, 
showered with Easter lilies. The light 
through the palms was beautiful. Win- 
dows in the altar were banked with 
Easter lilies. On each side of the church 
were tall trees of American Beauty. 
Seventy-five extra lights were put in the 
chandeliers, and all of these were beauti- 
fully showered with Easter lilies and 
American Beauties. The decoration was 
planned and executed by Mr. Smith, ot 
Smith & Fetters. 



Hints on House Decoration. 

In a house decoration the most im- 
pressive effects are produced by confin- 
ing a distinct color to each room, and if 
the individuality can be carried still fur- 
ther and special features of form and 
character be followed as well, the result 
will be excellent. Schemes of decoration 
depend for their success very much on 
individual taste and feeling. The style 
of architecture and furniture of a room, 
the colors and figures in floor coverings 
and wall paper and other accessories 
will be carefully noted by the intelligent 
florist, and it will be his special endeavor 
to make his work harmonious with these 
surroundings. The old style of loading 
a room with flowers of promiscuous 
colors was, perhaps, in keeping with the 
stage of development which the art of 
floral adornment had reached at the 
time, but there is, to-day, no room for 
the florist who is not capable of better 
things. 

Some customers come to the surface, 
occasionally, who insist on the florist's 
doing absurd things and tell you, in 
response to your polite protest, that if 
you cannot do it there are others who 
can. Fortunately, however, this class is 
not so often met with as formerly and 
the cases are infrequent where a lady 
cannot be induced to accord with the 
florist's views in regard to effects, pro- 
vided he is able to explain them in a 
refined and intelligent manner. 

To make a beautiful mantel decoration, 
cut a board the size of the mantel and 
mound it up with moss the day before it 
is to be used. A strip of rubber cloth 
under and behind it will prevent anypos- 
sibility of damage from dampness or 
otherwise. Small glass vases can be 
concealed in the moss for the reception of 
such cut flowers as are to be used, and 
the dressing of the bank with small ferns 
and other plants, plunged in the moss, 
out of pots, is the work of but a few 
minutes for a clever workman. 

A word about the helpers. The man- 
ners and appearance of the employes 



1904. 



The American Florist. 



9 



whom you have as assistants in carry- 
ing plants and similar work inconnection 
with a decorative job should not be 
overlooked. Have the men leave their 
pipes at home. It may seem absurd to 
some that such advice should be printed, 
but it is inspired by experience, that 
"best of all teachers." 



New York. 

While a little improvement can be dis- 
cerned in the cut flower trade it is still 
true the volume of business is not what 
it should be at this season, especially 
considering that it is a short season. On 
some few things values have braced up 
slightly, but on the general list there is 
not much advancement. Some lines sell 
out a little closer than they did during 
the early part of the month. Among the 
noticeably good flowers offered are Rosa 
Mundi tulips at Traendly & Schenck's 
and Raynor's and Liberty roses with 
stems three to four feet long at Young & 
Nugent's. Frank Millang finds the Ber- 
tha Rath one of the most popular of 
white carnations. Henry Rath, who 
raised it, sells no cuttings, simply raising 
enough to stock his own houses. White 
lilac of splendid quality is abundant. 
Some of the double varieties are exceed- 
ingly fine and bring good prices. Of 
bulbous stock such as Trumpet major 
narcissus, campernelles, tulips and lily of 
the valley there is an over-supply and 
much unsold material of this class as well 
as of violets is held from day to day in 
wholesalers' hands. 

A few blooms of F. R. Pierson's new 
crimson carnation Daheim have been seen 
here. It is a remarkably fine flower, the 
blooms splendidly built up and in size 
and sturdiness of flower and stem might 
not unworthily be called a crimson Law- 
son. The color — crimson slightly shaded 
with maroon— is very brilliant in both 
sunlight and artificial light and the flow- 
ers have demonstrated excellent keeping 
qualities. The growers say that one of 
its best points is the rapidity with which 
the buds develop on the plant. It is to 
be introduced this spring and promises 
to be to the crimson class what Lawson 
is in dark pink and Enchantress in light 
pink. 

Besides carnation night February 8 
will be ladies' night at the New York 
Florists' Club. Mazzetti, the caterer, has 
been ordered to look out for the ladies. 
Judging Irom the number of entries 
already received from exhibitors it will 
be a great affair. All members are invited 
to bring their lady friends and anybody 
else interested in flowers. Among the 
many entries already received for the 
carnation exhibition are those of the Chi- 
cago Carnation Company and the J. D. 
Thompson Carnation Company, of Joliet, 
HI. Peter Fisher, of Ellis, Mass., is 
expected to read a paper. 

Siebrecht & Son furnished a fine decora- 
tion last week at the A. P. Stokes man- 
sion. There were twenty tables to 
accommodate 125 guests. The main 
table, fifteen feet in diamete'r, and the oth- 
ers, each five feet, were adorned with cat- 
tleyas, Itelias and phala;nopses. The ball 
room was decorated exclusively with 
American Beauty, the morning room 
Bridesmaid, the parlor with Bride and 
the red room with Liberty roses. 

Simon Rodh, the ribbon expert, 40 
West Twenty-eighth street, reports a 
largely augmented business this season. 
Mr. kodh's cleverness in matching the 
exact tints of flowers in general use and 
the fidelity with which florists' tastes in 





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DECORATIONS AT THE TOD-McBRIDE WEDDING, CLEVELAND, O. 



this line are adhered to are his strong 
points. 

A. J. Scott, son of the well-known 
grower of West Brighton, Staten Island, 
met with a serious coasting accident, 
being badly injured aboutthe head. The 
entire party of coasters, fifteen in num- 
ber, was thrown from the sled and all 
were more or less badly hurt. 

Theodore Paltz, an aged florist of East 
New York, was found dead in his shanty 
on New Lots avenue January 20. -He 
lived alone and was regarded as eccen- 
tric. 

George Vocke, an old Astoria grower, 
has given up business and taken charge 
of some greenhouses for Admiral Rogers 
at the Navy Yard. 

Percy Richter, salesman for the E. G. 
Asmus estate, has been seriously ill at his 
home in Elizabeth but is now reported 
as recovering. 

Gustav C. C. Schrader of Elmhurst is 
an enthusiastic automobilist. He takes 
a daily spin on Hoffman boulevard with 
his family. 

A. S. Burns, Jr., of Spring Valley, is 
sending to Raynor some Enchantress 
carnations of remarkable quality. 

P. Watson, of Orange, is bringing to 
the market some roses of very superior 
quality. 

Visitors: Jac. M. Jansen, Hillegom, 
Holland; George Hannan, Forest Hills. 
Boston; Carl Jurgens, Newport, R. I.; F. 
R. Mathison, Waltham, Mass. 



Chlcagfo. 

The second consignment of arctic 
weather was delivered this week, just 
as if the growers and shippers did not 
have enough conspiring forces to contend 
with. Practically no stock came into 



the market Monday and it was not until 
Tuesday that the slightest trace of 
activity was instilled into the market. 
The week has not been a good one from 
the dealer's point of view. Curtailed 
receipts in the better grades of all cut 
flowers, indifferent quality, unsatisfac- 
tory prices and a general apathetic con- 
dition in the ranks of the buyers in the 
country and city is a quad of forces in 
fatal conspiracy which keep the whole- 
salers figuring pretty hard these days. 
There was quite a brisk carnation move- 
ment on during the middle of the week, 
induced by the McKinley carnation day. 
The heaviest calls came from the Buckeye 
state, and red was the much desired color. 
But the movement was short-lived and 
the carnation situation hardly shows a 
perceptible improvement over that of 
last week. Roses have not been doing so 
badly. The top notch grade of Beauty 
are at a premium, but the lesser grades 
do not find much favor with the buyer. 
Bulbous stock persistently remains a 
surfeit, and from the looks of the stock 
constantly jamming itself into the market 
no one is able to discern a rift in the 
clouds. Nice tulips are coming in but 
prices are not half way respectable say 
the dealers. The week has been of the 
spasmodic order, some days bringing a 
brisk movement, others nothing doing. 
In spite of the comparative quiet, some 
wholesalers report a satisfactory ship- 
ping business. The cut flower business 
locally promises to open up soon, the 
effects of the Iroquois fire, etc., having 
run their course. 

The second district meeting of the 
Florists' Club was held, according to 
schedule, on the west side, January 28. 
There was a good attendance and those 
present showed much interest in the pro. 



10 



The American Florist. 



Jan. JO. 



ceedings. Melville G. Holding, of the 
Sprague-Stnith Company, presented an 
instructive paper on "Geeenhouse Glass," 
and replied in a very practical manner to 
numerous questions on the subject. Mr. 
Young, who was to have read a paper 
on "Pipes and Fittings," was unable to 
be present owing to illness. C. B. Read 
made a few remarks on "Paints, Oils 
and Putty," and John Thorpe gave a 
short address. On conclusion of business, 
supper was served. An exhibition of 
carnations, roses, violets and bulbous 
stock will be held February 17, and 
premiums will be awarded to the amount 
of $100. Varieties already awarded 
prizes this season will not be entitled to 
premiums at this exhibition. P. J. Haus- 
wirth has been appointed manager, and 
the exhibits should be addressed to F. F. 
Benthey, 35 Randolph street, Chicago, 
all charges prepaid. 

It takes more than one severe winter 
season to teach many shippers the proper 
manner to pack flowers for long distance 
shipping, with the mercury hiding in the 
bulb. A number of important carnation 
and violet shipments reached this market 
in a frozen state the early part of the 
week. Some were lightly packed in paper 
boxes. A few additional layers of news- 
papers will save many a dollar these cold 
days. 

The Chicago Carnation Company, of 
Joliet, 111., exhibited a number of leading 
carnations at the Flower Market Satur- 
tiay afternoon, January 23. In the dis- 
play were fine blooms of the prize winner. 
Fiancee, Dorothy Whitney, Harlowarden, 
Crusader and Reliance. Manager James 
Hartshorne was here also, booking cut- 
ting orders. 

Wm. R. Mannheimer, aged 23, a son of 
Julius Mannheimer, of 3812 Prairie 
avenue, committed suicide this week at St. 
Louis. He left Chicago about a week ago, 
saying that he was going to Memphis, 
Tenn., to secure work. He was at one 
time an employe of John Mangel, and 
was well known by local florists. 

Leonard Kill wears a bandage on his 
hand, the memento of last Monday even- 
ing's bowling seance. L. forgot the key 
to his residence, and in executing the 
step-ladder stunt to the transom he fell, 
spraining his good right arm. 

George Scott, with the E. F. Winterson 
Company, is another example of the 
versatility of florists. In a match ice 
skating race with Wineberg, a prominent 
local professional, this week, he emerged 
a good second. 

The George Wittbold Company has 
added some bulbous stock to the stock 
in the Flower Growers' Market. Every- 
thing in this line is exceptionally well 
grown. 

The E. F. Winterson Company reports 
a brisk shipping business the fore part of 
the week. Some remarkably well grown 
freesias with long stems were seen here 
this week. 

The Chicago factory and warehouse of 
the Pittsburg Plate Glass Company was 
totally destroyed by fire Friday night, 
Jan. 22. The loss is estimated at 
$175,000. 

Fire broke out in the Masonic Temple 
January 23. T. D. Mosconesotes, the 
State street retailer, sustained losses to 
the extent of about $100. 

A. H. Schneider will erect a range of 
greenhouses in Concordia cemetery this 
spring. He has leased about ten acres of 
land for that purpose. 

Poehlmann Brothers Company is 
handling a fine line of American Beauty 
roses. Their Bride and Bridesmaid are 
in good crop. 



Mrs. Alex. Newett, wife of the wide- 
awake manager at J. B. Deamud's, has 
been quite ill for several weeks. 

Charles Kronenberger, of Peter Rein- 
berg's greenhouses, was married Tuesday 
to Miss Blanche Smith. 

John Thorpe was called to La Crosse, 
Wis., January 27, for consultation in 
some important public park work. 

E. C. Amling enjoyed a good business 
this week, notwithstanding the adverse 
weather conditions. 

Fred. Kingel, of Peter Reinberg's, is 
again at his desk after several weeks' 
illness. 

Benthey & Company are now prepared 
to meet a heavy cutting rush in all lines. 

A visitor this week was J. Stern, of 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Philadelphia. 

Good roses are scarce, very scarce, and 
poor ones, too, and one has to be on the 
spot when the boxes are opened these 
mornings if his orders are to be anything 
like filled. Most of the growers say their 
houses are off crop, and this with the 
dull weather is blamed for the scarcity. 
Supply seems to keep pace with the 
demand, however, for there is but little 
doing, the social season being the lightest 
in several years. Beauty has been par- 
ticularly scarce, and commission men find 
it hard to get half enough to fill shipping 
orders. S. S. Pennock had an order for 
two hundred specials one day this week. 
Liberty is also much in demand. Meteor, 
which held the lead so long, now makes 
a sorry showing against its younger 
rival, as there are so many dark and ball- 
headed flowers that are not saleable. 
But a rose that stands the pace for ten 
years is a good one, and Meteor will not 
soon be forgotten. Violets are more 
plentiful, the Californias coming in well 
and all other kinds in larger quantities. 
Sweet peas are now constantly in stock 
and welcome, particularly the white ones 
in funeral work. Mignonette is at its 
best. Tulips can be had in all colors and 
daffodils are seen in quantity, but all 
single. No doubles as yet. 

L. K. Peacock is building three large 
greenhouses and a propagating house 
and putting in a 60 horse power boiler 
at his Atco, N. J., place. One hundred 
and twenty acres of dahlias, planted 
closer, is to be the extent of his garden 
next summer, an increase of some forty 
acres. 

Robert Scott & Son are sending fine 
gardenias to S. S. Pennock. The stock 
at the nursery looks fine and there will 
be a good supply until after Easter. 
Fifty cents each is the price, and they are 
cleared up every day. 

The field day at Horticultural hall last 
week was like the play of Hamlet with 
the chief actor left out, as Chief Lonsdale 
was unable to be present, being kept 
indoors by a bad cold. 

George Anderson is cutting some choice 
Beauty and Liberty. His Easter lilies are 
still in 3-inch pots with shoots only two 
to three inches high, but he is confident 
of success. 

Jacob D. Eisele's oldest daughter has 
been very ill with typhoid fever but is 
now on the way to recovery. 

Leo Niessen reports a fine shipping 
trade. His special Bridesmaid and Lib- 
erty are fine. 

Hustling John Maclntire, of Ed. Reid's 
stafi", is on the sick list. K. 

Columbus, O.— E. Metzmaierhas a fine 
white sport of the Lawson carnation, 
which he expects to propagate and grow 
extensively. 



Washington. 

There is a steady demand for good 
stock in orchids, roses, valley and tulips, 
all of which enter largely into decorations 
for dinners and similar events. Roses 
are generally off crop and prices are firm, 
American Beauty in special instances 
going to $15 per dozen. First-class 
Liberty have sold for $12 per dozen in 
some instances. Bride and Bridesmaid 
from $2 to $4 per dozen. A lew gar- 
denias are on the market at $1 each. 
Tulips are in demand and retail at fifty 
to seventy-five cents per dozen. A few 
single daffodils have appeared at $1.25 
per dozen. Violets are more plentiful 
and of better quality than a month ago. 
Louis Loose and J. R. Freeman are 
now showing good violets grown at 
their respective ranges, and all the deal- 
ers have good stocks which, on account 
of the mild weather of the past week, 
have sold well. 

The visitors to the botanical gardens 
can find many flowering novelties that 
are worthy of mention. In one of the 
houses a Bougainviltea speciosa, now in 
full bloom, has been trained along 
overhead tile. It is now the full length 
of the house, about seventy-five feet. As 
it seems to be growing fast it will now 
have to "double." The purple and white 
flowers of the Franciscea latifolia are 
also very pretty, peeping out from 
among the tall palms and pansies. 
Superintendent Smith has a large collec- 
tion of orchids, a house of roses and 
other plants in great variety. 

In the store of a local dealer I recently 
noticed a bunch of Fair Maid, a light 
pink carnation, sent out several years 
by Albert Roper, of Tewkesbury, Mass. 
It is a free bloomer and good keeper and 
deserves a place among the better varie- 
ties. 

John Brown is growing fine carnation 
stock. His Prosperity, Lawson, Cress- 
brook and other varieties have all the 
points of good carnations. S. B. 



Pittsburg. 



Fears of a record-breaking flood did not 
materialize after the few days' thaw, yet 
it was near enough to warrant alarming 
predictions. The passing of the tremen- 
dous accuraulationsof ice wasa spectacu- 
lar sight. No loss is reported by the 
firms who=e cellars were invaded by 
water, wbiih included Breitenstein & 
Flemm, L. I. Neff, Pittsburg Cut Flower 
Companv, Mrs. Williams, Geddes & 
Blind Brothers and W. C. Beckert. The 
Pittsburg Rose and Carnation Company 
was unable to ship its stock to the city 
January 23, as the railroad was under 
water. J. L. Wyland could not ship by 
rail last Saturday, but made his delivery 
by wagon. On the return trip home his 
horse dropped dead. 

Business continues quiet. Cold weather 
has returned. Roses are much improved 
and more plentiful. Carnations are very 
fine and moving nicely. Yellow tulips 
are particularly good, as are baby prim- 
ulas and lilacS. Lilies are scarce; lily of 
the valley plentiful and good; yellow 
narcissi are few; violets moving nicely. 

The Florists' and Gardeners' Club will 
give a "smoking rancher" February 2. 
A number of entertaining features are on 
the programme. 

"Bill" Clark and "Tom" Ulam have 
engaged Victor Herbert to coach them 
for Tuesday evening. 

Randolph & McClements had the decor- 
ation for the banquet given by the east 
end board of trade. E. L. M. 



1904. 



The American Florist. 



11 



St. Louis. 

Trade conditions in St. Louis show an 
improvement. Roses are scarce. Bride 
and Bridesmaid are quoted at $3 to $8. 
Carnations sell at $1 to $4- with suf- 
ficient quantities coming in. Ferns show 
a slight increase, present prices being $2 
to $2.50 per 1,000. Violets are plenti- 
ful, but owing to increased calls quo- 
tations are somewhat higher— 60 cents 
to 75 cents per 100. Paper White 
narcissi, stevias, lilies of the valley and 
Roman hyacinths are abundant. 

The body of William Mannheimer, a 
florist from Chicago in search of work, 
was found by two men January 26 in a 
retiring room at Union Station. He had 
swallowed carbolic acid. He died on the 
way to the city hospital. In a pocket 
was found a memorandum book in 
which was written the name William R. 
Mannheimer, 3812 Prairie avenue, Chi- 
cago. H. G. Berning said Mr. Mann- 
heimer had been at his place seeking 
work. 

Mrs. H. G. Berning, who has been quite 
ill for some time, took a sudden turn for 
the worse and is in a critical condition. 
Physicians said January 26 there was 
small hope of recovery. F. K. B. 



OBITUARY. 



Henry Weber. 

Henry Weber, senior member of the 
firm of H. Weber & Sons, Oakland, Md., 
died January 21, after an illness of sev- 
eral months. The funeral and interment 
occurred January 23 at "Seelheim," his 
late residence in the suburbs of Oakland, 
Md. The following particulars of Mr. 



Indianapolis. 
Two days of heavy rain last week 
brought on a very disagreeable experi- 
ence to B. A Nelson. Part of his place 
was entirely under water and one of his 
rose benches settled, carrying the purlin 
supports with it. which caused a number 
of sash bars and a good number of lights 
to break. His boiler cellar was flooded 
and for a time it looked as if the fires 
would be extinguished. The damages 
amount to many hundred dollars. It is 
said tampering with a sewer in that 
neighborhood caused the mischief. 

The Indianapolis Flower and Plant 
Company is cutting exceptionally fine 
roses at present in spite of its recent 
wood stove experience. Whenever any- 
thing happens to your heating system 
remember that the Indianapolis Flower 
and Plan* Company can help you out 
with a couple dozen wood stoves and a 
mile or two of stove pipe. 

Frank Harritt, of Broad Ripple, sold 
his grounds and greenhouses to Wm. F. 
Dowe for $6,500. Mr. Dowe is a gradu- 
ate of Purdue University and has the 
reputation of being a good grower. Mr. 
Harritt's plans for the future are not yet 
completed. He is considering going into 
the retail flower business. 

H. W. Rieman has purchased a fine 
two-horse decoration wagon and a team 
of five-year-old grays. The horses are so 
perfectly matched that Henry himself 
can't tell which is which. Mr. Rieman 
has a strain of cyclamen which is a great 
acquisition. 

H. Junge has been appointed on the 
committee for trees and shrubs of the 
Indianapolis Civic Improvement Associa- 
tion. 

E. C. Amling pronounces Smith & 
Young's violets equal in flower and better 
in stem than the Hudson river stock. 

John Bertermann is keeping an eye on 
farm lands. 

John Heidenreich is bulb king for this 
locality. 

Rochester, N. Y.— The Western New 
York Horticultural Society held its 
annual convention here January 27-28. 

GovANSTOWN, Md. — The greenhouse of 
C. H. Paterson was partially destroyed 
by fire on January 9. The blaze was 
caused by the overturning of a furnace. 




The Late Henry Weber. 



lings of 1896, among them 110, a large 
white; No. 30, a bright pink, and No. 126, 
a sweet scented, long-stemmed crimson. 
He has also a number of later seedlings 
which have not yet passed through the 
period of testing. Sub-irrigation, side- 
ventilation and indoor culture are prob- 
lems in which Mr. Weber takes much 
interest and he believes they will soon be 
recognized as essential to the best devel- 
opment of the carnation." 

Charles Evans. 
Charles Evans, prominent among Bos- 
ton rose growers for many years, died at 
his home in Watertown, Mass., on Sun- 
day evening, January 24. Several days 
previous, returning from the city, he had 
slipped and was slightly cut on the le^ in 
alighting from a car. Blood poisoning 
eventually set in and caused his death. 
Mr. Evans was born in Mongomery- 
shire, Wales, March, 1838. When a 
young man he entered the employ of the 
Right Rev. Bishop Judge, serving as gar- 
dener for many years. He emigrated to 
Canada in May, 1868, but immediately 
left Canada for the United States, where 
his first position was as gardener for the 
senior member of the Ames Plow Com- 
pany, at Worcester, Mass. After one 
year he went to the Tucker greenhouses 
in Worcester, and from there he engaged 
in 1870 with Stephen Dow, of Woburn, 
where he built and superintended the most 
modern greenhouse establishment in New 
England for eight years. He went to 
England in 1880 to engage in rose grow- 
ing there on the American plan but two 
years later returned to Massachusetts, 
where he built the place at Watertown, 
which he conducted successfully till the 
time of his death. He leaves a widow, 
two sons and a daughter. 



Weber's career are reprinted from our 
issue of February 17, 1900: 

"The subject of this sketch had his own 
little garden in the Province of Hesse 
Hassle, Germany, long before he had 
reached his fourteenth year and com- 
pleted the customary course in the gov- 
ernment schools, when he was appren- 
ticed to a florist, becoming foreman before 
he was nineteen, at which age he entered 
the British army, serving in the Crimean 
war in 1854 and 1855. During the fol- 
lowing ten years he was stationed at 
various points in Asia, Africa, Australia 
and New Zealand, meeting many thrill- 
ing adventures, particularly in the Hot- 
tentot war. In 1865 Mr. Weber came to 
America and, with his brother John, who 
had preceded him, embarked in market 
gardening at Mt. Savage, Md. At the 
end of five years he sold out to his brother 
and removed to Cumberland, combining 
floriculture with gardening. In 1879 he 
bought a tract of swampy land near 
Oakland, much against the advice of his 
associates, redeemed it and made it a 
veritable garden. It was his intention to 
grow cauliflower and celery for the east- 
ern markets and his greenhouses were 
only designed for meeting local demands, 
but it was only a few years before he 
became alive to the possibilities of carna- 
tion culture and for the past nine years he 
has given particular attention to this 
specialty. He was among the first to 
adopt modern methods and believes that 
the improvement has only fairly begun. 
He takes great pleasure in the raising of 
seedlings and has achieved much success 
in this line. As a result of his efforts we 
have Genevieve Lord, now being dissem- 
inated, and in 1901 several more fine 
sorts will be put on the market, all seed- 




Mr. Evans was of most amiable and 
kindly disposition and always compan- 
ionable and popular with his associates. 
Last year he became a member of the 
Ancient and Honorable Artillery Com- 
pany and participated eilthusiastically 
in the reception given to the Honorable 
Artillery Company of London. 



Fond du Lac, Wis. — E. Haentze is 
recovering from a severe spell of illness. 



12 



The American Florist. 



Jan. JO. 



NUTBTBBNTH YEAR. 

Subscription. $1.00 a year. To Europe, 12.00. 

Subscriptions accepted only from those 

in the trade. 

Advertisements, on all except cover pages, 

10 Cents a Line, Agate; 11.00 per inch. 

Cash with Order. 

No Special Position Guaranteed. 

DiBoountB are allowed only on consecutive inter- 

tioni, as follows— 6 times, 5 per cent; 13 times, 

10 per cent; 26 times, 20 per cent; 

52 times, 30 per cent. 

Space on front pages and back cover page sold 

only on yearly contract at $1.00 per inch, net. 

The Advertising Department of the American 

Flobist is for florists, seedsmen and nurserymen 

and dealers in wares pertainingto those lines on/y. 

Orden lor less than one-half inch space not accepted. 

Advertisements must reach us by Wednesday to 

secure insertion in the issue for the following 

Saturday. Address 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO., Chlcaao. 
IVhen sending us change oj address, always send 
the old address at the same time. 

This is the first issue of a new half 
yearly volume. 

European growers are taking increased 
interest in American carnations. 

Efforts are being made to secure 
reduced railroad rates to the Detroit car- 
nation meeting. 

The legislature of the state of Ohio has 
recognized by joint resolution the scar- 
let carnation as the state flower. 



yellow; La Reine, light pink; Proserpine, 
red, and Yellow Prince; varieties for later 
forcing are Murillo, Coleur Cardinal, 
Vermillion Brilliant, all the Pottebakkers, 
Tournesol and Cottage Maid. G. 



Cold Storage for Lilies. 

Ed. Am. Florist: — What temperature 
will suit to keep in cold storage Lilium 
longiflorum, L. giganteum and lily of the 
valley? 

California Cold Storage Keeper. 

A temperature of 34° will best suit 
Lilium longiflorum and L. giganteum in 
cold storage. Lily of the valley, how- 
ever, should be kept as nearly as possible 
to 28°. G. 

Hydrangeas for Decoration Day. 

What is the best time for bringing in 
hydrangeas for Decoration dav ? 

E. G. B. 

Leave the hydrangeas for Decoration 
day in a cool place until March 1. It is 
best to place them on a light bench now, 
holding them on the dry side so as to in- 
duce a slow, stocky growth. After March 
1 the temperature can be raised to 50° or 
55° at night, which will flower them in 
time for Memorial day. No hard forc- 
ing is required thus late in the sea- 
son. G. 

Tulips Wltli Long Stems. 

Ed. Am. Florist: — What method shall 
I use to grow tulips with long stems? 
What varieties will suit best for this? 
Green Grower. 

No trouble need be had in getting long 
stemmed tulips at this season of the year. 
For the first two weeks after bringing 
them into heat they should be placed in 
a dark place; under a warm bench with 
a piece of canvas or other heavy material 
tacked in front to provide absolute dark- 
ness will do as well as any other place. 
They require a high temperature, say 85° 
at night, and while in this extreme heat 
they should iave abundance of warm 
water. Darkness is absolutely necessary 
to lengthen out the stems. After the 
first two weeks they can be removed to 
a lighter place, gradually inuring the foli- 
age and flowers to the light. The best 
varieties to force at this season of the 
year are Keizerskroon, striped red and 



The American Rose Society. 
The premium list for the exhibition of 
the American Rose Society, to be held in 
connection with the spring show of the 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, has 
been issued. The rose exhibition will 
take place Tuesday, March 22. Plants 
in pots have been made prominent feat- 
tires and gold and silver medals will be 
awarded for the best new varieties not 
yet disseminated. Copies of the schedule 
may be had on application to David 
Rust, Horticultural hall, Philadelphia, or 
Leonard Barron, 136 Liberty street, New 
York. 



American Carnation Society. 
department of registration. 
Registered by H. Weber & Son, Oak- 
land, Md., New Daybreak, color the true 
Daybreak shade, which is not affected by 
the heat of summer, the result of a cross 
between seedlings of Scott extraction on 
one side and of Daybreak extraction on 
the other. The vigorous characteristics 
of these two varieties are fully conserved 
in the New Daybreak; the color at no 
time of the year has a washed out appear- 
ance. Blooms are three inches and over 
in diameter, stems eighteen to thirty 
inches in season and always strong 
enough to hold the flower erect. It is a 
very free bloomer and possesses the 
elements of a most profitable commercial 
variety. Does not iDurst and is a splen- 
did keeper and shipper. 

Albert M. Herr, Sec'y. 



Society of American Florists. 

department of plant registration. 

F. R. Pierson Company, Tarrytown, 
N. Y.,submitsfor registration. Carnation 
Daheim. Color, Harvard crimson; form 
compact, built high in center; three and 
one-half inches in diameter; fragrance 
strong clove; habit very robust, in way 
of Mrs. Lawson; stems heavy and rigid; 
free bloomer. 

H. Weber & Sons, Oakland, Md., sub- 
mit for registration a seedling carnation. 
New Daybreak, the result of a cross 
between seedlings of Scott extraction on 
one side and Daybreak extraction on the 
other. The vigorous characteristics of 
both these progenitors have been well 
perpetuated. Color is the true Daybreak 
shade which is maintained without 
fading at any time of the year. Blooms 
are three inches and over in diameter, 
stems eighteen to thirty inches and 
always strong enough to hold flower 
erect. 

Peter Reinberg, Chicago, 111., submits 
for registration a rose. Uncle John, sport 
from Goldett Gate. The flower opens 
nicely like Bridesmaid and is of a much 
deeper shade of pink than Golden Gate, 
which it resembles in all other respects. 
Wm. J. Stewart, Sec'y. 



Cincinnati. 



Trade has improved considerably. 
Good Bride and Bridesmaid are scarce. 
The best bring $8 to $10 per 100. Good 
long-stemmed Liberty are few and easily 
bring $12 to $15 per 100. Short Beauty 
is plentiful, while it is very difficult to fill 
orders for 18 to 24 inch stems. Carna- 
tions are improving in quality and fancy 
ones, such as Enchantress, sell for $(i per 



100, from that down to $2. There has 
been an extra heavy demand for white 
carnations, and it is next to impossible 
to fill all the orders. There are just 
enough violets to go around. Valley is 
not moving very well. Roman hyacinths 
and Paper White narcissi have to be sold 
at less than the quoted prices to make a 
bargain. Smilax and other green goods 
are plentiful. There was a heavy 
demand for common ferns the past week. 
The Cincinnati Florists' Society will 
hold a Special exhibition of roses Feb- 
ruary 13. Premiums are to be awarded 
as follows: 

Blooms 1st 2(1 3d 

American Ueauty lii 110.00 *! uO *«.ni 

Bridesmaid 2j 4.00 3.00 2.00 

liride 25 4.00 li.OO 2.00 

Meteor 2i 4.||0 :i. 2.00 

I'erle 2- 4.00 3.00 'a.OO 

Golden Gate 2.5 4fO 3.00 2.00 

Ivory 2i 4.00 M.OO 2.0O 

Liberty 3.5 4.00 3.00 S.OO 

Uc'Stdisplay of violets 6.00 4.0O 3.0) 

Best general display l''.C0 

Society of American Florists medals, 
silver or bronze, will be competed for at 
this exhibition. A special exhibition of 
carnations will be held March 12. 

Geo. Meyer, of the Avondale Floral 
Company, is in the same boat, his boy 
arriving one day ahead of Joe Gold- 
man's. 

H. B. McCuIlough, who has been on 
the sick list tor the past month, left for 
Palm Beach, Fla, January 21. 

A. J. Frumas & Company is the name 
of the firm that recently opened a retail 
store in the arcade. 

Joseph R.Goldman, of Middletown, O., 
is all smiles. Its a boy. A. 



Springfield, Mass. 

The florists of this city are now having 
their usual January dull period, and from 
what I hear it seems to be general 
throughout New England. However, I 
do not think there is much to complain 
about, for during the past two months 
Springfield has been quite busy socially. 
I think there have been more good decor- 
ations and flowers used by society peo- 
ple than ever before up to this time of 
the season. There has also been consid- 
erable funeral work. The store windows 
commence to brighten up now with bulb- 
ous stock, which is moving fairly well. 

Visitors:— .v. T. Boddington, of Clucas 
& Boddington, and fames McHutchison, 
of McHutchison & Co., of New York; 
Walter Mott, of Jamestown, N. Y. 

A. B. 

Niles, Mich.— The Michigan Central 
Railway has just completed at this point 
one of the largest greenhouses ever oper- 
ated by a railroad system. 

SITUATION!^, WANTS, FOR SALE. 

One Cent Per Word, 

Cash with the Adv. 

Plant Advs. NOT admitted under this head. 

Every paid subscriber to the American Florist 
Tor the year 1903 is entitled to a flve-line want 
ADV. (situations only) free, to be used at any 
time during the year. 

Situation Wanted— By good all-around grower 
ai,'e36, single. F I. care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By Horist and gardener on 
private place; age 36, single; 21 years' experience. 
Address I F, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— As Toreman or manager. 
Tweuiy ytars experience in best private and 
commercial places in country, 

D S. 84 Uawley St., Boston. 

Situation Wanted— By thorout?hly experienced 
seedsman. Practical in every department. Would 
travel. Total abstainer. Address 

Seeds, care American Florist. 



igo4. 



The American Florist. 



13 



Situation Wantad — On commercial place as 
assistant;8 years' experience in roses carnations, 
'mums, etc. Can come at once. Address 

A R B. care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By an experienced tjar- 
dener of unquestionable ability: well qualified to 
take full charge; near Chieaeo: terms reasonable. 
Damaris, Box 486, Highland Park, III. 

Situation Wanted— As head gardener on private 
place or institution. 33 years' experience, Sweden, 
England and America; age 37, married 

2097 St. Anthony Ave., Merriam Park, Minn. 

Situation Wanted— By young man as assistant 
in private placf^. Understands carnations, roses, 
violets, etc. Sober and industrious; good refer- 
ences. H D, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted- Bv a single, honest and 
industrious man. age 34, Dane. An all-around 
commercial place in a country town preferred. 
Stale wages. Box 679, Omaha, Neb. 

Situation Wanted— A young lady, active, 
capable and willing to learn, wauts a position in 
a retail florists' establishment. Address 
■Miss Katie Thompson, 
38 Lincoln Park Boulevard. Chicago. 

Situation Wanted—Position in cut flower store 
(Chicago preferred) with view of learning busi- 
ness. Wi years experience. Best of references. 
Not afraidof work. Salary immaterial. A^e 23. 
\V .T, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By an American. 30 years 
old, single. l(i years' experience wiih carnations, 
roses and pot plants. South or South-west pre- 
ferred. Can get refereLce from every florist in 
my town. Southern, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— Hy -x young married man 
in private or commercial place, having ten years' 
experience in roses, carnations and general stock: 
American Beauties a specialty. When writing 
please state wages. Address 

M H, Box ?63, Southport, Conn. 

Situation Wanted- Situation wanted as fore- 
man to take entire charge of a large plant. A tirst- 
class grower of cut flowers and plants, capable of 
managing help and having the work done in a 
practical way. Good wages expected; references. 
O K 125 . care American Florist, 

Situation Wanted— By competent gardener to 
take charge ol gentleman's place. 18 years' 
experience and thoroughly understands the care 
private grounds, greenhouses, also forcit g of 
grapes ©.nd peaches. First-class references. 

L B, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— B;y a thorough practical 
grower, 20 years' experience in growing roses, 
carnations, 'mums, ferns, palms and general 
greenhouse stock. Can furnish Al references as 
to abilities and character from last employers. 
Would accept private place. 

J D, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted--By March 1, to take charge 
of commercial retail place, south preferred, by an 
up-to-date man, 50 years of age, single, in grow- 
ing roses, carnation and all kinds of bulbous 
stock. Good plantsman and grower of bedding 
plants. First-class designer and experienced in 
nursery and landscape work. At present man- 
ager of a large retail place near Boston, Mass. 
Please state wages. Address 

W' G, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By first-class florist of 
business ability. German, age 33, single. Life 
experience in cut flowers, roses, carnations, 
'mums, lilies, flowering bulbs, and everything in 
the forcing line, ferns, stove and bedding plants, 
also tasteful designer. Would take charge and 
manage small place of 10,000 to 25,000 feet of glass. 
Retail and wholesale business preferred. Having 
18 years' practical experience. Germany, England 
and United States, understand my business and 
can produce good stock. With view of good 
salary, share of profits or active partner. 

Reliable, care American Florist. 

Help Wanted— An experienced young man to 
take charge of carnation section. Address 

Chicago, care American Florist. 

Wanted — Annual Reports of the American Car- 
nation Society for 18&4, 1895 and 1901. Address 
Cabnation, «are American Florist. 

Help Wanted— An assistant for greenhouse 
work. Private place. Wages $45.00. 

James Holloivat, Glen Cove, N. Y. 

Help Wanted — An assistant for general green- 
house work in a first-class retail place. Position 
any time this month, permanent the year around. 
Theo. Bock, Hamilton, O, 

Help Wanted— Suitable party to take charge of 
our poultry department. State experience, salary 
expected, etc. 

Vavghan'b Seed Store, Chicago, 111. 



Help Wanted— A carnation grower. Must be 
single and well up in his business. State wages 
with board and room and give lull particulars. 

N. ZwEiFEL, R. R. 10, North Milwaukee, Wis. 

Help Wanted— An upright young man, ac- 
quainted in the culture of vegetables and plants. 
Good place for the right party. State wages 
wanted with board. Address 

A C, care American Florist. 

Help Wanted— Good man for greenhouses. 
Experience in landscape and park work desirable 
but not necessary. Good wages and board to 
sober or right party. Address 

C. A. Peters, Huntington, W. Va. 

Help Wanted— Competent man to take charge 
of small commercial place 40x]45 in suburb of 
Chicago. Producing roses, carnations and general 
retail stock. Good pay to right man. Address 
Degnan, care' E. F. Winterson Co.. 

45 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

Help Wantrd— An all-around man not over 35 
vears old in retail place of 10,000 feet of glass. 
Must be a neat and rapid workman. Wages $60 
per month. State age and reference; steady 
position. Seattle Floral Company. 

Fourth and Denny Way, Seattle, Wash. 

Wanted— To rent, lease or run on shares, 5000 
to IO.OOj feet of glass. Ten years' experience. 
Harrt, care American Florist. 

Gardeners- We are getting calls for gardeners 
for private places. Send for our application sheet 
so we can file your name. Address 

A' aughax's Seed Store, Chicago. 

For Sale — At a bargain, 4 greenhouses, 20x100 
feet, barn, 7 room dwelling house, 1 acre. 16 miles 
northwest of Chicago. Cause, failing health. 

J D, care American Florist. 

For Sale — Greenhouses: good location for local 
and shipping business in Micnigan. Well stocked. 
Reason for selling, on account of failing health. 
H B, care American Florist, 

For Sale- Greenhouses. Good location for 
local and shipping business. Well stocked; win- 
ter coal laid in. Will sell cheap if sold at once. 
Selling on account of failing health. 

Jas. Richardson, London, O. 

For Sale or Lease— Fine greenhouse estab- 
lishment of 10,000 feet of glass, in good condition 
and well stocked, with or without dwelling. Fine 
opening for a single man. Stock reasonable. 

X Y Z, care American Florist. 

For Sale— I will offer at public sale, Feb. 11, 
1904, greenhouse property consisting of 4.000 feet 
of glass; well stocked. Also 8 room dwelling will 
positively be sold. Call or address 

W. S. Taqgart, St. Clairsville. O. 

For Sale or Lease— Between 30,000 to 40,000 feet 
glass; barn, dwelling house; hot water heating, 
constant water supply, two acres for cultivation 
in Bronx Borough. New York city. Address 

J. Ringler. 728 3d Ave., New York. 

For Sale— Four greenhouses. Chicago, 7,000 feet 
of glass, on leased ground. Well stocked with 
carnations and potted plants. Good retail trade 
and long lease. Price !?2,oOO.i.O, part cash, balance 
on time. Address 

J R F., care American Florist. 

For Sale- Stock of small greenhouse plants, 
including carnations and bedding plants. The 
amount of glass occupied by stock is 10,000 feet. 
Stock will be sold very reasonably owing to death 
of proprietor. The greenhouses with 3 years' 
unexpired lease can be rented for $25 per month. 
Mrs. H. McMichael, Wilmette, 111. 



For Sale— Greenhouse 20x112 feet, 5i span, 
steam heated. Also house and barn and other 
outbuildings and 20 acres of first-class garden 
land, with 214 acres small frHit.2V4 acres of orchard, 
consisting of apples, plums and aherries. Good 
chance to grow winter vegetables or cut flowers 
as large quantities are shipped in annually. 
E. E. Thompson, R. D. No. 3, Madison. Wis. 

For Sale — Established greenhouses, nursery, 
two dwelling houses, barn. No other in south- 
eastern Idaho. Also supplies northern Utah and 
western Wyoming. Unexcelled shipping facili- 
ties. Six lines of railroads diverting into rapidly 
growing towns and country. Its a bargain, no 
competition and the business should be conti- 
nued. Must be sold on account of death. 

The Church it White Co., Pocatello, Idaho. 

For Sale— At a great bargain for quick sale: 
greenhouses of about 3.500 feet of glass, hot 
water heat, first-class boiler, large enough to heat 
double the space, up-to-date ventilators, full of 
clean, healthy, paying stock. Can sell everything 
you raise. Will sell houses with or without land. 
Small amount of cash needed. Reason, old age 
and failing strength. Address 
Des Moines Plant Co , 38th St., Des Moines, la. 

For Sale— Three greenhouses situated in West 
Tenn. About U'.OtO square feet glass, well stocked 
with roses, carnations, palms, ferns and bedding 
plants. Heated by two Florence hot water heaters. 
About one and one-quarter acres of ground, 300 
feet cold frames which belong to the plant. Every- 
thing in first-class condition. No competition. 
A good bargain. A change of climate necessary 
for family cause of sale. Address 

Mrs. M. Iki3 Brown, Union City. Tenn. 



U/onioH Greenhouse Material for ?i span. 
fValllCUi L'lass 18x16; dbl. A sash bars and 
platts, ventilating fixtures, etc. Quote prices 
giving particulars for whole or part. 

North\\t:st, care American Florist. 

Position as foreman or manager in an up-to- 
date establishment; either wholesale, retail or 
mailing. Am up in all branches, catalogue mark- 
ing, building, heating and growing of fine stock. 
2,000,000 plants grown the pasc season. Three 
years in last place. 40 years old and a hustler. 
Northern place preferred. Married, temperate and 
strictly business. Best of reference as to ability 
and business qualities. Address Lone Stab, 
611 No. Washington Ave., Dallas, Tex. 

For Sale— 12,000 to 15.0C0 square feet of glass, 
splendid location, all retail trade, no dilFiculty 
in selling all you grow and more too. All new 
houses, small dwelling house, barn and every- 
thing new and up-to-date; Shousesin carnations, 
2 in roses, 2 were in 'mums, now bedding plants, 
1 mixed house, fine palms, callas, smilax, aspara- 
gus, etc. Will take partner with privilege of all 
later if desired. Strictest investigation solicited. 
Ill health only reason for selling. Furman 
boiler, electric lights, office. Everything up-to- 
date. Cost $n,COO. A bargain for someone. No 
mouey wanted until everything is proved as 
represented. Apply to 

W. Butler, Chillicothe, O. 

HERE IS A BARGAIN. 

For sale or rent on long lease a tract of about 4 
acres of land in Rogers Park, this laud is vacant, 
has been rented tor truck gardening, and con- 
sists of heavy black loam, fronting on Murphy 
aveniie, one block west of Clark street, 200 feet 
North of Rogers avenue. First-class location 
for greenhouses. Easy Terms. No Agents. 

Call or write G. F. Kellhek. Owner, 
'Phone North 126. Office, 319 Clybourn Ave. 
Residence, 4391 N. Clark St., Chicago. 



A Bargain in New Mexico 



A LOCALITY WHERE THE SUN SHINES EVERY DAY IN THE YEAR. 



2 acres; 

City 
water; 
Stable; 

3,000 

feet 

glass. 



■KH I^^^^^HSS^^^^^ 





One 

housejust 
built. 
Three 
houses 
three 
years. 
Business 

runs 
$200 per 
month . 
I'ised 
expenses, 
$6 J per 
month. 



Prosperous oily of 5,000 inhabitants. Shipping trade extends over large territory. 

For price and more particulars apply to 

C. B. WHITNALL, care Citizens Trust Company, MILWAIKEE, WIS, 



14 



The American Florist. 



Jan. 30, 



ChasJJdejk 

Wholesale Commission Florist 

AND DEALliU IN 

ALL FLORISTS' SUPPLIES. 

51 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

Long Distance 'Phone Central 3598. 



Correspondence invited from growers of special- 
ties in Cut Flowers. 
Please mention the American Florist when writing. 

C. ^. KUEHN, 

Wholesale Florist, 

1122 Pine St., ST. LOUIS, MO^ 

A Comolftt* i'"* *»• M**-© DoslQnA. 

Please mention the A merican Florist when writine 

H.G.BERNING 

Wholesale florist 

J402 Pine St., ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Pleaie nutttwn (he A nir> iran Flat ist nhen 7u> iting. 

ICE BROTHERS 

128 N. 6th St., MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Wholesale Cut Flowers and Supplies. 



Wild Smilax 



Flowers billed at 
Market Prices. 
Shippers of choice Cut Flowers and Greens of al) 
kinds. Try us. 

Please mention the Atnetican Florist wtienwritine- 

" Locust Valley, N. Y. — Robert E. 
Berry is now gardener for W. D. Guthrie 
at Mendon, his beautiful estate in this 
place. A fine house 40x100 has just been 
completed by Lord & Burnham Com- 
pany for palms and decorative plants. 
Two more houses are contemplated, one 
for orchids and one for miscellaneous 
hard-wooded plants. Mr. Perry has 
some unexcelled carnations, among which 
Enchantress and Lillian Pond loom up 
as the best in theif respective classes. 

Bridgewater, Conn.— J. J. Johnson 
recently discharged an employe for care 
lessness in allowing the fires to run low 
and the stock to suffer from cold. John 
Kelleher, the employe, brought suit 
against Mr. Johnson to recover back 
wages of $78.80. The case has just been 
finished in the Brockton court in favor 
of Mr. Johnson, it having been shown 
that Kelleher had been arrested and fined 
for drunkenness at the time of his dis- 
charge and Mr. Johnson's loss from 
freezing exceeded the wages claimed. 



Wbol^ale power/arK^ 



Roses, Beauty 
" Bride, 


MlLWAUKBB, . 

, long per doz. 

med. " 1 

short " 
Bridesmaids. 
, Golden Gate 


an. 38. 

3.00 
.50® 3 00 
.50® 1.00 
4.00® 8.00 

4.nofa x.oo 


" Perle. 




.. 4.00® 8.00 
.. 2.00® 4.00 








15.00 








..35.00@50.0O 


Violets 






. .50® .75 


Valley 






400 


Stevia 






.. 2.00® 3.10 



PiTTsEUBa Jan. 28. 



,00@60.00 
.00@30.t0 
,00®l.').0o 
00® 6.00 
,00® 15.00 
.00fall5 00 

ootaasoo 

75® 8.00 
00® 4.00 
50®15.00 
00® 1.25 
00®50.00 
00® 4.00 
50® 1.00 
50® 1.50 
(0®20.00 
00® 6.00 
0O@ 3.00 
,00® 4.00 
00® 1.5J 



Roses, Beauty, specials 

" " . extras au. 

No. 1 10. 

•' " ordinary 2. 

" Bride. Bridesmaid 3. 

" Meteor 6. 

" Liberties 12. 

Carnations - 

Lily of the valley 3. 

Smilax 12, 

Adiantum 1. 

Asparagus, strings 30. 

Asparagus Sprengeri 2. 

Sweet Peas 

Violets 

Lilies 12. 

Mignonette 3. 

Romans, Paper White l.i 

Tulips 2, 

Lilac 1. 

Cincinnati, .Tan, 28. 

Roses, Beauty 2.00® 6.00 

" Bride, Bridesmaid 4 00@12.00 

" Liberty 4.00®10.00 

" Meteor, Golden Gate 4.00@li.00 

Carnations 3.00® 6.00 

Lily of the valley 3.00® 4.00 

Asparagus 50.00 

Smilax 12.50@15.00 

Adiantum 1.00® 1.50 

Violets 75® 1.00 

Narcissus 4.00 

Romans 4.00 

Harrisii per doz., 2,00 

Calla 12.50®15.00 

Sweet peas, Blanche Ferry 1.00 

St. Louib, Jan. 28. 

Roses, Beauty, long stem 3.00@4.00 

" Beauty, medium stem... 1 50@2.00 

" Beauty, short stem 50® .75 

" Liberty 300® 8.00 

" Bride.'Bridesmaid 3.00® 8.00 

" Golden Gate 3 00® 6.00 

Carnations 1.00® 4.00 

Smilax 12.50@15.00 

Asparagus Sprengeri 1.00@ 3.00 

" Plumosus 35.00@75.00 

Perns per 1000, 2.00@2.50 

Violets, single 60® .75 

Narcissus Paper White 3.00® 3.00 

Stevi;i 1.00 

Valley 3.00® 4.00 

Romans 3.00® 3.00 

Denver, Jan. 27. 

Roses, Beauty, long 25.00 

" •' medium 15.00 

short 8.00 

Liberty 4.00® 8.00 

" Chatenay 4.00(<4 7 00 

Bride, Bridesmaid 4.00® 6,00 

Carnations 3.00® 4.00 

Smilax 20.00 



E. H. Hunt, 



WHOLESALE 



Cut flowers 

"THE OLD RELIABLE." 
76 Wabash Ave CHICAGO. 

Please nirndon tht' A met wan Florist zvlien ui iting. 



FANCY 

CARNATION BLOOMS 

OUR SPECiaiTY. 

TELEGRAPH ORDERS FILLED 
PROMPTLY. 

THOMPSON CARNATION CO. 

JOLIET. ILL 



jJ.M.McCULLOUGH'SSONSE 

i WHOLESALE \ 



FLORISTS 

ALSO SUCCESSORS TO 

THE CINCINNATI CUT FLOWER CO. 



CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. | 

Special Attention Given to Shipping Orders. \ 
J 316 WALNUT ST. CINCINNATI, OHIO, f 

.'Tr^'»r'i''n'^''irnT'ic(|n|ru'^i"i'Mpii"i'*M''i"irM''i"irir< 

CUT FLOWERS °K.Afei 

and fMorlsts' Sx:a.i>x>Hes< 

Galax, bronze or green. 75c per 1000. Leucothoe 
Sprays. 50a per 100. Sphagnum Most, Ferst. 

Wire Work of all kinds for florists. Special 
attention given to shipping orders. 

U/M MIIDPHV Csmmlitlon Dealer, 

niH. m UN rill, 1301. 3d St., CINCINNATI, 0. 

Telephone, 980 Main. 



ROSES, 
CARNATIONS, 
BEAUTIES, 
VALLEY. 



Pittsburg Gut Flower Co., Ltd. 

Wholesale Florists and Supplies. 



504 Liberty St., 



PITTSBURG, PA. 



f lease mention the A mertcan Florist when w*-iiing 



RENNICOTT BROS. COMPANY 

WHOLESALE COMMISSION FLORISTS 

FLORISTS' SUPPLIES. 



AND DEALERS IN ALL 
KINDS OF 



42-44 E. Randolph St., 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



1904. 



The American Florist. 



15 



ilull.^lxh.n.iLilk.a^iilt.lLiKJl.lLtliillJLilt.U.lLJt.A.ilti' 

E.C.AMLING 

THE LARGEST, 

BEST EQUIPPED, 

MOST CENTRALLY LOCATED 

WHOLESALE 

CUT FLOWER HOUSE 

IN CHICAGO. 

32, 34, 36 Randolph St., 
CHICAGO. 

!nnni"iruM|F'w-u"i''oii"i''U''i"ir(r»ii 



Bassett&Washburn 

76 & 78 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO. 

^—•rrr, Cut Flowers 

GREENHOUSES: HINSDALE, ILL. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 



WEILAND AND RISCM 



CHICAaO'S RELIABLE 

Wholetale Groweri and Shippers ol 

OUT FLOWERS. 

59 .Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

BIND FOB VBEKLT PBIOX LIST. 



'HOLESALE FLORISTS 



Please mention the A merican Florist when -writing. 

FRANK GARLAND, 

'"^.^CutFIowers 

■iPEOIAL ATTENTION ^fTt-WTV-tJTyr ^j 

aiVEM TO HARDY CUT *^ M2tMX.l^^^St 

B5-S7 WABASH AVENUE, 
relephone Central 3284. CKIIC;.A.OO< 

Please mention the A merican Florist -when writing. 

A. L. RANDALL GO. 

Wholesale Florists. 

19 & 21 Randolph St., CHICAGO. 

Send for weekly price list and 
special quotations on 1000 lots. 




MICHAEL 



Winandy 

«».»rr, CUT FLOWERS 

60 WABASH AVE., PHTr'APO 

Telephone 3067 Central. ^niV.*/\VjV.^, 

Please mention the American Florist when writing, 

WIETOR BROS. 

•"•""'• .. Cut Flowers 



Growers 



All telegraph and telephone orders 
given prompt attention. 

51 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO. 

Please mention the A 7nerica7t Florist whenwriting. 

Brant & Noe Floral Co., 

GROWERS OF 

Gut Flowers at Wholesale. 

Careful attention given shipping orders. 

58-60 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO. 



J. 6. DCAMUD, 

WnOLFSAIF CUT FIOWERS 



51 Wabash Ave. 



OEIIOA.OO. 



PRIOE LIST. PerDoz 

Beauties, 30 to 36 inch stem $4.00 to % 5.00 

30 to 24 inch stem 3.00 

" 15 to 18 inch stem 1.50 to 2.00 

" 12inchstem 75 to 1.00 

Per lOO 

: Liberty and Chatenay 6.00 to 10.00 

; Brides and Bridesmaids 6.00 to 10.00 

Meteor and Golden Gates 6.00 to 10.00 

; Carnations 2.00 to 4.00 

fancy 3 00 to 5.00 

Valley 2.00 to 4.00 

Violets, double i^O to 1.50 

single 50 to .75 

Asparagus Plumosus — per string, 25 to 50o 

Asparagus Sprengeri Sprays 2.00 to 4.00 

„ , . ,„ „ ... „ . „ . Fern8,fanoy 83.00 per 1000 .30 

Caldwells Kwalitu Kounts Brand sm"ax i3.6oto 15.00 



CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 



00 



J. A. BCDLONG 

37-39 Randolph Street, CHICAGO. 
Boses and 
Carnations 
A Specialty...^- 

BENTHEY & CO. 

35 Randolph Street, CHICAGO. 

F. F. BENTHEY, Manager. Wholesale and p | r| O I QX ^ 

Consignments Solicited. Commission M L^VFIv*>>^ ^ ^^ 



WHOLESALE 

GROWER of 



cut FLOWERS 



r 



HOLTON & HUNKEL CO., 

"Wholesale Cut flowers— 



457 Milwaukee Street. 



MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



Wbol^ale power/\arl^ 


QEO. REINBERG, 

"rr.?« Cut Flowers 

CHOICE AMERICAN BEAUTIES. 

We will take care of your orders at 
reasonable prices. Prompt attention. 

51 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO, ILL. 


Chicaoo, Jan. 29. 
Roses, Beauty, 30 to 36-in. stems 3.00® 4.00 
20 to 24 " 2.50 
15 to 18 " 1.50® 3.00 
13 " 1.00@1.25 
Liberty 6.00® 8.00 


Chatenay 6.00@13.00 

Bride, Bridesmaid 6.00@10.00 

Meteor, Golden Gate 6.00@10.00 

Carnations 2.00® 3.00 

fancy 3.00® 5.00 

Valley 2.00® 4.00 

Asparagus Plumosus, per string 35 to 50o 
sprays 3.00@4.00 

Sprengeri 3.00® 4 00 

Violets, double 50® 1.50 


Poehlmann Bros. COr 

Wholesals Growers ol 

Bii..r..„ Cut Flowers 

All telegraph and telephone orden ~- -- 
given prompt attention. iO^ii 


single 50® .75 

Leucothoe Sprays 1.00 


Obeenhouses: Randolph StrMk 
Morton Grove. Ill CHICAOO. ILL. 


Galax Leaves, Bronze, per 1000, 1.50 .15 
Green. „ „ 1.00 

Adiantum 1.00 

Fancy ferns... per 1000 2..50® 3.00 

Smilax 13.50@15.00 


Michigan Gut Flower Exchange, 

WM. DILCER, Mgr. 


Harrisii 2.00@ 3.50 


All Cut Flowers in Season. 

26 Miami Ave., DETROIT, MICH. 


SINNER BROS. 

Wholesale Growers AIIT CI flUfCDC 
and Shippers of bill rLUIlClfa 
58 WABASH AVENUE, GHICAGO, ILL. 

With the Flower Telephone- 
Growers' Co. Central 3067. 

All telephone and telegraph orders 

given prompt attention. 




American florist Advertisements 
Work Every Day. 



16 



The American Florist. 



Jan. 30, 



LeoNiessen ^\tlV^^' 

ORCHIDS.I 



WHOLESALE FLORIST. 

r1?^%°SJr.}."'.r8"o«"^'.'^=.°'''" 1217 Arch Street, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



FLOWERS FOR EVERY DAY 



AND FOR EVERY OCCASION. 
QUANTITY UNLIMITED. 

QUALITY UXCELLED. 



WE ARE OPEN FOR BUSINESS AT 6:00 O'CLOCK A. M. WE WANT YOUR TRADE. 



J. K. ALLEN, 



THE PIONEER 
HOUSE, 



106 West 28th St., New York, 



GEO. A. SUTHERLAND, 

Best Boston Flowers. 
All Florists' Supplies. 

Distributing Depot for the KORAL LETTERS. 

lELEPHOHE 1270 MAIN. 34 Hawicy St., BOSTON. 



N.F. M<^Carthy&Co; 



r.-jj 



jstWfLOLESALE y i%- 




^^.v.^^^vs^84HAWLEYSm^.^_ 



CITY HALL CUT FLOWER MARKET, 

15 Province St., BOSTON, MASS. 



WELCH BROS. 

Best Flowers. Lar^e Variety. Prompt Shipments. Careful Pacldn^. 



THOMAS YOUNGJr. 

WHOLESALF riORIST. 

CHOICEST CUT FLOWERS. 

43 W. 28th St., NEW YORK CITY. 

Please menliun tne .'J mr^rtcu 'i hiuTisi u'Hfn wyiting. 

GEORGE SALTFORD, 

WHOLESALE FLORIST. 



46 W. 29th street, NEW YORK. 

Tel. 3393 Madison Square. 
Specialties: VIOLETS AND CARNATIONS. 

Consignments of any good flowers solicited. 
Please mention the Aw- ica7i Florist whenwriting- 

N.Y. GUT FLOWER EXCHANGE 

Coogan Bldg. 6th Ave. and W. 26th St., New York. 
Open for Cut Flower Bales at 6 o'clock 
Every Morning.. 

DESIRABLE WALL SPACE TO RENT FOR 
ADVERTISING. 

JOHN DONALDSON. Secretary. 

N.Lecakes&Go. 

63 W. 28th St., and 46 W, 29th St. 

Also at 

26th St. and 34th St. Markets 

New York. 

FERNS, GALAX LEAVES, LEUCOTHOE SPRAYS 

OUR SPECIALTIES 

GREEN AND BRONZE GALAX LEAVES, 

7Bc per 1000; $6.00 and $6.50 per case of 10,000. 
Holly, Princess Pine and all kinds of Evergreens. 

Telephone 1214 Madison Square. 
Please mention the Anwvican Florist when writing. 



m 



Wbol^ale [!ower/\arH?fe 

Boston, .Jan. 27. 

Roses, Beauty, extra 3O.I)O@4a.0O 

medium.... 10. 00® 20 00 

culls 1 0)@ 5.00 

" Bride, Bridesmaid 2,00® 5 00 

extra 600@10.00 

Liberty 4.00®10.00 

Carnations 50@ 3.0O 

Fancy SCO® 4.00 

Violets 40® .75 

Lily of the valley 3.00® 3.00 

Harrisii lilies 6.00® 8.00 

Smilax 10.00@15 00 

Adiantum .T .75® 1.00 

Asparaprus . . . '35.00®50.00 

Roman Hyacinths, P. W. narcissus 1.00® 2.(0 

Daffodils 1.00® 3.00 

Philadelphia. Jan. 37. 

Roses, Tea. ...1 6.00@ia00 

" extVa 12.00@I500 

" Beauty ,'esrtra . 35.00@60.00 

firsts 16.00@85.00 

" Queen of Edgely, extra 40.00@50.00 

firsts 16.00®25.00 

Carnations 1.50® 6.00 

Violets, single 40® .60 

double 75® l.CO 

Lily of the valley 3.00® 5.00 

Lilac 75® 1.25 per bunch 

Asparagus 25.00@50.00 

Smilax 13.00@15.00 

! BnFPALO, Jan. 28. 

Roses, Beauty 5.00@E0.00 

I '.'1 Bride, Bridesmaid, Meteor 3.00@13.00 

Carnations 2.00® 6.00 

Harrisii 1,5.00 

Lily of the valley 3.00@ 5.00 

Asparagus, strings 4O.00((u60.00 

.Srtllax 13..50@15.0O 

Adiantum SOd" 100 

Violets 40@ 1.00 

Callas 8.00@13.5Q 

Sweet Peas 50® 1.(0 

South Framingham, Mass. — Sander & 
Company have given the name of Mrs. J. 
T. Butterworth, of this city, to a superb 
hybrid cypripedium. 



SOUTHERN SMILAX. 

No, 1 quality only $5 50 per case of 50 lbs. Be 
sure and try it when you want Smilax. GALAX, 
bronze or green, 75c per lOOO. Discount on large 
orders. LAUREL FESTOONING, No. 1 quality, 
4c. 5c and 6c per yard. Always on hand and large 
orders filled at short notice. FANCY or DAGGER 
FERNS, $1.50 per 1000. 




Tel. 



illington, Mas*. 

. office, New S»len). 
Long distance telephone connection. 

SMILAX and BEAUTIES CHEAP. 

500 Beauties, 3^-inch pots, well branched, 
»6.00 per 100. 

2,000 Smilax 3K-inoh, stocky plants, t2.00 per 
100. Cash with order. 

Quality of plants guaranteed. 

ROSEMONT GARDENS. "Q^y^""^- 

Laurel Roping 

OLIVER L.TRONHEM,Vinelan(l,N.J. 

Many Electrotypes 

SUITABLE FOR 

Folders, Circulars and Catalogues 

FOR SALE liY THE 

AM. FLORIST. 



324 DEARBORN ST., 
CHICAGO. 



Flowers of All Kinds. 






OPEN FROM 7:00 A. M. TO ;00 P. M. 



THE PHILADELPHIA WHOLESALE FLOWER MARKET, 1224 Cherry Street, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



1904. 



The American Florist. 



IT 



JOHN I. RAYNOR 

ARE THE BEST PRODUCT OF THE BEST 
GROWERS FOR THE NEW YORK MARKET. 



Adiantum Croweanum 

Sold here Excloslvely. 



49 W. 28th Street, NEW YORK. 

Tel. 1998 MaJison Square. 



YOUNG & NUGENT 



42 W«sl 28th Straet, 

Telephone 2065 Madison S<i. 



Wholesale Florists. 



CATTLEYAS. GARDENIAS. VIOLETS, ROSES. CARNATIONS and all seasonable 
novelties. With our long experience in shipping, and competent assistants 
in our packing department, we are in a position to guarantee out-of-town 
customers who place their orders with us that they \vill not be disappointed. 



Walter r. Sheridan, 

Wholesale Florist, 

Tolepliona 902 Kadlaon Sqnaze. 

39 West 28tli St., NEW YORH 

Talaphona No. 756 Madison Squara, 

MOORE, HENTZ ft NASH 

Wholesale Commission riorlsts. 

66 and 67 Watt 26th St. NEW YORK CITY. 




Advice 01 sale note daily. Statement aa4 check 
weekly. All consignments, large or small, receive tb. 
same attention. CORRESPONDENCE INVITED. 



VIOLETS. 



WILLIAM GHORMLEY, 



VIOLETS. 



I Wholesale " ■■■■■■"■fi wiiviimtah ■ ^ Commission i 

Daily Receiver and Shipper of Fresti Cut Flowers. 

Orchids, Roses, Carnations, Vailey, Clirysantliemums. 

57 West 28th Street, NEW YORK CITY. ! 



telephones 2200 and 2201 Madison [Square. 



JOHN YOUNG 

•pMlal Anerloan Beauties, 

Sarpasslng Carnations, 

Lily of tht Valley, Orohlds, 

and all Seaionable Flowen, 

61 West 88th St, HBW TOKK. 

Tel. 1905 Madlion Sq. 

rNK RKCOONIZED HEADQUARTERS IN 
NEW YORK CITY FOR 

Violets and Garnations 

■ROWERS and BUYERS make a note of thii. It 
wlU be to your advantage. 

WM. H. QUNTHER^ 
West 29tli St., New Tor£. 

Telephone 551 Madison Square. 

Franic IMIIIang 

from 6 a. m. to 5. p. m. 



Cit Flower Exchange, 

Phone 399 Madison Square. 



55-57 W. 26th St. 

NEW YORK. 



ESTABLISHED 1872. 

JOHN J. PERKINS, 

COMMISSION FLORIST, 

Solicits Consignments or Shippint^ Orders. 
Satisfaction given in both. Tel. 956 Madison Sq. 

116 W. SOtti St.. New York. Alto 48 W. 30th St. 

Bonnot Bros. 

WHOLESALE FLORISTS. 

EE and 67 W. 26th St, M<>u/ Ynrk 
Cut Flower Exchange. rrcw 1 urii. 

OPEN 6:00 A. M. 

JUi Unequalled Outlet (or Consigned Flowers. 



Choice Carnations. 



Selected Roses. 



Traendly&Schenck 

NEW YORK CITY, 
38 W. 28th Street, Cut riower Exchange. 

New Telephone No. 788 & 788 Madison Sq. 

Wbol^ale [fower/arKjfe 



New York, Jan. 27. 

s, Beauty, best 15.00@40.00 

medium 6.00®I0.00 

culls 1.00® 3.00 

Bride. Bridesmaid, G. Gate 1. 00® 8,00 

Liberty 3.00@I5.00 

Carnations 2.00® 3,00 

" fancy and novelties 4.00@IO.00 

Lily of the valley 1.00© a.OO 

Lilies, Callas 0.00® 10,00 

Violets .SO® ,60 

special 50(fli .75 

Sniilax 5.00® 10,00 

Adiantum 35® .75 

Asparagus 25,00@50.00 

Cattleya Peroivalliana 40 00@50,00 

Dendroblum formosum 30,00@40.00 

MiRnonette 1,00® 4.00 

Rom.an Hyacinths 50® 1.50 

Tulips 1,00® 3.00 

Narcissus, Paper White 1.00@ 1.50 

Gardenias 25.00@50,00 

Stevia, per bunch, .10 to ,25 

Freesia 10@ ,15 per bun. 

Jonquils, Daffodils l.CO@ 2,00 



Charles Millang 

WHOLESALE FLORIST. 

Conservatory connected from which can ship 
ferns and decorative plants promptly 

50 West 29th St. NEW YORK 

Tel. 2230 Madison Square. 



FORD BROS. 

Receivers and Shippers of 

FRESH FLOWEBS, 

HI West 30tli St., NEW TOSK. 

Telephone 157 Madison Sqaue. 

REPRESENTING EMINENT GROWERS. 

JuliusLang 

53 West 30lh Street, NEW YORK. 

COMMISSION DEALER in FLOWERS 

Telepbcine 280 Madison S-OT^A-nv. 

ALEX. J. GUTTMAN, 

Wholesale Commission florist, 

A full supply dally of the choicest 

New York and New Jersey 

FLOWERS. 

62 W. ZSih Strael, NEW YORK CITY. 

Telephone 1738 Madison Square. 

NEW YORK CuTfLOWER CO. 

55 and 57 West 26th St., 

WHOLESALE FLORISTS. 
Dally Raports. Weekly Payments 

Telephone J. A. MILLANQ, 

756 Madison Sq. Manager. 



GARNATIONS "' 



Specialty. 



CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. 
Prompt Payments. Established 1891. 

55W.28thSL 
New York. 



Alfred H. Langjaiir, 



Telephone 3924 Madison Sq, 



EDW. C. HORAN, 



Telephone 421 
Madison Square. 



55 WEST 28TH STREET, 



.NEW YORK. 



Cyj F LOWERS AI W HOLESALE. 



18 



The American Florist. 



Jan. 30, 



INTERNATIONAL FLOWER DELIVERY. 



NEW YORK. 



Steamer Gifts 

Orders for flowers in any form 
carefully filled and delivered by 
special messenger on board any 
steamer on day of departure from 
New York. 

THOS. YOUNG, JR. 

43 W. 28th St., NEW YORK CITY. 

Please mention the Am ' ican Florist when writing. 



NEW YORK. 



ALEX. McCONNELL, 

546 Fifth Avenue, 

Cor.4BthSt.N.W.NeW YOfli GtV 



TELEGRAPHIC Orders forwarded to any part 
of the United States, Canada and alt princi- 
pal cities of Europe. Orders transferred or en- 
trusted by the trade to our selection for delivery 
on steamships or elsev/here receive special atten- 
tion. Cable Address: ALEXCONNELL. 

WESTERN UNION CODE. 

TELEPHONE CALLS: 340 and 341 38th Street. 

Please mention the A mencan Florist 7vhett ivritina 

LONDON. 

COMMISSIONS 
CARRIED OUT in LONDON 

or any part of Groat Britain. 

Messrs. WILLS & SEGAR will attend to 
any commission from American florists for 
the supply of Cut Flowers, Birthday Flowers, 
Bouquets, High Class Floral Desigiu. etc. to 
their clients w^ho maybe travelingin England. 

U/lli C C. CCftAD Court Plortats to bit 
niLLo 06 OCUAn) Malesty, The KIne. 

ROYAL EXOTIC NURSERY. 

Teleobahs, Onslow Crescent, South Kensington. 
Flobculo, London. LONDON, ENGLAND. 

CHICAGO. 

A. LANGE, 

47-51 Monroe Street, 

——CHICAGO. 

BEST FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS. 
NDIANAPOLIS. 

Bertermann Bros. Co., 

FLORISTS, 

241 Massachusetts Ave., INDIANtPQLIS, INU, 

ST. LOUIS. 

Fred. C. Weber, 

FLORIST, 

4326-4328 Olive SL, ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Established 1873. Long Dist. 'Phone Lindell 196 M 



PASSENGER STEAMSHIP MOVEMENTS. 

The tabUs herewith give the scheduled time of departure of ocean ateamshlpB carry- 
ing flrst-claBS passengers from the principal American and foreign ports* covering the space 
of two weeks from date of this Issue of the AMERICAN FLORIST, much disappointment 
often results from attempts to for.ward flowers for steamer delivery by express, to the care 
of the ship's steward or otherwise. The carriers of these packages are not Infrequently 
refused admission on board and even those delivered on board are not alw^ays certain to 
reach the parties for whom they w^ere Intended. Hence florists la interior cities having 
orders for the delivery of flowers to passengers on out-going steamers are advised to 
intrust the filling of such orders to some reliable florist In the port of departure, who 
nnderstands the necessary details and formalities and has the facilities for attending to 
it properly. For the addresses of such firms we refer onr readers to the advertisements 
on this page : 



FROM 


TO 


STEAMER 


»LINE 


DAY 


DUE ABOUT 


New York 


Liverpool 


Etruria 


1 


Sat. 


Feb. 6, 9:C0 a. m. 


Feb. 12 


New York 


*' 


Umbria 


1 


Sat. 


Feb. 13, 2:00 p. m. 


Feb. 19 


New York 


Glasgow 


Corinthian 


2 


Thur. 


Feb. 4, Noon 


Feb. 14 


Portland. 


Genoa 


Ontarian 
Auguste Victoria 


2 
3 


Sat. 
Tues. 


Feb. 13, 

Feb. 2, 10:00 a.m. 


Feb. 23 


New York 


Feb. 17 


New York 




Pnnz Adalbert 


3 


Thur. 


Feb. 4, 10:00 a.m. 


Feb. 19 


New York 


Hamburg 


Bluecher 


3 


Thur. 


Feb. 11,10:00 a. m. 


Feb. 21 


New York 


CoFeohagen . 


Norge 


4 


Sat. 


Feb. 6, 2:00 p. m. 




New York 


Glasgow 


Anchoria 


6 


Sat. 


Feb. 13, Noon 




New York 


London 


Minnehaha 


6 


Sat. 


Feb. 6, 9:00 a. m. 


Feb. 16 


New York 


«t 


Mesaba 


6 


Sat. 


Feb. 13,9:00 a. m. 


Feb. 23 


New York 


Liverpool 


Majestic 


7 


Wed. 


Feb. 3, 10:00a. m. 


Feb. 10 


New York 


" 


Oceanic 


7 


Wed. 


Feb. 10, 1:00 p. m. 


, Feb. IS 




Alexandria 
Soathampton 


Cretic 
Republic 
St. Louis 


7 
7 
8 


Thur. 

Sat. 

Sat. 


Feb. 4, 11:30 a.m. 
Feb. 13, 8:00 a. m. 
Feb. 6, 9:80 a. m. 


Feb. 11 


Boston.. .... 


Mar. 2 


New York 


Feb. 13 


New York 


" 


New York 


8 


Sat. 


Feb. 13, 9:30 a. m. 


Feb. 20 


New York 


Antwerp 


Finland 


9 


Sat. 


Feb 6, 10:30 a. m 


Feb. 1& 


New York 


'» 


Vaderland 


9 


Sat. 


Feb. IS. 10:30 a. m. 


Feb. 22 


New York 


Havre 


La Champagne 


10 


Thur. 


Feb. 4, 10:00 a. m. 


Feb. 14 


New York 


" 


La Lorraine 


10 


Thur. 


Feb. 11, 10:00 a. m 


Feb. 20 


New York 


Rotterdam 


Rotterdam 


11 


Tues. 


Feb. 2, 10:00 a. m. 


Feb. 12 


New York 


Genoa 


Nord America 


12 


Tues. 


Feb. 2, 11:00 a. m- 


Feb. 17 


New York 


" 


Liguria 


12 


Tues. 


Feb. 9, 11:00 a. m. 


Feb. 20 


New York 


Bremen 


Mam 


13 


Tues. 


Feb. 2,10:00 a.m. 


Feb. 13 


New York 


" 


K. Wil. Der Grosse 


13 


Tues. 


Feb. 9, 10:00 a. m. 


Feb. 16 


New York 


Genoa 


Hohenzollern 


13 


Sat. 


Feb. 13, 11:00 a. m. 


Feb. 26 


Boston 


Liverpool 


Canadian 
Cestrian 


14 
14 


Wed. 
Wed. 


Feb. 3,11:00 a.m. 
Feb. 10, 5:80 a. m. 


Feb. 13 




Feb. 20 







*1 Cunard; 2 Allen-State; 3 Hamburg-American; 4 Scandinavian-American; S Anchor Line; 
6 Atlantic Transport; 7 White Star; 8 American; 9 Red Star; 10 French; U Holland-American; 
12 Italian Royal Mail; 13 North German Lloyd; 14 Leyland; 



DETROIT. 



lOHN BREITMEYER'S 
SONS^— 

Cor. MIAMI and GRATIOT AVES. 

DETROIT, MICH. 
Artistic Designs. .j*^.^».j* 
High Grade Cut Blooms. 

We cover all Michigan points and good sections 
of Ohio, Indiana and Canada. 

CHICAGO. 

P.J.HAISWIRTH 

Auditorium Annex, 

^ CHICAGO. 

Mail, telegraph or telephone orders filled 
promptly in best style. 

DENVER. 

nORAL DESIGNS AND PLOWERS. 



DENVER. 



T 



Best Quality on Shortest Notice. 



DENVER. 
COLO. 

Order by mail, telephone, telegraph or cable. 
Cable address: "Daniels Denver." 



DANIELS & FISHER, 



he Park 

Floral Co. 

J A VALENTINE, DENVER, COLO. 

Please tnention the A nu'> lean Floy isl whett wi ittng. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

TELEPHONE MAIN 1023 . 

SIEVERS & BOUND, 

Floral Artists, 

33 Post Street, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

LOS ANGELES. 

Orders for Los Angeles and Southern Calilornia 

Will be filled bv 

E. J. VAWTER 

GROWER AND DEALER 

522 So. Spring St.. Los Angeles, Cal. 

Catalogue Illustrations. 

We sell Electros of the fine illus- 
trations used in the AMERICAN 
FLORIST at 15c per square inch. 
Send list of your needs to 

The American tlorlst Co., Chicago. 



PLACE YOUR NAME. 



and your speoialtiea before the purohaiing florisu of the entire country 

by advertiiing in ^^ ^^ 

«cNo »ovr. wow. THE AMERICAN FLORIST. 



1904. 



The American Florist. 



19 



INTERNATIONAL FLOWER DELIVERY. 



STEAMSHIPS LEAVE FOREIGN PORTS 



FROM 



Liverpool 

Liverpool 

Glasgow 

Genoa 

Hamburg 

Hamburg 

Copenhagen 

Copenhagen . . .. 

Glasgow 

London 

London 

Liverpool 

Liverpool 

Liverpool 

Alexandria 

Southampton... 
Southampton... 

Antwerp 

Antwerp 

Havre 

Havre 

Rotterdam 

Genoa 

Genoa 

Bremen 

Bremen 

Genoa 

Genoa 

Liverpool 

Liverpool 



TO 



New York 



Boston 
New York 



STEAMER 



Ivernia 

Campania 

Siberian 

Prinz Oskar 

Patricia 

Moltke 

Island 

United States 

Furnessia 

Minnetonka 

Menominee 

Celtic 

Cedric 

Cymric 

Romanic 

St. Paul 

Philadelphia 

Kroonland 

Zeeland 

La Bretagne 

La Touraine 

Statendam 

Sardegna 

Citta di Milano 

Koenigen Luise 

KronprinzWilhelm 

Lahn 

Prinzess Irene 

Winifredian 

Bohemian 



9 
9 
10 
10 
U 
12 
12 
13 
13 
13 
13 
14 
11 



DAY 



Sat. 

Sat. 

Sat. 

Thur. 

Sat. 

Sat. 

Wed. 

Wed. 

Sat. 

Thur. 

[Thur. 

[Wed. 

VVed. 

Thur. 

Thur. 

Sat. 

Sat. 

Sat. 

Sat. 

Sat. 

Sat. 

Sat. 

Mon. 

Mon. 

Sat. 

Tues. 

Thur. 

Thur. 

Sat. 

Sat. 



Feb. 
F. b. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 



6 
13 
13 

4 

6 
13 

3 
10 

6 

4 
11 

3, 3;30 p. m. 
10, 3:30 p. m. 

4, 3:00 p. m. 
4, 3:30 p. m 
6, Noon. 

13, Noon. 

6, 3:00 p. m. 
13, 11:00 a. m, 

6 
13 

6 

1 

8 

6, 8:00 a. m, 

9, 8:00 a. m. 

4 
11 

6 
13 



DUE ABOUT 



Feb. 14 
Feb. 20 
Feb. 23 
Feb. 19 
Feo. 16 
Feb. 23 



Feb. 10 
Feb. 17 
Feb. 11 
Feb. 22 
Feb. 12 
Feb. 19 
Feb. 16 
Feb. 22 
Feb. 16 
Feb. 22 
Feb. 16 
Feb. 16 
Feb. 23 
Feb. 16 
Feb. 16 
Feb. 16 
Feb. 24 
Feb. 16 
Feb. 23 



* See steamship list on opposite page. 



PETER REINBERG 

51 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO. 

Wholesale Cut Flowers 

LARGEST GROWER 

IN THE WORLD. 



Current Price List. 







Per Doz. 


AM. BEAUTIES 


, long stems, 


$5.00 


" 


30-36-in. " 


S3 5C to 4.00 


tl u 


20-a4 


3.50 to 3 00 


>• 


15-18 


1 50 to 8.00 


" " 


Short stems. . 


.. l.fOto 1.25 
Per 100 


SUNRISE 




..S4 00to$lC.00 


CHATENAY.... 




.. 6 00 to 13.00 


BRIDE 




.. 5.00 to 8 00 


BRIDESMAID.. 




.. 5.00 to 8 00 


PERLE 




.. 5.00 to 8.00 


CARNATIONS. . 




.. 3.00 to 4.00 


ROSES, OUR SELECTION... 


4.00 



All nowert are perfectly fresh and properly packed. 

No charge for P. and D. on orders over $5. 



Knoxville, Tenn.— Chas. W. Crouch 
has purchased a building ifrom the Swep- 
son estate and will move his business 
this spring. His business has outgrown 
his present quarters. 



GALAX LEAVES, ETC., ' cr'op'! " 

Galax Leaves, Green and Bronze, per 1000 8 .60 

Cut Fancy :ind Dagger Ferns, per 1000. 1.00 

Leucothce Sprays, tireen. per 1000 3.00 

Red, per 1000 6.00 

Rhododendron Sprays, per 1000 5.00 

Largest dealer in the U. S. Orders filled 
promptly. Send cash with order. Send 60c5 lor a 
nice cane, cut from the famous mountains of N. 
C. Nicely varnished, crooked or straight. Men- 
tion length desired and variety of wood — hickory, 
rhododendron, wahoo. poplar, striped maple, etc. 
Grand souvenier, besides useful. Try one or more. 
J. N. PRITCHARD, Elk Park, N. C. 

GALAX... 

Bronze or green, 75c per 1000, in 3,000 ots orl 
more. Lsuoolhoe Sprays, green, 90c per 100. 
Soulharn Smilax, fresh stock, per 50-lb. case, 
$6.00; per 35-lb. case, $3.50. Green Sheet Moss, 

choice stock, $3.50 per barrel sack. Spagnum 
Moss, $1.75 per large bale. 

FLORIST' SUPPLIES of Every DESCRIPTION. 
Tel. 597 Madison Li J. KRESHOYER, 



Square. 



110-112 W. 27th St., New York. 



It is good business policy ^ ^ ^ 
to mention the Jf' t^ Jf' 

American Florist 

When you write to an advertiser. 



E.FJinter8onCo. 

5uccesfors to 

McKellar & Winterson. 

BSTABLISHED 1894- 



We are handling the cut of Rudd's 
"PHYLLIS," the grand new pink— and 
ne-iv Seedling White (unnamed, but 
a "crackerjack") carnations. These 
arrive daily — get a sample shipment, 
but give us a day or two notice, as 
we sell them out as a rule in advance 
oi arrival. Price. Phyllis, 6c: While 
Seedling, 4c. 

FANCY EASTERN VIOLETS. The best 
that come into this market, $1.00 
per hundred. 

EXTRA FINE HARRISII BLOOMS, 12c 

to 15c. 

FANCY FREESIAS, 3c to 4c. 

A daily supply trow 34 GROWERS 
enables us to take care of shipping 
orders to the buyers' advantage. 



Get our Weekly Price List It is free and 
worth your while. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Galax Leaves and all Greens. 

"SUPERIOR QUALITY" 

WILD SMILAX 

(NONE BETTER.) 

ALWAYS ON HAND. 

We carry The most complete line of 
Florists' Supplies in tbe West. Catalogue free. 
Address all correspondence to 

45-47-49 Wabash Ave., 
CHICAGO. 



Orchids ! $t 

Just arrived in superb condition, a large ship- 
ment of DENDROBIUM NOBILE, most useful for 
florists; also Dend. Chrysanthura and others. 
To arrive, Cattleya Trianae and C. Gigas. 

Lager & Hurrell, summit, n. j. 

Orclild Growers and Importers. 



WILD SMILAX ?p«5,S''Hlk''o%^jARTERS. 

\\ e c.Trry the finest and most complete stock of Florists' Hardy Supplies, 
Dagger and Fancy Ferns, $1.50 per lOOU, A No. 1 quality. Bronze and Green 
Galas, $1.00 per 1000, A No. 1 quality. Southern Wild Smilas,50 pound case. $7.00. 
25 pound case. $3.50 per case. Laurel Festooning, good and full, 5c and 6c per 
yard. Leucothoe Sprays, $1.00 per 100. Green Moss, $1.00 per bbl.; 75c per bag. 
Sphagnum Moss. $1.00 per bbl.; 5Cc per bag. Order by mail, telegraph or tele- 
phone will receive our personal and prompt attention, long DIs. 'Phone 2618 Main. 

HENRY M. ROBINSON, No. II Province St., BOSTON, MASS. 




THE CLEVELAND CUT ELOWER COMPANY 



-SUCCESSORS TO- 



BATE BROS. AND THE F 

52-54 High St., 



R. WILLIAMS COMPANY 

BOTH PHONES. 



We Carry a Full Line of Florists' Supplies and Make Wire Designs. 

WRITE FOR OUR WEEKLY PRICE LIST. 



CLEVELAND, O. 

Send Your Stock to Us on Commission. 



20 



The American Florist. 



Jan. JO 



The pEEE) Trsde. 



AMERICAN SEED TRADE ASSOCIATION. 

S. F. Willard, Pres.; J. Charles McCullough, 
First Vice-Pres.; C. E. Keudel, Cleveland, 0., 
Seo'y and Treas. 

Twenty-second annual convention, St. Louis, 
Mc. June 31-23, 1904. 



Sweet corn prices are said to be a little 
less firm. 

The very severe cold weather is of no 
help to mail orders. 

The new potato' Eldorado is being 
offered in England at $875 per pound at 
wholesale rate. 

Contract bean prices are higher, while 
growers are refusing to take large orders 
for scarce sorts. 

Nearly every itetn on both the green 
pod and wax bean list seems to be short. 
Seed stocks will be needed. 

San Francisco, Cal., January 23.— 
There is a deficiency of rain here which is 
alike bad for crops and growers. 

Business with catalogue houses gener- 
ally is very good as compared with last 
season, in many cases much better. 

The disposition to make heavy con- 
tracts for seed peas is about in line with 
the sentiment on contracting for onion 
seed. 

The spring catalogue of Peter Hender- 
son & Company has been mailed this 
season as promptly as most others in the 
trade. 

Visited Chicago. — August Rhotert, 
New York; E. M. Parmalee, of the John 
H. Allan Seed Company, Cape Vincent, 
N. Y., on his annual contracting trip. 

Schmidt & Botley, Springfield, O., 
report that the returns from their new 
catalogues are coming in very satisfacto- 
rily, even better than last year, and they 
think the prospects for business the com- 
ing spring are very good. 

There will be some reduction of the 
acreage planted to onion sets in the 
Chicago district the coming season. 
Two years of low prices have discour- 
aged some of the growers who can see 
more profit in other lines. 

Among the short items in flower seeds 
this season are Viola odorata and varie- 
ties. Phlox Drummondii, P. decussata. 
Lady Grisel Hamilton sweet pea, thun- 
berg'ia, Browallia speciosa major, hol- 
lyhocks, Lathvrus latifolius, Machet 
mignonette and nasturtiums. 



Buckbee's New Warehouse. 

The accompanying illustration shows 
the new shipping warehouse of H. W. 
Buckbee, of Rockford, 111. The dimen- 
sions are 65x184 feet with boiler and 
engine room 39x65 feet. The cellar is 
very spacious and the machinery for 
cleaning and manipulating seeds of the 
best and most modern patterns, making 
the establishment one of the most com- 
plete and up-to-date to be found any- 
where. 



A California Protest. 

We are pleased to see the protests 
against the extravagant humbug of 
national distribution of an inferior and 
worthless article, says the Santa Cruz 
Sentinel. In the early history of the 
country seed distribution was useful and 



[iti 
III 

i II 11 II 




]f]iji;:''iHHiH 




:n\i^ 



NEW WAREHOUSE OF H. W. BUCKBEE, ROCKFORD, ILL. 



beneficent. The population was thinly 
scattered and no one had seed farms. 
But these times have passed away. The 
government seeds are looked upon with 
suspicion by every farmer. They plant a 
few by way of experiment, but go to a 
reliable seedsman to be sure of a success- 
ful crop. The government should never 
do what the individual does better. 



American Seed Trade Association. 

Ed. Am. Florist:— A meeting of the 
executive committee of the American Seed 
Trade Association was called at the New 
Willard hotel, Washington, D.C., on Jan- 
uary 20. There were present S. F. Wil- 
lard, president, Walter P Stokes, Albert 
McCuUough, W. Atlee Burpee, Henry W. 
Wood, F. W. Bolgiano and C. E. Kendel, 
secretary. 

It was decided to meet at St. Louis 
June 21—23 at the Forest Park University 
hotel, which is located but a very short 
distance from the fair grounds, and is we 
are assured by the St. Louis members of 
the association in every way desirable. 
Suggested topics for the programme 
give promise of a most practical and 
interesting meeting, and this with the 
general attraction of the greatest expo- 
sition, at least from a horticultural 
standpoint, and the low rates on the 
railroads, ought to result in having the 
largest and best convention of the asso- 
ciation. 

Further announcements will follow in 
due time. C. E. Kendel, Sec'y. 

January 22, 1904. 



Buffalo, N. Y. 

W, F. Kasting has started to move his 
goods to his new place, but will not 
move all until after Easter. At his new 
establishment there will be a hall for 
florists' meetings and he has promised us 
the use of it. We now use his store and 
cigars. What more can he do? 

The meeting of the Buffalo Florists' 
Club last week was postponed owing to 
the disagreeable weather. There was a 
meeting of florists January 27 to take 
action on the Forest Lawn cemetery's 
resolution to do all watering and take 
care of graves. 

Trade took a good jump last week. 
Several receptions and dinners gave a 
number of florists work. Stock is still 
equal to the demand, but there is no sur- 
plus. 

Rudolph Boettger, of Eggertsville,N.\'., 
lost a sister this week. She at one time 
had a store and handled plants on 
Niagara street. 

Dan'l. B Long was called to Waynes- 
boro, Pa., Monday owing to the death of 
his brother, David, who was well known 
in Buffalo. 

Barney Meyers, superintendent for W. 
J. Palmer & Son, says their stock for 
Easter is in fine shape. 

The extreme weather last week made 
a terrible hole in the coal bins. 

V^isitors: S. D.Green, Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Ernest Schoepke, New York. Bison. 



Denver, Col.— L. C. Waterbury has 
sold his wholesale cut flower and general 
supply business to R. S. Maham. 



IMPORTANT TO PRIVATE GARDENERS 

The system of allowing Private Gardeners a discount on their annual purchases 
of seeds has become almost univrrsal; in fact, they have been gradually educated 
to expect it. We are offering this season 

I A Special Discount of 15% 



ON ALL GENERAL SEED ORDERS AT OUR GARDEN GUIDE PRICES 

Which are quoted as low as any reliable seed grower olTors. Also, we df liver b\ 
freight or express prepaid to New York, Boston, Baltimore, Washington, Pitts- 
burg, Cincinnati or St. Louis. Garden Guide mailed free on application. 

nODbnT BUIST COMPANY9 £>»[ii:^^^i3Gci^F>H[iA, it»A. 



Cr 



^A.. ■ 



igo^. 



The American Florist. 



21 






PEDIGREE STOCKS 



or= 






Vegetable s riower Seeds 

Wc make a very special study of the improvement and selection of the Choicest Stocks of Seeds ^ 

gfenerally, and especially of those required by MARKET GROWERS* jk 

These Pedigree Stocks are continually and constantly being improved under our own personal j. 

supervision, in our various Trial and Stock Grounds. ^ 



fl 
?* 
a 
a 
?* 

ii 
^ 
f* 



TRY THEM ONCE, AND YOU WILL WANT THEM AGAIN. 



?* 
^ 



Send for our Special Offer of Flower and Vegetable Seeds (now ready) and for our General <4 
Catalogue of Novelties (mostly of our own raising), Vegetable and Flower Seeds, ready in December. jk 



We shall be pleased to answer any correspondence or send samples for trial next season, if preferred. 

WATKINS & SIMPSON 

SEED MERCHANTS, 12 Tavistock St., 

% COVENT GARDEN, LONDON, W. C, ENGLAND. I 



¥ 






GLADIOLI. "'^SirK. 

May, 3rd size, at $5.00 per 1000. Will all bloom. 
Also Bulblets, Childsii, Groff's Hybrids. Gray's 
Inglesides. Choicest selections in one general 
mixture at $5.00 per busbel. Cash. 



FRANK BANNING, 



KINSMAN, 
OHIO. 

Please mention the American Florist zi'hen uniting. 

Gi Anini I Fancy mixture, 1st size, $8 per 
LAUIULIi 1000: 3nd size, S6.00 per 1000: 
good mixture. 1st size, $6 per IQOO; 3nd size, 
$4 per 1000. Light colors, S7and S5. Discount 
on large orders. Cash. 

E. E. STEWART, Rives Junction. Mich. 

^ssr A. :n^ or E^ i> . 

Growers of Sweet Pea Seed for the trade. 
F. A. ROSCOE. Steeple Morden. Royston. England. 

1 fresh from 
' the vines, 
■$6.00 per lOOO or $5.00 per 1000 above 10.000. Smilax 
Seeds, new crop, $1.25 per lb. Cash with order. 
COTTAGE NURSERY, 1421 D. St., San Diego, Cal. 



Asparagus Plumosus Nanus Seeds; 



The American Florist Co.'s 

TRADE DIRECTORY 



HUNDREDS OF NEW NAMES 
AND ADDRESSES. 



And contains the usual fully corrected and 
revised lists of Florists, Seedsmen, Nurserymen 
Gardeners, Horticulturists, Landscape Architects 
Parks, Cemeteries, Botanical Gardens, Horticult- 
ural Societies and Horticultural Supply Concerns 
of the United States and Canada. 

Price S2.O0 Prepaid. 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO. 

324 Dearborn St., CHICAGO. 



A Bear Movement on Japan 

Per 100 1000 

TUBEROSES, XLCR Dwarf Pearl, large bulbs $1.25 $ 8.50 

GLADIOLUS, Red and Scarlet, mixed 1.00 8.00 

GLADIOLUS, White and Light, -mixed 2.50 20.00 

CALADIUMS, Small. ..per 100, $5.00; Medium, $8.00; Large, 10.00 
PAEONIES, Herbaceous, double in separate colors 12.00 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERii 

Clean, Fresh Seed from Bahamas, per lOOO seeds, $1.25. 
BAMBOO CANES, for your Lilies, per 1000 $6.00 

W.ELLIOTT&SONS,NewYork. 



LILY OF THE VALLEY 

SELECTED DRESDEN. 

Unequaled for early forcing. No. I Stock per JOO, 
$1.50; 250, $3.50; 500, $6.50; 1000, $13.00; case 
?,5C0 pips, $30.00. J-J-^J-J-J-jt^J-J. 

R. & J. FARQIHAR & CO., ^ nosVoN^I^M^sl!"'''* 



22 



The American Florist. 



Jail. JO 



The iJ^luRSERY Tme>e. 

AM. ASSOCIATION OF NURSERYMEN. 

N. W. Hale, Knoxville, Tenn., Prea.; Fbank 
K. Wbber, St. Louis, Mo., Vice-Pres.; Gkobge C. 
SEAesR, Rochester, N. Y., Sec'y. 

Twenty-ninth annual convention, Atlanta, Ga. , 
;une, 1904. 

Decatur, III.— The Mt. Zion Nursery 
Company partnership has beea dissolved. 

J. Blaadw & Company, of Boskoop, 
Holland, have issued a very attractive 
souvenir of their nurseries and Boskoop 
which they are mailing to customers. 

The Department of Parks, Borough of 
Brooklyn, N. Y., is in the market for a 
large quantity of trees and shrubs, the 
estimates to be in the office of the depart- 
ment, Litchfield Mansion, Prospect Park, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., by 9 a. m., Tuesday, 
February 9. The superintendent is Wm. 
J. Zartmann. 



Pennsylvania Nurserymen's Association. 

An auxiliary association of the Penn- 
sylvania State Horticultural Association 
was formed at Lancaster, January 20, to 
be known as the Pennsylvania Nursery- 
men's Association with the following 
officers: W. H. Moon, Morrisville, presi- 
dent; Thomas B. Meehan, Philadelphia, 
vice-president; Earl Peters, Mount Holly 
Springs, secretary; Thomas Rakestraw, 
Kennett Square, treasurer. 



Omaha, Neb. 

Business has been rather slow for this 
time of the year. There are a good 
many society functions, but none very 
important to the florists. The weather 
for the first three weeks of January was 
summer-like. Stock was consequently 
plentiful and low prices prevailed. Vio- 
lets sold at any price. The weather man 
helped us out for the last five days, the 
thermometer going down to 18° below 
zero for three days. Stock is now scarce 
and the prices are higher, 

Paul Paulson erected two houses at 
the Prospect Hill cemetery grounds to 
supply the cemetery with plants and cut 
flowers. 

The Nebraska Florists' Club decided at 
the last meeting to form a bowling team 
to take part in the St. Louis convention. 

H.Slocomb, the violet grower, contem- 
plates the erection of two houses, 30x200 
feet, for violets this season. 

A. Donaghue, Jr., opened his new store 
on Farnam street, and it is quite a credit 
to him as well as to the trade. 

Grippe. 






x>. 



<A//{>A(rBESTWHOLESALE'^^k^'A ^ 




J . F. MULLER NURSERY Rellingew. (Germanyi. 
FINEST RAFFIA AND TREE SEEDS. 



♦♦♦< 



\ NOW IS THE TINE TO ORDER. 



T Per 100 

X Exochorda Grfl., 18 to 24-inch, bushy $8.00 

T Lonicera. ^ Belgica and Heckrotti, 3 to 

T 4 fi-et, bushy. 8.00 

X Ampelopsis Japonica. 3i4-inch pots 4.00 

Z Cearus Deodara. 16 to 18-inch 25.00 

» o.j... n-.j... on.„o<;„„V. 30 00 



Cedrus Deodara, 3C to 24-inch, 

Oranges, beat sorts, grafted, bearing size 

12-Inch, bushy, 4-inch pots 20.00 | 

Ligustrum Amurtinse, true. 3 to 3- feet branched 

Writa for Wholssale and Dascrlpllve Catalogua, 



Per 100 

Oranges. 15 to 18-inch, 5-lnch pots 30.00 

Lemons, grafted, 18 to 24-inch, 5-inch 

pots 30.00 

Kentia Belmoreana. 13 to 15-incb. 5 leaves 18.00 

Latania, 15-iuoh, 3 to 4 ch. leaves 20.00 

Phoenix Canariensis, 16 to 18-inch, 3 to 3 

leaves, showing character 15.00 

Not less than 50 of a kind at above prices. 
per 1000, $20.00 



►. J, :BB>ieoK:j\j:.^Bjs OO., (inc.) X 

FRUITLAND NURSERIES. 4 

Established 1856. A.UGUS'TA., O.^* ♦ 

Plfiase ynfntinn the A merican Fiorist ivfien w* Jting. 



etc., have been the standard of excellence for half » 
cntury. The best always cheapest. Have huudreds 
of curloadF«of 




FicuR, Ferns, Roses, etc. Oorrespoinif iice solicited. 

THE STORRS & HARRISON CO., 



Fruits and Ornamentals. 

40 acres of Hardy Rohes includioE tS/XiTl of the 
famous Crimson Rambler. 44 i;reenhousPs of Palms, 
Catalogue free. &ith year. IfXiO acres. 

Box 260, Painesville, Ohio. 



August Rolker & Sons, 

IMPORTERS OF 

Palms. Bay Trees, Auracarias, etc. Decorative Plants 
for spring delivery; Lily of the Valley, Lilacs, Forc- 
ing Bulbs, etc. tor tall delivery; Raffia for Nursery- 
men and Florists. Address 

31 Barclay St. or P. 0. Box 752, NEW YORK. 

Please mention the American Florist when 7vrtting. 

J. DIJKHUIS & CO. 

BOSKOOP-HOLLAND. 
QUALITY. QUANTITY. 

Ask our prices for 

AZALEAS, RHODODENDRONS, PEONIES, 

ROSES, HARDY EVERGREENS, 

CLEMATIS, Etc, 

Price List Free on Application. 

KOSTER <& CO. 

SSllVrii: Boskoop, Holland. 

HARDY AZALEAS, BOX TREES, CLEMATIS, 

CONIFERS, HYDRANGEAS, PEONIES. 

Pot-Grown Plants for Forcing. 

RHODODENDRONS, H. P. ROSES, Etc. 

No Agents. Catalogue free on demand. 
Please viention the A merican Florist when writing. 

When in Europe come and see us and inspect our 
extensive Nurseries. Gouda is our railroad depot, 

HARDY, FANCY ORNAMENTAL NURSERY STOCK. 

J. Blaauw & Co., 

BOSKOOP, HOLLAND. 

Catalogue free on demand. Headquarters for the 
famous ColoradoBlue Spruces, purest, bluest strain 
Please mentioti the A merican Florist when writing. 



Send to 




THE MOON 



Company 

For \ Trees, Shrubs, Vines 
Yourj and Small Fruits. 

Descriptive Illustrated Catalogue Free 
THE WM. H. MOON OO. 
Morrisville, Pa. 



Philadelphia Rambler. 

The new forcing rose, strong field plants, 
$15,00, $20.00 and $30.00 per 100. 

CRIMSON RAMBLER. 

E.vtra well branched, $8.00, $11.00 and $16.00 
per 100. 

The Conard& Jones Co., '^^r"' 

Please mention the A mt* ican F.'orist when writing. 



California Privet... 

Per 1000 

13,000, 1 year, 18 to 24-inch, very bushv $1!.00 

15,090, 1 year, 13 to 18-ineh, well branched., 8.50 

CANNAS, Strong Eyes. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

5,000 Egandale $1.00 J8.00 

5,000 Charles Henderson I.OO 8.00 

5,000 Chicago 1.(0 8 00 

2,000 Florence Vaughan 1.90 8.00 

2,000 Mme. Crozy 1.00 8.00 

15,000 Austria 75 5.00 

We also have 6 000 Biota Rosedale in all sizes. 
This is the best florists' Evergreen in the list. 
Our stock will please you. 

riRROW BROS., Quthrle, Okla. 

Order to-day our giant-flowering Betjonia bulbs; 
$3 50 per 100. $33.00 per 1000, f. o. b. New-YorK. 
Sole proprietor of the entire stock of this pro- 
fusely blooming lieizonia grown in Holland. Only 
15uodleft. ORDER 10 DAr. 

John Scheepers, '^New'vVrk^* ' 

THE 

Brockton Dahlia rarm. 

The largest and finest collection of Dahlias 
in the United States, consisting of all the 
leading varieties. Spnd for price list. • . • . 

W. p. LOTHROP, ^-rr"^' 

t^ease mention the A merican Florist when writing, 

VINCA VINES. 

AVe have a fine stock of Vinca Major in 3 and 
4-inch pots. Place your order now for spring and 
summer delivery as stock is always scarce. \Vrile 
for jirices stating quantity wanted. 

WAGNER PARK CONSERVATORIES, 

SIDNEY. OHIO. 

Van der Weijden & Co. 

THEjiuRSERiEs. BOSKOOP. HOLLAND. 

Wholesale Growers ol RhododendroDs, Azaleas, 
Mofinolias; Conifers, Taxus, all sizes and varieties. 
Pot t:rown plants for forcing. II. P. Roses in every 
quantity. Some Crimson Ramblers left, strong. 

No Agents. Catalogue Free. No Agents. 

AI117QVC 'P^'^*'QQ *^g Americaa Flo- 
ill TT €Lj O rist when you o r der stock. Jt 



igo4. 



The American Florist. 



23 



SPECIAL OFFER 



OF A FEW GOOD VARIETIES OF WELL=SHAPED 

CONir[RS m OTHER PLANTS 



ALL RECENTLY TRANSPLANTED, GROWN SINGLY AND SPECIALLY PREPARED FOR EXPORT. 

"Articles not mentioned as transplanted in 1903 were moved in 1902." 

Coniferae 



lo.o: 



3.50 
4.00 



5.00 
15.00 



Per 10 
Abies Blliamoa. the balsam fir, (transplanted 

UK3),3!4 to 4 feet $ 3.00 

D^i to 654 feet 4.00 

" CoerulM, the common blue fir, 2H to 1 ft. 3.50 

" Concolor, the most majestic of the blues, 

3"ito3Hfeet 600 

" Excelsa Aurea, beautiful golden foliage, 

ft'i to 6/2 feet .- 10.03 

" Exealta Argtntaa. beautiful white foliage, 

9 to 13 feet 50.00 

'* Homoleniis, a uew strong growing Abies 
from Japan, foliage white under- 
neath, 2H to 3 fei feet 6.00 

4to5K (eet 9 00 

" Invarta, the weeping flr, very curious, 
3M to 4'4 feet 

" Nigra Doulnatti, dwarf, compact and blue 
with very small leaves, 5 to BH feet 
each $4.tO 

" Nordmannlana (trauspl. 1903), 1 to IJi feet 
(transpl. 1903),3to 3Vi feet 

" Oriinlalls, 2H to 3>i feet, very small Ivs., 
darlj foliage, 2Ji to ZM feet. . , 

6i/i.to8feet 

8to9^feet 20.00 

" Parryana Glauea or Pungent, 1 to H£ feet . . 4.00 

2to2^ifeet.. 8.00 
" " " " (transplanted 

1903), 2 to 2H feet 8.00 

'■ Pintapo, 2 to 2H feet 5.00 

3to3i4feet 6.00 

4to5 feet 9.00 

5Hto7feet I5.0U 

" Reglnoe Amollai one of the quickest 

growing Abies, 8'/4 to 8H feet 10.00 

9 toll feet 15.00 

" RemontI, a dwarf, pyramidal and com- 
pact Br, 2i4 to 3ii feet 6.00 

trauearia Imbrleala, l to l ^ feet 6.00 

1!^ tol?i feet 12.00 

H., to2 feet.... 17.00 

Cadnu Atlantlca Argtntaa, well shaped plants, 

grown in pots, 3 to %\i feet 4.00 

4 to4V4 feet 6.00 

CupratiUi WattermannI, heavy drooping foli- 
age of a beautiful golden tint, 2^ to 3 ft. lO.OO 
Juniparut Sinantl* Varlegata, Vi to 3M feet .... 4.00 
Larjx Siblrica, from true Siberian seed, curious 
pyramidal, compact tree; numerous 

red cones in the spring, 6 to 6^ feet 4.00 

6^4 to 8 feet 6.00 

Pinut Auttriaea Nigra, beautiful well-formed 
specimens, (transplanted), 2 to 2!^ feet, 

per 100 $12.00; 1.50 

4/2 to 6 feet 7.C0 

6to7H feet 10.00 



Per 10 
Taxui Baccata, English Yew, (transpl. spring 

1903), 31/2 to 3!4 feet, per 100 S15.00 3 00 

(transpl. spring 1903), 3^ to 4 feet, per 

100 - 8250J 3.00 

(transpl. spring 1903), 4!4 to 5M feet, 

per 100 $35.00; 4.00 

Transplanted, 3 to 4'/4 feet, per 100, 35.0J; 3.00 
Transplanted, 4!4 to 5'.i feet, per 

100 35.00; 4.00 

Transplanted, 5V4 to 6 feet 6.00 

Transplanted, 6 to 6^ feet 10 00 

Taxus HIbernIca Pyramidalis, 2!4 to 3 feet 4.00 

Thuya Comnacla, 3H to 3M feet 2.50 

Elwangerlana, 4H to 5 feet 5. GO 

5H to 59i feet 8.0O 

" 6to6!4feet 10.00 

" Lobbii Gigantaa, 5^ to ^Vi%% feet through 8.O1) 

6!4 to 8 X 4 feet through lO.OO 

8 to 10 X 5 feet through 12.00 

(transplanted), 3/2 to 3 feet 2.00 

(transplanted), 3 to 4V4 feet 4 OO 

(transplanted) 5 to 6 feet 6.00 

'' Lobbil Atrovirens, dark green, (transpl.,) 

4'41o5reet 4 00 

5 to 6 feet 6.00 

" Lobbil Aurea, 5 to 6 feet 8.00 

" " " Varlegata, certainly the best 

of variegated coniiers. 5 to 6 feet 10.00 

" Oceidentalit Pyramidalis Columnaris, 5^ to 

5?^ feet 8.00 

6 to6J£ 13 00 

Tbuyopils Dolabrata Variagata, 3H to 3 feet 6.00 

3Si to4feet 10 00 

5to6feet 16.00 

Borealis, 4!4 60 5!4 feet 4.0 

S to 7 feet 6.00 

" Borealis Pendula, a most elegant form, 

3>4to3lee[ 5.00 

3 to 4 feet 8.00 

Varlegita, 3 to 4 feet 6.00 

All above will move well and can be lifted with 
good, strong solid balls of earth. 

Ornamental Standards 

Ac0r Nogundo Robustum "LstoMiar/' new. 3 year 
buas OQ strong steins. Originated in 
our nurseries, regular variegated foliage, 
never burns, grows three times larger 

and quicker than the old variety 6.00 

fsculus Hippocastanum FloreplenSi 5 to 6 feet. . 3.00 

6to6»4r«et 4.0U 

eysto?^ feet 6.00 

8 to y feet . . 8.00 

The true double-flowering horse Chestnut 
(grafted trees), fruitless variety suitable 
for street planting. 

Belula Pendula, lOtoii feet 16.00 

13 to 14 feet 24.00 

The true silver bark variety, specimen 
trees with drooping branches all around 
the stem from the ground. These are 
grown in baskets to make growth certain. 



Per 10 
JuQlans Sleboldii, 9 to 10 feet 4.00 

10 to 11 feet 6.00 

11 to 13 feet goo 

Beautiful ornamental tree, very quick 
grower, white bark, very long foliage. 

Evergreen Shrubs 

Buxus Elegantlssima, (Dwarf variegated Bos), 

IMtolVifeet 6.00 

Beautiful silver variegation showing as 
well in winter as in summer. 

Cotoneaslsr Buxifolia, tall evergreen variety 
3 to 5 leet ' 



3.00 
4.00 
7.00 



Hex Varlegata, ly to 2 feet, per 100 $30.C0; 

3 to 3'4 leet 

We grow mostly the best variety. T. Mar- 

ginala Alba leaves liable to drop in transit. 
Mahonia Rolundifolia, IK to 2 feet 4.00 

The best variety, blooms very freely, large, 

compact, rigid spikes. 



Various 



100 



30.00 
20.00 



Per 10 
Carnlnus Pyramidalis, (Pyramidal Horn- 
beam), 8 to 10 feet $8.00 

Prunus PIssardi, 4 to 5 feet 3.00 $15.00 

5^ to 6',« feet 3 00 35.00 

Pruned bushy stuff, well formed 
bushes, many branches, fine roots. 

Populus Bolleana, 5V^ to 6H feet 4 00 

While Lilac, 314 feet 3.CO 

S'.jtoSfeet 4.50 35.00 

The best variety, well formed bushes. 
Spineless fioeseberrles, (3 varieties), 

=i to 1 toot 4.00 35.00 

Almost entirely pricklesa, big red 
early fruit of good flavor. 

Larix Lsplolepis, true stock from .Japa- 
nese seed variety much superior to 
European varieties in all respects, 
strong transplanted, 2- year plants, 
$8 per 1000; $76 per 10,000. 

Myiobsland Sloclcs, 1st size, 2 to 3 feet, 
$6.00 per 1000; $56.00 per 10.000. 3nd. 
size. 1 to 2 feet, 14.00 per 1000; $36.00 
per 10,000. For edging or for stocks. 

Magnolia Grandiflora 

Beautiful well-grown specimen plants all trans- 
planted, all sure to grow. Per doz. 100 

3to4feet $9.00 $65 00 

4to5feet 11.00 

5 to 5^ feet 15.00 

6 feet 18.00 

7 to 8 feet 24.00 



80.00 
100.00 
130.00 
160.00 



All above prices are for goods delivered FREE TO HAVRE. Packing extra carefully 
done and charged at cost price. We know how to pack all above safely and economically 
and can give the highest American references. We ^have many other good articles at 
advantageous prices. Please ask for catalogue. 

LETELLIER SON & CO., 

CAEN, Calvados, France. 



24 



The American Florist. 



Jan. 30, 



Our pasTiMES. 



A.nnouDcements of coming contests or other 
events of interests to our bowline, shooting and 
sporting readers are solicited and will be given 
place in this column. , »v j ^ 

Address all correspondence tor this department 
to Wm. J. Stewart, 42 W. 28th St., New York. 
Robt. Kift, 1725 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa.; 
or to the American Florist Co., Chicago, 111. 

At New York. 

The New York Florists' Bowling Club 
met at Meagher's alleys, Twenty-third 
street and Tenth avenue, Monday even- 
ing, January 25, when the following 
scores were rolled : 

Player l|t M 3d 4th 

En^v:;::::::::::::::::;::::::::io9 ib 

Nm'ent 8'' '"' °' "'' 

Oraw 12'? 12* 95 116 

Traendiv 136 141 187 116 

fiibbs ..".:■ 140 141 112 118 

Kavhor 133 158 141 16i 

yI^^ 147 151 144 150 

Ihaw 1*1 138 138 12' 

Young'.".'.'. 132 133 126 126 

Siehreoht 166 158 137 161 

lord ..■.■.■.'."........ 157 164 160 186 

Aiter the bowling a meeting was held 
for the purpose of organizing and elect- 
ing officers for the ensuing year, when the 
following were chosen : W. H. Siebrecht, 
president ; Wm. P. Ford, secretary ; John 
B. Nugent, Jr., treasurer; Theo. J. Lang, 
captain. 

At Chicago. 

The weekly bowling session was held 
Tuesday evening at the Geroux alleys. 
Four spirited games were rolled with the 
following scores. The ladies are mani- 
festing a healthy interest in the games 
and their scores show a marked improve- 
ment week after week: 

Plaver 1st 2d 3d 4th 

ctevens I" 1^5 143 149 

P J.Hauswirth 154 149 184 136 

R Asmus 137 204 144 163 

r^f,7 12s 104 130 116 

Winter'son].'.' 130 143 150 187 

J HuebneV . 139 174 119 126 

isia : 148 119 146 166 

Kreit'li'n.'' 117 137 140 148 

A Lanel "9 91 11° 

BalluT... '...;:. 174 157 196 

LADIES. 

Player 1st 2d 3d 

Mrs. Asmus 71 94 72 

Mrs. Hauswirth 90 101 104 

Mrs. Lange..... 88 9b .8 

Mrs. Kill... <l 96 m 

Mrs. Kreithns 116 115 '08 

Mrs. Winterson 61 <b bl 



South Framingham, Mass.. 

J. T. Butterworth's collection of coin- 
mercial orchids is rapidly increasing in 
extent and value. Mr. Butterworth is 
the only florist growing orchids as a 
specialty for the Boston cut flower mar- 
ket and is likely to hold his monopoly of 
this specialty for a long time. Orchid 
cultivation is one of the lines not likely 
soon to be done to excess or placed at 
the mercy of the "factories." for a thor- 
ough training and comprehensive knowl- 
edge of their cultural requirements is 
absolutely essential to success in flower- 
ing them and in maintaining the plants 
in healthy condition from year to year. 
That Mr. Butterworth is equipped with 
this indispensable prerequisite is obvious 
from the condition of the plants in his 
house which give evidence of sturdy 
growth and substantial yearly enlarge- 
ment since they have come into his pos- 
session. 

Cattleyas Percivaliana, Trianse, labiata 
and gigas, Laelias autumnalis andanceps, 
Coelogyne cristata var. Chatsworth, 
Oncidium varicosum Rogersii, Dendro- 
bium Wardianum and Cypripedium 



insigne of several varieties are the lead- 
ing kinds in point of numbers and there 
are smaller quantities of other well- 
known species. At present Cattleya 
Percivaliana holds the center of the 
stage with a sea of bloom. A fair quan- 
tity of the flowers of this species were cut 
for Christmas. Trianss will come in 
next and are well supplied with promis- 
ing buds. Among the La;lia anceps now 
blooming are two superb dark-flowered 
varieties and among the cattleyas sev- 
eral white or otherwise rare sorts have 
come to light. 

Among the plants are many veterans 
with a record, some of which in bygone 
days have graced the exhibition tables of 
Horticultural hall. Ccelogynes once the 
pride of James Cornley are of the number 
and grow side by side with former pets 
of Benj. Grey and David Allan. The 
oldest house on the place, once the prop- 
erty of the late C.J. Power and one of 
the oldest in the state, having been built 
in 1850, is a lean to that is rich in remin- 
iscence of the early experiences of Joseph 
Tailby, W. W. Edgar, F. R. Mathison, 
John Forbes and other affluent worthies 
who successfully kept the flues agoing 
and operated the watering pot under the 
protection of its 6x8 glass in the days of 
yore. 

Bulb culture has been a leading spe- 
cialty with Mr. Butterworth from the 
start, but the former profits in this line 
are no longer possible. Tulips are now 
being brought in although it is still 
rather early for them and they require 
careful manipulation by shading and 
retarding after the flower has formed, to 
acquire a sufficient length of stem. The 
first Dutch hyacinths are already coming 
into bloom. French single trumpet nar- 
cissi are in abundance and will be fol- 
lowed by the larger and finer sorts which 
cannot be forced so rapidly. A house of 
callas, of which a good proportion are 
the dwarf-growing variety, attracts 
attention because of its perfect health 
and the abundance of the bloom. Mr. 
Butterworth states that he gives the 
pots a good top dressing of bone about 
the middle of November and no other 
stimulant, liquid or otherwise is used. 



Hitchings & Company erected for Mr. 
Butterworth a fine carnation house 
36x165 last summer in which the favor- 
ite varieties of the day are seen in prime 
condition. 



Newbubgh, N. Y. — The firm of F. J. A. 
Schaefer's Sons has been incorporated 
with a capital of $50,000. The incorpo- 
rators are Sadie A. Chadborn, F. C. 
Chadborn and G. F. Chadborn. 




NEW LARGE-FLOWERING GALLA 

CALLA DEVONIENSIS. 

Blooming Callat From Seed In One Year 

100 seeds. 75c: 1000 seeds. $6.00. 

STOCKS— Beauty of Nice 

A very conspicious and handsome new 
Stock of quick growth, with flowers of very 
large size. The color is of a very pleasing 
daybreak pink. It is grown in large quanti- 
ties in the south of France for shipment north. 
IDnder good culture the plants will grow 24 to 
30 inches high. The seedlings will bloom in 
10 weeks, and if the seed is sown by the end 
of May the plants will bloom in September 
when "out-flowers begin to get scarce, and 
contine to bloom during winter. 

Beauty of Nice, pink, plit. (250 seeds). 25c. 

Beauty ol Nice, Stock Pure White, trade 
pkt., 25c. 

Vaughan's Seed Store, 



CHICAGO. 

84-86 Randolph St. 



NEW YORK, 

14 Barclay St. 



NEW CROP OF THE TRUE VARIETY JUST GATHERED- 

Asparagus Plumosus Nanus 




$1.00 per 100 seeds; $7.50 

per 1000 seeds. 

(Special price on large 

quantities.) 

New Crop flower 
Seeds. 

Are now ready. The 
following should be sown 
early : 



Ageratum 


Lobelias 


Asparagus 


Maurandia 


Asters 


Pansies 


Begonias 


Petunias 


Browatlia 


Phlox 


Cannas 


Primula 


Carnations 


Pyrethrum 


Celcsias 


Salvias 


Coboea 


Solanum 


Cyclamen 


Stocks 


Dracaenas 


Thunbergia 


Grevillea 


Torenia 


Heliotrope 


Verbenas 


Ipomoea 


Vincas 


Lantana 


Etc., Etc. 


All are described and 


offered in 


our current 


"Wholesale Price List. Sent 


free to all florists. 



HENRY 3. DREER, Philadelphia. 



Please mention the A metican Florist when writing. 



7p0/. 



The American Florist. 



25 



CRUSADER 



Has gradually and surely pushed its way to the highest rung of the ladder on the 
Chicago market. J. B. Deamud says it is the best selling Carnation. The retailers are 
fighting for them. 

Mr. Geo. Wienhoeber says the color is ideal. 

Mr. Jas. Wilson says: "It is a good thing; I was well impressed with it when 
at your greenhouses." 

All the large growers of Chicago say it improves in every respect every time 
they see it. 

CRUSADER will be grown in the middle west next year more exclusively than any 
other red. Why ? Because they know what it is. Chicago, Detroit, Philadelphia, St. 
Louis have seen the blooms. Milwaukee will see it February 2, New Yorkers February 8. 
Don't miss it. Go to your Club and see it. 

The rush for cuttings is on. Get your order in at once. 

CRUSADER is a Seedling from the two well known varieties, Lawson and Crane. 
It can be grown successfully in a wide range of temperature, at from 46 to 54 degrees at 
night, as it never bursts the calyx. Form is always perfect. Produces strong stems 

from 20 to 30 inches in length, according to the season. It is 

a more robust and quicker grower than even the Lawson, and 
a freer bloomer. Color the same as Crane, and average size 
of bloom three to three and one-half inches, very full and 
slightly fringed. From 200 blooming plants, J 00 blooms were 
picked that won the first prize at Kansas City, Fall, 1902. 



PRICES: 

100 $10.00 

1,000 80.00 

2,500 75.00 per 1.000 

5,000 70.00 per 1,000 

10.000 60.00 per 1,000 



OTHER FINE VARIETIES READY NOW, BEST EVER GROWN 



100 

FLAMINGO, grand scarlet $12.00 

RELIANCE, white 10.00 

LADY BOUNTIFUL, white 12.00 

INDIANAPOLIS, cerise 12.00 

THE BELLE, white 12.00 

ALBATROSS, white 12.00 



STANDARD VARIETIES. 

WHITE. 

GOV. WOLCOTT $4.00 

HER MAJESTY S.OO 

LILLIAN POND 5-00 



1.000 

$100.00 
80.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 



$30.00 
45.00 
45.00 



VARIEGATED. 



100 



PROSPERITY $2.50 

MARSHALL FIELD 6.00 

RED. 

ESTELLE 3.00 

PALMER 3.00 

HARLOWARDEN, grandest crimson 6.00 

PINK. 

ENCHANTRESS 6.00 

PRESIDENT McKINLEY 6.00 

NELSON 4.00 

LAWSON 2.50 



1.000 

$20.00 

50.00 

25.00 
25.00 
50.00 



50.00 
50.00 
35.00 
15.00 



CHICAGO CARNATION CO., Jollet, III. 

JAS. HARTSHORNE3 Manager. 



26 



The American Florist. 



Jan. JO, 



Hartford, Conn. 

The Hartford Florists' Club held an 
interesting meeting January 12. It was 
"cyclamen" night and splendid specimens 
were shown. J. F. Huss had six plants 
for which he was awarded a diploma. 
P. Zuger, of Elizabeth park, was awarded 
a certificate of merit for his exhibit. 
They were large and well grown. John 
Coombs showed plants for which he 
received honorable mention. Mr. Huss 
also showed a well grown plant of 
Platyclinis glumacea in full flower. 
Messrs. R. L. Osborn, of Hartford, and 
Boddington, of New York, acted as 
judges. In a discussion on culture of 
cyclamens Mr. Osborn gave his experi- 
ences. After the plants become too large 
for SVo-inch pots he plants them out in 
frames, raises the sashes when it becomes 
necessary and waters when needed. In 
September he lifts the plants and puts 
them in 5 to 6-inch pots and shades them 
for a few days. He cuts a lot of flowers 
in the summer and by fall has plants as 
good as if they had been grown in pots 
and at half cost and labor. The next 
meeting will be the carnation night. 

The annual meeting of the Connecticut 
Horticultural Society was held January 
13. Although the society has given no 
exhibition, the year 1903 was especially 
profitable to the members since much 
work was done in preparing the state's 
horticultural exhibit for the St. Louis 
Exposition. Before this exhibit is sent 
away this spring it will be shown at a 
free exhibition to be given in this city in 
February. The society adopted resolu- 
tions lauding the movement for the pres 
ervation by the government of the big 
trees in California. The foUowiner elec- 
tions for the ensuing year weremade: 

President — A. C. Sternberg, of West Hartford. 

Vice-president— Theodore Wirth. for Hartford 
county: J. X. Amrhyn, for New Haven county; D. 
.\. Lyman, for Wyiidham county; Edwin Hoyt, 
for FairOeld county; A. N. Pierson, for Middle- 
sex countv; T. H. Gold, for Litchfield county, 
and O. A. Leonard, for Tolland county. 

Treasurer — W. W. Hunt. 

Secretary and librarian— L. H. Mead. 

Statistician — G. A. Parlver. 

Professor in vegetable physiology — G. A. 
Parker. 

Pomologist— A. C. Sternberg. 

Executive committee and committee on awards 
and premiums—A. W. Driggs, .Tohn Coombs, C. 
M. Rogers, F. \V. Davis, J. F. Huss and E. S. 
Greer. 

A. fine exhibition of winter-blooming 
plants is now in progress at the Eliza- 
beth park greenhouses. A house 100 feet 
long is filled with cyclamens, cinererias, 
primulas, begonias, geraniums and car- 
nations. 

Mr. Huntsinger, principal of Hunt- 
singer's Business College, will build a 
small greenhouse. 

Karl Fohn, late of Bar Harbor, Me., 
has engaged as forester at Keney park. 

Drake & Carlson will open a store on 
Main street. 

Visitors: — Mr. Ringier, of Rutherford, 
N. J., and A. T. Boddington, of New 
York. R. K. 



north Adams, Mass. 

The florists and gardeners of Adams, 
North Adams and Williamstown met 
January 19 and organized a florists' club, 
to be called the Hoosac Valley Horticult- 
ural society. The following officers were 
elected: 

President— J. Ilynes, of North Adams. 

Vice-president— F. D. Brown, of North Adams. 

Secretary — A. J. Schmutz, of North .\dam3. 

Treasurer — Mr. Maher, of Williamstown. 

Auditors— Mr. McClellan, of Williamstown and 
P. H. Pratt, of North Adams. 

The next meeting will be held Feb- 
ruary 2. J. S. 



Carnations ?^,^!r«'l 



Cuttings. 



ONLY FIRST-CLASS STOCK SENT OUT. GET YOUR ORDER IN NOW 
TO BE SURE OF EARLY DELIVERY. 

NEW VARIETIES. 



Per ICO Per 1000 

Flamingo $18.00 $100.00 

Lady Bountiful 12.00 100.00 

The Belle 12 00 100.00 

Indianapolis 12 00 100.00 

NelsonFisher 12.00 100.00 



Per 100 Per 1000 

Mrs. M. A. Patten $12.00 $100.00 

White Lawson 12.00 lOO.OO 

Albatross 10.00 80.00 

Crusader 10.00 80.00 

Reliance 10.00 80.00 



CHOICE VARIETIES. 



Per ICO Per 1000 

Enchantress $6.00 $50.00 

Este le 4.00 30 00 

Fragrance 6.00 50.00 

Golden Beauty 5.00 40.00 

Gov. Lowndes 6.00 40.00 

Gov. Wolcott 5.00 40.00 



Per 100 Per 1000 

Harlowarden $6.00 $50.00 

Lillian Pond 5.00 40.00 

Mrs. Theo. Roosevelt 5.00 40.00 

Pres. McKinley 5.00 40.00 

The Queen 5.00 40.00 

White Bradt 6.00 



STANDARD SORTS. 



Per 100 Per lOCO 

America $1.75 $15.00 

Cressbrook 4.00 30.00 

Enquirer 2 50 20.00 

Ethel Crocker 1.75 15.00 

Flora Hill 1.75 15.00 

Genevieve Lord 1.7li 15.00 

G.H.Crane 2.50 20.00 

Gov. Roosevelt,... 3.60 30,00 

Lorna 3.00 25.00 

Marquis 1.75 15,00 



Per 100 

Morning Glory $2.60 

Mrs. F. Joost 1.75 

Mrs. H. N. Higinbotham 4.00 

Mrs. N. H. Nelson 4.00 

Mrs. Potter Palmer 3.00 

Mrs. Thos. W. Lawson 2.50 

Norway 1.75 

Prosperity 2.50 

Queen Louise 1.76 

White Cloud 1.75 



Per 1000 
$20.00 
16.00 
35.00 
36.00 
25.00 
20.00 
15.00 
20,00 
15.00 
15.00 



Vaughan's Seed Store, Chicago. 

GREENHOUSES AND NURSERIES, WESTERN SPRINGS, ILL. 

Please mention the A ntencan Plot i.\t 7vhen writing. 



STRONGLY ROOTED 

CARNATIONS 



NOW 
READY. 



GROWN OUT OF DOORS AND ROOTED WITHOUT HEAT. 



Per 100 lOCO 5000 



Quaan Laulaa 

Flora Hill 

Aim 

Gov.WoImH.. 

Norway 

Lillian Pond... 

Chicot ,. 

Viola Allan 



PINK. 

Mra. T. W. Lawaon. . 

Mra Jout 

Marmaid 

Mrs Rooiavalt — 

Enchantraas 

Sucoats 

PnaldanI MoKlnloy, . . 
Craatbrook 



$1.20 $10,00 

1.20 10.00 

3.40 30,00 

3,40 30,00 

1,30 10,00 

5,00 45,00 

1,20 11,00 

300 35,00 



1,40 13,50 

1.00 10 00 

1.20 10.00 

6,00 55 00 

600 ,10,00 

4,00 35,00 

.S.OO 45.00 

2,60 30,00 



! 40,00 
40,00 

125,00 

135,00 
40.00 

235.00 
50, CO 

100,00 



60,00 
40,00 
40,f0 
2S.5.00 
235,00 
150(0 
200,00 
90,00 



SCARLET. 



J. H, Manlay. 
G. H. Crana.. 

America 

Eatalla 

Mrs Palmar. 

Apollo 

Adonis 



Per 100 

.... 3 50 

.... 1.30 

.... 1.20 

.... 1.50 

.... 1.20 

.... 3,50 

.... 7,00 



CRIMSON. 

Hariowardon 

Gov. Roosevoli 

YELLOW. 

Eldorado 

VARIEGATED. 

Marshall Flald 

Stalla 

Armazlndy 

Prosparlty 



5,00 
1,50 



1000 
30,00 
10,00 
10 00 
14,00 
10,00 
30.00 
65,00 

45,00 
11,00 



5000 
140,C0 
40.00 
40,00 
65,00 
40.00 
135,00 
300,00 

200,00 
20 00 



1,00 9,00 35,00 



5,00 
3,00 
1,00 
1,40 



45,00 
25,00 
9,00 
12,00 



20'',00 
100 00 
35,00 
115.00 



Unrooted Cuttings at one half above prices, 35 at 100 prices, 350 at 1000 prices, 2,500 at 5,000 
prices, Ws prapay expross chargas and will ship C. O. D. with the privllags of sxamlnatlon, we 

assumins^ all the responsibility of Cuttings arriving in good condition and proving satisfactory. 



Loomis Floral Co., 



LOOMIS, 
CAL. 




Our 1st and 2n(l Grade 

Tea Roses, 

Many of our Customers tell us are 
better than others have sent them as 
higher grade. Then, you know, they are 
'fresh," sent to you same day they are 
cut. Prices on these grades are 3cand Sc. 

Heller Brothers, 

SOUTH PARK FLORAL CO., 



Please mention the American Florist to advertisers. 



1904. 



1'he American Florist. 



27 



Stock Plants, Rooted Cuttings and Plants In Small Pots, 

The dome of Chrysanthemum Stock. Roses, Violets. Geraniums and Carnations For Sale. 

WHEN YOU ORDER TURN TO ISSUES JANUARY 2nd AND 9lh. 1804, FOR PRICES AND VARIETIES. 



BEACH, THE FLORIST. 



LEADS. WHY NOT BUY DIRECT? 

Slora No. S Post Ofllet Areadi. BRIoeEPORT. CONN. 

Greenhouses, 3L83 Piirk Ave. David S. Beach, Prop. 



Mease mention the American Florist when writing 



CARNATIONS 

Rooted Cuttings 

NOW READY 

Terms Cash or C. 0. with privilege of exami- 
ning; at your Ixpress Office. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

5,000 Violinia, 4-inch bloom, var. ..$12.00 $100.00 

40,000 Sucess, La France pink 3.00 16.00 

5,000 Los Angeles, white 3.00 25.00 

10,000 Golden Beauty, yellow 2.00 18.00 

4,000 Gold Nugget, yellow 1.50 14.00 

4,000 Stella, var 3.00 25.00 

7,000 Lorna, white 1.20 10.00 

38,000 Mermaid, free salmon pink.... 1.20 10.00 

42,000 America, scarlet 1.20 10.00 

45,000 Mrs. P. Palmer, big red 120 10.00 

60,000 White Cloud, white 1.00 9.00 

30,000 Eldorado, yellow 1.00 9.00 

44,000 Marquis, light pink 1.00 9.00 

20,000 Argyle, pink 1.00 9.00 

25,000 Gen. Gomez, crimson 1.00 9.00 

27,000 Armazindy, var 1.00 9.00 

5,000 Viola Allen, var 3.00 25.00 

25 at 100 rates, 250 at 1000 rates. EXPRESS PRE- 
PAID BY US AT ABOVE PRICES. 

HYBRID SEED, MIXED,t°:s^,YLor^^; 

100; $9.00 per 1000. 

All Orders on Arrival are Packed to stand 30 Degrees 
Below Zero. 

California Garnatlon Go. 

A. MITTINC, IMgr. 

LOOMIS, CAL. 

CARNATION CITTINGS. 

We now have ready good, well-rooted Cuttings, 
from the following varieties: 

100 1000 

Eldorado S2.50 $20 

Manley 4.00 

Adonis 4.00 

I Lawson. 
Joost. . . . 
Harlowa: 
Harry Fe 

NEW VARIETIES FOR 1904— 

100 1000 

Nelson Fisher $12.00 $100.00 

Mrs. M. A. Patten 12.00 100.00 

All selected cuttings from healthy stock. Send 
in your order now and secure early delivery. 

BACKER & CO., 





100 1000 


Enchantress .. 


.$6.00 $50 


Fair Maid 


. 3.00 25 


Fragrance 


. 6.Q0 50 


The Queen 


. 5.00 40 


Boston Market. 


. 4.00 30 


Gov. Wolcott. . 


. 5 00 40 


Bradt 


. 3.00 25 


Prosperity 


. 3.50 20 



Lawson 2.50 

Joost 2.5U 

Harlowarden. . 6.00 
Harry Fenn. 



5.00 



Long Dis Tel. 
BILLBRICA, MASS. 



CARNATIONS 

Rooted Cuttings. Ready Now. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

QUEEN LOUISE $1.50 $12.50 

LILLIAN POND 6.00 40.00 

ETHEL CROCKER 1.60 10.00 

MRS. E. A. NELSON 2.00 15.00 

FLORIANA 1.60 12.50 

ENCHANTRESS 6.00 50.00 

ADONIS 6.00 50.00 

Send lor estimates on complete order and 
list of other varieties. 

ALBERT M. HERR, Lancaster, Pa. 

Please viention the American Florist when writing. 

Manetti Stocks 

FOR SALE at *12.00 to $15.00 per 1000. 
C. & C. L. PENNOCK, Lanidowne, Pa. 




Indianapolis 

The best bright pink carnation in sight. Come 
and see it growing. Awarded Certificate of Merit 
Indiana State Florists' Ass'n, Jan. 12, 1903. 
Scored 86 points Chicago, Nov. 18, 1903. Certifi- 
cate of Merit, Cincinnati Florists' Club, Jan. 9, 
1904. Certificate of Merit, Indiana State Florists' 
Ass'n., January 12, 1904. What more could you 
ask? t2.SOpBrdoz.;$1Z0aptr100;S100.00p«r100O. 

A FINE LOT OF STANDARD SORTS. 

Per 100 1000 
MoKinley ....$3.00 
Harlowarden. 5.00 
Her Majesty.. 5.00 
Flora Hill.... 1.50 $13.50 

Crane 2.50 30.t0 

Estelle 3.00 25.00 

W. Cloud 1.50 13.50 

Lorna 3.U0 18.00 Apollo 3.10 

Viola Allen. . . 3.00 , 25.00 

BAUR & SMITH, 

330 W. 38th St, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Per 100 
Ploriana .. . 2.00 
Q. Louise. . . 3.00 
E. Crocker. 
Lawson ... 
30.t0 G. Roosevelt 3.00 
P. Palmer.. 3.00 
E. A. Nelson 3.00 



1000 

18.00 

18.00 

50 13.50 

3.00 18.00 



Please mention the A merican florist when Tvriting. 



CARNATION CUTTINGS 



strong Plants Ready lor Prompt Shipment. Our Stock is Unexcelled. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

PERU 3.00 25.00 

WHITE CLOOD 3.50 30.00 

AMERICA 3.50 30.00 



Per 100 Per 1000 

FL0R4 HILL $3.50 $20.00 

THE SPORT 3..50 20.00 

MRS. LAWSON 3.00 25.00 

MRS. HIGINBOTHAM 3.00 26.00 

BRIDE SI3.50 per 1000 IVORY $13.50 per lOOO 

BRIDESMAID 13.50 " GOLDEN GATE 12.50 

Lots of 500 at 1000 rate. 

SINNER BROTHERS, 

Wholesale Cut Flowers, 
58-60 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO. 

NEW WHITE CARNATION FOR 1904. 

The Bride 

This variety was the winner of the first prize for best lOO white at the Carnation 
Convention Show in Brooklyn last February and is unquestionably the best white in sight. 

PRICE, $2.50 per Dozen; $12.00 per Hundred; 
$100.00 per Thousand. 

JOHN N. MAY. Summit. N. J. 



i Carnation Cuttings.! 

X STRONG AND WELL ROOTED. READY NOW. 2 

J President McKinley. Fair Maid, Roosevelt, Wolcott, Lawson, Crocker J 

X and Dorothy. Other varieties a little later. 4 

\ E. T. GRAVE, Richmond, Ind. | 

Please ynention the American Florist when writing. 



28 



The American Florist. 



Jan. 30, 



Cleveland, 0. 

The cut flowermarket is assuming large 
proportions. There is plenty of funeral 
■work and decorations. A number of 
florists have stated that the cold weather 
has been too severe for their business, but 
in spite of this discouraging fact large 
quantities of cut flowers are used daily. 
The two wholesale cut flower firms, Bate 
Brothers and F. R. Williams, have incor- 
porated, the business to be known as the 
Cleveland Cut Flower Company. It will be 
located at 52 and 54 High street. They 
have a large store, 40x80 feet, the oflice 
and show room being partitioned off from 
the main part. The firm will do ageneral 
cut flower business. 

Godfrey Lendy, florist at the Cleveland 
State Hospital, is an enthusiastic designer 
with carpet bedding plants. He con- 
templates large additions along that 
line this spring. They have a large work- 
ing force there, and Mr. Kalm supervises 
the potting shed and Martin is busy 
making flats for cannas. 

G. Hammel & Sons, west side lettuce 
growers, have devoted some of their 
houses to the growing of plants and cut 
flowers. 

James Wilson of Eddie road is sending 
in some superb carnations. Enchantress, 
Lawson, Joost and others. 

J. Houska has established a store at 
963 Broadway. O. G. 



Milwaukee. 



Cold weather, the mercury going as 
low as 25° below zero, has made trade 
quiet. Business is very erratic. One day 
there is a rush, the next day nothing 
doing; but in some lines there is nothing 
doing all the time, especially in violets, 
which have sold at lower prices than any 
previous season. Roses are in good 
demand and are cleaned out well but 
there are enough carnations to go around 
at all times. Bulbous stock is slow sale 
at present excepting daffodils, which have 
just made appearance. Green goods are 
selling well. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edlefsenhave been spend- 
ing a few weeks with their daughter in 
Pittsburg. 

The Milwaukee Florists' Club will have 
a carnation show at its next meeting 
February 2 in the club rooms, Empire 
building. 

A. Billings is bringing in some fine 
tulips, among them some well colored 
La Reine. H. 



Providence, R. I. 



At last we may consistently report a 
brighter prospect. For the last two 
months things have not been indicative 
of good business and we have seriously 
felt the trade shortage and poor collec- 
tions. It may be the present good call 
for design work will last until Easter. 
The last week has done wonders in the 
the way of restoring confidence and cre- 
ating a more ambitious feeling. 

Roses and carnations are in good sup- 
ply and show a tendency to firmer prices, 
although there is no real increase over 
present figures. Carnations seem to 
have perceptibly fallen ofi' in quality and 
retail customers are prompt to notice 
this. Violets remain slow at 50 cents 
per hundred wholesale. Carnations bring 
$1.50 to $2.50 and roses $3 to $6 for 
nice flowers. M. 



Waukesha, Wis.— J. G. Robinson & 
Son are picking some exceedingly fine 
violets this season. 




"A Wee Wail From The Woods(man)" 

"dUALITY COiTS" 

("That's AIL") 

This siock can be had ONLY direct from the 
introducers or their Agents: 

J. B. DEAMUD, W. F. KASTING, 

Chicago, III. Buffalo. N. Y. 

LEO. NIESSEN. GEO. M. KELLOGG, 

Philadelphia, Pa. Kansas City, Mo. 

J. M. McCULLOUGH'S SONS, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

REED & KELLER. New York City. 
HOLTON &HUNKEL. H. G. BERNING, 

Millwaukee. Wis. St. Louis. Mo. 

BARTELDES & CO., Denver, Colo. 

Caldwell The Woodsman Co. 

EVERGREEN, ALABAMA. 



CARNATION CITTINGS 

WELL ROOTED. CLEAN, HEALTHY AND POPULAR VARIETIES 
ORDER NOW AND RECEIVE PROMPT SHIPMENT. 



PINK. Per 100 lOOD 

Enchantress $6.00 $60.00 

Morning Glory 2.00 15.00 

Higinbotham 160 12.60 

Lawson 1.50 18.60 

Guardian Angel 1.26 10.00 

Cressbrook 1.50 12.60 



RED. Per 100 

Palmer $2.00 

Estelle • 2.00 

Harlowarden 3.00 

WHITE. 

Her Majesty 3.00 

White Cloud 1.50 

Flora Hill 1.50 



ICOO 

$15.00 

15.00 

25.00 

25.00 
12.50 
12.50 



Rooted Rose Cuttings. 



Per 100 1000 

Bride $1.60 $12.60 

Bridesmaid 1.50 12.00 

Ivory 1 60 12 50 

Golden Gate 1.60 12.60 | 



Per 100 lOOO 

La France $2.00 $15.00 

Meteor 1.60 12.60 

Liberty 3.00 25.00 



WIETOR BROS.. ""t.fnSrr 

5^=53 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO. 



of 



Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 



NOW 
READY 



Carnations 



roR 

SHIPMENT. 



BEST AND MOST STRONQLY ROOTED CARNATIONS ON 
THE MARKET. 



WHITE. 



Per 100 1000 .^000 
.$I.-!0 SIO.OO I 40.00 



40.01) 
35.00 



40.00 
50.00 



PINK. 

Mrs. T. W. Lawun. . 

Marquli 

Mra. Joo<t 



Pet 100 1000 5000 



1.40 
1.00 
1.20 



12.50 
9.00 
10.00 



60.00 
36.00 
40.00 



VARIEGATED. 



Armailndy. 
Prosperity . 



1.00 9.00 
1.40 12.50 



35.00 
60.00 



Qusan Louis* $I.!0 SIO.OO ( 

6ov. Wolcott 1.20 10.00 

WhHeCloud 100 9.00 

SCARLET. 

Amorlci 1.20 10.00 

CRIMSON. 

Gov. Roosovolt 1.30 11.00 

EXPRESS PREPAID TO ANY DESTINATION. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
OR YOUR MONEY BACK. 

LOOMIS CARNATION CO 

LOCK BOX 115. LOOMIS, CAL. 

Please mention the American Florist whenwrttine- 
Special quotations on Gov. Wolcott, Lawson and Palmer in large lotg. 



Per 101 1000 

Kncliantress *5.00 $15.00 

Gov. Wolcott 3.50 30.00 

200) and over, $28.00 per lOOO. 
Lawson 1.60 12.50 

2000 and over. $11.00 per lOOP. 



Per 100 1000 

Prosperity 2.00 18 00 

Lillian Pond 3.00 25 IK) 

Palmer 1.50 13.50 

3000 and over. If 11. CO per 100'. 

.Joost 1.50 12.00 

Stock 'raums of Merry Christmas and Eaton, big clumps, $1.00 per dozen. 
Booking orders for 3H-inch roses and 'mums for spring deliverv. Get vour orders in and secure 
good stock. Send in list for estimate. POEHIMANN'BROS. CO., Morton Grove, III. 

Mease mention the A merican Florist when writing. 



Per 100 1000 

Higinbotham 1.50 12.50 

Harlowarden 3.00 

Lorna 2.50 20.00 

Prices on 3i4-inch stock on ap- 
plication. 



1904. 



The American Florist. 



29 



La DETROIT 

Breitmeyers' New Rose 

A SEEDLING OF TESTOUT SND BRIDESMAID. 

To Be Disseminated April 1, 1904. 

COLOR. Prevailing color a beautiful shell pink, shading in the center to a soft rose pink. The reverse of the outer petal 
is of a creamy, flesh tint, shading to silvery toward the base, which may best be described as opalescent. The full open flower discloses 
a vivid richness of coloring, rare and fascinating. FRAGRANCE. Subtle, strongly tea-scented; reminds one of old Bon Silene. 
FORM. Large cup-shaped, heavy petal, shell-like in formation. GROWTH. Strong and healthy, with a rich, glossy foliage, 
rampant and vigorous, with a strong tendency to long shoots; very prolific. 

ALL ORDERS BOOKED PILLED IN ROTATION BEQINNINQ APRIL i. 

For *'Own Roofed" Plants from 2 1-2 inch po<s. 

1 Plant, each % .75 I 100 Plants and over and less than 1,000, each $ .25 

12 Plants, each 6o | i ,000 Plants and over, each 20 

25 Plants, each 50 I 3-inch pot plants, 5c each additional. 

50 Plants and over and less than too, each 30 | prices of qrapted stock given on application. 

JOHN BREITMEYER'S SONS, 

Gratiot and Miami Aves., DETROIT, MICH. 



STRONG STOCK 
from 2 1-2 inch pots. 



UNCLE JOHN. 



The fluest pink rose yet introduced; beautiful color, free bloomer, best 
money-maker. $20.00 per 100; $150.00 par 1000. 



Per 103 1000 

MME. CHATENAY $6.00 850.00 

SUNRISE 5.00 40.00 

KAISERIN 4.C0 35.00 

LIBERTY 6.00 50.00 



Per 100 

MAID $3.t0 

BRIDE 3.00 

PERlE 3.00 

GOlDEN GATE 3.00 

IVORY 3.00 



1000 
$25.00 
25.00 
35.00 
35.00 
25.00 



ROSE CUTTINGS-Well Rooted. 



IVORY. 
MAID . 
BRIDE. 



Per 100 lOOO 

....$1.50 $13.50 

.... l.EO 12.50 

.... 1.50 13.&0 



Per 100 1000 

GOLDEN GATE $151 $13.50 

PERLE 1.50 13 50 

SUNRISE 3.50 30.10 



CARNATIONS— Well rooted, healthy cuttings, of the following vailetles, now ready. 



PINK. Per 100 1000 

MRS. LAWSON $1.50 $12.50 

MRS. E. A NELSON 2.50 30 00 

GUARDIAN ANGEL 1.25 1000 

MRS. HIGINBOTHAM 3.00 15.00 

SYBIL 3.00 25.00 

Mckinley 3.00 25.00 

joosT 1.25 10.00 

VARIEGATED. 

MRS. BR4DT 2 00 15.00 

PROSPERITY 2.00 15 03 

All stock Bold under express condition that if not satisfactory 

PETER REINBERG. 



WHITE. Per 100 

MURPHY'S WHITE $3.00 

FLORA HILL 1-25 

WHITE CLOUD 125 

PERU 125 

QUEEN LOUISE 12> 

NORWAY 1-25 

MARION 1.35 

GOV. LOWNDES 3.00 

RED. 

ESTELLE 2.50 

MRS. INE 1-25 

CHICAGO (Red Bradt) 2.00 

HARLO WARDEN 3.00 

t is to be returned immediately wlien money will be refunded. 



1000 
35.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.' 
10.00 
10.01 
10.00 
35.00 

20.00 
10.00 
15.00 
35.00 



51 

WABASH AVE., 



CHICAGO. 



Healthy Carnations. 

W«n Rooted. Enchantress, all sold till March 
15th, $6.00 per 100; $50.00 per 1000. Strong, 2-inch 

Eots now ready, 88.00 per 100. Now ready, Queen 
lOnise, Flora Hill, Lorna, White Cloud, Peru. 
Innocence, Lawson, Floriana, Prosperity, Doro- 
thy, Marquis, Pres. Roosevelt, Manley. $3.00 per 
100; $17.50 per 1000. 

W. W. COLES, Kokomo, Ind. 



strong, will rootad Carnation Cuttings. 
|1|L!1..> Dujxll White Sport of Mrs. 
WllltB Diaail Geo. M. Bradt. 

$1 50 per 25; $5.00 per 100; $22.(0 per 500. 
Cash with order or C. O. D. 

REDWINQ, 

MINN. 



JOHN E. STEN, 



Rooted Cuttings 

CHOICE WELL BOOTED STOCK. 

American Baauly, $3.50 per 100; *3P.C0 per lOOO. 
Brldo, Bridetniaiil, Goldan Gata, Ivory, $150 per 
lUU; $l2.5u per luUO. 

L. L. MAY & CO., "mi^' 



30 



The American Florist. 



Jan. JO, 



New Bedford, Mass. 

"Now comes the winter of our discon- 
tent." This is a winter that will show 
what your boiler is good for, and how 
much more heating pipe to put in next 
summer. A good many people know to 
their sorrow much more about heating 
greenhouses than they did. Probably 
half the greenhouses about here got 
nipped a little, or more than a little, by 
Jack Frost. The extreme cold weather 
all through January with the streets all 
the time a glare of ice had a very bad 
effect on the flower business. People 
would not come out in such weather. 
All the retail stores are feeling it keenly. 
But probably the bluest lot of people are 
the small growers who sell mostly at 
wholesale. The retail stores have here- 
tofore bought their flowers here but this 
winter they have been buying out of 
town, so the poor growers are left out 
in the cold, not only by Jack Frost, but 
by the florists. One thing the retail 
stores have had to be thankful for in the 
past is that department stores and 
flower peddlers have not been trouble- 
some, but now a change may come. 

The annual election of the New Bedford 
Horticultural Society was held in the Y. 
M. C. A. building January 12 with the 
following result: 

President— William Keith. 

Vice-president — Peter .Murray. 

Clerli — Joseph C. Forbes. 

Assistant clerk — George W. Woods. 

Treasurer — William F. Turner. 

Executive Committee— Dennis She.a. Peter Mur- 
ray, James Garthley, August H. Jahn and A. J. 
Fish. 

After the meeting a supper was held at 
Wickham's cafe. Purchase and High 
streets, thirty-one plates being laid. 
President Keith acted as toastmaster 
and Thomas Gray of Boston was the 
guest of the evening. The Horticultural 
Society is now just a year old. The 
treasury is in good condition, and the 
membership roll contains sixty-five 
names. 

On January 14 the Florists' Club was 
invited by one of its members, Mr. 
Hoxie, of Mattapoisett, to hold its 
regular meeting at his house and not to 
eat any supper betore coming. So the 
club to the number of fifteen took the 
car six miles to Mattopoisett and were 
royally entertained by Mr. and Mrs. 
Hoxie. They had a discussion on boilers 
and heating greenhouses and then took 
the last car for home. 

H. N. V. Soule, who started a store at 
the north end, could not make it pay and 
has opened another one nearer the center 
of the city. 

It is rumored the Richard Nofftz will 
open a store about March 1. 

A. B. H. 



scooted Cvi1;tln8:»~^Ro*^s 

I'cr 100 lOtO 

American Beauty }:) 00 130.00 

Bride, Maid, Ivory, Gate 1.50 12 00 

Perle, Kaiserin, Meteor, Canadian Q'n 2.50 22.50 
Write your order lor 2i4 or 3-inch stock later 
delivery. We guarantee this strongly rooted 
healthy stock and extra good value. Twenty 
leading varieties of stock 'Mums and R. C. at 
lowest rates. Boiton Ferns, S4.00 to t35.00 per 100. 
In excellent condition. 

W. H. CULLETT & SONS, Lincoln, III. 
Please mention the A mertcan Florist when writing 

in r<-'d, yellow and mixed varieties, both rooted 
cuttings and 2 inch stock. CARNATIONS—Fisher, 
.loost, for summer bloomins; in both rooted cut- 
tings and 2 inch. Crane, Wolcott, Norway, Queen 
Louise, Lawson and Guardian Angel. 



^i|=OEO.A.KinL, PekinJII. F?^es 

Please tnention the American Florist tvhen writing. 



500,000 



Unrooted Carnation Cuttings 

NOW READY. SHORT JOINTED, HEALTHY 



White. Per 1000 

Queen Louise $ 6.00 

Alba 12.60 

Los Angeles 12.60 

Norway 6.00 

White Cloud 6.00 

Lorna 6.00 

PiDk. 

La\vson 8.00 

Argyle 4.0O 

Mrs. Joost 6.00 

Mermaid 6.00 

Wm. Scott 6.00 

Triumph 6.00 

Dorothy 6.00 



Scarlet. Per 1000 

America $ 5.00 

Apollo 12.60 

Crimson. 

Harlowarden 20.00 

Gen. Gomez 5.00 

Variegated. 

Violiania f4-inch bloom best var.).. 60.00 

Marshall Field 20.00 

Stella 18.60 

Armazindy 6.00 

Viola Allen 12.60 

Mrs. Bradt 7.0O 

Yellow. 

Golden Beauty 8.00 

Eldorado 5 00 

Gold Nugget 7.00 



TERMS:— Cash or C. 0. D. with privilege of examination. 500 at 1000 rates. 

CALIFORNIA CARNATION COMPANY, 



CARNATIONS ^. 

Clean, Healthy, Well Rooted Stock. 

Per 100 1000 Per 100 1000 

Flora Hill.. $1.60 $12.60 Crane $2 00 $16 00 

Prosperity.. 2.60 20 00 America.... 2.00 15.00 

Lawson... 2.50 20.00 G. Beauty.. 5.00 40 00 

Marquis 1.75 16.00 Gaiety 3.00 25.00 

Melba 1.50 12.50 Gov. Roose- 

Dorothy... 3.00 26.00 velt 3.00 25.00 

McKinley... 5 00 45.00 Harlowarden6.00 60.00 

E.Crocker.. 1.50 12.50 Joost 1.75 15.00 

Q. Lord 1.75 15.00 Chicago.. .. 2.00 15.00 

Mrs.Nelson 3.50 30.00 

V/e also have a few of 1903 varieties 
not listed. Write for information. 

The MISMl FLORAL CO., 

r>^yto*a, Olr^lo. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 

ROOTED 

CARNATION CUTTINGS. 

I'er 100 lOfO 

G. H. Crane $2.50 S20.00 

Mrs. Lawson 2.0U 17.50 

Mrs..7oost 150 12.60 

Ethel Crocker 1.50 12.50 

Wm. Scott 1.50 12.50 

PloraHill 1.60 1250 

Queen Louise 1.5i) 12.80 

Norway 1,60 13.50 

Cash or C. 0. D. 

ST. LOUIS CARNATION CO., Clayton, Mo. 

Please mention the American Flotist when writing. 

HEALTHY CARNATIONS. 

Slock Guaranteed. Come and See Before Buying. 

I'l-r 100 1000 

White Cloud $1.60 .fl2..il 

Queen Louise 1.75 I.S.CO 

Bradt, variegated 3.00 2i.00 

Prosperity, variegated. 2.50 20.01 

Lawson, pink 3.00 2.5.00 

Cuttines guaranteed. Healthy and clean and 
sold C. O. D. or Cash with order." 

A. LAUB &. SON, 

Hughsonville, Dutchess Co., N. Y. 

^4:..CARNATI0NS 

The Leading Novelties of 1904. 

The Best Varieties of 1903. 

All the Standard Sorts. 
Order your Rooted Cuttings NOW. 

GEO. HANCOCK & SON. 

GRAND HAVEN, MICH. 



-ROOTED- 



CARNATION CITTINGS. 

RED Per 100 1000 

Crane $J..50 $20.00 

America 2.50 20.00 

Potter Palmer 2.50 20.00 

PINK 

Lawson 1,50 12.50 

Dorothy 1,50 12,50 

Nelson 2.S)0 20.00 

Guardian Angel 1.50 12 50 

Triumph 1,50 12.50 

Joost 1.25 10.00 

Crocker 1.25 10.00 

WHITE 

Flora Hill 1.25 10.00 

WhiteCloud 1.25 10.00 

Queen Louise 1.50 12.50 

Norway 1,60 12.i)0 

LIGHT PINK. 

Enchantress 5.60 50.00 

Higinbotham 2.F0 20.00 

Morning Glory 3.50 20.00 

VARIEGATED. 

Prosperity 150 20.00 

ROSE CUTTINGS. 

Bridesmaid 1..60 12.50 

Bride 1.50 12.50 

Ivory 1.60 12.50 

Golden Gate 1.50 12.50 

Perle 1.50 12.50 

Geo. Reinberg, 

51 Wabash Ave.. CHICAGO, ILL. 

f^ease mention the American Florist when writing. 

SPECIAL OFFER 

Carnation Cuttings. 

READY FOR SHIPMENT. 

Having a surplus of the varieties in heavy print 
will make sppcial price lor 15 days. Our stock is 
perfection and free from disense.' 



Pink. Per 100 1000 
Enchantress . , $5 60 $60.00 



Nelson i.eO 

LavHon 1.50 

Joost 1.25 

Marquis I 25 

Eniiuirer 2.50 

Dorothy 1.60 

White. 

Gov. Wolcott.. 3.50 

Boston Market 3.60 

Innocence 1.60 



18.00 
12 50 
10.00 
10.00 



30.00 
30.00 



PptlinitIC Double fringed. Ten novelties 
■ tflUillOOf trom Dreer's latest sets. Labeled. 



White. Per 100 

Glacier 1.50 

Mhite Cloud. 1 25 
Flora Hill... 125 

Scarlet. 

Crane I -.50 

Apollo 3.60 

Estelle 2.00 

Crimson. 
Harry Fenn 3.60 

Variegated. 
Prosperity... 1 50 
Ten 



1000 
14.00 
10.00 
1000 

14.00 
30 00 
14.00 

30.00 



Strong R. C, $1.25 per 100. 



■CASH. 



The W. T. BUCKLEY PLANT CO., 

SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 

Please mention the A mertcan Florist when writing. 



1904. 



The American Florist. 



31 



ROSE PLANTS 



STRONG STOCK from 2 1-2 inch pots. 



UNCLE JOHN. 



Per 100 Per UOl 

J20.I0 $150.00 

Mme. CbaUmav 6.00 50.CO 

Sunrise ' 5.00 -10.00 



Per ICO Per lOfO 

Liberty $4.00 135.03 

Maid 3.00 25 00 

Bride 3.00 25.00 



Per 100 

Golden Gate J3 00 

Ivory 3 01 

American Beauty 6.00 



Per ICOO 
SJS.OO 
26.00 
50.00 



UI^CI^b; JOHKJ ia the best Pink introduction in recent years. It's a money-maker. 



ROSE CUTTINGS-Well Rooted. 



Per 100 Per 1000 

Bride !fl.50 »I2.S0 

Bridesmaid 1.50 13.5J 



Per 100 Per 1003 

GoldenGate $1.50 12.50 

Ivory 1.50 !fl2.50 



Per 100 Per 1000 

Sunrise ai}.5il 930.00 

American Beauty 3.00 * 25.00 



CARNATIONS. 

Well rooted, healthy cuttings, of the following varieties, now ready. 



WHITE 

Per ICO Per lOCO 

Reliance $10.00 $80.00 

Lady Bountiful 12.00 100.00 

Moonlight lO.CO 7.5.00 

Her Majesty 5.00 <5.00 

Gov. Wolcott 4.(;0 30.00 

Boston Market 300 25.00 

Norway 3.00 15.(J0 

TheBell 13.00 100.00 



SCARLET 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Crusader $10.00 $80.00 

Flamingo 12.00 lOn.OJ 

Estelle 3.00 35.00 

Mrs. Potter Palmer 3.0O 2r.00 

America 2.00 15.00 

VARIEGATED 

Prosperity 3.50 SO.fO 

Mrs. Bradt 3.00 20.03 



VARIEGATED 

Per 100 

Marshall Field $6.00 

PINK 

Indianapolis 12.00 

Enchantress 6.00 

President MoKinley 6.C0 

Mrs. Lawson 3.50 

Mrs. Higinbotham 4.0 J 



Per 1000 
$50.00 



lO'.OO 
50.00 
.50.00 
20.(0 
30.00 



All stock sold under express condition that if not satisfactory it is to be returned immediately, when money will be refunded. 



BENTHEY & CO., 



8^ 

RANDOLPH ST., 



CHICAGO. 



Carnations 

ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

Orders booked now for next season's delivery of 
all the leading varieties. Send us a list of what 
you want and get prices that are right. 

Chas. Chadwick, l. Box it. Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Please tnention the A merican Florist when writing. 



Orders Booked Now ^^'' 

Rooted Cuttings and Phmts of Rose Queen 
of Edgely, (Pink American Beauty). Write for 
prices. 

EDWIN LONSDALE, 

Wyndmoar.ChHtnut Hill, PHIUDELPHU. 



CARNATIONS. 

50,000 ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

The protit;ible ones to grow for Cut -B^lowers. 
Our stock is exceptionally fine. List of varieties 
and prices on application. 

C. AKEHURST & SON, 

WHITE MARSH, MD. 

Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 

Carnation Cuttings 

We are now booking orders for rooted outtinga. 
liiit of varieties and prices sent on application. 

The Cottage Gardens. Queens, L. I. 

Please vieniion the American Florist when writing. 

Cyclamens 

C. WINTERICH, Defiance, Ohio. 

Please tnention the American Florist when writing. 



blooming and in bud; fine 
stock. 4-inch.$13.00: o-inch, 
820.00 and 5^.00 per 100. 



The Queen 



Best Commercial White 
CARNATION. 



Rooted Cuttings, XXX Stock 
$5.00 per 100; $45 per 1000. 

LAST YEAR'S 
BEST NOVELTIES. 



TOTTYS^PEERLESS CHRYSANTHEMUMS 

JOHN BARR, South Nafick, Mass. 



Send for Descriptive Circular 
and Price List. 



Please mention ike A merican Florist when writing. 



AMAZE. 



The New.... 
Scarlet Carnation 

A profuse Christmas bloomer, strong grower, 

heavy stem, flower intense scarlet and remarkable 

keeping qualities. Rooted Cuttings ready February 1. 

PRICE: SI 0.00 PER 100; $75.00 PER 

1000 CASH. 

ORDER FROM THE GREENHOUSES, 

JEROME SUYDAM, Flatbush, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

OR FROM THE AGENTS, 

SLINN& HUGHES, CooganBldg., New YorkClty. 

Rooted Carnation Cuttings 

Per 100 

Enchantress 85.00 

Queen 4.00 

Fair Maid 3.50 

La ivson 2.50 

H. F. LITTLEFIELD, "'Kifg" 

ROOTED CARNATION CUTTINGS. 

From strong, healthy plants. 100 1000 

Enchantress S6.C0 $50.00 

The Queen 6.00 50.00 

FairMaid 4.00 30.00 

Gov. Wolcott 4.00 31.00 

Boston Market 4.00 3'.00 

Mrs. T. W. Lawson 3.00 3100 

HENRY A. STEVENS CO., Dedham, Mass. 

Carnation Rooted Cuttings. 

ardsorts. Send for price list. 

Box 226. KENNEH SQUARE. PA. 



All the new 
and stand- 



NEW CARNATIONS. 

All of the leading new varieties of 1904 at 
introducers' prices. The best of last years* varie- 
ties, and other standard kinds now ready. 

NEW CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

Novelties of 1904, and other desirable kinds. 
Write for preliminary price list, ready Jan. 10th. 

H. WEBER & SONS, 

OAKLAND, MD. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 

CARNATIONS... 

Rooted Cuttings. Good ones and lots of them. 

Order Now. per loo 1000 

Mrs. T. W. Lawson $3.00 S20.00 

Boston Market 3.00 30.00 

FloraHill 1.50 15.00 

(■DraililiniC ^ ^Qd 3i4-inch. Sne plants, S. A. 
UCIOIIIUIIIS. Nutt and La Favorite, $3.00 per 

100; 135.00 per lOOO. 
Rnctnn PornC *^"* '^^ 3-inch pots, ready 
UUSIUII I CI 119. for 4-inoh, $8.00 per 100. All 

above first-class stock. 



S. T. DANLEY, "Y^Sr^ 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 

Best standard whits 

for summer flowering. 
Strong rooted cuttings, 
$1.35 per lOO; $10.00 per 1000. 



IVIrs. fisher 



A. CHNSTENSEN, Stmshim, Ms» 



32 



The American Florist. 



Jan. 30, 



St. Paul. 

The present cold weather is the 
most severe on record, the ther- 
inometer not rising above 20° below 
ia forty-eight hours and dropping as low 
as 35° below. One grower reported 43° 
below. We have heard of no damage, 
but it will be a close shave if everybody 
pulls through all right. Stock seems 
plentiful, especially bulbous stuff. As 
soon as the weather moderates it will 
move well. 

Axel Hallstrom, formerly in charge of 
James J. Hill's private place, has been 
succeeded by H. C. Coates, formerly with 
Mendenhall's in Minneapolis, At a recent 
visit to Mr. Hill's greenhouses some good 
orchids were seen, plants of Dendrobium 
Wardianum in fine bloom. 

William Spetb, with Holm & Olson, 
and his wife had a close call from coal 
gas asphyxiation Sunday night. By 
prompt medical aid they were brought 
around all right. 

Dr. R. Schiffman, who has the largest 
collection of orchids in the west, left last 
Saturday for his annual trip to the 
Philippines. He will be gone four or five 
months. 

R. C. Suger had the smokestack of his 
plant blown down in a heavy wind 
storm recently. O. 



Minneapolis, Minn. 

The Florists' Club will give a social 
dance February 4. Tickets and invita- 
tions are out to the number of 300. The 
event will take place at the fourth ward 
wigwam. Western avenue and Ninth 
street. Will Desmond, Otto Will and 
John Monson, of the executive commit- 
tee, have the afi'air in charge. 

There has been a heavy funeral trade. 
Social functions were few. White stock 
was in demand and scarce, excepting 
bulbous flowers. The carnation and 
rose cut is very small, owing to off crop 
followed by extreme cold weather. 

John Vasatkaof Chicago avenue called 
on the writer Saturday. John is always 
in the best of spirits and is a good enter- 
tainer. Hehas been agreatexperimenter 
with medicines and has a remedy for 
each ill. 

The nursery edition of the Minneapolis 
Journal issued under the management of 
H. L. Patthey, January 18, met with 
decided success. 

Oscar Swanson has had a week of 
heavy funeral orders. C. F. R. 



DoBBS Ferry, N. Y.— The regular meet- 
ing of the Dobbs Ferry Horticultural 
Association was held in Odd Fellows 
hall, January 16. President Henderson 
was in the chair. Two new members 
were elected. An essay was read by Mr. 
Henderson for which he received a vote 
of thanks. J. B. 

CARNATION CITTINGS... 

FROM SOIL. 

The Queen, extra selected, $5.00 per 100; $40.00 
per 1000. Cash please. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
Special prices on large lots. 

H. A. JAHN. '*^'^^m°'"'' 

CARNATIONS. 

B^ine. strong, well-rooted cuttings uow ready. 

ENCHANTRESS. *6.no per 100; SSO (O per lOtO. 

ULUIN PONO. *.=i.0o per lUO; $4''.00 per lOOP. 

PROSPERITr, «3.00 per 100; *2.«i.0O per 1000. 

UW80N. Is.OU per 100: S2.<S.G0 per 1000. 

THE QUEEN, Jan. delivery, *5 per 100; S40 per 1000. 

LARCHMONT NURSERIES, Urchmont, N. Y. 



Seasonable Plants for forcing 




HARDY AZALEA MOtLIS FOR £ARLY FORCING. 

These brilliant colored hardy varieties are 
becoming more popular every season for 
early forcing. We offer a nice lot of well- 
budded plants, 15 inches high, $4 50 per 
dozen; $35.00 per 100. 

RHOOODFNDROVS, Early-Flowering Varieties for 
Easter Forcing. If vou have never used 
these give them a trial, you will find them 
useful not only for decorating, but your 
retail customers will buy them freely and 
at profitable prices. We offer a fine lot of 
busby planis, weW set with buds 

18 to 24 in. high, $1.00 each; $11.00 per doz.; 
$90.00 per 100. 

24 to 30 in. high. $1.50 each; $15.00 per 
doz.; $115.00 per 100. 

DEUTZU LEMOINEI and GRACILIS ROStA. Very 
strong, two years old, field-grown plants, 
suitable for 6 and 7-inch pots, $1.00 per 
dozen; $8.00 per 100. 

LILACS FOR FORCING. Charles X, red and 
Marie Legraye, white, in strong pot-grown 
plants, well set with buds, $6.00 per dozen; 
M5.00 per 100. 

HENRY A. DREER, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



.jluik-ii.Jk.ik.<i..<ltji.4Kiit.n.J>.tk.iLiik.ii 4i.Jt.».ii.,ji.ii.4K.ii n.ii>ji.n.iit.<t.ti..ii ii.dK.it ti,<ih.ii.a.Jk.iL<i.jtji.<uji i).ii(.jt.<iwiijt,tl,,^ 



NEW ROSE FOR 1904. 



General MacArthur 

The most brilliant in color and the coming red rose for the 
general florist. For prices see issue of January 1 6. Ready 
for distribution, April l, 1904, by 

The STORRS & HARRISON CO., JOHN N. MAY, 



PAINESVILLE, O. 



SUMMIT, N. J. 



AMERICAN BEAUTY ^S?TrN''cs 

This stock is from good, clean, healthy wood, will be free from spot and thor- 
oughly rooted when sent out. Money refunded if not perfectly satisfactory upon 
return of stock. $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 

Wholesale Grower of Gut Flowers, 

37-39 Randolph Street, 



J. A. BIIDIONG, 



Please mention the American Plot ist when writing. 



SEND TO- 



Eastern Nurseries, 

FOR VINCA MINOR 



JAMAICA PLAIN, 
MASS. 



FINE LARGE CLUMPS. 



FOR SALE CHEAP. 



Need a Good Scarlet? 

Take my word for it and order Flominnn 
There ia nothinj; bettor, nor' lamiliyu. 
more profitable in sight. I can also supply 
the following varieties: Albatross, Lady 
Bountiful, The liell. Moonlight, Nelson 
Fisher, Mrs. Patten and Indianapolis, $12 00 
per 100; SIOO.OO per 1000. 

ThP flllPPn ^^ excellent commercial 
■ III/ yuccil white of last year's intro- 
duction, $5.00 per lOj; MO.OO pefUOO. 

S. S. SKIDELSKY, 

708 North 16lh St., PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

Please jnention the American Florist when writing. 



CARNATION CUTTINGS. 

I'er 100 1000 

Fnchanlres* 16.00 l.'iO.OO 

40.00 
45.00 
srp.oo 
20.110 
20.00 
2100 
25.00 
40.00 
20 00 
15 00 
25.00 



Queen 5.0iJ 

Lillian Pond 5.oo 

Prosperity 2.50 

Lawson 2.50 

Cressbrook 2.50 

Challenger 250 

Fair Maid 3 00 

Harry Fenn 5.00 

Gen. Maceo 2.50 

Queen Louise 2.00 

Bradt 3 00 

C. WARBURTON, Fall River, Mass. 

Mease nuntton the American Florist when writing. 



1^04. 



The American Florist. 



33 



Chatanooga, Tenn. 

Work has been completed on the large 
new flower garden and greenhouses 
which have been built by Karsten 
Brothers at Blowing Springs, Ga., a 
short distance beyond St. Elmo and 
about seven miles from the city. The 
new garden has been built at an expense 
of $10,000 and is one of the largest in 
the south. A tract of land of six acres is 
required for the greenhouses and the 
buildings are supplied with the latest 
appliances. Seven large greenhouses have 
been erected and many other smaller 
buildings constructed. Frank Phillips, 
recently of Nashville, has arrived to take 
charge of the new garden. All the stock 
sold by the firm will be grown hereafter 
at the new garden and the greenhouses 
in the city will be converted into display 
and salesrooms. John and Charles 
Karsten have built up their business to 
such an extent that the old quarters were 
entirely too small to meet the demands 
and the new greenhouses were a necessity. 
It is the intention of the firm to make 
extensive improvements on their city 
greenhouses. 



Lenox, Mass. 



The regular meeting of the Lenox 
Horticultural Society was held in the 
society's rooms, January 16. W. A. 
Manda, of South Orange,' N. J., delivered 
a very interesting essay on "Evergreens 
lor Winter Landscape Effect." Mr. 
Manda had about 200 samples of coni- 
fers and evergreen shrubs for illustrating 
his essay which fully covered the essen- 
tial points of the subject. A hearty vote 
of thanks was given the essayist. 

There were several vases of cut flowers 
on exhibition. A cultural commendation 
was awarded to Elm Court farm, for 
some fine spikes of Vanda coerulea. 
Among other exhibits were two fine vases 
of Cypripedium villosum, from E. J. Nor- 
man, Erskin Park. 

G. P. 



CYCLAMEN PLANTS. 

Cyclamen Persicum Splendens Gieanteum, 
finest strain In the world in four colors, from 4-in. 
pots tK.W per 100. PRIMULA CHINLNSIS riMBRlUA, 

(fringed Primroses). Wo finer strain, all colors, 
3-in. pots, 85 00 per 100. 

PAUL MADER, E. Streadsburg, Pa, 

Chrysanthemums... 

American Novelties. Also a complete line of 
Auslraliani English and Trench varieties, both 
new and standard sorts. For prices and descrip- 
tions address 

NA1HAN SMITH & SOW, ^iSlfdr- 

SPECIALTIES 



in Best 
Varieties 



ROSES, from 3-inch pots, 
CARNATIONS, for all delivery, 
CHRYSANTHEMUMS, 
SMILAX, VIOLETS. 

Prices Low, Send for List. 

WOOD BROTHERS. Fishkill. N.Y. 

Geo. Wittbold Co., 

1667 Buoklngham PI., CHICAGO, ILL. 

Send for Price List on all 

Palms and Ferns 



VERBENAS 



>A^e are the largeax growers of Verbenas in the 
country, and those who buy of us are sure to get 
plants and rootert cuttings perfectly healthy and 
free from rust. OO 'V^xrl^lrles* 



Rooted Cuttings, 60c per 100; $5.00 per 1000; $45.00 per 10,000. 
Plants, $2.50 per 100; $20.00 per 1000. 



White. Per 100 

The Queen $5.00 

Queen Louise 1-50 

Lorna 8.60 

Good Enough 2.00 

White Cloud 1.60 

Flora Hill 1.60 

Red. 

Adonis 6.00 

Mrs. Potter Palmer 8.00 

J. H. Manley 4.00 

Oriole 2.60 

G. H. Crane 2.00 

Jubilee 1.60 

Portia 1.25 



CARNATIONS. 

Pink. Per 100 

Enchantress $6.00 

Success 4.00 

Mrs. Higinbotham 5.00 

Cressbrook 3.00 

Mrs. E. A. Nelson 3.00 

Mrs, Thos. Lawson 3.00 

Dorothy 2.00 

Sunbeam 2.50 

Morning Glory 1.50 

Mrs. Joost 1.26 

Daybreak 1.26 

Wm. Scott 1.26 

Crocker 1.25 

Mermaid 2.00 

Floriana .• 1,60 

GRAFTED ROSES. 



Crimson. Per 100 

Harry Fenn $5.00 

Gov. Roosevelt 2,50 

Gen. Maceo 1.50 

Variegated. 

Prosperity 2. 50 

Mrs. Q. M. Bradt 3.00 

Yellow. 

Dorothy Whitney 6.00 

Buttercup 3 00 

Gold Nugget 2.00 

Eldorado 1.25 



Our grafted roses are fine, bushy plants and erown in 3 and 3'/2-inch pots. Orders booked now for 
delivery in May, June and July. Brid>-smaid, Bride, Golden Gate, Kaiserin, price $15.00 per ICO. 
Ivory, Liberty, price $1H,00 per 100. Send for Catalogue. 

J. L. DILLON, Bloomsburg, Pa. 

Please mention the American Florist luhen zvriting. 



'MUM STOCK PLANTS. 

Strong plants, carefully packed, of the follow- 
ing varieties at $4.(10 per 100; 60c per dozen: Bon- 
naflfon, Robinson, Modesto, Murdoch, Childs, 
Glory of the Pacific, Ivory, pink and white, 
Montmort and Wanamaker. Stavla. stock plants 
from bench or pots, 85.00 per UO; 75c per dozen. 

We are headquarters for Carnation, 'Mum and 

Stovia cuttings in season. 

lAhn RpArl Wholesa'e Florist, 
JUIIII Dl UUy NILES CENTER JLL. 

GERANIUMS. 

Well-rooted cuttings of Jean Viaud, Mrae. 
Bruant, Riocard, Nutt, Perkins and LaFavorite. 
The six best bedders, $1.10 per UO; $10 00 per 1000. 
Unrooted cuttings of same' 75c per 100; $6.50 per 
lOdO. Will prepay express on above in the United 
States for 15c per 100; $1.25 per 1000. Burbanks 
New Shasta Daisies, strong seedlings, 60c per 50; 
$1.00 per ICO. Will bloom early in summer 
Blant Panslet, choice strain, stocky plants, 40c per 
100; $3.00 per 1000. Cash with order. Express 
prepaid on Daisies and Pansies. 

Des Moines Plant Co., 



5 I 3ii38th SIreat, 



DES MOINES, IOWA, 



GERANIUMS K. 

Per 103 ICOO 

Buchner $1.50 $10,00 

Jean Viaud 2,U0 12.50 

M. deCastellane 3,00 15.00 

Send for list of other varieties, 

ALBERT M. HERR, Lancaster, Pa. 



DAHLIAS. 



POT 
ROOTS. 



Tan Gold Midili Awarded 1903. Pot-roots for 
shipment at once. Every section including the 
popular Cactus Pahlias at 84.00 per 100 m 25 
sorts. Better and newer Icinds at 15.00 and ,16.00 
per 100. Terms; Cash with order. 

HOBBIES LIMITED. Dereham, Eng. 

Norfolk Nurseries. 

ALlj JN urserymen, Seedsmen and PHorists wishing 
to do business with Europe should send for the 

"Horticultural Advertiser." 

This is the British Trade Paper, being read weekly 
by all the Horticultural traders; It is also taken 
by over 1000 of the best continental houses. 
Annual subscription to cover cost of postage 75c. 
Money orders payable at Lowdbam, Notts. 

Address KDITORS OP THE "H. A." 
Chilwell NurieriM, LOWDHAM, NotU. England. 

!t is good business policy 

to mention the ^ ^ ^ 

American Florist 

When you write to an adv^rtis^r. 



Boston Ferns 



TO MAKF DOniM »'e offer large, strong, 
lU ITIf^ni. HUUin perfect planU at a sacri- 
fice price. 

From bench, large 5-inch stock *15,C0perlC0 

From bench, large 6-inch slock 25,00 per 100 

From 0-inch pots 20,00 per 100 

From 6-inohpots 30,00 per 100 

From 7-inch pots 50.00 per 100 

CurrieBros.Co. 

Milwaukee, Wis. 

Please tnention the American Florist when writing. 

Julius Roehrs 

RUTHERFORD, N. J. 

Grower of 

Palms, Bay Trees, 
Box Trees 

AND— 

Decorative Stock. 

Please mention the American ^'orist when writing. 

~ROBT. CRAIG & SON, 

Roses, Palms 

and Novelties in Decorative Plants, 

Market and 49th Sts., PhUadelphla, I 

Please menlion the A mert'can Florist when writing. 

We Must Have Room 

and offer a lot of ten thousand COOCO) Geraniums 
in 3^4 and 3-inch pots at a special discount from 
regular prices. Have them in all the popular 
shades or Red, White, Pink and Salmon Get your 
order in early, as these are a bargain. Write ' 

CEO. A. KUHL, Peltin, III. 

1,100 Extra Strong Boston Fern 

Runners from Bench, at $1.50 per 100, ii taken 
at once. Cash please. 

L. A, RIKE a, SON, LaRoy, III. 



u 



The American Florist. 



Jan, 30 



r^ldntS* Cuttings. 

BOSTON FERNS, from bench, strong, for 4 and 

5-inch, luc. 
PRIMULA OBCONICA GRANDIFLORA, Alba. Rosea, 

$1.50 per ICOi 300 for JM.OO. 
AGERATUM, Gurnev, Pauline: GIANT MARGUERITE 

DAISY, White; SALVIA, SplenJens, Silver Spot, 

2- inch. 2c. 
Rooted Cuttings Prepaid. SALVIA, Silver Spot, 

Splendens. STEVIA, variegated. 90c per lOU. 

AGERATUM, S. Gurnev, P. Pauline. ALTER- 

NANTHERA, red, yellow, 50o per lOi). HAROr 

PINKS, 5 best kinds, 75o per IOC. VERBENAS. 

10 kinds, 6O0 per 100. FUCHSIAS, r, kinds. $1.35 

IjerlOO. DAISY, HELIOlROPE, blue, ifl.tO per 

100. Cash. 

BYER BROS., c-'-^p'/'""!! 

Asparagus and Ferns 

We have a fine stock of the above which we 
will offer until the stock is reduced at the follow- 
ing prices: 

Per 100 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 2-inch $2.00 

3-inch 3. SO 

Asparagus Plumosus, from flats 2 26 

" " 2-inch 3.00 

" 3-inch 6.00 

Kentia Bel., 2H-in. pot, 8-IO in., 2-3 leaves . 12.00 

" 2yi-in. pot, 16-18 in., 3-4 leaves .15.00 

" 3 -in. pot, 16-18 in., 4-6 leaves 18.00 

" 3 -in. pot, 18-24 in., 6-6 leaves 20.00 

Latania Bor., 2-in. pot, seed leaves.. 5.00 

■' 3-in. pot, 15-18 in., 2-3 chr. Ivs. 12.00 

6-in. pot, 18-20 in., 3-4 chr. Ivs. 20.00 

6-in. pot, 20-24 in., 4 chr. Ivs. 30.00 

Sherman Nursery Co., ''''^\^^^''' 

Asparagus... 

Per 100 

Plumosus Nanus, 2-inclj pots ltS.50 

SprcngsrL 3-iach pots 1.50 

BtranJums, 10 varieties 3.00 

Pansy Plants, per 1000 $3.50 .50 

Cash Please. 

JOS. H. CUNNINGHAM, Delaware, Ohio. 

GOOD FERNS. 

BOSTON FERNS, short and bushv,e:ich ,50c; 
per dozen, «6.00: per 100, $45.00. 

PIERSON FERNS, Dnc bushy plants, $1.00 
each; ^ inch, $1.35 each. 

JOH^ SCOTT, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Heap Street Greenhouses. 



GROWER or 



A fine lot of 2 and :Vinch Piarson Ferns, reudv 
for a shift. Also 5, 6. 7, 8 and 10-iuchat low prices. 

. BOSTON FERNS. 

In 2H, 3. 4, .'5. 6, 7, 8 and 10-incli. Fine stock. 

gg^ GEO. A. KIHL. Pekin. III. 

JOSEPH HEAC06K, 

WYNCOTE, PA. 

Areca Lufescens 
Kentia Belmoreana 
Kentia Forsteriana 

For our prices see page ,%1, Nov. 7th issue. 

PIERSON FERNS. 

an-inch at IfS.CO per 100. 
Young plants from the bench, $5.00 per 100. 
l.arye plants ready hjr 8 and 7-incn pots, 

.')0c each . 
RnCtnit FprnS aH-lm-.h at 93.50 per 
DUMUII I CI 115 100. Also line line of 
4 .">. ti :ind 7-inch. Write for fjuotations. 

DAVIS BROTHERS, Morrison, III. 

Anna Foster *«>> Boston Ferns 

Kul I plants, $-J5.0» to »r>0 00 i.ei- 100 1 n pots 2.5c 
to *fi.00 euch. Small |.lant3, 15 cC per 100. 

Asp. P. N., 4-iMch. UIOIXI: 8-inch pans, J60.no 
per i,.0. asp. Sprsngarl, 4-inch, *6.00 per 100. 
Draoana Indlvlsa, :!-iucli. strung, $tt.00 per 100. 
Kantias, FIcus. 

Ls Hs Foster^ DORcneSfbR, MASS. 



THE PIERSON FERN 

(NEPHROLEPIS PIERSOM.) 

We desire to call particular attention to our large stock of specimen plants 
ready for immediate sale. Florists will find ttiis one of the quickest selling 
and most profitable plants that they can handle. These are grand, strong 
established pot-grown plants in the very best possible condition, not plants 
over-potted or lifted from the bench, and are exceedingly cheap at the prices 
oflFered. Stock is in grand shape, and will guarantee every shipment to give 
perfect satisfaction. 

Florists will find these plants readily salable at twice or three times their 
first cost, and by shifting them up and holding them a couple months their 
value can again be doubled. Retail florists with stores will find this gilt- 
edged stock for retailing. We guarantee they will find nothing that they can 
handle as readily salable and profitable as this grand fern. 

Extra fine plants in 6-inch pots,.$l.00 each. Fine specimens in 8-inch pots, 
very line, $2.00 each. Extra fine specimens in 1 0-inch pots, $3.00 each. 
Larger plants, $5.00 each. 

F. R. PIERSON CO., 



I 



Tarrytown-on-Hudson, NEW YORK. 



I 



Please me7ition the A mencan Florist when writing 



Asparagus Plumosus Nanus 

2 1-2-inch stock in fine shape at S3. 00 per hundred. 

HOLTOM k mWLV CO., Milwaukee, Wis. 
FOR THIRTY DAYS ONLY. 

BOSTON FERNS. Extra line bench plants, 5-inch at lOo; 6-inch at I5c to close out. Must have 
room. 3H-inch, ready tor 4-inch, *j.60; 3-inch, S8.00. CANNAS, F. Vaughan, J. C. Vaughan, 
F^Bandale,Chas. Henderson, A. Bouvier, Burbank, Souv.de AntoineCrozy, in variety $3.50 per 100; 
*30 0O per 1000. CARNATIONS, Queen Louise, white, B'loriana. pink, the two best money 
niakers we have, $1.35 per 100; *M).00 per 100. Lawson, $1.75 per 100; $15.00 per 1000. Cash please. 



A. J. BALDWIN, 



Newark, Ohio. 



Please vienho7i the American Florist when zuyitiu^. 



Albert Fuchs, 

F-AIv^MS, I^£^RPi:S, FTICIJ^®, 



Eslabllshod 1884. 



OHIOA.OO. 2045-59 Clarendon Ave. 



please mention iHe American i'tun^i wnen utitmg. 



ARAUCARM EXCELS*. From 30, 33-35 inches high. 
6 inch pots, perfect plants, 750, JI.OO to $1.25 
each. Extra larije specimens, 8-inch pots, 28 
to 35 inches high. 25 to 32 inches across, (show 
plants), onlj; $3.,50 to $3.00 each, (worth $10.00 
retail). Syinch pots, 40 to .50c each. 

FICUS ELASTICA. (Rubber Plants). 6-incli pots 
from 3J t.. 38 inches high, $3.00, $3.00. $4.00, $.5.00 
and $i;.OU per doz. 

DRACiENA BRUANTI. 6-inch pots. 30 to 35 inches 
hisih. (to make room for Easter ])lant8), cut 
dow n from ,50c to 35c. 

BEGONIA PRES. CARNOT. 6-inch pots, in bud and 
anu bloom, $3.5j ji^-r doz. Other mixed varie- 
ties 4-inch pots, $I.8J per doz. 

CYCLAMENS. In bud and bloom, $3.00 per doz. 

PRIMULA OBCONICA. 4-inch, inbloom. $1.80 per doz. 
Cash with order please. Plants are shipped at 

purchaser's risk. 

GODFREY ASCHMANN, 

Wholesale Grower and Importer ol Pot Plants, 
1012 Ontario St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Bell Telephone Tioga 3669 A. 



Always 



mention the American Flo- 
fist wh>n you order stock, i^ 



A FEW 600D THINGS 

YOU WANT. 

An extra fine lot ol PALMS and BOSTON FERNS 
grown especially lor Christmas sales, 

ARECA LUTESCENS. 3 plants to pot, 4, 5 anJ 
6-inch, $25, $40 and $100 per 100. 

KENTIA BELMOREANA and FORSTERIANA, 3,4,5 
and fi-ii.rh, $13, $35. $40, $100 per 100. 

BEX BEGONIA, 3 and 3-inch, $4 and $6 per 100. 

DRACAENA INOIVISA. 3-inch, $5 per 100; 4-in(jh, 
$10 per 100. 

ENGLISH IVY, 3 and 3-inch, $3 and $6 per 100. 

BOSTON FERNS, S-inch. $.10 per 100. From beds, 
for 2, 3 and 4-inch pots, $4, $8. $15 per 100 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS. 3 inch, $8.00 per 100. 
SPRENGERI, 3-inoh, $3.00 per 100. 

VINCA VARIEGAT*. 2-inch, $2.00 per 100. 

CARNATIONS, Queen Louise, 2-in., $2.00 per 100. 
Lawson, 2-inch, $2.50 per 100. 

GERANIUMS, 3-in. pot plants. Double and sin- 
gle Grant, lionnot, S. A. Nutt, Perkins, La- 
Favorite, John Doyle, Riccard, Mrs. E. G. Hill, 
$3.50 per 100. 

ROOTED CARNATION CUTTINGS. Queen Louise 
and Wolcott, $1.50: Lawson and Prosperity, $2.00: 
Crocker and Goodenough, $1.25 per 100. 

CASH OR C. O. O. 
CEO. IM. EMMANS, NEWTON, N. J. 



jgo4. 



The a mer i ca n Fl grist. 



35 



To-Bak-Ine Products. 

For Killing Green Fly. Red Spider. Thrips and Other Injurious Insects. 



-THEY WILL DO IT. 



W. W. RAWSON S CO. 12 Faneuil Square, Boston, Mats. 

HENRY F. MICHELL CO 1018 Market St., Philadalphia, Pa. 

H. E. WILSON Rochester, N. Y. 

WM. F. KASTING 481 Washington St., Buflalo, N. Y. 

JOHN H. DUNuOP S W. King SI , Toronto, Ont. 

WM. BRINKER 329 Prospect St , Cleveland, 0. 



IF YOU WANT TO KNOW HOW AND WHY, WRITE TO 

MICHIGAN CUT FLOWER EXCHANGE 26 Miami Ave.. Detroit, Mich. 

E. H. HUNT 76-78 Wabash Ave., Chicago, III. 

HOLTON S HUNKEL 457 Milwaukee St., Milwaukee, Wit. 

ST. LOUIS SEES CO 615 N. Fourth SI , St. Louis, Mo. 

BARTELDES 8 CO 1521 FKih St., Denver, Colo. 

E. W. McLELLAN t CO., 144 Union Square Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 



The abovd reliable fiims will hi glad to give you this in'ormation send you interesting bookUt entitled "Words o( 
Wisdom" and will show you how to save a large share of the stock that now goes to waste owing to attacks of insect pjsts. 

NICOTINE MANUFACTURING COMPANY, Detroit, MicI). 




Rescues 

The 

Blooms 



From 



'^ I BUGS. 



The Tobacco Warehousiug A Trading Comi»any, 
Louisville, Kentuckv. 



Fumi^atin^ Kind Tobacco 

D^..,J..»'<"-'-S *LL APHIS IN ONE NIGHT 
r OWQCr >° a house 100x2.-; ft., at a co.*t of 
10c. A 5 lb. trkl pkR. wiU cost 
notluDt; if you will pay the express chari^ca on 
it. Our booklet tells of it. Write Dept, C. for it. 
The H. A. STOOXHOFF COMl'ANY 
116, 117, 118 WestSt., N. Y.Citr 




A mulcli truck for use iu the uarrow walks of 
H greenhouse. Will turn a square corner and 
pass down a 30-inch walk. Holds about 2 bushels, 
is easy to handle and is very strong. Trice. $5.00 
netf. o. b. Joliet. 

JOLIET, ILL. 

Chessman's Adjustable Pot Hanger ^^^t^Sl,_ 

Fits any size, 85c per doz. The first ino florists 
ordering a doz., will receive 6 of our Greenhouse 
Hangers freu.. Order now. Send size of sash bar from 
di'ipgutterdown. H. C. Chessman, Richmond, Ind. 



Help tor Florists ! 



If you are troubled with 
Bugs and want to get 
more out of the busi- 
ness than they do and 
have not yet used 

Nicoticide 
Bug Killer 

, Just send us your name 
and address and that of 
your dealer and we will 
make you an attractive and interesting propo- 
sition. 

Tobacco Warehousing and Trading Company, 

1002-1004 Magnolia Avenue, 

Louisville, Kentucky. 




Please inention the American Florist when writing. 



[ESTABUSHED 1 
l!666 



EMILSTEFFEItS> 



5UCC.«> (ISTEfTEMS! 
"oSTEFTEnSBSOSi 




Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 



86 



The American Florist. 



Jan. JO. 



TIN FOIL 

Plain, Fancy, Printed & Mounted, 

Manabctnred by 

Tlie Conley Foil Go. 



S31 to S41 West SSth St., 

Plca!ie mention f he American Florist icUen writing. 

Vir,^. ADJUSTABLE VASE HOLDER. 

No. 1. — Brass, nickel, 4 feet long, 6 clasps to each 
rod. Price complete (with green or wnite tum- 
bleri) $2.35. Price complete (with green or white 
cornucopia vases) $3.50. No. 2.— Heavy 4 ft. rod, 
brassed and nickeled, with three clasps for 5 to 
6-inch pots, each $1.75. 

KIFT*S PATENT Rubber Capped FLOWER 
TUBES. IH-inch diameter, per 100, »3.50. 

JOSEPH KIFT & SON. 1725 Chestnut St., Phila.. Pa. 

A. HERRMANN, 

J- Cape Flowers, all colors, 
^ Cycas Leaves, Metal Designs, 
* and All Florists' Supplies. 

Send for Prices. 
404-412 East 34th St. NEW YORK, 

please mention //w .-J mei ican Flonst zthen 70 iting, 

SIGMUND GELLER 

Imparler and Manulaclurer of 

FLORISTS' SIPPLIES 

All new Fall Goods in now. Ask to see tbe 
latest, Embossed and Pleated Crepe Paper. 



108 W. 28th Street, 



NEW YORK. 



Please mention the American Florist when ivnting. 

RIBBONS... 

FOR YOUR TRADE AT 

SIMON RODH, 

40 W. 28th St., NEW YORK. 

ChKfens, an Wldllis and Colors. 

Please mention tlie A merican Flat 1st wlien writing, 

GREEN SiLKALiNE. 

Do not be put of) with cheap substitutes. 

John C. Meyer & Co., 

80 Kingston St, BOSTON, MASS. 

please mentiun the A merican Fhn ist ivhen writifig. 

Wired 
Toothpicks 

10,000, 11.50; 50,000, 16.25. Manuf&otured b; 

W. J. COWEE. BERLIN. N. Y. 

Sample Free. For sale by deaters> 

Please mention the American Plot iU 7vhen writing. 

Foley's.Floral Fotographs. 

Floral Album, size 12xl1 containing 24 

different funeral designs. By 

express $7.00 c. o. d. 

226-228^ BOWERY. NEW YORK. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 



Standard Flower Pots 

TheWHSLLDIN POTTERY COMPANY. 

^NflUADELPHIA. PA. JERSEY CITY, N. J. LONG fSLANO CITY. N. Vi 

Trtyellinfl RiDresontative, U. CliTLER RYERSON, 108 Third Ave.. Newark, N. i. 
Please mention tfie A nerican Florist zrhen viritmz 



r"LORIST Plain, Violet, Rose 



ri 



OIL 



MADE BY 



The John J. Grooke Co. 

155 Ave. D, NEW YORK. 149 Fulton St., CHICAGO. 



Kramer's Pot Hangers 

THE neatest, simplest, most 
convenient and only 
practical device for convert- 
ing ordinary flower pots into 
hanging baskets They fit 
all standard made pots from 
2 to 10 inches in diameter. 
The illustration shows how 
they are attached Just the 
thing for hanging up ferns, 
begonias, etc. You can make 
room and money by their use. 
Try them. For Sale by 

Vaughan's Seed Store. 

Chicago and New York. 
£. F. Winterson Co , 

Chicago. 
C. C. Pollworth Co., 

Milwaukee. Wis. 
Price with wire chain as 
shown in cut, $1.00 per dozen 
by express. Sample dozen by mail, $1.25. 

I. N. KRAMER & SON, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 

STANDARD FLOWER POTS \ 

Packed in small crates, easy to handle. 

Price per crate 
120 7-ln., in crate, $4.20 
60 8 " 3.00 

HAND HADE. 

48 9-in., in crate, $3,80 




1500 2-in 


Price per crate 
, in crate, $4.88 


1500 2H 
1500 2H 
1000 3 


5.35 
6.00 
5.00 


800 314 
5004 
320 5 
144 6 


5.80 
4.60 
4.51 
3.16 



48 10 
24 11 
24 12 
12 14 
6 16 



4.80 
3.60 
4.80 
4.80 
4.60 
Send for price 



Seed pans, same price as pots, 
list of Cylinders for Cut Flowers, Hanging Baskets 
Lawn Vases, etc. Ten per cent off for cash with 
order. Address 

HILFINGER BROS. POTTERY, Fort Edward. N. Y. 
Or August Rolker A Sons, New York Agents, 
31 Barclay Street, New York City. 

Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 

THOSE RED POTS 

"STANDARDS" 

FULL SIZE AND WIDE BOTTOMS. 
BULB PANS AND AZALEA PUTS. 

DETROIT FLOWER POT M'F'Y. 



HARRY BALSkEV. 
Rap. 



DETROIT, MICH.. 
40O Howard St. 




GEO. KELLER & SON, 

MANUTACTUBEBi OF 

FLOWER POTS. 

B.fore buying write for price*. 

361-363 Herndon Street, 
near Wnghtwood Ave.. 

CHICAGO. ILL 



(Sine abfoliilc 9Jot^tt)enbifjfcit 



$termit $1.00 fur ntein TOonttement 
es ift bie tpflic^t eineS ^titn prompt filr 
ben ,Slmertcan Slorift" gu bega^len, toeil 
biefer eine abfoiute Jtot^toenbieleit fflr 
jebett ffllutnettaui^ter ift 

Eorl Sloegnet, Wla&owtt. 






iMiIIBilii 



Please mention the American Florist when writing' 

FLOWER POTS 



STANDARD POTSsPcc^tT. 

List ana SAMPLES FREE. 

SWAHN'S POTTERY MF'G CO., 

PO. Boi7a MINNMPOLIS MINM. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 

Standard OriX^ 
Flower... ^ ^^ A v3 

If your greenhouses are within 600 
miles ofthe Capitol, write us, we 
can save you money 

W. H. ERNEST. 

23th and M Street.. WASHINGTON. 0. C. 

Red Standard Flower Pots 

Price list and samples on application. 

Paducah Pottery, 

J. A. B4UER, Proprietor. 

RED P OTS 

SAMPLE POT AND PRICE LIST 
ON APPLICATION. 

C, C. POllWOPTH CO., JII^"*'"''^ 



WRITE 



AF IfnUR IS21-23 N. LBAVITTt 
• r, Minili OHIOAOO. ILL.. 



ST.. 



rOB PBIdCR 01 



Standard Pots 

•ffiiob lor itrength and poroiltv oombLtM 
kl« the l>«it OB tb« mwssti 



igo4. 



The American Florist. 



37 



The Height of the Season i 



AND 



HERE COMES BAYERSDORFER & CO. 

With every supply and choice accessory that is called for 
in a florist's business. Try a sample case of our beautiful 
fancy Baskets for cut flowers and tin lined basket Jardi- 
nieres for ferns and other decorative plants, now so 
popular, ^25.00 will pay for a nice assortment of these, 
our selection based upon the demand from metropolitan 
centers. Pretty Vases, specially adapted for daffodils, 
violets, roses or carnations. Can be sold with the cut 
flowers. Sheaves, Doves, Immortelles, etc., etc. 

H. Bayersdorfer & Co. 



v.-. 



60-56 N. 4lh St„ PHILADELPHIA, PA, 



-J 






Flower Stands 

Made in 12 Sizes. 16 incites to 66 incli>s higii. 

Used by Progressive Florists 

in nrrani^ing elTective displays nt every function. 

Avoid expensive accidents to valuable plants falling from 
insecure supports by using The ANDERSON Flower Stand. Pur- 
chasers of one dozen or more can have name in raised letters on 
every stand without extra char^jp. Catalogues of sizes FREE for 
the asking. 

W.H.ANDERSON & SONS, (Inc.) 

21-31 St. Aubin Ave. ^ _ 

'Xv DETROIT. - - MICH. /_J- 



f-» »♦♦♦••♦♦♦♦♦♦■•♦♦♦ ♦*♦««««•*« 



r»* ♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦ »■•»♦♦♦♦■• »■»< 

* THE BEST THING OUT FOR FLORISTS. 

I The Patent Smilax and Asparagus Tyer 



The work done in half the time. You will not do without it after 
a trial. Will last a lifetime. No wires on the ground. No tying or 
knots required. Be sure to send $1.00 for sample 100 of each. Satis- 
faction guaranteed. Easy applied. 



LEO. WELLENREITER, 



Denvers, Illinois 



>♦••*•♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦••»•*••»«»«♦♦»♦ 



TtieHorticultural Trade Journal 

THE LARGEST, BRIGHTEST AND BEST 

Hortioultural Trade paper in the British IsleEi 
It contains MORE ADVERTISEMENTS, MORE 
ILLUSTRATIONS and MORE NEWS than anj 
of its contemporaries. Read by the whole of the 
British trade and all the best European houses 
every week. Annual s.ubsoription, 75 cents 
Specimen copy post free. Publisned weekly. 
Horllounural Trade Jouraal Co.. Padiham. Lane*.. Eon. 



KORAL LETTERS 

For Sale by all Wholesale Houses. 

Koral IVffg. Co., 

12 Hawley Place, Boston, Mass. 

Please mention {he Avie* iran Florist when writing. 



SUCCESSFUL SELLERS 

•re tlie iucccMfttl growert who advertise iaJtjtjtj/tjUjItjItjt 

^ ■ THE AMERICAN FLORIST. 



Attention, 
Florists! 

Here is an opportunity to buy 
material and supplies at such 
extremely low prices that you 
must take advantage of it at 
once. "Ws are headquarters for 
Boilers. Heating Apparatus, 
Pipe, Valves, Fittings, Wire, 
Glass, Sash, and a thousand and 
one other items that enter into 
the construction of your Green- 
houses. It will pay you to keep 
in touch with us and advise us 
of your wants. 

When in Chicago be sure to call and 
see us. Our mammoth plant is the 
most extensive in the world. Five 
long distance 'phones, all Yards 827. 
The 35th street cars pass our doors. 

We Offer for 
Immediate Acceptance: 

12 6oxi6 horizontal tubular 
boilers, in excellent con- 
dition, complete with 
fronts and all castings 

and fittings, each $295.00 

13 54x16, each . 225.00 

6 42x14, each 170.00 

And a hundred other boil- 
ers in various sizes. 

100,000 feet 4-inch boiler 
tubes, in good condition, 
overhauled, rattled, 
squared ends, which we 
furnish with sleeve coup- 
lings, per foot .10 

100,000 feet of 3 1-2 inch, 
per foot .08 

A million feet of standard 
black wrought iron pipe, 
overhauled, with threads 
and couplings; sizes from 
3-8 to 16-inch. 

Good second-hand Globe, 
Angle, Check, Gate and 
Pressure Valves at low 
prices. 

75,000 feet 3-4 inch garden 
hose, per foot .04 

12 carloads galvanized wire, 
gauges 10 to 14. It is in 
short lengths, ranging up 
to 250 feet. One gauge 
only to a bale. Price per 
bale of 100 bales 1.40 

Wire Staples, per keg of 
100 lbs 2.00 

\Vire Nails, mixed, all kinds, 
per 100 lbs 1.60 

WRITE FOR OUR CATALOGUE No. 47. 

Chicago House Wrecking Co,, 

W.'.35tk and IRON SIS.. CHICAGi), ILL. 



38 



The American Florist. 



Jan. 30, 



Oceanic, N. J. 

The semi-monthly meeting of the Mon- 
mouth County Horticultural Society was 
held January 22. The officers were 
installed by Prof. C. H. Walling. They 
are as follows: Wm. Turner, president; 
George H. Hale, vice-president, George 
Kuhn, financial secretary; H. A. Kettel, 
recording secretary; W. W. Kennedy, 
treasurer. The treasurer's report showed 
a good balance on hand from last year, 
in addition to the stocks the society 
holds. Some beautiful roses were shown. 
Geo. H. Hale had Morgan which scored 
80 points. H. A. Kettel had the finest 
Bride, Bridesmaid, Carnot and Golden 
Gate roses ever shown in this society; 
they scored 971/2 points. He had also 
some fine sprays of clerodendron, two 
varieties of tulips and a vase of callas. 
James Dowlen had a crimson carnation 
seedling, a splendid bloom with a strong 
two-foot stem, which scored 80 points. 
He had also a good scarlet one but not 
enough blooms to be judged. The judges 
of the evening were G. A. Hale, J. Dowlen 
and A. Williams. Mr. Hale read a list of 
chrysanthemums, 117 varieties, which 
he grew ten years ago in Brookline, 
Mass. There is not one of those varie- 
ties grown at the present time. The dis- 
cussions of the evening were "Strawberry 
Forcing" and "Remedies for San Jose 
Scale." After the business meeting a col- 
lation was served. B. 



Columbus, 0. 

The Fifth Avenue Floral Company has 
purchased the Smith Floral Company's 
holdings, including land, buildings and 
stock. This place is situated directly 
north of the Fifth Avenue Establishment 
and is in fine condition. The two places 
will be under the one management, 
namely, the Fifth Avenue Floral Com- 
pany. Mr. Seibert, the manager of the 
firm, is to be congratulated for the pro- 
gress he has made in so short a time. 

Business continues brisk. Some good 
tulips and daffodils are making their ap- 
pearance. Carnations are doing well 
and find a ready market at a good price 
for first quality, but the poorer grades 
of these, as well as roses, go begging at 
any price. 

E. T. Grave, of Richmond, Ind., was 
among the callers last week. Carl. 

Sudbury, Mass.— C. A. Jones has 
bought the Blair greenhouses comprising 
about 15,000 feet of glass and one and 
three-fourths acres of land. 

Springfield, O.— Schmidt & Botley 
have just completed an additional range 
of six houses, each 20.k100 feet. At pres- 
ent the houses are filled with roses— for 
which orders were booked last fall, 
aggregating 150,000— which are to be 
shipped throughout the spring. 



D. O. 

Cunningham 
Glass Co* 

PITTSBURG, PA. 



( 



TANK WINDOW GLASS. 



Hot- House Glass a Specialty. 



Use our Patint 
IRON BENCH 
FITTINGS and 
Roof Supports. 






IMPROVEI 



JENNINGS 
IRON GUTTER. 




IMPROVED VAPORIZING PANS VENTIUTIM 

For TotMMOO ExtTSiCta, Bt«. Send for Circtilar*. ■ 

DILLER, CASKEY & CO., oEN^rNTrB^o... APPABITUS, 

8. W. Car. SlJlth «nd B*rk Sts.. PHILADELPHIA. ' 

fH^as^ ntftttinn the A fnerican Plnrixt when ii'vttine 



The James H. Rice Co. 



-IMPORTERS and JOBBERS- 



GREENHOISE GLASS 

A SPECIALTY. 

■Wlxxcio^Tv- Ola^sts, I»a.lrxt, I»»a.tty, eto. 

80-82 Wabash Avenue and 34 to 40 South Water Street, CHICAGO. 



GLASS. 

GOOD BRANDS. 

QUICK SHIPMENTS. 

LARGE STOCK. 

Warehouse on railroad switch. Be sure 
and get our prices. 

Sharp, Partridge & Co. 

22nd St. and Union Place, CHICAGO. 



Please mention the American Flm ist 7vhen :i.ititin_^. 

GULF CYPRESS 

GREENHOUSE 

MaTERIALI 

HOT-BED SASH, BOILERS. PIPES, FITTINGS, 
VENTILATING APPARATUS. 

GLASS AT WHOLESALE. 

We furnish everything for building. Ssnd 
for prices and catalogues. 

S Jacobs & Sons, '^IVo^iVL'^N^^-N^'v" 

Pleaie mentioti Ihe American Flunst '^'lie)i 7Liiling. 

H. M. HOOKER GO. 

Window Glass, Paints and Putty, 
Greenliouso Glass a Specialty. 

S9 Wast Raadoiph St.. CHICAaO. 

Please mention the American /-'loiis/ when -utiling. 



LucasPutty 

The putty that stays where you put it. 

The putty that paint sticks to. 

The putty that does not rob paint of its 

oil. 
The putty that does not evaporate. 
The putty that does not discolor white 

or light tints. 
The putty for Florists. 
The putty for Nurserymen, 
The putty for you. 

Glass 

Lucas Glass is the best for 
Green or Hot Houses. 
Let us quote you prices. 



JOHN LUCAS & CO. 

Manufacturers 
NEW YORK. PHILADELPHIA. CHICAGO. 



J'Jrasr mrnli.nt the A in ri ican }-h" i i u-hen .oitin^. 



,%^t^^i^^.^i ^^^j^m.^^^ 



••• the Peint Hf. 



I4M f^M* W Ma. .mtp.14. 

■KKKT 4U BRVKK, 
114 GkMt... m-, n,M^, w%. 




Plecuc mention tlie American F!oi lit when writing. 



MASTICA 



FOR- 



—USE IT NOW. 

F. 0. PIERCE CO., ';"^' 



Fulton St., 
YORK. 



Sprague Smith Go. 

PLATE AND WINDOW GLASS 

Greenhouse Glass a Specialty. 

205 Randolph Strooi, CHICAGO. 



igo4. 



The American Florist. 



39 




A pprfeut inexpensive 
proierliou against jill 
<'iT<*plug and crawtin-; 
insects. Agents want'^d 
everywhere; write at 
once. 

Michigan Cut Flower 
Exchange, 

\Vm. Uilger. mgr., Sole 
Distributors. 

Detroit, Mich..U. S. A 



CATALOGUES 



!!!£ Regan Printing House 

Nursery 

5eed 

Florists' 

87-91 Plymouth Place. CHICAOO. 

BOOKS rOR FLORISTS. 

The time is coming along when these are 
needed and opportunity at hand for reading 
them. Every one of the following should be 
in your library. 

Send prices quoted and we send the books. 

Landscape Gardening (Maynard).— 
The development of landscape art within 
the past few years compels the wideawake 
florist to keep posted on this branch of 
the business. The many suggestions of 
this book will be found helpfiil every 
business day. It contains 338 pages, 
165 illustrations. $1.50 

The Goldfish (Mulertt).— A number 
of florists find goldfish an attractive and 
paying addition to their business. The 
best advice is given in every department 
of the subject, including construction and 
care of the parlor aquarium, in this 
volume of 160 pages, handsomely illus- 
trated. $2.00 

Geeenhodse Construction (Taft) .—It 
tells the whole story about how to build, 
and heat a greenhouse, be it large or 
small, and that too in a plain, easily 
understood, practical way. It has 118 
illustrations. $1.50. 

Heating and Ventilating Buildings 
(Carpenter). — This book covers the entire 
subject most fully. In the preparation of 
heating and ventilating plans, it will be 
found a most valuable guide. $4.00. 

How TO Make Money Growing Vio- 
lets (Saltford). — This is by a practical 
grower who has made a success of the 
Business. No grower of violets can afford 
to be without it. Price 25 cents. 

Steam Heating for Buildings (Bald- 
win). — Contains valuable data and hints 
for steam fitters and those who employ 
this method ot heating. The 350 pages 
are fiiUy illustrated. $2.50. 

The Horticulturists' Rule-Book 
(L. H. Bailey). — Contains information 
valuable to all those engaged in any 
branch of horticulture. Illustrated. 312 
pages. 75 cents. 

Fumigation Methods (Johnson). — A 
practical treatise on cheap and effective 
means of destroying insect pests. Hand- 
somely bound and profusely illustrated; 
250 pages. $1.00. 

The American Carnation (C. W. 
Ward). — A complete treatment of all the 
most modern methods of cultivating this 
most important flower. Illustrated. 
$3.50. 

Practical Floriculture (Peter Hen 
dtrson). — A guide to the successful propa- 
gation and cultivation of florists' plants. 
Illustrated. 325 pages. $1.50. 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO.. 

324 Qatrborn Siraat, CHICAGO. 



I INS U RANGE j^^ | 

F of your plants from freezing in cold weather at but a WXS^^^¥3^lc^ikt^^^V ^^\ 3 
p trifling cost if you will use a viB*k " ^^ '^^^SSP? 

I LEHMAN WAGON HEATER. ^%^ \ 

^ There is no danger of fire; no smoke, dirt or gases to injure the ^ ^ 

^ plants. They burn LEHMAN COAL which costs less than »4 cent per hour. Can you afford to ^ 

C be without one? 200,000 Lehman Heaters are in use by Florists, horsemen, physicians, etc. ^ 

^ They all highly recommend them. What better endorsement could we offer you? For ^ 

C circular and price list write -^ 



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E Manufacturers, General Western Sales Agent, ^ 

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The a mer i ca n Fl oris t. 



Jan. Jo. 



Index to Advertisers. 



AtlverLislug Kates. . . 1- 
Akehurst (J a, Soq. . 31 
Albany steHin Trap 

Co in 

Aldrich A R H 

Allen J K 16 

Amling EC 15 

AndersonWH.VSoDS 37 
Aschmann Godfrey. . 34 

Backer & Co 27 

Baldwin A J 31 

Barr John 31 

Banning FninK 31 

Bassett A Was&burn l<i 

Baur & Smith 37 

BayersdorrerHtKCo. . 37 

Beach DS 37 

Beokert W C H 

Uenthey <S Co IS 31 

Berckmaus P J Co.. 22 

Berning U 14 

Bertermann Bros Co 18 

Blaauw J &Co 23 

Bonnot Bros 17 

Boston Letter Co. . 3M 
Brant & Noe Flo Co 15 
Breitmever'3 J Sons 

; 18 29 

Brod John 33 

Bruns H N II 

Buckley WTPlantCo 30 

Budlong J A 15 31 

BuistRobtA Co 20 

Burpee W A ^t Co... II 

Byer Bros 34 

Caldwell the Woods- 
man Co 38 

Calif Carnation Co 

27 30 

Carmody J D Ill 

Chadwick Chas 31 

Chessman H C 35 

Chicago Carnation Co 

25 

Chicago House 

Wrecking Co 37 

ChriatensenA 31 

Cleveland Cut Flo Co 19 

Coles WW 29 

Uonard & Jones Uo. . 22 

Conley Foil Co 36 

Cottage Qardecs.... 31 

Cottage Nursery 31 

Cowee W J 36 

Craig Robt&Son.... 33 
CrooKe John J Co. . . 36 

Growl Fern Co 16 

Cunningham D O 

Glass Co 38 

Cunningham Joa U . 34 

CuiTie Bros 33 

Daniels & Fisher 18 

Danley ST 31 

DavisBros 31 

Deamud J B 15 

UesMoinesPlantCo.. 33 
Detroit Flower Pot 

Mfy 36 

Dietsoh A at Co Ill 

Dljkhuii J iCo 32 

Ulller Caskey Si, Co.. 38 

UlllonJL 33 

Dillon's MfgCo 40 

Darner F <!kSons Co. I 

Dreer H A 24 32 38 

Dunne & Co 39 

Eastern Nurseries... 33 
KUiott Wm & Sons.. 31 

Emmans Geo M 34 

Ernest W H 36 

Farquhar R & J Co . . 21 

Finley C E 3) 

Fisher Peter 1 

Foley's Floral Foto- 

grapbs 36 

Foley Mfg Co 4u 

Ford Bros 17 

For sale and rent — 13 

Foster Lucius H 34 

Fuchs A 31 

Furrow Bros 32 

GardenersCbronicle. 39 

Garland Geo M S9 

Garland Frank 15 

Geller Sigmund 36 

Ghormley Wm 17 

Glblln* Co 38 

Grave E T i7 

GuUett W H<!k Sons 30 

Gunther Wm H 17 

Gurney Heater Co.. . 40 

Quttman Alex J 17 

Hail Association 4i 

Hancock Geo A Son 30 
llassluch.&Roumanilel I 

Hauswirtb P J 18 

Heacock Jos 31 

Heller Bros 3i' 

Heller & Co II 

Uerendeeii Mr^ Co.. IV 
Herr Albert M.... 37 33 

Herrmann A 36 

Hews A H &Co 36 

Hilllngor Bros 36 

Hill The EG Co 1 

Hippard E 40 

Hitohings * Co IV 



Hobbies Limited ... 33 
Holton & Hunkel Co 

16 34 

Hooker H M Co 38 

Horan Edw C 17 

Hort Advertiser 33 

Hort Trade Journal. 37 
Hub VemlIiitin(;Co. 39 

Hunt EH 14 

International Flower 

Delivery 18 19 

Jacobs S & Sons 38 

Jahn HA 33 

Kasting W P I 

Keller Geo A Son .... 36 
Kennicott Bros Co.. 14 
Kift Joseph & Son. 36 
KlngConstructionCo 40 

Kohr A F 36 

Koral Mfg Co 37 

Koster Jt Co 3i 

Kramer I N ASon.. 36 

Kreshover L J 19 

Kroesohell Bros Co.. IV 

KuehnOA 14 

KuhlQA 30 33 34 

Lager i& Hurrell 19 

Lang Julius 17 

Lange A 18 

Langjahr A H 17 

Larchmont Nursery. 32 

Laub A ASon 30 

Lecakes N & Co 18 

Lehman Bros 39 

Letelier Son .t Co. . . 33 

LittlelieldH F 31 

Livingston Seed Co. 39 
Lockland LumberCoIlI 
LooinisCarnationCo. 38 
Loomis Floral Co — 26 

Lonsdali: Edwin 31 

Lord & Burr ham Co. IV 

Lothrop W P 22 

Lucas J Si Co 38 

MaderPaul 33 

May John N 27 1 

May L L&Co 29 

McCarthy N F A Co. 16 

McConnell Alex 18 

MoCullough's J M 

Sons 14 

McKellarChas \V... 14 
Metropolitan Mate- 
rial Co Ill 

Meyer John C & Co. 36 
Miami Floral Co.... 30 
Mich Cut Flower Co 

15 39 

Millang Chas 17 

Millang Frank 17 

Moller Ludwig 39 

Moninger J C Co. ..Ill 
Moon The Wm H Co 22 
Moore Hentz A Nash 17 

Murphy Wm 14 

Nat Flo Bd of Trade II 
N Y Cut Flower Co. . 17 
N Y Cut Flower Ex. 16 
Niootiue Mfg Co. . . . 35 

N lessen Leo 16 

Paducah Pottery.... 36 

Park Floral Co 18 

Pennock C AG L.... 27 

Perkins John J 17 

Philadelphia Whole- 
sale Flower Mkt... 16 

Pierce FOCo 38 

Pierson F R & Co... 34 
Pierson-Sefton Co. IV 
Pittsburg Cut Flo Co 14 
Poehlmann Bros Co. 

15 28 

Pollworth CC 36 

PritchardJN 19 

Quaker City MachCol 1 1 

RandallAL 15 

Rawson W W A Co. II 

Raynor J 1 17 

Rees A Campere.. .. II 
Regan Print House 3J 
Reinberg Geo — .15 :iJ 
Keinberg Peter.. 19 39 

Rhotcrt Aug 22 

Rice Bros 14 

Rice James H Co — 3^ 

Rice M ACo ;-9 

Rikf L A A Son 33 

Robinson U W A Co 19 

Rodb Simon 36 

Roemer Fred'k 11 

Roehrs Julius 33 

Etolker A A Sons.... -il 

Roscoe FA 31 

Kosemont Gardens . . 1 6 

Sakford Geo 16 

Scheepers John 32 

Scbillo Adaui Ill 

Scott JohD 34 

aharpPartridgeACo. 38 
ShermanNurserv^o 34 

Sheridan W F 17 

Sievers A Roland — 18 

Sinner Bros 15 37 

Situations A Wants. 13 

Skldelsky SS 32 

Smith NathASon.... 33 
Smith W A TCo.... I 



Spangler E J A Co.. II 
Sprague Smith Co... 38 
Standard Pump and 

Eutfins Co IV 

Stearns Lumber Co. .Ill 

Stetfens Emil 35 

Stevens II L Co 31 

StLouisCarnationCo 30 

Sten John E 49 

Stewart E E iil 

Stoothoff H A A Co 35 
Storrs A HarrisonCo 

23 32 
StyeVjJ.'.'.'.'.!!'.".'.'..r iT 
Superior Machine A 

Boiler Works Ill 

Sutherland G A 16 

Suvdam Jerome 31 

Swahn Pot Mfg Co.. 36 

Sv\ayne Wm 31 

Telet^raph Code II 

Thompson J D 

Carnation Co.. 14 I 
Thorburn J M A Co. II 
Tobacco Warehouse 

A Trading Co 35 

Traendly A Schenck 17 



Tronnem O L 16 

VanderWeiJdenACo 33 
Vaughan's Seed Store 

30 34 S6 II I 

Vawtei- E .1 |H 

Vick's Sons Jas 11 

WagnerParkCons. . . 33 

Warburton C 33 

Watkins & Simpson . 21 

Weber F C 18 

Weber H A Sons... 31 

Weeber A Don II 

Weiland A Risch ... 15 

Welch Bros 16 

WellenreitiT Leo 37 

Whilldin Pot Co 36 

Wietor Bros 15 28 

Wildpret Bros II 

Wilis A Segar 18 

Winandy M 15 

Winterioh C 31 

WintersonEFCo.... 19 
Wittbold Geo Co.... 33 

Wood Bros 33 

Young John 17 

Young Thoa Jr.... 16 18 
Young ANugent 17 



The King Construction Go. 

New Root Construction. Autotnitic 
Stoliers, Water Tube Steam Boiler, 

Automatic and Hand Ventilators 

LOCKPORT, N. Y. 
a2 Church Strael, TORONTO, ONT. 



The Standard 

Ventilating Machinery. 

The orit,'iu;il Machiuc with SL-lf uiJiD;.; i-u|>s. 
The most powt-rful, k-ast complicated, v<;ry rom- 
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The NEW DUPLEX GUTTER. 

Over si.x miles of tliis Iron Gutter iu Ubt-, aDil 
highly recominendf-il. Thi- only drip-proof gutter 
on the market. 

The STANDARD RETURN STEAM TRAP. 

It has nofiii]:ils for simplicity or its workings. 
Catalogue fr'->'. 

E. HiPPABD, ^°"yHt;°*^- 

THE 

Florists' Hail Association 

Insures 19,000,000 square feet of Glass. Now is 
the time to join. Address 

JOHN C. ESLER, Sec'y. 
SADDLE RIVER. N. J. 

Please mention the American Florist 
every time you write to an advertiser. 



EUREKZ[ GREENHOUSES 

SOLD BY 

DILLON GREENHOUSE MFG. CO. 'tr 



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Life insurance is valuable because it guarantees the outcome. 

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Vol. XXII. 



CHICAQO AND NEW YORK, FEBRUARY 6, 1904. 



No. 818. 



iToiJii Okmmmm ^mmm 



Ndtetbenth Ybab. 

Copyright 1904, by American Florist Company 

Entered as Second-Class Mail Matter. 

Published bvbbt Satttbdat by 

AMERICAN FLORIST COMPANY, 

334 Dearborn St., Chicago. 

Eastern Office: 4a W. 28th St., New > ork. 

Subscription, 11.00 a year. To Europe, t3 00. 

Subscriptions accepted only from the trade. 

Volumes halt-yearly from August, 1901. 

SOCIETY OF AMERICAN FLORISTS AND 
ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURISTS. 

OtTicBBB— John Bdbton, Philadelphia, Pa., 
president; C. C. Pollwobth, Milwaukee, Wis., 
vice-president; Wm. J. Stewabt, 79 Milk Street, 
Boston, Mass., secretary; H. B. Bkattt, Oil City, 
Pa., treasurer. 

Oppicebs-elect — Philip Bbeitmeyee, presi- 
dent; J.J. Benekb, vice-president; secretary and 
treasurer as before. Twentieth annual meeting 
at St. Louis, Mo., August, 1904. 

THE AMERICAN CARNATION SOCIETY. 

Annual convention at Detroit, Mich., March 2, 
1904. Albbbt M. Hbbb, Lancaster, Pa., secretary. 



PALMS AND FERNS. 



AMERICAN ROSE SOCIETY. 

Annual meeting and exhibition, Philadelphia, 
March, 1904. Leonabd Babbon, 138 Liberty St., 
New York, secretary. 

CHRYSANTHEMUM SOCIETY OF AMERICA. 

Annual convention and exhibition, November, 
1904. Fbed H. Lemon, Richmond, Ind., secretary. 

THIS ISSUE 44 PAGES WITH COVER. 

CONTENTS. 

Palms and ferns — Latanias 41 

— Fancy ferns 42 

— Nephrolepis Scottii (illus.) 43 

Filling: conservatories (illus.) 43 

The carnation— Notes on propagating 44 

AVith the growers 44 

— Esses Greenhouses, N. Olmstead, O. (illus.).. 44 

— John L. Wylnnd, Do Haven, Pa. (illus.) 4.5 

Tarry town Horticultural Society 45 

Window glass inakicg 46 

Greenhouse buildinir 46 

The retail trade— Standing shield (illus. ) 46 

Chicago 46 

New York 47 

Philadelphia 47 

Boston 47 

St. Louis 48 

Baltimore 48 

Washington 49 

Milwaukee 49 

Montreal 49 

Obituarv — Win. Burgess 49 

— Joseph Ligi^i'tt 49 

— Leroy Hopkins 49 

— Wm. Thompson 49 

Wistarias for Easter 50 

Late blooming chrysanthemums 50 

Detroit 58 

Buffalo , i ^8 

Lenox, Mass F8 

The nursery trade 60 

St. Paul 60 

Our pastimes Qi 

Pittsburg 63 

Cincinnati ; 78 



Latanlas. 



That botanical nomenclature has been 
very much mixed in many of its divisions 
is an old story, and among the palms in 
particular there have been many revisions 
and alterations. To many in the trade 
the name latania brings to mind the most 
familiar of our commercial species of 
palms, that one so frequently called 
Latania Borbonica, and yet this palm is 
not a latania, but on the contrary should 
be catalogued as Livistona Chinensis. 
It is quite true that both the latanias 
and the livistonas are four-leaved palms, 
thus presenting some similarity in 
appearance, but with the true latanias 
are found usually unarmed leafstalks, 
while the livistonas in general are quite 
liberally provided with prickles up the 
edges of the stalks, the thorns being 
strong enough to make a very painful 
wound. 

There are also marked botanical diflfer- 
ences between these two genera, the 
livistonas producing perfect flowers that 
are followed by large, branched bunches 
of small, single-seeded fruits, while the 
latanias do not have perfect flowers, bat 
on the contrary the male and female 
flowers are produced upon diSerent 
plants, the former in large quantities and 
the latter more sparingly, these being 
followed by fruits as large as a small 
apple and containing three seeds each, 
the latter being about the size of Brazil 
nuts. The latanias also seem to be some- 
what restricted geographically, the three 
species that have been cultivated in this 
country being natives of the Mascarene 
Islands, a group of small islands in the 
Indian Ocean, possibly 300 miles east of 
Madagascar. 

The livistonas are more widely spread 
and also more numerous in species, these 
being chiefly natives of various islands in 
the South Pacific ocean or of tropical 
Australia, while one species, L. oliva 
formis, is found in Brazil, and the most 
widely known of all the livistonas, L. 
Chinensis, is, as its name indicates, a 
native of the Flowery Kingdom. Three 
species of the latanias have been men- 
tioned, these being L. Loddigesii — once 
known as L. glaucophylla — L Com- 
mersonii — also known in our boyhood as 
L. rubra — and L. Verschafleltii, the last 
having had its name changed from L. 
aurea to commemorate a noted Belgian 
horticulturist. Talk about the trials of 
the Peony Committee ! Why, that is easy 



compared with the tangles that crop up 
in the other plant families, and that serve 
to impress upon us from time to time 
how very little each of us really knows 
when compared with the whole sum of 
botanical knowledge. 

But to return to the latanias, we find 
that for some time past it has not been 
necessary to go outside of United States' 
territory in order to get seeds of some of 
these palms, for L. Loddigesii has been 
planted in Hawaii and has produced 
seeds there quite freely for several years. 
This is the strongest growing of the three 
species in question, and produces immense 
fan-shaped leaves on strong stems that 
often reach a length of 6 to 8 feet, the 
tree itself having a comparatively slender 
trunk that sometimes grows to a height 
of 40 feet in its native islands. The foliage 
of L. Loddigesii is very dark green, the 
ribs and stems tinted with chocolate or 
dull red in the young plants, though 
showing but little of this coloring in the 
case of large plants. The second species, 
L. Commersonii, is by lar the most 
attractive, being rather more slender than 
the first named, while the stems and ribs 
of the leaves, and to some extent the 
entire leaf at the time it is unfolding, are 
dark crimson, and surely merit its former 
varietal name of rubra. Latania Ver- 
schafleltii makes quite a contrast to the 
other members of this family, its foliage 
and stems being strongly colored with 
bright yellow, and in growth is perhaps 
the weakest of the three. 

These palms areessentially warmhouse 
species, and being rather slow in growth 
as young plants, have not been given 
much attention from a commercial point 
of view, for in this formative period of 
our horticulture there are fewpeople who 
take up rare palms; but it may be worth 
recording that all three of these beautiful 
palms were in cultivation in this country 
more than twenty-five years ago, and the 
writer was not their only cultivator at 
that time, either. The dates of intro- 
duction of various plants to the American 
trade do not seem to be very well fixed, 
in the minds of some growers at least, 
and it does appear slightly humorous, to 
say the least, when we find a certain Bel- 
gian grower gravely claiming to have 
been the first to export successfully palms 
and azaleas to the United States, and to 
find that he places thedateintheeighties, 
when there are several men in the trade 
here who can recall the fact that other 
European growers shipped azaleasinlots 
of 500 to 1,000 plants and palms by 
hundreds to the United States fully ten 
years before the date mentioned, and 



4S 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 6. 



shipoed them in good order, too. But 
these trifling aberrations are perhaps of 
little moment, and it is barely possible 
that our Europqan cousins might point 
out that even in America the catalogue 
makers sometimes draw the long bow. 

Fancy Ferns. 

A few ferns that are out of the common 
run may sometimes prove useful to have 
about the place if one can spare a small 
space for that purpose, and if so there 
might be some of the golden and silvery 
foliaged sorts among them, tender though 
they mostly are. The ferns in question 
are found among the gymnogrammas, 
there being several varieties of each class, 
some of the best of the golden leaved sec- 
tion being G. Laucheana magnifica, G. 
chrysophylla, and G. decomposita. G. 
Peruviana argyrophylla is one of the 
finest of the silvery section, G. Tartarea 
is a stronger grower, but less silvery, and 
G. Wettenhalliana is a very beautiful 
variety with crested foliage. 

These are warm house ferns, requiring 
a night temperature of 05° and also to 
be well shaded, a rather light soil being 
preferable for their culture. The farinose 
powder with which both the upper and 
lower sides of the fronds of these ferns are 
covered is liable to be washed off to some 
extent by careless watering, and these 
species not being especially benefitted by 
overhead watering it is much the better 
plan to keep the hose from them and to 
water them more carefully and gently 
with a watering can. Some of these 
gymnogrammas grow over freely from 
spores, the latter being produced in 
immense quantities by the stronger grow- 
ing forms, of which G. decomposita is a 
good example, the seedHngs of this fern 
being liable to come up in all directions 
from a few parent plants, much the same 
as those of the common "soft fern," 
Nephrodium molle. W. H. Taplin. 

Nephrolepls Scottil. 

Nephrolepis Scottii, the latest addition 
to the number of beautiful sports from 
the Boston fern, originated in the green- 
houses of John Scott, Brooklyn, three 
years ago. As well shown in the illustra- 
tion, the habit of the plant is dwarfer 
and much denser than that of the typical 
Boston fern, the fronds also being shorter 
and less erect, their arching form giving 
a graceful, fountain-like contour to the 
plant. A remarkable uniformity in size 
and growth is noted in the fronds, which 
is carried out also in the character of the 
plants themselves when seen in numbers 
and in various sizes in the greenhouses. 

Mr. Scott states that the variety will 
not grow rank, even under excessive feed- 
ing. Notwithstanding its denseness the 
fronds in the center of the plant do not 
grow long jointed nor shed the pinna;, as 
is the case with the Boston fern when over 
crowded, and the reason for this is obvi- 
ous in the tough, leathery texture of the 
foliage. 

Its rapidity of increase is well-evidenced 
in a densely packed bench of plants at 
Mr. Scott's Flatbush greenhouses, which 
was planted with single runners last 
August, and in the immense stock of the 
variety now held by Mr. Scott from what 
was, only three years since, one small 
plant with four fronds. 

It is no reflection on the other excellent 
forms of Nephrolepis exaltata already 
disseminated to say that this one is the 
first to come into dangerous competition 
with the type known as the Boston fern. 
The Boston fern is distinctly the lead- 
ing plant in the country for dwelling- 
house culture, and its popularity in this 



line seems not to have suffered in the 
slightest degree from the recent distribu- 
tion of two elaborately decorative forms. 
If it has a fault at all it is that under 
generous cultivation it is apt to attain 
an unwieldy size and become inconveni- 
ently large for the average room in a city 
dwelling. The compact, symmetrical 
growth of N. Scottii furnishes the ideal 
form, while its moderate size and its con- 
tentment under closely-crowded condi- 
tions will be appreciated when valuable 
bench room is taken into consideration, 
and its hard-fibered fronds give assur- 
ance that it will withstand rougher 
treatment than its illustrious parent, all 
of which invests it with much promise as 
an all-around standard commercial plant. 
Mr. Scott is to be congratulated on his 
find, and the tradeowes him its gratitude 
for this addition to the limited list of 
plants whose qualities fit them espe- 
cially for popular favorites. N. Scottii is 
to be disseminated next June. 



Filling: Conservatories. 

The rapid increase in the number of 
conservatories connected with private 
estates opens the way for a lucrative 
business, and affords an opportunity for 
the display of a high degree of artistic 
taste in the planting and furnishing of 
these flower houses, without which no 
suburban or country estate of any pre- 
tentions is complete. The ingenuity of 
greenhouse builders in erecting glass 
structures of tasteful design and propor- 
tions is supplemented by the ability and 
artistic perceptions of the plantsman, 
and the result is a picture such as we 



have here represented. The conserva- 
tory illustrated is that of I'ercival Rob- 
erts, Jr , at Narberth, Pa., not far from 
Philadelphia, and the furnishing and 
planting is the work of Siebrecht & Son, 
New Rochelle, N. V. The conservatory 
is 40x50 feet in area and 32 feet to the 
top of the dome. The central plant is a 
splendid specimen of Kentia australis 
twenty-two feet high. From the center 
radiate four irregular pebbled walks, and 
in the center of each of the four divisions 
thus laid out are a Dicksonia antarctica 
fifteen feet high, in the south division; 
Cham.T;rops excelsa, twenty feet high, in 
the north; Cycas circinalis, fifteen feet 
high, in the east, and Kentia Baueri, 
fifteen feet high, in the west division. 
The planting is concealed by masses of 
tuffa rock, in the crevices of which are 
planted small ferns, tradescantias, lycopo- 
diums, grasses and similar small growing 
things in profusion. Over each of the 
four doors a mammoth platycerium is 
suspended, and on the rafters are climb- 
ing vines, such as jjassifloras, lapagerias, 
bignonias and stephanotis. Our illustra- 
tions show the central plant and sur- 
roundings in the north, east and south 
sides of the conservatory. 

Davenport, Ia.— The firmof Littigand 
Allison, composed of Victor A. Littig, Ed. 
C. Littig and Robert Allison, has pur- 
chased the business of Charles Dannacher 
on the Brady street road north of Cen- 
tral park, where the greenhouses are 
and also the stock of the down town 
store on East Third street. Mr. Dan- 
nacher will retire from business altogether 
on account of ill health. 




NEPHROLEPIS SCOTTII. 



Z904. 



The American Florist. 




CONSERVATORY OF PERCIVAL ROBERTS, JR., AT NARBERTH, PA. 



44 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 6, 



THE CARNATION. 



Notes on Propagating:. 

If the stock Jor the coming season's 
planting is not now complete we must 
get after this very important part of the 
business right away as the time is fast 
approaching when the bright warm days 
tell greatly on the propagating bed and 
a successful batch of cuttings is an excep- 
tion rather than the rule. We have also 
to bear in mind that most of the very 
finest varieties which are being grown 
today, unless propagated early are not 
nearly so profitable. Take, for instance, 
the varieties Mrs. Lawson, Gov. Wol- 
cott, Harlowarden and Prosperity. 

We will first select the variety Mrs. 
Lawson, though, being a very vigorous 
grower during the winter months, it has 
a tendency to bud up very easily in the 
fall, particularly so when the plants have 
been grown in the field. The side 
growths from these short blooming 
shoots are the ones to bring the next 
winter's returns, but it takes time to 
produce these shoots and we have to 
take into consideration that for this 
variety to give the best results it should 
be planted into the house by August 1 
at the latest. This will give verv little 
time for them to make much of a plant 
while out in the field and theretore a plant 
taken from the sand and planted out in 
the field within three or four weeks can- 
not have had time to get properly estab- 
lished, with the top pinched out and the 
side shoots branching out as they ought 
to be. But if they are propagated dur- 
ing January or February and receive 
careful attention afterwards regarding 
topping, etc., they will be well estab- 
lished plants with plenty of side shoots 
bursting out by May 1, which generally 
is the best time for setting in the field. 

Gov. Wolcott is a very tree grower as 
far as making grass is concerned, but it 
is rather slow in throwing up blooming 
shoots in the early winter months and 
unless a good sized plant is secured at 
planting the variety is very likely to be 
condemned in time because its nature has 
not been properly understood and catered 
to. 

Prosperity will not certainly pay its 
wav with plants propagated later than 
February 1, its growth being peculiar 
and different from any other carnation, 
throwing up a good strong main stem 
with lots ot side shoots branching out, 
but the side shoots seem to get so far 
and then stop, taking a long time to 
stifien out and produce a bloom. This 
variety can be made to bring better 
returns by having the young plants in 
good growing condition at the begin- 
ning of February in 2 inch pots; then 
about the middle of March, shifting up 
into 3-inch pots will make them excellent 
stock for planting in the field and you 
will reap fine blooms much earlier by 
several weeks for this extra trouble. I 
am also of the opinion that Adonis can 
be made a success of if treated this way. 
Harlowarden just at this time appears 
the picture of health and prosperitj' with 
its fancy blooms and their 3-loot stems, 
but what a small plant and carrying very 
little grass it is. This is another variety 
that takes a long season to produce a 
large enough plant to make it profitable. 
With us it has a tendency to throw all 
its energy into the crop that is on and 
then take its time to recover. We must 
therefore see the plants are of sufficient 
size and health to make that crop of suf- 
ficient duration to make it pay. 



Cuttings put into the sand from this 
time forward will need extra care as the 
sun is gaining in strength right along 
and if the bed is left too long on a bright 
morning without being shaded or the 
steam left on till the temperature of the 
house runs too high the cuttings will 
very soon commence to suffer. Also, on 
bright days, or when the weather is very 
cold, causing extra firing, the walks 
around the propagating beds should be 
dampened down a little oftener to pre- 
vent the atmosphere becoming too dry. 
As soon as the cuttings are rooted get 
them out of the sand right away, either 
potting them or planting in boxes or in 
the bench. Some growers favor one 
method, some another, but I prefer the 
pots for most of varieties with heavy 
growth like Enchantress, Lawson, Crane 
and Prosperity. Varieties like Flora 
Hill, Mrs. Joost, Glacier and White 
Cloud I find do equally as well when 
transplanted into flats. Then again you 
must be guided to a certain extent by 
the nature of your planting field. If it is 
so you can water the plants directly after 
planting should the weather be dry then 
the flat grown plants will not suffer; 
again, if your soil is of a cold, clayey, 
wet nature, you will find plants set out 
from the flats will not take hold nearly 
as readily as those that have been grown 
in pots. After the cuttings are potted 
keep them in a temperature as near to 
that of the propagating house as possi- 
ble for a few days or until the roots show 
through the soil after which it is best to 
give them a temperature of about 45° at 
night with plenty of ventilation in the 
daytime on all favorable occasions. 

C. W. Johnson. 



WITH THE GROWERS 



Essex Greenhouses, North Olmstead, 0. 

a The remarkably fine 



roses and carnations 
which are being sent in 
to the Cleveland mar- 
ket from the Essex 
Greenhouses, North Olm- 
stead, O., caused the 
writer to pay that estab- 

lishment a recent visit, 

M. liloy. and the sights to be seen 
in the way of well grown carnations and 
roses were sufficient compensation for 
the rather long ride on the not too well 
heated electric car. This establishment 
consists of seventeen houses in all about 
50,000 feet of glass, and is presided over 
by M. Bloy, who is a thorough plants- 
man, and second to none when it comes 
to growing extra fine flowers, but withal 
very modest about his success. In the 
several houses devoted to carnations, 
Lawson takes the lead. Next in order 
come Crane, White Cloud, Apollo and 
Queen Louise. Several of the newer 
kinds are being tested, of which Enchan- 
tress is distinctly the best. All varieties 
are practically free from stem rot. Crane 
remarkably so. This variety has aver- 
aged five first-class blooms to the plant 
since October 1. Lawson and White 
Cloud have averaged 6. Apollo is show- 
ing up well, and is considered by Mr. 
Bloy to be the coming money maker in 
red. Queen Louise is all that is claimed 
for it in the way of good stem and free 
flowering qualities. 

In the rose houses everything looks in 
splendid condition with one single excep- 



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AMERICAN BEAUTY AND GRAFTED ROSES AT ESSEX GREENHOUSES. 



igo4. 



The American Florist. 



45 




PARTIAL VIEW OF JOHN L. WYLAND S RANGES, DE HAVEN, PA. 



tion, a half bench of Liberty which look, 
in that phrase so familiar to growers, 
"on the bum." Mr. Bloy has decided to 
cut this variety off the list as he finds it 
impossible to get satisfactory results 
from it. The American Beauty could not 
very well be in better condition. The 
crop for Christmas came in just on time 
and averaged between two and three 
long stemmed flowers to the plant. They 
are entirely free from black spot and 
"feathered" to the bottom. The Bride 
Bridesmaid are in equally good condition, 
especially the grafted stock which has 
averaged fifteen good blooms to the 
plant since the first of October. Meteor, 
of which two houses are grown, has pro- 
duced in the same period sixteen blooms 
to the plant. One house entirely filled 
with poinsettias was in grand shape. 
Another planted to sweet peas gave evi- 
dence of producing an abundance of 
blooms in the near future, the first lot of 
about 1,000 being cut for Christmas. 
Propagating is now under full swing and 
judging from the quality of stock being 
propagated the outlook for good mate- 
rial for next season is good. A new 
boiler of 1-tO horse power was installed 
last fall to assist in the heating. The 
whole place is a model of neatness and 
reflects a great deal of credit on the excel- 
lent management of Mr. Bloy. 

The four illustrations accompanying 
this are from photographs taken Decem- 
ber 30, 1903. The house of American 
Beauty roses was photographed after a 
cut of nearly 1500 blooms during the 
month. In the house of Lawson carna- 
tions, 525 blooms were picked the same 
day. The boy in the house of White 
Cloud is a coming gardener, and is a son 
of Mr. Bloy. The average height of the 
plants of grafted Bride and Bridesmaid 
roses is four feet. I. K. 

John L. Wyland, De Haven, Pa. 

No one ever visits the plant of John L. 
Wyland at De Haven, Pa., without being 
impressed by the great natural beauty of 
its surroundings and the warm hearted 
courtesies of its owner. Mr. Wyland's 
plant is about ten miles north of Pitts- 
burg on the P. & W. railroad, about ten 
minutes' walk from the station, just off 
the new macadamized county road. Mr. 
Wyland began growing flowers as a busi- 
ness about twelve years ago. In his 
range are eight houses with about 
25,000 square feet of glass and southern 
exposure. Roses and carnations are his 



specialties. In roses he grows only 
Bride and Bridesmaid. Of carnations at 
present he grows about ten of the best 
varieties, including Wolcott, Enchantress, 
Mrs. Lawson, Nelson and Adonis. Sys- 
tem rules in this establishment and it 
takes but little time to observe this. 
Each summer Mr. Wyland replenishes his 
houses with new rose plants. He is a 
close observer of all new carnations. 
His holdings at De Haven include sixty- 
five acres on which are valuable deposits 
of granite and undoubtedly coal. There 
is also a gas well of great pressure and 
an unbounded quantity of water. The 
supply of natural gas and water is suffi- 
cient to operate more than 200,000 
square feet of glass. The soil is of the 
finest order. The natural gas well was 
sunk about two years ago and gas struck 
at a depth of 1650 feet. The plant and all 
houses on Mr. Wyland's premises are 



heated by this fuel, which is inexpensive 
and easily regulated. 

Mr. Wyland has an orchard in which 
he has planted over 5,000 fruit trees. In 
1901 the peach crop (Elberta variety) 
was more than 3,000 bushels. Mr. 
Wyland takes great pride in his peaceful 
domain. The various buildings on the 
place are complete, substantial and com- 
fortable. 

A stone wall in front and on the side of 
Mr. Wyland's residence is 150 feet long. 
It is built of coarse rubble with coping 
of granite. It has a foundation three 
feet in depth and stands three feet high. 
The entire wall was constructed of stone 
and granite taken from the quarry on 
the premises. E. L. M. 



Tarrytown Horticultural Society. 

The monthly meeting of the Tarry- 
town Horticultural Society was held in 
the Vanderbilt hall, Tarrytown, N. Y.. 
January 28. It was decided to change 
the monthly meetings from the last 
Thursday to the last Tuesday of each 
month. Some of the members were in 
favor of having the annual fall chrysan- 
themum show in either White Plains or 
Yonkers, but after some discussion it was 
decided to hold it again in Tarrytown, 
and the dates selected were November 1, 

The prize for this month's exhibit was 
awarded to President Ballantyne for 
twelve roses. This exhibit consisted of 
excellent blooms of the new Killarney 
rose, Wootton, American Beauty and 
Bridesmaid. He also exhibited a very 
fine vase of Killarney roses. He said 
this variety was a first class grower and 
more of it would be seen next year. F. 
Gibson, gardener to Mrs. J. H. Hall, 
offered a box of cigars as a prize for the 
best fifty double blue violets to be com- 
peted for at the next meeting. 

New members elected were R. Barton, 
gardener to L. Stern, Tarrytown, and 




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WHITE 1 CLOUD AND LAWSON CARNATIONS, ESSEX GREENHOUSES. 



46 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 6, 



Mr. Parker, of Ervington. A.Brownand 
F. Koenig were proposed for member- 
ship. The business meeting over, the 
members adjourned in a body to the 
Perry House for the annual dinner. In 
all about sixty members and invited 
guests were present. The tables were 
tastefully decorated with fronds of 
Nephrolepis Piersoni and vases of roses 
and carnations. The carnations espe- 
cially were the object of much comment. 
John E. Haines, Bethlehem, Pa., brought 
with him a fine vase of a new scarlet 
variety, named after himself This was 
the largest carnation ever seen in Tarry- 
town. He also had some white and 
variegated seedlings. The F. R. Pierson 
Company supplied well grown blooms of 
White Lawson,Daheimand Enchantress. 
H. Nichol of Yonkers brought some very 
good Golden Gate roses, and President 
Ballantyne's prize winners were also 
placed on the tables. As soon as the 
cigars were passed, President Ballan- 
tyne introduced J. W. Smith of White 
Plains as toastmaster. The first to come 
under his eye was the Hon. C. S. McClel- 
land, easily a past master as an after- 
dinner speaker. Then the poet laureate 
of the profession, J. Austin Shaw, of New 
York, gave a very good example of his 
poetical ability in a poem in which he 
named Tarrytown and managed to 
gather in most of the gardening fraternity 
of the neighborhood, enrolling the vir- 
tues of each. Then the song bird of the 
profession, J. J. Butterfield, New York, 
warbled off his sweetest notes. P. E. 
Kessler, of New York, spoke for the gar- 
dening press. J. Do wling and John New- 
man, from the Monmouth County Soci- 
ety, N. J., replied to the toast, "The 
Visitors." Wm. Scott spoke for the gar- 
deners reminding those present that 
theirs was the oldest profession on earth. 
Jas. Scott gave a humorous account of 
his experience as gardener at the House 
of Refuge on Randall's Island. Mr. Mc- 
Farlane recited in his best form. After a 
few more speeches the evening came to a 
close with votes of thanks, and the sing- 
ing of "Auld lang syne." 

T. A. Lee, Cor. sec. 



Window Glass Making. 

[Paper read by Melville G. Holding before the 
f'hiuiiffoFlorists' Club, January 38.] 

The materials of which window glass 
is made are chiefly white sand, lime and 
alkali, all melted together by intense heat, 
about 2,600° Fahrenheit, applied for 
about fifteen hours. 

Formerly, and for many years, all 
glass was made in crucibles or pots 
made of fire clay, very thick and heavy, 
to stand the heat and hold the weight of 
the batch. In later years a large propor- 
tion of window glass has been made on 
what is known as the continuous melting 
tank. 

The first successful tank was built in 
Belgium, in 1884, and created a great 
disturbance with labor, and in 1886 a 
mob destroyed the factories. Ever since 
the rebuilding the tanks have been in suc- 
cessful operation. 

The adoption of the tank came in this 
country much later, and they have now 
largely displaced the old pot factories. 
Still a large quantity of glass is made in 
pots, the capital required for a tank fac- 
tory being large compared with that for 
a pot factory. 

It would be impossible to give you in 
words any adequate description of the 
process of making v/indow glass. It 
must be seen to be appreciated. In gen- 
eral the gatherer dips the end of the 



blow pipe, which is a heavy iron tube, 
into the melted glass and brings out a 
ball of the material, which is then taken 
by the blower and gradually blown into 
a large cylinder. The cylinder is cracked 
open with a hot iron, and it then goes to. 
the flattening oven, where it is flattened 
and annealed, and is then ready for the 
cutter. 

It is interesting to wateh the blower 
make from a ball of glass a cylinder from 
twelve to eighteen inches in diameter and 
from six to seven feet long, of even and 
uniform thickness. In fact, the whole 
process of making window glass, from 
the melting of the batch to the cutting 
table, requires skill of a high order, and 
can only be learned by long practice and 
experience. It is no easy work to handle 
on the end of a heavy blow pipe, four feet 
long, a heavy cylinder of glass six or 
seven feet long. 

The skilled labor around a glass fur- 
nace is very well paid, the average wage 
being high, and some of it very high. 
It is not unusual for a blower of large 
double strength glass to make $400 per 
month. Of course the average is much 
below this. 

The workers have had for many years 
the strongest kind of a union and have 
kept wages hi^h, taking advantage of 
the very high tariff on window glass. 
The worker in Belgium receives much less 
for his labor, and glass costs much less 
there than here, as labor is about sixty- 
five per cent of the cost of the glass. In 
Belgium thecost to-dayof aboxof 16x18 
double is about $1.45, and here about 
$3.25. The duty on a box of foreign 
glass, 16x18, would be $1.50, certainly a 
large protection to American labor, and 
the American workman takes all the 
advantage of it. 

It would appear, however, that the 
day of great wages in this line of busi- 
ness is drawing to a close. A machine, 
as you know, has been invented, and is 
being slowly perfected, to take the place 
of the man blower and gatherer. It is 
already turning out glass in considerable 
quantities at several tanks, and it seems 
to be only a matter of time when it will 
largely displace man power, and certainly 
decrease the cost of making glass, but as 
long as the present tariff rates are main- 
tained, the manufacturer will take advan- 
tage of them and no cheap glass in in 
sight. 

The machine makes glass in cylinders 
by use of compressed air instead of the 
breath of man, and there is good reason 
to believe that it will ultimately be 
entirely successful. 



Greenhouse Building:. 

Locust Valley, N. Y.— W. D. Guthrie, 
range of conservatories. 

Bridgeport, Conn.— Gladys L. MacFar- 
land, conservatory. 

New Bedford, Mass. — Wm. E. Mosher, 
house 16x60; Chas. H. Beetle, one house. 

Battle Creek, Mich.— C. C. Warburton, 
one house, 20x132. 

Terrell, Tex.— E. H. R. Green, range 
of twenty houses. 



Mound City, Mo.— James C. Durham 
will shortly move toAnadarko, Okla., to 
engage in the greenhouse business. 

NoBLESviLLE, Ind. — The large green- 
house of Ross Farley, southwest of this 
city, was seriously damaged January 26 
and many plants frozen. Snow drifted 
on the glass roof causing a space of 
about 100 square feet to fall in. 



THE RETAIL TRADE 



standing: Shield. 

This shield was made solid of white 
carnations bordered with lily of the val- 
ley and maidenhair ferns. The sword 
and anchor crossed in the center were of 
double violets. The base was of Easter 
,lilies, narcissi and Bridesmaid roses. 
This design was made six feet high and 
was sent by the manager of the St. 
Charles hotel. New Orleans, La., to the 
funeral of Gen. John B. Gordon, at 
Atlanta, Ga. It was said to be the hand- 
somest design there. It was made by the 
C. A. Dahl Company of Atlanta. 



Chicagfo. 

Shippers are very well satisfied with 
the week's run, although a comparison 
with the amount of business transacted 
during the same week of 1903, will show 
a decrease. The market has not been what 
might be designated as brisk any day this 
week, although some days brought in 
enough outside orders to keep stock 
moving satisfactorily. The carnation 
situation is not taking on any marked 
improvement. The poor grades have a 
difficult time attracting buyers, as the 
fancies are rxding at such low prices. 
Good roses are the stifFest article on the 
market and all stock moves with celerity. 
American Beauty remain comparatively 
scarce. The medium sizes are the scarce 
article in this line. Bulbous stock con- 
tinues to improve and tulips are now 
seen at their best. Since the invasion ot 
the famous eastern violets the local vio- 
let situation is astride the horns of a 
dilemma. The imported goods have the 
call and are selling far better than a few 
weeks ago. 

The Florists' Club held its regular 
bi-monthly meeting Wednesday evening 
in Handel hall. The evening was devoted 
to an exhaustive discussion of modern 
greenhouse construction. A number of 
prominent members of the trade took 
part in the discussions. 

The next club exhibition will be held 
Wednesday, February 17, at Handel hall. 
Roses, carnations and all flowers in sea- 
son will be covered and an interesting 
event is anticipated by those having the 
management in hand. After the regular 
exhibition in the afternoon a club meet- 
ing and a banquet will follow. The pub- 
lic will be admitted to the hall between 
fixed hours. Phil Hauswirth is sparing 
no pains to make this one of the most 
successful of this season's club shows. 

The next sectional winter meeting of 
the club will be held on the evening of 
February 13 at the Drexel cafe, corner of 
Cottage Grove and Thirty-ninth streets. 
Wm. A. Moak will deliver an address on 
the subject of club membership and its 
benefit. The club is sending out neatly 
printed programmes of the schedule of 
club events for the balance of the season. 
An active campaign has been inaugurated 
with a view to swelling the membership 
of the club to the 500 mark. 

Kuehn & Pearson have bon3;ht the 
stock and rented the greenhouses of John 
Hoeft, 920 North Campbell avenue, for a 
term of twenty years. The premises 
were leased from Mrs. Charles Held. 
These gentlemen were formerly employes 
of W. L. Palinsky. 

Miss Anna Kreitling was married to 
Chas. Kochman Sunday, January 31. 
They will be at home on Claremont ave- 
nue after March 1. Mrs. Kochman is a 
sister of Walter Kreitling. 



igo4. 



The American Florist. 



47 



A serious fire was narrowly averted 
last Saturday in the Atlas block, in which 
there are about a dozen florists' stores. 
The fire partially destroyed several cases 
of moss in the warehouse of the E. F. 
Winterson Company. 

Peter Reinberg has been confined to his 
bed by sickness. He was able to be out 
the last days of the week. 

Daniel Branch is in Minneapolis, Minn , 
where he was called on account of his 
mother's illness. 

John Zeck, who was formerly with ]. 
A. Budlong, has taken a position with E. 
C. Amling. 

Visitors this week were W. Bertermann, 
of Indianapolis, Ind.; R. Will, of Minne- 
apolis, Minn.; Robert King, of the King 
Construction Company, Toronto; J. W. 
Lyon, of Belvidere, 111.; J. F. Ammann, of 
Edwardsville, 111.; A. Jablonsky, of Wells- 
ton, Mo.; E. G. Hill, of Richmond Ind. 



New York. 



The cut flower market continues about 
as last reported. Carnations and roses 
are holding up more steadily than for 
several weeks, American Beauty leading, 
but there is not the usual winter anima- 
tion and the satisfactory marketing of 
some things is due more to lightness of 
supply than to seasonable demand. 
Violets retain their low prices as hereto- 
fore. A season of temperate weather 
would help the violet crop greatly in its 
sale and, no doubt, when that comes the 
growers will have a more comfortable 
experience. All bulbous stock, including 
fine Golden Spur narcissi, isoverplentiful, 
selling being devoid of any hopeful feat- 
ures. Lily of the valley shares in the 
depression although of excellent quality, 
as a rule. Lilacs have never been so good 
nor so plentiful here at this season as at 
present. 

The dinner of the New York Florists' 
Club will be held Saturday, February 20, 
at 7:30 p. m., at the St. Denis hotel. A 
corps of entertainers has been engaged 
and every effort is being made by the 
efficient committee to insure an enjoyable 
evening. 

Victor S. Dorval, of Woodside, has pur- 
chased tour acres of ground at Manhas- 
set, L. I., for the building of a new plant. 
Several more growers are talking of 
doing the same thing. Taxes are getting 
too high to make it pay in greater New 
York. 

A son of Gustav Frumiere, of Jersey 
City, died January 28 from the effects of 
excessive cigarette smoking. The boy 
was thirteen years of age. 

Mrs. Julius Hanft died Monday, Feb- 
ruary 1. 



Philadelphia. 



A new device for collecting the black 
soot from bituminous coal smoke has been 
installed at Robert Craig & Sons and it 
■ appears to work like a charm. A fan 
run by water power draws the smoke 
from the stack near the bottom and 
forces it through several thin sheets or 
sprays of water which spread completely 
across the special smoke flue. It is then 
forced against a series of clay tiles set on 
end, to which much of the smoke sticks 
and which is again washed off by the 
falling water to the bottom of the flue 
and empties into a submerged tank. 
Here the soot rises to the top from which 
it is gathered, as it has a good commer- 
cial value. After the cleansing process 
the smoke passed back into the main 
stack and averages at least seventy-five 
per cent purer. The drait is about the 




STANDING SHIELD AT FUNERAL OF GEN. J. B. GORDON. 



same, there being no noticeable difference. 
Should this prove as successful as the 
inventors claim, and as the trial appears 
to prove it will, it should meet with 
great favor everywhere. 

Another spell of extreme cold weather 
has made further inroads on the coal 
pile. Some of the growers say that they 
have already burned as much as last sea- 
son and what is required from now until 
the spring season will bring up this item 
of expense to a record breaking point. 
Business is slow; there seems no life to it 
and still there is a scarcity of flowers in 
some lines. Beauty roses are noticeably 
scarce. Liberty fill in nicely and are 
taken in preference to the shorter Beauty. 
Bulbous stock is now to be seen in 
quantity, all the lines being full. Double 
Von Sions came in a week ago and are 
now to be had by the thousand. Car- 
nations are at their best and some 
extra fine stock is seen, the stars being 
Prosperity, Lord, etc. Craig's Vesper, 
the new fringed white, is very fine and S. 
S. Pennock claims it to be one of the best 
sellers. 

There was a very interesting meeting 



of the Florists' club last Tuesday even- 
ing. The chief attraction was the paper 
read by Secretary W. J. Stewart on "We 
and Our Field." This was handled in a 
masterly manner, being full of good 
thoughts and suggestions. It was well 
received and he was given a vote of 
thanks by the club. A. Fahrenwald is 
to tell us how to grow Liberty roses at 
the March meeting and as his stock is 
now the best in the country he should 
have a large audience. 

M. B. Myers, of the Colonial Flower 
shop, has filed a petition in bankruptcy. 
K. 

Boston. 

The January exhibition at Horticul- 
tural Hall on Saturday was the best on 
record. Over five hundred bottles of 
orchid blooms were shown by the F. L. 
Ames estate, W. N. Craig gardener; J, E. 
Rothwell, E.Johanssengardener.and Mrs. 
J. L. Gardner, Wm. Thatcher gardener, 
to whom were awarded the Appleton sil- 
ver gilt medal, silver medal and bronze 
medal respectively. There were c-chid 
plants by Lager & Hurrell and Colonel 



48 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 6, 



Charles PfaflF, George Melvin gardener, 
the latter being given a certificate of 
merit lor superior cultivation ol Coelo- 
gyne cristata var. Chatsworth. There 
were two magnificent tables of Lorraine 
begonias, one for exhibition only from 
R. i& J. Parquhar & Company, the other 
from J. Montgomery Sears, Alex. Ogg 
gardener. Mr. Ogg received a certificate 
of merit tor superior cultivation as dis- 
played in these begonias, an illustration 
of which was given in last week's issue of 
the American Florist. Robert Cam- 
eron, of the Harvard Botanic Garden, 
received a certificate for Acacia Boyleana 
and a cultural certificate for Chorizema 
ilicifolium. A sport from the Mrs. Law- 
son carnation, striped in the way of Mrs. 
M. A. Patten, was shown by the Rock- 
land greenhouses, and was recognized by 
the award of a certificate of merit. The 
prize competitions brought out some 
superb groups of Primulasinensis, P. stel- 
lata and P. obconica from E. J. Mitton, 
J. Lawson gardener; E. W. Breed and 
Mrs. J. L. Gardner; violets from Norris 
F. Comley and Colonel Pfaff, and freesias 
from Mrs. E. M. Gill. E. A. Orpet showed 
another of his seedling cattleyas, a cross 
between C. maxima and C. cinnabarina. 
The next important exhibition will be the 
spring show in March. 

The cut flower trade moves along 
somewhat better than during the two 
previous weeks. There are no special 
features except a fair advance in the 
value of carnations. McKinley day, 
which was looked forward to as a possi- 
ble factor in the carnation market, failed 
utterly in that respect here. 

John Washek, for many years manufac- 
turer of florists' wire designs, committed 
suicide by shooting himself on January 
28, in his workroom in the rear of 
Sutherland's store. The cause was 
despondency over dull business. He 
leaves a wife and seven young children. 

George Sutherland, who underwent an 
operation at the city hospital two weeks 
ago, is about again. 



St. Louis. 



One certainly gets a taste of the strenu- 
ous life visiting members of the trade 
these frigid days. It is not encouraging 
to learn "there is not much doing except 
in funeral work." Trade conditions, 
however, are somewhat improved. The 
prevailing cry is that white and pink 
roses are scarce, very scarce. Red is more 
plentiful. Yellow is seen only occasion- 
ally. Liberty roses are not on the market. 
Violets have taken a downward slant, 
quotations being from 50 to 60 cents. 
Roman hyacinths are more abundant 
than ever. Stevia is out of the market 
entirely. 

The members of the Florists' Club will 
give an entertainment and hop at H. 
Haney's hall February 19. An interest- 
ing programme has been prepared for the 
meeting of the club February 11. F. J. 
Fillmore will talk on "Carnation Grow- 
ing," and E. W. Guy will lead the dis- 
cussion on "Propagating Carnations." 
This is to be acarnation meeting. Local 
growers are expected to show vases as 
well as those out of town. 

Geo. E. McClure and Miss Ida Norton 
were quietly married the evening of 
February 1. Only a few intimate friends 
were present at the ceremony, which was 
quite informal. Mr. and Mrs. McClure 
left February 2 for Manhattan, Kas., 
for a week's visit with Mrs. McClure's 
family. 

The banquet to be given in honor of 



the executive committee of the S. A. F. is 
expected to take place on the evening of 
March 5. A jolly, instructive and appe- 
tizing time is anticipated. Every member 
of the Florists' Club should attend if 
possible. 

The St. Louis Cactus Association held 
an interesting meeting on January 31. 
Subjects under discussion were "Epiphyl- 
lums, Their Care and Culture",and "Ferti- 
lizing Succulent Plants." 

Geo. Walbach is having a busy time 
with decorations. His most notable 
work of recent date was at the banquet 
given to a number of capitalists by 
Mayor Wells. 

That the firm of Grimm & Gorley is 
enterprising is evidenced by the new 
delivery wagon recently received. It is 
one of the finest of the kind in the city. 

C. H. Thompson, of Leland-Stanford 
University, will soon arrive in the city to 
take charge of the collection of succulents 
at the Missouri Botanic Garden. 

The Bentzen Floral Company has a 
house of fine Flora HiU and Joost carna- 
tions. The stock lor early spring sale is 
in good shape. 

Mrs. H. G. Beming has been removed 
from the hospital to her home. Her con- 
dition continues to be anything but 
satisfactory. 

The Michel Plant and Bulb Company 
has commenced work on the new range 
of houses. F. K. B. 



Baltimore. 



The weather, upon which the florists' 
trade so closely depends, continues win- 
try and exceptionally trying, the records 
of the weather bureau showing that Jan- 
uary was the coldest of thirty-three 
years, the average being 27.3°, which is 
5° or 6° below the normal mean temper- 
ature of that period. Still more abnor- 
mal is the continued cold. In ordinary 
seasons in this section afteracold "spell" 
of two or three days there is a thaw, fol- 
lowed by a spring-like interval of a week 
or so, but this year the cold has been 
unremitting and snow has covered the 
ground for weeks. Fortunately, one 
favorable feature was the few cloudy 
days, the atmosphere generally being 
clear and inspiring. 

After the holiday trade, which hardly 
displayed the swing of last year, there 
was the usual dullness which is expected 
for a week or two in January. This has 
now yielded to a better demand, and 
most of the cut flowers oflered have been 
taken up each week, though prices may 
have been shaded somewhat from former 
years. At Christmas, carnations were 
hardly equal to the market's require- 
ments, and this condition still exists at 
times, good whites being especially in 
request. Roses are in fair supply, though 
those really first-class are insufficient for 
calls. Poorer grades drag somewhat, 
and the severe weather cuts oS'the street 
vendors, who usually take up a consid- 
erable proportion of this material. Nor 
are good violets abundant, and they 
seem in less demand than in times gone 
by. Some large growers have dropped 
out, and one shipper only, John E. Bar- 
tell, seems to have the secret of maintain- 
ing the quantity, color and fragrance 
which many others have lost. 

The Liberty rose has practically disap- 
peared here, owing to the difficulties of 
Its culture. Few Meteors are grown, the 
dread of the black and bull-headed flow- 
ers, which follow periods of low temper- 
ature and clouds, operating against it. 
Here, as in most other localities, a great 



desideratum is a red rose of moderately 
easy cultivation. 

Isaac H. Moss, of Govanstown, is send- 
ing in well-bloomed astilbes, apparently 
belated for Christmas forcing, but they 
do not seem to take as in the holiday 
season. John M. Rider is shipping hand- 
some cyclamens, this gentleman being a 
farmer, who embarked a few years ago 
in the growing of violets, then ventured 
into the carnation field, being one of our 
largest shippers, and now competing 
with those "to the manor born" in rais- 
ing blooming plants. 

It sounds provincial to write it, but 
the opening of a new hotel has given the 
greatest impulse here of years to floral 
decorations. The handsome Belvedere 
has been in the six weeks or so of its 
business, the scene of many dinners, 
receptions, and other social functions of 
the fashionable set, including many 
strangers who alight here for an interval 
on journeys from north or south, and so 
largely stimulated the employment of 
flowers as to have a marked and health- 
ful influence on the trade. 

Henry Weber, of Oakland, whose death 
was recorded in the last issue of The 
American Florist, was widely known 
here and much respected. His career as 
a gardener began in Maryland as a 
grower of superb vegetables, and years 
ago he supplied the hotels of the moun- 
tain resorts then maintained by the Bal- 
timore and Ohio railroad. On the occa- 
sion of the meeting in Baltimore of the 
American Pomological Society, he made 
a great exhibit of the varieties in the cul- 
ture of which he was famous. He was a 
man of deep religious feeling, and his 
business envelopes often bore numerous 
scriptural texts and religious exhorta- 
tions. 

The Florists' Exchange, a joint stock 
concern, which is the only intermediary 
between the growers and retailers of this 
community (there being no wholesale 
florists here), closed its year recently 
with 3, good showing of increased busi- 
ness. John J. Perry, now the manager, 
has systematized its work, and the oper- 
ations are carried on with promptness 
and advantage to both growers and buy- 
ers. 

Th« agricultural experiment station of 
Maryland, at the request of the Garden- 
ers' Club, is undertaking to procure sta- 
tistics of the florists' industry of this 
state, including the quantity of glass 
maintained, capital invested, amounts 
expended for labor, etc. There is no 
legal compulsion to make the returns, as 
in the census, and some object to disclos- 
ing their business, although it is prom- 
ised that reports will be confidential. 

At the instance of the new general 
superintendent of Parks, the custom 
which has prevailed of late years of 
growing plants for cut flowers in the 
greenhouses of the city parks has been 
discontinued. Large and costly struc- 
tures erected as was popularly supposed 
for the production of budding plants for 
the various parks and squares, were 
devoted in reality to forcing roses, carna- 
tions and violets, and even the culture of 
mushrooms was exploited. This has 
provoked much criticism and seemed 
likely to result in a public scandal, for 
there was no public knowledge of the 
disposition made of the flowers. They 
were certainly not for the delectation of 
visitors, as the houses were kept locked 
and were inaccessible, and necessarily so, 
since the growing of roses with the con- 
stant opening of doors by visitors was 
of course impossible. Some other reforms 



igo4. 



The American Florist. 



49 



are expected under the new park direc- 
tion. 

Over the stand of a vendor in paper 
flovirers in one of our city markets a con- 
spicuous sign reads: "Botanical Art 
Study!" S. B. 



Washington, D. C, 



With the landscape covered with nearly 
a foot of snow and the Potomac by an 
equal thickness of ice, we are in a posi- 
tion to sympathize with the florists of 
those semi-arctic regions between Boston 
and Duluth, who have been pelting the 
mercury with high priced coal. Consid- 
ering the fact that a large and varied 
assortment of weather was crowded 
into the past week, trade was good. 
There were several entertainments at the 
White House; dinners to the outgoing 
and incoming secretaries of war, and 
many other functions, all of which called 
for a large amount of first-class stock. 
On account of the cold the trade in pot 
plants is at a standstill and several of 
the growers will have azaleas left on 
their hands. Roses are scarce and unless 
we have an exceptional spell of fine 
weather they will continue so for some 
time to come. Carnations are in fair 
quantity but bulbous stock, excepting 
white and yellow tulips, comes in slowly. 

On a recent visit to the Soldiers' Home 
I was much interested in looking over 
the handsome and commodious conserva- 
tory. The palms and ferns are sheltered 
by a curvilinear house that is an orna- 
ment to the grounds. In the rear are 
several even span houses for cut flowers 
and bedding plants, as thousands of the 
latter are annually used in beautifying 
the grounds of the institution. The 
palms and ferns are arranged in a unique 
rockery of petrified vegetable matter, 
the material, I was told, having been 
brought from Geneva, Ohio. The clever 
work of arrangement is by Alex McPher- 
son, florist and gardener at the home. 

A handsome silver cup, the gift of Fred. 
H. Kramer, the florist, is now in the 
hands of the Baltimore bowlers. Mr. 
Kramer presented the cup with the 
understanding that it be contested for by 
the clubs of Philadelphia, Baltimore and 
Washington. On the night of January 
27 the Baltimore Club came on and 
l.lted the cup from our giants. The 
locals say they are going after it some 
time in March. As the weather will be 
warmer by that time, their "rheumatiz" 
may be better, at any rate, we hope so. 

At the annual state dinner given Janu- 
ary 14 by President and Mrs. Roosevelt 
to the diplomatic corps, the state dining 
room was even more elaborately decor- 
ated than usual for a dinner. The long 
mirror surrounded by a French gilt 
frame, purchased during the reign of 
Dolly Madison at the White House, was 
used on the table for the first time in sev- 
eral years. Floral plaques of rare laven- 
der orchids, alternated with white carna- 
tions, were placed upon the mirror, while 
tall vases of flowers alternated with 
plaques of orchids the full length of the 
table. 

John Robertson attended the dinner to 
commemorate the birth of Robert Burns 
and reports that it was an enjoyable 
event. Carnations were the flowers used, 
which seems to have been a misfit, for 
the memory of Burns and the heather 
are inseparable. 

On January 29, the anniversary of the 
birth of President McKinley, the Ohio 
delegation in the house of representatives 
furnished carnations to all the other 
members of the house. The carnation 



was also worn on that day by many 
others. 

F. H. Kramer. Z. D. Plackistone, A. 
Gude & Brother and G. B. Shaffer all 
report a good week of business, the most 
serious handicap being scarcity of stock. 

The Gridiron club closed the week with 
a dinner, in the decorations for which 
Small turned himself loose and eclipsed 
his previous efforts. S. E. 



Milwaukee. 



The Milwaukee Florists' Club had its 
annual carnation show Tuesday, Feb- 
ruary 2. There were some excellent 
exhibits of Milwaukee growers. The 
Lawson, Enchantress and Adonis grown 
by Nic. Zweifel were notable. Some well 
grown stock of I^ord was shown by Pohl 
& Krause; Heitman & Baerman showed 
Crane and Higinbotham; Otto Tietbohl 
had Lord and Wm. Helwig displayed 
Mrs. E. A. Nelson and a seedling white 
carnation, all very fine; J. D. Thompson 
Carnation Company exhibited Mrs. 
Nelson Fisher, which certainly is a fine 
carnation, also Mrs. M. A. Patten agood 
variegated variety, and some Adonis. 
There was also a magnificent vase of 
Estelle. F. Dorner & Sons showed The 
Belle and Lady Bountiful, a very good 
white carnation. The Chicago Carna- 
tion Company exhibited a fine lot of Cru- 
sader which was well liked, also some 
Fiancee which elicited considerable atten- 
tion on account of its monster size. The 
same firm also showed Harlowarden, 
Reliance, Dorothy Whitney, Prosperity, 
Enchantress, Indianapolis and Alba. 
The club provided eatables, drinkables 
and cigars. 

There was a slight improvement in 
the market the last week, especially 
in the rose line. All roses sold well 
and at good prices. Carnations are 
arriving in increasing numbers and in 
econsquence all orders are easily filled 
and at reasonable prices. Bulbous 
stock is still slow sale, excepting some 
good La Reine tulips which are moving 
fairly well. There is an exceptionally 
good call at present for green goods, 
especially in the adiantum line. Plants 
have been slow sale the past month due 
to the extremely cold weather, the aver- 
age temperature being 16° above zero. 

Fred. Schmeling is able to be about 
again after being laid up with a broken 
ankle for five weeks. 

Charles C. Carpenter, the new park 
superintendent, assumed his duties Feb- 
ruary 1. 

Visitors: J. C. Vaughan, Chicago; Otto 
Sylvester, Oconomowoc, Wis.; James 
Hartshorne and J. D. Thompson, joliet, 
111. H. 



Montreal. 



The Gardeners' and Florists' Club is 
progressing nicely. The last meeting, 
held on February 1 , had the best attend- 
ance for years. Joseph Bennett was 
elected president to succeed W. Whiting, 
who has removed from his old home in 
Montreal. 

The florists in this city are experiencing 
the dullest period they ever had. Good 
roses are very scarce. The weather is 
not helping to improve this state of 
affairs. Snowstorms are succeeding each 
other at close intervals. G. V. 



Rochester, N. Y.— The Western New 
York Horticultural Society began its 
annual meeting here January 27 with a 
large and enthusiastic attendance. 



OBITUARY. 



William A. Burgess. 

Wm. A. Burgess, of Glen Cove, an old- 
time florist and famous grower of Mare- 
chal Niel roses, and father of the young 
man who lost his life in the Hotel Royal 
fire a number of years ago, died at 
Brooklyn, Sunday, January 31, aged 83 
years. 

Joseph Liggett. 
Joseph Liggett, for many years a florist 
at Lowellville, O., died January 28 at the 
state hospital at Cleveland. He was 75 
years of age and for three years had been 
confined to the state institution. He is 
survived by but two brothers, William 
and James. The former resides in Lowell- 
ville and the latter in the country. His 
wife preceded him to the grave. 

Leroy Hopkins. 
Leroy Hopkins, of Cortland, N. Y., 
dropped dead of heart disease on the 
afternoon of February 1, while at work 
in his greenhouse preparing flowers for a 
funeral. Mr. Hopkins had been subject 
to heart trouble for some time. Four or 
five years ago he dropped in a faint in 
Brown's drug store, but was restored to 
consciousness after hard work. The day 
before his death he complained of not 
feeling well, and did not return to work 
until 2 o'clock, feeling somewhat better. 
He was filling an order for flowers for 
the funeral of William H. Crane, of 
Homer, when he fell to the floor, 'or. 
Dana was summoned, but life had 
departed. Coroner Moore was notified 
and pronounced death due to heart fail- 
ure. The deceased was about thirty-six 
years of age, and is survived by his 
father, L. C. D. Hopkins; his wife, one 
son, and a brother, Harry S. Hopkins, of 
Binghamton. Mr. Hopkins was one of 
Cortland's most progressive and success- 
ful business men. His greenhouses were 
the largest and most successful in this 
section of the state. A. I. B. 

William Thompson. 
William Thompson, gardener to the 
Manhattan state hospital. Central Islip, 
L. I., died suddenly at the age of 63 
years, January 17, and was buried in the 
Catholic cemetery at Bay Shore. L. I. 
January 20. He was born in Dublin^ 
Ireland, and came to this country in 
1888. He became widely known here as 
a gardener of skill. He was employed at 
the Manhattan hospital for the last five 
years, and had marked success, his exhi- 
bitions of vegetables and plants at the 
fairs of Riverhead, Huntington, and at 
the Barkley lyceum, being awarded the 
highest prizes in their class. He was 
formerly gardener at the N. Y. Experi- 
ment station, Geneva, N. Y., where he 
had charge of the growing of vegetables 
for the World's Fair, Chicago, in 1893. 
His success and skill were here again 
very marked, as he was awarded a 
diploma for high class vegetables grown 
both in the open and under glass. He 
was well known in Ireland for his skill in 
growing all kinds of fruits, flowers and 
vegetables, and was awarded a certifi- 
cate of merit by the Royal Horticultural 
Society of Ireland. The passing away of 
Mr. Thompson will be very much regret- 
ted by the many friends who knew him, ' 
because they all loved him for his simple! 
pure and honorable ways. D 



60 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 6. 



Nineteenth Year. 

Subscription, $1.00 a year. To Europe, $2.00. 
Subscriptions accepted only from those 
in the trade. 
Advertisements, on all except cover pages, 
10 Cents a Line, Agate; $1.00 per inch. 
Cash with Order. 
No Special Position Guaranteed. 
Discounts are allowed only on consecutive inser- 
tions, as follows— 6 times, 5 per cent; 13 times, 
10 per cent; 26 times, 20 per cent; 
52 times, 30 per cent. 
Space on front pages and baclc cover page sold 
only on yearly contract at $1.00 per inch, net. 
The Advertising Department of the American 
Florist is for florists, seedsmen and nurserymen 
and dealers in wares pertaining to those lines ow/y. 
Orders lor less than one-hall inch space not accepted. 
Advertisements must reach us by Wednesday to 
secure insertion in the issue for the following 
Saturday. Address 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO., Chicago. 
IVken sending us change of address, alwayssend 
the old address at the same time. 

The severe winter and its heavy 
demand on the coal supply should 
advance the price ot all greenhouse 
plants from fifteen to twenty-five per 
cent. 

Pot roses of all kinds should have a 
temperature of 55° at night and 65° to 
70° during the day. Frequent fumigating 
to keep off greenfly will be necessary. 
Roses want abundant ventilation from 
the start, but sudden changes must be 
carefully avoided or mildew will appear. 
Daisies should have plenty of water, air 
and light, and (umigating at least once a 
week. Fifty degrees at night and 60° to 
65° in day will just suit them. 

Azaleas for Easter blooming should 
now be given all possible sunlight and 
abundant water and all new growths 
should be pinched back. A night tem- 
perature of 50° to 55° and day tempera- 
ture of 65° to 70° is about right for them. 
Acacias require essentially the same con- 
ditions and treatment. Special care 
should be observed to prevent their going 
dry at any time. Genistas will come 
along all right under similar conditions. 
They particularly require all the fresh air 
that can possibly be given them. 

Wistarias for Easter. 

Ed. Am. Flosist:— What course will be 
necessary to force wistarias for Easter? 
Green Grower. 

About five weeks at a moderate tem- 
perature, 50° at night, will land them all 
right; give plenty of syringing at the 
start. Wm. Edgar. 



Late Blooming Chrysanthemums. 

Ed. Am. Florist: — Kindly give me a 
list of late blooming chrysanthemums. 
I notice good blooms in the market as 
late as Christmas and would like to try 
them if I knew the varieties. 

Constant Reader. 

The following is a list of the best late 
blooming varieties: 



Yanoma. 

W. H. Chadwiok. 

Merry Xmas. 

Maud Dean. 
Superba. 

Mrs. E. Bucttner. 
H. \V. Rieman. 



WHITE. 

Mrs Rufus W. Smith. 
Convention Hall. 
White Bonnaffon. 
riNK. 

Mrs. S. T. Murdock. 
Xeno. 

YELLOW. 

H. W. Buokbec. 
Yellow Chadwick. 



To be successful with late blooming 
chrysanthemums care must be taken to 
select only fresh young growing stock at 
time of planting which should be done 
during July or the first part of August. 



Then aim to take the terminal bud at 
about October 1 to 15. The main point 
to be taken into consideration is to hold 
back the ripening of the wood until as 
late a date as possible. It makes quite a 
difference in what part of the country 
"Constant Reader" is located because if 
there is an over abundance of bright 
warm weather in the late fall months the 
wood will ripen and the bloom mature 
in spite of your calculations. 

C. W. Johnson. 



Railroad Gardening. 
The Alton railroad has sent out irom 
Chicago a corps of landscape gardeners 
to examine the different stations on its 
lines from that city to St Louis and from 
Kansas City to St. Louis, with the view 
of preparing plans for the beautifying of 
depot grounds. It is the intention tolay 
out flower beds, grass plots and shrub- 
bery patches at every important station 
along the lines between the points named, 
with the view of making the grounds as 
attractive as possible for the visitors to 
the world's fair at St. Louis. The work 
of fixing up the grounds according to the 
plans now being prepared will be begun 
as soon as the weather will permit. 



Mamaroneck, N. Y.— Samuel Riddell. 
gardener to F. A. Constable, has a white 
sport from Bnchantress. The flowers 
are said to be very large and of pure, glis- 
tening white, with regular Enchantress 
habits. 

SITIATIONS, WANTS, TOR SALE. 

One Cent Per Word. 

Cash with the Adv. 

Plant Advt. NOT admitted under this head. 

Every paid Bubscriber to the American Florist 
for the year 1903 is eotitled to a flve-line want 
ADV. (situations only) free, to be used at any 
time during the year. 

Situation Wantad— By good all-around grower 
age 36, single. P I. care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— Hy youn^' man as rose 
grower; 7 years' fxperience. Address 

R, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted-I5y youne lady experienced 
in cut flower store. Must be in Chicago. Address 
E M, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted -Private place by flrst-class 
man, 30 years' exoerience; 10 years in last place. 
liox 20. care American Florist. 

Situation Wantad— By florist and gardener on 
private place: age 36, single; 21 years' experience. 
Address I F, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— As foreman or manager. 
Twenty years experience in best private and 
commercial places in country. 

D S, 84 Hawley St., Boston. 

Situation Wanted— By practical llorist. grower 
of roses, carnations, 'mums and general stock; 9 
years experience. Address 

R B, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— As foreman. CarnatioDs, 
roses and general stock. Single, age 27. Refer- 
ences. Life experience. Address 

George, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted--By all-around florist, life 
experience, carnations, roses and general stock, 
on a»relail place. "Address 

Vercy Kogeks, St. Johnsbury, \t. 

Situation Wanted— By practical florist: 25 
yenrs growiog ttne roses, carnations, 'mums 
and general stock; good desiu'^er. Address 

W. H. Florist, P. ()., Detroit. Mich. 

Situation Wanted— By young man as assistant 
in private place. Understands carnations, roses, 
violets, etc. Sober and industrious; good refer- 
ences. H D, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— As head gard<-ner in private 
place, understanding greenhouse work, vegetable 
raising, home landscaping, poultry raising and 
bee culture single; 45 years old and sober. 

O V. care American Florist. 



Situation Wanted— By young man. 6 ye^rg' 
experience in retail florist business. Chicago or 
middle west preferred: good references; state 
wages. Address John Williams, 

928 N. Clark St., Chicago. 111. 

Situation Wanted— By a young married man 
on private or commercial place. Capable of tak- 
ing charge of small place; reference as to ability. 
Small town preferred. State wages. Address 
No. 35. care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By an experienced gardener 
of unquestionable ability. Well qualified to take 
charge of an up-to-date gentleman's country 
estate. Address 

P. B. R. Bos 486, Highland Park, 111. 

Situation Wanted— Carnation expert wants 
position on commercial place. 20 years' experi- 
ence in general greenhouse work. Best of refer- 
ences given. Give full particulars when you 
write. " Expert, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By young man. age 32, 
German, single. Experienced in palms, feme, 
bulbs, bedding, forcing stock and Easter plants. 
St. Louis preferred. Address C. J., 

care H. E. Soheffler, 738 Chicago Ave.. Chicago 

Situation Wanted— By competent gardener to 
take charge of gentleman's place, 18 years' 
experience and thoroughly understands the care 
private grounds, greenhouses, also forcing of 
grapesRnd peaches. First-class references. 

L B, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By energetic and practical 
gardener, age 37; thoroughly versed in theoretical 
and practical landscape gardening, cultivating 
and growing. German, some English. Is open 
for flrst-class position by March X Address 

G B, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted- By competent grower of 
roses, carnations, mums, bedding plants, palms, 
ferns: good propagator; some experience in mak- 
ing up and decorating: German, age 33:17 years' 
expcrienr-e. Around Chicago or central states 
preferred. C V, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted- By a single, sober man, age 
34; experienced in vegetable and nursery stock, 
in an all-around retail business where there is 
opportunity to loarn to grow cut flowers, carna- 
tions, etc. A country town preferred. State 
wages. Address " Box 679, Omaha, Neb. 

Situation Wanted— As foreman by practical 
man. First-class landscape gardener and florist. 
Grower of cut flowers and plants. Capable to 
take full charge on private or commercial plao«». 
18 years' experience. Southern state preferred. 
Plea.se state wages. Address 

LANDStAPE, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— As foreman by March 1st, 
nf 25.000 to 75,0C0 feet of gla>;s, in or within 25 to 
50 miles from Chicago. Have a thorough experi- 
ence in retail and wliolesale trade. I am young, 
27 years of age, but energetic and willing and c-an 
furnish flrst-class references. 

Box 15, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By married man as fore- 
man in commercial or private place, having now 
charge of the most up-to-date place in his vicinity 
and with best of reference. Can come at once; 
understands florist's business in all its branches 
and used to handling men. Good wages expected. 
With full particulars, address 

C O F, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By American, as manager. 
Good grower of cut flowers, palms and plants, 
well up in design and decoration. Thoroughly 
understand construction and hi-ating and can 
manage help. Furnish good references and will 
only accept good position where good wages will 
be paid. In answering give full particulars and 
wages you will pay. Address 

H. E. Seitz, Newville, Pa. 

Situation Wanted— By flrst-class florist of 
business ability. German, age 32, sinjtle. Life 
experience in cut flowers, roses, carnations, 
'mums, lilies, flowering bulbs, and everything in 
the forcing line, ferns, stove and bedding plants, 
also tasteful designer. Would take charge and 
manage small plaee of 10.000 to 25,000 feet of glass. 
Retail and wholesale business preferred. Having 
18 years' practical experience, Germany, England 
and United States, understand my business and 
can produce good stock. With 'view of good 
salary, share of proflts or active partner. 

Reliable, care American Florist. 

Help Wanted— A flrst-class florist for store 
work. Must be capable to act as head man. 

D B. care American Florist. 

Help Wanted— Florist and landscape gardener, 
for private place. Must be thoroughly compe- 
tent, sober and industrious. State wages. 

Oxford Retreat, Oxford, Ohio. 



tgo4. 



The American Florist. 



51 



Help Wanted— A reliable youDg man to stay in 
cut flower store that can decorate and plant 
flower beds in the springr. Address 

P. Walker A: Co., Louisville, Ky. 

Help Wanted— An experienced single man to 
grow vegetables for large private family; good 
permanent position for steady, industrious man. 
Alfbed Harding. Villa Nova, Pa. 

Help Wanted^Single man with some experi- 
pnce, lor general greenhouse work. References 
required.. State wages expected with board and 
room. ESTHERVILLE Greenuoises, 

EstherviUe, la. 

Help Wanted— V good nursery foreman who 
is capable of handling men and understands trans- 
planting thoroughly. First-class position for 
first-class man. Address 

The Cottage Gardens Co., Queens, L. I. 

Help Wanted— Competentman who thoroughly 
understands packing and shipping specimen 
nursery stock. 'First-class man can secure a 
permanent position. Address 

The Cottage Gardens Co., Queens, L. I, 

Help Wanted— An experienced violet grower. 
Thoroughly capable and well recommended to 
take care of greenhouses for violet culture in 
subucb of Chicago. State experience, age and 
salary wanted. Address 

B D, care Anrerican Florist. 

Wanted— To lease with option of buying a place 
of from 15,000 to 30.000 sq. feet of glass, wholesale 
trade preferred with necessary land, house, barns, 
etc. Must be in good condition and suitable for 
production of first-class slock. 

M D, care American Florist. 

Help Wanted — Bright, energetic young man to 
take charge of retail flower store. Must be thor- 
oughly up to-date as a designer and decorator. 
Address with reference as to ability, character, 
etc., stating wages expected. 

Currie Bros. Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Help Wantrd— An all-around man not over 35 
years old in retail place of 10,000 feet of glass. 
Must be a neat and rapid workman. Wages $6J 
per month. State age and reference; steady 
position. Seattle Floral Company, 

Fourth and Denny W^ay, Seattle, Wash. 



Wanted— To buy a second-hand Nicholson's or 
or Bailey's Dictionary. W'rite to 

Box ISt, South Lancaster, Mass. 

Wanted— An active young man with busi- 
ness ability and some capital, and experience in 
managing a large cut flower growing plant, 
wishes to correspond with a grower with view of 
buying interest in place and taking full charge. 
Only a clear, aggressive party in middle western 
states need reply-. Address 

Confidential, care American Florist. 



For Sale — Greenhouses; good location for local 
and shipping business in Michigan. Well stocked. 
Reason for selling, on account of failing health. 
H B, care American Florist. 

For Sale— Over 12.000 feet of glass, all heated 
by steam, in llrst-class condition. Will sell at 
reasonable price. Terms to suit. Address 

Glass, care American Florist. 

For Sale— Greenhouses. Good location for 
local and shipping business. Well stocked; win- 
ter coal laid in. Will sell cheap if sold at once. 
Selling on account of failing health. 

Jas. Richardson, London, O. 

For Sale— I will offer at public sale, Feb. 11, 
1904, greenhouse property consisting of 4.C0O feet 
of glass; well stocked. Also 8 room dwelling will 
positively be sold. Call or address 

W. S. Taqqabt, St. Clairsville, O. 



For Sale or Lease— Fine greenhouse estab- 
lishment of 10.000 feet of plass, in good condition 
and well stocked, with or without dwelling. Fine 
opening for a single man. Stock reasonable. 

X Y Z, care American Florist. 



For Sale or Lease— Between 30,000 to 40.000 feet 
glass; barn, dwelling house; hot water heating, 
constant water supply, two acres for cultivation 
in Bronx Borough, Ne^v York city. Address 

J. Ringlbr, 728 3d Ave., New York. 

\A/ontnrl Greenhouse Material for % span, 
iVdniUUi glass ISxlO; dbl. A sash bars and 
plates, ventilating fixtures, etc. Quote prices 
giving particulars for whole or part. 

NoRTUwEiT, care American Florist. 



Situation Wanted. 

As manager or chief assistant in retail cut 
flower store. Sixteen years' experience in 
first-class stores. Best reference. 

W F H, 2041 Arch St., Philadelphia. 



FOR SALE. 

3 New Greenhouses. 26x130 feet, each, in 
suburbs of Detroit, on street car line. Five 
cent fare. .Sell at great sacrifice. Easy terms 
Inquire quick. 

A. A. NALL, 778 Second Ave., Detroit, Mich. 



Position as foreman or manager in an up-to- 
date establishment; either wholesale, retail or 
mailing. Am up in all branches, catalogue mark- 
ing, building, heating and growing of fine stock. 
3,000,000 plants grown the past season. Three 
years in last place. 40 years old and a hustler. 
Northern place preferred. Married, temperate and 
strictly business. Best of reference as to ability 
and business qualities. Address Lone Star, 
611 No. Washington Ave., Dallas, Tex. 

For Sale-13,000 to 15,00 square feet of glass, 
splendid location, all retail trade, no difficulty 
in selling all you grow and more too. All new 
houses, small dwelling house, barn and every- 
thing new and up-to-date: 5 houses in carnations. 
2 in roses, 3 were in 'mums, now bedding plants, 
1 mixed house, fine palms, callas. smilax, aspara- 
gus, etc. Will take partner with privilege of all 
later if desired. Strictest investigation solicited. 
Ill health only reason for selling. Furmau 
boiler, electric lights, ofTioe. Everything up-to- 
date. Cost $11,100. A bargain for someone. No 
money wanted until everything is proved as 
represented. Apply to 

'W. BuTLEE, Chillicolhe, O. 

Always mention the American Florist 
when wrritinp; to advertisers. 



MitiiuuiiititiiituauuuuiiititituiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiimmitiiiiiititiutiiiiAmamiuitutiUiiuuitmta umiiiumiu uuuintauiMinuuy 

' FLORISTS' AMERICAN EXCHANGE 

WILL CONVERT INTO CASH 

I WHAT YOU CANNOT USE TO ADVANTA(iE===OTllERS ARE IN NEED OF 

Florists' Real Estate, with or without improvements, Nursery Land, Seed Farms, 
Buildings, Machinery, Store Outfits, with or without merchandise or good will. 
Fuel, Boilers, Fertilizers — anything pertaining to the business of a Florist, Grower 
or Seedsman, which he may cease to have use for. 



IT COSTS 



OIV OHA.lVO:« 



IVOTHIIVO 

TO 



If there is anyone in the United States or Canada who may have use for your property, we 
will find him for you, and collect our commission after sale has been negotiated, J- j/t 

WE ARE NOT IN COMPETITION WITH ANY OTHER FIRM IN EXISTENCE. 

In preparing^ your list of property for us, be sure to have description accurate and honestly made, 
and as far as possible supply photog;raphs. All our sales will be made conting;ent upon the 
truthfulness of representations made. Our charge is 5% on Real Estate for amounts under 
$(,000; on all amounts in excess of $1,000 we charge 2%; on all other property we charge 8%. 
Address all communications to 



I WE INVITE THE COOPEBATION OF THE WHOLE CRAFT. 



C. B. WHITNALL, 

Care Citizens Trust Company. MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



irnnTTWffnTtnnTTnTTnTTTTTTnTTTTTTTTTTTTTTnnniTTTnnTTTTnnntftu m iTWHHHWT H fTTTTnnnnTmnnfTnTmTTTTf unnnn T W fTfTnnTTnTTTTntt 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 



52 



The American Florist. 



Peb. 6, 



Cha^OcKdlar, 

Wholesale Commission Florist 

AND dealkh in 

ALL FLORISTS' SUPPLIES. 

51 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

Long Distance 'Phone Centra) 3598. 



Correspondence invited from growers of special- 
lies in Cut Flowers. 
Please yyiention the American Florist when writing. 

Geo. A. Kuhl, 

Pekin, 111. 

Grows for the Trade 

Roses, Carnations, Coleus, Boston 
and Piersoni Ferns, Geraniums, 
Primroses, Obconica, Cinnerarias, 
Etc., in bloom. 

SEE ADS IN LAST WEEK'S ISSUE. 
WRITE HIM. 

C. T^. KUEHN, 

Wholesale Florist, 

1122 Pine St, ST. LOUIS, MO. 

A Comalaia Li->i> »• uii..« Doslentu 

PUaie mention the A merican F lorist when writing. 

H.G.BERNING 

Wholesale florist 

t402 Pine St„ ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Please mention t/ie Ametiran Florist 7ftien writing. 

ICE BROTHERS 

128 N. 6th St., MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Wholesale Cut Flowers and Supplies. 



Wild Smilax 



Flowers billed at 
Market Prices. 



Shippers of choice Cut Flowers and Greens of aU 
kinds. Try us. 

(ginc abfolutc ^lotljttcnbtgtfit ! 



fiiermit $1.00 fiir ntein TOonnement 
ISiS ift bie WW eineS 3eben prompt fill 
ben ,american glorift' gu bega^Ien, toetl 
biefet eine abfolute Jlot^toenbiflteit fflr 
jeben ffllumenguc^tet tjt 

Sari ?toegnei, filabcaaa. 



Wbol^ale [lower/\arHgJ5 



Milwaukee, Feb. 4. 
Roses, Beauty, long per do/,. 3.00 

med. " 1 ijOia 2 OO 
short " .50® l.CO 

" Bride, Bridesmaids 6.00® 8.00 

" Meteor, Golden Gate 6.00® «.00 

" Perle 6.00@ 8.00 

Carnations 2.00® 4.00 

Smilax 15.00 

Asparagus 35.00@50.00 

Violets 50® .75 

Valley 3 00® 4.00 

Romans 2 00® 3.10 

Freesias 3.00 

Tulips SOU 

Pittsburg Feb. 4. 

Rosea, Beauty, specials 40.00(a60,00 

extras 2.=).00fci :i5.(j0 

No. 1 lO.OOfu -30.00 

•' " ordinary 300(31 6.00 

" Bride. Bridesmaid 3.00®Id.OO 

" Meteor 6.00(3)15 00 

" Liberties 13.00(3'35 00 

Carnations - 1.00(3> 8.00 

Lily of the valley ■ 3.00® 4.00 

Smilax 12.50(915.00 

Adiantum 1.00® 1.25 

Asparagus, strings 30.00®50.00 

Asparagus Sprengeri 2.00® 4.00 

Sweet Peas 50® 1.00 

Violets 50® I. .50 

Lilies 13.(0®20.00 

Mignonette 3 00@ 5.00 

Romans, Paper White 1.00® 3.00 

Tulips 2.00® 4.00 

Lilac 1.00® 1.5J 

Cincinnati, Feb 4. 

Roses. Beauty 2.00® 6.00 

" Bride, Bridesmaid 4.00@12.00 

" Liberty 4.00@10.00 

" Meteor, Golden Gate 4.00(Sli.OO 

Carnations 3.00® 6.00 

Lily of the valley 3.00® 4.00 

Asparagus 50.00 

Smilax 12,50@I5.00 

Adiantum l.OOca 1.60 

Violets 75® 1.00 

Narcissus 4.00 

Romans 4.00 

Harrisii per doz., 8.00 

Calla 18.50@15 00 

Sweet peas, Blanche Ferry 1.00 

St. Louis, Feb. 4. 

Roses, Beauty, long stem 3.00@4.00 

" Beauty, medium stem... 1 50®2.0U 

" Beauty, short stem 50@ .75 

" Bride," Bridesmaid 4.00® 8.00 

" Golden Gate 3.00® 6.00 

Carnations 1.00® 4.00 

Smilax 12.50®15.00 

Asparagus Sprengeri 1.00® 3.00 

" Plumosus .35.00@75.00 

Ferns per 1000, 2.00@2.75 

Violets, single 50® .eo 

Narcissus Paper White 2.00® 3.00 

Valley 3.00® 4.00 

Romans 1.00® 3.00 

Denver, Feb. 2. 

Roses, Beauty, long 25.00 

" -' meaium 15.00 

" " short 8.00 

Liberty 4.00® 8.00 

f Chatenay 4.00((i 7 00 

" Bride, Bridesmaid 4.00(i> 6 00 

Carnations 3.00® 4.00 

Smilax 20.00 



E. H. Hunt, 



WHOLESALE 



Cut riowers 

"THE OLD RELIABLE." 
76 Wabash Ave., ....CHICAGO. 

Please viention the A met ican Florist when writing. 



FANCY 



OUR SPECIftLTY. 

TELEGRAPH ORDERS FILLED 
PROMPTLY. 

THOMPSON CARNATION GO. 

JOLIET. ILL. 



tj.M.McGULLOUGH'SSONSl 

WHOLESALE \ 



FLORISTS [ 

ALSO SUCCESSORS TO Z 

THE CINCINNATI CUT FLOWER CO. [ 

b 

CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. \ 

Special Attention Given to Shipping Order*. p 
j 316 WALNUT ST. CINCINNATI, OHIO. ¥ 

■s f 

<'TTr'i"i''WTTniT-iiinT'wi"P"M''i"nMp''i"ir,m"inn 



OF ALL 
KINDS 



CUT FLOWERS 

and X^lorlait*' Svxpplies. 

Galax, bronze or green. 75c per 1000. Leucothoe 
Sprays, 50c per 100. Sphagnum Most, Fer.t. 

W^ire Work of all kinds for llorists. Special 
attention given to shipping orders. 

M/M MIIDPHY Cammliilen Dealer, 

nin. iriUHriii, isoe. sdsi., Cincinnati, o. 

Telephone, 980 Main. 



ROSES, 

CARNATIONS, 

BEAUTIES, 

VALLEY. 504 Liberty St., 



Pittsburg Gut Flower Co., Ltd, 

Wholesale Florists and Supplies. 



PITTSBURG, PA. 



Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 



KENNICOTT BROS. COMPANY 

WHOLESALE COMMISSION FLORISTS 



AND DEALERS^m ALL FLORISTS' SUPPLIES, 



42-44 E. Randolph St., 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



1904. 



The American Florist. 



53 



A.O.fl n'i^ " *> "«^-ft^>-^«t-ft^> '^^«t " ''■^■l> "-'■■^■'^ il.il4.ft.il.. <h.<Lilk ^ 



E.C.AMLING 



THE LARGEST, 

BEST EQUIPPED, \ 

MOST CENTRALLY LOCATED \ 

WHOLESALE p 

CUT FLOWER HOUSE | 

IN CHICAGO. I 

32, 34, 36 Randolph St., [ 

CHICAGO. \ 



Bassett&Washburn 

76 & 78 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO. 

•*•"""' rrr, Cut Flowers 

GREENHOUSES: HINSDALE, ILL. 

Please mention the American Florist when -writingt 



WEI LAND AND- RISCH 



CHICAdlO'S RELIABLE 

Wholetale Growers and Shipper* ol 

OUT FLOWERS. 

59 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

BBin> 70B WEEKLY PBIOE LIST. 



WHOLESALE FLORISTS 



Please mention the American Florist when writing. 

FRANK GARLAND, 

"n:, .. Cut Flowers 

■PEOIAL ATTENTION TTTT^Tgl^T fB 

GIVEN TO HARDY OUT *^ M3tXX.^J^ '^ 

B5-57 WABASH AVENUE, 
Telephone Central 3284, OXIIO.A.OO, 

Fiease mention the A merican Florist when writing, 

A. L. RANDALL GO. 

Wholesale Florists. 

19 & 21 Randolphs!., CHICAGO. 

Send for weekly price list and 
special quotations on 1000 lots. 



MIGHilEL 



Winandy 

"■».»?jrr, CUT FLOWERS 

60 WABASH AVE., C^AJC t^CCi 

Telephone 3067 Central. V.jmVjJWJW. 

J^ease mention the American Florist when writing. 

WIETOR BROS. 

"Sr;. .. Cut Flowers 

All telegraph and telephone orders 
given prompt attention. 

5t Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO. 

Please mention the Atnerican Florist when writing. 

Brant & Noe Floral Co., 

GROWERS OF 

Gut Flowers at Wholesale. 

Careful attention given shipping orders. 

58-60 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO. 



$2.00 




J. B. D[AMUD, 

WnOLESAIF CUT FIOWERS 



51 Wabash Ave., 



OHIOA.QO. 



PRIOE LIST. PerDoz 

Beauties, 30 to 36 inch stem , 14.00 to 8 5.00 

20 to 24 inch stem 3.00 

" 15 to 18 inch stem 1.50 to 2.00 

" 12 inch stem 75 to 1.00 

^v- Per 100 

Liberty and Chatenay 6.00 to 10.90 

IJrides and Bridesmaids 6.00 to 10.00 

Jleteor and Golden Gates 6.00 to 10.00 

Carnations 3.00 to 4.00 

fancy 3 00 to 5.00 

Valley 2.00 to 4.00 

Violets, double .SO to 1.50 

single 50 to .75 

Asparagus Plumosus — per string, 25 to 50o 

Asparagus Sprengeri Sprays 2.00 to 4.00 

„ . _ J Ferns,fancy $3.00 per 1000 .30 

Caldwell's Kwalitf Kounts Brand ^^^^:::::::;:::::::::::-,:::::[:::::::::-^^^^ 



CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 



CO 



J. a. BDDL0NG 

37-39 Randolph Street.^HJCAGO. 
Boses and 
Carnations 
A Specialty....* 

BENTHEY & CO. 

35 Randolph Street, CHICAGO. 

F. F. BEHTHEY, Manager. Wholesale and 

Consignments Solicited. Commission 



WHOLESALE 

GROWER of 



CUT FLOWERS 



FLORISTS 



HOLTON & HUNKEL CO., 

"Wholesale Cut flowers -- 


457 Milwaukee Street. MILWAUKEE, WIS. 


Wboifjale power/\arK^ 

Chicago, Feb. 5. 

Roses, Beauty, 30 to 36-in. stems 3.00® 4.00 

20 to 24 " 2.50 

15 to 18 " 1.50® 3 00 

" " 12 " 1.00@l.a5 

Liberty 6.00® 8.00 


GEO. REINBERG, 

"ts:?- Cut Flowers 

CHOICE AMERICAN BEAUTIES. 

"We will take care of your orders at 
reasonable prices. Prompt attention. 

51 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO, ILL. 


Chatenay 6.00@13.00 

Bride, Bridesmaid 6.00(g>10,00 

Meteor, Golden Gate 6.00@10.00 

Carnations 2.00® 3.00 

fancy 3.00® 5.00 

Valley 2.00® 4.00 

Asparagus Plumosus, per string 25 to 50o 
sprays 2.00@4.00 
" Sprengeri 2.00® 4 00 


Poehlmann Bros. Co. 

Wholesale Growers of 

KSlersIn Cut FlOWeM 

All telegraph and telephone order. -_ ,_ 




given prompt attention. 3>-o/ 


single 50® .75 

Leucothoe Sprays 1. 00 


GBBBNHonsss: Randolph StrMfc 
Morton Grove, lU. CHICAaO, ILL, 


Galax Leaves, Bronze, per 1000, 1.50 .15 

Green 1.00 

Adiantum 1.00 


Micliigan Gut Flower Exchange, 

WM. DILCER, Mgr. 


Fancy ferns... per 1000 2.50® 3.00 

Smilax 12.60@15.00 


Harrisii 2.00® 2.50 


All Cut Flowers in Season. 


SINNER BROS. 

Wholesale Growers A||T CI AUfEDC 
and Shippers of UUI rLUIffClld 
68 WABASH AVENUE, GHICAGO, ILL. 

With the Flower Telephone- 
Growers' Co. Central 3067. 

All telephone and telegraph orders 

given prompt attention. 


26 Miami Ave., DETROIT, MlCil. 


American Florist Advertisements 
Work Every Day. 



54 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 6. 



Leo N lessen 5I?fJlf 

ORCHIDS. 



After October 1st, Store will be open 
from 7:00 A. M. till 8:00 P. M. 



WHOLESALE FLORIST. 

1217 Arch Street, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



FLOWERS FOR EVERY DAY 



AND FOR EVERY OCCASION. 
QUANTITY UNL1IV1ITED. 
QUALITY UXCELLED. 



WE ARE OPEN FOR BUSINESS AT 6:00 O'CLOCK A. M. WE WANT YOUR TRADE. 



J. K. ALLEN, 



THE PIONEER 
HOUSE, 



106 West 28th St., New York, 



GEO. A. SUTHERLAND, 

Best Boston Flowers. 
All Florists' Supplies. 

Distributing Depot for the KORAL LETTERS. 

TELEPHOHE »7o MAIN. 34 Hawlcy St., BOSTON. 



liMP^tefiiiyf&ife 




^m;S{^SvTv^.sl84HAWLEY STREET. 



^^itl\0>V'=:,^\.'L^ W VvMV^'^ 



BOSTON. 



CITY HALL GUT FLOWER MARKET, 

15 Province St.. BOSTON, MASS. 



WELCH BROS. 

Best Flowers. Large Variety. Prompt Stilpments. Carefol Packing. 



THOMASYOUNGJr. 

WHOLESALE PLORIST. 

CHOICEST CUT FLOWERS. 

43 W. 28th St., NEW YORK CITY. 

Please mention the a meyictm Fionst when uutiting. 

eEORGE SALTFORD, 

WHOLESALE FLORIST. 



46 W. 29th street, NEW YORK. 

Tel. 3393 Madison Square. 
Specialties: VIOLETS AND CARNATIONS. 

Consignments of any good flowers solicited. 
Please mention the Atr^-ican Florist when writings 

N.Y. GUT FLOWER EXCHANGE 

Coogan BIdg. 6th Ave. and W. 26lh St., New York. 
Open for Cnt Flower Bales at 6 o'olook 
Every Morning 

DESIRABLE WALL SBACE TO RENT FOR 
ADVERTISING. 

JOHN DONALDSON, Secretary. 

^Hk 53 W. 28th St., and 45 W. 29th St. 

^I^v Also at 

^r Z6th St. and 34th St. Markets 

^ New York. 

FERNS, GALAX LEAVES, LEUCOTHOE SPRAYS 

OUR SPECIALTIES 

GREEN AND BRONZE GALAX LEAVES, 

75o per 1000; $6.00 and $6.50 per case of 10.000. 
Holly. Princess Pine and all kinds of Evergreens. 

Telephone 1214 Madison Square. 
Please mention the American Florist when writing. 



N.Lecakes&Go. 



Wbol^ale flower/\arKjfe 

Boston, Feb. 3. 

Roses, Beauty.extra 30. 00@ .50.00 

" " medium lO.OOgMOO 

" " ouUs 1 01® 5.00 

" Bride, Bridesmaid 2.00® 5 00 

" extra 600@I3.00 

" Liberty 4.00®10.00 

Carnations 1.00® 2.t0 

Fanoy 3 00® 5.00 

Violets 40® .75 

Lily of the valley 3,00® 3.00 

Harrisii lilies 6.00® 8.00 

Smilax 10.00® 15 00 

Adiantum 75® 1.00 

Asparagus .. 35 00@50.00 

Roman Hyacinths, P. W. narcissus l.CO® 2.f0 

Daffodils 1.00® 3.00 

Tulips 2.0C@ 3.00 

FHII.ASBLPHU, Feb. 3. 

Roses, Tea 6.00® 1 00 

" extra 13.0C(iaI50O 

Beauty, extra 35 00M50.00 

firsts 16.00«i)a5.00 

" Queen of Edgely, extra 3.=>.00((i'.50.00 

" . " " firsts 16.00(<i25.00 

Carnations 2.00® 8.00 

Violets, single 40® .60 

double 75® l.OO 

Lilv of the valley 3.00® 5.0O 

Daffodils 4.50® 5.00 

Tulip S.OC® 4.00 

Freesia 3.00® 5.00 

Lilac 75® 1.25 per bunch 

Asparagus 25.00®5fl.00 

Smilax 12.oe@15 00 

Buffalo, Feb. 4. 

Roses, Beauty 5.00@50.00 

Bride, Bridesmaid, Meteor 3.00@12.00 

Carnations 2.00® 6.00 

Harrisii 15.00 

Lily of the valley 3.00@ 5.00 

Asparagus, strings 40.00<(i 50.00 

Smilax 12. SOW 15.00 

Adiantum 50® 1 00 

Violets 40® 1.00 

Callas 8. 00® 12,60 

Sweet Peas 50® 1.(0 

Please mention the American Florist 
every time you write to an advertiser. 



SOUTHERN SMILAX. 

No. 1 quality on\y $5 50 per case of 50 lbs. Be 
sure and try it when you want Smilax. CALAXi 
bronze or green, 150 p(T lOCO. Discount on large 
orders. LAUREL FESTOONING, No. 1 quality, 
4c. 5c and 6c per yard. Always nn hand and large 
orders filled at short notice. FANCY or DAGGER 
FERNS, $1.50 per 1000. 




MJIIinfi^on, Maaa. 

Tel. offioe. New Salen. 
Long distance telephone connection. 

SMILAX and REAUTIES CHEAP. 

BOO Beauties, BH-inoh pots, well branched, 
J6.00 per 100. 

2,000 Smilax 3V4-inoh, stocky plants, 12.00 per 
100. Cash with order. 

Quality of plants guaranteed. 

ROSEMONT GARDENS. 



MONTGOMERY, 
ALA. 



Laurel Roping 

OLIVER L.TRONNEM.Vineland.N.J. 

Many Electrotypes 

SUITABLE FOR 

Folders, Circulars and Catalogues 

FOR SALE BY TUE 

M. FLORIST. "* "oSSISS." "• 



Flowers of All Kinds. 






OPEN FROM 7:00 A. M. TO :D0 P. M. 



THE PHILADELPHIA WHOLESALE FLOWER MARKET, 1224 Cherry Street, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



1904. 



The American Florist. 



55 



JOHN I. RAYNOR 

ARE THE BEST PRODUCT OF THE BEST 
GROWERS FOR THE NEW YORK MARKET. 



Adiantam Croweanum 

Sold here Exclaslvely. 



49 W. 28th Street, NEW YORK. 

Tel. 1998 Madison Square. 



YOUNG & NUGENT 



42 WesI 28lh Strast, 

Telephone 20«5 Madison Sq. 



Wholesale Florists. 



CATTLEYAS. GARDENIAS. VIOLETS. ROSES. CARNATIONS and all seasonable 
novelties. With our long experience in shipping, and competent assistants 
in our packing department, we are in a position to guarantee out-of-to^vn 
customers who place their orders with us that they %vill not be disappointed. 



Walter f. Sheridan, 

Wholesale Florist , 

Tslaphone OOS MkOlson Sqnur*. 

39 West 28th St., NEW YOBX. 



Talaphona No. 756 Madlaon Square, 




MOORE, HENTZ & NASH 

Wholesale Commission Florists. 



66 and 67 Wttt 2Sth St. 



NEW YORK Cin. 



Advice ot sale note daily. Statement an4 check 
weekly. All consignments, large or small, receive tb« 
same attention. CORRESPONDENCE INVITED. 



VIOLETS. 



WILLIAM GHORMLEY, 



VIOLETS. 



Wholesale " ■fcfcinawi wiiv iirnhh ■ 9 Commission 

Daily Receiver and Shipper ot Fresh Cut Flowers. 

Orchids, Roses, Carnations, Valley, Ciirysanthemums. 

lelephones 2200 and 2201 Madison iSquare. 57 West 28th Street, NEW YORK CITY. 



JOHN YOUNG 

tinltl Anerloan Beauties, 

Sarpasslng Carnations, 

Lily of the Valley, Orohlds, 

aad all Seaionable Floweri. 

SI Wast 28th St., NBW TOBK. 

Tel. 1905 Madiion Sq. 

THK RKCOQNIZED HEADQUARTERS IN 
NEW YORK CITY FOR 

Violets and Garnations 

•ROWERS and BUYERS make a note of thir It 
will be to your advantage. 

WM. H. GUNTHER. 
Weat 29t]i St., New York. 

Telephone 651 Madiion Square. 

Frank Miilang 

from 6 a. m. to 5. p. m. 

55-57 W. 26th St 

NEW YORK. 



Choice Carnations. 



Seiected Roses. 



Cit Flewer Exchange, 

Phone S9S Madiaon Square. 



ESTABLISHED 1872. 



JOHN J. PERKINS, 

COMIMISSION FLORIST, 

Solicits Consignments or Shipping Orders. 

BatlBtaction given in both. Tel. 956 Madison Sq. 

116 W. 80th SI.. N>w Yorli. *lio 48 W. 30tli 31. 

Bonnot Bros. 

WHOLESALE FLORISTS. 
6S and S7 W. 26th St. N<>u/ Ynrk 

Cut Flower Exchange, i^EJZ ' "^1%. 

OPEN 6:00 A. M. 

ta Uaequilled Outlet for Consigned Floweri. 



Traendly & ScJienck 

NEV YORK CITY, 
38 W. 28th Street, Cut Flower Exchange. 

New Telephone No. 798 & 7S9 Madiion Sq. 

Wbol^ale [lower/\arl^ 



New York, Feb. 2. 

Roses, Beauty, best 35.00@50.00 

" '• medium 8.00® 15. 00 

culls 1.00® 3.00 

Bride. Bridesmaid, G. Gate 3 00@15.00 

Liberty 3.00@35.00 

Carnations 2.00® 3.00 

" fancy and novelties 4.00@10.00 

Lily of the valley 1.00@ 3.00 

Lilies, Callas 6.00@10.00 

Violets 35® !40 

special 50(fh .75 

Smila.t 5.00@10.00 

Adiantum 35® .75 

Asparagus 25.00®50.00 

Cattleya Percivalliana 40 00@50.00 

Dendrobium formosum 30.00@40.00 

Cvpripediums 10.00@12.00 

Mignonette l.CO® 4.00 

Roman Hyacinths. 50® 2.00 

Tulips 1.00® 3.00 

Narcissus, Paper White l.OOriS 2.00 

Gardenias 25.00@50.00 

Stevia. per bunch, .10 to .25 

Freesia 10® .15 per bun. 

Jonquils, Daffodils l.C0@ 3.00 



Charies Miilang 

WHOLESALE FLORIST. 

Conservatory connected from which can ship 
ferns and decorative plants promptly 

50 West 29th St. NEW YORK 

Tel. 2230 Madison Square. 



FORD BROS. 

Receivers and Shippers oi 

FRESH FLOWERS, 

Ul West 30th St., NSW TOmK. 

Telephone 157 Madison BquufCL 

REPRESENTING EMINENT GROWERS. 

Julius Lang 

53 West 30th Street, NEW YORK. 

COMMISSION DEALER in FLOWERS 

Telephone 380 Madison Square. 

ALEX. J. GUTTMAN, 

Wholesale Commission Florist, 

A full supply daily of the choicest 

New York and New Jersey 

FLOWERS. 

52 W. 29lh Strael, NEW YORK CITY. 

Telephone 1738 Madison Square. 

THE 

NEW YORK GUT FLOWER GOi 

55 and 57 West 26th St., 

WHOLESALE FLORISTS. 
Dally Reports. Weekly Paymenis 

Telephone J. A. iVIILLA^Q, 



756 Madison Sq. 



Manager, 



GARNATIONS "' 



Specialty. 



CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. 
Prompl Payments. Established 1 89 1 . 

55W.28ttiSt. 
New York. 



Alfred H. Langjahr, 



Telephone 3934 Madison Sq. 



EDW. C. HORAN, 



55 WEST 28TH STREET, 



Telephone 421 
Madison Square. 



.NEW YORK. 



V- 



Cyj F LOWERS Al W HOLESALE. 



56 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 6, 



INTERNATIONAL FLOWER DELIVERY. 



NEW YORK. 



Steamer Gifts 

Orders for flowers in any form 
carefully filled and delivered by 
special messenger on board any 
steamer on day of departure from 
New York. 

THOS. YOUNG, JR. 

43 W. 28th St., NEW YORK CITY. 

Please mention the Am "^an Florist when writing. 



NEW YORK. 



ALEX. McCONNELL, 

546 Fifth Avenue, 

Cor 4Bthsf N w^ew Yofk Otv 



TELEGRAPHIC Orders forwarded to any part 
of the United States, Canada and all princi- 
pal cities of Europe. Orders transferred or en- 
trusted by the trade to our selection for delivery 
on steamships or else^vhe^e receive special atten- 
tion. Cable Address: AtEXCONNELL. 



WESTERN UNION CODE. 



TELEPHONE CALLS: 340 and 341 38th Street. 

FUase mention the A mencan Florist when writing 

LONDON. 

COMMISSIONS 
CARRIED OUT in LONDON 

or any part ot Great Britain. 

Messrs. WILLS & SEGAR will attend to 
any commission from American florists for 
the supply of Cut Flowers, Birthday Flowers, 
Bouquets, High Class Floral Designs, etc. to 
their clients w^ho may be traveling in England. 

U/ll I C fit CCRAD Court Florists to bli 
ITILLO Ob OLuAn, Maiesty, Th. Klne. 

ROYAL EXOTIC NURSERY. 

TsLEeBAMs, Onslow Crescent, South Kensington, 
Flosoulo, London. LONDON, ENGLAND. 

CHICAGO. " 

A. LANGE, 

47-51 Monroe Street, 

— CHICAGO. 

BEST FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS. 
NDIANAPOLIS. 

Bertermann Bros. Co., 

FLORISTS, 

241 Massachusetts Ave., INDIANAPOLIS, INU. 

ST. LOUIS. 

Fred. C. Weber, 

FLORIST. 

4326-4328 Olive SL, SL LOUIS, MO. 

EMabliihed 1873, Long OitL 'Phone Lindell 196 M 



PASSENGER STEAMSHIP MOVEMENTS. 

The tables herewith give the scheduled time of departure of ocean steamships carry- 
ing: first-class passengers from the principal American and foreign ports* covering the space 
of two weeks from date of this Issaeofthe AMERICAN FLOBIST. Mach disappointment 
often resalts from attempts to forward flowers for steamer delivery by express* to the care 
of the ship's steward or otherwise. The carriers of these packages are not Infrequently 
refused admission on board and even those delivered on board are not always certain to 
reach the parties for whom they were Intended. Hence florists In Interior cities having 
orders for the delivery ot flowers to passengers on out-going steamers are advised to 
Intrust the filling of sach orders to some reliable florist In the port of departure, w^ho 
understands the necessary details and formalities and has the facilities for attending to 
It properly. For the addresses of such firms we refer our readers to the advertisements 
on this page : 



FROM 


TO 


STKAMER 


•LINE 


DAY 


DUE ABOUT 


New York 


Liverpool 


Umbria 


1 


Sat. 


Feb. 


13, 2:00 p. m. 


Feb. 21 


New York 


'• 


Ivernia 


1 


Sat. 


Feb. 


6, 7:30 a. m. 


Feb. 28 


New York 


Glasgow 


Mongolian 


2 


Thur. 


Feb. 


18,11:00 a. m. 


Feb. 28 


Halifax . 


Liverpool 




2 




Feb 


8 


Feb. 16 
Feb. 22 


Halifax 


Pretorian 


2 


Mon. 


Feb. 


15, 


New York 


Hamburg 


Bluecher 


3 


Thur. 


Feb. 


11, 10:00 a. m. 


Feb. 21 


New York 


'• 


Pennsylvania 


3 


Sat. 


Feb. 


20, 7:00 a. m. 


Mar. 1 


New York 


Genoa 


Palatia 


3 


Tues. 


Feb. 


16, 10:00 a. m. 


Feb. 29 


New York 


Copenhagen . 


Oscar 11 


4 


Wed. 


Feb. 


17, 2:00 p. m. 




New York 


Glasgow 


Anchoria 


6 


Sat. 


Kph. 


13, Noon 


Feb. 23 


New York 


London 


Mesaba 


6 


Sat. 


Feb. 


13, 9:00 a. m. 


Feb. 23 


New York 


*• 


Minnetonka 


6 


Sat. 


Feb. 


20, 8:00 a. m. 


Mar. 1 


New York 


Liverpool 


Oceanic 


7 


Wed. 


Feb. 


10, 1:00 p. m. 


Feb. 16 


New York 




Celtic 


7 


Wed. 


Feb. 


17, 6:00 a. m. 


Feb. 23 


Boston 




Cymric 


7 


Thur. 


Feb. 


18, 11:00 a. m. 


Feb. 25 


Boston 






7 


Sat. 


Feb. 


18, 8:00 a. m. 


Mar. 2 


New York 


Southampton 


New York 


8 


Sat. 


Feb. 


13, 9:80 a. m. 


Feb. 20 


New York 


'• 


St. Paul 


8 


Sat. 


Feb. 


20, 9:30 a. m. 


Feb. 26 


New York 


Antwerp 


Vaderland 


9 


Sat. 


Feb. 


13, 10:30 a. m. 


Feb. 22 


New York 


" 


Kroonland 


9 


Sat. 


Feb. 


20. 10:30 a. m. 


Feb. 29 


New York 


Havre 


La Lorraine 


10 


Thur. 


Feb. 


11, 10:00 a. m. 


Feb. 21 


New York 


«t 


La Bretagne 


10 


Thur. 


Feb. 


18, 10:00 a. m. 


Feb. 23 


New York 


Genoa 


Liguria 


12 


Tues. 


Feb. 


9, 11:00 a. m. 


Feb. 24 


New York 


Bremen 


K. Wil. Der Grosse 


IS 


Tues. 


Feb 


9, 10:00 a. m- 


Feb. 16 


New York 


" 


Rhein 


13 


Tues. 


Feb 


16, 10:00 a. m. 


Feb. 27 


New York 


Genoa 


Hoheniollern 


13 


Sat. 


Feb. 


13,11:00 a. m. 


Feb. 26 


New York 


'* 


Lahn 


13 


Sat. 


Feb. 


20, 11:00 a. m. 


Mar. 3 




Liverpool 


Cestrian 
Devonian 


14 
14 


Wed. 
Wed. 


Feb. 
Feb. 


10, 6:30 a. m. 
17, 10:30 a. m. 


Feb. 18 


Boston 


Feb. 26 







*1 Cunard; 2 Allen-State; 3 Hamburg-American; 4 Scandinavian-American; 6 Anchor Line; 
6 Atlantic Transport; 7 ^Vhite Star; 8 American; 9 Red Star; 10 French; 11 Holland-American; 
12 Italian Royal Mail; 13 North German Lloyd; 14 Leyland; 



DETROIT. 



lOHN BREITMEYER'S 
SONS — — 

Cor. MIAMI and GRATIOT AVES. 

DETROIT, MICH. 
Artistic ^e%\qn%..^j^.^j^ 
Higii Grade Cut Blooms. 

^Ve cover all Michigan points and good sections 
of Ohio, Indiana and Canada. 

CHICAGO. 

P.J.HALSWIRTH 

Auditorium Annex, 

._ CHICAGO. 

Mail, telegraph or telephone orders fille<^ 
promptly in best style. 

DENVER. 

nORAL DESIGNS AND TLOWERS. 



DENVER. 



'!« »1_- 



T 



he Park 



J. A. VALENTINE, 
Pr«>. 



Best Quality on Shortest Notice. 

DANIELS & FISHER, °!o7!" 

Order by mail, telephone, telegraph or cable. 
Cable address: "Daniels Denver." 



Floral Co. 

DENVER, COLO. 

Mease mention the A mertcan Florist when writing, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

TELEPHONE MAIN 1023 . 

SIEVERS & BOUND, 

Floral Artists, 

33 Post Street, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

LOS ANGELES. 

Orders lor Los Angeles and Southern California 

Will be filled by 

E. J. VAWTER 

GROWER AND DEALER 

522 So. Spring St.. Los Angeles. Cat. 

Catalogue Illustrations. 

We sell Electros of the fine illus- 
trations used in the AMERICAN 
FLORIST at 1 5c per square inch. 
Send list of your needs to 

The American riorlst Co., Chicago. 



PLACE TOUB NAME. 



and vour speoialtiei before the parofaaiing^floriiti of the entire country 

by advertiiing in ^^ 

EMo 4Dvr. wow. THE AMERICAN FLOBIST. 



1904- 



Th E American Florist. 



57 



INTERNATIONAL FLOWER DELIVERY. 



STEAMSHIPS LEAVE FOREIGN PORTS 



FROM 


TO 


STEAMER 


*LINE 


DAY 


DUE ABOUT 


Liverpool 

Liverpool 

Liverpool 

Fiume 


New York 

Boston 
New York 
«( 

Boston 
New York 

(( 

(t 

*( 
Boston 


Campania 

Etruria 

Saxonia 

Aurania 

Siberian 

Moltke 

Pretoria 

Phoenicia 

United States 

Hekla 

Ethiopia 

Menominee 

Minneapolis 

Cedric 

Majestic 

Cretic 

Canopic 

Philadelphia 

St. Louis 

Zeeland 

Finland 

La Touraine 

La Champagne 

Rotterdam 

Citta di Milano 

Sicilia 

KronprinzWilhelm 

Prinzess Irene 

Bohemian 

Canadian 


1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
3 
3 
3 
4 
4 
6 
6 
6 
7 
7 
7 
7 
8 
8 
9 
9 
10 
10 
11 
12 
12 
13 
13 
14 
14 


Sat. Feb. 
Sat. F. b. 
Tues. Feb. 
Fri. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 
Thur. Feb. 
Wed. Feb. 
Wed. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 
Thur. Feb. 
Thur. Feb. 
Wed. Feb. 
Wed. Feb. 
Thur. Feb. 
Thur. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 
Mon. Feb. 
Mon. Feb. 
Tues. Feb. 
Thur. Feb, 
Sat. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 


13 

20 

16 

19 

13 

13 

20 

18 

10 

17 

20 

11 

18 

10 

17 

18, 3:30 p. m. 

18, 3:00 p. m. 

13, Noon. 

20, Noon. 

13,11:00 a.m. 

20, 2:00 p. m. 

13 

20 

20 

8 
15 

9, 8:00 a. m. 
11 
13 
20 


Feb. 20 
Feb. 26 
Feb. 23 

Feb. 23 


Hamburg 

Hamburg 


Feb. 23 
Mar. I 
Mar. 2 


Copenhagen 

Copenhagen 


Mar. 1 




Feb. 21 




Feb. 28 


Liverpool 

Liverpool 

Liverpool 

Alexandria 

Southampton — 
Southampton — 


Feb. 17 
Feb. 24 
Feb. 26 
Mar. 7 
Feb. 19 
Feb. 27 
Feb. 22 


Antwerp 

Havre 


Feb. 29 
Feb. 23 


Havre 


Mar. 1 


Kotterdam 


Mar. 1 
Feb. 28 




Mar. 1 




Feb. 16 




Feb. 24 


Liverpool 

Liverpool 


Feb. 21 
Feb. 28 



* See steamship list on opposite page. 



PETER REINBERG 

51 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO. 

Wholesale Cut Flowers 

LARGEST GROWER 

IN THE WORLD. 



Current Price List. 



AM. BEAUTIES, long stems, 
" " 30-in. " 



Per Doz. 

$5.00 

4.00 

20-34 " $3.50 to 3.00 

" " 15-18 " 1.50 to 2.00 

" " Short stems 1.00 to 1.35 

Per 100 

SUNRISE $4 00 to$10.00 

CHATENAY 6.00 to 13.00 

BRIDE 5,00 to 8.00 

BRIDESMAID 5.00 to 8.00 

PERLE 5.00to 8.00 

CARNATIONS a.OOto 4.00 

ROSES, OUR SELECTION 4.00 

All flowers are perfectly fresh and properly packed. 
No charge for P. and D. on orders over $6. 



Fakgo, N. D.— The North Dakota Hor- 
ticultural Society was organized here the 
last week in January. James Holes, of 
Fargo, waselected president; David Bart- 
lett, treasurer; C. B. Waldron, secretary. 



Fresh New 
Crop. 



GALAX LEAVES, ETC., 

Galax Leaves, Grean and Bronze, per 1000 9 .60 

Cut Fancy and Dagger Ferns, per 1000. 1.00 

Leucothoe Sprays, Green, per 1000 3.00 

Red, per 1000 6.00 

Rhododendron Sprays, per 1000 5.00 

Largest dealer in the U. S. Orders filled 
promptly. Send cash with order. Send 60c for a 
nice cane, cut from the famous mountains of N. 
C. Nicely varnished, croolced or straight. Men- 
tion length desired and variety of wood — hickory, 
rhododendron, wahoo, poplar, striped maple, etc. 
Grand souvenier, besides useful. Try one or more. 
J. N. PRITCHARD, Elk Park, N. C. 

GALAX... 

Bronze or green, 75o per 1000, In 2,000 ots orl 
more. Lauoothoa Spraya, green, 90o per 100. 
Soulhem Smilax, fresh stock, per 50-lb. case, 
$6.00; per 35-Ib. case, $3.50. Craan Sliaat Moaa, 
choice stock, $3.50 per barrel sack. Spaonum 
Moaa, $1.75 per large bale. 

FLORIST' SUPPLIES of Every DESCRIPTION. 

Tel. 597 Madison Li J. KRESHOVER, 

Square. 110-112 W. 27th St.. New York. 

It is good business policy j .• ^ 
to mention the J^ t^ J^ 

American Florist 

When you write to an advertiser. 



E.FJinter$onCo. 

Successors to 

McKellar & Winierson. 

eSTABLISHBD 1894. 



We are handling the cut 0/ Rudd's 
"PHYLLIS," the grand new piak — and 
new Seedling White {unnamed, but 
a "crackerjack") carnations. These 
arrive daily — get a sample shipment, 
hut give us a day or two notice, as 
we sell them out as a rule in advance 
0/ arrival. Price. Phyllis, 6c; While 
Seedling, 4c. 

FANCY EASTERN VIOLETS. The best 
that come into this market, $1.00 
per hundred. 

EXTRA FINE HARRISII BLOOMS, 12c 

to 15c. 

FANCY FREESIAS, 3c to 4c. 

A daily supply Irom 34 GROWERS 
enables us to take care of shipping 
orders to the buyers' advantage. 



Get our Weekly Price List. It is free and 
worth your while. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Galax Leaves and all Greens. 

"SUPERIOR QIAUTY" 

WILD SMILAX 

-(NONE BETTER.) 

ALWAYS ON HAND. 

We carry the most complete line of 
Florists* Supplies in tbe West. Catalogue free. 
Address all correspondence to 

45-47-49 Wabash 3ve., 
CHICAGO. 



Orchids ! i^ 

Just arrived in superb condition, a large ship- 
ment of DENDROBIUM MOBILE, most useful for 
florists; also Dend. Chrysanthum and others. 
To arrive, Cattleya Trianae and C. Gigas. 

Lager & Hurrell, summit, n. j. 

Orclild Growers and Importers. 




WILD SMILAX. 



ORDER DIRECT 

FROM HEADQUARTERS. 

We carry the finest and most complete stools of Florists' Hardy Supplies, 
Dagger and Fancy Ferns, 81.50 per 1000, A No. 1 quality. Bronze and Green 
Galax, $1.00 per 1000, A No. 1 quanty. Southern Wild Smilax, 50 pound case, 87.09. 
25 pound case, $3.50 per case. Laurel Festooning, good and full, 5o and 60 per 
yard. Leuoothoe Sprays, Sl.OO per 100. Green Moss, $1.00 per bbl.; 75c per bag. 
Sphagnum Moss, $1.00 per bbl.; 50o per bag. Order by mail, telegraph or tele- 
phone will receive our personal and prompt attention. Long Dis. ' Phone 2618 Main. 

HENRY M. ROBINSON, No. II Province St., BOSTON, MASS. 



THE CLEVELAND CUT fLOWER COMPANY 

SUCCESSORS TO 

BATE BROS. AND THE F. R. WILLIAMS COMPANY 

CLEVELAND, O. 

Send Your Stock to Is on Commission. 



52-54 High St., 



BOTH PHONES. 



We Carry a Full Line of Florists' Supplies and Make Wire Designs. 

WRITE FOR OUR WEEKLY PRICE LIST. 



58 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 6 



The gEEE) TRa!>E. 



AMERICAN SEED TRADE ASSOCIATION. 

S F Willard, Pres.; J. Charles McCullough, 
Fir»» Yioe-Pres.; C. E. Kendel, Cleveland, 0., 

Twenty-second annual convention, St. Louis, 
He. June 21-23, 1904. 

Mail order business to date is reported 
rather slow. 

The value ot French bulbs exported to 
the United States the fall of 1902 is given 
in the United States consular report at 
Toulon as $127,881. 

The canners' convention, which occurs 
in Columbus, O., the coming week, is 
expected to shed some much-needed light 
on the sweet corn situation. 

Visited Chicago:— J. E. Northrup, of 
Northrup, King & Company, Minne- 
apolis, Minn.; J. A. Robinson, with the 
J. B. Rice Company, Detroit; O. H. Will, 
of the O. H. Will Company, Payetteville, 
N. Y. 

Le Syndicat de Defence Agricole et 
HoRTicoLE, having completed its third 
successful year, at its annual meeting at 
Hyeres, France, January 10 last, selected 
the following named persons for its 
officers for the year of 1904: President, 
M. Fichet-Nardy; Vice-Presidents, MM. 
Paul Amic, Michel Crozy and Paul Gen- 
sollen; Secretary, Pierre Moulis; Assist- 
ant Secretary, Henri Coufourier; Treas- 
urer, M. Burlat; Assistant Treasurer, 
Lucien Recous. 



Detroit. 

The continued excessively cold weather 
seems to be largely responsible for a con- 
dition of trade which is anything but 
satisfactory to either growers or retailers. 
The former are complaining of a meagre 
cut of both roses and carnations, and the 
bulbous flowers produced are bringing 
very unsatisfactory prices. The violet 
growers, who are producing a generous 
crop of good blooms, are realizing lower 
prices at present than ever before, at the 
same period of the year, while the con- 
sumption of coal is greater than ever, 
and adding materially to the cost of 
everything grown. In retail circles 
reports indicate a great scarcity of good 
roses during the whole of the last month, 
and while carnations are at times plenti- 
ful the supply is irregular and unsteady. 
Romans, Paper Whites and lilies have 
been plentiful but their use has been con- 
fined almost entirely to funeral work. 
Violets are meeting with slow demand 
and the reduced prices on them do not 
encourage the retailers and the public 
sufficiently to consume the present large 
supply. 

The club meeting Wednesday evening, 
February 3, brought out a large attend- 
ance. The entire time was devoted to 
the consideration of matters pertaining 
to the coming carnation meeting. Several 
committees were appointed to take 
charge of different portions of the work, 
and nothing is being neglected which will 
add to the completeness of every detail 
connected with the event, it being the 
desire and determination of those in 
charge to make the meeting and exhibi- 
tion the most successful in the history of 
the society. Already many growers have 
signified their intention of making exten- 
sive exhibits, and the many inquiries con- 
cerning hotel accommodations, etc., 
indicate a large attendance of mem- 
bers. J- F. S. 



Buffalo, N. Y. 

We are still having cold weather with 
lots of snow. The event of last week 
was McKinley day. The sale of car- 
nations was far in excess of last year. 
Palmer & Anderson, being downtown, 
had a large sale among business men. 
The Rebstocks, both J. H. and R. M., 
and also Byrne & Slattery had good 
sales. The making of a flat rate of 10 
cents each was an excellent move. If an 
increased price had been asked the sales 
virould have been much smaller. Sev- 
eral store windows were appropriately 
trimmed for the occasion. Anderson had 
samples of the mourning stationary used 
by all the cabinet officers, the lead pencil 
used by President McKirdey in the last 
official business he transacted and the 
book compiled by the committee contain- 
ing clippings, pictures, etc., pertaining to 
his assassination, death and burial. 

The meeting of florists to discuss the 
action of the directors of Forest Lawn 
cemetery was spirited and resolutions 
were drawn protesting against their 
action. An effort will be made to see if 
it cannot be received. It seems to be 
unwarranted and deprives many florists 
of what was a big feature of their busi- 
ness. Another meeting will be held and 
a reply from the directors heard. 

Prof. Cowell called last week and 



reported things in good shape at South 
Park. It is not decided as yet who is 
going to Detroit but the usual eight or 
ten will surely go. 

Several weddings are booked for this 
week and a good trade is expected 
between now and Lent. Bison. 



Lenox, Mass. 

The Lenox Horticultural Society held 
its tenth annual ball January 26 in the 
town hall. It was the most successful 
and elaborate of the series. Preceding 
the dance a concert was given by Gart- 
land's tenth regiment band, of Albany. 
Dancing was commenced shortly after 
9 p. m. and continued until 2:30 
a. m. The customary programmes were 
dispensed with and favors substituted, 
the ladies receiving celluloid book marks 
with pansies painted on them. The 
grand march was led by Vice-President 
Heeremans and Miss Weston, of Lenox. 
The march was participated in by nearly 
100 couples. The committees of the ball 
were: 

Arrangements — Charles R. Russell, Edward .1. 
Norman and George F. Thompson. 

Floor— Charles R. Russell. H. P. Woolsey, F. 
Heeremans and J. E. Bosworth. 

Reception— E. Jenkins. F. Heeremans, S. Carl- 
quist. R. A. Schmid and Geor<je Foulsliam. 

G. F. 



LILY OF THE VALLEY. 


FINEST BERLIN PIPS, for Early Farcing, 


$12.00 per 1O0O: $30.00 per case 2500: 


$1.50 per 100. 


These are strong pips, well rooted and give 


best satisfaction. 


FINEST CUT VALLEY ALWAYS 


ON HAND. 


H. N. BRUNS, 


VALLEY SPECIALIST, 


1409-1411 W. Madison St., CHICAGO. 



A 



20,000 PRESH 

sparagus Plumosus Seed 



Pries per 1000, S5.0O. 

Inquire of 



HENRY YOUNG, Ma, Ohio. 
wr jv i^ 'X' E> i> . 

Growers of Sweet Pea Seed lor the trade. 
F. A. ROSCOE, Steeple Morden, Royston, England. 

Asparagus Plumosus Nanus Seeds {{;'e'M;°e?; 

$6.00 per lOOO or S5.00 per 1000 above 10.000, Smilax 
Seeds, new crop. Si. 25 per lb. Cash with order. 
COTTAGE NURSERY. 1421 D. St., San Diego, Cal. 



LILY OF THE VALLEY 

SELECTED DRESDEN. 

Uncqoaled for early forcing. No. I Stock per 100, 
$1.50; 250, $3.50; 500, $6.50; JOOO, $13.00; case 
2,500 pips, $30.00. J^J-J^J-J-^J^^^ 

R.&J.rARQlHAR&CO., 



6 and 7 So. Market Street, 
BOSTON, MASS. 



Important to private garoenerP 

The system of allowing Private Gardeners a discount on their annual purchases 
of seeds has become almost universal; in fact, they have been gradually educated 
to expect it. We are offering this season 

j A Special Discount of 15% 

ON ALL GENERAL SEED ORDERS AT OUR GARDEN GUIDE PRICES 

Which are quoted as low as any nliable seed grower offers. Also, we deliver by 
freight or express prepaid to New York, Boston, Baltimore. Washington, Pitts- 
burg, Cincinnati or St. Louis. Garden Guide mailed free on application. 

• ROBERT BUIST COHPINY, <.„.r.^%%t''>&''.IVA 



-;/ 



1904. 



The American Florist. 



59 



From the Atlantic to the Pacific 

Burpee's FORPHOOK F^RMS are fanioiis 

As the largest Trial Grounds in America. 

From the Atlantic. 



*o— f-^^^You need not take fiur word for t he 
IgRiE"^ truth of this statement (although we 
never knowingly exaggerate), but can read below 
the entirely unsolicited opinions of two leading 
experts. There is not money enough, even in all 
the territory "from the Atlantic to the Pacific," 
to purchase such testimony from either of these 
well-known Horticulturists! They know whereof 
they speak and do not hesitate to tell freely the 
plain truth— as learned from their own inspection. 



Professor Johnson of The 
American AgricuUuri$t, 
performed a similar office 
on behalf of the members of 
the agricultural and horti- 
cultural press present. Mr. 
Johnson said that the day 
had been one rare treat. 
. . . In speaking of the 
immensity of the Trial 
Grounds at Foehook, Pro- 
fessor Johnson stated that 
those present would take 
home a lesson which would 
be remembered for many 
years. There was not an 
experiment station in the 
United States, supported 
by State or natlonoi legis- 
lation, that had anylhine 
lil<e the variety o« tests 
that were conducted on 
the Fordbook Farms. He 
said this in all fairness to 
the splendid work of the 
Experiment Stations. . . 
—Extract from an Edit- 
orial account of "A Field 
Day at Fordhook" which 
appea red in THE Florists' 
Exchange, New York, July 

4. 1903- 

From tlie Pacific. 

A careful seedsman's ex- 
periment grounds, like 
yours, it seems to me, are 
far more useful than auy 
of the colleges or public 
experiment stations, as it 
all practical work. Your 
Fordhoolc Trial Grounds 
were the best of all my 
Eastern object lessons, 
and I had many of them. 
I had no idea i>f Ihtir ex- 
tent and value, not only 
to yourself, but to every 
one of your customers, 
and eventually 10 every 
one who cu tivates ihe 
ioU—Thus -.i'tote LUTBEK 
BURBANK, "The iVi:.aydof 
Horticulture,' trom Santa 
Rosa, California, October 
20, J900, upon kts return 
from an extended eastern 
trip. 

Special Announcement. 

To FLORISTS and DEALERS 

who desire to suppl\ the 
BEST SEEDS THAT GROW. 

(^"Herewith we show 
one page advertisement in 
March Delinealor: similar 
page advertisements will 
appear also in the JIarch 
numbers of McClure's. Mun- 
sey's. and Everybody's Maga- 
zine; also in Ihe NIayfljwer. 
Success with Floweis. The 
Christian Herald. Etc., while 
the same otters will appear 
in The Ladies' Home Jour- 
nal, Country Life in America, 
Saturday Evening Post, Coun- 
try Gentleman, btc. 

This Advertising, to^ethir 
with the wide ciriulation 
of BURPEES' FARM ANNUAL 
FOR 1904, gererally recog- 
nized as "The Leading 
American Seed Catalogue, 
will create a great demand 
for these Special Colleciions 
WHOLESALE. We will sup- 
ply any or all of these 
popular 25c collections at 
$2.00 per dozen, postpaid, 
or $1.80 per dozen, by ex- 
press— iust 15c each. 
BURPEE'S 'BLUE LIST." 
A nevi) book of 144 pages 



Eight Elegant New Sweet Peas. 



For 25 Cts. 



we will mail, postpaid, one regular 
pacicet each of the following Fight Best 
Sweet Peas: BURPEE'S DAINIY, the !■ 
flowers are beautifuUv formed and uniquely marked, "white with a piuL tdgt 
LORD ROSEBERRY', richlv colored, deep rose-carmine flowers, gracefulh hoodi. 
see tllustralioK.— JANET SCOTT, " the best pink sweet pea," flowers ol lar i 
size, three on a stem.-^LADY ORISEL HAMILTON, largest and be^t //t / ' 
lavfnder, —rWB. HON. MRS. E. KENYON, beautiful primrose-colot id flow ei 
of trulv enormous size,— COCCINEA, a new color in Sweet Peas, a briirht ch, 1 1 1 
«i/— JEANIE GORDON, charming bright rose, shaded primrose, and a larm 
packec of the unequaled new BURPEE'S BEST MIXED FOR 1904. W^r-The 
Seven Superb Separate Sorts are shown painted from nature, whik the 
Special Mixture is described on page loS of our new Catalogue loi 1904 
-J c *^4._ buys all the above Eight Elegant New Tall Sweet 
^J W-IS* Peas, and in each collection we enclose 
our New Leaflet on Culture for 1904. 

SevenNasturtiums.fof:i?,?,Srt^e-' 

packet each of all seven distinct types : The beautiful 
Dwarf Liiiput in best mixture,— the unequaled mixture, 
Burpee's "Gorgeous" New Tom Thumb,— the interesting, 
small -leaved Tom Pouce, — the brightly colored Lobb's 
Finest Mixed,— the superhlv brilliant new and uneqiuleil 
mixture of Burpee's Hotspur Harlequin,— the gracelull\ 
artistic Ivy. Leaved, and the finest Burpee's New Superb 
Qiant-flowered ISasturtiums. In the large bag enclosim,' 
each collection is included our New Leaflet on culture. 

Burpee's GEM Collection. 



For 25 Cts. 



we mail one packet each of all the follow in. 
Little Gem SWEET ALYSSUM, carpet- tht 
ground with a mass of white, — Fordhook 
Favorites among ASTERSi embracing nianv of the choicest types.— Burpee's 
Defiance BALSAMS, in unequaled mixture, including the new A-iyidii/c,— 
Dwarf Marguerite CARNATIONS, in finest colors.-Burpee's New Giant- 
flowered NASTURTIUMS, in unequaled mixture,— Royal Prize PANSIES. j 
bnth free-flowering and giant varieties,— Largest-flowering PHLOX UKUIM- 
MONDil, as grown by ourselves,— Fordhook Fairy POPPIES, most gracelii 
double flowers, in many colors,— a large packet of Burpee's New Grand I all 
SWEET PEAS, as speciallv prepared for iqo4, and a small packet of the most 
beautiful New PLUMED CELOSIAS. This novelty is likely to give such rare 
delisht to all floiuer lovers as to be alone worth the quarter paid f 01 all ten pacsels 

V^rt^^^n Kloc » "FIVE FINEST" FORDHOOK 

V egeiaOies • famous new vegetables 

■7* '^ C i^± we will mail, postpaid, one full-size packet 

t^ t\V X ■ t l^ (such as we sell scparatelv at ten cents per packet 
» Wl S^\r V/i.iS. each of the following: Fordhook Famous CucLM- 
PFR the largest, most handsome, and finest flavored of all cucumbers,— Burpee s 
Brittle-Ice Lettuce, the popular New " Nameless " Lettuce distributed lor ad 
vance trials last season,— Burpee's New Halbert Honey Water- 
melon, sweetest and best for home use.— Burpee's New Golden 
Globe Onion, earliest and handsomest of globe-shaped onions, a 
Chalk's Early Jewel Tomato, largest of all exlrenie-earlies. 

* t __,-, TJ-.-i are all shown, painted from 
>*.OOVe Hive nature, on the cover or plates 

in our Catalogue. iii^S* Perhaps there are named above 
one or two vegetables that vou do not care for. Therefore 
you may omit any of the above, and instead select a packet 
of either the New Danish Roundhead Cabbage,- the un- 
equaled Chinese Giant Pepper. — the earliest Hailstone 
Radish, — the delicious Fordhook Bush Squash, or the New 
Quarter-Century Strain of Burpee's Bush Lima Bean. 

For One Dollar ^edTadvertlsed-ten 

New Vegetables and twentv-five packets Choicest New Sw eet 
Peas, Nasturtiums and other Flowers — in all thirty-five 
full-size packets for ONE DOLLAR I 

4®" Every one of these \-arieties is entitled to be marked 
with a buirs=eye [O],— as absolutely 
the best of its type. *&» 

Or For One Dollar 

vou can have ANY FIVE COLLEC- 
1 IONS, and mailed to separate addresses 
if so requested. flSg=* Be sure to ask for 
Burpee's Farm Annual for 1904 
when ordering. Write TO-DAY I 




Farm Annual for 1904. 




LEADING AMERICAN SEED CATALOGUE. 

Mailed FREE to all 



who want the Best Seeds 1 

An elegant new book of 17S 
pages, w ilh luui'lreds of illustrations and six superb colored 
plates, it is now brighter and better than ever b efore. Many 
new features for iqo4,— including valu- ' 

able RARE NOVELTIES not lo be had 
elsewhere. You can send vour address 
on a postal card. Write TO=DAY I 

Burpee Building, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



W. ATLEE BURPEE (Ei, CO., 

KSl; Ml InS til ^^^:^^"''' 1 Headquarters in PHILADELPHIA of 
[ TH E WORLD'S LARGEST MAIL-ORDER SEED BUSINESS 




wm-be mailed free bn'application to any Market Gardener or Florist who ^"V^, seeds to "pUnt for profit." but cannot be m^^ 

asked tor BURPEE'S RED LIST. Our slnctiy "Wholesale" Catalogue is mailed to Dealers only. ^^ It can not be sent even to florists, unless tneyouyw sen 

again. Which of the above two oataloguei are you entitled to receive? I^indly advise 

Catalogue as advertised herewith is Iree to all who ask for it. 



at once and it will be sent by first mail. Our Retail 



W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



60 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 6, 



The Nursery T^aDB. 

AM. ASSOCIATION OF NURSERYMEN. 

N. W. Halb, Knoxvllle, Tenn., Pres.; Prank 
A. Wbbeb, St. Louis, Mo., Vioe-Pres.; Gbobob C. 
SiASBB, Rochester, N. Y., Sec'y. 

Twenty-ninth annual convention, Atlanta, Ga., 
June, 1904. 

Dayton, O. — The Montgomery County 
Horticultural Society held its monthly 
meeting February 3 at the residence of 
John Siebenthaler. 

Mobile, Ala. — The Alabama State 
Horticultural Society convened here 
January 26 for a two days' session. 
Members from various parts of Alabama, 
Georgia and Florida were present. 

Nashville, Tenn.— The Pebble Hill 
Fruit Farm and Nurseries of Franklin 
county, has been incorporated by T. W. 
Boozelton, J. E. Carmack,J.C. Carmack, 
T. A. Embrey and Jo. C. Garner and cap- 
talized at $10,000. 

Salt Lake City, Utah.— The state 
board of horticulture will make many 
improvements in the southern Utah fruit 
farm at St. George. Among those con- 
templated is the putting in of complete 
apparatus for recording and measuring 
the irrigating water used on the various 
plats of the fruit farm. 

Louisville, Ky. — The Kentucky State 
Horticultural Society at the meeting 
January 28, which closed the convention 
for 1904, requested the legislature to 
expand the scope and duties of the State 
Entomologist to include a more frequent 
and more minute examination ot the 
fruit stock in Kentucky for the discovery 
of insects and other damaging marauders 
of that variety. 



St. Paul. 

Trade has felt the effect of the cold 
vyeather the last couple of weeks, but 
with plenty of funeral vrork it has been 
nearly as good as could be expected. A 
surplus of bulbous stock is seen every- 
where, but prices are being kept up well. 
All the stores are making extra efforts to 
keep up attractive window displays, and 
are all satisfied that it pays, too. The 
only scarcity in flowers is Beauty stock. 
A few are seen, but they are of poor qual- 
ity. 

Some of the growers are vrorrying 
about getting their lilies in for Easter, 
and some of them will have a hard pull 
to get them. 

Messrs. C. W. Scott, Aug. Rhotert and 
L. P. Lord were visitors during the week. 

0.0. 



Pueblo, Col. 



The steel works' closing down has 
made business very dull here. J. O. 
Zimmerman has closed his Main street 
store, which he opened before Christmas. 
G. Fleischer has a fine stock of roses, car- 
nations and violets. 

Charles H. Vick, of Wm. Hagemann & 
Company, New York, was with us a dav 
this week. S. R. L. ' 



Urbana, O, — C. A. Reeser & Company, 
florists, filed a deed of assignment Janu- 
ary 26 naming L O. Tritt assignee. The 
liabilities will reach $15,000. The 
assets will not reach over $10,000. The 
failure of the Reeser company was pre- 
cipitated by the failure of the Floral Pub- 
lishing Company and the New Era Com- 
pany, in Springfield, last week. The 
Reeser people were on their paper. 



NOW IS THE TIME TO ORDER. 



Per 100 

Exochorda Grfl., 18 to 34-inch, bushy $ 8.00 

A Lonicera, ^ Belgica and.Hecl^rotti, 3 to 

~ 4 feet, bushy 8.00 

A Ampelopsis Japonica, 2K-inch pots 4.00 

,, Cedrus Deodara.l5 to 18-inch 25.00 

Z Cedrus Deodara. 30 to 24-inch 30.00 

- Oranges, best sorts, grafted, bearing size 

12-Inch, bushy, 4-inch pots 20.00 

Ligustrum Amurense, true, 2 to 3-feet branched 

Write for Wholesale and Deacripllve CalalogHe. 



Per 100 

Oranget, 15 to 18-inch, 5-incb pots 30.00 

Lemons, grafted, 18 to 34-inch, 5-inch 

pots 30.00 

Kentia Belmoreana, 13 to 15-inch, 5 leaves 18.00 

Latania, 15-inch, 3 to4ch. leaves 20.00 

Phcenix Canariensit, 15 to 18-inch, 2 to 3 

leaves, showing character 15.00 

Not less than 50 of a kind at above prices. 
per 1000, S20.00 



►. J. :BK^I«OI£:AdCi%LN^S OO., (inc.) 

^ FRUITLAND NURSERIES. 

Established 1866. A.UGUSTA., GtA., ♦ 

♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



Please mention the American Florist when writing. 




FicQS, Ferns, Koses, etc. Correspondence solicited. 

THE STORRS & HARRISON CO., 



etc., have been the standard of excellence for half a 
centur;. The best always cheapest. Have hundreds 
of carloads of 

Fruits and Ornamentals. 

40 acres of Hardy Roses including 45.000 of the 
famous Crimson Hambler. 44 Kreenbouses of Palms, 
Catalogue free. 60th year. 1000 acres. 



Box 260, Painesville, Ohio. 



fleaie mention tfir- ^ menca*' F'n 



-SEND TO 



Eastern Nurseries, 

FOR VINCA MINOR 



J4MAICA rUIN, 

MASS. 



FINE LARGE CLUMPS. 



FOR SALE CHEAP. 



August Rolker & Sons, 

IMPORTERS OP 

Palms, Bay Trees, Auracarias, etc. Decorative Plants 
(or spring delivery; Lily ol the Valley, Lilacs, Forc- 
ing Bulbs. etc. for fall delivery; Raffia for Nursery- 
men and Florists. Address 

3t Barclay St. or P. 0. Box 752, NEW YORK. 

Please mention the American Florist ivhen writing. 

J. DIJKHUIS & CO. 

BOSKOOP-HOLLAND. 
QUALITY. QUANTITY. 

Ask our prices for 

AZALEAS, RHODODENDRONS, PEONIES, 

ROSES, HARDY EVERGREENS, 

CLEMATIS, Etc. 

Prioa List Fraa on ApuUoallon. 

KOSTER & CO. 

HSl!:;ri« Boskoop, Holland. 

HARDY AZALEAS, BOX TREES, CLEMATIS, 

CONIFERS, HYDRANGEAS, PEONIES. 

Pot-Grown Plants for Forcing. 

RHODODENDRONS, H. P. ROSES, Etc. 

No Agents. Catalogue free on demand. 
Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 

When in Europe come and see us and inspect our 
extensive Nurseries. Gouda is our railroad depot 

HARDY, FANCY ORNAMENTAL NURSERY STOCK. 

J. Blaauw & Co., 

BOSKOOP, HOLLAND^ 

Catalogue free on demand. Headquarters for the 
famous ColoradoBiue Spruces, purest, bluest strain 

Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 



Send to 



THE MOON 

Company 

For j Trees, Shrubs, Vines 
Yourj and Small Fruits. 

Descriptive Illustrated Catalogue Free 
THE WM. H. MOON OO. 
MorrisvMIe, Pa. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 




California Privet... 

Per loeo 

12.000, 1 year, 18 to24-inoh, very bushy $11.00 

15,000. 1 year, 13 to 18-inch, well branched. . 8.50 

CAN N AS, Strong Eyes. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

5,000 Egandale $].00 $8.00 

5,000 Charles Henderson 1.00 8.00 

5.000 Chicago l.ro 8.00 

2 000 Florence Vaughan l.flO 8.00 

2.0C0 Mme. Crozy l.PO 8.00 

15,000 Austria 75 5.00 

We also have 6 000 Biota Rosedale in all sizes. 
This is the best Borlsts' Evergreen in the list. 
Our stock will please you. 

f IRROW BROS.. Guthrie, Okla. 

YOU BET IT IS 

The quality that does the talking. 

inUN ^P<tFPPFRC member of P.. Schoo & 
JUriN Ob^CCrCnO. Co., Bulb Growers at HH- 
]f".iom ( Holland ( and of Multiflora Nurseries, Bos- 
koop. (Holland) will furnish you same and for 
reasonable prices at that. Write to day. 

1 36 Water Street, NEW YORK. 



THI 



Brockton Dahlia Tarm. 

The largest and finest collection of Dahlias 
in the United States, consisting of all the 
leading varieties. Send for price list. ■ . • . 

W. P. LOTHROP, 



East Bridgewater, 
Mass. 



\\ e Uevott' a large acreage of ground to the cul- 
tivation of Cannas, and our list of varieties is 
complete, includinii all the novelties and stand- 
ard kinds Prices as low as any for first class 
-stock. Writ"' Jor pric list. 

WAGNER PARK CONSERVATORIES, 

It IS good business policy ^ *t •£ 
to mention the «^ ^ ^ 

American Florist 

when writing to an advertiser. 



jgo4. 



The American Florist. 



61 



DREER'S Summer Elowering Bulbs. 

Two Great Tuberous Rooted Bedding Begonias 

DUKE ZEPPELIN and LAFAYETTE 

See colored illustration of these two varieties on cover of our new 19C4 
Catalogue; they are the most brilliant among all the Begonias and invalua- 
ble either as pot plants or for bedding. 

Duke Zeppelin, Pure Rich Scarlet, 15 cents each; $1.50 per dozen; $12.00 
per 100, 

Lafayette, Brilliant Crimson Scarlet, 35 cents each; $3.50 per dozen • 
$18.00 per 100. 

NEW HYBRID FRILLED TUBEROUS BEGONIAS 

A unique form with flowers of immense size, with wavy or frilled 
petals similar to the best forms of single petunias, S5 cents each; $2.50 per 
dozen; $20.00 per 100. 

GLOXINIA GRASSIFOLIA GRANDIFLORA 

A very fine selected strain, strong, well-matured bulbs. Red, White, 
Blue, Red with white border. Blue with white border, in separate colors or 
in choicest mixture, 50 cents per dozen ; $4.00 per 100; $35.00 per 1000. 

MISCELLANEOUS BULBS 




Amaryllis Formosissima 

Johnsonii 2.00 

Amorphophallus Rievierii 2.00 

Caladium, Fancy Leaved, 25 named sorts 1,25 

Choicest Mixture 1.00 



TUBEROUS ROOTED BEGONIAS. 

Single Flowered, So:irlet. Crimson. White, Yellow, Rose and Orange, 
40 cents per d"Zi-n; I3.f0 pi-r 100; $25.00 per 1000. 

Choicest Single Flowered In Allxture, 35 cents per dozen; $3.50 per 
100; $23.00 per 1000. 

Double Flowering, Scarlet, Ros<', White and Yellow, 65 cents per 
dozen; $5.00 per 100; $40.00 per 10^0. 

Choicest Double Flowering In Mixture, 50 cents per dozen; $4.00 pet 
100; $35.00 per 1000. 



Esculentum, 6 to 8-inch bulbs 40 

Esculentum, 8 to ID-inch bulbs 65 

Esculentum, 10 to 12-inch bulbs 90 

Esculentum, 12 to 13-inch bulbs 1.26 

Hyacintbus Candicans 30 

Ismine Calathina 1.60 

Lilium Auratum, 8 to 9-inch 76 

" 9 toll-inch 1.00 

11 to 13-inch 1.75 



Per Doz. Per 100 Per 1000 

30 $ 2.00 $15.00 

15.00 

16.00 

10 00 

8.00 



Lilium Speciosum Album and Rubrum, 7 to 9-inch 
Gladiolus, American Hybrids, choicest mixture.. 

GrofF's Hybrids, choicest mixture 36 

Madeira Vines .• , 30 

Montbretias, 6 choice named varieties 

Tigridia Conchiflora, Grandiflora Alba aud Pavonia. . 
Tuberoses, Double Pearl, selected, 6 to 8-inch 

Double Pearl, fine, 3 to 4-inch 

For a complete list of all seasonable Bulbs including the best list of 
up-to-date Dablias, see current >Vholesale Price List. 



.90 
.15 



.25 
.30 
.20 
.10 



3.00 
5.00 
7.00 

10.00 
2.00 

10.00 
5.00 
S 00 

1400 
7.00 
1.00 
2.60 
2.00 
1.75 
2.0O 
1.00 



9.00 
22.00 
15.00 
12.50 
15.00 
8.00 
5.00 



HENRY A. DREER, 714 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 




NEW LARGE-FLOWERING CALLA 

CALLA DEVONIENSIS. 

Blooming Callat From Seed In One Year 

100 seeds, 75c; 1000 seeds, $6.00- 

STOCKS— Beauty of Nice 

A very conspicious and handsome new 
Stock of quick growth, with flowers of very 
large size. The color is oC a very pleasing 
daybreak pink. It is grown in large quanti- 
ties in the south of France for shipment north. 
Under good culture the plants will grow 24 to 
30 inches hieh. The seedlings will bloom in 
10 weeks, and if the seed is sown by the end 
of May the plants will bloom in September 
when cut-flower3 begin to get scarce, and 
contine to bloom during winter. 

Beauty of Nice. pink. pkt. (350 seeds), 25c. 

Beauty of Nice, Stock Pure White, trade 
pkt.. 25c. 

Vaughan's Seed Store, 

NEW YORK. 

14 Barclay St. 



CHICAGO. 

84-86 Randolph St. 



Please mention the American Florist when writing* 




ALPHONSE BOUVIER. 
ALSACE. 
AUSTRIA 
BLACK BEAUTY, $7.00 per 100. 
BASSETT'S RED. S3.00 per 100. 
CHARLES HENDERSON. 
CRIMSON BEDDER. 

DUKE OF MARLBOROUGH. 
EGANDALE, $3.00 per 100. 
FLORENCE VAU3HAN. 



Strong Root Pieces, 
. averaging 2 to 3 

F eyes. 

MAD. CROZY. 
MRS. KATE GRAY, $5.00 per 100. 
PRES. CARNOT. 

PRES. CLEVELAND. 
PROGRESSION. 

QUEEN CHARLOTTE. 
ROBERT CHRISTIE. 
SAM TRELEASE, $4.00 per 100. 
SOUV. DE ANTOINE CROZY. 



UNLESS NOTED $2.00 per 100; $18.00 per 1000. WRITE FOR PRICES ON LARGE LOTS. 



The Storrs & Harrison Co., 



Faiuesville, 
Ohio. 



Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 



Philadelphia Rambler. 

The new forcing rose, strong field plants, 
$15.00, $20.00 and $30.00 per 100. 

CRIMSON RAMBLER. 

Extra well branched, $8.00, $11.00 and $15.00 
per 100. 

The Conarda Jones Co., *%r^^' 

Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 

We Have Got Them 

50,000 young Roses in 2x2K-inoh pots, ready to 
go out right along. We pack so cold does not 
hurt them. The earlier start you get the further 
along you will be in the spring. 



WRITE. 



GEO. A. KUHL, Pekin, 



The American Florist Co.'s 

TRADE DIRECTORY 



HUNDREDS OF NEW NAMES 
AND ADDRESSES. 



And contains the usual fully corrected and 
revised lists of Florists, Seedsmen, Nurserymen 
Gardeners, Horticulturists, Landscape Architects 
Parks, Cemeteries, Botanical Gardens, Horticult- 
ural Societies and Horticultural Supply Concerns 
of the United States and Canada. 

Prlc« $2.00 Prepaid. 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO. 

324 Dearborn St., CHICACO. 



SUCCESSFUL SELLERS 



are the luceeuful growen who advertiBc iajtjtjtjtjltjltjtjt 

^ * THB AMERICAN FLORIST. 



62 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 6, 



Our pasTiMES. 



Announcements of coming contests or other 
events of interests to our bowling, shooting and 
sporting readers are solicited and will be given 
place in this column. 

Address all correspondence for this department 
to Wm. J. Stewart, 42 W. 28th St., New York. 
Robt. Kift, 1725 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa.; 
or to the American Florist Co., Chicago, 111. 



At St. Louis. 

The bowling club had a lively time at 
the meeting February 1. Team 2 won 
by a good margin. Kuehn was high 
man with a total of 575. The score fol- 
lows: 

TEAM 1. 

Player Ist 2nd 3d T'l 

Beneke 191 176 157 524 

Miller 171 136 161 468 

Weber 121 134 116 371 

Young..; 129 117 149 395 

1758 

TEAM 2. 

Player 1st 2nd 3d 4th 

Kuehn 143 145 187 575 

Beyer 185 144 170 479 

Beneke 187 138 15U 475 

^eber 137 137 127 401 

1930 
F. K. B. 



At New York. 

The New York Florists' Bowling Club 
had a light attendance last Monday 
night, several of the bright lights being 
kept away by illness or other unavoid- 
able causes. The scores of the first four 
games were as follows: 

Player. 1st 2d 3d 4th 

Siebrecht 159 119 135 167 

Ford 146 161 146 142 

Lang 157 151 166 163 

Nugent 86 80 

Shaw 102 114 133 129 

Stewart 75 126 14J 114 

Gibbs 96 179 183 118 

Siebrecht, Jr 87 99 

The bowling alleys in the basement of 
the Coogan building are the scene of 
many an exciting contest between 
growers of the Cut Flower Exchange. 
On Tuesday last John Donaldson, George 
Golsner, E. W. Holt and Jasper McMullen 
rolled sixteen games, Golsner and Holt 
winning twelve games and Donaldson 
and McMullen four. 



■ - At Chicago. 

Another spirited session was held at 
the Geroux alleys, Tuesday evening, with 
the following results. E. F. Winterson 
took a streak, and in the second game 
chalked up 224. A number of ladies par- 
ticipated. 

Player 1st 2d 3d 4th 

Stevens 172 175 170 191 

P. J. Hauswirth 124 130 173 121 

Geo.Soott 158 127 147 159 

JohnDegnan 148 123 147 

L. Kill 112 117 126 

G. Asmus 148 165 174 137 

Decker 181 164 150 158 

E. F. Winterson 147 224 99 135 

McReil 169 173 180 202 

Newett 113 149 132 161 

V. Kreitling 163 135 143 

LADIES. 

Player 1st 2d 3d 

Mrs. Winterson 88 133 97 

Mrs. Kreitling 119 144 130 

Mrs. Hauswirth 84 95 115 

Mrs. Kill 87 111 13J 

Miss Eastman 61 37 65 

.Miss Katzeaberger 85 78 90 

Miss Smith 44 

MissEll 63 51 



At Baltimore. 

A team of bowlers of the Gardeners' 
Club composed of Cha^. L. Seibold, Rob- 
ert Halliday, Jas. H. Boone, Mack Rich- 
mond and Mr." Kreh brought back from 
Washington January 27 a handsome 



silver cup, won by them in the first of a 
series of inter-city contests against a 
team of the Washington Florists' Club. 
The Baltimore score was 887, 817, and 
890; the Washington, 715, 739 and 819. 
The Philadelphia club failed to send its 
representatives, who were expected. The 
cup is the gift of Fred H. Kramer, of 
Washington, D. C. S. B. 



Pittsburg. 

The "smoking raucher" given by the 
Pittsburg and Allegheny Florists' and 
Gardeners' Club, February 2 was an 
unbounded success. It was not known 
the club contained so many talented 
entertainers. Every one that did a 
"stunt" received the hearty applause of 
the 200 present. The raucher was held 
in the rathskeller of the club's quarters. 
This was suitably decorated with laurel, 
holly, palms, and immortelle designs, 
including a large pipe of immortelles, 
all sent to the club and arranged by Gus 
and W. J. Ludwig. Refreshments were 
served during the evening. Preceding 
the entertainment fifteen tables were 
arranged for card playing. E. Reinamau 
was master of- ceremonies. The enter- 
tainment began with an excellent trio of 
Swiss singers who were recalled time and 
again. Phil Langhans, dressed in the 
costume of a German i count, sang a top 
ical song to the tune of "Mr. Dooley." 
This choice bit was done with great dig- 
nity. The song included the names of 
many of the club members. Mr. Lang- 
hans was accompanied by four desperate 
looking musicians, who added much to 
the hilarity of the occasion and played 
music that will never be forgotten. These 
artists were Ed. McCollum, George Mar- 
shall, Carl Klinke and William Potter- 
John Bader, in a short talk, gave away 
the secrets of "pool playing." When he 
finished Mr. Langhans in the name of the 
club presented him with a genuine dia- 
mond ring of about eight karats as a 
token of appreciation for his great ser- 
vices to the club. A "colored" quartette 
then rendered coon songs. P. S. Ran- 
dolph spoke on shooting as an amuse- 
ment in the potting shed, and was will- 



ing to shoot an apple ofi the head of any 
one who came forward. There were no 
takers. A skit by Julius Ludwig and 
Wm. Lauch made a hit. A boyhood 
reminiscence was related by E. Zieger. 
Patrick Maier gave "A Speech Without a 
Title." 

The bouquet presented to Mr. Lang- 
hans after his act at the club affair was 
composed of red carnations and lighted 
Chinese incense sticks. When the actor 
became hoarse he loosened a cork in the 
butt of the bouquet and poured out a 
glass of "ambrosia." 

Business continues irregular with no 
prospects of improvement until the 
weather moderates. All stock seems to 
be plentiful and fine. Spring flowers are 
coming in in good shape. 

A parting of the water main from which 
I. S. Crall, of Monongahela City, gets his 
supply of water, caused the loss of a 
house of Meteor and the greater part of 
a house of carnations. E. L. M. 



Louisville, Ky. 



Members of the Society of Kentucky 
Florists at their recent meeting voted to 
have March 1 carnation exhibition day, 
and will invite carnation growers to 
show their flowers. J. Coenen was the 
originator of the plan and motion. 
Express charges will be paid by the 
society on flowers sent for the exhibi- 
tion. 

Cut flowers have been scarce in Louis- 
ville all winter, the demand exceeding the 
supply. 

Anders Rassmussen, who was ill with 
typhoid fever, is able to be out again. 

H. G. W. 



Cleveland, O. 

M. Wokral & Company have a new 
wagon, one of those long aflfairs painted 
black with gold lettering. 

McKinley day was celebrated here last 
Friday by almost everyone wearing Law- 
son carnations. 

Will Pouting, of Olmsted Falls, O., has 
about 7,000 geraniums, all staple varie- 
ties. O. G. 



NEW CROP OF THE TRUE VARIETY JUST GATHERED- 

Asparagus Plumosus Nanus 




SI. 00 per 100 seeds; $7.50 

per 1000 seeds. 

(Special price on large 

quantities.) 

New Crop flower 
Seeds. 

Are now ready. The 
following should be sown 
early: 



Ageratum 

Asparagus 

Asters 

Begonias 

Browallia 

Can n as 

Carnations 

Celosias 

Coboea 

Cyclamen 

Dracxnas 

Grevillea 

Heliotrope 

Ipomcea 

Lantana 



Lobelias 

Maurandia 

Pansies 

Petunias 

Phlox 

Primula 

Pyrethrum 

Salvias 

Solanum 

Stocks 

Thunbergia 

Torenia 

Verbenas 

Vincas 

Etc., Etc. 



All are described ,and 
offered in our current 
■Wholesale Price List. Sent 
free to all florists. 



HENRY 3. DREER, Philadelphia. 



IHease mention the A merican Fhrist when writing. 



igo4. 



The American Florist. 



63 



New Rose 



GENERAL MdcARTHyR 



Hybrid Tea. 



Color by far the most brilliant of any shade of crimson forcing 
rose ever offered, retaining its brilliancy when fully expanded. It 
_ is also one of the very sweetest varieties ever offered, of very easy 

culture, as it can be grown in the same temperature as an ordinary Tea variety such as Bride. It is a good, strong, 
vigorous grower, producing stems 24 to 30 inches long, a free and continuous producer. It can be grown at much 
less cost than Meteor or Liberty and is a much brighter color than either. Also larger when fully e.xpanded. We 
predict that this will be the red rose for the multitude. Ready for distribution April t, 1904. 




=F»JRIOK«S:= 



Crafted Plants From 2 1-2-inch Pots. 



From 2 1-2-inch Pots. Own Roots. 

S 6.00 Per Dozsn S 7.00 

10.00 w 25 

IS. 00 pe' SO 

25 00 P»r 100 

57.50 per 250 

110.00 PSf 50O 

200.00 per 1000 260.00 

Extra strong S-lnch stock at S4.00 par 100 additional to above tigures. 

The STORRS & HARRISON GO. JOHN. N. MAY, 



■ Per Dozen 



12 OO per 25 

IS.OO • per 50 

32.00 per 100 

72.50 per 250 

140.00 per 500 

per 1000 



PaiNESVILLE, OHIO. 



SUMMITT, N. J. 



64 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 6 



SPECIAL OFFER 

Carnation Cuttings. 

READY FOR SHIPMENT. 

Having a surplus of these varieties will make 
special price lor IS days. Our stock ia perfection 

and free from disease. 

Per 100 1000 



Pink 

Lawion if 1.60 $12.50 

Jooit 1.35; 10.00 

Marquis 125 10.00 

Dorothy 1.60 

White. 

Innocence 1-50 



White. Per 100 1000 

Glacier $160 $14.00 

White Cloud. 1.25 10.00 
Flora Hill. . 1.35 lOOO 

Scarlet. 
Crane- 150 14.00 

Variegated. 
Prosperity... 



1.50 12.00 

PAtliniac Double fringed. Ten novelties 
rvlUIIIOOi from Dreer'a latest sets. Labeled. 
Strong R.C., $1.25 per 100. ^TCASH. 

The W. T. BUCKLEY PLANT CO., 

SPRI NGFIELD, ILL. 

CARNATIONS SC 



Clean, Healthy, Well Rooted Stock 

Per 100 1000 

Crane $2.00 $16 00 

America... 2.00 15.00 

G. Beauty.. 6.00 40.00 

Gaiety 3.00 26.00 

Gov. Roose- 
velt 3.00 25.00 

HarlowardenB.OO 60.00 

Joost 1.75 16.00 

Chicago.. .. 2.00 15.00 



Per 100 1000 
Flora Hill.. $1.50 $12.60 
Prosperity.. 2.60 20 00 

Lawson 2.50 

Marquis.... 1.75 

Melba 1.50 

Dorothy. .. 3.00 
McKinley... 5.00 
E.Crocker.. 1.60 

G. Lord 1.76 

Mrs. Nelson 8.60 



20.00 
16.00 
12.50 
26.00 
45.00 
12.50 
15.00 
30.00 



We also have a few of 1903 varieties 
not listed. \Vrite for information. 

The IVIIXMI FLORAL CO., 

I>e»yto«3., 01n.it>. 

Piease mention the American Florist when 2vriting. 

CARNATION CUTTINGS. 

Per 100 1000 

Enchantress S8.00 $.50.00 

Oueen 500 40.00 

Lillian Pond 5.00 45.00 

Prosperity 2-50 20.00 

Lawson.. 2-50 20.00 

Cressbrook 2.50 20.00 

Challenger 2.60 20.00 

FairlWaid 3.00 25.00 

HarryFenn 5.00 40.00 

Gen. Maceo 3.50 20.00 

QueenLouise 200 1500 

Bradl 300 25.00 

C. WARBURTON, Fall River, Mass. 

Need a Good Scarlet? 

Take my word for it and order Flaminnn 
There is nothing better, nor ' mimnyWi 

more profitable in si^ht. I can also supply 
the following varieties: Albatross, Lady 
Bountiful, Tt>e Bell, Moonlight, Nelson 
Fisher, Mrs. Patten and Indianapolis, $12.00 
per 100; $100.00 per 1000. 

Thp HllPPn ^° excellent commercial 
■ lie yUvCII white of last year's intro- 
duction, $5.00 per lOJ; $40.00 per" liOO. 

S. S. SKIDELSKY, 

708 North 16th St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

ROOTED 

CARNATION CUTTINGS. 

Per 100 lOCO 

G. H. Crane $2.50 $20.00 

Mrs. Lawson 2.0U 17.50 

Mrs..Joost 1.50 12.60 

Ethel Crocker 1.50 12.50 

Wm. Scott 1.50 12.50 

FIoraHill 1.50 12 50 

QueenLouise 1.50 12.i0 

Norway 1.50 13.50 

Cash or C. 0. D. 

ST. LOUIS CARNATION CO., Clayton, Mo. 

CARNATIONS. 

Fine, strong, well-rooted cuttings now ready. 

ENCHANTRESS. if6.C0 per 100; .5150 CO por lOOO. 

LILLIAN POND. *.i.00 jier 100; $411.00 per 1000. 

PROSPERITY, *3.00 plt 100; fei.OO per lOOO 

LAWSON. $3.00 per 100: $25.00 per 1000. 

THE QUEEN, -'an. delivery, $.t per 100; $40 per 1000. 

LARCHMONT NURSERIES, Larchmont, N. Y. 



Carnations K^„^„ 



Cuttings. 



ONLY FIRST-CLASS STOCK SENT OUT. GET YOUR ORDER IN NOW 
TO BE SURE OF EARLY DELIVERY. 

NEW VARIETIES. 



Per lOO Per 1000 

Flamingo $12.00 $100.00 

Lady Bountiful 12.00 100.00 

The Belle 12 OO 100.00 

Indianapolis 12 00 100.00 

NelsonFisher 12.00 100.00 



Per 100 Per 1000 

Mrs. M. A. Patten $12.00 $100.00 

White Lawson 12.00 100.00 

Albatross 10.00 80.00 

Crusader 10.00 80.00 

Reliance 10.00 80.00 



CHOICE VARIETIES. 



IVr ICO Per lOOO 

Enchantress $6.00 $50.00 

Este le 4.00 30.00 

Fragrance 6.00 60.00 

Golden Beauty 5.00 40.00 

Gov. Lowndes 5.00 40.00 

Gov. Wolcott 5.00 40.00 



Per 100 Per 1000 

Harlowarden $8.00 $50.00 

Lillian Pond 6.00 40.00 

Mrs. Theo. Roosevelt 6.00 40.00 

Pres. McKinley 6.00 40.00 

The Queen 6.00 40.00 

White Bradt 6.00 



STANDARD SORTS. 



Per 100 Per lOCO 

America $1.75 $16.00 

Cressbrook 4.00 30.00 

Enquirer 2.60 20.00 

Ethel Crocker 1.76 16.00 

FIoraHill 1.76 16.00 

Genevieve Lord 1.76 16.00 

G. H. Crane 2.60 20.00 

Gov. Roosevelt 3.60 30.00 

Lorna 3.00 26.00 

Marquis 1.76 16.00 



Per 100 

Morning Glory $2.60 

Mrs. F. Joost 1.76 

Mrs. H. N. Higinbotham 4.00 

Mrs. N. H. Nelson 4.00 

Mrs. Potter Palmer 8.00 

Mrs. Thos. W. Lawson 2.60 

Norway 1.76 

Prosperity 2.60 

Queen Louise 1.76 

■White Cloud 1.76 



Per lOOO 
$20.00 
16.00 
36.00 
36.00 
25.00 
20.00 
16.00 
20.00 
16.00 
16.00 



Vaughan's Seed Store, Chicago. 

GREENHOUSES AND NURSERIES, WESTERN SPRINGS, ILL. 



Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 



STRONGLY ROOTED 

CARNATIONS 



NOW 
READY. 



GROWN OUT OF DOORS AND ROOTED WITHOUT HEAT. 



WHITE. 



Queen Louitt. 

Flora Hill 

Alba 

Gov. Wolaott.. 

Norway 

Lillian Pond... 

Chloot 

Viola Allan .. 



PINK. 

Mrs. T. W. Uwion.. 

Mrs. Joott 

Mormaid 

Mr*. RooHvall 

SiKOOtt 

PraildonI MoKlnloy.. 
Croubrook 



Per 100 lOOO 
.$1.20 $10.00 



.... 1.20 

.... 3.40 

.... 3.40 

.... 1.20 

.... 5.00 

.... 1.20 

.... 3.00 



10.00 
30.00 
30.00 
10.00 
45.00 
11.00 
25.00 



12.50 
lOOO 



1.40 
1.00 

1.20 10.00 

6.00 55.00 

4.00 35.00 

5.00 45.00 

2.50 20.00 



SCARLET. 

J. H. Manlay 

G.H. Crana 

Amarlea 

Mr*. Palmar. 

Apollo 

Adonli 

CRIMSON. 

Harlowardan 

Gov. Rootovall 



Per 100 1000 
$350 $30.00 



.. 1.20 

.. 1.20 

.. 1.20 

.. 3.50 

.. 7.00 



5.00 
1.50 



10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
30.00 
65.00 



45.00 
11.00 



YELLOW. 



Eldorado . 

VARIEGATED. 

Marshall Flald 

Stolla 

Armazlndy 

Prospsrlly 



1.00 9.00 



5.00 
3.00 
1.00 
1.40 



45.00 
25.00 
9.00 
12.00 



25 ol any one Itind at 100 prices. 260 at 100 ^prices. 



Wo propay oxpros* eharges and will ship C. O. D. with the privllega ol axamlnallon, we assuming 
all the responsibility of Cuttings arriving in good condition and proving; satisfactory. 

LOOMIS, 
CAL. 



Loomis Floral Co., 




Our 1st and 2n(l Grade 

Tea Roses, 

Many of our Customers tell us are 
better ttian others have sent them as 
higher grade. Then, you know, they are 
"fresh," sent to you same day they are 
cut. Prices on these grades are 3c and Sc. 

Heller Brothers, 

SOUTH PARK FLORAL CO., 



Please mention the American Florist to advertisers. 



igo4. 



The American Florist. 



65 




New Carnation 

The Bride 

For 1904. 



We have grown this variety for the past four 
years and can with confidence assert that it is the 
most prolific white variety we have ever grown. 

The flowers average 3 to 3V4 inches in diameter, 
of ideal form and the purest white, borne on good 
stout stems which average (1 to 16 inches long, after 
the plants get well established; a free and continuous 
producer, and a healthy, clean grower, not subject to 
disease in any form. 

Awarded Certificate of Merit by the New York 
Florists' Club, February 1 J, I90I; First prize for the best 
JOO white at the American Carnation Convention 
Show in Brooklyn, N. Y., February, 1903; Certificate 
of Merit by the Pennsylvania H irticultural Society at 
their March Exhibitioa, J903. 

Strong, w^ell-rooted stock ready February J, 1904. 

Prices $2.50 per do2;n; $12,00 per JOO; $100 00 
per lOCO. 



JOH^ N.MAY, 



SUMMIT, N. J. 



Please mention the American Florist when writing. 



Carnafion 
Cuttings. 

Well Rooted. Ready Now. 

Per 100 1000 

Enchantress, light pink $6.00 $50.00 

Harlowarden, crimson 6.00 50.00 

Her Majesty, white 500 45.00 

Lillian Pond, white S-OO 45.00 

Pres. McKlnley, dark pink 5.00 45.00 

Sybil, dark pink 5-00 40.00 

Dorothy Whitney, yellow 6.00 50.00 

Gov. Wolcott, white 5-00 40.00 

Alba, white 500 40.00 

Estelle, scarlet 3.00 25.00 

Mrs. T. W. Lawson, dark pink 2.50 20 00 

Mrs. Higinbolham, light pink... 4.00 30.00 

Prosperity 2.50 20.00 

NEW VARIETIES, f,°eUrr^ 

Crusader, best scarlet ,$t0.00 80.00 

Flamingo, fancy scarlet 12.00 100.00 

While Lawson, pure white 12.00 100.00 

Reliance, white 10.00 80.00 

Moonlight, white 10.00 75.00 

Lady Bountiful, white 12.00 100.00 

Snd for prie* IM of ibov* and othtr varlatltt. 

Ghicap Carnation Go. 

Fleoie mention the American Florist when writing. 



l^SSSSSgSSSSSSS3S& 



u 



NEW LIGHT PINK CARNATION 

NEW DAYBREAK" 

To the commercial grower wtio is looking for profit, this variety is all that its 
name implies, and will at once command itself as the old Daybreak reincarnated 
without its faults. Color, true Daybreak shade; of Daybreak aad Scott extraction 
thrnuKh several generations of seedlings. Inherits the vigor and freedom of both 
the above varieties. Blooms, large, well formed and very sweet; does not have a 
washed oHt appe.irance at any time of the year. A fine keeper and shipper. 

Price, $3.00 perdoz.; $12.00 per 100; $100.00 per 1000. 

OTHER NEW AND STANDARD VARIETIES. 

Chrysanthemums. 



The best American and foreign varieties and best 
standard sorts. Write for Price List. 



H. WEBER & SONS, 



OAKLAND, MD. 



Please mention the American Florist when writing. 



CARNATION Loulse Naumanii 

Dark pink. Produces far more than Lawson and is a better color. With this variety you 
can pick every day the year around. Always heavy with buds and flowers. Most excellent 
keeper. Size, 3-3H inches. Fri»ged and never bursts or fades. Averages 25 flowers per plant 
a season, more than any variety I have ever grown. Come and see them grow. Order 
now for February and March Delivery, 81.35 per Doz, ; S8.00 per 100; S70.00 per 1000. Also 
Rooted Cuttings of ENCHANTRESS, »6.00 per 100. 
O. »«. I«A.XJ1VI.A.PII«, 1537 Doan Street, Cl©'>i;'Ol^r»<a.. Ol-ilo. 
Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 



€6 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 6, 



Stock Plants, Rooted Cuttings and Plants In Small Pots. 

The Home of Ghrysanthemum Stock. Roses, Violets, Geraniums and Carnations For Sale. 

WHEN YOU ORDER TURN TO ISSUES JANUARY 2nd AND 9lh, 1304, FOR PRICES AND VARIETIES. 



BEACH. THE FLORIST, 



LEADS. WHY NOT BUY DIRECT? 

Store No. 8 rott Oflico Arcado. BRIDGEPORT. CONN. 

Greenhouses. 2.82 Park Ave. David S. Beach, Prop. 



Mease mention the A meri'can Florist when writinst 



HEALTHY 

CARNATIONS 

Slock Guarinloed. Como and Sm Beforo Buying. 

Per iro lono 

White Cloud, white $I.£SO $I3..^0 

Queen Louise, white l.fiO 13.50 

Bradt, variegated 2.50 20.00 

Prosperity. vHriegated 2.25 20.00 

Lawson, "oink 2.25 20.00 

Crane, red 2.25 20.ro 

Enchantrt'sa 11.00 50.00 

Sand rooted. Send for prices on lart^e orders. 

Cuttines guaranteed. Healthy and clean and 
Bold C. O. D. or Cash with order. 

A. LAUB & SON, 

Hughsonville, Dutchess Co.* N. Y. 

Please mention the American Florist zvhen ivriting. 

ROOTED 

CARNATION CUTTINGS. 

FINE HEALTHY STOCK. 

Per ion ICOO 

Enchantress $6.00 J50.00 

Gov. Woloott 5.00 40.[0 

Lawson 2.50 iO.OO 

Genevieve Lord I.T5 15.00 

White Cloud 1.75 16.00 

The J. M. Gasser Co., 

234 Euclid Ave., CLEVELAND, O. 

CARNATION CUTTINGS. 

We now have ready good, well-rooted Cuttings, 
from the following varieties: 

100 1000 I 100 1000 

Enchantress $6.00 $50 Eldorado $3.50 $20 

Fair Maid 3.00 25 I Manley 4.00 30 

Fragrance 6.00 50 I Adonis 4.00 



Lawson 2.50 



Joost. 
Harlowarden.. 
Harry Fenn. . 



.50 
6.00 
5.00 



The Queen 5.00 40 

Boston Market.. 4.00 30 

Gov. Wolcott. ... 5.00 40 

Bradt 3.00 25 

Prosperity 2.50 20 

NEW VARIETIES FOR 1904- 

100 1000 

Nelson Fisher $12.00 $100.00 

Mrs. M. A. Patten 12.00 100.00 

All selected cuttings from healthy stock. Send 
in your order now and secure early delivery. 

_ DU Tel. 
BILLBRICA, MASS. 



BACKER & CO., k?C£ 



CARNATIONS 

Rooted Cuttings. Ready Now. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

QUEEN LOUISE $1.60 $12.60 

LILLIAN POND 6.00 40.00 

ETHEL CROCKER 1.60 10.00 

MRS E. A. NELSON 2.00 16.00 

FLORIANA 1.60 12.60 

ENCHANTRESS 6.00 60.00 

ADONIS 6.00 60.00 

Send for estimates on complete order and 
list of other varieties. 

ALBERT M. HERR, Lancaster, Pa. 

Please tnentjon the A merican Florist 7vhen ivriting. 

Manetti Stocks 

FOR SALE at $12.00 to $15.00 per 1000. 
C. a, C. L. PENNOCK, Lantdowne, Pa. 



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Inldianapolis 

The best bright pink carnation in sight. Come 
and see it grow/ing. Awarded Certificate of Merit 
Indiana State Florists' Ass'n, Jan. 12, 1903. 
Scored 86 points Chicago, Nov. 18, 1903. Certifi- 
cate of Merit, Cincinnati Florists' Club, Jan. 9, 
1904. Certificate of Merit, Indiana State Florists' 
Ass'n., January 12, 1904. What more could you 
ask? 12.50 par doz.; $12 00 par 100; $100. 00 par 1000. 

A FINE LOT OF STANDARD SORTS. 

Per 101 lOCO Per 100 1000 

McKinlev . ..$3.00 Floriana . . . 2.00 18.00 

Harlowarden. 5.00 Q. Louise. .. 2.00 18.00 

Ht-r Maiesty.. 5.00 _ - . 

Flora Hill.... 1.5) $12.51 

Crane 2.5) 20. i 

I'^stelle 3.00 25.00 

W.Cloud ).50 12.50 

Lorna S.nO 18.00 

Viola Allen... 3.00 2.5.00 

BAUR & SMITH, 

330W. SBthSt., Indianapolis, Ind. 



E. Crocker.. 1.50 
Lawson .... 2.00 
G. Roosevelt 2.00 
P. Palmer.. 3.00 
E. A. Nelson 3.00 
Apollo 3.10 



12.50 
18.00 



PUase mention the A merican Florist when zvritinz. 



CARNATION CUTTINGS 

strong Plants Ready for Prompt Shipment. Our Stock is Unexcelled. 



Per 100 Per 1000 

PERU 3.00 25.00 

WHITE CLOOD 2.50 30.00 

AMERICA 2.50 20.00 



Per 100 Per 100.1 

FLOR\ HILL $2..5n $>0.00 

THE SPORT a.-'iO 20.0'1 

MRS. LAWSON 3.00 2.5.00 

MRS. HIQINBOTHAM 3.00 2J.00 

BRIDE $13.50 per 1000 IVORY $12..50 per 10:0 

BRIDESMAID 13..50 " GOLDEN GATE 13.50 

Lots of 500 at 1000 rate. 

SINNER BROTHERS, 

Wholesale Cut Flowers, 
58-60 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO. 



ROSES. ROSES. 



Rootsd Cuttings, $3.00 per 100; S25.00 I'er 1000. 
2>,-inch, $6.00 I»:-r 100; $50.00 per 1000. 



Beauties, 

BRIDES, BRIDESMAIDS, METEORS, IVORIES, LIBERTIES, 

DEDI EC 2'4-lnch pols. S3. 00 per 100; $25.00 per lOro. 
rLnLLO, Rooted Cuttings, SI. SO per 100; $ 1 2.50 per ICOO. 

ALL STRICTLY Al STOCK. PERFECT SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
ON ALL ORDERS. 

J. F. WILCOX, Council Bluffs, Iowa. 



rWWWwwWWWWWWWW^WWWWWWW^^W^ VVWW W ▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼ W 1 

Carnation Cuttings, j 

STRONG AND WELL ROOTED. READY NOW. 

President McKinley. Fair Maid, Roosevelt, Wolcott, Lawson, Crocker 
and Dorothy. Other varieties a little later. 



E. T. GRAVE, 



Richmond, Ind. | 



igo4. 



The American Florist. 



67 



Transplanted Carnation Rooted Cuttings 

10.000 of each variety, to close them out. 



Per 100 1000 
VIOLINIA, the largest, freest variegated Carnation 

to date, extra fine $12.00 $100.00 

LOS ANGELES, a fine white 3.00 25.00 

ALBA, the big white 2.50 25.00 

STELLA, a good variegated 2.50 20.00 

SUCCESS, LaFrance color 2.S0 20.00 

VIOLA ALLEN, a fine variegated 2.50 20.00 

APOLLO, bright scarlet 2.50 20.00 

MARSHALL FIELD, fine variegated 2.50 20.00 

HARLOWAROEN, come to stay 3.00 25.00 

Mckinley, come to stay 3.00 25.00 



25 at 100 rates; 250 at 1000 rates. Cash or C. 0. D. with privi 
Express prepaid by us at above prices. 



Per 100 

MRS. THEO. ROOSEVELT, O. K $ 3.00 

GOLDEN BEAUTY, best yellow 1.50 

GOLD NUGGETT 1.20 

CRANE, still good 1.20 

ELDORADO, good yet 1.00 

ARMAZINDY, good yet l.OO 

THE MARQUIS, light pink i.oo 

AMERICA, best summer bloomer i.OO 

PALMER, the big red 1.00 

MERMAID, very free salmon pink 1.00 

GEN. GOMEZ, good color i.oo 

e of examining. 



1000 

$25.00 

12.00 

10.00 

10.00 

8.00 

8.00 

8.00 

8.00 

8.00 

8.00 

8.00 



California Carnation Co. 

LOOMIS. CAL. 



The Two Best Commercial White Carnations 

LADY BOUNTIFUL. 




The best of all white carnations. 

It is clean and liealthy. 

It has a strong, robusi growth, but produces 
no surplus grass. 

It is early flowering and the beat producer 
throughout the entire season. 

Iti keepin;^ and shipping (laalities are far 
superior to any other white carnation. 

If you grow Lady Bountiful you have a. 
white carnation where every flower is a flower 
with a stifl wiry stem, a perfect calyx and 
no splits. 

It does well in eithera medium or heavy soil. 

You canoot miss it by placing your order 
now before all the early stock is sold. 

We have up-to-date booked more orders for 
Lady Bountiful than the whole season's sales 
of any new carnation wi' have yet introduced. 
It is a winner. 

THE BELLE. 

Is an excellent companion to Lady Bounti- 
ful with equally good points to make it a 
favorite paying variety with all growers. 

Our largfi stock and easy propagation still 
enables us to offer February and March 
delivery. 

Price for well rooted cuttings: 
- $12.00 per 100; $.00.00 per 1000. 



We also have all of the best of the 1903 
Xovelties and the leading standard varieties. 

Send for Pfico List. 

F. Dorner & Sons Co. 

LaFAYEITE, IND. 



68 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 6. 



CARNATIONS... 

Rooted Cuttings. Good ones and lots of them. 

Order Now. Per loo 1000 

Mrs. T. W. Lawson $2.ciU $20.00 

Boston Market 3 01 Su 00 

Flora Bill 1.50 15.00 

flPranilimC '- ''°<' 214-inch, fine plants, S. A. 
UCIOIIIUina. Nutt and La Favorite, S3.00 per 

100; *25.00 per lOOO. 
RACtnn f'Prnc ^^^ °^ 3-incb pots, ready 
UUOIUH I t^l lldi for 4-inoh, $8.00 per 100. Ail 

above flrst-class stock. 

S. T. DANLEY, '"Yll""^ 

FUase mention the A merican Florist 7vhcti writing. 

Scarlet Carnation i\. Vf\ /% LJL^m 

A profuse Christmas bloomer, strong' trrower, 

heavy stem, flow? r intense scarlet and remarkable 

keeping qualities. Rooted Cutting* ready February 1. 

PRICE: $10.00 PER 100; $75.00 PER 

1000 CASH. 

ORDER FROM THE GREENHOUSES, 

JEROME SUYDAM. Flalbush, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

OR FROM THE AGENTS. 

SUNN &HUGHES,CooganBldg., New YorkCity. 

Rooted Carnation Cuttings 

Per 100 

Enchantress 85.00 

Queen 4.00 

Fair Maid 2.50 

Laivson 2.50 

H. F. LITTLEFIELD. "K™ 

Carnation Cuttings 

We are now booking orders for rooted outtingi. 
List of varieties and prices sent on application. 

Tin Cottage Gardens. Queens, L. I. 

Carnations 

ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

Orders booked now for nest season's delivery of 
all the leading varieties. Send us a list of what 
you want and get prices that are right. 

Chas. Chadwick, L. Box ii. Grand Rapids, Mich. 

CARNATIONS. 

50.000 ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

The profitable ones to grow for Cut 'Flowers. 
Our stock is exceptionally fine. List of varieties 
and prices on application. 

O. AKEHURST & SON. 

WMire MARSH, MD. 

ROOTED CARNATION CUTTINGS. 

From strong, bfaltbj plants. lOO 1000 

Enchantress $6.C0 SliO.OO 

The Queen 6.00 60.00 

Fair Maid 4.00 30.00 

Gov. Wolcott 4.00 3J.0O 

Boston Market 4.00 3^.00 

Mrs. T. W. Lawson 3.00 23.00 

HENRY A. STEVENS CO., Dedham, Mass. 



Orders Booked Now SLS."" 

Rooted Cuttings and Plants of Rose Queen 
of Edgely, (Pink American Beauty). Write for 
prices. 

EDWIN LONSDALE, 

Wyndimer, Chutaiiit Hill, PHILADELPHU. 



The American Florist Company's 



DIBECTOBY 



oontelng the namea and addreaoa* al the Florists, 
Borierymen and Seedsmen of (He Cnlted States 
ttA Canada. PRICE. «2.00. 




"A Wee Wail From The Woods(man)" 

"DUALITY COUNTS" 

("That's All.") 

This stock can ba had ONLY direct (ram the 
Introducers or their Agents: 

J. B. DEAMUD, W. F. KASTING, 

Chicago, III. BulTalo, N. Y. 

LEO. NIESSEN. GEO. M. KELLOGG, 

Philadelphia, Pa. Kansas City, Mo. 

J. M. McCULLOUGH'S SONS, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

REED & KELLER, New York City. 
HOLTON & HUNKEL. H. G. BERNING, 

Millwaukee. Wis. St. Louis, Mo. 

BARTELDES & CO., Denver, Colo. 

Caldwell The Woodsman Co. 

EVERGREEN, ALABAMA. 



Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 



CARNATION CITTINGS 

WELL ROOTED. CLEAN, HEALTHY AND POPULAR VARIETIES. 
ORDER NOW AND RECEIVE PROMPT SHIPMENT. 



PINK. Per 100 1003 

Enchantress $6.00 $50.00 

Morning Glory 2.00 15.00 

Higinbotham 150 12.50 

Lawson 1.50 12.50 

Guardian Angel 1.25 10.00 

1.50 12.60 



Cressbrook. 



RED. Per 100 ICOO 

Palmer $2.00 $15.00 

Estelle 2.00 15.00 

Harlowarden 3.00 26.00 

WHITE. 

Her Majesty 3.00 

White Cloud 1.50 

Flora Hill 1.50 



25.00 
12.50 
12.50 



Rooted Rose Cuttings. 



Per 100 1000 

Bride $1.50 $12.60 

Bridesmaid 1.50 12.00 

Ivory 150 12.50 

Golden Gate 1.50 12.60 



Per 100 1000 

La France $2.00 $15.00 

Meteor 1.50 12.60 

Liberty 3.00 26.00 



WIETOR BROS., """'enSr " 

51=53 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO. 



Please mention the American Florist when writins. 



NOW 
READY 



Carnations 



roR 

SHIPMENT. 



BEST AND MOST STRONGLY ROOTED CARNATIONS ON 
THE MARKET. 

WHITE. Per 100 1000 5000 PINK. 

White Cloud 1.00 9.00 36.00 

SCARLET. 

Amtrlea 1.20 10.00 40.00 



Marquh .... 

Mr*. Jooit 

VARIEGATED. 

Armazlndy 

Proiptrlly 



Per 100 1000 
... 1.00 900 
... 1.20 10.00 



1.00 9.00 
1.40 12.50 



5000 
36.00 
40.00 

35.00 
60.00 



EXPRESS PREPAID TO ANY DESTINATION. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
OR YOUR MONEY BACK. 



LOOM IS CARNATION CO. 



LOCK BOX 115. 



LOOMIS. GAL. 



Special quotations on Gov. Wolcott, Lawson and Palmer In large lots. 



Per 100 1000 

Prosperity 2.00 18.00 

Lillian Pond 3.00 35.00 

Palmer 1.50 12.60 

30O0 and over, $11.00 per lOOO. 

Joost 1.60 12.00 

Stock 'mums of Merry Christmas and Eaton, big clumps, $1.00 per dozen. 
Booking orders for 2!4-inch roses and 'mums for spring delivery. Get ^our orders in and secure 
good stock. Send in list for estimate. POEHLMANN BROS. CO., Morton Grove, III. 

FUaie mention the A merican Florist when -writings 



Per 100 1000 

Enchantress »5.00 $45.00 

Gov. Wolcott 3.50 30.00 

3OO0 and over, $28.00 per lOOO. 
Lawson 1.50 12.50 

2000 and over, $11.00 per 1000. 



Per 100 1000 

Higinbotham 1.50 12.60 

Harlowarden 3.00 

Lorna 2.50 20.00 

Prices on 2'Hi-inch stock on ap- 
plication. 



tgo4. 



The American Florist. 



69 



La DETROIT 

Breitmeyers' New Rose 

A SEEDLING OF TESTOUT AND BRIDESMAID. 

To Be Disseminated April 1, 1904. 

COLOR. Prevailing color a beautiful shell pink, shading in the center to a soft rose pink. The reverse of the outer petal 
is of a creamy flesh tint, shading to silvery toward the base, which may best be described as opalescent. The full open flower discloses 
a vivid richness of coloring, rare and fascinating. FRAGRANCE. Subtle, strongly tea-scented; reminds one of old Bon Silene. 
FORM. Large cup-shaped, heav/ petal, shell-like in formation. GROWTH. Strong and healthy^ with a rich, glossy foliage, 
rampant and vigorous, with a strong tendency to long shoots; very prolific. 

ALL ORDERS BOOKED FILLED IN ROTATION BEQINNINQ APRIL i. 

For "Own Roofed" Plants from 2 1-2 inch pots. 

1 Plant, each $ .75 I lOO Plants and over and less than 1,000, each. $ .25 

12 Plants, each .-. 60 | 1,000 Plants and over, each 20 

25 Plants, each 50 I 3-inch pot plants, 5c each additional. 

50PIantsandover and less than 100, each 30 | prices of qrapted stock aivBN on application. 

JOHN BREITMEYER'S SONS, 

Gratiot and Miami Aves., DETROIT, MICH. 

SKr^T^IKIG- A.r^B;iWTS: MICHIGAN CUT FLOWER EXCHANGE, 

ERNST ASMUS & SON, VAUGHAN'S SEED STORE. J. AUSTIN SHAW, 

A. ROLKER & SONS, S. S. SKIDELSKY, CLUCAS & BODDINGTON CO 



STRONG STOCK 
from 2 1-2 inch pots. 



UNCLE JOHN. 



The finest pink rose yet introduced; beautiful color, free bloomer, best 
money-maker. $20.00 per 100; $150.00 par 1000. 



Per 10) 1000 

MME. CHATENAY »6.00 S50.0O 

SUNRISE 5.00 40.00 

KAISERIN 4.(0 35.00 

LIBERTY 600 50 00 



MAID 

BRIDE 

PERLE 

GOLDEN GATE. 
IVORY 



Per 100 
....S3.(0 
.... 3.t0 
.... 3.00 
.... 3.00 
.... 3.00 



ROSE CUTTINGS— Well Booted. 



Per ICO lOOO 

IVORY ►. $1.50 S13.50 

MAID lEO 12.50 

BRIDE 1.50 1360 



Per 100 

GOLDEN GATE $1.51 

PERLE l.SO 

SU^RISE 3.50 



CARNATIONS— Well rooted, healthy cuttings, of the following varieties, now ready. 



PINK. Per 100 1000 

MRS. LAWSON....... :....:..... .'$150' $12.50 

MRS. E. A NELSON 2.50 20 OO 

GUARDIAN ANGEL 1.25 10 00 

MRS. HIGINBOTHAM 3.C0 15.00 

SYBIL 3.00 25.00 

Mckinley 3.00 35.00 

JOOST 1.35 10.00 

VARIEGATED. 

MRS. BRADT 3 00 15.00 

PROSPERITY 200 15 OJ 

All stock sold under express condition that if not satisfactory 

PETER REINBERG. 



WHITE. Per 100 

MURPHYS WHITE ...$3.00 

FLORA HILL 1.25 

WHITE CLOUD 1.35 

PERU 1.35 

QUEEN LOUISE 1.2i 

NORWAY 1.35 

MARION 1.25 

GOV. LOWNDES 3.00 

RED. 

ESTELLE 2.50 

MRS. INE 1.35 

CHICAGO (Red Bradt) 3.00 

HARLO*ARDEN 3.00 

it is to be returned immediately when money will be refunded. 



loco 

$25.00 
25.00 
35.00 
25.00 
25.00 



lOOD 

$12.50 

12.50 

30.10 



1000 

35.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.(0 
10.00 
10.0) 
lO.CO 
35.00 

20.00 
10.00 
15.00 
35.00 



51 

WABASH AVE., 



CHICAGO. 



Healthy Carnations. 

WtH RooMd. Enchantress, all sold till March 
15lh, $6.00 per 100; 150.00 per 1000. Strong, 2-inoh 
pots now ready, $8.00 per 100. Now ready, Queen 
Louise, Flora Hill, Lorna, White Cloud, Peru, 
Innocence, Lawson, Floriana, Prosperity, Doro- 
thy, Marquis, Pres. Roosevelt, Manley. $3.00 per 
lOO; $17.50 per 1000. 

W. W. COLES, Kokomo, Ind. 



strong, will rootgd Carnallon Cultlnsi. 



White Bradt, 



JOHN E. STEN, 



White Sport of Mrs. 
Geo. M. Bradt. 

$1.50 per 35; $5.00 per 100; $22.(0 per 500. 
Cash with order or C. O. D. 

RBDWINQ, 
MINN. 



CARNATIONS 



The Leading Novelties of 1904. 

The Best Varieties of 1903. 

All the Standard Sorts. 
Order your Rooted Cuttings NOW. 

GEO. HANCOCK <& SON. 

GRAND HAVEN, MICH. 



70 



The American Florist. 



Peb 6. 



F WW WV^ ▼▼▼▼ WVVVVvV WW ▼▼▼▼ WV^VVW VVVV^WV •▼▼▼▼▼▼▼ ▼▼WVVVV WW ' 

Best Commercial White 
► Carnation To Date. 

Puie white. Blooms 3 inches and over in diameter, beautifully fringed; very fragrant; exceedingly freebloomer; eirly and contin- 
uous; very healthy and vigorous; stems stiff, three feet long and over; has brought top prices in the Philadelphia Market the past three 
seasons. COME AND SEE IT GROWING. $10 00 per 100; $75.00 per 1000. From 2-inch pots, $12.00 per 1000; $90.00 pertOOO. 




WE ALSO OFFER THE FOLLOWING GOOD VARIETIES: 



Per 100 1000 

HARLOWARDEN, the finest crimson $5.00 $45.00 

From 2-inch pots 6.S0 60.00 

Those in pots are extra fine for immediate delivery. 

ENCHANTRESS 6.00 50.00 

From 2-inch pots, well established plants 7.50 65.OO 

MRS. IH A. PATTEN 12.00 100.00 

FLAMINGO 12.00 100.00 

MRS. THEO. ROOSEVELT 5-00 40.00 

ADONIS 7.50 6500 



Per 100 
LILLIAN PONO 5.00 

PRES. Mckinley 4.00 

WHITE BRADT fico 

MAY NAYLOR 4.00 

HER MAJESTY 500 

MRS E. A. NELSON 3.00 

ALPINE GLOW 4.00 

MRS. THOS. LAWSON 3.00 

MRS. GEO. M. BRADT 3.50 



1000 
40.00 
30.00 

35.00 

40.00 
25.00 

35.00 

25.00 

30.00 



Send For Catalogue. Five Per Cent Off for Cash with Order. 



j ROBERT CRAIG & SON, t1ilit^^l^^f:T' | 

^•♦♦♦♦♦« ♦♦♦♦»»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦»♦♦*♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦»♦♦♦ »♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦» 

ROOlBQ GUltinKSl ones, Wper 100; 85.00 per 
ICOO. Hehotroiip. gooJ varieties, $1.00 per 100; J8.00 
per 1000. Coleus, all the best, 70c per 100; S6.00 
per 1000. AEeratums, 60o per 100; 15.00 per lOtO. 
Salvias, $1.00 per 100; $8.00 per ICO). Petunias, 
double. $1.35 per 100; $10.00 per lOOO. Daisies, $1.00 
per 100. Fuchsias, $1.50 per ICO. Pelargoniums, 
$2.25 per 100. Express prepaid on all rooted cul- 
tin^s. Cash vfith orders; satisfaction guaranteed. 
Write S. D. BRANT, The Clay Center Florist, 

(Jlay Center, Kansas. 

scooted Oi;i.1;1;iz3(ES— ^oaes 

Per 100 10(0 

American Beauty $3,00 $30.00 

Bride, Maid, Ivory, Gate 1.50 1200 

Perle, Kaiserin, Meteor, Canadian Q'n 2.50 22.50 
Write your order for 2% or 3-inch stock later 
delivery. We guarantee this strongly rooted 
healthy stock and extra pood value. Twenty 
leading varieties of stock 'Mums and R. C. at 
lowest rates. Boston Ferns, $4.00 to $35.00 per 100. 
In excellent condition. 

W. H. CULLETT & SONS, Lincoln, III. 
Please mention the American Florist when writing 

CYCLAMEN PLANTS. 

Cyclamen Persioum Splendens Gieanteuni, 
finest strain in the world in four colors, from 4-in. 
pots $12.00 per 100. PRIMULA CHMtNSIS FIMBRItTA, 

(fringed Primroses). .No finer strain, all colors, 
3-in. pots, $5 CO per 100. 

PAUL MADEB, E, Sttouilsbatg, Pa, 

Ghrysanthemums... 

American Novplties. Also a complete line of 
Auslraliant English and Trench varieties, both 
new and standard sorts. For prices and descrip- 
tions address 

NATHAN SMITH & SON, ^^jf^^ 

SPECIALTIES 



In Best 
Varieties 



ROSES, from 3-inch pots, 
CARNATIONS, forall delivery 
CHRYSANTHEMUMS, 
SMILAX. VIOLETS. 

Prices Low. Send for List. 

WOOD BROTHERS . Fistikill. N.Y. 

Best standard white 

for summer flowering. 
Strong rooted cuttings. 
$1.25 per 100; $10.00 per lOOO. 

A. CHRISTENSEN, Slontham. Mast 

Carnation Rooted Cuttings, an 

ard sorts. Send for price list. 

■si Z26. KENNETT SQUME, PA. 



Mrs. fisher 



1 the new 
d stand- 



NEW PINK CHRYSANTHEMUM 

Dr.ENGlEHARD 

The finest commercial Pink Chrysanthemum ever introduced. 

We were awarded for this, first prize for the best six blooms any new 
pink variety at the Chrysanthemum Show in New York. This ii going to be 
in pinic chrysanthemums what Col. D. Appleton has been in yellow and 
Timothy Eaton in white. It is a fine commercial flower of the largest size, 
and an ideal color; fine, large, compact blooms of great substance; a fine 
shipper; something that has long been wanted in pink chrysanthemums. It 
has grand foliage, is an easy "doer," and a phenomenal variety in every respect. 

As the demand for this is enormous, it would be advisable to place orders 
without delay. As orders are filled in rotation, the earlier order is placed the 
earlier delivery we can make. 

Certificated by the C. S. A., having scored as high as 95 points. 

50c each, $5s00 per dozen, $30 00 per 100 

F. R. PIERSON CO., 

Tarrytown-on-Hudson, NEW YORK. 



Please men turn the Ameticayt Fhn i\t -ivlten lot itm^. 

AMERICAN BEAUTY "^^^^^ 

This stock is from good, clean, healthy wood, will be free from spot and thor- 
oughly rooted when sent out. Money refunded if not perfectly satisfactory upon 
return of stock. $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 

Wliolesale Grower of Cut Flowers, 

37-39 Randolph Street, 



J.A.BIJDLONG, 



Please mention the American Floriit when writing. 



'^r^l^ _ £^ ^ ^ ^ Best Commercial White 
I ll6 lJlJ66ri CARNATION. 

.■ MM^^ ^^^ VA^^^^MM Rooted Cuttings, XXX Stock 
0^0 $5.00 per 100; $4S per 1000. 

CHRYSaNTHEMUMS ^'iisViS^^i.^x^s. 



TOTTV'S PEERLESS 
SET 

'"' °/n?°lrittst'^^'"" JOHN BARR, South Natick, Mass. 

J^ase mention the A merican Fiorist when writing. 



1904. 



The American Florist. 



71 




STRONG STOCK from 2 1-2 inch pots. 



IIIIPI r inUM Per 100 Per ICO) 

uhuLl junn 120x0 $150.00 

Mme. Chalonav 6.00 60.00 

Sunrise 5.00 40.00 

U9ff01w£D JOMff? is the best Pink introduction in recent years. It's a money-maker. 



Per ICO Per 1000 

Liberty $4.00 lf35.0a 

Maid 3.00 2500 

Bride 3.00 25.00 



„ ,, „ . Per too PerlCOO 

GoldenGate S3 oo S25.0O 

].™>'y-. •■••■■ 30) 2.5.00 

American Beauty e.oo 50.00 



ROSE CUTTINGS-Well Rooted. 



Per 100 Per lOOO 

Bride SI. 50 $13.50 

Bridesmaid 1.50 13.5) 



Per 100 Per 1000 

GoldenGate $1.50 12.50 

Ivory 1.50 $13.60 

CARNATIONS. 



Per 100 Per 1000 

Sunrise S3.50 J3000 

American Beauty 3.00 25 00 



Well rooted, healthy cuttings, of the following varieties, now ready. 



WHITE 

Per ICO Per 1000 

Reliance $1000 $80.00 

Lady Bountiful 12.00 100.00 

Moonlight lO.CO 75.0 

Her Majesty 5.00 45.00 

Gov. Wolcott 4.i'0 30.no 

Boston Market 3 00 25.00 

Norwav 2.00 15.00 

The Bell 12.00 100.00 



SCARLET 

Per 100 
Crusader $10 00 


Per 1000 

$80 00 




100.03 


Kstelle 3.00 

Mrs. Potter Palmer 3.0O 


25.00 
2.i.00 


VARIEGATED 

Prosperity 2 50 

Mrs. Bradt 3.00 


20.ro 

20.0J 



VARIEGATED 

„ , „ ^. ,^ Per 100 Per 1000 

Marshall Field $6.00 $50.00 

PINK 

Indianapolis 12.00 

Enchantress g.oo 

President McKinley 6.00 

Mrs. Lawson 3..50 

Mrs. Higinbotham 4.00 



lOf.OO 
50.00 
50.00 
20.C0 
30.00 



All stock sold under express condition that if not satisfactory it is to be returned immediately, when money will be refunded. 



BENTHEY & CO., 



RANDOLPH ST., 



CHICAGO. 



Julius Roehrs 

RUTHERFORD, N. J. 

Grower ol 

Palms, Bay Trees, 
Box Trees 



-AND- 



Decorative Stock. 

'Ml STOCK PLANTS. 

Strong plants, carefully packed, of the follow- 
ing varieties at $4.00 per 100; 60c per dozen; Bon- 
naffon, Robinson, Modesto, Murdoch, Childs, 
Glory of the Pacific, Ivory, pink and white, 
Montmort and Wanamaker. Stevla. stock plants 
from bench or pots, S5.00 per UO; 75c per dozen. 

We are headquarters for Carnation, 'Mum and 

Stavia cuttings in season. 

John Brod, y.SEVT'ggliL. 

ALL Nurserymen, Seedsmen and FIbrists wishing 
to do business with Kurope should send for the 

''Horticultural Advertiser." 

This is the British Trade Paper, being read weekly 
by all the Horticultural traders; It is also taken 
by over 1000 of the best continental bouses. 
Annual subscription to cover cost of postage 75c. 
Money orders payable at Lowdham, Notts. 

Address EDITORS OP THH "H. A." 
Chilwell Nurieriet. LOWDHAM. Notts. England. 



VERBENAS 



"We are the largest growers of Verbenas in the 
country, and those who buy of us are sure to get 
plants and rooted cuttings perfectly healthy and 
free from rust. OO XraLX*let:ie«. 



Crimson. 



Rooted Cuttings. 60c per 100; $5.00 per 1000: $45.00 per 10,000. 
Plants, $2.50 per 100; $20.00 per 1000. 

CARNATIONS. 

Pink. Per 100 

Enchantress $6.00 

Success 4.00 

Mrs. Higinbotham 5.00 

Cressbrook 3.00 

Mrs. E. A. Nelson 3.00 

Mrs. Thos. Lawson 3.00 

Dorothy 2.00 

Sunbeam 2.50 

Morning Glory 1.60 

Mrs. Joost 1,25 

Daybreak 1.26 

Wm. Scott 1.25 

Crocker 1.25 

Mermaid 2.00 

Floriana.. 1.50 

GRAFTED ROSES 



White. Per 100 

The Queen $6.00 

Queen Louise 1.50 

Lorna a. SO 

Good Enough 2.00 

White Cloud 1.60 

Flora Hill 1.50 

Red. 

Adonis 6.00 

Mrs. Potter Palmer 3.00 

J. H. Manley 4.00 

Oriole 2.50 

G. H. Crane 8.00 

Jubilee 1 SO 

Portia 1.26 



Per 100 



Harry Fenn $S.0O 

Gov. Roosevelt 2.50 

Gen. Maceo 1.50 

VarUgiled. 

Prosperity 2 so 

Mrs. G. M. Bradt 3.00 

Yellow 

Dorothy Whitney 6.00 

Buttercup 3 OO 

GoldNugget 2.00 

Eldorado 1.25 



Our grafted roses are fine, bushy plants and erown in 3 and 3'y4-inch pots. Orders bonl^ed now for 
delivery in May, June and July. Bridesmaid, Bride, Goldc-n Gate, Kaiserin, price $15 lO per UO 
Ivory, Liberty, price 818.00 per 100. Send for Catalogue. 

J, L, DILLON, Bloomsburg, Pa. 



Rooted 
Cuttings. 



GERANIUMS 

Per 100 1000 

Buchner $1.50 $10.00 

Jean Viaud 2.00 12.50 

M. deCastellane 2.00 15.00 

Send for list of other varieties. 

ALBERT M. HERR. Lancaster, Pa. 

1,100 Extra Strong Boston Fern 

Runners Irom Bench, at $1.50 per 100, if taken 
at once. Cash please. 

L. A. RIKE & SON, LeRoy, III. 



Please mention the American Florist to advertisers. 



DAHLIAS. SSW 

Ten Gold Medali Awarded 1903. Pot-roots for 
shipment at once. Every section including the 
popular Cactus Pahlias at $4.00 per 100 in 25 
sorts. Better and newer kinds at .J5.00 and $6 00 
per 100. Terms: Cash with order. 

HOBBIES LIMITED, Dereham, Eng 

Norfolk Nurseries. 

THE AMERICAN FLORIST'S 

COLOR CHART 

PRICE 1 5 CENTS POSTPAID. 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO., 324 Dearborn St., Chicago. 



72 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 6, 



Worcester, Mass. 

There has been a change in the board 
of officers of the Worcester Conservato- 
ries, P. G. Davis retiring. The officers 
now are G. F. Barnard, president; W. B. 
Barnard, treasurer; L. C. Midgeley, sec- 
retary and manager. W. T. Tapper has 
severed his connection with the firm and 
Mr. Goudy has charge of the roses. 

Trade the last month has been satis- 
factory and good flowers in all lines are 
plentiful. Fine stock of roses, carna- 
tions, violets, mignonette, etc., is in good 
supply at the present writing. 

According to the local papers H. F. 
Littlefield contemplates building a 250- 
foot house in the near futute. 

Lange's roses and carnations are of 
specially fine quality. 

A. H. L. 



Spokane, Wash. 



The Washington State Horticultural 
Association at its last session decided to 
hold the next meeting at Wenatchee. 
The association adopted resolutions 
demanding a flat reduction from the 
express companies of I2V2 per cent, on 
fruit. The following officers were elected 
for the coming year: President, Rev. P. 
B. Utter, Wenatchee; first vice-president, 
W. H. Paulharaus, Sumner; second, vice- 
president, C. L. Whitney, Walla Walla; 
treasurer, R. C. McCroskey, Garfield; 
secretary, L. G. Monroe, Spokane; presi- 
dent of the horticultural department, 
Mrs. L. B. Wright, North Yakima. 



Albany, N. Y. 

The convening of the legislature, Janu- 
ary 13, was made the occasion for the 
presentation of many gifts of flowers to 
the members by their friends. Since there 
have been a number of funerals, society 
functions and receptions, which have 
kept the local florists very busy. 

Walter Mott, of Jamestown, was in the 
city January 25 and 26. 

JOSEPH HEACOCK, 

WYNCOTE, PA. 

,,.„^o «r Areca Lutescens 
GR^ROF Kenfia Belmoreana 
Kenfia Forsteriana 

For our prices s^e pa^f* toI, Nov. 7th issu*'. 

PIERSON FERNS. 

2i4-inch !lt $8.00 per 100. 
Young plants from tbe bench, S.5.0D per 100. 
Large plants n/ady tor 6 and 7-inch pots, 

Rnctnn FprnC 2«-inch at *3..50 per 
DUMUII I cms 100. Also flnelineor 
4. .^, 6 and 7-iuch. Write for quotations. 

DAVIS BROTHERS, Morrison, 111. 

Please mprttfon the A merican Florist when wrtting, 

GOOD FERNS. 

BOSTON FERNS, short and bushy, each 50c; 
per dozen, I6.00: per 100, $15.00. 

PIERSON FERNS, fine bushy }lants, It 00 
each; H inch. $1,25 each. 

JOHN SCOTT, Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Reap Street Greenhouses. 

Asparagus... ,_„ 

Plumotut NiRHi, 2-inch pots S3.50 

SpranBiri, 2- inch pots 1.50 

■•ranlumt, 10 varieties 3 on 

Piniy Plintl, per 1000 «i.50 50 

ColiUt, 10 varieties, 2-inch pots 2.00 

Cash Please. 

JOS. H. CUNNINGHAM, Delaware, Ohio. 

Plfase mention the American '^'ortst when writing 



Asparagus Plumosus Nanus 

2 1-2-inch stock in line shape at $3.00 per hundred. 

HOLTOM & mWLV CO., Milwaukee, Wis. 
FOR THIRTY DAYS ONLY. 

BOSTON FERNS. Extra fine bench plants, 5-inch at lOc; 6-inch at Inc to close out. Must have 
room. 31^-inch, ready for 4-inch. $3.50; 3-inch, *8.00. CANNAS, F Vauehan, J. C. Vaughan, 
Egiindale.Chaa. Henderson, A. Bouvier, Burbank, Souv.de AntoineCrozy, in variety $2 50 per 100; 
$20 00 i)er 1000. CARNATIONS, Queen Louise, white, Flotiana. pink, the two best money 
makers we have, 81.35 per 100; *r0.00 per 100. Lawson, $1,75 per 100; $15.00 per 1000. Caih please. 

A. J. BALDWIN, - - Newark, Ohio. 

Please mention the American Florist when tvriting. 



Albert Fuchs, 

r-AI^I^S, I^£>RJVS, IMOtr®, 



Establlchad 1884. 



OHIOJVGO, 2045-59 Clarendon Av*. 



ARUCARIft EXCELS*. From 30, 23-25 inches high, 
6 inch pots, perfect plants, 75c, $1.00 to $1.2.5 
each. Extra larj^e specimens, 8-inch pots, 28 
to 35 inches hisrh. 25 to 32 inches across, (show 
plants), onlj; $2.50 to $3.00 each, (worth $10.00 
retail). 5'4 inch pots, 40 to 50c each. 

FICUS EUSTICA. (Rubber Plants). 6-incli pots 
from 20 to 28 inches high, $2.00, $3.00, $1.00, $5.00 
and $6.00 per doz. 

DRtC/ENA BRUANTI. 6-inch pots. 20 to 25 inches 
high, (to malie room for Easter plants), cut 
down from .50c to 35c. 

BEGONIt PRES. URNOT. 6-inch pots, in bud and 
and bloom, $2.5' ]>'r doz. Other mixed varie- 
ties 4-inch pots, $1.80 per doz. 

CYCUMENS. In bud and bloom, $2.00 per doz. 

PRIMULA OBCONICA. 4-inch, in bloom, $1.8) per doz. 
Cash with order please. Plants are shipped at 

purchaser's risk. 

GODFREY ASCHMANN, 

Wholesale Grower and Importer of Pot Plants, 
1012 Ontario St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Bell Telephone Tioga 3669 A. 

Asparagus and Ferns 

We have a fine stock of the above which we 
will ofTer until the stock is reduced at the follow- 
ing prices: 

Per 100 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 2- inch $2.00 

" " 3-inch 3.50 

Asparagus Plumosus, from flats 2 25 

" " 2-inch 3.00 

" " 3-inch 6.00 

Kcntia Bel., 2H-in. pot, 8-10 in., 2-3 leaves. 13.00 

•' 24-in. pot, 15-18 in., 3-4 leaves .16.00 

" " 3 -in. pot, 15-18 in., 4-5 leaves. .18.00 

" " 3 -in. pot, 18-24 in., 6-6 leaves. .20.00 

Lat^nia Bnr.. 2-in. pot, seed leaves.. 5.00 

" 3-in. pot, 15-18 in., 2-3 chr. Ivs. 12.00 

5-in. pot, 18-20 in., 3-4 chr. Ivs. 20.00 

" " 5-in. pot, 20-24 in., 4 chr. Ivs. 30.00 

Sherman Nursery Co., ^"T^.^"^' 

Geo. Wittbold Co., 

1657 Buckingham PI., CHICAGO, ILL. 

Send for Price List on all 

Palms and Perns 

Inna Foster *>«> Boston Ferns 

Full plant.s, .$25.00 to $.50 00 per 100 In pots 25c 
to$5.00Pach. StiimII plants, $5 00 per 100. 

Asp. P. H., 4-inch. $10.00; 8-inch pans, $50.00 
per UO. Asp. Sprangarl, 4-inch, .fO.OO per 100. 
Draesna Indlvlsa, :i-iuch, strong, $8.00 per 100. 
Kentlas, FIcus. 

Li H. rOSteri DORUieSTbR. MASS. 

r*m/olimAno blooming and in bud; fine 
I.VlilnlllrllN stock. 4 inch.$l2.00: .5-inch, 

C. WINTERICn, Defiance, Ohio. 



Plants. 



A FEW GOOD THINGS 

YOU WANT. 

An extra fine lot of PALMS and BOSTON FERNS 
grown especially for Christmas sales, 

ARECA LUTESCENS, 3 plants to pot, 4, 5 and 
6-inch, $25, $40 and $100 per 100. 

KENTIA BELMOREANA and FORSTERIANA, 3,4,5 
and 6-inch, $12, K5, $40, $100 per 100. 

REX BEGONIA, 2 and 3-inch, $4 and $6 per 100. 

DRACAENA INDIVISA, 3-inch, $5 per 100; 4-inoh, 
$10 per 100. 

ENGLISH IVY, 2 and 3-inch, $3 and $6 per 100. 

BOSTON FERNS, 5-inch, $30 per 100. From beds, 
for 2, 3 and 4-inch pots, $4, $8, $15 per 100 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS, 3 inch, 18.00 per 100. 
SPRENGERI, 2-inch, $3,00 per 100. 

VINCA VARIEGATA, 2-inoh, $2.00 per 100, 

CARNATIONS, CJueen Louise, 2-in,, $2.00 per 100. 
Lawson, 2-inch, $2.50 per 100. 

GERANIUMS. 2-in. pot plants. Double and sin- 
gle Grant, Bonnot, S. A. Nutt, Perkins, La- 
Favorite, John Doyle, Riccard, Mrs. E. G. Hill, 
$2.50 per 100. 

ROOTED CARNATION CUTTINGS. Queen Louise 
and Wolcott, $1.50; Lawson and Prosperity, $2.C0; 
Crocker and Goodenough, $1.25 per 100. 

CASH OR C. O. D. 
CEO. M. EMiVIANS, NEWTON, N. J. 

Rooted 
Cuttings. 

BOSTON FERNS, from bench, strong, (or 4 and 
5-inch, 10c. 

PRIMULA OBCONICA GRANDIFLORA, Alba, Rosea, 
$1.50 per ICO; 300 for $4.00. 

AGERATUM, Gurnev, Pauline; GIANT MARGUERITE 
DAISY, White; SALVIA, Splendens, Silver Spot, 
2-inch, 2c. 

Rooted Cuttings Prepaid. SALVIA. Silver Spot, 
Splendens. STEVIA, variegated. 90c per 100. 
AGERATUM. S. Gurnev, P. Pauline. ALTER- 
NANTHERA, red, yellow, 50o per 101. HARDY 
PINKS. 5 best kinds, T.5c per 100. VERBENAS, 
10 liinds, 60c per 100. FUCHSIAS. 5 kinds, $1.25 
per 100. DAISY. HELIOTROPE, blue, $1.00 per 
100. Cash. 

BTER BROS., Chambe^sburg, 

Pli'ase nicntion the Ametican Flo> i.sl ivlwn w>iting. 

Hardy Cut Ferns. 

Fancy or Dagger, now 
$1.25 per 1000. Cash. With- 
out cash 1 will not sell. 

Sphagnum Moss. 

Fine quality, 60c per 
barrel. 

All orders by mail or 
dispatch.with cash, piompt- 
ly attended to. 

THOMAS COLLINS, Hinsdale, Mass. 




igo4. 



The American Florist. 



%% 





SELF-OILING 

VENTILATING APPARATIS 
For Greenhouses. 



Sectional Water Boiler, Open View. 

''Burnham" Boilers 

RELiaBLE, DURABLE, ECONOMICAL. 



RED GULF 
CYPRESS 
MATERIAL 

Cast Iron Gutters, 
Iron Purlins, 
Columns, etc. 



FASCIA, 




CLASP 



Galvanized Ice Clearing Eave 
Plate and Sash Bar Clasp. 



(PATENTED.) 



Headquarters for 
All Kinds of 

GREENHOUSE 
BUILDING 
MATERIAL 



Largest Builders of 
Greenhouse Structures. 

Catalogue of Greenhouse Heating and Ventilating Apparatus mailed from 
New York office on receipt of five cents for postage. 

Also Patent Iron Greenhouse Construction catalogue for five cents postage. 

LORD & BIRNHAM CO. 



New York Office, 



St. James BIdg., BROADWAY and 26th Si. 



General Office and Works, 

IRVINGTON-ON-THE-HUDSON, N. Y. 



74 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 6, 



McCray Florist REFRIGERATORS 

KNOWN EVERYWHERE FOR SUPERIORITY. 




SPECIAL STYLE NO. 639. 

72 in. wide. 42 in. deep. 96 in. high. 

SPECIAL DESIGNS BUILT TO ORDER 

Also wa have slock sizas of very neai design 
ready for prompt shipment. 



Noted for absolutely dry interior, thus avoiding; 
entirely the sweating of glass. 

The positive circulation of pure cold air within 
keeps the flowers in perfect condition. 

Economical in the Use of Ice. 
Scientifically Constructed. 

Write at once for Florists' Catalogue No. 70. 

For the Residence, Grocery, Meat Market, Res- 
taurant, in fact any purpose, the McCRAY is 
Guaranteed Absolutely Satisfactory, Thousands 
testify to its merits. 

Mention this Journal and we will send you the following cata- 
logues: No. 39, for Residence; No. 45, for Hotels, Public Institutions 
and Cold Storage Houses; No. 63, for Groceries; No. 56, for Meat 
Markets; No. 70, for Florists. 

McCRAY REFRIGERATOR GO. 

317 Mill Street, Kendallvllle, Ind. 

Branch Offices and Salesrooms: Chicago, 55 Wabash Avenue; 
St. Louis, 404 N. Third St.; San B'rancisco, 122 Market St.; Pittsburg, 
710 Penn Ave.; New York, 341 Broadway; Detroit, 305 Woodward Ave.; 
Columbia, S. C , 1210 Main St.; Boston, 52 Commercial St.; Columbus, 
O., 356 N. High St. 

^^ Address Main Office unless ycu reside In one of the above 
named cities. 



To-Bak-Ine Products. 

For Killing Green Fly, Red Spider. Thrips and Other Injurious Insects. 

THEY \?ILL DO IT. IF YOU WANT TO KNOW HOW AND WHY, WRITE TO 



W. W. RAWSON S CO 12 Faneuil Square, Boston, Mats. 

HENRY F. MICHELL CO 1018 Market St., Philadelphia, Pa, 

H. E. WILSON Rochester, N. Y. 

WM. F. KASTING 481 Washington St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

JOHN H. DUNLOP 5 W. King St, Toronto, Ont. 

WM. BRiNKER 329 Prospect St, Clevelanit, 0. 



MICHIGAN CUT FLOWER EXCHANGE 26 Miami Ave.. Delrott, Mich- 

E. H. HUNT 76-78 Wabash Ave., Chicago, III. 

HOLTON S HUNKEL 457 Milwaulcee St., Milwaukee, Wit. 

ST. LOUIS SEEO CO 615 N. Fourth St., St. Louit, Mo. 

BARTELDES S CO 1521 Fifteenth St., Denver, Colo. 

E. W. McLELLAN S CO., 144 Union Square Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 



The above reliable firms will be glad to give you this information, send you interesting booklet entitled "Words Ol 
Wisdom" and will show you how to save a large share of the stock that now goes to waste owing to attacks of insect pests. 

NICOTINE MANUFACTURING COMPANY, Detroit, Mich. 



Lightning Flower 
Pot Waslier. 

Washes all sizes of pots, clean as new, about 
as fast as you can handle thera. Strong Plants are 
only grown in Clean Pols. Send for desoription. 
Sold direct $1.5.00 net F. O. B. .Toliet. 



O. E. FINLEY, 



Joiiet, III. 



Chessman's Adjustable Pot Hanger a^^ar. 

Fits iinv size, «5c piT do/. Th.- first lOO tlorists 
ordering a doz., will receive 15 of our Greenhouse 
Hangers free. Order now. Send size of sash bar from 
drip gutter down. H. C. Chessman, Richmond, Ind. 




1904. 



The American Florist. 



75 



S^-rffsjck^tt^piUr 



^^^°a^ 





(>1r A.€ ir IWur 




%i^l\^\ttV i\vk^ 



^Uetvc\vt«C||ier:ttvwvWl^5 



tPtv 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT ON ALL 
BOILERS ORDERED THIS MONTH 

Will book order now and deliver boiler any time during \ 904. 
Let us hear from you at once if you will need a boiler. 

Kroeschell Bros. Co., 

45 Erie St., CHICAGO. 



78 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 6, 



WHY NOT BUT 

RED POTS 

OF C8? 

Standard Sfzej 

Quality— No Better. 

Carefully Pack»d In Small 

Crates. Easy to Handle. 

Price List Free. 

Syracuse Pottery Co., 

Syraciue, N. T. 

I BEST POT IN 

THE' UASKFTJ 



Please mention the A merican Florist when writing, 

^1?;^ ADJUSTABLE VASE HOLDER. 

No. 1.— Brass, nickel, 4 feet long, 6 clasps to each 
rod. Price complete (with green or wnite tum- 
bleri) $2.25. Price complete (with green or white 
cornucopia vases) $2.50. No. 2.— Heavy 4 ft. rod, 
brassed and nickeled, with three clasps for 5 to 
6-inch pots, each $1.75. 

KIFTS PATENT Rubber Capped FLOWER 
TUBES, lV4-inch diameter, per 100, $3.50. 

JOSEPH KIFT & SON. 1725 Chestnut St., Phila.. Pa. 

A. HERRMANN, 

J- Cape Flowers, all colors, 
j^ Cycas Leaves, Metal Designs, 
j^ and All Florists' Supplies. 

Send for Prices. 
404-412 East 34lh St. NEW YORK. 

please mention t/te American Florist when 'ivriting. 

SIGMUND GELLER 

Importer and Manufacturer of 

FLORISTS' SIPPLIES 

All new Fall Goods in now. Ask to see the 
latest, Embossed and Pleated Crepe Paper. 

108 W. 28tli Street, NEW YORK. 

Please mejition the Aynerican Florist when writing. 

REED & KELLER, 

122 Was! 25lh St., NEW YORK. 

importers and Manufacturers or 

FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

Galax Leaves and all Decorative Greens. 

New York Agents for Caldwell's Monroe, Ala., 
"Parlor Brand" Smilax. 

GREEN SILKALINE. 

Do not be put oil with cheap substitutes. 

John C. Meyer & Co., 

80 Kingston St, BOSTON, MASS. 

Please mention the A merican Floi ist ivhen luriting. 

Wired 
Toothpicks 

10,000, 11.50; B0,000, $6.25. Manufactured by 

W. J. COWEE. BERLIN. N. Y. 

Sample Free. For sale by dealers. 

I^ease mention tfte A merican Fhn i^t 'wlteti zvt iting, 

Foley's Floral Fotographs. 

Floral Album, size I2xii containingn24 

different funeral designs. By 

express $7.00 c. o. d. 

226-228^ BOWERY. NEW YORK. 

Please mention the A merican Florist when zvriting. 



Standard Flower Pots 

The WHiLLDIN POTTERY COMPANY. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. JERSEY CITY, N. J. LONC ISLAND CITY. N. V. 

Travelling Repreiantatiye, U. CUTLER RYERSON, 108 Third Ave.. Newark, N. J. 

PIea%e mention tfu American Florist when writing 



i~LORIST Plain, Violet, Rose 



ri 



OIL 



MADE BY 



The John J, Grooke Co. 

155 Ave. D, NEW YORK. 149 Fulton St., CHICAGO. 



Kramer's Pot Hangers 

THE neatest, simplest, most 
convenient and only 
practical device for convert- 
ing ordinary flower pots into 
hanging baskets They fit 
all standard made pots from 
2 to 10 inches in diameter. 
The illustration shows how 
they are attached Just the 
thing for hanging up ferns, 
begonias, etc. You can make 
room and money by their use. 
Try them. For Sale by 

Vaughan's Seed Store. 

Chicago and New Yori(. 
E. F, Winterson Co., 

Chicago. 
C.C.Pollworth Co., 

Milwaukee, Wis. 
Price with wire chain as 
shown in cut, $1.00 per dozen 
by express. Sample dozen by mail, $1.25. > 

I. N. KRAMER ft SON, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 

STANDARD FLOWER POTS \ 

Packed in small crates, easy to handle. 

Price per crate 
120 7-in., in crate, $4.20 
60 8 " 3.00 

HAND HiDE. 

48 9-in.,lii crate, $3.80 




1500 2-in 


Price per crate 
, in crate, $4.88 


1500 2H 


5.25 


1500 2« 


6.00 


1000 3 


5.00 


800 3H 
5004 
320 5 
144 6 


6.80 
4.50 
4.51 
3.16 



48 10 
24 11 
24 12 
12 14 
6 16 



4.80 
8.60 
4.80 
" 4.80 

4.60 
Send for price 



Seed pans, same price as pots, 
list of Cylinders for Cut Flowers, Hanging baskets 
Lawn Vases, etc. Ten per cent off for cash with 
order. Address 

HILFINGER BROS. POTTERY, Fort Edward N. Y. 
Or August Rolker A Sons, New York Agents, 
31 Barclay Street, New York City. 

Please mentioyi the A merican Florist when writing, 

THOSE RED POTS 

"STANDARDS" 

rULL SIZE AND WIDE BOTTOMS. 
BDLB PANS AND AZALEA POTS. 

DETROIT FLOWER POT M'F'Y. 

HARRY BALSLEV. DETROIT, MICH.. 
Rep. 490 Howard St. 

Please mention the A met ican Flat fit zclu'ii zvi iting. 



I IVHHI — ■■-■ 



GEO. KELLER & SON, 

MANUPACTURERi OF 

FLOWER POTS. 

Before buying write for pricei 

3S1-363 Herndon Street, 
near Wrightwood Ave., 

CHICAGO. ILL 



CLAY'S FERTILIZER. 

Used by all English and Scotch Florists. 
56 lbs. for S3. 25. 

WM. ELLIOTT & SONS, New York. 




(^ease menrt'on the A merican Florist when writing' 

FLOWER POTS 



STANDARD POTSspE<i;.tr, 

List and SAMPLES FREE. 

SWAHN'S POTTERY MF'e CO., 

P 0. Bo> 7& MINNEAPOLIS. MINN 

Please mention the American Florist when tvrilirig. 

Standard OOX^ 
Flower... ■ ^ * v^ 

If your greenhouses are within 600 
miles of the Capitol, write us, we 
can save you money 

W. H. ERNEST, 

23th and M Street*. WASHINGTON. 0. a 

Red Standard Flower Pots 

Price list and samples on application. 

Paducah Pottery, 

J. A. BAUER, Proprietor. 

RED P OTS 

SAMPLE POT AND PRICE LIST 
ON APPLICATION. 

e, C. POllWOBTH CO., {Ilk"*'"'=^ 



WRITE 



AF IfniJR 1521-23 N.LBAVITTl 
I I ■ KUnili OHIOAQO. ILL., 



ST. J 



roB PBiciB or 



Standard Pots 

whloh (or 'itrength and poroiity oomblud 
an the beat on toe market 



1904. 



The American Florist. 



77 



n A.^A.A AAAA AAAAAAA A ^AAAA AAA AAAAAAAA AAA AAA AA AAAA AAAA AAA 
VWWWT ▼▼▼▼ wvv ▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼ wwww^ ▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼ WWVVVV^ ▼▼▼ 

Now is the Time 

To Investigate Matters Pertaining to Improvements in 

Your Plans for the Coming Season. # 







I wish to calLyour attention to the new DUPLEX IRON GUTTER, made of the best and strontrest 
materia), over six miles in use. giving; the best of ri'sults. iSo snow or ice has bothered the 
Duplex this snowy winter, the only positively drip-proof <iutter made. No drip from the ghiss 
or f;:uttor. A boy can erect them. Simple and durable. Make a shadeless house, very neat and 
strong. Over 14 years in use and still the leader in simplicity, durability and ease of operation 
with power to sell. 

Also the recently patented STANDARD STEAM TRAP. This trap has been especially invented 
to fill a want am'^ns the Florists, knowing that :i reliable trap at all times wil'in^ to work, 
and easily controlled is needed. Do not fear to risk your plant to a Standard Steam Trap. 
It beats gravity to a stand still. 

E. HIPPARD, Youngstown, Ohio. 
>*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 



I The Heigiit of the Season i 



AND 



HERE COMES BAYERSDORFER & CO, 

With every supply and choice accessory that is called for 
in a florist's business. Try a sample case of our beautiful 
fancy Baskets for cut flowers and tin lined basket Jardi- 
nieres for ferns and other decorative plants, now so 
popular, $25.00 will pay for a nice assortment of these, 
our selection based upon the demand from metropolitan 
centers. Pretty Vases, specially adapted for daffodils, 
violets, roses or carnations. Can be so'd with the cut 
flowers. Sheaves, Doves, Immortelles, etc , etc. 

H. Bayersdorfer & Co. 



\— . 



50-56 N, 4th St,, PHILADELPHIA, PA, 



TiieHortlcultural Trade Journal 

THE LARGEST, BREGIITEST AND BEST 

Horticultural Trade paper in the British Isles. 
It contains MORE ADVERTISEMENTS, MORE 
ILLUSTRATIONS and MORE NEWS than any 
of Its contemporaries. Read by the whole of the 
British trade and all the best European houses 
every week. Annual subscription, 75 cents. 
Specimen copy post free. Published weekly. 
Hortleununil Trad* Journal Ca~ Padlham. Lanu.. Ena. 

Always mention the American Floeist 
when writing to advertisers. 



KORAL LETTERS 

For Sale by all Wholesale Houses. 

Korai IVIfg. Co., 

12 Hawley Place. Boston. Mass. 

Sphagnum Moss and Cedar Poles. 

Moss, 5 barrel bale, fresh and clean, SI. 35; 3 bales, 
$3.25; 6 bales. f5.00. Poles 2 to 5-iD. at butt, .iny 
length required. H, R. AKERS, Chatiworth N. J. 



Attention, 
Florists! 

Here is an opportunity to buy 
material and supplies at such 
extremely low prices that you 
must take advantage of it at 
once. \A^e are headquarters for 
Boilers, Heating Apparatus, 
Pipe, Valves, Fittings, Wire, 
Glass, Sash, and a thousand and 
one other items that enter into 
the construction of your Green- 
houses. It will pay you to keep 
in touch with us and advise us 
of your wants. 

When In Chicago be sure to call and 
see us. Our mammoth plant is the 
most extensive in the world. Five 
long distance 'phones, all Yards 827. 
The 35th street cars pass our (oors. 

We Offer for 
immediate Acceptance: 

12 6oxi6 horizontal tubular 
boilers, in excellent con- 
dition, complete with 
fronts and all castings 

and fittings, each $295.00 

13 54x16, each 225.00 

6 42x14, each 170.00 

And a hundred other boil- 
ers in various sizes. 

100,000 feet 4-inch boiler 
tubes, in good condition, 
overhauled, rattled, 
squared ends, which we 
furnish with sleeve coup- 
lings, per foot 10 

100,000 feet of 3 1-2 inch, 
per foot .08 

A million feet of standard 
black wrought iron pipe, 
overhauled, with threads 
and couplings; sizes from 
3-8 to 16-inch. 

Good second hand Globe, 
Angle, Check, Gate and 
Pressure Valves at low 
prices. 

75,000 feet 3-4 inch garden 
hose, per foot 04 

12 carloads galvanized wire, 
gauges 10 to 14. It is in 
short lengths, ranging up 
to 250 feet. One gauge 
only to a bale. Price per 
bale of 100 lbs 1.40 

Wire Staples, per keg of 
100 lbs 2.00 

WireNails, mixed, all kinds, 
per 100 lbs 1.60 

WRITE FOR OUR GATAL06UE No. 47. 

Chicago House Wrecking Co., 

W. 35tli IIHI IRON SIS., CHICAGO, ILL. 



78 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 6, 



Cincinnati. 

Trade holds up exceedingly well, and it 
is a case of skirmish to get enough roses 
and carnations for orders. Harrisii and 
calla lilies are in good demand, with not 
quite enough to go around. There are 
enough violets for all orders and a few 
left over. Bulbous stock is plentiful, also 
smilax and Asparagus plumosus, while 
A. Sprengeri is scarce. There are a few 
'mums seen on the market now and then, 
of the variety Merry Christmas. The 
last lot of poinsettias were brought in 
last week, and were sold as soon as 
taken out of the box. Klehms' nurseries, 
at Arlington Heights, 111., are sending 
the Novelty tulip to this market. This 
is in demand at $-t per 100. We have 
also had shipments of violets from Rhine- 
beck and Poughkeepsie, but they cannot 
be compared with the local article. 
When it comes to the real thing in violets 
we all have to take off our hats to Smith 
& Young, of Indianapolis, as their Marie 
Louise are the finest to be had. A great 
many carnations were used forMcKinley 
day, January 29, and florists sold out 
clean. Jos. Goldman, of Middletown, 
says he sold all the Lawson he could 
get at twenty-five cents each, and did 
not have enough for all his customers. 

It is with utmost regret that we read 
the obituary notice ot Henry Weber, of 
Oakland, Md. Mr. Weber was a frequent 
visitor and exhibited often at our 
monthly shows. The dealers of this city 
take this method of extending their sym- 
pathy to the bereaved family. 

Dohrmann & Schroetter have purchased 
the greenhouses of Henry Benzinger, at 
Fifteenth and Holman streets, Coving- 
ton, Ky., and will grow cut flowers for 
the Cincinnati market. A. O. 



You.\GSTOWN, O.— Charles Adgate esti- 
mates the loss caused by the freezing of 
his stock January 24 at $7,000. 

Second-Hand American Glass Cheap. 

lOxl.'idoubli' thick quality li. 
Mrs. Annie Caldwell, 431 W. Market St., Scranton, Pa. 

TIN FOIL 

Plain, Fancy, Printed & Mounted, 

Manufitctured by 

The Conley Foil Co. 



Sai to 641 West 3Sth St., 



D. O. 

Cunningham 
Glass Co. 

PITTSBURG. PA. 



TANK WINDOW GLASS. 



Hot-House Glass a Specialty. 



Use our Patent 
IRON BENCH 
FITTINGS and 
Roof Supports. 






IRON GUTTER. 




IMPROVED VAPORIZING PANS VENTILITINB 

For Tobaeeo Extnrata, Bto. Bend for Olronlan. ^-^-^— ^^^— — > 

DILLER, GASKEY & CO., ^But^m^'iT^o:. APPARATUS. 

8. W. C«r. Sixth and B«rk 8t».. PHILADELPHIA. ■ 

Please mention the A tnerican h'lnrtKt mhen itrriting 



The James H. Rice Co. 



-IMPORTERS and JOBBERS- 



GREENHOISE GLASS 

A SPECIALTY. 

X^^'iia.ciO'w- G^l^iss, I»^ia:xt, F»»atty, e-to. 

80-82 Wabash Avenue and 34 to 40 South Water Street, CHICAGO. 



GLASS. 

GOOD BRANDS. 

QUICK SHIPMENTS. 

LARGE STOCK. 

Warehouse on railroad switch. Be sure 
and get our prices. 

Sharp, Partridge & Co. 

22nd St. and Union Place, CHICAGO. 



Please mention the A merican Flortst when ivriting. 

GULF CYPRESS 

GREENHOUSE 

MATERIAL 

HOT-BED SASH, BOILERS. PIPES. FITTINGS, 
VENTILATING APPARATUS. 

GLASS AT WHOLESALE. 

We furnish everything for building. Send 
for prices and catalogues. 

S Jacobs & Sons, "l'R'o'iVL'rN?Nn"- 

Please mention the American Florist 'when writing. 

H. M. HOOKER GO. 

Window Glass, Paints and Putty, 
Greenhouse Glass a Specialty. 

89 W«st Raadolph St.. CHICAQO. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 



Holds Class 
Firmly <* 

■•• Ma Peint «V. 



II. il«Ma n UfU. B.I .r 
HKITBT L. BREKK, 



please mentioyi the A merican Florist when writing. 




It Has Great 

STRENGTH. 



Lucas Glass wears well. A 
prominent florist who has tried 
many makes says: "Lucas 
GUss is the best for strength 
and evenness of surface." 

If you require Glass for 
Green or Hot Houses ■write 
Lucas. It will save you money. 

Price lists and illustrated 
pamphlets gladly furnished on 
application. 

We are also headquarters for 
Glaziers' Sundries. All grades 
of Putty, Glass Cutters, etc 

JOHN LUCAS & CO. 

Manufacturers 
NEW YORK. PHIUDELPHIA. CHICAGO. 



Please menti-m the A ?>!f> ican Fhn ist when ~wf iting. 



MASTICA 



-FOR- 



—USE IT NOW.= 

F. 0. PIERCE CO., 'l%^Tont' 



Sprape Smith Go. 

PUTE AND WINDOW GLASS 

Greentiouso Glass a Specialty. 

20S. Randolph Slra««, CHICAGO; 



1904- 



Th E American Florist. 



79 



^m 




4. 


ItBnrnsi 




The most convenient way W 
or applying an insecticide IV 
ewer yet devised. No pans A^ 
required -No heating of k^ 
jrons-Notrouble-Cannot b^ 
injure the most sensitive wJJ 
Wooms -Very effective YA, 
Price 60<t per box of 12 H 
^o\Ss.,A\\(kalers$eUiLi H 


T 
1 


■A 


NICOTINE MFG. CO.. ^ 
ST LOUIS MQ. "^ 





Please tnentioti the A merican Florist when writing. 




^i^rc:. 



Best 
BUG 
Killer 



& BLOOM 
SAVER 



The Tobacco Warehousing *.t Tradiog Corapiiny, 
Louisville, Kentucky. 



Fumi^atln^ Kind Tobacco 

n I KILLS ALL APHIS IN ONE NIGHT 

r OWUCr in ii lic.usi- luOx2.5 ft., at a cost of 
10<% A5 11.. trial i.ks. will cost 
notliinti if you will pa.v the cxprcs.s cliar^ca on 
it. Ourliooklettollsofit. Write Depi. C. forit. 
Tlie H. A. STOOTIIOli-F COMVANY 
116, 117, 118 West St., N. Y,.C!ltT 



Please mention the A meruan Florist when writing. 




THE ARNDT TREE PROTECTOR. 

A perfect inexpensive 
protection against all 
creeping aod crawliDi; 
insects. Agents wanted 
everywhere; write at 
once. 

Michigan Cut Flower 
Exchange, 

Wm. Dilger, ragr., Sole 

Distributors, 
Detroit, Mich.,U. S. A 




SIMON RODH, NEW York: 

I have the Newest Things for Violet Tyings. Ribbons to match all your Flowers and Chiffons 

in all Widths and Colors. 

EASTER NOVELTIES NOW READY. 



GARLAND'S GUTTERS 

WILL KEEP SNOW AND ICE OFF 
YOUR GLASS. 

DES PLAINES. ILL. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 

A sample of our Gutter is on Exhibition at the Chicago Flower Growers' Market. 





M. RICE & CO., 

Importers and Manufacturers, 

Leading Florists* 9,8 Filbert Street, 

Supply House and ■>■.•■ j ■ ■.* n 

Ribbon Speciaiisfs. Philadelpnia, Pa. 



Boston Florist Letter Go. 

MANUTACTTTRERS OF 

FLORISTS' LETTERS. 




Thifi irooden box nicely stained and Tar- 
nished, 18x30x13 made in tvro sections, one 
for eacli size letter, given away witli first 
order of 500 letters. 

Block Letters, \y% or 2-inch size, per 100, $2.00. 

Script Letterf ^4. Fastener with each letter or 
•vord. 

Used by leading florists everywhere and for sale 
by all wholesale florists and supply dealers. 

N. F. McCarthy, Trcas. and Manager, 
84 Hawley St., BOSTON, MASS. 

Please mention the A merican Florist when writirig. 

CUT FLOWER BOXES ""^^^ 

The best, strongest and neatest folding cut 
flower box ever made. Cheap, durable. To try 
them once is to use them always. Per 100 Per lliOO 
Size No. 0. 3x4x20 $200 SI9.CK) 

1. 3x 4Vjx16 1.90 17.50 

2. 3x6x18 2.0O 19 00 

•' 3. 4x8x18 2.50 23.00 

4. 3x5x24 2.75 26 00 

" 5 4x8x22 3.00 28 50 

6. 4x8x28 3.75 36.00 

" 7. 6x16x20 5.50 54.00 

8. 3x 7x?? 3.00 28.50 

9. 5x10x35 6.50 63.00 

" 10. 7x20x20 9.50 67.50 

11. 3i/2xSx30 3.00 28.50 

Sample free on apphcation. No charge for 
printing on orders above 250 boxes. Terms cash. 

THE LIVINGSTON SEED COMPANY, 

BOX 104. COLUMBUS, OHIO. 

HEADQDABTEBS FOR 

HORTICULTURAL SUPPLIES 

Of Every DeaMrlptlon, 

When you can't get what you want anywhere 
elie, Bend here, we will send It to you. 

"irit's used In Hortloulture, we have It." 
DUNNE &CO..64«r.S0UM.,Hfw Ytit 

Tri.pbone 0.11. 1700 Madiion Sqn.ra. 

Boilers »=^ 

For GREENHOUSES. 

See Our Catalogue 

a'o7;s.l."^. Giblin&Co.,Utica,N.Y. 



THE BEST THING OUT FOR FLORISTS 

THE 

Patent Smilax and Asparagus 
Tyer and Stake. 

The work done in lialf the time. You will 
not do without it after a trial. Will last a life- 
time. No wires on the ground. No tying 
or knots required. Be sure to send $1.00 for 
sample ICO of each. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
Easily applied. 

Leo. Wellenreiter, 

OANVERS, ILLINOIS. 

Please jnention the American Florist when writing. 

Gardeners' Chronicle. 

A Weekly Illustrated Journal. 

Established 1841. 

The GARDENERS' CHRONICLE has been for 
OVBR Sixty Years the Leading Journal of Us 
class. It has achieved this position because, while 
specially devoting itself to supplying the daily 
requirements of gardeners of all classes, the infor- 
mation furnished is of such general and perma- 
nent value that the GARDENERS* CHRONICLE 
is looked up to as the standard axjthoritt on 
tke subjects of which it treats. 

Subscription to the United States, 94 20 per year. 
Remittances to be made payable to H. G. COVE. 

Office :— 
41 Wflllinoton St.. Covent Garden. London. England. 

HOLLER'S DEUTSCHE 

GARTNER ZEITUNG. 

The most widely circulated German gardening 
Journal, treating of all departments of horticulture 
and floriculture. Numerous eminent correspon- 
dents in all parts of the world. An advertising 
medium of the highest class. 

Holler's Deutsche Gartner Zeitung is published 
weekly and richly illustrated. Subscription 13 00 
per annum, including postage. Sample copies free. 

LI PWIG MOLLER^ S^Sv 

THE ^ 



'^ Regan Printing House 

CATALOGUES 



Nursery 

Seed 

Florists' 

87-91 Plymouth Place, CltlCAGO. 



80 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 6 



Index to Advertisers. 



Akehurst C&Son... 68 

Akers H R 77 

Albanv Sjteam Trap 

Co.: IV 

Allen JK 54 

/Lmling KG 53 

Aschmann Godfrey. . 72 

Backer & Co 66 

Baldwin A J 72 

Uarr.Iohn 70 

KassettA Wastiburn £3 

liaur A Smith 66 

BayersdorferHiSCo. . 77 

Beach D S 66 

Beckert W C II 

Benthey & Co 53 71 

Berckmans P J Co.. 6J 

Berning H G 52 

Bertermann Bros Co 56 

Birnstiel Franz 74 

Blaauw J & Co 68 

Bonnot Bros 55 

Boston Letter Co. ... 79 

Btani SD 70 

Brant dk Noe Flo Co 53 
Breitmever's J Sons 

56 69 

Bred John 71 

Bruns H N 5S 

Buckley WT PlantCo 6 1 

Budlong J A 63 70 

Buist Robt cSs Co 58 

Burpee W A AGO... 59 

Byer Bros li 

Caldwell the Woods- 
man Co 68 

Calif Carnation Co 67 

Carmody J D Ill 

Chadwiok Chas 68 

Chessman H C 7i 

Chicago Carnation co 

65 

Chicago House 

Wrecking Co 77 

Christensen A '.0 

Cleveland Cut Flo Co 57 

Coles WW 69 

Collins Thos 72 

Conard & Jones Co. , 61 

Conley Foil Co 78 

Cottage Garder s . . . . 68 

Cottage Nursery E:8 

Coweu Arthur II 

Cowee W J 76 II 

Craig Robt&Son.... 70 
Crooke John J Co. . . 76 

Crowl Fern Co t4 

Cunningham D O 

Glass Co .. .. 78 

Cunningham Jos B . 72 

Daniels & Fisher 56 

Uanley ST 68 

Davis Bros 72 

Deamud J B 53 

Detroit Flower Pot 

Mfy 76 

Dickinson The A Co II 

uletscn A A Co Ill 

Dijkhuis J & Co 60 

Diller Caskey A Co. . 78 

Dillon JL 71 

Dillon's MtgCo 80 

DornerFA SonaCo. 67 I 

Ureer HA 61 62 78 

Uunne & Co 79 

Easteru Nurseries . .. 60 
Elliott Wm A Sons.. 76 

blmmans oeo M VZ 

Ernest W H 76 

Farquhar R A J Co .. b8 

Finley CE 74 

Pisher Peter I 

Florists' Am. E.xch. &1 
Foley's Floral Foto- 

graphs 76 

Foley Mfg Co Ill 

Ford Bros 55 

F'oster Lucius H 72 

Fucha A 72 

Furrow Bros 6 i 

GardenersOhronicle. 79 

Garland Geo Jl 79 

Garlaud Frank 53 

Gasser J M Co 66 

Geller Sigmund 76 

Ghormley Wm 5i 

Giblin A Co 79 

Grave E T 66 

Gullett W H A Sons. 70 

Gunther Wm H 55 

Gurney Heater Co.. . 80 

Guttman Alex J 55 

Hail Association 81 

Hancock Gho A Son. 69 
HasslachAKoumanilel I 

Hauswinh P J 56 

Ueacock Joa li 

Heller Bros ('4 

Heller ACo II 

Hereudeei' Mfg Co. .IV 

Herr Albert M 66 71 

Herrmann A 76 

Hews AHA Co 76 

Hilflnger Bros 76 

Hill The EG Co 1 

Hippard E 77 

Hitcbiaga A Co IV 



Hobbies Limited ... 71 
Holton A HuQkel Co 

.53 72 

Hooker H M Co 78 

Horan Bdw C 55 

Holt Advertiser 71 

Hort Trade Journal. 77 

HuntE H 12 

International Flower 

Delivery .56 57 

Jacobs S A Sons 78 

Kasting W F I 

Keller Geo A Son — 76 
Kennicott Bros Co . . 52 
Kv Tob Product Co 79 
Kift Joaeph A tion. . . 76 
KingConatructionCo 80 

Kohr A F 76 

Koral Mfg Co 77 

Koster A Co 60 

Kramerl N ASon.. 76 

Kreshover L J 57 

Ktoeschell Broi Co.. 76 

KuehnC A 52 

KuhlG A 52 61 

Lager A Hurrell 57 

Lang Julius 55 

Lange A 56 

Langjahr A H .55 

Larchmont Nursery 61 

Laub A A Son 66 

Lecakes N A Co ."^4 

LittlefieldH F 68 

Livingston Seed Co. 79 
Lockiand LumberCoIil 
LoomisCarnationCo. 68 

Loomis Floral Co 61 

Lonsdale Edwin &i 

Lord ABurnhamOo. 

73 IV 

Lothrop W P 60 

Lucaa J ACo 78 

Mader Paul . 70 

May JohnN 65 I 

McCarthy N P A Co. 54 

McConnell Alex 56 

McCrav Refrig Co.. 74 
McCuliough'i J M 

Bona 52 

McKellarChas W,,. 53 
Metropolitan Mate- 
rial Co Ill 

Meyer John C A Co. 76 

Miami Floral Co 64 

Mich Cut Flower Co 

53 79 

Millang Chaa 55 

MiUang Frank 65 

Moller Ludwig 79 

Moninger J C Co. ..Ill 
Moon The Wm H Co 60 
Moore Hentz A Naah 5 > 
Murphy Wm.. .. 52 
Nat Flo Bd of Trade U 

Nauman G M 6j 

IN 1 Cut Flower Co. . 5i 
N Y Cut Flower Ex . 54 
Nicotine Mfg Co.. 74 79 

Nieaaen Leo 54 

Paducah Pottery.... 76 

Park Floral Co 56 

Pennock C AG L 66 

PerkinaJohnJ t5 

Philadelphia Whole- 
aale Flower Mkt. . . 54 

Pierce POCo 78 

Pierson F R A Co... 70 
Pieraon-Seltoa Co. . . 80 
PittaburgCut Flo Co 52 
Poehlmann Bros Co, 

53 68 

PoUworthC C 76 

Pritchard J N 67 

l^uaker City MaohCol U 

Randall A L 63 

Kawson W W ACo. II 

Raynor J 1 55 

Reed A Keller 76 

Reea A Campere.. ..II 
Kegan Print House 79 

Ueinberg Geo 53 

Reinberg Peter.. 57 69 

Rice Broa 52 

Rice Jamea H Co 78 

Rice M A Co 79 

Rike L A ASon 71 

Robinson H W t£ Co 57 

Rod h Simon 79 

Ruemer Fred'k II 

Roehrs Julius 71 

Rolker A A Sons 60 

Roscoe FA, .58 

Rosemont Gardens. . 54 

Saltford Geo 54 

Scheepers John 60 

Schillo Adam 80 

ScottJohn 72 

SharpPartridgeACo. 78 
ShermanNurseryCo. 72 

Sheridan W F 55 

Sievers A Boland 5(5 

Sinner Bros 53 66 

Situations A Wants. 51 

Skidelaky S S 64 

Smith NathASon 70 

Smith W A TCo.... I 
Spangler E J A Co.. II 



Sprague Smith Co. . . .78 
Standard Pump and 

Engine Co IV 

Stearns ■ Lumber Co. . I A' 

Stevens II L Co 68 

StLouisCarnationCo 64 

Sten John E 69 

Stewart E E II 

Stoothoff H A A Co 79 
Storrs A HarriaonCn 

60 61 63 

Styer J J II 

Superior Machine A 

Boiler Works Ill 

Sutherland G A 54 

Suydam Jerome 68 

Swahn Pot Mfg Co.. 76 

Swayne Wm 7tt 

Syracuse Potterv Co. 76 

Telegraph Code II 

Thompson J D 

Carnation Co.. .53 I 
Thorburn J M A Co. II 
Tobacco Warehouse 

A Trading Co 79 

Traendly A Schenck 65 
TroEneni O L 54 



Vaughan'a Seed Store 

61 64 II I 

Vawter E J 56 

Vick'a Sona Jaa II 

WagnerParkCona... 60 

WarburlonC 64 

Weber FC f>6 

Weber H A Sons .... 65 

Weeber A Don II 

Weiland A Risch ... 63 

Welch Bros 54 

WellenreitiT Leo 79 

WhiUdin Pot Co 76 

Wietor Broa !3 68 

Wilcox J F 66 

Wildpret Bros II 

Wills A Segar 66 

Winandy M 53 

Winterich C 72 

WintersonEPCo.... .57 
Wittbold Geo Co.... Ti 

Wood Broa 70 

Young Henry 58 

Young John 5i 

Young Thos Jr. ...54 f6 
Young A Nugent 55 



The King Construction Go. 

New Roof Construction. Automatic 
Stol(ers, Water Tube Steam Boiler, 

Automatic and Hand Ventilators 

LOCKPORT, N. Y. 
S2 Church StrasI, TORONTO, ONT. 



ADAM SCHILLO LUMBER CO. 

Sl'l"-k^Sd'^f Hemlock and Pine 



and "PECKY CYPRESS," our ntw introduction 
to the trade. 

For Greenhouses. 

ALSO CEDAR POSTS of ALL LENGTHS and DIMENSIONS. 

Having had an extensive experience in thf line 
of Lumber and Posts n<:-eded for Greenhouse work, 
I am prepared to mettail in<iuirios. Send for prices. 

Cor. Weed and nawthorne Ave . 

CHICAGO, III. Tel. North 1636 A 1627 

^^~ References given from the leading Florists 
of Cook County. 

—THE 

Florists' Hail Association 

Insures 19,000,000 square feet of Glass. Now is 
the time to join. Address 

JOHN G. ESLER, Sec'y 

SADDLE RIVER, N. J. 

Please mention the American Florist 
every time you write to an advertiser. 



EUREKA GREENHOUSES 



-SOLD BY- 



DILLON GREENHOUSE MFG. GO. 

Can be erected bv any mechanical person. Practical, reasonable in cost. Most durable. Send 
for circular, blue prints and plain directions. 



BlooBsburt 
Penni. 




CROP INSURANCE. 

Life insurance is valuable because it guarantees the outcome. 

' Ourncy" Heaters 

''BRIGHT IDEA.** "DORIC" and "400 SERIES" do tb€- 

Bame thing for your bothouse: THEY GUARANTEE THE 

CROP. First of all they save 20 per cent on ihe coal bill and 
so keep expense at a minimum. Next, they produce an even 
heat and so do not imperil the life of the plant. Next, they 
are simple to operate and so require least attention. Lastly, 
they wear longer than others and thus perceptibly reduce the 
capital Invested. Don't buy or exchange until you've inves- 
tigated them. 

GURNEY HEATER MFG. CO. 



•DORIC" HEATER, 



74 Franklin Street, 
BOSTON, MASS. 



Ill Fifth Avenue. 
NEW YORK CITY, 



"PIERSON" BOILERS 

WAT ER AND jjEA W, Tht Most Complete 

and Perfect line of 
Horticultural Boilers 

OVER 100 SIZES AND STYLES. 

Iron Frame Conservatories, Palm Houses and Green- 
houses, Red Gulf Cypress Greenhouse Material, 
Ventilating Apparatus, Plans, Specifications and 
Estimates. Prompt Shipments. 

THE PIERSON-SEFTON CO. 




Dcslgnars, Manulaoturars and Bulldars 
of Hortlculiural Structuraa. 



West Side Ave., South, Jersey City, N. J. 







HmBrica is "ths Praw of the JIbsseIi thers may be mnre comfort JImiJsbips, but wb ars the Erst to touch Unknown Seas." 



Vol. XXII. 



CHICAQO AND NEW YORK, FEBRUARY 13, 1904. 



No. 819. 



ipLHiii l^mMmmm lFi!=@ii3i!iiT 



NnrETSXHTH Yeab. 

Copyright 1904, by Amerioan Florist Company 
Entered as Second-Class Mail Matter. 

PtJBLIBHBD BnSBT SaTDBDAT BT 

AMERICAN FLORIST COMPANY, 

3*4 Dearborn St., Cblcago. 
Butern Offico: 4i W. 3(tth St., New \ ork. 

Subscription, 11.00 a year. To Europe, 1*00. 

Subscriptions adOepted only from the trade. 

Volumes half-yearly from August, 1901. 

SOCIETY OF AMERICAN FLORISTS AND 
ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURISTS. 

0FJ10EB9--J0H1I BUBTOS, Philadelphia, Pa., 
president; C. C. Pollwobth, MilwauKee, Wis., 
vice-president; Wm. J. Stbwabt, 79 Milk Street, 
Boston, Mass., secretary; H. B. Bbatty, Oil City, 
Pa., treasurer. 

OiTicEBS-KLECT — PHILIP Breitmbybb, presi- 
dent; J.J. Benekb, vice-president; secretary and 
treasurer as before. Twentieth annual meeting 
at St. Louis, Mo., August, 1904. 



THE AMERICAN CARNATION SOCIETY. 

Annual convention at Detroit, Mich., March 2, 
1904. AlbebtM. Hebb, Lancaster, Pa., secretary. 



AMERICAN ROSE SOCIETY. 

Annual meeting and exhibition, Philadelphia, 
March, 1904. Leonabd Babbon, 136 Liberty St., 
Kew York, secretary. 



CHRYSANTHEMUM SOCIETY OF AMERICA. 

Annual convention and exhibition, November, 
1904. FbedH. Lemon, Richmond, Ind., secretary. 

THIS ISSUE 44 PAGES WITH COVER. 



CONTEJ^TS. 

Pftlms and ferns — Seasonable notes 81 

The carnation— Cultural reminders S2 

— American Carnation Society... 82 

— Advice to exhibitors 82 

The late Josiah Hoopes (portrait) Si 

American Carnation Society premiums 83 

A carnation house at Marlboro. Mass (illus.) . . 84 

Plant notes (or week of February 13 81 

New delivery wa'.:on or Grimm & Gorley (illus.) Si 

Roses at Peter Reinbern's (illus.) 85 

Chrysanthemums — Marquise de Pins S.'i 

The violet— Structures for violets 86 

—Marie Louise violets at A. Laub A- Sous (illus.) 88 

Vegetables indoora-Notcs of the growers 87 

— Cucumbers for forcing 87 

Stem rot and its probable causes 87 

We and our lield 87 

The retail trade— Georgia coat of arms (illus.) . 89 

Chicago 89 

New York 90 

Philadelphia 90 

Boston 91 

St. Louis 91 

Obituary 91 

It pays 92 

Auction bulb sales in London 92 

The seed trade 100 

—Santa Clara, Cal lOO 

The nursery trade 1(^3 

Our pastimes 104 

Baltimore * 108 

Washington 112 

San Diego, Cal 114 

Toronto 116 



PALMS AND FERNS. 



Seasonable Notes. 

This is the quiet season among plants 
of this character, for many of them are 
still taking a more or less complete rest, 
though the resting period is getting 
short. But little pottii'g is in order as 
yet, there being nothing gained by too 
much haste with plants that are not in 
condition to take hold of the fresh soil. 
We have remarked several times before 
that kentias are the only palms among 
the ordinary commercial species that are 
improved by being repotted during the 
winter instead of waiting for I he opening 
of spring, and even in so severe a season 
as the present one we find no reason to 
change that opinion, the only condition 
under which we might change our pres- 
ent practice being in the case of a poorly 
heated establishment where it was impos- 
sible to keep the kentias in a proper tem- 
peratureof 60° atnight. Undersuchcon- 
ditionsit would be the part of wisdom to 
wait until the breaking up of winter before 
disturbing the roots of even the kentias. 
But supposing the kentias to be kept in 
a night temperature o( 50°, they are 
quite likely to lose some oi their deep, 
rich, green color before spring, the 
younger leaves showing the greater loss 
of color, and the plants getting a rather 
hard and starved look that is attractive 
to neither grower nor buyer, though not 
necessarily resulting in permanent injury. 
The greatest loss from getting plants in 
this condition is in the loss of time that 
is used in getting them back to a good 
growing condition again. It takes sev- 
eral weeks to start them on again in the 
spring and thus cuts down the growing 
season to that extent. This matter of 
time is an important factor to the palm 
grower, the margin of profit being not 
by any means an excessive one, and, 
unless prepared for these contingencies, 
the wise grower will touch the palm 
market but lightly. 

About three years ago the European 
stocks of palms were rather down in 
regard to certain sizes that were much in 
demand, but now the small plants of 
that period are coming into the market 
in great quantities, and there will doubt- 
less be many attractive offers made by 
the representatives of the European 
growers, those interesting hustlers who 
are always quite ready to separate the 
American florist from his hard-earned 
capital. But attractive though these 
offers may be, there is always that forty- 



five or fifty per cent of expenses to be 
kept in mind when ordering plants from 
Europe, and that the one dollar plant 
does not look quite so large and cheap 
after you get through paying $1.50 for 
it without taking into consideration the 
constant possibility of finding a few 
injured or imperfect plants in each ship- 
ment. That there are many plants of 
excellent quality imported from Europe 
each season no one will deny, but there 
are also large numbers that will not pass 
muster as first-class stock, and in addi 
tion to this there is no good reason, 
climatic or otherwise, to prevent us from 
supplying our own market with palms, 
the difference in thecost of labor not being 
enough to count for much in this matter. 
Higher duties would probably have but 
little effect on this case, the chief reason 
for the American dealer and decorator 
importing palms being found in the fact 
that he is frequently unable to find what 
he wants in this country, and is thus 
driven to importing in order to get 
plants adapted for his purpose. Our 
climate is superior for the production of 
palms to that of most of continental 
Europe, and many of the species may be 
grown much more rapidly here than 
there. But the pros and cons of the ques- 
tion of importing may scarcely be consid- 
ered in the light of cultural items by the 
editor unless it be along the line of mind 
culture, and it would seem best that we 
return to our knitting, or rather to our 
potting. 

There is a fungoid disease of kentias 
that bears some resemblance to the stem 
rot of which the carnation growers have 
so much tribulation. The palm that is 
affected in this manner first shows a 
slightly withered appearance of the foli- 
age, much as though the plant was suf- 
fering from lack of water. This is usually 
followed by one or two of the lower 
leaves turning yellow rather suddenly, 
and a further examination will show 
that the plant has i otted off at the collar 
and is entirely beyond recover}'. The 
progress of the disease is so rapid that 
on turning out of the pot one of the 
plants that has rotted off, it is sometimes 
found that the roots still appear to be 
healthy, though in some cases the roots 
will also appear to be affected. This dis- 
ease has given much trouble to some 
growers, and apparently infects the par- 
ticular space on the bench that has been 
occupied by the diseased plant, for an 
apparently healthy plant that has been 
moved to fill up the space will sometimes 
develop the disease and go off in the 
same manner as its predecessor. From 



The American Florist. 



Icb 



it would seem that the bench had 
ome infested to some extent with the 
- .rms or mycelium of the fungus. Thus 
ir there does not appear to have been a 
satisfactory remedy found for this trouble, 
but it would seem that plants that are 
not over strong to begin with, and that 
have suffered from extremes of moisture 
and dryness, are more likely to develop 
the stem rot than are those that are in 
vigorous health. In fact the plants that 
are allowed to get very dry, or are kept 
in a partially dry condition during the 
winter, are much more likely to become 
suitable objects for the vegetable pathol- 
ogist than those that enjoy a liberal sup- 
ply of water the year around. 

The tremendous firing that has been 
needful duringthe present winter inorder 
to keep up a proper temperature has 
brought about various attacks of red 
spider, the strong heat and compara- 
tively dry airprovide ideal conditions for 
this little pest and require constant 
watchfulness on the part of the grower. 
Vigorous syringing will do much to keep 
this pest down, but in case a batch of 
small plants become affected by it, a dip- 
ping in a rather strong solution of 
tobacco soap or whale oil soap and 
tobacco extract will probably put a stop 
to it. The plants are thoroughly rinsed in 
the solution so that all portions of the 
foliage may be wetted, the same treat- 
ment being also of value in ridding small 
palms of mealy bug, which insect also 
propagates freely during the winter, as 
in fact it does at almost all seasons of 
the year. The subject of shading will 
soon need to be considered again and 
will probably be referred to an article in 
the near future. W. H. Taplin. 



THE CARNA TION. 

American Carnation Society. 

DEPARTMENT OF PLANT REGISTRATION. 

Registered by Davis Brothers, Blooms- 
rfurg, Pa., Mary Albert, color pure white; 
stem twenty-four to thirty-six inches, 
long, stiff and wiry. Early and continu- 
ous bloomer; does not burst at any time 
of the year. Blooms measure from two 
and one-half to three inches. An extra 
good keeper. Cross Crane by Flora Hill. 
Might be termed an improved Flora Hill. 
Everyone interested in carnations should 
attend the meeting of the American Car- 
nation Society at Detroit, Mich , March 
2 and 3. The rate of one and one-third 
fares has been secured from the Trunk 
Line Association and the Central Passen- 
ger Association, these two associations 
covering the greater part of the territory 
from which attendance will be forth- 
coming for this meeting. Everyone who 
has something to exhibit and is not a 
member of the society can get a premium 
list giving full particulars by applying to 
the secretary, Albert M. Herr, Lancaster, 
Pa. The premium list has been sent to 
each member of the society, and anyone 
not getting his should apply at once for 
a second copy. 

Albert M. Herr, Sec'y. 



Advice to Exhibitors. 
The Detroit meeting of the Carnation 
Society will be here in a little more than 
two weeks and intending exhibitors 
must by this time be making their prepa- 
rations. Detroit being located within 
easy distance of so many large carnation 
growers, together with the fact of so 
many new varieties now being intro- 
duced this season, ought to be indication 
enough that this convention will be the 



greatest in the history of the society. 
Introducers cannot afford to neglect this 
opportunity of displaying their new 
varieties now being offered to the trade, 
also those being worked up for the sea- 
son of 1905. This will also be the great- 
est and cheapest opportunity of every 
carnation grower to compare and make 
observations between the novelties and 
those that have stood the test. Many 
bright ideas and experiences can be 
obtained in a very short while by attend- 
ing these meetings, all of which will more 
than repay you for your time and 
expense. If you make an exhibit you 
may not win out but you will have the 
experience of comparing your products 
with those that do. 

The one great point to bear in mind 
when putting up a vase of carnations is 
evenness. Even in color, even in size, 
even in form and even in length and 
strength of stem are things that tell. I 
have been at exhibitions several times 
with a vase of blooms, in which many of 
the flowers were so much superior to the 
others in the vase that they have given 
the whole an uneven appearance. Con- 
sequently a vase of blooms though not 




The Late Josiah Hoopes. 
(Sep issue of .Taiui.'iry 23. page 9S1.) 

quite as large, but more even, has beaten 
it out. 

To be able to show the blooms at their 
best particular care must be taken from 
now on to keep the temperature of the 
houses as near the mark as possible with 
a slight tendency to the cool side. You 
can do this by reducing the steam heat a 
little earlier on bright days and leaving 
it off a little later in the afternoon; also 
by ventilating more freely but not so 
much that a cold draught will flow on 
the plants. By watching this part 
closely you will get a better texture in 
your blooms and a much stifler stem, 
besides a far better color. If the weather 
is cloudy do not neglect a little crack of 
ventilation even if it takes an extra pipe 
of steam to get it. Use extra care in 
watering to keep the beds as near moist 
as you can but do not let them dry out 
or the size of the blooms will suller. An 
application of liquid manure once a week 
will prove beneficial. This will be ample 
if the plants are as they should be at this 
season and if not, any quantity of liquid 
manure will not make them produce 
exhibition blooms. As the sun is getting 
much stronger every week now some of 



the pink varieties will need a little light 
shade as they fade very quickly, notably 
Mrs. Lawson and Enchantress. It is 
too early to shade with a brush so I find 
that the best way is to syringe enough 
of the shading on the glass to break the 
glare of the sun. 

When it is time to cut the blooms allow 
them to stand about twenty four hours 
in water before packing them. Get jars 
about twelve to fifteen inches deep, large 
enough to hold fifty blooms and take 
some stifl' paper and tie around the jar 
allowing it to extend far enough above 
the top to hold the blooms upright. This 
will enable the stems to take up the 
water freely. Be sure, though, that the 
flowers are not crowded and give them 
every chance to expand. Regarding the 
best method of packing for shipment, I 
find that it is well to use a box four to 
four and one-half feet long, eighteen 
inches wide and six inches deep, and to 
pack one layer of blooms in each box, 
cleating three such bo.xes together in one 
package. For the inside packing we cut 
strips of cotton wadding to cover the 
bottoms and sides. We tack these on, 
then take a double thickness of tissue or 
oil paper and tack over this, treating the 
lid the same way. We then make little 
pillows of tissue paper to lay under each 
row of blooms, working from each end, 
and laying a wad of wet paper over the 
stems and cleating the whole in the cen- 
ter. By following this plan the paper 
cannot press down on the blooms. You 
can nail three of these boxes together 
and paper the whole outside to suit the 
weather. C. W. Johnson. 



Cultural Reminders. 

The past eight to ten weeks have been 
anything but favorable to the produc- 
tion of the highest grade of flowers. In 
our section there has been so little sun- 
shine that the stems have appreciably 
limbered up and the growth has become 
softer than we care to see it at any time. 
We have scarcely had a half dozen days 
on which the sun was seen at all during 
ten weeks, and then hardly long enough 
tg penetrate the frosty glass. We expect 
better weather from now on, however. 
It is a good thing in cases of dearth of 
sunshine to give the plants a dressing of 
wood ashes or lime, or both, at intervals 
of about a month. The unleached hard 
wood ashes should be put on at the rate 
of about a bushel to one thousand square 
feet of bench surface. Air slaked lime 
should be put on just heavy enough to 
whiten thoroughly the surface of the soil. 
Liquid manure may be used more freely 
from now on in bright weather, but in 
uncertain weather must still be used 
with considerable care, else a softgrowth 
will result. With plants in rapid grow- 
ing condition and good weather, twice a 
week after the middle of February is not 
too much. 

Some varieties usually need a very 
light shade after February 1, especially 
the light pink. Among these are Law- 
son, Enchantress and Sunbeam, all of 
which burn easily. It takes good judg- 
ment to put on this coat of wash, for if 
put on more than enough just to break the 
strongest rays of the sun there is danger 
of injuring the vitality of the plants. The 
plants themselves would be better off 
without any shade at all for a couple of 
months yet, for the temperature can still 
be controlled by proper manipulation of 
the ventilators and the syringe. On 
bright, sunny days, when there is much 
air on the house, a fine spray given in 
the form of a gentle shower will prevent 



tgo4. 



The American Florist. 



83 




CARNATION HOUSE OF W. L. LEWIS, MARLBORO, MASS., INTERIOR. 



wilting. It is not well in such cases to 
have more than the usual quantity of 
water at the roots, but the plants should 
be gradually inured to more abundant 
ventilation, and wilting, which is never 
beneficial, will be reduced to a minimum. 
A little more water at the roots than was 
used a month ago, of course, is in order 
now. The syringe should also be used 
with greater freedom, for red spider 
should be guarded against at all times 
and never allowed to gain a foothold. 
Greater folly could not exist than to wait 
for traces of this pest to appear before 
making an effort to expel it. If the end 
of the hose is in skillful hands and prop- 
erly used there will be little use for salt 
water or any other concoction to kill red 
spider. Stick to nature's method wher- 
ever you can. We do not like to spray 
plants in bloom with any kind of mixture 
and seldom find it necessary. 

The young stock will come in for a 
great deal of attention now. All cuttings 
should be thoroughly rooted before they 
are taken from the sand, and it is prefer- 
able to run them a little warm right after 
transplanting for a week or so, say about 
53° at night, until they are well started. 
Give them the sunniest bench, iree from 
drip, and shade for a few days during the 
warm part of the day. After they have 
started growing the night temperature 
may be held at about 45°, but no lower. 
The object is to get a solid short growth, 
which is essential to produce a shapely 
plant. A good syringing once a week for 
red spider should not be omitted. After 
the days get sunnier twice a week will 
be right. A good smoking once a week 
for green aphis with good, strong 
tobacco stems or dust, will do away 
with the necessity of dosing the plants 
with a strong spray or with tobacco 
dust later. 

Whether to grow the young plants in 
pots, flats or benches is a question every- 
one must decide lor himself. When there 
are plenty of pots on hand, and plenty of 
room, pot culture for the young stock 
might be preferred, but the writer has 
always produced good plants in flats 
and on benches and that is the method 
he is using now. Either way has its 
advantages and drawbacks. To plant a 



lot of cuttings on a bench now and leave 
them in the same position until planting 
out time and then destroy most of the 
good roots is a barbarous method. The 
feeding roots travel quite a distance from 
the plants, and by cutting the plants out 
with an ordinary sized ball most of these 
are lost. Right here is where a little 
brain comes in handy. Experienced nur- 
serymen know that to transplant nur- 
sery stock every year is better than to 
leave it in the same position year after 
year, because the root pruning conse- 
quent to transplanting keeps the roots 
near the plants. The same principle 
applies to stock indoors. With us the 
cuttings are first planted in benches or 
flats from the sand, about two inches 
apart each way, to remain there about 
six weeks to two months. Then they 



are transplanted intc .s or pots, early 
enough to get them uoroughly estab- 
lished by the time they are removed to 
the cold frames. This extra handling is 
iust what they need to keep the roots at 
home. By planting out time a good root 
foundation is secured and there is not one 
quarter the check that would otherwise 
result. At the second transplanting they 
are allowed three inches each way, or 
more, if necessary. The soil should not 
be very rich. A pampered growth will 
not stand much wear. J. 

American Carnation Society. 
We are in receipt of the premium list 
for the tenth annual meeting of the 
Axnericau Carnation Society, which will 
be held in Harmonic hall, Detroit, Mich., 
March2to4. The premiums are numer- 
ous, and there are many attractive spe- 
cial prizes ofiered by prominent houses in 
the trade. Papers will be presented as 
follows: "The Management of Exhibi- 
tions," by W. N. Rudd, Mt. Greenwood, 
III.; 'The Exhibition of Carnations on 
lines similar to those of the Chrysanthe- 
mum Society," by W. Scott, Buflfalo, N 
Y.; "The Maintenance of Health and 
\ Igor in Carnations," by Robert Craig, 
Philadelphia, Pa. The railroads have 
granted a rate of one and one-third fare 
and it is expected that there will be a 
very large attendance. The exhibition 
will be under the management of John F 
Sullivan, and all exhibits should be 
addressed to him, charges prepaid, at 
Harmonic hall, corner of Wilcox and 
Center streets, Detroit, Mich. Copies of 
the premium list and all other particulars 
may be had on application to Secretary 
Albert M. Herr, Lancaster, Pa. 



North Adams, Mass.— The Hoosac 
Valley Horticultural Society, which was 
organized some time ago, held its second 
meeting February 2 at the office of A. J 
Schmutz in Arnold place. There was a 
good attendance of the members. By-laws 
and a constitution were adopted and it 
was decided that the regular meetings of 
the society will be held at Pythian hall 
the first and third Tuesday evenings of 
each month. 




CARNATION HOUSE OF W. L. LEWIS, MARLBORO, MASS., EXTERIOR. 



84 



The American Florist. 



Feb. /?, 



WITH THE GROWERS 




A Carnation House at Marlboro, Mass. 

Exterior and interior 
views are given on page 
s;', of a carnation house 
110x150 feet, erected by 
tlie Lord & Burnham 
Company, for W. L. 
Lewis, at Marlboro, 
Mass. Mr. Lewis is a 
young man, being but 
W. L. Lewis. twenty-six years of age. 
and his energy and ambition mark him 
as one of the heavy weights among the 
New England growers of the future. He 
acquired the Howe greenhouses which 
are seen in the extreme right of the exte- 
rior photograph, several years ago, and 
since then has been rapidly building up a 
prosperous local and wholesale trade. 
The local trade of Marlboro, which is an 
affluent city of 15,000 people, calls for 
15,000 geraniums and a corresponding 
number of other bedding plants, winter 
flowering placts, lilies and bulbous flow- 
ers, etc., and the old range is devoted 
mainly to this material, the new house 
being filled with carnations, of which 
Mr. Lewis grows some 22,000 plants, 
the product of which is being marketed 
this season through Welch Brothers' City 
Hall Cut Flower Market in Boston, to 
the full satisfaction of Mr. Lewis, who 
states that he has given a trial to other 
methods of marketing and finds that 
Welch Brothers secure a better price for 
his carnations than he can get through 
any other means. 

The interior view is taken from near 
the center of the bed and shows the 
house as it appeared on August 1, 1904. 
Mr. Lewis is a believer in early planting 
and a large part of his stock is raised in 
pots under glass. The plants are healthy 
and have been given an uninterrupted 
cutting of first-class blooms all through 
the season. 

Among the varieties noted in a recent 
visit Enchantress is easily the leading 
attraction, producing heavily of high- 
grade flowers. Estelle takes high rank 
as a scarlet and is very satisfactory. 
Morning Glory makes a good record as 
to number ot blooms produced but is 
decidedly unhealthy and this is its last 
year. Flora Hill is seen in considerable 
quantity, but its days are also numbered 
as are also those ot Gov. Roosevelt, 
which will be supplanted by Harry Fenn. 
Governor Wolcott has been eminently 
satisfactory and is regarded as indis- 
pensable. Although grown with a tem- 
perature never exceeding 50° to 55° at 
night it shows no disposition to split its 
calyx. Lawson, Prosperity, Manley, 
Golden Beauty, Queen Louise and other 
popular varieties are all grown in greater 
or less number and with good returns. 
The usual corner of home-made seedlings 
is in evidence. One white seedling, the 
progeny of Mary Wood X Flora Hill, has 
successfully passed through its three- 
year preparatory course and is to be 
exploited in the exhibitions the coming 
season. 

The propagating house, a lean-to on 
the north side, is filled with rooted cut- 
tings. Here as throughout the place a 
moderate temperature and abundant 
circulation of fresh air is observed. Close 
disbudding and scrupulous cleanliness in 
every particular attest the efficiency of 
Mr. Cooper, the foreman. The big house 
with its several gutters, one of the first 
of its pattern in this section, gives per- 
fect satisfaction. It is equipped with the 



Chadbourn automatic ventilator, the 
glass is laid with the long way horizon- 
tal and the heating is by two Lord & 
Burnham sectional boilers. 



Piping for Greenhouse. 

Ed. Am. Florist:— How much H4-inch 
pipe will I need for a 17.xl20-foot house 
with a three-cjuarters span running east 
and west, the walls and ends to be 
boarded and shingled, front wall four 
feet high and back wall six feet high, 
from ground level to the ridge pole ten 
feet. The glass will be butted. I will 
use hot water for heating with a twenty- 
five horse power locomotive boiler which 
has thirty-eight 2-inch tubes. The night 
temperature required is 70°. It rarely 
goes below 16° below zero in this section. 
I have a house 12x100 running north 
and south, glass lapped, heated by 2-inch 
pipe, five flows and five returns. Will 
the two houses, the new and the old, be 
too much for the boiler in cold weather? 

E.J. B. 

It is not advisable to use pipe as small 
as H4-inch for a house more than 100 
feet long. It will be far better to use 
2-inch pipe for the coils in a house 120 
feet in length. To maintain a tempera- 
ture of 70° under the conditions named 
there should be three 2y2-inch flow pipes 
and twelve 2-inch returns in three 'coils. 
One flow can be in the center of the house 
and the others upon the plates. The 
flows may be partly upon the walls or 
all may be under the benches, according 
to the arrangement of the houses. 

L. R. T. 



Doiiii's Ferry, N. Y.— A regular meet- 
ing of the Dobb's Ferry Horticultural 
Association was held in Odd Fellows' 
hall, Saturday, January 30. There was 
a large attendance. The evening was 
devoted to the making of a new schedule 
for the fall show. A prize was given by 
S. Bradley, gardener to O. J. Smith, for 
the best foliage plant in a 6-inch pot, 
which was awarded to Mr. Fisher for a 
dractena. Other competitors were Mr. 
Kasberg and Mr. Boreham, who staged 
Pandanus Veitchii and Aspidistra varie- 
gata. S. Bradley staged a fine specimen 
of Pandanus Sanderi. Thomas Lee is to 
give an essay at the next meeting. 

J. B. 



PLANT NOTES. 



For Week of February 13. 

Gladioli. — A batch of gladioli may be 
planted now if any early flowers are 
needed. Plant them about two feet 
apart along the north edge of a carna- 
tion bench; the foliage is not heavy 
enough to harm the carnations. Corms 
that were forced last year are all right to 
force again, for the mild heat to which 
they are subjected does not impair their 
vitality; in fact we have found that the 
corms that have been forced the previous 
season will come into bloom several 
weeks earlier than fresh ones. Plant 
them just deep enough to cover the tops 
of the corms. 

Smilax. — If the smilax bed is to be 
renewed next summer the seed should be 
sown at once. Keep the seed boxes in a 
rather warm place until it germinates, 
and pot off as soon as two or three leaves 
have been developed, A little later, if 
pressed for room, the small plants can be 
shifted to 3 inch pots and placed in a 
mild hot bed, where they may remain 
until they are planted out in June or 
July. Keep the plants in the beds well 
syringed to hold red spider and thrip in 
check, and do not subject them to heavy 
toljacco smoke for it burns the vines. A 
few weeks after a section of a bed has 
been cut, cleaned off and started into 
growth, a light mulch of well rotted cow 
manure will be beneficial. 

Cytisus. — Cuttings of Cytisus racemo- 
sus root readily in the sand now. Take 
the soft end growths before the buds have 
formed and insert them into the sand in 
a moderately warm part of the propa- 
gating house. When rooted pot oft and 
keep them growing on, shifting as needed. 
During the summer they can be plunged 
outside in a frame, topping them at 
intervals of a kvi weeks. The old plants 
for Easter flowering had better be kept 
in a temperature of about 50° at night 
to have them on time. They are of little 
value after Easter, neither is there great 
demand for them before that time, and 
since the flowers last only a few weeks, 
care should be taken to have them just 
right for Easter, so as to make the crop 
profitable. 

Cannas. — The seed of cannas should be 
sown now to make good 4-inch stock by 




NEW DELIVERY WAGON OF GRIMM 



GORLY, ST. LOUIS, MO. 



igo4. 



The American Florist. 



85 




Uncle John. Madame Chatenay. 

TWO POPULAR ROSES AT PETER REINBERG S ESTABLISHMENT, CHICAGO. 



the first of June. They come quite true 
from seed and the stock of desireable 
varieties can easily be increased by this 
method. Soak the seeds in hot water 
for about twenty- four hours before plant- 
inpr and, holding each seed firmly in a 
pair of pincers, file a small portion of the 
hard surface off; otherwise it will take 
the seeds all eternity to start. Started 
in this manner, many of the seeds will 
germinate in a few weeks and should be 
given small pots when they are three 
or four inches high, shifting to 4-inch 
when it is necessary. Keep the seed boxes 
in a warm place until all the seed has 
started, for it will probably be several 
months before the last seed germinates. 
The old clumps under the benches need 
not be started for another four weeks. 

VerAenas.— The first of February is the 
proper time to sow the seed of verbenas. 
If they are sown much later than this 
they will hardly come into flower for 
Memoriil day. Sow them in rather light 
soil, and when they are sufficiently large 
to handle transplant into flats an inch 
apart. As soon as they are large enough 
pot off into 21/2 inch pots and keep them 
growing in a temperature of about 50°. 
Grown from seed they are less subject to 
mildew than when they are propagated 
from cuttings. For keeping the varieties 
true to name, however, the latter method 
is to be preferred, and now is the best 
time to propagate them. About the first 
of March the small plants can be trans- 
ferred into a mild hotbed, for at this time 
the pressure for room in the greenhouse 
becomes serious. While they are in the 
hotbed they will grow quite rapidly, and 
for this reason they must be handled over 
several times or the roots will ramify too 
much in the manure, thus producing a 
rank growth which quickly wilts when 
they are taken from the bed and offered 
for sale. Whenever thev are handled over 



all the roots on the outside of the pot 
should be removed. The stock plants 
which are now in 21/2 inch pots should be 
shifted to 3-inch about the first of March, 
and they will make excellent stock with 
a number of flowers to the plant by 
spring. G. " 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS 



Roses at Peter Reinbergs. 

Madame Abel Chatenay is one of the 
best roses on the Chicago market and it 
is increasing in popularity each year. 
It produces strong, straight stems agd 
every flower is perfect in form and color. 
Peter Reinberg is having great success 
with this rose. It is easy to grow and 
very seldom mildews. Plenty of ventila- 
tion and a temperature of about 58° are 
the requirements. The accompanying 
engravings show the Chatenay and Mr. 
Reinberg's new rose Uncle John. The 
latter is a sport from Golden Gate and 
originated at Peter Reinberg's green- 
houses about three years ago. It is 
taking a great hold as a popular and 
successful commercial rose. The new 
variety is more pink in color than Golden 
Gate and unfolds its petals on the order 
of Bride and Bridesmaid. It is a won- 
derful producer and has its parent beaten 
on that score, says the owner. I'ncle 
John, which was named after the 
renowned Chicago horticulturist, "Uncle 
John" Thorpe, was awarded a special 
prize of $40 at the Kansas City exhibi- 
tion a year ago. C. 



Lenox, Mass. — Geo. Ferguson, superin- 
tendent of the F. A. Schermerhorn estate, 
was married in Michigan on February 
3, and is now on the homeward end of 
his honeymoon trip with his bride. Last 
reports located him at Washington, 
D.C. 



Marquis de Pins. 

I notice in the report of the Paris chrys- 
anthemum show, which appeared in the 
American Florist for December 12, a 
slight misprint which it is important to 
correct at an early opportunity. The 
Marquis de Pins, a new raiser of seed- 
lings, is in that report referred to as the 
Marquis de Paris. The correction is 
necessary, because anyone who saw that 
gentleman's new seedling chrysanthe- 
mums at the Paris show could not fail 
to be struck with the remarkable quality 
of his exhibit, and also because we are 
almost certain in the course of the next 
season or two to have an opportunity of 
seeing at our shows some of the novelties 
this gentleman has raised. Such quality 
cannot possibly remain outside the pale 
of .American and English collections. 

Concerning the newgrowera few notes 
from Le Jardin, of Paris, are interesting. 
In a recent issue of our Parisian contem- 
porary an excellent portrait of the Mar- 
quis and a biographical notice appear. 
It seems that this gentleman has only 
been a grower of the flower for a few 
years, and as he lives in a district pecu- 
liarly suitable for seedling raising, it was 
not long before he made attempts in that 
branch of chrysanthemum culture. He 
showed his first blooms at Toulouse in 
1900, then the next year some at Mont- 
pelier, in which town the next exhibition 
of the French National Chrysanthemum 
Society will be held in November of the 
present year. 

In 11)02 he exhibited at the Paris show, 
where he won a gold medal and several 
certificates. And again in 1903, at which 
show the writer had the amplest oppor- 
tunity of examining these wonderful 



86 



The American Florist. 



Feb. IS, 



samples of cultural skill. There was 
something about these new seedlings 
that struck one as being unique. A 
large display of big, heavily built Japa- 
nese blooms of the greatest size and sub- 
stance is not an ordinary feature at a 
French chrysanthemum show, except per- 
haps in the case of a grower like Ernest 
Calvat. But in the case of the novelties 
staged by the Marquis there was a dis- 
tinctive mark of high cultivation, com- 
bined with great originality of form and 
color. Every variety shown was repre- 
sented by five colossal blooms. In 1902 
he was awarded nine first-class certifi- 
cates for varieties that were also included 
in his 1903 exhibit. In 1903 fourteen 
other varieties were awarded this dis- 
tinction, and they fully deserved the 
recognition they obtained. 

Where weight and solidity are required, 
and this is especially the case in such 
classes as the big vase class at the Eng- 
lish N. C. S. show, these novelties will be 
invaluable to exhibitors. High class 
quality and liberal culture will result in 
the production of blooms that it will be 
hard to beat. In course ot time it seems 
probable some of these novelties will find 
their way to America, although it was 
stated that the raiser only grew for his 
own pleasure and did not intend to sell 
them. A brief mention may therefore be 
useful to any growers in the States who 
are interested in the introduction of new 
chrysanthemums. Only those that have 
been certificated by the Paris floral com- 
mittee are named, viz.: 

Baronne Renee Reille. 

Belle L'Isloise. 

Mme. Marie Carrel. 

Mile. Rose il'EIchingen. 

Mme. Brejae. 

Souvenir de Bruselles. 

Vierge Montbrunoise. 

Triomphe de Montbrun. 

Souvenir de la Comtesse Reille. 

The above are of 1902. Those of 1903 



Nyphon. 

Poupoule. 

Angele. 

Bebe. 

Rose. 

Anne-Marite. 

Germaine. 

Baron de Labusquiere. 

Charles Bacque. 

Marquis de la Motte St. Pierre. 

Mile. Lasies. 

Souvenir de Lomboz. 

It has often happened that fine Ameri- 
can varieties have tailed to accommodate 
themselves to European culture and vice 
versa, but from a recent critique of some 
French varieties in America there appears 
to be some hope that there are varieties 
from this side of the Atlantic that will do 
well in the States. If this applies to any 
of those raised by this new grower, there 
will be agreeable surprises in store for 
those who first undertake the culture of 
them. P. 



THE VIOLET. 



Piping For Greenhouse. 

Ed. Am. Florist: — How many runs of 
2 inch pipe one hundred feet long will a 
5-inch main feed, the first feed to be four 
2-inch pipes twenty feet from the boiler 
and the same every seven feet thereafter? 

R. L. D. 

Thirty-two can be reckoned on with 
safety and with an elevated flow and 
the returns well above the boiler, from 
twenty-five to fifty per cent more can be 
carried. L. R. Taft. 



Structures for Violets. 

There are a good many ways to grow 
violets. Some grow them in any old 
place; others cannot grow them even in 
good houses. I consider we have always 
grown the best violets in solid bed 
houses. In preparing for a house, dig 
out the walks and put the soil from 
them in the beds. Dig deep enough so 
you have your paths low enough. It is 
well to have them two and one-half feet 
below the beds. Use a five-foot locust 
post. Sink it two and one-half feet in the 
ground, and two and one-half feet will 
remain for the bench support. Of course 
space must be figured on for good violet 
soil. Make the paths the desired depth 
the first year. Don't make the beds one 
board high, and then add one board each 
year until you have them the right height. 
This costs money for longer posts every 
time you make them higher. 

After you have the posts set nail hem- 
lock boards, planed on one side, to the 
posts, to support the beds. Some use 
2-inch spruce plank, which is better, but 
more expensive. Our houses run east 
and west, even span, and we find them 
much better than the three-quarter span. 
We use 15-inch glass, put in lapped on 
ground cypress bars. We find the heavy 
bars the best, about one and one-quarter 
inches wide and two and one-half inches 
thick, as heavy braces are not needed. A 
truss rafter is sufficient to hold the roof. 
We have continuous ventilation on both 
top and sides of the house. Be sure and 
have the ventilation on both sides of the 
house at the top, and when the wind 
blows from one quarter you can venti- 
late from the opposite. We have two 
4-inch flow pipes overhead, under the 
ventilators, which is a great benefit to 
the middle bench, as when ventilation is 
on thechilled air doesn't strike the plants. 
We have two 4-inch return pipes hung on 
each side of the house over the side beds. 
Use locust posts for the house. Saw 
them on the pitch of the roof, then nail 
on the slating and go ahead with the 
house. Have slide ventilators about two 
feet wide and any length that may be 
desired hung under a 3-inch pipe, the 
same thickness nailed under the plate. 
If a beginner follows these instructions 



he will have a good and not too expen- 
sive house, as solid beds to start with 
are much cheaper than raisea beds, and 
as I stated before far superior. 

Alex. A. Laub, Jr. 



The New Jersey Florlcultural Society. 

The regular monthly meeting and exhi- 
bition of the New Jersey Floricultural Soci- 
ety, the first competitive one for 1904, was 
held on Friday, February 5, at Oceanic, N. 
J. Orchids Ltelia anceps Stella, Oncidium 
Forbesii and Coelogyne Micholetzii, from 
the houses of William Barr of Llewellyn 
Park, grown by Arthur Bodwell, 
attracted attention for their variety, 
beauty and skillful cultivation. The last 
two were of last year's importation, it 
being a very difficult thing to secure bloom 
the first season. The cyclamens in pots 
from the houses of Wm. Runkle, grown 
by D. Kindsgrab, were perfect in form 
and beauty of flower and foliage and 
received 95 points. The judges for the 
evening were Harry O. May and Jos. B. 
Davis. Vases of The Bride carnations 
and Gen. MacArthur roses, exhibited by 
John N. May, on attention being drawn 
to the fact that they were not entered for 
competition and had already been cer- 
tificated by the society, received a unani- 
mous vote of thanks. Topics discussed 
all bore upon the contest and were: 
"Adherence to By-laws in Elections," 
"Standards of Judging," "Award of 
Certificates," "Selection of Judges" and 
"What Constitutes a Gardener." It was 
decided to adhere strictly to the by-laws, 
to leave judges untrammeled, using due 
care to select competent men, and to 
guard certificates so when they were 
given they would be valued. Pres. Geo. 
Smith announced that provision had 
been made to award prizes, the exact 
number not having been determined, and 
explained why the committee had formed 
two classes that the younger members 
might feel secure of their share of prizes. 
One new member was nominated. Let- 
ters from the Tarrytown and New York 
Florists' Clubs were read and attendance 
upon the carnation night of the last 
urged by Joseph A. Manda, who stated 
that while ladies had been invited for 
that night the "canteen" would be 
operated "on the quiet," for he was on 
that committee. Jos. B. Davis. 



Greenhouse Building;. 

Hortonville, Mass. — Horton Brothers, 
two vegetable houses. 

Little Neck, L. I.— W. K. Vanderbilt, 
Jr., six conservatories, each 20x250 feet. 




MARIE LOUISE VIOLETS AT ADAM LAUB & SONS, HUGHSONVILLE, N. Y. 

(Flowers picked from these 2,400 plauts for Christmas numbered 7,200; picture taken December 23,1 



1904. 



The American Florist. 



87 




Notes of the Growers. 

George M. Kendall, of Leonminster, 
Mass., one of the largest vegetable 
forcers of the state, is making the experi- 
ment of setting cucumber plants farther 
apart than usual. Most of the cucum- 
ber growers settheirplantsfrom fourteen 
to thirty inches apart but Mr. Kendall 
regards four feet between the plants as 
not too much for best results. He grows 
his cucumbers on mackeral nets in place 
of wire on account of its cheapness and 
ease of removal when clearing the houses. 
His largest house is 80x250 feet. 

Most of the large vegetable forcers in 
New England sterilize all the soil used in 
their houses. 

A swarm of bees in the greenhouse will 
do the work of fertilizing cucumber flow- 
ers much more thoroughly and in much 
less time than is possible by manual 
labor. 

A bushel of cucumbers to the plant is a 
fair average for a greenhouse cucumber 
crop. 

W. W. Rawson, the extensive grower 
of vegetables under glass at Arlington, 
Mass., regards the question of labor sav- 
ing as the greatest problem at present 
confronting the vegetable forcer. It is 
thirty years since the first greenhouses 
were established in the vicinity of Bos- 
ton for vegetable growing and since then 
the increase has been remarkable, and the 
improvements in greenhouse building and 
heating during that period have been 
taken full advantage of by the market 
gardeners. 

George Matthews, of Great Neck, L. I., 
has eight large middle benches sown 
with sweet peas planted two rows in a 
bed; and between the rows are sown 
radishes which he sends to a commission 
man in New York, getting 4 cents a dozen 
for them. 



Cucumbers for Forcing. 

Ed. Am. Florist: — I am thinking of 
putting cucumbers in one of my green- 
houses. Will you kindly inform me what 
are the best kinds for forcing and whether 
it is necessary to have bees? 1 have had 
good success with the English forcing, 
but some claim it is better to have bees 
for White Spine. F. H. R. 

The forcing of the various types of 
White Spine cucumbers does not greatly 
differ from that of the English forcing 
varieties, but there are some points of 
difference worth noting. The English 
varieties need some shade, the American 
sorts require practically all possible sun- 
light, at least during the colder months. 
The White Spine section have a tendency 
to ripen up their crop much quicker than 
the English sorts and require artificial 
pollination to secure satisfactory results; 
we find the English varieties set fully as 
well when not fertilized in winter. A 
good selection of White Spine oflered is 
that known as Improved Arlington, and 
can be procured from all reputable seeds- 
men. This is relied on almost exclusively 
in the extensive cucumber forcing estab- 
lishments in Arlington, East Mansfield 
and the vicinity of Fitchburg, Mass., 
which send large quantities to New York 
in addition to supplying the Boston 
markets. It is an undoubted fact that 



the White Spine varieties need artificial 
pollination of some kind. Bees are used 
in not a few places, and with excellent 
results. If F. H. R. can secure a hive we 
can guarantee him a good set, other con- 
ditions being right. Other methods of 
pollination adopted are shaking the 
wires to disseminate the pollen about 
noon on bright days when the atmos- 
phere is dry, and hand pollination by 
means of camel's hair brushes; if bees, 
however, are procurable they will prove 
the most satisfactory. Remove them 
from the house when doing any fumiga- 
ting. Of the English forcing varieties we 
can recommend the following as being 
first-class: Telegraph, Improved, Peer- 
less, Matchless, Lord Roberts and Sensa- 
tion. These are as distinct an advance 
over varieties grown a generation ago 
as are the improved White Spine cucum- 
bers now grown compared with those 
cultivated even a decade ago. 

W. N. Craig. 



Stem Rot and Its Probable Causes. 

(I'apor read by Peter Fisher, of Ellis, Mass., 
before the New York Florists' Club, February 8.] 
Mr. President, members of the New 
York Florist Club and friends — ^In looking 
up a subject for a short paper on the 
carnation to read before you tonight, I 
thought nothing could be more appropri- 
ate at this season of the year than "Ex- 
tremely early propagation as related to 
stem rot and its probable causes," in- 
cluding a few suggestions as to a means 
of preventing or minimizing the ravages 
of this, the deadliest of all carnation dis- 
eases. During the past summer stem 
rot has been most prevalent in the east, 
especially through Long Island, central 
New Tork and Pennsylvania, many of the 
largest growers losing their stock by the 
thousands both in the field and after be- 
ing planted indoors, and the financial 
loss being extremely heavy. That cli- 
matic conditions had much to do with 
this there is no doubt and with outdoor 
culture we in future years will be just 
as liable to a recurrence of the disastrous 
results of the past season. This suggests 
to me the question, wherein lies the rem- 
edy? During the past five years or so 
vou have doubtless observed the growing 
tendency towards earlier propagation and 
planting. Six or eight years ago early 
August to September 20 was considered 
about the right time to bench carnations 
from the field. The method as adopted 
at present is July planting from the field, 
finishing as early as possible in August. 
In some cases indoor culture is almost 
exclusively adopted, usually benching In 
Jlay and June and where space is avail- 
able I have known some cases where the 
plants were benched in February with 
.«;plendid results. I was much interested 
on looking over an old trade price list of 
Fred. Domer's (that veteran carnationist 
to whom we owe so much) to find him 
offering his novelties with distribution 
commencing April 1. Think of it! What 
do we find today? Nearly every buyer 
wants early January delivery. Some will 
gladly accept their cuttings in December 
and should orders remain unfilled until 
March 15 they are liable to cancellation. 
The points I want to bring up are these: 
Is this increasing tendency towards ex- 
tremely early propagation and planting 
for or against the best development and 
longevity of the carnation, and is there 
not in this a probable cause for so much 
stem rot, especially where field culture 
is practiced? 

Where the intention is to adopt m- 
door culture entirely I believe in early 
propagation, pottmg off the cuttings in 
January or early February commencing 
with 2 to 2 1/2 -inch pots and re-potting 
into 3 to 3% or 4-inch as the case re- 
quires, but never allowing the plants to 
get stunted or pot-bound. Such early 
stock ought to be benched not later than 
May and if space permits .^pril would 
give better results, insuring strong root 
action before the extremely hot weather 
sets in. Cuttings taken a month later can 
be benched during May and June. This 
method has many advantages over plant- 
ing January stock in the field during 
April or early May and then lifting and 
benching it In July, because those early 
cuttings often get pot-bound and stunted 
before being planted out, the balls be- 
ing full of roots become hard and should 



the weather be warm and dry, for some 
weeks after planting they dry out and 
wilt. This condition, followed by heavy 
rains, is the first step towards a severe 
loss from stem rot, as the plants are in 
no condition to absorb this surplus of 
moisture. A later batch of the same va- 
riety that has not been pot-bound and 
abused before being planted out, will 
pull through often with little loss while 
cuttings of the same sort potted off, say, 
in April and set in the field will often 
make better stock than either of the ear- 
lier lots with little or no loss from stem' 
rot. This proves to me that much of the 
trouble is caused from the stock being 
allowed to become stunted, pot-bound 
and abused before being planted out, — 
and herein lies one of the greatest dan- 
gers In extremely early propagation: If 
you do not Intend this stock for early 
planting in-door culture it Is much safer 
to use a later lot of cuttings for plant- 
ing out, and benching during July or 
early August. My experience has been, 
if a batch of cuttings once get extreme- 
ly dry and wilted, either In the sand or 
after being potted, or put in flats, it is 
better to throw them away. They never 
recover from the check and are sure to 
be a source of trouble and disappoint- 
ment later. Avoid extremes. I believe 
for field-culture February and March 
cuttings, preferable to December or Jan- 
uary stock ai:d if you cannot house your 
stock before August, cuttings taken from 
the sand early in April will give grand 
rc'sults. Of course this refers to good, 
free growing sorts. Some that develop 
more slowly need carl'er propayatlon and 
planting. 

The one great drawback to indoor cul- 
ture with the average florist is, he can- 
not afford to throw out plants that are 
giving abundance of bloom at a minimum 
cost of production during the early tum- 
mer months. Yet I believe the time is 
not far distant when, with properiy con- 
structed houses, the carnation (like the 
chrysanthemums) will be grown indoors 
exclusively. There is too much risk at- 
tached to planting out in the field new 
and valuable stock to be at the mercy of 
our variable climate and the experiences 
of the past will only tend to spur us on 
to devise means by which we shall yet 
overcome the difflculties and uncertain- 
ties of our present mode' of culture. 

I believe for all indoor culture, the best 
places are wide houses running north and 
south, even span, thirty-three feet wide 
with five benches, each four feet wide. 
(This admits of a better circulation of 
air than can be obtained on a five-foot 
bench.) Height of sides five feet, three 
feet being glass: ridge, fifteen feet in 
height with continuous top ventilation 
on each side, thirty feet in width, also 
side ventilations (to be used judiciously). 
Ton will find a house running north and 
south much cooler and better during the 
hot summer months than one running east 
and west and all things taken into con- 
sideration, the loss from this aspect dur- 
ing winter Is scarcely noticeable In a 
large, light structure. 



We and Our Field. 

[Read by Wni. J. Stewart before the Florists' 
Club of Philadelphia, February 2, 1904.] 

A transposition in the title of this dis- 
sertation might betoken a commendable 
modesty. The typical gardener or florist 
has, however, always been a somewhat 
aggressive and self-complacent individ- 
ual. Like the Ayrshire farmer and his 
wife, one Is "Aye richt" and the other 
"Never wrang." Even before that mem- 
orable uprising which resulted In the es- 
tablishment of our powerful National So- 
ciety — when our Interests in all liorticul- 
tural activities were usually subordinat- 
ed to those of the farmer and the fruit 
nurseryman — even then the Shibboleth of 
the craft was "'WTia's like us?" "Nae- 
body." and the less a man knew the more 
emphatic oftentimes his declaration. I 
once read of an encounter on the Dela- 
ware between a magnificent steamer and 
a grimy coal lighter. Officer: "Clear out 
of the way with that barge." Lighter- 
man: "Are ye the captain av that ves- 
sel?" Officer: "No." Lighterman: "Then 
spake to yer equals: I'm the captain of 
this." The gorgeous self-sufficiency of 
some of our old-time champions over- 
sliadows tiiat lighterman's Inflation as 
completely as Philadelphia's bowling 
record eclipses that of some of her chesty 
rivals, and since the race is yet far 
from extinct we shall. In conformity to 
usage, talk first of ourselves, then of our 
field and how we may cultivate it. 

That we have some basis for our pre- 
tensions, the vastly enhanced prominence 
which our art and its literature (not to 



88 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 13, 



mentiqn our sporting prowess) have at- 
tained during' the last two decades stands 
in evidence. The deduction that we are 
destined to become of yet greater conse- 
quence will doubtless pass undisputed, liut 
mere theoretical conclusions have little 
value, and these boasts of future ascen- 
dancy which we have a habit of makmg 
are often little more than hollow general- 
ities in support of which, if pressed fin' 
a specific forecast, we might find it dil- 
ficult to put up a convincing argument. 

Recognizing in ourselves the connecting 
link between the past which we know and 
the future w^hich we know not. it is 
healthy to ask ourselves often how well 
we are filling the places of the sturdy 
pioneers whose heritage we enjoy, and 
to- make it our constant aim to so shape 
our course that posterity shall see in us 
a pattern to in.itate and not an example 
to deter. If we are to prove worthy suc- 
ces.sors of a distinguished ancestry, the 
masterly proficiency of Harris, the sa- 
gacity of Henderson, the noble simplicity 
ai Cartledge. the intensity of Menand. 
the tenacity of Wood and the sunny kind- 
liness of Halliday must find their coun- 
terpart in the leaders of today and we 
should strive that nothing be lost either 
in amplitude or potentiality of the emi- 
nent qualities so well exemplified in the 
character and lives of these honored men. 

Our reverence for old age should, how- 
ever, cease at the door of the rose cellar 
and, while we should emulate the example 
■and recognize the genius of the old mas- 
ters there are problems arising daily, as 
new elements intrude themselves within 
our sphere, which bring us to a realiza- 
tion that while the principles' actuating 
therri' were of the sterling kind, success 
today mav demand a somewhat different 
application of them. We have with us 
now the Greek who cares not whether 
plants are fed on water or on carbolic 
acid but who, after six months in our 
country knows the cut- flower market bet- 
ter than do many of our craftsmen who 
have spent a lifetime in the business, 
and. on the otlier hand, we find the man 
who can grow violets or carnations of a 
quality hitherto undreamt of. but who 
somehow cannot understand why Ijlooms 
with whLskers on them can't be sold at 
Christmas for three times what they were 
worth three weeks earlier, before their 
whiskers started out. Where shall we 
strike the balance between the dear soul 
who loves his profession more than its 
emoluments who can say. in all truth 

"Thou source of all my bliss and all 
my woe 

'niou found'st me poor at first. ;u)il 
keep'st me so," 
and the latter-day flower-factory man in 
whose transactions sentiment has no 
place, to whom a blossom is handsome 
only when going out of the door on the 
order of a cash customer, and who would 
not hesitate to accelerate with a brisk 
movement of his boot the exit of any 
fiower, however beautiful in itself, the 
moment it should transpire that there 
Was no pecuniary profit in it? 

I am persuaded that a goodly portion 
of the comfort and joy of a horticultur- 
ist's existence comes from iiis* gregarious 
instincts. One of the most forlorn crea- 
tures in the world is the gardener .so 
isolated that he is prevented from asso- 
ciating with his fellow gardeners, and al- 
most pathetic is the keen delight evinced 
by one long shut out. when circumstances 
bring him in contact with old friends in 
the profession, "drinking it all in and 
life never seemed so full before." Study 
this marked characteristic' of the craft 
and you will discover that the most con- 
tented as well as most progressive flor- 
ists are usually found in those com- 
munities' where ample facilities are af- 
forded for flocking together. Thus the 
cohesive influence of our fraternal institu- 
tions is a boon which we should, in this 
era of Specialization. i)ri^e most highly. 
Its value as an offset to the disintegrat- 
ing forces now at work can hardly be 
overestimated. It begins to dawn upon 
us that the S. A. P.. with its stimulus to 
the fraternal sentiments, came upon the 
scene at a most opportune time, and we 
applaud the rare discernment shown bv 
her Philadelphia offspring in respect to 
providing abundant inducement for com- 
radeship which has its timely reward in 
the unpai-alleled prosperit>' which this 
dub enjoys and is sure to continue to 
enjoy, at least so long as John West- 
cott's buffet keeps on doing business. 

Our field — It is a big field and a fertile 
one, as wide as vegetation extends, as 
broad as human sympathy, as deep as* 
roots can penetrate the earth or love the 
heart, as lofty as the tallest trees can 
grow or noble .sentiment aspire, a. field 
in which to cultivate the intellectual fac- 



ulties as well as material vegetation. Our.-i 
is a calling more ancient and honorable 
than any other pursued by mankind, 
whose mission it is to soften the asperi- 
ties of life, to develop the liest in hu- 
manity and clothe the wcjrld in beauty, 
whose adherents are fellow workers with 
Nature herself. "God the first garden 
made, the first city, Cain." 

Are we occupying this fair field to full- 
est advantage? To do so we must be 
wide awake to its broader possibilities 
and take care that narrow vision and 
trivial controversies are not permitted to 
limit and monopolize our attention. Tlie 
great expansion of our business and the 
influx of capital in certain branches have 
brought about changed conditions and 
evolved new problems. How shall we 
meet them? How successfull.\' elude per- 
ils that seem to threaten and which es- 
pecially concern those working hitherto 
on a small scale and subject to that most 
uncomfortable disease, lack of money? 
Our development has been so many-sided 
and on such varied lines that our ag- 
gregate interests, at first simple and 
closely akin, now rapidly grow complex 
and diverse. Thus disintegrating forces 
lead us into divergent paths, the circles 
widening as our diversified branches mul- 
tiply. We see the situation througlt dis- 
similar eyes until 

" 'Tis with our judgments as our 
■ watches — none 

Go just alike, yet each believes his 
own." 

Admitting that no two of us are likely 
to quite agree in what direction the 
greatest measure of well-being presents 
itself, it .seems to me that those who have 
cultivated broad habits of vision, who 
have perceived their business not so much 
in its essence as through its' effects, will 
agree that the time has gone forever 
when things can be successfully run as 
the foolhardy .skipper sailed his schoo- e 
"by luck, by G — d and the moonlight" 
and that insight, economy and foresie'it 
are three cardinal virtues to be hence- 
forth zealously cultivated by the fiorist, 
whatever his particular line may be. 

Without trespassing too far in the di- 
rection of special questions, which I have 
purposely avoided in this paper, let us 
for a moment turn to that most \'ital 
problem of the cut-flower industry, the 
distribution of the produce. At the i-e- 
cent holiday time we read from sundr.v 
suburban and country papers that the 
scarcity of flowers for Christmas- was un- 
precedented, "On Christmas eve there 
was not a rose or carnation of any kind 
to be purchased in the city" was a sort 
of stock item all along the line. Why is 
it that we find florists reporting a holi- 
day famine in towns within an hour's ride 
of New York city while growers' cellars 
and wholesalers' refrigerators are bulg- 
ing with unsold stock and perchance the 
curbstone stands in the city heaping with 
flowers of varying ages at a few cents a 
bunch? In reply to that question we shall 
avail ourselves of the Yankee's birth- 
right and answer by asking another — 
"WTiy a higher price on flowers at Christ- 
mas?" 

I take it that in a profession so com- 
l^rehensive in .scope, no necesslt.v exists 
for long-continued over-production on an.v 
special line. If fortune be unstable our 
will is free. When you find yourself 
over-crowded and jostled in your spe- 
cialty, jtist watch your opportunity and 
move up. There is aiwa.\-s i-oom at the 
top. No place is so well conducted that 
some material increase in efficiency is 
impossible: no plant or flower now popu- 
lar so universally well grown that some- 
body cannot do it still better. The list 
of good subjects as yet in obscuritv that 
may be made popular is practicall.v un- 
limited and there is abundant latitude 
for talent and industry in the establish- 
ment of improved strains of scores of 
things that have thus far scarcely been 
touched. As wealth and refinement in- 
crease the demand for conservatories 
grows apace: well-grown stock for tlie 
filling of such places, in the hands of a 
well-managed concern, is as good as gov- 
, ernment bonds. So rapidly has this fever 
for beautiful home grounds and gardens 
spread in this country that the call for 
choice planting material far exceeds the 
stock available here, and even foreign 
sources are being rapidly denuded. Only 
a few days ago a« friend desirous of con- 
structing a rose garden complained to 
me of inability to procure the stock he 
required. Choice lilacs on their own roots, 
well-grown conifers in reliably hardy va- 
rieties, nursery-grown kalmias and simi- 
lar things are wanted. Where arc thev? 
Where can the stock for one suljstantial 
plantation of hardy rhododendrons, or for 
, a house of foreign grapes, or good plants 



iji tlie finer piPouies, in a business way, 
be found? 

Every sign points to a glorious open- 
ing for the immediate future for the in- 
telligent gardener with high aspirations 
and a determination to excel. There is 
scarcel.v a line, no matter how unpromis- 
ing it looks, that will not respond in a 
profitable way when you put brains into 
it. While it is true that the worst bow- 
ler on the alley may some time make 
the first ten-strike in the game, and that 
the chance hybridizer may turn up a car- 
nation or a chry.santhemum that will 
sweep the field, yet it is a safe proposi- 
tion always that in the long run the ex- 
pert will distance the common throng. 
The young man who takes up horticul- 
ture as a calling today, if endowed with 
common sense and zeal, will not be con- 
tent to settle into any branch, however 
lucrative for the moment, which oilers 
the novice an even chance to locate at 
his elbow and become a dangerous rival. 
Think you tliat Peter Fisher lies awake- 
nights fretting o\-er the possibility of 
somebody showing up to skim the cream 
of his carnation milk? Tom Roland can 
sell ten times as many Lorraine bego- 
nias as he can produce, year after year. 
M. H, Walsh hasn't seen rose h,\-bridiza- 
tion run into the ground just yet, and 
Tom Butterworth will be a centenarian 
before he sees a flower-factory able to 
compete in his- specialty of orchid grow- 
ing. Numerous similar illustrations of 
my point might be cited and will no doubt 
come to the minds of all. 

Most powerful of agencies in the eleva- 
tion of our craft is our professional press. 
The vastnes^ of its contributions to the 
sum total of our knowledge is already 
far beyond our comprehension. Preg- 
nant with helpful suggestions, reflecting 
in its reading columns current thought 
and progress, and in its advertising col- 
umns the limits of our commercial enter- 
prise, it shows us where we are and 
points' to what we ma.v attain, and those 
of us who do not recognize nor heed the 
benefits the press brings within the reach 
of all must surely fall behind. Perhaps 
contributors are now and then prone to 
forget or underestimate the responsibili- 
ties of authorship and the bemasked 
would-be regulator, 

"More peevish, cross and splenetic 

Than dog distraught or monkey sick," 
has been known to debase its columns 
with ungenerous per.sonal reference, but 
these are the exception. As to the use 
of a nom de plume it may be all right 
and even desirable when its assumer 
busies himself with impersonal questions 
or general principles or in a controversy 
with another of his kind, but how can 
anyone making a claim to manliness ever 
indulge in skulking ambushed criticism 
by name of a fellow florist? 

I>ong familiarity with horticultural 
clippings leads me to feel that florists 
err in not making better use of the ave- 
nues for desirable publicity provided in 
the public ne-wspapers. Much of the in- 
formation unwittingly gleaned by these 
journals i.s- undesirable and positively in- 
jurious to our interests. As a help to 
progress and popularity we should see 
to it that the floral news which reaches 
our patrons is something better than the 
immense profits in floriculture and the 
exorbitant prices of flowers, something 
more edifying than fried chrysanthe- 
mums, weird Mexican plants that will 
make a man forget his way home at night 
and so on. When a wedding occurs, in- 
stead of a half a column or more devoted 
to accordion-pleated crepe de chine, fawn 
colored taffeta, aigrettes, toques, bodices, 
"Chiffon and lingerie 
(Wliatever that may be)," 
and six or eight lines to the floral dec- 
orations, cannot we have the space re- 
versed, thus- helping to make the press a 
"soul-ele\-ating agency" as our friend 
Smith ivould say. and placing our art on 
its proper plane? 

We want the people with us. The re- 
cent christening of a rose at Detroit was 
a broad benefit to the business at large 
and its influence in this direction far 
transcended whatever financial advantage 
might accrue to the introducers from the 
publicity gained. We want the impres- 
-sion to take deep root among the con.- 
mon people that one of the first requisites 
to a happy life is a home with a garden 
and an abundance of flowers everywhere, 
on all occasions, that no incident of life 
is quite complete without the presence of 
these things in one form or another, that 
there is nothing more worthy of a place 
in the heart and home than the flowers 
and no more honored occupation among 
the industries of a community than that 
of the florist. 



1904. 



The American Florist. 



89 



And here your essayist meets the fate 
of the Scotch minister, who, on reaching 
the last page of his sermon, said, "But 
I will not enlarge," and an old woman 
in the gallery cried out, 

"Ye canna, ye caraia, for yer paper's 
give oot!" 



THE RETAIL TRADE 



Georgia Coat of Arms. 

The arch of this design was made of 
white carnations and Roman hyacinths. 
The cross piece was of pink and white 
carnations, Easter lilies and Roman 
hyacinths. The three columns were 
made oi pink carnations and Roman 
hyacinths. The lettering was all done 
on tulle, "Constitution" on the top, 
"Moderation" on the right post, "Jus- 
tice" in the center and "Wisdom" on the 
left post. The center of the base was 
solid in Paper White narcissi with Brides- 
maid roses, Easter lilies and asparagus in 
each bank on the right and left ends of 
the base. The whole piece was trimmed 
with maidenhair ferns. The design was 
eight feet high and was sent by the gov- 
ernor of Alabama and other state house 
officials to the funeral of Gen. John B. 
Gordon. It was made by the C. A. Dahl 
Company of Atlanta. 



Flowers at Wliitney Funeral. 

In writing my article for the week I 
think of nothing more appropriate than 
the magnificent tributes sent to the 
funeral of William C. Whitney. Such a 
wealth of floral pieces is seldom seen. 
Nothing but the choicest of everthing 
was used. One standing wreath con- 
sisted of Phalaenopsis amabilis and 
Cattleya Schilleriana with a base of lily 
of the valley. Another immense wreath 
five feet across was formed entirely of 
lilv of the valley and superb cattleyas. 
There were several other large pieces, all 
over six feet in height, including wreaths, 
anchors and a cross made entirely of 
bronze galax and violets tied with broad 
sashes of light purple ribbon inscribed 
with the names of the several jockey clubs 
that sent them, blue and brown being 
the racing colors of Mr. Whitney. A 
wreath entirely of Gardenia Florida was 
a marvel. The casket cover was cattleyas 
and lily of valley. There were several 
other pieces well worth a description, 
and it was difficult to say which was the 
handsomest. The work represented all 
the leading florists of the city. 

I saw an extremely handsome presenta- 
tion basket last week made with Ameri- 
can Beauty roses and Easter lilies. The 
basket, about thirty inches across, was 
of green wicker work with a high square 
handle. The roses and lilies were arranged 
on either side, low in the center and rising 
gradually to the top of the handle. The 
ribbon used was a pale green watered 
silk and blended beautifully with both 
flowers. The table decorations at the 
same function were quite simple. Azalea 
VervKneana were cut down and arranged 
loosely in large silver urns. No other 
flowers or green were seen on the table. 
The effect was severe but thoroughly in 
keeping with the surroundings. 

A mirror decoration in the same house 
was rather odd. A semicircular bed of 
tulips, hyacinths and jonquils was 
planted on the floor in front of the 
mirror, giving the effect of a large round 
bed. Asparagus plumosus formed an 
arch over the top of the mirror. 

The Artist. 




GEORGIA COAT OF ARMS IN FLOWERS. 
(By C. A. Dalil Company, Atlanta.) 



Clilcas:o. 

At last a tiny break in the clouds which 
have kept the local trade conditions in 
gloom for several weeks. It is a relief to 
report that business is improving, both 
with the wholesalers and city retailers. 
From a shipper's view, the last week was 
all that could be asked for, and prosper- 
ity in that department is pretty general 
among the wholesalers of this city. 
Everything in roses remains short and 
shippers have been kept at their wits' 
end to meet' the call of their customers. 
Good American Beauty roses are very 
shy, as are Liberty, Meteor and all reds. 
Carnation receipts about keep apace 
with the demand. Carnation buyers are 
now in great glee, as the best of stock 
can be bought for poor quality prices. 
Tulips are now coming in at their best. 
All lilies are showing good ■form and 
quite a brisk demand for them is notice- 
able. Bulbous stock is generally slow 
sale, except dafiodils, which have been 
kept well cleaned up at an average of 
$4 per 100. The fern business has not 
been active for some time. Smilax is sell- 
ing well and at good prices. 

Preparations for the next club exhibi- 
tion at Handel hall, Wednesday, Feb- 
ruary 17, are progressing with vigor and 
dispatch. The public will be admitted 
by card from 2 to 4 p. m. As previously 
announced the banquet will be dispensed 
with, as many members wish the exhibi- 
tion held open during the evening. The 
annual banquet will be held at some 
future date, probably in connection with 
one of the exhibitions. 

A large delegation from this city is 
expected to attend the Detroit carnation 
show March 2-3. P. J. Hauswirth, who 
was appointed by the club some time 
ago to attend to the matter of transpor- 



tation, reports that he has secured a rate 
of one and one third fare for the round 
trip via the Wabash. The party will 
leave Chicago on Tuesday afternoon, 
March 1, at 3 o'clock. 

Frank Garland has leased a room on 
the second floor of the Atlas block and 
will move from his present quarters May 
1. Michael Wiuandy will also have floor 
space in the room. A large drug house 
has leased the basement nowoccupied by 
Mr. Garland. 

The Florists' and Gardeners' Union is 
making an effort to secure union wage 
rates for the gardeners in the West Side 
parks. Theysent acommittee to a recent 
meeting of the West Park board to make 
application for the same. 

Frank Lockyear, formerly with Frank 
Garland, met with an accident Friday, 
February 5. He slipped and fell from an 
icy step at his home and was badly 
bruised, necessitating confinement to his 
home for some time. 

The next and last sectional meeting of 
the Florists' Club will be held Saturday 
evening, February 13, at Drexel's cafe, 
corner of Cottage Grove avenue and 
Thirty-ninth street. A large attendance 
is looked for. 

A bursted water pipe caused a minia- 
ture flood in the basement wholesala 
store of J. B. Deamud on February 6. 
Fortunately no damage was done 
beyond temporarily inconveniencing the 
boys. 

Henry Hansen and Miss Mary Smith, 
of Rogers Park, were married Wednes- 
day, February 10. The groom is a son 
of H. C. Hansen, of the Growers' Mar- 
ket. 

Bride and Bridesmaid roses are seen in 
fine form at F. Benthey & Company's, 
and they are kept well cleaned up. ' 



90 



The American Florist. 



Feb. I J, 



Charles M. Dickinson, according to 
Asphaltum.has been appointed secretary 
of the National Oil Reigning and Manu- 
facturing Company of California. 

Manager Hartshorne, of the Chicago 
Carnation Company, has been at St. 
Louis this week with a fine display of his 
specialties. 

A. H. Budlong has assumed the man- 
agement of J. A. Budlong's downtown 
wholesale store. 

A. C. Kohlbrandt, of E. C. Amling's, 
has been ill for several days, but is rapidly 
convalescing. 

The E. F. Winterson Company is hand- 
ling choice smilax and a good demand is 
reported. 

J. D. Thompson was at St. Louis this 
week with good vases of his leaders. 

Sinner Brothers are offering exceptional 
good daffodil stock. 

Visitors this week were W. Hagemann, 
of New York, and Mr. Hill, of Grand 
Rapids, Mich. 

New York. 

The meeting of the Florists' Club Mon- 
day evening, February 8, was a record 
breaker. It was remarkable for the 
attendance, which amounted to 225, 
including a fair representation of the fair 
sex; for the exhibition of carnations, 
which was of extraordinary extent and 
merit, and for the number of distinguished 
visitors from distant points, among them 
being Robert Craig, Philadelphia; J. E. 
Haines, Bethlehem, Pa.; P. Welch, Bos- 
ton; M. A. Patten and L. E. Small, 
Tewkesbury, Mass.; Peter Fisher, Ellis, 
Mass., and T. J. Johnston and wife. 
Providence, R. I. The exhibition was 
superb, the number of blooms shown in 
each vase contributing to produce an 
effect of exuberant brilliancy. The 
capacity of the hall was taxed to the 
utmost with the large number of exhibits 
and the throng of visitors. With a room 
twice as large the effect of the exhibits 
would have been even better. There 
being no incitement to competition in 
the way of prizes, the committee entered 
into the spirit of the occasion and in its 
report mentioned only the general excel- 
lence of the exhibits and recorded the 
name of each contributor and his exhibit 
without individual comment except as 
regarded a vase of white carnations from 
Dailledouze Brothers, which was singled 
out as so remarkable as to be worthy of 
this especial honor. The blooms in ques- 
tion were of a seedling known as No. 144 
C, and in size, form and other important 
characteristics were simply marvelous 
and unapproached by anything in the 
carnation line hitherto. The other exhib- 
itors and their displays were as follows: 

Robert Cniig & Son— Vesper, white and deeply 
fringed, and Adonis. 

Wm. Didden— Helen Reid, rosy pink. 

L. E. Marquisee— Albatross, white, and Fla- 
mingo, scarlet. 

H. Li, Patthey— Pink seedlings, including Suc- 
cessor and Gov, Odell. 

J. E. Kraver-Yorkston, blush sport from Lawson. 

J. E. Haines— Star of Bethlehem, self yellow; 
Juno, scarlet; .J. E. Haines, scarlet; Imperial, 
pink and rose striped and Xo. 77 rosy pink. 

J. Reimels— Gomez, Lawson, Striped Lawson 
and seedling No. 21, white and carmine striped. 

Cottage Gardens — Alpin« Glow, Enchantress, 
Prosperity, White Roosevelt, Octoroon, maroon 
crimson; The President, crimson: Ethel Ward, 
rose pink; Sensation, blush with deep pink cen- 
ter; ,Iudge Hinsdale, striped; Macinac, white; 
Mrs. J. A. Thayer, light pink, and a vase of hand- 
some unnamed seedlings, 

E. Witterstaetter— The Cardinal, scarlet; L, E. 
Small, white seedling No. 3. 

Peter Fisher — Nelson Fisher and Mrs, M, A*, 
Patten. 

A, .T. Tharp— Crane. 

M. A. Patten— Mrs. M. A. Patten. 

Baur & Smith— Indianapolis, pink, 

.J. D, Thompson Carnation Company — Enchant- 
ress Mrs, Patten and several seedlings, but all 
badly injured in traveling. 



F, R. Pierson Company — Enchantress, White 
Lawson, Adonis and Daheim, maroon rrimson. 

Jerome Suydam— Amaze, scarlet; white seed- 
ling and several mixed seedlings. 

,1. N. May— The Bride, wliite. 

Among the promiscuous exhibits were 
an improved freesia from J. A Shellem, 
three varieties of freesia from Rudolph 
Fischer, Adiantum Farleyense from A, N. 
Pierson, Nephrolepis Scottii from John 
Scott and a movable expansion plant 
support from H. L. Patthey. 

The usual routine business of the club 
having been gone through with, Peter 
Fisher of Ellis, Mass., was introduced by 
President Traendly and after an enthusi- 
astic reception proceeded to read the 
admirable paper on the stem-rot prob- 
lems which appears io this issue. Mr. 
Fisher added in the discussion which fol- 
lowed that, on account of the danger 
from red spider, he did not believe in 
giving side ventilation to carnation 
houses on hot, dry summer days, but 
that he found it very beneficial on cool 
moist days and towards evening. 

Robert Craig, who was called upon for 
remarks, followed with one of the most 
eloquent tributes to beauty as seen 
throughout all phases of nature which 
he asserted never comes in more bewitch- 
ing and attractive shape than when it 
assumes the grace and form of the carna- 
tion. He enthusiastically applauded the 
enterprise of the New York Florists' Club 
and the social aspects of occasions such 
as the present. 

C. W. Ward spoke in approval of all 
Mr. Fisher had said in his address. He 
said that the worst outbreak of stem rot 
he ever had had followed just such condi- 
tions as Mr. Fishier had outlined. His 
experience had been uniformly in favor of 
the plan of growing carnations under 
glass and against field planting, the 
earliest planted carnations from the field 
giving unvaryingly the best results and 
the latest planted being always the most 
satisfactory. As to side ventilation he 
did not agree with Mr. Fisher, it being 
his custom to give it freely under all con- 
ditions, closing up only when a gale pre- 
vailed. 

M. A. Patten, in response to a call, 
said he had come only to see Mr. Fisher 
arrive in good shape, and that being 
accomplished he felt he had done his duty 
without making a speech. P. Welch 
refused to budge from his seat under any 
urging and Harry May responded briefly 
to a call. P. O'Mara, always witty, 
entertaining and eloquent, made the 
closing speech and under the incentive of 
the great exhibition and the presence of 
the ladies fairly outdid himself as he 
skipped from grave to gay, from quota- 
tion to simile, interspersing an anecdote 
by way of punctuation, here and there. 

After a vote of thanks to Mr. Fisher 
and the exhibitors, refreshments were 
served and an entertainment of vocal 
music and magic by three clever perform- 
ers followed. An invitat ion was received 
from the New York Horticultural Society 
to attend their meeting on Wednes- 
day evening. The awards committee 
appointed last month to visit Mr. Ward's 
place reported the award of a certificate 
of merit to his phenomenal scarlet seed- 
ling. No. 303. 

Market conditions are practically 
unchanged, violets selling a trifle better 
and American Beauty roses being stiff- 
ened in price ovring to light supply. The 
American Institute held its annual meet- 
ing last Wednesday. A collation was 
decided upon as an adjunct to attract a 
better attendance than has been custom- 
ary, with the result that sixty members 
showed up. 



S. R. Wiley, said to be a florist at 952 
Madison avenue, was arrested one day 
last week charged with having threat- 
ened to shoot a woman who had declined 
to marry him. 

Mrs. F. R. Pierson, of Tarrytown, is 
very ill with measles contracted from a 
little nephew who had the disease at her 
home. 

The wreath of violets sent by Thomas 
C. Piatt to the funeral of the late Wm. C. 
Whitney was made up by August Mil- 
lang. 

Peter Rehm, who was formerly with 
Wm. H. Siebrecht, has taken a position 
with F. W. Massmann, of East Orange, 
N.J. 

W. F. Sheridan confided to a few of his 
friends that Monday, February 8, was 
his birthday, with the usual result. 

W. H. Gunther celebrated the fifteenth 
anniversary of his marriage on Saturday, 
February 6. 

The directors of the Cut Flower 
Exchange held their regular meeting on 
February 6. 

J. Bowne Hyatt, of Winfield, L. I., is 
expected home from St. Luke's hospital 
shortly. 

Ben Dorrance, president of the Rose 
Society, has gone south. 

Frost is two feet deep in the city 
streets. 

Will Saltford, of Twenty-ninth street, 
is ill. 

Visitor: Johs Tetkamp, Holland. 



Philadelphia. 



It seems hard to realize that Lent will 
commence with next Wednesday, as there 
is generally a rush of work that precedes 
and foretells that the end of the social 
season is near. Since there has been no 
such warning, all hands are hoping that 
this season will be an exception, and that 
this period of rest will be brightened and 
enlivened by quantities of flowers. The 
stock of flowers now coming in is not 
any too plentiful, with the exception pos- 
sibly of violets and carnations. Lawson, 
Prosperity, Lord and Vesper, and several 
other varieties are to be seen in quantity 
and of very fine quality. It would be a 
shame to see these fine sorts on the 
streets, but no doubt when the full crops 
come in this will be their fate. Already 
fine mignonette is seen on the corners 
offered at twenty-five cents per dozen. 
It has been very fine this season, but it 
has hung fire, and as anything that 
accumulates has to be moved, the fakirs 
soon get a whack at it. Daffodils are 
piling up and $3 per 100 is now the 
price. Roses seem to move very well and 
are nearly all cleaned up every day. 
Beauties are most scarce; none but the 
specials appear to be worth much, and 
Liberty takes the place of all the lower 
grades. This latter is certainly a grand 
variety, as the flowers all come so uni- 
formly good. 

Robert Craig reports having spent a 
most delightful evening at the New Y'ork 
Florists' Club's carnation show. The 
new carnation of Dailledouze Brothers, 
which he says measured five and one-half 
inches in diameter, was a record breaker, 
and looked almost equal to a chrysan- 
themum. I wonder if the club did not 
borrow some of Commodore Westcott's 
bunch and pass it around with a liberal 
hand. 

The trade was startled to hear of the 
death of Clarence A. Dunn last Saturday 
night. He had been sick but a week and 
scarcely anyone knew of his illness until 
his death was announced. He was taken 
with grip which in a few days turned 



Tgo4. 



The American Florist. 



91 



into pneumonia. He leaves a wife and 
four children who have the sympathy of 
the entire trade in their bereavement. 
The business will be carried on as before. 

Harris' lilac is coming in fine shape, a 
whole house being devoted to it. All the 
stock forced is fine and large, and so far 
has flowered abundantly. He says he 
has found a good market and a steady 
demand for all he has cut. Prices range 
from $1 to $2 per dozen sprays. 

H. H. Bayersdorfer fell on the ice at his 
home and dislocated or broke one of the 
bones in his shoulder. While it will keep 
him home for a while, the injury is not 
serious. 

R. Scott & Son are now cutting gar- 
denias in quantity. Their best flower 
readily brings $5 per dozen. S. S. Pen- 
nock handles the bulk of the stock. 

Leo Niessen is headcjuarters for pan- 
sies, which are popular for St. Valentine's 
day. His stock of Liberty and special 
Bridesmaid roses is also fine. 

Pennock Brothers have an elaborate 
window decoration of floral valentines. 
Charles Fox also had quite a display of 
pretty conceits in this line. 

Eddie Fancourt has recovered from the 
operation for appendicitis but will be 
confined to the hospital for three weeks. 

S. S. Pennock has handled large quanti- 
ties of fancy orchids the past winter, and 
finds an increasing demand. K. 



Boston. 

Business in the wholesale markets is 
rather brisk at present, indicating a dis- 
position on the part of the festive element 
in society to wind up the season in a 
jubilant spirit, and also suggesting to 
the initiated the fact that certain lines of 
standard flowers are blooming sparsely 
about this time. The activity is well 
confined to a few specialties, roses being 
the most afiected, and of these American 
Beauty heading the line. Colored carna- 
tions are in full abundance for all 
demands, but white ones are none too 
plentiful. Violets have still to contend 
with the adverse conditions of the preva- 
lent zero weather of this frigid winter, 
and bulb stock of all kinds, in evident 
sympathy with the utter banishment of 
all springlike tendencies, is badly stag- 
nated and without a standard of value. 

George A. Sutherland has installed a 
wire design factory, with full equipment 
for order work, in connection with his 
business at 34 Hawley street. J. Jansky, 
hitherto located at the flower market, 
will be in charge of this department. 

A. Leuthy, of Roslindale, and D. Lums- 
den, of Jamaica Plain, have gone into 
partnership and will continue the palm 
ijusiness conducted hitherto by Mr. Leu- 
thy. 

Visitor: Paul Berkowitz, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

St. Louis. 

Trade conditions in St. Louis show but 
little change. Roses are still scarce, 
excepting red, which are abundant. 
Prices on Bride and Bridesmaid have 
taken an upward jump, the best being 
quoted at $10. The demand for Golden 
Gate has slightly increased, prices now 
being $3 to $8. Ferns have shown a 
tendency to depreciate. Violets are 
everywhere and prices range accordingly. 
Occasionally the fancy grades call for 50 
cents. Roman hyacinths are not as 
plentiful as last week, the result being a 
slight advance in prices for Al stock. 
There is little demand for Paper White 
narcissi. Too many are already on the 
market. The same may be said of lily of 



the valley, the best grades of which sell 
for $4. Carnations are steady. 

Otto Koenig says he "hasn't been 
snowed under yet." This might be taken 
as an indication that business is prosper- 
ous up his way. Mr. and Mrs. G. E. 
McClure returned home Wednesday 
morning from an eight days' honeymoon 
visit to Manhattan, Kan. 

H. F. Aue is cutting some fine smilax 
at his place in Lindenwood. The sweet 
peas are also of good quality. The 
variety Christmas is extensively grown. 
Mr. Aue has about 8,300 feet of glass 
devoted exclusively to the wholesale 
trade. 

G. J. Kessler, of the landscape depart- 
ment at the World's Fair, has submitted 
plans to the city park commissioner, Mr. 
Aull, for improving the courthouse 
grounds. The amount appropriated for 
improvements was $2,000. 

Geo. Wagner, who secured possession 
of E. Michel's establishment on Maryland 
avenue last fall, has had a very success- 
ful season. He says his trade is good in 
cut flowers and "lots of funeral work." 

Dr. Halsted, of Belleville, was in the 
city Tuesday. F. K. B. 



Worcester, Mass. 



The large watertowerof the Worcester 
conservatories was bloom down Feb- 
ruary 8, and besides wrecking the tower 
nearly one hundred lights of glass in 
houses No. 4 and 5 were broken. This 
tower had not been in use this winter, so 
they were not inconvenienced as to water 
supply. There is nothing specially new 
in trade circles; trade remains steady, 
with a good supply of fine flowers. 

Mr. Joy, of Nashville, Tenn., is making 
a tour of the east and while here visited 
the larger places in town. A. H. L. 



OBITUARY. 



Joseph Maglll. 

Joseph Magill, treasurer of the A. T. De 
La Mare Printing and Publishing Com- 
pany, Ltd., since its organization in 
1891, died Friday, February 5, at his 
home in New York. The funeral services 
were held at the Second United Presby- 
terian church, Jersey City Heights, on 
Sunday, February 7. 

Charles M. Thornton. 

Charles M. Thornton, senior member 
of the firm of Thornton Brothers, died 
February 1, from heart failure, a trouble 
from which he had long suffered. Mr. 
Thornton was the son of Geo. J. Thorn- 
ton who was for many years gardener 
for Wm. Sutton in North Andover. In 
1876 in company with his two brothers 
he established the firm of Thornton Broth- 
ers, which has since that time done a 
large and profitable business as florists 
and art dealers. His age was 52 years. 

Clarence A. Dunn. 

Clarence A. Dunn died Tuesday, Feb- 
ruary 9, at Philadelphia, Pa., of pneu- 
monia, aged 43 years. He was sick but 
a week and the news of his death was a 
great shock to his many friends. Mr. 
Dunn started in the business at Robert 
Craig's. After a few years he engaged in 
business as a grower at Norristown. He 
afterward moved to Philadelphia and 
opened a retail establishment. Later he 



took up the commission business with 
Leo Niessen, going from there to Horace 
Dumont. Last fall he commenced the 
commission business on his own account. 
He later added florists' supplies. He 
leaves a wife and four children. K. 



Ell B. Lewis. 

Eli B. Lewis died at his home on Locust 
street, Lockport, N. Y., January 21. He 
was born at Boose Hill, Conn., in 1819. 
He removed from there to Holland, N. Y., 
in 1841. From there he went to Albion, 
Mich., where he married in 1846, return- 
ing to Holland, N. Y., in 1848. Here he 
engaged in gardening. In 1862 he moved 
to Lockport, where he continued garden- 
ing and embarked in flower growing, 
which lines he carried on very successfully 
for many years. He propagated about 
all of the once famous Niagara grapes 
and at the time of his death was propa- 
gating a new grape for Stark Brothers, 
which was unnamed. The grape and 
fruit business will be continued by Fred 
B. Lewis; his son, and the greenhouses 
by Fred. G. Lewis, agrandson. He leaves 
a wife and two sons, Frank B. and Fred 
B. Lewis, also three daughters, Mrs. 
Clement, of Lockport, Mrs. Lamont 
Brace, of Bufi'alo, and Mrs. R. B. Oliver, 
of Lockport. Mr. Lewis was known all 
over the country among nurserymen and 
w-as one of the wealthiest of Lockport' s 
citizens. His residence and grounds on 
Locust street were among the most 
attractive in the city. While he was not 
a member of the Bufi'alo Florists' Club 
his sons and grandson were very active 
members, and Mr. Lewis himself was 
always a great reader of everything per- 
taining to the nursery and floriculture, 
and an authority on grapes and small 
fruits. 



Philip Gauges. 

Philip Gauges, for the past twenty-two 
years an employe of the United States 
Botanical Gardens, Washington, D. C., 
died at his home in that city on Monday, 
February 1. He had suffered from a 
muscular trouble for nearly a year but 
the end came with an attack of pneu- 
monia. Mr.Gauges was bornin Baltimore 
forty-eight years ago. At the age of 
thirteen he entered the employ of Robert 
J. Halliday, the well known Baltimore 
florist, remaining there until 1882, when 
he secured a position in the botanical gar- 
dens at Washington. In the same year 
he married Miss Annie Frederick, of Bal- 
timore, who died a few years later. In 
1890 he married Miss Mary E. Yockel, 
also of Baltimore, who with five children 
survives him. His other living relatives 
are his mother, a sister and three broth- 
ers. One brother, Jos. A., is an employe 
of the bureau of plant industry of the 
agricultural department. During his 
long service at the botanical gardens he 
had met many men of national fame, his 
kind and obliging disposition winning 
him friends among them. He attended 
many of the conventions of commercial 
florists in other cities and had a large 
acquaintance among the growers and 
dealers of the country, and a host of 
friends connected with the government 
horticultural bureaus and the commer- 
cial trade of Washington. His funeral 
was held at St. Mary's Catholic church, 
Washington, on Wednesday, February 3, 
the pall bearers being Assistant Superin- 
tendent Reynolds, Magnus Swenson, 
Michael McCarthy and Alex Weir, all of 
the botanical gardens. 



92 



The American Florist. 



Feb. /J, 



IfLlilli /Al!lfil!@/AI» |FtL@iS0@7 

NlNETBEHTH YKAB. 

Subscription, Jl.OO a year. To Europe, 12.00. 

Subscriptions accepted only from those 

in the trade. 

Advertisements, on all except cover pages, 

10 Cents a Line, Agate; $1.00 per inch. 

Cash with Order. 

No Special Position Guaranteed. 

Discounts are allowed only on consecutive inser- 

tion«, as follows— 6 times, 5 per cent; 13 times, 

10 per cent; 26 times, 20 per cent; 

52 times, 30 per cent. 

Space on front pages and back cover page sold 

only on yearly contract at Sl.OO per inch, net. 

The Advertising Department of the American 

Florist is for florists, seedsmen and nurserymen 

and dealers in wares pertaining to those lines only. 

Orders lor less than one-hall inch space notaccepted. 

Advertisements must reach us by Wednesday to 

secure insertion in the issue for the following 

Saturday. Address 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO., Chloaao. 

It Pays. 

The generous and enthusiastic support 
given by the carnation growers to the 
local exhibition given by the New York 
Florists' Club last Monday evening was 
very much to the credit of the devotees 
of the divine flower. Gentlemen vyho 
will unhesitatingly respond to an invita- 
tion to contribute to an informal affair 
ol this kind, sacrificing material that 
might be sold readily in the market for a 
■ stibstantial cash value, are entitled to 
the gratitude and respect of all and if 
their liberality brings them business it is 
no more than they are well entitled to. 
But this characteristic has at all times 
been prominent among the carnation 
brethren and those who have done it the 
most unselfishly stand, as they should, in 
the first rank as successful carnationists, 
commercially. A little of the same public 
spirit and enterprise on the part of grow- 
ers in othw special lines would not come 
amiss to their interests either collectively 
or individually. 

Auction Bulb Sales in London. 

Regarding sales at auction January 20, 
1904, of Japan lily bulbs and American 
grown tuberose bulbs, A. Hemsley writes 
in the Gardeners' Chronicle as follows: 
"On January 20 there was a very large 
consignment of the above sold at Messrs. 
Protheroe & Morris' auction rooms. 
There have been several sales previously, 
but they continue to attract large num- 
bers of buyers. Among the buyers on the 
above date were several from long dis- 
tances. Some of the bulbs offered were 
the largest I and others have seen. In 
the catalogue they were aptly described 
as 'mammoth bulbs.' No exceptionally 
high prices were made, unless it was for 
L. speciosum album; for bulbs of this 
there was lively competition, the largest 
being particularly in demand. In all 
other varieties it was the largest bulbs 
that attracted most attention. The 
medium-sized bulbs were bought in large 
quantities by market growers. Judging 
from these sales, it would appear that 
though the trade may be dull just now, 
growers anticipate a better time later on. 

"American Pearl tuberoses were sold in 
large quantities. In all there were 
upwards of 200,000 sold. These brought 
about 26 shillings per 1,000. Palm seeds 
sold well, especially Cocos Weddelliana 
and Kentia Belmoreana, but Kentia 
Forsteriana did not make quite such 
high prices, although the samples were 
very good. Lily of the valley 'Fortin's 
Giant' sold well at about double the 
prices made by the ordinary Berlin 
crowns." 



SITUATIONS, WANTS, fOR SALE. 

One Cent Per Word. 
Cash with the Adv. 

Plant Advs. NOT admitted under this head. 

Every paid subscriber to the American Florist 
for the year 1903 is entitled to a five-line wamt 
ADV. (situations only) free, to be used at any 
time during the year. 

Slluallon Wanted— By Kood all-around grower 
age 36, single. F I, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By florist and gardener on 
private place. Age 29. Address 

14, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— Hy young man as rose 
grower. 6 years' experience. Address 

Z Y, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted -Private place by first-class 
man, 30 years" experience; 10 years in last place. 
Hox 20, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By florist and gardener on 
private place: age 36, single; 21 years' experience. 
Address I F, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— liy practical florist, grower 
of roses, carnations, 'mums and general stock; 9 
years experience. Address 

R B, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By all-around florist, life 
experience, carnations, roses and general stock, 
on a retail place. Address 

Percy Rogers, St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

Situation Wanted— As foreman. Carnations, 
roses and i^eneral stock. Single, age 27. Refer- 
ences. Life experience. Address 

George, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— As foreman of section by a 
single German. Life experience in cut flowers 
and pot plants. Address 

G. KiEFNER, 73 VV. Madison St., Chicago. 

Situation Wanted— By young man as assistant 
in private place. Understands carnations, roses, 
violets, etc. Sober and industrious; good refer- 
ences. H D, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By a young man in store or 
greenhouse as assistant; four years' experience in 
large cities. Near New York or Philadelphia 
preferred. N B, 38 Westminster St., 

Bellows Falls, \'t. 

Situation Wanted— By an experienced man to 
take charge of smail place oratore. Good designer 
and decorator. Married. Best of references. 
Address with full particulars, 

H T, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By gardener who under- 
stands growing vegetables out and inside flowers, 
fruit trees, shrubs and bushes. Temperate, wil- 
ling to work. 15 years' experience. Single (30.) 
.1 Z, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By experienced gardener 
and florist up-to-date, on private place; wants to 
change present position for other;age 38; married, 
no children; best references. Address 

A M, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— As gardener on private 
place; well experienced in growing flowers and 
vegetables, care of shrubs, etc., also competent to 
run greenhouse. Address 

B, Box 96. Highland Park, 111. 

Situation Wanted— By first-class rose and car- 
nation grower. Al rererences. Age 38, single. 
Liberal wages expected. Capable of taking 
charge. Full particulars in first letter please. 
Grower. .^4 S. Sheldon St. Chicago. 

Situation Wanted— By an experienced gardener 
of un(iuestionable ability. Well qualified to take 
charge of an up-to-date gentleman's country 
estate. Address 

P. B. R. Box 486, Highland Park, 111. 

Situation Wanted— By a sober industrious man. 

married, has had 15 years' experience in pot and 

floral culture, capable of taking charge of a small 

place where practical work is practiced. Address 

H. W. Hill, 635 Spring St., Decatur. 111. 

Situation Wanted— As vegetable gardener on 
private placf, German, age 3D, single; 2) years' 
experience in hot-houses and outside in the mid- 
dle states. Salary with or without board and 
room. Wm. A. Tietz. Hollywood, Cal. 

Situation Wanted— Carnation expert wants 
position on commercial place. 30 years' experi- 
ence in general greenhouse work. Best of refer- 
ences given. Give full particulars when you 
write. Expert, care American, Florist. 



Situation Wanted— As foreman by a first-class 
grower of rjit riowf^rs and bi-dding plants Roses 
a spetualt^'. Capabl(^ to do design work and 
malcing dtcoralions. Age 35, single with 2fl years' 
experience. F W, Garden t^ity Hotel, 

46 Sherman Street, Chicago. 

Situation Wanted— By young single man. 35 
years of age as assistant in coniraercial place, 
where roses, carnations, 'mums and pot plants 
are grown. 6 years' experience. Sober and indus- 
trious. Can give reference. Address 

S S, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By a thorough practical 
grower. 20 years' experience in growing roses, 
aarnations, 'mums, ferns, palms and general 
greenhouse stock. Can furnish Al references. 
Would accept private place. Address 

E W. care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By competent gardener to 
take charge of gentleman's place. 18 years' 
experience and thoroughly understands the care 
private grounds, greenhouses, also forciog of 
grapes and peaches. First-class references. 

L B, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By first-class rose grower 
and florist, capable of taking charge of place or 
section; good propagator and grafter; 15 years' 
experience with good reference; age 30, married. 
Please state wages. Address 

R J P, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— As bead gardener on pri- 
vate place, understanding greenhouse work, 
vegetables, raising trees, shrubs and general 
landscaping. 29 years old. Married. Life 
experience. Address 

A 714, Law Building, Indianapolis, Ind, 

Situation Wanted— By expert grower of pot 
plants, stove or temperate house, including 
orchids. Well posted in forcing, grafting and 
propagating; 20years' experience; German, mar- 
ried; as foreman or manager on an up-to-date 
place. State wages and full particuhirs. 

E R, American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By a sober and competent 
man; 36 years of age, 20 years' experience in 
general stock plant growing and landscape gar- 
dening. Have diploma. Am able to take full 
charge of private or commercial place. Best of 
references. Want steady position. 

E L, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— As foreman by March 1st, 
of S-^.UIU to 75.W0 feetof glass, in or within 25 to 
50 miles from Chicago. Have a thorough experi- 
ence in retail and wholesale trade. I am young, 
37 years of age, but energetic and willing and can 
furnish flrst-class references. 

Box 15, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— As foreman in flrst-class 
establishment. Advertiser is at present holding 
a responsible position, but is desirous of making 
a change. Thoroughly versed in all modern 
methods of culture. Of" good habits and address; 
married: the West preferred. Address stating 
full particulars, X. care American Florist. 

Help Wanted— A good store man. Address 
X Y Z, care American Florist. 

Help Wanted— Good rose grower, capable of 
taking charge of new range of rose houses. 

.Tame's Eadie. 297 Erie St., Cleveland, O. 

Help Wanted— Florist as assistant. Must know 
the growing of carnations and bedding plants. 
Slate wages. F B, care American Florist. 

Help Wanted— A foreman who understands 
handling help. Must be all-around florist and 
married. Sta'e wages. Address 

C. H. Fret, 1133 O St., Lincoln, Neb. 

Help Wanted— A ma a who understands grow- 
ing Beauties irom the cuttings up. Apply 
The Floral Exchange, 
H. Simpson, Supt., Edgely, Bucks Co., Pa. 

Help Wanted — Young man experienced in 
handling palms and ferns in greenhouse, also 
competent to wait on customers. Address 

,H. F. IIalle, 548 W. Madison St., Chicago. 

Help Wanted— Man that can run a truck gar- 
den, can raise strawberries and handle fluwers. 
State wages. FInuse rent free to married man 
F. L. CRAia,263 So. Union St., Battle Creek. Mich. 

Help Wanted— A carnation grower. Must be 
single and well up in his business. State wages 
with l^oard and room and give full particulars. 

N. ZwEiFEL. R. R. 10, North Milwaukee, Wis. 

Help Wanted— Single man with some experi- 
ence, for general greenhouse work. References 
required. State wages expected with board and 

room. ESTHERVILLK GREENHOrSES, 

Kstherviile, Is. 



igo4. 



The a mer i ca n Fl orist. 



93 



Help Wanled— A srood man who understands 
growing of roses, carnations, 'mums and general 
stock. Single German preferred. Address with 
reference: state wages per month with board. 
KKi>ni Brus., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Halp Wanted— Foreman or man capable of 
taking cliarjze of 15,t00 feet of glass, if necessary. 
Must understand growing carnations and roses. 
For further particulars Address 

IIiLL f'LORAL Co., Strccter, 111. 

Halp Wanted— An experienced violet grower. 
Thoroughly capablo and well recommended to 
take care <^f greenhouses for violet culture in 
suburb of Chicago. State experience, age and 
salary wanted. Address 

B D. care An-crican Florist. 

Help Wanted— First-class working foreraau 
gardener on private place in Kentucky. Must 
thoroughly understand care of lawns, shrubbery, 
and the raising of fruits. Ilowers and vegetables. 
Address, giving experience and stating wages 
expected. F VV A, care American Florist. 

Help Wanted— ^onng man for general green- 
house work. Small place of about lOOOO feet, 
where carnations are leading specialty. One who 
could take charge in absence of employer. Nice 
town and good place. Must have references 
State wages expected and esperieDce. Single or 
married. Tbos. M. Fitzgerald, 

Hea\ er, Beaver Co., Penn. 

Help Wanted— A competent plantsman for 
landscape work. Must have a general knowledge 
of nursery work, outdoor rose culture, be a good 

f)ropagatnr, and be able to execute and maintain 
arge plantings or native and ornamental stock. 
Give full particulars as to past experience, refer- 
ences and salary.expected. Address 

Competent, care American Florist. 

Wanted— At once, new or second-hand refrig- 
erator, trlass front, dimensions about 3x5x8 feet. 
Give particulars and photograph of same in fi'st 
letter. Address Bauii Floral Co., Erie, l*a. 

Wanted— To lease with option of buvin? a place 
of from 15,000 to3ti,0C0sq. feet of glass, wholesale 
trade preferred with necessary land, house, barns, 
etc. Must be in good coodition and suitable for 
production of first-class stock. 

M D, care American Florist. 



Wanted — An active young man with busi- 
ness ability and some ca'pital, and experience in 
managing a large cut (lower growing plant, 
wishes to correspond with a grower with view of 
buvin^ interest in place and taking full charge. 
Only a clear, aggressive party in middle western 
states need reply. Address 

Confidential, care American Florist. 

For Sale — At a bargain, 4 greenhouses 20x100 
feet, barn, 7 room dwelling house, 1 acre; 16 miles 
northwest of Chicago. Cause, failing health. 
J D, care American Florist. 

For Sale — Greenhouses; good location for local 
and shipping business in Micnigan. Well stocked. 
Reason for selling, on account of failing health. 
H B. care American Florist 

For Sale— Over 12.000 feet of glass, all heated 
by steam, in first-class condition. Will sell at 
reasonable price. Terms to suit. Address 

Glass, care American Florist. 

For Sale— At a bargain. A nice home located 
5 blocks from postofhce; greenhouses well slocked 
with up-to-date retail stock; business established 
for 23 years; good mail and express business. 

C. n. liAc.LEr, Abiline, Kau. 

For Sale — Greenhouses. Good location for 
local and shipping business. Well stocked; win- 
ter coal laid in. Will sell cheap if sold at once. 
Selling on account of failing health. 

Jas. Richardson. London, O. 

For Sale or Lease— Fiue greenhouse estab- 
lishment of 10,000 feet of elass. ingood condition 
and well stocked, with or without dwelling. Fine 
opening for a single man. Stock reasonable. 

X Y Z, care American Florist. 

For Sale or Lease— Between 30,000 to 40,000 feet 
glass; barn, dwelling house; hot water heating, 
constant water supply, two acres for cultivation 
in Bronx Borunsh. New York city, address 

J. RiNGLBR, 728 3d Ave.. New York. 

For Sale or Rent- Commercial place, 9 green- 
houses. 2(f,0i feet of glHss. shed 3u feet wide con- 
n«*cting houses, heated with steam by return 
tubular boiler: storage capacity for season's sup- 
ply of coal. Three miles from city hall. Address 
Samuel .T. Bunting, Elmwood Ave. 

and o8th St.. Philadelphia, Pa. 



For Sale— Three greenhouses situated in West 
Tenn. About 10,000 square feet glass, well stocked 
with roses, carnations, palms, ferns and bedding 
plants. Heated by two Florence hot water heaters. 
About one and one-quart«*r acres of ground, 300 
feet cold frames which belong to the plant. Every- 
thing in first-class condition. No competition. 
A good bargain. A change of climate necessary 
for family cause of sale. Address 

Mrs. M. Iris Brown. Union Citv.iTenn. 

EXPERT NURSERY MANAGER. 

WANTED— Position as Nurserv Manager by a 
man having thorough practical knowledge of all 
depattments. Best of European and American 
recommendations. Extensive experience currying 
out planting plans, making estimates, etc. ; age 34. 
Address ^ g ^,3,^ ^^^ MacOonald. 

222 A Street S. E.. Washington. D. C. 

Position as foreman or manager in an up-to- 
date establishment; either wholesale, retail or 
mailins. Am up in all branches, catalogue mark- 
ing, building, heating and growing of fine stock. 
2,0J0,000 plants grown the past season. Three 
years in last place. 40 years old and a hustler. 
Northern place preferred. Married, temperate and 
strictly business. Best of reference as to ability 
and business qualities. Address Lone Star, 
611 No. Washington Ave., Dallas, Tex. 

Wanted... 

FOREMAN for large commercial place in 
Chicago; married man. Must be Al rose 
grower and able to take charge of twelve 
growers. Unless ca]>able do not answer. 
Address QUIZ, care American Florist. 

Manager, 

First-class grower, designer and deco- 
rator, very best references, wants first- 
class place, with fiir facilities. Address 
M G D, care American Florist, 



atAtitiiuuiiiAUuiiuauuuuiiUUUAiimAiuimiitiitmiiiiiitiiniiitiiiiititaiiiiitiiitititiHinnuiiiimi uuumtuitu imuii iiiiitn aiiiiine 

FLORISTS' AMERICAN EXCHANGE | 

WILL CONVERT INTO CASH | 

WHAT YOU CANNOT USE TO ADVANTAQE===OTHERS ARE IN NEED OF 

Florists' Real Estate, with or without improvements; Nursery Land, Seed Farms, 
Buildings, Machinery, Store Outfits, with or without merchandise or good will, 
Fuel, Boilers, Fertilizers — anything pertaining to the business of a Florist, Grower 
or Seedsman, which he may cease to have use for. 



IT COSTS IVOTKIIIVG OIV CHA.IVO]© 

TO 

If there is anyone in the United States or Canada who may have use for your property, we 
will find him for you, and collect our commission after sale has been negotiated, j* J- 

WE ARE NOT IN COMPETITION WITH ANY OTHER FIRM IN EXISTENCE. 

In preparing your list of property for us, be sure to have description accurate and honestly made, 
and as far as possible supply photographs. All our sales will be made contingent upon the 
truthfulness of representations made. Our charge is S'/o on Real Estate for amounts under 
$1,000; on all amounts in excess of $I,O0O we charge 2%; on all other property we charge 8%. 
Address all communications to 

C. B. WHITNALL, 

Care Citizens Trust Company. MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



WE INVITE THE CO-OPERATION OF THE WHOLE CRAFT. 



Please mention the American Florist when •'vriting. 



94 



The American Florist. 



F. b. 



'3- 



E. H. Hunf, 



WHOLESALE 



Cut flowers 

"THE OLD RELIABLE." 
76 Wabash Ave CHICAGO. 

Wbol?.5ale flower/\arl^}5 



Milwaukee, Feb. 11. 
Roaes, Beauty, long per doz. 3 00 

med. " 1 50® 2 Ou 
short " .50® l.CO 

" Bride, Bridesmaids 6.00® 8.00 

" Meteor, Golden Gate 6.00® 8.00 

" Perle 6.00® 8.00 

Carnations 2.00® 4.00 

Smilax 15.00 

Asparagus 35.00@50.00 

Violets 50® .75 

Valley 3.00@ 4.00 

Romans 2.00® 3.C0 

Freesias 3.00 

Tulips 3.0U 

Pittsburg Feb. 11. 

Roaes, Beauty, specials 

" extras 

No. 1 

" ordinary 

Bride, Bridesmaid 

Meteor 

Liberties 

Carnations - 

Lily of the valley ■ 

Smilax 

Adiantum 

Asparagus, strings 

Asparagus Sprengeri 

Sweet Peas 

Violets 

Lilies 

Mignonette 

Romans, Paper White 

Tulips 

Lilac 

Pansies and Daisies 

Daffodils 



40.00®60.00 

25.00«! 35.00 

lO.OOWSO.OO 
3.00® 6.00 
3.00@12.00 
8.00@15.00 

I2.00@25.00 
1.50@ 6.00 
3.00® 4.00 

13.50®15.00 
1.00® 1.35 

30.00@50.00 

2.00® 4.00 

.50® 1.00 

.20@ 1.25 

!2.C0®20.00 
3.00® 6.00 
1.00® 3.00 
2.00® 4.00 
1.00® 1.50 
1.00® 1.50 
3.O0® 4.00 



Cincinnati, Feb. 11. 

Rosea, Beauty 2.00® 6.00 

*' Bride, Bridesmaid 

" Liberty 

" Meteor, Golden Gate 

Carnations 

Lily of the valley ,., 

Asparagus 

Smilax 

Adiantum 

Violets 

Narcissus 

Romans 

Harrisii per doz., 2.00 

Calla 

Sweet peas, Blanche Ferry . . . 



4.00®12.00 

4.00®10.00 

4.00<<sll3.00 

3.00® 6.00 

3.00® 4.00 

50.00 

12.50®15.00 

1.00® 1.50 

.75® 1.00 

4.00 

4.00 

12.50@15.00 
1.00 



St. Louis, Feb. 11. 

Roses, Beauty, long stem 3.00@4.00 

" Beauty, medium stem.. . 1,50@2.00 

" Beauty, short stem 50® .75 

" Bride, Bridesmaid 4.00®10.00 

" Golden Gate 3.00® 8.00 

Carnations 1.00® 4.00 

Smilax 12.50@15.00 

Asparagus Sprengeri 1.00® 3.00 

" Plumosua .35.00@75.00 

Ferns per 1000, 2.00@2.50 

Violets, single 30® .50 

Narcissus Paper White 3.00® 3.00 

Valley 2.00@ 4.00 

Romans 2.00® 3.00 




Caldwell's Kwallty Kounts Brand 

CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 



J. B. DEAMLD, 

WHOLESAlf CUT flOWERS 

51 Wabash Ave., OHIOi^OO. 

PRICE LIST. Per Doz 

Beauties, 30 to 36 inch stem M.OO to S 5.00 

20 to 24 inch stem 3.00 

15 to 18 inch stem 1.50 to 2.00 

" 12inohstem 75 to 1.00 

PerlOO 

Liberty and Chatenay 6.0O to 10.00 

Brides and Bridesmaids 6.00 to 10.00 

Meteor and Golden Gates 6.00 to 10.00 

Carnations 2.0O to 4.00 

fancy 3 00 to 5.00 

Valley 3.00 to 4.00 

Violets, double .50 to 1.50 

*' single 50 to .75 

Asparagus Plumosus — per string, 35 to 50c 

Asparagus Sprengeri Sprays 2.00 to 4.00 

Ferns, fancy J3. 00 per 1000 .30 

Smilax 12.50 to 15.00 

Adiantum 1.00 



ROSES, 
CARNATIONS, 
BEAUTIES, 
VALLEY. 



Pittsburg Gut Flower Co., Ltd. 

Wholesale Florists and Supplies. 



504 Liberty St., 



PITTSBURG, PA. 



Ftease mention the A merican Florist when writing. 



FANCY 



OUR SPECIALTY. 

TELEGRAPH ORDERS FILLED 
PROMPTLY. 

THOMPSON CARNATION GO. 

JOLIET. ILL. 



CUT FLOWERS °K.Sfek 

and F^XorlsIrs' Supplies. 

Galax, bronze or green. 75c per lOOO. Leucothoe 
Sprays, 50c per 100. Sphagnum Mos«, Ferns. 

Wir*' Work of all kinds for florists. Special 
attention given to shipping orders. 

U/M Ml ID PHY Commlitlon Dtaler, 

fiiTi. muHriii, i3aE.3dst., Cincinnati, o. 

Telephone, 980 Main. 
Please mention the American Florist when writing. 

C. ^. KUEHN, 

Wholesale Florist, 

1122 Pine St., ST. LOUIS, MO^ 

A Comolsia Lt-^i^ nf uii.g DoslgnH. 



to. WJcKellar, 

Wholesale Commission Florist 

AND DEALER IN 

ALL FLORISTS' SUPPLIES. 

51 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

Long Distance 'Phone Central 3598. 



Correspondence invited from g:rowers of special- 
ties in Cut Flowers. 

Please mention the American Florist when writings 

Brant & Noe Floral Co., 

GROWERS OF 

Gut Flowers at Wholesale. 

Careful attention given shipping orders. 

58-60 Wabash Ave.. CHICAGO. 

H.G.BERNING 

Wholesale riorist 

»402 Pine St., ST. LOUIS, MO. 



HENNICOTT BROS. COMPANY 

WHOLESALE COMMISSION FLORISTS 



AND DEALERS IN ALL 
KINDS OF 



FLORISTS" SUPPLIES, 



A.T OIIIOA.OO Aj:.A.isis:E;ar ic.A.ar£;«s. 



42-44 E. Randolph St., 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



igo4. 



The American Florist. 



95 



EVERY 
ORDER 
CALLS for 



"GREEN GOODS" 

Now-a-days, but we have inexhaostible supplies of 
Asparagus Strings, Asparagus Sprays, Sprengeri and 
Smilax. We can supply the market. All we need on 
the largest orders is time to cut the Stock. 

All Cut Flowers in Season. 

SEND US YOUR ORDERS. 

£• C. SMLING, 

The largest. Best Iquipped and Most Centrally Located 
Wholesale Cut Flower House in Chicago. 

CHICAGO, ILL 



32-34-36 Randolph St., 

Long Distance Telephones 1978 and 19T7 Central. 



American Beauty. per do. 

Lode stemmed $.5 00 

30-incli stem 4.C0 

2)-iuch stem 3.00 

20-inch slera 2.50 

15-ineh stem 3 00 

12-iDi'.h stem 1.50 

Short stem $S.O0 to S8.00 per 100 

Per 100 

Brides and Maids ....SS.Oii to $10.00 

Meteors and Gates 6 ' to 10. 

Liberty 6.00 to 1.5.00 

Carnations 2 (jO 

large and fancv 3.0" to 6.00 

Violets ■IS to 150 

Valley 2.UU to 3. 

Daffodils. Paper Whiles 2.''n to 4.i 

Tulips 2.00 to 5.0J 

Calhis. per doz $1.50 to S2.00 

Hamsii per doz.. $ J. '"0 

Asparasius. per string, 35c; to 50j 

Asparagus Sprengeri — 3 CO to 6.0o 

Ferns per ^0 0. $2.51 .2.5 

(ialax peril 00, 1.00 .I5 

Adiantum l.Dp 

Smilax per doz., %i uO 15- ""o 

Leucolhoe Sprays .75 

Subject to change without notice. 



Bassett&Washbum 



76 St 78 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO, 

Cut Flowers 



t|%olaMle Dealers and 
Growers of 
GREENHOUSES: HINSDALE. ILL. 

flease mention the American Florist when writing. 



WEILAHD AND RISCH 



CHICAaO'S RELIABLE 

Wholenle Growers and Shippers ol 

CUT FLOWERS. 
59 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

tXSCD 70B WSBKLY FBIOS LIST. 



WHOLESALE FLORISTS 



Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 

FRANK 6ARLAND, 



Wbolesala 
Qrower 



01 Cut Flowers 



■PEOIAL ATTENTION 13^Tr-1^1^JBi 

GIVEN TO HARDY OUT -■-' ."ar."*..*-^ 1^ 

S5-57 WABASH AVENUE, 

Telephone Central 3284. CEIXO.A.OO, 

fletue mention the A merican Florist when writing, 

A. L RANDALL GO. 

Wholesale Florists. 

19&21 Randolph St., CHICAGO. 

Ssnd for weekly price list and 

special quotations on 1000 lots. 

please mention the American Florist ichen writing. 



MICHAEL 



Winandy 



Vbolesale Grower 
and Shipper of 



CUT FLOWERS 

60 VI/ABASH AVE., C^WC f<C,C\ 

Telephone 3867 Central. V.-n.iV-/\VJW. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 

WIETOR BROS. 

•"•'"*'• .t Cut Flowers 



Growers 



All telegraph and telephone orders 
given prompt attention. 

51 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO. 

Please 7nentioji the American Florist when writing 



J. H. BUDLONG 



WHOLESALE 

6RQWER of 



37>39 Randolph Street.^HICAGO. 
Boses and 
Carnations 
A 8peclalty.>»M 

BENTHEY & CO. 

35 Randolph Street, CHICAGO. 

F. F. BEHTHEY, Manager. Wholesale and 
Consignments Solicited. Commission 



CUT FLOWERS 



FLORISTS 



HOLTON & HUNKEL CO., 

"Wholesale Cut Flowers-- 



457 Milwaukee Street. 



MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



Wbol^ale flower/\arK^ 



Chicago, Feb. 12 

Roses, Beauty, 30 to 36-in. stems 3.00® 4.00 

20 to 24 " 2.60 

15 to 18 " 1.50® 2 00 

12 " 1.00@1.25 

Liberty 6.00® 8.00 

extraseleot 10.00® 15.00 

Chatenay 6.00@12.00 

Bride, Bridesmaid 6.00® 10.00 

Meteor, Golden Gate 6.00®10.00 

Carnations 200® 3.00 

fancy 3.00® 5.00 

Valley 2.00® 4.00 

Asparagus Plumosus, per string 25 to 50c 
" " sprays 2.00®4.00 

Sprengeri 2.00® 4 00 

Violets, double 50® 1.50 

single 50® .75 

Leucothoe Sprays 1.00 

Galax Leaves, Bronze, per 1000, 1.50 .15 

Green. „ .. 1.00 

Adiantum , • ■ • 1-00 

Fancy ferns. ..per 1000 2.50® 3.00 

Smilax 12.50@15.00 

Callas l.FO® 2 00 per doz. 

Harrisii 200® 2.50 



SINNER BROS. 

Wholesale Growers AIIT CI nUf CDC 
and Shippers of uU I W LU Vl CI19 

58 WABASH AVENUE, CHICAGO, ILL. 

With the Flower Telephone- 

Growers' Co. Central 3067. 

All telephone and telegraph orders 

given prompt attention. 



GEO. REINBER6, 

"5S".?« Cut Flowers 

CHOICE AMERICAN BEAUTIES. 

We will take care of your orders at 
reasonable prices. Prompt attention. 

51 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO, ILL. 



Poehlmann Bros. Co. 

Wholesale Growers of 

i« Cut Flowers 



and 
Dealers I 

A!! telegraph ana telephone ordera ^ ^ 

eiven prompt attention 35-0/ 

Obsenhouses. Randolph $(Fe«t. 

Morton Grove lU CHICAGO ILL 



MiGliip Gut Flower Exchange, 

WM. DILCER, Mgr. 



All Cut Flowers In Season. 

26 Miami Ave.. DETROIT, MICH. 



American Florist Advertisements 
Work Every Day. 



96 



The American Florist. 



Feb. ij. 



Leo Niessen ^ItYl^^ 

ORCHIDS. 



WHOLESALE FLORIST. 

f^^'A%°S5°^",i^''ti!,TooT'.'Sf.°'''=" 1217 Arch Street, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



FLOWERS FOR EVERY DAY 



AND FOR EVERY OCCASION. 
QUANTITY UNLIIVIITED. 

QUALITY UXCELLED. 



WE ARE OPEN FOR BUSINESS AT 6:00 O'CLOCK A. M. WE WANT YOUR TRADE. 



J. K. ALLEN, 



THE PIONEER 
HOUSE, 



106 West 28th St., New York» 



GEO. A. SUTHERLAND, 

Best Boston Flowers. 
All Florists' Supplies. 

Distributing Depot for the KORAL LETTERS. 

TELEPHONE 1270 jwiH. 34 Hawlcy St., BOSTON. 



NlF/M<^CARTHY&Ca, 

,5,Wh OLESALE-i?ii_ 




^t«m.':rs«^.C^s^84HAWLEYSTREn 



\ K\iu\^)>vS».tswV\.w^'^'^ 



BOSTON. 



CITY HALL GUT FLOWER MARKET, 

15 Province St., BOSTON, MASS. 



WELCH BROS. 

Best Flowers. Lar^e Variety. Prompt ShipmeDts. Careful Packing. 



THOMASYOUNGJr. 

WHOLESALE fLORIST. 

CHOICEST CUT FLOWERS. 

43 W. 28th St., NEW YORK CITY. 

Please mention tne A merriai^ Fionsc when -writing. 

GEORGE SALTFORD, 

WHOLESALE FLORIST. 



46 W. 29th street, NEW YORK. 

Tel. 3393 Madison Square. 
Specialties: VIOLETS AND CARNATIONS. 

ConsigDments of any good flowers solioited. 
Please mention the Amrican Florist when writing. 

N.Y. GUT FLOWER EXCHANGE 

Coogan BIdg. 6th Ave. and W. Z6th St., New York. 

Open for Cut Flower Bales at 6 o'clock 
Every Morning 

DESIRABLE WALL SPACE TO RENT FOR 
ADVERTISING. 

JOHN DONALDSON, Secretary. 

N.Lecakes&Co. 

B3 W. 28tli St., and 45 W, 29th St. 

Also at 

26th St. and 34th St. Markets 

New York. 

FERNS, GALAX LEAVES, LEUCOTHOE SPRAYS 

OUR SPECIALTIES 

GREEN AND BRONZE GALAX LEAVES, 

75c per 1000; 86.00 and $6.50 per case of 10,000. 
Holly, Princess Pine and all kinds of Evergreens. 

Telephone 1214 Madison Square. 
Please mention the Atnpvican Florist ivhen -writing. 



# 



Wbol^ale power/\arK?fe 

Boston, Feb. 10. 

Roses, Beauty, extra 30.00(3.^0.00 

" " medium 10.00@20 00 

" " oulls 301® 6.00 

" Bride, Bridesmaid 4.00® « 00 

" extra 8.00@I300 

" Liberty 4.00®10.00 

Carnations 1.00® 2.C0 

" Fancy 3 00® 4.00 

Violets 30@ 50 

Lily of the valley 3.00® 3.00 

Harrisii lilies 6.00® 8.00 

Smilax 10.00®15 00 

Adiantum 75® 1.00 

Asparagus 35.CO@50.00 

Roman Hyacinths, P. W. narcissus 1.00® 2.(0 

Daffodils 1.00® 3.00 

Tulips 3.0C@ 3.0J 

Philadelphia, Feb. 10. 

Roses, Tea 4.00® 8 OO 

" extra 12.00®I500 

" Beauty, extra. 35 00(<«60.00 

" " firsts 16.00((U25.00 

" Queen of Edgely, extra 3ri.00(s50.00 

firsts I6.00(9'2o.00 

Carnations 2.00® 8.00 

Violets, single 40® ■ .50 

double 50® l.CO 

Lilvof the valley 3.00® 5.00 

Daffodils 3.00® 4.(i0 

Tulip 3.011® 4.00 

Freesia 3.00® 5.00 

Lilac 50® 2.80 per bunch 

Asparagus 25.00®50.00 

Smilax 12.00@15 00 

Buffalo, Feb. 11. 

Roses, Beauty 5.00@50.00 

Bride, Bridesmaid, Meteor 3.00@12.00 

Carnations 2.00® 6.00 

Harrisii 15.00 

Lily of the valley 3.00@ 5.00 

Asparagus, strings 40.00@50.00 

Smilax 12.50@15.00 

Adiantum 50® 100 

Violets 30® 1.00 

Callas 8.00@12.50 

Sweet Peas 50® 1.(0 

Please mention the American Florist 
every time you write to an advertiser. 



SOUTHERN SMILAX. 

No. 1 quality only $5 50 per case of 50 lbs. Bq 
sure and try it when you want Srailax. CALAX,. 
bronze or green, 75c per lOOO. Discount on large 
orders. LAUREL FESTOONING, No. 1 quality, 
4c. 5c and 6c per yard. Always on hand and large 
orders filled at short notice. FANCY or DAGGER 
FERNS, $1.50 per 1000. 




Millinston, Mass. 

Tel. office, New Salem. 
Long distance telephone connection. 

SMILAX and BEAUTIES GHEAP. 

500 Beauties. S^-^-inch pots, well branched, 
86.00 per 100. 

2,000 Smilax 3!4-inch, stocky plants, 12.00 per 
100. Cash with order. 

Quality of plants guaranteed. 

ROSEMONT GARDENS, "o^y^"^"^- 

RICE BROTHERS 
128 N. 6th SL, MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Wholesale Cut Elowers and Supplies. 

Wild Smilax I ^iSS^^Vc'i'" 

Shippers ot choice Cut Flowers and Greens of si) 
kinds. Try us. 

Laurel Roping 

OLIVER L.TRONNEM.Vineland.N.J. 



Flowers of All Kinds. 






OPEN FROM 7;00 A. M. TO 9;00 P. M. 



THE PHILADELPHIA WHOLESALE FLOWER MARKET, 1224 Cherry Street, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



1904- 



Th E American Florist. 



97 



JOHN I. RAYNOR 

ARE THE BEST PRODUCT OF THE BEST 
GROWERS FOR THE NEW YORK MARKET. 



Adlantom Croweanum 

Sold here Excloslvely. 



49 W. 28th Street, NEW YORK. 

Tel. 1998 Madison Square. 



YOUNG & NUGENT 



42 Wast ZSth Street, 

Telephone 2065 Madison Sq. 



Wholesale Florists. 



CATTLEYAS. GARDENIAS. VIOLETS. ROSES. CARNATIONS and all seasonable 
novelties. With our long experience in shipping, and competent assistants 
in our packing department, we are in a position to guarantee out-of-town 
customers who place their orders with us that they will not be disappointed. 



Walter F. Sheridan, 

Wholesale Florist , 

Telephone SOS Madison Bq.na,re. 

39 West 28th St., NEW YOBK. 



Telephone No. 756 Madison Square, 







MOORE, HENTZ & NASH 

Wholesale Commission Florists. 



66 and 67 Watt 26th St. 



NEW YORK CITT. 



Advice ot sale note daily. Statement an4 check 
weeitly. All consignments, large or small, receive tb« 
same attention. CORRESPONDENCE INVITED. 



VIOLETS. 



WILLIAM GHORMLEY 



VIOLETS 



! Wholesale " ■^■■■""" i*iiwiiiwi» ■ ^Gommission : 

Daily Receiver and Shipper ot Fresli Cut Flowers. « 

Orchids, Roses, Carnations, Valley, Clirysantliemums. • 

lalephones 2200 and 2201 Madison ISquare. 57 West 28th Street, NEW YORK CITY. • 



JOHN YOUNG, 

Special American Beauties, 

Surpassing Carnations, 

Lily of the Valley, Orchids 

and all Seasonable Flowers. 
51 West 28th St., NEW TOBE. 

Teloplioiio 1905 Madison Sqiiuro. 

■ Mm RBcocNizeo headquarters in 

NEW YORK CITY FOR 

Violets and Garnatlons 

•ROWERS and BUYERS make a note of thii. It 
will be to your advantage. 

WM. H. GUNTHER. 

West 29th St., New York. 

Telephone 661 Madlion Square. 

Frank Millang 

Gpen from 6 a. m. to 5. p. m. 



Cit Flower Exchange, 

Phone 899 Madison Square. 



55-57 W. 26th St. 

NEW YORK. 



ESTABLISHED 1872. 



JOHN J. PERKINS, 

COMMISSION FLORIST, 

Solicits Consignments or Shipping Orders. 

Satisfaction given in both. Tel. 966 Madison Sq. 

lis W. SOtli St.. Hew York. Wio 48 W. 80th St. 

Bonnot Bros. 



WHOLESALE 

E5 and 67 W. 26th St, 
Cut Flower Exchange, 



FLORISTS. 

New York. 



OPEN 6:00 A. M. 

ta Unequalled Outlet for Coniigned Floweri. 



Choice Carnations. Selected Roses. 

Traendly&Schenck 

NEV YORK QTY, 
38 W. 28th Street, Cut Flower Exchange. 

New Telephone Mo. 798 <b TBS Madiion Sq. 

Please mention theAjnerica7i Florist when writing. 

Wbol^ale [fower/arKjfe 



New Yohk. Feb. 10. 

Roses, Beauty, best 25.00@60.00 

" '• medium 8.00@15.00 

culls'. 1.00® 3.00 

Bride, Bridesmaid, G. Gate 3,00@15.00 

Liberty 3.00@25.00 

Carnations 1.00@ 3.00 

fancy and novelties 4.00@ 8.00 

Lily ot the .valley 1.00® 3.00 

Lilies, Callas 6.00@13.00 

Violets 25® .40 

" special 60® .75 

Smilax 6.00® 12.00 

Adiantum 35® .75 

Asparagus 25.00@60.00 

Cattleya Percivalliana 40.00@60.00 

Dendrobium formosum 30.00®40.00 

Cvpripediums 10.00@13.00 

Mignonette 1.00® 4.00 

Roman Hyacinths 60® 2.00 

Tulips 1.00® 3.00 

Narcissus, Paper White.. 1.00® 3.00 

Gardenias 25.00@50 .00 

Freesia 10@ .16 per bun. 

Jonquils, Daffodils l.CO® 3.00 

Charles Millang 

WHOLESALE FLORIST. 

Conservatory connected from which can ship 
fems and decorative plants promptly 

50 West 29th St. NEW YORK 

Tel. 2230 Madison Square. 



FORD BROS. 

Receivers and Shippers of 

Fresh Flowers 

111 West 30th St., NEW TOKK. 

Telephones 3870-3871 Madison Sq. 
REPRESENTING EMINENT GROWERS. 

Julius Lang 

53 West 30th Street, NEW YORK. 

COMMISSION DEALER in FLOWERS 

Telephone 380 Madison Square. 

ALEX. J. GUTTMAN, 

Wholesale Commission florist, 

A full supply dally of the cfaolceat 

New York and New Jersey 

FLOWERS. 

62 W. 29lh Streot, NEW YORK CITY 

Telephone 1738 Madison Square. 

NEW YORK CUT FLOWER CO 

55 and 57 West 26ih St., 

WHOLESALE FLORISTS. 
Daily Reports. Weekly Payments 

Telephone J. A. MILLANQ, 
756 Madison Sq. 



M ANAGEB 



CARNATIONS "' 



Specialty. 



CONSIGNIVIENTS SOLICITED. 
Prompt Payments. Established 1891 

.28thSL 
York. 



Alfred H. Langjahr, ''Z.'^ 

Telephone 3934 Madison Sq. 



EDW. C. HORAN, 



55 WEST 28TH STREET, 



Telephone 421 
Madison Square. 



.NEW YORK. 



CSJJ F LOWERS AI W HOLESALE. 



98 



The American Florist. 



Feb. I J, 



INTERNATIONAL FLOWER DELIVERY. 



NEW YORK. 



Steamer Gifts 

Orders for flowers in any form 
carefully filled and delivered by 
special messenger on board any 
steamer on day of departure from 
New York. 

THOS. YOUNG, JR. 

43 W. 28th St., NEW YORK CITY. 

Please mention the A m ' -'can Florist nifien writing. 



NEW YORK. 



ALEX. McCONNELL, 

546 Fifth Avenue, 

c.tith w New York City 



TELEGRAPHIC Orders forwarded to any part 
of the United States, Canada and all princi- 
pal cities of Europe. Orders transferred or en- 
trusted by the trade to our selection for delivery 
on steamships or elsewhere receive special atten- 
tion. Cable Address: ALEXCONNELL. 

WESTERN UNION CODE. 

TELEPHONE CALLS: 340 and 341 38th Street. 

Please mention the A merican Florist when writing 

LONDON. 

COMMISSIONS 
CARRIED OUT in LONDON 

or any part of Great Brttaln. 

Messrs. WILLS & SEGAR wiU attend to 
any commission from American florists for 
the supply of Cut Flowers, Birthday Flowers, 
Bouquets, High Class Floral Designs, etc. to 
their clients who may be traveling in England. 

U/ll I C 9. CCRAD Court Plorlats to his 
nlLLO Oil OLUAll) Maiesty. Ihe King. 

ROYAL EXOTIC NURSERY. 

TELEeBAUB, Onslow Crescent, South Kensington. 
FLO8CULO, LoNBON. LONDON, ENGLAND. 

LOS ANGELES. 

Orders for Los Angeles and Southern Calitornia 

Will be filled bv 

E. J. VAWTER 

GROWER AND DEALER 

522 So. Spring St.. Los Angeles, Cal. 

INDIANAPOLIS. 

Bertermann Bros. Co., 

FLORISTS, 

241 Massachusetts Ave., INDIANAPOLIS, INU. 

ST. LOUIS. 

Fred. C. Weber, 

FLORIST, 

4326-4328 Olive St., SL LOIIS, MO. 

Established 1873, Long Dist. 'Phone LIndell 196 M 



PASSENGER STEAMSHIP MOVEMENTS. 

The tables hereivith give the schednled time of departure of ocean steamships carry- 
ing first-class passengers from the principal American and foreign ports, covering the space 
of two weeks from date of this issue of the AMERICAN FLORIST. Much disappointment 
often results from attempts to forward flo'wers for steamer delivery by express, to the care 
of the ship's stenrard or other^vise. The carriers of these packages are not Infrequently 
refused admission on board and even those delivered on board are not always certain to 
reach the parties for whom they were Intended. Hence florists la interior cities having 
orders for the delivery of flow^ers to passengers en out-golog steamers are advised to 
Intrust the filling of such orders to some reliable florist in the port of departure, who 
understands the necessary details and formalities and has the facilities for attending to 
It properly. For the addresses of such flrnas we refer our readers to the advertlsenctentii 
on this page : 



FROM 


TO 


STEAMER 


"LINE 


DAY 


DUE ABOUT 


New York 


Liverpool 


Ivernia 


1 


Sat. 


Feb. 


20, 7:30 a. 


m. 


Feb. 28 


New York 


" 


Campania 


1 


Sat. 


Feb. 


27, Noon. 




Mar. 5 


New York 


Glasgow 


Mongolian 


2 


Thur 


Feb. 


18, 11:00 a 


m. 


Feb. 28 


New York 


Genoa 


Palatia 


3 


rues. 


Feb. 


16, 10:00 a. 


m. 


Mar. 2 


New York 


*' 


Prinz Oskar 


3 


Thur 


Feb 


25, 10:00 a. 


m. 


Mar. 11 


New York 


Hamburg 


Pennsylvania 


3 


Sat. 


Feb. 


20, 7:00 a. 


m. 


Mar. 1 


New York 


" 


Patricia 


3 


Sat. 


FeD. 


27, 1:30 p. 


m. 


Mar. 8 


New York 


Copenhagen . 


Oscar 11 


4 


Wed. 


Feb. 


17, 2:00 p. 


m 




New York 




Island 


4 


Sat. 


Feb. 


27, 2:00 p. 


m 




New York 


Glasgow 


Furnessia 


5 


Sat. 


Feb. 


27, Noon. 




Mar. 8 


New York 


Loncon 


Minnetonka 


6 


Sat. 


Feb. 


20, 8:00 a. 


m. 


Mar. I 


New York 


" 


Menominee 


6 


Sat. 


Feb. 


27, 9:00 a. 


m. 


Mar. 8 




Liverpool 

Alexandria 

Liverpool 


Cymric 

Romanic 

Celtic 


7 
7 
7 


Thur. 

Sat. 

Wed. 


Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 


18, 11:00 a. 
27, 6:00 a. 
17, 6:00 a. 


m. 
m. 
m. 


Feb. 25 




Mar. 16 


New York 


Feb. 24 


New York 


.» 


Cedric 


7 


Wed. 


Feb. 


24, 11:00 a. 


m. 


Mar. 2 


New York 


Southampton 


St. Paul 


8 


Sat. 


Feb. 


20, 9:30 a. 


m. 


Feb. 26 


New York 


•' 


Philadelphia 


8 


Sat. 


Feb. 


27, 9:ao a. 


m. 


Mar. 4 


New York 


Antwerp 


Kroonland 


9 


Sat. 


Feb. 


20 10:30 a 


m. 


Feb. 29- 


New York 




Zeeland 


9 


Sat. 


Feb 


27, 10:30 a. 


m. 


Mar. 7 


New York 


Havre 


La Bretagne 


10 


Thur. 


Feb. 


18, 10:00 a. 


m. 


Feb. 28 


New York 


" 


La Touraine 


10 


Thur. 


Feb. 


25, 10:00 a. 


m. 


Mar. 6 


New York 


Rotterdam 


Statendam 


11 


Tues. 


Feb 


23. 




Mar. 4 


New York 


Genoa 


Sardegna 


12 


Tues. 


Feb 


23, 




Mar. 8 


New York 


Bremen 


Rhein 


13 


Tucs. 


Feb 


16, 10:00 a 


m. 


Feb. 27 


New York 




KronprinzWilhelm 


13 


Tues. 


Feb 


23, 10:00 a 


m- 


Mar. 1 


New York 


" 


Koenigen Louise 


13 


Thur 


Feb. 


25, 10:00 a 


m. 


Mar. 6 


New York 


Genoa 


Lahn 


13 


Sat. 


Feb. 


20, 11:00 a 


m. 


Mar. 3 


New York 


.1 


Prinzess Irene 


13 


Sat. 


Feb. 


27, 11:00 a 


m. 


Mar. 11 


Boston 


Liverpool 


Devonian 
Winifredian 


14 
14 


Wed. 
Wed. 


Feb. 
Feb. 


17, 10:30 a 
24, 3:30 p. 


m. 
m. 


Feb. 27 




Mar. 5 







*1 Cunard; 2 AHen-State; 3 Hamburg-American; 4 Scandinavian-American; 5 Anchor Line; 
6 Atlantic Transport; 7 White Star; 8 American; 9 Red Star; 10 French; 11 Holland-American; 
12 Italian Royal Mail; 13 North German Lloyd; 14 Leyland; 



DETROIT. 



lOHN BREITMEYER'S 
SONS 

Cor. MIAMI and GRATIOT AVES. 

DETROIT, MICH. 
Artistic Designs. .3tjt.j*.jt 
High Grade Cut Blooms. 

We cover all Michigan points and good sections 
of Ohio, Indiana and Canada. 

CHICAGO. 

P.J.HAISWIRTH 

Auditorium Annex, 

^^ CHICAGO. 

Mail, telegraph or telephone orders filled 
promptly in best style. 

DENVER. 

FLORAL DFSIGNS AND FLOWERS. 



Best Quality on Shortest Notice. 



DANIELS & FISHER, 



DENVER, 
COLO. 



Order by mail, telephone, telegraph or cable. 
Cable address: "Daniels Denver." 



DENVER.. 



T 



he Park| 
Floral Co, 



J A VALENTINE. QtMygR^ COLO. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

TELEPHONE MAIN 1023 . 

SIEVERS & BOLAND, 

Floral Artists, 

33 Post Street, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.. 

iJ.M.McGULLOUGH'SSONSi 

j WHOLESALE \ 

\ FLORISTS I 

\ ALBO BrCCE880R8 TO Z 

\ THE CINCINNATI CUT FLOWER CO. 'f 



i CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. 

A E 

i Special Attention Given to Shipping Orders. .- 
\ 316 WALNUT ST. CINCINNATI, OHIO. \ 

'''ir'irM"i'MrM''iP*ip'»i'"H'«"inrii"r"M'^i"i'-«-'i"i^«»'M"i»-«'-" 



PLACE YOUB NAME. 



and your gpeoialtiea before the purohaiing florlsti of the entire country 
by advertising in ^^ 

SEND ADVT. NOW. THE AMERICAN FLORIST. 



igo4. 



The American Florist. 



99 



INTERNATIONAL FLOWER DELIVERY. 



STEAMSHIPS LEAVE FOREIGN PORTS 



FROM 


TO 


STEAMER 


♦LINE 


DAY 


DUE ABOUT 


Liverpool 

Liverpool 

Liverpool 

Fiume 


New York 

Boston 
New York 

Boston 
New York 

Boston 


Etruria 
Lucania 

Saxonia 

Aurania 

Corinihian 

Pnoencia 

Prinz Adalbert 

Pretoria 

Graf Waldersee 

Hecia 

Helig Olav 

Ethiopia 

Minneapolis 

Marquette 

Cret c 

Canopic 

Majestic 

Oceanic 

St. Louis 

New York 

Finland 

Vaderland 

La Champagne 

La Lorraine 

Rotterdam 

Siciha 

Lombardia 

K. AVil. Der Grosse 

Konig Albert 

Canadian 

Cestrian 


1 
1 
1 

\ 

3 
3 
3 
3 

\ 
6 
6 
6 
7 
7 
7 
7 
8 
8 
9 
9 
10 
10 
11 
12 
12 
13 
13 
14 
14 


Sat. F. b. 
Sat. Feb. 
Tues. Feb. 
Fd. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 
Thur. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 
Wed. Feb. 
Wed. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 
Thur. Feb. 
Thur. Feb. 
Thur. Feb. 
Thur. Feb. 
Wed. Feb. 
Wed. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 
Sit. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 
Mon. Feb. 
Mon. Feb. 
Tues. Feb. 
Thur. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 
Sat. Feb. 


20 

27 

16 

19 

27 

13 

27 

20 

27 

17 

24 

20 

18 

2S 

18, 

18, 

17, 

24, 

20, 

27, 

20, 

27, 

20 

27 

20 

15 

22 

23 

25 

20 

27 


3:30 p. m. 
3:00 p. m. 
3:30 p. m. 
8:30 p. m. 
Noon. 
Nnon. 
2:00 p. m. 
10:00 a. m. 


Feb. 26 
Mar. 4 
Feb. 23 

Mar. 8 




M,r. 4 




Mar. 13 


Hamburg 

Hamburg 

Copenhagen 

Copenhagen 


Mar. 1 
Mar. 8 

Mar. 1 




Feb. 28 




Mar. 6 


Liverpool 

Alexandria 

Liverpool 

Liverpool 

Southampton — 
Southampton.. . 


Feb. 25 
Mar. 7 
Feb. 24 
Mar. 2 
Feb. 87 
Mar. 5 
Feb. 29 


Antwerp 

Havre 

Havre 

Rotterdam 

Genoa . 


Mar. 7 
Mar. 1 
Mar. 8 
Mar. 1 
Mar. 1 
Mar. 8 




Mar. 1 


Genoa 


Mar. 9 


Liverpool 

Liverpool 


Mar. 1 
Mar. 8 



* See steamship list on opposite page. 



PETER REIN6ERG 

5i Wabash Ave., CHICAGO. 

Wholesale Cut Flowers 


LARGEST GROWER 
IN THE \ 


^ORLD. 
St. 

Per Doz. 

$5.00 

4.00 

13.50 to 3.00 

150 to 2.00 

l.COto 1.35 

Per 100 

$4 00toS10.00 

6 00 to 13.00 

. 5.00 to 8.00 

5.00 to 8.00 

. 5.00 to 8.00 

3.00 to 4.00 

4.00 

Dperly packed. 

srs over $5. 


Current Price Li 

AM. BEAUTIES, long stems, 
30-in. " 
20-24 
15-18 
" " Short stems 

SDNEISE 


CHATENAY 

BRIDE 


BRIDESMAID 

PERLE 

CARNATIONS 

ROSES, ODR SELECTION 

All flowers are perfectly fresh and pr 
No charge for P. and D. on ord 



HOPKINSVILLE. Ky. — Wm. F. Snyder is 
building a house 20x60 feet, with office 
and rooms, for displaying plants. The 
Foley Manufacturing Company is sup- 
plying the material. 



GALAX LEAVES, ETC., ''T.T 

Galax Leaves. Green and Bronze, per 1000 8 .60 

Cut Fancy and Dagger Ferns, perlDOO 100 

Leucothoe Sprays, Green, per 1000 3.00 

Red. per 1000 6.00 

Rhododendron Sprays, per 1000 5.00 

Larijest dealer in the U. S. Orders filled 
promptly. Send cash with order. Send 50c for a 
nice cane, cut from the famous mountains of N. 
C- Nicely varnished, crooked or straight. Men- 
tion length desired and variety of wood— hickory, 
rhododendron, wahoo, poplar, striped maple, etc. 
Grand souvenier, besides useful. Try one or more. 
J. N. PRITCHARD, Elk Park, N. C. 

GALAX... 

Bronze or green, 75c per 1000, in 2,000 ots orl 
more. Laueotiioe Sprays, green, 90c per 100. 
Southern Smllax, fresh stock, per 50-lb. cas«, 
$6.00; per25-lb. case. S3.50. Crean Stiest Moss, 
choice stock, $3.50 per barrel sack. Spagnum 
Moss, $1.75 per large bale. 

FLORIST' SUPPLIES of Every DESCRIPTION. 

Tel. 597 Madison Li J, KRESHOVER, 

Square. 110-112 W. 27tti St.. New York. 

It is good business policy ^ ^ ^ 
to mention the <^ '^ •^ 

American Florist 

When vou write to an advertiser. 



E.F.Winler8onCo. 

Successors to 

McKellar & Winterson. 

ESTABLISHED 1894. 



We are handling the cut 0/ Rudd's 
"PHYLLIS," the grand new pink— and 
new Seedling White (unnamed, but 
a "crackerjack") carnations. These 
arrive daily — get a sample shipment, 
but give us a day or two notice, as 
we sell them out as a rule in advance 
ol arrival. Price. Phyllis, 6c; White 
Seedling, 4c. 

FANCY EASTERN VIOLETS. The best 
that come into this market, $1.00 
per hundred. 

EXTRA FINE HARRISII BLOOMS, 12c 

to 15c. 

FANCY FREESIAS, 3c to 4c. 

A daily supply irom 34 GROWERS 
enables us to take care of shipping 
orders to the buyers' advantage. 

Get our Weekly Price List. It is free and 
worth your while. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Galax Leaves and all Greens. 

"SLPERIOR QIALITY" 

WILD SMILAX 

(NONE BETTER.) 

ALWAYS ON HAND. 

We carry the most complete line of 
Florists' Supplies in the West. Catalogue free. 
Address all correspondence to 

45-47-49 Wabash Ave., 
CHICAGO. 



Orchids ! j^ 

Just arrived in superb condition, a large ship- 
ment of DENOROBIUM NOBILE, most useful for 
florists; also Dend. Chrysanthura and others. 
To arrive, Cattleya Trianae and C. Gigas. 

Lager & Hurrell, summit, n. j. 

Orchid Growers and Importers. 




WILD SMILAX 



ORDER DIRECT 

FROM HEADQUARTERS. 



We carry the finest and most complete stock of Florists' Hardy Supplies, 
Dagger and Fancy Ferns, $1.50 per lOOU. A No. 1 quality. Bronze and Green 
Galax, $1.00 per 1000, A No. 1 quality. Southern Wild Smilax,50 pound case,$7.C0. 
25 pound case. S3.50 per case. Laurel Festooning, good and full, 5c and 6c per 
yard. Leucothoe Sprays, $1.00 per 100. Green Moss, $1.00 per bbl.; 75c per bag. 
Sphagnum Moss. $1.00 per bbl.; 50o per bag. Order by mail, telegraph or tele- 
phone will receive our personal and prompt attention. Long Dis. 'Ptione 2618 Main. 

tIENRY M. ROBINSON, No. 11 Province St., BOSTON. MASS. 



m CLEVCLAND m \mm company 



-SUCCESSORS TO- 



BATE BROS. AND THE F. R. WILLIAMS COMPANY 

52-54 High St., -"-"^---- CLEVELAND, O. 

We Carry a Full Line of Florists' Supplies and Make Wire Designs. Send Your Stock to Us on Commission. 



-WRITE FOR OUR WEEKLY PRICE LIST.- 



100 



The American Florist. 



Feb. /J, 



The ^EEt) TnaiDE. 



AMERICAN SEED TRADE ASSOCIATION. 

S. F Willard, Pres.: J. Charles McCuUousli. 
First Vice-Prcs.; C. E. Kendel, Cleveland, ()., 
Seo'y and Treas. 

Twentv-secnnd annual convention, St. Louis, 
Mc, June 31-24, 1904. 



The price of White Pea beans has 
advanced 15 cents per bushel the past 
week. 

The Floral Publishing Company, of 
Springfield, Ohio, has failed. Assets, 
$1,247.23; liabilities, $43,488.97. 

Onion set prices at Chicago range as 
follows: $1.30to$l. 35 for Yellows: $1.40 
to $1.50 for Reds, and $1.75 for Whites. 

Prices of $6 to $7 on fair grades of 
Stowell's Evergreen sweet corn are 
reported made at the Canners' Con- 
vention. 

Mail order business continues fairly 
slow. The trouble about such conditions 
is that the shortage in receipts is never 
made up. 

Terre Haute, Ind.— Joseph I^. Warder 
has bought out the Levings Brothers' 
Seed Company, an old established com- 
mission box seed house of Pekin, 111. 

Seed peas and onion seed continue 
slow and dealers are almost ashamed to 
mention them to possible buyers, seeds- 
men even in the smallest towns being 
overstocked with some kinds of peas 
and onions. 

Memphis, Tenn.— The J. L. UUathorne 
Seed Company has been incorporated by 
J. L. UUathorne, O. C. Armstrong, A. S. 
UUathorne, Hosmer J. Barrett, Geo. S. 
Hooper, W. A. Bickford and Henry Craft, 
and capitalized at $100,000. 

Norfolk, Va.— The Cotton Oil and 
Fiber Company's big mills and the 
McNally oil manufacturing plant at Nor- 
folk are both closed and many employes 
are out of work as a result of the scarcity 
and high prices of cotton seed. 

Columbus, Ohio. — Among the visitors 
at the canners' convention here the 
following firms were represented: The 
Everett B. Clark Company, Jerome B. 
Rice Seed Company, D. M. Ferrv & Com- 
pany, W. H. Grenell, M. Cushinan, S. D. 
Woodruff & Sons, Goodwin Harries Com- 
pany and M. G. Madson Seed Company. 
Canners report generally that they are 
fairly well supplied with all seeds. 

Baltimore, Md. — The following seeds- 
men suffered by the recent fire: John 
Bolgiano & Son, Griffith & Turner Com- 
pany (Light street store) , S. L. Lambert 
& Company, W. A. Simpson & Company, 
W. G. Scarlett, Jr., & Company, Field's 
Sons and C. N. Robinson & Company. 
All are burned out with heavy losses, 
which, however, are generally covered 
by insurance, and the stocks can be 
replaced. S. 

At the canners' convention, which 
opened at Columbus, O., February 9, the 
Western Canned Goods Association 
elected the following officers: Dr. A. C. 
Eraser, Manitowoc, Wis., president; L. 
A. Sears, Chillicothe, O., vice-president; 
Ira S. Whitmer, Bloomington, III,, secre- 
tary-treasurer. The above all served last 
year and have been re-elected. The 
Canned Goods Brokers elected James M. 
Paver, Indianapolis, president; Lincoln 
North, New York, vice-president; Lord 
L. Dillon, New York, secretary. 



Santa Clara, Cal. 

Thomas M. Landrum, secretary and 
assistant manager of C. C. Morse & 
Company, was married on January 25 
to Miss T. Emily Pfister, of Santa Clara. 
They will spend two weeks in Southern 
California, when they will return to Gil- 
roy, where they intend to reside in a 
pretty little cottage being erected lor 
them by the company at Carnadero. 

We are enjoying a very timely and 
bountiful rain, which began January 3 
and still continues. Crops in the vicinity 
of Santa Clara are now assured, so far 
as rain is concerned, for at least another 
month, and promises are good for more 
rain and good times. C. 



Adulteration of Seeds. 

Ottawa, Ont.— The Minister of Agri- 
culture hopes to secure the adoption this 
session of the bill he had before parlia- 
ment last year to prevent the adultera- 
tion and mixing of seeds. He is satisfied 
alter inquiring that careless seed collec- 
tion has resulted in the spread of many 
noxious weeds, and is determined that 
this menace to agriculture shall not be 
permitted to continue. There was strong 
opposition, however, to the means by 
which it was proposed to achieve this 
object. 



Better Than the Others. 

Ed. Am. Florist:— Enclosed is $1 for 
another year's subscription to the Amer- 
ican Florist. I have sent for sample 
copies of three different florist papers this 
winter but none is up to the American 
Florist. C. W. Sibley. 

Athol, Mass. 



ASPARAGUS 

* ID A €i J^^ J 



LILY OF THE VALLEY. 


FINEST BERLIN PIPS, (or Early Farcing, 


$12.00 [ 


er 1O0O: $30.00 per case 2500; 1 


$1.60 per 100. | 


These are 


strong pips, well rooted and give 




best satisfiiction. 


FINEST 


CUT VALLEY ALWAYS 




ON HAND. 


H. 


N. BRUNS, 




VALLEY SPECIALIST, 


1409-1411 


W. Madison St., CHICAGO. 



Please mention the A merfcan Florist when wvitine 



WE INVITE COMPARISON OF OUR SEED 
WITH OTHERS. SAMPLES SUPPLIED. 



"Once Grown Always Grown" 

The Maule motto for more 
than 25 years. My new 

SEED 

BOOK for 1904 

roBt over Ssn.OOO to publish. If you 
have a garden you can have a copy 
for the asking. Send a postal for It to 

Wm. Henry Maule, Philadelphia, Pa. ' 



LILY OF THE VALLEY 

SELECTED DRESDEN. 

Unequaled for early forcing. No. \ Stock per 100, 
$t.50; 250, $3.50; 500, $6,50; JOOO, $J3.00; case 
2,500 pips, $30.00. J-J-J-J-J-J-J-J-J- 

R.&J.FAR01JHAR&CO., 



6 and 7 So. Market Street, 
BOSTON, MASS. 



Important to private gardener? 

The system of allowing Private Gardeners a discount on their annual purchases 
of seeds has become almost universal; in fact, they have been gradually educated 
to expect it, We are offering this season 

I A Special Discount of 15% 

ON ALL GENERAL SEED ORDERS AT OUR GARDEN GUIDE PRICES 

Which are quoted as low as any ri'liable seed grower oiTers. Also, we deliver by 
freight or express prepaid lo New York. Boston. Baltimore. Washington, Pitts- 
burg, Cincinnati or St. Louis. Garden Guide mailed free on application. 



ROBERT BUIST COMPANY, 



■ nui 



SEED GROWERS, 



-J 



1904. 



The American Florist. 



101 



ADIANTIM CROWEANIM 

By far the best Adiantum fern that has been introduced to the Florists' trade, is a free grower, the darkest green 
of the Adiantum family and longest stemmed, has the most graceful foliage, the average length of fronds measuring 30 
inches, is by far the best keeper; cut fronds can be kept fresh several weeks in a cool place, and it is also one ot the 
best ferns for a dwelling house. 1 have given presents of this fern to several Utica friends and from my own obser- 
vation note it grows better than the Boston fern. 

And as 1 have given up rose cultivation some ten months ago, in order to give all my attention to the fern culti- 
vation, for cut fronds, I find it pays me gt.5o to Si 00 on roses, from the same amount of bench room. I will be 
delighted to give the history, also cultivation of this fern to any purchaser who may desire it. 



Utica, N. Y. 
Mr. Peter Crowe. 

Dear Sir:— Regarding: your fern. 
-Croweanuni, would say that I have 
bad the variety under observation 
since your stock appeared. Also 
that I have used many thousands 
of the cut fronds, believe it to be 
positively the best Fern of any 
family for Florist use and welcome 
"the chance to buy a stock at what 
I believe to be a very low rate. 
Very truly. 

" C. F. Baker &, Son. 

Detroit, Mich. 
Dear Friend Crowe; — 

I am very happy to hear that 
a.nother good thine is about to 
be launched, and that in the fern 
line. T am satisfied Croweanum 
is by far the best Adiantum in 
-existence, every frond being per 
feet. It is certainly an easy 
grower and money maker. You 
are deserving of a great success 
and know you will have it. Hop- 
ing for the visit at the Carnation 
meeting, I am, 

Yours very truly, 

Philip Breitmeier. 

New York, N. Y. 
Mr. Peter Crowe. 

Dear Sir: — During the two years 
in which I have had the sale of 
the fronds of Adiantum Crowe - 
«,num in New York City, the 
-demand has at all times lar ex- 
ceeded the quantity you have been 
able to supply me with at %\ 50 
per 100. while ordinary Cuneatum has been, as a 
Tule, in over supply at half that price. 
• It is without question, the best Fern for cut 
fronds ever seen in this market. 

Respectfully yours, John I. Ratnor. 

Boston, Mass. 
Mr. Peter Crowe. Dear Sir:— Having had 
•occasion to note the sale of Adiantum Croweanum 
in the New York market during the past eighteen 
months, I have been impressed with i's great 
superiority for florists' use, as cut fronds, and 
have observed with pleasure the eagerness with 
which it has been bought by the trade. I con- 
gratulate you on the possession of a variety of 
such sterling commercial merit. 

Very truly yours, Wm. J. Stewart. 

Natick, Mass. 

Mr. Peter Crowe. Dear Sir : —I am very 
pleased to hear that you have decided to put 
plants of your fern Adiantum Croweanum on the 
market. I have always been more or less inter- 
«sted as I understand it originated from some 
plants of Adiantum Cuneatum that I sold you at 
the Wab'an Conservatories in the early eighties. 
I remember the circumstances very well, as I sold 
the balance of our stock to Robert Craig in 1890. 

Wishing you every success with it, I remain, 
Yours' truly, Alexander Montgomery. 

Washington. D. C 
Mr. Peter Crowe. Dear Sir:— The fern has 
been very satisfactory, and we will place a 
regular order next season for some. 

Youry truly, Z. D. Blackistone. 




s 


^^ 


^^ 


^^^r^^ 


'^^ 


|2^^ ~^iasri» 


^^ 




^^^^ 


^^^s^^-Js^^ 


--^ 


•TTll i 


w 




X^Bwyf^ 


W^\ 


H^^^^^^^^^H^^f ^rT^" \ 



Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mr. Peter Cbowe. 

Dear Sir:— I consider your Adi- 
antum Croweanum a very valuable 
acquisition to this line" o( Ferns. 
It is an excellent commercial vari- 
ety, good keeper and has given the 
best satisfaction wherever we have 
sold it. Our customers much pre- 
fer paying an extra price for it 
than buying the commoner varie- 
ties. The great trouble we find is, 
we cannot get enough to meet our 
customers' wants. 

Yours very truly, 

Samuel S. Pennock. 

Rochester, N. Y. 
Mr. Peter Crowe: 

Dear Sir: — We have used your 
Adiantum Croweanum for several 
years and must ssy it beats any 
Adiantum we ever had. It is cer- 
tainly par excellence. 
Yours truly, 

Salter Bros. 

Denver, Colo. 
Peter Crow, Esq. 

Dear Sir;— As compared with 
any other Adiantum, we have 
found it more graceful and a much 
rapid grower, giving a much taller 
growth than we have ever been 
able to Cuneatumr Our store 
men, prefer it to any other cut 
fern. I certainly think it ought 
to be a winner, not only for you, 
but for those who buy it. 
Yours truly, 
J. A. Valbxtine. Pres., 

Park Floral Co 



Honolulu, H. I. 
Mr. Peter Crowe. Dear Sir:— Your Crowe- 
anum sent on October 17, came to hand on 29th 
ult., in very fair condition. Kindly send me full 
information in regard to it. 

Respectfully yours, C. F. Trbe. 

Southport, Conn. 
Mr. Peter Crowe. Dear Sir: — Adiantum 
Croweanum is certainly a fine thing, shall want 
some as soon as you disseminate it. 

Very truly yours, Edw. J. Taylor. 

San Mateo, Cal. 
Mr. Peter Crowe. Dear Sir: — Croweanum 
arrived here in good saleable condition; stems 
were longest we ever saw in Cuneatum type 
Wish you success and a big sale. 

Y'ours very truly, Fick & Faber, 

Summit, N. J. 
Mk. Petbe Ceowe. Dear Sir : — Have ex- 
amined Croweanum with Interest. Shall 
want it as soon as you send it out. It is 
certainly a great improvement and I am 
sorry I cannot get some at once. 

Yours truly. E. C. McFaddbn. 

Boston, Mass. 
Mk. Peter Ckowe. Dear Sir : — We read- 
ily disposed of Croweauum for a much 
higher price than we receive for Adiantum 
of ordinary varieties shipped in by our 
growers. Respectfully, Welch Bbos. 



The plants which will be ready for sale by the 1st of July next, will be from benches and large enough for 4-inch pots, as it is a rapid 
grower and no easy matter to confine it] to a 3-inch pot. The photograph of the small fern shows character of plants, when ready to be 
shipped 1st of July. The prices will be as follows: 



$35.00 per 100. $250.00 per lOOO. 



250 AT 
1000 RATE. 



PETER CROWE, Itica, N. Y. 



102 



The American Florist. 



Feb. IS, 



The (Nursery Tssqe. 

AM. ASSOCIATION OF NURSERYMEN. 

N W. Hale, Knoxville, Tenn., Pres.; Frank 
A. 'Wkbbb, St. Louis, Mo., Vice-Pres.; Gkoeqb C. 
SSAeER, Rochester, N. Y., Seo'y. 

Twenty-ninth annual convention, Atlanta, Ga., 
June, 1904. 

Santa Barbara, Cal.— The extensive 
collection of bamboos and other orna- 
mental plants grown by the Southern 
California Acclimatizing Association is 
being dispersed, the land being required 
for building purposes. 

Thk senate committe on public lands 
has authorized a favorable report on the 
bill providing means for acquiring groves 
of Sequoia gigantea, in the state of Cali- 
fornia, with a view to making these 
tracts a national park. 

Madison, Wis.— The closing meeting of 
the Wisconsin State Horticultural Society 
February 5 was in honor of its dead 
members. The memorial session was for 
Henry Terrant, A. Clark Tuttle and Z. 
K. Jewett. Addresses were given by 
George J. Kellogg, Lake Mills; Franklin 
Johnson, Bara'boo, and A. J. Phillips, 
Sparta. 

White Pine Seed. 

One of our correspondents is in the 
market for a quantity of white pine seed. 
Those who are in a position to supply 
same should advise us. 



Lowell, Mass. 

During the last two weeks we experi- 
enced the severest winter weather we 
have had for years, the mercury going 
down to 30° below zero. It has been so 
severe that it almost put several growers 
out of business. Business in general con- 
tinues to keep up well, considering the 
weather. While the cut flower trade has 
dropped off considerably, there have been 
several large funerals, which have kept 
down the heavy supply of flowers. 
Spring flowers are very much in evidence 
and make one think of the good days 
that are coming. 

Geo. Buxton, of Nashua, N. H., is send- 
ing to town some excellent carnations of 
his own creation, Marion Buxton. His 
carnations in general are as good as one 
could wish for. 

Frank Sladen has something of a nov- 
elty in the way of a new cypripedium 
carrying two blooms on a stem. 

A. M. 



riinnnrAwmrDCCDicc "*% ^ 



S 
c* 



■^. 



SEEDLING STOCK, SHRUBS, 
(ORNAMENTAL TREES, EVER( 
GREENS. FORCING PLANTS. 



SUPERIOR 
^QUALITY.GRADING^ 



J. F. MUUER NUSSERY. Rellingen. (Germanyi. 
FINEST RAFFIA AND TREE SEEDS. 

Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 



n 



NOW IS THE TIME TO ORDER. 



"1 



Per 100 

Exochorda Gill., 18 to 24-inch, bushy S 8.00 

Lonicera. H Belgica and Heckrotti, 3 to 

4 feet, bu.shy 8.00 

Ampelopsis Japonica. 2H-inch pots 4.00 

Cearus Deodara.lf) to 18-inch 35.00 

Cedrus Deodara. 39 to 24-inch 30.00 

Oranges, best sorts, grafted, bearing size 

12-Inch, bushy, 4-inch pots 20.00 i 

Ligustrum Amurense. true, 3 to 3-feet branched. . . 

Write lor Wholasals and 



Per 100 ■ , 

Oranges, 15 to 18-inch, 5-inch pots 30.00^ \ 

Lemons, grafted, 18 to 34-inch, 5-inch 

pots 30.00 

Kentia Belmoreana, 13 to 15-inch, 5 leaves 18.00 

Latania, 15- inch, 3 to 4 ch. leaves 20.00 

Phoenix Canariensis, 15 to 18-inch, 2 to 3 

leaves, showing character 15.00 

Not less than 50 of a kind at above prices. - 
per 1000, $20.00 



Dascrlptlve Calalogua. 



f. J. :be^rok:jm:^V]vs oo., (inc.)i 

^ FRUITLAND NURSERIES. • 

Established 1856. A.UOUSTA., GtA.. 



I 



Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 



etc., have been the standard of excellence for half a 
century. The best always cheapest. Have hundreds 
of carloadBof 

Fruits and Ornamentals. 

40 acres of Hardy Roees including 45,f)00 of the 

famous Crimson Kambler. 44 greenhouses of Palms, 

Correspondence solicited. CatalOBue free. GOth year. 1000 acres. 




Ficufi, Ferns, Hoses, etc, 

THE STORRS & HARRISON CO., 



Box 260, Painesville, Ohio. 



^ nip*-trn " 



SEND TO- 



Eastern Nurseries, 

FOR VINCA MINOR 



JAMAICA PLAIN. 
MASS. 



FINE LARGE CLUMPS. 



FOR SALE CHEAP. 



August Rolker & Sons, 

IMPORTERS OF 

Palms. Bay Trees. Auracarias. etc. Decorative Plants 
for spring delivery; Lily of the Val>ey, Lilacs, Forc- 
ing Bulbs, etc for fall delivery; Raffid for Nursery- 
men and Florists. Address 

31 Barclay St. or P. 0. Box 752, NEW YORK. 

Please mention the American Floriit when wyittng. 

J. DIJKHUIS & CO. 

BOSKOOP.HOLLAND. 
QUALITY. QUANTITY. 

Ask our prices for 

AZALEAS, RHODODENDRONS, PEONIES, 

ROSES, HARDY EVERGREENS, 

CLEMATIS, Etc. 
Price List Frea on Application. 

KOSTER <& CO. 

KSllsTrii: Boskoop, Holland. 

HARDY AZALEAS, BOX TREES, CLEMATIS, 

CONIFERS, HYDRANGEAS, PEONIES. 

Pot-Grown Plants for Forcing. 

RHODODENDRONS, H. P. ROSES, Etc. 

No Agents. Catalogue tree on demand. 
Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 

When in Europe come and see us and inspect our 
extensive Nurseries. Gouda is our railroad depot. 

HARDY, FANCY ORNAMENTAL NURSERY STOCK. 

J. Blaauw & Co., 

BOSKOOP, HOLLAND. 

Catalogue free on demand. Headquarters for the 
famoua ColoradoBlue Spruces, purest, bluest strain 

Please yncntion the American Florist -when writing. 



Send to 



THE MOON 

For < Trees, Shrubs. Vines 
Yourl and Small Fruits. 

Descriptive Illustrated Catalogue Free 
THE WM. H. MOON OO. 

^^.a> Morrisville. Pa. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 




California Privet... 

Per lOOO 

13,Cno, 1 year. 18 to 24-inch, very bushv $11.00 

15,000, 1 year, 13 to 18-inch, well branched . . 8.50 

CANNAS, Strong Eyes. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

5,000 Eeandale $1.00 $8.00' 

5,0C0 Charles Henderson 1.00 8.00' 

5.000Chioago l.fO 8 00 

2 000 Florence Vaughan 1.00 8.0O 

2,0r0 Mnie. Crozy I. CO 8.00' 

15,000 Austria 75 5.00 

We also have 6 000 Biota Rosedale in all sizes. 
This is the best llorlsts' Evergreen in the list. 
Our stock will please you. 

riftROW BROS., Guthrie, Okla. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 

CALIFORNIA PRIVET. 

Per lOOa 

■jno.OOO 2 yrs., 2 to 2!4 ft., very bushv $80.00 

l.iO.OOO 3 yrs.. 18 to 24 in., very bushV 16.00 

100,0011 3 yrs., 12 10 18 in., very bushy lO.Oa 

300.000 I yr., 13 to 18 in., branched 9.00' 

200,000 1 yr.. 10 to 12 in., branched 7.C0 

lOO.OOO CuttiuKs, 8 in., strong 80 

ICO.OOO Cuttings, 8 in., light. 60 

.\lso have a large stock in Asparagus Roots, 3 yrs.. 
Palmetto and Barrs. 30.010 Canna Roots, 50.000 
Tuberose Roots, 5,0jO Geraniums, 'iVt pots, all good 
stock and low prices. Write for trade list. 

J. H. O'HACAN, Little Sllvar, N. J. 

Please mention the A merican Florist when writing, 

YOU BET IT IS 

The quality that does the talking;. 

member of R Schoo & 
Co., Bulb Growers at Hil- 
leyom (Holland) and of .Multiflora Nurseries, Bos- 
koop, (Holland) will furnish you same and for 
reasonable prices at that. Write to day. 

136 Water street, NEW YORK. 



JOHN SCHEEPERS. 



THE 



Brockton Dahlia Farm. 

The hirszestand finest collection of Dahlias 
in the United States, consisting of all the 
leading varieties. Send for price list. * . • . 

W. P. LOTHROP, ^' ' rsr'*' 



1904- 



Th E American Florist. 



103 



DREER'S Summer Flowering Bulbs. 

~ 1^ ''^\*=' . '"W^ '''"*° Great Tuberous Rooted Bedding Begonias 

r^^ 1^ /^W """^E ZEPPELIN and LAFAYETTE 

( ■W'\^i:~' "^ ^-^'"^"^^i&t^ ^€W- _/~ ■■7 S^^ colored illustration of these two varieties on cover of our new 1904 

—/^yK-'-JM/^i 'i ^ I Tjg Jpii' '" " tfeCl'M '~ntalo2ue: they are the most brilliant among all the Begonias and invalua- 

iiiJrVTfeJ: '^^~^"'^'*B^?°7^*^ y ' ■jijlw-.^') ble either lis pot plants or for Ijedilini.'. 

m^SS0' ^^^S* ''^to>*«nSD*,,>rl£jJi^'-^^ ""''« Zeppelin, Pure Rich Scarlet, 15 cents each; $1.5) perdozen; Sia.OO 

'~A;^^ *'.^^^''£3y/^^^3%j-^iVnJ< 'w^ ^ Lafayette, Brilliant Crimson Scarlet, 25 cents each; $3.50 per dozen; 

^U^^^^^^^^^S^h NEW HYBRID FRILLED TUBEROUS BEGONIAS 

'vt.^'^^J^^tV^k^'^l V^-'^'^lf^ '^^^^^5l^Tll^?Sl A '^ unique form with (lowers of immense size, with wavy or frilled 

vX'^fZ^W^^0,.i^i -.ir^^ /K-WW^ liMh^Jty \Mft^ pet:ils similar to the best forms of single pttunius, 35 cents each; S3.E0 per 

m^^>fi^^f2^i^^^l^^.^ GLOXINIA GRASSIFOUA GRANDIFLORA 

^^'T'^CB&^W Vvii («lf!^l''V«sJ,^^^^»t7' J'^vly^i^' A very line selected strain, sirong, woll-miil ured bulbs. Red, White, 

.<^ i'4,»=^>-^p- ^ *»!!«, 'I' -^"^ 7.^»**X"'*!S?^ ■?*. J*®?!* Blue, Red with white border. Blue with white bordi;r, in separate colors or 

gt^f "OS-W^^ J^ l!25^ vfc 'ia'\* V*- ^^^ nC^^l in choicest mixture, 50 cents per dozen; $4.00 per 100; $35.00 per lOOr. 

J^^^\L^W^ i^fc5 ^^£v>^^ MIobtLLBIItOUS BULBS 

/»^^Hv -A^af^^S V^^l^^L^te ' ' ^^MkoVt Amaryllis Formosissima $.30 $2.00 $15.00' 

1/ S^\, '^ '^'^(irt¥''i'^tS^' 1 ife^^^l^»I^V Amorphophallus Rievierii .'.".'..'.':.'. 2^00 is'oo 

V j^^.^smr* '''^^ „^.^*'1r^'^'n^^^^nS"' SSSI^ ^^K5St_ l^Plfc^ Caladium, Fancy Leaved, 25 named sorts 125 10 CO 

/^ r^ "*"^^^fe ^L "\ ^^ 3L'^ p^ \ ^^sR&^fc"^^^ Escuientum, 6 to 8-inch bulbs 40 3.00 

r~ ,^ ^^^^a_ V -^ ^k. \'%i^^^SL. Escuientum, 8 to 10- nch bulbs 65 5.00 

— ~- V '5^4,^* 3*^B&>. ^ ^ l^iS^ -'**'**Wk»^^^-= Escuientum, 10 to 12-inch bulos 90 7.00 

•^m I y "^ ' ^ ^i^^^^''^" '^ ^Saikti \^w!!„ ^ — Escuientum, 12 to 13-inch bulbs 1.86 10.00 

^^jJp-=^^^^Stt[j^ \g^^^'^^^fi^ J^^ ^ /'i,.- »v^ ~^ Hyacinthua Car.dicans 30 2.00 

w^^^^^^^S rf i *^^^^ , i^wfflfcfc w^^^'i'f^^^^ ^^ Ismine Calatnina 1.60 lO.OO 

^"^ -- -Zi^^^m^^^^^^^^^^^^^^L^^^^4 t^~^ tJ^^^ — Lilium Auratum, 8 to 9-inch 76 5.00 

~"^^°°~^^^ . -^.=st,,._-. S3*=;_^ ,, 11 to 13-inch '.... 1.75 14 00 

T||BCBf|||C DnflTCn DCISnilUC I-iUumSpeciosum Album and Rubrum, 7 to 9-inch .. .90 7.00 

I UDCnUllw nUUICU DCIIUnmi- Glarlolus, American Hybrids, choice:.! mixture 15 1.00 9.0» 

Single Flowered, Scarlet, Crim.son. White, Yellow, Eose and Orange, ., Groff's Hybrids, choicest mixture 35 2.50 22.00 

40 cents per dozen; $3.C0 per irO; J35.00 per lOnn. Madeira Vines , 30 2.00 15.00 

Choicest Single Plonered in Mixture, 35 cejits per dozen; S2.50 per Montbretias, 5 cnoice named varieties 25 l.';5 12.60 

100; $33.00 per 1000 Tigndia Conchiflora, Grandmora Alba aud Pavonia 30 2.00 15.00 

'Double Flowering, Soar'et,, Rose, White and Yellow, 65 cents per Tuberoses, Double Pearl, selected, 6 to 8-inch 20 1.00 8.0O 

dozen; $.1.00 per lOO; $40.00 per 10 c. Double Pearl, fine, 3 to 4-inch 10 .60 5.00 

Choicest Double Floweiiog in Mixture, 50 cents per dozen; $4.00 per For a complete list of all seasonable Bulbs including the best list of 

100; $35.00 per 1000. up-to-date Dahlias, see current Wholesale Price List. 

HENRY A. DREER, 714 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 




NEW LARGE-FLOWERING GALLA 

CALLA DEVONIENSIS. 

Blooming Dallas From Seed In One Year 

100 seeds, 75c; 1000 seeds, $6,00, 

Slreptocarpus Vaughan's Giant Hybrids. 

This st-ed should be sown in February or 
March and commence blooming in July or 
August, and if the'seed pods are removed as 
fast as they appear, the plants will bloom all 
winter. These Giant Hybrids are the best 
that exist in Streptccarpus and will produce 
flowers two or three times larger than those of 
the ordinary strain, in colors ranging from 
pure white through lavender, purple, violet, 
red and rose. Trade pkl. (500 seeds). 50c. 

Vaughan's Seed Store, 



CHICAGO, 

84-86 Randolph St. 



NEW YORK, 

14 Barclay St. 



Please mention the American Florist when writing. 




Strong Boot Pieces, 
averaging 2 to 3 
eyes. 



ALPHONSE BOUVIER. 
ALSACE. 
AUSTRIA. 

BLACK BEAUTY, $7.00 per 100. 
BASSETT'S RED, »3.00 per 100. 
CHARLES HENDERSON. 
CRIMSON BEDDER. 

DUKK OF MARLBOROUGH. 
EQANDALE, $3.00 per 100. 
FLORENCE VAUGHAN. 
UNLESS NOTED $2.00 per 100; $18.00 per 1000. WRITE FOR PRICES ON LARGE LOTS 



MME. CROZY. 
MRS. KATE GRAY, $6.00 per 100. 
PRES. CARNOT. 
PRES. CLEVELAND. 
PROGRESSION. 

QUEEN CHARLOTTE. 
ROBERT CHRISTIE. 

SAM TRELEASE, $4.00 per 100. 
SOUV. DE ANTOINE CROZY. 



The Storrs & Harrison Co., 



Faiuesville, 
Ohio. 



Please mention the American Florist when writing. 



The Gonard & Jones Co., 



Philadelphia Rambler. 

The new forcing rose, strong field plants, 
$16.00, $20.00 and $30.00 per 100. 

CRIMSON RAMBLER. 

E.\tra well branched, $8.00, $11.00 and $15.00 
per 100. 

WEST GROVE, 
PA. 

Please mention the American Florist whenwriting. 

Van der Weijden & Co. 

THE NURSERIES. BOSKOOP, HOLLAND. 

WhjOlesale Growers of Rhododendrons, Azaleas, 
Magnolias; Conifers, Taxus, all sizes and varieties. 
Pot grown plants for forcing. H. P. Roses in every 
quantity. Some Crimson Ramblers left, strong. 

No Agents. Catalogue Free. No Agents. 



AVe devote a large acreage of ground to the cul^ 
tivation of Cannas, and our list of varieties i& 
complete, including all the novelties and stand- 
ard kinds Prices as low as any for first class 
stock. Write (or price list. 

WAGNER PARK CONSERVATORIES, 

Please mention the American Florist whenwriting. 

Cannas«.« 

A oollectioDS of beat varieties, dry roots at 
$I3.50'per ICOO; 10,OJ0 for $100.00. Names of 
varieties on application. 

C, G. NANZ, Owensboro, Ky. 



SUCCESSFUL SELLERS 



are the luceessful growers who advertise iajtjtjtjtjtjtjltjt 

-THE AMERICAN FLORIST 



104 



The American Florist. 



Feb. /J' 



Our Pastimes. 

AnnouncementB of coming contests or other 
events of interests to our bowling, shooting and 
sporting readers are solicited and will be given 
place in this column. 

Address all correspondence for this department 
to Wm. J. Stewart, 43 W. 28th St., New York. 
Robt. Kift, 1725 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa.; 
or to the American Florist Co., Chicago, 111. 

At New York. 

The Florists' Bowling Club met Mon- 
day afternoon, February 8, at the 
Twenty-third street alleys and the fol- 
lowing scores were recorded: 

Player. 1st 2d 3d 

Prank 133 113 145 

Siebrecht 171 135 134 

Gibbs 141 95 143 

Mansfield 157 175 145 

Butterfleld 101 135 

Hafner 138 131 

Guttman 131 151 12" 

Shaw 131 130 169 

Burns 120 140 148 

Lang 165 174 

Bennett 126 

Next Monday evening a prize bowling 
contest will be on and all members ot the 
Florists' Club are invited to bring prize 
packages and participate in the fun. 



At St. Louis. 

The Bowling Club met as usual on 
Monday night. Team 2 won. Kuehn 
was high man with a total of 587. 

TEA3I 1. 

Player Ut 3nd 8d T'l 

Kuehn 237 163 188 587 

Weber 165 150 142 447 

Beneke 123 115 178 416 

Ellis 145 107 134 386 

Weber 133 115 109 337 

2173 
TEAM 2. 

Player 1st 2nd 3d 4th 

Beneke 163 198 203 564 

Miller 165 167 139 471 

Meinhart 132 124 118 374 

Young 139 131 101 371 

§turtz 154 195 172 521 

2301 

F. K. B. 



At Philadelphia. 

Although there is not much excitement 
in bowling circles in this quiet town, the 
regulars keep pegging away and many 
good scores are made. A new four-team 
league has been formed, in which the sec- 
ond team of the club has been entered. 
The most fun in the alleys appears to be 
the post mortems that are held after 
close games. Old man "Bake" is gener- 
ally chief official on these occasions, and 
his diagnosis is worth going a mile to 
hear. Prize bowling for the ladies on 
Febriiarv 22 will no doubt bring out 



The January averages fol- 



great scores, 
low: 

Moss 174 Burton 151 

Connor 168 Kitt 150 

Starkey 1P4 Anderson 147 

(Jraham 159 Baker 147 

Westcott 159 Gibson 144 

Harris 154 Craig 144 

Watson 153 Dungan 130 

Foeck 153 Gardener 125 

Dunlap 151 Baxter 123 



At Cliica£:o. 

An event of interest to the bowlers 
took place on the evening of February 5 
at Benzinger's Monroe street alleys. In 
a match of seven games, total pins to 
count, E. C. Benthey defeated E. F. Win- 
terson, one of the Florists' Club cracks, 
by a margin of 281 pins. The totals 
were: Benthey, 1128; Winterson, 847. 
Another set-to between the same con- 
testants is promised for the near future. 

Another merry bowling party held the 
boards at Geroux alleys Tuesday evening, 
February 9. Three informal games were 
rolled with the following scores: 

Player 1st 

Stevens 174 

P. .7. Hauswirth 139 

John Degnan 101 

Geo. Scott 134 

L. H. Winterson 104 

G. Asraus 146 

E. F. Winterson 159 

Newett 108 

L. Kill 133 

Essa 105 

V. Kreitling 133 



2d 


3d 


166 


146 


131 


131 


123 


12H 


i:iH 


143 


\\:t 


101 


i.w 


159 


129 


149 


144 


153 


127 


79 


125 




134 


131 



LADIES. 

Player Ist 2d 

Mrs. Winterson 119 80 

Mrs. Scott 48 59 

Mrs. Kill 119 115 

Mrs. Hauswirth 87 99 

Mrs. Kreitling 99 112 

Mrs. Melius 79 83 



3d 

77 
64 
111 
108 
106 



Akron, O. — Hitchings & Company 
have just completed for C. B. Ray- 
mond a house 20x120 heated with hot 
water and fitted with one of their sec- 
tional boilers. 

Warwick, R. I. — A fire starting in the 
ventilator and fanned by a fierce wind, 
totally destroyed the barn and green- 
houses of J. A. Foster February 2. The 
loss is more than $20,000, partly insured. 
Four valuable horses, other stock and 
the entire contents of the building were 
consumed. 

Fond du Lac, Wis. — Mrs. Ernest 
Haentzedied on the morning of February 
7, after a brief illness. She had been a 
sufferer from diabetes at different times 
for eight years. The deceased was born 
in Gemuenden, Germany, in 1841. She, 
as her husband, was an enthusiastic flor- 
ist, and she worked for many years with 
her busbar. ^ at their greenhouses on Lin- 
den strec t She is survived by her hus- 
band, five sons and one daughter. The 
funeral occurred Wednesday, February 
10. 




4 Grades of 

TEA ROSES 



"Specials" 
"Selects" 
"1st" 



«« 



2ncl 



99 



The "Specials" are highest possi- 
ble quality in color, stem and foliage and 
are far superior to what are usually called "BEST." Price lo cents, 
The "Selects" are equally fine, but not quite so large. Price 8 cents, 
The "Firsts" are good standard roses in every way at a popular price 
5 cents, The "Seconds" are good clean buds, with stems 6 to 9 
inches. Price 3 cents BEAUTIES, all grades at market prices. 

Garefull packing andshipping to any distance. 

mm^m m^ r'm^ ^^f% O south park floral 00. 

nt.LLt:.it BifU9m, NEW GASTLE, IND. 



rHE ANNUAL FLOWER AND PLANT SHOW 

Under the Auspices of the 

Boston Co-Operative Flower Growers' Association. 

Will take place at the BOSTON FLOWER MARKET, 

161-163 Columbus Avenue, :bO{STOK^, :ivi:A.®®. 

Saturday, February 27, 1904, from 9 O'clock A. M. to 5 O'clock P. M. 

Further particulars for intending exhibitors may be had on application to the Secretary. 

COaVUVUTTBE s 

WM. NIOKOLSON, Chairman, E. SUTERMEISTER, GEORGE CARTWRICHT. 



J904. 



The American Florist. 



105 



Minneapolis. 

The last week's trade was fairly good 
and stock seems sufficient to meet all 
demands excepting tea and Beauty 
roses. The weather has been exceedingly 
disagreeable and eastern trains have been 
from two to eight hours late, so that the 
retailer ordering from these points exper- 
ienced many disappointments in trying 
to supply his customers. Carnations 
have been increasing in supply, as have 
violets Quality is all that is desired. 
Bulbous stock of all kinds has shortened 
up. There seems to be a promising out- 
look for an increased cut of tea and 
Beauty roses for some time to come. 
Valley of choice quality is being shipped 
in. 

R. Wessling has the distinction of hav- 
ing a "count" in his employ. The said 
party coming to this city with $300 
in his pocket straightway hired a 
"cabby" to drive him around the city. 
The result was he imbibed too much, and 
was released of his $300 and now has to 
go back to his old trade, which he claims 
is the culture of flowers. 

Irving Kimball, of Anoka, Minn., w^as 
in the city last week. He is growing 
carnations and is meeting with success. 
His attention was formerly given to vege- 
table production. 

John Monson of the Minneapolis Floral 
Company says the firm intends to add a 
range of carnation houses in the spring. 

The coal question has caused the grow- 
ers much annoyance during the cold snap 
as the quality is very poor. 

The Florists' Club social dance Febru- 
ary 4 was well attended by the old as 
well as the young. 

H. A. Bunyard, of New York, was a 
caller last week and attended the Flo- 
rists' Club dance. 

W. A. Sauer, of the East Side Floral 
Company, is the proud father of a new 
bright baby boy. 

Hopper & Schamp are getting ready 
for the construction of their new range. 

Walter Kerridge is busy on decorations 
and has some good orders booked. 

R. G. Mendenhall has been confined to 
his bed the last week by illness. 

Hans Rosacker is marketing some 
choice violets. C. F. R. 



Providence, R. I. 



Business continues in the familiar slow 
rut despite the fact that flowers are in 
crop and medium-priced. Carnations at 
$2 and $2.50 per 100, roses at 3 to 6 
cents each and violets 40 to 50 cents per 
100 are the prevailing rates. Narcissus 
is very slow at $1 and $1.50 per 100. 
Romans bring 2 cents and tulips 3 cents 
wholesale. Smilax is plentiful at 10 cents 
per string and maidenhair is short at 75 
cents per 100. 

With the exception of J. A. Foster's 
fire there is nothing new to report. Mr, 
Foster lost several thousand dollars in 
barns, horses, etc., and a couple of forced 
vegetable houses, but the carnation range 
with its valuable stock remains unharmed 
much to the relief of Wm. Macnair, who 
handles the product in Providence and 
who appreciates the skill of Wm. Burke 
as a grower. M. M. 



OsHKOSH, Wis. —John Nelson has 
recently contracted with Riemer & Rad- 
mer, of Milwaukee, to install a Furman 
sectional boiler in his greenhouse. This 
change was caused by his old wrought 
iron boiler giving out. He has suffered 
no loss of stock, although the weather 
has been very severe. 



Carnations M*„^. 



Cuttings. 



ONLY FIRST-CLASS STOCK SENT OUT. CET YOUR ORDER IN NOW 
TO BE SURE OF EARLY DELIVERY. 

NEW VARIETIES. 



Per ino Per lOOn 

Flamingo, March delivery $12.00 $100.00 

Lady Bountiful 1300 100.00 

The Belle 12.00 100.00 

Indianapolis 12 00 100.00 

Nelson Fisher, March delivery.... 12.00 100.00 



Per 100 

Mrs. M. A. Patten $12.00 

^Vhite Lawson. March delivery. . . 12.00 

Albatross, March delivery 10.00 

Crusaaer 10.00 

Reliance 10.00 



CHOICE VARIETIES 

Per ICO Per 1000 



Enchantress $6.00 $60.00 

Este le 4.00 30 00 

Fragrance 6.00 50.00 

Golden Beauty 5.00 40.00 

Gov.Lowndes 5.00 40.00 

Gov. Wolcott 6.00 40.00 

STANDARD 

Per IfO Per loro 

America $1.75 $15.00 

Crcssbrook 4.00 30.00 

Enquirer ■ 2.60 20.00 

Ethel Crocker 175 15.00 

Flora Hill 1.76 16.00 

Genevieve Lord 1.76 15.00 

G.H.Crane 2.50 20.00 

Gov. Roosevelt 3.50 30.00 

Lorna •■. 3.00 25.00 

Marquis 1.75 15.00 



Per 100 

Harlowarden $6.00 

Lillian Pond 6.00 

Mrs. Theo. Roosevelt 5.00 

Pres. McKinley 5.00 

The Queen 5.00 

White Bradt 6.00 



Per 1000 
$100.00- 
lOO.OO 
80.00 
80.00 
80.00 



Per 1000 
$50.00- 
40.00 
40.0» 
40.00 
40.0O 



SORTS. 



Per too Per lOOa 



Morning Glory $2.60 

Mrs. F. Joost 1.76 

Mrs. H. N. Higinbotham 4.00 

Mrs. E. A. Nelson 4.00 

Mrs. Potter Palmer 3.00 

Mrs. Xhos. V^. Lawson 2.50 

Norway 1.76 

Prosperity 2.50 

Queen Louise 1.75 

White Cloud 1.75 



$20.00 
15.00 
35.00 
35.00 
25.00 
20.00 
15.00 
20.00 
16.00 
15.00 



DORMANT CANNAS. 



strong 2-3 eyed bulbs. 
TRUE STOCK. 



Per 100 

Allemannia $3.00 

Burbank 2.00 

Black Beauty 7.00 

Chas. Henderson 2.00 

Chicago 6.00 

Duke of Marlborough 2.00 

David Harum 6.00 

Egandale 4.00 

Leonard Vaughan 4.00 



Per 100- 

Mme. Louis Druz $2.60 

Mile. Berat 2.60 

Mme. Crozy , 2.00- 

Monsieur J arry Desld^es... .~. 3.00 

Mrs. Kate Gray 6.00 

Mont Blanc 20.00 

Pennsylvania 6.0O 

Red Indian 5.00 

Secretaire Chabanne 2.0O 



Exp. Crampbell 
Francois Reif 
J. Aymard 



The fallowing sorts SI. 00 per 100: 

L. Patry Paul Marquant 

Mme. Alfred Blanc Partenope 

Mme. Celestin Dubost President Carnot 



Vaughan's Seed Store, Ciiicago. 

GREENHOUSES AND NURSERIES, WESTERN SPRINGS, ILL. 



STRONGLY ROOTED 

CARNATIONS 



NOW 
READY. 



GROWN OUT OF DOORS AND ROOTED WITHOUT HEAT. 



WHITE. 



Quean Louise. 

Flora Hill 

Alba 

Gov. Wolcott.. 

Norway 

Lillian Pond... 

Chicot 

Viola Allen... 



Per 100 10:0 

....S1.20 $10,00 
1.20 10.00 



3.40 
3.40 
1.20 
5.00 
1.20 
3.00 



PINK. 



Mr(. T. W. Lawson 1 40 

Mrs. Jonst 100 

Mermaid 1 M 

Mrs Roosevelt 600 

Success lOO 

President McKinley 5.00 

Crossbraok 2 so 



30.00 
30.00 
10.00 
45.00 
11.00 
25.00 



12.50 
10,00 
10.00 
55.00 
35.00 
45.00 
30.00 



SCARLET. 



J. H. Maniey. 
G. H. Crane . . 

America 

Mrs Palmer. 

Apollo 

Adonis 



Per 100 lOOO 

S3.50 $30.00 

1.20 10.00 

.... 1.20 
1.20 



10.00 
lO.OO 



CRIMSON. 

Harlowarden 

Gov. Roosevelt 



YELLOW. 



Eldorado . 

VARIEGATED. 
Marshall Field 



3.50 30.00 
7.00 65.00 



5.00 45.00 
1.50 Il.OO 



1.00 9.00 



Stella 3.00 

Armazindy 100 

Prosperity 1-40 



25.00 
9.00 
12.00 



25 ol any one liind at 100 prices. 250 at lOOJprices. 



We prepay express charges and will ship C. O. D. with the privilege of examination, we assuming 
all the responsibility of Cuttings arriving in good condition and proving satisfactory. 

Loomis Floral Co., '^"cT"' 



Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 



CARNATION Louisc NauHfiann 

Dark pink. Produces tar more than Lawson and is a better color. With this variety you 
can pick every day the year around. Always heavy with buds and flowers. Most excellent 
keeper. Size, Z-iV- inches. Fringed and never bursts or fades. Averages 35 flowers per plant 
a season, more than any variety I have ever grown. Come and see them grow. Order 
now lor February and IWarch Delivery, »1.:35 per Doz.; $8.00 per 100; $70.00 per 1000. Also 
Rooted CuttiUKS ol ENCHANTRESS, $6.00 per 100. 

IVA.U1VIA.1V3V, 1537 Doan Street, Cle-%^ela.n.<ai» Olaio. 
Please mention the A merican Florist when writing* 



AX. 



106 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 13, 



stock Plants, Rooted Cuttings and Plants in Small Pots. 

The tlome of Chrysanthemum Stock. Roses, Violets. Geraniums and Carnations For Sale. 

WHEN YOU ORDER TURN TO ISSUES JANUARY 2nd AND 9lh, 1 904, FOR PRICES AND VARIETIES. 



BEACH, THE FLORIST, 



LEADS. -WHY NOT BUY DIRECT? 

Store No. 8 Fotl Offico Areado, BRIDGEPORT. CONN. 

Greenhouses. 3^83 Park Ave. Oiivid S. lieach, Prop. 



BOOKS rOR nORISTS. 

The time is coming along when these are 
needed and opportunity at hand for reading 
them. Every one of the following should be 
in your library. 

Send prices quoted and we send the books. 

Landscape Gardening (Maynard). — 
The development of landscape art within 
the past few years compels the wideawake 
florist to keep posted on this branch of 
the business. The many suggestions of 
this book will be found helpful every 
business day. It contains 338 pages, 
165 illustrations. $1.50 

The Goldfish (Mulertt). — A number 
of florists find goldfish an attractive and 
paying addition to their business. The 
best advice is given in every department 
of the subject, including construction and 
care of the parlor aquarium, in this 
volume of 160 pages, handsomely illus- 
trated. $2.on 

Greenhouse Construction (Taft).— It 
tells the whole story about how to build, 
and heat a greenhouse, be it large or 
small, and that too in a plain, easily 
understood, practical way. It has 118 
Illustrations. $1.50. 

Heating and Ventilating Buildings 
(Carpenter). — This book covers the entire 
subject most fully. In the preparation of 
heating and ventilating plans, it will be 
found a most valuable guide. $4.00. 

How TO Make Money Growing Vio- 
lets (Saltford) .— This is by a practical 
grower who has made a success of the 
business. No grower of violets can afford 
to be without it. Price 25 cents. 

Steam Heating for Buildings (Bald- 
win) . — Contains valuable data and hints 
for steam fitters and those who employ 
this method of heating. The 350 pages 
are fully illustrated. $2.50. 

The Horticulturists' Rule-Book 
(L. H. Bailey). — Contains information 
valuable to all those engaged in any 
branch of horticulture. Illustrated. 312 
pages. 75 cents. 

Fumigation Methods Qohnson) .—A 
practical treatise on cheap and efiective 
means of destroying insect pests. Hand- 
somely bound and profusely illustrated; 
250 pages. $1.00. 

The American Carnation (C. W. 
Ward) . — A complete treatment of all the 
most modern methods of cultivating this 
most important flower. Illustrated. 
$3.50. 

Practical Ploricdlturb (Peter Hen- 
derson) . — A guide to the successful propa- 
gation and cultivation of florists' plants. 
Illustrated. 325 pages. $1.50. 

How TO Grow Cut Flowers (Hunt). 
— The only book on the subject. It is a 
thoroughly reliable work by an eminently 
successful practical florist. Illustrated. 
$2.00. 

The Rose — Its cultivation, varieties, 
etc. (H. B. EUwanger). — A complete 
guide of the cultivation of the rose, 
together with a classification of all the 
leading varieties. $1.25. 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO., 

324 Dearborn SIrast, CHICAGO. 




Indianapolis 

The best bright pink carnation in sight. Come 
and see it grow/ing. Aw/arded Certificate of Merit 
Indiana State Florists' Ass'n, Jan. 12, 19^3. 
Scored 85 points Chicago, Nov. 18, 1903. Certifi- 
cate of Merit, Cincinnati Florists' Club, Jan. 9, 
1904. Certificate of Merit, Indiana State Florists' 
Ass'n., January 13, 1904. What more could you 
ask ? 12.60 par doz.; SI 2 00 por 1 00; $1 00. 00 ptr 1 000. 

A FINE LOT OF STANDARD SORTS. 



Per 100 


1000 


Per 100 


1000 


McKinley ....S3.00 




Plotiana .. . 2.00 


18.00 


Harlowarden. .5.00 




Q. Louise. . . 2.00 


IH.OO 


Her Majesty.. 5.00 




E. Crocker.. 1.60 


12.50 


Flora Hill.... 1.59 $12.51 


Lawson .... 2.0O 


18.00 


Crane 2.50 


20.10 


G. Roosevelt 2.00 




Kstelle 3.00 


25.00 


P. Palmer.. 3.0O 




W.Cloud 1.59 


12.50 


E. A. Nelson 3.00 




Lorna 2.U0 


18.00 


Apollo 3.C0 




Viola Allen... 3.00 


25.00 







BAUR & SMITH, 

330 W. 38th St., Indianapolis. Ind. 



Please mention the A meri'can Florist when writing. 



CARNATION CUTTINGS 



strong Plants Ready lor Prompt Shipment. Our Stock is Unexcelled. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

PEED 3.00 2,5.00 

WHITE CLOUD 2.50 20.00 

AMERICA 2.50 20.00 



PerinOPerlOOD 

FLORA HILL $2.,50 $20.00 

THE SPORT 2..50 20.00 

MRS. LAWSON 3.00 25.00 

MRS. HIGINBOTHAM 3.00 25.00 

XeOSB CUTTIIWGS. 

BRIDE S12..50 per 1000 IVORY SI2.50 per 1000 

BRIDESMAID 1-2.50 " GOLDEN GATE 12.50 

Lots of 500 at lOOO rate. 

SINNER BROTHERS, 

Wholesale Cut Flowers, 



58-60 Wabash Avenue, 



CHICAGO. 



Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 



>4K ji. II, J. .It. <i.<it.n.<i>. It. ».4i>Jt,ii. at ji.<i.JkJi-di.jitJt.ii.Jt-n. JtJi.ii.ifi.il. 4it<it-ti.akJi-ii.J»Ji.iii«ltJt.<KJi.Ji.J4.li.ii.<it.ii.<it<lt.ii.«it^« 



NEW ROSE FOR 1904. 



General MacArthur 

The most brilliant in color and the coming red rose for the 
general florist. For prices see issue of January 16. Ready 
for distribution, April l, 1904, by 

The STORYIS & HARRISON CO., JOHN N. m\, 



PAINESVILLE, O. 



SUMMIT, N. J. 



r»i'M» M'«l'-(rM''riPM'M»M»i'MrM'M'(i M''ir» <i''irir'i'MrM'M'»''l"l»-M'M''l'"M''i'"i» 'r'l'ip M-'i' u'l'ip «i''i'u «r')F ir'i'-l'" 



Carnations 



Rooted 
Cuttings. 

No\\' roiidy lots ol them. For :i limited time ;it 
these low prices. If not satisfactory on arrival 
return them, when money will be refunded. 

Per 100 lOOO 

Mrs. T. W. Lawson $1.25 $12.00 

Flora Hill 1.00 10.01) 

Boston Market 3.00 30.00 



per 



fioranilimc 2 and 2V4-inch. fine plants, S. A 
UCiailiUIIIS. Nutt and La Favorite, $3.00 pe) 

lOO; $25.00 per lOOO. 

We guarantee to please yoa in every way. 

S. T. DANLEY. Macomb, III 



ROOTED 

CARNATION CUTTINGS. 

FINE HEALTHY STOCK. 

Per 100 1000 

Enchantress $6.00 ft'iO.OO 

Gov. Wolcott 5.00 40.00 

Lawson 2.50 20.00 

Genevieve Lord 1.75 15.00 

White Cloud 1.75 16.00 

The J. M. Gasser Co., 

234 Euclid Ave., CLEVELAND, O. 



jgoi. 



The American Florist. 



107 



CRUSADER... 

Best sarlet cirnation ever introduced or in sight. No stem rot; stron? grower; no splitting; extremely free; 3 inclies 
long, strong stems. COME AND SEE IT. Price, $10.00 per 100: $80.00 per 1000. 



SEE OUR AD. ON THIS PAGE FOR OTHER VARIETIES 



CHICAGO CARNATION COMPANY, Joliet, III, 

Carnation ^^^ white carnation for i904. 

The Bride 

This variety was the winner of the first prize for best 100 white at the Carnation 
Convention bhow in Brooklyn last February and is unquestionably the best white in sight. 

PRICE, $2.50 per Dozen; $12.00 per Hundred; 
$100.00 per Thousand. 

JOHN N. MAY. Summit, N. J. 



Cuttings. 

Well Rooted. Ready Now. 

Per ifO 1000 

enchantress, light pink $5-50 $50.00 

tiarlowarden, crimson 4.50 40.00 

Her Majesty, white 4 50 40.00 

lillian Pond, white 4.50 40.00 

Pres. McKinley, dark pink 4.50 40.00 

Dorothy Whitney, yellow 4.50 40.00 

Gov. Wolcott, white 4 00 30.00 

Estelle, Jcarlet 3.00 25 00 

'Mrs. T. W. Lawson, dark pink 2.00 17.50 

Mrs. Higlnbotham, light pink... 4.00 30.00 

Prosperity 2.00 16.00 

Boston Market 4.00 30.00 

fair Maid 4.00 30.00 

Marshall Field 5.00 40.00 

NEW VARIETIES, \^:^^r 

Crusader, best scarlet $10.00 80 00 

Flamingo, fancy sarlet 12.00 lOO.OO 

White Lawson, pure white 12.00 100.00 

Lady Bountiful, white 1200 100.00 

Sand for price lit! ol above and other varieties. 

Chicago Carnation Co. 

Please mention the A mencan Florist leiien zc> iting. 

CARNATION CUTTINGS. 

We now have ready good, well-rooted Cuttings, 
from the following varieties; 

100 1000 I 100 1000 

Enchantress ...,$6.00 S80 Eldorado S2.50 $20 

Fair Maid 3.00 25 I Manley 4.00 30 

Fragrance 6.00 50 I Adonis 4.00 30 

The Queen 5.00 40 I Lawson 3.50 3i 

Boston Market.. 4.00 30 I Joost 2.50 30 

Cov. Wolcott. ... 5.00 40 I Harlowarden. . 6.00 SO 

Bradt 3.00 35 I Harry Fenn. . . 5.00 40 

Prosperity 3.50 20 | 

NEW VARIETIES FOR 1904— 

100 1000 

Nelson Fisher $12.00 $100.00 

Mrs. M. .\. Patten 13.00 lOO.OO 

All selected cuttings from healthy stock. Send 
n your order now and secure early delivery. 

Lone Dis Tel 
BlLLERlCA, MASS. 

Please mention the A met tcan Florist wlienwriting. 
NEW LIGHT PINK CARNATION 

"NEW DAYBREAK" 

To the commercial grower wh© is looking for 
profit, this variety is all that its name implies, and 
will :it once commend itself as the old Daybreak 
reincarnated without its faults. Color, true Day- 
break shade, of Daybreak and S'ott extraction 
through several generations of seedlings. Inherits 
the vigor and freedom of both the above varieties. 
Blooms, large, well formed and very sweet: does 
not have a washed out appearance at anv time of 
the year. A fine keeper and shipper. Prici.'. $3.00 
per do/..: $12.00 per 100: *l(O.0Jper ICOO. OTHER 
NEW AND STANDARD VARIETIES. 

The best American and 
foreign varieties and 
test standard sorts. Write for Price List. 

H. WEBER & SONS, Oakland, IVId. 



BACKER & CO., 



Chrysanthemuins. 



Please mention the American Florist when writing 



iVE^PBl^i 



Finest white Carnation on Market this year; flowers 3 in. to 3^ in., fine stem, free 
good keeper and shipper. $1.50 per doz. ; $10.00 per 100; $75.00 per 1000. 350 at lOUO rate 
Cuttings ready now. Also the following standard varieties: 



Per 100 Per 1000 

Adonis $7.00 $60.00 

Enchantress 600 

McKinley 4.00 30.00 

Estelle 4.00 30.ro 

Nelson 3.50 30.00 



Per too 

Laweon $2.50 

Queen Louise 2.50 

Mrs. Bradt 3.50 

Flora Hill 2.00 

Mrs. Joost 1.50 



bloomer, 
, Rooted 

Per tOOO 
$20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
15.00 
12 50 



I 
I 



-CASH. NO C. O. D.- 



Wm. C. SMITH, 61st & Market Sts., Philadelphia, Pa. 



HEffLTHY 

CARNATIONS 

Stock Guaranteed. Come and See Before Buying.' 



White Cloud, white. 



Per mo 1000 
il.fSO *13..50 



Queen Louise, white 1.50 12.50 

Bradt, variegated 2.E>0 20.00 

" ■ ' 2U.0n 

20.00 
30.ro 



Prosperity, variegated 2:25 

Lawson, pink 2.25 

Crane, red 2.25 

Enchantress 6.00 5J.00 

Sand rooted. Send for prices on large orders. 

Cuttings guaranteed. Healthy and clean and 
sold C. O. D. or Cash with order.' 

A. LAUB & SON, 

Hughsonville, Dutchess Co., N. Y. 

CARNATIONS 

Rooted Cuttings. Ready Now. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

QUEEN LOUISE $1.50 $12.50 

LILLIAN POND S.OO 40.00 

ETHEL CROCKER 1.60 10.00 

MRS. E. A. NELSON 2.00 16.00 

FLORIANA 1.60 12.60 

ENCHANTRESS 6.00 50.00 

Send lor estimates on comolete order and 
list ol other varieties. 

ALBERT M. HERR, Lancaster, Pa. 



Announcement 

RosLiNDALE, Feb. 1, 1904. 
The undersigned beg to announce that they 
have this day formed a partuership. under the 
name of A. LEUTHY & COMPANY, for the 
growing and dealing in Palms, Ferns, -Flowering 
and Decorative Stock, the same as conducted to 
this day by A. LEUTHY. 

All liability up to -January 1st, will be assumed 
by said A. LEUTHY, and all bills due to this 
date must be paid to the last named party. 

Thanking you for the liberal support shown 

A. LEUTHY during the many years of dealing 

and hoping the future business relations will 

bring forth the same pleasant results, we are 

Yours respectfully, 

A. LEUTHY, 
DAVID LUMSDEN. 



The American Florist Co.'s 

TRADE DIRECTORY 



HUNDREDS OF NEW NAMES 
AND ADDRESSES. 



And contains the usual fully corrected and 
revised lists of Florists, Seedsmen, Nurserymen 
Gardeners, Horticulturists, Landscape Architects 
Parks, Cemeteries, Botanical Gardens, Horticult- 
ural Societies and Horticultural Supply Concerns 
of the United States and Canada. 

Prico $2,00 Prepaid. 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO. 

324 Dearborn St., CHICAGO. 



108 



The American Florist. 



Feb. ij. 



Oceanic, N. J. 

The semi-monthly meeting of the Mon- 
mouth County Horticultural Society 
was held February 5. The meeting was 
very well attended and interesting. A 
grand display of cut flowers was on exhi- 
bition. H. A. Kettel, gardener to James 
Loeb, had some fine lily of the valley, 
roses, Lilium Harrisii and narcissi, scor- 
ing in all 220 points. James Dowlen, 
gardener to H. L. Terrell, had a well 
flowered plant of Coelogyne cristata, a 
vase of good roses and a vase of carna- 
tions, scoring in all 235 points. Mr. 
Dowlen exhibited several seedling carna- 
tions of promise, a crimson scoring 90, a 
red 90, a scarlet 85, and several whites 
scoring 70 points. Geo. H. Hale, gar- 
dener to Edward D. Adams, had some 
well grown freesias, Princess of Wales 
violets and imantophyllums, scoring in 
all 250 points. The judgesof theevening 
were W. W. Kennedy, A. G. Williams and 
Wm. Turner. The members who visited 
Tarrytown, N. Y., to attend the annual 
dinner of the Tarrytown Horticultural 
Society, arrived home safely, although I 
understand the snow was a little deep 
in places. They reviewed their trip in 
detail. J. Yomaus, our Oceanic Chauncey 
Depeiv, made a speech which will not be 
forgotten for a long time at Tarrytown. 
The discussions ot the evening were on 
experiment stations and San Jose scale, 
and its treatment in winter and summer. 
Most of the members present took part. 
Mr. Hale, in order to find the views of the 
members, asked whether they thought it 
essential for a person learning the gar- 
dening profession to take up botany to 
become a good gardener. Most of those 
present gave their views, some stating 
that if a gardener could combine and 
carry the two he would be a stronger 
man, but the general trend of the views 
was against it, stating it was not neces- 
sary, as botany was a study in itself and 
from their experience and observation 
botanists as a rule made very poor gar- 
deners. B. 



Baltimore. 



The great fire which has destroyed so 
large a part of the business section of our 
city, the loss being estimated by the 
more conservative at about sixty million 
dollars, and by other calculators at more 
than double that sum, has disorganized 
and paralyzed all local trade. Some 
funeral orders are being filled, naturally 
and necessarily, but pretty nearly all 
Social events, public and private, are 
postponed or abandoned, and the florist 
whose commodities are classed as luxu- 
ries will feel for some time to come the 
disastrous blow to the business of our 
city. 

Fortunately in the burned district there 
was not located one florist's establish- 
ment, and, except mere incidental losses 
such as are common to the whole com- 
munity, and the prostration which will 
follow the disaster, the florists have had 
an exemption from loss above all other 
trades. 

Last week was one of fair business and 
the demand fop cut flowers about 
absorbed all the cut flower shipments at 
prices which ruled about the same as the 
preceding week. The weather was cold 
and unfavorable, but there was one 
warm day and night and the ice and 
snow which have been with us so long, 
disappeared. 

Charles street florisf s are being offered 
heavy figures for their stores by burned 
out concerns. That will be the main 
retail thoroughfare during the recon- 
struction period. S. B. 




"A Wee Wail From The Woods(man)" 

"OUALITY COUNTS" 

("That's All.") 

This stock can bs had ONLY direct from the 
Introducers or their Agents: 

J. B. DEAMUD, W. F. KASTING, 

Chicago, III. Buffalo, N. Y. 

LEO. NIESSEN. GEO. M. KELLOGG, 

Philadelphia, Pa. Kansas City, Mo. 

J. M. McCULLOUGH'S SONS, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

REED & KELLER, New York City. 
HOLTON & HUNKEL. H. G. BERNING, 

Millwaukee. Wis. St. Louis, Mo. 

BARTELDES & CO., Denver, Colo. 

Caldwell The Woodsman Go. 

EVERGREEN, ALABAMA. 



Please mention the American Florist when writing. 



CARNATION CITTINGS 



WELL ROOTED. CLEAN, HEALTHY AND POPULAR VARIETIES. 
ORDER NOW AND RECEIVE PROMPT SHIPMENT. 



PINK. Per 100 1000 

Enchantress, $6.00 $60.00 

MorningGlory 2.00 16.00 

Higinbotham 150 12.60 

Lawson 1.50 12.60 

Guardian Angel 1.25 10.00 

Cressbrook 1.50 12.50 

RED. 

Palmer $2.00 $15.00 



RED. Per 100 

Estelle 3.00 

Harlowarden 3.00 

WHITE. 

Her Majesty 3.00 

White Cloud 1.50 

Flora Hill 1.60 

Queen Louise 1.50 

Norway 1.50 



1000 
26.00 
26.00 

26.00 
12.60 
12.60 
126.0 
12.50 



Rooted Rose Cuttings. 



Per 100 

Bride $1.60 

Bridesmaid 1.50 

Ivory 1 50 

Golden Gate 1.60 



lom 

$12.'3u 
12.00 
12 60 
12.60 



Per 100 1000 

La France $2.00 $15.00 

Meteor 1.50 12 50 

Liberty 3.00 25.00 



WIETOR BROS., """"clff&r "* 

51=53 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO. 



Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 



Special quotations on Gov. Wolcott, Lawson and Palmer in large lots. 



Per 100 toco 

Enchantress S5.00 $45.00 

Gov. Wolcott 3.50 30.00 

2000 and over, $28.00 per 1000. 
Lawson 1.50 12.50 

2000 and over, $11.00 per 1000. 



Per 100 1000 

Prosperity 3.00 18.00 

Lillian Pond 3.00 25.00 

Palmer 1.50 13.50 

3000 and over, $11.00 per lOOa. 

, Joost 1.60 12.00 

Stock 'mums of Merry Christmas and Eaton, big clumps, $1.00 per dozen 
Boolcing orders for 2^-inch roses and 'mums for spring delivery. Get your orders in and secure 
good stock. Send in list for estimate. POEHLMANNBROS. CO., Morton Grove, III. 

Please mention the A merica n Florist when writing. 



Per 100 1000 

Higinbotham 1.50 12.50 

Harlowarden 3.00 

Lorna 2.50 20.00 

Prices on 2V^-inch stock on ap- 
plication. 



AMAZE. 



The New.... 
Scarlet Carnation 

A profuse Christmas bloomer, strong: grower, 

heavy stem, flowt r intense scarlet and remarkable 

keeping qualities. Rooted Cuttings ready February 1. 

PRICE: $10.00 PER 100; $75.00 PER 

1000 CASH. 

ORDER FRO.M THE GREENHOUSES, 

JEROME SUYDAM. Flatbush, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

OR FROM THE AGENTS. 

SLINN&HUGHES,CooganBldg., New York City. 

Please mention the American Flonst ic/ieu zvriting. 

Rootod Carnation Cuttings 

Per 100 

Enchantress $5.00 

Queen 4.00 

Fair Maid 2.50 

La,vson 2.50 

H. F. LITTLEFIELD, ""Sf/IJ" 

please mention the American Florist when writing. 



Carnation Cuttings 

We are now booking orders for rooted cuttingt, 
List of varieties and prices sent on application. 

The Cottage Gardens. Queens, L. i. 

Please mention the A met icon Florist 7ihen writing. 

Carnations 

ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

Orders booked now for next season's delivery of 
all the leading varieties. Send us a list of what 
you want and get prices that are right. 

Chas. Chadwick, L. Box 11. Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Mention the American Horist when 
writing to advertisers on this page. 



igo4. 



The a mer ican Fl grist. 



109 



Tran8plante(l Carnation Roolcd Cuttings 

10 OOP of each variety, to close them out. 



Per 100 1000 
VIOLINIA, the largest, freest variegated Carnation 

to date, extra fine $12.00 $100.00 

LOS ANGELES, a fine wliite 3.00 25.00 

ALBA, the big white 2.50 25.OO 

STELLA, a good variegated 2.50 20.00 

SUCCESS, LaFrance color 2.50 20.00 

VIOLA ALLEN, a fine variegated 2.50 20.00 

APOLLO, bright scarlet 250 20.00 

MARSHALL FIELD, fine variegated 2. 50 20.00 

HARLOWARDEN, come to stay 3.00 25.00 

IWcKINLEY, come to stay 3.00 25.OO 



Per 100 

MRS. THEO. ROOSEVELT, O. K % 3.OO 

GOLDEN BEAUTr, best yellow 1.50 

GOLD NUGGETT 1.20 

CRANE, still good 1.20 

ELDORADO, good yet 1.00 

ARMAZINDY, good yet i.OO 

THE MARQUIS, light pink l.OO 

AMERICA, best summer bloomer 1.00 

PALMER, the big red l.OO 

MERMAID, very free salmon pink 1.00 

GEN. GOMEZ, good color l.OO 



1000 

$25.00 

12.00 

10.00 

10.00 

8.00 

8.00 

8.00 

8.00 

8.00 

8.00 

8.00 



25 at 100 rates; 250 at 1000 rates. Cash or C. 0. D. with privilege of examining. 
Express prepaid by us at above prices. 



CalifoMiia Carnation Co. 

LOOMIS, CAL. 



SPECIAL OFFER 

Carnation Cuttings. 

READY FOR SHIPMENT. 

Having a surplus of these varieties wiil make 
special price for t.i days. Our stock is perfection 
and free from disease. 

Pink Per 100 1000 

Lawton $1.50 $12.80 

Joost 1 25; 10.00 

Marquis 125 10.00 

Dorothy 1.50 

White, 
innocence 150 



White. Per 100 lonn 

Glacier $1 50 $14.00 

nhite Cloud. 1 25 lu.OO 
Flora Hill.... 135 

Scarlet. 
Crane 1.50 

Variegated. 
Prosperity... 150 



10 00 
14.00 



12.00 



Pptlinii)^ Doubly fringed. Ten novelties 



Strong R. C, 



Dreer's late st s ets. Labeled. 
35 per 100. ^~C4.SH. 



The W. T. BUCKLEY PLANT CO., 

SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 

ROOTED 

CARNATION CUTTINGS. 

Per 100 lOCO 

G.H.Crane $3.60 $20.no 

Mrs. Lawson 2.0U 17.60 

Mrs..Joost 159 12.60 

EthelCrooker 1.50 12.50 

Wm.Soott 1.50 12.50 

Flora Hill 1.50 12 50 

Queen Louise 1.50 12.60 

Norway 1.50 13.50 

Cash or C. 0. 0. 

ST. LOUIS CARNATION CO., Clayton, Mo. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 

Carnations. 

Fine, strong, well-rooted cuttings now ready. 

ENCHANTRESS. $6.00 per 100; $50 ro per lOCO. 
LILLIaN POND. $5.0(1 per 100; $4 i.OO per 1000. 
THE QUEEN, .Jan. delivery, $5 per 100; $40 per 1000. 

LARCHIVIONT NURSERIES, Larchmont, N. Y. 



CARNATIONS "* 



Clean, Healthy, Well Rooted Stock. 



Cuttings. 



Per 100 1000 
Flora Hill.. $1.60 $12.60 



Prosperity.. 2.60 

Lawson.... 2.60 

Marquis. . . . 1.76 

Melba 1.60 

Dorothy 3.00 

McKinley... 3.00 

E.Crocker.. 1.60 

S. Lord 1.75 

Mrs. Nelson 3.60 



20 00 
20.00 
16.00 
12.60 
26.00 
26.00 
12.60 
16.00 
80 00 



Per 100 

Crane $2 00 

America.... 2.00 
G. Beauty,. 6.00 

Gaiety 3.00 

Gov. Roose- 
velt 3.00 

HarlowardenO.OO 

Joost 1.75 

Chicago.. .. 2.00 



1000 
$16 00 
16.00 
40 00 
26.00 

26.00 
50.00 
15.00 
15.00 



^Ve also have a few of 1903 varieties 
not listed. \Vrite for information. 

The IV1ISIV1I FLORAL CO., 
CARNATION CUTTINGS. 

Per 100 1000 

Enchantress $6.00 $50.00 

Queen 5.00 40.00 

Lillian Pond 5.00 45.00 

Prosperity 2.50 20.00 

Lawson 2.50 20.00 

Crossbrook 2.50 20.00 

Challenger 2 50 2i.00 

Fair Maid 300 25.00 

HarryFenn 5.00 40.00 

Gen. Maceo 350 2000 

QueenLouise 2.00 1500 

Bradt 300 35.00 

C. WARBURTON, Fall River, Mass. 

CARNATIONS. 

So.ooo ROOTED CUTTINQ*. 

The profitable ones to prow for Cut Flowprs. 
Our btnck is exceptionally fine. List of varieties 
and prices on application. 

C. AKEHURST & SON. 

WHITE MARSH, MD. 



Need a Good Scarlet? 

Take my word for it and order FlaminnA 
There is nothing better, nor ' lailllliyu. 

more profitable in sight. I can also supply 
the following varieties: Albatross, Lady 
Bountiful, The Hell, Moonlight, Nelson 
Fisher, IMrs. Patten and Indianapolis, $1200 
per 100; $100.00 per 1000. 

Thp HllPPn -^° excellent commercial 
I \l\i yuct/ll n-hite of last year's intro- 
duction, $5.00 per 10); $40.00 per KOO. 

S. S. SKIDELSKY, 

708 North 16th St., PHILftDELPHIA. PA. 

ROOTED CARNATION CUTTINGS. 

From strong, healthy plants. lOO 1000 

Enchantress $6.C0 $50.00 

The Queen 6.0O 50.00 

Fair Maid 4.00 30.00 

Gov. Wolcott 4.00 3 1.00 

Boston Market 4. CO 3.00 

Mrs. T. W. Lawson 3.00 2D.00 

HENRY A. STEVENS CO., Dedham, Mass. 



Orders Booked Now Senv^ry'."" 

Rooted Cuttings and Plants of Ross Queen 
ol Edgely, (Pink American Beauty). Write for 
prices. 

EDWIN LONSDALE, 
Wyndmeer. Chutnut Hill, PHIUDELPHU. 



Large flowering, 6 distinct kinds, per doz., 
S2.0 1; per 100, $16.00. Will bloom for spring sales 
if potted now. PEONIES, 10 choice, distinct 
kinds for florists, three whites, early, medium, late, 
$1,511 per doz.; $10.' 100. H. P.ROSES, dor- 
mant, own roots, $1.50 per doz; $12.01 per 10". 
PANSIES, transplanted, the very flnest, $1.50 
P"''"- F. A. BALLER, Bloomington, III. 



(S-OUK DIBECTORY FOB 1904 WILL BE HAILED TO 70U-«| 
19-FBOmFTLT UFON AFFLICATION. FKICE TWO DOLLABS.*^ 



110 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 13, 



Springfleld, Mass. 

Business the lasttwo weeks was steady 
with no great rush. Roses are scarce and 
of poor quality. Carnations are fair and 
enough to go around. Sunlight is badly 
needed. Violets are moving more freely 
owing to a reduction in price; singles are 
being more called for this season and 
growers in this section are going to 
double up next season. Tulips, daffodils 
and Paper Whites are plentiful but do 
not move any too fast. 

Store men are making good displays 
of pot plants, such as azaleas, cinerarias, 
cyclamens, primroses and hyacinths, but 
report they do not move very fast. 

Visitors this week were Paul Berko- 
witz, representing Bayersdorfer & Com- 
panv; Mr. Green, of Rice & Company, 
N. Y.; Mr. Norton, of Vaughan's, N. Y.; 
also a representative of Speelman& Sons, 
o» Holland. A. B. 



Columbus, O. 

There is talk of organizing a florists' 
club in this city. A move in this direction 
would be a proper step, since great 
benefit could be derived from discussions 
that would take place at the meetings, 
besides creating a friendship among many 
who are now practically unknown to 
each other. Sherman Stephens is spoken 
of as a good man to organize the pro- 
posed society and act as its leader. 

The Livingston Seed Company has 
added a wholesale department to its cut 
flower establishment and there is no 
reason why success should not crown the 
efibrt. Carl. 



Little Neck, R. 1. 
William J. Hamilton has just been 
awarded a contract to construct green- 
houses and conservatories on the estate 
of Wm. K. Vanderbilt, Jr., at Lake 
Success. There will be six houses, each 
20x250 feet, and their cost will be about 
$25,000. Iron, brick and glass are the 
materials to be used. The houses will 
be located on what was formerly the 
Isaac Poole estate. They will be near the 
Italian gardens, which are now under 
construction. Work on the houses will 
be commenced March 1. 



Newburgh, N. Y. — The extensive green- 
house property owned by Henry Carter 
has been sold. 



The Queen 



TOTTY'S PEERLESS 
SET 



Best Commercial White 
CARNATION. 

Rooted Cuttings. XXX Stock 
$6.00 per 100; $46 per 1000. 

LAST YEAR'S 
BEST NOVELTIES. 



CHRYSaNTHEMUMS 

JOHN BARR, South Natick, Mass. 



Send for Descriptive Circular 
and Price List. 

Please mention the A mer^'ran Florist when ivriting. 

AMERICAN BEAUTY ^^^^^^ 

This stock is from good, clean, healthy wood, will be free from spot and thor- 
oughly rooted when sent out. Money refunded if not perfectly satisfactory upon 
return of stock. $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 

Wholesale Grower of Gut Flowers, 

37-39 Randolph Street, 



J.A.BIDLONQ, 



Please mention the American Florist when writinz- 



THE PIERSON FERN 

(NEPHROLEPIS PIERSONI.) 

We desire to call particular attention to our large stock of specimen plants 
ready for immediate sale. Florists will find this one of the quickest selling 
and most profitable plants that they can handle. These are grand, strong 
established pot-grown plants in the very best possible condition, not plants 
over-potted or lifted from the bench, and are exceedingly cheap at the prices 
offered. Stock is in grand shape, and will guarantee every shipment to give 
perfect satisfaction. 

Florists will find these plants readily salable at twice or three times their 
first cost, and by shifting them up and holding them a couple months their 
value can again be doubled. Retail florists with stores will find this gilt- 
edged stock for retailing. We guarantee they will find nothing that they can 
handle as readily saUble and profitable as this grand fern. 

Extra fine plants in 6-inch pots, $1.00 each. Fme specimens in 8-inch pots, 
very fine, $2.00 each. Extra fine specimens in lO-inch pots, $3.00 each. 
Larger plants, $500 each. 

r. R. PIERSON CO., 

Tarrytown-on-Hudson, NEW YORK. 



I 



I 



Please mention the American Florist when writing 




y ▼▼▼▼▼▼▼^ ▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼ WW WW VWWWVV^VW~~~~ ▼▼▼▼▼▼▼""▼▼▼" 

Best Commercial White 
\ Carnation To Date. 

Pure white. Blooms 3 inches and over in diameter, beautifully fringed; very fragrant; exceedingly freebloomer; eirly and contin- 
uous; very healthy and vigorous; stems stiff, three feet long and over; has brought top prices in the Philadelphia Market the past three 
seasons. COME AND SEE IT GROWING. $10 00 per 100; $75.00 per 1000. From 2-inch pots, $12.00 per 1000; $90.00 perlOOO. 

WE ALSO OFFER THE FOLLOWING GOOD VARIETIES: 



Per 100 1000 

HARLOWARDEN. the finest crimson $5.00 $45.00 

From 2-mch pots 6.50 60.00 

Those in pots are extra fine for immediate delivery. 

ENCHANTRESS 6.00 5000 

From 2-inch pots, well established plants 7.50 65.00 

MRS. IW A. PATTEN 12.00 100.00 

FLAMINGO 12.00 100.00 

MRS. THEO. ROOSEVELT 5.00 40.00 

ADONIS 7.50 65.00 



Per 100 

LILLIAN POND 5.00 

PRES. McKINLEY 4.00 

WHITE BRADT 6.00 

MAY NAYLOR 4.00 

HER MAJESTY 5.00 

MRS E. A. NELSON 3.00 

ALPINE GLOW 4.00 

MRS. THOS. LAWSON 3.00 

MRS. GEO. M. BRADT 3.50 




35.00 
40.00 
25.00 
35.00 
25.00 
30.00 



Send For Catalogue. Five Per Cent OH for Cash with Order. 



ROBERT CRAIG & SON, 



49th & Market Streets, 
PHILADELPHIA, P4. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ »♦»♦»♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



1904. 



The American Florist. 



Ill 



La DETROIT 

Breitmeyers' New Rose 

A SEEDLING OF TESTOUT AND BRIDESMAID. 

To Be Disseminafed April 1, 1904. 

COLOR. Prevailing color a beautiful shell pink, shading in the center to a soft rose pink. The reverse of the outer petal 
is of a creamy flesh tint, shading to silver y toward the base, which may best be described as opalescent. The full open flower discloses 
a vivid richness of coloring, rare and fascinating. FRAGRANCE. Subtle, strongly tea-scented; reminds one of old Bon Silene. 
FORM. Large cup-shaped, heavy p:tal, shell-like in formation. CROWTH. Strong and healthy, with a rich, glossy foliage, 
rampant and vigorous, with a strong tendency to long shoots; very prolific. 

ALL ORDERS BOOKED PILLED IN ROTATION BEQINNINQ APRIL I. 

For **Own Roofed** Plants from 2 1-2 inch pots. 

1 Plant, each % .75 I lOO Plants and over and less than 1,000, each % .25 

12 Plants, each 60 | 1,000 Plants and over, each 20 

25 Plants, each 50 I 3-inch pot plants, 5c each additional. 

50 Plants and over and less than 100, each 30 | prices OP qrafted stock qivbn on application. 

JOHN BREITMEYER'S SONS, 

Gratiot and Miami Aves., DETROIT, MICH. 

SBM^r-'ITVO .AfiKIVTrSl MICHIGAN CUT FLO'WER EXCHANGE, 

ERNST ASMUS & SON, VAUGHANS SEED STORE, J. AUSTIN SHAW 

A. ROLKER & SONS, S. S. SKIDELSKY, CLUCAS & BODDINGTON CO 



STROIVG STOCK 
from 2 1-2 Inch pots. 



UNCLE JOHN. 



Thp finest pink rose vet introduced; beautiful color, free bloomer, best 
S20.00 per 100; SI 50.00 par 1000. 



Per lOD 

MME. CHATENAY $6.00 

SUNRISE 5.00 

KAISERIN 4.C0 

LIBERTY 6.00 



money-maker. 

1000 

$50.00 

40.00 



35.00 
60.00 



Per 100 

MAID $3.C0 

BRIDE 3.10 

PERlE 3.00 

GOiDEN GATE 3.00 

IVORY 3.00 



ROSE CUTTINGSWell Rooted. 



Per ICO 1000 

....$1.50 $12.50 
I.EO 13.50 

12.S0 



IVORY 

MAID 

BRIDE 1.50 

CARNATIONS 

PINK. Per 100 1000 

MRS. LAWSON $150 $13.50 

MRS E. A NELSON 3.50 30.00 

GUARDIAN ANGEL 1.25 10 00 

MRS. HIGINBOTHAM 3 CO 15.00 

SYBIL 3 00 25.00 

Mckinley 3.00 25.00 

joosT 1.35 10.00 



Per 100 

GOLDEN GATE $1.50 

PERLE 1.50 



lOOO 
$25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 



1000 
SI 3. 50 
13 50 



VARIEGATED. 

MRS. BRADT 2.00 15.00 

PROSPERITY 2.00 15 OJ 

All stock sold under express condition that if not satisfactory 

PETER REINBERG. 



SU^RISE 3.50 30.00 

Well rooted, healthy cuttings, of the following varieties, now ready. 

WHITE. Per 100 1000 

MURPHY'S WHITE $300 35.00 

FLORA HILL 1,25 10.00 

WHITE CLOUD 1.35 10.00 

PEkU 1.35 10 

QUEEN LOUISE 1.2. lO.OO 

NORWIY 1.35 10.01 

MARION 1.35 10.00 

GOV. LOWNDES 3.0O 35.00 

RED. 

ESTELLE 3.50 30.00 

MRS. INE 1.25 10.00 

CHICAGO (Red Bradt) 3.00 15.00 

HARLOAIAROEN 3.00 35.00 

it is to be returned immediately when money will be refunded. 



51 

WABASH AVE., 



CHICAGO 



Healthy Carnations. 

Well Rooted. Enchantress, all sold till March 
15th, $6.00 per 101); $5i).00 per lOOi). Strong, 3-inoh 
pots now readv, $8.00 per 100. Now ready, Queen 
Louise, Crocker, Lorna, White Cloud, Peru, 
Innocence, Lawson, Floriana, Prosperity, Doro- 
thy, Marquis, Pres. Roosevelt, Manley. $3.00 per 
100; $17.50 per 1000. 

W. W. COLES, Kokomo. Ind. 



Roses. Roses. 



Plants and 
Rooted Cuttings. 

R. C. Per 100 VA-va. Per 100 

American Beauty $3.00 $6.00 

Bride. Maid Ivory, Gate 1.50 3.00 

Perle, Kaiserin, Canadian Q'n 2.00 4.00 

LOW RATE BY THE THOUSAKD. 
BOSTON FERNS. 214-inch. $4.00 per 100; 3-inch, 
$8.00; 4-inch. SI3.50; 5 inch, $35.00; 6-inch. $4000. 
Fine stock. Note the special low prices on smaller 
sizes. CULLETT & SONS, Lincoln, in. 



CARNATIONS 



.^11 

The Leading Novelties of 1904. 

The Best Varieties of 1903. 

All the Standard Sorts. 
Order your Rooted Cuttings NOW. 

GEO. HANCOCK &. SON. 

GRAND HAVEN, MICH. 



112 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 13, 



Washington, D. C. 

There recently has been cjuite a dis- 
cussion of the scheme for a vista through 
the mall from the capital to the Potomac 
river. A vista or boulevard 800 feet wide 
was in the plans of L' Enfant, the French 
engineer who laid out the streets and 
parks of Washington. About 1850-51 
the services of the celebrated landscape 
architect Downing were secured by the 
government and among his services was 
the planting of the mall with trees that 
are now a beauty and a joy to the lovers 
of cool and refreshing shade. In the 
years following Downing's work the 
vista scheme seems to have slumbered, 
but it was recently revived by the plans 
for the new agricultural building. The 
house committee on agriculture, of which 
Mr. Wadsworth is chairman, finding that 
the new building was designed to front 
on a vista that does not exist at once 
began an investigation. One result of 
their labors has been to show that the 
new building if so placed would be incon- 
venient to the present lines of travel, its 
rear instead of its front being on the 
street. They further claim that it will 
be fifty years before the government can 
afford to build the boulevard. A vista 
can be had at any time by chopping 
down the trees. The trees are now 
causing most of the discussion. It 
always seems a pity to destroy fine trees, 
but all who have knowledge of what a 
fine city park ought to be must agree 
that the mall as it now is falls short of 
the requirements. Its streets and walks 
are rambling and uncertain; between its 
most attractive point and the best 
section of the city a disreputable red- 
light district intervenes. The Smith- 
sonian Institute and the National 
Museum are noteworthy attractions, 
but as a park it is more a resort for 
idlers and loafers than for fashionable or 
even the great middle classes. If a vista 
would make it a popular resort by all 
means let us have the vista. 

The weather moderated toward the 
last of the week and trade of the transient 
sort was better. Prices remain firm. The 
society people were active with recep- 
tions, dinners and teas during the past 
week. The congressional reception at 
the White House was the leading event. 
A large amount of good stock came in 
from S. S. Pennock, of Philadelphia, to 
various Washington retailers. 

George H. Cooke received an extra fine 
lot of Bridesmaid roses. He also has 
received from a local grower a lot of 
Dielytra spectabilis (Bleeding Heart) in 
5-inch pots which will come in all right 
for St. Valentine's day. 

Thomas J. Wade, who was for some 
time a traveller for various Holland bulb 
firms, is now in Washington as manager 
ofZ. D. Blackistone's store. 

Alex. B. Garden is doing a good whole- 
sale business in La Reine and Yellow 
Prince tulips. His Yellow Prince are the 
best on the market. 

H. Wilden, representing Warnaar & 
Company, of Sassenheim, Holland, 
recently visited the growers of this 
vicinity. 

C. Ponnett & Company have given up 
their Fourteenth street store. 

S. E. 



Cannot Do Without It. 

Ed. Am. Florist:— Enclosed please 
find $1 for renewal of subscription. We 
cannot do without this paper and would 
consider ourselves back numbers if we 
did not get it. J. Sylvester. 



VERBENAS 



^^^e are the largest growers of Verbenas in the 
country, and those who buy of us are sure to get 
plants and rooted cuttings perfectly healthy and 
free from rust. OO 'Vr^rl^-ti^w. 



Rooted Cuttings. 60c per 100; $5.00 per 1000; $45.00 per 10,000 
Plants, $2.50 per 100; $20.00 per 1000. 

CARNATIONS. 

Pink. Per 100 Crini(on. 

Enchantress $6.00 

Success 4.00 

Mrs. Higinbotham 6.00 



White. Per 100 

The Queen $5.00 

Queen Louise 160 

Lorna 2.60 

Good Enough 8.00 

WhiteCloud 1.60 

Flora Hill 1.60 

Red. 

Adonis 6.00 

Mrs. Potter Palmer 3.00 

J. H. Manley 4.00 

Oriole 2-60 

G. H. Crane 2.00 

Jubilee 1 60 

Portia 1.26 



Cressbrook 3.00 

Mrs. E. A. Nelson 3.00 

Mrs. Thos. Lawson 3.00 

Dorothy 2.00 

Sunbeam 2.60 

MorningGlory 1.50 

Mrs. Joost 1.25 

Daybreak 1.26 

Wm. Scott 1.26 

Crocker 1.26 

Mermaid 2.00 

Floriana 1.60 

GRAFTED ROSES. 



Harry Fenn $6.00 

Gov. Roosevelt 2.60 

Gen. Maceo 1.50 



Variegated. 

Prosperity 2.60 

Mrs. G. M. Bradt 3.00 

Yellow. 

Dorothy Whitney 6.00 

Buttercup 3.00 

GoldNugget 2.00 

Eldorado I.2S 



Our grafted roses are fine, bushy plants and srown in 3 and SV^-inch pots. Orders booked now for 
delivery, in May, June and July. Hridf^smaid, Kride, Golden Gate, Kaiserin. price $15.00 jier ICO. 
Ivory, Liberty, price ItlS.OO per ICO". Send for Catalogue. 

J. L. DILLON, Bloomsburg, Pa. 



Rooted Cuttings. :ztz%.fmr^.^%t 

1(00. ileliotrope, good varieties, $1.00 per 100, J8.00 
per 1000. Coleus, all the best, 70c per lUO; S6.00 
per 1000. Ageratums. 60c per 100; $5.00 per 1010. 
Salvias, $1.00 per 10 ; $8 00 per 1 Oi. Petunias, 
double, $1.3> per 100: $10.00 per lOCC. Daisies, $1.00 
per too. Fuchsias. $1.50 per 110. Pelargoniums, 
$2.25 per 100. Express prepaid on all rooted cut- 
tings. Cash with orders; satisfaction guaranteed. 
Write S. D. BRANT, The Clay Center Florist, 

Clay Center, Kansas. 

CYCLAMEN PLANTS. 

Cyclamen Persicum Splendens Giganteum, 
flnest 6train in the world in four colors, from 4-in. 
pots $IS.0O per 100. PRIMULA CHlNtNSIS flMBRiaA, 

(fringed Primroses). No finer strain, all colors, 
3-in. pots, $5 CO per 100. 

PAUL MADER, E. Stroudsburg, Pa. 

Please inenlion the Amei icati Florist when writing. 

Chrysanthemums... 

American Novflties. Also a complete line of 
Australian, English and French varieties, both 
new and standard sorts. For prices and descrip- 
tions address 

NAIHAN SMITH & SON, '^fir.!!^'- 

Please mention the American Florist 7vhen writing. 

SPECIALTIES 

In BesI 
Varieties 



ROSES, from 3-inch pots, 
CARNATIONS, for all delivery, 
CHRYSANTHEMUMS, 
SMILAX, VIOLETS. 

Prices Low. Send for List. 

WOOD BROTHERS. Fishkill.N.Y. 

wIrS llSnPir for summer flowering. 
ITII Oa I lOIIVI strong rooted cuttings, 
$1.25 per 100; $10.00 per 1000. 

A. CHRISTENSEN, Stoneham. Mass 

Carnation Rooted Cuttings. 

ard sorts. Send for price list. 

Box 226. KENNETT SQUARE, PA 



All the new 
and stand- 



a. 



ffi 



|:ggi6:&gi&:&&6-:&6(&:6gg:eg:g.:6:&&&^ 

IT IS NOT... 

what you pay for the adver- % 
tisement but what the adver- * 
tisement pays you. It pays w 
to advertise in the American % 
Florist. ^ 



Julius Roehrs 

RUTHERFORD, N. J. 

Grower of 

Palms, Bay Trees, 
Box Trees 



AND— 

Decorative Stock. 

STOCK PLANTS. 

Strong plants, carefully packed, of the follow- 
ing varieties at $4.00 per 100; 60c per dozen: Bon- 
nafFon, Robinson, Modesto, Murdoch, Childs, 
Glory of the Pacific. Ivory, pink and white, 
Mon'tmort and Wanamaker. Slavia. stock plants 
from bench or pots, $5.00 per KO; 75c per dozen. 

We are headquarters for Carnation, 'Mum and 

Stevia cuttings in season. 

Inhn RpArl Wholesale Florist, 
JUIIII Dl UUy NILES CENTER, ILL. 

Please ynention the A met ican Florist when writing. 

DAHLIAS. ^S'oTs 

Ten Gold Medals Awarded 1908. Pot-roots for 
shipment at once. ICvtTy section including the 
popular Cactus Pablias' at $4.00 per 100 in 25 
sorts. Better and newer kinds at ^.00 and $6.00 
per 100. Terms: Cash with order. 

HOBBIES LIMITED. Dereham, Eng. 

Norfolk Nurseries. 

Please ynention the A met icon Flo* ist when writing. 



Rooted 
Cuttings. 



GERANIUMS 

50,000 ready March 15. Send for list of varieties 

and price. 
150,000 ready April 15tb. Those now in sand 

all sold. 

ALBERT M. HERR. Lancaster. Pa. 

ALL Nurserymen, Seedsmen and Fltarists wishing 
to do business with Europe ghould send for the 

"Horticultural Advertiser." 

Thi» is the British Trade Paper, being read weekly 
by all the Horticultural traders: It is also taken 
by over 1000 of the best cootinental houses. 
Annual subscription to cover cost of postage 75o. 
Money orders payable at Lowdham, Notts. 

Address EDITORS OP THB "H. A." 
Chilwell Nuneriet, LOWDHAM. Notts. England. 



igof. 



The American Florist. 



113 



Lenox, Mass. 

The regular meeting of the Lenox Hor- 
ticultural Society was held in the society 
rooms February 6. After the meeting, 
Dr. E. O. Hovey, curator of the Museum 
of Natural History, delivered a very 
interesting public lecture on "Mount 
Pelee and the destruction of St. Pierre," 
which was illustrated with 200 stereop- 
tican views which were for the most 
part taken by Dr. Hovey. The lecture 
was free and the hall was well filled. 

At the next meeting, February 20, the 
society will hold another public lecture, 
at which Edward Howe Forbush, state 
ornithologist, will be the speaker. His 
lecture will be on "Birds" and will also 
be illustrated by stereopticon views. 
The society anticipates another large 
attendance. 

G. F. 



New Brighton, Pa. — August Meyer's 
greenhouses were flooded by the overflow 
which swept the Ohio valley and ruined. 
The water entered the boiler room and 
drowned the fire. Nearly all his plants 
were frozen in the zero weather which 
followed. Mr. Meyer and a force of men 
tried to get the water out of the boiler 
room and start up the fires, but he suc- 
ceeded too late. His loss was $2,000. 



PIERSON FERNS "sVoS"' 

Strong 2^-inch stock $13.F0 per 100 

Strons 3-inch stock 20.00 per 100 

Strong rooted runners 8.00 per 100 

Cash with order. Satisfaction guaranteed. 

BAUR FLORAL CO., Erie, Pa. 

GOOD FERNS. 

BOSTON FERNS, short and bushy, each 50c; 
per dozen. ffiOU: |.pr 100, $45.00. 

PIERSON FERNS, line bushy plants, %\ 00 
each; 8 inch, $1.25 each. 

JOHN SCOTT, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Keap Street Greenhouses. 

Asparagus... ,. „ 

Plumosut Ninut, 2-inch pots S3 50 

Sprangirl, 2-inch pots 1 .50 

Giraniums, 10 varieties 3.00 

Coitus, 10 varieties, 2-inch pots 2.00 

Cash Please. 

JOS. H. CUNNINGHAM, Delaware, Ohio 

Please mention the American ^'oHst when writing 

PIERSON FERNS. 

\ou want something nice for Easter. Order a 
dozen. 50 or 100 of these ferns in 5, 6, 7. 8 and 
10-inch pots. You will never regret it. We also 
have the 3 and 3-inch sizes. 

Boston Ferns. 

We are as u^unl lieadquarters for 'IV^. .S, 4. 5. 6, 
7, 8 and 10-inch sizes. 

Asparagus Plumosus Nanus. 

Seedlings, 3 x 3!4, 2VJ x 3 and 4-inch. Also 
plenty of Sprengeri. 

Roses. 

We grow over 100,000 annually for the trade of 
thefollowingvarieties; Meteor, Bride, Bridesmaid, 
Ivory. Golden Gate, Perle, La France, Kalserin. 
Wootton, lielle Siebrecht, Pres. Carnot, American 
Beauty. Liberty. 

We believe in shifting young roses often. All 
stock otfered in 2i^-in. pots has been shifted 
from 2-in. and is equal to most stock advertised 
as3-in.,and when we send it out is well estab- 
lished. We solicit your orier and guarantee 
satistaction. Write for special prices on large lots. 

Ivory is a Money Maker. Be sure and include 
a few in your order. Send 50c or !fl.00 for samples 
of anything you may want, then you see exactly 
the stock you are ordering. 

GEO. A. KUHL, Pekin, III. 

Please mention the A merican Florist when writivg. 



Asparagus Plumosus Nanus 

2 1-2-inch stock in line shape at $3.00 per hundred. 

HOLTOK & HLMKEL CO., Milwaakee, Wis. 
FOR THIRTY DAYS ONLY. 

BOSTON FERNS. Extra fine bench plants, 5-inch at ICc: 6-inch at 15c to close out. Must have 
room. 2i4-inch, ready for 4-inch, $i.50; 3-inch, $8.00. CANNAS, F. Vaushan, .1. C. Vaughan, 
Esandale.Chas. Henderson. A. Bouvier, Burbank, Souv.de AntoineCroz.v, in variety $2 50 per 100; 
$20 00 per 1000. CARNATIONS, Q.ueen Louise, white, Floriana. pink, the two best money 
makers we have, $1.35 per 100; $'0.00 per 100. Lawson, $1.75 per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 
ALTERNANTHERA BRILLIANTISSIMA, the tinest variety oT all line pot plants, full of 
cuttings, $1.00 per dozen; $6.(0 per luo. COLEUS, 15 varieties, 3-in., $3.00 per 100. Caih please. 



A. J. BALDWIN, 



Newark, Ohio. 



Albert Fuchs, 

F»A.i:-,i^s, i^£>r:k^s, imoit», 



EslabllBhad 1884. 



CXXIOA.OO* 



S04B-5* Clarendon Ava. 



ARtUCARIA EXCELS*. From 30, 23-35 inches high, 
6 inch pots, perfect plants, 75c, $1.00 to $1.35 
each. E.^tra large specimens, 8-incb pots, 38 
to 35 inches high. 25 tj 32 inches across, (show 
plants) onlj; $3.50 to $3,00 each, (worth $10.00 
retail). 54 inch oots, 40 to 50c each. 

FICUS EUSTICA. (Rubber Plants). 6-incli pots 
from ■2'i to 38 inches high, $3.0l',$3.00, W.tO, $5.00 
and $6.00 per doz. 

DRkC/ENA BRUANTI. 6-inoh pots. 20 to 25 inches 
high, (to make room for Easter plants), cut 
down from 50c to 35c. 

BEGONU PRES. MRNOT. 6-inch pots, in bud and 
and bloom, $2.5 ■ p' r doz. Other mixed varie- 
ties 4-inoh pots, $1.81 per doz. 

CYCLIMENS. In bud and bloom, $2.00 per doz. 

PRIMULA OBCONICA. 4-iach. in bloom, $1.8J per doz. 
Cash with order please. Plants are shipped at 

purchaser's risk. 

GODFREY ASCHMANN, 

Wholesale Grower and Importer of Pot Plants, 
1012 Ontario St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Bell Telephone Tioga 3669 A. 

Asparagus and Ferns 

We have a fine stock of the above which we 
will offer until the stock is reduced at the follow- 
ing prices: 

Per 100 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 2-inch $2.00 

3-inch 3.50 

Asparagus Plumosus, from flats 2 2S 

" " 2-inch a.OO 

" " 3-inch 6.00 

Keritia Bel., 2^-in. pot, 8-10 in., 2-3 leaves .12.00 

" " 2Vj-in. pot, 15-18 in., 3-4 leaves. .IS. 00 

" " 3 -in. pot, 15-18 in., 4-5 leaves. .18. CO 

" " 3 -in. pot, 18-24 in., 6-6 leaves. 20. 00 

Latania Bor., 2-in. pot, seed leaves.. 5.00 

" 3-in. pot, 15-18 in., 2-3 chr. Ivs. 12.00 

" S-in. pot, 18-20 in., 3-4 chr. Ivs. 20.00 

5-in. pot, 20-24 in., 4 chr. Ivs. 30.00 

Sherman Nursery Co., '""''l^^.":'''' 

Geo. Wittbold Co., 

1657 Buckingham PI., CHICAGO, ILL. 

Send for Price List on all 

Palms and Ferns 

Anna Foster «nd Boston Ferns 

Full plants, $35.00 to $50 00 per 100 In pots 35c 
to $5.00 each. Small plants, $5 00 per 100. 

Asp. P. N., 4-inch. $10,00; 8-inch pans. $60.00 
per liO. tsp. Sprengeri, 4-inoh, $6.00 per 100. 
Dracasna Indlvlsa, 3-iuch, strong, $8.00 per 100. 
Kentias, FIcut. 

Li Hi rQSteri DORt^neSTbR. MASS. 

1«;r»l ->in<kn&' bluomlug and lu bud; due 
Vl.mllllillS stock. 4 inch.$l'2.00: 5-inch, 
'J VIUIII VIIO jjo.OO and $30.00 per 100. 

C. WINTCRICn, Defiance, Ohio. 



A FEW eOOD THIN6S 

YOU WANT. 

An extra fine lot of PALMS and BOSTON FERNS 
grown especially for Christmas sales, 

ARECA LUTESCENS. 3 plants to pot, 4, 5 and 
6-inch, $25, $40 and $100 per 100. 

KENTIA BELMOREANA and FORSTERIANA. 3, 4, 5 
and 6-iBch, $13, $35, $40, $100 per 100. 

BEX BEGONIA, 3 and 3-inch, $4 and $6 per 100. 

DRACAENA INOIVISA, 3-inch, $5 per 100; 4-inch, 
$10 per 100. 

ENGLISH IVY, 2 and 3-inch, $3 and $6 per 100. 

BOSTON FERNS, 6-inch, $30 per 100. From beds, 
for 2, 3 and 4-inch pots, $4. $8, $15 per 100 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS, 3 inch. $8.00 per 100. 
SPRENGERI. 2-inoh, $3.00 per 100. 

VINCA VARIEGAT4, 2-inch, $3.00 per 100. 

CARNATIONS, Queen Louise, 2-in., $2.00 per 100. 
Lawson, 2-inch, $2.50 per 100. 

GERANIUMS. 2-in. pot plants Double and sin- 
gle Grant, Bonnet, S. A. Nutt, Perkins, La- 
Kavorite, John Doyle, Riccard, Mrs. E. G. Hill, 
$3.50 per 100. 

ROOTED CARNATION CUTTINGS. Queen Louise 
and Wolcott, $1.50; Lawson and Prosperity, $2.00; 
Crocker and Goodenough, $1.25 per 100. 

CASH OR C. O. D. 
CEO. M. EMMANS, NEWTON, N.J. 

BOSTON FERNS Sets. 

strong bench plants, fit for 5-inch. 

PRIMULA OBCONK^A GRANDIFLORA, Alba, Rosea, 
$1 50 per 1(0; 30O for $4.00. 

AGERATUM, Gurney, Pauline; GIANT MARGUERITE 
DAISY, White: SALVIA. Splendens. Siiver Spot, 
Bonfire. PETUNU, double, 15 kinds. VINCA, 
variegated, 2-inch, 2c. 

REX BEGONIA, 4 sorts. 3Hc. 

Rooted Cuttings Prepaid. SALVIA, Silver Spot, Bon- 
fire. Splendens. STEVIA, variegated. 90c per 100. 
AGERATUM. White, S. Gurnev, P. Pauline. 
ALTERNANTHERA. red, yellow. 5''o per 100. 
PINKS, Mary Gray, variesated, 75o per IOC 
PETUNIt, double, 15 kinds, $1.00 per 100. 
FUCHSIAS. 5 kinds, $1.25 per 100. DAISY, 
HELIOTROPE, blue, $l.(JOper 100. Cash. 

BYEB BROS., Chambe^sburg, 

JOSEPH HEAC06K, 

WYNCOTE, PA. 

Areca Lufescens 
Kenfia Belmoreana 
Kentia Forsieriana 

For our prices see page 551, Nov. 7th issue. 

PIERSON FERNS. 

3H-inch at $8.C0 per 100. 
Young plants from the bench, $5.00 per 100. 
Large plants ready lor 6 and 7-inch pots, 
.50c each . 

BiKtnn FprnC scinch at $3.50 per 
IIMUII I Cilia ion. Also line line of 
4 5. 6 and 7-inch. Write for quotations. 

DAVIS BROTHERS, Morrison, III. 



GROWER OF 



114 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 



J3> 



San Diego, Cal. 

California lias been experiencing one of 
tlie most remarkable droughts on record. 
North of the Tehechipi Pass there was 
some rain last November but in southern 
California, outside of the mountains, less 
than one-half inch has fallen since the 
spring of 1903. In the east this would 
spell ruin to the farmers, but here, while 
a bit scared, we are not hurt very much, 
certainly not starving, with 30,000 car- 
loads of oranges to ship. Besides we 
have three months of the rainy season 
yet before us and whatever moisture we 
get will come when it will do the most 
good. The orchardists are independent, 
to a certain extent, of the rainfall. Great 
and little companies and private owners 
have been busy developing water supply 
these last seven lean years, and now we 
may look with no great concern on a 
prospect which would have been appall- 
ing ten years ago. 

Frank Sessions, brother of Miss K. O. 
Sessions, is to be congratulated on the 
success of his poinsettia experiment. 
Frank has a place near his sister's new 
gardens on Spreckel's Heights, where he 
planted a lot of poinsettia cuttings last 
spring. They did nicely and he cut and 
shipped 3,000 bracts to San Francisco 
for the Christmas trade. They sold well 
and it is reported were the finest outdoor 
stock ever seen in that city, having a 
richer coloring than that possessed by 
northern grown stock. The base of the 
stems were dipped in boiling water before 
shipping to coagulate the milky sap. If 
this is not done the stemsbleed badly and 
the flowers wilt. 

Geo. Cooke, of Parsons & Cooke, the 
well known landscape architects, is now 
in San Diego perfecting plans for the 
improvement of the big city park of over 
1,4.00 acres. San Diego has a population 
of only 25,000 to-day but has big expec- 
tations, as may be inferred from the size 
of the park site. George W. Marston, a 
leading business man, has donated the 
amount necessary to have the plans 
made, and he and others are providing 
funds to make a beginning of the improve- 
ments. 

Mrs. Mary Boyle of the Cottage Nur- 
sery on Golden Hill, has returned to her 
old stand in the Jose block on D street. 
This store has been neatly fitted up and 
is very attractive. Mrs. Boyle reports a 
-to per cent increase in holiday flower 
sales. House plants broke about even 
with last season's demand. Violets are 
now retailing at 25 cents per bunch of 
fifty. The Golden Hill violet plants look 
better and are freer from spot than any 
others around San Diego. 

E. J. Vawter, of Los Angeles, proprie- 
tor of extensive carnation gardens at 
Santa Monica and Ocean Park, was a 
December visitor to San Diego and vicin- 
ity, looking up carnations for shipment 
to Los Angeles. It is said he has con- 
tracted for the entire cut of Mr. Hasp's 
gardens at Oceanside and has also 
secured the output of Wolfskill's carna- 
tion houses in Los Angeles. 

Miss Kent, who was with the Cor- 
onado Beach Company two years ago, is 
again in charge of the flower store in the 
Coronado hotel. R. H. A. 



Finds It an Aid. 



Ed. Am. Florist: — I much prefer your 
paper to others. I have just started 
growing cut flowers for the New York 
market, and find your paper very valu- 
able. ' WM. SlMMONDS. 

Staten Island, N. Y. 



Standard Flower Pols 

TheWHlLLDIN POTTERY COMPANY, 

PHILADELPHIA. PA. JERSEY CITY, N. J. LONG ISLAND CITY, N. V« 

Travslling R«prM*nUtiv«, U. CUTLER RYERSON, 108 Third Ava.. Newark, N. J. 
Please mention the A tnertcan florist when writing 



r"LORIST Plain, Violet, Rose 



r? 



OIL 



MADE BY 



The John J. Grooke Go. 

155 Ave. D, NEW YORK. 149 Fulton St., UHICAGO. 





Price per crate 


1500 2-in 


, in crate, $4.88 


1500 2X 


5.25 


1500 2« 


6.00 


1000 3 


5.00 


800 3^ 


5.80 


500 4 


4.50 


320 5 


4.51 


144 6 


3.16 



WHY NOT BUT 

RED POTS 

OF US? 

[Standard Size] 

Quality— No Better. 

Carefully Packed In Small 

Crates. Easy to Handle. 

Price List Free. 

Syracuse Pottery Co., 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

[bbst pot in 

thb> uaiikf?] 



Please mention the A mertcan florist when writing, 

STANDARD FLOWER POTS \ 

Packed in small crates, easy to handle. 

Price per crate 
120 7-in., in crate, $4.20 
60 8 " 3.00 

HAND UADB, 

48 9-iD., in crate, $3.60 
48 10 •' 4.80 

24 11 •' 3.60 

24 12 '• 4.80 

12 14 " 4.80 

6 16 " 4.60 

Seed pans, same price as pots. Send for price 
list of Cylinders for Cut Flowers, Hanging Baskets, 
Lawn Vases, etc. Ten per cent off for cash with 
order. Address 

HILFINGER BROS. POHERY, Fort Edward. N. Y. 
Or August Rolker & Sons, New York Agents, 
31 Barclay Street, New York City. 

Please tnention the American Florist whcnwriting. 

THOSE RED POTS 

"STANDARDS" 

FULL SIZE AND WIDE BOTTOMS. 
BULB PANS AND AZALEA POTS. 

DETROIT FLOWER POT M'F'Y. 

HARRY BAL8LEV. DETROIT, MICH.. 

Rep. 490 Howard St. 

Please mention the Amoican Florist whcnwriting, 

GEO. KELLER & SON, 

MANUPACTURERi OP 

FLOWER POTS. 

Before bxiying write for prices. 

3S1-3B3 Herndon Street, 
near Wrightwood Ave., 

CHICAGOj ILL. 

Pltast nit ntion the A merican Flof ist zthen writing. 

The Horticultural Trade Journal. 

THE LARGEST, BRIGHTEST AND BEST 

Hortiiiultural Trflilc paper in the British Isles. 
It contains MORE ADVEKTISEMENTS. MORE 
ILLUSTRATIONS and MORE NEWS than any 
of its contemporaries Read by the whole of the 
British trade and all Ihe best European houses 
every week. Annual subscription, 75 cents. 
Sppcimen copv post free. Published weekiv. 
HORTICULTURAL PRINTINB CO., Burnlfy. Linos., Cng. 




m-HEWS^^ 



f^ease mentton ihe A merican Florist when writing- 

FLOWER POTS 



STANDARD POTS 



A 
SPECIALTY 

List and SAMPLES FREE. 

SWAHN'S POTTERY MF'G CO., 

P. 0. Box 78. MINNEAPOLIS. MINN. 

Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 

Standard POX^ 
Flower... T \J I \D 

If your p"eenhouses are within 600 
miles of the Capitol, write us, wc 
can save you money 

W. H. ERNEST. 

28th and M Street!. WASHINGTON. D. C. 

Red Standard Flower Pots 

Price list and samples on application. 

Paducah Pottery, 

J. A. BAUER, Proprietor. 

RED P OTS 

SAMPLE POT AND PRICE LIST 
ON APPLICATION. 

C. C. POUWORTH CO., jt'.l"!*"''^^ 
WRITE 

AF IfnilR 1821-23 N. LIAVITT ST.. 
I Ti KUnili OHIOAQO. ILL., 



roB PBicis oT 



Standard Pots 

whlota tot 'itrength and poroiity oombiatd 
are the l>eit oa the maiket. 



tpo4. 



The American Florist. 



115 



To-Bak-lne Products. 

For Killing Green Fly, Red Spider, Thrips and Other Injurious Insects. 

THEY WILL DO IT. IF YOU WANT TO KNOW HOW AND WHY, WRITE TO 



W. W. RAWSON i CO 12 Faneull Square, Boston, Mass. 

HENRY F. MICHELL CO 1018 Market St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

H. E. WILSON Rochester, N. Y. 

WM. F. KASTING 481 Washington St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

JOHN H. DUNLOP 5 W. King St , Toronto, Ont. 

WM. BRINKER 329 Prospect St., Cleveland, 0. 



MICHIGAN CUT FLOWER EXCHANGE 26 Miami Ave.. Detroit, Mich. 

E. H. HUNT 76-78 Wabash Ave., Chicago, III. 

HOLTON S HUNKEL 457 Milwaukee St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

ST. LOUIS SEED CO 615 N. Fourth St., St. Louis, Mo. 

BARTELDES S CO 1521 Fifteenth St., Denver, Colo. 

E. W. McLELLAN S CO., 144 Union Square Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 



The above reliable firms will be glad to give you this information, send you interesting booklet entitled "Words of 
Wisdom" and will show you how to save a large share of the stock that now goes to waste owing to attacks of insect pests. 

NICOTINE MANUFACTURING COMPANY, Detroit, Mich. 



THE ARNDT 




TREE PROTECTOR. 

A perfect inexpensive 
protection against all 
creeping and crawling; 
insects. Agents wanted 
everywhere; write at 
once. 

Michigan Cut Flower 
Exchange, 

Wm. Dilger, mgr., Sole 

Distributors, 
Detroit, Mich.,U. S. A. 
Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 

^L^nf ADJUSTABLE VASE HOLDER. 

No. 1. — Brass; nickel, 4 feet long, 6 clasps to each 
rod. Price complete (with green or white tum- 
bleri) $2.35. Price complete (with green or white 
cornucopia vases) $2.50. No. 2.— Heavy 4 ft. rod, 
brassed and nickeled, with three clasps for 5 to 
6-inch pots, each $1.75. 

KIFTS PATENT Rubber Capped FLOWER 
TUBES, iii-inch diameter, per 100, $3.50. 

JOSEPH KIFT & SON. 1725 Chestnut St.. Phila.. Pa. 
Please inention the American Florist -when 'writing. 

A. HERRMANN, 

J- Cape Flowers, all colors, 
^ Cycas Leaves, Metal Designs, 
^ and All Florists' Supplies. 

Send for Prices. 
404-412 East 34th St. NEW YORK. 

Please mention the Amencan Florist when -writing, 

SIGMUND GELLER 

Importer and Manulacturer of 

FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

All new Fall Goods in now. Ask to see tbe 
latest, Embossed and Pleated Crepe Paper. 

NEW YORK. 



iSTABUSHED 
8866 



EMIL^STEFFEItS^ 



3iOCC.»» lUTEFFEMS. 
"0 STIFFENS BROS 




EASr2/: 

please mention the A?nerzcan Florist when writing. 



Kramer's Pot Hangers 



108 W. 28th Street, 



Foley's Floral Fotographs. 

Floral Album, size 12x1 1 containing 24 

different funeral designs. By 

express $7.00 c. o. d. 

226-228i BOWERY, NEW YORK. 

KORAL LETTERS 

For Sale by all Wholesale Houses. 

Koral Mfg. Co., 

12 Hawley Place, Boston, Mass. 




THE neatest, simplest, most 
convenient and only 
practical device for convert- 
ing ordinary flower pots into 
hanging baskets They fit 
all standard made pots from 
2 to 10 inches in diameter. 
The illustration shows how 
they are attached Just the 
thing for hanging up ferns, 
begonias, etc. You can make 
room and money by their use. 
Try them. For Sale by 

Vaughan's Seed Store. 

Chicago and New York. 
E. F. Winterson Co., 

ChiGago. 
C.C.Pollworth Co.. 

Milwaukee, Wis. 
Price with vrire chain as 
shown in cut, $1.00 per dozen 



by express. Sample dozen by mail, $1.25. 

I. N. KRAMER ft SON. Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

GREEN SILKALINE. 

Do not be put ofl with cheap substitute*. 

John C. Meyer & Co., 

80 Kingston St, BOSTON, MASS. 

Wired 
Toothpicks 

10,000, tlBO; 50,000, (6.25. Manufactured by 

W. J. COWEE. BERLIN. N. Y. 

Sample Free. For sale by dealers. 

It is good business policy ^ -* -* 
to mention the •^ '^ ^ 

American Florist 

When you write to an advenisar. 




]B1ooj:i:x«s< 



The Tobacco Warehousing A Trading Company, 
Louisville, Kentucky. 



Fuml^atin^ Kind Tobacco 

n_ .J KILLS ALL APHIS IN ONE NIGHT 

r OWQCr '1 * bouso llX)s;:3 ft., »t « cost of 
10c. A r> 111. trial rkR, w.iU cost 
notliint^ if you -will p«.v tbo f-xprese cb:ir>_'C:! on 
it. Our booklet tells of it. Viite Dcpi. C forit. 
The H. A. STOOTHOrr COMVANY 
116, 117,118 West St., N.Y.t!ltT 



Please mention the A merican Flni ist 'when -writing. 

Lightning Flower 
Pot Wasiier. 

Washes all sizes of pots, clean as new, about 
as fast as you can bandle them. Strong Plants are 
only grown in Clean Pots. Send for description. 
Sold direct $15.00 net F. O. B. .Joliet. 



C. E. FINLEY, 



Joliet, III. 



116 



The American Florist. 



Feb. I J 



Toronto. 

This section is still experiencing bad 
weather. Growers are unanimous in 
declaring it the worst ever seen. As 
to the volume of business being done, 
there is a diversity of opinion among 
the retailers. With the long period 
of unsuitable weather transient trade 
has fallen off quite noticeably and there 
are few social events of any import- 
ance. Roses are not coming in very rap- 
idly though there is some very choice 
stock being cut and special blooms of 
Bridesmaid, Bride and Meteor will soon 
be more plentiful. The stock at present 
is readily disposed of and there is consid- 
erable demand for the cheaper grades for 
design work. Carnations are also very 
good, also mignonette. Freesias are quite 
plentiful and have a good sale. There is 
quite a glut of tulips and they are being 
oifered at the price of the bulbs. Violets 
are also hard to get rid of and it will be 
a good thing for the retailers when they 
are brought down in price. 

Several boxes have recently arrived 
with the flower frozen stiff, having 
been too well sprinkled with water 
and the boxes containing little more 
lining than in the moderate weather. 
Usually the water in the bottom of the 
boxes freezes and the frost on the flowers 
results from this. Several claims nave 
been made to the express companies on 
frozen shipments which were the ship- 
pers' own fault, and it is said that they 
are contemplating refusing to carry 
flowers except at owners' risk. I think 
the florists' clubs should take this matter 
in hand. 

The Gardeners' and Florists' Club held 
a very successful meeting and the follow- 
ing officers were elected: President, W. H. 
Ford; vice-president, Geo. Douglas; sec- 
ond vice-president, Geo. Manton; treas- 
urer, George Mills; secretary, E. H. Col- 
lins; executive committee, W. Muston, T. 
Manton, W.Jay, D.Robinsod, J. H. Dun- 
lop, H. Dillemuth, J. Ede; representa- 
tives to the exhibition board, W. Jay and 
T. Manton. 

J. H. Dunlop had the decoration of the 
Masonic Temple and certainly did credit 
for the auspicious occasion. In the sup- 
per room large quantities of southern 
smilax and many strings of pendants 
besides hundreds of flags were used. It 
was the most artistic and largest decora- 
tion ever had in this building. D. 



ViNELAND, N. J. — The floral society of 
this place, the only one of its kind in 
southern Jersey, which was chartered in 
1868, has elected these ofiicers: President, 
Mrs. A. E. Gay; vice presidents, Miss M. 
Abbott, Mrs. J. P. Gage, Mrs. H. Gove; 
librarian, Mrs. S. S. Gould; treasurer, 
Mr. Godkin. 



D. O. 

Cunningham 
Glass Co. 

PITTSBURG, PA. 

TANK WINDOW GLASS. 
\ Hot-House Glass a Specialty. 

Please mention f/ieylmerican Flat tsi when writing. 






IMPROVtl 



JENNINGS 
IRON GUTTER. 



Use our Patent 
IRON BENCH 
FITTINGS and 
Roof Supports. 

IMPROVED VAPORIZING PANS VEHTIUTINB 

For Tobae«o Eztnota, Btoi Send for Olrcnlsn. ' 

DILLER, GASKEY & CO., .ENrNTre^os.. APPARATUS. 

8. W- Cor. Sixth -rta B^i-k St^.. PHILADKLPHIA. ■ 

Pl^as^ tnentian the A merican Flnrt^t ivhett ■fjtyttinp 




The James H. Rice Co. 



-IMPORTERS and JOBBERS- 



GREENHOISE GLASS 

A SPECIALTY. 

"Wirxdo-w- Ol^ss, JP^lint, I**at;ty, eto. 

80-82 Wabash Avenue and 34 to 40 South Water Street, CHICAGO. 



GLASS. 

GOOD BRANDS. 

QUICK SHIPMENTS. 

LARGE STOCK. 

Warehouse on railroad switch. Be sure 
and get our prices. 

Sharp, Partridge & Co. 

22nd St. and Union Place, CHICAGO. 



Please mention the Afuerican Florist when writing. 

GULF CYPRESS 

GREENHOUSE 

MATERIAL 

HOT-BED SASH, BOILERS, PIPES, FITTINGS, 
VENTILATING APPARATUS. 

GLASS AT WH^tFQ/»LF. 

We furnish everything for building. Send 
for prices and catalogues. 

S. Jacobs & Sons, "l^'o^ilirN^.'V."'- 

Please mention the Aincncan Florist when writing. 

H. M. HOOKER GO. 

Window Glass, Paints and Putty, 
Greenhouse Glass a Specialty. 

69 W.St Ra.d.lph St., CHICAaO. 

Please mention the Amertcan Florist wtien ■writing. 



\ Holds Class 
Firmly » < 

•.• tha Paint JV. 



? 



I K. rifka H IMU. 1.1 .f a 

9i,«a r.imk n num. vMtp.it. 
KE 



BnniT A. .REKK, 

tU Clurta.t M,, ruib, F.. 




Please mention the American Florist when ivriting. 



They Say So 



Who? Most of the florists. 
What do they say? 
Well, it is this: 

"Lucas Green 
House Glass 

Always Pleases." 

BE WISE 

If Lucas Glass has pleased others 
isn't it likely to please you? 
Certainly it is. 

Remember, all sizes. Prices right, 
too. Write to-day. 

JOHN LUCAS & CC. 

/Manufacturers 
NEW YORK. PHILADELPHIA. CHICAGO. 



MASTICA 



=^USE IT NOW.=^ 

F. 0. PIERCE CO., ';°eJ5";?s"rI 



Sprague Smith Go. 

PLATE AND WINDOW CLASS 

Greenhouse Glass a Specialty. 

205 Randolph Straat, CHICAGO. 



1904- 



Th E American Florist. 



117 



jyt^ffejckM^piUr 





Ov tx y "WouJ' 




%i^l%^\^'^\^ 



^Ufir-c\vt«C||itr:ttitwvWtl 



tetv 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT ON ALL 
BOILERS ORDERED THIS MONTH 

Will book order now and deliver boiler any time during \ 904. 
Let us hear from you at once if you will need a boiler. 

Kroeschell Bros. Co., 

45 Erie St., CHICAGO. 



118 



The American Florist. 



Feb. /J, 



The 

American 
Florist 

A JOURNAL FOR THE TRADE. 
♦ ♦ ♦ » 

What Advertisers Say 



ML 



mm 
<3a 



mii 
mm 
rnti 

^$ 

ma 

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m 
m 
mii 
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^^ 
mm 
^.m 
mm 
mm 
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SAME OLD STORV.-AM. Fi.n- 
RIST Co.: — Kindlv discontimw 
ouradv."Bred iaOld Kentucky" 
The Florist is certainly a splen- 
did medium for advertisins. Tlie 
first insertion brou;;lit us orders 
enough to clean us out of cut- 
tings. We enclose $100 to pay 
for the insertions. When we 
have more stock will try itacain. 

We were not only highly pleased 
with the results, but with man- 
ner in which you displayed our 
adv. C. L. Urunson & Co. 

Paducah, Ky. 

* * * 

PLEASURE AND PROFIT. A>i. 

Florist Co. :— Your paper is a 
weekly source ot pleasure and 
profit to every one connected 
with this concern, and three 
copies have been subscribed for 
by the company for several years 
—one to my house, one to the 
greenhouses and one to the store. 
In addition to that the foreman 
and one or two ot the men each 
receive a copy. 

J. A. Valentine. Pres. 
Denver, Colo. Park Floral Co. 

* * * 

THE WHOLE THINC.-En. Am. 

Florist: — WeencloseP.-O order 
for the American Florist for 
another year. We consider it 
the "whole thing." • 

S"UTH Park Floral Co. 
New Castle. Ind. 



mm 

^.m 



Advertising Rates. 

Jl.ro per inch. $30.00 per page ot 30 inches. 
Discounts on time contracts as follows: 

6 insertions 5 per cent. 

13 i nsertions 10 per pent. 

26 insertions 20 percent. 

52 insertions 30 percent. 

Space on front and back cover pages 
sold only on yearly contract at $1.00 per 
inch, net. 



THE AMERICAN flORIST CO. 

324 Dearborn ftreet, 
CHI w AGO, ILL. 



CLAY'S FERTILIZER 

Used by all English>nd Scotch Florists. 
56 lbs. for $3.25. 

WM. ELLIOTT & SONS, New York. 



40 W. 28fh St., 

NEW YORK. 



SIMON RODH 

I have the Newest Things for Violet Tyings. Ribbons to match all your Flowers and Chiffons 

in all Widths and Colors. 

EASTER NOVELTIES NOW READY. 

GARLAND'S GUTTERS 

WILL KEEP SNOW AND ICE OFF 
YOUR GLASS. 

DES PL< INES. ILL. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 





:^SN^^s■^>.^v■^^^^^ss^s^^.'^^^^^^^"»t^ 

A sample of our Gutter is on Exhibition at the Chicago Flower GrowiTS' .Market. 



M. RICE & CO., 

Importers and Manufacturers, 

Leading Florists' 9,8 Filbert Street, 
Supply House and rfti.«i j ■ ■_• «« 

Ribbon Specialists. Ptllladelpilia, Fa. 



Boston Florist Letter Co. 

MANXTFACTUREBB OF 

FLORISTS' LXITERS. 




/2IN. LETTF^ 

Thin wooden box nicely Rtalned and var- 
nished, 18x30x12 made In two sections, one 
for eacli bItih letter, given away with fiist 
order of 5U0 letters. 

Block Letters, 1% or 2-incb size, per 100. $2.00. 

Script Letterf ^4. Fastener with each letter or 
■vord. 

Used by leadin? florists everywhere and for sale 
by all wholesale florists and supply dealers. 

N. F. McCarthy^ Trcas. and Majiagcf, 

84 Hawley St., BOSTON, MASS. 

Plrnsf mrn/ion the A wr"' icau Flot iit ichen zv} iiing. 

CUT FLOWER BOXES "SlgXS 

The best, strongest and neatest folding cut 
flower box ever made. Cheap, durable. To try 
them once is to use them always. Per 100 Per 1(00 
Size No. 0. 3x4x20 $3 00 $19.00 

1. 3x 4VSSI6 1.90 ViSfS 

2. 3x6x18 2.00 19 00 

3. 4x 8sl8 2.50 23.00 

4. 3x5x24 2.75 26.00 

6 4x8x22 3.00 28 50 

•' 6. 4x8x28 3.75 36.00 

" 7. 6x16x20 5.50 54.00 

" 8. 3z 7\V 3.00 28.150 

9. 5x10x35 6.50 62.00 

10. 7x20xM 9.50 67.50 

11. SKjxS'iSO 3.00 28.50 

Sample free on application. No charge for 

printing on orders above 250 boxes. Terras cash. 

THE LIVINGSTON SEED COMPANY, 

BOX 104. COLUMBUS, OHIO. 

HEADQCABTER8 FOB 

HORTIGULTURAi. SUPPLIES 

Of Every Dea '.rilptlon. 

When jcu oan't get what Jou want anywhere 
dlse. Bend here, we will send U to you. 

"If it's used In Horlloultjre, we have If." 

OUNNE & CO.<B4t>.t0ttM.,N«W YMt 

TtHpbone Call. 1700 Madiion Sgnan. 

Boilers »=-■ 

For GREENHOUSES. 

See Our Catalogue 

^'o?;7.;rr1 6iblin&Co.,UtiGa,N.Y. 



THE BEST THING OUT FOR FLORISTS 
THE 

Patent Smilax and Asparagus 
Tyer and Stake. 

The work done in half the time. You will 
not do without it after a trial. Will last a life- 
time. No wires on the ground. No tying 
or knots required. Be sure to send $i.00 for 
sample uo of each. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
Easily applied. 

Leo. Wellenreiter, 

DANVERS, ILLINOIS. 

Pleaic mention the American Florist when writing. 

Gardeners' Chronicle. 

A Weekly Illustrated Journal. 

Established 1841. 

The GARDENERS* CHRONICLE has been fob 
ovBR Sixty Years the Leading Journal of lt« 
class. It has achieved this position becauso, while 
specially devoting itself to supplying the daily 
requirements of gardeners of all classes, the infor- 
mation furiiiSbed is of such general and perma- 
nent value that the GARDENERS' CHRONICLE 
is looked up to as the standard authority on 
tke subjects of which it treats. 

Subscription to the United States, €4 20 per year. 
Remittances to be made payable to H. G. COVE. 

Op pice: — 
il Wellinoton St.. CnvenI Garden. Lonrtnn. Englanfl 

MOLLER^S DEUTSm 

GIRTNER ZEITUKG, 

The most widely circulated German gardening 
Journal, treating of all departments of horticulture 
and floriculture. Numerous eminent correspon- 
dents in all parts of the world. An advertising 
medium of the highest class. 

Moller's Deutsche Gartner Zeitung is published 
weekly and richly illustrated. Subscription IS 00 
per annvm, including postage. Sample copies free. 

LIDWIG MOLLfR=S:i"Jiv 



'^ Regan Printing House 

CATALOGUES 



Nursery 

5eed 

Florists* 

87-91 Plymouth Place, CHICAGO. 



igo4: 



The American Florist. 



no 



r" — — - — ^ 

I The Height of the Season 

AND 

HERE COMES BAYERSDORFER & CO. 

With every supply and choice accessory that is called for 
in a florist's business. Try a sample case of our beautiful 
fancy Baskets for cut flowers and tin lined basket Jardi- 
nieres for ferns and other decorative plants, now so 
popular, $25.00 will pay for a nice assortment of these, 
our selection based upon the demand from metropolitan 
centers. Pretty Vases, specially adapted for daffodils, 
violets, roses or carnations. Can be so'd with the cut 
flowers. Sheaves, Doves, Immortelles, etc., etc. 

H. Bayersdorfer & Co. 



*-- . 



50-56 N. 4th St„ PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Meetinsfs of Florists' Clubs. 

Baltimore, Md.— Gardeners' Club of Baltimore. 
Royal Arcunum buildiog. 18 W. Saratoga street. 
Second and fourth Monday of each month, at 8 p. 
m. John J. Perry, Sec'y, Gay and Eager streets. 

Boston, Mass— Gardeners' and Ftorists' Club 
of Boston, Horticultural Hall. Meets third 
Tuesday of each month, October to March 
inclusive. W. E. Fischer, Sec'y, 18 Union Ter- 
race, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

BtrFPALO, N. Y —Buffalo Florists' Club, 481 
Washington street. Second Wednesday of each 
month, at 8 p. m. Wm. Legg, Sec'y* 1440 Dela- 
ware avenue, Buflfalo. 

Butte, Mont.— Montana Florists' Club, 45 W. 
B oadway. First Saturday in each month. D. E. 
Law, Sec'y. 

CmcAQO, III —Chicago Florists' Club, Hande) 
Hall, 40 Randolph street. First and third 
Wednesday of each month, at 8 p. m. George 
Wienhoeber. Sec'y, 413 Elm street, Chicago. 

Cincinnati, O.— Cincinnati Ftorists' Society, 
Jabez Elliott Flower Market. Second Saturday 
of each month, at 8 p m. Geo. Murphy, Sec'y, 
Sta. F., Cinciuna'i, O- 

Cleveland, O.— Cleveland Florists' Club, 
Progress Hall, 344 Detroit street, aeeond and 
fourth Monday of each month, at 8 p. m. Isaac 
Kennedy, Sec'y, Westpark. O. 

Denver, Colo.— Denver Floral Club, 323 Charles 
Block. Second and fourth Friday of each month, 
at 8 p. m. Adam Bulmer. Sec'y. 

Detroit, Mich -De roit Florists' Olub, Cowie 
Building, Parran and Gratiot avenue. First an i 
third Wednesday of each month at 8 p. m. J. F. 
Sullivan, Sec'y, 214 Woodward avenue. 

Grand RAPTDg, Mich.— Grand Kaplds Florists' 
Club, Board of Trade rooms, PbhtI street. Fourth 
Monday of each month. N. B. Stover. Sec'y. 
Grandville, Mich. 

Hamilton. Ont.— Hamilton Gardeners' and 
Florists' Club, offices of members. First and 
third Tuesday of each month at 8 p. m. 
Chas. M. Webster. Sec'y. 

Hartford, Conn.— Hartford Florists' Club. 
Second and fourth Tuesday of each month at 8 
p. ra. J F Coombs, Sec'y. 

Indianapolis, Ind. — State Florists' Association 
of Indiana, Commercial Club rooms, Indianapolis. 
Fust Tuesday of each month, at 8 p. m. H. 
Junpe, Sec'y, 456 E. Washiagton street, India- 
nanolis. 

Madison, N. J.— Morris Co'inty Gardeners' and 
Florists' Society, Masonic Hall. "Second Wednes- 
day of each month at7:30 p. m. in winter. S. Red- 
stone, Secy. 

Milwaukee, Wis.— Milwaukee Florists' Club. 
Meets first Tuesday of each month at St. Charles 
Hotel club rooms. H. V. Hunkel, Sec'y. 

Minneapolis. Minn. — Minneapolis Florists' 
Club, West Hotel. FirstThursday of each n_onth, 
at — p. m. C F. Rice, Sec'y, lii N. Sixth street. 

Montreal. Que. — Montreal Gardeners' and Flo- 
rists' Club, Alexandria rooms, 2204 St Catherine 
street. First and third Monday of each month. 
W H Horobin, SdC'y 23 Closse street. 

New Bedford. Mass.— New Bedford Florists' 
club, second Thursday of each month. Wm 
P. Pierce, Sec'y. 

New London, Conn.— Gardeners' and Florists' 
Club, first and third Tuesday of each month at 
greenhouses of secretary. U. H, Appeldorn, Sec'y. 



TIN FOIL 

Plain, Fancy, Printed & Mounted, 



Maniifoctiired by 



Tlie Coniey Foil Co. 



S31 to 641 We«t 3Sth St., 

Please mention the A merican FloiiU when writing. 

ADAM SCHILLQ LUMBER CO. 

A°L\"k^"ND's'oF HeniloGl( and Pine 

and "PECKY CYPRESS," our new introduction 
tu the trade. 

For Greenhouses. 

ALSO CEDAR POSTS off ALL LEN6THS and DIMENSIONS. 

Having had an extensive experience in tht' liuL' 
of Lumber and Posts needed for Greenhouse work, 
I am prepared to mettall inquiries. Send for prices. 

Cor. Weed and Hawthorne Ave., 

CHICAGO, ILL. Tel. North 1636 & 1627 
^^References given from the leading Florists 

of Cook County. 
Please mention the American Florist when writing. 



Superior Boilers 

ARE 

GOOD BOILERS. 

Send for Catalogue and full information. 

SUPERIOR MACHINE AND BOILERWORKS, 
129-133 W. Suparior St., CHICAGO. 



Second-Hand American Glass Cheap. 

lOxirnloubl.- ibick qiiiillty i:. 
Mrs. Annie Caldwell, 431 W. Market St., Scianlon, Pa. 



Attention, 
Florists I 

Here is an opportunity to buy 
material and supplies at such 
extremely low prices that you 
must take advantage of it at 
once. We are headquarters for 
Boilers. Heating Apparatus, 
Pipe, Valves, Fittings, Wire, 
Glass, Sash, and a thousand and 
one other items that enter into 
the construction of your Green- 
houses. It will pay you to keep 
in touch with us and advise us 
of your wants. 

When In Chicago be sure to call and 
see us. Our mammoth plant is the 
most extensive in the world. Five 
long distance 'phones, all Yards 827. 
The 35th street cars pass our Coors. 

We Offer for 
Immediate Acceptance: 

12 6oxi6 horizontal tubular 
boilers, in excellent con- 
dition, complete with 
fronts and all castings 
and fittings, each $295.00 

13 54x16, each 225.00 

6 42x14, each 170.00 

And a hundred other boil- 
ers in various sizes. 

100,000 feet 4-inch boiler 
tubes, in good condition, 
overhauled, rattled, 
squared ends, which we 
furnish with sleeve coup- 
lings, per foot 10 

100,000 feet of 3 1-2 inch, 
per foot 08 

A million feet of standard 
black wrought iron pipe, 
overhauled, with threads 
and couplings; sizes from 
3-8 to 16-inch. 

Good second-hand Globe, 
Angle, Check, Gate and 
Pressure Valves at low 
prices. 

75,000 feet 3-4 inch garden 
hose, per foot .04 

12 carloads galvanized wire, 
gauges 10 to 14. It is in 
short lengths, ranging up 
to 250 feet. One gauge 
only to a bale. Price per 
bale of 100 lbs 1.40 

W^ire Staples, per keg of 
loolbs 2.00 

WireNails, mixed, all kinds, 
per 100 lbs 1.60 

WRITE FOR OUR CATAL08UE No. 47. 

Chicago House Wrecking Co., 

W. 35tb ind IRON STS.. CHIGA60, ILL. 



120 



Tii-R American Florist, 



^A. ^J; 



ln<fcx to Adv«r«»H. 



AkehurBt G A Son...i(^ i 



Albanv st«am Tr 



»«., 



Co .Ill 

Allen J K ..x- 96 

Amling EC.^.. 95 

Asohmann P od trey. .113 

Backer & 'co 107 

Baldwi'. A J 113 

lB»Ue- p A 119 

«»'.rJolin 110 

^.assettiK Wasbburn 95 

Bauer Floral Co !1S 

liaur & Smith 106 

BaversdorfetHifcOo. .4»9 

Beach L» S s.^...U6 

Beokert Vfi? II 

I«onthei' AKX) 95 

l8?^cfcmoit8 P J Co. . 102 

'Bernlng H Q 94 

•Be*Wmann Bros Co 98 

'BlW»iuw J &Co 112 

'B'jDnot Bros 97 

■yoston Cooperativt,' 

Flo Growers Assool04 

Boston Letter Co 11« 

Brants D 112 

Brant & Noe Flo Co 'J4 
Breitmever's J Sons 

■«■ III 

«Twa John.... 112 

Sruns H N 100 

ISuokley Wt' PlantCoI09 
Budlong J A... .95 110 

l«uWt*!\3bt & Co lUO 

Burree W A A Co... II 

^SPtt Bros 113 

V7aldwt-ll Mrs A 119 

Caldwell the Woods- 
man Co 108 

Calif Carnation Co 109 

Carmody J D Ill 

ChadwiokChas 108 

Chloaeo Carnation Co 

107 

Chloaeo House 

Wrecking Co 119 

Christensen A 112 

Cleveland Cut Flo Co 99 

Ooles W W Ill 

Gonard ^ Jones Co. . 103 

Oontey Foil Co 119 

Cottage Gardeis....l08 
Cotiage Nursery — 11 

"Cowef- Ar4*<ir II 

«owee W J 115 

CraigRobtASon.... 110 

'C^row'*' Wler 101 

Croekfl John J Co...ll4 

'CMWl Fern Co 96 

*0*bnlnEham D O 

Glass Co 116 

'Cunningham Jos B . 1 1 3 

Daniels & Fisher 98 

Danley ST I 6 

DavisBros 113 

Deamud J B 91 

Detroit Flower Pot 

Mfy 114 

Dickinson TLo A (Jo Ii 

Uietsoh A dt CO Ill 

Ui)khuis J & Co 102 

DiUer Caskey A Co. . 1 1 .=> 

Dillon J L 112 

Dillon's MfgCo 1.0 

DornerFASonsCo. .. I 

Dreer H A 103 116 

Dunne <t Co 118 

Eastern Nurseries.. .It2 
Elliott Wm & Sons. 118 

Emmans Geo It 113 

Ernest W H 114 

Farquhar R A J Co . . 100 

Finley C E ll.i 

Fisher Peter I 

Florists' Am. E.'ich. 93 
Foley's Floral lioto- 

graphs 115 

Foley MfgCo 120 

Ford Bros 97 

Foster Lucius B 113 

Fuchs A 113 

Furrow Bros K 2 

GardenersChronicle .118 

Garland Geo M Ii8 

Garland Prank 95 

Gasser J M Co lOti 

Oeller Sigmund 115 

Ghormley Wm 97 

Giblin & Co 118 

Gullett W HA Sons. Ill 

Gunther WmH 97 

Gurney Heater Co ... 120 

Guttman Alex J 97 

Hail Association 12J 

Hancock Geo & Son. Ill 

Hauswirth P J 98 

Heaoock Jos 113 

Heller Bros 104 

Heller&Co II 

Herendeei' MfgCcIV 
Herr Albert M...ia7 112 

Herrmann A 115 

Hews A H A Co 114 

Hilflnger Bros 114 

Hill The EG Co I 

Hippard E 120 

Hitohings A Go IV 



lobbies Limited ...112 
Holton A Hunkel Co 

95 11,'i 

Hooker H M Co 116 

Horan Edw C 97 

Hort Advertiser 118 

Hort Trade Journal. 1 14 

HuntEH 94 115 

International Flower 

DeiiTCty 98 99 

Jacobs S A Sons 116 

Kasting W F 1 

Keller Geo A Son .... 1 1 1 
Kennioott Bros Co . . 94 
Kin Joseph A Son. .115 
KingConstructionCoI20 

Kohr A F 114 

Koral Mfg Co im 

Koster A Co Ite 

Kramer I N A Sob.. Ue 

Kreahov«r L J 99 

Kroeschsll Bm Go. . 1 17 

KuehBC A 94 

Kuhie A 113 

Lag«t A Hurrell 99 

Lang Julius 97 

Langjahr A H 97 

Larcbmont Nursery. 1(9 

Laub A A Son 107 

Lecakes N A Co 96 

Leuthy A 107 

Littlefleld H F K8 

Livingston Seed Co 118 
Lockland LumberCoItl 
Loomis Floral Co.. . I » 

Lonsdale Edwin K9 

Lord A Burnham Co. 

IV 

Lothrop W P !02 

Lucas J ACo 116 

MaderPaul 112 

Maule W H 100 

May John N 107 I 

McCarthy N F A Co. 96 

McCoanell Alex 98 

MoCuUough's J M 

Sons 98 

McKellarChas W... 94 
Metropolitan Mate- 
rial Co Ill 

Meyer John C A Co. 115 
Miami Floral Co....lu9 
Mich Cut Flower Co 

95 115 

Millang Chas 97 

Millang Frank 97 

Moller Ludwig 118 

Moninger J C Co. ..Ill 
Moon The Wm H ColC2 
Moore Hentz A Nash 97 

Murphy Wm 91 

NanzCG 103 

Nat Flo Bd of Trade 11 

Nauman Q M 105 

N V Cut Flower Go. . 97 
N Y Cut Flower Ex . 96 

Niessen Leo 96 

OHagan J H Ii3 

Paducah Pottery 114 

Park Floral Co 98 

Perkins John J 97 

Philadelphia Whole- 
sale Flower Mkt... 96 

PierceFO Co 116 

Pierson F It A C0...IIU 
Pierson-Selton Co. IV 
Pittsburg Cut Fio Co 91 
Poeblmann Bros Co. 

95 1(8 

Pollworth C C 114 

Pritchard J N 99 

Quaker City MachCoI 1 1 

Randall A L 93 

Rawson W W A Co. li 

Raynpr J 1 97 

Rees A Campere. . .. II 
Regan Prim House 118 

Reinberg Geo 95 

Reinberg Peter.. 99 111 

Rhotert Aug 1^2 

Rice Bros 98 

RiceJamesHCo 116 

Rice M A Co 118 

Robinson H W A Go 99 

Rodb Simon 118 

Roemer Fred'k 11 

Roehrs Julius 112 

Rolker A A Sons . . . . li'3 
Rosemont Gardens.. 96 

Saltford Geo 96 

Scheepers John 102 

Schillo Adam 119 

Scott John 11:) 

SharpPartridgeACo.lIC 
ShermanNurseryCo. 113 

Sheridan W F 9T 

Sievers A Boland — 98 

Sinner Bros 95 109 

Situations A Wants. 92 

Skidelsky SS 109 

Smith NathASon .... 1 12 

Smith Wm C 107 

Smith W AT Co.... I 
Spangler E J A Co.. II 
Sprague Smith Co... 116 
Standard Pump and 
Engine Co IV 



Stearns Lumber Co.. IV 

Steffens Emil 115 

Stevens H L Co 108 

StLouisCarnationCo 109 
Stootbott HA ACt) !I5 
Stotts A HftttUnnCo 

ioS l03 106 

StyiBtJj II 

Superior Machine A 

Boiler Works 119 

Sutherland Q A 96 

Suydam Jerome 108 

Swahn Pot Mfg Co. 114 

Swayne Wm 112 

Syracuse Potterv Co. 114 

Telegraph Code II 

Thompson J D 

Carnatfen Co.. 94 I 
Tbotbara J M A Co. II 
Tobftttco Warehouse 

A Trading Co 115 

Traendly A Schenck 97 

Trounem O L 96 

VanderWeiJden&Co U3 



Vaugh&n'S Seed Siotfe 
.......ICDl i03 t05 if I 

Vawleir E J . . ...... 95 

Vlck's Sola's Jas II 

WAgnerParkCons ... 103 

Warburton C 109 

Weber FC 98 

Weber H A Sons.... 107 

Weeber A Don II 

Weiland A Risch ... 95 

Welch Bros 96 

Wellenreitir Leo 118 

Whilldia Pot Co. .,,..lt4 

WletofBtos is 108 

Wlldilre't Bros IT 

Wills & Segar 98 

Winandy M 95 

Winterich C 113 

WintersonEFCo.... 99 
Wittbold Geo Co... 113 

Wood Bros 113 

Young John 97 

Young Thos Jr....98 98 
Young A Nugent,... 97 



TheKingConsMionCo. 

New Roof ConttruetfBn, Auiomitic 
Stokers, Wttet Tode Steam Boiler, 

Automatic an4 Hand Ventllatort 

tOCKPORT, N. Y. 
a2 Church Street, TORONTO, ONT. 



^/ease mention the A niey ican Ftoi is[ when writing. 



The Sfandard 

Venfilaling Machinery. 

The original MachiEf witli seir-oiUnfJ: cubs. 
Thti' most powerliil. least coraplic;lied, Vet^y c6m- 
pa,;t with ease of 'Op'erilioU. 

The NlW DUPLEX GUTTER. 

Over six miles nf this Iron Giiitor inus'^.and 
highly recommeiKled. Thu onl> drip-proof gutttr 
OQ the iiiarkt't, 

The STANDARD RETURN STEAM TRAP, 

It lias no equals lor simplicity or its workin^fi' 
Catalogue free. 

E. HIPPAUD, ^°""o?.?of*'*' 



-THE- 



Florists' Hail Association 

Insures 19.000,000 square feet of Glass. Now is 
the time to join. Address 

JOHN G, ESLER, Sec'y. 

SADDLE RIVER, N. J. 

Please mention the American Florist 
every time you write to an advertiser. 



EUREKS GREENHOUSES 



SOLD BY- 



DILLON GREENHOUSE MFG. CO. """"' 



hm. 



Can be erected by any mechanical petiOB. PtacUoal, f e&Sotiafale In eost. Most durable. SH'ai 
for circular, blue prints and plain directions. 




CROP INSURANCE. 

Life Insurance is valuable because it guatantees the outcome. 

' Ourncy" Heaters 

"BRIGHT IDEA," "DORIC" and "400 SERIES" do the 

Bftme thiDR Ut your hothouse: THEY GUARANTEE THE 

CROP. First of all they save 20 per cent on the coal bill and 
6o keep expense at a minimum. Next, they produce an even 
heat and ao do not imperil the life of the plant. Next, they 
are simple to operate and so requira least attention Lastly- 
they wear longer than others and thus perceptibly reduce the 
capital invested. Don't buy or exchange until you've invei^ 
tigated them. 

GURNEY HEATER MFG. CO. 



■DORIC" HEATER, 



74 Franklin Street, 
BOSTON, MASS. 



Ill Filth Avenue, 
NEW YORK CITY. 



"/9 $> sacred 15 a $ earned ^' 

You mczy 3a ere yiiore iha?i Ot/e. dollar 
if j/ou JDi/y your 

Greenhouse AiATERiAL 

47/ )V. 2.2.'-°. ST. CZH/C/iQO^ 

NooSuJork , Hoi-be^ Sas7i,lenne3iee T^e^Csaarposfi 
Yen tilatiny Apparatus, har^cuare speciaUies 
Q aZora nized S>creu/ eyes^ Screoj^ooAij '^urnbuckks ^ loh-e 

FRE-E illustrated C<9TaL0(^U£-fff 




RmBrica is "ths Praw of the JIbssbI; there may bs mare camfart Amidships, but u/e are tlie Srst ta touch Unknown Seas.' 



Vol. XXII. 



CHICAQO AND NEW YORK, FEBRUARY 20. 1904. 



No. 820. 



f LHlii ^|K!ii@J!@JIIS IFlL@lS0@7 



NnrETSENTH YSAB. 

Copyright 1904, by American Florist Company 

Entered as Second-Class Mail Matter. 

Published evbbt Satdbday by 

AMERICAN FLORIST COMPANY. 

334 Dearborn St., Cblcago. 
Butern Office: 4a W. aSth St., New Yarlc. 

Subscription, $1.00 a year. To Europe, tZ 00. 

Subscriptions accepted only from the trade. 

Volumes hall-yearly from August, 1901. 

SOCIETY OF AMERICAN FLORISTS AND 
ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURISTS. 

Officers — Philip Breitmeter, Detroit, Mich., 
president; J. .1. Bbneke, St. Louis. Mo., vice- 
president; Wm. J. Stewart, 79 Alilk St., Boston, 
Mass., secretary; H. B. Beattt, Oil City, Pa., 
treasurer. Twentietli annual meetinfjat St. Louis, 
Mo., .\ugust, 1904 

THE AMERICAN CARNATION SOCIETY. 

Annual convention at Detroit, Mich., March 2, 
1901. .\lbbrt M. HfiRR, Lancaster, Pa., secretary. 



AMERICAN ROSE SOCIETY. 

Annual meeting and e.Khibition. Philadelphia. 
March. 1904. Leonard Barron, 136 Liberty St.. 
New Yorl\, secretary. 



CHRYSANTHEMUM SOCIETY OF AMERICA. 

Annual convention and exhibition, November, 
1901. Fred H. Lemon. Richmond, Ind.. secretary'. 

Tills ISSUE 44 PAGES WITH COVER. 



CONT£JVTS. 

Greenhouse construction and heating .131 

The late Philip Gauges (portrait) 133 

The carnation — Raising seedlings , 132 

— A nierican Carnation Society 123 

Chrysanthemums— Santa Claus (illus.) 123 

—Chrysanthemum comment 123 

Chicago Florists' Club exhibition 121 

With the growers 13 i 

—A Fairhaven, Mass., florist (illus.) 135 

Some shamrock folklore (illus.) 135 

Queries — To desl roy earth worms 136 

— Rose cuttings in cellar..,, 126 

— Greenhouse heating ... 126 

— Unopened camellia buds ■ 126 

— Changing soil for roses 136 

European horticulture 137 

New aster, Miss Kate Lock (illus.) 138 

The retail trade — Flag on easel (illus.) 129 

Chicago 139 

New York 130 

Philadelphia 13 1 

Boston 130 

St. Louis 130 

Baltimore 139 

Detroit 131 

Obituary 133 

The seed trade — Not statesmen but seedsmen. .140 

—Import values of seeds and bulbs 14f) 

The nursery trade 143 

New Bedford, Mass 143 

Our pastimes 144 

Milwaukee, Wis 148 

St. Paul, Minn 148 

Washington 150 

San Diego, Cal 163 

Cincinnati, 158 

The.allied trades. 158 

iLondon... .......;...-.. ...158 




Greenhouse Construction and Heating. 

[Presented before the Chicago Florists' Club, 
February 3, 1904, by Robt. W. King, of North 
Tonawanda, N. V.] 

In receiving an invita- 
tion to attend the meet- 
ing ot this club I under- 
stand its object is the 
bringing together of men 
engaged in the florists' 
profession, with the pur- 
pose of exchanging ideas; 
not only amongst the 
florists or growers them- 
selves, but also with greenhouse builders, 
engineers, etc., whose interests are allied 
with those of the first referred to. The 
chief subject I understood was to be 
"Greenhouse Construction." On this 
question, being open to learn, I was very 
pleased to have the opportunity afi'orded 
me of being present, and can assure you 
I feel honored in receiving an invitation 
from the Florists' Club. I am also 
promised the opportunity of inspecting 
the mammoth conservatories and becom- 
ing acquainted with many growers of 
renown whose praises have been carried 
my way on brecEes eminating from what 
I have heard designated as the "Windy 
City." In reference to the florists' pro- 
fession, a good many flowery things have 
been and still can be said in regard 
to the ennobling influences of the same, 
but to drop down to hard pan without 
the use of parachute or wings is the kind 
of knocks we are more accustomed to 
deal with and have got to make up our 
minds to expect when we allow our 
aspirations to carry us too high. There 
are many questions I would like to 
receive more light upon, possibly far too 
many for the present occasion to cope 
with. However, the old saying, "Rome 
was not built in a day," still applies as 
an offset against expecting to build too 
much on any single occasion. The ques- 
tions in greenhouse construction before 
my mind are as follows: 

Best width for beds. 

Best width for walks. 

Best width for houses. 

Best methods of ventilation. 

whether continuous. 

Whether opening at ridge. 

Whetherhinged at ridge. 

Whether single or double. 

Whether hand or automatic. 

Difference for roses as compared with carna- 
tions. 

Detached houses or in block for roses. 

Detached houses or in block for carnations. 

In block hpuses has ventilation at the gutter 
as well as the ridge ever been tried? 

Upon these questions I am not com- 
petent to protrude my opinion. There 
are other questions, however, on which 



my profession as an engineer engaged 
especially in greenhouse improving may 
entitle me to have something to say. I 
will treat them in turn as follows: 

The Houses Themselves.— In regard 
to the improving of the houses them- 
selves, it is universally acknowledged 
that two very desirable factors are per- 
manency of construction and the obtain- 
ing at the same time of such form as will 
admit the greatest degree of light. Along 
these lines I have brought with me a 
sample of a new purline, thinking it may 
interest the club. You note it is on the 
same principle of truss work introduced 
some years ago, and on which many 
houses have been erected in the United 
States and in Canada, some of which 
have been illustrated in the trade papers. 
The first form did away with the posts 
that supported either ridges or purlines, 
making the walls of the houses or inside 
gutters the only roof supports, thus 
leaving the beds clear of obstruction. 
The present improvement exchanges the 
solid purline whether of wood or angleiron 
(either of which is a serious obstruction 
to light at the time it is most needed) for 
one of skeleton form, the purline itself being 
but three-eighths inch in diameter, trussed 
with wire of three-si.xiteenth inch diameter. 
The larger truss limbs at the end of the 
sample are those used in the form referred 
to and were fastened to either wood or 
angleiron purline. In this form they are 
adapted to fasten to the three-eights inch 
iron sash bar direct, theintermediate sash 
bars being supported by the smaller truss 
limbs. 

Greenhouse Steam Economizer. — 
Briefly, the object of the economizer 
applied to a steam boiler is to use the 
temperature of the colder return or feed 
water to absorb heat from the fuel gases 
after they have left the hotter surface of 
the boiler. In our new system we dis- 
tribute the return pipes from the heating 
coils about the houses to be heated as in 
hot water heating, so abstracting the 
heat for a useful purpose; by so cooling 
the returned water we render it capable 
of absorbing additional heat from the 
otherwise waste gases. 

The Economy Obtained. — By reference 
to Green's economizer catalogues (this is 
the economizer almost universally used 
in steam engine practice) you will find 
substantial references from all parts of 
the world and tabulated data as to the 
percentage of saving under different con- 
ditions. It will be seen that where con- 
ditions are as favorable as in greenhouse 
heating a saving of at least fifteen per 
cent* could be accomplished where the 



122 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 



system is successfully applied. In the 
writer's own practice he has not been 
able to give exact results on the economy 
obtained with the economizer system 
alone, because it has been mixed with 
other elements of economy in the plants 
experimented upon. For instance, econo- 
mizer surface adds considerably to the 
total area of heating surface of the boiler, 
and where this latter has been too small, 
as it usually is, an additional element of 
economy is here introduced, adding to 
the economy due to the economizer 
system only. In some work where the 
economizer system in greenhouses has 
been only partially installed along with 
other improvements, such as water tube 
boilers, as compared with the old style 
fire tube, a saving of twenty-five per cent 
in fuel has been accomplished. In other 
work where the efiect of the economizer 
system has been more fully developed 
along withotherimprovements, a saving 
of as much as thirty-three and one-third 
per cent has apparently resulted. This is 
equal to a saving of one ton of coal in 
every three. The writer regrets that he 
is not at present able to speak more 
definitely on the economic value of the 
economizer alone, though he expects to 
later on or before this season is through. 
The guarantee given with the new system 
referred to is fifteen per cent. Before 
leaving this part of my subject a few 
words may be said on the financial side 
of the question. Many growers object 
to putting in an up-to-date heating plant 
and operating the same when erected on 
such business principles as are followed 
in other power stations on the ground of 
expense, and yet the extra expense so 
incurred would be the best paying part of 
their whole investment. For example, 
180,000 square feet of glass, ventilation 
and heating plant included, represents an 
investment of, say, $80,000. A net profit 
of seven per cent would realize $5,600 per 
annum. The fuel bill for this glass on a 
basis of twelve tons of coal per season 
per 1,000 square feet of glass would 
represent 2,160 tons of coal. On a basis 
of eight tons it would represent 1,240 
tons, being a difference of 920 tons of 
coal, which at $4 per ton would represent, 
were this ratio of economy obtained, an 
additional profit for the year of $3,680. 
Suppose the improvement of the plant 
cost $1,000, which would be adding, 
say, twenty-five per cent to the boiler 
cost. This would be a profit of 368 per 
cent per annum on the additional 
outlay. 

When the writer first realized the im- 
portance of the economizer system he soon 
afterwards took steps to apply it to 
greenhouse work, since steam heating 
was then coming into use, and arranged 
with a grower desiring to experiment 
also, or rather to get something better 
than was then on the market, to work 
jointly along these lines. Coal at that 
time was costing $6 per ton, so a saving 
in the proportion mentioned, viz: eight to 
twelve, would mean an extra dividend of 
itself of seven per cent on the whole 
capital invested. After the first year's 
operation a very careful and minute 
stock taking and comparison with an 
ordinary plant (the figures of which I yet 
intend to publish) did not show quite 
eight to twelve, but showed seven and 
one-half to ten, which was very near it. 
It is said "the proof of the pudding is in 
the eating." I submit then as additional 
evidence that the grower who operated 
that plant became rich. Though this 
fact may not be due altogether to the 
superiority of the plant, still the writer is 
thankful that by no possibility whatever 



can the fact of this man getting rich be 
used as an argument against it. 

Installing a Heating Plant.— Since it 
has been explained how the installing and 
conduct of a heating or power plant cuts 
such a large figure in the profit and loss 
account at the end of the year, is it not 
a wonder that so little regard is paid to 
the matter by florists generally? Is it 
that the profits derived from his work 
are so large that he does not care to 
bother with many things indispensible to 
other businesses working on finer margins 
and profits? This may apply to large 
concerns who are satisfied with a margin 
of seven per cent on their investment 
after living expenses orsalaries have been 
paid. But howaboutthesmaller grower 
who may be paying that or more for 
borrowed capital and credit which can 
only be redeemed or his business increased 
on the profit that can be made over and 
above the interest item mentioned. In 
the writer's opinion there is yet a large 
opening in this country for growing of 
all descriptions where the plant is erected 
on up-to-date engineering lines and then 




The Late Philip Gauges. 
(.See issue of February 13, page 91.) 



expertly operated, the reverse being gen- 
erally the rule. If a man wants to build 
a house to dwell in, so as to get the best 
value for his money he engages an 
architect and places the matter in his 
hands. But, let the'same man undertake 
to run a greenhouse or to build one, the 
chances are that the whole thing will be 
run up haphazard, or by what is called 
in the part of the world the writer came 
from, "The rule of thumb." Pardon me 
while I explain this expression. Before 
thermometers were invented beer was 
brewed, and pretty good beer too, some- 
times, by the rule of thumb; that is, to 
ascertain temperature of the worts, 
which have to be judged to a nicety, the 
brewer dipped in his thumb. It will 
probably be found that Mr. Bass was 
amongst the first to adopt more scientific 
methods. His brews are not only some- 
times, but have the reputation the world 
over of being always good. Too many 
greenhouses and their heating plants are 
erected by the rule of thumb, and run on 
the same principle. Where can you go 
and learn from agreenhouse man (as you 
can from other power stations) the pro- 
portion of boiler surface to the power or 



radiating surface he uses? The propor- 
tion of great area with height of stack 
to the boiler surface? The proportion of 
radiating surface to glass and wall area? 
The percentage of moisture in the steam 
made? The percentage of CO3 in his 
chimney gases? The average tempera- 
ture of his feed or return water with 
average pressure of steam? The amount 
of water evaporated per pound of coal 
consumed under the above and other con- 
ditions by which the actual caloric value 
received from the coal used can be accu- 
rately determined, all with a view to 
improving, if necessary, some of the con- 
ditions referred to. The successful com- 
bining of these things means, in some 
cases, a dividend or no dividend to those 
holding an interest in the plant. If any 
one knows of agreenhouse establishment 
in the United States or Canada where 
such records are to be found on file in the 
office for future reference I want to be 
informed of it. I want to meet the man 
who inaugurated it if he is alive and 
shake him by the hand. I hope to find 
him in or somewhere about Chicago, and 
can assure you that the privilege of an 
hour's chat with him will be an event 
that will receive a double underscore in 
my diary. My notice to meet the club 
was too short for a paper. Also, to go 
further into detail of greenhouse plants 
and their management might tire my 
hearers. Such medicine is best taken and 
retained when in small doses. At some 
future time you may hear further from 
me on this subject. 



THE CARNATION. 



Raising Seedlings. 

This is a good time to do some hybrid- 
izing, if you are thinking of raising some 
plants from seed. Hybridizing can be 
done at any time of the year, but as it is 
desirable to know the parentage of any 
variety and to avoid adulteration from 
inferior sorts, it is best to do it at a time 
when the chance of insects or other 
agents interfering with the work is 
reduced to a minimum. It was the 
writer's intention to refer to this subject 
earlier, but the stress of circumstances 
has interfered very much with his plans 
during the past few months. The months 
of November, December, January and 
February are the most free from outside 
influences and therefore the chance of 
knowing exactly what variety is used to 
fertilize the seed' parent is then the great- 
est. Bees gathering their honey or a 
strong current of air blowing through 
the house will carry the pollen from one 
flower to another and in that way the 
result of an important cross may be 
entirely changed. 

Few are ignofant of the fact that 
plant propagation by seed is effected by 
sex relation, much the same as is the case 
in the animal kingdom. In some species 
of plants the sexes are very widely sepa- 
rated, flowers of one sex appearing only 
on certain plants; in others flowers of 
both sexes may be found on the same 
plants; butinthegreatmajority of plants 
both the male and female organs are 
found in the same flower. To the latter 
class belongs the carnation. The anthers 
with the pollen capsules attached to the 
end are the male organs, the dust or 
pollen being ejected when ripe. Each 
grain of pollen is capable of fertilizing an 
unimpregnated seed and combining the 
qualities of its parent with those of the 
seed parent. The ovary containing the 
seed and the stigmas reaching out from 



1904. 



The American Florist. 



123 



the top are the female organ. The office 
of the petals of the flowers is to breathe 
in the essence of the sunshine which is 
necessary for this most delicate opera- 
tion in plant life. To make sure of a per- 
fect cross and perpetuation only of such 
qualities as are desirable it is well to 
operate only on varieties that nearest 
approach an ideal. Select a few promis- 
ing looking buds and tie them up some 
time before the flower is open, making 
sure that the stem and calyx are as near 
perfect as possible and that the plant is 
healthy. When the flower is about half 
open is the time to begin to prepare the 
flower for fertilization. The calyx is 
then split on one side with a sharp knife 
and the immature anthers are cut out. 
This is done in order to prevent self- 
fertilization. From then on there is 
nothing to do but to allow the flower to 
mature and the stigmas to become ready 
to receive the pollen. When the flower 
has grown to full maturity the stigmas 
are usually well developed, having 
assumed a hairy and moist upper surface. 
The operation of fertilizing the flower is 
very simple. A well developed flower 
that has been carefully selected is taken 
and the pollen dust is carefully rubbed 
over the stigmas by bringing the two 
flowers together. This is best done on a 
sunny day when life is most active, and 
the capsules containing the pollen must 
have burst to liberate it. If the opera- 
tion has been well performed the petals 
and stigmas of the fertilized flower will 
wither up in a few hours and fertilization 
will be complete. The ovary will begin 
to swell in a few days and there is noth- 
ing more to do but to guard it from 
injury until it is ripe. The calyx and 
withered petals and stigmas should be 
cut away, so that water lodging around 
the seed pod will dry up quickly and not 
rot the ovary. The time required for the 
seed to ripen varies considerably, six 
weeks being about the average. When 
the seed pod has turned brown about 
half its length from the stem down, it is 
ripe, and should be cut off with the whole 
stem and laid in a cool, airy place to dry, 
after which the seed is carefully removed 
and either sown immediately or put 
away in an envelope upon which the 
cross is marked. 

It is well to sow the seed early enough 
so that most of the plants will bloom 
outside before frost, thus saving consid- 
erable bench space, as at least three- 
quarters will come single or otherwise 
undesirable, and this should be no later 
than the last of March, Germinate the 
seed in a temperature of about 56° at 
night. Use a light soil and do not cover 
the seed more than twice their own 
thickness. When large enough to handle, 
pot into small pots and shift along when 
necessary, giving them the same treat- 
ment that is given the young stock prop- 
agated from cuttings. Top the plants 
only once and allow the side shoots to 
bloom as soon as possible. Watch each 
plant as it comes into bloom and if it 
seems worthy of further trial, mark it for 
planting indoors. Single-flowered plants 
or those that are otherwise undesirable 
should be pulled up immediately and 
thrown away. 

This branch of commercial carnation 
culture, though not always the most 
remunerative and certain in its result, 
possesses a charm and fascination that 
is worth any effort bestowed upon it. 
Probably not one in a thousand plants 
grown from seed ever becomes the parent 
of a variety worthy of introduction to 
the trade, and of the many varieties 
introduced each year a very small per. 




CHRYSANTHEMUM SANTA CLAUS. 



centage become really standard varie- 
ties. The man who works along the 
lines of established rules of plant breed- 
ing and does not place his hopes for 
earthly treasures too high will get 
greater satisfaction from this work than 
he who goes at it in a haphazard way 
and sees the mirage of a golden harvest 
ever before him There is a satisfaction 
in working for an ideal that is far greater 
than any surprise that may ever come 
from mere chance. 

Waste no time on poor varieties and 
keep a record of each cross. Make every 
cross with a certain end in view. A good 
white may be produced, for instance, by 
crossing Lawson with White Cloud. 
The seed parent usually influences the 
plant resulting from a cross, while the 
pollen parent reflects its qualities more 
in the color and shape of the flower. 
Quite the opposite, however, comes trup 
in exceptional cases. J. 



American Carnation Society. 

DEPARTMENT OF PLANT REGISTRATION. 

Registered by Swan Peterson, Gibson 
City, 111., Gibson Beauty, color a mag- 
nificent shade of light pink, and entirely 
different from anything ever originated. 
Considered to be superior to Enchant- 
ress. Size three and one half inches and 
over. Form perfect and ideal for high 
grade fancy blooms with stem twenty- 
four to thirty inches and over, stiff and 
wiry. Calyx perfect and never bursts. 
Fragrance a rich spicy clove. Substance 
of the best, an excellent feature being its 
keeping and shipping qualities. Habits 
ideal; produces no surplus grass and is a 
strong and vigorous grower. Early, 
free and continuous bloomer, needing no 
special treatment to develop its blooms. 

SPECIAL NOTICE. 

Class L of the premium list should read: 
"By J. B. Valentine, of Park Floral Com- 
pany, Denver, Col., $25 in cash for the 
best twelve blooms of an undisseminated 
seedling shown by the originator, all 
varieties that are shown in classes requir- 
ing more than twelve blooms being 
excluded. " The premium list as published 



reads $25 in cash for best blooms instead 
of best twelve blooms. It is the inten- 
tion of the donor of this premium to 
bring out some of the good things in their 
second year, instead of waiting for the 
third year to see them. 

Albert M. Herr, Sec'y. 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS 



Santa Claus. 



The new white chrysanthemum, Santa 
Claus, brought out last season by David 
S. Beach, of Bridgeport, Conn., is shown 
in the accompanyingengraving. It took 
well in its initial season and it has all the 
earmarks of a stayer. Mr. Beach, who 
is quite proud of the new acquisition, 
states that the habits of the plants are 
such as to make it very easy to grow. 
The foliage is dark green, plant dwarf, 
height not exceeding three feet, with a 
remarkably thick stem. The blooms do 
not begin to show until the last week in 
October. Mr. Beach named the variety 
Santa Claus because of its snow white, 
bearded appearance. 



Ciirysanthemum Comment. 

"E. D. S." in the American Florist of 
January 16, page 940, is somewhat "at 
sea" as to the origin of some of thevarie- 
ties he mentions. Mrs. "F. W." Vallis 
(not "F. S") is the correct name of Sils- 
bury's variety, and it was distributed by 
no particular firm but by the whole of 
the English specialists. The probabili- 
ties are that good as it is in this country 
it will not be a success under the Ameri- 
can method of culture. 

Lord Ludlow is not a recent English 
novelty but is a standard variety here 
and is an Australian. Le Grand Dragon 
is one of Calvat's (French) of many 
years ago, once popular here but now 
surpassed. Lord Salisbury and Matthew 
Smith are rather ancient varieties and 
with Mary Inglis are also due to Aus- 
tralia. On the other hand I can claim 



124 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 20 



credit for raising Kimberley so it must 
not be classed as an Australian. 

It is wrong to class Miss Elsie Fulton 
and Princess Alice de Monaco as synony- 
mous, ladmit that until the past sea- 
son many considered them such. The 
first named is much to be preferred, the 
flowers being larger and more easily pro- 
duced. The florets are smoother and 
more even, whilst the foliage is less 
robust. W. J. Godfrey. 

I do not doubt the correctness ot Mr. 
Godfrey's comments, as most of the 
varieties brought to this country are 
procured from English disseminators. I 
cannot say how these errors occurred 
unless my article was written by mem- 
ory instead of referring to records at 
hand. As to Lord Salisbury, Lord Lud- 
low and Matthew Smith, they are still 
quite new in this country. However, we 
find all three of these as well as Le Grand 
Dragon were reported in the Gardeners' 
Chronicle of November 14 as being 
among the winning lortyeight blooms, 
distinct, and were grown by W. Mease, 
gardener to A. Tate, and shown at the 
N. C. S. meeting. As to the similarity of 
Miss Elsie Fulton and Princess Alice de 
Monaco, I doubt if there are many who 
could identify the two varieties if placed 
in stands unlabeled. They are certainly 
very much alike. I quite agree with Mr. 
Godfrey that many of the novelties which 
reach us from England do not respond to 
our methods; yet we must expect them 
as good until they have proved other- 
wise. Elmer D. Smith. 



Chicago Florists' Club Exhibition. 

The fourth exhibition given this season 
under the auspices of the Florists' Club 
was held at Handel hall, Wednesday 
afternoon and evening, February 17, and 
was pronounced by those who regularly 
attend these club functions as one of the 
most interesting and successful of the 
winter series, both in point of the num- 
ber of exhibits and the exceptional qual- 
ity ot stock staged. The exhibits com- 
prised roses, carnations, violets, miscel- 
laneous plants and bulbous stock, and 
each of these departments contributed 
something of keen interest and value to 
the trade. Under the management of Phil 
Hauswirth who worked untiringly, the 
exhibition took a long step toward the 
standard of excellence which is being 
sought by the club members. It is to be 
hoped that the spirit of unalloyed and 
genuine interest manifested in this event 
by exhibitors, trade members and the 
craft in general will be fostered, and that 
the successful club show has come to 
stay. As an adjunct to the trade these 
exhibitions are proving invaluable. A 
healthy interest was also shown by the 
public, who were admitted to the hall by 
card from 2 to 4 o'clock. The exhibits 
were adjudged by John Thorpe, W. L. 
Palinsky and Harry Bunyard, of New 
York, who is a visitor here this week. 

The Chicago Carnation Company had 
vases of Crusader, Harlowarden and 
Alba, all blooms of high exhibition 
standard. Manager Hartshorne also 
staged a vase of Baur and Smiths' 
Indianapolis. 

The J. D. Thompson Carnation Com- 
pany, of Joliet, had a vase of Estelle, 
blooms of extraordinary size, color and 
foliage. Also vases of Mrs. M. A. Patten, 
Gov. Wolcott and Nelson Fisher. 

E. G. Hill & Company, of Richmond, 
Ind., sent a vase of Adonis, 100 
blooms. 



Sinner Brothers had Lawson and 
America, the former remarkably well 
done. Their white seedling No. 200 was 
shown, and it has all the appearance of 
a good commercial carnation. 

F. R. Thornton, of Galesburg, 111., sent 
a vase of his white Illinois, which 
attracted much comment on account of 
its large free blooms and strong stem. 

Anton Then displayed a promising 
variegated seedling. No. 122. 

Several vases of 100 blooms each, of 
Lawson, were shown by John Reardon, 

fardener to Martin Kyerson. They were 
ne flowers, well up to the Lawson 
standard. 

W. N. Rudd's popular pink Phyllis 
attracted creditable comment. It is a 
high class carnation and is winning 
many plaudits among the newcomers. 
Chicago White was also in Mr. Rudd's 
exhibit. 

F. Dorner & Sons, of Lafayette, Ind., 
sent a vase of Lady Bountiful, splendid 
blooms. 

Wietor Brothers sent from their regu- 
lar noon shipment, taken from their 
counters a halt hour before the exhibition 
opened, vases of Harlowarden. Sport, 
Lawson, Morning Glory, Enchantress 
and Chicago (Red Bradt). It was diffi- 
cult to distinguish them from the care- 
fully nursed exhibition carnations. 

Peter Reinburg contributed to the rose 
exhibits with a fine display of his leading 
varieties, most prominent among them 
being his new Uncle John, the pink sport 
from Golden Gate. There were also 
vases of American Beauty, Chatenay, 
which Mr. Reinberg grows to perfection. 
Ivory, Liberty, Golden Gate, Bride, Brides- 
maid, Perle and Sunrise. 

Benthey & Company had a vase of 
good Bridesmaid, fifty blooms, and one 
of Bride, flowers much above the aver- 
age. 

George Hopp, of Grand Rapids, Mich., 
was present with a vase of his new 
unnamed pink rose, which, however, 
were frozen in shipping, and did not 
therefore show up as well as their worth 
merited. It is a cross between Testout 
and Bridesmaid, and a sister to La 
Detroit, which was originated by Mr. 
Hopp. It is somewhat darker than Test- 
out, of good form and foliage. Mr. 
Hopp's stock is limited, only about 100 
plants being now in his possession. 

G. Swenson, of Elmhurst, 111., sent 
the only violets shown, three vases of 



100 each of California, Princess of Wales 
and Marie Louise, all of a rich dark color 
and delicious fragrance. 

The George Wittbold Company never 
fails to come to the fore with a high 
class exhibit of assorted plants. The 
display of bulbous stock in decorated 
boxes and pans embraced Keizerskroon, 
Yellow Prince and Proserpine tulips, 
well grown jonquils, daftbdils and Dutch 
hyacinths. Good azaleas and rhododen- 
droms were also noted. 

The Garfield Park Floral Company's 
exhibit of plants is deserving of special 
mention. It included specimen Pierson 
and Boston ferns, acacias, gardenias, 
cyclamens, primroses, Begonia Gloire de 
Lorraine and Azalea mollis. 

StoUery Brothers had a nice display of 
La Reine and Keizerskroon tulips. 

W. L. Palinsky showed fifteen pots of 
remarkably well grown cinerarias in 5 
and 6-inch pots. 

Primula obconica was shown by J. J. 
Mitchell. There were five pots, some of 
the best stock seen here this year. 

H. N. Bruns, the well known valley 
grower, displayed a small lot of good 
lily of the valley. 

Kennicott Brothers staged home-grown 
valley, of the Berlin variety, grown by 
Klehm Brothers' nurseries. There were 
also 100 fine La Reine tulips, which were 
marvels in point of size and color. 

The following awards were announced 
by the judges. They are not for individual 
exhibits, but for the general displays of 
the successful exhibitors: Peter Reinberg, 
roses, $20; George Wittbold Company, 
plants and bulbous stock, $20; Garfield 
Park Floral Company, plants, $15; J. J. 
Mitchell, obconicas, $5; StoUery Brothers, 
tulips, $5; Wietor Brothers, carnations, 
$5; W. L. Palinsky, cinerarias, $5; 
Chicago Carnation Company, carna- 
tions, $5; J. D. Thompson Carnation 
Company, carnations, $5; W. N. Rudd, 
carnations, $5; John Reardon, carna- 
tions, $5; Klehm's Nurseries, valley, $5; 
Sinner Brothers, carnations, $2. 



CoBLESKiLL, N. Y. — Alfred Goldring's 
greenhouse office was slightly damaged 
by fire on the night of February 4. 

WiLKESBARRE, Pa.— Wm. B. Alburger, 
a prominent florist, died at his home, 
2021 North Thirty-first street, after a 
short illness of pneumonia. Mr. Alburger 
was born in this city forty-seven years 
ago, and is survived by a widow. 




SECTION OF S. S. PECKHAM'S SHOW HOUSE, EASTER, 1903, AT NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 



igo4. 



The American Florist. 



125 



WITH THE GROWERS 



A Fairhaven, Mass., Florist. 

With this we present 
views in two houses at 
the nurseries of S. S. Peck- 
hatn, Fairhaven, and a 
view of Mr. Peckham's 
show houses at New Bed- 
ford, Mass. The carna- 
tion house is interesting 
from the fact that it viras 
s. s. Peckham. planned by its owner and 
built mostly by the help on the place. It 
is of iron and cypress throughout, hav- 




Some Shamrock Folklore. 
"The sweet little, green little, shamrock 
of Ireland" is perhaps, next to "sublime 
potatoes, that from Antrim's shore to 
tamous Kerry form the poor man's 
store," the most universally popular 
plant in the world to-day, for while the 
latter may be the more widely known 
and most useful to all nations the former 
holds an unique place in the realms of 
sentiment; and among people of Celtic 
and Saxon origin is regarded with the 
warmest affection as emblematic of all 
that is charming and lovable in the 
Irish character — acharacter which blends 

Three godlike friends — 
Love, Valour, Wit, lorevet. 




CARNATION HOUSE OF S. S. PECKHAM, FAIRHAVEN, MASS. 



ing three lines of Lord & Burnham ven- 
tilating apparatus, and is heated by a 
Lord & Burnham sectional boiler. The 
benches and braces are constructed of 
pipe and Jennings Brothers' fittings. 

This year Mr. Peckham has added to 
his nursery equipment a water plant, 
also planned by himself and built by the 
force on the place. Having tried driven 
wells, which proved unsuccessful, he 
finally had resort to a boiling spring 
1,600 feet distant, which was dug out 
twenty feet square down to bed rock, the 
excavation thus forming a reservoir hold- 
ing about 700 barrels of water with a 
constant supply of twenty-five gallons 
per minute. At a distance of about 600 
feet from the greenhouses a pumping sta- 
tion was located in which were installed 
a Mietz & Weiss kerosine engine and 
Deming triplex pump with a capacity of 
twenty-two gallons per minute. The 
next addition in the line ot up-to-date 
equipment is to be a large soil and tool 
shed and packing house. 

Stroudsburg, Pa. — Oscar Stemple, a 
former East Stroudsburg florist, died 
February 8. 

Colorado Springs, Col. — The El 
Paso County Horticultural Society has 
decided upon August 2-t, 25 and 26 as 
the dates for its annual flower show. 

Lebanon, Ind.— P. O. Tauer will this 
spring build several new houses, 20x150 
feet, for the growing of cut flowers. A 
new boiler will be installed in the houses 
in the near future. 



A great deal has been written as to 
what is the real plant meant by the 
shamrock, and as a rule most of the 
commentators start out with St. Patrick 
who used a three-leaved plant satisfac- 
torily to explain to the early converts of 
Christianity the trinity in unity. The 
trefoil plant, however, was held sacred 
long before that, as can readily be gath- 
ered from the fact that shamroc and 



shamrakh is Arabic for the trefoil and 
the plant was held sacred in Iran and 
was emblematic of the Persian triad, 
long before St. Patrick's day. Mr. Bicheno 
and others have held that the wood sorrel 
(Oxalis Acetosella) is the true shamrock 
while Dr. Withering and Professor Ren- 
nie named the white clover (Trifolium 
repens) and London claimed the black 
medick (Medicago lupulina) as the true 
Irish emblem. Mr. Croker (not he of 
Tammany) points out, however, that as 
far back as 1689 the Irish themselves 
considered sorrel and shamrocks as 
entirely distinct. The "Irish Hudibras," 
printed in 1689, says: 

Springs, happy springs, adorned with sallets. 
Which nature purpos'd for their palats; 
Shamrogs and watercress he shews. 
Which was both meat and drink and clothes. 

And again the Irish are there repre- 
sented as 

Without a rag, trouses, or brogues, 
Picking of sorrel and sham-rogues 

In another ancient Irish poem, the 
"Hesperi-nesographia," the following 
passage occurs: 

Besides all this, vast bundles came 
Of sorrel more than I can name. 
And many sheaves I hear there was 
Of shamrocks and of water-grass. 
Which there for curious salads pass. 

Keough, Threlkeld, and other Irish 
botanists assert that Trifolium repens or 
white clover is the true Irish shamrock 
and will have nothing to do with that 
"little, sour, puny plant, the wood sor- 
rel." On the whole the weight of evidence 
seems to be with the white clover and it 
may not be out of place to whieper here 
to those conscientious deacons and other 
experts that the seeds of Trifolium repens 
that are for sale at any seed store in 
America at 25 cents per pound are just 
the same as what the humorous Irish- 
men charge them $2 a pound for! On the 
strict "q. t." they were both of them, 
most likely, grown in Germany. After 
that we can all swear to having "the real 
thing" with a clear conscience. 

I cannot refrain, in closing this brief 
note, from mentioning the clever reply of 
the author of the popular song, "The 
Green Little Shamrock of Ireland," to the 
manager of the Dublin theater whose 
breach of faith had caused Cherry's leav- 
ing the Irish stage. In answer to an 
application after his success at Drury 
Lane to enter into an engagement Andrew 
wrote: 




PALMS AND FERNS AT S. S. PECKHAM'S, FAIRHAVEN, MAS.S 



126 



The American Florist. 



Feb. ^0, 



Sir: I am not so great a fool as you take me 
for. I have been bitten once by you and I will 
never give vou an opportunity of making two 
bites of ' A. Cbeiiry. 

The words of the song referred to were 
by Andrew Cherry, the music by Shield, 
and it was first sung by Mrs. Mountain 
in her entertainment called "Travelers at 
Spa," in Dublin in 1806. At the present 
time the shamrock is as popular in Lon- 
don town on St. Patrick's day as in Dub- 
lin or Manhattan and is therelore 
emblematic of the improved sentiments 
of good feeling and imperial comity 
which peace loving citizens of the universe 
so rejoice to see. That the shamrock 
The plant thflt blooms forever, 
With the Rosecombineii, 
And the Thistle twined, 
Defy the strength of foes to sever. 
Firm be the triple 1 ague they form, 

Despite all change of weather; 
In sunshine, darkness, calm or storm, 
.Still may they fondly grow together. 

And so say we all of us: Long may 
the shamrock flourish! 

George C. Watson. 



Q UERIE S. 

To Destroy Earthworms. 

Ed. Am. Florist: — What can be done 
to destroy the common earthworm in 
vegetable houses? Subscriber. 

Apply broadcast one bushel of unleached 
hardwood ashes to each 400 square feet. 
If spread upon the surface the potash 
will be carried into the soil in watering, 
but it will be better to fork it evenly in 
the soil to the depth of four inches. If to 
be worked in deeperthanthis the amount 
should be increased. Saturating the soil 
with lime water or the use of fifteen 
pounds of kainit in 400 square feet are 
other remedies. L. R. Taft. 



Rose Cuttings in Cellar. 

Ed. Am. Florist:— Will hybrid per- 
petual rose cuttings, dormant wood, six 
inches long, put in sand in a cellar where 
it averages 35° to 40° and put in open 
ground as soon as spring opens, do well 
or turn all black after they are put out? 

J. Van L. 

The scheme is impracticable. Dormant 
rose cuttings cannot be rooted in a cellar 
under those conditions. A fair degree of 
success may be attained by planting cut- 
tings in sand in a cold frame in the fall. 
By keeping them properly protected dur- 
ing the winter and attending carefully to 
air, watering, etc., in spring a strike of 
forty to sixty per cent may be assured. 
This method is practiced in some of the 
southern states, principally the Carolinas, 
with marked success. 

Isaac Kennedy. 

Greenhouse Heating. 

Ed. Am. Florist:— We have a green- 
house l")x25, nine feet to the ridge and 
banked to the eaves, which we wish to 
heat to 60° in zero weather. We have a 
Wilks heater described as follows: Size 
of boiler, 16x30; heating capacity, 140 
gallons per hour; size of opening, I14 
inches. Will it heatthe house? We have 
140 feet of 1V4 inch pipe. We would 
rather run all pipes underneath the 
lienches. Would we gain anything by 
using larger pipe? C. H. I. 

The heater would probably give a tem- 
perature of 50° to 55°. but is hardly 
large enough for 60°. In order to heat 
the house easily there should be about 
200 square feet of radiating surface. 




THE SHAMROCK IN POTS. 



which will require -tOO feet of IV2 inch 
pipe. The easiest way to secure it will 
be to run a coil of six pipes around three 
sides of the house. By enlarging the 
openings to the boiler to 2-inch the coil 
can be supplied. If the pipes are placed 
under the benches there should be four 
coils of four pipes each with two flows 
and two returns in each coil. There 
should be a IVs-inch feed pipe for each 
coil. L. R. T. 

Piping For Greenhouse. 

Ed. Am. Florist:— We desire to heat a 
small house 16x40 with hot water using 
2-inch flow pipe, the heater to be below 
floor of the shed. What is the best way 
to pipe it and how many flows and 
returns are needed if returns are lV4-inch 
and bring the temperature to 60°? Out- 
side temperature is sometimes 20° below. 

J. B. 

To heat the house properly about 300 
square f;et of radiation will be required 
and this is too much for one 2-inch flow. 
By using two flows and placing one 
upon each side wall or upon the purlin 
posts if there are any in the house and 
then using about twelve l',i-inch returns 
the temperature desired can be obtained. 
The returns can be divided between the 
two walls, or if there is a middle bench 
where bottom heat is desired some of 
them may be placed there. In case the 
end of the house is exposed it will be well 
to carry the coils partly across the end. 
If there is no door in the end of the house 
farthest from the heater a very simple 
method of piping the house will be to run 
a coil of five 2-inch pipes clear around the 
house. L. R. T. 

Unopened Camellia Buds. 
Ed. Am. Florist: — I have several nice, 
stocky plants of camellia in 7-inch pots, 
one of them, a white one, bearing a dozen 
buds which opened fully. The others, 
some of them having as many as twenty- 
five or thirty buds, have only partly 
opened and some of the buds are falling. 
They were grown in a carnation house 
in a temperature of 50° in an ordinary 
light compost. What is the best exposure 
for growing them, southern orotherwise? 

E.MgUIRER. 

It is not an easy matter to say just 
why some camellia plants open their 
buds satisfactorily, while others under 



the same treatment and conditions do 
not. Dryness at the root has frequently 
been the cause of the trouble complained 
about. This I am inclined to think 
would be more likely to cause the 
unopening and dropping of the buds 
than being too wet, provided, of course, 
the drainage is all right, though, of 
course, there is danger in both extremes; 
but camellias are lovers of water, and 
should never be allowed to sufJer for the 
need of that essential element at any 
stage of their being. The temperature 
seems about right. The escape of dele- 
terious gases has sometimes been charged 
with the cause of the fall of buds, but if 
that were the cause why should one 
escape and the others succumb? Camel- 
lias are wont to set more buds than they 
can carry and open satisfactorily. Try 
disbudding, leaving one or at most two 
buds on each shoot of the plants that 
are dropping their butls. In the early 
days when I was younger at one place 
where I was working buds from camellia 
plants were removed by the bushel. As 
to exposure, at this season of the year 
camellias are not at all particular, but 
during their season of growth, when 
same is quite young, a little shade to 
save from burning during hot bursts of 
sunshine might be an advantage. 

E L. 

Changing Soil for Roses. 

Ed. Am. Florist:— Would some of your 
readers, who are expert gardeners, give 
the reason for changing the soil each year 
in the cultivationofrosesand carnations. 

S. 

The foregoing question, while it might 
be open to argument from a scientific 
point of view, would scarcely be con- 
sidered to have more than one answer 
by anyone who has grown roses for cut 
flowers for profit, under the American 
system of forcing. I believe this question. 
if put to expert rose and carnation 
growers, would be answered in the 
majority of cases in these words: 
"Because the life has gone out of the 
old soil." Just what that life is we 
are not prepared to state, but we do 
know from experience that it must be 
present in order to obtain the finest 
results. In all probability it is sod. The 
best mechanical condition can only be 
maintained when a soil contains a fair 
proportion of sod. Such a soil we call 



igo4. 



The American Florist. 



127 



lively; it can be firmed without becoming 
packed; it admits air freely and absorbs 
water readily, while it drains properly 
with very little danger of becoming sour 
on account of stagnant water. These 
conditions are necessary for the successful 
establishment of young stock. There 
may be other reasons in favor of new 
soil, such as the supply of available plant 
food and so forth, but the above men 
tioned are so important that they alone 
make it imperative to renew the soil. I 
may state for the benefit of ''S." that rose 
growers do not consider it necessary to 
renew the soil every year, but only every 
time a house is replanted, whether it be 
in one, two or three years. Many rose 
growers are getting first-class results by 
planting in well-drained, solid beds, in 
from eight to ten inches of soil, forcing 
lor one year and resting the plants. 
Then when they are started without 
being removed they have a year's growth 
of roots to begin with, so that conditions 
which would apply to plants having to 
make new root action would not hold in 
this case, as the plants when once started 
would be in a position to take artificial 
feeding. In case "S." may think I am 
begging the question in regard to new 
soil, I will admit that I take it for granted 
that when a grower renews his soil he 
does so with one containing sod; but in 
so doing I can point to men who will say 
that experience has taught them to do 
that, and experience, as every gardener 
knows, is sometimes a very dear teacher. 
If this answer is not to the point then I can 
say that I am so firmly convinced of the 
merits of new soil for replanting that I 
can only give a woman's reason for the 
same: "It is so just because it is so." 

M. 



HoBOKEN, N. J.— Rudolph Freese suf- 
fered a severe loss of plants, from a fire 
which broke out in his greenhouses on 
the night of February 5. 

Miami, Fla.— The annual fair of the 
Dade County Horticultural and Agricult- 
ural Society will be held in the Horticult- 
ural hall here March 4 to 7. 



European Horticulture. 

(From the German trade papers.) 

Forcing Strawberries. — This seems to 
pa.v well in nortliern Germany. Ijargre 
langes of glass are now devoted to tlie 
culture. Certain varieties found to be tlie 
liest and most profitable for this purpose 
are used. Small plants, rooted runners, 
are planted in 5 or 6-inch pots in August 
and kept in frames outside until late in 
the tall, when they are taken in and 
placed on benches in a coldhouse. Nar- 
row houses covered with movable sashes 
and provided with one or two heating 
pipes give the best results. The real 
forcing begins in January and fruit is 
harvested in March and April. Two- 
year-old plants are sometimes carried 
over (depending on variety, soil and lo- 
cality), but young plants, taken annually 
from the field, produce larger fruit, al- 
though a little later than second-year 
plants. 

Dahlias The finest of the hundreds of 

old and newer varieties of dahlias exhi- 
bited last summer are said to be: Red — 
Standard Beaver, Red Rover, Progenitor, 
Holsatia, Meteor and Captain Broad. Tel- 
low — Golden Plover. Volker. J. J. Crowe. 
Hobble's Yellow and Sonnenstrahlen. Sal- 
mon, apricot and terra cotta — Countess of 
Lonsdale. EJxquisite, Artus, Lodestone, 
General Frencli and Mrs. MacKergow. 
Rose — Krimhilde, ZephjT and Sylvia. 
Dark red. almost black — Ebony, Uncle 
Tom and Night. Wliite — Lord Roberts is 
the finest and most suitable for cutting 
in pure white. 

New Celosla. — Celosia cristata Thomp- 
soni magnifica, a fairly well known newer 
variety of the ostrich feather section of 
coxcombs, by careful selection, cross- 
breeding and special culture has been 
brought to so great a perfection that it 
now ranks first with the most gorgeous 
of pot plants and show specimens in Ger- 
many. Well grown plants attain a height 
of from two to three feet, forming a 
symmetrical cone, which, when in bloom, 
is covered with numerous, large, waving 
spikes of flowers, closely resembling real 
ostrich plumes, their colors ranging in all 
tints and shades from the brightest golden 
yellow to the deepest blood-red. the lat- 
ter color being considered the finest. It 
rightly handled these celosias reach an 
enormous height, over three feet: so will 
their flowers be extremely large and bril- 
liant and the season of blooming will 
last from early In July to late in autumn; 
or, if grown outdoors, until cut down by 
early frosts. To obtain these results the 
German growers sow the seeds not earlier 
than the latter part of April, keep them in 
warm quarters, encourage their rapid 
growth and transplant and repot as soon 
as needed, but never before the plant has 



formed a firm, compact ball of roota. 
which by handling must not be bruised 
or broken. In this point is to be found 
the secret of their wonderful success in 
growing this plant, as well as in that of 
sowing- the seeds late, instead of sowing 
early in midwinter, as is usually done. 
In sowing so early, the Germans claim, 
only stunted little plants are produced, 
which will begin to bloom before they 
are fully developed and the flowers of 
which will be of ordinary size only. 

Eucharls Oraadltlora. —This plant, better 
known in America as B. Amazonica, has 
been found to be a profitable cut-flower 
in Germany and is grown there tp a 
great extent, while here only a plant or 
two are seen occasionally, sleepily grow- 
ing in an old pot placed in some out of 
the way corner of the greenhouse. Doubt- 
less our gardeners are not ignorant of 
the, culture of this well known plant, still 
a few points may be of interest. A 
writer in a German paper says: "This 
is one of those plants that, it grown as 
a single specimen or separated from 
other plants of its kind, amounts to lit- 
tle or nothing. It loves to be growing 
in large numbers closely massed together. 
So grown in a bench, provided if possible 
with bottom-heat, in ordinary well en- 
riched, sandy soil, it produces an abund- 
ance of flowers twice a year. In this 
bench they remain undisturbed for three 
or four years, when they ought to be 
taken out, divided and replanted into re- 
newed fresh soil. The best time, of course, 
for this operation is in the natural time 
for rest, March or August. They are 
grown in a temperature like that of our 
rose houses, but requiring shade. A 
house in which palms or ferns are grown 
would answer better." 

Dahlias vs. Tomatoes. — Tomatoes grown 
in the same field or in close proximity 
to dahlias cause ruin and destruction to 
the latter, owing to the evaporation of 
ammonia from the tomatoes. This state- 
ment, now swelling the miscellaneous 
reading matter of some of the German 
trade papers, first appeared in an English 
paper, and the Germans faithfully copied 
it. Some, however, declare it to be dog- 
day nonsense. 

Potting Soil. — We all know how impor- 
tant the question of soil for the different 
cultures used to be, and still is in some 
places with European gardeners. flow 
painstakingly particular, guided by elabor- 
ate formulas for this or that kind of plant, 
the.v were in the composition, preparation 
and mixing of the many different ingredi- 
ents, believed to be absolutely requisite 
for success. They have got "over that, 
in certain quarters, and overan.xiety about 
the texture, smell and color of potting 
soil does not keep them awake nights 
now. Especially have German commer- 




KENTIAS AT THE GEO. WITTBOLD COMPANY'S, CHICAGO. 



128 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 20, 



cial gardeners learned a good deal of 
Jate in this respect by attending the many 
exhibitions, conventions and other trade 
and social gatherings of the craft in all 
parts of the fatherland, as well as by their 
more frequent journeys to neighboring 
countries. They found, for instance, that 
Mr. Linden, at Brussels, grows his fine 
collection of thousands of the costliest 
orchids in peat and sphagnum, while 
Sander in his branch establishment at 
Bruges uses nothing but leaf-mold for his 
orchids with equal success. What aston- 
' ished them most though was the sight 
of acres of the finest azaleas, camellias 
and rhododendrons, all grown in all kinds 
of ordinary good soil, when it had taken 
our German friends a year or more at 
home to import, collect, compound and 
prepare a handful of soil for a few 
plants of that class. Most of them went 
home converts to the new ideas, while 
some remained hardened old sinners, and 
now those sacred dogmatic formulas 
have all to be gone over again, corrected 
and supplemented by comments, to be 
followed by the most careful experiment, 
trial cultures and separate tests. It's 
awful! 

Tomatoes la Germaay. — It is interesting 
to noie in German papers the many dif- 
ferent methods in the culture of toma- 
toes described and recommended. Ger- 
mans have not only learned to appreciate 
their peculiar flavor, but have also in a 
way mastered the art of growing them. 
Twenty years ago the plant was practi- 
cally unknown in Germany, at least among 
the common class of people. Only on 
well endowed private places one would see 
a plant occasionally growing under glass, 
not raised for its edible fruit, but as an 
ornamental vine, the bright clusters of 
fine scarlet love-apples greatly adding to 
its otherwise rather coarse beauty. They 
still gi-ow them under glass, some in hot 
houses; most of them, however, on the 
sunny side of a wall; in many cases es- 
pecially erected for that purpose. Sashes 
are leaned against or fastened to this 
wind-break and no doubt the plants do 
well enough so protected. The very early 
wrinkled kinds, long since discarded here, 
give best results. Various modes and 
systems of tying and pruning are in 
vogue, all of them named after their 
originators and every one as complicated 
and laborious as can be. Of course, won- 
der at all this lessens when the difference 
between their midsummer season and ours 
is taken into account. 

Aa Interesting Arum. — An arum, re- 
markable for its great beauty and singu- 
lar habit of growth, is to be sent out 
next season by a German firm, and will 
no doubt meet with unbounded favor and 
ready sales as something really new in 
house and parlor plants. Strictly speak- 
ing it is not a new plant, having been 
in cultivation in some botanical gardens 
for a number of years, where its intro- 
ducer, wideawake and realizing its great 
possibilities, found it. The rhizome, or 
bulb-like corm of this interesting plant, 
is roinid and large, resembling that of 
Caladium esculentum. and in the fall or 
early winter develops directly from its 
crown a flower, or, what is botanically 
more correct, a spathe of rare beauty 
and form, about ten inches high by five or 
six inches in width, of a rich velvety blood 
red color, the odor of which is not dis- 
agreeable as is the case with most mem- 
bers of that order. The plant is of the 
easiest culture; in fact, no care of any 
kind is required to coax it into bloom. 
Brought into the house when in its dor- 
mant diY state, about September, placed 
in a saucer or ornamental dish of that 
description, it will send up its magnificent 
bloom, no soil or water being needed. 
The numerous dark green leaves, a foot 
long, of oval shape, forming a graceful 
dense rosette, appear after the flower 
dies away, and by their tropical luxuri- 
ance and symmetrical ai-rangement ren- 
der this arum a superb decorative par- 
lor plant for the rest of the winter. Al- 
though the wording of the description 
leads one to infer that even at this period 
the plant would grow without soil or 
water, it should no doubt be understood, 
granting all else, that after blooming it 
is to be potted up to complete its sea- 
son's growth under conditions more nat- 
ural to arums. 

Why Evergreens Die. — Good logic and 
sound reasoning is not wanting in a 
paragraph from an article on conifers. It 
reads: "That so many of our hardiest 
evergreens are found in the spring with 
browned tops, barely surviving and great 
numbers of densely branched pines, 
spruces, arbor vitae. etc.. entirely dry 
and dead, is not directly due to the low 



temperature of a previous severe win- 
ter, but Is to be explained by the fact 
that all evergreens and non-deciduous 
trees and shrubs evaporate through their 
foliage or needles moisture at all times, 
and, of course, also in the winter, and 
that their roots, being at that time im- 
bedded in solidly frozen earth, are unable 
to replace this loss, thus being prevented 
from performing their part in the regular 
circulation of sap. Thorough watering on 
a mild day once or twice in winter is 
recommended as a precautionary meas- 
ure." 

CompetUloa Restricted. — The authorities 
of Hanover have enacted a law forbidding 
all auction sales of plants in that city by 
firms of other towns. 

Woman's Horticultural College. — A school 
for the training and instruction o£ 
women in practical horticulture has been 
established at Godesberg on the Rhine. 

Noteworthy New Plants. — A new be- 
gonia of the semperflorens section is B. 
S. coccinea fl. pi., excellent for lawn-bed- 
ding and edging. Plants of this new vari- 
ety are compact, bushy and not more than 
four inches higli, covered all summer with 
bright scarlet double flowers. It was 
awarded the gold medal for best bedding 
plant by the Royal Horticultural Society 
of Vienna last summer. Another novelty, 
similar in character to the above, also 
fine for edging and border-planting, is 
Ageratum Blausternchen (little blue star), 
height three to four inches, flowers of a 




New Aster Miss Kate Lock. 



beautiful sky-blue, produced in profusion 
all through the season. 

Polygonum Spectablle. — This, as yet 
scarce and high-priced, is a new outdoor 
decorative plant, belonging to the hardy 
■herbaceous perennials. It is said to be 
the most valuable novelty in hardy plants 
sent out for many years. The foliage 
displays a variegation in all the colors of 
the rainbow, some of the large leaves being 
green with white, red or purplish spots, 
blotches or stripes, others half or entirely 
pure white, orange or fiery scarlet, not 
two leaves being alike in coloring, but all 
greatly resembling those of hot house 
fancy caladiums. This polygonum, like 
the older kinds, does well in any and all 
soils or locations, in a densely shaded po- 
sition as well as in one exposed to the 
hottest sun. A plant of such great dec- 
orative value, thoroughly hardy and so 
easy of culture, may well be considered a 
grand acquisition. 

Imperial Verbenas. — An entirely new 
race of verbenas has been obtained by 
taking advantage of the proclivity in that 
genus to sport, by careful selection and 
continued crossing, which, it is expected, 
will eventually take the place of those old 
emaciated varieties now in cultivation. In 
this new strain, introduced under the name 
of Verbena hybrida grandifl. Imperialis 
and being better known in Germany as the 
new Imperial verbenas, a novelty of great 
merit is offered to the public. The liabit 
of the plant is robust, not creeping but 
boldly upright, carrying its immense 



trusses of bloom on sturdy stems well 
above the foliage. Flowers in the bright- 
est of colors, very large, single florets • 
measuring nearly an inch in diameter, 
each one distinctly marked with a large 
pure white center or eye, rendering it 
most effective for massing in border 
plantings. On account of its compact, 
symmetrical growth it will be one of the 
finest pot plants for spring trade. 

Thunbergia harrlsll. — As a profitable 
]5lant to grow for cut flowers during the 
winter Thunbergia Harrisii is recommend- 
ed. The color of the flowers is light- 
blue with white center; ten to twelve 
together in the form of sprays or 
trusses fifteen to eighteen inches 
long, produced by the thousands on 
a plant well established, all through 
the winter. Propagation from cuttings or 
from seeds is not difficult and the subse- 
quent treatment is simple. Either in pots, 
or. which is better, in the bench or solid 
bed, they will do well. Best results, how- 
ever, are obtained from older, firmly es- 
tablished plants, if properly taken care of 
and given sufficient head-room to expand. 
The temperature required is about 60 
degrees in winter. 

China Asters. — The improvement in 
China asters is steadily going on. The 
last two or three years were remarkable 
for the number of new varieties intro- 
duced here as well as in Germany. But 
this season seems to have been even 
more prolific in this respect than any. 
Scores of new asters are offered in ne.xt 
year's lists, of which, so it seems, a 
Giant Comet aster, named Rubin (Ruby) 
may be found of great value to gardeners 
and fiorists, especially for cutting. It is 
declared to be the best of the comets so 
far brought out. Tlie flowers are of 
enormous size, wavy and curled, full up 
to the center, not showing at any time a 
yellow disk, resembling chrysanthemums 
to such an extent that it was mistaken 
for such by nearly all of the members 
present at a meeting of the Society for 
the Advancement of Horticulture, Berlin, 
held September 24. where it was first 
shown. The color, as its name indicates, 
is a deep glowing scarlet, a shade scarce 
in asters. 

Tropxolum Black Prince. — This is a 
new addition of great merit to the Lob- 
bianum section of this ever popular genus 
of plants. Its foliage is very dark with 
a bluish violet cast; the flowers, when 
first expanding, are of a deep purple- 
black, gradually becoming a velvety jet- 
black, good for cutting. 

Vltis T/iomsoD/.— This, a novelty of Jap- 
anese origin, is closely related to ampe- 
lopsis. to whicli our Virginia creeper and 
Boston ivy belong. This also is a loardv 
climber with beautiful foliage marked and 
spotted red, blended with violet. 

Saxifraga Rhel Superba. — This is a 
greatly improved form of the well known 
Aaron's beard. It is said to be a good 
thing for rockeries, hanging baskets, etc. 
Salvia RIngens. — Although not a new 
thing, this plant had become very scarce, 
but now, when the value of some of our 
old garden favorites for certain purposes 
begins to be more appreciated and hardy 
perennials are finding their road to pub- 
lic favor smoother, this beautiful hardy 
border plant is also brought forward and 
re-introduced by German growers. And 
indeed, it fully deserves it. It is a verv 
pretty, semi-woody, shrub-like plant, not 
resembling other members of the sage 
family much, although it belongs to that 
tribe. It forms a neat, compact bush, 
several feet high, covered for months in 
the summer with countless beautiful light 
blue flowers of large size, and a pe- 
culiarly graceful feathery form. The 
plants can be easily raised from seeds 
and. if sown early in the spring, will 
flower the second season. 

Yellow Disliked. — Yellow flowering 
plants, and especially cut flowers, loose 
or made up in that color, meet with dis- 
favor and slow sales in (jermanv. 



New Aster Miss Kate Lock. 
This aster originated from the Branch- 
ing and Washington asters. The flowers, 
wfhich resemble the Truffaut in form, 
measure from five to seven inches across 
with stems thirty-six to thirty-nine inches 
long on fine robust plants, about fifteen 
blooms on very stiff stems to each plant. 
The fiowers can be easily and artistically 
arranged when cut. This aster will take 
a prominent place in the market for cut 
blooms as soon as it is better known. 



1904. 



The American Florist. 



129 



THE RETAIL TRADE 



The i3oral tributes which had been 
sent to the family of the late Mark 
Hanna filled the marble room in the rear 
of the senate chamber, Washington, D. 
C, and only a few lilies and roses were 
banked about the catafalque. President 
Roosevelt sent a cross of violets, sur- 
rounded by a wreath of orchids. 



Confederate Flag' On Easel. 
This was one of the largest and most 
elaborate emblems sent to the funeral of 
General John B. Gordon at Atlanta, Ga., 
and was the tribute of the John B. Gor- 
don camp. United Sons of Confederate 
Veterans. It was made on a panel and 
stood eight feet high. The flag was made 
of red carnations and violets and the 
stars of white carnations. The top of 
the flag pole was a half-blown Easter 
lily tied with chenille tassels. Bronze 
galax leaves filled the space between the 
flag and the border, which was made of 
Bride roses, white hyacinths, smilax and 
maiden hair ferns. The lettering was 
done with pink felt letters on the white 
satin ribbon. The drapery at the bot- 
tom of the design was of white tulle and 
black crepe. The emblem was made by 
the C. A. Dahl Company, of Atlanta. 



Chicago. 

The market this week broke awaj' from 
the indifierent rut it has been traveling 
since the holidays and turned stifl' and 
strong. Everyone reports a most satis- 
factory condition. A healthy briskness 
characterized the market all week, espe- 
cially during the first few days. The 
activity was considerably accentuated by 
the circumstances of St. Valentine day 
and the festivities, and heavy shipping 
calls from New Orleans. On Saturday 
violets were the item demanded and 
those who exercised enough foresight to 
fill their refrigerators with this popular 
Valentine day Bower had no cause for 
complaint. Beauty roses continue a 
scarce item, this applying especially to 
the medium lengths. The growers have 
been compelled to cut all rose stock 
exceedingly close, but in spite of this the 
general quality is excellent. There 
appear to be plenty of carnations. 
The better grades move readily, but 
considerable "drumming" is necessary 
to dispose of the lesser lights. Bulbous 
stock is coming into the market with no 
signs of abatement. Red tulips have the 
call over other stock. The fancy fern 
situation is worthy of comment. It has 
been a long time since thjs item has ruled 
as high as they are now figuring; $3.50 
has been reached and all of the receipts 
are selling readily. Some of the eastern 
ferns show a deficiency in quality. The 
growers advise their local buyers that 
their supplies now in storage are limited 
to an almost unprecedented degree. 
Excessive snows during the last cutting 
season is given as the cause. 

The south side meeting of the Florists' 
Club, Saturday evening, was of the enter- 
tainment order and proved very enjoy- 
able. After supper at the Drexel cafe the 
members proceeded to a hall across the 
street, where W. Foster Burns made an 
interesting address urging unity of action 
where the best results are desirt d in club 
life as well as in politics and business. 
Press Woodrufi' told a number of his 
inimitable funny stories and a negro trio 
rendered vocal and instrumental music. 
Messrs. Reardon and Woodward deserve 
the thanks of the club for the excellence 




CONFEDERATE FLAG ON EASEL. 
(By C. A. Dahl Comp,any, Atlanta.) 



of the arrangements, but it is to be 
regretted that the south side representa- 
tives of the trade did not turn out in 
larger numbers. 

Fire in the greenhouse of Herman 
Krause, on Jeffery avenue, caused a loss 
of several hundred dollars on the morn- 
ing of February 12. The blaze started 
from the heating plant and before the 
arrival of the firemen it had gained such 
headway that it threatened the dwelling 
occupied by Mr. Krause and his family. 
Many potted plants were damaged. 

Benthey & Company, with a view to 
expanding, and possibly in the near 
future absorbing other interests, have 
incorporated with a capital of $10,000. 
The new stock company will be known 
as the Benthey-Coatsworth Company. 
The incorporators are F. F. Benthey, 
Louis Coatsworth and Philetus Smith. 

The fourth Florists' Club exhibition of 
the season was held at Handel hall on 
the afternoon of February 17. In another 
column will be found a detailed report, 
together with the awards of the judges. 
The next regular meeting of the club will 
be held at Handel hall on evening of 
March 9. 

Representatives of the Gardeners' and 
Florists' Union complained to the execu- 
tive board meeting of the Chicago Federa- 
tion Wednesday that General Superin- 
tendent Cook of the West Park system 
refused to grant union wages to the men. 
A committee of the federation will call on 
Mr. Cook. 

Wietor Brothers report an increased 
activity in the cutting business. The 
extremely cold weather has not been con- 
ducive to a heavy business in this line. 
While the orders cameinfast enough, the 
stock could not be shipped to distant 
points with any degree of safety. 

The carnation convention at Detroit 
March 2-3 is exciting more than passing 



interest among live local florists. A rep- 
resentative Chicago delegation will be on 
hand. Special rates have been secured 
on the Wabash and the party will leave 
on the afternoon of March 1. 

The George Wittbold Company this 
week removed its stand in the rear of the 
Flower Growers' Market to a more 
prominent location in the front of the 
hall. Some fine stock is coming in from 
the company's Edgebrook establishment. 

Frozen violet shipments from the east 
were incidents in nearly every commission 
house this week. In several cases no 
blame can attach to the shippers as the 
goods were properly packed. It is up to 
the express companies. 

Some unusually large elm trees, weigh- 
ing from three to four tons, are being 
moved from Maywood for planting 
along the avenue leading to the proposed 
site of the Washington monument in 
Washington park. 

H. D. Kamp, of Kenosha, Wis., was a 
business visitor here this week. He says 
this season has been unusually severe on 
the Wisconsin growers and' coal bills 
make those of 1903 look insignificent in 
comparison. 

T. J. Corbrey is now located at Long 
Beach, Cal., and his health has been 
excellent since he went to the coast. He 
will make a specialty of growing asters 
and pansies on an extensive scale for 
seed. 

Wednesday was the first day of Lent, 
and it was barely noticeable in the 
market. Retailers report a quiet trade 
the latterpartof the week inconsequence. 

John Degnan, of the E. F. Winterson 
Company, was confined to his home 
several days this week by a severe cold. 

Four new houses will be built this 
spring by J. A. Dudlong. 

G. E. Pieser made a business trip to 
Iowa last week. 



180 



The American Florist. 



Feb Po, 



Andrew McAdams is sojourning at 
Ocean Springs, Miss., for the benefit of 
his health. 



New York. 



The less said about the cut flower trade 
the better. At the present writing Ash 
Wednesday looms up, linked with a 
blizzard, and the result of the combina- 
tion is as uncertain as the Russo-Japanese 
war. The war, by the way, has been 
settled and we know the victors, thanks 
to the Barclay street contingent. Prices 
are tending downward, nevertheless, and 
no doubt our next week's report will 
show a drop in such specialties as have 
not already touched bottom. 

It is a little early, but we will pause 
long enough to remark that the next 
meeting of the Florists' Club will be 
devoted to the interests of the rose. Pros- 
pectuses now on record indicate a remark- 
able outbreak on that occasion, despite 
the carnation. Robert Simpson, the 
expert on roses, will read a paper on his 
specialty with the dollars bristling all 
o'er. 

At the meeting of the American Insti- 
tute on Wednesday evening, February 
10, a paper on "Cool Orchids," by E. O. 
Orpet, was read, also a paper on "Leaf 
Mold for Orchids," by C. W. Schneider. 
G. V. Nash, of the New York Botanical 
Garden, presented some stereopticon 
views in illustration, the slides being 
beautifully colored by Mrs. C. Van 
Brunt. 

Wm. Fink, a florist who was supposed 
to have been drowned February 1 in 
escaping by swimming the East River 
from Blackwell's Island, where he was 
serving a six months' sentence for non- 
support, has been discovered very much 
alive by his wife. He was handed over 
to serve out the rest of his term. 

Siebrecht & Sons are building a green- 
house 25x60 feet at Ninetieth street and 
Broadway. 

Treasurer H. B. Beatty, of the Society 
of American Florists, was a visitor this 
week. 



Philadelphia. 



The chief topic at this writing is the 
weather which has been very cold for 
the past few days, the glass showing a 
night temperature of 2° to 4° below zero 
two nights in succession. Coming as 
this does after so many weeks of severe 
weather it cuts into the already depleted 
coal pile and adds to the grower's bur- 
den. Things were much more lively the 
past week and all salable flowers were 
quickly grabbed up. Valentine's day is 
getting to be quite a factor in the busi- 
ness. At the close of Saturday there was 
scarcely anything left. Violets sold up 
clean and were the favorite flower. Some 
of the retail florists ofiered floral valen- 
tines and some had pretty boxes. Most 
of the business, however, was of clusters 
and boxes ol choice flowers. Prices 
stifiened a trifle, the best Beauties going 
to $6 per dozen and very scarce at that. 
Carnations are now at their best. Law- 
son is now foremost as all the stocks 
appear to be doing well. The Stratford 
farm is sending in grand Lawson, Pros- 
perity and Adonis, the latter being par- 
ticularly fine. Pansies are scarce. Many 
growers say their stock this season has 
been a failure. Dafiodils and tulips are 
now the favorites and large quantities of 
the dafiodils are handled every day at $2 
to $2.50. Freesias sell well at $3 to $4. 
There has been a scarcity of Easter lilies 
the past two or three weeks. Why is 



this? They are easy to flower at this 
season and will bring readily $1.50 per 
dozen, which is better tha,n $10 at 
Easter. , . 

The lilac crop has been short the past 
week, Harrig being the only man, with 
the exception-of a few out of town ship- 
ments, having them. This is Mr. Harris' 
first season and he is much pleased with 
the results. 

"France has the lily 

England has the rose" 
But Harris' is the place 
Where the shamrock grows. 

Here they are, 40,000 strong, a large 
house full, pot after pot and an overflow 
house for the shamrock pans. This is a 
great side line. Everybody has to have a 
few and this explains where they all go. 

Next Wednesday evening will be ladies' 
night at the club. The committee has 
worked hard and it should be a grand 
occasion. There will be music, refresh- 
ments and special prizes for both bowl- 
ing and shuffie-boards, open to ladies 
only. 

The extreme weather has made the lily 
growers apprehensive of their Easter 
crop. Robert Craig says it will take 
some hurrying but if the weather is 
bright it will help considerably and most 
of the stocks will be in. 

Manager Meehan, of the Market, says 
trade has been booming lately and he 
has no kick coming. Their stock of fancy 
single violets is fine and they go out 
almost faster than they come in. 

Myers & Santman are cutting some 
choice Queen of Edgely which for color, 
stem and foliage are hard to beat. Their 
Beauties have also done exceptionally 
well this season. 

W. P. Craig was confined to his bed a 
few days threatened with pneumonia, 
but is now better. 

Leo Niessen has been headquarters for 
pansies, at present the scarcest flower in 
town. 

Eddie Fancourt is on the mend and 
hopes to be about in a couple of weeks. 

John Mclntireof Ed.Reid'sforce is now 
with H. H. Battles. 

Visitors in town were Messrs. Seide- 
witz & Frazier, of Baltimore, and J. H. 
Troy, of New York. K. 



Boston. 

Jackson Dawson was the star at the 
monthly meeting of the Gardeners' and 
Florists' Club at Horticultural Hall last 
Tuesday evening. His talk was on his 
favorite subject of hardy shrubs and 
climbers for the garden. The list of sub- 
jects desirable for this purpose because of 
their attractive habit, beautiful foliage, 
flowers or fruit, hardiness and varied 
adaptability, was an extensive one, but 
Mr. Dawson held his audience intact 
throughout by his earnestness and inter- 
esting manner. A motion was unani- 
mously adopted, seconding the invita- 
tion by the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society to the American Carnation 
Society and American Rose Society to 
hold their 1905 meetings in Boston. 
The club was invited by Messrs. Oakes 
Ames and W. N. Craig to visit the Ames 
conservatories at North Easton on Tues- 
day, March 8. Mr. Craig exhibited two 
very fine plants of Cyclamen Persicum on 
the president's desk. 

Wintry weather and the closing of the 
fashionable period have conspired to help 
the flower business somewhat during the 
past ten days. Prices have been better 
and maintained better than for some 
time heretofore on a few specialties, 
chiefly roses, but it is very evident that 
the short crop has been the mainstay of 



the flower values and that with a full cut 
conditions would be discouraging. The 
total amount of business done this sea- 
son falls far below the average of recent 
years. Lent is not likely to make it 
much worse, and it is possible that in the 
event of moderate weather the market 
may be materially improved under the 
favorable conditions for transient street 
sales. 

L. B. Brague, H. J. Smith and others 
interested in the hardy fern business, 
have been in attendance at the state 
house in the interests of the fern trade, 
as affected by the bills now under con- 
sideration for the regulation of this 
industry. A compromise measure is 
likely to pass, whereby the interests of 
the local fern gatherers will be protected 
while vandalism by irresponsible foreign- 
ers will be checked. 

Cornelius Dineen, for twenty years 
head gardener for Mrs. Wm. Peck, at 
Arlington, was in court on February 12 
to answer to a charge of cruelty to ani- 
mals. The alleged offense was cutting 
off the tails of a number of cats. 

At Horticultural Hall last Saturdav a 
very fine plant of Odontoglossum Midg- 
leyanum was exhibited by Arthur Hun- 
newell and a cultural certificate was 
awarded to T. D. Hatfield, the grower. 

W. A. Kennedy, of Milwaukee, who 
came east to attend the funeral of his 
father, spent one day in Boston this 
week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oakes Ames started on 
Monday for a two months' trip to 
Cuba. 

Julius Heurlin has returned from a 
short visit to France. 



St. Louis. 



The carnation meeting of the St. Louis 
Florists' Club February 11 was adecided 
success. It was remarkable for enthusi- 
asm and the magnificent blooms exhib- 
ited. Thirty-four members and five vis- 
itors attended. Among the visitors were 
J. D. Thompson of The J. D. Thompson 
Carnation Company, Joliet, 111.; James 
Hartshorne, manager of the Chicago 
Carnation Companv, Joliet; Martin Ren- 
kauf, with H. Bayersdorfer & Company, 
Philadelphia, and G. M. Kellogg, Pleasant 
Hill, Mo. The general excellence of the 
vases shown elicited favorable comment. 
Although no prizes were offered exhib- 
itors from distant points, the representa- 
tives present vied in arranging stock to 
the best advantage. The J. D.Thomp- 
son Carnation Company had five of its 
choicest varieties — Enchantress, Mrs. 
Patten, Estelle, Gov. Wolcott and Nelson 
Fisher. About forty blooms of each 
variety were shown. They averaged by 
actual measurement three and one-half 
inches in diameter. Enchantress was at 
its best with fine flowers on good, long, 
stiff stems. It was pronounced by the 
committee appointed, consisting of A. 
Joblonsky, Wm. Winter and J. Steidle, 
to be the best of its color. Mrs. Patten 
was said to be the "best variegated." 
Nelson Fisher, was also in evidence. Gov. 
Wolcott is a good white, with a well 
built flower and stem. The report on 
Estelle speaks for itself: "Best we have 
seen of its fine color and stem." The 
Chicago Carnation Company had four 
varieties on exhibition, including Doro- 
thy Whitney, Fiancee, Crusader and 
Harlowarden. Dorothy Whitney was 
the only yellow variety present. It was 
said to be "finest of its color." Crusader 
is a very good red with good stem and 
flower. Harlowarden was pronounced 



igo^. 



The American Florist. 



131 



the best crimson. Fiancee was the 
largest pink variety, with a good stiff 
stem and perfect iJower. Baur & Smith, 
of Indianapolis, showed a beautiful vase 
of the new Indianapolis. They were 
much better than those shown at a 
former exhibition. The stems were stiffer 
and blooms slightly deeper in color. The 
committee's report read: "Good pink for 
commercial purposes." R. Witterstaet- 
ter, Cincinnati, had a large vase of the 
new Cardinal. It is a deep red of good 
color and stem. Everyone admired it 
greatly. F. Dorner & Sons' Company, 
Lafayette, Ind., were much in evidence 
with Lady Bountiful as the center of 
attraction and The Belle a close con- 
testant. Lady Bountiful is an almost 
pure white variety of good stem and sub- 
stance. It was one of the best on exhibi- 
tion. The Belle is a good white. The 
local exhibitors were out in force with 
some of theirchoicest. Three prizes were 
offered by the club. John Steidle got 
first for a vase of Enchantress and Har- 
lowarden; F. W. Ude second, for a vase 
of Enchantress and Prosperity, and A. 
Joblonsky, third, for a vase of fifty Peru. 
Fred. Ammann exhibited White Cloud 
and Queen Louise. James Dunford and 
F. J. Fillmore exhibited vases of mixed 
varieties. All the blooms shown by 
local men were of a high order and 
reflected great credit on the growers. 

The usual routine of business being 
dispensed with at the meeting, F. J. 
Fillmore read an interesting essay on 
"Carnation Growing." Several points 
called for lively discussion, particularly 
in regard to the merits of side shoots 
or stems for cuttings, also the proper 
heat for the propagating bench. AH the 
visiting growers entered into the spirit 
of the meeting and gave the local men the 
benefit of their experiences. Mr. Guy, of 
Belleville, illustrated his talk with a box 
of specimens. After a vote of thanks to 
the out-of-town exhibitors and to Mr. 
Fillmore, F. W. Maas, of the Plant Seed 
Company, made application for mem- 
bership in the club. J ames Dunlord made 
a motion that James Gurney, superin- 
tendent of Tower Grove park, be elected 
an honorary member. This was done 
by an unanimous vote. Fred. Ammann 
then read an interesting account of the 
journey he and Mr. Joblonsky took 
through Illinois and Indiana and their 
search for blue carnations. President 
Beneke announced the meeting would be 
held one week earlier next month, as the 
national executive committee would then 
be in session. The meeting will be on 
March 3. The prize winning blooms 
were next auctioned off by Auctioneer 
Fillmore, after which the meeting 
adjourned. 

The prevailing cold weather has given 
the demand for stock a slight boost, 
although no change in prices is -notice- 
able. Roses held up well. Beauty is 
offered in small quantities. Carnations 
are seeking a higher level, the best selling 
for $5. Violets were in great demand 
St. Valentine's day. Quantities were 
sold at 75 cents to $1. There is no per- 
ceptible change in either narcissi, valley 
or Romans. The market as a whole is 
steady and holding its own. 
1 Dr. Wm. Trelease, of the Missouri 
k Botanic Garden, left February 17 for a 
two months' collecting tour in Old and 
New Mexico. Sam Trelease, who was 
stricken with a severe attack of appendi- 
citis in the fall, accompanied him. 
! Mrs. H. O. Berning is slowly improv- 
ing. 
I F. K. B. 



Baltimore. 

As a result of the great fire trade the 
last week was slack, and the near future 
is not encouraging. There were a few 
weddings, which there was no disposi- 
tion to delay, and necessarily some funer- 
als it was impossible to postpone, but 
practically all social entertainments were 
called off, society cotillions, assemblies, 
dinners and receptions, for some of which 
elaborate preparations had been made, 
being postponed indefinitely. Lent began 
Wednesday and diminished still further 
the demand for flowers and decorations, 
for, although recently this season of 
denial has not made the difference that it 
formerly did, this year will find its exhi- 
bitions of display and indulgence com- 
port only too well with the conditions 
generally of pocket books and bank 
accounts. The usual routine was the 
ending of large functions, and in some 
religious communions almost all wed- 
dings, but there were many small gather- 
ings — teas, receptions and dinners — 
making a pretty constant and even 
trade. These for a few weeks now are 
hardly expected to materialize. 

But trade is not dead, and there are no 
signs of despondency. The florists as a 
body suffered directly less probably than 
any other trade, though from the inter- 
dependence of all our people there are 
necessarily some losses which will, as 
they must, be borne with the courage 
inspiring our entire community. The 
heaviest loss is the decline in business, 
but this will right itself as our business 
community rehabilitates itself All are 
cheerful and grateful that there was no 
loss of life, that few homes were 
destroyed, that no destitution exists 
(only twenty persons having applied to 
our Associated Charities for relief) , and 
that we miss wholly the physical sufler- 
ing and mental distress which would 
have followed the destruction of so great 
an area in the residential section. 

The weather continues extremely cold 
for this section; and we have completed 
our third month of a winter without a 
break — an experience new here to men 
of even old age. Still, the days are 
bright, the skies blue, the air bracing and 
dry. Roses were scarce last week — prob- 
ably scarcer than at any other time dur- 
ing the winter, and orders for St. Valen- 
tine's day were difficult to fill. Carna- 
tions were more abundant and bulbous 
stock is coming in very plentifully. 
Demands forflowers forSenator Hanna's 
funeral in Washington made a marked 
demand to-day (February 16). On Sun- 
day there were great crowds of excur- 
sionists from contiguous territory to 
view the ruins in the burnt section, and 
this being [doubtless noted by the press 
there were seen yesterday street fakirs 
from other cities offering flowers on our 
congested thoroughfares. 

To-day died one of our oldest members 
of the trade, Nicholas Kress, aged eighty- 
two years. He was born in Hinder- 
steinen, Hesse, Germany, and came to 
this city in 1846. He was employed for 
several years as a private gardener, then 
began business as a florist, made it a suc- 
cess until his retirement, when he was 
succeeded by his son, Edward Kress, who 
continues the business at the stand on 
North avenue, so long occupied by his 
father. Mr. Kress was widely known 
and greatly respected. His portrait 
appeared in the issue of April 7, 1900, of 
The American Flobist. 

Another death of a citizen known to 
thousands of our people viras that of 
Captain William H. Cassell, for some 
thirty-six years superintendent of Druid 



Hill, the largest and noblest of our sys- 
tem of public parks. He was seventy- 
five years old, and his long contact with 
the tnultitudes who frequent the park, 
his kindly and frank manners, his cheer- 
ful disposition, and especially his fond- 
ness for the children who were so often 
under his care in their picnics and assem- 
blages, made him a universal favorite, 
whose death will come to multitudes as 
a personal bereavement. S. B. 



Detroit. 

The club meeting February 17 brought 
out an extraordinary attendance. The 
coming carnation meeting absorbed 
attention. All the committees' reports 
indicated complete readiness for the event 
of March 2 and 3. Inquiries for hotel 
accommodations are being made from aU 
parts, and indications are for a grand 
exhibition and record breaking attend- 
ance. There will be a special meeting of 
the club in the rooms of the Michigan 
Cut Flower Exchange, February 29, 
when all minor details for the convention 
will be completed. 

St. Valentine's day was celebrated Sat- 
urday and brought a wave of business 
activity. Purchases were heavy and ran 
mostly to violets and carnations. The 
supply of roses was early exhausted. 
The price of violets was materially less 
than a year ago. Carnations and roses 
maintained the same figures. 

Mrs. N. M. Nettleton, 126 Miami ave- 
nue, has quit business, and is succeeded 
by C. A. Shaw. J. F. S. 



New Castle, Ind. 



All the greenhouses in this great rose 
growing center are having good cuts con- 
sidering the extreme winter which we 
are having. At the Reinberg & Weiland 
place, which contains 100,000 feet of 
glass, they are cutting some fine Bride 
and Bridesmaid with stems three feet and 
more. Their Beauty roses are consider- 
ably off crop now. This place the coming 
season will be owned and operated 
exclusively by Peter Weiland and will 
be planted partly in carnations. 

At the South Park Floral Company's 
houses (Heller Brothers) they are having 
a fine cut of all varieties except Liberty. 
They have a bench of 600 plants of the 
new red rose. Gen. MacArthur, which 
they think will be a a great addition to 
the red roses. As seen here it is much 
more free blooming than Liberty, makes 
stems that grade high and has no surplus 
or blind wood. The foliage is extremely 
large and beautiful and its fragrance is 
delicious. A very heavy crop of magnifi- 
cent Bride and Bridesmaid is just start- 
ing. The Beauties are in fine healthy con- 
dition, and while they are not cutting 
heavily now within two weeks there will 
be thousands of them. They have 200,000 
feet of glass planted exclusively to roses. 

At Benthey & Company they will soon 
be cutting a nice lot of tea roses, but the 
Beauty are off crop. They are devoting 
a great deal of their time now to the cut- 
ting business. They devote 75,000 feet 
of glass to roses. 

At L. A. Jennings' good Bride and 
Bridesmaid will soon be cut. It is 
rumored that he will enlarge his place 
soon. 

At Dittmann's the Beauty roses have 
been dried off and are now being started. 
He will build two houses this spring. 



Cleveland, O.— Adam Graham and 
wife;are sojourning in Florida. 



132 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 



20, 



NnnsTEENTH Year. 

Subscription, $1.00 a year. To Europe, 12.00. 

SubBcriptions accepted only from those 

in the trade. 

Advertisements, on all except cover pages, 

10 Cents a Line, Agate; 81.00 per inch. 

Cash with Order. 

No Special Position Guaranteed. 
Discounts are allowed only on consecutive inser- 
tions, as follows — 6 times, 5 per cent; 13 times, 
10 per cent; 26 times, 20 per cent; 
52 times, 30 per cent. 
Space on front pages and back cover page sold 
only on yearly contract at $1.00 per inch, net. 
The Advertising Department of the American 
Florist is for florists, seedsmen and nurserymen 
and dealers in wares pertaining to those lines only. 

Orders for less than one-half inch space not accepted. 

Advertisements must reach us by Wedneadajf to 
secure insertion in the issue for the following 
Saturday. Address 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO., Chicago. 

IVken sending us change of address, always send 
the old address at the same time. 



Easter this year tails on April 3, nine 
days earlier than last year. 

Our Baltimore "Subscriber" should 
remember that all communications 
should be signed with the real name and 
address of the writer. 

Rhododendrons take from four to six 
weeks, according to variety, lor forcing 
into flower, with a temperature of 70° 
by day and 60° by night. An abundance 
of water and exposure to full sun is 
recommended. Watch for burning spots 
in the glass which are very apt to disfig- 
ure the foliage as well as the bloom. 

Crimson Ramblers for Easter should 
now be in rapid growth and well covered 
with luxuriant foliage. Full sun is essen- 
tial. If the foliage is still tardy supply a 
moist atmosphere and spray frequently. 
Avoid sudden changes and blow flowers 
of sulphur freely over the surface to keep 
mildew off. Fumigate often to escape 
insect pests. Ramblers flourish in a day 
temperature of 65° to 70° and a night 
temperature of 58°. 

Give the hydrangeas full sun and moist 
atmosphere until they are in full bloom 
after which a slight shading may be bene- 
ficial. Frequent syringings are'required to 
combat red spider and the plants should 
be fumigated lightly, but often, for green 
fly, etc. In the earlier stages of growth 
hydrangeas should be watered sparingly, 
otherwise the foliage is apt to come light 
colored and flimsy. Day 70° and night 
60? is the right temperature. 

An even temperature for gardenias is 
very essential. Any changes are liable 
to blight and cast the buds; 60° steadily 
by day and night is about right for their 
best development. Moderate watering 
is advised as either excessive or scanty 
watering is apt to bring on the "yellows." 
Lilacs can be forced for Easter in from 
nineteen to twenty-one days. The pink 
varieties wll prosper in full light and a 
temperature of 70° day and 60° night 
but the white sorts require heavy shad- 
ing and a regular temperature of 70° 
both day and night. Too high a tem- 
perature, especially in the first few days, 
is apt to cause the blooms to come 
knotty. To insure fine growth the 
branches should be sprayed five or six 
times each day. 



Society of American Florists. 

The annual meeting of the executive 
board has been called by President Breit- 
meyer to convene at St. Louis, Mo., on 
Saturday, March 5. Members of the 



society or others having in mind matters 
which should be brought to the atten- 
tion of the committee for the benefit of 
the profession or the interests of the 
society are requested to send same in 
writing to the secretary at an early date. 
All such communications will be gladly 
welcomed by the officers of the society, 
and will be given all due attention. The 
sessions of the board will be held at the 
Southern hotel, and will probably con- 
tinue for three days. 

William J. Stewart, Secretary. 



Catalogues Received, 

The Leach Insecticide Company, Balti- 
more, Md.. insecticides; Nathan Smith & 
Sou, Adrian, Mich., chrysanthemums, 
etc.; Harry N. Hammond Seed Company, 
Ltd., Bay City, Mich., seeds; Old Colony 
Nursery, Plymouth, Mass., nursery 
stock; Wm. Henry Alaule, Philadelphia, 
Pa. , seeds; Vaughan's Seed Store, Chicago 
and New York, seeds, plants, bulbs, etc.; 
Bobbink & Atkins, Rutherford, N. J., 
plants, nursery stock, etc.; W. E. Cald- 
well Company, Louisville, Ky., tanks 
and tubs; M. Crawford Company, Cuya- 
hoga Falls, O., strawberry plants and 
gladiolus bulbs; Friedr. C. Pomrencke, 
Altona Hamburg, Germany, seeds and 
bulbs; The Mitchell Greenhouses and 
Nurseries, Mitchell, S. D., plants, bulbs 
and nursery stock; F. Dorner & Sons 
Company, Lafayette, Ind., carnations; 
W. N. Scars', New Cariisle. O., berry 
plants, poultry, etc.; A. E. McKenzie & 
Company, Brandon, Manitoba, Can., 
seeds; Northrup, King & Company, 
Minneapolis, Minn., seeds; James Vick's 
Sons, Rochester, N. Y., seeds, plants, 
bulbs, etc.; John Lucas & Company, 
Philadelphia, Pa., paint; Rene Schoo & 
Company, Hillegom, Holland, bulbs and 
roots; Lewis Roesch, Fredonia, N. Y., 
nursery stock; F. W. Dixon, Holton, 
Kan., fruit plants; The Eraser Nursery, 
Huntsville. Ala., nursery stock; Forest 
City Nurseries, Portland, Me., nursery 
stock; 



OBITUARY. 



Mrs. Emma KUngrbiel, 

Mrs. Emma Klingbiel, wife of Otto 
Klingbiel, Davenport, la., died at the 
Mercy hospital, February 15. Mrs. 
Klingbiel was born at Segeberg, Schles- 
wig-Holstein, and came to this country 
in 1888, and was married to Mr. Kling- 
biel in 1898. Mr. Klingbiel and two 
children survive. 

Alexander Kennedy. 

Alexander Kennedy died February 6, 
at George's Road, New Brunswick, N. J. 
He was born at Banff, Scotland, seventy 
years ago. He served his time at garden- 
ing at Gordon Castle, also at Edinbor- 
ough. He came to America and worked 
as gardener at private places around 
Boston and New York city, finally set- 
tling at New Brunswick on a place of his 
own and growing cut flowers, vegetables 
and small fruit. Here he laid out a place 
whose fine and stately trees live as a 
monument to his memory. He was 
known bj; those who knew him best for 
his strict integrity and honorable deal- 
ings. A wife, two sons and one daughter 
survive him, the sons following in the 
footsteps of their father, Lachlan at 
Yonkers, N. Y., and William A., at Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 



SITUATIONS, WANTS, FOR SALE. 

One^Cent Per Word. 

Cash with the Adv. 

Plant Advt. NOT admitted under this head. 

Every paid subscriber to the American Florist 
for the year 1903 is entitled to a flve-line want 
ADV. (situations only) free, to be used at any 
time during the year. 

Situation Wanted— By youn^ man in green- 
houses; 7 years' experience. Address 

R, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— liy youne man. age 30, with 
cxperif-nce in greenhouse and garden and in tak- 
ing; care of a s'^ntleman's place. Address 

Y M, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By young HoUandf-r palm 
grower: life (_'sperience evergreens and fruit 
trees. Host references. Address 

K L, care American Florist. 

Sitnatlon Wanted — Hy a middle-aged, single 
German; life experience in cut Mowers and pot. 
plants. State wages. Address 

G. IviEFNER, 72 W. Madison St., Chicago. 

Situation Wanted— By florist and gurdener on 
privute place. All branches; married, capable; 
agc2S, Swede. Address A. Lawson, 

Eastover Farm, Oyster Bay, L. I., N. Y. 

Situation Wanted— By >oung man 23 with 
commercial florist; 4 years' experience under 
glass in England and Guernsey. Excellent refer- 
ences. Address H B, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By experienced gardener 
and llorist up-to-date, on jirivate place; wants to 
change present position for other; age 38; married, 
no children; best references. Address 

A M, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By young man, German, 
31 years old; 15 years' experience in palms, 
ferns, bedding, forcing and Easter stock. Private 
or commercial. Address 

C J, 738 \V. Chicago Ave., Chicago. 

Situation Wanted— As head gardener in private 
place: 17 years' practical experience in large 
English gardens; good testimonials as to charac- 
ter and abilities: age 31. married. Address 

F. Wescott, Box 214, Deep River, Conn. 

Situation Wanted— Carnation expert wants 
position on commercial place. 20 years* experi- 
ence in general greenhouse work. 'Best of refer- 
ences given. Give full particulars when you 
write. Expert, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By a thorough practical 
grower. 20 years' experience in growing roses, 
carnations, 'mums, ferns, palms and general 
greenhouse stock. Can furnish Al references. 
Would accept private place. Address 

E W. care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By first-class rose grower 
and florist, capable of taking charge of place or 
section; good propagator and grafter; 15 years' 
experience with good referenct.'; age 30, married. 
Please state wages. Address 

R J P, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— As head gardener on pri- 
vate place, understanding greenhouse work, 
vegetables, raising trees, shrubs and general 
landscaping. 29 years old. Married. Life 
experience. Address 

A 714, Law Building. Indianapolis, Ind, 

Situation Wanted— By gardener who thor- 
oui^hly understands the raising of fruits, flowers, 
vegetables under glass and outdoors: also general 
landscaping. Gentleman's place preferred. Mar- 
ried, j>ge 37. Address 

2097 St. Anthony Ave.. Merriara Park, Minn. 

Situation Wanted— By expert grower of pot 
plants, roses and carnations. Well posted in 
forcing, grafting and propagating; 11 vears' 
experience in this country and Europe.' Can 
furnish Al references; 26 years of age. Please 
state wages. B C. care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— By a sober and competent 
man; 30 years of age, 20 years' experience in 
general stock plant growing and landscape gar- 
dening. Have diploma. Am able to take full 
charge of private or commercial place. Best of 
references. Want steady position. 

E L, care American Florist. 

Situation Wanted— As foreman in first-class 
establishment. Advertiser is at present holding 
a responsible position, but is desirous of making 
a change. Thoroughly versed in all modern 
methods of culture. Of good habits and address; 
married; the West preferred. Address stating 
fullparticulitrs, X, care American Florist, 



jgo4. 



The American Florist. 



133 



Situation Wanted— Id Qrst-c'ass commerciat 
place by hoaest. sober and Indus rious youDir 
man. age 19, single, 15 years' experiei ce in grow- 
ing of ferns' palms, flowering and bedding plants, 
also roses and caraitions. Good wp,ges wanted. 
Best of references from England, Germany and 
this conn ry. Address H. Hansen. 

Bos 85, Mt. Auburn, Mass. 

Halp Wanted— A foreman who understands 
handlmg help. Must be all-around florist aod 
married. Sta e wages. Address 

C. H. Frey, 1133 O St., Lincoln, Neb. 

Help Wanted— V good man who understands 
^rowiug of roses, carnations, 'mums nnd general 
stock. State wages per month. Address with 
reference, N. Bommeksbach. Decatur, 111. 

Help Wanted— Voung man as assistant florist. 
"Must hiive some experience and take care of 
horse. Wages $35 per month, board and rcom. 
Address Jos, F. Khmmer. 

Desplaines Ave. and Harrison St., Oak Park, 111. 

Halp Wanted — Firsc-c^ass working foreman 
gardeuer on private place in Kentucky. Must 
thoroughly understand care of lawns, shrubberv, 
-and the raising of fruits, flowers and veiietables. 
Address, giving experience and stating wages 
expected. F W A, care American Florist. 

Help Wanted— A competent plantsman for 
landscape work. Must have a general knowledge 
of nursery work, outdoor rose culture, be a good 
propagator, and be able to execute and maintain 
targe plantings of native and ornamental stock. 
Give full particulars as to past experience, refer- 
ences and salary expected. Address 

Competent, care American Florist. 

For Rent- Old established greenhouses with 
good house, barn, all utensils, t.ols, etc. For 
particulars address 

(J E, care American Florist. 

For Sale— At a bargain. 4 greenhouses 20x100 
leet. barn, 7 room dwelling house, I acre: 16 miles 
northwest of Chicago. Cause, failing health. 
J D, care American Florist. 

For Sale — Greenhouses; good location for Iccal 
and shipping business in Micnigan. Well stocked. 
Reason for selling, on account of failing health. 
H B, care American Florist. 



For Sale— Over 13,000 feet of g'ass all heated 
by steam, in tirst-class condition. Will sell at 
reasonable price. Terms to suit. Address 

Glass, care American Florist. 

For Sale — At a bargain. A nice home located 
5 blocks from postofRce: greenhouses well slocked 
with up-to-date retail stock; business established 
for 2J years, good mail and express business. 

C. H. Baglet, Abiline, Kan. 

For Sale— Greenhouses. Good location for 
local and shipping business. Well stocked; win- 
ter coal laid in. Will sell cheap if sold at once. 
Selling on account of failing health. 

Ja9. Richardson, London, O. 

For Sale or Lease— Fine greenhouse estab- 
lishment of 10.000 fei^t of glass, in good condition 
and well stocked, with or without dwelling. Fine 
opening for a single man. Stock reasonable. 

X Y Z, care American Florist. 

For Sale or Lease— Between 30,000 to 40.000 feet 
glass; b;irn, dwelling house; hot wiiler heating, 
constant water supply, two acres for cultivation 
in Bronx Borough. New York city. Address 

J. RiNGLBR, 728 3d Ave., New York. 

For Sale — Old established greenhouses, large 
lot. good house and baru, together wiih all the 
parapheualia incidental to this line of business. 
Sickness compels an imme-iiate sale of ihis plant. 
No reasonable offer refused. 

Clarence E. Smith, 145 LaSalle St., Chicago. 

For Sale or Rent— Commercial place, 9 green- 
houses. 20,0t0 feet of glass, shed 2j feet wide con- 
necting houses, heated with steam by return 
tubular boiler: storage capacity for spflson's sup- 
ply of coal. Three miles from city hall. Address 
Samuel J. Bunting, Elmwood Ave. 

and 58ih St.. Philadelphia, Pa. 

For Sale— Three grepnhouses situated in West 
Tenn. About lO.tOO square feet glass, well stocked 
with roses, carnations, i: alms. lerns and bedding 
plants. Heated by two B^lorence hot water heaters. 
About one and one-quarter acres or ground, SjO 
feet cold frames which belong to the plant. Every- 
thing in first-class condition. No competition. 
A good bargain. A chnnge 'f climate necessary 
for family cause of sale. Address 

Mrs. M. Iris Buown, Union City,^Tenn. 



Wanted— A florist to buv part interest in a good 
paying florist's Imnlness and take fuUchargeof 
greenhouses. For paniculari address 

J D, Raymond St.. Wheeling. W. Va. 

Wanted— At once, new or second-hand refrig- 
erator, i^iass front, dimensions about 3x5x8 feet. 
Give particulars and photograph of same in first 
letter. Address Baur Floral Co., Erie, Pa. 

Wantod— An active young man with busi- 
ness nbility and some capital, and experience ia 
managing a large cut (lower growing plant, 
wishes to correspond with a grower with view of 
buving interest in place andiaking full charge. 
Only a clear, aggressive party in middle westera 
stales need reply. Address 

Confidential, care American Florist. 

Position as foreman or manager in an up-to- 
date establishment: either wholesale, retail or 
mailini;. Am up in all branches, catalogue mark- 
ing, building, heating and growing of fine stock. 
2,000.000 plants grown the past season. Three 
years in last place. 40 years old and a hustler. 
Northern place preferred. Married temperate and 
strictly business. Best of reference as to ability 
and business qualities. Address Lone Star, 
611 No. Washington Ave., Dallas, Tex. 

Manager, 

First-class grower, designer and deco- 
rator, very best references, wants first- 
class place, with f lir facilities. Address 

M G D, care American Florist. 

For Sale. 

Range of 4,500 feet, erected in 1903, cypress 
throughout: modern ventilators, city water, 
h jt water heat: well stocked for general retail 
trade. Only greenhouse in city of 10,000 and 
doing good business Best reasons for stalling. 
Address NEBRASKA, care American Florist. 



FLORISTS' AMERICAN EXCHANGE 



POINTER NO. 1. 

In an Iowa town of 5000 inhabitants, thriving 
with three railroads to ship over, making tradi with 
surrounding: villages convenient and profitable. The 
coal used cost $1.70 per ton on cars back of green- 
house which is heated b7 Hot Water. 

J Greenhouse - - 20x 76 

2 Lots - - - - JC0xI60 

Dwelling - - - J4x 34 

2 Office Bjildiogs - - I4x 40 

Barn - - - - I6x 20 

A number of large Hot-Beds. All well stocked 
with plants. A good established business. Plenty of 
fruit for one family. Good well, also city water. 
Place situated so near center of city as not to require 
Price, $2200. 



a separate store. 

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. Inreferring to our offers please give "Pointer Number. 



POINTER NO. 2. 

A rare opportunity for a beginner. In a Wiscon- 
sin city of 25,000 inhabitants, a property worth 
$tO,O0O— owner too old and feeble to carry on busi- 
ness, will incorporate the would-be purchaser to 
invest $2000, to raise a debt and organize for business, 
also making arrangements by which he can acquire 
the balance of stock as fast as capital is earned. 

There is but one other Florist established here; no 
difficulty for the proper person doing a good business 
from the start. 

6 greenhouses, windmill, place well piped, barn, 
good dwelling, two stories, hot-water heating, stocked 
with plants; a large piece of land in the city, which in 
itself is sure to be worth i he price in a short time. Elec- 
tric cars to suburban village pass every 30 minutes. 

The 



information given above is furnished by owners over their own signatures, 
such additional data as you may desire. 



We will be please to produce 



R II in need of Hot-Bed Sasii or second-hand Glass for making more room next montli? 

If so, please send us a m-moranium of whit you would like to have. We miy save you timt aad money. 

C. B. WHITNALL, 

Care Citizens Trust Company. MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



ADDRESS COMMUNICATIONS TO 



Hease mention the American Florist when writings . 



134 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 20, 



E. H. Hunt, 



WHOLESALE 



Cut flowers 

"THE OLD RELIABLE." 
76 Wabash Ave., ....CHICAOO. 

Wbol^^ale flower/\arK^ 



Milwaukee, Feb. 18. 
Roses, Beauty, long per doz. 3.00 

med. " 1 500 3 OO 
short " .60® I.ro 

" Bride, Bridesmaids 6.00® 8.00 

" Meteor, Golden Gate 6.(10(ai 8.00 

" Perle 6.00® 8.00 

Carnations 3.00® 4,00 

Smilax 15.00@18(0 

Asparagus 35.00(0*50.00 

Violets 50® .75 

Valley 3 00® 4.00 

Romans 2 00® 3.10 

Freesias 2.00® 3.00 

Tulips 3.0U 

Pittsburg Feb. 18. 

Roses, Beauty, specials 40.00@60.00 

" " extras 2."i.00(n 35.00 

" " No. 1 10.00®3O.0O 

" " ordinary 3.00®10.00 

" Bride. Bridesmaid 4.00®l.5.00 

" Meteor 6.00@15 00 

" Liberties 12.00®25.00 

Carnations - l.SOfa' 6.00 

Lily of the valley ■ 3.00W 4.00 

Smilax 12.50®, 15.00 

Adiantum 1,00® 1.35 

Asparagus, strings 30.00®50.00 

Asparagus Sprengeri 2.00® 4.00 

Sweet Peas 50® 1.00 

Violets 30® 1.25 

Lilies 12.10(420.00 

Mignonette 3.00® 5.00 

Romans, Paper White 1.00® 3.0O 

Tulips 2.00® 4.00 

Lilac 1 .00® 1 .55 

Pansies and Daisies 300® 3.C0 

Daffodils S.OC® 4.00 

Freesias 1.50.9 3,00 

Cincinnati, Feb. 18. 

Roses, Beauty 2.00® 6.00 

" Bride, Bridesmaid 4,00(tt'lo,00 

" Liberty 4.00(12110.00 

" Meteor, Golden Gate 4.00(("Ii.OO 

Carnations 3,00(i!i 6.00 

Lily of the valley 3.00(i» 4.00 

Asparagus 50.00 

Smilax 12 50@15.00 

Adiantum 1.00(si 1.50 

Violets 75(0) 1.00 

Narcissus S.OOftii 4.00 

Romans 3.00(9 4.00 

Harrisii per doz., 2,00 

Callft 12.50@I5,00 

Sweet peas, Blanche Ferry 1.00 

St. Louis, Feb. 18. 

Roses, Beauty, long stem 3.OO@4.0O 

" Beauty, medium stem... 150(92.00 

" Beauty, short stem 50® .75 

" Bride,' Bridesmaid 4.00(3*10.00 

" Golden Gate JOO'* 8,00 

Carnations 1 ,00® 5.00 

Smilax 12.50@15,(JO 

Asparagus Sprengeri 1. 00® 3,00 

Plumo'sus 35.00@75.00 

Ferns per 1000, 2.00®2.50 

Violets, single go® ] .00 

Narcissus Paper White 3.00(gt 3 00 

Valley 3.00(iu 4.00 

Romans 2.00® 3.00 




J. B. DEAMUD, 

WnOlFSAlP CUT flOWCRS 



51 Wabash Ave., 



CHIC^VQO. 



Caldwell's Kwalitu Kounts Brand 

CONSTANTLV ON HAND. 



PRICE LIST. Per Doz 

Beauties. 30 to 36 inch stem M.OO !0 I 5.00 

20 to 24 inch stem ., 3,00 

15 to 18 inch stem l.,SO to 2.00 

12 inch stem..., 75 to 1.00 

Per 100 

Liberty and Chatenay 6. 00 to 10.00 

Jtridesand Bridesmaids 600 to 10.00 

Meteor and Golden Gates 6.00 to 10.00 

CurnHtions 2.00 to 4.00 

fancy *... 30Uto 5.00 

Valley 2,00 to 4.00 

Violets, double 50 lo 1.50 

single 50 to .75 

Asparapus Pluraosus — per string, 25 to 50c 

Aspanipus Sprengeri Sprays 2.00 to 4.00 

Ferns, fancy »3.00 per 1000 .30 

Smilax 12.50 to 15.00 

Adijintura I.OO 



ROSES, 
CARNATIONS, 
BEAUTIES, 
VALLEY. 



Pittsburg Gut Flower Co., Ltd. 

Wholesale Tlorists and Supplies. 



504 Liberty St., 



PITTSBURG, PA. 



Flease mention the A nterican Florist when writing. 



FANCY 



OUR SPECIALTY. 

TELEGRAPH ORDERS FILLED 
PROMPTLY. 

THOMPSON CARNATION GO. 

JOLIET. ILL. 



OF ALL 
KINDS 



CUT FLOWERS 

and F^lox>ls«a' JSvipiplles. 

Galax, bronze or green. 75c per 1000. Leucothoe 
Sprays. 50c per 100. Sphagnum Moss, Fernt. 

Wire Work of all kinds for llonsts. Special 
attention fjiven to shipping orders. 

U/M MIIDPHV CommlKlon Dialer, 

TflTI. in UH rill, 130 E. 3d St., CINCINNATI, 0. 

Telephone, 980 Main. 

Mease mention the American Florist when writing, 

C. 1^. KUEHN, 

Wholesale Florist. 

1122 Pine St., ST. LOUIS, MO; 

A ComDlMa Li»* »• wui.,, Dedgns. 



Chas. W. McKellar, 



Wholesale Commission Florist 



-AND DEALER IN- 



ALL FLORISTS' SUPPLIES. 

51 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

Long Distance 'Phone Central 359B. 



Correspondence invited from growers of special- 
ties in Cut Flowers. 

Please mention the American F'o> i.-t :i hen writings 

Brant & Noe Floral Co., 

GROWERS OF 

Gut Flowers at Wliolesale. 

Careful attention given shipping orders. 

58-60 Wabash Ave.. CHICAGO. 

H.G.BERNING 

Wholesale riorist 

1402 Pine St., ST. LOUIS, MO* 



RENNICOTT BROS. COMPANY 

WHOLESALE COMMISSION FLORISTS 



42-44 E. Randolph St., 



AND DEALERS^IN. ALL FLORISTS' SUPPLIES, 
A.T OHIOA.OO IWi:A.ieiC^X YtAJT^lSi^, 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



1904- 



Th E American Florist. 



135 



Longiflorum Lilies for [aster 

Last year we had the best Lilies on this market and the stock this 
year, from the same growers, promises to be even better. To be 
sure to be supplied with tirst-class stock l;t us book your order now. 

$13.00 per 100. $125.00 per lOOO. 

500 at 1000 rate. 

All Cut Flowers in Season. 

£• C. SMLING, 

The Largest Best tquippel and Most Centrally Located 
\^h lies lie Cut Flower House in Chicago. 

CHICAGO, ILL 



32-34-36 Randolph St., 

Long Distance 'iVIophones 1978 and 19i7 Central. 



CURRENT PRICE LIST. 

American Beauty. Per iloz. 

Lou^ stemmeu ; $.5 00 

30 inch stem 4.00 

^4-inch stem 3.00 

20-iuch stem 2.50 

15-inch stem 2 00 

12-iDch stem 1.50 

Short stem SS.OO to $8.0J per 100 

Per 100 

Brides and Maids $6.00 to SIO.OO 

Meteors and tlates 6-OT to 10.' 

Liberty 6.00 to 15.00 

Carnations 2 OO 

large and fancy 3.00 to 6.00 

Violets .' 75 10 lOD 

Vallev ; 2.00 to 3.' 

Daffodils, Paper Whiles 2.00 to 4. CO 

Tulips 2.00 to 5.0J 

Callas. per doz lfl..50 to $2.00 

Harrlsii per doz.. ^i.i'O 

Asparagus, per striug, 35c to .50.; 

Asparagus Sprengeri 3. CO to 6.00 

Ferns per lO 0. «f..50 .35 

Galax per It 00, 1.00 .15 

Adiantum 1. 00 

Sniilax perdoz., $-J00 15.r0 

Leucoihoe Sprays .75 

SUBIfcCT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. 



Bassett&Washburn 



76 & 78 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO. 

Cut Flowers 



<FkotM«le Dealers and 
Growers ol I 
CKEENHOUSES: HINSDALE. ILL. 

Please vientiov the A merican Florist when writing. 



WEILAND AND-RISCH 



CHICAaO'S RELIABLE 

Wholeiale Growers and Shippert ol 

OUT FLOWERS, 
59 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

SSMD FOB WSBKLT PBIOB LIST. 



WHOLESALE FLORISTS 



Please mentwn (he American Fiorisi 7vhrn writing 

FRANK GARLAND, 



Wbolesalo 
Qrower 



of Cut Flowers 



«^EOIAL ATTENTION -J-lt fp. wr y WT- ajj. 

easVEN TO HARDY OUT -"^ .»V.B^.i-^H^ 

65-57 WABASH AVENUE, 
OCslephone Central 3284. CHi:C^A.QO. 

Fiease mention the American Florist iL-licn writing. 

A. L. RANDALL GO. 

Wholesale Florists, 

19 & 21 Randolph St., CHICAGO. 

Send for weekly price list and 

special quotations on 1000 lots. 

Flease mention the A mericari Florist when writing. 



MICHAEL 



Winandy 

"•Mi^p-err, CUT FLOWERS 

60 WABASH AVE., C\^\r I^CC\ 

Telephone 3967 Central. V^rUV-AVJW. 

Please mention the American Florist -when zwUtng. 

WIETOR BROS. 

"tSSS. « Cut Flowers 

All telegraph and telephone orders 
given prompt attention. 

5t Wabaah Avenue, CHICAGO. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing 



J. A. BUDLONG 



WHOLESALE 

GROWER of 



cut FLOWERS 



37-39 Randolph Street.^HICAGO. 
Bosea and 
Carnations 

A Specialty...... 

BENTHEY & CO. 

35 Randolph Street, CHICAGO 

F. F. BEHTHEY, Manager. Wholesale and 

Consignments Solicited. 



Commission 



PLORISTS 



r 



HOLTON & HUNKEL CO., 

"Wholesale Cut flowers-- 



457 Milwaukee Street. 



MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



Wbol^ale power/\arK^ 



Chicago, Feb. 19 

Roses, Beauty, 30 to 36-in. stems 3.00® 5.00 

20 to 24 " 2.60 

15 to 18 " 1.50® 3 00 

12 " . 1.00®1.25 

Liberty 600® 8.00 

extra select 10.00® 15.09 

Chatenay 600@13.00 

Bride, Bridesmaid 6.00@10.00 

Meteor, Golden Gate 6.00@10.00 

Carnations 2.00® 3.00 

fancy 3.00® 5.00 

Valley 200@ 4.00 

Asparagus Plumosus, per strine 25 to 50o 
sprays 2.00@4 00 

Sprengeri 3.00® 600 

Violets, double 75® L.'^O 

single 50® .75 

Lcucothoe Sprays 1.00 

Galax Leaves, Bronze, per 1000, 1.5'i .15 

Green, „ „ 1.00 

Adiantum 1.00 

Fancy Iern3...per 1000 2.50® 3 50 

Smilax 12.50@15.00 

Callas 1.50® 2 00 per doz. 

Harrisii 2.00® 2.50 



SINNER BROS. 

Wholesale Growers flllT CI AllfEDC 
and Shippers of UU I rLUllClld 
68 WABASH AVENUE, CHICAGO, ILL. 

With the Flower Telephone- 

Growers' Co. Central 3067. 

All telephone and telegraph orders 

piven prompt attention. 



GEO. REINBERG, 

•".ST.. Cut Flowers 

CHOICE AMERICAN BEAUTIES. 

We will take care of your orders at 
reasonable prices. Prompt attention. 

51 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO, ILL. 

Poehlmann Bros. Co. 



Wholesale Growers of 



aid 

Dealers 



.« Cut Flower5 

A.11 telegraph and telephone orders ^ 

given prompt attentloiL 35^3/ 

Gbbenhoubes: Randolph SirM^ 

Morton Grove, III CHICAOO. ILL> 

Michigan Cut Flower Exchange, 

WM. DILCER, Mgr. 



All Cut Flowers in Season. 

26 Miami Ave., DETROIT, MICH. 



American Florist Advertisements 
Work Every Day. 



136 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 20, 



LeoNiessen 

WHOLESALE FLORIST. 

f^r^%°SJ°r.i"t^.Toot'.'^'.-" 1217 Arch Street, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Gardenias, 
Freesias, 
Pansies. 



FLOWERS FOR EVERY DAY 



AND FOR EVERY OCCASION. 
QUANTITY UNLIMITED. 

QUALITY UXCELLED. 



WE ARE OPEN FOR BUSINESS AT 6:00 O'CLOCK A. M. WE WANT YOUR TRADE. 



J. K. ALLEN, 



THE PIONEER 
HOUSE, 



106 West 28th St., New York. 



GEO. A. SUTHERLAND, 

Best Boston Flowers. 
All Florists' Supplies. 

Distributing Depot for the KORAL LETTERS. 

TELEPHONE 1270 mm. 34 flawlcy St., BOSTON. 



NiFM^CARTHY&Co:, 




^:3^^f^,^^S»;^S^^ 84 HAWLEY STREEl 

I, ^MOT^n^'i^^s.%o^V^.»<^^ BOSTON. 



CITY HALL CUT FLOWER MARKET, 

15 Province St., BOSTON, MASS. 



WELCH BROS. 

Best Flowers. Large Variety. Prompt Stiipmeots. Careful Packing. 



THOMAS YOUNG, Jr. 

WHOIFSAIF Fl PRIST. 

CHOICEST CUT FLOWERS. 

43 W. 28th St., NEW YORK CITY. 

Piease mention tn^ a mf^-uu,^ f-innsi -umm v/ritine 

fiEORGE SALTFORD, 

WHOLESALE FLORIST. 

46 W. 29th Street, NfW YORK. 

Tel. 3393 Madison Square. 
Specialt;*s: VlOlErS AND CARNAIiONS. 

Consignments of any good flowers solioitsd. 
Please mention the Ar^'-'ican Florist when writing 

N.Y. CUT FLOWER EXCHANGE 

Coogan BIdg. 6th Ave. and W. 26th St., New York. 
Open f.ir Cat Flower Sales at 6 o'clock 
Every Morning 

DESIRABLE WALL SPACE TO RENT FOR 
ADVERTISING. 

JOHN DONALDSON. Secretary. 



N.Lecakes&Go. 



^BHF B3 W. 28lh St., and 46 W. 29th St. 

"^BB Also at 

■^F 26th St. ard 34th St. Markets 

'^ New York. 

FERNS, GALAX LEAVES, LEUCOTHOE SPRAYS 

OUR SPECIALTIES 

GREEN AND BRONZE GUAX LEAVES, 

75o per 1000; 86.00 and $6 50 per case of 10 000. 
Holly, Princess Pine and all kinds of Evergreens. 

Telephone 1214 Madison Square. 
Please mention the A m^^ican Florist when writing. 



Wbol^ale f[ower/\arKjfe 

Boston, Feb. 17. 

Roses, Beauty, extra 30.00@.'>n.00 

medium 10no6-'O00 

" " culls 30'@ 8.00 

" Bride. Bridesmaid 4 00@ li 00 

" extra 8UU^J2no 

Liberty 4,onoiu00 

Carnations 1 00® 2.i 

Fancy 3ro@ 4.00 

Violets 30® 50 

r.ilv of thevallev 3 Ot® 3 00 

Hairisii lilies 6.00® .? 00 

Siuilax.. 10.01 1® 16 00 

Adiantum 75® 1.00 

Asparapns 3500@51.0O 

Roman Hyacinths, P. W. narcissus l.fO® 9.f 

L>alfodils 1.00® 3.00 

Tulips 3.0 @ 3.0 J 

Philadelphia. Feb. 17. 

Roses, Tea 4.00® 8 00 

" extra I;0ii@l500 

" Beauty, extra 35 00®60 00 

'• " firsts I« 00® 5.00 

" Queen ol Edgely, extra 35,00®.50.00 

firsts ie.0i@2S.0O 

Carnations 2.00® 8.00 

Violets, single 40(§> 60 

double 51)® 1.10 

Lilvof th- valley 3.00® 6.00 

Haffodils 30(.® 4.'0 

Tulip 3.0'®400 

Freesia 3.00a» 6.00 

Lilac 5)@ 3.0J per bunch 

Asparagus 2.i.00@50,00 

Smilax 13.00®15 00 

Buffalo, Feb. 18 

Roses, Beauty 5.on@EO.00 

Kride. Bridesmaid, Meteor 4.UO®13 00 

Carnations 2.00® 6.00 

Harrisil 15.00 

Lily of the valley 3.00® 5.00 

Asparagus, strings 4n.on®50.00 

Smilax 12 50(3)15.00 

Adiantum .5u® 100 

Violets 30® I. in 

Callas 8. 00® 12.50 

Sweet Peas 60® 1 .i 

Please mention the American Florist 
everv time you write to an advertiser. 



SOUTHERN SMILAX. 

No. 1 quality only $5 50 per cii«e of 50 lbs. Re 
sure and trv it when you warn Smilax. CALAX, 
bron/e or gri>en. 15i: per lOtO. Disfouut on large 
orders. LAUREL FESTOONING, No. 1 quality, 
4c. 5c and 6c |)er yard. AKvavs nu hand and Inrg"* 
orders filled at short notice. FANCY or DAGGER 
FERNS, SlSOper 1000. 




Millington, Maaa. 

TeL office, New Salen. 
Long distance telephone connection. 

SMILAX and REAUTIES CHEAP. 

500 Beauties, SVi-inch pots, well branched, 
16,00 per 100. 

2,000 Smilax 314-iDoh, stocky plants, 12.00 per 
100. Cash with order. 

Quality of plants auarantead. 

ROSEMONT GARDENS. "°'^^a°l°a'""^- 

RICE BROTHERS 
128 N. 6th St., MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Wholesale Cut Flowers and Supplies. 

Wild Smilax I ^^is^riVtliVc'l" 

Shippers of choice Cut Flowers and Greens of all 
kinds. Try us. 

Laurel Roping 

OLIVER L.TRONNEM.Vineland, N.J. 



Flowers of All Kinds. 



Write Us rror 
i^rloes. 



OPEN FROM 7:00 A. M. TO 9:00 P. M. 



THE PHILADELPHIA WHOLESALE FLOWER MARKET, 1224 Cherry Street, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



1904. 



The American Florist. 



137 



JOHN I. RAYNOR 

ARE THE BEST PRODUCT OF THE BEST 
GROWERS FOR THE NEW YORK MARKET. 



Ailantum Croweanum 

Sold here Exclaslvely. 



49 W. 28tli Street, NEW YORK. 

Tel. 1998 Madison Square. 



YOUNG & NUGENT 

Telephone 2065 Madison Sq! nh0l6S3l6 llOriSlSi 

CATTLEYAS. GARDEMUS. VIOLETS, ROSES. CARNATIONS and all seasonable 
novelties. \Vith our long experience in shipping, and competent assistants 
in our packing department, we are in a position to guarantee out-of-to\wn 
castomers who place their orders with us that they will not be disappointed. 



Walter f. Sheridan, 

Wholesale Florist , 

Telopbon* 002 Uadlaon Bqiuua. 

39 West 28th St.. NEW YOBK. 

Telephone No. 756 Madison Square, 

MOORE, HENTZ & NASH 

Wholesale Commission Florists. 




65 and 67 West 26th St. 



NEW YORK CITY. 



Advice ot sate note daily. Statement slo^ check 
weekly. All consignments, large or small, recAve the 
same attention. CORRESPONDENCE INVITED. 



VIOLETS. 



WILLIAM GHORMLEY 



VIOLETS : 

9 Commission I 



i Wholesale 

Daily Receiver and Shipper ol Fresh Cut Flowers. j 

Orchids, Roses, Carnations, Valiey, Lilies, etc. : 

57 West 28th Street, NEWYORK CITY. • 



Telephones 2200 and 2201 Madison iSquare. 



JOHN YOUNG, 

Special American Beauties, 

Surpassing Carnations, 

Lily of tlie Valley, Orchids 

and all Seasonable Flowers. 

51 West 28th St., NEW TOR^ 

Telephone 1905 Madison Sqnnre- 

■ M> RftuOCNIZtO HtAuyUAXTtRS IN 

NEW YORK CITY FOR 

Violets and Carnations 

■ROWERS and BUYERS make a DOte of tbii. It 
will be to your advantage. 

WM. H. GUNTHER, 
Weit 29tli St., New York. 

Telephone 651 Madtion Square. 

Frank Millang 

Bpen from 6 a. m. to 5. p. m. 



Cit Flower Exchange, 

Pbone S9S Madison Square. 



55-57 W. 26th St. 

NEW YORK. 



ESTABLISHED 1872. 



JOHN J. PERKINS, 

COMMISSION FLORIST, 

Solicits Consignments or Shipping Orders. 

Satisfaction given in both. Tel. 956 Madison Sq. 

115 W. 30Bi St., Hew York. WW 48 W. 30tli St. 

Bonnet Bros. 

WHOLESALE FLORISTS. 

66 and 67 w. 26th St. New York. 

Cut Flower Exchange, J-^JC" a vi ■>» 
OPEN 6:00 A. M. 

ta Uaequalled Outlet for Consigned Flowers. 



Choice Carnations. 



delected Roses. 



Traendly&Schenck 

NEV YORK QTY, 
38 W. 28th Street, Cut Flower Exchange. 

Mew Telephone No. 768 & 799 Madison Sq. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing, 

Wbol^ale [lower/arK^ 



New York, Feb. 17. 

Roses, Beauty, best 35.00(asn.00 

medium 8.00@I5.00 

culls 1.00® 3.00 

Bride. Bridesmaid, G. Gate 3 00@15.00 

Liberty 3.00(3)35.00 

Carnations 1.00@ 3.00. 

fancy and novelties 4.00(a H.OO 

Lily of the valley 1.00® 3,00 

Lilies. Callas 6.C0@10.0O 

Violets 25@ .40 

special 50@ .75 

Smila.t 6.00@12.00 

Adiantum 35© .75 

Asparagus a'i.OOSBO.UO 

Cattleya Hercivalliana 40 00(350.00 

Decdrobium lormosum 30.00@40.00 

Mignonette 1 (0@ 4.00 

Roman Hvacinths 50@ 2.00 

Tulips.. .r l.C0@ 3.00 

Narcissus l.COim 2.00 

Gardenias 25.00@50.00 

Freesia 10(S^ .15 per bun. 

Charies IMillang 

WHOLESALE FLORiST. 

Conservatory connected from whicti can ship 
fei-ns and decorative plants promptly 

50 West 29th St. NEW YORK 

Tel. 2230 Madison Square. 

Please mention the A merican Florist -when writing. 



FORD BR05. 

Receivers and Shippers of 

Fresh Flowers 

111 West 30th St . NEW TOBE. 

Telephones 3870-3871 Madison Sq. 

REPRESENTING EMINENT GROWERS. 

Julius Lang 

53 West 30th Street, I^EW YORK. 

COMMISSION DEALER in FLOWERS 

Telephone 280 Madison Square. 

ALEX. J. GUTTMAN, 

Wholesale Commission Florist, 

A full supply daily of the choicest 

New York and New Jersey 

FLOWERS. 

52 W. 29th SIreat, NEW YORK CITY 

Telophone 1738 Madison Square. 

the; 

NEW YORK GUT FLOWER CO. 

55 and 57 West 26<h St., 

WHOLESALE FLORISTS. 

Daily Rapons. Weekly Payments 

Telepbonb J. A. MILLANQ, 

756 Madison Sq. 



M ANAGEB 



CARNATIONS "' 



Specialty. 



CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. 
Prompt Payments. Established 1 80 1 

55 W. 28th St. 
) New York. 



Alfred H. Langjahr, 



Telephone 3924 Madison Sq. 



EDW. C. HORAN, 



55 WEST 28TH STREET, 



Telephone 421 
Madison Square. 



.NEW YORK. 



Cyi F LOWERS AI W HOLESALE. 



138 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 20, 



INTERNATIONAL FLOWER DELIVERY. 



[S 



NEW YORK. 



Steamer Gifts 

Orders for flowers in any form 
carefully filled and delivered by 
special messenger on board any 
steamer on day of departure from 
New York. 

THOS. YOUNG, JR. 

43 W. 28th St., NEW YORK CITY. 

Please mention the Am 'zcan Florist when writing. 



NEW YORK. 



ALEX. McCONNELL, 

546 Fifth Avenue, 

C" 45th. St. Nw New York City 



TELEGRAPHIC Orders forwarded to any part 
of the United States, Canada and all princi- 
pal cities of Europe. Orders transferred or en- 
trusted by the trade to our selection for delivery 
on steamships or elsewhere receive special atten- 
tion. Cable AddreM: ALEXCONNELL. 

WESTERN UNION CODE. 

TELEPHONE CALLS: 340 and 341 38th Street. 

Please mention the A met tcan Florist when writing 

LONDON. 

COMMISSIONS 
CARRIED OUT in LONDON 

or any part of Croat Britain. 

Messrs. WILLS & SEGAR will attend to 
any commission from American florists for 
the supply of Cut Flowers, Birthday Flowers, 
Bouquets, High Class Floral Designs, etc. to 
their clients who may be traveling in England. 

Ulii I C P CCPAD Court Plorlstt totals 
IVILLO Ob OCUAn, Malesty, The King. 

ROYAL EXOTIC NURSERY. 

TiLESRAHs, Onslow Crescont, South Kensington, 
FLO8CUL0. London. LONDON, ENGLAND. 

LOS ANGELES. 

Orders for Los Angeles and Southern Calilornia 

Will be ailed bv 

£• J. VAWTER 

GROWER AND DEALER 

522 So. Spring St. ■ Los Angeles. Cal. 

INDIANAPOLIS. 

BertermanD Bros. Co., 

FLORISTS, 

24. i»i.i>4;n!liusettsAve., INDIANAPOLIS, IHu. 

«T. LOUIS. 

Fred. C. Weber, 

FLORIST, 

432(> 4328 Olive St., SL LOIIS, MO. 

ablished IS73, Long DIsL 'Phone Lindell 196 M 



PASSENGER STEAMSHIP MOVEMENTS. 

The tablf 8 herewith g^tve the schednled time of departure of ocean steaiushlpfl carry- 
logr first-class passeugers froiu the principal American and foreign ports, covering the space 
of two weeks from date of this Issue of the AMERICAN FLORIST. Much disappointment 
often resalts from attempts to forward flowers for steamer delivery by express, to the care 
of the ship's steward or otherwise. The carriers of these packages are not Infrequently 
refased admission on board and even those delivered on board are not always certain to 
reach the parties for whom they were Intended. Hence florists In Interior cities having 
orders for the delivery of floivers to passengers on out-golog steamers are advised to 
intrust the filling of such orders to some reliable florist in the port of departure, who 
anderstands the necessary details and formalities and has the facilities for attending to 
it properly. For the addresses of such firms we refer onr readers to the advertisements 
on this page: 



FROM 


TO 


STEAMER 


•LINE 


DAY 


DUE ABOUT 


New York 


Liverpool 


Campania 


1 


Sat. 


Feb. 27, Noon. 




Mar. 5 


New York 


*» 


Etruria 


1 


Sat. 


Mar. 5, 8.00 a. 


m. 


Mar. 11 




Glasgow 


Saxonia 

Siberian 


1 
2 


Tues. 
Thur. 


Mar. 1, 9:00 a. 
Mar. 3, 11:00 a. 


m. 
m. 


Mar. 2 


New York 


Mar. 13 


New York 


Genoa 


Prinz Oskar 


3 


Thur. 


Feb. 2S, 10:00 a. 


m 


Mar. 11 


New York 


Hamburg 


Patricia 


S 


Sat. 


Feb. 27, 1:30 p. 


m. 


Mar. 8 


New York 




Moltke 


3 


Thur. 


Mar. 3, 10:00 a. 


m. 


Mar. IS 


New York 


Copenhagen 


Island 


4 


Sat. 


Feb. 27, 2:00 p. 


m. 




New York 




United States 


4 


Wed. 


Mar. 2, 2:00 p. 


m 




New York 


Glasgow 


Furnessia 


6 


Sat. 


Feb. 27, Noon. 




Mar. g 


New York 


London 


Menominee 


6 


Sat, 


Feb. 27, 9:00 a. 


m. 


Mar. « 


New York 




Minneapolis 


6 


Sat. 


Mar. b, 8:00 a. 


m. 


Mar. IS 




Liverpool 

Alexandria 

Liverpool 


Cret c 

Romanic 

Cedric 


7 
7 

7 


Thur. 

Sat. 

Wed. 


Mar. 3, 1U:30 a. 
Feb. 27, 6:00 a. 
Feb. 24, 11:00 a. 


m. 
m 
m. 


Mar. 10 


Boston 


Mar. 16 


New York 


Mar. 2 


New York 


■ • 


Majestic 


7 


Wed. 


Mar. 2, 10:00 a. 


m. 


Mar. 9 


New York 


Southampton 


Philadelphia 


S 


Sat. 


Feb. 27, 9:S0 a 


m. 


Mar. 4 


New York 


• ' 


St. Louis 


8 


Sat. 


Mar 6, 9:30 a. 


m. 


Mar. 12 


New York 


Antwerp 


Zeeland 


9 


Sat. 


Feb 27, 10:30 a. 


m 


Mar. 7 


New York 


*' 


Finland 


9 


Sat. 


Mar. 5 10:30 a. 


m. 


Mar. 14 


New York 


Havre 


La Touraine 


10 


Thur. 


Feb. 25, 10:00 a 


m 


Mar. 6 


New York 




La Champagne 


10 


Thur 


Mar. 3, 10:00 a 


m. 


Mar. 13 


New York 


Rotterdam 


Staatendam 


11 


Tues. 


Feb. 23. 




Mar. 4 


New York 


G^noa 


Sardegna 


12 


Tues. 


Feb. 23, 




Mar. 8 




• » 


Citta di Milano 


12 


Tues. 


Mar. 1, 




Mar. 15 


New York 


Bremen 


KronprinzWilhelm 


13 


Tues. 


Feb. 23, 10:00 a 


m* 


Mar. 1 


New York 




Koenigen Louise 


13 


Thur. 


Feb. 26, 10:00 a 


m. 


Mar. 6 


New York 


t( 


K. Wil. DerGrosse 


13 


Sat. 


Mar. 6, 10:00 a 


m. 


Mar. 12 


New York 


Genoa 


Prinzess Irene 


13 


Sat. 


Feb. 27, 11:00 a 


m. 


Mar. 11 


New York 


Naples 


Neckar 


13 


Sat. 


Mar. 6, 11:00 a. 


m. 


Mar. 18 


Boston 


Liverpool 


Winifred ian 


14 


Wed. 


Feb. 24, 3:30 p. 


m. 


Mar. 6 


Boston 




Bohemian 


14 


Wed. 


Mar. 2, 10:30 a 


m. 


Mar. 18 



*1 Cunard; 2 Allen-State; 3 Hamburg-American; 4 Scandinavian-American; 5 Anchor Line; 
6 Atlantic Transport; 7 White Star; 8 American; 9 Red Star; 10 French; 11 HoUand-American; 
12 Italian Royal Mail; 13 North German Lloyd; 14 Leyland; 



DETROIT. 



lOHN BREITMEYER'S 
SONS— 

Cor. MIAMI and GRATIOT AVES. 

DETROIT, MICH. 
Artistic Designs. j*^^.j* 
Kigh Gr^de^ut Blooms. 

We cover all Michigan points and good sections 
of Ohio, Indiana and Canada. 

CHICAGO. 

P.J.HAISWIRTH 

Auditorium Snnex, 

._ CHICAGO. 

Mail, telegraph or telephone orders filled 
promptly in best style. 

DENVER. 

PlORAl DfSIGNS AND riOWERS, 



Best Quality on Shortest Notice. 

DANIELS & FISHER, '^^^' 

OrJer hv mail, telephone, telegraph or (Mble. 
Cable address: "Daniels Denver." 



DENVER. 



T 



he Park 

Fforaf Co. 

J. A VAtENTINE. DtNygR, COLO. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

TELEPHONE MAIN I0?3 . 

SIEVERS & BOLAND, 

Floral Artists, 



33 Post Street, 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



J.M.McOULLOUGH'SSONSE 

WHOLESALE \ 



FLORISTS 

ALSO BCCCBSSOKS TO 

THE CINCINNATI CUT FLOWER CO. 



\ CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. | 

^ Special Attention Given to Shipping Ordari. F 
I 316 WALNUT ST. CINCINNATI. OHIO. \ 

*'^ir'o^r'i'Tn'*ini'^rn-<("ir«'«i"i'M''i"i'Mi'|..,rtr»i'M'*ii-t 



PLACE TOUR NAME. 



&nd your specialtiei before the pniobsiing florittt of the entire country 
by sdvettiiing in ^^ 

msHoAoMT.Not,. THE AMEBICAN FLORIST. 



rgo4. 



The American Florist. 



139 



INTERNATIONAL FLOWER DELIVERY. 



STEAMSHIPS LEAVE FOREIGN PORTS 



Liverpool 

Liverpool 

Glasgow 

Genoa 

Hamburg 

Hamburg 

Copenhagen . . 
Copenhagen . . 

LoodOQ 

Loadoa 

Liverpool .... 
Alexandria ... 

Liverpool 

Liverpool 

Southampton. 
Southampton.: 

Antwerp 

Antw^erp i 

Havre 

Havre 

Rotterdam 

Genoa 

•Genoa 

Bremea. : 

Bremen 

Genoa. — . — 

Genoa 

ILiverpool 

Liverpool 



TO 



New York 



Boston 
New York 



Boston 



STEAMER 



Lucania 

Umbria 

Corinthian 

Prinz Adalbert 

Graf Waldersee 

Bluccher 

Helig Olav 

Norge 

Marquette 

Mesaba 

Cymric 

Republic 

Oceanic 

Celtic 

New York 

St. Paul 

Vaderland 

Kroonland 

La Lorraine 

La Bretagne 

Noordam 

Lombardia 

Nord America 

K. ■Wil. Der Grosse 

Kaiser Wilh. II 

Konig Albert 

HohenzoUern 

Cestrian 

Devonian 



1 

1 

2 

3 

3 

3 

4 

4 

6 

6 

7 

7 

7 

7 

S 

8 

9 

9 

10 

10 

11 

12 

12 

13 

13 

13 

13 

14 

14 



DAY 



Sat. 

Sat. 

Sat. 

Sat. 

Sat. 

Sat. 

Wed. 

Wed. 

Thur. 

Thur. 

Thur. 

Thur. 

Wed. 

Wed. 

Sat. 

Sat. 

Sat. 

Sat. 

Sat. 

Sat. 

Sat. 

Mon. 

Mon. 

Tues. 

Tues. 

Thur. 

Thur. 

Sat. 

Sat. 



Feb. 
Mar. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
Feb. 
Mat. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
Feb. 
Mar. 



37 

6 
27 
27 
27 

5 
24 

2 
25 

3 

3, 4:39 p. m. 

3, 3:00 p. m 
24, 3:30 p. m. 

8, 3:30 p. m, 
27, Noon. 

5, Noon. 
27, 10:00 a. m, 

5, 3:00 p. m. 
27 

5 

5 
22 
29 
23 

1 
25 

3 
27 

S 



DUE ABOUT 



Feb. 26 
Mar. 11 
Mar. 8 
Mar. 13 
M,r. 8 
Mar. 16 



Mar. 6 
Mar. 13 
Mar. 10 
Mar. 21 
Mar. 2 
Mar. 9 
Mar. 6 
Mar. 11 
Mar. 7 
Mar. 14 
Mar. 8 
Mar. 15 
Mar. 15 
Mar. 8 
Mar. 15 
Mar. I 
Mar. 8 
Mar. 9 
Mar. 16 
Mar. 8 
Mar. 15 



• See steamship list on opposite page. 



PETER REiNBERG 

51 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO. 

Wholesale Cut Flowers 

LARGEST GROWER 

IN THE WORLD. 



Current Price List. 



AM. BEAUTIES, long stems. 
" 30-iii. 

20-24 " 
15-18 



Per Doz. 

$5.00 

■1.00 

12.50 to 3 00 

1 50 to 2.00 



" Shortstems l.CO to 1.25 

Per 100 

SUNRISE $4 00tollC.OO 

CHATENAY '. 6 00 to 12.00 

BRIDE 500 to 800 

BRIDESMAID 5.00 to 8 00 

PERLE S.OOto 8.00 

CARNATIONS 3.00 to 4.00 

ROSES. OUK SELECTION 4.00 

All flowers are perfectly fresh and properly packed. 

No charge for P. and D. on orders over $5. 



Pleai-^ tf!^j!;:ou the A mei ican Flo) ist -.chen an iting. 

Daffodil and Jonquil 

blooms. Dev 100. JI.OO per 1000, $8.00. 
■WILD SMILAX. per 50 pound case. $2.00, 

F. & S. LEE, IMARION, ALA. 



GALAX LEAVES, ETC., ''t,^- 

Galax Leaves, Green and Bronze, per 1000. ...% .60 

Cut Fancy :ind Dagger Ferns, per 1000 1.00 

Leucothoe Sprays, Oreen, per 1000 3.00 

Red, per 1000 6.00 

Rhododendron Sprays, per 1000 5.00 

Largest dealer in the U. S. Orders filled 
promptly. Send cash with order. Send 50c for a 
nice cane, cut from the famous mountains of N. 
C. Nicely varnished, crooked or straight. Men- 
tion length desired and variety of wood — hicliory, 
rhododendron, wahoo, poplar, striped maple, etc. 
Grand souveuier, besides useful. Try one or more. 

J. N. PRITCHARD, Elk Park, N. C. 

GALAX... 

Bronze or green, 75c per 1000, in 2,000 ots orl 
more. Lsuoothoe Spray*, green, 90c per 100. 
Soulharn Smllax, fresh stock, per 50-lb. case, 
36.00; per25-Ib. case, 13.50. Crasn Shaet Moss, 
choice stock, $2.50 per barrel sack. Spagnum 
Moss, $1.75 per large bale. 

FLORIST' SUPPLIES of Every DESCRIPTION. 

Tel. 597 Madison L. J. KRESHOVER, 

Square. 110-112 W. 27th St., New York. 

It is good business policy ^ ^ ^ 
to mention tlie *^ "^ •^ 

American Florist 

\A/hen vou write to an advertiser. 



E.FJinlersonCo. 

Successors to 

McKellar & Winterson. 
ESTABLISHED 1894. 



We are handling the cut ol Rudd's 
"PHYLLIS," the grand new pink— and 
new Seedling White (unnamed, but 
a "crackerjack") carnations. These 
arrive daily — get a sample shipment, 
but give us a day or two notice, as 
we sell them out as a rule in advance 
ol arrival. Price. Phyllis, 6c: White 
Seedling, 4c. 

FANCY EASTERN VIOLETS. The best 
that come into this market, $1.00 
per hundred. 

EXTRA FINE HARRISM BLOOMS, 12c 

to 15c. 

FANCY FREESIAS, 3c to 4c. 

A daily supply Ironi 34 GROWERS 
enables us to take care of shipping 
orders to the buyers' advantage. 

Get our Weekly Price List. It Is free and 
worth your while. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Galax Leaves and all Greens. 

"SIPERIOR QUALITY" 

WILD SMILAX 

(NONE BETTER.) 

ALWAYS ON HAND. 

We carry the most complete line of 
Florists' Supplies in tbe \Vest. Catalogue free. 
Address all correspondence to 

45-47-49 Wabash Sve., 
CHICAGO. 



Orchids! ^ 

Just arrived in superb condition, a large ship- 
ment of DENDROBIUM NOBILE. most useful for 
florists; also Dend. Chrysanthum and others. 
To arrive, Cattleya Trianse and C. Gisjas. 

Lager & Hurrell, summit, n. j. 

Orchid Growers aud Tmporterw. 




WILD SMILAX. 



ORDER DIRECT 

FROM HEADQUARTERS. 



We carry the finest and most complete stock of Florists' Hardy Supplies, 
Dasger and' Fancv Ferns, $1.50 per lOOU. A No. 1 quality. Bron'-^e and Green 
Galax, $1.00 per 1000, A Xo. 1 quality. Southern Wild Ejmilax.SO pound case. $7.00. 
25 pound case. $3.50 per case. Laurel Festooning, good and full. 5c and 6c per 
vard. Leucothoe Sprays, $1.00 per 100. Green Moss, $1.00 per bbl.; 75c per bag. 
Sphagnum Moss. $1.00 "per bbl.; 5 c per bag. Order by mail, telf^rjiph or tele- 
phone will receive our personal and prompt attention. Long Dis 'Phone 2618 Main. 

HENRY M. ROBINSON. No. 11 Province St., BOSTON. MASS. 



THE CLEVEUND CIT FLOWER COMPANY 

SUCCESSORS TO 

BATE BROS. AND THE F. R. WILLIAMS COMPANY 

CLEVELAND, O. 

Send Your Stock to Us on CDmmission 



52-54 High St., 



BOTH PHONES. 



We Carry a Full Line of Florists' Supplies and Make Wire Designs. 

WRITE FOR OUR WEEKLY PRICE LIST 



140 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 20, 



The gEEE) Trsde. 



AMERICAN SEED TRADE ASSOCIATION. 

S. F. W illnril, Pros.: J. Cluirk-s .Mi-CuHoucli. 
First Vice-Pros.; C. E. Kendel, Cleveland, O., 
Sec"y and Treas. 

Twenty-second Annual convention. St. Louis. 
Mo., June 21-24, 1904. 



S. D. Woodruff & Sons, of Orange, 
Conn., now have a branch at 82— 84Dey 
street, New York. 

The St. Paul News devotes half a col- 
umn or less to a lost carload of seeds 
belonging to D. L. May & Co. 

Clearbrook, Wash. — One grower of 
bulbs here has matured 100,000 seeds of 
hyacinths, tulips and narcissi. The win- 
ter has been wet and warm. 

It is reported that the Jones onion set 
loss by fire and water, approximately 
6,000 bushels, has been settled by an 
allowance of something like 2,200. 

John Degnan, with the E. F. Winter- 
son Company, Chicago, takes exception 
to the advertisement of seedsmen who 
offer fifteen per cent discount to private 
gardeners. It is, in his opinion, in line 
■with fake patent medicine advertisement 
and should not be printed. 

At the Columbus convention of can- 
ners the members of the Canned Goods 
Brokers' Association made their tem- 
porary organization permanent. J. M. 
Paver, of Baltimore, Md., and D. H. But- 
ton are respectively president and secre- 
tary. The Atlantic States Packers' Asso- 
ciation elected Willard G. Rouse, presi- 
dent, and H. P. Cannon, of Bridgeville, 
Del., secretary. 



Union Set Supply and Market. 

It is reported that Chicago and vicinity 
now holds the main supply of onion sets 
not sold on contract. Prices are about 
as stated in our last issue, or a trifle 
firmer. The Jones loss by fire and water 
was 5,000 or 6,000 bushels, on which 
salvage, if any, is doubtful. 



Not Statesmen, Ijut Seedsmen. 

In the house of representatives February 
5 Sheppard, of Texas, and Lind, of Min- 
nesota, made a strong fight against the 
free seed bill. Sheppard said: "If the 
congressional comedy continues, con- 
gressmen will no longer be statesmen, 
but seedsmen." 

Shafroth, ot Colorado (of whom we 
shall later supply further information), 
supported the bill. Sheppard's amend- 
ment, proposing to distribute only rare 
and untried seeds, was lost. We shall 
give the names of those voting to con- 
tinue the distribution in a later issue. 



Import Values of Seeds and Bulbs. 

The difiiculties attending the fixing ol 
values at time of shipment have been 
partly met by the assistance of appraisers 
themselves. This is now prohibited by 
the letter below. This leaves the importer, 
no matter how honest he may be, entirely 
in the hands of the customhouse authori- 
ties, and he is expected to pay duties on 
values at date of shipment even though 
he may have bought twenty-five per cent 
less by contract. The careful business 
man is thus fined for the improvidence of 
his careless competitor. 

The trouble here is two-fold. First, the 
law is old and out of date and not in 
accord with the present contract methods 
of seed and bulb buying, and secondly 



the law is not justly administered, being 
interpreted by the letter instead of the 
spirit. Many of the items mentioned are 
not grown and cannot be grown in 
America and should not be dutiable any- 
way. The government itself imports 
similar seeds and bulbs iree of duty and 
gives them away. All in all, matters 
could hardly be worse. 

Treasury Department, February 9, 19'4. 

Sir; — Referring to the department's letter, 
addressed to you under date of .July 13, 1901, 
wherein, owing to tbeallegied inability of import- 
ers of nursery stock, such" as seeds and bulbs, to 
inform themselves as to the forcif^n raurkct value 
at time of shipmcLt and to the perishab'e nature 
of the goods and other excei)tional circumstances 
attending such importations, you were authorized 
to supply importers with data relating to the 
different foreign market values of such merchan- 
dise, without, however, miking any suggestions 
as the value to be declared on entry, I will state 
that the department is in receipt of information 
to the effect ihat there seems to be no good reason 
why importers fchould not be as familiar with the 
foreign market value of seeds, plants and bulbs 
as importers are with the value of other goods. 

It appears that frejuently where merchandise 
of the character in question is raised under con- 
tract the contract price is accepted as the foreign 
market value; Ihat in a year when there is an 
abundant crop the contract price may represent 
the true foreign market value, but that should 
th^re be a partial failure in Ihe crop the contract 
l>rice may not represent such value. 

In this connection, it further appears that it has 
been the practice at one or more ports to average 
invo-ce values in order to arrive at the foreign 
market value of goods of the above description, 
which practice is disapproved. 

In view of the foregoing, it is hereby directed 
that the practice aforesaid be discontinued. 
Robert B. Armstrong, 
Assistant Secretary. 



Los Angeles, Cal.— The Ocean Park 
Floral Company, E. J. Vawter, president, 
has sold its retail store at 224 W. Fourth 
street to T. H. Wright, who has been 
manager of the store from its installa- 
tion. Mr. Wright will continue busi- 
ness at the same place under his own 
name. 

Lancaster, Pa. — A house of geranium 
cuttings in Albert M. Herr's range was 
frozen this week. The steam pipes were 
all in working order and in use, but the 
wind formed a rebound and it was 
impossible to heat the house. Nothing 
else on the place was hurt. A. M. H. 



LILY OF THE VALLEY. 


FINEST BERLIN PIPS, for Early Forcing, 


$12.00 per lOCO: $30.00 per case 2500: 


$1.60 per 100. 


These are strong pips, well rooted and give 


best satisfaction. 


FINEST CUT VALLEY ALWAYS 


ON HAND. 


H. N. BRUNS, 


VALLEY SPECIALIST, 


1409-1411 W. Madison St., CHICAGO. 



Our Mr. Harry van Koolhergen will have the 
pleasure to call on the trade during the months 
March, April and May, trusting you will favor 
him with your orders like last year. Our 1904 
ca-alogue will interest >ou, which we send to 
anvbody free on application. 

DE CRAAFF BROS. Ltd., Uulb Growers and 
Merchants. Special growers of Tulips, Daffodils, 
Hyacinths ana all kinds of miscellaneous bulbs- 
and plants. Leidan, Holland. 

Chafer's Hollyhock Seeds. 

In six superb double colors. 75c peroz.; 40c per 
■4-oz. Allegheny Holljhocks. SI. 00 per oz.: 60c per 
H-oz. Finloiia Double Hollyhocks, Mew, Sl.ro per 
oz. Single Hollyhocks, 10 distinct colors, 60j per 
Vi-o'- New Hydrangea, .leanne d'Arc, white 
flowered and red branched. 4-in. pots. 40c each; 
J3.00 per doz.; fine for florists. Cash please. 

JOHN CHARLTON & SONS, Rochester, N. Y. 

MIXED GLADIOLUS 

About one halt choice Groff's Hybrids, others 

select from best of different strains. Large range 

of colors and markings. Per HO Per 1000 

Light and white $1.'25 $10.00 

Medium and dark 103 8 00 

All colors 80 6.00 

10,000... 5.00 

F. A. ROWE. Conneaut, O. 

GLADIOLI. 

Having more small gladioli than 1 wish to plant. 
I offer about 500,000 at following prices: 

PerlOOO 

Groff's hybrids, '"j to %-\i\. diam .^2 56 

Groff's hybrids, % to fi-in. diam 1.50 

Groff's hybrids, M to =8-in. diam l.OO 

May and Lemoine's hybrids, same size as 
Groff's, at 82.00, $1.25 and 76o per 10(0. Gladioli, 
in fine mixture, all classes, %-\-\ti., $1.50; %-\- 
in.,$1.00; 5i-»g-in..50c per lOOc. The smallest of 
these will generally flower the first year, under 
favorable conditions. Hulblets of Gladioli, per" 
bushel at low rates. 

Jsmene calathina, small bulbs, $3.00, $1.00 and 
50c per 100, according to size. 

EY Tasc CentrevHIe, 
• I • I Caa^ Ind. 



ASPARAGUS 
^\ cNA^ffUSS/ 



WE INVITE COMPARISON OF OUR SEEI> 
W UK OTHERS. SAMPLES SUPPLIED. 



Important to private gardener? 

The system of allowing Private GardcDersa discount on tluM ran Dual purchases 
of seeds has become almost universal; in fact, they have been gradually educated 
to expect it. We are offering this season 

I A Special Discount of 15% 



ON ALL GENERAL SEED ORDERS AT OUR GARDEN GUIDE PRICES 

Which are quoted as low as any rt-liable seed grower otfers. Also, we deliver by 
fre ght or express prepaid to New York, lioston. Baltimore, Washington, Pitts- 
burg, Cincinnati or St. Louis. Garden Guide mailed free on application. 

SEED GROWERS, 



ROBERT BUIST COMPINY, 



J 



igo4. 



The American Florist. 



141 



DREER'S Summer Flowering Bulbs. 

Two Great Tuberous Rooted Bedding Begonias 

DUKE ZEPPELIN and LAFAYETTE 

See colored illuslration of these two varieties on cover of our new 190* 
rataloKue; they are the most brilliant among all ihe liegonias and invalua- 
ble eitber as pot plants or for bedding:. 

Duke Zeppelin, Pure Kich Scarlet, 15 cents each; $1.50 per dozen; S12.00' 
per 100, 

Laiayette, Brilliant Crimson Scarlet, 25 cents each; J3.50 per dozen; 
118.00 per 100. 

NEW HYBRID FRILLED TUBEROUS BEGONIAS 

A unique Torra with llowers of immense size, with wavy or frilled 
petals similar to the best forms of single pttunias, 25 cents each; $2.50 per 
dozen; $20.(j0 per 100. 

GLOXINIA CRASSIFOLIA GRANDIFLORA 

A very fine selected strain, strong, well-matured bulbs. Red, White, 
Blue, Red with white border. Blue with white border, in separate colors or 
in choicest mixture, 50 cents per dozen; $4.00 per 100; $35.00 per lOOC. 

MISCELLANEOUS BULBS 




TUBEROUS ROOTED BEGONIAS. 

Single Flowered, Scarlet. Crimson, White, Yellow, Kose and Orange, 
40 cents per dozen; SS.'O i.er ICO; 135.00 per 1000. 

Choicest Single Flowered In Mixture, 35 cents per dozen; J3.50 per 
100; Sii.OO per 1000. 

Double Flowering, Scar et. Rose, White and Yellow, 65 cents per 
dozen: *:i.00 per 100: $40.00 per 10"0. 

Choicest Double Floweilog in Mixture, 50 cents per dozen; $4.00 per 
100: 435.00 per 1000. 



Amaryllis Formosissima 

Johnsonii 2.00 

Amorphophallus Rievierii 2.00 

Caladium, Fancy Leaved, 25 named sorts 1 25 

Choicest Mi.xture 1.00 

Esculentum, 6 to 8-inch bulbs 40 

Esculentum, 8 to 10- nch bulbs 65 

Esculentum, 10 to 12-inch bulbs 90 

Esculentum, 12 to 13-incb bulbs 1.85 

Hyacinthus Can dicans 30 

Ismine Calathina 1.60 

Lilium Auratum, 8 to 9-inch 76 

9toll-incb 1.00 

11 to 13-inch 1.7S 

Lilium Speciosum Album and Rubrum, 7 to 9-inch . . .90 

Glaciolus, American Hybrids, choicest mixture 15 1.00 9.00 

Groff's Hybrids, choicest mixture 35 2.50 22.00 

Madeira Vines , 80 2.00 15.00 

Montbretias, 5 choice named varieties 26 1.'75 12.50 

Tigridia ConchiHora, Grandiflora Alba aud Pavonia 30 2.00 15.00 

Tuberoses, Double Pearl, selected, 6 to 8-inch 20 1.00 8.0O 

Double Pearl, fine, 3 to 4-inch 10 .60 S.OO 

For a complete list of all seasonable Bulbs including the best list of 
up-to-date Dahlias, see current Wholesale Price List. 



Per Doz. Per 100 Per 1000 
30 $ 2.00 $15.00 
15.00 
16.00 
10 00 

8.00 

3.00 

5.00 

7.00 
10.00 

2.00 
lO.CO 

5.00 

8 00 
14 00 

7.0O 



HENRY A. DREER, 714 Cliestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 




NEW LARGE-FLOWERING GALLA 

CALLA DEVONIENSIS. 

Blooming Callat From Seed In One Year 

100 seeds. 75c; 1000 seeds, $6.00- 

Penlstemon, Vaughan^s 

NEW LARGE FLOWERING. 

This is a much improTed strain of these 
beautiful flowers. The flowers are large, very 
numerous, in shape like a Gloxinia and are 
borne on long stems. In color they vary from 
pure white, pink, rose and crimson to 'mauve 
and purple, including many which are beauti- 
fully edged with a fine contrasting: color. If 
this seed is sown in January, February or 
March, in a fairly warm place, the plants will 
bloom in Summer and Fall— Splendid cut 
flowers also suitable for pot culture. Height, 
3 feet. 1-4 oz., $1.00; pM., 50c. 

Vaughan's Seed Store, 



CHICAGO. 

84-86 Randolph St. 



NEW YORK, 

14 Barclay St. 



Pitase mention tke American Florist when writing. 




ALPHONSE BOUVIER. 
ALSACE. 
AUSTRIA 
BLACK BEAUTY, $7.00 per 100. 
BASSETTS RED. «3.00 per 100. 
CHARLES HENDERSON. 
CRIMSON BEDDER. 

DUKE OF MARLBOROUGH. 
EGANDALE, $3.00 per 100. 
FLORENCE VAUGHAN. , 
UNLESS NOTED $2.00 per 100; $18.00 per 1000 



Strong Root Pieces, 
averaging 2 to 2 
eyes. 



MME. CROZY. 
MRS. KATE GRAY, $5.00 per 100. 
PRES. CARNOT. 

PRES. CLEVELAND. 
PROGRESSION. 

QUEEN CHARLOTTE. 
ROBERT CHRISTIE. 

SAM TRELEASE, $4.00 per 100. 
SOUV. DE ANTOINE CROZY. 

WRITE FOR PRICES ON LARGE LOTS. 



The Storrs & Harrison Co., 



Faiuesville, 
Ohio. 



Please mention the A merican Florisl wlien writing. 



. . . Civ:iviVA.s . . . 

F. Vaughan, J. C. Vaughan, EgaDdale, Chns. Henderson, A. Bouvier, Burbank, Souv. de Antoine 
Crozy in variety, $1.50 per lUO: $12.00 per ICOO. ALTERNANTHERA, the new Brilliantlssima, 
finest of all, $1.(0 per dozen; $S.CO per 100. BOSTON FERNS, 2V4- inob, ready (or 4-ineh, J3.50 per 100; 
3-inch, $8.01 per ItO; PIERSON FERN, 3V4-iiioh, ready for 4-incb, «IU.0n per 100; S-inob, fine, 5fc. ASP. 
PLUMOSUS, 2>4-inch, extra Bne, J3.5U per 100. ASP. SPRENCERI, 2>.J-inch, $3.00 per 100. CARNA- 
TIONS, Queen Louise, R. C. $1.25 per 100; $10.00 per 1000. COLEUS, 15 varieties, 3-inch, $3.00 per 100. 



CASH 
PLEASE. 



A. J. BALDWIN, Newark, Ohio. 



Please mention the A mericin Florist -when writing. 



Cannas««. 

Chas. Henderson, Chicaeo, Papa. McKin 
ley. Alphonse Bouvier, Florence Vaugban, 
Eeandale, C. D. Cabos. Strong healthy 
tubers, 3-3 eyes true to name, $1.75 per 100; 
$15,00 perlCbO. 

PAUL MADER, E. Stroudsburg, Pa. 



Cannas««« 

A collections of best varieties, dry roots at 
$13.50 per 1000; lO.OJO for «IOO.OO. Names of 
varieties on appliaation. 

C, G. NANZ, Owensboro, Ky. 



SUCCESSFUL SELLERS 

Arc the lueccuful erowen who Advertifc injtjfjtjtjtjtjtjt 

^m •TT AMERICAN FLORIST. 



142 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 20, 



The i^URSERY TRfii^E. 

AM. ASSOCIATION OF NURSERYMEN. 

N, W. HiLE, Knoiville, Tenn., Pres. ; Prank 

A. Weber. St. Louis, Mo., Vioe-Pres.; George C. 
Sbaser, Rochester, N. Y., Sec'y. 

Tweutv-ninth annual convention, Atlanta, Ga. , 
June. 19W. 

OwATONNA, Minn.— L. P. Lord & Com- 
pany have sold out to T. E. Cashman 
■who will continue their business in con- 
nection with his nursery trade. O. 

Menominee, Mich. — E. L. Parmenter 
intends to engage in the nursery business 
extensively next spring. He has a farm 
on the county road just outside the city 
limits. 

AuEHicus, Ga.— P. D. Hill & Son are 
planting lemon hedges in this vicinity 
and it is expected that they will make a 
good screen and produce fruit at the 
same time. 

Wichita, Kan.— Owing to the increas- 
ing demand the Wichita Nursery has 
recently purchased eighteen acres on 
Arkansas avenue, and will plant it in 
nursery stock. 

Riverside, Cal. — The Riverside County 
supervisors have passed a law giving the 
County Board ot Horticultural commis- 
sioners power to destroy all nursery 
stock imported from any place, where 
peach yellows, peach rosette, phyloxera, 
red spider or white fly prevail. 

Guthrie, Ok. — The Oklahoma Horti- 
cultural society elected the following offi- 
cers for the ensuing year: President, J. A. 
Taylor, Wynnewood, I.T.; vice president, 
R. kleiner,'Wheatland,Okla.; secretary, J. 

B. Thoburn; assistant secretary, J. Carl 
Gilbert, Stillwater, Okla.; treasurer, N. B. 
Williss,Eason,Okla. The society adopted 
a resolution asking that the next legisla- 
ture enact a law to eradicate diseases in 
orchards, that officers of institutes in 
the difterent counties be empowered to 
enter orchards tor this purpose, the 
expense to become a lien on the property. 
The society will be reincorporated as the 
State Horticultural Society of Oklahoma. 



New Bedford, Mass. 

February 11 the Florists' Club met at 
the Mansion House hotel. One new 
member was admitted. There was an 
interesting discussion on the newer varie- 
ties of carnations. At the close of the 
meeting the club was treated to a nice 
supper given by the retail florists. 

We are again in the grip of an Arctic 
wave. So much cold and cloudy weather 
is beginning to shorten up greenhouse 
crops. There is considerable funeral 
work, but transient trade is poor. Bulb- 
ous stock and violets go slow at low 
prices. 

On February 9 the New Bedford Horti- 
cultural Society held its regular meeting 
with a large attendance. Two new 
members were admitted. H. F. Burt, of 
Taunton, gave a talk on the origin and 
development of the dahlia. 

W. G. Kroeber has returned to New 
Bedford and is at work for Wm. P. Pierce. 

H. .\. John has moved his store to a 
better location. 

Philadelphia Rambler. 

The new forcing rose, strong field plants, 
$15.00, $20.00 and $30.00 per 100. 

CRIMSON RAMBLER. 

Extra well branched, $8.00, $11.00 and $15.00 
per^lOO. 



n 



NOW IS THE TIME TO ORDER 



Tiie Conard & Jones Co,, 



WEST GROVE, 
PA. 



Per 100 

Exochorda'Grfl , 18 to 24-inoh, bushy J 8.00 

Lonicera. H Bel^ica and Heckrotti, 3 to 

4 feet. bushy.. 8.00 

Ampelopsis Japonica, 2V4-inch pots....... 4.00 

Cedrus Deodara.lEi to 18-inch 25.00 

Cedrus Deodara. 39 to 34-inch 30.00 

Oranges, best sorts, griifted, bearing size 

13-Inch, bushy, 4-inch pots 20,00 | 

Ligustrum Amurense, true. 3 to 3-feet branched... 

Writs lor Wholaaala and 



I'er 100 

Oranges, 1-5 to 18-inch, 5-inch pots 30.00 

Lemons, grafted, 18 to 34-inch, 5-inch 

pots 30.00 

Kentia Belmoreana, latol 5 inch. 5 leaves 18.00 

Latania, 15-inch, 3 to 4ch. leaves 20.00 

Phoenix Canariensis, 15 to 18-inoh, 3 to 3 

leaves, showing character 15.00 

Not less than 50 of a kind at above prices. 
perlOOO, S30.00 



Dascrlpllve Catalogua. 



►. J. jbb^i«ok::xj:^vivs oo., (inc.) 

FRUITLAND NURSERIES. 
Established 1856. A-UGUSSTA., OA.. \ 

Please rnenlion the A merican Florist when writing. 



etc., have been theetaodard of eicellencfl for half a 
century. The best always cheapeHt. Have hundreds 
ot carJoad»of 




Fruits and Ornamentals. 



40 acres of Hardy Roses ind 
famous Crimson Kambler. 44 



1.1 me 4r..!ilH"l of the 
<>r Falms, 



FicQs, Ferna. Roses, etc. ('orrf*-<ii'tii'lMrice solicited. Cataloeue free. 5Uth year. ICXXJ acres, 

THE STORRS & HARRISON CO., Box 260, Painesvilie, Ohio. 



f lease meniion tne Atnerica?t Florin. 



SEND TO 



Easfern Nurseries, 

VINCA MINOR 



JAMAICA PUIN, 
MASS. 



FOR 



FINE LARGE CLUMPS. 



FOR SALE CHEAP. 



August Rolker & Sons, 

IMPORTERS OF 

Palms, Bay Trees. Auracarias, etc. Decorative Plants 
for spring delivery; Lily of tlie Valley, Lilacs, Forc- 
ing Bulbs, etc. for fall delivery, Raffia for Nursery- 
men and Florists. Address 

31 Barclay St. or P. 0. Box 752, NEW YORK. 

Please mention the Amei ican Flm i.st 7vhe)i willing. 

J. DIJKHUIS & CO. 

BOSKOOP-HOLLAND. 
QUALITY. QUANTITY. 

Ask our prices for 

AZALEAS, RHODODENDRONS, PEONIES, 

ROSES, HARDY EVERGREENS, 

CLEMATIS, Etc. 
Prioa List Frae on Application, 

KOSTER & CO. 

Hollandia 
Nursarlos 

HARDY AZALEAS, BOX TREES, CLEMATIS, 

CONIFERS, HYDRANGEAS, PEONIES. 

Pot-Grown Plants for Forcing, 

RHODODENDRONS, H. P. ROSES, Etc. 

No Agents. Catalogue free on demand. 
Please mention the American Flo> ist when waiting. 

When in Europe come and see us and inspect our 
extensive Nurseries. Gouda is our railroad depot. 

HARDY. FANCY ORNAMENTAL NURSERY STOCK. 

J. Blaauw & Co., 

BOSKOOP, HOLLAND. 

Catalogue free on demand. Headquarters for the 
famous ColoradoBiue Spruces, purest, blueststrain 

Please mention the American Florist when zvriting. 



Boskoop, Holland. 



Send to 



THE MOON 

ComjJ.^ray 

For \ Trees, Shrubs, Vines 
Your) and Small Fruits. 

Descriptive Ilhisi.r,ated Catalogue Free 
THE WM, H. MOON OO. 
Morrisvllle, Pa. 

Please mention theAmei ican Floiist uhen writing. 





Mrs. Winters 



The World's Best 

White Dahlia. 
$18.C0 per 100. 

Inijeborg lOgeland, 
the best scarlet 
cactus. $.T 00 per 
doz. Other novelties and standards. Also 20000 
double field-grown Hollyhocks in separate colors 
of red, white, pink, yellow and maroon, J3,00 per 
100. Gladioli and hardy plants. Send for cata- 
logue before ordering'. 

W. W. WILMORE. The Dahlia Specialist. 

Box 382, DENVER, COLO. 

CALIFORNIA PRIVET. 

Per 1000 

210.000 2 yrs., 2 to 2i4 ft., very bushv $30.00 

l.iO.OOO 3 yrs.. 18 to 24 in., very hushy 16.00 

lOO.OO'i 3 vrs., 13 10 18 in., very bushy 10.00 

3(10.000 1 yr., 13 to 18 in., brariclied.," 9.00 

300,000 1 yr.. 10 to 13 in., branched 7.fO 

lUO.cOO Cuttings, 8 in., strons; 80 

1(0.000 Cuttings, 8 in., light fiO 

.\lsohave a large stock in Asparagus Roots. 3 vrs.. 
Palmetto and Barrs. 30.0i Canna Roots. 50.C0O 
Tuberose Roots. 5,0)0 Geraniums. 3V4 pots, all good 
stock and low prices. Write for trudc list. 

J. H. O'HACAKI, Little Silver, N. J. 

Please mention tlie A ntri iran Fl"i i^t 7uhen 70 i.'ing. 

Do Your Eyes Hurt 

When vou look upon the floweriut^ of jour 
bulbs? Why not let th'-m shine witli delight by 
buying your bulbs from 

JOHN SCHEEPERS. 

Member ot R. Schoo & Co., Bulb Growers, Hille- 
gom, (Hollandj. Write to-d:iy. 

136 Water Straet, NEW YORK. 

DAHLIAS 

We make a specialty of Dahlias and grow in 
large quantities all the leading novelties and 
standard varieties. Wrif<* for price list. 

WA6NER PARK CONSERVATORIES, 



igo4. 



The American Florist. 



143 



300,000 Unrooted Carnation Cuttings... 



WHITE. 



Per 100 Per lOCO Per 5000 



QUEEN LOUISE $ .55 $ 5.00 J.23.00 

NORWAY 55 5-00 23.00 

PINK. 

ARGYLE 55 5 00 23.00 

MERMAID 55 500 23.00 

MARQUIS 55 5.00 23 00 

LAWSON 1.00 8.00 35.00 

CRESSBROOK 75 6 00 25.00 

SUCCESS 1.00 8.00 35.00 

CRIMSON. 

HARLOWARDEN 1.50 12.50 50.00 

GEN. GOMEZ 55 5.00 23.00 



YELLOW. 



Per 100 Per 1000 Per 5000 



GOLDEN BEAUTY $ ,75 $ 6.00 

ELDORADO 55 5.00 

GOLD NUGGET 60 525 

VARIEGATED. 

VIOLINIA, 4-inch bloom, fine 6.00 50.00 

MARSHALL FIELD I.50 12.5O 

STELLA 1.50 12.50 

MRS. 8RADT l.OO 7.50 

ARMAZINDY 55 5.00 

SCARLET. 

AMERICA 55 5.CO 

MRS. P. PALMER 55 5.00 

APOLLO 55 5.CO 



$25.00 
23.00 
25.00 



60.00 
60.00 
35-00 
23.00 

23.00 
23.00 
23.00 



Cash or C. O. D. with privilege of examination. Express prepaid at above prices. 

SEE R. O. CARNATION PRICES IN BACK ISSUES. 



California Carnation Co. 



LOCK BOX 
103. 



LOOMIS, CAL. 



SPECIAL OFFER 

Carnation Cuttings. 

READY FOR SHIPMENT. 

Having a surplus of these varieties will make 
«p«dal price for 15 days. Our stock is perfection 
and free from disease. 

Pink Per 100 1000 

Lawion $1.50 $12.50 

Joott 1.35 10.00 

Marquis 125 lO.CO 

Oorothy 1.60 

White. 
Innocence 1 50 



White. Per 100 1000 

Glacier $1 50 .114.00 

White Cloud. 1.25 lOOO 
Flora Hill... 

Scarlet. 
Crane 

Variegated 
Prosperity... 



1.25 10 00 
1.50 14.00 



1.50 1200 
novelties 



PptlinlaC Double fringed. Ten 
IClUllluo. from Dreer's latest sets. Labeled 
Strong R. C, J1.25 per 100. ^fCASH. 

cCiikrAnlliniC Best bedders in pink, salmon. 
'UCI aillUlliO. and scarlet, labeled, rooted cut- 
tings. .$1.75 per 100. 

The W. T. BUCKLEY PLANT CO., 

SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 

FUCHSiaS... 

Strong 2i4-inch plants, ready now. LITTLE 
BEAUTY, $5.00 per 100. LORD BYRON. $4.00 
per 100. 

S. S. SKIDELSKY, 

708 North I6lh St., PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

Carnations. 

Fine, strong, well-rooted cuttings now ready. 

CNCHANTRESS. .$6.00 per 100; S50 fO per lOCO. 
LILLIAN POND, S5.00 per 100; J40.00 per lOOu. 
THI QUEEN, .Ian. delivery, S5 per 100; S40 per 1000. 

LARCHMONT NURSERIES, Larchmont, N. Y. 



CARNATIONS "*^ 



Clean, Healthy, Well Rooted Stock. 



Cuttings. 



Per 100 1000 
Flora Hill..$l.SO $12.60 
Prosperity.. 2.50 20 00 
Lawson.... 2.50 
Marquis. . . . l.'jd 

Melba 1.50 

Dorothy... 3.00 
McKinley... 3.00 
E.Crocker.. 1.50 

G. Lord 1.75 

Mrs. Nelson 3.60 



20.00 
15.00 
12.50 
25.00 
25.00 
12.50 
15.00 
30 00 

We also have a few of 1903 variet 
not listed. Write for information. 



Per lOO 

Crane $2 00 

America 2.00 

G. Beauty.. 5.00 

Gaiety 3.0O 

Gov. Roose- 
velt 3.00 

HarlowardenO.OO 

Joost 1.75 

Chicago.. .. 2.00 



1000 
$13 00 
15.00 
40 00 
25.00 

25.00 
50.00 
15.00 
15.00 



The MISMI FLORAL CO., 
CARNATION CUTTINGS. 

Per 100 1000 

Enchantress 16.00 $50.00 

Queen 5.0J 40.00 

Lillian Pond 5.00 45.00 

Prosperity 2.50 20.00 

Lawson 2.50 20.U0 

Crassbrook 2.50 20.00 

Challenger 2 50 29.00 

Fair Maid 3.00 25.00 

Harry Fenn 5.00 40.00 

Gen. Maceo 2.50 2O00 

Queen Louise , 2.0O 1500 

Bradt 3 00 25.00 

C. WARBURTON, Fall River, Mass. 

CARNATIONS. 

So.ooo ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

The profitable ones to grow for Cut Flowers. 
Our stock is exceptionally fine. List of varieties 
and prices on application". 

C. AKEHURST & SON. 

WHITE MARSH, MD. 



-HOOTED- 



CARNATION CUTTINGS. 



Per 100 

G. H. Crane $350 

Mrs. Lawson 2.OU 

Mrs. .Toost ] 5Q 

Ethel Crocker 1..5') 

\Vm. Scott 150 

Flora Hill ;;,■ i,yi 

Queen Louise | 50 

Norway I'sg 

Casti or C. 0. 0. 

8T. LOUIS CARNATION CO., Clayton, Mo. 

ROOTED CARNATION CUTTINGS. 



10(0 
S20.0O 
17.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
13 50 
13.50 
13.50 



From strong, healthy plants. 100 

Enchantress * $6.C0 

The Queen \ g'oo 

Fair Maid 4,00 

Gov. Wolcott '.*'.' 4I00 

Boston M arket 4.00 

Mrs. T. W. Lawson 3.00 



1000 
$50.00 
50.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 



HENRY A. STEVENS CO., Dedham, Mass. 



For Future 
Delivery. 



Orders Booked Now 

Rooted Cuttings and Plants of Rose Queen 
01 Edgely, (Pink American Beauty). Write for 
prices. 

EDWIN LONSDALE, 

Wyndmeor, Chattnul Hill, PHILADELPHIA. 



Larse flowernis. 6 distinct kinds, per doj., 
t2.0J; per 100, *16.00. Will bloom for spring sales 
if potted now. PEONIES, 10 choice, distinct 
kinds for florists, three whites, early, medium, late, 
*1,50 per doz.: SlO.iO ICO. H. POROSES, dor- 
mant, own roots, $1.50 per doz; $12.00 per 100. 
PANSIES, transplanted, the very finest, $1.50 

P"'^° F. A. BALLER, Bloominglon. III. 



UCCESSFUL SELLERS 

are the SHCcessful growers wbo advertise In TliE AMERICAN FLORIST. 



144 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 



20, 



Our Pastimes. 



Announcements of coming conteatB or other 
events of interests to our bowline, shooting and 
sporting readers are solicited and will be given 
place in this column. 

Address all correspondence for this department 
to Wm. J. Stewart. 42 W. 28th St., New York. 
Robt. Kift, 1725 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa.; 
or to the American Florist Co., Chicago, 111. 



At New York. 

The Florists' Bowlinjj; Club had a prize 
contest last Monday evening. The 
accompanying scores give no intimation 
as to the prizes accompanying them. 
Some got neckties; others got sausages; 
but we draw the veil. 

Player. 1st 2d 3d 

Butterdeld 147 106 121 

Shaw 147 116 119 

Siebrecht H8 166 131 

Bennett 162 lU 122 

Hafner 134 168 96 

Smiih. 147 13.5 146 

Traendly 152 89 1(8 

Sampson :l5i 12! 130 

Gibbs 116 191 152 

Mansfield 138 120 173 

Guttman 113 125 1?9 

Lenker 73 97 

Nugent 92 141 

John Young 116 

At ChicafO. 

The regular weekly meeting of bowlers 
was held Tuesday evening at the Geroux 
alleys. The following tells the story in a 
nutshell: 

Player 1st 2d 3d 

V. Kreitling 168 160 131 

Stevens 181 197 173 

Huebner 121 203 141 

Degnan 115 172 161 

Bergman 139 141 128 

Balluff 150 523 

Geo.Soott 141 138 145 

E. F. Winterson 113 173 106 

L.Kill 98 122 93 

Day 191 149 126 

W. "Kreitling. .- 110 122 

LADIE8. 

Player 1st 2d 3d 

Mrs. Kill 126 109 101 

Mrs. Maisel 97 75 119 

Mrs. Hauswirth 87 82 130 

Mrs. Winterson 79 98 73 

Mrs. Scott 91 ,55 51 

Mrs. Kreitling .110 84 108 



Minneapolis. 

The weather conditions are steadily 
improving and the last seven days have 
been busy ones with the retailers. Car- 
nations are the only flowers appearing in 
any number. Tea and American Beauty 
roses still are backward. Bulbous stock 
is scarce and a heavy demand is main- 
tained. Violets are in good supply and 
demand as well. Hans Pracker is mar- 
keting choice violets. A heavy funeral 
trade drains the market of white stock 



and the man with the early order is the 
only one who stands a chance of filling 
his needs. 

Ralph Lathom, employed in William 
Donaldson & Company's flower depart- 
ment, will sever his connection with the 
firm shortly and take charge of E. Nagel 
Company's store, which he has pur- 
chased. He will continue the plant busi- 
ness in his own name. This was Ralph's 
old place of labor and he expects to build 
up a good trade. He has the best wishes 
of all in his undertaking. 

The downtown store of the Minneapo- 
lis Floral Company especially the show 
window, has been a scene of grandeurthe 
last few days. Some choice azaleas, 
sword (erns and palms, arranged with 
vases of cut flower?, were used in the dis- 
play. The store is under the manage- 
ment of Miss Hannah Harven, who was 
formerly with A. S. Swanson. 

Walter Kerridge has been engaged by 
Miss H. B. Whittedthe last week arrang- 
ing some large decorations. 

A. J. Mendenhall has a choice display 
of cinerarias in his Sixth street window. 

Carl Johnson reports a good trade for 
St. Valentine's day. 

A. S. Swanson has had heavy funeral 
orders recently. C. F. R. 



Bridgeport, Conn.— John Reck, of the 
firm of John Reck & Son, has sailed for 
Germany with his daughter. The trip 



will be a short one, as he intends to 
return before March 1. 

Fremont, Mich.— R. L. Chamberlin 
has purchased the three lots east of the 
power house and is getting ready to 
move his greenhouses from the lake to- 
this location. 



Wanted. 

A few bushels of each of the following Beanst 

Bountiful, Longfellow, Yosemite Wax. 

Saddleback Wax. 

VAIIGHAN'S SEED STORE. ChiC3E0. 

Dealers and Florists 

Visiting Bermuda during tbe next 4 monlb» 
are invited to visit Lonebird farm and view ihe 
crop of Genuine HarrJs'i Lilies liow in bloom, tne 
finest ever sefn in Herrouda. 

Otfice Telephone 517, Residence 509. 

R. H. JAMES, Prop., St. Georges, Bermuda. 

F. J. Scott, 

Loyd, Ulster Co., N. Y. 

DEALER IN 

Orchid Peat, Sphagnum Moss and Leaf Mold at 

bottom prices. Sample on apphcation. 




4 Grades of 

TEA ROSES 

"Specials" 
"Selects" 



"1st" 

"2nd" 

The "Specials" are highest possi- 
ble quality in color, stem and foliage and 
are far superior to what are usually called "BEST." Price lo cents, 
The "Selects" are equally fine, but not quiteso large. Price Scents, 
The "Firsts" are goodstandardrosesinevery way at a popular price 
5 cents, The "Seconds" are good clean buds, with stems 6 to 9 
inches. Price 3 cents BEAUTIES, all grades at market prices. 
Garefut packing andshipiting to any distancom 

EMFt # F^ t^^t% O SOUTH PARK FLO 

nC.LLC.it OitU9mf NEW OASTLE, 



FLORAL CO. 

IND. 



THE ANNUAL FLOWER AND PLANT SHOW 

Under the Auspices of the 

Boston Co-operative Flower Growers' Association. 

Will take place at the BOSTON FLOWER MARKET, 

161-163 Columbus Avenue, ]BOSTOI^, :c^A.eS®. 

Saturday, February 27, 1904, from 9 O'clock A. M. to 5 O'clock P. M. 

Further particulars for intending exhibitors may be had on application to the Secretary. 

cojmxiittke; : 

WM. NICKOLSON, Chairman, E. SUTERMEISTER, GEORGE CARTWRICHT. 



'904- 



Th E American Florist. 



145 



CRUSADER... 

Best sarlet cirnation ever introduced or in sight. No stem rot; stron? grower; no splitting; extremely free; 3 inches 
long, strong stems. COME AND SEE IT. Price. $10.00 per 100: $80.00 per 1000. 



SEE OUR AD. ON THIS PAGE FOR OTHER VARIETIES. 



CHICiZ^GO CARNATION COMPANY, Joliet, III. 



Carnation 
Cuttings. 

Well Rooted. Ready Now. 

Per iro 1000 

Enchantress, light pink $5-50 $50.00 

Harlowarden, crimson 4.50 40.00 

Her Majesty, white 4 50 40.00 

Lillian Pond, white 4.50 40.00 

Pres. McKinley, dark pink 4.50 40.00 

Dorothy Whitney, yellow 4.50 40.00 

Gov. Wolcott, white 4 00 30.00 

Estelle, 5carlet 3.00 25 00 

Mrs. T. W. Lawson, dark pink 2.00 17.50 

Mrs. Higinbotham, light pink... 4 00 30.00 

Prosperity 2.00 16.00 

Boston Market 4.00 30.00 

fair Maid 4.00 30.00 

Marshall Field 5.00 40.00 

NEW VARIETIES, \°^^ir' 

Crusader, best scarlet $10.00 80 00 

Flamingo, fancy scarlet 12.00 10OO0 

White Lawson, pure white... . 12.00 10000 

iLady Bountiful, white 1200 100.OO 

Sand for pries lit! of abova and othar variatiat. 

Chicago Carnation Co. 

Please mention the A met icon Floi nt u/ien -wi iling. 

CARNATION CLTTINGS. 

We now have ready good, well-rooted Cuttings, 
'Crom the following varieties: 

lOJ inno I 100 1000 

Enohantrpss ....$6.C0 S50 | Eldorado S.'iiO S20 



Fair Maid 3.ro K I Manley 4.00 

Fragrance 6,00 50 I Adonis 4 00 

The Queen 5.00 40 I Lawson 2.50 

30 I Joost 2.5U 



4 00 

.■JOO 'O I Harlowarden.. 6 00 
Harry Fenn... 5.00 



Boston Market 
*Gov. Wolcott. . 

Bradt 3 00 35 I 

Prosperity 2.50 20 1 

NEW VARIETIES FOR 1904- 

100 1000 

Nelson Fisher 112.00 JIOO.OO 

■Mrs. M. A. Patten 12.00 100.00 

All selected cuttings from healthy stock. Send 
n your order now and secure early delivery. 

Lonic DIs Tel 
BILLERICA, MASS. 

Flease mention the American Florist when writing. 



BACKER & CO., 



-NEW LIGHT PINK CARNATION- 



ii 



NEW DAYBREAK" 



To the commercial grower who is looking for 
profit, this variety is all that its name implies, and 
will at once commend itself as the old Daybreak 
■reincarnated without its laults Color, true Day- 
break shade, of Daybreak and S'ott extraction 
through several ^generations o[ seedlings. Inherits 
the vigor and freedom of both the above varieties. 
Blooms, large, well formed and very sweet: does 
not have a washed out appearance at anv time of 
"the year. A fine keeper and shipper. Price. $3.00 
per do7.. : if I-J.OO per 100. ^U O.OJ pt-r KOO. OTHER 
NEW AND STANDARD VARIETIES. 

Chrysanthemums. Zl^i' 4"?^° zl 

best standard sorts. Write for Price List. 

H. WEBER & SONS, Oakland, Md. 



NEW WHITE CARNATION FOR 1904. 

The Bride 

This varietv was ths winner of the first prize for best 100 white at the Carnation 
Convention Show in Brooklyn last February and is unquestionably the best white in sight. 

PRICE, $2.50 per Dozen; $12.00 per Hundred; 
$100.00 per Thousand. 

JOHN N. MAY. Summit, N. J. 

Please mention the American Florist whenwriiing 



VE^PBR^i 



Finest white Carnation on Market this year; flowers 3 in. to 3V4 in., fine stem, free 
good keeper aod shipper, $1.60 per doz.: $10.00 pT 100, $75.00 per 1000. 250 at lOUO rate. 
Cutiings ready now. Also the folJowing standard varieties: 



Per 100 

Adonis $7.0) 

Enchantr<?ss 6 00 

McKinley 4 00 

Estelle 4.00 

Ntlson 3.60 



Per 1001 

$;o.oo 

.won 
30,10 
30.0J 



Per too 

Lawson $2.50 

Que>4n Louise 2.50 

Mrs. Bradt 2.50 

Floia Hill 2.00 

Mrs. Joost 1 50 



bloomer, 
, Rooted 

Per TOOO 
$20 00 
20.00 
30.00 
15.00 
12 50 



I 
I 

iWm. C. SMITH, 61st & Market Sts., Philadelphia. Pa^ 

Rooted Carnations. 



-CASH. NO C. O. D. 



The New Scarlet Carnation 

AMAZE 

A profuse Christmas bloomer, strong 

grower, heavy stem, flower intense scarlet 

and remarltable keeping qualities. Rootsd 
Cuttings ready February 1. 

PRICE: SI 0.00 PER 100; $75.00 PER 
1000 CASH. 

ORDER FROM THE GREENHOUSES, 

JEROME SUYDAM, 

riatbush, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

OR FROM THE AGENTS, 

SLINN & HUGHES, 

Coogan Building, NEW YORK CITY. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 

Rooted Carnation Cuttings 

PerlOO 

Enchantress $5 00 

Queen 4 00 

Fair Maid 2.50 

La vvson 2 50 

H. F. LITTLEFIELD, ""SSfS^"^ 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 



100« 
$10.00 
10.00 
15.00 
10.00 
10.00 



20.00 
13.S0 
9.0O 

12.00 



100 

Pori Hill, white $1.3J 

Quaen Louise, wliite 1.20 

Bon Honimo Richard, white 1.50 

Mri. P. Palmor. scarlet... 1.20 

G. H. Crane, scarlet 1.20 

ApoUo, scarlet 3.C0 

J. H. Manlay. scarlet 3 00 

Mrs. HiBlnbothani, pink 2.50 

Mrs. Lawson, piuli 140 

Mermaid, pink 100 

Harry Fenn, crimson 3.00 

Prosperity, variegated 1.40 

Gaiety, variegated 3.0O 

Express prepaid. Cash with order. 

Tlie Knoll Nurseries, Penryn, Cal. 

The American Florist Co.'s 

TRADE DIRECTORY 



HUNDREDS OF NEW NAMES 
AND ADDRESSES. 



And contains the usual fully corrected and 
revised lists of Florists, Seedsmen, Nurserymen 
Gardeners, Horticulturists, Landscape Architects 
Parks, Cemeteries, Botanical Gardens, Horticult- 
ural Societies and Horticultural Supply Concerns 
of the United States and Canada. 

Pries $2.O0 Prepaid. 

XNERICAN FLORIST CO. 

324 Dearborn St., CHICAGO. 



146 



The American Florist, 



Feb. 20, 



Stock Plants, Rooted Cuttings and Plants in Small Pots. 

The dome of Chrysanthemum Stock. Roses, Violets. Geraniums and Carnations For Sale. 

WHEN YOU ORDER TURN TO ISSUES JANUARY 2nd AND 9th, 1904, FOR PRICES AND VARIETIES. 



BEACH, THE FLORIST, 



LEADS. WHY NOT BUY DIRECT? 

Stort No. 8 *n\ Ottin Aretd*, BRIDGEPORT, CONIT. 

Greenhouses. 3 82 I'ark Ave. David S. Beach, Prop. 



BOOKS FOR nORISTS. 

The time is coming along when these are 
needed and opportunity at hand for reading 
them. Every one of the following should be 
in your library. 

Send prices quoted and we (end the books. 

La.ndscape Gardening (Maynard).— 
The development of landscape art within 
the past few years compels the wideawake 
florist to keep posted on this branch of 
the business. The many suggestions of 
this book will be found helpful every 
business day. It contains 338 pages, 
165 illustrations. .$1.50 

The Goldfish (Mulertt). — A number 
of florists find goldfish an attractive and 
paying addition to their business. The 
best advice is given in every department 
of the subject, including construction and 
care of the parlor aquarium, in this 
volume of 160 pages, handsomely illus- 
trated. $2.00 

Greenhouse Construction (Taft). — It 
tells the whole story about how to build, 
and heat a greenhouse, be it large or 
small, and that too in a plain, easily 
understood, practical way. It has 118 
illustrations. $1.50. 

Heating and Ventilating Buildings 
(Carpenter). — This book covers the entire 
subject most fully. In the preparation of 
heating and ventilating plans, it will be 
found a most valuable guide. $4.00. 

How to Make Money Growing Vio- 
lets (Saltford). — This is by a practical 
grower who has made a success of the 
business. No grower of violets can afford 
to be without it. Price 25 cents. 

Steam Heating for Buildings (Bald- 
win). — Contains valuable data and hints 
for steam fitters and those who employ 
this method of heating. The 350 pages 
are fully illustrated. $2.50. 

The Horticulturists' Rule-Book 
(L. H. Bailey). — Contains information 
valuable to all those engaged in any 
branch of horticulture. Illustrated. 312 
pages. 75 cents. 

Fumigation Methods (Johnson) . — A 
practical treatise on cheap and effective 
means of destroying insect pests. Hand- 
somely bound and profusely illustrated; 
250 pages. $1.00. 

The American Carnation (C. W. 
Ward).— A complete treatment of all the 
most modern methods of cultivating this 
most important flower. Illustrated. 
$3.50. 

Practical Floricultceb (Peter Hen- 
derson). — A guide to the successful propa- 
gation and cultivation of florists' plants. 
Illustrated. 325 pages. $1.50. 

How TO Grow Cut Flowers (Hunt). 
— The only book on the subject. It is a 
thoroughly reliable work by an eminently 
successful practical florist. Illustrated. 
$2.00. 

The Rose— Its cultivation, varieties, 
etc. (H. B. Ellwanger). — A complete 
guide of the cultivation of the rose, 
together with a classification of all the 
leading varieties. $1.25. 

AMERICAN FLORIST CO.. 

424 Daarbom SIrcat, CHICAGO. 



ffi 


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WBI^M^^fes^^y-Onit ■r,<:>jw-^-^gSS^^^^BI 



Indianapolis 

The best bright pink carnation in sight. Come- 
and see it growing. Awarded Certificate of Merit 
Indiana State Florists' Ass'n, Jan. 12, 19 8. 
Scored 85 points Chicago, Nov. 18, 1903. Certifi- 
cate of Merit, Cincinnati Florists' Club, Jan. 9,. 
1904. Certificate of Merit, Indiana Slate Florists' 
Ass'n., January 12, 1904. What more could you 
ask.' $2.50paraoz.;$12(l0p>rK0;$1D0O0|Mr100O. 



A FINE LOT OF STANOARD'SORTS. 



PerlDI lOCO 
McKinley . ..*3.00 
Harlowarden. .5.00 
Her Majesty.. 5.00 

Flora Hill.... 1.51 $12.51 

Crane 2.5) 2O.i0 

Kstelle 3.00 25 00 

W.Cloud 1.5) 13.51 

Lorna 2.11O 18.00 

Viola Allen... 3.00 25.00 



Per 100 
Floriana ... 2.00 
Q. Louise. . . 2.00 
K. Crocker. 1.50 

Lawson 2.00 

G. Roosevelt 2 00 
P. Palmer.. 3.00 
E. A. Nelson 3.00 
Apollo 3.tO 



1000 

18. 0» 
18.00 
12.50 
I8.0O 



BAUR &^ SMITH, 

330 W. 38th St,, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Please mentioti the A mertcan Florist when ivriting. 



CARNATION CUTTINGS 

strong Plants Ready (or Prompt Shipment. Our Stock is Unexcelled. 



Per 100 Per 1000 

PERD 3.00 25.00 

WHITE CLOUD 2.50 [20.00 

AMERICA 2.5J - 20.00 



Per 100 Per 1001 

FL0R4 HILL Sii.oO SM-OO 

THE SPORT 2..50 20.01 

MRS. LA.WSOM 3.00 2.5.00 

MRS. HIGINBOTHAM 3.00 25.00 

XeO«SB CUTTIKffGS. 

liRIDE $12.50 per 1000 IVORY $12.50 per 1000 

BRIDESMAID 12.50 " GOLDEN GATE 12.50 

Lots of 500 at lOOD rate. 

SINNER BROTHERS, 

Wholesale Cut Flowers, 



58-60 Wabash Avenue, 



CHICAGO. 



Please mention the A mertcan Florist when writing. 



-<i..it.<i.<ik.ii.4i..it.ii.<ikiit.n,<ikJi.ii.<it,ii.«L'ik.ii <i..ikji.>i>,ti II. <KJi.it.. It. it.iiwit ii.<ik.ii-ii..ii.ii.ii.iit.n.<i.iit.ii.<ii,ii ii..it,ii.tKjii.M.ik>* 



NEW ROSE FOR 1904. 



General MacArthur 

The most brilliant in color and the coming red rose for the 
Reneralflorist. For prices see issue of January 16. Ready 
for distribution, April 1, 1904, by 

The STORRS & HARRISON CO., JOHN N. \14V, 



PAINESVILLE, O. 



SUMMIT, N. J. \ 



-U"I"I'~)|'<I''II'U'< 



p'ii'"i''»'M''i» »r'i''H'ti"i»ii''r"i» «i"i''irM"i''ir«l"l»'M'«r-irir'i''i»'M"i''i<M'"i» «'M''i»'»i'"i'iP''r*i'«*i"i'"«'*» 



Carnations cCuings. 

Now ready lots of them. For a limited time at 
these low prices. If not satisfactory on arr.val 
return them, when money will be refunded. 

Per luU lO'O 

Mrs. T. W. Lawson , $1.25 $12.00 

Flora Hill 100 10.0) 

lioston Market 3.00 30.00 

fl^ranilimc 2 and 2Vs-inch. One plants, S A. 
UCIOIIIUIIIS. N,„t and La Favorite, $3.00 per 

lOJ; $25.00 per lOJO. 

We guarantee to please you in every way. 

S. T. DAN LEY. Macomb, III. 



ROOTED — 

CARNATION CLTTINGS. 

FINE HEALTHY STOCK. 

Per 100 ICOO 

Enchantress , $6.00 $50 00 

Gov. Woloott 5.00 40.CO 

Lawson 2.50 20.00 

Genevieve Lord 1.75 15.00 

White Cloud 1.75 16.00 

The J. M. Gasser Co., 

234 Euclid Ave., CLEVELAND, O. 



jgo4. 



The American Florist. 



14T 



Price $2,00 
Postpaid, 



TjTIHE AMERICAN FLORIST COM- 
1 pany's Trade Directory for J 904, fully 
^^Sj revised to date, with thousands of new 
^^^ names and changes of add'^ess, is now 
ready for distribution. It contains 412 pages, 
including complete lists of the Florists, Seeds- 
men and Nurserymen of the United States and 
Canada, arranged both by states and towns and 
all names alphabetically. Also lists of Foreign 
Merchants, Firms which issue catalogues. Horti- 
cultural Supply Concerns, Parks, Cemeteries, 
Landscape Architects, Experiment Station Hor- 
ticulturists, Botanical Gardens, and much other 
conveniently indexed and invaluable trade infor- 
mation. Published by the 

American riorist Co. 

324 Dearborn St., Chicago, III., I. S. A. 



i 



Contains 
412 Pages, 



Now 
Ready 



148 



The American J^lurist. 



Feb. 20. 



St. Paul. 

Trade has picked up and everything: is 
anoving well despiie the continued cold. 
A good deal of funeral work has been a 
big factor in bringing up the total sales. 
St. Valentine's day coming on Sunday 
this year made most of the business on 
Saturday and it was the best on record. 
Special window displaj's were made by 
the larger stores. 

The winter has been the coldest in 
many years. The thermometer has 
hardly been above the zero mark since 
before Christmas. The high price of coal 
has made itahard winterforthegrowers. 

Many shipments of flowers have come 
in frozen. It really seemed impossible to 
get flowers through without their being 
frozen solid. In our opinion it is the 
fault of the shipper. 

Cigars are being passed around freely 
of late. No fewer than three in the craft are 
•celebrating— Henry Puvogel a daughter, 
O. J. Olson a daughter and Gilbert Jens- 
void a son. 

R. C. Seegar is attending to his store 
business in place of his daughter who is 
ill with typhoid fever. Mr. Seeger is cut- 
ting excellent roses, and his carnations 
are good. 

Some of our Minneapolis brethren are 
explaining the absence of all the St. Paul 
dealers at their recent dance by saying 
the invitations must have got lost in the 
mails. 

Holm & Olson had a pretty window, 
small lace baskets hang from the ceiling 
with gauze ribbon and pretty bows, 
filled with red carnations and violets. 

The Swanson Floral Company's win- 
dow is attractive. Mr. Colberg reports 
business fine. 

Harry Bunyard and John Vandermeig 
were recent callers. O. 



Milwaukee. 



There was a change for the better in 
last week's business and stock of all 
kinds sold at fair figures. Roses have 
been in very short supply and are readily 
■cleaned out at good figures. Violets, 
which for some time have been way down 
took a decided upward movement and 
for the first time since Christmas sold at 
good prices. Green stock of all kinds is 
scarce while just the reverse is true of 
bulbous stock. 

The Mil waukeeGardeners' Association, 
at its meeting last night, decided to 
vacate its present quarters in Juneau 
avenue, where it has been located for 
many years, and remove to the haymar- 
ket in the second ward. 

Mrs. Currie, wife of Robert Currie, the 
Wauwatosa violet grower, died on Feb- 
ruary 13. Mr. Currie has the sympathy 
of the entire trade here. 

W. Freytag and F. H. Holton went to 
Fond du Lac last Thursday to attend 
the funeral of Mrs. Haentze, wife of E. 
Haentze. 

Holton & Hunkel Company is now 
receiving a heavy supply of Harrisii 
lilies of extra fine quality. 

Wm. Kennedy was called to New York 
to attend the funeral of his father who 
died very suddenly. 

Fred. Schmeling says there is more 
money in serving on the jury than in 
growing flowers. 

Max Reitz and and Miss Laura Gar- 
butt were married on January 26. H. 



YoUNGSTOWN, O. — Albert Harrold is 
making preparations to put up a green- 
ihouse on his farm near here. 



Carnations M*„^„ 



Cuttings. 



ONLY FIRST-CLASS STOCK SENT OUT. GET YOUR ORDER IN NOW 
TO BE SURE OF EARLY DELIVERY. 

NEW VARIETIES. 



Per IdO Per lOOO 

Flamingo. March delivery $12.00 $100.00 

Lady Bountiful 12.00 100.00 

The Belle 12.00 100.00 

Indianapolis 12 00 100.00 

Nelson Fisher, March delivery 12.00 100.00 



Per ion Per 1000 

Mrs. M. A. Patten $12.00 $100.00 

White Lawson, March delivery... 12.00 100.00 

Albatross, March delivery 10.00 80.00 

Crusader 10.00 80.00 

Reliance lO.OO 80.00 



Enchantress $6.00 $50.00 

Este le 4.00 30 00 

Fragrance 6.00 50.00 

Golden Beauty 5.00 40.00 

Gov. Lowndes 5.00 40.00 

Gov. Wolcott S.OO 40.00 



CHOICE VARIETIES. 

Per ICO Per lOOO 



Per 100 Per 1000 



Harlowarden $6.00 $50.00 

Lillian Pond 6.00 40.00 

Mrs. Theo. Roosevelt 6.00 40.00 

Pres. McKinley 5.00 40.00 

The Queen 5.00 40.00 

White Bradt 6,00 



STANDARD SORTS. 



Per mo Per lOfO 

America $1.75 $15.00 

Cressbrook 4.00 30.00 

Enquirer 2.50 20.00 

Ethel Crocker 1.75 15.00 

Flora Hill 1.75 15.00 

Genevieve Lord 1.76 15.00 

G.H.Crane 2.50 20.00 

Gov. Roosevelt 3.50 30.00 

Lorna 3.00 25.00 



Per 100 Per lOfO 



Morning Glory $2.50 

Mrs. F. Joost 1.75 

Mrs. H.N. Higinbotham 4 00 

Mrs. E. A. Nelson 4. CO 

Mrs. Potter Palmer 3.0O 

Mrs. Thos. ^V. Lawson 2.50 

Norway 1.75 

Prosperity 2.50 

Queen Louise 1.75 

Marquis 1.75 15.00 White Cloud 1.76 



$20.00 
15.00 
35.00 
36.00 
25.00 
20.00 
15.00 
20.00 
15.00 
15.00 



DORMANT CANNAS. 



strong 2 3 eyed bulbi. 
TRUE STOCK. 



Per 100 

Allemannia $3.00 

Burbank 2.00 

Black Beauty 7.00. 

Chas. Henderson 2.00 

Chicago 6.00 

Duke of Marlborough 2 00 

David Harum 6. CO 

Eeandale 4.00 

Leonard Vaughan 4.00 



Per 100 

Mme. Louis Druz $ 2.50 

Mile. Berat 2.50 

Mme. Crozy 2.00 

Moniieur J arry Desloges 3.00 

Mrs. Kate Gray 6.00 

Mont Blanc 20.00 

Pennsylvania 6.00 



Red Indian 



5.00 



Secretaire Chabanne 2.00 



Exp. Crampbell 
Francois Reif 
J. Aymard 



The fallowing sorts SI. 00 per 100: 

L. Patry 

Mme. Alfred Blanc 

Mme. Celestin Dubost 



Paul Marquant 
Partenope 
President Carnot 



Vaughan's Seed Store, Chicago. 

GREENHOUSES AND NURSERIES, WESTERN SPRINGS, ILL. 



STRONGLY ROOTED 

CARNATIONS 



NOW 
READY. 



GROWN OUT OF DOORS AND ROOTED WITHOUT HEAT. 



WHITE. 



Per 100 lOCO 



Quean Laulie $120 tlO.CO 

Flora Hill 1.20 10.00 

Aim 3.40 3000 

Gov. Wolcott 340 30.00 

Norway 1.20 10.00 

Lillian Pond 5.00 45.00 

Chleot 1.20 11.00 

Viola AHen 3.00 35.C0 

PINK. 

Mra. T. W. Lawion 1.40 1250 

Mrs JoMt 1.00 1000 

Mermaid I lO 10.00 

Mr< Rootevalt 600 .5.5 00 

Sucoait 4.00 35.00 

Preildent MeKlnlay 5.00 4.5.00 

Creatbraok 2.50 20.00 



SCARLET. Per 100 1000 

H. Manlay {3 50 $30.00 

10.00 



J. 

G. H. Crane 1. 

America 1.20 

Mra Palmar 1.30 

Apollo 3.50 

" ■ ■ 7.00 



10 00 
10.00 
30.00 
65.00 

CRIMSON. 

Harlowarden 5.00 45.00 

Gov. Roosevelt 1.50 11.00 



YELLOW. 



Eldorado . 

VARIEGATED. 

Marshall Field 

Stella 

Armailndy 

Prosperity 



1.00 9.00 



5.00 
3.00 
1.00 
1.40 



4.5.00 
25.00 
9.00 
12.00 



25 o( any one kind at 100 prices. 250 at 100 prices. 



Wa prepay express charges and will ship C. O. D. with the privileoe ot examlnallon, we assuming 
ail the responsibility of Cuttings arriving iu good condition and proving satisfactory. 



Loomis Floral Co., 



LOOMIS, 
CAL. 



Please mention the A mr* iran f!ot ist when 7oriling. 



NEW 

CARNATION 



Naumann 



G. 



Dark pink. Produces far more than Lawson and is a better color. With this variety you 
can pick everv day the year around. Always heavy witti liuds and flowers. Most excellent 
keeper. Size, 3-3^ inches. Fna^pd ami never bursts or fades. Averages 2f) tlowers per plant 
a season, more than any varietv I have ever grown. Come and see them grow. Order 
now for February and 'March Delivery, $l.-;5 per Doz.; $8.00 per lUU; $7o.Uo per 1000. Also 
Rooted Cuttings ol ENCHANTRESS, *ii.UO per 100. 

AS. JV.A.1J^^S.^9ffIV, 1537 Doan Street, Cle-v^el^x^d, Olrk.io» 
Please mention the A metican Florist when writing. 



igo^. 



The American Florist. 



149 



La DETROIT 

Breitmeyers' New Rose 

A SEEDLING OF TESTOUT SND BRIDESMAID. 

To Be Disseminated April 1, 1904. 

COLOR. Prevailing color a beautiful shell pink, shading in the center to a soft rose pink. The reverse of the outer petal 
is of a creamy flesh tint, shading to silvei y toward the base, which may best be described as opalescent. The full open flower discloses 
a vivid richness of coloring, rare and fascinating. FRAGRANCE. Subtle, strongly tea-scented; reminds one of old Bon Silene. 
FORM. Large cup-shaped, heavy petal, shell- like in formation. GROWTH. Strong and healthy, with a rich, glossy foliage, 
rampant and vigorous, with a strong tendency to long shoots; very prolific. 

-ALL ORDERS BOOKED FILLED IN ROTATION BEQINNINQ APRIL i. 

For *'Own Roofed" Plants from 2 1-2 Inch pots. 

1 Plant, each % .75 I lOO Plants and over and less than 1,000, each $ .25 

12 Plants, each 60 | 1,000 Plants and over, each. .20 

25 Plants, each 50 I 3-inch pot plants, 5c each additional. 

50 Plants and over and less than 100, each 30 | prices op qrafted stock given on application. 

JOHN BREITMEYER'S SONS, 

Gratiot and Miami Aves., DETROIT, MICH. 

SBM^IvITVGi- J^-OHJIVTS : MICHIGAN CUT FLOWER EXCHANGE, 

ERNST ASMUS & SON, VAUGHAN'S SEED STORE, J. AUSTIN SHAW, 

A. ROLKER & SONS, S. S. SKIDELSKY, CLUCAS & BODDINGTON CO. 



STRONG STOCK 

from 2 1-2 inch pots. 



UNCLE JOHN. 



The finest pink rose yet introduced; beautiful color, free bloomer, best 



Per lOJ 

MME. CHATENAY $6.00 

SUNRISE 5.00 

KAISERIN 4.0O 

LIBERTY 6.00 



money-maker. 

1000 
$50.00 

40.00 



35.00 
50.00 



S20.00 par 100; SI 50.00 per 1000. 

Per 100 

MAIO 83.C0 

BRIDE 3.0O 

PERlE 3.0O 

GDI DEN GATE 3.00 

IVORY 3.00 



ROSE CUTTINGS— Well Booted. 



IVORY. 
MAID .< 
BRIDE. 



Per lOO 1000 

....$1.50 $18.50 
EO 12.50 



1.50 



13.60 



Per 100 

GOLDEN GATE $1.50 

PERLE 1.50 



SU^RISE 3.50 

CARNATIONS— Well rooted, healthy cuttings, of the following varieties, now ready. 



PINK. Per 100 1000 

MRS. LAWSON $1.50 $12.50 

MRS. E. A NELSON 3.50 20.00 

GUARDIAN ANGEL 1.25 1000 

MRS. HIGINBOTHAM 2.00 15.00 

SYBIL 3.00 25.00 

McKINLEY 3.00 25.00 

JOOST 1.25 10.00 



VARIEGATED. 

MRS. BRADT 2.00 15.00 

PROSPERITY 2.(j0 15 OJ 

All stock sold under express condition that if not satisfactory 

PETER REINBERG. 



WHITE. Per 100 

MURPHY'S WHITE $3.00 

FLORA HILL 1.25 

WHITE CLOUD 1.25 

PERU 1.25 

QUEEN LOUISE 1.2i 

NORWAY 1.25 

MARION 1.25 

GOV. LOWNDES 3.00 

RED. 

ESTELLE 2.50 

MRS. INE..-. 1.25 

CHICAGO (Red Bradt) 2.00 

HARLO<VARDEN 3.00 

it is to be returned immediately when money will be refunded. 



lOOO 
$35.00 
25.00 
25.00 
35.00 
25.00 



lOOO 

$13.50 

12.50 

30.C0 



1000 
25.00 

lo.oe 

10.00 
10.10 
10.00 
10.01 
10.00 
25.00 

20.00 
10.00 
15.00 
35.00 



51 

WABASH AVE., 



CHICAGO. 



Healthy Carnations. 

Well Rooted. Enchantress, all sold till March 
15th, $6.00 per 100; $50.00 per 1000. Strong, 3-incli 
pots now ready, $8.00 per 100. Now ready. Queen 
Louise, Crocker, Lorna. White Cloud, Peru, 
Innocence, Lawson, Floriana, Prosperity, Doro- 
thy, Marquis, Pres. Roosevelt, Manley. $2.00 per 
100; $17.50 per 1000. 

W. W. COLES, Kokomo, Ind. 



Roses. Roses. 



Plants and 
Rooted Cuttings. 

E. C. Per 100 3i^-in. Per 100 

American Beauty $3.00 $8.00 

Bride, Maid Ivory, Gate 1.50 3.00 

Perle.Kaiserin, Canadian Q'n 2.00 4.00 

LOW RATE BY THE THOUSAND. 
BOSTON FERNS. 2!4-inoh, Si.OO per 100; 3-inch, 
$8.00; 4-inch. $12.50; 5 inch, $25.00; 6-inoh, $40.00. 
Fine stock. Note the special low prices ou smaller 
sizes. CULLETT & SONS, Lincoln, III. 






CARNATIONS 

The Leading Novelties of 1904. 

The Best Varieties of 1903. 

All the Standard Sorts. 
Order your Rooted Cuttings NOW. 

GEO. HANCOCK &. SON, 

GRAND HAVEN, MICH. 



150 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 20, 



Washington, D. C. 

The last week of the social season, so 
far as it concerned the oflRcial set, was a 
good one for business, there being many 
receptions, dinners and other social 
affairs. The illness of Senator Hanna 
caused the postponement of several social 
functions, and his aeath has cast a 
shadow of gloom over the whole citv. 
Saturday was observed as St. Valentine's 
day, and cupid's arrows were in many 
instances cunningly concealed in bou- 
quets and baskets of flowers. Dinner 
centerpieces in the form of hearts were 
sent out by several stores. Blackistone, 
Gude and Loose each had in his show 
window designs appropriate for the 
day. It was the best day for trade since 
Christmas, and all stock was well 
cleaned up. The following prices now 
rule: American Beauty roses, $10 to $15 
per dozen; Bride and Bridesmaid, $1.50 
to $4 per dozen; carnations, 50 cents to 
$2.50 per dozen; tulips, 50 cents to 75 
cents per dozen; narcissi, 50 cents to 75 
cents per dozen. There are plenty of 
gooa lilacs, and sweet peas are in good 
supply. 

The National Woman Suffrage Associa- 
tion is now in session in this city. A 
careful young man who looked in a few 
nights ago, saw pots of pink azaleas in 
bright pink "petticoats" standing about 
the platform, and on the stand a great 
bunch ot roses which had been presented 
to Miss Susan B. Anthony at the white 
house. All of which shows that the pro- 
prieties are being observed, and that the 
suffragists have friends in high places. 

February 12, the birthday anniversary 
of Abraham Lincoln, was observed by 
various organizations in a quiet way. 
The wearing of the carnation on McKin- 
ley's birthday is a pleasing custom, which 
1 hope will become more general. I would 
like to see a league organized and a 
flower chosen to commemorate the birth 
of that other great man, Abraham Lin- 
coln. 

**Heroic soul in homely garb half hid, 
Sincere, sagacious melancholy, quaint, 
What he endured, no less than what he did. 
Has reared bis monumeDt and crowned him 
saint." 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Louis Loose have 
returned from Jamaica, British West 
Indies, where they spent a month. They 
talk interestingly of the flora of that 
island. At the botanical gardens near 
Kingston they saw a splendid collec- 
tion of tree ferns, bougainvilleas, and 
other tropical plants growing in the open 
air. 

One of the strictly up-to-date florists 
had a cupid wearing petticoats in his 
window on St. Valentine's day. 

R. Bowdles has been sending in some 
very good narcissi. 

S. E. 



Urbana, III. — The department of 
agronomy of the College of Agriculture 
has under construction an iron frame 
greenhouse. The house is 22x75 feet and 
will be used for pot cultures of the vari- 
ous soil types found by the state soil sur- 
vey. The material was furnished by 
Lord & Burnham Company, Irvington- 
on-Hudson, N. Y. 



Better Than the Others. 

Ed. Am. Florist:— Enclosed is $1 for 
another year's subscription to the Amer- 
ican Florist. I have sent for sample 
copies of three different florist papers this 
winter but none is up to the American 
Florist. C. W. Sibley. 

Athol, Mass. 




"A Wee Wail From The Woods(man)" 

"(jUALITY COUNTS" 

("That's All.") 

This stock can be had ONLY direct from the 
introducars or their Agents: 

J. B. DEAMUD, W. F. KASTING, 

Chicago, III. Buffalo, N. Y. 

LEO. NIESSEN. GEO. M. KELLOGG, 

Philadelphia, Pa. Kansas City, Mo. 

J. M. McCULLOUGH'S SONS, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

REED & KELLER, New York City. 
HOLTON & HUNKEL. H. G. BERNING, 

Millwaukee. Wis. St. Louis, Mo. 

BARTELDES & CO., Denver, Colo. 

Caldwell The Woodsman Co. 

EVERGREEN, ALABAMA. 



Please mention the American Florist when -writing. 



CARNATION CITTINGS 



WELL ROOTED. CLEAN, HEALTHY AND POPULAR VARIETIES. 
ORDER NOW AND RECEIVE PROMPT SHIPMENT. 



PINK. Per 100 1000 

Enchantress $6.00 $60.00 

Morning Glory 2.00 15.00 

Higinbotham 1.50 12.50 

Lawson 1.60 12.60 

Guardian Angel 1.26 10.00 

Cressbrook 1.60 12.50 

RED. 

Palmer $8.00 $16.00 



RED. Per 100 

Estelle 3.00 

Harlowarden 3.00 

WHITE. 

Her Majesty 3.00 

White Cloud 1.50 

Flora Hill 1.60 

Queen Louise 1.50 

Norway 1.50 



1000 
26.00 
26.00 

25.00 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 



Rooted Rose Cuttings. 



Per 100 1000 

Bride $1.50 $12.50 

Bridesmaid 1.60 12.00 



Per 100 lOOO 

Golden Gate $1.60 $12.50 

Meteor 1.60 12.50 



Ivory 1.50 12.60 Liberty 3.00 26.00 



WIETOR BROS., """'ffr&T 

51=53 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO. 



of 



Please mention the A merican Fhrist wlien writing. 



i«ooTE;r> o.A.suvA.'rxoiv ouimpffGi 



Special quotations on Gov. Wolcott, Lawson and Palmer in large lots. 



Per 100 1000 

Prosperity 2.00 18.00 

Lillian Pond 3.00 25.00 

Palmer 1.50 12.50 

3000 and over.Sll.OO per lOOJ. 
Joost 1.60 12.00 



Per 100 1000 

Gov. Woloott 3.50 25.00 

2000 and over, $22.00 per lOOO. 

Lawson 1.50 12.50 

2000 and over, $11.00 per 1000. 

Booking orders for2H-inch roses and 'mums for spring delivery. 



good stock. Send in list, for estimate. 



Per 100 1000 

Lorna 2.60 20.00 

Higinbotham 1.50 12.00 

Prices on 2i4-inch stock on ap- 
plication. 
Get your orders in and secure 



POEHLMANN BROS. CO., Morton Grove, III. 



CARNATIONS 

Rooted Cuttings. Ready Now. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

QUEEN LOUISE $1.60 $12.60 

LILLIAN POND 6.00 40.00 

ETHEL CROCKER 1.60 10.00 

MRS. E. A. NELSON 8.00 15.00 

FLORIANA 1.60 18.50 

ENCHANTRESS 6.00 60.00 

Send for estimates on complete order and 
list of other varieties. 

ALBERT M. HERR, Lancaster, Pa. 



CarnatioD Cnttio^s 

We are now booking orders for rooted outtiogi. 
Lilt of varieties and prices sent on application. 

Tha Cottage Gardens, Queens, L. I. 

Carnations 

ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

Orders booked now for next season's delivery of 
all the leading varieties. Send us a list of what 
you want and get prices that are right. 

Chas. Chadwick, L. Box 11. Grand Rapids, Mich. 



Successful Growers are Wanted j 

To kiiow that they can dispose of all their surplus stock byadver' 



.tising in the American Florist. TRY IT NO^T. 



i 



igo4. 



The American Florist. 



151 



Albany, N. Y. 

The present week has seen more than 
usual activity. Monday evening the firm 
of Whittle Brothers supplied the decora- 
tions for the review held by Company B, 
Tenth Battalion, in the state armory. 
The company rooms were tastefully deco- 
rated with pink azaleas, Boston ferns, 
palms and other foliage plants. On 
Tuesday evening W. C. King supplied the 
decorations for the dinner given by 
Governor Odell at the executive mansion 
in honor of a number of young society 
people. Liberty roses, mignonette and 
Farleyense ferns were used in consider- 
able quantities. H. G. Eyres Wednesday 
evening had a large decoration at Odd 
Fellows' haU where the Republican organ- 
ization of the county held its banquet. 
Palms, southern smilax and laurel roping 
were used for decorating, and tulips and 
azaleas for the tables. Friday evening 
the local society people held a charity 
ball in the same hall and the decorations 
were by Eyres, who used mostly laurel 
roping and southern smilax. 

F. A. Danker on January 27 filled the 
order fori the floral decorations at the 
Blake-McArdle wedding. The order was 
remarkable on account of the fact that 
the florist was told to go ahead regard- 
less of all expense, which he did to the 
queen's taste. In addition to very 
elaborate house decorations and bouquets 
of ample proportions for all the ladies, 
the cathedral in which the ceremony 
took place was also elaborately deco- 
rated. 

The firm of Henkes Brothers, at New- 
tonville, Albany county, has lately gone 
into the growing of plants. The concern 
formerly did a large business growing 
vegetables. A new house 25x125 feet 
was built this winter. 

Mrs. C. Gloeckner will tear down a 
wooden frame house 25x125 feet this 
coming season and will replace same 
with a house of iron frame construction. 

Louis Menand, of Cemetery avenue, is 
contemplating the building of a carna- 
tion house this summer, but has not yet 
decided on the plans. B. D. 



Richmond, Ind. 



The Florists' Club held its January 
meeting at the greenhouses of its presi- 
dent, George R. Gause. After routine 
business Fred Lemon read an excellent 
paper entitled, "The drawbacks to suc- 
cessful carnation growing, together with 
experiments with different fertilizers, and 
the results obtained therefrom." The 
paper and the discussion which followed 
proved both interesting and instructive, 
and could not help but be of material 
benefit to all. Mr. Lemon appointed Mr. 
L. H. Schepman to prepare a paper for 
the February meeting, which will be held 
at the Graves greenhouses west of the 
city. At the close of the meeting waiters 
appeared with hot cofiee and sandwiches 
and fruit, and the way it disappeared 
showed that the members of the club had 
their appetites with them. 

John A. Evans, not to be behind the 
rest of the boys, has come to the front 
with another fine boy. All doing well. 



Finds It an Aid. 



Ed. Am. Florist:— I much prefer your 
paper to others. I have just started 
growing cut flowers lor the New York 
market, and find your paper very valu- 
able. Wm. SlMMONDS. 

Staten Island, N. Y. 



NEW PINK CHRYSANTHEMUM 

Dr.ENGlEHARD 

The finest commercial Y\\^ Ghrysantliemum ever introduced. 

We were awarded for this, first prize for the best six blooms any new 
pink variety at the Chrysanthemum Show in New York. This is going to be 
in pink chrysanthemums what Col. D. Appleton has been in yellow and 
Timothy Eaton in white. It is a fine commercial flower of the largest size, 
and an ideal color; fine, large, compact blooms of great substance; a fine 
shipper; something that has long been wanted in pink chrysanthemums. It 
has grand foliage, is an easy "doer," and a phenomenal variety in every respect. 

As the demand for this is enormous, it would be advisable to place orders 
without delay. As orders are filled in rotation, the earlier order is placed the 
earlier delivery we can make. 

Certificated by the C. S. A., having scored as high as 95 points. 

50c each, $5.00 per dozen, $30.00 per 100 

F. R. PIERSON CO., 

Tarrytown-on-Hudson, NEW YORK. 



Please ineniion (he A merican Florist when ^vriting. 



Rooted Carnation Cuttings. 

SPECIAL LOW QUOTATIONS FOR TEN DAYS. 



PINK. 100 lOOO 5000 RED. 

Mrs. Lawson $1.35 SIO.OO $40.00 G.H.Crane 

Mrs. Nelson 2.00 18.00 80.00 

Guardian Angel 1.25 lu.OO 40.00 

Dorothy 1..50 12.50 5000 

MoKinley 2.00 18.00 80.0U 

Ethel Crocker 1.25 10.00 40.00 

Mrs. Joost 1.35 10.00 40.00 



100 1000 5000 
.$3.C0 $18.00 $80.00 



WHITE. 

Flora Hill 1.25 10.00 40.00 

White Cloud 1.25 10.00 40.00 

Queen Louise 1.25 10.00 40.00 

Norway 1.35 10.00 40.00 

Gov. Wolcott 3.50 27.00 125.00 

We have been shipping every day. N 

satisfactory will refill or return money, 

this season. 



Estelle 2.00 18.00 80.00 

America 2.00 18 lO 8U.00 

Palmer 2.00 18.00 80.00 

LIGHT PINK. 

Enchantress 5 50 50 00 200.r0 

Higinbotham 2.00 18.00 80.00 

Moruing Glory 2.U0 18.C0 80.00 

Prosperity 2.00 18.00 80.00 

Rooted Rose Cuttings. 



100 



Bridesmaid $1.50 

Bride 1.50 

Golden Gate 1.50 

Ivory 1.50 

o frozen shipments reported. If stock not 
Cuttings have never been so good as 



1000 
3.50 
lii.O 
12.50 
12 50 



GEO. REINBERG, 



51 Wabash Avenue, 



Please mention the American Florist when writine' 



AMERICAN BEAUTY ^C?^f^"Gs 

This stock is from good, clean, healthy wood, will be free from spot and thor- 
oughly rooted when sent out. Money refunded if not perfectly satisfactory upon 
return of stock. $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 

Wholesale Grower of Cut Flowers, 

37-39 Randolph Street, 



J.A.BIDLONG, 



Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 



The Queen 



Best Commercial White 
CAR^4TI0^. 



Rooted Cuttings, XXX Stock 
$5.00 per 100; $46 per 1000. 

TOTTY-S^PEERLESS CHRYSANTHEMUMS "eVsr^N-o'^lLT.ES. 

Send for Descriptive Circular 
and Price List. 



JOHN BARR, South Natick, Mass. 



ftease mention the American Florist when writing. 



152 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 20, 



San Diegro, Cal. 

P. Ridel is now foreman at the Cor- 
onado botanical gardens. He has Chi- 
nese helpers only. The outdoor carna- 
tions, about 8,000, are looking well. 
The Coronado White is a remarkably 
thrifty variety and may be seen in its full 
glory here. It is one of the famous 
Redondo varieties. These flowers pos- 
sess several points of merit but should be 
somewhat larger to balance stem devel- 
opment. Another drawback is the ten- 
dency to pink at the base of the petals. 
If some wizard of the camel's hair brush 
could combine the good qualities of this 
variety and those of the Los Angeles 
White we would have an ideal carnation. 

A good many annuals aregrown atthe 
botanical gardens for use in the big hotel. 
About 4,000 strings of smilax were ready 
to cut before the holidays, besides some 
Asparagus plumosus. A Monterey 
cypress hedge which has been robbing 
neighboring plants of moisture and 
nutriment many years has been grubbed 
out and a neat fence put in its place. 
The Monterey cypress was planted very 
extensivelv a few years ago for hedges 
and wind-breaks, but at present the tree 
is looked on with growing disfavor by 
careful planters. It is a notorious dust 
accumulator and old trees are very sel- 
dom things of beauty. It will not stand 
as much drought as some species of pines. 
I can show you abandoned places in the 
dry hills ba'ck of San Diego where pines 
and cypresses are growing together — the 
pines handsome, hale and hearty as a 
grey squirrel cracking an acorn, while 
the cypresses remind one of lean and 
hungry rats. Then, too, the cypress is 
pretty nearly as adept in the gentle art 
of highway robbery as that grim and 
unblushing old scalawag Eucalyptus 
globusus. A precious pair they are. 

The beach company is preparing to set 
out a lot of roses lor cut blossoms. The 
beach soil is deficient in some respects 
and Mr. Ridel was having a lot of adobe 
put on the ground, together with a 
heaw dressing of stable manure. Vio- 
lets were not looking very well. Leaf- 
spot is induced by too much alkali in the 
irrigating water. Rain would straighten 
this out as well as improving the charac- 
ter of the water supply. Heavy rains in 
the mountains mean soft water in the 
reservoirs, doing away with the neces- 
sity of pumping hard water from wells. 
One glass house is planted to carnations 
as an experiment. Stem rot has been 
very troublesome under glass. 

Geo. Otto sold more flowers than a 
year ago. House plants were about the 
same as last year. Mr. Otto buys these 
outside mostly. 

R. H. A. 

Davenport, la. 

On February 1 the Allison- Littig Com- 
pany purchased the Charles Dannacher 
greenhouses and business and consoli- 
dated them with their own. This firm now 
has by far the largest plant about here 
and at present occupies Ihe Charles Dan- 
nacher store at 110 E. Third street. In 
a few days, however, the concern will 
move to 207 Brady street. The new 
store will be a pretty one in a good loca- 
tion well suited to the business. 



Cannot Do Without It. 

Ed. Am. Florist: — Enclosed please 
find $1 for renewal of subscription. We 
cannot do without this paper and would 
consider ourselves back numbers if we 
did not get it. J. Sylvester. 



I Carnation Society's Convention. 

j The Wabash Railroad £,r?.TwS!''"N'ort'Sr,;3 

i Southwest, who will attend the Convention of the American Carnation Society at 

i Detroit, March 2 and 3. Through sleeping cars, vestibule trains; unsurpassed dining 
car service. 

The Chicago Delegation o^l^b^r ^^tlo^a^a^o^'r^ 

Tuesday, March 1. Those passing through Chicago to the Convention are invited 
to see that their tickets read via The Wabash from Chiago and should start from 
home in time to connect with this train. 

RATE — Fare and one-third for the round trip from all points. Be sure to get 
a CERTIFICATE when buying your ticket. 



A. G. P. S. Wabash Ry., 



CHICAGO. 



Please rnention the A mertcan Florist when writin£. 



JOSEPH HEACOCK, 



GROWER or 



WYNCOTE, PA. 

Areca Lufescens 
Kenfia Belmoreana 
Kentia Forsteriana 

For our prices see page 551, Nov. 7th issue. 
Please mention ihe A nleriean Florist when writing. 

Anna Foster *nd Boston Ferns 

Full plants, $35.00 to $50 00 per lOO In pots 25o 
to S5.00 each. Small plants, SS.OO per 100. 

A>p. P. H., 4-inoh, $10.00; 8-inch pans, $50.00 
per UO. dtp. Sprtngarl, 4-inch, $6.00 per 100. 
Dracaena Indivisa, 3-moh, strong, $8.00 per 100. 
Kgntlai, FIcui. 

Li Hi FOSterf DORCHESTBR, MASS. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing, 

f*«/r>l'«fnAilo blooming and in bud; fine 
I .VI JnlllKnN stoc>i' 4 inch,$12.00: 5-inch, 
VJ VIUIII V»«J jjQ 00 ^nj J30 00 p„ ,oo. 

C. WINTERICn, Defiance, Ohio. 

Please mention the Ainerican ^'orist when writing 



AMERICAN FLORIST COMPANY'S 

DIRECTORY 



FOR 1904. 



THIS 1904 Trade Directory is fully 
revised to date, with thousands 
of new names and changes of 
addresses. It contains 412 pages, 
including complete lists of the Flo- 
rists, Seedsmen and Nurserymen of 
the United States and Canada. These 
lists are arranged both by states and 
all alphabetically. It also contains 
lists of Firms that issue catalogues, 
Horticultural Supply Concerns, Parks, 
Cemeteries, Landscape Architects, 
Experiment Station Horticulturists, 
Botanical Gardens, Leading Foreign 
Houses, and much other conveniently 
indexed and valuable trade informa- 
tion. 

PRICE S2.00 POSTPAID. 



THE AMERICAN FLORIST CO. 

324 Daarborn Straet, 
CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 



BIER&ANKERSMIT 

Wholesale Growers, 

MELLE, near GHENT, BELGIUM. 

Cable Addresi, SUNRISE, Mall., Balglum. 

Azalea Indica, Kentia Belmoreana and Fors- 
teriana, Areca Baueri and Sapida, Cocos ^Ved- 
deliana, Phoenix Canariensis, Coripha Australia, 
Chamaeropsexcelsa,Araucarias, Ferns, Dracaenas, 
etc. Our price list is now ready. Write for a copy. 

VON ZONNEVELD BROS. & PHILIPPS, 

Care J. W. HANTTON, JR., 41 Broadway. NEW YORK, 

General Agents for U. S. A. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 

Delivery to April 1. April A Way 
Per 100 D'vy. Per 100 

Mis. Coombes J3.00 $2.00 

Yanariva 3.00 1.60 

Alice Byron 6.00 410 

Mme. Cadbury 6.00 4.00 

Mrs. Tranter, pure white 4.C0 3.00 

,\drian 2.00 1.50 

Mrs. Robinson, extra fine stock 1.50 1.25 

Mrs. P. J. Taggart 3.00 1.50 

F. .J. Tii^'eart 6.00 4.00 

Robt. Halliday 2.00 1.50 

Mrs. H. EmmertoD 8 00 6.00 

Prices are for rooted cuttings. Prompt shipment. 
Orders booked for later delivery. Not less than 25 
of a kind at above rates. Send for price list of 
other varieties. W. A. CHALFANT. Springfield, Mo. 
Please mention ihe Amei lean Florist when writing. 

Wanted. 

1000 Begonia, Triumph de Lorraine, 2.M-inch 
pots. Address, giving price, 

The GEO. H. MELLEN CO., 

Springfield, Ohio. 



special in 3-in. Golden Gate. Ivory and Liberty. 
All other stock ready to go out in 2 "x 2H-inch. 

ASPARAGUS. Plumosus Seedlings in 2Vi. 3 
and 4-inch. Sprengeri in 2, 3 and 4-inch. 

GERANIUMS in 2, 'Z% and 3-incb. COLEUS, 
Rooted Cuttings and in 2-inch. 

GEO. A. KUHL, Pekin, III. 

Geraniums*. 

Per 100 

10 v:ir., fine, 2!^-inch pots $3.01) 

Col.us, 10 varieties, 2- inch pots 2.00 

Vine. V.r. Vln.», 2-inch pots 2.50 

A<p. PluitiMiu Nmu. S.ads, per 1000.. $7.00; 1.00 

Cash Please. 

JOS. H. CUNNINGHAM, Delaware, Ohio. 



1904. 



The American Florist. 



158 



Cincinnati. 

The exhibition of roses February 13 
was one of the best shows ever given by 
the Cincinnati Florists' Society. There 
were three exhibitors— George & Allan, 
W. K. Partridge and the E. G. Hill Com- 
pany. Baur & Smith, of Indianapolis, 
showed their new carnation Indianapo- 
lis. Dick Witterstaetter showed an 
improved Estelle, which he has named 
The Cardinal. Its flower is an improve- 
ment over the Estelle, but of course we 
do not know anything about the bloom- 
ing qualities. Tom Windram, who is 
growing some of the best Estelle coming 
into this market, says they will have to 
show him. W. K. Partridge had a table 
of about four hundred carnations, such 
varieties as Mrs. E. A. Nelson, Lorna, 
Lawson, Enchantress, Adonis, Nelson 
Fisher, Prosperity and Mrs. Patten, 
which helped him win the prize for best 
general display. Mr. Partridge received 
the first prizes for Bridesmaid, Bride, 
Meteor, Golden Gate and Ivory, and sec- 
ond for Liberty and American Beauty. 
His vase of Beauty was the only one on 
exhibition. George & Allan had a table 
nicely arranged with roses and bulbous 
stock. They received second prize for 
Bride, Bridesmaid, Meteor and Perle, 
their Perle being the only vase on exhibi- 
tion. The vase of Lilium Harrisii shown 
by this firm was grand, as was also 
their lily of the valley. The E. G. Hill 
Company, of Richmond, Ind., received 
first prize for Liberty, with what cer- 
tainly was the finest vase of this rose 
ever exhibited in this city. Their Bride 
and Bridesmaid were also very good 
in flower, but a little short of stem. 
A new variety, Rosalind Orr Eng- 
lish, was also shown. It was regret- 
ted that the La Detroit roses, which 
had been sent by Breitmeyer's Sons, 
did not arrive in Cincinnati until Sunday 
morning. There were numerous inqui- 
ries about this variety. Theodore Bock, 
of Hamilton, O., acted as judge, and any 
variety receiving a prize was deserving 
of it, as Theodore was in one ol his crit- 
ical moods. A great many visitors 
attended the show in the afternoon and 
evening. 

Business here is good and there was an 
extra demand for violets for St. Valen- 
tine's day. There was a big supply of 
this favorite little flower, consequently 
the price did not advance. George Cor- 
bett sent in 6,000, and they sold readily 
at $1 per 100. Mr. Corbett is also send- 
ing in some very fine Lawson carnations, 
which find a ready market at $5 per 100. 
Good roses. Bride, Bridesmaid and 
Golden Gate, are scarce and sell rapidly 
at $10 per 100. White carnations are 
also a little short at present, but there 
are enough colored ones to go around. 

At the Florists' Society meeting held 
Saturday evening Chailes Murphy was 
elected a member of the society, and a 
committee was appointed to draft reso- 
lutions of sympathy on the death of 
Henry Weber and to send them to the 
family of the deceased. Fred Lemon, of 
the E. G. Hill Compan-^, told of the new 
rose seedlings on their place. It was 
also decided to hold a carnation exhibi- 
tion in March. 

George Murphy had one of his green- 
houses blown down by the strong wind 
early last Sunday morning. 

Visitors: Martin Reukauf and B. Esch- 
ner, of Philadelphia; Mr. Greenlaw, of N. 
F. McCarthy Company, Boston; John 
Lodder and Theo. Bock, of Hamilton, O.; 
Fred Lemon, of Richmond, Ind. 

A. O. 



VERBENAS 



We are the largest growers of Verbenas in the 
country, and those vtho buy of us are sure to get 
plants and rooted cuttings perfectly healthy and 
free from rust, QO "V^ri^tlew. 



Rooted Cuttings. 60c per 100; $5.00 per 1000; $45.00 per 10,000 
Plants, $2.50 per 100; $20.00 per 1000. 

QARNATIONS. 

Pink. Per 100 

Success 4.00 

Mrs. Higinbotham 5.00 

Cressbrook 3 00 

Mrs. E. A. Nelson 3.00 

Mrs. Thos. Lawson 3.00 

Dorothy 2.00 

Sunbeam 2. SO 

MorningGlory 1.60 

Mrs. Joost 1.25 

Daybreak 1.25 

Wm. Scott 1.2S 

Crocker 1.25 

Mermaid 200 

Floriana 1.50 

GRAFTED ROSES 



White. Per 100 

The Queen $5.00 

Queen Louise 1-50 

Lorna 2.S0 

^Vhite Cloud 1.60 

Flora Hill 1.60 

Red. 

Mrs. Potter Palmer 3.00 

J. H. Manley 4.00 

Oriole 2.60 

G. H. Crane 2.00 

Jubilee 1 60 

Portia 1.26 



Crimion. Per ICO 

Harry Fenn $6.00 

Gov. Roosevelt 2.60 

Gen. Maceo 1.60 

Variegated. 

Prosperity 2.50 

Mrs. G. M. Bradt 3.00 

Yellow. 

Dorothy Whitney 5.00 

Buttercup 3 00 

Gold Nugget 2.00 

Eldorado 1.26 



Our grafted roses are fine, bushy plants and grown in 3 and 3V4-inch pots. Orders booked now for 
delivery in May, June and July, Bridi'smiiid, Bride, Golden Gate, Kaiserin, price S15.00 per ICO. 
Ivory, Liberty, price $18.00 per 100, Send for Catalogue. 

J. L. DILLON, Bloomsburg, Pa. 



ROOtBd CUttinS[Sl ones.Mc^nOOr&OOper 
1100. Heliotrope, gtjod varieties, SI. 00 per 100. 88.00 
per 1000. Coleus, all the best, 70o per lUO; S6.U0 
per lOOO. Ageratums, 60c per lOU; $5,00 per lOlO. 
Salvias, $1.00 per 10 : S8 00 per 1 0'. Petunias, 
double, SI,2> per 100; $li',00 per lOCO. Daisies, J1,00 
per 100. Fuchsias, $1,50 per 1(0, Pelarponiums, 
$2.25 per 100. Express prepaid on all rooted cut- 
tings. Cash with orders; satisfaction guaranteed. 
Write S. D. BRANT, The Clay Center Florist, 

Clay Center, Kansas. 
Please mentionlhe American Flortit wken writing. 



American Beauties 

We have a fine lot in 2 x 2^-inch that will 
be ready to go out early in March, Get your 
order in at once and we will send you fine 
stock and guarantee satisfaction. 

GEO. A. KUHL, Pekin, 111. 

Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 

Ciirysanthemums... 

American Novelties. Also a complete line of 
Australian, English and rrench varieties, both 
new and standard sorts. For prices and descrip- 
tions address 

NA1HAN SMITH & SON, '^flfdi^'' 

Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 

SPECIALTIES 

ROSES, from 3-inch pots, 
CARNATIONS, for all delivery, 
CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 
SMILAX, VIOLETS. 

Prices Low. Send for List, 

WOOD BROTHERS. Fisliidil, N.Y. 

Please mention the American Florist zchen writing. 

^HiUiiiiiiiiim 

IROBT. CRAIG & SON, 

I Roses, Palms 

5 and Novelties in Decorative Plants. 

I Market and 49th Sts., Philadelphia, Pa. 

%UltlMI>ll>lllllMI»ISIf<»»fI»M<»ai^A" 



in BesI 
Varieties 



iVIrs. Fisher 



Best standard white 

for summer flowering. 
Strong rooted cuttings, 
81.25 per 100; 810.00 per 1000. 

A. CHRISTEN8EN, Stonftham. Mau 



All the new 
nd stand- 



Carnation Rooted Cuttings, a 

ard sorts. Send for price list. 

■ox ZZe. KENNETT SQUARE, P«. 



Julius Roehrs 

RUTHERFORD, N. J. 

Grower of 

Palms, Bay Trees, 
Box Trees 

AND— 

Decorative Stock. 

'Ml STOCK PLANTS. 

Strong plants, carefully packed, of the follow- 
ing varieties at $4.00 per 100; 60c per dozen: Bon- 
naffon, Robinson, Modesto, Murdoch, Childs, 
Glory of the Pacific, Ivory, pink and white, 
Montmort and Wanamaker. Stevla. stock plants 
from bench or pots, $5.00 per ItO; 75c per dozen. 

We are headquarters for Carnation, 'Mum and 

Stevla cuttings in season. 

John Brod, rL^^itEVr'^f.lliL. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 

DAHLIAS. ^S^Ts 

Tan Gold Madals Awarded 1903. Pot.roots for 
shipment at once. Every section including; the 
popular Cactus Pahlias at $4.00 per 100 in 25 
sorts. Better and newer kinds at $5.00 and $6.00 
per 100. Terms: Cash with order. 

HOBBIES LIMITf D. Dereham, Eng. 

Norfolk Nurseries. 

Please mention the A met lean Florist when writing. 

GERANIUMS SX. 

50,CO0 ready March 15. Send for list of varieties 

and price. 
150,000 ready April 15th. Those now in sand 

all sold. 

ALBERT M. H£RW. Lancaster. Pa. 

A Lb iSurserymen, Seedsmen and Flloriats wishing 
to do business with Europe should send for the 

"Horticultural Advertiser." 

This is the British Trade Paper, being read weekly 
by all the Horticultural traders; It is also taken 
by over 1000 of the best continental houses. 
A.nnual subscription to cover cost of postage 75o. 
Money orders payable at Lowdham, Notts. 

Address EDITORS OP THE "H. A." 
Chilwell Nurieriea. LOWDHAM. Notts. England. 



164 



The American Florist. 



F.b 



Oceanic, N. J. 

The Willowmead orchidry furnished 
100 Cattleya Trianas to the recent W. C. 
Whitney funeral in New York. At the 
houses now are Oncidium splendens, 
Cattleya Percivaliana and Trianae — the 
trade price of which was 85 cents at the 
holidays — Vanda coerulea and a scatter- 
ing of C. labiata, which are resting. 
1 rouble still is experienced with the 
Mexican thrip in the formosum house, 
but it is kept under by constant fumi- 
gating. Dr. Kitcher is satisfied best 
results are only to be obtained with the 
last named variety by constant renewal, 
otherwise the bloom will be later and 
later each season, it finally becoming 
impossible to get the plants into bloom 
on time. Still he has individual plants 
that have been growing for a number of 
years. Sweet peas and carnations have 
been added to his list. 

Michael Doyle goes this week from the 
employ of Miss Maud Adams, the actress, 
to the superb new houses put up by the 
PiersonSetton Companyfor Dr. Leslie D. 
Ward, of Madison. Dr. Ward has with- 
out exception the finest equipment in this 
section and Mr. Doyle is to be congratu- 
lated upon securing so fine a post. 

Alec Smith is with Benj. Douglas, Max 
Schneider with Geo. Merck and Tim 
McCarthy withE. P.Slavin on the ridge. 

In Llewellyn Park Louis Puker, formerly 
■with Thos. Taylor, is now with A. B, 
Jenkins under George Von Qualen. 

Oscar Carleson, formerly with Paul 
Wilcox, Montclair, is now with Mrs. 
Jennings, of Fairfield, Conn. 

Jos. B. Davis. 

The eighth annual ball of the Mon- 
mouth County Horticultural Society was 
held in Red Men's hall on February 12, 
and was the grandest aflfair of the sea- 
son. Over two hundred were in the 
grand march and about 250 guests were 
present. The hall was beautifully dec- 
orated with garlands, flags and flowers, 
and around the picture of Abraham Lin- 
coln was a beautiful wreath o( poinset- 
tias donated by G. H. Hale. Refresh 
ments were served at twelve o'clock. 
Some of the boys got home just in time 
for breakfast. Thecommittee of arrange- 
ments was composed of W. W. Griffiths, 
J. Yeomans, G. H. Ash worth, G. B. Kuhn 
and H. A. Kettel. B. 



PiTTSFiELD, Mass.— James G. Hayes 
and W. J. Connors have formed a part- 
nership and will engage in the florist 
business, beginning to-day. The young 
men will have greenhouses on Seymour 
street, and are to open an office on Sum- 
mer street. 

THE AMERICAN FLORIST CO.'S 

DIREGTORYforl904 

IS NOW READY. 

And contains the usual fully corrected and revised 
lists of Florists. Seedsmen. Nurserymen, Horti- 
culturists. Landscape Architects. Parks, Ceme- 
teries, Kotanical Gardens, Horticultural Srcieties 
and boni'Mjltural Supply Concerns of the Vnited 
Statt'S and Canada. 

Hundreds of New Names and Addresses. 

Price Two Dollars, Postpaid. 

AMERICAN fLORIST COMPANY, 

CHICAGO, ILL., U. S A. 



Asparagus Plumosus Nanus 

2 1-2-inch stock in fine shape at S3. 00 per hundred. 

HOLTON & nUNKEL CO., Milwaukee, Wis. 



Albert Fuchs, 

r»A.i:v»^s, i^e>r:n^s, i^icijr». 



Eslabllshad ISa4. 



OHIO.A.OO. t04S-B9 Clarendon Av*. 



BOSTON FERNS Sets. 

strong bench plants, fit for 5-inch- 

AGERATUM. Gurney, Pauline: GIANT MARGUERITE 
DAISY, White: StLVIA. Splendens. Sliver Spot, 
Bonfire. PETUNIA, double, 15 kinds. VINCA, 
variegated, 2-inch. 2o. 

REX BEGONIA. 4 sorts. iV,<i. 

Rooted Cuttincs Prepaid. SALVIA, Silver Spot, Bon- 
fire, Splendens. STEVIA, variegated. 90c per 100. 
AGERATUM. White. S. Gurnev, P. Pauline. 
ALTERNANTHERA, red, yellow, COLEUS. 10 

kinds, 5''c per 100. 
PINKS, 5 fine kinds, 75c per 100. 
PETUNIA, double, 15 kinds, $1.00 per 100. 
FUCHSIAS. 5 kinds, SI. 35 per 100. 
DAISY, Sl-flO per 100. Cash. 

PRIMULA OBCONICA GRtNDIFLORA, in bloom. 2- 
inch, $1.00 per 100. No order taken for less 
than 50 unless ordered with other stock. 

BTER BROS., Chan,ber.bur8, 

Please mention the American Florist when writine. 

ARAUCARIA EXCELSA. From 20. 23-35 inches high, 
6 inch pots, perfect plants, 75c, 81.00 to $1.25 
each. Extra larjre specimens, 8-inch pots. 2S 
to 35 inches high. 25 ta 33 inches across, (show 
plants) only $3.50 to $3.00 each, (worth $10.00 
retail). h\\ inch pots, 40 to 50c each. 

FICUS ELASTICA. (Rubber Plants). 6-inch pots 
from 30 to 38 inches high, $3.00, $3.00, $4.00, $5.00 
anH ¥6.00 per doz. 

ORAC£NA BRUANTI. O-inch pots. 20 to 35 inches 
hioh. (to make room for Easter plants), cut 
down from .lOc to 35c. 

BEGONIft PRES. CARNOT. 6-inch pots, in bud and 
and bloom, $2.5 p^r doz. Other mixed varie- 
ties 4-inch pots, $1.80 per doz. 

CYCLAMENS. In bud and bloom, $2.00 per doz. 

PRIMULA OBCONICA. 4-iQch, in bloom, $1.80 per doz. 
Cash with order please. Plants are shipped at 

purchaser's risk. 

GODFREY ASCHMANN, 

Wholesale Grower and Importer of Pot Plants, 
1012 Ontario St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Bell Telephone Tioga 3669 A. 

Please mention the A meticaii Florist when writing. 

PIERSON FEBNS «sV«ff^ 

Strong 3H-inch stock $12.^0 per 100 

Strong 3-inch stock 20.00 per 103 

Strong rooted runners 8.00 per 100 

Cash with order. Satisfaction guaranteed. 

BAUR FLORAL CO., Erie, Pa. 

Please mention the A met ican Florist -vhen writing. 

GOOD FERNS. 

BOSTON FERNS, short, and bushy, each 50c; 
per dozen, *i.0O: i.nr 100. S15,00, 

PIERSON FERNS, line bushy plants, $1,00 
each; y inch, $1,2.5 each, 

JOHN SCOTT, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Keap Street Greenhouses. 

Please mention the American Flat ist rvhen wiiting. 

Geo. Wittbold Co., 

1667 Buckingham PL, CHICAGO, ILL. 

Send for Price List on all 

Palms and Ferns 



A FEW 600D THINeS 

YOU WANT. 

An extra fine lot ol PALMS and BOSTON FERNS 
grown especially lor Christmas sales, 

ARECA LUTESCENS. 3 plants to pot, 4, 5 and 
6-inch, S25, HO and SlOO per 100. 

KENTIA BELMOREANA and FORSTERIANA, 3, 4, 5 
and 6-inch, IH2, $25, WO, $100 per 100, 

BEX BEGONIA, 2 and 3-inch, $4 and J6 per 100. 

DRACAENA INOIVISA, 3-inch, J5 per 100; 4-inch, 
»10 per 100, 

ENGLISH IVV, 3 and S-inch^iS and $6 per 100. 

BOSTON FERNS, 5-inch, $ro»l>er 100. From beds, 
tor 2, 3 and 4-inch pots, $4, $8, $15 per 100 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS, 3^ inch. $8,00 per 100. 
SPRENGERI. 2-inch, $3,00 per 100. 

VINCA VARIEGAT4, 3-inch. $2,00 per 100, 

CARNATIONS, Queen Louise, 2-in., $2,00 per 100. 
" Lawson, 3-inch, $2.50 per 100, 

GERANIUMS. 2-in. pot plants Double and sin- 
gle Grant, Bonnot, S. A. Nutt, Perkins, La- 
Favorite, John Doyle, Riocard, Mrs. E. G. Hill, 
$2,50 per 100. -» 

ROOTED CARNATION CUTTINGS. Queen Louis? 
and Wolcott, $1.50: Lawson and Prosperity, 43. OO; 
Crocker and Goodenough, $1.25 per 100. 

CASH OR C. O. D. 
CEO. M. EMMANS, NEWTON, N.J. 

Please mention the A me> ican Plot ist when it'ridng. 

Asparagus and Ferns 

We have a flae stock of the above which we 
will offer until the stock is reduced at the follow- 
ing prices: 

Per 100 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 2-inch $2.00 

" '• 3-inch 3.60 

Asparagus Plumosus, from flats 2 2S 

" •' 2-inch 3.00 

" 3-inch 6.00 

Kentia Bel., 2!4-in. pot, 8-10 io., 2-3 leaves. 12.00 

" 2V4-in. pot, 15-18 in., 3-4 leaves ,16.00 

" " 3 -in. pot, 15-18 in., 4-6 leaves, ,18. CO 

" 3 -in. pot, 18-24 in,, 6-6 leaves ,20.00 

Latania Bor., 2-in. pot, seed leaves,, 6.00 

" 3.in. pot, 18-18 in., 2-3 chr. Ivs. 12.00 

" " 5-in. pot, 18-20 in., 3-4 chr. Ivs. 20.00 

" " 6-in. pot, 20-24 in., 4 chr. Ivs. 30.00 

Sherman Nursery Co., '"^Yo'^J"'- 

Please jnentmn the A me) ica n F.'o> ist zvhen writing, 

HARDY CUT FERNS 

Koth Fancy and Dagger. Sl.50 
per lOOU. Sphagnum Moss, fine 
quality, 50c per bbl. Laurel 
Festooning, fine, heavy and 
hund made. $r.CO per 100 yds. 
Bouqutt Green Fes'ooning. 
t5.00 per 100 yds. Elm and 
Maple Trees, I'or spring plant- 
inu. Cash with order or no 
goods shipped. All orders 
by mail or dispatch prompt- 
Iv attended to. 

THOMAS COILINS, "'^.^5^ 
PIERSON FERNS. 

31^-inch at SS.fOper 100. 
Young plants from the bench. ¥5.03 per 100. 
Large plants ready for fl and 7-incn pots, 

50c each. 
Rn^tnn FprnQ 2H-inoh at $3.50 per 
DUMUII ICIlia 100. Also finelineof 
4. 5. 6 and 7-iDch. ^Vrite for quotations. 

DAVIS BROTHERS, Morrison, III. 




igo4. 



The American Florist. 



155 



McCray Florist REFRIGERATORS 

KNOWN EVERYWHERE FOR SUPERIORITY. 




SPECIAL STYLE NO. 639. 

72 in. wide. 42 in. deep. 06 in. high. 

SPECIAL DESIGNS BUILT TO ORDER 

Also we have stock sizes of vary neat design 
ready for prompt shipment. 



Noted for absolutely dry interior, thus avoiding: 
entirely the sweating of glass. 

The positive circulation of pure cold air within 
keeps the flowers in perfect condition. 

Economical in the Use of Ice. 
Scientifically Constructed. 

Write at once for Florists' Catalogue No. 70. 

For the Residence, Grocery, Meat Market, Res- 
taurant, in fact any purpose, the McCRAY is 
Guaranteed Absolutely Satisfactory, Thousands 
testify to its merits. 

Mention this Journal and wi> n-ill send you the foUowine cata- 
logues: No. 39, for Residence; No i.s. for Hotels, Public Institutions 
and Cold Storage Houses; No. 63, lor Groceries; No. 56, for Meat 
Markets; No. 70, for Florists. 

McCRAY REFRIGERATOR CO. 

317 Mill Street, Kendallvllle, Ind. 

Branch Offices and Salesrooms: Chicaeo, 55 Wabash Avenue; 
St. Louis, 404 N, Third St.; San Francisco, 122 Market St.; Pittsburg, 
710 Penn Ave.; New York, 341 Broadway; Detroit, 305 Woodward Ave.; 
Columbia, S. C , 1210 Main St.; Boston, 52 Commercial St.; Columbus, 
O., 356 N. High St. 

^~ Address Main Office unless you reside In one of the above 
named cities. 




BUG KILLER 

All Else 
Fails 



Flowers 



The Tobacco Warehousing A Trading Company 
Louisville, Kentuckj'. 

Foley's Floral Fotographs. 

Floral Album, size I2xii containing 24 

different funeral designs. By 

express $7.00 c. o. d. 

226-228i BOWERY. NEW YORK, 

KORAL LETTERS 

For Sale by all Wholesale Houses. 

Koral Mfg. Co., 

12 Hawley Place, Boston, Mass. 



^ 






The most convenient way 
of applying an insecticide 
«ver yet devised. No pans 
requtred-No heating of 
jnons-No trouble-Cannot 
injure the most 5f nsitive 
bTooms-Very effective. 
Price 60* per box of 12 
--oils. All (kalers sell it! , 



NICOTINE MFG. CO, 
ST LOUIS MO- 



Wired 
Toothpicks 

10,000, tl.EO; 50,000, 16.25. Manufactured by 

W. J. COWEE. BERLIN. N. Y. 

Sample Free. For aale by dealers. 

It is good business policy ^ ^ ^ 
to mention the iJ* e5" «5" 

American Florist 

When you write to an advertis«r. 



THE ARNDT TREE PROTECTOR. 

A perfect inexpensive 
protection against all 
creeping and crawling 
insects. Agents wanted 
everywhere ; write at 
once. 

Michigan Cut Flower 
Exchange, 

Wm. Dilger, mgr. , Sole 

Distributors, 
Detroit, Mich., U. S. A. 
Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 



^1?;^ ADJUSTABLE VASE HOLDER. 

No. 1.— Brass, nickel, 4 feet long, 6 clasps to each 
rod. Price complete (with green or white tum- 
blers) 12.25. Price complete (with green or white 
cornucopia vases) $2.50. No. 3.— Heavy 4 ft. rod, 
brassed and nickeled, with three clasps Xor 5 to 
6-inch pots, each $1.75. 

KiFT*S PATENT Rubber Capped FLOWER 
TUBES, IH-inch diameter, per 100. »3.50. 

JOSEPH KIFT & SON. 1725 Chestnut St.. Phila.. Pa. 





«Li.-ROUND 

INSECTICIDE 

OB the 9Itrk«t. 



^ Saie by 

Seedsmen, 
For Free 
Pamphlet. 
Write to 

The KentvcKy 

Tobacco 
Product C«.. 

LanUTllt., Ky, 



Fumi^atln^ Kind Tobacco 

n^.., 1^ KILLS ALL APHIS IN ONE NIGHT 

r OWQCr '" ••* 'iC'""'' ll«lx2.-. ft., at .1 m.^t of 
10c. .v."-. 111. tri;il 1)1;- will coat 
notlvinir if you will \yAy the cxprfss clr.'if;,'cs on 
it. Our booklet tells of it. \Vrite Dein. C. forit. 
Tlie II. A. STOOTIIOFl- COMl»ANY 
116, 117, 118 Wost St., N. Y. City 



Please mention the American Florist when writing.- 



156 



1^^ 



The American Florist. 



Feb. zo 



STANDARD FLOWER POTS \ 

Packed in small crates, easy to handle. 

~ ■ Price per crate 

120 7-in., in crate, $4.20 
60 8 '• 3.00 

HAND HADE. 

48 9-in., in crate, $3.fi0 





Price per crate 


1500 2-in 


, in crate, J4.88 


1500 2M 


5.25 


1500 2H 


6.00 


1000 3 


5.00 


800 3VJ 


5.80 


5004 


4.50 


320 5 


4.51 


144 6 


3.16 



48 10 
24 11 
24 12 
12 14 
6 16 



4.80 
3.60 
4.80 
" 4.80 

4.50 
Send for price 



Seed pans, same price as pots, 
list of Cylinders for Cut Flowers, Hanging baskets. 
Lawn Vases, etc. Ten per cent off for casli with 
order. Address 

HILFINGER BROS. POHERY, Fort Edward. N. Y. 
Or August Rolkeb ife Sons, New York Agents, 
31 Barclay Street, New York City. 

Standard POX^ 
Flower... \ yJ \ \^ 

If your greenhouses are within 600 
miles of the Capitol, write us, we 
can save you money 

W. H. ERNEST, 

28th and M Streets. WASHINGTON. D. C 

RED p ots 

SAMPLE POT AND PRICE LIST 
ON APPLICATION. 

C. C» POLLWORTH CO., Rjk"!*'^"^ 
WRITE 

AF If nUR 1821-23 N. LIAVITT ST.. 
I fi KUnili OHIOAQO. ILL., 

VOB FBIOIB or 

Standard Pots 

wtalob tor itrengtb and poioilty oomblmad 

Lightning Flower 
Pot Washer. 

Washes all sizes of pots, clean as new, about 
as fast as you can handle them. Strong Plants are 
only grown in Clean Pots. Send for description. 
Sold direct $15,00 net F. O. B. Joliet. 



C. E. FINLEY, 



Joliet, ill. 



REED & KELLER, 



122 Wast 25th St., 



NEW YORK. 



Importers and Manufacturers ol 

FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

Galax Leaves and all Decorative Greens. 

New York Agents for Caldwell's Monroe, Ala., 
**ParIor Brand" Smilax. 

A. HERRMANN, 

J- Cape Flowers, all colors, 
* Cycas Leaves, Metal Designs, 
J- and All Florists' Supplies. 

Send for Prices. 
404.4 1 2 East 34lh St. NEW YORK. 

Please mention the American Florist -when writing. 

GREEN SILKALINE. 

Do not be put ofl with cheap substitutes. 

John C. Meyer & Co., 

80 Kingston St, BOSTON, MASS. 

SIGIV1UND GELLER 

Importer and Manufacturer of 

FLORISTS' SIPPLIES 

All new Fall Goods in now. Ask to see the 
latest, Embossed and Pleated Crepe Paper. 

108 W. 28th Street, NEW YORK. 




Standard Flower Pols 

TheWHILLDIN POTTERY COMPANY. 



PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



JERSEY CITY, N. J. 



LONG ISLAND CITY. N. V. 



Tra«ellina R*pr«i«ntative. U. CUTLER RYERSON, t08 Third Ave.. Newark, N. i. 

Plea \e mention the A nencan /''tortst when wrttine 



F LORIST Plain, Violet, Rose 
MADE BY 
P2!!r The John J. Grooke Co. 



155 Ave. D, NEW YORK. 149 Fulton St., *;HICAGO. 



Kramer's Pot Hangers 




THE neatest, simplest, most 
convenient and only 
practical device for convert- 
ing ordinary flower pots into 
hanging baskets They fit 
all standard made pots from 
2 to 10 inches in diameter. 
The illustration shows how 
they are attached Just the 
thing for hanging up ferns, 
begonias, etc. You can make 
room and money by their use. 
Try them. For Sale by 

Vaughan's Seed Store, 

Chicago and New York. 
E, F. Winterson Co., 

Chicago. 
0. C. Pollworth Co.i 

Milwaukee, Wis. 
Price with wire chain as 
shown in cut, $1.00 per dozen 
by express. Sample dozen by mail, $1.35. 

I. N. KRAMER « SON, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

THOSE RED POTS 

"STANDARDS" 

FULL SIZE AND WIDE BOTTOMS. 
BULB PANS AND AZALEA POTS. 

DETROIT FLOWER POT M'F'Y, 

HARRY BAL8LEY. DETROIT, MICH., 
Rep. 400 Howard St. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 

GEO. KELLER & SON, 

MANUFACTUBEBl OP 

FLOWER POTS. 

Before buying write for pricei. 
361-363 Herndon Street, 

near Wrightwood Ave., 

CHICAGO. ILL. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing. 

FLOWER POTS 




STANDARD POTS 



A 
SPECIALTY 

List and SAMPLES FREE. 
SWAHN'S POTTERY MF'O CO., 

P-0. BOX78. MINNEAPOLIS. MINN. 

Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 




e^ease mencion the American Florist when writing- 



WHT NOT BUT 

RED POTS 

OF US? 

[Standard Sizei 

Qnallty— No Better. 

Carefully Packed In Small 

Crates. Easy to Handle. 

Price List Free. 

Syracuse Pottery Co., 

Syracoge, N. T. 

[ BBST POT IN 

THE^MABKEli 



Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 

The Horticultural Trade Jouroal. 

THE LARGEST, BRIGHTEST AND BEST 

Horticultural Trade paper in the Hritish Isles. 
It contains MORE AUVEKTISEMENTS, MORE 
ILLUSTRATIONS and MORE NEAVS than any 
ot its contemporuries. Read by the whole of tbe_ 
British trade and all the best European houses 
every week. Annual subscription, 75 cents. 
Specimen copy post free. Published weekly. 
HORTICULTURALiPRINTWQ CO., Bumlty, Lanet., Eng . 



igo4. 



The American Florist. 



wg- 



157 



LI I ^V A ^ ■ n r^DlOT'Ol 'Tis the kind that will save you 

U O M O ; '^'■^"'^ ' ^' money. All sizes. Write today. 

Greenhouse- john lucas & co. 

^->^ -J- ^ ^z^ ^:r^ ■ CHICAGO: NEW YORK: PHILADELPHIA: 

\jC M^ J^^ \^^ V^^ ■ 53-55 N. Desplaines St., 89 Maiden Lane, 322 Race St. 



GULF CYPRESS 

GREENHOUSE 

MATERIAL 

HOT-BED SASH, BOILERS, PIPES, FITTINGS, 
VENTILATING APPARATUS. 

GLASS AT WHOLESALE. 

We furnish everything for buiiding. Send 
for prices and catalogues. 

S Jacobs & Sons, "I'^'o'^^Kl'^N^Nn" 

t^ease mention the American Florist when ivrtttng. 



CyPRE^S 

Is Far More Durable Than PINE. 

rCYPRESSi 
SASH BARS 

UPT0 32 FEET_OR LONGER. 

Greenhouse 

AND OTHER BUILDING MATERIAL, 

MEN FURNISHED TO SUPERINTEND 

ERECTION WHEN DESJjJED. 

S[encl for our Circular's. 

THEAJ-S+eAm^lymber Co., 

I^EPQ jjsET. Boston, t^ ASS. 



Mnaafia&MeaMBfigieroet^Qoo-Miccooooeooootoao^ae 



Please nirndo)! //if Afmncan FiO) is( :che)! :<.■} iting. 



MASTICA 

FOR 

Greenhouse Glazing. 

^=USE IT NOW.— 

F. 0. PIERCE CO., 'Ji«rr.H!»2"-.?«-. 



lEW YORK. 



Please mention l/tr A/f/ei nan Plot is/ rc/iej/ zci if nig. 

H. M. HOOKER GO. 

Window Glass, Paints and Putty, 
Greeniiouse Glass a Specialty. 

S9 Wast Raadolph St., CHICAaO. 



IT IS NOT... I 

what you pay for the adver- %, 
tisement but what the adver- | 
tisement pays you. It pays w 
to advertise in the American % 
Florist. jj 




Tiie Johnston Glass Company 

Hartford CKy, Ind. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Window Glass, 



Long Distance Telephone. 

Direct Western Union Wires. GROIND 4ND CHIPPED GL4SS. 

Please mention the American Florist when writing 



The James H. Rice Co. 



IMPORTERS and JOBBERS- 



GREENHOISE GLASS 

A SPECIALTY. 

Wixa-cio-vv- Ol^iss, I»a.ini:, I»*Atty, eto. 

80-82 Wabash Avenue and 34 to 40 South Water Street, CHICAGO. 



Please men/ion the American Florist when zut iling. 



^ 



IMPROVEI 



JENNINGS 
IRON GUTTER. 



Use our Patent 
IRON BENCH 
FITTINGS and 
Roof Supports. 

IMPROVED VAPORIZING PANS VENTIUTINfi 

For Tobseeo Extrscta, Eto. Send for Clrcnlsn. — ^^— ^-^^■^^^"" 

DU.LER, GASKEY & CO., dEN^lNTrB^os.. APPABnUS, 

8. W. Ctfr. Sixth and B»rk 8t«.. PHILADELPHIA. ■ 

Please mention ike A merica n Florist when writing. 




D. O. 

Cunningham 
Glass Co. 

PITTSBURG, PA. 



( 



TANK WINDOW GLASS. 



Hot- House Glass a Specialty. 



please mention the A tnerican Floi is/ when 7vri/ing. 



\ 



Holds Glass 
Firmfy ^ 

••• Ma Paint JV. 



ir« ri^tt .r lafli. Box .f 

BKirST A. BREKK. 

>1< CkMamt M,, PUIa., P.. 




Please mention the American Florist when writing. 



GLASS. 

GOOD BRANDS. 

QUICK SHIPMENTS. 

LARGE STOCK. 

Warehouse on railroad switch. Be sure 
and get our prices. 

Sharp, Partridge k Co. 

22nd St. and Union Place, CHICAGO. 



Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 

Sprague Smith Go. 

PUTE AND WINDOW GLASS 

Greenhouse Glass a Specialty. 

206;Randolph Stroot, CHICAGO. 

Please mention the American Florist zuhen ivriting. 



158 



The American Florist. 



Feb. 20, 



The ^LLiEt) TRsieies 

Descriptive part'culars — with drawings or plio- 
tographs, if possible— of any new apparatus or 
device whicli may prove helpful to the trade are 
solicited for this department. 

John C. Meyer & Company now make 
silkaline in all the fashionable colors. 

The King Construction Company has 
decided to locate its United States busi- 
ness at North Tonawanda, N. Y., and 
has purchased land there and completed 
the erection of the first building. It has 
been found that this is a better shipping 
point than Lockport and as the United 
States business has more than fulfilled its 
expectations, the firm feels justified in 
making preparation for carrying it on in 
a substantial way. 



London. 

The Royal Horticultural Society's first 
meeting of the year, held January 5, was 
well attended and there were some inter- 
esting exhibits. Orchids were again a 
prominent feature. The only awards 
made were for some interesting species 
shown by L. W. Moore, of the Botanic 
gardens, Dublin, who gained a botanical 
certificate forMaxillariaMacrura, Maxil- 
laria cucullata, Bulbophyllum micropeta- 
lum and Epidendrum Cooperianum. 
Other exhibits were mostly remarkable 
for beautiful hybrids of laelio-cattle- 
yas, cypripediums and odontoglossums. 
There were very few other floral novel- 
ties and the only award made by the 
floral committee was for Moschosma 
riparium. This recent introduction from 
South Africa is sure to become a popular 
winter flowering plant. Some good 
chrysanthemums were shown. Harry 
Whatelev, a sport from Niveus, pure 
white with narrow florets and well tilled 
flowers, is certainly a fine late variety. 
Allman's Yellow was again well shown, 
also Winter Cheer, a deep-colored variety 
of Mme. Felix Perrin. Jacobinia coccinea 
and Jacobinia Chrysostephane were seen 
in well flowered plants. Evidence of the 
mild season was seen in the exhibit of 
Alpine and other hardy plants by Messrs. 
Cutbush, which included several things 
in flower from the open ground. The 
society continues to increase in strength, 
fifty-two new fellows being elected on 
the above date. 

The new French market at Covent 
Garden, in the large hall which has been 
built specially for the sale of imported 
flowers, which was opened a few weeks 
ago, is now beginning to assume a busy 
aspect. It is a most commodious build- 
ing and it will be more fully appreciated 
later on, when the ordinary flower market 
is quite unequal for the immense quanti- 
ties of produce which pour in from all 
sources from early in April onwards until 
the London season is past. Just now all 
market trade is very quiet. Pot trade is 
at its worst. It would appear, however, 
that growers do not despair, for in many 
of the nurseries I have lately visited I 
find active preparations are already 
being made for a busy spring trade. 

It appears to be very uncertain what 
will be done with the beautiful garden at 
Wisley, butChiswickis evidently doomed 
and now wears a most desolate and 
forsaken appearance. It is not without 
some regret that we see the last of this 
old institution, where many of us have 
passed some pleasant hours and gained 
useful experience. There will be many 
readers of the American Florist who 
have also some kind regard for Chiswick. 

A. H. 



40 W. 28fh St., 

NEW YORK. 



SIMON RODH 

I have the Newest Things lor Violet Tyings. Ribbons to match all your Flowers and Chiffons 

in all Widths and Colors. 

EASTER NOVELTIES NOW READY. 

GIRLAND'S GUTTERS 

WILL KEEP SNOW AND ICE OFF 
YOUR GLASS. 

DES PLAINES. ILL. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 

A sample of our Gutter is on Exhibition at the Chicago Flower Grolvers' Market. 





M. RICE & CO., 

Importers and Manufacturers, 

Leading Florists* 9,8 Filbert Street, 
Supply House and >«■_•■ j ■ ■.• r» 

Ribbon Specialists. Phlladelpnia, Pa. 



Boston Florist Letter Co. 

MANUFACTURERB OP 

FLORISTS' LCT-^ERS. 




GUT FLOWER BOXES 



Thifl wooden box nicely stained and var- 
nished* 18x30x12 made in two sections, one 
for eacli size letter, griven away witti first 
order of 500 letters. 

Block Letters, 1V4 or 3-inoh size, per 100, J2.00. 

Script Letterf 44. Fastener with each letter or 
"vord. 

Used by leading florists everywhere and for sale 
by all wholesale florists and supply dealers. 

N. F. McCarthy, Treas. and Manager, 
84 Hawley St., BOSTON, MASS. 

Please tneniion the American Florist ivhen writing, 

WATERPROOF 

Corner Lock 

Style. 

The best, strongest and neatest foldini; cut 
flower box ever made. Cheap, durable. To try 
them once is to use them always. Per 100 Per ICOO 
Size No. 0. 3x 4x20 $300 $19,00 

1. 3x4^4x16 1.90 17.60 

2. 3x6x18 2.00 19.00 

3. 4x8x18 2.50 23.00 

4. 3x5x24 2.75 26.00 

5 4x8x22 3.00 2850 

" 6. 4x8x28 3.75 36.00 

" 7. 6x16x20 5.50 54.00 

8. 3x 7x2! 3.00 28.50 

" 9. 5x10x35 6.50 62.00 

" 10. 7x20x20 9.50 67.50 

11. 3!/jX.'is30..... 3.00 28.50 

Sample free on application. No charge for 
printing on orders above 250 boxes. Terms cash. 

THE LIVINGSTON SEED COMPANY, 

BOX 104. COLUMBUS. OHIO. 

KEASQUABTEB8 FOB 

HORTIGULTURIL SUPPLIES 

Of Every DeshMption. 

When you can't get what ^ou want anywhere 
else, send here, we will send It to fou. 

"If It's used In Hortloultare, we have It." 
DUNNE &CO..S4».tnkM, Ntw YMfc 

Telsphone Oall. 1700 Hadiion Sonars. 



Boilers 



OP HIQH ^ 
QRADB..*^ 



For GREENHOUSES. 

See Our Catalogue 

S'or;s.r. Giblin&Co.,Utica,N.Y. 



CLAY'S FERTILIZER 

Used by all English^and Scotch Florists. 
56 lbs. for.$3.25. 

WM. ELLIOTT' & SONS, New York. 

Please mention the A merican Florist when writing. 
THE BEST THING OUT FOR FLORISTS. 

The PATENT SMILAX and ASPARAGUS 
TYER and STAKE. 

The work done in half the time. You will not 
do without it after a trial. Will last a life-time. 
No wires on the ground. No tying or knots 
required. Be sure to send $1.00 for sample 100 of 
each. Satisfaction '^luiranteed. Easily applied. 

LEO WELLENREITER, Danvers, III. 

Gardeners' Chronicle. 

A Weekly Illustrated Journal. 

Established 1841. 
The GARDENERS' CHRONICLE has been fob 

OTIB SiXTT YbABS THE LEASINO JOtrBNAL Ot it> 

olaas. It has achieved this position because, while 
Bpeoially devoting itself to supplying the daily 
requlremeDts of gardeners of all classes, the infor- 
mation furnished is of such general and perma- 
nent value that the GARDENERS' CHRONICLE 
is looked up to as the btakdabd authobitt on 
tke subjects of which it treats. 

Subscription to the United States, t4.20 per year. 
Remittances to be made payable to H. G. COVE. 

Office: — 
41 Wellinoton St.. Covent Garden. London. Enaland- 

WOLLER'S DEUTSCHE 

GARTNER ZEITUNG, 

The most widely circulated German gardening 
journal, treating of all departments of horticulture 
and floriculture. Numerous eminent correspon- 
dents in all parts of the world. An advertising 
medium of the highest class. 

MoUer's Deutsche Gartner Zeitung is published 
weekly and richly illustrated. Subscripti